(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A sailor's garland"

. 



A SAILORS GARLAND 



BY THE SAME AUTHOR 

SEA LIFE IN NELSON'S TIME 
ON THE SPANISH MAIN 



A SAILOR'S GARLAND 



TED AND EDITED 



JOHN MASEFIEI 1 






METHUEN ft CO. 
36 ESSEX STREK 
LONDON 



First Published . . October 
Second Edition . 19$ 



To C 



521) 



INTRODUCTORY 



IT is curious that m sea-going people such as the 
English should have written so little poetry, of a 
ibout the sea and its sailors until omipara- 
y recent times. It might he said that until tin- < ml 
of the eighteenth century our poets hardly saw the b 
of the tea, though they felt its terror. We have poems, 
such as Donne's "Storm" and "Calm/' expressing 
horrors and its desolation ; and later we have poems, 
Falconer's "Shipwreck, expressing its force and 
These, in their way, are excellent, hut they are not 
exhaustive. They rrcogniae and make significant ti.r 
grimmnrt aspects, and only those, of the sea, and of the 
life of its follower*. In this they are not singular. In 
loathing of the waters and of sea 1 resemble 

mott early English sea poetry. Nearly all the English 
poets, from Chau< t t< Keats, have a du! or a 

dread of, the sea, and a hatred of sea-life and 
opinion of sailors. Chaucer," says someone, " dismisses 
the sea with a shut! 

He accepts -man as a roadmate, and describes 

him with delicate art, but he describes him as a n 
who would rather break cargo than be sober, and to w),. m 
the ginger that is hot in the mouth is the one thing north 
praying fcrof all the things in the world <,.mrr. Ins follower, 
seldom leaves dry land ; though for a page or so he sings 
gracefully about the Sirens. T<> tlu- mrtnc.il n.mair 



viii INTRODUCTORY 

the sea is a wilderness haunted by magical ships plying 
from wonderful countries. To the Elizabethans (as 
Shakespeare, Markham, Webster, and Hey wood) it is a 
place of tempest, or the scene of battle, or the haunt of 
pirates. To the Jacobeans (as Browne, Fletcher, Dekker, 
and Daborne) it is magical or tempestuous, or the haunt 
of pirates. To Donne, as I have said, it was desolate and 
horrible. To Sackville, the courtier, it was little save a 
place of exile, where one could have wine and hard knocks 
and a little quiet dice, but no ladies. To Falconer it was 
dangerous and deadly. 

None of these poets took delight in the contemplation of 
the sea. Shakespeare, indeed, invites to merriment upon 
the sands. Fletcher dreams about beautiful islands, peopled 
by goddesses or princesses. Heywood tells us of sea captains 
drinking wdne at a tavern. The others "dismiss the sea with 
a shudder." Nashe alone seems to have a word of praise for 
her. To Nashe she is the original home of "Solyman 
Herring," " our dappert Piemont Huldrick Herring," " the 
puissant red herring, the golden Hespcridcs red herring, the 
Meonian red herring, the red,herring of Red Herrings Hall." 
To Nashe she is the "glassy fieldes of Thetis," the "boil- 
ing desert," full of " careeringest billowes," over which go 
the smacks of Yarmouth "and never bruise one bubble." 
From Nashe alone does the sea get sympathetic treatment ; 
and the sympathy of Nashe is not worth a very great deal. 
It was not until the nineteenth century that she came to 
her own. Then Keats. Shelley Byron, Wqrdsworth, and 
a school of landscape painters taught us to regard her, as 
we regard her now, not as a hedge but as an outlet, not 
as an enemy but as a manifestation. 

Our sea heroes have received, on the whole, as scanty 
recognition as their element. Until the beginning of the 
nineteenth century the poets who honoured our sailors 
were generally ballad-singers, greater in their zeal than in 



ivninnrrrouY ix 

their poetry. There are a few poems "by eminent hands 

nt sailors, xurh .is 1'fcle's address to Drake and 

H.iukins. tl; )>assage in Browne s Pastoral^ 

Drayton's poem t ian Voyage, and Marvt 11 s 

Hit these are exceptions. As a rule our 

great poets have left our great seamen unsung. We have 

< poem on the deeds of our sailors The 

ballad-singers have do us. and the 

in t 'are excellent ballads, such as < Andrew 

an d the ballad of 

:\g Porto Hello. Our true se;i epies are 
i prt.se I hry are to be 

iirtos 
..fl' 

story of mgtj in the 

books of ! ke, Dam] 

and Hun < -s, some three 

appear to have taken firm hold upon the national 

MM tarnation. 

sea and the sea heroes have reim 
most part unsung, the fault is rather racial than 
personal Until the i ntury the Kn^lish 

- sense of the majesty and grandeur of certaii 

ii they eould fear and turn to use, 

splendour and beaut \ 

breaking water. As a na y have regarded their 

great men in "M"g the same way. They have broken 
thehr hearts or obeyed them or accepted them blindly, 
Inil they have never g! n, so that we need not 

look, in liooks of early ; poetry, for any rapture of 

percepticH sea's beauty, nor rapture of praise of a 

s nobler; >ur poetical strengi : i rapture 

n paneg\ . e;uid in eharaeteri-atiou. 

more etpcci.illy the characterisation .f homely types. We 
have had few great poems . and no ~n 



x INTRODUCTORY 

the sea heroes, but we have had unmatchable sea char- 
acters in our poetry and in our prose fiction. 

The sailor has been expressed for us with perfect art 
and perfect truth, though he himself may complain of the 
treatment he has received. The poets have not loved 
him. They have not been attracted by him. They have 
dismissed him, not with a shudder, but with a volley of 
his own oaths or with a scrap of his own song, as a sort of 
monster, a sort of sea-bear, a sort of a bawling rough 
Commodore Trunnion. So far as I know there are not 
half a dozen attractive naval characters, created and 
celebrated in poetry or in prose fiction, prior to the early 
nineteenth century. If a poet or a novelist desired a 
common seaman or a sea captain in his art, he followed 
the type of Chaucer's shipman or of Shakespeare's boat- 
swain for the one, and that of Congreve's " young Ben " 
or Smollett's Commodore, or Edmund Thompson's Captain 
Mizen for the other. Heywood's sea captains, at the inn, 
are perhaps the best we have prior to Miss Austen and 
Captain Marryat, though our fiction makers have always 
done well with pirates, as with Captain Ward and Captain 
Roberts. 

We cannot wonder that the poets have said so little 
that is beautiful about the sailor. There is little to say 
about him ; and that little, to a perceptive person, is very 
readily apparent. The poetic, or sea-bear sailor, who 
bawls and drinks and raps you out oaths and bangs upon 
tables with his cudgel, is always to be found. One can 
find him on blue water ships at the present time; and 
where he exists he is the best man in the vessel. He is 
not fitted to command, but he is excellent before the 
mast. He has hardly changed since Chaucer's time. One 
could find a dozen like Chaucer's shipman in any dock in 
Liverpool or New York or Sydney or San Francisco. He 
no longer wears " faldyng," or rough Irish frieze, but he 



IvrROlHTTORY xi 

without a knife (as he will tell you himself in a 
coarse proverb), and lie is tanned by the wind and the 
and he is a "good felawe," a good comrade, a stand- 
by in any sudden trouble. It is significant that Chaucer 
> the goodness of his felaweship direetly he has drawn 
his portrait. He describes him riding "as he couthe " (as 
well, that is, as a sailor generally rides something like a 
sack), and he tells us of his clothes, and knife, and tan. 

the man has been drlined tor u-. ( haucer points 

hief characteristic 

" And certainly he was a good fcla 

that >e one supremely a i hin^ in all sail. .is. 

rest, he is a mere ruffian with a knavish trie k of 

broa< wine casks in the h-.'.d \\hile that the 

chapman sle< ; <-e conscience <1 mess, 

-linary human mercy, he is careless. If he fi^hu. and 

li MWI !. | ;i "t.'Ts in a topsail and dumps them 

!>oard 

: .> water he sent hem boom to every land 

he "makes water-spaniels . as the F.li/abtthan 

I<>rd hinted to his successful pirate. Hut with all his 
he is a craftsman and a kmmledge- 
nows his terms of hunting and the 
He can reckon the tides, h the 

cum - a good pilot Channel and its ] 

of call, while he can stow a ship's hold like an artist. 
i s weather-beaten and toughened by the 
sea. He is hardy and " wise to undertake " ; not reckless, 
but valiant and t < >n tin whole he is tin 

perfect sailor in creative wr. i. when we get him 

and a little gentler, in Mai Ainburne, 

we like him rather bet 



x INTRODUCTORY 

the sea heroes, but we have had unmatchable sea char- 
acters in our poetry and in our prose fiction. 

The sailor has been expressed for us with perfect art 
and perfect truth, though he himself may complain of the 
treatment he has received. The poets have not loved 
him. They have not been attracted by him. They have 
dismissed him, not with a shudder, but with a volley of 
his own oaths or with a scrap of his own song, as a sort of 
monster, a sort of sea-bear, a sort of a bawling rough 
Commodore Trunnion. So far as I know there are not 
half a dozen attractive naval characters, created and 
celebrated in poetry or in prose fiction, prior to the early 
nineteenth century. If a poet or a novelist desired a 
common seaman or a sea captain in his art, he followed 
the type of Chaucer's shipman or of Shakespeare's boat- 
swain for the one, and that of Congreve's " young Ben " 
or Smollett's Commodore, or Edmund Thompson's Captain 
Mizen for the other. Heywood's sea captains, at the inn, 
are perhaps the best we have prior to Miss Austen and 
Captain Marryat, though our fiction makers have always 
done well with pirates, as with Captain Ward and Captain 
Roberts. 

We cannot wonder that the poets have said so little 
that is beautiful about the sailor. There is little to say 
about him ; and that little, to a perceptive person, is very 
readily apparent. The poetic, or sea-bear sailor, who 
bawls and drinks and raps you out oaths and bangs upon 
tables with his cudgel, is always to be found. One can 
find him on blue water ships at the present time ; and 
where he exists he is the best man in the vessel. He is 
not fitted to command, but he is excellent before the 
mast. He has hardly changed since Chaucer's time. One 
could find a dozen like Chaucer's shipman in any dock in 
Liverpool or New York or Sydney or San Francisco. He 
no longer wears " faldyng," or rough Irish frieze, but he 



INTRODUCTORY xi 

without a knife (as he will tell you himself in a 
coarse proverb), and he is Unned by UK- wind and the 
gun, and he is a "good felawe," a good comrade, a stand- 
by in any sudden trouble. It is significant that Chaucer 
notes the goodness of his felaweship directly he has drawn 
his portrait He describes him riding "as he couthe " (as 
well, that is, as a sailor generally rides something like a 
sack), and he tells us of his clothes, and knife, and tan. 

the man has been defined for u . Chaucer points 

1 certainly he was a good felawe/' 

that >e one supremely at 

rest, he is a mere ruffian with a knavish trick of 

broac M wine casks in the hold while that the 

chapman slet ; .re conscience/' or tmd -mess, 

dinary human mercy, he is careless. If he fi^lu-. and 

n in a topsail and dumps them 

overboard 

i .y water he seat hem boom to every land " ; 

he "makes water-spaniels . as the Kli/abcthan 

lord hinted to his successful pirut with all his 

brutality and he is a craftsman and a kno\\ 1< 

MOWS his terms of Imnln,-.- .uid tin- 
He can reckon the tides, he knm\~, the 
cum || a good pilot Channel and its ports 

of call, while he can stow a ship's hold like an artist. 
With all >s weather-beaten and toughened by the 

sea. He is hardy and "wise to undertake ; not reckless, 
but valiant and t >.. the whole he is the most 

perfect sailor in creative wr u hen ue #ct him 

and a little gentler, in Marryat's Swinburne, 
we like him rather bet 



xii INTRODUCTORY 

Shakespeare's sailor, Sebastian's "bawling, blasphemous, 
incharitable clog," is much such another. His lack of 
charity places him alongside the shipman, as it would 
place him alongside many sailors of the present day. He 
is without any " bowels of mercies," but he is diligent in 
his office, and a faithful servant, as long as there are 
planks beneath him. He has a fine contempt for shore- 
folk. To shore-folk he gives a rough tongue : " Keep 
your cabins," " Out of our way, I say," " What do you 
here ? " etc. ; but his men are " my hearts " and " good 
hearts," good fellows whom he cheers and heartens. 
There are one or two sailors in Webster's comedies, and 
the best of these is something more human than either 
Shakespeare's sea-bear or than Smollett's sea-bulldog ; 
but in forming the present volume I have tried to avoid 
quotations from plays. Such quotations can seldom be 
detached effectually from their context, unless they are 
purely descriptive. I must pass to the consideration of 
those sea ballads which, after all, make up the bulk of 
the sea poetry we possess. 

The ballads are mostly ancient. One or two were 
written as late as 1820; and one, a very merry ballad on 
"Jack Robinson," may be as late as 1830. But most of 
them, certainly all of those with any serious pretensions 
to beauty, date from the sixteenth, seventeenth, and 
eighteenth centuries. They may be classed, as I have 
ventured to class them, in several broad divisions. They 
may be ballads which illustrate naval history ; or ballads 
of sea life, its dangers, wonders, and delights ; or ballads 
of tragical disaster, or of poetical justice, such as " Brown 
Robyn's Confession " or " Captain Glen." Many of them, 
and some of these are among the best, are love ballads, 
either from the sailor to his lady or vice versd. As a rule 
the lady's verses are to be preferred to the sailor's. 

The earliest ballads which illustrate our sea history are 



iNTRonrn 



Xlll 



of the 

BpMiaJi 

pirates. After Mu is a gap of rather moiv than 

two centuries. The sea battles of the ivi-i. , h 

inspire the next poems. There are inany Elizabethan sea 
poems, too many, in fact, to be mentioned here. I >\ ill 
merely indicate Gervase Markham's poem on the last i 
!>c ItrreHgr, the curious poem on Drake'* Ii 
i'homas ( 

1 ballad - \\ inning of 

Cale.v i Ust-mentioned ballad is one of tlu most 

vigorous in the language. 1 know of no poem, w.;i. tin- 

i.tions of Draytoo's "Agincourt," and that old. r 

parent poem of the same name, which moves to quite 

i unit music, It is a stirring piece ot 
and it is so foil of "local c< I littlr | 

; the actual events of the sack, that one feels 
that ii one of tlu i ikemen, or " one of tl>. 

lusty bragging bowmen," or " a tire blood, a vantbrace " 
i tlic soldiers and ailon engaged. 

mac places we did find, p> baking left be! 
Meat at fire roasting, and falkei ran away" 

is admirable, A pie, or a roast joint, would be good pur- 
chase indeed to any poor sailor, particularly to those ^ !; 
had been living on the poor John and beer of the KlUa- 

m laaareets. The remark about the materials of tlx 
bonfire, a httU lower down, is also realistic. I fancy th . 

man who wrot 

h their BUT wainacoU, their ptcsscs and bedsteads, 
Their joint -ttouls and tables a fire we made" 

had lent a hand in the piling up of the gear befor. 

is set t. : he destrn mish 

Armada inspired three ballads, In. 



xiv INTRODUCTORY 

them (that included in this volume) has any literary 
merit. The defeat of the Armada seems to have been 
less fruitful to the poets than the defeat of various pirates. 
Among the best of the sea-battle ballads are those de- 
scribing the overcoming of Sir Andrew Barton, a Scottish 
knight who scoured the Channel and intercepted English 
merchant-ships during the reign of Henry vin. Sir 
Andrew was not, in the strict sense, a pirate, as his 
quarrel was with the Portuguese, but he stopped so many 
English traders in his search for Portuguese goods that 
it became necessary " to reason with him." He has in- 
spired many ballads, but this old sixteenth-century ballad 
is by far the most stirring of them. Sometimes, as in the 
versions of the ballad which are still familiar to English 
country folk, he figures as Henry, or Sir Henry, Martyn, 
one of three Scottish brothers who cast dice, or " kevels," 
to decide which of them should turn pirate to support the 
others. The ancient ballad gives a very curious picture 
of a sea fight. The actual fighting was perhaps a little 
more determined, and at closer range ; but still, in read- 
ing the ballad, one creates a fine image of the battle, the 
ships lying near together, in a good deal of smoke from 
fire pots and the like, while the archers, in the little 
gilded tops, keep shooting at the officers. Apart from its 
historical and pictorial worth, the ballad is manly and 
grand. There is nobility in the rover's cry 

" 'Fight on, my men,' Sir Andrew sayes, 
' A little I'me hurt, but yett not slaine ; 
J'le but lye downe and bleede a -while , 
And then Fie rise and fight agayne." 

Sir Andrew is never less than a hero. He has style ; he 
is no "gentleman of fortune" like Bonnet or Roberts. 
He dies like a king, and his dead face wears such a 
nobleness that his veiy enemies lament him. 



xv 

More popular tliau Sir Andrew wo* later pirate, u hose 
name fur years was terrible to the l'/._!Mi. He 

inspired a poetical play, two chap-books, a number of 
ballads, and one knows not how many Royal Proclama- 
tion. This was J ird, a K. herman, who, 
after a short service aboard the Lion's Whelp man-of-u n , 
turned pirate, with a crew of drunken mates, and at last 
turned Turk and settled down at Tunis. He became 
head of a sort of colony of pirates, with whom he roved 
thr Mediterranet lie destrn trade. He 
pillaged many English and Venetian ships, and amassed 
great wealth. In the height of his prosperity he took 
ue Dansker or Dansekar, a Dutchman, with 
i he afterwards quarrelled. Dansekar eventually 

.ned a pardon from Henri i\. of France, and passed 
his old age in the service of the Duke \\ u.I 

retired in time "to make his peace with (. <1 \M.. ,, 
his nerve began to fa. himself a marble palace 

rnrnoi mis orange gardens, where he lived royally, 

ke a prince than a pirate," till he died of old age. 
Willi.iin I.ithgow supped with him there, and seems to 
have enjoyed his sup|> 

The ballads about Ward are not historical. They de- 

a wonderful battle between a king's ship, the 
Rambom, and Ward's cruiser. They give the fortunes of 
the fight to Ward, but the glory to the Rainbow, or to 
a " damsel," a "gallant damsel," a "damsel of fai 
who handled -A hen her captain was hurt 

There was a ship call Rainbow then in the navy, 

but she never fought with War iid any royal ship, 

so far as we can learn, unless it were the Lion's H'helj) 
(Ward's old ship), whieh Km- James sent to the Mediter- 
ranean to suppress piracy. It is probable that the 
ballads contain some ger uth. Perhaps some 

merchantman named the Rainbow escaped (mm a running 



xvi INTRODUCTORY 

tight with Wanl, and perhaps her captain, or some man 
aboard her, made the ballad in the glory of his heart. 
And perhaps some lover, with an heroical lady, imagined 
the circumstances of the "damsel of fame." 

