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Full text of "Royal purple"

1 



DUANE ACKER, 
?R£S. KANSAS STAT! 



' 







Introduction 



Student Life 



10 



Academics and 

Organizations 82 

Sports 178 

Housing 242 

Closing 448 




Rhythm 



In the spring of 1980 an area radio sta- 
tion released its new theme song, 
"Kansas I'm Coming Home." 

When the melody swept across campus, 
it created an awareness of the state's am- 
ber waves, beautiful Flint Hills and friend- 
ly people. Through the tune, a link of 
brotherhood was also formed. 

So we, the 1981 Royal Purple Staff, de- 
cided to demonstrate that this heartland 
bond was evident on the K-State campus. 
We wanted to show that from March 1980 
to March 1981 our collegiate world was 
affected by the heartland rhythm. 



Kansas Sunshine- The sun 

glissens on the state flower and 
rolling hills south of Manhattan, 
which symbolize the heartland 
rhythm. 



cover photo by Craig Chandler 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/royalpurple1981unse 




Craig Chandler 



1981 Royal Purple 



Kansas State University 



Volume 72 



Manhattan, Kansas 



Heartland rhythm 
bonds K-State 
students together 

Whether a confused freshman, wandering 
through the ivy-covered maze; an older 
student, attempting to relearn the 
steps to the college hustle; or the confident, 
yet reluctant upperclassman, approaching the 
end of the academic tunnel; K-State students 
are linked together by a common bond, do 



Heartland Sunset- South of 

Manhattan the evening light 
reflects on the Kansas hills. 



opening 1 




2 opening 




Heartland 

Almost as strong as super glue, this 
enduring bond is the unique brotherhood of 
the "heartland." so 



Practicing Pride- Robin Wilson, 
junior in education-business, stays 
in step with fellow flag team 
members as they practice their 
routine. The team rehearses with 
K-State's Marching Band four 
times a week. 



Bo Rader 



opening 




opening 




Heartland 

To K-State students, the Kansas heartland 
may represent a friendly, "back to basics" 
view of life. Yet, others might summarize 
the Flint Hill region as advanced and 
progressive. s» 



Open Classroow In the shade 
east of Justin Hall a drawing 
instructor discusses the 
surroundings with one of his art 
students. 



Bo Rader 



opening 5 




6 openiny 




Heartland 

Whatever the philosophy, the common 
thread still exists. The link of brotherhood 
has created a durable cohesion between the 
rolling hills and the knowledge-seeking 
students. zx> 



Gotcha- During an intramural 
football game, a Goodnow 6 
player attempts to outrun his 
opponents from Haymaker. 



Craig Chandler 



opening 7 




opening 




Heartland 

For those students who have stopped to 
listen, the heartland strikes a steady and 
recurring beat. 

The constant musical melody rings 
throughout the campus valley. The beat, 
which binds the diverse students, echoes the 
simple heartland rhythm. * 



Night Lights- Surrounded by 
flashing lights, several students 
enjoy the opportunity to dance at 
one of Aggieville's establishments. 



opening 9 




10 student life 






Student Life 

From the coastal beaches, the urban boule- 
vards and the rural farming areas, over 
19,000 students filter into the Manhattan 
community. 

But, the geographic backgrounds are not the 
only differing characteristics. Each K-State colle- 
giate varies in attitudes, activities and even attire. 
Some students dress in izod sweaters, blazers 
or skirts, while others can be found in everyday 
blue jeans. 

Whatever the difference, K-State students are 
bound together by the heartland rhythm.^ 



12:20 Rush- Between lecture 
courses, the halls and sidewalks 
are flooded with students. Some 
leisurely stroll while other students 
hurry to make it from the Union 
to Ackert in ten minutes. 

FTD Florist?' Capped by the 
increasingly popular winged hat, a 
student listens to the live 
entertainment at the fall festival, 
held on the lawn west of Weber 
Hall. The Oct. 3 event featured 
Southern Comfort, Celebration 
and The Clocks. 



photos by Bo Rader 






student life 11 



Boots & buckles back 



r herever John Travolta goes, the 
nation seems to follow. 

From the staccato beat of disco in the 
film "Saturday Night Fever," he has led 
us also to the alternative sound of country 
and western in the movie "Urban 
Cowboy." 

Though he may not have been a 
success in some of his movie ventures, he 
can be credited for influencing our tastes 
in sound, step and style. 

Finally, there is an alternative to disco 
where everyone can just be themselves, 
whether they aspire to be the Urban 
Cowboy or not. It's now "cool" to be in a 
bar wearing something (most likely denim), 
probably held up by an oakleaf engraved 
leather belt with a name on the back, 
sporting a big, shiny, silver buckle. 

And the feet can finally relax — 
replacing the spike heels with something 
flat and heel-stomping solid. 

"A few years ago, 1 wouldn't have been 
caught dead wearing a pair of cowboy 
boots. But I found out that they're some 
of the most comfortable and practical 
things you can put on your feet," Denise 
Gatzoulis, junior in business administration 
said. 

Even if a person doesn't plan to break 
bucking broncs wearing elephant- or 
ostrich- hide boots, one can probably find 
another suitable way to put them to use. 
Like spikes found their home in the 
hustle, boots can glide into the two-step 
or Texas swing. 

With hair flying and boots shuffling, 



couples can twist their bodies into strange 
contortions such as the pretzel or 
Windmill- 
Even without the urge to swing, one 
can sit and pretend to cool off with a 
couple of beers. As one sips, the tunes of 
Waylon and Willie, Kenny Rogers, Crystal 
Gayle, Red Steagall, and the Oakridge 
Boys vibrate from the jukebox. Bands in 
Manhattan please the crowds with the 
country and western beat, getting whoops 
and hollers, replacing snapping fingers. 

The "homier" atmospheres have been 
more popular places for these activities. 
Rockin' K and Cowboy Palace draw the 
crowd demanding more than just a little 
bit of country. Brother's Non-Disco isn't 
always country and western, but is 
certainly what it advertises. Another bar 
sporting country notes is Enoch's Tavern, 
"where the beer's cheap and the 
atmosphere's different than Aggie," Dale 
Richardson, senior in electronical 
engineering technology, said. 

As the night wears on, cowboys, their 
dress inspired by the movie "Urban 
Cowboy," still come through the bar- 
room doors to try the swinging thrill or 
just to relax. Nevertheless, they defy the 
words of Willie Nelson, as he sings and 
advises their mammas, "don't let your 
babies grow up to be cowboys." # 



Cari Cavassa 




Whip'er around — Sheryl 

Russell, senior in secondary 

education, and Brian Keith, 

sophomore in animal science and 

industry, swing dance in the 

Rockin' K. 









*as^ 






f 



<~ 



12 alternatives to disco 



photos by Criag Chandler 




Bar room bronco — A bull- 
riding daredevil takes a spin on El 
Toro, the mechanical bull at 
Cowboy Palace. 



Manhattan taverns choose the bullish approach 



TPhe small, wiry contestant threw a leg 
* over the bull's back, scooted himself 
into place, and gripped the rigging with a 
gloved hand. He jerked his right arm into 
the air — signaling that he was ready to 
take on El Toro — the mechanical bull 
performing at one of Manhattan's clubs. 

With a sudden twisting writhe, El Toro, 
operated by a rodeo professional, 
attempted to knock off its rider. But 21 
year-old Randy Powell, Fort Riley, knew 
what he had to do to win the contest. 
Years of rodeo experience had given him 
a feel for the unpredicatable contortions 
of an angry bull. Arching with the bull's 
jumps and jolts, Powell rode for the 8- 
second duration — the time required to 
score. His score of 77 gave him some 
satisfaction, as he topped the other 
contestants' scores by at least 8 points. 

Powell, who hopes to ride in the Pro 
Rodeo Association, "but not for a few 
more years," he said, "This is harder than 
a real bull. A real one has a neck you can 
watch so you know which way you want 
to go." 

An increasing number of bars are 



placing a bucking machine in their midst. 
Enoch's and Cowboy Palace in Manhattan 
have ventured to add this to their line of 
entertainment. And the crowds go — 
curious after seeing this machine that was 
featured in the movie "Urban Cowboy." 

El Toro was introduced in Cowboy 
Palace on Sept. 28 and 30. "I've been 
thinking of having it here for a year, but I 
was worried about its liabilities, and 
because it takes up so much room it's a 
prohibitive factor," John Gilman, co-owner 
of Cowboy Palace, said. 

The bull used the entire area of the 
Palace's dance floor. Placed dead center 
on the floor it was surrounded by wall to 
wall piles of cushy foam to comfort riders 
who were thrown. The bull itself, made 
from a hard rubber substance, was 
covered with foam along its backside, 
cushioning some of the jolts. 

"I'll probably have blisters," Lana 
Hinton, Manhattan, said. Hinton, 4 feet 
11 inches, rode the bull seven times in 
one day. One of those rides won her the 
girls' bull-riding contest. The rides were 
scored on a point basis from 25-100 



points. Hinton scored a 57 on her winning 
ride. Because of her small size, she has an 
advantage over most contestants. 

"It helps when you're smaller. There's 
not as much weight to throw around. The 
ideal cowboy is 5 feet 5 inches to 5 feet, 
6 inches and around 145 pounds. And 
small people are really just as strong as 
big people," Chuck Elliott, one of the 
professionals controlling the bull's kicks 
and spins, said. 

But whether a contestant was large or 
small, these bull-riding daredevils kept 
hopping up one after the other. 

"I'm enjoying the enthusiasm of the 
participants; I think it's a great idea. It's 
exciting. It's the closest thing you can find 
to a rodeo in a bar," Don Paustian, 
former employee of Cowboy Palace, said. 

As Gilman said, "This thing is tougher 
than any bull that ever lived. It's the 
meanest; it's El Toro! Git on!," another 
pseudo-cowboy bit the dust. ^ 



Carl Cavassa 




alternatives to disco 13 




All tied up? 

** Plagued by endless forms, red tape 
engulfs students who are forced to fill out 
form after form after form: in triplicate. 

The most common are the ominous 
lines for registration. But even preparing 
for registration is a sticky situation in 
itself, especially if for some reason one 
didn't pre-enroll. 

The hassles begin when students search 
for an appointment with a faculty adviser. 
Without his signature, enrollment forms are 
useless. 

Reaching registration, students must 
attend the specific time slot. Many 
attempt to disregard the alphabetized 
signs, but the I.D. checker, who has heard 
all the excuses, forces the disobediant 
student back into the proper time period. 

Now the lines begin. Approaching table 
one, students pick up their class schedules. 
For those collegiates who are handed an 
incomplete form, the entangled drop-add 
system is a must. 

Filling out the master cards, K-Staters 
blacken in the ovals with a number two 
pencil. The toughest situation at table two 
is remembering one's new phone number. 

At table three, the student must 
register their automobile, so security and 
traffic can trace the permit number when 
parked in a restricted area. 

After surviving registration, the red 



tape continues to ravel. Both full and part 
time students undertake the process of 
changing course line numbers. 

Thus, once again, a visit to the adviser, 
who is becoming quite familiar, is 
necessary for the class alterations. 
Grasping their appointment card, 
thousands of collegiates go to the 
basement of Farrell Library. Each student 
must stand in a separate line for each 
class added. The drop-add entanglement 
increases when a student accidentally 
drops a class before adding the new one. 
Invariably the course is full, so the 
frustrated student must wait in line again 
to add the very same class he just 
dropped. 

Another of the knotted procedures at 
K-State is in financial aid. Though 
obtaining the form isn't too difficult, the 
process becomes more complicated with 
each step. 

Before receiving any aid from the 
government, one must fill out an ACT 
family financial statement packet and send 
it to Iowa. Next, a notarized affidavit must 
be received by the university financial aid 
office before one can pick up any money. 

This red tape was exemplified in the 
fall of 1980, when 450 students waited 
for their work-study checks. While the K- 
State students struggled with their offices, 
the departments waited for the work-study 



authorization forms. The forms, available 
at financial aid, involved another line. 

In some cases the correctly completed 
forms were returned to the department 
for processing. These forms were 
forwarded to financial aid, who in turn 
forwarded them to the University payroll 
office. 

Somewhere along the organization of K 
State, the paperwork was misplaced, thus 
delaying the checks by as much as two 
months. 

The entanglement continues. At K-Stat< 
there are certain students who are choser 
to receive a key, which will unlock an 
office door or building on campus. 

Of course, these "fortunate" students 
must have a legitimate reason for needing 
the key and the department head's 
authorization. 

After meeting the requirements, these 
students complete key request cards, in 
triplicate. When finished, the secretary 
signs and initials the department head's 
signature. 

After a 10-minute hike to Dykstra and 
another 10-minute wait in line for keys, 
some of these students may be surprised 
to learn that they are still entangled in th< 
adhesive situation. , 

Due to a policy change, many of these 
students left Dysktra with the same green 
form, instead of the gold key. 



14 red tape 




Like other complicated university 
systems, in the new key policy the 
department head must annually verify that 
he has authorized someone to sign his 
name and then initial it. 

Even simple things are caught up in the 
policies of this institution. Students will 
find it impossible to cash a check at the 
Union without their plastic K-State I.D. 
Now, even the fee card won't work. 

Some consider this ironic, as the only 
way to get ones I.D. validated is to 
present the current fee card. Yet, the fee 
card won't fit into those little machines 
used to validate the checks written. 

The fee card also won't serve as one's 
pass into buildings. For without the I.D., 
students can't use the library, get into 
Lafene or enjoy the new recreation 
complex. 

Replacing those cards isn't too bad 
though. If a student looses his I.D., he 
must jog over to Farrell and have his mug 
shot taken. Maybe in three weeks or so 
:he new I.D. will get replaced . that is, 
f it doesn't get misplaced in a stack of 
red tape. & 



'Jill McAntee 



art by Mel Westmeyer 



red tape 15 




16 extra costs 



Students feel the bite 



Books only minor expense 



A check here, a check there does it 

**ever stop? Students enrolled in 
architecture, interior design, apparel 
design and multi-equipment related majors 
often wonder. 

Every student pays for tuition, books 
and housing, but some curriculums involve 
additional expense. Consider the 
architects' situation. 

Architecture students are generally 
required to produce three projects a 
semester. Projects generally run from $10 
to $100 a piece. The average model runs 
about $30. 

Pre-design students also feel the bite of 
the added costs of materials and 
equipment. Pre-design classes require the 
student to experiment with water colors, 
markers, pencils, charcoal, rapidiograph 
pens, prisma colors and pastels. 

The initial cost of these supplies runs 
high. If the student finds that he only 
likes, or is good at only one or two 
different medias, he is stuck with supplies 
he has used only once or twice. Then he 
must invest to upgrade his final media 
choice. 



A special thanks to Alex 
Poorman, fifth-year student in 
interior architecture. 



Art students must also invest in a long 
list of supplies. The list might include: 
drawing boards, T-squares, triangles, 
pencils, leads, drawing paper, matte 
board, magic markers, tackle boxes, 
rapidiograph pen sets, colored pencils, 
drafting sets, portfolios, brushes, 
templates, tracing paper, acrylics, water 
colors and paints. The list, according to 
art students, is endless. 

"The biggest investment is at the 
beginning of each semester when you 
have to buy all the basics," Valerie Mills, 
fifth-year student in interior design, said. 
"But my parents have been real good 
about helping me pay for my stuff," she 
added. 

"I bought an $11 adjustable triangle 
that I've used twice, and some acrylic 
paints for my Design II class which I've 
hardly used at all," Mills admitted. 

Students that have been in the program 
longer learn the ropes. 

"When an instructor gives me a lot of 
supplies, I usually wait until they are 
needed. This way I know what I'm going 
to need and how much I'm going to use," 



Dan Engler, junior in interior architecture, 
said. 

Another field in the area of design 
which strains the pocketbook is apparel 
design. 

"When I began here at K-State, they 
did not inform us as to the equipment and 
time involved," Nancy Shelley, senior in 
apparel design, said. It is unfortunate that 
students with limited finances don't have a 
chance to make it through the course, 
Shelly said. 

"If money is a barrier," Shelley said, 
"There's no way one can go on." 

In addition to the list of drawing and 
sketching supplies also required of 
architect and interior design students, 
apparel design majors must also supply 
themselves with the designers' equipment 
(shoulder slope, hip curve, etc.), industrial 
scissors, dress forms, muslin, fabric, and 
an endless assortment of notions. 

Extra supplies required of architecture, 
art and design majors may help to further 
their education, nevertheless still drain 
the checkbook. & 



Randy Dunn, Anne Schmitz 



i^- 



m 



extra costs 17 




Dallas: 



*They call him the man 
* people love to hate. 
J.R. Ewing will go down in 
time with such villian greats as 
the Klingons, the Godfather and 
Raven in "the Edge of Night." 
The only difference between 
these characters and the one and 
only J.R. is people love to hate 
him. 

Larry Hagman, who plays J.R., 
is quoted in People magazine as 
saying "people come up to me 
and say 'I hate you so much', 
then they ask if they can kiss 
me." Now, it would seem that 
this should be all wrong. Fans 
should be throwing eggs and 
onions at the terrible villian who 
hecomes nastier by each 




art by Mel Westmeyer 



J. R. E wing's city of fate 



"Dallas" episode. 

So, why this irony? One theory is that 
people love to take their frustrations out 
on something. What could be better than 
to watch the "evening soap opera" and 
take all those frustrations out on a man 
who deserves to be hated. 

The United States and Great Britian 
were hit with "Dallas fever." K-State has 
been affected, too. 'Who Shot J.R.' 
t-shirts, bumper stickers, Dallas books and 
anticipation filled the campus as some 
students waited for the actors' strike to 
end, so they can find out who shot J.R. 

The Central Broadcasting System 
(CBS), being very careful to protect their 
new found rage, had even filmed several 
different episodes of different characters 
being arrested for the shooting. This was 
done so that even the actors in the show 



would not know who got the "treat" of 
gunning down J.R. 

Larry Hagman stated on the Today 
Show that he didn't even know who shot 
J.R. The cast filmed several versions of 
the show, but the last 15-20 pages from 
every script was missing, keeping the cast 
in suspense, Hagman said. The shooting 
of these episodes began before the actors 
strike put a halt to the continued filming 
of the show. 

Theories, of course, ran wild. 

There's pretty Pamela. If anyone had a 
reason, she did. J.R. caused her 
miscarriage, hounded her brother, Cliff, 
and forced her and her husband to leave 
Southfork. 

Miss Ellie was a suspect. So far J.R. 
had lied to her, mortgaged her ranch 
without her permission and caused her 



family embarrassment. 

Kristin, J.R.'s mistress, was a prime 
candidate. He gave her packing papers 
when she tried to blackmail him. He told 
her he would spread it all over Dallas. 

Some people even speculated that J.R. 
did it to himself for sympathy. 

So K-State students are waiting 
patiently for the answer. Since there are 
such things as trials, police investigations 
and other delay tacts, during the whole 
season many viewers are asking "Who 
shot J.R.?" 

On Nov. 21, CBS finally revealed 
that Kristin pulled the trigger. 8 



Glenna Menard 



"I'm a soap opera junkie 



>» 



¥E7arning: The Surgeon General should 
determine that watching soap 
operas is hazardous to your mental health. 

With all the cancer research studies 
being done on laboratory rats, I would 
think that the Surgeon General could take 
time to have the above warning 
emblazoned on every television that is 
sold. 

A few years ago, I was reasonably 
normal, but now I'm a soap opera junkie. 
It's an obsession. I find myself arranging 
my schedule so that I can be home in 
time to watch my favorite soaps; passing 
up dates so I can watch "Dallas"; and 
eating quickly so I won't'miss "Guiding 
Light". 

Soap operas have a quality that is able 
to draw in even the most intelligent 
person. Similar to a mystery, a soap 
opera gives one just enough information 
about each tiny plot variation to gain 
interest, before going on to the next mini- 
plot. To add to this technique, a soap 
opera will invariably end at the most 
suspensful moment to insure that the 
viewer will tune in the next day. It 
doesn't take long for a person to be 
hooked. 

Who could pass up a program with 
such lifelike drama? Eve loves her ex- 
husband Ben. Ben loves Eve but is 
married to Amanda (having given up on 
Eve), Ross wants to marry Amanda 
(because of her mysterious inheritance) 
and is dating Eve to make Ben jealous so 



he will meet with Eve, be caught by 
Amanda, and Ben and Amanda will break 
up. 

Of course the plan is foiled by 
wellmeaning Jennifer who convinces 
Amanda that Ben is truly faithful to her, 
so Ross must devise another devious plan 
before he falls in love with Eve. It makes 
my head spin but I love it. 

I thrive on the fact that Draper Scott 
(Edge of Night), who is believed by his 
loved ones to be dead, has amnesia and is 
falling in love with a woman who believes 
him to be her long lost husband. This 
woman's father knew the truth but died 
on his way to tell Draper. 

The wonderful twist is that Draper and 
his woman have moved into what was 
Draper's town and into the same house 
that he lived in with his real wife, April. 
To make matters worse, or better for the 
writers, the woman who Draper believes 
to be his wife has become good friends 
with April. 

I've often wanted to quit watching 
soaps but I always go back. A few 
minutes with Lance, Laurie, Luke and 
Cris (another amnesia victim) and the rest 
of the cast of the "Young and the 
Restless", and I am convinced that my 
thoughts of ending the daily rendezvous 
are ridiculous. Sometimes I feel like I 
can't live if I don't find out what happens 
with the newly introduced cult on the 
"Young and the Restless." 

I began as a social soap opera watcher. 



The girls and I would gather around the 
television after lunch to watch our soaps. 
It was just harmless fun-it couldn't hurt to 
watch once in a while. 

But soon a half hour a day wasn't 
enough. I had to see more, to go deeper 
into daytime drama. I began sneaking off 
to watch a soap opera, skipping class, 
hiding from my friends, from my parents, 
from reality. 

I tried to quit. I heard about a sort of 
shock treatment that had been successful 
in less serious cases. I tied myself to a 
chair and forced myself to watch reruns 
of 60 Minutes. It was a painful trip back 
to reality but I made it. I was a 
recovering soapaholic. 

I had been warned that watching even a 
few minutes of a soap opera would drive 
me back into hopeless addiction, but when 
I turned the television on that Friday night 
I thought I was safe. I watched Dallas and 
was lost in a sea of drama once again. 

There ought to be a law against soap 
operas. A warning to unsuspecting people 
to avoid programs disguised under the 
innocent name of "daytime drama" before 
they too are hooked. 

Thousands of housewives and students 
are hooked. Thousands just like me. 
Maybe not just like me. I can quit anytime 
I want to. I've done it hundreds of times. $ 



Alice Sky 



dallas 19 



Inarched lips, dry throats and sweaty 
* bodies were a portion of the suffering 
during the red-hot summer of 1980. 

From mid-June to mid-August the heat 
wave set record high temperatures 
throughout the nation. In Dallas, Texas 
the temperature was over 100 degrees 
every day from June 23 to August 3. 

People tried to escape the heat by 
diving in swimming pools, or sitting under 
air conditioners. And those using air 
conditioners set a new record for 
electrical energy used. During the week 
ending July 19, 52,635 million kilowatt 
hours were used, six percent over the old 
record according to an article in 
Newsweek. 



People not fortunate enough to own an 
air conditioner were offered aid in heat 
relief centers which opened nationwide. 
These heat relief centers were typically 
church and school buildings open during 
the daylight hours, enabling people to 
seek shelter from the exhausting 
temperatures. 

Even with air conditioners, the heat 
wave caused 1,265 deaths and almost 
$20 billion in damage, according to the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration. 

The highest death rate, 311, was in 
Missouri. The majority of those who died 
lived in non-air conditioned homes. The 
victims were usually elderly, afraid to 




open doors or windows because of theft; 
or persons of low-income. 

These deaths were caused by heat 
exhaustion and heat stroke. High 
temperatures and humidity during a heat 
wave reduce evaporation in humans 
resulting in dehydration. In turn, 
dehydration increases the chance of 
sunstroke. 

Nevertheless, a middle-aged Atlanta 
man, lived with a 116.7 degree body 
temperature, according to an article in 
Newsweek. Hospital officials said this was 
the highest body temperature ever recorded 

People weren't the only element hurt 
by the diverse affects of the heat. 
K-State's agricultural department felt 
the impact of the drought. 

This year's soybean yield was expected 
to be about 40 to 50 percent lower than 
the normal yield, according to Carl 
Overley, associate professor of agronomy. 
Nevertheless, Overley believes the crop 
will yield enough seed for the 1981 crop. 

The department remained concerned 
about the soybean supply for Kansas 
farmers. 

"The drought has caused our 
department to have increased costs of 
feed grains and roughages to feed our 
teaching and research herds and flocks," 
Don Good, Department of Animal 
Sciences and Industry head, said. 

Farmers in the states were devastated. 
Even with the prospect of higher prices; 
hard, shriveled corn and burnt wheat 
fields caused the farmers' outlooks to be, 
at best, dismayed. 

The government's Basic Educational 
Opportunity Grant program was extended 
because of such losses. Special grant 
allotments were given to students whose 
parent's farms suffered. 

Ironically, the searing heat helped 
research on crops during extreme 
conditions. Tom Fritz, head of the 
Department of Horticulture, said the 
temperatures gave a good indication of 
the hardiness of plants in stress-related 
tests. & 



Jill McAntee 



Waves a blaze- Wheat stubble, 
too thick to plow, burns as 
Clarence Minton plows in the 
background. 



Photo9 by Scott Liebler 



20 heatwave 




Warm Wind 'n Water- Maarten 
Van Swaay, associate professor of 
chemistry, finds the Kansas wind 
and warm water ideal for wind 
surfing at Tuttle. 



Take the Tuttle Creek plunge 



^^lad in string bikinis, with a 6-pak in 

^hand, students flocked to Tuttle 
Creek Reservoir in order to escape the 
blistering hot sun during the summer of 
1980. 

Tuttle offered a variety of choices to 
cool a body when no other means of 
relief were in sight. 

One of the more popular locations 
during the summer months was the rocks. 
One of the surrounding flint hills forms a 
cliff of rocks which students lay out on. 
The water is just a few feet from the 
rocks, as inner tubes, rafts and styrofoam 
devices supporting K-Staters specked the 
area. 

A floating dock at Tuttle Cove 
provided a cool place for students to 
catch some rays. At the cove, frisbees fly 
as the sand beach joined by a grass field 
provided an excellent area for sports 
amateurs. 

"One time last summer, we were out 
on the dock — it started raining, but it 
was so hot, we just stayed in the water," 
Ann Masoner, graduate in education, said. 

For the fortunate few having access to 
ski boats, meeting at the marina for a day 
of water skiing was preferred. 

"One of the best ways I found to cool 
off during the summer was skiing. We'd 
go out to the marina in the morning 



around 10 a.m., load up, and ski all day," 
Terri Garrett, summer resident, said. 

For those preferring a slower more 
relaxing pace, sailing across the cool blue 
water aided in the relief from the broiling 
sun. 

"I didn't have to be at work until 5 
p.m. everyday, so about 11 a.m. I'd take 
my sailboat out to Tuttle. Even the wind 
was hot this summer. When it got 
unbearable, I'd just tip over on purpose," 
Randy Dunn, senior in journalism and 
mass communications, said. 

With a bottle of wine in one hand, 
toting a canoe on their shoulders, students 
found still another water activity at Tuttle. 
And for those who put a little more effort 
forward, paddle boats were available. 

In the cover of darkness, students 
sneaked to the beach below the dam to 
take a dip — naked. Yes, students even 
skinny dipped at Tuttle. Just a few or in 
a group, skinny dipping not only eased 
the sweltering bodies, but also added zest 
to dodging the high humidity. & 



Jill McAntee 



Weekend Water- Lesa Miller, 
senior in horticulture, creates a 
wake at Tuttle as she skis. 



3 




tuttle fever 




K-State 



tjrom both eastern and western Kansas, 
* all the way to California, students 
have found "heartland" at K-State. 

Students transfer to K-State from junior 
colleges and major universities all over the 
United States. Their reasons vary, but 
almost all agree, K-State is a place for 
everyone. 

Brenda Sinclair, senior in speech 
education from Garden City, Kansas 
transferred to K-State from the local 
junior college. 

"I'm very glad I came to K-State, it's 
been a real learning experience, not just 
educationally, but psychologically," she 
said. 

Sinclair said adjusting to K-State was 
difficult for her because it was her first 



Tic-Talk -In the center of campus, 
amid the trees and limestone 
buildings, "the clock" is a common 
meeting place for students. 

Stateroom Affairs - K-State 
students find the stateroom of the 
Union a place for everybody to 
eat, to study, and to socialize 
between classes. 



A place for 



time away from home and K-State is so 
much larger than the junior college where 
she knew everybody. 

Aggieville is what Sinclair says she likes 
best about K-State. 

"Besides Aggieville, hmmm I like 

all the activities people can get involved 
in. I think it's neat that there are so many 
(activities) so that everyone can do their 
own thing," she said. 

The University of Kansas (KU) lost a 
student when Julie Miller, sophomore in 
business finance, transferred to K-State. 

According to Miller, she transferred 
because students at KU aren't as friendly 
and personable as K-Staters. 

"People at KU seem to have their 
noses in the air all the time," she said. 

Miller said she misses the hills of 
Lawrence but believes K-State's campus is 
pretty with its trees and old buildings. 

"I like the smallness of it, too," Miller 
said, "I like the campus because it's not 
as spread out as KU, it's more 
concentrated and convenient here." 

K-State's campus is beautiful and the 
old buildings give it a lot of character, 
according to Becky Oliver, junior in 
journalism and mass communications from 
San Dimas, California. 




22 heartland 



everyone 

"I like Anderson Hall," she said, "I 
ove that building because it is so unique, 
remember seeing that building when they 
;ent me literature on K-State and I 
hought it was the coolest." 

Oliver transferred to K-State from 
California State Polytechnic University in 
5 omona, California. 

"I came to K-State because I had a 
jreat uncle who set up a trust fund so 
hat when he died any descendants could 
jo to K-State free," she said. 

Oliver was anxious to come to K-State 
>ecause she knew she could get involved 
n campus activities. One of the things she 
ikes most about K-State is that it is easy 
o get involved on campus. 

According to Oliver, K-State is not well 
ecognized academically in California, but 
he does believe that the Manhattan 
iniversity has a good reputation in 
Cansas. 

Even though Oliver misses the cultural 
;vents of big cities, she says she likes K- 
>tate because it offers plenty to do and 
ler social life couldn't be fuller. 

"It's easy to meet people and they are 
'ery friendly here there are a lot of 

lifferent ways to meet them — through 
orities and fraternities, activities, and 
^ggieville," she said, "A lot of schools 
lon't have Aggievilles!" 

Since K-State is smaller than Cal Poly., 
tudents can get to know their advisors 
nd instructors very well, and Oliver says 
he believes they really care about the 
tudents. 

"In big schools the instructors are more 
jiterested in doing research and publishing 
jian teaching. They don't give a two-hoot 
jbout the students," she said. 

K-State is a place for everybody, 
Iccording to Oliver. Students don't have 
p be just an average person to fit in, she 
aid, because K-State offers such diverse 
ireas to major in and activities and 
rganizations to join, she said, and added, 
;I definitely think anyone can fit in at K- 
:tate!"# 



ndrea Carver 



■State's Steeple ■ Anderson 
all, one of the oldest buildings 
' campus is a symbol of KState 
a place for everyone. 




heartland 23 



Pack up, we're going to London 




Country Representatives- Phil 
Hewett exchanges greetings with 
the leader of the Royal Military 
Band before the two bands took 
the field at Wembley. 

Where Next?' Band members 
contemplate their next sightseeing 
spot. In addition to touring, 
members also spent free time 
napping, sending postcards and 
studying for finals. 

Bus Lag- Kathy Schmidt will 
testify that buses were a familiar 
second home to the traveling 
Kansans. The group spent fifteen 
hours in buses between Manhattan 
and Chicago's O'Hare 
International airport. Group tours 
of London were executed by bus 
travel. 



A iter 18 months of raising funds, the 
outside of McCain Auditorium 
resembled a three-ring circus. On May 4, 
1980 members of K-State's Marching 
Band gathered and shortly after midnight 
the 350-plus members departed for a 10- 
day concert tour of London, England. 

After long hours of bus travel and 
waiting during airport layovers, the 
members' tired eyes widened as they 
boarded the British Airways 747 jet. 
Flying at 500 miles per hour over 
Greenland and the North Atlantic, it took 
eight hours of flight to reach London. 
Nevertheless, drink, dinner and a movie 
helped to pass the time. After 30 hours 
of travel, the Pride of Wildcat Land had 
finally reached London. 

The first real glimpse of London was 
seen from the busses, called coaches. 
Driving down the crowded streets, on 
what seemed like the wrong side of the 
road, the guide explained life in London. 
The lessons included: the hamburgers 
contain horse meat, pedestrians don't 
have the right of way and everyone takes 
baths instead of showers. 

Since this was a once-in-a-lifetime 
experience, the itinerary provided plenty 
of free time for sight-seeing. Scheduled 
tours included visiting Oxford University 
and Shakespeare's home. 

Band members were also encouraged to 
"strike out" on their own to see such 
sights as Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, the 
changing of the guards at Buckingham 
Palace, Piccadilly Circus and London's 
tube, the subway. 

Even with the sightseeing, the band 
practiced their show everyday in an 
attempt to strive for perfection. 

After a breakfast of hard rolls, orange 
marmalade and tea, on May 10, the band 
headed for Wembley. Before a sellout 
crowd of over 100,000 and a television 
viewing audience of over 600 million, the 
K-State Marching Band stepped on the 
field at Wembley to perform for the 198C 
World Cup Soccer Championship. This 
performance marked the first time womer 
were allowed to step on the soccer field 
at Wembley. 

The soccer field seemed large and alier 
without the familiar football yard lines. 
The crowd noise steadily increased and 
reached fever pitch. 

"Take a KU-K-State game in Ahearn 
Field House and magnify it about ten 
times and you can get an idea of the 
enthusiasm," Phil Hewitt, bandmaster, 
said. 

The field conductors' whistles were 
almost useless against the noise of the 



24 london 



, &*7ffifg g tadium Tours £& 




fans. The voice of the band announcer 
filled the stadium, momentarily quieting 
the crowd. The 27 minute show started 
with "London Bridges Falling Down". 
Song after song, the music poured forth 
against the roar of the crowd. 

Over 3,000 "Bobbies" were in charge 
of security at the performance. Crowds 
surged towards the girls "throwing sticks" 
and the band in "grape outfits". 

This attention was especially true at the 
opening of Hyde Park's summer series on 
May 11. Hewett said students were so 
popular at the Hyde Park concert that 
departure was delayed over an hour. 

Almost every band member was asked 
for an autograph or to pose for a family 
photo. K-State band albums sold well to 
the English concert-goers. 

The Jazz Ensemble gave three 
performances while in London. The first 
was at Oxford in the city auditorium. The 
other two were before sell-out crowds at 
Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club, a night club in 
London. Three encores were demanded 
from the second show audience, which 
consisted predominately of professional 
musicians. # 



I 



utM 



Circle of Pride- The Pridettes 
put a little boot into their routine 
for the crowd at the soccer 
championships. 

Taking It To the Streets- Not 

only did the marching band 
perform at Wembley, they also 
took the rhythm of the heartland 
to the city routes of London. 

photos by David Von Riesen 



Jill McAntee, Mike Johnston 




london 25 




( 



Warning: Life 




\ 



•j 



i.YSS 



// 








(P. 




26 hazardous 



may be hazardous to your health 



I've come to the conclusion that the 
safest way to live the rest of my life is 
to sit in a dark corner and mind my own 
business. Nothing is safe anymore — 
sverything is hazardous to your health. 

I realized this the other week when I 
was reading an issue of People 
magazine. The magazine contained an 
article about the newest scare disease, 
toxic shock syndrome (TSS). 

Dr. James Todd, chief of the infectious 
disease department at the Children's 
Hospital in Denver said, "You run a 
greater risk of dying in your car on the 
way to the store to buy tampons than you 
do from toxic shock." 

As I fell asleep I questioned what Dr. 
Todd said. Then my thoughts turned to 
dreams. 

There I was — in the consumer 
product graveyard with cans and bottles 
as tombstones. The epitaphs said things 
ike: "Use of this product may be 
hazardous to your health;" "This product 
Contains saccharin which has been 
determined to cause cancer in laboratory 
jmimals;" "Warning: The Surgeon General 
jias determined that cigarette smoking is 
jlangerous to your health;" etc. 

Then I pictured myself surrounded by a 
nazy cloud. My cemetery tour guide told 
ne the fog was the ozone layer coming 
down to haunt me since I had been 
polluting it by using aerosols containing 
luorocarbons. 



When the mist finally cleared there I 
was holding a hair dryer. Before I knew it 
the drier had been turned on and millions 
of asbestos particles were traveling to my 
lungs. Suddenly someone was cramming 
cigarettes in my mouth and trying to 
make me inhale the nicotine. 

When the fog rose I was lying out on a 
sunny beach with the intense sun rays 
penetrating my body. I was being 
bombarded by ultraviolet rays! 

The rest of my dream was an 
assortment of things to sketchy for me to 
remember. I do recall people selling me a 
plot of land which turned out to be at the 
base of Mt. St. Helen's. And, on my way 
to view my new purchase, a real-estate 
agent made me believe the ash was 
actually a cure for cancer. 

My agent told me that I was fortunate 
to receive such a great plot of land. 
"Someday it might even be a part of the 
San Andreas fault," he encouraged. 

Then I started running. I ran and ran 
stepping over cans which said: "do not 
puncture, incinerate, or expose to heat;" 
"Keep out of the reach of children;" "do 
not inhale;" "use in a well ventilated 
room;" "do not take internally". 

Bottle and can warning labels were 
hurled at me from all directions. As I 
came to the end of the path, I saw a sign 
which said Warning: The Surgeon General 
has determined that living is hazadous to 
your health. 



I woke up that morning exhausted from 
my nightmare, but realized how true it 
was. Practically everything was hazardous 
to my health. 

I went shopping later and every label 
seemed to jump at me with its warning 
message. I went through the rest of the 
day wondering if I could even rely on 
Rely. $ 



Nancy Reese 



art by Mel Westmeyer 




hazardous 27 



"Me lazy? No, I procrastinate" 




W've always admired people who work 
*hard at their studies and make straight 
A's. 

Even more, I admire those people who 
get straight A's and don't do any work at 
all, because 1 like the idea of getting a 
lot for a little. 

Some call it lazy, but I prefer the term 
procrastination. It sounds scholarly. 

I've had a case of the "I'11-do-it-later" 
syndrome ever since I can remember and 
I have never gotten around to changing 
that behavior; yet. 

I've got a list of excuses a mile long. 
At the top of my procrastination list is: 
"But I do my best work at the last 
minute." This excuse is followed closely 
by: "I like to work under pressure." 

When I finally got around to figuring 
out why I put everything off to the last 
minute I went to the dictionary and 
looked up the definition of 
procrastination. According to Webster, to 
procrastinate is to postpone habitually. 

The only cure for procrastination would 
be organization and hard work-a slow 
painful death for me. 

I blame my severe case of 
procrastination on my second grade 
teacher (after all, I've got to blame it on 
someone). After missing two weeks of 
school, because of the German measles, I 
turned in about half of the accumulated 
homework. Once I returned to school, 
I failed to finish the work and event- 
ually the teacher forgot it. 

That's one habit I've kept until now. 
Unfortunately, now they give incompletes 
for work not received. I'm sure I have the 
record for the most incompletes. 

My mom has tried to cure my habitual 
laziness by quoting an old proverb: 
"Never put off until tomorrow what you 
can do today." 

Today in the world of posters and 
t-shirts they have made that old proverb 
suit my situation: "Never do today what 
you can put off until tomorrow." 

In college I have found that my 
procrastination is forever prevalent. Take 
reading assignments for example. Usually, 



28 procrastination 




i put off reading until the week of the 
:est. By this time I figure it is too late to 
senefit me so I punt the entire 
assignment. 

I always tell myself that "next semester 
I'm going to do better I'm going to 

do all my homeowrk and I'll study in 
advance for each test." - 

I'm a senior now and I'm still putting 
:hose goals off until another semester. 

I was off to a bad start this semester 
already. I vowed I would study for my 
osychology test because I was positive I 
:ould ace the course if I put a little effort 
Wo the class. I marked my test date on 
he calendar and began to psych myself 
ip for the big test. 

The week before the test I began my 
eading assignment but it was just too 
'oring to read. So I studied class notes- 
>ut I always found something I would 
ather do than study. 

Finally, the evening before my test I 
lecided I would stay up as long as I had 
o to study for the test I ended up in 

^ggieville that evening and when I got 
ome I told myself I was to tired to study 
nd I would get up at 6 a.m. and do 



some heavy last-minute cramming. 

I did wake up early (6:30 - only half an 
hour late) and read over the class notes 
again, decided I could probably fake a 
decent answer, rolled over and went back 
to sleep. 

I woke up in time to comb my hair, 
throw on some sweats and make it to my 
test. 

After that I decided I was a 
procrastiholic. Anything that was 
displeasurable or had a hint of work I put 
off until the last minute. 

Since I'm in the job market now, I 
figure it is time to cure my 
procrastination. 

At the present I've been doing a fair 
job. I've gotten everything done on time, 
a small wonder in itself. 

But I know I'll go down in the Guiness 
Book of World Records as the greatest 
procrastinator — provided I get the 
proper forms filled out and sent in on 
time. 

What the heck, I'll do it tomorrow. & 




Note: The editor regrets 
that the photos on this 
page are missing. Due to 
uncontrollable student 
laziness they were never 
taken. In fact, the photo 
assignment was completely 
forgotten. 



Nancy Reese 



procrastination 29 



Those embarrassing dates 



You got caught doing what last night? 



' ' 'ow was your date last night?" I 
>said glancing up from my 
typewriter. 

"You wouldn't believe what happened 1 ;" 
John said. "I knew Lisa was a nice girl, 
but not how nice. When I picked her up 
she brought a Bible along." 

"What a great chaperon!" I said. 

"Yeah all the plans 1 made for the 
evening were shot, so I asked her what 
she would like to do," "Lets go to the 
park and read scriptures," she said. 

"So your date was a drag," I said. 

"No it was one of the best dates I've 
ever had. She's really a nice girl. She's 
really easy to talk to and besides after the 
scriptures, we went out for a few beers. 
Everything worked out fine," John said. 

By the time John finished his story 
several people had gathered around. Just 
the mention of a date, especially an 
unusual one catches attention almost as 
much as mentioning E. F. Hutton. 

What a way to rub in my having to stay 
home on a Saturday night typing a 
philosophy paper. Soon many stories 
were being exchanged about what had 
happened on their dates last night. 

Jeff began telling his story in a slow 
monotone voice. He looked like he had 
been through the ringer. 

"I was out north of town trying to find 
a special, out of the way place. You 
know, the place where I knew there 
would be no interruptions." 

"I put my Bronco in four wheel drive 
and took off speeding across the field to 
find a perfect spot to romance my girl" 
leff paused, glanced around the ^J^ri- jf\ 
Phen added, "I got out about halfway 
through the field and I had a flat tire. I 



got out and changed the tire and 
proceeded on. 

"I hadn't gone 150 yards when another 
tire had gone flat. I found out that the , r 
tire wasn't the Only thing deflated, by now 
my date's mood had also. We ended up - 
having to walk all the way back to a : 
blacktop road and hitch a ride into town," 
he said. 

"You think you had a rough night" 
Steve said. "Michelle and I drove out to 
Tuttle to watch the submarine races. 1 had 
the Royals placing on the radio. Just after 
the last inning of overtime I tried to start 
my car and the battery was dead." 

"We had to walk in from Tuttle to the 
doughnut shop before we found a 
telephone, I tried to call you guys but no 
answer. At last resort, I called home. My 
mom came and picked us up. After we 
dropped off Michelle, my mOm asked me 
why my shirt was inside out," Steve said, 
shaking his head. 

As the conversation continued, Jim 
brought up the lady and the tramp party 
held last year. Everyone told his date that 
it was a forma! -xcasion. Boy were they 
surprised when -we picked them up. 

"You should have seen Debbie's face 
when she opened the door. I could tell 
she was not impressed with my ragged 
old blue jeans and the shirt I wore last 
summer painting houses." 

"When I handed her the rose that 
wasn't de-thorned, I could sense I had 
some explaining to do." 

"This was our first date and, it took 
some choice words before she wbuld even 
listen to my explanation. I told her that 
lady and theJj^Hrrp' was the theme of the . 
party." ^0 



"I could tell I finally had reached her 
heart when she saw the menu of a 
hamburger, an order of fries and an apple 
turnover. She just loved the young wine I 
served." 

Then Fred walked in. We all knew that 
he had a date last night with his dream 
girl. Yesterday he was on cloud nine and 
now he looked like his wings had been 
clipped. Fred was heart broken. 

"What's wrong", I said. 

"I thought the date was going great. 
She seemed to enjoy the stories I was 
telling her about my Doberman named 
Lassie. But when I got to the part of how 
Lassie can play dead, roll over, sit and 
shake hands she said she wasn't feeling 
very well." 

Soon all the experiences had been 
confided and the room cleared. Recalling 
all the unusual happenings my friends had 
experienced, I began to think about the 
people who really take chances. 

Like the guy who purchased a personal 
in the Collegian. 

"Looking for a typical egotistical male? 
Don't answer this ad. Super nice guy, 
gentle and bashful, seeks sincere female, 
19 to 22 for evening dinner, conversation, 
and a good time." . 

After realizing the trails and tribulations 
of dating, I decided sitting home typing 
wasn't so bad after all. Then I thought 
again ... 

"Hello Kim, this is Randy. Do you have 
plans for tonight?" & 



Randy Dunn 



r'-< s f**v. 



! 3§Si ! * r i'is '. -"■ ! '' r, »'w&»* 



embarrassing 30 



A yummy bite- Melissa Miller, 
freshman in computer science 
and Curt Lampher, junior in 
construction science treat 
themselves to a Swannies run. 




Only a $5 date? 



The thought's what really counts 



$4.97, $4.98, $4.99, $5.00. Not much 
cash for a night out — but to take a 
date out on it too? 

"In Meriden, (Kansas) you'd save the 
$5," Paul Brown, junior in electrical 
engineering, said. 

But in Manhattan, land of flashing lights 
and romance, surely a $5 bill can be the 
key to some excitement with a date. 

"We'd eat dinner at McDonald's, buy 
beer and go to Tuttle," said Edwin 
Cuevas, junior in pre-vet, as he described 
his ideal date for $5. 

"It's not the money you spend, but the 
company you keep," Dana Davidson, 
senior in agricultural economics, said, then 
laughed. 

For one adventuresome couple, the $5 
stayed in the bank as Tuttle cove 
provides a secluded place for skinny 
dipping (saves on buying suits). 

Davidson described a good date as 
taking his wife to a show at the Union: 
$3. The gas to get there would be 
another dollar and the other dollar would 
buy them each a medium pop — as long 
as the drinks were less than 50 cents 
each. 

"I couldn't take her to the show and 
have a dollar left over," Davidson said. "I 



may be broke, but I'm not cheap." 

"Ideal for me would be to go to 
Rockin' K's and dance every song. 

You wouldn't have to worry about buying 
beer," Sue Henry, junior in dairy 
production, said. 

"We'd go on Thursday; 50 cents would 
get us both in," Henry said. "Then we'd 
probably go raid Vern's." 

Cynthia Carper, sophomore in wildlife 
biology, said that in her hometown of 
WaKeeney, "after six o'clock you can't 
even spend $5." 

But Carper has more romantic plans for 
a date in Manhattan. 

"I'd buy a bottle of wine, that'd cost 
about $3 and go to Tuttle with my date 
until the sun goes down," she said. 

Jeff Gillispie, junior in geophysics, also 
likes watching the sky with a date. 

"I'd take a picnic dinner, go to 
Hackberry Glenn and watch the sun set," 
he said. 

One couple stated fishing at Pott 
County Lake after midnight would suffice 
as a $5 date with certain added 
advantages. 

Then there's always snipe hunting at 
Pillsbury Crossing or admiring the lights of 
Manhattan from Top of the World. 



Rita Weaver, senior in family life and 
human development, adds her ideal 
situation for a $5 date: 

"We could go roller skating or go to 
McDonald's. Or go to A&W and have 

a root beer float. We could also play 
racquetball or go swimming. In the winter 
we could go sledding," she said. 

An ideal $5 date for Charlene Trachsel, 
senior in music education, would be a trip 
to the ice cream parlor for single dip 
ice cream cones, a ten minute drive 
around Tuttle and a trip to the bakery for 
one doughnut. 

If you go for the $5 date, there are 
some rules to the game: 

DO NOT pick her flowers on campus 
— no matter how romantic the moment 
may seem. 

DO NOT order two $2.50 dinners 
unless you're sure the service is going to 
be lousy. 

DO NOT take a taxi to Sunset Zoo and 
expect to take the taxi back home. 

DO NOT make a $6 bet with your 
date.® 



Carol Sobba 



32 $5 date 






Craig Chandler 



Dimming the lights 

Energy costs 

id you ever have to walk around the 
apartment and turn off all the lights 
your roommate leaves on? If that was 
frustrating, think of how Gene Cross must 
feel. 

Gene Cross, vice president for 
university facilities, has the job of 
overseeing energy conservation on 
campus. That job has taken on special 
importance in a time when the consumer's 
problem is paying for energy — not 
getting it. 

Energy conservation at K-State 
encompasses several different areas, 
according to Cross. One of the more 
obvious is campus lighting around 
buildings and walkways. 

"A few years back - I can't tell you 
exactly how many — the lighting was 
drastically reduced," said Cross. "Then 
there was some requests to raise the level 
back up in some areas." 

Requests for changes come from 
individuals or groups and are evaluated 
through Cross's office each year. 

"Where there is a safety problem or 
some other justifiable reason we will raise 
the lighting." 

"Obviously we could just shut off all 
the lights and save a lot of money. We 
are trying to provide the minimal 
acceptable level. The key words are 
minimal and acceptable." 

The same philosophy applies to 
temperature control in campus buildings. 
The temperature is kept at 65 degrees in 
the winter and 78 in the summer, 
according to Cross. 

"That is our standard. From there 
people may request exceptions, but they 
have to be justified. There are cases such 
as labs where animals are kept which 
require higher temperatures," said Cross. 

The standards are just that, Cross 
pointed out. They do not guarantee that 
every building is the same temperature. 

"With some of the older buildings it 
just isn't possible to have that degree of 
control," he said. 

The state legislature funded several 
special conservation projects for the 
campus this year. 

One campus-wide project involved the 
replacement of inefficient wooden sills and 
clearglass windows with metal sill frames 
and "thermo-pane" windows. 

The metal frames provide better seals 
than some of the cracked old frames and 
the tinted glass panes are more thermally 
efficient. Several buildings on campus 
recieved similar replacements for their 
doors and doorframes. 

"The state has given us the money for 
the windows and additional attic 
insulation. This was done purely for 
conservation. There are also funds for the 
upgrading to the heating plant and line 
insulations to make the use of steam on 



34 energy 



spawn conservation projects 



campus more efficient," said Cross. 

One university project arose from 
students' efforts to conserve energy. In 
response to increased numbers of bicycles 
on campus, bike racks have been added 
to numerous areas. Larry Wilson, director 
of landscaping and campus planning, was 
coordinator for the project. Wilson said 
the increase was due at least in part to 
the cost of gasoline and efforts by 
students to conserve. 

The decision to provide the bike racks 
was based on an informal study of his 
own, observations by campus police, and 
complaints by people through his office, 
said Wilson. 

Wilson compared the number of 
bicycles parked between the Union and 
Seaton Hall over a two month period in 
1979 to bicycle use in the fall of 1980. 

"I did an informal survey- not a 
scientific one- but I counted the number of 
bicycles over by the Union every time I 
was over there. There is certainly an 
increase (in bicycle use)." 

Wilson hoped to provide 300 additional 
bike stalls on campus, of which 280 would 
be portable. 

"We've hired a consultant to study 
pedestrian and bike traffic on campus. 
That's one of the reasons most of the 
bike racks are portable. We will proceed 
on the findings from that study," said 
Wilson. 

The bike racks were placed according 
tb a priority list of congested areas on 
campus. 

"We have a lot longer list than we have 
money for so we're just going down the 
list as we get the money," Wilson said. 

Funds for the project have come from 
an auction of surplus university goods 
such as desks and office equipment held 
in the spring of 1980. Money was also 



received from the sale of unclaimed 
bicycles and other items by Security and 
Traffic. 

K-State also has an evergy conservation 
committee comprised of faculty and 
administration which acts as a 
coordination committee for campus 
conservation. 

Robert Dahl, head of the department of 
architectural engineering and chairman of 
the committee, outlined four objectives of 
the energy conservation committee. 

The goals included determining the 
need for conservation on campus and to 
call attention to that need, to serve as a 
central coordinating group and sounding 
board for the campus community. The 
goals are also to direct an on-going 
awareness campaign that may include 
choosing an energy slogan and logo to be 
used on university vehicles and stationery, 
and to recommend actions and programs 
for energy conservation and to 
communicate and publicize results of such 
actions to the campus community. 

The committee is waiting for the results 
of two separate energy surveys on 
campus before it takes concrete actions, 
Dahl said. One survey is the State Energy 
Audit which audits energy use in all state 
buildings. The other is being done by 
Flack & Kurtz Consulting Engineers, a 
New York firm. 

"It is possible that past energy projects 
on campus have been more fragmented 
than it could be. The committee could 
become the coordinating device for 
conservation by the university," Dahl 
said. # 



Anton Arnoldy 



BPiii , 



1 






I A real turn on- Campus lighting 
J was just one area of conservation 

examined by university facilities in 

recent years. 

Rack 'em up- New bike racks 
,$ were placed in several congested 
areas of campus as more students 
turned to pedal-power over their 
cars or walking. 



energy 35 



<p& • ******************** National elections * ********************* 

From Hollywood to Washington . . . 



ovember the 4th, 1980. The day the 
land slid over President Jimmy 
Carter and a large percentage of the 
Democratic candidates. It was a sound 
victory for the Republicans — not only 
did they gain the top spot in the nation's 
White House, they captured the majority 
rule in the Senate — a control not 
enjoyed by the elephant's party since 
1954. 

Although the Republicans did not take 
control of the House of Representatives, 
they did gain 33 seats thus making 242 
Democrat and 192 Republican members 
in the House. 

The Republican landslide was not 
expected. In the presidental election the 
polls declared the race a virtual tie the 
week before the election — a slight edge, 
is any, went to President Carter. 

Carter was leading the race 42% to 
41% — with 12% leaning towards 
Anderson and 5% undecided. However, 
Carter's lead was such a narrow one, that 
in the range of a sampling error the lead 
was virtually meaningless, according to a 
77me poll. 

But the polls couldn't change the fact 
that Carter had been haunted by inflation 
and unemployment, or that Reagan was 
trying to overcome a reputation for right- 
wing extremism and simplistic thinking. 
Nor could the polls alter the fact that 
Anderson was accused by some 
Democratic party members of trying to 
wreck the two party system. 

Because of these public attitudes the 
debates became extremely important to 
each man's campaign because "a mere 
swing of 3% of popular vote could switch 
states with 200 electoral votes," as 
estimated by Republican pollster Bob 
Teeter — a remarkable number as only 
270 electoral votes are required to win 
the election. 

With this in mind the candidates 
carefully prepared for the debates, which 
were broadcast on national television. 

The first debate was sponsored by the 
League of Women Voters. All three 
candidates were invited to the debates, 
but Carter turned the invitation down in 
protest of Anderson's third party 
affilation. 

In the second debate, also sponsored by 
the League of Women Voters, Anderson 
was not invited. Thus a Carter-Reagan 
square-off was held Oct. 28, 1980. 

With the elections only a week away, 
ooth Carter and Reagan placed their 
political future on the line by debating. 
Any damage made by either of the 
candidates would be far to difficult to 
overcome in the time remaining before 
Election Day 

So, in the week before elections a 



circus of mudslinging and political 
manuevers took place. 

Carter had been accused of being weak 
in the area of foreign policy, of having an 
insufficient economic policy, and of not 
taking a firm stand on the issues which 
confronted him. 

Realizing the American voters were 
afraid of war, Carter plotted his strategy 
around what his aides termed the 
"Tolstoy" issue — an issue of war and 
peace. Carter charged that Reagan lacked 
the judgement to keep the U.S. out of 
war. In a radio speech from the Oval 
Office Carter said: "Peace is my passion 
peace is my pledge." 

On the other hand, Reagan was dealing 
with charges of being a warmonger and 



"trigger happy." To counter Carter's 
attack, Reagan told his supporters while 
he was campaigning in Cincinnati: "The 
President seems determined to have me 
start a nuclear war. Well, I'm just as 
determined not to." 

The 52 hostages in Iran also became a 
major campaign issue because prior to 
Election Day new hope was shed on the 
release of the captives, and on Carter's 
campaign. 

There was a possibility the hostages 
could be released perhaps before Election 
Day-a maneuver which would give the 
Carter administration a powerful boost in 
his bid for re-election. 

Thus the hostages became a heated 
issue between Carter and Reagan. Reagan 



Issues 



Carter 

1. A $12 billion anti-recession jobs program and a "guaranen- 
teed job for every American able to work." 

2. Upgrading combat readiness of armed forces and set new 
wage standards for military forces. 

3. To continue trade restriction against U.S.S.R. and to deter 
further Soviet "adventurism." 

4. Increase level of support for farm prices with no future 
embargos on agricultural products. 



Reagan 



1. Spending limits on federal government and to have a bal- 
anced budget. 

2. Support production of B-l bomber and deployment of MX 
missiles and increased naval power. 

3. Deregulation of energy industries and expansion of energy 
production through oil, coal, and nuclear energy. 

4. Opposed to peace-time draft and registration but favors 
strengthening National Guard. 

Anderson 

1. Opposed to general tax cut unless accompanied by large 
cuts in government spending. 

2. Low interest rates to industry and 10 percent tax credit for 
innovative research and development. 

3. 50<: per gallon gas tax coupled with a 50 percent cut in 
social security taxes. 

4. Opposed to American intervention into the troubled Middle 
East and other areas. 



•••••••••••••■•• "*• 



'■YtY-'-Yi'iYi 1111111 Vt 



^^^^^^»*^ 



36 national elections 



•••••••••••••••••***•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 




Ronald Reagan-Representing the 
Republican party, Reagan had a 
landslide victory over incumbent 
Jimmy Carter in the race to the 
Oval Office. Reagan was finally 
successful after 12 years of 
campaigning. 

Jimmy Carter-39th president of 
the United States conceded his 
loss to winner Ronald Reagan 
even before the last polls were 
closed. Several Democrats blame 
their loss on Carter's early 
concession. 

John Anderson-Independent 
candidate was called a spoiler 
because some felt he was trying 
to wreck the two-party system. 
Anderson received enough of the 
popular vote to earn federal 
campaign funds. 



Reagan succeeds by defeating Carter 



responded to a Carter statement that he 
did not understand foreign policy by 
saying: "I don't understand why 52 
Americans have been held hostage for 
almost a year now the fact they have 

been there that long is a humiliation and a 
disgrace to this country." 

Reagan also said he had some ideas on 
how to free the hostages, but refused to 
comment. 

Carter hit back hard, accusing Reagan 
of breaking a pledge to keep the hostage 
issue out of the campaign. 

"1 notice that Governor Reagan 
announced a secret plan to get the 
hostages back," Carter said and added 
later, "The Republicans have a habit of 
spreading a lot of horse manure around 
right before election. Lately it's been 
getting pretty deep all over the country." 

After the bitter exchange, the 
candidates silenced themselves to prepare 
for the Oct. 28 debate. 

In the final hours before Election Day, 
Carter did not deny he made mistakes in 
office but claimed he had grown with the 
presidency and strongly believed he had a 
workable platform for the future. It was 
on these issues that Carter based his 
election platform: inflation, taxation, and 
the economy. 

The Carter platform called for the 
enactment of a $12 billion anti-recession 
jobs program providing at least 800,000 
jobs and "guaranteeing a job for every 
American who is able to work." The 
platform called the job plank "our single 



highest domestic priority." 

Included in the platform was a plan to 
keep American military strength 
"unsurpassed" by the deployment of the 
new missile, Trident submarines, and 
cruise missiles — along with upgrading 
the combat readiness of armed forces, 
new wage standards for military forces 



"The President seems deter- 
mined to have me start a nucle- 
ar war. Well, I'm just as deter- 
mined not to." 



and opposition to the peace-time draft. 

Also called for was the use of both 
diplomacy and military power to deter 
further Soviet "adventurism." 

Carter also supported affirmative action 
passage of the Equal Rights Amendment 
and an "increase in the level of support 
of farm price," with a promise to protect 
farm families and no future embargos on 
agricultural products, except in war 
situations. 

Like Carter, Reagan believed that 
national defense should not be 
compromised. Reagan's platform also 
supported the production of the B-l 
bomber, and the deployment of the MX 
and cruise missiles, and an increase of 
naval power. 

Reagan's basic philosophy was one of 
growth. The platform encouraged 



continued growth of industry and stunting 
growth of big government. 

Reagan did not favor the ratification of 
the Equal Rights Amendment but did 
favor equal rights for women and 
minorities. 

The zealot without a chance was a 
charge John Anderson faced, but in a 
317-page platform Anderson detailed 
plans and goals for the future of America. 

Overall, Anderson was opposed to a 
large tax cut unless it was accompanied 
by a large cut in government spending. 

With these platforms made public, the 
American voter took the ideas to the 
voting booths, with astounding results. 

In the outcome, 483 or 51% of the 
electoral votes were awarded to 
challenger Ronald Reagan. Carter received 
only 49 or 41% of the electoral votes 
needed to retain his White House 
position. The defeat made Carter the first 
Democrat since Grover Cleveland, in 
1888, to be voted out of the Oval Office. 

The defeat was so sound that Carter 
offered his concession to Reagan at 5:30 
Eastern Standard Time, or about an hour 
and a half before the last polls in 
America were closed. $ 



Nancy Reese 



national elections 37 



*•••••*•••••**•**••••••••*•* St3te elections ************************ 



Dole is re-elected for a 3rd term 



hanks to the outcome of the Nov. 
4th election, Kansas has gained 
more recognition in the Senate. 

Senior Bob Dole, Republican, easily 
won the U.S. Senate contest against John 
Simpson, a Salina lawyer. 

Dole's victory means a promotion to 
chairman of the Finance Committee, 
where he was previously a ranking 
minority member. Sen. Dole is also a 
member of the Agricultural Committee. 

Simpson was appointed as a Republican 
to fill a vacancy in the Kansas Senate in 
1971, and retained that position until 
1979 when he changed parties and 
resigned his office to make a bid in the 
senatorial race. 

As part of his election pitch, Simpson 
attacked Dole, saying that Dole had used 
his senatorial position to gain national 
prominence, rather than working for the 
benefit of Kansas. 

Defending these charges Dole said: "I 
had the choice last year of either serving 
as ranking Republican on the Agriculture 
Committee or on the Finance Committee. 
I sent about 600 letters to my 
constituents asking for their opinions. A 
total of five were against my taking the 
Finance Committe position. I'm still on the 
Agriculture Committee. My opponent 



makes it sound as though I abandoned 
agriculture altogether." 

In the Kansas Senate, Simpson had 
worked as chairman of the Committee of 
Tax Legislation, and as a member of the 
Committees on Agriculture, Judiciary, 
Energy and National Resource, and 
Education. 



Where Simpson's experience had come 
at a state level, Dole's experience was on 
the national level as he has been a 
member of Congress for 20 years, the last 
12 as a U.S. Senator. 

On Election Day, Sen. Dole was an 
easy winner, capturing 63% of the vote 
to Simpson's 37%. & 




Bob Dole- Incumbent Republican Senator was John Simpson-Salina lawyer lost decisively to 
re-elected. Dole. 



Despite tactical errors, Jeffries wins election 



|2am Keys, former professor of 
*^ administration and foundation at K- 
State, was looking for an upset against 
incumbent Jem Jeffries in the 2nd District 
Congressional race, and almost had it. 

Two and a half weeks before election in 
a critical part of the campaign, a Jeffries' 
staff member was caught trying to get 



semi-private files from the College of 
Education at K-State. 

"I had no knowledge of the incident 
until I was told a few minutes ago ... I 
have issued orders that they (Van Slyke 
and Woodruff) be suspended from the 
campaign," Jeffries said in the wake of 
the incident. 




James Van Slyke, campaign staff 
member for Jeffries went to the College 
of Education, identifying himself as a 
graduate student from University of 
Kansas, and asked to see the records 
when Keys served as the dean of the 
college. 

In order to get permission to see and 
copy the files, Van Slyke was required to 
sign a form attesting that the information 
needed was for a research paper and that 
Jerry Woodruff, paid member with 
Jeffries' campaign, was his adviser for the 
paper. 

Later, following inquiries, both men 
were caught and their positions were 
revealed; meaning disaster for a hopeful 
Jeffries re-election bid. 

However, in a close battle, Jeffries 
emerged victorious by a slim yet decisive 
margin. About 9:30 p.m. on Election eve 
following a see-saw lead for Jeffries, the 
incumbent congressman pulled ahead and 
kept his slim margin until all votes were 
tallied. ^ 



Jim Jeffries-was elected to a second 
congressional term 



Sam Keys-Former K-State professor ran 
against Republican Jeffries. 



stories by Nancy Reese 



T l CTffirrT i ?! ! ?fflv?T l ' . l /. 1 .'. J .-. L . 1 , 
•Vrli'mVi' 



\ 

38 state elections 



....'.•■V.V.V.V. 1 . 1 ^ 

•'-*•'•■• '■'■■' '■* '■'-'•' 



, 




art by Mel Westmeyer 

elections 39 



Concerts stray from K- State 



K -State is missing something. Concerts 
— especially big name performers. 

In past years K-State has hosted Billy 
Joel, Chicago, America and various other 
bands. But now the bands are gone and 
the walls of Ahearn Field House no longer 
resound with musical notes. 

"It's not just K-State. Other colleges 
are experiencing the same thing (lack of 
concerts)," said Margaret Cieslicki, 
program director of Union Program 
Council (UPC). 

The National Entertainment and 
Campus Activities Association (NEC A A) 
met in November to discuss the future of 
concerts on college campuses. 
Representing some of the Big 8 schools, 
Colorado, Nebraska, Missouri and Kansas 
attended the conference, along with a 
Chris Fritz representative from New West 
Presentations. 

The consensus of the meeting was that 
the major concert market on the college 
campus is not what it used to be. The 
availability of acts is low and the situation 
holds a dismal outlook, according to 
Cieslicki. 

"Gross potential is involved. The band 
looks at how much more money they 
could make in percentages," Cieslicki 
said, "and if they can make more 
somewhere else, they'll go somewhere 
else." 

Because of this, concerts are getting 
more expensive. It may cost $25,000 to 
$30,000 for a "big name act" and 
$25,000 more to open the doors of 
Ahearn Field House, Cieslicki explained. 
On several occasions in the past, UPC has 
suffered monetary loss when bringing the 
acts to K-State. 

"If you have $50,000 or $60,000 on 
the line, there is no space to hope to 
break even. It needs to be a sure thing," 
Cieslicki said. 

"The best results have been with artists 
with a track record, such as Chicago, 
Doobie Brothers and America," she said. 
"We lost money on the Marshall Tucker 
Band and that surprised us. In the last six 
years, there has been only two sell-outs; 
Bob Hope and Red Skelton. Neither were 
rock concerts and that surprised us, too." 



Last year, Doc Severinson's 
performance was cancelled due to lack of 
ticket sales. UPC could not have funded 
the appearance without the support of 
ticket sales, she added. 

One of the barriers to having concerts 
at K-State is that during the 1980-81 
school year no one filled the position that 
handles live entertainment. 

Cieslicki speculated that the position 
would not be filled any sooner than the 
summer of '81. 

"I would anticipate that the position will 
be filled, if the idea of concerts is a 
reality," said Walt Smith, Union director. 

UPC's plans include working with 
McCain Auditorium to bring "young, up- 
and-coming acts" to K-State. Whether 



"If I can find a vacant slot and a 
group that is touring through 
here, you bet we will indeed 
have a performance." 



people are willing to take a chance and 
see someone "without a track record" is 
a question both UPC and McCain director, 
Doreen Bauman, are trying to answer. 

"My principle need right now is to 
know what students want. We'll start with 
what they like and then see if they'll take 
risks with unknowns," Bauman said. 

"If I can find a vacant slot and a group 
that is touring through here, you bet we 
will indeed have a performance," Bauman 
said. 

Some students have volunteered to 
gather information and put together 
priority lists for Bauman to use when 
making plans to bring groups to McCain. 

"I'm certainly welcoming student input, 
not that it's a guarantee, but we can try," 
Bauman said. 

Most students do not want concerts to 
die out. 

"We've had a petition turned in with 
about 400 signatures on it. We've had 
students concerned about the concerts 
come in and talk to us. We've even had 
students do persuasive speeches in their 



oral communications class in defense of 
concerts," Cieslicki said. 

According to Cieslicki, UPC also does 
not want concerts to die out. 

"If a big one (concert act) comes along, 
we'll certainly try and get it if we can 
afford it," Smith said. "It's quite a 
production when we do anything at 
Ahearn." 

Most big name acts in the past have 
performed in Ahearn, but due to 
acoustics, McCain is better for concerts. 
However, the seating in McCain is limited 
to 1,800. Ahearn seats 8,000-11,000. 

"Ahearn is bigger by a long shot but it 
is still a gym. The facility itself is there, 
but everything else is created. The 
sounds, the lights, even the dressing 
rooms. It will never be like McCain," 
Cieslicki said. 

Future dates for big name acts lean 
toward busy university weekends. 

"I think a direction we will look in will 
be Parents' Day, Homecoming and some 
of the major university weekends. We 
feel especially responsible to insulate 
those weekends," Smith said. 

University for Man (UFM) has been 
filling some of the emptiness due to lack 
of major concerts. Through their Java 
Jive coffeehouses they sponsor local 
entertainers to perform, asking for small 
donations of approximately one dollar. 
The coffeehouse committee was 
responsible for the Parents' Day 
entertainment on Saturday evening, Nov. j 
15, when Kimberlite, a Manhattan group, 
performed in the Catskeller. 

"We had the place packed. The 
Catskeller is a great place for live 
entertainment. We used a local band and 
they worked out great. I think too many 
people close their eyes to local 
entertainment and that's too bad because 
they are the ones that give the community 
a chance to hear some really good music 
and will perform for an affordable price," | 
Lori Bergen, graduate student and 
member of the Coffeehouse committee, 
said. & 

Diane Doctor 



40 lack of concerts 



. 




Memory from the past — The 

chairs haven't had to have been 
set up for over a year now as a 
lack of concerts have left the 
students concertless. 



Craig Chandler 



lack of concerts 41 



Shooting the breeze 



College jargon fits lifestyles 



"117 hat's the hap?" 

*'*' "Not much going on, how 
'bout you?" 

"Oh just hanging out waiting for Friday 
and a chance to party." 

"Me too. I'm bummed out from hitting 
the books all week. I'm ready to catch a 
buzz." 

"No doubt. I could use a good drunk." 

"Well, let's do it. What time's your last 
class on Friday?" 

"11:30, should I meet you somewhere 
for an Aggieville run?" 

"Yeah, sounds good. Front of the 
Union at 12:30." 

"Good deal. Hey, what went on with 
that girl you met in Aggie the other 
night?" 

"Oh, she was the pits. Airhead to the 
max. When I saw her I was so psyched, 
then she opened her mouth. You're 
talking space." 

"Life is hard." 

"By the way, how'd that test in Calc II 

go?" 



"It was a bite. Course I didn't put a 
whole lot of effort into it. In fact I fell 
asleep reading chapter four. When I woke 
up it was too late to study so I blew it 
off." 

"That's a bad deal, catching Z's when 
you should've been cramming. My 
problem is getting away from the stereo. 
My roommates crank the tunes all the 
time." 

"I can relate. A guy that lives down th< 
hall is into punk rock. That gets old in a 
hurry." 

"Really! I tell 'ya, this cold weather is 
getting me down. I can't wait for warm 
weather." 

"For sure. Tuttle Creek Boulevard, 
Spring time and the tubes. They're great. 
Nothing better than catching some rays 
and watching the women drive by." 

"Listen, I've got to take off. One more 
class and I'm done for the day." 

"Okay, we'll catch ya later." 

This conversation could be heard 
almost any day on the K-State campus. 



College jargon used across the nation sets 
students in a social class of their own. 

Students at K-State in 1980 conversed 
daily using terms and definitions specific 
to their lifestyles. The uniqueness of 
college students was best demonstrated 
through their language. $ 



Jill McAntee 



Chilly wave — A bare-chested 
Kurt Pierce, sophomore in 
mechanical engineering, shows 
"typical" college craziness as he 
rides on the shoulders of Robin 
Friedrichs, senior in agricultral 
general, during the 'Cats football 
game on Nov. 15. 

It's not Mickey — Deena 
Krebs, freshman in foods and 
nutrition, Karla Rossi, freshman in 
accounting, and Jeanine Mealy, 
freshman in general home 
economics, catch mice on sixth 
floor Ford. The 27 mice were a 
gift from eighth floor Haymaker. 



42 college jargon 





Rob Clark 

college jargon 43 




Craig Chandler 

It's all in the lips ■— John 
Orth, a 14-year-old member of 

the Thomas Moore Prep School 
band from Hays, blows on his 



Bands tune to K-State 



louring half-time of the Arkansas State 
*^ football game at KSU Stadium Sept. 
27, every seat in the end zone was 
empty. No, the empty seats weren't 
caused by a record low attendance but by 
K-State's traditional band day. 

The 1980 edition of band day had 
approximately 6,500 high school students 
from all over Kansas, some of them 
driving since 4 a.m. to arrive in time for 
the 9 a.m. parade down Poyntz. 
Beginning at fourth and Poyntz, band 
members marched to the city park where 
they loaded their buses to head for KSU 
Stadium to practice. 

A crowd of over 32,000 watched as 
Phil Hewitt, K-State marching band 
director, conducted the mass of students 
from his perch in the cherry picker. The 
band members, wearing uniforms in every 
color of the rainbow, formed the letters 



K-S-U to play Wildcat Victory. 

Having practiced before the game, the 
band exhibited three other special 
selections. 

As a particular tribute to Gordon Jump, 
a K-State graduate and star of WKRP in 
Cinncinati, the mass band played the 
theme from WKRP. 

After a quick change in formation, the 
bands played God Bless America, while 
spelling out U-S-A. 

The tradition of playing the 1812 
Overture was given a new look when the 
bands formed 1-8-1-2, stretching from 
sideline to sideline. As in past years, the 
Howitzer cannons from Fort Riley added 
a realistic volley of fire for grand finale. & 



Susan Tousignant 



"1 ""), .» { ! "";, ,. 




K-State Kazoos 80's 



The buzzing of red, blue, yellow and 
green plastic kazoos started off the 
1980 "Roaring Eighties" Homecoming 
celebration. 

Plans to "Kazoo Mizzou" were aided by 
the distribution of nearly twenty-thousand 
kazoos. Kazoos were given away by 
merchants during Homecoming week 
before the Oct. 25 Homecoming game 
against the University of Missouri Tigers. 

An award for the best kazoo band at 
the pep rally competition was given to 
Delta Delta Delta and Alpha Tau Omega. 

Tuesday's College Day competition was 
won by the College of Agriculture. 
Students in the eight colleges were 
encouraged to wear their college or major 
T-shirts. Each college constructed a 
banner to hang on the outside of their 
home academic building. Teams 
comprised of three students and three 
professors from each college competed in 
relay games in the Union Courtyard. 

Union Day was Thursday with 
continuous student entertainment 
throughout the day. Football coach Jim 
Dickey and the K-State cheerleaders made 
a special appearance at noon. 

Friday evening was the annual alumni 
dance with special music provided by Matt 
Betton's Palace Jazz Band. The traditional 
pep rally and bonfire was held at 
Memorial Stadium at 11 p.m. The K-State 
marching band, twirlers, pridettes and 
cheerleaders were on hand to provide 
plenty of pep and spirit. 

Homecoming parade on Saturday 
morning featured floats constructed by K- 
State living groups to show their 
homecoming spirit. Bands from Manhattan 
and Junction City high schools also 
marched in the parade on Poyntz. 

A special Homecoming surprise was the 

Grass roots — Members of the 

K-State Alumni Band play some 

tunes in the parade. 

Ballooning reflections — A 

student clown from Van Zile Hall 

makes tours on his moped 

through the crowd during 

Homecoming. 



televising of the football game against 
Missouri. ABC broadcast the game which 
K-State lost, 13-3. 

Among special activities at the game 
was the naming of the K-State 
Ambassadors. Since 1977, ambassadors 
have been chosen to represent the 
student body at official university 
functions. Selected as the 1981 
Ambassadors were Beverly Biggs, junior 
in accounting, and David Lehman, junior 
in agricultural economics and political 
science. They received a $100 scholarship 
from Blue Key senior honorary. 



46 homecoming 





photos by Hurriyet Aydogan 



Parents shine in student life 



TP o the theme of "Parents are the 

* Sunshine of our Lives," thousands of 
10ms and dads flooded K-State's campus 
ov. 15 for Parent's Day. 

The 1980 Parent's Day was sponsored 
nee again by Chimes Honorary with the 
elp of the Parent Programming 
ommittee, a committee formed just this 
ear for the purpose of making Parent's 
ay more special. 

The parent programming committee 
as responsible for the introduction of 

ini-classroom sessions — featuring four 

culty members who received the 1980 

utstanding Faculty Awards. 

The purpose of the sessions was to 
icpose parents to a typical classroom 
:uation. Civil Engineering was taught by 

iwin Lindley, associate professor of civil 
ngineering; journalism was instructed by 

arold Shaver, associate professor of 

urnalism and mass communications. 
:lward DeVilbiss, associate professor of 
i chitecture, gave a session on 



architecture. Finance was taught by 
Verlyn Richards, head of the Department 
of Finance. 

Chimes also sponsored guided tours 
around campus for parents. Until noon, 
the tours left from the Union every half 
hour. 

Another tour was given by the 
University for Man through its newly 
completed solar greenhouse. 

For many, the main event of the 
afternoon was the K-State vs. Oklahoma 
State game. The event was highlighted 
with pre-game ceremonies, including 
presentations of awards to show how 
"parents can be the sunshine of our 
lives." 

Cindy Bray, junior in fashion marketing, 
was the winner of the annual essay 
contest. She received a $200 scholarship 
for her essay which explained how her 
parents have been the sunshine of her 
life. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herb Bowman of Lamed 



were selected as honorary parents for the 
day. The Bowmans were selected for the 
honor as a result of an application 
submitted by their daughter, Shelly 
Bowman, senior in home economics 
extension. The award was based on the 
parents' contributions to K-State, their 
community, and their son or daughter. 

After-game activities encompassed 
special programs sponsored by several 
living groups. Residents of Ford Hall 
provided their parents with buttons that 
stated "My daughter goes to K-State," 
and Boyd Hall residents sponsored an 
evening talent show with refreshments 
following. 

In addition, Java Jive, the coffeehouse 
staff, sponsored a special performance in 
the Catskeller. A full house of mostly 
parents were entertained by two K-State 
students, Skip Brod and Fred Schmidt, 
and by Kimberlite, a group that 
specializes in folk and bluegrass music. •$ 



Susan Tousignant 



parents day 47 



0m 



\ 




% 




Homosexuals reveal identity 



There are a myriad of emotions and 
reactions that surface when the 
homosexual male or the lesbian female 
take the step towards an honest 
relationship with their family or friends. 

For some Manhattan gays, male or 
female, the decision to reveal their 
homosexuality comes only after a 
traumatic and painful process for them. 

"The first step-in the coming out 
process is that of moving towards a 
recognition and acceptance of one's 
gayness. Some people become aware of 
the lesbianism or gayness early in life. 
Others do not reach that awareness for a 
long time because of the many social 
pressures which demand heterosexuality," 
according to a booklet published by the 
National Gay Task Force. 

Ron, an architecture student, was 
married for five years. He has been in the 
military and told his wife about his 
homosexuality over three years ago. 

"I'd known I had homosexual feelings 
since I was 15 or 16 years old. I 
considered myself to be very confused. 
During high school I didn't know how I 
wanted to be. I was a space case," Ron 
said. 

"I was brought up in a family with a 
strong religious background. I didn't come 
to terms with myself until about a year 
ago. Sue, (Ron's ex-wife) helped me 
through the rough stages. She probably 
knew before I did," Ron said. 

After revealing his homosexual 
tendancies to his wife, Ron informed his 
parents. 

"I wrote a letter to my parents. It was 
very intense. I followed it up with a 
phone call. They were very disappointed. 
They don't accept it," Ron said. 

"They tend to be the type of people 
who keep things hush-hush. But my goal 
was to finally tell my mom and dad, and I 
have. I wanted to tell them about 5 or 6 
months ago before I came out. I'm glad I 
didn't, they would have rejected me, and 
that would have set me back," he said. 
"I'm just now in the beginning stages of 
adjustment with my parents," Ron said. 

Mary, an art major, is a lesbian 
feminist. 

"The wonderful thing about being a 
lesbian feminist is that we are very 
supportive of the individual. Not to base 
the relationship on two people, but on a 
one to one level, where equality is of 

photo by Craig Chandler 



primary importance. You end up with an 
abundance of support and not criticism," 
Mary said. 

"Women have been victimized by the 
whole idea of love. Women live in a 
fantasy world in regards to love. Love 
puts you into a submissive position. It 
puts men in the dominant role. It's not a 
relationship based on equality. It's like for 
a woman to be satisfied or fulfilled in her 
life she has to please the male. Even 
when she makes a decision it's to please a 
male. A woman justifies her place in 
society through the illusion of romantic 
love," Mary said. 

Even with Mary's beliefs she has not 
yet come to terms with her sexuality 
enough to tell her mother about it. She 
fears the loss of her mother's love and 
support. 



"Society tells you that you're 
wrong to have 'those' feelings. 
It's wrong. It's sick. You're a de- 
viate. You're perverted. You're 
disgusted with yourself so you 
go through a whole period of 
self hatred." 



"It bothers me that I can't be open 
with her. I think it's because I fear my 
mother would reject me. Not so much 
that she personally wouldn't try to 
understand, in a way that's me classifying 
her into a stereotype. It becomes a 
question of duality, a contradiction. I want 
to tell her very much, but I don't want to 
lose her." 

"It's hard not to be able to share the 
fact that I love women with my mother. 
It's real hard for me to think that my 
lover will never know my mother as 
deeply as I can," Mary said. 

Jim is a student at K-State. The signs 
and feeling for the gay lifestyle have been 
with him for as long as he remembers. 

"I had no attraction to women, I 
remember wondering about it. During my 
senior year in high school I dated one girl, 
and it was a nice relationship, but it 
wasn't what I truly wanted. When I was 
finally in a relationship that I could truly 
feel comfortable in, it was one that I 
couldn't tell my parents about. I wanted 
to tell them 'Mom! Dad! I'm happy! I'm 
carrying on a relationship that I love!' but 



unfortunately I couldn't." 

According to Jim when he told his 
parents about his life choice it was very 
emotionally draining. 

"My mother and father sat down on 
the couch, she did the talking, they were 
clear across the room. My mother told me 
that they were aware of my 'identity 
problem', and they felt it was necessary 
to discuss it; discuss what could be done 
about it. I told them I was gay. My father 
was sitting holding a book in his hands, 
smoking a pipe. He bit his pipe and broke 
the book in two. My mother was wringing 
her hankerchief," Jim said. 

To satisfy his parents wishes, Jim went 
to a psychiatrist. The psychiatrist 
pronounced him to be healthy, sane and 
fully aware of what his choice entailed, he 
said. 

"My parents were furious when they 



found out that the psychiatrist wanted to 
see them. He thought the root of my 
homosexuality was environmental. 

"It broke my parents apart as far as» 
talking about my homosexuality. But 
things have started to fall into place. I 
have gained the respect of my mother 
and father. My father trys to listen now. 
My mother is a good friend. I know she 
will be a confidant in the coming years," 
Jim said. 

"All through my adolescence the square 

peg didn't fit. But now I find that in this 

community that acceptance is there," Ron 

said. 

The fact that Manhattan is a small 

university town has, according to the 

homosexual group, helped them to find a 

more stable and accepting atmosphere in 

which to live. 

"Manhattan has the type of community 

where gays are able to establish couple 
relationships. You see a lot of stable 
homosexual relationships. What you would 
. expect to find in any relationship. The 
university and the Manhattan community 
have been very responsive in listening to 
the gay community," Lisa said. 

"I've become really strong since coming 
out. My door is always open to anyone 
who wants to talk. People may ask, 'Why 
do you need to be open? Why do you 
need to talk about it?', The answer to 
that is, it's so much harder by yourself." 
Jim said. & 

Denise Harvey 



gay liberation 49 



Drink and drown 



Bar specials yield beer wars 



War. There is always some type of 
war going on. In the 1960s it was 
the gas war. Oh, those wonderful years of 
cheap gas. Then, in the 1970s it was Star 
Wars invading the galaxies. 

Now in the exciting decade of the 
1980s the war which is being fought right 
here in Manhattan is the great beer war. 

That's right folks, beer wars. This 
wonderful battle is the result of specials 
which are offered by the local bars. 

Although wars are not usually 
welcomed with opened arms, this type of 
war is welcomed with opened mouths. 

Perhaps the term bar specials should be 
defined. Specials are cheap beer drinks. 
Examples would be 3-fers, happy hour 
and drink and drown. 

The reason bars have specials is to 
attract more business, hoping to increase 
profit. 

"We have specials to draw the people 
in," said one bartender. "And that's 
usually what happens." 

I would seem that no student could 
pass up a bargain. With the cost of higher 
education rising and the pressure college 
students are going through, a cheap outlet 
is needed. 

"Bar specials are the best. I couldn't 
afford to get drunk unless it was during a 
special. I'm on a budget, you know," 
:ommented a budget-minded student. 

Money or the lack of it is what attracts 
Tiany students to the specials. Yes, the 
ainch of inflation has hit the beer drinkers 
if Manhattan. 

"I don't want to stop going to bars," 



admits one avid beer drinker, "so I wait 
until a special comes arond. My favorite 
special is drink and drown." 

The concept of drink and drown 
includes paying only a cover charge and 
downing as much beer as is possible. The 
price of drink and drown is higher for the 
guys, assuming that they drink more. This 
is a real bargain for the gals who are 
heavy drinkers. 

Another favorite special is the T-shirt 
special. This is when a T-shirt is given to 
a person buying a certain number of 

"I couldn't afford to get drunk 
unless it was during a special." 

pitchers of drinks. 

"I have every T-shirt you can get from 
specials," said a well-dressed student. 

"Give me any day and I can name the 
specials going on. Let's take Thursday. 
After chem lab I go and get cheap fish 
bowls. Then on Friday, ah those TGIF 
specials are everywhere," claims one 
student. 

Unannounced specials are common at 
one bar. These range from a free keg to 
quarter fishbowls. Although they do not 
occur on a regular basis, they are warmly 
received by the customers. 

With the exceptions of TGIF specials, 
most of the cheap rates are during the 
week, and students take advantage of the 
discounts — classes the next day or not. 

"You condition yourself to drink on 
weeknights. It doesn't affect my classes. 



Well, maybe just a little, but I can't resist 
a special," one student said. 

Since the price of beer has gone up in 
the bars it would seem logical and 
cheaper to buy beer in the grocery stores. 
But the social disadvantages seem to 
outweigh the cheaper price. 

"Sure I buy beer at a store, but how 
often do you meet girls in a grocery 
store?" confessed one male. "That's why 
I like the bar scene." 

"Every Tuesday I see the same kids in 
here for the same specials," a bartender 
said. 

The basic reason bar specials are so 
popular with students is because it saves 
them a few bucks. They are able to go to 
a bar and have a good time on a cheap 
drunk. 

While the majority of students do enjoy 
the specials, there are those who disagree. 

"Nope, I don't like bar specials. You're 
supposed to save money, right? Well, 
every time I go I lose control of my 
senses and spend more on a special night 
than I would on a weekend," one student 
said. 

While a few of the local bars claim they 
are temporarily out of the beer battle, 
there are those that are still going strong. 
This is one war that no one wants to see 
come to an end. 

To the brave soldiers who are fighting 
this battle, this beer is for you. & 



Colleen Lally 



bar specials 51 



Landon Lecture Series 




Craig Chandler 



((W r. President, students, faculty, ladies 

UA and gentlemen, please help me to 
welcome " The audience politely 

applauds and the 1980-81 Landon Lecture 
series begins. 

The Alfred M. Landon Lecture Series on 
Public Issues began in 1966 to honor Alf 
Landon, one of Kansas' most noteable 
statesmen. 

The Landon Lectures, held in McCain 
Auditorium, became the center of statewide 
controversy when Ian Smith, former 
Rhodesian Prime Minister, was scheduled to 
speak. 

Some students and faculty objected to 
Smith's appearance stating that he headed c 
racist government in Rhodesia which violate 
human rights. 

K-State officials allowed Smith to speak, 
but the Landon Lecture designation was 
withdrawn. Therefore Smith appeared as a 
convocation speaker. 

All-University Convocations are held in 
addition to the Landon Lectures throughout 
the year. Convocation speakers do not hold 
the distinctions of Landon Lectures, and the 
events are typically not as well attended. 
Consequently, other locations besides McCa 
Auditorium such as the Union Little Theatn 
are utilized for convocations. $ 



John Connally 




March 20, 1980 — The "unrealistic 
attitude" of Americans and their leaders 
needs to be changed if the United States 
is to survive the decade, John Connally, 
former Texas Governor, said. 

With a campaign-style speech that could 
have been used on the trail of his 
unsuccessful bid for the GOP presidential 
nomination, Connally called the '80s a 



"decade of danger and decision." He was 
interrupted several times by the applause 
from a near-capacity crowd in the 1800- 
seat auditorium. 

"The Federal Reserve is going to force 
a depression on the country," Connally 
said, and added that its policies are going 
to have a disasterous effect on home 
building, auto makers and savings and 
loan associations. 

The government's policies restricting 
financial incentives for business have 
reduced U.S. production capacity, 
resulting in "outmoded" industry, 
Connally said. 

While the rest of the world changes 
production techniques every 10 years, the 
United States changes only every 30 
years. 

"Of the 24 modern blast furnaces 
producing steel in the world today, 14 are 
in Japan. There's not a single one in the 
United States," Connally said. 

"We are the only nation in the world 
which taxes capital gains. We need to be 
giving incentives instead of penalizing the 
industrial sector of the economy." 

Personal savings are another area that 
need incentives and Connally suggested 
the removal of tax on savings under 
$10,000 and a change in the depreciation 
schedule. At present, he said, the United 
States has the lowest level of national 



saving of any industrial nation. 

Americans should be realistic in their 
assessment of the nation's position as a 
world power, Connally said. 

"In the past, our allies were time and 
distance, but that has changed since we 
split the atom and sowed the seeds of 
vulnerability." 

The deterioration of the nation's civil 



"We have to recognize the reali- 
ty of the times in which we live. 
We have lost the prestige and 
influence we once had around 
the world because of our loss of 
military strength." 



defense program and the lack of support 
for it from the leaders could help lead to 
our downfall, Connally said. 

"By 1983, the Soviets first strike 
capability will be enough to knock out 95 
percent of all our land-based missies. Our 
first strike directed at Soviet cities, would 
kill 15 million Soviets because they have 
shelters to protect them. Their second 
strike will kill over 150 million Americans 
because we do not have any shelters." ® 



Gregg Coonrod 



52 lectures 



1 



Edmund Muskie 

Dec. 4, 1980 — Edmund Muskie, 
Secretary of State, appealed to the 
incoming Reagan administration to 
conduct its foreign affairs with 
moderation. 

"In short, we face a period in which 
nationalistic impulses will be strong. The 
great challenge — for us and for others 
— will be to resist short-term expedients 
that only mortgage our future security 
and well-being ... to take an enlightened, 
longer-term view of our national 
interests." 

Muskie examined "some of the longer- 
term social, economic and technological 
forces at work in our world that will help 
define, not just the next few years, but 
the next decade or more . . . To engage 
in such a look ahead is not to escape the 
present choices we face, but to help 
illuminate them," he said. 

As for future energy sources, Muskie 
said, "We have made a good beginning in 
recent years . . It is just a beginning, but 
it is grounded in an emerging international 
awareness that the end of the oil era is 
pressing upon us." 

"But we are by no means out of the 
woods," he added. "The entire world 
faces the difficult transition out of the era 
of bountiful and inexpensive oil." 

Muskie's speech was interrupted by a 
small deluge on the speaker's stand. He 
had inadvertently spilled a glass of water. 
"I thought Kansas was a dry state," he 
quipped. 



"For the nations of the world to shape 
their own national futures will require an 
unprecedented degree of international 
cooperation," he said. "But the very 
challenges and strains which make that 
cooperation essential also make it 
intensely difficult." 

A healthy international economy, a 
secure environment, and controlling the 
strategic arms race-" all of these essential 
efforts require a committment to 
negotiation and to compromise," he said. 

"We must invest in the economic 



progress of developing nations-because it 
will contribute to our own progress and 
because hopelessness and frustration are 
the combustible ingredients for violence 
and extremism," Muskie said. 

"These efforts are not 'give-away' 
programs," he added. "They are not 
international charity. They are investments 
we make in our own future no less than 
the futures of others. "& 




James 
Schlesinger 

April 28, 1980 — Declaring that the 
United States is in its most perilous 
position since World War II, James 
Schlesinger, former secretary of energy 
and defense, presented a five-part plan to 
re-establish America as a force to be 
reckoned with. 

To an audience of about 1,800 in 
McCain Auditorium the former CIA 
director called for a permanent military 
force in the Persian Gulf area, 
reinforcement of CIA information 
gathering and analysis systems, increased 
U.S. military spending, increased military 
assistance to Persian Gulf nations, and 
development of a firm foreign policy. 

The United States has "no alternative 
but to be the protector of world peace," 
he said, adding that an imbalance of 
power exists between the United States 
and the Soviet Union. 

I submit it is time for emergency 
action. We must face the issue of power 
in the Indian Ocean. Our survival will 




depend on our ability to maintain a 
balance of power," he said. 

The U.S. Marines and Navy must "be 
there and must seem to remain there. Our 
allies don't want to look up and see the 
fleet sailing over the horizon." 

To ensure the United States has the 
ability to "be there," Schlesinger said 
military spending must be increased "if 



the U.S. is to compete in the 1980s and 
'90s with the USSR." 

"History has shown that the weak 
normally perish. As long as there are 
aggressors we will need a military balance. 
As long as rivalries exist in the world 
there will remain fear. Those who protect 
freedom should be feared, not regarded 
as people to be manipulated or forced 
back by impudence," Schlesinger said. 

Although he cited current manpower 
shortages in the armed forces, Schlesinger 
admitted the all-volunteer Army has 
worked better than expected. 

"But I didn't expect it to work very 
well," he said. "I am prepared to see the 
higher taxes, deficit spending and higher 
inflation to get a balance of power." 

Schlesinger said the only thing resting 
between the United States and the 
balance is the American peope. 

"It's all of us. It's the American 
people," he said. "We didn't see the 
problem until all of a sudden, it's there 
and too big."# 



Roger Aeschliman 



lectures 53 



Hugh Sidey 



March 27, 1980 — In a candid 
analysis of the news media, Hugh Sidey, 
contributing editor and political columnist 
for Time magazine, criticized the effects 
of their coverage on election campaigns 
and voters. 

As the 50th speaker in the Landon 
Lecture series, Sidey told a McCain 
Auditorium audience of about 1,100, the 
media have become enormously powerful 
during recent presidential election years. 

"I am still puzzled whether Richard 
Nixon lost the first debate to John 
Kennedy in 1960 because he had sweat 
on his upper lip and looked nervous. I am 
not at all chagrined at the outcome of 
that election. But if some analysts truly 
believe the first debate tipped the process 
in Kennedy's favor, we must wonder if 



that is any way to go about selecting a 
president," Sidey said. 

In a humorous example, Sidey 
described how Gerald Ford's reputation as 
a "klutz" dominated public opinion during 
his re-election campaign. 

"He repeatedly bumped his head on 
the helicopter door . . he swam into the 
side of the White House swimming pool. 
Down in El Paso (he) ate an entire tamale 
with the husk still on it. An accumulation 
of those incidents may have sunk his 
second-term ambitions," Sidey said. 

Had the media not covered these 
events they wouldn't have become issues 
and different results could have occurred, 
Sidey said. 

Sidey expressed concern about changes 
occurring in what he called the "trade and 
craft" of journalism. 

He said he didn't like to see the wave 
of young journalists looking for a 



"Watergate behind every corner" and 
seeing only the bad news. 

"If you detect a slight prejudice on my 
part, for the print and against television, 
you are correct," Sidey said. 

Sidey called television news a 
combination of TV and show business. To 
survive, the networks need to find and 
sustain viewers. The viewers want to see 
all the news, done in an entertaining way. 
This means sacrificing detail, Sidey said. 

Sidey said although he didn't want to 
"inhibit the media" that they often 
presented a "distorted view." 

"Television fills your world for two or 
three minutes with screaming people and 
streets in Tehran . . and that's the only 
thing you see that night," he said. # 



Roger Aeschliman 



Convocations 



Ian Smith 



Nov. 2, 1980 — What's a Landon 
Lecturer? Those may have been the 
thoughts of Ian Smith, former 
Rhodesia Prime Minister, when he 
arrived at K-State. Smith was greeted 
with little encouragement, as the 
Landon Lecture title was withdrawn 
from his appearance. 

Smith's lecture called for 
strengthened communication ties 
between people and their 
governments, yet Smith dealt with a 
few communication problems of his 
own during the convocation. 

Smith's lecture required an hour 
and 15 minutes to complete, due to 
outbursts by an overflow crowd in 
McCain Auditorium of nearly 2,000. 

During the convocation, Smith said 
that although the country (Rhodesia) is 
now under a democratic rule, the 
people of Zimbawe resented this 
system forced upon them, and that a 
meritocractic system was more 
appropriate and acceptable for 
Rhodesia. 

Smith defined meritocracy as giving 



citizens voting privileges and other 
liberties in accordance to their ability 
to handle those situations. 

In further support of meritocracy, 
Smith said it was an "acceptable fact" 
that the average intelligence of people 
in the country was "below the 
desirable intelligence quotient." 

Smith suggested that the white 
government was necessary to "keep 
the wheels going," and said he is not 
satisfied with the weak democratic 
system that has been developed in 
Zimbabwe. 



Kyle Bryson 




Smith go home!- Pam Lewis, a 
student from KU, screams human 
rights slogans as students protest 
the visit of Ian Smith, former 
Rhodesian Prime Minister, to the 
K-State Campus. 



Bo Rader 



William Webster 

April 24, 1980 — Calling the 
proposed charter to set down 
guidelines for the FBI one of two 
"vital topics of the day," William 
Webster, FBI Director, said he 
"wholeheartedly supports" the charter 
currently being considered by 
Congress. 

The charter will be the first 
formalized set of guidelines for the 
bureau, he said. 

The FBI has been acting since 1908 
under a law which gives the U.S. 




Attorney General the right to have an 
investigative organization. 

"Today we are seeking to put out 
on the table the mission of the FBI. 
The bill will affirmatively state the 
mission of the FBI; what the American 
people expect of this dynamic 
organization," Webster said. 

Webster defended the use of 
informants and special undercover 
agents as a means of "reaching 
beyond the streets" and said 
undercover operations are the second 
vital topic. 

"The informant is the single most 
important tool in law enforcement. 



Without the informant we cannot 
function." 

Webster said some critics believe 
the bill sanctions excesses of the past 
and doesn't provide enough controls 
on informants. 

The principles incorporate full 
respect for the First Amendment, 
Webster said under the charter, all 
investigations would be focused on 
criminal law and not on what someone 
is "thinking or saying." 



Kathy Murry 



54 lectures 



L 



Julian Bond 

Sept. 10, 1980 — "Great gains 
were won at lunch counters, movie 
theaters, polling places and the fabric 
of legal apartheid in the United States 
began to be destroyed. While our 
general condition has improved a great 
deal, our relative condition has 
actually managed to get worse," Julian 
Bond, Georgia state senator, said 

Bond called the history of civil 
rights achievements "a tale of two 
decades." 




Howard Bird 

Nov. 20, 1980 — Oil companies 
have desperately tried to warn us that 
the energy crisis is real, while 
journalists have perpetuated a myth 
that there is no crisis, said Howard 
Bird, Jr. former vice president of 
Mobil Oil Company's international 
marketing division. 

According to Bird, oil industry 
giants like Mobil have tried to warn 
the American public of an impending 
oil shortage since the early 1970s. 




John Slaughter 

Feb. 26, 1981 — The United 
States is facing, and from all 
indications, will continue to face during 
the next decade, a "crisis" in the 
education of engineers and computer 
scientists 

This point, the thesis of a 
presentation by John Slaughter, 
director of the National Science 
Foundation (NSF), has forced the 
United States from its once lofty 
position as a leader in scientific 
research and development in the 



"It is clear that the greatest 
advances for black and poor people 
was the period of our most purposeful 
non-violent militancy-the decade of the 
'60s," he said. 

But then came the disillusionment of 
Vietnam and the mood turned to one 
of "cynicism and narcissism." 

Bond criticized the so-called me- 
decade, saying that many teenagers, 
especially blacks, didn't care enough 
to vote. 

"A re-creation of the movement is 
needed in all communities in order for 



there to be further human progress 
and economic justice," he said. And 
reading from the goals of the NAACP, 
he added, "We must complain, yes, 
plain, blunt complaint, ceaseless 
agitation, unfailing exposure of 
dishonesty in the law. This is the 
ancient unerring way to liberty and we 
must follow it. We must urge Negroes 
to vote intelligently and effectively." 



Deanna Hutchison 




Germaine Greer 

Oct. 22, 1980 — "Art has ceased 
to fulfill its function," Germaine Greer, 
author-feminist, said. "Art has become 
a sort of postage stamp, a small 
repository of tremendous value." 

The modern attitude that "if it's not 
Rembrandt, it's not worth seeing" has 
"condemned minor artists to death, 
and most women artists are in this 
category," Greer said. 

Greer, author of best seller The 
Female Eunuch and The Obstacle 



Race, set up a study of women's 
literature at the University of Tulsa. 

"When they think about what is a 
work of art, many people decide that 
it must be an object which claims no 
ulterior purpose," she said. 

But she disagreed with this notion, 
giving a teacup as an example. A 
teacup can be a work of art even 
though it has an ulterior purpose-to 
drink tea from. No matter that the 
handle is too small to hold. It still can 
serve that function, Greer said. 

"Fine art declares its discontinuity 



News coverage about energy has 
been "pretty dreadful," he said. Mobil 
has been trying to persuade the press 
that a severe oil shortage is just 
around the corner. However, 
newspapers and television have 
treated these attempts as thinly 
disguised excuses covering up a profit- 
making maneuver. 

To make up for this, Mobil has run 
advertisements in the New York Times 
editorial section every week for nearly 
a decade. 

One of the reasons public opinion 
has turned against the oil industry is 



because energy corporations are 
garnering high profits, he said. This 
idea is played up by the press. 
However, when compared to 
exploration and development costs, 
the take isn't large at all, he said. 

"For every dollar make in the oil 
business over the past 25 years we 
have, on the average, reinvested 
$1.75," Bird said. 



Stephen Hoffman 



Barry Blechman 

Feb. 2, 1981 — A senior associate 
for the Carnegie Endowment for 
International Peace warned K-State 
students in vivid prose that "the 
temptation to turn again to 

nuclear threats" as a part of U.S. 
foreign policy could have horrible 
consequences 

After describing the devestating 
effects of nuclear war, Barry Blechman 
said "the most important technological 
fact is that there's no effective defense 
against missiles armed with nuclear 



warheads. 

Blechman, the former assistant 
director of the U.S. Arms Control and 
Disarmament Agency, said some 
government officials argue that the 
threat of nuclear retaliation should be 
given a central place in foreign policy. 
But, he said, such a policy 
"implements greater risk of nuclear 
war and when the bluff is called 

and the card is tarnished, it loses 
credibility." 

He said he believes that generally 
nuclear threats aren't credible because 



with the real world. A painting is 
separated by its frame, a poem by its 
meter. This is what dutiful parents grit 
their teeth and take their children to 
see," Greer said. 

Greer labeled this type of art as 
cold, useless, self-explanatory and 
oppressive. Further, she blamed this 
conflict on the masculine world of self- 
contained art. 



Deanna Hutchison 




risks associated with nuclear war are 
so great that no country will believe 
the United States is willing to risk a 
nuclear war. 

Blechman also warned students that 
they had grown up in an age of 
nuclear weapons and that the weapon 
might not seem awesome to them 
anymore. He cautioned concern and 
consideration about nuclear activity. 



Debra Graber 



world, into a position behind other 
countries such as Japan and the Soviet 
Union. These countries place a greater 
emphasis on science and mathematics 
at the secondary and post-secondary 
levels of education, Slaughter said. 

Slaughter alluded to a report, 
prepared by the NSF and the 
Department of Education, which said 
the scientific and mathematical 
requirements placed on students at the 
secondary level in other countries far 
exceeds that of the United States. 

Most students in the Soviet Union 
have a minimum of 10 years of 



education, and about 60 percent of 
those complete secondary school 
which "surpasses that of any other 
country including the U.S." according 
to a report prepared by the SRI 
International for the NSF. 

Slaughter received a bachelor of 
science degree in electrical engineering 
from K-State in 1956 and a PhD in 
engineering physics from the 
University of California at San Diego. 



Damien Semanitzky 




lectures 55 




Cultist 

declares 

K-Staters 

headed 




Anonymous message- Giving 
no information besides his name, 
Paul Franklin, an evangelist from 
the West Coast picketed at K- 
State with a sign stating, "Jesus 
saves from Hell. " 



Rob Clark I 



56 cults 



Sue Pfannmuller 



<<« was a disco fanatic," proclaimed 

JL Cindy Lasseter during a six-hour 
oration in front of the Union, Sept. 22, 
1980, "until I was born again. Now I'm 
dancing with the Holy Ghost." 

Lasseter spent a week preaching at K- 
State Sept. 22 through 26, declaring K- 
State to be "a stronghold of the devil" 
where most students are "headed for the 
lake of fire." 

A follower of Jed Smock, a leader who 
she said has traveled to over 150 
campuses in 29 states garnering new 
disciples to spread what he calls "the 
word," Lasseter left the University of 
Florida in May 1980, and by September 
of that year, claimed to have visited 36 
universities in 19 states. 

Lasseter's visit created some 
controversy, not only among students but 
also among area clergymen. 

Some preachers warn their searching 
students and congregations to avoid "soul- 
winning" tactics — promises of perpetual 
happiness in exchange for commitment 
received from cult groups. This 
commitment often starts with a promise to 
"love" the other members of the group 
and the leader and is followed by a 
promise to help fund the group by giving 
time, money, sleep, thought, and 
eventually health. 

When a member of a religious group is 
losing rather than finding himself, while at 
the same time helping to financially 
support group leaders, the member is 
involved in what many theologions define 
as a "cult." 

There is no set definition for a cult, but 
they can be dangerous. At the beginning 
of the last decade, a discussion about 
cults would have prompted oniy mild 
interest or polite boredom from most 
listeners. Headlines like, "Parents rescue 



child from religious leader," and "Child 
sues parent for kidnapping," would have 
left most Americans feeling apathetic. 

In one grizzly 24-hour period in 
November 1978, all this was changed. 
That was the grim night when 900 
followers of Jim Jones agreed to go 
beyond spiritual food and voluntarily 
swallowed cyanide-laced, grape Kool-aid. 

Lasseter's message, too, was not a true 
representation of the Gospel, but was 
instead the tirade of a "false prophet," 
according to Gary Roellchen, pastor of 
the Alta Vista Methodist Church. 

"The Gospel is a gospel of love and 



"Turn away all perverts and for- 
nicators or you will die among 
the worms in the lake of fire." 



not a doctrine of bloody hatred," 
Roellchen said. "She took messages out 
of context and was speaking only the 
condemnation of God and said nothing of 
God's love." 

Clad in a floor-lenth, calico dress and 
brimmed hat and pointing at specific 
students, Lasseter shouted commands of, 
"repent you wicked wretch," "put away 
your vile vices and be saved," "turn away 
all perverts and fornicators or you will die 
among the worms in the lake of fire." 

In addition to preaching against drug 
abuse, murder, pre-marital sex and 
homosexuality, Lasseter's speech included 
condemnations for those who dance, 
belong to fraternities or sororities, drink 
beer or kiss, saying that pre-marital kissing 
is forbidden in Proverbs 22:14; "The 
mouth of a strange woman is a deep pit." 

Lasseter said she did not believe in 



"the word" until she had listened to 
Smock's preaching many times. 

"As he preached," she said, "he drew 
close to me, pointed me out of the crowd 
and shouted, 'Repent of your sins you 
wicked woman.'" 

"He took me out to eat," she stated in 
a brochure she distributed to students, 
"and after about an hour with him I could 
see that he was different from any man 
that I had ever met. He had a certain air 
of love about him; a special joy and 
peace." 

When asked how the disciples' journeys 
were funded, Lasseter said only, "No 
church gives money. We get money from 
people who are called to give." When 
asked for specific names of contributors, 
she cried, "Depart from me satan. Money 
is the root of all evil." 

Roellchen said he "didn't want to judge 
Lasseter," but "wanted to point out to 
those who were listening seriously that 
Lasseter taught only condemnations and 
left out the part of the Gospel about 
God's love." He also said that he didn't 
believe Lasseter shoud be judged by her 
actions. 

"I would consider this a cult 
movement," Roellchen said. "You can see 
how much he (Smock) has controlled her 
mind." 

To prevent becoming involved with a 
cult, the Ecumenical Christian Ministries in 
Manhattan puts out a pamphlet advising: 

"Don't be foolish! Protect yourself! 
Don't go away for a day, a weekend, or 
longer with a stranger or a strange group. 
Sudden, drastic changes in environment 
lead to heightened suggestibility and to 
drastic changes in attitudes and beliefs. "ft 



Deb Neff 



cults 57 



Organizations stand strong despite cult 



In response to the growing cult 
controversy at K-State in 1980. 
ministers and students clung to their 
traditional religions. These religious 
organizations on campus have maintained 
their status for 70 years. 

One of the 29 organizations registered 
with the Activities Board was Crusade for 
Christ. 

Kerry Relihan, senior in horticulture 
therapy and president of Campus 



"I liked the people who were 
real fun and cordial and 1 just 
kept going." 



Crusade, and ten other members make up 
a Central Action Group which leads the 
activities of Crusade. Four of the 
members are trained staff who work full- 
time for the organization, which is located 
on 400 major universities in 11C countries. 

A leadership training class was held in 
Justin Hall where a group of 85 people 



gathered weekly. Other small Bible study 
groups were hosted by members of 
Crusade in various living groups. 

Jenny Pierce, senior in speech- 
pathology-audiology is also a member of 
Campus Crusade. 

Pierce got involved over three years 
ago, after attending a meeting with a 
friend. 

Before finding Crusade Pierce felt 
frustrated with life and studies, and 
contemplated suicide. 

Pierce feels a person is made up of five 
dimensions: emotional, intellectual, physical, 
spiritual and social, which all must balance. 

"Often we do not consider the spirtua! 
side and our lives are unbalanced. All 
must work together in order to maintain a 
balance." she said. 

Pierce devoted more than 20 hours 
weekly working with small Bible groups 
she helped to start. 

Still another large group on campus is 
the KSU Bible Study. As a member of 
KSU Bible Study, Andy Ainslie, junior in 
life science, feels that the group helped 
him grow as a Christian, "KSU Bible 



Study is for anybody and everybody, no 
matter what church they are affiliated 
with." 

"Bible studies are helpful and are a 
growing experience. Good Bible studies 



"1 may be going through prob- 
lems and the Bible Study gives 
me answers to my questions." 

relate the Bible to what one learns at the 
University, affirms our humanistic nature 
in life and gives a legalistic approach, not 
religious do's and don't" Don Fallon, 
Lutheran Campus Minister and 
coordinator of the religious groups on 
campus, said. 

They teach that we are all human, it is 
okay to fail, take risks, enjoy our bodies 
and have feelings," Fallon said. 

Fallon divided religious groups into two 
categories; one which students join to 
acquire friends and share their lives, and 
another group that teaches members more 
about the Christian way of life. 




photos by Richie Bergen 



58 religion 



movement 

"Some are not as helpful as others to 
the growth of the student, they smother 
the student, and consequently the student 
drops his studies and escapes from school 
by closing himself off. The group is a 
hideout from the pressures of the world," 
Fallon said. 

However most religious groups at K- 
State benefit from leaders who are trained 
to support students and offer explanations 
on how the Bible effects their lives, Fallon 
said. 

Furthermore, according to Fallon the 
majority of people who join a Bible study 
group were usully dependent people. 

"Freshmen and younger people looking 
for a support group are likely to become 
members," Fallon said. 

Rod Saunders, the minister of 
Ecumenical Christian Ministries, was one 
of the trained leaders Fallon expressed a 
need for on campus. 

Sauders, a soft spoken man wearing a 
large cross emblem, said he helped to 



"Without a doubt Campus Cru- 
sade is the most important part 
of my education at K-State. 
Through it my spirtual life has 
grown and everything else is 
worthwhile. I see a plan and a 
purpose for my life that I never 
saw before." 



sponsor activities during the school year 
such as: weekly Sunday suppers, retreats, 
Brown Bag Forums, Biblical Reflections 
and a Bible study group. 

For students searching for an informal 
and a smaller (about 40 members) group 
Cowboys for Christ was established at K- 
State. 

"No dues or membership role, most of 
the members come from farm-oriented 
backgrounds but you don't have to have a 
horse to join," Scott Crain, junior in pre- 
veterinary medicine and president of 
Cowboys for Christ, said 

The main concern was to have a good 
time in fellowship Crain said. & 



Kathy Pakkebier 



Bless my soul— Two guest 
speakers convey their beliefs 
through music and song during a 
KSU Bible Study meeting. 

Let it shine — This cross and bell 
located at the First Lutheran 
Church at 10th and Poyntz 
reminds students of traditional 
values. 




religion 59 




Vibes hit audience 

Sept. 5, 1980- Gary Burton proved to 
be the foremost vibraphonist of time in 
McCain Auditorium. 

In his opening number Burton and his 
band captivated the audience with "Open 
Your Eyes You Can Fly," by Chick 
Corea. 

Thundering applause assured the 
quartet that the audience was ready to sit 
back and enjoy the talents of the jazz 
musicians. 

Although Burton did songs by other 
artists, such as Keith Jarrett, Jim Hall and 
the late Duke Ellington, he focused on 
songs by Corea, Jazz pianist. 

The second song was also by Corea. 
Burton started the "Song to Gale" very 
softly on his vibraphone and the others 
blended in. 

Swallow performed an excellent solo on 
the bass in "Careful" written by Jim Hall, 
guitarist. Even though he was seated 
behind Burton, his intense melodies were 
just as important. 

During a ten minute solo Burton 
created a dreamy atmosphere with his 
gentle ringing sound and refined lyricism. 

After receiving a standing ovation, 
Burton exclaimed, "Wow, you folks are 
alright."® 




60 mccain attractions 




Sue Pfannmuller 



Ballet combines color, technique, elegance 



Feb. 29 and March 1, 1980- The San 

Francisco Ballet Company blended dance 
with music, movement with imagination 
and razor-sharp technique with effortless 
execution in McCain Auditorium. 

The evening began with the prelude 
from the second act of William 
Shakespeare's "The Tempest." The 
beautifully trained dancers performed in 
practice clothes but still brought color and 
a buoyant elegance to the stage. 

The full-length production of "The 
Tempest" with costumes by Willa Kim 
and scenery by Tony Walton made its 
world premiere on May 13, 1980 at the 
War Memorial Open House in San 
Francisco. 

A superb performance by Robert Sund 
as a drunk in "Bacchus, God of Wine" 
captivated the crowd. His well-defined 
facial expressions enhanced his 
tremendous body control. 

In another performance, Iris, the spirit 
of the rainbow and performed by Betsy 



Erickson, swirled a long blue ribbon while 
the rainbow consisting of six other 
ballerinas, swirled red ribbons in perfect 
unison. 

The second and third selections differed 
on Friday and Saturday. 

On Saturday, the second selection was 
"Scarlatti Portfolio." Sandra Woodal 
designed the magnificent costumes for this 
performance. Going from "The Tempest" 
to the "Scarlatti Portfolio" was like going 
from Dorothy's Kansas farm to the 
Emerald City. The colorful costumes 
enhanced the beauty of the dancer's 
movements. 

Marcos Paredes designed the costumes 
for the third selection, Mozart's "C Minor 
Mass." Taped music was substituted for 
the orchestra. 

The San Francisco Ballet Company 
serves as a showcase for graduates of the 
ballet school on the same premises. As 
the oldest classical ballet company in the 
United States, it began in 1933 as the 



San Francisco Opera Ballet, providing 
dancers for San Francisco Opera 
performances. It was the first American 
dance company to tour the Far East in 
1957 and the first to perform the full- 
length "Nutcracker" in the U.S. in 1944. 

The dancers saved the San Francisco 
Ballet in 1975. The deficit had the ballet 
on the edge of bankruptcy. They took 
their plight to the streets and organized a 
campaign to gain the attention of the 
community. In an unprecedented show of 
support, money was collected. 

Directors of the company are Lew 
Christensen and Michael Smuin. 

"The San Francisco Ballet is entering a 
Golden Age," Smuin said. "It now has the 
creative force, leadership and talent to 
become a company of international status, 
a company that will set trends, not follow 
them."® 



Kathe Rusnak 



mccain attractions 61 



Dancers attend K-State classes 



Sept. 19 and 20, 1980- The Oakland 
Ballet, incorporated in 1965, is a unique 
company because it takes every color, 
size and shape, according to Ronn Guidi, 
artistic director. 

Friday's dances in McCain Auditorium 
were revivals of works from 1910 to 
1919, whereas most of Saturday's dances 
were less than four years old. The only 
exception was "Billy the Kid." 

Choreographed by Eugene Loring and 
accompanied by a score by Aaron 
Dopeland, "Billy the Kid" demonstrated 
the control and imagination of Lance 
James in the title role and Ron Thiele as 
Pat Garret. Mario Urena, the Cowboy in 
Red, amused the audience when he 
galloped across stage. 

"Gallops and Kisses" by Guidi changed 
the mood of the stage to a vibrant and 
bouncy one. Dressed in orange, nine 



dancers per formed to selections from 
Lanner, Schubert and Strauss. 

Ponchos and sombreros dominated the 
stage in "El Salon Mexico." This 1980 
festive piece used talent from 15 dancers. 

The dancers extended their personal 
expressions from the stage to the K- State 
campus by attending ballet classes and 
offering a lecture-demonstration session 
on the day of their first performance. 

Guidi wants to preserve the Serge 
Diaghilev ballets. Diaghilev's company 
toured Western Europe and the America's 
for 20 years after 1909. 

Most important, Guidi said he wants to 
present the art of ballet with dancers who 
are people. ® 



Kathe Rusnak 



Frozen charm Members of the 
Oakland Ballet seem to freeze in 
position as they perform in 
McCain Auditorium. The ballet, 
from California, was at K-State on 
Sept. 19 and 20, 1980. 




photos by Sue Pfannmuller 



62 mccain attractions 




Leaping Motif- A member of the 
Oakland Ballet glides through the 
air while other dancers await 
the moment to begin their portion 
ot the dance. 



Heeere's Johnny, no Jim, no 



Oct. 25, 1980- "And now ladies and 
gentle men, we are proud to present the 
President of the United States, Jimmy 
Carter or is it former President 

Richard M. Nixon or columnist 

William F. Buckley Kirk Douglas . . 

maybe Howard Cosell?" 

How about the many faces and voices 
of David Frye? 

Homecoming Week celebrations 
included the popular political satirist and 
impressionist who changed faces at least 
30 times before an audience in McCain 
Auditorium. 

Dressed in a brown suit and wide collar 
white shirt, Frye made sharp satirical 
pokes at politicians and personalities 
including Fidel Castro, George Wallace, 
Clark Gable, Dustin Hoffman, Mister 
Rogers and even Morris the Cat. The 
audience's favorites were Jimmy Stewart, 
Tony Curtis and Sylvester Stallone. 

It was as if George C. Scott was 
actually on stage when General Patton 
said, "I am going to go into Iran and ring 
the Ayatollah by his Khomeini." 

Frye became HHHenry FFFonda for 
GGGAAAFFF as he recalled about the big 
movie stars in his day like Jack Nicholson, 



Gregory Peck, cheek sucker Robert 
Mitchum and chin sucker Kirk Douglas. 

Frye had Howard Cosell doing his first 
interview from inside his mother's womb 
where it was "hot and gooey" He was 
there interviewing Sammy Sperm. 

Midway through his performance, Frye 
showed a black and white film entitled "1 
Did it My Way" which focused on the 
political career of former President Nixon. 
The taped narration was of Nixon's voice. 
The repeated phrase in the film "and let 
me make it perfectly clear, I did it my 
way," echoed chuckles throughout the 
auditorium. 

Frye followed the film with the Great 
Debate 1980 featuring Anderson, Carter 
and Reagan. 

Walter Cronkite, who was filling in for 

Roger Mudd, introduced the contenders 

after he commented, "1 am tired of mud. 

I've got mud in my eyes, mud in my nose 
»> 

One of the highlights of Frye's 
performance was a wheelchair comedy 
during the debate. 

Frye once again used his satirical knife, 
this time on Reagan. After Cronkite spoke 
to Carter and Anderson, he asked for 



Reagan's wheelchair to be brought to the 
debate floor. 

"Can you hear me Governor Reagan?" 
Cronkite asked. "You can hear me but 
you can't see me." 

Carter offer his help in getting Reagan's 
wheelchair to the floor and said, "I've 
always believed in helping senior citizens." 

Henry Kissinger offered Vicks nasal 
spray to Reagan but when Cronkite told 
him to spray Reagan he refused. 

Kissinger shouted in his thick German 
accent, "I can't spray Governor Reagan. 
He has a boogey up the nose." 

The hysterical lines flowed from Frye's 
mouth with not a hint of difficulty. 

Frye wrote the wheelchair comedy 
scene on his plane flight to Manhattan. He 
said he was quite pleased that it went 
over well with the audience and that he 
would perfect it for future shows. 

Giving the peace sign, the many faces 
and voices of David Frye walked off 
stage. $ 



Kathe Rusnak 



mccain attractions 63 




Comedy is fast paced 

Nov. 20 and 22, 1980- Combining a 
romantic dime store novel with a fast 
paced british comedy, the product would 
be close to "The Rivals." 

The K-State players and the 
Department of Speech presented the 
comedy by Richard Brinsley Sheridan. 

Centered around the early British 
aristocracy, the characters spent most of 
their time in hysterical romantic schemes. 

Deb Neff, senior in journalism and mass 
communications, was brilliant as Mrs. 
Malaprop, a busy body woman whose 
words were even more elaborate than her 
costumes. 

The audience never stopped laughing at 
Bob Acres, played by Thomas Paden, 
junior in speech. His hair was an absolute 
mess and his nervous croaking vocal 
characterizations eased the atmosphere 
among the other more proper characters. 

The rotating stage, capable of 
representing four different sets, proved to 
be quite effective in eliminating the 
between act chaos for instant location 
changes. $ 



photos by Richie Bergen 

Courtsey- Two actors in "The 
Rivals" dance during a practice 
session. 

I Spy- Deb Neff, senior in 
journalism and mass 
communications, and Ed Schiappa, 
graduate in speech, play the two 
main characters in "The Rivals." 
"The Rivals" was directed by Lew 
Shelton and presented in 13 
scenes. 



Kathe Rusnak 



Funny 

Oct. 29, 1980- "One, one, two, two, 
three, three, four, four and 11 for 

you," Weller Martin said as he kept time 
with his foot. But the evening at McCain 
Auditorium was more than just a gin 
rummy game. 

Weller, played by Larry Gates, posed 
as a retired businessman who constantly 
talked of lost fortunes through the 
dishonesty of business partners. While 
Weller's card partner, Fonsia Dorsey, 
played by Phyllis Thaxter, attempted to 
conceal that her son no longer cared for 
her. 

Fonsia had only been a resident of the 
elderly home for three weeks when she 



"Half the ones that do tal 
make you appreciate the one 
that don't. But they're not ha 
as sick as those that put thei 
there and not one-third as sic 
as those that work here." 



met Weller on the dilapidated front pore 

In an attempt to relax his new 
acquaintance, Weller said, "I'll amuse yc 
immediately, and at our age that could 
only mean one thing . I'll get the 
cards." 

After much persuasion, Fonsia was 
convinced to participate in the new form 
of entertainment, the same recreation 
which her father had always condoned a 



64 mccain attractions 



IU 




rummy 

evil. The card game provided a nice break 
from the musical presentations brought 
into the home. Weller summarized those 
church groups by saying, "half the 
audience is shaking so goddamn much 
that they can't look at the other half 
that's asleep." 

After being severely defeated in cards 
by his novice opponent, Weller shouted 
"beginner's luck!" 

Yet, the initial gin game lead to a series 
of daily occurences, with the outcome 
always being the same. The predictable 
victory by Fonsia repeatedly caused 
Weller to enter a state of outrage. 

This 1978 Pulitzer Prize winning play, 
written by D.L. Coburn, confronted the 
topic of "homes for the aged." Through 
the two characters, the sterotypic 
messages became apparent. 

"The food gives you diarrhea," Weller 
said. "Dietitians are not noted for their 
imaginations." 

But, the meals were not the only 
complaints. While playing cards the topic 
shifted to the verbal grievences uttered by 
fellow residents. 

"Half the ones that do talk make you 
appreciate the ones that don't," Weller 
said. "But they're not half as sick as 
those that put them there and not one- 
third as sick as those that work here."& 



Susan Schlickau 




art by Mel Westmeyer 

mccain attractions 65 




art by Mel Westmeye: 



66 



The worst films ever made 



46 



I slept through 'Reefer Madness" 



' * C emi-Proudly" presenting seven of 
*^the worst, abominable, repugnant, 
abhorrent, disgusting films ever made . . . 
Admission-$2.25 for all seven. 

K-State saw its first "bad" version of 
the Cannes European Films Festival on 
Feb. 6 and 7, 1981. The Union Program 
Council (UPC) presented The Golden 
Turkey Awards coinciding with the first 
annual Bad Films Festival at Forum Hall. 

Michael Medved, author of "What 
really Happened to the Class of '65?," 
collaborated with his brother inventing and 
writing "The Golden Turkey Awards." 
Medved visited K-State to give the first 
reverse awards ceremony to honor the all- 
time bad films and performances in 
Hollywood history. 

Medved said he believes comedy is 
more effective when it is not intended and 
believes people have more fun laughing at 
bad films than arguing the quality of good 
films. 

"Part of comedy is if you watch a 
comedian who pretends he is slipping on 
a banana peel, that is suppose to be 
funny. It's even more funny if you see 
one of your professors slipping on a 
banana peel in real life. By the same 
I token, a film like 'Airplane' is funny 
| because it is a satire of bad films, but real 
! bad films where people are trying to be 
j serious are even funnier. The stupidity is 
| sincere and the humor is even better 
because it is unintentional," Medved said. 

"We, my brother and I, noticed that 
people have more fun laughing about bad 
films than arguing the artisitc merits of the 



few good films that come out. There is 
plenty of attention given to good films 
and we feel that achievements on the 
other end of the spectrum deserve their 
own moment in the sun," Medved said. 

During the awards ceremony, Medved 
said "They Saved Hitler's Brain" was on 
of the films nominated for The Golden 
Turkey Awards. Medved said the movie 
was "the most brainless brain movie of all 
time," and announced "Plan Nine From 
Outer Speace" as the winner of The 
Golden Turkey Awards. 

Pete Manfredo, senior in fisheries and 
wildlife biology and UPC chairperson, said 
other universities have held bad film 
festivals with successful results. UPC 
decided to have the festival and call it the 
first annual because if successful, UPC will 
continue to have it in future years, 
Manfredo said. 

The Bad Films Festival was inexpensive 
in more ways than one. Not only was it 
inexpensive because of its poor 
production, but also because UPC only 
spent $90 per film as compared to the 
average price of $650 to $700 for a 
more popular film. 

Students, along with other Manhattan 
residents, had a variety of reasons to see 
the Bad Films Festival. Many said they 
were motivated to see the movies just to 
find out how bad they really were, while 
others were motivated by their bizzare 
sense of humor. 

"I like English humor and warped, bad 
humor," (Monty Python's Flying Circus, 
Benny Hill), explained Paul Kaiser, 



sophomore in animal science and industry. 

"It's good to know Hollywood is still 
putting out low grade movies," Kaiser 
said. 

Freda Love, Manhattan resident, said 
she probably wouldn't have gone to the 
Bad Films Festival had the movies been 
advertised as good. After seeing three of 
the seven movies, Love decided to take a 
short nap. Love thought "Terror of Tiny 
Town" was an appropriate time to take 
the short nap since the movie dealt with 
3'8" midgets who rode Shetland ponies 
instead of horses. 

Eric Swegle, sophomore in pre-design 
professions, said he went to the film 
festival "to see just how bad the films 
really were." 

"'Beach Blanket Bingo' definately the 
worst movie I have ever seen because it 
was so corny and wholesome," Swegle 
said. 

Swegle reached his own philosophy as 
to why such cheaply made movies were 
still able to remain funny. 

"Because societal opinions have 
changed so much since the movies were 
made, what was serious at one time is 
now hysterical," Swegle said. 

Alicia Smither, sophomore in pre-design 
professions, said she enjoyed the movies 
because of the audience participation and 
believed the movies were entertaining 
because they were done so poorly that 
they were funny. & 



Carol Douglas 



movies 67 




I - 




art by Mel Westmeyer 



Roadtrips provide a break 



<< 



Hey, let's go on a road trip," 
echoed down the hall and the 



next thing I knew I was crammed into the 
back of an orange Volkswagon on my 
way down 1-70. 

