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Full text of "Sacramento, California"

F 868 
.S12 
S12 
Copy 1 




acramentS^ 
bounty 



o/ ^ r, 



RESOURCES OF SACRAMENTO COUNTY, 



CAUIFORINIA. 



COMPILED BY 

The Sacramento Chamber of Commerce. 



directors: 



WM. SCHAW, President. 

C. F. PRENTISS, . . . Vice-President. 

C. F. DILLMAN, Treasurer. 

M. R. BEARD Secretary. 

L. F. BREUNER GEO. H. CLARK 

M. J. CURTIS P. C. DRESCHER 

H. H. GRAU AC. HINKSON 

GEO. M. MOTT A. E. MILLER 

H. J. SMALL H. I. SEYMOUR 

P. J. SHIELDS L. TOZER 







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P. 



3 S'O^ 



RESOURCES OF SACRAMENTO COUNTY, 

CAUIPORINIA. 



Compiled by the Sacramento Chamber of Commerce, 1901. 



It is not the present purpose to present an historical article, 
but rather to call attention to the important position occupied 
by this favored section, rich in resources and unlimited in its 
opportunities of commercial progress and general advance- 
ment. 

Sacramento County contains about 620,000 acres, all of it 
occupied; that is to say, there is no vacant or "government" 
land within its borders. Land, however, is obtainable at a 
moderate valuation, this section having never experienced 
what is generally known as a "boom." 

The largest watercourse in the State — the Sacramento 
River — forms the western boundary, traversing the entire 
length of the county from north to south, while the American 
River crosses the upper portion of the county from east to 
west, with additional watersheds centering in the Cosumnes 
and Mokelumne Rivers. 

Fruit Culture. — Fruit culture has become one of the leading 
and most profitable industries in the State of California. This 
being conceded, markets and facility of transportation become 
most important factors, and herein again Sacramento County 
excels. 

Taking the center of Sacramento County as an initial point 
and drawing about it a circle having a radius of fifty miles, 
within this circle will be found the region producing the 
earliest vegetables, berries, and fruits within the State, as 
well as the area from which is shipped to the Eastern States 
and outside consumers, more than 75 per cent of the output 
of green and deciduous fruits from the whole State, and over 
go per ce7it of it must pass through this county on its way to 
reach a final market. 

From the accompanying map of the fifty-mile circle men- 
tioned, it will be seen that it extends to and beyond Marys- 
ville on the north, Colfax on the northeast, Placerville on the 
east, Stockton on the south, CoUinsville on the Sacramento 
River, Suisun on the southeast, and Vaca Valley on the west. 




The increase in citrus fruit cannot fail to challenge notice. 
Since we commenced to ship oranges from Central California 
the record stands: 1893, carloads 4; 1896, carloads 81; 1897, 
carloads 286; 1898, carloads 589; 1899, carloads 910, and last 
year, 1800 carloads. Considering the first oranges to ripen 
come from the north and go into home consumption largely, 
this is an encouraging showing. 

Productiveness. — Here and there throughout the State of 
California, are "thermal belts" and "fruit sections," laying 
claim to certain qualification, such as "apricot section," "the 
home of the prune," or a "citrus belt," etc. Of Sacramento 
County, it may be said, it combines all of these, and there is 
neither fruit nor flower, vegetable nor grain produced else- 
where that cannot be produced to perfection within this sec- 
tion. Nor is there a month within the calendar failing to 
produce, and in which are not gathered fruits and vegetables 
for market. 



Large land-holdings are not necessary for the support of a 
family in competence. This can be done on a ten or twenty- 
acre piece, if well selected and located. Several colonization 
enterprises have been inaugurated within the county, with 
a view to supplying small and choice subdivisions of land to 
intended settlers, with all the accessories necessary to suc- 
cess. The most extensive and successful of these are the 
Orange Vale Colony and Fair Oaks Development Company, 
situated in the most eligible part of the county for fruit rais- 
ing. Over six thousand acres have been subdivided in these 
two colonies, with the purpose of settling it with people who 
would become tributary to, and add to the material prosperity 
of, Sacramento. A splendid water system has been com- 
pleted, the water from the American River being carried to 
the land, in underground pipes, and there distributed to each 
tract, so that water, under pressure, is available at every tract 
for either domestic or irrigation purposes. Three-fourths of 
the aforesaid tracts are now planted and successfully growing 
in orchard, grove and vineyard, and here examples of the 
best growth may be seen. 