Sir Francis Drake's achievements on the Spanish main 
near Venta Cruz in 1572 were celebrated, some seventy 
years later, in an opera by Sir William Davenant. He 
was not neglected by his contemporaries, as has been 
stated too frequently, for in addition to Peele's send-off 
he is hymned by Charles Fitz-Geffery and by his follower 
Thomas Greepe. Robert Blake, the Admiral of the 
Parliament, was honoured during his life, by Andrew 
Marvell, in a fine poem. The seventeenth century is 
rich in sea poems ; and with these two " copies of verses " 
we may bracket Heywood's poem on " The Sovereign of 
the Seas," Browne's splendid fragment on the decay of 
sea adventure, and a number of rousing ballads. After 
the Restoration we have Sackville's " To all you Ladies," 
and a few love ballads of the " Come all ye " kind, and 
a drinking song which means business. 

The eighteenth century gives us several interesting 
poems. We have one very fine ballad on the death of 
Admiral Benbow, and a bragging strophe in honour of 
Admiral Vernon. " The Taking of Porto Bello " (for the 
sixth or seventh time in our national history) caused the 
nation to lose its wits. The ballad in this collection 
preserves one little mite of the general enthusiasm. 
Those who collect old china will know how frequently 
the mugs and bowls and plates of 1740 and thereabouts 
are decorated with Vernon's face, or with pictures of his 
ships. The triumphant, not to say braggart, note of the 
ballad (which is a good ballad) may be compared with 
another note, another tune in the same orchestra, in the 
ballad of " Hosier's Ghost." 

The eighteenth century was a piratical century, as well 



ivruonucTouY 

as a century of great naval .untibure. 

\Vr have a fragment on Captain Kidd, or Kyd, a ] 
who made a great stir, not so much l>\ hU , by 

respectal* h he moved, and 

the greatness of the names with which his was coupled 
at the time of his trial. The fragment may still be In- u-d 
at sea. It is sung to the very excellent tune of Samuel 

41 My name is Captain K 

Capuin Kidd. 
My name is Captain Kidd, 

Capuin Kidd. 
My name U Captain Kidd, 

And wtckedh 
God's laws I did forbid, 

As I sailed. 

My topsails they did shake 

As I sailed. 
My topsails they did shake 

As I sailed. 
My topsails they did sh.v 

And the merchants they did quake, 
For many did I take 

Ai I 



u- ruffian " Blackbeard " is also celebrated in a ballad ; 
I M it Roberts, a more distinguished pirate, remains UN- 
though he has been movingly chronicled. Tin- buccaneers 
of an earlier generation receive sentimental poetical 
tnlmtes to this day. During their lives they received little 
honour, and deserved rather less than they received. 

The great French wars of the late eighteenth and early 

inspired a mass of verse, i 

execrable, from which one may gather a few good l>a! 
Captain Marryat's hearty " Port Admiral " and " the Cap- 
tain stood on the Carronade " are the best of them ; and 
the mawkish nonacmr of the Dibdins and their kind, the 
b 



xviii INTRODUCTORY 

worst. Prince Hoare's " Arethusa " is an admirable ballad, 
not perfect in its form by any means, but full of spirit 

" On deck five hundred men did dance, 
The stoutest they could find in France. 
\Ve with two hundred did advance 
On board of the Arethusa." 

There is also a rousing though vainglorious ballad on some 
of the British naval victories under Jervis, Duncan, and 
Nelson. It goes'to the tune of "The Roast Beef of Old 
England." To one with a voice like a gale of wind it may 
be confidently recommended. Nelson receives a number 
of memorial verses, some of them of great dignity ; but his 
victories roused little music save that of drums for many 
years after his final triumph. One of the very best of the 
sea ballads of this period is that called " Spanish Ladies," 
a poem in which some unknown sailor describes his voyage 
home, and the picking up of the various headlands, the 
Dodman, Ram Head, the Start, etc. etc., as the ship comes 
leisurely up Channel towards the Downs. Rather later 
we have the excellent ditty of "Jack Robinson," by 
Thomas Hudson, a poem in which the ancient man-of- 
wars man, with his grog and his pigtail, takes his final 
leave of us. 

Of the ballads which illustrate life at sea, none are quite 
so good as the earliest. The poem of the pilgrims, sailing 
from "Sandwych or Winchelsee," to some French port, 
from which they could tramp to Compostella, is as vivid 
and as vigorous as a poem could well be. One can hardly 
read it without imaging the ship, some tub of a dromond, 
as she goes butting through the Channel, with her foresail 
dark with sprays as high as the yard, and her deck like 
Rachel mourning for her children, and her cabins like woe 
unutterable. It makes one a little squeamish even to read 
it. There are the groans and the misery and the loud 



INTRODUCTORY xix 

talking at the bows, and the wire-hum of the wind in the 

i<>," of thf sailors 

roans and more groans, and misery, and 
thru the mockery of the call to dinner. But the i 
does not hring one vei good of its kind, hut 

there are better kinds. There are the magical md terrible 
ballads, such as "The S<- 1 i,.- Denoa L<> 

yn's Confession," and others, which slum us 
other aspects <-se ballads are amou- tin- 

finest in tlu- language. No one could have writt. 
poem lik- .ie" (with its suggestion of un< 

prescience in the human, inhuman creature) who had not 
brooded long by the seas, and gone agaxin- into tin- water 
after immortal ai. . h as people the 

green pools. " Brown Robjn's Confession " is one of many 
such. MM .nah is one of nial tales. It 

appears in : >st lands, and I can well 

believe that, if a ship were to meet with head- winds for 
several months, in tin- present year, her sailors would 
pOOBsitO unpleasantly, among themselves, as to the cause 
A good instance of nah ballad is "Ca) 

ballad is an exan - ktnfU 

ballad, whieh 1 sailors sometimes sing when 

are cheerful It is not good poetry, but I know no poem 

li has so deep an effect, when sung as the sailor 
it, in a steady, clear, s! h brings 

out, t tl><- chorus in a tragedy, with < inu 

presiige. the line 

"A* we went to New Bar!.. 

I he dangers and miseries of life at sea 1 

md 1 have given ballads enough, 1 hope, to 
hack my statement. (Mil t life at sea it does not 

i sailor to sing. Such joys as the sea give 
rather those of hope and unrest. i :inds 



xx INTRODUCTORY 

here and there in sea ballads is joy that the voyage 
is over, or will soon be over, with honour, profit, 
or safety to the sailor ; or joy that the woman he 
loves is still alive. It is in his love ballads that the 
sailor shows himself most joyous. The virtue he praises 
most in women is constancy, for that is the virtue he is 
likeliest to appreciate. Women are invariably constant to 
him, perhaps because they have so much temptation to be 
otherwise. The love tragedies, such as they are which 
darken this section of my anthology are tragedies due, as 
all such tragedies are due, not to the women but to the 
men, in their weakness or their strength. 

1 have said that one of the joys the sea gives is the joy 
of unrest. This joy has been expressed in poetry during 
the last three generations, so perfectly that I have no 
need to indicate particular names. The glory and the 
beauty of the water have been hymned in glorious and 
lovely verse. I wish to express my gratitude to those 
living poets who have allowed me to quote their poems in 
that section of this anthology which treats of the beauty 
and wonder of the sea. I am confident that when the 
poetry of our time is reckoned up it will be said that one 
of its chief triumphs is that it has proclaimed the majesty 
and glory of the dominion of water. It is unnecessary for 
me to speak of poems like " The Forsaken Merman " ; but 
before closing this essay I should like to point out the 
extreme beauty of some of the modern sea poems in this 
volume. Our early poets have told us of the sea's terrors, 
and our early ballad singers have told us of our sea 
victories. It has been the task of modern poets, Mr. 
Binyon, Mr. Bridges, Mr. Kipling, Mr. Newbolt, and Mr. 
D. C. Scott, to tell us of the magical attraction of the sea, 
and to set before us, in ringing and strenuous verses, the 
nobility of those who have made the seas our heritage. 

JOHN MASEFIELD. 



OMISSIONS 



1 KEUHKT extremely that I have beeu unable t.. include 
any poem by Mr. Swinbunu . The reasons \\ t n r 1 1 torbid 
that inclusion also force me to mnit the t\\ splendid 
Revenge, a Ballad of tl ; tin- 

M.u-ldi. . Alfred l..-nl I 

lamentable, but unfortun.iU-lv m-cess.i 
km is that of any poem by Mr. A. 1 . Hrady,an A 
poet, whose " Ways of Many Waters 
poems yet * B merchant sailor and tin- 

man-of-war's man. 

rparation >t thi^ lxx>k I have omitted any 
noble porm. through my own negligence or iguoram 

Ail) take its place, let a man do all he can." 

1 ha what I cou tin- means at my dis{K)6al. 

A prose " Sailor's ( iarlaiul " is now in preparation, as a 



NOTE 

I WISH to thank the following poets and publishers for 
their kindness in granting me permission to avail myself of 
copyright material : Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ashbee, for 
their rendering of " Ich stand auf hohen Berge " (Song 
Book of the Guild of Handicraft, Essex House Press) ; Mr. 
Laurence Binyon, for "John Winter" (London Visions, Elkin 
Mathews) ; Mr. Robert Bridges, for " A Passer- By" (Shorter 
Poems, Daniel, Oxford) ; the Rev. Father John Gray, for 
"Wings in the Dark " and " The " Flying Fish " (Silver- 
points (John Lane), and No. 4 of The Dial) ; Messrs. 
Macmillan, for the late Charles Kingsley's ballad "The 
Last Buccaneer"; Mr. R. E. M'Gowaii, for "A Young 
Man's Fancy"; Mr. T. Sturge Moore, for "The Rower's 
Chant" (The Vinedresser, Unicorn Press); Messrs. G. P. 
Putnam's Sons, for the three poems of Walt Whitman ; 
Mr. Henry Newbolt, for "Messmates" and "Drake's 
Drum" (The Island Race and Admirals All, Elkin 
Mathews). Mr. Duncan Campbell Scott, for " The Piper 
of Aril," "At Les fiboulements" (Labour and the Angel, 
Boston, Copelaiid & Day); and for "Off Riviere du 
Loup" (The Magic House, Methuen & Co.); Messrs. 
Smith Elder, for the use of the lyric from Paracelsus 
(collected edition of Robert Browning's W^orks) ; Mr. 
A. T. Quiller-Couch, for "Victoria" and "Dolor Oogo" 
(Poems and Ballads, Methuen); and Messrs. Chatto 
Windus, for " Christmas at Sea " (from Ballads), by the 
late R. L. Stevenson. 

I also wish to thank the editor and proprietors of 
the Manchester Guardian for allowing me to reprint 
an article on "Chanties" from their issue of l6th 
August 1905 ; and Mr. Rudyard Kipling and Messrs. 
Appletoii & Sons, for the use of the poem "THE LAST 
CHANTY" (Seven Seas, Methuen Co., London, and D. 
Appleton & Sons, New York). 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



'DUCTIOH 



MIS< 10USP01 

\\ALT Win TV 

Song for all Seas, all Ships . . 3 

JOHN KEATS 

Sonnet . . 4 

KOBEET BRIDGES 

5 

JOHN Gk 

Wings in the Dark . 5 

AM CAMPBELL SCOTT 

At Let Eboulemenu . . . 6 

THOMAS L. BEDDOES 

-cm . 7 

: MOOEE 

Rower's Chant . ... 7 

LAURENCE Bis 

John Winter s 

DUKCAM CAMPBELL SCOTT 

Off Riviere du Loup . 1 ' 

KOBEET BROWN mo 

Song from Punutlsns . . . > 2 

ANONYMOUS 

Outwards . . 14 

ALFRED LORD TENNYSON 

The Lotos Eaten . ... 14 

GERMAN FOLK-SONG, ADAPTED BY CHARLEH AND JANET 

illEE 

i stand aufhohen Berge w . . 16 



xxiv TABLE OF CONTENTS 

WALT *<* 

Ship . . . . .1? 

JOHN GRAY 

The Flying - . . .18 

M.T 

-.nates 

WILLIAM SHAKESFKARE 

From AV; r Richard 111. . . . 25 

WALT WH 

The World below the Brine . . . -25 

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 

Song from The Tempest . . . .26 

N CAMPBELL SCOTT 
The Piper of Aril . . . . .26 

LORD BYRON 

From Childe Harold's Pilgrimage . . -31 

H. W. LONGFELLOW 

Lost Youth . . . . . -33 

RUDYARD KIPLING 

The Last Chanty . . . . -34 



POEMS ILLUSTRATING OUR SEA HISTORY 

LAURENCE Mi NOT 

The Sea-Fight at Sluys, 24th June 1340 . -37 

Winchelsea Fight, or the Humbling of the Spaniards. 40 

ANONYMOUS 

Sir Andrew Barton . . . . 41 

CHARLES FITZ-GKFFERY 

The English Captains . . . . 51 

SIR WILLIAM DAVENANT 

Sir Francis Drake Reviv'd . . . 56 

CHARLES FITZ-GEFFERY 

On Sir Francis Drake . . . . 58 

ANONYMOUS 

Sir Richard Grenville's Farewell . . .60 

THOMAS GREEPE 

The Taking of Cartagena . . . Ci 

WILLIAM WARNER 

From Albion's England . . . .64 

The Defeat of the Spanish Armada . . .67 



TABU ] NTS xxv 

GEORGE I'F.RLR f . A( . P 

A Farewell to the most famous Generals, Sir John 

Norris and Sir Francis Drake, Knights . . 69 

ANONYMOUS 

The Sailor's Oncly Delight . . 7 , 

ANONYMOUS 

The Winning of Gales . 

(tRRVA&E MARK HAM 

End of The Last Fight of the Jtowajv . 76 

HENRY NEW* 

Drake's Drum . . . 82 

CHARLES Firx-GRrrRRV 

The l+A Voyage of Sir Francis Drake and Sir John 

Hawkins . . s, 

IAM WARNEK 

From Albion's England . . 87 

AEJ. DRAYTON 

To the Virginian Voyage . 87 

ANONYMOUS 

The Hooow of Bristol . . 89 

;AM BROWNE 

Frum Britannia's Pastoral* . . 93 

THOMAS HEYWOOD 

An Epigram upon His Majesty's Great Ship (Tk* 
S**rtirn f ttu Sw) lying in the Dock at 
Woolwich i . 94 

t .... 

\\. S i M' | 

The Famoas Fight at Malaga .... 96 
ANDREW MARVRLI. 

On the Victory obtained by Admiral Blake over the 
niards in the " 



Bay of Santa Cras . 99 

GEORGE HARRISO* 

The Epitaph Acrostkk on Robert Blake . 104 

ANONYMOUS 

The Royal Victory . 104 

ANONYMOUS 

The Second of November . . 107 

ANONYMOUS 

Admiral Bbow . 108 

ANONYMOUS 

The Death of Admiral Benbow . 109 

ANONYMOUS 

Admiral Hosier's Ghost in 



xxiv TABLE OF CONTENTS 

WALT WHITMAN PACK 

After the Sea-Ship . . . . 17 

JOHN GRAY 

The Flying-Fish . . . .18 

Hi NRY NEWBOLT 

Messmates . . . . . .24 

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 

From King Richard 111. . . . .25 

WALT WHITMAN 

The World below the Brine . . . 25 

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 

Song from The Tempest . . . .26 

DUNCAN CAMPBELL SCOTT 

The Piper of Aril . . . . .26 

LORD BYRON 

From Childe HarohFs Pilgrimage . . -31 

H. W. LONGFELLOW 

Lost Youth . . . . . -33 

RUDYARD KIPLING 

The Last Chanty . . . . -34 



POEMS ILLUSTRATING OUR SEA HISTORY 

LAURENCE MINOT 

The Sea-Fight at Sluys, 24th June 1340 . ' . 37 
Winchelsea Fight, or the Humbling of the Spaniards. 40 

ANONYMOUS 

Sir Andrew Barton . . . . .41 

CHARLES FITZ-GEFFERY 

The English Captains . . . . .51 

SIR WILLIAM DAVENANT 

Sir Francis Drake Reviv'd . . . 56 

CHARLES FITZ-GEFFERY 

On Sir Francis Drake . . . . .58 

ANONYMOUS 

Sir Richard Grenville's Farewell . . .60 

THOMAS GREEPE 

The Taking of Cartagena . . . .61 

WILLIAM WARNER 

From Albion's England . . . .64 

The Defeat of the Spanish Armada . . -67 



TA1U.I ,TS xxv 

UBORCR PEELE HAG* 

A Farewell to the most famous Generals, Sir |..)m 

Norris and Sir Francis Drake, I. . 69 

ANONYMO 

The Sailor's Oncly Delight . . 7 , 

ANONYM* 

The Winning of Gales . . 74 

MARKIIAM 

End of The Last Fight of the AVtvwjv . . 76 

NEW* 

Drake's Drum . Hi 

CHARLES FITZ-GEFFERY 

The Last Voyage of Sir Francis Drake and Sir John 

Hawkins . S; 

W M LI AM WARNER 

From Albion's England . 7 

ABL DRAYTON 

To the Virginian Voyage . 87 

ANONYMOUS 

The Hooow of Bristol . . 89 

i AM BROWNE 

From Britannia'. Pastoral . . 93 

THOMAS HEYWOOD 

An Epigram upon His Majesty's Great Ship (Tkt 
S*rri,m tf tJu SMS) lying in the Dock at 
HUM* . . 94 

AJKMTYMOCS 

The Famous Fight at Malaga .... 96 
ANDREW MARVRLL 

On the Victory obtained by Admiral Blake over the 

Spaniards in the Bay of Santa Cruz . . 99 

GEORGE HARRISON 

The Epitaph Acrostick on Robert Blake . 104 

ANONYMOUS 

The Royal Victory . . . .104 

ANONYMOUS 

The Second of November . . . 107 

AjSQSJfSJQOI 

Admiral Bcnbow . . 108 

ANONYMOUS 

The Death of Admiral Benbow . 109 

ANONYMOUS 

Admiral Hosier's Ghost in 



xxvi TABLE OF CONTENTS 

ANONYMOUS PAGE 

Brave News from Admiral Vernon . . .114 

ANONYMOUS 

Bold Sawyer . . . . . .116 

DAVID GARRICK 

Heart of Oak . . . . . .118 

WILLIAM COWPER 

On the Loss of the Royal George . . .119 

ANONYMOUS 

Admiral Rodney's Triumph on the I2th of April . 120 
ANONYMOUS 

A New Song on Parker the Delegate, Head of the 

Mutiny at Sheerness . . . .121 

PRINCE HOARE 

The Arethnsa . . . . . .123 

ANONYMOUS 

A New Song on Lord Nelson's Victory at Copenhagen 124 
ANONYMOUS 

The Brave Tars of Old England . . .126 

ANONYMOUS 

Trafalgar . . . . . .129 

ANONYMOUS 

The Battle of Trafalgar . . . .131 

A. T. QUILLER-COUCH 

Victoria, 22nd June 1893 . . . .133 



POEMS OF SAILORS AND OF LIFE AT SEA 

GEOFFREY CHAUCER 

The Shipman . . . . . .136 

ANONYMOUS 

The Sailing of the Pilgrims from Sandwich towards 

St. James of Compostella . . . .137 

ANONYMOUS 

Sir Patrick Spens . . . . .139 

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 

From The Tempest . . . . .142 

ANONYMOUS 

The Saylor's Song . . . . 145 

ANONYMOUS 

A Ballad of Sea Fardingers, describing Evil Fortune 145 



TAHI.K 01 ruNTKNTS xxvii 



AG 

Valter Raleigh Sailing in the Lowlands . .147 

ANONYMOUS 

The GmUtm V**it< . . , 49 

ANONYMOUS 

The CM* Vanity (a modern version) . .151 

JOHN DONNE 

DM Bhra . , 52 

\M FALCONER 
From Th< Skifmtk . . . 154 

Joan DONNE 

The Calm . 159 

MARTYN PARKER 

Neptune's Raging Fwy . . 160 

NY MOOS 

The Distressed Sailor 1 * Garland . 163 

CAPTAIN JACK MITFORH, R.N. 