"Wait a minute," I mumbled through 
the bodies, snacks and "refreshments." 

"I have a huge Chemistry test on 
Monday." 

"That has been taken care of," 
someone in the front announced, "We 
called your instructor and told him that 
your great aunt died." With that I saw the 
sign that announced our final destination: 
Russell, KS 129 miles. 

Road trips can be anything from a short 
drive to a nearby community to a full- 
sized trip to Daytona, Padre or the 
Rockies. Almost every college student has 
substituted a road trip for a mild case of 
insanity. The college pressures lead 
normal, sophisticated students into crazed 
derelicts on their way to the get-away- 
from-it-all vacation spots. 

Russell turned out to be quite the 
experience. I figured we would sit at a 
bar, probably the only one in town, and 
tip a few suds. But to my utter 
amazement, there was more to it than 
that. 

Everyone in the town was out on 
Saturday night cruising mainstreet. 
"Cruising mainstreet," I thought was some 
Hollywood configuration resulting from 
American Graffiti, but people really drive 



up and down the mainstreet (all seven 
blocks). "Flagging someone around" was a 
new term I learned. "Flagging" is 
signaling someone my native Russellites 
knew, which was everyone, to a side 
street. Then we exchanged the latest 
gossip, contributed to someone who was 
low on Coors Light, or switch around 
passengers to change scenery. Then it 
was back onto the mainstreet for a couple 
more rounds. 

In contrast, road trips can also be more 
than an overnight trip into a town. One 
Saturday afternoon as the Wide World of 
sports was featuring the downhill skiing 
championships, one member of the crowd, 
who was watching the television 
mentioned, "Wouldn't it be great to be in 
Colorado right now skiing down the 
mountains?" 

"It sure would," someone answered 
half-heartedly. 

Suddenly from the back of the room, a 
loud voice bellowed, "Road trip." I 
thought John Belushi from Animal House 
had just walked in the door. 

Again, before I knew it, I was in the 
back of a black and silver Camero on the 
way across Kansas. This time it was my 
car and I was assured not to worry about 
my test on Monday. 

My roommate told me that my 
Psychology teacher sent her regards about 
the tragic death of my second cousin. 

We had only one problem to face on 



the beginning of this trip and that was 
money: the lack of it. But again the 
Belushi voice came through the immortal 
words "Zip card." It was then when we 
went to an automatic teller to withdraw 
funds from one of my friend's room and 
board savings account. 

The trip turned out to be an exhausting 
ten hour drive filled with plenty of beer, 
snacks and "rest stops" and conversation 
to keep the driver awake. However, the 
sight of the Rockies gave us our second 
wind. 

We drove into Winter Park and found 
out that all lodging was full. (Advice one: 
secure lodging before leaving Manhattan). 
So even though the skiing was great, the 
accomodations left something to be 
desired. Cameros just weren't designed 
for sleeping, especially with four people. 

The two and half day trip ended and 
we were back in time for classes on 
Tuesday. I still don't think my teacher 
ever bought the story about my second 
cousin. I'm sure my sunburned face didn't 
help either. 

I think I need to cut back completely 
on my road trips. Let's face it, my studies 
are beginning to suffer and I don't think I 
could take another death in the family 

well, I guess it depends on 

where we are going. $ 



Jerry Katlin 



road trips 69 



70 windmills 



Windmills symbolize 
Kansans attitudes 

\, lone. 

Single, solitary, isolation. 

Just as the windmills scattered across 
Kansas stand secluded from the busy rat 
race of the cities, college life offers its 
own form of solitude. 

Like the windmills, which have been 
abandoned for more sophisticated forms 
of energy, the freshman must learn to 
abandon his previous lifestyle. Personal 
problems, previously solved by sharing 
them with an older sister, must now be 
resolved in a letter or long distance phone 
call. 

As students progress through college, 
the loneness transforms into one of the 
few forms of privacy. To escape the busy 
chatter of roommates, blaring stereos and 
dry lectures, students quickly become 
acquainted with Tuttle Creek. The 
surrounding Flint Hills set a quiet mood 
perfect for reading the eight chapters of 
psychology required for the next exam. 

Even though the windmills work alone, 
they catch the omnipresent Kansas wind 
effectively. The windsmills are a symbol of 
progress that most Kansans welcomed. 
The easy-going attitude of Kansans is 
demonstrated through those windmills 
standing untouched, despite the fact their 
usefulness has long disappeared. 

That attitude persists at K-State, for 
living in the heartland is a distinct way of 
life. It's a life of learning to be alone. 
Whether combining rows of wheat in the 
summer or studying in the back of the 
stacks at Farrell Library, the seclusion of 
Kansas exists. 

So the windmills stand. Alone. And the 
K-State student learns that being alone is 
part of being in the heartland, ft 



Jill McAntee 



windmills 71 



Review 



New 

Grass, 

Russell, 

LL • 9 9 

revive 
McCain 



To all a good night - Leon 
Russell waves good night to a sell- 
out crowd in McCain Auditorium 
as Sam Bush, playing mandolin, 
and John Cowan, playing bass, of 
New Grass Revival provide 
background music. 



Something wonderful happened in 
McCain Auditorium Feb. 6, 1980. It 
was a miracle of sound that accomplished 
something that is becoming less and less 
frequent in this trouble stricken world. 

The New Grass Revival, Leon Russell 
concert made people happy. Not kind of 
happy. Not sort of happy. Not a little 
happy, but down home, footstomping, 
hand clapping, gut feeling, love the world, 
kiss your dog, hurray I got an A, I love 
you happy. 

And they did it by playing music. Lots 
of music-two hours and 15 minutes of 
non-stop music. They called it 
"Bluegrass." 

It's sort of like purple passion. You 
don't know exactly what it is, but it sure 
tastes good. It was a gravy-like mixture of 
blues, jazz, and rock, with a pinch of 
gospel and a dash of soul, all ladled over 
a steaming hot platter of bluegrass. 

New Grass Revival stepped on stage 
and took a moment to strap on their 
instruments. The crowd applause died 
down. That was the last quiet moment of 
the evening. They started playing and 
didn't stop until they had belted out eight 
rocking Bluegrass tunes. 

The high power fiddling of Sam Bush 
during the song "The Lee Highway 
Blues" was one of the outstanding 
features of the New Grass Revival. Bush 
played the mandolin most of the 
performance, but when he picked up the 
fiddle he gave good reason why he was 
indeed a national champion. 

"Lee Highway" was a long solo piece. 
Just when it started to drag, and had 
some wondering, "When will this end?," it 
took off. Everybody joined in. The sounds 
grew and swelled. It accelerated at a 
frantic pace. Everytime it seemed as 
though it would end, it started again only 
twice as fast. It was the "Bolero" of the 
bluegrass world. 

New Grass got a standing ovation as 
they left the stage. 

Leon Russell strolled out, sat down to 



his electric piano, looked at the audience 
as if to say "Are you ready" and 
proceeded to mellow out. 

His fingers tap danced on the keys as 
he sang. Russell's version of "Somewhere 
over the Rainbow" was musical poetry. 
His voice, rougher than sandpaper, had a 
gravel tone, but it had that Leon quality, 
that special something that bounced off 
the ceiling and floated down to the seats. 

When Russell's solo ended, the New 
Grass Revival came back to share the 
stage with him. 

The last set was "Bluegrass." It was 11 
songs that logically should not have fit 
into the same show. But through 
remarkable rewriting and incredible 
showmanship they did. 

They played and played and played. 
They didn't stop to breathe. They went 
from song to song, with the last note of 
the one before blending into the first note 
of the next one. 

Tight harmonies and sharp entrances 
and exits by instruments and voices were 
the staple of such songs as "Yesterday" 
and "Stranger in a Strange Land." The 
three-way vocals of Bush, John Cowa, 
bass player and lead vocalist of the New 
Grass Revival, and Russell were every bit 
as good as the Beach Boys or the Statler 
Brothers. 

They managed to squeeze in several of 
Russell's best sellers between the rest. But 
even "Up on a Tight Wire" and "Wild 
Horses" had a slight bluegrass flavor. 

The final number of the set was the 
most rocking and rolling version of the 
bluegrass classic "Rolling in my Sweet 
Babies Arms" conceivable. They blasted it 
out and brought people up dancing on the 
seats. 

Three standing ovations and two 
encores later it was over. And the 
audience was happy. $ 



Roger Aeschliman 



72 revival 





Crowd gazing - Leon Russell 
looks out across the audience 
between songs during his concert 
in McCain Auditorium. 



photos by Cort Anderson 



revival 73 



National-International News 



Peace walks the land 



Peace Pilgram is a silver-haired lady, 
dressed in navy blue slacks and shirt. She 
wears a short tunic with pockets all 
around the bottom in which she carries all 
her worldly possessions. 

She has walked more than 25,000 
miles, in travels around the United States, 
without a penny in her pocket. 

Her mission is to spread peace to the 
world. 

"I shall remain a wanderer until 
mankind has learned the way of peace, 
walking until I am given shelter and 
fasting until 1 am given food," Pilgram 
said, in an interview as she passed 
through Manhattan. 

Pilgram said she has been walking since 
1953, covering 50 states, 10 Canadian 
provinces and parts of Mexico. 

She encounters and works with troubled 
people as her service, she said. The 
problems of the universe are not capable 
of being solved without the proper 
attitude, which she said is learning and 
growing through solving. 

She said she only had trouble 
communicating with the Mexicans on her 
journey, but she smiled and had a 
translator, an interpreter for the United 
Nations, give them her message. 

Her stay in Manhattan was brief, she 
spoke her message, and walked out of 
town as silently as she had walked in. 4$ 




World silent over death 



Monday, Dec. 8 was not a happy day for Beatles fans. 
John Lennon, band member, was shot outside his luxury 
Dakota apartment in New York. 

The following day Mark David Chapman, a 25-year 
old former mental patient and "devout Beatles fan" was 
arraigned on second-degree murder charges in the slay- 
ing of the legendary singer-songwriter. 

Chapman entered no plea at his arraignment in court. 
Yet his attorney, who was appointed by the court, said 
his client had attempted suicide twice. The attorney also 
said that Chapman could not understand the charges. 

During Chapman's arraignment, the 40-year-old Len- 



non's death was mourned by the music world. Sales of 
his latest album "Double Fantasy" soared in record 
stores throughout the nation. 

Yoko Ono, Lennon's widow, asked fans to take part in 
a silent vigil "to pray for his soul", instead of participat- 
ing in his funeral. 

Paul McCartney, Beatles co-founder, said "John was a 
great guy. He is going to be missed by the whole world." 

Outside his apartment near Central Park on 72nd 
Street, a crowd fluctuating from 100 to 500 people sang 
Beatle songs, prayed, lit candles and demanded justice 
for Lennon's death. $f 



74 national/international news 




Reagan brazed by shot 



Glimpses 

Atlanta murders' Postal increases 



Twenty-one black children were 
murdered between August 1979 
and February 1981 in Atlanta, Ga. 
Two remained missing. Thousands 
have helped search vacant 
buildings, sewers and brush 
thickets looking for the children. 
Police thought they had a suspect 
but he soon died, from suicide. All 
of the black children, except two, 
were boys and many of the 
victims knew each other. The 
search continued for the killer 
while Atlanta carefully guarded its 
children. 

Actors strike 

Members of the screen Actor's 
Guild and the American 
Federation of Radio and 
Television Artists went on strike in 
July. Almost all movies and 
production on prime-time shows 
stopped for almost three months. 
The prime-time fall season did not 
start until November. 

Riots in Miami 

Over 3,000 members of the 
Florida National Guard were 
called to Liberty City on May 1. 
During the three days of rioting, 
18 people were killed, 1,267 
were arrested and there was an 
estimated $100 million in damage. 
The riots started when blacks 
became upset by the exoneration 
of four white policemen in the 
death of a black businessman. 

The rioting was concentrated in 
the downtown area and curfews 
were put into effect to protect the 
citizens in the downtown Miami 
area. 



The Postal Service received an 
okay from the federal government 
to raise the postal rate, from 15c 
for a first class letter, to 18c. 
Post cards required 12c stamps 
instead of 10c stamps to be 
delivered effective Mar. 22, 1981. 

Peanut shortage 

Peanut butter, the staple of 
children and college students, 
became a scarce commodity this 
winter. The extreme heat and 
drought of last summer had 
peanut products in short supply, 
and prices soared. 

Taxes cut back 

As Ronald Reagan, 69, became 
the next president of the United 
States in January 1981, his first 
duty in office was to put a freeze 
on all federal hiring unless 
necessary to "maintain vital 
services." 

Reagan declared that the 
government must make dramatic 
cuts in taxes and spending. He 
started cutting the budget by two 
percent. One of the programs 
losing some funding was the Basic 
Educational Opportunity Grant, 
affecting college students across 
the country. 

Las Vegas fire 

Fires plagued hotels in Las 
Vegas. The first and largest fire 
was at the MGM Grand Hotel on 
November 21. Over 8000 people 
were in the 26 story hotel, 83 
died and more than 500 were 
injured. 



President Ronald Reagan was 
wounded in the chest by a blaze 
of .22-caliber pistol fire Monday, 
March 30, 1981. The same fire 
critically wounded White House 
Press Secretary James Brady. 
Two others, a secret service agent 
and a Washington policeman were 
also wounded. 

John Warnock Hinckley, 25, of 
Evergreen Colo, was arrested for 
the attempted assasination. 

Pushed into the limousine after 
the first shots, it was not apparent 
that the President had been 
wounded until he "collapsed" in 
the hospital. The limousine had 
been redirected to the hospital 
after the President began to 
complain of chest pains. 

Hours later, after surgery, 
Reagan was pronounced in good 
and stable condition. A bullet had 
been removed that had entered 
his left side and penetrated his 
left lung about three inches. The 
President had walked into the 
hospital, "alert and awake" if a 
bit light-headed, according to Dr. 
Dennis O'Leary, spokesman for 



the George Washington University 
Hospital. 

Press Secretary Brady wasn't as 
fortunate. A bullet entered his 
forehead and passed through his 
brain. O'Leary said that Brady, 
40, will likely suffer brain damage 
if he survives. The extent of the 
damage is not known. 

An in-house investigation was 
conducted by the Secret Service 
to try to answer how the 
President could be shot on home 
turf, barely a mile from the White 
House. 

"After reviewing the video 
tapes a dozen times, we believe 
the presidential protection was as 
effective s it possibly be," Jack 
Warner of the Secret Service said, 
"These guys were competing with 
a bullet. They moved as quickly 
as they could." 

By Tuesday, President Reagan 
resumed command of the country 
by signing a major economic bill. 
Meanwhile, Vice-President Bush 
took over the day-to-day White 
House schedule. 



Middle East creates 
headaches 



Hostages released 

Day 444 - The 52 American 
hostages were flown to West 
Germany and to freedom. The 
previous day, Warren Christopher, 
Deputy Secretary of State, had 
signed an agreement to unfreeze 
Iranian assets in the U.S. for the 
return of the hostages, who were 
held captive at the Algerian 
Foreign Ministry. 

The release came two days 
after Ronald Reagan was sworn in 
as the new president. Jimmy 
Carter flew to West Germany as 
special envoy of the president to 
welcome the hostages back to 
freedom. 

Over 14 months earlier, the 
militant students wanted the 
return of the exiled Shah of Iran 
for trial in their country. The U.S. 
refused to deport the shah, who 
was being treated for cancer in 
the U.S. 

Then in March of 1980, the 
Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi 
flew to Egypt, where he died July 
28. 

President Carter broke off all 
relations with Iran on April 8. He 
ordered all the Iranian diplomats 
out of the country and many 
Iranian students were deported 



back to their country. Trade was 
all but cut off between Iran and 
the U.S. 

A secret mission to rescue the 
hostages ended in tragedy when 
the mission was called off April 
25 because of equipment failure. 
During the withdrawal from the 
Iranian desert, two of the 
helicopters collided, leaving eight 
crewmen dead. 

Iran, Iraq Dispute 

A "holy war" broke out 
between Iran and Iraq. Iraq 
bombed the oil center of Abadan, 
Iran, killing four Americans. The 
U.S. tried to remain neutral as the 
Iranians bombed Iraq with 
American made planes. The world 
watched to see if the fighting 
would stop oil trade through the 
Persian Gulf. 

In late September, Iraq agreed 
to a U.N. requested ceasefire, if 
Iran agreed; the fighting persisted. 

On Oct. 1, the U.S. rushed 
radar planes to oil-rich Saudi 
Arabia, the number one producer 
of oil, to help strengthen their air 
defenses. The U.S. was trying to 
avoid a possible spread of the war 
and contradicted its previous 
neutral stance. 



national/international news 75 



- Manhattan-Kansas News 



Zoning issue resolved 



Manhattan city commissioners approved the first read- 
ing of an ordinance for a rezoning plan that would allow 
fraternities and sororities located in the 1700 and 1800 
blocks of Fairchild and those on the west side of Denison 
between Fairchild and Leavenworth "conditional use" of 
the property within R-II residential districts. 

The commission's action was initiated because of re- 
quests made in September 1980 by homeowners in that 
area who were concerned about local traffic and parking 
congestion and the conversion of single-family homes on 
the 1800 block of Fairchild Avenue into fraternities and 
sororities. 

Included in the proposal is a provision that would 
allow the greek houses to have parking in areas not 
adjacent to them. 

"Before, parking had to be within 600 feet of the 
residence. (Under the proposal) if a fraternity or sorority 
cannot provide parking on their own property, and if 

Fire cripples 
Poyntz shop 

Seven businesses and offices 
were destroyed when the building in 
which they were located was severe- 
ly damaged in a fire in the 600 block 
of Poyntz Avenue. 

Firefighters were at the scene for 
several hours before extinguishing 
the blaze and spent much time keep- 
ing it from spreading to an adjacent 
floral shop. No one was injured in 
the blaze. 

The fire apparently started in the 
rear of the building, according to 
Jim Morris, associate professor of 
journalism, an owner of the building. 

Apparently the fire started in Yeo 
and Truby Electric Co., Morris said. 

Morris said he "conservatively es- 
timated" the loss of the building at 
$150,000. 



they can show the parking is for university use, they 
may designate a place . . " Joe Gerdom, senior city 
planner, said. 

Fraternities and sororities are normally prohibited 
from R-II residential districts, but have been allowed in 
the disputed area because it is within the boundaries of 
the university overlay. 

However, the commission expressed tentative appro' 
al for a plan to lift the overlay designation from the art 
by amending the text of the Manhattan zoning code to 
conditionally allow fraternities and sororities to be estab- 
lished in an R-II area, Dan Gibson, city planner said. 

"In the past, fraternities and sororities were prohibited 
in the R-II district. We changed that to a conditional use 
(in their recommendation to the commission)," Gerdom 
said. 

The university overlay consists of areas outside the 
campus designated for university-related uses. & 




Scott Lleble 



76 manhattan/kansas news 



,. 




Scott Liebler 

Sorrowful drought - July 1 980 brought Kansas and the Midwest tempera- 
tures in the high 90's through the 120's. Kansas crops were severely 
crippled by the drought and some Kansas farmers lost up to 85 per cent of 
their crops. 



Glimpses 



Controversial 
Waste Sites 

Six hazardous waste sites were 
found in Kansas City, Ks. The sites 
were found to obtain waste material 
from a metal recycling company. 

Some people from the nearby 
neighborhoods cited problems they 
had contracted from the wastes. 
Yet, others said they had children 
who had been playing at one of the 
sites for a year and had not had any 
problems. 

No level drop 

The Corps of Engineers proposed 
to draw down Tuttle Creek six feet 
to encourage growth of vegetation 
for more fish and wildlife habitats. 
The proposal was met with hostile 
jeers at a public meeting July 28. 
The Blue Valley Yacht Club would 
have to make costly renovations if 
the water level was lowered. It also 
would cause the loss of 100 boating 
acres leaving 500 acres. 

After much debate, the Corps left 
the water level unchanged. 

Holidome to open 

The Manhattan Holiday Inn and 
Holidome, a new convention and re- 
creation center, is scheduled to 
open November 1, 1981. 

The inn will have 190 sleeping 
rooms, five executive suites with bar 
and meeting accomodations for 10 



to 20 persons, and four sico rooms, 
Nancy Denning, director of sales for 
the Holidome, said. 

The 11,000 square foot Holi- 
dome indoor recreation center will 
house an indoor swimming pool, 
heat lamps, miniature golf course, 
whirlpool, exercise room, electric 
games, ping pong and pocket bil- 
liards. 

Ten thousands room nights have 
been booked already, she said. 

"I feel Manhattan is the city in 
Kansas that has tremendous things 
to offer conventioners like super 
restaurants, Kansas State Universi- 
ty, shopping and Tuttle Creek 
Lake," Denning said. 

Punishment Vetoed 

The capital punishment bill was 
again brought before the state sen- 
ate. It passed less than 30 minutes 
after introduced. Governor Carlin 
then vetoed it, for the third year in a 
row. 

Nuclear Concern 

Kansas's first nuclear power 
plant, Wolf Creek Generating Sta- 
tion, generated some concern with 
the Kansas Corporation Commis- 
sion. 

The KCC investigated the con- 
struction delays and price increases 
of the $1.5 billion structure. Wolf 
Creek was scheduled to be in opera- 
tion within the decade, but construc- 
tion was delayed another year. 




Scott Williams 



Hanging on- Riley County ambulance attendent Erik 
Maher attends to Kelly McGuirk, former K-State stu- 
dent, after the plane he was piloting, crashed Saturday 
near the K-State crew boat house on the east side of 



Tuttle Creek Reservoir. McGuirk and a passenger of the 
plane, Blake Debord, junior in marketing, were taken to 
a Topeka hospital following the crash. 



manhattan/kansas news 77 



K-State News 




Dressed to kill - Not wishing her identity to be known, Lisa 
Luck, junior in business administration, sits well-hidden to fellow 



Craig Chandler 

assassins at the organizational meeting for the kick-off of the 
ASSASSIN. 



Glimpses 

Union 
celebrates 25th 

The K-State Union was 25 years 
old March 8 and many celebration 
activities were sponsored by the 
Union Programming Council (UPC), 
bookstore, food service and the re- 
creation center. 

The festivities began with tours of 
the union and campus, a reception, 
banquet and dance. 

A large replica of a birthday cake 
was on display during the entire 
week. On Friday, the birthday cake 
along with punch was available to 
students. 

There were also discounts on 
bowling, billiard and table tennis. 
The bookstore offered discounts 
ranging from 5 to 25 per cent, and 
the copy center offered discounted 
services. 

Student deaths 

Two K-State students died last 
year of "natural causes," Gary Fair- 
banks, 21, and William Marquette, 
20. Three other students died in car 
accidents, Tony Fountain, Gregory 
Herard, and Rebecca Titus. 




Congratulatory hug - Suze Brink, senior 
in journalism and mass communications, 
embraces Angela Scanlon, junior in agri- 
cultural journalism, after the student body 
presidential elections. Scanlan was the first 



Craig Chandlei 

woman elected to the top position in the 
history of Kansas State student govern- 
ment. She gained 60 percent of the votes 
cast. 



78 k-state news 



Assassin: A ' friendly ' killing 



Students are killing one another on campuses through- 
out the United States. They're "bumping off" each oth- 
er, much like the way the Mafia makes a hit, only in this 
game, no one dies. 

The popular student game, called "Killer" at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, where it started in the early 1960's, 
and "Assassin" at Colorado State University is a game 
played with $.79 dart guns. 

The rules of the game are simple. Everyone is a hit 
man with an assigned victim, while at the same time being 
the intended victim of someone else. 

"You have to be totally alone," Jim Wall, junior in 
chemistry at CSU, said. "There can be no witnesses 
because it's just like real life. If you were in a crowd and 
someone saw you kill someone then you're caught. If 
you're caught, you're eliminated." 

After a killer makes a hit, he has to report the death to 
a coroner who is in charge of making the assignments. 
The successful killer is then assigned another victim. 

The game continues until there are only two people 
left who must try to kill each other. The last living 
person, the winner, has to commit suicide. Then the 
game starts over. It takes anywhere from three to five 
weeks for a round to be completed. 

Most of the hits are made in rooms but there are some 
made on campus late at night or during the day. 

The game has met some opposition. There are signs 




up in some residence halls saying "You Shouldn't Make a 
Game Out of Violence," but the complaints are mostly 
made in silent protest. 

Locally at K-State the game has blossomed, but has 
also met some opposition. 

ASSASSIN was sponsored by the Union Programming 
Council (UPC) Ideas and Issues Committee and Feature 
Films Committee as a promotion to a lecture, "The 
Embryo of an American Police State" by Peter James, 
former CIA spy. 

The first meeting was postponed because of questions 
concerning the objectives of the game raised by Chet 
Peters, vice president of student affairs. 

Peters said he was concerned about the game because 
it is "non-productive to an educational environment." 

He also said that his main concern was for people who 
don't know about the game, who "might see a suspicious 
person in a bush, misread it, and endanger someone's 
life." 

A similar game was played by a fraternity and sorority 
as an idea for a function. Each person was assigned 
someone to kill with a stick dart. It lasted throughout a 
week and ended with a function. 

"It is a good outlet to vent your hostilities," Chris 
Dring, senior in pre-design professions, said. "But I could 
see where it might get out of hand-otherwise I think it's 
good."^ 

Fines Increase 



In 1980-81 it cost more to park 
on university lawns. It also cost 
more to park illegally in a loading 
zone. 

Security and Traffic increased the 
cost of traffic tickets to conform 
with the fines set by other Kansas 
universities, Art Stone, director of 
Security and Traffic said. He added 
that certain tickets now can be void- 
ed if a violation is corrected. 

Last year, a vehicle, with a valid 
parking sticker parked on the lawn 
or in a loading zone was ticketed 
and fined $3. 



Violation #157- Rick Bailey, 
senior in political science, places a 
ticket on the windshield of a car 
illegially parked in the lot north of 
the Derby Complex. Bailey is one 
of several students working as 
ticket writers for Security and 
Traffic. The student "parking 
control checkers" received some 
controversy from their peers over 
their newly-formed positions. 



This year, the same violation will 
cost $7.50 if paid in 14 days, and 
$12.50 if paid after the 14 day peri- 
od. 

"Certain things, like failure to re- 
move your old permit, was a $3 fine 
last year," he said. "This year if you 
remove the permit (within 7 days) 
and have it verified by a campus 
officer, we'll cancel the ticket." 

"We're hoping that if you pay 
$7.50 versus $3, you'll say 'Hey, I 
haven't got $7.50' and you'll park 
legally," Stone said. 



Scott Williams 



k-state news 79 






\ 



Aggieville: 

A-G-G-I E-V-I-L-L-E spells release. 
At least it does to students, who 
wanting a break from the pressures of 
classes, studying, tests and writing papers, 
take a journey to this mecca located on 
Moro, between 11th and 13th streets. 

This city within a city, with its variety 
of taverns and bars (distinguishable from 
each other by the criteria of age), seems 
to attract certain personality types that 
can be observed in abundance at the 
various bars. 

One personality that is considered 
typical of the bar scene is Peter Prowl. 
He may be Johnny Study on campus, but 
when he hits the bar scene with his half- 
buttoned shirt and gold medalion 
glittering, he's out for a choice cut of a 
one-night stand. He travels from one end 
of the bar to the other looking for the 
selection that will fall for his line. Besides 
the "macho" attire, a girl can be warned 
of this wolf type by the odor of Hai- 
Karate that reaches the senses before he 
does. 

The. object of Peter Prowl's charms is 
often a personality type labeled, Evelyn 




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80 aggieville 



A welcome mat to Manhattan 



Easy. She's the one with a jello chest 
from not wearing a bra and has perfected 
the game of shake, rattle and roll. She 
loves to be the center of attention and 
goes out of her way to be noticed. 

Being able to combine a favorite drink 
and a favorite game is what brings the 
type Pat Pinball to the Aggieville bars. He 
is easily identified by the bulges in his 
pockets from all the change he carries. 
One can also hear him approach from a 
distance, with his change pocket rattling 
his arrival. Bartender and cashiers get to 
know him pretty well, as he is continually 
replenishing his supply of quarters. His 
best friends are the Space invaders, and 
his favorite song is the one the machine 
plays when he wins another game. He has 
also perfected the art of moving the 
machine in such a way that it doesn't 
retaliate with a "TILT". 

Calvin Cowboy is a personality that 
usually only frequents certain bars. 
Dressed in hand-tooled boots and wide 
belt, he enjoys the boot stompin' fast 
pace of the swing dance. His name is no 
problem, for when he spins around, it is 



tooled on the back of his belt. Often his 
back jean's pocket has a worn circle from 
the Skoal can that often occupies it. 

Polly Purebred can be found in a few 
select bars. She's the one with her nose 
scrapping the ceiling and making frequent 
trips to the bathroom. She only associates 
with a select few. Her frequent trips to 
the bathroom are to check the mirror to 
assure every hair is in place and her 
Mabelline beauty is secure. 

The nicest guy in the bar is the Freddy 
Friendly type. He's the one, who on any 
given night, can be seen with a beer in his 
hand and overjoyed to see anybody with 
which he is even only midly acquainted. 
He knows all the latest jokes, and makes 
sure everyone else hears them too. At the 
beginning of the night, he's a great guy 
but later in the evening he becomes 
unbearable. His good mood changes with 
his consumption of alcohol to depression 
and must constantly be reassured that 
everyone is his friend. 

A pair of types are Disco Dan and 
Doris. Oddly enough, they are usually 
found in the bars offering disco music and 



are on the dance floor every time the 
music takes up that staccato rhythm. 

Doris just can't keep her eyes off the 
mirror on the dance floor, for she loves 
the way she moves. The couple appear at 
times to think that they are the only ones 
on the dance floor, for they have been 
known to prance, bump and dip, having 
more contact with everyone else on the 
dance floor than themselves. 

But then there are the John and Jane 
Doe types. The name, commonly 
associated with the majority, rings true 
here. Although these 'other' types can be 
found in the various bars in Aggieville, the 
majority of 'types' are those who just 
come down to relax, talk to friends, 
release some frustrations on the dance 
floor or with an uncooperative pinball 
machine, and have a good time while they 
forget the frustrations and pressures of 
college. $ 



Randy Dunn 




YeeHaw-Tanya Carlson, 
sophomore in animal science and 
industry, stands under a drawing 
of a true cowpoke. The drawing 
demonstrates the contrast between 
a cowboy's duds of yesteryear 
and the western attire of 1980. 

Cheers-Toasting to the 
completion of their class projects, 
David Patterson, senior in 
electrical engineering, and Jean 
Harter, junior in interior 
architecture, enjoy a relaxing 
beer. 



photos by Craig Chandler 



aggieville 81 




82 academics and organizations 





Rob Clark 



Academics & 
Organizations 

Like circus clowns juggling brightly 
colored balls, thousands of K-Staters 
annually go through their own juggling act. 
But instead of balls and fruit, the colle- 
giates are balancing huge loads of classes, 
extra-curricular events and organizational 
functions. 

For some, the careful rhythmic control 
even allows part-time jobs or a second ad- 
dress in the bars of Aggieville. 

But whether the student is earning just 
over the probation limit or is a consistent 
performer appearing on the Dean's Honor 
Roll, K-Staters move in the rhythmic, 
though hectic pace of a heartland universi- 
ty. # 



Brushing Up- Harold Carter, 
senior in landscape architecture, 
seem to blend with his own 
creation. Carter painted the 
mural, representing more than 
200 years of minority history, on 
the fourth floor of Farrell Libmry. , 

When's the test?- Working in 
pairs through the student tutor 
program, some students may 
receive individual guidance. These 
tutors are giving aide in physics. 



academics and organizations 83 








Duane Acker 
President 

"From the nation's heartland have come those human characteristics of 
individualism, uncommon persistence and hard work that have permitted 
men and women to improve themselves and their ways of life. In full 
concert with this heritage of the heartland, Kansas State University is 
dedicated to providing its students with high quality teaching, to sharing 
with Kansans the fruits of its research, and to extending its resources to all 
citizens of the state," 

Owen J. Koeppe 
Provost 

"KSU reflects the best of the Kansas heartland by offering high quality 
academic programs in an environment characterized by friendship, pride 
without snobbery, respect for the past along with willingness to change, 
appreciation for conservative and liberal views and an abiding concern for 
students." 



Chester E. Peters 
V.P. For Student Affairs 

"When walking the prairie and woodlands in the Kansas heartland, one 
grasp the majestic power of the intellectual being. Aesthetics is a most 
critical factor in learning as the environment and the wisdom of the people 
come together through beauty. The Flint Hills around Kansas State Uni- 
versity allow the vision and the freedom of search to discover and achieve, 
which is not available in a concrete maze of tall buildings and crisscrossed 
streets." 



Gene Cross 

V.P. For University Facilities 

"The Kansas heartland has much to offer the future university student in 
the form of opportunity, challenge, growth, and a total preparation for the 
future. This offering is available to those students that are willing to 
involve and give of themselves that they might receive the richness of life 
that they eagerly anticipate and expect from their efforts as they prepare 
for their adult future." 



Daniel D. Beatty 

V.P. For Business Affairs 

"The Kansas heartland does and will provide university students a place to 
live and attend a university that provides rural openness and country 
beauty and peacefulness close to a large metropolitan center without the 
disadvantages of blight, crowding, traffic snarls and urban sprawl. The 
climate is moderate but with four distinct seasons that provide stimulation 
and variety. In short, they can live in an ideal environment while attending 
a first-rate university. 



Roger L. Mitchell 
V.P. For Agriculture 



"A university exists first of all to help each student who enters its doors 
develop himself or herself to the fullest of their capacity. The Kansas 
heartland has proven to be a stimulating setting where the accumulation of 
humanity's past experience and the search for new knowledge can be 
shared by the wonderfully diverse people who are attracted here. The 
rigorous environment of the Flint Hills and the Great Plains set a tone of 
directness and a willingness to openly search together for ways of using 
knowledge to better serve our fellow human beings." 

Robert Kruh 

Dean Of Graduate School 

"Kansans have a strong tradition of self-reliance, and they value education 
as a means of improving their lives. They are fortunate that Kansas State 
University provides rich opportunities for study at all levels in an atmo- 
sphere where students and faculty members can work closely together in 
preparing a better future for the next generation." 



Turmoiled 



Within the ivory tower of Anderson 
Hall, several alterations were made 
in K- State's administrative structure. 

Deleting the positions of Vice President 
for Academic Affairs and Vice President for 
Agriculture, President Duane Acker reorga- 
nized his administrative cabinet. 

In August 1980, Owen Koeppe filled the 
position of Provost. According to Acker, the 
new office was created for more efficient 
administrative communication. Under the 
new framework, all deans will report directly 
to Koeppe, instead of two positions as in the 
past. 

A second reorganizational program began 
in the Spring of 1980, when Vice President 
Roger Mitchell of the College of Agriculture 
announced that he wanted to reorganize the 
college. Controversy arose and the project 
was immediately shelved by Acker. 

Acker, under pressure to decide whether 
the college needed reorganization, set up a 
committee to oversee the problem. 

Under the reorganization plan, the titles 
of vice president, dean and director of the 
Agriculture Experiment Station would falli 



college experiences change 



under the executive in the administration of 
the College of Agriculture. 

The 1980 fall semester brought changes 
to the College of Agriculture, as John Dun- 
bar, previously dean of the Cooperative Ex- 
tension Service, was chosen as the college's 
new dean and director. 

Dunbar said he was "overjoyed" to learn 
he had been selected as the new dean. 

"I hope to make K-State's College of Ag- 
riculture second to none and to increase its 
enrollment immediately," he said. 

Under Acker's guidance, Dunbar was re- 
sponsible for selecting candidates to fill the 
three associate dean positions. 

Numerous applications were received by 

"There has been too much tur- 
moil in the College of Agricul- 
ture." 

the search and screening committees. The 
committees were headed by Don Good, 
head of Animal Science and Industry, 
Charles Deyoe, head of Grain Science and 



Charles Marr, associate professor in horticul- 
ture. 

One faculty member said the appointment 
of Dunbar would mark the end of months of 
controversy within the department. 

"There has been too much turmoil in the 
College of Agriculture. The old organization 
was wrong, very wrong," Erie Bartley, pro- 
fessor of animal science and industry and 
member of the screening committee, said. 
"It's going to hurt people like Dean Hess 
and Floyd Smith (director of Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station), but if there's going to be a 
reorganization in the College of Agriculture, 
people are going to be hurt." 

In November, Fred Sobering, previously 
associate director of the Cooperative Exten- 
sion Service, was chosen to become associ- 
ate agricultural dean and director of the Co- 
operative Extension Service. 

Sobering had been at K-State for more 
than three years and had also been director 
of the Cooperative Extension Service at 
North Dakota State University, Fargo. 

Dunbar said he was extremely pleased 
with the committee's selection. 



"K-State is lucky to get such a qualified 
individual as Fred Sobering. I have known 
Fred for some time and I was the one that 
encouraged Fred to apply for the associate 
director of the Cooperative Extension Ser- 

"Having one man to make deci- 
sions will make the College of 
Agriculture run more efficient- 

ly£ 

vice in 1977," Dunbar said. 

"Dr. Sobering is among one of the most 
highly respected cooperative extension peo- 
ple in the United States. He is extremely 
knowledgable of people in the field and is a 
leader in argicultural economics as well as 
cooperative extension," he added. 

The reorganization plans began to take 
more shape as David Mugler, previously as- 
sociate dean in the College of Agruiculture, 
was appointed the new associate agricultural 
dean and director of resident instruction. He 
was selected unanimously Z>0 



reorganization 85 



7- 



'9to. 



*x&*** 



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/ 



Bernard Foerster 

Dean Of Architecture And Design 



* get vocational training and a 
genuine education 

* study the past and dream for 
the future 

* love the gentle hills 

* discover that only the unquanti- 
fiable has value" 



"An opportunity to: 

* have contact with friendly, car- 
ing people 

* be exposed to the world and to 
provincialism 

* have excellent faculty and leak- 
ing roofs 

William Stamey 

Dean Of Arts And Science 

"In accordance with our best traditions and because our region is blessed 
with natural wealth, we can offer students an opportunity to study and to 
learn in an environment which welcomes new ideas, encouragaes creativ- 
ity, and nourishes the intellect." 



RoberTLynn 

Dean Of Business Administration 

"Having just returned from visiting an urban university in an area with a 
major smog problem, the advantages of fresh air and lack of extreme 
congestion are keenly felt. We have a good setting for intellectual work. 
Our human environment is equally important and it is good to work among 
those who have earned a reputation for reliability and high productivity." 



Jorden CItsey 
Dean Of Education 

"Through the professional programs provided by the College of Educa- 
tion, students can seek certification in kindergarten and elementary educa- 
tion, middle school teaching, secondary education and junior college 
teaching. The honors program, and opportunities to gain experience in 
rural, small town and urban settings, provide students of the College rich 
and challenging learning opportunities." 



Donald Rathbone 
Dean Of Engineering 

"I believe the Kansas heartland offers the advantages of a friendly, 
tranquil and stable environment. It provides an excellent opportunity for 
the individual to participate m the many cultural and intellectual activities 
of a progressive university such as Kansas State." 



Ruth Hoeflin 

Dean Of Home Economics 

"Home Economics is at the heart of the family with its 108-year-old history 
of having a widespread impact on families and communities around the 
world. The service, knowledge, compassion, friendliness and the expertise 
of our home economics students and faculty blossom In the heartland of 
Kansas." 



Donald M. Trotter 

Dean Of Veterinary Medicine 

"Beautiful variable scenery, fresh air and sunshine, a growing economy 
with a balance of agricultural and Industry, ever developing cultural oppor- 
tunities, good educational programs, overall good quality of living." 



^tt^w^t™- 



Reorganization 

"Dave Mugler was unquestionably the 
unanimous choice to become the 
Associate Dean and Director of Resident 
Instruction," Dunbar said. In his new 
position, Mugler will be responsible for 
providing guidance to faculty members in 
the college. He will also coordinate classes 
within the College of Agriculture. 

"My support for Dave Mugler came 
because he was highly supported by the 
Ag students and faculty alike," Randy 
Tosh, student body president and member 
of the screening committee, said. 

"Being chosen to become Associate 
Dean and Director of Resident Instruction 
is a very humbling and gratifying 
experience," Mugler said. 

Mugler said his first responsibility was 
to the students of K-State. 

"My primary interest to to work closely 
with the student body and to serve in the 
capacity where I can make the greatest 
contribution to agricultural students, the 
College of Ag and to the Agriculture 
Industry," Mugler said. 

President Acker was also pleased by 
the selection of Mugler. 

"I think that Dr. Mugler has the rich 
experience that will help him in his new 
responsibility that will serve K-State," 




reorganization 




Advertising Club 

TOP ROW: Leigh A. Hand, Jeanny J. Jackson, 
Brenda A. Shevlin. SECOND ROW: Brenda K. 
Bauer, Dianne R. Danner, Susan M. Franzen, Cari 
C. Cavassa. BOTTOM ROW: Dave C. Cook, 
Kathy J. Binford, Harold L. Ramirez. 



Ag. Ambassadors 

TOP ROW: Brenda M. Ericson, Lorl R. Willhite, 
Kim R. Phillips, Penny S. Morgan, Jill M. Martin- 
son, Cesar Ruiz, Jeff E. Dillon, Dave Zeller, J.D. 
Gottlieb, Larry Erpelding. THIRD ROW: James 
H. Blaauw, Charlton R. Allen, David E. Lehman, 
John C. Coen, Timothy N. Ohlde, Douglas A. 
Albrecht, John T. Amrein, Warren F. Schep- 
mann, Roger A. Macks. SECOND ROW: Russell 
D. Galle, Harold B. German, Bradley E. Steffen, 
Ronald E. Wulfkuhle, Richard V. Llewelyn, Ed R. 
Kerley, Todd A. Gigstad, Michael D. Beck, Bryan 
L. Goodman. BOTTOM ROW: David L. 
Goetsch, Mitch F. Meehan, Richard A. Jacobs, 
Scott E. Hedke, Joseph K. Snyder, Fred H. 
Heersche, Anthony J. Stueve, Charlie A. Gray, 
Brian E. Vining. 



Ag. Ambassadors 



TOP ROW: Lisa D. Wulfkuhle, Lisa M. Skoch, 
Pamela A. Bell, Sandra L. Hundley, Natalie G. 
Haag, Brenda F. Hundley, Terri L. Johnston, 
Katherina A. Kotoyantz, Carol Sobba, LewAnn 
G. Schneider. THIRD ROW: Debbie D. Rudicel, 
Anita K. Conley, Jacqueline I. Russ, Trudy L. 
Nowman, Shawn Frey-Plunkett, Kelley D. Rou- 
land, Cathy A. Sterns, Debra J. Hall, Susan K. 
Tousignant. SECOND ROW: Nicholas V. 
Stroda, Steven R. Arnold, Christopher J. Schrick, 
Tom Aherns, Charles A. Gray, Mary G. Kohman, 
Nick Meyer, Charles A. Banks. BOTTOM ROW: 
Steven D. Hunt, Mark D. Mugler, Jim R. Jantsch, 
Mark A. Yoesel, David J. Mugler, J. Douglas 
Smart, J. Blake Donnelly, Dan F. Clawson, Leon 
E. Heinen. 



Agricultural 
Communicators 
of Tomorrow 



TOP ROW: Kimberly A. Wolfe, Pamela I. Van- 
Horn, Susan K. Tousignant, Stephanie M. Mow- 
rey. SECOND ROW: Gordon R. Dowell, Jerilyn 
S. Johnson, Jane Ramsbottom, Carol M. Sobba. 
BOTTOM ROW: Dee Hoffman, Missy Reardon, 
Nancy Wilson, Kay Hunter. 



Ag. Council 

TOP ROW: Lisa D. Wulfkuhle, Pamela A. Bell, 
Sandra L. Hundley, Natalie G. Haag, Brenda F. 
Hundley, LewAnn G. Schneider, Terri L. John- 
ston, Katherina A. Kotoyantz, Carol Sobba. 
THIRD ROW: Larry Erpelding, Cathy A. 
Sterns, Michelle M. Maddux, Kelley D. Rowland, 
Susan K. Tousignant, Jill M. Mattinson, Dawn R. 
Johnson, Charlton Reef Allen. SECOND ROW: 
Dave Zeller, Stuart R. Hays, Charles A. Gray, 
John C Coen, J. Douglas Smart, Charles R. 
Banks, Fred H. Heersche, Bryan W. Schurle, 
David E. Lehman. BOTTOM ROW: Kris M. Ir- 
win, Mitch E. Meehan, Steven D. Hunt, Mark D. 
Mugler, Mark A. Yoesel, Lwon E, Heinen, Scott 
E. Hedke, Richard A Jacobs. 



Halls 



■■■ 



fhitt 






•*. 



•V- 



provide "homey" atmosphere 




They're a dedicated group, an 
altogether different breed of 
students. They work through the 
night, finishing projects, preparing for 
exams, or editing stories for the 
newspaper. They're the architecture, 
veterinary medicine, journalism and art 
students. 

Many of these students have found a 
home away from home, not in residence 
halls, fraternity or sorority houses but in 
buildings such as the Veterinary Medicine 
complex, the Art Building, Seaton Hall 
and Kedzie Hall. 

"It's a second home!" Kimber Williams, 
junior in home economics and mass 
communications, said. 

While working on the Collegian, 
Williams sometimes puts in more than a 
days work. She added that there are 
other students on the staff that spend a 
lot more time on the paper than she 
does. 

"There've been people who have spent 
24 hours here," she said. 

Holly Grey, junior in art education and 
graphic design, said that the Art Building 
seems home-like to her. 

"It's kind of junky and cluttered, but 
there's a secure feeling here. This is the 
place I go when I want to draw," she 
said. 

Chris Miles, first year student in 
veterinary medicine, agreed with Grey and 
Williams. 

"It's secure here," she said, referring to 
the Veterinary Medicine Complex. "It's 
like going home, almost." 

"I made it a point to do all of my 
studying at school," Miles explained. She 
spends approximately 53 hours a week in 
the complex. 

Miles said that the whole building is 
designed for students. Each student has 
his own desk, with a microscope and 
other accessories. There is also a locker 
room where students can go to take 
showers to relax. 

According to Gene Lukow, fifth year 
student in landscape architecture, students 
must adapt their life styles in order to 
spend so much time in one building. 

"When I first started here, it was a real 
pain. I didn't have a free weekend eight 
weeks in a row!" Lukow said. He 
explained that architecture students often 
adapt by "decorating" their studios. 

"Everyone can do their own thing," he 
added. "You can give your studio a 
'personal identity.'" ZX> 



This is due tomorrow?- Scott 
Zatt and Ryan Hazzen, juniors in 
architecture, are cramming to 
finish their projects. 



Hurrlyet Aydogan 



halls 89 








Ag. Economics 
Club 

TOP ROW: Natalie G. Haag, Pamela A. Bell, 
Lori R. Wilthlte, Carol S. Hotting, Ruth E. Bie- 
senthal, Trudy L. Norman, Gena E. Courter, Bri- 
an E, Beisner, Dale R. Anders, Greg J. Whttehahr, 
Nicholas V. Stroda. THIRD ROW: Jay C. Da- 
vies, Gregg D. Martin, Rodney D, Jones, Michael 
E, Smith, Gene Beauchamp, Douglas E. Wendt, 
Robert D, Thompson, Kim D. Krehbiel, Mike R. 
Heintzelman, Ernest L. Amershek. SECOND 
ROW: Denette D. Vonada, Max C. Engler, 
Charles R. Banks, Kenneth W, Furgason, James 
E, Wulf, Joe Herrmann, Chris Wilson, Davis 
Stutzman, Tom Ahrens, Mark Frasler. BOTTOM 
ROW: Kerry L. Hoops, Harry W. Dawson, Ste- 
ven D. Hunt, Loren R. Troyer, Randy R. Rein- 
hardt, David P. Mueller, Steve S. Mullins, Scott E, 
Hedke, Mark C. Ward, Mikel C. Hadachek, John 
B. Rtiey, 

Ag. Education Club 

TOP ROW: Sandra L. Hundley, Terri L. John- 
ston, Brenda F, Hundley, Wayne Goss, Mark E. 
Muller. THIRD ROW: Mary Lou Pasley, Athana- 
slus A, Akpehe, Joe C. Riekabaugh, Qark R. 
Harris, Tim N. Ohlde, Nicholas E. Meyer. SEC- 
OND ROW: Bob E. Green, Todd J. Danber. Stan 
E. Park. Stanley L. Buscher, Mark Riekabaugh. 
BOTTOM ROW: Richard R. Welton, Frank L. 
Shoemaker, Jack W. Untfepiist, Dale E. David, 
son, Jeff L. Johnson, Kevin A. Larson. 



Ag. Mechanization 
Club 



TOP ROW: Jolene B. Revey, Ed McQueen, J. 
Lee Stevenson, Jerrol K. Claassen, Christopher 
J. Schrtek, THIRD ROW: Steven L. Fehr, Ray 
D. Lemon, Anthony J. Stueva, Lee M. Garner, 
Dale R. Thomas. SECOND ROW: Paul F. Vto. 
cent. Lance D. Resae, Gary W. Gate, Tim A<. 
Klein. BOTTOM ROW: Ralph J. Upper, Gregg 
A. Denholm, Joseph K, Snyder, George L. 
Lauppe, Paul A. Schmidt. 



Air Force ROTC 



TOP BOW: Kathy A. DeJesus, Kathy S. Grad- 
wohl, Phyllis A, Trowbridge, JinYoung Kang, 
Joyce R. Jenkins, James A. Dice, Valerie J. Sehe- 
bor, Paul E. Bacanl. THIRD ROW: Margaret A. 
Young, Scott E. Hern, Mark S. Davis, Hamlin A. 
Ortlj, Douglas B. Tayren, Patricia A. Miller, 
Gregg A. Burden. SECOND BOW: Mike T, Lin- 
neman, Scott L. Fahshcta, Ken D. Long, Blaine 
D. Bauer, Jon E. Hornbostel, Michael W. Pavlo- 
vld, Ron C. Pierce. BOTTOM ROW: Col, Paul 
A. Barber, Phillip E. Long, Chris R. Chambllss, 
Craig F, Campbell, Robert K. West, Arthur T. 
Boechtold Jr., Robert J. McCttllu, 



Alpha Epsilon 
Delta 



TOP ROW: Dena R. Isackson, Robin R. Randall, 
Julie A. Nottorf, Tamara S, Martin, Katla A. 
Hefty. THIRD ROWt Steve J. Wistuba, Richard 
D, Creed, Phil N. Heinecke, Michael R. Turner. 
SECOND ROW: Crlstle G. Carrlker , Patricia M. 
Daniels, Mtchael W, Richard, loni L. Webber. 
BOTTOM ROW: Settle M. Dale, A. Dark Rut- 
tinger, Larry M. Seheele, Timothy M. Penner. 



"When students be- 
come upperclassmen 
they tend to spend 
more time in certain 
buildings on cam- 
pus." 



Laid Back-Scott Gray, 
freshman in veterinary 
medicine, is studying in the 
Veterinary Medicine Complex 
during a break in a lecture 
class. 




J«l 



Halls become homes 



Students use radios, crazy posters, 
family pictures and even a basketball 
hoop, to personalize their space, he said. 

Like the studios, the newsroom, is 
personalized with various posters, sayings, 
and cartoon clippings. 

Even though the surroundings have 
been personalized, Williams and Lukow 
both agreed that working long hours in 
one location can get tiresome. 

"There are days when you wake up 
and don't want to get involved," Williams 
said. "I've almost reached a point of fixed 
stress, just like a junkie." 



"It's kind of neat because it's always 
the same people. You get to meet and 
know everybody in your department and 
everybody's really friendly," she said. 

Most of the veterinary medicine 
students spend a lot of time together, not 
only during classes, but other things, too, 
according to Miles. 

"We have intramurals together, we play 
together, we study together. We do a lot 
of things together," she said. 

Architecture students also spend a lot 
of time together, according to Lukow. 
All-nighters in Seaton Hall are common 



among architecture students. 

"We take breaks every couple of 
hours, maybe go to Vern's or Swannie's," 
he said. "You get real spacey — 
especially after two or three all-nighters in 
a row." 

For most people, "home is where the 
heart is." For some students, however, 
home is where the work is, in Seaton, 
Kedzie, or any of the other halls on 
campus. & 



Elizabeth Hagen 




Hurrlyet Aydogan 



halls 91 




Alpha Kappa Psi 

TOP ROW: Theresa J. Yocom, Cindy J. Shep- 
ard, Cecilia A. Mayerle, Shawnya L. Schnitker, 
Cindy L. Janssen, Kimberly S. Myles, Lou Ann 
Miller, Bill F. Beckelhimer, Fred, I. Rock, Mary E. 
Despard. THIRD ROW: Brenda G. Jellison, 
Monte W. Wedel, William M. Kehr, Janice M. 
Schuler, Deborah M. Johnson, Jerry T. Katlin. 
Casey A. Lair, Kara D. Brant, Mari S. Luthi. 
SECOND ROW: Thomas S. Feldmann, Kristi K. 
Sieck, Susan E. Gravenstein, Kenneth L. Marvel, 
Gary L. Hassenflu, Joel D. Bloom, Kathy D. Fran- 
kamp, Jeff M. Fox. BOTTOM ROW: John C. 
Martin, Ken R. Laudan, Stephen M. Carlson, C. 
Kevin Jackson, Gary A. Scott, Lynne M. Tracey, 
Roger L. Taylor. 



Alpha Lambda 
Delta 



TOP ROW: Janet M. O'Connell, Elizabeth R. 
McLenon, Janeen K. Nelssen, Jane A. Baird, 
Patricia A. Nichols, Kerri L. Tibbits, Marcy R. 
Sherve, Carol A. Stine, Lorrie R. Blanchard, Lori 
A. Price, Anita M. Sobba. THIRD ROW: Debbie 
D. Rudicel, Tammie A. Rice, Heidi M. Bright, 
Diana L. Stoner, Roberta A. Storer, M. Melinda 
Gale, Kay S. Scarbrough, Sharon A. Berry, 
Fonda Cline, Patricia M. Anthony. SECOND 
ROW: Jan C. Ostenberg, Sue M. Gose, Beth 
Hughes, Lisa M. Baalman, Jan L. Turnbull, Kim 
S. Hefley, Karen A. Carle, Julie D. Brockelman, 
Jean A. Hintz. BOTTOM ROW: Patricia C. 
Crews, Karlene K. Ediger, Julie D. Clark, Shari 
A. Rippe, Suzanne E. Gentile, Vicki D. Cook, 
Vicki E. Blyholder, Julie A. Grinstead, Amy L. 
Simons, Terry E. Schmalzried. 



Alpha Nu Sigma 



TOP ROW: Kenneth D. Matney. B. Ellen John- 
son, Robert B. Stuewe, Jeffrey H. Simmons. 
BOTTOM ROW: Hermann J. Donnert, Darryl 
Drayer, Tim DeBey. 



Alpha Phi Omega 

TOP ROW: Tamara J, Warren, Debra K. Hop- 
kins, Kimberly S. Myles, Marty A. Criswell, Moni- 
ca Haley, B. Ellen Johnson, Paul Briggs. THIRD 
ROW: Dale W. Blanchard, Michael V. Lopez, 
Kathy J. Russell, Sandra J. Larson, Todd M. 
Hesher, Rebecca S. Skeels, Pete S. Tangprasert- 
chal. SECOND ROW: Lila L. Ensminger, Janet 
K. King, John P. McDermott, Terri L. Hazen, 
Linda L. Kraus, Gary L. Bond. BOTTOM ROW: 
F. Lanice Thomson, Jon Cranmer, Robert Ad- 
ams, Chuck Hitt, Prof. Michael Finnegan. 



Alpha Pi Mu 

Mark A Zeorlin, Mary K. Konz, Rachel J. Roth, 
Janice M. Russell, Brad L. Hafner. SECOND 
ROW: Tom Newton, Brad Kramer, David L. 
Barthuly, John S. Taylor. BOTTOM ROW: Joan 
E. Stammer, Mark A. Dreiling, Gail A. Ritzdorf. 



GTA's 

receive 

additional 

funding 




Like many of their undergraduate 
colleagues, this year some K-State 
graduate students were eligible to receive 
financial aid. Through a new monetary 
program, financial benefits were provided 
for graduate students. 

"Graduate students have only been 
eligible for regular hourly work study jobs 
for the past two years," Mike Flores, 
administrative assistant for student 
financial aid, said. 

According to Flores, the two-year old 
project was created when the financial aid 
funds received an increase in federal 
government allocations. 



The $170,000 increase was designed to 
benefit the graduate work study program, 
he said. The new program should benefit 
both graduate students and the University, 
Flores added. 

Under the new project, Flores said, 65 
percent of the salaries for graduate 
teaching assistants were paid by the 
financial aid office. The remaining 35 
percent was paid by the specific 
department. 

In the past, funds for the full salary 
were the burden of the departments, he 
said. The new financial assistance program 
was initiated by William Feyerharm, 




assistant vice president for academic 
affairs. 

According to Feyerharm, the program 
was a way of "opening a new area of 
savings for the university, by using federal 
dollars to supplement state funds." 

With the new method, the program has 
created a savings at the departmental 
level, Flores added. 

Currently the program is channeled into 
other graduate educational areas. 
According to Flores, the extra money is 
expected to allow departments to create 
additional graduate teaching positions. 
This addition of funds should be available 
for graduate programs and projects within 
the departments, he added. 

"The extra funds must be spent on 
graduate student orientation costs," Flores 
said. "It can't be used to buy new office 
furniture or to add a clerical position." 

Graduate students taking advantage of 
this new program must meet the financial 
guidelines for work study, Lorene Dahm, 
administrative officer for student financial 
assistance, said. 

Students must submit the past year's 
family financial statement in order to 
qualify for the work study program, Dahm 
said. The results of this statement are 
studied by the financial aid office. The 
office then determines the salary of each 
assistant, based upon need, he said. 

According to Flores, it is not difficult 
for most graduate assistants to qualify for 
the new financial aid program. Usually 
graduate students are not claimed as 
exemptions on their parent's tax returns. 
Therefore, with their own income listed 
upon the statement, they commonly 
receive the financial assistance, Flores 
said. 

In addition to work study, most 
graduate students qualify for other 
financial aid as well, Flores said. 

"The majority of graduates in the work 
study program also take advantage of 
other financial aid programs, like loans or 
grants," he added. 2>C> 



Scoping- Ming-Chih Lee, second 
year graduate student in physics, 
focuses on his experiment while 
Atilla Aydinli, post-doctoral in 
physics assists. 



Hurriyet Aydogan 



graduate students 93 



Additional funding 

The financial aid for graduate students 
was not only a recent addition to K-State, 
but also a new procedure, compared to 
other universities. 

"K-State is unique in it's participation in 
the graduate work study program, 
because only 12 schools in the country do 
participate," Flores said. 

According to Flores, many schools 
including the University of Kansas have 
not tried a graduate student financial 
program. It is not commonly used because 



it places an additional work load on the 
financial aid offices, he said. 

Despite K-State's financial aid office 
being understaffed, Flores said they 
handle the extra work load very well. 

"The program is definitely on an 
experimental basis this year," Flores said. 
"If not run properly, the program could 
cut into undergraduate work study funds." 

If funds were discontinued, Flores said 
the financial aid office would be forced to 
terminate undergraduate work study pay 



and the departments would return to 
paying the full salaries until new funds 
were made available or the positions were 
discontinued. 

"I don't see this sort of thing happening 
here, but it is a remote possibility," Flores 
added. & 



Toni Alley 




94 graduate students 




Photos by Hurrlyet Aydogan 



graduate students 95 







art by Mel Westmeyer 



96 computers 




/techEck VW Inpu 



t 



I 



I 



Tt 



H 



'The computer lost my grades' 



*The beginning of each semester 

* usually brings new experiences for 
undergraduates and graduate students. 
These occurences are often found while 
enrolling, looking over personal transcripts 
or receiving grades in the mail. 

It's one of those experiences that can 
drive a student's mind to the limit, with 
the often heard remark 'that damn 
computer messed up again.' 

Computer mess-ups are not new. In 
fact, when K-State started using 
computers to handle such administrative 
functions as transcripts, grades and course 
schedules, mistakes were commonly made. 

"Computer's are almost foolproof and 
very seldom make mistakes. It is the 
people that make mistakes by entering 
the wrong information into the material or 
entering the material correctly that was 
given to them. But it might have been the 
wrong information," Mick Atteberry, 
junior in computer science, said. 

Computers are sophisticated machinery 
that perform functions by electronics, 
i magnetic tape, or key punched cards. 

"The only way computers will make 
mistakes is if there is a power surge in 
the electrical circuit. But really it is still a 
mistake on human error because the 
power plant should have notified the 
programming (computer) department 



before increasing the power in the 
electrical circuits," Atteberry said. 

The data processing center in Anderson 
Hall, handles all student records, financial 
accounts, and other administrative 
functions. Many people suggest that if 
student records were handled in the old 
way, there would be less chance of a 
mistake. 

"Computers have been scheduling 



"It's a fact that computers do 
not make mistakes, people do." 



classes for students since 1967," Melvin 
Kepple, director of data processing said. 

Computers handle the process of 
scheduling class, balancing classes and 
recording grades. 

"The computer is given a line schedule 
of classes submitted by the administration 
(Admissions and Records). It then will 
balance the number of students between 
the hours of a class," Kepple said. "If a 
student's schedule has two classes that are 
being held the same hour, it will reject 
both classes. The adviser of the student 
or the student should check his scheduling 
of classes and be sure the classes are not 



the same hour on the same day." 

K-State began using the 371-145 
computer system in the late 1960's. This 
system, now 12 to 13 years old, is 
becoming outdated and the data 
processing center hopes to go to a new 
S.I.S. 4341, I.B.M. system, Kepple said. 

"The computers we are now using 
handled student records sufficently and 
adequately but we hope to go to this new 
system because it is an on-line disk 
programming computer. It will also be 
able to be used by administration staff 
and by Admissions and Records beside 
being used by ourselves (data 
processing)," Kepple said. "The computer 
will be in Anderson Hall, but it will have 
terminals in Fairchild, Farrell, Cardwell 
and possibly other locations." 

According to Kepple, the new system 
will feature discs and electronic tape, 
which is relatively inexpensive and can be 
used several times. 

"The computer system 4341, will be 
able to use electronic tape that costs only 
$8 for 2400 feet. We can use this tape 
several times and it can be edited by 
writing on it. The computer will also 
feature 5 megcores that will make the 
computer processing faster," Kepple said. 



computers 97 




Alpha Zeta 



TOP ROW: Lisa D. Wulfkuhle, Amanda Distier, 
Lisa M. Skoch, Karen Chrisler, Terrl L. Johnston, 
Sheri L. Henry, Sue A. Henry, Katherian A. Ko- 
toyanU. THIRD ROW: Pamela A. Bell, Shawn 
S. Frey-Plunket, Scott H. Johnson, Cathy A. 
Sterns, Susan J. Steinlage, Sherry L, Grisham, 
Larry F. Roeder, Michael E. Smith. SECOND 
ROW: Cindy A. Payne, Clark R. Harris, Janice L. 
Stucky, Raimund M. Combs, Lewis A. Worcester, 
Todd A. Gigstad, Curtis A. Russell. BOTTOM 
ROW: Max C. Engler, Mark C. Ward, Tim J. 
Grossenbacher, Gregory A. Noltlng, Leon E. 
Heinen, Larry A. Liggett, Jay A. Griffin, Tony 
Kramer. 



Alpha Zeta 



TOP ROW: Wanda Y. Trent, Cindy Henricks, 
Elaine D. Hobson, Brenda F. Hundley, Julia K. 
Beems, Sandra L. Hundley, Natalie G. Haag, 
Pamela I. VanHorn, Susan J. Kinsler, Kimberly 
A. Smith, Eileen M. Eggleston. THIRD ROW: 
Susan K. Tousignant, Kathy L. Pecchioni, Rebec- 
ca J. Williams, Sandra S. Clark, Teresa A. No- 
votny, Ed K. Twidwell, Jerry D. Thomas, Jed D. 
Barnes, Markus M. Frese, Ellen K. Forsberg. 
SECOND ROW: Len M, Messenger, Kim D. 
Krehbiel, Robert A. Morando, Jill A. Wlngerson, 
Steven M. Bowser, Kelvin W. Belin, Buck A. 
VanTrease, David L. Goetsch, Bob E, Green, 
BOTTOM ROW: Dale Eustace, Scott D. Waler, 
Kerry L. Hoops, Keith R. Branson, James F. 
Schesser, Deryl E. Waldren, Vernon A. Schaffer, 
Duane A. Lankard, Jonathan P. Haliscak, Gerry 
L. Poster. 



Alpha Tau Alpha 



TOP ROW: Sandra L. Hundley, Terri L. John 
ston, Michelle Bender, Brenda F. Hundley, Mar 
yLu Pasley. SECOND ROW: Bob E. Green, 
Todd J. Dauber, Jack W. Lindquist, Kevin A 
Larson. BOTTOM ROW: James J. Albracht 
Rodney A. Stewart, Dale E. Davidson, Mark E 
Muller, Clark R. Harris. 




Amateur Radio 
Club 

TOP ROW: William H. Dawes, David L. Jacobs, 
Martin N. Jones, William G. Jurrens, Karla J. 
Jurrens. SECOND ROW: Robyn L. Sanders, 
Doyle L. Slack, David C. Nail, Christopher G. 
McHarg. BOTTOM ROW: William H. Barnes, 
David D. Yoder, Ken Klamm, Jeffrey D. Jenkins. 



Am. Home 
Economics Assoc. 

TOP ROW: Darlene K. Carlson, Linda L. Gib- 
son, Kathleen M. Downing, Bonnie J. Maday, 
DeAnn M. Hiss, Loretta I. Johnson, Denlse E. 
Delange, Gayla L. Backman, Karen S. Kalivoda, 
Lori A. Scheuerman. THIRD ROW: Patricia K. 
Bornholdt, Shelly A. Bowman, MaryAnn Rempe, 
Gina A. Kaiser, Kathy K. Rupp, Pam R. Jorns, 
Tracey L. Pittman, Denise K. Warne, Trlna D. 
Cole, Trlsha L. Helms. SECOND ROW: Cynthia 
S. Bray, Susan D. Zimmerman, Christl L. Dutton, 
Kathryn A. Hlxon, Debra J. Jones, Tarn S. 
Ashby, Carla M. Morrlcal, Brenda J. Huntsman, 
Kim S. Morey, Sheryl K. Wilkinson. BOTTOM 
ROW: Denise M. Ebert, Therese L. Schamle, 
Linda D. Teter, Sheryl A. Remmel, Susan M. 
Blush, Bonnie M. Bahr, Linda K. Young, Susan E. 
Traskowsky, Judy A. Spiegel, Brenda K. Stott- 




Computer mess ups 

"The records of students are 
tremendous and some of the space that 
Administration had used to store student 
records has been filled. 

The electronic tape that is used for 
back-up or (extra copies of transcripts) are 
being stored in the salt mines near 
Hutchinson, Kansas. The reason for this is 
that electronic tape has to be stored in a 
humidity controlled environment and the 
salt mines are the best method of 
controlling humidity that we have," he 
said. 

Kepple said it would be more 
convenient if the computer programming 
systems at K-State had all of its 
operations in one building instead of 
scattered in different buildings across 
campus. 



If the students at K-State have trouble 
with their records being is disarray, 
Kepple said it most likely is not the 
computer's fault. 

"The computer is just a big black dumb 
box that can use only the information that 
it is given. The operators of K-State's 
computers are skilled civil employees. If 
they make a mistake, they will usually 
catch it. That is the reason for our back- 
up systems. I guess you could say, that 
we are just the tools being used to record 
information given to us. If this information 
is wrong in the beginning, then can we be 
blamed?" Kepple said. & 




computers 99 




Am. Institute of 
Architects 

TOP ROW: Kehinde O. Aina, Timothy P. Krug, 
Teri A. Bishop, David W. Curbow, Gordon Ash- 
worth, Michael R. Kern, Brian S. Sullivan, Kevin 
R. Meinhardt, Marsha K. Hoffman, Craig A 
Greenwood. THIRD ROW: Chris B. Bailey, Pat 
rick J. O'Brien, Robert L. Barnett, Daniel C 
Keiter, Mark A. Flamm, Yat-Ming Yim, James L 
Nightingale, Dale A. Hermes, Chris A. Hasek 
SECOND ROW: Steven R. Hefta, Jeff B. Bor 
chardt, Michael P. Tchoukaleff, Steven A. John 
son, Kenneth D. Graham, Mike L. GaJloway, 
Keith P. Whittle, Thomas A. Wright. BOTTOM 
ROW: Jeff D. Bolen, Michael G. Flynn, Earl w. 
Hilchey, David L. Hieronymus, Robert W. Rad- 
ley, Richard A. Bartholomew, Doug R. Porter- 
field, Steve M. Johnson, Clark R. Greenlee. 

Am. Institute of 

Architectural 

Engineers 

TOP ROW: Ethel A. Attig, Roya J. Ferdowsian, 
Suzanne D. Shirvani, Xadhi L. Sllsby, Karen S. 
Roberts, Mary A. Robarge, Gretchen A. Williams, 
Michelle A. Hoferer. Kevin D. Pew. THIRD 
ROW: Edward A. Andraos, Saed B. Raztzadeh, 
Sasan Shadfari, Stephen C. Cotner, Michael R. 
Thome, Craig L. Cook, John Loyd, Warren D. 
Schwabauer Jr. SECOND ROW: Mark A. Wend- 
land, John E. Brewer, David A. Patterson, Kip D. 
Hanzlicek, Marcus O. Nelson, Rich Beardmore, 
David M. McNaghten. BOTTOM ROW: Karl D. 
Barnett, Gary M. Ploesser, Tim E. Lang, Wayne 
D. Maxwell, Kevin D. Fritson, Tracy R. Hall, Mike 
J. Giller, David R. Gateno, Mark E. Conrardy. 



Am. Institute of 
Architectural 



Engineers 



TOP ROW: Tim E. Mizer, Martin J. Murphy, 
Tom A. Trabue, Gregory F. Hall, Michael S. 
Glasker, James B. Giroux, Tim L. Nelson, Carl A. 
Johnson, Keithian L. Arnold, Douglas A. Riat, 
Ralph A. Rauch. THIRD ROW: Mark O. Snyder, 
Brian E. Guenther, Andrew E. Light, Garth L. 
Dvrre, Stephen K. Collins, Wayne Whaley, Bill 
Bassette, R. Linneman, Ronda K. Gergren, T. 
Scott Carter. SECOND ROW: Bruce E. Botter- 
muller, Donavon D. Coup, Randy D. McWhirter, 
David S. Broadstone, Michael P. Drury, Dean L. 
Hiebert, Matthew K. Elliott, Keith L. Wetter, Mi- 
cheal J. Murphy, Allen R. Moore. BOTTOM 
ROW: Tom C. Orazem, Hugo O. Slavia, Rick D. 
Lack, Barry J. George, Mike J. Weyand, Fred L. 
Hasler, Drew S. Thompson, David W. Douthit, 
Mike C. Costello, Charles R. Bissey. 

Am. Institute of 

Chemical 

Engineers 

TOP ROW: Kimoanh T. T. Nguyen, Chris D. 
Jones, Sandra S. Callahna, Sheila D. Hecht, Mar- 
garet A. Stewart, Sherrt L. Yarber, Bart A. Peter- 
son, Robe-t K. Franke. THIRD ROW: Scott J. 
Ringle, Mark W. Herron, David A. Carr, Douglas 
Bickel, Evelyn M. Northum, Kirk Barrett, Mike S. 
Colvin. SECOND ROW: Gerald K. Findley, Da- 
vid C. Guth, Patrick J. Silady, Richard J. McKit- 
trick. Jay A. Curless, Jeffrey A. Hubbell, Kent E. 
Bryan, Bradley K. Kloefkorn. BOTTOM ROW: 
Barbara G. Lindholm, Charles D. Darling, Rod S. 
Donovan, James R. Gundersen, Bruce Hazeltlne, 
Roger W. Grier, Thomas G. Lingg, Larry Sam- 
son, Steven R. Hieger. 



Am. Institute of 

Industrial 

Engineers 

TOP ROW: Mary K. Konz, Rachel J. Roth, Su- 
san M. Swanson, Mary R. Weber, Sharl L. Ca- 
meron, Deandra L. Tiliman, Linda G. Gordon. 
THIRD ROW: Alison D Lueker, Amy L. Fitz- 
gerald, Martha M. Mesh, Lisa B. Hoffmaster, 
Steve P. Navarro, Drew C. Westcort. SECOND 
ROW: Jeffrey B. Dorsch, Bart K. Bieker, Ronald 
D. Frazee, Ronald K. Williams, Susan E. Graven- 
stein, John M. Monrad. BOTTOM ROW: Mark 
A. Dreiling, Eugene R. Russell, Scott M. McCol- 
ley, Richard Higgs, Jon Kirkegaard, Duane 
Kogler. 





Campus 
construction 
provides needed 
space 



¥17hile K-State's enrollment is steadily 

''» increasing, new facilities and 
building additions are being constructed to 
accommodate student and faculty needs. 

The construction of the Recreation 
Complex, a $3.5 million sports arena, was 
completed Oct. 3, 1980. 

In February 1979, a record number of 
students voted in favor of increasing fees 
to cover the construction of the complex, 
according to Raydon Robel, Director of 
Recreation Services. 

Full-times students pay $12 a semester 
towards the 30-year construction bonds, 
and $3 for operation expenses. Part-time 
students pay $7.50 a semester, he said. 

The complex is used for intramurals, 
and for sports and recreational activities 
for students, faculty, and staff. 

The Recreation Complex houses a 



Zigging the Zag — A student 
gains additional exercise as he 
runs down the complex steps. 

Weight Watching — Charles 
Knight, sophomore in engineering 
and business, works with weights 
in the weight room of the 
Recreation Complex. 



weight room, 16 racquetball courts, two 
gyms, a multi-purpose room, men's and 
women's locker rooms and administrative 
offices. 

In addition to the complex, temporary 
fences surrounded the site of the general 
classroom building, located between 
Dickens and Justin Halls. 

The contract for the six story general 
classroom building was signed in 
September 1978. The $6.5 million 
construction was to be completed in 
January 1981, but due to delays in 
construction, the completion date was 
changed to later in the spring, according 
to Vincent Cool, university architect. 

The general classroom building houses 
the Departments of Education and 
Psychology. In addition, it provides 
laboratory facilities, classrooms, and 
lecture halls for other university courses. 

Like the classroom building, students 
were able to witness the erection of 
another structure, a plant sciences 
building. The building, named 
Throckmorton Hall after a previous dean 
of agriculture, was divided into three 
phases. 

In May 1979, the university signed a 
contract to construct the $8.5 million 5>C> 




Rob Clark 



Nancy Zogelman 



new buildings 101 



Campus construction 

facility, according to Cool, which was to 
be completed by mid-1981 and available 
for use in the fall. 

The plant sciences building houses plant 
pathology and agronomy offices, teaching 
laboratories, and some research 
laboratories. The greenhouses directly 
behind the main building are used for 
teaching and research, he said. 

"A large percent is research space 
because as a land-grant university, we 
have the responsibility to increase 
productivity of Kansas crops," Cool said. 

According to administrators, the main 
reason for construction of more buildings 
on campus is because K-State has never 
caught up with its enrollment. This 
information, based on the present 
enrollment indicates a need for 400,000 
square feet of additional space in 
comparison to other regent schools, Cool 



said. 

As well as keeping up with student 
enrollment, K-State has to keep up with 
modern laboratory space, so modern 
technology can be taught. Modern 
facilities are important in attracting the 
best possible faculty to teach and research 
at K-State, according to Cool. 

"The process of planning and acquiring 
space usually takes approximately five 
years, requiring check-offs all the way 
down the line," he said. 

The "check-offs" include brainstorming 
sessions and meetings of the university 
long-range planning committee, the 
university president's approval, and the 
Board of Regents and State Legislature's 
approval. Funding for the constructions 
are provided through state funds. 

In addition to the three major 
construction sites, university architects are 



completing plans for additional structures. 
Future plans for expanding the classroom 
and research space at K-State include 
Phase Two of Durland Hall with its 
construction beginning in March 1981. 
The addition to Durland Hall provides 
more space for the Departments of 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, 
Cool said. 

Also in the spring of 1981, according 
to Cool, a third floor addition will be 
added to Shellenberger Hall to increase 
the space for research in milling and 
baking science. Burt Hall will be 
remodeled for additional space for the 
Biochemistry Department. & 



Andrea Carver 




102 new buildings 



Building a Building — Two 

construction workers lay boards 
on the scaffolding of the east side 
of the plant sciences building. 

Sprouting — Dave York of 
Ludy's Greenhouse Manufacturing 
aligns a rafter of a research 
greenhouse behind the plant 
sciences building. 




4 




„• 



4* 



, •*'' 



4&H 



m> 





Rob Clark 



Scott Liebler 



new buildings 103 




Am. Institute of 
Industrial Engineers 

TOP HOW: Brad L. Hafner, William A. Groglio, 
Jr., Kristin L. Buckstead, Diana L. Stoner, Janice 
M. Russell, Steven F. Ripper, Edwin A, Betan- 
court, Bradley D. Eckhoff, Terry P. Dockum. 
THIRD ROW: Steven W. Barber, Richard N. 
Schiele, Paul F. Smyth, Ricardo Zayas, Carlos 
Berrocal, Casey Mussatto, Tom Newton, Keith 
Ice. SECOND ROW: John S. Taylor, David L. 
Barthuly, Brian S. Grauer, Gail A. Rltzdorf, Mark 
A. Zeorlin, James W. Sellers, Paul J. Strecker. 
BOTTOM ROW: Max J. Atwood, Mark A. 
Roessler, Joan E. Stammer, Brad A. Kramer, 
Bruce A. Bowersox, Dean A. Hayse, Frank A. 
Tillman. 

Am. Nuclear 
Society 

TOP ROW: Kenneth D. Matney, Kathy A. Van- 
Daalen, Lorrie R. Blanchard, B. Ellen Johnson, 
Robert B. Stuewe. SECOND ROW: Ralph H. 
Appelseth, Nick Hilton, Kent J. Wietharn, Don E. 
George, Chris Schmeissner. BOTTOM ROW: 
Hermann J. Donnert, Jeffrey H. Simmons, Ross 
Rohla, Donald L. Schmidt, Charles H. Mathews. 



Am. Society of 

Agricultural 

Engineers 

TOP ROW: Larry E. Wagner, Naomi K. Regier, 
Judith J. Garcia, Ed J. Heim, Kevin L. Salter, 
Curtis J. Reese. SECOND ROW: Russell B. 
Bauck, Curtis R. Janssen, Ronald D. Shinogle, 
Dan Brabec, James Steichen. BOTTOM ROW: 
Randall M. Friesen, Timothy K. Beougher, R. 
Shannon Johnson, Richard A. Weber. 



Am. Society of 
Interior Designers 

TOP ROW: Brenda L. Meyer, Julie A. Ellas, 
Regina M. Conroy, Shelley A. Way, Melody V. 
Gee, Angela D. Duerksen, Laura E. Tinker. 
THIRD ROW: Kathy A. Rudroki, Deanne PS. 
Bowersox, Cheryl A. Bennett, Cheryl A. Farney, 
S. Minette Duncan, Terri K. Bishop. SECOND 
ROW: Susan M. Karlln, Devin E. Williams, Kim 
A. Moter, Linda A. Strong, Susan K. Heckethorn, 
Linda D. Teter, Jane E. Klumpp. BOTTOM 
ROW: Fran Newby, Joanne R. Becker, Glenda 
Lee Sklenlcka, Craig C. Cook, Chrlstl L. Dutton, 
Carolyn A. Burnett. 



Am. Society of 

Mechanical 

Engineers 

TOP ROW: Mary E. Austin, Owen C. Taylor, 
Dallas H. Tubbs, Keith R. Jevons, Andy Gallup, 
Bob L. Clewell, Randy S. Cullison, Nancy K. 
Foust. THIRD ROW: John L. Stum, Michael A. 
Haverkamp, Paul Neal, Ken Johnson, Jeff Bridg- 
water, Keith Skldmore, Jeff L. Owen. SECOND 
ROW: John K. Niemoller, David R. Gateno, Alan 
T. Leard, David S. Douglass, David L. Eves, Phil 
A. Hrenchir, Kenneth W. Lassman. BOTTOM 
ROW: Tom G. Betzen, Richard J. Singer. David 
D. Blship, Michael Y. Nash, John C. Gelger, Pat- 
rick L. Borgerding, Alan G. Heskamp. 



Mail student- Mary Anne 
Jackson, junior in education, 
works part time at the campus 
postal center sorting mail. 



Work means more than money 



Working in school doesn't just mean 
studying, for many students it 
means making money. 

To many students, a part time job is a 
necessity in order to pay for living 
expenses and education. Many jobs are 
available on and off campus which offer 
students flexibility in working hours and 
the opportunity to make enough money 
to support themselves and go to school at 
the same time. Some jobs are unusual and 
accommodate the student's schedule. 



John Duensing, senior in accounting, is 
a campus firefighter. He lives on the third 
floor of the University Power Plant in the 
firemans' quarters provided for him in 
return for his services. 

"Not having to pay for room really 
helps me cut expenses," he said. "The 
job works great because I don't go on 
duty until 5 p.m. two nights a week, and I 
work a 24 or 36 hour shift on the 
weekends. 

"The only time it interferes with school 



is when I have to be on duty and I need 
to do some research for a paper in the 
library," he added. 

Most students usually work for the 
money, but the experience is also an 
important element. Students can gain 
experience and develop a working style 
that can carry over until after they 
graduate. 

Scott Darby, senior in journalism and 
mass communications, has worked on the 
Collegian Z>C> 




working students 105 



More than money 

advertising staff for five semesters. He 
sells advertising space to Manhattan 
merchants and also does layouts. 

"Of course 1 work for the money, but I 
also work for the experience of it. The 
job allows me to meet many people that I 
hope will be important contacts now and 
later," he said. 

Nitinai Bhanganando, senior in fine arts, 
is employed by a sorority as a house boy 
serving meals and working in the kitchen. 

"I wanted to get experience here at K- 
State because it's much easier to work 
here than it is in Thailand," Bhanganando 
said. 

"I work because I wanted to know 
what it's like to go out and work and 
make money instead of getting money 
from home," he added. 

Debbie Fisher, senior in marketing, and 
local shoe store employee said, "I enjoy 
working and meeting people. I think this 
experience is very valuable and 
rewarding." 

Many students find that working part 
time to help themselves get through 



school allows them to enjoy the 
experience of earning their own money. 
They find that they appreciate and are 
more proud of something they have 
worked for. Some students say earning 
their own money gives them a sense of 
independence because they have a say in 
how they spend their money. 

"I enjoy the independence I have with 
my own money," said Lisa Griffith, senior 
in journalism and mass communications. "I 
would much rather use my own money to 
buy things instead of asking my parents." 

Some students believe work can also be 
a method to fill spare time. There are 
many jobs that offer students the 
opportunity to meet people and make 
new friends. 

Tom Buckley, senior in correctional 
administration, works at a local tavern 
checking ID's and serving refreshments to 
the patrons of the establishment. 

"I'd be in Aggieville at least twice a 
week anyway, so I figured I might as well 
work and get paid for it." Buckley said. 

Mike Flores, Student Financial 



Assistance administrative assistant, said 
that more students are working part time 
this year as compared to the past. 

"This year employment services has 
almost doubled the work force from last 
year," he said. 

"We have filled 89.3 percent of work 
study jobs," he added. 

Flores said he believed the reason 
fewer students were employed last year is 
because low interest rates were attracting 
students to take out loans instead of 
working. 

This year students seem to want to 
work for their money and cut down on 
the amount of money borrowed. Student 
loans are still popular among students, but 
the trend now seems that the students 
would rather work, he said. 

"The student can really gain some good 
experience and application skills by 
working," Flores added. & 



.Randy Dunn 




106 working students 



.J* 



Credit or debit- Cam Blackly, 
senior in accounting, works part 
time as a bookkeeper for the K- 
State Union. 

Fill 'er up- Steve Pendergasdt, 
junior in marketing, works at a 
local tavern. 

Let your fingers do the filing- 
Kim Quarles, sophomore in 
accounting, files at the placement 
center for extra income. 





photos by Rob Clark 



working students 107 




Angel Flight 

TOP HOW: Linda M. LuginbiU, Debra D. Peter- 
son, Karen L. Stutterheim, Jennifer S. Sisney, 
Annette C. Hachinsky, Mary E. Despard. SEC- 
OND ROW: Michele M. Biamesen, Anne E. 
Bengston, Kay L. Deever, Shelly Sixta, Ann Day- 
vault, Twila El-Beheri. BOTTOM ROW: Julie K. 
Artz, Millie R. Wolff, Marcia E. Utt, S. Minette 
Duncan, Donna Hampel. 



Arnold Air Society 



TOP ROW: Kathy A. Dejesus, Kathy S, Grad- 
wohl, James A. Dice. SECOND ROW: Deborah 
S. Kool, Patricia A, Miller, Scott E. Hern. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Mark S. Davis, Robert K. West, 
Bobby Harp. 



Arts and Science 
Council 

TOP ROW: Penny C. Acsio, S. Gayle Northrop, 
Patricia K. Schlegel, Barbara J. Miller, Cheri L. 
Rolph. SECOND ROW: Carol J. Bell, Patricia 
A. Cooper, Catherine J. Karlin, Cheryl L. Smith. 
BOTTOM ROW: Kevin L. Fox/Kelly J. Higga- 
son, Mark W. Skinner, Mike H. Gibson. Not Pic- 
tured: Gary Mignano, Larry Courtney, Kelly 
Howard, Linda Trelber, Margret McClintock, 
Karl West, Mark Davis. 



Assoc, of Filipino 
Students 



TOP ROW: Jun C. Custodio, Isabelita M. Pa 
buayon, Elgie L. Namia, Marites S. Corpus, Evan 
getina P. Novero, Rosseni M. Manalo, Romeo L. 
Saplaco. THIRD ROW: MaElizabeth E. StoDo 
mingo, Judith S. Acosta, Jocelyn F. Catapusan 
Diosile G. Arlda, Norma B. Natino, J.V. Delacruz 
SECOND ROW: Efren E. Gonzales, Mario V 
Perilla, Jocelyn O. Naewbanlj, Elpidio J. Agbislt 
Rolando F. Camacho. Ferdinand R. Jarquio 
BOTTOM ROW: Emmanvev S. Santiago, Ales 
sandro A. Manllay, Roel F. Campos, Gary M 
Paulsen, Esterlina S. Olan, Maltri Naewbanlj. 



Assoc, of General 
Contractors 

TOP ROW: Kenn Lee, Bill Gensky, Michael L. 
Weimer, Pamela J. Best, Steven W. Cope, Mark 
P. Snell, Scott D. Budreau, David F. Steele, Ar- 
mon J. Pfeifer, Gary P. Dominguez. THIRD 
ROW: Don A. Shaver, Tom L. Engelland, Mark 
C. Lundin, Steven C. Koegeboehn, Don A. Enloe, 
James Lynn Edwards, Nancy J. Swartwout, Ter- 
ranee J. Shinogle, Brian W. Stark, Gary L. Swo 
boda. SECOND ROW: Jim R. Zlbert, James D 
Calvert, Roger A. Seymour, Donald O. Eschel 
bach, Tim W. Wagner, James A. Young, Mark J 
Welshaar, Tim M. Wagner. BOTTOM ROW: 
Merrill E. Blackman, Trent D. Peterson, Timothy 
J. Muetlng, Joseph D. Ostemeyer, Todd A. Bed 
nar, John G. Rehmer, Steve Polll, Scott B. Brew 
er, Jane D. Yarbrough, Richard M. Kuhn I. 





iJ 




Surgeon keeps perspective 



T\r- Eugene Schneider's folded legs 
*^ rested against the side of his 
cluttered desk. He slouched back in the 
swivel chair. He'd put in a long day. 

His office was in a state of disarray- 
medical manuals, x-ray charts, bandages 
and rumpled clothing were strewn 
aimlessly about the room. Baskets, 
buckets and boxes spilled over with 
unsorted materials, and file cabinets and 
bookcases pressed Schneider closely on 
two sides. 

"I'm only a procrastinator with my 
office," he said, grinning broadly. "Every 
time I make an effort to clean it up, a 
student stops by." 

Schneider has been head surgeon in the 
equine department at K-State's Veterinary 
Hospital since 1972, and he presently 
teaches more than 400 students. 

Some of his teaching takes place in a 
normal classroom situation, but the sterile 



environment of an operating room is 
where Schneider spends most of his time, 
guiding delicate surgical procedures. 

When he pulls those thin, skintight 
gloves over his fingers with a quickness 
that indicates his years of experience, 
Schneider begins to instruct the students 
who will be assisting him. 

Under the glare of bright lights, he 
operates and teaches at the same time, 
asking questions of students without 
breaking his rapid, surgical stride. 

"We don't joke around like the guys of 
'MASH,'" he said. "All conversation is 
directed towards the surgery, and no Z>0> 

Checking X-Rays-Schneider 
views x-ray and discusses surgery 
procedures with another doctor. 

Patient Pat- Schneider gives a 
reassuring pat to a foal after 
operating on its leg. 




photos by Bo Rader 



vet surgeon 109 




Assoc, of General 
Contractors 



TOP ROW: Kevin N. Kelley, John F. Hartford, 
Cunthla J. Smith, Sanora L. Holloway, Scott R. 
Berakamp, Mark A. Wingfield, Mike A. Allen. 
THIRD ROW: Carl A. Johnson, Jeffrey R. Ban- 
ister, Greg A. Paulsen, Glenn P. Shain, Phill L. 
Herrell, Robert C. Tinker Jr. SECOND ROW: 
Greg B. Bruggeman, VonnL. Mann, Bruce Botter- 
muller, Paul L. Oberle, Greg L. Harrelson, Phil E. 
Hoover. BOTTOM ROW: Robert B. Curry, Bret 
W. Rose, Mark E. Sell, Kevin A. Govert, Carl T. 
Hiebsch. 



Assoc, of Resident 
Halls 

TOP ROW: Jan L. Winter, Jennifer L. Stelner, 
Elizabeth L. Phelan, Suze E. Brink, Karen E. 
Kluge, Sharlene K. Mitchell, Cathy A. Rohleder. 
THIRD ROW: Sharon C. Rodlna. Howard K. 
Jones, Martin Wilde, Stewart M. Bowersox, Rog- 
er D. Page, Dennis R. Lynch. SECOND ROW: 
Harvey J. Lange, Steve P. Larkin, Mike A. Pezza, 
David Yoder, Tom S. Madden, Mark J. Hodges. 
BOTTOM ROW: David A. Kidwell, Ron D. Vau- 
pel, Winton L. Smith, W. Andrew Cooke, Deryl 
E. Waldren, Bryan A.Megee. 



ARH Honorary 

TOP ROW: Jennifer L. Steiner, Starr E. Pugh, 
Size E. Brink, Brenda K. Ellis, Elizabeth L. Phe 
Ian, Karen E. Kluge, Mary K. Farber, Lana K. 
Davis, Lor! A. Price, Denlse K. Harper. THIRD 
ROW: Sandy M. Grisham, L. Christine Faulk 
Mike Yamamoto, Link A. Evans, Dawnlee D 
Weber, Cathy A. Rohleder, Diane E. Haverkamp, 
Robbin R. Waldner, Lachele A. Harper, Lisa M 
Wiedmer. SECOND ROW: Martin Wilde, How 
ard K. Jones, Scot J. Stubenhofer, Mike A 
Rezza. Stewart M. Bowersox, Bradley J. Brill 
Dennis R. Lynch, Jerry D. Marr, Kathy D. Fran- 
kamp, Marcus O. Nelson. BOTTOM ROW: 
Dean A. Hayse, Jody B. Meralf, Mark A. Knoll 
Mark J. Hodges, Tom S. Madden, Winton L. 
Smith, W. Andrew Cooke, George L. Lauppe 
Deryl E. Waldren, Bryan A. Megee. 



Beta Alpha Psi 

TOP ROW: Cynthia A. Rach, Cheryl L. Denton, 
Karen L. Jaderborg, Melodie J. Janssen, Janette 
J. Wilson, Tamra S. Ramsey, Linda A. Kllma, 
Cathy G. Hougland, Linda S. Ebersole, Coleen K. 
Jurey. THIRD ROW: Marti Grady, Reva Eileen 
King, Jo L. Whetzel, Beverly G. Kool, Marcia K. 
Dryden, Patricia E. Llpp, Diane R. Rolechek, 
Allen D. Webber, Jon D. Fuqua, Reed C. Garrett. 
SECOND ROW: Diane M.Brown, Alan H. Ush- 
er, Mary Pat O'Connor, Klmberly Jo Butcher, 
Bruce M. Thomson, Greg J. Mermls, Patrick D. 
Petrie, John Jay Jenson, Mike Meisenheimer. 
BOTTOM ROW: Jane B. Stockard, Joel M. Mar- 
shall, Kevin Reichmuth, Doug A. VonFeldt, Den- 
nis S. Walker, Michael K. Mines, Cam L. Blakely, 
Robert K. Anderson, Scott M. Poland. 



Beta Alpha Psi 

TOP ROW: Patricia A. Mallams, Christy A. War- 
ren, Andrea A. Foutch, Deborah K. Mouser, 
Kathy L. Robertson, Roberta G. Mugler, Marilyn 
L. Short, Teresa L. Wagner, Pattl J. Cook, Rob- 
ert S. Dolechek, Paul Robben. THIRD ROW: 
Joseph G. Keller, Janet K. Anstaett, Sharon R. 
Skaggs, Stephen H. Snyder, Coni. J. Llckteig, 
Margaret L. Lobmeyer, John H. Mullen C. Ed 
Grasso, Vincent J. Kearney, Thomas J. Neely. 
SECOND ROW: Albert Clark III, Paul A. Win- 
terman, Jim Hofbauer, David A. Katz, Scott M. 
Stanley, Kevin J. Mast, Craig A. Becker, Thomas 
J. Gottschalk, C. Kevin Jackson. BOTTOM 
ROW: Amy J. Mario, Keith K. Klaassen, Geof- 
frey B. Roof, David L. Dyck, Harvey L. Lewis, 
Doyle G. Sawyer, Timothy E. Dlller, Chris H. 
Graham, Robert L. Steer, William H. Copher. 



"They're exposed to 
the best equipment 
and they should be 
equal to the task. 
Competition is keen 
here, and we don't 
want second best." 




Surgeon 



monkey business is tolerated. There's a 
lot of sterility with my presence in the 
operating room." 

It can be a nerve-racking experience 
when a student first takes up the scalpel 
alongside Schneider. By his own 
admission, Schneider is a perfectionist 
who demans the utmost from each of his 
students. 

"With him, there's no room for error. 
Everything's gotta be just right," Brad 
Walker, senior in veterinary medicine, 
said. "Right now, almost everything in 
surgery is a challenge, so we sometimes 



feel uncomfortable. But a year from now, 
we'll be hummin' right along." 

"They're exposed to the best 
equipment, and they should be equal to 
the task," Schneider said. "Competition is 
keen here, and we don't want second 
best." 

Although he is a stern disciplinarian in 
the operating room, without his cap and 
mask Schneider is known to students and 
associates as a jovial, easy-going man. 

"He's a big guy, and he can be real 
gruff, but actually he's a mellow, soft- 
hearted kind of guy," Jack Easly, a 




surgical associate, said. 

"I really do love my students," 
Schneider said. "They're energetic and 
their minds are fertile. I try to instill 
confidence in them with constant 
encouragement. 

"My desire is that every one of them 
be a better surgeon than I am." 

As a surgeon, Schneider has had many 
accomplishments, although he doesn't like 
to talk about them. 

He hesitates to mention that a type of 
bone joint fusion he developed for curing 
lameness in horses is now a recognized 
surgical procedure around the world. 

In 1967, he helped establish a 
veterinary school in Kenya, where he 
operated on lions, leopards, elephants, 
camels, antelopes, zebras and many 
species of birds before leaving in 1970. 

Schneider also spent some time as a 
surgeon in England and France before 
coming to K-State in 1972. 

In addition to his work here, Schneider 
frequently travels to other Midwestern 
states at the request of horse owners who 
need surgical assistance. 

Schneider attributes his skill to a driving 
dedication to be the best. 

"As a student at Colorado State 
University, I was an angry young man 
wanting to work my way to the top. It 
didn't matter who I kicked along the way. 

"I also wanted to treat as many animals 
as I possibly could in one day, and cure 
every one of them. In the process, I tried 
to do many things that hadn't been done 
previously. 

"When I first went into practice, I 
shirked almost all of my family 
responsibilities. It's not that way now, 
though. Jesus Christ comes first, then my 
family and others, and then my job. 

"Besides the teaching and surgery, a 
big part of my job is encouraging others. 
People spend too much time tearing each 
other down. I guess my philosophy is that 
we're here to bless and serve each other, 
and I'll do what I can to help strengthen 
another person." $ 



Kevin Cook 



Watchful Eyes' Schneider 
watches intently as one of his 
students performs an operation. 



Bo Rader 



vet surgeon 111 




Biology Club 

TOP ROW: JoAnn Fremerman, Paula D. Fell, 
Keith Johnson, Dan Croker,Carol Lose. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Brian D. Barnett, Roger K. Heiman, 
Mike E. Fubanks, Jon Anderson. 



Block and Bridle 

TOP ROW: Ellen D. Wasserman, Linda G. Gib- 
son, Tyra L. Lockhart, Cindy Luginsland, Sonya 
G. Lauppe, Peggy I. Reid, Patty E. Carey, 
LewAnn Schneider, Carol Horting, Tamara Sack 
hoff, Brenda M. Ericson. THIRD ROW: Lisa M. 
Skoch, MaryAnn Gilsdorf, Toni R. Duckworth, 
Connie L. Coldsmith, Dee B. Hoffman, Danni L. 
Wolf, Mary B. Smith, Susan M. Schlickau, Connie 
D. Pelton, Trudy L. Norman. SECOND ROW: 
Carolyn Schuetze, Jane Baldwin, Patti Moser, 
Gregory R. Kimzey, Ron Graber, Jacqueline I. 
Russ, Mary G. Kohman, Eric Guenther, John S. 
Bradley. BOTTOM ROW: Lyle D. Shipley, 
Bruce A. Milbum, Curtis A. Russell, Kevin R. 
Beyer, Larry Schalles, Ron A. Knight, Earl D. 
Fink, Dan C. Riley, Dan F. Clawson. 



Block and Bridle 



TOP ROW: Anita L. Nicholson, Mona M. Rusk, 
Debbie D. Rudicel, Lyn A. Huffaker, Terrl L. 
Johnston, Daniel L. Latourell, Jeffrey A, Woods, 
Lori R. Willhite, Linda K. Young, Jeanette A. 
Wear. THIRD ROW: Tracy L. Thomas, Scott E. 
Drake, Gint A. Pearson, John G. Prewitt, Sophie 
S. O'Neill, Will J. Novak, Patrick S. Fallon, J. 
Chris Baker, Max E. Krull. SECOND ROW: 
Bryce F. Schuman, Ed R. Kerley, Warren F. 
Schepmann, Gary D. Thompson, Tom J. Fang- 
man, Rick R. Klein, R. Kevin Chase, Kevin C. 
Barnes. BOTTOM ROW: Bryan L. Fisher, Mark 
A. Root, Stephen S. Pottorff, J. Mark Raaf, Ran- 
dy E. Olson, Gerald W. Gray, Kerry Ferguson, 
Scott A. Wendland, Tim Wiles. 



Block and Bridle 



TOP ROW: Jennifer A. Haggard, Janet K. Turn 
er, Susan M. Gunsauley, Kelly P. Gibbs, Cindy A 
Payne, Karen L. Chrisler, Constance C. Herl 
Debbie A. Donley, Sherrlta I. Mercer, Tina M 
St. Clair, Julie A. Tessendorf, Vlcki R. Upson 
Ken K. Kelly. THIRD ROW: James R. Temple 
ton, Billie J. Evans, Laken M. Heinrichs, Kelly D 
Foley, Melva D. Shipley, Francy George, Janice 
N. Ott, Monica L. Bailey, Cyndi S. Lyon, R. Faye 
Ploeger. SECOND ROW: Kim R. Bandyk, Cathy 
A. Sterns, Chan E. Gates, Charley F. Seiwert, 
Steven D. Roth, Nancy E. Landrlth, Lori A. Lips, 
Sherry L. Grlsham, Mallnda K. Bailey. BOTTOM 
ROW: Debra J. Hall, Mitch J. Moorman, Kent A. 
Jaecke, Kevin T. Good, Greg E. Banks, Jerry D. 
Grlnstead, Tom L. Buckley, Tammy L. Edwards. 



Block and Bridle 

TOP ROW: Bruce A. Kroeker, Lisa D. Wulf- 
kuhle, Rita J. Peuser, Janet M. Wlngfleld, Toni E. 
Timmis, Susan R. Brewer, Sheri L. Henry, Linda 
Jo Ranney, Shawn Frey-Plunkett, Becky A. 
Doores, Debora J. Beck. THIRD ROW: Mary 
Ferguson, Hugh Rogers, Brad W. Walter, E. Lane 
Chase, Kathy Bearnes, Diana Berry, Josephine 
Cllne, Vanessa Brands, Carroll Middleton, Larry 
Hoover. SECOND ROW: Reed E. Wilson, Ran 
dy McCallum, Gary Benteman, Bruce J. Shanks, 
Joel A. Seacat, R. Craig Patterson, Anthony J 
Stueve, Dave E. Anderson, Christine E. Elam 
BOTTOM ROW: David L. Goetsch, Eric L. Si 
monson, Scott K. Bokelman, Brent L. Kuehny, 
Evan Mai, Mike C. Simon, J. Douglas Smart, 
Eugene G. Schmltz, Duane L. Davis, Chris Fields 



.S< 



VT 



art by Mel Westme | 




Sometimes things go wrong. 
Some K-State students who think 
they are on their way toward 
commencement, receive a graduation 
check stating they are lacking credit hours 
or course requirements toward their 
degree program. 

Unnecessary delays in graduation and 
incorrect credit hours can be remedied if 
students would familiarize themselves with 
their degree requirements outlined in the 
K-State Bulletin and not rely so heavily on 
an advisor, according to Jack Carpenter, 
associate dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

"In a University this size, misadvising 
could happen, but it doesn't happen as 
often as people say it does," Lillian 
Bajich, arts and sciences general student 



advisor, said. 

"If there is a problem in advising, an 
advisor should first admit they misadvised 
a student. They should then write a letter 
and talk to the head of the department or 
to the dean of that college to see if a 
course can be waived, if there are any 
substitutions, or set up an independent 
study course," Bajich said. 

Bajich said sometimes students don't try 
to work out their advising problems with 
their colleges. They play a very passive 
role which results in them staying an extra 
semester. 

"They take the burden upon 
themselves because they don't know 
something might be worked out," Bajich 
said. "But sometimes things can be 
worked out." 



"Students and advisors should know 
what can be done. It's a student's 
responsibility to know requirements as 
well as an advisor's," Bajich said. 

"If a student comes to me and says he 
was misadvised, first I would contact his 
advisor to see if he was in fact misadvised 
and if there really was a mistake," 
Carpenter said. "Then there are various 
things we can do." 

Carpenter said they can set up a 
problems course, arrange to take an extra 
course, or if a student is trying to 
graduate that semester we would carefully 
reevaluate his transcript. Carpenter said 
sometimes a course might be listed as an 
elective on a student's transcript that 
might satisfy a course requirement. 

"K-State degree programs are very ix> 



misadvicc 113 





§900® 




Blue Key 



TOP BOW: Mona M. Rusk, Clifford G. Gilbert, 
Michael J, Scully, Kathleen M. Cott. SECOND 
ROW: Gene K. Atkinson, Susan P. Barsanian, 
Scott M. Poland, Bruce M. Thomson. BOTTOM 
ROW: Steven D. Hunt, Stephen E. Hentges, 
Reed C. Garrett, Jeffery R. Wilbur. 



Circle K 



TOP ROW: Kathleen C. Kennedy, Mary Jo Lilt, 
Alice Sky, JeanMary Alexander, Julie A. Castelli. 
THIRD ROW: Mary E. Pfenninger, Kelly S. 
Blair, Kevin D. Langston, David J. Albracht. 
SECOND ROW: Lewis M. Spangler, Sherry R. 
Geisler, John K. Llppman, Kendall B. Borthwick. 
BOTTOM ROW: Paul L.Laugesen, D.J. Haver- 
kamp, Brent Ahsmuhs, Michael A. Pezza. 



Chi Epsilon 



TOP ROW: Sheryl M. Henderson, Pedro L. Ser- 
rano, Julie L. Hawley, Art K. Umble, Kurt A. 
Garst, David A. Bohnenblust, Thomas M. Lind- 
ley, Larry B. Bull. THIRD BOW: Joe D. Delay, 
Michael J. Scully, Gene K. Atkinson, John N. 
Palma, Kevin F. Kandt, Beverly A. Johnson, Ron- 
nie D. Thomas. SECOND BOW: Steve W. 
Smurtz, Brett L. Wood, Bryan W. Reinecke, 
James A. Coen, Robert C. Dusin, James B. 
Shimp, Mark C. Jones. BOTTOM BOW: James 
J. Brennan, Gary W. Weidman, Michael W. Ber- 
ry, David R. Black, Kerry L. Black. 



Chimes 



TOP ROW: Stephen A. Nutt, Mike A. Mueller, 
L. Gregory Besler, Robert Frye, Jeffrey Dorsch, 
Terry Carlton. THIRD ROW: Carol M. Sobba, 
Carla M. Ott, Brenda E. Hundley, Susan M. Flem- 
ming, Marty E. George, Sheila D. Hecht. SEC- 
OND ROW: Edward J. Jaax, Dennis C. Wike, 
Charles R. Banks, Michael E. Hegarty, Timothy 
M. Penner, Max M. Guenther, Michael E. Brown. 
BOTTOM ROW: Jan Ahnen, Karen Kluge, Be- 
verly Kool, Kimberli Bearly, Julie Bunck, Linda 
Dobratz. 




Clothing Retail 
Interest Group 

TOP ROW: Trudy L. Hlatt, Miriam Shaheed, 
Anne K. Schmitz, Barb Wassenberg, Susan 
Wiebe, Dana Spain, Doris Delzelt. THIRD 
BOW: Sami L. DeBarker, Nancy K. Shelley, Lin- 
da S. Herman, Karen A. Bradley, Theresa M. 
Roesner, Vanetta J. Blevlns. SECOND BOW: 
Mona L. Dawson, Julie K. Artz, Maureen A. 
Meckler, Cheri A. Burton, Debl L. Frey. BOT- 
TOM BOW: Tim Burrow, Cynthia S. Bray, Su- 
san M. Blush, Maria L. Newell, Barbara Webster. 




art by Mel Westme; 



Misadvice 



flexible. A student can pick up additional 
hours toward their degree with programs 
such as intersession and correspondence 
courses," he said. 

According to Carpenter, sometimes stu- 
dents take courses that they think satisfy 
a requirement and sometimes they 
don't. 

"Students can petition a course so it 
does count toward their graduation 
requirements," he said. 

"If students were really careful about 
their own progress toward graduation they 
should start periodic checks to see where 
they stand. They should ask themselves, 
'Have I satisfied my requirements so I 
won't have any problems graduating?' 
Carpenter said. 

"Everybody wants the students to 
graduate on time and with cooperation 
between the student and advisor the 
system will work. But the student must 
take the responsibility," Carpenter said. 

Bajich said sometimes mistakes come in 
when students call the Registars Office in 
Anderson Hall and ask for their total 
number of hours. "That's exactly what 
they get. It includes: hours of "F," 
remedial classes, in fact everything they 
have taken at K-State." 

It is up to the colleges to know a 
student's hours which satisfy the 
requirements in order for him to receive a 
degree. 

Bajich said each college grants students' 
degrees so they are responsible for 
applying the hours to that degree 
program. 

"I have been working with one advisor 
during my whole duration at K-State and 
she advised me on the classes that I 
needed to fulfill the requirements for my 
degree," Erwin Lax, senior in social sci- 
ences, said. 

"After a graduation check I found that 
I needed more hours than I had been led 
to believe by my advisor. I thought I 



needed 11 hours to graduate this semes- 
ter (fall) and after this graduation check 
— I needed 40 hours," Lax said. 

Lax said after this happened he went to 
see his advisor about the matter. 

"My advisor refigured my hours and 
they came out the same as the graduation 
check," Lax said. 

"What she had done was figured in 
some hours twice that were retakes. She 
said she wasn't aware of my anticipated 
graduation and claimed she had not told 
me I was supposed to graduate in 
December as a means to cover up her 
mistake," Lax said. 



"After a graduation check I 
found that I needed more hours 
than I had been lead to believe 
by my advisor. I thought I need- 
ed 11 hours to graduate this se- 
mester(fall) and after this 
graduation check — I needed 40 
hours." 



"I couldn't prove what had happened 
because there was nothing in writing and 
therefore I was a victim of misadvising. I 
had to rearrange my class schedule so 
that I could at least graduate in May," he 
said. 

"I would advise a freshman entering K- 
State to make sure they keep copies of 
their own records and make sure they get 
all forms of advising in writing," according 
to Lax. 

Lax said he thought he had a very 
concerned advisor who was interested in 
his future and career. 

"I put all of my faith in her and as it 
turned out I ended up getting screwed," 
he said. 

"Sometimes mistakes come in when a 



student talks to his advisor and they set 
up a long range graduation plan. The 
student might withdraw, drop a course 
and they still think they can graduate on 
time," Bajich said. 

"I did my own long range planning 
toward graduation without the aid of a 
faculty advisor and it created problems," 
Lee Willis, senior in mechanical 
engineering and business administration, 
said. 

"As a result of not taking the pre- 
requisites that were needed for some of 
the more important courses, I have to 
come back an additional semester to 
complete degree requirements," Willis 
said. 

"I had a lot of advisors, actually too 
many, trying to tell me what to do. I was 
being juggled around so I took it upon 
myself to limit my advisors to one and 
consult her on class scheduling for future 
semesters," Willis said. 

Planning to graduate in May of 1981, 
Willis found when enrolling for the spring 
semester that one required course was 
only offered during the fall semester. 
Therefore he will have to return in the 
fall of 1981 to complete graduation 
requirements. 

"I lightened my semester load to 13 
hours a semester so that I could expand 
the time required for graduation to carry 
an even course load," Willis said. 

"I would recommend that all in-coming 
freshmen get one advisor they can trust 
and outline the courses they need to take 
for four years and stick with that 
schedule." 

"Make sure they are advised about 
dropping courses," Willis said. 

"Because the advisor and student are 
busy, they can overlook almost anything," 
Bajich said. & 



Dale Blanchard 



misadvice 115 




College 
Republicans 

TOP ROW: Teresa J. Larson, Sally J. Wilson, 
LewJene M. Schneider, Anne K. Schmitz, Lew 
Ann G. Schnieder. SECOND ROW: Roberta J. 
Riederer, Julie A. Fletcher, Stephen Linen- 
berger, Sara A. Huber, Carla M. Ott. BOTTOM 
ROW: David L. Ferguson, Mark W. Skinner, 
Craig A. Collins, David Lehman. 



Collegiate FFA 

TOP ROW: Laurie Layman, Klmberly R. Phil- 
lips, Suzy K. Allen, Sandra L. Hundley, Natalie G. 
Haag, Brenda F. Hundley, Rhonda M. Raven. 
THIRD ROW: John B. Gilliam, Tracy L. King, 
Mary Lu Pasley, Brian E. Vlning, Dale Unruh, 
Dee James, Larry Dossett. SECOND ROW: De- 
bra L. Yarrow, Anthony J. Stueve, Rodney D. 
Jones, Jeanette D. Jones, Jeff E. Dillon, Richard 
V, Llewelyn. BOTTOM ROW: Tim L. Sjogren, 
Randy R. Reinhardt, Charlse A. Gray, Timothy 
N. Ohlde, Scott A. Wendland. 



Collegiate 4-H 



TOP ROW: Renee D. Walker, Janet F. Strick- 
land, DeKeta S. Nicholson, Claudia M. Pratt, 
Brenda M. Ericson, Feona M. Clark, Kathleen J. 
Rippe, Kimberly R. Phillips, Jennifer A. Haggard, 
Linda L. Gibson, Hayley J. Matson, Sandy K. 
Tegtmeier. THIRD ROW: Rebecca A. Wagner, 
Renee A. Nyhart, Kay E. Hunter, Denise K. 
Harper, Shelley J. Purcell, Barbara J. Ott, Esther 
M. Hagen, Toni R. Duckworth, Sheryl K. Wilkin- 
son, S.Dawn Smith, SECOND ROW: Mary L. 
Hughes, Cheryl K. Thole, Lachele A. Harper, 
Karen S. Noll, Nancy S. Bigham, Kevin D. Pos- 
tier, Kelley P. Rowland, Martha M. Paschal, Ann 
M. Garten, Kevin L. Fox. BOTTOM ROW: 
Steve D. Young, Scott O. Nyhart, Ronald E. 
Wulfkuhle, Linda L. Bigham, Tim L. Sjogren, 
Robert L. Hughes, Deryl E. Waldren, Dean L. 
Hiebert, Dan F. Clawson, Keith W. Hefty. 

Concert Choir 

TOP ROW: Kim Johnson, Brian O'Nell, Wendy 
Litfln, Mark Ketterman, Susan Haynes, Steve 
Moldrup, Jeff Tarrant, Shelly McNaughton. 
Mitch Piper, Lori Reynolds, Phillip Debolt, Susan 
Tucker, Mitch Overmlller, Kerry Oberg. THIRD 
ROW: Chris Whittle, Mike Gromer, Susan Ker- 
senbrock, Greg Harms, Martha Greg, John Red- 
der, Kim Flanagan, Darryl Wlttlch, Mark Miller, 
Tracey Nelson, Randy Doerksen, Janet Anshutz, 
Brett Wolgast. SECOND ROW: Lynn Hill, Terry 
Schroff, Connaltre Miller, Brad Short, Leona 
Fowler, Monte Selby, Beth James, Paul Torkel- 
son, Ida Quick, Terry Thomas, Laura Pierce, 
Greg Hamilton, Charlotte Barrett. BOTTOM 
ROW: Amy Tennal, Tom Commerford, Sherry 
Foster, Dave Teeter, Susan Graber, David 
Carnes, Wendy Sistronk, Dave Atchison, Yvonne 
Mersman, Alan Kraft, Kim Brenslng, Dave Exllne, 
Marita Martin. 



Hmmmm- David Hacker, visiting 
professor in journalism, listens and • 
his students question Huck Boyd 

I 
And then — Huck Boyd tell the 
Colloquium classes about his 
former affiliation with the 
democratic party. Boyd has been 
the Kansas Republican 
Committeeman since 1966. 




116 colloquium 








photos by John Greer 



Colloquium course 
summons experts 



Fishing, hunting, law suits, film 
production, teenage drug abuse and 
"big-name" journalists share common 
ground in the National Affairs Colloquium 
class. The class, offered through the 
journalism department, is "taught" by 
David Hacker, visiting professor in 
journalism. 

The class meets weekly from 1-4 p.m. 
in the K-State Union, and gives students 
the chance to talk on a personal level 
with big-name journalists. 

Through personal contact, Hacker 
invites writers, editors, producers, 
advertising professionals and lawyers to 
visit the colloquium. 

Students must have special permission 
from Hacker to enroll in the class and are 
selected by Hacker for effective two-way 
communications between the guests and 
the students. 

The class structure is very informal and 
students are free to get up and serve 
themselves coffee or iced tea furnished by 
the Union at any point. 

Hacker was a founding editor of the 
National Observer, a Washington D.C. 
weekly newspaper founded in 1962, 



which folded in 1977. 

"When I first came to K-State, I 
wondered what I could do to take 
advantage of my experiences to help the 
K-State students," Hacker said. 

"When I was going to Harvard, I took 
an International Affairs Program which 
was a 4-5 hour seminar meeting with the 
people who made decisions, who ran 
government and ran the country. We 
learned how these people made the 
decisions which were being made," 
Hacker said. 

According to Hacker the students of 
the International Affairs Program met on 
an equal level with these ranking officials, 
and were not intimidated for asking silly 
questions. 

"Most of the people we met with were 
secretaries or assistant secretaries of 
government, and I always thought that 
sometime I would have my own version of 
the class." 

To start the class, Hacker sent a 
memorandum proposing the class to then 
head of the journalism department Walter 
Bunge. 

Outlined in Hacker's proposal were a Z50 



colloquium 117 




Cowboys for Christ 



TOP HOW: Jennifer A. Haggard, Paula A. Lins- 
ley, Debbie E. Regier. SECOND ROW: Nancy L. 
Ross, John G. Prewitt, Scott L. Craln, Tammy L. 
Edwards. BOTTOM ROW: J. Douglas Smart, 
Patrick K. Regier, Michael E. King. 



Crop Protection 

TOP ROW: Urftaru A. Gwamna, Kevin D. Tay- 
lor, Terrell E. Pritts, Denise E. Chubb. SECOND 
ROW: Brad A. Johnson, Daniel A. Filbert, Ron- 
ald E. Schulze, Bret L. Norman. BOTTOM 
ROW: Mitch E. Meehan, Hugh E. Thompson, 
Richard A. Hammel. 



Dairy Science Club 



TOP ROW: Elizabeth C. Stevens, Pamela I. Van 
Horn, Sue A. Henry, Jana A. Stutts, Jeffrey A. 
Woods, Curt Mueller, David W. Jons. THIRD 
ROW: Rick R. Klein, Ted M. Wilson, Bill R. 
Hedges, John C. Coen, Debbie J. Clubine, Mar- 
tene R. Richardson. SECOND ROW: Rick P. 
Teaford, Fred H. Heersche, Samuel S. Peabody 
III, Robert E. Schutz Jr., Kevin G. Licktelg. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Charles L. Norton, John O. Mozler, 
Tom W. Neely, Tim L. Peelen, Chip May, Erie E, 
Bartley. 



All present-15 selected students 
listened to men and women from 
different field of journalism during 
the National Affairs Colloquium. 




118 colloquium 



Colloquium 



list of possible guest speakers and a 
description of how the class was to be 
structured. 

"He (Bunge) seemed enthusiastic about 
the whole idea and took the proposal to 
the curriculum committee," Hacker said. 

The committee liked the proposal and 
gave Hacker the go-ahead. Thus, the 
class was added to the class schedule. 

However, there was one important 
thing lacking from the proposal, and that 
was how the class was to be funded. 

"I had heard that certain foundations 
granted money for this type of project," 
Hacker said. 

So Hacker sent a memo similar to the 
one presented at K-State to the Ganmett 
Foundation in Rochester, New York. 

Three months later, the foundation 
responded positively to the proposal and 
granted $5,000 for the first year's class, 
in 1978. 

The Ganmett Foundation is still 
contributing money for the class, 
increasing its gift in 1980 to $6,000 to 
allow for inflation. 

The grant is used for the speakers' 
plane fares, and for any food and lodging 
on the trip to Manhattan. 

As the class is operated, students can 
ask the speaker anything about any 
subject. There is no lecture, it is strictly 



informal, and journalism isn't always one 
of the topics discussed. 

For example Grant Sanborn, K-State 
graduate and copy editor for a South 
Dakota newspaper, commented about a 
house of ill repute in a town called 
Deadwood. The point was argued whether 
the women had an occupation or a 
profession. 

In a serious legal discussion where an 
editor of a paper was accused of 
hounding a city judge to death, the 
discussion was interrupted with: "Do you 
like duck hunting?" "Have you been yet 
this year?" 

Sometimes if the speaker stays in town 
the class reconvenes later at one of 
Manhattan's private clubs. 

Students like the class because it 
enables them to learn in a relaxed 
atmosphere. 

"You learn a lot from professional 
people because they've been there and 
have been through more than I have at 
this point. 1 might not be able to use 
everything they say now but I will be able 
to in the future," Kathy Witherspoon, 
senior in journalism, said. 

"Most students will never realize in 
their K-State life what they have learned. 
It's an inspirational learning which pays 
dividends later," Hacker said. 



There are no exams in the class, and 
Hacker stresses that spontaneity is 
cruicial. 

The class is unique because it is built 
entirely around the 15 guests. 

The success of the class lies with how 
much the students get out of the class. 

"You could tell that the speakers were 
really interested in what we thought 
because they were always asking us our 
opinions," Mike Wilson, senior in 
journalism and political science, said. 

"You see people who have been there 
and it tends to sober you up," he said. 

"It's a good class because it lets you 
talk to professionals in the field of 
journalism from radio and T.V., film 
producers, and people on special 
assignments," Greg Coonrod, senior in 
journalism and business, said. 

"It shows you how tough competition is 
in the real world and emphasizes how 
little journalists get paid," Coonrod 
added. 

"It ought to be called the Colloquium in 
Discouraging Would-be Journalists," 
Coonrod said. ■$ 



Nancy Reese 




John Greer 

colloquium 119 




r 



r 






Debate Team 



TOP ROW: Doug E. Prochazka, Sonia D. Over- 
holser, David Dunlap, Barbara Miller. SECOND 
ROW: Vance C. Green, Kurt May, Ed Schlappa. 
BOTTOM ROW: Elton L. Smith, Eric C. Chris- 
tensen, Chris E. Wheatiey, Joe McCollough. 



Delta Psi Kappa 



TOP ROW: Miriam P. Poole, Pamela J. Davis, 
Marietta Deets, Jackie A. Mignano, Dana D. Ste- 
phan, Nancy J. Beems, Deborah L. Plhl, Cynthia 
M. Smith, Susan E. Miller. THIRD ROW: Susie 
R. Bollig, Shari D. Flene, Dizle Kuklinski, Susan 
K. Haas, Cathy A. Siebert, Rebecca L. Walsh, 
Connie L. Goeckel, Elizabeth J. Kolarik. SEC- 
OND ROW: Catherine A. Peterson, Sally R. 
Greenbank, Lorl D. Lamb, Janet Cockerill, Mau- 
reen Hosty, Deb McDaniel, Nancy Duffin. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Leslie L. McGinnis, Carol Young, 
Kathy Edwards, Sheila Hultgren, Carol Schle- 
sener, Lynne Swaney, 



Design Council 

TOP ROW: Sharon L. Strobel, Inga Fenijh, Teri 
A. Bishop, Tim Mulligan, David W. Curbow, Rod 
ney C. Harms. THIRD ROW: Timothy P. Krug ; 
Lois E. Herbers, Paul L. Stefanskl, Mike L. Gallo 
way, Gary L. Schmltz. SECOND ROW: David L 
Hieronymus, Matthew D. Connolly, Bob Kaplan 
Daniel C. Keiter. BOTTOM ROW: William G. 
Young, Scott W. Fairbairn, Winton L. Smith, Pete 
J. Kruse, Joseph K. Wledemeier. 




Education Council 

TOP ROW: Linda J. Gottsch, Sheree L. Lam- 
bert, Jennifer J. Wagner, Denise L. Kolman, 
Becky A. Hay, Krlstl A. Rlngen, Krlsta A. 
Vaughn. SECOND ROW: Theresia M. Steiner, 
Diane M. Stump, Liz A. Drees, Cindy S. Halpaln, 
Kave L. Belkmann, Sandra D. Burns. BOTTOM 
ROW: Willard J. Nelson, Kathryn A. Treadway, 
Lorl A. Butterfield, Gary L. Gurss, Randy B. 
Tolle. 



120 biofeedback 



Relaxing the stress away 



Tests, homework, the car won't run, 
we'll be late for the game, 
interuptions and deadlines. Though college 
is a learning institution, it is also filled 
with stress. According to statistics, stress 
related disorders are the leading killer in 
our society. 

Stress related problems interupt our 
daily lives constantly. However, individuals 
can now deal with stress through 
biofeedback training that is offered 
through K-State's counseling services. 

"We can now deal with stress through 
relaxation that biofeedback offers an 
individual," David Danskin, professor in 
student development, said. 

Biofeedback is a technique of seeking 
to control one's emotions by using devices 
to train oneself to modify involuntary 
body functions, according to Jon Lewis, 
assistant professor at the University 
Counseling Center. 

K-State's biofeedback training has been 
offered to students since 1973. Danskin 
began the program because he thought it 
would help the students improve their 
grades and also deal with stress related 
problems. 

"Biofeedback is a method that allows 
the individual to get some signals back 
from the body. It lets us know what state 
we are in," Lewis added. 



According to the two professors, 
biofeedback can help students in two 
ways. 

"It helps them relax and release tension 
that causes stress and also helps the 
student do better on exams," Danskin 
said. "Through biofeedback, we learn to 
voluntarily control our bodily functions, 
both in the mind and the body." 

In Holtz Hall, K-State students can use 
the various biofeedback machines. 

"We now offer biofeedback techniques 
that allow students to actually see the 
tension in their body," Danskin said. 

"Biofeedback training is on machines 
like the skin temperature machine or 
muscle relaxation machine. These 
machines actually measure the tension in 
our bodies," he said. 

The skin temperature machine is 
attached to the finger and measures the 
temperature in the hands. 

"The idea being, the more tense you 
are the lower the temperature is going to 
be. The more relaxed you become the 
blood vessels in the extremities tend to 
open up and they get warmer. This can 
monitor the degree of tension or 
relaxation you have," Lewis added. 

"The optimum temperature in the 
hands is 95.5 degrees or more," Danskin 
said. "A person can learn how to get the zx> 




Brain waves - Doug Allen, 
junior in milling science, 
relaxes as he goes trough 
Biofeedback training. This 
machine records the tension of 
the muscles. 



biofeedback 121 




Engineering 
Student Council 

TOP ROW: Suzanne D. Shirvani, Tadhi A. Ho- 
ferer, Susan A. Attig, Julie L. Hawley, Kathleen 
A. VanDaalen, L. Christine Faulk, Allecia Rem- 
ington. THIRD ROW: Mark W. Peterson, Gene 
K. Atkinson, Pratt Barndollar, Todd W. Smith, 
Glenn P. Shain, Mark Bergmeier, Kent J. Wleth- 
arn, Brad Hafner. SECOND ROW: David S. 
Douglas, Rick R. Mercer, Randall M. Frlesen, 
John E. Roush, Kurt C. Wilbur, Clifford, G. Gil- 
bert, Mark R. Hutchison, Eugene R. Russell, 
BOTTOM ROW: Hermann J. Donnert, David R. 
Black, Robert B. Curry, Darrell D. Simon, Bruce 
Hazeltiner, James Seymour, Michael McGeough, 
John P. Dollar. 



Faculty Senate 

TOP ROW: Candyce Russell, Peter Cooper, Al 
Adams, C.E. Hathaway, Heinz Bulmahn, Floyd 
Harris, Randy Pohlman, Nelda Elder. FOURTH 
ROW: Gary Vacin, Tony Barnes, Carl Clayberg, 
Bob Kruh, Jackson Byars, Joyce Jones, David 
Ames, Richard Gallagher, Wellington Koepsel, 
Frank Orazem. THIRD ROW: Gerry Posler, Leo 
Figurski, David Whitney, Roscoe Ellis, David 
Mugler, Wayne Bailie, Mike Lynch, Bob Scott, 
Keith Beeman, Wayne Nafziger, Charles Reagan. 
SECOND ROW: Tom Brown, Jim Grelg, Larry 
Cindrich, Roy Frederick, Katherine Burke, John 
Pence, L,V. Withee, John Murry, Vincent Gille- 
spie, Page Twiss, Jerry Weis, Marilyn Stryker, 
Charles Corbin, Kenneth Burkhard, Mary Ellen 
Sutton, Robert Poresky, Antonia Pigno, Nancy 
Twiss, Jim Carey. BOTTOM ROW: Lyman Ba- 
ker, Jerome Vestweber, Terrence O'Brien, Allen 
Chapman, Ralph Field, Margaret Ordonez, 
Charles Marr, AI Davis, Dorothy Thompson, C. 
Heintzelman, Eugen Friedmann, Jack Lambert, 
Lowell Brandner, Mary Harris, Dave Laurie, 
Dave Cox, Sandra Bussing, Fredrlc Appl, Charles 
Bussing, Bob Linder, Bettie Dale, Kent Stewart. 

Family Economics 
Interest Group 

TOP ROW: Danlene K. Carlson, Lori A. 
Scheuerman, Sharon S. Holling, Kathleen M. 
Downing, Cynthia K. Wren. SECOND ROW: 
Susan E. Traskowsky, Frances L. Waugh, Brenda 
K. Buss, Lisa K. Scheunemann, Laura J. Tem- 
plin, Albie Rasmussen. BOTTOM ROW: Mary F. 
Baucus, Janet L. Thierolf, Lori B. Fulton, Shauna 
L. Horn, Joni K. Schwartz. 



Financial 
Management 
Honor Society 

TOP ROW: Linda K. Gelger, Pamela J. Parker, 
Kim A. Long, Tom C. Sailors, Verlyn D. Rich- 
ards. THIRD ROW: Alan D. Powell, Michael A. 
Mullen, Jerome J. Weber, David J. Agres, Paul 
L. Watklns. SECOND ROW: Richard D Webb, 
James A. Duensing, Ron D. Hoskins, Alan R. 
Stetson. BOTTOM ROW: Jeff D. Cllne, Eric C. 
Samuelson, Robert D. Holllnger, Ali M. Fatemi, 
Randolph A. Pohlman. 



Better 
grades 

by 
body 

control 






122 biofeedback 



hands this warm by utilizing biofeedback 
practice." 

Another technique employed by 
Danskin is placing electrodes on the 
individual's forehand and measuring the 
tension of the muscles of the individual. 

"Many of us who think we are in a 
relaxed state are really very tense. 
Through the use of this technique, it 
allows us to really see how tense we are 
and then we can employ relaxation 
techniques that will reduce the stress 
levels of the body," Danskin said. 

"Our daily lives are more complicated 
. . . because we go from one situation to 
another. We don't give our bodies a 
chance to come down to a point of 
relaxation," Lewis said. "Instead of the 



level going up and then coming back 
down, they stay at a high level." 