It is a fact worthy of note that, whereas we learn from 
authentic reports from Eastern and Southern States, includ- 
ing Florida, that during the winter of 1898-99 great loss of 
fruit trees has been incurred by the severe frosts, no fruit 
trees, deciduous or citrus, have been injured by frost in Sac- 
ramento County. 

Climate — The winter sanitarium of the world is supposedly 
located in northern and western Italy, the Riviera and its 
citrus and olive belt. By comparison, it will be found that 
Sacramento County shows a warmer winter, spring and yearly 
average, and about the same autumn and summer tempera- 
ture as that of the great citrus belt of northern Italy, where 
it is said "perpetual summer exists, skies are blue and the 
sun ever shines." Comparison will show that while the clear 
days in the year reach but 220, Sacramento County averages 
238, being more clear days than any inhabited portion of the 
northern hemisphere, excepting only Yuma, Arizona. 

These statements are made from authentic information. 
All of the tables following were prepared by James A. Bar- 
wick, United States Weather Bureau Observer, and official 
in charge, Sacramento. The facts above referred to are de- 
duced from the following table: 



Av'age 
Winter 
Temp. 



Av'age Av'age 
Spring Sum'er 
Temp. Temp. 



Av'age Av'age 

Autm'n Yearly 
Temp. Temp. 



High 'st. Lowest 
Temp. Temp 



Clear 
Days. 



Florence 44.3 

Pisa { 46.4 

Genoa j 44.9 

San Remo I 48.9 

Mentone i 49.0 

Nice 47.8 

Cannes 49.5 



Av'age in Italy .. 
Av'age in Sacra- 
mento Connty.. 



47-3 
47.0 



56.0 
57-2 
58.6 
57-3 
58.3 
56.2 

57.4 



57-3 
60.0 



74.0 
75-2 
75-0 
72.4 
73-9 
72.3 
731 



73-7 
75-0 



60.7 
62.8 
63.0 
61.9 
62.5 
61.6 
61.0 



58.8 
60.4 
60.4 
60.1 
60.9 

59-5 
60.2 



85 
85 



25 
23 



85 



61.9 60.0 I 85 20 

61.0 61.0 tiio *I9 



218 
214 
229 



220 

238 



tOccurred but once in fifty-five years. 

♦Occurred but twice in fifty years — once in January, 1854, and once in January, i88S. 

A favorable locality, one in which the extreme severities 
of the weather do not recur too often. The cultivation of 
peaches, oranges, grapes and other fruits whose plants require 
five or ten years to mature may be profitable if killing weather 
does not recur oftener than once in ten or twenty years. 

The following table gives the average temperature for each 
season of the year, along with the highest and lowest tem- 
perature and average rainfall, for Sacramento, Folsom, Gait, 
Florin, Orange Vale, Fair Oaks and Brighton The mean of 
these seven places of observation gives the average mean 
for the county: 



Av'age 
Winter 
Temp 



Av'age Av'age | Av'age Av'age „ 
Spring j Sum'er Fall Annual Ji^rr' 
Temp, j Temp. Temp. | Temp. ^ P- 



Min. 
Temp. 



Av'age 
Precip. 



Sacramento 48 

Folsom 48 

Gait 48 

Florin 47 

Fair Oaks | 46 

Orange Vale | 46 

Brighton 47 

Average for the 

County 47 



60 
60 
62 
58 
58 
58 
60 



72 
78 
76 

74 
76 
76 
75 



62 
61 
63 
57 
60 
60 
62 



60 
62 
62 

59 
60 
60 
61 



no 
107 
108 
108 
107 
107 
109 



60 



75 



61 



61 



19 
20 

19 
20 
20 
20 
20 



^19 



19.94 
24.00 
15-70 
18.00 
24-75 
24-75 
18.44 



20.14 



*Higliest and lowest temperature. The lowest, 19°, occurred but twice 
in fifty years, and that was in January, 1854, and January, 1888. The 
highest temperature indicated occurred but once in fifty-five years. 

Note. — The elevations above the sea-level of the points mentioned are 
as follows: Sacramento, 35 feet; Folsom, 1S2 feet; Gait, 49 feet; Florin, 
58 feet; Orange Vale, 300 feet; Fair Oaks, 300 feet; Brighton, 53 feet. 
The latitude and longitude of Sacramento City is: North latitude, 38° 
35''; longitude west from Greenwich, 121° 30'. 