A Gate o/ Wind (from ^AmAmyYd^AtaMO*) 169 
ANONYMOUS 

The Benjamin'* lamentations . . 173 

ANONYMOUS 

The Leadsman's Song . 175 

KVBNSOM 

Christmas at Sea .176 

us 

The Whale . 178 

NYMOUS 

Spanish Ladies . . iSo 

NYMOUS 

The Greenwich Pcnsionef , ill 

ANONYMOUS 

Comfortable Song on the Poor Sailors . . 182 

ANONYMOUS 

Sailors' Delight . .183 

FREDERICK MARRYAT 

. is> 
The Captain stood on the Carronade . 

NYMOUS 

The Press-Gang . .187 

>us 

Captain Bover . ,..! 



xxviii TABLE OF CONTENTS 



ANONYMOUS 

The Flash Frigate . . . . .188 

LORD BYRON 

The Man-o'-War (Childe Harold's Pilgrimage} . 189 

T. HUDSON 

Jack Robinson . . . . . .190 

CAPTAIN JACK MITFORD, R.N. 

The Fight (from Adventures of Johnny Newcome) . 192 



THE STORY OF JONAH. POEMS OF MERMAIDS 
AND OF THE SEA SPIRITS 

The Story of Jonah . . . . .198 

Captain Glen . . . . . 199 

Brown Robyn's Confession .... 202 

William Grismond's Downfall .... 203 

S. T. COLERIDGE 

The Ancient Mariner ..... 205 

MATTHEW ARNOLD 

The Forsaken Merman ..... 225 

A. T. QUILLER-COUCH 

Dolor Oogo ...... 229 

ANONYMOUS 

The Merman Rosmer . . . . .231 

Ho ! for Lubberland ..... 235 

GEORGE CHAPMAN 

Ulysses and the Sirens ..... 237 

JOHN GOWER 

The Story of Ulysses . . 238 

ANONYMOUS 

The Silkie of Sule Skerrie . . . .239 

The Daemon Lover ..... 240 
The Mermaid ...... 242 



POEMS OF LOVE AND THE AFFECTIONS 

The Lass of Lochroyan .... 243 

The Seaman's Happy Return .... 249 
Constance and Anthony . . . -253 

THOMAS NASHE AND CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE 

From The Tragedie of Dido . . . .258 



^'1! \ xxix 



WILLIAM SHA 



Stephano's Song . 359 

ANONYMOUS 

The LowUnd* of Holland 259 

The Mavdens of London 260 

The Gallant Seaman's Resolution . 262 

The Gallant Seaman's Return . . .266 

A Sailor . .67 

CHARLES SACKVILI.B 

To all you Ladies 268 

ANONYMOUS 

The Seaman's Compass . 271 

MCGOWAN 

A Young Man's Fancy . . 275 

ANONYMOUS 

The Fair Maid's Choice . 276 

The Sailor Laddie 278 

A IN THOMSON 

Song to Mary . . 280 

ANONYMOUS 

The North Country Collier , . 281 

The Bold Privateer . 282 

LRS DlBDIN 

T.xn Bowling . . 283 



POEMS OF PIRATES AND SMUGGLERS 
ANONYMOUS 

Mm U.ry . . 284 

Ilrr.ry M.tyn . . 28? 

Capcain Ward and the Kaimhtw . 289 

As we were sailing ... .292 

The Sakomhe Seaman's Flaunt . . 293 

Teach the Rover . . 294 

: RS KlNOSLEY 

The Last Baccaaeti 

LORD MACAULAY 

The Last IH^*"^*' 298 

ANONYMOUS 

The Smuggler . ... 299 



XXX 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



CHANTIES 

EDITOR'S NOTE 

Lowlands 

Storm Along 

Whiskey Johnny 

John Franois . 

Blow the Man down 

Roll the Cotton down . 

Reuben Ranzo . 

Roll and go 

Roll him over . 

Hanging Johnny 

Sally Brown 

Poor Old Joe . 

Tommy's gone . 

A long Time Ago 

Blow, Bullies, Blow 

The Rio Grande 

Sebastopol 

The Banks of the Sacramento 

The Maid of Amsterdam 

Hand over Hand 

Haul away, O . 

Haul the Bowline 

Runaway Chorus 

Paddy Doyle 

Leave her, Johnny 



305 
306 
307 
308 

309 
3ii 
312 

313 
3H 
315 



317 
317 
3i8 
320 
321 
321 
323 
323 
324 
325 
326 
327 
327 



INDEX OF AUTHORS 



Arnold, Matthew, 225. 
Ashbee, Charles and Ji 

Beddoes,T. L., 7. 
Butvon, I-aurmcc, 8. 
Bridges, Robert. 



1 6. 



r.r vniM, K bert, ..-. 
Byron, Lord, 31, 189. 






119, 



Davenant, Sir Williaai, $6. 
Dibdln, Charles, 283. 
DOOM, John, 152, 159. 
Draytoo; Michael, 87. 

Falconer. William, 154. 
FkjQeflery, Charles, 51, 

83. 

Garrick, David, 118. 

Gray, John, 5, 18. 
Greepe, Thorns, 61. 

Harriaon. George, 104. 
"nrwood, T., 94. 
Hoare, Prince, i 

. 



K- i- >. 1 .hn. 4. 



K: s :.:.,. 



Longfellow, I! v 



iy, Locd, 398. 
McGowan, R. E., 7S- 
Markham, Gerrase, 76. 
Marlowe, Chrutophcr, 258. 
Marryat, 1 S6. 

Marvell, Andrew, 99. 
Minot, Uurence, 37, 4a 
rd, Jack, 169, 192. 
Moore, T. Sturgc, 7. 

Naihe, T., 258. 

Nc* ,24,82. 

Parker, Martvn, 160. 
Peek, George, 69, 

Quiller -Couch, A. T., 133, 229. 

Sackrille, Charles, 268. 
Scott, Duncan C, 6, u, 26. 
Shakespeare, William, 25, 26, 259. 
Stevenson, R. L. , 1 76. 

Tennyson, Lord, 14. 
Thomson, Captain, 280. 

Warner, William, 64, 87. 
Whitman, V , 25. 






A SAILOR'S GARLAND 



OLD SAILOK 

OF old Sailors, the song you would hear, 

n have forgot who they were, 
But all we remember, shall come to your ear, 
That were old Sailors of the Queen's 

And the- Quern * old Sailors. 

Francis Drake, that was the next man 
To the old brave Portugal! (*)> i>egan) 

To KI raits of Magellan 

(Queen's 
s old Sail 

That put the proud Sp.mMi Armada to wrac 

And travrll. -.1 ill oVr tin- I. and came back 

In his old ship, laden with gold and old sack 

Like an old - Queen's 

And the Queen's old Sail 

jewels and the Spanish King's 
And banners flying in his rigging a! i 1 red, 

And a drum to beat a bravery when he lay dead 

I .kc an old Sail. Queen's 

And the Queen's old Sail 



2 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

With a courtly Candish, that seconded him, 

And taught his old sails the same passage to swim, 

And dighted them, therefore, with cloth of gold trim 

Like an old Sailor of the Queen's 

And the Queen's old Sailor. 

With an old brave Raleigh, who twice and agen 
Sailed over most part of the salt seas, and then 
Wrote a brave old history with his old pen 

Like an old Sailor of the Queen's 

And the Queen's old Sailor. 

With an old George Anson, who beat round the Horn, 
With his ships falling to pieces and his sails all torn, 
And made Spanish dollars as common as seed corn 

Like an old Sailor of the Queen's 

And the Queen's old Sailor. 

With many an old sailor, on many an old ship, 

Who hoisted out many a barrel onto many an old slip, 

And went below to his hammock or to a can of flip 

Like an old Sailor of the Queen's 

And the Queen's old Sailor. 

With many an old brave captain we shall never know, 
Who walked the decks under the colours when the winds 

did blow, 

And made the planks red with his blood before they 
carried him below 

Like an old Sailor of the Queen's 
And the Queen's old Sailor. 

And in Davy Jones's Taverns may they sit at ease, 
With their old tarpaulin aprons over their old knees, 
Singing their old sea ballads and yarning of the seas 

Like good old Sailors of the Queen's 

And the Queen's old Sailors. 

(Adapted) 



MISCELLANEOUS POEMS 
SON(. FOB A I l. BEAR ALL BHIP8 



NY a rude brief recitative, 
Of ships ie seas, each with its special Bag or ship- 

s ^ ' ' 1 1 . 
Of unnamed heroes in the ships of waves spreading 

and spreading far as the eye can reach, 

ishing spray, and the winds piping and blowing, 
And out of these a chant for the sailors of all nations 
Fitful, like a surge. 

Of sea-captains young or old, and the mates, and of all 
i sailors, 

Of t! ite can never 

rise nor death dismay, 

(1 sparingly without noise by thee old ocean, chosen 
byti 

Thou sea that pickest and cullest the race in time, and 
unitest nations, 

.led by thee, old husky nurse, embodying thee, 
Indomitable, untamed as thee. 

(Ever the heroes on water or on land, by ones or twos 

appearing, 
SPOT the stock preserved and never lost, though rare, 

enough for seed preserv'd.) 



A SAILOR'S GARLAND 



ii. 

Flaunt out O sea your separate flags of nations ! 

Flaunt out visible as ever the various ship-signals ! 

But do you reserve especially for yourself and for the soul 

of man one flag above all the rest, 
A spiritual woven signal for all nations, emblem of man 

elate above death, 
Token of all brave captains and all intrepid sailors and 

mates, 

And all that went down doing their duty, 
Reminiscent of them, twined from all intrepid captains 

young or old, 
A pennant universal, subtly waving all time, o'er all brave 

sailors, 
All seas, all ships. 

WALT WHITMAN 



SONNET ON THE SEA 

IT keeps eternal whisperings around 

Desolate shores, and with its mighty swell 
Gluts twice ten thousand caverns, till the spell 

Of Hecate leaves them their old shadowy sound. 

Often 'tis in such gentle temper found, 
That scarcely will the very smallest shell 
Be mov'd for days from whence it sometime fell, 

When last the winds of heaven were unbound, 

Oh ye ! who have your eye-balls vex'd and tir'd, 
Feast them upon the wideness of the Sea ; 

Oh ye ! whose ears are dinn'd with uproar rude, 
Or fed too much with cloying melody, 

Sit ye near some old cavern's mouth, and brood 

Until ye start, as if the sea-nymphs quir'd ! 

JOHN KEATS 



WIM,- IN TUT DARK 5 

A PASSER BY 

WHITHER, O i] owding, 

Leaning across the bosom of the urgent V 
That fearest nor sea rising, nor sky cloui! 
Whither away, fa: md what thy que^ 

has all our vales opprest, 
n skies are cold and misty, and h .ii '.-> hurling, 
NVilt tlxiu tfliclr on tli rest 

In a summer haven asleep, thy white sails furling ? 

re befor< try that \\rll then knowest, 

Already arrived am inhaling rous air: 

1 watch thee - >cst, 

And* anchor queen of the strange sin irre, 

Thy sails t .& spread, thy masts bare : 

foaming reef to the snow-capped, 



Peak, that Is orer the feathery palms more fair 

Than thou, so upright, so stately, and still thou standest 

And yrt, O splendid sir imeless, 

timing a fancy, I right 

I hit thou hast a purpose joyful, a courage blameless, 
Tliy |K>rt assured in a h 1 than i 

Hut t.r all I havr _ 
As thou, aslant with trim tackle and shrouding, 

i the proud nostril a prow's linr 

In tlie offing scaUerest foam, thy white sails crowding. 

ROBERT BRIDGES 



IN THE DARK 

the warm darkness faring wide- 
More silent momently the silent quay 
Towards where the ranks of boats rock to the tide, 
their plaintive gurgling jealously. 



A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

With gentle nodding of her gracious snout, 
One greets her master till he step aboard : 
She flaps her wings impatient to get out ; 
She runs to plunder, straining every cord. 

Full-winged and stealthy like a bird of prey, 
All tense the muscles of her seemly flanks ; 
She the coy creature that the idle day 
Sees idly riding in the idle ranks. 

Backward and forth, over the chosen ground, 
Like a young horse, she drags the heavy trawl 
Content ; or speeds her rapturous course unbound, 
And passing fishers through the darkness call, 

Deep greeting, in the jargon of the sea. 

Haul upon haul, flounders and soles and dabs, 

And phosphorescent animalculae, 

Sand, sea drift, weeds, thousands of worthless crabs. 

Darkling upon the mud the fishes grope, 
Cautious to stir, staring with jewel eyes ; 
Dogs of the sea, the savage congers mope, 
Winding their sulky march meander-wise. 

Suddenly all is light and life and flight, 
Upon the sandy bottom, agate strewn. 
The fishers mumble, waiting till the night 
Urge on the clouds, and cover up the moon. 

JOHN GRAY 



AT LES BOULEMENTS 

A GLAMOUR on the phantom shore 
Of golden pallid green, 

Gray purple in the flats before, 
The river streams between. 



TO SI 

From hasy hamlets, one by one, 

Beyond the island-bars, 
The casements in the setting 

I la-.li lut k in \iolct 



A brii: IN Ntr.iiiiini; -ut t'.T 

To Norway or to France she goes, 
And all her happy flags are free, 
sails are flushed with rose, 

DUNCAN CAMPBELL SCOTT 



TO SEA 

To sea, to sea ! The calm is o 
water leaps in sp 
And rattles down the pebbly shore ; 

Iphin wheels, the sea-cows snort, 

\.M mfeen m.-rm u.U { irl\ N,.H^ 

Comes bubbling up the weeds among. 

ad the sail, dip deep the oar: 
To sea, to sea ! The calm is o'er. 

To sea, to sea ! Our white-wing'd bark 
Shall billowing cleave its wat'ry w.t 

its shadow, fleet and dark, 
Break the caved Triton's asure day, 

mountain eagle soaring light 
O'er antelope* on Alpine height 

mehor heaves, the ship swings free, 
^ails swell full: to sea, to sea! 

T. L. BEDDOCS 



KOWEITS ( II \VI 

Row till the land dip 'neath 

in view. 

Row till a land peep up, 
A home for you. 



A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Row till the mast sing songs 

Welcome and sweet. 
Row till the waves outstripped, 

Give up dead beat. 

Row till the sea-nymphs rise 

To ask you why 
Rowing you tarry not 

To hear them sigh. 

Row till the stars grow bright 

Like certain eyes. 
Row till the noon be high 

As hopes you prize. 

Row till you harbour in 

All longing's port. 
Row till you find all things 

For which you sought. 

T. STURGE MOORE 



JOHN WINTER 

WHAT ails John Winter, that so oft 

Silent he sits apart ? 
The neighbours cast their looks on him ; 

But deep he hides his heart. 

In Deptford streets the houses small 

Huddle forlorn together. 
Whether the wind blow or be still, 

'Tis soiled and sorry weather. 

But over these dim roofs arise 

Tall masts of ocean ships. 
Whenever John Winter looked on them, 

The salt blew on his lips. 



JOHN WINTKU 

He cannot pace the street about, 
But they stand before his eyes! 

The more he shims them, the more proud 
And beautiful they rise. 

He turns Ids he< his ear 

ills run, 
And in his eye the endless waves 

1 at evening sakl, 
Now tell us, dad, a Uie 
Of naked men that shoot with bows, 
ic spouting whale ! " 

His wife looked up to see, 
And smiled on him : kit in the midst 

ll- ...I- el 

He bade his boys good-night, and kissed 

y wondered and were still, to feel 
I* so fondly pressed. 

He sat absorbed in silent gloom. 

.ad 

From sewing, and stole up to him, 
What ails x .hesaid. 

llsoaiy down her oheek. 
She knelt beside him, and his hand 



But even as his tender 

The mighty waves danced in his eyes 
And through the silence rolled. 



io A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

There fell a soft November night, 
Restless with gusts that shook 

The chimneys, and beat wildly down 
The flames in the chimney nook. 

John Winter lay beside his wife, 
Twas past the mid of night. 

Softly he rose, and in dead hush 
Stood stealthily upright. 

Softly he came where slept his boys, 
And kissed them in their bed ; 

One stretched his arms out in his sleep 
At that he turned his head. 

And now he bent above his wife, 

She slept a sleep serene, 
Her patient soul was in the peace 

Of breathing slumber seen. 

At last, he kissed one aching kiss, 
Then shrank again in dread, 

And from his own home guiltily 
And like a thief he fled. 

But now with darkness and the wind 
He breaths a breath more free, 

And walks with calmer steps, like one 
Who goes with destiny. 

And see, before him the great masts 
Tower with all their spars 

Black on the dimness, soaring bold 
Among the mazy stars. 

In stormy rushings through the air 
Wild scents the darkness filled, 

And with a fierce forgetfulness 
His drinking nostril thrilled. 



OFF KiviiuF nr i.orp M 

He hasted with quick feet, he hugged 

The wildness 
As one who goes the only way 

To set his heart at rest. 

When mo: mmered, a great ship 

Drojit jjluliMi: ilown the shore. 
John oiled the anchor ropes 

Among his mates once more, 

LAURENCE BINYON 



OFF HI \IFRE DU LOUP 

O SHIP incoming from the sea 

i all your cloudy tower of sail, 
Dash vvater to the lee, 

Ami leaning grandly to the gale. 

The sunset pageant In the west 
Has 61 led your canvas curves with rose, 
And jewelled every toppling crest 
That crashes into silver snows ! 

know the joy of coming home, 
After long leagues to France or Spa 
You feel the clear Canadian foam 
And the gulf water heave again. 

Between these sombre purple hills 
That cool the sunset's molten bars, 
You will go on as the wind wills, 
Beneath the river's roof of stars. 

You will toss onward toward the lights 

That spangle over the lonely |> 

By hamlets glimmering on the heights, 



12 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

You will go on beyond the tide, 
Through brimming plains of olive sedge, 
Through paler shadows light and wide, 
The rapids piled along the ledge. 

At evening off some reedy bay 
You will swing slowly on your chain, 
And catch the scent of dewy hay, 
Soft blowing from the pleasant plain. 

