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Full text of "The Montana state plan for emergency management of resources"

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COPY #1 



Monlan.l Slate Library 



3 0864 1004 7508 9 



. i-.-^ 




THE MONTANA 
STATE PLAN 

FOR EMERGENCY 
MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES 



Edited and 
published by 





^tatr of iWnntaua 
©fftcc of (Tlic (6nlirntnr 



TIM BABCOCK 



October 10, 1966 



A preparedness organization created by my office has been engaged 
in an extensive study to determine the best possible methods and organi- 
zation by which this State could manage available resources, both human 
and material, should this Nation be subjected to enemy attack. 

The study included examination of the Federal Government's re- 
sponsibilities for management of resources, and took into consideration 
National plans for this purpose. Likewise, decisions were reached to 
define State and local responsibilities to insure compatability between 
State and Federal plans and methods. 

Through this process this Plan was developed, and I hereby adopt 
it as the Official Emergency Resource Management Plan for the State of 
Montana. 

It is hereby directed that each State Department and Agency having 
responsibilities under this Plan be prepari-d co discharge the responsi- 
bilities entrusted to it. 



I earnestly request all political subdivisions in our State to take 
the necessary steps to support the Plan, 

I wish to thank all those who participated in this preparedness 
work and those officials from State Departments and Agencies and from 
private industry who have accepted specifis^s^sponsibilities. 




i/jU-W— 



GOVERNOR 



APR 2 198f 



e 



<• 



STATE OF MONTANA 
EMERGENCY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN 



CONTENTS 



Governor's Letter Promulgating Plan 

Part A RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

Part B RESOURCE SECTIONS: 

Section I Construction and Housing 

Section II Economic Stabilization 

Section III Electric Power and Gas 

Section IV Food 

Section V Health 

Section VI Industrial Production 

Section VII Manpower 

Section VIII Petroleum and Solid Fuels 

Section IX Telecommiinication 

Section X Transportation 

Section XI Water 



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S^ATE OF !«D!N^?MJA 
EMERGENCY RFSOUf^CE MMAJEME!\?r PLAN 
PAB? A 



PeES0'7KC£ MAJJA-GEiVEfNT 



TA£< LE IF CONI'ENI'S 

Page 

Introduction , . . . , ,,•,».,..,,.»,.».,».,„,,. A- 1 

1 . Purpose -..,,.,..,.,. o . = ,... c .,,,.,,,,.,, A- 3 

2. Definition ,,,.,.....,. , A- 3 

3 . Activation .,.»..,. o .,,.,, = ,,.,.„,,„ . A- 3 

h . Authority : ,..,..,.....,,..-.... ^ A - 3 

5 . Plarming Factors o ..,,.,..,.,......., . A- h 

6 . Assumpt.ions .....„.,.,.„.,,-.,,.,.„..,,.,... = ,...,.,.,. A- 5 
7 • Major Policies <..,., ..o ...o o o ...,,,.,.„.,.,... . A- 5 

8 . CrgaTiization .,-.<..,,„,...,,.-.,,,... o ....,,.. , A- 6 

9. Pinergency Actions ....,,.„... o .»...<..... o .,.».,... = .. . A- 7 

10 . Emergency Action Dccu;-nerii;& ,..» „.,..o .,...,., c ..,.,.. , A- 9 

Index of Engrgency Action T)ocu.raents - ., = . ....,,.... . A- 9 

11 . Emergency Organization ..,,,,,. o., o .„,..,.,.,,.,,.... . A-35 



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IWTP.ODaCTION' ' ' 

THIS IS A ST.A-TOBY TIM TO BE ACl'I^/ATSS UTIDER STAl'E Ao"r^HORITY IN THE 
E^'ETT OF A CiriL EMERGENCY ifECBiSSI^M'IISTi 'THE STAlTfi TO ACT IK THE TEMPORARY ABSENCE 
OF FEDERAL DIRECI'ION IW CARF{YING O'JT' CERTAIN WATIOML EROORAMS SUCH AS PRICE j, 
WAGE M2 REM' CONTROIS, AND ;:?HE CCK3ER"ATI0N MD MCST M./AK^A.GEOUS USE OF 
RESOURCES . THE PLAN IS BASE".' Ol^i MLAXIM-M RELIAfTCE C'a ':::i& PRITAI'E SECTOR OF THE 
ECONOMY TO PERFOm«'i VOLfJMI'fi.RILY I:v^ E-ffii^cJEECf . C v'ERA.LL u-'JIDAECE AM) UrRECTION 
WILL BE EXERCISED BY C-C'TiSRWMfc¥r ; -jlVB'JM'FJ WILL COS^-:^- JE TO MANAGE MD OPERATE 
PLAWr-S^ FACILITIES AM) SESA/TC'tS IX fUffTHEfiAN:'? OF OCmO^ OajE-CTrvTES , THE FULL 
COOPERATIOIO. Of PRIVATE CITIZE^^fS M^E 7CnJM?.AP.Y GaiARIMl'IOWS IS EXPECTED. 
WHILE DEVELOPED SPECIFICALLY IXM Tiffin .■^OM\mGEKCY OF .toCLEAR ATTACK, THE 
PROCEDURES l^IAY ALSO BE APPLICABIS IN CASE OF MAJOB. SATtiPAL DISASTE'RS REQUIRING 
MOBILIZATION CI' THE I?ES0U?-,CE5 OP 'I'dE STAIrS. 

Part A of the State Emergerx-y he source ^^a'^age2..er:t Pi.an contains over- 
all State policies and gui^ianc^i for the provision and use of essential 
resources to meet urgent neecis iii the State i.rj. a nuclear attack emergency. 
Part A also describes the systexa ar^d iisn-.ifies roles of Federal, State^ 
and local goverrjnent organisaiions for the emerger.ey aanagement cf essen- 
tial resources availa.ble to IV-e State,, 

This par-t of t,he pia: -.wCl' xes organlzatior.&i a-i staffing arrangements 
to provide, on behalf of che tTO.-e.tiicr, cs::tra:. cccr^ina'-lon and policy 
direction to the State government orgar-lzations with emergency assignments 
in particular resource fields such as transportation, pexroleum, and electric 
power. The roster of key officials selectai and designated pxeattack to 
serve on the Resource Priorities Toaro, the coordina.tir.g and advisory body 
to the Governor for resource act.i-f-ities In a nuclear attack emergency, and 
to staff the various Resource Agencies is maintained ana kept current in 
the Office of the Adjutant General, the £+ate Office cf Emergency Planning, 
the State Civil Defense Agency, an.^ ir. the State Eitergency Operations 
Center. Seme of these key officials are heads of reg^alar departments and 
agencies of the State governmert-. - thexs acre selecte-a from industry and 
business to bring into Sta'-.e es.erat: ncy government special knowledge, skills, 
and experience in resource fields L.ot normally a direct concern of State 
government . 

Included in Pai't A of tlie St;ate plan is an executive order making 
specific resource assignments ar-i authorixing existing and emergency State 
organizations to maxiage resources in an emergency. In some cases these 
State organizations manage designated resources on behalf of the Federal 
Government when Federal capabilir-y is absent. In cisner cases, specified 
State Resource Agencies are ca'iied upon to represent State interests and 
needs, and to provide inforraation and support, to cert&in Federal organiz- 
ations functioning in the State. 

Upon warning of attack people cccupv shelL-ers i:-i accordance with local 
civil defense plans and preattack cons.unity prepa::-atioriS and arrangements. 
Following emergence from shelter, lo:al gOTernments conserve available local 
resources. They direct their use to carry on emergency operations and to 
meet needs immediately necessary ior survival and defense,. 

State level resource ofilcials are iramediately concerned postattack 
with providing statewide policies ar.d guidance to local gOv-exTiments on the 
conservation, distribution an.il use of the resources immediately available 



A-1 



to them, and to arrange for continuing resupply of goods and services to 
meet local emergency needs. Urgent needs for resources that cannot he met 
from locally availahle supplies are reported to the State. State resource 
officials arrange with industry, either directly or through Federal Govern- 
ment agencies functioning in the State for deliveries of goods or provision 
of services to meet these local shortages. 

As soon as possible, once this immediate supply process is underway, 
the State acts to assure the longer rajige continuing provision and efficient 
use of resources availahle to the State. On direction of the Governor, the 
State Resource Agencies exchange information on anticipated supplies and 
essential continuing requirements for resources. These requirements include, 
in addition to the direct civilian and military needs, the resources required 
on a continuing basis to support essential industrial and commercial acti- 
vities. Such resources are the petroleum products needed to operate trans- 
portation systems or the electric power, water, and meuipower needed by manu- 
facturing plants to maintain theproduction of essential items. Decisions 
are made by, or on behalf of the Governor, on the essential activities to 
be maintained in the State and the assignment of available resources to 
support them. Arrajigements are made either directly or through Federal 
organizations with industry and commerce to provide and distribute essential 
goods and services to meet essential continuing needs in the State. 

Part B of the State plaji Includes separate resource sections containing 
specific provisions and procedures to implement overall State resource poli- 
cies and guidance in the following resource categories: 

I. Construction and Housing VII. Manpower 

II. Economic Stabilization VIII. Petroleum and Solid Fuels 

III. Electric Power and Gas IX. Telecommunications 

IV. Food X. Transportation 

V. Health XI. Water 

VT. Industrial Production 

These separate resource sections include emergency actions, action 
documents, and organizational arrangements to carry on State management roles 
in particular resource fields. They are concerned primarily with actions and 
arrangements to assure supplies of essential resources and services to meet 
immediate and continuing needs in the State. The procedures the State Re- 
source Agencies follow to obtain resupply of local inventories and to provide 
services to meet local needs are included in these resource sections. They 
also include State policies and guidance for the operation of a statewide 
system for rationing items to individual consumers and for stabilizing prices 
and rents. 



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s'm^'E 0? w:mMA 



EMERGEWC? f-.ESO'JPCf MMtiEMER^' PLWf 



TMvI A 



RESO;.!F.CE JVlAJtAaEMEM' 



lo Fj?;POS£! The purpose of this peuTt of the plan Is to; 

a. Piovide a.ii emergency crgaii-izatlon to assist the Governor of the State 
of Montana in establishir.g Stale pciicies aixi guidance for the pro- 
vision, utilization, ar^d manageffient of available resources to meet 
urgent needs in the State :lT!iE.ed-.&,tely following a large scale disaster, 

bo Provide for the immediate supply aril resupply of resources to meet 
survival and. militax-y needs .liiEEe.i:!.8tei\r- following a nuclear attack 
arid to provide for the ccn^;-lnuing inaciagement of X'escurces available 
to the State to meet &uTv:l\'al ai'-d recovery .leeis thereafter, to In- 
clude the actions ana measures riecessary for the emergency provision, 
distribution, and use of goo'ds at-i services and the utilization of 
manpower for essential purposes, 

2. DEFIMHIOK : 

Resourc e Ma nagement ; Goverr'.men'',al control of tne ais^;ribut ion, alloca- 
tion, conservation, and use of all available resources .'manpower, goods, 
services and related facilities'; so that they may be assigned to prior- 
ity activities essential to survival and recovery^ 

3. ACTIVA'I'IOK ; 

Tne provisions of this plan ar'e tc te activated by tne declaxation of a 
civil defense emergency by the President , by receipt of an attack warning, 
or by direction of the Governor of the State of Mcrtana or his legal 
successor as provided for in Article 711, Seeticns 1'+, 15, and 16 of the 
Constitution of the State of Kontana. 

k. AUT3GRITY: 

Actions taken by the State of Montana to manage resources under State 
jurisdiction are pursuant to; 

(1) Article VTI, Sections 1., 5> 6, 10, 11, Constitution of Montana. 

(2) Section 82-I301 Revised Codes of Mor.tana 

(3) Montana Civil Lefense Act of 1951o 



A-B 



(k) The Governor's Executive Orders specifically designated by this 
Plan or its attachments. 

PLANNING FACTORS 

a. This plan will be concerned with the entire spectrum of national emeA 
gency ranging from international tension, cold war, conventional and 
limited war to general war involving nuclear weapons. Planning and 
thinking must be oriented toward the most extreme emergency caused by 
a sudden and unpredicted nuclear attack on the Continental UoS, It 
is quite unlikely that such an attack will occur, however as long as 
our potential enemies have a nuclear capability, plans must be pre- 
pared that will permit instant response. Plans drafted to the most 
extreme contingency can easily be modified and adapted to an emergency 
of lesser magnitude. 

b. Plans will be compatible to the National Plan for Emergency Prepared- 
ness. Facts related to weapons capability, delivery means, targets, 
warning, and duration of emergency as discussed in the National Plan 
will be considered. (Chapter 1, National Plan.) 

c. Assistance and support is available from Federal Agencies and repre- 
sentatives of departments assigned responsibilities of Emergency 
Planning. Montana is supported by the Office of Emergency Planning, 
Region 8, Everett, Washington. 

d. Postattack Conditions . There will be considerable loss of human 
life and displacement of population. Severe shortages of certain 
resources will occur. Health and sanitation services will be dis- 
rupted or nonexistent in some areas. Normal distribution systems wlli^^ 
be inoperative in some ajreas exposed to fire and fallout hazards ear -f 

in the postattack phases. Rigid and effective conservation measures 
will be imposed immediately. Normal systems of distribution, com- 
munication, transportation, production, power supply, finance, trade 
services, law enforcement, government aid, and direction may be dis- 
rupted for days or months. Areas will be denied occupancy and freedom 
of movement by radiological hazards of fallout. 

e. The intangible effects of a nuclear attack on human beings' ability 
to react efficiently and the degree of normalcy with which they will 
respond to nucleax caused disaster cannot be accurately defined. It 
is estimated that those in the vicinity of a nuclear explosion will 
suffer from severe shock and mental deterioration. Confusion and 
panic may result throughout the State. Regardless of the many un- 
certainties and intangibles we must contend with, it is certain that 
human and material resources will survive a nuclear attack. The proper 
application and direction of sui^iving resources will depend entirely 
on emergency planning done now. 



k-h 



6. ASSUMPTIOMS 

a. That areas in Montana will have been damaged by blast and fire and 
other areas will be temporarily immobilized by fallouts For planning 
we assume the most extreme conditions resulting from an attack on the 
Continental U.S. with nuclear- weapons, 

b. The State of Montana will be isolated from the Federal Government due 
to destruction of lines of communication » 

c. Primary reliance will be upon the resources within the State for the 
first 90 days. 

d. There will be an influx of refugees into the state.. 

e. Management of resources will be by civil authoriT-y. Limited military 
support will be available in some areas o Jiowever^ planning will not 
consider the use of Military Eule or Martial Lawo 

7. MAJOR POLICIES 

a. Federal policies on the use of resources in the peiiod. .immediately 
following attack are considered in the Rational Plan for Emergency 
Prejiaredness. Actions taken by the State of Montana will be in con- 
formance with the National policy, 

b. The objective of the State of Montana in the period immediately fol- 
lowing attack on the U.S. is to save lives^ to assist in immediate 
military defense and retaliatory operations to prevent or limit fiar- 
ther enemy attack, and to control econom,ic activities essential to the 
survival and recovery of Montana^ other States, and the Nation, 

c. In the absence of Federal direction regarding the use of resources^ 
the Governor and designated state officials will detexitdne what re- 
sources are available to the state, to what needs they will be applied, 
and the extent to which resources are short of or in excess of the 
needs of priority activities. 

d. The Governor, or the Resource Memagement Director^ will determine the 
order of priority among the essential activities for which the State 
is responsible. This authority is delegated to resource management 
areas or to County Government in the event state direction is not 
available. 

e. Immediately upon attack, the State of Montana will implement its 
emergency plans and exercise direction and control, over the use of 
all resources available to the State, Preattack agreements with 

the Federal Government covering the control and use of resources will 
be honored. Such agreements are included with appropriate annexes in 
Part B of this plan. 



A-5 



f . Resources controlled by Federal agencies will be made available to 
the Governor, or his representative, upon presentation of forTtial 
requests, with justification, to the controlling agencies. (Detailed 
procedures are included in Part B of this plan.) Resources will 
actually remain in the hands of industrial and other owners and usera^^ 
Business will be transacted between them in much the seime manner as p, 
usual, subject to priorities and other allocations established, Tns 
Governor requests an allocation or a priority euid the Federal 
government grants it if possible, but purchases are not by the 
Federal agencies and delivery is not to the State government . 

g. The State of Montsuia will honor requests for assistance from other 
states whenever possible. When requests from or to other states 
for assistance result in conflicts of priority or allocations, 
such requests will be referred to the Director, Region 8, Office 

of Emergency Planning. This provision in no way prevents or limits 
mutual aid agreements between states developed preattack, 

h. Federal representatives within the State of Montetna, who do not possess 
the authority or capability to act independently postattack, will 
assist the state in execution of emergency plans. The use of this 
personnel will be in conformity with preattack agreements between the 
State of Montana and the Federal agency involved. Coordination of 
activities of the State and functions of the Federal agencies will 
also be based upon preattack agreement, whenever possible. 

i. Federal direction of resources management will be re-established upon 
notification to the State of Montana by Region 8, Office of Emergency 
Planning, that the Federal agencies possess the capability to control 
specified resource areas. In the event Region 8, OEP, cannot conmunij^ 
cate with the State of Montana, the Director of the Regional Office cC^ 
the Federal agency or the Director of that agency's activities withir. ■ 
the State of Montana will furnish the Governor with a written declar- 
ation that the Federal agency is capable of directing the manageffient of 
resources under its authority and that it is assuming the responsibility 
for such direction. The emergency organization of the State of Montana 
will continue to operate in order to assure the orderly transition of 
authority and continuity of operations. The emergency organization of 
the State of Montana will be dissolved only upon the direction of the 
Governor . 

j. The State of Montana is responsible, postattack, for the protection of 
essential resoxirces under the State or Federal control. 

k. Resources controlled by the State of Montana shall be conserved and 
used to meet urgent needs on an austere basis. 

ORGANIZATION 

a. The Governor shall have final authority to approve, disapprove, modify 
or alter any action taken within the Resource Management Organization. 



A-6 



The Governor shall be the firial authority on all issues gmd adjudica- 
tions regsirding the use of resources under state control during any 
period when competent Federal direction is lacking. ('This excepts 
specific resources placed under control of Federal agencies hy pre- 
attack agreement o) 

bo The official appointed by the Governor as his principal assistant for 
the management of resources available tc the state shall be termed 
Resource Management Director o He shall have the responsibility for 
the over-all operation of the resou:r-ce asanagement program, including 
but not limited tot coordination, acjuaication of conflicting claims, 
appointment of personnel, development and impleiLertatlcn of policy, 
execution of emergency management of resoiorce respcnsitllities, and 
liaison with other states and Federal gcverruaert agencies on resource 
management matters. He shall be the Governor s prlirjary ad'.^^isox on 
all resource management masters o 

c. Each State Emergency Besource Agency will manage the particular re- 
source for which it is responsible » It will determine r.he availability 
of the resource and allocate it on a pricrity casis. It 'will have the 
authority to refuse or restrict the allocation or use of the resource , 
Its decisions are subject to review arid modificailon by the Resource 
Majiagement Director or the Governor o 

d. The Governor or the Besource Management Director shall, at his dis- 
cretion, call together representatives from a portion or all State 
Emergency Resource Agencies. These representatives shall advise and 
assist the Governor or the Resource Maii.agement Director in making 
decisions involving the use of resources.. This group shall be called 
the Resource Priorities Board o 

e. The Resource Management Director and the director of each resource 
agency are responsible for naming two to seven successors., The 
Director of each Resource Agency is responsicls for assuring that his 

agency has sufficient personnel to operate in axi eitergencyo 

9. EMERGENCY ACTIOMS 

a. Key resource management personnel will, immediately upon attack or 

declaration of an emergency, report to the location indicated in each 
Resource Section of Par-t B of this plan- 

bo The Executive Ord.ers and other emergency docuirients snown below have 

been prepared and pre -positioned witn appropriate officials and shall 
be issued under the direction of the Resource Management lirector un- 
less otherwise directed by the Govem^r^ The Resource Management 
Director is responsible for seeing tnat they receive the widest poss- 
ible distribution and that the public is aware of their existence t 

c. Actions for Immediate Supply 

(l) Direct compliance with the Federal General Freeze Order. (FM-1° 
Governor's Order Directing Compliance witn Federal General Freeze 
Order <. ) 



(2) Assign authorities ajid responsibilities to elements of the 
State Emergency Resource Management Organization. (RM-2; 
Executive Order Providing for the Administration of Resource 
Management and Economic Stabilization Program^ ) 

(3) Announce to the public the establishment and functions of tne y 
State Emergency Resource Management Organization. (RM-3 ° 
Public Announcement - State Resource Orgsmizationo ) 

(k) Announce to the public the provisions of the Federal General 

Freeze Order and point out the need for individuals to conserve 
essential items. (PJVI-i^-: Public Announcement - General Freeze 
Order . ) 

(5) Issue State policy on the priorities which will govern the 
provision and use of resources within the State • (EM"5s 
The Priority Assignment of Resources.) 

(6) Issue Governor's proclamation announcing that State resource 
policies are in effect throughout the State and providing 
guidance to local governments on the implementation of these 
State policies. (RM-6 : Governor's Proclamation on State 
Resource Policies and Guidance.) 

(7) Designate essential items to be distributed through the consumer 
rationing system. (RM-7: Essential Items to be Rationed,) 

d. Actions for Continuing Supply 

As soon as actions have been taken to conserve local use of essentiai^^^ 
resources and to resupply secondary inventories to meet essential nei 
in the localities, the following actions ar-e taken to anticipate neeaJ" 
and to arrange for the continuing supply of essential resoiirces to meet 
these needs. 

(1) Authorize the Directors of the State Resource Agencies to 
apportion resources available to the State among essential needs 
euid to take actions to arrange for the provision of these re- 
sources to meet these essential needs. (RM-8: Delegation of 
Resource Authority.) 

(2) Direct the Directors of the State Resource Agencies to refer 
to the State Resource Priorities Board for recommendations to 
the Governor on the Adjudication of unresolved conflicts result- 
ing from inability to meet needs from expected resoxiices avail- 
able under their jixrisdiction. (RM-9; Adjudication of Resource 
Conflicts.) 

10. EMERGENCY ACTION DOCIIMEM'S 

RM-1 Copy of Governor's Order Directing Compliance with Federal 
General Freeze Order. 

Attachment 1: Federal General Freeze Order. 

Attachment 2: List of Essential Survival Items o _^^^ 



A-8 



RM-2 Copy of Executive Order Providing for the Administration of 
Resource Management and Economic Stabilization Program, 

RM-3 Public Announcement of Establishment of Emergency Resource 
Management Orgemization. 

RM-U Public Announcement of Implementation of Federal General 
Freeze Order. 

RM-5 Copy of Governor's Letter Establishing Policy on Priority Use 
of Resources. 

RM-6 Copy of Governor's Proclamation on State Resource Policies and 
Guidemce . 

RM-7 Copy of Governor's Letter Concerning Essential Items to be 
Rationed. 

RM-8 Copy of Governor's Letter Delegating Resource Authority, 

RM-9 Copy of Governor's Letter Concerning Adjudication of Resource 
Conflicts. 



A-9 



COPY OF GOVERNOR 'S ORDER DIRECTING COlVrPLIMCE WITH 
FEDERAL GENERAL FREEZE ORDER 

STATE OF MONTANA 

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR 



To All Concerned: 

By virtue of the authority vested in me in a nuclear attack emergency 
by the laws of the State of Montana, including the Civil Defense Act of 
1951 > it is hereby ordered: 

All persons shall comply with the provisions of the attached Federal 
General Freeze Order (Economic Stabilization) dealing with ceiling on 
prices, rents, the prohibition of retail sales and the rationing of essen- 
tial consumer items. 

In accordance with this Federal General Freeze Order I have designated 
essential consumer items that sure to be distributed in this State through 
the consumer rationing system. These essential consumer items are listed 
in RM-7, Essential Items to be Rationed which is issued concurrently with 
this order. 

The Executive Heads of governing bodies of local governments are 
authorized to make exceptions to the "Freeze" provisions to permit retail 
sales to meet immediate needs of designated essential local users and to 
maintain operations of designated essential facilities. They shall enforce 
compliance with all provisions of the Federal General F'reeze Order and any 
subordinate regulations, orders or directives issued by State or local 
governments. 

This order, the Federal General Freeze Order and RM-7 listing items 
to be rationed shall be published and made known to all affected persons 
by use of all media available for the purpose. 

By the Governor of the State of Montana. In witness 

whereof I set my hand and seal this d ay of 

19 . 



Governor 



SEAL 



Secretary of State 
Attachment : Federal General Freeze Order . 



A-IO 



BM-1., Attachment 1, 

FEDERAL GENEPAL FREEZE ORBER 
(Economic Stabilization; 

VThereas^ the President has proclaimed tne existence of sua unlimi.t&d national 
emergency and of a civil defense emergency, and has found that it is necessary 
to provide for resomrce conservation and control and for the stabili2aT;ion of 
the civilian economy j 

Now, therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the President, 
it is hereby ordered as follows: 

Section 1 . General Freeze , 

All prices, wages and salaries and rents are hereby fr-02en at the levels 
specified in section 2 of this order. 

Section 2 . Prohibitions » 

(a) No person may charge, receive, or pay more for commodities and services 
than the highest prices which weie in effect, during the one-month base period 
(prior to the base date). 

(b) No employer shall pay and no employee shall receive a wage, salary or 
other form of compensation at a rate higher or lower than that paid or received 
as of (the base date). 

(c) No person shall demand or receive, nor shall any person pay more than 
the following rent ceilings: 

(1) The rent in effect on the base date for any housing accommoiaticn, 
commercial, or industrial unit which was rented on the Dase datej 

(2) The last rent in effect during the base period for any house, 
apairtment, flat, commercial, or industrial unit which was not rented on the base 
date but was rented at any time during the base period; 

(3) The ceiling rent established by regulation, directive, or order 
Issued pursuant to this Order for houses, apartments, flats, commercial, and 
industrial units, for rooms of all types, and for any rented str^acture, unit, 
or space . 

(d) No owner of any interest in real property shall demand or receive, and 
no purchaser shall pay more than the sales price ceilings which shall be; 

(1) The sale price specified in a sales contract signed by tctri parties 
on or before the base date; or 

(2) Where there is no such sales contract, the fair market value of 
the property in the rent-control axea as of the base date, as established by aii 
authorized appraiser, subject to the approval of the local rent administrator » 



A-11 



RM-1, Attachment 1 



Section 3' Consumer Rationing. 



For a period of five days from the effective date of this Order^ all retail 
sales, except perishable foods or any health item dispensed under prescribed 
procedures, shall be prohibited. Thereafter, rationing of selected essential 
consumer items will be imposed as rapidly as possible., 

Section h . Definitions . 

(a) "Base Date": Base date means the date of the first nuclear attack on 
the United States. 

(b) "Base Period": Base period means the one-month period prior to the 
base date as to ceiling prices, ajid the three months prior to and ending on the 
base date as to rents. 

(c) "Persons": Persons shall include an individual, corporation, partner- 
ship, firm or any other entity. 

(d) "Price": Price shall include rentals, commissions, margins, rates, 
fees, charges or other forms of prices paid or received for the sale or use of 
commodities or services or for the sale of real property, but shall not include 
prices on finished military items produced for the armed forces » 

(e) "Commodity": Commodity meajis all commodities, articles, products, and 
materials, including those provided by public utilities services, such as elec- 
tricity, gas, and vreiter. 

(f) "Services": Services means all services rendered, other than as ari 
employee, in connection with the processing, distribution, storage, installation, 
repair, or negotiation of purchases or sales of a conmiodity, or in connection 
with the operation of any service establishment for the servicing of a commodity, 
or privileges Including professional services. (The term "services" shall not 
be construed to authorize the regulation of compensation paid by an employer to 
any of his employees.) 

(g) Wage, salary, or other form of compensation includes all forms of re- 
muneration to an employee by an employer for personal services including, but 
not limited to, premium overtime rate payments, night shift, yesir-end ajid other 
bonus payments, incentive payments, commissions, vacation eind holiday payments, 
employer contributions to or payment of insurance or welfare benefits or pension 
funds or annuities, and other payments in kind. Regardless of any right or con- 
tract heretofore or hereafter existing, no change or adjustment shall be made in 
such rates of wages, salaries, or other forms of compensation except as may be 
permitted or required by regulations, orders, or directives issued under this 
Order . 

(h) "Sale": Sale Includes sales, dispositions, exchanges, and other trans- 
fers and contracts eind offers to do any of the foregoing. 



A-12 



HM-1;, Attachment 1 

(i) "Authorized Appraiser": Authorized appraiser meaxis qualified appraiser 
designated by the local rent administrator to make appraisals in cormection with 
the establishment of sales price ceilings for real property. 

(j) "Essential Consumer Items": Essential consumer items means Items that 
are used to satisfy essential needs of individual corisumers, such as food, cloth- 
ing, petroleum products, and other items as indicated in section S.f'b)^ 

(k) "Retail"; Retail (sometimes referred to as secondary) mearis the level 
at which commodities, products, and materials are sold directly to the consumer,, 

fl) "Rent": Rent includes char-ges for at.y building, structure or part 
thereof, or land appurteneunt thereto, or services, forrdshings, furniture, 
equipment, facilities, and. improvements eoniiected with the use or occupaiLcy of 
such property „ 

Section__5« Interim Administration . 

Until such time as a Federal emergency stabilization agency is created ar.d 
is capable of administering the provisions of this Grier, interim operations in- 
clude the following: 

(a) The Secretary of Labor is delegated authority to administer those 
provisions of this Order dealing with wages^ salaxies and other compensation 
'and the resolution of any labor disputes that may arise) and to issue such re- 
gulations, orders, or directives as he deems necessary to such administration. 

"He is further authorized to redelegate this authority to such officers of his 
[lepartment as he deems appropriate. 

(b) It is e;<pected that the Governor of each State through such State 
officers or agencies, local authorities including civil defense and other emer- 
gency organizations as he may designate, will exercise such emergency authorities 
as are available to him under State law, to provide for the administration of 
those provisions of this Order dealing with ceilings on prices, rents, tne pro- 
hibition of all retail sales, and the rationing of essential consumer items o 

In the course of such aiministratior, the Governor through such designees is 
expected to make such essential exceptions to the prohibition-of-saies pro- 
visions of this Order as he finds necessary and shall designate those essential 
consumer items to be distributed through the consumer rationing system. 

(c) It is l\irther expected that the Governor of each State, pursuant 
to the laws of his State and supported by local authorities will provide for 
the interim, enforcement of ceilings established by this Order an.d of any 
regulations, orders or directives issued pur&uar_t to this section. 

S ection 6 .. Record Keeping . 

(a) Commodities and Services: All records in existence on the date of 
this Order reflecting prices which were charged for the comm.odities or services 
during the base period, together with all other records of any kind or de- 
scription shall be preserved. All record.s hereafter required, to be kept pur- 
suarit to regijlattons or directives issued hereunder shall be preserve:: . 



A-13 



RM-lj Attachment 1 

(t) Rents 2 All persons subject to this Order shall preserve stcd maintain 

all records which are necessary to show the manrier by which the ceiling rentals ^^ 

were determined and the record of payments made by persons in cccupancy of real f^ 

property or any part thereof. * 

{c) Wages and Salaries; All employers sfeall preserve and maintain all 
records which reflect the rates of wages^ salaries or other forms of compensation 
paid on the base date, together with all other records of ajiy kind, or description. 

Section 7 ° Applicability o 

The provisions of this Order shall be effective immediately and are 
applicable to the United States, its ter-ritories and possessions, the Comnion- 
wealth of Puerto Rico^ and the District of Columbiao 

Sec tion 8 . Tejrm i nation . 

This interim order shall expire when replaced by subsequent executive or 
administrative Economic Stabilization Agency orders^ 



Dated 



Designated Federal Official 



(Note: For planning purposes States are to assume that such an order will be * 
issued by the Federal Government in a nuclear attack emergency,) 



A-llf 



RM-2 



COPY OF EXECUTIVE ORDER PROVIDING FOR THE ADMINIST P.ATiaN_OF 
RESOURCE MANAGEMENT MP ECONOMIC STABILIZAI'ION mOGRAM 

STATE OF MONTANA 

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR 

By virtue of the authority vested in me in a nuclear attack emergency by 
the laws of the State of Montana, including the Civil Defense Act of 1951, in 
order to provide for the administration of the emergency resource maxiagement 
and economic stabilization activities for which the State is responsible dar- 
ing a nucleetr attack emergency, it is hereby ordered: 

Section 1. Establishment of a Resource Assistant to the Governor ; 

There is hereby established in the Adjutant General Department an 
office of the Director of Resource Management, who sheill be a 
special assistajit to the Governor. 

Section 2 . Functions ; 

a. The Director of Resource Management shall act as the principal 
assistant and advisor to the Governor on all emergency resource 
management and economic stabilization activities under the 
jurisdiction of the State and its political subdivisions); and^ 
in this capacity, shall act for and on behalf of the Governor 
in coordinating all emergency resource management and economic 
stabilization activities of the executive departments, and 
agencies of the State Government. Every officer and agency of 
the State Government having emergency resource majiagement or 
economic stabilization functions, as delegated, redelegated or 
otherwise assigned thereto by or under the authority of the 
Governor after the date of this order, shall perform the said 
functions subject to the coordination and guidance of the 
Director of Resource Management, and in accordance with State 
and national policies. 

"b. In carrying out the functions conferred upon him by this order, 
the Director of Resource Management, acting for or on the 
direction of the Governor, shall among other things; 

(1) Make provision for the conservation of scarce and critical 
resources and their mobilization and employment in defense, sur- 
vival, and other essential activities through the establishment 
of priorities, allocations, and other measures as may be 
necessary. 

(2) Make provision for the rationing of selected essential 
items to consumers and for the stabilization of prices and rents. 

(3) Make provision for the rehabilitation, restoration, and 
recovery of essential facilities, utilities, services, and oper- 
ating plants by the establishment of priorities and allocation 

A-15 



r 



of materials for such purposes. 

(h) Take such actions and promulgate such measures^ con- 
sonant with law, or policy, as may be necessary to carry 
out the functions assigned to him by this order, and re- 
solve interagency issues which otherwise would require the 
attention of the Governor. 

(5) Report to the Governor on his operations under this 
order . 

Section 3 « Resource Management Responsibilities 

a. The Director of Resource Management is hereby delegated 
emergency management coordinating responsibility over the 
resources under the jurisdictional control of the State o 

b. The Director of Resource Management shall exercise said 
responsibilities in accordance with national and State 
policy on priority use of resources. 

c. The Director of Resource Management shall, in carrying out 
the functions incident to the exercise of said responsibility, 
coordinate, on behalf of the Governor, the performance of re- 
source management functions sind activities by the Resource 
Agencies designated in Section h of this order. 

Section k . Resource Agencies . 

The agencies designated in this Section k, hereinafter referred to ^^ 
as Resource Agencies, are hereby assigned emergency resource mar^age- |^_^ 
ment functions with respect to resources under the jurisdiction of 
the State. 

a. The Construction and Housing Agency - control of the construction, 
repair and modification of emergency facilities and housing. 

b. The Economic Stabilization Agency - price stabilization con- 
trols, rent stabilization controls, consximer rationing o 

c. The Electric Power ajid Gas Agency - control of the distribution 
of electric power and of natioral and manufactured gas available 
for use in the State. Provision of resource support for the 
operations of electric power and gas utilities located in the 
State . 

d. The Food Agency - control of the distribution of food in retail 
and in any wholesale and processor inventories assigned to the 
State by preattack agreement with the United States DepsLrtment 
of Agriculture and supplies made available to the State 
postattack by the USDA. 



A -16 



e. The State Health Agency - control of the distribution of health 
resources available for use in the State including civilian 
health manpower. 

f . The Industrial Production Agency - control of the distribution 
of certain essential items available for use in the State. 
Provision of resource support for the operation of essential 
production and distribution facilities located in the State o 

g. The Manpower Agency - control of the recruitment, classifica- 
tion euid assignment of civilian manpower except health man- 
power. 

h. The Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency - control of the distri- 
bution of petroleum ajid solid fuels supplies available for use 
in the State. Provision of resource support for the operations 
of the Petroleum and Solid Fuels industry located in the State. 

i. The Telecommunications Agency - control of the use of communi- 
cations services available to the State. Provision of resource 
support for the operations of the telecommunications facilities 
located in the State. 

j. The Transportation Agency - control of the use of intrastate 
transportation services and interstate transportation services 
available to the State. Provision of resource support for the 
operations of essential transportation facilities sjid essential 
equipment located in the State. 

k. The Water Agency - control of the distribution and use of water 
available for use in the State. Provision of resource support 
for the operations of water utilities and suppliers located in 
the State. 

There shall be at the head of each of the foregoing Resource Agencies a 
Director, who shall be appointed by the Governor. These Directors, with respect 
to those resources for which they are assigned responsibility and subject to the 
coordination and guidance of the official responsible for resource management, 
shall perform the following instructions: 

(a) Develop, advise on and administer policies, measures SJid activities 
required to protect, conserve and provide for the distribution and 
effective use of resources available for use within the State » 

(b) Maintain a continuing surveillance over the current and essential 
supply and expected emergency needs for such resources as a basis 
for administering required resource control systems, 

(c) Determine needs for supporting resources for the operation of facil- 
ities and establishments under their cognizance aind present and just- 
ify these needs as claims to appropriate Resource Agencies. 



A -17 



RM-2 

(d) Coordinate their activities with and provide support and assistance 
to Federal agencies with related resource management responsibilities 
in the State. 

Section ^ . Establishment of the Resource Priorities Board , 

There is hereby established the Resource Priorities Board, The 
Board has as members a Chairman, the Directors of the State Re- 
source Agencies, representatives of major users of resources, and 
liaison representatives of Federal agencies carrying on Federal 
resource management functions in the State, 

The Board shall advise the Governor and his principal resources 
assistaxit on policies and problems concerning the management of 
resources available to the State. The Board shall also advise on 
the resolution of conflicting claims for scarce resources, and on 
the priorities to be accorded to users of scarce or critical 
resources. 



By the Governor of the State of Montana. 

In witness whereof I set my hand and seal this_ 



day of 



SEAL 



Governor 



Secretary of State 



c 



A-18 



EM- 3 



PU BLTC AOTJOimCEMEM' CF ESTABLISHMEOTT 
OF EI/ERGRTJCr RESOURCE imMGEZffiNT ORGANIZATION 



The Governor today issued the following anziouncement : 

"By virtue of the authority vested in me in a nuclear attack emergency by 
the laws of the State of f'lontana, T have established a Resource Priorities 
Board and Resource Ap;encie6 responsible for the management of resources avail- 
able to the State. 

All citizens are directed to coTiiply wixh the regulations and directives 
published by the Resource Priorities Board and the Resource Agencies, These 
directives will j-uaranTefc the equitable distribution of available resources 
and assure the survival am recovery of the State of Montana. 

Unlawful acquisition or use of vital resources will endanger the survival 
and recovery of the State of "^'lontana. All citizens willfully aiding and abett- 
ing such unlawful use will be subject to prosecution. 

All citizens are encouraped to conserve and protect essential resources 
and cooperate with legal a'<thorities in assisting the Resource Priorities Board 
and Resource Ajiencies in accornplishing t'-eir duties." 

The complete iJrecutive ^ider follows. 



(Note: Tnls arinour* cement is to be issued coneurren-oly with RM-2) 



A- 19 



BM-U 



PUBLIC AOTOIWCEMENT OF IMPLEMEFTA!?ION 



OF FEDERAL GENERAL FREEZE ORDER 



Governor ^today ordered the implemeatation in the State 

of Montana of the Federal General Freeze Order, The Governor said! 

"By virtue of the authority vested in me in a nuclear attack emergency 
"by the laws of the State of Montana, I have ordered implementation of and com- 
pliance with the Federal General Freeze Order effective immedi&telyo 

All citizens are requested and directed to conform with the provisions 
of my order and the Federal General Freeze Order, Tlie actions stated in the 
Freeze Order are necessary to assure the sujn/ival and recovery of the State 
of Montana. 

It is further directed that all citizens drastically conserve on the use 
of essential items. Your compliance with this directive will materially assist 
your fellow citizens and neighbors. 

The Governor's Order and the Federal General Freeze Order follow. 



(Note: This emnounceraent is to be issued concurrently with BM-l and 
Attachment thereto.) 



A -20 



RM-5 



COPY OF GOVERNOR'S lETTER ESTABLISHING POLICY 



ON PRIORITY USE OF PJSSOURCES 



STATE OF MONTANA 
OFP'ICE OF THE GOVERNOR 



To: State Resource Agency Directors and Executive Heads of Government in the 
Political Subdivisions in this State. 



1. Priority A.ctivities in Immediate Postabtack Period . The following act- 
ivities in :.his rotate are to be accorded priority over all other claims for 
resources. There is no significance in the order of the listing - all are 
important. The order in which, and the extent to which, they axe supported 
locally may vary with local conditions and circumstances. If local conditions 
necessitate the establishment of an order of priority among these activities, 
that order shall be based on determinations of relative urgency eimong the 
activities listed, the availability of resources for achieving the actions re- 
quired, and the feasibility and timeliness of the activities in making the 
most rapid and effective contribution to national survival. 

a . The Immediate defense and retaliatory combat operations of the Armed 
Forces of the United States and its Allies . This includes support of military 
personnel and the production and distribution of military and atomic weapons, 
materials and equipment required to carry out these immediate defense and re- 
taliatory combat operations. 

b . Maintenance or .Re-establis-'iment of Government authority and control , 
to restore and preserve order and to assure direction of emergency operations 
essential for the safet;> and protection of the people in this State. This 
includes: 

(1) police protection and movement direction; 

(2) Fire defense, rescue, and debris clearance; 

(3) Warnings; 

(k) Emergency information and instmictions ; 

(5) F.adiological detection, monitoring ^ and decontamination. 

c. Prod,uction and distribution of survival items and provision of ser - 
vices essential to continued survival and rapid recovery in this State. These 
include : 

( 1 ) Kxpedl ent she It er ; 



A-21 



RM-5 



(2) Food^ including necessary processing and storage; 

(3) Feeding, clothing, lodging and other welfare services; 
(k) Emergency housing and. coramurilty services; 

(5) Emergency health ser^Aices, including medical care, public 
health and sanitation; 

(6) Water, fuel, ajid power supply; 

(7) Emergency repair and restoration of damaged vital facilities^ 

do Essential communications and transportation services needed to carry 
out the above activities o 

e. Provision of supplies and equipment to jgioduce and distrihute goods 
needed for the above activities . 

2, Assignment of Resources . Resources required for essential, uses, including 
manpower, will be assigned to meet the emergency requirements of the priority 
activities indicated above. The principal objectives are to use available re- 
sources to serve essential needs promptly and effectively and to: 

a. Protect and to prevent waste or dissipation of resources prior to 
their assignment to priority activities. 

b. Support production of essential goods » Other production will be per- 
mitted to continue only from inventories on hand and when there is no emergency 
requirement for the resources vital to this production 

c. Support construction for emergency repair and restoration, construction 
of facilities needed for survival, or the conversion of facilities to survival 
use, where this can be accomplished quickly. Other construction already under 
way should be stopped, and no new construction started unless it can be used 
immediately for essential purposes upon completion. 



By the Governor of the State of Montana, In witness whereof I set my 
hand and seal this day of , 



Governor 



SEAL 



Secretary of State 
Attachm,ent: List of Essential Survival Items 



A-22 



RM-5, Attachment 1 
LIST OF ESSENTI/iL SUEVIVAL ITEMS 



This document contains a listing of items considered essential to 
sustain life at a productive level to a.ssure national purvlval in an 
emergency. The list identifies items to -which major attention should be 
given in all phases of preattack planning to insure the availability of 
basic essentials for a productive econoriiy in the event of a nuclear attack. 
Supply-requirements studies and assessments for these items will be made 
to disclose critical deficiencies or other problems that can be anticipated. 
Revisions will be made as necessary to keep the ite:cris as up-to-date as 
possible o 

The items are arranged by seven major groups: 

(1) Health Supplies and Equipment, 

(2) Food, 

(3) Body Protection and Household Operations, 
(h) Electric Power and Fuels, 

(5) Sanitation and Water Supply, 

(6) Emergency Housing and Construction Materials and Equipment, and 

(7) General Use Items. 

Survival items are defined as "those items without which large segments 
of the population would die or have their health so seriously impaired as to 
render them both burdensome and non-productive." The items have been classi- 
fied into Group A or Group B, with Group A representing end products consumed 
or used directly by the population, and Group B consisting of those items 
essential to the effective production and utilisation of the Group A items, 
which are consumed or used directly by the people. 

There are no Group B iteias in the c.-.tegories of Health Supplies and 
Equipment, Body Pr-oduction and Household Operations, and Emergency Housing 
and Construction Materials and Equipment. All of these items are considered 
to be consumed directly and any attempt to separate them in to A and B 
groupings would be too arbitrary to be meaningful. 

It is important to keep in mind the fact that while the items listed 
are the basic essentials necessary for maintaining a viable economy dixring 
the first six months following an attack, not all of them would create 
problems that would require government action preattack to insure adequate 
supplies. The aforementioned supply-requirem.ents studies will be under- 
taken to identify the problem areas. In developing supply data, all available 
production capacity, existing inventories, and possible substitutions will be 
considered. For example, in analyzing clothing items, all available supplies 
would be considered from sport to dress shirts, from overalls to dress suits. 
However, new production would be Imited to the simplest form of the basic 
item which can be produced. Tlie final determination as to which of the items 
are most critical and which may require preattack actions by the Government, 
as well as the type of actions which must be taken, can be made oaly after a 
comprehensive supply- requirements analysis is can.pleted. 



A-23 



■RM-5, Attachment 1 



LIST OF ESSENTIAL SURVIVAL ITEMS 



I. Health Supplies and Equipment; 
Group A 

1 . PHAEM^iCEUTICALS : 
Alcohol. 

Analgesics, non~ narcotic. 
Antibiotics and antibacterials. 
Antidiabetic agents, oral. 
Antihistamines. 
Antimalarials . 
Atropine. 

Blood derivatives. 
Carbon dioxide absorbent. 
Cardiovascular depressants. 
Cardiovascular stiinulants. 
Corticosteriods . 
Diuretics. 

General anesthetics. 
Hypnotics. 
Insulin. 

Intravenous solutions for replace- 
ment therapy. 
Local anesthetics. 
Lubricant, surgical. 
Morphine and substitutes. 
Oral electrolytes. 
Oxygen. 

Surgical antiseptics. 
Sulfa drugs. 

Synthetic plasma volume expanders. 
Vitamin preparations, pediatric. 
V7ater for injection. 

2. BLOOD COLLECTDJG Alffi DISPENSING 
SUPPLIES: 

Blood collecting and dispensing 

containers. 
Blood donor sets 
Blood grouping and typing sera. 
Blood recipient sets. 
Blood shipping containers. 

3. BIOLOGICAr^: 
Diphtheria toxoid. 
Diphtheria antitoxin. 
Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and 

pertussis vaccine. 
Gas gangrene antitoxin. 
Poliomyelitis vaccine, oral. 
Rabies vaccine. 
Smallpox vaccine. 
Tetanus antitoxin. 



Tetanus toxoid, absorbed. 
Typhoid vaccine. 
Typhus vaccine, epidemic. 
YeLlovr fever vaccine. 

Uo SURGICAL TEXTILES: 
Adhesive plaster. 
Bandage, gauze. 
Bandage, muslin. 
Bandage, piaster of paris. 
Cotton, USP. 
Surgical pads. 
Stockinette, surgical. 
Wadding, cotton sheet. 

5„ EJyiERGENCY SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 
AM) SUPPLIES: 

Airway, pharyngeal. 

Anesthesia apparatus. 

Basin, wash, solution. 

Blade, surgical knife. 

Brush, scrub, surgical. 

Catheter, urethral. 

Containers for sterilization. < 

Chisel, bone. 

Drair., Penrose. 

Dusting powder. 

Forceps, dressing. 

Forceps, hemostatic. 

Forceps, obstetrical. 

Forceps, tissue. 

Gloves, surgion's. 

Handles, surgical knife. 

Holder, suture needle. 

liihaler, anesthesia, Yahkauer 

(ether mask). 
Intravenous injection sets. 
Knife, cast cutting. 
Lamps, for diagnostic instruments. 
Lamps, for surgical lights. 
Laryngoscope, 

Light, sur-gical, portable. 
Litter. 

Mallet, bone surgery. 
Needles J hypodermic, reusable. 
Needles, suture, eyed. 
Otoscope and ophthalmoscope set. 
Probe, general operating. 
Razor and blades (for surgical 

preparation) . 
Retractor, rib. 
Retractor set, general operating. 



A-2U 



RM-5, Attachment 1 



Rongeur, boneo 

Saw , amputat Ing . 

Saw, bone cuttirjg, wire (Gigil). 

Scissors, bandage. 

Scissors, general surgical. 

Sigmoidoscope. 

Speculum, vaginal. 

Sphygmomanometer- , 

Splint, leg, Ti-.omas. 

Splint, wire, ladder. 

Sterilizer, pressure, portable. 

Stethoscope. 

Suture s , ab sorb eb le . 

Sutures, absorbable, with attached 

needle. 
Sutures, nonabsorbable. 
Sutures, nonabsorbable, with attached 

needle . 
Syringes, Luer, reusable (hypodermic 

syringes). 
Thermometers, clinical. 
Tracheotomy tube. 
Tube, masogastric . 
Tubing, rubber or plastic, and 

connectors. 
Vascular prostheses. 
Webbing, textile, with buckle. 

6. lABOMTOKY EQUIPMENT AM) SUPPLIES; 

Bacteriological culture media and 

apparatus. 
Balance, laboratory with weights. 
Blood and urine analysis instruments, 

equipment and supplies. 
Chemical reagents, stains and 

apparatus. 
Glassware cleaning equipment. 
Laboratory glassware. 
Microscope and slides. 
Water purification apparatus. 



Gi-Qup B 



None. 



2. MEAT AND MEAT ALTERNATE GROUP. 
Meat, poultry, fish, eggs; also 
dry beans, peas, nuts. Important 
for protein, iron, and B-vitamins, 

3. VEGETABLE-FRUIT GROUP. Includ- 
ing (l) dark green and yellow vege- 
tables. Important for Vitamin A. 
(2) citrus fruit or other fruit or 
vegetables. Important for Vitamin 
C. (3) other fr-uits and vegetables, 
including potatoes. 

h. GRAIN PRODUCTS, Especially 
enr-iehed, restored, cereal and 
cereal products, and bread, flours, 
and meals, laportant for energy, 
protein, iron, and B-vitamins. 

5. FATS Am Ollis. Including butter, 
margarine, lard, and other shorten- 
ing oils. Important for palata- 
billty and food energy; some for 
Vitamin A and essential fatty acids. 

6. SUGARS AND SYRUPS. Important 
for palatability and food energy. 

7. FOOD ADJ-uTJCTS. Certain food 
adjuncts should be provided to 
make effective use of available 
foods. These include antioxidants 
and other food preservatives, 
yeast, baking powder, salt, soda, 
seasonings and other condiments. 
In addition, coffee, tea, and 
cocoa are important morale 
support . 

Group B 

Food containers. 
Nitrogenous fertilizers. 
Seed and livestock feed. 
Salt for livestock. 



II. Food; 



Group A 

1. MILK GROUP: Milk in all forms, 
milk products. Important for calcium, 
riboflavin, protein, and other nutrients, 



VETSRIK.ARY MEDICAL ITEMS: 
Anthrax vaccine. 
Black leg vaccine. 
Hog cholera vaccine. 
Newcastle vaccine. 



A-25 



Ill, Body Protection and Household 
Operations; 

Group A 

1. CLOTHING; 
Gloves and mittens. 
Headwear . 
Hosiery. 
Outerwear. 

Shoes and other footwear. 

Underwear. 

Waterproof outer garments. 

2. PERSONAL HYGIENE ITEMS: 
Diapers, all types. 
Disposable tissues. 

First aid items (included on Health 
Supplies and Equipment List). 

Nipples. 

Nursing bottles, all types. 

Pins. 

Sanitary napkins. 

Soap, detergents, and 
disinfectants. 

Toilet tissue. 

3. HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT: 
Bedding 

Canned heat. 

Cots. 

Hand sewing equipment. 

Heating and cooking stoves. 

Incandescent hand portable lighting 

equipment (including flashlights, 

lamps, batteries). 
Kitchen, cooking, and eating 

utensils. 
Lamps (incandescent medium base) 

and lamp holders. 
Matches, 

Nonelectric lighting equipment. 
Sleeping bags. 



BM-5, 
Group B 



Attachment 1 



Group B 



None 



IV, Electric Power and Fuels: 

1. EIoECTRIC POWER: 

Group A 
Electricity^ 



Conductors (copper and/or aluminum )\ 
including bare cable for high 
voltage lines and insulated wire 
or cable for lower voltage 
distribution circuits. 

Switches and circuit breakers. 

Insulators » 

Pole line hardware, 

Poles and crossarais. 

Transformers (distribution, 

transmissions and mobile). 

Tools for "Mve-circuit operations, 
including rubber protective 
equj-pKient s and linemen's 
tools . 

Utility repair trucks, fally 
eqvtipped . 

Prime mrr/er generator sets up to 
501 kilowatts and 2^+00 volts, 
including portable ajid mobile 
sets up to 150 kilowatts and 
110/220/440 volts, 3-phase, 
6O-- cycle complete with fuel 
tank and switchgear in self- 
contained units, ^^ 

2. PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; 

Group A 
Gasoline. 
Kerosene, 

Distillate fuel oil. 
Residual fuel oil. 
Liquefied petroleum gas. 
Lubricating oil. 
Grease , 

Group B 
Storage tanks. 

Pump for loading and unloading. 
Pressure containers and fittings 
for liquefied petroleum gas. 

3. aAS; 

Group A 

Natural gas. 
Manufactured gas. 

Group B ^^ 

Various sizes of pipe (mostly steel X^^ 
Various sizes of valves, fittings, 
and pressure regalators. 



A-26 



BM-5, Attachment 1 



Specialized repair trucks and 
equipment . 

k, SOLID FUELS: 

Group A 
Coal and coke. 

Group B 
Conveyor belting. 
Insulated trail cables. 
Trolley feeder wire. 
Roof bolts. 

V. Sanitation and Water Supply: 

Group A 

1. WATER. 

2. WATER SUPPLY MATERIALS; 

a. COAGULATIOM; 
Ferric chloride. 
Ferrous sulfate. 
Ferric sulfate. 
Chlorinated copperas. 
Filter alum. 
Hydrated lime. 
Pulverized limestone. 
Soda ash 

b. DISINFECTION CHEMICALS: 

High- test hypochlorites (70 percent) 

in drirnis, cans, ampul.es. 
Iodine tablets. 

Liquid chlorine, including containers. 
Chlorine compounds (not gas). 

c. MISCELLAlffiOUS MATERIALS: 
Diatomaceous earth. 
Activated carbon. 

3. CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, AND RADIO- 
LOGICAL (CBR) DETECTION, PRO- 
TECTION, AND DECONTAMINATION 
ITEMS: 

Calibrators. 

Chemical agent detection kits, air, 

food, and water. 
Dosimeters and chargers. 
Protective masks, clothing, helmets. 
Survey meters (A.lpha, Beta, Gamma). 
Warning signs - biological, chemical, 

and radiological contamination. 



U. INSECT AND RODENT CONTROL ITEMS: 

a. INSECTICIDES: 

DDT, water dispersible powder (75 

percent ) „ 
Lindane powder, dusting (l percent). 

Malathion, liquid ^ emulsifiable 
concentrate (57 percent). 

Deet (diethyltoluairiide) 75 percent 
in denatared alcohol. 

pyrethrccr.. 

b. RODENTICIDES: 

Anticoagulant type, ready-mixed bait, 
"1080" (sodium monofluoroacetate) 

(for corctrclled use only, ) 

5. GENERAL SAl^ITATION: 

Group B 

1. GENERi^J.- SUPPLIES AM) EQUIPMENT: 
Chemical feeders. 

Mobile and portable pressure filters. 

Chlorinators (gas and hypochlorites). 

Pumps and app'urtenances, Hand- 
Electric -Gasoline-Diesel, 

Well-drilling equipment, including 
well casing, drive pipe and 
drive points, 

2. STORAGE: MD TRANSPORT EQUIPMENT: 
lyster bags. 
Storage tanks ^ 

portable. 
Storage tanks. 



collapsible and 
rigid, transportable. 



Storage tanks, wood stave, knock-down. 

3. LABORATORY EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES: 
Membrane filter kits with filters 

and media. 
Chlorine and pH determination 

equipment , 

U, SANITATION EQUIIMENT: 
Hand sprayer, continuous type. 
Hand sprayer, compression tjrpe. 
Hand duster, plunger type. 
Spraying equipment for use with 
helicopter, fixed-wing light 
aircraft, high-speed fixed - 
wing attack aircraft, and cargo- 
type aircraft,. 



A-27 



EM- 5, Attachment 1 



VI, Emergency Ho-gsing and Construction 
Materials and Eq_ulpment; 

Group A 

Asphalt and tar roofing and siding 

products o 
Bui3.ders hardw-are - hinges, locks, 

handles, etc. 
Building board, including insulating 

board, larainated fiberboard, 

hardpressed fiberboard, gypsum 

board, and asbestos cement (flat 

sheets and waUboard). 
Building papers. 
Plastic patching, couplings, clamps, 

etc. for emergency repairs. 
Plumbing fixtures and fittings. 
Prefabricated eaTiergeney housing. 
Rough hardware - nails, bolts, 

screws, etc. 
Sewer pipe and fittings. 
Tents and tarpaulins; canvas, plastics, 

and other s:j:rii3.ar materials. 
Lumber and allied products: Lumber, 

princii>al3y 1-inch and 2- inch, 

minor quantities of small and 

large tirabers; siding and 

flooring; plyf/ood; m.illwcrk, 

doors, and windows. 
Masonry products - brick, cement, lime, 

concrete block, hollow tile, etc. 
Trans2,ucent window coverings. 
Water pipe and hose, plus fittings - 

all types, including fire hose. 



Pipe installation materials and 

equipment . 
Refrigerators, mechanical. 
Rigging tools - cables, ropes, 

tackle, hoists, etc. 
Tank railroad cars. 
Tank trucks and trailers. 
Tires. 

Trenching equipment. 
Truck tractors and trailers, 

including low bed. 
Trucks up to five tons (25 

percent equipped with power 

takeoff) . 
Welding equipment and supplies 

(electric and acetylene). 



Group 



None . 



VII. General Use Items: 



None 



GroupA 



Group B 



Batteries, wet and dry ce3.1. 

Bulldozers. 

Fire fighting equipK).ent. 

Light equipment and hand tools 

(including electric powered) 

for carpentry, masonry, plumbing, 

and exca.>/ation. 



A- 28 



RM-6 



0011 OP GOVERNOR'S EROCrAMATION ON STATE 



RESOURCE KiLICIES AND GUIDANCE 



STATE OF MONTANA 
■"'I''ICE OF Tl-ffi GOVERNOR 

To: Executive Heads of e"', .. Political subdivisions in this State. 



It is essential that thf. resources available to this State during the 
immediate postattack situation be carefully conserved and channeled into the 
most urgent uses and activities. 

I have issued overall p-^lieies and guidance on the use of essential re- 
sources. Copies of these policy and guidance documents are contained in the 
State Plan for the Emergenc^y Management of Resources and have been provided to 
the executive hea4s and governing bodies of all of the political subdivisions 
in the State. Included is a list of specific items considered essential for 
survival . 



State. 



I hereby proclaim these policies and guidance in effect throughout this 



I have instructed the Directors of the several State Resource Agencies 
to provide to you more specific guidance on the application of State policies 
for the distribution and use of resources. 

Facilities in your jurisdiction which produce or distribute items or 
provide ser^rices essential for local. State, and National survival and which 
must be supported with locally available reso\irces to maintain operations 
have been identified for you by the State Resource officials. 

You are requested to authorize essential local users and essential facil- 
ities in your Jurisdiction to use the following certification on their pur- 
chase orders or request on their suppliers to obtain resources, or in placing 
specific provisions contained in policies and guidance provided to you, on my 
behalf, by the several State Resource Agency Directors. 



"This is an essential order 
authorized by the State of 
Montana. " 

Signature of Purchaser 



A--29 



Please advise local employinent offices to act on requests and 
arrange for the assignment of manpower needed "by essential local users 
and essential facilities. 

You are to inform secondary suppliers of essential survival items 
in your jurisdiction that they are prohibited from selling items in 
their inventories unless (l) excepted hy the Federal General Freeze 
Order, or (2) to fill authorized demands under the consumer rationing 
system, or (3) to meet other essential needs authorized by you pursuant 
to specific guidance provided to you by the iirectors of the several 
State Resource organizations. Secondary suppliers and secondary in- 
ventories of resources are defined and designated in the separate re- 
source sections of the State Plan for the Eraergency Kanagement of 
Resources. 

If supplies of essential survival items available for use to meet 
essential needs in your jurisdictions axe inadequate you are to restrict 
further their delivery and use to those needs, -which in your judgment, 
are most urgent and request appropriate State officials to arrange for 
an increased resupply to make up local deficiencies o 

Federal emergency regulations contain provisions for persons 
operating essential facilities or providing essential services to use 
Federal certification on delivery orders to obtairi production materials; 
capital equipment; and maintenance, repair, and operating supplies. The 
Business and Defense Services Administration of the U. S. Department of 
Commerce has issued these regulations axid State production officials 
have distributed and pxiblicized them. You should advise the manage- 
ment of essential facilities to make use of these Federal authorities 
to obtain production materials; capital equipment; and maintenance, re- 
pair, and operating supplies where these are applicable; all other 
essential needs are to be met through State certified orders. 

You are to inform persons engaged in essential local activities 
or operating essential facilities how to obtain emergency credit from 
local banks and financial institutions in aceordar.ce with Federal emer- 
gency regulations. A copy of the Federal T^toergericy Banking Regulation 
has been provided to you preattack by the State Emergency Stabilization 
organi zat i on . 

As soon as possible you are requested to arrange for rationing of 
designated essential consumer items. 



^ 



A-30 



Governor of the State of Montana. In witness where of I set 
my hand amd seal this ____ ^^y ^^ , 19 



Governor 



Seal 



Secretary of State 



A-31 



RM-7 



ESSEMIAL CONSUMER ITEMS TO BE RATIOWED 

STATE OF MOHTMA 
OFFICE OF THE GOVHlSfOH 

To: Executive Heads of Political Subdivisions 



You are hereby directed to provide for distribution, through the 
consumer rationing system, of the following essential consumer items. 



Effective Date 



Govezv_or 



A-32 



RM-8 



(NOTE: This action docvonent will not be issued until immediate actions to 
supply arid resupply local needs are 'binder way. The precise point in time 
postattack for its issuance cannot be precisely identified preattack. The 
action must be based on a judgment that information upon which reasonably 
sound estimates of future requirementE and ar.ticlpated future resource sup- 
plies is obtainable by the Directors of the several Resource organizations.) 



COPY OF GO-TERNOH 'S IgllK?. 
DELEGATING K:ESOUfiCE'' ATW-SmiTl' 



^TATE 



MMTANA 



OFFICE err TJffl CzOWSMOR 



To: 



Resource Agency Directori 



With raspect to the particular rescui-ces assigned to your Jurisdiction 
you are hereby authorized to decide on the dii-isicn of such supplies during 
the 90-day period commencing (dats) afsong essential needs for these 
resources. In reaching these decisir/ns you will review estimates of require- 
ments presented to you by civil defense officials, representatives of the 
United States Department of Defense^ anxl other appropriate Federal agencies 
fianctioning in the State, and Directors of other State Resource Agencies. 
You will be guided in making decisions on the division or allocation of re- 
sources by my letter of (date) establishing State policy on the 

priority use of resources (RM-5) . 

You are to notify representatives of aiajor users of resources (claimants) 
of the quantities of resources allocated to carry on activities under their 
particular jurisdiction during the prescribed 9'3-day period. 

You will authorize such claimants to use and in turn to authorize others 
to use the following certification on purchase orders to procure quantities 
of resources within the amount allocated to th-err>: 



This is an emergency order 
authorized by the Directoi- of the 

State of Montane. (name of 

Resource Agency 1 



jlgnature 



Effective 



Governor 



A-33 



RM-9 

COPY OF GOVERNOR'S LETTER COMCERNING 
ADJUDICATION OF RESOURCE CONFLICTS 

STATE OF MONTANA 
OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR 



To: Resource A.gency Directors 



You are herelDy directed to report to the C-overnor, through the 
Director of Resource I'feinagement, conflicts resulting from actual or anti- 
cipated inability to meet needs for resources from supplies expected to 

be available during the 90-day period commencing (date) . 

This report must indicate the total estimated supply of the resources and 
of the demands placed upon them, together with your recommendations to 
resolve conflicts. 



Effective Date 



Governor 



A-3^ 



11. Emergency Organization . 

The attachments which follow identify ±\inctional areas involved in the 
management of resources in Montana in am eiaerp;ency. 

Attachment 1 - outlines crgani'^atio--.ai arrar.geitient s for the overall 
emergency rianageraent of resources and shows in chart 
form the composition of the organization. 

AttaclTimenb £ - illustrates both in outline and chart form the compo- 
sition aiid IV.nctions ol tiie Resource Priorities Board. 

Attachment 3 - pro/ides for the coiitinuity of Emergency Resource 
Management functions. 



■S:> 



Emergency Organization - Attachment 1 

ORGANIZATIONAL ARRMGEMEMTS 

FOR THE 

EMERGENCY MANAGE^ffiNT OF RESOURCES 



1. GENERAL : 

a. The Governor is vested with emergency powers and authorities by 
Article VTI, Sections 1, 5^ 6, 10, 11, Constitution of Montana, 
Section 82-1301, Revised Codes of Montaxia, and the Civil Defense 
Act of 1951, to manage all resources under the jurisdictional con- 
trol of the State in a nuclear emergency and to impose ajid admin- 
ister economic controls needed to statilize and maintain the economy. 

b. Outlined below are the actions taken by the Governor to assure the 
preparedness of the State to assume its responsibilities for manage- 
ment of resources during emergencies, 

2. STATE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATION 

a. The Governor, by Executive Order, has established an organization 
which has been assigned the responsibility for administering emer- 
gency resource management and economic stabilization during declared 
emergencies. Where possible assignment of these responsibilities were 
given to applicable departments and agencies of the State Government. 
Where existing agencies were not adequate for assuming required re- 
sponsibilities, certain emergency organizations and individuals from 
industry were appointed and given appropriate legal authority to act . 

b. The State Resource Management Orgajiization consists of a Director of 
Resource Management, a Resource Priorities Board Chairman, Federal 
liaison personnel, representatives of major resource users (claim- 
ants), and representatives of the following I'esource axeas: 

(1) Construction and Housing 

(2) Economic Stabilization 

(3) Electric Power and Gas 
(U) Food 

(5) Health 

(6) Industrial Production 

(7) Manpower 



(^ 



A-36 



Attachment 1 

(8) Petroleum and Solid Fuels 

(9) Public Information 

(10) Telecommunications 

(11) Transportation 

(12) Water 

c. Appointing authority aaid responsibilities of the organization is con- 
tained in RM-2 of this part of the Flano 

3. STATE RESOUECE PRIORITIES BOARD ; The Governor, by Executive Order, has 
established a State Resource Priorities Board to advise hiim on emergency 
resource management and exonomic stabilization policies and on decisions 
governing the allocation and use of essential resources to meet the most 
urgent needs, and has appointed an official to serve as chairman of the 
Board. 

h. STATE DIRECTOR OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ; 

a. The Governor has, by Executive Order, established the position of 
Director of Resource Management. This official shall act as his 
principal assistant and advisor on emergency resource management and 
economic stabilization activities of the departments and agencies of 
the State Government. 

b. The Governor has appointed the Adjutant General to the position of 
Director of Resource Management. 

5. CHART. 

On the following page is an organization chart of the Emergency Resource 
Management Orgajiization. 

Regular agencies of the State having responsibilities as emergency 
resource agencies are; 

State Board of Health -- Health Agency 

State Planning Board — Industrial Production Agency 

State Unemployment Compensation Commission -- Majipower Agency 

State Board of Health -- Water Agency 



A-37 



Attachment 1 



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A-38 



Emergency Organization •• Attachment 2 



^oMPOsrnoN at) ymmE^i^n? of 



THE STAT3 OF MOlfZAIJA 



RESOURCE PPiIOEriTiS ?CAEI 



IN TRCDU O'riOK 

1'Yi.e .Resource Priorities Board meets oxj. call of the Chairman when problems 
arise requiring the collective consider atic:.'j. and advice of its members. Nor- 
mally, the Directors of the Resource Agencies dispose of problems concerning 
the management of resources under their jurisdi-ition on their own initiative 
and refer to the Board only those problems they are unable to deal with by 
direct ;iegotiation. 

initially, most of the problems and actions to direct the distribution of 
locally available resources to meet iimtiediate end urgent needs will take place 
at local levels and create requirements for Sta~e action to resupply resources 
to meet local needs. 

As soon as infoxniiation is available;, the ^Hesource Priorities Board serves 
as a coorc-inating body in the developmeiit 'by the State Resource organizations 
of estimates of future continui)ig requiremeitts and expected supplies of resources 
that will he available for use in the State. It makes recommendations to the 
Governor for resolution of conflicts arid allocation of resources when expected 
supplies will not be adequate to meet all essential progra^is and needs. Member- 
ship on the State Besource Priorities Board ::iust necsssariiy consist of persons 
residing in or near the State Capital in ord.er to he able to meet and carry on 
Board fxsnctions as required following an attack, 

1. The Governor, by Executive Order, has ectaolished a State of Moviteuna Re- 
source I'riorities Board. 

2. i'he Fesource Priorities Board advises the Governor on resource msuriagement 
and exonomic stabilization activities in the State in an emergency, includ- 
ing the resolution of conflicting claims for scarce resources. In addition 
to presenting to the Eoai\l Ghe status of their resource in the State, the 
Pesource Agency Directors also present their claims upon other resources 
under the jurisdiction of other Litate Resource Agencies. 

3. Members of the Resource I-riorities Beard are an appointed Chairman, Direc- 
tors of the several Resource Agencies, as well as members representative of 
principal users of resources. 

K. /■'edsral agency officials pai'ticipating with the State in tlie management of 
certain resources as a Federal responsibility se^-ve as liaison representa- 
tives to the Resource Priorities Eoar'd, both in their capacity as suppliers 
of resources under Federal Jurisdiction and as claimants of resources under 
Stat.e jurisdiction. 



On the following pages are chai'ts shvowing t'l 
bhe Resource Pi'iorities Board. 



ccsposition and functions of 



A--39 



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Emergency Organization - Attachment 3 

ACTIONS TO ERO\nDE FOR THE 
COIfTBIUITY OF RESOliRC E MAMqEMEIgT 

1. The Governor of the State of Montana has assigned to the Montana Adjutant 
General Depaitment the responsihility for providing administrative support, i.e 
personnel, facilities, and supplies for the conduct of the emergency resource 
management function. ' Copies of this Plan and all action arid reference docu- 
ments have been placed and are immediately available in the Office of the 
Adjutant General and in the State Emergency Operations Center, 

2. Upon activation of this Plan the Resource Management Director and his 
immediate key staff establish headquarters at the State Emergency Operations 
Center. 

3. The Governor has selected and designated from gov-emment and the private 
sector qualified leaders with experience in particular resource fields to pro- 
vide executive direction in an emergency. Sosxers of key personnel of the 
Emergency Resource Management Organization and lines of succession to insure 
continuity of fianctions in all resource areas will be maintained in the State 
Office of Emergency Planning and in the State Emergency Operations Center. 
These rosters will be reviewed and up-dated periodically. 

h. The State Office of Emergency Planning will provide copies of the rosters 
mentioned in 2 above, to the State Civil Defense Agency. Upon receipt of 
appropriate instructions from the Governor or the Director of Resource Manage- 
ment, the State Civil Defense Agency will alert designated key officials in 
each resource area. These officials will further alert other members. 



A-U2 



PAET B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 



COKSTRUCT'ION AND HOaSING 



MONTANA PLAN 

?0R EMERGENCY 

MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES 



STATE OF MOmMA 

EMERGENCY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN 

PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 

I - CONSTRUCTION AND HOUSING 



This section of the State Emergency 
Resource Management Plan contains 
two subsections. The Construction 
Subsection deals with general con- 
stri^ction. The Housing Subsection 
deals with the repair, conversion, 
and construction and the management 
of emergency housing. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

CONSTRUCTION Page 

Introduction • B-I-1 

1 . Emergency Actions B-I-6 

2. Emergency Action Documents B-I-8 

Index of Emergency Action Documents B-I-8 

HOUSING 

Introduction B-I-lB 

1 . Emergency Actions B-I-2'+ 

2 . Emergency Action Documents B-I-25 

Index of Emergency Action Documents B-I-25 

3 . Reference Documents B-I-3d 

EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION B-I-39 



CONSTRUCTION 

INTRODUCTION 

This Construction Subsection of the State Resource Management Plan 
contains State policies^ guidance, and actions to meet essential con- 
struction needs in the State in a nuclear attack emergency. 

Definitions 

a. "Construction activity" includes the emergency repair and. modifi- 
cation of existing facilities and the construction of new facilities. 
It also includes the use of construction resources for the performance 
of emergency operations such as debris clearance, decontamination, 
highway repair, etc. 

b. "Construction resources" include contractor services such as general 
contractors, builders, and specialty contractors who provide the manage- 
ment skill and direction required for the execution of a canstruction 
project. 

c. "Construction contracts and orders" Include contracts for the repair, 
modification or construction of a facility and work orders to obtain 
the use of contractor services to carry on emergency oi>eratlon8. 

d. "Facilities" as used in this section Include facilities to provide 
essential services and protection for people including emergency hous- 
ing, welfare, and health services facilities. They also Include indus- 
trial plants and commercial facilities producing or distributing 
essential items, food production euid processing facilities, transportation 
and communications systems and facilities, electric power, gas and water 
utility systems and facilities, essential public works facilities, and 
essential military facilities. 

e. "Certified orders" are purchase orders, contracts, or other requests for 
resources which bear a signed certification that the order is an essen- 
tial order authorized pursuant to Federal Government emergency regulations 
or State authorizations. 

f. "Construction industry" means general contractors, builders, special trade 
constructors, and related professional skills such as design organizations 
who provide the management skill and direction required for execution of 
projects. 



General 



Emergency construction in the State involves two series of actions. First, 



B-I-1 



essential immediate needs for construction of facilities or use of contractor 
services to provide mass care and reception facilities, medical facilities ^ 
and emergency housing, etc., to carry on essential civil defense emergency 
operations for the survival of people and protection of property eure identi- 
fied and actions are taken to meet these needs. Secondly, and as soon as 
possible, future continuing construction needs and anticipated available 
construction resources are estimated and decisions are made and actions are 
taken to channel these expected future construction resources to meet con- 
struction needs most essential to continued survival and recovery of the 
State and the Nation. 

Following is a brief description of Federal, State, euad local govern- 
ment roles in the emergency man-agement and provision of construction re- 
sources in the State in a nuclear emergency. 



Federal Government 

The Federal Government has provided National policies and guidance axid 
preattack assistance to the State in the development of this plan and the 
prepajrations to implement it in an emergency. 



State Government 

The State Construction and Housing Agency develops in cooperation with 
other organizations of the State government and provides, on behalf of the 
Governor, policies and guidance, consistent with State and Federal construction 
objectives. The purpose of these policies and guidance is to assure applica- 
tion throughout the State of compatible measures to assure that the most 
essential construction needs are identified and met within the resources 
available. The State Construction and Housing Agency works with the construct- 
ion industry at State and local levels to arrange for contractor services and 
their materials and equipment vo undertake construction projects and services 
in the localities when locally available contractor services eure inadequate to 
meet urgent and essential construction needs in the immediate postattack 
situation. As soon as possible after the attack, the State Construction and 
Housing Agency in cooperation with other State organizations representing 
major activities in the State that involve the construction or repair and 
modification of facilities, anticipates continuing construction needs and 
arranges for construction resources to meet these ongoing construction needs. 

Construction contracts may be negotiated by the State Construction and 
Housing Agency in the event that local governments do not take action. 



Local Government 

Operation Survival Plans of the State of Montana and its political sub- 
divisions contain provisions for authorizing essential local construction 
and the use of construction contractor services and supporting resources to 



B-I-2 



meet essential needs In the localities. These plans also provide for local 
government decisions and guidance, consistent with State policies, for 
construction contractor functions in the localities and acquisition "by them 
of the manpower, construction material and equipment, petroleum products, 
and other supporting construction resources and services. 



Flow Chart 

Following is a flow chart showing the process and the actions to be 
taken hy State and local governments to assure that essential construction 
needs in the State are met in a nuclear attack emergency. The legend 
accompanying the chart identifies : 

A. actions to be taken immediately to provide for the construction 
of facilities and use of contractor services for survival, and 

B. actions to be taken as soon as possible to anticipate continuing 
needs and to channel construction resources to meet the most 
urgent construction needs for continuing survival and recovery. 



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■1-5 



1. Emergency Actions 

The following actions are taken on behalf of the Governor at State 
level by State Construction and Housing officials to provide policies and 
guidance applicable throughout the State on the provision and use of con- 
tractor services and construction resources to meet essential local needs. 

The emergency action and reference documents contained here have been 
prepared and placed with appropriate State officials during the preattack 
planning process. 

(Note: Where arrangements or consultations with, or requirements of, 
the construction industry are indicated, the principal contact at State 
level will be with the two Montana chapters of the Associated General 
Contractors of America, Inc. (AGCA) ; the Montana Contractors Association, 
Inc. for heavy construction and the Montana Building Chapter, Inc. for 
housing construction. This should not be interpreted to preclude contact 
with, or use of, non-members of AGCA by local governments.) 

a. Actions to Provide Immediate Construction 

(1) Issue, on behalf of the Governor, policies and guidance 
applicable throughout the State covering the provision of 
contractor services and available construction resources 
within the State. (Con-1, State Construction Policy and 
Guidance.) 

(2) Arrange with the construction industry at State level for 
the provision of contractor services euid construction re- 
sources to meet local needs based on local government 
reports of deficiencies in locally available contractor 
services and construction resources. (Con-2, State Assist- 
ance to Local Governments, and Con-3, Requests for Assist- 
ance to Expedite Deliveries of Consti^iction Resources.) 

b. Actions to Provide Continuing Construction 

As soon as construction activity for urgent immediate needs In 
the localities is underway, the State Construction and Housing 
Agency takes the following actions to anticipate continuing 
needs and to arrange for continuing construction services to 
meet these needs. 

(3) Consult with State civil defense officials. Federal military 
officials, and appropriate Federal and State resource offic- 
ials to estimate continuing requirements for construction 
that will be needed in the State during the ensuing 90-day 
period. (Con-U, Estimate of Continuing Construction Require- 
ments.) 

(k) Consult with the construction industry and estimate con- 
struction contractor services that can be supplied for 



B-I-6 



continuing use in the State during the ensuing 90-day period. 

(5) Estimate continuing requirements of building and construction 
supplies and equipment, petroleum products, construction man- 
power, transportation, and other supporting construction re- 
sources and services that will be needed to carry on required 
construction activities in the State during the ensuing 90-day 
period. Present these requirement estimates to appropriate 
State Resource organizations. (Con-5, Construction Industry 
support Requirements.) 

(6) If anticipated construction capabilities are Inadequate to 
meet the estimated requirements and adjustments in require- 
ments cannot be negotiated., refer to the Resource Priorities 
Board for recommendations to the Governor on the allocation 
of anticipated capability among competing programs. 

(7) Issue revised State policy on the use of construction capabil- 
ities in the State to conform with the Governor's decision. 
(Con-6, Revised State Construction Policy.) 

(8) Authorize civil defense officials, Federal military officials, 
and appropriate Federal and State resource officials to place 
or authorize others to place construction contracts. (Con-7, 
Construction Program Authorizations.) 



B-I-7 



2. Emergency Action Dociunents 

Following are emergency action documents to implement the foregoing 
emergency actions. 

(Note: During the process of expediting deliveries to meet urgent 
local needs, the quickest meajis of communication between levels of govern- 
ment euid with industry will be used. The forms illustrate the kind of inform- 
ation to be transmitted over telephone or other available mesins of fast 
communication. ) 

Index of Emergency Action Documents 

Con-1, State Construction Policy and Guidance 

Con-2, State Assistance to Local Governments 

Con-3> Request for Assistajice to Expedite Deliveries of Construction Resources 

Con-U, Estimate of Continuing Construction Req^ulrements 

Con-5* Construction Industry Support Requirements 

Con -6, Revised State Construction Policy 

Con-T, Construction Program Authorizations 



B-I- 



bon-1. State Construction Policy and Guidance 

To: Heads of Political Subdivisions 

Guidance for Local Governments . It Is essential that construction 
capabilities available for use In this State be carefully conserved and 
restricted to immediate and urgent use for local, State, and National 
survival and recovery until continuing construction capability can be 
assessed and contractor services and construction resources that will 
be abailable can be determined. 

In order to prevent waste and dissipation of construction resources 
and to provide adequate construction capability to meet immediate euid 
urgent needs, appropriate officials of local government are requested to 
take the following actions : 

1. Provide instructions to local constructtQH pantPftOta^B PP the 
Hinds of construction contracts and work orders they R^e to Reoppffe ta 
meet essential local needs, 

3, Authorize essential local users and esBBRtiiftJ, fReilttiies to 
plttse certified work orders and contracts with QWiptpuo^ic^ oontpactors, 

3. Enforce the Governor's policy by stopping npn-epeeiitlal con- 
struction underway and prohibiting new construction start s, unless 
authorized as essential. 

In the event available construction resourceB ore Inadequate to 
meet all essential needs, local governments should cut back on authorized 
local construction. Concurrently they should reptart shortagea and request 
appropriate officials of State government to take actions to increase the 
availability of construction resources to the local JurlBdlctiont 



Effective Date 



Governor of the State of Montana 



By: 



Director 

State Construction and Housing Agency 



B-I-9 



Con-1, Attachment 1 



Background Information 

The Governor has issued general policy on the use of essential 
resources In the immediate postattack period. These policies are set 
forth in Part A of the State plan. They have been furnished to appro- 
priate officials of the political subdivisions of the State. 

In general, these State policies provide for temporary freezing 
of retail inventories of essential items ajid immediate ajid continuing 
release of these items to meet urgent military and civilian needs and 
to maintain operations of facilities essential to continued survival 
and recovery. They provide for continuing resupply of local secondeury 
inventories as well as inventories of essential facilities which obtain 
their supplies from wholesale ajid primary sources. 