According to Lewis, the biofeedback 
exercises break that pattern of tension 
levels going up. Through the exercises, 
they allow the tension level to fluctuate. 

"A person should build times during the 
day where he can close his eyes and sit, 
relax and daydream about a place that is 
very comfortable, to let some of the 
tension out," he said. 

Danskin agreed that the majority of K- 
State students could benefit from using 
biofeedback techniques. 

"Biofeedback can help us become more 
relaxed and to still our minds and also to 
become relaxed in our body, so that we 
may actually be able to visualize events in 




our mind," Danskin said. 

Biofeedback training could help many 
students with stress related disorders like 
high blood pressure, asthma, migrain 
headaches and even heart attacks. 

"Biofeedback training is directed at 
helping students manage their own stress. 
K-State has many students who will have 
high blood pressure," he said. "I figure 
that out of the 20,000 students at K- 
State, 3,000 will end up having high 
blood pressure, 2,000 with migrain 
headaches and 800 to 1,000 with ulcers. 
They will also spend 40 to 50,000 dollars 
on medication to deal with these stress 
related problems." 

"With biofeedback training many of 
these individuals would be able to 
relinquish the medication and also be 
healthier," Danskin said. 

Biofeedback is not a medication, but a 
self-controlling process that the student 
develops and helps themselves deal with 
everyday problems, he said. 

"Biofeedback is as good as the 
individual wants to make it. With continual 
practice, biofeedback is very effective," 
Danskin said. "What biofeedback does is 
increase the blood flow through an 
individual's body and relaxing him." 

Biofeedback helps the person 
voluntarily control his mind. The person 
unconsciously does control his mind and it 
is the mind that causes the stress. 

"Biofeedback is really getting a 
physiological feeling on how to relax and 
regulate your mind and body," Danskin 
concluded. & 



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Touch of tension - Silvia 
Workerman, junior in secondary 
education, uses one of the many 
machines that the Holtz 
Counseling center provides for 
student use. 

Stress machine • This is one of 
the instruments used to do 
reasearch in Biofeedback. 



photos by Rob Clark 



biofeedback 123 



Student involvement 



Some students feel that University 
involvement may be an asset in 
obtaining certain positions in the job 
market. 

"I am involved in extracurricular 
activities because I need to stay active, I 
like to be involved, and I enjoy being 
involved because it makes me feel at 
home in the university," David 
Hogeboom, junior in radio and TV, said. 

"My overall campus involvement is not 
geared toward my major but more toward 
self-fulfillment," Hogeboom said. "It is 
important to me to know where I am, to 
be comfortable and to be very involved 
— it will be just as important when I get 
a job — becoming an important part of 
that job," he said. 

"I am involved because it makes me 
feel like I have more of a reason for 
being in school other than class work," 



Marjorie Boyd, sophomore in radio and 
TV, said. 

"I enjoy working with people. It 
enhances my leadership abilities and it 
helped my four years as an undergraduate 
pass quickly," Billy Williams, graduate 
student in counseling, said. 

"Being involved with Union Governing 
Board (UGB) has given me a definite 
insight on how the university functions as 
a whole," Philip Atkins, senior in food 
science, said. "Also, UGB has given me a 
chance in dealing with the administration, 
to make policy decisions concerning the 
university and in dealing with other 
students." 

Agreeing with students, administrators 
feel that employers seem to be interested 
in students who take an active role in the 
university or community and show 
leadership ability. 




124 extracurricular activities 



favored 



"Outside school work activities are very 
important," Bruce Laughlin, director of 
the career planning and placement center, 
said. "All employers ask about college 
activities." 

"We suggest that all students get 
involved in the university because 
employers see involvement in 
extracurricular activities as an asset," 
David Kraus, assistant director of the 
center, said. 

"Not only do employers want to see 
involvement, they also want to see 
evidence of leadership ability," Kraus said. 

"Nearly all jobs require a lot of 
communication and human relationships," 
Laughlin said. "A student's extracurricular 
activities have become more important to 
employers in identifying those students 
that are capable and interested in working 
with other people." 

"Outside activities are used as a 
measuring stick for leadership potential, 
unselfishness, and a student's ability to 
work with others," Laughlin said. "Also, it 
is an index to measuring a student's work 
capacity and productivity." 

According to Laughlin, extracurricular 
activities usually indicate to an employer, 
motivation, involvement and good work 
traits. It can be beneficial if activities that 
a student is involved in are relevant to his 
professional career objective. Leadership 
positions, fraternity and sorority affiliation, 
campus wide activities, academic awards, 
and community programs paint a picture 
of a good student. I>D» 



Pulll- Randy Hamm, sophomore 
in electrical engineering, Karen 
Kluge, junior in accounting, and 
Larry Durant, senior in 
accounting, grit their teeth during 
a tug of war, part of the 
extracurricular activities sponsored 
by the K-State Association of 
Residence Halls every year during 
Spring Fling. 

Victory dance- Kelly Edmonds, 
junior in correctional 
administration, and Becky Cook, 
senior in health and physical 
recreation, celebrate after Cook 
scored on a penalty kick in the Ed 
Chartrand Memorial Soccer 
Tournament. The two are 
members of the K-State soccer 
club. 




extracurricular activities 125 





°a® 



/■ & U L- rJI 





Flying Club 



TOP ROW: Mary Ann Gilsdorf, Brenda J. Bust- 
er, Andy Kiorpes, Dan Wancura, Stan Davisson, 
Eric Peck. THIRD ROW: Richard C. Husselman, 
Bernard R. Buster, Denis E. Eaton, Lou Scott, Biit 
Metcalf. SECOND ROW: Lillis S. Peck, Robert 
W. Anderson, Bruce C. Spellman, Tim J. O'Hara, 
Charles E. Reagan. BOTTOM ROW: David C. 
Fischer, Philip B. Bradley, Tim L. Sjogren, Harry 
M. Clark, Christopher G. McHarg. 



Foods & Nutrition 
Interest Group 

TOP ROW: Lisa K. Hight, Bonnie J. Maday, 
Donna L. Klontz, Jana S. Fields. SECOND 
ROW: Lydi L. Fan, Rachel L. Severance, Anna 
M. Miskovsky, Karen S. Noll, BOTTOM ROW: 
Nancy J. Hoffman, Rhonda R. Horsch, Jwiana L. 
Olorunfemi, Kathy Belden. 



Food Science Club 

TOP ROW: Rebecca A. Haddock, Lynn Seeley, 
Laura V. Bassette, Lachele A. Harper, Philip R. 
Atkins. SECOND ROW: Frank E. Cunningham. 
David Croweil, Doug A. Albrecht, Janice Stucky, 
Don Kropf. BOTTOM ROW: Danie! Y.C. Fung, 
Gay L. Winterringer, Bruce J. Shanks, Jan Wiker, 
Charlton R. Allen, Terry Howard. 



French Club 



TOP ROW: Darrel L. Carter, Kelly M. O'Con- 
nor, Vickie L. Rock, Ann E. McNeer, Patricia 
Flgurski, Joyce Hoerman. THIRD ROW: An- 
drea E. Smallwood, Mary Ann Moore, Kathleen 
M. Cott, Margaret A. Renfro, Deborah J. Frank- 
lin. SECOND ROW: Ann N. Drlss, Tara S. Tray- 
lor, Nancy K. Moore, Margie Daniels, Elizabeth 
Folland. BOTTOM ROW: Mitchell S. Farrell, 
Jerald A. Thompson, Carol S. Eagleton, Bret G. 
Pierson, Mark T. Mills. 



FTD Student 
Chapter 

TOP ROW: Annette D. Armstrong, Wanda Y. 
Trent, Mitzi A. Shuttleworth, Julia K. Beems, 
Penny S. Pyle, Sandra K: Sawyer, Shannon F. 
Shelton. SECOND ROW: Linda C. Botkln, April 
A. Titsworth, Marlene A. Rudkins, Beverly A. 
Iwert, Pam R. Burch, Sandy Reeves. BOTTOM 
ROW: R. K. Klmmlns, Teri L. Bortz, Crystal K. 
Zabel, Rose M. Atkins, Dawn R. Johnson, Paul A. 
Farha. 



'V 




Craig Chandler 



Involvement 

"For many types of jobs, outside 
activities are as important as academic 
work," Laughlin said. "For example, 
those students seeking sales positions will 
be evaluated more carefully by employers. 
They usually are more interested in the 
students' involvement in extracurricular 
activities than academic work. Usually a 
satisfactory level of classroom 
performance is sufficient." 

"The absence of extracurricular 
activities can sometimes be discarded if 
students work while attending school," 
Laughlin said. 

"Students with low grade point 
averages sometimes have to raise a family 
or work to put themselves through school; 
sometimes these can be an asset when 
students apply for a job," Kraus said. 

"Large well-organized companies have 
not changed their recruiting tactics over 
the years, but they do seek stars 
(students) that are well-rounded," Laughlin 
said. 

"There is no single answer to which is 
more important — extracurricular 
activities, grade point averages or work 
experience," Laughlin said. 

"We cannot generalize on just which of 
the three is more important, but related 
to the students' field of study, all of them 
are important depending on the nature of 
the job," Kraus said. "As a matter of fact 
all three are important and employers 
usually look for students with a balance of 
all of them." 

"Sometimes it depends on the type of 



Hanging around- Becky 
Crenshaw, senior in political 
science, waits to deliver papers to 
the Senate chambers in Topeka as 
part of an intern program for K- 
State students. 



work whether or not an employer will put 
heavy emphasis on extracurricular 
activities." 

"Most of the time research jobs do not 
stress a lot of extracurricular activities." 

"A position with a major research firm 
— grades are most important," Laughlin 
said. "A sales job with a retail 
organization — activities are most 
important." 

"Students should sell what they have 
the most of. In an interview situation an 
employer will look at a student's 
qualification: jobs, grades, special training, 
hobbies, and extracurricular activities. 
They want to see how well-rounded they 
are." 

"Employers are interested in potential 
leaders with organizational talent, 
communication skills and the ability to 
work with others, these are the necessary 
ingredients to being successful," Kraus 
said. 

"As long as a student has excelled in 
something and show they are good at it, 
businesses translate this ability into their 
particular company," Laughlin said. 

"Some students are offered jobs before 
they graduate because they show that 
they can be successful," Kraus said. 

"We encourage freshmen to get 
involved with the career symposium 
service that we offer in the center. 

"In this service we bring speakers who 
have successfully excelled in their careers. 
They tell them what they had to do to 
get where they are now, how they did it, 
what their salaries are and the necessary 
skills that are essential in their field," 
Kraus said. & 



Dale Blanchard 



extracurricular activities 127 



Union reflects on 25 



<<Ty eferendum Question #1: To 

*■■ impose a student fee increase of 
$5 per semester, $2 for summer school. 
Proceeds of fee will not directly benefit 
anyone for at least fifteen years." 

Sounds ridiculous? It happened. In a 
sense, anyway. And it happened with the 
largest percentage of student body voter 
turnout in K-State history. 

Of course, the 1938 referendum for a 
fee increase to raise money for a student 
union did not include the fifteen-year 
waiting period. 

When 72.2 percent of the student body 
turned out to vote more than three to 
one in favor of funding a student union, 
most expected construction within a few 
weeks. But due to World War II, the 
construction had to be postponed and 
again by the time they had a building 
committee formed and plans under way in 
the late 1940's the Korean War delayed 
construction. 

In 1947 a temporary barracks was 
brought to campus, located in what is now 
the Union parking lot area. The barracks 
consisted mainly of a snack bar, an area 
to play cards and one table tennis table, 



according to a history written by Walt 
Smith, director of the K-State Union. 

Progress toward obtaining a student 
union was given a boost in 1951 when 
President McCain appointed five students 
and five faculty members to a student 
union planning committee. 

Two years later the Union Governing 
Board was established and in 1954 
semester fees for the as yet non-existent 
building were increased. 

Finally, on March 8, 1956, fifteen year 
after the first student fees for it were 
collected, the K-State Union officially 
opened for business. Overall costs for the 
original building amounted to $1,650,000 

The Union's grand opening was covere 
extensively by the K-State Collegian and 
the K-Stater, an alumni publication, as 
well as being noted in papers across 
Kansas. 

The Union Governing Board approved 
"The K-State Union" as the official name 
of the building to convey the feeling that 
it was a building for the entire university 
family — not just students. 

In 1961, the first addition was started. 
Because of the tremendous increase in 




Mmmii i itiaiMHii 



year existence, looks to the future 



enrollment, 40,000 square feet of space 
was added without an increase in fees. 
The addition consisted of the southeast 
portion of the present building at a cost 
of $900,000. 

The final addition was began in 1968 at 
a cost of 2.88 million dollars. Completed 
in 1970, the addition was just slightly less 
than the size of the original building. 

Total construction costs of the Union 
amounted to 5.4 million dollars. In 1978 
the value of the building was placed at 14 
million dollars. According to Smith, it 
would be impossible to build additions of 
large size due to the high costs of 
construction. 

The Union operates self-sufficiently and 
depends on sales and student fees as its 
only income. Students currently pay $23 
per semester toward the Union. 

Non-income areas make up almost one- 
half of the total square footage of the 
Union and are supported by the income 
areas in a break-even operation, according 
to Smith. 

Smith has been with the Union for 24 
of its 25-year existence. Starting as an 
accountant in 1957, Smith was named 



director in 1973 after serving both as an 
assistant and associate director. 

"The goals (of the Union) today are 
basically the same as it was 25 years ago, 
only we are serving more people," Smith 
said. 

"If there has been a change I would 
say it is in the attitude of the students 
toward the Union. We don't have quite as 
much student involvement in Union 
programs. Today's students are perhaps 
goal orientated toward their degree and 
more career minded. It's probably a 
matter of time (that the student has)," 
Smith said. 

Looking toward the future, Smith did 
not foresee major physical changes in the 
Union, but talked about three smaller 
project ideas. 

"I would envision a kind of mall area 
between the Union and Seaton," Smith 
said. "We have talked about an ice cream 
parlor. Certainly the information desk 
needs expanding and I could envision this 
idea with the mall area. We have the 
possibility there for a beautiful area." 

"I don't know if we can do this out of 
our operational budget. If we want it done 



we'll probably have to do it ourself. The 
university is going to be tight for money." 

An outdoor amphitheatre on the east 
side of the Union was also in the idea 
stage, Smith said. 

"The idea is to keep it as rustic as 
possible — perhaps a raised stage area. 
We could move some of the 
entertainment from the Catskellar, or 
speakers from Issues and Ideas, outside 
during the spring, summer and fall. 
Certainly, with the shade on the east side 
it would be comfortable. We usually get a 
cool breeze on that side of the building 
also." 

Overcrowding in the cafeteria area has 
sparked discussion of expansion there. 

"We don't know what we are going to 
do yet. Short of building on, we are kind 
of limited. It's been mentioned that we 
could put stairs up through the ceiling to 
the KSU room but we really haven't sat 
down and studied it out", Smith said. $ 



Anton Arnoldy 



photo by Cort Anderson 





Union 



WffN 
11 
II 

II 
I V 



IB 



11 
11 
II 
II' 



w 

I 
« 




German Club 



TOP ROW: Sandra A. Nalder, Janet L. Baskill, 
Hania Shaheed. Priska V. Chappell. BOTTOM 
ROW: Scan J. Clipshang, Donna K. Lang, James 
F. Schesser. 



Grain Science Club 



TOP ROW: Frances M. Jilka, Betsy Perry, Paul 
M. Brown, Daryl Bashor, Jeff S. Bilyeu, Marilyn 
S. Bolt, Anne M. Schletzbaurn, Steve Woerner, 
Scott Brooks. THIRD ROW: Steve A. Konz, 
Scott T. Bell, Tyrone L. Rumford, Mary A. 
Iwinski, Kelvin W. Belin, Doug Trumble, Marc 
Smith, Bryan Miller. SECOND ROW: Dale Eus- 
tace, Gary J. Murphy, Steve G. Tangeman, Tim 
S. Morris, Allan D. Schoof, Shaban Abbul Mutla- 
lib, Donald P. Morrison. BOTTOM ROW: David 
J. Neff, Gregory A. Nolting, Mark A. Yoesel, 
Kent E. Nolting, David LR Lewman, Mike Young- 
quist, Kent D. Holder, Timothy P. Clary. 



Greek Affairs 



TOP ROW: Lynne A. Kiriakos, Lisa Beam. Be- 
verly Kool, Stephanie Davis. SECOND ROW: 
Steven W. McCarter, Margaret Miller, Mike Goss. 
BOTTOM ROW: Barb K. Robel, Duane A. Web- 
ber, Reed C. Garrett, Eric C. Samuelson. 



Home Economics 
Council 



TOP ROW: Gina A. Kaiser, Kathy K. Rupp, Pam 
R. Jorns, DeAnn M. Hiss, Kay A. Bartel, Mary- 
Ann Rempe, Denise E. DeLange. THIRD ROW: 
Loretta I. Johnson, Shelly A. Bowman, Vicki Y. 
Nelson, Trina D. Cole, Linda K. Ventsam, Esther 
M. Hagen, Tracey L. Pittman. SECOND ROW: 
Bonnie J. Maday, Gail Goodyear, Gayla Back- 
man, Teresa A. Utech, Susan M. Blush, Kahleen 
M. Downing. BOTTOM ROW: Timothy T. 
McHenry, Susan D. Zimmerman, Christi L. Dut- 
ton, Karen S. Kalivoda, Jackie E. Hubert. 



UlJJ* 



is 



key 

te 

decree 




130 magician 



The power of illusion and sleight of 
hand is helping one K-State student 
through college. A majority of K-State 
students take out loans, receive 
scholarships and apply for grants but for 
Nicholas de Saint-Erne freshman in 
veterinary medicine, magic is the key to a 
degree. 

Because of his magical abilities, de 
Saint-Erne decided to put them to use to 
finance his college education. 

"I pay my full load through school on 
the magic shows I do. I pay for books, 
tuition and living expenses through 
performing magic shows and teaching it. 
A professional magician is someone who 
does magic for a living and it is his only 
source of income. A semi-professional 
magician does magic for money, but it is 
not his only source of income," he said. 

"I seem to fall in between those two 
descriptions because I am paying my way 
through school and it's my only source of 
income. When I get out of school I will be 
semi-professional because I'll do it in my 
spare time, de Saint-Erne said. 

An interest in magic was formed early 




in life for de Saint-Erne, one that he 
began to cultivate in the first grade. This 
interest has carried him through most of 
his teen and adult years. 

"My first encounter using magic was 
when I was in first grade. My sister gave 
me a magic kit. I did my first show for 
some of my friends and class mates," he 
said. 

Even at an early age de Saint-Erne was 
able to use his magic abilities to further 
his education. He often incorporated 
magic into a number of his classes while 
in secondary school to add interest to the 
often mundane assignments given by his 
teachers. 

"When I was in 8th grade I read a 
magic book that showed me how to put 
on a magic show with a few things around 
the house. I was suppose to do a book 
report on this book, but instead I did a 
magic show in place of the book report. 
My teacher liked it so well that she had 
me put on this same show for a class of 
first and second graders," he said. 

"My first big show was in 1973 at The 
Coca Cola Bottling Plant in Wichita, at a 
Christmas party. In the spring of 1974 I 
joined a magic club called 'Wizards of 
Wichita.' Today, there are 39 
professional, semi-professional and 
amateur members. I've been doing magic 
for more than nine years," de Saint-Erne 
said. 

De Saint-Erne works Fridays and 
Saturdays at a local club, and does his 
studying during the week. "I can walk 
around and get to know them (the 
audience) instead of just performing on 
stage," he said. 

"Working with children is probably the 
hardest thing to do in magic because they 
are harder to fool. They don't have a 
long attention span," he said. 

De Saint-Erne is not always alone when 
he performs his magic tricks. Like most 
magicians he has an assistant, Jocelyn 
Jenab, junior in biology who has been 
working with him for about a year. 

"I enjoy working as an assistant to 
Nicholas. I am learning how to perform 
magic tricks. I am not as skilled at it as 
Nicholas but hopefully I will be able to 
perform a magic show as skillfully as he 
does. I get a big kick out of waiting for 
the show to start, and watching the 
audience reactions and responses. I have 
been working with him for about a year," 
Jenab said. 

De Saint-Erne and Jenab incorporate 
the traditional magician's trick of making a 
rabbit appear into their act in a non- 
traditional manner. 

"In this trick de Saint-Erne has a black 
scarf that he forms into the shape of a 
rabbit. He takes this black scarf and puts 
it into a big doll house and makes a black 
rabbit appear. He then puts this black 
rabbit back into the doll house and I 
appear in its place in a black bunny outfit 



with ears," Jenab said. 

De Saint-Erne has performed all around 
the country at various T.V. shows, 
seminars and conventions to keep his 
repertoire of magic acts up-to-date and to 
exchange ideas with other magicians. 

"I travel around the Midwest going to 
magic conventions and performing 
shows," he said. 

Along with learning new tricks as a 
magician, de Saint-Erne also, invents 
different magic tricks that are introduced 
to other magicians. 

"I invent tricks and sometimes sell them 
to other magicians at conventions. I 
invented a magic trick called the IBM 









Wr_. N. | 








B£^ / \ #9 s 








v y U 




vl 


';•- 


* ■*** f^B I 


t£ja 


V s * 


^1 "-'? 




IT 




'/■" 





photos by Scott Williams 

Cardputer. It is in Japan and a couple 
other countries," he said. 

Even with the notoriety of television 
and appearing before audiences de Saint- 
Erne does not want to be a professional 
magician as a way of life. 

"I would not like to do magic as a 
profession because it would be a serious 
occupation for me, rather than something 
that is fun. To do it as a profession it 
would become more of a pressure and it 
would take some of the pleasure and 
satisfaction out of it," de Saint-Erne said. ® 



Dale Blanchard 



Keyed up - Nicholas de Saint- 
Erne, freshman in veterinary 
medicine, performs a trick with a 
"magic" box for Terri Groth, 
junior in journalism and mass 
communications, and Dena Taylor, 
senior in fashion marketing. 

Pick a card, any card - Card 
tricks are one of the most popular 
illusions in de Saint-Erne's 
repertoire. 



magician 



131 




Home Ec. Education 
Interest Group 

TOP ROW: Debra R. Miller, Judy K. Reed, Pat 
K. Bornholdt, Mary Jo Lill, Sandy K. Tegtmeier, 
Monica M. Klenda. THIRD ROW: Shelley J. 
Purcell, Carla M. Morrical, Sheryl K. Wilkinson, 
Monica J. Kohake, Sharon M. Bairow. SECOND 
ROW: Kathryn A. Hixon, Sonia R. Dyck, Brenda 
K. Stottmann, Cynthia M. Nietfeld, Denise M. 
Ebert. BOTTOM ROW: Jan R. Wissman, Tracey 
L, Pittman, Linda K. Young, Kathy K. Rupp, 
Judy A. Spiegel. 



KSCI Horsemen's 
Assoc. 

TOP ROW: Beth R. Saunders, Sue A. Henry 
Tyra L. Lockhart, Margie O. Black, Lonie L 
Burch, Sheri L. Henry, Kim K. Edwards, Kim C 
Hamilton, Billie J. Evans, Deborah A. Diehl 
Shannon Heinly, Meg McDonough. THIRD 
ROW: Gregory A. Fowler, Linda C. Habiger 
Alexis E. Cooper, Debra L. McDermott, Thann 
Boyum, Jane E. Gottsch, Beth R. Walz, Kelley D 
Rowland, Kelly D. Foley, Jane Baldwin, Char 
lotte Clack, Tracy King. SECOND ROW: Thorn 
as P. Good, Kim S. Sellers, Susan R. Worrell 
Teri L. Sellers, Karen L, Baucus, Vanessa 
Brands, Darci M. Harvey, Kathryn A. Jackson 
Lorrie K Meuli, Chris Fahrenhoiz, Sherry L. Gri 
sham, Monica Bailey. BOTTOM ROW: Bill J 
Riese, Duncan Wilson, Bill Denlinger, Doug 
Trumble, Max Sprague, Dennis H. Sigler, John T. 
Amrein, Kevin J. Dwyer, Patrick L. Burton, Kelly 
McGlashon, Nancy Miller. 

Horticulture Club 

TOP ROW: Sharon R. Mueting, Julie A. McLain, 
Debi S. Hart, Karen M. Brox, Sandra K. Sawyer, 
Lisa J. Roberts, Janet L. Ehrlich THIRD ROW: 
Bryon F. Black, Teri L. Bartz, Harvey J. Lang, 
Jeff A. Dowell, Dale R. Havry, August L. Lietzen. 
SECOND ROW: Charles A. Gray, Clark R. Har- 
ris, J. Blake Donnelly, Steven J. Plummer, Mark 
J. Dahlman. BOTTOM ROW: Jerry J. Moore, 
Roy Wilshire, Mark D. Mugler, Harvey W. 
Wright, Nicholas E. Meyer. 



Horticulture Club 

TOP ROW: Wanda Y. Trent, Kimberly A. Smith, 
Nettie D. Millian, Maribeth Mazur, Julia K. 
Beems, Susan D. Schonewers. THIRD ROW: 
Shirley A. Kristek, Sharon J. Heiniger, Ginger A, 
Malone, Bonnie J. Heard, Kay B. Daniels, Ellen 
K. Forsberg, Barbara L. Benda. SECOND ROW: 
Katherine M. Larson, Nancy R, Nickel, Sonia R. 
Dyck, Brad B. Cooper, Cindy Henricks, Charlene 
Horinek. BOTTOM ROW: Richard D. Wootton, 
Lori K. Brax, Georgia S. Urish, Kirk C. Bierly, 
Elaine D, Hobson. 



Students 

paid 

with job 

training 



Double decker - Lisa K riese, 
sophomore in pre-veterinary 
medicine, hands an ice cream 
cone to a customer while working 
at the dairy bar in Call Hall. 




132 job experience 



Jobs are a financial necessity for many 
students, but there are other reasons 
for working besides money. 

Some students at Call, Shellenberger, 
and Weber Halls, are using their jobs to 
gain practical experience in their majors. 
Call Hall works with students in the dairy 
areas, Shellenberger with the students in 
the grain science areas, and Weber with 
the students in the animal sciences areas. 
Each campus location produces its 
specialties and sells them to the public in 
different ways, but all have one main 
purpose — to provide experience for the 
students. 

Under the supervision of four full-time 
employees, students assist in all phases of 
processing milk and milk products sold at 
Call Hall. Between 20 to 25 students each 
semester work at the dairy sales counter 
and processing plants. 

The main objective of the dairy 
producers at Call Hall is to produce an 
item that involves teaching, research and 
extension, Harold Roberts, professor of 
animal sciences and industry said. Roberts 
said it is more important for students to 
learn to make high quality products 



instead of competing with the prices at 
local grocery stores. 

"We try to keep prices competitive to 
outside, but we don't try to undersell it," 
Roberts said. 

Student employees help sell dairy 
products at the sales counter and process 
the dairy products in the plant at Call 
Hall. 

"Anybody who wants to get more 
practical experience, it's for their benefit," 
Roberts said. 

"I'm in food sciences and it works 
along with my major," Lynn Kessler, 
sophomore in animal sciences and 
industry, said. "It gives me a lot of 
background knowledge to work here. If I 
go towards dairy, it will help out a lot." 

The sales counter in Call Hall is 
operated by the Department of Animal 
Sciences and Industry. Dairy products, 
including ice cream, cheese, milk, and 
butter are also sold at the counter. The 
counter also has a fountain service, sells 
eggs from the department, and sells 
coffee and doughnuts. 

The milk is also delivered to the 
residence hall food centers. The dairy 




processing plant supplies all the milk for 
the residence halls on campus. Students 
deliver an average of 500 to 600 gallons 
a day of milk to the halls, Roberts said. 
The other dairy products are sold only at 
Call Hall. 

What began two years ago as an idea 
for "something different" for All- 
University Open House, has turned into a 
profitable business for the Bakery Science 
Club, according to Greg Kobs, senior in 
bakery science and management and 
president of the club. 

The club had operated the bakery once 
a year to make doughnuts to hand out at 
open house. Two years ago, club 
members tried making bread and found it 
was extremely profitable, Kobs said. 
That's when the students decided to try it 
on a weekly basis. They opened the once- 
a-week bakery in August 1979. 

The members of the club worked 
through the Department of Grain Sciences 
and Industry but the department let the 
students set up the plans. 

"Experience is the big thing," Kobs 
said. "We learn how to run a business, 
how to market, streamline our processes." 

Every Wednesday, the club sells raisin, 
whole wheat, rye and french breads. It 
also sells doughnuts, and specialities such 
as danish pumpernickel bread and pound 
cakes. 

The bread and doughnuts are made in 
a small experimental lab in Shellenberger. 
They are kneaded by hand to give 
students experience in handling dough. 

The money the club earns is used to 
finance club field trips and to replace 
equipment for the lab. 

Although most of the 19 student 
workers are in the Bakery Science Club, 
membership isn't a requirement to work 
in the bakery, Kobs said. By enrolling in a 
one hour course, Grain Science Problems, 
a student can bake bread three hours a 
week, he said. Students work for 
experience and credit — not money. 

Cattle, sheep and pigs are killed, 
processed, cut, packaged and sold weekly 
in the meat lab in Weber Hall. Ten 
students process and sell the meat under 
the supervision of two full-time assistants. 

"It's a good learning experience," Mary 
Lyon, assistant in the meat lab and 
graduate student in animal sciences and 
industry, said. "It's the only position you'll 
ever have where you work from the 
slaughter to slicing bacon. In an industry, 
you are just on a line doing one thing. '£» 



job experience 133 





Institute of Electrical 
and Electronics Engg. 

TOP ROW: David J. Bogen, Mark L. Brown, Richard 
R. Hubert, Laura A. Tracey, John K. Moore, Paul D. 
Kreutzer, Donald M. Hummels, Alan D. Rymph, Joe 
Staudinger. THIRD ROW: Myron D. Flickner, Mary 
W. Peterson, Arnold A. Schwartznegger, Doug D. 
Grederking, Tim S. Anderson, Mac A. Cody, Daniel L. 
Strom, Marcus Junod, Scott Green. SECOND ROW: 
James F. Stilwell, Randall L. Urban, Dale A. Utter- 
back, Mark W. Aitken, Larry W. Stoss, Gregory B. 
Clark, Kent M. Schuler, Alan D. Lybarger, Robert V. 
Belms. BOTTOM ROW: Richard L. Craft, David W. 
Richards, Ken G. Klamm, Darel N. Emmet, Scott E. 
Thull, Kris J. Fionda, Chris McHarg, Don Hush, Rob- 
ert J. Faus, Donald R. Hummels. 

International 
Coordinating Council 

TOP ROW: Ming-hong Chow, Hamdi Y. Hulais, Nam 
H. Oh, Elpidio J. Agbisit, Duangduen Onnuam. 
THIRD ROW: Khawar F. Maneka, Dave D.S. Sach- 
deva, Abdel A. Abdelrahman, Imran S. Malik. SEC- 
OND ROW: John A. Brettell. Firooz Bakhtiari-Nejad, 
Yueh-Chuan Yu. BOTTOM ROW: James F. 
Schesser, David E. Lehman, Ishobee Wayo, Esmail 
Parsai. 



Judo Club 



TOP ROW: Sandra A. Nolder, Wade A. Leitner, Mike 
W. Shelton, Jeff F. Kenworthy THIRD ROW: Jim F. 
Foster, David A Watts, Amir Jafari. SECOND ROW: 
Ike Wakabayoshi, Mark E. Ward, Aian L. Remick. 
BOTTOM ROW: Jim Hime, Ben W. Lange. Greg 
Cooper. 



Kansas Assoc. 

of Nursing Students 

TOP ROW: Shari J. Erickson, Pamela D. Marvin, 
Joan E. Lopez, Lynn M. Farrell. SECOND ROW: 
Jackie D. Voight, Mary L. Hughes, Stacy A. Shearer, 
Lori J. Blomquist. BOTTOM ROW: Rebecca D. 

Keyser, Heidi S. Jernigan, Karen L. Stutterheim, 
Phoebe J. Samelson. 



" t v i >--j 



Doughboys- Greg Kobs, senior in 
bakery science, watches as Jeff 
Bilyeu, sophomore in milling 
science, and Ed Reinwald, junior 
in bakery science, remove danish 
pumpernickel dough from the 
mixing bowl in Shellenberger Hall. 




134 job experience 



Experience 



"This is the best experience because 
they (the students) have to work behind 
the counter," Lyon said. "They have to 
represent the school and work with the 
public. You learn quickly by answering 
questions and learn about what's going 
on." 

"Originally I came here for the 
money," Anita Cowley, freshman in 
animal sciences and industry, said. "But I 
see how much experience you gain. I'm 
getting experience working with something 
related to my major." 

The amount of meat sold each week is 
determined by the amount of research 
done by faculty members and the lab 
work done by students in the Department 
of Animal Sciences and Industry. 
Annually, an average of 10,000 pounds of 
lamb, 120,000 pounds of beef, and 
30,000 pounds of pork is sold. 

"The main thing we have here," Lyon 
said, "is an outlet for our product and the 
benefit of teaching students." & 



Tanya Branson 





On the lamb- Lynn Rundle, 
senior, and Lance Galloway, 
sophomore, both in agricultural 
education, and Bob Thayer, junior 
in animal science and industry, 
learn to distinguish different cuts 
of lamb during a meats lab class 
in Weber Hall. 



Cort Anderson 



job experience 135 




Kansas Music 
Teachers Assoc. 



TOP ROW: Carolyn Curts, Christina Whittle, 
Kyla StoHus. Julie Shute. BOTTOM ROW: Su- 
san K. Linder, Lisa K. Grigsby, Brett A. Wolgast, 
Cheryl D. Glahn. 



Kansas State 
Engineering Tech. 

TOP ROW: William G. Jurrens, Karla J. Jurrens, 
Linda M. Carra, William J. Roeder, Darrel L. 
Carter, Cynthia L. Jackson, Rhona L. Walton, 
Nancy L. Jeter, Jerry A. Burton, Haytham K. 
Alsalih. Kurtis R. Bahr. THIRD ROW: Greg A. 
Ochs, Dave T. Remmei, Mark W. Fielder, Rich- 
ard D. Sayler, Lawrence A. Davis, David E. Ka- 
laidjian, Robert F. Jandera Doyle L. Slack, 
Charles W. Brunnert, Raymond J. Ryan, L. Paul 
Kiefer. SECOND ROW: Mark R. Hutchison, 
Kevin L. White, Eric R. Thompson, Wilmer, J. 
Bartel, Robert J. Adams, Brian E. Bigelow, Mark 
G. Richter, Larry A. Cohn, Robert Bacchus, Tay- 
lor L. Preston, Arthur Vaughan (Advisor). BOT- 
TOM ROW: Charles P. Obiander, Mark E. Worf, 
Bruce Z. Hansberry, Kelly R. Jones, Tim E. 
McEnulty, Michael A. McNairy, Pete Werner, 
Kent A. Gray, Mark E. Talbott, Larry M. McWil- 
liams. 

Kappa Kappa Psi 

TOP ROW: Dana E. Brown, Mike L. Quintanar, 
Don D. Martin, Glen E. Hush. SECOND ROW: 
Glenn D. Lewis, Anthony J. Stueve, Cedric C. 
Heiniger, Ray D. Lemon. BOTTOM ROW: Phil- 
lip W. Hewett, Joseph B. Aarons, John E. 
Strickler. 



Korean Student 
Assoc. 



TOP ROW: Kwang Soo Kim, Hyuk II Kim, Jin- 
Young Kand, Ike J. Jeon, Dayoung Han. THIRD 
ROW: Nam H Oh, Nam I. Kim, Kwang-Ok Kim, 
Seoung-Jee Jung, Sungwon Hong. SECOND 
ROW: Dae H. Young, Chidong Kim, Moon J. 
Han, Myung H. Oh, Ho Young K. Ku. BOTTOM 
ROW: K. Rho, S. Kim, Mooyoung Jung, Jakang 
Ku. 



K-State Players 



TOP ROW: Dana-Lou Pinkston, Donna-Lou 
Gerber, Robin L. Selfridge, Patty Wit, Evelyn 
Gabbert, David L. Dunlap. THIRD ROW: David 
L. Ollington, Steve L. O'Connell, Gale L. Rose, 
Linda Haynes, Ian L. Snider, Wendy Slstrunk 
SECOND ROW: Miles L. Phillips, Ed L 
Schiappa, Randy L. Cyegg, John L. Rahe, Shar 
on L. Rhine. BOTTOM ROW: Chamblee L. Fer 
guson, Thomas L. Downing, Kevin L. Brown 
Richard L. Walker. Chris L. Wheatley. 



What 

job 

interview? 



An employment interview is one of 
the most important events in a 
person's life. Those 20 or 30 minutes that 
a student spends with the interviewer can 
shape the course of his life. 

As a result, there is a certain key to 
help the student in job interviewing. 

In going in for an interview, the student 
should find out the exact place and time 
of the interview. Being late for an 
interview is never considered excusable. 

"Schedule time to get there and don't 
schedule yourself too tightly in case the 
interview runs longer than you expected," 
Jim Akin, associate director of Career 
Planning and Placement Center, said. 

i It is a good idea to research the 
company that is doing the interviewing. 

It is helpful to know how old the 
company is, what type of services they 
offer, where it is located, the growth of 



the company and their future, Akin said, 

It is also essential to be neat and clean. 
It is imperative that the student dress for 
the interview with good taste. 

In regard to clothes, one must 
remember that he is applying for a job — 
not a ball game. 

After a student has prepared for the 
interview, he must concentrate on the 
interview itself. 

Feeling nervous during an interview is a 
normal emotion. As a matter of fact, a 
student is expected to be a little nervous. 

In combatting nervousness, it is a good 
idea to remember that the interviewer is 
there to hire people and not to embarrass 
them. 

"The best way to be in an interview is 
to be as natural as possible," Akin said. 

"The general mode of operation is the 
interviewer determines how the interview 



is to be handled." he said. 

Most of the time interviewers follow a 
simple question and answer routine. 

"There is no particular kind of answer 
that the interviewer looks for. It is the 
evidence of thought being given to the 
questions, whether it is technical or 
general," Akin said. 

Akin said the quality of the answer is 
most important. 

"Sometimes it is all right to admit a 
failure especially if you can show you 
learned something from it," he said. 

The Career Planning and Placement 
Center offers workshops throughout the 
semester that teach students how to 
prepare resumes and offer films that show 
how an interview is conducted. 



Janice Lenior 



Next . . . 



i i 



Maybe he'll overlook the ketchup on my resume 



1 1 



ulp! 



In exactly five minutes and 32 
seconds Claude Clump would be going 
through his first job interview. 

Pacing impatiently and looking at his 
watch every 25 seconds, Claude finally 
sat down. 

"Oh hell," Claude thought as he sat. "I 
have one brown sock and one black sock 
on. But if I shuffle in and keep moving 
my feet, maybe they won't notice," he 
reasoned. 

Unfortunately, Claude should have been 
more concerned with things other than the 
color of his socks. 



His hair could have been an 
advertisement for cooking oil, and his face 
could have been an ad for facial tissues. 

Because of a quick shaving job, 
Claude's face looked like Custer's last 
stand, cuts and nicks everywhere. So he 
tore squares of tissue off to stop the 
bleeding, but had forgot to take them off. 

His physical appearance wasn't 
enhanced by his choice of clothing either. 

The scarlet shirt didn't match the 
burgundy polka dotted tie, or the orange 
nylon pants, let alone the plaid yellow and 
red blazer which looked like it had been 
slept in for three months. 

Nevertheless, our hero was confident. 



Mentally he went over and over responses 
to anticipated questions. He also reviewed 
the history of the company, which he read 
over his morning breakfast of chocolate 
cake and left-over pizza. 

He was positive, he knew everything 
about ACME Co. that he needed to know. 

"I'm going to breeze right through 
this," l.e told himself and he wrung his 
clammy, shaky hands. 

As he worried, he saw one of his 
competitors step out of the interviewing 
office. He was immaculately dressed, 
cleanly and carefully shaven, and not a 
hair out of place in his wind-blown look 
hair style. Z>C> 



interviewing 137 



""^■■^■■■■■M 



ACME. EXEOniVE. RACEMtHT 5EKYCE. 




V, 



\» 



138 interviewing 



Ketchup resume 



"Claude Clump?" the interviewer 
stepped out and yelled. 

Claude jumped to his feet and went 
over to shake the interviewer's hand. 

He should have looked before he 
walked because not only did he trip over 
his untied shoe laces, he tripped over the 
footstool as well. 

"What a klutz!" the interviewer thought 
to himself, but instead of laughing out 
loud, he offered to help Claude to his 
feet. 

"My name is Ivegot Acne, that was 
quite a spill you took, let me help you 
up." As he extended his hand he 
continued. "I'm assistant vice-president of 
the ACNE company and I'll be 
interviewing you for the position of 
assistant manager of our new ACNE Co. 
branch in Manhattan." 

Claude panicked silently. "I'm in real 
trouble if they ask me any questions 
about company history. I read about 
ACME Co., not ACNE." 

"Well Claude, I assumed you've read 
all about our company," Ivegot said, "do 
you have any questions you'd like to ask 
about ACNE?" 

"Uh, well, uh, I guess not, I think I 
understand everything," Claude said. 

"Good! Let's get started then. By the 
way what religion are you?" 

"Religion? Sometimes I'm Lutheran, 
sometimes I'm Catholic depends on 

what kind of mood I'm in." 

"I see. Tell me Claude, how are you 
and your wife getting along?" 

Claude paused, wondering: "He did it 
again he asked me another illegal 

question but I don't want to make 

him mad, so I guess I'll go ahead and 
answer his question." 

"Well sir, I don't have a wife yet." 

"Oh ho, I see. Hmmmmm, I see you 
live in an interesting part of town. That's 
a Greek area isn't it?" Ivegot asked. 



>y Me] Westmeyer 



"Yes there are several fraternities and 
sororities around where I used to live, ha 
ha ha ha ha ha!!" Claude said, proud of 
his attempted humor. 

Fifteen minutes into the interview, 
Ivegot kept thinking to himself: "Is this 
guy for real? He's got real nerve coming 
in and looking like that I wonder what 
those white specks all over his face are 

and the way he's answering these 
questions!! Sheesh! He must be trying to 
fake me out or something." 

"Well Claude, do you have any 
questions you'd like to ask about our 
company now?" 

"Yeah, come to think of it I do. When 
I start to work for you guys, can we be 
pals or something? I mean like, well, I 
don't really know anybody, and I really 
would like to get to know all the hot-shots 
in the company. You're a hot-shot ain't 
yar 

"Uh, well, we'll have to see about 
that." Ivegot answered hesitantly. "By the 
way, did you bring a copy of your resume 
along? I'd like to take a look at it." 

Claude stood up, and pulled the 
mangled resume from his back pocket. 
The paper looked like Claude had been 
using it as a paper plate. "I hope he 
overlooks the ketchup stain on my 
resume," Claude said to himself. 

As he handed the resume to Ivegot, 
Claude made a last-ditch effort to 
straighten the crumpled piece of paper. 

Ivegot grabbed the paper between his 
index finger and thumb, not knowing what 
miracle cure for what disease would be 
growing on the paper. 

"This is quite a resume you've got here 
Claude. I see your grade point average is 
a 3.887. That's very impressive." 

"Well actually, it's not quite that. Right 
now I've got a 2.005 grade point, but I'm 
expecting a good semester, since it's my 
last one," Claude said. 



"Let me ask you this Clyde I mean 
Claude what do you expect to be 

doing five years from now? What are 
you're goals in life?" 

"Gee that's a toughie! Let's see 
well I plan to start out small you 

know, like being an executive vice- 
president or something. Then I'll plan to 
work up from there. I realize that 
everyone has to start from the bottom, 
and then work their way up." 

Coughing spasmodically, Ivegot 
concluded the interview. "Well thanks for 
thinking of us Claude. Don't call us, we'll 
call you." 

Immediately following the interview, 
Ivegot called the new president of the 
board of directors. 

"Listen to this boss. This real loser of a 
guy came in and wanted the manager job 
at our Manhattan branch. He handed me 
a resume covered with chocolate, 
ketchup, and God knows what else. Get 
worse that that! Can you even believe it? 
And get a load of the name Claude 

Clump!" 

"Excuse me uh, Ivegot are you 

trying to tell me you won't hire this young 
manr 

"You've got to be kidding. The only 
thing he's got going for him is his nose 

and it's so long he could open a ski 
resort on it." 

"I think you should reconsider 

What do ya mean reconsider? I'm 
telling you this guy is a loser," Ivegot 
said. 

"And I'm telling you, he's my nephew." 

"Like I said The guy has a lot of 

good qualities I think we could really 
use him as part of our company " & 



Nance Reese 



interviewing 139 




Lutheran Young 
Adults 



TOP ROW: Elaine G. Bosse, Ruth E. Biesenthal, 
Lois Y. Molz, Pam Frerichs, Fonda L. Cline. 
SECOND ROW: Leslie B. Wegele, Donna N. 
Becker, Kaye L. Beikman, Susan P. Zimmerman, 
Glenn M Becker BOTTOM ROW: Barb R. 
Lammert, Daniel C. Melgren, Robert W. 
Lenkner, Brad D. Brunkou, Scott A. Quasebarth. 



Marketing Club 

TOP ROW: Kent B. Brooke, James M. Johnson, 
Pamela S. Martin, Heidi Holiday, Chilie Gerlaugh, 
Kelli Walden, Carla Ott, Kim Long, Deborah J. 
Franklin, Bill Beckelhimer. THIRD ROW: Jan L. 
McCarty, D. Mark Robertson, Joan L. Coughen- 
our, Leigh Peters, Brenda Beachey, Dianna K. 
Blanchard, Kara D. Brant, Kathy Knadle. SEC- 
OND ROW: Kevin T. McDermed, James A. 
Duensing, Richard Mross, Gary L, Isaacson, Lin- 
da K. Spence, Sally B. Knapp, Karen Robben, 
Randy Waldorf. BOTTOM ROW: Keith A. 
Geist, Harold L. Ramirez, Kent V. Woner, Gary 
A. Scott, Charley Crutchfield, Mark L. Averill, 
Mike Hotujac, Andrew . Bolin. 



Marketing Club 

TOP BOW: Janet S. Bartels, Doris A. Delzeit, 
Christine M. Schreiner, Kimberly S. Myles, Pame- 
la A. Meadows, Gwyn O'Brien, Judy Brull, Cynda 
L. Wright, Anne E. Dixon, Shari S. Moffet. 
THIRD ROW; Laurie A. Carr, Dawn E. Carlson, 
Brenda S. Roberson, Marilyn A. Little, Cathy 
Larson, Susan G. Roush, Bart W, Holmes, Mi- 
chael K. Funk. SECOND ROW: Deborah 
Gonnaway, Syd D. Scherling, Denise A. Edmon- 
son, Byron T. Bates, Dennis J. Schafer, Jimmie 
D. Weir Jr., Lawrence B. Cleland, Jose L. Rivera. 
BOTTOM ROW: Brad C. Butterfield, Robert L. 
Hughes, Roger B. Ciithero, George L. Brennan, 
Jacob M. Powell, Michael E. Homes, Dan M. 
McKee, Raymond J. Coleman. 



MECHA 



TOP ROW: Michelle A. Gariboy, Rebecca M. 
Guillen, Anna M. Lopez. SECOND ROW: Enri- 
que S. Garibay, Lucinda M. Jones, Larry A. Ra- 
mos. 



Medical Tech. Club 



TOP ROW: Joy E. Dunback, Kaylene M. Call- 
teux, Carolyn M. Engelken, Luella A. Mayer. 
SECOND ROW: Melissa K. Hoover, Connie S. 
Sampbell, Janet S. Fengel. BOTTOM ROW: 
Jennifer J. Volavka, Teresa K. Wimmer, Kent C. 
Larson, Susan F. Alejos. 




Dance breaks 

traditional 

mold 

A traditional classroom situation: 
teacher at the head of the class, 
students taking notes and the occasional 
class clown napping during lectures. 

However, one program at K-State, 
Rhythmic Aerobics, varies from the 
traditional norm of the classroom situation. 

The program, offered to all students 
and facility use card holders, improves the 
cardiovascular system. The word aerobic 
means promoting the supply and use of 
oxygen. The better the supply of oxygen, 
the more efficiently it can be delivered, 
helping the body burn fuel (food) to 
produce energy. 

Aerobic exercises are those activities 
which improve one's ability to take in and 
deliver oxygen to the body tissues. 

"Aerobics got underway (at K-State) in 
about 1973. There was an aerobics clinic 
here, we did some reading about it and 
we thought it was something people 
would enjoy," Raydon Robel, director of 
Recreational Services, said. 

"It first started with a small tape 
recorder and 15 to 20 participants. Now 
we have a big P. A. (public address) 
system, so it has really grown," Robel 
said. In its seventh year the class had 
over 500 members which were mostly 
female. 

"We have to go to a clinic, then we 
become certified before we can teach the 
aerobics class," Robbi Beema"n, senior in 
health, physical education and recreation 
(H.P.E.R.), said. 

Many of the girls in the aerobics class 
said they enjoy the class. 

"I like aerobics because it is relaxing, it 
really keeps me in shape and it gives me 
a break from the books," Cindy Wilson, 
sophomore in journalism and mass 
communications, said. 

"It's sort of exercise and dance that 
makes you feel you are doing something 
to better yourself," Wilson said. 

"I like aerobics for the exercise. I feel I 
need some type of exercise rather than 
walking back and forth to class," Laren 
Messersmith, junior in psychology, said. 

The routines are meant to improve 
coordination, flexibility, balance and 
agility. I>t> 



rhythmic aerobics 141 



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Marching Band 



FLUTES 

Lori Banman 
Carol Bartelg 
David Bevins 
Terri Bortz 
Emily Coble 
Lori Dunlap 
Rhonda Durant 
Debra Ellis 
Liisa Embrec 
Lisa Engler 
Sherri Haberman 
Elizabeth Hagen 
Judy Hecht 
Melissa Mauck 
Tammy McCarty 
Michelle McDonald 
Elizabeth McLenon 
Shelly McNaughton 
Renee Nyhart 
Lisa Redler 
Kim Reed 
Sara Rosenkoetter 
Amy Schneider 
Lori Schooley 
Diane Scott 
Shernise Spearman 
Susan Stearns 
Karla Steinberg 
Connie Turner 
Laurie Williams 
Lillian Woods 
Diane Zoeller 

Mellophone 

Stephen Clay 
Mary Pottorlf 
Anne Ripper 
Steve Ripper 
Janetta Wells 

Baritone* 

Edwin Brokesh 
Lance Flake 
Merrle Martin 



Miles Phillips 
Steve Roof 
Doyle Slack 
Stephanie Wagner 
Kent Wallace 

Clarinets 

Deb Barner 
Kathleen Bergkamp 
Mary Blattner 
Nancy Blattner 
Lori Brax 
Linda Chlapok 
Craig Collins 
Terry Ecklund 
Melanie Griffith 
Esther Hagen 
Laura Harris 
Linda James 
Sharee Jorgensen 
Karen Kaiivoda 
Susan Liebl 
Michelle Maddox 
Donna Montgomery 
Kathy Osborne 
Nancy Pihl 
Patsy Poe 
Sandra Sawyer 
Stacy Stevens 
Gayla Strohm 
Eric Thiele 
Richard Walker 

Tuba 

Dean Becker 
Edith Dohl 
Caroline Erker 
Kevin Foerschler 
John Hollenbeck 
Glen Hush 
Brian Janke 
Marc Jayson 
Dawn Judah 
Mark Lyles 
Connie Meech 



Joe Myers 
Tim Schlieker 
Rhonda Waller 
Syl Washington 
Bryan Williams 

Managers 

Monica Haley 
Sue Hill 
Joe McAfee 
Dusty Moore 
Tom Murphey 
Rick Young 

Alto Sax 

Cheryl Blake 
John Butel 
Nancy Criss 
Dan Dolezal 
Rae Faurot 
Steve Funk 
Sherry Headrick 
Brenda Hoch 
Denise Hugh 
Susan Johnson 
Julie Langdon 
Kathy Maertens 
Vickie Mayer 
Marty Meier 
Cedric Patton 
Jef Pekham 
Wendy Ross 
Scott Sanders 
Kay Scarbrough 
Dave Schmidt 
Karl Seyfert 
James Sharp 
Teresa Ubben 
Greg Vermillion 
Cecelia Walker 
Michael Warren 
Michelle Weber 

Tenor Sax 

Terry Dockum 



Fanci Horton 
Val Oltman 
Michelle Prentice 
Beth Price 
Bob Rodriguez 
Pat Schlegel 
Marcus Stinnett 

Bari Sax 

Stan Harstine 
Linda Luginbill 

K-Steppers 

Michelle Bender 
Rhonda McCurdy 
Julia Reynolds 
Kathy Schmidt 

Trumpets 

Joe Aarons 
Janle Allen 
Sandy Anthony 
Brian Burtin 
Gayle Dembsk! 
David Erwin 
Elizabeth Gardner 
Mark Hegarty 
Cedric Heineger 
Will Hewett 
Keith Hoch 
Dean Kerr 
Glenn Lewis 
David Lewman 
Andy Lovett 
Paul Mallr 
Don Martin 
Lance McClosky 
Monna Metzger 
Sharon Mueting 
Casey Mussatto 
Laura Nelson 
Mike Norris 
Andre Qulnton 
Mike Qulntanar 
William Ross 



Tom Schmidt 
Sue Schmitt 
Sid Schmoker 
Mark Seaman 
Craig Shadday 
Todd Sonntag 
Steve Vinson 
Ronald Wolfkuhle 

Drum Majors 

Larry Hlnkin 
Nikki Hope 
Kelly Mack 
Dawnlee Weber 

Feature Twirlers 

Debbie Barnes 
Koralea Wall 

Trombones 

Danny Adams 
Gilbert Chauza 
David Deckert 
Mark Gray 
Susan Hargardine 
Scott Johnson 
Ivan Ketter 
Ray Lemon 
Tim McCarty 
Greg McGehee 
Roger Muse 
Sheryl Neblock 
Lori Price 
Paul Porter 
John Riley 
Roy Shuster 
Julie Shute 
Ted Spaid 
Tony Stueve 
Brian Tempas 
Brent Weber 
Cheryl Wendt 
Tom Wheeler 
Mark Wurm 



Flags 

Anita Bonnar 
Barb Brlnkman 
Mel Berbohm 
Christie Campbell 
Shery Foster 
Shari Fulhage 
Teri Gatschet 
Kathy Hagen 
Krlss Kidd 
Caroline Kline 
Rosie Kristak 
Laura Londeen 
Terri Noble 
Cindy Novak 
DeAnne Rathbun 
Mary Relihan 
Cheri Roudybush 
Ann Sack 
Angie Schneider 
Rhonda Shideler 
Brenda Shields 
DeAnne Stenger 
Jerri Turner 
Laurie Weber 
Robin Wilson 
Karen Whitener 

Percussion 

David Altenbernd 
Sara Borst 
Dana Brown 
Steve Brown 
David Edmonds 
Donna Foster 
Tim George 
Paul Harrison 
Lynee Karlin 
Dianne Karmeler 
Lezlie Kidd 
Troy Long 
Bruce Major 
Greg Ogborn 
Tim Olson 
Lee Phillips 



Teresa Shea 
John Strickler 
Tony Taylor 
Tracy Williams 

Prldettes 

Kim Andrews 
Kathy Arnold 
Stephanie Baker 
Dana Barker 
Kelly Blair 
Cyndee Bostick 
Marjorie Boyd 
Dana Duden 
Denise Esparza 
Jane Flohrschutz 
Andi Foutch 
Susie Huggins 
Marcy Imel 
Heidi Jernigan 
Becky Johnson 
Marie Kolich 
Laura Lukens 
Lisa Mays 

Merilee McCaustland 
Denise Mogge 
Cherie Parish 
Julie Pharis 
Lori Phillips 
Trish Phillips 
Keltene Ponte 
Kendra Ponte 
Cathy Rohleder 
Kathy Robinson 
Joan Schrleber 
Yvette Schrock 
Vicki Schroth 
Becky Sell 
Ellen Swaney 
Carol Wesrfall 
Donna Wilbur 



Marching Band 





$v 



l — 4i£ 



PP - 



«■ 



i 






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■«»&». 



/I 



Aerobics 



photos by Rob Clark 



The class at first was all women but in 
past semesters there have been a number 
of males participating. Two seniors in 
landscape architecture, Rick Barrett and 
Kurt Kuhlmann, joined the class last 
spring. 

"There's nothing I would rather do than 
exercise with 500 girls. It's hard to keep 
your mind on aerobics," Barrett said. 

"The reason I went to the class was 
because Barrett wanted to attend, and 
because of all the girls. Plus we needed a 
break from the evening. It's a great way 
to meet girls," Kuhlmann said. 

"I encourage anybody who enjoys the 
fellowship of a group, wants fantastic 
body benefits and likes to dance to neat 
music, to come to aerobics," Leah 
Hennigh, junior in life science, said. # 



Kim Hanzlicek 



Stretch, 1, 2, 3- Leah Hennigh, 
junior in life science and course 
instructor, leads students through 
aerobic exercises. 

Pulsating Experience- Mary 
Ann Anderson, an employee at 
Student Financial Assistance, 
checks her pulse after exercising. 



thmie aerobics 




Melta Phorum 

TOP ROW: Shelly Thcis, Lisa Spiegel, Patricia 
A- Wade, Connie J. Jay, Ann Wylie. SECOND 
ROW; Jean A. Edmonds, Patricia E. Oswald, 
Ramona L. Lucius, Shelly J Potter, BOTTOM 
ROW: John O. Rees, Glenna Menard, Geryi G, 
Buss, Jerome S. Dees. 



Men's Glee Club 

TOP ROW: Scott Smith, Dennis De la Mater, 
Mike Scalet, Brian Parks, Jim Rinner, John Fink, 
Randy Clegg, Scott Williams, Brian Bowers, Ke- 
vin McGahee, Rich McKittrick, Kent Holder, Alan 
Peil, Dan Eyestone, Eddie Hathaway, Steve Ol- 
sen, Jim Stllwell, Clavin Carlson, Brian Ragsdale, 
Kerry Relihan, Stan Frlesen, Brad Fllpse, Kevin 
Letourneau. THIRD ROW: Vern Hoobler, Rich 
Brunner, Kevin Loop, Charlie Long, Doug Coon- 
rod, Richard Tlppln, Alan Somers, Brent Beck- 
man, Dan Llndquist, Steve Afiingham, Lance 
Reynoso, Greg Leet, Tom Feldman, Tom Good, 
Robert Howell, Dan Stark SECOND ROW: 
Roger Aeschilman, Terry Schroff, Jeff Tarrant, 
Shannon Erickson, Roy Speer, Keith Thompson, 
Brad Steffen, Chris Lesser, David Carlin, Dean 
Hayse, Mark Frasier, David Burns. BOTTOM 
ROW: Gerald Polich, Bill Lippold, Shannon 
Brant, Jeff Peckham, Kevin Chase, Robert Eu- 
bank, Marc Rhodes, Scott Schulte, Kirk Kelley, 
Tim Dalton, Greg Gomez, Dan Schulte, Jeff 
Lawernce, Jeff Stark, Jon Culley, Steve Kline. 

Microbiology Club 

TOP ROW: Allen K. Sample. Melanie S. Keyset, 
Guy W. Miller, Michael D. Belluomo. BOTTOM 
ROW: James E. Urban, Mary E Staab, Kevin L, 
Tietze, Kent C. Larson, Kirk M. Volker. 



Mortar Board 

TOP ROW: Kimoanh T. Nguyen, Lynne A. Kir- 
iakos, Lisa Beam, Gena E. Courter, Tracey L. 
Deines. THIRD ROW: Susan K. Haas, Lynn A. 
Roosa, Susan K. Fletcher, Lynda J. Heckelmann. 
SECOND ROW: Barbara J. Arehart, Patrick L. 
Clark, Greg A. Trempy, William D. Buck. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Allen D. Webber, David P. Haw- 
kins, Richard J. McKittrick, Marlyn E. Spare. 



Mu Phi Epsilon 

TOP ROW: Marita L. Martin, Emily A. Coble, 
Kula K. Stolfus, Patricia K. Schlegel, Shannon K. 
Hall. SECOND ROW: Wendy A. Sistrunk, Greg- 
ory A. Gooden, Tamara L. McCarty, Amy Fla- 
herty, Teresa L. Shea. BOTTOM ROW: Glenda 
S. Kersenbrock, Susan K. Linder, Valerie L. Oil- 
man, Brett A. Wolgast, Todd Westgate. 







activities carnival 145 



Ql <^ 





National Ag 

Marketing 

Association 



BOTTOM ROW: Harry W. Dawson, Scott E. 
Hedke, Timothy E. Diller, Rocky L. Sweartngen, 
Brent A. Rockers, Fred G, Seller, Kick A. Carna- 
han. THIRD ROW: Gregory W. Kobs, Mtssy 
Reardon, Thomas W, Ahrens, John B. Riley, 
Anthony J. Stueve, David R. Stutzman, Steve J. 
Waria, Steven D. Hunt. SECOND ROW: Larry 
H. Erpelding, Stan E. Park, Kim D. Krehbiel, 
James H. Bfaauw, Perry A. Butsch, Steven M. 
Bowser, David K. Bever. TOP ROW: Brian E. 
Beisner, Carol M. Sobba, Marilyn S. Bolt, Nicho- 
las V. Stroda, Douglas E. Wendt, J. D. Gottlies, 
Anne M. Schletzbaum, Michael E. Smith. 

National Resource 
Management 

TOP ROW: Merry A. Johnson, Rebecca D. 
Crow, Laura S. Bergan, Vicki S, Ellman, Anita M. 
Sobba. SECOND ROW: Sharon A. Berry, M. 
Annette Norris, Lisa M. Garvin, Sherry D. Hea- 
drick, Lisa E. Redler. BOTTOM ROW: Lex 
Shaw, Randall D. Just, Rhonda R. Durant, Kim- 
bra E. Lindburg, Jill M. Mattlnson, Daniel M. 
Robison. 



Newmass Youth 
Group 

BOTTOM ROW: James E. Srilweil, Dave W 
O'Reilly, Anthony J. Stueve, Michael E. Gllmar 
tin, Gerald L. Sorell, John L. Works, Bill S. Mea- 
dor. THIRD ROW: David W. Bussen, Will J, 
Novak, Patrick J. Novak, Elizabeth J. Kotarik 
Annette M. O'Connor, Anne M. Schtetzbaum 
Bart K. Beiker, Jolene A. Riley. SECOND ROW: 
Julie E. Kirn, Teresa J. Miller, Monica M. Neff, 
Michael H. Blust, Sharon K. Vishnefske, Debby 
L. Corder, Larry H. Erpeldlng. TOP ROW: 
Diane C. Scott, Lillian M. Arnold, Regina S 
Stadler, Jim L. Meats, Monica M. Klenda, An 
nette Mahoney, Justine M. Tampo. 



Omega Chi Epsiion 

TOP ROW: Kimoanh Thi Nguyen, Chris D 
Jones, Carrie M. Mastin, Sheila D. Hecht, Polly S, 
Robinson, Sandra S. Callahan, Allecla L, Reming 
ton. THIRD ROW: Ross M. Ostenberg, Jay A 
Curless, Franz O. Gutchenhelser, Fred O. Gor 
don, Kent E. Bryan, Jeffrey A. Hubbell. SEC- 
OND ROW: Use K. Butler, Lynne E. Brockhoff, 
Frank O. Garibaldi, Scott J. Rlngle, Carl T. Lira, 
Felix O. Garner, BOTTOM BOW: W. 
Walawender, Felijoe O. Grossenbacher, Fritz O. 
Goodman, Thomas G. Lingg, Brad W. Schultz, 
Frederick O. Gamp, Larry J. Samson, L. T. Fan. 



Omega Psi Phi 

TOP ROW: Anthony Hutchinson, Lee Willis. 
SECOND ROW: Erwtn Lax, Joseph Simmons. 
BOTTOM ROW: Aaron Williams, Michael 
Lange, Dale Blanchard 






aatrsK 




"I think I'll join 



»» 



"The purpose of the flying club is to 
promote flying. The club owns and 
operates six different aircraft and a 
simulator," Andy Kiorpes, vice president, 
said boastingly. 

I could picture myself flying out into 
the wild blue yonder or better yet leaping 
from an airplane with the KSU Parachute 
Club, another organization represented at 
the carnival. 

As I continued, my cultural interests 
shined through as I passed the Le Cercle 
Francais and Russian clubs. Or maybe the 
Hunger Project committee of Manhattan 
or Big Brothers/Big Sisters was the 
answer for me. 

Walking further, the intellectural side of 
me was impressed with the number of 
honorary societies. 

"Mortar board is a senior honorary 
whose purpose is to serve K-State and the 
surrounding community," Lynda 
Hecklemann president said, as I passed 
the decorated table. Angel Flight was still 
another possibility. 

"Angel Flight is a service organization 
which also acts as a little sister group to 
support Arnold Air," Jennifer Sisney, 
treasurer, informed the group that had 
congregated around her table. Ranging 
from marketing to poultry science, there 
were curriculum clubs galore. 

As I passed the Public Relations 



state union 

>gram court c 





Student Society of America (PRSSA) 
table, Mary Jacobson, president, pulled 
me aside. 

"PRSSA's goal is to educate public 
relations students about new events 
through speakers and practical 
experience," Jacobson said. Then out of 
the corner of my eye, I saw a whirlwind 
of body movement. The K-Laires were 
demonstrating the art of square dancing. 
A combination of swing your partner left 
then right, do-si-do and a promande right 
then left, exhausted me just watching. 

I collected my thoughts as I passed the 
KSU Wildlife Society. It must have been 
my "roaring wildness" that attracted me 
here. 

"We are a group of students working 
to promote wildlife through projects and 
speakers," Laura Bareiss, president, said. 

At least 10 different religious 
organizations were represented from 
Cowboys for Christ to B'nai B'rith Hillel 
Foundation. With all the possible clubs to 
join, my head was spinning. 

Ranging from feature films to travel, 
the Union Programming Council (UPC) 
had a variety of committees to join. 

"One project of the council is to host 
this activities carnival, so clubs and 
organizations can recruit members and 
educate people of their existance," 
Marlesa Roney, UPC president, stated. 

After touring the entire carnival, my 
thoughts raced over what seemed like 
millions of clubs that I had heard about. 

"Get involved," but there are only so 
many hours to a day, I thought. "Broaden 
your horizons," but what about my GPA? 
I debated. 

Then with the pop of a UPC balloon I 
drifted back into reality. I had to decide 
which clubs I would best excell in. The 
KSU Horsemen's Association or Castle 
Crusade; Flint Hills Equestrian or Fone? 

Since the choices were broad I 
determined the key to the dilemma was to 
find a median for myself. I should choose 
something that included study time, plus 
the fun and involvement that clubs 
provide. 

After evaluating all the clubs, I finally 
narrowed it down to two flipped a 

coin and it came up heads. $ 



Karen Barancik 



Up in the air-Bart Wingert, junior 
in pre-vet, awaits a potential mem- 
ber for the Union Programming 
Council. 

The main event-Students roam 
the booths provided by campus or- 
ganizations at the activities carnival. 



photos by Rob Clark 



activities carnival 147 




Omicron Nu 

TOP ROW: Lonise G. PHasterer, Bonnie L. Frai- 
ley, Bronwen L. Rees, Barbara A. Wassenberg, 
Jana M. Fishbum. SECOND ROW: Cheryl K. 
Thole, Denise L. Brown, Sheryl K. Wilkinson, 
Renee J. Wiebe. BOTTOM ROW: Judy A. Spie- 
gel, Susan D. Zimmerman, Vanetta J. Blevins, 
Ikoti H. Ak. 



Pep Coordinating 
Council 

BOTTOM ROW: Larry Hinkin, Peter Brady, 
Steve Frlesen. SECOND ROW: Lori B. Fuhon. 
Timothy F. Schtieker. BOTTOM ROW: Janet L. 
Busenbark, Denise C. Mogge, Lisa M. Mays, San- 
dra J. Larson. 



Phi Chi Theta 



TOP ROW: Mary A, Bohnenbiust, Susan A. 
Niemczyk, Janell M. Vehman, Debra K. Hopkins. 
Janet K. Anstaett, Janis K. Little, Kelly L. Hoss- 
feld, Patti A. Roths, Pamela L. Franklin. THIRD 
ROW: Ann L. Peterson, Ellen K. Swaney, Debbie 
A. Storey. Deanne R. Moore. Andrea A. Foutch, 
Brenda K. Buss, Martha P. Keil, Lisa Feden. 
SECOND ROW: Diane M. Brown. Julia A. 
Meade, Mary A. Sabring, Christine M. Hoferer, 
Kari J. Johnson, Diartna K. Blanchard, Sandra 
L.B. Kidd, Vickie P. Maddox. BOTTOM ROW: 
Linda K. Spence, Sally A. Humphrey, Dedra 
Manes, Jacque McLelland, Rebecca Skeeis, 
Rhonda Grace McCurdy, Octavia M. Russell. 



Phi Eta Sigma 

TOP ROW: M. Dean Sutton, Edward G. Can- 
tre;l, Kevin Follett. Ivan Ketter, Joseph M. Sack, 
Tom N. LaRoche, Ken Meus. THIRD BOW: 
Evan A. Howe, Kurt G. May. Alan Ryroph, Karl 
H. Kraus, Bradley M. Reinhardt, Tony J. Kum- 
mer. SECOND ROW: Lance A. Reynoso, Duane 
R. Hicks, Brett A. Wolgast. David A. Sandritter. 
David Douthit, Ed L. Wierman. BOTTOM ROW: 
Ralph G. Field, Doran Z. Morgan, Alan P. Rot- 
tlnghaus, Robert L. Hooper, Shannon B. Ericson. 



Phi Theta Kappa 

TOP ROW: Judy K. Reed, Kathleen M. May, 
Brenda M. Ericson, Qenda L. Stewart, Lisa J. 
DeGarmo, Joyce R, Walker. THIRD ROW; Cyn- 
thia S, Hoskfcwon, Donna R. Swaney, Jane C. 
Wolters, Joni K. Schwartz, Darrel L. Carter. 
SECOND BOW: Dan L. Partridge, Dale E. 
Loepp, Marvin L. Thomas, HI, Sharon K. Vlsh- 
nefske, Dennis J. Dtsberger, Donald A. Cooper, 
BOTTOM ROW: Vernon A. Schaffer, Bobby L. 
Francis, Lynn D. Anderson, Kerry L. Hoops, 
Loren R. Troyer. 



YOU- Gerald Polich, director 
of the K-State Singers, gives 
instructions during a rehearsal 
for the ROTC concert. 

Heave ho- Randy Gassman, 
sophomore in general, and Vina 
Anderson, junior in education, 
load up equipment for a concer 




The ' 'singing ambassadors 



** 



<<*W* here's a lot more involved than 
* just singing and dancing," Maria 
Neelly, senior in elementary education and 
member of the university's traveling vocal 
group said. "One thing I've learned is to 
budget my time," 

The K-State Singers devote anywhere 
from 12 to 40 hours per week to the 
organization, according to Mike Ronen, 
senior in business education. The amount 
of time each week varies according to 
how many trips they take. In addition, 
they manage to attend classes, belong to 
other organizations, and keep up their 
grades. 

According to Gerald Polich, assistant 
professor of music and director of the 
group, the K-State Singers averaged 
above a 3.0 GPA last year. 

Time budget begins with the selection 
process for K-State Singers. Each April, 
auditions are held for the twelve vocal 
and four accompanist positions. This year 
there were 135 applicants. 

Membership is open to non-music 
majors only. The reason, according to 
Polich is that music majors don't have 
enough time to devote to the 
organization. 

Auditions consist of singing and dancing 
before 20 former K-State Singers and 
Polich. Z>0 





Photos by Scott Williams 



singers 149 




Phi CJpsilon 
Omicron 



TOP ROW: Janeen K. Strahm, Marilyn J. Do- 
mann, Debra J. Adams, Elena M. Laham, Linda 
K. Ventsam, Lorl A. Scheverman. THIRD ROW: 
Donna J. Stucky, Cindy S. Bray, Tam S. Ashly, 
Susan M. Blush, Carolyn D, Birkman, Anne K. 
Schmitz, Vadaline S. Strohm. SECOND ROW: 
Sonia R. Dyck, Cheryl K. Thole, Denise L. 
Brown, Maria L. Newell, Jan M. Robben, Ju- 
lianah, L. Olorunfeal. BOTTOM ROW: Shlela 
K. Morse, Christi L. Dutton, Sharon K. Franz, 
Brenda S. Green, John J. Cannava Jr. 



Phi Gpsilon 
Omicron 



TOP ROW: Brenda J. Huntsman, Mary Jo Lill, 
Mindy S. Levy, Anna M. Miskovsky, Robin L. 
McNaughton, Jana M. Fishborn, Susan C Rizer, 
Kathy Betden. THIRD ROW: Kathleen M. 
Downing, Teresa D. Simmelink, Cindy A, 
Stuckey, Nancy K. Shelley, Lonise G. Pflasterer, 
Shelley A. Way, Monica M. Klenda. Sharon K. 
Winkler. SECOND ROW: Julie E. Kirn, Kathy 
A. Rudrow, Traci A. May, Cheryl D. Stimach, 
Karen D. Stadel. BOTTOM ROW: Judy A. Spie- 
gel, Charlotte J. Appl, Susan K. Zimmerman, 
Jennifer L. Jones, Ramona L. Norris, Bronwen L. 
Rees, Amy M. Holzle. 



Physical Therapy 
Club 



TOP ROW: Jana R. Bevier, Kim Strong, Kellene 
Ponte, Jackie Just, Sandra A. Nolder, Sue 
Goode, Melanie S. Berbohm. SECOND ROW: 
Shelly Chrlstensen, Leah K. Hennlgh, Debra A. 
Wells, Teresa Rogers, Miryana Bajich, Stacey 
Hennessey. BOTTOM ROW: Mike D. Apley, 
Mary M. Garten, Ross R. Vines, Robert C. Peter- 
son, Phoebe J. Samelsor. 



Physics Club 

TOP ROW: Grant H. Stehle, Thomas G. King, 
Jr., Vincent Needham, Shanalyn A. Kiger. SEC- 
OND ROW: John A. Nees, Timothy J. Robben, 
Lonnie A. Haden. BOTTOM ROW: Curt Ham- 
mill, Dean A. Zollman, John P. Giese. 



Pi Alpha Pi 



TOP ROW: Maureen Basgall, Denise K. Smith, 
Julia K. Beems, Barbara L. Bunda, Cindy Hen- 
ricks, Nancy Agnew. SECOND ROW: Wanda Y. 
Trent, Nancy R. Nickel, Mary E. Osborne, Elaine 
D. Hobson. BOTTOM ROW: Dr. R. K. Kimmlns, 
Steven J. Plummer, Jay D, Cody, Michael L. 
Agnew, Ward S. Upham. 



Practice First- Vince 
Anderson, sophomore in 
education, left, and Sharon 
Brown, junior in family and 
child development catch som\ 
rehearsal time before a 
concert. 

Then Perform- K-State 
Singers perform a 
choreographed routine. Frorr. 
Left, Mike Ronen, senior in 
business education, B.J. 
Arehart, senior in physical 
therapy, Dan Lindquist, junk 
in radio and television, and 
Jana Nelson, junior in physic 
therapy. 



Ambassadors 



Written applications and personal 
interviews are conducted in the secondary 
stages. Even students who have been in 
the group before must go through the 
selection process. 

Practice for the Singers begins the 
week before school starts in August. 
During the week the group spends nine 
hours each day learning music and 
choreography. 

"We try to get as much music learned 
as soon as possible, because the later in 
the semester it gets, the busier the 
Singers get with other activities," Polich 
said. "We usually have a 30-minute 
program in four weeks," he said. 

All of the music performed by the 
group is chosen by Polich. Sharron 
Washington arranges choreography. 

The group puts a variety of music into 
their show. It includes jazz, broadway, 
classical, pop, and 40's music. 




"We perform for audiences that range 
from 35-60 years old, so we have a big 
variety," Polich said. 

According to members, the group 
works up an hours' worth of performance, 
but the length depends on who the show 
is for. The average show is 20 to 30 
minutes. 

When classes start, the Singers meet 
every day for an hour and a half. During 
August and September, they work to 
perfect their show. 

From October to May, the group 
performs at least once, and as many as 
four times per week. Most performances 
are throughout Kansas. These include 
K-State Alumni Association meetings, 
banquets, conventions, civic and church 



"The people who are in Sing- 
ers are the type who like to be 
active. We're all in other organi- 
zations and most of us work." 



meetings, and annual meetings for various 
groups. During spring break the group 
tours out-of-state. 

"We usually pick a big city that has a 
large number of K-State alumni," Polich 
said. 

When traveling in Kansas the average 
trip usually takes eight hours, according to 
members. 

The group must allow time to load 
equipment, travel, unload equipment, and 
set up. The Singers then have to rehearse 
at the new location, dress, and allow time 
to eat before the show. 

"We always like to be there early 
enough in case something goes wrong," 
Neelly said. 

After each show the Singers mingle 
with the audience to answer any questions 



about the group or K-State. Since the 
Singers represent the K-State campus, 
they are often referred to as the "singing 
ambassadors." 

"Being a K-State Singer, representing 
your school is just a good feeling," 
Sharon Brown, junior in family and child 
development said. "You get to meet a lot 
of people, and you get so close to the 
others in the group." 

"When we travel some place for a 
show, it's like taking K-State off-campus. 
People think everyone at K-State looks 
and acts like the K-State Singers," Polich 
said. 

According to some of the members, 
there are many benefits of belonging to 
the group. The Singers said the 
advantages include traveling to cities, 
meeting new people every week, 
belonging to a small, close-knit group, and 
being able to entertain crowds. 

"I enjoy singing, entertaining, and 
people," Scott Schulte, junior in general 
business administration said. "It's a good 
time. School would be boring if I didn't 
have something extra to do." 

"I think one of the biggest things I've 
learned is to budget your time, especially 
if you have a test the day after a trip," 
Cindy Shaft, sophomore in radio and 
television said. "To me, all the work is 
worth it. I really enjoy performing and 
being in front of people." 

Although the K-State Singers are a self- 
supporting group, they do accept 
contributions. The funds help defray 
costumes, equipment, travel and office 
expenses. Money left over goes toward 
the Music Service Guild, a music 
scholarship at K-State.* 



Jan Mead 




photos by Scott Williams 



singers 



151 




lb t&ty 



Poultry Science Club 

BOTTOM ROW: Richard A. Jacobs, Jeff A. 
Johnson, Larry A. Liggett SECOND ROW: 
Samuel 1. Agbidye, Keith P. VanSkike, Laura L. 
Bamirez, David M. Houser. TOP ROW: Paul E. 
Sanford, Carlos M. Carazo, Narda Huyke. 



Pre-Vet Club 



TOP ROW: Stacey E. Frobes, Emily L. Janes, 
Sheryald L. Baughn, Cindy K. Michel, Christina 
L. Topliff, Carol B. Carlson. THIRD ROW: Su- 
san M. Mauler, Patrick R. Wesley, Martha J. 
Bearce, Vicky L, Green, Donna R. Swaney, SEC- 
OND ROW: Terrl K. Baird, Jacqueline I. Russ, 
Panny L. Budreau, Rebecca J. Williams, Marvin 
L. Thomas III, Stephen B. Angumayn BOTTOM 
ROW: Steven A. Jensen, Mary G. Kohman, Rog- 
er M. Silua, Douglas A. Regnier, Karen M. Jesse, 
Kevin B. Barnes, 



Pre-Vet Club 



TOP ROW: Eva I. Dudek, Robyn R. Welliever, 
Paula K. Hazelton, Mary Ferguson, Karen A. 
Carle, Jerry D. Thomas. THIRD ROW: Jose R. 
Lozada, Hugh A. Rogers, Robert E. Krug, 
Tammy A. Berggren, Scott L. Crain, SECOND 
ROW: Heather M. Rife, Norman D. Wiltshire, 
John S. Bradley, Bryan L. Goodman, David G. 
Springer, Bill J. McGuire. BOTTOM ROW: Guy 
H. Klracofe, Jeffrey D. Brose, Russell L. Coad, 
Keith L. Longhofer, George R. McCalium. 



Psi Chi 



TOP ROW: Christina M. Frazee, Julie B. De- 
berry, Rita L. Bronaugh, Ann E. McNeer, Robin 
L. Bunton. SECOND ROW: Lori L. Sims, 
Wenda R. Pickell, Nancy E. Landrith, Paula K. 
Williams, Brett A. Murray. BOTTOM ROW: Cin- 
dy S. Ellerman, Richard D. Webb, Robert J. Bet- 
zen, Ricky L. Cameron, Randy McMains. 



Recreation Club 



TOP ROW: Teresa M. Muller, Nancy J. Beems, 
Debbie K. Mueller, Tammy S. Tutland. SEC- 
OND ROW: Carol J. Schlesener, Angela A. Law- 
rence, Benita J. Unruh. BOTTOM ROW: Dave 
F. Winter, Ted L. Hayden, Doug L. Stark, Brandt 
F. Bish. 



UFM. University for Man. 
This organization, funded 
by student senate 
allocations, is not directly 
related to the university. 
UFM hires its own 
instructors, conducts its 
own enrollment, and 
teaches seperate courses. 
However, UFM does 
involve a large number of 
K-State students. Many 
persons use UFM classes to 
broaden their cultural 
interests beyond the 
textbook learning. 
Instructors of UFM courses 
occassionally teach 
university sponsored 
classes. 



Soaking up sun - The UFM 

solar house was on display 
November 9 for the interested 
community. The open house 
included tours and 
demonstrations. 

Touch and Feel - A young 
girl takes a close up view of 
the walls of the solar 
greenhouse during the open 
house. 



Catchind 





photos by Scott Williams 



the rays for the house that (IFM built 




T Tniversity for Man culminated a major 

^■^ project Nov. 9 with the dedication 
of a new solar structure at 1221 
Thurston. The project was a collective 
effort of UFM, several K-State colleges, 
and the community. 

The solar building is comprised of a 
greenhouse, public lounge, a workshop 
which will house the UFM tool co-op, 
kitchenette and restroom. 

A large percent of the building's energy 
supply comes from the passive energy of 
the sun, Bruce Snead, construction 
supervisor, said. In this instance, 
"passive" does not mean inactive, but 
rather that the building is receptive to an 
external force — the sun. 

Sunlight heats the building in a fashion 
similar to the heat build-up in a parked 
car with the windows rolled up. The 
radiant heat is trapped inside the building, 
after passing through the double-paned 
wall and ceiling panels. Convection of the 
warmed air keeps the room temperature 
even. 

Rigid insulating shutters in the building's 
ceiling can be opened when there is a 
heat build-up, but the shutters will remain 
closed on most winter days, Snead said. 

"When you see a forecast of lots of 
cloudy and cold weather in the winter, 
you allow some heat to build up," Snead 
said. 

The building is fitted with a wood stove 



and unit ventilators, which are tapped in 
from the UFM boiler as a back-up heat 
source. 

"The wood stove is mostly for 
atmosphere for various groups holding 
meetings in the community lounge," said 
Doug Walter, assistant to the project. 
"The unit ventilators are really what we 
plan to rely on for back-up heat." 

"The boiler in the UFM building has a 
greater capacity to heat than the building 
needs," he said. "By tapping in the solar 
building, we increase our conservation by 
using the full capacity of the boiler." 

The solar building is equipped with a 
mobile beadwall insulating system. At 
night, the double-paned panels are filled 
with small styrofoam beads which are 
stored in the floor during the day. 
Vacuum motors are used to suck the 
beads into place. 

A system composed of earth tubes is 
used to cool the building in the summer. 
The tubes will cool the building's interior 
as much as twenty degrees lower than the 
outside temperature. 

The earth tubes are made of clay flue 
liners laid end-to-end five feet beneath the 
surface of the ground. The tubes join at 
the surface and are directed into a 
ventilator. Fans draw air through the 
tubes and the cooled air is exhausted into 
the building. Outside, bench seats protect 
the tubes from the weather. Z>0 



ufm 153 




Restaurant Club 

TOP ROW: Lori M. Torres, Renee Johnson, 
Mary H. Hahn, Lois Y. Molz, Beth L. Jones. 
SECOND ROW: Patricia A. Lamb, Susan E. 
Stegall, Thomas S. Schweder, Kimberly A. 
Loecker. BOTTOM ROW: Tim J. VanAllen, 
Joan P. Fye, Karan J. Law, Larry J. Lindstrom, 
Rich Kitos. 



Rifle Club 



TOP ROW: Sean B. Dow, Glen Benteman, 
Joyce K. Ivy, Sue M. Bennett. SECOND ROW: 
Steven D. Martin, Paul W. Neal, Sam E. Bollnger, 
Bill M. Gottschalk, John F. Wilson. BOTTOM 
ROW: Tim F. Ahrens, Doug A. Regnier, Bill A. 
Adams, Dan M. Ashmore. 



Rodeo Club 



TOP ROW: Robin L. Peppers, Lisa A. Leister, 
Denise L. Simcox, Lesley A. Hause, Paula A. 
Tinsley, Jolene B. Revey, Laura R. Londeen, 
Marci Geisler. THIRD ROW: BiHie J. Evans, 
Tonl R. Duckworth, Brian K. Keith, Royce A. 
Wilson, Michael J. Christensen, Larry T. Stangle, 
Jeffrey F. VanPetten. SECOND ROW: Steve B. 
Angermayer, William S. Shoemate, Brad A. Nick- 
elson, Gary D. Thompson, Terry R. Vanderplas, 
John G. Prewitt. BOTTOM ROW: Gregory A. 
Fowler, Erik R. Osmon, J. Mike Christiansen, 
Chris A. Martlnsen, Cary L. Russell, Denton K. 
Jorgensen, Chris H. McCord. 



Senior Class officers 



Greg Trempy, Laura Randall, Debbie Steiner, 
Steve Holloway. 



Sigma Delta Pi 

TOP ROW: Beverly Cooper, Judy Currey, Patri- 
cia Flgurski, Jackie Kelly, Debra D. Peterson, 
Deanna Belden. SECOND ROW: Russell W 
Jultgren, Leigh Peters, Jill Holland, Julie Young- 
doff, Melissa Byers, Lori A. Phillips. BOTTOM 
ROW: David M. Calovich, Randall D. Belkmann, 
Diane Duggan, Karen S. Geubelle, Cheryl L. 
Blake. 



•£-■" 



..;, 







Scott Williams 



House UFM built 

Community uses for the solar 
greenhouse at present include projects for 
the elderly and for clients of the Big 
Lakes Developmental Center, said Ginny 
Patterson, community greenhouse 
coordinator. 

"We will be growing vegetables such as 
lettuce, peas, spinach, and tomatoes," she 
said. "We will also have some plants and 
flowers housed in the greenhouse." 

"We are presently planning a project 
for the elderly which would consist of 
them helping us with volunteer work and 
UFM helping them by letting them have 
some of the produce," Patterson said. 

UFM also will coordinate a program for 
Big Lakes clients, who will visit the 
greenhouse twice a week for therapeutic 
education and plant identification. 

"For now, we will only have organized 
sessions with the elderly and Big Lakes," 
said Patterson. "We want to start small 
and build, based upon what we ascertain 
about the potential of the building. We 
will be doing a lot of experimentation 
because we are not sure what the building 
can do in Kansas." & 



Debbie Leasure 



Solar view - Visitors to the solar 
house take the opportunity to 
analyze the alternatives to 
electricity. 



ufm 155 




Sigma Gamma 
Epsilon 

TOP ROW: Valerie J. Broedel, Holly K. Legault, 
Lucy J. Nicastro, Susan K. Hargadine. Tina W. 
Chandler. THIRD ROW: Bill D. Richards. An- 
drew L. Clayton, Maura A. O'Halloran, Richard 
J. Robinson. SECOND ROW: Michael J. 
Greene, Nanci E. Witbeck, Michael J. DiMarco, 
Mark E. Patzkowsky BOTTOM ROW: Lex D. 
Shaw, Steve H. Nordeng, Allen R. Moody, Mi- 
chael J. Killion. 



Sigma Lambda Chi 

TOP ROW: Bill Meeker, Kevin Miller, Armon 
Pfeifer, Chuck O'Brien, John Foudray, Daniel 
Moore. THIRD ROW: Donald Eschelbach, Wil- 
liam J. Marquette, Jim Calvert, Joe Felton, Jane 
Yarbrough. SECOND ROW: Steven C. Gile, 
Mark C. Nyquist, Steven D. Reschke, Clifford C. 
Larson, Gary L Swabada. BOTTOM ROW: 
James F. Goddard, Stan C. Riser, Richard M. 
Kuhn, Mike L. Hildebrand. 



Sigma Phi 



TOP ROW: Debra L. Ungles, Julie D. Brockel- 
man, Jerry D. Felt, Stacey R. Lightcap. SEC- 
OND ROW: Carl A. Cameron, Ronald R. Sam- 
ples, Dave L. Navrat. BOTTOM ROW: David E. 
Keller, Mindy K. Neuenswander, Michael F. To- 
mandl, James J. Boever. 



Social Work Club 

TOP ROW: Susan N. Mulryan, Janice I. Morgan, 
Denise K. Warne, Jennifer L. Steiner, Julie K. 
Nelson. THIRD ROW: Tammy L. Howser. Shir- 
ley J. Lockhart, Cathy A. Valades, D. Kaye 
Geier. SECOND ROW: Susan B. Blackman, 
Carol J. Wienck, James L. Schremmer. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Marvin A, Kaiser, Debbie L. Stege- 
man, Julie A. Reed, LuAnn L. Schaefer. 



Society for 
Advancement of 
Management 

TOP ROW: John D. Dalton Jr., Debbie A. Stock, 
Laurie A. Carr, Connie M. Fagan, Ashesh 
Chowdhury. SECOND ROW: Robert L. Brad- 
ley, Cheri L. Prose, Kim J. Olson, Bill F. Beckel- 
himer. BOTTOM ROW: Dale R. Ohl, Michael J. 
Wentling, Joe B. Allen, David J. Albracht, Gwyn 
O'Brien. 



In a class by herself- 

Bernice Biggs, freshman in 
business administration, is 
one of 120 students over 
40 at K-State. 




New 

math 

for older 

students 




*T here is an organization on campus 
* that has no minimum GPA, specific 
major, or religious background necessary 
for membership. The Fenix organization 
has one basic requirement — to be over 
25 years of age. 

Fenix gets it name from a mythical bird 
with the power to renew its own life and 
is sponsored by the Center for Student 
Development. 

"The concept of Fenix is the renewal, 
regeneration and reaching out for new 
opportunities," said Margaret Nordin, 
associate director of student development 
and coordinator of the program. 

Fenix opens the doors for older 
students to meet, share interests, 
problems, and achievements. 

"The Fenix program is designed to 
show the adult student that K-State cares 
about them," Nordin stated. "Over 120 
students are over the age of 40." 

There are over 1,500 undergraduate 
students attending K-State who are over 
25, according to Nordin. Seventy-five 
percent of these students are full-time 
students, and 34 percent also hold full- 
time jobs or maintain a home and family. 

Fenix addresses the problems of 
combining a job and family responsibilities 
with an education. The program also 
helps older students through their first 
registration, scheduling classes, making 



career decisions and developing good 
study habits. 

Fenix also conducts a pre-enrollment 
and orientation program in the summer 
much like the program offered to 
incoming freshmen. 

Older students often seek the help of 
the Fenix program to coordinate their 
classes around work and family 
obligations. In addition, counselors at 
Fenix help older students decide what 
field of study they should choose. 

"Some of the older students are at the 
point that they know they want to make a 
change but don't know what kind of 
change they want," Nordin said. 

"I really hadn't thought about going to 
college, but now that I am, I'm like a kid 
in a candy store. Now that I have a taste 
of college, I have an insatiable appetite 
for it. There are too many classes I'd like 
to take," Dee Locker, a 54 year-old 
freshman said. 

Most of the emphasis is placed on 
getting the older student started again in 
school, even though Fenix provides 
programs for the students through-out the 
school year. 

"The older student faces the problem 
of having no one to study with, no 
roommate, no boyfriend, and no sorority 
sister," Locker said. "At least this is a 
problem to me. I have no one to kick 



Rob Clark 

ideas around with." 

Fenix meets weekly throughout the 
semester. Most of the meetings feature 
speakers on subjects like pre-enrollment 
procedures, stress management and 
financial aid. There are also open 
meetings where Fenix students have an 
opportunity to exchange ideas on topics 
such as preparation for finals. 

Fenix also assists students who are still 
considering whether or not to attend 
college. The group's advisors help the 
prospective student cut through the red- 
tape of applying for admission to the 
university. 

Joan Fye is working toward a degree in 
restaraunt management and dietetics. She 
feels that students don't care about the 
age difference. 

"I have noticed nothing as far as 
younger students singling me out," Fye 
mentioned. "I have found almost without 
exception, everyone to be very kind and 
helpful. I just think K-State is great." 

Her husband, Stanley, 51, is back in 
college after 20 years. 

"Even though I'm retired, I'm not 
retired from life." & 



Leah Ann Cook, Sue Schmitt 



Fenix 157 




Society of 

Manufacturing 

Engg. 

TOP ROW: Carl Wilson (faculty advisor), Ran- 
dall Angell, David Walterscheid, Steven Prowell. 
BOTTOM ROW: David Haverkamp, Linda 
Carra. 



Society of Women 
Engg. 

BOTTOM ROW: Gail A. Ritzdorf, Barbara G. 
Lindholm, Lisa B. Hoff master, Connie J. Berner, 
John C. Lindhdm, Faculty Advisor. THIRD 
ROW: Janice M. Russell, Linda G, Gordon, Lisa 
K. Christensen, Susan E, Phipps. Diane M. Dal- 
ton. SECOND ROW: Diana L. Stoner, Marie R. 
Ford, Mary E. Austin, Evelyn M. Northum, Ann 
R. Sack. TOP ROW: Kimoanh I. Nguyen, Julie 
L. Hawley, Marilyn A. deJesus, Darci L. Moore, 
Marsha A. Melll, Mary K. Konz. 



Speech Unlimited 

TOP ROW: Jenifer Hiett, Jane Ramsbottom 
Hayley Jo Matson, Marcia Hoover, Chuck Kin 
caid, Julia Talge, Cindy Mog, David Dunlap. 
THIRD ROW: Penny A. Cullers, Mary R. Peter 
son, Lisa M. Holdal, Rick T. Schulze, Ann M 
Cashin, Becky L. Oliver, Linda M. Treiber. SEC- 
OND ROW: Julie M. Bunck, Craig E. Brown. 
Gary W. Berry, David P. Mueller, Jeffry L. Ram 
sey, Evelyn A. Gabbert. BOTTOM ROW: Caro 
lyn M. Scofield, Darla Germeroth, Chris Wheat 
ley, Jerry Lobb, Harold J. Nichols, Lynne S 
Ross. 



Sport Parachute 
Club 



TOP ROW: Trudy L. Hiatt, Jeanette L. Finnell 
Karen L. Fowler, David W. Bussen, Alys A 
Brockway, Denlse A. Gatzoulis, Paula S. Clark 
Darren L. Haller. THIRD ROW: Michael S. Pla 
toff, Lowell A. Mathews, Gregory J. Retter, Shel- 
ley L. Smith, Don Pierce, Kevin Taylor, Paul 
Klausen, Kent Pember. SECOND ROW: Steven 
L. Garinger, Russell W. Sheets, James W. 
McChesney, John R. Hassed, Bret J. Stitt, Don L. 
Crusseil, Tim S. Anderson. BOTTOM ROW: 
Dale E. Fox, Ron Wilms, Paul N. Mulcahy, Sylvia 
K. Workman, Ed McPheeters, Paul Benlon, Mark 
Young, Brian Hettrick. 



Spurs Honorary 

TOP ROW: Bill C. Phillips, Marietta Deets, Jana 
K. Collins. Rebecca D. Crow, Lorrle R. Blan- 
chard John M. Letourneau. THIRD ROW 
Lance A. Reynoso, Jean A. Hintz, Melinda Gale 
J. Darren Gale, Connie L. Lutz, Jan C. Osten 
berg, Ed L. Wierman. SECOND ROW: Tony J 
Kummer, Emily A. Starr, Randall K. Spare, Kar 
lene K. Ediger. BOTTOM ROW: Jeffrey D 
Brose, Joseph E. Neumann, Dave E. Anderson. 
Shannon B. Ericson, Michael D. Beck. 



-#-4MMi_ 




art by Mel Westmeyer 



Elephant vs Donkey: Election '80 



Clection year 1980. The battles of 
^^ Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan; 
Bob Dole and John Simpson; Jim 
j Jefferies and Sam Keys highlighted the 
; pre-election fever for the organizations of 
I College Republicans and Young 
S Democrats. 

These K-State groups provided the 
| fanfare that was present at election day. 
Booths in the union, rallies at city hall and 
guest candidate speakers were a few of 
;the events planned by the two groups. 

Kansas' traditional Republican 
dominance was also present on the 
i campus. College Republicans had a edge 
jover the Young Democrats in the 
categories of membership, events and 
publicity. 

"We are a group of 175 students 
whose purpose is to foster the Republican 
parties' views on campus and help out on 
campaigns when needed," Nancy Reese, 



senior in journalism and mass 
communication, said. 

The College Republicans spread the 
word of the Grand Old Party (GOP) by 
taking leaflets door-to-door, putting up 
signs in the community and placing 
telephone calls to various voters. Post 
election plans included inviting guest 
speakers to express their view on 
different topics. 

"Our national office urges us to 
sponsor service projects in the community 
during the off-election years to keep 
College Republican's name strong," Alan 
Stetson, fifth-year student in pre-law, said. 

The Young Democrats also had their 
share of publicity for the "donkey" party. 
Pro-Democratic bumperstickers, buttons, 
posters and brochures were passed out to 
interested students. 

"In the past, Young Democrats was an 
organization that seemed to come and go 



with the elections. However, with our 
district chairman on campus, Phil Wiltz, 
we hope to reorganize and remain a 
strong group locally," Susan Price, 
president and a sophomore in computer 
science, said. 

The Young Democrats sponsored a 
lecture given by Sam Keys. Also, each 
year a state convention is held at a 
chapter who receives the bid for the year. 

Jointly, the two groups set up a voter 
information booth. 

So in election year 1980 the never 
ending battle of the donkey and elephant 
continued. The domination of the elephant 
in Kansas remained consistent with the 
returns. & 



Jerry T. Katlin 



democrats/republicans 159 



Students bullish 
on club activities 



Organizational clubs come in all sizes, 
from the smaller groups with a 
handful of members to the largest club, 
Block and Bridle with over 250 paid 
memberships. 

Block and Bridle is one of the 
departmental clubs for the animal science 
and industry department. 

"Most of the students join because they 
want to learn more about animal science 
and they want to meet other people 
involved in the livestock industry," Lyle 
Shipley, senior in animal science and 
industry and club president, said. 

According to Calvin Drake, professor of 
animal science and industry and Block and 
Bridle faculty advisor, the livestock 
industry is of great interest to many 
students at K-State. 

"In Kansas, livestock is the major 
industry. The beef cattle industry is the 
largest in the state, the meat industry is 
second, and swine is also in the top ten," 
Drake said. 

"We are the club in the department 
that represents beef cattle, swine, sheep 
and horses, therefore, we represent a 
major interest group in Kansas and in our 
department," he added. 

"Not only is the Block and Bridle Club 
recognized on our own campus by the 
services we provide but its achievements 
are notable within the National Block and 
Bridle organization, which is made up of 
60 local chapters," Drake said. 

The club has consistently done well in 
national competition in such areas as 
activities, club yearbook and scrapbook. 

"Our club was number two in 
membership in the nation last year. In 
fact, five of the top seven Block and 
Bridle clubs were in the Big Eight," he 
added. 

The club has many activities to keep all 
of its members involved. According to 
Drake, the activities of the K-State 
chapter are not just "dead wood" 
activities to produce student interest. 
Some of the these activities include guest 
speakers, meetings, catered "feeds" and 
horse shows. 

"I have been in many clubs where the 
officers and advisors have to think up 
activities to keep it's members involved, 
but that's just not true for this club. 



Instead of dreaming up new activities, I 
often have to remind the members not to 
undertake too many," Drake answered. 

The club works on projects that not 
only help the student grow, but gives 
them experience that can later be used on 
the job. 

The main money projects undertaken 
by the members are serving "feeds." 
Feeds are meals that the club caters to its 
members and the community. The club 
serves more than 3,000 people during the 
school year. Some events that the 
members serve at are K-State Cattleman's 
Day and Swine Days, K-State livestock 
sales and the Midwest Training School. 

"The department invites people from 
all over the state to these events and the 
club is expected to serve a good meal, 
which we have done consistently," Drake 
said. i>o 




160 block and bridle 



Watching eyes — Francy 
George, freshman in pre-design, 
and Karen Chrisler, Steve Roth 
and Ellen Wasserman, all in 
animal science and industry, seem 
to find some humor in the 
meeting as they listen to the 
presentation. 



Predictions — Jim Buchanan, a 
Manhattan commodity broker, 
speaks to the club on the future 
of the economy under the Reagan 
presidency. Throughout the year 
the club hosts speakers from 
across the nation. 




B-b-b-b — In addition to selling 
advertisements and assisting with 
"feeds," new Block and Bridle 
members must obtain signatures 
for their "B." The individually 
decorated wooden emblems 
requires signatures from 10 
faculty and 25 club members. 



161 




Steel Ring 



TOP ROW: Chris D. Jones, Mark W. Fielder, 
Rich J. McKittrick, Clifford G. Gilbert, B. Ellen 
Johnson. THIRD ROW: James D. Calvert, Brad 
L. Hafner, Ann F. Atkinson, Mark C, Jones. 
SECOND ROW: Gail A. Ritzdorf, Tim S. Ander- 
son, Sue Barsamlan. BOTTOM ROW: Ray E. 
Hightower, Tony K. Lippert, Tom C. Orazem, 
Drew S. Thompson. 



Student Body 
President's Cabinet 



TOP ROW: Richard McKittrick, Linda Palacios, 
Suze Brink, Linda Kassebaum, David Hogeboom 
SECOND ROW: Sue Barsamlan, Mark Zimmer- 
man, Llifford Gilbert, Mark Mugler. BOTTOM 
ROW: Stephen Hentges, Mark Skinner, Randall 
Tosh, Billy Williams 



Student Dietetics 
Association 

TOP ROW: Mindy S. Levy, Hazel M. Ehm, Julie 
W. Rundell, Karma D. Huck, Jan M. Medlin, 
Cheryl L. Wendt, Lois A. Fladie. THIRD ROW: 
Denlse A. Wiseman, Linda J. Ranney, Debbie L. 
Augustyn, Carla J. Shoemaker, Cindy A. 
Stuckey, Teresa R. Schemper. SECOND ROW: 
Marcia E. Utt, Maryfrances Wutich, Nancy R. 
Pihl, Renee J. Wiebe, John J. Cannava Jr., Alice 
B. Raple. BOTTOM ROW: Shera L. Woodson, 
Mary E. Okiphant, Parti J. Moser, Cindy K. Da- 
vis, Sheila K. Morse, Deborah D. Canter. 



Student Governing 
Association 

TOP ROW: LewJene M. Schnieder, LewAnne 
G. Schneider, Teri A. Bishop, Michelle A. Ho- 
ferer, Mark J. Kohlrus. THIRD ROW: Dan W. 
Chase, Mike N. Anderson, Dongil Chang, Dent 
Wllcoxon. SECOND ROW: Mark Bergmeier, 
Scott A. Long, Mark A. Knoll, Lynda L. Mum- 
ford, Charles R. Banks. BOTTOM ROW: Doug- 
las D. Dodds, Laurie L. Mills, William G. Young, 
Daniel C. Keiter, Larry Schalles. 



Student Governing 
Association 



TOP ROW: Gerl A. Greene, Kyle A. Exllne, 
Debra D. Peterson, Trina D. Cole, Linda K. Vent- 
sam, Mary S. Holm, Kathleen A. VanDaalen. 
THIRD ROW: Carol A. Kamps, Kay A. Barrl, 
Kimberli A. Bearly, Tim A. Matlack, Mark C. 
Houser, Nam H. Oh. SECOND ROW: Timothy 
P. Krug, Mark A. Zimmerman, Ross R. Vines, 
Kelly J. Presta, David E. Lehman, Rod A. Rus- 
sell. BOTTOM ROW: Mark C. Ward, Brad D. 
Hamill, Kurt C. Wilbur, Gregory H. Gibson, Rod 
E. Wahle. 






■' u *""T1 



' • 



Royal Show — While the 
clowns and spectators look 
on, K-Staters participate in 
the Little American Royal, a 
competitive livestock 
showmanship contest. The 
March 30 show was co- 
sponsored by Block and Brid, 
and the Dairy Science Club. 




Bullish 

Some of the activities done by the 
Block and Bridle Club are a part of it's 
62 year-old tradition such as the Block 
and Bridle Horse show, Little American 
Royal and an annual judging contest. 

The club has either sponsored or co- 
sponsored the Little American Royal 
livestock show since its beginnings. 

"It takes a lot of manpower to pull the 
show off, we have to have people in 
charge of the livestock, the arena, the 
program, ticket sales and so on. Further 
more, many of our own members are 
showing livestock in the show, so they are 
unable to help," Shipley said. 

To many K-State students, the Little 
American Royal is something to look 
forward to and work for. 

"The Little American Royal is the 
highlight of the year. I enjoy participating 
in the show and helping with the feeds 
because it's a good chance to get away 
from your books and studies. Anyway, 
you can always be sure you'll have a 
good time," said Dave Mackintosh, senior 
in animal science and industry and club 
member. 

The Block and Bridle Club also 
sponsors a collegiate Horse Show in the 
spring. Horsemen from all over Kansas, as 
well as neighboring states compete in this 
annual show. Noted country and western 
singers such as Red Stegall, have 
traditionally entertained during the show. 

According to Drake, the Block and 
Bridle Club is well respected by people 
involved in the livestock industry 
throughout the state of Kansas. 

To return this respect, an Honorary 
Member and Outstanding Stockman are 
named each year at the Annual Block and 
Bridle Banquet. The Outstanding 
Stockman is based upon the person's 
contribution to the livestock industry. 
Their portraits are hung in the Portrait 
Gallery in Weber Hall Library. 

Even with Block and Bridle's large 
membership all of its members are 
involved in various club functions and the 
club is active on campus. The 
organizations reputation and strong 
involvement is what keeps the group 
thriving with a large membership.^ 



Lisa Wulfkuhle 



block and bridle 163 




SGA Executive 
Committee 



TOP ROW: LewAnn Schneider, Kay Bartel, 
Mark Zimmerman. SECOND ROW: Douglas 
Dodds, David Lehman, Charles Banks. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Kurt Wilbuk, Rany Tosh, Larry 
Schalles. 



Student National 
Education Assoc. 



TOP ROW: Nancy E. Flott, Susan E. Thomas, 
Sarah E Merrill, Susie M. Musick, Elaine M, Mill- 
er, BOTTOM ROW: Diane M. Stump, Liz Drees, 
Mary L. Matthew, Mary Jones, Wanda Akin. 



Student 
Publications 
Board of Directors 

TOP ROW: Carolee Stark, Bryce Haverkamp, 
Kathy Witherspoon, Gayle McGehee. BOTTOM 
ROW: Michael Henderson, Harry Marsh, Jack 
Carpenter. 



Student 
Publications 
Summer Ad Staff 

Renee Currie, Tawnya Ford. 



Student 
Publications 
Fall Ad Staff 

TOP ROW: Greg Pappas, Lisa Foster, Kirk Mun- 
son, Dave Cook, Alan Winkler, Janet Elmore, 
Kim Hanzlichek, Docter Darby, Mike Miller. 
BOTTOM ROW: Lisa Griffith. Randy Dunn 
Kathy Binford. 




The> 




HAPPY 
BIRTHDAY 






Beware Truly Wild 

Piglet, 
you will be dogged. 

May your night 
be truly wild 

Happy 21st 



made me a celebrity? 




Who are these 
birthday beauties? 

Could it be 
JoAnn and Karen 



Somehow I just couldn't get up the 
nerve to say hello to her. She was a 
gorgeous blonde studying economics in 
the basement of Farrell. The next day I 
knew I just had to meet her. 

One solution to my problem would be 
to take out a personal in the K-State 
Collegian. 

Those tiny messages on the last page 
of the newspaper may be the answer for 
those men or women who can't seem to 
get out the first hello or those mysterious 
messengers looking for someone with 
whom to share those "pina coladas" and 
"walks in the rain." 

"Everybody I know reads the personals 
so if I want to say hello to a special 
someone that's the cheapest way to go," 
Amy Sargent, junior in criminology, said. 

For many K-State students personals 
and birthday ads have become as much of 
a tradition as jiffin' in Aggieviile and 
Swannie runs. With them, students have 
an open forum to announce anniversaries, 



parties, say a special hello, try to meet a 
recent acquaintance or just send crazy 
messages. 

According to Randy Dunn, spring 
semester advertising manager, not only 
are they very popular with students but 
they also bring in quite a bit of money to 
the Collegian advertising department. 

"They're a big source of revenue and 
there is usually never a day when we 
don't have some personals to put in the 
paper," he said. 

Dunn said the policy for such 
advertising has changed from previous 
years, because the Collegian can be held 
libel for any pictures or personals they 
print. 

Therefore students putting in picture 
birthday ads must sign a photo release 
and must obtain the signature of the 
person they are putting the picture in of. 

"This is just a precautionary measure 
so that the Collegian can't be held libel 
for something we put in," he said. Z>C> 



birthday ads/personals 165 




Student 

Publications 

Fall Collegian Staff 

TOP ROW: John Doddertdge, Kevin Haskin, 
Gregg Coonrod. SECOND ROW: Kathy Weick- 
ert, Alice Sky, Mark Eddy, Mike Wilson. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Debra Graber, Kathy Witherspoon, 
Carol Holstead, Kimber Williams, Roger Aeschil- 



Student 
Publications 
Royal Purple Staff 

TOP ROW: Anton Arnoldy, Cari Cavassa, Nan- 
cy Reese, Jerry Katlin. SECOND ROW: Yvette 
Schrock, Jill McAntee, Dale Blanchard. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Andrea Carver, Susan Schlickau, 
Jan Mead. 



Student 
Publications 
Photography Staff 



Scott Liebler, Bo Rader, Hurrlyet Aydogen, 
Scott Williams, Craig Chandler, John Greer, Rob 
Clark, Richie Bergen. 



Student 
Publications 
Spring Ad Staff 



TOP ROW: Lisa Foster, Kyle Bryson, Mike Mill- 
er, Kirk Munson, Greg Pappa, Dave Cook. BO- 
TOM ROW: Kathe Rusnak, Sandy Lang, Kathy 
Witherspoon, Randy Dunn, Kim Hanzlichek, 
Dave Burns. 



Student 
Publications 
Spring Collegian 
Staff 



TOP ROW: Terl Groft, Gregg Coonrod, Kevin 
Haskin, Marcia Vanderllp, Jill Shelley. SECOND 
ROW: Laurie Shaneyfelt, Karen Carlson, Paul 
Stone, Bruce Buchanan, Kathy Welckert, Megan 
Bardsley. BOTTOM ROW: Diane Doctor, Alice 
Sky, Michelle Duell, Roger Aeschllman. 



BRET-AS long as you contin- 
ue to fool around with Angie I 
will continue to be bugged 
and grouchy. What hurts the 
most is you're hiding it from 
me. Why? 1 know the whole 
story anyway. I'm not out for 
competition so you'd better 
foget her. I promise you'll 
lose me forever if your don't. 
Aunt M. 

BIG BEND Caravan: My Mas- 
tercharge is due and I am 
worried. Please help me out. 
Pay me in a hurry. N. 

TO THE girl in room 254 at 
the Hilton in JC Friday night: 
What was it that you wanted 
me for? Too bad the springs 
broke but 303 worked just as 
well. Thanks for everything. 
By the way what time is it? 
Love, Gonga. 



MIKE 

HEGARTY 

HAPPY 21ST 

to my 
Christmas Baby! 

Love ya much - 
Caty 




Ads make celebrities 

Dunn said this is usually nr* a problem 
as most of the birthday ads and personals 
they receive are morally acceptable. 

"Sure we've had to turn down some 
that have been questionable," he said. 
"We try to take each ad at a time." 

According to Dunn the student rate for 
personal and birthday adertising is $2 a 
column inch — a small price to pay for 
some good natured vengence, according 
to some students. 

"When it was my birthday, my roomates 
put in a picture of me that was, well, 
let's say not to flattering," Kim Sykes, 




sophomore in speech pathology and 
audiology said. "It was one of those 
mornings after a long night in Aggieville 
and I looked pretty sad, raccoon eyes 
and everything. But I got them back when 
their birthdays rolled around," she said. 

Another student, Theresa Brown, said 
she was surprised when she opened the 
paper on her birthday to see her picture, 
but in spite of the teasing she received 
during the day she thought the idea was 
funny. 

"My roommates hinted around that 
they were going to do something but I 
wasn't sure what it was,"- Brown, 
sophomore in industrial engineering said. 

"I have to admit I thought it was pretty 
funny and you can't really get mad when 
it's all in fun," she said. 

"The personals and the weather are the 
first things I read in the paper," Michelle 
Arnold, sophomore in home economics 
said. "1 like to see what other people 
have written, it wakes me up in the 
morning." 

Dunn said the advertising department 
has had few problems with angry students 
over embarrassing pictures mainly because 
all are screened before being put in. 

"We haven't had too many problems," 
he said. "Basically students realize they're 
all in fun." 

With the help of a personal, one K- 
State student had friends that took it 
upon themselves themselves to help him 
find a mate, in fun. 



"It all started when a friend asked me 
what I wanted for Christmas and I had 
jokingly said 'well a wife would be nice'." 
Dave Mackintosh, senior in animal science 
and industry said. 

According to Mackintosh that lead to 
the personal which read: Attention 
females of all ages, sizes and species! 
December graduate desires female 



"The personals and the weather 
are the first things 1 read in the 
paper. I like to see what other 
people have written, it wakes 
me up in the morning." 

companion to accompany him to the 
Nebraska wilderness. An excellent 
opportunity for the right person. Any or 
all offers considered. Help this sex-starved 
man have a Merry Christmas. Apply at 
Weber Library weekdays 9-5. Sponsored 
by the Dave Mackintosh Mate Selection 
Committee. 

"My friends actually made up 
applications and we had quite a few girls 
come to apply," Mackintosh said. 

"We got a lot of laughs out of the 
whole thing and it was sure an interesting 
new way to meet people," he said. $• 



Sharon Riley 



Hi- 

My name is Beth and I just popped up 
to say that today is my birthday and I 
want every boy that sees me to give 
me a great big kiss! 

Happy Birthday you Sexpot! 
Love J.T.AA. 



Jay, If life is a bowl of cherries, how come we got stuck 
with the PITZ? 




HAPPY B-day??? 



birthday ads/ personals 167 




Symphony Orch. 

VIOLIN I: Carolyn Thayer, Catherine Cunning- 
ham, Teresa Williams, Charles Hu, Lyndal Ny- 
berg, Marilyn Cunningham. VIOLIN II: Rebecca 
Gutierrez, Karen Athey, Malanie Paris, Brock 
Dale, Abigail Siddall, Jim Seeber. VIOLA: Rich 
ard Brunner, Ginger Howlett, Becky Sawyer 
Alexander Skutlartz. CELLO: Peter Criss 
Alanso Ferrer, Sheldon Lentz, Cheryl Glahn 
Chanalyn Kiger, Susan Linder, Ellen Stewart 
Lisa Perry. BASS: Breta Bloomberg-Ellis, Ran 
dall Wilkens, Thomas Long, Christopher Banner 
FLUTE: Laurel King Brunken, Karla Steinberg 
Emily Coble. OBOE: Frances Jilka, Sue Thomen 
Melissa Leech. CLARINET: Susan Treiber, De- 
bra Barner, Teresa Shea. BASSOON: Julie 
Langdon, Greg Briggs, HORN: Rene Boatman 
David McConnell, Janet Anschutz, Susan Graber 
TRUMPET: Craig Shadday, Bill Orth, John 
Hays. TROMBONE: Randy Crow, Julie Shute, 
Thomas Wheeler. PERCUSSION: Charles Bey, 
Lee Phillips, Paul Torkelson, Mark Miller. 

Tau Beta Psi 

TOP ROW: Kimoanh T. Nguyen, Rachel J. 
Roth, Nancy K. Foust, Mary K. Konz, Sandra S. 
Callahan, Pedro L. Serrano, Kristin J. Fionda, 
Susan P. Barsamian, David A. Carr. THIRD 
ROW: Randall S. Jones, Tim J. Sobering, Eric L. 
Unruh, Todd W. Smith, Wayne M. Bla2e, Daryl 
A. Coleman, Lynne Brolkhoff, Brian E. Guenther 
SECOND ROW: John N. Palma, Richard J 
McKittrick, Spencer L. Tholstrup, Jay A 
Hathaway, Jeffrey D. Bridgwater, Steven M 
Scrivner, David S. Douglas, Robert V. Beims 
BOTTOM ROW: Paul J. Strecker, Kevin R. Stat- 
cup, Thomas L. Hardenburger, Timothy K 
Beougher, Kerry L. Black, Dennis C. Wilke, Mi 
chael L, McGeough, Frank A. Tillman. 

Tau Beta Sigma 

TOP ROW: Laurie A. Williams, Linda M. Lugin- 
bill, Kimberly A. Reed, Tern L. Shea, Rae J. 
Faurot, Kathryn A. Maertens. SECOND ROW: 
Laura R. Londeen, Sara J. Borst, Liisa E. Em- 
bree, Karla S. Steinberg, Debra L. Barner, Nancy 
R. Pihl. BOTTOM ROW: Stacy E. Stephens, 
Teresa R. Ubben, Kay S. Scarbrough, Sheryl L. 
Neblock, Lorri L. Banman, Lori K. Brax. 



Tau Sigma Delta 

TOP ROW: Candace Sheeley, Linda Brooks-Pill- 
ing, Sue Corrigan, Minoru Terada, Pamela Ma- 
gargal, Kari Heitman. SECOND ROW: Cranston 
Heintzelman, Paul Stefanski, Kelly Boylan, Dave 
Chael, Clark Peters, Keith Whittle. THIRD 
ROW: Brent Argo, Brian Sullivan, Dixie Junk, 
Kelly Kerns, David Brown. BOTTOM ROW: 
Todd Verwers, Jeff Bolen, Brad Teeter, Ken 
Zuber, Richard Bartholomew. 



Union Governing 
Board 

TOP ROW: Michael J. Scully. Warren V. Walk- 
er, William, H. Honstead, William G. Young, 
Bruce Hazeltine, Robert J. McCully, Joel M. Mar- 
shall, Philip R. Atkins, Gregory N. Hamilton. 
BOTTOM ROW: Marjorie M. Stith, Margaret S. 
Cieslicki, Amy L, Button, Joan M. Minneman, 
Richard J, McKittrick, Walter D. Smith. 



Matrix class sparks creativity 



*he "real world" can be a shock to 
new graduates and the more 
exposure received before the jump into 
the working world helps in this transition. 

Students majoring in Graphic Design 
are getting a taste of the real world. 

The real world is a class called Matrix. 

Matrix is a final course offered to 
students who have the required 
prerequisite classes, Lettering, Graphic 
Design Techniques and two classes of 
Graphic Design and Illustration. The class 
is selective and students take it 
simultaneously with their regular class 
load. 

A former K-State professor assistant, 
Dennis Kuronen started the class in the 
spring of 1979 in the art department 
because of the need to experience 
students with the graphics proffession. 

The course gives the students 
experience working ithe with the outside," 
said Karol Winegardner, assistant 
professor of art. Winegardner has taught 
the Matrix class for the past year. 

"This class is a work shop rather than 
a real class situation," Winegardner said. 
The class is held in the attic of the Art 
Building. 

"We are limited on space for the 
class," Winegardner said. "The room is 
very small and we can only let nine or 
ten in the class each semester." 

If a student does meet the 
requirements, he must submit a portfolio. 

"David Harms, assistant professor of 
art, and myself look at the portfolios and 
then the student may be accepted," 
Winegardner said. 

"In the portfolio we look at their 
drawing talents, how they work with a 
design problem. They have to be 
motivated and self disciplined," 
Windgardner said. 

"Not all of the students have been 
graphic majors. A couple have been from 
the journalism department," she said. 

"We do like to get a mix of majors. It 
makes no difference if they are a graphics 
major, just as long as they have taken the 
other classes before submitting." 

Most of the jobs have been for on 
campus groups or departments," 
Winegardner said. 5>C> 



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xK&ition in union gallery following leci 





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matrix 169 





Union Programming 
Council 



TOP BOW: Marilyn L. Gilbert, Diane J. DeFor- 
est, Maresa A. Roney. SECOND ROW: Dana O. 
Lesher, Linda L. Voider, Margaret S, Cieslicki, 
Pete Manfredo. BOTTOM ROW: Ed H. 

McPheeters, Curt Hammill, Jeff R. Wilbur. 



UPC Arts 
Committee 



TOP ROW: Susan A. Attig, Ann F. Wylie, Kathy 
J. Knadle, Marilyn L. Gilbert, Vickie P. Maddox. 
BOTTOM ROW: Sally A. Fitzpatrick, Linda L. 
Voider, Jody M. Nelson, Patricia Honors. 



UPC Coffeehouse 



TOP ROW: Sandy K. Evans, Julie B. Deberry, 
Margaret S. Cieslicki, Lisa Feden. SECOND 
ROW: Judi Gamarano, Ray P. Smith, Patricia M. 
Hall. BOTTOM ROW: Ed H. McPheeters, Doug 
Sharpe, Steve J. Andrew, Bruce E. Dyson. 



UPC Feature 
Films Committee 

TOP ROW: Joan M. Minneman, Susan J. Petro, 
Ross A. Myers, Julie A. Grinstead. SECOND 
ROW: Bill Muret, Pete Manfredo, Eric Foster. 
BOTTOM ROW: Greg Cooper, Bart Wingert, 
James Seymour. 



UPC Issues 
and Ideas 



TOP ROW: Sara J. Hibbeler, Lynn A. Wylie, 
Donna R. Abboll, Karl E. Sweers. SECOND 
ROW: Micki L. Steele, Dennis C. Wlke, Kent L. 
Linger. BOTTOM ROW: Jeffrey R. Wilbur, Te- 
resa I. Jenkins. Kurt C. Wilbur. 





Matrix 

"If a department decides they need a 
poster made, the head of the department 
usually comes to the class and presents 
the problem and when they need the 
project finished." 

"From there it is a voluntary decision 
between the Matrix students. Usually four 
or five students work individually on the 
assignment." 

"We have a few jobs for the Matrix 
that were off campus but primarily the 
jobs are on campus," Winegardner said. 

After the projects are finished the client 
will return to class and tell them their 
decision. The clients give their point of 
view which is important for the students 
to know why some of the ideas would be 
more successful than the next," 
Winegardner said. 

Barb Pihl, senior in graphic design, 
learned the ropes of Matrix during the 
spring semester. 

"This was my first time to apply. The 
reason I wanted to take the class was to 
get some professional experience for my 
graphics major," Pihl said. 

Students do the have the opportunity 



to reapply, but many do not. 

"Once a student has been in Matrix for 
a semester they can reapply. They do 
have to submit another portfolio so that 
everyone has an equal opportunity. The 
seniors are the only ones with a little 
advantage, especially if they are 
graduating the semester that they have 
applied. But juniors are not discouraged 
from applying," Winegardner said. & 

Kim Hanzlicek 



Group Shot - Members of the 
Matrix class, Lynda Grace, Rick 
Allen, Tracey Deines, Charlie 
Th'ng, Andrea Humphrey, Terry 
Fisher, Leigh Hand and Stan 
Higgason assemble in the classroom 
to work on their projects. Karol 
Winegardner, seated in front, is the 
coordinator of the class. 

Drawing Grace - Lynda Grace uses 
her graphic training to work in the 
design area of the office of infor- 
mation where she does various pro- 
jects for campus departments. 





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matrix 171 




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UPC Kaleidescope 
Committee 



TOP ROW: Hal B. Rager, James G. Meliza, 
Thomas R. Stiller, Hayden L. Wands- BOTTOM 
ROW: Dan S. Mabry, Bill Muret, Diane J. DeFor- 
est, Kathleen M. Cott. 



UPC Outdoor 

Recreation 

Committee 



TOP ROW: Robyn R. Welliever, Carol A. Lose, 
Lesa R. Miller. SECOND ROW: Gail Gargy. 
Mari Hemmert, Nancy Hardesty, BOTTOM 
ROW: Jim Armstrong, Curt Hammlll, Bruce 
Loyd. 



(IPC Travel 
Committee 



TOP ROW: Kathe M. Rusnak, Raul E. Alfaro, 
Barbara L. Pihl. BOTTOM ROW: Dana O. 
Lesher, Rita D. Waish, Phil J. Howard. 



Senior 



United Black 
Voices 



TOP ROW: Errol V. Cade, David M. Moore, 
Terry N. Francis, Francis McMillon, Milton B. 
Thomas, Johnny K. Fleming II, Thommie L. 
Pratt. THIRD ROW: Pat L. Pace, Denny G. 
Pearson, Charles J. Bey Jr., Robert L. Williams, 
JR., Billy C. Williams, Cedric R. Saunders, Ernest 
L. Downs, Zelma M. Lewis. SECOND ROW: 
Latessa R. Jackson, Linda F. Roberts, Renee 
Johnson, Joniece McFalls, Daphne R. Stewart, 
Mona L. Lucas, Nita L. Cobbins. BOTTOM 
ROW: Detria A. Stephens, Sherri J. Chapell, 
Tami E. Farr, Vicki E. Felder, Yolonda L. Tumb- 
leson, Deborah L, Harris, Denise M. Duckett. 



Wheat State 
Agronomy Club 



TOP ROW: Katherine A. Kotoyantz, Kimberly 
M. Kepler, Lisa Auen, Daniel Croker, Loren J. 
Moshier, Daryl G. Sales, Ed Twidwell, Steve 
Schartz. THIRD ROW: Mark Wm. Lyles, Jer- 
ome F. Buser, Dale A. Weishaar, Mary Bunck, Ab 
Smith, Larry L. Lockhart, Jeff L. Kimmell, Rich- 
ard V. Llewelyn. SECOND ROW: Matthew J. 
Doperalski, Dr. Walter H Fick, Scott M. Barnes, 
Frank A. Cole, Jr., Mike Pottorff, Timothy L. 
Miller, Gerald Sharp. BOTTOM ROW-- David L. 
Goetsch, Vernon A. Schaffer, Leon E. Heinen, 
Reg C, Wescott Jr., Gary L. Strodtman, Gaien L. 
Meyer, Deryl E. Waldren. 




IrW^i 




Wildcat- Amidst the greek 
letters and decorations, a 
purple wildcat can be detected 
in the mobile donation in the 
Union courtyard. 



class reinstates gift tradition 




¥ n addition to parties and t-shirts, the 

*1981 senior class focused on more 
imvolvement and more participation. 

The most popular aspects of college life 
some might recall are social gatherings. 

"We have had two parties this semester 
(fall) — one at Tuttle Creek and one at 
Kites for the last home football game," 
said Steve Holloway, senior in marketing 
and senior class president. 

"We plan to give a few more parties 
and we'll be looking for a class gift," said 
Greg Trempy, senior in biology and senior 
class vice president. "We are also trying 
to set up an interviewing seminar for 
graduating seniors." 

According to Holloway, the main 
fundraising events were the selling of 
senior class t-shirts and senior class 
activity cards. These two fund-raisers 
make up the senior class budget for the 
year. 

The seniors, like any other organization, 
wear their t-shirts to be identified. 

"One thing we have done differently 
this year than other classes was at the 
beginning of the fall semester we sent 
letters to the living groups. We asked 
them to select one liaison to represent 
them (the living group) at the senior class 
meetings. It was successful and it did 
create more awareness of the senior class 
activities and it did generate more 
involvement," Holloway said. 

After abandoning the tradition of giving 
gifts to the University for five years, the 
senior class of 1981 has planned to 
reinstate that tradition. 

"There hasn't been a senior class gift 
donated to the University for a few years 
but we hope to donate something this 
year," Holloway said. 



"There is a tree that stands a few 
yards from All-Faiths Chapel that was 
donated by the class of 1886. This 
donation started the tradition of senior 
classes giving gifts to the University," said 
Amy Button, senior class advisor and 
assistant director of the alumni 
association. 

"One gift that was suppose to be 
donated to the university by the class of 
1969 and 1971, but for some reason it 
never developed, was an outdoor 
classroom(amphitheatre)," Button said. "It 
was suppose to be made out of three 
layers of poured cement and be located 
outside McCain Auditorium." 

Some of the past senior class gifts 
include the four-sided clock at central 
campus (between Holtz, Denison, and 
Seaton Halls) which was donated by the 
classes of 1968, 1971, 1973 and 1974, 
according to Button. 

"The senior class of 1972 donated the 
Landon Lecture podium," she said. 

"The purple cat and the learning tree 
mobile located in the Union courtyard was 
donated by the class of 1970," she said. 
"Also the seating area made of brick by 
Anderson Hall was donated by the class 
of 1969." 

According to Button the senior classes 
from 1975 through 1980 have combined 
funds to give a gift to the University. But 
nothing has been determined. They 
wanted to donate something that would 
be functional and lasting. Several ideas 
are being explored to see what gift could 
be donated to the University. # 



Dale Blanchard 



senior class 



173 



Chalmers honored with graduate: 




/V lmost a month of near-drought 
**weather in Manhattan and the day 
before K-State's 1980 Commencement 
many students feared a repeat 
performance of the previous year when 
rain soaked spectators and graduates at 
the 1979 commencement exercises. 

But the overcast skies and slight fog 
proved to be only small threats and on 
the morning of May 17, approximately 
3,500 K-State graduates prepared 
themselves for their long-awaited degrees 
and congratulations on completing their 
college studies. 