As showing what preponderance of clear sunshiny days is 
here enjoyed over the places named below, representing the 
climate of eleven States situated on the same line of latitude, 
as also the record of lowest temperatures, the following table, 
compiled from oflBcial sources, has been prepared: 



f^ 


W 


H^S 


|^»5■ 


2 a 


n s* 


B 


s n 


•o 


■O S- 


3^ 










c x 








n \^ 






o 


"4 


n 


'V 


> 


si™ 
5->i 


5 
c 

-1 B 






G2^ 
2 = 3 


;?« 
■< 


^0 


5' 5' 


p ^ t; 








5-° 


[fi 2 


5' 


5' 


B' 


SB 


. p 



PC 3 
c Bto 

: o p 



Sacramento, Cal.... 
Washington, D. C. 
New York, N. Y.... 

Columbus, O 

Chicago, 111 

St. Louis, Mo 

Cincinnati, O 

Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Baltimore, Md 

Memphis, Term.... 
Vicksburg. Miss.... 

Savannah, Ga 

Louisville, Ky 

Atlanta, Ga 



48 


74 


35 


78 


32 


69 


32 


72 


28 


68 


34 


74 


36 


73 


33 


75 


36 


78 


43 


79 


50 


83 


53 


80 


37 


78 


46 


74 



19 

- 5 

- 6 
-20 
-21 
-22 

-17 

- 6 

- 7 

- 9 

- I 

8 
-14 



39 
21 
22 

13 
21 

25 
18 
20 
22 

25 
24 

32 
19 
26 



28 
38 
36 
32 
36 
33 
31 
36 
39 
29 
31 
28 

31 
32 



23 
31 
32 

45 
33 
32 
41 
34 
29 



238 
105 
104 

97 
108 



74, 122 
51 99 



36 15 

35 , 16 

30 10, 

40 I 13. 

32 I 19 



107 
108 
129 
126 
121 
106 
122 



68 
126 
126 
150 
136 
115 
141 
118 

133 
122 
107 
120 
121 
141 



A dash, thus ( — ), before a figure indicates temperature below zero. 

Educational. — That Sacramento is mindful of the value of 
the education of the masses, and that she has done and is 
doing her full duty in this respect, is evidenced by the follow- 
ing figures taken from the records of the County Superin- 
tendent of Schools: 

Number of public school houses in city and county 89 

Number of teachers employed 220 

Number of census children (between 5 and 17) 8,683 

Total current expenses for the year 1900 1186,627.54 

Sacramento City. — Sacramento City is the county seat, and 
also the capital of the State. It has a population of 30,000, 
is compactly built, covering an area of about 4 square miles, 
with broad streets ot an average width of 80 feet, and wholly 
lighted by electricity. It is a city of homes and flowers, the 
residence portion being embowered in choice foliage and the 
streets well shaded. It is one of the chief cities of the State, 
being a railroad center, with unequaled transportation facil- 



8 

ities. Outside of San Francisco, it is the chief manufacturing 
city of the State. Indeed, upon the authority of the bulletin 
of the Census Bureau, giving the statistics of 165 manufact- 
uring cities, but three cities upon the entire Pacific Coast 
exceed it in the value of their products. The returns men- 
tioned make the following showing for Sacramento: 

Establishments 302 

Investments 15,654,782 

Employes 4,510 

Wages 12,967,954 

Materials l9,o33,3 17 

Products 110,424,582 

Its trade extends all through the central, northern and 
mining sections and into the adjoining States and Territories, 
aggregating annually over $60,000,000. It has a compre- 
hensive street-car system, operated entirely by electricity. 
It has a number of daily and weekly newspapers of a high 
type; also public schools of excellent standing, private schools 
and seminaries, an art school and school of design in connec- 
tion with the E. B. Crocker Art Gallery, containing a collec- 
tion of paintings valued at more than a half million dollars. 
It contains the State Capitol building, erected at a cost of 
nearly $3,000,000, the State Agricultural Exhibition building 
and the State Printing Office, all situated in a park of unpar- 
alleled beauty and covering about 30 acres of ground under 
the highest state of cultivation, and planted to grass, trees 
and flowers. The great railway shops of the Southern Pacific 
Company, covering 20 acres of ground, at times employing 
over 3,000 skilled workmen, complete in all particulars and 
capable of turning out any branch of the work from the rails 
up to the finest finished coach, are likewise located here. 
Five banking institutions of large resources, building and 
loan associations, and metropolitan conveniences for the trans- 
action of financial affairs, are among the facilities aflforded. 
The social advantages of churches, educational and fraternal 
organizations are numerous. The Odd F'ellows, Masons, 
Foresters and Knights of Pythias have spacious, attractive 
halls. A Government building, containing accommodations 
for the Post Oftice department. United States Land Offices 
(Register and Receiver), Internal Revenue department, 