The general State policy calls for the following types of construction; 

(1) Emergency repair, restoration, or construction of facilities 
needed for survival, such as essential production, essential 
services, and emergency housing. 

(2) Conversion of facilities to survival use, where this ceui be 
accomplished quickly. 

Other construction already started should be stopped, and no new 
construction started unless it can be used immediately for essential 
purposes upon completion. 



B-I-10 



Con~2, State Assistance to Local Governments 

To: (name of appropriate official of a designated local government) 



In accordance with your request for assistance following are the 
names J addresses, and telephone ntunbers of construction and "building 
contractors that can undertake the construction or provide contractor 
services to correct the deficiencies you reported under date of ______ 



Name Address 



I have checked with appropriate government officials of the jurisdictions 
in which these contractors are located and have agreements that their services 
can "be diverted to your locality. 



Director 

State Construction and Housing Agency 



B-I-11 



Con-3i Request for Assistance to Expedite Deliveries of Construction Resources 

To: (state Resource Agency, e.g., Industrial Production Agency) 

You are requested to arrange with suppliers to make deliveries on 
certified orders received from construction contractors or from local distri- 
butors in the following localities in the follcf^ing quantities: 



Locality 




Item 


Unit 


Quantity 


Miles City 




Concrete 


Cu. Yds. 


100 


Kalispell 









































Director 

State Construction and Housing Agency 



B-I-12 



Con-U, Estimate of Continuing Constnactlon Requirements 

Attached are lists of and descriptions of construction projects that 
are required to be started in this State during the 90-day period commenc- 
ing . 

These requirements have been estimated and submitted by claimants eind 
resource agencies to provide essential facilities needed to carry on a.ct- 
Ivitles under their cognizance by the following categories : 

Civilian Requirements include the construction projects needed to 
carry on emergency civil defense operations and to maintain essential local 
clviliaji activities o These civilian requirements estimates are provided by 
appropriate civil defense officials. 

Military Requirements include the construction projects needed to carry 
on military activities and to maintain and operate mlliteiry Installations 
and equipment. These military requirements estimates are provided by appro- 
priate military officials. 

Resource Support Requirements Include the construction projects needed 
to repair, modify, or construct essential facilities under the cognizance 
of Federal and State Resource organizations functioning in the State. These 
support resource requirements are provided by appropriate State Resource 
Agencies, 

Attach lists of required projects submitted by claimant and resource 
organizations . 



B-I-13 



Con-^j Construction Industry Support Requirements 



Estimate of Construction Industry Suirport Requirements 
For 90-Day Period Commencing 


Resource 


Unit of 
Measure 


First 
30 Days 


Following 
60 Days 


Total 
90 Days 


Electric Power & Gas 










Water 










Transportation 










Petroleum & Solid Fuels 










Manpower 










Communications 





























































B-I-ll^ 



Con-6, Revised State Construction Policy 

(Note: The content and substance of the revised construction policy- 
will depend on the situation and the supplies expected to be avail- 
able to meet continuing essential needs. Necessarily, this document 
will not be completed except in a test of the plan or at the appro- 
priate point in a postattack situation. ) 

This document will be, in essence, a Revised Con-1, State Construction 
Policy and Guidance, contained here. 



B-I-15 



Con-7, Construction Program Authorizations 
To: (name of claimant or resource agency) 



This is confirmation of the list of construction projects that have 
been determined feasible of accomplishment in accordance with the Governor's 
policy or program decisions. 

You are authorized to place construction contracts or to authorize 
others to place construction contracts with contractors. 

These construction con+-racts are to bear the following certification: 



'This is an essential contract 
authorized by the State Construction 
and Housing Director. 



(Person placing contract)" 



Construction contractors are to be instructed to use this certification 
or the appropriate Federal certification on purchase orders for supporting 
construction resources. 



Effective date 



Director 

State Construction and Housing Agency 



B-I-16 



Con- 7, Attachment 1 
List and Description of Construction Projects 

Project (Description) Location Starting Date Completion Date 



3-1-17 



HOUSING 



INTRODUCTION 

This Housing Subsection of the State Resource Management Plan contains 
State policies, guidance, and actions for the repair, conversion, construction 
and management of emergency housing to meet the needs of the State in ja. nuclear 
attack emergency. 



Definitions 

a. "Emergency housing" means additional dwelling accommodations provided 
by construction of housing, repair of damaged housing, or the conversion 
of non-dwelling structures to dwelling use to meet the State and local 
housing needs. (Provisions for the emergency lodging or billeting of 
people in existing housing facilities are contained in the Operational 
Survival Plans of the State and its political subdivisions). The post- 
attack billeting use of existing housing and its management and conserv- 
ation is also a part of emergency housing. 

b. "Emergency community facilities" means all installations necessary to 
furnish water, sewer, electricity, and gas resources between the housing 
unit or project and the nearest practical source. 

c. "Housing management" as used in this plan means the provision by any 
level of government of management personnel and services for the oper- 
ation of housing owned or operated by government housing and organizations. 
It also means the provision of management by government to direct the 

use of and to protect the equity and interests of owners of private 
housing when for any reason the legal owners are not available in an 
emergency. 



General 

Emergency housing in the State involves two series of actions. First, 
immediately necessary emergency housing needs are identified and actions 
taken to meet these needs for the survival and protection of people. Secondly, 
and as soon as possible, future emergency housing needs are estimated and 
actions are taken to channel construction resources to meet the most essen- 
tial housing needs for continued survival and recovery of the State and the 
Nation. 

Following is a brief description of Federal, State, and local govern- 
ment roles in the provision and management of emergency housing in the State 
in a nuclear emergency. 



B-I-18 



Federal Government 

The Federal Government has provided National policies and guidance, 
and preattack assistance to the State in the development of this plan, 
and in the preparations to implement it in an emergency. 

The U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (USDHUD) has 
established a Federal emergency housing organization in this State with 
a State office located at 6l6 Helena Avenue, Helena, Montana. The USDHUD 
representative is empowered with the authority of the Secretary of Housing 
and Urban Development in the absence of effective national direction. 
Upon request of the State or local governments, this Federal agency pro- 
vides technical guidance and undertakes the construction, management, and 
financing of emergency housing where the State or local governments cannot 
provide additional essential housing capacity. 

Procedures and forms for requesting Federal assistance to provide 
emergency housing are contained in Reference Document Number 2 attached to 
this section of the State plan. Requests for Federal assistance will be 
processed by the State Construction and Housing Agency when requested by 
local government. 

Also, the Federal Government is responsible in cooperation with State 
and local governments for the emergency management of any part of the 
existing housing supply which in a postattack situation is left without 
effective ownership and management. This management will be for the pur- 
pose of insuring its greatest utility in connection with the survival and 
recovery of the Nation, and to conserve its value for the owners when they 
appear. This would occur after the housing is no longer needed for billet- 
ing. Basically, it would consist of housing upon which FHA had written 
mortgage insurance or VA had guaranteed mortgages, but would include any 
other "ownerless" housing. 



State Government 

The State Construction and Housing Agency develops and provides, on 
behalf of the Governor, policies and guidance consistent with State and 
Federal housing objectives. The purpose of these policies and guidance is 
to assure application throughout the State of compatible measures to assure 
that the most essential housing needs are identified and met within the 
resources available. 

The State Construction and Housing Agency arranges for contractor ser- 
vices and supporting resources when locally available construction resources 
are inadequate to meet urgent and essential housing needs in the immediate 
postattack situation. 

As soon as possible after the attack, the State Construction and 
Housing Agency, in cooperation with other State organizations, anticipates 
continuing housing construction needs and arranges for the provision of 



B-I-19 



construction resources to meet these needs. 

The State Construction and Housing Agency provides policies and, -where 
necessary, provides management or assists local governments in the provision 
of management for emergency housing. It also, where necessary, requests the 
USDHUD to provide Federal assistance and financing to construct emergency 
housing in the State. 



Local Government 

Operational Survival Plans of the State of Montana and its political 
subdivisions contain provisions for authorizing essential local housing con- 
struction activities and the use of the home building industry and supporting 
resources to meet essential needs in the localities. These plans also provide 
for local government decisions and guidance, consistent with State policies, 
for home builder operations in the localities and acquisition by them of the 
manpower, building materials and equipment, petroleum products and other sup- 
porting resources and services. 

Local governments also include in their plans arrangements to provide 
manpower, water, transportation, fuels, and other locally available resources 
for the provision of emergency housing and related community facilities. 

Local government, in addition, will be called on to determine local 
emergency housing needs, prepare a local housing construction plan by select- 
ing damaged housing for repair, structures for conversion, and sites for 
mobile housing or construction of new housing. 

Flow Chart 

Following is a flow chart showing the process and the actions to be 
taken by Federal, State, and local governments to assure that essential 
housing construction needs in the State are met in a nuclear attack emer- 
gency. The legend accompanying the chart identifies: 

A. actions to be taken immediately to provide, by new construction 

or by repair and conversion and/or management of existing structures, 
housing needs for survival and protection of people, and 

B. actions to be taken as soon as possible to anticipate and provide 
housing construction and management for continued survival and 
recovery. 



B-I-20 



BLANK PAGE 



3-1-23. 



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B-I-23 



1, Emergency Actions 

The following actions are taken on behalf of the Governor at State 
level by State Construction aiid Housing Agency officials to provide policies 
and guidance applicable throughout the State on the management of existing 
housing and construction of emei'gency housing to meet essential local needs o 

The emergency action documents contairied herein have been prepared and 
placed with appropriate State and local officials during the preattack plan- 
ning process o 

a. Actions to Provide Inmiediate Housing Construction and Mana gement 

(1) Issue^ on behalf of the Governor, policies and guidance 
applicable throughout the State covering the provision and 
management of emergency housing. (Eousing-1, State Haasing 
Policy and Guidance „ ) 

(2) Request the Construction Division to arran.ge for contractor 
services and construction resou.rces to meet deficiencies 
reported by local governments. (Housing-2j State Assistance 
to Local Governoent . ) 

(3) Request Construction Division to undertake construction of 
emergency housing beyond the capacity of local governments 
when requested to do so by local governments » 

(k) Upon request 'i>y local goveraments arrange for State or Federal 
financiiig and the provision of management for local emergency 
housing projects. 

bo Actions to Provide Continuing Housing Construction and Management 

As soon as emergency housing and management activity for urgent 
iimnediate needs in the localities is under way, the State Con- 
stiniction arA Housing Agency takes the following actions to esti- 
mate future continuing housing construction and management to meet 
these needs V 

(5) Consult with State civil defense officials. Federal military 
officials, and appropriate State and Federal resource officials 
to estimate continuing requirements for construction, conversion, 
and repair of housing that will be needed in the State during 
the ensuing 90-day period. Present these future housing re- 
quirements to the Construction Division together with estimates 
of building materials and equipment and other construction 
resources required to meet the requirements, (Hcusing-3j 
Estimate of Continuing Housing Construction Requirements.) 

(6) Receive approved housing program for the ensuing 90-day period 
and authorize local governments to undertake housing construction. 



t 



% 



B-I-2U 



(7) Issue revised State policy on emergency housing, construction, 
and management, (Housing-^, Revised State Housing Policy,) 

(8) If the State intends to request Federal reimbursement, copies 
of each application should be prepared for submission as 
appropriate to the USDHUD Emergency State Office for approval 
(see USDHUD documents on Emergency Housing Constmaction, Repair, 
or Conversion, as appropriate - Reference Docixment No. lo) 

(9) Authorize Civil Defense officials, Federal military officials, 
and appropriate Federal and State resource officials to place 
or authorize others to place housing construction contracts , 
(Housing-5, Housing Construction Program Authorizationo) 

2. Emergency Action Documents 

Following are emergency action doc-oments to implement the foregoing 
emergency actions. 

(Note: During the process of expediting deliveries to meet urgent local 
needs, the quickest means cf communication between levels of government and 
with industry will be used. The forms illustrate the kind of information to 
be transmitted over telephone or other available meems of fast communication.) 



Index of Emergency Action Documents 

Housing-1, State Housing Policy and Guidajice 

Housing -2, State Assistance to Local Government 

HouBing-3, Estj-mate of Continuing Housing Construction Requirements 

Housing-i4-, Revised State Housing Policy 

Housing-5, Housing Construction Program Authorizations 



B-I-25 



Housing-1, State Housing Policy emd Guidance 
To: Heads of Political SuMl visions 



Guidance for Local Governments . It Is essential that capabilities for 
housing repair, conversion, emd construction^ available for use In this 
State, be carefully conserved emd restricted to immediate and urgent uses 
for local. State, and National siirvival and recovery xmtil the continuing 
capability can be assessed and capabilities for less essential housing con- 
struction can be determined. 

In order to prevent waste and dissipation of housing construction re- 
sources amd to meet urgent and immediate local housing needs, appropriate 
officials of local government axe requested to take the following actions: 

1. Enforce State construction policies by stopping non-essential 
housing construction underway and prohibiting the start of non-essential 
housing repairs and construction. 

2. Authorize home owners to \indertake austere home repairs where 
this is essential for survival and immediate protection of occupants. 

3. Determine housing needs that ceuinot be met by lodging and billet- 
ing in existing structures and establish a program for the conversion of 
existing structures, repair, and construction of emergency type housing to 
meet these needs. 

k. Establish austere housing construction plans and specifications 
and engage building contractors to londertake housing repair, conversion, 
and construction. 

5. Where necessary, request the State to provide assistance or to 
obtain from the Federal Government assistance to finance, provide, and 
manage urgently needed housing. 

6. Provide for the management and use of housing where owners or 
managers cannot be located and protect the equity of these absent owners 
in such housing. 

The Construction Subsection of this section of the State plan contains 
policies, guidance, and actions on the provision and use of construction re- 
sources for necessary housing construction as well as all other types of 
essential construction. These have been provided to local governments. 

In the event available housing construction resources are inadequate to 
meet essential local needs, local governments should cut back on authorized 
local emergency housing construction. Concvirrently, they should report 



B-I-26 



# 



shortages and request appropriate officials of State government to take 
actions to increase the availability of housing construction resources to 
the local jurisdictions. 



Effective 



Governor of the State of Montana 



By: 



Director 

State Construction and Housing Agency 



B-I-2T 



Houslng-1, Attachment -1 



Background Informatlan 



The Governor has issued general policy on the use of essential re- 
sources in the immediate postattack period. These policies are set forth 
in Part A of the State plan. They have been famished to appropriate 
officials of the political Bubdivlsicms of the State. 

In general^, these State policies provide for temporary freezing of 
retail inventories of essential items and iriBnediate and continuing release 
of these items to meet urgent military and civil defense needs and to 
maintain operations of facilities essential to continued survival and 
recovery. They provide for continuing resupplj of local secondary invent- 
ories as well as inventories of essentieil facilities which obtain their 
supplies from wholesale and primary sources. 

In addition, the Governor has issued a ptrcclamatlon requesting the 
executive heads of the political subdivisions in this State to provide 
resources from locally available supplies to cetrry on immediate and urgent 
activities for survival and to maintain the operation of essential facilit- 
ies. In accordance with this direction from the Governor;, local govern- 
ments are requested to Inform essential users of resources and persons 
engaged in the operation of essential facilities how to identify their 
purchase orders, contracts, and other purchase arrangements to obtain 
deliveries of supplies and services. 

In accordance with Federal policies and objectives State conetruction 
policies provide for the use of construction resources to support the 
following types of constrxiction: 

(l) emergency repair, restoration, or construction of facilities 
needed for survival, such as essential production, essential 
services, and emergency housing, and 

(2} conversion of facilities to survival use, where this can be 
accomplished quickly. 

Other construction already underway should be stopped, and no new con- 
struction started unless it can be used immediately for essential purposes 
upon completion. 

Local governments, upon attack, certify their contracts to obtain essen= 
tial repair and construction of housing with the following certification. 



"This is an essential order authorized 
by the State of Montana 



(signature of official 



B-I-28 



Hou5lng-2, State Assistance to Local GovernmeE t 
Tcs Chief. Construction Division 



You are requested to take action to meet the follo-wlrtg shortages of 
emergency housing as reported by local governments o 



Locatic^__ ________.^ Des^^r-JPlti'^P. of Pro ject^ 



(date] Chief, Housing Division 



B-I-29 



Houslng"3i Estimate of Continuing Housing Construction B.equlreD.ents 

Tos Chief., Construction Division 

Attached are lists of and descriptions of building projects that are 
required to be started in this State during the 90-day period commencing 
(date) 

Completion 

Start Expected 
Locatio n Purpose Description of Work Date_ Date 

Lot 2.1 , ScLo 18 to construct complete construction 
housing units including required 
for 38 facilities 

(Note: Atach hill of 
materials and con- 
struction resources 
that will be required 



(date) Chief, Housing Division 



B-I-30 



Houslng-3^ Attachment-l 
To; State Construction and Housing Agency- 
Application No. _ _ ^ ^ 

From 



(City or County} "^^ 

Application for Emergency (Barracks) Housing 
(Where necessary, use additional pages to provide required informardon) 

We hereby officially request permission to construct Emergency Barracks to 
meet a critical housing shortage as follows} 

a. Number of Emergency Barracks Structiirea 
(each to house 20 persons) 

b. Number of Utility Buildings 

c. Number of Mess Halls 
1, Housing Condition 

a. Estimated number of people presently housed 

b. Estimated number of additional people expected 

c. Total • 

d. Estimated total number of usable units in 
community occupied and vacant 

e. Average number of persons per room In 
occupied family units 

f . Estimated number of additional persons who 
can be absorbed in existing units 

go Number of persons for whom additional housing 
must be constructed 



B-I-31 



Housing-3^ Attachment-1 (Contd,) 

2. Materials and Labor 

a. Are materials and equipment available locally for construction of 
the requested barrack structures? Yes No__ 

If partial^ state amount available 

b. If YES, who controls said materials and equipment ?_ 



(Indicate Federal, State, County, or City official by name or title o ) 

c. If not available locally, do you know where materials and equipment 
can be obtained? State where. 



d. Is labor available' 
3. Land 

a. Is land available?_ 

b. How many acres? 

c. Who has title? 



# 



d. Will land have to be requisitioned under emergency authority? 



e. 


Have appropriate officials agreed to requisition land? 




f. 


Name and title of these officials 











U. utilities 

a. Is there sufficient public water supply for the increased popu- 
lation? 



B-I-32 



Houslng-3, Attachment -1 (Contdo) 
b. If not, has application been made for increased water facilities? 



c. Are there sufficient public sewage disposal facilities for the 
Increased population? 



d. If not, has application been made for increased sewage disposal 
facilities? 



Signature of Official making Application 

Title: 

Date: 



5-1-33 



Houslng-i^f Revised Stdte Housing Policy 

(Note: The content and substance of the revised housing policy 
will depend on the situation and the supplies expected to he 
available to meet continuing essential needs. Necessarily, 
this document will not be completed except in a teat of the plan 
or at the appropriate point in a postattack situation. ) 

This document will be, in essence, a revised Houslng-1, State 
Housing Po licy and Guidance, contained here. 



B-I-3^ 



HouslKg-3> Housing Construction Program Authorizations 
To: (Name of claimant or resource agency) 



In response to your requirements the attached list of housing projects 
have heen deteniiined feasible of accomplishment. 

You are authorized to place contracts or to authorize others to place 
contracts with housing contractors. 

These housing contracts are to hear the following certification: 



"This is an essential contract 
authorized by the State Construction 
and Housing Agency Director, 

'[person placing contract)" ~ 



Housing contractors are to be instructed to use this same certification 
on purchase orders for supporting resources not covered by Federal emergency 

reg'j.lation. 



Effective date 



Director 

State Construction and Housing Agency 



Attachment: List of projects 



3-1-35 



3. Reference Documents 

Reference Doc\3inent No. 1 , Application for FederaJ. Relmbxirsement for Construe - 

tlon of Emergency Housing 

Application Is hereby made for reimbursement o f per cent* of 

the cost of construction of emergency housing. Including the cost of land. 

Incurred b y 

(State or Local Govemmftnt) 
The h ereby certifies that the emergency 

(State or Local Government) 
housing was necessary to take cexe of dislocated persons sad/ or employees 

of essential industries. 

The emergency housing consists of 



(T^PRcribft in tftrmR nt nr\-\f.fi err Htxiiftyp ■Pp>p+., as ftpprr>rr1 A.t.*» . irwA «i^^^^+■^onl^^ 

sheets and attach them to this application to provide all essential details) 

and was constructed betwee n 

(Insert starting and completion dates) 
No prior application for authorization to construct the above described 



housing was submitted because 



(State reasons, e.g., no communication possible; candltlons would not 
permit delay) 

A detailed account of the total expense Inctirred is attached. 



(Date) (State or LoceJ. Government) 

By: 

(Authorized Representative) 

*The cost of emergency construction of housing wlH be absorbed by the 
Federal Government to the degree and extent consistent with operating 
details now being developed to support a national policy of postattack 
loss -sharing or indemnification. 



B-I-36 



Reference DocLunent No- 2. USPIfJB Guidar-ce Publications 



(Note : Since these publicatioTLS are intended for use at State level 
they are kept; available at the State Corstrijction and Housing Agency- 
location in the State Emergency Operations Center o) 

1* C onstruct ion o Fl.acsj d.r8wi:::.gs ^ specificatiorij and materials lists 
have 'been developed fcr emergency harx'acks-type structures^ each 
accommodating 20 persoris?. Seine have been designed for use as mess 
halls and lavatories. Instructions for their use^ covering admini- 
strative procedures, design criteria, construction and financitig 
procedures J ax.d sample fcr/Ti;-.. 3;re contaijied in the docujnent entitled. 
Emergency Housing v'3crLi:t:ruction (Barracks.) 

2. Repair . Emergency repair t: tc 'damaged housing means those repairs 
which can "oe o.one jaic!*<:Ly with the materials arid manpower available 
locally and ui:der t".e c.-ntrsl of^ cr readily obtainable by, the 
local goveriment . I'hey include only the mi.nor repairs essential 
for restoring the daaagei structures to housing use and may or may 
not include the repair of all damage sustained by the str-jcture. 
The document entitled E^i^tiergg ncv Repair of Damaged Housing contains 
criteria for determining vhich striictures are repairable, as well as 
method, organization >, sa-mple contract forms, and financing for housing 
repair programs <, 

3. Conversions c Conversixi ii only one of several methods of providing 
emergency housing. By definition, "conversion" is a term used to 
indicate a non-dwellirg siii'uctujre which is physically altered by 
construction clianges cr aalitions so that it may be used as living 
quarters for jeopie, 'I'-ve document entitled Emergency Conversion of 
Hon-P-welling Stru cture; tc Dwelling Use contains guidance and in- 
structions for State and local officials, and includes standards 
for detennining convertibility, methods, and fineuricing, and sample 
forms. 

h. Tents euid T-railers. The document entitled Emergency Use of Tents and 
Trailers contains instructions for State and local governments on 
how to prepare and keep a current inventory, stan.dards foi' occupancy, 
site selection, and prepar'ation, financing, and management of existing 
stocks of tents and house t-railers in the hands of dealers and manu- 
facturers o 

5. Manageme nt . The Eaergency Hcusin g Management Manual sets forth poli- 
cies and procedures for the riiaiiagement of emergency housing, including 
tenant eligibility standards; eviction; establishment, collection and 
use of rei'.ts; managemenT: perscnTiel; and reporting. 

6. Emergency Comrj,.ni :;y Facilitie &_ Related to Housing . This pamphlet con- 
tains operational guidance, procedures;, and sample forms for use by 
local. State, and Fej^eral gcvamments in the repair, consti*uction and 



-1-57 



Housing Ref. Doc No. 2 (Contd,) 

financing of emergency community facilities related to housing in 
event of attack. Such facilities include installations necessary 
to furnish water^ sewer, electric, and gas services "between housing 
and the nearest practical source. 

7. Local Emergency Housing Service . This covers details on responsibil- 
ities, authorities, relationship to other local civil defense plans 
and operations, preattack planning, staffing requirements, postattack 
functions and anticipated State and Federal Government housing oper- 
ations. 



B-I-38 



CONSTRUCTION AND HOUSING AGENCY 
EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION 



The organizational chart which follows Identifies functional 
areas involved in the management of construction and housing re- 
sources in Montana in an emergency. 

These are actions to provide for the continuity of operation 
of the State Construction and Housing Agency. 

1. Copies of this plan and all action and reference documents have 
been placed ajid axe available in the office of the State 
Controller ajad in the State Emergency Operations Center. 

2. The Governor has selected and designated from Governmer^-t 
and the private sector qualified leaders with experience 
and knowledge of the construction and housing industries 
to provide executive direction in em emergency for the 
operation of the State Consti^ction and Housing Agency. 
Lines of succession to assure continuity of key staff 
for the operation of this Agency are provided in the 
roster of key personnel maintained in the Office of the 
State Controller, the State Office of Emergency Planning, 
and the State Emergency Operations Center. 

3. The State Controller is the Director of the State Con- 
struction and Housing Agency. 

k. Upon activation of this plan, the Director of the State 
Construction and Housing Agency and key staff with emer- 
gency assignments to the Agency establish headquarters 
at the State Emergency Operations Center. 



B-I-39 







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B"I=1^0 



PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 



II. ECONOMIC STABILIZATION 



MONTANA PLAN 

FOR EMERGENCY 

MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES 



STATE OF MONTANA 

EMERGENCY RESOUECE MANAGEMENT PIAN 

PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 

II - ECOWOMJEC STABILIZATION 



TABLE OF CONTErn?S 

Page 

Introduction B-II- 1 

1. Emergency Actions. ...« .... o B-II-10 

2 . Emergency Action Dociiment s . , B-II-11 

3. Reference Documents v , E-II-lil 

Emergency Organization. B-II-15 



INTRODUCTION 

This section of the State Resource Management Plan contains State 
policies, guidance, and techniques for the rationing of food, petroleiam, 
and other essential items to consumers and the stabilization of prices 
and rents including sales prices of real property in a nuclear attack 
emergency. 

Federal Government 

The Federal Government has made available to the State, National 
policies, guidance, and techniques for initiating and carrying on activ- 
ities in the State and its political subdivisions for the rationing of 
food, petroleum products and other essential items to consumers and for 
stabilizing prices azid rents including sales prices on real property 
postattacko 

State Government 

The State Economic SLabilization Agency on behalf of the Governor 
provides Stat:: policies, g-j.ide^ce, and techniques consistent with National 
policies, for the operation of consumer rationing systems and price and 
rent stabilization measures in the political subdivisions of the State 
until the Federal Government can absorb and administer, on a National basis, 
stabilization systems and measures. 

Local Governments 

Emergency plans of the political subdivisions of the State, con- 
sistent with Federal and State policy, contain organizational 
ari'angements and procedures for the local administration of consumer ration- 
ing and price and rent stabilisation functions within their jurisdictions 
immediately postattack. 

Boards of County Commissioners are designated as responsible bodies 
for State political subdivisions to supervise the above mentioned functions. 
To provide uniformity throughout the State, election precincts will be 
used for registration of individuals and Issuance of ration evidence as 
provided for in Reference Document No. 3^ "Ration Board Instructions for 
Postattack Consumer Rationing". This should not be interpreted to mean 
that ration boards will be established at precincts. Ration boards will 
be established at such locations and in such numbers as directed by Boards 
of County Commissioners. 

Financial, Monetary, Banking and Credit Responsibilities 

a. Federal Government 

Measures to maintain the solvency and functioning of the sur- 
viving banking and monetary system are a Federal Government 
responsibility. The United States Treasury Department through 



-II-l 



Federal financial agencies such as the Federal Reserve System 
and the Federal Home Loan Bank are responsible for the prepared- 
ness 8Jid administra^iion of postattack banking, monetax-y, credit, 
ai:d tax prograJs.s. Self -triggering postattack operating programs 
and orders have been prepositioned with bar.ks suid other financial 
institutions at all levels throughout the State. 

b. State Government 

The State has iuade known preattack to its political subdivisions 
the postattack provisions of these programs and orders. 

c. Local Govern^iaent 

Local goverriments are respo^.sible for advising persons engaged 
in carrying on essential survival activities or martaging essen- 
tial facilities In their jurisdictions of the general provisions 
of these programs and orders. Officials of local banks and 
financial institutions can provide specific information on how 
to obtain necessary credit to carry on emergency local functions 
and operations. 

(Reference Document No. 1 identifies the Federal Emergency 
Financial Operating Plan. Banking Reg. I of that Plan provides 
specific g-aidance with respect to the procurement; of credit for 
essential purposes. Further information with respect to the 
maintenance of the money, credit and banking system can be 
obtained from the Emergency Planning Officer of the Federal 
Reserve Bank serving this State.) 

Wage and Salary Stabilisation 

The field offices of the Wage and Hovir and Public Contracts Division 
of the United States Department of Labor ai-e responsible for planning for, 
and administering, on an interim basis, measures for postattack stabiliza- 
tion of wages emd salaries throughout the State. State aiid local govern- 
ment stabilization officials provide necessai-y supporting resources to 
this Federally administered program and coordinate the timing and appli- 
cation of local price and rent stabilization measures with the related 
Federal actions to stabilize wages and salaries. 

(Reference Document No. 2 identifies the Federal operating instructions 
for Wage and Salary Stabilization. This document lists the locations of 
United States Department of Labor who are responsible for actions to 
stabilize wages and salaries.) 

Flow Charts 

Following are three flow chai-ts arid accompanying functional statements 
for the Consumer Rationing, Price Stabilization, and Rent Stabilization 
programs . 



B-II-2 



Chart Number 1 



Indicates the various control levels involved in the flow and 
distribution of essential survival items in secondary invent- 
ories and their relationship to the Consumer Rationing system. 



Chart Number 2 

Indicates the responsibility of the various control levels with 
respect to the Price Stabilization program. 

Chart Number 3 

Indicates the responsibility of the various control levels with 
respect to the Rent Stabilization program. 



-II-3 



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-II-9 



1. Emergency Actions 

The following actions are taken at State level to provide State 
policies, guidance, and techniq.ues to cocrdinate and support the Admini- 
stration of economic stabilization systems and measures throughout the 
State. These emergency ac-*iions are effective iirniediately following 
attack upon this country everywhere physically possible or feasible - 
and particularly in all towns, cities or communities which escape major 
damage or are free of intolerable fallout. 

(l) Assure that local governments publicize and enforce the Federal 
General Freeze Order and the Governor 's Order dj.recting com- 
pliance with the Federal Fx-eeze" Order » (See Part A, RM-1, 
Governor's Order Directing Casvlt&ncs with the Federal General 



Freeze Orde r. 

(2) Assure that State Economic Sta'Dllizatlcn Grgani?;ations and 
programs are in effect thrcughcut the State in undamaged areas 
free of intolerable failaut. (Stab-1, State Econoxdc Stabil- 
ization Policy and Guidar^ce . ) 

(3) Issue emy cha^iges in the prepositioned Gcr/ernor's Order designating 
items to be rationed to individual cons^omers and, after consult- 
ation with State organizations, inform local governments ^ on behalf 
of the Govemor-j of recommended initial use levels for items to be 
distributed to individual consumers through the rationing system. 
(See Part A, RM-T, Essential Items to be Rationed.) 

(k) Request local governments to report on numbers of individual 

consumers registered and to be provided food, petroleum products, 
and other items distributed under the consumer rationing system 
and furnish this information to 3,ppropriate State Resource 
organizations as a basis for determining future resource require- 
ments. 

(5) Upon approved modification by State Resource Agencies inform 

local goverriJi).ents, on behalf of the Governor, of adjustments in 
use level tc conform to the expected availability of supplies 
for distribution to individual consiomers in the State under 
local consumer rationing system. 



-10 



2. Emergency Action Documents 

Stab-l, State Economic Stabilization Policy and Guidance 

To: Heads of Political Subdivisions 



Guidance for Local Governments o It is essential that food;, petroleum 
products ;, axid other items essential for the survival of people available 
for use in this State be carefully conserved and restricted to immediate 
and urgent needs until the continuing supply for use in the State can be 
assessed and the supplies to be available for less essential needs de- 
termined. 

In accordance with the Governor's general policy, it is necessary to 
(l) ration essentia.1 items to d_n.dividual consumers ^ '2) stabilize prices, 
and (3) stabilize rents including prices of real property a Consequently, 
Boards of County CcmEdssioners and appropriate officials of local Govern- 
ment as designated by Boards of County Commissioners are requested to 
take the following actions ; 

1, Riblicize and enforce the temporary freeze on retail invent- 
ories of designated essential items. 

2« Ann.ounce items to be rationed to individual consumers » 

3. Announce use levels for items to be rationed. 

k^ Upon request report to the State the numbers of individual 

consumers who are to be provided continuing supplies of food, 
petroleum products, and other essential items under local 
rationing systems. 

5. Announce items that are to be distributed through the use of 
individually issued ration certificates such as batteries, 
automobile tires, fuel oil, etc. 

6. Advise the public how and where to register to receive ration- 
ing evidence and how to use this evidence to obtain rationed 
items from distributors. 

7. Inform local retail distributors on their roles under the local 
rationing system. 

8. Announce and enforce prices and rents including sales prices 
of real property at levels in effect at the time of or just 
prior to the attack. 

In the event resupply of local inventories is inadequate to meet essential 
local needs including cons'jjners under the rationing system, local 



-11-11 



governments will cut iDack authorized uses including consumer use levels. 
Concurrently they will report local shortages and request appropriate 
officials of State government to take actions to increase supplies avail- 
able to the locality. 



Date 



governor of the State of Montana 



By:, 

Director J Moritar:a State Economic 
Stabilization Agency 



B-II-12 



stab - 1, Attachment 1 



Background Information 



The Governor has issued general policy on the use of essential 
resources in the immediate postattack. period. These policies are set 
forth in Part A of the State plan,, They have been furnished to appro- 
priate officials of the political subdivisions of the State o 

In general, these State policies provi'^e for tempcrary freezing 
of retail inventories of essential items and immediate and continuing 
release of these items to meet urgent military and civil defense needs 
and to maintain operation of facilities essential to continued survival 
and recovery. They provide for continuing resuuply of local secondary 
inventories as well as inventories of essential facilities which obtain 
their supplies from wholesale an.d primary sources. 

Essential Local Users are (l) civilian orgarizations engaged in essen- 
tial activities including persons., equipment and facilities providing 
essential survival care ar^.d services to people, (2) military organiz- 
ations engaged in essential military activities and, (3) farmers 
producing essential food and workers employed in essential facilities 
or local establishments providing essential items and services to people. 

Essential Facilities are (l) military establishments engaged in immediate 
retaliatory or defense operations, (2) electric power, gas, and water 
utility systems, (3) industrial plants producing or processing essential 
items, (h) major wholesale establishments storing or distributing essen- 
tial items, and (5) transportation and communications systems providing 
essential services. 

Individual Consumers are individuals who depend on local distribution 
systems (retailers and dealers) for essential supplies for individual ajid 
family use. 



B-II-13 



3. Reference Docviinents 

Detailed information concerning emergency economic stabilization 
programs is contained in the f ollavfing dociiments : 



Reference Document No. 1 



Reference Doctuaent No, 2 



Reference Document Wo. 3 



Reference Document Wo. 



Reference Document Wo. p 



Reference Document No, 6 



Money, Credit and Banking Programs 
in a Postattack Emergency, 

Wage aj-.i Salary Stabilization Programs 

in a Postattack Emergency. 

Ration Board Instructions for Post attack 
Consumer Rationing (Rationing "evidence" 
not included.) 

Rent Board Inst ;riact ions for Stabilizing 
Rents and DetermiL.i;ag Ceiling Prices of 
Real Property in a Postattack Emergency. 

Price Board Instriactions for Stabilizing 
Prices and Services in a Postattack 
Emergency. 

Suggested Structure - Emergency 
Economic Stabilization organization 
including F>J.nctional Statements, 



The above documents have been provided under separate cover to all 
members of the State Economic Stabilization Agency ajid to all Board of 
County Commissioners in Montana. Documents "i, k, 5j snd. 6 constitute 
Federal guidance to State and County Economic Stabilization Groups. 
Documents 1 and 2 are for the information of these groups and other 
Interested officials. 



5-II-^lL 



ECONOMIC STAJBILIZAIIOW AGENCY 
EMERGE'NCY ORGMIZATION 



The organization chaa-t which follows identifies functional areas 
involved in the management of economic stabilization activities in 
Monteuia in an emergency » 

These are actions necessary to provide for the contlnui.ty of oper- 
ation of the State Economic Stabilization Agency^ 

lo Copies of this plaa and ail reference documents ha^e been placed and are 
available in the office cf the State Audlr.or and in the State Emergency 
Operations Center 

2, The Governor has selected and, designated troir-. gcvemment aad 
the private sector qualified leaders with experience and know- 
ledge in the areas of responsibility of the Economic Stabiliz- 
ation Agency to provide executive direction in a£. emergency for 
the operation of the Agency, Lines cf succession to assure 
continuity of key staff for the operation of this Agency are 
provided in the roster of key personnel maintained in the Office 
of the State Auditor, the State Office of EToiergency Planning, and 
the State Emergency Operations Center.. 

3. The State Auditor is the Tirector of tne State Economic Stabil- 
ization Agency, 

kc Upon activation of this pleui, the Director of the State 

Economic tabilization Agency gtnd key staff with emergency 
assignments to the Agency establish headquarters at the State 
Emergency Operations Center = 



B -11-15 



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B-II-16 



FART B - RE30U;\CE SECTIONS 



III. ELECT'RIC POWER AND GAS 



MONTANA PLAN 

FOR EMERGENCY 

MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES 



STATE OF I^iONTMA 

EMEBGETJCY RESOURCE MANAGEIVENT PLAN 

PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 

IIIo ELECTRIC POWER AND GAS 



This section of the State Emergency 
Resource Management Plan contains two 
subsections <, ITie first deals with 
electric power and the second with 
natural gas. The two subsections are 
placed in this manner since the same 
State agency is responsible for the 
emergency management of both resources. 
This corresponds to normal distribution 
practices in Montana by private utilities 
corporations. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

ELECTRIC POWER Page 

Introduction B-III-1 

lo Emergency Actions B-III-6 

2. Emergency Action Documents . . „ . « . <, » . . • » B-III-7 

Index of Emergency Action Documents B-III-7 

GAS 

Introduction . B-III-28 

1. Emergency Actions .. B-III-3^ 

2. Emergency Action Documents B-III-35 

Index of Emergency Action Docioments ................. B-III-35 

3. Reference Documents ........ ..^ ............... B-III-^T 

EMERGENCY ORGAJ^IZATION ...................................... B-III-U8 



ELECTRIC POWER 



ITO'RODUCTION 

This subsection of the State Resource Management Plan contains policies, 
guidance, and actions to provide electric power to meet essential needs in 
the State in a nuclear attack emergency. 

The process for managing reso\irces in the State in a nucleax emergency- 
involves two series of actions. First, essential immediate needs are identi- 
fied and actions taken to supply these needs. Secondly, and as soon as 
possible, continuing needs and expected future supplies are estimated. De- 
cisions are made and actions are taken to channel these expected future 
supplies to meet the continuing needs that are most essential to survival 
and recovery of the State and the Nation. 

Following is a brief description of Federal, State, and local goverrjnent 
roles in the emergency management and supply of electric power in the State. 

Federal Government 

The Federal Government is responsible for working with the electric 
power industry to assure maximum generation, transmission and distribution 
of electric power to meet essential needs in the State of Montana as well as 
to meet essential needs in other States which depend on these common sources 
of electric power by virtue of interconnections. The Federal Government is 
also responsible for arrax^ging for the release of electric power from other 
States to meet essential needs in this State when necessary in an emergency. 

The United States Department of the Interior has established the Defense 
Electric Power Administration (DEPA) to perform these functions in an emer- 
gency. The DEPA has l6 Area Power Offices in the United States. 

In addition, najned eiiiployees of the electric power industry in this 
State have been selected by the industry and designated by DEPA as State 
and local power liaison representatives to work with State and local govern- 
ment power officials. They provide information needed by the Federal Area 
Power Directors to make decisions on the distribution of available electric 
power to the States included in their Areas. 

State Government 

Tne State Electric Power and Gas Agency develops, in cooperation with 
organizations of the State government, and provides, on behalf of the 
Governor, State policies and guidance consistent with State euid Federal 
objectives. The purpose of these policies and guidance is to assure the 
application throughout the State of compatible meadures for the conservation, 
distribution, and use of electric power to meet essential needs within the 
ava J lab le supply , 



B-III-1 



In collaboration with other State Agencies representing major activities 
within the State that consume electric power it anticipates feature continuing 
needs and requests^, through the State ax-d local power liaison representives, 
actions by the industry to correct existing and anticipated power supply de- 
ficiencies o 

In the event the DEPA is ijinable to function in the State in the immediate 
post-attack period, the State Electric Power and Gas Agency assumes, on behalf 
of the Federal Government, the responsibility for working directly with the 
electric power industry until Federal capability is established. 

Local Government 

Operational Survival Plans of the State of Montana and its political sub- 
divisions contain provisions for the conservation, distribution, and use of 
electric power provided by local utilities for local use. These plans provide 
for local government decision eoid action, consistent with State policies and 
guidance, to curtail nonessential uses of local power and to establish priori- 
ties on use where necessary. 

Local governments also include in their plans arraz.gements to pro\-ide 
manpower, water, transportation, fuels, and other locally available requisites 
for the operation of essential electric power facilities in their jurisdictions. 

Flow Chart 

Following is a flow chart showing the process and the actions to be taken 
by State and local governments to assure a continuing flow of electric power 
to meet essential needs in the State in a nuclear attack emergency. The legend 
accompanying the chai't identifies: 

A. actions to be taken immediately to supply immediate needs essential 
for survival; and 

B. actions to be taken as soon as possible to anticipate continuing 
needs and to channel electric power to meet the most urgent needs 
for continuing survival and recovery. 



m 



E-III-2 



BIAITK PAGE 



5-III-3 



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B-III-5 



1. Emergency Actions 

The following actions are taken on behalf of the Governor hy State 
Electric Power and Gas Agency officials to provide statewide policies and 
guidance on the distrihution and use of electric power. 

The emergency action and reference documents contained herein have 
heen prepared and placed with appropriate State and local gcverrjnent of- 
ficials during the preattack planning process. 

a. Actions for Immediate Su] 

(l) Issue, en "behalf of the Governor, State policies and guid- 
ance applicable throughout the State covering the provision, 
distribution, and use of electric power. (Elec, and Gas - 1, 
State Electric Power and Gas Policy and Guidance . ) 

(p.) Receive requests fV'om local governments for assistance to 
meet local shortages of electric power supply. (Elec. - 2, 
Request for State Assistance.) 

(3) Request State power liaison representatives to arrange for 

actions oy the industry to correct local power supply defic- 
iencies. (Elec. - 3} Request for Industry Assistance.) 

b. A ctions for Continuing Supply 

As soon as supply to meet essential immediate needs in the local- 
ities has been taken care of, the State Electric Power and Gas Agency 
takes the following steps to anticj.pate continuing needs and to arrange 
for continuing supply to meet these needs. 

(U) Consult with State civil defense supply officials, Federal 

military officials, and appropriate State resource officials 
to estimate continuing requirements for electric power in 
the State during the ensuing 9^-day period. (Elec - 4, 
Estimate of Continuing Electric Power Requirements.) 

(5) Obtain through the State power liaison representative esti- 
mates of the electric power that can be supplied by the 
industry for continuing use in the State during the ensuing 
90 -day period. 

(6) If anticipated supplies are inadequate to meet the estimated 
requirements, and adjustments in the requirements cannot be 
negotiated, refer to the Resource Priorities Board for re- 
commendations to the Governor on the allocation of anticipated 
supplies among competing programs. (Elec. - ^, Allocation of 
Electric power Supply.) 



m 



B-III-6 



(?) Issue revised State policies arA guidance on the use of 

electric pover in the State to conform with the Governor's 
decision. 'Eleco - 6, Revised State Electric Power Policy.) 

(8) Consult with the State power liaison representative and 
develop estiitiates of continuing requirements for manpower ^ 
fuels, transportation, water, petrolevim products, and other 
operating sapplies, equipment, and. services that will be 
needed to jcalr-tain cjperatrlons of essential electric power 
facilities in the State during the ensuing 90-day period. 
Present theae requirements estimates to appropriate State 
resource orgsnization.. (Elec, ~ J, Electric Power Indi.;stry 
Support Reqii ir eKient s , ) 

(9) Consult with the State Power liaison representative arid de= 
velop estimates of emergency repair and construction of 
essential electric power facilities that will be required 
during the ens.iing 9':.' -day period,. Present these requirements 
estimates to the State Constr-action and Housing Agency,. (Elec. 
- 8, Electric Power Industry Construction Requirements o) 

(lO) Consult with ^Jtate power liaison representative sjid authorize 
electric power sjistems and facilities to obtain designated 
quantities of specif iec!. supporting resources. (Elec. - 9, 
Authorization to Electric Power Systems and Facilities to 
Obtain Supporting Resources,) 

2 . Emergency Action Docuj'e.t t s 

Following are emergency action documents tc implement the foregoing 
emergency actions , 

(Note; During the process of expediting deliveries to meet urgent local needs, 
the quickest means of comrranicaticn between levels of government and with in- 
dustry will be used, 'I'he forms illustrate the kind of information to be trans- 
mitted over telephone or other available means of fast cofurotinication,) 

Index of Emergency Action Docvunents 

State Electric Power and Gas Policy axtd Guidanc e 

Request for State A ssist ance 

H equest for Industry .'Issistance 

E stimate of C o ntin uing Electric Power R equirements 

.A-lloc atiqr ; of Elec tric Power Supply 

Revise d State Electric Power Policy 

Electric power Industry Support Requirement s 

Electric Fower Industry Construction Requirement s 

Author iz at ion t_o E'.i .ect ri e mpower Systems and F acilities 

tc; Obtain 5app_or_tj.ng_ Resource s 



Elec, 


ar^d Gas 


Elec. 


~ 2 


Elec. 


- 3 


Elec. 


„ k 


Elec, 


- 5 


Elec, 


" 6 


Elec,> 


" 7 


Elec. 


- 8 


Elec, 


~ Q 



E-III-7 



Elec. and Gas - 1, State Elec t ric Power and Gas Policy and Guidance 

To; Heads of Political Subdivisions 

Guidance for Local Governments 

It is essential that electric power and gas available for use in this 
State and its localities he carefully conserved and restricted to essential 
local users , essential faciliti es, and the miniaiugi _needs of individxial con- 
sumer g^^til the continuing supplies of these resources can he assessed and 
the supplies that will he available for less essential needs can be deter- 
mined . 

In accordance with the Governor's general policy to (l) prevent waste 
and dissipation of electric power and gas, (2) provide supplies of electric 
power and gas to meet needs of essei'^tial local users and ma?lntain operation 
of essential facilities, (3) meet mnimum electric power aiid gas needs of 
individual consumers^ and (k) assure continuing supply of electric pcwer 
and to resupply of local secondary inventories of gas, appropriate officials 
of local goveniraents are requested to take tiie follo^/ing actions: 

lo Curtail non-essential and unsafe local uses of electric power and 
gas. (Attachment - 2); 

2. Enforce priorities on local use of electric power and gas. 
(Attachment - 3) - 

In the event electric power or gas supplies are not adequate to meet 
all essential local needs, local governments will decide and cut back author- 
ized local tises. Concurrently they will repoi-t local shortages euid request 
the State Electric Power and Gas Agency to take actions to increase the 
supply of the appropriate resource to the local jurisdictions. 



Effective Date 



^ 



Governor of the State of Montana 



BY: 



Director 

State Electric Power and Gas Agency 



B-rii-8 



Elec= and Gas - 1, Attachment - 1 



Background Information 

The Governor has issued general policy on the use of essential re- 
sources in the immediate nostattack period. These policies are set forth 
in Part A of the State plan. They have been furnished to appropriate of- 
ficials of the political subdivisions of the State. 

In general, these State pclicies provide for temporary freezing of 
retail inventories of essential items and for immediate and continuing re- 
lease of these items to meet urgent military and civil defense needs and to 
maintain operation of facilities essential to continued survival and re- 
covery. They provide for continuing resupply of local secondary inventories 
as well as inventories of essential facilities which obtain their supplies 
from wholesale and primary sources. 

In addition, the Governor has issued a proclamation (P_M-6) requesting 
the executive heads of the political subdivisions in this State to provide 
resources from locally available supplies to carry on immediate eind urgent 
activities for survival and to maintain the operation of essential facilities. 
In accordance with this direction from the Governor, local governments are 
requested to inform essential users of resources and persons engaged in the 
operation of essential facilities how to identify their purchase orders, 
contracts, and other purchase arrsingements to obtain deliveries of supplies 
ar;d services. 

Local governments, upon attack, notify the management of these essen- 
tial electric power and gas facilities to certify their purchase orders and 
contracts to obtain production materials, capital equipment, and roaintengmce, 
repair, and operating supplies or to place contracts for essential repair arid 
construction as follows: 

1. Essential electric power facilities and essential gas facilities 
use the following State certification to identify: 

a. purchase orders for supplies of electric power, gas, petrol- 
eum products, solid fuels, and transportation services, and 



b. 



construction contracts for repair and constin-iction of facil- 
ities. 



'This is an essential order 
authorized by the State of Montana 



("signature of purchaser") 



B-III-9 



Elec. and Gas - 1, Attachment ■- 1 
(Continued) 

2o Essential electric power and gas facilities identify their 
purchase orders in accordance with the rating and certification provisions 
of Federal emergency regulations issued hy the Business and Defense Services 
Administration of the U= S. Department of Commerce upon attack, sjid other 
maintenance ;, repair aiid operating supplies. The State Industrial Pi'Oduction 
Agency publicizes axid makes known these Federal regulations to local govern- 
ments and industry immediately following an attack. 

Retail distributors use the State certification on purchase orders to 
supply their inventories from primary gas distributors. 

Essential Local Users are (l) civilian organizations engaged in essen- 
tial civil defense activities including persons, equipment and facilities 
providing essential survival care arid services to people, (2) militai-y 
organizations engaged in essential military activities, ajid (3) fanuers 
producing essential food and workers employed in essential items and services 
to people. Less essential individual consumers are not included except those 
requiring jjnmediate supplies for individual or family survival. 

Essential Facilities are defined as (l) military establishments engaged 
in immediate retaliatory or defense operations, (2) electric power, gas, and 
water utility systems, (3) industrial plants producing or processing essen- 
tial items, (h) major wholesale establishments storing or distributing 
essential items, and (5) transportation and communications systems providing 
essential services. 

Individual Consumers are consumers not included in defined Essential 
Facilities or Essential Local Users. These individual consumers obtain electric 
power and gas for authorized uses from local utilities subject to curtailments 
on use issued by local governments. 

(Note: Essential Electric Power Facilities are facilities engaged in the 
generation, transmission, and distribution of electric power. Essential 
Gas Facilities are facilities engaged in the production, transmission, and 
distribution of natural gas.) 



B-III-10 



Elec. euid Gas - 1, Attachment 2 



Curtailment of Service 



EIECTRIC POWER 



In accordance with the Governor's policy^ curtailment on local use of 
electric power is suggested hy a series of seven steps, which are listed 
below. When Steps I through Tl are taken they axe enforced by appropriate 
local government authorities « Step VTI is carried out by the utility. 
The public is to be informed and instructed through available communication 
media. Modification at the discretion of local government of the curtailment 
steps to suit local conditions is to be effected as required. Local utility 
representatives can be of great assistance in advising local governments. 

If, in the restoration of electric power, service CEuinot be provided 
for all uses, restoration shall be in reverse order of the steps listed 
below. 

Step I - Discontinue t 

a. All exterior advertising, decorati'^e, and flood lighting. 

b. All show window lighting. 

c. All interior display and showcase lighting. 

d. All comfort air conditioning. 

e. The use of electric ovens and broilers in home cooking, and 
reduce use of electricity for other home cooking to an abso- 
lute minimum. 

f . The use of all residential electrical appliances except re- 
frigerators, ranges, and television or radio receivers o 

g. Nonresidential cooking arid baking on electrical equipment except 
for essential staple foods, and reduce nondomestic use of 
electricity for all cooking emd baking to em absolute minimum. 

Step II - Reduce! 

a. Elevator service to sji absolute minimum. 

b. Public lighting to the absolute minim-um essential for safety, 

c. Thermostat settings for comfort heating, utilizing electricity, 
to a maximum of 65 degrees daytime and 50 degrees night-time 
temperature s . 



E -III -11 



Elec. and Gas - 1, Attachment 2 
(Continued) 

d. The use of hot water heated by electricity to minimum require- 
ment s . 

e. General illumination "by 50^ in all commercial and residential 
establishments . 

f. Electric trajisportation facility heating by 50^ • 

g. The use of radio and television receivers to the minimum 
necessary to receive civil defense information and instructions » 

Step III - Discontinue the use of electricity except for preservation of 
equipment : 

a. In all places of amusement. 

b. In nonessential public places (such as museums, galleries, etc) 

c. In schools other than those vrith pupils attending pursuant to 
requirements to the Compulsory Education Law and institutions of 
higher learning. 

Step IV - Discontinue the use of electricity except for preservation of 
equipment : 

a. In all commercial wholesale and retail establishments except these 
engaged in the distribution of controlled-temperature storage 

of foods, fuel, medical supplies, and medicines. 

b. In all industrial establishments not engaged in the manufacture, 
processing, or controlled-temperature storage of staple foods, 
medicines, and medical supplies, or specifically designated by 
the State as essential facilities. 

c. In all office buildings not engaged in communications, utilities, 
police, fire, health, water supply, public works, welfajre and 
transportation services. 

Step V - Discontinue industrial use of electricity by all essential indus- 
trial facilities except those engaged in the manufacturing, pro- 
cessing, controlled-temperature storage and distribution of staple 
foods, fuel, and medical supplies. 

Step VI - Discontinue use of electricity to preferred services. 

Step VII - If electric power service caiinot be rendered with safety, the 
utility shall disconnect all power supply 



B-III-12 



Elec. and Gas - 1, Attachment 2 
(Continued) 



G A S 

In accordance with the Governor's policy, curtailment on the local 
use of gas is suggested by the following steps. When Steps I emd II are 
taken they are enforced "by appropriate local government authorities. 
Step III is carried out by the utility. The public is to be informed and 
instructed through available communication media. Modification at the 
discretion of local government of the curtailment steps to suit local con- 
ditions is to be effected as required. 

Step I - Discontinue: 

a. All comfort air conditioning. 

b. All residential useS;, except refrigeration, cooking, space 
heating, axid water heating. 

c. Use in coin operated laundries for drying purposes. 
Step II - Reduce : 

a. Thermostat settings for comfort heating to a maximum of 

65 degrees day-time and 50 degrees night-time temperatures, 

b. Use of hot water heated by gas to minimum requirements. 

Step III - If gas service can not be rendered with safety, the utility 
shall disconnect all gas supply. 



B-III-13 



Elec, and Gas - 1, Attachment 3 
Priorities on Local Use of Electric Power and Gas 

In accordance with the Governor's policy the following essential local 
users having more direct application of electric service shall have first 
preference for service or restoration of service; 

Electric and gas utilities power requirements needed for rendering 
service for essential uses- 

Military reprisal facilities « 

Hospitals ajid emergency hospitals » 

Water pumping ai:d sewage disposal plant So 

Emergency shelters and community facilities for displaced persons. 

Control centers (civil defense^ police, fire, light, gas, water, etc) 

Food production, processing, storing and distribution. 

Dairy fanus for militing arid cooling = 

Ice and dry ice plants. 

Comnronication utilities: 

Telephone Services 
Radio Services 
Telegraph Services 
Television Services 

Solid fuels, petroleum gas, and electricity. 

Transportation utilities. 

Doctors' offices and clinics. 

Essential government services. 

Plants manufacturing survival items. 

It must be recognized that damage may be sustained by the facilities supply- 
ing these priority loads and that every effort will be made by the utilities to 
restore service to the users listed above. The priority of restoration shall 
be determined by appropriate local goveiTiment authorities in cooperation with 
representatives of local utilities. 



B-III-1^ 



EleCo ar.d Gas - 1, Attachment k 

Dai cage Asses3meri.t 

Timely restcratior. of electric power and gas service will depend greatly 
upon prompt and accurate darcage ir-.Tcr-'aatior:. received by the State Electric 
Power and Gas .Agency„ A nuclear attack may cause radiological fallout to pre- 
vail over various sections of Montana and render on the spot assessment of 
damage impossible for a number of days. However, equipment peculiaa* to these 
industries will provide inforaation that can 'be used in formulating initial 
dajnage estimates and Inventories. 

\^fhen dajnage information is available (normally such information will come 
from the system dispatchers of the various utilities) , communications must be 
established with the State E:nergency C'perations Center by one of the follov/ing 
methods. 

1. Telephone. If direct line service is inoperable, have operator try 
routing call through another city, 

2. If telephone comEiu.uication is nor. possible;, use radio or microwave 
to an.other point in the pai'ticuiar utility system or the Montana 
Power Company system for relay to the E„CoC„ 

3- If above systems are out, contact local Civil Defense office and ask 
them to relay infomiation to the EoO.C, 

Initial damage information shoj.ld include the following as a rainimiam: 

1. Power generation and gas production facilities - out of service ajid 
inoperaVile. 

2. High voltage transmission lines a:id primary pipelines - out of 
service and inoperable. 

3. Substations (electricity transmission) and primary pipeline regulat- 
ing stations - out of ser.-^r±ce end inoperable. 

k. Substations (towi:) and gas regulating stations (town) - out of 
service and inoperable . 

\Then on-site assessment, of damaged facil5.ties can be made, the following 
information must be reported to guide the logical scheduling of repairs which 
will permit restoration of service for the most essential uses. It is recog- 
nized that the utilities normally a7.-e capable of taking care of their own needs, 
however damage may be so expensive as to require coordination by the State Elec- 
tric Power and Gas Agency for mutual assistaiice between utilities and for pro- 
curement of requirements through other State Resource Agencies. 

1. Facilities that can be restored wrlth xinor repairs. (Estijuate time.) 

2. Facilities that can be restored with major repairs. (Estjjoate time.) 



B-III-1:^ 



Elec. and Gas - 1, Attachment h 
(continued) 



3. Materials needed and where available, if known. 

h. Transportation needed, 

5. Manpower needed, 

6. Equipment needed and where available, if known. 



E -III -16 



Elec. - 2, Req.uest for State Assistance 

To: Director, State Electric Power and Gas Agency- 



Supply of electric power in this local jurisdiction is inadequate to 
meet present arid anticipated needs of essential local users, essential 
facilities and individual consumers. 

Authorized local uses have been cut back as far as possible by local 
government action. 

Assistance is needed to increase the level of supply to this local 
jurisdiction as quickly as possible, 

(List below present supply level and minimum requirements in kilowatt hour 
Show hourly and daily requirements data.) 



Date (Name of Head of Local Govt.) 



By: 



Local Electric Power Official 



B-III-17 



Elec. - 3 J Request for Industry Assistance 



To: State Power liaison Representatives 



Shortages of electric power have teen reported from the following 
localities in this State: 



Sunnoary of Local Deficiencies 
in Daily Supply of Electric Power 



(List helow localities reporting deficient power supplies. 
Show present supply levels ai-j/i minimum ho-^xrly and daily 
requirements expressed in fcLlowatt hours/; 



You are lequested to arrajige with the electric power industry to 
correct these deficiencies by taking steps to Increase power supply to 
these localities. 

Please advise this office of the increased power supply that has heen 
made available to these localities. 



Date 



Director, 

State Electric Power and Gas Agency 



B -111-18 



Elec. - k, EstJPiate of Continuing Electric Power Requirements 

Forms 1 and 2 attached to this emergency action document contain data 
on quajitities of electric power that will he required in this State for 
the 90-da;y period coinmencing_ . 

The requirements stated include the quantities of electric power to 
meet needs of essential users, essential facilities and individual consumers 
throughout the State .> 

i'he purpose of these State requiiements estimates is to deteraiine and 
anticipate quantities of electric power needed from the industry during this 
90-day period. 

Definitions 

■'Civiliai-i Requirements" include the electric power needed to carry on 
emergency civil defense operations, to maintain essential local activities^, 
and to supply individual consumers. These civiliaji requirements estimates 
are provided by appropriate civil defense officials. 

"Military Requirements'' include the electric power needed to carry on 
military acti'v'ities and to maintain an.d operate military installations and 
equipment.. These militso-y requirements estimates are provided by appro- 
priate military officials, 

"Resource Support Requirements" include the electric power needed to 
maintain operation of essential facilities located in the State. These 
support resource requirements are provided hy appropriate Resource Agencies. 

Representatives of all above sources are headquartered in the State 
Emergency Operations Center. 



B -III -19 



Elec. ~ h, Form 1 



&iTnmflry Estimate of Continuing Requirements for Electric Power for 
90 -Day Period Commencing 




Requirement Categories 


Kilowatt Hours 


Civilian 

First 30 days J 




Following 60 days 




Total - 90 days 




Military 

First 30 days 




Following 60 days 




Total - 9-3 Bays 




Resource Support Requirements 
First 30 'days 




Following 60 days 




Total - 90 days 




Total Requirements 
First 30 days 




Following 60 days 




Total - 90 days 





B -III -20 



Elec. - k, Form 2 



Estimate of Cont5.nuing Resoui-ce Support Requirements for Electric 
Power by Resource Program for 90-Day Period Commencing . 



Resource programs 



industrial Production 



First 30 days 



Following 60 days 



Total - 90 days 



Tran sport at ion 
First 3"^^ days 



Following 60 days 



Total " 90 days 



Total 



First '¥J days 



Following 60 days 



Total - 90 days 



Kilowatt Hours 



B "III -21 



Eleco - 3, Al location of Electric Power Supply - Form 1 



Allocation of Expected Continuing Supplies of Electric Power for 
90 "Day Period Commencing 




Major Use Categories 


Kilowatt Hours 


Civilian 

First 30 days 




Following 6q days 




Total - 90 days 




Military 

First 30 days 




Following 60 days 




Total - 90 days 




Resource Support Requirements 
First 30 days 




Following 60 days 




Total - 90 days 




Total 

First 30 days 




Following 60 days 




Total - 90 days 





B-III-22 



Elec. - 3, Allocation of Electric Power Supply - Form 2 



Allocation of Electric Power Supply Toy Resource Prograjn for 90-Day 
Period CuraLnencing 




Resource Pr-ograms 


Kilowatt Hours 


Proauction 
First 30 days 




Following 60 days 




Io1;-al - 90 days 




Transportation 
First 30 days 




Following 60 days 




Total - 90 days 




ET.C . 




Total 

First 30 days 




Following 60 days 




Tota]. - 90 days 





B-III-23 



EleCo - 6 1 Pevised State Electric Power Policy 

(Note; The content and subststnce of the revised electric power 

policy will depend on the situation and the supplies expected to /H^k 

be available to meet continuing essential needs. Necessarily, ( ^B 

this document will not be completed except in a test of the plan 

or at the appropriate point in a post-attack situation,) 

This document will be, in essence^ a Revised Elec, - 1, State 
Electric Power Policy sind Guidance » 



B-III-211- 



Elec. - 7 J Electric Power Industry Support Requirements 



Estimate of Electric Power Industry Support Requirements for 90-Da.y 
Period Commencing 




Resouxce 


Unit of 

Measure 


First 
30 days 


Following 
60 days 


Total 
90 days 


Petroleum 
Products 










Solid Fuels 










Tran sportat ion 










Vfater 










C-as 










Manpower 










Telecommunications 







































































B-III-25 



Elec. - 8, El e ctric Power Industry Construction Requirements 
To; State Construction and Housing Agency- 
Following is a list and description of major construction, 
repair and modification of facilities that will be required to 
maintain desired generation, transmission and distribution of 
electric power in this State during the 90-day period commenc- 
ing. 

Construction Projects 

1, Kame, location, type, and size of construction project; 
start arid completion dates, 

(if project is underway or a construction contract has 
heen prepared, attach a copy of the contract docoment 
and sunmary hill of materials.) 



3» 



^ 



Lirector, 

State Electric Power and Gas Agency 



E -III -26 



Elec. - 9, Authorization to Electric Power Systems and. Facilities 

t o Oljtain Supporting Resources 



To: (Name of Compa jiy)^ 



You are hereby authorized to obtain the supporting resources in the 
quantities specified in the attached list. 



— ■ ' 

Resource 


Unit of 
Measure 


First 
30 Days 


Following 
60 Days 


Total 


Petrole-om 
Products 










Water 










Transport at i on 










Solid Fuels 










Gas 











In placing orders for the above supporting resources, you are author- 
ized to use the following certification: 



"^^is is an essential order authorized 
by the State Electric Power and Gas 

Director. 



Effective Date 



Director 

State Electric Power & Gas A^gency 



B -III -27 



GAS 



IHTRODUCTION 

This subsection of the State Resource Management Plan contains 
policies ;; guidance;, and actions to provide gas to meet essential needs 
in the State in a nuclear attack emergency » 



Defi nitions ; 

"Primax-y Inventories" are supplies of natural gas by transiaission 
systems^ including quantities of natural gas in transmission pipe- 
lines^ including related underground and other storage facilities, 
for delivery direct to Oovemment and industrial users and to local 
gas distributors at the "city gate" (the point at which ownership 
or control passes from the transmission pipeline to the local gas 
utility) , The production^ gathering, and processing of natux-al gas 
aire also related sources of primaiy Inventories » 

"Secondary Inventories'' are those quantities of natural gas which 
have been delivered by transmission pipelines to local gas utilities 
{i.e. to the "city gate") for subsequent distribution and sale by 
the utility to customers ; also included is gas manufactured ajid 
distributed by local gas utilities. 

"Certified Orders" are purchase orders, contracts, or other requests 
for resources which bear a signed certification that the order is an 
essential one authorized pursuant to Federal Government emergency re- 
gijilations or State authorizations. 



General 

The process for managing gas resources in the State in a nuclear attack 
emergency involves two series of actions. First, essential immediate needs 
are identified and actions taken to supply these needs. Secondly, and as 
soon as possible, continuing needs and expected future supplies are esti- 
mated, decisions ai'e made and actions are taken to channel these expected 
future supplies to meet the continuing needs that are most essential to 
survival and recovery of the State and the Nation. 

Following is a brief description of Federal, State, and local govern- 
ment roles in the emergency management and supply of gas in the State = 



Federal Governm ent 

The Federal Government is responsible for working with the gas industry 
to assure maximum production and for the release of natural gas in primary 



B -III "28 



inventories in the State to ceet the most essential needs of the State 
of Montar.a as well as to meet the most essential needs of other States which 
depend on these primary sources for gas. The Federal Government is also 
responsible for aj-rranging for the distribution of gas in primaiy invent- 
ories in other States to meet essential needs in the State of Montana where 
this is necessary in an emergency. 

The United Staces Department of t.he IQx'yai'ior has established the 
Emergency Petx'oleum and Gas A6jmi.nistration (EPIA.) for this program., To 
facilitate the handling of "Prinia.ry Inventories" of natural gas, the trans- 
mission systenis of the United States have "been divided into nine (9) 
operating groups called Gas Group Areas "oased on common supplies arid 
marketing areas servedo An EP'^A Gas Group Office has been established in 
each Area and chairged in s>n emergency \^ith the direction and control of the 
transmission systeiiis compv-ising the Group, subject to the authority of an. 
appropriate EPGA Regional Office = A State office of the EPGA will be located 
with the State Gas Agency, Representatives of the State I5PGA office will 
also be assigned as needed tVn'oughout the State, These EPGA representatives 
will be concerned chiefly with primaiy inventories of gas and their release 
to resupply secondaxy inventories. They will also arrange with primary- 
sources for a continuing supply of gas to military installations, government, 
and essentisJ. industrial far-ilities which normally depend on direct trans- 
missioi-i i'TOT'i pririary sources for all or part of their gas needs. 

No EPGA offices have been established in Montana as of the initial 
wrj.ting of this plan, "vfnen such offices aire established, a list of the 
offices, together with the nar.es , addresses, and telephone munbers of key 
gas executives and liaison representatives assigned to the offices will be 
distribn^ed as a Reference Document to this Section of the Plan. 

Until such offices are established, the State Electric Power and Gas 
Agency will perform, on behalf of the federal Government, the EPGA functions 
enumerated in this Section of ■■:he Plan. 



S t ate G overriiaent 

"lie Staie Eleccric Power and Gas Agency develops, in cooperation with 
other organizations of the State government, and provides, on behalf of the 
Governor, policies ai^d. guidance consistent with State £ind Federal objectives. 
The purpose of these policies and guidarice is to assure application through- 
out the StabS of compatible .measures for the conservation, distribution, axid 
use of gas to preverri; dissipation end waste and to assure that essential needs 
for gas are identified and met within the supplies available. The State Elec- 
tric P'Ower and Gas Agency acts on requests for State level assistance from 
local government officials arid arranges with the EPGA for adjustments in 
deliveries from primary sources to correct local shortages in supply. 

As soon as possible after the attack, the State Electric Power and Gas 
Agency, in collaboration with other State agencies representing major act- 
ivities with the State that consume gas, anticipates continuing needs aiid 
works with the EPGA to assure that arrajigenent s ai'e made with the primary 
industry to provide gas to meet ongoing demands of authorized essential 



^-riI-29 



In the event the EPGA is unable to f\inction in the State in the immediate 
postattack period, the State Electric Power and Gas Agency assumes, on behalf 
of the Federal Government, the responsibility for working directly with the 
primary gas industry until Federal capability is established. 



Local Government 

Operational Survival Plans of the State of Montaina emd its political 
subdivisions contain provisions for the conservation, distribution, and 
use of gas in secondary inventories within the State. These plans also 
provide for local government decisions and guideuice, consistent with State 
policies, for the functioning of the secondary gas distribution system in 
the localities in the State. 



Essential Primary Gas Facilities 

Attached to this plan as Reference Document No. 1 is a chart of prim- 
ary gas facilities and their locations which are essential to National 
survival emd which must be kept in operation to assure a continuing flow 
of gas to meet essential needs for survival and recovery. Preattack arrange- 
ments have been made with appropriate authorities of local governments to 
assure provision of electric power, manpower, transportation, water, petrol- 
euia products and other locally available requisites for the continuing 
operation of essential gas facilities. 



Flow Chart 

Following is a flow chart showing the process and the actions to be 
taken by Federal, 'state, and local governments to assure a continuing flow 
of gas to meet essential needs in the State in a nuclear attack emergency. 
The legend accompanying the chart identifies: 

a. Actions to be taken immediately to supply immediate needs 
essential for survival, and 

b. Actions to be taken as soon as possible to anticipate con- 
tinuing needs and to channel gas supplies to meet the most 
urgent needs for continuing survival and recovery. 



(% 



B-III-30 



BIANK PAGE 



B-ITI-31 



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B-III-33 



1. Emergency Actions 

The following actions are taken on behalf of the Governor at State 
level by State Electric Power and Gas officials to provide policies and 
guidance applicable throughout the State on the distribution and use of 
gas axid to arrange for re supply of secondary inventories tram, primary 
sources to meet essential local needs » 

The emergency action as.d reference documents contained here have 
been prepared end placed with appropriate State and local officials during 
the preattack planning process » 

a. Actions for Immediate Supply 

(l) Issue, on behalf of the Governor, policies and guidance, 
applicable throughout the State covering the distribution 
and use of secondary in'ventories of gas supplies within the 
State » (EleCo and Gas -1, State Electric Power and Gas 
policy and Guidance.,) (Notes This document and its 
attachments is shown in the Electric Power subsection since 
it is pertinent to both industries.) 

(2; Arrange with the EPGA for adjustments in deliveries from 
primary sources to meet local shortages in gas supplies as 
reported by local govemraents. (Gas - 2, Adjustment of 
Delivery Quotas . ) 

b. Actions for Continuing Supply 

As soon as resupply of secondary inventories to meet 
essential immediate needs in the localities is underway, the 
State Electric Power and Gas Agency takes the following actions 
to anticipate continuing needs and to arrange for continuing 
supply to meet these needs. 

(3) Consult with State civil defense supply officials, EPGA, 

military officials and appropriate State Resource officials 
to estimate continuing requirements of gas that will be 
needed in the State during the ensuing 90'-<3.ay period- 
(Gas -3, Estimate of Continuing Gas Requirements » ) 

(k) Obtain from the EPGA estimates of qusaitities of gas that 

can be supplied from primary sources for continuing use in 
the State during the ensuing 90-day period. 

(5) If anticipated supplies axe inadequate to meet the estimated 
requirements and adjustments in requirements caimot be ne- 
gotiated, refer to the Rescijrce Priorities Board for recom- 
mendations to the Governor on the allocation of einticipated 
supplies among competing programs. (Gas - 4, Allocation of 
Gas Supplies.) 



B -III -34 



(6) Issue revised State policies on the use of gas in the State 
to conform with the Governor's decision, (Gas - 5, Revised 
State Gas Policy) <, 

(7) Consult with the EPGA and deveicp estimates of continuing 
requirements for electric power, manpower, transportation, 
petroleum products, and solid fuels and other operating 
supplies, equipment, and services that will he needed to 
maintain operation of essential gas facilities in the State 
during the ensuing 9'-'-day period. Present these requirements 
estimates to appropriate State B.esource Agencies, (Gas - 6, 
Gas Industry Supporf. Requirements o) 

(8) Consult with the EPGA and develop estimates of emergency 
repair and construction of essential gas facilities that will 
he required during the ensuing 9'0-day period and present 
these requirements estrliaates to the State Consti'uction and 
Housing Agency, (Gas - 7, Gas Industry Construction Require- 
ments.) 

(9) Infona the ER'JA State offices of supplies of suppor-ting re- 
sources that will he availahle in the State for acquisition 
axid use hy the primary gas industry to maintain essential 
operations during the ensuing 90-day period, (Gas •• 8, 
Allocation of Suppor'ting Resources to Pi-imar-y Gas Industry,) 

2. Emergency Action Document s 

Following are emergency action documents to isiplement the foregoing emer- 
gency actions. 

(Note: During the process of expediting deliveries to m.eet xxrgent local needs, 
the quickest means of communication oetween levels of goverirsent and with 
industry will he used. The forms illustrate the kind of information to he 
transmitted over telephone or other available means of fast coitmrunication,) 

Index :f Emergency Action Documents 



Elec. and Gas - 1, State Electric Power and Gas Policy and Guidance . 

(T 



(See page B-III-8) 



Gas - 2, Adjustment of Primary Distributor Delivery Quotas 

Gas - 3 J Estimate of Continuing Ga s Requirements 

Gas - h, Allocation of Gas Supp ly 

Gas - 5, Revised State Gas Policy 

Gas - 6, Gas Industry Support, ReQui rements 

Gas - 7} Gas Industry Construc tion Requirements 

Gas - 8, Allocation of Supporting Resources to PT-imary Gas Industry 



B-.ITl-3^ 



Gas - 2, Adjustment of Primary Distributor Delivery Quotas 



To: Area Office of the Emergency Petroleum and Gas Administration 



Shortages i.i gas supplies are being reported by local governments in 
this State, 

You Eire requested to arrange with the primaxy gas Industry to Increase 
their deliveries to meet certified orders received from customers in this 
State, 

Following is an estimate of the increased amounts of gas from primary 
sources that will be needed to meet essential needs in the State. 



Summary of Local Deficiencies 
in Daily Re supply of Gas 


Locality 


GAS 
(in 1000 cubic ft. o per day) 


Havre 

Silver Bow County 

Helena 





Date 



Director 

State Electric Power axid Gas Agency 



B-III-36 



Gas - 2, Attachment 1 



Request for State Assistance 
Re supply of Gas 

(name of locality) 



Required increase in daily 

deliveries of gas: 

(in 1,000 cubic ft. per day)_ 



Date 



(Name of Head of Local Government) 

By: 

Local Gas Official 



B-III-37 



Gas - 3? Estimate of Continuing Gas Requirements 



Forms 1 eind 2 attached to this emergency action document contain 
data on qusjitities of gas that will be required in this State for a 
90-day period commencing „_ ' 

The requirements stated include the quantities of gas needed to 
fill authorized orders of essential users, essential facilities, ajid 
consumers . 

These requirements do not include quantities of gas needed by 
essential facilities such as large military installations and bases 
ajid large industrial facilities that obtain their requirements directly 
from primary gas distributors. These latter requirements axe the 
responsibility of the EPGA. Procedures for claims, allocations and 
supply arrangements are included in the EPGA Emergency Operations 
Manual for the Natural Gas Industry (Office of Oil and Gas, Department 
of the Interior, April 1965)- 

The piirpose of these State requirements estimates is to determine 
and BJiticipate quantities of gas needed from primary sources under 
Federal jurisdiction to resupply secondary distributors under State and 
local government jurisdiction. 



Definitions 

"CiviliaxL Requirements" include the gas needed to carry on emer- 
gency civil defense operations, to maintain essential local activities, 
and to supply individual consumers o These civilian requirements 
estimates are provided by appropriate civil defense officials. 

"Military Requirements" include the gas needed to carry on militso'y 
activities and to maintain and operate militeiry installations sjid equip- 
ment. They include only the supplies that are to be obtained from the 
local gas distribution utilities. These military requirements estimates 
are provided by appropriate military officials. 

"Resource Support Requirements" include the gas needed to maintain 
operation of essential facilities under the cognizance of Federal and 
State resource organizations functioning in the State. These support 
resources requirements are provided by appropriate State resource organ- 
izations- 
Representatives of all above sources are headquartered in the State 
Emergency Operations Center. 



B -III -38 



Gas - 3, Form 1 



Summary Estimate of Continuing Requirements for Gas for 
90-Day Period Commencing 




Pequirement Categories 


1,000 cubic feet per day 


Civilian 

First 30 Days 




Following 60 Lays 




Total - 90 Days 




Military 

First. 30 Days 




Following 60 Days 




Total - 90 Days, 




Resource Support Requirements 
First 30 Days 




Fcllawing 60 Days 




Total - 90 Days 




Total Requirements 
First 3C rays 




Following 60 Days 




Total - 90 Days 





B-lll-39 



Gas - 3, Form 2 



Estimate of Continuing Supporting Resource Requirements for 

Gas by Resource Program for 90-Day Period 

Commencing 




Resource Programs 


1,000 cubic feet per day 


Industrial Production 
First 30 Days 




Following 60 Days 




Total - 90 Days 




Tr anspori^at ion 
First 30 Days 




Following 60 Days 




Total - 90 Days 




Etc, 












Total 

First 30 Days 




Following 60 Days 




Total - 90 Days 





B-IIl-iiO 



Gas - ^, Allocation of Gas Supply - Form 1 



Allocation of Expected Continuing Supplies of Gas for 
90 -Day Period Commencing 




Major Use Categories 


1,000 Cubic Feet Per Day 


Civilian 

First 30 Days 




Following 60 Days 




Total - 90 Days 




Military 

First 30 Days 




Following 60 Days 




Total - 90 Days 




Resource Support Requirements 
First 30 Days 




Following 60 Days 




Total - 90 Days 




Total 

First 30 Days 




Following 60 Days 




Total - 90 Days 





B-III-iH 



Gas - ^, - Form 2 



Allocation of Expected Continuing Supplies of Gas by Resource 
Program for 90-Day Period Commencing 






Resource Program 


1,000 Cubic Feet Per Day 


Production 

First 30 Days 




Following 60 Days 




Total = 90 Days 




Transportation 
First 30 Days 




Following 60 Days 




Total - 90 Days 




Etc. 












Total 

First 30 Days 




Following 60 Days 




Total - 90 Days 





# 



B-III-i^2 



Gas - 5, Revised State Gas Policy 



(Note: The content smd substance of the revised gas policy will 
depend on the situation and the supplies expected to be available 
to meet continuing essential needs. Necessarily, this document 
will not be completed except in a test of the plan or at the 
appropriate point in a postattack situation.) 

This document will be, in essence, a Revised Gas - 1, State 
Electric Power and Gas Policy and Guidance, contained here. 



B-III-i^3 



Gas - 6, Gas Industry Support Requirements 



Estimate of Gas Industry Support Requirements for 90-Day Period 
Commencing 




Resource 


Unit of 
Measure 


First 
30 Days 


Following 
60 Days 


Total 
90 Days 


Petroleu-m Products 










Electric Power 










Transportation 










Water 










Telecommunications 






■ 






















- -■'. 































































B-III-4J^ 



Gas - 1 , Gas Industry Construction Requirements 
Tot State Construction and Housing Agency- 



Following is a list and descrD.ption of major construction, repair and 
modification of facilities that will be required to maintain desired pro- 
duction, transmission, and distribution of gas during the 90-day period 
commencing 



Constraiction Projects 

1= Netme., location, type and size of construction project! stai-t- and 
completion dates; 

(if project is underway or a construction contract has 'been pre- 
pared, attach a copy of the contract doc^jjment and suramar:/' hill 
of materials. ) 



Director 

State Electric Power and Gas Agency 



B-IH-U5 



Gas - 8, Allocation of Supporting Resources to Frlmary Gas Industry 
To: Emergency Petroleum and Gas Administration 

# 

Attached is a list and the quantities of supporting resources that 
have been allocated for maintaining essential operations of primary gas 
facilities. 

This is furnished as a basis for authorizing these facilities to 
obtain continuing supplies of these resources during the allocation 
period. 

(Attach List.) 



Director 

State Electric Power and Gas Agency 



B-III-U6 




B.III-U7 



ELECTRIC POWER AM) GAS AGENCY 
EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION 



The organizational chart which follows identifies functional areas 
involved in the management of electric power and gas resources in Montana 
in an emergency. 

These are actions to provide for the continuity of operation of the 
State Electric Power and Gas Agency. 

1. Copies of this plan and all action and reference dociiments have 
heen placed axid are immediately available in the State Office 
of Emergency Planning, the State Emergency Operations Center, 
and in the Office of the Division Manager, Helena Division, 
Montana Power Company. 

2. The Governor has selected and designated from government euid 
the private sector qualified leaders with experience eind know- 
ledge of the electric power and gas Industries to provide exec- 
utive direction in axi emergency for the operations of the State 
Electric Power and Gas Agency. Lines of succession to assure 
continuity of key staff for the operation of this Agency are 
provided in the roster of key personnel maintained in the office 
of the State Railroad and Public Service Commission, the State 
Office of Emergency Planning, and the State Emergency Operations 
Center , 

3. The Division Manager, Helena, Division, Montana Power Company is 
the Director of the State Electric Power and Gas Agency. 

k. Upon activation of this Plan, the Director of the State Elec- 
tric Power and Gas Agency and key staff with emergency assign- 
ments to the Agency establish headquarters at the State Emer- 
gency Operations Center. 