"Commencement is a long and 
complicated event that requires a lot of 
advance planning," Bob Bruce, director of 
information and member of the 
commencement committee, said. "We 
naturally had alternative plans in case of 
rain, but we were glad we didn't have to 
use them," he said. 

As in the past, K-State's 117th annual 
commencement consisted of an all- 
university exercise followed by individual 
college exercises where degree candidates 
received their diplomas. 

"I think it all went off quite well," 
Bruce said. "There was a little congestion 
at the stadium because there was a track 
meet going on while students were trying 
on their robes, but we worked it all out 
and everything went about as expected." 

Bruce helped organize arrangements for 
commencement and said there were many 
behind-the-scenes preparations that were 
important to the success of the event. 

"For instance, separate programs had 
to be printed up for spectators and the 
platform party," Bruce said. 

Cum laude — an honor student 
stands to be recognized for her 
accomplishments. 



He said one of the main reasons for 
this concerned the honorary degree 
received by John Chalmers, vice president 
of academic affairs. 

"We wanted it to come as a surprise to 
him, so the platform party had programs 
which only listed Fred J. Benson as a 
recipient. We managed to keep it pretty 
hush and it worked well because he was 
genuinely surprised about receiving the 
degree," he said. 

In additiop to * ne honorary degrees 
received by Chalmers and Benson, 

One of the more significant 
events during graduation, was a 
degree awarded in the College 
of Home Economics ceremony. 
After a 40-year wait, 63-year 
old Harry Eugene Martin re 
ceived his undergraduate de 
gree in home economics. 



citations for excellence in undergraduate 
teaching were awarded to Harold Shaver, 
assistant professor of journalism and mass 
communications; Edward Devilbiss, 
associate professor of architecture; Verlyn 
Richards, professor of business 
administration and Edwin Lindly, associate 
professor of civil engineering. 

Governor John Carlin and Sandra 
McMullen of the Kansas Board of Regents 
greeted and gave best wishes to the class 
and after the all-university program the 
individual colleges held their own 
ceremonies for graduates. ® 



Sharon Riley 



174 graduation 




Just another face? -Graduates 
applaud the "words of wisdom" 
as they attend the All-University 
ceremony. 



Bo Rader 



graduation 175 




Wildlife Society 



TOP HOW: Eva I. Dudek, Paula D. Fell, Sheryl 
A. Barnett, Julie A. Cornett, Linda R. Schaffner, 
Laura J. Bareiss. SECOND ROW: William A. 
Bergh, Linda J. Critchfield, Robert L. Unruh, 
Galen L. Critchfield, David G. Springer. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Robert J. Robel, John A. Bond, 
Michael J. Reid, Tony V. Callen, Tom G. Heger, 
Bruce D. Cuevas. 



Williston Geology 
Club 



TOP ROW: Lucy J. Nicastro, Valerie J. Broedel, 
Susan K. Hargadin, Holly K. Legult, Tina W. 
Chandler. THIRD ROW: Andy A. Howell, Rick 
Robinson, Maura A. O'Halloran, Brian C. Ed 
wards. SECOND ROW: Bill D. Richards, Nanci 
E. Witbeck, Allen R. Moody, Mark E. Potz 
kowsky. BOTTOM ROW: Lex Shaw. Michael J 
Freene, Michael J. DiMarco, Greg C. Rinke, Mi 
chael J. Killion. 



Women in 
Communications 

TOP ROW: Karen S. Barancik, Anne K. 
Schmitz, Kathleen P. Pakkebier, Debra D. Peter- 
son, Geryl G. Buss. SECOND ROW: Kleila E. 
Carlson, Denise R. Harvey, Mona M. Rusk, Kathe 
M. Rusnak. BOTTOM ROW: Debbie D. Lea- 
sure, Dee A. Weinreis, Mary T. Jacobson. 



K-Stat 
graduate 

makei 
Playbo 



Smile! — One of the thousak 

of black robed graduates 
decorates her cap in an attend 
to be recognized. 




176 graduation 






At 63-years-old Harry Eugene Martin 
did what many K-State male 
graduates would love to do — make the 
pages of Playboy. 

But Harry didn't stop there. 

He was also written about in the New 
York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the 
International Herald Tribune, The 
Washington Star, and a variety of other 
newspapers and magazines nation-wide. 

"It was sure a surprise. Some reporters 
told me to expect quite of bit of publicity 
but I didn't know there would be this 
much," Martin said. 

The incident that brought Martin to 
nation-wide attention was K-State's 1980 
commencement exercises. 

After having been denied a Home 
Economics degree in 1940 because he 
was a male, Martin was invited back to 
K-State by Home Economics Dean Ruth 
Hoeflin to receive his diploma 40 years 
after the fact. 

"I never expected anything like this," 
Martin said of Hoeflin's invitation. "The 
wife and I were really surprised because 
we hadn't heard anything about it before 
we were called," he said. 

Hoeflin said the circumstances that led 
to the invitation were coincidental and 
stemmed from a conversation she had 
with two former faculty members visiting 
K-State that year. 



"They were reminiscing about a male 
student who couldn't get a Home 
Economics degree," Hoeflin said referring 
to Bessie West, former head of the 
institutional management department and 
Levelle Wood, a 1940 home economics 
faculty member. 

"The administration had some rule — 
if they didn't then they made one up — 
that no male could get a degree in Home 
Economics," she said. 

Determined to right the injustice, 
Hoeflin proceeded to go through the 
necessary channels for Martin to return to 
K-State and receive his degree. 

"I can't just go around giving out 
degrees you know," she said at the time. 
But in Martin's case, approval came 
during commencement week and when 
the media caught wind of it, Martin's 
degree became a national interest story. 

As a student in the late 30's Martin 
came to K-State for chemical engineering 
but later decided to switch his major to 
dietetics, nutrition and food management 
in the College of Home Economics. 

"Many males took courses in the 
department but I was the only one who 
attempted to complete the program,"he said 

His problem came when upon 
completing all the requirements for a 
home economics degree he was told he 
would not receive one. 




"At the time i wasn't exactly sure why 
I couldn't receive the degree," he said. 
"But I figured it was because they didn't 
want to give a home economics degree to 
a man." 

According to Hoeflin decisions made at 
that time were usually never questioned 
which probably accounts for Martin's 
acceptance of the injustice. 

"I just knew I'd have to get a degree in 
something else," Martin said. 

Martin did get a degree in 1940 but 
only after going to summer school to take 
nine hours needed for a Bachelor of 
Science in general science. 

"The poor man was discriminated 
against by other men," Hoeflin said when 
she discovered the circumstances that 
kept Martin from receiving his degree. 

According to Hoeflin, in 1940 President 
F.D. Farrell made the decision to withhold 
Martin's diploma over the objections of 
Home Economics Dean, Margaret Justin 
and Bessie Brooks West. 

"I think it's fun that a woman rescues a 
man for once," Hoeflin said. 

The national media obviously agreed 
and when the first story about Martin's 
trip to Manhattan appeared in the 
Nashville Banner under "Food Pro 
Conquers Degree of Injustice," publicity 
increased with a snowball effect. 

Martin received calls from People 
Magazine and To Tell The Truth, in 
addition to having spots on ABC news 
and local radio stations. 

Martin now lives on a farm outside 
Nashville, Tennessee where he raises 
horses and cattle, sells real estate and 
does occasional food service consulting. 

During his career he managed a 
restaurant in Manhattan called the New 
Pine, a country club in Kansas City and 
finally retired after holding an executive 
food management position with Holiday 
Inns, Inc. 

Martin said the lack of a degree in 
1940 did affect his career, some. "It 
made it impossible for me to get a 
dietetics internship and kept me out of 
certain kinds of work, like teaching. 

Martin said he holds no grudges, 
however, and said the weekend he spent 
at K-State was one he'll never forget. 

"The campus had changed a lot since 
I'd seen it last. It looked very fine. Of 
course K-State's always been my favorite. 
It's a place somebody can really be proud 
to be from."® 



Sharon Riley 



graduation 177 




178 sports 





Sports 



Whether sweating out the lottery sys- 
tem for basketball tickets or hud- 
dling three-to-a-blanket on a cold day at 
the football stadium, thousands of It- 
Staters support the athletic programs. 

Some, in complete purple attire, skip 
classes and punt tests to help cheer on the 
'Cats, while other are drawn by the count- 
less tailgate parties. Even the action of an 
intramural battle can bring out enthusias- 
tic fans. 

Even if the Wildcats aren't playing their 
crimson and blue rivals from down the riv- 
er, K-State fans are brought closer togeth- 
er by the heartland bond. * 



It's good!' Stephanie Sparkes, 
Manhattan resident, jumps above 
other cheering fans after K-State 
scored during the Missouri game 
on Oct. 25. 

Refugee camp?' Amidst the old 
matt esses and canvas tents Dave 
Anderson, sophomore in 
agricultural economics and 
Mariann Poss, freshman in 
agricultural economics await the 
next roll call for individual 
basketball tickets. 



photos by John Greer 



sports 179 




Practice 
makes 
perfect 



Wt's the only class he wouldn't dare 
*skip. While walking to his car, Tom's 
mind prepares for his next class — varsity 
football. He's not thinking about the test he 
just took or his assignment that's due tomor- 
row, he's thinking about football. 

Tom arrives at the stadium fieldhouse at 
2:00 in the training room to work his bad 
knee, an injury from the previous season. A 
student trainer assists him in wrapping his 
knee. 

Later, Tom joins other players to see the 
videotape of last Saturday's game. Good 
and bad plays are pointed out by the coach- 
ing staff at the team meeting. Tom knows 
what he needs to work on in practice and 
sets some personal goals. 

By 4:15 the players move out to the prac- 
tice field. Stretching and running come first. 
He concentrates on the drills so he won't 
make the same mistakes he made in the last 
game. The 24 periods of drills at five min- 
utes each must be executed with precision 
so when the groups get together the plays 
will run smoothly. 

Six already. Practice is over. Tom feels 
fatigue, hunger pains and sore muscles as he 
heads home. Despite his pains, he feels he 
has reached his goals set that day and that's 
an accomplishment. 

Athletes in all varsity sports also exper- 
ience the aches, pains and fatigue of practice 



five to seven days a week during the season 
and up to four days a week on off-season. 
The time these students spend practicing 
could be used for studying or social life 
Athletes must sometimes sacrifice thost 
things that practice time takes away from. 

"It is stressed that the players graduate in 
four years, so we understand that they mav 
be carrying a heavy class load as well as 
some having a job and these pressures car! 
get them down," Lynn Hickey, women': 
basketball coach, said. 

"During the season, concentrate more or 
football than classes. I try to catch up on mi 
studying on the off-season. Football is mon 
important to me, especially since it's my las 
year to play," Monte Bennett, varsity foot 
ball player, said. 

"The biggest (sacrifice to practice) is prob 
ably studying. Tuesday and Wednesday an 
longer practices and it's sometimes hard t( 
find time to study. Friday and Saturday an 
pretty well shot for studying," John Liebe 
varsity football player, said. 

Not only time for studying is sacrificei 
because of practice but social life also sui 
fers. 

"When you're in training it hurts you nol 
to get sleep on the weekend," Dee Weinreis 
women's varsity basketball player, said. Al 
cohol doesn't mix with conditioning, sh< 
said. 



180 practice 




All sports 



Tim Costello 

"Sometimes when there are a lot of social 
activities, it's hard to get involved in them 
because we're gone so much on weekends 
when most activities are going on," Janelle 
LeValley, cross country and track runner, 
said. 

Be it football, basketball, tennis, volley- 
ball, cross country, track, baseball or softball; 
the time spent practicing exceeds the time 
that is spent at the game, meet or tourna- 
ment. 

In women's volleyball for two and a half 
hours a day, four days a week, ten hours a 
week and 13 weeks of season play there's 
close to 150 hours of practice, Scott Nelson, 
women's volleyball coach, said. 

With all the time put into the sport, varsity 
athletes get only one hour of credit. 

"There was a theory proposed by Dr. 
John Syler that in order to get rid of hypo- 
ed 



The cruncher-John Liebe 
stretches out before a football 
practice. 



(18) 



Do what? -Rolando Blackman 
intently watches Coach Jack 
Hartman at a basketball practice. 




Rob Clark 



practice 181 



Practice 

crisy, fraudulent transcripts, pud classes and 
easy grades that degrees be granted in ten- 
nis, basketball, football, etc.," David Hack- 
er, women's tennis coach, said. 

"A football or basketball player has to 
practice five or more hours a day, learning 
more than 150 plays, so why not grant him 
the same credit as a student in economics 
who has to learn economic theories. This 
would be a helluva lot more useful if he's 
going into coaching," he said. 

"It (practice) takes up a lot more time 
than it gives you credit for," Les Craft, varsi- 
ty basketball player, said. 

"It's like 1 go to classes Monday, Wednes- 
day and Friday three hours a day and don't 
really have to think about those classes. I go 
out on the court seven days a week. Mini- 
mum practice time is two and a half hours. I 
come home and don't even feel like study- 
ing. 1 just want to lie down and sleep. It's not 
only the physical work, it's a lot of mental 
exhaustion, too," Craft said. 

According to all varsity coaches, the play- 
er's preparation for practice is important in 
any sport. 

"They (the players) have to go out there 
and be into practice or it's no good," Gary 
Coble, football student trainer, said. 

Scott Nelson, women's volleyball coach, 
coaches on a contract basis. 

"I agree to be prepared for practice and 



the players agree to be prepared for prac- 
tice, games or any other team function," 
Nelson said. 

Being prepared involves being on time, 
coming in with a positive attitude and setting 
some individual goals in the drills for prac- 
tice that day, he said. 

"It makes for a healthy environment. Just 
showing up and going through the motions 
doesn't help them (the players) or the 
team," Nelson said. 

Practice is important for the success of 
individual and team performances at any 
game, meet or tournament. 

Organization and work habits that have 
developed are the most important reasons 
for practices, Lon Kruger, assistant basket- 
ball coach, said. 

With the long hours of practice and the 
time a varsity sport takes away from other 
aspects of college life, an athlete has reasons 
why he/she is dedicated to a varsity sport. 

"I get an inner satisfaction from running," 
LeValley said. 

"I have the rest of my life for social life 
but only four years to play college basket- 
ball," Weinreis said. 

"It's just rewarding when you win and I 
just love the sport," Brenda Bennett, varsity 
tennis player, said. & 



Paige Howard 



Toe hold-Dee Weinreis stretches 
out at basketball practice. 




Killer shot- Jean Stevenson raises 
her racket to hit a ball during 
drills at tennis practice. 



182 practice 






Trackin'-Janelle LeV alley, 
number one runner for the 
women's cross country team, runs 
her miles during practice. 



Rob Clark 



practice 183 



There's someplace like home 



anging from a compact, muscular mo- 
•del to a long, lean edition with extra 
height, Manhattan families can have the op- 
tion of adopting a K-State student. Athletic 
skills include the ability to play football, bas- 
ketball and tennis. 

K-State's foster parent program may 
sound unusual. But for the students in- 
volved, having a foster family home is a 
comfort when home is two or three states 
away or when trips home are once or twice a 
year, according to basketball player Les 
Craft, sophomore in computer manage- 
ment. 

"Because it's someplace to go like home, 
it makes being away a lot easier," said John 
Marx, sophomore in accounting and mem- 
ber of K-State's basketball team. 

Those athletes included in the program 
are football players, men and women basket- 
ball players, and men's tennis team mem- 
bers. Dedicated to their work, some of these 
athletes spend 11 months of the year at 
school (including Thanksgiving and Christ- 
mas vacations). They attend classes, then 
practice three to four hours — seven days a 
week — the sport for which they were re- 
cruited. 

Vince Gibson, who came to K-State to 
coach football in 1967, started the foster 
parent program for the football players. 



"Because it's someplace like 
home, it makes being away a lot 
easier." 



"He (Gibson) was a firm believer that 
when you come a long way from home you 
need a little more support," said Warren 
Pray, a foster parent for the football pro- 
gram. 

"It started by trying to room athletes from 
out of state with kids from in state, so that 
the out of state kids could go home with 
their roommates during the holidays. But 
then the foster parent deal was set up so 
they could have a homelife away from 
home, and the family gives them someone to 
support them academically as well as athleti- 
cally," Pray said. 

When they came up for the games, his 
wife would give home-baked cookies to the 
guys. 

Liking the involvement, the Prays had five 
foster sons one year. "It was a very fun 
time," said Pray. Some of their sons in the 
past years include slotback Kerwin Cox, 
quarterback Joe Hatcher, and linebacker 
Ray Sprinkle, and currently, Jeff Koyl, 



freshman in general and junior varsity offen- 
sive tackle from Carlsbad, California. 

According to Pray, all the football players 
except the walk-ons and those who live with- 
in 20-30 miles of the school have foster 
parents. There are about 80 foster families 
involved in the football program here. 

The athletes don't actually live at the fos- 
ter home, but use it as a place of refuge from 
the dorm to just relax or find a good meal to 
eat. But the "adoptees" put in their own 
part, too, even washing dishes, Pray said. 

"They really pitch in and help out — just 
like you'd want your own kids to," Pray 
said. 

He included some of the other benefits for 
the foster family as getting to know the play- 
ers and the player's family, becoming in- 
volved in K-State's athletic program, and 
watching the students mature. 

"The real fun is watching them grow up," 
Pray said. For example, when Ray Sprinkle 
was their son, they saw his relationship with 
a girl grow from date to wife. "He brought 
her to our house on the first date they ever 
had. In this case, we ended up getting a 
daughter, too," he said. 

As Mike Kopsky discovered, the family 
grows for the foster kids, too. Kopsky, foot- 
ball defensive back and sophomore in gener- 
al, found three new brothers and sisters in 
the family of Jerry and Mary Vestweber. 

"Coming from a family of 11 kids, it helps 
to have them around, and when my family 
comes up for the games everybody stays 
there at the Vestwebers and as a result be- 
come good friends," said Kopsky. 

"She's a great cook," he said. 

The foster parent program for men is reg- 
ulated by the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association (NCAA). The women's pro- 
gram, regulated under an organization titled 
Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for 
Women (AIAW), follows the same guidelines 
proposed by the men's program. 

Abiding under the NCAA rules, the peo- 
ple involved may not provide anything to an 
athlete not generally provided other stu- 
dents at the University, nor may they in any 
way defray expenses including such things 
as providing a restaurant meal, purchase of 
anything, provide transportation to or from 
the student's home or even transportation 
on errands around town. 

"We go by the rules. We don't want to 
give them any illegal inducement — like 
letting them use their phone for extra long 
distances," said Coach Donnan, football of- 
fensive backfield coach and coordinator of 
the football foster parent program. 

According to a letter which women's bas- 
ketball coach Lynn Hickey sent out to the 




parents involved in her program, the NCA^ 
permits parents to have the athlete come 
into the home to be treated in the same 
manner that any other student would be 
treated. Inviting the athlete to dinner is ac 
ceptable. The letter states that the purposf 
of this program is to provide a "family typ( 
atmosphere" away from the institution, ii 
which a feeling of trust and friendship can bij 
fostered. 

The program for the women's basketbal 
players was coordinated in the fall of 197' 
by Doug King, instructor for Continuing Edi 
cation, and his wife Eileen. 

Though there are usually more peopl 
wanting to be foster parents for the men' 
program than there are athletes, the won 
en's program has trouble finding enough vo 
unteers. Thus, the scholarship people ge 
foster parents first, then the ones furthe: 
from home, according to Hickey. 

"One lady has three kids. Finding the fo 
ter parents is kind of hard. It's more pres' 
gious to have a men's football player than 
women's basketball player, said Hickey. 

An incident where the foster parents re< 



184 foster parents 



All sports 




Mother's helper — Jeff Koyl 
helps clean up dishes after dinner. 



ly came in handy was in the 1980 women's 
playing season when forward Eileen Feen- 
ey's father died. Feeney, from New Jersey, 
was able to turn to her second family during 
that crisis. "It just made the whole situation 
easier to have the foster parent there," 
Hickey said. 

The support of the foster family is also 
appreciated at the games. "It means a lot to 
the players to know that there's some added 
personal support out there," said foster par- 
ent Pray. 

"It helps to have a group of people that 
are always at the games, to hang around 
after the game is over. A lot of times, these 
kids' (natural) parents don't ever get to see 
them play," said Hickey. 

Also a success, the men's basketball foster 
parent program has been active for about six 
years, according to assistant basketball 
coach Lon Kruger. 

"We're proud of the people that have 
acted with our program. We've had very 
good luck with it," he said. "Finding families 
that are interested is not a big problem; we 
usually have a lot that are. It tells us that the 



Photos 

program is a success," Kruger said. 

In order to become a foster parent family, 
the couple would indicate to the coaches an 
interest in the program, and if an opening 
comes up, the players are matched to the 
family as best as possible. 

"They really screen the foster parents; 
they really check 'em out to find the right 
ones," said basketball player Eddie Nealy, 
junior in engineering technology. 

One of the families involved in the men's 
basketball program is that of Joe and Sheila 
Mills. 

"We just enjoy athletics. It's one way of 
getting that much closer and makes the 
games even more fun. It's one thing to rec- 
ognize the players, and another thing for 
them to recognize you," said Joe Mills, his 
third year in the program. 

Their foster player at present is John 
Marx. This last summer, both Marx and 
teammate Les Craft stayed with the Mills 
during summer practice. 

"They're real nice kids and I enjoy having 
them around. They're very quick for thank- 
yous," said Sheila Mills. 



by Rob Clark 

The relationship to the family becomes a 
strong one, and in the Mills' case, Marx and 
Craft are treated just like members of the 
family, and vice-versa. 

"I have to tell John when to get his hair 
cut, so sometimes I even end up making his 
hair appointment for him," Sheila said. 

"You become very close to them," said 
Sheila. Both the Mills and the Prays still have 
their past foster sons come back and visit 
them, often during game weekends and holi- 
days. 

"Our door's open to all of them all of the 
time," said Pray. "It's the personal contact 
that makes it interesting." 

"It's a good deal for both sides. The par- 
ents get to interact with the school more, 
and it gets the kids away from school to a 
home-life where they can talk to people oth- 
er than the players and coaches," said 
Coach Donnan.& 



Cari Cavassa 



foster parents 185 




uggie, nuggie- Willie 
puts a strangle hold on the KU 
Jayhawk during the KU-K-State 
game at KSU Stadium. 

Purple passion- Fans cheer on 
the 'Cats wearing a variety of 
purple attire from head to toe. 

Sweet Nothings- Stan Weber, 
defensive safety, pulls a KU 
player to the ground. 



186 red and blue 




purple 



n a never ending Dame 01 wit, 
• and KU students struggle with an annual 
supremacy rite. This battle has taken place 
on and off the playing field and seems to 
have oceured for as long as baseball, hot- 
dogs, and apple pie have been America's 
favorite. 

Occasionally the teasing gets out of hand 
and a few punches are thrown. But, for the 
most part, the battle is all in fun often 
sparked by cheerleaders, alumni and stu- 
dents, each university gets in their pokes and 
jabs. Yet, no one ever seems to have the last 
word. 

Every year there are the typical pranks 
— the one's which are met with "don't you 
dare" threats but still creep into the lime- 
light. For example, the red and blue chick- 
ens thrown onto the basketball courts — or 
KU painted on "KS" hill. 

In the t-shirt combat a KU shirt says: 
"Stuff the Wildcats," depicting a Jayhawk 
stuffing a bruised Wildcat down a basketball 
goal. The hot-off-the-press K-State shirts say 
"Another 'Hawk bites the dust" with a pic- 
ture of a Wildcat tromping a bandaged Jay- 
hawk. 

Once KU cheerleaders came dressed 
game in over-alls, straw hats and cowboy 
boots — a low blow. 

But K-State cheerleaders retalliated by 
holding their heads and their noses high — 
way high. 

Prize possessions from the K-State - KU 
war are either purple cowboy hats for 
KU'ers or red and blue hats for K-Stater's. 

And so it goes: on and on, game after 
game, year after year. The score is never 
tied although someone is always trying. 

But I wonder if KU students realize that 
their Jayhawk red and blue makes our royal 
Purple' . . 

K-State, score one! & 



I 










photos by Rob Clark 



Nancy Reese 



red and blue 187 



Party time is game time and 




Game time is party time 




You are cordially invited to a game 
warming party to be held at KSU Sta 
dium, Manhattan Kansas, Saturday after 
noon. 

Football game will follow. 

B.Y.O.B. 

Although invitations aren't sent out for K 
State home football games, they are socia 
events. People are always showing up foi 
the game and the parties, and in fact, the 
pre-game parties are probably the main at 
traction to the football season. It is a tirm 
when friends can meet friends and alumn 
can talk about the good 'ole days at K-State 

On usual game days the crowd starts roll 
ing into the stadium parking lot as early a 
11:30. As soon as the cars are parked, anx 
ious fans open their trunks — thus beginninc 
the "trunk party". 

In the typical trunk-party, food is alway 
involved. Sanwiches, chips, vegetables, pies 
and cakes all form a delicatessen. 

There are trunk parties which there ar< 
no alcoholic beverages — just good friend 
and good food. But of course there are trun 
parties with alcohol — good friends, goo 



My turn — Jim Litz steps up to 
the keg for another beer. 

Peace — K-State fans party it 
up before the annual K-State - KU 
clash. 



social events 




food, and good booze. 

Throughout the course of the pre-game 
party, students wonder through the parking 
lot searching for parents — looking for a red 
scarf tied to the car antenna; a means par- 
ents use to help their children find them in 
the parking lot. 

Fans from all over the state congregate in 
the stadium parking lot — vehicles ranging 
from VW's to mobil homes file into the park- 
ing lot and host their own parties. 

Pre-game parties continue right into the 
stands. Students cart coolers, wine skins, 
and thermos bottles to the game filled with 
"spirits" to enjoy the game. 

Game day becomes a time when people 
can get together and socialize after a rough 
week, see old friends, and re-hash last 
week's game. 

In ever popular section 24, students can 



be seen wandering around visiting with other 
students and old high school buddies. A few 
"privileged" girls can see an over-head view 
of the game as they are pssed up hand-to- 
hand above the crowd. 

Parties at the stadium aren't the only pre- 
game gatherings. Several Aggieville bars 
open at 10 a.m. on game days and offer 
shuttle bus service to and from the game. 
Groups have pre-game functions to "get 
psyched" for a Wildcat victory. 

In fact to some, the word "party" has 
almost become synonomous with football 
games; and no R.S.V.P.'s are required. & 



photos by John Greg 

Gulp — Rick Fry enjoys a drink 
during the homecoming game 
against Missouri. 



Nancy Reese 



social events 189 



Footbal 



190 





0& 



Penalties lifted, 

'Cats 
begin 



anew 



• • • 



hanks to the athletic directors of 
the Big 8 Conference schools, the 
1980-81 Wildcat football season 
(^ opened on a brighter note. In a suprise 

move taken on May 22, 1980, the directors 
lifted the K-State football probation — an infr- 
ingment which had taken away certain scholor- 
ship privileges, and television and bowl appear- 
ances. 

Conrad Colbert, associate athletic director for K- 
State said the Big 8 officials were "impressed" with 
the way K-State had responded to the probation by 
concentrating efforts to upgrade the football pro- 
gram. 

Coming off the 1979-80 season with a 3-8 record 
Coach Jim Dickey had high hopes for his young 
team. 

"I think we'll be competetive against LSU and 
everyone else," Coach Dickey said prior to the Lou 
siana State game. 



K-State 
Louisiana State 



21 



'■'he K-State Wildcats opened their 1980 season on the road at Bato 
* Rouge, La. against the fighting Tigers of Louisiana State. 
Before the game, Coach Jim Dickey said, "I can't sleep before all games 
the first or last. We have put in some new things but I'm sure LSU will mak 
some adjustments, too, after last week." 

Dickey must have been referring to the Tigers season opening loss t 

Florida State, which was also Jerry Stovall's debut as the LSU head coacF 

Stovall and the Tigers didn't have to worry about a two-game losin 

streak, though. Before a noisy crowd of 75,405 at Tiger Stadium, ? 

State lost its third straight opener under Dickey. In fact, the Wildcat 

were shutout 21-0 and in the process were held to just 160 yarc 

of total offense. 

Three lost fumbles and a running game that could only pr< 

Mighty finel-Jim Morris 
defensive safety signals approv, 
after stopping an OSU drive 



Craig Chandler 



duce 19 yards on 31 rushing attempts were 
the main factor that hurt the Wildcats in 
their first meeting ever with LSU. 

"I was disappointed in the LSU game be- 
cause anytime we have an opportunity to 
play well against a good team, we'd like to 
leave with them thinking that we are on their 
level," Dickey said. 

On the second play of the game, running 
back Pete Brown fumbled the ball over to 
LSU on the 31-yard line. Four plays later, 
Tiger quarterback Alan Risher threw a 12- 
yard scoring strike to Tracy Porter and LSU 
had all the points they needed with only two 
minutes gone in the game. 




ited with the block and set up the Wildcats at 
the 5-yard line. Three plays later, Ernie Co- 
leman scored to give K-State a 17-3 lead as 
the Wildcats coasted the rest of the way. 

"I'm always happy with a win. In an 11 
game season, you have to appreciate all the 
victories you come by. Even though we 
didn't do some things offensively very well, 
there were encouraging aspects of the game 
besides the one which shows up in the win 
column," Dickey said. 

Dickey felt that some of the players were 
not mentally prepared for playing against 
the Coyotes. 

L.J. Brown paced the offense with 115 
yards on 18 carries. The 
Wildcats ended up with 
183 yards on the ground, 
in addition to 102 yards 
in the air on 10-of-14 
passing yards by Darrell 
Ray Dickey. 

Defensive end James 
Walker led the defense 
with 10 tackles including 
five for 24 yards in 
YJT*\ losses. K-State's defense 
| held the Coyotes to 187 
t yards of offense. 
f "We feel our Big 8 

players are on defense. 
They have more exper- 
ience than our offense," 
Dickey said, who specifi- 
cally singled out the play- 
ing of linebacker Will Co- 
keley, safety Stan We- 
ber, cornerback Steve 
Schuster, Simeta and 
Walker. 

"We made some inex- 
cusable errors, especially 
on kickoffs. We have an 
amazing ability to make 
the score close. They are 
going to make an old 
man out of me before 
too long," Dickey said.& 



Move over-Ernie Coleman plows past the 
goal line during third quarter action. 

Darrell Ray Dickey started at quarterback 
for the Wildcats and played all but two series 
of the game. Dickey finished with 136 yards 
on 11 of 21 passes.® 



Nancy Zogleman 



K-State 
Arkansas St. 



31 

7 



K-State 
S. Dakota 



24 
3 



W^-State evened its record at 1-1, with a 

* "24-3 win over South Dakota. 

The Division II Coyotes threatened until 

<-State blocked a punt halfway into the third 

quarter. 

Defensive tackle Mike Simeta was cred- 



Jim Dickey and Larry Lacewell were 
old buddies when they coached to- 
gether at the University of Oklahoma in the 
early 1970's. They met up again but this 
time on opposite sides of the field. 

Lacewell brought his Arkansas State team 
into KSU Stadium before a Band Day crowd 
of 32,580 and lost the coaching reunion to 
Dickey 31-7. 

"I know they (Arkansas St.) aren't as 
good a team as we'll play this year but I feel 
we played with more confidence, especially 



in our offensive line," Dickey said. 

A balanced running attack was the key to 
the Wildcats offense. They ran for 237 yards 
plus threw for 107 for a total of 344. 

"I was happy that we showed some im- 
provement. Our offensive linemen appear to 
be coming off the ball better, and they are 
getting a little confidence in blocking peo- 
ple," Dickey said. 

"Our backs ran hard for the first time. 
That's important because the reason we 
work so hard on the running game is that we 
know our quarterbacks aren't going to have 
great days every time out." 

"Perhaps the two things that pleased me 
most about the game were: we played with 
good intensity and concentration, and we 
were able to play a lot of people." 

James Walker was awarded the game ball 
after leading the Wildcats defense with 15 
tackles including three for 30 yards in losses. 

"The next three weeks are crucial ones 
for us. We have three tough road games 
against Tulsa, Iowa State and Oklahoma," 
Dickey said. $ 



K-State 
Tulsa 




3 



IJor the second year in a row, the foot of 
Stu Crum decided the final outcome in 
K State's game with Tulsa Golden Hurri- 
cane. 

A second quarter 27 yard field goal by 
Crum were the lone points scored in the 
game, as Tulsa came away with its second 
straight win over the Wildcats. 

The year before, Crum kicked a 50- 
yarder with no time left on the clock to beat 
the Wildcats 0-3 in Manhattan. 

The Wildcats defense continued to play 
well as they held Tulsa to 11 first downs and 
180 yards of total offense. 

"We've got to do a lot of things better to 
be playing in the league we're in. It doesn't 
do anything for our confidence. We've 
worked with our players to make them be- 
lieve they're better than they are," Dickey 
said. 

"Right now, what this team needs is some 
leadership and we're going to try to provide 
it. It would be easy to get down but that's 
not the answer. I'm disappointed in our inef- 
fectiveness on offense but we'll just work to 
Improve." 

"The reason, I suppose, that our offen- 
sive failures bother me so much is because 
we have worked so hard in that area — 
particularly with our running game." 

"Defensively, it's hard to ask a heckava 
lot more from our players. It's always im- 
pressive when you can hold a team (Tulsa) to 
only a field goal." ® 



football 191 



ite 
State 



K -State continued to flounder 
downwards as they dropped their 
second straight road game. The 'Cats lost 
to the Iowa State Cyclones 31-7 in Ames 
before a sell-out homecoming crowd of 
50,163 at ISU Stadium. 

Just when the Wildcats' offense showed 
some life, the defense let down, which 
made it a frustrating afternoon for Coach 
Dickey. 

The Cyclones held a 10-0 lead at the 
half and stretched it to 17-0 in the third 
quarter. 

Then K-State's offense went to work 
and preceded to drive 80 years in 11 
plays capped by a 7-yard touchdown pass 
from Darrell Dickey to Roman Bates. 

Iowa State countered with a scoring 
drive of their own, aided by the play of 
quarterback John Quinn, who finished 
with 116 yards rushing on only 10 carries. 

Junior college transfer Dwayne 
Crutchfield paced the Cyclones running 
attack with 165 yards on 31 carries. 

K-State finished the day with 263 yards 
of offense, led by fullback Jeff Meyers 55 
yards on the ground. 

"Iowa State is a much improved team 
from last year. I hate to see their 
program improve that much more than 
ours. Both phases of our game left a lot 
to be desired today and we're a long way 
from being a good team," Dickey said. 

"Our players and coaches are both 
disappointed. We've had better talent 
since I've been here, but if we keep 
working, some good things are going to 
happen to us before the end of the year.'' 

Starting defensive end Wade Wentling 
and reserve linebacker Rick Lewis both 
sustained torn knee ligaments putting 
them out for the season. & 




K-State 
Oklahoma 



21 

35 



The Wildcats offense finally got on 

* track, except they picked the wrong 
team to do it against. In wide-open 
fashion, K-State dropped a 35-21 decision 
to the Oklahoma Sooners in Norman. 

After going into the half down 28-7, the 
Wildcats made a game of it early in the 
fourth quarter and narrowed the OU lead 
to 28-21. 

The Sooners added an insurance 
touchdown and K-State went home with a 
sample of a moral victory. 

Darrel Dickey directed K-State's offense 



Craig Chandler 

Let go!! — An OU player rushes to assist 
quarter back J.C. Watts, while the K-State 
defense combines to make the stop. 

with a total of 311 yards, including 178 in 
the air on 13-of-22 passes and three 
touchdown passes. 

John Liebe was the receiving star with 
three catches for 68 yards and two 
touchdowns. 

Darryl Black was the running leader 



"Oklahoma doesn't 
rebuild, they reload" 

- Darrell Dickey K-State QB said after OU 
game. 



with 56 yards on just three carries, 
including a 41-yard end around which set 
the Wildcats third touchdown. 

OU finished with 548 offensive yards as 
its wishbone attack pounded out 469 
yards on the ground. 

Two first-time starters on defense made 
an impression on Coach Dickey. 
Sophomore Stu McKinnon replaced the 
injured James Walker at defensive end 
and freshman Stan Weber filled in for 
Mike Kopsky at safety. 

"Stu played as hard as I've ever seen a 
guy play in his life. He was hurt, but he 
kept on playing. I just wish you'd go look 
at him," Dickey said in reference to 
McKinnon's severely cut nose. 



OU Coach Barry Switzer was not very 
impressed with his squad's performance 
against K-State, as he said, "We are not a 
very good football team right now. If we 
play next week at Iowa State the way we 
played today against K-State we'll be in 
trouble." 3£ 



K-State 
Missouri 



3 
13 



'■'he Wildcats moved closer to victory 
but still came up short in their 
homecoming clash with the Missouri 
Tigers before 30,610 chilly fans at KSU 
Stadium, and an ABC regional television 
audience. 

A second quarter fumble at the 2-yard 
line by fullback Jeff Meyers proved to be 
costly to K-State as they fell to MU 13-3. 

The Tigers first score was set up by th 
Wildcats first fumble, at the 10-yard line 
by Ernie Coleman. Ron Verrilli kicked a 
22-yard field goal to give MU a 3-0 lead 
which held up until Jim Jackson tied the 
score with a 23-yard field goal in the thirc 
quarter. 

Another Verrilli 3-pointer and 1-yard 
sneak by quarterback Mike Hyde were th< 
finishing touches to the Wildcats third 
straight conference loss. 

"I think Missouri is a better football 
team than we are. Not getting the ball in 
from the two hurt our chances of winning 
It could have been a much more 
interesting game if we could have gotten . 
score at that point of the game," Dickey 
said. 

"Basically, our players gave a good 
effort. Missouri dominated both lines of 
scrimmage. But I have to admire us for 
competing and fighting. It gets 
disappointing to play good and lose, but 
have no complaints about our preparatior 
and effort." 

MU Coach Warren Powers was pleasec 
with his team's hard-earned win. 

"It was a good win for us. At this poin 
in the Big 8, any win is a good win. It 
was a hard fought win and I think we 
deserved it. K-State is a tough team and 
Jimmy Dickey always has a good game- 
plan. I didn't feel comfortable until we 
had a 13-3 lead late in the game," 
Powers said. 

One player who may have hurt the 
Wildcats the most was running back 
James Wilder, who rushed for 119 yards 
on 23 carries. Terry Hill added another 
80 yards on 22 rushes, for the Tigers. 

Darrell Dickey lead the Wildcats on 
offense both on the ground and in the ai 
He threw for 100 yards on 6-of-13 
passes and ran for 44 yards on 13 
carries. & 



192 football 






football 



K-State 
Kansas 



18 
20 



The Kansas-K-State rivalry in football 
dates back to 1902 when KU beat the 
Wildcats in Lawrence 16-0. 

Since then, the Jayhawks have had a 
stranglehold on the series and the score 
didn't change this year except for the one on 
the scoreboard. 

Taking advantage of an inconsistent Wild- 
cat attack, KU held on for a 20-18 victory 
before the fourth largest crowd (43,276) in 
K-State history. 

The final score was not a very good indi- 
cation of how the 'Hawks dominated the 
game. 

"They whipped us. They knocked us off 
the line of scrimmage like they did last 
year," Coach Dickey said. 

"1 didn't see much difference in this game 
from last year's (against KU). It looked to me 
like a replay. KU is an improved team over 
last year." 

The only thing that saved the 'Cats from 
total embarrassment were three KU fumbles 
in the third quarter when the 'Hawks led 17- 
7. 

K-State made the game interesting in the 
final minutes when Monte Bennett blocked a 
KU punt to set up a K-State touchdown and 
two-point conversion to put the 'Cats within 
two points with 2:15 left in the game. 

The only chance of victory for K-State 
was thwarted on the ensuing kickoff when 
KU recovered an onsides kick by Jim Jack- 
son. 

"The onsides kick is a high risk and we 
have to hope it takes a crazy bounce for us. 
We practice it every week but we shouldn't 
have to depend on it to win the game," 
Dickey said. 

KU freshman running back Kerwin Bell 
was the offensive star of the game. He 
rushed for 216 yards on 38 carries. & 



K-State 
Nebraska 



8 
55 



T* he Big Red were ready for the Wild- 
* cats' visit to Lincoln. The 'Huskers led 
34-0 at the half and rolled to a 55-8 victory 
over the Wildcats before 76,121 fans at Ne- 
braska's Memorial Stadium. 



"No question about it, Nebraska is the 
best team that we've faced this year. They 
were stronger and more dominant than I 
have ever seen them in all the time I've 
coached against them," Coach Dickey said. 

Quarterback Jeff Quinn directed the 
'Husker attack in the first half, when they 
struck for three quick touchdowns. 

K-State quarterback Darrell Dickey only 
saw action in the first half after he was hit by 




Bo Radcr 

Up and over- A KU defensive man hurdles 
another KU player in an attempt to sack 
Dickey. KU won the annual clash 20-18. 

defensive end, Jimmy Williams and left the 
game with bruised ribs. 

Doug Bogue came in for Dickey and suf- 
fered much of the same bad luck as his 
predecessor. 

'Husker I-back Roger Craig, who rushed 
for 183 yards on just nine carries, made the 
play of the day when he ran for 69 yards 
while breaking six or seven tackles in the 
process. 

"They have more speed on both offense 
and defense than I have ever seen. I doubt if 
anyone would be better than them if they 
play like they did against us. I can't remem- 
ber all of their I-back's names but they all 
have a lot of speed," coach Dickey said. 

Don Birdsey was the lone star of the day 
for the 'Cats. He boomed a school-record 
93-yard punt, which was only one-yard off 
the Big 8 record by Kansas' John Hadl. 

Nebraska finished with 692 yards of total 
offense to the 'Cats 193 yards.* 



K-State 
Okla. St. 




10 



T*he Wildcats suffered their third shu- 

* tout of the season at the hands of the 
Oklahoma State Cowboys before a Parent's 
Day crowd of 22,370 at KSU Stadium, los- 
ing 10-0. 

Doug Bogue started in place of the in- 
jured Darrell Dickey at quarterback and was 
harassed by the Cowboys defense all after- 
noon. 

He was sacked for 85 yards in losses and 
finished with minus 87 yards on the ground. 
His total put the 'Cats rushing game in the 
red with minus 33 yards. 

"I thought we played a good defensive 
game, but it's hard to play when you don't 
get any points," Coach Dickey said. 

"It's not a case where the offense didn't 
play hard, we're just not a good offensive 
team. This shows our inability to get any- 
thing going offensively." 

Dickey made sure to not put the blame of 
the 'Cats offense on Bogue. 

"From where I stood, the quarterback 
was not the problem. He was running for his 
life. We tried to sprint out early, but then 
went to a drop back pass later. I know I 
sound like a broken record, but we don't 
have any backs who can break through," 
Coach Dickey said. 

"We have some down linemen on defense 
that I wouldn't trade for anybody in the 
league. We're going to need to recruit some 
offensive linemen in order to play with the 
best teams." flf 




Craig Chandler 

Let go of me!- Substitute quarterback Doug 
Bogue tries to escape a Nebraska defender in 
front of a crowd of 76,121 in Lincoln, Neb. 



football 193 



footbal 



ssSB&sseBBS&K 




W t was a battle for last place in the Big 8 

*and the outcome wasn't decided until 
the last second. 

Jim Jackson split the uprights from 17 
yards out with a second to spare to give the 
'Cats a 17-14 win over the Colorado Buffa- 
loes in the season finale at KSU Stadium. 

An interception by cornerback Gary Mor- 
rill helped set up the game winning kick with 
2:45 left in the game. 

L.J. Brown, who finished his career at K- 
State with a 148-yard day on 36 carries, had 
a chance to score from the one-yard line 
with 28 seconds left but was stopped short 
of the goal line. 

"I'm really happy we at least finished up 
with a win. I thought we did a lot of good 
things, and we made a lot of mistakes," 
Coach Dickey said. 

The 'Cats had numerous opportunities to 
win the game earlier. Twice they ran out of 
downs while in Colorado's territory in the 
fourth quarter. 

Both teams traded touchdowns in the first 
half. K-State went ahead 14-7 in the third 
quarter on L.J. Brown's second short touch- 
down run of the game. 

But the Buffs refused to die, tying the 
score early in the fourth quarter on a long 
screen pass for a score. 

On setting up the winning kick, the 'Cats' 
coaches were prepared for getting the kick- 
ing team on the field in time, as there were 
no more timeouts for K-State after the Buffs 
stopped Brown at the one. 

"We set up the final play real well. They 
(CU) didn't want a tie and we didn't want 
one. On the last timeout, our coaches did a 
good job of telling the kids to be ready to get 
on the field for a field goal," Coach Dickey 
said. $ 




Craig Chandler 

/ want It! — K-State running 
back Kenny Smith is grabbed by 
two Oklahoma payers at a game 
in Norman. K-State lost 21-35. 



but finish last 



Even though the 'Cats started the season on a brighter note, the 
season was a disappointment for K-State, winning only one confer- 
ence game. 

The team repeated last year's 3-8 season, with the team's big- 
gest problem in the offensive area. 

James Walker was the only player on the team to be honored on 
the All-Big 8 team and Jim Morris, safety and Don Birdsey, punter 
made second team All-Big 8. 

Defensively, the 'Cats equalled a school record by holding five 
teams (South Dakota, Arkansas State, Tulsa, Missouri, and Okla- 
homa State) to one or fewer touchdowns.* 



game by game stories by John 
Dodder idge 



introduction and closing by Nancy Reese 




Football 



TOP ROW: Tim Buchanan, Reggie Young. Jim 
Otto, Todd Rohr, Jeff Thorson, Wayne Brown, 
Jim Gouldie, Doug Hanlon, Gregg Wolgost. 
ELEVENTH ROW: Bob Lindsey, Lyndon 
McClintock, D.L. Johnson, Mitch Foote, Russ 
Rieder, Bill Allerheillgen, Duane Dirk, Brian Ra- 
zak. Dr. Guy Smith, Marty Richards, Jim Rudd, 
Jim Kleinau, Gene Russell, L.E. Madison, Greg 
Pemberton, Mike Orr. TENTH ROW: Steve 
Clark, Doug Hoppock, Tom Menas, Jeff Stevens, 
Mike Cox, Rick Lewis, Dave Walter, Darrell Wild, 
Roman Bates, Bruce Bingham, Hal Bentley, Scott 
Lauridson, Rick Manning, Stuart McKlnnon, Jeff 
Peterson. NINTH ROW: Amos Donaldson, 
Kent McNorton, Tim Murray, Jeff Koyl, Brent 
Bayer, Kerry Benton, Kerry Wilson, Floyd LeB- 
lane, Kyle Clawson, Tim Cole, Jim Northcutt, 
Wade Wentling, Donald Walker, Mike Slmeta. 
EIGHTH ROW: Bart Horner, Doug Johnson, 
James Walker, Jim Kennedy, John Morrlssey, 
Ernie Hoehne, Will Cokely, Dan Ruzlch, Monte 
Bennett, Mike Ruzlch, Kent Schmidt, Jeff Colvln, 
David Michenko. SEVENTH ROW: Phil Swltzer, 
Ernie Coleman, David Farrell, Jim Morris, Blal 



Benedict, Murray Head, Larry Kent, Rawn Wil- 
liams, Lemuel James, Doug Taylor, Pat Sura, 
Brad Turner. SIXTH ROW: Jack Williamson, 
Gary Patterson, Dan Sparks, Craig McMurray, 
Donnie McKinnis, Robert Bailey, Lynn Elder, Ed 
Grasso, Mark Newton, Jeff Meyers, Steve Schus- 
ter, David Letourneau, Mark Hundley. FIFTH 
ROW: Vic Koennig, Nell Groom, Pete Brown, 
Richard Pfeifer, Darren Gale, Beryl Preston, Glen 
Hughes, Gary Morrill, Gary Anderson, Klllsimasl 
Toluao, Kent Sedlacek, Curtis Cobb, Donnell 
Garrett. FOURTH ROW: Greg Best, Ivan 
Pearl, Mark Mackey, John Llebe, James Robin- 
son, Kenny Smith, Donnie Farrow, Bob Kerr, 
Joel Jorgenson, Rick Kuhlmann, Brad Helnrick, 
Richard Buck. THIRD ROW: Dennis Cashlon, 
Steve Willis, Stan Bachman, Donnie Campbell, 
Harry Justvlg, Stan Weber, Rusty Hill, Doug Bo- 
gue, John Chandler, Bob Daniels, Dirk Nelson. 
SECOND ROW: Pat Schroeder, Darryl Black, 
Tom Saey, Darrell Ray Dickey, Don Birdsey, 
Mark Maples, Jim Jackson, Mike Kopsky, Joel 
Torczon, Frand Glldea. BOTTOM ROW: Joe 
Hatcher, Dennis Franchione, Jim Donnan, Mo 
Latlmore, Carl Selmer, Head Coach Jim Dickey, 
Gary Darnell, Chuck Dlresbach, Gary Bogue, 
George Walstad, Jim Davie. 









,\ 




mm 



• ;.'■>• 



& 



Taps — /I sillhouetted K-State 
student plays Taps for the 
Missouri Tigers during the kazoo 
contest during Homecoming week. 
The kazoo finals were during the 
bonfire at Old Stadium Friday, 
Oct. 24. 



football 195 




Barbells 



'■'he harsh clang of metal against metal, 
* sounds of quick breaths, grunts . . . 
the low rumble of conversation bounces 
across the room. A radio sits by the wall and 
pours out a stream of "doo-wahs" that min- 
gle with the other sounds. 

This is not the description of some sort of 
20th century torture chamber. It's K-State's 
Recreational Complex weight room. It is the 
site of future weight-lifting championship 
contenders, competition body-builders and 
individuals trying to keep their minds and 
bodies sound. 

Reasons for straining over weights, push- 
ing their muscles to their maximum capacity 
and grimacing as they lift a bar above their 
heads vary. 

"If I don't lift (weights) everyday I feel bad: 
. . . it's kind of addictive," Laura Ward, 
sophomore in pre-law, said. 

Ward is an unusual case, not because she 
is a female weight-lifter, but because she lifts 
every day. 

"Most people lift every other day," she 
said, "but I feel awful if I don't lift daily. 
Besides, I love to eat and weight lifting is my 
main way of controlling my waistline." 

Not every person in the weight room is 
lifting for the same reason as Ward. In fact, 
most men don't even think of lifting as a 
form of weight control, according to Steve 
Cox, sophomore in electrical engineering 
and second year powerlifter. 

"There are powerlifters, bodybuilders 
and weightlifters. I like to compete in power 
lifting. It (lifting) makes you feel good know 
ing you're stronger than other people," Co> 
said, "I lift to get stronger." 

Cox works out five days a week. 

"It's not good to seriously lift every day,' 
he said. "Since I am a powerlifter I work 
towards lifting in competition meets. This 
means concentrating my workouts on three; 
major lifts — the squat, bench press anc 
dead lift. The first two I do twice a week, thf| 
last one once a week." 

Cox works with a partner powerlifter' 
Mike Stein, senior in electrical engineering 
and a weight lifter for seven years. 

"We know each other's capabilities anc 
limits. We always 'spot' each other wher 
working out. That way we can encourage 
ourselves without passing our limitations,' 
Stein said. 

Stein has been lifting weights since higl 
school and is looking forward to his firs 
competition meet in January, whereas Co: 
has competed in three major powerliftin< 
meets, placing second in the most recen 
meet. 

"The competition gets stronger ever 
meet, but then I am getting stronger ever; 
time," Cox said. 



196 body building 



build bodies 



Weight lifting does have its drawbacks. 
"A back injury could be the worst thing to 
happen to a lifter since his back is used in 
every form of lifting," Stein said. 

Wide leather belts are strapped around 
the waists of weight lifters to help prevent 
such injuries. 

Other than the possibility of a serious 
back injury, soreness is the main discomfort 
a lifter experiences, Stein said. 

"Unless I have my clothes custom made I 
have to wear industrial pants or else sweat- 
pants. In order to fit my shoulders I have to 
buy big shirts that are huge around my waist. 
I also gained 30 pounds since I started lifting 
two years ago," Cox said. 

Weight lifting is becoming more and more 
popular at K-State. Over 30 people can be 
found in the weight room at the Recreation 
Complex, every afternoon and on into the 
night. 

"It's a new form of working out for a lot 
of girls. They've found out it doesn't turn 
you into a muscle-bound woman unless you 
work on developing those sort of muscles," 
Ward said. 

"It's a routine for me. I would work it into 
my day regardless of my school schedule," 
she stated. & 




Mirror reflections — Lifting 
dumbells at the Recreation Com- 
plex, Debbie Michalski, junior in 
fashion marketing, tones up her 
muscles. 

Powerlift — Kevin Dick, 
freshman in general engineering, 
strains to build muscles using new 
equipment available. 

Rows and Rows — Dumbells 
ranging from five to 100 pounds 
line the walls in the Rec Complex 
weight room. 

Determination — Agony 
screams from Rob Beck's face as 
he lifts weights. He is a sopho- 
more in foods and nutrition sci- 




J 



body building 197 



volleyball 



New coach ■ new program 




John Greer 



volleyball 200 






scores- 



**^7olleyball is undergoing some major 
™ changes at other universities. K- 
State is behind. Other universities are going 
(practicing) year round. K-State has been 
losing ground over past years so now we're 
going year round. We need to put in hours 
that other teams put in," Scott Nelson, 
women's volleyball coach, said. 

The year round season began this year 
with the collegian season in the fall. A ten- 
day break followed, then open season start- 
ed in the spring with practice three or four 
times a week, according to Nelson. 

This new coach has brought changes to 
the women's volleyball program. 

Scott Nelson, a former United States Vol- 
leyball Association (USVBA) All-American 
player at Ball State, took over K-State's vol- 
leyball coaching Aug. 1. 

"The program is in a transition period by 
hiring a new coach with a different philos- 
ophy and different ideas on techniques," 
Nelson said. 

Nelson emphasized the fundamental tech- 
niques of volleyball. In the fall he empha- 
sized forearm passing when receiving the 
serve, and serving. In the spring Nelson con- 
centrated on defense and spiking. 

"I spent most of this year teaching my 
techniques. It's really hard on the older play- 
ers. They've had three coaches in as many 
years," Nelson said. 

Of the 12-member squad, five were fresh- 
men. The five freshmen included Gloria 
Blount, Annell McKee, Cathy Sittenauer, 
Beth Wiseman and Sharon Ridley. The team 
closed out the season with a 12-23 record. 

Coach Nelson did have high aspirations of 
winning all out when the season started but 
said he realized it wasn't realistic because of 
the jump other universities had on them with 
their year-round programs. 

For the collegian season, the award for 



All hands-Susan Drews, middle 
blocker, reaches to block an 
attempted spike. 



the team's most valuable player and best 
server went to Holly Sinderson, senior. 

"I think there's a real good outlook for 
the future with a good coach. I think he'll get 
good recruits," Sinderson said. "There is 
potential to have a nationally ranked team," 
she said. 

Susan Drews, the Wildcats' best blocker, 
was named to the region VI sub-regional all- 
star team. 

"The overall effect of the program will 
turn upward in the next two years and be- 
come nationally competitive," Drews said. 

Beth Wiseman, freshman, was named 
most-improved player. 

Nelson plans to build a strong Wildcat 
program that can compete nationwide. 

"The grass roots exist for a quality pro- 
gram. I expect our program to blossom 
more in the next two years," he said. 

Because of the experience the younger 
players have gotten and will be getting, Nel- 
son predicts that their record will definitely 
improve. 

"Since the team is so young I would like 
to take them to the junior national this sum- 
mer. It would be a real positive experience 
and build confidence for them to know how 
good they are in comparison to other play- 
ers the same age," Nelson said. 

Starters for the upcoming season will be 
made up of mostly sophomores and juniors, 
he said. 

"We have laid down a good foundation of 
the type of volleyball system I'd like to run 
at Kansas State," Nelson said. "Our record 
doesn't reflect what we've learned, and now 
I can move away from teaching basic funda- 
mentals into teaching higher skills." ® 

Paige Howard 



Touchdown?-K State Wildcat 
middle blocker, Beth Wiseman, 
makes a desperate attempt to 
block a University of Nebraska 
volley. 




Volleyball 



Top Row: Holly Sinderson, Susan 
Haas, Caria Diemer, Sharon Ridley, 
Paige Agocs, Coach Scott Nelson Sec- 
ond Row: Annell McKee, Shelly 
Schroeder, Gloria Blount, Cathy Siten- 
auer, Sandy Drury. Bottom Row: Su- 
san Koehn, Jennifer Koehn, Susan 
Drews, Beth Wiseman, 



Sept. 17 
Sept. 19-20 



Sept, 26-27 



DATE TOURNAMENT 

Sept. 12 13 K-State Invitational 

Drake 

Nebraska-Omaha 

North Dakota State 

Benedictine 

Iowa State 
Dual Match at Kansas 
Oral Roberts Invitational 
(Tulsa, OK) 

Oral Roberts 

West Texas State 

Indiana State 

Tulane 

Texas Lutheran 
Nebraska Invitational 
(Lincoln, Neb.) 

Southwest Missouri 

State 

Oklahoma 

Iowa State 

Minnesota 
Triangular at 
Omaha, Neb 

Nebraska 

Creighton 
Triangular at 
Manhattan 

Wichita State 

Nebraska 

(Neb beat WSU) 
Minnesota Invitational 
(Minneapolis, Minn ) 

Southwest Missouri 

State 

Drake 

St. Cloud State 

Minnesota 
Big Eight Championship 
(Lincoln, Neb.) 

Oklahoma State 

Iowa State 

Oklahoma 

Kansas 

Missouri 
(Placed sixth) 
Triangular at 
Wichita 

Creighton 

Wichita State 
Dual Match with 
Kansas in Manhattan 
Iowa State Invitational 
Ames, IA) 

Western Illinois 

Iowa State 

Simpson College 



Oct. 17 18 



Nov 5 
Nov. 7-8 





Regionals 

Cross country, one of K-State's smaller 
sports, doesn't have the funds to re- 
cruit heavily. But the team doesn't seem to 
need any help in this area. 

When it comes to recruiting track and 
cross country athletes, K-State has not had 
to chase after foreign runners. Instead, for- 
eign athletes have come to K-State on their 
own. 

"We don't go out looking for foreign run- 
ners, they come to us," Jerome Howe, 
men's cross country coach, said. 

"It is just coincidental that we have the 
foreign runners that we have now. We make 
no big attempts to find them. They just find 
us." 

One of these new foreign athletes who is 
running on the cross country team is Sammy 
Rotich. He is from Kenya and transferred to 
K-State this year from Colby Community! 
College. 

Rotich came to K-State because of the 
persuasion of his track coach at Colby and 
the academic environment. 

"In my home country, the track season 
lasts only one month each year. But here in 
the United States, you have the season last 
year round. Plus, the cross country season 
keeps me in condition for the track season," 
Rotich said. 

Rotich said he has only one dislike in thej 
American culture-the food. 

"There is no one special food I hate the 
most. I don't care for any of it. I used tc 
prepare my own meals which wasn't toe 
bad, but now the food is fixed for me and 
don't care for a lot of the American food. 

Another runner also came to K-State ir 
his own unique way. 

John Holliday is from Toronto, Canadc 
and has been running on the varsity cros: 
country team. He decided to come to K 
State for almost the same reason as Rotich 
his education. 

"I visited a few other agriculture school: 
and talked to people at each school. I lookec 
at each athletic program and then decidec 
on K-State. Another reason was because 
felt most comfortable after visiting K-State,' 
Holliday said. 

The men's cross country team ended th 



202 cross country 



L 



dead-end for teams 



cross country 



season at the NCAA regionals at Ames, 
Iowa, with a seventh place finish. Dan 
Schlicher finished 23rd followed by Rick 
McKean at 30th. 

Overall in the Big 8, the team finished 
fifth, six points behind Kansas and seven 
points behind third-place Missouri. 

The women's cross country team opened 
their season without the presence of nation- 
ally-ranked Cathy Saxon. In 1979, she 
placed second in the Big 8 cross country 
championships. 

"My attitude was not as good as it should 
have been. It wouldn't have been fair to 
everybody else on the team if there was 
someone with a bad attitude. If you can't 
give 100 percent, why do it at all?" Saxon 
said. 

Saxon returned to the team with a second 
place finish in the K-State, Missouri and 
Dodge City Community College triangular. 
In this race, Janel LeValley tied the course 
record set by Debbie Veeter in 1977. 

Barry Anderson, women's cross country 
coach, believes the key to the success of his 



program was the support of Athletic Direc- 
tor DeLoss Dodds, who was K-State's men 
men's track and cross country coach from 
1963 to 1979. 

"DeLoss sincerely believes that the wom- 
en should have the opportunity to compete, 
as he has special interest in track and cross 
country. He's been behind us 100 percent 
and I think we get all the support we need 
from the top," Anderson said. 

LeValley had a string of first place finishes 
broken at five in the Big 8 championships in 
Columbia, Mo. She finished fifteenth with a 
time almost one minute off her regular 
5,000 meter time. Hoever, LeValley came 
back strong in the Region VI championships 
in Ames, Iowa, with a fifth place finish as 
Saxon ran in one second later in sixth. 

Both the men's and women's teams have 
potential for successful seasons next year 
because of their depth of returning letter- 
men. # 



Kim Hanzlicek, Mark Sageser 




r 


- scores > 




Women's 


1st 


Shocker Gold Classic 


lsl 


KU Dual 


1st 


K-State Triangular 


2nd 


Missouri Triangular 


1st 


Husker Invitational 


3rd 


Big Eight Championships 


4th 


Region VI Championships 




Men's 


6th 


Shocker Gold Classic 


1st 


K-State Invitational 


2nd 


Nebraska Invitational 


3rd 


Missouri Trinagular 


1st 


KU Dual 


5th 


Big Eight Championships 


7th 


NCAA Regional 

4 



The journey's over - Dan 

Schleicher rests after a sixth place 
finish at the K-State invitational. 

Jungle run - Mark Sageser and 
Jim Gleason jog through the 
rough terrain on the outskirts of 
Manhattan. 



photos by John Greer 



cross country 203 



tennis 







Women's 




ksu 


3 


Wichita State University 


b 


ksu 





Oklahoma State University 


9 


KSU 


8 


Central Oklahoma State 


1 


ksu 


1 


Tulsa 


8 


KSU 


8 


Hutchinson Community College 


1 


ksu 


1 


Oral Roberts University 


8 


KSU 


6 


Southwest Missouri State 


3 


KSU 


8 


Missouri Western University 


1 


KSU 


9 


Fort Hays State University 





ksu 


2 


Fort Hays State University 


4 


KSU 


8 


Southwestern College 


1 


ksu 





Nebraska 


9 


KSU 


7 


Emporia State University 


2 



Men's 



ksu 


1 


Tulsa 


8 


ksu 
KSU 


3 
6 


Oral Roberts University 
Southeastern Oklahoma State 


6 
3 


ksu 


2 


East Texas State 


7 


ksu 





Cooke Junior College 


9 


ksu 





North Texas State 


9 


KSU 


9 


McPherson 





ksu 


1 


Colorado 


8 


ksu 
KSU 



5 


Oklahoma State 
Iowa State 


9 

4 


KSU 
ksu 

ksu 
KSU 


8 
4 
5 
5 


Baker University 
Bethany 
Sterling 
Tabor 


1 
5 
8 



ksu 


1 


Missouri 


8 


ksu 
KSU 

KSU 
ksu 


2 
9 

5 



Kansas 
Doane 

Emporia State 
Oklahoma 


7 


4 
9 


ksu 
KSU 


3 
9 


Nebraska 

Cowley County College 


6 




Racing to win 



Finish line in sight 




'*¥ ast year it was always like a 100- 

*"^ yard race," said K-State women's 

tennis team coach David Hacker, summing 

up the '79-80 tennis season in the words of 

one of his players. 

"When the race finished, we were always 
at the 50-yard line when the other team was 
at the 100-yard line. But this year we 
seemed to be at the 90-yard line at the end 
of the race," he said. 

Although the '79-80 record of 13-11 was 
an improvement over the 5-15 record of the 
year before, Coach Hacker attributed the 
team's fall season improvement to patience. 

"The team was a year older; they had 
developed, but mostly they showed signs of 
patience. That's the key to the top flight in 
tennis," Hacker said. 

The coach predicts that the women will 
continue to improve over time, with the help 
of "an entirely different schedule." 

"I decided that this year, the only way to 
get better is to play upward. So we've been 
playing better schools this fall," Hacker said. 

Competing against more out-of-state 
schools in the 1981 spring season, the coach 
expects the season record to be dismal with 
the tougher competition. 

"All the schools we're playing are fielding 
players from California and Florida — ever- 
ything's just a matter of money," Hacker 
said. 

However, maybe next year the women's 
tennis team will reach the 100-yard line at 
the same time as the rest of the schools, with 
continued practice and patience, according 
to Hacker. 



Women's Tennis 

TOP ROW: Wendy Lu Frahm, Candle Gwin, 
Kathy Manning. Brenda Bennett BOTTOM 
ROW: Shem Nelson Coach David Hacker, 
Tamie Peugh. 

Men's Tennis 

TOP ROW: Coach Steve Snodgrass, Mike Goss, 
Steve Webb, Matt Westfall, Kurt Reld. BOTTOM 
ROW: Gary Hassenflu.Dan Forester, Dave Berg. 



The K-State men's tennis team also faced 
the toughest schedule ever faced in the 
spring of 1980, according to coach Steve 
Snodgrass. The team finished the season 
with a 9-12 record overall and a 1-6 mark in 
the Big 8. 

The Wildcats placed seventh in the con- 
ference at the Big 8 Championships, but 
played shorthanded. 

Greg Last, the regular No. 3 singles and 
No. 2 doubles player, was injured in a freak 
accident the night before the champion- 
ships. Mike Goss was injured in second 
round action and was forced to forfeit his 
final round matches. 

"We didn't reach our goal of placing 
fourth in the Big 8," said coach Snodgrass, 
"but we lost a lot of close matches; not only 
in the championships, but in the entire sea- 
son." 

Playing just four of five duals during the 
1980 fall season, Snodgrass said, "We had 
an excellent fall practice and fall schedule. 
Although the No. 1 man, Jeff Henderson 
quit the team, I think we'll do okay." 

"Gary Hassenflu has shown a vast im 
provement over last season, and Matt West 
fall is now playing singles as well as doubles 
since his accident in 1978," Snodgrass said. 
"And freshman David Berg could possibly 
make the top six with some strength condi 
tioning and become a good asset to the 
team."* 



Car! Cavassa 




Scott C. Williarr 



204 tennis 




Another one bites the tongue 

— Steve Webb returns a volley 
during a match against a player 
from the University of St. Louis, 
during the KSU Men's Invitational. 

Canned relief — (inset) Webb 
relaxes with a can of ice water 
between games. 



tennis 205 





Wildcat teams not 



art by Carl Cavassa 



Behind the scenes at every athletic event 
are a number of people insuring a 
smooth performance for the Wildcat fans. 
These are the athletic trainers and equip- 
ment managers. 

"Trying to coordinate 12 coaches and 
120 football players can cause big head- 
aches," Jim Kleinau, equipment manager, 
said. 

"But without trainers and managers, you 
just can't put a team on the field," Doug 
Hanlon, student equipment manager said. 

During the week, these people do what 
ever must be done to make practice sessions 
as interruption-free as possible. 

The 11 equipment managers, headed by 
Kleinau, are responsible for the purchase, 
maintenance, repair and inventory of all 
equipment. 

They put freshly-laundered practice 
clothes in each locker, set out all the equip- 
ment — balls and dummies, repair or re- 
place anything broken and time the prac- 
tices. 

The athletic department is staffed by five 
trainers certified by the National Athletic 
Trainers Association and thirteen student 
trainers. 

Head trainer Jim Rudd has two assistant 
trainers — Richard Ray and Chris Neuman. 
Rudd travels with the football squad, Ray 
accompanies the men's basketball team and 
Neuman attends to the women basketball 



players. All the student trainers work wit! 
the football program in the fall then an 
divided among basketball, baseball, softball 
track and spring football during the spring 

The end goal of the hours and days o 
practice is game day. 

A typical football game day begins at j 
a.m. for the athletic trainers. At this earl 
hour, Jim Rudd, head trainer and two of th 
other trainers start wrapping players' ar 
kles. About 60 percent of the players ge 
preventive taping, Rudd said. 

Other trainers prepare sideline and hal 
time drinks and special supports and tapin 
supplies. They help the Red Cross set u 
sideline emergency equipment, such z 
stretchers and splints. The trainers also o 
der the 15,000 pounds of ice used at eac 
game. 

The equipment managers have done mo 
of the setting-up the night before. 

"For the last two seasons now, we ha\ 
taken everything out of each player's ba< 
set it out and checked it over the night b 
fore a game. We have gotten more profe 
sional in our procedure," Hanlon said. 

While the players are dressing for tl 
game, the managers replace missing soc 
and broken shoestrings. 

Because the team now has a separate s 
of game helmets which can be checked ai 
repaired throughout the week, helm 
breakage during the game is not as comm< 



206 trainers 



/ can't watch — Fred Barton, 
K-State basketball player rel axes 
as one of the trainers 
tapes his ankles. 




always on the playing field 



as it used to be. In addition, the team has an 
extra set of helmets, one of each size, so it 
one does break, the player does not miss 
any of the action while waiting for it to be 
fixed. 

During the game the trainers take care of 
injuries as they occur. 

"It would be great if all we did was watch 
from the sidelines (during the game)," Rudd 
said, "but unfortunately, injuries do hap- 
pen. 

If a player gets hurt during the game, a 
doctor examines him and the trainers admin- 
ister immediate first aid. If the injury is not 
serious, the trainers do whatever is neces- 
sary for him to return to the game. 

After the game, the doctor holds a clinic 
| where he examines all the injuries sustained 
| by the players and the trainers begin treat- 
ment procedures while the equipment man- 
jagers pack up all the equipment. 

"Athletic trainers are concerned with pre- 
tention, care, and rehabilitation of athletic 
[injuries," David Witter, student athletic 
(trainer, said. 

Like football trainers, the responsibilities 
jof trainers in other sports are much the 
isame. 

Neuman, who travels with the women's 
)asketball team begins taping about onp and 
i half hours before a game, depending on 
he numbers and types of wraps needed. 

"I generally tape almost the whole team 



each individual is done just a little differ- 
ently," she said. 

Taping ankles is the most common for 
basketball players, and knees are the most 
time-consuming. She also tapes calves, 
thumbs, and fingers, she said. 

Neuman's interest in being an athletic 
trainer was sparked by her next-door neigh- 
bor of her childhood in Ohio, a trainer for 
the Cleveland Cavaliers. 

"I became seriously interested in the field 
during tenth grade," she said. 

Several of K-State's trainers and manag- 
ers began their field experience around that 
same age. 

"I was the smallest guy in my high school 
sophomore class when the football coach 
asked me to be a trainer which I did for three 
years," Witter said. "Then I was a trainer for 
a year at junior college. A K-State coach 
came down to Juco as a recruiter. He didn't 
end up with any football players, but he 
came back with me." 

Kleinau used his experience as a high 
school student trainer to help finance his 
college education, first at a junior college, 
then at Oklahoma State University. 

"It just comes easy to me and it's very 
rewarding. I enjoy traveling and meeting 
people," he said. 

Rudd too was a trainer in college. He then 
went on to be an assistant trainer for the 
Philadelphia Eagles, head trainer for a junior 



college, assistant trainer at the University of 
North Dakota, then assistant at K-State until 
his promotion last April to the position of 
head trainer. 

"I have worked in most every level of 
school and have learned a lot from each 
experience," he said. 

After playing football in high school, both 
Hanlon and Jeff Thorson, student equip- 
ment manager, wanted something to do to 
stay around football teams. 

"Managing is almost like going out there, 
being a part of it all," Thorson said. "We 
travel with the team, get to know the 
coaches — it's a good time." 

Kleinau agrees that despite the headaches 
involved, the job is rewarding and enjoyable. 

"In a way it's kind of like coaching. There 
is comaraderie between the managers in the 
league," he said. 

Although vital to the athletic program, the 
jobs can also be thankless ones. Many times 
the work of the managers and trainers is 
taken for granted. 

"What it amounts to is that we all have 
just got to work together to put it all togeth- 
er on game day," Hanlon said.0 



Teresa Larson 



all sports 



Bench players 



ike an evergreen in a Christmas tree 

■■■''lot, a player on the football or basket- 
ball bench waits to be chosen. 

Similar to Charlie Brown's Christmas tree, 
a bench player experiences the pain of being 
chosen last, while others take the spotlight. 
But given the chance to step on the court or 
gridiron, he too might sparkle and glitter — 
ornamented with the driving desire to excel. 

Football player Doug Bogue is K-State's 
own example of the bench to field story. 
Bogue, sophomore in pre-veterinary medi- 
cine and Wildcat quarterback, didn't get the 
opportunity to play a great deal until the 
Nebraska game this year when he replaced 
the injured Darrell Dickey. Prior to that time, 
he had played in two junior varsity games 
and one varsity game his freshman year. 

"Nobody likes to sit on the bench much," 
Bogue said. You feel like you're taking a 
shower without getting wet." 

"The hardest thing about sitting out is you 
don't feel like you're part of the game. It's 



hard to celebrate a victory and hard to b« 
sad when you lose. But you've got to suffei 
and celebrate right along with them (thost 
who did play)," Bogue said. 

A K-State football player has to expect tc 
sit out a year or two, though, Bogue said. 

"You've got to adapt to the crowd, th< 
excitement and the whole college game," h< 
said. "You've got to mature and adjust t< 
things, and sitting on the bench is just part o 
it." 

When a player is sitting on the bench, hi 
sometimes feels that he would do things dii 
ferently than the other player out there i 
his position, according to Bogue. 

"There are times when I felt like I woul 
have done better, but I respected Darrell' 
judgement because of the extra experienc 
he'd had," Bogue said. 

An athlete has a lot to think about whil 
waiting for the chance to show what he ! 
learned. Applying to both football and ba 
ketball, a player has to keep his mind on th 



208 athletic bench 




await chance to glitter 




Rob Clark 



Bench talk — Bill Mosier, 
freshman in business management, 
gets the game instructions from K- 
State coaches Lon Kruger and 
Jack Hartman during the Dec. 13 
game against Wisconsin-Parkside. 



defensive and offensive plays being made, 
learning from the mistakes, understanding 
the reasons for losses, and just staying in- 
volved, according to Bogue. 

"A player's got to be mentally alert as 
well as physically ready," Bogue said. "You 
have to keep your mind on the game. While 
I was sitting on the bench I thought about the 
situation that Darrell was in and what I 
would do. It's kind of like a back seat driv- 
er." 

"You've got to be ready all the time, 
because you might get thrown in there. If 
you're not ready you might not get another 
chance," Greg Prudhoe, junior in business 
administration and reserve basketball cen- 
ter, said. 

Prudhoe, redshirted two years ago in or- 
der to increase his mobility, agility and 
strength, is an experienced bench player. 
But according to Coach Jack Hartman, 
Prudhoe has made "a lot of physical and 
mechanical progress, and could be a factor" 
in future Wildcat action. 

John Marx, another basketball player 
who's seen a lot of the varsity bench, said 
that a player always has to think about 
what's going on. 

"You know that your chance will come 
and you wait for it," Marx, sophomore in 
accounting, said. 

"Everyone's going to get to play. It's just 
a matter of time," Bogue said, "We (the 
football team) don't have that much depth, 
so everyone's going to play sometime. But 
like on the Oklahoma or Nebraska teams, 
there's a lot of good players sitting on the 
bench. Some of these players might be start- 
ing here, whereas they're just wasting away 
at those schools." 

Of course the coach is the deciding factor 



concerning who plays or not. 

"I'd like for all of my players to be able to 
play, but there's no way they can in a varsity 
game," Joe Hatcher, assistant football 
coach, said. 

Most of the freshman football players are 
relegated to the ranks of junior varsity (JV) 
football or else they sit on the bench during 
varsity games, according to Bogue. 



"You feel like you're taking a 
shower without getting wet." 

"Coach Dickey won't play freshmen un- 
less he has to," Bogue said. "It can really 
ruin a guy's confidence if he goes out his 
freshman year and doesn't play up to expec- 
tation." 

After playing two JV games his freshman 
year, Bogue warmed the varsity bench the 
rest of the year. 

"I was glad to be able to be there for the 
varsity games at first because I thought it 
was pretty neat. But then I wished I'd been 
able to get the experience through the JV 
games," Bogue said. "But during the spring 
practices, everything evened out as far as 
getting the experience." 

Also being primed for the right place and 
time to exhibit their talent, some of K-State's 
basketball players play JV basketball, and 
then suit up again for the varsity game in 
case their skills can be utilized. 

Marx and Eric Salter, both forwards, have 
been following this pattern for the last two 
years, as Eduardo Galvao, K-State guard, 
had been last year as a freshman. 

JV coach Dean Danner feels that JV bas- 
ketball is important to the players because, 



"it's a good time to develop the things 
they've learned," he said. "As far as the 
varsity players playing JV, it's good for 
them to play against other players. It's a 
different situation to learn under." 

"The difference between JV and varsity 
games is that most of the JV teams come 
from in-state and the competition is always 
easier," Marx said. 

"We try to get everybody to play in the 
JV games, but the guys that come down 
from varsity get the most playing time, so 
the others may wait a while," Danner said. 

Danner, a fifth year student in engineering 
technology and business management, 
played varsity basketball for K-State for four 
years. Ineligible to play a fifth year, he 
missed being a part of the team and 
snatched the opportunity to coach the JV 
team when coach Darryl Winston left, he 
said. 

Potential JV basketball members audition 
for the team through the all-university try- 
out in October. Thus, members of this team 
are walk-ons, with the exception of varsity 
members, who sometimes participate in the 
games for the experience, as with Marx and 
Salter. 

Another example is that of Les Craft, for- 
ward-center. After sitting out with a stress 
fracture for ten straight games, Craft himself 
decided that the JV game experience could 
be beneficial in tuning up for the remaining 
varsity season. 

"JV is still a part of K-State basketball," 
Danner said. "It's quite a big deal to be on 
the team, whether it's JV or varsity. JV 
gives some of the kids that like to play ball 
and who want to work hard a chance to 
play for K-State. It's just a thrill to be part of 
the program." Y» 



athletic bench 209 



all sport 



Bench to glitter 

However, as in the varsity games, there 
are still members of the bench during each 
game. It's not an easy decision to make as to 
who will play or sit on the bench, according 
to Danner. 

Sometimes the athletes do have differ- 
ences with the coach as to whether they 
should get to play or not, Gary Bogue assis- 
tant football coach, said. 

"But you just talk to them, and help them 
understand your reasons. There are certain 
situations that they should get to play in 
You're always making minor adjustments 



with the players — maybe they'll be better 
in one spot than another player," Bogue 
said. 

"It's tough for me being put in the posi- 
tion of authority since I played with these 
guys last year — I'm just one or two years 
older than they are. But generally, every- 
body's been really good about it," Danner 
said. 

Though unusual, a player may desire to 
be benched. 

"I might want to be redshirted next year," 
Bogue said. "Since Darrell Dickey and I are 



the same age, I'd have an extra year to play 
after he graduates." 

A redshirt player still practices with the 
team, but there's no pressure to know the 
plays. It's also a time where the athlete can 
catch up on his grade point average, accord- 
ing to Bogue. 

"If you think positively about it, it could 
be beneficial," Bogue said. "Patience and 
bench can be the key to success." $ 



Cari Cavassa 




Rob Clart: 

Celebrating success — 

Members of the K-State footbah 

team react to the last-second field 

goal in the Colorado game.\ 



210 athletic bench j 



"Ro"-lling the ball- Rolando 

Blackman fights for the ball 

against a South Dakota player 

uring the second home game of 

the basketball season. 



I .. JWUH.SW I, 



!W P W 



'Cats no surprise 




basketball 



TO ^ m ^ : ,..„_ T .„ r ^ r ^ r .^ or -»-,. r ^^ T --,^-^^_ ;? ^ — ippHppppi^p-pj 



The 1980-81 Wildcats started the basketball 
season recognized as a highly competitive 
team not only in the Big 8 but also on the 
national level. 

"It's going to be difficult to sneak up on any- 
ody with this ball club/' Jack Hartman, Wild- 
cat coach said. 

Hartman, ranked third nationally for major 
college wins (.681), coached the 'Cats in the 
NCAA post-season tournament last year 
against the eventual national champions, Loui- 
ville. 

Returning for the Wildcat team were Ro- 
lando Blackman, starter on the U.S. Olympic 
Team, and picked by pre-season polls as an All- 
American; forwards Tyrone AdajB&And Ed Nea- 
ly, and point guards Tim Jj 
Barton. ix> 




Nebraska Cornhuskers 



Jan. 14, Lincoln, We6.- K-State opened their Big 8 schedule 
on the road, battling a tough Nebraska team. The 'Huskers paced 
by Andre Smith came out on top, 59-49, following two unsuccess- 
ful surges from the Wildcat offense. Smith had 20 points for 
Nebraska. 

"We'd work up to a point where we'd catch up, and then we 
couldn't hold the lead," guard Rolando Blackman said. 

It was the fourth consecutive loss for K-State in Lincoln, and 
gave the 'Cats a 0-1 conference record, 10-3 overall. 

"It didn't bother me so much that we lost," coach Jack Hart- 
man said, "but the way we lost. After we showed poise and 
maturity to get back in it, we didn't show it at the end when the 
game was on the line. We didn't attack." 

Blackman led K-State scorers with 15 points, scoring in double 
figures for the 38th straight game. Randy Reed and Tim Janko- 
vich added 12 each. 




. Craig Chandler 

Miss it!- Tyrone Adams attempts 

to block a shot by a Nebraska 

player. The biggest crowd 

(11,520) since 1971 saw the 'Cats 

roll to a 66-49 victory. 

Feb. 14, Manhattan, Ks-it was a sweet victory for a standing 

room only Valentine's Day crowd of 11,520. K-State won the 

second meeting with Nebraska convincingly 66-49. 

Reed sizzled the nets with 70 percent shooting, and all five K- 
State starters scored in double figures. 

The win put K-State in a tie for first place with the Corn- 
huskers, both supporting 7-3 records. 

Although the game promised to be intense, several members of 
the pre-game crowd appeared bored-reading newspapers while 
the Nebraska players were being introduced. 

The intensity of the game came to the surface with a near 
confrontation between Tyrone Adams and Nebraska's Andre 
Smith. 

"He was trying to get to a position I didn't want him to get to," 
Adams said. "He pushed me and so I pushed him back. If you let 
him get away with pushing you once, he'll push you the entire 
game. It was nothing big, both of us were at fault. "^ 



Colorado Buffaloes 



Jan. 17, Boulder, Colo.- Coming off a loss from Nebraska, 
K-State was out to even their Big 8 record at 1-1. Though the 
'Cats didn't play up to par; the mission was accomplished. The 
Wildcats brough home a 63-62 overtime win against the Colorado 
Buffaloes. 

"That was enough to give you indigestion," Hartman said of 
the overtime victory. 

Jo Jo Hunter had a chance to win the game for the Buffs both 
at the end of regulation, and in the overtime, but both shots fell 
short. 

The difference in the game was on the free throw line. K-State 
hit 23 of 34 free throws, while Colorado only hit on eight of 15. 

Key plays by Blackman aided K-State to victory, and Blackman 
ended the afternoon with 21 points. Nealy added 15 points and 
13 rebounds. 




Cort Anderson 



Listen to what I tell ya-Coach 
Hartman gives directions to his 
team during the annual K-State — 
KU clash. 

Feb. 7, Manhattan, Ks-"\ thought we opened the game 
playing about as well as we can play," Hartman said. "The 
defense was really doing the job." 

The defense Hartman spoke of, the famous 3-2 zone the K- 
State defense frequently implements, was a major factor in the 
82-62 victory for the Wildcats in Ahearn. The Wildcat defense 
held Colorado to nine points in the first 16 minutes of play, and 
took a 36-15 lead at the half. 

"Everybody has a responsibility in the zone," Blackman said. 
"Everybody covers for each other and we try to keep the zone 
sealed." 

The game was well balanced with a poised patient offense who 
shot 50 percent from the field. 

"The offensive movement was good," Hartman said. "They 
had good timing, passing, shot selection and movement." 

Nealy led the K-State scorers with 14 points, and hauled down 
13 rebounds. 

The win gave K-State a 5-3 conference mark, and a three way 
tie for second place with Kansas and Missouri.^ 



212 basketball 



Oklahoma St. Cowboys 



Jan. 21, Manhattan, Ks-The home opener against Oklahoma 
State ended up disasterous for K-State, as they lost 90-83. 

"We didn't play very smart. We were too impatient on offense. 
The trend was set early when we started putting our shots up too 
early. We didn't make them play any defense. We got into their 
rhythm," Hartman said. 

Although Randy Reed had a career high of 26 points (and only 
played 25 minutes), it wasn't enough for the 'Cats to overcome 
the Cowboys. 

Adams returned to the K-State line-up after missing the four 
games previously because of a knee injury, and scored 15 points 
for the 'Cats. 

Hartman was forced to use Adams more than he wanted 
because Nealy was suffering from the flu. 

K-State's biggest lead of the night came in the first half wher 
the 'Cats went ahead by five with 6:57 left in the first half, 32-27 




Scott Williams 

Determination- Tyrone Adams 

completes a lay-up for K-State 

Despite the O. State defense. 



Feb. 11, Stillwater, Okla.- Oklahoma State, suffering illness 
and injuries, bowed to K-State their second meeting of the confer- 
ence 73-70. 

The win for K-State put them one game out of first place in the 
Big 8 race with a 6-3 record behind league-leading Nebraska. 

Poor free-throw shooting plagued the Oklahoma State team all 
evening, while K-State hit 75 percent of their charity shots. 

Blackman scored 14 point in the match, moving him into 
second place on the career scoring charts, with 1686 points 
beside his name. 

Nealy had 11 points and 12 rebounds. 

"Our kids did a good job a fighting off Oklahoma State at the 
end," Hartman said. "That's the most impressive thing about the 
game. Their pressure got to us a time or two coming up the court 
at the end."& 



Oklahoma Sooners 



Jan. 24, Norman, Okla.- 1 You're looking at a man who 
doesn't have any answers," Hartman said after a 65-63 loss to 
the Oklahoma Sooners. 

Whatever the answers to Hartman's dilemma, it doesn't 
change the fact the game marked the seventh consecutive loss for 
the 'Cats to Oklahoma. 

Results of the loss were a 1-3 Big 8 record and a tie for last 
place in the conference with the Sooners. A K-State team hadn't 
started with as poor of record as this since 1965 under the 
coaching of Tex Winter. 

The lead of the game switched hands 18 times, and in the late 
stages of the ball game, K-State build an eight point lead, but 
poor shooting gave Oklahoma the chance to close the gap and 
take the lead. 

"We had absolutely no poise. The things we did after we got 
the eight-point lead almost defy understanding. Turning the ball 
over against the press . . . it's unbelievable," Hartman said. 

Feb. 21, Manhattan, Ifs.-It's hard to beat a team that shoots 
62.3 percent for the entire game as Oklahoma found out, bowing 
to the 'Cats 108-71. 

The 108 points tied the Ahearn Field House record set in 
1959 against Missouri and in 1975 against Iowa State. 

Randy Reed was among the record breakers as he scored a 
career-high of 28 points. 

K-State led at the half by a margin of 16 points, 51-35. 

Bringing only seven players to Manhattan proved to be a 
problem for Oklahoma as one player was injured during the 
course of the game, and three players played with four fouls in 
the remainder of the game. 

The win put K-State in a three way tie for first place with 
Missouri and Nebraska, all supporting 8-4 conference records. $ 




Bo Racier 

Sit down Coach- Oklahoma 
Coach Billy Tubb's is told to 
return to his seat by a Big 8 
official. Tubb's received two 
technicals during the game. 



basketball 213 



Kansas Jayhawks 



Jan. 28, Manhattan, Ks- It's always tough facing the intra- 
state rival down the Kaw, but it's also something that fans, 
coaches and players look forward to every year. This year the K- 
State team carried their enthusiasm and implemented basketball 
skills to a 54-43 victory over the Jayhawks. 

Patience was the key to the game. 

"K-State played a fine game," KU coach Ted Owens said. 
"They executed a great deal of patience, more than we did." 

Rolando Blackman was held to just one point, but Jankovich, 
Nealy and Adams came through, all scoring in double figures. 

"They won without Blackman scoring. That just goes to show 
that when K-State wants to play its game, it can, whether Black- 
man scores or not," John Crawford, KU reserve said. 

"This just exemplifies that he (Blackman can contribute with- 
out scoring. I think it goes to show the kind of team player he is." 
Hartman said. 

The win gave K-State a 2-3 conference mark, and 12-5 overall. 



Feb. 18, Lawrence, Ks.- K-State's winning steak of six 
games was broken by the same team which was responsible for 
the beginning of the hot streak for the 'Cats. 

Before 16,000 fans in Allen Fieldhouse, the Wildcats dropped 
a 58-50 decision to the Kansas Jayhawks. 

"They controlled the boards and that was a big factor," Hart- 
man said. 

That 'Cats had been ranked 19th natinally in the polls prior to 
the game, and the defeat gave the 'Cats a 17-6 overall and a 7-4 
conference record. 

"We felt real good after the first five minutes," guard Tim 
Jankovich said. "But then we lost our aggressiveness. I don't 
know if it was something they were doing or if it was just us." 

Blackman, who for the second time was sealed off from the 
nets by the KU defense, scored only four points. 

"It really burns me up. We felt if we'd win tonight, we'd be in 
good position the rest of the way. But now, it looks like it's going 
to go down to the wire," Blackman said.^ 



Iowa State Cyclones 



Jan. 31, Ames, Iowa- Just when K-State was on the verge of 
being buried deep in the Big 8 loss column, the 'Cats started 
putting together a balanced offense and defense and put them- 
selves in the thick of the Big 8 race by thrashing the Cyclones 75- 
62. All give starters scored in double figures, paced by Black- 
man's 18 points. 

K-State won the battle on the boards, getting 28 rebounds to 
Iowa State's 21. 

Not only was K-State vicious on the boards, they were tough 
on the nets, hitting 72 percent of their shots in the second half. 

The win evened the K-State conference record at 3-3, and put 
the 'Cats two games out of first place, behind Oklahoma State. 

Besides Blackman's 18 points, Reed added 15, Adams had 14, 
Nealy 13, and Jankovich contributed 11. 

K-State, back in the Big 8 race returned home to face a tough 
Missouri team-a team predicted to win the Big 8 title for the 
second consecutive year. 



Feb. 25, Manhattan, Ks- "We're just glad to get this game 
out of the way. We're totally refreshed now. Iowa State wasn't 
having a very good year and they could have spoiled everything 
for us," Ail-American candidate Rolando Blackman said, after the 
67-60 defeat of Iowa State. 

The win for K-State set up a confrontation with Missouri which 
would determine who would win the Big 8 crown. 

However, the win for K-State was no easy one. A one point in 
the second half of play, Iowa State led 52-51 with 9:17 left. 

"I thought Iowa State played exceptionally well," Hartman 
said. "They moved the ball quickly and they got it inside quick- 

ly." 

Blackman led K-State scorers with 18 points. Randy Reed 
added 16 and Nealy had 13. The win gave the 'Cats a 9-4 
conference record, and the loss assured Iowa State of a last place 
finish in the Big 8 conference. & 

Hurrlyet Aydogan 



214 




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Missouri Tigers 



Feb. 4, Manhattan, Ks. -Tyrone Adams pumped in career- 
high of 25 points to lead K-State to a 75-56 victory over the 
Missouri Tigers. 

Adams had to take charge when Rolando Blackman picked up 
his fourth foul with 14:31 left to play. 

"Me and Ed (Nealy) knew we had to take over when Ro went 
out," Adams said. "We're next year's senior class, and we've got 
to provide some leadership." 

The game was especially exciting for junior Randy Reed, as he 
is from Missouri originally. Reed had 21 points and seven re- 
bounds. 

"1 wanted to play extra hard. I knew my family and friends 
would be watching," Reed said. 

Blackman fouled out for his second time in his four-year career 
with 4:43 left in regulation time. 

Feb. 28, Columbia, Wo.- Following a suprise stall with 7:44 
left in the game and the score tied at 43, the Tigers won the Big 8 
title in the last seconds of the game with an off-balance shot by 
Ricky Frazier. Frazier, who was fouled on the play by Tyrone 
Adams, converted the three point play and giving Mizzou a 46-43 
loss. 

"I didn't foul him. I didn't touch him with anything. I don't 
know why they called it," Adams said of the last second call. 

Frazier agreed. "He didn't hit me with his hand, and he barely 
touched the ball. On the way down he might have touched me 
with his body, but not when I was shooting," Frazier said. 

The loss dropped K-State to a 9-5 conference mark, and a 
three way tie for second with Nebraska and Kansas. 

The win enabled Missouri to win the Big 8 title for the second 
consecutive year.& 



% » 





"•- "-■-■■■■■&Sj*^j^^ ■■■■; 



Vj 



Ju 



jlL 



Let go of my leg-ol-Randy 
Reed and Steve Stipanovich tangle 
trying to get the basketball. K- 
State won 75-56. 



Bo Rader 




En guardel- Willie challenges the 
KU Jay hawker with his "laser 
beam". K-State won, 54-43. 



Cort Anderson 



basketball 215 





4 



0gmim&'*»>> 



■■-'■■*. 







Bo Rader 



TOP ROW: Jack Hartman, Dean Danner, Eric 
Sailer, Bill Mosier, John Marx, Greg Prudhoe, 
Les Craft. Second Row: Tim Jankovich, Steve 
Reid, Rolando Blackman. Tyrone Adams, Ralph 
Setter, Ed Galvao, Calvin Alexander, Fred Bar- 
ton. Bottom Row: John Scott, John Stafford, 
Dick Nibarger, Scott Durr. 



Nation discovers 'Cats 

As some pessimistic K-State fans were putting away their 
purple and groaning "Aw, not again," Olympian Rolando Black- 
man fired a shot heard 'round the NCAA tournament. Playing for 
a team that barely got its foot on an NCAA berth, Blackman hit a 
shot from the baseline with two seconds remaining to beat 2nd 
ranked Oregon State. The win provided the momentum to con- 
tinue the team in the western regionals. 

Suffering from a loss in the post season Big 8 tournament to 

Kansas, the 'Cats experienced 
some doubt of obtaining an 
NCAA tournament in- 
vitation. However, K- 
State, along with 
Missouri and Kansas, 
were invited of the Big 8. 
Another Kansas team, 
Wichita State was also invited. 
(Kansas was beat in the Midwest re- 
gional by Wichita State, who was later 
eliminated by Louisiana State University). 
In the western regional, K- 
State beat San Francisco 64- 
60, second ranked Oregon 

s State 50-48 and Illinois 57-52. 

North Carolina eliminated K- 
State 68-82 in the western re- 
gional championship. 

As a result of their most suc- 
cessful tournament bid the 
'Cats received national atten- 
tion. The March 25 Sports Il- 
lustrated featured the winning 
jumpshot against Oregon State 
on the cover. Sports Illustrat- 
ed writer, Curry Kilpatrick de- 
scribed Hartman as being "a 
friendly hardware dealer cam- 
ouflaging the mind of a crafty 
terrorist." 

In another sports magazine, 
Hartman was named as the 
second most under-rated 
coach in the nation. Hartman 
along with the Oregon State 
coach were named by NCAA as 
co-coaches of the year and Ro- 
lando Blackman named to the 
NCAA tournament all-star 
team. 

The team retired the season 
with a 24-9 record. 



scores 



Pre-season 



Northern Iowa 
South Dakota 
Arizona 
Arizona State 
Wisconsin-Parkside 
US International 
Indiana 
Arkansas 
Fresno State 
Louisville 
Oklahoma City 
Eastern Illinois 



Oklahoma 

Colorado 

Kansas 

San Francisco 

Oregon State 

Illinois 

North Carolina 



54 
50 
53 
84 
58 
45 
51 
46 
39 
47 
79 
62 

Post-season 

56 
61 
80 

60 
48 
52 
82 



KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 



KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 
KSU 



72 
83 
55 
61 
72 
78 
44 
47 
47 
64 
97 
74 



75 
64 
68 
64 
50 
57 
68 




Basketball by Nancy Reese 



] 




Gettin' around- Kim Price, 
forward, takes the ball past a KU 
competitor in the women's Big 8 
tournament. Price had an average 
of 12 points per game. 









f 


Women 


's basketball 




KSU 


109 


Tulsa 


78 


KSU 


96 


Pittsburg State 


40 


KSU 


98 


Iowa State 


62 


KSU 


67 


Washington State 


48 


KSU 


82 


Memphis State 


75 


KSU 


74 


Missouri 


68 


KSU 


73 


Creighton 


63 


KSU 


75 


Nebraska 


63 


KSU 


57 


Wichita STate 


56 


ksu 


70 


UCLA 


83 


ksu 


62 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


82 


KSU 


84 


Pepperdine 


80 


KSU 


79 


Nebraska-Omaha 


77 


KSU 


83 


Stephen F. Austin 


75 


KSU 


67 


Illinois 


52 


ksu 


70 


MINNESOTA 


71 


KSU 


93 


Wichita State 


70 


KSU 


74 


Nebraska 


72 


KSU 


85 


Missouri 


77 


ksu 


60 


KANSAS 


85 


ksu 


54 


MINNESOTA 


70 


ksu 


68 


KANSAS 


88 


KSU 


77 


Creighton 


53 


ksu 


66 


WICHITA STATE 


67 


ksu 


59 


BOSTON UNIV. 


62 


KSU 


84 


Virginia State 


43 


ksu 


74 


DRAKE 


94 


ksu 


63 


KANSAS 


75 


KSU 


70 


Marymount 


36 


KSU 


78 


C Missouri 


73 


ksu 


61 


Wichita State 


65 


KSU 


104 


South Dakota 


52 


V 









Cort Anderson 



Injuries create inconsistency 



Whether the task is governing the uni- 
versity's student body or baking 
cookies as part of a fraternity's little sister 
organization, almost every group effort re- 
quires a leader to start and keep the ball 
rolling. 

And as playing basketball is certainly a 
team effort, there's usually a captain on the 
team or at least one outstanding player to 
boost the team to victory. 

But the ball's momentum slowed down 
during the 1980-81 season for the K-State 
women's basketball team when Tammie 
Romstad, center, sustained a knee injury 
and was benched for most of the season. 

Major losses during the season included 
three losses to the University of Kansas out 
of three games played, and the team fell two 
out of three times to Wichita State Universi- 
ty.^ 

"The year didn't measure up to our ex- 
pectations," Coach Lynn Hickey said. "We 
did have a 22-11 win-loss record, but the key 
to the season was our injuries. 

"When we lost Tammie Romstad, it was 



impossible to fill her shoes. There was just 
no consistency we really just played 

flat." 

However, the Wildcats finished second in 
the Big 8 conference, won the Thanksgiving 
tournament at K-State, and were in the Top 
20 N {AP) rating three-fourths of the season. 
The team was also invited to the Region VI 
tournament. The 'Cats faced fourth-seeded 
Drake, which beat K-State 94-74 in DeS 
Moines, Iowa on Feb. 13. 

"What we need to be thankful for is we 
got into the tournament. I didn't want this to 
be the first year the women didn't go the 
regionals." 

According to Hickey, one of the problems 
during the year was lack of one player who 
gave the team a lot of help. 

"I thought Taryn Bachis started the year 
off well, and Kim Price is playing better. 
Gayla Williams started well, went into a 
slump, and is playing better. Shelly Hughes 
is probably our most consistent player. She 
performed well above what I expected of 
her. 



"The four or five that we have contribut- 
ed a lot to the things we have accomplished. 
It's been a team effort. We didn't have any 
one superstar." 

"The kids have worked awfully hard," 
Hickey said. "They've had bad breaks, but 
there's been no team turmoils. I feel very 
good about that." 

During the 1981-82 season the women 
lose two important people, according to 
Hickey. For both Gayla Williams and Taryn 
Bachis, guards, the 1980-81 season was 
their last. 

However, Hickey believes next year is the 
year for the Wildcats. 

"We're in about the same situation as KU 
was last year," she said. "They had mostly 
seniors this year and one key addition. 

"I don't think anyone's going to be close 
to us, I really feel if we have a decent recruit- 
ing year we'll be one of the powers in the 
Midwest. "& 



Carl Cavassa 





Maybe next year . . . Shelly 
Hughes, Dee Weinreis, and Cayla 
Williams view the University of 
Kansas Jayhawks beat the 'Cats, 
as they await their call back on 
the court. 

High-centered- Becky Dobbins 
and Taryn Bachis grab the ball 
from the Wichita State Shockers. 



Cort AndersoJ 




Craig Chandl 



218 women's basketball 








•s 




%J 







\ \w kxm 



>/*m 



'<■■ ■■■": 



^ 




\rK 



Cort Anderson 

No chance' Dee Weinreis, 
center, blocks a KU player's shot 
as Kim Price and Taryn Bachis 
stand ready to back her up. 



TOP ROW: Jeanne Daniels, Becky Dobbins, Shelly 
Hughes, Dee Weinreis, Tammie Romstad, Kim Price, 
Becky Smatana, Taryn Bachis, Coach Lynn Hickey. 
BOTTOM BOW: Jill Bleier. Betsy Sloan, Gayla Wil- 
liams, Angie Taylor, Karen Coupe, Melanle Lees, 
Jean Roise. 




women's basketball 219 



Key to smaller sports success 



Football, basketball support the 



EB iddle: Which comes first — selling 

** more K-State football tickets so the 

university can recruit better football players 

or recruit better football players so more 

tickets can be sold? 

Even the athletic directors at K-State can't 
seem to solve this problem, but if they could, 
the answer could lead the way to improving 
the smaller sports other than football and 
basketball at the university. 

"It's a chicken and egg proposition," said 
Robert Snell, faculty representative for the 
Intercollegiate Athletic Council. 

"We need to make more money by selling 
more football tickets, and we need to invest 
in our football program to get the return." 

"We have the smallest budget for any of 
our sports of any school in our conference, 
Snell said. "We're at the bottom of the 
heap." 

According to Snell, the council's goal is to 
obtain funding for all of the sports, but the 
road to doing so can only be opened by 
making more money in the athletic pro- 
grams. 

However, even in this age of "inflation," 
the university has done better than stay 
even, Athletic Council chairperson Veryl 



Switzer said. 

"A few years ago we were in the red up to 
$500,000 but now we've shown income for 
the last two to three years," Switzer said. 
"Eventually we'll increase so we can be- 
come competitive with our non-revenue net 
producing sports." 

But presently, the sports that provide a 
deficit in the respective budgets don't hold 
impressive standings in the Big 8 confer- 
ence. 

For example, K-State's men's tennis team 
placed seventh in the Big 8, while the wom- 
en's tennis team placed eighth. The men's 
cross country team finished with fifth place 
in the conference and the men's and wom- 
en's golf team completed the year at the 
bottom of the Big 8. 

Although the accomplishments may not 
be stunning, the budgets for the smaller 
sports have been increasing over the years 
— allowing for the addition of more scholar- 
ship players. For instance, in 1977, the 
women's tennis budget was $1200 and has 
increased to $6900 since women's coach 
David Hacker has been at K-State. 

"I'm appreciative of the increase; howev- 
er, it's still woefully inadequate for a com- 
petitive basis out-of-state and even in-state," 
Hacker said. "We're being beaten by smaller 
schools such as Fort Hays." 

According to Switzer, there are several 
keys to continue to increase competively in 
any of the sports at K-State. 

"We need to develop our football pro- 
gram to where we can increase our atten- 
dance record at home. That's where our 
potential is," he said. 



"What we really need to do is rally our 
sport," Switzer added. "If we could be com- 
petitive with Oklahoma State in game atten- 
dance — where they have 50,000 in the 
stadium in almost every game, whereas we 
have 45,000 during one game a year — 
then we can start thinking about increasing 
the budgets." 

However, K-State does have one sport 
that makes more money than any other 
school in conference. 

In contrast to the University of Colorado, 
who spends more than they make on their 
basketball program with quite a large deficit, 
according to K-State athletic director De- 
Loss Dodds, K-State's basketball program 
made over a million dollars in 1980 for the 
first time in the university's history. 

"We're proud of our traditional basketball 
program," Switzer said. "We have very few 
things to feel part of a winning program. We 
relish and cherish it." 

"But another sport at K-State where 
there's real potential is women's basket- 
ball," he said. 

Increasing in attendance by 1,000 at the 
K-State-KU game this year over 1980's at- 
tendance, Snell agreed that women's basket- 
ball is a sport which more people need to get 
acquainted with. 

"Most of the people that do go to the 
games enjoy it (women's basketball) and 
would like to support it," Snell said. "We 
have the seating capacity for quite a few 
more." 

"We've done a lot more individual game 
advertising and have been making more at- 
tractive brochures. We've also been sending 
out ticket applications for the women's 
games along with the ones for the men's — 
hoping we'll build the income." 




220 athletic budget 



family 



Another key to building the income is 
through contributions. Since DeLoss Dodds 
came to K-State in 1978, the revenues have 
increased by more than 200 percent — 
from $250,000 to $683,000. 

Also, since the introduction of Title IX, 
there's little chance any of the sports 
dropped in the last 10 years, such as swim- 
ming, wrestling and gymnastics will be 
brought back, according to Dodds. And 
sports like soccer and rugby are destined to 
remain in club status. 

"My main goal is to fund what we've got," 
Dodds said. "Tennis and golf aren't in a high 
priority, but if we can get football to where 
we're selling out every seat in the stadium 
every weekend, then we'll work on it." 

But according to Dodds, there is more 
potential for budget increases in tennis and 
other sports that can be played indoors as 
well as outdoors, over the outdoor sports 
like golf and baseball. 

"Tennis is the sport we can do better with 
because you can practice inside, but out cli- 
mate is not conducive to golf, baseball and 
softball," Dodds said. 

"K-State golfers and baseball players 
have to cram everything into one and a half 
months. Our baseball players go to 48 
games during this period of time and miss 
half of their schooling. We're not trying to 
encourage this." 

"It's going to be the responsibility of foot- 
ball and basketball to sponsor the family to 
get the revenues in order that any sports at 
K-State become more competitive," Switzer 
said. $ 

Cari Cavassa 




athletic budget 221 






Sink or swim- Mike Buchanan, 
junior in recreation, gasps for air 
while working out in the 
natatorium. Pool hours were 
unaffected by changes in free time 
use of Ahearn facilities. 








Student free time in Ahearn is cut 



T he fall transfer of Recreational Ser- 

* vices to the new Recreation Complex 

sparked an interdepartmental struggle for 

use and administrative duties of Ahearn 

Field House. 

Before the completion of the Recreation 
Complex, Recreational Services (Rec Ser- 
vices) was housed in Ahearn Field House 
along with the Department of Health, Phys- 
ical Education and Recreation (HPER), Con- 
tinuing Education, and the Athletic Depart- 
ment. 

However, in November it was announced 
by Gene Cross, vice-president for facilities, 
that the administrative duties of Ahearn 
Field House would be the responsibility of 
HPER. The change was to occur on or be- 
fore July 1, 1981. Rec Services had been 
responsible for the administrative duties pri- 
or to the announcement. 

With much of Rec Services's programs 
moved out and a new administrative depart- 
ment in charge, requests for changes in pro- 
gramming by the Athletic Department, Con- 
tinuing Education, and HPER were in the 
making. If program expansions were ap- 
proved, it would be at the cost of time Rec 
Services had at the fieldhouse. 

According to Cross, the other depart- 
ments believed that since Rec Services had 
expanded its program capabilities, they 
should also have the same opportunity. 

The other departments were suggesting 
that Rec Services conduct its programs 
strictly in the Recreation Complex and the 
natatorium. 

"The initial plan was for continued use of 
Ahearn (by Rec Services) after the complex 
was completed," Raydon Robel, Rec Ser- 
vices director, said. "The building of the 
complex was to take pressure off of Ahearn 
and to program recreation in both areas." 
Robel said if the Rec Services programs 



were restricted to the Recreation Complex, 
the $3.5 million building would be too small 
within six months. In November, about 
1,000 students used the fieldhouse per week 
and 1,200 students used the Recreation 
Complex per day. Without the use of 
Ahearn facilities, intramural basketball was 
played on 4 courts, the same number of 
courts used before the complex was opened. 
The Recreation Complex afforded expand- 
ed hours for intramurals plus two free activ- 
ity courts. Previously, no courts were open 
for free activity during intramurals. 

"Since 1970, there has been five 
pounds of activities in a three- 
pound building." 



"Since 1970, there has been five pounds 
of activities conducted in a three-pound 
building," Kirkendall said. 

There is no desire to shove anyone out of 
the fieldhouse or cut anyone's programs, he 
said. The other departments just want a 
chance to expand their programs, too. 

In December, Rec Services and HPER 
reached an agreement for HPER to take 
over the administrative duties of the field- 
house and manage free-time recreation on 
Jan. 1, 1981 instead of waiting until July 1, 
1981. 

This meant that free recreation time in the 
fieldhouse would be divided between Con- 
tinuing Education, the Athletic Department, 
and HPER. Rec Services would manage only 
the Recreation Complex and the natatorium. 

With HPER in charge of Ahearn adminis- 
trative duties, Kirkendall said many changes 
would be made over Christmas vacation but 
he wasn't sure of what they would be. 

"Changes will happend rather quickly but 



there won't be any changes made without 
consulting the student leaders," he said. 

However, after the Christmas vacation, it 
was announced that Ahearn Field House 
would remain available to students on al- 
most the same basis as in the fall. Student 
free time at the fieldhouse would remain 
virtually unchanged for the spring semester 
to avoid confusion, Kirkendall said. The oth 
er departments would have to wait to ex 
pand. 

The only exception was the use of the 
weight training and gymnastics rooms, Kir 
kendall said. 

"We in the department became quite con 
cerned when the gymnastics room was oper 
for free play," he said. "It was like havinc 
the pool open without lifeguards. The gym 
nasties room will never be open for fre< 
play. That is definitely over." 

The weight room was set aside nightly fo> 
faculty, staff, and alumni, Kirkendall saidi 
For students, weight training classes are ol 
fered and facilities are also available at th 
Recreational Complex, he said. 

No further changes were made until Fer. 
ruary, when the night hours for free recrec 
tional time were reduced from 8 to 10 p.n 
to 8:30 to 10 p.m. The two and one ha 
hour reduction per week was the result of 
request by the Athletic Department for e 
tra time. Because of the lack of student o\ 
position it was approved, Kirkendall said 

All of the changes concerning student uj 
of Ahearn Field House had been made f( 
the semester, Kirkendall said, but mar 
changes will occur before the fall 1981 s 
mester begins. He didn't know for sure wh 
the changes may entail, Kirkendall said. | 



Sharon Bohn 



222 ahearn hours 



Money problems and damaged crafts don't sink crew 



It was a good year for crew if you don't 
count the fact that they lost their two best 
racing shells and were again underfinanced. 

Not three miles out of Manhattan the Blaz- 
er, pulling the trailor carrying three eight- 
man and two four-man racing shells, lost 
control and overturned. As it flipped, the 
rear tires caught the ends of crew's two best 
racing shells and smashed them. 

Crew members went on to the regatta in 
Lawrence and captured the Big-8 title for 
both the men and women's varsity eights, 
using borrowed shells. 

"Since the wreck our best eight-man shell 
which we will be racing is 12 to 15 years 
old," Dave Knoll, new head coach, said. 

"we wrecked our two best eights, and 
they will not start repairing until we tell them 
we have the money to get them repaired," 
Knoll said. 

Most of the shells the crew uses were 
purchased between 1963 and 1972. 

"And they were not all new then," Knoll 
said. 

"We are working on possible donations" 
to repair the two eights and possibly for new 
racing shells, he said. 

Crew has not been funded by the universi- 
ty since 1974, when student senate decided 
to no longer fund club sports. 

In Spring 1980, the club formally changed 
its name from K-State Crew to the Kansas 



State Rowing Association. The name change 
allows the association to generate their own 
funds without clearing it through the K-State 
Foundation, Knoll said. 

Knoll believes there is no other source of 
funding besides donations available to crew 
which would provide sufficient money for 
crew's needs. 

However, neither financial problems nor 
having to borrow shells kept crew from hav- 
ing a successful season. 

At the Midwest Sprints in Madison, Wise, 
the novice men's team brought home third- 
place medals, while the women's varsity 
lightweight-eight took second. 

In the dual with the University of Kansas, 
at Shawnee Mission Park, K-State was victo- 
rious in all the races. 

The women's varsity lightwieght-eight 
ended their season by winning the women's 
regionals in Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Training is the biggest contributing factor 
to crew's success, according to Knoll. 

Off-the-water training usually begins in 
February. The winter training includes dis- 
tance running, running steps, and individual 
weight training, Knoll said. 

"The most important thing about off-the- 
water practice is establishing as great level 
of endurance as (we) can. Because when we 
do get out on the water, rowing is the most 
energy consuming sport per time there is," 



he said. 

Depending on the winter, the team 
doesn't usually start rowing until around 
spring break. 

During 1980 spring break, crew went to 
Austin, Texas, for more water time. 

"We go strictly for practice. The water as 
well as the lake we row on is just perfect for 
rowing," Knoll said. 

If they have this level of endurance estab- 
lished when they get out on the water they 
will be able to work on technique first, ac- 
cording to Knoll. 

"We will straighten out the problems, 
then do some distance rowing with interval 
sprints to build up conditioning," he said. 

Then as the racing season draws closer 
the crew does more short pieces which are 
closer to the length of a race. 

A course is 2,000 meters, approximately 
1 and Va miles, which takes six to eight 
minutes at racing speed, Knoll said. $ 



Gail Garey 



Getting their feet wet- The 

women 's crew prepare to launch 
an eight-man shell while the men 
wait on shore for their turn. On- 
water training usually begins 
around spring break in early 
March for the crew teams. 




John Greer 



crew 223 



K-State colors red and black? 




Line Out — K-State's scrum 
wins the line out as a player 
jumps to tip the ball to a fellow 
rugger. A line out is used when 
the ball is knocked out of bounds. 



photos by Craig Ch< 



The Great Escape- A K-State 
Player grabs the ball while play. 
Pittsburg on Sept. 15. 

Soggy Scenery- Spectators fk 
to a tent as rain fell during the 
Sunflower Tournament. 



224 rugby 



Red and black may not be well known 
colors to K-State, but to any rugby 
: anatic a flash of red with a black stripe 
lopefully means a K-State rugger dashing 
[or a tri. 

The red and black jerseys vary from K- 
State's purple and white because rugby 
jvasn't solely a K-State activity when it be- 
gan, according to Don Harris, a rugby club 
nember. 

The rugby club has legitimately been 
termed the Kansas State University Rugby 
Football Club. Its club status prohibits the 
team from receiving any funding from the 
University. Without this funding, rugby has 
Decome an expensive sport to the individual 
player. 

Those expenses begin with $25 dues to 
the club. Scott Bertrand, president of the 
club, said the largest portion of that $25 
goes towards the purchase of kegs the home 
team provides after each game. Besides the 
partying expense, the rugby club pays dues 
to the Heartland of America Rugby Union, 
the referees receive pay for officiating the 
game and field alignment requires a fee. 

A uniform including jersey, shorts and 
socks costs about $40, Harris said. Shoes 
may range from $14 to $26 at any area 
sporting goods store. Another expense 
arises with road trips. An in-state road trip 
usually runs about $15, depending on the 
various circumstances, Harris said. 

Harris said during the fall season the club 



had five in-state trips and one out-of-state 
trip, a tournament in Houston, Texas. Only 
15 of the 35 members traveled to Houston 
and those were the 15 who could afford it, 
Harris said. 

"I was on a tight budget so I only spent 
$105," Roger Aeschliman, rugby club mem- 
ber, said. 

One of the most unusual aspects of rugby 
is that it is not unusual for one member of a 
club, to join a different club for a road trip. 
And this is especially the case with tours. 

Harris traveled with the University of Kan- 
sas to England and Wales during Christmas 
break. Harris said the entire tour cost him 
about $1,500. 

According to Harris, playing with another 
club doesn't create any problems. 

"You have to get used to playing with 
someone else. As long as you have good 
knowledge of the game and the different 
aspects, you can adapt your play toward 
different styles of play," Harris said. 

The contrast between K-State and KU 
styles of play lies in that KU relies on a 
running game and K-State's power is in the 
scrum, Harris said. K-State depends on ball 
control, winning scrum outs and wearing 
down the other team. 

Harris said the K-State club suffered a lot 
from inconsistency. K-State beat the Univer- 
sity of Missouri 48-0, yet lost to KU 16-6. K- 
State met KU three times in the fall season, 
but lost each game. K-State's record for the 



season was seven wins and eight losses. 

The K-State club also had difficulty with 
the availability of fields. The regular field on 
Ft. Riley Boulevard was not available since it 
was chosen as the new site of a Holidome 
and construction was underway during the 
season. 

The fields at Tuttle Creek Reservoir 
were too far away to be convenient for both 
the players and spectators, Harris said. The 
club received permission to use the intramu- 
ral fields for games. 

Besides the practices and games during 
the seasons, the rugby club also has meet- 
ings throughout the year and a banquet at 
the end of each season. The club chooses 
outstanding players and the awards are giv- 
en during the banquet. 

In the fall season the outstanding player 
was Harris, the outstanding back-Bertrand, 
the outstanding scrummie-Mike Quinn and 
the rookie of the year was Barry Brunning. 

According to Bertrand the biggest single 
factor which distinguishes rugby from other 
sports is the comradeship between the 
teams after the games. 

"There are three halves in rugby; the two 
on the field and one at the party after the 
game," Bertrand said.& 



Jill McAntee 




rugby 225 



Manhattan bike racing picks up speed 



a. 



When you get exhausted, it hurts — 
and it's scary. Cyclists call the condi- 
tion bonking. It's when you run out of ener- 
gy. Runners are protected because they can 
feel the fatigue in their knees and other 
joints, but bikers can go on and on." 

Rick Summerhill, associate professor of 
mathematics, referred to his own exper- 
iences as an avid bicyclist. 

"A bicycle is very smooth, so it becomes 
easy to run out of energy. You have nothing 
left to burn. It happened to me one time 
when I was 30 miles away from home, but I 
just had to keep riding." Summerhill said. 

The professor took up bike riding a few 
years earlier as a means of transportation 



from his home seven miles from his job on 
campus. He found it not only saved him 
money, but was a great way to stay fit, he 
said. "I used to run to stay in shape but 
biking is just as effective." 

"I got involved in racing because it's fun," 
Summerhill said. "I like to train for the 
races." 

Summerhill says he's totaled about 
10,000 miles this year. He booked some of 
his miles through involvement in the Blue- 
mont Bicycle Club of Manhattan. The club 
sponsors activities related to bicycling 
throughout the entire year — road races, 
long-distance tours, casual fun rides, and 
other events. 




As a member of the club, Summerhill gets 
involved most in the road races, riding in the 
veteran age group (35- plus). He likes the 
long races, usually 65 miles, he said. Usually 
when he trains, he does it on the way home 
from work. Training by himself, he usually 
rides about 20 mph. 

"With other people it's faster — about 23| 
mph. The really good guys can ride 28-29 1 
mph," said Summerhill. 

According to Summerhill, there are nc 
rules in bike racing. The only stipulation thai! 
riders have to follow is that they are not 
allowed to touch anybody else in the racej 
But Summerhill says that it happens all the 
time. 

"During the big million dollar races, if i 
happens, they'll give them time penalties 
maybe adding five minutes to the total tirm 
of a rider, " Summerhill said. "But arounc 
here it's too low class to add penalties i 
anyone's touched." 

Theresa Fleming, senior in textile scieno 
at K-State, is another bicycle fanatic. A 
though she doesn't race, she says she wouli 
like to get involved in racing. "I'm alway 
really competitive, and I think I'd like it, 
she said. 

Instead of racing, Fleming and a cyclin 
partner hit the road on their bikes around si 
o'clock in the morning. They usually rid 
about 40 miles every time out. 

"The time of the year doesn't stop me. 
she said. "We've ridden when it's cold - 
just so it's nice." 

"My ultimate goal is to make a long-di 
tance ride — maybe to K.C. I figure it woul 
take about five hours to ride there." 

Whether they finish to win or just finisl 
Fleming summed up the joy of bike ridir 
for them all. 

"I use it (riding) as a way to venture out 
enjoy the countryside so much. And I love 1 
feel the air against my body." she said. $ 



Cari Cavassa 



Pedal power- Rick Summerhill, 
associate professor of 
mathematics, pedals up one of the 
grueling hills in the veteran's class 
of the Kansas State Bicycling 
Championships. The race, held in 
the Stockdale Recreation Area, 
covered 34 miles. 



226 bicycle racing 




Hurriyet Aydogan 



Rec. Services, ORC aid canoers 



11 T hether in search of Whitewater in Mis- 
W souri, a gut-wrenching race on the 
Kaw, or a few quiet hours of fishing at Tut- 
tle, canoeing provides diversion for numer- 
ous K-Staters. 

Recreational services maintain twelve ca- 

| noes for student and faculty rental at the L. 

I P. Washburn complex. Pam Johnson, free 

| time recreation coordinator for recreational 

services, says use of the canoes is not just 

restricted to the summer. 

"In the fall and spring, the canoes pretty 
much go out every weekend," Johnson said. 

The peak demand for the canoes occur in 
the fall and spring just before the K-State- 
KU Kaw river races. 

"We only take reservations up to two 
weeks in advance, though," Johnson said. 

Part of the popularity of the canoes can 
be attributed to the rental price. 

"I'm sure that our rates are lower than a 
commercial rental operation. We're com- 
petitive with other universities in our 
prices," Johnson said. 

Students or faculty can rent a canoe for 
the weekend for $10. The price includes the 
canoe, a carrier bracket to mount on a car, 
vests, and oars. 

Although current demand is good, John- 
son said there are no plans to buy more 
canoes. 

"It's a pretty substantial investment and 
since we have a lot of things going on with 
the new rec complex, we'll pretty much 



maintain the status quo with what we've got 
for now," Johnson said. 

Recreational services is not the only can- 
oeing enterprise on campus. Outdoor Re- 
creation Committee (ORC), a group spon- 
sored by the Union Programming Council, 
organizes several canoe trips each year 
along with other outdoor activities. 

"Usually the trips are filled the same day 
they become open," Bruce Loyd, ORC 
member and junior in mechanical engineer- 
ing, said. 

Outdoor Recreation Committee orga- 
nized a trip on the Current River, Missouri, 
in the fall semester and planned two for the 
spring; one on the Buffalo River in Arkansas 
and one on the Boundary Water River near 
the Canadian border in Wisconsin. 

"We try to vary our difficulties as far as 
choosing the rivers. We try to do the rivers 
we haven't done in a while," Loyd said. 

ORC does all the publicity on campus, 
makes the reservations, and preparations 
for food on each trip. 

"We get allocations from Student Senate 
but we figure up trips at cost and we try to 
charge the participant exactly what it costs 
UPC," 

"Usually we have different people on 
each trip. The range is always pretty good," 
Loyd said.$> 




Hurriyet Aydogan 



Anton Arnoldy 



Where's the Whitewater?- The 

Kaw is not particularly noted as a 
fast flowing river but it attracts 
canoers anyway — especially for 
the K-State/K-U canoe races in 
the fall and spring. 

Traffic jam- Downtown 
Manhattan is not the only place to 
get bogged down in traffic. 
Sometimes it's hard to find the 
passing lane when it isn't marked 
with white lines. 



canoeing 227 




Double duty- In an attempt to 
make a double play, a Barton 
Community College second 
baseman goes airborn while a K- 
State player slides in underneath 

Safe at Second- Kent Schwartz 
shortstop for Cloud County 
Community College, misses the 
tag at second as K-State's Mark 
Nordyke slides in untouched. 



228 baseball/softball 



Fever fails to reach K- State 



While the plague of "Royalmania" was 
lurking around the state of Kansas, 
K-State never caught any of the symptoms 
of the craze. The fever was never apparent 
in the men's baseball team or the women's 
softball team during the 1979-80 season. 

The women's softball team finished with a 
12-24 record overall and a 3-8 record in the 
Big 8. 

"We had a lack of consistency, a lot of 
potential was there but we couldn't quite get 
it together," Janel Anderson, pitcher, said. 

Julie Hershey, an outfielder, said that re- 
state coach, Susan Norton, emphasized 
teamwork. 

"We played as a team, not as a group of 
individuals," Hershey said. 

Winning against Kansas University and 
the University of Nebraska gave the team 
their 3-8 Big 8 record. 

"We got beat by a lot of close games," 
Hershey said. 

Never getting the offense and defense to- 
gether was sited as a team problem by An- 
derson. The defense was there but the lack 



of hitting lost a lot of close games, she said. 

Leslie McGinnis, infielder and Hershey led 
the team in RBIs with 14 each as the team 
finished with a total of 89 RBIs. 

Pitching her first season of college ball, 
Janel Anderson gave the team a 6-14 pitch- 
ing record. 

"It was quite a challenge," the rookie said 
of her first pitching season. 

Simultaneously, the similiar attitude was 
present in the men's baseball team which 
ended with a 15-29 record. 

By defeating Colorado and Oklahoma the 
'Cats finished 2-18 in Big 8 play and finished 
4th place in the Western division of the Big 
8. 

High points of the season were baseman 
Rob Holder's homerun record of hitting 14 
in the season. While batting a .377, Holder 
also lead the team with 45 RBIs. 

"We had a good defensive ball club. We 
scored a lot of runs but were ineffective on 
the mound," Dave Baker, head baseball 
coach said. 

"The pitching was not consistent," Baker, 



coach at K-State for three years added. 

In pre-conference games the Wildcats 
were 13-10. Entering Big 8 race, the team 
lost the first nine games, beat Oklahoma, at 
home, and lost the next five consecutive 
games. Beating Colorado gave the 'Cats 
their second conference win and then fin- 
ished the season losing the remaining five 
games. 

On the offense, four teammates batted 
over .300, Jeff Sherrer, second baseman, 
Greg Kaifes, designated hitter, Glynn Perry, 
shortstop and Robin Golder, center fielder. 

The weather didn't cooperate with the 
teams during the beginning of the season as 
rain forced the cancellation of approximate- 
ly 15 games. 

"That's something you expect. You 
schedule enough games because you know 
you're going to lose some to the weather," 
Baker said. & 



Kathleen Pakkebier 




Women's softball 



Men's baseball 



KSU 


15 


Marymount 


b 


KSU 


10 


Baker University 


ksu 


4 


Marymount 


5 


ksu 


1 


Baker University 


ksu 


3 


Iowa 


3 


KSU 


19 


Bellevue 


KSU 


5 


Stephen F Austin 


2 


KSU 


3 


Bellevue 


ksu 


1 


Central St. of Oklas. 


2 


KSU 


7 


Bethany 


ksu 


1 


Missouri 


3 


KSU 


10 


Bethany 


ksu 


4 


Oklahoma 


5 


ksu 


2 


Oral Roberts 


ksu 





Texas A&M 


4 


ksu 


4 


Oral Roberts 


ksu 


1 


Univ. Texas/Arlington 


9 


ksu 


4 


Arkansas 


ksu 





Nebraska 


7 


ksu 


3 


Arkansas 


ksu 





Texas Womens Univ 


5 


ksu 


10 


Mo. Southern 


KSU 


4 


Southern Illinois 


3 


KSU 


17 


Mo Southern 


KSU 


4 


Missouri Western 


3 


KSU 


10 


Mo. Southern 


KSU 


6 


Missouri Western 





KSU 


17 


N.W Missouri 


KSU 


5 


Kansas University 


2 


ksu 


11 


N W. Missouri 


ksu 


(I 


Kansas University 


8 


KSU 


7 


Marymount 


ksu 


1 


Oklahoma State U 


6 


KSU 


11 


Marymount 


ksu 





Iowa State U 


2 


KSU 


8 


Creighton 


ksu 


2 


Emporia State U. 


3 


ksu 





Creighton 


KSU 


5 


Cloud County 


4 


ksu 


12 


Creighton 


KSU 


16 


Cloud County 


11 


KSU 


12 


Fort Hays State 


ksu 





Creighton 


2 


KSU 


8 


Benedictine 


ksu 


2 


Creighton 


4 


ksu 


3 


Kansas University 


ksu 





Nebraska 


3 


ksu 


3 


Kansas University 


KSU 


6 


Nebraska 


4 


ksu 


7 


Nebraska 


ksu 


1 


Cloud County 


2 


ksu 





Nebraska 


KSU 


7 


Cloud County 


5 


ksu 


3 


Iowa State U. 


ksu 


4 


Creighton 


5 


ksu 


3 


Iowa State U. 


ksu 





Creighton 


3 


ksu 





Missouri 


ksu 


6 


Nebraska Omaha 


7 


ksu 


5 


Missouri 


KSU 


5 


Nebraska-Omaha 


1 


ksu 


4 


Okalhoma 


KSU 


1 


Nebraska 





KSU 


3 


Oklahoma 


ksu 


1 


Nebraska 


2 


ksu 


4 


Oklahoma 


ksu 





Iowa 


1 


ksu 


2 


Oklahoma 


ksu 


4 


Minnesota 


8 


ksu 

ksu 

ksu 

ksu 

KSU 

ksu 

ksu 

ksu 

ksu 

ksu 


1 

4 
4 
5 
9 
1 

1 
1 
5 


Emporia State U. 
Colorado 
Colorado 
Colorado 
Colorado 

Oklahoma State U 
Oklahoma State U 
Oklahoma State U 
Oklahoma State U 
Kansas University 



13 
7 
9 

7 
13 



4 

8 

14 

2 

7 

10 

9 

8 

5 

4 

13 

1 

7 

10 

31 

10 

12 

15 

21 

14 

15 

7 

2 

12 

8 

15 

13 



baseball/softball 229 



track 




Bo Raderj 



Teams encounter hurdles 



Although injuries hindered men and 
women tracksters, both teams had 
consistent showings at meets throughout the 
season. 

"Field events were a strong basis for our 
upper division finish in the Big 8 outdoor 
track championships," Mike Ross, head 
men's track coach, said. The men's team 
finished fourth in the Big 8. 