DUNCAN CAMPBELL SCOTT 



SONG FROM PARACELSUS 

OVER the sea our galleys went, 
With cleaving prows in order brave, 
To a speeding wind and a bounding wave 

A gallant armament : 
Each bark built out of a forest- tree 

Left leafy and rough as first it grew, 
And nailed all over the gaping sides, 
Within and without, with black bull-hides, 
Seethed in fat and suppled in flame, 
To bear the playful billow's game : 
So each good ship was rude to see, 
Rude and bare to the outward view, 

But each upbore a stately tent ; 
Where cedar pales in scented row 
Kept out the flakes of the dancing brine : 
And an awning drooped the mast below, 
In fold on fold of the purple fine, 
That neither noontide nor starshine 
Nor moonlight cold which maketh mad 

Might pierce the regal tenement. 
When the sun dawned, oh, gay and glad 
We set the sail and plied the oar : 
But when the night-wind blew like breath, 



<M /'.// I3 

joy of one day's voyage more, 
ing together on the wide sea, 

i at peace on a peaceful shore ; 
Each sail was loosed to the wind so free, 
Each helm made sure by the twilight star, 
ti a sleep as calm as death, 
tie voya K liar, 

Lay stretched along, each weary crew 

Whence gleamed soft light and ent, 

And lit and perfume music 

So the stars wheeled round, and the darkness past, 
And a s e started beside the mast, 

And still each ship was sailing fast ! 

Now, one mom, land appeared ! a speck 
wut sea and sky ; 
eck 

T.llM thr ra- 

was I 

many a night and many a day, 
And land, though but a : <*w nigh ; 

c brake the cedar-pales aw 

urple awning flap in the wind, 
i a statue bright was in every deck ! 

every a of , 

Ami steered right liarbour thus, 

With potnp and (Mean 



A hundred shapes of lucid stone ! 

lay we built its shrine for each, 
A si i >ck for every 



uisrd till in the westering sun 
sat together on the beach 
To sing, because our task was cl- 
Wh< it shouts and merry songs ! 

What laughter all the distance > : 
A loaded raft with happy throngs 
Of gentle islanders! 



14 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

" Our isles are just at hand/' they cried ; 

" Like cloudlets faint in even sleeping, 
Our temple-gates are opened wide, 

Our olive-groves thick shade are keeping 
For these majestic forms" they cried. 
Oh, then we awoke with sudden start 
From our deep dream, and knew, too late, 
How bare the rock, how desolate, 
Which had received our precious freight ; 

Yet we called out " Depart ! 
Our gifts, once given, must here abide. 

Our work is done ; we have no heart 
To mar our work," we cried. 

ROBERT RROWNING 



OUTWARDS 

OVER the dim blue rim of the sea 

Comes the pale gold disc of the moon ; 

The topsails slat as we pass the quay, 
And the yard goes up with a tune. 

We are outward bound for the west to-night, 
And the yard goes up with a cheer ; 

And the bells will ring in the town to-night, 
And the men in the inns will hear. 

And the carts will creak in the lanes to-night, 
And the girls will dance to the band ; 

But we shall be out with the sails to fist, 
And the topsail-sheets to hand. 



THE LOTUS-EATERS 

" COURAGE ! " he said, and pointed toward the land, 
"This mounting wave will roll us shoreward soon." 
In the afternoon they came unto a land 
In which it seemed always afternoon. 



TIIK I.O'ITS-KATERS 15 

All round the coast the languid air did swoon, 

ucary dream. 
Full-faced above the valley stood the m 

like a downward I cam 

>ng the cliff to fall and pause and fall did seem. 

A land of streams ! some, like a downward smoke, 
Slow-: of thinnest lawn, did go; 

iro' wavering lights and shadows broke, 
Rolling a slumbrous sheet of foam b< 

v saw the gleaming river seaward flow 

ner land : far off, three mountain-tops, 
Three silent pinnacles of aged snow, 

1 sunset-flush'd : and, dew'd with showery drops, 
Up-clomb the shadowy pine above the woven copse. 

The charmed sunset linger'd low adown 

In the red West: thro* mountain clefts the dale 

Was seen far inland, a \vn 

Bord< i |>*lm, and many a \MI. 

And meadow, - ilingale ; 

A land where all things always seem'd the same ! 

And round about the keel with faces pale, 

Dark faces pale against that rosy flame, 

The mild-eyed melancholy Lotus-eaters came. 

Branches they bore of that enchanted stem, 
Laden with flower and fruit, whereof they gave 
To each, but whoso did receive 
And taste, to him the gush . wave 

Far far away did seem to mourn and rave 
On alien shores ; and if his fellow spake, 

<>ice was thin, as voices from the grave ; 
And deep-asleep he seem'd, yet all awake, 
And i his ears his beating heart did make. 

They sat them down upon the yellow sand, 
Between the sun and moon upon the shore ; 
And sweet it was to dream rl.md, 

Of child, and wife, and slave ; but evermore 



1 6 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Most weary seem'd the sea, weary the oar, 
Weary the wandering fields of barren foam. 
Then some one said, " We will return no more " ; 
And all at once they sang, "Our island home 
Is far beyond the wave ; we will no longer roam." 

ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON 



"ICH STAND AUF HOHEN BERGE r 

Air GERMAN FOLK SONG 

I STOOD on a mighty mountain 

Looking over the sea ; 
And there I spied a ship at anchor, 
There I spied a ship riding at anchor, 

And she beckoned to me. 

Then she signalled with white flags, 

With flags green and blue, 
And the captain sent me out a little boat, 
Sent me out a little leaping jolly boat, 

With the pick of his ship's crew. 

We tossed in the yellow sunset, 

We climbed the ship's side ; 
And the captain paced about the quarter-deck, 
Yes, the captain paced the windy quarter-deck 

As he watched for the tide. 

She'd a cargo of crimson roses 

And anemones blue ; 
And a dozen ton of shining beryl stones, 
Yes, a dozen ton of sea-green beryl stones 

For to make her ride true. 

ee Say, captain, where' s she bound for 

With her cargo of flowers ? " 
" Oh, we're sailing out into the West, my lad, 
Sailing out into the wondrous West, my lad, 

For a thousand good hours. 



AF1T.K THl SKA-SHIP 17 

\Ve are bound for the Isle <>t 

Through moonlight, through ft> 
And who knows if we shall land our beryl stones, 
Land our hundred bags of !>eryl stones, 

< >r our brave ship bring home. 

" If her masts now should be bn> 

compass be lost ; 

If the captain should misread his re< 
Through the western stars misread his reckon 
screen sea be crossed ? " 

" Na : i the gallant anchor, 

Let all her sails r 

1 we'll cheer the merry lads of Devonshire, 
(Yes, we're all of us stout lads of Devonshire !) 

And away towards the Si. 

I IIARLJDS AND JANET AsilBCC 



AFTER THE SEA SHIP 

AFTER the sea-ship, n; winds, 

r the white-grey sails taut spars and ropes, 

w, a myriad myriad waves hastening, lifting up their 
necks, 

Tending in ceaseless flow toward the track of the ship. 

<>rr;ui bubbling and gurgling, blit h ' 
*, undulating waves, 1 n-ven, emulous waves, 

Toward that yant, 

curves, 

>c great vessel sailing and tack ' i.-.-d tin- 

surface, 

Larger and smaller waves in the spread of the ocean 
yearnfu Mg, 

The wake of the sea-ship after she passes, flashing and 
frolicsome under the sun, 

A motley procession with many a fleck of foam and many 
fragments, 

Following the stately and rapid ship, m the wake folio v 

\\ M I \V IMIMAN 



1 8 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

THE FLYING FISH 



MYSELF am Hang, the buccaneer, 
Whom children love and brave men fear, 
Master of courage, come what come, 
Master of craft and called Sea-scum. 

Student of wisdom and waterways, 
Course of moons and the birth of days : 
To him in whose heart all things be, 
I bring my story from the sea. 

The same am I as that sleek Hang, 

Whose pattens along the stone quay clang 

In sailing time : whose pile is high 

In the mart when the merchants come to buy ; 

Am he who cumbers his lowly hulk 
With refuse bundles of feeble bulk ; 
Turns sailor's eyes to the weather skies ; 
Bows low to the master of merchandise ; 

Who hoists his sail with the broken slats : 
Whose lean crew is scarcely food for his rats ; 
Am he who creeps from tower top ken 
And utmost vision of all men. 

Ah then ! am he who changeth line, 
And no man knoweth that course of mine ; 
Am he, sir Sage, who sails to the sea 
Where an island and other wonders be. 

After six days we sight the coast ; 
And my palace top ; (should the sailor boast) 
Sail rattles down ; and then we ride, 
Mean junk and proud, by my palace side. 



TII -ii 19 



For thrrv livi-N a junk in tin I sea, 

is palace be ; 
- aboard 

walls are painted water-green 
Like the green sea's self, both shade and she 
Lest any marl i rate's trade 

Is to hover swiftly and make afraid.) 

Its sails are fashioned of lithe bamboo, 
minted blue as the sky 

not seen till t! ^h. 

(Hang loves nut that the same should fly.) 

In midst of the first a painted sun 

(in. 

In i he second a t 

That t kiss his flute and swoon, 

Or maid touch lute at ri third, 

i all the crystal h. 
I'ised at M 

ind water a goodlier junk 
that have ever smiled < 

junk was theirs: than 

- tall ..t Mian. 

So cotton rags lays Hang aside ; 
Lays bare the sailor's gristly hide ; 
He wraps his body in vests of silk, 
Ilk is as beautiful as ilk. 

nt mail, 

k, and scale on scale, 
dragons, uhirh I is grandsirc bore 
him, and his grandsire before. 



20 \ < MI.OKS (\ AK1 AND 

Ho binds his legs with buskins grim. 
I'awny .mil gold for tin* pride of him. 
His fret :uv bare. like his who quelled 
The dragon ; Ins fret .ire feel of eltl. 

His head is brave with a lac wrought casque, 
Tin* donning which is a heavy task ; 
Its lappets are spikeil like a dolphin's tin ; 
' Tis strapped with straps of ti^er skin. 



Thr passions of his lathers whelm 

The heart of llan^ \\hen he wears their helm. 
Then Haiijj ro\vs wrinkled betwixt h, 
He frowns likt- a de\il. di-vilwise. 

His eyeballs start, his mark is reil 

Like to the last judije of the 1 deail ; 

Ills nostrils pipe ; his mouth is the mouth 

Of the fish that swims in the torrid south. 

His beard the pirate llan^ lets How. 
He lays his hand on his father's bow : 
\N herewith a eunnini^ man ot strength 
Miirht shoot a shaft the vessel's length. 

1 have another of crimson lac. 

Of a great man's height, so the silk be slaek. 

The bolt departs with a bra/en clang, 

Tis drawn with the foot, and the foot of ll-ing. 

Such house and harness become me when 
I wait upon laden merchantmen ; 

1'wixt tears and the sea. 'twixt brine and brine. 
They shudder at sight of me and mine. 

Of the birds that fly in the farthest sea. 

arc more strange than others be J 
lender its tumble, among the fish, 
Six are a marvel passing wish. 



Tin i i N IM, i I-H 

i is a hawk, exceeding gre.v 

> mate ; 

( >n ins breast is the crest of an ancient king. 

'iff pale, 

little head to sea. 

She is striped *ith l.l.-u-k'i.i vinf, 

Which is rose -lined like a costly thing. 



nit third. 
Of all I-!.. 

\ in IMM.U ; and seen by day, 
By t'he side of them the sky is grey. 

1 mind thr fifth, I forg- rth, 

Save that it cornea from east and nor 
The fifth is an orange white 

tth never a foot on ln< h to stand, 

I cs not land. 
This is the end of many words, 

. concerning marvellous birds. 

The great-faced dolphin is first of fish, 

ved and devilish. 
i the fishes is he most brav 
walks the sea like an angry wave. 

The second, the fishes call ti 
>elf a bow, his face is a swi 
sword is armed with a hundred teeth . 
. above and fifty benea 

The third hath a scarlet suit of mail, 
th to nought but a feeble tail. 

fifth is a ulnp \\itli i hundred strands; 
And every arm hath a hundred hands. 



22 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The last strange fish is the last strange bird. 

Of him no sage hath even heard ; 

He roams the sea in a gleaming horde, 

In fear of the dolphin and him of the sword. 

He leaps from the sea with a silken swish, 
He beats the air does the flying fish. 
His eyes are round with excess of fright, 
Bright as the drops of his pinions' flight. 

In sea and sky he hath no peace, 

For the five strange fish are his enemies. 

And the five strange fowls keep watch for him, 

They know him well by his crystal gleam. 

Oftwhiles, sir Sage, on my junk's white deck, 
Have I seen this fish-bird come to wreck ; 
Oftwhiles (fair deck) 'twixt bow and poop, 
Have I seen that piteous sky fish stoop. 

Scaled bird, how his snout and gills dilate, 
All quivering and roseate ! 
He pants in crystal and mother-of-pearl, 
While his body shrinks and his pinions furl. 

His beauty passes like bubbles blown ; 
The white bright bird is a fish of stone. 
The bird so fair, for its putrid sake, 
Is flung to the dogs in the junk's white wake. 



Have thought, son Pirate, some such must be 
As the beast thou namest in yonder sea. 
Else, bring me a symbol from nature's gear 
Of aspiration born of fear. 

Hast been, my son, to the doctor's booth 
Some day when Hang had a qualm to soothe ? 
Hast noted the visible various sign 
Of each flask's virtue, son of mine ? 



THI-: FI.YIM; ri-n 23 

picture of insect seldom fomul. 
Ot' plant th.it thrives in marshy ground. 
(...him ot' cast uind, fog or draught, 
Sign of the ph raft? 

> where the drug is sense, 
\Vherewisdomismoretha .se, 

irrain than a poui mded bones; 

\\ hrre knowledge is redder than ruby stones. 

Hast thou marked how poppies are sign of si: 
How bravery's mai 

How earth is dark and ire ? 

v song is the speech of all the a . 



Trt wisr in thy sailor kind. 
known by its rind.) 

a truth distilled and strained and cask. 
hast brought the symbol it sorely asked. 

sign most whole and sure 
D plain an 
u- variation 01 

In ttl* !. ,.t tiir rfgfl tO th- WOfW'l uidr i-iul. 

fish is the fairest of all that be 
hrobbing heart of yonder sea. 

I It- | i\. in hi- mdrM-rnt In-art ; 

I .mi OreOM-Ced ami a li-h a>art. 



My back has the secret of every shrll. 

1 lang of fishes knows me v 
Scales of my breast are softer still, 
The ugly fishes devise my ill. 

He prays the maker of water-things 
a sword, but cricket's wings ; 
!>e one of the sons of a 

the water is all his prayer. 



24 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

All his hope is a fear-whipped whim, 

All directions are one to him. 

There are seekers of wisdom no less absurd, 

Son Hang, than thy fish that would be a bird. 

JOHN GRAY 



MESSMATES 

HE gave us all a good-bye cheerily 

At the first dawn of day ; 
We dropped him down the side full drearily 

When the light died away. 

It's a dead dark watch that he's a-keeping there, 
And a long, long night that lags a-creeping there, 
Where the Trades and the tides roll over him 

And the great ships go by. 

He's there alone with green seas rocking him 

For a thousand miles round ; 
He's there alone with dumb things mocking him, 

And we're homeward bound. 
It's a long, lone watch that he's a-keeping there, 
And a dead cold night that lags a-creeping there, 
While the months and the years roll over him 

And the great ships go by. 

I wonder if the tramps come near enough 

As they thrash to and fro, 
And the battleship's bells ring clear enough 

To be heard down below ; 

If through all the lone watch that he's a-keeping there, 
And the long, cold night that lags a-creeping there 
The voices of the sailor-men shall comfort him 

When the great ships go by. 

HENRY NEWBOLT 



THE WOKI.I) HKI.ONV Till; IWIM: 



1 ROM A'/.Vr; /.'/( ll.iltl) III. 

I SAW a thousand fearful wrecks ; 
A thousand men that fishes gnaw'd upon ; 

Inestimable stones, unvalued jewels, 
All scatter cl in the bottom of the sea. 
Some lay in dead n Us ; and, in those holes 

\N here eyes did once inhabit, these were en 
(As ' ' scorn of eyes) reflecting gems, 

That woo'd the *! "in of the 1- 

And mock'd the dead bones that were scatter'd by. 

M SHAKI 



TIIK WORLD BELOW 1111 IWIM: 

THE world below tin l>rine, 

Forests at the bottom of the sea, the branches and leaves, 

Sea-! strange flowers and seeds, the 

thick Uncle's openings n<l pink turf, 

pale grey aii i purple, white and 

t through the wa' 
Dumb swimmers there among the rocks, coral, gluten, 

grass, rushes, and the alin. -.M miners, 

Sluggish c grazing there suspended, or slowly 

crawling close to the bolt 
The sperm-whale at the surface blowing air and spray, or 

disporting with his flukes, 
The leaden-eyed shark, the walrus, the turtle, the hairy 

sea-leopard, and the sting-ray, 

Passions there, wars, pursuits, tribes, sight in those ocean- 
depths, breathing that thick-breathing air, as so 

many do, 
The change thence to the sight here, and to the subtle air 

breathed by beings like us who walk this sphere, 
The change onward from ours to that of beings who walk 
her spheres. 

WALT WHITMAN 



26 A SAILORS GARLAND 



SONG FROM THE TEMPEST 

FULL fathom five thy father lies ; 
Of his bones are coral made ; 
These are pearls that were his eyes : 
Nothing of him that doth fade, 
But doth suffer a sea-change 
Into something rich and strange. 
Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell ; 

Ding-dong. 
Hark ! now I hear them ding-dong, bell. 

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 



THE PIPER OF ARLL 

THERE was in Aril a little cove 
Where the salt wind came cool and free : 
A foamy beach that one would love, 
If he were longing for the sea. 

A brook hung sparkling on the hill, 
The hill swept far to ring the bay ; 
The bay was faithful, wild or still, 
To the heart of the ocean far away. 

There were three pines above the comb 
That, when the sun flared and went down, 
Grew like three warriors reiving home 
The plunder of a burning town. 

A piper lived within the grove, 

Tending the pasture of his sheep ; 

His heart was swayed with faithful love, 

From the springs of God's ocean clear and deep. 

And there a ship one evening stood, 
Where ship had never stood before ; 
A pennon bickered red as blood, 
An<angel glimmered at the prore. 



-nn. 1'iri.R <>F AUI.I. 

About tl of dew, 

n!s Imrned rosy, ami tin- >pars, 
gold, ami all tlie tackle grew 
\\itli ruby -hearted stars. 



j.ijii-r heard an outland tongue, 
\\ ith iiiu-n- in the cadenced fall : 
And wh< ry lights were hung, 

The sailors gathered one and all. 

And leaning on the gunwales dark, 
Ousted with shells and dashed with foam, 

nils to hark, 
sang th< 

B the sweet airs had fled away, 
The piper, with a gentle breath, 

love and longed for death. 
e fair sound began to lull, 

A silence held the shadowy hull, 
1 the eerie song was through. 

dark and dreary deck 

An alien son^r thrill ; 

It mingled u 

-tirrcd the braird upon the hill. 