B -III -1^8 












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B-III-il9 



PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 



IV FOOD 



MONTAjm PLAN 

FOR EMERGENCY 

MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES 



STATE OF MONTANA 

EMERGENCY RESOUECE MAtJAGEMENT PLAU 

PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 

IV - FOOD RESOURCES 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
Introduction o ...»,..... .o.. » , . B-IV- 1 

1. Emergency Actions ..^ ,..«.... E-IV- 8 

2. Emergency Action Docaments. B-IV- 9 

Index of Emergency Action Dociiments , » . B-IV- 9 

3. Emergency Organization. .....,......,...,.<>............<> « B-IV-37 

h. Reference Documents. .»•,. ... ... o.o B-IV-39 



INTRODUCTION 

This section of the Montana Resource Management Plan contains policies^ 
guidance J ajid actions to provide food to meet essential needs in Montar:a in 
a nuclear attack emergency. 



DEFINITIONS 

ao "Primaiy arid secondary food, resources" include all food, in all 
locations. The division between priTiiary arid secondary resources is governed 
by the Monteuia-USDA Memorandum of Understanding with resources under Montana 
control 1/ being secondary food resources and Felerally con"i;rolled food re- 
sources being the primary food, resou:rces. The cononcn division is as follows; 

(1) "Pr-imary food resources'" ai-e food on farms^ livestock feed, 
and seed at all levels including retail, plus food in traasib ard, processor 
and warehouse stocks (distribution, commercial storage, cold storage, retail 
and wholesaler.) 

(2) "Secondary food resources ' ai*e food in homes, :-:etail stores, 
restaurants, and other commercial eating places, schools, hospitals, emd other 
institutions (except Federal), and cold storage lockers (for use by owner.) 

bo "Distribution controls" is a general term used to denote any kind, of 
orderly process which promotes conservation and equitable distribution of food 
at rates consistent with supplies, but not to exceed the National Emergency 
Food Consumption Standard. Such processes may range from mass feeding to a 
formalized procedure, such as a point -rationing system., or lesser arrsaigements 
which nonetheless will prevent uncontrolled dissipation of food stocks or per- 
mit any one individual or concern obtaining an unfair advantage ever another. 

c. "Requisites" are supporting resources such as manpower, ica,terials, 
equipment, supplies, and services needed for food production, processing, 
storage, and distribution, 

GENERAL 

The process for managing food resources in Montana in a nuclear attack 
emergency involves two series of actions. First, essential immediate needs are 
identified and actions are taken to supply these needs . Secondly, and as soon 
as possible, continuing needs and expected future supplies are estimated. De- 
cisions are made and actions are taken to channel these expected future supplies 



1/ "Under Monta:ia control" is used broadly to mean not only the State level 
food organization, but also local political jurisdictions whose emergency food 
management activities are carried out in consonance with policies ajru:-.oiunced by 
the Governor. 



lT-1 



to meet the continuing needs that aire most essential to survival and recovery 
of the State and of the Nation, 

Followiiig is a "orief description of Federal, State, and local government 
roles in the emergency management ar.d supply of food in the State. 

Federal Governraent 

The Federal Government is responsible for working wi.th the food i?;idustry 
to assur-e needed production, processing, and distribution cf food in priiEary 
inventories to meet essential r.eed.s cf the sui-viving population of the United 
States o Generally, the U, So Department of Agriculture State and County De- 
fense Boards carry out these Federal food responsibilities in their respect= 
ive jurisdictions. 

In an emergency, the USDA Defense Boards work with producers, processors, 
and wholesalers to conserve ar.d direct food supplies available from these 
sources to where they are most neededo 5!hese Boards are authorized to make 
supplies cf food available from "priinary'' sources (a) to the State for feed- 
ing the civilian population (after distr^-bution coni-.rols are in effect), 
(b) to the Department of Defense, (c) for essential industrial uses, ajad 
(d) for meeting other urgent needs outside the State, 

Defense Boards issue orders controlling primary food resources. The 
initial orders permit the free flow of certain types of food, chiefly perish- 
ables; restrict the flow of such storable foods as canned goods; place 
specific limitations on the flow of foods likely to be extremely short in 
supply; and limit the distribution of the remaining foods to specified 
percentages of preattack rates. This system permits the food industry to 
continue the orderly conduct of its regular business to the e^ctent possible 
under the circumstances. 

Defense Boards authorize food facilities whose stocks are under USDA control 
to continue food deliveries to regular customers, both intrastate and inter- 
state and subject to the appropriate control ojrders, as soon as adequate State 
or local food rationing and distribution controls are in effect. In the event 
of breakdown in commercial operations, the USDA State Defense Boeird arretnges 
through National Headquarters or, where direction from higher authority is 
unavailable, with its counterparts in other states, for the inshipment of food 
to make up local deficiencies in food supplies. Food so received will usually 
be channeled by USDA into the wholesale distribution system. 

Food producers and operators of food processing, storage, and wholesale 
distribution facilities will obtain uncontrolled requisites necesseiry to 
essential production ajid services from their usual suppliers of these re- 
quisites. For essential controlled requisites, they will seek procurement 
authorization form the governmental authority having local jurisdiction over 
the requisite. When they are unable to obtain essential requisites in the 
above manner they will request assistance from the USDA County Defense Boards. 

USDA County Boards will work with local governments to obtain sup- 
plies of requisites needed for food production, processing, storage, aziA. 



w 



i-IV-2 



distribution. Where essential needs cannot be met, the USDA County Defense 
Board will advise the USDA State Defense Board of its problem. The USDA 
State Defense Board works with appropriate Federal agencies ajid State 
government officials to obtain necessary assistsjice. 

F ood Whole someness 

Following an attack, assurance against consumption of contaminated 
foods requires appropriate inspection and monitoring. In meat and poultry 
plants under USDA inspection, inspectors will determine the wholesomeness 
of the products they inspect. Persons now inspecting other foods for 
wholesomeness will continue to have this responsibility following an attack. 
This inspection at the local and State levels is by cooperative program 
arrangements with the U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 
which will provide preattack gtiidance, standards, an.d plans for emergency 
inspection of these types of foods. None of the foregoing will preclude 
mututal assistance among the agencies concerned. 

State Government 

The Montana State Food Agency develops, in cooperation with other 
organizations of the State government and the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, and provides, on behalf of the Governor, policies and guidance for 
the control of secondary food resources consistent with Federal and State 
objectives. The purpose of these policies and guidance is to assure 
application throughout Montana of measures compatible with National and 
State plans for the conservation, distribution, and use of secondary 
inventories of food to prevent their dissipation and waste and to assure 
that essential needs for food are identified and met within the supplies 
of food available to the State. 

The Montana State Food organization issues all policies, orders, and 
instructions relative to use or sale of secondary foods. 

The Montana State Food Agency, acting within the framework of the 
National Emergency Food Consumption Standard, also receives and acts upon 
requests for assistance from local government officials. Upon a showing 
of necessity and evidence of effective rationing, USDA may be requested 
to arrange for additional supplies * As soon as possible after attack, 
the Montana State Food Agency anticipates future continuing needs for food 
in Montana and requests the USDA to make arrangements with the primary 
industry to provide food to meet ongoing needs in the State. 

Operators of facilities having secondaj^y food resources obtain un- 
controlled requisites from their customary suppliers in the customary 
manner. If requisites are controlled, operators of such food establish- 
ments go to their local government control agency for requisites such as 
petroleum, fuel, manpower, electric power, transportation, and other items 
controlled by these local civil authorities. To the extent possible, local 
civil authorities meet such needs. V/hen requisites cannot be obtained in 
this manner, food handlers subject to State control over their food stocks 



B-IV-3 



request assistance from the Montana State food organization ^ Montana State 
Food Agency representatives work with appropriate local civil agencies to 
develop the best possible distribution of items in short supply. When it 
becomes possible to install a more sophisticated system, appropriate re- 
source agencies will allocate additional requisites to meet essential local 
needs on a continuing basis. (Note: Fai^ers and food processors and whole- 
salers who are unable to obtain necessary coirtrolled requisites through local 
control agencies con-tact the :JSDA County Defense Board.) 

The nationwide Federal network of USDA National Headquarters ^ USDA 
State Defense Boards (one for each State), USDA County Defense Boards (one 
for each county)^ and the siuthcrity given each to function on its own 
where reccuxse to higher authority is impossible^ provides the best 
possible preattack. plan whereby the U. So Departmsr-t of Agriculture will 
be able to fulfill its emergency responsibilities. 

However remote, the possibility of a temporary breakdown! of USDA 
control in some geographic areas m^j.st be recognised. Should the established 
USDA network be incap&.ble of functioning postattacfc, the Montana State Food 
Agency would undertake responsibility for working directly with the primary 
food industiry until USDA infonns the State it has resumed control over pri- 
mary food resources. 

Local Government 

Operational Survival Plans of the State cf Montana and its political 
subdivisions contain provisions for the rationing and use of food at retail 
levels within the State, ^hese plans also provide for local government 
decisions and guidance, consistent with State policies, for the functioning 
of the secondary food management system as applied to local government 
levels in the State. They also provide for local governments to request 
State assistance to obtain deliveries of food to meet local shortages. 



B-I7-U 



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B-IV-7 



1. Emergency Actions 

The following actions are taken at the State level to provide policies 
and giaidance applicable throughout Montana on the distrilDution and use of 
secondary food inventories and to arrange for their replenishment o 

The emergency action and reference documents contained here have heen 
prepared and placed with appropriate Montana and local officials during 
the preattack planning process. 

ao Actions for Immediate Su] 

(1) Issue^ on "behalf of the Governor, policies and guidance, 
applicable throughout Montana, covering the provision, distribution, and 
use of secondary food rescarces within the State » (Food-1, Montana State 
Food Policy and Guidance « ) 

(2) Consult with the USDA State Defense Board to ascertain what 
arrangements USDA has made for primary food suppliers to make deliveries 
on orders received from regular customers. (Food-1, Attachment 8, Food 
Resupply Program. ) 

(3) Request the USDA County Defense Boards to arrange for in- 
creased food deliveries when needed to meet minimum urgent requirements,, 
(Food-2, Request for Increase in Food Deliveries.) 

b. Actions for Continalng Supply 

As soon as food distribution controls (see definitions page l) are 
operating and resupply of secondary inventories to meet essential immed- 
ate needs in the localities is under way, the Montana State Food Agency 
takes the following actions to anticipate future continuing needs eind to 
arrange for continuing supply to meet these needs. 

(h) Estimate current stocks of secondary food resources (Food-3 
Estimate of Current Stocks of Secondary Food Resources.) 

(5) Estimate civilian requirements for food in the State during 
the ensuing 30, 60, and 90 days. Requirements are stated in numbers of 
people to be fed at a stated food allowance per person per week, (Food-4, 
Estimate of Continuing Food Requirements.) 

(6) Report Items (k) and (5) to the USDA State Defense Board 
and request advice concerning ability to make up such shortages as are 
indicated. 

(7) Issue revised State Policies on the use of food in Montana 
to reflect needed adjustments in weekly consumption levels. 

NOTE: USDA will obtain and consolidate estimates for requisites, 
including construction materials, needed for all food processing, storage 
and wholesale distribution throughout Montana. They will advise State and 



B-IV-8 



Federal resource agencies with respect to geographical and commodity needs 
in Montana to guide the distribution of requisites in support of the Federal 
food program. 

2. Emergency Action Documents 

Following are emergency action documents to implement the foregoine 
emergency actions. 

(Note: These action documents are illustrative in character to convey as 
clearly as possible the substance of the actions involved. During the 
process of expediting deliveries to meet urgent local needs, the quickest 
means of communication between levels of government and with industry will 
be used. The forms illustrate the kind of infomation to be transmitted 
over telephone or other available means of fast communication.) 

Index of Emergency Action Documents 

Food - 1 Montana State Food Policy and Guidance 

^°°<i - 2 Request for Increase in Food Deliveries 

^°°^ - 3 Estimate of Current Stocks of Secondary Food Resources 

Food - k Estimate of Continuing Food Requirements 



B-IV-9 



Food - 1, Montana State Food Policy and Guidance 

To: Heads of Political Subdivisions 

Guidance for Local Go vemiaentSo It is essential that food be cajrefully 
conserved and restricted to immediate and ^argent needs for local. State, 
and National survival until the contiTiUing supply of food that will be available 
for distribution can be determiaedo 

In order to (l) prevent waste and dissipation of food in local 
secondary inventories, (2) pro\--ide supplies of food to meet immediate and 
urgent needs, (3) assure continuing resupply of local secondary inventories 
of food, and (U) ration food to meet minimom essential needs of individual 
consumers, appropriate officials of local government shall take the follow- 
ing actions : 

lo Provide policies on the sale and resupply of food. (Attachment 2.) 

2. Announce the provisions of the Food Freeze Order governing retail 
stocks of nonperishable foods. (A~tachment 3») 

3. Announce and enforce the Emergency Food Release Order and in- 
structions to local food retailers for release of food as authorized in this 
order. (Attachment h.) 

k. Announce general authorization regarding public eating places. 
(Attachment 5 • ) 

5. Announce restrictions on the use of commodities in critically 
short supply. (Attachment 6„) 

6. Announce that the National Emergency Food Consumption Standard 
will be utilized as the general guide for the distribution and use of food. 
(Attachment 7.) 

In the event resupply from primary suppliers of food is not adequate 

to meet all essential needs, local governments shall cut back authorized 
levels of distribution. Concurrently they shall report shortages to the 
USDA County Defense Board and request them to increase the supply of food 
to the local jiorisdiction. (See Attachment 9») When unable to obtain 
necessary quantities in this maxner, request assistance of Montana State 
Food Agency. 

Definitions 

a. "Primary and secondary food resources" include all food in all 
locations. The division between primary and secondary resources is 
governed by the Montana Stste-USDA Memorandums of Understanding with 



'^ 



B-IV-10 



resources \inder State control l/ being secondary food resources and Fed- 
erally controlled food resources being the primary food resources. The 
common division is as follows : 

(1) "Primary food resources" are food on farms, livestock feed, 
and seed at all levels including retail, plus food in transit and processor 
and wsLrehouse stocks (distribution, commercial storage, cold storage, re- 
tail and wholesaler.) 

(2) "Secondary food resources" are food in homes, retail stores, 
restaurants, and other commercial eating places, schools, hospitals, and 
other institutions (except Federal) , and cold storage lockers (for use by 
owner . ) 

b. "Distribution controls" is a general term used to denote any kind 
or orderly process which promotes consen/'ation and equitable distribution 
of food at rates consistent with supplies, but not to exceed the National 
Emergency Food Consumption Standard. Such processes may range from mass 
feeding to a formalized procedure, such as a point -rationing system, or 
lesser arrangements which nonetheless will prevent uncontrolled dissipation 
of food stocks or permit any one individual or concern obtaining an unfair 
advantage over another. 

c. "Requisites" are supporting resources such as manpower, materials, 
equipment, supplies, emd services needed for food production, processing, 
storage, ajid distribution. 



Effective Date 



Governor of the State of Montsma 



By; 



Director, Montana State Food Agency 



T/ "Under State control" is used broadly to mean not only the State level 

food organization but also local political jurisdictions whose emergency 
food management activities are carried out in consonance with policies 
announced by the Governor. 



B-IV-11 



Food - 1, Attachment 1 



Background Information 

The Governor has issued general policy on the use of secondary food 
resources In the immediate postattack period. They have been furnished 
to appropriate officials of the political subdivisions of the State of 
Montana , 

In general, these State policies provide for temporary freezing of 
retail inventories of essential foods, and immediate and continuing re- 
lease of these items to meet urgent food needs. They describe the Federal 
program for resupply of secondary inventories. 

Essential Facilities arid Users . In the immediate postattack period 
before a rationing program can be instituted, there may be any number of 
people who are without food. These may be individuals or families in 
homes, people in hospitals or other institutions with in-feeding facilities, 
or those employed in facilities producing or distributing essential items 
or providing essential services. Such persons in need may be authorized 
by local civil authorities to purchase emergency food from secondary 
sources either for feeding others in need or themselves. Providing food 
as an interim measure to those in dire need before rationing to all con- 
sumers is considered an immediate essential use. 



B-IV-12 



Food - 1, Attachment 2 



Policy on Retail Sale of Food 

The following policies are provided, on "behalf of the Governor, for 
use and guidance of local governments until such time as more detailed 
guidance cein be provided. Copies of this statement should be supplied 
pre -emergency to local food stores : 

1. Inventory ; During the freeze on sales of nonperishables, take 
inventory of stocks and isolate emd/or remove from display areas items 
which are not to be sold. Inventory forms attached as Attachment 2a here- 
to will be completed by retail stores and forwarded to Board of County Com- 
missioners who will consolidate and forward consolidation to Montana State 
Food Agency, Helena, Montana, 

2. Sale of Perishable Foods ; Local food authorities will authorize 
food stores to stay open and sell perishables and/ or non-food items not 
controlled. 

3. Sale of Rationed Foods : As soon as a food rationing program is 
put into effect (presumably within five days), food stores will reopen to 
sell foods that are rationed and items exempt from rationing and the in- 
ventory freeze. Stocks of certain reserved foods will be retained until 
directions for their use are received. Generally these will be nonperish- 
ables which the State and local authorities may need for emergency use in 
other areas (canned foods.) 

h. Prevention of Hoarding : Representatives of local food stores 
in the community shall meet during the five day freeze period to agree on 
common community policy to keep hoarding at a minimum. 



B-IV-13 



Food - 1, Attachment 2a 



Date 



Address 



Retailer Inventory Form (Pages 1, 2 & 3) 
(Taken during General Freeze Order) 



Store 
City 



County 







Canned Vegetables 








Enter Here: 
Size of Can 














Enter Here: 
Total No. 
Containers 















Enter Here ; 



Dried Vegetables 
Total No, of Pounds 





Canned Fruit 
(including Jam, Jellies, Preserves) 






Enter Here : 
Size of Can 














Enter Here: 
Total No. 
Containers 















Dried Fruits 



Enter Here: Total No. of Pounds 







Canned 


Milk 








Enter Here: , 
Size of Can 














Enter Here: 
Total No. 
Containers 















Dry Milk 
Malted Milk 

Enter Here: Total No. of Pounds 



B-IV-lU 



(Retailer Inventory Continued -2) 







Canned Soups 








Enter Here: 
Size of Can 






; 








Enter Here: 
Total No. 
Containers 















Dried Soups 
Enter Here: Total No. of Pounds 





Can & Glass Syr-jp^ Sweeteners, 


Honey 






Enter Here: 
Size of Glass 














Enter Here: 
Total No, 
Glass 















Sugar 
Enter Here: Total No. of Pounds 





Vegetable & Fr^ait Juices 








Enter Here : 
Size of Cem 












Enter Here: 
Total No. 
Containers 













Pounds of Cheese 



Pounds of Nuts 



Canned Meats, Meat Product 


s and Shell Fish & Fish 




Enter Here : 
Size of Can 














Enter Here: 
Total No. 
Containers 















B-IV-15 



(Retailer Inventory Continued -3) 



Cereal & Cereal Products 



Item 


Flour 

& 
Mixes 


Com 
Meal 


Rice 


Hominy 


Macaxoni 


Cereal 


Pounds 


















Baby Foods 








Enter Here: 
Size of Can 














Enter Here: 
Total No. 
Containers 















Dry Baby Food & Baby Cereal 
Enter Here: Total No. of Pounds 







Food Fats 


& Oils 








Item 


Butter 


Margarine 


Lard 


Shorten- 
ing 


Salad & 
Cooking 
Oil 


Soa-n 


No of 
Pounds 















If Electricity Available for Refrigeration 
List Frozen Foods in Columns Below 



Item 


Vegetables 


Fruit 


Fruit 
Juice 


Meat 


Poultry 




No. of 
Pounds 















If Electricity Available for Refrigeration 
Enter Here: Total No. of Pounds of Fresh Meat 



B-IV-16 



Food - 1, Attachment 3 
Food Freeze Order 



Section 1 - Purpose 

The purpose cf this Order is to control sales ^ transfers ^ disposition, 
and use of secondary food stocks until such time as appraisals are made of 
the food supply situation, and more refined food management programs are 
instituted to provide appropriate and adequate distribution of food supplies. 

Section 2 - Scope 

This Order applies to all food retailers throughout the State of Montana 
regardless of location. 

Section 3 - Definitions 

Following definitions are taken from USDA-Montana State Memorandum of 
Understanding : 

X - X - X - X - XX XXX XXXXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXX -X-?Hf-X-i(-?HK (XXXXXXK)(XXXXXXXXXXX 

"k. Understandings Reached . Discussions "between duly authorized re- 
presentatives of the State of Montsina and of USDA have resulted in the follow- 
ing understandings : 

Ao Responsibility for Food Stocks . It is understood that USDA will 
retain all responsibility for postattack distribution control of the 
food stocks of wholesalers (including chain store warehouses) and of all 
processors except those in the categories described in Item B which 
follows. It is understood also that USDA will exercise such control in 
full cooperation with the State of Montana and in consideration of the 
needs of its surviving population. 

B. State Control of Certain Processor Food Stocks . It is understood 
that the State of Montana will assume responsibility for postattack dis- 
tribution control of food in all retail positions, including retail 
stores, hotels, schools, restaurants, institutions (except Federal in- 
stitutions), and homes and for the food stocks of processors such as 
confectioners, delicatessens, local fluid milk distributors, retail 
bakers, and others whose distribution in any case is retail in nature 
ajid subject to rationing. 

C. Distribution of Food . It is 'understood that food stocks from 
sources under distribution control of the State of Montana and such 
foods as may be made available to the State of Montana by USDA, shall 
be distributed at a rate which will not result in an amount in excess 
of that necessary to meet the National Emergency Food Consixmption Stan- 
dard. 



B-IV-17 



Food - 1, Attachement 3 (contd») 

D, Food in Transit s Food in transit is ^onderstood to he peorb of the 
national food reserve acd subject to USDA management. It is understood 
also that both State and Federal authorities will facilitate its con- 
tinued movement to destination to the extent possible, as provided by 
the National Food Plan, 

E, Identification of Facilities o It is understood that, in the 
interest of the welfare of its surviving population, the State of Mon- 
tana will assist USDA as necessary and possible in the identification 
and listing of food wholesalers and processors whose stocks would be 
important in the postattack period. 

F, Facilities and Claiinancy. It is tinder stood that USDA will re- 
tain responsibility postattack for facilities and will serve as claimant 
for materials, equipment, manpower, arid services that may be needed post- 
attack by food wholesalers (including chain store warehouses) and pro- 
cessors. " 

^(-X^-^X-JHHfX-X-)HHHHKHHKHHHf X- X -X-X-X-X^^ XX XX 

Section h - Regulatory Provisions 

In keeping with the General Freeze Order promulgated by the Federal 
Government and confirmed by the Governor, it is hereby ordered as follows: 

1. For a period of five days from the effective date of this Order, or 
until consijmer food rationing shall have been established, sales and 
transfers of all secondary food reso\arces shall be prohibitedo 

2. No person engaged in the business of handling secondary food re- 
sources shall sell, assign, divert, deliver, barter, give away, exchange, 
or otherwise dispose of, or permit the disposal of, any food which is or 
becomes subject to his custody or physical control, irrespective of 
ownership; nor shall any person contract to do any of the foregoing; nor 
shall any person receive any food subject to this Order. 

Section ^ - Exceptions 

Exceptions to this Order may be made to meet urgent and immediate sur- 
vival needs as specified in this Montana State Emergency Food Release Order 
or amendments thereto. The Montana State Food Director is hereby authorized 
to make such exceptions as he deems necessary and appropriate. 

Section 6 - Requests for Release of Food 

Requests for the release of food stocks subject to this Order shall be 
addressed to the Director, State Food Agency, Helena, Montana. 



# 



B-IV-18 



Food - 1, Attachment 3 (Contd.) 



Section 7 - Violations 



Any person who violates or conspires to violate any provision of this 
Order or any requirement pursuant to this Order, will be subject to the full 
penalties of applicable laws and regulations. 



Effective Date 



Governor of the State of Montana 



By: 



Director, Montana State Food Agency 



B-IV-19 



Food - 1, Attachment k 



Emergency Food Release Order 

Acting on the authority delegated to me by the Governor of the State 

in order to meet urgent ajid immediate survival needs, !_ 

Director of the Montana State Food Agency^ authorize all food retailers 
to release secondetry food resources as provided "below; 

1« The following foods which are exempt from rationing: (insert 
list prepared to fit conditions at the time of issuance.) 

2. Special dietary foods and ether special foods as needed to pro- 
vide diets for specific individuals when prescribed in writing by 
recognized medical authorities « (When a rationing program is in 
effect, they will be supplied in place of the standard ration.) 

3. Canned and packaged baby foods for babies in accordance with 
sx>ecial ration plains developed by local civil authorities. These 
foods should be supplied only to persons that the local rationing 
authorities certify as having children under two years of age. 
Since quantities available for resupply are likely to be limited, 
care should be exercised in development of such plans, and quan- 
tities shall be provided for no more than a week at a time. 

k. Such food as may be determined by me or my designee to be 
needed for emergency feeding purposes. 

5. Perishable foods in danger of spoilage. In areas without 
refrigeration, this will include frozen foods. 

Any person who violates or conspires to violate any prevision of this 
Order or any requirement pursuant to this Order, will be subject to the 
full penalties of applicable laws and regulations. 



Effective Date 



Governor of the State of Montana 



By; 



Director, State Food Agency 



B-IV-20 



Food - 1, Attachment 5 

Authorization for Public Eating Places 

In order to meet the food needs of persons who nonaally eat in public 
eating places and those who are away from home, the following types of 
public eating places aire authorized to feed people of the categories in- 
dicated prior to issuance of food ration ceirds. 

1. Hospitals and public institutions are authorized to feed resid- 
ent patients and inmates and staff in residence or while on duty at the 
institution « l/ 

2. Cafes, cafeterias, restaurants, hotels and motels are authorized 
to sell meals to out-of-town customers; emd to local persons known to eat 
regularly at the facility. 

3. Educational institutions may continue to feed students in res- 
idence. Day schools norrae.lly providing a noon meal may continue to do so 
for students and faculty <, l/ 

Food services shall be limited to regular meals. Quantities served 
per person shall be limited to 67 percent of preattack quantities of 
rationed foods. Use of canned foods shall be held to a minimum and no 
resupply of such items shall be requested. Frozen foods will be available 
only in areas where electric power failure makes it impossible to store 
locally available supplies of frozen foods. Public eating places serving 
meals in complismce with this Order may request their regular suppliers to 
provide them with foods available pursuant to applicable regi-ilations. They 
may order the following foods in quantities not in excess of the percentages 
of preattack rates specified: 

Item Percentage of Preattack Rate 

a . 

b. 



d. 



Requests for permission to order increased quantities of food will be 
considered by the Montana State Food Agency when such a request is accompajiied 



1/ Note: When rationing begins, the ration cards of all individuals who 
consume meals at their place of work or study will be adjusted in the 
same manner as those of individxials who eat certain meals in public 
eating places. 



5-IV-21 



Food - 1, Attachment 5 (Contd,) 

by records indicating that the number of meals served is materially greater 
than preattack. 

Each public eating place shall make an inventory of food on hand as of 
the time the Food Freeze Order was issued, and keep a record of the n\imber 
of meals while operating under this Order for presentation to the Monteuia 
State Food Agency on request. 



Date By : 



Director, Montajia State Food Agency 



5-IV-22 



Food - 1, Attachment 6 



(Sample Commodity Order) l/ 
Montana State Food Agency 

Restrictions on Use of Sugar 

Under authority delegated to me hy the Governor, I hereby direct all 
users and distributors of sugar and other natural sweeteners in the State 
to abide by such regulations as may be issued by the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture pertaining to the use of such goods. If no such regulations 
have been issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, I direct that: 

1. Use of sugar by public eating places be held to no more than 
percent of preattack levels per day. 

2. No sugar be used by bakeries, dairies or soft drink manufact- 
urers until specifically authorized by me. 

3. Sugar used in other types of food processing shall be only as 
specifically authorized by me. 

All questions relative to this Order shall be made to local govern- 
ment food officials. This Order will be replaced by regulations governing 
sugar rationing. 



Date By: 



Director, Montana State Food Agency 



l/ Similar Orders may be required governing use of any foods found in 
short supply. 



B-IV-23 



Food - 1, Attachment 7 



National Emergency Food Consumption St andard 

Introduction . The National Emergency Food Consumption Standard is 
the standard for food consumption promulgated nationally for use hy 
governmental authorities at all levels to assure the conservation an.d^ 
iquitable distribution of the food supply among the population reinainuig 
postattack. It establishes the maxljnum distribution level for consumer 
food rationing ajid mass feeding operations during the inmediate post- 
attack period of between 2,000 and 2,^00 calories per person per day ^ 
depend-- ng upon the foods selected. The Standard also shall be the basic 
guide for establishing distribution levels for categories of various foods, 
for evaluating requests made upon the USDA for food, and for making other 
food management decisions o The Standard is established at a level which 
will ma,intain a reasonable degree of health ajad vigor for a limited tune. 

The Standard contains three tables. Table 1 shows the food allow- 
ance per person per week under emergency conditions » Table 2 prescribes 
acceptable subsitutions which may be made among the foods m Table 1. 
Table 3 presr-ribes the substitution rates for canned, dry and concentrated 
foods. However, the canned, dry and concentrated foods in Table 3 may be 
used only after maximum utilization has been made of nonstorable foods. 



■B~VJ-2k 



National Emergency Food Consumption Standard 
Taljle 1 - Food Allowance per Person per Week 

Food Groups and Food Items Amount per Week 



Meat and Meat Alternates 3 It's. 

(Fresh, frozen, and cured meat, 
poultry, fish, shellfish, cheese 
and nuts) 



Eggs 6 eggs 



Milk (Fluid, whole ) 7 pints 



Cereals and Cereal Products k lbs. 



(Flour including mixes, fresh 
takery products, corn meal, rice, 
homj.ny, macaroni, and breakfast 
cereals) 



Fruit s and Vegetables k lbs. 

Fresh and frozen 

Food Fats and Oils l/2 lb. 



(Butter, margai'ine, lard, 
shortening, salad and 
cooking oils) 



Potatoes (white and sweet) 


2 lbs. 


Sugars, Syrups, Honey & Other Sweets 


1/2 lb. 



B-IV-25 



National Emergency Food Consumption Standard- 
Table 2 - Acceptable Substitutes 
(Among Foods in Table 1) 



Unit 



Equiv. Unit 



Sub St. Foods or Food Groups 



Meat and Meat 
Alternates 



1 lb. 



1/2 lb. 
l/k lb. 
12 

2-3/4 It's. 
2-1/2 pts. 



Cereals & Cereal Products 

Food Fats and Oils 

Eggs 

Potatoes 

Milk (Fluid, whole) 



Eggs 



6 eggs 



1/2 lb. 
l/U lb. 
1 pt. 



Meat and Meat Alternates 
Cereals and Cereal Products 
Milk (Fluid, Whole) 



Milk (Fluid, Whole) 
1 Pint 



2/5 It. 
1/5 lb. 



Meat and Meat Alternates 
Cereals & Cereal Products 



Cereals and 
Cereal Products 
1 lb. 



2 lbs. 
5 lbs. 



Meat and Meat Alternates 
Potatoes (white and Sweet) 



Food Fats 
and Oils 
1 lb. 



h lbs. 
2 lbs. 



Meat and Meat Alternates 
Cereal and Cereal Products 



Potatoes 
1 lb. 



1/5 It. 
2 lbs. 



Cereal smd Cereal Products 
Fruits and vegetables 



B-IV-26 



National Emergency Food Consumption Staadard 
Table 3 - Substitution Rates for Canned, Dry and Concentrated Foods 



Unit 



Equiv. Unit 



Subst. Foods or Food Groups 



Meat and Meat 
Alternates 



1 lb, 



1 lb. 

2 lbs. 
2 lbs. 



1 lb. 



Canned meats, poultry & fish 
Canned pork and beans 
Canned meat mixtures such as 
hash, chili, stew, spaghetti 
and meatballs, etc. 
Dry beans and peas 



Mi_lk 

XFluid, Whole) 

1 pt. 



8 ozs. 
3 ozs. 

2 ozs, 

3 ozs. 
3 ozs. 



Canned evaporated milk 
Canned condensed milk 
Dried milk, whole 
Dried milk, non-fat solids 
Malted milk, dry powder 



Fruits and 
Vegetables 
1 lb. 



2/3 lb. 



Canned fioiits & vegetables 



Food Fats 
and Oils 

1 lb. 



1 lb. 



earned Food Fats and Oils 



B-IV-27 



1. In utilizing the National Emergency Food Consijmption Standard 
the following shall he observed: 

a. Special dietary foods and other special foods may be released 
by local authorities as needed to provide diets for specific in- 
dividuals as prescribed by recognized medical authorities. 

bo Canned ajid Packaged Baby Foods may be released for babies in 
accordance with special ration plans that may be develoi)ed by local 
civil authorities. Since quantities available are likely to be 
limited, care should be exercised in development of such plans, 

c. Special military packaged rations shall be released only to 
the military. 

do The Standard may be exceeded only after maximum substitutions 
have been made within the framework of the Standard and there still 
remain substantial quantities of food in danger of spoilage if not 
used immediately. 

e. Canned meats (including fish and poultry) and canned mixed 
foods containing meat and canned cheese may be released only if the 
total quajatity of fresh, frozen, and cured items in the meat group 
that are available for distribution falls below l-=l/2 lbs. per 
person per week. In such a case, sufficient quantities of these items 
may be released to increase the total of the meat group items to 2 lbs, 
per person per week. 

f . Dry and canned milk (including malted milk axxd all products con- 
taining 50 percent or more of dry milk) will be released only for use 
by (a) children under 6 years of age and (b) pregnant women and nurs- 
ing mothers, and then only if the total supply of usuable fresh milk 
that Is available in the area is less than the amount that is nec- 
essary to supply these two groups with 7 pints per person per week. 
The amount of dry and canned items released will be only enough to 
make up the deficiency below 7 pints per woman or child in categories 
(a) and (b) above. 



m 



B-r/-28 



Food - 1, Attachment 8 



Food Re supply Program 

Close cooperation between Federal and State governments will be 
essential in the immediate postattack juried to assiire adequate and 
equitable distribution of available food supplies. The program which 
it is desirable for the State to follow is sussmaa-lzed below. This is 
compatible with USDA plans for control of food processing and whole- 
sale distribution. 

1. Temporary Re supply Arrsjigement . Immediately following a 
nuclear attack local goveraments will authorize food retailing 
facilities to obtain and distribute food subject to the follow- 
ing requirements: 

a. The following foods may be received without restriction 
and may be distributed in accordance with applicable rationing 
regulations. 

(1) fresh (not frozen) fruits and vegetables (except 
potatoes) ; 

(2) milk for fluid consumption; and 

(3) bakery products (no sweet goods may be produced 
postattack) . 

b. The following foods may be neither received nor dis- 
tributed: 

(1) canned goods not requiring refrigeration; 

(2) dehydrated and dried fruits and vegetables in- 
cluding dry edible beans and peas. 

c. Because of expected short supplies, the following foods 
shall be subject to individual controls with respect to use by 
processors and/ or percentage restrictions on quantities which whole- 
salers may supply; sugeir, yeast, coffee and tea, fats and oils, 
imported spices, and any other foods in short supply. 

d. All foods not falling in to one of the categories listed 
above shall be treated as a group and users may order from wholesalers 
or other suppliers who normally supplied them at a percent of the pre- 
attack rate to be announced by the Montana State Food Agency in col- 
laboration with the U. S. Depajrbment of Agriculture. 

This plan would authorize resupply to retailers by their regular 
suppliers at a fixed percentage of the preattack level. The Montana State 



B-IV-29 



Food - 1, Attachment 8 (Contd.) 

Food Agency may request the USDA to authorize release of reserve stock held 
hy sources under USDA control for some specific dispostion or use. The 
Montana State Food Agency will require food retailers to maintain records of 
transactions in food. To the extent necessaji-y, the Montana State Food Agency 
may modify the ahove procedure to meet unforeseen critical situations with 
respect to transactions "between food retailers and secondary food whole- 
salers and processors. 

To the extent that the Montana State Food Agency finds that the appli- 
cation of standard procedure is inequitable hecause of a situation resulting 
from the Attack (e,g., influx of refugees or loss of supply source) the 
Montana State Food Agency and the USDA State Defense Board shall arrange for 
appropriate adjustments. These adjustments may include: (a) administrative 
establishment of a new "base''; (b) modification of the distribution percentage; 
(c) authorization of a single delivery specifying supplier^ recipient;, items 
and quantity; (d) authorization of release of a specific quantity of some food 
on the restricted list; or (e) other appropriate adjustments. The Montana 
State Food Agency shall advise USDA Defense Boards of any food establishments 
which have failed to follow State and local food control orders so that USDA 
may take action to insure the discontinuation of food shipments to these 
establishments. 

2, Long-Rajige Postattack Resupply Arrangements . As quickly as admin- 
istratively feasible^ a State or Federal food rationing program will be 
developed with a resupply plan based on sales under the ration program. 
The temporary system previously discussed will be effect until this 
more precise program can be put into effect. 



B-iy-30 



Food - 1, Attachment 9 

Resupply of Req_uisites 

Fanners and operators of all food facilities obtain uncontrolled 
requisites from their customaxy suppliers in the customary manner. If 
requisites are controlled, these users go to their local government 
control agency for such requisites as petroleum fuel, manpower, electric 
power, and other items controlled by these civil authorities. To the 
extent possible, these local civil authorities meet such needs. 

When requisites csjanot be obtained in this manner, operators of 
facilities subject to State control request assistance from the State 
Food organization. State Food organization representatives work with 
appropriate local civil agencies to develop the best possible distri- 
bution of items in short supply. 

When fsirmers and operators of food processing, storage, and whole- 
sale distribution facilities cannot obtain requisites as outlined in 
paragraph 1 above, they request assistance from the USDA County Defense 
Boards. These Boards work with appropriate local civil authorities to ob- 
tain needed quantities of items in short supply. Where essential needs 
cannot be met, the USDA County Defense Board advises the USDA State 
Defense Board of its problem. The USDA State Defense Board works with 
appropriate Federal agencies and State government officials to obtain 
necessary assistance. 

When it becomes possible to install a more sophisticated system 
for distribution of controlled requisites, appropriate resource organ- 
izations will allocate additional requisites to meet essential local 
needs on a continuing basis. 



B-IV-31 



Food - 2, Request for Increase in Food Deliveries: USDA State Defense Board 



To: USDA State Defense Board 



• 



Address: 



Shortages in food supplies are "being reported by local governments 
in Montana. 

Following is an estimate of the Increased amounts of food needed 
to meet essential needs in the named localities in the State. 



List Food Items in Column Below 



Locality 


Meat 


Eggs 


Potatoes 


Etc. 






Billings 
Lake County 
Etc. 















Date 



By: 



Director, Montana State Food Agency 



B-rv-32 



Food - 2, Attachment 1 



To: Director, Montana State Food Agency 
Helena, Montana. 



Food in this local jurisdiction is inadequate to meet present and an- 
ticipated needs under the rationing system. 

Local use levels have been cut back as far as possible by local govern- 
ment decision and action. 



The USDA 



County Defense Board has been requested but 



is unable to arrajige for adequate deliveries from primary food sources. 

Assistance is needed to increase the level of resupply to this local 
jurisdiction as quickly as possible. 

Following are estimated increases in weekly deliveries required to 
meet essential local needs for food. 



Request for State Assistance 
Resupply of Food 


List Food Items 
in Column Below 


Unit of 
Measure 


Increase in 
Weekly Deliveries 




. . . ........ . 





Date 



(Name of Head of Local Government) 



By: 



Local Food Official 



B-lv-33 



Food - 3, Estimate of Current Stocks of Secondary Food Resources 



To: USDA State Defense Board 



i 



Address; 



It is estimated that the following quantities of food will be avail- 
able from secondary sources during the next 3O-60-9O days. 



Estimate of Current Stocks of 
Secondary Food Resoiirces 


Item 


30 Days 


60 Days 


90 Days 











Date 



By: 



Director, Montana State Food Agency 



(Note: Report quantities available using the same categories contained 
in Food - ^.) 



B-IV"3^ 



Food - k, Estimate of Continuing Food Requirements 



To: USDA State Defense Board 



Address; 



Following is an estimate of the number of civilians to be fed in 
Montajia during the 30-60~90 day period commencing 



Wijmber of persons to be fed: 30 days ; 60 days 

90 days . 

The following level of feeding for these people is desired. 

Food Ration Level Per Person Per Week 

Food Groups and Food Items Amount Per Week 

Meat sjid Meat Alternates 

(Fresh, frozen, and cured meat, poultry 
fish, shellfish, cheese and nuts) 

Eggs 

Milk (Fluid, Whole) 

Cereals and Cereal Products 

(Flour including mixes, fresh bakery products 
corn meal, rice, hominy, macaroni, and 
breakfast cereals) 

Fruits and Vegetables 

(Fresh and frozen) 

Food Fats and Oils 

(Butter, margarine, lard, shortening, 
salad and cooking oils) 



1/ This may be adjusted to meet local conditions but not in excess of 
the National Emergency Food Consumption Standard. 



B-IV-35 



Food Ration Level Per Person Per Week (Contd.) 

Food Groups and Food Items Amoiint Per Week 

Potatoes 

(white and Sweet) 
Sugars, Syrups, Honey & Other Sweets 

Please advise if food, that can he provided from primary sources and 
made available for civilian use in Montana during this 3O-6O-90 day period, 
will be adequate to meet these requirements. If not adequate, advise the 
food allowance per person per week that available supplies will permit. 

Date By: 



Director, Montana State Food Agency 



B-IV-36 



3. Emergency Organization 

The organizational chart which follows identifies functional areas 
involved in the management of food resources in Montana in an emergency. 

These are actions to provide for the continuity of operation of the 
State Food Agency. 

1, Copies of this plan and all action and reference documents have been 
placed and are immediately available in the Office of the Commissioner of 
Agriculture, the State Office of Emergency Planning, and in the State Emergency 
Operations Center. 

2. The Governor has selected and designated from government and 
the private sector qualified leaders with experience and knowledge of 
the food industry to provide executive direction in an emergency for 
the operations of the State Food Agency. Lines of succession to assure 
continuity of key staff for the operations of this Agency are provided 
in the roster of key personnel maintained in the Office of the Commiss- 
ioner of Agriculture, the State Office of Emergency Planning, and the 
State Emergency Operations Center. 

3- The State of Montana Commissioner of Agriculture is the 
Director of the State Food Agency. 

h. Upon activation of this Plan, the Director of the State Food 
Agency and key staff with emergency assignments to the Agency establish 
headquarters at the State Emergency Operations Center. 



S-IV-37 
















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B-iv-38 



k. Reference Docxjments Reference Document No, 1 

MEMClRMDUM OF UNDERSTAKDING 
On the Federal-State Division of Post -Attack 
Food Management Responsibilities 

1p Purpose o The purpose of this Memoranduip. of Understanding is: 

Ao To provide an understanding betweeri the U, S. Department of Agri- 
culture (USDA) and the State of Montana as to the emergency management 
of food stocks following a national emergency caused by enemy attack; 

Bo To provide a meai'.s for exihancing the survival of the citizens of 
the State of Montana through the orderly management of food supplies 
to support State food rationing in an emergency period; 

Co To give recognition to the principle that certain food stocks are 
pai't of a national supply and must be available as such to accomplish 
the most equitable distribution possible \.Lnder conditions of post- 
attack emergency; 

Do To foster close working relationships between USDA and the State 
of Montema in both the pre-emergency and post -attack periods; 

E. To form a basis for eliciting the cooperation and assistance of 
the food industry in the planning to cope with a national emergency; 
and 

Fo To facilitate the carrying out of the responsibilities assigned 
to USDA for the States by the National Food Plan (Chaper 8 to the 
National Plan for Emergency Preparedness o) 

2o Em.ergency Food Management Objectives of USDA . In exercising distri- 
bution control of certain food stocks within the State;, it is the USDA 
objective and intent to provide the State and its citizens with an appro- 
priate share of those stocks under emergency conditions. Moreover, in the 
iiianagement of food supplies at locations outside the State, it will be the 
USDA objective and intent to utilize such foods in such manner as to meet 
the needs of all s\i3rvivors, including those in the State of Montana. 

3" Scope . This MemoraiLdom of Understanding pertains to the management 
responsibility for food stocks of wholesalers (including chain store ware- 
houses) and processors located in the State of Montana. It provides a 
basis for both pre-emergency planning and the management in a post-attack 
period of food stocks of such wholesalers and processors. 

Uo Understandings Reached ,. Discussions between duly authorized re- 
presentatives of the State of Montana and of USDA have resulted in the 
following landerstandings : 



B-IV-39 



Ao Responsibility for Food Stocks » It is understood that USDA 
will retaiij, all responsibility for post-attack distribution control 
of the food stocks of wholesalers (including chain store warehouses) 
and of all processors except those in the categories described in 
Item B which follows o It is understood also that USDA will exercise 
such control in full cooperation with the State of Montana and in 
consideration of the needs of its sur-viving population o 

B, State Control of Certain Pr ocessor Food Stocks . It is vmder- 
stood that the State of Montana will assume responsibility for post- 
attack distribution control of food in all retail positions ;, in- 
cluding retail stores^ hotels^ schools^ restaurants^ institutions 
(except Federal institutions)^ sind homes and for the food stocks 
of processors such as confectioners, delicatessens^ local fluid milk 
distributors, retail takers ^ and others whose distribution in any 
case is retail in nature and subject to rationing. 

Co Distribution of Food . It is ■understood that food stocks from 
sources undez° distribution control of the State of Montaxia axid such 
foods as may be made avai.Iable to the State of Montana by USDA^ 
shall be distributed at a rate which will not result in an amount 
in excess of that necessary to meet the National Emergency Food Con- 
sumption Standard. 

D. Food in Transit . Food in transit is imderstood to be part of 
the national food reserve and subject to USDA management. It is 
tuiderstood also that both State and Federal authorities will faci- 
litate its continued movement to destination to the extent possible, 
as provided by the National Food Plan. 

Eo Identification of Facilities . It is understood that, in the 
interest of the welfare of its surviving population, the State of 
Montana will assist USDA as necessary eind possible in the identi- 
fication and listing of food wholesalers and processors whose stocks 
would be important in the post -attack period. 

Fo Facilities arxd Claimaacy . It is understood that USDA will re- 
tain responsibility post-attack for facilities and will serve as 
claimant for materials, equipment, manpower, and services that may 
be needed post -attack by food wholesalers (including chain store 
warehouses) ajid processors. 

5» Modification of Understandings. In the event that future developnents 
require modifications of the understandings summarized herein, representa- 
tives of the State of Montana and USDA will hold such discussions as are 



B-lV-40 



necessary to arrive at informaQ. mutual agreement concerning necessary 
changes. Such changes will be summarized and subscribed to as addenda to 
or revisions of this Memorandum of Understanding. 

October, 6 __; 1965 /s/ Douglas G. Smith 

Douglas G. Smith, Chairman 
Montana USDA State Defense Boeurd 

CONCURRENCE 

October, 6 . 1965 /s/ Tim Babcock 

Tim Babcock, Governor 
State of Montana 



B-IV-Ul 



i 



PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 



V — HEALTH 



MOOTANA PLAN 

FOR EMERGENCY 

MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES 



STATE OF MONTANA 
EMERGENCY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN 
PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 
V — HEAIil'H 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction ......... o . o .». o . o ...a. <,o o » oo = « oo ... o o »..,«.<. » B-V~ 1 

1 . Emergency Act ions ...................... ,...„o ............ . B ~V- 6 

2. Eipergency Action Doc-oments ............................... B-V- 7 

Index of Emergency Action Documents .................. B-V- 8 

3 . Emergency Orgemization ................................... B-'\/-3I 

h-^ Reference Documents ...................................... B-V-33 



m 



HEALTH 



ct:.t;oduction 

Tnis section of the State of Montana Emergency Resource Management 
Plan contains policies, guidance, and actions to provide health resources 
to meet essential needs in this State in a nuclear attack emergency,, 

DEFINITIONS 

a- "Emergency health services" means medical and dental ceire for 
the civilian population in all of tnelr specialities and adjunct, thera- 
peutic fields and the planning, provision, and operatic- of first aid 
stations, hospitals and clinics; preventive health services, Including 
detection, identification, and control of communicable diseases^, their 
vectors, and other public health hazaj-ds; inspection and control of 
purity and safety of food, drugs and biologicals; food and mllK sani- 
tation; preservation of public water supply; sewage eud other waste 
disposal; registration and disposal of the dead; prevention and alle- 
viation of water pollution; vital statistics services; preventive and 
curative care related to human exposure to radiological, chemical and 
biological warfare agents; and rehabilitation and related services for 
disabled survivors. 

b» "Health resources" means manpower, material, and facilities 
required to prevent the impairment of and to improve and restore the 
physical and mental health conditions of the civilian population, in 
support of emergency health services as defined above. 

c. "Health manpower" means physicians (including csteopaths), 
dentists, sanitary engineers, registered professional nurses, veterinar- 
ians, and occupations included in the List of Health Manpower Occupations- 
(Attachment-2 of action document Health-l) Licensed morticians are also 
to be considered in the field of health manpower. 

d. "Primary inventories" are health end items :lr storage at General 
Services Administration, federally controlled and Veterans Administration 
depots. Also included are stocks of the Bureau of Narcotics and interstate 
wholesale distributors. 

e. "Secondary inventories" are health end items at retail outlets 
and at intrastate and interstate wnolesale outlets. There are no health 
end items producers or producer warehouses in Montana. Secondary inventor- 
ies are State controlled. Mutual assistance agreements between Montana and 
other states will be honored where possible. 

i\ "Certified orders" are purchase orders, eontractis, or other 
requests for resources which bear a signed certification that the order 
is an. essential order authorized pursuant to Federal Government emergency 
regulations or State authorizations = 



B-V-1 



g. "Health end item" is a manufactured health item in its final, 
and smallest, usable form. 



General 

The process for managing resources in the State in a nuclear emergency 
involves two series of actions » First, essential immediate needs are 
identified and actions taken to supply these needs.. Secondly, and as soon 
as possible, continuing needs and expected future supplies are estimated. 
Decisions are made and actions are taken to channel these expected future 
supplies to meet the continuing needs that are most essential to survival 
and recovery of the State and the J^atioi-o 

Following is a brief description of Federal, State, a:ad local govern- 
ment roles in the emergency mariagement and supply of health resources in 
the State. 



Federal Goverriment 



i'he U. S. Department of rlealth. Education aiJ.a Welfare is responsible 
for National plar.s for the management of health resources in an emergency. 

Regional representatives of this Federal department have provided 
guidance and assistance to the State in the preparation of this section 
of the State plan. In addition, the DHEW provides Federal policies on the 
distribution of primary stocks of health end items in a nuclear attack 
emergency . 



State Government 



The State Health Agency and its Axea Emergency Health Directors 
develop, in cooperation with other organizations of the State government, 
and provide, on behalf of the Governor, policies and g-aidance consistent 
with State and Federal objectives. The purpose of these policies and 
guidance is to assure application throughout the State of compatible 
measures for the conservation, distribution, and use of health resources 
to prevent dissipation and waste and to assure that essential needs are 
identified and met within the supplies available. The State Health Agency 
also works with wholesale distributors in this State. It furnishes guid- 
ance to these wholesalers on the consei-vation ana release of inventories 
and the replacement of inventories from producers. The State Health Agency 
and its Area Emergency Health Directors act on requests for State level 
assistance from local government officials and arrange with distributors 
of secondary stocks to adjust deliveries of health end items to correct 
local shortages in supply. As soon as possible after the attack, the 
State Health Agency ajiticipates continuing needs amd aakes arrangements 
to provide health end items to meet ongoing demands of autViorized essen- 
tial users. 



B-V- 



Local goveriiment 

Local governments, through designated medical and health agencies 
and officials, aj-e responsible for providing essential medical and health 
services to the people within their own juiisdictiaa<, Ihey will utilize 
all local facilities necessary together with their own stocks of medical 
and health supplies euid eq^uipment and locally available medical and health 
manpower to perform this function » vfhen these locally available resources 
are inadequate to carry on essential services^ a request fcr assistaxice 
will be forwarded through appropriate channels (municipalities to County 
Health Officers to Area Emergency "Health Directors) to tne State ffealth 
Ager.cy . 

Essential Eealth End Items Fa cilities 

Attached to this plan as Beference Doctmient Iv'c. 2: is a list of whole- 
salers of he&l^n end items and their locations which are essential to 
National survival and which must be kept in operation to ass'ure a continuing 
flow of nealth items to meet essential needs for survival and recovery. 

(Kote- The inventories of biologicals and drugs, suitable for treatment 
of humans J in the stocks of veterinarisns must t>e considered in a disaster 
situation in Montana due to the limited nomtei of wholesale 'drag establish- 
ments in the State o; 

Flow Chai't 

Fcllcwing is a flow charb showing the process ani tae actions to be 
taken by State and local goverriments to assure a continuing flow of health 
end items to meet essential needs in the State in a nucleax attack emergency. 

I'he legend accompanying tne chart identifies; 

A, actions to be taken immediately to suppxy i:Timediate needs 
essential for survival and, 

B. actions to be taken as soon as possible to anticipate 
continuing needs and to channel health end item, supplies 
to meet the most urgent needs for continuing sur\'ival and 
recovery o 



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B-7-.5 



1, Emergency Actions 

The following actions are taken on "behalf of the Governor at State 
and Area levels by State Health Agency officials to provide policies and 
guidance applicable throughout the State on the management and use of 
health resources. 

The emergency action an.d reference documents contained here have 
been prepared and placed vith appropriate State axid local officials 
during the preattack planning process, 

a. Actions for Iin ae diatg Supply 

(1) Issue;; on behalf of the Governor, policies and guidance 
applicable throughout the State covering the provision and 
distribution of health resources vithin the State, (Eealth-1, 
State tlealth Resources Policy and Guidance.) 

(2) Confinn arrangemenrs with wholesalers of health end items 
to make deliveries on certified orders received frcm customers 
in the State. (Health-2, Request for Release of Health End 
Items Inventories.) 

(3) Arrange with health end item distributors for adjustments 
of deliveries tomeet local shortages in health supplies re- 
ported by local governments. (Note; In the event wholesalers 
are not able to meet local shortages through adjustment of de- 
liveries, it may be necessary to redistribute stocks from one 
area to another or to recommend to the Governor the placing of 
restrictions on the use of particular items and redistribute 
based on this restricted use.) (Health-3^ Adjustment of De- 
liveries. 

(k) Arraxige for transfer of health manpower in the State to 
meet urgent shortages repox-ted by local governments. (Eealth-4, 
Request for Health Manpower . ) 

b. Actions for Continuing Supply 

As soon as resupply of secondary inventories to meet essential 
immediate needs in the localities is under way the State Health Resources 
organization takes the following actions to anticipate continuing needs 
and to arrajige for continuing supply to meet these needs. 



health services officials j Federal military officials arxd appro- 
priate State resource officials to estimate continuing require- 
ments of health end items that will be needed in the State during 
the ensuing 90-day period. (Health-5<, Estimate of Continuing Health 
End Items Requirements.) 

(6) Obtain from wholesalers estimates of quantities of health 
end items that csin be supplied for continuing use in the State 
diiring the ensuing 90 -day period. 



B-V-6 



(7) If anticipated supplies are inadequate to meet the esti- 
mated requirements of the various emergency health services and 
adjustments in requirements cannot be negotiated, refer to the 
Resource Priorities Board for recommendations to the Governor on 
the allocation of anticipated supplies among competing programs. 
(Health-6, Allocation of Health Supplies.) 

(8) Issue revised State policies on the use of health resources 
in the State to conform with the Governor's decision, (Health-7j 
Revised State Health Resources PoLicyo) 

(9) Consult with wholesalers of health end items and providers 

of health services euid develops estimates of continuing requirements 
for electric power, manpower, transportation, petrolexim products, 
communications, and other operating supplies, equipment, and ser- 
vices that will he needed to maintain operations in the State 
during the ensiling 9'>^--day period, present these requirements 
estimates to appropriate State resource organizations. (Health-8, 
Health Services Support Requirements.} 

(10) Consult with providers of health services and develop esti- 
mates of emergency repair and consti action of essential health 
services facilities that will be required during the ensuing 90-day 
period and present these requirements estimates to the State Con- 
struction organization. (Health-9, Health Services Construction 
Requirements. ) 

(11) Inform providers of health services of supplies of supporting 
resources that will be available in the State for acquisition and 
use by them to maintain essential operations during the ensuing 
90-day period. (Eealth-10, Allocation of Supporting Resources.) 

(12) Authorize providers of health services to certify purchase 
orders to obtain specified quantities of supporting resources and 
services during the ensuing 90-day period. (Health-11, Authorization 
to Obtain Supporting Resources.) 

2. Emergency Action Docu ments 

Following are emergency action documents to implement the foregoing 
emergency actions. 

(Note: During the process of expediting service to meet urgent local needs, 
the quickest means of communication between levels of government and with 
industry should be used. The forms illustrate the kind of information to be 
transmitted over telephone or other available means of fast communication.) 



B-V-7 



Ind ex of Smergency Action Documents 

F-'ealth- 1^ State He alth Agency Policy aad Guidance 

Health- 2^ Request for Release of Health End Items Inventories 

Health- 3} Adjustme nt of r^&livferj.e^ 

Health- h^ Req^uest for Health ¥Ja Xi.j)Oyiej: 

Health- 5, Estimate of Contin uing Healph^En d Items Requirements 

Health- 6, Allocation of Health Supplies 

Health- 7^ Revised State He alth Agency Policy 

Health - 8, Health Serv ices Sup port Hequirements 

Health- 9^ Health Services Construction Requirements 

Health -10, Allocat ion of Supporting Res ources 

Health-11, Au thoriza ti on to Ohtaln Supporting Resgarces 



E~V»8 



Health -1 , State Health Resouices Policy and uailarice 
^"•O' Heads of Political Subdivisions 



'Juidance for Loca l Governments o It is essential that Health Re- 
sources availaole for use in this State be carefully conserved and 
restricted to immediate and urgent uses for local;, State aod National 
sur-/ival axA recovery. Consequently, appropriate officials of local 
government are requested to take the fcllovrLng actions; 

1<. Advise all health manpower not ordered to military service 
to continue, if possible, in their regular work relationships unless 
requested ^o perform other emergency health activities by local health 

authcrities. 

i: . Notify supporting manpower who are integral to health opera- 
tions and who are employed at time of attack by medical facilities or 
laboratories or government health agencies to remain with the employ- 
ing organization if not ordered to military service » 

}, Announce and enforce restrictions on release and sale of 
inventories of local secondary distributors of health end-items, except 
as authorized by you. 

-t., Implement instructions to retail distributors on how to 
release inventories to meet essential needs o 

5» Authorize essential local users to obtain Immediate suid urgent 
health end items from retail distributors » 

60 Authorize essential health facilities to certify purchase 
orders for health supplies needed to maintain their operations. In- 
struct essential facilities to place these certified orders through 
chai-u-.el3 shown below. 

Provisions must be made to avoid the maldistribution postattack of 
available stocks. Therefore those health facilities authorized to 
certify their orders should be required to limit replenishment of health 
end items to a maximum operating level of fourteen days based on austere 
treatment procedures. The certified orders for health items should be 
for the amount which, when added to the inventory on hand, will constitute 
a fourteen day supply. As production is increased to meet requirements 
operating inventory levels of supply may be adjusted upward. 

Persons authorized to certify orders at each facility should be 
kept to a minimum. These should be limited to persons in key executive 
pcsiticns wnich should be identified to the wholesalers, preattack. 

In the event locally available health resources are not adequate to 
meet all essential needs, local governments should decide and cut back 
authorized local uses. Concurrently they should report snortages and 



•B-V-9 



request appropriate officials of State Govermaent to take actions to 
increase the supply of health resources to the local jurisdiction. 

Adequate management of health resources makes mandatory the 
adherence to specified channels for report-s and requests <> These 
channels are: municipalities to County Health Officers to Area 
Emergency Eealth Director to State Health Agency, (See Attachment 3«) 



Effective Date 



Govemcr of t'he State of Montana 



By; 



Director, State Eealth Agency 



"10 



Health -1, Attachment -1 



B ackground Informatio n 

The Governor has issued general policy on the use of essential 
resources in the Immediate postattack period. These policies axe set 
forth in Tart A. of the State plan. They have been furnished to appro- 
priate officials of the political subdivisions of the State, 

In general, these State policies proviae fcr teiipcrary freezing 
of retail inventories of essential items and immeciate ax^d continuing 
release of these items to meet urgent military and civil defense needs 
and to maintain operations of facilities essential to continued survival 
arid recovery. They provide for continuing resupply of local secondary 
inventories as well as inventories of essential facilities which obtain 
their supplies from wholesale and primary sources. 

In addition, the Governor has issued a proclamation requesting the 
executive heads of the political subdivisions in this State to provide 
resources from locally available supplies to carry on immediate and urgent 
activities for survival and to maintain the operation of essential facil- 
ities. In accordance with this direction fr-om the GoTemor, local govern- 
ments are requested to inform essential users of resources and persons 
engaged in the operation of essential facilities how tc identify their 
purchase orders, contracts, and otner purchase arrangements to obtain 
deliveries of supplies and services. 

Attached to the Health Section of the State plan is a list of end 
item wholesale distribution facilities that must continue in operation to 
assure an adequate flow of health end items for local and State survival 
and recovery. Names and addresses of these facilities located in the 
political subdivisions have been provided to the local governments con- 
cerned o 

Local governments, upon attack, notify the management of these 
facilities to certify their purchase orders and contracts to obtain pro- 
duction materials, capital equipment, and maintenance, repair, and operating 
supplies or to place contracts for essential repair and construction as 
follows t 

1. Health Services use the following State certification to identify: 

a. purchase orders for supplies of electric power, petroleum 
products, gas, solid fuels, and transportation services, and 

b. construction contracts for repair and construction of 
facilities^ 



This is an essential order 
authorized by the State of Montana 



(Signature of Purchaser)" 



B-V-11 



2o Health Services identify purchase orders In accordance vrlth the 
rating and certification provisions of Federal emergency regu.lations issued 
by the Business and Defense Services Administration cf t-he Uo S, Department 
of Commerce upon attack^ for supplies cf production materials^ capital 
equipment^ and other maintenance, repair, and operating supplies » The 
State Industrial Production Agency puhlici^es and makes knorwn these 
Federal regulations to local governments and industry immediately following 
an attack. 

Eetail and wholesale distriVatois use the Federal rating and certifi- 
cation on purchase orders to supply their inventories from primary dis- 
triljutorso 



B-V-12 



Health-1, Attachment 2 
To; Director of State Health Agency and Executive Heads of Government 



1. Purpose ♦ This order issues the List of Health Manpower Occupations 
and assigns responsibilities in regard thereto » 

2» Definitions . The Federal Government has defined health manpower as 
"physiciajis (including osteopaths), dentists, sanitary engineers, regis- 
tered professional nurses; and such other occupations as may be included 
in the List of Health Manpower Occupations," issued by appropriate authority. 
The list issued by this order is consistent with Federal Government usage 
as established in Defense Mobilization Order 851^0 ol issued by the Director, 
Office of Emergency Planning, March 11, 196ii, with two additions made by 
the State of Montana which are explained at the end of the list. 

3" Responsibilities . The Executive Order providing for the administration 
of Resource Management and Economic Stabilization programs assigns civilian 
manpower mobilization planning responsibilities to the State of Montana 
Unemployment Compensation Commission and civilian health manpower mobili- 
zation planning responsibilities to the State of Montana Board of Health. 

State and local health officials have the primary responsibility of 
planning the organization, training, and utilization of civilian health 
manpower. The facilities of the State Manpower Agency and its local offices 
will be utilized in carrying out the health program (e.g., recruitment, 
referrals, and other manpower measures). 

The skills identified in the attached List of Health Manpower Occupa- 
tions are those which will be immediately required for the provision of 
essential emergency public health and medical services. Persons possessing 
the listed skills and allocated by appropriate officials to meet non- 
military requirements will be made available to health services. However, 
as health hazards are brought under control and medical care loads permit, 
health officials will release for utilization in other essential activities 
the health manpower that is no longer critically needed. 

Supporting manpower, integral to health operations, e.g., hospital, 
sanitation, and laboratory helpers, and engineering, clerical, food service 
and custodial personnel, is not listed. Such civilian manpower employed at 
the time of attack by a medical facility or laboratory, or governmental 
health agency, will, if not ordered to military service, remain with the em- 
ploying organization. All others will be provided according to priorities 
established by the manpower agency ranking governmental official. 

^o Effective Date. This Order is effective the date of issuance. 



;iovernor 



Tab A, Attached. 



B-V-13 



Health-lj Attachment 2, Tat A 

LIST OF HEAHPH MANPOWER OCCUPATIONS l/ 

Based on Defense Mobilization Order 85UO.I 

Office of Emergency Planning 

Executive Office of the President 

Department of Labor 

Occupational Title Occiipational Code No. 

Audiologist 079.108 

Biochemist 04lo08l 

Clinical Radioisotope Technicieui O78.381 

Dental Eygienist 078.368 

Dental Technician (Bus. Serv.) 712. 38I 

Dentist 072. IO8 

*Dietician 077-168 

Food and Drug Inspector (Govt. Serv) 168.287 

Health Physicist 2/ 079-021 

Medical Physiologist 0i<-1.08l 

Medical Record Librarian 100. 388 

Medical Te clinician (Med. Serv.) O78.38I 

Medical Technologist (Med. Serv.) O78.38I 

Bacteriology Technician O78.38I 

Biochemistry Technician O78.38I 

Bloodbank Technician O78.38I 

Cytology Technician O78.38I 

F.eitatology Technician O78.38I 

Parasitology Technician O78.381 

Serology Techniciaji 078. 38I 

Tissue Technicieui O78.38I 

Virology Technician O78.38I 

Midwife 35^.878 

Natural Scientists (N.E.C.): 

Anatomist (Prof . and Kindred) Oit-1.08l 

Biophysicist 3/ Oi»-1.08l 

Dairy Bacteriologist 0ifl.08l 

Food Bacteriologist OU1.O81 

Hematologist O78.38I 

Histcpathologist 0^1. O81 

Medical Bacteriologist OU1.O81 

Parasitologist, Medical 0^4-1.081 

Pharmaceutical Bacteriologist 0^4-1.081 

Pharmacologist 0^1 . O81 

Public Health Bacteriologist 0^^-1.281 

Veterinarian Bacteriologist hj .■ ,■ O73.O81 

Nurse Aide (Med. Serv.) 355.878 

Nurse, Licensed Vocational 079.378 

Nurse, Practical 35^.878 

Nurse, Professional 075.378 

Occupational Therapist 079.128 



B-V-lU 



Opt omet ri st 079 • 108 

Orderly (Med. Serv.) 355.878 

Orthopedic Technician 712.281 

Osteopathic Physician 071. 108 

Pharmacist (Prof. and Kindred) 074. l8l 

Podiatrist 7/ 079. 108 

Psychologist, Clinical 5/ OU5.IO8 

Fhysicisms & Surgeons 070. 

Physical Therapist (Med. Serv.) O79.378 

Sanitarian 6/ O79.II8 

Sanitary Engineer OC5.081 

Social Worker, Medical 195.108 

Social Worker, Psychiatric I95.IO8 

Speech Pathologist O79.IO8 

S'aperintendent, Hospital (Med. Serv.) 187.II8 

-^'L.ndertaker I87 . 168 

veterinarian. 073 • IO8 

X-ray Technician (Med. Serv.) O78.368 



1/ Includes students, trainees, and interns whose training or education 
leading to axiy of the indicated skills is sufficiently aavajiced to qualify 
*:neiti to contribute to the technical tasks of providing health services. 

£/■' HEALTH PHYSICIST . Devises and directs a research training and monitor- 
ing program to protect plant personnel from radiation hazards. Conducts 
research to develop inspection standards, radiation exposure limits for 
personnel, safe work methods, and decontamination procedures and tests 
surrounding areas to assure that releases to environment are not in excess 
of permissible radiation standards. Designs or modifies health physics 
equipment, such as detectors and counters to improve radiation protection. 
Assists in developing standards of permissible concentrations of radio- 
isotopes in liquids and gasses. Directs testing and monitoring of equip- 
■tent and recording of personnel radiation exposure dates. 

Requests special bio-assay samples of individuals believed to be 
exposed. Consults with scientific personnel regarding new experiments 
to determine that equipment or plan design conforms to health physics 
standards for protection of personnel. Supervises radiation monitoring 
and directs monitoring of plant areas smd work sites. Requisitions and 
maintains inventory of instruments. Records location and quantity of 
radioactive sources assigned to depajrtment s . Instructs personnel in 
priirciples, policies, rules, and regulations related to radiation hazards. 
/■ssigns filjn badges and dosimeters to personnel and recommends changes in 
assignment for health reasons. May advise public authorities on methods 
of dealing with radiation hazards and procedures to be followed in radi- 
ation incidents and assists in civil defense planning. Reports findings 
and recommends improvements in safety measures. A bachelor's degree with 
a. major in physics, chemistry, engineering, or a biological science, plus 
at. least one year of specialized training in health physics is required. 

jj/ BIOPFfSICIST . Studies the physical principles of living cells and 
orgavxisms, including mechanics, heat, light, radiation, sound, and elec- 
tricity. Is trained in both physics and biology. May specialize, for 



B-V-15 



example, in the field of radiobiology which includes such activities as 
the study and use of radiation and nuclear particles in the trsatment of 
cancer or the use of atomic : sctcpes in discovering the transforniation of 
substances in cells » 

kj VETER'BTAB.IM BACTE RIQIOGIST » Though current planning provides that many 
veterinarians be utilized, in casualty care and preventive medicine activi- 
ties in the Immediate postattack period^ veterinarians will continue to 
he needed to perfor-m services of a strictly veterinary nature after most 
of the h\j.marL casualties have been cared for tenrporarily . Such veterinary 
activities will include protection of food animals against diseases and the 
effects of atomic, biologicalj, ar^d chemical warfare; meat and poultry in- 
spection and supplementing food inspection forces for certain food process- 
ing plants, and food, storage facilities o (See Kote P.) 

5/ CLTJii lCAL FSYCHOL'DGIST , Diagnoses mental and. emotional disorders of 
individuals in clinics, hospitals, prisons, and ether institutions and 
administers program of treatment = Interviews patient, studies medical and 
social case history, observes patient in play or other situations, and 
selects, a,dmlnisters, arid interprets projective and, other psychological 
tests to diagnose disorder and. formalate plan of treatment o Treats 
psychological disorders to effect improved adjustment through psychodrama 
play therapy, and other techniques of individual and group therapy o 
Selects approach to use in individual therapy such as .directive, non- 
directive, and supportive therapy and plans frequency^ intensity, and 
duration of therapy. 

Jlay collaborate with reYCKIATRIST'; PEDIAI^- ICIkJV ; SOCIAL WORKER : 
FSYCHIAl'RIC : and other specialists in developing treatment programs for 
patients, based on analysis of clinical data. May instruct and direct 
students serving psychological internships in hospitals and clinics. May 
develop experimental design said conduct research in field of personality 
development and adjustment and on problems of diagxiosis, treatment , and. 
prevention of mental illness. May ser-zice as consultant to social, 
educational, welfare and otner agencies on individual cases or in evalu- 
ation, planning and development of mental Jiealth programs. May specialize 
on one of the follcving; behavior problems, crime and delinquency, group 
therapy, individual diagnosis and therapy, mental deficiency, objective 
tests, projective techniques, and speech pathology. A Clinical Psycholo- 
gist is identified as an individual who is working in the field of clinical 
psychology and who meets one of the following criteria; (l) is a diplomate 
in clinical psychology of the i^jnerican Board of Examiners in Professional 
Psychology; (2) is a fellow of the Division of Clinical euid Abnormal 
Psychology of the American Psycnolcgical Association; or (3) holds a 
Ph. D. degree in clinical psychology. 

6/ S AfilTARIAKi o Interprets and enforces saivitat-iorj laws and regulations 
to protect and prom.cte public health. Inspects and investigates sanitation 
facilities and conditions in such places as dwellings, water supply and 
sewerage p.lants, recreational areas, industrial plants, barber shops, 
beauty salons, arid food processing and serving establishments to determine 
compliance with standards. Takes samples of such ma-terials as water, food, 
and air and performs or orders a vai-iety of ehem;lcal, physical or biological 
tests for contamination. Formulates plans and oversees programs for insect 



B-V-lG 



and rodent exteraination and control,, Issues corrective notices arid orders, 
and follows up on compliance. Collal^orates wit'n putlic health personnel in 
epidemiology sar^rey, analyses, emd control programs „ Reviews and makes 
recommendations on sanitary laws and resruiatlcnSo Plans, orgsuiizes and 
conducts training programs in saxLitary practices for such persor-nel and 
organizations to interpret emd promote sanitation standards and practices. 
In seme states, may "be required to hold license or be registered. When 
employed by public health agencies, and in industry, may be designated 
according to specialization, as FOOD-AKX-IWFJSiaiA.L SMTI-AHIAIJ (Profess. 
& kin.); HOUSING SAWITARIM' (Pi-ofess, & Kin.); MILK SMirAFJAE' (Profess. 
& kin . ) . 

7/ FODIAIT^IST . (Medical ser.) O79.IO6. Chiropodist; orthopedic 
specialist o Diagnoses 6ind treats diseases and deforraitles of human foot. 
Diagnoses foot ailments such as tumors,, ulcers^ fr'acturts, skin or nail 
diseases, and congenital or acquired deformitiesj utilizing such medically 
accepted methods as urinalysis, blood tests> a-id X-ray ar.alysiSo Treats 
deformities such as flat or weak feet aad foot imbaiaxi.ce by mechanical 
methods such as whirlpool or paraffin baths, o;r- by electrical methods such 
as short wave and low voltage curientSo Treats ccnditior.s such as corns, 
calluses, ingrowing nails, tumors, shortened tenoonsj cystSj, aiid abcesses 
by surgical methods including suturing^ medicat.ior.s, and administrations 
of local anesthetics. Does not perfoi-m airpuxations of tne foot. Corrects 
deformities by means of plaster casts and strappings o N'iakes and fits 
prosthetic appliances. Prescribes correcti'>''e footwear, Pefers patients 
to PBiYSICIM when symptoms observed in feet and legs evidence systemi.c 
disorders such as arthritis, heart disease, aiabetes or kidney trouble. 
^fey treat bone, muscle and joint disorders and be knoixT. as PCDIAi?RIST , 
OFTTIEOPEDIC : children's foot diseases and be kiiown as POIOPEDIA'IRICIAN j 
or perform surgery and be known as PDCI/VIfi'IC S'JI'.GEON^ 

*rhe State of Montana has added Dieticians to the List of Health 
Manpower Occupations since their services would be of vital importance in 
hospitals, evacuee centers and other installations where mass feeding may 
be necessary. 

^Undertakers (Licensed Morticia:is) have a;^.3C beer, added since the use 
of this personnel and their equipment in a ternpcrary role of transporting 
sick and injured and their subsequent ftinctions in providing registration and 
burial services certainly fall within the purview of the State Health Agency. 



B-V"I7 



Health- 1, 
Attachsent-3 




|^V-18 



Health"? , Req,uest for Release of Feaiitn End. Item laventorles 



To° Wholesalers of Health r'na I'.ems 



Local governments in this State, tn aecordar.ce with Scate policies 
and guidaace, have identified and aMz'ticTlzeii health persomiel and. 
essential health facilities in ^heir juxis-lictions to certify their 
purchase orders for health er.a. i:;emSo 

Retail distributors have been instr-acted tc accept, and. make 
deliveries to fill these certified orders o Ihey hare "been authorized 
to certify their purchase orders to resupply their inventories o 

Wholesale dlstribatore are req.uested to accept and deliver against 
these certified orders vithln the quar^tities of health end items in 
their inventories t.h&.t are availatie for ase in this State:, 



Effective Date 



I.irector, State Health Agency 

■'or iirea Eicergency Health Director) 



"19 



Health-3 j Adjustaient of Deliveries -- Form 1 

To : (Name of vrhole sal er 3f Healra En d Items) 

Shortages in supplies of health end items have oeen reported from 
the following localities in your distribution area; 



Suioinary of Local Dsficieneies in Weekly 
Resapply of Health End Items 



locality Raitie of Item 



You are requested to adjust your local deliveries, if posslhle, to 
correct the deficiencies indicated above » 

Please advise this office of the increase in deliveries you can 
make in this way to the naimed connnun-ities. 



Date: 



Director, State Health Agency 

(or Area Emergency Health Director) 



E-V-20 



'Health-3, Adjustment of Deliveries - Form 2 
To: Area Emergency Health Director 



Eesupply of secondary inventories of health end items in this local 
jurisdiction is inadequate to meet present and antici.pated needs of 
essential health facilities and essential local aserso 

Authorized local uses and use levels have Reen cut back as far as 
possible by local government decision and acrica. 

Assistance is needed to increase the level of resupply to this 
local jurisdiction as quickly as possible. 

Following aj-e estimated increases in weekly deliveries required to 
meet essential local needs for health end items. 



Request for State Assi stance 
Resupply of Health End Items 

Increase In 
Health End Items Unit of Measure Weekly Deliveries 



From: To; 



1. (name of item) 

2. 

3. 



Date__ 

(Name of Head of Local Government) 



By: 



Local Health Official 



B-V-21 



Health~tt^ , Request for Healhh MJanpower 

To; Area Emergency Health Director 

The supply of health iHanpcwer in this local jurisdiction is 
inadequate to meet present ar.d anticipated needs for health manpower. 

Assistance is needed as quickly as possible, 

Following is a detailed list of the needs for health joanpower. 



BegLisst for Health Ma&.power 



Number Occupational Code Wo, 



(Note: It is intended that the U.S. 
Department of Labor's occuiiational 
code he used here. The relevant part 
of this code is included in Attachment 
2, of Health-l.) 



Date; 



^Name of Kead of Local Government) 

By: 

Local Health Official 



E-7-22 



Health-^ , Estimate of Cont inuing Eealth j^m__It_e_m_ geg^^^ 

Form 1 attached to this emerger.cy act-ion document contains data on 
quantities of health end items that vill Le refiuired in this State for a 
90-day period conmeneing (date) 

The requirements stated include the quaritities of health end items 
to be supplied by producers, rfhcieialerS;; axid local distrioutors to fill 
authorized orders of essential health facilities, axid individual consumers. 

These requii^ements do not include a[jant-ities of nealth end items 
needed by essential facilities such as large military installations and 
bases that obtain their require'nents drlrectly from producers. These latter 
requirements aire the responsibility cf the relevant federal agency. 

The pur-pose of these ota'';e requirertents estfjnates is to determine and 
anticipate quantities of health end items needed, fr'om primary sources under 
Fedei-al jurisdiction to resupply seconaary stocks under State Jurisdiction. 

Estimates should be limited to items on the List of Essectial Health 
Items until notified that national production has recovered sufficiently to 
meet additional demands. 

Definition s 

" Civilia:i F.equire^ients " include the health items needed to caxry on 
emergency civil defense operations to tnaintai:. essential local activities 
and. to supply Individual consumers under the consumer rationing system. 
These civilian requirements estimates are provided by appropriate health 
officials. 

" Military Requirements " include the tiealth end items needed to carry 
on military activities. They include only the supplies that are to be 
obtained from wholesale and retail distributors . These military require- 
ments estimates are provided by appropu-iate military officials. 







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B-V-25 



Health-7, Ee/ised State Health Resource Policy 

fKote: The content and su'Dstanee of the revised Health resources 
policy will depend on the situation ar.d the supplies of health resources. 
Necessarily, this document will not he completed except in attest of the 
plan or at the appropriate point in a pest -attack situation,; 

This document will he, in essence, a Re-^^ised Health-1, State Health 
Resources Policy and guidance, contained here. 



B-V-26 



Health-8, Health Services Su pport Reqairemer.ts 



Estimate of Heal^ 
Period Cofflmer 


.h Ser'vices 
icing 


Support Requirements for 90-Day 
(Date) 






Resource 


Unit of 
Measure 


.First 
30 Pays 


Fc] 1, awing 
6c ;:ays 


Total 
90 Days 


Electric Power 










Petroleixm Pi-oducts 










Tran sporta t i on 










Solid Fuels 










Gas 










Water 










C onmra n 1 c at i on s 



















































B-7-27 



Health-9 , Health Services Construction Requirements 
To: State Construction and Housing Agency 



Following is a list sind description of major construction, repair and 
modification of facilities that will be required to maintain desired supply 
of health resources during the 90-day period commencing (date) . 



Construction Projects 

1. Name, location, type and size of constx'action project; 
start axid completion dates; 

(if project is undei*way or a construction contract has "been 
prepared, attach a copy of the contract document and summary 
hill of materials.) 

2. 
h. 



Bireetor, State Health Agency 



B-V-28 



Health-10, Allocation of Supporting Bgsourcesj^c Health Services 



lo: 



Attached, is a list and the quantities of supporting resources that 
have been allocated for maintairlng essential health serT>-iceso 

This is furnished as a basis for authorizing these facilities to 
obtain continuing supplies cf these resources during the allocation 
period. 



(Attach list,) 



B--V-29 



HeaIth-11 , Authorization to O btain Supporting Resources 

To: (Name of Provider of Health Ser/ices) 

You are hereby authorized to obtain the supporting resources in the 
quantities specified in the attached listo 



Resources 


Unit of 
Measure 


First 
30 Days 


Following 
6C Days 


Total 
90 Days 


Electric Power 










Petroleum Products 










Transportation 










Solid Fuels 










Gas 










Water 










Communications 





















In placing orders for the above supporting resources ^ you are 
authorized to use the following certification; 



"This is an essential order 
authorized by the State 
Health Direct or o" 



^.Signed by Purchaser 



fSigned) 



Director, State Health Agency 



B-v'-30 



3. Emergency Orgajiizatlon 

The organizational chart which follows identifies Functional areas 
involved in the management of health resources in Montana in an emergency. 

The Area Emergency Health L'irectors shown in the organization chaxt 
are located in control centers at points which have been established for 
area emergency operations. (See Health-1, Attachment -3 ) - 

These are actions to provide for continui-cy of operation of the 
State Health Agency. 

1. The Governor of the State of Montana has assigned to the State 
Board of Health the responsibility for providing aJmittistrative 
support, i.e., personnel, facilities, axii supplies, for the operation 
of the State Health Agency. Copies of this plan and all action and 
reference documents have been placed, axtd are immediately available 

in the State Board of Health, the State Office of Emergency Planning, 
ajid in the State Emergency Ciperatlcns Center., 

2. The Governor has selected and designated q.ualified leaders with 
experience and knowledge in the health resources area to provide 
executive direction in an emergency for the operation of the State 
Health Agency. Lines of succession to assa-e continuity of key 
staff for the operation of this Agency are provided in the roster 

of key personnel maintained in the State Beard of Health, the State 
Office of Emergency Planning, and. in the State Emergency Operations 
Center o 

3. The Executive Officer' of the State Board of health is the 
Director of the State Health Agency. 

k. Upon aetiT-ation of this plaxi, the Director of the State Health 
Agency and key staff with emergency assigrjnents to the Agency establish 
headquarters at the State Emergency Operations Center. 