United States Weather Bureau, etc. This handsome edifice, 
but recently completed, is erected in the heart of the city, 
standing in an area i6o feet square, built of red sandstone, 
and cost $300,000. 

Water Poivcr. — On the American River, 20 miles northeast 
from the City of Sacramento, is built a great dam, which was 
the first attempt to introduce the use of water power upon a 
large scale within the State. This dam is constructed entirely 
of granite blocks, having a width at the top of 24 feet, at the 
bottom 87 feet, a height of 89 feet, and 650 feet long; stability, 
7,979 tons. The power-house, to utilize this great force of 
nature, has six immense turbine wheels. This power is 
transmitted to the City of Sacramento as a propelling power 
for its street-car system, and has been substituted lor steam- 
power in mills and factories wherever available and desirable. 
The future developments from this enterprise are promising 
and the people are alive to its value. 

Another source of power is the immense storage system of 
the South Yuba Water Co., in whose thirty-one reservoirs on 
the Divide and in the foothills of the Sierra Nevadas, two 
billion cubic feet of water are stored during the rainy season. 
Certain drops in altitude on the canals, in the towns of 
Auburn and Newcastle, are utilized to develop power, by 
pressure pipe lines and tangenital wheels. There is avail- 
able at the present time with these two companies, 11,500 
horse-power. The possibilities of increase on this system are 
indefinite. 

The rates for electric current are probably lower, at the 
present time, in Sacramento than anywhere else in the world. 

California, taken as a whole, is no doubt the richest in its 
resources of any country in the world. It contains every- 
thing necessary for the establishment and maintenance of an 
empire. 

Within its borders are found all the resources that con- 
tribute to the wealth and prosperity of other countries. It 
has gold, silver and copper mines that produce many millions 
annually; oil wells, vast forests of the finest timber known, 
and soil equal to that of any other country in fertility. Within 
its territory, bordering on the Pacific Coast about 800 miles, 
and extending into the interior from 140 to 200 miles, in area 




ORANGE TRBE AND FRUIT. 
PHOTOGRAPHED NOV. 21, 1 896, J. G. KELLOGG'S GROVE, ORANGE VALE. 

This ten-acre grove (now ten years old) is yielding from ten to fifteen 
per cent interest on a valuation of 515,000. This has proved to be the 
best orange and lemon section in the United States. Since the planting 
of this and other groves in this district the trees have not been affected 
by frost, while in Florida, once the favorite citrus growing belt, orange 
trees have been killed by cold on several occasions. In this portion of 
Sacramento County more than 1,000 acres have been planted to oranges 
and lemons, and the acreage for this purpose is being increased yearly. 



about 160,000 square miles, there is a climate and soil so 
varied in localities that it possesses the ability to grow all 
kinds and varieties of agricultural and horticultural products, 
including all cereals, deciduous and citrus fruits known to 
the commercial world. 

In regard to cereal products the positive guarantee against 
damage from rain during the months of June. July and August 
makes California the best grain growing State in the Union, 
from an economic standpoint, for the reason that it permits 
the employment of methods in har\-esting. threshing and put- 
ting the grain in sacks for market for a less amount than it 
takes to do the same thing in other States where heavy 
showers are liable to occur without warning at any time. 
In California, the farmers can wait three or four weeks after 
the grain is ripe in order to utilize machinery that cuts, 
threshes and sacks the crop all at the same time, and at a 
fraction of the cost it takes to accomplish the same thing in 
climates which keep the grain moist and not in condition to 
thresh immediately upon cutting, as is done through the use 
of the "combined harvester and thresher." 

As these facts become better known and understood, it is 
reasonable to assume that prices for good grain land in Cali- 
fornia will matenal'v advL^nce. 




Bavana Flaxts. 