Consistently performing well for the Wild- 
cats throughout the season were Vince Par- 
rette, triple jumper; Ray Bradley, shot-put- 



Feet don't fall me now- Steve 
Cotton seems to do a backbend 
as he high jumps at the Big 8 
meet. 

Nice goln'l- Dana Schaulis 
congratulates Wanda Trent after 
she won her race in a dual against 
Wichita State. 

Craig Chandler 



ter; and Kevin Swane, long jumper. 

"We did very well on the circuit because 
of these men," Ross said. 

According to Barry Anderson, head wom- 
en's track coach, it was a down year for the 
women, particularly at the Big 8 meet. 



"Due to injuries the women didn't do too 
well, It was one of those years where things 
didn't go right," Anderson said. 

Despite the injuries contributing to the 
outcome of the season, the women's team 
stuck it out together. 



230 track 




"We are a very close team with a lot of 
unity and team spirit," Anderson said. 

Both Ross and Anderson geared their 
training programs so the athlete would reach 
his peak during the outdoor season. 

"Each athlete must have a strong back- 
ground of training by March when outdoor 
meets begin," Ross said. 

Coach Anderson considers the indoor 
meets a chance to get in quality workouts. 

"We use these early indoor meets as 
training," Anderson said. 

However, training doesn't begin then. 
Some tracksters begin training in Septem- 
ber, Ross said. Now distance runners are 
beginning to train year-round. 

It is very common for distance runners to 
run cross-country because it is a good devel- 
opmental time to prepare for track, Ander- 
son said. 

"If we were just training, it would get 
boring. Being able to race in the fall makes it 
fun and more interesting," Heidi Bright, 
women's trackster, said. 

Anderson and Ross have a similar goal 
which is to re-establish K-State's position in 
the Big 8. Both agree that the Big 8 confer- 
ence is definitely one of the toughest, and 
nowhere is there finer individuals assembled 
at one place. 

"Other conferences may seem better on 
the surface, but they don't nearly approach 
what depth advantage we have in the Big 
8," Anderson said. $ 




■scores- 



Gail Garey 



Givin' it all he's got- Vince 
Parrette triple jumps 54'-8" at the 
Big 8 outdoor track meet taking 
first the Big 8 outdoor track meet 
taking first place. He holds the 
second best jump record in the 
world of 55' -10 Vi " which he set 
at the Big 8 indoor meet. 



Men's Indoor Track 



NTS 


Sooner Relays 


2nd 


Kansas Quadrangular 


3rd 


Missouri Triangular 


NTS 


Oklahoma Track Classic 


1st 


K-State Triangular 


5th 


52nd Annual Big 8 Championships 


NTS 


Track and Field Association (TFA) USA 


NTS 


NCAA National Indoor Championship 



Men's Outdoor Track 



2nd 

NTS 

NTA 

NTS 

NTS 

NTS 

2nd 

4th 

NTS 

NTS 



Texas Triangular 

Arkansas Relays 

Texas Relays 

John Jacobs Invitation 

Kansas Rela ys 

Drake Relays 

Kansas Triangular 

Big 8 Championship 

NCAA Championships 

TFA/USA 



Women's Indoor Track 



NTS Sooner Indoor Relays 

2nd Nebraska Dual 

1st K-State Triangular 

6th Big 8 Championships 

NTS Kansas Triangular 

NTS AIAW National Indoor Track and Field Championship 

Women's Outdoor Track 



1st 






New Mexico Dual 


4th 






Husker Invitational 


NTS 






Texas Relays 


NTS 






John Jacobs Invitational 


NTS 






Kansas Relays 


NTS 






Drake Relays 


5th 






Big 8 Championships 


NTS 




AIAW 


National Championship 


NTS 






TFA/USA 


NTS-no 


team standing 








. . . must come down- Beets 
Kolarik clears the bar in the 
high jump. 



track 231 



intramurals 



Co-rec sports gain acceptance 



Remember when it was "unfeminine" 
for a girl to play sports, much less play 
sports against (heaven forbid!) men? 

If you still believe in that idea, a trip out to 
the Recreation Complex would be enough to 
frazzle your knickers and pop your suspend- 
ers. 

Women and men playing sports together 
is not only allowed but has been encouraged 
since 1971 when volleyball became the first 
official intramural co-rec sport. 

"It's (co-rec sports) growing. I've been 
taking a look at past years' records and it's 
definitely growing," Steve Martini, intramu- 
ral director, said. 

"Co-rec is a real wholesome situation. It's 
great. Of course the movement now is to- 
ward physical activity and co-rec is a way to 
do that," Martini said. 

"It's a great way to be competitive with 
women and vice versa for the girls. Students 
respect each other for their ability. It's a 
very social thing. 

"Men are no longer embarrassed to get 
on a court with a woman. The talent differ- 
ential is not like it was years ago. It's one 



thing for a man to shoot hoop with other 
guys but it's great to be competitive against 
women. The same goes for the women," 
Martini said. 

Martini is in his first year as intramural 
director at K-State. He moved to Kansas 
after serving as an instructor and intramural 
director at California State University at 
Chico. 

Co-rec sports bring out the social aspect 
of sports, according to Martini. 

"I'm not cutting competitive elements of 
sports — we want to keep them. It's just 
that the recreational aspects are important. I 
see them in co-rec sports. The social aspect 
is there." 

There are approximately 30 categories of 
co-rec sports, ranging from waterbasketball 
to doubles horseshoes, according to Martini. 
Addition of a sport is dependent on the 
demand for that sport. 

Linda Gordon, senior in industrial engi- 
neering, said that co-rec sports seemed less 
competitive than separated sports. 

"It's more social. The rules are different 
than regular for many sports, like basketball 



and football. Not everybody is real familiar 
with the rules so it's hard to be competitive. 
It's more for fun," Gordon said. 

Brad Taylor, senior in agricultural eco- 
nomics, thought the competitive and socia 
aspects were balanced. 

"I can see that a lot of people take it both 
ways. We always were competitive. We al 
ways went out and tried to go just as hard 
The girls on our teams are competitive anc 
want to win — it just makes you work thai 
much harder. We always had fun though,' 
Taylor said. 

Joan Stammer, senior in industrial engi; 
neering, agreed that it could be either com! 
petitive or social. 

"It's both. It depends on the sport and thJ 
team you are on. Most that I've been oij 
were competitive, especially in basketball,' 
Stammer said. 

"But I've been on teams that were onlj 
there for fun. That is a part of it." & 



Anton Arnoldy 




232 co-rec sports 




= intramurals 



Shooting form- Emily Starr, 
sophomore in pre-nursing, 
struggles with the ball while 
making a shot during an 
intramural water basketball game 
in the natatorium. 

The eyes have it- Team 
members search the grass after 
Cam Blakely, senior in accounting, 
lost a contact lens. The lens was 
never found and the game 
continued after the unexpected 
time-out. 




Rob Clark 




Double or nothing- Terri 
Muller, junior in health and 
physical education, checks the 
clock after her team doubled their 
opponents score. 

Blocking out- Megan Bardsley, 
junior in journalism and mass 
communications and political 
science, gets position on an 
opponent for a rebound during a 
co-rec intramural game. 



co-rec sports 233 



Sports News 



Ro bypasses Moscow 



Cheerleaders 
place second 

Performing amidst a star-studded cast of 
celebrities, the K-State cheerleaders 
achieved a certain amount of fame and glory 
as they took second place in the Internation- 
al Cheerleading Foundation's national cheer- 
leading competition. 

Held in Miami at the Fontaine Bleau Hil- 
ton on April 4 and 5, the cheerleaders' per- 
formance was taped for national television 
appearance in which they competed against 
five other schools, including Ohio State Uni- 
versity, which placed first in the competi- 
tion. 

At the taping, the cheerleaders made ap- 
pearances with celebrities such as Victoria 
Principal, who plays Pam Ewing on "Dal- 
las," and singer Andy Gibb. Appearances 
were also made by the Beach Boys, dancer 
Julia Prowse and performer John Davidson. 





Hurriyet Aydogan 

Rolando power- During the Iowa State game, Roland Black- 
man cheers on a teammate. Rolando spent most of the sum- 
mer touring the country as part of the Olympic basketball 
team 



Rolando Blackman didn't get to 
go to Moscow, so he went to Seat- 
tle, Los Angeles, Phoenix, New 
York and Indianapolis instead. 

"It was a very, very exciting sum- 
mer doing all that traveling a 
summer of freedom. It will be hard 
being around school for 10 
months," K-State's All-Big 8, third 
team ail-American guard said. 

Blackman's summer started al- 
most the minute school was out with 
the Olympic basketball tryouts May 
19 through the 22nd in Lexington, 
Ky. 

With the United States boycotting 
the 1980 Olympics in Moscow, the 
U.S. Olympic Committee put to- 
gether an international track meet in 
Philadelphia and a number of games 
to be played between National Bas- 
ketball Association (NBA) players 
and the national team. 

Another player on the Olympic 
team was University of Kansas star 
Darnell Valentine, Blackman's long 
time adversary. 

"It was a great experience play- 
ing with Darnell, throwing out the 
Wildcat and Jayhawk and getting to 
know each other as people," Black- 
man said. Missouri players Steve Sti- 
panovich and Larry Drew were also 
invited to try out, but turned down 
the invitation. 



Infants take the plunge 



Mark Spitz would be proud. 

Although they're not Olympic 
swimmers, the six to 18-month-old 
infants in the Water Babies class, 
offered by the University for Man 
(UFM), could have earned gold med- 
als in good clean fun. 

The purpose of the class is so that 
babies can "get to enjoy the water," 
Charmine Mazzia, instructor of the 
class said. 

Concern for their children 
prompted the parents to take the 
class. 

"I want her to learn how to float 
and know what to do in the water," 
Lyn Stoecker said of her daughter, 
Amanda. 



"I've always wanted my child not 
to be afraid of water," Jenne An- 
drews, another parent in the class 
said. 

In fact, babies have no in-born 
fear of water, but can learn the fear 
from a parent, Mazzia said. 

The Water Babies class began 
when Mazzia first moved to Manhat- 
tan. Having taught the class before 
coming here, she noticed there was 
nothing like it offered in Manhattan.; 

UFM was receptive to the idea 
she said. They helped set up a Wa 
ter Babies (six to 18 months) and i 
Tiny Tots (18 months to three 
years) class, she said. Mazzia taugh 
both classes. 



Refreshing swim- Lynnie Sloan, ju- 
nior in horticulture therapy, and eight 
month old son, Jacob, take their first 



Scott Licbler 

swim during the University for Man Wa- 
ter Babies class held in the Natatorium 
in Ahearn Field House complex. 



234 sports news 



. 




Cort Anderson 



Take it off- Willie the Wildcat, K-State s mascot, performs his traditional stripping routine along with the 
University of Missouri mascot during a time-out. The stripper routine was one of many of the new routines 
performed by Willie during the 1980-81 season. 



Glimpses 

Brett misses .400 

George Brett, third baseman for 
the Kansas City Royals, attempted 
to be the first major league player to 
bat .400 in 39 years. On Aug. 26, 
he had a batting average of .407, 
but fell below .400 by the end of the 
season. 

Women go pro 

Two Wildcat women basketball 
players were drafted to play profes- 
sionally. Eileen Feeney was drafted 
in the third round by the New Or- 
leans Pride and LeeAnn Wilcox was 
drafted in the ninth round by the 
Milwaukee Express. 

Royals miss the top 

The Kansas City Royals won the 
American League layoffs by dea- 
feating the New York Yankees. 
However, the Royals came up short 
in their first attempt of gaining the 
World Series crown. They were 
beaten by the Philadelphia Phillies, 
four games to two. George Brett 
was voted the American League 
Player of the year following the 
games. 

'Cats get NCAA bid 

Even though the K-State basket- 
ball team finished second in both the 
Big 8 league race and the post-sea- 
son tournament at Kemper Arena in 
Kansas City, the season was not 
over. The Wildcats were asked to 
play in the NCAA tounament with 
their impressive 21-8 record. 




ABC televises 'Cats 



Local taverns welcomed them on 
their marquees, sororities moved 
their homecoming brunches back 
and improvements were made at 
KSU Stadium as Glen Stone, K- 
State sports information director, 
worked long hours in preparing for 
what hasn't happened to K-State 
since 1968. 

The American Broadcasting 
Company (ABC) was the cause for 
all the commotion in Manhattan 
when K-State was chosen to be one 
of the regional televised college 
games of the week. K-State football 
was last televised 12 years ago, 
when they played host to the Uni- 
versity of Kansas. 

The game which was scheduled 



to start at 1:30, was moved back to 
11:35 a.m., to accomodate ABC's 
first game of a regional telecast in a 
doubleheader package. 

Before the television crew of 35 
arrived, the athletic department was 
busy making improvements at KSU 
Stadium, so it would accommodate 
a television broadcast. 

Yard lines were re-painted, a 
pick-up truck was modified for use 
as a sideline camera truck and an 
announcers booth had to be built on 
the photo deck in the pressbox. 

The Missouri Tigers got revenge 
on K-States homecoming, cashing in 
on the Wildcat's two second quarter 
fumbles for a 13-3 win before 
30,610 chilly fans. 



Nancy Zogleman 



sports news 235 









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Being an athletic-minded society, we've 
always been told to believe that "it 
doesn't matter whether you win or lose, 
it's how you play the game." 

Unfortunately, that doesn't console 
anyone when that heartbreaking moment 
occurs. And accepting that defeat is just as 
inevitable as living and dying. 

However, a team can come "back to 
life." Coaches pick up their teams and 
psychologically and physically prepare 
them for the next confrontation. The loss 
is soon forgotten, and often the wounds 
are healed with a healthy dose of victory. 

"Victory" is a vitamin that instantly 
boosts the morale of the team, and 
restores faith and confidence of the fans. 
The vitamin of victory cannot be taken 
before or after the game, because no team 
is immune to defeat. z>t> 



) 



236 photo study 




Bear hug - (opposite, top) 
Quarterback Darryl Dicky is 
swamped by fellow players after a 
touchdown during the annual K- 
State-KU clash. 

Whadda ya mean?! - (opposite, 
bottom) Coach Dickey argues with 
a referee over a questionable call. 

Finders keepers - K-State's 
Rolando Blackman and an 
Oklahoma Sooner member juggle 
for the basketball. 

Quite picking on me! - Ted 

Owens, KU Coach, looks 
disgusted after a foul called 
against a Jayhawker. K-State won 
in Ahearn, 54-43. 

Craig Changler 




Ten gallon hats?- Denise 
Esparza and Cathy Fuchs show 
their Wildcat spirit in a "big" way 
during a K-State football game. 

First come, first served ■ K- 

State tries to outleap Missouri for 
possession of the fumble. The K- 
State Homecoming game was 
televised on national television. 

Agony of De-feat- (Opposite) 
Brenda Bennet examines her 
blisters after beating a Fort Hays 
State player following an hour 
long match. 



238 photo study 





— ». 






Accepting defeat- Kim Price 
and Shelly Hughes express post 
tournament sorrows after losing to 
85-60 in the final round. 

Sweet victory A member of the 
"Front-Row Fanatics" rejoices 
after the opening night Wildcat 
victory in Ahearn. 



The many faces of K-State athletics. Not 
always happy, not always sad. 

Given any moment during a game, a 
variety of expressions can be seen; 
depending on whether it's a spectacular 
play by the purple pride, or a bad call 
against them. It's the thrill of being 
nationally ranked one week, and the agony 
of being defeated the next game by a 
celler dweller. 

Indeed it does become a matter of "how 
you play the game." A loss doesn't hurt as 
much when you play a powerhouse team 
down to the wire. Likewise, a victory 
won't be as sweet winning on a last 
minute shot to a team who should have 
lost by 20 points. 

The win /loss column doesn't always 
reflect the personality of the game. 
Dejected and elated fans shuffle out of the 
stadium, filing the game in the sports 
section of their memory bank, v 

Nancy Reese 



240 photo study 




■ 








242 housing 





Rob Clark 




Whether burning breakfast on the an- 
tique stove of a tiny one-room apart- 
ment or enduring hell week as a pledge in 
one of the greek fraternities, K-Staters 
live under many diverse conditions. 

These living arrangements vary from a 
deluxe trailer on the outskirts of town to 
identical dorm rooms on the corner of 
campus. 

While some K-State students enjoy the 
companionship of "brother and sisters/' 
other collegiates like the freedom of being 
independent. 

Even with diverse dwellings, K-Staters 
share the common bond of the heartland 
rhythm. * 



Home Sweet Home- 
Surrounded by posters and 
decorations Lisa Clare; freshman 
in pre-vetrinary medicine, studies 
her class notes. 

And their off- Residents from 
Boyd and Marlatt Halts push up 
the hill near Farrell Library during 
the Spring Fling activities in April. 



Craig Chandler 



housing 243 



Chariot races unit greeks 



The Chariot Relays live for another 
year. Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity 
decided to continue a past greek tradition 
for the first time in 1979 and the second 
in October, 1980. 

"The relays are an event that every 
greek house is invited to participate. They 
bring greeks together working for one 
goal, promote the greek system and 
promote competition," Dan Chase junior 
in fine arts and chairman of the 1980 
relays, said. 

According to Chase, one of the main 
goals of the Chariot Relays is to bring the 
greek system together. 

"One of the reasons we decided to 
have the relays again is because there 
isn't any competitive sport or activity that 
is 'greek only.' We thought it would be 
good for the greek system to have a 
competitive activity that is only for 
greeks," Chase said. 

The relays involve fraternity men, who 
pull the chariots and sorority women who 
are the riders. 

According to Chase, the fraternities and 
sororities are randomly paired, drawn out 
of a hat, to determine who will race 
together. 

"We do it this way so no politics are 
involved and no one will think the races 
are set up," Chase said. "The fraternities 
and sororities that are paired spend a lot 
of time practicing for the relays, and get 
to know each other better," he said. 

In addition to the races a queen is 
chosen for the relays. 

"Each sorority nominates a member to 
be their candidate. That girl then writes 
an essay on "What it Means to be 
Greek," Chase said. "The members of 
our house, (Lambda Chi Alpha) read the 
essays, with the names covered, and vote 
on the queen," he said. 

According to Chase, the queen is 
crowned the day of the relays, between 
the preliminary and semi-final races. 

"We sponsor a 'kegger' the night of the 
relays for members of the houses who 
participated," Chase said. 

Horse Power?- TKE members 
strain to close the gap during the 
renewed chariot races. 



The goal that the greeks are working 
toward is the scholarship which results 
from the proceeds. 

"Each fraternity pays an entry fee of 
$15 for two runners, and each sorority 
pays $10 for the first rider and $5 for 
each second (rider)," Chase said. "Since 
there are more fraternities than sororities, 
there are two riders from some sororities. 
This is determined on a first-come, first- 
serve basis," he said. 

According to Chase the scholarship 
money comes from the entry fees only. 
"The scholarship is awarded to one male 
and one female who are members in good 
standing with their greek house. They 
must be sophomores with a cumulative 
grade-point average of 3.5 or higher, have 
the recommendation of their house, and 
their house must have participated in the 
relays," Chase said. 

"The names are submitted to the KSU 
Endowment Association who selects the 
winners by guidelines we set (Lambda Chi 
Alpha)," Chase said. 

According to Chase, each scholarship is 



a minimum of $150. If the profits from 
the relays are higher, the scholarship is 
divided equally. If the relays don't raise 
the necessary $300, Lambda Chi Alpha 
makes up the difference. 

"The relays originally began in 1954. 
They were stopped in 1970 because of a 
decrease in enrollment, the Vietnam War. 
and they had become too competitive," 
Chase said. 

According to Chase, the relays were 
started again in 1979 when Larry Frank, 
who was then vice-president of Lambda 
Chi Alpha, now a K-State alumnus, 
developed an interest in the history of the 
races. 

"He wanted to see the races started 
again to promote the greek system and 
provide the scholarship," Chase said. 

The relays provide a way to promote 
the greek system, and held the greeks 
unite for a good cause," Chase said. & 



Jan Mead 



244 chariot relays 





Cort Anderson 

chariot relays 245 



Acacia 



POWERS. ROBERTA Housemother 

AHRENS. TOM Oakley 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BARNOW. KENT Topeka 

Speech Freshman 

BATES. JEFFERY Ellsworth 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BAYER. BRENT St Marys 

Management Junior 

BAYER. STEVE St. Marys 

General Business Administration Senior 



BEVER, DAVID Sedan 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BLATTNER. JEFF Rozel 

Physical Education Senior 

BLATTNER. RICKEY Rozel 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BUSTER. BRYCE Larned 

Agricultural General Freshman 

CRIST. LOREN Scott City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

CULLEY. JON Topeka 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 



CULLEY. PATRICK Topeka 

Management Senior 

DOLEZAL. DAN Ellsworth 

General Engineering Administration Sophomore 

EKISS. BRENT Kansas City, Mo 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

FLEMING. ROBERT Kanopolls 

Biology Senior 

FOX, KEVIN Emporia 

Pre Design Professions Sophomore 

FRAWLEY. CHRIS Newton 

Accounting Senior 



GIBBONS, TIM Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GUTSCHENRITTER, JOHN Larned 

General Freshman 

HAFFNER. CHRISTOPHER Eldorado 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

HORMEL. DENNY Olathe 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

JACKSON. KEVIN Wichita 

Accounting Senior 

JANZEN. JOEL Newton 

Architecture Senior 



JANZEN. SCOTT Newton 

Accounting Junior 

JOHNSON. BRAD Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KLINE. STEPHEN Wichita 

Marketing Senior 

KOBS, GREGORY Manhattan 

Bakery Science and Industry Senior 

LANGE. MICHAEL Ellsworth 

Chemical Science Senior 

LETOURNEAU. KEVIN Wichita 

Accounting Junior 

LONG, SCOTT Council Grove 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

MARVEL. KENNETH Wichita 

Marketing Junior 

MILLER. KELLY Ellinwood 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

PATTERSON, GREG Rozel 

General Freshman 

PERRY, CLIFFORD Ellsworth 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

PHILLIPS, LEE Bonner Springs 

Music Sophomore 



RHOADES, MARC Newton 

Pre Medicine Sophomore 

RICKS, JOE Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

RICKS. MATTHEW Topeka 

General Freshman 

RUTHERFORD. GREG Larned 

General Engineering Freshman 

SCHEFFLER, LEON Newton 

General Business Administration Senior 

SCHNEIDER. JEFF Shawnee 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

SNEATH STEVE Kanopolls 

Animal Science and Industry .... Senior 

STEWART. PAUL Springfield. III. 

Architecture i ' ,' 

SUMMERVILL MARC Wi-h°a 

Chemical Engineering Jun|0 

THOMPSON. JOE Courted 

Architecture c„„i». 

WARTA.STEVE .'. " ;" ■££ 

Agronomy Q-nirtr 

WOOTON MICHAEL £arned 

A 9'° n °">y Freshman 

YAGER, DALE Fredonla 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

YOWELL, GLENN Delphos 

Pre-Dentistry j unlor 




246 acacia 



Alpha Chi Omega 




BEARDMORE. TRACY Topcka 

Accounting Junior 

BERN1CA, SUE Topcka 

Elementary Education Junior 

BOCHARD. PAM Wichita 

Elementary Education Junior 

BOWEN. KAREN Lenexa 

Milling Science and Industry Sophomore 

BRINKMAN. BARBARA Emporia 

Interior Design Senior 

BROWN. TERESA Great Bend 

General Engineering Sophomore 

BURKE, LIZ Mission 

General Business Administration Junior 

BURNETT, CAROLYN Overland Park 

Interior Design Junior 

BUTLER. KELLY Salina 

General Freshman 

CHAPPELL. KELLY Morganville 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 



CLARK. CONNIE Preston 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

CONRAD. CLARISE Overland Park 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

CUPIT. JANON Wichita 

Accounting Senior 

DALTON. DIANE Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

DANNEBOHM. GAIL Ellinwood 

General Business Administration Freshman 

DAVIDSON, CATHY Belpre 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

DITZLER. CYNTHIA Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

EVANS, CARRIE Kansas City 

General Freshman 

FAIRBAIRN. JAN Garden City 

Interior Design Senior 

FIELDS, SUE Mission 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

FOLKERTS, REBECCA Great Bend 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

FRAZIER, JEA Lamed 

Office Administration Freshman 

GERBER. DONNA Overland Park 

Dance Sophomore 

GIES. JULIE Topeka 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

GLEESON. CAROL Prairie Village 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

GOLDEN. JANET Hoyt 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

HATTENDORF, BARBARA Scott City 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HEATH, BRENDA Olathe 

General Sophomore 

HEIKES. LISA Riley 

Home Economics Education Freshmen 

HENDERSON, SHERYL Pierre, S.D 

Civil Engineering Junior 

HIGHT. LISA Goddard 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HINNERS. KAREN Wichita 

Management Freshman 

HOWARD, KELLY Wichita 

Anthropology Junior 

HULEN, SARAH Shawnee Mission 

Fine Arts Junior 

JAMES, LINDA Overland Park 

Fashion Design Senior 



KANEMASU, DEBBIE Manhattan 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

KENNEDY, CAROL Sedan 

Construction Science Sophomore 

KING. ANDREA Olathe 

Pre-Professional Secondary Junior 

KISSINGER, JULIE Hiawatha 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

KLEIN. KIM Leawood 

Accounting Freshman 

KNACKSTEDT, LYNETTE Inman 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

KNEHANS. VIRGINIA Mission 

General Business Administration Freshman 

LAHUE. DIANE Mission 

Accounting Senior 

LAMPKIN, SHAWN Overland Park 

Interior Design Sophomore 

LAWRENCE, JULIE Lenexa 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 



jL 



alpha chi omega 247 



Alpha Chi Omega 



LOCKWOOD, SHAWN Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

LONG, JOANN Lacygne 

Speech Freshman 

LYNN, SHARON Prairie Village 

Accounting Senior 

MCCULLICK, JILL Minneapolis 

Elementary Education Junior 

MCDONALD. LISA Overland Park 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

MCLAIN, JULIE Overland Park 

Speech Pathology Junior 

MCMAHON. CATHERINE Overland Park 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

MCMILLAN, SHELLY Stafford 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

MCNAGHTEN, NANCY Overland Park 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

MEEHAN, MAUREEN Shawnee 

Elementary Education Junior 

MELSTER, ALLISON Hiawatha 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MEYER. BRENDA Topeka 

Interior Design Junior 

MILES. JANE Basehor 

Office Administration Freshman 

MILLER. DIANE Wellsville 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

MILLER. MELISSA Fredonia 

Computer Science Freshman 

MINOR, KELLY Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MORSE, MARY Joplin, Mo. 

Accounting Sophomore 

MOSBURG, DEBORAH Lake Qulvera 

General Business Administration Junior 

MOWRY. STEPHANIE Council Grove 

Agricultural Journalism Sophomore 

NELSON, LAURA Manhattan 

General Freshman 

NOBLE. TERRI Kansas City 

Elementary Education Senior 

NORDEN, MARGARET Prairie Village 

Humanities Sophomore 

OBANNON, VIRGINIA Kansas City 

Computer Science Freshman 

ONE1LL, SOPHIE Lawrence 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

OSE. CAROL Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

PEARCE. JANNETTE Hiawatha 

Accounting Junior 

PFE1FER. ANNETTE Victoria 

Elementary Education Senior 

PONTE, KELLENE Wichita 

Physical Therapy Junior 

REED. DIANA Leawood 

Interior Design Senior 

REESE. NANCY White Cloud 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

RICE, ALICIA Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

RILEY. JOLENE Iola 

Business Education Senior 

RIORDAN, RENEE Wichita 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

ROBERTS, MARY ANN Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

ROE, DEENA Leavenworth 

Marketing Freshman 

ROMBECK, JULIE Topeka 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

SCHLEGEL, PATRICIA Ness City 

Applied Music Junior 

SCHONEMAN, LAURIE Kansas City 

Horticulture Sophomore 

SCHWARZ. ELIZABETH Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SCOTT. LORI Belleville 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SEMRAD, CHERYL Shawnee 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SHEPHERD, LAURIE Carlisle 

General Freshman 

SHIRLEY, VICKI Norcatur 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

SINGLETON, DARLA Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

SKAGGS. SHARON Roeland Park 

Accounting Senior 




248 alpha chi omega 




SOMORA, SUSAN Independence 

Accounting Freshman 

STEINBRING, LINDA Jetmore 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

STENGER, DEANNE Topeka 

Dance Junior 

STETSON. NANCY Leawood 

Journalism and Hiu Communications Senior 

STRONG, KIM Prairie Village 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

STRONG. LINDA Medicine Lodge 

Interior Design Junior 

TINBERG, KAREN Linwood 

Accounting Freshman 

TRACY. TAMMY Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

VEDROS. PATTY Mission 

Interior Design Senior 

VENTSAM, LINDA Leotl 

Home Economics Junior 

VOEGELE. PATTY Leawood 

Elementary Education Junior 

WALTER. DAWN Chesterfield. Mo 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 




UMMMMMM, Good-Julie Gies, 
and Sharon Skaggs serve pie 
during an Alpha Chi fund raising 
event. 



Scott Williams 



alpha chi omega 249 



Alpha Delta Pi 



ALLAN. LESI Overland Park 

Pre Professional Elementary Education Freshman 

ARGIRIS, IRENE Lenexa 

Psychology Freshman 

BAETZ. CANDICE Salina 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 

BECK. REBECCA Overland Park 

Fashion Design Senior 

BEST, LEIGHANNE Independence, Mo 

General Freshman 

BISHOP, TERI Salina 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

BLOXOM, ANN Emporia 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Sophomore 

BOOKLESS, LISA Great Bend 

General Business Administration Freshman 

BROWN, DIANA Columbus. Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

CARLSON, DAWN Manhattan 

General Freshman 

COPE. STACY Liberal 

Humanities Senior 

COSGROVE, MARY Council Grove 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

DESPARD. MARY Wichita 

Management Senior 

OOBRATZ. CAROLYN Belolt 

Life Sciences Senior 

DOBRATZ, LINDA Beloit 

English Junior 

DUBOIS, MARIE Overland Park 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

ECKENBERG. MARY Lenexa 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

FLICKINGER. AMY Halstead 

Home Economics Freshman 

FREDERICK. SERENA Salina 

Sociology Senior 

FULTON. LORI Ellsworth 

Consumer Interest Senior 

FUTRELLE. DANA Overland Park 

Professional Education Sophomore 

GARBER. CYNTHIA Council Grove 

Fine Arts Junior 

GATZ, KAREN Pratt 

General Business Administration Senior 

GERICHTEN, DENISE Overland Park 

Marketing Sophomore 

GREENE. GERI Garden City 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

GROME. TRACY Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

HAGEN. KATHY Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

HARRIS. STACY Wichita 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

HECHT, SHEILA Seneca 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

HINES. SUSIE Easton 

General Business Administration Junior 

HOCH, BRENDA McPherson 

Sociology Freshman 

JAMESON, JENNY Benton 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

JOHNSON. SUSAN Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

JONES. GWYN Washington 

History Senior 

KRESIE, KAREN Topeka 

Pre-Pharmacy Junior 

LAVINGE, LINDA Wichita 

General Freshman 

LEONARD. KATHY Overland Park 

Marketing Junior 

LIPPOLD, PAM Leawood 

Elementary Education Junior 

LOOBY. LAURA Webster Groves, Mo 

Agriculture Junior 

LOVELL, PATRICIA Wichita 

Pre Professional Elementary Education Sophomore 

LUKENS. LAURA Hutchinson 

Modern Language Senior 

MARRS. DIANE Arkansas City 

General Sophomore 

MARTIN. JULIE Topeka 

Pre Medicine Freshman 

MCGONAZLE. SHERI Scott City 

Retail Flortlculture Sophomore 

MCDONALD. KELLI JO Topeka 

Elementary Education Junior 



250 alpha delta pi 





MEADE. JANE Abilene 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

METZGER. MONNA Council Grove 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MILLER. JULIE Topeka 

Finance Sophomore 

MILLER. LEAH Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

MUPRHY. KIMBERL1E Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 

NEMEC. BARBARA Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

NORR1S, MICHELLE Ellsworth 

General Sophomore 

MORRIS. TAMMY Ellsworth 

Home Economics Senior 

OEHME. SUSAN Manhattan 

Microbiology Sophomore 

PENNINGTON. LYNN Derby 

Fashion Design Freshman 




Cort Anderson 



~)ne More- Some members of 
\.D. Pi attempt to build a 
yramid in their living quarters. 



alpha delta pi 251 



Alpha Delta Pi 



PEREZ. LISA Humboldt 

Fine Art* Senior 

PETERS, LEIGH Lamed 

Marking J""' ' 

PETERSON. DEBRA Clifton 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

PETERSON. MACHELLE Potwln 

Early Childhood Education »e nUw 

PHILLIPS. LORI Overland Park 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

PHILLIPS. V1CKI Overland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 

PONTE. KENDRA Wichita 

Fine Arts f'"?™? 

RAMM KAREN Overland Park 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

REINKE. DEE ANN Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

ROSS. BONNIE Overland Park 

^ rt -. . . Freshman 

ROSS. GINA Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

SASENICK, CAROL Roeland Park 

General Sophomore 

SASENICK. MARY PAT Roeland Park 

General Business Administration Junior 

SEARS. ELIZABETH Colby 

Pre-Professlonal Education Senior 

SPENCER. STACEY Oakley 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

STEWART, ANNE Overland Park 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Sophomore 

SWAIM. JILL Dodge City 

Management Senior 

SWAN, MICHELLE Overland Park 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

SWEETIMAN, TAMMY Great Bend 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

TEETER, CAROLYN Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

THOMAS, THERESA Winfield 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

TREDWAY. LINDA Winfield 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

VIVONA, LAURA Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

WAIDE. COURTNEY Topeka 

Social Work Senior 

WALLER. VIRGINIA Mulvane 

Elementary Education Senior 

WALSH. JANICE Prairie Village 

Accounting Junior 

WERNER, PATTI Victoria 

Medical Technology Freshman 

WERNER, RHONDA Victoria 

Pre Professional Education Sophomore 

WILLIAMS. JAN Overland Park 

Social Work Senior 

W1NTERMAN. MARY JEAN Mission 

General Business Administration Senior 

WRIGHT. KAREN Tecumseh 

General Freshmafln 

YOUNGERS. SHER1 HutchinsoW 

Marketing FreshmS*" 




252 alpha delta pi 



Alpha Gamma Rho 




HAB1GER, MARGARETTE Housemother 

ALBRECHT, DOUG Lindsborg 

Food Science Junior 

AMREIN, JOHN Bonner Springs 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

ANDERSON. DAVE Jamestown 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

ANDERSON. DEAN Jamestown 

Agronomy Junior 

BAKER. CHRIS Leavenworth 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BARNES. SCOTT Dodge City 

Agronomy Senior 

BELL, STEVEN Peck 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BEYER, KEVIN Grldley 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BOKELMAN, SCOTT Washington 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

BOWMAN. MARK Norton 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

BRAND. JIM Valley Center 

Horticulture Sophomore 

BRANSON. KEITH Wellington 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BRYANT, JEFF Arkansas City 

Agricultural Education Junior 

CARLSON. JON Marquette 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

CARNAHAN. RICK Altamont 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

CHASE. KEVIN El Dorado 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

CLARK, RANDY Hauana 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

COEN. JOHN Ottawa 

Agricultural Education Senior 

DA VIES. JAY Reading 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

DEHOFF. ROBERT Tonganoxie 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

DRAKE, DAVID Winfield 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

DRAKE, SCOTT Winfield 

Animals Science and Industry Junior 

DUNLOP, CHARLES Parker 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

FANGMAN, TOM Topeka 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

FRANCIS, JON Attica 

Agricultural General Freshman 

GALLE, RUSSELL Moundridge 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

GOSS, WAYNE Garden City 

Agricultural Education Junior 

GUTSCH, PERRY Burdick 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

HANSON. DANE Jamestown 

Agricultural General Freshman 

HOPP, KENDALL Marquette 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

JOHNSON, STUART Caldwell 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

KERLEY, ED Peck 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

KUEHNY. BRENT Caldwell 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

LATOURELL. DANIEL Lyons 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

LINSCOTT, MICHAEL Effingham 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

MACKINTOSH. DAVE Whitman. Ne. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MAI, EVAN Linn 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MARTIN, GREGG Opolis 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

MCDAN1EL. MARK Genda 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

MCDONNELL, TIMOTHY Sterling. 111.. 

Horticulture Senior 

MEYER, JAY Palmer 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

MORGAN, JAMES Greeley 

Agricultural General Junior 

NELSON, TROY Long Island 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

OHLDE, TIM Linn 

Agricultural Education Freshman 



alpha gamma rho 253 



Alpha Gamma Rho 



PARK. STAN Protection 

Agricultural Education Junior 

PARMER, DAVID Tonganoxie 

General Business Junior 

PETERSON, MARVIN Delavan 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

PR1NGLE. TODD Yates Center 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

REINHARDT. MARK Erie 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

REINHARDT. RANDY Erie 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

ROCKERS. BRENT Greeley 

Agricultural General Junior 

ROCKERS, DENIS Greeley 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

ROOT. MARK Medicine Lodge 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

SCHEPMANN. WARREN Preaton 

Agronomy Senior 

SCHUMANN. BRYCE Lawrence 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

SCHUTZ, ROBERT Hebron, Neb 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

SEILER, FRED Colwich 

Agronomy Junior 

SIMON, MIKE Leon 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Junior 

SMITH. MICHAEL Long Island 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

SMITH. TIM Ottawa 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

STEPP. DAVE Fairbury, Neb. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

STR1CKLER. DOUGLAS lola 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

WARD. MARK Dodge City 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

WOODS, JEFF Ottawa 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

WULF, JAMES Newton 

Agricultural General Fre<;hm*n 



Rho-Mates 



TOP ROW: Debbie K. Steiner, Jane Ramsbot- 
torn, Anita M. Sobba, Janice 1. Morgan, Susan E. 
Brink, Julie M. Martin, Janet M. Coen. THIRD 
ROW: Gayla J. Gutsch, Denlse E. Sauerweln, 
Manann K. Poss, Lisa A. Heikes, Debbie A. 
Reinhardt, Carol M. Sobba. SECOND ROW: 
Francy George, Amy Prltchett, Colleen L. Thies- 
sen, Merry Lu Pasley, Brenda K. Stottmann, San- 
dra Perkins, Chris S. Relchenberger. BOTTOM 
ROW: Kathy A. Bearnes, E. Lane Chase, Janice 
A. Stottmann, Sharon A. Rhine, Emily D. 
Schmidt, Margarette E. Habiger. 




254 alpha gamma rho 



Alpha Kappa Lambda 




SALZMANN, DORCAS Housemother 

ARELLANO, JOHNNY Mt. Vernon, III 

Engineering Technology Junior 

BARRETT. KYLE Randall 

General Business Administration Freshman 

BOSARGE. RANDELL Topeka 

Music Education Senior 

BREHM, JOHN Mt Vernon, III, 

General Sophomore 

BRIGGS, BRIAN Topeka 

Computer Science Freshman 

BROOKE. KENT Topeka 

Marketing Senior 

BORSE. JEFF Valley Falls 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

CARDWELL. PETER Lenexa 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

CERVANTAS. MICHAEL Eldorado 

Education-English Junior 

COAD, RUSSELL Garden Plain 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

DAVIS, DONALD Walden N Y 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

DECKER. CURTIS Mt Vernon, 111 

Computer Science Freshman 

DEWITT, MARK Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

DONNELLY, JOHN Mt Vernon, III 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

EARNSHAW. JAMES Overland Park 

Construction Science Junior 

ERWIN, DAVID Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

FRAZEE. RONALD Arkansas City 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

GILLISPIE. BRADLEY Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

GILLISPIE. JEFF Manhattan 

Geology Junior 

HADLEY. STEVEN Mullinvllle 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HE1SE, DALE Scranton 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

HENSLEY. WESLEY Winfield 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

JACKS, HOLGER Fort Riley 

PreMedicine Freshman 

JOHNSON, KEN Evergreen. Colo 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

KELLY. KEN Severy 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KIEFER. LESTER Leoti 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

KING. WILLIAM Lewis 

Elementary Education Junior 

LICKTEIG. BLANE Wichita 

General Engineering Freshman 

LOUX. RICHARD Wichita 

Finance Senior 

MCKINNON, ROSS Ulysses 

General Engineering Freshman 

MCCALLIAN. RUSS Girard 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MCCAULEY. RICK Manhattan 

Pre-Law Freshman 

MOORE, TOBY Merrlam 

Bakery Science and Management Senior 

NEWTON. DOUGLAS Merriam 

Bakery Science and Management Freshman 

PADIN. STEVEN Sunnyville, Ca. 

Geography Junior 

PETROSKY, JOSEPH Highland Mills, N.Y. 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

PETTIT. DOUG Mt. Vernon, 111 

Geology Sophomore 

PHILLIPS, WILLIAM Valey Falls 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

ROOD, DAN Winfield 

General Engineering Junior 

RUYACK, BRIAN Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SABBERT. DOUG White Cloud 

General Senior 

SCHUMACHER, JOHN Kansas City, Mo. 

Music Education Sophomore 

SELLS, THOMAS Topeka 

General Engineering Freshman 

SHUCK. JERRY Omaha, Neb. 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 



alpha kappa lambda 255 



Alpha Kappa Lambda 

STEWART. MICHAEL Kansas City. Mo. 

Pre-Deslgn Professions Senior 

STORER. KARL Abilene 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

TENNAL. DARBY Sabetha 

General Engineering Freshman 

THOMAS. ANTHONY Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

TOWLE, JAMES Osage City 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

VON THAER. LEWIS Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

WALKER. SCOTT Udall 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

WALTER. BRIAN Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

WILSON, LARRY Topeka 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

WOODDELL. REX Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Junior 





256 alpha kappa lambda 



Alpha Tau Omega 




i^AilA^ll 



LAFLIN. WANDA Housemother 

ALTADT. MICHAEL Elllsvllle. Mo. 

Architecture Senior 

BAKER, STEWART Pleasanton 

Management Junior 

BARRON. CORY Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BA YOUTH, BRYAN Stockton 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

BELLERIVE. JAMES W.chita 

General Engineering Freshman 

BEUERLEIN, JOSEPH Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

BOLEN. JEFF McPherson 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

BOLEN, TIM McPherson 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

BOLLING. MARK Kansas City, Mo. 

Special Junior 

BROWN, ALLAN Salina 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

BROWN, MICHAEL Hoisington 

Finance Junior 

BUCK, PAUL Sedan 

Geography Freshman 

BURK. KYLE Shawnee 

Marketing Senior 

COONROD. GREGG Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

CRANEY, BEN Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

DANIELSEN. GEARY Overland Park 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

DUNFIELD, JAY Wichita 

General Sophomore 

DUNGAN. JOHN Emporia 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

EDMUNDS. FRITZ Overland Park 

General Freshman 

FIRNER. ANTONI Tribune 

Construction Science Junior 

FISCHER, GARY Kansas City 

Construction Science Sophomore 

FRYE, ROBERT Lee Summit, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

GATES. JEFFREY Derby 

General Business Administration Junior 

GENSKY. BILL Jefferson City, Mo. 

Construction Science Senior 

GILL, DOUGLAS Mission 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

GR1EBEL, JOHN Stockton 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

GROSDIDLER, PHIL Ft Wayne, Ind. 

General Business Administration Freshman 

GUTTU, BRUCE Kansas City 

General Freshman 

HASSELWANDER. JEFF Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HAYRE, MARK Kansas City 

General Freshman 

HERRELL, PHILLIP St. Louis. Mo. 

Construction Science Junior 

HILLS. BLISH Sedan 

Food Science and Management Senior 

HOFFMAN. MILT Wathena 

Construction Science Freshman 

HOLIDAY. ALLAN Overland Park 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HOLIDAY, JOHN Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

ISAACSON. GARY Belleville 

Marketing Senior 

JERMAIN, DON Wathena 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

JERMAIN, GARY Wathena 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

JERMAIN, JERRY Wathena 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

JOHNSON, JAMES Kansas City. Mo. 

Marketing Senior 

JONES, DAN Olathe 

Accounting Freshman 

KELLEY. GREGG Belleville 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

KRIZMAN. DAVID Overland Park 

Biology Senior 

KRIZMAN, GARTH Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 



alpha tau omega 257 



Alpha Tau Omega 



LINVILLE. STANLEY Holcomb 

Agricultural Economic* Senior 

LOBAUGH, RANDY Junction City 

Management Sophomore 

LONG, JAMES Harper 

Pre-Law Junior 

MAXWELL. WAYNE St. Joseph Mo 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

MCCULLOUGH. GREGORY McPherson 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MCKERNAN. MIKE Wathena 

Accounting Senior 

MCTAGUE. RICHARD Overland Park 

Construction Science Sophomore 

MEIER. KEITH Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MEIER. DON Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MERILLAT. DAN Topeka 

Construction Science Freshman 

MILLER. SCOTT Marienthal 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

MINES. MICHAEL McPherson 

Accounting Senior 

MOLDRUP. STEVEN Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MULCAHY. TIM P rairlc Village 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

NIXON. JOHN Medicine Lodge 

Marketing Senior 

NORRIS. JOHN Kan.a. City. Mo. 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

REHMERT. RORY Overland Park 

General Business Administration Senior 

REICHARDT. STEVE Overland Park 

General Business Administatlon Freshman 

ROBSON, DANNY Wichita 

Pre-Design Profession Sophomore 

SCHUKNECHT, TROY Topeka 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

SCHWEDER. TOM Fairway 

Restaurant Management Senior 

SHOEMAKER, JEFF Kansas City, Mo 

Construction Science Junior 

SILER. MARTIN Kansas City. Mo. 

Horticulture Senior 

SPEDDING, CHARLES Sallna 

General Business Administration Junior 

TRAYFORD, MARVIN Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WALLACE. KENT Topeka 

Applied Music Sophomore 

WALSH, ED Topeka 

Accounting Junior 

WICKLUND, THOMAS Fairway 

Pre-Law Freshman 

YOUNG, KENDALL Overland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 



Standing Guard-Members of 
Alpha Tau Omega guard over 
their crest in the ATO house. 



258 alpha tau omega 




Richie Bergi 



Alpha Xi Delta 




SLOAN, ALICE Housemother 

ANDERSON, AMY Wichita 

Applied Music Sophomore 

ANDERSON, JILL Manhattan 

Marketing Junior 

ANDERSON. KAREN Perry 

General Sophomore 

BALDWIN, CATHY Salina 

General Sophomore 



BARNES, MARCIA Sedan 

Health and Physical Recreation Junior 

BAUER. BRENDA Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BELKNAP. KAYE Wichita 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BENNET. TRACY Newton 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

BOHN. SHARON Alma 

Journalism and Mass Communication Senior 

BURCH. DEBRA Ottawa 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

CHRISTIE, JULIE Hays 

General Sophomore 

COOK. STACEY Kansas City 

General Business Administration Freshman 

COOPER. JILL Garnett 

General Business Administration Freshman 

CRAIG, TERI Great Bend 

Psychology Sophomore 

CRILLY, DIANA Wamedo 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

CUPIT, CHRISTIE Wichita 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

DAVIS, CATHLEEN Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

DEARDORFF. LORI Wichita 

Home Economics-Liberal Art* Senior 

DOCTOR. DIANE Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

DROUILLARD. RISA Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

DUNCAN. SONDRA Manhattan 

Genera] Freshman 

ENSMINGER, LILA Moran 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore 

FABRICIUS, KARLA Great Bend 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

FENTON, BETH Overland Park 

General Business Administration Junior 

FITZGERALD, TAMMY Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

FORNELLI. CYNTHIA Shawnee Mission 

General Sophomore 

FOUST, GAIL Bucklin 

Elementary Education Junior 

FOWLER. KAREN Shawnee 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

FREDRICKSON. NANCY Leawood 

Interior Design Junior 

FRUEHAUF, JODY Great Bend 

Pre-Deslgn Professions Sophomore 

GOERING, DAWN Moundrldge 

General Home Economics Freshman 

GOSS. KATHRYN SUE Overland Park 

General Engineering Sophomore 

GROFT. TERI Wakeeney 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

HERDE. ELIZABETH Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

HERDE. JANE Manhattan 

Genera] Freshman 

HOUSE, JANINE Derby 

Physical Therapy Junior 

HYATT. JEANENE Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

IRVINE. JUDY Manhattan 

Genera] Business Administration Sophomore 

JOHNSON. PATRICIA Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 



alpha xi delta 259 



Alpha Xi Delta 



JOHNSON. VICKI Great Bend 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

JURCZAK, CINDY Overland Park 

Psychology Freshman 

LEWIS. CYNTHIA Great Bend 

General Engineering Freshman 

LINCOLN, SHARON Overland Park 

Office Administration Junior 

LONG. KIM Mission 

Marketing Senior 

LONG, LAURA Overland Park 

Genera] Sophomore 

LOVELL. KARLA Franklin. Neb 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

MACKEY. SUSAN Olathe 

Agricultural General Freshman 

MAGGIO. AMY Stilwell 

PreProfessional Elementary Freshman 

MAI, LAURA Wakeeney 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

MARRS. KAY LYNN Arkansas City 

Home Economics Education Senior 

MARSH. TERR1 Manhattan 

Marketing Junior 

MCCAUSTLAND. MER1LEE Bucklin 

General Freshman 

MCGEHEE. GAYLE Wichita 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior 

MCKITTR1CK. SANDRA Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

MENDENHALL. KAREN Sedan 

General Freshman 

MILLER. JENIFER Wichita 

Psychology Freshman 

MILLER. MARGARET Manhattan 

Pre-Law Senior 

MOELLER, MICHELE Kansas City 

Finance Junior 

MYZER. CYNTHIA Topeka 

Social Work Senior 




It's not a VW but . . . 

members of the Alpha Xi Delta 
sorority stuff the window well 
outside their house. 



260 alpha xi delta 





NEWCOMER. JEAN Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

NEWTH. LORRAINE KAY Mission 

Health and Physical Recreation Senior 

NICHOLS. NANCY Leawood 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

NICKELL. SHANA Overland Park 

Consumer Affairs Senior 

OLIVER, BECKY San Dimas, Cal 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

OVERHOLZER. CYNDI Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

OVERHOLZER, SON1A Overland Park 

Pre-Law Freshman 

PARSA, SUZIE Leawood 

Elementary Education Junior 

PEASE, REBECCA Hutchinson 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

PIHL. BARBARA Falun 

Fine Arts Senior 



PIHL. DEBORAH ! Falun 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

POULSEN. JULIE Wichita 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

REALS, MARY Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

REESE. CINDY Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

REESE. LU ANN Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Junior 



ROBISON. JUDY St. George 

Pre-Professlonal Secondary Senior 

ROGERS. TERESA Overland Park 

Physical Therapy Junl °' 

ROOSA. LYNN Leawood 

Pre-Dentlstry Senior 

ROSE. LESLIE Manhattan 

Agricultural General Freshman 

SCHARNHORST, V1CKI Olathe 

Civil Engineering Junior 



SCHEUFLER. SHELLY Elllnwood 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

SCHLAGER, LORI Garden City 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

SCHMIDT. KAREN Augusta 

General Home Economics Freshman 

SHOEMAKE, KAREN Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SHORTALL, LISA Topeka 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

SIU. DEBBIE Jefferson City, Mo 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Freshman 

SJOGREN. KARLA Llndsborg 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

SORENSON, JANE Manhattan 

Mathematics Sophomore 

SPENCER, NINA Scott City 

Family and Child Development Junior 

STEHLEY, JILL Manhattan 

Music Education Junior 

STUPAS. PAM Overland Park 

Interior Design Sophomore 

TAYLOR. DENA Wichita 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 

THOMAS, TRACEY Wichita 

Pre-Nurslng Sophomore 

THOMPSON, MARY A Coffeyvllle 

Home Economics Education Junior 

TUROV. JAN Overland Park 

Health and Physical Education Senior 



VANDERWEIDE. LINDA Garden City 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

VANIER, SHARON Sallna 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

WARREN, TAMMY Galva 

Pre-Professlonal Secondary Sophomore 

WILLIAMS. ANNE Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

WILSON. SALLY Leawood 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior 



WOOLWINE. KATHY Pratt 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 



alpha xi delta 261 



Beta Sigma Psi 



BAKER. JIM Wamego 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore 

BECKER. DWIGHT Melvern 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

BECKER. GLENN Garden City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

BEICHLEY. DOUG Sallna 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BEVENS. DAVID Topeka 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 



BLACKWOOD, DAVID Belleville 

General Freshman 

BOERGER. ALAN Topeka 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

BRUENGER. MELV1N Garden City 

Health. Physical Education Junior 

BRUNKOW, BRADLEY Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BURTNESS. NORMAN Manhattan 

General Business Sophomore 



CARLSON. DAVID Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

DANNENBERG. MARK Gaylord 

General Freshman 

DANNENBERG. MAURY Gaylord 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

DORTON. KEVIN Admire 

Food Science and Industry Junior 

ELM. KEVIN Clay Center 

Chemical Engineering Senior 



FREDRICKSON. KURT Oberlln 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

FROELICH, ROGER Emporia 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

HARMS. JEFF Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

HOLLOWAY. DAVID Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HUSSELMAN. RICHARD Sallna 

Correctional Administration Junior 



JOHNSON. EDWARD Leawood 

General Business Adminlstation Freshman 

JOHNSON. ERIC Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

KARMEIER. KENT Kansas City, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

KLEIN, CLAYTON St. Louis, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

KLEMA, MIKE Russell 

Management Freshman 



LANG. SCOTT Wichita 

General Freshman 

LEHMANN, DENTON Gaylord 

Agronomy Sophomore 

LENKNER, ROBERT Medicine Lodge 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

LIGGETT. LARRY Lincoln 

Poultry Science Senior 

LIRA. CARL Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Senior 



MANN. VONN Hutchinson 

Construction Science Senior 

MAY, ROLAND Oberlln 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MELGREN. DANIEL Osage City 

Accounting Senior 

MERRILL, DAVE Sallna 

General Freshman 

MINES. JOSEPH Oberlln 

Accounting Sophomore 



MOOTS. ERIC Eureka 

Horticulture Sophomore 

NEIMEYER. ELLERD Arnold. Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Senior 

RANDOL, BRETT Lincoln 

Crop Protection Junior 

RIGG. ART Shawnee 

General Business Freshman 

SCHMIDT, ALAN Mt. Hope 

Agronomy Senior 



SHARP. JAMES Kansas City 

General Freshman 

SHOOK. ARTHUR Hutchinson 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

SMITH, BRIAN .' Topeka 

Pre Medicine Freshman 

SPRICK. MARK Junction City 

General Freshman 

STEGMAIER. JAMES Agra 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 



262 beta sigma psi 




TOBABEN. WARREN Shawnee Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

WILMS. RONALD Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

ZABEL, JOHN Athol 

Agricultural General Freshman 




Here's to 'ya I- 

Members of the Beta 
Sigma Psi fraternity 
enjoy the convinence of 
a bar located in their 
house. 



Hurriyet Aydogan 



beta sigma psi 263 



Beta Theta Pi 



ATKINSON. GENE Manhattan 

Civil Engineering ■ • »«"'<" 

ADAMS. DOUG CofieyvOle 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

ANDERSON. BRUCE Sallna 

Construction Science Senior 

ATTWATER. PAUL Wichita 

General Sophomore 

AYRES. MARK Wichita 

Accounting Jun,or 

BAUMEN. KEVIN ^ Abilene 

,- , ... Freshman 

General „ . ■ 

BELL, SPENCER G ' eat ® md 

General Business Administration freshman 

BISAGNO. DAVE Senior 

Accounting :: , 

CARLSON, STEPHEN Manhattan 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

COLLINS. CRAIG • ■ ,ow 

Architecture Sen, °' 

COOK. CRAIG Wichita 

Interior Design .r^."' ' 

COPHER. BILL Prairie Village 

Accounting • ■ „ Sen '°' 

COTNER. STEPHEN Coffeyvllle 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

DEARDORFF. BRET Wichita 

Computer Science Senior 

DEVAULT. JERRY Hutchinson 

General Freshman 

EDMONDS. JAMES Topeka 

Education and Speech Senior 

EXL1NE. DAVID Sallna 

Pre-Deslgn Professions Senior 

FREY, GARY Newton 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 

FUNK. BRYAN Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

GAR1NGER, NED Buhler 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

GEIGER. JOHN Denver, Colo, 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

GUNN. DOUG Sallna 

Marketing S , e S l0 ,' 

HEATH. BRETT Overland Park 

Geology , J " nl ° r 

HOFBAUER. JIM Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

JONES, WARREN Lees Summit, Mo, 

General Freshman 

KEHR, BILL Wicnita 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

K1MMEL. TEDD Hutchinson 

Agricultural Economics »e nloi 

KRAFT, ALAN • Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

LAFFERTY, STEVE St, Charles, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LINDIG, RONALD Shawnee Mission 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

MARTIN, JOHN Leawood 

Finance Junlor 

MARTIN. MAX Wichita 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

MAYOTT, STEWART Glens Falls, NY 

Pre Professional Secondary Education Junior 

MERCER, RICHARD Wichita 

Construction Science Junior 

MOHLER. STEPHEN Arkansas City 

General Business Administration Senior 

MROSS. ROBERT Wichita 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

MULLEN. MIKE Wichita 

Finance Senior 

MURRAY, MATTHEW Olathe 

General Freshman 

NOLDER, RONALD Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 

OCONNOR. PAT Sallna 

PreDentlstry Junior 

REICH. BRIAN Paradise 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

REYHER. MIKE Lenexa 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

SALSBURY, DANIEL Ottawa 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SCHREINER, NOEL Wakeeney 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

SEE, TIM Fort Dodge. Iowa 

Agricultural Economics . Junior 




264 beta theta pi 



SPIER. STEPHEN Columbia, Mo. 

Architecture Senior 

STAFFORD. TOM Leawood 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

STITES. TIM Manhattan 

Fine Art* Senior 

TADTMAN, JON Manhattan 

Pre Dentistry Freshman 

TURNER. MIKE Burrton 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

WAGNER. KEITH Hoisington 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

WEDEL. MONTE Hutchinson 

Accounting Junior 

WEEKS. MARK Hoisington 

General Business Administration Freshman 

WEST. JEFF Salina 

General Business Administration Freshman 

WICKERSHAM. JAMES Newton 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

WILBUR. JEFF Haya 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

WILBUR. KURT Hays 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

WILBUR, MICHAEL Lawrence 

General Freshman 

WILSON. DUNCAN Kansas City 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

ZUERCHER. GREG Wichita 

Journalism and Mas* Communication* Senior 




You want what? — Members 
of Beta Theta Pi form the Beta 
Rock Vigilante group in order to 
protect their territory. 



John Greer 



beta theta pi 265 



Chi Omega 



BURKE. SHIRLEY Housemother 

ADAMS, JANE Overland Park 

Dletltice and Institutional Management Senior 

BARDSLEY, MEGAN Topeka 

General Junior 

BATT, LEE Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

BAUMGARTNER, JAMIE Mulvane 

General Business Administration Freshman 



BROCKWAY. ALYS Olathe 

Horticulture Senior 

CAIN. SUSAN Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

CAMPBELL, CYNTHIA Topeka' 

General Sophomore 

CARLISLE, SUE Paola 

General Engineering Freshman 

CLEVELAND, DEBRA Minneapolis 

General Freshman 



CLEVELAND, JODY Minneapolis 

Accounting Junior 

DAWSON. SUE Abilene 

Pre-Prolessional Elementary Junior 

DEBO, KATRINA Independence 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

DREES, LIZ Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

DREES, SUE Overland Park 

Finance Sophomore 



ECKES. TRACY Salina 

Clothing Textiles Sophomore 

ELSTON. KIM Mulvane 

Accounting Sophomore 

ERSKIN. JERILYN Shields 

Accounting Junior 

FARRIS, CYNTHIA Wichita 

Pre-Law Freshman 

FRANZEN, SUSAN Shawnee Mission 

Fine Arts Sophomore 



GARFOOT. JUDY Omaha. Neb. 

Marketing Senior 

GATZOULIS, DENISE Prairie Village 

General Business Administration Junior 

GORDON. KAREN Overland Park 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

GOTTSCH. JANE Prairie Village 

General Sophomore 

GRIFFITH. LISA Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communication* Senior 



HAMMERGREN. CONNIE Wichita 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

HATCHER. SUSAN Leawood 

Finance Freshman 

HAUSE. LESLEY Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

HAYDON, LAUREL Wichita 

Management Freshman 

HENNIGH, LEAH Colby 

Physical Therapy Junior 

HIPPS. LISA Wichita 

Fine Arts Senior 

HOUTS. KATHY Council Grove 

Computer Science Freshman 

HOVEY, KAREN Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Junior 

HUMMER. KAREN Wichita 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

JAMISON, GINA Perry 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

JONES. COLLEEN Topeka 

Accounting Junior 

KEITH, TACY Prairie Village 

Restaurant Management Freshman 

KERR. KELLI Lawrence 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

KIR1AKOS. LYNNE Leawood 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

KIRKENDALL, KALEEN Norton 

General Sophomore 

KOOL, BEVERLY Manhattan 

Accounting Junior 

KUKUK, JOAN Lawrence 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

MATTHEW. MARY Olathe 

Elementary Education Senior 

MCCUE. MELISA Hutchinson 

Music Freshman 

MCPHERRON, LISSIE Prairie Village 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Freshman 




266 chi omega 




MEALY, JEANINE Scott City 

General Home Economics Freshman 

MCK1NZIE. CAROL Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MERSHON, DIANE Manhattan 

Consumer Interest Junior 

MILLER, SUSAN Shawnee 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

MOHLSTROM, DEANA Lawrence 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

MORGAN, LISA Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 

MORGAN, PATRICIA Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

MURPHY, DIANE Omaha, Neb 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

MUSICK, SUSIE Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

NELSON. TRACEY Emporia 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 



NEWELL, MARLA Stafford 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

PARTRIDGE, BECKY Wichita 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

PATTERSON, MEGAN Prairie Village 

Marketing Junior 

PENNYBACKER. GAIL Overland Park, Kan. 

Journalism and Mas* Communication* Senior 

PETRY, BRENDA Centralla 

Pre-Pharmacy Junior 

PRITCHETT. AMY Shawnee 

Clothing and Textile* Senior 

PYLE, MEG Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

REINECKER. JANN Overland Park 

Interior Design Freshman 

REYNOLDS, SANDRA Salina 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

RIEHL, PEGGY Overland Park 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 



RILEY, MEGAN Hiawatha 

Political Science Freshman 

ROUDEBUSH. JEANETTE Overland Park 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

RUCH. RENEE Prairie Village 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

SANTERO. LYNDEE Overland Park 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

SCHMITT. SHERRY Scott City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 



SCHNACKE, JUDITH Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

SIMCOX. DENISE Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

SLOAN, KATHY Leawood 

General Sophomore 

STUTTERHIEM, NANCY Salina 

Pre Law Freshman 

TAYLOR. ANNETTE Abilene 

Elementary Education Junior 



THOMAS, SUSAN Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

VAN BRIMMER, BRENDA Grent Bend 

Finance Sophomore 

WALLER. DANA Overland Park 

General Business Administration Senior 

WHITNEY, SUE Overland Park 

General Engineering Freshman 

WILSON, RENEE Arkansas City 

Interior Design Freshman 



WOODBURY. JALUE Leotl 

Pre-Professional Secondary Junior 

WRIGHT. KAREN Overland Park 

Health and Physical Education Senior 



chi omega 267 



Delta Delta Delta 



ALLEN. JANE v a |le y Center 

Home Economics and Journalism Junior 

ANDERSON, JEAN Topeka 

Engineering Technology Junior 

ANTENEN. KIM Ness Ci, y 

y^ r l Sophomore 

BARR. MARGARET Lawrence 

Clothing and Textiles Jun,or 

BARSAMIAN. SUE Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Senior 



BAUER. JUDI Derb V 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BEVIER JANA Bonner Springs 

Accounting Sophomore 

BIGGS, BEVERLY Edson 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BINKLEY, MICHELLE Topeka 

Psychology Freshman 

BOUDREAU, MARY Prairie Village 

Pre Nursing Sophomore 



BRASS. SARAH Topeka 

Marketing Sophomore 

BROADIE, LISA Hays 

Elementary Education Junior 

BULLOCK, ANNE Norton 

Political Science Sophomore 

BURNS. KELLIE Shawnee 

Accounting Freshman 

BURNS. STACY Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 



BUSENBARK. JANET Lamed 

Family and Child Development Senior 

CALIBAN1, LISA Wichita 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

CARPENTER. ANNE Overland Park 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

COE. CAREN Mcpherson 

Social Science Junior 

DAVIS. DIANE Manhattan 

Accounting Freshman 



DAVIS. PAMELA Salisbury, Mo. 

Health and Physical Recreation Senior 

DEVINE. MARTHA Shawnee Mission 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 

DOVE. MARY Great Bend 

General Business Administration Junior 

EXLINE. KYLE Great Bend 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

FIONDA, KRIS Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Senior 



FIRESTONE. RUTH Baldwin City 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 

FITCH. DIANE Overland Park 

General Business Administration Senior 

FITZPATRICK. SALLY St. Joseph, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

FRESCHETT, PATT1E Overland Park 

Marketing Sophomore 

FRISBIE. KAYE Lyons 

Health and Physical Education Senior 



FUNK. SUSAN Oakley 

Pre Medicine Sophomore 

FUNK. TERRI Oakley 

Education-Physical Science Senior 

GAREY. GAIL Stafford 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

GISH, LINDA Merriam 

Elementary Education Junior 

GORTON, ELAINE Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 



HAGGARD. KATHY Overland Park 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HAJIN1AN. KARIN Overland Park 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

HANSON. SHARI Shawnee 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

HARTENSTE1N. KRISTEN Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HAYMAN, CHERI Leawood 

PreNursing Freshman 



HEATH. KYLE Overland Park 

Sociology Freshman 

HEIDEBRECHT, LAURA Mcpherson 

Pre-Educatlon Sophomore 

HEMMERT. MARI Oakley 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

HENLEY, KELLY Topeka 

General Freshman 

HIGGASON, KELLY Norton 

PreNursing Junior 




268 delta delta delta 






■■■■..:■■■ 




HOWARD. PAIGE Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

HUGG1NS. SUSAN Beloit 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

HUNT. EMILY Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

JENKINS. SUSAN Ottawa 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

JENKINS. THERESA Topeka 

General Business Administration Junior 

JOHNSON, CINDY Medford, Okla 

General Sophomore 

JONES. SHARI Pratt 

General Business Administration Junior 

KELLEY. RITA Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

KELLY. KAYTE Overland Park 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

KELLY. MELISSA Bucyrus 

General Sophomore 

KEPPLE, ANNETTE Manhattan 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

KNADLE. KATHLEEN Bucyrus 

Elementary Education Junior 

KRAMER. NANCY '.'.' Kansas City 

Life Science Sophomore 

LASHBROOK. VICKI Kansas City 

Dan « Junior 

LEE. DEBBIE Topeka 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 




Can I take a message?- Melissa 
Kelly, sophomore in journalism 
and mass communication, takes 
care of phone duty at Delta Delta 
Delta sorority. 



delta delta delta 269 



Delta Delta Delta 



LYONS, AMIE Leawood 

PreProfessional Elementary Freshman 

MANNING. MELISSA Wichita 

General Sophomore 

MCKEE. ANNELL Manhattan 

General Engineering Freshman 

MCKIM. ALLISON Overland Park 

PreProIessional Secondary Sophomore 

MCM1LLEN. JULIE Sallna 



MILLER, BARBARA Manhattan 

Health and Physical Recreation Freshman 

MILLER. REBECCA Manhattan 

Health and Physical Recreation Freshman 

MOEHRING, SUSY Wichita 

PreLaw Sophomore 

MURPHY. KIM Manhattan 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MUSOLINO. CAMILLE Dallas, Texas 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 



OLANDER, MARIAN Llnwood 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

POTTER. JULIE Baldwin 

Accounting Junior 

REEP. LORI BETH Larned 

Interior Design Freshman 

REINHARDT. RENEE Great Bend 

Pre-Dealgn Profeaalona Senior 

ROSS. LIZ R- R'ley 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 



ROWLEY. KATHRYN Kansas City 

Pre-Mediclne Sophomore 

RUIZ. JULIE Prairie Village 

General Sophomore 

RUTTER, JAN Overland Park 

Marketing Sophomore 

SCHEUERMAN. LORI Great Bend 

General Home Economic* Senior 

SCHMER. NANCY Overland Park 

General Engineering Freshman 



SCHMITT. SALLY Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

SHEETS, ANITA Topeka 

Genera! Business Administration Freshman 

SHIVELY, JULIE Lebanon 

General Freshman 

SMITH. SHERI Overland Park 

General Home Economics Junior 

STIGALL. SUSAN Topeka 

Reataurant Management Senior 



STOUT. SALLY Hutchinson 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

STUMP. DIANE Kanaaa City 

Elementary Education Senior 

TENNAL. AMY Sabetha 

Mualc Education Senior 

TILLMAN. DEANDRA Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

TOLMAN, LORI Overland Park 

Genera] Freshman 



VANOVER, SHELLY Topeka 

General Freshman 

WATSON, DEANNE Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

WEAVER. CHERYL Leawood 

General Bualneaa Admlnlatratlon Senior 

WELLIEVER. ROBIN Phoenix, Ariz 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

WESTFALL, CAROL Kansas City 

General Sophomore 



WIGGINS, TON1 Minneapolis 

Elementary Education Junior 

WILLIS. JULIE Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

WOODS. MELODY Overland Park 

Marketing Freshman 

WYLIE. ANN Shawnee 

Engllah Senior 

WYLIE. LYNN Shawnee 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

YOUNGDOFF. JULIE Overland Park 

ziMMlR^NNm:::::::::;:::;;;;;;;;;;;;:::;; 50 ^:-: 

General Bw*.k— 

rreshman 



270 delta delta delta 




Delta Sigma Phi 




ACKER. DAVID Allcnurood. Penn. 

Pre-Design Profession* Senior 

ALISON, DALE Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Graduate Student 

ALLRED. GARY Coffeyviile 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

ANDRADE, JOSEPH Prairie Village 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

AVILA, JOSEPH Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BARKER, STEVE Coffeyviile 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BARTZ, RODNEY Manhattan 

Finance Junior 

BEEBE, RICK Iola 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BIEN. DARREN Ottawa 

Computer Science Sophomore 

BISHOP. CRAIG Salina 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

CADE, LLOYD Abbyville 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

CHAPMAN. JEFFERY Kansas City. Mo. 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

ERICKSON, ROBERT Salina 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

FERRARI, MIKE Wichita 

Biology . Freshman 

FOUNTAIN, TONY Kahoka, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FREDERKING, DOUG Salina 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

FULLER. BRIAN McPherson 

Pre-Veterlnary Science Senior 

GOGOLSKI, TIMOTHY Carbondale 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

GRAVENSTEIN, MARTIN Ottawa 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

HAMILL, BRAD Abilene 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

HARRELL, ROBERT Mission 

General Sophomore 

HENNEKES. JERRY St. Louis, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HOLDCRAFT, JAMES Housesprings, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HWANG. FRANK Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

JORGENSEN. STUART Manhattan 

Economics Sophomore 

KNAPP. TIMOTHY Prairie Village 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

LEMOS, KELLY Coffeyviile 

Marketing Junior 

LORIE. GREG Norman. 111. 

Architecture Senior 

MEJIA. MICHAEL Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

MEYER. MARK Chapman 

Pre-Medlclne Freshman 

MORRIS. JAMIE Arkansas City 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

NEMETH. LOUIS Northampton. Penn. 

Pre-Design Professions Senior 

OLSEN. FRED Kinsley 

Agriculture Economics Senior 

PEPOON. BILL P»ola 

Construction Science Senior 

PHELPS, RANDY Wellington 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

QUASEBARTH. SCOTT Wichita 

Accounting Senior 

REILLEY. KENT Colby 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

RUTTINGER. CLARK Mission 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

SAMUELSON. ERIC Newton 

Finance Senior 

SCHONEWE1S, MARK Manhattan 

Construction Science Junior 

SCOTT, VERNON Coffeyviile 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

SHUEY, ROBERT Independence 

Computer Science Freshman 

TAYR1EN. DOUG Leavenworth 

Management Junior 

WATSON. RANDY Manhattan 

History Senior 

WATTS, MARTIN Prairie Village 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 



J 



delta sigma phi 271 



WEBER, WILLIAM St. Louis, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

WEIMER. MICHAEL Salisbury. Mo. 

Construction Science Senior 




Scott Liebl' 

Band Bang- Brad Johnson, left, 
junior in microbiology, and Doug 
Tayrien, junior in business 
management, nail up some 
paneling in their room at the 
Delta Sigma Phi house 



delta sigma phi 272 



Delta Tau Delta 




AtMA 




^t. 




<C5ii 




#% 


J^ 


\i": 


/ 





MiAtik 




CHAPPELL, MARY BELL Housemother 

AXLAND. DAVID Overland Park 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

BECKMAN. BRENT Oakley 

General Business Administration Graduate Student 

BINGHAM, BRUCE Manhattan 

Health and Physical Recreation Junior 

BINGHAM. KURT Rossvllle 

General Business Administration Freshman 

BOOMER. RUSSELL Portls 

Accounting Senior 

BRASS. DAVE Wilmore 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BRASS. SAM Wilmore 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BREWSTER. PETE Sallna 

Management Senior 

COOPER. SCOTT Garnett 

Political Science Senior 

COWAN. MARK Rossvllle 

General Business Administration Senior 

CRONENWETT, FRED Overland Park 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

DAWSON, GEFF Abilene 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

DEARDORFF, MIKE Wichita 

General Freshman 

DENSON. CRAIG Solomon 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

«LE. KEN Belolt 

Speech Senior 

GARIBAY. MARIO Manhattan 

Marketing Sen|or 

GOWDY. JAMES Overland Park 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HARDING, ROB Cheney 

Marketing Junior 

HESSE. SCOTT Rossvllle 

Political Science Senior 

HORNER, DANA Overland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 

JAAX, BRYAN Garden Plain 

General Freshman 

JAAX. EDWARD Garden Plain 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

JAHRAUS, JOW ..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' .'.'." Kinmundy 

Agr.culture Freshman 

JOHNSON, BRADLEY Wakeeney 

Geology Junior 

JOHNSON, BRENT Olathe 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

JURCZAK, MIKE Overland Park 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

KELLY, CHRIS Leawood 

General Freshman 

KLUGH, DAVE Prairie Village 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

KNORR, JAY Overland Park 

General Freshman 

KRENGER, MARK Abilene 

Construction Science Junior 

KRENGER, MICHAEL Abilene 

Geology Junior 

LAIR, JEFFERY Overland Park 

Marketing Senior 

LITTLE, JEFF Prairie Village 

General Business Administration Freshman 

MACY, JAY Minneapolis 

General Business Administration Junior 

MCGEHEE, GREG Hesston 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

MERRIFIELD. JOHN Leawood 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

MYERS, ANDREW Tribune 

Agriculture Freshman 

NEAL, WILLIAM Garnett 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

OTEY, JIM Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

OWINGS, CHRIS Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

PARTINGTON, KEN Andale 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

RIORDAN. MIKE Solomon 

General Business Administration Senior 

ROBERTSON, MARK Tribune 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

ROBERTSON, STANLEY Coldwater 

Marketing Sophomore 



delta tau delta 273 



Delta Tau Delta 



Delta Darlings 



TOP ROW: Lyndee S. Santero, Diane Marrs, 
Janie Gleissner, Jodi Howard, Judy Young 
THIRD ROW: Sue A. Dawson, Kerri J. Hadley, 
Ceil Pientka. Patty Carlson, Debra Cloud. SEC- 
OND ROW: Kim Long. Jill Anderson, Nancy 
Miller, Kathleen Holland, Cindy Jurczak. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Diane Cloud, Emtly Starr, Sheree 
3uinlan, Mindy Neuenswander. Yvette Schrock. 



ROE, DAVE Wakeeney 

General Sophomore 

SAILORS, TOM Erie 

Finance Senior 

SANDERS. KENTON Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Mediclne Senior 

SCHERICH, KEVIN Wilmore 

General Freshman 

SCHROEDER, JED Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SOLDNER. WOODY Farina, III. 

Genera] Business Administration Junior 

STARR, BLAIR Hutchinson 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine ■_ Freshman 

STARR. PATRICK Arkansas City 

Accounting Senior 

TOUSLEE, DARRELL Colby 

Finance Junior 

RUCKER. SCOTT Leawood 

General Business Administration Freshman 

WALKER, KENT Arlington Hts, 111 

General Business Administration Junior 

WILLIAMS, STEVE Manhattan 

Construction Science Freshman 

WINGATE, JEFF Topeka 

General Sophomore 

WOODWARD, PHIL Overland Park 

Agriculture Journalism Junior 




' ! P 71 11 
! 'IINft\T7( >/\l 



Calendar girls for sale - 

Prospective buyers look over 
calendars sold through Delta Tau 
Delta fraternity. Each month 
depicts a girl from a sorority. 




■ 



Rob Clark 



274 delta tau delta 



Delta Gpsilon 








.4 k (1 ; a 




AHSMUHS, BRENT Wichita 

Construction Science Junior 

ANDERSON, DON Anthony 

Pre-Law Junior 

ARNOLD. DAVID Ashland 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BAHR. STEPHEN Andale 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BOLAR, MIKE Wichita 

Construction Science Sophomore 

BREEDEN, JOHN Leawood 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BUGNER. DEAN Garden Plains 

Accounting Senior 

BOLERJACK. CRAIG Shawnee 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BURNETT. GREG Scott City 

Accounting Freshman 

BUSCH. MELV1N Clnmarron 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

BUTEL. JOHN Overbrook 

General Engineering Junior 

CHEW. DON Atchison 

Accounting Senior 

COONROD. SCOTT Overland Park 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

CORNELL. DON Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

DEGENHARDT. MARC Topeka 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

DESHAZER. GARY Hutchinson 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

DILLON. KELLY Ozawkie 

Construction Science Sophomore 

GARRET. REED Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

GIRALDO. JUAN Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

GOSS, MICHAEL Great Bend 

Economics Junior 

GROSIDIDIER. GARY Eudora 

General Business Administration Senior 

GROSDIDIER GLEN Eudora 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

GROSSENBACHER. TIM Bern 

Bakery Science and Management Senior 

HALLMAN. BRIAN Hutchinson 

Engineering Technology Senior 

HATHAWAY. JAY Wichita 

Civil Engineering Senior 

HAWKINS. DAVID Wichita 

Accounting Senior 

HAYS. STUART Oakley 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HEWITT, RANDALL Topeka 

Construction Science Freshman 

HORSHC, RONALD Wichita 

Management Freshman 

HOSKINS. RONALD Great Bend 

Finance Senior 

JACKSON. TONY Great Bend 

Accounting Freshman 

JACOBSON. JON Overland Park 

Engineering Technology Junior 

JORDAN, TROY Salina 

General Business Administration Freshman 

KAPPLER, JOHN Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

KUEHNLE, BRUCE Prairie Village 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Senior 

KUTINA, LARRY Great Bend 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

LAWRENCE. PAUL Norton 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

MCKELVEY, JOHN Olathe 

General Freshman 

MEYERS. BROOKE Merriam 

Accounting Senior 

MEYERS. TODD Merriam 

General Sophomore 

MORROW. RIC Salina 

General Sophomore 

NEELLY, STEPHEN Overland Park 

General Freshman 

NEMEC, TONY Topeka 

Accounting Junior 

OBERLE, PAUL Clafin 

Construction Science Junior 

PEARSON, ROBERT Clyde 

Agriculural Economics Freshman 



delta upsilon 275 



Delta CIpsilon 



REiNHARDT, BRADLEY Great Bend 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

RICKEN. GERRY Garden Plain 

Accounting Senior 

RIELING. RAYMOND Kansas City. Mo. 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

ROBINSON. MIKE Hutchinson 

Finance Senior 

SCHULER, WILFRED Atchison 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SEILER. GERARD Mt. Hope 

General Sophomore 

SEILER. TIM Wichita 

Finance Senior 

SHARPE, DOUGLAS Olathe 

PreDesign Professions Sophomore 

SHELTON. GREGORY Wichita 

General Freshman 

SHIRLEY. DALE Axtell 

Agronomy Sophomore 

SPILLAR, BILL Great Bend 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 

STANLEY. SCOTT Topeka 

Accounting Senior 

TEETER. DAVID Hutchinson 

Political Science Senior 

UPCHURCH, STEVE Green Fork 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

VINES. ROSS Wichita 

Life Science Senior 

VOORHES. MIKE Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Freshman 

WARNER. RYAN Stanley 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

WEBER. JEROME Hutchinson 

Finance Senior 

WEST, NATHAN Garden City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

WINTER. BART Colivich 

General Business Administration Sophomore 



She DU's 



TOP ROW: Karen Athey. Shayla Reed, Janet 
Shirley. Brenda Miller. Theresa Stanley, Lorl 
Scheuerman, Kelli Walden, THIRD ROW: De- 
bra Hall, Cynthia May. Brenda Swift. Kristin Cox, 
Donna Hampel. Cheryl Campbell. SECOND 
ROW: Barbara Nemec, Kelly Grover, Gall Seller, 
Jennifer Garrett. Lana Hurrington. Janis Little. 
Debbie Storey. BOTTOM ROW: Yolando Salts, 
Kim Mason, Christy Andra, Denny Dler King, 
Sally Schultz, Brenda Smith. 




276 delta upsilon 



Farmhouse 




BANKS. CHARLES Wamego 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BEBERMEYER. RYLAN Manchester 

Music Graduate Student 

BLAAUW, JAMES Philmont, NY 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

CARL1N, DAVID Topeka 

Pre-Law Freshman 

CARLSON. CALVIN Smolan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CARLTON, TERRY Geneseo 

General Business Administration Junior 

CARNAHAN, BRIAN Wamego 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

COTT, ROBERT Clay Center 

Agronomy Sophomore 

ENGLER. MAX Deerfleld 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

FRASIER. MARK Woodrow. Colo. 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

FURGASON, KENNETH Preston 

Management Junior 

GALE, DARREN Phillipsburg 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

GARDNER. GREG Ashland 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

GARDNER. MARK Ashland 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

GATES. CHAN Coldwater 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

GILLMORE. BRYAN Moundrldge 

Computer Science Senior 

GOOD. KEVIN Charlotte. Minn. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

GRAY. SCOTT Sedan 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

HADACHEK. MIKEL Cuba 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

HARSTINE. STAN El Dorado 

Mathematics Junior 

HEINEN. LEON Huron 

Agronomy Senior 

H1LDEBRAND. MIKE Stafford 

Construction Science Senior 

HILL. SCOTT Mosby, Mont 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

HOCH, KEITH McPherson 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

HUNT. STEVE Arkansas City 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

JOHNSON. SCOTT Smolan 

Construction Science Freshman 

KARST. TOM Bertrand. Neb. 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

KETTER. IVAN Sabetha 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

KREHBIEL, KIM Pretty Prairie 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

LARSON, ROBERT Hiawatha 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

LEET. GREGORY Halifax. Mass. 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

LINDQUIST. DANIEL Waterville 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

LINDQUIST. JACK Waterville 

Agricultural Education Senior 

MANN. TRAVIS Potwln 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MAYDEW. MARCUS Portls 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

MCFALL. RANDY Sabetha 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

MILLER. TIMOTHY Holcomb 

Agronomy Senior 

MORTON, MARK Wamego 

Chemical Science Junior 

MUGLER. MARK Manhattan 

Horticulture Junior 

PATTERSON. ROBERT Van Wert, Ohio 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

PAUL, STEVEN Sharon Springs 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

PAULSEN, DAVID Stafford 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

PELTON, GALEN Burdette 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

PENNER, TIMOTHY Assaria 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

PULL1AM. STAN Freeport 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



farmhouse 277 



Farmhouse 



RAGSDALE, BRYAN Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

RUNDLE. LYNN Axtell 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

SALES. DARYL Valley Falls 

Agronomy Sophomore 

SEVERANCE. JIM Beloit 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SMITH. CRIS Overland Park 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

SPARE. MARLIN St. John 

Agronomy Senior 

SPARE, RANDALL .St. John 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

SPEER. ROY Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

SWALLOW, KEVIN Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

SYLVESTER, ELDON Wamego 

Aricultural Mechanization Freshman 

TAYLOR, JOHN Llnaborg 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

THOMAS. TRACY Clay Center 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

THOMPSON, CURT Hays 

Economics Sophomore 

TOEWS, JEFFREY Whitewater 

Agricultural Education Junior 

TOSH. RANDALL Valley Falls 

Political Science Senior 

USHER. ALAN Sallna 

Accounting Senior 

VISSER. KARL Wakefield 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

WALKER. KIM Ft. Worth. Texas 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WALTER, BRAD Sublette 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

WORCESTER, LEWIS Hill City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ZELLER, DAVE Holton 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



Pearls and Rubies 



TOP ROW: Marietta Deets, Sally A. Coltraln, 
Teresa J. Larson, Kristl E. Walter, Dare! L. 
Moore, Kim D. Brenslng, Dee Gale, Cheryl A. 
Sales, Kathleen M. Cott. SECOND ROW: Ra- 
chel L. Severance, Paula D. Fell, Mona M. Rusk, 
Annell McKee, Larlssa Sylvester, Denlse K. 
Warrte, Cindy A. Johnson, Susan A. Oltjen, Sandl 
K. Oltjen. BOTTOM ROW: Dawn R. Johnson, 
Karen E. Mayer, Patti K. Hadachek, Anita K. 
Mayer, Angela Scanlan, Mary M. Garten, Ann M. 
Garten, Rita A. Weaver. 




278 farmhouse 



Gamma Phi Beta 




AYERS, LOIS Housemother 

ADAMS, AMELIA Topeka 

Fre-Nursing Sophomore 

BAILEY. FRANCES Overland Park 

General Freshman 

BENDER. NANCY Russell 

Childhood Development Junior 

BERBOHM, MELANIE Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Freshman 



BRADDOCK, BETSY Lenexa 

General Sophomore 

BRE1POHL. DIANE Lawrence 

General Engineering Senior 

BRENSING, KELLY Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

BRENSING. KIM Stafford 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

BRUNER. SUSAN Sedan 

Business Administration Freshman 

BURKHEAD, TERR1 Lawrence 

Elementary Education Junior 

COUGHENOUR. LAURI Wichita 

Interior Design Junior 

DAY, NANCY Lincoln, Neb. 

Interior Design Freshman 

DEMBSKI. HELEN Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

DUFF1N. NANCY Overland Park 

Physical Education Senior 

EDMONDS. KELLY Topeka 

Correctional Administration Senior 

FERGUSON, KAREN Overland Park 

Childhood Development Sophomore 

GARRISON, KATHY Norton 

General Sophomore 

GLEISSNER. JANE Mission 

General Home Economics Senior 

GOETSCH. GAYLA Hutchison 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

GREEN, MARISIA Lawrence 

General Home Economics Freshman 

GWIN. CANDIA Prarle Village 

Physical Education Senior 

HAAS. SUSAN Mission 

Physical Education Senior 

HARMLESS, ANN Prarie Village 

Business Administration Freshman 

HEETER. LISA Mission 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

HOLLAND, KATHLEEN Merriam 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

HOWARD, JODI Emporia 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

1LIFF, MARY ANN Prarie Village 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

JORDAN. JAN Overland Park 

Childhood Development Senior 

KARL1N. CATHERIN Grinnell 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

KARLIN. PATRICIA Grinnell 

General Junior 

DERSENBROCK. GLENDA Colby 

Music Education Senior 

KISSINGER, MARILYNN Shawnee 

General Home Economics Freshman 

KOPEC, IDA Kansas City. Mo. 

Pre Medicine Freshman 

LEVEAU. ROBYN Overland Park 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

LEVITCH, ROBIN Overland Park 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

LUEBBERS. BEV Marienthal 

Accounting Sophomore 

LUEKER, CINDY Hoisington 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

MARSHALL. JONI Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

MARVIN. PAMELA Overland Park 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

MATUSZAK, JILL Lenexa 

General Junior 

MILLER, PAULA Hutchison 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

MILLS. JULIA Leavenworth 

General Engineering Freshman 

NEWLIN, MICHELLE Leawood 

Elementary Education Junior 

NUZUM. REBECCA White Cloud 

Management Senior 



gamma phi beta 279 



. 



Gamma Phi Beta 



PALMA, JEAN Topeka 

Business Administration Freshman 

PFLASTEKER. LONN] Colby 

Horns Economics Education Senior 

POTTER. CAROLYN Dighton 

Horticulture Junior 

REESE, MARY Hiawatha 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

REYNOLDS. DEBBIE Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

BOBBINS. KARESA Great Bend 

General Senior 

RONNING. STACIA Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

ROSS, KELLI Wichita 

Life Science Senior 

SAGE, STEPHANIE Phillipsburg 

Accounting Sophomore 

SCHELL. DEBBIE Wichita 

Home Economics Senior 

SCHROCK, YVETTE Oakley 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

SCHROTH, VICKI Colby 

General Freshman 

SEARS, SUSAN Overland Park 

Physcial Therapy Sophomore 

SELLERS, KIM Lyons 

Accounting Freshman 

SELLERS, TERI Lyons 

Elementary Education Senior 

STAUFFER. JILL Wichita 

Elementary Education Senior 

STE1NER, DEBORAH Overland Park 

Marketing Senior 

STOSKOPF, BECKY Valley Falls 

General Home Economics Freshman 

SUTTON, PATTY Norton 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SWEENEY. SHELBY Quinter 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

TATGE. AMY Herlngton 

Child Development Sophomore 

TOWNSEND, LESLIE Overland Park 

Finaance Freshman 

TOWNSEND. LINDSAY Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

VANDAALEN, KATHY Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering t Sophomore 

WA1DE. STACY Perryton, Texas 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

WALTERS, EMILY Topeka 

General Freshman 

WEST. TAMMY Shawnee 

General Junior 

WESTHUES, JANE Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

WILLCOT. DIANA Leavenworth 

Physical Education Sophomore 

WOOLDR1DGE, MARGO Prarie Village 

General Sophomore 





BpP^v 




IV. 


^L 




. Ja^Lsk 




280 gamma phi beta 



Kappa Alpha Psi 




ATKINS. PHILIP Elmhurat. N.Y. 

Food Science Senior 

BLACKMAN, ROLANDO Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Sociology Senior 

BLACKWELL. GARLAND Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BURNETT. ANTHONY Salina 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

GARNETT. THOMAS St. Loula. Mo. 

Construction Science Senior 

JOHNSON. JAMES Tacoma, Wash. 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

LEE. STEVEN Kansas City 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MARTIN, LANCER Salina 

Correctional Administration Junior 

SMITH. MARK Salina 

Psychology Junior 

STONE. MARVIN Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 



Finishing Touch- A construction 
worker adds the finishing touch 
to a portion of the Kappa Alpha 
Psi Fraternity house. The house 
underwent renovations, forcing its 
members to find alternate housing 
until completion of the work. 



Scott Llebler 



kappa alpha psi 281 



Kappa Alpha Theta 



ROETH. INA Housemother 

ANNEN. JAN Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Junior 

ALERECHT, SHARI Russell 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

ALLEN. AMY Leawood 

General Business Administration Senior 

ANDERSON, DEBBIE Shawnee 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 



ANDERSON. DEE Shawnee 

Speech Pathology Junior 

BANKER, PRISCILLA Russell 

General Business Administration Junior 

BEAM, LISA McPherson 

Journalism and Mass Communication Senior 

BEARLY, KIM Garden Plain 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BELL, DIANE Overland Park 

Pre Law Freshman 

BUELL. JAN Omaha. Neb. 

Home Economics Education Senior 

CHESNUTT, DEBRA Hutchinson 

Accounting Junior 

COEN, JANET Ottawa 

Pre-Secondary Education Freshman 

CONROY, REGINA Beloit 

Interior Design Junior 

COOLEY, MONET Shawnee 

Marketing Junior 

CRISS, SHANNON Prairie Village 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 

CROFT. SUZANNE Overland Park 

Pre Medicine Sophomore 

DAVIS. STEPHANIE Norton 

Home Economics Senior 

DAWSON, MONA Medicine Lodge 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

DEFOREST, DIANE Peabody 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

EGAN. CARRIE Peabody 

Marketing Freshman 

FABRICIUS. VICK1 Great Bend 

Pre-Elementary Education . , Sophomore 

FINN, JOYCE Wichita 

Home Economics Sophomore 

FLOTT. NANCY Sabetha 

Elementary Education Junior 

FADELY. JANA Sedan 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

GOLDSMITH, JENNIFER Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

HAMMER. SUSAN Topeka 

General Sophomore 

HARDESTY. NANCY Topeka 

Life Science Senior 

HILL. BRENDA Leawood 

Home Economics Senior 

HOBBS. JODY Overland Park 

General Freshman 

HOLLADAY, JANA Kansas City, Mo 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

HUBERT, JACKIE Mullinville 

Clothing Retail Junior 

HUBERT. STEPHANIE Mullinville 

General Home Economics Freshman 

HULSING, CHERYL Topeka 

Pre Professional Elementary Sophomore 

HUNTER, JILL Overland Park 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

JACOBS. DEANNE Prairie Village 

Pre Elementary Education Sophomore 

JERNIGAN. HEIDI Council Grove 

Pre Nursing Sophomore 

JOHNSON. DIANE Overland Park 

Engineering Freshman 

JOHNSON, KAREN Prair.e Village 

Health and Physical education Sophomore 

JOHNSON. PAULA Manhattan 

preLaw Sophomore 

JOHNSTON. TERESA Wichita 

General Freshman 

JONES. MARY Leawood 

Elementary Education Junior 

KAISER, GINA .....'.'.',' Hoisington 

Clothing Retail Freshman 

KELLER. PAULA Manhattan 

Computer Science Junior 

KLINE, COROLINE ....'..'. '.'.'.'. '.'. ' Emporia 

Interior Design Sophomore 




282 kappa alpha theta 




Hats on!- When the camera is in 
the Theta house the hats come 



KOELLER. KELLY Emporia 

Interior Design Sophomore 

KOMAREK. TRACY Great Bend 

Labor Relations Freshman 

LETOURNEAU, RENEE Wichita 

General Freshman 

UNDENMUTH. LORIE Scott City 

Accounting Senior 

MARTELL. LAURIE Topeka 

Computer Science Freshman 



MCDAMEL. CHERYL Sabetha 

Marketing Senior 

MCDOWELL. AIMEE Chanute 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MCKESSOR. MARY ANN Leawood 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

MCKINNEY, NANCY Independence 

Accounting Junior 

MEARS. SHERRI Independence 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 



kappa alpha theta 283 



Kappa Alpha Theta 



MERRILL. SARAH London. England 

Elementary Education Junior 

MILLER, BRENDA Topeka 

Accounting Junior 

MOOKE, NANCY Hiawatha 

Modern Language* Senior 

MOSS. JULIE Sallna 

English and Education Senior 

MURRAY, KELLEY Leawood 

Horticulture Junior 

OCONNOR, KELLY Shawnee Mission 

Computer Science Sophomore 

ORR. DEANNA Lewis 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Freshmen 

PEACOCK. SHARON Sylvia 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

PETERSILIE. KIM Ness City 

Computer Science Sophomore 

PETRO. SUSAN Topeka 

Pre Elementary Education Sophomore 

PLUMER. KAREN Overland Park 

Marketing Junior 

POSS, MARIANN Richmond 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

PRAY, JANIS Wichita 

Office Administration Sophomore 

PUGH. JANICE St. Louis, Mo. 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

ROBERTS, CINDY Overland Park 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

SANDERS, BETH Prairie Village 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

SCHMIDT, SUSAN McPherson 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SCHROEDER. VAL Overland Park 

Biology Freshman 

SCHULZ. SUZANNE Overland Park 

Home Economics Senior 

SETTER, SHERYL Junction City 

Fashion Marketing Freshman 

SHINKLE. FRAN Kincald 

Recreation Senior 

SKUB1TZ, SUZANNE Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SMITH. BRENDA Ft. Leavenworth 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

SMITH. MACHELLE Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SOPCICH. KATHRYN Independence, Mo. 

Consumer Interest Senior 

STALCUP. POLL1E Great Bend 

Social Work Sophomore 

STEPHEN. DANA Wichita 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

STEPHEN, LISA Wichita 

Accounting Freshman 

STOREY, DEBBIE Wichita 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

STOREY. GRETCHEN Manhattan 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

SUWALSKY, SUSAN Leavenworth 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SWAFFORD, SUSAN Overland Park 

General Freshman 

SWANEY. ELLEN Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SWANEY. LYNNE Wichita 

Recreation Senior 

TEMME, LORI Larned 

General Business Administration Freshman 

TENEYCK. BARBARA St John 

Computer Science Freshman 

THIES, AMY Great Bend 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

TILTON, SUSAN Wichita 

General Freshman 

TODD, KATHY Minneapolis 

Computer Science Freshman 

UBEL, MARY Topeka 

Family and Child Development Junior 

WEIBERT, KIM Tampa 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

WHITE, DENA Prairie Village 

Community Services and Social Work Junior 

WOODSON, HEATHER Penalosa 

General Freshman 

YEAKLEY. CHERYL Holsington 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 

ZIMMER. LINDA Shawnee 

Interior Architecture Senior 




284 kappa alpha theta 



L 



Kappa Delta 




GORE. VIRGINIA Housemother 

ANSTAETT. JANET Lyndon 

Accounting Senior 

ANTOINE, MARGARET Kirkwood. Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ARNOLD, LILLIAN Kansas City 

Home Economics Senior 

ATHEY, KAREN Overland Park 

Music Education Junior 



BALDERSON. JILL Overland Park 

Modern Language Senior 

BANKS. ROBYN Lenexa 

General Freshman 

BAREISS. LAURA Overland Park 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

BARTH, RHONDA Kansas City 

General Freshman 

BENNETT. CHERYL Overland Park 

Horticulture Junior 



BERTRAND. LINDA Lincoln. Neb. 

Speech Senior 

BLEDSOE. FAITH Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BOGER. RHONDA Jetmore 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BOYD, VICKY Belleville 

Geography Senior 

BRANT, SOLVEIG Isabel 

Food Science and Industry Junior 

BUSSEE. JANA Kansas City 

Interior Design Junior 

BUSSERT, KAREN « Independence 

General Freshman 

CAMBELL. BARBARA Spring Hill 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

CARLSON, CATHY Emporia 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

CARPER. CYNTHIA Wakeeny 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 



CASEY. KELLY Junction City 

General Business Administration Freshman 

CHAMPLIN. KATHI Cedar Vale 

Accounting Sophomore 

CLENDENEN, JENNIFER Overland Park 

Pre Pharmacy Freshman 

COCKER1LL. JANET Spalding Neb. 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

CRA1N, DEANNE Lawrence 

Biology Junior 

CURTIS, KIM Mission Hills 

Pre-Pharmacy Freshman 

DECKER. CATHY Overland Park 

Fashion Design Junior 

DEGN. KERRI Merrlam 

General Business Administration Senior 

DE1NES. TRACEY Wakeeney 

Fine Arts Senior 

DOUD. CYNTHIA Wakursa 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 



FABRIZIUS. ALANA Wakeeney 

Pre-Profeaslona! Elementary Senior 

FIELDS, JANE Wichita 

Accounting Freshman 

FOSKUHL. KIM Dodge City 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

FOSTER. SHERRY Caldwell 

Applied Music Freshman 

FRANCIS. CAROL Attica 

Agricultural Journalism Sophomore 



FULLER. KAREN Prairie Village 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior 

FYE. ANN Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

GERMAN, TERESA Louisburg 

Accounting Freshman 

GILE, MICHELLE Scandia 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

GRAME, RENAE Berryton 

General Freshman 

GREY. HOLLY Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

HAUN. JULIE Overland Park 

General Freshman 

HENDERSON. MEREDITH Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

HENSON. BRENDA Leawood 

Pre-Professional Elementary Senior 

HUCKE, JANET Leawood 

Pre-Professional Elementary Senior 



kappa delta 285 



Kappa Delta 



HUGHES, JODIE Overland Park 

Freshman 

IOAND1S, CHRISTINE Ft. Riley 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

JADERBORG, BEV Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

JONES. KELLY Lenexa 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

KARST, SHERI Topeka 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

KELLEY, DILYN Falun 

Home Economics Freshman 

KELLY, MARY JO Lawrence 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

KIGHTLINGER. MONA Hutchinson 

Marketing Junior 

KNOPP. REBECCA Chapman 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

KRAMER. RUTH Corning 

Accounting Senior 



KREIE, LYNNE Great Bend 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 

LALLY, KELLY Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

LAW, KATHERINE Overland Park 

Pre Nursing Freshman 

LEVIN, DEBBY Leawood 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

MALLON. DONNA Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

MARLO. AMY Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

MCCLARY. CRYSTAL Centralia 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

MCLAUGHLIN, PAULA Chapman 

General Freshman 

MEADOR, JUDY Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

MERVE1LLE, CAROLINE Shawnee Mission 

General Sophomore 



MILLER. CAROL Savannah, Mo 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

MILLER, COQETTE Scott City 

Marketing Sophomore 

MILLER. MARTY Prairie Village 

General Sophomore 

MILLER, NANCY Prairie Village 

Accounting Freshman 

MILLS, KIRSTEN Manhattan 

General Freshman 



MITCHELL, LORI Ellsworth 

Home Economics Junior 

NELSON, JODY Lawrence 

Interior Design Sophomore 

NORTHUM, EVELYN Kingman 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

PARKER. PAM Fairway 

Finance Senior 

PATE, JANICE Overland Park 

Marketing Sophomore 

PERPARAS. MICHELE Overland Park 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

POLLOCK, STEPHANIE Junction City 

Accounting Freshman 

POTTER, TAMERA Arkansas City 

Agricultural Education Freshman 

REDLER. MARY Overland Park 

Geology Junior 

REYNOLDS, HELEN Lawrence 

Interior Design Junior 



RITTER, SALLY Kuala-Lampur. Malaysia 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

ROBARGE, MARY Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ROLF, LINDA Pratt 

General Engineering Freshman 

ROLPH, CHER1 Delphos 

Political Science Junior 

ROLPH. CYNTHIA Delphoa 

Geography Senior 



RUNYAN. DENISE Osage City 

Horticultural Freshman 

SAUNDERS. K1MBERLY Bonner Springs 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

SCHEFFLER. ROBIN Wichita 

Pre-Nurslng Senior 

SCHROFF. JANE Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SEIWALD, KAREN Prairie Village 

General Freshman 



286 kappa delta 





Neither rain nor snow 

Mona Kightlinger, junior in 
accounting, fills the mailboxes 
in the Kappa Delta House. 

Rich Bergen 

SHEVLIN, BRENDA Topeka 

Fine Arts Freshman 

SIEMENS. LOR1 Burrton 

Accounting Freshman 

SMITH, GRETCHEN Merriam 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SNEED, SHERI Lenexa 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

SORENSON. DIANE Ness City 

Education Senior 

STERNER. ELLEN Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

STEVENSON. JEAN Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

STROUD. SALLYANN Olathe 

Elementary Education Senior 

SWANSON. SUSAN Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

THOMPSON. MELANIE Cedar Vale 

History Junior 

UHLRICH. BETH Wamego 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

UTECH, TERESA Topeka 

Home Economics and Journalism Sophmore 

VAUGHN. RENEE Wichita 

Speech Pathology Senior 

WALSH. BECKY Collyer 

Health and Physical Education Sophmore 

WENTZEL. DEBRA Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

WHITE. SHELLEY Goodland 

General Business Administration Junior 

WHITTLE. CHRISTINA Sedgwick 

Music Education Senior 

WOLF. TENLEY Colby 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Senior 



kappa delta 287 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 



WALK, LOU Housemother 

ADAMS. MARSHA McPherson 

Pre-Nursing ■ Sophomore 

ANDRA. CHRISTY Conway Spring 

General Business Administration Senior 

BAIRD, JANE Arkansas City 

Accounting Sophomore 

BARANC1K, KAREN Shawnee Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BARR. JANE Overland Park 

Psychology Senior 

BARTH. KAREN Kansas City 

Management Junior 

BAUCUS, KAREN Arkansas City 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

BAUCUS. MARY Arkansas City 

Consumer Interest Senior 

BEARDSLEY. JENNIFER Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Senior 

BE1KMANN, KAYE Manhattan 

Elementary Education Junior 

BELL. DELAYNE Great Bend 

General Business Administration Senior 

BERENTZ. KIM Eureka 

Elementary Education Senior 

BIGLER. LISA Prairie Village 

General Bualness Administration Senior 

BLASI. KAREN Wichita 

Accounting Sophomore 

BLOMQU1ST, LORI Assaria 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

BOWEN. CAROL Overland Park 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 

CARLSON. PATTY Overland Park 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

CARROLL. MICHELLE Prairie Village 

Food Science and Industry Freshman 

COFFEY. COLLEEN Wichita 

Health and Phyalcal Recreation Senior 

COLE, TRINA Modoc 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

COPHER, CAROLYN Prairie Village 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

CORNELISON, JULIE Leawood 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

DANZIG, LINDA Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

DAYTON, ALICIA Manhattan 

Art Sophomore 

DAYVAULT. ANN Wichita 

General Business Administration Junior 

DEARDORFF, DEBBIE Wichita 

Interior Design Sophomore 

EATHERLY, JULIE Garden City 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

EDIGER. KARLENE McPherson 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

ELBEHERI. TWILA Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

FERRELL, MOLLY Marion 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

FLETCHER, JULIE Bucklin 

General Sophomore 

FLETCHER. SUSAN Bucklin 

General Bualneas Administration Senior 

FOUNTAIN. AMY Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

FREY, LYN Overland Park 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

FRI2ELL, CHRISTINE Maple Hill 

Veterinary-Medicine Freshman 

GARRET. JENNIFER Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HAGEN. NANCY Sallna 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

HAMPEL. DONNA Garden Plain 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

HECKELMANN. LYNDA Manhattan 

Biochemistry Senior 




288 kappa kappa gamma 



, 




HEIMKE. SALLY Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

HOWSE, JOAN Wichita 

Accounting Sophomore 

JENKINS. KENNA Kansas City, Mo 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

JOYCE, MELODIE Garden City 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

KOEHN, JENNIFER Concordia 

General Sophomore 

KREBS, DEENA Scott City 

Foods and Nutrition Freshman 

KUEHL. KELLY Leawood 

Modern Language Senior 

LAFEVER. RENEE Wichita 

Social Work Senior 

LAMARRE, JANE Kansas City, Mo 

General Home Economics Freshman 

LARSON, STEFANI Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

LITCHFIELD, JENNIFER Leawood 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

LUNDQUIST. REBECCA Lindsborg 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

MATZ, MARGARET Wichita 

Management Junior 

MAYHEW. KATHY Hutchinson 

Accounting Junior 

MERID1TH, SHELLY Wellington 

General Freshman 




Real swingers — Kappa 
Kappa Gamma sorority members 
find afternoon fun on their porch 
swing. 



Rob Clark 



kappa kappa gamma 289 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 



MERIDITH, SUSAN Wellington 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

MESSERSMITH, LAUREN Wichita 

Psychology Junior 

MINNEMAN, JOAN Affton, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

NINCI. LORETTA Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

NORDGREN, SHERRI Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

ODDO. LINDA Overland Park 

Management Junior 

ONEAL. ELAINE Prairie Village 

Modern Language Senior 

OSWALD, PATRICIA Hutchinson 

English Sophomore 

OTT, CARLA Peck 

General Business Administration Junior 

PARTRIDGE, AMY Wichita 

Pre Education Freshman 



PEARCE, JULIE Overland Park 

General Home Economics Freshman 

PELTON, CONNIE Goddard 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

PRINSLOW, LAURA Arlington Heights. 111. 

General Business Administration Junior 

RAMOS. CONNIE Leawood 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

REDD, LORE Overland Park 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

ROBINSON, STEPHANIE Wichita 

Interior Design Junior 

RODEFELD. KAREN St. Loula. Mo. 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

ROSSI, KARLA Wichita 

Accounting Freshman 

SCANLAN, ANGELA Abilene 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

SCHMIDT. KATHLEEN Calwald 

Pre Nursing Junior 

SCOTT, SANDRA Tecumseh 

General Sophomore 

SHAFT, CINDY Hutchinson 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

SILER. ANN Kansas City, Mo. 

Psychology Senior 

SISNEY, JENNIFER Prairie Village 

General Sophomore 

SKAER. SARA Little Rock. Ark. 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

STUTTERHEIM. KAREN Salina 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

SWADER, CARITA Gardner 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

THOMPSON. LAURA Augusta 

General Freshman 

TURNBULL. JAN Stockton 

General Sophomore 

TYLER. DEBBIE Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

URICK. LINDA Wichita 

Elementary Education Senior 

VAIL, NANCY Ft. Riley 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

VICKERS. LAURIE Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

VINES, CLAUDIA Wichita 

General Sophomore 

WAGNER, LORI Overland Park 

Health and Physical Recreation Freshman 



WALDEN. KELLI Garden Plain 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

WOLF. BARBARA oiathe 

Interior Design Freshman 

YANCEY. LISA Manhattan 

Finance Junior 




290 kappa kappa gamma 



Kappa Sigma 




JOHNSON. KATHLYN Housemother 

ADAMS. ROBERT Garnett 

Engineering Technology Senior 

AHNEMANN. GREGG Sophomore 

Accounting Sophomore 

AYRES. KELLY Smith Center 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BAKER. PHIL Pleasanton 

General Business Freshman 

BECK. ERIC Shawnee Mission 

Accounting Senior 

BEDNAR. BRIAN Oketo 

PreDentistry Junior 

BEDNAR. TODD Oketo 

Construction Science Sophomore 

BLANCHON, ED Bucyrus 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

BOWEN. DAVE Manhattan 

Pre-Law Freshman 

BOXBERGER, MARK Russell 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BURFORD. JOHN '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' Leawood 

General Freshman 

COOL. KENT Manhattan 

General Business Sophomore 

DEMOTT. KIRBY Overland Park 

Engineering Technology Junior 

EGGERMAN, JIM Green 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

EICHER. ERIC Colby 

Pre-Law Freshman 

EISSLER, CHARLIE Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

ELLER. JAMES Great Bend 

General Business Freshman 

EUBANKS. MIKE Shawnee 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

FANKHAUSER, ALAN Garden City 

General Business Junior 

FOREMAN. PATRICK Kansas City 

Accounting Freshman 

FOWLER, RAY Larned 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

GEORGE. DON Wichita 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

GERMAN. MARK Loulsberg 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

GIBSON, JEFFREY Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

GILLETTE. ROBERT Great Bend 

Life Sciences Junior 

GRAHAM. MICHAEL Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

HARRIS. JOHN Olathe 

Accounting Senior 

HAUN. DARREN Larned 

PreDentistry Sophomore 

HEDRICK, BRAD Shawnee 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HERRMAN, FLOYD Great Bend 

Computer Science Junior 

HUFF. LAURENCE Shawnee 

Construction Science Junior 

HUGHES. ROBERT Manhattan 

General Business Senior 

HUNT. ALAN Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

IBARRA. CARLOS Garden City 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

JACOBS, LARRY McPherson 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

JOHNSON, KEITH Kansas City 

Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

KEAST, JIM Larned 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

KRAMER. SCOTT Webster Groves. Mo. 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

MANN, DAVID Kansas City, Mo 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

MCMAHAN, MARK Cheney 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

MOHAN, KEVIN St. Louis, Mo 

Architecture Engineering Junior 

MURPHY. MARTIN Great Bend 

Architecture Engineering Senior 

OLANDER. MORGAN Llnwood 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

POLSON, BRADLEY Vermillion 

General Business Sophomore 



kappa sigma 291 



Kappa Sigma 



PORTER, MARK Leawood 

Pre Design Professions Sophomore 

REINHARDT, DAVID Chanute 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

RINNER. THOMAS Topeka 

General Junior 

ROBERTS, PHILLIP Kansas City 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

SCHARTZ, BERT Larned 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

SCHERLING, DANE South Center 

Construction Science Freshman 

SCHERLING, SYD Smith Center 

Marketing Sophomore 

SCHULTZ, DAVID Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering J" nior 

SCOTT, STUART Wichita 

General Freshman 

SKILLETT, GARY Centralia 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

SMITH, DEE Enterprise 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SMITH. STACY Ozawkle 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

STERLING, SAMUEL Hardtner 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

STOLTENBERG, MICHAEL Hiawatha 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

TADTMAN, JEFF Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

TAGUE, TRACY Emporia 

General Freshman 

WALTER. LOBEN Peru. III. 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

WHISLER, KENT Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

YARBER. STEVE Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

YOUNG, DOUGLAS Sedan 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

ZORN, RANDY Smith Center 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



After hours- Phil Roberts, 
junior in industrial engineering, 
uses the house dining room to 
catch up on some reading. 




292 kappa sigma 



Lamda Chi Alpha 




BABCOCK. WES Chapman 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

BAILEY, KEVIN Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BAKER, BARRY Mulvane 

General Freshman 

BAKER. KRIS Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BALL, DARWEN Sabetha 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BEARDMORE. RICH Overland Park 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

BELONGIA, ROBERT Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

BORTHWICK, KENDALL Mulvane 

Accounting Sophomore 

BOWERS. RICH Mexico, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BOYD, MICHAEL Manhattan 

General Business Administration Junior 

CAMERON. RICKY Wlnfleld 

Psychology Senior 

CHAN1TZ. MARK Creve Coer, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

CHASE, DAN Overland Park 

Fine Arts Junior 

CHRISTIE, DWIGHT Beloit 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

CLARK. BRAD Derby 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

CUTBERTH. JEFF St. Joseph. Mo. 

Architecture Senior 

DAVIS. WILLIAM Topeka 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

DRING, PAUL Prairie Village 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

DUNN. DARYLE Dodge City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

EADES. CHRISTOPHER Scott City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

ENGLEBERT. JIM Beloit 

General Freshman 

FOLLETT. KEVIN Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

FOWLER. KENNETH Emporia 

Finance Senior 

GERLAUGH. CHARLES Manhattan 

Marketing Senior 

GLADBACH, JIM Concordia 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

GUENTHER, MAX St. Joseph, Mo. 

Architecture Junior 

HAFLEY. DUANE Webster Groves, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

HALL. TRACY Springfield. Mo. 

Architectural Engineering . Junior 

HANSFORD. JOHN Kansas City, Mo. 

General Business Administration Senior 

HAROLD. SCOTT Sallna 

Computer Science Sophomore 

HEGARTY, MICHAEL Effingham 

Economics Junior 

HENTGES. STEPHEN Columbia. Mo. 

Political Science Senior 

HILL, KEVIN Shawnee 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

HOWARD, PHIL Manhattan 

Life Science Junior 

HOWARD. TIM Hutchinson 

Management Senior 

JONES. GREG Tyrone, Okla 

General Sophomore 

KING, TIM Lenexa 

General Business Administration Junior 

KISNER, KEVIN Garden City 

General Business Administration Junior 

KNIGHT. JOHNATHAN Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

LARSON. JIM Rossvllle 

General Business Administration Senior 

LIPPE, DAVID Topeka 

General Business Adminstratlon Junior 

LUNDIN. MARK Manhattan 

Construction Science Senior 

LONG. TROY Topeka 

General Business Administration Freshman 

LOYD, JOHN Warrensburg, Mo 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

MARLEY. STEVE Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 



lambda chi alpha 293 



L 



Lambda Chi Alpha 



MARQUETTE. WILLIAM Overland Park 

Construction Science Senior 

MCCABE. MARC Topeka 

Geography Senior 

MCCALLA, CHARLES Kansas City, Mo 

English Junior 

MCCARTHY, MARK Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

NEWMAN, MICHAEL Overland Park 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

OVERMYER, DAVID Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

OVERMYER, TOM , . Topeka 

General Freshman 

PERKINS, MARK Houston, Texas 

General Business Administration Junior 

PETERSON. KEITH Tonganoxle 

Marketing Graduate Student 

QUEEN, JOHN '. Shawnee 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 

RICHARD, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Pre Design Professions Junior 

ROSS, WILLIAM Topeka 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SCHMIDT, TOM Bennington 

Finance Junior 

SERRANO. PEDRO Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Junior 

SHAIN. GLENN El Dorado 

Construction Science Senior 

SHIRER, BRADLEY Holslngton 

Accounting Senior 

SILVERS. DON Olathe 

General Freshman 

SKOOG. CARL Topeka 

Geology Senior 

STARK, DANIEL Manhattan 

General Business Administration Junior 

STARK, JEFFERY Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 

STEFFEN, BRADLEY Burdett 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

STEUBER. TERRY Topeka 

Construction Science Senior 

SWIHART, KEN Imlay City 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

TARRANT, JEFF Manhattan 

Music Education Junior 

THOMPSON, STEVEN Rossville 

Elementary Education Freshman 

WASINGER, JIM Scott City 

Finance Sophomore 

WIKE, DENNIS Topeka 

Civil Engineering Junior 

WINTERMAN. PAUL Mission 

Accounting Senior 

WINTERMAN. RICHARD Mission 

General Business Administration Freshman 

WONER, KENT Hutchinson 

General Business Administration Senior 



Crescents 



TOP ROW: Denise Esparza, Deanna Rathbun, 
LeAnn Wtllhite, Jane Immenschuh, Darlyne Hin- 
kle. Mary J. Wlnterman, Diane M. Rombeck, 
THIRD ROW: Laura A. Wilson, Emily L. Janes, 
Dana L. Rlchey, Tracy Beardmore, Jan Pate, 
Ruthle Beckerdlte, Angela M. Marquez. SEC- 
OND ROW: Diane E. Pierce, Beth E. Sanders, 
Laura J. Rombeck, Karen R. Follett, Kathy J. 
Knadle, Shauna L. Horn, Sheryl L. Russell. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Elizabeth Jennings, Julie Rombeck, 
Denise Manke, Dawn Walter, Charlene Susan, 
Christine Haferer, Renee Vaughn. 



294 lambda chi alpha 




Phi Delta Theta 








ANDERSON. CHRIS Garden City 

Marketing j unlor 

ANDERSON, JOEL Manhattan 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

BACH. MICHAEL Blue Rapids 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BACHMAN. RON '.'.'.' St Joseph, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BARNHART, JOHN Manhattan 

Pre Law Sophomore 

BELL, JERRY Alexander 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BRADLEY. GARY Overland Park 

Marketing Senior 

BROADFOOT. GREG Olathe 

Construction Science Senior 

CROKER. DANIEL Lake Qulvera 

Agronomy Senior 

DAHL, GREGORY Overland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 

DAVIDSON. STEVE Sallna 

Blo, °9V Senior 

DESHAZER, DONALD Topeka 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

DEVILBISS. BARRY Manhattan 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

DICKERSON. MARK Manhattan 

Construction Science Senior 

DREES, DAVID [[[] Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

DREES. GREGORY Wichita 

Marketing Senior 

FAIRBAIRN. SCOTT Garden City 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

FAULKNER, TRACEY Manhattan 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

FEYERHERM, ROGER Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FINK, JOHN Topeka 

General Junior 

FOSTER, ERIC Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

FULTON, RANDY Bucklin 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

GALLUP. DONALD Blue Rapids 

Nuclear Engineering Graduate Student 

GORDON, PHILIP Valley Falls 

Pre-Law '. Junior 

GRAUER, BRIAN Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

HAGER, RANDY Ness City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

HARRISON, WARNER Augusta 

Genial J unior 

HOLLE. WADE Wamego 

Management Sophomore 

HORMEL, JEFFERY Olathe 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

HORNER, KIRK Shawnee 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HOWE. EVAN Manhattan 

Social Science Sophomore 

HUFFMAN, MARK Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

IRVINE, RONALD Manhattan 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

JOHNSON, MIKE Leawood 

General Freshman 

KINCAID. RANDALL Wichita 

Management Freshman 

KNOLL. DAVID Topeka 

Finance Senior 

LANE, WALTER Chanute 

Genera] Business Administration Freshman 

MCCOSH, KENT Manhattan 

General Engineering Sophomore 

MCREYNOLDS, JEFF Dodge City 

General Engineering Freshman 

MILLS, BRIAN Lewis 

Health and Physical Recreation Junior 

MILLS, PATRICK Russel 

Accounting Junior 

MILLS, STEPHEN Lewis 

Art Sophomore 

MYERS. BRUCE Topeka 

Food Science and Management Senior 

MYERS, ROSS Garden City 

Accounting Junior 

NELSON, TIM Rose Hill 

Finance Freshman 



295 phi delta theta 



Phi Delta Theta 



OLNEY, MARK Manhattan 

Crop Protection Senior 

RAZOOK. SCOTT Hesston 

Marketing Senior 

REED. GREG Chanute 

Geology Freshman 

RIETCHECK, RANDY Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BOBBY. MICHAEL Topeka 

Finance Senior 

ROGERS. ROBERT Manhattan 

Agricultural Econmlca Graduate Student 

ROSE, BRET Manhattan 

Construction Science Sophomore 

RUZEK, WESLEY Ashland 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

SCHROFF, TERRY Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

SCOVILLE, BRET Manhattan 

Pre Dentistry Freshman 

SHARP. DAVID Wichita 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

SORENSON. NATHAN Manhattan 

Construction Science Junior 

STUELKE. JAMES Leawood 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

TAYLOR. BRAD Garden City 

General Business Administration Junior 

TEAGUE, MARK Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

TINKER, ROBERT Wichita 

Construction Science Junior 

WATSON. DEAN Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

WHEELER. VINCE Caney 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

W1NSATT, ANDY Freshman 





Kp 


* fa 


m 






Scott Lleber 



Psuedo library- Ron Irvine, 
sophomore in accounting, sits at 
his desk and studies while Paul 
Fritzler, sophomore in accounting, 
takes a more restful approach to 
his subjects. 



296 phi delta theta 



Phi Gamma Delta 





tkkli 










LAWRENCE, NORMA Housemother 

AESCHLIMAN, ROGER Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BARRERA, MIKE Shawnee Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BLACKWELL, STEVE Sallna 

General Business Administration Senior 

BOUCHER. DOUGLAS Smith Center 

General Engineering Freshman 

BOUCHER. JAY Smith Center 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BOUCHER. MICHAEL Smith Center 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BROADFOOT. DOUGLAS Holton 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BUETTE. JOHN Hutchinson 

Marketing Sophomore 

CATNEY. MICHAEL Lenexa 

General Business Administration Freshman 

CORN. JACK Garden City 

Mark eting j unior 

DWYER. KEVIN Overland Park 

Food Science and Management Senior 

ECKHOFF. PETE Osslpee. N.H. 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

EGAN, DENNIS Sallna 

Construction Science Senior 

GRABER. JOSEPH Hutchinson 

Music Education Senior 

GREEN. ROBERT Maysville, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HAUG. TIM Abilene 

Management Senior 

HERMAN, MICHAEL Mission 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HOCKING, DAVID Freshman 

Pre-Medicine Salina 

HOFFMAN, DANIEL Abilene 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

HOGARTY, PHILIP Salina 

General Engineering Freshman 

HOLGERSON. KREG Salina 

Accounting Sophomore 

HUBBARD. TOM Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

JANTSCH. JIM Bucyrus 

Agricultural General Freshman 

KEARNEY, VINCE Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

KELLY, JIM Kansas City, Mo. 

Pre-Veterniary Medicine Freshman 

LAW. JEFF Hutchinson 

General Business Administration Freshman 

LOBB. CHRISTOPHER Kansas City, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

LONDEEN, KEVIN Chapman 

General Business Administration Freshman 

LUTZ. ANDREW Overland Park 

Marketing Senior 

MARTIN. MIKE Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

MICHAELIS. JOEY Salina 

General Freshman 

MILLER, DANIEL Mission 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

NESTLER. GREG Hutchinson 

Accounting Sophomore 

NICHOLS. BRENT Hutchinson 

Economics Senior 

PAYNE, STEPHEN Klrkwood, Mo, 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

PHILLIPS, BOB Hutchinson 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

REIHS. BRIAN Manhattan 

Construction Science Sophomore 

ROGLER. KEN Leawood 

Agronomy Sophomore 

SELEY, JIM Abilene 

Construction Science Freshman 

SEXTON. BEN Abilene 

History Sophomore 

SOPER, RAY Wichita 

Accounting Freshman 

SVEC. JAMES Stllwell 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

SVEC. ROBERT Stllwell 

Marketing Freshman 

THOMAS. KELLY Sallna 

Accounting Senior 



phi gamma delta 297 



Phi Gamma Delta 



TOWNSEND, KENT Merriam 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

TROSTLE, J_ACK Salina 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

VEACH, JOHN Abilene 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

WATSON. WILLIAM Leawood 

Construction Science Senior 

WENDELBURG. BLAKE Wichita 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

WILSON, EVAN Abilene 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

WILSON. JEFF Abilene 

General Business Administration Junior 

YOESEL, MARK Morlll 

Food Science and Management Senior 




.-- 



w 



tfcatfj^rf 




Phi Gammas 



TOP ROW: Meg M. Pule, Jackie A. Mignano, 
Shery] D. Grace, Marsha L. Robinson, Jennifer S. 
Korchak, Tracy L. Komarek, Karen S. Wright. 
THIRD ROW: Jeanette E, Mitchell, Lori A. Whi- 
tehalr, Shell! A. Thompson, Elizabeth A. Harvell, 
Gayla L. Guard, Denlse M. Fleming, Denlse C. 
Mogge. SECOND ROW: Maria L. Newell, Diane 
L. Mershon, Gay A. Miller, Sandy K. Reynolds, 
Karen Hesemann. Connie Erwin, Kim J. Olson. 
BOTTOM ROW: Norma M. Lawrence, Theresa 
M. Fleming, Teresa D. Teel, Annette Taylor, Car- 
ol Young, Judy Schnacke. 




298 phi gamma delta 



Phi Kappa Tau 




ABRAMS, DAVID Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

BALES, STEVE Overland Park 

General Engineering Sophomore 

CARR, MARK Liberal 

Geology Senior 

CHANCE, MARVIN Liberal 

Finance Junior 

CRANFORD. CURTIS Ulysses 

Chemical Science Senior 

DUNLAP, VAN Wichita 

Accounting Sophomore 

FOGLEMAN, KEVIN Ringoes, N J 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

FRANCIS. SHANNON Liberal 

Marketing Senior 

FRIEDEL. MICHAEL Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

GIBBS. BEN Clay Center 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

HANNA. DAVID Wichita 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HILL, J.D Duncanvllle. Texas 

General Business Administration Senior 

IMPERIAL. BOB Warminister, Pa 

Bakery Science and Management Junior 

JOHNSON, GARY Bonner Springs 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

JONES, BRUCE Wichita 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore 

KEIRSEY. SCOTT Dexter, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

LONG, MICHAEL Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

POTTLE, PAUL West Gardiner. Maine 

Construction Science Senior 

REBECCA, DANIEL Champaign, 111 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

STILES, DAVID Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

THIERER. LARRY Ogden 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

WEATHERFORD, CRAIG Lenexa 

Computer Science Sophomore 



phi kappa tau 299 



Phi Kappa Theta ■ 

WOOLAR. JUDITH Housemother 

ARNOT, JAMES St. Louis. Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BALLINGER. ALAN Colwich 

Medical Technology Freshman 

BAHNER, JED Council Grove 

Pie Veterinary Medicine Senior 

BOGNER. DANIEL Galesburg 

Crop Protection Freshman 



BOGNER. DAVID Haven 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BOGNER. TIM Parsons 

Food Science and Management Sophomore 

BROWN. DANA Grinnell 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

CONNELL. LOUIS Leavenworth 

Computer Science Freshman 

DALTON, RANDALL Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

DAVIS. GARY Hays 

General Junior 

DRUMMOND. JERRY Leawood 

Construction Science Junior 

FINKE, ALAN St. Charles, Mo 

Pre Design Professions Junior 

GONZALES. SALVADOR Salina 

General Business Administration Junior 

GOTTSCHALK, MARK Hays 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

GREER. RICK Wilsey 

Agronomy Junior 

HOLLANDER. STEPHEN St. Louis. Mo. 

Architecture Senior 

KETTERMAN. MARK Salina 

Music Education Freshman 

KIERNAN. JOHN Salina 

Pre Law Senior 

KING. JOHN Olathe 

Biology Freshman 

KING. MICHAEL Oswego 

Nuclear Engineering . Senior 

KOEHN. CRAIG Marquette 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

LEWIS, GLENN Manhattan 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

LYTLE. RICHARD Junction City 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

MARION, STEPHEN Independence. Mo. 

Construciton Science Junior 

MOORE, CHRISTOPHER Junction City 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

MROSS, RICHARD Wichita 

Marketing Sophomore 

PFEFFER, SCOTT Chesterfield. Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

ROY. STEVE Altamont 

Construction Science Sophomore 

SCHLAFFER, MICHAEL Prairie Village 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SHAW. ROBERT Wichita 

General Business Administration Junior 

SHOCKLEY. MARK Shawnee 

Finance Senior 

SMITH, DENZIL Cherryvale 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

SMITH. KEVIN Kansas City 

Pre Design Professions Junior 

SMITH, SCOTT Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Freshman 

STEINLE, GRANT Parsons 

Physics Freshman 

URBANEK. ROD Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

VAZQUEZ, SHELDON Manhattan 

Medical Technology Junior 

WAGERS, CHRIS ......'..'.'.' Topeka 

General Junior 

WILLIAMS, TODD Topeka 

General Business Administration Junior 




300 phi kappa theta 






Pi Beta Phi 




COOMBS, DONNA Housemother 

ALONZA. KATHY Topeka 

Fashion Marketing Senior 

AREHART. B.J St. George 

Physical Therapy Senior 

ARMER. ALISON Leawood 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

BALL. SALLY Overland Park 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 



BALL. SUZY Overland Park 

Retail Floriculture Senior 

BARNES, DEBBIE Dodge City 

General Sophomore 

BARNOW, SONJA Topeka 

Family and Child Development Junior 

BARR, SUSAN Dodge City 

General Freshman 

BARTELS. JANET Hays 

Marketing Senior 

BASHAM. SUSAN Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

BRANSON. TANYA Hutchinson 

General Sophomore 

BUNCK. JULIE Everest 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BUNCK, MARY Everest 

Agronomy Freshman 

CHAPMAN. CINDY Creve Coeur. Mo. 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

COLLINS. JANA Hutchinson 

Dance Sophomore 

COOK. PATTI • Wlnfleld 

Accounting Senior 

CURRY. KELLY Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Senior 

DANNER, DIANNE Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communiations Junior 

DONNAN, TAMMY Manhattan 

Fashion Marketing Freshman 

DOWNING. BECKY Eureka 

General Sophomore 

DOWNING. DEBBIE Eureka 

Speech Pathology Senior 

DRYDEN. MARCIA Dodge City 

Accounting Senior 

EAGLETON. CAROL Salina 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

EXLINE, CHRIS ." Salina 

Art Sophomore 

EXLINE. JEAN Salina 

Marketing Freshman 

FAGAN, CONNIE Leawood 

General Business Junior 

FANSHER, JANET Garden City 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

FLEMMING. SUSAN McPherson 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

FLOYD, BECKY Sedan 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

FOGO, KAREN El Dorado 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

FREISENBORG. LAURIE Leawood 

Speech Pathology Senior 

GRAHAM, MICHELE Larned 

General Business Freshman 

GRAHAM. SHARON Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Senior 

GUTSCHENRITTER. DEBBIE Larned 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

HARTMAN, LESLIE Norton 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

HOLIDAY. HEIDI Overland Park 

Marketing Senior 

HOLMES. LISA Decatur. III. 