5o It must be recognized that whereas the State Board of Health has 
primary responsibility for administering the provisions of this Chapter 
of the Plan, during normal peacetime operations T.edical care is not 
one of its chief concerns. Conversely, hospitals, physicians and 
other paramedical personnel ordinarily provide medical care outside 
any State administrative control. It is logical then to Include in 
the State Health Agency persons autside the State Board of Health or 
any other unit of State or local government.. 



B-V'-31 







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B-B-32 



Reference Documents 



Health Reference Document No. 1 



LIST OF ESSENTIAL HEAI.IH IFFMS 



1 „ HiARMACE^.TTICAIS : 
Alcohol 

Analgesics, non-narcotic 
Antibiotics and antihacterials 
Antidiabetic agents, oral 
Ant ihi stain irte s 
Antimalarials 
Atropine 

Blood derivatives 
Carbon Dioxide absorbent 
Cardiovascular depressants 
Cardiovascular stimulants 
Corticosteriods 
Diuretics 

General anesthetics 
Hypnotics 
Insul.in 

IntravenouK solutions for replace- 
ment therapy 
Local anesthetics 
Lubricant, surgical 
Morphine and substitutes 
Oral electrolyl".es 
Oxygen 

Surgical antiseptics 
Sulfa drugs 

Synthetic plasma volume expanders 
VitajTiin preparations, pediatric 
Wattr for injection 

2. BLCOD COLLECTING .MID DISPENSING 

SUPPLIES: 
Blood collecting and dispensing 

containers 
Blood donor sets 
Blood grouping and typing sera 
Blood recipient sets 
Blood shipping containers 

3o BIOIOGICALS: 

Diphtheria toxoid 

Diphtheria antitoxin 

Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and 

pertussis vaccine 
Gas gangrene antitoxin 
Poliomyelitis vaccine, oral 
Rabies vaccine 



Stiialapox vaccine 
Tetanus antitoxin 
Tetanus toxoid, absorbed 
Typhoid vaccine 
Typhus vaccine, epidemic 
Yellow fever va,ccine 

h, SURGICAL TEXTILES: 
Adhesive plaster 
Band-Agi, gauze 
Bandage, musliri 
Bandage, plaster of paris 
Cottion, USP 
Surgical pads 
Stcc.kir.ette. surgical 
Wadiirg., cotton sheet 

5, EMERGENCY SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 

MI) SUE PLIES: 
Airi/ra-yj, pharyngeal 
Anesthesia apparatus 
Basin, wash, solution 
Blade, surgical knife 
Brasho scrub, surgical 
Cat':L=ter, uretiriral 
Containers for sterilization 
Chisel, bone 
Drain., Perirose 
Dusting Powder 
Forceps^ dressing 
Forceps, heniostatic 
Forceps, obstetrical 
ForccfS, tiss'je 
Gl eve s <, surgeon ' s 
Handles, surgical knife 
Holder, sutur-e needle 
Inhaler, anesthesia, Yankauer 

(ether mask) « 
Intravenous injection sets 
Kriifes cast cutting 
Lamps, for diagnostic instruments 
Lamps 3 for surgical lights 
Laryngoscope 

Light, surgical, portable 
I-3.tter 

Mailet, bone surgery- 
Needles , hypcdertrde, reusable 



B-V-33 



Health Reference Doc. No. 



Needles, suture, eyed 
Otoscope and ophthalmoscope set 
Probe, general operating 
Razor and blades (for surgical 

preparation) 
Retractor, rib 

Retractor set, general operating 
Rongear, bone 
Saw, amputating 

Saw, bone cutting, wire (Gigil) 
Scissors, bandage 
Scissors, general surgical 
Sigmoidoscope 
Speculum, vaginal 
Sphygmomanometer 
Splint, leg, Thomas 
Splint, wire, ladder 
Sterilizer, pressure, portable 
Stethoscope 
Sutures, absorbable 
Sutures, absorbable, with attached 

needle 
Sutures, 
Sutures, 

needle 
Syringes, Luer, reusable (hypodermic 

syringes) . 
Thermometers, clinical 
Tracheotomy tube 
Tube, masogastric 
Tubing, rubber or plastic, and 

connectors 
Vascular prostheses 
Webbing, textile, with buckle 



nonabsorbable 
nonabsorbable, with attached 



1 (contd.) 



6. LABORATORY EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIE: 
Bacteriological culture media and 

apparatus 
Balance, laboratory with weights 
Blood and urine analysis instruments 

equipment and supplies 
Chemical reagents, stains and 

apparatus 
Glassware cleaning equipment 
Laboratory glassware 
Microscope and slides 
Water purification apparatus 

7, VETERIMAEY MEDICAL ITEMS: 
Anthrax vaccine 

Black leg vaccine 
Hog cholera vaccine 

Newcastle vaccine 



(Note: The inventories of biologicals and drugs, suitable for treatment of 
humans , in the stocks of veterinarians must be considered in a disaster sit- 
uation in Montana due to the limited number of wholesale drug establishments 
in the State) . 



B-V-3^ 



Health Reference Document No. 2 
Major Health End Item Distributors (Wholesale) in the State 

Name Address ^^^ Tel. Ho. 

1. MCKesson & Robbins, Inc. 3021 Montana Avenue 252-6316 

Billings, Montana 

2. Newbro Drug Co. Arizona & Aluir.inum. 'j<^2-0kkk 

Butte, Montana 

3. Montana Wholesale Drug Co. 110 3 South U53-3263 

Great Falls, Montana 

k. Davis Bros. Inc. 9kO Strand Avenue 5^3-7177 

Missoula, Montana 



B-V-35 



Health Reference Document Wo. 3 
LICENSED HOSPITALS IN THE STATE OF MONTANA 
As of December 1, I965 



Classification Code; 

G General OP 

IG Intermediate General M 

SG Small General MH 

CHF Community Health Facility MS 

CD Chronic Disease TB 

IND Industrial M.INF 

■'^Provisional License 



Orthopedic-Pediatric 

Medical 

Mental Beds (Psychiatric) 

Medical Surgical 

Tuberculosis 

Medical Infirmary 



City 



Anaconda 

Baker 
Big Sandy 
Big Timber 
Billings 

Billings 

Billings 

Bozeman 

Butte 

Butte 

Chester 

Circle 
Choteau 
Columbus 
Conrad 
Culbertson 
Cut Bank. 
Deer Lodge 
Dillon 

Ekalaka 

Enni.s 

Forsyth 
Fort Benton 



Hospital 



St. Ann's Hospital 

Fallon County Memorial Hospital 
Community Health Facility- 
Sweet Grass Comm.ur!lty Hospital 
Billings Deaconess Hospital 

New Western Manor 
St. Vincent's Hospital 
Bozeman Deaconess Hospital 
St. James Conariurity Hospital 
Silver Bow General Hospital 

Liberty County Hospital 

McCone County Hospital 
Teton Memorial Hospital 
Stillwater Community Hospital 
St, Mary's Hospital 
^Roosevelt Memorial Hospital 
Glacier County Memorial Hospital 
Powell County Memorial Hospital 
Barret Hospital 

*Dahl Memorial Hospital 
Madison Valley Hospital 

^Rosebud Community Hospital 
St, Clare Hospital 



Classi- 


No. of 


fication 


Beds 


IG 


6k 


SG 


19 


CHF 


9 


SG 


17 


(G 


19i^■ 


(MH 


8 


CD 


31 


G 


185 


G 


102 


G 


200 


G 


lit2 


(SG 


10 


(CD 


20 


SG 


20 


SG 


27 


SG 


22 


IG 


36 


SG 


22 


IG 


1+U 


SG 


35 


SG 


19 


SG 


16 


CHF 


9 


SG 


28 


(SG 


18 


(CD 


20 



B-V-36 



City Hospital 

Glasgow Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital 

Glendive Glendive Community Hospital 

Great Falls Cascade County Convalescent Hosp. 

Great Falls Columbus Hospital 

Great Falls Montana Deaconess Hospital 

Hamilton Marcus Daly Meniorial Hospital 

Hardin Big Horn Co, Memorial Hospital 

Harlowton Wheatland Mem.orial Hospital 

HaArre Kennedy Deaconess Hospital 

Havre Sacred Heart Hospital 

Helena St. John's Hospital 

Helena S^, Peter's Hospital 

Helena Shodair Crippled Children's Hosp. 

Hot Springs Sanders County General Hospital 

Jordan Garfield County Hospital 

Kaiispell Flathead County Hospital 

Kali spell Kaiispell General Hospital 

Lewistown St. Joseph's Hospital 

Libby *St, John's Lutheran Hospital 

Livingston Livingston Memoria.1 Hospital 

ftolta Malta Hospital 

Miles City Holy Rosary Hospital 

Missoula ^Missoula Community Hospital 

Missoula N.P.B.A. Hospital 

Missoula St. Icitrick Hospital 

Philipsburg Granite County Memorial Hospital 

Plentywood Sheridan Memorial Hospital 

Poison St. Joseph Hospita.1 

Poplar Poplar Communiby Hospital 

Red lodge Carbon County Memorial Hospital 

Ronan St. Luke Hospital Inc. 

Roundup Roundup Memorial Hospital 

St. Ignatius Holy Family Hospital 

Scobey Daniels Memorial Hospital 

Shelby Toole County Hospital 

Sheridan Ruby Valley Hospital 

Sidney Coirimunity Memorial Hospital 

Superior -^Mineral Hospi.tal 

Terry ■'^Prairie Community Hospital 

Town send Broa,dwater Hospital 



Classi- 


Wo. of 


fication 


Beds 


IG 


52 


IG 


55 


CD 


132 


G 


190 


G 


212 


IG 


32 


SG 


18 


SG 


19 


IG 


70 


IG 


90 


IG 


65 


IG 


73 


OP 


22 


SG 


16 


SG 


21 


MS 


Ik 


IG 


81 


IG 


75 


SG 


31^ 


IG 


58 


SG 


30 


G 


119 


SG 


31 


MS 


71 


G 


210 


SG 


10 


SG 


2k 


IG 


ko 


SG 


22 


SG 


27 


SG 


2k 


SG 


17 


(SG 


26 


(CD 


10 


SG 


20 


SG 


30 


CHF 


9 


IG 


5J+ 


CHF 


9 


SG 


Ik 


SG 


23 



B-V-3T 



City 



Whitefish 
White Sulphur 

Springs 
Wolf Point 



Hospital 



Wliitefish Memorial Hospital 
Mountainview Memorial Hospital 

Trinity Hospital 



Classi- 
fication 

SG 

CHF 

IG 



No. of 
Beds 

22 



J^9 



STATE OWHETD MD OPERATED 



Boulder Montana Staue Training School Hosp. 

Deer Lodge Montana State Prison 

Galen Montana State T.B„ Sanitarium 

Missoula University of Montana Health Service 

Warm Springs ^Montana State Hospital 

Bozeman Montana, State University 



MS 


93 


M.INF, 


9 


TB 


255 


M.IKF, 


2k 


MH 


lU67 


M.nff, 


Ik 



FEUE?AL HCSPITAIS 



Helena 
Miles City 
Browning 
Harlem 
Crow Agency 



Veterans Administration 
Veterans Adtainistration 
USPHS Indian Hospital 
USPHS Indian Hospital 
USFHS Indian Hospital 



l6o 
96 
37 
30 
31^ 



Classification Code: 



LICENSED LONG TERM CAPE FACILITIES 



KH Nursing Home 

PCH Personal Care Home 

BH Boarding Home 

^Provisional License 



City 



Anaconda 
Anaconda 

Big Sandy 

Big Sandy 

Big Timber 

Billings 

Billings 

BiJ.lings 

Billings 



Facility 



Mountain View Nursirig Home 
St. Ann's Rest Home 

Mary Sande Nursing Home 

Sternberg Home 

Sweet Grass County Pioneer ?Iome 

Daily Rest Home 

Fairhaven Rest Home 

Glendeen Home 

Grace Rest Home 



Classi- 


No. of 


fication 


Beds 


WH 


16 


WH 


30 


NH 


22 


PCH 


8 


NH 


32 


PCH 


k 


PCH 


13 


NH 


18 


PCH 


6 



E-v-38 



City 

Billings 
Billings 

Billings 

Billings 
Billings 

Billings 

Billings 

Bozeman 

Bozeman 

Bozeman 



Broad us 

Butte 

Butte 

Chcteau 
Chateau 



Clancy- 



Facility 

Haskins Rest Home 

New Western Manor Hospital and 

Nursing Home 
St, John's Lutheran Home 

Sunnyview Rest Home 

Valley Convalescent Nursing Home 

West End Manor 

Yellowstone Convalescent Home 
Florence Convalescent Hom.e, Inc, 
Gallatin County Rest Home 
*Hillcrest 



*River View Manor 
Crest Nursing Home, Inc. 
Silver Bow Annex Nursing Home 

Depner Rest Home 
•^Teton County Rest Home 



Alhartibra Manor, Inc. 



Columbia Falls Steppe Boarding Home 

Columbus Fairhaven Nursin g Home 

Conrad Pondera Pioneer Nursing Home 

Cut Bank Glacier Rest Home 

Cut Bank Glacier County Nursing Home 

Dillon Eventide Rest Home 



Classi- 


No. of 


fication 


Beds 


PCH 


6 


NH 


127 


(PCH 


i^3 


(bh 


86 


PCH 


k 


(NH 


50 


(bh 


50 


PCH 


10 


NH 


36 


NH 


k6 


NH 


3J^ 


(NH 


6 


(PCH 


11 


(BH 


120 


NH 


10 


NH 


60 


NH 


72 


PCH 


6 


(NH 


9 


(PCH 


10 


(BH 


6 


(NH 


39 


(PCH 


33 


BH 


k 


NH 


38 


(NH 


38 


(BH 


6 


NH 


22 


NH 


12 


(NH 


39 


(BH 


15 



Ekalaka *Dahl Memorial Nursing Home 

Forsyth -^Rosebud County Nursing Home 

Glendive Glendive Community Hosp. Nursing Home 

Glendive General Nursing Home 

Great Falls Cascade County Conv9,lescent Home 

Great Falls I. B. Manor 

Great Falls McAuley Rest Home 

Great Falls Park Place Nursing Home 

Great Falls Smith Boarding Home 

Great Falls Sternberg Rest Home 

Great Falls Throckmorton Convalesceii.t Home 

Great Falls Waters Personal Care Home 



NH 



NH 



12 



25 



NH 


10 


NH 


27 


NH 


90 


BH 


6 


PCH 


i^9 


NH 


60 


BH 


6 


PCH 


6 


PCH 


8 


PCH 


19 



B-V-39 



City Facility 

Hamilton Valley View Esta'ces Nursing Home Inc. 
Hardin Big Hern County Memorial Hospital - 

Nursing Home Unit 
Hardin Mountain View Rest Haven 

Harleiri Harlem Rest Home 



Harlowton Wheatland Meir.oriaI Hospital - 

Nursing Home Unit 

Havre Havre Resb Home 

Havre Sixth Avenue Nursing Home 

Helena Cooney Convalescent Heme 

Helena Merritt Pes-5 Home 

Hot Springs Ex.il Marsh Home 

Hot Springs Hot Springs Manor 

Hot Springs Stand if crd Home 

Jordan Garfield Co'onty Hosp, Boarding Home 

Kalispeil Flathead Co, Hospital Nursing Home 

Kalispell Immanuel Lutheran Home 

Kalispeil Jones Home 

Kalispell Kalispell Convalescent Home 

Laurel Laurel Nursing Home 

Lewistown Geriatric Div. St, Joseph's Hospital 

liewistown Montana Center foi' the Aged 

lewistown Valle Vista Marjsr 

Libby Lincoln County Nui-sirig Home 

Livingston Ford Rest Home 

Livingston Livingston Pioneer Home 

Livingston *S unset Rest Home 

Malta Vickhamro.er Sunset Home 

Manhattan MarJiattan Rest Home 

Miles City Abbey Convalescent Home 

Miles City Custer County Rest Home 

Miles City Holy Rosary Nursing Home 

Miles City Rest Haven 

Missoula Daly Addition Rest Home 

Missoula Flor Haven Home 

Missoula Hillside Manor 

Missoula Lee Rae Heme 

Missoula *Royal Manor 



Classi- 


No, of 


fication 


Beds 


NH 


96 


NH 


10 


(NH 


2 


(PCH 


16 


(NH 


39 


(PCH 


22 


(BH 


6 


NH 


12 


NH 


18 


NH 


13 


(NH 


33 


(PCH 


33 


PCH 


20 


BH 


5 


^NH 


39 


(PCH 


17 


BH 


7 


BH 


6 


NH 


3h 


NH 


75 


NH 


3 


PCH 


17 


NH 


29 


NH 


16 


NH 


153 


(NH 


39 


(PCH 


17 


NH 


10 


PCH 


5 


(NH 


15 


(PCH 


19 


PCH 


26 


NH 


31 


PCH 


13 


PCH 


I^ 


Wd 


76 


NH 


61 


PCH 


h 


PCH 


11 


PCH 


lU 


NH 


100 


PCH 


25 


(PCH 


27 


(NH 


20 



B-Af-i+0 



City Facility 

Kiis^cuia Wayside Sanitarium 

Missoula Will-0-Deli Sanitarium, Inc. 

"^learywood Montana Pioneer Manor, Inco 

I-lentyrfood Sheridan Me'Tjorial Home 

Pc"I;3on St. Joseph's Rest Ho'^iiS 

F^opjar Community Hospital Nursir^ Home 

Red lodge Mountain Ho«;e 

Ronan Conne Nursing Home 

Roundup *Mu3sel-3he.l.i Valley Home 

Roundup Grandview Rest Home 

Scobey Clscn Rest Home 

Shelby Toole County Hcsp. & Nursing Home 

Sidney Richland Homes, Inc., 

Superior ^Mineral Hospital Nursirig home 

Stevensville Stevensvi].ie Rest Home 

lerry ■^-prairie Community Hospital 

I:\ree Forks Three Forks Nursing Home 

"cwHiSend *Broadwater County Rest Home 

Wc;. f Point Faith Lutheran Home 

Vnii.e Sulphur *Mountainview Memorial Hospital 
Spr ings 



Classi- 


No. of 


fication 


Beds 


NH 


1^2 


NH 


10 


BH 


kd 


BH 


10 


NH 


23 


NH 


20 


PCH 


17 


Wd 


13 


PCH 


2k 


PCH 


7 


BH 


k 


BH 


3h 


(NH 


39 


(PCH 


25 


NH 


12 


PCH 


30 


PCH 


8 


NH 


15 


PCH 


17 


(NH 


39 


(PCH 


21 


rwH 


6 


(BH 


5 



Galer: 
Sheridan 



STATE Ol'TNED /^.I\D OPERATED 

Custodial Care Unit 
Madison County Nursing Home 



PCH 
NH 



98 
38 



B-V-kl 



PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 



VI - INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 



MONTANA PLAN 

FOR EMERGENCY 

MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES 



STATE OF MONTAm 

EMERGENCY RESOURCE MAMGEMEUT PLAN 

PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 

VI - INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Introduction ,..,.. = o 

1 . Emergency Actions .<....., = .,. 

2o Emergency Action Documents . o . o . 

Index of Emergency Action Documents 
3 o Emergency Organization .00.,.,..,.,..,.... 
h. Reference Documents o »,,<,<, o <.<,..» o .. .0 .... • 



Page 



B- 


-Tl" 


• 1 


B- 


-Tl- 


- 6 


B- 


-\1^ 


' 6 


E. 


-71- 


- 8 


B- 


=V"- 


•30 


B- 


-VT- 


•3^ 



INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 



INTRODUCT ION 

This section of the State of Montaxia Emergency Resource Management 
Plan contains policies, guidance ^ and actions to provide essential items 
to meet urgent needs in the State in a nuclear attack emergency. 



Definitions 

ao "Essential items" are processed or manufactured products and 
materials that are required for consumption and use by people for 
survival or are required to carry on essential surs/-ival and recovery 
activities in a nuclear attack emergency. The essential items which 
the State Industrial Production Agency is directly concerned with 
include health supplies and equipment, tody protection and household 
operation equipment ai:d supplies, light, power, and fuels equipment 
and supplies, sanitation and water supply items, and emergency housing 
ec.d lodging materials and equipment. A detailed list of these items 
is attached as Reference Document Wo. 1 to this section of the State 
plan. 

h, "Primary essential item inventories" are essential items in 
producer and interstate wholesale distributor inventories. 

Co "Secondary essential item inventories" are essential items in 
intrastate wholesale distributor and retail inventories. 

d. "Certified orders" are purchase orders, contracts, or other 
requests for resources which bear a signed certification that the 
order is an essential order authorized pursuant to F'ederal Government 
emergency regulations or State authorizations. 



General 

The process for managing industrial resources in the State in a nuclear 
attack emergency involves two series of actions. First, essential immediate 
needs are identified and actions taken to supply these needs. Secondly, 
and as soon as possible, continuing needs and expected future supplies are 
estiwiated. Decisions are made and actions are taken to channel these ex- 
pected future supplies to meet the continuing needs that are most essential 
to survival and recovery of the State and the Nation. 



P'ederal Government 



The Federal Government is responsible for working with industry to 
assure maximum production smd the release of essential items in producer 
and interstate wholesale inventories in the State to meet essential needs 
of the State of Montana as well as to meet essential needs of other States 



S-VI'l 



which depend on these inventories for essential item supplies. The Federal 
Government is also responsible for arranging for the distribution of essen- 
tial items in primary inventories in other States to meet essential needs 
in the State of Montaxia where this is necessary in an emergency. 

The Business and Defense Services Administration (BDSA) of the United 
States Department of Commerce has kO field offices throughout the country 
and, in addition has designated officials in the States for this purpose. 
These Federal repi'esentatives arrange with producers of essential items for 
maxim'jm production. They also work with these producers and interstate 
wholesalers to assure a continuing supply of essential items to meet essen- 
tial needs in this as well as in other States. 

Federal plans provide that immediately postattack, BDSA, as the 
emergency production agency^ puts into effect emergency regulations designed 
to implement National policy. These emergency regulations are issued by 
authorized BDSA officials at the Department of Commerce Regional or Field 
Office level, under the authority delegated by BDSA Emergency Delegation 
No. 1. These emergency regulations provide automatic purchase priorities 
for producers of essential items and supplies of essential services to 
obtain production materials, maintenance, repair and operating supplies, 
and capital eviuipment. These regulations freeze inventories of selected 
finished essential items and provide for the5.r release to fill priority 
orders o? under specific authorization of appropriate governmental authority. 



State Goverrjnent 

The State Industrial Production Agency develops, in cooperation with 
other organizations of the State government, and provides, on behalf of the 
Governor, policies and guidaxice consistent with State and Federal objectives « 
The purpose of these policies and guidance is to assure application through- 
cut the State of compatible measures for the conservation, distribution, and 
use of essential items to prevent dissipation ajid waste and to assure that 
essential :aeeds for these items are identified and met within the supplies 
available. 

The State Industrial Pi-oduction A.gency acts upon requests for State 
level assistance from local government officials and arrauiges through BDSA 
representatives with producers and interstate wholesalers to adjust deliveries 
of essential items to correct local shortages in supply. The State Industrial 
]^-oduction Agency also works with intrastate wholesale distributors and re- 
tailers to correct these local shortages. As soon as possible after the 
attack, the State Industrial Production Agency, in collaboration with otJier 
State agencies representing major activities within the State that consume 
essential items, ajiticipates future continuing needs and works with BDSA 
representatives to assure that arreuigement s aa'e made with the primary industry 
to provide essential items to meet ongoing demands of authorized essential 
users. 

The State Industrial Production Agency is responsible for assisting and 
cooperating with BDSA in carrying out Federal policy with respect to the 



B-VI-2 



emergency management- of industrial production and distribution. It is also 
responsible for directing the distribution and use of essential items vfith 
respect to supplies of such items allocated by BDSA to the State of Montana^ 
by the assignment of such supplies to the various State of Montana emergency 
organizations for distribution to ultimate users. 

Ir. the event BD3A is unable to function in the State in the immediate 
postattack period, the State Industrial Production Agency assumes, on behalf 
of the Federal Government, the responsibility for working directly wi.th the 
producers and interstate wholesalers of essential items until Federal capa- 
bility is reestablished. 



Local Government 

Operational Survival PlaXiS of the State of Montana and its political sub- 
divisions contain provisions for the conservation^ distribution, and use of 
essential items in secondary inventories within the State. These plans also 
provide for county and municipal goverrunent decisions and guidajice, consistent 
with State policies, for the functioning of the secondary essential item dis- 
tribution system in the localities in the State. 

The Montana Directory of Memufacturers eujd Buyers Guide, a bienrxiai pub- 
lication prepared by the Montana State PlsTAning Board, has been distributed 
to all Boards of County Commissioners, Chamber of Commerte, incorporated 
municipalities, SJid libraries. Producers of essential items (see Reference 
Document No. 2) are listed alphabetically, by County, and by industrial code 
classification. 

These installations must be kept in operation to assure a continuing 
flow of essential items to meet survival and recovery needs. 

County and rnianicipal governments are responsible for reducing non- 
essential use of essential items and for arrangements to assure provision of 
electric power, manpower, petrole-om products, transportation, water, fuels 
and other locally available requisites for the continuing operation of these 
identified essential items facilities. 

In the event State level assistance is required, the channel for requests 
is municipal government to Board of County Commissioners to State Industrial 
Production A.gency. 



Flow Chart 

Following is a flow chart showing the process and the actions to be taken 
by Federal, State, and local governments to assure a continuing flow of essen- 
tial items to meet essential needs in the State in a nuclear attack emergency. 
The legend accompanying the c]iart identifies; 

k<, actions to fce taken immediately to supply iimnediate needs essential 
for survival, and 

B-, actions to be taken as soon as possible to anticipate future con- 
tinuing needs and to channel essential item supplies to meet the most urgent 
needs for continuing survival arid recovery. 



B-VI.-3 



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B-BT-5 



1, Emergency Actions 

The following actions are taken on. behalf of the Governor at State 
level by State Industrial Production Agency officials to provide policies 
and guidance applicable tJ-.\roughout the State on the distribution and use 
of essential items and to arrange for resupply of secondary inventories 
from primary so\irces to meet essential local needs. 

a>o Actions for Immediate Supply 

(1) Issue, on behalf of the Governor, policies and guidarice^ 
a.pplicable throughout the State, covering the provision, distribution, 
and use of essential items within the State o (Prcd-1, State Essential 
Items Policy and Guidance,) 

(2) Confirm with the State office of BBSA tha^ the Federal 
Emergency Regulations have been issued requiring producers and interstate 
wholesalers to make deliveries on authorized orders received from customers 
in the State. 

Assist the 3DSA in the distribution of Federal Emergency P.egulations 
to acquaint authorized persons with the provisions of these regulations. 
(Prod-r;, Request for Release of Primary Inventories.) 

(3) Request the State office of BDSA to arrange for increases 
where needed in deliveries by producers and interstate wholesalers of 
essential items to resupply local inventories to meet shortages reported 
by local government s» (Prod-3, Adjustment of Primary Deliveries.) 

(V) Provide emergency assistance to locate sources of supply 
and to expedite deliveries of industrial products, materials and services 
needed to maintain operations of essential local users and essential 
facilities. 

b. Actions for Continuing Supply 

As soon as resupply of secondaiy inventories to meet essential im- 
mediate needs in the localities is underway, the State Industrial Pro- 
duction Agency takes the following actions to anticipate continuing needs 
and to arrange for continuing supply to meet these needs. 

(5) Consult with State Civil Defense officials, Federal military 
officials, and appropriate State resource officials to estimate continuing 
requirements of essential items that will be needed in the State during 

the ensuing 90-day period. {l?To6.~k, Estimate of Continuing Essential Item 
Requirements, ) 

(6) Obtain reports from prod-ucers and interstate wholesalers on 
quantities of essential items 5.n inventories and additional supplies of 
these items that can be furnished from new production in the State during 
the ensuing 90-day period- (Prod-5ji Heports on Available Continuing 
Supplies.) 



B-^/I-6 



(7) Request BDSA to decide on and allocate quantities of 
essential Items for use in the State during the ensuing 90-day period. 

(8) If anticipated supplies are inadequate to meet the estimated 
requirements aiid adjustments in requirements caxinot be negotiated, refer to 
the Besource Priorities Board for recommendations to the Governor on the 
allocation of anticipated supplies airiong competing programs. 

(9) Issue revised State policy on the use of essential litems 
in the State to conform with the Governor -s decisions » rprcd-6^ Revised 
State Essential Item Policy.) 

(10) Assign quantities of essential items available to the State 
to appropriate agencies axid authorize them to use, or to authorize orders 
to use^ certified orders to procure from wholesale and retail distributors 
quantities of the items assigned to them (Pi-od-'f^ Assignment of Essential 
Items o ) 

(11) Develop estimates of continuing requirements for electric 
power, manpower, transportation, petroleum products, and other operating 
supplies, equipment and services that will be needed to maintain operations 
of essential item production and wholesale facilities in the State during 
the ensuing 90 -day period. 

Consult with BCSA as to the most practical methods and the most 
expedious techjiiques for securing this information. Present these require- 
ments estimates to appropriate State Resource Agency. (Prod-8, Essential 
Items Industry Support RequirementSo ) 

(12) Develop estimates of emergency repair and construction of 
primary essential item facilities that will be required during the ensuing 
90 -day period and present these requirements estimates to the State Con- 
struct ion organization. Consult with BDSA as to the most practical methods 
and the most expedious techniques for securing this information. (Prod-9, 
Essential items Industry Construction Requirements » ) 

(13) Inform the BDSA State office of supplies cf supporting re- 
sources that will be available in the State for acquisition and use by 
essential items producers and wholesalers to maintain essential operations 
during theensuing 90-day period. (Prod.-10, Allocation of Supporting 
Resources to Essential Items Production and Interstate Vfcolesale Distrib- 
ution Ir^dustry.) 



-VI -7 



2. Emergency Action Documents 

Following are emergency action documents to implement the foregoing 
emergency actions: 

(Note: These action documents are illustrative in character to convey 
as clearly as possible the substance of the actions involved. During the 
process of expediting deliveries to meet urgent local needs, the quickest 
means of communication between levels of government and with industry will 
be used. The forms illustrate the kind of information to be transmitted over 
telephone or other available means of fast communication.) 

Index of Emergency Action Documents 

Prod-1 State Essential Items Policy and Guidance 

Prod-2 Request for Release of Primary Inventories 

Prod-3 Adjustraent of Primary Deliveries 

Prod-i4- Estimate of Continuing Essential Item Requirements 

Prod-5 Reports on Available Continuing Supplies 

Prod -6 Revised State Essential Items Policy 

Prod-7 Assignment of Essential Items 

ri-od-B Essential Items Industry Support Requirements 

Prod-9 Essential Items Industry Construction Requirements 

Prod-10 Allocation of Supporting Resources to Essential Items 

Production and Interstate Wholesale Distribution Industry 



B-VI-8 



Prod-1 , State Essential Items Policy eind Guidance 

To: (Boards of County Commissioners and Heads of Incorporated Municipalities) 

Guidance for Local Governments 

It is important that essential items available for use in this State be 
carefully conserved aind restricted to immediate and urgent uses for local. 
State, and National survival and recovery until the continuing supply of 
these items can be assessed and the supplies that will be available for less 
essential needs can be determined. 

In order to (l) prevent waste and dissipation of essential items in 
secondary inventories, (2) provide supplies of essential items to meet im- 
mediate and urgent needs, (3) assure continuing resupply of local secondary 
inventories of essential items, and (h) ration essential items to meet most 
essential needs of individual consumers, appropriate officials of local 
government are requested to take the following actions: 

1. Announce and enforce the temporary freeze on inventories of local 
secondary distributors of designated essential items except health end items 
which will have controlled distribution in accordance with previously dis- 
tributed "Ration Board Instructions". 

2. Provide instructions to secondary distributors on how to release 
suid resupply their Inventories to meet essential needs. 

3. Authorize essential local users to obtain immediate and urgent 
supplies of essential items from secondary distributors. 

k. Authorize essential facilities to certify purchase orders on 
secondary distributors for essential items needed to maintain operations. 
Instruct essential facilities to place these certified orders on their 
customary sources of supply. (Boards of County Commissioners, Chambers 
of Commerce, libraries and Incorporated municipalities have been provided 
with the I965-I966 Montajia Director of Manufacturers and Buyers Guide. 
Manufacturers of essential items are listed by County and by industrial 
code classification. This g^aide is published every two years and distri- 
bution will be continued as shown above.) 

5. Inform essential local users and essential facilities how to 
identify their purchase orders on primary producers and distributors of 
essential items. 

6. As soon as possible, ration designated essential items to indiv- 
idual consumers and inform these individual consumers how to obtain supplies 
under the ration system. 

7. Inform local secondary distributors of essential items as to 
their roles under the ration system. 



B-Vl-9 



In the event resupply from producers and wholesalers of essential 
items is not adequate to meet all essential needs, local governments should 
decide and cut back authorized local uses. Concurrently, they should 
report shortages, through Boards of County Commissioners, and request /^^ 

appropriate officials of State government to take actions to increase (1^^ 

the supply of essential items to the local jurisdiction. ^* 



Effective Date 



By; 



Governor of the State of Montana 



Director 

State Industrial Production Agency 



m 



B-VI-IO 



Prod-1, Attachment 1 



Background Information 

The Governor has issued general policy on the use of essential 
resources in the immediate postattack period. These policies are set forth 
in Part A of the State Plan. They have been fornished tc appropriate 
officials of the political subdivisions of the State. 

In general, these State policies provide for temporary freezing of 
retail inventories of essential items, immeiiate ar:3 continuing release of 
these items to meet urgent military and civil defense needs axid to maintain 
operations of facilities essential to continued survival and recovery. They 
provide for continuing resupply of local secondsLry inventories as well as 
inventories of essential facilities which obtain their supplies from primary 
sources o 



Essential L ocal Users are (l) civilian orgariizations engaged in 
essential activities including persc:is, equipment aiid facilities providing 
essential survival care and sei-vices to people, (2) militai'y organizations 
engaged in essential military activities, and f3) farmers producing essen- 
tail food ar.,i workers employed in essential facilities or local establishments 
providing essential items and services to people „ less essential individual 
consumers are not included except those requiring immediate supplies for 
individual or family survival o 

Esseiitial Facilities are (l) militaiy establishments engaged in 
inniediate retaliatory or defense operations, (2) electric power, gas, 
and water utility systems, (3/ industrial plants producing or processing 
essential. 5.tems, (_h) major wholesale establishment: storing or distrj-buting 
essential itemS;, exid (5) i^rarisporati'^n and communications systems providing 
essential services o 

Individual Consumers are individuals not included i.i defined Essential 
Facilities or Essential Local Users who receive their essential items under 
the consumer rationing system. The process for rationing essential items to 
consumers is shown in the flaw chart in the Economic Stabilization Section 
of the plan. 



-11 



Prod-2, Request for Release of Primary Inventories 



To: State Office of the Federal Business and Defense 
Services Administration 



Local governments in this State^ in accordance with National and 
State policies and guidance, have advised essential local users, essen- 
tial facilities, and secondaj-y distributors to certify their purchase 
orders placed with their suppliers of essential items. 

You are requested to arrange with producers and interstate whole- 
salers of essential items for acceptance and delivery against these 
orders within the quantities of essential items in their inventories 
that are available for use in this State. 



Effective Date 



Director 

State Industrial Production Agency 



9 



B-VI-12 



Prod -3 > Adjustment of Prlicary Deliveries 



To; State Office, Federal Business and Defense Services Administration 



Shortages in essential item supplies axe being reported by local 
governments in this State. 

Authorized local uses have been cut back as far as possible by local 
governmetit decision emd action. 

You are requested to arrajige with producers and interstate wholesalers 
to increase deliveries to meet authorized orders received by them from 
these localities. 

Attached are requested increases in deliveries of specified essential 
items to named localities. 



Necessary Increases of Essential Item Deliveries 
Name of Locality 



Essential 
Item 



Unit of 
Measure 



Increase in 
Deliveries 



Director 

State Industrial Production Agency 



B-VI-13 



Rrod-^4- j Estimate of Continuing Essential Items Requirements 

(Since representative of the claimants listed in Attachment 1 are ^ 

physically located in the State Emergency Operations Center, this action j|^ 
step will be accomplished by direct contact. The form shown in Attachment ^^ 
2 must be completed, however, to facilitate consolidation by the Industrial 
Production Agency and to be used as a matter of record.) 

In order to conserve available sujrplies of essential items and to 
assure that they are utilized for the most essential purposes, it is 
necessary to obtain estimates of emergency requirements for such items 
from the claimant organization in the State (see Attachment l) . 

Officials preparing the form must base their requirements estimates 
on the most austere usage. 

ESSENTIAL SURVIVAL ITEMS ARE LISTED IN RM-5, ATTACHMENT -1, PART A 
OF THE STATE PLAN FOR THE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES, AND IN 
REFERENCE DOCt/MENT' NO. 1, OF THE INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION SECTION OF PART B 
OF THE PLAN. 



t 



B-VI-llj- 



Frod-ii, Attachment 1 



Representative Users of Essential Items 
in the ^tate (Claimant'iy ~ 



Federal military officals 
State Civil Defense authorities 
State Emergency Resource Agencies: 

Construction and Housing 

Economic Stabilization 

Electric Power and Gas 

Food 

Health 

Industrial Pi'oduction 

Manpower 

Petroleiim and Solid Fuels 

Tele c omarani cat ions 

Transportation 

Water 

Other State organizations with assigned 
emergency responsibilities. 



B-VI-15 



Prod-U, Attachment 2 



To: Director, State Industrial Production Agency- 
Helena, Montana 



Estimate of Requirements for Essential Items 
(See Instructions) 



(State ClaimantT ~~ 
Requirements for the period from: 



(Date) 



to: 



Item 


Unit of 

Measure 


Quantity 









(i 



Prepared by: 



(Print name ajid title) 



Signature 



B-\n:-i6 



Frod-5j Reports on Available Continuing Supplies 



Attached are procedures and forms for obtaining and processing reports 
from wholesalers on inventories eind from producers on production capabilities 
Eind inventories on hand. 

As soon as possible after attack, the State Industrial Production Agency- 
notifies producers ajid wholesalers to complete these forms aad submit them to 
the State Industrial Production Agency, 

Inventories I'rocedures 

Inventories of essential items represent the only immediate source of 
supplies in a postattack situation etnd will continue as sach for an in- 
definite period. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance that an assess- 
ment of the amounts of such supplies available in wholesale inventories 
within the State of Montana he made as scon as possible, 

vn-iolesale outlets villi report their j.nventories of essential items on 
Form 1. Producers of essential items will report their .inventories of 
finished items on Form 2. 

Agreements have been entered into with the State Planning Board arid 
the Boards of County Conatiis si oners to assist in collecting inventory data 
and to follow-up in cases where reports are delayed. Complete lists of 
wholesale outlets for the various essential items as well as lists of pro- 
ducers of such items have been prepared. Copies of these lists are main- 
tained in the office of the State Plajoning Board and are available to the 
State Industrial Production Agency. Boards of County Commissioners will 
consolidate inventory foirms and forward them to the Director, Montana State 
Industrial Pr-oduction Agency, Helena. 



Produc t ion Capabilities Procedure 

It is reasonable to assjiae that inventories of particular essential 
items available postattack will be inadequate to meet emergency requirements. 
Consequently, the capability for immediate production of such items is 
extreriely iTmortant as an addition to existing irr/entories. 

Producers of essential items, in addition to reporting their invent- 
ories of finished item.s on Foi-m 2, will complete production capabilities 
section of the form in accordance with the special instructions which will 
be entered on the re\'erse side at the time the forms are distributed. 

Boards of County Conrnissioners will consolidate these forms and for- 
ward them to the Idrector, Montana State Industr-ial Pi'oduction Agency, 
Helena. 



B-VT-IT 



m 



EIANK PAGE 



# 



B-VT-18 



Prod-3, Form 1 



To: Director, State Industrial Production Agency 
Helena, Montana 

Report on Inventory of Essential Items 
(See Reverse) 



Date 



C ompany 

Mailing Address 

Telephone Number 

Inventory Location 
Type of Business 



(Ukp ^^pparate sh eet for each inventory location) 



Item 



Unit of 
Measure 



Stocks on 

Hand 



Leave 
Blank 



Emergency Address & telephone number 
if different from above: 



Prepared by 



(Print Name & Title) 
(Signature) 



B-VT-19 



It is vital to the recovery of Montana and of the Nation that 
current inventories of essential items located in the State be identified 
to facilitate their conservation, distrihution and use in restoring and 
maintaining essential facilities » 

This form should be completed in accordance with the following special 
instractions and forwarded without delay to the Board of County Ccmiiiission - 
ers of the County in which your installation is located. 

Boards of County Commissioners will consolidate these forms and 
forward without delay to the addressee shown on the face of the form. 



Special Instructions : 



B-Vl-20 



Prod-^ , Form 2 



To: Director, State Industrial Production Agency 
Helena, Montana 



Producer's Production Capability and Inventory 
of Finished Essential Items 
(See Reverse) 

Date 



Company 
Mailing" Address^ 

Telephone N\iffiber 

Facility Location 



Item 


Unit of 
Measure 


Maximum 
Production 
Capability 
90 -days 


Run out 
Production 

from 
Supplies of 
Production 
Materials 
on Hand 


Present 
Inventory 

of 
Finished 
Items 


Leave 
Blank 















Emergency address & telephone number Prepared by_ 
if different from above; 



[Signature) 



B-V^>21 



It is vital to the recovery of Montana and of the Nation that 
current inventories and production capabilities of producers of essen- 
tial items located in the State be identified to facilitate their 
conservation, distribution and use in restoring and maintaining essen- 
tial facilities o 

This form should be completed in accordance with the following 
special instructions and forwarded without delay to the Board of County 
Commissioners of the County in which your installation is located. 

Boards of County Commissioners will consolidate these forms and 
forward without delay to the addressee shewn on the face of the form. 



Special Instructions; 



E-VT-22 



Prod -6, Revised State EBsentlal Items Policy 



(Note: The content and substance of the revised essential items 
policy will depend on the situation and the supplies expected to be 
available to meet continuing urgent needs. Necessarily this document 
will not be completed except in a test of the plan or at the appro- 
priate point in a postattack situation.) 



This document will be, in essence a revised Prod-1, State Essen - 
tial Items Policy Guidance. 



# 



B-VT-23 



BLANK PAGE 



B-VI-2U 



Prod-7, Assif2,nment of Es s ential Item s 



"Xstate Clalmanty 



(^Date) 



Allocation of Essential Items 
(See Reverse) 



Allocations for the peiiod, from__ 



to 



Name of 
Item 


Unit of 
Me as 'J re 


I'lme 
Period 


Quantity 






30 Days 

60 Days_ 

90 Days 





































Prepared "by 



T^'rint- Name & iitle 



Signature 



Director 

State Industrial Production Agency 



■&-VI-23 



The allocations for yOLi>' organization as shown on the face of this 
form for the period indicated have been directed hy the Governor hased 
on recoramendations of the State Resource Board. 

You are authorized to use, or to authorize others to use, the 
following certification on orders to procure from wholesale and retail 
distrlhutors the quantities of items shown on the face of this form. 



This is a PRIORITY ORDER authorized 
by the State of Montana 



(Sigi'iature' 
(Title) 



B-VT-26 



Prod-^, Essent ial Items Industry Support Requirements 



LstiBiate of L 
for 90 -Day 


ssential Item 
Period Commen 


industry Support Eequiremen~.s 
::ing 






I<<;sGuref Unit of 

Measure 


?"irst 
30 Cay 3 


Following 
60 Days 


Total 
90 Days 


Eiecxric lower 










Manpcve : 










Transpo:-tat ion 










Petrcle-'XTi 










C ciffiEii ai ca'^ :". on s 

















































































E-VT-27 



^^od;9^ Essential Items Industry Construction Requirements 

To; State Construction and Housing Agency 

Following is a list and descriptions of major construction, repair^ 
and modification of facilities that will be required to maintain desired 
production and distribution of essential items during the 90-day period 
coamencing (date) 

Constr uction Projects 

1. Name, location, type, and size of construction project j 
start and completing dates. 

(if project is underway or a construction contract has been 
prepared, attach a copy of the contract document and summary 
bill of materials.) 

2. 

3» 
1^. 



Director 

State Industrial Production Agency 



B-\rr-28 



Prod-10^ Allocation of Supporting Resources to Essential Items emd 
Interstate V/holesale Distribution Industry 



To: State Office of the Federal Business and Defense Services Administration 



Attached is a list and the quemtities of supporting resources that 
have tieen allocated for ujaintaining urgent operations of producers ' and 
interstate wholesalers' essential items facilities. 

This is fu-mished as a basis for authorizing these facilities to obtain 
continuing supplies of these resources during the allocation period. 



Director 

State Industrial Production Agency 



B-Vl-29 



3. Emergency Organization 

The organizational cheurt which follows identifies functional areas 
involved in the memagement of industrial production resources in Montana 
in an emergency. 

These are actions to provide for the continuity of operation of the 
State ladustrlal Production Agencyo 

lo l.ne Governor of the State of Montana has assigned to the State 
Planning Boai'd the responsibility for providing administrative sup- 
port, i.eo, personnel, facilities, and supplies for the operation 
of the State Industrial Production Agency. Copies of this plan and 
all action and reference documents have been placed and are immed- 
lately available in the office of the State Planning Board, the State 
Office of Emergency Planning, and in the State Emergency Operations 
Center o 

£» The Governor has selected and designated qualified leaders with 
experience and knowledge of industrial production to provide executive 
direction in an emergency for operations of the State Industrial 
Production Agency. Lines of succession to assure continuity of key 
staff for the operation of this Agency are provided in the roster of 
key personnel maintained in the office of the State Pismning Board, 
the State Office of Emergency Planning, and in the State Emergency 
Operations Center. 

3. The Director of the State Plauining Beard is the Director of the 
State Industrial Production Agency. 

k^ Upon activation of this Pla/i, the Director of the State Indust- 
rial Production Agency and key staff with emergency assignments to 
the Agency establish headquarters at the State Emergency Operations 
Center. 



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B-VI-31 



Functions of the State Industrial Production Agency- 



Director 

1, Advises the Governor, the Director of Resource Management 
and all departments of the State having emergency responsibilities 
with respect to production, inventories, distrihution, requirements, 
and allocation of essential items. 

2„ Presents recommended allocations of essential items in 
short supply within the State to the Resource Priorities Board for 
their consideration and further recommendations to the Governor. 

3. Provides BDSA with information concerning supplies of 
essential items within the State available for allocation to other 
States. 

k. Establishes and supervises maintenance of close working 
relationship between all elements of State Industrial Production 
Agency and BDSA. 

5. Provides liaison with the other State Resource Agencies. 

6. Serves as member of the State Resource Priorities Board. 



Chief, Production Division 

1, Principal adviser to Director of the State Industrial Pro- 
duction Agency on all matters concerned with the achievement of 
maximum production of essential items and supporting industrial pro- 
duction resources within the State. 

2. Assembles and maintains on a current basis complete inform- 
ation concerning production capabilities within the State, using 
prearranged sources to collect this information. 

3o Provides information on current production capabilities and 
current producers' inventories of essential items to Chief, Distri- 
bution Division. 

h. Assists producers of essential items in obtaining support 
resources such as manpower, electric power, water, and transportation 
within the State. 

5<. Maintains close working relationship with the other State 
Resource Agencies for this purpose. 

6, Works closely with BDSA and producers of essential items to 
assist them in locating sources of supply of production materials and 
equipment within the State. 



# 



B-VI-32 



7. Assists BD3A in expediting production of essential items 
through close cooperation with production sources within the State. 



Chief, Distribution Division 

1- Principal adviser to the head of the State Industrial 
Production Agency concerning distribution of essential items to meet 
emergency needs. 

2. Maintains close working relationships with the other State 
claimant organizations responsible for preparing estimates of require- 
ments for essential items. 

3" Assembles and maintains on a current basis complete inform- 
ation concerning inventories of essential items within the State, 
using prearranged sources to collect this information, 

k. Determines total potential supplies of essential items within 
the State from Chief, Production Division., 

5- Assembles requirements for essential items. 

6. Determines shortages or overages in essential items within 
the State. 

7- Where shortages are disclosed, consults with the other State 
claimant organizations concerning possible reduction or deferral of 
requirements to achieve balance of requirements with available supplies. 
Tf such adjustments appear infeasible, consults with BDSA concerning 
availability of additional supplies from sources outside the State. 

8. On the basis of this consultation, makes recommendations to 
the Director of the State Industrial Production Agency regarding allo- 
cations of available supplies of essential items to State claimant 
organizations to fill emergency needs within the State and for obtain- 
ing additional supplies from sources outside the State, when needed. 

9. Makes recommendations to the Director of the State Industrial 
Production Agency regarding availability of surplus supplies of essen- 
tial items for distribution to other States « 



3-^1-33 



ko Reference Documents 

Reference Document No„ 1 Essential Items and Services 

LIST OF ESSENTIAL SURVIVAL ITEMS 

This document contains a listing of items considered essential to 
sustain life at a productive level to assure national survival in an 
emergency. The list identifies items tc which major attention should be 
given in all phases of preattack planning to insure the availability of 
basic essentials for a productive economy in the event of a nuclear attack. 
Supply- requirements studies and assessro.ents for these items will be made 
to disclose critical deficiencies or other problems that can be anticipated. 
Revisions will be made as necessary to keep the items as up-to-date as 
possible. 

The items are arranged oy seven major groups: 

(1) Health Supplies and Equipment, 

(2) Food, 

(3) Body protection and Household Operations, 
(k) Electric Power and Fuels, 

(5) Sanitation and Water Supply, 

(6) Emergency Housing and Construction Materials and Equipment, and 

(7) General Use Items, 

Survi-val items are defined as "those items without which large segments 
of the population would die or have their health so seriously impaired as 
to render them both burdensome and non-productive," The items have been 
classified into Group A or Group B, with Group A representing end products 
consumed or used directly by the population, and Group B consisting of those 
items essential to the effective production and utilization of the Group A 
items, which are consumed or used directly by the people. 

There are no Group B items in the categories of Health Supplies and 
Equipment, Body Protection and Household Operations, and Emergency Housing 
and Construction Materials and Equipment. All of these items are considered 
to be consumed dd.rectly and any attempt to separate them in to A and B group- 
ings would be too arbitrary to be meaningful. 

It is important to keep in mind the fact that while the items listed 
are the basic essentials necessary for maintaining a viable economy during 
the first six months following an attack, net all of them would create 
probleiris that would require government action preattack to insure adequate 
supplies. The aforementioned suppl^y- requirements studies wiLl be under- 
taken to identify the problem areas. In developing supply data, all 
available production capacity, existing inventories, and possible substitu- 
tions will be considered. For example, in analyzing clothing items, all 
available supplies would be considered from sport to dress shirts, from 
overalls to dress suits. However, new production would be limited to the 
simplest form of the basic item which can be produced. The final determina- 
tion as to which of the items are most critical and which may require pre- 
attack actions by the Government, as well as the type of actions which must 
be taken, can be made only after a comprehensive supply- requirements analysis 
is completed. 



B-VI-3^ 



LIST OF ESSENTIAL SURVIVAL ITEI^ 



I, Health Supplies and Equipment: 
Group A 

1 . PHAJai'lCEUT IC ALS : 
Alcohol 

Analgesics, non- narcotic 
Antibiotics and antibacterials 
Antidiabetic agents, oral 
Ant ihi st amines 
Antimalarials 
Atropine 

Blood derivatives 
Carbon dioxide absorbent 
Cardiova.scalar depressants 
Cardiovascular stimulants 
Corticosteriods 
'Diuretics 

General anesthetics 
Hypnotics 
Insulin 

Intravenous solutions for replace- 
ment therapy- 
local anesthetics 
Lubricant, surgical 
Morphine and substitutes 
Oral electrolytes 
Oxygen 

Surgical antiseptics 
Sulfa drugs 

Synthetic plasma volume expanders 
Vitamin preparations, pediatric 
Water for injection 

2. BLOOD COLLECT nr, AI© DISPENSING 
SUPPLH^S : 

Blood collecting and dispensing 

containers 
Blood donor sets 
Blood grouping and typing sera 
Blood recipient sets 
Blood shipping containers. 

3. BIOLOGICAI£: 
Diphtheria toxoid 
Diphtheria antitoxin 
Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and 

pertussis \'uccine 
Gas gangrene antitoxin 
Poliomyelitis vaccine, oi-al 
Rabies vaccine 
Smallpox vaccine 
Tetanus antitoxin 



Tetanus toxoid, absorbed 
Typhoid vaccine 
Typhus vaccine, epidemic 
Yellow fever vaccine 

k. SURGICAL TEXTILES: 
Adhesive plaster 
Bandage, gauze 
Bandage, muslin 
Bandage, plaster of paris 
Cotton, USP 
Surgical pads 
Stockinette, surgical 
Wadding, cotton sheet 

5. EMERGEircY SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 

AND SUPPLIES: 
Ainvay, pharyngeal 
Anesthesia apparatus 
Basin, wash, solution 
Blade, surgical knife 
Brush, scrub, surgical 
Catheter, urethral 
Containers for sterilization 
Chisel, bone 
Drain, Penrose 
Dusting powder 
Forceps, dressing 
Forceps, hemostatic 
Forceps, obstetrical 
Forceps, tissue 
Gloves, surgeon's 
Handles, surgical knife 
Holder, suture needle 
Inhaler, anesthesia, Yankauer 

(ether mask). 
Intravenous injection sets 
Knife, cast cutting 
Lamps, for diagnostic instruments 
Lamps, for surgical lights 
Laryngoscope 

Light, surgical, portable 
Litter 

Mallet, bone surgery 
Needles, hypodermic, reusable 
Needles, suture, eyed 
Otoscope and ophthalmoscope set 
Probe, general operating 
Razor and blades (for surgical 

preparation) 
Retractor, rib 

Retractor set, general operating. 
Rongeur, bone 



B-VI-35 



Saw, amputating 

Saw, bone catting, wire (Gigil) 

Scissors, bandage 

Scissors, general surgical 

Sigmoidoscope 

Speculum, vaginal 

Sphygmoinanoineter 

Splint, leg, Thomas 

Splint, wire, ladder 

Sterilizer, pressure, portable 

Stethoscope 

Sutures, absorbable 

Sutures, absorbable, with attached 

needle 
Sutures, nonabsorbable 
Suture- s J nonabsorbable, with attached 

needle 
Syririges, Luer, reusable (Hj.'podermic 

syr-inges) 
Themometers , clinical 
Tracheotomy tube 
Tube, nasogastric 
Tubing, rubber or plastic, and 

connectors 
Vascular prostheses 
Webbing, textile, with buckle 

6. LfvBORA.TORY EQiJIH-lENT AND SUPPLIES: 
Bacteriological culture media and 

apparatus 
Balance, laboratory with weights 
Blood and urine analysis instruments, 

etjuipment and supplies 
Chemical reagents, stains and 

apparatus 
GlassT-rare cleaning equipment 
Laboratory glassware 
Microscope and slides 
Water purification apparatus 



2. MEAT AND MEAT ALTERMTE GROUP 
Meat, po-a3.try, fish, eggs; also 

dry beans, peas, nuts. Important ^^ 
for protein, iron, and B-vitamins. ^H 

3. VEGETABLE-FRUIT GROUPo Includ- 
ing (l) dark green and yellow vegetables. 
Important for Vitaiain A, (P) citrus 
fruit or other fruit or vegetables. 
Important for Vitamin C, (3) other 
fruits and vegetables, including 
potatoes. 

h. GRAIN PRODUCTS. Especially 
enriched, restored, cereal and 
cereal products, and bread, flours, 
and meals. Important for energy, 
protein, iron, and B-vitamins. 

5. FATS AMD OlIB. Including butter, 
margarine, Is.rd, and other shorten- 
ing oilSo Important for palata- 
bility and food energy; some for 
Vitamin A and essential fatty acids. 

6. SUGARS MW SYEUPSo Important 
for palatability and food energy. 

7. FOOD iiD-JUUCTSo '.ertain food M 
adj'uncts should be provided to ^ 
make effective use of a\'ailable 

foods. These include antioxidants 
and other food preservatives, yeast, 
baking powder, salt, soda, seasonings 
and other condiments. In addition, 
coffee, tea, and cocoa are important 
for morale support. 

GrouD B 



Group 



None 



II. Food : 

Group A 

1, rCELK GROUP. Milk in all forms, 
milk products. Important for calcium, 
riboflavin, protein^ and other 
nutrients. 



Food containers 
Nitrogenous fertilizers 
Seed and livestock feed 
Salt for livestock. 

VETERINARY MEDICAL ITEMS: 
Anthrax vaccine 
Black leg vaccine 
Hog cholera vaccine 
Newcastle vaccine 



B-VI-36 



III, Br^dy Protection and Household 
Operations; 

Group A 

1. CLOTHING? 

Gloves and mittens 

Headwear 

Hosiery 

Outerwear 

Shoes and other footwear 

Underwear 

Waterproof outer garments 

2o PERSONAL HYGIENE ITEMS: 

Diapers, all types 

Disposable tissues 

First aid items (included on Health 

Supplies and Equipment List) 
Nipples 

Nursing bottles, all types 
Pins 

Sanitary napkins 
Soaps, detergents, and 

disinfectants 
Toilet tissue 

3o HOUSEHOLD EQUIIMENT: 

Bedding 

Canned heat 

Cots 

Hand sevirig equipment 

Heating and cooking stoves 

Incadescent hand portable lighting 

equipment (including flashlights, 

lamps, batteries) 
Kitchen, cocking, and eating 

utensils 
Larnp.^ (incandescent medium base) 

and lamp holders 
Matches 

Nonelectric lighting equipment 
Sleeping bags 

Group B 

None 

IV, Electric Pcver and Fuels: 

1, EIECIRIC POWER. 

Group A 
Electricity„ 



Group B 

Conductors (copper and/or aluminum), 
including bare cable for high 
voltage lines and insulated wire 
or cable for lower voltage dis- 
tribution circuits. 

Switches and circuit breakers 

Insulators 

Pole line hardware 

Pole and crossarms 

Transformers (distribution, trans- 
mission, and mobile) 

Tools for live-circuit operations, 
including rubber protective 
equipment, and linemen's tools 

Utility repair trucks, fuLTy 
equipped 

Prime m.over generator sets up to 
501 kilowatts arid 2^+00 volts, 
including portable and mobile 
sets up to 150 kilowatts and 
110/220/UUO volts, 3-phase, 
60- cycle complete with fuel 
tank and switchgear in self- 
contained units. 

2, PETROLEUM PRODUCTS: 

Group A 

Gasoline 

Kerosene 

Distillate fuel oil 

Residual fuel oil 

Liquefied petroleum gas 

Lubricating cil 

Grease. 

Group B 

Storage tanks 

Pumps for loading and unloading 

Pressure containers and fittings 

for liquefied petroleum gas 



3. GAS: 



Group A 



Natural gas 
Manufactured gas 



B-VI-37 



Various 



Group B 

Various sizes cf pipe (mostly steel) 
dous sises of valves, fittings, 

^nd pressure regulators 
Specialized repair trucks and 

equipment 

k. SOLID FlIEIS: 



CheBlcal agent detection kits, air, 

food, and water 
Dosimeters and chargers 
Protective masks, clothing, helmets I 
Survey meters (Ajpha, Beta, Gamma) 
Warning sigi's - 'biologieal, cheinlcal, 

and radiological contamination 



k. 



INSECT Am RODENT CONTROL ITEMS; 



Group A 

Coal and coke 

Gi'oup 3 

Conve;y"or belting 
Insulated trail cables 
Trolley feeder wire 
Roof bolts 

V„ Sanitation and Water Supply; 

Group A 

1. WATER 

2. W^TER SUPPLY MATERIALS: 

a„ COAGUIATION: 
Ferric chloride 
Ferrous sulfate 
Ferric sulfate 
ClTilorlnated copperas 
Filter alum 
H^yd rated liirie 
Pulverized limestone 
Soda ash 

b„ DISINTT:CTI0N CHEI.IICALS: 
High-test hypochlorites (70 percent) 

in drums, cans, ampules 
Iodine tablets 

Liquid chlorine, including containers 
Chn.orlne compounds (not gas) 

c. MISCELLANEOUS MATERIALS: 
Diatomaceous earth 
Actii/uted carbon 

3. CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, AND RADIO- 
LOGICAL (CBR) DETECTION, PROTECT- 
ION, AND DECONTAMINATION ITEMS: 

Calibrators 



a. INSECTICIDES; 

DDT, water dlspersible powder 

(75 percent) 
Lindane powder , dusting (i percent) 
Malathion, liquid, eiroilsifiable 

concentrate (57 psreent) 
Deet (diethyltoluamide") 75 percent 

in denatuT'sd alcohol, 
Pyrethrum 

b. R0DENTICIDE3: 

Anticoagulant type, ready-irdxed bait. 
"1080" (sodium, monof luoroacetate ) 

(for controlled use orily) 

5. GENERAL SANITATION: 
Lye 

Group B M 

1. GENE.RAL SUPPLIES AND EQUIHffil^JT: 
Chemical feeders 

Mobile and portable pressure filters 
Chlorinators (gas and h^ypochlorites) 
Pumps and appurteria.nces, Hand- 

Electric-Gascline-Diesel 
V7ell-drilling equipment, including 

well casing, drive pipe and 

drive points 

2. STORAGE AND TRANSPORT EQUIPMENT: 
Lyster bags 

Storage tanks, collapsible and 

portable 

Storage tanks, rigid, transportable 

Storage tarJcs, wood stave, knock-down 

3. IA30PAT0RY EQUIHyEENT AND SUPPLIES: 
Membrane filter kits with filters 

and media 
Chlorine and pH determination 
equipment 

k. SANITATION EQUIBCNT: i 

Hand sprayer, continuous t^-pe ' 



B-Vl-38 



Hand sprayer, compression type 
Hand d aster, pliinger type 
Spraying equipment for use with 
helicopter, fixed -wing light 
aircraft, high-speed fixed- 
wing attack aircraft, and 
cargo- t-jT^e aircraft, 

VT= Effiergency Housing and Construction 
Materials and Equipment; 

Group A 

A.sphalt and tar roofing and siding 

prod acts 
Buildei'S hardware - hinges, locks, 

handles, etc. 
Building Loard, including insulating 

board J lajrxi:nated fiberboard, 

nardpressed fiberboard, gypsum 

board, and asbestos cement (flat 

shests and wallboard) 
Building papers 
Fiastlc patching, couplings, clamps, 

el-Co for emergency repairs 
fl'jcrjDing fixtures and fittings 
Prefa^brieated emergency housing 
Rough hardware - nails, bolts, 

screws, etc. 
Sewer pipe and fittings 
Ten^^s and tarpaulins; canvas, 

plastics, and other similar 

:nateria,ls 
Lairiber and allied products: Lumber, 
principally 1-inch and 2-inch, 

minor quantities of small and 

l3,rge tiiabers; siding and 

flooring; plyvrood; millwork, 

dcors, and windows. 
Masonry products - brick, cement, lime, 

concrete block, hollow tile, etc. 
Translucent window coverings 
Water pipe and hose, plus fittings - 

all types, including fire hose. 



Group B 

Batteries, wet and dry cell 

Bulldozers 

Fire fighting equipment 

Light equipment and hand tools 
(including electric powered) 
for carpentry, masonry, plumb- 
ing, and excavation 

Pipe installation materials and 
equipment 

Refrigerators, mechanical 

Rigging tools - cables, ropes, 
tackle, hoists, etc. 

Tank railroad cars 

Tank trucks and trailers 

Tires 

Trenching equipment 

Truck tractors and trailers, 
including low bed 

Trucks up to five tons (25 
percent equipped with power 
takeoff) 

Welding equipment and supplies 
(electric and acetylene). 



Group B 

None 

VJI, Genera,! Use Items; 

Group A 
None 



B-vi-39 



Reference Document No. 2 



The Responsibilities of BDSA 

The Easiness and Defense Services Adiriinistration (BDSA) of the U, S, 
Department of Commerce has the responsibility for actions with respect 
to the production and distribution of products, materials, facilities, 
and services related to production and construction, except for the follow- 
ing: Food and the domestic distribution of farm equipment ana commercial 
fertilizer which are the responsibility of the Department of Agricultujre; 
petroleum, gas, solid fuels, electric power and certain minerals which 
are the responsibility of the Department of the Interior. Reference 
Document No. 1 contains a list of the items which have been determined 
to be essential for survival. In addition to these, BDSA is responsible 
for the production and distribution of all products and materials other 
than those assigned to the Departments of /igricultare and the Interior, 
Reference Document No. 1 (Section VIl) contains a list of essential services. 

BDSA performs its em.ergency responsibilities by exercising the 
priorities and allocations powers under the Defense Production Act of 1950, 
as amended. The broad authority provided by the Defense Production Act 
permits BDSA to direct and control industrial production, distribution, 
and construction by taking the following types of actions s 

1. Issuance of regulations and orders controlling the production, 
use and distribution of products, materials, and the construction and use 
of related facilities. 

2. Authorization of the use of priorities. 

3. Establishment of mandatory preference in the performance of 
contracts or orders. 

k. Mandatory rescheduling of production and deliveries. 

5. Issuance of mandatory "set-aside" orders requiring suppliers to 
reserve part of production or stocks fc-r designated pjjrpcses. 

6. Allocation of facilities for specified production. 

7. Establish:n.ent of inventoiy restrictions including freezirig of 
inventories. 

8. Allocation of materials to designated purchasers or classes of 
purchasers. 

9. Issuance of production and distribution directives to require 
specific actions on the part of individuals or individual companies. 

In taking any of the foregoing types of actions to carry out its 
emergency responsibilities, BDSA cooperates closely with the State Resource 



3„VI-I).0 



organizations and looks to them for full supports BDSA will issue 
Emergency Regulations in a nuclear emergency. These Emergency Regulations 
will: 

a. Provide automatic purchase priorities for the ise cf com- 
panies and persons producing sorviva.l itewis and furnishing essential 
services to obtain maintenance, repair, and operating supplies; capital 
equipment; and production materials. These regulations will require 
neither the submission of applications nor specific government author- 
ization and will serve as an interim emergency measure; 

bo Limit the distribution of inventories of selected firdlshed 
survival items to the filling of priority orders or by specific author- 
ization of appropriate government authority in order tc avoid dissipation 
of existing supplies. 

In addition, BDSA, in cooperation with the State Industrial Production 
organization, will provide emergency assistance to essential government 
activities, producers of essential items, and suppliers of essential ser- 
vices in locating sources of supply and expediting deliveries of nesded 
products 5 materials, and services „ D'orlng this initial period in which 
great dependence will be placed on automatic Federal controls, the State 
Industrial Production organization will be called upon to provide full 
support to the State civil defense authority, the State rationing authority, 
producers of essential items, and providers of essential services in locat- 
ing sources of supply within the State. As soon as conditions permit, BDSA 
will call upon the State Industrial Production organization to furnish data 
relating to remaining supplies of and requirements for essential items within 
the State. On the basis of the supply-requirements data provided by each State, 
BDSA will determine the supplies which can be allocated to each State ff^r 
emergency distribution within its jurisdiction. 



B -VI -1^1 



PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 



VTI - MAJJPOWEH 



MONTANA PLAN 

FOR IMERGEWCY 

MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES 



STATS OF MONTANA 

KMERGENCY RESCTORCE MANAGEMENT PLAN 

PART B - :RESOimCE SECTIONS 

V"II - MANPOl-ffiR 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction • » • ■• B-VTI-1 

1. Emergency Actions • • B-'/II-^ 

2. Emergency Action Documents - . = • • • B-VTI-o 

3. Emergency Organization • B-VII-15 

U. Local Manpower Offices and Areas Served B-VII-I6 

5 . Reference Document B-VII-17 



INl'RODUCTIOH 

This section of the State Resource Management Plat. con.t.ains policies^ 
guidance, and actions to provide civiliaXi manpower to carry on essential 
activities in the State in a nuclear attack emergency or to provide similar 
services in the event of a natural disaster through control of the 
recruitment, classification ar^d assigxment of civilian manpower except 
health manpower; and to provide unemplo^Tiient insurance benefits to idled 
workers , 

This section is based on assumptior.s showr. in Fart A of the Plan. 



DEFINITIOWS 

Manp o wer includes everyone capable of effort which will contribute to 
the survi.val of the C'tate or Naticn- 

Health Manpower means those occupations included in the attached list 
of Health Manpower Occupatior.s ., 

M anpower Priorities are staff instr-actions issued by manpower officials 
to carry out executive guidance by the Governor or head of local government 
or their authorized agents in tr^e assignment of available manpower. 

Military Manpower includes military reserves and Selective Serivce 
inductees c After appropriate authoiization by the President or the Con- 
gress the Ready Reserve of the armed forces and such Standby reserves as 
are determined to be available by the Selective Service System aj:-e sub- 
ject to call by the armed forces. In addition, calls may be levied on 
States by the Selective Service System, pursuant to Presidential decision 
on augmentation of the armed forces, and inductions will be made in 
accordance with the establisiied procedures. 

GENERAL 

The process for nianaging civilian manpower in the State in a nuclear attack 
emergency involves two series of actions. First, essential imiaediate needs 
are identified and actions taken to supply these needs. Secondly, and as 
soon as possible, contin.^ing needs arid expected future supplies are esti- 
mated. Decisions will be made and actions will be taken x,o channel these 
expected future supplies to meet the continuing needs that are most 
essential to survival and recovery of the State and the Nat^iono 

Federal, State, and Local gcverivmen'.. roles in the emergency management and 
supply of manpower in xhe State are as follows: 

Federal Government ; Tlie U. S. Department of Labor, as the staff agency 
responsible to the President, has established Kational loanpower policies 
and operational procedures t.o be followed by the U. S. Employment Service 



B-VII-1 



and its affiliated State Employment Security Agencies and local offices in 
the majiagement of civilian manpower in a nuclear emergency attack. 

State Government ; The Kanpower Agency of the State of Montsuia operates as ^^ 
a part of the nationwide system of State Employment Security Agencies affil- ^^ 
iated with the U= So Employment Ser-viee. The chairman of the Montana ^^ 
Unemployment Compensation Commission is Director of the Manpower Agency 
and his line of succession iss 

lo Defense axid Mobilization Coordinator 

2. State Director of theEjosployment Service 

3. Unemployment Insurar.ce Division Director 

U. Field Supervisors in order of Seniority 

Local office managers are designated Manpower Chiefs for their respective 
areas of operation. Local offices and the area which they serve are shown 
on the attached map^ page 3-\1I"l6o In local offices the line of success- 
ion will be local office interviewers in order of seniority. 

The Director of Manpower Agency ajid his organization is responsible for: 

lo ITie registration^ classification j recruiting and allocating of 
all civilian manpower in the State during emergency of war con- 
ditions with the exceptions of those workers engaged in health 
manpower occupations . 

2. The referral of available manpower for priority needs as defined in ^^ 
the Governor's directive RM-5 establishing policy on priority use ^^ 
of resources o 

3. Ascertain and report manpower resources and requirements for State 
and local areas, including the collection, analysis, and use of 
labor market information with the identification of areas, in- 
dustries, and occupations of labor shortage and supply. 

h. Measures to provide to the extent possible fair compensation and 
injury and death benefits for all who undertake civil emergency 
work. 

5. A system of unemployment payments to eligible members of the labor 
force who are out of work„ 

6, In implementing activities to accomplish the above responsibilities, 
manpower officials at all levels will make full use of the voluntary 
cooperation of management, labor and other appropriate groups. Man- 
power officials will be guided in all emergency operations by the 
National Manpower Plan, the Defense Readiness Handbook of the U. S. 
Department of Labor, ar.d the Montana Civil Defense Act of 1951 • 



B"'/II-2 



% 



The State Manpower Agency and its area and local organizations develop, in 
cooperation with other organizations of theStete gcvernmer.t sjid provide > on 
behalf of the Governor, policies and guidaxice consistent with State and Fed- 
eral objectives. This is to assure compatible measures for the management 
of manpower to assure that essential needs for manpower are iaentified and 
met within the supplies availaDle. 

Local Government : Local offices of the Montana Sta^-e Employment Service 
have in their "Basic Employment Security Manual, Part II'' specific procedures 
for such emergency employment stabilization measures as controlled referrals, 
employment ceilings, labor -management consult at ion ;, and establishment of 
manpower priorities etc. Additional manpower plans are based on guidelines 
utilizing information contained in the Lepar'tment of labor's "Defense Readi- 
ness Handbook" for the State Employm.ent Security Agencies, This guidance 
provides for the assignment and use of locally available manpower and in- 
cludes detailed guidance on streamlined procedures for supplying manpower 
for post attack activities in accordartce with the Policy on Pricrity Vse of 
Resources. 



e-\t:i-3 



1. Emergency Actions for ImiLediate and Continuing Suppl y 

a. Actions for Immediate Supply 

The Manpower Agency of Montana wills i 

(1) Issue, on behalf of the Governor, policies euid guidance appli- 
cable thr'oughout Montana covering the management and utiliz- 
ation of Manpower throughout Montana » (Manpower ~ 1, Manpower 
Policy and Guidance.) 

(2) Confirm with the Selective Service System State Headquai1:ers 
the activation of joint placs to augment the facilities of 
local employment offices in the locations of civilian man- 
power to meet emergency needs. 

(3) Ar'range for the trarisfer of manpower available within the 
State, or from other States, to meet shortages reported by 
local governments to State and Area Manpower organizations. 

(k) Identify manpower skills in short supply and critically 
needed to staff essential activities. 

(5) Advise the Selective Service System State Headquarters of 
critical civilian requirements for manpower skills for use 
in administering deferments. 

(6) Receive and act upon requests for assistsa^ce from health 
authorities in locating and referring health manpower, 

(7) Activate arrangements for area level consultation with re- ( 
presentatives of labor and management under the procedures 

set forth in the Basic E- S. Manual (Part II, Chapter I5OOO). 

b. Actions for Continuing Supply 

The Meuipower Agency of Moiitana will: 

(1) Consult with State Civil Defense Officials, Federal Military 
officials, and appropriate State resource officigils to obtain 
their estimate of civilian manpower that will be needed in 
Montana during the following 90 days. 

(2) Obtain estimates from the Selective Service System of probable 
draft calls during the following 90 days. 

(3) Estimate civilian manpower that will be available in Montana 
during the ensuing 90 days» 

(h) If estimated supply of manpower to meet estimated require- 
ments is insufficient, refer conflicts ir. demand to the Resource 
Priorities Board for recommendations to theOoverrior on 
relative urgency among competing programs. 



B-VH-4 



(5) Issue State policy on the priority use of Mar.power in accord- 
ance with theGovernor ' s decision. 

In order to expedite action for immediate needs the following is necessary: 

1. All personnel in the Manpower Service will know and understar.d the 
Montana Civil Defense Operational Svirvival plan in general and tne 
Manpower chapter to the Montar.a Plan for Emergency Marxagement of Re- 
sources, the National Fanpower Plan and the Defense Readiness Hand- 
hook of the U. S, Department of Labor in particular'. 

2. The Director of the Manpower Agency and his staff will: 

a. Maintain a list of essential equipment, materials and records 
in the State Office and all local Employment Offices o These 
items will be arranged for convenience in moving should evac- 
uation be ordered and specific persons made responsible for 
their transportation to a relocation point. 

b. Instruct local naj.power chiefs to coordinate with the ^ local 
Welfare Chiefs in securing manpower registration requirements 
on the Welfare --Employment Service combined registration form. 
This instruction to be effective in the immediate affcerriath 
of a nuclear attack. Other methods of securing a manpower 
inventory in a given area may be used if necessary. Such 
methods as described in the Defense Readiness Har.dbook will 
be used as alternatives. 

c. Maintain liaison on man.power activities with the State and 
local Civil Defense Ortianlzations, other State Resource Agencies, 
private industry and Federal agencies, 

d. Develop emergency rales and regulations to authorize depart- 
ure from normal procedures where necessaryc Char.ges involved 
should be understood by and be available to lower echelons in 
order that they may be placed in effect immediately if required. 
The Defense Readiness Handbook will be used as a g-aide in es- 
tablishing emergency rules and regulations. 

e. Advise local Manpower Chiefs that, in event of ai.^attack they 
are isolated and communication with the State Office is not 
possible, thev will carry out the responsibilities of the Man- 
power Service' according to this chapter, the National Manpower 
Plan and the Defense Readiness Handbook, 

f . Develop an emergency plan for payment of unemployment insurance 
payments to unemployed workers under such rales and regulations 
as wi]l permit continuous payment of benefit.s even though oasic 
employment and wage records have been destroyea or are unavail- 
able. Should a federal plan of emergency unemployment payments be 
initiated by the Uo S. Department of Labor, the Montana Maiipower 
Ser-riee will administer the program as an agent of theDepart- 
ment of Labor. 



E-\n:i"5 



The Director of the Manpower Agency and his staff will adhere to the policies 
and standards of the Secretary of Labor and the United States Employment Service, 

1. In emergency operations, the Director of the Manpower Agency will 
maintain direct communication with the Regional Office of the Depart- |^^ 
ment of Labor in Seattle if possible on matters involving employment ^^ 
security program guidance, inter-regional clearetiice of workers and 
employment security fiscal administration o 

2. If not possible, the Director of the Manpower Agency will make nec- 
essary decisions subject to approval of the Director of Resources 
Management or the Governor, 

In the event of a Strategic Warning; 

1. The Director of the Manpower Agency, the Defense and Mobilization 
Coordinator^ and theDirector of the Employment Service Division will 
report to the State Emergency Operations Center in the sub -basement 
of the State Arsenal Building in Helena. The remainder of the State 
office Staff, both Employment Service and Unemployment Divisions, will 
prepare to occupy the shelter in the basement of the Unemployment Com- 
pensation Commission Building. If the attack results in damage to the 
U.C.C. Building to an extent that would preclude efficiem^ operations, 
this personriel will move to the relocation site at Bozeman as soon as 
conditions will permit such relocation with safety. As m'uch equipment, 
forms and operating materials as possible wi^l be trar^sported by the 
persons relocating in their private automobiles , 

2. Local Manpower Chiefs ajid their staffs will relocate with the local 
Civil Defense Directors, if relocations is determined to be necessary ^^^^ 

The following is to expedite action for continuing needs, ^^ 

1. The State Director of Resource Management, acting under the authority of 
the Governor, designates -uhe Manpower agency as the chaxinel through which 
all orders for emergency workers ajid all applications for employment will 
be controlled and coordinated. All applications for employment or 
requests for emergency manpower will be submitted fttrough the local man- 
power office or its designees. 

2. Initial registration of surviving and available manpower will be carried 
on as a coordinated operation with the Welfare authorities. The combined 
Welfare and Employment Registration Form will be used for this purpose if 
if proves practical at the time. Sixty thousand of these forms are pre- 
positioned o Other means of recruiting, classifying and registering 
workers may be used as conditions warrant, such as the suggested methods 
outlined in the Defense Readiness Handbook, 

3- Priority in referral of Civil Defense emergency workers will be in 
accord with Directive RM-5 issued by the Governor, 



B-7II-6 



k. Assessment of damage effects upon the labor force will be carried out 
with t?ie assistance of Civil Defense authorities arjd reporting of 
demand and supply of manpower to State Civil Defense and Manpower will 
be operative. 

a. The cnarinel of reports will be from the Local Manpower Offices to 
the State ivianpower Offices ajid from there to other interested levels 
of the Civil Defense and Manpower Operations o 

b. Areas of labor supply and labor shortages will be identified by 
industrial and occupational characteristics o 

5. In the event a national system of manpower stabilization is proclaimed 
the Manpower Service will follow procedures established by the U:. So 
Department of Labor o Such a system will involve the establis'nment 

of area lab or -management committees, incentive programs^ employment 
opportunities and adjustment in hours of work. Procedures for 
appeals by workers or employers from adverse actions taken under the 
provisions of stabilization plans will be established in accordance 
with policies initiated by the U. S. Department of Labor. 

6. Regular intrastate axid interstate clearance procedures for moving 
labor from areas of supply to areas of shortages, modified as necessary 
in individual circumstajices to meet emergencies of the postattack 
situation. 

7« The Manpower Agency will assist the State Board of Health, which has 
been delegated the responsibility for recruitment axid allocation of 
health manpower, in carrying out this responsibility. 

8. Consideiation will be given to cumulative radiation dosages ajid ex- 
posure liability in referring workers to survival activities. Radio- 
logical monitors will be consulted and used as required. 

9. As soon as possible, unemployment insurance benefits will be resiimed. 
Such adjustments in the procedures, rules €ind regulations for payment 
of benefits and collection of teixes will be made as are warranted by 
the situation encountered at the time. Alternative plans of operation 
for this function will be on a standby basis to be used as determined 
by varying conditions. The Manpower Agency will act as agent for any 
federal plan of emergency unemployment insurance which may be initiated. 

In order to insure a continuing operation in the face of heavy damage the following 
will be effective: 

1. If the State Office remains intact, operations will continue from that 
location with sufficient supplies and equipment to last for 30 to 60 
day s . 

2. If relocation to Bozeman is necessary, operations will be moved to that 
location. A stockpile of supplies is maintained at the Business Office 
of Montana State College in sufficient quantity for temporary operation. 
As many supplies, equipment items, and records as possible will be trans- 
ported in private automobiles of the State Office staff to Bozeman at the 
time of relocation. 



-VII -7 



3<. If relocatior., of local office is determined necessary 'hy the local Civil 
Defense Director, such supplies, equipment smd records as may be trans- 
pori^ed in private vehicles of the local office personnel will be moved 
tc the relocation site« A list of essential supplies, equipment, and 
records is maintained in each local office and individual employees are J^ 
designated to traxisport specific items of supply, equipment and records ^ ^| 
Should, relocation not be necessary, the local office will continue oper- 
ations in the regular location and use such supplies, equipment and 
records as are on hand, which should be sufficient for 15-30 days» (Ref. 
Document Wo. l) „ 

ko Requests for additional supplies and equipment by local offices will be 
directed to the State Office unless communications and transportation 
facilities are inoperative o Otherwise, requests will be made through 
the local Civil Defense Director at the local level ar^d from the State 
Civil Defense Director at the State level o 

5. All local offices will ;a3ake maximum use of private vehicles, 

6, Additional emergency transportation to evacuate important records, 
supplies and equipment, arranged for in advance, will be supplied by 
Civil Defense authorities » 

7o All communications will be through normal mear-s unless inoperative. 
If normal means axe inoperative, communications will be transmitted 
through Civil Defense Facilities. 