1',. in .ith til.- itHI r.irh s.-nt tn 

A message tender, till at last 

Tlu- |.i|M-r ^Irpt upon tin- br:irll. 

The sailors slumbered mil 



1 as a dream till nearly dawn, 

> was bosomed on 1 1 
streamlet munnnrinir on ;iii<l 

sweet water < 



28 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Then shaking out her lawny sails, 
Forth on the misty sea she crept ; 
She left the dawning of the dales, 
Yet in his cloak the piper slept. 

And when he woke he saw the ship, 
Limned black against the crimson sun ; 
Then from the disc he saw her slip, 
A wraith of shadow she was gone. 

He threw his mantle on the beach, 

He went apart like one distraught, 

His lips were moved his desperate speech 

Stormed his inviolable thought. 

He broke his human-throated reed, 
And threw it in the idle rill ; 
But when its passion had its meed, 
He found it in the eddy still. 

He mended well the patient flue, 
Again he tried its various stops ; 
The closures answered right and true, 
And starting out in piercing drops, 

A melody began to drip 
That mingled with a ghostly thrill 
The vision-spirit of the ship, 
The secret of his broken will. 

Beneath the pines he piped and swayed, 
Master of passion and of power ; 
He was his soul and what he played, 
Immortal for a happy hour. 

He, singing into nature's heart, 
Guiding his will by the world's will, 
With deep, unconscious, childlike art 
Had sung his soul out and was still. 



TIIK 1'irr.K or AHI.I. 29 

And then at evening came the bark 
Th .it >tir earning heart's dt^ 

It 1'iirned slow lights along the dark 
That died in glooms of crimson fire. 

The sailors launched a sombre boat, 
And bent with music at the oars ; 

The rhythm throbbing every throat, 
And lapsing round the liquid shores, 

Was that true tune the piper 
wave-worn mariners, 
When with the beck and ripple blent 
He heard that outland song of theirs. 

Silent they rowed him. dip and drip. 
The oars beat out an exe<) 
They laid him down within the ship, 
They loosed a rocket to the sky. 

It broke in many a crimson sphere 
That grew to gold and floated far, 
And I '-ft the sodden sh< lear, 

!i one slow-changing, drifting star. 



ThD -h.M.k the mapc sails, 

That charmed the wind in other seas, 
From where the west line pearls and pales, 
They waited for a ruffling breeze. 

Hit in the world there was no p! 

The cordage slacked with never a creak, 

heard the flame begin to purr 

i the lantern at the peak. 

They could not cry, they co 

They frit th<- lure from the charmed sea; 

y could not think of home or love 
Or any pleasant land to be. 



30 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

They felt the vessel dip and trim, 
And settle down from list to list ; 
They saw the sea-plain heave and swim 
As gently as a rising mist. 

And down so slowly, down and down, 
Rivet by rivet, plank by plank ; 
A little flood of ocean flown 
Across the deck, she sank and sank. 

From knee to breast the water wore, 
It crept and crept ere they were ware. 
Gone was the angel at the prore, 
They felt the water float their hair. 

They saw the salt plain spark and shine, 
They threw their faces to the sky ; . 
Beneath a deepening film of brine 
They saw the star-flash blur and die. 

She sank and sank by yard and mast, 
Sank down the shimmering gradual dark ; 
A little drooping pennon last 
Showed like the black fin of a shark. 

And down she sank, till, keeled in sand, 
She rested safely balanced true, 
With all her upward gazing band, 
The piper and the dreaming crew. 

And there, unmarked of any chart, 
In unrecorded deeps they lie, 
Empearled within the purple heart 
Of the great sea for aye and aye. 

Their eyes are ruby in the green 
Long shaft of sun that spreads and rays, 
And upward with a wizard sheen 
A fan of sea-light leaps and plays. 



THK B&A 31 

'I VinlnU nt' or .-i-ui .1/11: 

s of amb' 
he gloam 
esaresti: >t' ^olil. 

The hall is changed, a solid gr 
That glows with a soft stony Hglit, 
The lost prince of a diadem. 

And at the keel a vine is qi 

That spreads its bines and works and weaves 

nnbers, veining th 
le of silver leaves. 

CAMPBELL SCOTT 



Till HA 

HE is a pleasure in the pathless woods, 

.1 raj>tur< ' v shore, 

re is society who; Crudes, 

Sea, and music in its roar : 
m the less, but Nature more, 
From these < ] \ I steal 

ii all I may be, or have been before, 
To mingle v me, and feel 

Wh.v 



Roll -.. th.m deep and dark blue Ocean roll ' 

thousand fleets sweep over thee in vain ; 
Man marks the earth with ruin his control 
Stops with the il ]x>n the watery plain 

wrecks are all thy den i 
A shadow of man's ravage, save his ov 
v. hri. r a moment, like a (in 
I Ir sinks into thy depths with bubbling ^roan, 
\N ithout a grave, unknell'd, uncoffin'd and unkncn 



32 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

His steps are not upon thy paths thy fields 
Are not a spoil for him thou dost arise 
And shake him from thee ; the vile strength he wields 
For earth's destruction thou dost all despise, 
Spurning him from thy bosom to the skies, 
And send'st him, shivering in thy playful spray, 
And howling, to his Gods, where haply lies 
His petty hope in some near port or bay, 
And dashest him again to earth there let him lay. 



The armaments which thunderstrike the walls 
Of rock-built cities, bidding nations quake, 
And monarchs tremble in their capitals, 
The oak leviathans, whose huge ribs make 
Their clay creator the vain title take 
Of lord of thee, and arbiter of war ; 
These are thy toys, and, as the snowy flake, 
They melt into thy yeast of waves, which mar 
Alike the Armada's pride, or spoils of Trafalgar. 



Thy shores are empires, changed in all save thee 
Assyria, Greece, Rome, Carthage, what are they ? 
Thy waters wasted them while they were free, 
And many a tyrant since : their shores obey 
The stranger, slave or savage ; their decay 
Has dried up realms to deserts : not so thou, 
Unchangeable save to thy wild waves' play 
Time writes no wrinkle on thine azure brow 
Such as creation's dawn beheld, thou rollest now. 



Thou glorious mirror, where the Almighty's form 
Glasses itself in tempests : in all time, 
Calm or convulsed in breeze, or gale, or storm, 
Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime 



r vorTH 33 

Dark-heaving ; boundless, endless, and sublime 

tlu- th: 

in out thy slime 
leep are made ; each zone 
Obeys iou goest >mless, a! 

And I have loved thee, Ocean ! and my joy 
Of youthful sports was on thy breast to be 
Borne, li -. . bbles, onward : from a boy 

I u mi- *.hy breakers they to me 

re a delight ; and if the freshening sea 
Made them a terror 'twas a pleasing fear, 
: 1 uas a> it were a child of thee, 

<<! t thy Mllows far and near, 
And laid my hand upon thy mane as I do here. 

LORD BYRON 
(CkiUc Harold* Pilgrimage) 



LOST YOt I H 

OFTEN I think of the beautiful town 

That is seated by the sea ; 
Oft< ; itfht go up and down 

The pleasant streets of that dear old town, 
1 my youth comes back to me, 
: a verse of a Lapland song 
Is haunting my memory st 
" A boy's will is the wind's * ill 
And the thoughts of youth are long, long 
thoughts." 

I can see the shadowy lines of its trees, 

the far-si ng seas, 

And islands that were the Hespehdes 
Of all my boyish dreams. 

3 



34 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

And the burden of that old song, 
It murmurs and whispers still : 
" A boy's will is the wind's will, 
And the thoughts of youth are long, long thoughts.' 

I remember the black wharves and the slips 

And the sea-tides tossing free ; 
And the Spanish sailors with bearded lips 
And the beauty and mystery of the ships 
And the magic of the sea. 

And the voice of that wayward song 
Is singing and saying still : 
ef A boy's will is the wind's will, 
And the thoughts of youth are long, long thoughts.' 

H. W. LONGFELLOW 



THE LAST CHANTY 

"AND THERE WAS NO MORE SEA" 

THUS said the Lord in the vault above the Cherubim, 
Calling to the Angels and the Souls in their degree : 
" Lo ! Earth has passed away 
On the smoke of Judgment Day, 

That Our word may be established shall We gather up the 
sea ? " 

Loud sang the souls of the jolly, jolly mariners : 
" Plague upon the hurricane that made us furl and flee ! 
But the war is done between us 
In the deep the Lord hath seen us 

Our bones we'll leave the barracout and God may sink 
the sea ! " 

Then said the soul of Judas that betrayed Him : 
" Lord hast Thou forgotten Thy covenant with me ? 

How once a year I go 

To cool me on the floe ? 
And Ye take my day of mercy if Ye take away the sea ! " 



THE LAST CHANTY 35 

Then s*id Hie *ou\ of the Angel d ml : 

(He that I . thunder \*hen the luill-mnutiu-d 

breakers flee) 

" I have watch and ward to keep 

thy wonders on the deep, 
And Ye take mine honour from me if Ye take away the 



Loud sang the souls of the jolly, jolly manners : 
" Nay, but we were angry, and a nasty folk were we ! 
If we worked the ship together 

Are we babes that we should clamour for a vengeance on 

thr SM 



Thru said the souls of the flares that men threw <> 

bo 

" Kennelled i; iroon a weary band were we ; 

But Thy arm was strong to save, 
Ai: wave, 

And we drowsed the long tides idle till Thy Trumpets tore 
the sea." 



Th :" the stout Apostle Paul to God 

"Once we frapped a ship, and she laboured *< .: <!ii\ . 

rr. were fourteen s Iiese, 

And they blessed Thee on their knees, 
Whrn they learned Thy Grace and glory under Malta by 
the 



Loud sang the souls of the jolly, jolly mariners : 

Plucking at their harps, and they plucked unhandily . 

" Our thumbs are rough and tarn 

And the tune is something hard 

May we lift a Deapsea Chanty such as seamen use at sea?" 



36 A SAILOR'S GARLAN.O 

Then said the souls of the gentlemen adventurers, 
Fettered wrist to bar all for red iniquity : 
" Ho, we revel in our chains 
O'er the sorrow that was Spain's 

Heave or sink it, leave or drink it, we were masters of the 
sea ! " 

Up spake the soul of a grey Gothavn 'speckshioner 
(He that led the flinching in the fleets of fair Dundee) 
" Oh the ice-blink white and near, 
And the bowhead breaching clear ! 

Will Ye whelm them all for wantonness that wallow in 
the sea ? " 

Loud sang the souls of the jolly, jolly mariners, 
Crying : " Under Heaven, here is neither lead nor lee 

Must we sing for evermore 

On the windless, glassy floor ? 
Take back your golden fiddles and we'll beat to open sea." 

Then stooped the Lord, and He called the good sea up 

to Him, 

And 'stablished His borders unto all Eternity, 
That such as have no pleasure 
For to praise the Lord by measure, 
They may enter into galleons and serve Him on the sea. 

Sun, wind, and cloud shall fail not from the face of it, 
Stinging, ringing spindrift, nor the fulmar flying free ; 
And the ships shall go abroad 
To the Glory of the Lord 
Who heard the silly sailor-Jolk and gave them back their sea. 

RUDYARD KIPLING (The Seven Seas) 



POEMS ILLUSTRATING OUR 
SEA HISTORY 

TIN: BE \ runrr AT BLU1 - 

! JINK 1340 

>TKN, and the battle I shall beg 
Knglishmen and Normans in the Swyn. 

Minot with mouth had meant to make 
True saw* and sad for some men's sake. 
The words of Sir Edward makes me to wake, 
id he salve us soon my sorrow should slake, 
re my sorrow slaked soon would I sing, 
Wl (1 ward shall us boot bring. 

Sir i Valois east was in care ; 

And said Sir Hugh Kyret to Flanders should fare, 
And have Normans enough to leave on his Ure, 
I landers to burn and make it all bare ; 
> ward, woe was him there, 

Wh.-ii li.- m& 9 iii viir : 

Sore it them smarted that fared on ice ; 

Englishmen learned ' re a new dance. 

The hurgess(es) of Bruges wer- hlame ; 

1 pray, Jesu, save >m sin and from shame, 

they were soon at the Sluys all by a name, 
Where many of the Normans took mickle grame. 

17 



38 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

When Bruges and Ypres hereof heard tell, 
They sent Edward to wit that was in Orwell ; 
Then had he no liking longer to dwell, 
He hasted him to the Swyn with sergeants snell, 1 
To meet with the Normans that false were and fell, 
That had meant, if they might, all Flanders to quell. 

King Edward unto sail full soon was dight, 

With earls and barons and many a keen knight 

They came before Blankbergh on St. John's night ; 

That was to the Normans a full sorry sight. 

Yet trumped they and danced with torches full bright, 

In the wild waning were their hearts light. 

Upon the morn after, if I sooth say, 

A merry man, Sir Robert, out of Morlay, 

At half ebb in the Swyn sought he the way ; 

There taught men the Normans at buckler to play ; 

Helped them no prayer that they might pray ; 

The wretches are wonnen, their weapon is away. 

The Earl of Northampton helped at that need, 
And the wise man of words and worthy in weed, 
Sir Walter the Maunay, God give him meed, 
Was bold of body in battle to bede. 2 

The Duke of Lancaster was dight for to drive 
With many a moody man that thought for to thrive, 
Well and stalwartly stint he that strife 3 
That few of the Normans left they alive. 
Few left they alive but did them to leap, 
Men may find by the flood a hundred on heap. 

Sir William of Clinton was easy to know, 
Many stout bachelors brought he in a row. 
It seemed with their shooting that it did snow, 
The most of the Normans brought they full low ; 
Their boast was abated and their mickle pride, 
For they might not flee, but there do they bide. 

1 Snell, active, fiery. 2 Battle to bede, to offer battle. 

8 Stint he that strife, did he end that battle. 



TIIK SKA-riCIlT AT SLUV- 39 

The good ester, God make him glad, 

Brought many bold men with bows full brade ; 

To bieker with the Norman^ I v bade, 

To wade were those wretches cast in the brim, 

The caitiffs come out of France to learn them to swim. 



i H ulding as one of the bt 
Fair came he sailing out of the south u 

lie proof of those Normans was he full prest, 
Till h<- had fought his till he had never rest 

he Slays with a squadron full sheen 
Was coming into Cagei 

soon was his 
Of him had Sir Edwar 1 I ween. 

The shipmen of England sailed full swith,' 

That none of the Normans from th skrith. 4 

Whoso kne* 

Of all the good that they got gave 1 1 the. 

Two hundred and more ships on the sands 

r hands; 
The < ind were out of bands, 

i also the Cknttopker 1 that in the stream stands ; 
In that stound they stood, with streamers full still, 
Till they witt full *rll Sir KcU 

ur good king worthy in wall,' 
it well on that flood, fair n ill ; 

As it is custom ot all, 

So thanked he goodly the great and the small. 
11 goodly, God give him meed, 
H came our km- in the Swyn till that good deed. 

1 Ca***t, a village of Zetland. * Cantly, briskly, smartly. 

';, gaily, swiftly. * Skritk, escape, or crawl away. 

make a show of, exhibit &g* t or cocks, ships of burthen. 
, a flagnhip captured by the English. 



Worthy in wall, apparently a good fellow, a stout fighter, one 
CwhenldlfeL 



vailing or bewailing when kill 
I- air mot kirn fall, good luck to him. 



40 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

This was the battle that fell in the Swyn, 
Where many Normans made mickle din ; 
Well were they armed up to the chin, 
But God and Sir Edward gar'd their boast blin ; l 
Thus blinned their boast, as we well ken, 
God assoil their souls, say all, Amen. 

LAURENCE MINOT 

WINCHELSEA FIGHT, OR THE HUMBLING 
OF THE SPANIARDS 

How King Edward and his meiiie, 
Met with the Spaniards in the sea. 

I would not spare for to speak, wist I to speed, 
Of wight men with weapons, and worthy in weed, 
That now are driven to dale, 2 and dead all their deed, 
They sail in the sea ground fishes to feed ; 
Fell fishes they feed for all their great fare, 3 
It was in the waning that they came there. 

They sailed forth in the Swyn in a summer's tide, 
With trumps and tabors and mickle other pride ; 
The word of those war-men walked full wide, 
The goods that they robbed in hold gan they it hide ; 
In hold have they hidden great wealths as I ween 
Of gold and of silver, of scarlet and green. 

When they sailed westward those wight men in war, 
Their hurdis, 4 their anchors, hanged they on here : 5 
Wight men of the west nighed them near, 
And gar'd them stumble in the snare, might they no ferr. 
Far might they not flit, but there must they fine, 7 
And that that before they reived then must they tine. 8 



in, come to an end, cease. 2 Driven to dale, driven to the grave. 

3 Their great fare, their boasts and brags. 

4 Hurdis, a war girdle, or pavesse, of coloured canvas, which pro- 
tected the sailors of a warship as they rowed or hauled. 

5 On here, aloft. 

6 No ferr, so that they might go no farther. 

7 Fine, come to an end. 8 Tine, lose. 



S1H AM)R1.\\ HA1M 41 

with thy black beard 1 1 rede th . '!in. 

And mi n : 

If thou njl.uid nougir 

: on that coast, thy bale shall begin. 
kindles thy care, keen men shall thee keep, 
a a day and dump in the deep. 

Ye broil;;! I Bretayne f your custom with care, 

t with the merchants and made them full bare ; 
good reason and right that ye evil misfare 

^land, learn of a new lare. 
New lore shall ye learn, Sir Edward to lout : 

when ye stood in your strength you were all too stout 

HENCE MlNOT 



SIR AMWKW HAHI 



THE FIRST PART 

i with her fragrant flowers 
Bedeckt the earth so trim and ga;. 
And Neptune with his dai wers 

Came to present the moot ! 

tirye rode to take the ay re, 

Thames past hee ; 

When i -iirhty merchants of London came, 
And downe they knelt upon their knee. 

> yee are welcome. : chants ; 

v, welcome unto mee." 
v swore by the rood, they were saylora good, 
Hut rich merchan i>ee: 

1 Boy wHk Iky black beard, "a most notorious pirate," named 
. who may have been in the Spanish ships destroyed by 

. the battle here celebrated. 
3 Out of firetaynt, the Spanish pirates had raided the I 

ma 

1 To lout, to salute. 



42 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

" To France nor Flanders dare we pass : 

Nor Bordeaux voyage dare we fare ; 
And all for a rover that lyes on the seas, 

Who robbs us of our merchant ware." 

King Henrye frownd and turned him rounde, 

And swore by the Lord, that was mickle of might, 
" I thought he had not beene in the world, 

Durst have wrought England such unright." 
The merchants sighed, and said, " Alas ! " 

And thus they did their answer frame, 
" He is a proud Scott, that robbs on the seas, 

And Sir Andre we Barton is his name." 

The king lookt over his left shoulder, 

And an angrye look then looked hee : 
" Have I never a lorde in all my realme, 

Will feitch yond traytor unto mee ? " 
" Yea, that dare I," lord Howard sayes ; 

" Yea, that dare I with heart and hand ; 
If it please your grace to give me leave, 

Myselfe wil be the only man." 