General Business Senior 

HOOKER, LISA Shawnee Mission 

General Business Sophomore 

HOWE. JANET Manhattan 

Physical Education Junior 

JANNE, KATHI Kansas City 

Accounting Junior 

JEFFERS, JOY Highland 

Finance Freshman 

JENNINGS, ELIZABETH Topeka 

General Freshman 

KELLY, KRISS Hutchinson 

General Freshman 

KINGSTON, EILEEN Holslngton 

Management Senior 



pi beta phi 301 



:._. 



PI Beta Phi 



KUEHL, KATIE ■ ■ ■ Leawood 

General Freshman 

LARSON, TERESA Hiawatha 

journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

LEISTER. LISA Salina 

General Sophomore 

LIEBL, SUSAN Dodge City 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

LOUD. SHEILA Shawnee 
Elementary Education Senior 

LOUK. STEPHANIE Shawnee 

Interior Design Freshman 

LOWE, PAMELA Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

LUTHI, DIANE Madison 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

LUTZ, LAURIE Rossville 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

MALONEY. KELLIE Wichita 

General Freshman 

MARTIN. PAMELA Salina 

Faahlon Marketing Senior 

MATTHEWS, SARAH Overland Park 

General Freshman 

MCGAW, TERRI Ft. Leavenworth 

Marketing Sophomore 

MCGIVNEY, MARY Abilene 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MURRAY. KIM Olathe 

Physical Education Senior 

NEELLY. MARLA Overland Park 

Pre-Profeealonal Elementary Senior 

NELSON. BARBARA Wichita 

Marketing Senior 

NEUSTROM. SARAH Prairie Village 

Agriculture Sophomore 

NORRIS, CINDY Holton 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

OFFUTT, LOIS Utica 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 



Charge it- Sally Ball, freshman in 
elementary education, Wendy 
Randall, sophomore in animal 
science and industry, Elaine 
Windsor, senior in interior design, 
and Sally Raymond, sophomore in 
elementary education, shop for 
sports wear labeled with greek 
logos. 




Cort Anderson 



302 pi beta phi 



L 




OLTJEN, SANDI Robinson 

Physical Education Sophomore 

OLTJEN, SUSAN Robinson 

General Business Administration Junior 

ONKEN, SALLY McPherson 

Sociology Junior 

OSWALT, SUSAN Hutchinson 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

PALEN, JUDY Scott City 

Home Economics Education Junior 



PANKRATZ. DIANE Wakefield 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

PEMBERTON. CINDY Wichita 

Home Economics Senior 

PENNEL, PAM Hiawatha 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

PERRIN, KIM Olathe 

General Freshman 

RANDALL, LYNN Wakeeney 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 



RANDALL. LAURA Wakeeney 

Pre-Dentlstry Senior 

RANDALL. WENDY Scott City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

RAYMOND. SALLY Wichita 

Dance Sophomore 

RAZOOK. SUZANNE Hesston 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

RE1D. MARCIA Topeka 

Marketing Sophomore 



RENFRO, MARGARET Charlotte, N C 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

RICE. CYNTHIA . . , Overland Park 

General Business Freshman 

RUTLEDGE. JANE Maple Hill 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SALTS, YOLONDA Holton 

Fashion Marketing Sophomore 

SARGENT. KAY Wichita 

Accounting Junior 



SCHULTZ, LORI Newton 

Pre-Law Freshman 

SCHWENSEN, MEG Clay Center 

Family and Child Development Junior 

SHAHEED. HANIA Manhattan 

Modern Language Junior 

SHAW, SHERLYN Overland Park 

Interior Design Freshman 

SHELTON. AMY Wichita 

Animal Science and industry Junior 

SISTRUNK. HOLLY Manhattan 

Art Senior 

SIUDA. NANCY Overland Park 

Management Freshman 

SKAER. SUSAN Little Rock. Ark 

General Freshman 

SLUSHER, PAULA Columbia, Mo 

Nutrition Sophomore 

STANBERRY, STEPHANIE Overland Park 

Genera] Business Freshman 



STEELE. SHARI Sallna 

Pre-Profeaslonal Elementary Senior 

STOCK, DEBBIE Leavenworth 

Management Freshman 

STOCK, MARY BETH Leavenworth 

Biology Freshman 

STROMGREN, BECKY Hays 

General Sophomore 

WARD. LAURA Stanley 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 



WESTHUSING, BRENDA Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

WILLIAMS. NANCY Overland Park 

Educational Business Senior 

WILLIAMSON, SARAH Clearwater 

Music Education Freshman 

WILTFONG, SUSAN Norton 

Pre-Design Profession Freshman 

WINDSOR. ELAINE Peabody 

Interior Design Senior 



WISCHROPP, SHERRILL El Dorado 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 



pi beta phi 303 



Pi Kappa Alpha - 

ROBISON. GRACE Housemother 

ALFARO, RAUL El Dorado 

Pre-Law Junior 

ANBLER. BRAD Topeka 

Radio-Television Senior 

BARBER, STEVE Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

BARLOW. SHAWN Shawnee Mission 

General Junior 

BEASTON. BROOK Marlon 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BUENGER. JIM Prarle Village 

Physical Education Senior 

CHANDLER. LARRY Richmond 

Finance Junior 

CHRISTENSEN, ERIC Concordia 

Pre Medicine Freshman 

CLAIR, KELLY Lewis 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

COLDIRON. CRAIG Overland Park 

Pre-Denistry Sophomore 

CONWAY. HARRY Parsons 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

CORDOVA, TERRY Denver, Colo. 

General Engineering Sophomore 

CURRY. ROBERT WoosJer. Ohio 

Construction Science Senior 

DICE, JAMES El Dorado 

Civil Engineering Junior 

DUMLER. BRAD Russell 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

EARNSHAW. RICHARD Overland Park 

Construction Science Freshman 

EWING. DOUG Pratt 

Accounting Junior 

FISHER JACK Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

GRIFFITH. JEFF Marlon 

Construction Science Junior 

GROVES. MARK Overland Park 

General Engineering Junior 

HACKLEY, MICHAEL Junction City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

HALLER. DARREN Lenexa 

Business Administration Junior 

HAYES. JERRY Albuquerque. N.M. 

Marketing Senior 

HEITMANN. RICK Frontenac. Mo. 

Construction Science Senior 

HIBBS, DAVID Chanute 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

KATLIN. JERRY Mission 

Management Junior 

KOHLRUS. MARK Junction City 

Accounting Senior 

LAGEMANN. JOHN Concordia 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

LAIR, CASEY Plqua 

Management Junior 

LESHER. DANA Overland Park 

Construction Science Senior 

LESHER, ERIC Overland Park 

Finance Sophomore 

LICKTEIG, RONALD Garnet 

Pre Medicine Junior 

LINE, RICHARD Russell 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

LINE. STEVEN Russell 

Management Sophomore 

MALNICOF. DARYLL Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

MCAFEE, KURT Pratt 

Physical Education Junior 

MCCLUSKEY, MICHAEL El Dorado 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

MCENDARFFER. DAVE Overland Park 

Social Science Senior 

MCWILLIE, BILL .[ Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MILLER. BRYAN Lewis 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

NELSON. CLAYTON St. Joseph. Mo. 

Mechanical Engineering , , . . Senior 

NOVICK, PAUL Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

O'NEAL, KERRY Overland Park 

Pre Dentistry Freshman 

PAPPAS. GREG Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 



304 pi kappa alpha 




Pi Kappa Alpha 




PETERSON, MONTY Overland Park 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

PHILLIPS, MARK Abilene 

Finance Junior 

RASMUSSEN, DOUG Pratt 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

REYNOLDS, WILLIAM Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SCHIELE, RICH Junction City 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

SCHMIDT, DENNIS Caldwell 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

SCHNOEBELEN, MICA Great Bend 

Agronomy Freshman 

SHAW, MORGAN HARRY Russell 

General Freshman 

SMITH, EDWARD Chanute 

Business Administration Freshman 

SMITH. MARC Marlon 

Food Science and Management Senior 

SMITH, MARK Overland Park 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

STACK. BRIAN Overland Park 

Management Senior 

STACK, DOUG Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

THOMPSON. DREW Leawood 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

THOMPSON, ROCK Leawood 

Construction Science Freshman 

UNDERWOOD, MICHAEL Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

WAHLE. RODNEY Junction City 

Social Science Senior 

WHITAKER. SCOTT Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

WHITE, DAVE Salina 

Accounting Junior 

WUELLNER, GRANT Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

YONKE. STEVEN Mission 

General Engineering Freshman 




Sweethearts of 
the Shield 
and Diamond 



TOP ROW: Laura A. Vlvona, Elaine O'Neal, 
Rhonda Miller, Sharlen, R. Heltrnann, Sandy 
M. Clark, Gretchen K, Smith, Trudy M, Daub- 
er, Theresa R. Vladar, Lisa M, Blgler. THIRD 
ROW: Nancy C. Nichols, Pam J. Llppold, Su- 
san E. Cain, Sarah E. Merrill, Debbie L. Ches- 
nutt, Virginia G. Thornton, Anne B. Carpenter, 
Diane G. Miller, Kathy G. Hagen. SECOND 
ROW: Susan E. Thomas, Lori A. Toiman, 
Dana J. Duden, Julie A. Youngdoff, Kelly S. 
Welch, Robyn A. LeVeau, Catherine A. Peter- 
son. BOTTOM ROW: Shaft R. Albrecht, Mary 
B. Dove, Sherrill R. Wischropp, Jolene A. Ri- 
ley, Shawn Lampkin, Carolyn S. Thornton, 
Marilynn K. Kissinger. 



pi kappa alpha 305 



Pi Kappa Phi 



ANDREWS, JIM Pierceville 

General Engineering Freshman 

BENTEMAN, GLEN Clifton 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

BOWKER, LEROY Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

CABY. GLEN Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

CANADA. RICHARD Florissant. Mo. 

Architecture Senior 

DUNBAR, DIRK Garden City 

Psychology Junior 

GEORGE. DAVID Bethlahcm. Pa. 

Architecture Senior 

GOULDIE. JAMES Mankato 

Accounting Senior 

GRIMES. ROB Prairie Village 

General Engineering Fresh 

HOPKINS, JOHN Prairie Village 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

JOHNSON, BART Meriden 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

JOSL1N, JAY Argonia 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

KEEGAN, DAVID Leawood 

Biology Freshman 

KINTNER. KURT Manhattan 

Computer Science Senior 

LEE, DOUGLAS Kansas City, Mo 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

LOCKHART, JIM Manhattan 

Finance Sophomore 

MADER. RANDY Jennings 

General Business Administration Junior 

MALLON. EUGENE Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

MCELLHINEY, ROSS Manhattan 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

MCGILL, MATTHEW Manhattan 

Geology Junior 

MEISTER. JEFFREY Great Bend 

General Business Administration Senior 

PENROD. KENT Kansas City 

Construction Science Senior 

PYLE, DON Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

REEVES. DAVID Grandvlew. Mo. 

Pre-Deslgn Professions Senior 

SCHOBER, RANDALL Great Bend 

General Engineering Freshman 

SKELTON, KERRY Aurora, Co. 

General Business Administration Freshman 

STRAFUSS, DANNY Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

SUDDUTH, CAREY Shawnee 

Marketing Junior 

TAYLOR, TONY Goodland 

Food Science and Management Freshman 

TERRY, MARK Honolulu, Hi 

General Engineering Junior 

THOMPSON, ERIC Manhattan 

Engineering Technology Junior 

WILLIAMS, CRAIG Osage City 

General Engineering Freshman 

WILLIAMS. DEWEY Shawnee 

Construction Science Senior 

WINTEROWD. BRIAN Union. Mo. 

Landscape Architecture Senior 



Little Sisters of the 
Star and Lamp 

TOP ROW: Lois Y. Mote, Terri L. Epler, Jill 
Wlnterowd, Sandy Molltor, Gayla Jones, Kathy 
Sanford THIRD ROW: Kim R. Kindle, Nancy 
A. Judge. Rosa Teats, Susan Wlebe, Tracey L. 
Plttmnn. SECOND ROW: Joan C. Neaderhlser, 
Deborah E. Olsen, Lana K. Davis, Diane M. Stef- 
(en, Klmberlce Crlghton, Paula R. Allison. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Carla E. Trumble, Tracy L. Miller, 
Debbie J. Jones, Nancy L. Unruh, Klley A. Lea- 
dabrand. 



306 pi kappa phi 




Sigma Alpha Epsilon 




VAN REED, LOTTIE Housemother 

ALLINGHAM, STEVE Manhattan 

Management Junior 

BAKER, DOYLE Dallas, Texas 

General Engineering Freshman 

BARK YOUMB. MICHAEL Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

BECK, MICHAEL Kinsley 

Agriculture Economics Sophomore 

BECKER, MICHALE Wichita 

Pre-I-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BISSELL, MARK Salina 

PreVeterinary Medicine Freshman 

BRADY. PETER St. Louis. Mo. 

Chemistry Senior 

BROMICH, BRADLEY Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

BURTON. PATRICK Plalnvllle 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CALOVICH, BRIAN Roeland Park 

Engineering Technology Junior 

CLAOVICH, DAVID Roeland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

CASTOR, DAVID Lenexa 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

CHANDLER, JOHN Newton 

General Business Administration Freshman 

CHRISTIE. KENNETH Holyoke. Col. 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

DAY, RUSTY Wellington 

General Business Administration Freshman 

FERGUSON. JIM Overland Park 

Marketing Senior 

FISER, MIKE Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

FISHER. MITCH Narka 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

GARVERT. RANDALL Plalnvllle 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

GASSMAN, RANDY Dighton 

General Engineering Sophomore 

GEIST, DAVID Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

G1LLAN. JONATHAN Garden City 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

HALE, DAVID Wichita 

Pre-Pharmacy Junior 

HASSENFLU, GARRISON Leawood 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HANNENFLU. MARK Leawood 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HILL, GARY Benton 

Agriculture Freshman 

HOOVER, TOM Garden City 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

HORNBAKER, KY Wichita 

Construction Science Sophomore 

HOUGH, DARALD Salina 

Finance Freshman 

HRDY, RAYMOND Omaha, Neb. 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

INNES, KIP Manhattan 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

JACKSON, KELLY Wichita 

General Junior 

JENSEN, DANIEL Hutchinson 

PreVeterinary Medicine Freshman 

JOHNSON, JIM Colorado Springs, Colo, 

Construction Science Sophomore 

JUDD, GARY Fairbury, Neb. 

PreDesign Professions Freshman 

KING, BRYAN Lenexa 

Biology Sophomore 

KIRKEGUARD, JON _ Topeka 

General Engineering Junior 

KNAMILLER, KEITH Overland Park 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

LACY. PAUL Shawnee Mission 

General Business Administration Senior 

LADDISH, CHRIS Overland Park 

Computer Science Freshman 

L1PPOLD. BILL Leawood 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

MCCLURE. MACK Alta Vista 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

MIDDLETON. MICHAEL Overland Park 

General Engineering Sophomore 

MUELLER, MIKE Wichita 

Biochemistry Junior 



sigma alpha epsilon 307 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



PETERSON, ARTHUR Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

PITTS. BRENT Salina 

Genera] Business Administration Freshman 

REDD. BROOK Overland Park 

Pre Dentistry Sophomore 

RICHARDS, MIKE Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

ROBERTSON. MARK Shawnee Mission 

Genera] Business Administration Senior 

ROONEY. BILL Garden City 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

SCHAULIS. RICK Indian Hill, Ohio 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SEGAL. HOWARD Manhattan 

Management Junior 

SKINNER, MARK Clay Center 

Political Science Junior 

SMITH. BARRY Odell, Neb 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SMITH, BRUCE Salina 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SMITH. SCOTT Leawood 

General Sophomore 

STETSON, ALAN Leawood 

Finance Senior 

SUMMERS. CRAIG Wlnfleld 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

TREMPY, GREG Overland Park 

Biology Senior 

UNGERER. JOHN Marysville 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

UNGLES, JOEL Satanta 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

WERTH, BRAD Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

WESTHUSIN. VANCE Natoma 

Food Science and Management Senior 

WILSON, MARK Turon 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

WILSON, MAX Turon 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

WRIGHT, GREGORY Topeka 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 



308 



Little Sisters 
Minerva 



TOP ROW: Sarah M. Matthews, Margaret A. Renfro, 
Tammy L. Fitzgerald, Kristen A. Hartensteln, Lorl S. 
Schlager, Christie J. Campbell, Tracy A. Gromer, 
Carolyn S. Dobratz, Sherl R. Youngers. THIRD 
ROW: Sally Hankomer, Sally Ball, Leslie Rose, Gerl 
Greene, Kelly Chappell, Sue Bernlca, Ann Dayvault, 
Janls Pray. SECOND ROW: Chert E. Hayman, Liz 
Drees, Sara K. Skaer, Denlse C. Gerlchten, Nancy 
Reese, Linda Dobratz, Bonnie Ross. BOTTOM ROW: 
Sharl D. Fulhage, M. Susan Drees, Judy K. Irvine, Kim 
R. Petersllle, Vlckl L. Phillips, Dee A. Relnke. 




TOP ROW: Peggy S. Nass, Sharon A. Lincoln, Elaina 
K. Hatfield, Vlckl L Waller, Deb L. Chappell, Tanya 
R Poling. Jody L. Brookshler, Joan E. Lopez. THIRD 
ROW: Sharon L. Vanler, Karen J. Ferguson, Gina M. 
Ross, Debbie L. Reynolds, Pamela D. Marvin, Trlcla 
A. Carney, Sandy S. Klngsley, Peggy M. Miller. SEC- 
OND ROW: Julie A. Poulsen, Vlckl S. Johnson, Can- 
dy K. Campbell, Kim K. Pheffer, Kellle L. Maloney, 
Jean Palma, Kathy A. Taylor, Molly E. Meade. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Tammy A. West, Janet L. Fansher, Mi- 
chelle L. Norrls, Cheryl F. Kruse, Chrlstl L. Dutton, 
Melodle F. Joyce. 



.JC 



Sigma Chi 




ALLEN. JOE Hutchinson 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

ANDERSON, ROBERT Kansas City 

General Freshman 

BLOOD, GILMAN Wichita 

Construction Science Sophomore 

BOLDING. JAY Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

BOSCH, ERIC Idana 

Adult Education Junior 

CARSON, JOHN Oak Grove, Mo. 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

CORLEY, DAVID Kansas City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

DAWSON, DAVID Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

EGGLESTON, RANDY Mulvane 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

HAREN, CHARLES Leawood 

Construction Science Freshman 

HENNES, BRIAN Alta Vista 

General Freshman 

HOSLER, CHRIS Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

JACOBSON, DANE Wamego 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

KERNS. KELLY Mulvane 

Architecture Senior 

KNOPICK, WILLIAM Wichita 

Construction Science Freshman 

KOSTER, BARRY Cawker City 

Accounting Junior 

LARSON. MARK Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

LAWRENCE, JEFF Marquette 

Modern Language Sophomore 

MILLER, CHRIS Prairie Village 

Construction Science Junior 

MILLER, LAURENCE Leawood 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MILLER. TIM Prairie Village 

Marketing Senior 

MINO, STEVE Leawood 

Construction Science Junior 

MORRIS. RONALD Kansas City, Mo. 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MURRAY, TED Manhattan 

Astrology Junior 

NUZMAN, JOHN Kansas City, MO 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

OPPY, PATRICK Manhattan 

Sophomore Management 

PATTERSON, DAVID Dwlght 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

PEINE. RON Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

PETERS, TIM Wichita 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

PIROTTE, DAN Leawood 

Veterinary Medicine , Freshman 




Little Sigma 's 



TOP HOW: Martina L. Mumford, Janet L. Bu- 
senbark, Serena K. Frederick, Diane P. Doctor, 
Karen E. Hovey, Denise A. Gatzoulls, Lesley 
Hause, THIRD ROW: Sue Samuels, Jane E. 
Gottsch, Susan C. Miller, Mary J. Thorpe, Diane 
J. Russell, Kay A. Sargent, Jan M. Jordan. SEC- 
OND ROW: Virginia L. Waller, Lorrl K. Newth, 
Gail L. Pennybacker, Jill A. McKlnnie, Linda F. 
Darartg, Kerrl Koch, Mary Jacobson. BOTTOM 
ROW: Karen E. Gati, Lynda L. Mumford, Court- 
ney A. Walde, Kim A. Eiston, Kenna J. Jenkins, 
Cathy L. Richards, 



Sigma Chi 309 



Igma Chi 



PORTER. BOB Prarle Village 

Social Science Senior 

PRIEBE. WILLIAM Wichita 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

PURDUM. MIKE Overland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 

REIN, BRAD Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SCHNEIDER. STEVE Overland Park 

Sociology Senior 

SEAGO. MARK Wichita 

Pre-Law Freshman 

SUITER. ROBB Macksvlile 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

TEARNEY. PHILIP Leaurood 

Accounting Senior 

TURPIN, STEVE Jefferson City. Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

VOGEL. ERIC Lenexa 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

WANDS. HAYDEN Kansas City 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

WATKINS. PAUL Roeland Park 

Finance Senior 

WELDON, CHRIS Prarie Village 

General Business Administration Freshman 

WELLS. JIM Wichita 

General Business Administration Junior 

WHITE. STEPHEN Leawood 

Microbiology Senior 





John Grce 

Bump 'Em- Paul Watkins, senior 
in finance, and Steve White, 
senior in biology, play a game of 
backgammon as a study break. 






310 sigma chi 






Sigma Nu 




BAUM, JON Stilwell 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BERGH, WILLIAM Marlenthal 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

Bolln, Andrew Mission 

Marketing Senior 

BOLIN, MATTHEW Mission 

General Business Administration Freshman 

BRAUN. STEVE Topeka 

General Freshman 

BRAUN, TOM Hays 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

CALVERT, CHRISTOPHER Leawood 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

CLEVELAND, BILL Norfolk, Neb. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

COHN, MICHAEL Prairie Village 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

DAVENPORT, MIKE Salina 

History Freshman 

DODDERIDGE, JOHN Shawnee Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

F1LLEY. TONY Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

FIONDA, DAVID Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

FORTHAUS, TODD St. Louis, Mo. 

Construction Science Junior 

FRANKLIN, CLIFF Columbia, Mo 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

GASPER, KERRY Wichita 

Labor Relations Junior 

GILLER, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

GILLER. THOMAS Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 

GROVE, TOM Olathe 

Marketing Junior 

GUTH, JEFFERY Shawnee 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HARPER, STEPHEN Prairie Village 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HARPER. WILLIAM Prairie Village 

General Business Administration Senior 

HATCH, CHARLES Salina 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

JOHNSON. DANIEL Overland Park 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

JONES. MARK Sedan 

Marketing Senior 

JONES. MIKE Sedan 

Construction Science Junior 

KASITZ. GARY Newton 

Construction Science Sophomore 

KONZ, STEVE Manhattan 

Food Science and Management Junior 

KRISKE, TIMOTHY Leawood 

General Business Administration Junior 

LAND, ROBERT Osawatomle 

Horticulture Senior 

LAUDAN, KENNETH Overland Park 

General Business Administration Junior 

LEATHERBY. DENNIS Lenexa 

Accounting Junior 

LYNCH. JON Wellington 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

MARTIN, JIM Overland Park 

Management Sophomore 

MARTIN. JOHN Leawood 

Finance Sophomore 

MATHEWSON, STEVE Seneca 

Construction Science Sophomore 

MILES, GREG Columbia, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MURPHY, BRENT Clinton, Iowa 

Engineering Technology Senior 

MURRY, TIM Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

NORDYKE, MARK Wichita 

General Business Administration Junior 

ORTH, MAX Andale 

General Junior 

PASMORE, SCOTT Stilwell 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

PELTZER, JOHN Andale 

General Junior 

PETREHN. KEVIN Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

POLLOM, GLEN Topeka 

General Business Administration Sophomore 



sigma nu 



311 



Sigma Nu 



PRESTA, KELLY Scott Citj. 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

RINNER. JAMES Topeka 

Construction Science Sophomore 

ROTH. STEVEN Elllsville, Mo. 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

SHEPHERD, MIKE Wichita 

Geology Freshman 

STUDER, CRAIG Columbia, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SURBEY, CHRISTOPHER Overland Park 

General Business Administration Senior 

VITZTUM, MICHAEL Hays 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

WALLACE, TROY Wellington 

General Freshman 

WILSON, TIM Longbeach, Cal 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

WINGER. CHARLES Wellington 

Pre-Law Senior 

WOOD, TY Manhattan 

PreVeterinary Medicine Freshman 

Z1NN, JAMES PraWe Village 

General Freshman 




Little Sisters 

of the White Rose 



TOP ROW: Belinda Nordyke, Sharon Graham, 
Linda Nordyke, Julia Willis, Nancy Kramer, Shari 
Hanson, Judy Brull, Cathy Baldwin, Linda Vent- 
sam, Cheryl Hulsing. THIRD ROW: Cheryl Rei- 
mal, Lisa Morgan, Pattle Freschett, Suzy Barsa- 
mlan, Karen Srutterheim, Linda Urick, Lynn Wy- 
tle, Carolyn Tetter, Kelli Kerr. SECOND ROW: 
Kelly Curry, Courtney Green, Pamela Martin, 
Kris Fionda, Sharilyn Broers, Shelly Theis, Kathy 
Simpson. Carrie Oliven, Diane Pankratz, Pamela 
Stupas. BOTTOM ROW: Maxine Miller, Su- 
zanne Gentile, Nancy Sluda, Kelly Bolte, Paige 
Howard, Lorie Undemuth, Amy Fountain. 




312 



sigma nu 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 




SHUPE. CORA Housemother 

ALDR1CH. CHARLES Larned 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

ALLEN, ALVIN Leawood 

Construction Science Senior 

ALLEN. DOUGLAS Sublette 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

AVERILL. MARK Kansas City 

Business Administration Senior 

BAKER. DOUGLAS Salina 

General Freshman 

BARRINGTON, TIM Overland Park 

Construction Science Junior 

BECKER. SCOTT Meriden 

Finance Junior 

BERGEN, RICHARD Salina 

General Sophomore 

BILLAU, BRENT Salina 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

BLAND DOUGLAS Larned 

General Engineering Freshman 

BOURK DANIEL uS23 

Social Science c.„,„, 

EJOOKOVE "• TIM Coffey v.Ue 

Physical Education c„„i„, 

BROWN. MICHAEL Clay Center 

finance ... c l. 

brown .paul ..•.■.-.•". ":::::::::::;::::;;;;;;;;. F Cs en 

Electrical Engineering Jumor 

BROWN.STEVE Clay Center 

Accounting F,„,h m „„ 

BROWN^ERRY ..V. 6*.^ ft 

S™:::::::::::::::;::;;::;;;;;;;;;;^ 

Journalism and Mass Communication . . Senior 

BUSH. SCOTT •. ■.•/.■: Meriden 

CH C ALTAS E lEF e F r,n3 ^ZZ 
Horticulture Freshman 

CHASTAIN. BLAKE Hutchison 

General Engineering Freshman 

CLARK. PATRICK Hays 

Accounting Senior 

CODY. JAY * Coffeyvllle 

Horticulture Senior 

COX. CHRIS Newton 

Business Administration Freshman 

CRUTCHFIELD. CHARLES Coffeyvllle 

Marketing Senior 

CUMMINGS, THOMAS Wjch 

Natural Resource Management ... " ' c„_ h „ m ' „ 

DEINES KELLY Sophomore 

Pre-Des,gn Professions '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. Frhhm.n 

DURLER. KEVEN tV j ? 

Management D ° dg t C " V 

DYER". MICHAEL i"" 10 ' 

Business Administration f 

FLICK. ROCKY . ... Ju , r "° J r 

Management ... W, , n,,eld 

Junior 

FOSTER, JIM Wichita 

Pre-Law Junior 

GAYARDT. TOM Lawrence 

Business Administration Junior 

BLANDER. CHIP 1 1 Overland Park 

Marketing Junior 

GRAY TED Goodland 

Agronomy Sophomore 

GUSTAFSON. JAMES McPherson 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

HEINTZELMAN. MIKE Leavenworth 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

HERZOG, MARK Tecumseh 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

HESHER, TODD Kansas City. Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

HOBBS. ANDREW Coffeyvllle 

Social Science Senior 

HOGAN, DAN St. Louis, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HURLBUTT. TODD Coffeyvllle 

Marketing Senior 

JACKSON, GREG Salina 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

JACKSON, MARK Wichita 

General Sophomore 

JOHNSTON, KIRK Goodland 

Agronomy Sophomore 

KRATZNER, KENT Geneseo 

Marketing Junior 



sigma phi epsilon 313 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 



KUHN, MICHAEL Salina 

Management Junior 

LANGTON, TERRY Manhattan 

Construction Science Junior 

LARSON, KENT Hiawatha 

Medical Technology Junior 

LIEBL. STEPHEN Dodge City 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

LIEBL. TOM Dod 3c City 

General Junior 

LYTLE, DOUG Merriam 

Construction Science Freshman 

MAY. WALTER Overland Park 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

MCCLURE. MIKE Goodland 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

MCELGUNN. KEVIN Dodge City 

Chemical Engineering Freshmen 

MEIER. STEVEN Scott City 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MERMIS. GREG Salina 

Accounting Senior 

MERR1MAN. DONN Manhattan 

Physical Education Sophomore 

MILLS, MARK Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

MUNSON. KIRK Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communication Senior 

NUNNINK. LEO Shawnee 

Construction Science Sophomore 

ORR. BRIAN Lewis 

Physical Education Junior 

PAULSEN. DAVID Scott City 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

PAULSON. LON Hutchison 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

PENDERGAST. STEVE Dodge City 

Marketing Senior 

PHILLIPS. STEVE Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

PIERCE. BILL Topeka 

Business Administration Sophomore 

PRICE. BENJAMIN Lawrence 

General Engineering Freshman 

REDMAN. PAT Dodge City 

General Sophomore 

RICHWINE, DAVID Salina 

Business Administration Junior 

ROBINSON. BARRY Topeka 

Business Administration Graduate Student 




Sisters of the 
Golden Heart 

TOP ROW: Joni L. Webber, Christine A. loanl- 
dis, Tracy D. Warclell, Susan M. Liebl, Debbie B. 
Barnes, Sue F. StigaJI, Regina A. Clare, Jane E. 
Klumpp, Cindy K. Pemberton, Jenny L. Jame- 
son, Ann A Bloxom. THIRD ROW: Karen A. 
Schmidt, Tanya R. Branson, Becky L. Stoskopf, 
Klm J. Perrln, Caren A. Coe, Shelly L. Vanover, 
Bev A. Luebbers, Terrl S. Burkhead, Debbie A. 
Stock, Jana R. Bevler. SECOND ROW: Mau- 
reen A. Meehan, Anne F. Williams, Bev Kool, 
Deanna Orr, Nina E. Spencer, Jane M. Rutledge, 
Kim K. Antenen, Jill R. Swalm, Margaret L. Lob- 
meyer, Marcia K Dryden. BOTTOM ROW: 
Pattl A. Werner, April Titsworth Rhonda K. 
Werner, Cheryl A. Semrad, Carol S. Eagleton, 
Marty Miller, Lisa C. Broadie, Sarah S. Neus- 
trom, Marcia L. Reid. 



314 sigma phi epsilon 




ROESSLER, MARK Coffeyville 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

SAGESER, MARK Prarie Village 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

SCHUETTE, RANDY Abilene 

Finance Sophomore 

STOSKOPF, STEVE Valley Falls 

Finance Junior 

THORSON. JEFF Elllnwood 

Social Science Senior 

TICKEL, LARRY Salina 

General Engineering Sophomore 

TILLERY, BRUCE Valley Falls 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

TUCKER. KENNETH Mound Valley 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

WALKER. KEVIN Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

WEBBER. DUANE Salina 

Accounting Senior 

WHITE. JIM Newton 

Business Administration Freshman 

WIERMAN. ED Brownell 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, CHARLES Kansas City, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WILLIAMS. JOHN Dodge City 

Marketing Senior 

WINGERT, BART Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Junior 

WINKLER. JOSEPH Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

WINTER. STEVE Newton 

General Freshman 




Wet 'n wild- Sigma Phi Epsilon 
pledges ' come out on the wet end of 
a water fight with the actives. 



sigma phi epsilon 315 



Tau 




a Epsilon 

ARONSON, WILLIAM Overland Park 

General Freshman 

BESLER, GREGORY Topeka 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

BLASI. WAYNE Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BOIS, DAVID Prairie Village 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BOOK. DON Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

BREMER, TIM Prairie Village 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

CONNOR, DAVID Overland Park 

General Freshman 

COTTON, STEVE Scott City 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

COX, CRAIG Silver Lake 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

DOMNICK, MIKE Harper 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

DUTY, KEN Wichita 

Pre-Education Freshman 

ESSER. JAKE Topeka 

General Business Administration Senior 

FOSTER. BRIAN Wichita 

Pre Law Freshman 

FRITSON, KEVIN Prairie Village 

Architecture Junior 

GAGE, KEVIN Prairie Village 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

GALLEHUGH. KURT Prairie Village 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

GARVER, DANIEL Severy 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GILBERT, CLIFFORD Manhattan 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

GINTHER, JIM Salina 

Accounting Junior 

HELINE, JEFF Salina 

Construction Science Junior 

HIGGASON, JAMES Norton 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

JAMES. ERIC Larned 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

JASO, RON Wichita 

Computer Science Freshman 

JENNINGS, RON Salina 

Finance Sophomore 

KALBACH, VINCE Leoti 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

KARSON, CHRIS Overland Park 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

KREUTZER. TIMOTHY Scott City 

Accounting Freshman 

LAMBERT. BART Overland Park 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

LANGLEY, GLEN Prairie Village 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

LANPHER, CURT Tranton, Mo 

Construction Science Junior 

L1LE, DAVID Leawood 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

LOGAN, STEVE , Salina 

General j unlor 

LUL1NG. VICTOR Topeka 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

MCCRACKEN. KEVIN Overland Park 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MCKENZIE. JON Fremont, Neb 

Biology Junior 

MCNEIL. MONTY Hutchinson 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

MULANAX. STEVE Abilene 

Fine Arts Sen,,,, 

NELSON, RONALD Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

ONEIL TODD . Salina 

gSK&v {55 

General Freshman 

PRESTON, BRIAN p ralr ,e Village 

Pre Nursing Freshman 

PRESTON. STEVE p ralrle Village 

General Engineering Junior 

RE1CHMUTH, KEVIN Llnco | n , Neb 

Accounting Junior 

REICHMUTH, TODD Lincoln. Neb 

General Business Administration Freshman 

RENFRO, CRAIG Salina 

Journalism and Mass Cmmunlcallons Junior 




316 tau kappa epsilon 




Humpty Dumpty- Members of 
Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity line 
up for pics in front of their house. 




RUDER, JIM Salina 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

SCULLY. MICHAEL Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

SIMS, RANDY Berrygton 

Political Science Junior 

SLAVEN. JEFFERY Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

SMITH. TODD Leotl 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

STREETS. BRADLEY Fredonia 

General Freshman 

TALLEY. JOE Overland Park 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

THOMPSON, STEVE Salina 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

TREBILOCOCK, GREG Hutchinson 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

VANLANDINGHAM, DAVID Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Sophmore 

WEARING. PATRICK Salina 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophmore 

WIECHMNA, TROY Scott City 

Genera] Freshman 

ZIMMERMAN. JEFF Salina 

Computer Science Sophmore 

ZIMMERMAN. MARK Salina 

Marketing Senior 



Daughters of Diana 

TOP ROW: Sherl M. McGonagle, Allison C. 
McKlm, Mailly A deJesus, Rebecca D Crow, 
Dana L. Futrelle, Laurie L. Weber, Sue M. Whit- 
ney. THIRD ROW. Susan K. Welgel, Janice E. 
Walsh, Karen S. Baranclk, Shannon K, Crlss, An- 
nette J. Krehblel, Terrie L. Neas. SECOND 
ROW: Loretta M. Nlncl, Llssie A. McPherron, 
Peri A. Plumb, Karen K. Blasl, Leighanne E. Best. 
BOTTOM ROW: Jane A. Mangold, Elizabeth J. 
Kolarlk, Kathleen M. Lyons, Tammy R. Manning, 
Lori A. Evans, Michelle L. Carroll. 



TOP ROW: Mary J. Eckenberg. Lisa K. Hlght, 
Karen L. Wright, Kelly D. Yeargin, Pam A. Mead- 
ows, Perlann Stevenson, Barbara D. Hattendorf, 
Kimberly S. Bohe. THIRD ROW: Mary B. 
Heimer, Leslie L. Hartman, Jana S. Fields, Jeri- 
lyn K. Erskin, Jalue Woodbury, Leah J. Miller, 
Kristine A. Stark. SECOND ROW: Kelly K. 
Hapke, Deborah A. Mosburg, Sherrl M. Young, 
Kaleen S. Klrkendall, Kristy A. Rapp, Julie E. 
Retake, Sherry J. Schmttt, Carmen Y. Cutler. 
BOTTOM ROW: Cynthia D. Risen. Julie L. 
Pearce, Deena R. Krebs, Jeanine M. Mealy, Tacy 
L. Keith, Connie S. Coats, Ronda K. Bergren. 
Melissa A. Miller. 



tau kappa epsilon 317 



Theta Xi 



KIMBROUGH, SUE Housemother 

ADAMS. MIKE Manhattan 

Engineering Technology Junior 

ANDERSON, MICHAEL Bird City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BEAT, MICHAEL Cunningham 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

BOYER, JOHNNY Kingman 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BUCK. WILLIAM Marysvllle 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

COONROD. DOUGLAS Overland Park 

Fine Arts Junior 

DILLINGHAM, KEVIN Warrensburg, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

ERICSON, SHANNON Marquette 

General Sophomore 

FERGUSON. DAVID Lindsborg 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

FREUDIENTHAL, LEONARD St. Joseph, Mo 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

FREY, JAY Abilene 

Food Science and Management Junior 

GLEASON, JAMES Shawnee Mission 

General Engineering Freshman 

GR1ER, ROGER Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

GUNDERSEN, JAMES Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

HERMAN, DOUGLAS Atchison 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HULSE. COLLIN Manhattan 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

IDEKER, CURTIS Whiting 

General Engineering Freshman 

KARLIN, JERRY Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KOEDAM, REMCO Zelst, Netherlands 

Economics Freshman 

KRAMER, FRANK Tonganoxie 

General Engineering Freshman 

KRAUS. KARL Valley Center 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

KUMMER, ANTHONY Great Bend 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

KURTH, TIMOTHY Offerle 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

LETOURNEAU. JOHN Wichita 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

LONG, CHARLES Beloit 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MAY. KURT Valley Center 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

MCCULLY, MICHAEL Eldorado 

General Business Administration Freshman 

MCCULLY. ROBERT Eldorado 

Computer Science Junior 

MCKITTRICK. RICHARD Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

MISAK. ALEX Caldwell 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

MONRAD. JOHN New Providence. N.J. 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

MURPHY, RUSS Manhattan 

Geology Sophomore 

OWENS, STEVE K Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

PIESCHL, RICK Minneapolis 

General Engineering Freshman 

RAINMAN, KERMIT Ulysses 

General Freshman 

RICE. ROBERT Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communication Senior 

RUSSELL. ROD St. John 

Pre-Law Senior 

SCHAEDE, KENT Wichita 

General Engineering Freshman 

SMITH, RAY Tribune 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SPEARS. TIM Parsons 

Pre-Medlclne Junior 

THOMSON. BRUCE Deephaven. Maine 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

TUCKER, DENNIS Wichita 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

WALTER, DAVE Beloit 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

WINDHOLZ, RICK Augusta 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 




m/, at ~ 





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318 theta xi 



Triangle 




COLLINS. MICHAEL Harrisonville, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

DEMONCHAUX, THEODORE Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DEWYKE, JON Cheyenne. Wyo. 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

DEWYKE. MIEK Cheyenne. Wyo. 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

DUNN, DANA Lawrence 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

DUONG, MINH Larned 

General Engineering Sophomore 

EHNEN. RUSSELL Smlthvllle. Mo. 

Architecture Senior 

FORD, TOD Abilene 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

FOX. WILLIAM St Louis, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

FRANKLIN, THOMAS Cincinnati, Ohio 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HURFORD, DANIEL Overland. Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

JOHNSON. KURT Naperville. Ill 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

LEWIS. LINTON Piedmont, Kansas 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

LINDAHL. PETER Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

MASTERS, MIKE Troy 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

MAU. WALTER Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

NATOLI. BART ..: Eawego. NY. 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

OREILLY. DAVE ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering .... Junior 

ORNELAS. BEN1GNO . Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions '.' Sophomore 

PETERSON. WILLIAM Greely 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

RAINES. THOMAS Weatwood 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

REDDY. PAUL Kansas City. Mo. 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

REINECKE. BRYAN Overland 

Civil Engineering Senior 

ROBERTS. WILLIAM Pomona 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

RODENBAUGH, DAVID St Marys 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

STAUDENMAIER. DANIEL Troy 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

SWIDERSK1. FRANK Leavenworth 

Engineering Technology Junior 

VISENTIN. PETER Wapplngera Fall. N.Y. 

Architecture Senior 



Tri-Angels 



TOP ROW: Karen M. Hicks, Pamela I. Van 
Horn, Natalie A. Bullock, Julie W. Rundell, Lisa 
M. Santry. THIRD ROW: Mary E. Blattner, Lin- 
da K. Goddard, Jennifer L. Kipp, Jenny L. Horn- 
ing. SECOND ROW: Judy A. Heeht, Sandy K, 
Steele, Janice L. Dittemore. BOTTOM ROW: 
Susan M. Roberts, Caroline J. Erker, Nancy L. 
Blattner, Linton L. Lewis. 



triangle 319 




Residents 



44 



K 



iss a frog:" 

The theme of Kansas State 
University Association of Residence Halls 
(ARH) comes from the fairy tale about a 
frog who is turned into a handsome 
prince by a kiss from a princess. Students 
who are already involved with ARH "kiss 
frogs," by offering other students the 
chance to achieve their greatest growth 
potential through involvement and 
interaction in ARH. 

The Association of Residence Halls 
sponsors all-hall events throughout the 
year, besides fundraisers including the 
annual canoe race with the University of 
Kansas and Oktoberfest, a three-day event 
which offers residence-hall dwellers 
Aggieville discounts, free evening movies 
and competition between the halls with 
the annual keg roll through the streets of 
Aggieville. 

ARH events are culminated in the spring 
when, after several months of planning, 
Spring Fling begins. During the week of 
Spring Fling residents may participate in 
the annual carnival, dance, picnic, games 
and numerous other events. In addition to 
these activities, residence hall leaders are 



Hurrlyet Aydogan 



320 residence halls 




kiss frogs 

honored during the week of Spring Fling 
with the ARH Leadership Banquet. 

The Mabel Strong Memorial Scholarship 
is presented during the banquet as well. 
The scholarship, in memory of the late 
Mabel Strong, former director of Putnam 
Hall, is given in the form of two awards. 
One is a recognition award and the other 
a monetary scholarship. The recipients of 
the awards are determined on the basis of 
academic achievement and involvement in 
the residence hall system. A committee 
consisting of Tom Frith, director of 
housing, Mike Pezza, ARH president, one 
hall director and one hall president 
chooses the scholarship recipients. 

ARH is based on the philosophy that a 
college education involves more than what 
a student learns in the classroom. This 
idea stems from the belief that students 
who are involved in the residence hall 
system will have added to their total 
education by interaction with others. 
That's where the theme "Kiss a Frog" 
comes from - helping each person to 
become the best he can be. # 



Suze Brink 





Paddle for your life- The teams 
for the annual canoe race against 
KU line up (or the start. The two 
day race was won by the Van Zile 
team. 

Roll out the keg~ The keg 

rolling race is just one of the 
many activities that residence hall 
dwellers participate in throughout 
the year. 

Bedtime Scurry Residence hall 
dwellers compete in the annual 
bed race that occurs during Spring 
Fling. 



Scoot C Williams 



residence halls 321 



ALLEN, TRACY Overland Park 

Management Freshman 

ARNOLD, CAROLYN Valley Center 

General Business Administration Junior 

BARNETT, MICHELLE Wakursa 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BARTELLI. JILL Lenexa 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

BEIM. PAULA Phillipsburg 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 



BELL. CAROL Wichita 

General Freshman 

BENNETT. PAULA Garnett 

Consumer Interest Senior 

BLYHOLDER, VICKI Fayettevllle, Ark 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BOLEY, PAM Newton 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

BOLT, MARILYN Goodland 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 



BOLZ, SHARON Valley Falls 

Interior Design Sophomore 

BRADSHAW, WENDY Topeka 

General Freshman 

BRIGHT, HEIDI Wlnfield 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BROWN. BRENDA Topeka 

Elementary Education Senior 

BROWN, SHARON Morganton, N.C. 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BYNAN. LINDA Mission Hills 

Interior Design Sophomore 

CALLHAN, DEBRA Lenexa 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

CARNEY, CAROL Prarie Village 

General Freshman 

CHAPMAN, DEBBIE Beloit 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

CHARTIER, DENISE Oakhill 

General Freshman 



CLARK, GRACE Leavenworth 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

COLTR1N, PAIGE Paola 

Social Work Freshman 

CONNOR, LISA Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

COOPER. ALEXIS Salisbury. N.C. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

DAVIS. CAROLE Prarie Village 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

DEETS, MARIETTA Beloit 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

DISTLER. AMANDA Wichita 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

DURANT, RHONDA Jewell 

Agriculture Sophomore 

EVANS, SANDRA Valley Center 

Computer Science Junior 

F1SHBURN. JANA Haven 

Early Childhood Education Senior 



FOLEY, KELLY Valley Falls 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

FRANKAMP, KATHY Belleville 

Accounting Sophomore 

GEARY. KAREN Lenexa 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

GERMANN. N1KKI Morganville 

Computer Science Freshman 

GEUBELLE, KAREN Valley Center 

Pre Nursing Sophomore 

GIBBS, KELLY Olsburg 

General Home Economics Freshman 

GOLDBERG, MICK1 Lenexa 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GRADWOLF, KATHLEEN Roeland Park 

History Junior 

GRIENSTEAD, JULIE Shawnee Mission 

Accounting Sophomore 

GRIFFITH, MELANIE Oakley 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

GRIMSHAM. SANDRA Shawnee 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

GRIMSHAM. SHERRY .'.'.'.' Shawnee 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junloi 

GUISLAIN. CLAIRE .'.'.'.'.'.'.' 'pVarle Village 

General Engineering Freshmar 

GUNSAULEY SUSAN M™|| 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshmar 

habluetzeL jill :.:.:: :::::::::: : ■<£&£ 

Pre Professional Secondary Freshmai 



322 boyd hall 






ttrf* 





HAGGARD, JENNIFER Atlanta 

Medical Technology Freshman 

HAMILTON. DEBRA Wichita 

Elementary Education Senior 

HANNA, SALLY Wlnfield 

General Sophomore 

HANSEN, SHERI Shawnee 

Family Child Development Sophomore 

HARNER, PATRICIA Hutchinson 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

HARRELL, SUSAN Cherryvale 

Home Economics Education Junior 

HAZEN, KAREN Grinnell 

General Freshman 

HIBBELER, SARA Overland Park 

History Junior 

HILDHETH, LONNA Leawood 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

HILL, LYNN Selden 

Music Education Junior 

HILLS. ROSALIE Overland Park 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

HINSON, CATHY Silver Lake 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

HOELSCHER. DENISE St. Louis. Mo. 

Interior Architecture Senior 

HORNBAKER. RHONDA Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Senior 

HUMBERT, GLENDA Wellington 

Management Freshman 

HUTCHINSON, DEANNA Altoona 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

JOHNSON, CHRISTY Valley Center 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

JOHNSON, DAWN Andover, Iowa 

Horticulture Sophomore 

JOHNSON, VALERIE Dwlght 

General Freshman 

JONES. DAWN Olsburg 

Agriculture Freshman 

JUDAH, DAWN Sabetha 

Music Education Freshman 

KAMPS. CAROL Mequlte. Texas 

Bakery Science and Management Senior 

KELLEY, ROBIN Topeka 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

KIMPLAY, JULIE Beattie 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

KERR, DARLA Wellsville 

Fine Arts Sophomore 




Chow Down!- Residents of Boyd 
Hall spend their evening meal 
together. 



Chuck Daughtery 



boyd hall 323 



Boyd Hall 

KOOL, DEBORAH Manhattan 

History Sophomore 

KORCHAK, JENNIFER Countryside 

General Sophomore 

KRATZER, SHERYLN Windham. Min. 

Pre-Desian Professions Sophomore 

KRUMWEIDE. KIM Salina 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

LANDRUM. BECKY Kansas City 

Art Education Senior 



LAUGHLIN. LAURA Great Bend 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

LEADERBRADN, MELISSA Salina 

Office Administration Sophomore 

LIPS, LORI Bartlett 

Aoricultural Economics Sophomore 

LONG. JOANN Overland Park 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 

LOOMIS. DIONA Topeka 

Interior Design Junior 



LUTZ. CONNIE Atchinson 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MACKNEZIE. JAN Overland Park 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

MACKENZIE, SHEILA Overland Park 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

MALONE, AMY Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

MANN, MARTY Independence, Mo. 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 



MATTISON, JILL Tulsa 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

MCGINN, REGINA Sedgwick 

Speech Education Freshman 

MCLELLAND. JACQUE Prescott, Ariz. 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

MCNAUGHTON, SHELLY Shawnee 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

MEDCALF. NANCY Bronson 

Finance Freshman 



MILLER, JULIE Shawnee 

Marketing Sophomore 

MILLER, TERESA Independence 

Elementary Education Junior 

MISKOUSKY, ANNA Glencoe. Mo. 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

MORGAN. MARY Olathe 

General Junior 

NELSSEN, JANEEN Smith Center 

Correctional Administration Sophomore 



NGUYEN. KIMOANH Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

NICKEL. NANCY Neurton 

Hotrlculture Senior 

OCONNELL, JANET Overland Park 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

OLSON, JANET Randolph 

General Home Economics Junior 

ORITZ. ZAIDA Villa Carolina. PR 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



PAGE JOANNA San Rafael, Cal 

Accounting Junior 

PANKRATZ. RENEE Wichita 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

PANKRATZ, SHERRI Potwin 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

PAYNE, CINDY Valley Center 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

PETERS, MARY Shawnee 

Civil Engineering Freshman 



PHILLIPS, KIM Valley Falls 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

POLING, TANYA Wichita 

General Sophomore 

PUGH, STARR Salina 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

REED, MARIANNE Olathe 

History Senior 

RICHARDS, LINDA Prarie Village 

Geric-nil Sophomore 



RICHEY, DANA Overland Park 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore 

RICHMOND, TRACEY Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

REIHM, JAMI Lawrence 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 

RIEMANN, KARLA Belolt 

Engineering Sophomore 

ROWLEY, FRAN Valley Center 

Agriculture Freshman 



324 boyd hall 





SALEE, CARLA Parker 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

SCHINSTOCK, JANET Kinsley 

General Engineering Freshman 

SCHMIDT. DEANNA Sharon 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

SCHNITTKER. DEAANN Peck 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

SCHOOLEY. LORI Haviland 

General Sophomore 

SCHUGART, RHONDA Great Bend 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

SHERWIN. RHONDA Beeler 

General Home Economics Senior 

SHUTE, JULIE Red Cloud Neb. 

Music Education Sophomore 

SITTENAUER, CATHY Nortonville 

Accounting Freshman 

ST1NE, CAROL Kansas City 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

STOLFUS, KYLA Bonner Springs 

Applied Music Sophomore 

SIMES, SUZETTE Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

SYKES. JULIA Albequerque, N.M. 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

TESSENDORF, JULIE Wamego 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

THEISS, MARGIE Overland Park 

General Freshman 

THOMAS, TARESA Wellington 

Agricultural Mechanication Freshman 

THURNAU, CAROLINE Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

TITSWROTH. APRIL Scott City 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

VUONO, KATHY Ft. Riley 

Management Sophomore 

WAISNER. JANEL Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Senior 

WEIMER, JODY Clay Center 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

WHEPLEY, SUZANNE Holden, Mass 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

WIEBE. RENEE Derby 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

WIENS, CARRIE Inman 

Home Economics Education Junior 

WIESNER, LORI Garden City 

General Business Administration Freshman 

WILBER, DONNA Belleville 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

WILT, JUDY Abbyville 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

WORKMAN, CHERRI Silver Lake 

Accounting Freshman 

WURTH, JOAN Wichita 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

YUNK, MICHELLE Osborne 

General Home Economics Freshman 

ZOELLER. DIANE Wamego 

Music Education Freshman 



boyd hall 325 



APPL, CHARLOTTE Manhattan 

Foods and Nutrition In Business Senior 

BAILEY, TAMARA Sabetha 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

BELL, PAMELA Medicine Lodge 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BENTRUP, DIANE Deerfield 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

BLUE. KAREN Alma 

Accounting Junior 

CARLIN, GERELYN Osborne 

General Business Administration Freshman 

CARLIN, GLENDA Osborne 

Interior Design Sophomore 

CHANGPRADIT. P1NWAN Manhattan 

Finance Sophomore 

CLUBINE. DEBORAH Havana 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

COLTRAIN, SALLY Neodesha 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 



COOPER, KAREN St. John 

Community Services and Social Work Senior 

COTT. KATHLEN Clay Center 

Social Science Senior 

DORRES, BECKY Lawrence 

Horticulture Therapy Junior 

DUNBACK. JOY Colby 

Medical Technology Senior 

EBERT, DENISE Hutchinson 

Home Economics Education Junior 

FIELDS, CHRIS Sublette 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

GALTIN. DOROTHY Colby 

Home Economics Education Senior 

GARTEN, ANN Abilene 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

GARTEN. MARY Abilene 

Life Science Senior 

HADACHEK, PATTI Cuba 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 



HAGEN, ESTHER Lawrence 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

HALL, DEBRA Junction City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HEFTY. KARLA Valley Falls 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

HEININGER, LISA Fairview 

Medical Technology Freshman 

HEINIGER. SHARON Bern 

Horticulture Junior 

HISS, DEANN Lyons 

General Home Economics Senior 

JOHNSTON, SARA McClure 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

KALIVODA. KAREN Agenda 

General Home Economics Senior 

KLENDA. MONICA Llncolnvllle 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior 

KOCH, KRIST1 Emporia 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

MENDENHALL, LESLIE Topeka 

Housing and Equipment Junior 

MIKEL, CASSANDRA Oswego 

Home Economics and Journalism Sophomore 

MILLER. NANCY Klncald 

Health Senior 

PEUSER. RITA Paola 

Interior Architecture Senior 

PHELPS, LESLIE Oakley 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 



PLUNKETT. SHAWN Satanta 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

PRATT, CLAUDIA Gardner 

Pre-Deslgn Professions Freshman 

PURCELL. SHELLY Webber 

General Home Ecomonlcs Freshman 

RANNEY, LINDA Delphos 

Pre-Profeslonal Secondary Junior 

RUPP. KATHY Moundrldge 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

SAUERWEIN, DENISE Walton 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

SHELITE. DONNA Sublette 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

SIMS, SUZANNE Paola 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

SKOCH. LISA Balleyville 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SLOAN, PATTY Colby 

Home Economics and Journalism Junior 



jJL^i* 





> Jos 



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aaV *** f^B 






SMITH, DAWN Garden City 

Food and Nutrition Science Sophomore 

STERNS, CATHY Hiawatha 

Agriculture Junior 

STOTTMANN, BRENDA Parsons 

Home Economics Education Junior 

STOTTMANN, JANICE Parsons 

Fashion Design Senior 

STRICKLAND. JANET Oswego 

Family and Child Development Junior 

TEGTMEIER, SANDRA Bern 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

WALKER, RENEE Clay Center 

Accounting Junior 

WALZ, SHARON Oakley 

Computer Science Junior 

WILKINSON. SHERYL Goodland 

General Home Economics Senior 

WILLIAMS, KIMBER Wichita 

Home Economics and Journalism Junior 

WULFKUHLE, LISA Berryton 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



On with the Show- Clovia 
members join in their lobby to 
watch TV and munch some 
popcorn. 



Hurriyet Aydogan 



clovia 327 



Edwards Hall 



BAKER, JOHN Salina 

Accounting Sophomore 

BARTHOLOMEW. RICHARD Northampton. Penn. 

Architecture Senior 

BENNETT. SHARON Salina 

General Business Administration Junior 

BOWLES, JAN Atwood 

Home Economics Education Junior 

BROWNLEE. STEVEN Liberal 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

CARNES. CAROL Weir 

Economics Graduate Student 

CHAMBLISS, CHRIS Overland Park 

Management Junior 

COLEMAN. DAVID Liberal 

Pie-Law Senior 

CREIGHTON. DEAN Honesdale. Penn. 

Farm and Dairy Science Graduate Student 

CUTRIGHT, ROBERT Overland Park 

Horticulture Junior 

D1LLENBECK. ROBERT El Dorado 

Geology Senior 

DOMINGUEZ. JOSE Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

DUDEK, EVA Vlneland, N.J 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

DURRE. GARTH Branson. Mo. 

Architecture Senior 

EGGER, DIANNE Overland Park 

Early Childhood Development Junior 

ELAM. CHRISTINE Fredonia 

Agriculture Junior 

ELLIS, ROBERT Wichita 

Agriculture Freshman 

EUBANK, ROBERT Pratt 

Finance Junior 

FLAHERTY. AMY Prairie Village 

Music Education Senior 

FRANCHETT, TOM Edwardsville 

Finance Junior 

FRESE, MARKUS Herkimer 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

GOETSCH. DAVID Brewster 

Agronomy Junior 

GREEN, GREGORY Alton, 111 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

HACHINSKY. ANNETTE Kansas City 

Management Senior 

HARNESS, RENE Springfield, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HARRISON. BETTY Leau-ood 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HARTIG, DONALD Kansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

HATFIELD. TANYA Lawrence 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

HODGSON. JOSEPH Little River 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HOISINGTON. RICHARD Chapman 

Labor Relations Senior 

HUNT, PAUL Chanute 

Engineering Technology Junior 

KEEFFEE, BRAD Cheney 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

KEELER. PEGGY Wichita 

Psychology Freshman 

KERR, ROBERT Prairie Village 

English Sophomore 

KESLER, JOEL Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

KLEIN. TIM Rozel 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

KRUSEN, KURT Leawood 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

L1CKEY, MARY Valley Center 

General Home Economics Freshman 

LOWERY, ELLEN Ayr, Neb 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

LVOBODA, LAURA Topeka 

Crlmlnalogy Freshman 

MACKEY, NANCY Burden 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

MANN, DOUG Ballwln, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

MCEVOY, JAMES Easton 

Crop Protection Junior 

MCKINLEY, BILL Cedarvale 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MILLER. PATRICIA St. George 

Life Science Senior 




328 edwards hall 




MULL. MICHAEL Salina 

Finance Junior 

OWENS. SCOTT Shawnee 

General Engineering Sophomore 

P1NKNEY. ROBERT St Louis, Mo 

PreDesign Professions Junior 

RAAF, MARK Gridley 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

RILEY, JOHN Topeka 

General Education Junior 

SCHANKER. LYNN Prairie Village 

Education and Biology Senior 

SCHNEIDER. SCOTT Kansas City. Mo. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

SELL, DARREL Plainville 

Computer Science Junior 

SIMONSON, ERIC ManakinSabot. Va 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

SIMS. RONALD Scott City 

General Freshman 

SMITH, BARBARA Ft. Leavenworth 

Medical Technology Junior 

SMITH. WINTON Arkansas City 

Architecture Senior 

SNIDER. GLEN Abilene 

Accounting Economic* Senior 

SPRINGER. DAVID Hutchinson 

Biology Senior 

STARNS. CONNIE Hill City 

Family and Child Development Senior 

STONES. RICHARD Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

SUTLIFFE, PAT Englewood, Colo 

PreDesign Professions Junior 

SWIERCINSKY. KEVIN Maple Hill 

Engineering Technology Junior 

TAYLOR. JOHN Rldgeurood. N.Y. 

Political Science Senior 

TIEMANN. TAMARA Salina 

Dietetics Senior 

UNZICKER. NADINE Belpre 

Art Senior 

WELLS, JUDY Wichita 

Modern Language Freshman 

WILLIS, ROBERT St James. Mo 

Pre Design Professions Sophomore 

WILSON, CHRIS Murdock 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

WORLEY, DENISE Colby 

General Junlor 

YAMAMOTO. MICHAEL Ft. Riley 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 



edwards hall 329 



■rd Hall 



ALBRIGHT, KRIST1NE Hutchison 

Family and Childhood Development - Junior 

ALEXANDER, JAN Hoisington 

General Sophomore 

ALLEN. JENNIFER Salina 

Business Administration Freshman 

ALLEN, REBECCA Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

ALLEN, SUZY Topeka 

Agricultural Education Freshman 



ALLEY, ROBYN Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

ANNAN. SYLVIA Onaga 

Speech Pathology Senior 

ANSCHUTZ, TAMBERA Salina 

Pre-Veternary Medicine Freshman 

ARMSTRONG. GLORIA Chicago, 111. 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

ASH, LAURIE Newton 

General Sophomore 



ASHBY, TAMARA Grantville 

Family and Childhood Development Junior 

BAALMAN, LISA Grinnel 

General Sophomore 

BACKMAN, GAYLA Vermillion 

General Home Economics Junior 

BA1RNESEN, MICHELE Olathe 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BANKS, REGINA Lecompton 

Economics Freshman 



BANMAN, LORRI McPherson 

General Engineering Freshman 

BARNETT, SHERYL Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

BARRETT, CHARLOTTE Clearwater 

Music Education Junior 

BARTELS. CAROL Topeka 

Elementary Education Senior 

BECKER, KELLY Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

BECKERDITE. RUTHIE Kingsdown 

Physical Education Sophomore 

BEISEL. SANDRA Salina 

Business Administration Sophomore 

BENZ, ELAINE Bonner Springs 

Physical Education Sophomore 

BERKLEY. CATHERINE Seneca 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

BERNER, KATHRYN Creve Coeur, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 



BERNER, VERONICA Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BERTELS. LORI Nortonville 

PreMedicine Freshman 

BIEHUNKO, TRACY Overland Park 

General Freshman 

BIGGS, BEVERLY Edson 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BILES, JO Haven 

Physical Education Senior 



BIRD, JANET Garfield 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

BLISS. NATALIE Topeka 

General Sophomore 

BLUSH, SUSAN Silver Lake 

Fashion Design Junior 

BOLL. LISA St. Francis 

Fashion Design Senior 

BOLLIER, COR1NNE Prarie Village 

Physical Education Freshman 



BOLTE, KIMBERLY Bridgeport 

Physical Education Freshman 

BOAZ. DONETTA Topeka 

Home Economics Senior 

BOWMAN, DANA Overland Park 

Interior Design Sophomore 

BOWSER. STEVEN Mayetta 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BOYER. LISA Iola 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 



BRADLEY, KAREN Topeka 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

BRAX. LORI K Assarla 

Horticulture Sophomore 

BRINK. SUZE Clmmaron 

Journalism and Mass Communications .... Senior 

BROOKS, LEA Leawood 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BROOKSHIER. JODY Newton 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 




330 ford hall 




ARBAB. EADA Shawnee Mission 

Psychology Sophomore 

BROSA. CYNTHIA Overland Park 

General Freshman 

BRUNIN, LAURIE St. Marys 

General Freshman 

BUCH. MICHELE Topeka 

Sociology Freshman 

BUCKSTEAD. KRISTIN Overland Park 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

BULLER, SUSAN New , on 

~ DE B .'. XT 

BURBLE MARLENE F "*£S 

COALER, .... 8 ^SS 
Pre ' Law Freshman 

CARLE, KAREN Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Sophomore 

CARLSON, DARLENE Mulvane 

Interior Design Sophomore 

CARRIKER, CRISTIE Lewis 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

CASEY. CHAUNCEY Ellinwood 

English Sophomore 

CASH. GINA Topeka 

Construction Science Freshman 

CHAMBERS. JACQUELINE Olathe 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 

CHAPPELL, PRISKA Halstead 

General Freshman 

CHERAY, JANE Overland Park 

Construction Science Sophomore 

CHLAPEK, LINDA Liberty 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

CHRISTIE, LORI Overland Park 

Art Freshman 



CLARK. ANGELA p ao la 

Marketing Junior 

CLEMENTS. RUTH Sallna 

Mus ' c Freshman 

COBLE, EMILY Kansas City 

Music Education Junior 

COLDSMITH. CONNIE .'.','.'. Emporia 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

CORDELL. VICKI Council Grove 

General Engineering Freshman 

CORNELISON, LORI Douglass 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

COTT, CARRIE Leavenworth 

General Sophomore 

COUP, JOLEEN McPherson 

General Sophomore 

CROW, REBECCA Wichita 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

CULVER. JOY Shawnee Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

CUMMINGS. CAROLYN Hutchinson 

Marketing Freshman 

DALTON, BETH Mission 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DANDURAND, TERRI Sallna 

Accounting Freshman 

DAVIS, ELLEN Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

DAVISON. DIANE Lyons 

General Freshman 

DEITCHER. GRETCHEN Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DEJESUS, MARILYN Junction City 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

DENNIS, JEANNE Philllpsburg 

Business Administration Freshman 

DEPEW, JAYNE Abilene 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

D1CKEN, PAM Newton 

Pre-Professlonal Secondary Freshman 



DITZLER, CYNTHIA Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DOMANN. MARILYN Herlngton 

Home Economic* Senior 

DOMBAUGH. DALYN McPherson 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DOSHEIER, JULIE Wichita 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Freshman 

DRAGASTIN, JANET Lenexa 

Social Science Junior 



ford hall 331 



DUNTZ, DEBBIE Herington 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

EBERT. RHONDA Wamego 

General Freshman 

EDDY. RITA Syracuse 

Interior Design Freshman 

EDMONDS. CONNIE Leavenworth 

General Sophomore 

EDWARDS. ROBIN White Water 

Home Economics Freshman 

EDWARDS, TAMMY Hamilton 

Home Economics Freshman 

EISLER, THERESA Topeka 

Political Science Freshman 

ELLERMAN, LISA Merriam 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 

ELLIS, DEBRA Shawnee 

Business Administration Junior 

ENSMINGER. JO LYNN Moran 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

EPP, AMY Sandy Hook, Conn 

Dieteics Sophomore 

ERICSON. BRENDA Ft. Scott 

Accounting Junior 

ESPINOSA. DRISTI Topeka 

Psychology Freshman 

ETZENHOUSER, ROSEMARIE Leawood 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

EVANS. KATHY Dwight 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 




332 ford hall 




EVANS. LORI Lyons 

General Sophomore 

EVANS, SHAR1 Newton 

Sociology Junior 

FAIRBURN. LAURIE Fargo, N.D 

Consumer Interest Junior 

FAIRCHILD, CARA Chanute 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

FAIRCHILD, DENISE McPherson 

Pre-Veterinary Freshman 

FARBER. MARY Mulvane 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

FEE, JANET Stilwell 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

FEIL. DIANA Salina 

Interior Design Freshman 

FELTS, JANET Lawrence 

Interior Design Freshman 

FERGUSON, LISA Merriam 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

FERRIS, SUZY Overland Park 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

FIENE, SHARI Newton 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

FINK. DIANA Phillipsburg 

Home Economics Junior 

PITT /\NNEL Overland Park 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Junior 

FITZGERALD, AMY Salina 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

FLINN. CHARLOTTE Olathe 

Business Administration Sophomore 

FLOYD. GINA • St Francis 

General Freshman 

FOUTCH. ANDREA Council Bluffs, lows 

Accounting Senior 

FOX, ROMALYN Syracuse 

General Freshman 

FRENZEL, DIANA Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

FRESE, LORI Winfield 

General Freshman 

FUNK. LINDA Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

FUTRELLE. DEE Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

GAMMELL, KELLY Lindsborg 

Home Economics Freshman 

GASTON, JULIE Mission 

General Sophomore 

GATES. SHAUNA Winona 

Geology Freshman 

GEORGE, FRANCY Lebo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GERMAN. GARALEE Lyons 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

GFELLER, DIANE Topeka 

General Business Administration Freshman 

GOSE. SUE Prairie Village 

General Sophomore 

GREEN, COURTNEY Leoti 

General Business Administration Freshman 

GRIFFITH, DIANE Leavenworth 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

GROVER, KELLY Great Bend 

General Freshman 

GUARD, GAYLA McPherson 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

GUTSCH, GAYLA Burdlck 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

HABERMAN, SHERI Aloha, Ore. 

Horticulture Sophomore 

HAMILTON, MICHELE Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

HAMMES, JULIE Seneca 

Accounting Freshman 

HANKAMER, SALLY Topeka 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HAPKE, KELLY Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

HARGROVE, SHARON Effingham 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

HARPER, DENISE Goodland 

Interior Design Freshman 

HARPER, LACHELE Goodland 

Food Science and Industry Sophomore 

HARRIS, LYNNE Abilene 

Marketing Freshman 

HAZEN, TERRI Leawood 

Food Science and Industry Junior 



ford hall 333 



.. ,v I --J 



HEADLEY, DEE Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

HECKER, RUTH Topeka 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HECKETHORN. SUSAN McPherson 

Interior Design Sophomore 

HE1MER. MARY Shawnee Mission 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HEINTZELMAN. THERESA Olathe 

Chemical Science Freshman 



HENNESSEY. STACEY Tecumseh 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

HESEMANN, KAREN Overland Park 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

HOBSON. ELAINE Hardy, Neb 

Horticulture Junior 

HOGAN. KATHER1NE Overland Park 

Finance Junior 

HOGUE. HANNAH Prairie Village 

Natural Resource Management Senior 



HOLLAND. JILL Prairie Village 

History Junior 

HOPE. NIKKI Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

HOSLER. LISA Junction City 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

HOSTY, MAUREEN We.twood 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

HOWLETT, JENNIFER Overland Park 

General Freshman 



HUMMELL, SUSAN Lenexa 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

HUNTER, CHRISTENE Prairie Village 

Accounting Sophomore 

HUNTSMAN, BRENDA Halstead 

Interior Design Junior 

IMEL. MARCY Merriam 

Marketing Junior 

INTFEN. SUSAN Atchln.on 

Electrical Engineering Senior 



JACKSON, TAMMY Spring Hill 

Home Economics and Journalism Sophomore 

JACOBSON, BARBARA Wamego 

General Sophomore 

JAMES, MARY Overland Park 

Fine Arts Junior 

JARCHOW. NANCY Newton 

Interior Design Sophomore 

JEPSON, RONDA Topeka 

Horticulture Freshman 



JOHNSON, BECKY Shawnee Mlaalon 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

JOHNSON, BRENDA Norwich 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

JOHNSON, CARLA Belpre 

General Sophomore 

JOHNSON, CINDY Medlord, Okla 

General Freshman 

JOHNSON, ELIZABETH Topeka 

Accounting Sophomore 



JOHNSON, KARI McPherson 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

JOHNSON. ROBYN Wellsvllle 

General Freshman 

JOHNSON. TRACY McPherson 

PreProfessional Secondary Freshman 

JOHNSTON. KAREN Shawnee 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

JONES. DOUGLEAS Manhattan 

Interior Architecture Senior 



JONES, LORIE Fairway 

General Freshman 

JONES. MARGOT Junction City 

Engineering Sophomore 

JONES. MONICA Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

JONES, REBECCA Manhattan 

Architecture and Design Graduate Student 

JOYCE, JODY El Dorado 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 



JUDGE, NANCY Leawood 

Accounting Sophomore 

JUDY, CATHERINE Leavenworth 

Accounting Junl 

JUST. JACQUELINE Ne wton, N J 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

KANDT. KIMBERLY Herlngton 

Construction Science Freshman 

KAUTZ. JANELLE ..'..'.'.'.'.'.'.'. Atchison 

General Freshman 



334 ford hall 





KEAGLE. KELLY McPherson 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

KEATING, DEBORAH Bonner Springs 

Home Economics Sophomore 

KEELER, SHERRI Great Bend 

General Sophomore 

KELLER. PENNY St. Francis 

Elementary Education Senior 

KELLOGG. MARIA Merriam 

General Freshman 

KESSLER. LORI Mission 

General Business Administration Freshman 

KIDWELL. CAROL Enterprise 

Accounting Sophomore 

KINDERKNECHT, CHARLOTTE Gnnnell 

Interior Design Junior 

KING. JANET Wakefield 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

KINGSBURY. TAWNYA Smith Center 

General Sophomore 

KLEMM, JUDY Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

KLOTZBACH, STACY Topeka 

General Freshman 

KLUG. KALA Great Bend 

Psychology Education Junior 

KLUGE. KAREN Topeka 

Accounting Junior 

KOHL, LAURIE Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

KOLCH, CONNIE Ft. Riley 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

KOSTELEC. LARUEEN Kansas City 

General Sophomore 

KOTOYANTZ. KATHERINA Junction City 

Agronomy Senior 

KRAMP. DONNA Ellinwood 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

KRAUS. LINDA Eskridge 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

KRISTEK, ROSE Tampa 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

KROUPA, THERESA Marion 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

LAHAM. ELENA Wichita 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

LAMONS. DEBORAH Shawnee 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

LANGREHR, JENNI Great Bend 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

LARKIN. RUTH Wichita 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

LARSON, CATHY Stllwell 

Marketing Senior 

LARSON, SANDRA Salina 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

LAUGHLIN. CAROL Mapleton 

Life Science Freshman 

LAWRENZ, SHEILA Herrington 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

LAWTON. JANET Concordia 

Accounting Senior 

LEE, JANNA Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 

LENOIR. JANICE Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

LESTISHEN. MARY Hutchinson 

Management Senior 

LEU, LORI ANN Winchester 

General Freshman 

LIVELY, CHERI Overland Park 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

LOCKHART, KATHLENE Junction City 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

LOCKHART, SHIRLEY Junction City 

Social Work Junior 

LOHREY, MARY BETH LaCrosse 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

LOWE. LORI Topeka 

Medical Technology Junior 

LUCKEROTH, LOUISE Seneca 

Genera) Business Administration Freshman 

LUEKER, ALISON Hoisington 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

LUSK, ANITA Wichita 

General Sophomore 

LYON, CYNDI Baldwin City 

General Freshman 

MARR, LISA Fredonia 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 



ford hall 335 



>-M 



MARVIN, KIMBERLEY Overland Park 

Art Freshman 

MAUCK, MELISSA Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communication* Senior 

MAUPIN, LAURA Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MAY, CYNTHIA Lenexa 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

MAY. SUSAN Mankato 

Home Economic* Education Senior 

MAYS, LISA Kansas City 

Dance Senior 

MCCARTHY, PAM Leavenworth 

Home Economics Junior 

MCCARTY, TAMARA Overland Park 

Music Education Junior 

MCDERMED, KATHLEEN Effingham 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

MCDONALD, SHERYL Shawnee Mission 

General Business Administration Junior 



MCDOWELL, ROBIN Shawnee 

Accounting Junior 

MCGRATH, MARTI Leawood 

General Freshman 

MCLEIGHTON, KIM Salina 

Marketing Sophomore 

MCRAE, PAULA Hays 

General Freshman 

MECHLER, MAUREEN Lenexa 

Management Sophomore 



MEJLI, MARSHA Beverly 

Civil Engineering Senior 

MERSMAN, YVONNE Overland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 

MIDDENDORF, TERRI Derby 

Home Economics Freshman 

MIES. LEE ANN Wichita 

Finance Sophomore 

MILLER. BARBARA Fredonla 

Pre-Law Sophomore 



MILLER, DEBRA McDonald 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

MILLER, GAY Lenexa 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MILLER, RHONDA Lenexa 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MILLS, LORI McPherson 

General Engineering Freshman 

MINOR. BETH ANN Nortonvi 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 



MITCHELL, DEBORAH Bellevue, Neb 

Accounting Freshman 

MITCHELL. JEANETTE Olathe 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

MOLDRUP, KELLI Overland Park 

Psychology Sophomore 

MOORE. DARCI luka 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

MOORE, DEANNE Abilene 

General Business Administration Freshman 




Nach-opoly Seventh floor Ford 
Hall residents spend an evening 
with a classic game and nachos 
with cheese. 

Scott C Williams 



336 ford hall 





MOORE, GAYLE Johnson 

General Engineering Junior 

MOORE, LIBBIE Great Bend 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

MOORE, MARY ANN Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

MOYERS, ELAINE Overland Park 

General Freshman 

MUMFORD, LYNDA Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

MUMFORD, MARTINA Overland Park 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

NEAS, TERRIE Overland Park 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

NEILAN. NANCY Shawnee Mission 

Speech Pathology Senior 

NELSON, COLLEEN Woodsun 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

NESTOR, CARLA McPherson 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

NICHOLSON. JEAN McPherson 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

N1EMAN. PENNY Nortonville 

Art Freshman 

NORTH, SUSAN Baldwin 

Home Economics Freshman 

OLSEN, CHRISTINE Hardy, Neb. 

Computer Science Junior 

ORTEN. DEADRE McDonald 

Family and Child Development Junior 

OSWALT. ELLEN Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Senior 

PASCHAL, MARTHA Luray 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

PEDERSON, LORI Topeka 

Elementary Education Junior 

PEEK. SUSAN Winchester 

Accounting Freshman 

PENLAND, AMY Salina 

Computer Science Freshman 

PERSIGEHL. DONNA Salina 

Food Science and Industry , Sophomore 

PETERS. SHEILA Mentor 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

PETTIBONE, KIMBERLY Kanorado 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

PETTIBONE, RAIDEL Kanorado 

General Junior 

PEVERLEY. SHARON Geneseo 

Agriculture Freshman 

PHARIS. JULIA Kansas City 

Accounting Junior 

PHEFFER, KIM Overland Park 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

PLUM, PERI Olathe 

Management Freshman 

PORTER, LINDA Kansas City 

Home Economics Junior 

PRENTICE. MICHELLE Shawnee 

Accounting Sophomore 

PRESTON, LORIE Newton 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

PRICE, BETH Ronel 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

PRITCHARD. MARILYN Baldwin 

Home Economics Sophomore 

RALEIGH, TERRI Windom 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

RAMSEY, CYNTHIA Gladstone 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

RANDALL. ROBIN Kansas City 

Pre-Dentlstry Senior 

REDLINGSHAFER. TERESA Shawnee Mission 

Elementary Education Senior 

REED, TREYSE Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

REICHLE, MARRIAM Leawood 

Marketing Sophomore 

REILLY, M1CHELE Topeka 

Pre-Law Freshman 

REINHARDT, DEBRA Erie 

Home Economics Freshman 

REMPE, MARY ANN Plainville 

Family and Child Development Junior 

RICE, TAMMIE Atchinson 

Accounting Sophomore 

RINGEN, KRISTI Beattie 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

RIPPE, KATHLEEN Linn 

Pre-Professional Secondary Freshman 



ford hall 337 



RISEN. CINDY Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

EOHLEDER. CATHY Overland Park 

Fine Arts Senior 

ROMBECK, LAURA Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

ROTHS, PATRICIA Benton 

Office Administration Freshman 

RUSSELL. DIANE Belpre 

Accounting Sophomore 

SACKHOFF. TAMARA Hunter 

Elementary Education Junior 

SAWYER. SANDRA McPherson 

Horticulture Sophomore 

SCARRITT, STACY Derby 

General Home Economics Freshman 

SCHEHRER, ELAINE Lawrence 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

SCHELLHORN, LOR1 White City 

Home Economics and Liberal Arts Junior 

SCHNEIDER, KATE Overland Park 

General Freshman 

SCHNEIDER. LEEANN Hutchison 

Marketing Senior 

SCHOOF. REBECCA Dodge City 

Psychology Freshman 

SCHRIEBER, JOAN Huron 

Accounting Sophomore 

SCHUSTER, GERRI Hays 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SCHWARTZ, CARRIE Baldwin 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

SEITZ. SHARON Ottawa 

Elementary Education Junior 

SELL. BECKY Overland Park 

General Home Economics Freshman 

SEYART. JANET Hinson 

Psychology Sophomore 

SHELTON. SHANNON St. John 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

SHEPARD. KARMEN Overland Park 

Business Administration Junior 

SHIDELER. RHONDA Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

SKELTON, AMY Lenexa 

General Freshman 

SMITH, COREE Tribune 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SMITH, CYNTHIA Lees Summit. Mo 

Management Junior 

SMITH, TERA Halstead 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

SPIEGEL. LISA Overland Park 

Education and English Senior 

STADLER, LISA Rossville 

Agriculture Freshman 

STANLEY, KIMBERLY Bonner Springs 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

STANLEY. LISA Bonner Springs 

General Freshman 

STANTON, JEANNE Sallna 

Interior Design Freshman 

STEJSKAL, GINGER Tlmken 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

STEVENSON, PER1ANN Great Bend 

Pre-Design Profession Freshman 

STICH. HELEN Chanute 

General Home Economics Senior 

STRAND, RETHA Munden 

General Junior 

SUHR, SHIRLEY Sallna 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

SUMPTER. CONNIE Mulvane 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

SUNDGREN. JOLENE Sallna 

Family and Child Development Junior 

SWAN, CHARLENE Overland Park 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

SWIFT, BRENDA Mission 

Business Administration Freshman 

TANGARI, CARA Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

TEEL. TERESA Kansas City, Mo. 

Business Administration Freshman 

THELLIAMS. JULIE Shawnee Mission 

Home Economics Sophomore 

THOMAS, SHERRY Sallna 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

TINDER, LAWRENCE Shawnee 

Art Sophomore 




338 ford hall 




TOPLIFF, CHRISTINA Plattsmouth, Neb 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

TORRES, LOR1 Prairie Village 

Restaurant Management Freshman 

TOUS1GNANT, SUSAN Herington 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

TURNER. JANET Oskaloosa 

Management Freshman 

UEBELHART. BETSEY Manhattan 

Construction Science Sophomore 

UPSON. KAREN Kansas City 

Sociology Junior 

VAUGHN. KR1STA Halstead 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

VAUGHT, CHRIST1ANNE Kansas City 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

VONADA. DENETTE Sylvan Grove 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

WAITE, JOYCE Leavenworth 

General Sophomore 

WALKER, CECELIA Topeka 

Accounting Junior 

WALTER, BARBARA Beloit 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

WARDELL, TRACY Tecumseh 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

WARREN. CHRISTY Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

WASINGER, CYNTHIA Ness City 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

WEBER, DAWNLEE Mission 

Accounting Junior 

WEBER, LAURIE Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Freshman 

WELCH, KELLY .'.'.' Overland Park 

Social Work Freshman 

WENDT, CHERYL Herington 

Deitetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

WERNES. VICKY Overland Park 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 




Frosty Finishes — Rosie 
Kristek, sophomore in family and 
child development and social 
work, and Ellen Strathman, 
sophomore in foods and nutrition, 
finish the female version of Frosty 
the Snowman. 



Scott C. Williams 



ford hall 339 






WEIDMER. LISA Emporia 

Medical Technology Freshman 

WILLIAMS, CHERYL Topeka 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, GRACE Brunning. Neb 

Elementary Education Junior 

WILLIAMS, TRACY Shawnee Mission 

Accounting Freshman 

WILLIS, TRACY Topeka 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

WILSON, CINDY Wichita 

General Sophomore 

WILSON, ROBIN Paola 

Business Education Junior 

WOLFE, ALANA Roeland Park 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

WOLFF, MILLIE Westwood 

Computer Science Junior 

WOODALL. JAYNE Towanda 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

WORRELL, SUSAN Topeka 

Biochemistry Freshman 

WRIGHT. SHARON Mission 

Business Administration Sophomore 

WRUBEL, SHARI Overland Park 

Psychology Freshman 

WYANT, DEBBIE Junction City 

Pre-Professional Secondary Freshman 

YEARG1N, KELLY Fort Belvoir, Virg. 

Accounting Junior 

YOAKUM. MARGARET Kansas City 

General Freshman 

YOUNG. JUDY Tribune 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

ZORN, JANE Great Bend 

Accounting Freshman 




Group Study- Some residents of 
sixth floor Ford take advantage of 
their lobby space for a group 
study jam. 




Scott William 



340 ford hall 






Goodnow Hall 




ABERNATHY, MIKE Independence, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ALEXANDER, JOHN Hutchinson 

General Freshman 

ANDERSON, TONI Norcatur 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

ANKERHOLZ, LANCE Chase 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

BAKER, BRENDA Dodge City 

Clothing & Retail Freshman 

BALES. SUSIE Valley Center 

Computer Science Freshman 

BAMMES, SANDY Geneseo 

General Freshman 

BAUCK. RUSSELL Vassar 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

BECKER. CRAIG Moundrldge 

Accounting Senior 

BERGREN, RONDA Marysville 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

BICKFORD, SHARON Arkansas City 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

BIGELOW, BRIAN Ida Grove 

Engineering Technology Junior 

BOTT, SONYA Lacrosse 

Computer Science Freshman 

BOWEN. BARBARA Hiawatha 

Accounting Junior 

BOWEN, CHERI Whitewater 

Social Work Junior 

BOYER. KEVIN Overland Park 

General Freshman 

BOYLAN, KELLY Ulysses 

Architecture Senior 

BRAUER. RICHARD Linwood 

Agriculture Sophomore 

BRE1SCH, KR1STINE Overland Park 

Journalism & Mass Communications Junior 

BRIGGS, TERESA Junction City 

General Freshman 

BRINEY, NELLIE Beloit 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

BRINK. MARGO Muscatine, Iowa 

Psychology Senior 

BROCKELMAN, JULIE Holton 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BROCKHOFF, LYNNE Hiawatha 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

BROX, KAREN Huron 

Horticulture* Sophomore 

BRUMLEY. TERESA Topeka 

Sociology Junior 

BUEHUE. HEIDE Salina 

General Freshman 

BUESSING, CONNIE Axtell 

Genera] Freshman 

BURKE, CARMEL Mulvane 

Finance Freshman 

BURNS. CHERYL Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

BURTON, BARBARA Frankfort 

General Sophomore 

BUSH, CLARA Coffeyville 

Accounting Sophomore 

BUSH. DEBBIE Quenemo 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

BUSS. BRENDA Leonardvllle 

Housing and Equipment Senior 

BUTTON, CAROLYN Great Bend 

Management Sophomore 

CANADAY, RANDY Lakewood, Colo. 

Finance Sophomore 

CANNON, JOHN Chesterfield, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

CARLISLE, LISA Topeka 

General . Freshman 

CARPENTER, JOHN Salina 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

CARR. LAURIE Overland Park 

Management Senior 

CARTER. SCOTT Wichita 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

CHANCE. EILEEN Jacksonville. Fla. 

Civil Engineering Senior 

CHAPMAN, JILL Wichita 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

CLEMENCE, STEHPHANI Garden City 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

COLLINS, KERRY „ lola 

Marketing Sophomore 



goodnow hall 341 



■■■& 



COOL, LISA Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

COPPLE, CONNIE Derby 

Accounting Sophomore 

COSTELLO. MIKE St. Louis, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

COUGHENOUR. JOAN McPherson 

Marketing Senior 

CRAFTON. GREG Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

CUDDY, JETTA Overland Park 

General Business Administration Senior 

CUMRO, GARY Summerfield 

Geology Freshman 

CUNNINGHAM. DAVID Overland Park 

Management Sophomore 

CURRIER. PATRICA Hox,e 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

DAVIS, DARINDA Meade 

Management Freshman 

DAVIS, LANA Meade 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

DAWKINS. BERNARD St. Louis, Mo 

Pre Design Professions Sophomore 

DEAN. EDGAR Wichita 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

DEL1SSA, LANCE Mcade 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

DEWITT, KARA Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

DIDDE, KAREN Overland Park 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

DIETER, DANA Colorado Springs, Colo. 

General Freshman 

DIKEMAN. DIANE Syracuse 

General Freshman 

D1LLBECK, JEAN Shawnee 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

DILLON, JAN Effingham 

Computer Science Freshman 

DILLION, SARA Effingham 

Computer Science Freshman 

DISNEY. DEBBIE Chanute 

Management Senior 

DIXON. SUSAN Howard 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

DOLZXAL, LAURA Russell 

Accounting Sophomore 

DOSS. RENATA Junction City 

Psychology Senior 

DOUTHIT, DAVID Baxter Springs 

General Engineering Sophomore 

DOWNES, DENISE Council Grove 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

DOYLE, GINA Clearwater 

Art Freshman 

DUERKSEN. ANGELA Emporia 

Interior Design Sophomore 

DUGGAN, DIANE Manhattan 

Education Sophomore 

DURST, LISA Moundridge 

Accounting Freshman 

DYCK. DAVID Inman 

Accounting Senior 

EDMONDS. DARYL Topeka 

Management Senior 

EDWARDS, GLEN Richmond 

Agronomy Sophomore 

ELLERMAN, JANE Atchison 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

FANARA. TERESA Independence, Mo. 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

FEIST. PAULA Spearville 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

FELTNER, SHARON Topeka 

General Freshman 

FOLTZ. JANA Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

FOWLER. LEONA Emporia 

Music Education Sophomore 

FRANCIS, JANA Liberal 

General Business Administration Junior 

FRANKLIN. JOANNE Ft. Scott 

Educational and Biological Sciences Senior 

FUNK. KENT Hillsboro 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

GABEL, KEVIN Ness 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

GAHAGAN, BRIDGET Ottawa 

General Business Administration Junior 



342 goodnow hali 





GARTLAND, MARIANNE Hillcrest Heights, Md 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

GILLETTE. BRENDA Gardner 

Computer Science Junior 

GRABER. YVONNE Hesston 

General Freshman 

GRANZOW. CINDY Herrington 

Political Science Senior 

GRAY. MARK Alton. Ill 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 

GROSSCUP, MARSHA Marysville 

Natural Science and Management Freshman 

GWALTNEY. ERNIE Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

HADEL, LAURA Prairie Village 

Education Sophomore 

HAFLICH. GAYLE Garden City 

General Sophomore 

HANKS, VAL Leawood 

General Engineering Freshman 

HARE, BRIAN Bluff City 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

HARMAN, SHERILL Dighton 

General Freshman 

HART. DEBI Kansas City 

Horticulture Freshman 

HATTRUP. JOANN Kinsley 

Computer Science Freshman 

HAURY. DALE Council Grove 

Interior Design Senior 

HAYS. PAT Kansas City 

Civil Engineering Junior 

HEIM. CHERI Hoxie 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HENDR1XSON. DAN1TA Minneapolis 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HERMAN, LINDA Hays 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

HETTRICK. J R Madlsonvllle. Ky. 

Education-Chemistry Senior 

HIMMELBERG, DANNY Hamilton, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HOFFMAN, BRENDA Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

HOLLENBECK, JOHN Effingham 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

HOLT, KEITH Rock 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

HOLVORSON. LORI Junction City 

Special Freshman 

HOOD, WILLIAM White City 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HOOPER. J Manhattan 

Computer Science Sophomore 

HOVIS. DAVID Mission 

Architecture Senior 

HOYER. JAMES Hutchinson 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

HRABE. MADELINE Plainville 

General Sophomore 

HURST, ROBYN Chase 

Interior Design Freshman 

INK, JOHN Leawood 

Management Freshman 

JABBEN. ELEANOR Independence 

Accounting Senior 

JACOBSON, RENEE Willis 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

JAFFERIS, MARY Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

JASPER, BRENDA Shields 

Education Sophomore 

JASSO. TONI Newton 

Fine Arts Freshman 

JENKINS, SCOTT Jefferson City, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

JESSE. KAREN Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

JOHNSON. DIANA Independence 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

JOHNSON, MARSHIELA Ness City 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

JONES, BETH Horton 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

JONES, HENRY Kansas City 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

JONES. JENNIFER Phllllpaburg 

Family and Child Development Senior 

JURRENS, DENISE Arkansas City 

General Business Administration Sophomore 



goodnow hall 343 



Goodnow Hall 



HASTENS, TONY Anthony 

General Sophomore 

KEITH, BRIAN Overland Park 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

KEENER. DARLA Shawnee 

Home Economics Education Junior 

KELL. BARBARA Wichita 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

KENNEDY, KATHERINE Frankfort 

Family and Child Development Senior 

KEPLINGER. REBECCA Grenola 

Computer Science Sophomore 

KEYSER. REBECCA Council Grove 

Pre Nursing Freshman 

KINDLE, KIM Little River 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

KNOCHE, NINA Gardner 

General Engineering Freshman 

KOEHN, CARLA Marquette 

Horticulture Sophomore 

KOHLER, PAMELA Kansas City 

Engineering Technology Junior 

KR1ESE, LISA Liverpool, NY 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

KUKLINSK1. LEEANNE Richfield. Maine 

Dance Senior 

LANDIS, CRAIG Medicine Lodge 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

LANGDON. JULIE Topeka 

Music Education Freshman 

LANTZ. MICHAEL Shawnee 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

LARSON. DIANE Scandia 

Education Sophomore 

LAUTTMAN, JANET Fort Dix, N.J. 

Computer Science Junior 

LAVERTENTZ, SUSAN Bendena 

General Home Economics Junior 

LEADABRAND, KILEY Osborne 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

LEAR. RUSTY Waldron 

Finance Sophomore 

LEEBURG, JILL Reading 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

LIGHTCAP, STACEY Satanta 

General Freshman 

LITFIN, JENIFER Topeka 

Elementary Education Freshman 

LIVENGOOD, JEFF Anthony 

General Sophomore 

LONCARICH. DIANE Oswego 

Medical Technology Freshman 

LUPEZ, JOAN Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

LUKOW, STEVE Holstein 

General Engineering Freshman 

LUJAN. JOHN Elkhart 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

LUTZ. ANITA Arkadelphia, Ark. 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 



>*W -Oik 

\ 



Long distance, please-Eileen 
Chance, senior in civil engineering 
makes a call from third floor of 
Goodnow Hall. 



344 goodnow hall 





LUTZ, LISA Hays 

General Sophomore 

LYLES. MARK St. Louis, Mo 

Agricultural General Junior 

MAH, ELAINE Garden City 

Psychology Freshman 

MARQUESS, SCOTT Merriam 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

MASCARENAS, ALESIA Colorado Springs, Colo 

General Engineering Freshman 

MASTIN, CARRIE St. John 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

MATHIES. MARK Kanaaa City 

Accounting Senior 

MAYER, ANITA Gypaum 

Elementary Education Senior 

MCCULLICK, MISSY Hays 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

MCDIFFETT, DANTON Alta Vista 

General Freshman 



MCDONALD, JANET Coffeyville 

Elementary Education Junior 

MCGAUGH, JERRI Topeka 

Marketing Freshman 

MCGREGOR, MOLLY Kansas City 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

MCLENON, ELIZABETH Effingham 

General Sophomore 

MCMULLEN, KENDRA Lake Quivira 

Genera] Freshman 

MCNEER. ANN Topeka 

Psychology Senior 

MEADOWS, JANET Cimarron 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ME1NHARDT. ROY Paxlco 

Construction Science Senior 

MENSE, MICHAEL Hoxie 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

MERCING, LINDA Gas 

Biology Sophomore 

MESSENGER, DIANE Dighton 

Accounting Sophomore 

MEZGER, RUTH Hutchinson 

Genera) Business Administration Sophomore 

MILLER. CONNIE Topeka 

Computer Science Senior 

MILLER. MARILYN Satanta 

Education Freshman 

MILLER, SHARON Topeka 

Pre-Law Freshman 

MONNICH, VALERIE Herington 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

MONROE, KEN El Dorado 

Physical Education Junior 

MONTGOMERY, DONNA Council Grove 

Music Education Freshman 

MORELAND, GLENN Jefferson City, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MORGAN, JANICE Greeley 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

MORRIS, RAYMOND Sallna 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

MOSTAFFA, SUSAN Lenexa 

Computer Science Junior 

MUELLER. DAVID Tampa 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

MUELLER. DEBRA Hiawatha 

Physical Education Junior 

MUETING, TIMOTHY Seneca 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

MULL, NATALIE Great Bend 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

MULLER. TERESA Coffeyville 

Physical Education Junior 

MULQUEEN, GAYLE Denver, Colo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MULVANEY. MARTHA El Dorado 

Mathematics Freshman 

MYERS, KAREN Hermitage, Pa 

Psychology Junior 

NEEF, MONICA Selden 

General Freshman 

NEUENSWANDER, MINDY Ottawa 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

NEWMAN, KATHY Winchester 

Accounting , Junior 

NEWTON, LAURI Anthony 

General Sophomore 

NICHOLSON. LARRY Colby 

Finance Senior 



goodnow hall 345 



'%3?%sa« Sv WW 



Jhtcill 



OHALLORAN, MAURA Pretty Prairie 

Gaolc-gy Senior 

OLBERDING, DANIAL Atwood 

Accounting Sophomore 

OLSEN. STEVEN Horton 

Animal Science end Industry Graduate Student 

ORR, MELISSA White City 

Education Freshman 

ORTIZ, MARK Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

OSBORN, KIRK Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

PAIGE. ANGELA White City 

PreMedicine Freshman 

PARAMESH, INDHU Larned 

PreMedicine Junior 

PARAMESH. KALPANA Larned 

PreMedicine Junior 

PECK, KELLY Concordia 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

PEDERSON. RICK Horton 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

PFENNINGER, MARY Evergreen, Colo 

Psychology Junior 

PHILLIPS, COLEEN Leavenworth 

Biology Freshman 

PHILLIPS, KATHY Wakeeney 

Interior Design Sophomore 

PICKELL. WENDA Olathe 

Psychology Junior 

P1TZER. JAY Concordia 

General Engineering Freshman 

POSTIER, KEVIN Wakeney 

Agricultural General Freshman 

POTTS, DANNY Grain Valley. Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

POWERS. JULIE Great Bend 

Home Economics and Journalism Sophomore 

PRESTON. TAYLOR lola 

Engineering Technology Senior 

PYLE. PENNY Morrill 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

QUICK. IDA Thousand Oaks, Calif 

Applied Music Junior 

RANDALL, JANET Liberal 

English Junior 

RAY, CHARLES Council Grove 

Computer Science Freshman 

REDFERN, APRIL Anthony 

General Sophomore 

REED, K1MBERLY Merriam 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 

REED. THOMAS Gardner 

Electrical Engineering Graduate Student 

REISER, LORI Hutchinson 

Office Administration Sophomore 

RIORDAN, PATRICIA Topeka 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

RIORDAN, PEGGY Topeka 

General Business Administration Freshman 

RIPPER. ANNE Topeka 

Political Science Freshman 

ROBERTSON, KATHY Olathe 

Accounting Senior 

ROBISON, DANIEL Winfield 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

ROGENMOSER, BETH Topeka 

General Business Administration Freshman 

ROGERS. V1CKI Overland Park 

Computer Science Sophomore 

RONNEBAUM, JOAN Seneca 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

ROSS. CHERYL Overland Park 

Home Economico-Liberal Art* Senior 

ROSS. GENE Leawood 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

ROSS. WENDY Huron 

Accounting Sophomore 

ROUNDY. ANDY Phoenix. Ariz 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

"? U f "• " ARK Chanute 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

RUFENER. PAM Hctl 

PhysicaJ Education F rD .K m „ 

RUFF KAREN . W ak , 

s^VEr^Ro^ 3 Co "'°"» ';■'• ■■;';;■;';';';';■;■■ F -^ 

Speech Pathology Senior 




346 goodnow hall 



■ a 




SCHAUF, MARILYN Garden Plain 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SCHMALZRIED. TERRY Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

SCHMIDT. ANNA Spearville 

Computer Science Freshman 

SEGER, CHERYL Coffeyville 

Horticulture ,, Sophomore 

SELLAND, DENISE Everest 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

SEVERANCE. RACHEL Belolt 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

SHEEL. SANDY Mollnc 

Elementary Education Senior 

SIMONS, AMY Topeka 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

SLACK, DOYLE Wellington 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

SMALL. LEE Harton 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

SMITH. CYNTHIA Leavenworth 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

SMYSER, K1MBERLY Maywood 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SNELL, RACHEL Medicine Lodge 

Computer Science Freshman 

STAAB, MARY Valley Fall. 

Microbiology Senior 

STARK. BRIAN Syracuse, NY 

Construction Science Sophomore 

STEGENGA. SUSAN Manhattan 

Finance Junior 

STERNSDORFF, DONNA Elfingham 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

STEWARD, ANGELA St, Louis, Mo 

General Sophomore 

STEWART, ANGELA Kansas City 

Psychology Freshman 

STONER, DIANA Derby 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

STORER, ROBERTA Abilene 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

STROM. LUANN White City 

Elementary Education Senior 

STROUD, TERESA Leawood 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

STUCKY, JANICE Burrton 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

STUEVE, GREGORY Axtell 

Pre-Professional Secondary Freshman 

STUTTS. JANA Claremont. Calif. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SUDERMAN, DCANN Inman 

Physical Therapy Junior 

TETER. LINDA , Ottawa 

Interior Design Freshman 

THOME, EDWARD Wichita 

Geology Sophomore 

THOMEN, SUE Gardner 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

TIEMANN, KRISTA Salina 

Accounting Junior 

TIERNEY, PATRICIA Mlaalon 

Humanities Senior 

TINKER. LAURA Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Interior Design Senior 

TIPTON, DOUG Meriden 

Construction Science Sophomore 

TOLLEFSON, LAURA Hiawatha 

Correctional Administration Freshman 

TRABUE, THOMAS Jefferson City. Mo 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

TRIMBLE. PAM Agenda 

General Sophomore 

TRUE. SCOTT Topeka 

Geology Sophomore 

TUCKER. BRIAN Lyons 

Psychology Junior 

TWEEDY. PATRICK Ogden 

English Sophomore 

UNGLES, DEBRA Satanta 

Marketing Sophomore 

UNRUH. HAROLD Newton 

Microbiology Senior 

VANDORN. BRIAN Vllets 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

VANLERBERG, JOANNE Shawnee 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

VANMETER, KAREN Lawrence 

General Freshman 



goodnow hall 347 



low Hall 



VERBOOM. LINDA Wichita 

Clothing and Textile* Senior 

WADICK. JAMES Belolt 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WARNER. GARY Salina 

Pre Design Professions Sophomore 

WARREN, SARA Ottawa 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

WASHBURN. JEAN McPherson 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WEAR. JEANETTE Kansas City 

Agricultural General Junior 

WEAVER. RITA Hiawatha 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WEBER. SHIRLEY Hoisington 

General Freshman 

WEBSTER. ELAINE Hays 

Geology Senior 

WE1NSAFT. NATHAN Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

WEIS, CHRIS Riley 

Dietetics and Industrial Management Freshman 

WELLS, JANETTA Mayetta 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

WELLS. SUSAN Mayetta 

Home Economics Education Graduate Student 

WERTH, MONICA Salina 

Accounting Freshman 

WEST. ANDY Dodge City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

WESTCOTT, GERRY Topeka 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

WHETZEL. JAN Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

WIETECTER. TRISHA Kirkwood, Mo. 

Sociology Freshman 

WILKINSON. RALPH We.t Isllp. NY. 

Construction Science Senior 

WILLIAMS, GRETCHEN Hutchinson 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

WILTFONG. SUSAN Norton 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 

WRIGHT. CYNDA Hutchinson 

Marketing Junior 

YOUNG. ANN Lyons 

Elementary Education Senior 



Study Hall- Elaine Man, 
sophomore in chemical 
engineering, turns her room in 
Goodnow Hall into a miniature 
library as she studies engineering. 




Hurrlyet Aydogar 



348 goodnow hall 



Haymaker Hall 




AHRENS. TIMOTHY Pohattan 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senloi 

ALEXANDER, STEVEN Baldwin 

Accounting Junior 

ANDERS, DALE Eudora 

Agriculture Economics Junior 

ANDRAOS, EDWARD Doha, Qatar 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

ANNAN, GEORGE Onaga 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

ANNAN. ROBERT Onaga 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

APPLEY, MICHAEL Lamed 

Physical Therapy Junior 

ARPIN, KEN Sallna 

Horticulture Junior 

BADGER, KEITH Carbondale 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BAHR, SAM Gridley 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BAHR. STEPHEN Olmitz 

Pre-Professional Secondary Freshman 

BANHOLZER, MARK Florissant, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BANISTER. JEFF Overland Park 

Construction Science Junior 

BARKLEY. ROGER Goodland 

General Engineering Freshman 

BAYER, GREGORY Pawnee Rock 

Agricultural Education Junior 

BECKELHIMER. BILL Arkansas City 

Accounting Sophomore 

BECKER, DEAN Garden City 

Biology Freshman 

BELLIS. STEVE Atchmson 

Ge^™ 1 Freshman 

BEOGHER. TIM Brrd City 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

BERRY. MICHAEL Topeka 

General Freshman 

BETTENCOURT, MARK Havensville 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

BEYER. SCOTT Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BIEBERY. MICHAEL Sallna 

Accounting Senior 

BIERLY, KIRK Lyona 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

BILLINGS, MARVIN Liberal 

Management Sophomore 

B1LLIOT, MIKE Atchison 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BLACK, ROBERT Salina 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

BLAND, BEN Greenup, 111 

Civil Engineering Junior 

BOEHM. MARC Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

BOISVERT. MICHAEL Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

BOLTE, JOHN Salina 

Civil Engineering Junior 

BONDANK, DAN Kansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

BORCHERD1NG. DAVID Overland Park 

Horticulture Freshman 

BORDEWICK, KEVIN Seward 

General Freshman 

BOWERSOX. DEANNE Wllmore 

Interior Design Senior 

BOWERSOX. STEWART Greensburg 

Psychology Senior 

BOWSER, ERIC Oskaloosa 

Accounting Sophomore 

BRADLEY, JOHN Lawrence 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BRADLEY, JOSEPH Leavenworth 

General Business Administration Junior 

BRADLEY. ROBERT Abilene 

General Business Administration Senior 

BRAUN. STEVE Topeka 

General Engineering Sophomore 

BRINK, JOHN Clmmaron 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

BROKAW, FLETCHER St Louis, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BROKESH, EDWIN Norka 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

BROWN. MARTIN Kansas City, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 



haymaker 349 



lymaker Hall 



BROWN. PATRICK Hays 

General Business Administration Junior 

BUCHHOLZ, GLENN Wakeeney 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

BURKHART, TIMOTHY Newton 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

BURRIS, ANDREW Paxico 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

BURTIN. BRIAN Eureka 

General Engineering Freshman 

BUSSE, DONALD Goodland 

Health and Physical Education Graduate Student 

BUTTERFIELD, TIM Beloit 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

BUTTS, DANIEL Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

CAMPBELL, ROBERT Beverly 

General Sophomore 

CANTRELL, ED Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

CARINDER, MARK Cherryvale 

Horticulture Junior 

CARMICHAEL, WADE Bird City 

Agriculture Freshman 

CARVAR. RICHARD Shawnee 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

CASHION. DENN1W Kansas City 

General Engineering Freshman 

CHARLES, SCOTT Salina 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

CHAVEZ, MIGUEL Leavenworth 

PreA/eterinary Medicine Freshman 

CHERAY, DAVID Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

CH1LDS. CLAYTON Elmdale 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

CHRISTY. DOUGLAS Topeka 

Finance Senior 

CHRISTY. GARY Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

CLAASSEN, JERROL Whitewater 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

COBB, CURTIS Russell 

General Engineering Freshman 

COEN. JAMES Ottawa 

Civil Engineering Senior 

COLYN. KENNETH McPherson 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

COMMERFORD. MATTHEW Great Bend 

Construction Science Junior 

CONLEY. JIM Delia 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

COOK, LEWIS Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

COTTRIL. DAVID Topeka 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

COUCHMAN, GARRY Winfield 

Agricultural Education Freshman 

COX, STEVEN Wichita 

Accounting Freshman 

CRAIG, MICHAEL Baldwin 

Agriculture Junior 

DANDURAMP, DAVE Hutchinson 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

DARBY, JOHN St Louis. Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

DAVIS, DIRK Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

DAVIS, DONALD Norton 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

DECKER, MIKE Sandy. Utah 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

DECKERT. DAVID Salina 

Accounting Junior 

DEMARS. THOMAS Salina 

Accounting Sophomore 

DILLARD, SANDY Winfield 

General Engineering Sophomore 

DILLE. RUSSELL Topeka 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

DILLON, JEFF Lawrence 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

DIXON, TOM Pleona 

Agriculture Sophomore 

DONNELLY. DOUG Independence 

Pre Medicine Freshman 

DRAGASTIN, NEAL Lenexa 

General Sophomore 

DREILING. MARK Sharon Springs 

Speech Sophomore 



350 haymaker hall 




.^ 




Kidnapped- Jeff Dillon, freshman 
in agricultural economics, holds a 
captive as Marty Ryan, freshman 
in geology, pushes another 
hostage from Smurthwaite into a 
ninth floor Haymaker room. 
Terms for release included a Vista 
Run. 



Scott C 
DUBBERT, DALE . . Cawker City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

DUSIN. ROBERT Phillipsburg 

Civil Engineering Junior 

EBBERT, KERRY Wakeeney 

Management Sophomore 

EBBERT, SCOTT Shawnee 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

EDWARDS. BARRY Overland Park 

Finance Junior 



ENGLERT, CHRIS St Louis, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ERICKSON. DEVIN Leawood 

General Freshman 

EVANS, BRUCE Poplar Bluff, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

EVANS, LINK Lyon* 

Geography Senior 

EVES, BRAD Goodland 

General Engineering Freshman 



haymaker hall 351 



;er Hall 



FABAC, MIKE Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

FAILS. BRUCE Creve Coerv, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

FEHLMAN, MARVIN Wakefield 

General Engineering Freshman 

FINK, JOHN Prarie Village 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

FISHER. DARYL Holton 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

FRERKING, STUART Shawnee 

Pre-Veterinery Medicine Sophomore 

FREY. DANIEL Hutchinson 

Accounting Sophomore 

FRIEDEL. KENNETH Wichita 

General Business Administration Junior 

FROETSCHNER. ROBIN Larned 

General Engineering Freshman 

FROWNFELTER, DONNIE Manter 

Agriculture Economics Sophomore 

FRY. JACK Overland Park 

Horticulture Junior 

FRYE, ALAN Hayavllle 

Geography Senior 

FULLER. DAN Warrenton. Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Senior 

GADWOOD. BOB Shawnee 

Pre Education Freshman 

GAEDDERT, TOM Newton 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

GALBRAITH. STEVE Stanley 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

GAUMER. DAVID Kingman 

Management Freshman 

GOODACK. JOHN Kansas City 

General Engineering Freshman 

GOTTSCHALK. BILL Leavenworth 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

GOULD, EVERETTE Hutchinson 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GRIESEMER, PAUL Lincoln. Neb 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GRIFFIN, JAY Abilene 

Agriculture Junior 

GRIMES, DAVID Florissant, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GROSSMAN. DUDLEY Overland Park 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

GUINTY. DAVID Topeka 

Geology Junior 

GURSS, GARY Easton 

History Junior 

GUSTIN, KEVIN Hoisington 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

HAAG. CHRIS Holton 

Construction Science Sophomore 

HALL. BRUCE Potwin 

Agriculture Sophomore 

HALL. DOUGLAS Shawnee 

Horticulture Senior 

HAMILTON. GARY Topeka 

Accounting Junior 

HAMPTON, MICHAEL Warrensburg. Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

HARBORTH. WILLIAM Huntsville, Ala 

Engineering Technology Junior 

HARNDEN. BRYAN Prairie Village 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

HARRELSON. GREG Olathe 

Construction Science Sophomore 

HAX, TIMOTHY Prairie Village 

Mechanical Engineering . Freshman 

HAZELTINE. BRUCE Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

HEFTY. KEITH Valley Falls 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

HEGARTY, MARK Effingham 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

HEIM, ROBERT St, Marys 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

HENDRICKS, DOUGLAS Topeka 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HENNESSEY, STEPHEN Tecumseh 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

HERBERS. PAY Rose Hill 

Horticulfure Freshman 

HERBSTER, JEFF Morrill 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

HERMAN, MARK Atchlnson 

General Engineering Freshman 




352 haymaker hall 




HERMES, FREDERICK Hutchinson 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HICKOK, LLOYD Ulysses 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

HICKS. DUANE Independence, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HINSON, DAVID Hays 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

HOFFMAN, KEITH Claflin 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

HOOPER, ROBERT Hiawatha 

Accounting Sophomore 

HOPKINS, CARL Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

HORTON, JOSEPH Plevna 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

HOWARD. GERALD Ottowa 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

HUBERT, RANDALL Monument 

Agronomy Sophomore 

HUME, ROBERT St. Louis, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HUNDLEY, MARK Lyons 

General Engineering Freshman 

IMEL. JED Overland Park 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

IRVIN. MICHAEL Goodland 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

JENKINS, SCOTT Holton 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

JENSON. JOHN Denlson 

Accounting Senior 

JOHNSON, BRAD Mound City 

Crop Protection Senior 

JOHNSON, DOUG Belpre 

Agriculture Freshman 

JOHNSON, JEFF Lawrence 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

JOHNSON, SHANNON Ensign 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

JOHNSON, THOMAS Shawnee 

Biology Sophomore 

JONES. BRETT Overland Park 

General Engineering Sophomore 

JONS, DAVID Bonner Springs 

Dairy Production Freshman 

JURGENSME1ER, RONALD Topeka 

General Business Administration Freshman 

JUST. RANDALL Marion 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

KANNARD. KEVIN Overland Park 

General Business Administration Junior 

KARPISCAK. JOHN Belle Mead, N.J. 

Architecture Senior 

KAVANAUGH, SHAWN Kansas City 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

KEMME, DANIEL Newton 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

KIBLER, WILLIAM Topeka 

Computer Science '. Freshman 

K1DWELL. DAVID Enterprise 

Bakery Science and Management Senior 

KIETZMAN. DEVIN Topeka 

Finance Freshman 

KITSON. MATTHEW Hutchinson 

General Business Administration Junior 

KLEYMANN, JEFFERY Tribune 

General Engineering Freshman 

KLUG, KEITH Lorraine 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

KLUG, KELLY Susank 

Accounting Freshman 

KLUG, KENT Lorraine 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

KNOLL. MARK New Cambria 

Management Junior 

KNOX. DOUGLAS Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

KOEGEBOEHN, STEVE Council Grove 

Construction Science Junior 

KOONTZ, GREG Topeka 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

KORTH, GREGORY Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

KOSTELEC. PAUL Kansas City 

Computer Science Freshman 

KRAMER. JOHN Garden Plain 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

KROUPA, WILLIAM Marion 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 



haymaker hall 353 



if ill' 



er Hall 




Welcoming committee- Martin 
Wilde and Skip Harborth, both 
juniors in computer engineering 
technology, design a large sign to 
display during the K -St ate — KU 
football game. 



KRUG, ROBERT Russel 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

KUETHER. CRAIG Topeka 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KURTZ, ED Kearney, Mo 

Architecture Junior 

LACOMBE, GARRY Shawnee 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LARSON, THOMAS Sallna 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 



LATIMER. ROB Overland Park 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

LATOURELL, PAUL Overland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 

LAUPPE. GEORGE Lawrence 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

LEIKER. GARY Salina 

Computer Science Freshman 

LEMON. RAY Parker 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 



LEPPKE, LYLE Peabody 

Special Sophomore 

LESSLIE. STEVEN Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

LEWIS. JEFF Sallna 

Civil Engineering Senior 

LOEFFLER, SCOTT Wichita 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

LUGO. JOHN Junction City 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 



MACK, KELLY Overland Park 

General Business Administration Junior 

MAHANNAH, JEFF Arkansas City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

MAJOR. BRUCE Mentor 

Music Education Sophomore 

MAL1R, PAUL Wilson 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

MARCOTTE, FRANK Zurich 

Electrical Engineering Junior 



MARTIN. DONALD Clay Center 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

MARTIN. STEVEN Bucyrus 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

MARZAN. ALFRED Rio Pledras. PR 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Freshman 

MARZULLO. STEVEN Lenexa 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

MAURATH. SCOTT Oakley 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 



354 haymaker hall 




MCCANN, JAMES Gardner 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

MCCARTY. TIMOTHY Overland Park 

Music Education Freshman 

MCELMURRY, BRENT Hesston 

Pre-Law Freshman 

MCGAHEE, KEVIN Marion 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MCMILLEN. SCOT Shawnee 

General Business Administration Freshman 

MEEHAN, MITCHELL Solomon 

Crop Protection Junior 

MERCER, BRYANT Burns 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

MEYER. TIMOTHY St. Louis, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MICHAEL. DONALD Olathe 

General Sophomore 

MILES, WILLIAM Overland Pari 

Biology Sophomor* 

MILLER, DAVID Lyons 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

MILLER, RAYMOND Columbus. Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

MILLER. WILLIAM Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

MOLDRUP, KURT Overland Park 

Pre-Law Freshman 

MONTGOMERY, TERRY Sabetha 

General Engineering Freshman 

MOORE. KERRY Salina 

General Engineering Freshman 

MOORMAN, MITCH Solomon 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

MORGAN, MITCHELL Dwight 

Agriculture Freshman 

MOZIER. JOHN Stanley 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

MUELLER. MARK Hiawatha 

Agriculture Freshman 

MUELLER. SCOTT Kingman 

Marketing Freshman 

MULL1NS, STEVE Hutchinson 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

MURPHY. MIKE Shawnee 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

MURPHY, ROBERT Atchinson 

General Enginerring Sophomore 

MYERS, GARY Ottoura 

Accounting Senior 

NADEN, DANIEL Salina 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

NIEHAUS, CURT Topeka 

General Engineering Freshman 

NOBLE, JEFF Shawnee 

Computer Science Freshman 

NOLTING, KENT Nortonville 

Food Science and Management Freshman 

NORTHUP, JOHN Woodston 

General Engineering • Sophomore 

OCHS, GREGORY Lyons 

Engineering Technology Junior 

OFFENBECHER, MICHAEL Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

OGBORN. GREG Girard 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

ONEIL, JOHN Gypsum 

Biology Sophomore 

ONEILL, PATRICK Okfene, Okla 

Geology Freshman 

OLSER, TOM Wichita 

General Engineering Freshman 

OST, BRUCE Glen Elder 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

OSTENBERG, ROSS Salina 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

OSTMEYER, JOSEPH Seneca 

Construction Science Sophomore 

PACKER. DOUGLAS McCloth 

Agronomy Senior 

PAGE. ROGER Roasvllle 

Agricultural Education Senior 

PARK. MICHAEL Springfield. Mo. 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

PARKER, KEVIN Salina 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

PARKS. WILLIAM Pomona 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

PE1STRUP, KURT Ferguson, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 



haymaker hall 355 



lymaker Hall 



PENN. DAVID Topeka 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

PERRY, GLYNN Matson, HI. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

PETERSON. GREG Sallna 

Marketing Senior 

PETERSON, ROBERT Greeley 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

PETITJEAN, MIKE St Francis 

Accounting Freshman 

PORTERF1ELD, DOUG Poplar Bluff, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

POSTON, JOHN Lenexa 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

PRITCHARD, KEVIN El Dorado 

Management Junior 

QUINN, DANIEL Annandale, Vir. 

History Sophomore 

RAMSEY. ROBERT Concordia 

Agronomy Senior 

RANKIN, RAYMOND Topeka 

Sociology Sophomore 

RAUCH. RALPH Coffeyville 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

REDFERN, RICHARD El Dorado 

Accounting Junior 

REED. NORMAN Pamona 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

REGNIER. BERNIE Bennington 

Agronomy Senior 

REITZ, DAVE St, Louis, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

REYNOSO, LANCE Tecumseh 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

RHODES. CHRIS McLouth 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

RICE, MIKE Naperville, 111. 

General Business Administration Freshman 

RICE. PHILLIP Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

RICHARDSON, DALE Wichita 

Engineering Technology Junior 

RICHMAN. HOWARD Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

RICKEY. VINCENT Falrlawn. N.J. 

Pre-Law Senior 

RINGHOFER, FRANK St Louis, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

RIZZA. FRANK Halstead 

Horticulture Sophomore 

ROBERTS, BRENT Council Grove 

General Engineering Freshman 

ROBKE. KEVIN Seneca 

General Freshman 

ROGERS, DAVID Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

ROGG, KYLE Valley Center 

Chemistry Freshman 

ROHR, KEITH Great Bend 

General Engineering Freshman 

ROLLEY. BRENT Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

ROSS. BOB Salina 

Construction Science Sophomore 

ROTT1NGHAUS. DONALD Seneca 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

RUBOTTOM. BRAD Stockton 

Agriculture Sophomore 

RUMFORD, TYRONE Ottowa 

Agriculture Freshman 

RZEPKA. VANCE Florissant, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SABADELL. STEWART St. Louis, Mo. 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 

SACHSE, DAVID Leavenworth 

General Engineering Freshman 

SACK, JOSEPH Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

SAMPLE. ALLEN Overland Park 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

SAUBER. BRIAN Hutchinson 

Engineering Technology Junior 

SCHAAKE, SCOTT Lawrence 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

SCHETTLER, DAVID .','.,, Albert 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

SCHLEICHER, JOHN Kansas City, Mo 

General Junior 

SCHMIDT. DONALD Topeka 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 




356 haymaker hall 




SCHMIDT, PAUL Riverton, Wy. 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

SCHUETTE, MIKE Wright 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

SCHULTZ. STEVEN Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

SCHWARTZ, GREG Baldwin 

Agricultural Education Junior 

SCHWEIGER. EDWARD Afton, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SCHWERTFEGER, ALAN Satanta 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SEIWERT. PAUL Goddard 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

SELL, MARK Oskaloosa 

Construction Science Junior 

SHARPE, BRETT Hill City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SHIMP. JAMES Topeka 

Civil Engineering Senior 

SHOGREN, DALE Salina 

General Engineering Freshman 

SHUCK. TODD Lenexa 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

SIMONS. GREGORY Derby 

Agriculture Junior 

SIRKOYICH. JOSEPH Kansas City 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SITES. DALEN Grlnnell 

Pie-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

SLAVEN. MICHAEL Overland Park 

Management Senior 

SLEMMONS. ROBERT Topeka 

Civil Engineering Junior 

SLEMMONS. TIMOTHY Topeka 

General Engineering Freshman 

SMITH. STATON Garden City 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

SNELL, MARK Overland Park 

Construction Science Sophomore 

SOLLNER, TOM Burdick 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

SPAFFORD, JAMES Belleville 

Accounting Freshman 

SPIDELL, MIKE Overland Park 

Management Junior 

SPREIER. JEFFEREY Larned 

General Engineering Freshman 

STEELE. ROD St. Marys 

General Sophomore 

STEVENSON, LEE Oakley 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

STOLFUS, ALAN Bonner Springs 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

STRODA. NICHOLAS Hope 

Agricultural Economic* Senior 

STROUTS, DARYL Solomon 

Agriculture Junior 

STUBENHOFER, SCOTT Cottonwood Falls 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

TEAFORD. RICK Valley Fall* 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

TEETER, BRAD Lyona 

Architecture Senior 

THIELE, ERIC Norton 

General Engineering Sophomore 

THOMPSON. GARY Hutchinson 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

THOMPSON, KEITH Johnson 

General Sophomore 




Two Yum-Yums and a 

Bearclaw- Bryan Harnden, junior 
in electrical engineering, takes a 
break from the books for a 
Swannee's run. 

Scott Williams 



haymaker hall 357 



aker Hall 



UKLEJA, ROBERT Shawnee 

Computer Science Sophomore 

VANAMBURG, KENT Overland Park 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

VARNER, DARREN Lenexa 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

VAUPEL, RON Salina 

Civil Engineering Junior 

VERMILLION, CURTIS Mullinville 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

VERMILLION, GREG Mullinville 

Accounting Junior 

V1NING. BRIAN Richmond 

Agronomy Freshman 

VOELKER. CHARLES Leonardville 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

VOSSMAN, BRIAN Beloit 

Horticulture Junior 

VRBAS, ROGER St. Francis 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

WALKER, JEFF Newton 

Accounting Freshman 

WARD. EDWARD Topeka 

Geology Senior 

WEBER. BRENT Bonner Springs 

Music Education Freshman 

WEBER, RICHARD Blud Mound 

Agricultural Education Junior 

WEISER. ALAN Glade 

Agricultural Education Senior 

WEISER, BRITT Glade 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

WELLS, RONALD Wichita 

General Business Administration Junior 

WENDT, DOUGLAS Hope 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

WETZEL, JOSEPH St. Louis, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WHELCHEL, KEVIN Solomon 

Food Science and Management Freshman 

WHITE, RANDALL McPherson 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

WHITESIDE, DAVID Topeka 

General Engineering Sophomore 

WHITMER. DAVID Goodland 

Accounting Junior 

WILDE, MARTIN Andover 

Engineering Technology Junior 

WILKERSON, KENT Shawnee 

General Engineering Freshman 

WILLIAMS. DANNY Sckeston, Mo 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

WILLIAMS. SCOTT Prairie Village 

Engineering Technology Junior 

WILSON, DOUG Lyons 

Computer Science Freshman 

WINGF1ELD. MARK Hutchinson 

Construction Science Sophomore 

W1NTERMANTEL, STEVE Baldwin 

Agriculture Sophomore 

WISTUBA, STEVEN Winchester 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

WITTICH, DARRYL Derby 

General Sophomore 

WOENER, STEPHEN Rochester, NY. 

Baker Science and Management Junior 

WOHLER, JEB St. Marys 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

WOLEHRMAN, DANNY Lansing 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

WOLTERS, JOHN Atwood 

Dairy Production Junior 

WOOD, BRETT Solomon 

Civil Engineering Junior 

WOOLF, VAUGHN Milton 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

WORCESTER, MARK Hill City 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

WORNKF.Y, KEVIN Topeka 

Art Sophomore 

YOCKEY, KRIS Scottsdale Ariz. 

Agriculture Sophomore 

YOWELL, MIKE McPherson 

Pre Dentistry Sophomore 

ZIEGLER, KURT Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

ZIMMERMAN, JEFF Jewell 

Accounting Freshman 

ZUK. ALAN Kansas City 

Horticulture Junior 




358 haymaker hall 



,A 



Marlatt Hall 




AKIN, RANDY Axtell 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

ALANI, AMER Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Junior 

ALLISON, DON Kansas City 

Civil Engineering Junior 

ANCELL. RICHARD Sylvan Grove 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

ANDERSON, KENT Mentor 

General Engineering Freshman 

ANDERSON, PETE Claremont, Minn 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

ARNOLD. DAVID Larned 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

ARTHERTON, PHIL St Joseph, Mo 

Construction Science Sophomore 

ASHTON, KEVIN Derby 

General Engineering Freshman 

BAIR, ROBERT McCook, Ne 

General Engineering Sophomore 

BARTEL, W1LMER Hillsboro 

Engineering Technology Junior 

BAUMGARTNER, BRAD Lenexa 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BAYLESS, DUANE Dodge City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

BELL, ALAN Olathe 

Geology Sophomore 

BENTEMAN. GARY Clifton 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BENTEMAN, BRUCE Topeka 

Labor Relations Freshman 

BERGMEIER, DAVE Phlllipsburg 

General Freshman 

BERRY. JEFF Longford 

General Freshman 

BERVERT, DAN Topeka 

General Business Administration Junior 

BICKEL, GREG Spearville 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BLACK, JAY Kiowa 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

BLACKBURN, RICHARD Bertrand, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BLY. VINCENT Kansas City 

Technical Journalism Freshman 

BOWERS, MICKEY Eskridge 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BRACK, MARC Hoisington 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

BRADY, PHIL Clay Center 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

BREWER, DOUG Liberal 

Engineering Technology Junior 

BRIGGS. DAVID Beloit 

Marketing Freshman 

BROCK, BRENT Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

BROWN, RONALD Missions 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BROWN. RUSSEL Horton 

Finance Senior 

BRUNER, RICHARD Salina 

General Business Administration Freshman 

BUCHER. SCOTT Sterling 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BUNDSCHUH, BILL St Louis, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BUSER, JEROME Cawker City 

Agronomy Sophomore 

BUTZ, RANDY Dodge City 

Engineering Technology Junior 

CAMERON, CARL Hill City 

Accounting Sophomore 

CARLGREN, BRIAN Cawker City 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Sophomore 

CARRA. JEFFREY Niotaze 

Political Science Freshman 

CATER, STEVEN Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

CHADWELL, BRADLEY Morill 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

CHRISTIANS, MITCHELL Hays 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

COCKS, PAUL Prairie Village 

Computer Science Sophomore 

COLV1N, MICHAEL Garnett 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

COMBS, RAIMUND Manhattan 

Natural Resource Management Junior 



marlatt 359 



CONRARDY. NEAL Spearville 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

COOK. DANIEL Louisburg 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

COOKE. ANDREW Elkhart 

Engineering Technology Senior 

COOPER, GREG Westville 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

COYLE, BRENT Fowler 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

DANIEL, PHILLIP Garden City 

General Engineering Freshman 

DAVIDSON, CRAIG Alton, 111 

PreDesign Professions Freshman 

DEBACKER. STEVE Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

DEEMS, VINCE Topeka 

General Engineering Sophomore 

DEJESUS. ANTHONY Junction City 

Pre-Law Freshman 

DILLON, DENNIS Phillipsburg 

Finance Freshman 

DOME, MARION Pfelfer 

General Engineering Freshman 

DORSCH, JEFF Bird City 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

DOUGAN, MICHAEL Pretty Prairie 

General Business Administration Freshman 

DOUGLAS, PAUL Baldwin 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

DOW, SEAN Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

DREIL1NG, MARK Hays 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

DRURY, MIKE Illmo, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

DULAC, DOUGLAS W.R. Junction, Vt. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

DURR, SCOTT Dodge City 

Computer Science Freshman 

EADS, BRAD Garden City 

Finance Junior 

EDWARDS, BILL Kansas City 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

EGGIMANN, BRAD Gordonvllle, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

EILERT, MARK Belolt 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

EILERT, TED Belolt 

General Agriculture Freshman 

ENGEL, STEVE Oakley 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

ESAU. DAVID North Newton 

PreDesign Professions Sophomore 

FALLON, PATRICK Carbondale 

General Agriculture Freshman 

FERRELL, DAVID Springfield, Mo. 