8, The Director of the Manpower Agency, acting under the Governor or his 

designated Director of Resource Management, will operate from the State 
EtD.ergency Operations Center, He will supervise, coordinate, and control 
all functions of his service as outlined in this plan amd established ±'-- H 
standard operating procedures, 

2 . Emergency Action Documents 

Following are emergency action documents to implement the foregoing emergency actions. 

Procedures, action documents and form.s for carrying out additional emergency actions 
are contained in the Department of Labor's "Defense Readiness Hscidbook for State Em- 
ployment Security Agencies", 



B-VII-8 



Manpower - 1. State Manpower P olicy_^__ Guidance 
To: Heads of Political SuMivisionSo 

Guidance for Local Governments. It is essential tnat niar^power avaiiaole for 
use iS~bhii'~St^e''bi"TItiTiiid fSr imraediate and urgent activities for local, State, 
and National survival and recovery. Consequently, appropriate officials of local 
goverrxinent are requested to take the following actions: 

1 Advise ei:.ployers ar.d worRers to continue, if possible, in their regular 
work relationships unless requested to perform other activities by 
civil authorities. Uree employers and employees to remain in contact 
with each other to the exteiit possible where normal actxvities are not 
feasible, pending action by local authorities, 

2e Notify women, older people, youths, an.d others not normally in the labor 
force to register for employment when requested by local marxpower author- 
ities . 

'< Assipti health marxpower in accordance with gaidar.ce of the appropriate 
hean-h au-/noritnes.- Supporting maiipower integral to health operations 
employed at the time of attack by a medical facility or laboratory or 
governmental health agency will remain witn the employing organr.zation, 
unless ordered to military duty. 

l. Authorize essential facilities and essential local users to recruit 

manpower to meet rljmaediate ai:d urgent needs, subject to appl-Cable man- 
power controls. 

5 Ar.riourice that the urgency of the situation may re:iuire imposition by 
manpower officials of measures such as employment ceilings, limitation 
of employment choices, and other measures as necessary to assure avail- 
ability of manpower for survival and defense activities , Carry out 
arrangements for consultation with labor and raangement. Compensate 
and prote-.!, as appropriate worKers accepting employment as requestea. 

6 In the event locally available manpower is not adequate to meet all 
essential needs, heads of local government or their authorized agents 
wili establish relative urgencies for the guidance of manpower offic- 
ials in assigning available supplies consistent with the Policy on 
Pr--oritv Use of Resources (RM-3) ° Manpower officials will report 
ihortii^TlMTiil^itl^ppropriate officials of State government to take 
actions to increase the supply of manpower to the local jurisdiction. 



Effective Date 



Governor of the State of Montana 



By; 

State Mar.power Director 



Attaclrments: 1. Governor's Order re Tiealth Manpower 
la. List of tiealth Manpower Occupations 



Manpower 1, Attachment ~ 1. 

STATE OF MONTANA 
OEP'ICE OP' THE GOVEENOR ^ 

To: Director of State Manpower Agency and Executive Heads of Political Subdivisions. 

1„ Purpose o This Order issues the List of Health Manpower Occupations and 
assigns responsibilities in regard thereto. 

2o Definitions. The Federal Government has defined health manpower as 
"physicians (including osteopaths), dentists, sanitary engineers, registered pro- 
fessional nuisesj and such other occupations as may be included in the List of 
Health Manpower Occupations," issued by appropriate authority. The list issued 
by this Order is consistent with Federal Government usage as established in 
Defense Mobilization Order 65i»-0.1 issued by the Director, Office of Emergency 
Planning, March 11, 1964, 

3- Responsibilities . Executive Order RM-2, Part A, assigns civilian manpower 
mobilization planning responsibilities to the State Manpower Agency, under the super- 
vision of the Director, and civilian health manpower mobilization planning respons- 
ibilities to the Montana Health Agency. 

State and local health officials have the primary responsibility for planning 
the organization, training, and utilization of civilian health manpower. The faci- 
lities of the State Msjipower Agency and its local offices will be utilized in ^ 
carrying out the health program (e.g., recruitment, referral, and other manpower V 
measures) . 

The skills identified in the attached List of Health Manpower Occupations, 
with the addition of mortuary services (identification and burial), are those 
which will be immediately required for the provision of essential emergency public 
health and medical services » Persons possessing the listed skills and allocated by 
appropriate officials to meet nonmilitary requirements will be made available to 
health services. However, as health hazards are brought under control and medical 
care loads permit, health officials will release for utilization in other essential 
activities the health manpower that is no longer critically needed. 

Supporting msmpower, integral to health operations, e.g., hospital, sanitation, 
and laboratory helpers, and engineering, clerical food service and custodial per- 
sonnel, is not listed. Such civilian manpower employed at the time of attack by a 
medical facility or laboratory, or governmental health agency, will, if not ordered 
to military service, remain with the employing organization. All others will be 
provided according to priorities established by the manpower agency or ranking 
governmental official. 

h. Effective Date. This Order is effective the date of issuance. 



Governor 
Attachments List of Health Manpower Occupations. 

B-VTI-IO 



Manpower 1, Attacliment la. 



LIST OF HEALTH MANPOWER OCCUPATIONS l/ 

Based on Defense Mobilization Order 85^0.1 

Office of Emergency Planning 

Executive Office of the President 



OCCUPATIONAL TITLE 



Department of Labor 
Occupational Code No» 



Auaiologlst. 

Blocneraist 

Clinical Radioisotope Techniciaxi 

Dental Hyglenist 

Dental Pechnician {3us» Ser^--.) 

Dentist 

Food and Drug Inspector (Govt. Serv.) 

Health Pnysiclst 2/ 

Medical Physiologist 

Medical Pecoid Librarieui 

Medical Technician (Med. Serv.) 

Medical Technologist (Med. Serv.) 

Bacteriology Technicisji 

Eiocheraistry Technician 

Bioodbarik Techniciari 

Cytology Technician 

;^?eipatology Technician 

Parasitology Technician 

Serology Technician 

Tissue Technician 

Virclogy Technician 
Midwife 
Natural Scientists (N.E.C.) 

Anatomist (Prof . and Kindred) 

Biophysicist j/ 

Dairy Bacteriologist 

Food Bacteriologist 

hematologist 

'listopathologist 

Medical Bacteriologist 

Parasitologist, Medical 

Pharmaceutical Bacteriologist 

Pharmacologist 

Public Health Bacteriologist 

'■'eterinariaxi Bacteriologist kj 
Nurse Aide (Med.. Serv.) 
Nurse, Licensed Vocational 
Kurse, Practical 
Nurse, professional 
Occupational Therapist 
Optometrist 



079 » 108 
OiH«08l 
078.381 
0780368 
712 0381 
072.108 
168.287 
079^021 
Oifl.081 
100.368 
078.381 
078.361 
078.381 
078.281 
078.381 
078.381 
078.381 
078.381 
078.381 
078,381 
078.381 
35^.878 

Qi+i.oei 

041. 081 

04l.08l 

oin.081 
078.381 
oui , 181 

OU1.O8I 
0)+1.08l 
041.081 
OJ+I.O8I 
OU1.281 
073 ".081 
355.878 
079.378 
35^.878 
075 o 378 
079 o 128 
079 . 108 



B-VII-11 



Manpower 1, Attachment la 

Department of Labor 
OCCUPATIONAL TITLE Occupa tional Code NOo 1^ 

Orderly (Med. Serv,) 355»878 

Or-thopedic Technician 712o28l 

Osteopathic Physician O7I0IO8 

Pharmacist 'Prof. and Kindred) 074. 18I 

Podiatrist 7/ 079-108 

Psychologist, Clinical 5/ 045ol08 

Physicians ajid Surgeons 070. 

Physical Terapist (Med. Serv.) 079 « 378 

Sanitarian 6/ 079»ll8 

Sanitary Engineer O05o08l 

Social Worker, Medical 195. IO8 

Social Worker, Psychiatric 195 =108 

Speech Pathologist 079-108 

Superintendent, Hospital (Med. Serv/j 187, II8 

Veterinarian hj 073-108 

X~Pay Teahnieian (Med. Serv.) 078.368 

1/ Includes students, trainees, and interns whose training or education leading 
to any of the indicated skills is sufficiently advancea to qualify them to 
contribute to the technical tasks of providing health services » 

2/ H EALTH FHySICIST . Devises and directs a research training and monitoring 

program to protect plant personnel from radiation hazards. Conducts researc^j^^ 
to develop inspection standards, radiation exposure limits for personnel, ss^^B 
work methods, and decontamination procedures and tests surrounding areas to 
assure that releases to environment are not in excess of permissible radi- 
ation standards. Designs or modifies health physics equipment-, such as 
detectors and counters to improve radiation protection. Assists in developing 
staxidaxds of permissible concentrations of radioisotopes in liquids and gases. 
Directs testing and monitoring of equipment and recording of personnel radi- 
ation exposure dates. 

Requests special bio-assay samples of individuals believed to be exposed. 
Consults with scientific personnel regarding new experiments to determine 
that equipment or plant design conforms to health physics standards for pro- 
tection of personnel. Supervises radiation monitoring and directs monitoring 
of plant areas and work sites. Requisitions and maintains inventory of 
instr^-imentSa Records location and quantity of radioactive sources assigned 
to departments. Instructs personnel in principles, policies, rules and re- 
gulations related to radiation hazards. Assigns film badges and dosimeters 
to personnel and recommends changes in assignment for health reasons. May 
advise public authorities on methods of dealing with radiation hazards and 
procedures to be followed in radiation incidents and assists in civil defense 
planning. Reports findings and recommends improvements in safety measures. 
A bachelor's degree with a major in physics, chemistry, engineering, or a 
biological science, plus at least one year of specialized training in health 
physics is I'equired. 



B -VII -12 



5/ 3I0PHYSICIST , Studies the physical principles of living cells and organisms, 
including mechanics, heat, light, radiation, sound ana. electricity. Is 
trained in both physics and biology. May specialise, for exemple, in the 
field of radiobiology which includes such activities as the study smd use 
of radiation and nuclear particles in the treatment of cancer or the use of 
atomic isotopes in discovering the transformation of substances in cells, 

y ■/E'l-IIRIIARIAU BACTE RI0L:«1IoTo [I'hough current planning provides that many 

veterinarians be utilized in casualty care and preventive medicine activities 
in the immediate postattack period, veterinarians will continue to be needed 
to perform services of a sf^rictly veterinary nature after most of the human 
casualties have been cared fox- temporarily. Such veterinary activities will 
include protection of feed einiiDals against diseases ai;d the effects of atomic, 
biological, and chemical warfajr-e; meat and poultry inspection and supple- 
menting food inspectior fc:t ces for certain food processing plants, and food 
storage facilities, 

5/ CLINICAL FSYCHOLOGIg'I 'o Fiagnoses mental and emctioral disorders of indiv- 

iauals in clinics; hospitals, prisons, and other ins"c-itutions, and administers 
prograja of treatment. ;"nterviews patient, studies medical aj:).d social case 
history, observes patient in play or other situations;, and selects, administers 
and interprets projective and other psychological test-s to diagnose disorder 
and formulate plan of treatrtent . Treats psychological disorders to effect im- 
proved adjustment through psychodrajna, play therapy, ana other techniques of 
individual and group therapy. Selects approach to use in individual therapy 
such as directive, r.on-intensity, and duration of therapy. 

May collaborate with P&YCHIATOIST : PEDIATRICIAN: SOCIAL V/ORKER, PSYCHIATRIC: 
ar.d otner specialists in developing treatment prograias for patients, based on 
analysis of clinical data. May instruct and direct students serving psycho- 
logical internships in hospitals and clinics. May develop e:cperimental 
design and conduct research in field of personality development and adjust- 
ment, an.d on problems of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental ill- 
ness. May serve as consultant to social, educational, welfare, and other 
8:gencies on individual cases or in evaluation, planning, and development of 
mental health programs. May specialize on one of the following: behavior 
problems, crime and deiin-^uency , group therapy, individual diagnosis and 
therapy, mental deficiency, objective tests, projective techniques, and speech 
pathology. A Clinical Psychologist is identified as an individual who is work- 
ing in the field of clinical psychology and who meets one of the following 
criteria: (l) is a diplomate in clinical psychology of the American Board of 
Examiners in Professional Psychology; (2) is a fellow of the Division of 
Clinical smd Abnormal Psychology of the American Psychological Association; 
or (3) holds a P'i. D, degree in clinical psychology, 

6/ SAJJIT/'P.L'-IW . Interprets ai'^i enforces sanitation laws and regulations to 
protect and promote public health. Inspects and investigates sanitation, 
facilities and conditions in such places as dwellings, water supply and 
sewerage plants, recreational areas, industrial plants, baroer shops, beauty 
salons, and food processing and serving establishments to determine compliance 
witn standards. Takes sa:Cpies of such materials as water, food, and air and 
performs or orders a variety of chemical, physical or biological tests for 
contamination. Formulates plans and oversees programs for insect and rodent 
extermination and control. Issues corrective notices and orders, and follows 



B-VTI-13 



Manpower 1^ Attachment la 

up on compliance. Collaborates with public health personnel in epidemiology ^_ 
survey^ analysees, and control programs. Reviews and makes recommendations ^^ 
on sanitary laws and regulations- Plans, organizes and conducts training pro-^* 
greims in sanitary practices for such personnel as foo-d hajidling, pest exterm- 
ination and recreational workers o Confers with governmental^ community, 
industrial, and civil defense personnel and organizatioris to interpret and 
promote sanitation stajidards and practices. In some States,, may "be required 
to hold license or be registered. When employed by public health agency, is 
KDOWTi as PUBLIC HEAia?H SMHTMClMo In large public agencies, and in industry, 
may be designated according to specialization, as FOGC-AJTC-IWDUS'ERIAL SAJMI- 
T'ARIAiM (profess, and kin,); HOUSING SANITARIAN (profess, and kin,); MILK 
SANITARIAN (profess, and kin.)- 

7/ PQI>IA!ERIST (Medical ser-^'-ice) C79.108. chiropodist; orthopedic specialist « 
Diagnoses and treats diseases and deformities of human foot. Diagnoses 
foocJ ailjnents such as tumors, ulcers, fractures, skin or nail diseases, and 
congenital or acquired deformities, utilizing such medically accepted methods 
as urinalysis, blood tests, and X-ray analysis. Treats deformities such as 
flat or weak feet and foot imbalance by mechanical methods such as wnirlpool 
or paraffin baths, or by electrical methods such as snort wave and low 
voltage currents. Treats conditions such as corns, calluses, ingrowing nails, 
tumors, shortened tendons, cysts, and abscesses by surgical methods Including 
suturing, medications, and administration of local anesthetics. Does not 
perform amputations of the footo Corrects deformities by means of plaster 
casts and strappings. Makes and fits prosthetic app^icarxces. Prescribes 
corrective footwear. Refers patient to PHYSICIAN when symptoms observed 
in feet and legs evidence systemic disorders such as arthritis, heart ij^^ 
disease, diabetes or kidney trouble. May treat bone, muscle and joint '^^^ 
disorders and be known as PODIATRIST, ORTHOPEDIC i children's foot diseases 
and be known as PODEPEDIA'PRICIAN, or perform surgery and be known as PCDIAIRIC 
SUBGEOK. 



B-VII-lU 



•^'a npower Emergency Organization 



MA1\; POWER ORGMIZATIONAL CHAr.' 



rrOV-pRNOR 


DIRECTOR OF RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 






DIRECTOR, I^IANPOVJER AGENCY 



DEFENSE AND 

MOBILIZATION 

COQKDI?J..\TwR 



cii :^F 



E^iPICYMENT Si'iRVICE DIVISION 
E, S. DiRECTOR 







i 


F.iEIJ.) SUPEHVIS.;; " ! 

(TiiReii) i 
1 






1 

1 
1 


..\L ^MPj^J'/Mi'T ' OPvICEB 


1 

i 



CHIEF 



UNEMPLOYMEOT Ilfc'JRANCE AMD 
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE DIvTSIOl^ 
U. I. DIRECTOR 



BENEFIT PAYlvENT 

oECTIOfi 



CONIRIBin.'IO'i 

DtCTi:'>f 



>r:?,et[ian 

Jasgcw 

■ reac Palis 

;aT'.iltori 

•'avre 



Lewis". .)v' 



MiBf.oula 
Poison 
Shelby 
Sidney 

Trioiupson Fall; 
Uolf Point 



B--v'II-15 



Local Manpower Office and Areas Served 




Manpower, Reference Document No. 1 

In case of nuclear attack or oti:.er national disaster situations, the Employment 
Service will be delegated responsibilities for registration, control and allo- 
cation of civilian manpower, Jnemployment insurance for dislocated workers will 
be paid through local office facilities. 

It may be necessary for some local offices to relocate when warnings of imminent 
attack are received, Piaiis for relocation and transportation of sufficient re- 
cords and supplies to continue basic operations in emergency locations are a 
logical requirement. Under such conditions, the following records, supplies and 
equipment would be a minimuit'. required. 



R ecords : 

Active Application Cards 

Active Claire. File 

Occupational In.dex 

Major Xiai'ket Employer Records, P'orms 330 and 331 

Applicant Cross-Index Pile (if currently used) 

Supplies ano £quipinent : 

Total Supply of Application Cards, ES--511 

Total Supply of Additional Application Cards, ES-512 

Total Supply of Referral Cai-ds, E3-5G8 

Total Supply of Applicant Identification Cards, ES-506 

Total Supply of Initial and Additional Claim Forms, UI-202 

Total Supply of Form UI-218 

Total Supply of Inter-Office Memorandum, UI-63 

2 Pads of Eiapioyer Order Form, ES-51U 

1 Ream of I^etterhead Stationery 

1 Ream of Onioii-skin Second Sheets 

1 Box of Carbon Paper 

Total .'■.jpp].y of Pencils 

Total Supply of Scratch Paper 

A Month's Supply of All Types of Envelopes 

71 Box of Paper Clips or a Stapler 

All J)ictloTiarie3 of Occupational Titles 

Telephone and City Directories 

As Maxjy Typewriters as Possible to Transport 



B-VII-IT 



PAP.T B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 



VIII, PETROLEUM AJND SOLID Fu-EIS 



MONI-ANA PLAIJ 

EOF. EMEP.GENCY 

MANAGRlvCEffi.' OF RESOURCES 



STATE OF MONTMA 
EME3RGERCY PESOUPCE xMAIWGEMENT PLAl^ 

PAFT B •=■ FJESOUP.CE SECTIONS 
VIII o I'ET'RCLElJlvf AMD SOLID FUEI£ 



This secticn of the State Emergency 
Resource Maxiagement Flan contains two 
subsections. The first deals with 
petroleu;cn and petroleum products and 
the second with solid fuels » I'he two 
subsections are placed in this manner 
since the same State agency is respons- 
ible for the emergency management of 
both resources. 



I'.AeLE OF COMED^'TS 
PETROLEUM 

Introduction .»,..,> ,...«»» .... . 

1 . Emergency Actions .,,„,....,.„• ,,,....„.,. ...,,. . 

2 . Emergency Action Documents ................ 

Index of Emergency Action Doc.^ients . » . . 
3 » Reference Documents ,......,,...., o . n „ .... , 

SOLID FUELS 

Introduction ...» o ......... < 

1. Emergency Actions .. ...................... < 

2 . Emergency Action Docixments ,.. ,...,,...... , 

Index of Emergency Action Documents . . . . 

3 . Reference Documents ,.,,,„,.......,,. 

EMERGENCY ORGANIZATION ,„, ..................... . 



Page No . 

B-VTII- 1 

B-VIII- 6 
B-VIII- 7 
B-VIII- 8 
B-VIII -28 



B-\/lII-51 

B-VIII-56 
B-VIII-57 
B-VIII-58 
B-VIII-72 

B-VIII-75 



PETROLEUM 



irfTRODUCTION 

This Petroleum Subsection of the State Resource Management Plan contains 
policies, guidance, and actions to provide petroleum products to meet essential 
needs in the State in a nuclear attacK emergency. 



Definitions 



"Primary inventories" are all criades, natural gasolines and un- 
finished oils, and those petroleum products in storage at refineries 
or at hulk terminals supplied primaTily hy pipeline emd preponder- 
antly distributed to bulk plai:t.s or large consumers. Stocks in 
transit from or to a primary storage terminal are included as primary 
inventories. (See Reference Document No, 2) 

"Secondary inventories" are those petroleum products ir. storage at: 

(1) Bulk plants supplied primarily by tank car or tank truck, rather 
than by pipeline and preponderatitly distributed to retailers, indus- 
trial users, farmers, ajid individual small consujners. For purposes 
of this plan, these bulk plants are referred to as i4ajor Petroleum 
Distributors (\>Jholesalers) ; (See Reference Document No. l); 

(2) Service Stations, jobbers or other small distributors having 
petroleum stocks in bulk storage; 

(3) Refineries where segregated for exclusive delivery to consumers 
listed in (2) . 

(Note: Military stocks are secondary inventories but sjre not avail- 
able for distribution for nonmilitary uses except by agreement with 
the military authorities.) 

"Certified orders" are pur_hase orders, contracts or other requests 
for resources wriich bear a sigcjied certification that the order is an 
essential order authorized pursuant to Federal Government emergency 
regulations or State authorization. 



General 

The process for managing resources in the State in a nuclear attack emer- 
gency involves two series of actions. First, essential immediate needs are 
identified and actions taken to supply these needs. Secondly, aiid as soon as 
possible, continuing needs and expected feature supplies are estimatedo 
Decisions are made and actions are taken to channel these expected future sup- 
plies to meet the continuing needs that ar-e most essential to survival and 
recovery of the State and the Nation. 

Following is a brief description of Federal, State, and local government 
roles in the emergency management and supply of petroleum products in the State. 



B-"7III-1 



Federal Government 

The Federal Governfnent is responsible for working with the petroleiun 
industry to assure maxiimjm production and for releasing petrcleiom products 
in pri3iary inventories in the State to meet essential needs of the State of 
Montana and other States which depend on these primary sources for petroleum 
supplies. The Federal Government is also responsible for arranging for the 
distribution of petroleum products in primary inventories in other States to 
meet essential needs in this State when this is necessary in an emergency. 

The United States Department of the Interior has established a Federal 
organ! zati on ;, the Emergei;.cy Petroleum ajad Gas Administration (FPGA) for this 
purpose., A State office of the FPGA will be located with the State Petroleum 
and Solid F^iels Agency. Representatives of the EPGA will also be assigned to 
each principal area in the State where tliere are primary facilities and in- 
ventories of petroleum products.. These Area EPGA representatives will be 
concerned chiefly with primary inventories and their release to resupply 
secondary inventories. They will also arraxige with primary inventory distri- 
butors for a continuing supply of petr'Oleum products to military installations ^ 
government, and essential industrial facilities which normally depend on 
direct shipments from prlinaiy sources for all or part of their petroleixm needs. 
Arrangements with the industry to assure maximum production and, provision of 
petroleum products through exploration, petroleum production, refining, axid 
pipeline operations within tiie State will be the responsibilities of the 
State office of the EPGA, 

State and Area offices of the EPGA have not been established in Montana 
as of the initial writing of this plan. Vfiien established ;, a list of these 
offices together with names, addresses and telephone numbers of key EPGA 
executive and. liaison representatives assigned to these field orgajiizations 
will be published and distributed as an addendum to this subsection of the plan. 



State Government 

The State Petroleum and Solid Ftiels Agency develops, in cooperation with 
other organizations of the State government, suid provides on behalf of the 
Governor, policies and guidance, consistent with State and Federal objectives. 
The purpose of these policies and guidance is to assure application throughout 
the State of compatible measvires for the conservation, distribution, and use 
of petroleum products to assure that essential needs for petroleum products 
are identified and met within the supplies available. The State Petroleum 
ajid Solid Pti-els Agency works with major wholesale distributors whose inventor- 
ies are preponderantly distributed in many communities In the State as well as 
in communities in neighboring States to retail, ind.ustrial, and other users 
who purchase petroleum in wholesale quantities. It furnishes guidance to 
these wholesalers on the conservation and release of inventcries and provides 
them with authority to replace inventories from primary sources. The State 
Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency accepts request for assistance from local 
governments and arranges with major wholesale distributors and through the 
EPGA, with primary distributors to adjust deliveries of petroleum products to 
correct local shortages in supply. 



B-VUI-2 



As soon as possible after the attack, the State Petroleum and Solid 
Fuels Agency, in collah oration with other State agencies representing major 
activities within the State that consume petroleum products, atnticipates 
continuing needs and works with the EPGA to assure that arrguigements are 
made with the primary industry to provide petroleum products to meet 
essential ongoing demands. 

Through arrangements to "be made preattack between the Office of Oil 
and Gas, the State of Montana, sind industry. State petroleum officials 
will deal directly with primary inventory operators during an emergency 
if EPGA representatives are not available to arrange for augmenting urgently 
needed secondary petroleum supplies to meet essential useso To the extent 
feasible, apportionments will be based on preattack patterns of distribution, 
taking into account conditions due to the emergency. State officials will 
also work directly as necessary with all other branches of the petroleum 
industry - production, refining, transportation, storage, etCo, until Federal 
capability is established. 



Local Government 

Operational Survival Plans of the State of Montana and its political 
subdivisions contain provisions for the conservation, distribution, asid 
use of petroleum products in secondary inventories within the State » These 
plans also provide for local government decisions and guidance, consistent 
with State policies, for the functioning of the secondary petroleum dis- 
tribution system in the localities in the State. 



Essential Petroleum Facilities 

Attached to this plan as Reference Document No. 2 is a list of primary 
petroleum facilities and their locations which are essential to Rational 
survival and which must be kept in operation to assure a continuing flow of 
petroleum products to meet essential needs for survival and recovery. 
Reference Dociiment No. 1 lists major wholesale petroleum distributors which 
are under State jurisdiction. Local governments will assist in the provision 
of electric power, manpower, transportation, water, fuels, and other locally 
available requisites for the continuing operation of these essential petro- 
leum facilities. Where shortages of these supporting resources requisites 
exist, local authorities will request assistance through the State Petroleum 
and Solid Fuels Agency Director, Helena. 



Flow Chart 

Following is a flow chart showing the process and the actions to be 
taken by Federal, State, and local governments to assure a continuing flow 
of petroleum products to meet essential needs in the State in a nuclear 
attack emergency. The legend accompanying the chart identifies; 

A. Actions to be taken immediately to supply immediate needs essential 
for survival amd, 

B. Actions to be taken as soon as possible to anticipate continuing 
needs and to channel petroleum supplies to meet the most urgent needs 
for continuing survival and recovery^ 



B-VIII-3 



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B-VTII-5 



1, Emergency Actions 

The following actions are taken on behalf of the Governor at State 
level by State Petroleum and Solid f-uels Agency officials to provide pol- 
icies and guidance applicable throughout the State on the distribution 
and use of petroleum products and to arrange for resupply of secondary 
inventories from major wholesale and primary sources to meet essential 
local needs » 

The emergency action £ir-d reference documents contained here have 
been prepared and placed with appropriate State and local officials during 
the preattack planning process., 

a- Actions for Inm ediate Sux 

(1) Issue;, on behalf of the Governor, policies and guidance, 
applicable throughout the State covering the provision, dis- 
tribution, and. use of petroleum supplies within the State, 
(Pet-1, State Petroleum Policy and Guidance,) 

(2) Confirm wich the State office of the EPGA arrangements made 
with primary petroleum distributors to make deliveries on certi- 
fied orders received from customers in the State o (Pet-2, Request 
for Release of Primary Inventories.) 

(3) The State Petroleum arid Solid Fuels Agency confirms arrange- 
ments with major petroleum distributors (wholesalers) for initial 
delivery, pursuant to initial quotas, to communities in their 
distribution areas and authorizes them to certify orders on 
suppliers to resupply their inventories, (Pet-3, Release and 
Resupply of Major '.fnclesale Inventories o ) 

(k) Arretuge with major petroleum distributors for adjustments 
of delivery quotas to meet local shortages in petrole'um supplies 
reported by local governments, (Pet-^^-, Adjustment of Delivery 
Quotas ^ ) 

(5) Request the State office of the EPGA to arrange for increases 
where needed in delivery quotas of primar-y petroleum distributors 
to resujiply wholesale and local inventories to meet shortages 
reported by local governments , (Pet-5, Adjustment of Primary 
Distributor Delivery Quotas.) 

b. Actions for Continuing Supply 

As soon as resupply of secondary inventories to meet essential 
immediate needs in the localities is well tmder^ay the State Petroleum 
and Solid Fuels Agency takes the following actions to anticipate con- 
tinuing needs and to arrange for continuing supply to meet these needs. 

(6) Consult with State civil defense supply officials, Federal 



B~VUI-6 



military officials, and appropriate State resource officials to 
estimate continuing requirexaents of petroleuia products that will be 
needed in the State during the ensuing 90-aay period, tPet-b, 
Estimate of Continuing Petroleum Requirements..) 

(7) Obtain from the EPGA estimates of quantities of petroleum pro- 
ducts that can be supplied by primary petroleum aistributors for 
continuing use in the State during the ensuing 90-day period.^ 

(8) If anticipated supplies are inadequate to meet the estimated 
requirements and adjustments ir. requirements car.not be negotiated, re- 
fer to the Resource Priorities Board for recommendations to the 
Governor on the allocation of anticipated supplies among competing 
programs. (Pet-7;, Aliocetion of Petroleum Supplies,) 

(9) Issue revised State policies on the use of ^petroleum in the 
State to conform with the Governor's decision. '?et-8. Revised 
State Petroleum Policy o) 

(10' Consult with the EFJA arid develop estimates of continuing require- 
ments for electric power, for manpower, for transpcr-t-aticn, and for 
other operating supplies, equipment, and services that will be needed 
to maintain operations of essential petroleum facilities in tne State 
during the ensuing 9C-day period. Present these requirements estimates 
to appropriate State Fesource Agencies. ('Pet-^9, Petroleum Industry 
Support Requ i rement s . ) 

(11) Consult with the EPOA and develop estimates of emergency repair 
and construction of essential petroleum facilities that will be 
required during the ensuing 90--day period and present these require- 
ments estimates to the State Construction and Housing Agency. 
(Pet-10, Petroleum Industry Construction Requirements.) 

(12) Inform the EPGA State office of supplies of supporting resources 
that will be available in the State for acquisition and use by tne 
primai-v petrole-um industry to m8.intain essential operations during the 
ensuing 90-day period,. (Pet-Il, Allocation of Supporting Resources to 
Pi-jma-^v Petroleup Industry.') 

(13) ;>uthorize maior petroleum distributors (wholesalers) to certify 
purchase o^-ders to^ obtain specified quantities of supporting resources 
and services during tne ensuing 90-day perioa. ^Pet-12, Authorization 
to Major Petroleum Listributors to Obtain Supporting Resources.) 

2, Emergency Action Documents 

Following are emergency acion doc-oments to implement tne foregoing emergency 
actions. 

(Note: Iniring the process of expediting deliveries to meet urgent local 
n-eds, the quickest means of comnranication between levels of government and 
with industry will be used. The forms illustrate the kind of infonnation 
to be transmitted over telephone or other available means of fast communi- 
cation, ) 



E-'/III-T 



Index of Emergency Action Documents 

Pet-1 State Petroleum Policy eind Guidance 

Pet -2 Request for Release of Primary Inventories 

Pet -3 Release and Resupply of Major Wholesale Inventories 

Pet-i| Release and Resupply of Maj or Wholesale Inventories 

Pet -5 Adjustment of Primary Dis trihutor Delivery Quotas 

Pet -6 Estimate of Continuing Petrole^un Requirements 

Pet -7 Allocation of Petroleum Supplies 

Pet -8 Revised State Petroleum Policy 

Pet -9 Petroleum Industry Support Requirements 

Pet -10 Petroleum Industry Construction Requirements 

Pet - 11 Allocation of Supporting Resources to Primary Petroleum Industry 

Pet - 12 Authorization to Major Petroleum Distributors to Ohtain Supporting 
Resources 



B -VIII -8 



Pet-1, State Petroleum Policy and Guidsmce 
To 2 Heads of Political SubdiTisicr.s 



Guidance for Local Goverrments ., It is essential that petroleum products 
available for use in this State be carefully conserved and restricted to 
inmediate and urgent uses for local, State, and National survival and re- 
covery until the conxinuing supply of petroleum products can be assessed 
and the supplies that will be available for less essential needs can be 
determined ,> 

In order to (l) prevent waste and dissipation of petroleum products 
in local secondary Inventories <, (?l) provide supplies of petroleum pro- 
ducts to meet immediate axid urgent needs, (3) assure continuing resupply 
of local secondary inveiJitories of petroleum products;^ and (k) ration 
petroleum products to meet most essential needs of individual constjmers, 
appropriate officials of local gcveriiJient are requested to take the 
following actions: 

1, Announce and enforce temporary freeze on inventories of local 
secondary distributors of petroleum products (jobbers, dealers^, retailers.) 

2. Pi'ovide instructions to secondaxy distributors on how to release 
inventories to meet essential needs. 

:o Authorize essential local users to obtain immediate and urgent 
supplies of petroleum products from secondary distributor So 

h. Authorize essential facilities to certify purchase orders for 
petroleum products needed to maintain tneir operations. Instruct essen- 
tial facilities to place these certified orders on their customary sources 
of supply, (Local governments have been provided by the State with a list 
of the essential facilities located in tneir jurisdictions..) 

^. As soon as possible, ration petroleum products to individual con- 
sumers and inform these individual consi'iners how to obtain supplies under 
the ration system. 

6. Inform local secondary distri.bators of petroleum products of 
their roles under the ration systeiri. 

In the event resupply from major wholesale distributors or primary 
distributors of petroleum products is not adequate to meet all essential 
needs, local governments should decide arid cut back authorized local uses. 
Concurrently they should report shortages and request appropriate officials 
of Gtate government to take ac"; ions to increase the local supply of petroleum 
products ~ To minimize duplication of effor-t reporting channels must be 



B-71II--9 



adhered to. These are: ^funicipalities to Boards of County Commissioners 
to the State Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency o 



Effective Date 



Govern. or of the State of Montana 



By: 



State Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency 
Director 



B-VTII-10 



Pet-i, Attachment -1 



Background Information 

The Governor has issued general policy on the use of essential re- 
sources in the immediate postattack period- These policies are set 
forth In Part A of the State plan. They have been furnished to appro- 
priate officials of the political subdivisions of the State. 

In general, these State policies provide for temporary freezing of 
retail inventories of essential items and immediate and continuing re- 
leases of these items to meet urgent military and civil defense needs 
and to maintain operation of facilities essential to continued survival 
and recovery. They provide for continuing resupply of local secondary 
inventories as well as inventories of essential facilities which obtain 
their supplies from wholesale and primary sources. 

In addition, the Governor has issued a proclamation requesting 
the executive heads of the political suDdivisions in this State to 
provide resources from locally available supplies to carry on immed- 
iate and urgent activities for survival and to maintain the operation 
of essential facilities. In accordance with this direction from the 
Governor, local governments are requested to inform essential users of 
resources and persons engaged in the operation of essential facilities 
how to identify their purchase orders, contracts, and other purchase 
arrangements to obtain deliveries of supplies and services. 

Attached to this section of the State plan is a list of essential 
petroleum facilities that must continue in operation to assure an adequate 
flow of petroleum products for local. State and national survival and re- 
covery. Names and addresses of these facilities located in the political 
subdivisicx-is have been provided to the local governments concerned. 

Local governments, upon attack, notify the management of these 
facilities to certify their purchase orders and contracts to obtain pro- 
duction materials, capital equipment, and malntenar.ce, repair, and 
operating supplies or to place contracts for essential repair and con- 
struction, as follows. 

1. Essential petroleum facilities use the following State certi- 
fication to identify: 

a. purchase orders for supplies of electric power, gas, solid 
fuels, and transportation services, and 

b. construction contracts for repair and construction of facilities. 



"This is ari 
authorized 
Montana . 


essent 
by tne 


ial order 
State of 






'si gnat 


ure 


of 


purchaser) " 













B-VIII-11 



2» Essential petroleum facilities identify their purchase orders in 
accordance with the rating and certification provisions of Federal Admini- 
stration of the U„ S, Tepartment of Commerce upon attack, for supplies of 
production materials, capital equipment, and other maintenaunce, repair, 
and operating supplies. The State Industrial Proiucticn Agency publicizes 
and makes known, these Federal regulations to local governments and industry 
immediately following an attack. 

Retail and wholesale distributors use the State certification on pur- 
chase orders to supply their inventories from primary petroleum distributors. 

Essential Local Users are (l) civilian organizations engaged in essen- 
tial civil defense activities including persons, equipment and facilities 
providing essential survival care and services to people, (2) military 
organizations engaged in essential military activities, and (3) farmers 
producing essential food and local establishments providing essential items 
and services to people. Less essential ixidividual cons^omers are not 
included except those requiring immediate supplies for individual or family 
survival . 

Essential Faciliti es are (l) military establishments engaged in 
immediate retaliatory or defense operations, (2) electric power, gas and 
water utility systems, ('3.) industrial plants producing or processing essen- 
tial items, and (k) major wholesale establishments storing or distributing 
essential items, and (5) transportation and communications systems providing 
essential services . 

Individual Consumers are consumers not included in defined Essential 
Facilities or Essential Local Users who receive their petroleum products 
supplies under the constimer rationing system^. The process for rationing 
essential items to consumers is shown in the flew c,-: • the Economic 
Stabilization Section of the Plan. 



■B-Till'12 



Pet -2, Request for Release of Primary Inventories 



To: State euid Area Offices of the Federal Emergency Petroleum ajid 
Gas Administration 



Local governments in this State, In accordajice with State policies 
and guidance, have identified essential local users ar.d essential facil- 
ities in their jurisdictions and authorized them to certify their purchase 
orders for petroleum products with the following certification: 



This is an emergency order 
authorized hy the State of 
Monteutia . 



(signature of purchaser)' 



Retail and wholesale petrolexim distributors have been instructed to 
accept and make deliveries to fill these certified orders <, They have in 
turn been authorized to use this seime certification on their purchase orders 
to resupply their inventories. 

You are requested to arrsinge with primary distributors of petroleum 
products for acceptajice and deliveries against these State-certified orders 
within the quantities of petrole^xm products in their inventories that are 
available for use in this State. 



Effective Date 



Director 

State Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency 



B -nil -13 



Pet -3 J Release and Resupply of Major Wholesale Inventories 



To: 



i^Name of Wliolesale Petroleum Distributor) 



Local governments in this State, in accordance with State policies and 
guidance, have identified essential local users and essential facilities in 
their jurisdictions and authorized them to certify their purchase orders for 
petroleum products with the following certification: 



'This is an emergency order 
authorized fcy the State of 
Montana 



^Q^- 



ignature of Purchaser } 



Retail petroleum distributors have been instructed to accept and make 
deliveries to fill these certified orders and to use the same certification 
on their pur-chase orders to resupply their inventories. 

You are to accept and make deliveries against these State-certified 
orders subject to the quotas governing your deliveries to the separate loc- 
alities in your distribution area,. You are prohibited from making deliveries 
on siny other orders that do not bear this State Certification. 

Initially you will establish local delivery quotas on the basis of the 
percentage of yoiir inventory delivered to the separate localities during 
the week inimediately preceding the attack. At the end of 10 days after the 
attack you will release reserved inventories under these local quotas to 
fill certified orders received fl-om. other localities. 

You will receive from time to time directions from the State Petroleum 
and. Solid Fuels Director to adjust your deliveries to meet snortages reported 
in particular localities. 

You are authorized to use the certification contained, herein to certify 
your purcnase orders on primary petroleum distributers to resuppl;^ your 
inventories. 

If you are unable to obtain adequate resupply to meet certified orders 
placed on you, notify this office promptly. 



Effective Date 



Director 

State PetroleuiTi and. Solid Fuels Agency 



e-\t:ii-iU 



Pet-i4-, Adjustment of Delivery Quotas 



• 



(Name of Wholesale Petroleum Distributor] 



Shortages in supplies of petroleuia products have been reported from 
the following localities in your distribution area: 



Sumfflary of ilocal Deficiencies in Weekly 
Resupply of Petroleum Products (in gallons) 



Locality 



jascj-ine 



Distillates 



Kerosene 



Lube Oils 
(le Greases 



Residual 
Fuel Oils 



You are directed to adj..st your local delivery quotas to correct these 
ieficiencies where, in your judgment, this can be done without creating un- 
acceptable shortages in other localities in your distribution area.. 

Report to this office the increase in deliveries you can make in this 
ffay to the named communities. 



Date 



State Petroleujn and Solid Fuels Agency 
Director 



b--vt:it-15 



7et"k, Attachment -1 

Tos Director, State Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency 
Helena, Montana 

Kesupply of secondary inventories of petroleum products in this county 
is inadequate to meet present and anticipated needs of essential users, 
essential facilities, and individual consumers, under the rationing system. 

Authorized local uses and use levels have been cut back as far as 
possible by municipal governments within the countyo 

Assistance is needed tc increase the level of resupply to localities 
within this county as quickly as possible in the amounts shown below. 



Request for Increase in Weekly Resupply of Petroleum Products (in gallons) 


Locality 


Gasoline 


Distillates 


Kerosene 


luce Oils 
& Greases 


Residual 
Pael Oils 














Date 

(Name of Board Chairman) 
By: (Signature) 



E~VIII-l6 



T'o; C .'iciirman , Bcsa.'d of 



Fet-4^ Attachment -2 

Ccar.'.:y Conoiis si oners 



Fes'^ppiy of secotj-riary iiuveiatories cf petroleam products in this local 
'■arisdiction is -f.nadequate to .meet preser.t ar:.l anticipated needs of 
essential local useis, esser.ti6,i facilities, arivi i-'jaiviaual consi-unerS;, 

ur:der tne rationirtg systeai = 

Aur/horized local usss ana use levels have leen cjx- back as fax as 
possible oy local govenimetir. decisior.. ai'.i acti.or. „ 



!\s£i3tarice is r.eedea x-o increase 
.jurisdiction as quic'Kly as possible, 



l-evel of resupply to this local 



Fclloving are estima'^ed ir.'reases in veek-ly del_veTies required to 
fueer e53cx.t:Lal local neeas for petrclevTc prodact-s. 



£u.-iii?JI_J. '~ §"r.^"'--^ ABsistance 
£.e3ug|!lj/ j:.f Petr cl eua 3'Tcd-uets 



.-■;-■. r'?.e irh Pi oSuct s 

-asolire 
ristillates 
K'eroserie 

iabe Oils %• :„-T'ease5 
Pesiduai F'-iel Oil 



Unit ox 

f''easure 



pali.ons 1 



Ir.crease in 
Weekly Deliveries 



'J'^-^f:-jr'?,3^^'?:. 51^-. .-^^'^^.j- C'Ove rnment ) 



'0'5airTeTroreuin~TiT*T ciai. 



Pet -3, Adjustment of Primary Distributor Delivery Quotas 



To; State Office of the Ercergency Petroleum and Gas Administration 



Shortages in petroleum supplies are being reported by local govern- 
ments in this State. 

You are requested to arrange with primary petroleum distributors to 
increase their delivery quotas to meet certified orders received from 
customers in this State, 

Following is aji estimate of the increased amounts cf petroleum 
products in primary inventories that will be needed to meet essential 
needs in the State. 



Request for Adjustment of Primary Petroleum 
Distributor Delivery Quotas 


The following increases in deliveries from priiiAry distributors are 
requested: 


Localitv 


Gasoline 


Distillates 


Kerosene 


Lube Gils 
ce Greases 


Residual 
I'uel Cils 






















State Petroleum, and Solid Fuels Agency 
Director 



B-VIII-lS 



Pet-6, Estimate of Continuing Petroleum Requirements 

Forms 1 and 2 attached to this emergency action document contain data 
or. quantities of petroleum products that will be require! in this State 
for a 90 -day period. 

The requirements stated include tne quantities of petroleum products 
to be supplied by major petroleum distributors (wholesalers; arid local 
petroleum distributors (jobbers, dealers, and retailers) to fill authorized 
orders of essential users, essentiax facilities, and cor^somers under the 
consumer rationing syteia. 

These requirements do not include qusiritities of petroleum products 
needed by essential facilities such as lai-ge military installations and 
bases and large industrial, facilities that obtain their requirements 
directly fron. primar-y peti'oleu^ distributorso I'nsse latter requirements 
are the responsibility of the EFCA . Procedures for claijis, allocations,, 
aiid supply arrangements are included in the emergency plar..,s of the EPGA. 

The purpose of these State requirements estimates is to ieterTnine and 
anticipate quantities of petroleum products needed from -prxsaaxy sources 
under }-"ederal jurisdiction to resupply secondary distributors under State 
ard local government jurisdiction. 

Since civil defense, military liaison, and other resource agencies are 
Iccatei in the State Emergency Operations Center, these requirements esti- 
-•nates car all be obtained rapidly by informal liaison. 



'eiinitions 



"^"^ivilian Requirements" include tne petroleum products neeaed to carry 
en emergency civil defense cperations, to maintain essential local activities, 
and tc supply individual consumers under the consumer rationing system. 
These civilian requirements estiiria;es are provided by appropriate civil 
defense officials., 

"Resource Support Requirements" include the petroleum products needed 
to maintain operation of essential facilities under the cognizance of 
Federal and State Resource organizations functioning in the State. These 
support resource requirements are provided by appropriate State Resource 

Agencies c 



E-VTlT-19 





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B~VTII~r;3 



Pet-8, Revised State Petroleum Policy 

(Note; The content and sulDstanee of the revised petroleum policy ^ 
will depend on the situation and the supplies expected to he avail- ^^ 
able to meet continuing essential needs, Wecessariiy, this docu- ^F 
ment will not he completed except in a test of the plan or at the 
appropriate point in a po&tattack situation . ) 

This document will he, in essence, a F.evised Pet-l, State Petroleum 
Policy and Guidance^ continued here. 



-B-mi-2k 



Pet"9j Petroleum Industry Supp or t Requirements 



Estimate of Petrole-^x?. Industry Support EeQuireisents 
for 90-uay Period CoMaencing 


Unit of 
Resource Measure 


First 
30 lays 


Pollowing 
60 Days 


Total 
90 Days 


Fie: trie Power 










wa.ter 










• -,c,. trj-rtatio*. 










Solid Fuels 










Gas 










C oirPT-un i cat i or l s 










1 ;..iuot,:-xal Kr-oductior. 










Mar;power 





























































B"VIII-i.5 



Fet°10, Petroleum Industry Construction Requirements 
To; Director, State Construction and Housing Agency 



Following is a list and description of major construction, repair, 
and modification of facilities that will "be required to maintain desired 
production and distribution of petroleum products during the 90-day 
period commencing_ (^date) __- 

Construction Projects 

1. Name, location, type, and size of construction project,- 
start and completion dates ^ 

(if project is underway or a construction contract has been 
prepared, attach a copy of the contract doci.iment and summary 
bill of materials . ) 

2. 

3o 



State Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency 

Director 



B -VIII -26 



Pe t-11. Allocation of Supporting Resources to ?i-lmary Petroleum Industry 

To: Emergency Petroleum and Gas Administration 

Attached is a list and the quantities of supporting resources that 
have been allocated for maintaining essential operations of primary 
petroleum facilities. 

This is furnished as a basis for authorizing these facilities to 
ottain continuing supplies of these resources during the allocation 
period. 

(attach list) 



State Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency 
'Director 



B -VI II -27 



Pet-12^ Authorization to Major Petroleum Distributors to Obtain Supporting Resources 

To ° (Najne and Major Petroleum Distributor) 

You are hereby authorized to obtain the supporting resources in the 
quantities specified in the attached listo 



Resource 


Unit of 
Measure 


First 
30 Days 


Following 
60 Days 


Total 


Electric Power 










Water 










Transportation 










Solid Fuels 










Gas 










Communications 










Manpower 










(Etc.) 


















tm 










1 













In placing orders or in making commitments for contir.. ing supplies of the 
above supporting resources, you are authorized to use the following certification; 



This is an essential order authorized 
by the State Petroleum and Solid Fuels 
Agency Director. 

(signature of Purchaser)" 



State Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency Director 



B-VIII-28 



PETROLEUM REI'''ERENCE DOCUMENT WO. 1 



MOlTIymA. WKOTJiSALE PETROLEUM DEALERS 

(juiffi 1, 196^) 



Najr.e and Address 



Product 



CobDle3tor'.e Garage, Absarckee 
George's Power Service, Absarckee 
Husky Saper Service, Absarckee 
Gtillwater Garage, Box 121, Absarckee 

Reart-at Garage, Box 2375 AJ.berton 

Contixiental Oil Compa.Dy, Alder 
Co-op Supply „ Iiie . , Alder 
Small Service, Alder 

Alsada Garage, Box 52, Alzada. 

Anaconda Service Station. 6OO E. ;^rk 
G:il's Mobil Service, Route 1, Anaconda 
Texaco, Inc., 207 E. Pennsylvania, Anaconda 
Toarist Service Station, 1220 E. Park, Anaconda 
Bert Wise Conoco, 627 E» Park, Anaconda 

Angela Mercantile, Angela 

l'ara;.er& Union Oil Company, Arlee 

B<jb's Service, Box 155? Ashland 
Redhorse Service, Box 107, Ashland 

Continental Oil Company, ho^ Main, Aagusta 
K, J. Cottle, Augusta 

Biorge Oil and Trucking, Box 85, Bainville 
far^ners Oil Compa.ny, Box 97, Bain''n.lle 

Baker Texaco, 51^1 "^■^. Montana Ave., Baker 

Continental Oil Company, Baker 

l-anriers Union Oil Company, Baker 

Mobil Oil Company, Baker 

L» R, Molina & Sons, Box 615, Baker 

Standard Oil Company Bulk: Plant, Box 818, Baker 

California Oil Company, (Box 1931, Billings,) Ballantine 
Continental Oil Coiirpany, Box 112, Ballantine 
J. (■„ Fleming, Ballantine 



Humble 
Unbranded 
Husky 
Mobil 



Conoco 
Co-op 

Mobil 

Sioux 

Humble 

Mobil 

Texaco 

Union 

Conoco 

Standard 

FU 

Enco 
Mobil 

Conoco 
Texaco 

Enco 
Humble 

Texaco 
Conoco 

FU 

Mobil 
Humble 
Standard 

Chevron 
Conoco 



B-\n:ii-29 



Pet. Ref. Doc, No. 1 



Belfry Garage, Box 12, Belfry 
Husky Service, Box 155, Belfry 

Flight Line, Box 97 » Belgrade 
Gallatin Farmers, Belgrade 
Thunem's Husky Service, Belgrade 

Bell Enco, Belt 

Farmers Union Elevator, Box 157, Belt 

General Mills, Inc, Box 222, Belt 

Benc'aland Farmers Co-op, Box 148, Benehland 

Farmers Union Oil Compaiiy, Box 2^6, Big Sandy 
Pratt & Svenn, Inc., Big Sandy 
Sandy Servicenter, Big Sandy 

Farmers 3er-\n.ce A.ssociation, 111 Anderson, Big Timber 

Koraian's Conoco Service, Big Tirtber 

Oie Motor Company, Box 57, Big Timber 

Ozzie's Service Station, Box 895, Big Timber 

&Tna,rt's, Box 6l8, Big Timber 

Standard Oil Company, Box 1T7, Big Timber 

Wa.lton Oil Company, Box 876, Big Timber 

Tlie California Oil Company, 3317 1st Ave. So., Billings 

Continental Oil C<ampany, Billings 

Contract Aviation Utilities, Logan Field, Billings 

Far^uers Union Oil Company, 2921 1st Ave. So., Billings 

GilJIis Aviation, Box 2098, Billings 

Hamble Oil & Refining Co„, Box ?51^, Billings 

Husky Bvn-lk Plant, Box IU62, Billings 

Inter-State-Chevron, Box 565, Billings 

Herb Ley, Box 502, Billings 

Lynch Flying Service, Box 1575, Logan Field, Billings 

Montana Airmotive, Logan Field, Billings 

O'Loiaghlin Oil Company, 2110 1st Ave. No., Billings 

Herb PTopp, 2722 Glenwood Lane, Billings 

Standard Oil Company, I72U Montana Ave., Billings 

Stockton Oil Company, I607 Uth Ave. No., Billings 

The Texas Company, Box 1238, Billings 

Adam Walters Enco Service, 1305 ^th Ave. No., Billings 

Union Oil Co., Harley E. Weydt, 3505 1st Ave. So. Billings 

Farmers Union Oil Company, Bex 15, Bloomfield 

P'ranchi "66" Service, Box 117, Boulder 
Kersey's Texaco Service, Box 8I, Boulder 

Continental Oil Company, Box Elder 
R. R. S'mith, Bex 195, Box Elder 



Humble 
Husky 

Texaco 

Co-op 

Husky 

Enco 

Co-op 

Standard 

Co-op 

Co-op 

Texaco 

Enco 

Co-op 

Conoco 

Texaco 

Frontier 

Mobil 

Standard 

Humble 

Chevron 

Conoco 

Enco 

Co-op 

Texaco 

Humble 

Husky 

Chevron 

Texaco 

Enco 

Texaco 

Standard 

Humble 

Standard 

Phillips 

Texaco 

Enco 

Union 

Co-op 



Phillips 66 
Texaco 

Conoco 
Phillips 66 



66 



B -VIII -30 



Pet. Ref. Doc„ No. 1 

Bair's Track Stop, 815 No, 7th, Bozeman ? 

California Oil Compary, 711 E, Main, Bozeman Chevron 

Continental Oil Company, 3l8 W« Griffin Drive, Bozeman Conoco 

Anthony Degel, 521 So, Grand, Bozeman Enco 

Gallatin Farmers Co,, kll No, 7th, Bozeman Co-op 

Ha-ahle Oil & Refining Co,, RFT #1, Bozeman R-ajritle 

C, E,. Keyes, 228 Sc. V7allace, Bozeman Union Oil 

Pete's Husky Service, 62C West Main, Bozeman Husky 

Standard Oil Company, 7l6 E. Main, Bozerran Standard 

Story Motor Supply, Box 8-~S_^ Texaco, Bozeman Texaco 

3^>ra,n.son's Mobil Station, 201 W, Main, Bozeman Motil 

Treasure State Oil Company, Bex 98, Bozeman Fliillips 66 



Equity Co-operative Association,, Brady 



Co-op 



Continental Oil Co,, Bridger 

Far-mers Union ValJ-ey Co-op j 209 No. Main, Bridger 

Model Garage, Bridger 

Dan's Farm Ser-vrice, Box '+5, Broadviev; 
Farmer-?, Union Oil Company, Box 25, Broadview 
Ray's Husky Ser\ice, Broadview 



Conoco 

Co-op 

Standard 

Texaco 

Co-op 

Husky 



i'ar?iiers Elevator Company, Brockton 



Co-op 



Bi'Ock^'Tary I'lotor Company, Brock"\-vay 
Standard Gil Company, Box 7, Broc'kway 



Enco 
Standard 



C;j.ev-rori vrnolesale, Box I90, Brovming Chevron 

Hoyt's Enco Service, Box 596, Brownirig Enco 

Husky Hi -Power, Inc., Box 158. Browning Husky 

Scotland Oil Company, Box 1;:'6, Browning Texaco 

Butte Aero Sales & Service, Box 30iv3, Butte Standard 
Continental Oil Company, Waite Oil Company 

/\naconda Highway, Butte Conoco 

F-di-mers Union Trading Co., 62U E„ Front St., Butte Co-op 

Leipheim.er Conrpany, 27OO Harrison Ave., Butte Chevron 

Ralph Olsen Oil Co,, 910 So. Montana, Butte Enco 

Standard Oil Company, 100 HollaM, Butte Standard 

Subey Oil Company, 2000 Holmes Avenue, Butte Phillips 66 

The Texas Company, 750 E. Iron St., Butte Texaco 

Union Oil Company, 6IO E. Iron Street, Butte Union Oil 

Vaino Oil Company, 1710 Grand Avenue, Butte Mobil 



Farmers Union Oil Co, , Carter 
Greeley Eleva.tor Co., Carter 

Glenn Bates, Box 262, Cascade 
Mattson Lumber Co., Box 385, Cascade 
Wally Moll, Cascade 
Standard Oil Company, Cascade 



Co-op 
Standard 

Phillips 66 
Conoco 
Enco 
Standard 



G. Vr, Warns ley Cornpany, Charlo 



Mobil 



B-VIII-31 



Continental Oil Co» Box 66, Chester 
Hanson Texaco Bulk Plant, Box 83, Chester 
Nealey's Conoco, Box 2i+8, Chester 
Roosevelt Service Station, Chester 
Standard Oil Company, Chester 

Continental Oil Co , , Chinook 
Farmers Union Oil Co. , Box lif6, Chinook 
Phillips Petroleum Co., Bex 662, Chinook 
Standard Oil Company, Chinnook 

Breen Oil Company, Chateau 

Glen's "66" Bulk Service, Box 219, Choteau 

Husky Hi-Power, Inc., Bhoteau 

Standard Oil Co., Box khh, Chateau 

The Texas Co., Box 87, Choteau 

Circle Husky, Box I36, Circle 

Continental Oil Co., Circle 

Farmers Union Oil Co., Box ''P'', Circle 

Logan Implement Co., Circle 

Peavey Company- Producer Service, Circle 

Sam BroiflTi, Distributor Humble Oil, Circle 

Continental Oil Company, Box 7^, Clyde Park 

Coffe Creek Farmers Union, Inc., Coffee Creek 

Far west Oil Co. , Columbia Falls, Box 569 
Thompson Oil Co., Columbia Falls 

Continental Oil Co., Box 56, Columbus 

Davey Motor Company, kk No. 5th, Columbus 

Fanners Union Trading Co., Box 395, Columbus 

Git's, Pike and Allen, Columbus 

Newman's Enco Service, 6^2 Pike Ave., Columbus 

Standard Oil Co., Box I08, Columbus 

Continental Oil Company, Conrad 
Farmers Supply Co-op, Ccnrad 
James D, Johnston, Box 591? Conrad 
Manning Mclntyre, Box ^27, Conrad 
Robinson's Distributors, Box 13^5, Conrad 
Standard Oil Com.pany, Box 13^1, Conrad 
Twin Service Company, Box 667, Conrad 

Corvallis Garage, Box I56, Corvallis 

Continental Oil Co., Culbertson 
Joe's Husky Service, Box 267, Culbertson 
Oelker's Servicenter, Box 395, Culbertson 
Standard Oil Company, Culbertson 



Conoco 

Texaco 

Conoco 

Phillips 

Standard 

Conoco 
Co-op 
Phillips 
Standard 

Eneo 

Ph-illips 

Husky 

Standard 

Texaco 

Husky 

Conoco 

Co-op 



Humble 



Conoco 



Co-op 



Big West and Shell 
Phillips 

Conoco 

Texaco 

Co-op 

Mobil 

Enco 

Standard 

Conoco 

Co-op 

Phillips 

Texaco 

Humble 

Standard 

Mobil 

Skyline 

Conoco 
Husky 
Enco 
Standard 



B-VIII-32 



Pet. Ref. Doc. No. 1 

Continental Oil Co., Custer Conoco 

Custer Service Station, Bex ikk, Custer Texaco 

Heberle & Sons, Box 38, Custer Standard 

Trail Carter Service, Box 72, Custer Humble 

Brenner Bulk Ser^Aice, Box 813, Cut Bank Thunderbird 

Continental Oil Co., Box 2205, Cut ^nk Conoco 

Bodd's Wholesalers, Box 176, Cut Bank Enco 

Farmers Union Oil Co., E. Railway, Cut Bank Co-op 

H. W. Humble, Box II+I6, Cut Bank Phillips 

Husky Hi-Power, Inc., Cut Bank Husky 

Kroger Flying Ser\-ice, Municipal Airport, Cut Bank Texaco & Union 

Pioneer Distributors, Inco, Box 222, Cut Bank Texaco 

Standard Oil Company, Cut Banlc Standard 

Union Oil Company, Box Jk5, Cut B3.nk Union 76 



Da.gmar Farmers Union Tradlrig Co. , Dagmar 



Co-op 



Danvers Farmers Oil Co. ,DanYers 



Co-op 



Evers Chevron Ser-vice, Darby 
I-ew's Service, Darby 



Chevron 
Husky 



Marvin C, Beck, Deer lodge 

Continental Oil Co., Box 388, Deer lodge 

Enco EuUt Plant, 701 Main Street, Deer Lodge 

Geil 4 McGhee's, Route #1, Deer Txsdge 

R. D. Perry Oil Co., Box ^UO, Deer Lodge 

Standard Gil Co., Box kkQ, Deer Jjodge 



Texaco 
Conoco 

Enco 
Mobil 
Union 76 
Standard 



Continental Oil Co., Denton 
Fanners Cc-opei"ative Elevator Co. 



Box 955, Denton 



Farmers Union Oil Co,, Box 154, Devon 

Gwyn A. Brown, Route #1, Box 175, Dillon 

Clarence J. Ruff, Enco Distr., Box 19I, Dillon 

The California Co., 502 So. Washington St., Dillon 

V. M, Camp, Box 3^8, Dillon 

Carr's Fuel Co., Box 142, Dillon 

Continental Oil Co., Box 285, Dillon 

Farmers Union Trading Co., Dillon 

Standard Oil Co., Box h'J, Dillon 

The Texas Co., Dillon 

Tony's "66" Truck & Car Step, Dillon 



Conoco 
Co-op 

Co-op 

Union Oil 

Enco 

Chevron 

Husky 

Marathon 

Conoco 

Co-op 

Standard 

Texaco 

Phillips 



Equity Co-op Association, Box G, Dodson 
Farmers Mercantile, Dodson 



Texaco 
Co-op 



Bert's Enco Service, Drummond 
Continental Oil Co., Drumiriond 
DruiTanond "66" Service, Drummond 
Durfee Oil Company, Box kkG, Drummond 
Husky Hi -Power, Inc., Box 255, Drummond 
Standard Oil Co., Box 1, Drummond 



Enco 

Conoco 

Phillips 

Mobil 

Husky 

Standard 



66 



B-VIII-33 



Peto Ref„Doc» No, 1 



Dupuyer Service Station, Box ll6, Dupuyer 

Phillips "66", Box 178, Dutton 

T. J. Cheetham & Son, Box k5, Dutton 

Farmers Mercantile Co«, Dutton 

R. E„ Hathaway, Box 96, Edgar 

Continental Oil Co,, Ekalaka 

Fanners Union Oil Co,, Box 337, Ekalaka 

Standard Oil Co,, Ekalaka 

Humble Oil Distributor, Box 398, Ennis 
Phillips 66 I'^oducts, Bex 65, Ennis 

Farmers Union Exchange, Eureka 

K. Gwynn, Box kkl , Eureka 

v.. A, Peltier, Box 25, Eureka 

Dirkes Fnillips 66, Box 176, Fairfield 
Greenfield Farmers Oil Co,, Box 206, Fairfield 
Greenfield Garage, Box 62, Fairfield 

East Fairview Service Station, Fairview 
Farmers Union Trading Co,, Box 392, Fairview 
Standard Oil Company, Fairview 
Westland Oil Company, Fairview 

Farmers Union Oil Co., Box 257, Fallon 
Albert Irion, Fallon 

Fishtail General Store, Fishtail 

Farmers Union Oil Company, Box 1U3, Flaxville 
Leslie's Westland, Service Flaxville 



Humble 

Phillips 

Conoco 

Co-op 

Enco 

Conoco 

Co-op 

Standard 

Humble 
Phillips 66 

Co-op 

Humble 

Union 

Phillips 

Co-op 

Phillips 

Mobil 
Co-op 
Standard 
Westland 

Co-op 
Humble 

Conoco 

Co-op 
Westland 



Eastern Solar Gas, 100 Main, Forsyth 

Farmers Co-op Oil Company, 12U0 Main Street, Forsyth 

Harris Texaco Products, 110 So. 10th, Forsyth 

Humble Oil Distributor, Box 251, Forsyth 

Oil Products, Co,, Box 876, Forsyth 

Standard Oil Company, Forsyth 

Central Service Station, Fort Benton 

Continental Oil Company, Fort Benton 

D - H Service, Box 886, Fort Benton 

Farmers Elevator & Trading Co., Box 137, Fort Benton 

Farmers Union Oil Company, Box 2017, Fort Benton 

Fort Benton Motor Co., Box 566, Fort Benton 

Caldwell's Service, Box kS, Fort Shaw 

Four Buttes Farmers Elevator Co., Four Buttes 



Conoco 

Co-op 

Texaco 

Humble 

Phillips 

Standard 

Phillips 

Conoco 

Humble 

Texaco 

Co-op 

Union 

Phillips 

Texaco 



B-VIII-3^ 



Pet. Ref. Doc. No. 1 

McDonald's Service, Box 36, Frenchtown Husky 

Farmers Union Oil Co., Froid Co-op 

Westland Oil Company, Froid Westland 

Carter Oil Bulk Plant, Box 1^7, Fromberg Humble 

Standard Oil Co., Fromberg Standard 

Galata Co-op. Box II6, Galata Co-op 

Continental Oil Company, Box 257, Gardiner Conoco 

Hansen Standard Service, Box 298, Gardiner Standard 

Shorten' s Enco, Box 328, Gardiner Enco 

Atchison Oil Company, Box 2^2, Geraldine Texaco 

Continental Oil Co., Geraldine Conoco 

Equity Co-op Association, Box 58, Geraldine Co-op 

Robert F. Spencer, Box 122, Geraldine Enco 

Farmers Union Oil Co., Geyser Co-op 

Rex Garage, Geyser ? 

Gildford Farmers Union Co-op, Gildford Co-op 

American Oil Company, Box 207, Glasgow Standard 

Brayko's 76 Service, First Ave., No., Glasgow Union 76 

Chevron Service, Box 367, Glasgow Chevron 

Continental Oil Co., 3l6 First Ave. So., Glasgow Conoco 

Fairground Carter Service, Hiway 2 & 5th Ave., Glasgow Humble 

Farmers Union Oil Co., 3^1 First Ave. No., Glasgow Co-op 

Jim's Husky Super Stop, 320 1st Ave. Wo., Glasgow Husky 

King Spring Service, No. Star Route, Glasgow Westland 

Markle's Oil Company, 236 First Ave. So., Glasgow Texaco 

Peavey Company- Producer Service, Glasgow ? 

Phillips Petroleum Bulk; Station, Box 87, Glasgow Phillips 

Standard Oil Company, Box 6OI, Glasgov; Standard 

Westland Oil Company, Glasgow Westland 

Wokal Flying Service, Box U68, Glasgow Texaco 

American Oil Company, E. Allard, Glendive Standard 

California Oil Company, Glendive Chevron 

Carter Bulk Plant, Allard St., Glendive Humble 

Cenex Pipeline Company, Box 2U0, Glendive ? 

Continental Oil Company, Box 787, Glendive Conoco 

Farmers Union Oil Co., Box 1267, Glendive Co-op 

Glendive Flying Service, Box 9U7, Glendive Standard 

Mortinson Texaco, Inc., Box 889, Glendive Texaco 

R. L, Robins, Box 35I, Glendive Mobil 

Tetrolite Company, Box 1002, Glendive ? 

Williamson Oil Company, 115 Cooke St,, Glendive Phillips 

Newberg Motor Company, Box ?6, Grass Range Rexaco 



B-^/III-35 



Pet. Ref. Doc. No, 1 

Oliver W. Arlington, 208 1st Ave, S<,W,, Gt. Falls Chevron 

Callaway Oil Company, 326 2nd Ave, No., Gt, Falls Phillips 

Continental Oil Co., Terminal, Box 1251, Gt, Galls Conoco 

Continental Oil Co,, 800 2nd St,, Gt. Falls Conoco 

Durkin Oil Company, 622 wnd 8t. So., Great Falls Big West 

Farmers Union Oil Co., HOC Smelter Ave, Great Falls Co-op 

Charles E, Fellows, Box I63I, Great Falls Union 

The Texas Co., Box I585, Great Falls Texaco 

Kernaghan's Service, Box 1711, Great Falls Phillips 

Northern Aviation Co,, Box 2k6k^ Great Falls Union 

Odegard Brothers, i+27 Central Ave. W. , Great Falls Phillips 

Ojala Oil Company, 111 First St, S.W., Great Falls Mobil 

Phillips Bulk Plant, Box 1239, Great Falls Phillips 
Herb Rast, Husky Distr., 327 lOth Ave. So., Great Falls Husky 

Roseth Brothers, 900 9th St. No,, Great Falls Enco 

Save Ur Self Service, Box 2353, Great Falls ? 

Sever son Air Activities, Inc, Box I82I, Great Falls Texaco 

Skyway Flying Service, Box 1866, Great Falls Standard 

Standard Oil Div. , Box I608, Great Falls Standard 



Farmers Union Oil Co,, Box 66, Hall 



Co-op 



Bell McCall Co., Box 353, Hamilton Phillips 

Chuck Bohac Mobil Service, lUO No. 1st St., Hamilton Mobil 

Chuck's Oil Co,, 310 Soo 1st St., Hamilton Chevron 

Continental Oil Co,, 400 No. 1st St,, Hamilton Conoco 

Davidson's Service, UlO So. 1st St., Hamilton Enco 

Grube Oil Co,, Hamilton Husky 

Lagerquist Fuel Service, Box II+6, Hamilton Union 

Rocky Mountain Ass' n, , Hamilton Texaco 

Stewart Oil COo, 333 So, 1st St., Hamilton Standard 

Fred Van's Oil Co,, 376 So. 1st St., Hamilton Union 

Boles Flying Service, Hardin Texaco 

Brown's Oil & Gas, Railroad St., Hardin Mobil 

California Oil Co., Hardin Chevron 

Continental Oil Co., Hardin Conoco 

Farmers Union Association, Railroad St., Hardin Co-op 

Foley Brothers, Box U57, YRS,, Hardin ? 

Fox Oil Company, Drawer 607, Hardin Enco 

Mac Oil, Inc., Box 395, Hardin Texaco 

Standard Oil Company, 703 1st St, So., Hardin Standard 

Equity Co-op Association, Harlem Farmers Union 

O'Leary's Service Station, Box U86, Harlem Chevron 

Tubb's Oil Compare, 221 Central Ave. E. , Harlem Texaco 

Bob's Husky, Box i+8^, Harlowton Husky 

Continental Oil Co,, Box 102i<-, Harlowton Conoco 

Holmes Service, Box 276, Harlowton Chevron 

Johnson Oil Co., Box 1521, Harloii-rton Phillips 

Leary's Carter Service, Box 15*43, Harlowton Humble 

Standard Oil Company, Ha.rlowton Standard 

Union Oil Com.pany, Box 53^^, Harlowton Union 

Wheatland Texaco Service, 131 2nd St, N,E,, Harlowton Texaco 



B -VIII -36 



Pet. Ref» Doco No. 1 



Don's Self Service, ^01 Wo First Sto, Havre 

Farmers Union Oil Co«, Box 912, Havre 

Heltne Oil Co., ihO First ft,,, Havre 

Northern Tire Co„, 2 2nd Sto, Havre 

E. A. Fehlke, Box IOU9, Havre 

Standard Oil Company, Havre 

Stromberg's Husky, 8II First St., Havre 

The Texas Co., Box 228, Havre 

Union Oil Company, 260 W„ First, Havre 

Phillips 66 Distributor, iSoU Columbia, Helena 

Continental Oil Terminal, Canyon Ferry Route, Helena 

Eck Oil Company, 620 Wo. Main, Helena 

VJayne Hicks, IO30 Butte Ave,,, Helena 

James F» Higgius, Box 787 •. Helena 

Humble Oil & Refining Co,, Box 1151, Helena 

George I'IcGaffick Wholesale, Box II6I, Helena 

C. E, McPherson, Box 2kk, Helena 

Morrison P'lying Service, Airport, Helena 

Neill Avenue Tire Co., 3^ Neill Ave,, Helena 

Standard Oil Company, I516 Montana Ave-, Helena 

Top Brands Oil Company, Box I76, Helena 

Farmers Union G , T , A . , Hi ghwc od 
Husky Hi-Power, Inc., Highv/ood 

Hingham. Motors, InCo, Hinghatr! 
I.dpp Motors, Hingham 

Fa:rmers Union Oil & Supply Co., Box 66, Hinsdale 
La.cock Fuel Service, Box 23'(-, Hinsdale 
McElvain Oil Company, Hinsdale 

Continental Cil Company, H-vbEon 
Hob.son Equipment Co., Box 69I, Hobson 

Equity Co-op Ass'n., Hogeland 

Farmers Elevator Co. , Box ^8, Home,'^>tead 
Victoria Eleva.tor Co,,, Homestead 

Continental Oil Co., Hot Springs 

Victor Holmberg Oil Co., Box R., Hot Springs 

"Y'' Chevron Service, Box 3'?, Hot Springs 

Trail Garage, Hunt.ly 

Continental Oil Co., Hysham 

Farm.ers Union Oil Co., Box 257, Hysham 

Zent Hardware Co., Hysham 

Continental Oil Co., Box 3.86, Inverness 



Thunderbird 

Co-op 

Humble 

Chevron 

Conoco 

Standard 

Husky 

Texaco 

Union 

Phillips 

Conoco 

Mobil 

Humble 

Union 

Humble 

Husky 

Texaco 

Texaco 

Chevron 

Standard 

Big West 

Co-op 
Husky 

Phillips 
Mobil 

Co-op 
Jet Fuel 
Phillips 

Conoco 
Enco 

Co-op 

Conoco 

Enco 

Chevron 

Conoco 

Conoco 

Co-op 

Standard 

Conoco 



B-ViII~37 



Pet, Ref, Doc. Wo, 1 

Wallace W. Blain, Joliet Independent 

Spaulding Carter Service, Box 13, Joliet Humble 

Continental Oil Co„, Box 2l8, Joplin Conoco 

Farmers Union Oil Co,, Box 2l6, Jcplin Co-op 

Continental Oil Co,, Jordan Conoco 

Courthouse Servicenter, Box 215, Jordan Eneo 

Farmers Union Oil Co,, Jordan Co-op 

Pioneer Garage, Jordan Texaco 

Standard Oil Company, Jordan Standard 

Judi.th Gap Oil Co., Box 286, Judith Gap Standard 

Songer's Carter Service, Judith Gap Humble 

City Service Co., 1st Ave. N. W. , Kalispell Texaco 

Continental Oil Co,, Kalispell Conoco 

Equity Supply Co., 150 1st Aveo,E.N., Kalispell ? 

Evergreen Fuel Co., Box 213, Kalispell ? 
Farmers Union Exchange, Uth Ave, ¥N & P. R.St., Kalispell Co-op 

Flathead Fuel Service, Route h, Kalispell Thunderbird 

Husky Oil Company, Box I98, Kalispell Husky 

T. Jo Landiy Oil Co„ Inc., Box 595, Kalispell Enco 

Smithson Oil Company, Box lOU, Kalispell Chevron 

Standard Oil Company, Box U13, Kalispell Che^rron 

Thompson Oil Co., 722 7th Ave. E., Kalispell Phillips 

Valley Oil & Service, Box 589, Kalispell Mobil 

Wamsley Union Service, Box U21, Kalispell Union 

Big West Oil Company, Kevin Big West 

FaiTO Supply Co-op, Box 38U, Kinsey Co-op 

Farmers Union Oil Co., Box 9k, Kremlin Co-op 

Farmers Union, Grain Co., Lambert Co-op 

Dave's Mobil Service, UlO W. Main, laurel Mobil 
Farmers Union Central Exchange, (Box 126, Billings) Laurel Co-op 

Laurel. Co-op Association, 8OO E. Main, Laurel Co-op 

Laurel Servicenter, 201 W. Main, laurel Enco 

Standard Oil Co„, Box 125, Laurel Standard 

Continental Oil Co., Laurin Conoco 

Eraser's Service Center, Box 217, Lavina Enco 

Bloom Oil Company, 700 First Ave. N. , Lewistown Humble 

California Oil Company, klh First Ave, W., Lewistown Chevron 

Central Air Service, Box 895, Lewistown Texaco 

Cooper Oil Co., Box hG^, lewistown ? 
Farmers Co-op Oil Company, 6II First Ave, S., Lewistown Co-op 
Farmers Union Oil Company, 207 First Ave. S., Lewistown Co-op 

Fries Oil Co., 6^2 Wo Main, Lewistown Mobil 



■B-vin- 38 



Pet. Ref. Doc, 



Husky Bulk Plant, IP.lU vh Washington, lewistown 
I.'swistown Tire Co.,^08 First Ave. N. , Lewistown 
■C'on A. Rindal, Box 50k, Lewistown 
Smith Oil Company, Box 32C, Lewistovn 
Standard Oil Co., 601 First Aveo W., Lewistown 
Texaco Balit Plant, 6lG First Ave, N. , lewistown 

City Service Co., Box 7^6, Libby 

Continental Oil Co., Box 96, Libby 

Husky Oil CoiTipany, Box 157, Libby 

Reed & Coup, 820 Minei'al, Libby 

Robert T. Roberts, Box 516, Libby 

Save -Rite 5 Hlway 2, Idbby 

Smart Oil Co<,, 103 W. Lincoln Blvd., Libby 

Spencer's '"66" Service, 9':n and California, Libby 

S-csr.dard Oil Company, Box 86, Libby 

L, Do Wi]Jlia!Ttson, Box U25, Idbby 

Ralph B. Stosich, Box 1357s Lir.ia 

Lincana Enco Truck Stop, Box 15'^, Lincoln 
Linccl.i Truck Stop, Box 287, Lincoln 
McClure's Texaco, Box 78, Lincoln 
Fat's Standard Service, Box V'h, Lincoln 

FaiT.'ier.- Union Oil Co., Box C, Lindaay 

TC'.e California Company, 621 E. Park, Livingston 
Continental Oil Company, Park & 6th, Livingston 
Farners Service Co-op, 301 S. Main, Livingston 
Curtiss Arthun, 2nd and Lewis, J-"dvingr.ton 
Livingston Oil Co., 813 E. Park St., Livingston 
McCaTnbell's Union Oil, 608 E. Callender, Livingston 
Ralph E. Moore, Box 98O, Livingston 
Standard Oil Company, 725 W. Callender, Livingston 
Treasure State Oil Company, 3C5 W. Park, Livingston 

Farmers Union Oil Co,, Lcdg3 Grass 
Standard Oil Company, I^t^dge Grass 

Greely Elevator Co., (Ford BTidgo, Gt. Falls) Loma 

Tra.ctor Oil Corfipany, Loring 

Zerbe Brothers Co., Lustre 

Feavey Company-l'roducer Service, Macon 

American Oil Co., Malta 
Beyer's Husky Service, Malta 
Clausen vVholesale, Malta 
Continental Oil Co, - Malta. 
i:quity Co-op Ass'n., Box 577; Malta 



Husky 

Conoco 

Phillips 

Union 

Standard 

Texaco 

Texaco 
Conoco 

Husky 

Enco 

Union 

Big West 

Mobil 

PIriillips 

Standard 

ChevTon 

Humble 

Enco 
•? 

Texaco 
Standard 

Co-op 

Chevron 

Conoco 

Co-op 

Humble 

Mobil 

Union 

Texaco 

Standard 

Phillips 

Co-op 
Standard 



Texaco 
Unbranded 



Standard 

Husky 
Enco 
Conoco 
Farmers Union 



B-VIII-39 



Pet., Ref. Doco Nc„ 1 



Malta Auto COo, Box Q,.. Malta 
Mendel Flying Service, Malta 

Amsterdam Garage, Routs 1, Man>vattan 

Fonk Conoco, Maxiiiattan 

Stoner's Eneo Service, Box 2:j6, Manhattan 

Haugan Brothers Garage,. Box I65, Martiasdale 
J & S Repair Shop, B^ox B, J4arti.nsdale 

Farmers Union Oil Co., McCabe 

Medicine Ia.ke Oil Co., Medicine I^ake, Box 28? 

Diamond Mo Ser^dce, Meistone 
Jake's Garage, Box 226, Meistone 

Melville Store, Melville 

B„ D, Shipley, Beacon Carter Service, Box 5^0, Miles City 
California Companj-, 1101 Main Street, Miles City 
Continental Oil Co., 5th 3t„ & Valw. Tracks, Miles City 
John M, Etchefnendy, Box 35, Miles City 
Farmers Union Co-op, Box 7163 Miles City 
Hicks and Jones, 620 K. 7th Street, Miles City 
Jack's Husky Super Stop, Box 308, Miles City 
Ray Jerrel, 300 H. Strevell, Miles City 
Miles City Aero Service, Box 656, Miles City 
Pennant Oil Company, 121:? Ivy Street, Miles City 
Standard Oil Co,, Box 301, Miles City 

Mill Iron Service Station, Mill Iron 



Texaco 
Texaco 

Conoco 
Conoco 
Enco 

Standard 

Enco 

co-op 
Conoco 

Conoco 

HaiT.ble 

Tenneco Oil 

Haiable 

Chevron 

Conoco 

Texaco 

Co-op 

Mcbil 

Husky 

Union 

Standard 

Fnillips 

Standard 

Humble 



California Oil Co., Box 1193, Missoula Chevron 

Continental Oil Co., Box 1504, Missoula Conoco 

Continental Oil Co,, Route 2, Raser Drive, Missoula Conoco 

Ellinghouse & Laing, Inc, Box 1322, Missoula Spur 

The Finest Oil Company, 1000 E, Broadway, Missoula Union 

Humble Oil & Refining Co,, Box li|82, Missoula H'amhle 

Husky Hi-?ower, Inc., 1002 E, Broadway, Missoula Husky 

Johnson Flying Service, Airport, Missoala Texaco 

Missoula Aerial Service, Sky Flite, Airport, Missoula Texaco 

Phillips Distributor, 1101 S, 6th West, Missoula Phillips 

Standard Oil Co,, IO30 E. Broadway, Missoula Standard 

The Texas Company, ^35 S. Hh St. E,, Missoula Texaco 
Time Chemical, M issouia, 521 Dahlia St ,, Commerce City, Colo. ? 