" Thou art but yong," the kyng replyed : 

"Yond Scott hath numbred manye a yeare." 
" Trust me, my liege, He make him quail, 

Or before my prince I will never appeare." 
" Then bowemen and gunners thou shalt have, 

And chuse them over my realme so free ; 
Besides good mariners, and shipp-boyes, 

To guide the great shipp on the sea." 

The first man, that lord Howard chose, 

Was the ablest gunner in all the realm, 
Thoughe he was threescore yeeres and ten ; 

Good Peter Simon was his name. 
" Peter," sais hee, " I must to the sea, 

To bring home a traytor live or dead : 
Before all others I have chosen thee, 

Of a hundred gunners to be the head." 



W 



SIR AMMKW BARTON 43 

" If you, mv lord, have chosen mee 

i hundred iruiuirr^ to l>r the head, 
i hang me up on your maine-mast tree, 
If I miss my marke one shilling bread. 
rd then chose a boweman rare, 

active hands had gained fame. 
In Yorkshire was this gentleman borne, 
An i Honeley was his name. 



-eley," sayd he, " I must with speede 

Go seeke a traytor on the sea, 
And now of a hundred boweman brave 

To be the head I have chosen thee." 
" If you," quoth hee, " have chosen mee 

Of a hundred bowemen to be the head, 
On your main-mast He hanged bee, 

1 t I miss twelvescore one penny bread." 



i pikes and gunnes, and bowemen bold, 

toward is gone to the sea ; 
!i a vulyant heart and a pleasant chcare, 

t at Thames mouth sayled he. 
And days he tctmi had sayled three, 
Upon the "voyage " he tooke in h 
Hut there hi- ha noble sin; 

And stoutely made itt stay and sti 



i must tell me," lord Howard said, 
" Now who thou art, and what's thy nn 
And shewe me where thy dwelling 

And whither bound, and whence thou came, 
name is Henry Hunt, quoth hee 
' h a heavye heart, and a carefull mind ; 
" I and my shipp doe both belong 

To t astlc, that stands upon Tyne." 

1 An old English word for breadtk. 



44 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

" Hast thou not heard, nowe, Henrye Hunt, 

As thou hast sayled by daye and by night, 
Of a Scottish rover on the seas ; 

Men call him sir Andrew Barton, knight ? ' 
Then ever he sighed, and sayd " Alas ! " 

With a grieved mind, and well away ! 
(t But over-well I knowe that wight, 

I was his prisoner yesterday. 



" As I was sayling uppon the sea, 

A Burdeaux voyage for to fare ; 
To his hach-borde he clasped me, 

And robd me of all my merchant ware : 
And mickle debts, God wot, I owe, 

And every man will have his owne ; 
And I am nowe to London bounde, 

Of our gracious king to beg a boone." 



" That shall not need," lord Howard sais ; 

" Lett me but once that robber see, 
For every penny tane thee froe 

It shall be doubled shillings three." 
" Nowe God forefend," the merchant said, 

" That you shold seek so far amisse ! 
God keepe you out of that traitor's hands ! 

Full litle ye wott what a man hee is. 



" Hee is brasse within, and steele without, 

With beames on his topcastle stronge ; 
And eighteen pieces of ordinance 

He carries on each side along : 
And he hath a pinnace deerlye (light, 

St. Andrew's cross that is his guide ; 
His pinnace beareth ninescore men, 

And fifteen cannons on each side. 



SIR AMWKW HAR'i 45 



^lippes, and he but one ; 
-art- by k i bower, and hall ; 

He wold overcome 

m-i- his brainr* they do downe fall." l 
ld comfort/' sais my 1 

ne a stranger he sea: 

Yet II apj> to shore, 

Or tod hee shall carrye mee." 



n a noble gunner you must have, 
And he must aim well with his ee, 
And sinke his pinnace i sea, 

Ise hee never orecome will bee : 
i chance his shipp to borde, 
This counsel I must give wit hall, 
Let no man to his topcastle goe 
To strive to let his beams downe fall. 



" And seven pieces of ordinance, 
I pray <*e, 

along, 

I will lead you on the sea. 
A glasse He sett, that may be scene, 
Whether you sayle by da 

we, I sweare, by nine of the clocke 
You shall meet with Sir Andrewe Barton knight." 

1 It should seem from hence, that before our marine artillery was 
brought to its present perfection, some naval commander* had recourse 



to instruments or machines, similar in use, though perhaps unlike in 
construction, to the heavy dolphins made of lead or iron used by the 
ancient Greeks, which they suspended from beams or yards fastened to 
the mast, and which they precipitately let (all on the enemy's ship, in 
order to sink them by beating holes through the bottoms of their un- 
decked Triremes, or otherwise damaging them. These are mentioned 
by Thucydidcs, lib, vii. p. 256, ed. 1564, folio, and are more fully ex- 
plained in Stkt/tri de MilitiA Ncrvali> lib. ii. cap. 5, p. 136, ed. 
1653, 410. Bishop Percys Not*. 



46 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 



THE SECOND PART 

THE merchant sett my lorde a glasse 

Soe well apparent in his sight, 
And on the morrowe, by nine of the clocke, 

He shewed him Sir Andrewe Barton knight. 
His hachebord it was "gilt" with gold, 

Soe deerlye digkt it dazzled the ee : 
"Nowe by my faith/' lord Howarde sais, 

" This is a gallant sight to see. 

" Take in your ancyents y standards eke, 

So close that no man may them see ; 
And put me forth a white will owe wand, 

As merchants use to sayle the sea." 
But they stirred neither top, nor mast ; J 

Stoutly they past Sir Andrew by. 
" What English churles are yonder," he sayd, 

" That can soe litle curtesye ? 

(t Now by the roode, three yeares and more 

I have beene admirall over the sea ; 
And never an English nor Portingall 

Without my leave can pass this way." 
Then called he forth his stout pinnace ; 

" Fetch backe yond pedlars nowe to mee : 
I sweare by the masse, yon English churles 

Shall all hang att my maine-mast tree." 

With that the pinnace itt shott off, 

Full well lord Howard might it ken ; 
For itt stroke down my lord's fore mast, 

And killed fourteen of his men. 
tf Come hither, Simon," sayes my lord, 

" Looke that thy word be true, thou said ; 
For at my maine-mast thou shalt hang, 

If thou inisse thy marke one shilling bread." 
1 i.e. did not salute. 



SIR ANDREW BAUT<>\ 47 

Simon was old, but his heart itt was bold. 

His ordinance he laid right lowe ; 
ll< i . in chain full nine yardes long, 1 

h other great shott lesse, and moe, 
Ami \\- U-tte goe his great gunnes sh 

Soe i his ec, 

The . tJi.it Sir Andrewesawe, 

He saw his pinnace sunke in the sea. 



And when he saw his pinnace sunke, 

<l. how his heart uith rairr ilid swell! 
" Nowe cutt my ropes, : : to be gon ; 

fetch yond pedlars backc mys 

1 sawe Sir And re we loose, 
n his heart hee was full/am? : 
" Nowe spread your ancyents, st Innnmes, 

Sound all your trumpetts out amaii 



i, my m \ndrewe sail, 

Weale howsoever this getrt mU any ; 
Itt is my lord admirall of England, 
Is come to seek mee on the sea." 

:i had a sonne, who shott right well, 

1 1 Irewe inicklc scare ; 
In att his decke he gave a shott, 

Killed threescore of his men of warre. 



Then Henrye Hunt with rigour hott 

Came bravely on the other si< i 
Soone he drove downe his fore-mast tree 

And killed fourscore men besi< 
" Nowe, out alas ! " Sir Andrewe cryed, 

hat may a man now thinke, or say ? 
ler merchant theefe, tint , mee, 

He was my prisoner yesterday. 

disefaamd chain shot 



48 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

" Come hither to me, thou Gordon good, 

That aye wast readye att my call ; 
I will give thee three hundred markes, 

If thou wilt let my beames downe fall." 
Lord Howard hee then call'd in haste, 

" Horseley, see thou be true in stead ; 
For thou shalt at the maine-mast hang, 

If thou misse twelvescore one penny bread. 



Then Gordon swarved the maine-mast tree, 

He swarved it with might and maine ; 
But Horseley with a bearing l arrowe, 

Stroke the Gordon through the braine ; 
And he fell unto the haches again, 

And sore his deadlye wound e did bleed : 
Then word went through Sir Andrew's men, 

How that the Gordon hee was dead. 



" Come hither to mee, James Hambilton, 

Thou art my only sister's sonne, 
If thou wilt let my beames down fall, 

Six hundred nobles thou hast wonne." 
With that he swarved the maine-mast tree, 

He swarved it with nimble art ; 
But Horseley with a broad arrowe 

Pierced the Hambilton through the heart 



And downe he fell upon the deck, 

That with his blood did streame amaine : 
Then every Scott cryed, " Well-away ! 

Alas a comelye youth is slaine ! " 
All woe begone was Sir Andrew then, 

With griefe and rage his heart did swell : 
" Go fetch me forth my armour of proofe, 

For I will to the topcastle mysell." 
1 sc. that carries well, etc. 



SIR ANDKl'AV MAKToN 49 

"Goe fetch me forth my annour of proofe ; 

That - with gold soe clearer 

(<! I f with my brother John <f Barton! 

Against th- ills hee it ware; 

ir of proofe, 
He was a gallant see : 

didst thou meet \*ith lixing wight, 
My deere brother, could cope with thee." 

" Come hither, Horseley," sayes my 

at itt goc right, 

Shoot a good shoote in tmn- <>t need, 
t thou shalt be made a ki 
"He shoot my best, ijuoth HorseK 

u r honour shall see, with might and inn 
Hut if I were hanged at your maine-mast, 
I have now left but arrowes tw. 

w he did swarve the tree, 

ht good will he swarved th 
I breast did Horseley I. 
the arrow bounded back agen. 
selev spyed a privye place 
With a perfect eye in a secrette par 
Under the spole of his right arme 
He smote Sir Andrew to the heart 

i. my m- udrew sayes, 

"A little hue hurt. l,ut yett lint sl'a 

He but lye downe and bleed e a while, 
i then He rise and fight ag . 

. my men w sayes, 

" Ar the foe; 

i stand fast by t ewes erosse 

>u heare my whistle blowe." 

ver heard his whistle blow, 
Which made their hearts waxe sore adread r 
Then Horseley say'd, " Aboard, my 
For well I ^ \ ml row's dead 



50 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

They boarded then his noble shipp, 

They boarded it with might and maine 

Eighteen score Scots alive they found. 
The rest were either maimed or slaine. 

Lord Howard tooke a sword in hand, 

And off he smote Sir Andrewes head, 
te I must have left England many a daye, 

If thou wert alive as thou art dead." 
He caused his body to be cast 

Over the hatchbord into the sea, 
And about his middle three hundred crownes : 

" Wherever thou land this will bury thee." 

Thus from the warres Lord Howard came, 

And backe he sayled ore the maine, 
With mickle joy and triumphing 

Into Thames mouth he came againe. 
Lord Howard then a letter wrote, 

And sealed it with scale and ring ; 
" Such a noble prize have I brought to your grace, 

As never did subject to a king : 

" Sir Andrewes shipp I bring with mee ; 

A braver shipp was never none : 
Nowe hath your grace two shipps of warr, 

Before in England was but one." 
King Henry es grace with royall cheere 

Welcomed the noble Howard home, 
" And where," said he, " is this rover stout, 

That I myselfe may give the doome ? " 

" The rover, he is safe, my liege, 

Full many a fadom in the sea ; 
If he were alive as he is dead, 

I must have left England many a day : 
And your grace may thank four men i' the ship 

For the victory wee have wonne, 
These are William Horseley, Henry Hunt, 

And Peter Simon, and his sonne." 



THE I K CAPTAINS 51 

1.) I [flOf] Hunt, th 

! what was from thee tane, 

Me a day now thou shnlt have, 

Irewes jewels and his 
I lorseU-y, thou shall be a knight, 
! lands ami livings shalt have store; 
ird shall be < hijjht, 

As Howards erst have been before. 



\ve, Peter thou art o 

I \\ill m.iintaine thee and thy son ne : 
Ami the men shall have five hundred markes 

the good service they have done." 
Then in came the queene with ladyes fair 
To see Sir Andrewe Barton 

weend that hee were brought on shore, 
1 thought to hare seen a gallant sight 

But when they set- his deadlye face, 
And eyes soe hollow in his head, 

king, " a thousand markes, 
This man were alive as hee is dead : 

he manful) part hee playd, 
\\iiu h fought soe well with heart and hand, 

1 have twelvepence a day, 
Till they come to my king's high la 



THE ENGLISH CAPTAINS 

VOEOUS CABOT, brave Venetian 1> 
Fostered with honour -breathing English air, 

nous I Icnry's name the more t' adorn, 
And to emblazon Troynovant the fa 

the far-most climates made repair : 
1 by the Southern and Sept. 
Measured the fame of famous Albion. 



52 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Lightless and nameless Prinia-vista lay, 

Till from his eyes it borrowed name and light ; 

Flora did never Florida array, 

Roses nor lilies shewed their shining sprite, 

Till it was ros'd and lilied with his sight : 

Thrice happy sight that verdant spring composes, 

By strewing lands with lilies and with roses. 

By Labrador's high promontory Cape, 
Beyond the isles of Cuba, CABOT sailed, 
Discovering Baccalaos uncouth shape : 
The mighty Silver- River not concealed, 
His tributary sands to him revealed, 
Nor 'darned it to be a tributor 
Unto the Ocean's mighty emperor. 

Honour of England, brave Sebastian, 

Mirror of Britain's magnanimity, 

Although by birth a right Venetian, 

Yet for thy valour, art, and constancy, 

Due unto England from thy infancy : 

Venice, thou claimst his birth, England his art, 

Now judge thyself which hath the better part. 

WYNDHAM, although thy rash temerity, 

Hast'ning for endless gain, gain hast'ned end ; 

And through improvident celerity, 

Too soon accelerated death did send : 

Yet since so far thy valour did extend, 

And death for rashness made full satisfaction, 

Why should not fame advance thy valorous action ? 

With like misfortune (though unlike advise) 

Did fame-ennobled WILLOUGHBY intend 

A famous action's hapless enterprise ; 

Arzina saw his lamentable end, 

Which her eternal winter's frost did send : 

Though freezing cold benumbed his vital flame, 

Heat shall not hurt, nor cold consume his Fame. 



THE r.xv.USH CA1TA1NS 53 

Fortuiu- not ulway good, nor alway ill, 
Wii: lercy with hrr power, 

- falls (as seenu-.l hrr till, 
Sinil d aspect 

,ir : 

llrr. .-"world shall know my powers 

How Fortune sometimes laughs as well as lowers. 

him a bark herself she framed, 

!i an almighty charm ; 
Which lhe tlu- blissful Bonavcnturt named, 

i wind, nor wave, nor heat, nor rold o.uld harm. 
Whilr h- 1 arm. 

to Moscovia, 
Safely red from Russia. 

.v ith success, and proud 011 
Again his lofty &a 'h advance, 

er's soul-attractive sa\ 
Hut t< ke the moon in change and ch i 

i shew like count* ; 
htd him in the seas: 
most she hurts, when most she seems to please. 

Ask the Wingandicoa savages, 

They can relate of GRENVILLC and his deeds ; 

Isles of Flores, and Azores, these 
valour a: uius meeds ; 

While Spain's griped heart fresh streams of anguish 

bleeds : 

His worth with all the world his praise made ev. 
Hut he scorned earth, and t 

Wh.it Tiim--<mt-slidin- ' SO far could fly, 

As did heroic CAVENDISH drive his sails ? 
The great Magores' Kingdom did he see, 
Where freezing Boreas rings his northern peals, 

whose ben heat avails: 

Hi- prowess hath been known to Malacca 
And to her neighbour-bordering Bengala. 



54 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Knighted by honour in desert's fair field, 
Death-scorning GILBERT, chronicled by fame, 
To England's Monarchess did force to yield 
The savage land (that Newfound now we name) 
Making wild people mild, submisse and tame. 
O, were men's lives unto their praise's tied ! 
Then, noble Gilbert, hadst thou never died. 

If searching labyrinths inextricable, 

By hard adventures and ambiguous ways, 

To purchase glory and renown be able, 

And meritorious of eternal praise : 

Then FROBISHER out -lives the Sybil's days : 

What death took from his life, this gives his name 

Death hath no dart to slay deserved fame. 

Rich China, and fair Met' Incognita, 

Admired his valour and extolled his fame, 

Cathaia, and the great America, 

The dangerous Straits that yet do bear his name, 

Are monumental annals of the same ; 

Annals, wherein posterity shall read, 

How Fame the living salves, revives the dead. 

Now drop, my pen, in ink of dreary tears, 

A name of late of laughter and of joy ; 

But now (O death, the agent of our fears) 

A name of dolour and of dire annoy, 

The sad memorial of the Fates destroy : 

HAWKINS (O, now my heart, cleave thou asunder) 

In naming him (meseems) I name a wonder. 

Nestor in wisdom, art, and policy, 
Nestor in knowledge, skill, and prudency, 
Nestor in counsel and in gravity, 
Nestor in wit, foresight, and modesty, 
Nestor in might and magnanimity : 
O would he had (as he had Nestor's hairs) 
Enjoyed Nestor's age, and Nestor's years. 



Til I.ISH CAFTAlNfl 55 

A mortal man more than * man of late, 
If mortal man more than a man may be, 

s calendar is out of da 
Ami ilraths lu-w-year exacts his 'customed fee, 

nore a man, not mortal now is he : 
No more a man because of breath bereaven, 
d no more, because a Saint in Heaven. 

CLIFFORD, a name that still was ominous, 
rrrtiirunng an hi<;h-resolved mind, 

is, vertuous, valorous, 
il adjuncts to that noble kind, 
nature's secret c assign*- 

can deny that names are ominous ? 

name hath still been valorous. 

d SYDNEY, England's Man and Muse, 
1 )EVRRCUX had never s< 
ir royal blood to earth's uiiv ,; 

i KOBISHCR his breath at Brest had s|> 
We si i.n's Iocs so much lam- 

worthies might have saved .! breath, 

By one accursed vassal's worthy death. 

Then ictorious CLIFFORD yet survive, 

And with renown-invested BASKERVILLB 
_;reet fair Albion's shining shore alive ; 
Spaniard had triumphed in his ill, 
boasted he so brave a knight did kill : 

whose worth his *.>rth r>uM sj 
He had not been slain, he had not been slain. 



!> you securely, O thrice blessed bones, 

sacred relics of so fair a Saint. 

ir rich tomb enchased with precious stones, 
Till honour shall your destiny prew 
And Fame revive the breath that Fates have spent 
And if no Homer will display your name, 
Accept a Cherilus to do the same. 