Agronomy Sophomore 

FERRIS. STEVE Narka 

General Agriculture Freshman 

FIGGS, ROBIN Sabetha 

Pre-Medlclne Sophomore 

FIKE, DENNIS Ramena 

General Agriculture Freshman 

FISCHER, ALAN Nashville 

Construction Science Sophomore 

FISHER, DONALD Elkhart 

Accounting Sophomore 

FORET1C, ALEJANDRO Overland Park 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Junior 

FRANZEN. MARK Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Design Professions Senior 

FRIESEN, VON North Newton 

General Freshman 

FROEBE. STEVE Cherryvale 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

FUNK, STEVE Topeka 

Music Freshman 

GATENO. DAVID Great Bend 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

GEMAEHLICH, DONALD Hays 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

GERMAN. HAROLD Cawker City 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

GFELLER, DOUG Topeka 

Construction Science Junior 

GIBSON, CHARLES Manhattan 

Art Education Junior 

GIESAKING. MARK Ulysses 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 



360 marlatt 





GOLDEN, JEFF Hoyt 

General Agriculture Freshman 

GOODMAN. MARK Goff 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

GORMAN, CORT Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

GREEN, RUSTY Garden City 

Engineering Technology Junior 

GREMILLION. MICHAEL Wichita 

Computer Science Senior 

GRIFFITH, CRAIG Ellinwood 

General Business Administration Freshman 

GUDENKAUF, DOUGLAS Seneca 

General Engineering Freshman 

GUTZMAN, ROBERT Wichita 

General Engineering Freshman 

HABIGER. ANTHONY Topeka 

General Sophomore 

HAMM. RANDY Tampa 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

HANSEN, RALPH Leavenworth 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

HAYSE. DEAN Greenaburg 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

HENDERSON. JEFF Mission 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HERRMAN, ALLAN Emporia 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HIATT. GEORGE Phillipsburg 

Fine Arts Junior 

HIEGER. STAN Andale 

General Business Administa Administration Freshman 

HINDERLITER, RUSS Emporia 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

HOBELMAN. JOHN Colony 

Civil Engineering Junior 

HOLLOWAY. MARK Easton 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

HOLLOWAY. PERRY Easton 

General Engineering Sophomore 

HOOBLER. VERNON Topeka 

Accounting Senior 

HORSEMAN. DAVID Kansas City 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

HOUDYSHELL. BRETT Salina 

Biology Freshman 

HUFFMAN, CURTIS Gardner 

General Freshman 

HUGHES, DAVE Hutchinson 

Genera] Freshman 

HUMMELL, STEVE Lenexa 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

INGALLS, DON- Ellinwood 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

JACOBS. RICHARD Tonganoxle 

Animal Science and Induatry Senior 

JAECKE, KENT Chapman 

General Home Economics Freshman 

JANZEN, MARLIN Hillsboro 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

JENNINGS, MATT St. Louis, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

JENSEN. ROD Salina 

General Business Administration Freshman 

JOHNSON. BRAD Caldwell 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

JOHNSON. BRAD Salina 

Finance Junior 

JOHNSON. JAY Quenemo 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

JONES. MARTIN Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

JORAY, DENNIS Shawnee Mission 

Marketing Junior 

JUSTVIG, HARRY Mission 

Finance Junior 

KAMLA. FREDRICK Bird City 

Elementary Education Junior 

KANDT, KEVIN Herlngton 

Civil Engineering Junior 

KASSEBAUM, BILL Wichita 

Physics Freshman 

KASSEL. JEFFREY Perry vllle. Mo. 

Pre-Deelgn Professions Senior 

KELLY, TOM Topeka 

General Engineering Freshman 

KENWORTHY, JEFF Ransom 

General Sophomore 

KERR. BRAD Kansas City 

Civil Engineering Freshman 



marlatt 361 



irlatt Hall 



KIELHOFNER, BRAD Chaffee, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

KLEIN, RICK Fairview 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

KLOZENBUCHER, THOMAS Greenleaf 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

KNIFFIN, MIKE Lenexa 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KREUTZER, PAUL Kanaaa City 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

KROH. FRANKLIN Hiawatha 

Chemistry „ "J 

KUEHN, DAVID Russe " 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

KUHLMAN, DEVON Kensington 

Engineering Technology • - Jun ' or 

LANGSTON. KEVIN Vandalia. Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

LARSH, CHARLES Derbv 

General Freshman 

LARUE, BRAD Chanute 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

LASSLEY, SCOTT Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

LAUGESEN. PAUL Clyde 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

LEE STEVE Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

LEHMAN, GREG Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

LE1HY, TOM Topeka 

General Engineering Freshman 

LEROY. DAN Madison 

General Freshman 

LESSER, CHRISTOPHER Topeka 

History Sophomore 

LEWMAN. DAVID St. Joaeph. Mo. 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

LINDSHIELD, MARK Lindsborg 

General Engineering Freshman 

LIPPMAN, JOHN Leavenworth 

Food Science and Industry Freshman 

LISTER, RON Roaavllle 

Retail Horticulture Senior 

LOGAN. BRIAN Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

LOGAN, SCOTT Wichita 

General Freshman 

LOVETT, ANDREW Oxnard, Calif 

General Engineering Freshman 

LOVETT, JOSEPH Oxnard, Calif. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

LUCAS. KURT Shawnee 

Electrical Engineering . Sophomore 

LUCE, NORRIS Dover 

General Engineering Sophomore 

MAIS, JOHN Sedalia 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

MANGES, JAMES Manhattan 

General Engineering Sophomore 

MARSH, TOM Overland Park 

History Sophomore 

MARSHALL, JEFF Merriam 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

MAUS. KEN Colwich 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

MCCABE. FRED Emporia 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

MCCLOSKEY. LANCE Wichita 

Computer Science Sophomore 

MCCONNELL, DAVID Liberal 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

MCFALL, KENDALL Dexter 

Pre-Law Freshman 

MCLAUGHLIN, KENT Raytown, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MCQUEEN, EDWARD Stockton 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

MCQU1LLEN, JOHN Topeka 

Pre Dentistry Sophomore 

MCWILLIAMS. LARRY Sharon Spring* 

Engineering Technology Senior 

MEADOWS. RANDY Liberal 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MEEKS. ROGER Effingham 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

MENZIE, BRADLEY Sublette 

General Business Administration Freshman 

MESSNER. ROGER Anthony 

Management Junior 




362 marlatt 



■ M. 




METCALF, CHESTER Independence 

Construction Science Junior 

MEYER. DOUGLAS Olathe 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

MEYER, NICHOLAS Castile, NY. 

General Agriculture Freshman 

MISHLER, JOHN Sabetha 

General Agriculture Freshman 

MISHLER, MARTIN Sabetha 

Horticulture Therapy Sophomore 

MOELLER, BRENT Bonner Springs 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

MONHOLLON, JEFFERY Tonganoxie 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MOULD, JOHN Cumberland 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

MULLIGAN, TIM Kirkwood, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MUSE. ROGER Topeka 

Music Freshman 

NAVRAT. DAVE Wichita 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

NEAL. PAUL TopeUa 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

NEELY. THOMAS Topeka 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

NIKRAVAN. NAVID Pittsburg 

Civil Engineering Senior 

NOLL. ROGER Atchison 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

NOONEN. EDWARD Olathe 

Psychology Sophomore 

NUTT, STEPHEN Lamar, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

OHL. DALE Conway Springs 

Accoutning Junior 

OLBERDING. RICK Shawnee Mission 

Civil Engineering Junior 

OLSON. REX Herndon 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 



Takin er easy Fourth door 
Marlatt residents take a break 
between classes during the day. 



Scott Llebler 



marlatt 363 



Marlatt Hall 



OMEARA, MICHAEL lola 

General Business Administration Freshman 

ONEAL, MARC Wichita 

Geology Junior 

OSBORNE, KEVIN Danville 

Agronomy Freshman 

OTTO, MATT Olathe 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

PAGE, JOHN Kansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

PARKE, BRIAN Collyer 

General Engineering Freshman 

PARKER. LLOYD F° r < Rlle V 

Pre-Law Freshman 

PARKER, STEVE Russell 

Geology ■ ■ ■ Sophomore 

PAYNE, JOSEPH Springfield, Mo 

Pre Design Professions Sophomore 

PEACH QUENTIN Morris Plains, N.J 

History Junior 



PECKHAM, JEF Frankfort 

Applied Music Junior 

PETERS, RONALD Washington, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

PETERSON, MARK Lindsborg 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

PEZZA. MICHAEL Johnston. R.I. 

Political Science Senior 

PHELON, RAYLEN Melvern 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

PHILLIPS, CRAIG Dunlap, III. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

PICKLER, MIKE Ulysses 

General Sophomore 

PINKERTON, RUSSEL Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

POSEY, TATE Ft. Riley 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

POTTS, JOE Carney 

Biological Science Education Freshman 



PRATTE, DARRYL Florissant, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

PRATTE, DOUGLAS Florissant, Mo. 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 

RAPP, JOHN Dearlng 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

REED, WILLIAM Gardner 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

REESE, CURTIS Overland Park 

Agriculture Freshman 

REILLY, BRIAN Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

REINERT, ARNOLD Downs 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

RELIHAN. KERRY Chapman 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

RIESE, BILL Leavenworth 

Construction Science Sophomore 

RIVAS. ED Junction City 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

ROBETORYE, RYAN Valley Center 

Pre-Mediclne Sophomore 

ROGENMOSER, BILL Topeka 

Biology Junior 

ROME, DAVID Morland 

Computer Science Freshman 

ROUSH. JOHN Kansas City 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

ROYER, STEVE Greenville, 111. 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 



RUDER, GREG Hays 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

RYAN, JIM New Cambria 

General Agriculture Freshman 

RYMPH, ALAN Belolt 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

SALTER, KEVIN Hugo, Co. 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

SANDERSON. MIKE Grandvlew 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

SCH1LTZ, GARY Wathena 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

SCHMALE, FRANK Garden City 

General Business Administration Junior 

SCHMIDT, JOHN Hlllsboro 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

SCHROEDER, STANLEY Grlnnell 

General Engineering Freshman 

SCHULER, MARK Waldo 

Civil Engineering Junior 




364 marlatt 




SCHULZ, DANNY Stafford 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

SCHWARZ. DWIGHT Home 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

SCHMOKER, SID Oswego 

Egnineering Technology Sophomore 

SCRONCE, DAVID Greensburg 

Management Freshman 

SCRONCE, GARY Greensburg 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

SEIWERT, CHARLES Goddard 

Agriculture Freshman 

SEWELL. MARK Merrlllvllle, Ind 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

SEYMOUR, JAMES Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

SHOEMATE. WILLIAM Alma 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

SIDERAS, SAWAS Cyprus, Md. 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

S1LSBY, CLAY Mankato 

Pre Law Freshman 

SIMON. ROBERT Augusta 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 

SKIDMORE. KEITH Ottawa 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

SMILEY, STEVEN Inman 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

SMITH, BRENT Emporia 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SMITH, RONALD Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

SMYTH. PAUL . . i Solomon 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

SOMMERS. BRADLEY Robinson 

Management Sophomore 

STINNETT. MARCUS Kansas City 

Music Education Junior 

STROM. DANIEL White Uty 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

SUDERMAN. ARLAN Newton 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

TAYLOR, CRAIG Goddard 

General Business Administration Freshman 

TAYLOR, WARD Winona 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

TEDMAN, PAUL Harper 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

TEMPAS. BRIAN Peoria, III 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

THIER, STEVE Great Bend 

Engineering Technology Junior 

THOMAS, MARVIN Concordia 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

THOMPSON. MARK Eldorado 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

THOWE. MARK Russell 

General Engineering Freshman 

TOMANDL, MICHAEL Junction City 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

TRAVIS. JOHN Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

TUSH, GERALD Kansas City 

Computer Science Senior 

UNRUH, THEODORE Deerfield 

General Engineering Freshman 

UTECH, DAVID Herington 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

UTTERBACK. DALE Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

VANCE, STEVE Olathe 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

VANDEEST, ROY Mulvane 

General Freshman 

VIEGRA, FRANCISO Hutchinson 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

VIETS. BRUCE Overland Park 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

V1EYRA. PETE Hutchinson 

Management Senior 

WADE. MARK Copeland 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

WAGNER, DALE Downs 

Accounting Sophomore 

WAGNER, LARRY Downs 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

WALKER. RICHARD Junction City 

Accounting Junior 

WARREN, RUSSELL Maiden, Maine 

Computer Science Freshman 



marlatt 365 



arlatt Hall 



WATSON, KARL Jetmore 

General Engineering Freshman 

WEBER. DEAN Emroaus, Pcnn. 

Pre-Design Professions Senior 

WEGER. MATTHEW Roeland Park 

General Business Administration Junior 

WENDELL, MIKE Garden Plain 

Agriculture Freshman 

WENDLAND, SCOTT Maple Hill 

Agriculture Freshman 

WENDLAND. STAN Wamego 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

WENDT. DAVID Hope 

Agriculture Freshman 

WENTLING, MICHAEL Topeka 

General Business Administration Junior 

WERNER, PAUL Spearville 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

WETTER. KEITH Salina 

Architectural Engineering *. Freshman 

WIENS. BRENT Olathe 

Agriculture Sophomore 

WIETHARN. KENT Topeka 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

WILSON, PHIL St Louis, Mo, 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

WILSON, ROYCE Springhill 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

WINGERSON, STEVE Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

WOODSIDE, ALAN Narka 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

WOODWARD. JEFF Loulsburg 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WULFKUHLE, RONALD Lecompton 

Agriculture Freshman 

WYATT, RANDALL Norton 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 




Scott Llebler 

It never stops- Shaun Vickers, 
freshman in fisheries and wild-life 
biology, tackles the never-ending 
task of reading for class. 



366 marlatt 



Moore Hall 




AITKEN, DENNIS Wichita 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

ANTHONY, PATRICIA Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

ARENSBERG, CHRISTOPHER Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

ARNOLDY, SUSAN Tipton 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

ARTZ, JULIE Alma 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

ATKINS, ROSEMARY Omaha, Neb, 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

AYDOGAN, HURRIYET Ankara, Turkey 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

BAHR, SHARON Olmitz 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

BARBER. MARK Wakeeney 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

BARCIA, JOSEPH Downers Grove, III 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BARNES. KATHY St. Joseph, Mo. 

Chemistry Freshman 

BARTEL, KAY Hillsboro 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

BAUER. STEVEN Kansas City. Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

BAYOLA. LOURDES Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Graduate Student 

BEAUDEAN, CHARLES G Sikeston, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BEISEL, CINDY Sallna 

Horticulture Therapy Sophomore 

BELIN. KELVIN . ., Green 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

BENDER, AMY Kinsley 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

BENDER, BARTON Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

BETANCOURT, EDWIN Rio Piedras, PR. 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

BEVIER. JULIE Bonner Springs 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

BINTER, CAROLINE Wichita 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BLAKE, TONY Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BLANK. RAYMOND Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

BLOOM. JOEL Larned 

Finance Junior 

BLUE. STEVE Salina 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

BREY. SHAWN Lake Quivera 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

BROWN. DENISE Hutchinson 

General Home Economics Senior 

BROWN, DOUGLAS Prairie Village 

General Engineering Freshman 

BROWN, KEVIN Topeka 

General Engineering Sophomore 

BROWN, LESLIE Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BROWN. MARVIN Wamego 

Social Work Freshman 

BROWN. STEVEN G Marysville 

Music Freshman 

BROWNLOW. DALE Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

BRUNER. JOHNNIE Sallna 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

BRUNGARDT, DENNIS Erie 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BRUNNEMER, JAY Plainville 

General Engineering Freshman 

BRUNNERT. CHARLES Topeka 

Engineering Technology Senior 

BRYAN. KENT Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

BRZON, MELINDA Belleville 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

BURNETT. DANIEL Kansas City 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 

BUSSIES. DIANE Overland Park 

General Freshman 

CANNAVA, JOHN Winchester, Mass 

Dietetics and Institutional Managment Junior 

CARLTON, DOUG Eldorado 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

CASH. LISA Wichita 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 



moore hall 367 



CHRISTIANSEN, GARY Durham 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

CLAASSEN, ROGER Whitewater 

Agronomy Junior 

CLARK. ALBERT Merlden 

Accounting Graduate Student 

CLARK. KELLY Holton 

Education and Biological Science Senior 

CLAWSON. DAN Santanta 

Agricultural General Freshman 

CLAY, STEPHEN Wichita 

General Freshman 

COMBS, TOM Clearwater 

Accounting Sophomore 

CONLEY, SHARON Wichita 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

COPE. STEVEN Sydney, Neb 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

COUCHMAN. JOHN Garfield 

Computer Science Senior 

COUNTS, DORCAS Hays 

General Freshman 

CRAFT, BRENDA Wichita 

Elementary Education Junior 

CRAGER, CATHY St Paul 

Accounting Junior 

CROW. BARTON Medicine Lodge 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

CULLISON. RANDY Lyons 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

DAHL. JUDY Hardy, Neb 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

DAHLMAN, MARK Wichita 

Horticulture Freshman 

DANIELS, MARGIE Kalvesta 

Accounting Junio '' 

DEARTH, ANTHONY Kansas City 

Computer Science Freshman 

DEEVER, KAY Junction City 

Pre Professional Elementary Sophomore 

DENHOLM, GREGG Tonganoxie 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

DENTON, SHAYNE Atchison 

General Business Administration Freshman 

DIBBEN. MONTE Junction City 

General Business Administration Senior 

DICKERSON, JOHN Ft Scott 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

DIETTERICH, ROBERT Ransom 

Geology Junior 

DOEBELE, JACQUELINE Hanover 

Accounting Freshman 

DOSSETT, LARRY McPherson 

Agricultural General Freshman 

DUCKETT, DENISE Wichita 

General Sophomore 

DUDEK, MICHAEL Streamwood, III. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DUNCAN, MINETTE Wichita 

Interior Design Sophomore 

DUPERE, LEROY Junction City 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DYCK. AUDREY Moundrldge 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 

ELLERMAN. CARL Nortonville 

Psychology Freshman 

ELLIOTT. TYRA Overland Park 

General Freshman 

ERNZEN, SUZANNE Potter 

General Sophomore 

ERVIN, MICHELE Jackson, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions . Sophomore 

FARNEY, CHERYL Haysville 

Interior Design Sophomore 

FERGUSON, MARY Liverpool, Ohio 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

FILLIMAN. DANA Glenview. Ill 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

FINLEY. CINDY Bonner Springs 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

FINNELL, JEANETTE Leavenworth 

General Freshman 

FISCHER, DAVID J Des Plalnes, III. 

Architecture Junior 

FOLSOM. BLANE Stockton 

Geography Junior 

FORD, MARIE Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

FOX, GARY Lamed 

Biology Freshman 



368 moorc hall 





GALBRAITH. JOEL Wathena 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

GATZ, GARY Newton 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

GEE, MELODY Wichita 

Interior Design Sophomore 

GEIGER. LINDA Topeka 

Finance Senior 

GEORGE, LAURA Salina 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

GIESE, JOHN Leavenworth 

Physics Junior 

GILBERT, JOE Mt Home AFB. Idaho 

General Freshman 

GILLIAM, JOHN Greanleaf 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

GLASSCO, SHANNON Montezuma 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

GLIDEWELL, ELIZABETH Emporia 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

GLOTZBACK, TERESA Leavenworth 

Accounting Sophomore 

GOMEZ. CHRIS Chase 

General Engineering Freshman 

GONZALES, VIRGINIA Graden City 

General Freshman 

GOODMAN. BRYAN Sabetha 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

GREASER. ALAN Cape Girardeau, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GREENUP, LANA Valley Center 

Pre Professional Elementary Sophomore 

GROMER. MICHAEL Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

GROOM, STEVEN Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

GUENTHER. ERIC P"" 1 * 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

GUNDESON, ELAINE Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 




A real pick-me-up- The dancing 
style of a couple at a sixth floor 
function in Moore Hall draws 
attention from some of the crowd. 
Functions, usually held on 
Thursday nights, are sponsored by 
individual floors. 



Hurriyet Aydogan 



moore hall 369 



Moore Hall 



HAHN, LEIGH Hutchinson 

Accounting Junior 

HAHN, MARY Louisburg 

Restaurant Management Junior 

HAKE, MARK Tipton 

Management Freshman 

HAMM, TIMOTHY Kansas City 

General Engineering Freshman 

HANCOCK, DAVID Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HARVEY, DARCI Mankato 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

HAVERKAMP. DAVID Baileyville 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

HAVERKAMP. DIANE Baileyville 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

HEARN, PATRICK Lenexa 

Political Science Freshman 

HEGER, MARTIN Wichita 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

HEGER. THOMAS Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

HE1TMANN. SHARIEN St Louis, Mo. 

Sociology Sophomore 

HELLMER, ROZANNE Roeland Park 

Management Sophomore 

HENG. RALPH Liberal 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

H1EBERT. MATTHEW Hillsboro 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HIEBSCH. MARCIA Wichita 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

H1TT, CHARLES Overland Park 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

HOFFMAN, DEE Chapman 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

HOLL, DONNA Great Bend 

Interior Design Sophomore 

HOOVER. LARRY Winfield 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 






■ - 


Stffr 


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0/' 


L / 




Wk^" 




ML y- 




W it/ 


«H> , 






mJs, 



No mail again- One of the daily 
rituals for most Moore Hall 
residents is to check their mail 
only to find there is none. The 
view is a little different for the 
mailroom clerk who sees the 
mailboxes from the backside. 




Hurriyet Aydogan 



370 



moore hall 



1 




HOSKINSON. CYNTHIA Burrton 

Elementary Education Junior 

HUNSICKER, BARRY Kansas City 

History Freshman 

HUTCHISON, HERB Hays 

Marketing Sophomore 

1NGRIM. DAN Westmoreland 

Pre-Dentlstry Senior 

JACOBSON, ELLEN Overland Park 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

JOHNSON, ANNETTE Kansas City 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

JOHNSON, STEVE Atchison 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

KENNEDY. KENNETH Lenexa 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KIM, TAESUNG Manhattan 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

KIMPLE, DEANNA Conway Springs 

Pre-Law Junior 

KING, THOMAS Upper St. Clair, Penn. 

Physics Freshman 

KLEIN. CARLA Overland Park 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

KRIEGER, MARTHA Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

LANCASTER. JAMES Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LANDIS. BRIAN Newton 

Agricultural Economic* Senior 

LANDIS, KEVIN Newton 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

LARSON, PAMELA Manhattan 

Pre-Education Freshman 

LAWSON. DOUGLAS Wichita 

Computer Science Freshman 

LEARD. ALAN Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

LEFEVER. SHIRLEY Eldorado 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

LEROCK. GARY Plainville 

General Engineering Freshman 

LEWIS. LANCE Winfield 

Agronomy Freshman 

LUDES, ERIC Great Bend 

Computer Science Freshman 

LUEBBERS, TERESA Marienthal 

Home Economics and Journalism Sophomore 

LYSTER. JEFF Burlington, Colo 

Computer Science Freshman 

MAIKE. DEBRA Lyndon 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

MARR, JERRY Formoso 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

MAST, KEVIN Hesston 

Accounting Junior 

MATLACK, TIM Clearwater 

General Business Administration Junior 

MAULER, SUSAN Otis 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MCALLISTER. SCOTT Florissant, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MCCOY, JACQUELYNN Marysville 

General Freshman 

MCCULLICK. MARK Minneapolis 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

MCCURDY, RHONDA Leavenworth 

Accounting Junior 

MCDOWELL, WILLIAM Halstead 

Engineering Technology Junior 

MCFALL, KIMBERLY Dexter 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

MEARES. LISA Topeka 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

MEGEE, BRYAN Spring Hill 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

MENDELSON. SCOTT Flushing. N.Y. 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

MERCER. SHERRITA Carbondale 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MICHEL, CINDY Bellaire 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MICK, DAMON Tipton 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

MILLER, CONNAITRE Junction City 

Applied Music Sophomore 

MILLER. DAVID M Topsfleld. Mass. 

Engineering Technology Senior 

MILLER. PEGGY Atchison 

Office Administration Freshman 



moore hall 371 



Moore Hall 



MOFF1TT, GEORGE Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MONTANARO, PATRICIA Rotterdam Jet , N Y. 

Computer Science Sophomore 

MORRIS, DAN Abilene 

General Business Administration Freshman 

MOUSER. DEB Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

MULIK, LARRY Kansas City 

Pre Medicine Freshman 

MULLINS, SHARON Salina 

Office Administration Freshman 

NABAZAS. BOB Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

NASS, PEGGY Atchison 

Accounting Freshman 

NELSON, DIRK Derby 

General Freshman 

NELSON, MARCUS Herington 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 



NEUFORTH. ROYCE Great Bend 

Computer Science Senior 

NEUMANN. JOE Troy 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

NOLL. KAREN Winchester 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore 

NORTON, MICHAEL Westwood, Mass. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

NULL, SANDRA Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 



OBRIEN, BROOKS Liberal 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

OLIPHANT, MARY Pittsburg 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

ORTIZ, ALFREDO Montecarlo, P. R 

Management Junior 

OTT, JANICE Gypsum 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

PAULS. ROD Newton 

Accounting Junior 



PEREZ, MAR1TZA San Francisco, P R 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

PEW, KEVIN Parkeville, Mo 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

PIERSON, BRET Holton 

Accounting Junior 

PLOESSER, GARY St Louis. Mo. 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

POTTER. K1MBERLY Winfield 

General Home Economics Junior 



RAETZ. PAULA Gypsum 

General Business Administration Freshman 

RAMER. STEVE Harper 

Agricultural Education Junior 

RAMIREZ. ILEANA Mayaguez. P. R. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

RANTIS, ARYL Downer, III. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

REED, MARTHA Wichita 

Horticulture Freshman 

REES, BRIAN Emporia 

Agricultural General Freshman 

REGNIER, DOUG Bennington 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

REICHENBERGER. CHRIS Mt. Hope 

General Freshman 

RESSER, DAVID St. George 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Freshman 

REYNOLDS, JULIA Topeka 

Accounting Junior 

RICHARDS. BRIAN Kansas City 

General Freshman 

R1EDERER. ROBERTS Holton 

Management Senior 

RIVERA, CESAR Forest Hills, P. R. 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

ROBERTS, AUDREY Salina 

General Freshman 

RODRIGUEZ, JOSE Palmar Sur. P. R. 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

ROE, STEVE Wakeeney 

industrial Engineering Sophomore 

ROSE, TAMARA Luray 

General Sophomore 

RUTZ, SHELLEY Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

RYYAN. MIKALL Newton 

Horticulture Senior 

SAMSON, LARRY Leavenworth 

Chemical Engineering Junior 



372 moore hall 






pH ■r i 








SANTILLI, MONIQUE Stockton 

Genera] Business Administration Freshman 

SCHIEFELBEIN, CRAIG Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

SCHLATTMANN, RICHARD Atchison 

Civil Engineering Junior 

SCHOEN, DOREEN Cawker City 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

SCHOENBEIN, MICHAEL Ferguson, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SCHOTTLER, KARL St. Charies, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

SCHREPEL, TERRY Ellinwood 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SCHUETTE, GARY Lebanon 

General Sophomore 

SCHULTZ, BRAD Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

SELLERS. JAMES Atchison 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

SELLERS, MARK Abilene 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SERRA, TERRY Overland Park 

Interior Design Sophomore 

SHEA. DOROTHY Abilene 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

SHERVE, KAREN Oskaloosa 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SHERVE, MARCY Oskaloosa 

Accounting Sophomore 

SHOGREN, BRUCE Llndsborg 

Accounting Junior 

SHUFFLEBARGER, PHIL Atchison 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

SISTRUUNK, WENDY Manhattan 

Applied Music Sophomore 

SMITH, KIMBERLY St Paul 

Elementary Education Junior 

SMITH, LAYTON Eskridge 

Marketing Junior 

SONNTAG, TODD Allentown, Penn 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SOWERS, NANCY K Spring Hill 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

SPAID, TED St. Louis, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SPENCE, STEVE Washington 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

SQUIROS, DORI Wichita 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 




Winter orphan- Bicycles are the 
primary means of transportation 
for many college students but are 
often neglected when winter's 
snow immobilizes them. This 
bicycle chained outside of Moore 
Hall becomes a snow sculpture in 
the first major snow of the year. 



Hurrlyet Aydogan 



moorc hall 373 



Moore Hall 



STAGGS. DENISE Dodge City 

General Business Administration Freshman 

STAMMER. JOAN Leauiood 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

STE1NBERGER, CHARLES Clay Center 

Engineering Technology Junior 

STEWART, MEG V Leawood 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

STIMACH. CHERYL Kansas City 

Family and Child Development Senior 

STIMACH, JOHN Kansas Cil, 

General Freshman 

STONE, JANET Florissant, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

STOVALL, DONNA Marion 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

TATE. GREGORY Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

TATE. ROXANN Junction City 

Pre-Lau/ Senior 



TERRILL. DEWEY Burr Oak 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

THOLE. CHERYL Stafford 

General Home Economics Senior 

THOMPSON. ROBERT D Liberal 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

THOMSON, LAN1CE Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

TILLWAY. ARVIN D Bombay 

Chemistry Graduate Student 

TINSLEY, CARLA Wichita 

General Freshman 

TIPPIN, RICHARD Manhattan 

Agricultural General Junior 

TRACY, TAMMARA Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

TROYER, LOREN Hutchinson 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

TYSON. PATSY Lyndon 

Family and Child Development Junior 

UTT. MARCIA Winfield 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

VOLK. VERA Omaha, Neb 

Microbiology Sophomore 

WAHL, LYNN Blaine 

Computer Science Freshman 

WALDREN. DERYL Tribune 

Agronomy Senior 

WALKER, SHARON Kansas City 

General Engineering Freshman 

WANGEMAN. MIKE Clearwater 

Accounting Junior 

WEHRMAN, MARY White Cloud 

Medical Technology Junior 

WEIR, BRENDA Pratt 

General Sophomore 

WILDER. CLAIRE Halstead 

Management Junior 

WILLIAMS, PAULA Wichita 

Psychology Junior 

WILSON. PHILLIP Plains 

History Senior 

WILSON, REED Washington 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

WILTZ. PHILIP Sabetha 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

WINDSOR, DAVID Haven 

General Engineering Freshman 

WINGERSON, AMY Topeka 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

WINTERS. LANETTE Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

WOODMANSEE, TAMI Great Bend 

Mathematics Sophomore 

WURM. WARD Oberlln 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

YIM. YAT MING Kansas City 

Architecture Senior 

YOCUM, JOHN 1 St. Marys 

A'' Freshman 

ZATT, SCOTT Barrlngton, III. 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

ZODY. DENENE Hutchinson 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Sophomore 




374 moore hall 



,*JL 



Putnam Hall 




ANDERSON, JULIE Lyons 

General Sophomore 

ANDERSON, JANEL Overbrook 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

ATHEY. MARTY Prairie Village 

Modern Languages Junior 

BAKER, BETH Winchester 

General Freshman 

BARNES, BARBARA Wamego 

Accounting Junior 

BECKER. DONNA Melvern 

Home Economics Education Senior 

BELL1NDER, BELINDA Wamego 

General Freshman 

BISHOP. RETA Topeka 

General Sophomore 

BLUNT, BERNITA Beloit 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

BOTKIN, LINDA Shawnee Mission 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

BRANDT, CHERYL Nora. Nebr 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BRUMMEL. RANA Garnett 

General Business Administration Freshman 

BUCHANAN. ANITA Wamego 

Interior Design Freshman 

CARTER, LUCINDA Kansas City 

Accounting Sophomore 

CARVER, GWEN Shawnee 

Elementary Education Junior 

CASTELLI. JULIE Wichita 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

CHAPPELL. DEB Morganville 

General Home Economics Freshman 

CHASE, JOLENE Newton 

Interior Design Junior 

COCHRAN, BECCA Wichita 

Horticulture Therapy Sophomore 

COOPER, CONNIE Chapman 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

CORNWELL. JEANETTE Luray 

Fine Arts Freshman 

COX, KRISTIN Shawnee 

Clothing and Textiles Sophomore 

CRAWFORD, RONDA Mulvane 

General Business Administration Junior 

CRUPPER. KAREN Wichita 

Music Education Sophomore 

CURTIS, RHONDA Osage City 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DELANGE, DENISE Girard 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

DENEKE. CHRISTINA Beloit 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

DISQUE, ANGELA Salina 

Accounting Freshman 

DREW. KATHY Shawnee 

Psychology Freshman 

ERWIN, CONNIE Salina 

Accounting Sophomore 

FORSBERG, ELLEN Assaria 

English Junior 

FOUNTAIN, MEL1NDA El Dorado 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

GARRETT. ROBERTA Manhattan 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

GENOVA, LISA Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

GRANBERG. ELAINE Prairie Village 

Accounting Senior 

HARRISON. LORRIE Hugoton 

Pre-Professional Secondary Freshman 

HEIMERMAN. LISA Garden Plain 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

HEINRICKS, LAKEN Garden City 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

HENNESS, MARTHA Kansas City 

Accounting Freshman 

HOOKER, JERI Scott City 

Computer Science Freshman 

HOOPER, HEATHER Gem 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

HORN, SHAUNA Pratt 

Consumer Interest Junior 

HULSING. ANITA Berryton 

Pre-Professional Secondary Freshman 

IRELAND. WAVA Florence 

Biology Senior 

JAKSA. PATRICIA Kansas City 

Art Sophomore 



putnam hall 375 



Putnam Hall 



JAY, CONNIE Asherville 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

JETTE. MICHELE Prairie Village 

Journalism and Mass Communications - Freshman 

JOHNSON. LORETTA Assaria 

Home Economics and Journalism Junior 

JONES. GAYLA Kansas City 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 

JUREY. COLEEN Clifton 

Accounting Senior 



KAISER, PATRICIA Hoisington 

Animal Science and Industry ■ Junior 

KARME1ER. DIANNE Kansas City, Mo. 

General Engineering Freshman 

KENNEDY, KATHLEEN Wichita 

General Freshman 

KIEFFER, DANA Grandview, Mo. 

Pre Design Professions Sophomore 

KNAUSSMAN. KARLA El Dorado 

Physical Therapy Senior 

KNOETTGEN, LORI Wichita 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

KOHAKE, LISSA Roeland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

KRUMWIEDE, DARLENE Salina 

Accounting Freshman 

LARMER, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Geophysics Sophomore 

LAWRENCE. ANGELA Lenexa 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

LAWRENCE. MARTHA El Dorado 

Accounting Sophomore 

LEONARD. LISA Wellington 

General Business Administration Freshman 

LITSEY. LYNNE Sedgwick 

Horticulture Sophomore 

MASONER. SHARON Fontana 

Horticulture Freshman 

MATHERS, BARRIE Topeka 

Marketing Freshman 

MAYER. LUELLA Norwich 

Medical Technology Senior 

MAYER, VICKIE Norwich 

Music Education Sophomore 

MCCOY, NANCY Whitewater 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

MCDANIEL. WENDY Tonganoxie 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

MCGAUGHEY. GAIL Ulysses 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

MCGEE. CATHY Columbus 

Correctional Administration Senior 

MCGOWEN, MICHELE Satanta 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

MCQU1RE, HEATHER Wichita 

General Sophomore 

MCINTYRE, KAREN Hill City 

Social Science Junior 

METTL1NG. KAREN Udall 

Computer Science Junior 

MOLZ, LOIS Deerfleld 

Restaurant Management Sophomore 

MOORHEAD. AMY Woolster, Ohio 

Finance Junior 

MURPHY. TAMRA Ulysses 

Horticulture Senior 

NEADERHISER, JOAN Solomon 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

NORRIS, SARAH Kansas City, Mo. 

Bakery Science and Management Sophomore 

OBERG. KERRY Wichita 

Music Education Junior 

PALM. TAMMY Topeka 

Fine Arts Senior 

PARRISH. KATHRYN Burns 

General . Freshman 

PENCE. ALICE Winchester 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

PEUGH. TAMIE Dodge City 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 

PHILLIPS. PATRICIA Mission 

Accounting Sophomore 

PRICE. LORI v Ro2c , 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

PUCKETT. BRENDA '.'.'. . . Fredonla 

Geology Freshman 

REMMEL, SHERYL Topeka 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

R |J Z. LISA Merriam 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 




376 putnam hall 




RODINA. SHARON Kansas City 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

RORABAUGH, LORI Lebanon 

General Engineering Freshman 

RUCKER. LORI Junction City 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

RUSCO. ROBIN Clifton 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

RUSSELL. KATHY .'..'.'. Wathena 

General Freshman 



SACK. MARIE Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

SEILER. GAIL M t Hope 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

SCHEUNEMANN, LISA Spring Hill 

Consumer Interest Junior 

SCHM1D. DEBBIE '.'.7.7.'. Salina 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

SCHMIDT, EMILY Hillsboro 

Social Science Freshman 



SCHOEN, DEBORAH Cawker City 

Management Senior 

SCOTT. LISA Leawood 

Accounting Sophomore 

SENTS. DORIS McPherson 

General Home Economics Freshman 

SEXSON. FAITH . /. . Weskan 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SHIPLEY, MELVA 7.7'. . . EsDorn 

Horticulture Sophomore 

SOYEZ. NANCY Cedar Point 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

SPIGHT, MARNITA St Louis, Mo 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

SPILLER. SHARON Frankfort 

Fine Arts Senior 

STEPHENSON. SALLY Shawnee 

Pre Pharmacy Sophomore 

STEWARD, PENNY Clay Center 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 



STROHM, GAYLE Manhattan 

General Home Economics Freshman 

TEATS, ROSA Independence 

Finance Senior 

TEMPLE. SUZANNE Norcatur 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

TERW1LL1GER. LORI Wichita 

Cetera] Freshman 

TILLOTSON. GWEN Ulysses 

Fine Arts Senior 



TIMMIS. TONI Udall 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

UNDERHILL, JILL Beloit 

General Sophomore 

UNRUH. LYNNEETTE Pratt 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

VESPER. DONNA Olathe 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

VOGT. KERRY Hesston 

Management Freshman 



VOLAVKA. JENNIFER Caldwell 

Medical Technology Senior 

WALFE. CHERYL Overland Park 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

WALKER, JOYCE Beloit 

Office Administration Junior 

WARREN. MAUREEN Shawnee 

Fine Arts Senior 

WARREN, MICHAEL Wamego 

Engineering Technology Senior 



WEBER, MICHELLE Mission 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

WELSH, MARCIA .777777 Shawnee 

Accounting Freshman 

WERNER. DIANE Merriam 

" r * Junior 

WILSON. CHERYL Garden City 

Art Junior 

W1NGFIELD, JANET Lecompton 

Education ■ Art Junior 



W1TTUM. DONNA Independence 

Elementary Education Junior 

WOLFE, KIMBERLY Southwick. Mass 

Agricultural Journalism Sophomore 

WOODS. LILLIAN Silver Springs, Mo 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

YAMASHIRO. SHARON Fullerton, Ca. 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

YOUNQU1ST, STEPHANIE Haskins 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 



putnam hall 377 



Smith 



ARNOLD. STEVEN Johnson 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

BARTHULY. DAVID Paxlco 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

BASS, MICHAEL Marseille 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

BEEN. KENT Goodland 

Agricultural Education Senior 

BOND, GARY Shawnee Mission 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

BOYD, DAVID Wakeeny 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BUHLER, JARALD El Dorado 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BURGH, ROBERT Trenton, N J 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BURNHAN, STEVE Rosehill 

Pre Law Freshman 

COOK. CRAIG Wichita 

Interior Deslng Senior 

CRANMER, JON Ncss Ci 'y 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

DOERKSEN, RANDY Buhler 

Music Freshman 

EUWER. BRIAN Austin. Texas 

Mechanical Enginering Junior 

HARDY. JAMES Wakefield 

Secondary Education Senior 

HARESNAPER. JEFF Labanon 

Agriculture Freshman 

JONES. HOWARD Llnwood 

Biology Senior 

LAWSON, ROBERT Lenexa 

Speech Freshman 

MAYDES, CORY Lebanon 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

MCKERNAN. PATRICK Wichita 

Horticulture Senior 

MILLER, STEVEN Hoisington 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

NIETLING. DUANE Spearville 

Pre Design Professions Freshman 

NYHART. SCOTT Agra 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

PARKER, CHRIS Kansas City 

lndustrical Engineering Sophomore 

PAYNE, JOHN Berrlngton 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

PETERSON. BRUCE Lindsborg 

Engineering Technology Junior 

PTACEK, TIMOTHY Wilson 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

REECE. JOHN Ulysses 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

SHEERON, GOERGE Philadelphia. Penn 

Bakery Science and Management Freshman 

SHORMAN. GENE Green 

Crop Protection Junior 

SIDEBOTTOM. DAVID Topeka 

Physics Sophomore 

SMITH. DENNIS Wichita 

Horticultural Therapy Senior 

VAUGHN, RANDALL El Dorado 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

VERSTRAETE. ROBERT Lenexa 

Computer Science Senior 

WHEATLEY, CHRISTOPHER Merriam 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

YOUNG, STEVE Calhoun 

Food Science and Management Junior 







378 smith 



Smurthwaite 




BERGKAMP, KATHLEEN Valley Center 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BOWMAN. SHELLY Lamed 

General Home Economics Senior 

BRENNAN, FRANCES St Marys 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

BROWN. DEBRA Lansing 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

BULLOCK, NATALIE Pittsburg 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BURR1S, APRIL Paxico 

Fashion Design Freshman 

CARRA, LINDA Havana 

Engineering Technology Junior 

CHAMBERLIN. PATRICIA Caphman 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

CHARBONNEAU, MARIAN Concordia 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

CLARK, SANDY Concordia 

Home Economics and Journalism Junior 

COLLET, MELINDA Marion 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

COURIER. GENA Edgerton 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

DUNKLEBERG, DEE Osborne 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

ERKER. CAROLINE Wellington 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

FORD, TERESA Wichita 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

FRAZEE. CHRISTIANA Arkansas City 

Psychology Senior 

GRABER, SUSAN Hutchinson 

Music Freshman 

GARDNER, ELIZABETH Hartford 

Consumer Interest Sophomore 

GARRETT. JENISE Woodbine 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

GREIF, DIANE Tipton 

General Business Administration Junior 

HAAG, NATALIE I Holton 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

HAYNES. SUSUAN Wamego 

Music Education Senior 

HIETT, JENIFER Buhler 

Speech Junior 

HOLMAN. KATHY Winfield 

Interior Design Sophomore 

HORNBACK, ANNE Wichita 

Food and Nutrition Science Junior 

HUGHES. LEE ANN Soldier 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

HUNDLEY, BRENDA Topeka 

Agricultural Education Junior 

HUNDLEY. SANDRA Topeka 

Agricultural Education Senior 

JOHNSON. SUZANNE Topeka 

Speech Pathology Senior 

JONES. JOHNNA Lawrnece 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

JORNS. PAM Preston 

Family and Child Development Junior 

KEMPLAY. LAURIE Beattie 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

LILL. MARY JO Towanda 

Home Economics Education Senior 

LORSON, VERONICA Hope 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

MARR, PEGGY Formoso 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

MCCARTY, JAN Elllnwood 

General Business Administration Junior 

MCDANIEL, SALLY Sallna 

Interior Design Freshman 

MOG. CINDY Wilson 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

MOREY, KIMBERLY Belleville 

Community Services Freshman 

NYHART. RENEE Agra 

Home Economics Extension Sophomore 

RELIHAN, MARY Chapman 

Social Work Sophomore 

REXW1NKLE, SHERRIE Great Bend 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Freshman 

RUNDELL. JULIE Topeka 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

RUSK. MONA Sun City 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

RZIHA. CECELIA Holslngton 

Biology Senior 



smurthwaite 379 



imurthwaite 



SHORMAN, DELLA Wakefield 

Fashion Design Junior 

SNYDER. BETH Republic 

Pre Professional Elementary Freshman 

STEINER. JENNIFER HoUlngton 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

STEINER, THERSIA Hoisington 

Pre Professional Elementary Sophomore 

STEWART, MARGARET Americus 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

UNRUH. BEN1TA Great Bend 

Recreation Senior 

VAN HORN, PAMELA Ottawa 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

VIERGEVER. MELODIE Wakefield 

General Business Administration Freshman 

VOPATA, VIRGINIA Marysville 

General Freshman 

WILKINSON, GENEVA Lyndon 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

WORKMAN. SYLVIA Concordia 

Music Education Senior 

YARROW, DEBBIE Clay Center 

Pre-Professional Education Freshman 




Scott Williams 



Divided Even- Vicki Logan, 
freshman in architectural 
engineering, and Debbie Rudicel, 
sophomore in animal science and 
industry, prepare a Sunday dinner 
at Smurthwaite cooperative house. 
The students perform various 
duties around the building. 



380 smurthwaite 



Van Zile Hall 




ALLEN. SUSAN N 

AND n E RSON d DEB ,trM ' 0n ^Graduate Student 

Pre D VeS y EB ■• Elm Creek Neb. 

ANDERSON. STAN l/'VTm 

Pre-Design Professions . . . . '. Frihm^ 

ANTOINE, PEGGY . .7. .7.7.7.7.7 fcrJSflS 

Pre-Design Professions F „,L m; , n 

ATKINSON. ANN Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BARBER. RHONDA Ellinwood 

B«-UAM rSK 

BELL" MENT Sophomore 

?T ■ B , R | NT Wich.ta 

Lnemical Engineering I,,ni„r 

BOHANNON, RANDY s.kes.on. Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BRANDS VANESSA .Long IsLd 

Oeneral Business Administration Junior 

BROOKMAN, CATHY Wichita 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 

BROWN. DIANE Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

BROWNELL. ALICIA Topeka 

General Sophomore 

CHILDERS. DEBRA Topeka 

Computer Science Freshman 

COLLINS. KELLEY Merrlam 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

COOPER, JOHN Brooklyn, NY. 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

CORSON. MELANIB Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

COUNTS. HUEY Salina 

General Sophomore 

DARDIS. ANNE Eudora 

General Business Administration Freshman 

DISNEY. ALICE ciayton. Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DOHL. EDITH Green Bay. Wit. 

Journalism and Mas* Communication* Senior 

DUTTON, CHRISTI Wichita 

Interior Design Junior 

ECKLUND, TERRY Emporia 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

ELLIS, BRENDA Merriam 

Management . . , .- Junior 

EMLEY, TERESA Manhattan 

General Freshman 

ENGLER, LEE Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

FINGER. TOM Lamed 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

FIRESTONE, SARA Baldwin 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

FLORER, ANGEL Shawnee 

Gcncral Freshman 

FOUST. NANCY Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

FREEMAN. JACQUELYN Kansas City 

Computer Science Freshman 

FRISBIE, LAURIE McDonald 

General Freshman 

FUGATE. MICHAEL Kanaa. City 

Education and Biological Science Senior 

GAFNEY. HOPE Overland Park 

Modern Language Graduate Student 

GARST. KURT Hutchln.on 

Civil Engineering Senior 

GIRHRDIER KEITH S t Louis, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GOFORTHBEN .' St Clair Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Inni™ 

GRE ?. NE ; JEFF :::::::::::::: wichita 

Architecture Senior 

GUENTHER GRENTHEN p" |* 

Recreation and Physical Education | lln inr 

GUENTHER. HILDA 7:.7.7 .■.■.■.•.':.•.•. ft£ 

Hor,lcul,ure Junior 

GUMULA. SHELLY Highland 

Restaurant Management Freshman 

HAMM KATHRYN ' / . 7 . . . 7 .' SToro 

^'^'"w^v; Freshman 

HANNA MARY Leavenworth 

^^^' enCe and Indus,r V Freshman 

HEDGE S- B,LL Nevada. Mo. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HERRON MARK j,™ 

Chemical Engineering Senior 



van zile hall 381 



Van Zile Hall 



HOLDAL. LISA Casper. Wyo. 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

HOPSON. DONNA Lenexa 

Speech Junior 

HUYSER. GRETCHEN Lawrence 

General Freshman 

KOLMAN, IRENE Washington 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

KRUSE, ANN Wichita 

Accounting Freshman 

LAMMERT, BARBARA Marysville 

Food Science and Industry J " nl °f 

LANG, HARVEY Grcat Bend 

Horticulture J u " lor 

LANGFORD, EDWARD W.chita 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

LENTZ. SHELDON Hutchinson 

Applied Music Sophomore 

LIGNITZ, MARYANN Marysville 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 



L1NDEMAN. VICKIE Mt. Prospect, III 

Horticulture • Jun ' or 

LUCAS, DAVID Topeka 

Finance ««"'»' 

MADDEN. THOMAS Wichita 

Fine Art. Senior 

MALM, MARY McPherson 

Natural Resource Management Sophmore 

MENDENHALL, KATHY Topeka 

Architectural Engineering Sophmore 

MARSH, KATHRYN Wichita 

Pre-Destgn Professions Sophmore 

MATHER, JAMES Sikeston, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Sophmore 

MCDERMED, KEVIN Effingham 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

MCDONALD. JAMES Independence 

Civil Engineering Senior 

MCKINZIE, TINA Kansas City 

Pre-Veterinary Sophmore 

MCNICHOLS. KELLY Burr Oak 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MURRAY, JANET Wichita 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

MYERS, ED Hiawatha 

Fine Arts Sophmore 

NELSON, BRAD Clay Center 

Management Freshman 

ORTOLF. CHERYL Olathe 

Correctional Administration Senior 

OWEN. MEDGE Goddard 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophmore 

PARKS. KEN Garden City 

General Freshman 

PEELEN. TIM Hume. Mo. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

P1TTMAN, KATHLEEN Wichita 

General Home Economics Sophmore 

PITTMAN, MELANIE Olathe 

General Freshman 

PLANK, MARY Creston, Ohio 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

POWELL, BENJAMIN St. Louis 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ROHRER, DONNA Salina 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

ROTTINGHAUS, ALAN Baileyville 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SCHWAB, STEVE Shawnee Mission 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

SCOTT, DIANE Prairie Village 

Social Work Junior 

SCRIVNER, STEVE Dallas 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

SEYFERT, KARL Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SIEMSEN, JULIE Holyrood 

Pre-Professional Secondary Freshman 

SNODGRASS. THOMAS Tuscumbla. Mo. 

Architecture Senior 







382 van zile hall 



Van Zile Hall 




SWANEY. DONNA Havana 

Pre-Veterlnary Senior 

TEPPER, JAMES Lee Summit, Mo. 

General Freshman 

THOMAS, BETH Jordan, N Y. 

Pre-Veterinary Freshman 

THREATS, TRAVIS Kansas City 

Speech Pathology Junior 

TURNER. CONSTANCE Shawnee 

General Freshman 

TURNER, STANLEY Waverly 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

ULRICH, JENNI Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

VERSLUYS, JOHN Salina 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

VIENS, JOHN Kansas City 

Sociology Junior 

WILLIAMS. DREW Preston 

Music Junior 




Cramming- Ann Kruse, freshman 
in general, studies late at night in 
the cafeteria area in the hall 
basement. 



Craig Chandle 



van zile hall 383 



West Hall 



ALLISON. LINDA Stafford 

Family and Child Development Senior 

ANDERSEN, SANDRA Ozawkie 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

ARNESON. CINDY Belleville 

Pre-Professional Elementary Senior 

ASHBURN. CELIA Garnett 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BAIRD. STACI Logan 

General Sophomore 

BAIRD, TERR1 ■ °' athe 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BAUGHN. SHERYALD Fredonia 

Pre-Veter,nary Medicine Freshman 

BEARCE. MARTHA Robinson 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BEBERMEYER, KATHY Abilene 

Pre-Professional Secondary ■ ■ Ju n ' or 

BENHAM, LOR! Columbus 

General Home Economics Freshman 

BENISCH, JULIE Wakeeney 

Pre-Professional Secondary Junior 

BERRY. ALICE Wichita 

Social Work Freshman 

BERRY. SHARON Kansas City 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

B1GHAM, LINDA Grantville 

Interior Design Junior 

BIGHAM, NANCY Grantville 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

BIRD, LINDA Liberal 

Accounting Junior 

BLANCHARD, LORRIE Gas Hills, Wyo. 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

BORTZ. TERI Haysville 

Horticulture Junior 

BOSTER. MARCIA Bennington 

Pre Professional Elementary Freshman 

BOTTS, KATHY Merriam 

Horticulture Junior 

BOWERS. JANELLE Marion 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BOSWER, JULIE Oskaloosa 

Finance Freshman 

BRAY. CINDY Sterling 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

BRENT, LYNNE Springfield, Mo 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

BRUENGER, MARY Garden City 

Accounting Freshman 

BRUNGARDT. DEBBIE St. Marys 

Pre-Profeasional Elementary Senior 

BURJES, KAREN Chapman 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BURKE. STEPHANIE Council Grove 

General Business Administration Freshman 

BURNS, NATALIE Chanute 

Interior Design Freshman 

BUTLER. LAURA Derby 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

BUTLER. LISE Salina 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

CAREY, PATRICIA St Louis, Mo. 

Art Sophomore 

CARLSON. MARLENE Mulvane 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

CLARK, JULIE McPherson 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

CLARK. SHELLY Newton 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

CLINE, FONDA Weskan 

Accounting Sophomore 

COATS, CONNIE Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

COLLINS, SANDRA Overbrook 

General Freshman 

CONLEY, ANITA Gypsum 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

CORKRAN. JULIE Olathe 

General Sophomore 

CROOK. TERI Garden City 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

CUMM1NGS. JULIANNE Hutchinson 

Interior Design Sophomore 

DENHOLM, LORIE Tonganoxie 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

DEUTSCHER, SONYA Ellis 

General Home Economics Freshman 

DITTMER. SUSAN Olathe 

General Freshman 



384 west hall 





DWYER. DEBBIE Hutchinson 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

EDMONDS. JEAN Topeka 

English Sophomore 

ELLIOTT, KELLI Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

EMBREE, LISA Leavenworth 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

ENNS, BETSY Wamego 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

EPLER, KATHY Hallowell 

General Business Administration Freshman 

EYE, JACKLYN Newton 

Computer Science Sophomore 

FAGER. RUTH Osage City 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

FARRELL, LYNN Russell 

Pie-Nursing Freshman 

FERGUSON, SHANNON Cheney 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

FIDLER. TINA Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

FIELDER. LISA Dwight 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

FORSYTH. DEANA Wlnflelc" 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

FOWLER. TRINA Garden City 

General Sophomore 

FRENCH. DEBORAH Olatht 

Business Education Senior 

FRIEDLEIN, JANE Chesterfield, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GALE. MEL1NDA Overland Park 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

GEISLER. SHERRY Topeka 

General Freshman 

GENRICH. SUSAN Olathe 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

GILE, KRISTI Salina 

General Home Economics Freshman 




West Hall, May 1 help you?- 

Beth Hughes, sophomore in pre- 
veterinary medicine, takes her 
turn with receptionist duty at the 
West Hall main desk. 



Scott C. Williams 



west hall 385 



West Hall 



G1LLMORE. MARY Gypsum 

Social Work Freshman 

GLENN. DEBRA Lenexa 

Horticulture Sophomore 

GRIGSBY, LISA Pratt 

Music Freshman 

GUNDESEN, JOAN Wichita 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

HADDOCK. REBECCA Atlanta 

Food Science and Industry Junior 

HADDOCK, SONYA Atlanta 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HALL. DEANN Fredonia 

Pre Professional Secondary Sophomore 

HAMMERLUND, JANICE St Marys 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

HAROLD. TERRI Omaha, Neb. 

General Freshman 

HARRINGTON, LANA Garden City 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

HEADRICK. SHERRY Jewell 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

HEINE, BRENDA Chase 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HEROFF, JANICE Manhattan 

Office Administration Sophomore 

HINTZ, JEAN Salina 

Accounting Sophomore 

HOFERER, CHRISTINE Topeka 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HOFERER. MICHELLE Topeka 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

HONIGS, DIANE Topeka 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

HORNER. TAMERA Wichita 

General Sophomore 

HORTING, CAROL Tescott 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

HUGHES. BETH Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

HUGHES, DENISE Hamilton 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HUMPHRIES, SANDRA Holton 

Psychology Freshman 

HUTCHINSON, JANE Cheney 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

1NMAN, SHERRI Topeka 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 

JANES. EMILY Prairie Village 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

JANSSEN. MELODIE Lorraine 

Accounting Senior 

JELLISON, BRENDA Coldwater 

Finance Junior 

JONES, DEBRA Reading 

Home Economics Education Junior 

KARLIN, LYNEE Lenexa 

General Freshman 

KELLER. JOYCE Overland Park 

Retail Floriculture Senior 

KEPLER. KIM Cincinnati, Ohio 

Agricultural General Freshman 

KERN, LOIS Osage City 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

KIERNAN. SANDRA Ft. Riley 

Pre-Professional Secondary Freshman 

KIGER, SHANALYN Newton 

Physics Freshman 

KING, TRACY Leon 

Agricultural General Sophomore 

KLONTZ. DONNA Hiawatha 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

KOENIGS, CHERYL Goddard 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

KOHMAN, MARY Solomon 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

LAFLIN. WENDY Nickerson 

Geography Junior 

LAMB, NITA Macksville 

Pre Professional Elementary Freshman 

LANGHOLZ, JULIE Wichita 

Gene"' Freshman 

LARSON, KATHERINE M Olathe 

Horticulture j un l or 

LAUPPE, SONYA Lawrence 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

LINDER. SUSAN Clay Center 

Music Education Junior 

LITFIN. WENDEE ..' .'.'.'.' .'.".'.' .V Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 



386 west hall 





LITTLE, JANIS Carbondale 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

LITTLE, MARILYN Carbondale 

Finance Freshman 

LITTLE, MARJORIE Carbondale 

Accounting Freshman 

LOCKHART. TYRA New Cambria 

Agriculture Freshman 

LUCE. NINA Dover 

Chemical Science Senior 

MAIKE, CYNTHIA Alma 

Accounting Freshman 

MANN, SHERILYN Waterville 

Art Sophomore 

MARINO, ELIZABETH Overland Park 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

MARTELL, JULIE Topeka 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MARTIN, TAMARA Johnson 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 



MARVEL, CATHY Wichita 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

MATSON, HAYLEY Clifton 

General Home Economics Freshman 

MAYER, KAREN Gypsum 

General Business Administration Freshman 

MCCULLOUGH. MELISSA Topeka 

Management Sophomore 

MEEHAN, BRENDA Abilene 

General Home Economics Sophomore 



METZ. MICHELLE Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

MICK, DIANNE Tipton 

Interior Design Junior 

MILLS. VALERIE New Boston. III. 

Interior Design Senior 

MIRANDA, ASTRID Isla Verde, PR 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

MOONEY, JOAN Roeland Park 

General Business Administration Junior 



MORGAN, JULIE Derby 

Office Administration Freshman 

MUETING. SHARON Axtell 

Horticulture Sophomore 

HEFF, RENEE Topeka 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

NELSON, DARLA Strong City 

Computer Science Sophomore 

NEWELL, CAROLYN Valley Falls 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 



NICHOLS, PATRICIA Olathe 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

NORDYKE, BELINDA Wichita 

Computer Science Freshman 

NORDYKE, LINDA Wichita 

Finance Freshman 

NORMAN, TRUDY Fowler 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

NORMS. ANNETTE Edgerton 

Natural Resource Management Senior 



OSBORN. CATHY Derby 

General Home Economics Freshman 

OSTENBERG. JAN Salina 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

PAKKEB1ER, KATHLEEN Prairie View 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

PARMER, DINA Tonganoxie 

Interior Design Sophomore 

PATZELL, ANN Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 



PENNINGTON, LYNN Derby 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

PFANENSTIEL. CHERI Victoria 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

PHILLIPS, CHRISTINE Wichita 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

PIHL, NANCY Salina 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

POTTER, MARY Highland 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 



RAINS. SHARI Matfield Green 

General Freshman 

REDLER, LISA Overland Park 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 

REED, CYNTHIA Cottonwood Fall 

General Freshman 

REED. MARIANNE Copeland 

Interior Design Senior 

REMMERT, JEANETTE Topeka 

General Home Economics Freshman 



west hall 387 



West Hall 



REUSINK. DEBBIE Long Island 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

REVEY, JOLENE Ottawa 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

RHINE. LINDA Hays 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

ROBERTS. MARY C Springfield. Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ROGGE. MARTHA Salina 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

ROUSH. SUSAN Kansas City, Mo. 

General Business Administration Freshman 

RUDICEL, DEBRA Kingman 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

RUSS. JACQUELINE Stockton 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

RUSSELL. KIMBERLY Chanute 

General Sophomore 

RYAN, TAMI Scott City 

Management Freshman 

SANDBERG, PATRICIA Chesterfield, Mo. 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

SAWYER. REBECCA Topeka 

Horticulture Junior 

SCARBROUGH. KAY Hiawatha 

Modern Language Sophomore 

SCHEMPER. TERESA Manhattan 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

SCHMITZ. ANNE Manhattan 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior 

SCHNEIDER. LEWANN Logan 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

SCHNEIDER, LEWJENE Logan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

SCHULTZ, JODI Wichita 

General Freshman 

SCHWARTZ. JONI Pretty Prairie 

Consumer Interest Junior 

SHELLEY. NANCY Wichita 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 



Play it again, Sam- Hall 
Director Marianne Reed, senior in 
interior design, and Anna Barton, 
junior in journalism and mass 
communications, find 
entertainment at the piano in the 
director's apartment of West Hall. 




Scott C. Williams 



388 west hall 




SHEWBART, CARRIE Great Bend 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

SHIRLEY, JANET Vermillion 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

SIMPSON, KATHY Topeka 

Accounting Sophomore 

SMITH, MAUREEN Topeka 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

SOBBA. ANITA Garnett 

Horticulture Sophomore 

SPENCER, BRENDA S Netawaka 

Office Administration Freshman 

STANLEY, THERESA Topeka 

General Sophomore 

STEWART, STEPHANIE Chanute 

General Sophomore 

SPITT1CH, SHERRY W.chita 

Accounting Junior 

TALBOTT, DARLA Marquette 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

TENPENNY. ALICIA Iola 

Accounting Junior 

TOWNLEY, MELODY Phillipsburg 

Biochemistry Sophomore 

TRAYLOR, TARA Springfield. Mo, 

Modern Language Freshman 

TREESE, SHERRI Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

TURNER, LINDA Waverly 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

UBBEN. TERESA Blue Rapids 

Computer Science Sophomore 

VENTERS, TAMMY Dodge City 

General Engineering Freshman 

VLADAR. THERESA Russell 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

WAGNER, REBECCA Richmond 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

WALDNER. ROBBIN Osage City 

General Sophomore 

WANGEMAN, LORI Clearwater 

Accounting Junior 

WARKENTIN, MAVIS Wichita 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Freshman 

WAY. SHELLEY Wichita 

Interior Design Senior 

WEIMER. SANDY Clay Center 

Pre-Professional Elementary Senior 

WEIRICK, JERI Wichita 

Office Administration Junior 

WELCH, DEBBIE Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

WELLS, DEBRA Garden Plain 

Physical Therapy Junior 

WHITENER, KAREN Topeka 

General Freshman 

WILLIAMS, KELLY D Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

WIMMER. SONYA Overland Park 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

WISEMAIN, BETH Hiawatha 

General Freshman 

WOLFF, KATHY St Louis, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WOODS. JILL Ottawa 

Accounting Freshman 

WRIGHT. KIM Harrisonville, Mo, 

History Freshman 

YARBER. SHERRI Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

YOUNGLAND. TAMMY Sallna 

Accounting Senior 

ZAMRZLA, KRIS Russell 

Pre-Professional Secondary Freshman 

ZIBELL. CARRIE Holton 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

ZIMMERMAN. SUSAN Alta Vista 

Home Economics Education Senior 

ZINN, APRIL Overland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 



west hall 389 




Fledging 

Like most new organizations, the Off- 
Campus Council (OCC) continues to 
suffer from growing pains, according to 
Eugene Russell, president. 

"The Off-Campus Council was set up 
to help off-campus students get more 
involved in student elections and to 
provide extra-curricular activities for those 
students," Russell said. 

The OCC, which began in 1979, was 
instituted by Sam Brownback, 1978 
student body president. Brownback 
organized a commission which surveyed 
off-campus students and found that they 
felt there were three major areas in which 
there was room for improvement. Those 
areas included under-representation in 
campus activities, lack of organized social 
activities and difficulty in obtaining 
basketball tickets. 

The commission created an off-campus 
student association and off-campus 
students then elect the seven-member 
OCC. 

According to Russell, OCC provides a 
social outlet. The group has a lot of 
parties, in addition to trying to help 
people who want to get involved in 
student government, clubs, organizations, 
intramurals, etc. 

"The biggest problem that the group 



Scott Liebler 




390 off-campus 



group endures pains 



has had since it was founded was 
communication. That means letting 
everybody know what's going on. That's 
one problem the new council will have to 
work on," Russell said. 

Rob Atland, senior in marketing, was 
the council's first president. Like Russell, 
Atland believes communication has been 
the major problem facing the OCC since 
it was founded. He also cites 
transportation and landlord-tenant 
relations as areas the council could help 
improve. 

"Another problem we've had is that 
once a person has been on the council, 
they leave. They get the leadership 
experience and the experience of working 
through student government services and 
then they move on to like student 
senate," Russell said. 

According to Russell, there are always 
new people on the council, which means 
more people get involved. But it also 
means that OCC is continually starting 
over with inexperienced individuals. 

Another problem Russell has had to 
confront is the lack of involvement by the 
majority of off-campus students. 

"The thing a lot of people don't 
understand is that if they live off-campus 
they belong to Off-Campus Student 



Association. A lot of them think they 
don't belong because it's a club or 
something. A lot of them don't come (to 
the meetings) because they don't want to 
get involved," Russell said. 

With the problems the council has had 
in trying to grow, Russell is not sure 
whether the council represents the 
majority of off-campus students since only 
60 to 80 people regularly attend the 
meetings. 

"My first guess would be no because of 
the small group of students we have there 
(at the meetings). But I think the group 
that it represents is the off-campus 
student who wants to get involved. That's 
the person who comes to the meetings 
and that's the person we work for," he 
said. 

Although there has been problems in 
establishing the staples of the organization, 
the OCC has had its accomplishments. 
Those accomplishments include formats, 
Judicial representation for off-campus 
students, participation in homecoming 
festivities, Student Governing Association 
funding, and representation on the Union 
Activities Board. $ 



Dave Cook 




Step-two-three- A couple seems 
to enjoy one of the slow dance 
tunes played during the OCC 
Valentines Day party. 

Now look here- Gene Russell, 
sophomore in industrial 
engineering and OCC president, 
seems to be illustrating his plan of 
action to secretary Brenda 
Roberson, junior in marketing. 



Scott Williams 



off-campus 391 



Off-Campus 



ABBOTT. DONNA Overland Park 

Management Senior 

ABDULMAFID, AKRAM Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Junior 

ABRAM, TAMI Jewell 

Marketing Sophomore 

ADAMS, DEBRA Bentley 

Home Economics Education Junior 

ADAMS, JIM Osborne 

General Business Administration Sophomore 



ADEJUNMOBI, BAYO Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Graduate Student 

ADEJUNMOBI, YETUNDE Manhattan 

General Engineering Freshman 

ADEYANJU. FLORENCE Manhattan 

Education Graduate Student 

ADMIRE. JOHN Tulsa, Okla. 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

ADOLPH, CONNIE Manhattan 

Accounting Junior 

AGARD, GARRIE Agusta 

Social Science Junior 

AGE, DAVID Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

AHLBERG, CHERYL Manhattan 

Accounting Freshman 

AKAGI. DONALD Ulysses 

Computer Science Senior 

AKIN. DEAN Manhattan 

Engineering Technology Senior 

AKIN. WANDA Leonardvllle 

Social Science Senior 

AL BAKER. JASSIM Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Graduate 

ALBIN. KENNETH Belleville 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

ALBRACHT. DAVID Manhattan 

General Business Administration Senior 

ALBRIGHT. DEBRA Parsons 

Clothing Retailing Senior 



ALEJOS, SUSAN Topeka 

Medical Technology Junior 

ALLEN. BRENDA Fontana 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

ALLEN, CHARLTON Belle Plain 

Food Science and Industry Junior 

ALLEN. DOUGLAS Parsons 

Architecture Senior 

ALLISON, PAULA Basehor 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

ALLISON, SANDRA Junction City 

Elementary Education Junior 

ANDERSON. DANA Wellington 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

ANDERSON. HOWARD Jamestown 

Management Senior 

ANDERSON, KIMBERLY White City 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

ANDERSON. LARRY Washington 

Business Education Senior 

ANDERSON. REGINA Wichita 

Art Education Senior 

ANDERSON. SHERI Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

ANDERSON. STEVEN Overland Park 

Management Senior 

ANDERSON. TIM Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

ANDERSON, TOD Kansas City 

Engineering Technology Junior 

ANDREWS. KEITH Bonner Springs 

Political Science Education Senior 

ANDREWS. PHYLLIS Joplln. Mo. 

Dance Senior 

ANGELL. RANDALL Manhattan 

Engineering Technology Senior 

ANTHONY, TOD Santanta 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

APIAFI. ATOWARIFAGHA Porthacourt 

PreDesign Professions Freshman 

ARGO. BRENT Lexington. Mo. 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

ARNETT, JONNA ] _[[ Wichita 

Dietetics and Institutional Management . . Junior 

ARNOLD. RICHARD Alma 

General Business Administration .... Senior 

ARNOLDY, ANTON Tlplon 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

ARTZ, ARTHUR ..'.'.'.'.'.'.'. Junction City 

PreProfesslonal Secondary , Junior 



392 off-campus 














f- 






l ■•• % 




n 








Cliff hanger- Mike Mc Vey, 
senior in general business 
administration, gets in some 
angling while perched above the 
churning waters of Rocky Ford. 

Scott Liebler 

ASBILL, CINDY Independence 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Junior 

ASBURY. LONALD Moberly. Mo. 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

ASCHER. KEITH Junction City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ATKINSON, ED Norton 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

ATKINSON. ERIC Wlnfleld 

Journalism and Man Communications Graduate Student 

ATTIG. SUSAN Leavenworth 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

AUGUSTYN. DEBBIE Harper 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

AUSTIN, CRAIG Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

AUSTIN, HELGA St George 

Special Junior 

BACHMAN. CHRISTYNE Fall City, Neb 

Genera] Sophomore 

BADUNG, BULUS Manhattan 

Horticulture Sophomore 



off-campus 393 



>ff-Campus 



BAHR. BONNIE Olmitz 

Family and Child Development Senior 

BAHR. KRUTIS Topeka 

Engineering Technology . Senior 

BAILEY, BRENDA Jefferson, Mo. 

Architecture Sophomore 

BAILEY. CHRIS Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

BAILEY, DANISE Manhattan 

Music Education Junior 

BAIRD, TAMRA Salina 

Pre-Professional Secondary Junior 

BAIROW. SHARON Wamego 

Home Economics Education Senior 

BAJICH, MIRYANA Kansas City 

Physical Therapy Junior 

BAKER, JACKIE Topeka 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

BAKER. KRISTI Junction City 

MUSIC Graduate Student 

BAKER. PAUL Bonner Springs 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

BAKER. SHERRY Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

BAKER, STEPHANIE Council Grove 

Psychology Sophomore 

BALDWIN, JANE Toganoxie 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

BALL. BRIAN Sabetha 

Architecture Senior 

BALLOU. JANICE Edwardsville 

Accounting Junior 

BALLOU. LINDA Delphos 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

BAMBERRY, TRACY Parsons 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

BAMBICK, MARTIN Fredonia 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BANDYK, KIM Manhattan 

Agronomy Sophomore 

BANTUGAN, EUGENE Junction City 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

BARBER, BEVERLY Topeka 

General Business Administration Junior 

BARNER. DEBRA Belle Plain 

Music Education Senior 

BARNES, KEVIN Salina 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BARNES. LYNN Wamego 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

BARNES, WILLIAM Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

BARNETT, DONNA Haysville 

Dietics and Institutional Management Junior 

BARNETT. ROBERT Bluffs, III 

Pre Design Professions Junior 

BARNETT, TAMMY Bluffs. Ill 

Music Freshman 

BARRERAS, MICHELE Hillsboro, Ohio 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

BARRETT, KIRK Elgin, 111. 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

BARRY. MICHELLE Colby 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BASCOM. JOHNATHAN Troy 

Geography Senior 

BASGALL. MAUREEN Grlnnell 

Marketing Senior 

BASOM, LYDIA Lamed 

Humanities Junior 

BATES, BYRON Manhattan 

Marketing Senior 

BAXTER, KATIE Wichita 

Accounting Junior 

BEADLES. KRISTI Fall River 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BEAHM. BRUCE St. Joseph. Mo. 

Architecture Senior 

BEARNES, KATHY Culver 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

BEAUDET, MARGIE Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

BECKER, LESLIE Leawood 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

BEEMAN. KEITH Harrlsonvllle. Mo. 

English Graduate Student 

BEETS. LINDA Paola 

Horticulture Senior 

BEGGS, FREDIA Manhattan 

Pre Nursing Freshman 







394 off-campus 




BE1M. PERRY Phillipsburg 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BEISNER. BRIAN Natoma 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BELDEN, DEANNA Wichita 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

BELDEN. KATHY Wichita 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

BELETSKY. MARY Shawnee 

Health and Physical Education Senior 



BELL. LESTA Manhattan 

General Home Economics Senior 

BELL. SCOTT Overland Park 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

BELLINDER, BEV Wamego 

General Sophomore 

BENDA. BARBARA Ludell 

Horticulture Junior 

BENDER. MICHELLE Port Charlotte. Fla. 

Agricultural Education Senior 



BENGSTON. ANNE Inman 

Accounting Junior 

BENNETT. RANDALL Williamsburg 

Architecture Senior 

BENNETT. SUE Johnstown, N.J. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BERGER. MARK Halstead 

General Business Administration Junior 

BERGHAUS. BOYD Elkhart 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BERGHAUS, PAMELA Elkhart 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

BERN1NG. DANIEL Leotl 

Agricultural Education Junior 

BERNING. SUZANNE Marienthal 

General Business Administration Junior 

BERRY. DIANA Minneapolis 

Animal Science and Industry Jun.or 

BERRY, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Graduate Student 



BERTELS. CHRISTOPHER Nortonville 

Management Sophomore 

BEVAN. JERRY Garden City 

General Business Administration Junior 

BEVANS, DAVID Topeka 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

BIASELLA, BEV Prairie Village 

Management Junior 

BIEKER. BART McCook. Neb 

Industrial Engineering Junior 



BIESENTHAL. RUTH Wheaton 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BILLINGER. ELIZABETH Wakeeney 

Psychology Senior 

BILLINGER, GLENN1S Collyer 

General Business Administration Junior 

BILLINGS, BARETTA Valley Falls 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

BINGMAN. PHIL Sabetha 

Engineering Technology Senior 



BINGMAN, SUZANNE Merrill 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

BIRKMAN. CAROLYN Shawnee 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

BISHOP. DAVID Haven 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BLACKMAN. SUSAN Olathe 

Social Work Senior 

BLAIR. GLENDA Kansas City 

Modern Language Senior 



BLAIR, KELLY Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BLAKE. CHERYL St. George 

Geography Senior 

BLAKELY, CAM Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

BLANCHARD. DALE Rockhlll. Mo. 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BLANCHARD. D1ANNA Manhattan 

Marketing Senior 

BLANTON. PHILIPP Manhattan 

Pre-Deslgn Professions Sophomore 

BLATTNER. MARY Rozel 

Elementary Education Senior 

BLATTNER, NANCY Rozel 

General Sophomore 

BLAZEK. KIM Munden 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

BLEVINS. VANETTA Highland 

Clothing Retailing Senior 



off-campus 395 



Off-Campus 



BLISS. DAN . . St John 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

BLISS. JILL Topeka 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

BLYTHE, LAURIE White City 

Pre Nursing Sophomore 

BOARDMAN. BARRY Concordia 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BOCK, DAN Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student 

BOCK. MARGARET Manhattan 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student 

BOEDING, JOE Rolla 

PreDesign Professions Junior 

BOHM. KYLE Concordia 

Pre-Proiessional Elementary Senior 

BOHN. DEXTER Eskridge 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

BOLLIG. SUSIE Chanute 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

BOLZ. RITA Valley Fall* 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

BOND. JOHN Herington 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

BOOCK. DAVA Sterling 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

BORHOLDT. PATRICIA Inman 

Home Economics Education Junior 

BORST, SARA Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

BOSENEILER. KELLY Rock Falls, III. 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

BOTTERMULLER. BRUCE Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

BOWERSOX. VALERIE Belleville 

Computer Science Senior 

BOYD. EDWINA Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 

BOYD, GINA Oakley 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

BOYD, STEVEN St. Louis. Mo. 

Architecture Senior 

BOYER. KEN Kanopolls 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BRABEC. DAN Washington 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

BRADBURY. WALTER Winfield 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

BRADEN. LEANN Wakefield 

General Junior 

BRADLEY. PHILLIP Manhattan 

Management Junior 




Bailing Out- Dan Rockers, 
freshman in natural resource 
management, works on a hay 
elevator at the pure bred beef 
barn on the north side of campus, 
a part of the department of 
animal science and industry. 



396 off-campus 





BRADLEY. STEVE Oskaloosa 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BRAMLAGE, DONALD Marysville 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BRAMLAGE. JOSEPH Marysville 

Construction Science Senior 

BRAMLAGE. JULIE Marysville 

Pre-Professional Elementary Senior 

BRAMLAGE. KENNETH Frankfort 

General Business Administration Junior 



BRAMMER. VICKIE Topeka 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BRAND. JULIE Topeka 

Interior Architecture Senior 

BRANT. KARA Kansas City 

Marketing Junior 

BRECKENRIDGE. JILL Overland Park 

Psychology Senior 

BRENEMAN. BRAD Parsons 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BRENNER. DARRELL Beeler 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

BREWER, CHARLES Manhattan 

Geology Sophomore 

BRINEY. RUSSELL Overland Park 

Management Senior 

BROERS. SHARILYN Mernam 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BROOKS. DAVID Manhattan 

Special Graduate Student 

BROOKS. THOMAS Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

BROOKSHIER. MICHAEL Newton 

Pre Design Professions Sophomore 

BROWN. CYNTHIA Parsons 

Interior Design Senior 

BROWN. DARLA Atwood 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

BROWN. GREG Randolph 

Engineering Technology Senior 

BROWN. MARK Cottonwood Falls 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

BROWN. SARA lola 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BROWN. SHARON Sallna 

Family Child Development Senior 

BROWN. SHERRY Coon Rapids, Minn. 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

BROWN. WARD Selden 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BRULL, JUDY Hays 

Accounting Junior 

BRUNN. REBECCA Shawnee Mission 

Consumer Interest Senior 

BRUNS. HENRY Liberal 

Finance Senior 

BRUNTON. JODY Ozawkie 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

BRYAN. RICK Osage City 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

BRYANT, CARLA Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BRYANT. MARSHA Concordia 

English Junior 

BUDDEN. ELIZABETH Concordia 

Physical Therapy Junior 

BUDREAU, SCOTT Concordia 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BUESSING. DEBRA Axtell 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BULTMAN, PENNY Elkhart 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

BUNTT. BETTY Richmond 

Clothing Retailing Graduate Student 

BURCH. ANGELA Towanda 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

BURES. RANDALL Hanover 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BURGESS. JAMES Wamego 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BURKMAN. TAMRA Shawnee 

Interior Design Senior 

BURNS, DAVID Salina 

General Business Administration Junior 

BURNS. SANDRA Easton 

Elementary Education Junior 

BURNS. SHAWN Valley Falls 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BURROW, FRANK St George 

General Freshman 



off-campus 397 



I 



Off-Campus 



BURROW. HADDIE Manhattan 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

BURROW. TIMOTHY Neodesha 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

BURTON. CHERI Belleville 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

BURTON. MARGARET Kansas City 

Accounting Junior 

BUSBEA. SUSAN Kansas City 

General Sophomore 

BUSCHER. STAN Kingman 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

BUSE. CYNTHIA Jefferson City, Mo. 

Construction Science Junior 

BUSH. DEBRA Phillipsburg 

General Business Administration Junior 

BUSH. LARRY Admire 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BUSH. RICHARD Coffeeville 

General Business Administration Junior 

BUSS. GERYL Linn 

English Education Senior 

BUSSEN, DAVID Concordia 

Construction Science Sophomore 

BUTCHER. KIMBERLY Clmmaron 

Accounting Senior 

BUTLER. BETH Derby 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

BUTLER. WAYNE Ulysses 

Management Junior 

BUTTERFIELD. BRAD Clay Center 

Marketing Senior 

BUTTERFIELD. LORI Morganvllle 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

BYARLAY. JEAN Osborne 

Business Education Senior 

CAHILL. DAVID Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

CAILTEUX. KAYLENE Clyde 

Medical Technology Junior 

CALDWELL. MIKE Desoto 

Management Senior 

CALLAHAN. SANDRA Lenexa 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

CLAVERT. JAMES Independence. Mo. 

Construction Science Senior 

CAMAC. CAROL Manhattan 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

CAMAC. JOE Manhattan 

Food Science and Management Senior 

CAMERON. SHAR1 Hill City 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

CAMERON. TERR1 Hill City 

Civil Engineering Senior 

CAMPBELL. CHRIS Belolt 

General Junior 

CAMPOS. ROEL Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Graduate Student 

CANCIENNE, STEPHANIE Ft. Riley 

Pre Medicine Freshman 

CARLSON. JON Manhattan 

Construction Science Senior 

CARLSON. KLEILA Llndsborg 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

CARR. DAVID Independence 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

CARSON. BOBBI Wetmore 

General Freshman 

CARTER. DARREL Morganvllle 

Engineering Technology Senior 

CASE. DIANA Junction City 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

CASEBIER. ELAINE McLouth 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

CASPER, CHARLES Burlington, N.J 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

CATT. SHELLY Olsburg 

Pre Education Freshman 

CHAMPLIN. RHONDA Manhattan 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

CHANDLER. CRAIG Newton 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

CHANG. LEX Manhattan 

Management Senior 

CHANG. MARILYN Manhattan 

Psychology Senior 

CHAPPELL. SUSAN Manhattan 

Accounting j unlor 

CHARBONNEAU. STEVE Clyde 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 



398 off-campus 





Playing in the mud- Cheryl 
Harris, freshman in general, gets 
tackled by Scott Stubenhoffer, 
junior in pre-pharmacy, in a 
messy game of football. 

Craig Chandler 

CHARPENT1ER. CINDY Lenexa 

Accounting Senior 

CHASE. LANE El Dorado 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CH1LDS, STAN Sterling 

Engineering Technology Junior 

CHRISLER, KAREN Winlield 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

CLARE, REGINA Meriden 

Management Junior 

CLARK. GREGORY Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

CLARK, JUSTIN Independence 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

CLARK. PAULA Mulvane 

General Business Administration Senior 

CLARK. SANDRA Baldwin 

Food Science and Industry Senior 

CLARK. SUSAN Overland Park 

Political Science Senior 



off-campus 399 



Off-Campus 



CLARKE. DANIEL Jetmore 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

CLARY. TIMOTHY Troy 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

CLAY. TRACY Chanute 

Geography Sophomore 

CLEGG. RANDY Granville 

Special Junior 

CLEWELL. ROBERT Wellington 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

CLINE. JAMES Mllford 

General Business Administration Senior 

CLINE. JOSEPHINE Havensville 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

CLITHERO. ROGER Wichita 

General Business Administration Senior 

CLOSSON. KAREN Kingman 

Home Economics Education Senior 

CLOUD, SHARON Overland Park 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

CLOWE. CONNIE Wetmore 

General Sophomore 

COBLE. GARY Gardner 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

COBURN. DANA Overland Park 

Interior Design Sophomore 

COGAN. MARC Towanda 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

COLBERT, MICHAEL Junction City 

Computer Science Junior 

COLE. WESLEY Kensington 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

COLEMAN. DARYL Haven 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

COLI. JOSEPH Verdi, NY. 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

COLLINGWOOD. AL Johnson 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

COLLINS. CRAIG lola 

Architecture Senior 

COLLINS. STEPHEN Farmlngton. Me. 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

COLWELL, ERIN Garden City 

Social Work Junior 

CONNER REBECCA Kansas City 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

CONRAD. JOHN Overland Park 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

CONRAD. MIKE Osau/atomle 

General Business Administration Senior 

CONRADY. MARK Kansas City 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

CONSIGLI. LINDA Manhattan 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

CONSTABLE. SONJA Blue Rapids 

General Sophomore 

COOK. CHERYL Sabetha 

Home Economics Education Senior 

COOK. DOUGLAS White City 

Geophysics Senior 

COOK. VICKI Hope 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

COOLEY, RENEE Shawnee 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

COOPER. BRADLEY Manhattan 

Horticulture Junior 

COPELAND, JANICE Riley 

Speech Pathology Junior 

COPELAND. KAREN Manhattan 

Anthropology Senior 

CORDER. DEBBY Selden 

Consumer Interest Senior 

CORDES. MORRIS Meade 

Civil Engineering Senior 

CORNAY. DINO Folsom. N.M. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CORRELL. CINDY Manhattan 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

CORRELL. KENT Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

COSSMAN. KRISTI Jetmore 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

COUP. DONAVON McPherson 

Architecture Senior 

COUTURE. CHERI Abilene 

Business Education Senior 

COWLEY. DANA Ozawkle 

General Home Economics Junior 

CRAGG. JANE Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 



400 off-campus 








W~» 4m 


4 





CRAGHEAD. DEWAYNE Jetmore 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CRANFORD. DAVID Ulysses 

General Business Administration Senior 

CRAWFORD, SANDY Clay Center 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

CRISS. NANCY Colby 

Music Education Senior 

CRIST. CINDY Wlndom 

Early Childhood Education Graduate Student 

CROTINGER, JIM Great Bend 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

CROW, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Political Science Junior 

CRUTCHF1ELD, ROBERT Coffeyville 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

CULLEY, SARA Hill City 

General Junior 

CULLOP, JERRY Sterling 

Agriculture Junior 

CULVER. STEPHEN Roeland Park 

Marketing Senior 

CUNNINGHAM. MARK Roeland Park 

General Business Administration Junior 

CURLESS. CINTHIA Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

CURLESS. JAY Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

CURRIE, RENEE Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

DALLEY, PAT Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

DANIELS. JEANNE Valley Center 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

DANIELS, KAY Lecompton 

Horticulture Junior 

DANIELS. PAT Valley Center 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

DAN1ELSON, JON Clyde 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

DARKENWALD, ROBERT Overland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 

DARLING, CHARLES Stafford 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

DARROW, ROGER Newton 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

DARROW. SHELLI Potomac. Md. 

Animal Science and Industry Graduate Student 

DATOK. CORNELIUS Manhattan 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

DAUBER. TODD Bunker Hill 

Agricultural Education Senior 

DAUBER. TRUDY Bunker Hill 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

DAVIS. KATHY Kansas City 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

DAVIS, KEVIN Ft. Scott 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

DAVIS. LAWRENCE DeSoto 

Engineering Technology Senior 

DAVIS. LORI Manhattan 

Agriculture Junior 

DAVIS. PATRICIA Abilene 

Political Science Senior 

DAVIS. PATRICIA Hutchinson 

Computer Science Junior 

DAWSON. HARRY Medicine Lodge 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

DEAVER, ZITA Clay Center 

Accounting Junior 

DEBACKER. SAMANTHA Topeka 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

DEBERRY. JULIE Manhattan 

Psychology Senior 

DEBRICK. KEVIN Paola 

Accounting Senior 

DEBRICK, NANCY Paola 

General Sophomore 

DECHANT. ELAINE Liberal 

Finance Senior 

DEGARMO, ELISA Ottawa 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

DEGENHARDT, DAN Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

DEGENHARDT, WILLIAM Leawood 

General Business Administration Junior 

DEITER, GREG Derby 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

DEJESUS. KATHY Junction City 

Modern Language Senior 



off-campus 401 



DELA CRUZ. JOSELIA Manhattan 

Grain Science Graduate Student 

DELANGE. CINDY Gerard 

Interior Design Fresh 

DELEHANTY. DANIEL Manhattan 

Accounting Sei lor 

DELIZIET, DORIS Wathena 

Marketing Senior 

DENEAULT, EDWARD Salina 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

DENTON. CHERYL Atchison 

Accounting Junior 

DERKSEN. ROBERT Newton 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

DERRICK. CYNTHIA Abilene 

Sociology Senior 

DETWILLER. THERESA Kensington 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

DEYOE. KATHRYN Manhattan 
Finance Junior 

DEYOE, NANCY Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

DIBLE. SUSAN Rexford 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

DICK. KAREN Newton 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 



Was it 7-5-8 or 8-5-7?- Tim 

Ptacek, sophomore in mechanical 
engineering, unlocks his bicycle 
from the new bicycle rack outside 
of Seaton Hall. The rack is one of 
many new bicycle racks installed 
around campus buildings. 



Rob Clark 



402 off-campus 





DICKERHOOF, RANDAL Chanute 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

DIEFFENBACHER. SHERYI Cheney 

Accounting Senior 

DISBERGER. DENNIS Hutchinson 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

DITTEMOR. JANICE Atchison 

Elementary Education Senior 

DIXON. JACQUELYN Hutchinson 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

DLABAL. PAMALA Ellsworth 

Agriculture Senior 

DOCKMUN. TERRY Hutchinson 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

DOMNICK, REBECCA Harper 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

DONINGUEZ, GARY Wichita 

Construction Science Senior 

DONLEY. DEBRA Coffeevllle 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

DONNELLY, PAM Independence 

Accounting Junior 

DOOLEY, CRYSTAL Peoria, III 

Interior Design Junior 

DOPERALISKI, MATTHEW Wamego 

Agronomy Junior 

DOUGAN. DARREL Pretty Prairie 

General Business Administration Junior 

DOUGLAS. DAVID Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

DOWELL. GORDON Clyde 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

DOWELL. JEFF Topeka 

Horticulture Senior 

DOWLER, JOLEEN Laramie. Wyo, 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

DOWNES. PAMELA Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

DOWNING. KATHLEEN Ellis 

Consumer Interest Senior 

DOYLE, RAE ANN Salina 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

DROYHARD. CECILIA Danville 

Agriculture Junior 

DUCH. LOR1NDA Junction City 

Art Senior 

DUCKWORTH. TONI Toronto 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

DUDEN, DANA Overland Park 

Office Administration Sophomore 

DUELL. MICHELLE Ellis 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

DUENSING. JIM Liberal 

Accounting Senior 

DUETHMAN. STEPHANIE Harper 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

DUETHMAN, TERRY Paola 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

DUGGER, DAN Salina 

Accounting Junior 



DUKE. K1MBERLY Marion 

Interior Architecture Senior 

DUMMERMUTH, BARBARA Barnes 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

DUNLAP. LORI Topeka 

General Sophomore 

DUNN, ROBERT Roeland Park 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

DUPREE, SANDY Lansing 

Consumer Interest Junior 

DURAR. ABOLRAZAG Ft. Collins. Colo. 

Agronomy Graduate Student 

DOROCHE, BRIDGET oiathe 

General Freshman 

DUTTON, KEVIN Manhattan 

Computer Science Sophomore 

DYCK, SONIA Minneapolis 

Home Economics Education Junior 

DYSON. BRUCE Concordia 

Marketing Senior 

EATON. DIANA Mankato 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

EBERSOLE. LINDA Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

EBERT. JEFFERY St George 

History Sophomore 

EBERT. KIMBERLY Wamego 

Agriculture Freshman 

ECK. DOUG Sharon 

Agriculture Freshman 



off-campus 403 



■/.puis 



ECK. MARCI Lawrence 

p rc . Veterinary Medicine Senior 

EDGAR, KELLEY Wellington 

Finance Junior 

EDMONDSON. DENISE Manhattan 

Interior Design Senior 

EDWARDS. KATHLEEN Olsburg 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

EFFLAND, DON Lincoln 

General Business Administration Sophomore 



EGGERS. DEXTER Bird City 

Agronomy Senior 

EGGLESTON. EILEEN Le Roy 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

EILBERT. JUDY Belolt 

Accounting Senior 

ELLERMAN. CINDY Nortonvllle 

Psychology Senior 

ELLIOTT. KAREN Oakley 

Home Economics Graduate Student 

ELLIOTT, MATT Festus, Mo. 

Architecture Junior 

ELLMAN, VICTORIA Lenexa 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

ELMER. PAMELA Wrlghtstown. N.J. 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

EMERSON. RON Overbrook 

Management Senior 

EMMOT. DAREL Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Senior 



ENGELKEN. CAROLYN Seneca 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

ENGELKEN, LAURIE Prairie View 

Mechanical Engineering . , . , Sophomore 

ENGELLAND, THOMAS Sterling 

Construction Science Sophomore 

ENGELSMAN, RODNEY Prairie View 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

ENGLER, LEUTTA Deerfield 

General Business Administration Junior 



ENGSTROM. BARBIE Junction City 

Correctional Administration Senior 

ENLOW, DON Kansas City 

Construction Science Junior 

ENYART. V1CK1 Manhattan 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

EPLER, TERRI Manhattan 

Accounting Junior 

ER1CKSON. SHAR1 Manhattan 

Pre Nursing Sophomore 



ERNSTMANN. JAMES Wichita 

Accounting Senior 

ESCHELBACH. DONALD St. Louis. Mo. 

Construction Science Senior 

ESPARZA, DENISE Kansas City 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

EUBANKS. JAMES Coats 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

EUBANKS, MAUREEN Kansas City 

Medical Technology Junior 

EULER. STEPHEN Harper 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

EVANS. BARRY Newton 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

EVANS, BILLIE St. George 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

EVANS, DAVID Wellington 

General Junior 

EVANS. JIM Marysvllle 

Construction Science Senior 



EVANS. JOHN Independence 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

EVERT. RONALD Republic 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

EVES. DAVID Goodland 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

FAIR. RUSSELL .'.'.'.'.' .'.'I ! Solomon 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

FAIRFIELD. DAVID Balleyvllle 

Food Science and Management Senior 

FAIRFIELD. CARLA Axtell 

Horticulture Senior 



404 off-campus 




'»•%*. • \ 




FARHA, PAUL Wichita 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

FARR, JACK Derby 

Computer Science Senior 

FARR, JOSEPH Derby 

General Freshman 

FARRELL, CHARLENE Wamego 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

FARTASH. MOJTABA Columbia. Mo. 

Civil Engineering Senior 

FAVIER. CHER1 Chesterfield. Mo. 

Architecture Graduate Student 

FAVIER. JAMES Brentwood. Mo. 

Architecture Senior 

FEE, RANDY White Cloud 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

FEESE. KYM Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

FEIL. ROD Salina 

Management Junior 

FELBER. LINDA Manhattan 

Humanities Senior 

FELDKAMP, KEITH Bailleyville 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

FELL. PAULA Hesston 

Biology Senior 

FELLER, THOMAS El Dorado 

Construction Science Junior 

FELSTED. ALAN Larned 

Construction Science Senior 

FENGEL. JANET Oakhlll 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

FERGUSON. CINDY Overland Park 

General Business Adminisration Junior 

F1CK. GREOFFREY Hutchinson 

Food Science and Industry Senior 

FIELDER. MARK Dwlght 

Engineering Technology Senior 

F1GURSKI, PATRICIA Manhattan 

General Business Administration Junior 




Now stay there- Gary Cowan, 
freshman in veterinary medicine, 
aligns a fence post while 
reconstructing a fence at the 
Kansas Artificial Breeding Service 
Unit. The Unit is located on 
College Avenue. 



Scott Liebler 



off-campus 405 



Off-Campus 



FILBERT. DANIEL Hutchinson 

Crop Protection Senior 

FINDLEY. GERALD Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

FINGER. JANICE Powhattan 

Horticulture Senior 

F1RHABER. DAVE Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

FISHER, BRYAN Richfield 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



FISHER, CAROL Alta Vista 

Management Junior 

FLAMM. MARK Arnold. Mo. 

Architecture Senior 

FLEENER. BECKY Topeka 

Speech Pathology Junior 

FLEENOR. TAMELA Manhattan 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

FLENTIE. LURA Lancaster 

Early Childhood Senior 

FLOYD. DENNIS St. Francis 

Engineering Technology Junior 

FLYNN. MICHEL Oklahoma City. Okla. 

Interior Architecture Senior 

FLYNN. PAULA Halifax. Maine 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

FLYNN. RUSSELL Overland Park 

Marketing Senior 

FOERSCHLER, KEVIN Enterprise 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

FOLLETT, KAREN Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

FORD. TAWNYA Shawnee Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

FOREMAN. LISA Edina. Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

FORSHEE. BECKY Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

FOUNTAIN. DEANNE Sterling 

Horticulture Senior 

FOUSE. SHIRLEY Belpre 

Chemical Science Senior 

FOWLER, GREG Derby 

General Junior 

FOX, DALE Norton 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

FOX, KEVIN Syacuse 

Agronomy Junior 

FRANCIS. BOBBY Blue Mound 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

FRANCIS. DONNA Emporia 

Business Administration . Graduate Student 

FRANKE. ROBERT Merrlam 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

FRANKEN, KAREN Easton 

Marketing Junior 

FRANKLIN. DEBORAH Seneca 

Social Science Senior 

FRANZ. LUANNA Goessel 

Home Economics-Liberal Arts Senior 

FRANZ. SHARON Sedgwick 

Clothing Retail Senior 

FRANZWA, JEFF Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

FRAZEE, LORI Summerfield 

General Sophomore 

FRAZEE. NANCY Wichita 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

FRAZ1ER. BRAD Prairie Village 

Journalism and Mass Communication Senior 

FRAZIER. STEPHEN Molina 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

FREDERKING, RHONDA Salina 

General Business Administration Junior 

FREED. DAVID Kansas City 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

FREED, JIM Lees Summit, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FREEMAN. MARY Prairie Village 

Office Administration Senior 

FRER1CHS, PAM Manhattan 

General Business Administration Junior 

FRERK1NG, GAY Summerfield 

Home Economics Education Junior 

FREY, BRYAN Newton 

General Business Administration Freshman 

FRIEDRICKS. ROBIN Bremen 

Agriculture Senior 

FRIESEN, STEVE Dodge City 

General Business Administration Sophomore 



406 off-campus 





FRITZ. GEORGE Wichita 

General Business Administration Senior 

FROHBERG. PAMELA Watervllle 

Finance Senior 

FUCHS. CATHY Leawood 

General Sophomore 

FULHAGE. SCOTT Beloit 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

FULHAGE, SHAR1 Beloit 

Business Education Junior 

FULTON. KEVIN Loup City, Neb. 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

FYE. JOAN Manhattan 

Restaurant Management Sophomore 

FYE. RICHARD Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

GALE. DEE Phllllpsburg 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

GALLION. JD Hunter 

Music Education Senior 

GALLUP. ANDREW Blue Rapids 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

GANNAWAY. DEBORAH Topeka 

Marketing Senior 

GARNER. LEE Independence 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

GARRETT. BLAINE Russell 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

GARRETT. ROY Topeka 

Marketing Senior 

GARTEN. SCOTT Abilene 

Agriculture Sophomore 

GARVIN. LISA Merrlan 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

GASKELL. DAN Chanute 

Management Junior 

GATSCHET. TERI Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

GAUDETTE. JOANNE Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development Junior 

GAUGHAN. JILL Leawood 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

GEHLBACH. BRUCE Shawnee 

Horticulture Senior 

GEIER. KAYE Larned 

Social Work Senior 

GEIST. KEITH Sterling 

Management Senior 

GERARD. KIMBERLY Concordia 

Engineering Technology Junior 

GERLACH. SARA Leawood 

Family and Child Development Senior 

GEYER. JOANNA Sylvan Grove 

Horticulture Senior 

GIBLER. KEVIN Manhattan 

Agriculture Sophomore 

GIBSON. LINDA Ogallah 

General Home Economics Junior 

GIDEON, VALERI Topeka 

Elementary Education Junior 

GIGSTAD. DWIGHT Nortonvllle 

Agronomy Senior 

GIGSTAD. TODD Nortonville 

Agronomy Junior 

GILBERT. CAROL Ft. Riley 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

GILMAN. KURSTEN Manhattan 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

GILMARTIN. ELIZABETH Wichita 

General Junior 

GILSLEIDER. JUDITH Brunawlch. N.J. 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

GLEASON, JAMES Shawnee Mission 

General Engineering Junior 

GLOVER. DOUG Dodge City 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

GOBBLE, GEOFF Overland Park 

Agriculture Junior 

GODBY, SHERYL Kendalville, lnd. 

Computer Science Freshman 

GOECKEL. CONNIE Hanover 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

GOEWEY, REED Manhattan 

Political Science Junior 

GONZALEZ. EDGGY Rio Pledras. P.R. 

Biology Senior 

GOOD, PAM Altamont 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

GOOD. THOMAS Ft. Scott 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 



off-campus 407 



:ampus 



GOODE, SUE Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

GOODEN. GREGORY Sallna 

Music Senior 

GOODNIGHT, STEVEN Meade 

Engineering Technology Junior 

GOODYEAR. GAIL Weavervllle. Calif. 

Clothing Retailing Graduate Student 

GORDON. BILL Overland Park 

Horticulture Senior 



GORDON. BRENDA Meriden 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

GORDON. LINDA Kansas City 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

GOSS, TIMOTHY Troy 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

GOTTLEIB. JORDAN Floral Park. NY. 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

GOTTSCH. LINDA Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Senior 

GOWDY. ELIZABETH Manhattan 

Social Work Senior 

GRABER. LOUIS Pretty Prairie 

Psychology Graduate Student 

GRABER. STEVE Hesston 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

GRADY. MARTHA Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

GRAFF. PEGGY Marienthal 

Correctional Administration Senior 



Food on wheels- David Wehde, 
eight, skates uphill towards 
Jar dine Terrace after buying a 
carton of milk, David was on an 
errand for his mother, Mary 
Wehde, sophomore in sociology. 



Craig Chandler 



408 off-campus 













GRAHAM. BRUCE Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

GRAHAM. JANICE Lawrence 

Social Work Senior 

GRAMLY. SUSAN Topeka 

Management Senior 

GRAY, GERALD Abilene 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

GRAY. KENT El Dorado 

Engineering Technology Senior 

GRAY. SHERRI Abilene 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

GREEN. BRENDA Wichita 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 

GREEN. SCOTT Pratt 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

GREEN. VANCE Independence 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

GREENBANK, SALLY El Dorado 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

GREENLEE. CLARK Emporia 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GREENWOOD. CRAIG Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

GREER, JANET Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

GREGG, MARTHA Manhattan 

Music Education Sophomore 

GRIMM, MARTHA Bern 

Accounting Junior 

GRINZINGER. GREG Kansas City 

History Senior 

GRISSINGER, SUE Overland Park 

Educational Architecture Junior 

GRIZZELL, TODD Macksville 

Agriculture Freshman 

GROMER. KATHY Overland Park 

Microbiology Senior 

GRONQUIST. PAUL Topeka 

General Junior 

GROSS, ROBERT Victoria 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

GROSSNICKLE. MARY Manhattan 

General Business Administration Junior 

GROUNDWATER. PAUL Topeka 

Management Senior 

GUNNELS, CHUCK Great Bend 

General Junior 

GUYDOS. EDWARD Manhattan 

Fine Arts Senior 

HABLUETZEL. DENISE Clay Center 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

HADDOCK. STAN Sallna 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

HADLEY. KARMA Portls 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

HADLEY. KERRI Portis 

Clothing and Textile Junior 

HADLEY. KRISTIE Portis 

Interior Design Senior 

HAEFNER. KARI Wheaton 

Social Work Freshman 

HAFLICH. ANNETTE Garden City 

Pre-Design Professions Senior 

HAINES, VERA Sylvan Grove 

Family and Child Development Senior 

HALEY. MONICA Paola 

General Home Economics Senior 

HALL. DEBRA Meriam 

Fine Arts Junior 

HALL. GREGORY Wlnsted 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

HALL. SHANNON Wichita 

Music Education Senior 

HALLAUER. JUDY Holton 

Education-Biological Science Junior 

HALVERSON. KATHY Manhattan 

Marketing Senior 

HAMMER, LORI Scandia 

Accounting Junior 

HAMMILL. CURT Knoxvllle. Tenn. 

Physics Senior 

HAMMOCK, STEVE Wichita 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

HAND. LEIGH Tonganoxle 

Fine Arts Senior 

HANSHEW, TINA Junction City 

Office Administration Sophomore 

HANZLICEK. KIM Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 



off-campus 409 



tff-Campus 



HANZLICEK. KIP Wichita 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

HARBACH. BETTY Scott City 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

HARBERS. SARAH Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HARDENBURGER, THOMAS . . Haddam 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

HARDESTY. SALLY Clifton 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 



HARDING, SHAWN Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HARKINS, LISA Lawrence 

Pre-Nursing Senior 

HARKRADER. RANDAL Thayer 

Geography Senior 

HARKRADER, ROBERT Thayer 

Natural Resource Management . Sophomore 

HARPER. SKYLER Broomfleld. Colo. 

Architecture Senior 



HARRIS. CLARK Overland Park 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HARRIS, JAN Lawrence 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

HARRIS. ROGER Pratt 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

HARRISON. BRIAN Natoma 

Agriculture Senior 

HARRISON. GREG Natoma 

Agricultural Economics Senior 



HART, BRUCE Kansas City 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

HART, TERESA Kansas City 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

HARTMAN. JACKIE Manhattan 

Business Education Senior 

HASLER. FRED Hutchinson 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

HATESOHL, PAULETTE Linn 

Life Science Junior 



HATESOHL. STEVEN Linn 

Finance Senior 

HATTRUP, JUDY Kinsley 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

HAUBER, GERALD Westwood 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HAVERFIELD. CYNTHIA Russell Springs 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

HAVERKAMP. BRYCE Elkhart 

Accounting Senior 



HAVERKAMP. JANETTE Howard 

Accounting Senior 

HAWKINS. GREGORY Clmmaron 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HAY. REBECCA Newton 

Pre Professional Elementary Senior 

HAYDEN. DAVID Monroe. La. 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

HAYES. TIM Hutchinson 

Accounting Senior 



HAYS. LINDA Natoma 

Speech Graduate Student 

HAZEN. RYAN Ottawa 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

HEALY, PAULETTE McCracken 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

HEARD, BONNIE Manhattan 

Horticulture Junior 

HEATH. KIM Overland Park 

General Sophomore 



HEATON. KAREN Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

HECK. VANDA Abilene 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

HEDKE. SCOTT Watervllle 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HEFTA. STEVEN '.'.'. ' St . John 

Interior Architecture Senior 

HEIN. DOUG Win(ic | d 

Finance Junior 



HEINECKE. PHILIP Ahil„n„ 

o r. ., Abilene 

rre Dentistry . . 

™ e ^a r leen ' :::::::::: Seymour w°s r 

Health and Physical Education „„■ 

HEINRICHS, ROMNEY . . Hilkh^ 

A i. .. . riillsboro 

Agriculture Mechanization i . 

HEINZ, CAROL .... fwu.,j 5i°[ 

. ■ . r . , Uverland Park 

Music Education .... I . 

HELMS, NEVILLE . " " M^hT,"" 

r . _ . , Manhattan 

Ueneral Business Administration Junior 




410 off-campus 




Easy rider- Facing the late 
afternoon sun, Eric Thompson, 
junior in engineering technology, 
takes a bikeway home. 



HELMS, PATRICIA Manhattan 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

HENDERSON. JOSEPH Overland Park 

General Business Administration Junior 

HENDERSON, PAULA Almena 

Computer Science Senior 

HEDRICKS. DENISE Lenexa 

Computer Science Senior 

HENRICKS. CYNTHIA Topeka 

Horticulture Senior 

HENRY. SHERI Ottawa 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HENRY. SUE Ottawa 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

HERBEL, DENE Piano. Texas 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HERL. CAROLYN Sharon Spring, 

Fooda and Nutrition Senior 

HERMAN. DEBORA Hays 

Interior Architecture Senior 

HERMAN. NEAL Manhattan 

Construction Science Senior 

HERMAN. SONDRA Atchison 

Bakery Science and Management Senior 

HERMRECK, DENNIS Garnett 

History Senior 

HERMSTEIN. GUY Council Grove 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HERN. SCOTT Topeka 

History Senior 

HESKAMP. ALAN Spearvllle 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

HESS. CHARLES El Dorado 

General Business Administration Junior 

HESS. STEVEN Scott City 

Accounting Junior 

HEWITT. JIM Belolt 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

H1ATT. TRUDY Munden 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

HICKEY. TOM Overland Park 

General Business Administration Senior 

HICKOK. SUSAN Ulysses 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

HICKS. KAREN Manhattan 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

HIEBERT. DEAN Erie 

Architectural Engineering Senior 



off-campus 411 



OffCampus 



HIEBSCH, CARL Manhattan 

Construction Science Senior 

H1GGINS. CASSANDRA St. Marys 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

HIGGS. RICHARD Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

HILL, GREGORY Manhattan 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HILL, GWEN McPherson 

Art Freshman 

HILL. VICTOR St. George 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

HILT, GERALD St. Francis 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

HILTON, NICK Hutchinson 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

H1NSON. DEIDRA Concordia 

Speech Education ....,- Junior 

HITZ, DENNIS Ensign 

Horticulture Senior 

HIXON, KATHRYN Ft Scott 

Home Economics Education Junior 

HIXON, STEVEN Ft. Scott 

Accounting , Junior 

HOAG, DEANNA . . . .\ Hays 

Office Administration Freshman 

HODGES, LEANN Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

HODGSON, JAMES Little River 

Geology Junior 

HOENER. WAYNE '"ka 

Agronomy Senior 

HOFFMAN. BRIAN Claflln 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HOFFMAN, MARSHA Emporia 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HOFFMAN, WAYNE Hoislngton 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HOLADAY, BRENDA Holton 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

HOLADAY. STEPHEN Seneca 

Business Education Senior 

HOLDER. KENT Leona 

Food Science and Management Senior 

HOLLE, DEB Marysville 

Accounting Junior 

HOLLING. SHARON Omaha. Neb. 

Consumer Interest Senior 

HOLM. MARY SUE Burns 

Elementary Education Senior 

HOLMES. BART Hutchinson 

Marketing Senior 

HOLMES, CAROL Kansas City 

Office Administration Sophomore 

HOLT, CHRIS Arnold, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

HONER. GAIL Atchlnson 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary Senior 

HONIG. DONALD Onaga 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HONORS. PATRICIA Overland Park 

Interior Design Junior 

HOOPS. KERRY Byron. Neb. 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HOOTS, BECKY Manhattan 

Marketing Senior 

HOOVER. MELISSA Scott City 

Life Science Senior 

HOPKINS. DEBRA Leavenworth 

Accounting Senior 

HORINEK. CHARLENE Colby 

Horticulture Junior 

HORNING, JENNY Wlnfield 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

HORSCH. BRIAN Colwlch 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

HORSCH, JULIE Marion 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

HORTON. FANCI Kendall 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

HOTUJAC. MIKE Kansas City 

Marketing Senior 

HOUGLAND. CATHY Leonardvllle 

Accounting Senior 

HOUSE, JEFF Chanute 

Genera] Business Administration Junior 

HOVIS. OSCAR Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

HOWELL. ROBERT Coats 

General Business Administration Junior 



412 off-campus 





HOWER. STEVEN Concordia 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

HOWSER. TAMMY Holsington 

Social Work Senior 

HUBERT. DAVID Monument 

Agricultural Education Junior 

HUBERT. RICHARD Concordia 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

HUBLER. DOUG Leawood 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

HUBLER, SARA Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

HUDSON. J ACKI Caldwell 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

HUDSON, KEVIN Topeka 

Construction Science Junior 

HUEY, RUTH Manhattan 

General Home Economics Freshman 

HUFFAKER, LYN Emporia 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

HUGGINS. DEBORAH Belolt 

Elementary Education Senior 

HUGHES. LOREN Eureka 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

HUGHES. MARTHA Canton 

Education Graduate Student 

HUGHES. RANDY Eureka 

Geophysics Senior 

HUGHES, TERR1 Manhattan 

Music Education Sophomore 

HUGHEY, LAURA Ottawa 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

HUMPHREY. SALLY Newton 

Office Administration Senior 

HUNTER. CINDY Manhattan 

Speech Pathology Junior 

HUNTER. DEBBIE Manhattan 

Speech Graduate Student 

HUSEMAN, BRIAN Ellsworth 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HUSLIG, DAN Ellinwood 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

HUTCHINSON. GLENDA Altoona 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

HUTCHINSON. MARY Salina 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

HUXMAN. KRISTIN Arnold 

General Junior 

IRELAND. G1NA Hutchinson 

Dance Senior 

IRELAND. KEVIN Lisle. 111. 

Architecture Senior 

IRVINE, EDWARD Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

IRVINE, JOANNE Manhattan 

Health and Physical Education Freshman 

IRVINE, MARLENE - Manhattan 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

JACK. MOIRA Manhattan 

Social Science Senior 

JACKSON, JEANNY Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

JACKSON. KATHRYN Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

JACKSON. TERRY Manhattan 

Architecture Senior 

JACOBS. DAVID Hill City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

JACOBS, DEBORAH Overland Park 

Office Administration Junior 

JACOBSON. ELEANOR Overland Park 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 

JACOBSON, JEANNE Axtell 

Home Economics Education Senior 

JACOBSON. MARY Wamego 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

JACQUINOT, ROBERT Prairie Village 

Construction Science Sophomore 

JADERBORG. KAREN Enterprise 

Accounting Senior 

JAMES, BETH Manhattan 

Music Education Junior 

JANSSEN, BRENT Scott City 

Biology Senior 

JANSSEN. CURTIS Solomon 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

JANZEN, DAVID Hesston 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 



off-campus 413 



Off-Campus 



Cruise control' A bicyclist 
receives a warning ticket from 
officer Reese Jackson for riding 
on the campus sidewalks. 



JEFFERY, BRAD Burr Oak 

Agriculture Freshman 

JENKS. BARBARA Elkhart 

Home Economic* Education Senior 

JENSEN. MIKE Holton 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

JENSSEN, EDWARD Rossville 

General Business Administration Junior 

JEPSON, GARY Topeka 

Engineering Technology Junior 

JESCHKE. REBECCA Severance 

Office Administration Senior 

JESTER, ALICIA Sallna 

Pre Design Professions Sophomore 

JILKA. FRANCES Shawnee Mission 

Agriculture Junior 

JOHANNES, TRACEY Abilene 

Management Junior 

JOHNS, DERRICK Junction City 

Chemistry Freshman 

JOHNSON, DAVID Manhattan 

Biology Sophomore 

JOHNSON, DIEDRA Utica 

Interior Design Junior 

JOHNSON, ELLEN Ensign 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

JOHNSON. GENE Agra 

Accounting Junior 

JOHNSON, KEN Wichita 

Accounting Sophomore 

JOHNSON, KIM Concordia 

Music Education Junior 

JOHNSON. MERRY Bridgeport 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

JOHNSON, RAYMOND Junction City 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

JOHNSON. RENEE Kansas City 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

JOHNSON, SUSAN Sallna 

Music Education Sophomore 



414 off-campus 





JOHNSON. ZELPHA Haven 

Accounting Senior 

JOHNSTON. KELLY Meade 

Civil Engineering Senior 

JONES. CHRIS Washington 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

JONES. DIANE Manhattan 

Correctional Administration Junior 

JONES, ERIC .'.'..'.'.','. Colby 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

JONES. JENNY T k „ 

Finance c i 

JONES. RANDALL . .'..'.'.'.'. BarnlVrf 

«. . , ._ Barnard 

Mechanical Engineering Q»ni«, 

JORGENSEN SHAREE Manhattan 

Music Education c„i„ 

J ° YN,NA C , :::::::::::::::::::::::::*t2% 

Elementary Education «<.„i„, 

JOYCE JANELL ! .' ! .' .' .' .' ! ! ! .' Gardfn C° 

tlementary Education Junior 

JOYCE. SANDRA Garden City 

Interior Design Senior 

JULIAN. KENT Manhattan 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

JUNG. MOO YOUNG 

Industrial Engineering Graduate 

JUNOD. MARCUS K anss City 

Electrical Engineering Frp<;hman 

JURRENS. KARLA '.'..'.'.'.'.'.' Arkansas City 

Engineering Technology Senior 

JURRENS. WILLIAM Arkansas City 

Engineering Technology Junior 

JUSTYNA. LOIS Concordia 

Finance Junior 

KAHLER. LEE Manhattan 

General Business Administration Junior 

KAIL. LESLIE Tribune 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KALOPER, CARRIE Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 

KARLIN. SUSAN Manhattan 

Interior Design Senior 

KARST. KEVIN Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

KATZER. ANGIE Greeley 

Pre-Professlonal Elementary .... Senior 

KEIL, MARTHA .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 

KELLEY, KEVIN Manhattan 

Construction Science Senior 

KELLEY. KIRK Oberlln 

Biological Science Education Senior 

KELLY. ERIN Manhattan 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

KELMAN. ROGER Sublette 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KENNEDY, DEAN _. Sarpy, Neb. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

KENT. STEVE Wlnfleld 

Management Senior 

KEPKA. GARY Ellsworth 

Architecture Senior 

KETRON. JAMIE H olton 

General Business Administration Senior 

K |D °. MAR " .....: Wichita 

Construction Science Junior 

KILBY. MITCHELLE \\ /Yates Center 

Computer Science Junior 

KILGORE, PATRICIA Sterling 

Family and Child Development Junior 

KILLEEN, MIKE New Monmouth, N.J. 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

KILMER. LYNN Merrlam 

Elementary Education Senior 

KIM. YONG Junction City 

Pre-Nurslng Sophomore 

KIMURA. STEVE Leawood 

Biology Junior 

KIMZEY. GREG Elk City 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

KING. KATHERINE Manhattan 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

KING. REVA Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

KINKELAAR. MARK Dodge City 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

KINSLER. SUSAN Kingman 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

KIRCHER, MARY '.'.'.'.'.'.'. Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 



off-campus 415 



ff Campus 



KSRN. JULIE Minneapolis 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

KLAMM. KEN Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

KLASSEN. EYD1E Centralla 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

KLAUSEN. PAUL Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

KLINE, JON! Herington 

Interior Design Junior 

KLINE. JULIE Herington 

Retail Florticulture Sophomore 

KLOCK. EDWARD Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

KLOEFKORN. BRADLEY Caldwell 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

KLUG. KIRBY Susank 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

KLUMPP, JANE Topeka 

Interior Design Senior 

KNIGHT. CHARLES Rose Hill 

General Sophomore 

KNIGHT. PATTY Beattle 

Accounting Senior 

KNIGHT. RON Sallna 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KNIPP. SHIRLEY Manhattan 

Interior Architecture Senior 

KNOEFEL. RAYMOND Abbyville 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

KOEHN. SUSAN Concordia 

Art Education Senior 

KOEPSEL. WELLINGTON Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

KOETS. GARY Meade 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KOEGLER. DUANE Salina 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

KOHAKE. MONICA Go" 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

KOHMAN, PAMELA Salina 

Dietectics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

KOLARIK, ELIZABEHT Prai'ie Village 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

KONZ. MARY Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

KOON. SUSAN Wichita 

Food Science and Industry Senior 

KOSTER. MARK Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

KRAMER LESTEL Hutchinson 

Social Work Junior 

KRAMER. LISA Manhattan 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

KRAMER. LOUISE Manhattan 

Dance Senior 

KRAMER. RANDY Marysvllle 

Marketing Senior 

KRAMER, TONY Easton 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

KRAMER. WILLIAM Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

KRAMP, DIANE Elllmvood 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

KRAUSHAAR, THERESA Wamego 

General Freshman 

KREHB1EL. MONTE Pretty Prairie 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KRIER, KENNY Beloit 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

KR1SKE, KEN Leawood 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

KRISTEK, SHIRLEY Tampa 

Medical Technology Junior 

KRULL. MAX Blue Mound 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

KRUSE. CHERYL Bremen 

Interior Design Sophomore 

KRUSE, KRISTINE Bremen 

Pre-Mcdicine Junior 

KRUSE. PETER Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

KUDLACEK, JOAN Shawnee 

Pre Design Professions Sophomore 

KUFAHL, RANDY Wheaton 

Accounting Sophomore 

KUHLMAN. KURT St. Louis. Mo. 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

KUKLENSKI. VICKI Kansas City 

Interior Design Junior 




416 off-campus 




KUMBERG. MARK Medicine Lodge 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

KURTH. LLOYD Offerle 

Computer Science Senior 

LABER. KEVIN Chapman 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

LAFEMINA. PETER Manhattan 

Agronomy Senior 

LAMB. LORI Macksvllle 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

LAMOREAUX, BARBARA Waterville 

Social Work Junior 

LANDAU, RUTH Overland Park 

Management Sophomore 

LANDRITH. NANCY Bartlett 

Psychology Senior 

LANG. DONNA Trego 

Modern Language Junior 

LANG, LAURENCE Shawnee 

Physics Sophomore 

LANG, LYLE Chapman 

History Education Senior 

LANG, STEVEN Abilene 

Agriculture Freshman 

LANKARD. DUANE Garnett 

Agriculture Economics Junior 

LANTZ, CRAIG Overland Park 

General Business Administration Junior 

LARSON, BRENDA Scandla 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

LARSON. CLIFF Stllluiell 

Construction Science Senior 

LARSON. KEVIN Scandla 

Agriculture Education Senior 

LARSON, LORI Colby 

Home Economics Education Junior 

LARSON. NATHAN Riley 

Agronomy Senior 

LARSON. SUZANNE Manhattan 

Agronomy Sophomore 

LASLEY. DAVID El Dorado 

Architecture Senior 

LASSMAN. KENNETH Chanute 

Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student 

LAUGHERY. JULIE Kansas City 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

LAURSEN. KATHRYN Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 




Fancy maneuvers- Tom 

Beardsley, junior in business, 
executes a kick-turn on his 
skateboard off the planters at 
Durland Hall between classes 
during summer school. 



off-campus 417 



Off-Campus 



LAWLESS, TOM Colby 

Accounting Sophomore 

LAWRENCE. KAY Ft. Collins. Colo. 

Social Science Senior 

LAX, ERWIN Manhattan 

Social Science Senior 

LECHTENBERGER, BRAD Colby 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

LEE KIM. JOSE Manhattan 

Physics Senior 

LEE. BRAD Abilene 

Psychology Junior 

LEE. KENN Manhattan 

Construction Science Senior 

LEE. STARR Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

LEGLEITER. RICK Hays 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

LEHMAN, DAVID Abilene 

Agriculture Economics Junior 

LEHKUHL, BRENDA Topeka 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

LEIKAM. MICHELLE Sallna 

Architecture Senior 

LERO. JAMES Erie 

Accounting Senior 

LEROUX. ROBERT Kingman 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

LETHERER. DIANA Aberdeen 

Dance Senior 

LEWIS. HARVEY Independence 

Accounting Senior 

LEWIS, ZELMA Topeka 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

L IKCTEIG, CONSTANCE Greeley 

Accounting Senior 

LICKTEIG, KERRY Lamed 

Elementary Education Junior 

LIKCTEIG, KEVIN Garnett 

Dairy Production Junior 

LIENEMANN, JOE Herkimer 

Agriculture Journalism Senior 

LIES. CATHY Colwlch 

Elementary Education Senior 

LIETZ. LESLIE Paxico 

Computer Science Senior 

LINDBURG. KIMBRA Osage City 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

LINDHOLM, BARBARA Manhattan 

Chemistry Junior 

LINDHOLM, CINDY Little River 

Accounting Junior 

LINN. NICK Albert 

Management Senior 

LINN, ROSEMARY Bison 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

LINNEMAN. MICHAEL Smith Center 

Engineering Technology Senior 

LINSCHEID. KATHY Hutchinson 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

LIVINGSTON, DOUG Dodge City 

General Business Administration Junior 

LODGE, ELISABETH Riley 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

LOEPP, DALE Inman 

Accounting Junior 

LOEWEN, MELONIE Salina 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

LONDEEN. LAURA Arkansas City 

Social Work Senior 

LONG. PHILLIP Manhattan 

Life Science Sophomore 

LONG. SHERRI Elkhart 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

LONGACRE, LISA Eureka 

Pre-Professional Secondary Junior 

LOPEZ, ANNA Manhattan 

Horticulture Freshman 

LORING. GARY Scandla 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

LOSE. CAROL Prairie Village 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

LOVE, ERIC Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

LOVEWELL. RHONDA Courtland 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

LOYD, BRUCE Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

LUCIOUS. RAMONA Manhattan 

English Senior 




418 off-campus 











I 


pi 


ft 


*M 






I 


^ 






iJ 


1 «•»> -^*-1M j 


> 




■^■^•^■m 




LUCK. CHERYL Tlpp City. Ohio 

Architecture Graduate Student 

LUCK. JULIE Manhattan 

English Senior 

LUCK. RICHARD Lyons 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

LUDWIG. MARILYN Belolt 

Accounting Senior 

LUGINBILL, LINDA Burrton 

Accounting Sophomore 

LUGINSLAND. CYNTHIA Hutchinson 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

LUGINSLAND, NENNETE Amerlcus 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

LUKOW. EUGENE Holsteln. Neb. 

Interior Architecture Senior 

LULL, STEVE Salina 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LUNDERBERG, TIM Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

LUSK. LISA Wichita 

General Business Administration Junior 

LUTHI. GREGORY Junction City 

English Senior 

LUTHI. MARI Madison 

General Business Administration Senior 

LUTHI, SUSAN Manhattan 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

LYBARGER. ALAN Garnett 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

LYON. CAROL SUE Overbrook 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MACNEILL. JUDITH Kingston. Maine 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

MADDOCK. CINDIE Concordia 

Marketing Senior 

MADDOCK. TOM Overland Park 

Marketing Senior 

MADDUX. MICHEL Manhattan 

Computer Science Senior 

MAH. PATRICIA Garden City 

General Business Administration Junior 

MAHANAY. WILLIAM Council Grove 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MAHANEY, JEFF Merrlam 

Accounting Senior 

MAIB, HELEN Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

MAIER, TIMOTHY Minneola 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

MAKADANZ. DEANNA Spring Hill 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

MANETH. KENT Great Bend 

Accounting Freshman 

MANFREDO. PETER Pompton Lakes. N.J. 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

MANGOLD, JANE Overland Park 

General Junior 

MANKE. DENISE , Shawnee 

Interior Design Sophomore 

MANNING. TAMMY Shawnee 

Social Work Senior 

MARD1S, JEREMY Pratt 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MARIHUGH. LINDA Esbon 

Finance Senior 

MARKER, PAM Cambridge 

General Business Administration Junior 

MARQUEZ. ANGELA Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

MARQUEZ. MARY Kansas City 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

MARSCHIK. IVAN Budapest 

Computer Science Graduate Student 

MARSHALL. BRYAN , Eureka 

Finance Senior 

MARSHALL. JOEL Minneola 

Accounting Senior 

MARSHALL, REGINA Eureka 

Life Science Senior 

MARTIN, BRENDA Manhattan 

General Freshman 

MARTIN. CONNIE Salina 

Elementary Education Senior 

MARTIN, JEROME Manhattan 

Engineering Technology Junior 

MARTIN, KARLA Topeka 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

MARTIN, KYLE Milford 

General Engineering Freshman 



off-campus 419 



.ampus 



Getting ready Rochelle Rand, 
junior in computer science, and 
Lana Schaulis, junior in crop 
protection, members of the K- 
State women's track team start 
training early in the fall for track 
season. 