Tremper's Inc, Route 2, Raser Drive >, Missoula Conoco 

Westslde Distributors, 92U Phillips St,, Missoala Enco 

Western Montana Co-op, 400 West Main, Missoula Co-op 

Augie, Zadra, Mobil Distro,, 955 Beech, Missoula Mobil 

Molt Farmers Elevator Co,,, Box 71, Molt Co-op 

Slaven's Lumber & Mercantile Co,, Molt Enco 



:il-kQ 



Pet. Ref. Doc. No, 1 



Central Service Station, Moore 
Moore Farmers Oil Co., Moore 

Jet Fuel Refinery, Mosby, (Box 700, Billings) 

Continer.tal Oil Company, Musselshell 

Famiers Union Oil Co., Box 68, Nashua 
rfegis.-.a Concco 3er\'lce, Box 213, Nashua 
Peavey Corapany Producer Service, Nashua 

McL€od Mercantile, Norris 

F3,iiriers Union Oil Co., Box 420, Cpheim 
Westland Oil Co., Ct^heiri- 

Farraers Oil Company, Outlook 
OufJ.cok Garage, Box 155, Outlook 

Farmers. Unior^ Oil Co., '.jr<rs.nio 

Stanley Eiseman, r>ox 126, Park City 
Seobty's Service, lOU N. Clark, Park City 

Farifiers U.nicn Oil Co., Peerless 

Fanners union Oil & chipping Ass'n,, Pendroy 

Contir-ental Oil Co., Pnilipsburg 
Fnilipsburg Service, Box 126, Philipsburg 
Winninghoff M otors, Philipsburg 

The California Company, Plains 
Continental Oil Company, Plains 
The Texas Company, Box 115, Plains 
Union Jo Listribator, Box 2l8, Plains 

Continental Oil Company, Plentyvood 

Farmers Union Oil Co., 301 w. 1st Ave., Plentywood 

Floyd Marsh, PLenty\-/ood 

Mike's Enco, Flentyvood 

Peavey Compa/ny- Producer Service, Plentywood 

Standard Oil Co., PlentyiTOOd 

WesT^'J and Oil Co., Plentywood 

Carle Kepperle, Box D,, Plevna 
P. 8i P. Service, Plein-ia 

Carl's Union bervice. Box 9^*, Poison 

lie jean Coons, Poison 

Newgard Oil Couipan^f, Box 32:i, Poison 

Poison Svervice Co., Box 72, Poison 

Standard Oil Co., Box 76U, Poison 

Tower & Robinson, Poison 

Clinton P. White, Box 1106, Poison 



Husky 
Co-op 



Conoco 

Co-op 
Conoco 



Co-op 
Westland 

Co-op 
Union 

Co-op 



Co-op 
Co-op 

Conoco 

Horable 
Union 

Chevron 
Conoco 
Texaco 
Union 

Conoco 
Co-op 
Union 76 
Enco 

Standard 
Westland 

Standard 
Husky 

Union 

Mobil 

Phillips 

Concco 

Standard 

Chevi-cn 

Hunible 



B-nil-i^l 



Pet, Refo Doc„ No. 1 



Continental Oil Co,, Poplar 
Farmers Union Grain Co,, Box I58, Poplar 
Fort Peck Service, Box 6O5, Poplar 
Husky Hi-Power, Inc., Box 506, Poplar 
West land Oil Co., Poplar 

Powers Fanners Elevator Co„, Power 

Pryor Garage, Box 31, Prycr 

Farmers Union Oil Co., Rapslje 
Harts, Inc., Box Hh, Rapelje 
Standard Oil Co., Rapelje 

Continental Oil Co., Ravalli 
Standard Oil Company, Box 40, Ravalli 

Michel s Garage, Raynesford 
Visocon Oil Company, Raynesford 

Bearx-ooth Services, Red Lodge 

Bud's Chevron, Box 606, Red Lodge 

Continental Oil Co., Red lodge 

Mountain View Station, Box 86, Red Lodge 

Red Lodge Enco, 119 S. Broadway, Red Lodge 

Standard Oil Co., Red Lodge 

Harley VIeydt, Box III6, Red lodge 

Ao D. Whitcomb Oil Co., Red Lodge 

Westland Oil Co., Redstone 

Dunce's Husky Service, Reed Point 

Community Oil Company, Reserve 

Farmers Union Co-op Oil Co., Box 17, Richey 
George & Stan's Service, Box 36, Richey 
Peavey Company- Producer Service, Richey 
Standard Oil Company, Richey 

Farmers Union Oil Company, Richland 

Shuyler Garage, Ringling 

Continental Oil Co., Roberts 
Laurel Co-operative Ass'n,, Roberts 
Robert Mo Paugh, Roberts 

Continental Oil Co., Ronan 

Co-op Supply of Lake County, Inc., Ronan, Box 266 
Moody's Husky Service, Main and 23rd, Ronan 
The Texas Company, Box 657? Ronan 



Conoco 
Co-op 

Enco 

Husky 

Westland 

Co-op 

Enco 



Co-op 

? 

Standard 



Conoco 
Standard 

Conoco 
Phillips 

Texaco 
Chevron 
Conoco 
Phillips 

Enco 
Standard 
Union 
Mobil 

Westland 

Husky 

Westland 

Co-op 
Texaco 

Standard 

Co-op 

Phillips 

Conoco 

Co-op 

Enco 

Conoco 
co-op 
Husky 
Texaco 



ii-nii-k2 



Pet. Ref. Doc. No, 1 



Continental Oil Company, Box 206, Roundup 
Distributor of Enco Products, Railroad Ave., Roundup 
Farmers Union Oil Co., 101 2nd St, E., Roundup 
Pioneer Security Inc., Box 368, Roundup 
Standard Cil Co., Box 2k'^, Roundup 

The California Co., Box 2l6, Roy 
Farmers Union Oil Co., Box 276, Roy 

Fanners Union Oil COo , Rudyard 
Lynch Tire Inc, Rudyard 
Wehr Auto Supply, Rudyard 

Clark Luiriter Co., Ryegate 

Farmers Ur.ion Oil Co., Box ^21, Ryegate 

liim'.ble Cil Company, Saco 
Saco Texaco Service, Saco 



Conoco 

Enco 

Co-op 

Texaco 

Standard 

Chevron 
Co-op 

Co-op 
Enco 



Encc 
Co-op 



Humble 
Texaco 



Hair.els Service, 3t. Ignatij.s Enco 

Miller Brotners, Box 136, St. Regis Texaco 

?, Ac Koovestal, Sanders Enco 

Dutron Encerprises, Sand Springs Mobil 

Eattlesori & Co., Box 277, Scobey Standard 

Continental Cil Co., Scobsy Conoco 

Grain Growers Oil Co., Box 3?, Scobey Co-op 

Juel's Service, B-dx 78U, Scobey Frontier 

Ron's Carter Servicenter, Box i+23, Scobey Humble 

VJestland Oil Conipany, Scobey Westland 

Victoria Elevt'.tor Co., Box 39^-.' Scobey M obil 

The California Co., Shelby Chevron 

Co'-van's Husky Service, Box 306, Shelby Husky 

Hannah - Porter Co., Box 378, Shelby Border Maid 

Husky Hi-Power Inc., Shelby Husky 

Standard Oil Company, Shelby Standard 

Ben Taylor, Box 810, Shelby Humble 

The Texas Company, Box 623, Shelby Texaco 

Union Oil Co. of California, Box 6kk, Shelby Union 

Vibo Oil Company, hyO Main Street, Shelby Mobil 

Sairi Guniock, Shepherd Comet 

Standard Oil Comjjany, Sheridan Standard 

Trie Texaco Station, Box 398, Sheridan Texaco 

California Oil Co., 323 S. Central Ave., Sidney Chevron 

Continental Gil Compariy, Box 111, Sidney Conoco 

D. & S. Tire & Oil Co., Box 666, Sidney Humble 

Farm.ers Union C)il Company, 303 Central Ave., Sidney Co-op 



B-VIII-U3 



Peto Ref. Doco No. 1 



Sani.'s Union BuIJ?:, 706 S, Central Avs„, Sidney 
Sidney Oil Co,, 4.35 2nd St„ No W., Sidney 
Standard Oil Co,, 901 3rd N„ Eo, Sidney 
Thogersen Motors, Box 873, Sidney 
Yoder Motor Company, 201 ,E. Main, Sidney 

Anderson & Moore Service, Box 137, S±m!,.s 
Flemings Service, Box 1^7, Simms 

Sliters, Box 2*^-8, Somers 

Continental Oil Co,, Stanford 

Farmers Union Grain Termirial Ass'n.,, Stanford 

Standard Gil Co, , Stanford 

Union Gil Bulk Plant, Box 461, Stanford 

Bell McCall Co., Box 366, StevensviLle 
Carl's Oil Station, Box 336, Stevensville 
Continental Oil Co , , Stevensvi."ll.e 
Farmers Exchange, Box 338, StevensviLle 

Klasner's Oil Co., Box "k", Stockett 

Farmers Co-op Oil Co., Box 37, Sunbiorst 
The Texas Company, Box 8, Sunburst 

Farmers Union Oil Co., Sun River 
Sun River Service, Box k3, San River 

Continental Oil Co., Superior 

Standard Oil Company, Bex 5l8, Superior 

Humble Oil Supplier, Box t>9''-j Terry 
Continental Oil Co., Box 368, Terry 
Farmers Union Trading Co,, Terry 
Standard Oil Company, Box 363, Terry 

Butte Service, Inc., Box 338, Thompson Falls 
Continental Oil Co., Box 576, Thompson Falls 
Motors Garage, Box 566, Ttiompson Falls 
Standard Oil Co., Box 214-6, Thompson Falls 
Sund Petroleum, Box 6, Thompson Falls 

American Oil Company, Three Forks 
Gallatin Farmers Company, Three Forks 
Lone Star Texaco, Box 6it^7, Three Forks 
George Mcl'hail, Box 101, Tiiree Forks 
Speedy 's Husky, Box 186, Three Forks 

Co-op Supply Inc., Box kk'T^^ Tcwnsend 
Huskj^- Hi -Power, Inc., Box 490, Townsend 
Poe's Enco Service, Townsend 
Standard Oil Co , , Townsend 
Townsend "66" Service, Townsend 
Ward Motors, Inc., Tovmsend 



Union 
West land 
Standard 
Husky 
Texaco 

Husky 

Major Brands 

Humble 

Conoco 

Co=op 

Standard 

Urdon 

Phillips 
Eneo 
Conoco 
Co-op 

Texaco 

Co-op 
Texaco 

Co-op 
Enco 

Conoco 
Standard 

Humble 
Conoco 
Co-op 
Standard 

Husky 
Conoco 

Enco 

Standard 

Phillips 

Standard 

Co-op 

Texaco 

? 

Husky 

Co-op 

Husky 

Enco 

Standard 

Phillips 

Conoco 



B-nu-hk 



Pet, Ref. Doc. No„ 1 



Husky Hi- Pover, Inc, Troy 

Suaset Texaco, Troy 

Troy 5averite, Bex K, Troy 

Equity Co-op .Asscc.i,at,ion, Inc., Turner 

Easoio Service., iwin Bridges 
Cori.tir.en~al Oil Compare, T-./in Bridges 
Union Oil Company, Box 333, Tvin Bridges 

Equity Co-op Associarion, Ulfii 

Cargiil Ir.c, Box 'i':5. Valier 
Ccntinsnta.! 01 .j Coo.- Vaiier 
Farrriers Qnion Oil Cn„, Bex 36, Valier 
Hujnble Oil Coirpi.ny, Vaiier 

D, J, Cur:^iTigh?jr,_, Bex Uy^, Victor 

Peek S'irtfice Station, vida 
Vida OlJ. Co!r.pany.., ViJs. 

Firxers Grain & Ti-adirg Coc;, Bex I38, Westby 

The California Co,. Wesi: li'sllcw-toire 
Big r.ky /."'•'iatior. Inc , ^ vMest Yeliovetone 

(HIP, Hi:' 7., Box ^196, Idalr.o Fails, Idaho) 
Joe E, Eagle, West Ye31ov;stone 
EncG Distributor, Box 3C6, We^t Yellovstone 
Farsei's Service, Box 3i5> V-^est Yellcwstone 
Phillips Petroieu:/.. Co.,, Box 2'>k, West Yellowstone 
Walter Stuart, Box 3-1 3.. West Yellovstone 
WLitrr.ar; Conoco Senrice, Box .19-'j West Yellowstone 
Wilscr. Service Staticr,. Box 370, West Yellowstone 



HusKy 

Texaco 

Thunderbird 

Farirers Union 

Texaco 
Conoco 
Union 

Fanners Union 

Mobil 
Conoco 
Co-op 
H'Uirible 



Petrofuels 

Mobil 

Mobil 
Chevron 



Chevron 

Enco 

Bay 

Phillips 

Texaco 

Conoco 

Union 



Continental Oil Compary, Whi-uefish 

Joe Jingie's Hus^^y Oil, 2nd a.nd Spokane, Whitefish 

Stacey Oil Coii'pany, <h3 Spokane, Wnitefish 

The Texas Company;, Box U36, Whitefish 

Brun'f: Service Garage. Box 518, Whitehall 

l-anriers Unior. Trading Coirpa.ny, Whitehall 

Dennis C-raunian, Wrdtehall 

Heinzmann's Chevron, Box '.^^S, '/Whitehall 

Lepp's Big Garage, Wn.iter:.all 

Rice Service Station, Box 566, Wnitehall 

Standard Cil CoTripany. Whitehall 



Lonoco 

Husky 

Enco 

Texaco 

Union 

Co-op 

Texaco 

Chevron 

Conoco 

Humble 

Standard 



Berg Gai-age Inc„, Box V70, if/iiite Salph'ur- Springs Standard 

Castle Enco Service, Bex K, W^rdte Sulph'or Springs Enco 
Continental Oil Company, Curry Motors, White Sulphur Springs Conoco 
SKerritt Oil Company, Wnite Sulphur Spririgs Fnillips 

Joe Walsh's Texaco Staricn, Bex 171, Wnite Sulphur Springs Texaco 



B -7111 -45 



Pet. Ref, Dcco No. 1 



Westland Oil Company, Whitetail 

Farmers Union Oil Company, Whitefrrater 

Continental Gil Company, Box 96, Wibaux 
Wibaux Co-op Oil Company, Box 67, Wibaux 

Park Farmers Co-op, Wilsall 
Wilsall Texaco Service, Wilsall 

Farmers Co-op Oil Company, Box 12? 3 Windham 

Fred D. Crow, Winifred 

Standard Gil Ci-jmpany, Winifred 

Winifred Farmers Oil Co., Box 783, Winifred 

The California Company, Winnett 
Continental Oil Company, Winnett 
Jadie Berg Carter Service, Box I3I, Winnett 
Winnett Motors, Box .I96, Wi.nnett 

Helming Brothers Cor-p., Box 312, Wisdom 
McKevitt Conoco, Wisdom 

Roeder Texaco, Box 9^5 Wolf Creek 

American Oil COo, Box 27, Wolf Point 

Continental Oil Co., Wolf xoint 

Danrjj-'s Truck Stop, Scobey Route, Wolf Point 

Eqaity Gil Co-op Association., Box 366, Wolf Point 

Farmers Union Oil Comparjy, 501 W. Main, Wolf Point 

Norv's BiiLk Deliveries, Box 509s Wolf Point 

Peavey COo Producer Service, Wolf Point 

Schutt Truck Line, Box 3^5, Wolf Point (closed at present 

Tesoro Petroleum COo, Wolf Point 

Texaco Inc „ , Wolf Point 

Westland Oil Company, Wolf Point 

Farmers Union Oil Company, Worden 
Standard Oil Company, Worden 



Westland 

Co-op 

Conoco 
Co-op 

Co-op 
Texa,co 

Co-op 

Mobil 
Standard 

Farmers Union 

Chevron 
Conoco 

H'omble 
Jet Fuel 

Texaco 
Conoco 

Texaco 

Standard 
Conoco 

9 

Union 
Co-op 
Texaco 
•? 

)' 

Unbranded 
Texaco 

Westland 

Co-op 
Standard 



B-VIII-46 



PETROLEUM RE-PSRENCE DOCIMEL^T N0„ 2 

PIFEIOTE CAPACITIES 
TELLOWSTONE FIPZLIIvrt CORPANY SYSTEM 

Ten inch refined prodacti Iiine from Billings, Montana, •■;o fne Montana/ldaho 
border at Lockout Pats; 

capacity of line.,,.. 229, 07^ bbls. 

Six inch refined prodacts line from Helei'a tenrinal to Great Falls Air Base: 

capacity of line,oo<, l6,U00 bbls. 

Eight inch refined prod act? line from Billings, Montaria, south to the 
Wyoming State line en rc;ite tc Casper:- 

capacity of line„„oo 25, 5&^ bbls. 

Six inch refined product? Ixn- fro.T, Billings, Mcntaaa, so'Ath tc the 
Wyoming State line en route to Cody:, 

capacity of line,.«. iU,000 bbls 

The Yellowstone Ixoducts Pipeline is used to transpcrx all types of refined 
prod'Jct,5, najnely, premi'm and regular gasolines, diesel oil, stove oil, jet 
fuel, heavy industriaZ fuej and white gasoline. 

Storage capacities a.t pipeline tei'rr.inals are s'howi'i on the refineries and 
pipeline terrra'n.al sheet.. 

gene:"; pipeline cot/cpaity refined products 

Eight inch refined products line fron la'orel, Montana, to the Mo:ntana/ North 
Dakota border via GleT:dive and ;3idney; 

capacity of line.o.. 100,500 bbls. 

Terminal storage at Glendive, Montana, served by Cenex products line: 

Humble Oil Co:!npany - 80,000 bbls. gasoline 

i+5,000 bbls. distilate 

Farmers Union Central Exchange - 50,000 bbls, gasoline, regular 

10,000 bbls, gasoline, premium 
62,500 bbls. diesel 

Terminal storage at Sidney^ Montana, served by Cenex prodacts line: 

Farmers Union Central flKcharige - 50,000 bbls. jet fuel 



B- '7111-47 





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B=VIII-*^S 



Pet. Ref, Doc„ Nc, 2 



^) 



YEI.I/3V^ST0M: PIPE LINE COMPAM' SYSTEM 

REFIM'.BIES AND PIPE LINE TERMINAlv-. 

T."M: MU^TBEPt, NOMTML SIZE, AJMD PEGLUCT GRADE 



Tank 

Nc 



Nominal 

Size 
(Barrels) 



Grade 



Tank 



Noffiinal 

Size 
(Barrels) 



Grade 



GREAT P'ALTiS I'ETO^INAL - 
CvONTINENTAl 



HEIENA TEPI^.INAI - CONTINENTAL 



90 


60,00c 


B 


30 


20,000 


Y 


91 


36,000 


P 


31 


30,000 


D 


92 


36,000 


D 


i2. 


20,000 


P 


93 


36,000 


Y 


33 


30,000 


R 


^h 


2U,000 


,T 


3'4 


280 


Marine 


95 


500 


R 


30i 


30,000 


J 








302 


30,000 


J 








20< 


30,000 


J 


BGZET^AN 


TER14INAL 


- 








COr.TINENTAL 




MISSOUL'. 


. TERVjINAL 


- CARTER 


10 


20,000 


R 


kCA 


15,000 


E 


Ij. 


20,000 


P 


kQ2 


30,000 


R 


1.2 


20,000 


r 


hok 


20,000 


H 


13 


20,000 


H 


U05 


15,000 


D 


ih 


2SO 


Marine 


'4O6 


15,000 


F 


m.i:mk 


TEMiNAl - 


CARTER 


B0ZFI^1AJ\I 


TEiMIimL ■• 


- CARTER 


301 


IS, 000 


E 


201 


15,000 


E 


302 


30,000 


R 


202 


30,000 


R 


302A 


15,000 


R 


203 


10,000 


W 


303 


15,000 


D 


20h 


15,000 


H 


30U 


15,000 


H 


205 


10,000 


D 


305 


15,000 


r 


206 


10,000 


F 



KEY; D - Diesel 

E - Premium ethel 
F - Heavy indastriaj 
H - #1 Stove oil 



J ~ Jet 

P - Premium 

R -- Regular 

W - White 

Y - Stove oil 



B-vIII-49 





Nominal 




Tank 


Size 




No„ 


(Barrels) 


Grade 


MISSOULA 


TERMIML - 


COFJ'INENTAL 


50 


30,000 


K 


51 


20,000 


P 


52 


20,000 


D 


53 


20,000 


Y 


'?h 


280 


Marine 



BILLINGS REFDffiRY - 




CONTINENTAL 




3 120,000 


R 


5 25,000 


R 


9 25,000 


R 


52 55,000 


P 


53 55,000 


Y 


5h 55,000 


D 


57 25,000 


J 


7 25,000 


P 





Nominal 




Tank 


Size 




No, 


(Barrels) 


Grade 


BILLINGS 


REFINERY - 


CARTER 


3h 


'40,000 


E 


58 


17,000 


W 


301 


96,000 


R 


303 


U3,000 


J 


30U 


i+5,000 


J 


305 


42,500 


H 


306 


42,500 


D 


307 


43,000 


E 


308 


45,000 


J 


YELLOWSTONE Pll^ELINE 


CO. 


YALE TANK 


: FARM - BILLINGS 


280 


80,000 


Y 


281 


80,000 


Y 


283 


55,000 


D 



KEY: D - Diesel 

E - Premium ethel 
F - Heavy industrial 
H - #1 Stove oil 



J - Jet 

P - Premium 

R - Regular 

W - White 

Y - xStove oil 



B-VIII-50 



Pet„ Ref, Doc. No. 2 



REPINING CAPACITIES 



Refiner^' 



Big West Oil Co. of Montana 
Kevin, Montana 

Continental Oil Company 
Billings, Montana 

Diamond A.sphalt Company 
Chinook, Montana 

Fanners Union Central Exchange, Inc. 
Laurel, Montana 

Humble Oil Company 
Billings, Montana 

Jet Fuel Refinery 
Mosby, Montana 

ITiillips Petroleum Company 
Great Falls, Montana 

Tesoro Petroleum Corporation 
Wolf Point, Montana 

Union Oil Company 
Cut Bank, Montana 



Barrels of Crude Oil per Day 
2,700 

35,500 

1,000 
26,000 
3^1,000 

1,000 

if, 500 

1,500 

U,ooo 



B-VIII-51 



BIANK PAGE 



B-V":iI-52 



S L I r F ■.■.: ELS 



IIJTRODUCTION 

This Solid Puels Subsection of the State Resource Managemerit Plan 
contains policies, gaidajice, and actions to provide sOi.id fuels to meet 
essential needs in the State in a nuclear attack emergency. 



Definitions 

a. "Solid FMels" means all forms of emthracite, bitumincus, sub- 
bituminous, and llgnitic ccals, axtd coke liade fro:ra coal,> (Coal 
chemicals recovered in the coke-masing process are ar. integral 
ajid, inseparable part of coke production at cer-t-ain facilities, 
but the distribution of such coal cheniicals Is under the juri- 
sdiction of the U, 3c Departiaent of Ccamerce. ; Only sut -bitu- 
minous or lignLtic ccals are produced in Montartet. 

b. "Primary solid fuels resources" include ail undistributed 
stocks of solid fveis at tne mines or other prlaary sources of 
supply, all solid fuels produced 5ubseq[uent to the occurrence 
of the emergency, and all solid fuels in transit by common 
carrier » 

c. "Seeondajry solid fuel resources" include all stocks of solid 
fuels delivered prior to emergency, and all stocks subsequently 
made available to designated consumers or :».ocaticns for redistri- 
ution. 

(Note: iviilitary stccKs are secondary inventories but not avail- 
able for distribution for nonmilitary uses except oy agreement 
with the military authorities,) 

d. "Certified orders" are purchase orders, contracts, or otner 
request,s for resources wnicn bear a signed certification that, 
the order is an essential order authorized pursuant to Federal 
Government emergency regulations or State authorizations. 



General 

The process for managing resources in the State in a nuclear attack 
emergency involves two series of actions o First, essential immediate needs 
are identified and actions taken to supply these needs. Secondly, and as 
soon as possible, continuing needs ajid expected future supplies are esti- 
mated. Decisions are made and actions axe taken to channel these expected 
future supplies to meet the continuing needs that are most essential to sur- 
vival and recovery of the State and the Nation. 

Following is a brief description of Federal, State, and. local government 
roles in the emergency management and. supply of solid fuels in the State. 



B-VIII-53 



Federal Government 

The Federal Government is responsible for working with the solid fuels 
industry to assure maximuai production and the release of primary solid fuels 
resources in the State to meet essential needs of the State of Montana as 
well as to meet essential needs of other States which depend on these 
primary resources of solid fuels c The Federal Government is also responsible 
for arranging for the distribution of solid fuels in primary Inventories in 
other States to meet essential needs in the Stare of Montana where this is 
necessajy in an emergency.. 

The Jnlted States Lepartment of the Interior has established a Federal 
Emergency Solid Fuels Adminis-Dration (ESFA.) for this purpose. .An office 
of the Federal Administration is located in most solid fuels producing 
States o The field representatives of ESFA are concerned chiefly with the 
production of solid fuels exid the distribution of primary solid fuels re- 
sources to assure a contin;:;ing supply of solid fuels to mllitaory installa- 
tions, government, and essential industrial facilities which normally depend 
on direct shipments from primary sources for all or part of their solid 
fuel needs. Arrangements with the industry to assure maximum production 
and provision of solid fuels t'firough mining^, processing, and delivery oper- 
ations within the State are the responsibilities of the field offices of the 
ESFA. 

State or Field offices of the ESPA have not been established in Montana 
as of the initial writing of this plan. If and when established, a list of 
these offices together with the names, addresses, ana telephone numbers of 
key Federal executives ar.d liaison representatives assigned to these Federal 
field organizations will be published and distributed as an addendxim to this 
subsection of the plario 



State Government 

The State Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency develops, in cooperation with 
other organizations of the State government, and provides, on behalf of the 
Governor, policies and gi^idamce consistent with State and Federal objectives. 
The purpose of these policies and guidance is to assure application of com- 
patible measures throughout the State for the conservation, distribution, and 
use of solid faels to prevent dissipation auid waste arid to assure that essen- 
tial needs for solid fuels are identified and met within the supplies avail- 
able. The State Petrcle-jm and Solid Fuels Agency accepts requests for State 
level assistance from local government officials and arranges through tne 
ESFA for producers of solid faels to adjust deliveries to correct local 
shortages in supply. As soon as pcssicle after the attack, the State Petrol- 
eum and Solid Fuels Agency ;, in collaboration with other State agencies re- 
presenting major activities within the State that consiome solid fuels, 
anticipates continuing needs and works with the ESFA to assure that ar-range- 
ments are made to provide solid fuels to meet ongoing demands of authorized 
essential users. 



E-VIII-5^ 



In the event the ESFA is unable to function in the State in the 
immediate postattack period, the State Petroleum emd Solid Fuels Agency- 
assumes, on behalf of the Federal Government, the responsibility for the 
production of solid fuels by facilities within the State and for the 
distribution of primary solid fuels similarly located until Federal 
capability is re-established. 

While Montana is currently a relatively small producer of solid 
fuels, with production limited to sum-bituminous or lignite coals the 
output of active mines can be greatly increased shoiild the emergency re- 
quire. 



Local Government 

Operational Survival Pleuis of the State of Montana ar-J its political 
subdivisions contain provisions for the conservation, distribu^ion, and 
use of solid fuels in secondary inventories within the State. These plans 
also provide for local government decisions and guidance, consistent with 
State policies, for the functioning of the secondary solid fuels distribution 
system in the localities in the State. 



Essential Solid Fuels Facilities 

All primary and secondary solid fuels facilities in the State of 
Montana are essential to national survival and must be kept in operation 
Attached to this plan as Reference Document No. 1 is a list of primary 
solid fuels facilities and their locations. Local governments shall 
identify all secondary solid fuels facilities (retail dea^ers^ within 
their respective areas of jurisdiction and make preattacii. arrangements 
to assure provision of electric power, manpower, trajisportation, water, 
fuels, and other locally available requisites for the continuing operation 
of these essential solid faels facilities. 



Flow Chart 

Following is a flow chart showing the process and the actions to be 
taken by Federal, State, and local governments to assure a continuing flow 
of solid fuels to meet essential needs in the State in a nuclear attack 
emergency. The legend accompanying the chart identifies: 

A. actions to be taken immediately to supply immediate needs 
essential for survival, and 

B. actions to be taken as soon as possible to anticipate continuing 
needs and to channel solid fuels supplies to meet the most urgent 
needs for continuing survival and recovery. 



B-VIII-55 



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B -VIII -57 



1 . Emergen cy Actions 

The following actions are taken on "oehalf of the Govemcr at State level 
by State Petroleum aad Solid [\jels Agency officials to pro^ride policies and 
guidance applica'ole throughout the State on the distribution and use of solid 
fuels ajid to arrange for resupply of secondary inventories from primary sources 
to meet essential local needs. 

In the immediate pcstattack period, information will be developed on the 
available stocks of solid fuels throughout ^he State « This survey will include 
the stocks of all consumers receiving direct shipments from primary sources of 
supply, the stocks of secondary distributors (retail dealers) and the stocks 
of all primary solid fuels resources which may be under the temporary control 
of the State, if Federal ccxitrols are disrupted « 

The emergency actioc acd reference doc\iments contained here have been 
prepared and placed with appropriate State and local officials during the pre- 
attack plariiiing process. 

(Note: If a Federal Emergency Solid Fuels Administration office does not 
exist in Montana at the time of the emergency, the State Petrole^jm and 
Solid Fnaels Agency will by -pass this channel and deal directly with pro- 
ducers until Federal authorities can ass'-ime control.,) 

B.0 A ctions for Imraediate Supply 

(1) Issue, on behalf of the Governor, policies and guidance appli- 
cable throughout the State covering the provision, distribution, 

and use of solid fuels supplies within the State, (SF-1, State 
Solid Fuels Policy and Guidance ») 

(2) Confinn with the field office (if one is in the State) of 
the Federal P'jiiergency Solid Fuels Administration arrangements with 
solid fuels producers to make deliveries on certified orders re- 
ceived from, customers in the State = (SF-2, Request for Release of 
Primary Solid PUeis Resources.) 

(3) Request the relevant field office of the ESFA to arrange for 
increases wnere needed in deliveries of primary solid fuels re- 
sources to resupply local inventories to meet shortages reported 
by local governments. (SF-3j, Adjustment of Primary Distributor 
Deliveries. ) 

b . Actions for Continuing Supply 

As soon as resupply of secondary inventories to meet essential im- 
mediate needs in, the localities is well 'under way, the State Petroleum 
and Solid Fuels Agency takes tiie following actions to anticipate con- 
tinuing needs and to arrange for continuing supply to meet these needs. 

(k) Consult with State civil defense supply officials, Federal 
military officials arid appropriate State resource officials to 



E-\^II-58 



estimate continuing requirements for solid fuels in the State 
during the ensuing 90~day period. (SF-V, Estimte of Continuing 
Solid Fiiels Requirements.) 

(5) Obtain from the ESP'A estimates of quantities of primary solid 
fuels rhat can "be supplied for continuing use in the State during 
tne ensuing S'O-day period. 

(6) If anticdpated supplies are inadequate to meet the estimated 
requi7 ements and adjustments in requirements cannot he negotiated 
refer to the Resource Priorities Board for recommendations to the' 
Governor otj the allocation of antici.pated supplies among competing 
prograxs, (SF-y, Allocation of Solid Fuels Supplies.) 

( -' / Issue revised State policy on the use of solid fuels in the 
State to conform with the Governor's decision. i''3F"6, Revised 
State ccllo. ?uel3 Foiicy,) 

( o ; De->-elop esLi^tiates of continuing requirements for electric 
power, manpower, transportation, and ether operating supplies, 
equipment, and services that will be needed to ms.intain operation 
oi' essential solid fuels facilities in the State during the en- 
sui.r.a 90-day perioa. Consult with the field office of the ESFA 
ir: tne State for assistarvce in developing these estimates for 
production facilities located within the State, Present these 
requirements to appropriate resource agencies (SF-7, Solid Fuels 
Inu.,;st.iy Support Pequirements. ) 

''?.' '.'C'veLop estimates of emergency repair and construction of essen- 
'.ial,, sciid Lueis facilities that will be required during the ensuing 
90-aay period. Consult with the field office of EEFA in the State 
for assistance in developing these estimates for production facilities 
^ocated wiUii:. the State. Present these requirements estimates to the 
State Const ruction Agency. (SF-8, Solia f-uels Industry Construction 
requirement s. ) 

I'iO) JnlVo-m tf,e relevant ESF/i field office of s-jpplles of supporting 
t-<?scurcPG that, will be available in the State for acquisition and 
use by tne pr:..mary solid fuels industry to maintain essential oper- 
at ...o.-s duri-g the ensuing 90-day period. (SF-9, Allocation of Sup- 
porting Resources to Primary Solid Fuels Industry »■) 

'^ ' S'i^g^g g.'.cy H ct i c.- : r.'oc ument s 

FCL-Cviuii are emergency action documents to implement, trie foregoing emer- 
gency acr-.;o',s 

(Mote- i-uring tne process of expediting deliveries to meet urgent local 
needs, tne quickest means of communication between levels of goverrjment 
and witn irjdustxy vill be used. The forms illustrate the kind of information 
to ce transmit tea over telephone or other available means of communication.) 



b-vt:ii-59 



IITOEX OF EMEP.GETJCY ACTIOM DOCUJMEWTS 

SF-1;, state Solid r-u.els Policy and Guidarice 

SF-2;, Request for Release of Primary Solid Fuels Be sources 

SF-3, Adjustment of Primary Distributor Deliveries 

SF-h, Estimate of Continuing Solid Fuels Requirements 

SF-5, Allocation of Solid Fuels Supplies 

SF-6, Revised State Solid F-'uels Policy 

SF-T, Solid Fuels Industry Support Requirements 

SF-8, Solid P\iels Industry Construction Requirements 

SF-9) Allocation of Supporting Resources to Primary Solid Fuels Industry 



b-\t:ii-6o 



^ 



SF-1^ State Solid Faels Policy sin' - 'j^aidance 



To: Heads of Political Subdivision 



Guidarice for I ,oc al Gover? jiii &nr. s . It is essential that solid fuels 
available for use in this State be carefully conseived ar^d restricted 
to inmediate axid. urgent uses for local, State, and Watioaal stu-irival 
and recovery until the ccntir-ai.'ig supply of solid fuels can be assessed 
and the supplies tliat vill be available for less essential needs can be 
determined. While Montana is currently a relatively small producer of 
solid fuelSj with produetio-... limitei to sub-bituriinous or lignite coal^ 
the output of Our' active aiines cati be greatly increased should the 
emergency require. 

In crder t.o {l) p:'&veixt wa&rs ecA dissipation of solid Taels in 
local secondary inventories, (2, provide supplies of solid fuels to 
meet immediate and urgent needs., (3; assure continuing resupply of 
local secondary inventories of solid, fuels, and (V) ratioi: solid fuels 
to meet most essential needs of ir.dividua.1 consumers, appropriate offic- 
ials of local govermuent are re-^uested to take the following actions: 

1. Announce and enforce temporai-y freeze on inventories of local 
secondary distributors of solil fuels (retail dealers,") 

2. Provide instructions co secondary distributors on how to 
release inventories to meet essential needs, 

3. Authorize essential local users to obtain ixcmediace and urgent 
supplies of solid fuels f-rom secondary distributors, 

h. Authorize essential facilities to certify purchase orders for 
solid fuels needed to maintain their operations. Instruct essential 
facilities to place these cer:-.ifieii orders on their customaiy sources 
of supply. (Local gcveiTijnents have been provided by the State with a 
list of the essential facilities located in their jurisdictions.) 

5. As sooD as possible, ration solid fuels to individual consumers 
and inform these individual consujn.ers how to obtain supplies under the 
ration system. 

6, InfoiTD local seconia^ry distributors of solid fuels of their 
roles under the ration system. 

In the event resupply from primary producers of solid fuels is not 
adequate to meet all essential needs, local gO'\' ernment s should decide and 
cut back authorized local uses. Conc'-arsntly they should report shortages 
and request appropriate officials of State government to take actions to 



E-7III-61 



increase the local supply of solid fuels. To minimize duplication of 
effort reporting chaimels must 'be adhered to. Tliese are r Municipalities 
to Boards of County Coamissioners to the State Petroleum and Solid Fuels 
Agency. 



Effective Date 



Governor of the State of Montana 



By: 



Director 

State Petroleujn and Solid Fuels Agency 



E-Vni-62 



SF-1, Attachment 1 



isackground Information 



T'ae Governor has issued general policy on the \;se of essential 
resources in the immediate postattack period. These pclicies axe set 
forth in Part A of the State plaji. They have heen furnished to appro- 
priate officials of the political subdivisions of the State,. 

In general, these St.ate policies provide for temporary freezing of 
retail inventories of essential items and immediate and continuing release 
of these items to meet urgent militaury and civil defe.ise needs stnd to 
maintain operations of facilities esser.tlal to continued survival and 
recovery. They provide for continuing resupply of local secondary in- 
ventories as well as inventories of essential facilities which ohtain 
their supplies from wholesale and primary sources. 

In addition, the Governor has issued a proclaiaation requesting the 
executive heads of the political suoaivisions in this State to provide 
resources from locally available supplies to carry on iiMJediate and ur- 
gent activities for survival and to maintain the operation of essential 
facilities. In accordance with this direction from the Governor, local 
governaients are requested to inform essential users of resources and 
persons engaged in the operation of essential facilities how to identify 
their purchase orders, contracts, and other purchase arrargements to 
obtain deliveries of supplies and services. 

Attacned to this section of the State plaji is a list of essentiaJL 
solid fuels facilities that aust continue in operation vC assure an 
adequate flow of solid fuels for local. State, and National survival 
and recovery. Names and addresses of these facilities located in the 
political subdivisions have been provided to the local goverrmients con- 
cerned. 

Local governments, upon attack, notify the management of these 
facil5.ties to cerxify their purcnase orders and contracts to obtain pro- 
duction materials, capital equipment, and maintenance, repair, and oper- 
ating supplies or to place contracts for essential repair and construction 
as follows: 

lo Essential solid fuels facilities use the following State certi- 
fication to identify: 

a. purchase orders for supplies of electric power, gas, petrcleiim 
products and trsmsportation ser^/ices, and 

b. construction contracts foi repair and construction of facilities. 



This is an essential order 
authorized by the State of 
Montana. 

r signature of purchaser)" 



b-\t:ii-63 



2, Essential solid faels facilities identify their purchase orders 
in accordance with the rating and certification provisions of Federal emer- 
gency regulations issued hy the Business and Defense Services Administration 
of the Uo Sc Depax-tment of Conanerce upon attack, for supplies of production 
materials, capital e>quipmeri-v, and other maintenance, repair^ and operating 
supplies. The State Production organization puhlicizes and makes known these 
Federal regulations to local gOTernments and industry immediately following an 
attack. 

Retail and wholesale distrib\itors use t-he State certification on pur- 
chase orders to supply their inventories from primary solid fuels producers. 

Essential Local jysers are (l) civilian organiEations engaged in 
essential civil defense activities including persons, equipment, and facilities 
providing essential survival care and services to people, (2) military organ- 
izations engaged in essential military activities, (3) local establishments 
providing essential Itsis ar..d services to people, and (h) individual consumers 
requiring immediate supplies for individual or family survivals 

Essen tial Facl.lities are (l) xoilitary establishments engaged in immed- 
iate retaliatory or del'eiise operations, (2) electric power, gas an,d water 
utility systems, (j) industrial plants producing or processing essential items, 
(k) major wholesale establishments storing or distributing essential services. 

Individual Caasimers are constimers who receive their solid fuels supplies 
under the consuner rationing system. The process for rationing essential items 
to consumers is showri ir. the flew chart in the Economic Stabilization Section of 

the Plan. 



B--VTII'-6U 



SF-2, Request for Release of Primary Solid Fuels Resources 



To: Field Office of the Emergency Solid Fuels Administration 



Local governments in this State, in accordance with State policies and 
guidance, have identified and authorised essential local users and essential 
facilities in their jurisdictions to certify their purchase crders for solid 
fuels with the following certification: 



"This is sin emergency order 
authorized by the State of 
Montstna . 

(signature of Purchaser 



Secondary distributors have been instructed to accept and make deliv- 
eries to fill these certified orders. They have in turn been authorized to 
use this same certification on their purchase orders to resupply their in- 
ventories o 

You are requested to arrange with primary producers of solid fuels 
for acceptance and delivery against these State certified orders within the 
quantities of solid fuels in their inventories that are available for use 
in this State, 



Effective Date 



Director, 

State Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency 



E-VIII-65 



SF-3j Adjustment of Primary Deliveries 

Tot Field Office of the Emergency Solid Fuels Administration 



Shortages in solid fuels supplies are Toeing reported by local govern- 
ments in this State. 

You are requested to arrange with solid fuels producers to increase 
their delivery quotas to meet certified orders received from customers in 
this State. 

Following is aji estimate of the increased amoi-aits of solid fuels in 
primary inventories that will be needed to meet essential needs. 

These requirements have been developed in accorda'ce with the Memo- 
randum of Agreement with the Department of the Interior, 



Siimmai-y of Local Deficiencies in Weekly 

Resupply of Solid Fuels (in net tons of 2,000 lbs.) 



Consignee 



Name 



Location 



Kind 



Size 



Quant it y 



Nonoal 
Supplier 



Date 



Director 

State Petroleum & Solid Fuels Agency 



B-VTII-66 



SF-'4, Esti mat e of Continuing 3olid Fuels Requirements 

Forms 1 and 2 attached to this emergency action document contain data 
on quantities of solid fuels that will be required in this State for a 
90-day period o 

The requirements stated include the quantities of solid fuels to be 
supplied by distributors to fill authorized orders of esseriti&l users, 
essential facilities^ and consumers under the consumer rationing system. 

These requirements do not include quantities of scll2 fuels needed by 
essential facilities such as large military installations srA bases and large 
industrial facilities that obtain their requirements directly from primary 
sources. I'hese latter requirements are the responsibility of the Federal 
Emergency oolid Faels Administration. Procedures for ciaijns., allocations 
and supply arrangements are included in the emergency plans r.f this Federal 
Administration ., 

The purpose of these State requirements estimates is to determine and 
anticipate quantities of solid fuels needed from primary souices under 
Federal jurisdiction. 

Since civil defense, militai-y liaison, and other resource agencies are 
located in the State Emergency Operations Center, these requirements esti- 
mates cari ail be obtained rapidly by informal liaison, 



Definitions 

"Civilian Requirements" include the solid fuels needed to carry on 
emergency civil defense operations to maintain essential local act-ivities 
and to supply individual cor.s'umers under the cons'.imer raticni:;g system. 
These civilian, requirements estimates are provided by appropriate civil 
defense officials. 

"Military Pequii'ements ' include the solid fuels needed to carry on 
military activities and to maintain and operate military installations and 
equipment , They include only the supplies that are to be obtained from 
secondary sources. These military requirements estijiates are provided by 
appropriate military officials. 

"Resource Support Requirements" include the solid fuels needed to 
maintain operation of essential facilities- These support resource require- 
ments are provided by appropriate State or Pederai resource organizations. 



B -^.1:11-67 



SF-^, Form 1 



Estimate of Continuing Requirements for Solid Fuels by Resource 
Pr'Ogr-ajns for 90-Day Period Commencing 




1 


Resource Program 


List size and amounts in net tons of 2/000 lbs. 


First 30 r.ays 


Following 60 Bays 


Total 90 Eays 


Construction & Housing 








Electric Power &, Gas 








EtCo 








































TO'UklS 









SF-U, Form 2 



Summary Estirnate of Continuing Requirements for Solid Fuels for 
90-I.'ay Period Commencing 






Requirement Categories 


List size and amount in net tons of 2,000 lbs. 


First 30 Days 


Following 60 Days 


Total 90 Days 


CIVILLA.M 








MILTTAR.Y 








RESO^JRCE PP.OGPJy^ 








TOrAIS 









B -VIII -68 



SF-5, Allocation of Solid Fuels Supplies 



r) 



SF-5;. Form 1 



Allocation of Expected Continuing Supplies of Solid Fuels by 
Pesource Programs for 90'-Day Period Commencing 




1 


Resource Programs 


List size and amounts in net tons of 2^000 lbs. 


First 30 Days 


Following 60 Days 


rotal 90 Days ' 


Construction & Housing 








Electric Power & Gas 








































TO:i}ALS 









SF-5, form 2 



Allocation of Expected Continuing Supplies of Solid Fuels for 

90 -Day Period Commencing „ j 






Requirement Categories 


List size and amounts in net tons of 2,000 lbs. 


First 30 Days 


Following 60 Days 


Total 90 Days 


CI\riLIA.N 








RTLIIAPi' 








RESOURCE PROGRAMS 








T&TArS 









B-'vTII-69 



SF-6, Revised State Solid Fuels Policy 

(Note: The content and substance of the revised solid fuels policy 
will depend on the situation and the supplies expected to he available 
to meet continuing essential needs. Necessarily, this document will 
not be completed except in a test of the plan or at the appropriate 
point in a postattack situation.) 

This document will be, in essence, a Revised SF-1, State Sol id Fliels 
Policy and Guideince. 



B -VIII -70 



SF-T, Solid TMels Industry Support Requirements 



Est.imate of Solid Fuels Industry Support Req,airements for 90- 
Day Period Commencing 




1 


Resource 


Unit of 
Measure 


First 
30 Days 


Follcr«7ing 
60 Cays 


Total 
90 Days 


Electric Power 










Manpower 










T ran sport at i on 










Petroleum Products 










Etc. 

















































































B"\1II-71 



SF-8, Solid Fuels Industry Construction Requirements 
To; State Construction and Housing Agency 

Following is a list and description of major constr^action, repair, and 
modification of facilities that will be required to maintain desired pro^ 
duction and distribution of solid fuels during the 90-day period commencxng 



Construction Projects 

1. Name, location, type, and size of construction project; 
start and completion dates. 

(If project is underway or a construction contract has been 
prepared, attach a copy of the contract document and summary 
bill of materials.) 

2. 

3. 

k. 



Director 

State Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency 



B -VIII -72 



^ 



Sr-9, Allocation of Supporting Resources to Priinary Solid Fuels Iniustry 
To: Emergency Solid Fuels Administration 



Attached is a list and the quantities of supporting resources that ha,ve 
heen allocated for maintaining essential operations of primary solid fuels 
facilities. 

This is furnished as a basis for authorizing these facilities to obtain 
continuing supplies of these resources during the allocation period. 



(Attach List"; 



Director 

State PetroleiuL and Solid Fuels Agency 



B-v-iii-73 



SOLID FUEIS REFERENCE DOCUMENT NO. 1 
MONTMA COAL MINES 



Mines "by County 



BIG HORN 

Tongue River Coal Co. 



BLAINE 

Milk River Coal Co. 



CARBON 

Roadside Mine 



Brophy Coal Co. 



CASCADE 

Love land Mine 



Latham Mine 



CUSTER 

Storm King Mine 



DAWSON 

Reuse Mine 



FERGUS 

Swanson Mine 



Tuss Mine 



HILL 

Rocky Boy Mine 



Tonnage Mined 
Year Ending June 30, 19^^ 



1,929 



2,938 

507 

12,910 

250 

No Report 
2,005 

2,000 

55 
300 

255 



Owner or Manager 



Henry Yallowizer 
Decker, Montana 



Lauren Sargent 
Box 661 
Havre, Montana 



Frank Jajiskovitch 
Bearcreek, Montana 

James Brophy 

Red Lodge, Montana 



Mrs. Earl Loveland 
Mlllegan Route 
Great Falls, Montana 

Dennis Yatso 
Stockett, Montana 



Ralph E. Bair 

Box 113 

Miles City, Montana 



Gordon Peuse 
Lindsay, Montana 



William Swanson 
Gilt Edge Route 
Lewistown, Montana 

C. M. Tuss 

East Evelyn Street 

Lewistown, Montana 



Ernie Friede 

Box Elder, Montana 



b-vhi-tU 



MCCONE 

No. 1 Mine 



Neumiller Mine 



MUSSEIgHELL 
Divide Mine 



Gildroy Mine 



For Strom Mine 



Johnny ' s Mine 



Nies Mine 



Square Deal Mine 



Western Coal Mine 



P & M Mine 



POWDER RIVER 

Coal Creek Mine 



Wilson Mine 



Two Tree Mine 



RICHIAND 

Coal Bank Cajiyon 



Bemer Mine 



Knife River Coal Co. 



300 
60 

9>92 
5.028 
1,500 
1,68U 
5,000 
No Report 
3,800 
2,300 

1,^72 

60 
50 

120 

850 
300,000 



P. = Dc Stephenson 
Circle, Montana 

Albert- Neumiller 
Vida, Montana 



Victor Carlson 
Roundup, Montana 

Palph Eo Gildroy 
RouEdup, Montana 

Victor Forstrom 
Roundup, Montana 

Jonnny Keosky 
Roundup, Montana 

William Nies 
Roundup, Montana 

Virgil Cross 
Roundup, Montana 

•jlerin Johnson 
Roundup, Montana 

Paul Meged 

Golden Creek Route 

Roundup^ Montana 



John Schoonover 

Box 9^4 

AshlajTid , Montana 

Jo L. Vfilson 
Broadus, Montana 

Ant one Gali 
Espie, Montana 



Cyr-us Lowery 
Boy 885 

Sidney, Montana 

Neville Bemer 
Culbertson, Montana 

Knife River Coal Co. 
Savage, Montana 



B -VIII -75 



ROSEBUD ^ ^ T, 

Foley Bros. 1,000 0. E. Rye 

Coalstrip, Montana 

Lame Deer Mine 1,200 Lester Scott 

Lame Deer, Montana 

SHERIDM , „ r. T ' ^ 

■ ■ Lagerquist Mine ^tOl E. C. Lagerquist 

^ ^ R. F. D. 1 

Wesfby^ Montana 

Acme Mine 2,300 M. F. Brenteson 

Coalridge, Montana 



t 



B-VIII-T6 



PEFP.OtEUM AND SOLID FOEIS AGENCY 
EMERCiENCY ORGANIZATION 



The organizational chart which follcws identifies functional areas 
involved in the management of petroleum and solid fuels resources in Montana 
In aji emergency. 

These are actions to provide for the eor.tinuity of operation of the State 
Petroleum and Solid Fuels Agency ^ 

1. Copies of this plan and all action and reference dcc-Lments have 
been placed ap-d are immediately available in the office of the 
State Oil arad Gas Conservation Commission arid ii^ the State Emergency 
Operations Center o 

2, The Governor has selected and designated fi'om gorerrment and the 
private sector qualified leaders with experience a::id Knowledge of 
the petroleuiD. ar^d solid fuels industries to provide executive direc- 
tion in an emergency for the operations of the State Petroleu:^! and 
Solid Fuels Agencyo Lines of successiori to assure continuity of 
key staff for the operation of this Agency are provided in the 
roster of key personnel maintained in the office of the State Oil 
and Gas Conservation Commission^ the State Office of Einergency 
Planning, and the State 2iaergency Operations Center, 

3' The Executive Secretary of the State Gil and Jas Conservation Com- 
mission is theDirector of the State Petroleum and Solid Fiaels 
Agency , 

ii. jpor: activation of this plan, the Director of the State petroleum 
and Solid Fuels Agency and key staff with emergency assignments to 
the agency established headquarters at the State Emergency Operations 
Center o 



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B -VIII -78 



PART B - RESOURCE SECTION 



IX TELECOMMLTKICATIOW 



MONTMA PIAN 

FOR EMERGENCY 

MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES 



I 



STATE OF MONTAHA 

EMERGENCY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN 

PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 

IX TELECOMMLTNICATION 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Introduction .o ..... .o.. o ...... . 

1 . Emergency Actions ..,.,.,.,,......., 

2. Index of Emergency Action Documents. 

3 . Emergency Organization ...... ............. . 

h. Reference Documents. ... .................. . 



Page 
.. B-rx- 1 

,. B-IX-lU 
. . B-IX-16 
.. B-I.X-30 
.. B-IX-32 



\ 



INTOODUCTIOM 

This section of the State Resource Management Plan contains policies, 
guidance and actions to provide teleconmimication service to meet essential 
needs of the State diirlng nuclear attack emergency periods o 



Definitionf; 



The '.releeoaimuriicat-lcgi resoi-a-ce for parposes of this plan comprises 
the facilities,, systems , persorjael and eqiaipment of all common 
cajTT'iers prcviding public telecommunicaticsn ser'i»-ice, 

TelecoiiDmxr.icatior. service is that su.ppcrt provided hy telecom- 
muaica,tion comraon carriers for the transmission and receipt; of 
telephone ai>.d telegraph messages as well as the provision of all 
other telecommunication support. Included is the handling of 
local; intercity, intrastate gs.d interstate telecomaiunication 
•traffic , 



General 



The process for managing resources in the State during ar^d after nuclear 
attack involves four functioiial sireas; 

Idei^tify lamediate resource requirements » 

Satisfy Immediate resource requirements. 

Conduct continuing identification of immediate and 
future requirements o 

Assess capability to meet continuing and future requirements 
and provide for the meeting of those requirements essential to 
suTArival and recovery of the State and Nation. 

Federal Governjnent Hole in Emergency Telecommunication Management 

In periods of national emergency the Federal Government is concerned with 
matters affecting the Nation in its entirety, but it also provides specific 
assistance to the States. For example, the Federal Government coordinates with 
industry to assure, insofar as possible, that telecommunication facilities and 
serrices are provided for essential needs of the State of Montana. This 
applies also to other States which are dependent upon interstate facilities 
and services provided by industry's telecommunication common carrier. 

To accomplish these tasks, the Federal Government, through the Federal 
Ccmmuni cat ions Cr-mmission, has established a State Industry Ad.visory Committee 
(SIAC) in each State, These advisor committees are now assisting the States 
in determiriation of requiremer.t3 for essential telecommunication services 
during nuclear attack and postattack periods. 



B-JX-1 



■Reference Document Number 1, attached, contains a listing of SIAC members 
in this State, Also, included in the document axe the telephone numhers and 
addresses of SIAC members. 

State Government Role in Emergency Telecommunication Management 

The State plays an important role in emergency telecommunication manage- 
ment . During periods of nuclear- attack, the State may become completely isolated 
from discourse with other States and the Federal Government, and even vithin the 
State the atta.ck msy prevent separate segments from communicating with each 
other. In such instances a prime requisite will be the reestablishment of 
communications between the various groups and States, and between the State 
and Federal Govemrj.ent. To accomplish this requirement the State must assiome 
an aggressive ccurce of sction. 

The State, therefore, has established a centralized telecommunication 
orgajiization for overall control. In cooperation with other elements of the 
State Government and on behalf of the Governor, this organization provides 
telecommunication plans, policies, and guidance consistent with State and Fed- 
eral objectives. 

The State Telecommunication Agency accepts and processes requests for 
S'v^ate level telecommunication assistance from authorized local government 
officials. They also arrange, under established procedures, with telecom- 
munication common carriers for the provision of facilities and services to 
meet State and local requirements. 

As soon as possible after an attack, the State Telecommunication Agency 
will assess continuing and anticipated future essential telecommunication 
requirements and arrange with the telecommunication industry for requirements 
satisfaction. Throughout this process, the State telecommunication organiz- 
ation will coordinate with other State elements representing State major act- 
ivities having requirements for telecommunication service. 

Local Government Role in Emergency Telecommunication Management 

Local govermnents also play an important role in the management of 
emergency telpcoramunications. Within local government plans must be made to 
assure provision of manpower, electricity, fuels, transportation, equipment, 
and similar- items necessary for the adequate operation and maintenance of 
telecommunication facilities and services within their respective areas. 

Role of the Telecommunication Industry in an Emergency 

The telecommunication common carrier industry has responsibility for the 
provision Of systems and services in support of Federal, State, and Local 
governments. Each of the telecommunication common carriers operate under 
their o\m. management to meet the stated telecommunication needs of government. 

Their management functions include the following. Providing for: 

Continuity of telecommunication management functions o 



B-IX-2 



Protection of telecommunication personnel and facilities » 

Kaintenance of essential telecommunication records. 

Conservation of operating supplies and equipment necessary 
for telecommunication operations. 

Restcrat'on of damaged telecommunication lines^ switching 
centers J and other facilities. 

Rerouting fcelecomraunieation traffic when systems and 
facl.li-.xes canrot accommodate normal traffic flow. 

Expansion and/or improvement of telecommunication operations 

aij required o 

Securing manpower^ materials ^ and services necessary to the 
adequate provision and operation of telecommunication. 

Essential State Telecommunication Facilities 

Telecommunication common carrier facilities located in the State of 
Montema must be kept in operation. They are essential to meet the tele- 
communication requirements for survival and recovery. Arrangements have 
been made with civil defense officials and appropriate local government 
authorities to assure adequate physical protection for these facilities. 
In addition, arrangements have been made with appropriate authorities to 
assure continued operation of these facilities and systems. 

Concept of Eiaergency Telecommunication Activities 

Upon receipt of a warning of attack all personnel will proceed to and 
occupy shelters in accordance with local civil defense plans and preattack 
community pieparations and instructions. Personnel will stay in the shelters 
until it is safe for them to emerge. Following emergence from the shelters, 
all steps possible will be taken by local governments in relatively undamaged 
areas to conserve the local resources available. The resources available 
should be used for carrying on emergency operations necessary to surA,'ival, 
recovery, and defense. lYovisions for salvage, rescue, and relocation of 
survivors in damaged areas are included in the Operational Survival Plans 
of the Stat.e and its political subdivisions. 

At the State level of government, officials will be immediately con- 
cerned in the postattack periods with the provision and dissemination of 
Statewide policies, guidance, and instructions to local governments concern- 
ing the conservation, distribution and use of immediately available resources. 
This vlli Include arrar.gements for assuring continuing resupply of goods and 
services to meet local emergency needs. Urgent needs for resources that 
cannot be met f^oro available local supplies will be reported to the appro- 
priate State resource agency. 



B-IX-3 



/t the State level ot governr.tnt, resource officials in coordination 
with industry wi 11 arrange for deliveries of goods and provisiont; of services 
to meet critical need3 for items of short supply . Such arrangements should 
preferatJ.y le laaue through i'e-'e.-aL Government agencies functioning within 
tho State, hut, vhero this is i.-npossible, or iiupracticahle, the arrajigements 
will oe made direcfciy -.dth appropriate officials in industry. 

The followivg ps.?es contain flov: charts depicting the foregoing concept 
of oisjiagemei-t fcr the provisior^ and use of telecommunication within the State 
cf Mont,ane. c'oring and after a nuclear attack emergency. The specific flow 
chart r. i^re titled; 

I, Tv.terrela-oionships existing between government and industry 
ar,-i i\mctiGi-.s pertaining to provisions of State policy and, 
regulations governing use of telecommunication systems ajid 
facilities. 

II. Irterrelationships existing between government and industry 
peitaining to provision of assistance to meet local govern- 
mt-.'it telecommunication requirements. 

III. Irterrelationships existing between government and industry 
pe.r'tainiiig to the assessment of continuing telecomnunication 
requirements . 

IV. Interrelauionships existing between government and industry 
pe^-uaining to the allocation of telecommunication services 
to meet continuing and future requirements. 

The term "rtRsential raci? f.ties, " used on the foregoing listed charts, in- 
clude: military establislmientr , teii^porary or permanent, engaged in immediate 
retaliatory or defense ojjerations; e].ectric power systems and facilities; 
water and gas utilities; industrial plants producing or processing essential 
items; major establishrents storing or distributing essential items; trar'S- 
portation and telecommunication facilities and organizations providing essential 
servicoo. 

The term "essential users," used on the foregoing listed charts, includes 
the following : 

Civil organizations engaged in essential civil defense or 
resource man-:.gemert activities. 

Persons, equipment ?jid facilities providing essential survival 
care and services to people. 

Militcry organizations engaged in essential military activities. 

Farmers producing essential food items. 

Workers employed iu essentia^ facilities. 



B-IX-U 



'".ocal t-L tabl^.shrcentc providing eseeuttai It^ms aud services to 

The term "Inlivldual users" includes eonsnaers who are not included in 
the definitions of "e^ueutir;.! racilioitKi; and "er.sentlal users" who depend 
on local dir.trl>.ution eystens and utilities for assential items and services 
for individual t..nd famil/ use. 



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B-IX-13 



1, Energency Actions 

The following actions are taken on behalf of the Governor by State 
Telecommunication Agency officials to provide Statewide policies and guidance 
on the provision and use of telecommunication service, 

a. State policy and local use of telecommunication service 

(l) Issue, on behalf of the Governor, State policies and g"aidanee 
applicable tlriroughout the State covering the provision and 
use of teleccraraunication service. (Telecom-l, State Telecom- 
munication Policy ajid Guidance.) 

b. Assistance to meet local telecommunication service shortages 

(1) From local governments, receive requests for assistance to 
meet local telecommunication service shortages. 
(Telecom-2, Request for State AssisteLnce.) 

(2) Request telecommunication coimnon carriers to arrange for 
satisffcction of local telecommunication service requirements. 
(Telecom-3, Request for Industry Assistajice.) 

As soon as the following actions can be undertaken without iuterf„^ring 
with the actions described in subparagraph (b) of the foregoing, the State 
Telecomcunlcation Agency will anticipate continuing needs for service and make 
arrangements for fumlshlug that service on a continuing basis. 

c. Continuing requireaants for telecommunication service 

(1) Consult with State civil defense officials, Federal military 
officials, and appropriate State resource agency offlciali-s 
for estiiiiation of continuing service requirements lu the Sta^e 
duriiig the ensuing 9^-day period. This in terms of circuits or 
loads between points to be served. (Telecom-U, Estimate of 
Continuing Telecommuuication Service Requirements.) 

(2) Obtain from the telecommunication common carriers their estl- 
nr.led ability to satisfj-- requirements in the State during the 
ensuing 90-day period. 

(3) If anticipated capauilities ai-e inadequate to meet estimated 
requirements sjid if adjustments in requirements carjTiOt be 
negotiated, obtain recommendations from the Resource Priorities 
Board to send to the Governor for allocation of anticipated 
available service among competing programs. (Telecoji-5, 
Allocation of Teiecommunication Service.) 

(4) lijsue revised State policies and guidance on the use of the 
remaining telecomm^onication resource in the State to conform 
•v/ith the Governor's decision. (Telecom-6, Revised State Pclicy 
on Use of Renalnlng Telecommunication Resource.) 



B-IX-lif 



(5) Coijuult with the management officials of the teleco;imiuriication 
coTT.Tiion carri^'-'s and develop estimates of ccntlnuii:g require- 
ments for mariDOwer, fuel, transporjttion^ water ^ petrcleum 
products J other operating supplies, equipment and services 
that will t-e needed to toaintain the operation of esse;atial 
telecommunication facilities in the State during the ensuing 
90-day period, Fresenb tnese estimates to appropriate State 
resource orpar.lzatioris. (Telecom~7, Telecommunication Industry 
Support Fequirements.) 

(5) Consult with the telecommunication common carriers and dt-velcp 
estimates for emergei„cy repair and construction of essential. 
faoil:" oies which will become requirements during the eriSuiag 
90-day period. Present these estimates to the State Con- 
struction and Housing Agency. (Telecom-8, Telecojomunication 
Indut-try Construction Requirements.) 

(7) (-orsult with telecommunication common carriers and authorise 
them to ottain designated quantities of specified support-ir.g 
resources based upon the decisions reached pursuant to Step (5)., 
(Telecom-9> Authorization to Telecommunication Coratttoa Carr5,ers 
to Obtain Supporting Resources.) 



B-rX-15 



2 . Emergency /a ction I/cciimf cuts 

Following is a listing of eaisrgency action doc^oments req^uired to im- 
plement the foregoing emergency actions i 

(Note: During the process of expediting service to meet urgent local needs, 
the quickest meartS of coam'jrd nation between levels of government and with 
industry should be used, The i cz-ms illustrate the kind of information to "be 
transm:'.tted over telephone or other available neans of fast communication.) 



Index of Eme rgency Action Documents 



Fa^e 



Telecom- 1 Gtate Tel&co;ia.unlca t ion Policy and Guidance 17 

Telecom- 2 Raquegt for St ate Assistance 19 

Telecom- 3 Request for In dustry Assistance 20 

Telecom- U Estimate o f Co::i tJ.nu.ing Tele com.muni cat ion Service 21 
Requiremeivos 

Ti^lecom.- 5 Allocation of Telecommunication Service 2k 

Telecom- 6 Kevised State P olicy on Use of Remaining Telecommunication 26 
Resource 

Telecom- 7 T^lecommuni cat -ior. Industry/ Support Requirements 27 

Telecom- 8 Tt^^jJ- ecomnuaicatio:- Industry Construction Requirements 28 

Telecom- 9 Auth o rization tc Tc lecorara'.tnication Common Carriers to 29 
Obtcxln S ipxortliig Resou rces 



E-iX-16 



TelecoTi-l. State Teleucmmunication Policj'^ and Guidance 



To: Heads of Political Subdivis'.cas 



Gv'.idan ct; for l ocal GcrerniriienT^s. It is essential that the telecom- 
mutii'-:atr~ir~,'ascvirces ai'ailable for use in this State and its localities, 
"be carefully allocated t.o esser^tial uijers, essential facilitie s, and the 
mlnimur g needa of ip/ilYi-iu&l^conjumers 'jj'-.tii the continuing capability can 
be asse's-sed and the ser.'ice t;ng,t will be avaiiarli for less essential needs 
can be d=terxdieo . 

The allociitior. and utiii^atic^n of the teleconuminicaticn resources 
available within this State tcuat be accomplished ir^ such a manner that 
essentia.1 (Priority) interstate communications will not be affected adversely 
through interruption ^r any forTE -f disriaption. This can best be achieved 
thi'ough knovflelge ct the Satiar.al R^'iority Systems in force and through col- 
laboration with the Federal Cox'^.-ai.ieations Comrrission field liaison officers 
an.d in CGordiixation withi the teleccaiEJLnication common carriers, 

IiOcal governments ai'e rr:.;^..riL,ed to take the following actions in accord- 
ance with the Governor 'i- policy to (l) promote efficient management of the 
telecomraunicatica resource. {■-. ■ aliooate remaining service within the State 
to meet needs of essential users and assist in maintaining the continued 
operation and the restoratiori of essential facilities, (3) meet minimum 
telecorjinunication needs of indi^'^ual users, and (U) assure, insofar as 
possible, the continuin.g prevision cf service: 

-- Curr.a.il non essential local uses of telecommunication 
seivice; and 

-"■ Enforce prlcriMes f^r the provision of service. 

In bhe event that remair-i.ng •oelecoramunication service is not adequate 
to meet all essential local )..^edb, local goveromsnts will reduce the number 
of authorized local users » CcLC-urrently, local gcverrjnents will report 
deficiencies to and request the State Telecommunication Agency to take 
actions for i:acreas;uig ser-rice availability to local jurisdictions. 



Effective Date 



:}ovemor of the State of Montana 



Director, State Telecommunication Agency 



B-^K-IT 



Telecom-i, Attachment 1 
Background Information 



The Governor has issued general policy concerning the use of essential 
resources in sja iimiediate postattack period. These policies are set forth 
in Part A of the State Plan. They have been furnished to appropriate 
officials of the political suhdivisions of this State, 

In genera] J these f>tate policies provide for temporsury freezing of 
retail inventories of essential items, for immediate emd continuing re- 
lease of these items to meet urgent military and civil defense needs, and 
to maintain oper.-ation of facilities essential to continued survival and 
recovery. They provide for continuing resupply of local secondary invent- 
ories and inventories of essential facilities which ohtain their supplies 
from wholesale anc primary sources. 

Local governments, upon attack, notify the local offices of the tele- 
communication conmon carriars to certify their purchase orders and contracts 
to obtain production materials, capital equiprr.eut, and maintenance, i-epair 
and operating sup-plies, or to place contracts for essential repair smd con- 
strv:ction as follows : 

1. The te±ecDnmunication common carriers will use the following State 
certification tc identify: 

a. Purchase orders for supplies of petroleum products, gas, 
solid fi-els, ajid j ran .• port at ion services. 

b. Construction contracts for repair and construction of 
facilities . 



"This is an essential order authorized 
by the State of Montana 

(signature of purchaser)" 



2. Upon attack teleco.-imunication common caxriers will identify their 
purchase orders in accordance with the rating and certification provisions 
of federal emergency regulatiois issued by the Business and Defense Services 
Acijriri.str:ition of the U.S. Department cf Corjr.erce for supplies of production 
materials, capital equipment, and other maintenance, repair, and operating 
supplies. The Stat.3 Industrial Production organization will publicize and 
make these Federal regulations known to local governments and industry im- 
mediately following an atrack. 



B-IX-13 



Telecom-2, Request for State Assistance 

To: Director, State Telecommunication Agency 



Provision of telecommunication service in this local jurisdiction is 
inadequate to meet present and anticipated needs of essential local users, 
essential facilities and individual consumers. 

Authorized local uses have been reduced as far as possible by local 
government action. 

Assistance is needed to increase the level of service to and vithin 
this jurisdiction as quickly as possible. 

1. (List here repairs necessary or new services and facilities 
required.) 

2. 

3. 
k. 



Date 



(Name of Head of Local Government) 



By: 



Local Telecoramunica&ion Official 



B-IX-19 



Telecom-3j Request for Industry Assistance 
To: (Name of Compaxiy) 



Telecomnrunication service deficiencies have been reported from the 
following localities in this State : 



Locality Summary of Reported Deficiency 

Glasgow 

Hill County 

Chinook 

Etc. 



m 



Please advise this office when these deficiencies have been satis- 
fied. 



Date 



Director 

State Telecommunication Agency 



B-IX-20 



Telecom-4, Estimate of Continuing Telecammunlcation Service Requirements 

Forms (l) and (la) attached to this emergency action docume&t contain 
data on telecommunication service requirements in this State for the 90 day 
period co.fflmencing — _' 

The stated requirements include the needs of essential users, essential 
facilities and individual consiuners t.hx'oughout the State. 

The purpose of these estimates is to determine sxA stnticipate telecom- 
munication service demands which will be placed upon the industry during 
this 90 day period. 



Definitions 

"Civilian EequirementB" include the telecomrnunication sert'lci^s needed 
for emergency ci^»'il defense operations, for essential local activities, ajid 
for individual users. These estimates are provided by appropriete civil 

officials o 

"Military Requirements" include the telecommunication service needed 
to carry en mf.litar-y activities, Thess estimates are provided by appropri- 
ate military officials, 

"Supporting Resource Requirements" include the telecommunication service 
needed to maintain operation of essential facilities and services located in 
the State. These requirements are pr-ovided by appropriate Federal and State 
Resource Agencies, 



B-IX--21 



Teleccm-ii-, Form 1 



Siimmary Estimate of Continuing Requirements for Telecommunitation 
Service for 90 Day Period Commencing ^^^ 



Requirement Categories 



Summaxy of Requirements 



I. C ivilian 

First 30 days 



Following 60 days 



Total 90 days 



II. Military 

First 3^ days 



Following 60 days 



Total 90 days 



IIIo Supporting Resource Requirements 
First 30 days 



(# 



Following bO days 



Total 90 days 



Total Requirements 
First 30 days 



Following 60 days 



Total 90 days 



B-LX-22 



Telecom-i4-, Form la 



Estimate of Supporting Resource Continuing Requirements for Tele- 
commiinicatian Service by Resource Area for 90 Day Period Commencing 



(The infcrmation on this form is to "be summarized then transferred to 
Requirement Category III of Form 1, Telecom-^.) 



Resource Areas 



Congt.r^.;ctiori and Housing 
First 30 days 



Summary Requirements 



Following 60 days 



Total 90 days 



Electric Power and Gas 
First 30 days 



Following 60 days 



Total 90 days 



Etc. 



Totals 



First 30 days 



Following 60 days 



Total 90 days 



•IX-23 



1elecam.~3 3 Allocation of Telecoinmunication Service 



Form 1 



Allocation of Anticipated Available Telecommmiication Service tci 
90 Day Period Commencing ^______ 



Major Use Categories 



I. Civilian 

First 30 days 



Following 60 d^ys 



Total 90 days 



II. Military 

First 30 days 



Following 60 days 



Total 90 days 



III. Resource Areas 
First 30 days 



Following 60 days 



Total 90 days 



Totals 

First 30 days 



Following 60 days 



Total 90 days 



(# 



Sunmary of Service alloted to 
meet Teleeoa:.-^ Requirements 



B-^X-2i^ 



Teleccfm-5, Form la 



Allocation of Telecommunication Service by Resource Area for 90 Dav 
Period Commencing 

(This Form is to be used to make a f'arther allocatiop within the 
allocation made to Category III of Form 1, Telecom-5o) 



Resctirce Areas 



Construction and Housins 



First 30 days 



Following 60 days 



Total 90 days 



Electric_Power ^d Gas 
?irst~30 days ~ 



Following 60 days 



Total 9C1 days 



Etc< 



Totals 



First 30 days 



Following 60 days 



Total 90 days 



Sximmary of Service Alloted to 
Meet Telecom-i^ Requirements 



E-IX-25 



Telecom-6, Revised State Policy on Use of Remaining Teleconmunl cation Resource 

(Note: The content and substance of the revised policy will depend on 
the situation and the capahility expected to be available to meet contin- 
uing essential needs. Necessarily, this document will not be completed 
except in a test of the plan or at the appropriate point in a postattack 
situation.) 



This docximent will be, in essence, a Revised Telecom-1, State Tele - 
communication Policy and Guidance . " " 



' **^i^'<^*|?. 



B-IX-26 



Telecom-7;) Telecommunication Industry Support Requirements 



Estimate of Telecommunication Industry Support. Requirements fo:r 
90 Day Period Coramencing 



Following Total 
60 days 1 90 days 




E-IX-27 



Telecom-8, Telecommunication Industry Construction Requirements 
To: State Construction and Housing Agency- 



Following is a list and description of major construction, repair 
and modification of facilities that will he required to maintain desired 
levels of telecomm\mication common carrier service in this State diiring 
the 90 day period commencing . 



Construction Projects 

1. Name, location, type, and size of construction project; 
start and completion dates. 

(if project is underway or a construction contract has 
heen prepared, attach a copy of the contract document 
and summary bill of materials.) 

2. 

3. 
k. 



Date 



Director 

State Telecommunication Agency 



B-IX-28 



Telecom-9i Authorization to Telecomnomlcation Ccmmon Carriers to 
Obtain Suppor t dng"~Resources 



To : (Name of Companyj 



You are hereby authorized to obtain the support.ing resources in 
the quantities specified in the attached list. 




In placing orders for the above supporting resources^ you are author- 
ized to use the following certification: 



"This is an essential order authorized 
by the Director of State Telecom- 
munication. 

(signed) " 

(purchaser) ~~ ~ ~~~ 



Effective Date 



Director, State Telecommunication Agency 



B-IX-29 



3. Emergency Organization 

The organizational chart which follows identifies functional areas 
involved in the management of telecommunication in Montana in an emerg- 
ency. 

There are actions to provide for the continuity of operation of the 
State Telecommunication Agency. 

1. Copies of this plan and all action and reference documents have been 
placed and are immediately available in the Montana Executive Offices 
of the Mountain State Telephone and Telegraph Company, and in the 
State Emergency Operations Center. 

2. The Governor has selected and designated from the private sector 
qualified leaders with experience and knowledge of the tele- 
communication industry to provide executive direction in an 
emergency for the operation of the State Telecommunication 
Agency. Lines of succession to assure continuity of key staff 
for the operation of this Agency are provided in the roster of 
key personnel maintained in the Montana Executive Offices of 
the Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Company, the State 
Office of Emergency Planning, and in the State Emergency Oper- 
ations Center. 

3. The Assistant General Manager of the Mountain States Telephone 

and Telegraph Company is the Director of the State Telecommunication 
Agency. 

h. Upon activation of this plan, the Director of the State Tele- 
communication Agency and key staff with emergency assignements 
to the Agency establish headquarters at the State Emergency 
Operations Center. 



B-IX-30 









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B-IX-31 



Teleconmunlcation Reference Document No. 1 



LIST OF STATE INDUSTRY 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS (SIAC) 



Name 



Address 



Title 



1. RICHARD S. KOBER 



2. E. M. WILLIS 



3, FRED L. BARTLETT 



k. CHARLOTTE BRADER 



5. CHARLES A. LYNCH 



6 . JACK WII50N 



7. PAUL MCADAM 



Home : 
Office : 

Home : 
Office : 

Home: 
Office : 

Home: 
Office : 

Home: 
Office : 

Home: 
Office ; 

Home: 
Office ; 



CHAIRMAN 
1953 Patricia Lane 
Billings 
Station KGEL 
Billings 

VICE CHAIRMAN 
1712 Highland 
Helena 

Mountain States Tel. &, Tel. Co. 
560 N. Park Ave. Helena 



2035 Avenue D 
Billings 
Station KGHL 
Billings 



817 7th Street 
Havre 

Station KOJM 
Havre 



SIAC MEMBER 



SIAC MEMBER 



SIAC MEMBER 



b39 Logan Street 

Helena 

State Aeronautical Commission 

P.O. Box 1698, Helena 



SIAC MEMBER 



1 Hilmer Road 

Helena 

State Aeronautical Commission 

P.O. Box 1698, Helena 



SIAC MEMBER 



525 S. 11 
Livingston 
119 N Main 
Livingston 



Tel No. 

259-8587 
2'^2~hGkl 

1^1;. 2-2^75 
l^■i^3-2370 

252-0757 
2i^5-7153 

265-65^^^ 
265-78^1 

l^.U2-Ho6 
l+l;2-8l60 

1^1^3-3826 
UU2-8160 

222-3U03 
222-3333 



B-IX-32 



B-IX-32 



Telecom-Ref. Doc. No, 1 (contd,) 



Name 



Address 



Title 



8. ROBERT BENNETT 



9. DALE G. MOORE 



10. W. H. PATTERSON 



11. DALE C. WII50N 



12. TOM WEIR 



Heme: KGEZ Radio Station 

Kalispell 
Office: KSEZ Radio Station 

Kalispell 



Home: 2600 Queen 

Missoula 
Office: KDVO Radio Station 

PoO. Box 1405, Missoula 

Home: 586 Conrad Drive 

Kalispell 
Office: Station KOFI 

317 1st Ave. E. Kalispell 



Home: 122 8 ave. NW., 

Sidney- 
Office: Radio Station KGCX 

Sidney 



Home: 51U n, Tracy Avenue 

Bozeman 
Office: Radio Station KBMN 

Bozeman 



13. WAIIPER BLANKMEYER 



Home: i800 Lowell Avenue 

Butte 
Office: Montana Power Company 

ho E. Broadway, Butte 



SIA.C MEMBER. 



SIAC MEMBER 



SIAC MEMBER 



SIAC MEMBER 



SIAC MEMBER 



SIAC MEMBER 



- Tel. No, 

756-U33I 
756-4331 

549-4277 
543-7151 

756-7314 
756-9471 

462-2756 
482-2115 

586=5214 
586-2394 

792-6030 
723-5421 



B-lx-33 



Telecommunication Reference Document No. 2 



Attachment A 
Annex 3 
DM0 3000,1 
November 8, I963 



PRECEDENCE SYSTEM FOR FJBLIG CORRESPONDENCE MESSAGE 

TELEPHONE AM) T,W,X. SERFICES ESSENTIAL TO THE 

NAjTIONAL defense and SECURITY 



The following is a system of canEronication precedences for public 
correspondence message telephone and ToW.X. services to be provided 'by 
all domestic and international telephone carriers. 

I. Gradations of precedence to be provided, and precedence indicators 
therefor: 

A. Group Order of Precedence and Types of Telephone and ToWoX, Calls 
to which Applicable : 

Group; 1 . 

Precedence :lndi cater: "Priority 1 Emergency." 

The precedence indicator "Priority 1 Emergency" shall be used only 
for calls which directly concern the matters described herein: 

(1) Immediate dangers due to the presence of the enemy, 

(2) Intelligence reports on matters leading to enemy attack 
requiring immediate actions 

(3) Urgent calls to or ftrom the United States Arm.ed Forces and 
their Allies. 

(U) Proclamations of Civil Defense Emergency, 

Calls in this group shall be given precedence over all other calls. 



B-IX-3^ 



Telecom-Ref , Doco No. 2 (contdo) 



Group; 2 . 

Precedence indicator: "Priority 2 Emergency." 

The precedence indicator "Priority 2 Emergency" shall he used 
only for calls which require immediate completion for the 
national defense and security^ the successful conduct, of war, 
or to safeguard life and property, other than, those set 
forth in Group 1 above, and such indicator may he used for 
calls concerning the matters listed herein: 

(1) Initial reports of damage due to enemy action. 

(2) Civil defense activities immediately subsequent to 

and resulting from enemy attack, 

(3) Calls that require immediate completion to or ftom 
the United States Armed Forces and their Allies. 

(k) Natural damage of exteme seriousness and widespreaid 
damage. 

Calls in this group shall be given precedence over all 
other calls except those in Group 1, 

Group : 3 » 

Precedence indicator: "Priority 3 Emergency," 

The precedence indicator "Priority 3 Emergency" shall be 
used only for calls which require prompt completion for 
national defense and security, the successful conduct of 
war or to safeguard life and property, which do not merit 
Group 1 or Group 2 precedence, and such indicator may be 
used for calls concerning the matters listed herein: 

(1) Civil defense or the public health and safety, 

(2) Important governmental functions, 

(3) Supply and movement of food, 

(k) Maintenance of essential public services. 



•IX-35 



Telecom-Ref . Doc. No. 2 (Contd.) 



(5) Production or procurement of essential materials and 
supplies. 



(6) Calls that require rapid completion to or ftom the 
United States Armed Forces emd their Allies. 

Calls in this group shall be given precedence over all 
other calls except those in Groups 1 and 2, 

B. Calls of the types listed in each group hereinabove shall 
have no precedence over other calls within the same group. 
Where necessary to obtain a circuit for the irataediate completion 
of a telephone call having Priority 1 Emergency precedence, amy 
telephone conversation in pi'ogress other thajj. one havln-g 
priority shall be interrupted. Upon specific request of the 
calling party, a conversation in progress at the called 
telephone station shall be interrupted to complete calls 
having Priority 1, Priority 2, and Priority 3 Ejnergency 
precedence. 

II. Persons authorized to use the precedence system: 

A. The precedence system shall be available for use by the 
President of the United States, the Vice Pi'esidnet, Cabinet 
Officers, members of the United States Congress, Federal, 
State, and Municipal goveriimental departments and agencies, 
essential war industries, and ser\rices such as communications, 
tremsportation, power, public utilities, press associations, 
news media, health sind sanitation services, the American Red 
Cross Organization, and such other individuals and 
organizations as may be designated. 

B. The effectiveness of the system will depend upon whole- 
hearted cooperation on the part of persons authorized to employ 
it. Users should familiarize themselves with the purposes to 
be served by the use of each precedence group and the types of 
calls which may be assigned the respective precedences » It 
must always be remembered that the entire system will operate 
successfully only if the use of the precedence indicators is 
limited strictly to the intended purposes. Each authorized 
user, therefore, should consider whether each call requires 
any special precedence and exercise care not to request a 
higher precedence than the circumstances require. 