Rainfall of Sacramento, Cal., from September 1st, 1849 to March 1st, 1901. 

From Dr T. M. I-ogaii, Dr. F. W. Hatch, S. H. Gerrish ami Weather Bureau records. 
Preparetl by James A. liarwick, Observer aud official iu charge U. S. Weather Bureau. 
Offices, Sacrameuto, Cal. 



Yr. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov 


Dec. 


Season 
of 


1849 
1850 


















.25 


1.50 


T 


12 50 
T 






4.50 


.50 


10.00 


4.25 


• 25 








1849-50 


36.00 


1851 


■65 


•35 


1.8S 


1. 14 


.69 








1. 00 


"."18 


2.14 


7.07 


!i85o-5r 


4.71 


1852 


■58 


.12 


6.40 


.19 


•30 








T 




6.00 


13.40 


1 1851-52 


17.98 


1353 


3.00 


2.00 


7.00 


3.50 


1^45 


"t 


f' 




T 


"t' i 1.50 


1-54 


11852-53 


36.35 


1854 


3-25 


8.50 


3.25 


1.50 


.21 


•31 




t' 


T 


I. or 


.65 


1.15 


11853-54 


20.06 


1855 


2.67 


3.46 


4.20 


4^32 


I-I5 


.01 






T 




■75 


2.00 


; 1854-55 


18.62 


1856 


4.92 


.69 


1.40 


2.13 


1.84 


.03 






T 


.20 


•65 


2.40 


1S55-56 


13-76 


1857 


1.38 


4.80 


.68 


T 


T 


•35 




t' 




.66 


2.41 


2.63 


1 1856-57 


ro.46 


1858 


2.44 


2.46 


2.88 


1. 21 


.20 


.10 


.01 


T 


"t 


3-01 


,•'5 


4.34 


11857-58 


14.99 


1859 


.96 


391 


1.64 


.98 


1.04 








.02 




648 


1.83 


1858-59 


r6.04 


i860 


2.31 


•93 


5." 


2.87 


2.49 


.02 


"•63 




.06 


•91 


.r8 


4.28 


1859-60 


22.06 


1861 


2.67 


2.92 


3^32 


.48 


•59 


.14 


■55 






T 


?a'7 


8.64 


i86o-6r 


r6.i8 


1862 


15.04 


4.26 


2.80 


.82 


1.81 


.01 




.or 




•36 


T 


2.33; jrS5r-62 


36.10 


1863 


1-73 


2.75 


2.36 


1.69 


•36 








■f' 




149 


1.82 


r862-63 


11.59 


1864 


1.08 


.19 


1.30 


1.08 


.74 


.09 




".OS 


T 


.r2 


6.72 


7.87 


1863-64 


7.79 


1865 


4.78 


•71 


.48 


1.37 


.46 




"t 




.08 


.48 


2.43 


.36 


1864-65 


22.59 


1866 


7.70 


2.01 


2.02 


.48 


2.25 


10 


02 






T 


2.43 


9.5i!|i86j-66 


17 91 


1867 


3-44 


7.10 


1. 01 


1.80 


.01 








.01 




3.8i 


r2.85 ir866-67 


25.32 


1868 


6.04 


3-15 


4.35 


2.31 


•27 


t' 










■77 


2.6r ;r867-68 


32.79 


1869 


4-79 


3-63 


2.94 


1.24 


•65 


.01 






' r 


2.r2 


■85 


I.g6; r86S-69 


r6.64 


1870 


I 37 


3.24 


1.64 


2.12 


•27 


T 


"r 


T 




.02 


•58 


.97II 1869-70 


13.57 


1871 


2.08 


1.92 


.69 


1-45 


.76 


T 






T 


.2r 


r.22 


io^59| 


r87o-7r 


S.47 


1872 


4.04 


4.74 


1.94 


.61 


.28 


.02 






T 


.22 


1.93 


5^39 


i87r-72 


23-65 


1873 


1.23 


4- 36 


■55 


.51 




T 


.02 






.31 


1. 21 


10.01 


1872-73 


14-19 


1874 


5.20 


1.86 


3.05 


.89 


^37 


T 


T 




05 


2 26 3-80 


.44 


1873-74 


22 92 


1875 


8.70 


■55 


.80 


T 


T 


1. 10 








•44 


6.20 


5.52 


1874-75 


17.70 


1876 


4.99 


3.75 


4.15 


I. ID 


•15 




.21 


.02 


T 


3 45 


.30 




1875-76 


26.30 


1877 


2.77 


1.04 


.56 


.19 


.64 


.01 


T 






•73 


1.07 


1.43 


1876-77 


9.19 


1878 


9.26 


8.04 


3.09 


1.07 


•17 








•29 


•.55 


•51 


•47 


1877-78 


24.86 


1879 


3.18 


3-88 


4.88 


2.66 


1.30 


■13 


t' 