56 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Live, O live ever, ever-living Sprites, 

Wherever live the sprites of virtuous livers, 

Heavens have your souls, the Earth your fame inherits 

But when Earth's massy apple turns to shivers, 

And fire conjoins that nature now dissevers, 

That hold's your souls shall then your fames contain ; 

For Earth shall end, your praise shall still remain. 

What though you left your bodies far from home, 

And some on seas, and some died on the sand, 

Losing the honour of your father's tomb, 

W 7 hich many seek, few have, none understand ? 

Heaven is as near from sea, as from the land : 

What though your country-tomb you could not have ? 

You sought your country's good, not country's grave. 

More than most blest (if more than most may be) 

Spirits of more than most renowned wights : 

But if of more than most be no degree, 

As much as most you are, victorious Knights. 

Earth's admirations, and the Heaven's delights ; 

And as, in worth, you were Superlatives, 

So shall you be, in Fame, Infinitives. 

CHARLES FITZ-GEFFERY 



SIR FRANCIS DRAKE REVIVED 

The Steersman. Aloof, and aloof, and steady I steer ! 

Tis a boat to our wish, 

And she slides like a fish, 
When cheerily stemmed, and when you row clear. 

She now has her trim ! 

Away let her swim. 

Mackrels are swift in the shine of the moon : 
And herrings in gales when they wind us, 
But, timing our oars, so smoothly we run, 
That we leave them in shoals behind us. 



SIR FRANCIS DRAKE RFYIVl) 57 

inert. Then cry, One and all 

Amain! For Whitehall! 

The Diegoes we'll board to rummage their hold ; 
And drawing ou : s out their gold. 



The Steersman. Our master and *8 mate, with bacon and 

pease, 

In cabins keep a boat 
Each as warm as a lord. 
No in, lies more at her ease. 

Whilst we lie in wait 
For reals of eight, 

some go! tune must send : 

ilas, how their ears will tingle, 
Wh :,', though still little Hectors we spend, 

- shall ji 
Mariners. Thru cry, One and all ! 

The Diegoes we'll board to runmin^ 

And drawing our steel, they must draw out t 

gold. 



The Steersman. But ,,!,. how the Purser shortly will 

wonder, 

^ hen he sums in his book 
All the wealth we have took, 

: finds that we' 11 give him none of the plm 
He means to abate 

Tin r owners some part he'll discoui 

Hir er; 

h \\ill stirk. that little will mount, 
Wlu-n he reekons the shares of either. 
The Manners. Then ery, One and all ! 

Amain! For Whitehall! 

The Diegoes we'll board to rummage their hold ; 
And drawing our steel, they must draw out their 

gold. 



58 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The Steersman. At sight of our gold, the boatswain will 

bristle, 

But not finding his part, 
He will break his proud heart, 
And hang himself straight in the chain of his 

whistle. 

Abaft and afore, 
Make way to the shore. 

Softly as fishes which slip through the stream, 
That we may catch their sentries napping. 
Poor little Diegoes, they now little dream 
Of us the brave warriors of Wapping. 
The Mariners. Then cry, One and all ! 

Amain ! For Whitehall ! 

The Diegoes we'll board to rummage their hold ; 
And drawing our steel, they must draw out their gold. 

(From the opera, The History of Sir Francis Drake, by Sir 
William Davenant, 1659. The opera is founded on the prose 
narrative "Sir Francis Drake revived." "One and All," "Amain," 
and "For Whitehall," were familiar war-cries of the mid-seventeenth 
century. " Amain " was the sailor's summons to an enemy to surrender 
his ship. The word " board" is used here as Sir Toby Belch uses it 
in Twelfth Night. The attack planned was a land attack, and the 
only "boarding" done was the stopping of a train of mules carrying 
silver and gold. ) 



ON SIR FRANCIS DRAKE 

You, whose exploits the world itself admired, 

Admire the strange exploits of peerless DRAKE ; 

And you whom neither lands nor seas have tired, 

Have tired your tongues when they rehearsal make 

What hard adventures he did undertake ; 

Then if that such Atlantes are too weak, 

What marvell if this weight our shoulders break ? 

O you once matchless monarchs of the seas, 
But now advanced to an higher place, 
Invested Vice-roys and high Satrapes, 
In that fair palace near the milken race ; 



<>\ SIR FRANCIS DRAKE 59 

think not that his praise doth yours deface: 
If he be justly praised, you justly graced, 

graces by his praise are not defaced. 

1 though his worth above \ \tolled? 

1 extenua 

Whit though your neighbour's jewels dearer - 
c whereat your gem is rated ? 

abated ? 
Wherefore to give both him and you your due 

1 say he was the best, the next werr 

1 1 of his summer age, 

Valour enmoved the mind of vent'rous DRAKE, 
To lay his life with winds and waves in gage, 
And bold and hard adventures t' undertake, 
Leaving his country for hi s sake : 

Loat i i hat cowardice doth st a 

Preferring death, if death might honour gain. 

at Coqwmbo gold, 

At China d precious silks h< 

Pearl at the Pearled K 

Is hoarded did abound , 
Embosom M in I u-hamachalco's j 

.lid raise 
hfc private praise. 

He that hath been win B hath been, 

Leaving the as he wc-i 

He that hath seen th.r - liath seen, 

Searching if any other world un 
Lay yet wit hi i .m's bosom pent : 

Even he was Drake : () could I say he is, 
No music would revive the soul li L.- 
He that did pass the Straits of Magr! 
And saw the famous island Mogadore : 
He that unto the Isle of Mayo came, 

nter yieldeth grapes in plenteous store : 



60 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

He that the Isle of Fogo passed before, 
A second Etna, where continual smoke 
Of brimstone-burning vaults the air doth choke. 

He that at Brava saw perpetual Spring 
Gracing the trees with never-fading green, 
Like laurel branches ever flourishing : 
He that at Taurapaza's port had been : 
He that the rich Molucca's Isles had seen : 
He that a new found Albion descried, 
And safely home again his bark did guide. 

CHARLES FITZ-GEFFERY 



SIR RICHARD GRENVILLE'S FAREWELL, ON 
HIS SAILING FOR FOREIGN PARTS IN 
THE YEAR 1585 

A BALLAD IN PRAISE OF SEAFARING MEN 

WHO seeks the way to win renown, 
Or flies with wings of high desire, 
Who seeks to wear the laurel crown, 
Or hath the mind that would aspire, 
Let him his native soil eschew, 
Let him go range, and seek a new. 

Each haughty heart is well content, 
With every chance that shall betide ; 
No hag can hinder his intent ; 
He steadfast stands, though fortune slide. 
The sun, quoth he, doth shine as well 
Abroad, as erst where I did dwell. 

In change of streams each fish can live, 
Each fowl content with every air, 
Each haughty heart remaineth still, 
And not be drowned in deep despair : 
Wherefore I judge all lands alike, 
To haughty hearts who fortune seek. 



THE TAKI\<; <>K CAKTA6EN \ 61 

To SJMI the seas some think a toil. 
Some think it strange abroad to roam ; 
Some think it a grief to leave their soil, 

. kintolk. and their home. 
Think *o 
I must abroad to try my lot 

Who list at home at cart to drudge, 
And cark and care for worldly trash, 

1 shoes let him go trudge, 
Instead of lance or whip to slash ; 

i.asehis kind will show 
Is carrion meet to feed a crow. 

If Jason of that mind had been, 
The Grecians when they came to Tr 
Had never so the Trojans t< 
Nor put them all to such ami. 
Wherefore who lust may live at home, 
To purchase fame I will go roam. 

ine MS. 2497, fol. 47) 



Till. TAKING OF CAl; MA 

(FROM THE TRUE AND PERFECTS NEWES or THE Won 
OP Siu IK \\ris DRAKE, 1586) 



uers the while provide 
J> and fresh water sweet: 

s beside, 
<>h was conveyed aboard the fleet 

men aboard without delay." 

Then urgently they sailed thence, 
To one rich island they were b 
But wind and storm turned their pretence, 
other course t invent. 

Cartagena they set at last, 
Where all their fleet their anchors cast 



62 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

This town was strong, well fenced about, 

Four hundred soldiers under pay : 

Four hundred Indians in a scout, 

Besides their townsmen in array. 

For they had news that Drake would come : 

And they thought sure to be his doom. 

Their fort well manned and fortified, 
Five sconces wherein good ordnance was : 
Three galleys then were amplified, 
With fifteen pieces of good brass. 
Full little then they feared the Drake : 
For they thought sure to make him quake. 

One mischief more they did devise, 
Whereby they thought to spoil our men : 
Many poisoned pricks in sundry wise, 
Amidst their way they fastened then. 
To prick their shins they did purpose : 
But the Lord God did that disclose. 

Nine hundred men were set on land, 

And marching forth then all by night : 

Until they ca Jie unto the strand, 

Where pricks with poisoned heads were dight. 

The water low, as God's will was : 

'Twixt strand and seas they safely pass. 

Then in the morn before daylight, 
They came full in their enemy's face : 
Then all at once with force and might, 
They ran upon them in a race. 
For all their force and thundering shot : 
One of their sconces soon they got. 

As God shut up the Lion's jaws, 
From 'noying His Prophet Daniell : 
And eke preserved from tyrant's paws, 
The three children of Israel. 
And saved them in the oven so hot : 
So He conveyed away their shot. 



THE TAKINi; OF ('\RT\Crv\ 63 

< ourage their sold i . t : 

Dili jenjiard themselves thru fort-most ly. 

ti in idc tl dread their might, 

Bold soldiers put foes to sha 

'. in their country honour and fame. 

i sconce to so < 

< arts right soon were quailed : 

,r holds and Hed for fear, 
Thru with thrir hrrls thry best pre% 
d strange news thry 
i esc be no men but fiends of I ifll." 

I nance and artillery, 
h in thrir holds did then remu 

ry, 

town, like case, they won certn 
Th.-ir ensigns the. play 

Upon thrir walls ; none durst say nay. 

:.-rs tlu-n s--' 

Som ire: 

^ h breakfast sharp, now, care away, 
cr *s sweet and wholesome fare. 
Bread and victual md good store : 

y make a sconce amidst the street, 
placed great ordnance in the same 

watch when 't came to night, 
their foes, their rage to tame. 

g sound 
So shook their C'hun-h, the roof tVll down. 

This town aK '-pt a space, 

And eke the Friary there beside ; 
These townsmen then v Me grace, 

Besought the general at tl, 
To release their town h< lisave 

And they would give what he would have. 
1 At San Domingo. 



64 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

All things provided orderly, 

And brought unto the water's side, 

Munitions and artillery, 

Was all embarked at that tide, 

The mariners, without delay, 

These things aboard with speed convey. 

Then when aboard their ships they come, 
They were received joyfully, 
A peal of guns, with thundering soune, 
For one hour's space even pierced the sky. 
Their drums struck up, their trumpets sound 
Their victories which did abound. 

Their yards across hoist at the top, 
Their anchors weighed then presently : 
Theirs sails displayed, their good ships lop, 
The mariners stand their tacklings by. 
Each helm belayed with good respect, 
As skilful masters did direct. 

" Quoth THOMAS GREEPE " 



FROM ALBION'S ENGLAND 

THE Spaniard's long time care and cost, invincible 

surnam'd, 
Was now afloat, whilst Parma too from Flanders hither 

aim'd, 
Like fleet, of eight score ships, and odd, the ocean never 

bore, 
So huge, so strong, and so complete, in every strength 

and store : 

Carracks, galleons, argosies, and galliasses, such 
That seem'd so many castles, and their tops the clouds to 

touch. 
These on the Lizards shew themselves, and threaten 

England's fall ; 
But there with fifty ships of ours that fleet was fought 

withal. 



FROM ALBION'S I \(,I.AND 65 

Howbeit of a greater sort our navy did 
But |>urt kept diet in the Jit of health have 

Vd, 

\nuada of our wants in i i.iven 

The r.^t had eye on Parma, that from Flanders an; 
threats: 

i ord Charles our Admiral, and Drake did 

'arless fifty m- !nw'd their tripled IP 

tains' base, 

even at first (so pleas'd it God) pursued as it in 
chase. 

By t. lie seera'd to English hearts the shore) 

gallants did embark each where and made our forces 

But irlike order t! ships at anchor lay, 

That we, unless we them disperse, on bootless labour stay. 

lacked policy that to that purpose made us way. 
Ours fired divers ships, that down the current sent, so 



That cables cat, and anchors lost, the Spaniards badly 

fared. 
Dispersed thus, we spare not shot, and part of them we 

k, 
And part we board, the rest did fly, not fast enough they 

think. 
Well ^uuled little axes so force tallest oaks to fall, 

10 us herds of stately harts, fly beagles few and 
mall, 
days together chas'd we them, not actious, save in 



About eight thousands perished by famine, sea, and fight. 
For treasure, ships, and carriages, lost honour, pris'ners 

ta'en, 
The Spaniards hardly 'scaping hence, 'scapt not rebukes 

in Spain. 
\\cll mijjht h (as much it did) cheer England, 

but murli more 

rum one to all to stop that common sore. 

5 



66 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Even Catholics (that erred name doth please the Papists) 

were 

As forward in this quarrel as the foremost arms to bear ; 
Recusants and suspects of note : of others was no care, 
And had not our God-guided fight on seas prevailed, yet 
The Spaniards, land whereso they could, had with our 

armies met, 
Our common courage wish'd no less, so lightly fear'd we 

foes 
Such hope in God, such hate of them, such hearts to 

barter blows. 
Here flam'd the Cyclop's forges, Mars his armoury was 

here, 
Himself he sheds in us, and with our cause ourselves we 

cheer. 
But (which had scarrified our wounds, if wounded, with 

the balm 

Of her sweet presence, so applaus'd as in sea storms a calm) 
Her royal self, Elizabeth our sovereign gracious Queen, 
In magnanimous majesty amidst her troops was seen, 
Which made us weep for joy, nor was her kindness less 

to us. 
Think nothing letting then that might the common cause 

discuss, 
Where prince and people have in love a sympathy as 

thus. 

Howbeit force, nor policy, but God's sole providence, 
Did clear fore-boasted conquest and benighted thraldom 

hence. 

He in Sennacherib his nose did put his hook, and brought 
Him back again the way he came without performing 

aught ; 

He fought for us, alonely we did shout and trumpets sound, 
When as the walls of Jericho fell flat unto the ground. 
Yea lest (for erst did never hear like strong supplies 

befall, 

Like loyal hearts in everyone, like warlike minds in all, 
Less spare of purses, more foresight, and valiant guides 

to act, 
As shew'd our hardy little fleet that battle never slack'd) 



DEFEAT OF THE SPANISH AKMADA 67 

Lest ^ay, might have been said the cause that we 

sulxl 

. ur gained cause pursued, 
Without our loss of man, or mast, or foe once touching 

re, 
Save such as wreck'd were prisoners, or but landing, liv'il 

not in- 

And as in public prayers we did His defence implore, 
So br: ly, we yielded thanks tlu-r< 

il'f H i ghness' sen (good cause she had 

On humbled knees did give Him thanks that gave her 

'>ry. 
Remaineth, what she won, what Spain and Rome did 

loxr in t'.um- : 

niaineth, Popes use potentates but to retrieve t 

!\M \\ \IINCR 



Tin: DKi-KAT OF TIN: H'ANMI AKMAD\ 



SOME years of late, in eighty-eight 

As I do well remember, 
It was, some say, the t. May, 

I, some say, in September, 

And, tome toy, m September. 

The Spanish train launch'd forth amain, 

i many a fine bravado, 
Their (a> th. : \ thought. l,t it proved iu 
;>le Armado, 

Jut tin i/>!>- .Irnnuln. 

re was a little man, that dwelt in Spain, 

. shot well in a gun-a, 
Don Pedro hight, as black a wight 

Sun-a, 
At ike Knight of ike &M-O. 



68 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

King Philip made him Admiral, 
And bid him not to stay-a, 

But to destroy both man and boy, 
And so to come away-a, 
And so to come away-a. 



Their Navy was well victualled 

With biscuit, pease, and bacon ; 
They brought two ships, well fraught with whips, 

But I think they were mistaken, 

But I think they were mistaken. 



Their men were young, munition strong, 

And, to do us more harm-a, 
They thought it meet to join the fleet, 

All w r ith the Prince of Parma, 

All with the Prince of Parma. 



They coasted round about our land, 
And so came in by Dover ; 

But we had men set on them then 
And threw the rascals over, 
And threw the rascals over. 



The Queen was then at Tilbury, 
What more could we desire-a ? 

And Sir Francis Drake, for her sweet sake, 
Did set them all on fire-a, 
Did set them all onjire-a. 



Then, straight, they fled, by sea and land, 
That one man killed threescore-a ; 

And had not they all ran away, 
In truth he had killed more-a, 
In truth he had killed more-a. 



A FAREWELL 69 

Then let them neither brag nor boast, 
Hut if they come ugen-a/ 

htm take heed, tl >t speed 

know when-a. 
At they did, you knotv tvhen-a. 



FAKKWI.I.L TO Till. MOST FAMOUS 
\I.K.\I>, SIR .JOHN NOKUIS AND SIR 
FKAV I- DKAK1.. K\1(,IH> 

done with care, my hearts, aboard am i 

ng sails t . the swelling waves: 

upland's shore and Albion s chalky cliffs 
Farewell ; bid stately Troynovant aci 

re pleasant Thames, from I sis' silver ho 
Begins her q . and runs along 

To that brave bridge, the bar that thwarts her course, 
Near m-i^hlNiur to that ancirnt Stony Tower, 
The K ( 't Julius Cwar 'built. 

Change love for arms ; arms, my boys ! 

Your rests and muskets take, take 1 I targe, 

And let God Mars his consort make you mirth, 

roaring cannon, and th- lir.i/n 
The angry sounding drum, the whistling fife, 

y courser's net 
Not* : Ix'iuirt .is at home . 

ill the lovely British dames adieu, 
That my a standard well-advan< 

Have hid the sweet alarms and braves of love ; 
Bid theatres and proud tragedians, 
Hid Mahmet, Scipio, i ue, 

i Charlemagne, Tom Stukely and the rest, 
Adieu. To arms, to arms, to glorious arms 
noble Norris, and victorious Drake, 
r the sanguine cross, brave England's badge, 
To propagate religious piety, 
And hew a passage wit -ring swords 

By land and MM, w hcrcvtT 1'hcL-hus' eye, 



70 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Th' eternal lamp of Heaven, lends us light ; 
By golden Tagus, or the western Inde, 
Or through the spacious bay of Portugal, 
The wealthy ocean-main, the Tyrrhene sea, 
From great Alcides' pillars branching forth 
Even to the gulf that leads to lofty Rome ; 
There to deface the pride of Antichrist, 
And pull his paper walls and popery down, 
A famous enterprise for England's strength, 
To steel your swords on Avarice' triple crown, 
And cleanse Augeas' stalls in Italy. 