B-IX-36 



PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 



X TRMSPORTATIOW 



MONTMA PLAN 

FOR EMERGENCY 

MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES 



STATE OF MONTMA 

EMERGENCY RESOURCE MAMAGEMENT PLAN 

PART B " RESOURCE SECTIONS 



X TRANSPORrATION 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Introduction . . . , o . , . . » . , o « » . o » „ . . » , , 

1 , Emergency Actions , . , » « , . , . o o , . » , , , . , 

2, Emergency Action Documents . , o . , „ « » . , 
Index of Emergency Action Documents. 

3 , Emergency Orgsjiizationo . o <,,,,.,,. o . . 
h . Reference Documents .o.«ooo,.o.oo.o.. 



Page 

B-X- 1 

B-X-17 

B-X-20 

B-X-20 

B-X-U8 

B-X-62 



INTRODUCTION 

This section of the State of Montana Emergency Resource Management 
Plan contains over-all State policies and g^aidance for the provision and 
use of transportation services to meet essential needs in the State in a 
nuclear attack emergency. 



Definitions 

For the purpose of this plan a distinction is made hetween interstate 
(primary) transportation resources and intrastate (secondary) transportation 
resources. 

a. "Interstate (prJjnary) transportation resources" - those civil 

transporaticn facilities, equipment, and services controlled or 
provided by operators generally engaged in interstate transport- 
ation and air carrier aircraft and their related facilities, 
equipment, and services. The management and the provision of 
centralized control over the utilization of interstate (primary) 
transportation resources are the general responsibilities of the 
Office of Emergency Transportation and other appropriate Federal 
Transportation agencies, 

b„ "Intrastate (secondary) transportation resources" - those civil 
transportation facilities, equipment, and services provided or 
authorized for use primarily within a State, territory, or the 
District of Columbia, excluding air carrier aircraft and their 
related facilities, equipment and services. Management and con- 
trol of intrastate (secondary) transportation resources are the 
responsibilities of State and local governments. 

c, "Certified requests" as used in this plan means transportation 
requests for service placed with carriers and others rendering 
transportation services, or their agents, bearing a signed certi- 
fication that the request is for essential service authorized by 
the State. Carriers and others rendering transportation service, 
or their agents, are required to furnish the service specified in 
"certified requests," wherever possible^ 

General 

The process for furnishing transportation services in the State in a 
nuclear attack emergency involves two series of actions. First, essential 
immediate needs are identified and actions are taken to supply these needs. 
Second, and as soon as possible, future continuing needs for transportation 
service and expected future transportation capabilities are estimated, follow- 
ing which decisions are ma.de and actions are taken to direct these expected 
future capabilities to meet needs most essential to continued survival and 
recovery of the State and Nation. 



E-X-1 



Following is a brief description of Federal, State, local government, 
and tran-sportation industry roles in the emergency management and use of 
transportation services in the State. 



Federal Governjnent 

The Federal Governm3r.t is responsiTcde for working with the transport- 
ation industry - all modes, as appropriate ■= to assure maximum service and 
to provide transportation service to satisfy shortages at State and local 
government levels. The several Federal transport agencies, i.e., the Office 
of Emergency Traiosportation (Commerce)., the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
the Bureau of Public Roads ^ ar_d the Federal Aviation Agency, have established 
intern.iediate offices or representatives at State amd £,rea levels where 
appropriate. Representatives of these Federal Transport agencies are avail- 
able to the State Transportation organization for assistance and guidance. 

Transportation service is available to all users for essential movements 
in the interest of State and National defense. In accordance with Federal 
policy, users within the State may use interstate transportation services 
originating in or passing through the State for essential movements and the 
responsible State or local government agencies may claim for any transport- 
ation to meet the transportation requirements of the State. 

Federal Government transport agencies work with the transportation 
industry to assure maximum transportation services ajid for the furnishing 
of interstate transportation services to meet essential needs in the State 
of Montana, as well as to meet essential needs in other States which also 
depend on these interstate transportation services. 



State Government 

The State Transportation Agency develops, in cooperation with other 
organizations of the State goverinment, and provides, on behalf of the 
Governor, policies and g-^iidance consistent with State and Federal object- 
ives. The purpose of these policies and guidance is to assure application 
throug?iout the State of compatible measures for the conservation and use of 
transportation services euid to assure that essential movement needs are 
identified and met within the transportation services available. The State 
Transportation Agency accepts requests for State level assistance from local 
goverrjnent officials and arrsmges through the Federal transportation agencies 
with interstate transportation systems to provide service to correct local 
tremsportation shortages. As soon as possible after the attack, the State 
Transportation Agency, in cooperation with State organizations representing 
major activities within the State that use transportation services, antici- 
pates continuing needs and vrorks with the Office of Emergency Transportation 
State Representative to assure that arrangements are made to provide trans- 
portation sei-vices to meet ongoing demands of authorized essential users. 

In the event of a breakdown in communications or area isolation, when 
the appropriate Federal agency representative responsible for control of a 



B-X-2 



particular mode(s) is not available, the State exercises responsibility for 
the control of the affected mode(s) within the boundaries of that State, 
exclusive of air carrier aircraft. 

When Federal agency representation is available, control of transport- 
ation is the responsibility of the Federal agency representatives. 



Local Government 

Operational Survival Plans of the State and its political subdivisions 
contain provisions for the conservation axtd use of transportation services 
available to the localities in the State. These plaxis also provide for re- 
questing and obtaining State assistance to provide trajisportation to meet 
local shortages of transportation ser\"ices. 



Industries 

Transportation industries function under their own managements and 
operate their systems and facilities so as to provide the maximum possible 
service within their capabilities and to fill essential needs as specified 
by appropriate Federal, Sta^e, and local government authorities. This in- 
cludes responsibility for continuity of management; protection of personnel 
and facilities; conservation of supplies; restoration of damaged lines and 
terminals; rerouting; expariSion or improvement of operations; and the securing 
of necessary manpower, materials, and services. 



Users and Shippers 

Users of transportation and shippers, including Government agencies, 
are responsible for their own internal transportation procedures and for 
arranging directly with carriers for the actual accomplishment of movements. 

Transportation installations and facilities in Montana sjre essential 
to State and National survival and must be kept in operation to assure pro- 
vision of transportation services to meet essential needs for survival and 
recovery. In accordance with the provisions of this plan (see Tran-1, 
Attachment l) management of these facilities will identify their purchase 
orders for equipment, materials, maintenance, repair, and operating supplies 
to assure acceptance and deliveries on these purchase orders by suppliers. 
Authorities of county and municipal governments will, within their capability, 
assure provision of electric power, manpower, communications, water, fuels, 
and other locally available resources requisite to the continuing operation 
of these transportation facilities. 

The arrangement described herein also include major intrastate trans- 
portation companies in their jurisdictions to identify purchase orders to 
obtain maintenance, repair, operation supplies, and equipment to assure con- 
tinuous operations. 



B-X-3 



Flow Charts 

Following are flow charts for the various modes of transportation (i.e.^ 
railj motor, and air) showing the process and the actions to he taken by- 
Federal, State, and local governments to assiire a continuing provision of 
transportation services to meet essential needs in the State in a nuclear 
E,ttack emergency. 

The legends accompanying the charts identify: 

A. actions to be taken inmediately to provide immediately needed 
transportation services essential for survival, and 

E. actions to be taken as soon as possible to anticipate future 
continuing needs and to direct transportation services toward 
meeting the most ixrgent needs for continuing survival and re- 
covery. 



Flow Chart No. 1 

Introduction - Transportation (Railroad ) 

Following is a brief description of Federal, State, and local government 
roles in the provision and use of rail transport services available to the 
State in a nuclear emergency. 

Federal Government 

The Federal Government is responsible for working with the interstate 
railroad industry to provide rail transport services to meet essential trans- 
portation needs in the State of Montana as well as to meet essential needs of 
other States which depend on these interstate systems for essential rail trans- 
port services. 

The Interstate Commerce Commission, Bureau of Railroad Safety and Service, 
has designated a State Senior Executive Reservist to work with State Trans- 
portation officials for this purpose. This Federal agency has also designated 
ICC Terminal Reservists at selected railroad terminal axeas within the State 
to work with State and Area transportation officials for the same purpose. 

The list of names, emergency locations, and telephone numbers of these 
Federal officials will be maintained by the State Transportation Agency at the 
State Emergency Operations Center. 

State Government 

The State Transportation Agency has a Rail Transport Division to work 
with Federal transportation officials to obtain interstate rail transportation 
services to meet shortages reported by local governments. As soon as possible 
after attack, the State Rail Transportation Division, in collaboration with 



B-X-h 



other State organizations representing major activities in the State that 
use transportation services, anticipates futiire interstate rail transport 
needs and arranges with Federal rail transportation officials for service 
to meet these ongoing needs. 

The State has adopted for its use as State general orders the ICC 
Czeneral Orders, ICC-TM-1 through ICC-TM-12, listed by subject in Reference 
Document No, 1 attached to this plan. Such orders, therefore, are the 
governing policy applicable to the appropriate surface transportation mode 
in the State. 

Local Government 

Operational Survival Plajis of the State of Montana and its political 
subdivisions contain provisions for authorizing essential local users and 
essential facilities to place certified transportation requests on cajrriers 
for essential rail transport ser/ices. 



B-X-5 





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-X-7 



Flow Chart No. 2 

Introduction - Trax.spcrtatio::-. (Motor ) 

Following is a brief description of Federal., State, and local govern- 
ment roles in the provision and use of motor transport services available 
to the State in a nucleeir emergency » 

I'ederal Government 

The Federal Government is responsible for working with the interstate 
notor transport, industry to provide motor transport services to meet essen- 
tial transportation needs in the State of Montana as well as to meet essen- 
tial needs of other States which depend on these interstate systems for 
essential motor trarisport services o 

The Interstate Comrcerce Ca/inission, Bureau of Operations ajid Compliance, 
has established a State representative located at 3l8 U.S. ?ost Office 
Building, Billings, to work with State transportation officials for this 
purpose . 

S tate Government 

The State Transportation Agency has a Motor Transportation Division to 
work with Federal transportation officials to obtain interstate motor trans- 
portation ser/ices to meet shortages reported by local governments. As soon 
as possible after attack the State Motor Transportation Division, in collab- 
oration with other State orgai.'.izations representing major activities in the 
State that use transportation services, anticipates future interstate motor 
transport needs and arranges with Federal motor transportation officials for 
services to meet these ongoing needs. 

The Motor Transpoi't Division is comprised of em Emergency Motor Trans- 
port Boai'd made up of a chalrmarj. designated by the Governor with representat- 
ives of the State Motor Transport regulatory commission, the ICC, and the 
Motor trsJisport industry to advise and assist on motor transport matters in 
the State » 

Where motor transportation is disrupted through enemy action, oper- 
ations are directed from the assembly and control points of the various motor 
transportation headquarters within each county in accordance with direction 
from the Emergency Motor Transport Board which is a part of the Motor Trans- 
port Division of the State of Montan.a Transportation Agency. 

The State has adopted for its use as State general orders the ICC 
General Orders, ICC-TM-1 through ICC-TM-12, listed by subject in Reference 
Doc-oment No. 1 attached to this plan. Such orders, therefore, are the govern- 
ing policy applicable to the appropriate surface transportation mode in the 
State. 



^ 



B-X-8 



Local Governments 

Operational Survival Plans of the State of Montana and its political 
subdivisions contain provisions for authorizing essential local users and 
essential facilities to place certified transportation requests on carriers 
for essential motor traiisport services. 



# 



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E-X-11 



Flow Chart No. 3 



Introdueticn 



Following is a "brief description of Federal^ State _, and local govern- 
ment roles in the prevision sjad use of air transport service available to 
the State in a nuclear attack emergencyo 

Federal Goverr!mer.t 

The Federal Government is responsible for work±ng with the air carrier 
industry to provide interstate air traaspcrt services to meet essential needs 
in the State of Montana as well as to provide air transport services to other 
States whicn depend on these interstate air can-ier systems to meet essential 
air transport needs in a nuclear attank emergency. 

The Federal A;viation Agency 'has designated a District office located at 
Helena., Montana to work with State aviation officials to assist in the pro- 
vision of air transport se.rvicesj provided "by other than air cander aircraft, 
to meet essential needs of the State as well as essential needs of other States, 
This Federal agency also assists the State in restoring and developing air- 
ports. 

State G overnment 

The Aviation Division of the State Transportation Agency develops, in 
cooperation with other organizations of State government, and provides, on 
hehalf of the Governor, policies and guidance consistent with State and Feder- 
al air transport objectives , The purpose of these policies and guidajice is to 
assiire application throughout the State of compatible measures for identify- 
iR.g the most essential air transport needs and to meet these needs within the 
air transport- service available to the State, The Aviation Division aJ.so works 
with campanies operating ether than air carrier aircraft charter services and 
individuals ai.d compar^ies owning other th.an air carrier aircraft for air trans- 
port services to meet shcrt.ages reported by local govenaaents. 

As soon as possible after attack, the Aviation Division in cooperation 
with other State organizations representing major activities that use air 
transport services anticipates continuing needs and arranges with the Federal 
air transport agencies for air transport services to meet these ongoing needs. 

Local Govemroent 

Operational Survival Plans of the State of Montana and its political 
subdivisions contain provisions for authorizing essential users and essential 
facilities in their jurisdictions to place certified transportation requests 
on air carriers and. on owners and operators of other than air carrier air- 
craft to obtain air transport services, Desi^iated aviation officials of 
local government assist authorized local users to obtain air transport ser- 
vices and where necessary assign priorities on local use. When shortages in 
local service arise, local governtnents request State Aviation officials to 
arrange either directly or if necessary through the Federal transport agencies 
for air transport services to meet these local shox'tages. 



E-X=12 



(Note: Detailed instructions for the use of General Aviation Aircraft (all 
civil aircraft except p-ablic carrier aircraft) for air transpor-b services 
are contained in the Montana Plsji for State and Regional Defense Airlift 
(SAEDA) o SAKDA has been distributed to all Montana registered aircraft 
owners, Montana airpori; mangers, district coordinators^ and area coordin- 
ators, SARDA is also available in the State Eitiergency Operations Center. 

The State Directoi' of SARDA is the Director of the Aviation Divison of 
the State Transportation Agency,) 



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Highway Traffic Regulation 

Highway traffic reguiatlcn is a function requiring participation and 
teamwork of highway departments and police and with organized highway users 
at both State and local levels working in close association with the Trans- 
poi-tation Agency of the State of Montana. 

Implemeatation. and direction of highway traffic regulation is employed 
on congested routes only where and so long as traffic demand exceeds capacity, 
aj3.d in restricted areas on rcrates where and so long as highway users must "be 
protected from exposu;re to radiological or other hazards resulting ftom use 
of modem, weapons » 

The designation of reg-ulated rautes will te made ty the State highway 
department working in close cooperation with the State police. 

On as.y category of regiilated route requiring use of a priority permit, 
the fcroi cf peroslt used will 'be as prescribed ty the U,S, Bureau of Public 
Rca^s, 

Interstate problems will be resolved normally by cooperative action of 
highway traffic regulation centers of s^Joining States. Special problems 
which cannot be resolved will be referz-ed to the U.S. Bioreau of Public Roads. 

Details of Highway Traffic Reg-j.lation are contained in the Montana 
Highway I}ei)artment ' s Traffic Regulation and by reference here, it becomes an 
integral part, of the Mom:ana Transportation Resource Section. The Montana 
Highway Traffic Regulation Plan is on file at the Montana Highway Department. 
Local levels of government should request those sections of the plan which 
affect their respective jurisdictions from the Highway Department. 



C^ 



ir 



i^ 



B-x-16 



1. Emergency Actions 

The following actions are taken on behalf of the Governor at State 
level by State transportation officials to provide policies and guidance 
applicable throughcjut the State on the provision ar.d use of transportation 
services. 

The emergency action e:r.d reference documents contained here have been 
prepared and placed with appropriate State a;ad local officials during the 
preattack planning pi'ocesso 

a. Actions to P rovide Iramediate Transpo rtation Services 

(1) Issue on behalf of the C-ovei-nor policies aiid guidance 
applicable throughout the State covering the provision 
and use of transportation services within the State. 
(Trar;.-1, State Transportation Policy and Guidarice,) 

(2) Confi-rm with the Si.ate representative of the various 
Federal Government transportation agencies arrangements 
with inters-cate trai'-sportation compa:aies to furnish 
services on certified requests received from users or 
shippers in the State (Tran-2;, Request for Ptirnishing 
of interstate (primaiy) Transportation Services.) 

(3) Notify intrastate transportation industry of authorization 
used by essential local users and essential facilities to 
certify requests for transpor-batlon services for all modes. 
(Tran-3, Authorization on Use of Intrastate Transportation 
Sei'vices,) 

(h) Act on request from local governments and arrange with 

intrastate transportation carriers and through the Federal 
transpo:rtation agency representatives with interstate 
transportation carriers to f-arnish serv-ices to meet local 
shortages of transpoi-tation service, (Tran-4, Request State 
Assistsiice; e^id Tran-5, Request to Industry to Adjust Ser- 
vice to meet shortages at Local Levels.) 

'^ ' Actions to Provide Continuing Transportation Services 

As soon as shortages of transportation service at local govern- 
ment levels are being satisfied through the furnishing of service by 
transport-systemsj the State Transportation Agency takes the following 
actions to anticipiate continuing needs for service and to make arrange- 
ments for furnishing service on a continuing basis to meet these needs. 

(5) Consult with State civil defense officials. Federal military 
officials, ai^d appropriate State resoui-ce officials to esti- 
mate the continuing tra:isportation requirements for movement 
t'iiat will be needed j.n the State during the ensuing 90 -day 
period, (Tvan~6, Estimate of Continuing Transportation Ser- 
vice Requirements.) 



5-X-lT 



(6) Obtain from the State office of the appropriate Federal trans- 
portation agency estimates of transportation capacities and 
capabilities which can be furnished by interstate transportation 
systems for continuing use in the State during the ensuing 90- 
day period. (Tran-T^ Estimate of Continuing Interstate Trans- 
portation Capability to Meet Transportation Service Requirements.) 

(7) Obtain from the management of intrastate (second.ary) transport- 
ation systems estimates of transportation capacities and 
capabilities which can be furnished for continuing use in the 
State during the ensuing 90-'day period, (Tran-8, Estimate of 
Continuing Intrastate and Local Transportation Capability.) 

(8) If anticipated capabilities cf the transportation systems are 
inadequate to meet the estimated requirements for transportation 
services^ and adjustments in req;j.irements cannot be negotiated, 
refer to the Reso-'Orce Priorities Board for recommendations to 
the Governor on the allocation of anticipated trajisportation 
services among conpeting programs, (Tran-9ji Allocation of 
Transportation Services . ) 

(9) Issue revised State policies on the use of transportation 
services in the State to conform with the Governor's decision. 
(Tran-10, Revised State Transportation Policies.) 

(10) Consult with the State office of the Federal Office of Emergency 
Trajisportation and the management of intrastate transportation 
companies and develop est^jnates of continuing requirements for 
power, petrole\am products, manpower, equipment, operating sup- 
plies and services that will be needed to maintain operations 

of essential transportation systems in the State during the en- 
suing 90-day period. Pi*esent these operating requirements 
estimates to appropriate State resource agencies. (Tran-11, 
Transportation Industry Support Requirements.) 

(11) Consult with the State Office of the Federal Office of Emergency 
Transportation snd the management of intrastate transportation 
companies and develop estimates of emergency repair and con- 
struction of essential transportation systems and facilities 

that will be required during the ensuing 90-day period and present 
these requirements estimates to the State Construction and Housing 
Agency, (Tran-12, Transportation Industry Construction Require- 
ments.) 

(12) Inform the State office of the Federal Office of Emergency 
Transportation of supplies of supporting reso^arces that will be 
available in the State for acquisition and use by the transport- 
ation industry to maintain essential operations during the 
ensuing 90-day period, (Tran-13, Allocation of Supporting Re- 
sources to Interstate (Primary) Transportation Industry.) 



i 



B-x-18 



(13) Inform the State office of the Federal Office of Emergency 

Transportation and the management of intrastate transportation 
companies of approved construction and major repair projects. 

(ik) Authorize the management of intrastate trajisportation companies 
to certify purchase orders and construction contracts to obtain 
approved quantities of supporting resources and to arrange 
with contractors to undertake approved construction and major 
repair projects. (TraJi-lU, Authorization to Major Transport- 
ation Carriers eind Facilities to Obtain Supporting Resources.) 



B-X-19 



2. Emergency Action Documents 

Following sire emergency action documents to implement the foregoing 
emergency actions : 

(note : These action documents are illustrative in character to convey 
as clearly as possible the substance of the actions involved. During the 
process of expediting deliveries to meet \irgent local needs, the quickest 
means of communication betweer. levels of government and with industry will 
be used. The forms illustrate the kind of information to be transmitted 
over telephone or other available means of fast communication,) 

Index of Emergency Action Docijments 

Train-l, State Transpoi-tation Policy and C-uidanee 

Traji-2, Request for Furnishing of Interstate (Primary) TrsLnsportation Services 

Tran-3, Authorization on Use of Intrastate (Secondary) Transportation Services 

Tran-U, Request State Assistance 

Tran-5j Request to Industry to Adjust Service to Meet Shortages at Local Levels 

Tran-6, Estimate of Continuing Transportation Service Requirements 

Trem-Tj Estimate of Continuing Interstate (Primary) Transportation Capa - 
bility to Meet Treuisportation Service Requirements 

Tran-8, Estimate of Continuing Intrastate and Local Transportation Capability 

Tran-95 Allocation of Transportation Services 

Tran-10, Revised State Transportation Policies 

Tran-11, Transportation Industry Support Requirements 

Tran-12, Transportation Industry Construction Requirements 

Train -13, Allocation of Supporting Resources to Interstate (Primary) Trans - 
portation Industry 

Tvas.-lk, Authorization to Major Tremsportation Carriers and Facilities to 
Obtain Supporting Resources 



(f 



B-X-20 



Tran-1 , State 'Praasportatlgn Policy and Guidance 



To: Heads of Political Subdivisions 



Gu idance for Local Gover runents. It is essential that transportation 
services availaljle for use in this State be cai'efully conserved and re- 
stricted to Immediate and urgent uses for local., State ezid National sui-vival 
and recovery until the continuing trazisportation capability can be assessed 
and transportation se^^'/lceK that will be available for less essential needs 
can be determined. 

In order to (l) prevent waste and dissipation of transportation services 
throughout the State, (2) provide transportation services to meet Immediate 
and urgent needs, an.d (3) to assure continuing transportation services for 
local uses, appropriate officials of loc^al gove::-nni2nt az'e requested to take 
the f ollovj'ing actions : 

lo AnrLouuice a:ic. enforce restrictions on the use of transportation 
services c 

2, Provide instructions to the transportation industry on how to meet 
essential xieedSo 

3. .A.uthori::e essentia], local users to obtain transportation services 
for immediate and urgent needs., 

^o Authorir,e essential facilities ar.d essential local users to certify 
requests for necessary transportation services using the following certifi- 
cation: 



This is en emergency transportation 
i-ecuest authorised by the State of 
Montai'ia , 

(signatu re of E ihip per o r User) " 



Instimct essential facilities and essential local users to place these certi- 
fied requests on their customa^ry agents or companies o (Local governments 
have been provided by the State with a list of the essential facilities located 
in their .jurisdictions.) 

In the event transportation services are not adequate to meet all essen- 
tial needs, local governments should reduce authorized local uses. Concurrently 
they should report shortages of service and, request appropriate officials of 
State government to take actions to increase transportation se.rvices to the 
local jurisdiction. 



Effective Date 



Governor of the State of Monte-na 



By: 



5tate 'transportation Agency Director 



B~X--21 



Tran-1, Attachment 1 

Background Information 

The Governor has issued general policy on the use of essential resources 
in the immediate postattack period. These policies are set forth in Part A 
of the State plan. Txiey have teen fuirnished to appropriate officials of the 
political subdivisions of the State. 

In general, these State policies provide for temporary freezing of 
retail inventories of essential items and immediate and continuing release 
of these items to meet urgent military and civilian needs and to maintain 
operations of facilities esser.tial to continued survival and recovery. They 
provide for continuing resupply of local secondary inventories as vrell as 
inventories of essential faellitiss which obtain their supplies from wholesale 
and primary so\irceso 

In addition, the Governor has issued a proclamation (RM-6) requesting 
the executive heads of the political subdivisions in this State to provide 
resources from locally available supplies to carry on immediate and urgent 
activities for survival and to maintain the operation of essential facilities. 
In accordance with this direction from the Governor, local governments are 
requested to inform essential users of resources and persons engaged in the 
operation of essential facilities how to identify their purchase orders, con- 
tracts, and other purchase arrangements to obtain deliveries of supplies and 
services. 

Trajisportation installations and facilities in Montana are essential to 
State and National survival and must be kept in operation to assure an ade- 
quate flow of transportation services for local. State, and National survival 
and recovery. 

Local governments, upon attack, notify the management of these facilities 
to certify their purchase orders and contracts to obtain production materials, 
capital equipment, and maintenance, repair and operating supplies or to place 
contracts for essential repair and construction as follows. 

1. Essential Transportation facilities use the following State certi- 
fication to identify: 

a. purchase orders for supplies of electric power, gas, solid 
fuels, ajid comm'onication services, and 

b, constraction contracts for repair and construction of facilities. 



"This is an essential order 
authorized by the State of 
Montana. 



(Signature of Purchaser ) ' 



B-X-22 



2. Essential Transportation facilities identify their purchase orders 
for supplies of production materials;, capital equipment, and other mainten- 
ance, repair^ and operating supplies in accordance with the rating and certi- 
fication provisions of Federal emergency regulations issued by the Business 
and Defense Serx^ices Administration of the U„So Dejartment of Commerce upon 
attack. The State Industrial Production organization publicizes and makes 
known these Federal regulations to local goverEments and industry immediately 
following an attack. 

Essential Local Users are (l) civilian crgasisatioas engaged in essen- 
tial civilian activities including persons^ equipment^ and facilities pro- 
viding essential survival care and services to people^ (2) military organ- 
izations engaged in essential military activities, arid (3) farmers producing 
essential fool and workers employed in essential facilities or local establish- 
ments providing essential items and services to people. Less essential 
individual users are not included except, those requiring irac'.ediate transportation 
services for individual or fam.ily survival. 

Essential Facilities are (l) military establisl'iments engaged in immediate 
retaliatory or defense operations, (2) electric power, gas, and water utility 
systems, (3) ii;.austrial plants producing or processing essential items, (U) 
major wholesale establishments storing or distributing essential items, and 
(5) transportation and ccsnnr-inications systems providing essential services. 



B-X~23 



Tran-2 , Request for Furnishing of Interstate Transportation Services 

To: State and Area Offices of Appropriate Federal Transportation Agencies, 



Local governments In this State;, in accordance with State policy and 
guidance, have Identified and authorized essential local users auid essential 
facilities in their jurisdictions to cert.ify their requests for transport- 
ation services with the following certification; 



"This is an emergency transportation 
request authorized oy the State of 
Montana » 

(signature of Shipper or User) " 



Local and intrastate transportation industries aad operators have been 
instructed to accept certified transportation requests and to famish the 
services requested. They have in turn been authorized to use this same 
certification on their requests for services, equipment or operating supplies 
needed to supplement their regular transpor-tation service o 

You are requested to arrange with interstate transportation operating 
systems of your appropriate mode for acceptance of these State certified 
requests for transportation within their capabilities to famish service. 



Effective Date 



Director, State Transportation Agency 



B-X-Zk 



Tran-3, Authorization on Use of Intrastate Transportation Seivices 



Tc; 



(Name of Each Intrastate Transportation Industry CompaJiy 



Local governments in this State, in accordance with State policy and 
guidance, have identified and authorized essential local users and essential 
facilities in their jurisdictions to certify their requests for transportation 
services with the following certification: 



"This is an emergency transportation 
request authorized by the State of 
Montana 

(Signature or Shipper or User) " 



You are to accept and furnish service when presented a State certified 
transportation request subject to your capability to f\arnish such service. 

You will receive, from time to time, directions from the State 
Transportation Director to adjust your services to meet shortages of service 
reported in particular localities. 

You are authorized to use the certification quoted above to certify your 
purchase orders for equipment, services, and operating supplies needed for 
your continued operations » 

If you are unable to obtain needed equijjraent, services, and supplies to 
meet the certified transportation requests placed on you, notify this office 
promptly. 



Effective Date 



Director, State Transportation Agency 



B-X-25 



Tran-U , Request State Assistance 
To: Director, State Transportation Agency- 
Transportation serri-iees in this local jurisdiction are Inadequate to 
meet present and anticipated needs of essential local users and essential 

facilities. 

Authorized local uses arid use levels have been cut back as far as 
possible by local goverrcnent control and actiono Assistance is needed to 
increase transport.ation services ii- this local jurisdiction as quickly as 
possible. 

Following are estimated increases in weekly transportation services 
req;aired to meet essential local needs. 



T>-pe 
Sei'vice 


WEEKLY INCREASE REQUIRED 


Remarks : 
(Special equipment, etc.) 


Ton Miles 


Pass. Miles 


Rail 








Motor 








Air 









Date 



(Name cf Head of Local Government) 



By: 



(Signature) 



Local Trs^asportation Officer 



B-X-26 



Tran-^ , Request to Industry to Adjust Service to Satisfy Shorteiges of 
Service at Local Levels 



To: (intrastate and Local Transportation Industry Companies) 



Shortages in transportation services have "been reported from the 
following localities in the area where you furt.ish transportation services. 



Suirrrnary of Local Deficiencies in Transportation Services 


Locality 


Rail 


Motor 


Air 


Gt, Falls 

Silver Bow County 

Etc, 


Ton 
Mi. 


PasE. 
Mi, 


Ton 
Mi, 


Pass, 
Mi. 


Ton 
Mi. 


Pass, 
Mi. 














You are directed to adjust your services to correct the above 
deficiencies in services where, in yoixr judgtLent, this can be done 
without creating unacceptable shortages in other lacalities in the 
area where you furnish transportation services. 

Report to this office the increase in transportation service 
you can furriish to the above named conmiunities. 

Date 


Director 

State Transportation Agency 



B-X-27 



Tran-6 , Estimate of Continuing Transportation Services Requirements 

Form 1, attached to this emergency action document contains civil re- 
quirements movement data on transportation services which will he required 
in this State for a 90-d.ay period commencing . 

The requirements stated include freight and i)assenger movements for 
which intrastate and local transportation industries will furnish movement 
services on authorized traxisportation requests from essential users and 
essential facilities. 

Procedures for claims, allocations, and the furnishing of service 
arrangements are included in the emergency plajis of the Federal transport- 
ation agencies. 

The purpose of these State requirements -for -movement estimates is to 
determine and anticipate the ton miles and passenger miles of service needed 
from interstate transportation sources under Federal jurisdiction and to 
fjamlsh trajisportation services to meet the shortages of intrastate and local 
transportation services. 

Definitions 

a. "Civilian requirements" Include all needed movement to carry on 
emergency civil defense operations and to maintain essential local 
activities. These civilian requirements estimates are provided by 
appropriate civilian officials. 

b. "Military requirements" Include the movement requirements needed 

to carry on military activities and to maintain and operate military 
Installations. These military movement estimates are provided by 
appropriate military officials. 

c. "Resource support, requirements" Include the transportation move- 
ment requirements needed to maintain operation of essential 
facilities under the cognizance of Federal ajid State resource 
organizations functioning in the State. These support resource 
movement requirements are provided by appropriate State resource 
agencies. 

The steps to be taken in arriving at an estimate of continuing transport- 
ation movement requirements are as follows : 

1. Determine the origin and destination of the traffic flow. 

2. Measure the mileage by mode using basing points located near the 
center of traffic origin or destination in each area. 

3. Determine ton mile and passenger mile movement requirements between 
origin and destination points. (Passengers or tonnage to be moved 
multiplied by mileage between origin and destination equals pas- 
senger or ton miles.) 



B-X-28 



'4. Determine equipnent needed. 

5« Determine resources needed to support operations. 

Following are the general categories of personnel and commodities to be 
included where appropriate, Obher commodity breaMowns and classes may be 
employed so long as they are compatible with aiid convertible to these terms- 



a. 



iMSSSS^M,' Persons to be mcyvei, including totals of those 
moving as individuals aad as grrwpso 

^' Geaeral Cargo o Ai^r of the -raz-loas goods and items hauled in 
usual lots or containers, such as boxes^ crates, bales, bags, 
barrels, and which do net require special vehicle or vessel 
or special handling which would necessitate its being reported 
ur..der one of the other c^ategorieso 

c» ££I?iShable_C.grso, That cargo requiring refrigeration or other 
temperatur-e control or special protection from the elements to 
prevent deterioration or loss. Freeze cargo will be reported 
separately from, chill caxgo, 

^» E:y;EJ:2siYes a-^-i Dangerous Car^Oo Those eai-goes, such as ammu- 
nition and explosives, which, because of the hazards involved 
in their handling and shipment, require specialized and iso- 
lated loailng and storage. 

^' Bulk Dry Cargo. Unpackaged dry grain, minerals, ores, and 

lumber which is to be loaded and trajisported in its "natural" 
bulk state. Edible products will not be grouped with inedible. 

^' ^iiiLirJiJM_£.^£££» Petroleum products and other unpackaged 

liquids which are to be loaded and transported in bulk. Acids, 
chemicals, and other products requiring special care or convey- 
ances should be separately listed. Edible oils and milk will 
be in separate listrlngs from mineral products. 

g« Uncrated Vehicles and Aircraft . Any vehicle or aircraft pro- 
cessed for shipment without boxing or crating. Items above 
35 short-tons will be separately reported or annotated. 

^' Outsize Cargo. That cai-gc which, because of its bulky size, 
weight, shape, or handlfjig characteristics, requires special 
loading, bracing, and transport. Any items that exceed in any 
dimension 8' height, 8' width, 26' length, or 50,000 pounds in 
weight, or the loading requirements of standard vessels and 
craft . 

Information wliich is not reportable ur.der the above for-mat, such as spec- 
ial routings or diversions and prospective aft andonment , will be explained in 
footnotes or coveiing srjwro.axy material. 



B-.X-29 



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B-X-32 



Tran-7., EstJTnate of Cont inuing interstate T'rap.sportation Capability 
to Meet Transport ation S ervice Reguix-ements 

To: Appropriate Fedeial Transportation Agency State Office 

You 8;re requested to submit estiajates of transportation service capa- 
bilities which caji be furnished by interstate transportation systems for 
continuing use in the State dta-ing the er^suing ^j-day period. 

Please subrait such estimates by mode(s) ia terms of ton miles for 
freight an.d. cargo, and passer^ger ndies for mcveiiient of persons. 



Date 



Director^ State Traaaspos-tation Agency 



B-X-.33 



Tran-7, Attachment 1 

Background Information 

Goverrjf.ents at all levels mast "be prepared to determine the capability 
of the transportation system serving their pajrticular jurisdiction and to 
assess any damage occurring to that system. 

For local government, this might ix^clude bus service, local trucking, 
local automobiles, taxi fleets, etc. For a State, this might include intra- 
state bus, rail, air, and tracking lines, etc. For Federal Government, this 
must represent the capability of interstate (primary) transpoi-tation re- 
sources. 

Such a task for any level of goveamment involves the collection and 
analysis of significant amounts of data abcfat transportation. To assist 
the States and local governments in the process of data collection, the 
Federal CJoveitiment transport s,gency representatives in a State will provide 
factors which can be used to determine the capability of the transportation 
system. In most cases these factors will have to be adjusted to the local 
system before they can be utilized, because the Federally developed factors 
have been detei°ird.ned on the basis of national averages. 

Capability analysis is defined as the procedure for determining the 
amount of transporte.tion service which a system or area can feasibly pro- 
duce on the basis of the available transportation equipment, facilities, 
travelvays, manpower, and other resou.rces. Generally speaking, the capa- 
bility of a transportation vehicle (railway cars, aircraft, trucks) is 
dependent upon the thx-ee major faetoi-s of load, speed, and utilization 
(time in motion,) The capability of the system, simply stated, is the fleet 
average load, speed, and utilization (time and motion) multiplied by the 
number of vehicles in the fleet. It is normally expressed in terms of ton 
miles or passenger miles for some particular time period (hour, day, week, 
month, or yeai-,) 

In addition to the thr-ee major factors that determine the capability 
of transport equipment, there ax'e several other factors that affect the 
productivity of transport equipment such as terminals, travelways, manpower, 
fuel, spare par-bs and other supplies, power, maintenance, and repair. 

In expressing the capability of a peirticular transportation system, it 
is not sufficient to state the number of tons or persons that can be carried 
over a given distance in a given time. Because the commodities carried vary 
significantly in their transport characteristics, special equipment has been 
developed for the carriage of these special commodities. For this reason 
the transportation service provided by a tank car caxmot be equated with the 
service offered by a stock car or a freight car. 

This being t?ie case, it is necessary for any capability analysis to in- 
clude more breakdown of the transportation equipment into classes represent- 
ing the general types of ser\'ice provided by the equipment. 



% 



B-X-?li- 



Tran-T, Attachment 1 (contd.) 

Reference Document No. 2., attached to this plan, provides such a class 
listing and in addition, assigns responsibility among the several levels of 
government for the collection of data pertinent to the subject of transport- 
ation capability. 

The steps to be taken in analysis of transportation capability follow: 

1. Inventory the equipment, facilities, and travelways composing the 
system, and the majipower, fuel, and other resources needed to 
support the system. 

2. Locate the inventory by geographical area of operation in accord- 
ance with metropolitan areas of the State and rural areas of the 
State. 

3. Divide the equipment inventor-y into the general classes of usage, 
as indicated in Reference Document No. 2, 

\. Use peacetime rates of load, speed, and utilization to determine 

t?ie system capability. Express the results in ton miles or passeng- 
er miles per time period for each class of equipment. 

5» Determine the amounts of resoiurces used or consumed in producing 
the amount of transportation service developed by the system. 



B-X-35 



Estimate of ContJEuing Intrastate aixd I^cal Transportation 
Capability to Meet Transportation Ser'/lee Requirements 



To: Intrastate and Local Transportation Industry Ccmpanies 



You are directed to submit ajiformation as to the service capability 
of your system, including equipment, fuel aed maintenance situation, man- 
power situation, and condition of carasunications . 



(t 



Date 

Director of Appropriate Mode 
Division of the State 
Transportation Agency 



(io8. Rail Transport Division, 
Motor Transport Division, 
Aviation Division,) 



B-X-36 



Tran-8, Form 1 



State Transportation Agency 
Rail Transport Division 

Evaluation Report Form. 

Ao Date & Time ; Location :_ 

Bo Operational Status; Goo d Fair- Poor_ 

C, Available and Operational: Rolling St ock 

1, Locomotives 



2o Freight cars - Type & Capacity 
3. Passenger cars - Type & Capacity_ 



Fuel & Maintenance Situation: (Quantity Available) 

lo Diesel Fuel Supplies: Adequate Inadequate_ 

2. Lubricant Supplies: Adequate Inadequate 



3o Repair & Replacement Supplies: Adequate Inadequate 

Uo Miscell.aneous Supplies: 

Manpower Situation: (N^imbe^ Available) 

lo Supervisors: Adequate Inadequate ^Surplus 

2, Engineers: Adequate^ Inadequate Surplus 

3. Mechanics: Adequate Inadequate Surplus 

k. Operating PersoriJiel: Adequate Inadequate Surplus_ 

Communications : 

Good Fair Poor 



B-X-37 



Tran-8, Form 2 



State Transportation. Agency- 
Motor Transport Division 
Evaluation Rey orb Form 
A. Date & Time; Location: 



i# 



B . Operational 3-hatu.s : :>ooA Fair Poor_ 

Caaipieteiy Ou.t 

C. Empty Vehicles Avs,ilafcle asd Operatiorial: 
io Tractors - -I'lype ^. L'^apaiity 



2, Trailers - Type & Capa^ity^ 



Trucks - Type & Capacity 



Refrigerators - Type & Capacity 



D. Fijel & Maintenance Situatio.i; (Qixantity Available) 

1« Diesel Fuel Supplies: Ade'ic.at?.__ Inadequate_ 

2. Gasoline Supplies: Adequate Inadequate 



3p Repair & Replacement Supplies: Adequate Inadequate 

k. Miscellaneous Supplies: 
E. Manpower Situation: (iMamber Available) 

1. Supervisors Dispatchers 

2o Drivers Helpers 

3o Mechanics Helpers 

ko Operating Personnel for Assemoiy Area 



B-X-38 



• 



Tran-8, Form 2 (Contd.) 

F. Communication Ability: Good Fair Poor 

Completely Out 

G. Immediate Needs for Continued Operations: 

H. Loaded Vehicles and Contents Held for Disposition: 1/ 
1= Food for Humans Perishables 



Food for Animals 



Medicines Related Commodites 



3. Clothing Related Commodities 

h. Miscellaneous Commodities 

General Remarks on Over-All Situation: 



TJ Designate trucks by symbol "T" and Tractor-trailer by symbol "TT' 



B-X-39 



Tran-8, Form 3 



State Transportation Agency- 
Air Transport Division 

Evaluation Report Form 

A. Date & Time: _„ Location :_ 



# 



B. Operational Status: Good Fair Poor 



C. Available and Operational: Aircraft - Under 12,^000 pounds 

1, Single Engine - 1 and 2 place 3 to 5 place 

6 places or over 

2. Tvin Engine - 1 3Jid 2 place 3 to 5 place 

5 to 8 place 

D. Available and Operational: Aircraft - Over 12,^000 pounds (List) 
1. Type^ No. Engines Type of Engine 

(Propeller, Turbo, Jet), Passenger Capacity 

Cargo Capacity lb. 

E. Available and Operational: Aircraft - Rotary Wing 
1. Type Passenger Capacity 

Cargo Capacity lb . 

F. Fuel and Maintenance Situation: (Quantity Available) 

1. Aviation Gasoline: Adequate Inadequate 

2. Jet Fuel: Adequate Inadequate 

3. Lubricants: Adequate Inadequate 

U. Repair & Replacement Parts: Adequate_ Inadequate 

5. Miscellaneous Other Supplies: (Detail) 



B-X-Jj-O 



Tran-8, Form 3 (Contd.) 



G. Manpower Situation: (Number Available) 
1. Flight Operations: 

a. Pilots: Adequate Inadequate 

b 

c 

d 



2o 



Surplus 



Co -Pi lots : Adequate 



Flight Eng: Adequate 
Na-vigat or : Ade quat,e 



e, Steward(ess) : Adequate 
Ground Operations : 



a. Dispatcher 

(Passenger) : Adequate 

b o Dispatcher 

(Freight) : Adequate 



Aircraft Grd, 

Maintenance : Adequate 



Mechanics - 
A & E Lie 



Adequate 



Mechanics " 

General : Adequate 



Misc„ Operating 

Personnel : Adequate 



Inadequate 



Surplus 



Inadequate 
Inadequate 



Surplus 
Surplus 



Inadequate 



Inadequate 



Inadequate 



Inadequate 
Inadequate 



Inadequate 



Inadequate 



Coimnunications (including Tower and GCA) 
Good Fair Poor 



Personnel: Adequate 
I . Remarks : 



Inadequate 



Surplus 



Surplus 



Surplus 



Surplus 



Siirplus 



Surplus 



Surplus 



Surplus 



B-X=4l 



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B'X-k2 



Tran 10, Revised State Transportation Policies 

(Note: The content and substance of the Revised State Transportation 
Policy will depend on the situation and the transportation services 
expected to be available to meet continuing essential movement re- 
quirement needs. Necessarily, this document will not be completed 
except in a test of the plan or at the appropriate point in a post 
attack situation.) 

This document will be in essence a Revised Tran-1, State Transportation 
Policy and Guidance, contained here. 



B-X-i+3 



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B^X-kh 



Trac^-dg, Tr^isp ortatlo- Industry Construction Requirements 
To; State Constructicn and Housing Agency 

Following is a list and description of .najor construction remir 
and modifxcation on facilities that will be re-^uired to mintain nSssary 
transportation services during the 9C)-day period commencin g "^^^^^^^y 

TlgJI^.P'^— -ation Construction Pro.ie cta 

1. Narae, location, type sx.d size of construction project: 
Et.art and completion dates, 

(If project is unde.™ay,, or a construction contract has been 
preparea, attach a copy of the contract docuinent and suimnary 
biii of materials.) '' 



Director 

State Transportation Agency 



B-X-l).5 



Tran-13^ Allocation of Supporting Resources to Interstate (Primary ) 
Transportation Industry 

To; Appropriate Fsderal Transportation Agency State Office 

Attached is a list a3d the quantities of supporting resources that 
hare "been allocated for maintaining essential interstate transportation 
operations , 

This is furnished as a 'basis for authorizin.g interstate transportation 

companies ar.d their facilities to obtain^ on a continuing basis, equipment ^ 

services, supplies, and materials fl°om these resources during the allocation 
period. 

(Attach List,) 



(date) 



Director 

State Transportation Agency 



B-X-if6 



IIS^::!^, Authorization to Ma.jor Trans-porta.t1 nn Carriers and Facilit^ 
to Obtain Supporting Resources ~ "~~" "■ — — 



To; Transportatior. Industry Companies ar.d their Facilities 

You are hereby authorized tc obtain the supporting res- 
operations in the quantities specified in the attached list 




to usf e?'he1'thrf"?-fT/'''? f - '''^'^'■^^^ resources, you are authorized 
to use ei.her the applicable Federal certification or the fo],laving certi- 



fication: 



This is an essential order 
authorized by the State 
Transport^ation D5.rectoro 



Par chaser 



Director 

State Transportation Asency 



B-X-lf'7 



3' Emergency Organization 

The organizational charts which follow identify functional areas in- 
volved in the management of transportation resources in Montana in an 
emergency „ 

These are actions to provide for the continuity of operation of the 
State Transportation Agency. 

lo Copies of this plan arid all action and reference documents have 
been placed and are immediately available in the Office of the 
Traffic Engineer, State Highway Department, the State Office of 
Emergency Planning, and in the State Emergency Operations Center. 

2. The Governor has selected and designated from government and the 

private sector leaders with experience and knowledge of the trans- 
portation industry to provide executive direction in an emergency 
for the operation of the State Transportation Agency, Lines of 
succession to assure continuity of key staff for the operation of 
this Agency are provided in the roster of key personnel maintained 
in the Office of the Traffic Engineer, State Highway Department, 
the State Office of Emergency Planaing, and the State Emergency 
Operations Center, 

3o The Assistant Traffic Engineer, State Highway Department, is the 
Director of the State Transportation Agency„ 

k. Upon activation of this plan, the Director of the State Transport- 
ation Agency and selected key staff with emergency assignments to 
the Agency establish headquarters at the State Emergency Operations 
Center, 



B-x~i^8 






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B-X-i+9 



state of Montana 
Trstnsportation Agency 



lo The Director of Transportation 



a. Establishes an appropriate organization, 

b. Establishes suitable transportation operating centers, 

c. Activates Divisions of the State Transportation Agency when 
directed by the Governor, 

do Establishes effective operatir^ procedures » 

e. Assists lower levels in the establishment of appropriate and 
uniform organizations and operation procedures. 

f. Directs the activities of the Transportation Agency, 

2, The Industry Advisory Group 

a. Advises and assists the Director on all matters i)ertaining to the 
availability, capability, procurement, and regulation of transport- 
at ion ser-vices, 

b. Advises and assists the Director in the selection of an Emergency 
Operating Staff of sufficient size and capabilities to handle the 
details of regulation of transportation services, 

c. Advises and assists the Director of Transportation in establishing 
suitable local level transport.ation operating centers and effective 
operating procedures for such centers, 

3, State and Federal Agency Advisors 

a. Advise and assist the Director oa all matters pertaining to the 
coordination of governmental agency responsibility and activities 
in respect to transportation, 

b. Maintain current information on all laws, regulations, directives, 
orders, etc, pertinent to the authority, responsibilities, and 
limitations of the respective agency of each member affecting the 
mobilization and regulation of emergency defense transportation 
services., 

c. Individual meaibers have the full authority to act for their 
agencies in the absence of coramranicaticns , 



B-X-50 



D irector of Rail, Av iation, Moto r and Highway Traffic Regulation Divisi ons 



a. 



Advise and assist the Director of Transportation pertaining to their 
respective m:^ies of traI^sportation aiid storage » 

Coc.'rdir...ate the activities of the various seg^ients of their respect- 
ive ::nodas of trar-sportation aiid storage, 

v.rg'aH.j.se ajia direct tlie ar.tiviti.-^^s of the emergency operating staff 
cf their respective d5. visions. 

Sapfc:r7i£e the t&z&lls cf reguiatio'n of storage arid transportation 
servi.-je of the moie cf trajispo;-; their divisions reg^alate. 

Advise aad assist representatives of industry for their respective 
moles in ejnergency operatioE.s f,^r the presei-vetion, consei-vation, 
a2...j. inaKiiiPxni. uti:..ir<atiD-:: of trax.sporb service in an emergency. 



3"X-51 



state Transportation Agency 
Rail Traasporfc Division 




Director 
State Transportation 
Agency 



Rail Transport 
Division 



ICC 

BRS & S 

Repre sentat ive 



State Senior 

Reservist 
Rail 



State Organization 
Representative 



ICC 

Terminal 

Reservists 



# 



1, 

2. 

■3 ^ 

5. 



Assess Damage to Transport 
Determine Remaining CapalDility 
Report to State Senior Reservists 
Guide and Direct as required 
Meet Local Transport needs if isolated 



'X-52 



state Tremsportation Agency 
Rail Transport Division 

The Rail Transport DJLvision is responsible to the Director of State 
Transportation Agency for railroad trajisportation facilities and equipment 
utilization within the State of Montana. The Rail Transport Division co- 
ordinates actions of an operational nature with the Regional Senior Executive 
Reserv'ist and will be guided by his advice and coiinsel. 

The Rail Transport Division in general mobilizes available rail trans- 
port and transportation facilities within the State of Montana for the purpose 
of effectine; the maximum utilisation of the industry for the movement of 
people^ supplies, and things in the event of a national emergency. 

The Rail Traxisport Di^'^ision, supplemented by railroad Executive Reserv- 
ists develops and maintains information as to the pre-attack rail transport 
equipment and facilities within the State of Montana. 

In general, rail terminal reporting areas are established as determined 
to be necessary throughout the State of Montana. 

Contacts with out-of-state emergency governmental elements, transport- 
ation associations, or specific railroad carriers are made primarily through 
the Rail Transport Division in the State of Monlana. In an attack situation, 
decisions regarding the emergency use of railroad transportation facilities, 
equipment, or personnel rest with the ICC State Senior Rail Reservist in co- 
ordination with the Regional Senior Reservist or his designee. 

The State is represented by a State Railroad and Public Service Com- 
mission member who is charged with carrying out over-all State transportation 
policy ajid procedures and, among other duties, will: 

1. represent the State as a member of the Rail Transport Division: 

2. be responsible for the emergency coordination of railroad trans- 
portation with Federal, military, ajid civilian representatives 
and the railroa.d industry. 

The Interstate Commerce Commission, Bureau of Railroad Safety and Service, 
representative provides support to the Rail Trajisport Division. The ICC 
member works closely with the railroad industry through the ICC Railroad Ex- 
ecutive Reservists for coordination of Federal transport policy direction with 
State and local authorities « 

The railroad industry is represented on the division by the State Senior 
Railroa.d Executive Reser'.-ist who has the primary responsibility for inventory 
and use of railroad transportation equipment throughout the State of Montana. 
He will obtain postattack inventory from the railroads serving Montana from: 



B-X-53 



Great Northern Railway Co. Chief Dispatcher, Havre 265-92*4-1 

Northern Pacific Railway Co. Chief Dispatcher, Missoula 5^3-^232 
The Milwaukee Road Assist. Superintendent, 

Deer Lodge 846-2064 

The St.ate Senior Railroad Executive Reservist coordinates problems of an 
operational nature with the Regional Senior Railroad Executive Reservist, In 
attack situations he keeps the Rail Transport Division advised as to railroad 
conditions and operations in the State and region. He advises as to most 
effective use of eor'/iving rai.lroad equipment, xaaAipower, and facilities. 

An ICC State Senior Railroad Reser^rist has been appointed in the State 
of MontaT3ao (Reference Doucment No, 4.) 

In accordance with established plans ^ he utilizes his transportation 
experience and managerial skills, together with executive training, in assist- 
ing in carrying cut the following functions: 

1. Determining transportation capabilities in view of available trems- 
port equipment ajid facilities. 

2. Ariaiyzing demands for the movement of strategic goods eind essential 
personnel. 

3o Defending, maintaining, and restoring of industry essential in 

providing the transport industry with the capability and supporting 
resources to accomplsih its emergency mission. 

ho Making effective arrangements to accomplish emergency transportation 
jobs. 

Duties of the Railroad Terminal Executive Reservist are broadly defined 
as follows : 

1. The terminal reser^rist is responsible to the State Senior Rail 
Executive Reser'/ist for situation reports or analyses of conditions 
within his terminal area, 

2, He maintains close working relationship with local civil defense 
authorities. 

Rail terminal areas within the State of Montana have been designated and 
Terminal Reservists have been appointed with responsibilities enumerated under 
paragraphs 1 and 2 above, (Reference Dociiment Wo. U.) 



B-X-54 



state Transpcr-tation Agency 
Motor Transport Division 



Military 

Liaison 

Officer 



Director 

State 

Traiispcrtation 

0::g6ULl2afcion 



Stats Motor Traji.sport. Di^m. 
(Emergeiicy Motor Transport 

Board) 
Chairmax. 
Member (ICC) 
Member (State) 
Memter ( Industry) 
Staff — ICC-BOC — State 

Executive Reservists 




BOC - Regional 

Director 
Responsible for 

ICC Policies J 

Procedures 

and Staff 















Chief 
Property For-Hire 
Carriers 






Chief 
Private Carriers 



Chief 
Passenger Inter- 
city Tremsit 
School Bus 




Chief 
Fuel 
Parts 
Supplies 



COUTJTY TRANSPORT OFFICERS 

1. Assess Demage to Motor Transport 

2o Determir-c Remaining Capability 

3. Report through Chiefs to Boaxd 

h, Marshall and direct Carriers 

5. Meet Local Tran.sport Needs if Isolated 




B-X-55 



state Transportation Ageney 
Motor Transport Division 

The Emergency Motor Transport Boards, within the State Motor Transport 
Division, is appointed by the Governor of the State and the Interstate Com- 
merce Conmissiono It is an integral part of the Motor Transport Division 
of the State of Montana Transpor-Gation Agency, 

The Motor Transport Division, comprising the Board, in general organizes 
all available motor trax:spor^; and transportation facilities within the State 
of Montana for the purpose of effecting the maximum utilization of all motor 
transportation media for the movement of people, supplies, and things in the 
event of an emergency or during a post~attaek period , 

The Board, the Division Chiefs, a:id the Cou^ity Motor Transport Officers 
gather and maintain such information as is or becomes available concerning 
postattack motor transport equipment and facilities within the State of Mon- 
tana, 

Motor transportatiOTi equipEoent dispersion and assembly areas are 
established in county seats or as othez-wise determined to be necessary 
th-TOughout the State of Monbana, 

Contacts with aat-of-state agencies, civil defense organizations, eind 
other transportation establishments are made primai'ily through the Emergency 
Motor Transport Eoajrd in the State of Montsj;:.a. If, for any reason, such as 
lack of communications, this aiTSJigement becomes impractical, decisions for 
the use of motor transportation faciliti<;s, both within the county and out- 
side the State, rest with County Motor Transport Officer, 

The duties of the Motor Transport Division and its entities are: 

1, The Motor Transport Division is responsible for Motor transport- 
ation facilities arid vehicle utilisation within the State of 
Montana, and is responsible to the Governor and the Interstate 
Commerce Commission through the Director of the State Transport- 
ation Agency for transportation actions, 

2, The Emergency Motor Transport Boai-d coordinates actions of an 
operatio;:jial nature with the Motor Transport Industry for the State 
Motor Transpoz't Division, 

3, The Chief of the Motor For-Hire Property Carrier Branch is re- 
sponsible for inventorying, assembling, and the use of all motor- 
dxlvsn truck transportation throughout the State, 

4, The Chief of the Private Caxxier Branch is responsible for ijivent- 
orying, assembling, and the use of all private carrier motor vehicles 
within the State. 







B-X-56 



5. The Chief of Passenger Transportation Branch is responsible for 
the acciuiiulation and use of all "bus and taxlcab transportation 
within the State of Montana, including interstate bus transport- 
ation, privately owned bus transportation, school bus transport- 
ation, and taxicabs in the State. 

6. The Chief of Privately Owned Automobile Branch is responsible 
primarily for the assembling of abandoned private transportation 
on highways and the restoration of these vehicles to their right- 
ful owners through the assistance of the chief law enforcement 
officer of the State of Montana. He is also responsible for the 
proper use and dispatch of these vehicles while under his control 
during the period that the owners are being identified and the 
equipment returned to the legal owner. 

7. The Chief of the Fuel, Parts, and Supplies Branch is responsible 
for claiming and making provision for the release of such items 
for essential traiisportation usage and keeping Industry informed 
of such provisions. 

8. The Military Liaison Officer is responsible to the Motor Transport 
Division for close liaison with the military. He makes all arrange- 
ments with the Board and various Branch chiefs to assist the mili- 
tary in the movement of troops and equipment when requested by the 
proper military authorities, 

9. The motor transportation areas for the State of Montana are the 
counties of the State. The County Motor Transport Officer is 
located at the county seat, unless some other place is designated 
during an emergency. 

(a) The co^onty motor transport organization is in general 
the same as that of the State. It may be modified to 
meet local needs of terrain and concentration of popu- 
lation within the county to satisfy emergency require- 
ment s . 

(b) Within the cities of the county, the City Motor Transport- 
ation Officer is responsible for the proper use of local 
transportation. The organization within the city may be 
modified to meet local needs. 

The Motor Transport Division, including the Emergency Motor Transport 
Board, is located in the City of Helena for the purpose of assisting motor 
transportation activities throughout the State. 



B-X-57 



state Transport Organization 
Aviation Division 



Military 

Liaison 

Officer 



State 
Transportation 
Director 



Director 

Aviation Division 

(state Director of SARDA) 



Federal Aviation 

Agency- 
District Office 





1 Area S.MIDA Chiefs 1 
































Control Airport A 




Control Airport B 




Control Airport C 



SARDA Districts 
1-2-12-13-lU 



SAPvDA Districts 
3_i4-5-6-7-8- 



SARDA Districts 
9-10-11 



# 



B-X-58 



state Transportation Organization 
Aviation Division 

The Aviation Division provides State government direction and assist- 
ance in the managed air movement of persons and goods in support of Regional 
State, and local essential activities. The State Aviation Division functions 
as a Division of the State Transportation Agency under the direction of the 
Director of the State Aviation Division, who is also State Director of SARDA. 
The Director of the State Aviation Division and his staff: 

1. Specify the duties and responsibilities of the State Aviation 
Division and those of the SARDA Areas, Area Control Airports, and 
District Chiefs o 

2. Provide the criteria for the establishment and operation of control 
of airports and methods of securing the controlling of the operation 
of aircraft fi^om all landing areas within the State except military 
installations o 

3. Assist in the establishment of communications network for the dis- 
semination of necessary directives and pertinent information to 
airports and personnel, and provide for necessary tests of facilities, 
training of personnel, and simulated drills to determine the adequacy' 
of the networks to perform the functions for which they are intended. 

^. Define responsibilities and establish procedures ajid general in- 
structions for the security control of civil traffic within the State 
in cooperation with the Federal Aviation Agency and appropriate 
military services » 

5o Provide by delegation appropriate authority to designated personnel 
to enable enforcement, if necessary, of security measiores and other 
actions to implenent the plan. 

6, Provide appropriar.e liaison to the State Civil Defense Director and 
armed forces. 

7. Compile and maintain a record of all aviation resources within the 
State, including airmen, aircraft, repair facilities, airports, 
fixed-base operators, executive aircraft, and other aeronautical 
activities and facilities, together with an indication of the avail- 
ability on a voluntary basis for their participation in support of 
the State or National interest during an emergency. 

8, Prepare and maintain a functional analysis of available passenger 
and cargo airlift and aircraft suitable for special purposes such 
as aerial radiological monitoring, reconnaissance, and others, 

9. Provide this information to the Director of the State Transportation 
organization and other interested offices, including the General 
Aviation District Office, Helena, Montana. 



B-X-59 



10, At all airports within the State, provide for the appropriate 

registration of all aircraft and maintenance of suitahle charts, 
directories, and other data to assvo-e proper pilot and/ or flight- 
crew briefing concerning operation of aircraft under security 
regu-lations. /&| 

Activation procedures for other than air can°ier airlift (State and 
Regional Defense Airlift Plan (SARDA) follows o 



B-X-60 



Activation of the State and Regional Defense Airlift Plan (SARDA) 

To: Owners and Operators of Non -Air-Carrier Aircraft; Registered 
in the State of Montana 

Notice is hereby given ty the londersigned that pursuant to the authority 
vested in the State Ti'ansportation Agency, Aviation Division, by the Governor 
of this State to make most effective use of non-air- carrier aircraft within 
the State and to meet the needs of the State for essential aviation services 
during the present emergency, all non-air-ca::'rier aircraft are herein mobil- 
ized for use \mtil further notice. 

All non-air-carrier aircraft owners and operators will report to the 
SAR.DA representative at the nearest airport by the fastest means of communi- 
cation, including: the present location of their aircraft, its permanent 
home base, availability of flight and maintenance crews, and the state of 
readiness of the aircraft for use. 

All civil airmen not assigned to aviation services in support of Federally 
designated and controlled air operations (CRAP, WASP) will report to the SARDa"^ 
representative at the nearest airport by the fastest means of communication, 
including: name, airmart certificate, ratings, current qualifications, present 
location and availability for immediate duty. 



Director of SARDA 
State of Montana 



B-X-61 



k. Reference Dociunents 
Reference Docijment No. 1 

Int erstate Coimaerce Commission Transport Mobilization Orders 

ICC I'M- 1, "Preference and Priority'- for Transportation by Carriers-For-Hire 
of U,S, Military Personnel, Accredited Civil Defense Workers and 
United States Mail." 

ICC TM- 2, "Rail Freight Embargo-Appoint of Permit Agent." 

ICC TM- 3, "Motor Fi'eight Embargo." 

ICC TM- h, "Inland Waterways Freight Embargo." 

ICC TM- 5;, "Disposal by Carriers of Undeliverable Shipments." 

ICC TM- 6, "Control of Railroad Taj.ik Cars." 

ICC TM- 7, "Rerouting of Rail Traffic." 

ICC TM- 8, "Direction to Certain Over-the-Road Motor Carriers of Property 

Regarding Routes, Diversions and Services to Certain Destinations." 

ICC TM- 9, "Direction to Certain Intercity Common Carriers of Persons by Bus 
to Serve Certain Points." 

ICC TM-10, "Control of Motor Transport Vehicles." 

ICC TM-11, "Control of Freight Shipments to or Within Port or Storage Areas." 

ICC TM-i2, "Inventory and Disposition of Shipments of Food and Medical Supplies 
Req.uisitioned by Government in Possession of Railroads ajid Motor 
CaiTiers . " 



B-X-62 



Reference Docviment NOo 2 



Transportation Equipment and Facilities 

1. Railvay Transportation 

General Responsibilit y; Interstate Commerce Commission 



Locomotives 



Steam 
Electric 
Diesel-Electric 
Switch Engines 
Other 

Freight Cars 

Box 

Flat 

Stock 

Gondola and Hopper 

Tank 

Refrigerator 

Other 

Passeng er Cars 

Coaches 

Combination Coaches 

Parlor 

Sleeping 

Other Passenger 

Kon-Articulated Passenger Rail Motor 

Other Cars 

Postal 

Baggage and Express 

Cinir^g, Club, Lounge and Observation 

Coitpar.y Service Equipment 

Cabooses 



B-X-63 



II. Motor Freight Vehicles 
General Responsibility ; Interstate Conimerce Commission 



Single UnitS;, up to 12,000 GVW 
Single Units, 12,000 to 26,000 GVW 
Single Units, 26,000 GVW and up 
Trailer, up to 12,000 GVW 
Trailer, 12,000 to 26,000 GW 
Trailer, 26,000 GVW and up 

All of the atove "by body type as follows: 

Van 
Reefer 

Flat 

Tank 

Specialized 

Dump 

Other 

Tractor, up to 12,000 GVW 
Tractor, 12,000 to 26,000 GV.^ 
Tractor, 26,000 GV-J and up 



III . Aircraft 



General Responsibility ; 



Federal Aviation Agency and Civil 

Aeronautics Board 



Small Aircraft (under 12,p00 pounds) 

1 and 2 place 

3 to 5 place 

5 to 8 place 

9 to lit- place 

15 to 20 place 



Broken down as : 



Single Engine, Land and Sea 
Twin Engine, Land and Sea 
^-Engine, Land and Sea 



Lan.d Aircraft (12,5000 pounds and over) 

Douglas C-47-A and C-4T-B 

Douglas DC-3, DC-3"A, DC-3-C, DC-3-D and Super DC-3 

Fair child F-27 series 

Ccnvair 24o and 28s ACF 

Martin 202 and 202-A 

Convair 3^) 



B-X-6U 



Large Aircraft (12^500 potmds and over) (Continued) 

Falrchild C-1P.3-B, C-82 and C-82-A 

Mai'tin kok 

Vickers -Aj-.TUstrong -Vis count 7^5 -D 

Convair V+0 and ^'(-0 series 

Douglas C-54 (All modifications) and C-7^ 

Douglas DC -4 and DC -6 

Lockheed K^hS and k-QhScld 

Lockbeed 61,-9-A-7'9 and 649-79 

Lockheed 749-A-79 and 749-79 

Vickers-Artastrong-Yiscount 8lO 

Curtis-VJright C"ir6., Super 46 and 46-C 

Douglas DC -6 "A and DC-6-B 

Lockheed iSd-A 

Lockheed 10^^953 and 104954 

Boeing YC-97 and 377 

Lockheed 1049-C-p5 and 1649-A-98 

Douglas DC -7, DC -73, and DC-7C 

Locklieed 1049-E and 1049-H 

Boeing 707 

Lockheed 1049-D-55 si-d 1049-G-82 

Douglas DC -8 

Rotary Aircraf t 

Sikorsky S-55, S-68, and S-6l 



IV. Mo tor Passenger Transport and Transit 
Genei - al Responsib ility : Interstate Commerce Commission 



School Buses 

Intercity Buses - Common and Contract 

Intercity Buses - ?i-ivate 



V. Transportation Facilities 



Terminals J Passenger Ai'rlval and Departure by mode 
Terminals, Freight Loa,ding and Unloading by mode 
Malntenajice Facilities (Shops and Gai'ages) by mode 
In-Transit Facilities (Classification Yards, etc.) 
Travelways (miles of) by mode 



B-X-65 



VI. Transportation Requirements 
(Manpower and MRO -- Maintenance, Repair, and Operating Supplies) 



Manpower 



Crews or Drivers - by mode 
Terminal Operating - by mode 
Maiatenan.ce Manpower - by mode 
Managemerit and Clerical - by mode 



Fuel 

Inventory 
Operational Use Rate 

Other Suppl ies and Eq.uipigient 

(Specify) 



B-X-66 



Reference Document Mo. 3 

Authorities and Related Guidance 
Federal Lavs ; 

Defense I^oduction Act of 1950, as amended 
Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950 
Federal Aviation Act of I958 
Interstate Commerce Act 

Presidential Executive Orders ; 

EO 10480 
EO 10537 
EO 10660 
EO 10997 
EO 10999 
EO 11003 
EO 11005 
EO 11090 
EO 11093 
EO 11095 

Other s ; 

Chapter G, Transportation, The National Plan for Emergency Preparedness 
Chapter 2, Civil Defense, The National Plan for Emergency Preparedness 
Transportation Appendices to State Survival Plans 
Bureau of Public Roads Emergency Planning and Operations Manual 
Bureau of Public Roads Order BPR-THM-1 

Civil Aeronautics Board Air Transportation Mobilization Orders; 
CAB ATM-1, General Order, Emergency Operating Authorizations 

CAB ATM-2, General Order, Preference and Priority for Trans- 
portation of U.S. Military Personnel, etc. 

Interstate Commerce Comission Emergency Planning and Operations Manual 



B-X-67 



Reference Document No. k 



RAILROAD EXE CLTIVE RESERVIST S FOR MONTANA 
State Senior Railroad Reser^rist (Vacant at time of printing) 



!?erminal Reservists 

Telephone 
W. W, Walters Siiperintendent 543-3161 

Northern Pacific Railvay 
Missouia, Montar^ 

S, Ao Anderson Superintendent 365-2391 

Northern Pacific Railway 
(Jlendive^ Monta-a 

R, Co Webb Assist.a-'t Superintendent 259-ij-521 

Northern Pacific Railway 
Billings, Montana 

W, Fo Flattenberger Superintendent 81+6-2064 

Chicago, Miiwaukae, St. Paul 
and Pacific Railjroad Co, 
Desr Lodge, Montsjia 



(NOTE: This document will be aaas.ended as cha;iges or additions occur.) 



B"X- 



PART B - RESOURCE SECTIONS 



XI. - WATER 



MONTANA PLAN 

FOR EMERGENCY 

MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES 



STATE OF MOWTAM 
EMERGENCY RFSOIJSCE MAWAGEMENT PLAU 
PART B — • I^EwSOTjECE SECTIONS 

Xl\ - WATER 



TABI£ OF COM'ENTS 

Page 

Introduction ..,. oo ...................... . B-XI- 1 

1 . Emergency Actions ,..».,,,....<,. B-XI- 6 

2 . Emergency Action Docujaents « . « » . . « B-XI- 7 

Index of Emergency Actions B-XI- 8 

3 . Emergency Organization o B-XI-20 

k. Reference Documents B-XI-22 



W A T E R 



nWRODUCTION 

This section of tlie State of Montana Emergency Resource Management 
Plan contains policies, guidance, arid actions for the provision and 
effective utilization of water resources and water supply equipment and 
materials to assure water of such quality ana in sufficient quantity to 
meet essential needs in the State in a nuclear attack emergency. 



Definitions 

a. "Water'" is used in its commonly xanderstcod meaning. It in- 
cludes water essential to our National sunAivalo 

b. "Pu.blic water supply" is any water supply regardless of owner- 
ship which served two or more unrelated usetco 

Co "Water utility" or "water supply utility" includes public water 
supply systems whether publicly or privately ow'cei aud controlled. 

d. "Primary water resources" are generally interstate or internat- 
ional sources oi' water supply which have a roajor interstate or international 
use. 

e, "Secondary water resources" are generally intrastate sources of 
water supply which eu'e available to meet essential needs within a single 
State , 

(Kote: Militajry water supplies are secondary water resources and are 
not available for noniralitary uses except by agreement with the 
military authorities . ) 



General 

The process for managing water resources in the State in a nuclear 
attack emergency involves two series of actions. Firsts essential immediate 
needs are identified and actions taken to supply these needs. Secondly, and 
as soon as possible, continuing needs and expected future supplies are esti- 
mated. Decisions are made and actions are taken to channel these expected 
future supplies to meet the continuing needs that are most essential to 
survival and recovery of the State and the Nation. 

Following is a brief description of 7ederal, State ^ and local govern- 
ment roles in the emergency management and. supply of water and the provision 
of supporting water- supply equipnient and materials. 



B-XI-1 



Federal Goverrment 

The Depaxtment of Healt/h, Ediication and Welfare has the primary res- 
ponsihility in the Federal Government to develop emergency plans and pre- 
paredness programs to assure the provision of water supplies for essential 
community uses in axi emergency „ 

The Fedei-al Gove'iToment is responsihle for the direct management of 
Federal water sources in the State » i'hese are natural and artificial, im- 
poundments stiid water flow systems operated by the following Federal Govern- 
ment agencies. 

Corps of Engineers/Department of the Arxy^ (Civil Works) 
Uo So Department of the Interior 
Uo So Department of Agriculture 

Tl'he managements of these Federal 'fia.t'.er sources ar-range for the re- 
lease of water to meet essential aeeds in the State of Morta^a as well as 
to meet essential needs of other States which depend on these primary 
sources for water supply. The Federal Goverximeiit is also responsihle for 
arranging for T,he release of water from prlmar-y sources in other States to 
meet essential needs in the State of Montana when possible o 

Attached to this section of the State plan as Heference Document No. 1 
is a list of the Federal water sources located in tnis State. 

State 'jovemment 

Ihie State Water Agency develops^ in cooperation with other orgajiizations 
of the State government, sind provides, on behalf of the Governor, water 
policies and guidance consistent with State and Federal objectives <, The 
purpose of these policies suid guidance is to assure application throughout 
the State of compatible measures for the conservation, distrihution, and use 
of water to prevent dissipation and waste ai.d to assure that essential needs 
for water ax-e identified arid met within the supplies available. The State 
Water Agency also works with the managements of natural and artificial im- 
poundiaents aad water flow systems under State government control. It fur- 
nishes guidance on the conservation and release of water from these State 
water sources and provides them with authority to obtain supporting water 
supply equipment and supplies. The State Water Agency acts on requests for 
State level assistance from local gove:mment officials ajid arranges with 
State water sources and through appropriate Federal agencies with Federal 
water sources for release of water to cor-rect local shortages in supply when 
possible. The State Water Agency also aocrasiges with the State Industrial 
Production Agency for deliveries of water supply equipment and materials to 
correct shortages reported by local goveraments. As soon as possible after 
the attack, the State Water Agency, in collaboration with other State Agencies 
representing major activities within the State tnat consume water, anticipate 
continuing needs axid works with appropriate Federal agencies and other State 
organizations to provide water to meet ongoing demands of authorized essen- 
tial users. 



B"X1'-2 



Local Government. 

Operational Survival Plans of the State of Montana and its political 
su"bdivisions contain provisions for the conservation, distribution, and the 
use of water supplied "by local water utilities and sources. These plans 
also provide for local government decisions axid giaidance, consistent with 
State policies, for the functioning of the water supply and distribution 
system in tne localities in the State, 



Essential Water Sources 

Attached to this plein as Reference Locumenx Ko, 1 is a list ajid 
locations of Federal, State, and privately awnec. water sources. Reference 
Document No. 2 lists public water supplies in Montana to include source, 
treatment, and type of system. These sources are essential to National 
survival and must be kept in operation to assure a continuing supply of 
water to meet essential needs for svirvival smi recovery. Local governments 
must assure provision of electric power, manpower, transpcrtation, fuels and 
other locally available requisites for the continuing operation of these 
essential water facilities. 



Flow Chart 

Following is a flow chajrt showing the process and the actions to be 
taken by Federal, State and local governments to assure a continuing supply 
of water to meet essential needs in the State in a nuclear attack emergency. 
The legend accompanying the char't identifies; 

A, actions to be taken immediately to suppiv immediate needs 
essential for survival, and 

B. actions to be taken as soon as possible to anticipate future 
continuing needs and to channel water supplies to meet the most 
urgent needs for continuing survival and recovery. 



B-XI-3 







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B-XI-5 



1. Emergenc y A-ctions 

The following aetior^s are takeri on behalf of the Governor at State and 
area levels "by State Water officials to proviie policies and giaideuice appli- 
cable throughout the State on the distribution and use of water to arrange 
for the provision of water supply equipment and materials to maintain oper- 
ations of essential water facilities. 

The emergency action ajid reference documents contained here have been 
prepared atid placed with appropriate State and local officieuLs during the 
preattack plaxtaing process.. 

a. Actions for Immediate Supply 

(1) i'ssue^ on behalf of the Governor, policies and guidance 
covering the provision, distribution, and use of water within 

the State, {Water-I^ State i^ater Policy and Guidance.) 

(2) Confirin with the State office of appropriate Federal agencies 
arrangements to release water f^om Federal water sources to 

meet essential needs in the State, 

(3) Confirm arrangements witn State water sources for the release 
of water to supply essential needs in tne State. 

(h) Arrange for interconnections vrith alternate sources of water 
of suitable quality to corr'ect shortages in water supply re- 
ported by local goverTxments. (Water-2, ^increase in Local 
Water Supply . ) 

(5) Arrange for redistribution of water supply equipment and 
materials in inventories of water utilities that can be spared 
to correct deficiencies :Ln local supplies reported by local 
gover.rtments. (Water-j, Redistribution of Inventories of Water 
Supply Equipment and Materials.) 

b Actions f or Cent i^^^i^__S iJ_££lv 

As soon as arrangements to meet essential immediate needs in the 
localities are underway, the State Water organization takes the 
following actions to anticipate continuing needs and to axrange for 
continuing supply to meet these needs. 

(6) Consult with State Civil Defense officials. Federal military 
officials, and officials of other State Besource Agencies to 
estiniate continuing requirements for water that will be needed 
in the State dmring the ensuing 90-iay period. These estimates 
can be obtained from mentioned officials who are located in the 
State Emergency Operations Centero {Water-ij-, Estimate of Con- 
tinuiiig Water Requirements.) 



B-:ja:-6 



(7) Obtain from appropriate Federal agency representatives. State 
water sources, axid local go-'-er/iJEe^+s estima:;es of quantities 
of water t'lat can be supplied for continuing use in the State 
during tbe ensuing 90 -day period-. 

(8) If ariticipated. supplies are inadequate to meet the estimated. 
reqiiireme.r.ts and adjustments in requirements cannot be negot- 
iated, refer to the Resource Priorities Board for Recommend- 
ations to the Governor on the allocation of aiiticipated supplies 
among competing programs. (Water ■'•5. Allocation of Water Supp- 
lies ) 

(9) Issue revised State policies on the use of water in the State 
to conform with the .jovemor 's decision. 'Water-6, Pevised 
State Water policy/) 

(10) Consult wi-^/r. appropriate Federal agency representatives in the 
State and. State water sources and de^.^elcp estimates of con- 
tinuing requirements for electric power, manpower, transport- 
ation, petrole^om products, ar-d other operating supplies, equip- 
ment, and ser-^'iees that wi.il "be needed tc maintain operations 
of essential water facilities in tne State during the ensuing 
90-day periO'i- Present tiiese requirements estimates to appro- 
priate State Resource Agencies = .■^Water^T, Water Industry- 
Support Requirements.) 

(11) Consult with appiopriate Federal agency representatives in 
the State and State water sources and develop estimates of 
emergency repair and constiuction of essential water facilities 
that will "'-■e required, during T.-he ensuing 90 -day period, aaid 
present these requirements estr'.jaates to the State Construction 
and Housing Agency. fWater-S, Water Ind.ustry Construction 
Requirements.. ) 

(12) Inform appropriate Federal agency representatives and State 
water sources of supplies of supporting resources that will 
be available to them In the State for acquisition and use to 
maintain essential operations during the ensuing 90-day 
period. (vTater-9, Allocation of Supporting Resources to Water 
Indu stry . ) 

2 . Emergency Action Documents 

Following are emergency action documents to .Implemert the foregoing 
emergency actions. 

(Note: During the process of expediting deliveries to meet urgent local 
needs, the quickest means oi' coram-anication between: levels of government and 
with industry will be used. The fonns illustrate the kind of information to 
be transmitted over telephone or other available means of fast communication.) 



B-x: 



Index of ^Emerge ncy Action Documents 

Water-l State Water Polic y and Gruidaiice 

Water -2 Increase in local Water Supply 

Water -3 Redlstri"bution of Inventories of Water Su pply^quipment and Materials 

Water-if Estimate of Continu ing Water Re Q.uiremer,t-s 

Water- 5 Allocation of Water Supplies 

Water -6 Revised State Wa ter Policy 

Water -7 Water Ind ustry Support R eq,uire gejits 

Water -8 Water Indus try Construc tion . ^equir.^^-^JjS 

Water -9 Allocation of Supporting Resources to Water Industry 



(• 



B-XI-8 



Water-1, State Water Policy ajid^aidance 



To: Heads of Pclitic^al Subdivisions 



Guidaxtce for Local G over-nme nt s . It is essential that vater available 
for use in this State be carefully conserved, aiid restricted to immediate 
and urgent uses for local, State, ajid Rational survival and recovery until 
the continuing supply of water can be assessed ax.d the supplies that will 
he available for less essential needs can be determined o 

In order to (l) prevent waste and dissipation of local water supplies, 
(2) provide water to meet immediate arid urgent needs, (3) assure continuing 
supply of water, and (k) to meet minimLmi essential needs of individual con- 
sumers, appropriate officials of local goverrmient are requested to take the 
following actions: 

1. Announce sources cf potable water for en,erger.cy use. 

2. Pr'ovide insti'uct;.ons to local water utilities and systems on the 
release of water to meet essential nee,5so 

3. Authorize essential local users to obtain immediate and urgent 
supplies of water from local water utilities and systems. 

h. Authorize essential facilities to certify purchase arrangements 
for water needed to maintain their operation. (Local governments have been 
provided by the State with a list of the essential facilities located in 
their jurisdictions » ) 

5= Announce emergency cons-omption levels ar:! enforce curtailment of 
non-essential uses of water. 

In the event local water supply is not, adequate to meet all essential 
needs, local goverrjuents should decide to cut back authorized local uses« 
Concurrently they should report shortages and request appropriate officials 
of State government to take actions to increase the supply of water to the 
local jurisdiction. 

State Tioard of Health coordination on public health aspects of water 
supplies is available through the State vjater Agency. 

It is extremely important that local governments notify the State Water 
Agency, by the fastest means of communication available, of the extent of 
damage to water sources and/or facilities. 



Effective Date 



Governor of the State of Montana 



By: 



rirector. State Water Agency 



B--XI-9 



Water -1;, Attaclmient - 1. 

Background Informat ion 

The Governor has issued general policy en the use of essential resources 
in the immediate postattack period, i'nese policies are set forth in Part A 
of the State plar;.' They have "been furnished to appropriate officials of the 
political subdivisions of the State. 

In general, these State policies provide for temporary freezing of re- 
tail inventories of essential items and immediate and continuing release of 
these items to meet urgent military arid civil defense needs and to maintain 
operations of facilities essential to continued survival and recovery. They 
provide for continuing resupply of local secondary iaveritories as veil as in- 
ventories of essential facilities which obtain their supplies from wholesale 
and primary sources. 

In addition, the Governor has issued, a proclamatlcri requesting the 
executive heads of the political subdivisions in this Sr;ate to provide re- 
sources from locally available supplies to carry on immediate and urgent act- 
ivities for survival and to maintain the operation of essential facilities. 
In accordance with this direction fr-om the Governor;, local governments are 
requested to inform essential users of resources arid persons engaged in the 
operation of essential facilities how to identify tneir purchase orders, 
contracts, and other purchase arraxigements to obtain deliveries of supplies 
and services, 

1. Essential water facilities use the following State certification to 
identify: 

a. purchase orders for supplies of petroleum products, electric 
power, gas, solid faels, and traiisportation senrices, and 

b. construction contracts for repair and construction of facilities. 