.88 


2.05 


341 


1878-79 


17.85 


1880 


1.64 


1.83 


1.70 


14.20 


.76 




T 








•05 


ir.8r 


r879-8o 


26.47 


1881 


6.14 


5.06 


1.37 


1.64 


T 


•50 


T 




•30 


.55 


1.88 


3.27 


18S0-81 


26.57 


1882 


1.89 


2.40 


3.78 


1.99 


•35 


.10 


T 




.57 


263 


322 


1. 13 


r 88 1-82 


16.51 


18S3 


2.23 


1. 11 


370 


.67 


2.85 








.90 


•97 


.61 


.44 


1882-83 


18 II 


1884 


3-43 


4.46 


S.14 


4.32 


.c6 


1.45 






.60 


2.0I 




10.45 


1883-84 


24.78 


1885 


2.16 


.49 


.08 


.68 


T 


.11 


■f' 




.08 


.02, ir.34 


5.76 


1884-85 


16.58 


1886 


7.95 


.29 


2.68 


4.08 


.07 










.68 


.2r 


2.2r 


1885-S6 


32.27 


1887 


1. 12 


6.28 


•94 


2.53 


T 






' r 


.02 




.45 


2.09 


r886-87 


13.97 


1888 


4.81 


■57 


3^04 


.10 


.40 


"".'08 


"f' 


T 


.55 




4.28 


4.63! 


r887-88 


11.56 


1889 


.15 


.33 


6.25 


.26 


325 


.25 








6 02 


3.15 


7.S2: 


1888-89 r9.95 


1890 


6.62 


4.06 


3.00 


1.33 


1.80 






■ .^. ■ 


.So 


T 




3-34 


r889-90 


33.80 


189 1 


•53 


6.61 


1.78 


2.04 


.66 


•05 


t' 




.10 


.10 


■■.48 


3.28' 


r 890-9 I 


15.81 


1892 


1.78 


2.84 


302 


1.20 


2.38 


T 






.18 


.70 


6.60 


4.90} 


r 891-92 


1518 


1893 


3.27 


2.66 


3.51 


1. 08 


105 




"t 


"r 


.22 


.12 


2.92 


1.761 


1892-93 


23.95 


1894 


4.17 


3^92 


.74 


•34 


1.70 


■■.46 


T 


T 


.88 


I 06 


.48 


8.86,;r893-94 


16.35 


189.1 


8.42 


1.84 


1.20 


.86 


•51 




.04 


T 


1.26 


•17 


1.54 


1.54 


1894-95' 24.11 


1896 


9.76 


.09 


257 


5-34 


•92 




T 


.20 


■31 


•55; 356 


r.76l 


1895-96, 23.23 


1897 


3.66 


4.15 


2.54 


.25 


•30 


.04 




.01 


16 


1.96 .61 


1.641 


r 896-97 


17.32 


1898 


.98 


3-19 


.04 


.28 


1-50 


.14 






•36 


.64J .61 


2.30J 


r 897-98 


10.51 


1899 


3-94 


.04 


6.02 


.10 


•54 


•49 




.02 




4.46^ 2.62 


2.9r 


r898-99 


15.04 


1900 


3-.'i4 


•32 


1.61 


1.88 


2.88 


T 


t' 




"."06 


1.74 


4.50 


1.38 


r 8 99-00 


20.24 


1901 


3-70 


5^32 
















.... 






r joo-or 


*i6.70 


Avg 


3.82 


2.80 


2.83 


1.75 


~84 


.12 


.03 


.01 


.18 


.85 


2.15 


4.28 




19.59 



T indicates trace of raiu. 
* Up to March i, 1901. 



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'4 



Tablh Showing Destination and Number of Cars of Fruit 
Shipped to Each Pi,ace in 1895, 1896, 1897, 1898, 1899 and 1900. 



destination. 