MARTIN, MERR1E Clay Center 

General Business Administration Freshman 

MARTIN, M1GNON Grinnell 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

MARTIN, SHARON Manhattan 

Microbioloby Sophomore 

MARTINEZ, MARIA Wichita 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MARTINEZ. ORLANDO Ames, Iowa 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student 



MARTIN1TZ, KAREN Chapman 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MARTINITZ, MELANIE Salina 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

MARTON, JOAN Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

MARTZ. DAVID Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MATHEWS, BECKY Kiowa 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

MATHEWS, CHARLES Salina 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

MATHIES, DARLENE Kansas City 

Elementary Education Senior 

MATHIES, JOHN Kansas City 

Accounting Senior 

MATTERS. SPENCER Leawood 

Construction Science Senior 

MAY. KATHLEEN Neosho Falls 

General Home Economics Senior 



MCAFEE, DUANE Garnett 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

MCANTEE, JILL Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

MCCALL, MARC Newton 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MCCALLUM. GEORGE Wlnfield 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MCCANDLESS. TIM Junction City 

Accounting Senior 




Craig Chandler 




420 off-campus 




MCCLELLAN, MICHAEL Palco 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

MCCLELLAND, BERTRA Oskaloosa 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

MCCL1NTOCK. MARGRET Council Grove 

History Sophomore 

MCCLURE, MARILYN Ottawa 

Psychology Junior 

MCCONN1FF, THERESA Mission 

General Sophomore 



MCCOWAN. KAREN Manhattan 

Consumer Interest Senior 

MCDAN1EL. DEBORAH Shawnee 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

MEGEOGH. MICHAEL Kenosha. Wis. 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

MCGEE. DAVID Ellsworth 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

MEGHEHEY. PEGGY Topeka 

Home Economics Education Senior 

MCGILL, SUSAN Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

MCGINNIS. LESLIE Rossvllle 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

MCGREGOR, MARK Goddard 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

MCHUGH. MIKE Valley Center 

Mathematics Graduate Student 

MCKAIN, MARK Dodge City 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MCKEE. DAN Derby 

Marketing Senior 

MCK1NNIE, JILL Glen Elder 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

MCKINSEY. JOEL Springfield, Mo. 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

MCMAINS. RANDALL Manhattan 

Psychology Senior 

MCMENOMEY, TIM McPherson 

General Business Administration Junior 

MCM1LLEN, MICHELLE Dighton 

General Sophomore 

MCNAIRY, MICHAEL Augusta 

Engineering Technology Senior 

MCNAUGHTON, ROBIN Shawnee 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

MCNEIL. KEVIN Clifton 

General Sophomore 

MCPHERSON. GAYLENE McLouth 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

MCROBERTS. SUSAN Manhattan 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MCVICKER. TANYA Abilene 

Office Administration Senior 

MCWHIRTER. JOHN Manhattan 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

MCWHIRTER, PAULA Manhattan 

Finance Junior 

MCWILLIAMS, LISA Kansas City 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MEAD. JAN Lewis 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

MEADOR. BILL Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

MEADOWS, PAM Shawnee Mission 

Marketing Sophomore 

MEALY, ROBERT Scott City 

Political Science Junior 

MEIER, GREGORY Topeka 

Agricultural Education Junior 

MEIER, LAURI Topeka 

Speech Pathology Junior 

ME1TL, THOMAS Dresden 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

MERGENMEIER, STEPHEN St. Marys 

Geology Sophomore 

MERILLAT. SUSAN Topeka 

Elementary Education Senior 

MERIWETHER, ELIZABETH Columbus 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

MESSENGER. LEN Kingman 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

METCALF, WILLIAM Paola 

Food Science and Industry Senior 

METZGER. ROXANNA Fredonla 

General Business Administration Senior 

METZINGER. RONALD Caldwell 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

METZLER, MARK Topeka 

Agricultural Education Junior 



off -campus 421 



impus 



METZLER, TARISA Manhattan 

Computer Science Freshman 

MEULI. JUL1 Hope 

Horticulture Senior 

MEULI. LORRIE Hope 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

MEUSBORN. MYRNA Shawnee 

Elementary Education Senior 

MEYEN, BRETT Lawrence 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MEYER, BRAD Manhattan 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

MEYER, BRUCE Palmer 

Agriculture Economics Senior 

MEYER, DEAN Great Bend 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

MICHALSKI, DEBBIE Salina 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

M1CHELSEN, SCOTT Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

MIDDLETON, CARROLL Udall 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MIES, MICHAEL Bonner Springs 

Accounting Junior 

MIGCHELBRINK. MARK Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

M1GNANO. GARY Manhattan 

Political Science Senior 

MIGNANO, JACKIE Manhattan 

Health and Political Science Junior 

MILBURN. BRUCE Penalosa 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MILES. NANCY LaCrosse 

Clothing Retailing T Junior 

MILES VIRGIL Burlingame 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MILLER, ALLISON Eureka 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

MILLER, ANTORIA Kansas City 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

MILLER, AUDREY Winchester 

Management Sophomore 

MILLER. ELAINE Derby 

Elementary Education Senior 

MILLER, GUY Ozawkie 

Microbiology Junior 

MILLER, KATHY Perry 

General Business Administration Freshman 

MILLER, LOU ANN Lenexa 

General Business Administration Junior 

MILLER. RAYMOND Olathe 

Engineering Technology Senior 

MILLER, THERESA Frankfort 

Accounting Junior 

MILLER, WARREN Holslngton 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MILLS, BRETT Sharon Springs 

Horticulture Sophomore 

MITCHELL. TIMOTHY Fredonla 

Correctional Administration Senior 

MITTS, HELEN Bonner Springs 

Elementary Education Junior 

MODLIN. SYLVAI Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

MOEDER, RANDY Great Bend 

Accounting Junior 

MOFFETT. STEVEN Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

MOGGE. DENISE Alma 

Art Senior 

MOHAN, STEVE Topeka 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

MOHSENI-ZONOOZ1. HASHEN LaCrosse, Wis. 

Education Graduate Student 

MOLITOR, SANDRA Zenda 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

MONTGOMERY. DAVID Lenexa 

Accounting Senior 

MOORE. ALLEN Merrlam 

Architecture Senior 

MOORE. DONNA Barnes 

Music Education Senior 

MOORE, ERIC Topeka 

General Engineering Freshman 

MOORE. JOHN Derby 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MOORE, TERRI Silver Lake 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

MOORE. TROY Johnson 

Electrical Engineering Graduate Student 



- - 




422 off-campus 




MORANDO. ROBERT Abilene 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

MORGAN, PENNY Goessel 

Horticulture Junior 

MORITZ. SUSAN Beloit 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

MORRICAL, CARLA Beverly 

Home Economics Education Junior 

MORRIS. JEFFERY Schenectady, NY. 

Architecture Senior 

MORRISON. DONALD Manhattan 

Food Science and Management Senior 

MOSER. PATTI Marysville 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

MOSER. REBA Winona 

Accounting Senior 

MOSER. TERESA Holton 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MOSIER, LINDA Bonner Springs 

Accounting Junior 

MOSSMAN. DONALD El Dorado 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MUELLER. CURT Humboldt 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MUELLER, DEB Kingman 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

MUGLER. GARY Hutchinson 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MUGLER. ROBERTA Hutchinson 

Accounting Senior 

MULLER. MARK Coffeyville 

Agriculture Education Senior 

MULVANEY, D1NA Wichita 

General Junior 

MULVIHILL. KAREN Mission 

General Sophomore 

MUMMA. DAN Alamota 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

MUNSEY, MARIBETH Frotenac 

Pre-Nursing Junior 




Grin and bear it- The 

sophomores and the freshmen of 
K-State's marching band were 
pitted against each other in a Tug- 
of-War competition during Howdy 
Week, Aug. 24, 1980. 



Craig Chandler 



off-campus 423 



MURAKAMI, LEO Honolulu, Hawaii 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Junior 

MURPHY, KEVIN Great Bend 

Agronomy Sophomore 

MURPHY, MARSHA Hill City 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

MURPHY, MEGAN Topeka 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

MURRAY, JAMES Clay Center 

Engineering Technology Senior 

MURRAY, SUZANNE Manhattan 

Pre-Education Freshman 

MURRAY, THOMAS Great Bend 

Marketing Senior 

MUSSATTO, CASEY Osage City 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

MYERS, DIANE Overland Park 

Speech Pathology Senior 

MYERS, KATIE Marshfield, Mo. 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

MYLES, KIMBERLY Lenexa 

Marketing Junior 

NACE, MARK Delphos 

Crop Protection Senior 

NASH, KATHRYN Dodge City 

Home Economics Education Senior 

NASH, MICHAEL Lenexa 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

NASS, MARY Atchinson 

General Business Administration Junior 

NAVARRO, STEVE Hutchinson 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

NAVRAT, JULIE Wichita 

English Junior 

NEBLOCK, SHERYL Overland Park 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

NEESE. MIKE Prairie Village 

General Business Administration Senior 

Neff. David Toganoxle 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

NE1BLING. ROBERT Highland 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

NEIPERT, TIFFANY Randolph 

General Home Economics Freshman 

NELSON. JERRY Burdick 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

NELSON, KIMBERLY Manhattan 

Commercial Art Senior 

NELSON, REX Salina 

General Engineering Sophomore 

NELSON, SHERRY Manhattan 

Accounting Freshman 

NELSON, VICKI Emporia 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

NEUFELD, CHERYL Newton 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

NEUFELD, DEANNA Andover 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

NEUTZLER. LYNN Kansas City 

Correctional Administration Senior 

NEWHOUSE, TOM Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

NIBARGER, RICHARD Randolph 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

NICHOLSON, ANITA Colby 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

NICHOLSON, DEKETA Dodge City 

Psychology Sophomore 

NIEMAN. JULIE Wichita 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

NIETFELD, CYNTHIA Marysvllle 

Home Economics Education Senior 

NIGHTINGALE, JAMES Burrton 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

NITCHER, ANGELA Wichita 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore 

NOFFSINGER, STEVE Clay Center 

General Freshman 

NOLAN. MICHAEL Shawnee 

Civil Engineering Senior 

NOLDER, SANDRA Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Senior 

NOLL, LORENE Winchester 

Labor Relations Sophomore 

NOLTING, GREG Nortonvllle 

Food Science and Management Senior 

NORMAN. BRET Scott City 

Crop Protection Senior 

NORTHROP. GAYLE Manhattan 

General Junior 




424 off-campus 




NORTON, JACKI Minneola 

Management Junior 

NORTON. KATHLEEN Manhattan 

General Junior 

NORTON. KENTON Dodge City 

Agronomy Junior 

NOVAK. CINDY Lost Springs 

Horticulture Senior 

NOVAK. PATRICK Belleville 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

NOVAK, WILL Belleville 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

NUDSON. CANDY Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

NULL. CARLA Independence 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

OAKES, PAUL Manhattan 

Computer Science Senior 

OBERLE. DEIDRE Manhattan 

General Engineering Freshman 

OBERLE, KIM Manhattan 

Accounting Junior 

OBRIEN. GWYN Emporia 

Management Junior 

OBRIEN. KATHY Mission 

Pre-Deslgn Professions Senior 

OCHOA. CONNIE Edwardsville 

Art Junior 

OCONNOR. ANNETTE Wichita 

Speech Pathology Junior 

OCONNOR. MARY Sallna 

Accounting Senior 

OGLEVIE. MARY Goodland 

English Senior 

OHMSTEDE. RICK Lebanon 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

OKOKURO, ANTHONY Portharcourt. Nigeria 

General Business Administration Freshman 

OKONKWO, FLORENCE Manhattan 

General Home Economics Freshman 

OKONKWO. CHRIS Manhattan 

Horticulture Graduate Student 

OL1VA. KATHLEEN Topeka 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

OLIVER. MICHELLE Claremont. Call!. 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

OLORUNFEMI. JULIANA Manhattan 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

OLSEN, DEBORAH Prairie Village 

Interior Design Junior 

OLSON. RANDY Altoona 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

OMALLEY. MICHAEL Oak Park, III. 

Social Science Senior 

ONNUAM. DUANGDUEN Manhattan 

Education Graduate Student 

ORBIN, WILLIAM Manhattan 

Management Junior 

ORR. WENDEL Manhattan 

Agronomy Senior 

OSBORNE, KEITH Danville 

Finance Junior 

OSHEA. TIM Oskaloosa 

Accounting Senior 

OSTROM. JENNIFER Concordia 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

OUELLETTE. JAMES Washington 

Architecture Senior 

OVERTON, LIZ Manhattan 

Correctional Administration Junior 

OWEN. SUSAN Topeka 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

OXANDALE, BRAD Wetmore 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

OZBUN. MARK Garden City 

Computer Science Junior 

OZBUN. PAUL Wlnfleld 

Architecture Senior 

PACALA. RUSSEL Bethelehem. Penn. 

Architecture Senior 

PACUMBABA, GINA Manhattan 

General Freshman 

PACUMBABA, MARJORIE Manhattan 

Computer Science Sophomore 

PAJL, JAMES Winner, S.D. 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

PAJL. MARTHA Manhattan 

General Home Economics Senior 

PALMER. MIKE Prairie Village 

Labor Relations Senior 



off-campus 425 



PAi.MER. ROBERT Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Senior 

PANTHONG. BUPPA Bankok, Thailand 

Home Economics Graduate Student 

PARISH, CHERIE Derby 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

PARKER. LINDA Dwlght 

Political Science Education Junior 

PARR, MICHAEL Salina 

Management Freshman 



PASEK. THERESA Salina 

General Business Administration Junior 

PASLEY. MARY Manhattan 

Agricultural Education Senior 

PATRON, RUFINO Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

PATTERSON, BRAD Stockton 

Engineering Technology Senior 

PATTERSON, KATHERINE Whitewater 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Junior 



PATTON. DENNIS Caldwell 

Horticulture Junior 

PAULS. JANETTE Inman 

Interior design Sophomore 

PAYNE, JAMES Leawood 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

PAYNE. JULIA Formoso 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

PAZ. JEFF St Louis. Mo. 

PreDesign Professions Freshman 



PEABODY, SAMUEL Wichita 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

PEARSON. CLINT Tribune 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

PEINTNER, JOHN Dodge City 

General Business Administration Junior 

PEPPERS, ROBIN Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

PERILLA. MARIO Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Graduate Student 



PERRY, BETSEY Leawood 

Bakery Science and Management Senior 

PERRY. THOMAS Minneapolis 

Finance Senior 

PETERS. BRUCE Elllnwood 

Electrical Engineering Graduate Student 

PETERS. CLARK Manhattan 

Architecture Senior 

PETERSON, ANN Bridgeport 

Business Education Junior 

PETERSON, BART Springfield, Mo. 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

PETERSON. CATHERINE Greeley 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

PETERSON. DALLAS Leonardvllle 

Agronomy Senior 

PETR1E. PATRICK Shawnee 

Accounting Senior 

PFEIFER. ARMON Morland 

Construction Science Senior 

PFOLTNER. KELLY Prairie Village 

Social Work Junior 

PHELPS, JOHN Hutchinson 

Civil Engineering Junior 

PHILLIPS, KEITH Shawnee 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

PHILLIPS. SANDRA Manhattan 

Speech Pathology Senior 

PH1PPS, SUSAN Shawnee 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 



PIENTKA. CECILIA Abilene 

Pre Professional Elementary Sophomore 

PITTMAN, TRACEY Toganoxie 

Home Economics Education Junior 

PL1NSKY. JANINA Manhattan 

Management Junior 

PLEDGER FAYE Morrill 

Accounting Junior 

POLAND. SCOTT Clyde 

Accounting Senior 

POLLOCK. KATHY Hazelton 

Accounting Sophomore 

POLSTON. GORDON Hope 

History Education Senior 

POTTER, SHELLY Concordia 

En 9^J Junior 

POTTER. VIRGINIA B „te, Spring. 

Business Education Senior 

POTTORFF. MARY .'.'.'.'.'.'.'...' Douglass 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 




426 off-campus 





Biker's solitude- Kevin 
Prichard, sophomore in 
j mechanical engineering stops on 
Bluemont Hill to watch a Kansas 
sunset. 

Hurrlyet Aydogan 

POTTORFF. STEPHEN Douglas 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

POUNDS. LISA Delphos 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

POWELL, PATRICK Mission 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

POWELL, RYAN Beloit 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

POWERS, MARK Great Bend 

General Business Administration Junior 

POWERS. ROGER Rose Hill 

Civil Engineering Junior 

PREWITT, JOHN Cassoday 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

PRIEST. MARK Plains 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

PRINTY, VAN Junction City 

Accounting Freshman 

PR1TTS, TERRELL Manhattan 

Crop Protection Senior 

PROCHASKA. SANDY Lenena 

Interior Design Senior 

PROCHAZKA, LUKE Atwood 

Agriculture Economics Freshman 

PROSE, CHERI Herndon 

General Busienss Administration Junior 

PROSE, MARY KAY Herndon 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

PROWELL, STEVEN Council Grove 

Engineering Technology Senior 

PULLIAM. HENRI Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

PUTT, JOAN Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

QUALLS. CARLOS Batesvllle. Ark. 

Computer Science Graduate Student 

QUIGLEY. DANA Wichita 

Finance Senior 

RAETZ. ALAN Gypsum 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

RAHTJEN, JAMES Overland Park 

Music Education Junior 

RAINS, HOWARD Beatrice, Neb 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

RAMAGE, RONALD Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

RAMIREZ. HAROLD Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

RAMIREZ, MARTHA Topeka 

Interior Design Sophomore 



off campus 427 



■m 



RAMSEY, TAMRA Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

RAND. ROCHELLE Shawnee 

Computer Science Senior 

RANEY. MARK Dodge City 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

RANKIN. REBECCA Topeka 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

RANNEY, PENN1E Delphos 

Pre-Professional Secondary Junior 

RANSOPHAR. ANN Clyde 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

RAPLE. ALICE Wichita 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

RAPP. CURT McPherson 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

RAY, MARLA Oberlin 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

REAVES, CYNTHIA Chanute 

Home Economics Education Senior 

REDPATH, SUE Prairie Village 

Microbiology Senior 

REED. EMILEY Sallna 

Home Economics Education Senior 

REED. JUDY Belleville 

Home Economics Education Junior 

REED, JULIE Medicine Lodge 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

REED. SHAYLA Overland Park 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

REED, TRACY Peru 

Art Education Junior 

REES, BRONWEN Emporia 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

REGEHR. LOWELL Hesston 

Architecture Senior 

REGIER. DEBBIE Wellsvllle 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

REGIER, PATRICK Whitewater 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 



Now the plan /s . . . K-State 
students enjoy a game of football 
after the first major snowfall in 
late January. 









u- 


% 




Hurrlyet Aydogan 




428 off-campus 




REHMER. JOHN Grlnnell 

Construction Science Senior 

REIFF, RICK Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

REILLY, ANNE Topeka 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

REINKE, JULIE Wichita 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

REISER, DEBBIE Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

REMINGTON. ALLEC1A Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

REMMEL, DAVE Topeka 

Engineering Technology Senior 

RENINGER, CINDY Ft. Riley 

Social Work Freshman 

RHEAUME. RON Colonla. N.J. 

Architecture Senior 

RIAT, DOUGLAS St. Mary's 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

RICE, TOMMY Kensington 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

RICE. TONY Wllsonvllle, Neb. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

RICHARDS, CATHY Wichita 

Elementary Education Junior 

RICHARDS. DANNY Neodesha 

Horticulture Junior 

RICHARDS. DAVID Grldley. 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

RICHARDS, YVONNE Washington 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

RICHARDSON, MARY Peoria, III 

Horticulture Junior 

RICHTER. DAVID Niles, Minn 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

RIEMANN, ROGER Phillipsburg 

Construction Science Junior 

RIFFEL. CINDY Hope 

Life Science Senior 

RIFFEL. DAVID Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

RIFFEL. JANE Tampa 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

RIGGS. CHRIS Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

R1NEHART, GAYE Topeka 

Speech Pathology Junior 

RINGER1NG, RICHARD Ellinwood 

Accounting Junior 

RINGLE, SCOTT Independence 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

RINKE. GREG Pratt 

Geology Senior 

RINKE, LINDA Pratt 

Interior Design Junior 

RISEN. LYNNE Overland Park 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

RISON, KATHY Sabetha 

Psychology Junior 

RITZDORF, GAIL Omaha, Neb 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

RIZEK. DEBRA Munden 

Speech Pathology Senior 

ROBBEN. JAN Oakley 

General Home Economics Senior 

ROBBEN, KAREN Newton 

Marketing Junior 

ROBBEN. PAUL Oakley 

Accounting Senior 

ROBBINS. LEE Yates Center 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

ROBERSON, BRENDA Silver Lake 

Management Junior 

ROBERTSON, PHIL Manhattan 

Construction Science Junior 

ROBINSON. JOAN Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

ROBINSON, POLLY Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

ROBINSON, RICHARD Brewster 

Geology Junior 

ROBISON, JOHN Concordia 

Agriculture Economics Senior 

ROBL, QUENTIN Ellinwood 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

ROCK, FRED Hope 

Accounting Sophomore 

ROESNER, THERESA Manhattan 

Management Junior 



off-campus 429 



ff-Campus 



ROETHER. LIZABETH Junction City 

Art Education Senior 

ROGERS. DAVID Fredonla 

Sociology Senior 

ROGGENBUCK, RENAE Milbank S D 

Pre Design Professions Junior 

ROGLER, JOHN Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

ROGLER, SUSAN Manhattan 

Biology Sophomore 



ROLLHOUS, CHRIS Arnold. Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

ROMBECK. DIANE TopeUa 

Accounting Senior 

RONEN. MIKE Meade 

Business Education Senior 

ROOF. STEVEN Los Alamos N.M. 

Microbiology Senior 

ROSE. GALE Havlland 

Speech Graduate Student 

ROSE, TOM Halstead 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

ROSEWICZ. GARY Kansas City 

Civil Engineering Senior 

ROUDYBUSY. CHERI Edwardsville 

Marketing Junior 

ROWLAND. KELLEY Hutchinson 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

RUDER. MARK Hays 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

RUDROW. KATHY Wichita 

Interior Design Senior 

RUGGLES, MICHAEL Scott City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

RUNDELL. BRENT Syracuse 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

RUNDLE. SUSAN Clay Center 

Engineering Technology Senior 

RUSNAK. KATHE Overland Park 

Modern Language Senior 

RUSSELL, BRYAN Codell 

Agriculture Sophomore 

RUSSELL. CURTIS Redfleld 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

RUSSELL, EUGENE Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

RUSSELL, JAN Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

RUSSELL. SHERYL Leawood 

Mathematics Education Senior 

RUSSELL, SAMANTHA Ft. Riley 

Elementary Education Junior 

RYAN, WILLIAM Manhattan 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

RYKER. SHAR1 Wellington 

Elementary Education Senior 

SALLEE. DOUGLAS Manhattan 

History Education Senior 

SANDERS, ANN Wichita 

Physical Science Junior 

SANDERS, LYNNETTE Osawatomle 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

SANDERS. MARY Lyons 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

SANDERS. ROBYN Centralla. Mo. 

Interior Architecture Senior 

SAWYER. DOYLE Valley Center 

Accounting Senior 

SANDORD, KATHLEEN Belleville 

Marketing Junior 

SAUNDERS, BETH Overland Park 

Biology Junior 

SAUVAGE, CAROL Topeka 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

SAVAGE, GREG A lma 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SCHAELDE. THERESA .'.'...'.'.'. Wichita 

Office Administration Sophomore 

SCHAEFER. BRETT Horton 

Management Senior 

SCHAEFER. LUANN Bremen 

Social Work Senior 

SCHAEFER. DENNIS Garden City 

Marketing Senior 

SCHAFFER. JACQUELINE Hays 

General Sophomore 

SCHAFFER. VERNON p ralI 

Agronomy Senior 

SCHAMBERGER. LEONARD Hoxie 

Engineering Technology Junior 



430 off-campus 





SCHAMLE, THERESE Wellsvllle 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

SCHARMANN, PHILLIP Eden Prairie, Minn 

General Sophomore 

SCHARTZ. MARGARET Cimmaron 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

SCHARTZ, MELVIN Great Bend 

Accounting Junior 

SCHARTZ. STEVE Cimmaron 

Agronomy Senior 

SCHAULIS, DANA Cincinnati, Ohio 

Crop Protection Junior 

SCHEBOR, VALERIE Leavenworth 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

SCHEMM, KEVIN Wakeeney 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

SCHILLING. RON Goodland 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SCH1NDLER, DIANE Goodland 

Art Sophomore 

SCHLETZBAUM, ANNE Atchison 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

SCHLICKAU, SUSAN Haven 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

SCHLUEMER, BARBARA Ferguson, Mo 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

SCHMALE, MARY Palmer 

General Business Administration Junior 

SCHMIDT. GARRET Hays 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

SCHMIDT, LINDA Shawnee 

Management Sophomore 



Live-In maid- Terry Beachey, 
sophomore in mechanical 
engineering, washes the dishes in 
his apartment. 



off-campus 431 



Outdoor schooling- Don Page, 
freshman in animal science, 
studies on her front porch during 
a warm February afternoon. 



SCHMIDT. LOREN Canton 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

SCHMIDT. RAE ANN Manhattan 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

SCHM1TT. DAVE Chapman 

History Education Junior 

SCHMITT. JAMES St. Louis. Mo. 

Architecture Senior 

SCHMITZ, TERRANCE Axtell 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

SCHMITZ. THEODORE Axtell 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

SCHMUTZ. RON Wakefield 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

SCHNECK, CHERYL Larned 

Computer Science Junior 

SCHNEIDER, GARY Arkansas City 

Interior Design Sophomore 

SCHNITKER, SHAWNYA Wichita 

Accounting Junior 

SCHONEWEIS. SUSAN Manhattan 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SCHRAEDER. BARBARA Jetmore 

Interior Design Senior 

SCHREINER. CHRISTINE Topeka 

Marketing Junior 

SCHRICK, CHRISTOPHER Nortonville 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

SCHROEGER, KAREN Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

SCHUETZE. CAROLYN Tonganoxie 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

SCHULER. KENT Chapman 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

SCHULTZ, SALLY Overland Park 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

SCHUMAKER, DENNIS St. Marys 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

SCHURLE, LAURIE Manhattan 

Accounting Freshman 




432 off-campus 




SCHUTTER, ANNA Topeka 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

SCHWALM. CATHY Hiawatha 

Pre-Nursing Senior 

SCHWARTZ. CHERI Washington 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

SCHWEMMER. NEIL Towanda 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

SCOBY. NANCY Sabetha 

Elementary Education Senior 

SCOBY, PATRICIA Sabetha 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

SCOTT, KURT Salina 

Accounting Junior 

SCOTT, LINDA White City 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

SCOTT, NANCY White City 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SCOTT, ROBERT Burlington 

General Business Administration Junior 

SCOTT, TERYL Clearwater 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

SEABOURN, BRAD Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SEACAT. KATHLEEN Ashland 

Food Science and Management Senior 

SEBRING. MARY Olathe 

Accounting Senior 

SEGLEM, JENNIE Merriam 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

SE1TZ, RICK Topeka 

Engineering Technology Senior 

SELL, STEVEN Great Bend 

General Business Administration Junior 

SELVES. WENDY Overland Park 

Horticulture Senior 

SEYMOUR, ROGER Manhattan 

Construction Science Senior 

SHABSHAB, NADIM Manhattan 

Interior Architecture Junior 

SHACKELTON, KAREN Manhattan 

Geology Sophomore 

SHADDAY. CRAIG Manhattan 

Music Education Senior 

SHAFFER. BRAD Marysville 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

SHAFFER, CONNIE Williamsburg 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

SHAHEED, PETER Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

SHANEYFELT, LAURIE Kansas City, Mo. 

Pre-Law Junior 

SHANEYFELT, LYNNE St. George 

Microbiology Senior 

SHANKS, BRUCE Columbus 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SHANNON, JANIS Clay Center 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

SHARP. ELIZABETH Fredonia 

Office Administration Senior 

SHARP. GERALD Benedict 

Agronomy Senior 

SHARP. JANET McLouth 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

SHAVER. DON Haven 

Construction Science Senior 

SHELTON. CINDY Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

SHELTON, MIKE Wichita 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

SHERMAN, STEVE Arkansas City 

General Business Administration Junior 

SHIELDS, BRENDA Osage 

Office Administration Junior 

SHINOGLE, RONALD Plains 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

SHINOGLE. TERRANCE Plains 

Construction Science Senior 

SHIPLEY. LYLE Esbon 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SHIRVANI, SUZANNE Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

SHOEMAKER, CARLA ; Wheeler 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

SHOEMAKER, FRANK Narka 

Agriculture Education Junior 

SHORT. BRAD Manhattan 

Music Education Senior 

SHORT. MARILYN Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 



off-campus 433 



mpus 



SHORT, MARSHALL Assaria 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

SHOW ALTER, TAMMY Courtland 

Fine Arts Junior 

SHOWALTER, JOHN Goodland 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

SHR1VER. ALLAN Coat* 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SHUMAN. RONALD Sallna 

General Business Administration Senior 

SHUSTER. LEROY Tribune 

Agronomy Senior 

SIEBERT. CATHY Topeka 

Health Senior 

SIECK. KRISTI Goodland 

General Business Administration Senior 

SIGMAN, JAY Emporia 

Accounting Junior 

S1LADY. PATRICK Shawnee Mission 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

SILLIMAN. LAURA Goddard 

Interior Design Senior 

S1LSBY, TADHI Mankato 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

S1LVA, ROGER Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SIMMF1 INK. TERESA Sallna 

Clothing Retallng Senior 

SIMMONS, DENNIS Larned 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

SIMMONS, KATHRYN Ft Riley 

Pre-Professional Elementary Junior 

SIMPSON, JEFF Dodge City 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

SIMS. KELLY Scott City 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

SIMS, LORI Scott City 

Psychology Senior 

SIMS, OZIE Kansas City 

Computer Science Senior 

SINCLAIR. BRENDA Garden City 

Speech Senior 



"Busched"' Shawn Neal, junior 
in horticulture therapy, Dana 
Neal, Sue Schmitt and Sharon 
Riley, all juniors in journalism and 
mass communications, TGIF on 
their porch steps. 




Scott Llebler 



434 off-campus 




SINCLAIR. BRENT Garden City 

Engineering Technology Senior 

SINDERSON. HOLLY Shawnee 

Accounting Senior 

S1TTENAUER, ANNETTE Nortonbille 

Physical Education Junior 

SIXTA. MICHELE Kansas City 

General Business Administration Senior 

SKAHAN. SCOTT Shawnee 

Construction Science Senior 



SKEELS. MARK Mendham. N.J. 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SKEELS. REBECCA Leavenworth 

Finance Senior 

SKY, ALICE Arlington, Va. 

Sociology Junior 

SLATER. MARTY Independence 

General Engineering Freshman 

SLEEPER. DONNA Elkshart 

History Education Senior 



SLOAN. ELIZABETH Salina 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

SLUSHER. ROBERT Kansas City 

General Freshman 

SMALL, TODD Garden City 

General Business Administration Junior 

SMALLWOOD, ANDREA Manhattan 

Fine Arts Freshman 

SMEED, CATHLEEN Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 



SMITH. CHERYL Manhattan 

General Junior 

SMITH. CYNTHIA Olathe 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

SMITH, CYNTHIA Leavenworth 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

SMITH. DAVID Leawood 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SMITH. DENISE Wichita 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 



SMITH, ERIC Bird City 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

SMITH. KAREN Marysvllle 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

SMITH, LEE Lebanon 

General Business Administration Junior 

SMITH. LYNNE Manhattan 

Social Work Junior 

SMITH. PHILIP Manhattan 

Pre-Law Junior 

SMITH, ROBERT St. George 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

SMITH, SHAR1 Wamego 

Accounting Freshman 

SMITH, SHEILA Goodland 

General Junior 

SMITH, SHEILA Spring Hill 

Home Economics Education Senior 

SNYDER. KEITH Manhattan 

Marketing Senior 



SNYDER. STEPHEN Mankato 

Accounting Senior 

SNYDER, VIRGIL Fairview 

Accounting Junior 

SOBBA, CAROL Garnett 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

SOLTERO. FRED Ramlrmayaguez, P.R. 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

SOMMERFELD, DAVID Basehor 

Geography Junior 



SOMMERFELD. GARY Basehor 

Engineering Technology ' Senior 

SONDERGARD, SANNA Wichita 

Management Junior 

SONES, DEBORAH Manhattan 

Accounting Freshman 

SOSNA. MARK Shawnee Mission 

Accounting Senior 

SOTHERS, DEB Courtland 

Health and Physical Education Junior 



SOTHERS, KAREN Courtland 

General Sophomore 

SOTHERS. KAYLENE Courtland 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

SOUTHARD, JOHN Pratt 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SPADE, DIANE Burllngame 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

SPAIN, DANA Berryton 

Clothing Retailing Junior 



off-campus 435 



SPAIN, KAREN Manhattan 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

SPANGLER, MARK Kansas City 

Biology Senior 

SPANGLER, TERR! Carthage. Mo 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

SPEAR, TERR1 Beloit 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

SPEED. TIMOTHY Shawnee 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

SPEER, CAROLE Clearwater 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

SPENCE, BRUCE Manhattan 

Architecture Senior 

SPENCE. LINDA Manhattan 

Marketing Senior 

SPENCER. WAYNE Welda 

Physics Senior 

SPEIGEL. JUDY Formoso 

Home Economics Education Senior 

SPRESSOR. LARRY Hoxle 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

ST JOHN, DEANA Manhattan 

Social Work Sophomore 

STADEL, KAREN Manhattan 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Junior 

STAHL. SUSAN Shawnee 

Sociology Senior 

STANFORD, MEL Cherry Hill, N.J. 

Natural Resource Management Junior 



Strummin'- David Berkely, junior 
in fine arts, plays his guitar in a 
quiet spot east of the International 
Student Center. 




Scott Llebler 



436 off-campus 




STANSELL, MARY JO Valley Falls 

Accounting Junior 

STANTON. JANICE Shawnee Mission 

Correctional Administration Senior 

STARR, EMILY Arkansas City 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

STAUFFER, BRAD Emporia 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

STELLE. KELLY Tribune 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

STEELE, LANCE Tribune 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

STEELE, MICKI Tribune 

Social Work Senior 

STEELE, PAM St. Marys 

Fine Arts Junior 

STEENBOCK, SARA Longford 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

STEENBOCK, SHERI Longford 

Agricultural Education Junior 

STEFFEN, DIANE Glenwood City, Wis. 

Biology Junior 

STEGEMAN. DEBBIE Sallna 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

STEGEMAN, SANDY Sallna 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

STEIMEL, LYNDON Wright 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

STEINBERT, KARLA Lincoln 

Music Education Senior 

STEPHEN. DIANE Junction City 

Consumer Interest Senior 

STEPHENS, SUSAN Waterville 

Accounting Junior 

STEPHENSON. BOB Osco. 111. 

Agronomy Graduate Student 

STEPHENSON, PETER Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

STEVENS. ELIZABETH St. George 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

STEWART, KENT Washington 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

STEWART, ELLEN Manhattan 

General Freshman 

STEWART. RODNEY Washington 

Agricultural Education Senior 

STICKNEY, LYLE Ellinwood 

Management Freshman 

STIEBE. ARLYN Kinsley 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

STILWELL, JAMES Merrlam 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

STITT. ROCKFORD Chanute 

Agronomy Senior 

STITZEL. SUE ANN Arkansas City 

Interior Design Senior 

STODDARD. MARTHA Manhattan 

General Business Administration Senior 

STODDARD, SUSAN Council Grove 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

STOVE. THEODORE Arkansas City 

General Business Administration Senior 

STRAHM, JANEEN Sabetha 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

STRAIN, SHANNON Manhattan 

General Junior 

STRAIT, SHERI Sallna 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

STRECKER. CHERI Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

STRICKLAND, TERRY Ottawa 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

STRODTMAN, GARY Laramie, Wyo. 

Agronomy Junior 

STUBBY, BRENDA Newton 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

STUCKY. DONNA McPherson 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

STUCKY, MORRIS McPherson 

Engineering Technology Junior 

STUDER. SHELLEY Preston 

Fine Arts Senior 

STUEVE, ANTHONY Hiawatha 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

STURN. JOHN Bshton 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

STURN. TAMMY Kansas City 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

SULLIVAN, BRIAN De Soto, Mo. 

Architecture Senior 



off-campus 437 



I: 



SULLIVAN, PETE Leau/ood 

General Sophomore 

SULTZER. ROBERT : Topeka 

Pre-Forestry Junior 

SURA. PATRICK Racine, Wis. 

Pre-Medlcine Senior 

SUTHER, BETSY Blaine 

Pre-Professional Secondary Senior 

SUTHERLAND, JOHN El Dorado 

Construction Science Senior 

SUTOR, LORNA Zurich 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SUTTON, DEAN Ferguson, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SVATY. DAVID Ellsworth 

Agronomy Senior 

SVATY, JEAN ANN Lucas 

General Sophomore 

SWANSON. SHAWN Hutchinson 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

SWART. LINDA Oakley 

Early Childhood Education Graduate Student 

SWEARINGEN, ROCKY Independence 

Agriculture Economics Senior 

SWEGLE, ERIC Omaha, Neb. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SWISHER, KYLE Beloit 

Pre-Medicien Sophomore 

SWOYER, GREG Shawnee 

Civil Engineering Junior 

SYLVESTER. LAR1SSA Wamego 

A rt Senior 

SYLVESTER, NORENE Wamego 

Early Childhood Education Graduate Student 

TALBOTT. MARK Halstead 

Engineering Technology Senior 

TALBOTT. TRACI Halstead 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Junior 

TANNER, JEFF Dod 9e City 

Health and Physical Education Sophomore 

TAP1A. LETIC1A Kansas City 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

TAYLOR. BRADLEY White Cloud 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

TAYLOR, CURTIS El Dorado 

Engineering Technology Senior 

TAYLOR, IRA Overland Park 

General Business Administration Junior 

TAYLOR, ROGER Enterprise 

General Business Administration Senior 

TEDFORD. ROBERT Great Bend 

Agriculture Education Junior 

TEDMAN. LAURA Harper 

Computer Science Junior 

TEMPLETON, JAMES Coffeyville 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

TEMPLIN, LAURA Stillwell 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

TESON. NANCY Manhattan 

General Business Administration Senior 

THE1S, SHELLY Wichita 

English Junior 

THEOBALD. ANNE Leaivood 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

THIEROLF. JANET Overland Park 

Consumer Interest Senior 

TH1ESSEN, MARK Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Secondary Junior 

THIESSEN. MIKE Beloit 

Marketing Junior 

THOMAS. GEORGALEEN Sallna 

Social Science Senior 

THOMAS. JERRY Emporia 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

THOMAS. RON Sallna 

Civil Engineering , Senior 

THOME, MICHAEL Pratt 

Agricultural Education Senior 

THOMPSON. BROOKS Wichita 

General Business Administration Senior 

THOMPSON, EVE Manhattan 

General Home Economics Freshman 

THOMPSON, SARA Harveyville 

General Junior 

THOMPSON, SHELL1 Abilene 

General Business Administration Freshman 

THOMSON, SCOTT Overland Park 

General Freshman 

THORNTON. KENT Scott City 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



438 off-campus 





THORPE, MARY Leawood 

Genera! Business Administration Junior 

TIBBITS, KERRI Eudora 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

TIETZE, KEVIN Topeka 

Microbiology Senior 

TIMMIS. TERRI Udall 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

TINKLER. JEFF McPherson 

Accounting Junior 

TINNEY. KENNETH Junction City 

Music Education Senior 

TOBEN, LARRY Wichita 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

TOBUREN, JACQUELINE Clay Center 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

TODD, PENELOPE Kansas City 

Geophysics Senior 

TONN, STEVEN Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Graduate Student 

TORCZON, JOWL Hutchinson 

Accounting Junior 

TOWNSON. TANYA Wichita 

Life Science Sophomore 

TRACEY, LAURA Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

TRACEY, LYNNE Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

TRACY, KAREN Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

TRACY, ROBERT Manhattan 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

TRASKOWSKY. SUSAN Woodbine 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

TRE1BER. SUSAN Atchison 

Music Graduate Student 

TREWETT, PAUL Shawnee 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

TROWBRIDGE. PHYLLIS Wichita 

Mathematics Junior 




Char-Broiled Biology Hadley 
Warwick, junior in veterinary 
medicine, combines eating time 
and study time. 



Nancy Zogleman 



off-campus 439 



ampus 

TRUMBLE, CARLA Oakhlll 

General Home Economics ■ ■ senior 

TRYON. BRUCE Robinson 

Agricultural Economics EKT2 

TUCKER, CINDY • • ■ tlknart 

Clothing Retailing &P 2K£22 

TUCKER. D1ANN t ' kh f rt 

Home Economics Education • • • - ■ *'"'"' 

TULP. PATRICIA Prairle Villa 3 e 

General Business Administration Junior 

TUMA. LARRA Manhaska 

Health and Physical Education _? cn,or 

TURNER, ELIZABETH Shawnee 

. . _. , Junior 

Management „ ,, 

TWIDWELL, ED l-rankton 

Junior 

Agronomy _ D -_j 

UNRUH. DALE ■ ■ • • • Great Bend 

Agricultural Education Graduate Student 

UNRUH, ERIC N 7 ,on 

Electrical Engineering Jumor 



Spring break preparatlon- 

Nelda Korbe, sophomore in 
elementary education soaks up 
some sun in a February warm 
spell on her porch roof. 




Cort Anderson 



440 off-campus 




UNRUH, NANCY Wichita 

General Business Administration Junior 

UPCHURCH, MICHAEL Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

UPDIKE. TERRY Spring Hill 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

UPSON, VICKI Kansas City 

Sociology Sophomore 

URISH, GEORGIA Wichita 

Horticulture Therapy Junior 



VAN ALLEN, TIM Manhattan 

Restaurant Management Sophomore 

VANAMBURG, CAROL Manhattan 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

VANDERVOORT, SCOTT Walnut 

Labor Relations Senior 

VANDEVEER. JACK Sharon 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

VANDEVEER, MONTE Sharon 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 



VAN DYKE, KYLE Somerset, N J. 

Architecture Junior 

VANORT. JOHN Caatleton. N.Y. 

Architecture Senior 

VANTUYL. ROBERT Olathe 

Food Science and Management Senior 

VANVLEET. RICK Jetmore 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

VARGA. SHEILA Harbert, Minn. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

VEACH. STEPHANIE Manhattan 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

VERRASTRO. SALVATORE Bethlehem. Penn. 

Architecture Senior 

VERSCHELDEN. LINDA Manhattan 

Marketing Senior 

VERTREESE. PATRIZIA Wichita 

Elementary Education Senior 

VILLASI. PATRICIA Manhattan 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 



VILANDER. RUTH ANN Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

VINEYARD. DONNA Sallna 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

VIOLA, ALLISON Arkansas City 

Management Freshman 

VIOLA. BARRY Arkansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

VISHNEFSKE. SHARON Scandia 

Clothing Retailing Junior 



VODA, KAREN Leauiood 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

VOGT. DIANNE Overland Park 

General Business Administration Junior 

VOGT, WES Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

VOHS. KAREN Decauter, 111. 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

VOLDER. LINDA Manhattan 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 



VOLLAND, CINDY Emporia 

General Sophomore 

WADE. PATRICIA Goodland 

English Education Senior 

WAGNER, JENNIFER Atchison 

Elementary Education Junior 

WAGNER. MARK Middlesex. N.J. 

Architecture Senior 

WAGNER, STEPHANIE Atchison 

Accounting Sophomore 



WAGNER. TERESA Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

WAGNER. TIM Topeka 

Construction Science Senior 

WAHLE, CHRISTINE Junction City 

Interior Design Junior 

WAITE, MARILYN Scandia 

Elementary Education Junior 

WALDORF, RANDALL Manhattan 

Marketing Junior 

WALKER. DENNIS Canton 

Accounting Senior 

WALKER. KATHRYN Leavenworth 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

WALKER. TIMOTHY Kansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

WALLACE. LARRY Clay Center 

General Business Administration Junior 

WALLACE, MUSTINE Lamed 

Pre-Nursing i . . Sophomore 



off-campus 441 



WALLACE. NETA JANE Manhattan 

Speech Pathology ■ ■ ■ Senior 

WALSH. RITA Topeka 

Art Senior 

WALTER. DEL Sallna 

Management Senior 

WALTER. KATHY Sallna 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

WALTERS. LAURA Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

WALTERSHEID, DAVID Manhattan 

Engineering Technology Junior 

WALTON. RHONDA Halstead 

Engineering Technology Senior 

WALTZ. ROSE Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

WARD. CHARLES Arkansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

WARD. RUSSELL Overbrook 

General Engineering Freshman 

WARDEN. DOUG Sallna 

Physical Therapy Senior 

WARNER, MARK Manhattan 

Geology Freshman 

WARNS. CATHY Hope 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

WASHINGTON. SYL Manhattan 

Psychology Senior 

WASINGER, SHARON Scott City 

Marketing Junior 




Tuttle In February?- Warren 
Tobaben, senior in journalism and 
mass communications, and 
Carolyn Burnett, junior in interior 
design and retail floticulture, study 
on the banks of still-frozen Tuttle 
Creek during an unseasonably 
warm February afternoon. 




Scott Llebler 



442 off-campus 




WASINGER. TIM Ness City 

Speech Pathology Senior 

WASSENBERG. BARBARA Seneca 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

WASSENBERG. MARCIA Marysvllle 

Consumer Interest Senior 

WATTS. DAVID Cawker City 

Horticulture Senior 

WAUGH. EDITH El Dorado 

Horticulture Senior 



WAUGH. LYNN Goodland 

Consumer Interest Senior 

WEALAND. JAY Cedar Point 

Microbiology Senior 

WEBB. DOUGLAS Manhattan 

Psychology Graduate Student 

WEBB. NOREEN Shawnee Mission 

General Sophomore 

WEBSTER, BARBARA Jetmore 

Clothing Retailing Senior 



WEDEKIND. SCOTT Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

WEHRBEIN. BEVERLY Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

WEIDNER. GARY Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

WEISHAAR, DALE Argonia 

Agronomy Junior 

WEISHAAR. MARGARET Valley Falls 

Early Childhood Education Senior 



WELCH, RON Topeka 

General Business Administration Junior 

WELLER. NADINE Topeka 

Elementary Education Junior 

WELLS. ELIZABETH Washington 

English Education Senior 

WEMPE, MICHELLE Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

WENDELBURG. VANCE Stafford 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



WEST. ALBERT Clifton 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

WESTON. EDWARD Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

WETZ. LORA Kiowa 

General Engineering Sophomore 

WHEELER, KAREN Overland Park 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

WHETZELL. JO LYNN Wichita 

Accounting Senior 



WHITE. DAVID Colby 

Engineering Technology Senior 

WHITE. DEBRA Albert 

General Business Administration Senior 

WHITE. KEVIN Belleville 

Engineering Technology Senior 

WHITE. MARK Cold Spring. NY. 

Interior Architecture Senior 

WHITE, SUSAN Salina 

Speech Pathology Freshman 



WHITEHAIR, GREG Abilene 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

WHITEHAIR, LORI Abilene 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

WHITNEY, WAYNE Manhattan 

Political Science Junior 

W1EBE, SUSAN Derby 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

WIEGERS. MICHAEL Marysv.lle 

Electrical Engineering Junior 



WIENCK. CAROL Barnes 

Social Work Senior 

WIESNER. KIRK Great Bend 

Accounting Senior 

WIKER. JAN Manhattan 

Food Science and Industry Senior 

WILDS, STANLEY Manhattan 

Geography Junior 

WILES, TIM Hunter 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



WILEY, KR1N Manhattan 

Life Science Sophomore 

WILEY, SALLY Manhattan 

Home Economics Education Senior 

WILKE. DONNA Loulsburg 

Labor Relations Senior 

W1LHELMS, PAUL Ferguson, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

WILLHITE. LEANN Wellsville 

Pre-Medicine Junior 



off-campus 443 



impus 



WILLH1TE, LORI Cottonwood Falls 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

WILLHITE. PAUL Wellsville 

Food Science and Management Senior 

WILLIAM, MIKE St. George 

General Freshman 

WILLIAMS, ARRON Bonnor Springs 

Accounting Senior 

WILLIAMS. BILLY Topeka 

Geography Graduate Student 



WILLIAMS. DEVIN Sprlnghlll 

Interior Design Senior 

WILLIAMS. JOHN Topeka 

Horticulture Senior 

WILLIAMS, JULIE Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

WILLIAMS. LAUREE Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

WILLIAMS. LEE Sallna 

Engineering Technology Senior 

WILLIAMS, LISA MAE Newton 

General Business Administration Junior 

WILLIAMS, MARTHANA Salina 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

WILLIAMS, REBECCA Overland Park 

General Home Economics Freshman 

WILLIAMS, REBECCA Topeka 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WILLIAMS. RON Shawnee 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

WILLIAMS. SCOTT Prairie Village 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

WILLIAMS. SHERYL Anthony 

PreProfessional Elementary Sophomore 

WILLMETH, CONNIE Jewell 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

WILSCHETZ. STEVE St. Louis. Mo. 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

WILSON, BRAD Goodland 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

WILSON. JANETTE Ashervllle 

Accounting Senior 

WILSON, TIMOTHY Coffeyvllle 

Geophysics Senior 

WILTZ. DON St. Marys 

General Business Administration Senior 

W1NGERSON, JILL Topeka 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WINKLER. ALAN Centralla 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

WINSTON. KIMBERLY Clay Center 

Health and Physical Education Senior 

WINTER, KEVIN Maize 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

WINTEROWD. JILL Union, Mo. 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

WISEMAN, LINDA Hiawatha 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

WOHLER, JAMES Concordia 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

WOLF, DAVID Junction City 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

WOLGAST, GREGG Alta Vista 

History Education Senior 

WOLTERS. JANE Ludell 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

WOOD, LARRY Manhattan 

Agronomy Sophomore 

WOODRUF, TIMOTHY Atchison 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

WOODYARD, CONNIE Manhattan 

Pre-Prolessional Elementary Freshman 

WOODSON. DARRAN Garden City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

WOOTTON, NANCY Plalnvllle 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

WORCESTER. GREG Hill City 

Social Work Junior 

WORCESTER, NELLENE Hill City 

General Business Administration Freshman 

WORF, MARK Scott City 

Engineering Technology Senior 

WORF, TERI Manhattan 

Retail Florticulture Sophomore 

WORKS. JOHN Humboldt 

Special Senior 

WRIGHT. CAROL Dwight 

Dietetics and Institutional Management . Freshman 

WRIGHT, KRYSTAL Westmoreland 

English Sophomore 



444 off-campus 





WRIGHT, THOMAS Westmoreland 

General Freshman 

WULFEMEYER. MARK Hutchinson 

Accounting Senior 

WYCKOFF. MARTHA Idaho Springs, Colo. 

Psychology Junior 

YAMABAYASHI, HERB Junction City 

General Business Administration Senior 

YEAKEL. GLENN Manhattan 

Architecture Senior 

YOAKUM. SUE Kansas City 

Pre-Deslgn Professions Senior 

YOST, DOUGLAS Garden City 

Chemistry Junior 

YOUNG, CAROL Manhattan 

Health and Physical Education Junior 

YOUNG, LINDA Cheney 

Home Economics Education Junior 

YOUNG. STEPHANIE Manhattan 

Economics Sophomore 

YOUNG. WILLIAM Dodge City 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

YOUNGQUIST, MICHAEL Overland Park 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

ZENTZ, KIMBERLY Manhattan 

Pre Medicine Sophomore 

ZEORLIN. DANIEL Wichita 

Civil Engineering Senior 

ZEPEDA. JOE Atchison 

Labor Relations Junior 

ZERGER, BRENDA Moundridge 

Psychology Junior 

ZERR. LEROY Grlnnell 

Agronomy Senior 

ZEY. STEVE Abilene 

Finance Junior 

Z1EGENFUSS, PAM St. Louis. Mo. 

Interior Architecture Senior 

ZOELLER. WILLIAM Junction City 

Political Science Senior 

ZOOK, KEVIN Hesston 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 




Who else?- The day after the 
Jackson Browne concert in Kansas 
City, Meg Stewart, Buffy Carau, 
sophomores in fashion design, 
Donna Stovall, sophomore in 
fashion marketing and Shirley 
Lefever, sophomore in family and 
child development, buy plants at 
the Panhellenic Plant Sale. 



Rob Clark 



off-campus 445 



Heartland beat 
unites K-State 

llThether you purchased the Royal Purple 
as a blind date pictorial reference or 
actually wanted to read the slaved-over fea- 
tures, we hope these almost 500 pages will 
bring you a smile or a memory as you view 
them now and in the future. 2» 



Raising Dust- Kicking up dust 
on the motorcycle trail near Tuttle 
Creek Dam, Steve Erichsen, a 
Manhattan resident, takes his dirt 
bike over a jump. 




446 closing 




John Greer 



closing 447 



Heartland 

Your memories might recall the Kansas 
windmills and wheat fields or the hilly alma 
mater bearing the label of "Purple Pride. "x>o 



Abandon- Surrounded by a grove 
of trees, an old school house 
stands deserted east of the 
airport. 




448 



closing 




Craig Chandler 



closing 449 



Heartland 

But, it has been more than the link of the 
"Heartland" which binds these pages. 
Through 12 months of effort, sacrifices and 
persistence, a devoted staff has attempted 
to capture the heartland rhythm of the year's 
personality. & 



Harvest Moon- Beyond the 
border of the city dwellings, the 
full moon casts beams of light on 
the rolling heartland hills. 




450 closing 





Craig Chandler 



closing 451 




Prison provides memories 



$*$&*> 
^&*> 




A iter 14 months, the sentence has 
been lifted. While some were 
pronounced as free, the verdict for other 
staff members was only temporary parole. 

Actualy the journalistic situation did not 
merit a judge or jury, but instead time 
removed the ball and chain. 

The charges included using a new 
computer system for housing, attempting 
to combine and alphabetize all 
organizations and setting the index on the 
Kedzie terminals. Following the reading of 
rights, a guilty plea was entered. 

But, completing the Royal Purple was 
actually more than serving an unpleasant 
sentence. The year provided opportunities 
and memories. 

There was never a dull moment, as 
Jill's tales and expressions spiced up life 
in Kedzie cell block #120. Her demands 
for pizza and attendance at hog roast 
bashes were the primary cause for her 
conviction. And her melting dance not 
only broke the monotony of completing 
layouts, but admitted her into the crazy 
ward. 

As a third year prisoner, Nancy 
completed her sentence as sports editor. 
She kept her fellow convicts up to date 
on the basketball action through her ever 
changing Jari Wills — Randy Reed craze. 

Returning to the scene of the crime is e 
frequent occurance among convicts, but 
Tony was just unable to adjust to the 
outside world. Armed with his calculator, 
he returned to prison life second 
semester. Tony pitched in to help with 
deadlines even before his name appeared 
on the warden's attendance list. 

Cari was charged with burning up the 
radio and loaning out money. Being 
followed by photographers, Cari's sweet 
smile and artistic talents were used as 
cover-ups. 

Novice criminals were given the same 
sentence as the hardened convicts, thus 
Jerry joined the cell block. His preppy 
look and business major added some 
social class, but his habit of dropping 
courses influenced the academic 
attendance record. 

Though serving the sentence, Dale was 
permitted to make and receive more than 



just one phone call. In addition to his 
numerous telephone messages, Dale 
almost experienced a jail break to 
perform at Mother's Worry. 

A controversy arose over the type of 
music played in the pen. Jan, usually 
attired in her sweats instead of the prison 
garb, insisted on hearing rock 'n roll. She 
claimed that this background music would 
keep her awake while preparing the 
housing "mug" shots. 

Mel's sentence was extended when the 
plant jury announced that he must re-do 
the airbrushing artwork for the third and 
fourth times. 

Andrea, Paige, Yvette, Roschelle and 
Pat were each given a lighter sentence, as 
they reported to the warden for only one 
semester. 

In almost every prison situation, 
visitation practices are a common 
occurance. But Curt was quickly 
transformed from a visitor into a 
hardened criminal. He was charged with 
committing crimes such as proofreading, 
typing and indexing. 

Though belonging to a different ward, 
the photographers were also sentenced to 
the Kedzie prison. Armed with their Nikon 
and Canon artillery, these basement 
convicts occasionally put IDs on the back 
of their pictures. 

Janet, assisted by her cellmate Kermit, 
attempted to keep the pen out of legal 
hot water. Her stereo and furniture 
provided the Royal Purple ward with a 
homey atmosphere. 

Dan, the Plant Attorney General in 
Topeka, kept in constant touch with the 
Kedzie jail. Through production memos 
and weekly phone conversations, he 
attempted to disolve all major conflicts. 
Warden Brown also helped assure that all 
systems were running smoothly. 

The final sentenced criminal was the 
Hereford lady, who was only known to 
her fellow convicts by her initials. Though 
plagued by headaches, she and the rest of 
the pen survived the year. ® 



<5w§> 



art by Cari Cavassa 




Aarons, Joseph B 136, 142 

Abbot, Donna R 170,392 

Abdul— Msi id, Akram M 392 

Abernathey, Michael 341 

Abram, Tami J 392 

Abrams, David L 299 

Acacia 246 

Academics 82 

Acasio, Penny C 108 

Acker, David R 271 

Acker, Duane 84 

Acosta, Judith S 108 

Activities Carnival 144 

Adams, Al 122 

Adams, Amelia S 279 

Adams, Danny J 142 

Adams, DebraJ 150,392 

Adams, Douglas K 264 

Adams, Jane E 266 

Adams, Jim K 392 

Adams, Marsha S 288 

Adams, Michael 318 

Adams, Robert J ....92,136,291 

Adams, Tyrone 212, 213, 216 

Adams, William A 154 

Adejunmobi, Yetunde 392 

Adeyanju, Florence B 392 

Adeyanju Nmobi, J Bayo D .392 

Admire, John D 392 

Adolt, Connies 392 

Advertising Club 88 

Advice 112 

Aeschliman, Roger T 144, 

166,297 

Agard, Garrie L 392 

Agbidye, Samuel I 152 

Agbisit, ElpidioJ 108,134 

Age, Timber D 392 

Agnew, Michael L 150 

Agnew, Nancy H 150 

Agocs, Paige A 201 

Agricultural Ambassadors . . .88 
Agricultural Communicators 

Of Tomorrow 88 

Agricultural Council 88 

Agricultural Economics Club 90 
Agricultural Education Club .90 
Agricultural 

Mechanization Club 90 

Agres, David J 122 

Ahlberg, Cheryl L 392 

Ahnemann, Gregg W 291 

Ahrens, Tim F 154, 246, 349 

Ahrens, Tom W 88, 90, 146 

Ahsmuhs, Brent E 1 14, 275 

Aina, Kehinde O . .98 

Air Force ROTC 90 

Aitken, Dennis L 367 

Aitken, MarkW 134 

Akagi, Donald G 392 

Akin, Dean A 392 

Akin, Randall L 359 

Akin, Wanda E 164,392 

Akpehe, Athanasius A 90 

Al-Ani, AmerH 359 

Al Baker, Jassim M 392 

Albin, Kenneth L 392 

Albracht, David J ..114,156,392 

Albracht, James J 98 

Albrecht, Douglas A .88,126,253 

Albrecht, Shari L 282, 305 

Albright, DebraG 392 

Albright, Kristine R 330 

Aldrich, Charles G 313 

Alejos, Susan F 140,392 

Alexander, Calvin O 216 

Alexander, Jan M 330 

Alexander, Jean M 114 

Alexander, John S 341 

Alexander, Steven S 349 

Alfaro, Raul E 172,304 

Alison, Dale 271 

Allen, AlvinM 313 

Allen, Amy S 116,282 

Allen, Brenda J 392 

Allen, Charlton R ... .88, 126, 392 

Allen, Douglas E 121,313 

Allen, Douglas L 392 

Allen, Jane E 268 

Allen, Janice K 142 

Allen, Jennifer L 330 

Allen, Joe B 156,245,309 

Allen, Leslie R 250 

Allen, Mike A 110 

Allen, Rebecca J 330 

Allen, RIckE 171 

Allen, Susan L 381 

Allen, Suzy K 330 

Allen, Tracy A 322 

Allerheilegen, Bill 194 

Alley, Robyn R 330 

Allingham, Steven M ...144,307 

Allison, Donald K 359 

Allison, Linda D 384 

Allison, Paula R 306, 392 

Allison, Sandra R 392 

Allred, Gary L 271 



Alonzo, Kathy D 301 

Alpha Chi Omega 247 

Alpha Delta Pi 250 

Alpha Epsilon Delta 90 

Alpha Gamma Rho 253 

Alpha Kappa Psi 92 

Alpha Lambda Delta 92 

Alpha Nu Sigma 92 

Alpha Phi Omega 92 

Alpha PIMu 92 

Alpha Tau Alpha 98 

Alpha Tau Omega 257 

Alpha XI Delta 259 

Alpha Zeta 98 

Alsalih, Haytham K 136 

Altadt, Michael 257 

Altenbernd, David L 142 

Alu, IkotiH 148 

Amateur Radio Club 98 

American Home 

Economics Association 98 

American Institute Of 

Architectual Engineers 100 

American Institute 

Of Architects 100 

American Institute Of 

Chemical Engineers 100 

American Institute Of 

Industrial Engineers 104 

American Nuclear Society ..104 
American Society Of 

Agricultural Engineers 104 

American Society Of 

Interior Designers 104 

American Society Of 

Mechanical Engineers 104 

Amershek, Ernest L 90 

Ames, David 122 

Amrein, John T 88, 132, 253 

Ancell, Richard E 359 

Anders, Dale R 90, 349 

Andersen, Sandra J 384 

Anderson, Amy L 259 

Anderson, Bruce E 264 

Anderson, Chris J 295 

Anderson, Cindy 384 

Anderson, Dalyn D 282 

Anderson, Dana R 392 

Anderson, Dave E 112, 

158,179,253 

Anderson, Dean E 253 

Anderson, Debbie R 282 

Anderson, Deborah M 381 

Anderson, Don 275 

Anderson, Gary L 194 

Anderson, Howard G 392 

Anderson, Janel R 375 

Anderson, Jean K 268 

Anderson, Jill D 259, 274 

Anderson, Joel D 295 

Anderson, Jon R 112 

Anderson, Julie L 375 

Anderson, Karen M 259 

Anderson, Kent D 359 

Anderson, Kimberly A 392 

Anderson, Larry D 392 

Anderson, Lynn D 148 

Anderson, Mary A 143 

Anderson, Michael N ...162,318 

Anderson, Pete T 359 

Anderson, Regina E 392 

Anderson, Robert K 126 

Anderson, Robert S 110,309 

Anderson, Sheri A 392 

Anderson, Stanley C 381 

Anderson, Steven M 392 

Anderson, Tim S 134, 

158, 162, 392 

Anderson, Tod A 392 

Anderson, Toni L 341 

Anderson, Vincent A .... 149, 151 

Angel Flight 108 

Andler, Bradley E 304 

Andra, Christy M 276, 288 

Andrade, Joseph A 271 

Andraos, Edward A 100, 349 

Andrews, James W 306 

Andrews, Keith L 392 

Andrews, Kim J 142 

Andrews, Phyllis C 392 

Angell, Randall L 158, 392 

Angermayer, Stephen 154 

Angumayn, Stephen B 152 

Ankerholz, Lance E 341 

Annan, George R 349 

Annan, Robert J 349 

Annan, Sylvia E 330 

Annen, Jan 282 

Anschutz, Janet K 168 

Anschutz, Tambera D 330 

Anstaett, Janet K 110, 

116, 148,285 

Antenen Kim K 268, 314 

Anthony Patricia M 92, 367 

Anthony, Sandra S 142 

Anthony, Tod E 392 

Antoine, Margsret M ...285,381 

Apiafi, Atowarifagha 392 

Apley, Michael D 150, 349 

Appelseth, Ralph H 104 

Appl, Charlotte J 150,326 

Appl, Fredric 122 

Arbab, Eada M 331 

Arehart, Barbara J .144,151,301 
Arellanoo, Johnny R 255 



Arensberg, W. Christopher . .367 

Arggiris, Irene 250 

Argo, Brent H 168,392 

Arida, DiosleG 108 

Armer, Alison C 301 

Armstrong, Annette D 126 

Armstrong, Gloria 330 

Armstrong, James R 172 

Arnett, Jonna S 392 

Arnold Air Society 108 

Arnold, Carolyn M 322 

Arnold, David R 275, 359 

Arnold, Kathy S 142 

Arnold, Keithian L 100 

Arnold, LillianM 146,285 

Arnold, Richard R 392 

Arnold, Steven R 88,378 

Arnoldy, Anton 116, 392 

Arnoldy, Susan 367 

Arnot, James F 300 

Arnonson, William D 316 

Arpin, Ken E 349 

Artherton,C. Phil 359 

Arts and Science Council — 108 

Artz, Arthur A 392 

Arts, Julie K 108,114,367 

Asbill, Cindi A 393 

Asbury, Lonald K 393 

Ascher, Keith W 393 

Ash, Laurie A 330 

Ashhburn, Celia D 384 

Ashby, TamS 100,150,330 

Ashmore, Dan M 154 

Ashton, Kevin R 359 

Ashworth, Gordon 100 

Association of 

Filipino Students 108 

Association of 

General Contractors — 108,110 

Association of 

Resident Halls 110,320 

Association of 

Resident Halls Honorary 110 

Atchison, David T 116 

Athey, Karen E 168, 276, 285 

Athey, Marty L 375 

Atkins, Philip R ...126,168,281 

Atkins, Rosemary 126,367 

Atkinson, Ann F 162, 381 

Atkinson, Edward A 393 

Atkinson, Eric J 393 

Atkinson, Gene K ...114,122,264 

Attig, Ethel A 100 

Attig, Susan A 122,170,393 

Attwater, Paul R 264 

Atwood, Max J 104 

Auen, LisaM 172 

Augustyn, Debbie L 162, 393 

Austin, Craig T 393 

Austin, Helga R 393 

Austin, Mary E 104, 158 

Averill,MarkL 140,313 

Avila, Joseph M 271 

Axland, David L 273 

Aydinli, Atilla 93 

Aydogan, Hurriyet N ...166,367 

Ayers, Lois 279 

Ayres,Xelly V 291 

Ayres, Mark 264 



B 



3aalman, Lisa M 92, 330 

Babcock,WesD 293 

Bacani, Paul D 90 

Bacchus, Robert G 136 

Bach, Michael L 235 

Bachis, TarynL 218,219 

Bachman, Christyne A 393 

Bachman, RonW 295 

Bachman, Stan B 194 

Backman, Gayla L .98,130,330 

Badger, Keith E 349 

Badung, BulusC 393 

Baechtold, Arthur T 90 

Baetz, CandiceL 250 

Bahr, Bonnie M 98,394 

Bahr, KurtisR 136,394 

Bahr, Sam A 349 

Bahr, Sharon R 367 

Bahr, Stephen C 275 

Bahr, Stephen J 349 

Bailey, Brenda L 394 

Bailey, Chris, B 100,394 

Bailey, Danise L 394 

Bailey, Frances A 279 

Bailey, Kevin H 293 

Bailey, Malinda K 112 

Bailey, Monica L 112,12 

Bailey, Robert C 194 

Bailey, Tamara K 326 

Bailie, Wayne 122 

Bair, Robert E 359 

Baird, Jane A 92,288 

Baird, Staci 384 

Baird, Tamra J 394 

Baird, Terri K 152,384 

Bairnesen, Michele 330 

Bairow, Sharon M 132,394 



Bajich.Miryana 150,394 

Baker, Barry D 293 

Baker, Beth E 375 

Baker, Brenda S 341 

Baker, Douglas J 313 

Baker, Doyle T 307 

Baker, Jackie M 394 

Baker, James D 262 

Baker, John V 328 

Baker, J Chris 112,253 

Baker, Kris R 293 

Baker, Kristi A 394 

Baker, Lyman 122 

Baker, Paul A 394 

Baker, Phil E 291 

Baker, Sherry C 394 

Baker, Stephanie L 142,394 

Baker, Stewart I 257 

Bakhtiari-Nejad, Firooz 134 

Balderson, Mary J 285 

Baldwin, Cathy 259, 312 

Baldwin, Jane E ....112,132,394 

Bales, Steven B 299 

Bales, Susann E 341 

Ball, Brian R 394 

Ball, Darwin T 293 

Ball, M Suzanne 301 

Ball, Sally J 301,302,308 

Ballinger, Alan R 300 

Ballou, Janice R 394 

Ballou, Linda M 394 

Bamberry, Tracy J 394 

Bambick, Martin P 394 

Bamirez, Laura L 152 

Bammes, Sandra K 341 

Band Day 44 

Bandyk, Kim R 112,394 

Banholzer, Mark R 349 

Banister, Jeffrey R 110,349 

Banker, Priscilla 282 

Banks, Charles R 88, 

90,114,162, 164,277 

Banks, Gregory E 112 

Banks, Regina Y 330 

Banks, Robyn R 285 

Banman, Lorri L ...142,168,330 

Banner, Christopher 168 

Bantugan, Eugene F 394 

Bar Specials 50 

Barancik, Karen S 176, 

245,288,317 

Barber, Beverly S 394 

Barber, Mark D 367 

Barber, Paul A 90 

Barber, Rhonda K 381 

Barber, Steven W 104, 304 

Barcia, Joseph M 367 

Bardsley, Megan N .166,233,266 

Bareiss, Laura J 176, 285 

Barker, Dana M 142 

Barker, Steve R 271 

Barkley, Roger B 349 

Barkyoumb, Michael D 307 

Barlow, Shawn K 304 

Barndollar, Pratt 122 

Barner, Debra L 168, 394 

Barnes, Barbara 375 

Barnes, Debbie E ...142,301,314 

Barnes, Debbie J 142 

Barnes, Jed D 98, 300 

Barnes, Katharine L 367 

Barnes, KevinC ....112,152,394 

Barnes, Marcia L 259 

Barnes, Patricia L 394 

Barnes, Scott M 172,253 

Barnes, Tony 122 

Barnes, William H 98, 394 

Barnett, Brian D 112 

Barnett, Donna M 394 

Barnett, Karl D 100 

Barnett, Margaret M 322 

Barnett, Robert L 100,394 

Barnett, Sheryl A 176,330 

Barnett, Tammy A 394 

Barnhart, John M 295 

Barnow, Kent 246 

Barnow, Son|a D 301 

Barr, Jane A 288 

Barr, Margaret E 268 

Barr, Susan E 301 

Barr, William 381 

Barrera, Michael L 297 

Barreras, Michele L 394 

Barrett, Charlotte A ....116,330 

Barrett, Kirk R 100, 394 

Barrett, Kyle 255 

Barrington, Timothy 313 

Barrl, Kay A 162 

Barron, Cory W 257 

Barry, Michelle 394 

Barsamian, Susan P 114, 

162, 168, 268 

Bartel, Kay A 130,164,367 

Bartel, J 136 

Bartel, Wilmer J 359 

Bartelli, JilIM 322 

Bartels, Carol K 142,330 

Barth, Karen L 288 

Barth, Rhonda K 285 

Bartholomew, Richard 100, 

168,328 
Barthuly, David L . . .90, 104, 378 

Bartley, Erie E 118 

Barton, Anna 388 

Barton, James F 207,216 



Bartz, Rodney B 271 

Bartz, TeriL 132 

Bascom, Jonathan B 394 

Basgall, Maureen 150,394 

Basham, Susan C 301 

Bashor, Daryl W 130 

Basketball 211,217 

Baskill, Janet L 130 

Basom, Lydia S 394 

Bass, Michael L 378 

Bassette, Laura V 126 

Bassette, William 100 

Bates, Byron T 140,394 

Bates, Jeffrey S 246 

Bates, Roman 194 

Batt, Lee A 266 

Bauck, Russell B 104,341 

Baucus, Karen L 132,288 

Baucus, Mary F 122 

Bauer, BlaineO 90 

Bauer, Brenda K 88, 259 

Bauer, Judi E 268 

Bauer, Steven L 367 

Baughn, Sheryald L ...152,384 

Baum, Jon E 311 

Bauman, Kevin R 264 

Baumgartner, Bradley 359 

Baumgartner, Jamie K 266 

Baxter, Mary K 394 

Bayer, Brent B 194, 246 

Bayer, Gregory G 349 

Bayer, Steven M 246 

Bayless, Duane S 359 

Bayola, Lourdes P 367 

Bayouth, Bryan R 257 

Beachey, Brenda A 140 

Beachey, Terry X 431 

Beadles, Kristi K 394 

Beahm, Bruce V 394 

Beam, Lisa ...130,144,245,282 

Bearce, Martha J 152,384 

Beardmore, Richard R .100,293 

Beardmore, Tracy 247, 294 

Beardsley, Jennifer 288 

Beardsley, Thomas 417 

Bearly, Kimberli A .114,162,282 
Bearnes, KathrynA 112,254,394 

Beaston, Brook J 304 

Beat, Michael G 318 

Beatty, Danial D 84 

Beauchamp, Jack E 90 

Beaudean, Charles G 367 

Beaudet, Margie E 394 

Bebermeyer, Kathy J 384 

Bebermeyer, Rylan J 277 

Beck, Debora J 112 

Beck, Eric B 291 

Beck, Mike D 88, 158, 307 

Beck, Rebecca A 250 

Beck, Roberts 197 

Beckelhimer, William 98, 

140,156,349 

Becker, Craig A 110,341 

Becker, Dean M 142,349 

Becker, Donna N 140,375 

Becker, Dwight A 262 

Becker, Glenn M 140,262 

Becker, Joanne E 104 

Becker, Kelly A 330 

Becker, Leslie A 394 

Becker, Michael H 307 

Becker, Scott D 313 

Beckerdite, RuthieG ...294,330 

Beckman, Brent A 144, 273 

Bednar, Brian K 291 

Bednar,ToddA 108,291 

Beebe, Rick L 271 

Beeman, Robert K 394 

Beems, Julia K . .98, 126, 132, 150 

Beems, Nancy J 120, 154 

Been, Kent D 378 

Beets, Linda L 394 

Beggs, Fredia J 394 

Behind the Scenes 206 

Beichley, Douglas K 262 

Beikmann, KayeL .120,140,288 

Beikmann, Randall S 154 

Beim, Paula L 322 

Beim, Perry L 395 

Beims, Robert V 134, 168 

Beisel, Cindy L 367 

Beisel, Sandra J 330 

Beisner, Brian E ....90,146,395 
Belden, Barbara K .126,150,395 

Belden, Deanna 154,395 

Beletsky,Mary E 395 

Belin, Kelvin W 98, 130, 367 

Belknap, Kaye 259 

Bell, Alan D 359 

Bell, Brent C 381 

Bell, Carol J 108,322 

Bell, Delayne 288 

Bell, Diane K 282 

Bell, Jerry D 295 

Bell, LestaL 395 

Bell, Pamela A ... .88, 90, 98, 326 

Bell, Scott T 130,395 

Bell, Spencer 264 

Bell, Steve C 253 

Bellerive, James A 257 

Bellinder, Belinda M 375 

Bellinder, Beverly A 395 

Bellis, Steve J 349 

Belluomo, Michael D 144 

Belon, Paul 158 



454 Index 



Belongia, Robert F 293 

Bench 210 

Benda, Barbara L 132,395 

Bender, Amy E 367 

Bender, Barton R 367 

Bender, Michelle ....98,142,395 

Bender, Nancy M 279 

Benedict, William B 194 

Bengston, Anne E 108,395 

Benham, Lori A 384 

Benisch, Julie R 384 

Bennett, Brenda L . . 182, 204, 239 

Bennett, Cheryl A 104,285 

Bennett, Monte L 180, 194 

Bennett, Paula J 322 

Bennett, Randall W 395 

Bennett, Sharon Y 328 

Bennett, SueAnnM 154,395 

Bennett, Tracy L 259 

Benteman, Bruce A 359 

Benteman, Gary D 112,359 

Bentley, Hal E 194 

Benton, Kerry B 194 

Bentrup, Diane M 326 

Benz, Elaine C 330 

Beougher, Timothy K 104, 

168,349 

Berakamp, Scott R 110 

Berbohm, Melanie S 142, 150, 279 

Berchard, Pam 245 

Berentz, Kara K 288 

Berg, David P 204 

Bergan, Laura S 146 

Bergen, Richard J 166,313 

Berger, Mark A 395 

Berggren, Tammy A 152 

Bergh, William A 176,311 

Bergkaus, Pamela K 395 

Bergkamp, Kathleen D .142,379 

Bergmeier, Dave D 359 

Bergmeier, Mark 122, 162 

Bergren, Ronda K .100,317,341 

Berkley, Catherine J 330 

Berkley, David D 436 

Berner, Connie J 158 

Berner, Kathryn L 330 

Berner, Veronica J 330 

Bernica, Susan K 247, 308 

Berning, Daniel R 395 

Berning, Suzanne R 395 

Berrocal, Carlos 104 

Berry, Alice M 384 

Berry, Debora J 112 

Berry, Diana S 395 

Berry, Gary W 158 

Berry, Jeff A 359 

Berry, Michael L 349 

Berry, Michael W 114,395 

Berry, Sharon A 92, 146, 92 

Bertels, Christopher 395 

Bertels, Lori K 330 

Bertrand, Linda J 285 

Bervert, Daniel P 359 

Besler, Leo G 114,316 

Best, Gregory L 194 

Best, LeighAnne E 250, 317 

Best, Pamela J 108 

Beta Alpha Psi 110 

Beta Sigma Psi 262 

BetaTheta PI 264 

Betancourt, Edwin A ...104,367 

Bettencourt, Mark L 349 

Betzen, Robert J 152 

Betzen, Thomas G 104 

Beuerlein, Joseph E 257 

Bevan, Jerry G 395 

Bevens, David L 262, 395 

Bever, David K 146,246 

Bevier, JanaR 150,268,314 

Bevier, Julie L 367 

Bevins, David 142 

Bey, Charles J 168,172 

Beyer, Kevin R 112,253 

Beyer, Scott A 349 

Biarnesen, Michele M 108 

Biasella, Beverly J 395 

Bickel, Douglas L 100 

BickeLGregA 359 

Bickford, Sharon S 341 

Bieberly, Mike J 349 

Biehunko, Tracy L 330 

Bieker, Bart K 100,146,395 

Bien, Darren L 271 

Bierly, KirkC 132,349 

Biesenthal, Ruth E ..90,140,395 

Bigelow, Brian E 136,341 

Biggs, Bernice A 157 

Biggs, Beverly A 157,330 

Bigham, Linda L 116,384 

Bigham, Nancy S 116, 384 

Bigler, Lisa M 288, 305 

Biles, Jo R 330 

Billau, William B 313 

Billinger, Elizabeth 395 

Billinger, Glennis R 395 

Billings, Baretta G 395 

Billings, Marvin W 349 

Bilyeu, Jeffrey S 130,135 

Binford, Kathy J 88, 164 

Bingham, Bruce 194,273 

Bigham, KurtO 273 

Bighman, Phillip E 395 

Bighman, Suzanne 395 

Binkley, Michelle C 268 

Binter, Caroline M 367 



Biofeedback 120 

Biology Club 112 

Bird, Howard 55 

Bird, Janet L 330 

Bird, Linda D 384 

Birdsey, Donald E 194 

Birkman, Carolyn D 150, 395 

Birthday Advertisments ....164 

Bisago, Dave A 264 

Bish, Brandt F 154 

Bishop, Craig A 271 

Bishop, David D 104,395 

Bishop, Reta J 375 

Bishop, Teri A 100, 

104,120,162,250 

Bissell.MarkA 307 

Bissey, Charles R 100 

Blaauw, James H . . . .88, 146, 277 

Black, Bryon F 132 

Black, DarrylS 194 

Black, David R 114,122 

Black, Jay C 359 

Black, Kerry L 114, 168 

Black, Margaret M 132 

Black, Robert E 349 

Blackburn, Richard K 359 

Blackman, Merrille 88 

Blackman, Rolando A 181, 

211,216,234,237,281 

Blackman, Susan B 156,395 

Blackwell, Garland A 281 

Blackwell, Steve K 245,297 

Blackwood, David D 262 

Blair, Glenda D 395 

Blair, Kelly S 114,142,395 

Blake, Cheryl L ....142,154,395 

Blake, Tony D 367 

Blakely, Cam L 107,110,233,395 
Blanchard, DaleW 92, 

116,146,395 

Blanchard, Dianna K 140, 

148,395 
Blanchard, Lorrie R 92, 

104, 158,384 

Blanchon, EdM 291 

Bland, Ben A 349 

Bland, Doug L 313 

Blank, Raymond W 367 

Blanton, Phillip 395 

Blasi, Karen K 288,317 

Blasi, WayneM 316 

Blattner, Jeffery D 246 

Blattner,Mary E ...142,319,395 
Blattner, Nancy L ..142,319,395 

Blattner, Rickey A 246 

Blaze, WayneM 168 

Blazek, Kim R 395 

Blechman, Barry 55 

Bledsoe, Faith E 285 

Bleier, Jill D 219 

Blevins, Vanetta J .114,148,395 

Bliss, Dan E 396 

Bliss, Jill E 396 

Bliss, Natalie C 330 

Block and Bridle Club ...112, 160 

Blomquist, Lori J 134, 288 

Blood, Gilman A 309 

Bloom, Joel D 98,367 

Blount, Gloria K 201 

Bloxom, Ann A 250, 314 

Blue, Karen L 326 

Blue Key 114 

Blue, Steve E 367 

Blunt, Bernita A 375 

Blush, Susan M 98, 

114, 130, 150,330 

Blust, Michael H 146 

Bly, Vincent C 359 

Blyholder, Victoria 92,322 

Blythe, Cindy R 396 

Boardman, Barry R 396 

Boatman, Ruth R 168 

Boaz, Donnetta M 330 

Bochard, Pam 247 

Bock, Donald R 396 

Bock, Margaret A 396 

Body Building 196 

Boeding, Joseph R 396 

Boehm, Marcus L 349 

Boerger, Alan R 262 

Boever, James J 156 

Bogen, David J 134 

Boger, Rhonda L 285 

Bogner, Daniel G 300 

Bogner, David J 300 

Bogner, Timothy J 300 

Bogue, Doug A 193, 194 

Bogue, Gary L 194 

Bohannon, Randy C 381 

Bohm, Kyle A 396 

Bohn, Dexter E 396 

Bohn, Sharon M 259 

Bohnenblust, David A 114 

Bohnenblust, Mary 148 

Bois, David J 316 

Boisvert, Michael F 349 

Bokelman, Scott K 112,253 

Bolar, MikeS 275 

Bolding, Jay D 309 

Bolen, Jeff D 100,168,257 

Bolen,Tim J 257 

Bolerjack, KyleC 275 

Boley, Pamela S 322 

Bolin, Andrew W 140,311 

Bolin, MatthewS 311 



Bolinger, Sam E 154 

Boll, Lisa G 330 

Bollier, Corinne E 330 

Bollig, Susan R 120,396 

Boiling, Mark L 257 

Bolt, Marilyns 130,146,322 

Bolte, JohnH 349 

Bolte, Kelly N 312 

Bolte, KimberlyS 317,330 

Bolz, Rita F 396 

Bolz, Sharon M 322 

Bond, Gary L 92,378 

Bond, John A 176,396 

Bond, Julian 55 

Bondank, Dan B 349 

Bonnar, Anita C 142 

Boock, Dava M 396 

Book, James D 316 

Bookless, Lisa L 250 

Boomer, Russell L 273 

Borchardt, Jeff B 100 

Borcherding, David P 349 

Bordewick, Kevin W 349 

Borgerding, Patrick 104 

Bornholdt, Patricia . .98, 132, 396 

Borse, Jeff 255 

Borst, Sara J 142, 168, 396 

Borthwick, Kendall B ...114,293 

Bortz, TeriL 126,142,384 

Bosarge, Randall H 245, 255 

Bosch, Eric P 309 

Boseneiler, Kelly R 396 

Bosse, Elaine G 140 

Boster, Marcia A 384 

Bostick, Cyndee 142 

Botkin, Linda C 126,375 

Bott, Sonya L 341 

Bottermuller, Bruce 100, 110, 396 

Botts, Katherine D 384 

Boucher, Douglas K 297 

Boucher, Jay M 297 

Boucher, Michael A 297 

Boudreau, Mary P 268 

Bourk, Daniel J 313 

Bowen, Barbara A 341 

Bowen, Carol A 288 

Bowen, Cheri L 341 

Bowen, David L 291 

Bowen, Karen R 247 

Bowers, Brian D 144 

Bowers, Janelle K 384 

Bowers, Mickey M 359 

Bowers, Richard A 293 

Bowersox, Bruce A 104 

Bowersox, Deanne P .... 104, 349 

Bowersox, Stewa rt M 110 

Bowersox, Valerie J 396 

Bowker, Leroy C 306 

Bowles, Janet L 328 

Bowman, Dana J 330 

Bowman, Mark S 253 

Bowman, Shelly A ...98,130,379 

Bowser, Eric L 349 

Bowser, Julie A 384 

Bowser, Steven M ...98,146,330 

Boxberger, Mark A 291 

Boyd, David W 378 

Boyd, Edwina M 396 

Boyd, Gina J 396 

Boyd Hall 322 

Boyd, Huck 116 

Boyd, Mar jorie R 142 

Boyd, MichaelS 293 

Boyd, Steven P 396 

Boyd, Victoria A 285 

Boyer, Johnny E 318 

Boyer, Kenneth L 396 

Boyer, Kevin A 341 

Boyer, Lisa S 331 

Boylan, Kelly C 168,341 

Boyum, Thann 132 

Brabec, Daniel L 396,104 

Brack, Marc D 359 

Bradbury, Walter J 396 

Braddock, Elizabeth 279 

Braden, Leann 396 

Bradley, Gary M 295 

Bradley, JohnS ... .112, 152, 349 

Bradley, Josephs 349 

Bradley, Karen A 114,330 

Bradley, Phillip B 126,396 

Bradley, Robert L 156,349 

Bradley, Steven W 397 

Bradshaw, Peter A 148 

Bradshaw, Wendy F 322 

Brady, Peter A 307 

Brady, Phil J 359 

Bramlage, Donald J 397 

Bramlage, Joseph N 397 

Bramlage, Kenneth C 397 

Brammer, Vickie L 397 

Brand, Jim G 253 

Brand, Julie A 397 

Brandner, Lowell 122 

Brands, Vanessa R .112,132,381 

Brandt, Cheryl A 375 

Branson, Keith R 98, 253 

Branson, Tanya R 301,314 

Brant, Kara D 98, 140, 397 

Brant, Shanon W 144 

Brant, Solveig 285 

Brass, David R 273 

Brass, Samuel J 273 

Brass, Sarah L 268 

Brauer, Richard H 341 



Braun, Steven D 349 

Braun, Steven K 311 

Braun, Thomas K 311 

Brax, Lori K ...132,142,168,332 
Bray, Cynthia S .98,114,150,384 

Breckenridge, Jill L 397 

Breeden, John W 275 

Brehm, John F 255 

Breipohl, Diane S 279 

Breisch, Kristine J 341 

Bremer, Timothy J 316 

Breneman, Bradley S 387 

Brennan, Frances A 379 

Brennan, George L 140 

Brennan, James J 114 

Brenner, Darrell D 397 

Brensing, Kelly A 279 

Brensing, Kim D ...116,278,279 

Brent, Ekiss 246 

Brent, Lynne M 384 

Brettell, JohnA 134 

Brewer, Charles A 397 

Brewer, Douglas R 359 

Brewer, John E 100 

Brewer, Scott B 108 

Brewer, Susan R 112 

Brewster, Peter K 273 

Brey, Shawn P 367 

Bridgewater, Jeffrey ...104,168 

Briggs, Brian L 255 

Briggs, David A 359 

Briggs, Gregory J 168 

Briggs, Paul N 92 

Briggs, Teresa K 341 

Bright, Heidi M 92,322 

Brill, Bradley J 110 

Briney, Nellie F 341 

Briney, Russell L 397 

Brink, John T 349 

Brink, Margaret A 341 

Brink, Susan E 78, 

110,162,254,330 
Brinkman, Barbara A .142,247 

Broadfoot, Douglas L 297 

Broadfoot, Gregory S 295 

Broadie, Lisa C 268, 314 

Broadstone, David S 100 

Brock, Brent L 359 

Brockelman, Julie D .92, 156, 341 

Brockoff, Lynne E 146, 341 

Brockway, Alys a 158, 266 

Broedel, Valerie J 156,176 

Broers, Sharilyn L 312, 397 

Brokaw, Fletcher L 349 

Brokesh, Edwin L 142,349 

Bolkhoff, Lynne 168 

Bromich, Bradley C 307 

Bronaugh, Rita L 152 

Brooke, Kent B 140, 255 

Brookman, Cathleen C 381 

Brookover, Tim B 313 

Brooks, Da vid T 397 

Brooks, Lea J 331 

Brooks, Scott W 130 

Brooks, Thomas A 397 

Brookshier, Jody L 308,331 

Brookshier, Michael 397 

Brosa, Cynthia I 331 

Brose, Jeffrey D 152, 158 

Brown, Allan R 257 

Brown, Brenda L 322 

Brown, Craig E 158 

Brown, Cynthia A 397 

Brown, Dana E 136, 142, 300 

Brown, Darla D 397 

Brown, Debra D 379 

Brown, Denise L 148, 150 

Brown, Diana C 250,381 

Brown, Diane M 1 10, 148 

Brown, Douglas R 367 

Brown, Gregory S 397 

Brown, J David 168 

Brown, Kevin D 136 

Brown, Kevin P 367 

Brown, Leslie A 367 

Brown, Mark L 134,397 

Brown, Martin J 349 

Brown, Marvin D 367 

Brown, Michael E 114,257 

Brown, Michael J 313 

Brown, Patrick J 350 

Brown, PaulM 130,313 

Brown, Peter E 194 

Brown, Ronald E 359 

Brown, Ronald W 194 

Brown, Russell A 359 

Brown, Sara J 397 

Brown, Sharon E ...151,322,397 

Brown, Sherry L 397 

Brown, Steven A 142 

Brown, Steven G 367 

Brown, Steven J 313 

Brown, Teresa J 247 

Brown, Terry L 313 

Brown, Tom 122 

Brown, Ward W 397 

Brownell, Alicia A 381 

Brownlee, Steven G 328 

Brownlow, Dale E 367 

Brox, Karen M 132,341 

Bruenger, Mary L 384 

Bruenger, Melvin L 262 

Bruggeman, Gregory B 110 

Brull, Judy 140,312,397 

Brumley, Teresa F 341 



Brummel, Rana M 375 

Bruner, Johnnie D 367 

Bruner, Richard W 359 

Bruner, Susan 279 

Brungardt, Dennis J 367 

Brungardt, Mary D 384 

Brunin, Laurie A 331 

Brunken, Laurel K 168 

Brunkow, Bradley D 140, 262 

Brunn, Rebecca 397 

Brunnemer, Jay D 367 

Brunner, Richard D ...144,168 
Brunnert, Charles W ...136,367 

Bruns, Henry R 397 

Brunton, Jody A 397 

Bryan, Kent E 100,146,367 

Bryan, Rick D 397 

Bryant, Carla S 397 

Bryant, Jeff rey B 253 

Bryant, Marsha J 397 

Bryson, Kyle A 166,313 

Brzon, Melinda S 367 

Buch, Michele R 331 

Buchanan, Anita J 375 

Buchanan, Bruce 166 

Buchanan, Jim 161 

Buchanan, Michael J 222 

Buchanan, Timothy A 194 

Bucher, Scott D 359 

Buchholz, Glenn A 350 

Buck, Paul J 257 

Buck, Richard L 194 

Buck, William D 144,318 

Buckley, Thomas L 112 

Buckstead, Kristin I 104,331 

Budden, Elizabeth A 397 

Budreau, Penny L 152 

Budreau, Scott D 108,397 

Buehre, Heidi L 341 

Buell, Jan E 282 

Buenger, James M 304 

Buessing, Connie K 341 

Buessing, Debra J 397 

Buette, JohnC 297 

Bugner, Dean R 275 

Buhler, JeraldL 378 

Bull, Larry B 114 

Buller, Susan P 331 

Bullock, Anne D 268 

Bullock, Natalie A 319, 379 

Bulmahn, Heinz 122 

Bultman, Penny J 397 

Bunck,JulieM 114,158,301 

Bunck, MaryG 172,301 

Bundschuh, Bill J 359 

Bunda, Barbara L 150 

Bunton, Robin L 152 

Burch, Angela K 397 

Burch, Debra L 259 

Burch, LonieL 132 

Burch, Pamela R 126,331 

Burden, Gregg A 90 

Burdiek, Debra J 331 

Bures, Randall L 397 

Burford, Bobbi J 291 

Burgess, James D 397 

Burgh, Robert B 378 

Burjes, Karen J 384 

Burk, KyleC 257 

Burke, Carmel J 341 

Burke, Katherine 122 

Burke, Elizabeth A 247 

Burke, Shirley 266 

Burke, Stephanie A 384 

Burkhard, Kenneth 122 

Burkhart, Timothy N 350 

Burkhead, Terri S 279, 314 

Burkle, Marlene L 331 

Burkman, Tamra J 397 

Burnett, Anthony Q 281 

Burnett, Carolyn A 104, 247 

Burnett, Daniel T 367 

Burnett, Gregory M 275 

Burnham, Steven E 378 

Burns, Cheryl A 341 

Burns, David M ... .144, 166, 397 

Burns, KellieR 268 

Burns, Mary S 268 

Burns, Natalie 384 

Burns, Sandra D 120, 397 

Burns, Shawn W 397 

Burris, Andrew 350 

Burris, April D 379 

Burrow, Frank E 397 

Burrow, HaddieM 398 

Burrow, Timothy 114,398 

Burtin, Brian 142,350 

Burtness, Norman D 262 

Burton, Barbara A 341 

Burton, Cheri A 114,398 

Burton, Gary 60 

Burton, Jerry A 136 

Burton, Margaret E 398 

Burton, Patrick L 132,307 

Busbea, Susan E 398 

Busch, Melvin P 275 

Buscher, Stanley 90,398 

Buse, Cynthia A 398 

Busenbark, Janet L . 148, 268, 310 

Buser, Jerome E 172,359 

Bush, Clara J 341 

Bush, Debbie K 341 

Bush, Debra J 398 

Bush, Larry L 398 



Index 455 



Bush, Richard L 398 

Bush, Scott 313 

Buss, Brenda K 122,148,341 

Buss, GerylG 144,176,398 

Busse, Donald H 350 

Busse, Jana L 285 

Bussen, David W ...146,158,398 

Bussert, Karen S 285 

Bussies, Diane M 367 

Bussing, Charles 122 

Bussing, Sandra 122 

Buster, Bernard R 126 

Buster, Brenda J 126 

Buster, BryceG 246 

Butcher, Kimberly J ....110,398 

Butel, John L 142,275 

Butler, Beth E 398 

Butler, Kelly K 247 

Butler, Laura K 384 

Butler, LiseK 146,384 

Butler, Wayne A 398 

Butsch, Perry A 146 

Butterfield, Bradley ...140,398 

Butterfield, Lori A 120,398 

Butterfield, Tim I 350 

Button, Amy L 168 

Button, Carolyn A 341 

Butts, Daniel E 350 

Butz, Randy F 359 

Byarlay, Jean A 398 

Byars, Jackson 122 

Byers, Melissa D 154 

Bynan, Linda E 322 



c 



Caby, Glen D 306 

Cade, Lloyd W 271 

Cahill, David T 398 

Cailtex, KatheneM 140,398 

Cain, Valerie A 331 

Caldwell, Michael J 398 

Calibani, Lisa A 268 

Callahan, Debra K 322 

Callahan, Sandra S 100, 

146,168,398 

Callen, Tony V 176 

Calovich, Brian E 307 

Calovich, David M 154, 307 

Calvert, Christopher 311 

Calvert, James D 108, 

156, 162, 398 

Camac, Carol L 398 

Camac, Joe L 398 

Camacho, Rolando F 108 

Cameron, Carl A 156,359 

Cameron, Ricky L 152,293 

Cameron, Shari L 100, 398 

Cameron, Terry K 398 

Campbell, Barbara A 285 

Campbell, Candice K 308 

Campbell, Cheryl A 276 

Campbell, Chris J 398 

Campbell, Christie 142,308 

Campbell, Connie S 140 

Campbell, Craig F 90 

Campbell, Cynthia B 266 

Campbell, Donald E 194 

Campbell, Robert D 350 

Campos, Roel F 108,398 

Can, Cuneyt 95 

Canada, Richard M 306 

Canaday, Randy O 341 

Cancienne, Stephanie 398 

Cannava, John H ...150,162,367 

Cannon, John E 391 

Canter, Deborah D 162 

Cantrell, Edward G 148,350 

Carau, Butty 445 

Carazo — Gilot, Carlos 152 

Cardwell, Peter W 255 

Carey, Jim 122 

Carey, Patricia E 112,384 

Carinder, Mark E 350 

Carle, Karen A 92,152,331 

Carlgren, Brian S 359 

Carlin.GerelynA 326 

Carlin,GlendaM 326 

Carlin, John D 144,277 

Carlisle, Lisa K 341 

Carlisle, Susan C 266 

Carlson, Calvin A 144,277 

Carlson, Catheryn J 285 

Carlson, Darlene 98,122 

Carlson, David W 262 

Carlson, Dawn E 140,250 

Carlson, Jon D 253 

Carlson, Jon S 398 

Carlson, Karen B 166 

Carlson Kleila E 176,398 

Carlson, Marlene G 384 

Carlson, Patricia M 274,288 

Carlson, Stephen M 98,264 

Carlson, Tanya 81 

Carlton, Terry L 114,277 

Carmichael, Wade J 350 

Carnahan, Brian E 277 

Carnahan, Rick A 146,253 

Carnes, Carol J 328 



Carnes, David A 116 

Carney, Carol J 322 

Carney, Patricia A 308 

Carpenter, Anne B 268,305 

Carpenter, Jack 164 

Carpenter, John K 341 

Carper, Cynthia A 285 

Carr, David A 100,168,398 

Carr, Laurie A 140,156,341 

Carr, Mark A 299 

Carra, Jeffrey B 359 

Carra, Linda M 136,158,379 

Carriker, Christie G 90,331 

Carroll, Michelle L 288,317 

Carson, Bobbie S 398 

Carson, John C 309 

Carter, Darrel L .126,136,148,398 

Carter, Harold A 83 

Carter Jimmy 37 

Carter, Lucinda D 375 

Carter, Thomas S 100,341 

Carver, Andrea L 166 

Carver, Gwen D 375 

Carver, Richard F 350 

Case, Diana L 398 

Casebeier, Elaine L 398 

Casey, Kelly A 285 

Cash, Gina M 331 

Cash, Lisa D 367 

Cashin.Ann Margaret 158 

Cashion, Dennis M 194,350 

Casper, Charles J 398 

Castelli, JulieA 114,375 

Castor, David P 307 

Catapusan, Jocelyn F 108 

Cater, Steven G 359 

Catney, Michael R 297 

Catt, Shelly J 398 

Cavassa, Cari L 88,166 

Cervantes, Michael B 255 

Chadwell, Bradley L 359 

Chael, David T 168 

Chaltas, Jeff A 313 

Chamberlin, Patricia 379 

Chambers, Jacqueline 331 

Chambliss, Chris R 90,328 

Champlin, Kathi L 285 

Champlin, Rhonda R 398 

Chance, Eileen 341,344 

Chance, Marvin D 299 

Chandler, Christine 156,176 

Chandler, Craig E 166,398 

Chandler, John A 194,307 

Chandler, Larry H 304 

Chang, Dongil 162 

Chang, Lex 398 

Chang, Marilyn K 398 

Changpradit, Pinwan 326 

Chanitz, MarkW 293 

Chapman, Allen 122 

Chapman, Cynthia L 245,301 

Chapman, Debra J 322,341 

Chapman, Jeffrey D 271 

Chapman, Mary B 273 

Chappell, Deb L 308,375 

Chappell, Kelly A 247,308 

Chappell, PriskaV 130,331 

Chappell, Susan L 398 

Charbonneau, Marian 379 

Charbonneau, Steven 398 

Chariot Races 244 

Charles, Scott E 350 

Charpentier, Cindy L 399 

Chartier, Denise D 322 

Chase, Dan W 162,293 

Chase, E.Lane 112,254,399 

Chase, Jolene S 375 

Chase, R. Kevin 112,144,253 

Chastain, Blake E 313 

Chauncey, Casey 331 

Chauza, Gilbert D 142 

Chavez, Miguel J 350 

Cheray, Da vid L 350 

Cheray, Jane A 331 

Chesnutt, Debra L 282,305 

Chew, Donald A 275 

ChiEpsllon 114 

Chi Omega 266 

Childers, Debra L 381 

Childs, Clayton W 350 

Childs, Stanley E 399 

Chimes 114 

Chlapek, Linda K 142,331 

Chow, Ming — Hong 134 

Chowdhury, Ashesh 156 

Chrisler, Karen L .98,112,161,399 

Christensn, EricC 120,304 

Christensen, Lisa K 158 

Christensen, Michael 154 

Christensen, Shelly 150 

Christians, Mitshell 359 

Christiansen, Gary W 368 

Christiansen, J. Mike 154 

Christie, Dwight D 293 

Christie, Julie A 259 

Christie, Kenneth A 307 

Christy, Douglas 350 

Christy, Gary V 350 

Chubb, Denise E 118 

Cieslicki, Margaret S 168,170 

Cindrich, Larry 122 

ClrcIeK 114 

Claasen, Jerrol K 90,350 

Claasen, Roger 368 

Clack, Charlotte 132 



Clair, Kelly B 304 

Clare, Lisa J 243 

Clare, Regina A 314,399 

Clark, Albert III 110,368 

Clark, Angela M 331 

Clark, Brad 293 

Clark, Connie J 247 

Clark, FeonaM 116 

Clark, Grace A 322 

Clark, Gregory B 134,399 

Clark, Harry M 126 

Clark, Julie D 92,384 

Clark, Kelly R 368 

Clark, Patrick L 144,313 

Clark, Paula S 158,399 

Clark, Porter J 399 

Clark, Randy W 253 

Clark, Robert R 166 

Clark, Sandra M 305,379 

Clark, Sandra S 98,399 

Clark, Shelly D 384 

Clark, Steven D 194 

Clark, Susan J 399 

Clarke, Daniel D 400 

Clary, Timothy P 130,400 

Clawson, Dan F ...88,112,116,368 

Clawson, KyleW 194 

Clay, Stephen L 142,368 

Clay, Tracy B 400 

Clayberg, Carl 122 

Clayton, Andrew L 156 

Clegg, James R 144,400 

Cleland, Lawrence B 140 

Clemence, Stephani J 341 

Clements, Ruth Lynn 

Clendenen, Jennifer 285 

Cleveland, Debra S 266 

Cleveland, Jody Ann 266 

Cleveland, William J 311 

Clewell, Robert L 104,400 

Cline, Fonda L 92,140,384 

Cline, James M 400 

Cline, Jeff D 122 

Cline, Josephine L 112,400 

Clipshang, Sean J 130 

Clithero, Roger B 140,400 

Closson, Karen S 400 

Clothing, Retailing 

Interest Group 114 

Cloud, Debra 274 

Cloud Diane E 274 

Clovia 326 

Clowe, Connie J 400 

Clubine, Deborah J 118,326 

Co-recreation 232 

Coad, Russell L 152,255 

Coats, Connie S 317,384 

Cobb, Curtis J 194,350 

Cobbins, Anita L 172 

Coble, Emily Ann 142,144,168,331 

Coble, Gary A 400 

Coburn, Dana Sue 400 

Cochran, Becca L 375 

Cockerill, Janet L 120,285 

Cocks, Paul W 359 

Cody, Jay D 150,313 

Cody, Mac A 134 

Coe, CarenAnn 268,314 

Coen, James A 114,350 

Coen, Janet M 254,282 

Coen, JohnC 88,118,253 

Coffey, Colleen C 288 

Cogan, Marc A 400 

Cohn, Larry 136 

Conn, Michael P 311 

Cokeley, Will H 194 

Colbert, Conrad 190 

Colbert, Michael H 400 

Coldiron, Craig W 304 

Coldsmith, Connie L 112,331 

Cole, Frank A 172 

Cole, Tim D 194 

Cole, Trina D 98,130,162,288 

Cole, Wesley J 400 

Coleman, Daryl A 168,400 

Coleman, David W 328 

Coleman, Ernest 191,194 

Coleman, Raymond 140 

Coli, Joseph M 400 

College Republicans 116 

Collegiate FFA 116 

Colleglate4— H 116 

Collett, MelindaL 379 

Collingwood, Al J 400 

Collins, Craig A 116,264 

Collins, Craig M 142,400 

Collins, Jana K 158,301 

Collins, Kelley A 381 

Collins, Kerry D 341 

Collins, MikeJ 319 

Collins, Sandra K 384 

Collins, Stephen K 100,400 

Colloquim 116 

Coltrain, Sally A 278,326 

Coltrin, Paige 322 

Colvin, Jeff L 194 

Colvin, Mike S 100, 359 

Colwell, ErinM 400 

Colyn, Kenneth 350 

Combs, RaimundM 98,359 

Combs, Tom A 368 

Commerford, Matthew 350 

Commerford, Tom J 116 

Computers 96 

Concert Choir 114 



Concerts 40,72 

Conley, Anita K 88, 384 

Conley, James C 350 

Conley, Sharon R 368 

Connally, John 52 

Connell, Louis A 300 

Conner, Rebecca L 400 

Connolly, Matthew D 120 

Connor, David E 316 

Connor, Lisa E 322 

Conrad, Clarise R 247 

Conrad, John H 400 

Conrad, Thomas M 400 

Conrardy, Mark E 100, 400 

Conrardy, NealM 360 

Conroy, Regina M 104,282 

Consign, Linda D 400 

Constable, Sonia D 400 

Construction 100 

Convocations 54 

Conway, Harry W 304 

Cook, Cheryl L 400 

Cook, Craig C 104,378 

Cook, Craig L 100, 264 

Cook, Daniel K 360 

Cook, David C 88, 164, 166 

Cook, Douglas H 400 

Cook, Lewis L 350 

Cook, PattiJ 110,301 

Cook, Rebecca 125 

Cook, Stacey L 259 

Cook, Vicki D 92,400 

Cooke, W.Andrew 110,360 

Cool, KentL 291 

Cool, LisaM 342 

Cooley, Monet J 282 

Cooley, Renee J 400 

Coombs, Donna 301 

Coonrod, Douglas A 144, 318 

Coonrod, Gregg R 166,257 

Coonrod, Scott A 275 

Cooper, Alexis A 132, 322 

Cooper, Beverly K 154 

Cooper, Bradley B 132,400 

Cooper, Connie S 375 

Cooper, Donald A 148 

Cooper, Gregory K .134,170,360 

Cooper, Jill D 259 

Cooper, John A 381 

Cooper, Karen K 326 

Cooper, Patricia A 108 

Cooper, Peter 122 

Cooper, Scott W 273 

Cope, Stacy L 250 

Cope, Steven W 108,368 

Copeland, Janice S 400 

Copeland, Karen L 400 

Copher, Carolyn A 288 

Copher, William H 110,264 

Copple, Connie 342 

Corbin, Charles 122 

Cordell, Vickie K 331 

Corder, Debra L 146,400 

Cordes, Morris E 400 

Cordova, Terry M 304 

Corkran, Julie A 384 

Corley, Julian D 309 

Corn, Jack C 297 

Cornay, Dino 400 

Cornelison, Julie G 288 

Cornelison, Lori R 331 

Cornell, Donald E 275 

Cornett, JulieA 176 

Cornwell, Jeanette D 375 

Corpus, Marites S 108 

Correll, Cindy J 400 

Correll, KentL 400 

Corrigan, Sue E 168 

Curry, Kelly 312 

Corson, Melanie A 381 

Cosgrove, Mary C 250 

Cossman, Kristi K 400 

Costello, Michael C 100,342 

Cotner, Stephen C 100, 264 

Cott, Carrie L 331 

Cott, Kathleen M 114, 

126,172,278,326 

Cott, Robert J 277 

Cotton, Steven D 316 

Cottril, David A 350 

Couchman, Garry D 350 

Couchman, John S 368 

Coughenour, Joan L ...140,342 

Coughenour, Lauri L 279 

Country and Western 12 

Counts, Dorcas L 368 

Counts, HueyA 381 

Coup, Donavon D 100, 400 

Coup, JoleenD 331 

Coupe, Karen R 219 

Courter, Gena E 90, 379 

Courtney, Larry W 108 

Couture, Cheri J 400 

Cowan, Garry W 405 

Cowan, Mark V 273 

Cowboys for Christ 118 

Cowley, Dana K 400 

Cox, Craig L 316 

Cox, Dave 122 

Cox, Kevin C 184,313 

Cox, Kristin A 276,375 

Cox, Michael L 194 

Cox, Steven D 350 

Coyle, Brent 360 

Craft, Brenda J 368 



Craft, Leslie D 182,184,216 

Craft, Richard L 134 

Crafton, Gregory L 342 

Crager, Cathy J 368 

Cragg, JaneM 400 

Craghead, Dewayne E 401 

Craig, Michael I 350 

Craig, Teri L 259 

Crain, Deeanne 285 

Crain, Scott L 118,152 

Craney, Benjamin J 257 

Cranford, Curtis L 299 

Cranford, David H 401 

Cranmer, Jon R 92,378 

Crawford, Ronda G 375 

Crawford, Sandy M 401 

Creed, Richard D 90 

Creighton, Dean W 328 

Crenshaw, Barbara S 127 

Crews, Patricia C 92 

Crighton, Kimberlee 306 

Crilly, Diana R 259 

Criss, Nancy L 142,401 

Criss, Peter J 168 

Criss, Shannon R 282,317 

Crist, Cynthia D 401 

Crist, LorenH 246 

Criswell, Marty A 92 

Critchfield, Galen L 176 

Critchfield, Linda J 176 

Croft, Suzanne D 282 

Croker, Daniel S ....112, 172,295 

Cronenwett, Frederic 273 

Crook, Teri L 384 

Crop Protection Club 118 

Cross, Country 202 

Cross, Gene 84 

Crotinger, James A 401 

Crow, Barton L 368 

Crow, Michael L 401 

Crow, Randy L 168 

Crow, Rebecca D 146, 

158,317,331 

Crowell, David C 126 

Crupper, Karen L 375 

Crussell, Donald L 158 

Crutchfield, Charles ....140,313 

Crutchfield, Robert 401 

Cuddy, Jetta J 342 

Cuevas, Bruce D 176 

Cullers, Penny A 158 

Culley, Jon B 246 

Culley, Patrick J 246 

Culley, Sara C 401 

Cullison, Randy S 104, 368 

Cullop, Jerry D 401 

Cults 56 

Culver, Joy E 331 

Culver, Stephen M 401 

Cummings, Carolyn A 331 

Cummings, Julianne 384 

Cummings, Thomas A 313 

Cumro, Gary A 342 

Cunningham, Catherin 168 

Cunningham, David W 342 

Cunningham, Frank E 126 

Cunningham, Marilyn 168 

Cunningham, Mark W 401 

Cupit, Christie L 259 

Cupit, Janon R 247 

Curbow, David W 100,120 

Curless, Cynthia L 401 

Curless, Jay A 100, 146,401 

Currey, Judith D 154 

Currie, Renee A 164,401 

Currier, Patricia K 342 

Curry, Kelly A 301 

Curry, Robert B ... .110, 122, 304 

Curtis, Kimberly D 285 

Curtis, Rhonda A 375 

Curts, Carolyn E 136 

Custodio, Hipolito C 108 

Cutberth, Jeffrey L 293 

Cutler, Carmen Y 317 

Cutright, Robert P 328 

Cyegg, Randy L 136 



D 



Dahl, GregS 295 

DahLJudyA 368 

Dahle, Mark J 132, 368 

Dairy Science Club 118 

Dole, BettieM 90, 122 

Dale, Brock 168 

Dalley, Patrick L 401 

Dalton, BethM 331 

Dalton, Diane M 158, 247 

Dalton, John D 156 

Dalton, Randall P 300 

Dalton, Timothy P 144 

Dauber, Todd J 90 

Dance 140 

Dandurand, David S 350 

Dandurand, Terrl 331 

Daniel, Phillip S 360 

Daniels, Jeanne M 219,401 

Daniels, Kay B 132,401 

Daniels, Margaret R — 126,368 



456 Index 



Daniels, Patricia M 90, 401 

Daniels, Robert G 194 

Danielsen, Geary H 257 

Danielson, Jon P 401 

Dannebohn, Gail A 247 

Dannenberg, Mark A 262 

Dannenberg, Maury 262 

Danner, Dean L 216 

Danner, Dianne 88,245,301 

Danzig, Linda F 288, 310 

Darby, John R 350 

Darby, Scott 164 

Dardis, Anne M 381 

Darkenwald, Robert A 401 

Darling, Charles D 100,401 

Darnell, Gary 194 

Darrow, Roger B 401 

Darrow, Shelli L 401 

Date 32 

Datok, Cornelius 401 

Dauber, Todd J 98, 401 

Dauber, Trudy M 305, 401 

Davenport, Michael R 31 1 

Davidson, Cathy M 247 

Davidson, Craig J 360 

Davidson, Dale E 90, 98 

Davidson, Steven D 295 

Davie, Jim 194 

Davis, Carole M 322 

Davis, Cathleen A 259 

Davis, Cynthia K 162 

Davis, Darinda D 342 

Davis, Diane G 268 

Davis, Dirk B 350 

Davis, Donald 255, 350 

Davis, Duane L 112 

Davis, Ellen G 331 

Davis, Gary 300 

Davis, Kathy L 401 

Davis, Kevin D 401 

Davis, LanaK 110,306,342 

Davis, Lawrence A 136,401 

Davis, Lori J 401 

Davis, Mark S 90, 108 

Dvais, Pamela J 120, 268 

Davis, Patricia G 401 

Davis, Patricia L 401 

Davis, Stephanie L .130,245,282 

Davis, William L 293 

Davison, K. Diane 331 

Davisson, Stanley P 126 

Dawkins, Bernard R 342 

Dawson, David W 309 

Dawson, Geff B 273 

Dawson, Harry W ...90,146,401 

Dawson, Mona L 1 14, 282 

Dawson, Sue A 266,274 

Day, Nancy R 279 

Day, Russell S 307 

Dayton, Alicia L 288 

Dayvault, Ann E ...108,288,308 
DeSt-Ernie, Nicholas ...130,131 

Dean, Edgar T 342 

Deardorff, Bret A 264 

Deardorff, Debra K 288 

Deardorff, Lori L 259 

Deardorff, Mike J 273 

Dearth, Antony M 368 

Deaver, Zita M 401 

Debacker, Sami L 114,401 

Debacker, Steve 360 

Debate Team 120 

Deberry, Julie B ....152, 170,401 

Debey, Timothy M 98 

Debo, Katrina U 266 

Debolt, Phillip E 116 

Debrick, Kevin E 401 

Debrick, Nancy S 401 

Dechant, Elaine 401 

Dechazer, Donald 295 

Decker, Cathy A 285 

Decker, Curtis L 255 

Decker, Mike P 350 

Deckert, David E 142,350 

Deems, Vince B 360 

Dees, Jerome S 144 

Deets, Marietta 120,158,278,322 

Deever, Kay L 108, 368 

Deforest, Diane J ...170,172,282 

Degarmo, Elisa A 401 

Degarmo, Lisa J 148 

Degenhardt, Daniel A 401 

Degenhardt, Marc J 275 

Degenhardt, William 401 

Degn, Kerr. L 285 

Dehoff, RobsrtE 253 

Deines, Kelly M 313 

Deines, Tracey L ...144,171,285 

Deitcher, Gretchen M 331 

Deiter, Gregory J 401 

Dejesus, Anthony A 360 

Dejesus, Kathleen A .90,108,401 
Dejesus, Marilyn A .158,317,331 

DelaCruz, Joselito 108,402 

Delamater, Denise E 98, 130, 375 

Delay, Joseph D 114 

Delehnty, Daniel A 402 

Delissa, Lance A 342 

Delta Delta Delta 268 

Delta Psl Kappa 120 

Delta Sigma Phi 271 

Delta Tau Delta 273 

Delta U psl Ion 275 

Delzeit, Doris A ....114,140,402 
Demars, Thomas P 350 



Dembski, Helen G 142,279 

Demonchaux, Theodore 319 

Demott, Kirby H 291 

Deneault, Edward W 402 

Deneke, Christina M 375 

Denholm, Gregg A 90, 368 

Denholm, Lorie J 384 

Denlinger, William L 132 

Dennis, Jeanne M 331 

Densom, Craig W 273 

Denton, Cheryl L 110,402 

Denton, Shayne A 368 

Depew, Jayne E 331 

Derksen, Robert E 402 

Derrick, Cynthia R 402 

Deshazer, Gary L 275 

Design Council 120 

Desparo, Mary E 98, 104, 250 

Detwiler, Theresa M 402 

Deutscher, Sonya J 384 

Devault, Jerry 264 

Devilbiss, Barry 295 

Devine, Martha M 268 

Dewitt, Kara A 342 

Dewitt, Mark B 255 

Dewyke, Michael W 319 

Deyoe, Kathryan L 402 

Deyoe, Nancy S 402 

Dibben, Monte J 368 

Dible, Susan G 402 

Dice, James A 90, 108, 304 

Dick, Keren J 402 

Dick, Kevin L 197 

Dicken, Pamela S 331 

Dickerhoof, Randal O 403 

Dickerson, John T 368 

Dickerson, Mark J 295 

Dickey, Darrell R .193,194,237 

Dickey, Jim 190, 

191,192,193, 194,237 

Didde, Elaine M 342 

Dieffenbacher, Sheryl 403 

Diehl, Deborah A 132 

Diemer, CarlaM 201 

Dierking, Denise M 276 

Dieter, Dana A 342 

Dietterich, Robert J 368 

Dikeman, Carol D 342 

Dillard, Sandy R 350 

Dillbeck, JeanM 342 

Dille, Russell E 350 

Dillenbeck, Robert L 328 

Diller, Timothy E 110,146 

Dillingham, Kevin W 318 

Dill ion, Dennis E 360 

Dillion, Jan E 342 

Dillion, Jeffrey E 88, 116, 350, 351 

Dillion, Kelly E 275 

Dimarco, Michael J 156,176 

Dirk, Duane P 194 

Disberger, Dennis J ...148,403 

Disney, AliceM 381 

Disney, Deborah A 342 

Disque, Angela K 375 

Distler, Amanda 98, 322 

Dittemore, Janice L 319,403 

Dittmer, Susan M 384 

Ditzler, Cynthia M 247,331 

Dixon, Anne E 140 

Dixon, Jacki J 403 

Dixon, Susan E 342 

Dixon, Thomas N 350 

Dlabal, Pamela S 403 

Dobbins, Becky L 218, 219 

Dobratz, Carolyn S 250,308 

Dobratz, Linda L ...114,250,308 
Dockum, Terry P ...104, 142,403 
Doctor, Diane P ... .116, 259, 310 

Dodderidge, John R 166,311 

Dodds, Douglas D 162,164 

Doebele, Jacqueline 368 

Doerksen, Randy L 1 16, 378 

Dohl, Edith E 142,381 

Dole, Bob 38 

Dolechek, Robert S 110 

Dolezal.DanC 142,246 

Dolezal, Laura L 342 

Dollar, John P 122 

Domann, Debra J 150 

Domann, Marilyn J 331 

Dome, Marion F 360 

Dominguez, Gary P 108, 403 

Dominguez, Jose L 328 

Domnick, Michael W 316 

Domnick, Rebecca A 403 

Donaldson, Amos R 194 

Donley, Debra A 112,403 

Donnan, Jim 184,194 

Donnan, Tammy L 301 

Donnelly, Douglas A 350 

Donnelly, John B ....88,132,225 

Donnelly, Pamela S 403 

Donnert, Herman J . .98, 104, 122 

Donovan, Rodrick S 100 

Dooley, Crystal L 403 

Doores, Rebecca A 112,326 

Doperalski, Matthew ... 172, 403 
Dorsch, Jeffrey B ..100,114,360 

Dorton, Kevin C 262 

Doshler, Julie R 337 

Doss, Renata C 342 

Dossett, Larry E 116,368 

Doud, Cynthia M 285 

Dougan, Darrel E 403 

Dougan, Michael D 360 



Douglas, Paul R 360 

Douglass, David S 104, 

122,168,403 
Douthit, David W ... 100, 148, 342 

Dove, Mary B 268, 305 

Dow, Sean B 154, 360 

Dowel I, Gordon R 88, 403 

Dowell, Jeffrey A 132,403 

Dowler, Joleen M 403 

Downes, Denise A 342 

Downes, Pamela A 403 

Downing, Becky R 301 

Downing, Debra J 301 

Downing, Kathleen M 98, 

122,130, 150,403 

Downing, Thomas L 136 

Downs, Ernest L 172 

Doyle, Gina L 342 

Doyle, Rae A 403 

Dragastin, Janet 331 

Dragastin, Neal 350 

Drake, David M 253 

Drake, Scott E 112,253 

Drayer, Darryl D 98 

Drees, David P 295 

Drees, Elizabeth A 120, 

164, 245, 266, 308 

Drees, Gregory J 295 

Drees, Mary S 266, 308 

Dreiling, Mark A ....90,100,350 

Dreiling, Mark E 360 

Drew, Katherine D 375 

Drews, Susan 201 

Driesbach, Chuck 194 

Dring, Paul C 293 

Driss, Ann N 126 

Drouhard, Cecilia R 403 

Drouillard, Risa R 259 

Drummond, Gerald D 300 

Drury, Michael P 100, 360 

Drury, Sandra S 201 

Dryden, Marcia K .110,301,314 

Dubbert, Dale 351 

Dubois, Marie A 250 

Duch, Lorinda M 403 

Duckett, Denise M 172,368 

Duckworth, Toni R 112, 

116,154,403 

Dudek, Eva I 152,328 

Dudek, Michael F 368 

Duden, Dana J 142,305,403 

Duell, R.Michelle 166,403 

Duensing, John A . . .122, 140, 403 
Duerksen, Angela D '...104,342 

Duethman, Stephanie 403 

Duethman, Terry E 403 

Duffin, Nancy A 120,279 

Duggan, Diane 154,342 

Dugger, Dan J 403 

Duke, Kimberly K 403 

Dulac, Douglas D 360 

Dumler, David B 304 

Dummermuth, Barbara ...403 

Dunback, Joy E 326 

Dunbar, Dirk J 306 

Dunbar, John O 87 

Duncan, MinetteS 108,368 

Duncan, Sharon M 104 

Duncan, Sondra L 259 

Dungan, John M 257 

Dunkleberg, Dee A 379 

Dunlap, David D ...120,136,158 

Dunlap, Lori A 142,403 

Dunlap, Van A 299 

Dunlop, Charles 253 

Dunn, Dana A 319 

Dunn, D. Randall . . . 164, 166, 293 

Dunn, Robert P 403 

Duntz, Debra A 332 

Duong, Minh 319 

Dupere, Leroy C 368 

Dupree, Sandra D 403 

Durant, Larry W 125 

Durant, Rhonda R .142,146,322 

Durar, Abdulrazag 403 

Durler, Kevin L 313 

Duroche, Bridget L 403 

Durr, Scott M 216,360 

Durre, Garth L 100, 328 

Durst, Lisa J 342 

Dusin, Robert C 114,351 

Dutton, Christ! L 98, 

104, 130,308,381 

Dutton, Kevin D 403 

Duty, Ken F 316 

Dwyer, Deborah S 385 

Dwyer, Kevin J 132, 297 

Dyck, Audrey L 368 

Dyck, Sonia R 132, 403 

Dyer, Michaels 313 

Dyson, Bruce E 1 70, 403 



Eadens, Christopher 293 

Eads, Bradley N 360 

Eads, Jim 216 

Eagleton, Carol S ... 126, 293, 314 
Earnshaw, Jim R 255 



Earnshaw, Richard 304 

Eatherly, Julie A 288 

Eaton, Denis E 126 

Eaton, Diana M 403 

Ebbert, Kerry L 351 

Ebbert, Scott D 351 

Ebersole, Linda S 110,403 

Ebert, Denise M 98, 132,326 

Ebert, Jeffery G 403 

Ebert, Kimberly K 403 

Ebert, Rhonda J 332 

Eck, Doug M 403 

Eck, MarciJ 250,317 

Eckes, Tracy A 266 

Eckhoff, Bradley D 104 

Eckhoff , Peter B 297 

Ecklund, Terry R 142, 381 

Eddy, Rita A 332 

Eddy, W.Mark 166 

Edgar, Kelley 404 

Ediger, Karlene K . . .92, 158, 288 

Edmonds, Constance J 332 

Edmonds, DarylW 342 

Edmonds, David L 142 

Edmonds, James K 264 

Edmonds, Jean A 144, 385 

Edmonds, Kelly M 125,279 

Edmonson, Denise A . . . . 140, 404 

Edmunds, Fritz 257 

Education Council 120 

Edwards Hall 328 

Edwards, Barry J 351 

Edwards, Bill 360 

Edwards, Glen W 342 

Edwards, James L 108 

Edwards, Kathleen L ...120,404 

Edwards, Kimberly K 132 

Edwards, Robin K 332 

Edwards, Tammy L 112,118,332 

Effland, Donald E 404 

Egan, Carrie K 282 

Egan, Dennis R 297 

Egger, Dianne 297 

Eggerman, Jim L 291 

Eggers, Dexter 404 

Eggimann, Bradley L 360 

Eggleston, Eileen M 98, 404 

Eggleston, Randy B 309 

Ehm, Hazel M 162 

Ehnen, Russell D 319 

Ehrlich, Janet L 132 

Eicher, Eric I 291 

Eilert, JudyM 404 

Eilert.MarkA 360 

Eilert, Ted J 360 

Eissler, Charles L 291 

Eissler, Theresa L 332 

El Beheri,Twila 108,288 

Elam, Christine E 112,328 

Elder, Lynn F 194 

Elder, Nelda J 122 

Elections 36,158 

Elias, Julie A 104 

Eller, James S 291 

Ellerman, Carl L 368 

Ellerman, Cindy S 152,404 

Ellerman, Jane E 342 

Ellerman, Lisa M 332 

Elliott, KarenS 404 

Elliott, Kelli D 385 

Elliott, Matthew K 100, 404 

Elliott, Tyra L 368 

Ellis, Brenda K 110,381 

Ellis, Debra S 142,332 

Ellis, Robert D 328 

Ellis, Rosceo 122 

Ellman, Victoria Sue ...146,404 

Elm, Kevin L 262 

Elmer, Pamela L 404 

E I more, J anet S 164 

Elston, Kim 266,310 

Embarrassing Moments 30 

Embree, Liisa E . . . . 142, 168, 385 

Emerson, Ronald E 404 

Emley, Teresa D 381 

Emmot, DareIN 134,404 

Energy 34 

Engel, Steven R 360 

Engelbert, Jim A 293 

Engelken, Carolyn M ...140,404 

Engelken, Laurie E 404 

Engelland, Thomas L . . . 108, 404 

Engelsman, Rodney D 404 

Engineering Student Council 120 

Engler, LeeM 381 

Engler, Lisa F 142 

Engler, Luetta M 404 

Engler, Max C 90,98,277 

Englert, Christopher 351 

Engstrom, Barbara L 404 

Enloe, Don A 108,404 

Enns, Betsy D 385 

Ensminger, Jo L 332 

Ensminger, Lila L 92, 259 

Entertainment 60 

Enyart, Vicki S 404 

Epler, Kathi J 385 

Epler, Terri L 306,404 

Epp,Amy E 332 

Erichsen, Steve 447 

Erickson, Devln L 351 

Erickson, Robert L 271 

Erickson, Shari J 134, 404 

Ericson, Brenda M 88, 

112,116,148,332 



Ericson, Shannon B 144, 

148, 158,318 
Erker, Caroline J ... 142, 319, 379 

Ernstmann, James N 404 

Ernzen, Suzanne K 368 

Erpelding, Larry H 88, 146 

Erskin, Jerilyn K 266, 317 

Ervin, MicheleM 368 

Erwin, Connie N 298, 375 

Erwin, David L 142, 255 

Esau, David J 360 

Eschelbach, Donald O 108, 

156,404 

Esparza, Denise 142, 

238, 294, 404 

Espinosa, Kristl D 332 

Esser, Leonard J 316 

Efzenhouser, Rosemarie 332 

Eubank, James W 404 

Eubank, Robert K 144,328 

Eubanks, Edward M 291 

Eubanks, Maureen M 404 

Euler, Stephen L 404 

Eustace, Dale 98, 130 

Euwer, Brian D 378 

Evans, Barry D 404 

Evans, Billie J .112,132,154,404 

Evans, Bruce W 351 

Evans, Carrie L 247 

Evans, David D 404 

Evans, Jim S 404 

Evans, John W 404 

Evans, Kathleen L 332 

Evans, LinkA 110,351 

Evans, Lori A 317,333 

Evans, Sandra K 317,322 

Evans, Shari K 333 

Evert, Ronald S 404 

Eves, Bradley S 351 

Eves, David L 104, 404 

Ewing, Douglas D 304 

Exline, Christine E 301 

Exline, David E 116,264 

Exline, Jean E 301 

Exline, Kyle A 162,268 

Extracurricular Activities .124, 
130 

Eye, Jacklyn K 385 

Eyestone, Daniel L 144 



Fabac, MikeP 352 

Fabricius, KarlaK 259 

Fabricius, Vicki 282 

Fabrizius, Alana R 285 

Faculty Senate 122 

Fagan, Connie M 156,301 

Fager, Ruth E 385 

Fahrenholz, Christin 132 

Fahsholtz, Scott L 90 

Fails, Bruce R 352 

Fair, Russell R 404 

Fairbairn, Jan M 247 

Fairbairn, Scott W 120, 295 

Fairburn, Laurie G 333 

Fairchild, Cara L 333 

Fairchild, Denise D 333 

Fairfield, Carla S 404 

Fairfield, David A 404 

Fallon, Patricks 112,360 

Family Economics 122 

Fan, Lydia 126 

Fan, L. T 146 

Fanara, Teresa A 342 

Fangman, Thomas J — 112, 253 

Fankhauser, Alan L 291 

Fansher, Janet L 301,308 

Farber, Mary K 110,333 

Farha, Paul A 126,405 

Farm House 277 

Farney, Cheryl A 104, 368 

Farr, JackV 405 

Farr, Joseph K 405 

Farrell, CharleneA 405 

Farrell, David 194 

Farrell, Lynn M 134,385 

Farrell, Mitchell S 126 

Farris, Cynthia L 266 

Farrow, Donnle 194 

Fartash, Mojtaba 405 

Fashion 80 

Fatemi.AliM 122 

Faulk, LubindaC 110,122 

Faulkner, Tracy R 295 

Faurot, Rae J 142,168 

Faus, Robert J 134 

Favier, Cheri S 405 

Favier, James B 405 

Feden, Mary L 148,170 

Fee, Janet L 333 

Fee, Randy E 405 

Feeney, Eileen 185 

Feese, Kymberly L 405 

Fehlman, Marvin L 352 

Fehr, Steven L 90 

Feil, Diana L 333 

Feil, Rodney D 405 



index 457 



Feist, Paula J 342 

Feiber, Linda L 405 

Felder, Vicki-Elaine 172 

Feldkamp, Keith G 405 

Feldman, Thomas S 98,144 

Fell, Paula D ...112, 176,278,405 

Feller, Thomas S 405 

Felsted, Alan K 405 

Felt, Jerry D 156 

Feltner, Sharon A 342 

Ffelton, Joseph C 156 

Felts, Janets 333 

Fengel, Janet S 140,405 

Fenijn, Inga 120 

Ferdowsian, Roya Joz 100 

Ferguson, Chamblee C 136 

Ferguson, Cindy L 405 

Ferguson, David L 1 16, 318 

Ferguson, James S 307 

Ferguson, Karen J 279, 308 

Ferguson, Lisa D 333 

Ferguson, Mary L ..112,152,368 

Ferguson, Shannon L 385 

Ferrari, Michael B 271 

Ferrell, Molly 288 

Ferrer, Alonso P 168 

Ferris, Steve J 360 

Ferris, Suzy K 333 

Feyerherm, Roger A 295 

Fick, Geoffrey L 405 

Fick, Walter H 172 

Fidler, Tina L 385 

Field, Ralph 122, 148 

Fielder, Lisa L 385 

Fielder, Mark W .... 136, 162, 405 

Fields, Christina M 112,326 

Fields, JanaS 126,285,317 

Fields, Susan M 247 

Fiene, Shari D 120,333 

Figgs, Robin R 360 

Figurski, Leo 122 

Figurski, Patr