This is aui essential order authorized 
by the State of Montana. 



(Signat ure of Purchaser)" 



2. Essential water facilities identify their purchase orders in accor- 
dance with the rating and certification provisions of Federal emergency regu- 
lations issued by the Business and Defense Services Administration of the U. 
S. Department of Commerce upon attack, for supplies of production materials, 
capital equipment, and other maintenarice;, repair, and operating supplies. The 
State Industrial Production Agency prubliclzes and makes known these Federal 
regulations to local goverrjaents and indastry immediately following an attack. 



B-XI-10 



Water-i, Attachment - 1 (Contd.) 

Essential Local. Users are (l) civilian organizations engaged in 
essential civil defense activities including persons, equipment and facil- 
ities providing essential survival care and services to people, (2) military- 
organizations engaged in essential military activities, and (3) faxmers pro- 
ducing essential food and workers employed in essential facilities or local 
establishments providing essential i"ems and services to people. Less 
essential individual consumers are not incladea except those requiring immed- 
iate supplies for individual or i'amily sur-"i;"ival . 

Essential Faci l ities are deflneo. as (1) military establishments engaged 
in immediate retaliatory or defense operations, (2') electric power, gas, and 
water utility systems, (3.) industrial plants producing or processing essen- 
tial items, (k) major wholesale establisnments storing or distributing essen- 
tial items, and. f/^) traxispcrtat ion and co-nnuni cat lens systems providing essen- 
tial services. 

Indivi dual C onsumers are consumers not included, in defined Essential 
Facilities or Essential Local osers. 



E-XI-11 



Water -2, Increase in Local Water Supply 

To: (Nsune of State Water Source (or local water utility) 

An existing or impendiag snortages in water supply to meet essential 
needs has been reported by (name of local government) . 

You are instriacted to arrange with this locality and to assist in the 
provision of skilled majipower and quipraent to supply the local water 
system with an alternate source of sources of water of suitable quality 
for local use as soon as possible. 

Kotify this office if needed equipment is not available and report 
when requested assistance has been accomplished o 



Director, State Water Agency 



B-XI-1£ 



Water-3^ Redistribution of Inventories of Water Supply Equipment euid Materials 

To: (Najne of Water Utility) 

Shortages of water supply equipment and materials have been reported 
by (name of local government) . 

Attached is a list of items and quantities required to maintain essen- 
tial water supply. 

You are requested, if possible, to release tnese supplies from your 

inventories and to contact (name of local water official) ^to arrange 

the fastest means of pick-up or delivery and t,he mei\tod of payment or re- 
placement m kind. 

please advise this office when the requested actions have been com- 
pleted. 



Director, State Water Agency 



i-XI-lj 



Water-U, Estimate of Continuing Water Requirements 

The table of this emergency action doc^oment contains data on quantities 
of water that will "be required in this State for a 90-day period commencing: 



The requirements stated include the quantities of water to be supplied by 
State sources to meet needs of essential users, essential facilities, and con- 
sumers. Requirements should be expressed in million gallons per day (MGD) . 

Definitions 

"Civilian Requirements" include water needed to carry on emergency civil 
defense operations, to maintain essential local activities, and to supply in- 
dividual consumers. These civilian requirements estimates are provided by 
appropriate civil defense officials located in the Sta-oe Emergency Operations 
Center. 

"Military Requirements" include water needed to carry on military acti- 
vities and to maintain and operate military installations and equipment. These 
Military requirements estimates are provided by appropriate military officials 
located in the State Emergency Operations Center o 

"Resource Support Requirements" include water needed to maintain oper- 
ation of essential facilities functioning in the State. These support re- 
source requirements are provided by appropriate State Resource Agencies and 
USDA State Defense Board representatives located in the State Emergency Oper- 
ations Center. 



Requirement Categories 


First 
30 Days 


Following 
6c Days 


Total 
90 Days 


Supporting Resources 


MGD 


MGD 


Gallons 


Industrial Production 








Electric Power 








Gas 








Petroleum 








Agricultural Production 








Food Processing 








Etc. 








TOTALS 
SUPPORTING RESOURCES 








CIVILIAi;i 








MILITARY 









E-XI-lii 



Water -^, Allocation of Water Supplies 



Major Use Categories 


First 
30 Days 


1 
Fcl lowing 
6C f-ays 


Total 
90 Days 


Supporting Resources 


M-r 


MOD 


GALLONS 


InduEtr ial Product ion 








Electric Power 








Gas 








Petroleum 








Agr i cu 1 turai Pr od u c t i on 








Food Processing 








i ..0, 


! 




1 

1 












i 














i 






TOTALS 

SI! Fpc '-^ I TNG Bj'L '. 'T.^F C E3 








Cr/IXIAF 








MT-irTA?.!' 









B-XI-15 



Water-6, Revised State Water Policy 

TNote: The content and substance of the revised water policy will 
depend on the situation and the supplies expected to be available 
to meet continuing essential needs. Necessarily, this document 
will not be completed except in a test of the plan or at the appro- 
priate point in a postattack situation.) 

This document will be, in essence, a Revised Water-1, State Water 
Policy and Guidance, contained here. 



m 



B-xi-16 



Water-7, Water Industry Support Requirements 



FJstiraate of Water Industry Support Requirements for 
90 -Lay Period Commencing (Date) 








Resource 


Unit of 
Measure 


First 
30 Days 


Following 
60 Days 


Total 
90 Days 


Electric Power 










Petroleum Products 










Transportat ion 










Gas 










C ommun i cat i on s 




















Construction & Housing 






























Operating Supplies 
and Equipment 


















, 1 










' f 


Etc, 





















B-XI-17 



Water-8, Water Industry Construction Requirements 
To: State Construction and Housing Agency 

Following is a list and description of major construction^ repair, 
and modification of facilities that will "be required to maintain desired 
water supply during the 90-day period commencing • 

Construction Projects 

1. Name, location, type, and size of construction project; 
start and completion dates; 

(if project is underway or a construction contract has "been 
prepared, attach a copy of the contract document and summary 
"bill of materials.) 

2. 

3. 
k. 



Director, State Water Agency 



B-XI-18 



Water-9> Allocation of Supporting Resources to Water I ndustry 
To: A.ppropriate Federal agency, appropriate State sources 



Attached is a list and the quantities of supporting resources that 
have been allocated for xoain.taining essential operations of water 
facilities under the control of the (name of ..agency source )_ . 

This is fiarnished as a basis for authorizing these facilities to 
obtain continuing supplies of these resources during the allocation 
period- 



(Attach List) 



rirector. State Water Agency 



B-XI-19 



3. Emergency Orgemization 

The orgeinizational chart which follows identifies functional areas 
involved in the management of water resources in Montsuia in aji emergency. 

These are actions to provide for the continuity of operation of the 
State Water Agency. 

1. The Governor of the State of Montana has assigned to the Environ- 
mental Sanitation Division of the State Board of Health the 
responsihility for providing administrative support, i.e., 
personnel, facilities, axid supplies, for the operation of the 
State Water Agency. Copies of this plan and all action and 
reference documents have been placed and are available in the 
Environmental Sanitation Division, State Board of Health, and 

in the St8.te Emergency Operations Center, 

2. The G-overnor has selected and designated from government quali- 
fied leaders with experience and knowledge of the water industry 
to provide executive direction in an emergency for the operation 
of the State Water Agency. Lines of succession to assure con- 
tinuity of key staff for the operation of this Agency eire pro- 
vided in the roster of key personnel maintained in the Environ- 
mental Sanitation Division, State Boeird of Health, the State Office 
of Emergency Planning and the State Emergency Operations Center. 

3. The Director, Environmental Sariitation Division, State Board of 
Health, is the Director of the State Water Agency. 

k. Upon activation of this plan, the Director of the State Water 
A.gency and key staff with emergency assignments to the Agency 
establish headquarters at the State B-Tiergency Operations Center. 



B-XI-20 







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B-XI-21 



WATER EEiTLSEKCE DOCinyEEM? N0« ■ 1 



Water Reservoirs in Montana 



Reservoir 
Hame 

Canyon Ferry- 
Clark Canyon 
Dry Fork 
Fort Peck 
Four 
Fresno 
Gibson 

Helena Valley 
Hut/bart 
Hungry Horse 
Kicking Horse 
Lake Como 

Little Bitteroot Lake 
Lodge Grass 
Lower Crew 
Lower Tocko lake 
McDonald Lake 
Mission 
Nelson 
Nine Pipes 
Pablo 
Pishkun 

St. Mary's "Lake 
Sherburn 
Tiber 
Twin 

Two Medicine 
Upper Dry Fork 
Willow Creek 
Yellowl,aiI 



State Office 



F-EDEFAL 0(«fflEftSHIP 




Nearest 




City 


Ownershii 


Helena 


B.Eo 


Dillon 


BoEo 


Elmo 


I»So 


Fort peck 


CoE. 


"t'alier 


I, So 


Havre 


B»Ho 


Augusta 


B.R. 


Iielena 


B.B., 


ELtj.0 


I. So 


Columbia Falls 


B.B. 


St Ignatius 


I.S. 


Darby 


B«E. 


Kalispell 


loSo 


Ledge Grass 


I. So 


Ronan 


I. So 


Ariee 


I. So 


St. Ignatius 


loSo 


St. Ignatius 


I, So 


Saco 


BoR. 


St. Ignatius 


loS. 


Pablo 


I.So 


Choteau 


SoRo 


St. Ignatius 


I.So 


Babb 


B.R, 


Cliester 


EoRo 


Poison 


I.S. 


East Glacier 


I.So 


Elmo 


I.So 


Augx.3ta 


B.R. 


Jiai-din 


B.Ro 



Key to Abbreviations 



BoR. - Bureau of Reclamation 

300 N. 26th, Billings, Montana 

CoE. " Dept. of Army, Corps of Engineers 
Fort Peck, Montana 

I.So " Irrigation Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs 
300 N. 26th, Billings, Montana 



Capacity in 
Acr e Feet 

2,050,900 

252,700 

4,000 

19,100,000 

20,000 

127,200 

105,000 

5,900 

12,100 

3,500,000 

8,350 

31^,800 

18,000 

31,000 

10,350 

7,600 

8,225 

7,250 

66,800 

lif,870 

25,000 

30,400 

23,300 

66,100 

1,368,200 

600 

600 

2,700 

32,300 

1,375,000 



Telephone 

245-6711 
Exto 6417 

526-3411 
245-6711 



E-XI-22 



Water Ref, Doc. No. 1 



STATE AND MJWICIPALLY OWNED 



Reservoir 
Name 

Ackley Lake Reservoir 
Broadwat.er-Missouri 
Cataract Cxeek Reservoir 
Connolly Lake 
Cooney Reservoir 
Cottonwood Creek Reservoir 
Deadmaii Basin Reservoir 
Durand ResenAoir 
Flint Creek Storage 

Reservoir 
Fred Burr Creek Reservoir 
Frenchmaxx Creek Reservoir 
Glacier Tjake Reservoir 
Glass-Lir.dsay Reservoir 
Martinsdale Reservoir 
Middle Creek Reservoir 
Nevada Creek Reservoir 
Nilan Reservoir 
North Fork Smith River 

Reservoir 
Petrolia Beservoir 
Ruby River Reservoir 
Swift Reservoir 
Teton Co-op Reservoir 
Theboe Lake 
Tir. Cup Lake 
Tongue River Reservoir 
Valentine Reservoir 
West Fork Bitterroot 

Reservoir 
Willow Creek Reservoir 
Yellow Water Reservoir 
Lake Francis Reservoir 
Plentywood, City of 



Nearest 

City Ownership 

Kobson S.W.C.B. 

Toston S.W.CB. 

Harrison S«W,C.B. 

Deer Lodge SoP.& M, 

Joliet S.W.C.B. 

Wilsal SoW.CB, 

Ryegate S.W.C.B, 
White Sulphur Springs S„W„C,B, 

Philipsburg S«W,C,B. 

Hamilton SoW„v«B, 

Saco S.WcCoB. 

Red Lodge SoW.C,B« 

Big Timber S.W.CB. 

Martinsdale S.W„CoB, 

Bozeman S,W.CoB, 

Helmville SoW.CB, 

Augusta S.WoCoB. 
Wliite Surphur 

Springs SoW, 

Winnett SoW, 

Virginia City S.W, 

Dupuyer S„W, 

Dutton SoW, 

Choteau SoW, 

Deer Lodge S.P, 

Decker S,W, 

Roy S, 

Darby SoW.CB. 

Harrison S.W.CB, 

Winnett S.W.CoB. 

Vaiier S.W.CB. 

Plentywood Municipal 

Key to Abbreviations 



C.B. 
C.B. 



oB, 
oB, 
.B, 



C. 

C, 

C< 

CoB. 

& M, 

CoBo 



W.C.B. 



Capacity in 
Acre Feet 

5,635 
3,000 

1,395 

181 

2i^,000 

1,14-00 
52,1^00 

7,009 

l6,oU3 

515 

7,010 

i|,200 

9,000 

23,105 
8,027 

12,628 
9,897 

10,750 

8,550 

38,760 

30,000 

it-, 000 

830 

120 

73,590 

2,000 

32,U00 
17,760 

3.700 
112,000 

1,056 



Address 



S.W. CoB. - State Water Conservation Board 
Sam W. Mitchell Building 
Helena, Montana 

S.P.&M. - Joint Ownership - State Prison 
and Municipal Wai'den, 
Montana State Prison 
Deer Lodge, Montana 



Telephone 

UV2-3260 
Ext. 659 



6i)-6-l320 



B-XI-23 



Water Ref. Doc. No. 1 



PRIVATE AND CORPORATION OWNED 



Reservoir 
Name 

Adams , Lonnie 
Anderson, Robert 
Anderson, 3. A. 
A verill , Le st er 

Ayers Sancn 

Bailey, Clarence 

Bar-rett, Jim 

Benson, Arnold 

Eerthe"bate 

Binion, L. B. 

Birkland 

Black Eagle Reservoir 

Blackford, A. R. 

Blair^ Harry 

Bonner P.esei'voir 

Boot Lake 

Booth, Fred 

Bozeitian Creek Reservoir 

Brady, Earl 

Bramlette, Glen 

Brownfield, Earl 

Burch;, R. Oo 

Burns 

Butcher, Emmett 

Buxbaum Brothers 

Bynum Reservoir 

Carlton Creek Irrigation Co 

Chenny Lake 

Childers, P. 

Cochran, Frank 

Cornwell Ranch 

Cremer, I^o Jr. 

Damme 1, Elmer 

Dear Lake 

Dearhead Lake 

Degner, Bill 

Delaney, Leo 

Dengal, Art 

D'Evart, William 

Donald, Bill 

Double N. Ranch 

Drahbels, H. 

Dreyer Brothers Ranch, Inc. 

Duncan, Clair 

Duncan, Jol-m 

Dybaj Leo & Paul 



Nearest 
City 

Roy 
Loiria 
Sidney 
Kali spell 
Grass Range 

Fort Benton 

Grant 

Dillon 

Sunburst 
Jordan 
Fort Benton 
Great Falls 
Ekalaka 
Ekaiaka 
Bonr.er 
Dillon 
Fort Benton 
Bozemsji 
Winnett 
Fort Benton 
Ekalaka 
Ekalaka 
Big Timber 
Suffolk 
Sidney 
B;/iium 
. Lola 
Melrose 
Galata 
Alzada 
Glasgow 
Big Timber 
Geraldine 
Dillon 
Dillon 
Grass Range 
Fairview 
Grass Range 
Wilsall 
Melville 
Libby 
Malta 
Circle 
Hinsdale 
Joplin 
Co?iagen 





Capacity in 


Ownership 


Acre Feet 


* 


1,800/500 


* 


100 


* 


375/200 


* 


239 


* 


250/250/ 




350/100 


* 


100 


* 


110 


* 


llj^O 


* 


220 


* 


100 


* 


150 


M.P. Co. 


1,380 


* 


100 


* 


400 


M.P. Co. 


100 


* 


800 


* 


780 


* 


6,000 


* 


150 


* 


100 


* 


280 


* 


U50 


* 


105 


* 


500/180 


* 


165 


I.D. 


80,000 


I.D. 


550 


* 


100 


■9{- 


250 


* 


500 


* 


120 


* 


500 


* 


1,600 


I.D. 


800 


I.D. 


200 


* 


150 


* 


150 


* 


180 


* 


120 


* 


lil3 


* 


661^ 


* 


100 


* 


275 


* 


205 


* 


160 


* 


100 



B-XI-2l^ 



Water Ref . Doc No. 1 



Reservoir 

Najne 

Embleton, Bill 

Emmons Ranch 

ErigellacXj Jolrin 

Estler Lam^ 

Evaxis, Robert 

Fish Lake 

Ford, }:'ugh and Tom 

Fox Ranches, Inc. 

Franklin, Glen 

Gardner & Son 

Georgetown Lake Reservoir 

Gladowski, Frank 

Glen Lake Irrigation 

District 
Golie Brothers 
Gollaher, Willard 
Good, Viley 
Goodian, Howard 
G ocd year , rrank 
Graher, Bill 
Grady, Ed 
Gray, The 1 ma 
Green Jjake 
Hank ins, Ewell 
Han ley, Pat 
Hardy, Carter 
Harris, John 
Harvey Lake 
Rassett, Clinton 
Haughain 
Hauser Reservoir 
Hebgen Reserv'oir 
Kedstrom, Kingman 
Heilens Brothers 
Hill, Mrs. Anna Mae 
Hilstad, Melvin J. 
Holter Reservoir 
Kolzhey, R. 
Hudson, Ernie 
Indian Butte Grazing 

District 
Iverson, W. (O'Haire 

Reservoir) 
IX Ranch 
Jenson Brothers of Circle, 

Inc. 
Job, John 
JohnoD , E 
Jones, Bill 
Jones, Williajn H. 



Nearest 






Capacity in 


City 


Ownership 
* 


Acre Feet 


Fort Benton 


500 


Olive 




* 


200 


Geraldine 




* 


6oo 


Argenta 


I, 


,D. 


1,700 


Fort Benton 




# 


100 


Monida 


I. 


,D. 


350 


Winifred 




* 


750 


Two Lot 




* 


220 


Grass Range 




* 


150 


Ekaiaka 




* 


300/350 


Anaconda 


M. 


,P. Co. 


33,000 


Sidney 




jf 


121 


Exireka 


I. 


.D. 


i,500/in6 


Great. Falls 




* 


130 


Cascade 




* 


200 


Car-cer 




* 


100 


Box Elder 




* 


200 


Gardiner 




* 


l60 


Grass Range 




* 


110 


Csjiycn Creek 




* 


1+00 


Gardiner 




« 


360 


Melrose 


I 


.D. 


200 


Fort Benton 




* 


150 


Ekaiaka 




* 


120 


Kalispell 




* 


225 


Fort Benton 




* 


100 


Choteau 


I 


,D. 


2,100 


Wi-mett 




* 


120 


Terry 




* 


530/^^50/500 


Helena 


M, 


.P. Co. 


51,900 


West Yellowstone 


M, 


.P. Co. 


3i+5,000 


Brockway 




* 


800 


Belmont 




* 


120 


Geyser 




* 


100 


Circle 




* 


200 


Wolf Creek 


M, 


.P. Co. 


86,500 


Malta 




* 


1,000 


Fishtail 




* 


100 



Roy 

Sionhurst 
Big Sandy 

Circle 

Wibaux 

Lunkirk 

Monida 

Dupuyer 



I.D. 



200 

UOO 
300/1+00 

220 
100 
100 
200 
260 



B-XI-25 



Water Ref. Doc. No. 1 



Reservoir 


Nearest 


Name 


City 


Judischj William 


Dupuyer 


Kaiser, 3ene 


Wilsall 


Kaufman, Jack & Charles 


Grass Range 


Lee land ^ Charles 


Richey 


Kelly Dam 


Argenta 


Kelly, Frank 


Caxter 


Keiister, Art 


Richey 


Killenbeck, Roy 


Scobey 


Kolar Brothers 


Geyser 


Kr eider, Gladys 


Sand Springs 


Krietle, Earl 


Ekalaka 


Lake Agnes 


Glen 


Lake Delmo Reservoir 


Whitehall 


Noxon 


Koxon 


Lake Terfbay 


Glen 


Larson, Will 


Jordon 


Latka, Jake 


Lame ert 


Lawi-ence, Clarence 


A-lzada 


Lee, Sam 


Richey 


Lenington, Von D. 


Fort Benton 


Levis Brothers 


Gr'ass Range 


Lima Reservoir 


L3.ma 


Limpus, Othai- 


Winifred 


Lindbergh 


Greenough 


Lohr, Ray 


Carter 


Lower Lake (Fau-mers Co-op 




Canal Co.) 


Choteau 


Lower Willow Creek Reservoir Drummond 


Lower Willow Creek 




Drainage District 


Drommond 


Madison Lake 


Ennis 


McCarto, Bill 


Galata 


McDonald;, Bill 


Lewi st own 


McLean J John 


Brady 


McLeish, A» E. 


Big Sandy 


McLeish, A, E., Jr. 


Lloyd 


McMullin Brothers (2) 


Terry 


Meadors, Wilbur 


Grass Range 


Miiine, Chris 


Geraidine 


Morgan, Glenn 


Alzada 


Morony Reservoir 


Great Falls 


Mother shead . R ob ert 


Brockway 


Murnion, Barney 


JordaJi 


Murphy ;, Joe 


Roy 


Mystic Lake Reservoir 


Fishtail 


Neils, George 


Libby 


Nelson^ Nils 


Harlowton 


Norby, Palmer 


Sidney 


Oliver, James 


Alzada 


Olson, Martin 


Grass Range 


Olson, Olando 


Terry 


Onstad, E, Go 


Carter 





Capacity in 


Ownership 


Acre Feet 


* 


120 


* 


110 


* 


250 


* 


129 


* 


Gik 


* 


100 


* 


600 


* 


120 


* 


150/100/135 


* 


i^OO 


* 


1^00 


I.D. 


600 


I.D. 


6,600 


W.W.P. 




I.D. 


250 


* 


100 


* 


100 


* 


120 


* 


320/106 


* 


200 


•X- 


110 


I.D. 


125,000 


* 


130/100 


* 


117 


* 


150 


I.D. 


2,1+00 


I.D. 


5,100 


I.D. 


5,000 


M.P. Co. 


i+0,000 


* 


10,000 


* 


100 


* 


1+00 


* 


385 


* 


125 


* 


320/100 


* 


100 


* 


100 


* 


150 


M.P. Co. 


6,730 


* 


175 


■X- 


500 


* 


110 


M.P. Co. 


20,960 


* 


700 


* 


100 


* 


135 


* 


300 


* 


100 


* 


120 


* 


100 



B-XI-26 



Water Ref. Doc, No. 1 



Reservoir 

Msune 

Osterbaur & Welch 
Pawlowski, Leonard 
Pearson J Earl 
Pemberton Bros. 
Peterson, Garde, Jr. 
Petrie, Louis 
Pfaff, o^ohn 
Phillippl;, Lester 
Pipestone Water Users ' 

Assoc. 
Kerr Daw, 
Price, Kenneth 
Prinquing, Walter 
Pi'^ayn, E-, M. 
Rainbow Reservoir 
Richland Co« Sportsman's 

Club 
Riggin Grazing Assn. 
Robertson, Bill 
Rock Creek 
Roma in , John 
Eosencranze, Art 
RoTcain, Ray 
Rustuen, Art 
Sanburn, J. N. 
Scheffer, Fraxicis 
Shields, River Rauich 
Sibra, Williajn 
Sitz, Robert 
Smith, Donald J. 
Stafford Reservoir (Bob 

Biggeml 
State (Walter Dion Lease) 
Stewartm Nirrus 
Stooss, Charles 
Swift, Grover 
Taber, Eugene 
Tauckj Lyle 
Teigen, J. 0. 
Thompson Falls 
Tomscheck, R. A. 
Turk Ranch, Inc. 
U, P, Group Flood Control 
U< S. Forest Service 



Ross, He B. 



Nearest 




Capacity in 


City 


Ownership 


Acre Feet 


Gildford 


* 


560 


Circle 


* 


250 


Winifred 


* 


lUO 


Broadus 


* 


100 


Winifred 


■X- 


100/100 


Turner 


* 


150 


Terry 


* 


250 


Ekalaka 


* 


100 


Whitehall 


* 


6,585 


Poison 


M.P. Co. 


1,219,000 


Avon 


^• 


21+6 


Carter 


* 


100 


Pot oral c 


* 


106 


Great Falls 


M.P. Co. 


930 


Sidney 


* 


210 


Harlem 


* 


100 


Carter 


* 


Uoo 


Dillon 


I.D. 


150 (2) 


Fort Benton 


* 


100 


Alzada 


* 


200 


Fort Benton 


* 


150 


Grass Range 


* 


115 


Broadus 


* 


300 


Huson 


* 


120 


Wilsall 


* 


660 


Big Sandy 


* 


270 


Harrison 


* 


1,600 


Melrose 


* 


100 


Lewistown 


* 


1,000 


Havre 


* 


uso 


Carter 


* 


200 


Geraldine 


* 


100 


Terry 


* 


520 


Shawmut 


* 


110 


Ekalaka 


* 


200 


Ekalaka 


•X- 


150 


Thompson Falls 


M.P. Co. 




Sunburst 


^ 


100 


Big Sandy 


■^ 


600 


Wolf Point 


* 


175 


Deer Lodge 


Privately 


132/270/175 




owned J but 


/i+,770/150 




on Forest 


/192/120/15U 




Service 


/IOO/120/U50 




leind 


/U95/250/779 
200 


Jordan 


* 


2,000 



5 -XI -27 



Water Ref. Doc. No. 1 



Reservoir 


Nearest 




Capa( 


:ity in 


NajBe 


City 

Great Falls 


Ownership 

M. P, Co. 


Acre 


Feet 


Volta Peservoir 




2,230 


War Horse lake Reservoir 


Winnett 


I.D. 




19,900 


Watt, Steve 


Jordan 


* 




100 


Westermark Brothers 


Devon 


* 




100 


Wheatcraft, Bob 


Sand Springs 


* 




352 


White, Brothers 


Devon 


* 




150 


White, Pete 


Two Lot 


* 




309 


Whitetail Reservoir 


Whitehall 


I.D. 




5,000 


Whitetail Lake 


Whitehall 


I.D. 




Ikk 


Wigger, Iiones 


Carter 


* 




IGO 


Wilson, Gay 


Loma 


* 




100 


Woodbury, Zlev. 


Geyser 


* 




110 


Woukena Lake 


Slen 


I.D. 




1^50 



Key to A'Phreviations 

* - Ciwners name in first column 

I.D. ~ Irrigation District 

M.P. - Montana Power Co. 

W. W. P. - Washington Water Power 



B-XI-28 



WATER REFERENCE DOCUTVlEffl' N0« 2 
Public Wat er Sup plies in Montana 



Key to Description of Supplies 



A 

B 

D 

F 

So 

C 



Gravity 


MS 


- Mechanical Screens 


H 


Pumps 


S 


'- Sedimentation 


</ ' 


Disinfection 


Aux 


- Auxiliary Supply 


C 


Filtration 


WoS. 


- Supt. of Water Dept, 


c 


Softening 


Fl. 


- Fluoride 


M 


Coagulation 






W 



- Health Officer 

- City Engineer 

- Councilman 

- City Clerk 

- Mayor 

- Water Commissioner 



City 



Ownership 



Source, Treatment Pop. 
& Type of System i960 



Supervision 



ABSAROKEE 

AIBERTON 
ANACONDA 

BAINITLLE 

BAKER 

BAS3U 

BEAB.CREEK 
BELGPADE 
BELT 
BIGFOP.K 

BIG SANDY 

BIG TIMBER 

BILLINGS 



Water Users ' 
Association 

Municipal 

Anaconda Co. 



Municipal 

Municipal 

Water Users ' 
Association 

F & S Water Co, 

Municipal 

Municipal 

Pacific Power 
& Light Co, 

Municipal 
Municipal 

Municipal 



356 

12,D5i«- 



2 Trilled Wells B 

Sprir^gs A 

Warm Springs 'Ireek 

A-L^^ MS-S 
Aux. Drilled Wells 

B"L! 

3 Drilled Wells B-D 

5 Iiriliedl Wells E 

Basin Creek .A-D 
Aux. Diilled Well B 

Bear Creek >."!; 

3 D'i Hied VJeils B 

Dug Well B-D 

Dug Weil B-D 



5 Drilled Wells B 95^ 

1 Dug Weil B-D 

Infiltration Gallery 1,660 
A-D 

Yellowstone River 60,000 

B-C-S-F-u 



600 E. Torgrimijon, flangr. 



Roy "ohnson, Mayor 
Ben Chestnut, Supt, 



285 


E, A. Brunner, W.S. 


2,365 


Bob Kinsey, W,S. 


300 


Arnie Mackey, Secy. 


60 


Dominic Favero 


1,057 


John Jensen, W.S. 


757 


Bert Williamson W.S. 


koo 


Fred Harris, Lineman 



Joe Trepina, W.S. 



Oscsir Forsythe, W.S. 



Ed Waldo, Manager 



B-XI-29 



Water Ref, Doc, No, 2 (Contd,) 







Saarce^ Treatment 


Pop, 




City 


O-tfnership 


Sc I'ype of System 


i960 


Supervision 


Humble Oil Co. 


Humble Oil 


Yellowstone River 
B-F-D 




I„ Jo staid ^ 


Lockwood 


Water Users ' 
Association 


2 Wells B-D 


5,000 


Carl Peters, Secy. 


BOULDER 


Municipal 


3 Drilled Wells 3 


l,39i^ 


AoWo Aspengren, W.S. 


Boulder 


State 


3 Drilled Wells B 


1,086* 


James Sanddal, Supt. 


BOZEMATI 


Municipal 


lymaxi Creek A-So-Fl 


13,367 


Ralph Dunahoo, W.S. 



BUTOi'E 



Bozemar. Creek A-So-Fl 
Hyllte Reser^roir 
A-D-S-Fl 



BRADY 


Water [jsers ' 
Association 


irrigation Litcn 


180 


BRIDGER 


Municipal 


3 I-rilled Wells B-D 


82i(- 


BROADUS 


Municipal 


3 Drilled Wells B 


628 


BROADVUilW 


Municipal 


Drilled Wells B 


160 


BROCKTOK 


Municipal 


2 Drilled Wells 


367 


BROWNINC- 


Mi-unicipal 


Springs A~D 
Dug Well A-B-D 


2,011 



Butte Water Co. 



Big nole River B-S-F-D 
Basin Creek A-S-D k^,COO 
Moult on Creek A-S-D 



Dick Sstngray, W.S. 

Ao Eewing, W,S. 
F.C. Cole, W.S. 
L. H. Bogden, W.S. 
Robert Murray, W,S. j 

John B= Hazen, Mangr. 



CANYON T'EKBY Bureau of 

Reclamation 

CASCADE Municipal 

CHARIO Water Users' 
Association 

CHEPPY CREEK Water Users' 
Association 

CHESTER, 1!4inicipal 

* Includes Employees 



Drilled Well 



Springs A-D 
3 Aux~ Wells B 

Drilled Well B 



Drilled Well B 



100 Bureau of Reclamation 



60lt- T-, Coulson, W.S. 



380 L. L. Fxyberger, Secy. 



150 Don Gray 



Tiber Dam E-S-F-D 1,158 Joe Btirrows, W.S. 



B-XI-30 



Water Ref, Doc. Wo, 2 (Contd,) 



Cit^L 



Ownership 



Source;, Treatment 
&^ Tyi)e of System 



i'op, 
196c 



Supervision 



CHINOOK 

CHOIEAU 

CIRC IE 
CLYDE PAB.K 
COFFEE CREEK 



Municipal 
Municipal 

Municipal 

Municipal 

Water Users ' 
Association 



COLUMBIA FALIS Municipal 

Columbia Falls State 
COLUMBUS Municipal 



CONRAD 



Municipal 



CORAM ("highway) Water Users' 
Association 

CORAM Water Users ' 

(railroad) Association 



CULBERTSOK 

GUI' BANK 

Cut Bank 
DARBY 
DEE?. LODGE 



Municipal 

Municipal 

Union Oil Co. 

Municipal 

Municipal 



Milk River 
B-D~S-F-F1 

Bug Well Is 
Spring A 

3 Drilled Weils B 

Springs R-D 

Springs A 

Spriags A-D 
Z Dug We:..ls B 

Drilled Wei:., b 



2,356 Carl King, C,E. 

1,966 Jack Sangray, W.S. 

1,112 Jack Stiles, W«S. 

253 Peter Haug, W.S. 

100 Henry Memec 

1,23--^ Don L'jnsford, W.S, 

113 Merlin Reynolds, W.S, 



Infiltration ''"''ell or. 1,287 Jens Jensen, W,S. 
Yellowstone River 
B-3-F-D 



lake Fremcis 

A-B-D-F-Fi 

Sp:'ing B-D 



B-D 



2,665 Herb Schroidt, WcS. 



200 F, B. Hedmaii 



200 Robert Hainer 



Missouri River fc~o-D 9^9 Hairy McCormick 
Drilled Well B 

Cut Bank Creek B-S-F-D William Croymans, W.S, 
Aux. Drilled Weil ^,539 



3 Drilled Wells 3 
Drilled Well 



50 F. A. Allinder, Supt, 
398 Allen Jones, W.S., 



Tin Cup Joe Creek A-D ii,68l P, A,. Mason, W,S. 
2 Drilled Wells B 
Infiltration Gallery 
B-D 

(2) 



Deer Lodge State Prison Drilled Well B 



2,009 Warden 



(2) Includes Ranch, Big House emd Employees. 



B-XI-31 



Water Refo Doc, No. 2 (Contd,) 



City 



Ownership 



Source, Treatment 
& Type cf System 



Pop, 
i960 



Sypervisior^ 



DEWTON 


Municipal 


DILLON 


Municipal 


DODSON 


Municipal 


BUTTON 


Municipal 


EAST HELENA 


M'oriicipal 


EKALA.KA 


Municipal 


ENNIS 


Municipal 


ESSEX 


Great Nort.hern 


EliREKA. 


Municipal 


FAIRi<'iELD 


Municipal 


FAIRV.IEW 


Municipal 


FLAXVIT.T.E 


Water Users' 




Association 


FORSYTH 


Municipal 


FORT BENTON 


Municipal 


FORTINE 


Private Owner 


FOPT FECK 


Corps, of 




Engineers 


FF.OID 


Municipal 


FB:ON[BERG 


Municipal 



Springs A 




i+lO 


Rattlesnake Creek A- 


■D 


3,690 


3 Aux. Wells B 






Dug 'well B 




313 


Dug Well B 




50i^ 


McClellan Creek A-D 




1,490 



GALEN 



2 Drilled Wells E 

Drilled Well B 

Drilled well B 

Spring A-D 

Sinclair Creek A-F-r 
Aux. Dug Well 

2 Dug Well B"D 
1 Drilled Well P 

2 Drilled Wells B 

2 Drilled Weils B 



Yellowstone River 

B-C-S-F-D 

Missouri River 

B-C-S-F-D 

Creek A-D 

Fort Peck Reservoir 
B-S-F-D 

Drilled Well 

Infiltration Well 

C larks lork Elver B-D 

2 Drilled Wells B 



738 

525 

70 

,229 



Trent Eowe, W,S. 
Roger Pierce J VJ<,S. 

Hugh Kienenberger 
Jim Nowlin, W.S. 
Joe Pistelak, W.S. 

Co W. Parr-ish, W.S. 
Steve Crsuidell, W.S, 
Eo C-o Wellman, W,S, 
Co E, HiblDert 



752 Floyd jiastwood, W,S. 

1,006 Wendell Broihead, W.3^ 

262 James Bourassa, W»S, 

2,032 Glifford Ha'bel, C,E. 

1,887 George Korining, W.S. 

100 R. C. Aitchison, Owner 

150 Area Engineer 

4l8 Earry Johnson ;, W.S. 

367 R. M, Obenchain, W.S. 



501 Supt. State IB Sani- 
tarium 



E-ri-32 



Water Ref. Doc. No. 2 (Contd.) 







S oxi Tce, T-r eatment- 


Pop. 




City 


Ownership 


& Type of System 


i960 


Supervision 


GAROmER S 


Gai-dlner Light 
5: Power 


Yellowstone River B- 
Aux. Gardiner River 

B-r 


=D 300 


We Thomas, Manager 


N 


Dsui Bigelow 


Springs A -It 


300 


D. C. Bigelow, Owner 


GERALDIKE 


Municipal 


Springs A 
Drilled Wexls A-B 


364 


John Graham 


GEYSER 


Water Users ' 
Association 


Drilled Well A 


300 


Joe Petesch 


GLACIER PARK 


Glacier Park Co 


vid-'/ale lireek .A-D 


3''4 


Harthon Bill, Supt. 


GLASGOW 


Municipal 


2 Diillei Wells B 


6,393 


John Wall^ W.S. 
Walter Maggill, C.E. 


GLENDIVE 


Municipal 


Yellav«'Stor>e River 
B.^-S-So-F-L 


■7,058 


Claude Eyer, C.E. 


Forest Park 


V/ater Users' 
Association 


2 Drilled. Wells 5 


300 


Lyle Past, W.S. 


Highland Park 


0. Simon son 


2 Irrliled Wells B 


300 


Lloyd Grow, W.S. 


GREAT FALIS 


Municipal 


Missouri River 
B-C-S^F-D 


65^000 


Del Brick, W.C. 


HAMIIirOW 


Valley Water Cc 


^ Drilled Wells 


2^78 


Jo So Thane, President 


HARDIN 


Municipal 


Big Horn River 
B-c-S-F-D 


2,78s 


S, R, Young, C.E. 


HARLEM 


Municipal 


Milk F.iver 
B-S~F-D 


1,267 


Charles Baker 


HARLOWTON 


Municipal 


k Drilled Wells B-D 


l,73i^ 


Elmer Crosmer, W.S. 


HAVRE 


Municipal 


MJ.lk River 
B-C-S-So-F-D 
3 Drilled Wells 


10,7^0 


S. J. Possenti, W.S. 


HELENA 


Municipal 


Missouri River 

B-C-S-F-D 

Ten Mile Creek 

A-S-D 
Eale C-roand Water 

A-S-D 
Be^irxck Wen. B-D 


21,000 


George Malben, W.S. 



B-XT-33 



Water Ref, Doc, No. 2 (Contd.) 







So\irce» Treatment 


Pop. 




City 


Ownership 


& Type of System 


i960 


Supervision 


HELENA 


State Vocation- 
al school for 
Girls 


Drillea. Well 


191 


Superintendent ^^ 


BIGHWOOD 


Water Users ' 
Association 


2 Drilled Wells E 


200 


Jack Bucklajid 


HIWGHAM 


Municipal 


2 Drilled Wells B 


25U 


L. C= Ulmen, W.S. 


HINSDALE 


Co, Commi- 
ssioners 


Dug Well B 


1^00 


0. Johnson, W.S. 


HOT SHRnJGS 


Municipal 


Hot Springs Creek A-D 

2 Drilled Wells B 


585 


Ted Craft, W„S. 


HUNGRY HORSE 


Jim Willows 


Dug Well B 


300 


Jim Willows J Owner 


HUNGRY HORSE 


M, Bauska 


Spring A 


200 


Manuel Bauska, Owner 


HYSEAM 


Municipal 


Infiltration Well in 
Yellowstone River B-D 


k9k 


Ray Zent, W.S, 


JOriET 


Municipal 


3 Drilled Wells B 


U52 


Andy Vandersloot, W.S. 


JORDAN 


Water Lsers ' 
Association 


Drilled Well 3 


557 


Fmifuiuel Einther, W.S^ 


JUDITH GAP 


Municipal 


2 Drilled Wells B 


185 


Geo. Brewinton, W.S. 


KALISPELL 


Municipal 


Spring B-D 
2 Drilled Wells 3 


12,600 


John Harris, W.S. 

L, 3. McClintock, C.E. 


Kal i spell - 


Olson 


Drilled Well B 


50 


Oscar Olson, Owner 


Olson 










KEVIN 


Municipal 


6 Drilled Wells B 


375 


A- D» Ketcham, W.S. 


lAUREL 


Municipal 


Yellowstone River 
E-C-S~F-F1-D 


i+,601 


Joe Nicholas, W.S. 
John Daley, C.E. 


lEWISTOWN 


Municipal 


Springs A 


7>08 


Jack McGhee, C.E. 


LIBBY 


Pacific Power 


Flower Ci'eek A-S-D 


5,500 


Stan Collins, Mangr. 



& Light Co. 



LIMA 



Union Pacific Springs A-D 
Railroad 



397 W. C. BTimett, Vice 
Pr'esidnet (Railroad) 



■XI-3i+ 



Water Ref. Doc. No. 2 (Contd.) 



City 


Ovnership 


Source, Treatment 
& Type of System 


Pop. 
i960 


Supervision 


LIVINGSTON 


Municipal 


Yellowstone River 
B-C-S-F-D 
3 Drilled Weils B-D 


8,229 


Verne Reed, C.E. 


LODGE GRASS 


Municipal 


2 Drilled Wells B 


687 


James Faught, W.S. 


MAIiTA 


Municipal 


3 Drilled Wells B 


2,239 


Bud Easier, C.E. 


MANHATTAN 


Municipal 


Spring A-D 
Drilled Well B 


889 


Dent LaRue, W.S. 


MARTIN CITY 


R. Baeth 


3 Drilled Wells B 


500 


Russel Baeth, Owner 


MEDICINE LAKE 


Municipal 


Drilled Well B-D 
Dug Well 


1+52 


Clarence Bakken 


MEISTONE 


Municipal 


Dug Well B-L 


266 


Richard Goodwin 


MILES CITY 


Municipal 


Yellowstone River 
B-C-S-r-Fl-D 


9,665 


Kurt Wiel, C.E. 


Miles City 


State 


k Drilled W -lis B-D 


328 


Super int endent 


MISSOULA 


Montana Power 
Company 


Rattlesnake Creek 
A-S-D 
8 Drilled Wells B 


35,000 


Harry McCann, Mangr. 
R. C. Cronin, Foreman 


Fairviews 


Fairviews Dev. 
Co. 


2 Drilled Wells B 


1,000 


A. J. Mosby, President 


MOORE 


Municipal 


2 Drilled Wells B 


216 


Glen Mason, W.S. 


MUSSEISHELL 


Municipal 


Drilled Well B 


150 


Chas. Perkins, W.S. 


NASHUA 


Municipal 


Drilled Well B 


796 


Clayton Me land 


NEIHART 


Municipal 


'Brien Creek A-D 


150 


Bonnie McDaniels, C.C. 


NOXON 


Water Users ' 
Association 


Pilgrim Creek A-D 


150 


Joe Dohrovec 


Noxon 


Washington 
Power 


2 Drilled Wells B 


50 


Herb Roehling 


OPHEIM 


Municipal 


2 Drilled Wells 3 


U57 


Leonard Or re 


PARADISE 


N. P. Railroad 
Co. 


Dug Well B-D 


300 


0. J. Murphy, Foreman 



B-XI-35 



Water Ref. Doc. No. 2 (Contd,) 







Source, Treatment 


Pop. 




City 


Ownership 


& Type of System 


i960 


Supejrvision 


PHILLIPSBURG 


Municipal 


Fred Burr Lakes A-D 
S. Boulder Creek A-D 
Springs A-D 


1,107 


R. J. McKinley, W.S.^ 


PLAINS 


Valley Water 


Springs A-D 


769 


H. S. Thane, President 




Co. 


K. P. Sink B 




Earl Inman, W,S. 


PLENTYWOOD 


Municipal 


7 Drilled Wells B 


2,121 


Adolph German, W.S. 


PLEWA 


Municipal 


3 Drilled Wells B 


263 


R. L. Ellingson, W.S. 


POISON 


Municipal 


Hell Roaring Creek 
A-S-D 
Drilled Well E 


2,31^^ 


Leonard Connell, W.S. 


Kerr Dam 


Montana Power 
Co. 


Flathead River Kerr 
Dam B-F-D 


50 


Montana Power Co. Supt 


POPLAR 


Municipal 


3 Drilled Wells 


1,565 


Vern Ostlund, W,S. 


RAPELJE 


Water Users ' 
Association 


Dug Well B-'D 


100 


Frank Woodrich, W.S, 


RAMSAY 


Water Users ' 
Association 


2 Drilled Wells 


200 


J. H. Seymour, W.S. 

1 


RED LODGE 


Municipal 


West fork Rock Creek A. 
Drilled Well B-D 


-D 

2,278 


Frank Yurkovich, W,S. 


REXFORD 


VJater Users ' 
Association 


Sullivan Creek A-D 


1+50 


George Rich 


RICHEY 


Municipal 


3 Drilled Wells B-D 


480 


Joe Ziegler, C.C. 


RONAE 


Municipal 


Crow Creek A-D 
1 Drilled Well B 


1,33^ 


Henry Redlaczyk, W.S. 


ROUND BUTTE 


Water Users ' 
Association 


1 Drilled Well B 


350 


Leo Kaiser, Secy. 


ROTJiroUP 


Municipal 


3 Drilled Wells B-D 


2,842 


Rollin Adams, W.S. 


RUDYARD 


VJater Users ' 
Association 


2 Drilled Wells B 


600 


Cliff Ulmen, W.S. 


RYEGATE 


Municii)al 


Dug Well B-D 


319 


S. M. Bracka, W.S. 



B-XI-36 



Water Fef. Doc, No. 2 (Contdo) 



City 



3ACC 



SALT-ESE 



SCOBFi^ 

SHELBY 
SHERIDAN 

SIDNEY 
SOMMERS 
SQUARE BUTTE 

STAWFORI) 
STE\'EWSVILLE 



SUNBURST 
SUPERIOR 



Source, iTeati'.erit Fopc 
Qvnership & Type of System 19^0 



Municipal 



ST, IGNATIUS Municipal 



Private 



SAND COULEE Water Jsers' 
Association 



Municipal 

Municipal 
Municipal 

M'onicipal 

Private 

Water Users' 
Association 

Municipal 

Municipal 



STOCKETT Water Users' 
Association 



Municipal 

Montana Power 
Co. 



?upervi.sr:.on 



Spring A-D 
Well B"D 



Mission Creek A-D 
Drilled Well 3 

Silver Creek A-D 
Packer Creek A-L 

Drilled Well E 



^^90 rcnc Baxim^ W.C. 

9^0 Albert. laPorte, W«S. 

85 Charles Barker, W^S, 

300 Geo. Mlttal, W.S, 



^r.filtration Gallery 1,726 Geo. Seeks, W,S< 
Drilled Well 3 



THOMPSON FALIS Municipal 



Woodlin Com 

THREE FORKS 
TOWNSERD 



Water Users ' 
Association 

Municipal 

Municipal 



6 Drilled Wells B 

Indian Creek A-D 
Springs A 

Drilled Wells B 

Flatnead laKe B-D 

Springs A 

5 Drilled Wells E 

Infiltration Wells A- 
Drilled Well !< 

Drilled Well B-D 

? Drilled Wells B 

Springs A-D 
Drilled Well B 

Ashley Creek A-D 
Coig Well 

Drilled Well 

h Drilled Wells 
2 Drilled Weils B 



k^OU Morris Sundty, W<,3 

539 "i^ Moore, W.S, 

4; 562 KeiTEit Welty, W,So 

TOO Allen Milne, Gwner 

85 John Webster, W.S. 

615 Henr-y Preshinger, WoS, 

78k Fred Odlin, W,S. 

UOO Tom Klassner, Owner 

882 5eo. Kiramet, W,S, 

1,2^4-2 Haxry McCann, Mangr, 
Ro Co Cronin, ForemgLn. 

l,27i»- T\ionnan Jacobson, W.S, 

50 Joe Chloupek, W,S, 

1,161 H. Ho Manning W^S, 

1,528 Harvey Bar roughs 



B-XI-3T 



Water Ref. Doc. No. 2 (Contd.) 



Source, Treatment Pop. 
Ownership Type of System I960 Supervision 



City 



TRACY 


Water Users ' 




Association 


TRIDENT 


Ideal Cement 


te:out creek 


Water Users ' 




A.ssociation 


TWIN BRIDGES 


State 


TWIN BRIDGES 


Municipal 


TROY 


Municii)al 


VALIER 


Municipal 


VAUGHN 


V7ater Users ' 




Association 



VIRGINIA CITY Municipal 
WARM SPRINGS State 



WESTBY 
WHITEFISH 

White fish 

WHITEHALL 

WHITE SULPHUR 
SPRINGS 

WIBAUX 

WIISALL 

WINIFRED 
WINNETT 
WOLF POINT 



Municipal 
Municipal 

Railroad 

Municix>al 

Municipal 

Municipal 

Water Users ' 
Association 

Municipal 

Municipal 

Municipal 



1 Drilled Well B 

3 Dug Wells B 
Drilled Well B-D 

2 Drilled Wells B 

2 Drilled Wells S 

'Brien Creek A-D 
Well B 

5 Drilled Wells B 

Drilled Well B 

2 Springs A 

3 Drilled Wells B 

2 Drilled Wells B 

Surface Streams A~D 
Whitefish Lake B-D 

Whitefish Lake B-D 

3 Drilled Wells B 
Willow Creek A-D 

3 Drilled Wells B 
2 Drilled Wells B-D 

2 Drilled Wells B-D 
Drilled Well B 
k Drilled Wells B 



150 Helen Lucotch, Secy7 

100 Don F. Carlson, Engr, 

100 S. J. Stonehocker, W.S. 

223 J. Balkovatz, Supto 

509 Charles Whitney 

855 Harold Nelson, W.S. 

72ij- Ted Olson, W.S. 

265 Henry Gurnsey, W.S. 

19^+ Carl Dixon 

2,089 Charles Harrington, 
Business Manager 

309 Earl Strand ^ 

2,965 James Allen, W.S. 

John Santana, W.S. 

898 Joe Yerman, W.S. 

1,519 Verne Atkins 

766 Raymond Barthel 

200 John Arthun 

220 Fred Crow 

360 Joe Self, Jr, 

3,685 Arlie Jensen 



B-XI-38 



Water Ref. Poc. No» 2 (Contdo) 



Source J Treatment Popo 

City Ovnership & Type of Sy stem i960 _ Supe rYislon 

WORDEK Water Users' Infiltration Well 225 W. C. Jackson 
Association B-D 

WYOIA Water Users' Dug Well B-D 100 Howard Curry 

Association 



B-xi-39 



STATE OF MONTAM. 
EMERGENCY RESOUECE MAmGEMENT ORGANIZATION 

ROSTER OF KEY OFFICIAIS 



RESOURCE I/[AM.GEI#Iin' 
DIRECTOR 



Home: 



MAJ. GEN. 5. G. KENDALL 
State Arsena,! Building 
1,0, Bex 115'7, Helena 
512 MilwaiiiieG Ave. Deer Lodge 



(Montana Area Code-Uo6) 
i+if2-3260 
ext.681 

846-181^7 



CHAIRMAN, RESOURCE 
PRIORITY BOARD 



Alternates; 



WALTER ANDERSON 
Misscijla Paving Co. 
1715 Ru3se.IL, Missoula 
Home: 1721 Helen, Missoula 

1. E. V. OMHOLT 
State Auditor 

State Capitol Building, Helena 
Home: 915 12th Ave. Helena 

2. C. LOWELL PURDY 
Commissioner of Agriculture 
Capitol Annex Building, Helena 

Home: 1015 No. Davis, Helena 



CONSTRUCTION AND HOUSING AGENCY 



DIRECTOR 



Home: 



Alternates: 1. 



Home: 



Home 



RALPH KENYOW 

State Controller 

State Capitol Building, Helena 

1910 5th Ave. Helena, 

MA.RVIN HOLTZ 

Architectixre & Engineering Divn. 
State Capitol Building, Helena 
39 North Benton Ave. Helena 

PHILIP H. HA.UCK 

Director, Architecture and 

Engineeririg Division 

State Capitol Building, Helena 

112^ Henderson, Helena 



Chief, Construction 
Division 



WILLIAM D. THORNBY 
Morrison-Maierle, Inc. 
910 Helena Ave. Helena 
Home: 428 So, Cocke, Helena, 



5]43_61+02 



5U9-5I+O8 

i+U2-3260 
ext.205 

1+1^2-8298 

hk2-32GQ 
ext.391 

I+U2-I693 



i4l-2-3260 
ext.338 

1+1+2-2989 

Ui^2-3260 
ext.326 

J+U3-2572 

Ui|2-3260 
ext.327 



i+i+2-7518 
l+i+2-3050 

1+1+2-7357 



Construction Division 
(Contd.) 

Alternates: 1. 



Chief, Supply- 
Requirements and 
Supporting Re- 
sources Division 



Alternates: 



Chief, Housing 
Division 



Alternates; 



RICHARD A POR'TE 

Calrd Engineering Works 

1131 N. Montana Ave. Helena 



Home: 1^01 Sibelius, Helena 

2. ROBERT SCRUrON 

Morrison-Maierle, Inc. 
910 Helena Aveo Helena 
Home: 72'7 Breckenridge, Helena 

HAROLD WEGGENMAJI 
Purchasing Division 
Dept. of Administration 
State Capitol Building, Helena 
Home: 656 North Warren, Helena 

1. lOTHER GIENW 
Pure^iasing Division 
Dept. of Administration 
State Capitol Building 

Home: 713 North Warren, Helena 

2. HARRISON LOWE 
Purchasing Division 
Dept. of Administration 
State Capitol Building, Helena 

Home: 6OI North Warren, Helena 

PHILIP H, HAUCK 
Director, Architecture and 
Engineering Division 
State Capitol Building, Helena 
Home: 112^1 Henderson, Helena 

1. MRTIN CRENNAN 

Campo and Crennan, Architects 
Granite Block, Helena 
Home: 1207 Hauser Blvd., Helena 

2. ED ADAMS 

Division of Architecture and 
Engineering 

State Capitol Building, Helena 
Home: Route 1, Box 137, Helena 



ECONOMIC STABILIZATION AGENCY 



DIRECTOR 



Home: 



E. V. OmOLT 

State Auditor 

State Capitol Building, Helena 

915 12th Ave. Helena 



Uif2-7957 

UU2-U518 
U42-3050 

l+i+2-5^22 

1^1^2-3260 
ext.316 

i|i^2-3260 
ext.316 

l+1^2-l4-795 

l^i+2-3260 
ext.316 

UI13-3115 

kk2-32G0 
ext.327 

1+1+2-7518 
I+U2-393O 

1+1+3-2911 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.326 

1+1+3-3525 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.205 

1+1+2-8298 



(2) 



ECONOMIC STABILIZATION AGEN CY 
(Contd.) 

Alternates: ] 



Home; 



2. 



JACK CROSSEE 

State Auditors Office 

State Capitol Building, Helena 

Ihlk Knight, Helena 



Chief, Price 
Operations 



Alternates: 



HARRY MA.SCHEPA 
State Auditors Office 
State Capitol Building, Helena 
Homes 105 SOo Cc^ke, Helena 

F. M. GAJeON 

Vice President, Union Bank & 
Trust Co. 

Union Bank Build irig, Helena 
Home: Dotsonville, Helena 

1. L. HOYT LAPISON 
President, Columbia Paint Co. 
1517 Dodge Ave. Helena 

Home: 712 Monroe, Helena 

2. JOHN P. CALDWELL 
Executive Director 
Montana Council No. 9, AFME 
2312 Humble, Missoula 

Home: 2312 Humble, Missoula 



Chief, Consumer 
Rationing Operations 



FRANK HUNTER 

Associated Food Stores, Inc. 
Airport Road, Helena 
Home: 1^ Hilmen Road, Helena 



Alternates: 



1. 



Home: 



TYLER REYNOLDS 
Ryan Wholesale Grocers 
7 N. 33rd, Billings 
1516 12 W., Billings 



Chief, Rent 
Operations 



2. THOMAS F. KENKEALY 

President, Town Pump Distributors 
825 E. Murcury, Butte 
Home: 2905 Moulton, Butte 

WILT.IAM H. STINCHFIELD 
Executive Secretary 
Montana, Real Estate Commission 
Capitol Annex Building, Helena 
Home: 2102 E. 6th Ave. Helena 



i|i+2-3260 
ext.205 

1^14.2-2906 

i|l+2-3260 
ext.205 

U42-8075 
Ui+2-5050 



i^42-28li+ 
U42-765O 

UU2-7318 
549-51^.81 

5U9_5U8l 
li42-31^0 

I1U2-3655 
252-3805 

2i+5-5377 
792-6663 

792-6135 

i+U2-326o 
ext.392 

UU2-8706 



(3) 



Rent Operations 
(Contd.) 

Alternates: 



1. RICHAJID C„ TBMERMM 
Real Estate Officer 

1st National Bank, Helena 
Home: Nortli of Helena 

2. GORDON BUCKIAND 
Buckland-Sanford Ins. Agency 
^4-17 N. Last Chance Guleh, Helena 

Home: 1720 Golden Avenue, Helena 



ELECTRIC POWER AND GAS AGENCY 



DIRECTOR 



Home: 



Alternates: 1. 



Home: 



2. 



Home; 



DIX C. SHEYAI-ni'R 
Helena, Division Manager 
Montana Power Company 
2 North Main, Helena 
822 Madison Avenue, Helena 

BRAD ¥„ DURAM; 
Division Manager 
Montana-Dakota Utilities 
Box 201, Glendive, Montana 
8l2 N, River Ave. Glendive 

J. DAN WEBSTER 
Division Mana^ger 
Montana- Idaho Division 
Pacific Power and Light Co. 
11.1 1st Aveo E., Kalispell 
60it 6th Ave. E., Kalispell 



Chief, Electric 
Power Division 



Alternates: 



BRAD W, DURANT 
Division Manager 
Montana-Dakota Utilities 
Box 201 Glendive, Montana 
Home: 8l2 N. River Ave., Glendive 



VERNE W. BROWN 
Division Superintendent 
Montana Power Company 
2 North Main, Helena 
1001 11th Ave. Helena 



Home: 



2. 



DAVID C. JOHNS 
Supt. Elect. Trans, and Dist, 
Montana Power Company 
i+O E. Broadway, Butte 
Home: 3017 Harvard Ave. Butte 



lfU2-2520 

4i+2-Ul02 
y+2-lll8 

i|U2-627i+ 

i|i^2-i^6l0 

14t2-0073 
365-3365 

365-22i+ii 
756-232I+ 

756-^+695 
365-3365 

365-22UU 
ifU2-i+6lO 

kh2-k76k 
723-5^^21 

792-7902 



(h) 



Chief, Supply Re- 
quirements and 
Resource Support 
Division 



SM COEENHAVER 
Storekeeper 
Montana Power Company 
2 North Main, Helena 
Home: ^13 North Beattie, Helena 



Alternates: 1. 



Home: 



KENNE'TH J. HAERI3 
Ch. Clk., Store Dept. 
Montana Poorer Company 
kO E. Broadway, Butte 
953 N„ Main, Butte 



Chief, Gas 
Division 



Alternates: 



FOOD AGENCY 
DIRECTOR 



Alternates: 



2. DAN H. PYFER 

Montana Power Co. 
1+0 E. Broadway, Butte 
Home: 3108 Edwg,rds, Butte 

ED DOUGHERTY 
Gen. Foreman, Gas 
Montana Power Co. 
2 North Main, Helena 
Home: 2321 Cannon, Helena 

1. JOHN ROBERTSON 
Asst. Manager, Gas 
Montana Power Company 
UO E. Broadway, Butte 

Home: 1203 W. Woolraan, Butte 

2. JOE C. KimiNSTER 
Supt. Gas Prod. 8c Dist. 
Montana Power Company 
kO E. Broadvray, Butte 

Home: 2255 Cross Drive, Butte 



C. LOI'ffiLL FURDY 
Comirdssioner of Agriculture 
Capitol Annex Building, Helena 
Home: 1015 No. Davis, Helena 

1. THOMAS A. MCI'IASTER 
Chief, Dairy Division 
Dept. of Agriculture 

Sam W. Mitchell Building, Helena 
Home: II09 Livingston, Helena 

2. EINAR LAP.SON 

Owner, Montana Meat Co. 
Helena Valley 
Home: I817 Silver, Helena 



UI12-I+6IO 

4U2-I629 
723-5^21 

792-3862 
723-5^+21 

792-3020 
723-5^21 

UU2-5057 
723-5^+21 

723-6772 
723-5^21 

792-2692 



i+i+2-3260 
ext.391 

l+i+2-1693 

Ui+2-3260 
ext.391 



1^1^2-2893 
41+2-1020 

UI+2-I72U 



(5) 



Chief, Primary 
Distribution 



Alternates; 



Home: 



Chief, Secondary 
Distribution 



Alternates; 



Chief, Supply 
Requirements 



Alternates; 



THOMAS A. MCMASTER 

Chief, Dairy Division 

Dept. of Agriculture 

Sam W. Mitchell Building, Helena 

1109 Livingston, Helena 



1. ALBERT LUNDBCRG 
Owner, D^mdy's Shopping Center 
306 Euclid Ave. Helena 

Home: 628 Hauser Blvd. Helena 

2. JOE MCINTOSH 
Ryan Grocery Co. 
P.O. Box 532, Billings 

Home: 1002 Parkhill Dr. Billings 

EINAR LAHSOW 
Montana Meat Co. 
Helena Valley 
Home: l8l7 Silver, Helena 

1. HENRY F. WILSON 
Montana Farm Bureau 
125 W. Mendenliall, Bozeman 

Home: Wilsall, Montana 

2. LEORAEE) KENTIELD 
Montana Farmers Union 
Box 2i|U7, Great Falls 

Home: 819 19th St. S., Great Falls 

GARY DELANO 

Chief, Div. of Weights & Measures 
Sam W. Mitchell Building, Helena 
Home: 101 Cole Ave. Helena 

1. MRS. JUNE HAGEN 

Dairy Div. Dept. of Agriculture 
Sam W. Mitchell Building, Helena 
Home: 102 E. Main, East Helena 



2. MRS. rffiLINDA KELLY 
Dept. of Agriculture 
Capitol Anriex Building, 
Home: Route 1, Helena 



Helena 



HEALTH AGENCY 
DIRECTOR 



DR. JOHN S. ANDERSON 
Executive Officer 
State Board of Health 
Cogswell Building, Helena 
Home: 22l6 E. 6th Avenue, Helena 



i|U2-3260 
ext.391 



I1I12-2893 
iA2-025i+ 

i^U2-5156 
252-2165 

2U8-618U 
ifi|2-1020 

Ui^2-172i^• 

587-3153 

wilsall-2659 
U52-6U06 

1+53-3881+ 

UU2-3260 
ext.393 

I+U2-1I+97 

1+1+2-3260 
ext . 39^ 

227-5^63 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.391 

l|lf2-7797 



1+1+2-3260 
ext . 2I+I 



1+1+2-0663 



(6) 



HEALTH AGENCY 
(Contd, 



Alternates: 1. 



Home; 



Chief, Health 
Manpower Division 



Alternates; 



Chief, Health 
Materials Division 



Alternates: 



DR. MARY E. SOULES 
Director, Disease Control 
State Board of Health 
Cogswell Building, Helena 
825 8th Ave. Helena 



2. DR. PAUL WOOLEY 

State Board of Health 
Cogswell Building, Helena 
Home: 50^ W. Lawrence, Helena 

DR. JOHN SINTYDER 
Director^ Dental Health 
State Board of Health 
Cogswell Building, Helena 
lUOO Winne Ave., Helena 



Home; 



Home; 



Home; 



Home; 



1. 



Home: 



MRS. VIRCxTNIA KENYON 
Director, Pablic Health Nursing 
State Board of Health 
Cogswell Building, Helena 
1211 nth Ave. Helena 

DR„ WILLLAI"! CASHI--10RE 
307 N. Jackson, Helena 
10 Montana Avenue, Helena 

RODERIC R. CUDGEL 

Executive Secretary 

Montana Pharmaceutical Association 

P.O. Box 908, Helena 

5UIO Montana Avenue, Helena 

MRS. EDITH KUHI^S 

Director, Microbiology Laboratory 

State Board of Health 

Cogswell Building, Helena 

1130 E. 6th Avenue, Helena 



Chief, Health 
Facilities Division 



2, HIIMER N. HANSEN 
Pharmacist 

Veterans Administration Hospital, 
Helena 
Home: 927 N. Benton Avenue, Helena 

ROBERT J. MUNZENRIDER 
Director, Hospital Facilities Div. 
State Board of Health 
State Laboratory Building, Helena 
Home: 515 1st Street, Helena 



UU2-326O 
ext.251 



yf2-2775 

i+i^2-0663 
ext . i+60 

ll-U2-3260 
ext . 566 



i+i^2-lli28 

I+I12-326O 

ext. 3^+1 



UU3-2618 
UU2-U390 
I+U2-2I+79 
i+lf2-li+32 

l+li2-275^ 

i+i|2-3260 
ext. 227 

UI+2-2098 
l+l+2-6illO 

Uit2-llH2 

4i|2-3260 
ext . i+69 

UI4.2-8077 



(7) 



Health Facilities 
Division (Contd.) 
Alternates: 



1. WALTER MOYLE 

Hospital Facilities Division 
State Board of Health 
State laboratory Building, Helena 
Home: 526 E. State , Helena 

2. WILLIAM LEAKY 
Executive Secretary 
Montana Hospital Association 
1330 9th Ave. Helena 

Home! 1330 9th Avenue, Helena 



Chief, Statistics 
and Mortuary Division 



JOHN C, WILSON 
Director, Records and 
Statistics Division 
State Board of Health 

Cogswell Building 3 Helena 
Home: 1229 Highland, Helena. 

Alternates: 1. JAMES BISHOP 

Chief, Civil Defense Committee 
Montana Funeral Directors Assocn. 
Holland and Bonine Funeral 
Home , Havre 
Home: UO Ridge Road, Havre 



2, PETER HARTMAN 

Member, Civil Defense Committee 
Montana Funeral Directors Assocn. 
T. F. O'Connor Funeral Home 
2lf25 8th Ave. N., Great Falls 
Home: 2if01 8th Ave. N., Great Falls 

ROBERT A. J.AMES 
Administrative Officer 
State Board of Health 
Cogswell Building, Helena 
Home: 211 So. Montana Ave., Helena 

GEORGE MAGNUSON 
Accountant, State Board of Health 
Cogswell Building, Helena 
Home: 311 W. Groschell, East Helena 



Administrative 
Officer 



Alternates: 1. 



2. MR.S. AWITA ELLIS 

State Board of Health 
Cogswell Building, Helena 
Home: Helena Valley 



l^U2-3260 
ext.U69 



¥+2-539^ 
ifU2-19ll 

i+U3-3076 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.l+13 

1+1+2 -llOU 
265-I+37I 

265-7035 
1+53-7257 

1+52-7782 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.l+61 

1+1+2- 5227 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.l+63 

227-6720 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.l+61 

1+1+2-7259 



(8) 



INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION AGENCY 



DIRECTOR 



Alternates: 



Chief, Production 
Division 



Nome ; 



Home: 



SAr<TUEL J. CHAPMAN 
Director, State Planning Board 
Sara W. Mitchell Building, Helena 
209 Washington, Helena 

PATRICK A, BYRNE 

State Planning Board 

Sam Mitchell Building, Helena 

1035 Mill Road, Helena 



2. 



MRS. lAURIE MCCARTHY 
State Planning Board 
Sam Mitchell Building, Helena 
Home: 903 Broadway, Townsend 



PATRICK A. BYRNE 

State Planning Board 

Sam Mitchell Building, Helena 

1035 Mill Road, Helena 



Home; 



Alternates: 1. 



Home; 



RICHARD SETTERSTROM 
Montana Power Co. 
UO E. Broadway, Butte 
Basin Creek Poad, Butte 



2. 



Chief, Distribution 
Division 



Alternates: 



imS. KAY TURNER 
State Planning Board 
Sam W. Mitchell Building, Helena 
Home: 908 Broadway, Helena 

MRS. LAURIE MCCARTHY 
State Planning Board 
Sam Mitchell Building, Helena 
Home: 9^3 Broadway, Townsend 



ROBERT E. MATSON 

State Planning Board 

Sam W. Mitchell Building, Helena 

1722 Leslie Avenue, Helena 



Home: 



2. MRS. DOROTHY GOGGIN 
State Planning Board 
Sam W. Mitchell Building, Helena 
Home: 3^3 W. Lawrence, Helena 



UI12-326O 
ext . 260 

1+1+3- 38I+3 

Ul+2-3260 
ext . 260 

1+1+3-2623 

1+1+2-3260 
ext. 260 

266-31+58 

1+1+2-3260 
ext . 260 

1+1+3-2623 
723-51+21 

792-5298 

1+1+2-3260 
ext. 269 

1+1+2-9386 

1+1+2-3260 
ext. 260 

266-31+58 

1+1+2- 3260 
ext. 269 

1+1+2-1+703 

1+1+2-3260 
ext. 269 

I+U3-2516 



MANPOWER AGENCY 
DIRECTOR 



E. H. REE:DER 
Chairman, 

Unemployment Compensation Coram. 
U.C.C. Building, Box 1728, Helena 
Home: 1205 Broadway, Helena 



1+1+2-3260 
ext. 1+33 



I+I+2-357I+ 



(9) 



MMPOWER AGENCY 
(Contd.) 

Alternates: 



Defense and 

Mobilization 

Coordinator 



Chief, Employment 
Service Division 



1. C. C. WARNER 

Unemployment Compensation Comm. 
Box 1728, Helena 
Home: lUlU Winne, Helena 

2. J. C. FLETCHER 
Unemployment Compensation Comm. 
Box 1728, Helena 

Home: 1025 6th Avenue, Helena 

C. C. WARNER 

Unemployment Compensation Comm. 
Box 1728, Helena 
Home: lUlU Winne, Helena 



Alternates: 1. 

Home: 
2. 



Home: 



Home: 
Alternates: 1. 

Home: 
2. 



Home: 

Chief, Unemployment 
Insurance and Financial 
Assistance Division 

Home: 



Alternates: 1. 



Home; 



RALPH JACKSON 

Unemployment Compensation Comm. 

Box 1728, Helena 

1007 8th Avenue, Helena 

J. L. DORRINGTON 

Unemployment Compensation Comm. 

Box 1728, Helena 

2005 5th Avenue, Helena 

J. C. FLETCHER 

Unemployment Compensation Comm. 

Box 1728, Helena 

1025 6th Avenue, Helena 

FRED FRISCH 

Unemployment Compensation Comm. 

Box 1728, Helena 

U30 Geddis, Helena 

JACK EGGE 

Unemployment Compensation Comm. 

Box 1728, Helena 

538 5th Avenue, Helena 

DON MERRITT 

Unemployment Compensation Comm. 

Box 1728, Helena 

31 W. Poplar, Helena 

CHARLES PETERSON 

Unemployment Compensation Comm. 

Box 1728, Helena 

1727 Golden Avenue, Helena 



UJ+2-3260 
ext.637 

i^i+2-678l 

Uif2-3260 
ext.588 

41^2-6929 

I+U2-326O 
ext.637 

Mt2-678l 

UU2-3260 
ext.i+87 

l^U2-i+U25 

UU2-3260 
ext.553 

I+U2-9659 

UU2-3260 
ext.588 

1+1^2-6929 

iiU2-326o 
ext.U3i+ 

1+U2-0771+ 

Ui+2-3260 
ext.635 

1+1+2-0773 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.683 

1+1+2-7127 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.381 

UU2-1I+I+9 



(10) 



Unemployment Insurance 
and Financial Assistance 
Division (Contd.) 

Alternates: 2. 



Home: 



WARREN LFIAITO 1+14-2-3260 

Unemployment Compensation Comm. ext.595 
Box 1728, Helena 

1504 Walnut, Helena U14-2-8219 



PETR0LEUI4 AM) SOLID FUELS AGENCY 



DIRECTOR 



Alternates: 



Chief, Petroleum 
Division 



Alternates; 



JAMES F. NEE;LY 1^+2-3260 

Executive Secretary ext.306 

Monta^na Oil and Gas 
Consenration Commission 
325 Fuller Ave. Helena 
Home: 515 togan, Helena l|lj-2-7388 

1. DR, EDWIN G. KOCH 729-9U76 
President, Montana College of 

Mineral Science and Technology 
Butte , Montana 
Home: 1315 West Pa,rk, Butte 723-7006 

2. J. MORIEY COOPER U42-3260 
Member, State Board of Equalization ext.U07 
State Capitol Building, Helena 

Home: 18OO Winne, Helena 1+U2-2297 

ROBERT L. GAFFRI 252-38X1 

Engineer, Humble Oil 8c Refining Co. 
Billings, Montana. 
Home: 1+15 Glen Drive, Billings 259-9357 

1. J. P. FRELICH l|53_U37i 

Manager, Fnillips Petroleum Refinery 
Great Falls, Montana 
Home: 36OI 7th Ave. S., Great Falls U5U-OI76 



Chief, Supply Re- 
quirements and 
Supporting Resources 
Division 

Alternates: 



2. JAI^IES H. VJALSH 252-0533 

Manager, Montana Division 
Rocky Mountain Oil & Gas Assocn. 
P. 0. Box 1V77, Billings 
Home: 2019 19th West, Billings 252-6757 

J. MORLEY COOPER 1+1+2-3260 

Member, State Board of Equalization ext.1+07 
State Capitol Building, Helena 

Home: 1800 Winne, Helena 1+1+2-2279 

1. ROBERT F, WILSON 1+1+2-3260 

Director, Motor Fuel Tax Dept. ext.61+5 
State Board of Equalization 
Sam W. Mitchell Building, Helena 
Home: 2030 Jerome Place, Helena 1+1+2-9025 



(11) 



Supply Requirements 
and Supporting 
Resources Division 
(Contd.) 

Alternates: 2. 



Chief, Solid Fuels 
Division 



DON MCKEEVER 
Motor Fuel Tax Dept. 
State Board of Equalization 
Sam W. Mitchel Building, Helena 
Hornet 607 E„ Dudley, East Helena 

DBo EDWHT G. KOCH 
President, Montana Col3.ege of 
Mineral Science and Technology 
Butte, Montana 
Homes 131^ W^ Park,. Butte 



Alternates: 1. 



THOMAS MORGAN 
State Coal Mine Inspector 
301 IW, Roundup, Montana 
Home: 301 IW, Roundup 

2. DR. S. L. GROFF 

Chief, Water & Fuels Division 
Montana College of Mineral 
Science and Technology, Butte 
Home: 2210 South Drive, Butte 



TELECOMMUNICATION AGENCY 
DIRECTOR 



Alternates: 



Home; 



Home: 



H. B. CAIN 

Mountain States Tel. S 
560 N. Park, Helena 
831 Dearborn, Helena 

E. M. WILLIS 
Mountain States Tel. 8 
560 N. Park, Helena 
1712 Highland, Helena 



Chief, Service 
Requirements and 
Capabilities 
Divisi o n 

Alternates: 



2. D. A. JOHNSON 

Mountain States Tel. 
560 N. Park, Helena 
Home: 131^ Leslie, Helena 



D, A. JOHNSON 
Mountain States Tel. 
560 N, Park, Helena 
131^ Iieslie, Helena. 



Tel. Co. 



Tel. Co. 



Tel. Co. 



Tel. Co. 



Home: 



1. 



J, L. WFxAMER 
Mountain States Tel. & Tel. Co. 
560 N. Park, Helena 
Home: 2008 Lockey Ave., Heleria 



it.ll-2-3260 
ext.6J+5 



227-568I1 
729-91^76 

723-7006 
323-13^3 

323-13^3 
723-6606 

792-8791 

I1U3-23II 

1+1+2-7565 
l^i+3-2370 

l+l+2-2i+75 
UU3-3290 

I+I+2-60H3 
i+i|3-3290 

1+1+2-60^3 
i+l+3-3267 

UU2-8571 



(12) 



Service Requirements 
(Contd,) 

Alternates: 



Chief, Service 
Priorities and 
Allocation 
Division 

Alternates' 



Home; 



Horns; 



1. 



J. D, HAERIS 
Mountain States Tel. 
560 N. Park, Helena 
728 Gilbert, Helena 



Tel. Co. 



E, M. Willis 

Mountain States Tel. & Tel, 

560 N, Paritj Helena 

1?12 Hi.ghl8,nd, Helena 



Co, 



¥„ F, ECKERT 
Mountain States Tel, & Tel. Co. 
^60 N, Park, Helena 
Home: 1126 Hudson, He'ieria 

2. D, M. CHUGG 

Mountain States Tel. & Tel. Co. 
560 W. Park, Helena 
Home: 910 Choteau, Helena 



Chief, Maintenance, 
Repair and Support- 
ing Resources 
Division 

Alternates: 



Home; 



J. R. MCIMYRE 

Mountain States Tel. & Tel. Co. 

560 No Park, Helena 

1117 Choteau, Helena 



1, R. W. DAVIS 

Mountain States Tel. & Tel. Co. 
560 N. Park, Helena 
Home; 527 N. Raleigh, Helena 

2. B. R. ROBERTS 

Mountain States Tel, & Tel. Co. 
560 N. Park, Helena 
Home: 527 Broadway, Helena 



TRANSPORTATION AGENCY 
DIRECTOR 



Home: 



JAMES W. HA.HN 
Traffic Erigineer Division 
State Highway Department 
6th Avenue & Roberts, Helena 
4.10 S. Montana A.ve., Helena 



Altema.tes : 



1. J. M. MCCIU3KEY 

State Highway Department 
6th Ave. & Roberts, Helena 
Home: U33 W, Lai«n"ence, Helena 

2. JOHN A, BERGUM 

Traffic Engineer Division 
State Highway Department 
6th Ave, & Rober-t.s, Helena 
Home: 1129 9th Avenue, Helena 



4^3-2239 

UJ+3-3089 
UU3-237O 

i;U3-2l83 

1+1^3-2666 
1+1+3-3360 

M+2-9787 
1+1+3-2279 

I+l;2- 981+9 

1+1+3-3206 

1+1+2-2957 
1+1+3-2305 

1+1+2-5977 



1+1+2-3260 
ext.239 



1+1+2-7590 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.201 

1+1+2-1113 

l+lf2-3260 
ext..239 



1+1+2-7812 



(13) 



Director, Rail 
Transport Division 



Alternates: 



Director, 
Aviation Division 



Director, Motor 
Transport Division 



Home; 



1. 



Home: 



2. 



Home: 



Home; 



Alternates: 1. 



Home: 



2. 



E. C. COM 
Superintendent 
Great Northern Railway- 
Great Falls, Montana 
1008 El Paso, Great Falls 

W. F. PIATTENEERGER 

Superintendent 

Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul 

and Pacific Railroad Co. 

Deer Lodge, Montana 

703 Milwaxikee Avenue, Deer Lodge 

R. J. DAVTS 

Tiainmaster 

Northern Pacific Railway Co. 

Helena, Montana 

1319 Butte Ave., Helena 

CHARLES A.LYTJCH 

Director, Montana Aeronautics Coram. 

Helena Airport, Helena 

639 Logan, Helena 

JACK WILSON 

Montana Aeronautics Commission 

Helena Airport, Helena 

1 Hilmen Road, Helena 



JAMES H. MONGER 
Montana Aeronautics Commission 
Helena Airport, Helena 
Hrane: 29 S. Alta, Helena 

LEONARD ECKEL 
Managing Director 
Montana Motor Transport Assocn. 
912 Wyoming Ave., Billings 
Home: h Locust, Billings 



Alternates: 1. 



CLAYTON BROWN 
Assistant Director 
Montana Motor Transport Assocn. 
912 Wyoming Ave., Billings 
Home: 1737 Ave. E., Billings 



1+53- 5^+81 

761-4123 
8i+6-206U 

8U6-II63 
Ul+2-1610 

iA3-3895 

IA2-3260 
ext.281 

kh2-kko6 

1+42-3260 
ext.281 

M+3-3826 

442-3260 
ext.281 

442-8126 

252-8487 

259-7552 
252-8487 

259-9744 



(14) 



WATER AGENCY 
DIRECTOR 



Alternates: 



C. ¥. BRINK 

Director, Environmental 
Sanitation Division, 
State Board of Health 
Helena, Montana 
Home: 123^ Winne Avenue, Helena 

1. A. D. MCDERTICTT 
Director, State Water Con- 
sers/ation Board 

Helena, Montana 
Home: 1315 Hauser Boulevard, Helena 

2. A, W. CLAEKSON, 
Chief, Water Section 
State Board of Health 
Helena, Montana 

Home: 9l6 Eighth Avenue, Helena 



Chief, Distribution 
Division 



Alternates: 



A. W. CLAEKSON 
Chief, Water Section 
State Board of Health 
Helena, Montana 
Home: 9lG Eighth Avenue, Helena 



1. 



Home; 



2. 



D. G. WILLEMS 

Environmental Sanitation Division 

State Board of Health 

Helena, Montana 

2222 Fifth Avenue, Helena 



Chief, Supply- 
Requirements 
Division 



Alternates: 



H. M. HUNT 
Environmental Sanitation Division 
State Board of Health 
Helena, Montana 
Home: ll8 Oregon, Helena 

A. D. MCDERI40TT 
Director, State Water Con- 
servation Board 

Sam W. Mitchell Building, Helena 
Home: 1315 Hauser Boulevard, Helena 

1. V. E. SLOULIN 

Environmental Sanitation Division 
State Board of Health 
Helena, Montana 
Home: 12^1-6 Winne Avenue, Helena 



1+1+2-3260 
ext.221 



1+1+2-2726 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.35l+ 



1+1+2-6856 

1+1+2-3260 
ext . 221 



1+1+2-7213 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.221 



1+1+2-7213 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.221 



1+1+2-9722 

1+1+2-3260 
ext.221 



1+1+2-7876 

1+1+2-3260 
ext. 3 51+ 



l+i+2-6856 

1+1+2-3260 
ext. 221 



1+1+2-5939 



(15) 



Supply Require- 
ments Division 
(Contd.) 

Alternates; 



Chief, Supporting 

Resources 

Division 



Alternates ; 



2. LYIxE FISHER 1+22-3260 

Environmental Sanitation Division ext,221 
State Board of Health 
Helena, Montana 
Home: lUoS Choteau Avenue, Helena 1^2-9603 

E. V. DARLINTON Ul+2-3260 

Assistant Director ext.692 

State Water Conservation Board 
Sam W. Mitchell Building 
Helena, Montana 
Home: i+21 W. Lawrence Ave., Helena kh2-k20'J 

1. JOHN SPINDIJER ^+2-3260 
Environmental Sanitation Division ext.221 
State Board of Health 

Helena 
Home: 323 Ming Avenue, Helena 1^2-959^ 

2. RALPH W. BOLAiro 4^2-3260 
Environmental Sanitation Division ext.208 
State Board of Health 

Helena 
Home: 635 First Avenue, Helena 1+1+2-2126 



(16)