1895 1896 I 1897 



1899 



1900 



Chicago 

New York 

Boston 

Philadel pbia 

Minneapolis 

Baltimore 

Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

Montreal 

New Orleans 

Denver 

St. Louis 

St. Paul 

Omaha 

C leveland 

Pittsburg 

Buffalo 

M il waukee 

England 

Scotland 

Germany 

Mexico 

Minor Points — Canada 

Minor Points — United States. 



Totals . 



1473 

862 

279 

82 

124 

37 

15 

91 

44 

75 

148 

78 

109 

176 

29 

26 

15 

42 



863 



4568 



1007 

1055 

471 

90 

147 

5 

2 

81 

81 

85 

136 

68 

91 
85 
10 

25 
7 

32 
42 



532 



4052 



1410 

1456 

543 

202 

180 

16 

20 

86 



59 
121 

165 

37 
40 

15 
52 
58 



586 



5323 



1203 

1429 

536 

176 

167 

16 

15 

no 

96 

62 

229 

27 

67 

156 

25 

47 

5 

19 
42 



I 
572 



5007 



1060 

1694 

710 

339 

247 

67 
89 

165 
128 
126 
269 
115 
125 
194 

83 

137 

34 

60 

117 

4 

2 

I 

52 

1051 



6869 



1 163 
1627 

649 

212 

302 

34 

35 

129 

126 

136 

233 

79 

131 

240 

63 

144 

10 

68 

192 

7 



71 
946 



6597 



Tabi,e Showing the Number of Cars of Each Variety Shipped 
IN 1895, 1896, 1897, 1898, 1899 A.ND 1900, 



varieties. 



Pears 

Peaches 

Grapes 

Plums and Prunes . 

Apricots 

Cherries 

Apples 

Quinces 

Figs 

Nectarines 

Persimmons 

Mixed 

Cars not reported.. 

Totals 



1895 

1 187 
1289 

lOIO 

465 
162 

180 

105 

13 

5 
152 

4568 



1624 
976 

712 

407 

172 

88 

53 
8 
2 
I 



4052 



1897 



1640 

1316 

1 100 

742 

177 

239 
61 

24 
3 

10 
2 
9 



5323 



1898 



1595 
1 103 

734 
542 
123 
297 
596 



I 
15 



5007 



1899 



1684 
2625 

847 

885 

90 

85 

490 

19 



I 

24 
117 

6869 



1900 



2115 

1361 

825 

1 158 

152 

238 

674 

10 



3 

27 

34 
6597 



15 



Dates on which the first appearance of bloom on fruit trees 
were observed. Furnished Observer Barwick by Mr. S. H. 
Gerrish, Voluntary U. S. Weather Bureau Observer, Sacra- 
mento, Cal. 

1870. First blossoms observed on February 21. 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 

1893 
1894 

1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 

During the past thirty-two years the earliest bloom ob- 
served occurred on January 28, 1887, while the latest was on 
February 29, 1880. 



" 




26. 


(1 
• ( 




16. 
14. 
21. 


l( 
l( 
(1 

n 




20. 
2. 
I. 

15- 
29. 
21. 
28. 
19. 
20. 
10. 


<( 




8. 


anuary 


28. 


^ebru 

K 
II 


ary 


20. 

3- 

13- 

17- 


II 

11 
II 
II 




16. 
16. 
12. 

13- 

I. 

16. 

16. 

14. 



Some Facts not Generally Known in the East Con- 
cerning Sacramento County. 



It is the heart of California's early fruit belt. 

It is the home of all citrus and deciduous fruits. 

The orange ripens here five weeks earlier than in Southern 
California. 

Seventy-five per cent of the deciduous fruits of the State 
are grown within a radius of 50 miles from Sacramento City. 

It contains the noted Flame Tokay district. 

It has the second largest vineyard in the world. 

It has the largest thoroughbred breeding farm in the world" 

It has the largest gold dredge in the world. 

It is the only district shipping berries in full carloads. 

It has the largest proportionate acreage of rich lands. 

It is the leading hops district of the United States. 

A failure of crops in this district has never been recorded. 

It has no sunstrokes, snow or blizzards. 

It has an average annual rain-fall of 20 inches. 

The climate averages about the same temperature as that 
of Los Angeles. 

It is the ideal winter resort. 



l.IBRflRY OF CONGRESS 



017 187 820 2g