To arms, my fellow-soldiers. Sea and land 
Lie open to the voyage you intend ; 
And sea or land, bold Britons, far or near, 
Whatever course your matchless virtue shapes, 
Whether to Europe's bounds, or Asian plains, 
To Afric's shore, or rich America, 
Down to the shades of deep Avernus' crags, 
Sail on, pursue your honours to your graves : 
Heaven is a sacred covering for your heads, 
And every climate virtue's tabernacle, 
To arms, to arms, to honourable arms ! 
Hoist sail, weigh anchors up, plough up the seas 
With flying keels, plough up the land with swords : 
In God's name venture on ; and let me say 
To you, my mates, as Caesar said to his, 
Striving with Neptune's hills ; " You bear," quoth he, 
" Caesar, and Caesar's fortune in your ships." 
You follow them whose swords successful are : 
You follow Drake, by sea the scourge of Spain, 
The dreadful dragon, terror to your foes, 
Victorious in his return from Inde, 
In all his high attempts unvanquished ; 
You follow noble Norris, whose renown 
Won in the fertile fields of Belgia, 
Spreads by the gates of Europe to the courts 
Of Christian kings and heathen potentates. 
You fight for Christ, and England's peerless Queen, 
Elizabeth, the wonder of the world, 
Over whose throne the enemies of God 



THi: SAILOR'S OM'.LY DKLU'.HT 71 

Havr thuiui- access less braves, 

O, M. that H^ht 

as Drake and N orris a: 
honours < iuse accompai 

Aii se endless honour- 

C honours and this sjlory shall lit- 
\N h'-sf honour and whose glory you defend. 

GKOI IE (1589) 

nil! SAILOR'S ONKLV DKLKill T 

Shewing the brave fight between the G<orgt-Aloe, the 
and certain Frenchmen at Sea. 

THE George-Aloe, and the Sn-fepstake, too, 

tk key, irith hoe, for and a natty no, 
O f they were Merchant-men, and bound for Safee 
And along* the Coast of Baroary. 

>rgc-Aloc to anchor came 

And th leepsiakc kept on her 

.///./ flfaarf, fte 



y had not say led leagues two or three, 

Hut tin -\ met with a French Man-of-War upon the Sea, 

Ami 



All haile, all haile, you lusty Gallants, 

is your fair Ship, and whither are you bou 
And along**, etc. 

W* u i -1 i shmen, and bound for Safee, 

whence is your fair Ship, and whither are you bound? 
And alongst, etc. 

1 This poem U quoted in the play of the Two Noble Kinsmen, by 
Shakespeare and Fletcher. Act in. Scene v. 



72 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Amaine, Amaine, 1 you gallant Englishman, 

With hey, etc. 
Come you French Swads, 2 and strike down your sayle, 

And alongst, etc. 

They laid us aboard on the Starboard side, 

With hey, etc. 
And they overthrew us into the Sea so wide, 

And alongst, etc. 

When tidings to the George- Aloe came, 

With hey, etc. 

That the jolly Sweepstake by a Frenchman was ta'en, 
r . And alongst, etc. 

To top, To top, 3 thou little Ship-boy, 

With hey, etc. 
And see if this French Man-of-War thou canst descry, 

And alongst, etc. 

A Sayle, a Sayle, under our lee, 

Wit-h hey, etc. 
Yea, and another under her obey, 

And alongst, etc. 

Weigh anchor, weigh anchor, O jolly Boat-swain, 

With hey, etc. 
We will take this Frenchman, if we can, 

And alongst, etc. 

We had not sayled leagues two or three, 

With hey, etc. 
But we met the French Man-of-War upon the Sea, 

And alongst, etc. 

1 Amain, surrender. 

2 Swads, query Swabs ? swabbers, the ship's scavengers, the 
pumpers, and sea-menials. 

3 Top, the platform on the masts above the lower yards of ships. 



TIIK SAILOR'S ONKI.V DKLIGHT 73 

All haile, All haile, you lusty Gallants, 
key, etc. 

Of wh tire Ship, and whither are you l>< 

And alongtt, 

O t wee are Merchant-men and bound for Safee, 

n'ith he, t . 
Ay, wee are Frnirh-mcn, and war upon the sea, 

And alongtt, etc. 



Amaine, Amaine, you }.n^li>h Dogges, 

With h,;,, ffe 

Come aboard, you French rogues, and strike down your 
dkft 

And alun^t, <!<-. 

The first good shot that the George-Aloe ri 

He made the Frenchman's heart sore alY 
And alongtt, 



The second shot the Georg< 

He stru.-k tlu-ir Main-mast over the board, 
And alongtt, 

Have mercy, have mercy, you brave English Men, 

< hry, etc. 

hat have you done with our Brethren on sh<> 
At they My led in Barbarie ? 

We laid them alxmnl the Starboard side, 

And we thn uto the Sea so wide, 

And alongtt, 

mercy as you have shewed unto them, 

Then the like mercy shall you have again. 
And alongtt , etc. 



74 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Wee laid them aboard the Larboard side, 

With hey, etc. 
And wee threw them into the Sea so wide, 

And alongst, etc. 

Lord, how it grieves our hearts full Sore, 

With hey, etc. 
To see the drown'd Frenchmen swim along the shore, 

And alongst, etc. 

Now gallant Seamen all, adieu, 

With hey, etc. 
This is the last Newes I can write to you, 

To England's Coast from Barbarie. 



THE WINNING OF GALES 

" The subject of this ballad is the taking of the city of Cadiz (called 
by our sailors corruptly Cales) on June 21, 1596, in a descent made on 
the coast of Spain, under the command of the Lord Howard, admiral, 
and the Earl of Essex, general. " 

LONG the proud Spaniards had vaunted to conquer us, 

Threatning our country with fyer and sword ; 
Often preparing their navy most sumptuous 
With as great plenty as Spain could afford. 

Dub a dub, dub a dub, thus strike their drums : 
Tantara, tantara, the Englishman comes. 

To the seas presentlye went our lord admiral, 
With knights couragious and captains full good ; 

The brave Earl of Essex, a prosperous general, 
With him prepared to pass the salt flood. 
Dub a dub, etc. 

At Plymouth speedilye, took they ship valiantlye, 

Braver ships never were seen under sayle, 
With their fair colours spread, and streamers ore their 

head, 

Now bragging Spaniards, take heed of your tayle, 
Dub a dub, etc. 



1 HK WINNING OF CALES 75 

Cales cunninglye, came we nu> iye, 

Where the kinges navy se> i nl ryde ; 

| ujum thrir hacks, pit- f sacks, 

my Spaniards our coming descryde. 
!> a dub, etc. 

was tht- crying, the running and ryding, 
\\ hic-h at that season was made in that place ; 
t>eacons were fyred, as need then required ; 
hyde their great treasure they had little space. 
Dub ;i du!>. etc, 



Ljht see their ships, how they were fyred fast, 

hemselves in the sea ; 
hear them cry, wayle and weep piteously, 
\V 1 saw no shift to scape thence away. 



r/nllij), the prydr of the Spaniards, 
.ind sunk in the sea ; 
Hut t ! \fattkrv, 

inanfullye and brought away. 

I)ul> i ilu!'. etc. 

of Essex, most valiant and hardy e, 
h horsemen and footmen marched up to the town ; 
I >anyards, which saw them, were greatly alarmed, 
for t heir savegard, and durst not 

tc. 

!i the noble Karl, "courage my soldiers all, 
ht and be valiant, the spoil you shall have ; 
And be well rewarded all from the great to the small ; 
Hut looke that the women and children you save." 
Duli a dub. etc. 

Spaniards at that sight, thinkin to fight, 

1 1 mi:: upp flags of truce and yielded the towne ; 

the walls on hye, 
With Knglish colours which purchased renowne. 

Dub a dub, 



76 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Entering the houses then, of the most richest men, 
For gold and treasure we searched eche day ; 

In some places we did find, pyes baking left behind, 
Meate at fire resting, and folkes run away. 
Dub a dub, etc. 

Full of rich merchandize, every shop catched our eyes, 
Damasks and sattens and velvets full fayre ; 

Which soldiers measur'd out by the length of their swords; 
Of all commodities eche had a share. 
Dub a dub, etc. 

Thus Cales was taken, and our brave general 

March'd to the market-place, where he did stand : 

There many prisoners fell to our several shares, 
Many crav'd mercye, and mercye they fannd. 
Dub a dub, etc. 

When our brave General saw they delayed all, 

And wold not ransome their towiie as they said, 
With their fair wanscots, their presses and bedsteads, 
Their joint-stools and tables a fire we made : 
And when the town burned all in flame, 
With tara, tantara, away wee all came. 



THE END OF THE LAST FIGHT OF 
THE REVENGE 

(SEPTEMBER 11-14, 1591) 

BUT when the morning's dewy locks drunk up 

A misty moisture from the Ocean's face, 

Then might he see the source of sorrow's cup, 

Plainly prefigured in that hateful place : 

And all the miseries that mortals sup 

From their great grandsire Adam's band, disgrace ; 

For all that did encircle him, was his foe, 

And that encircled, model of true woe. 



TIIK LAST ricirr OF THE /?/:i7 AV,/.; 77 

HU masts were broken, and his tackle torn, 
lli upper work hew'd down into the sea, 

his ship aU>\f th- surge was born, 
Hut fan lay, 

Onl p*i foundation (yet that woni) 

Remained a troph ''"ay; 

Nothing at all alx>\v the head remained, 
hat force maintained. 

Powder for shot was spent and wasted clean, 

Scarce seen a corn to charge a piece withal, 

All IHT pikes broken, half of his be*' 

rest, sore wounded, on Death's agents call, 
lie other side, her foe in ranks remain, 

Displaying multitudes, and store of all 

ry, 

Had they not wanted heart's true valian 

When Grenville saw his desperate dreary case, 
Merely despoiled of all successful thought, 
He calls I i all \\ithm the place, 

The Master, Ma- r. m.l them taught 

travail's toil had bought, 
How sweet it is, swift Fame to over-go, 
How vile to dive in captive overthrow. 

" Gallants," he saith, " since three o'clock last noon, 
t" lit ill this m i hours by course, 

have maintained stout war, and still undone 
foes assaults, and driven them to the worse, 
'en Armado's boardings have not won 
Content or ease, but been repelled by force, 

t hundred cannon shot against her ri 
Have not our hearts in coward colours dyed. 

Sim ln,iii.r t we unlost keep strong our praise, 
And make our glories gainers by our ends, 
Let not the hope of hours (for tedious days 

M no longer circuit lends). 



78 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Confound our wondered actions and assays, 
Whereon the sweet of mortal ears depends, 
But as we live by wills victorious, 
So let us die victors of them and us. 

And thus resolved, since other mean is reft, 
Sweet Master-Gunner, split our keel in twain, 
We cannot live, whom hope of life hath left, 
Dying, our deaths more glorious lives retain. 
Let not our ship, of shame and foil bereft, 
Unto our foemen for a prize remain ; 
Sink her, and sinking, with the Greek we'll cry, 
Best not to be, or being soon to die." 

Scarce had his words ta'en wings from his dear tongue, 

But the stout Master-Gunner, ever rich 

In heavenly valour and repulsing wrong, 

Proud that his hands by action might enrich 

His name and nation with a worthy song, 

Towered his heart higher than eagle's pitch, 

And instantly endeavours to effect 

Grenville's desire, by ending Death's defect. 

But the other Master, and the other Mates, 
Dissented from the honour of their minds, 
And humbly prayed the Knight to rue their states, 
Whom misery to no such mischief binds ; 
To him they allege great reasons, and dilates 
Their foes amazements, whom their valour blinds, 
And makes more eager t'entertaine a truce, 
Than they to offer words for war's excuse. 

They show him clivers gallant men of might, 
Where wounds, not mortal, gave hope of recure, 
For their sakes sue they to divorce this night 
Of desperate chance, called unto Death's black lure, 
Their lengthened lives, their country's care might right, 
And to their Prince they might good hopes assure. 
Then quoth the Captain, " Dear Knight, do not spill 
The lives whom Gods and Fates seek not to kill. 



THE LAST FK;HT OF Tin: KI-:VI-:XGE 79 

the Spaniards shall not brave 
>hi|> due to our virgin Queen, 
i ) know, that they, nor all the world can save, 
wounded bark, whose like no age hath seen, 
ot she leaks in hold, three shot beneath the wave, 
All whose repair so nt been, 

'n the sea shall angry work beL 
annot choose but sink ami -in. 

Besides, the wounds and bruisings which she bean, 

Are such, so many, so incur 

As to remove her from this place of fears, 

No force, no wit, no mean, nor man is able ; 

since that peace prostrate to us repairs, 
Unless our selves, our selves make miserable, 
Herculean K v Inn I. 

No fame consists in wilful desperate 

C) when ird saw them start aside, 

chained m to a glorious grave, 

those whom he mgers tried, 

ives to save, 

w and rage, shame, and \\ s pride, 

mg his soul, madly compelled him rave, 
1 his rage with vi^ onfound 

His heavy heart, and 1 ft I, MM in a swound. 

The Master-Gunner, likewise seeing Fate, 

rtune and his will to die, 
\\ ith Ins sharp sword sought to set ope the gate, 

i his soul might from his body I 
Had not his frit nds perforce preserved his state, 

locked him in his cabin, safe to 
Whilst others swarmed where hapless Grcnvillr lay, 
By cries recalling life, late run away. 

In this too restless turmoil of unrest, 
The poor Rrrmgf's Master stole away, 
And to the Spanish Admiral add rest 
The doleful tidings of this mournful day, 



8o A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

(The Spanish Admiral who then oppresst, 
Hovering with doubt, not daring t' end the fray,) 
And pleads for truce, with soldier-like submission, 
Annexing to his words a straight condition. 

Alonzo, willing to give end to arms, 
For well he knew Grenville would never yield, 
Able his power stood like unnumbered swarms, 
Yet daring not on stricter terms to build, 
He offers all what may allay their harms 
Safety of lives, nor any thrall to wield, 
Free from the galley, prisonment, or pain, 
And safe return unto their soil again. 

To this he yields, as well for his own sake, 
Whom desperate hazard might endamage sore, 
As for desire the famous Knight to take, 
Whom in his heart he seemed to deplore, 
And for his valour half a god did make, 
Extolling him all other men before, 
Admiring with an honourable heart, 
His valour, wisdom, and his soldier's art. 



made proud, unconquering t' over-come, 
Swore the brave Knight nor ship he would not lose, 
Should all the world in a petition come : 
And therefore of his gallants, forty chose. 
To board Sir Richard, charging them be dumb 
From threatening words, from anger, and from blows, 
But with all kindness, honour, and admire 
To bring him thence, to further Fame's desire. 

Sooner they boarded not the crazed bark, 
But they beheld where speechless Grenville lay, 
All smeared in blood, and clouded in the dark, 
Contagious curtain of Death's tragic day ; 
They wept for pity, and yet silent mark 
Whether his lungs sent living breath away, 
Which, when they saw in airy blasts to fly, 
They strived who first should staunch his misery. 



Tin: LA>T FK.IIT or Tin: in:\ t:\c,E si 

M lite, and lift his eyelids up. 

ith tears denounce their General's will, 
Whose ! _rlit to retort thr cup 

>eath's sad poison, -lu-kt to kill : 

him what fame and grace his eyes n 

kindness, and his surgeon's skill, 
Bot). !n\c(i him, and admired his fame, 

A hieh he sought t> lend a living flame. 

me/' quo " simple men, I know 

My body to your General is a prey, 
Take it, and as you please my limbs bestow, 
For I respect i li earth and c! 

Hut tor mv mind that miglr i^TOW 

l.-aven it shall, despite i>h sway." 

He swounded and did never speak a;. 
This said, o'ercome with anguish and with pain. 

They took him up, and to the General brought 
His mangled carcass, but unmanned inn 
Three days he breathed, \ spake he ought, 

Albeit his foes were humble, sa 

!i came down the Lamb that all souls bought, 

i worser parts refined, 
Bearing his spirit up to the lofty skies, 
Leaving his body, wonder to wonder's eyes. 



powers of Heaven, rain us hearse, 

hiiis t<> ime, 

the last age him rehearse, 
And s name: 

Let him that v. 'al verse, 

Conquer the style die to the same, 

11 that fire shall all the world consume, 
Shall never name, with Grenville's name presume. 

Rest then, dear soul, in thine all-resting place, 
And take my tears for trophies to th 
Let thy lost blood, thy unlost fame increase, 
Make kingly ears thy praise's se< 
6 



82 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

That when all tongues to all reports surcease, 
Yet shall thy deeds outlive the day of doom, 
For even Angels in the Heavens shall sing, 
Grenville unconquered died, still conquering. 
utinmn. 

GERVASE MARKHAM 



DRAKE'S DRUM 

DRAKE he's in his hammock an' a thousand mile away, 

(Capten, art tha sleepin' there below ?) 
Slung atween the round shot in Nombre Dios Bay, 

An' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. 
Yarnder lumes the Island, yarnder lie the ships, 

Wi' sailor lads a-dancin' heel-an'-toe, 
An' the shore-lights flashin', an' the night-tide dashin', 

He sees et arl so plainly as he saw et long ago. 

Drake he was a Devon man, an' ruled the Devon seas, 

(Capten, art tha sleepin' there below ?), 
Rovin' tho' his death fell, he went wi' heart at ease, 

An' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. 
" Take my drum to England, hang et by the shore, 

Strike et when your powder's runniii' low ; 
If the Dons sight Devon, I'll quit the port o' Heaven, 

An' drum them up the Channel as we drummed them 
long ago." 

Drake he's in his hammock till the great Armadas come, 

(Capten, art tha sleepin' there below ?), 
Slung atween the round shot, listenin' for the drum, 

An' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. 
Call him on the deep sea, call him up the Sound, 

Call him when ye sail to meet the foe ; 
Where the old trade's plyin' an' the old flag flyin', 

They shall find him ware an' wakin', as they found him 
long ago ! 

HENRY NEWBOLT 



DRAKE AND HAWKINS 83 

THK LAST \o\ AC -IK FRANCIS 

DRAKK. AND SIR .JOHN HAWK1N- 

1 minds, 

i;ip is nearest still 

ii_: ilir-ir hopes and lives to sea and winds, 
(Two trustless treasurers full of annoy) 
Did toward the \\YsU-rii Ind thrir course emj> 

Whose guide to Drake and Hawkins was assign 'd. 
When they went forth, () who would stay 1 

it-r to win from Spain what was not Spain's, 
1 wrong, 

Or ii -In-ir Itidi.in hoped gaii 

Th< in .11,. l make us strong; 

nay say truth Vs laws, 

111 WHS th' erteot, how good so e'er the cause. 

Now are they on the seas resolved to prove 
The -f a mercy-wanting wave : 

England behind them lies, there lies their love; 
Before them and about them air they have, 
And sometimes foggy mists their sight bereji 

Beneath them, seas ; above them skies they find : 
Seas full of waves, skies threatening storms and 

:,d. 

Thus still ambiguous "twist fear and hope, 
Fear in the storms and hope in calm- 
Passing Saint Michael's promontory top, 
At length the bay of IWtinpilr they spied, 
Where not <1 me to abide, 

Again they ventur ir danger's source, 

And t<> nd Canaries bend their course. 

Now pass in silence, O my droo) > 
So many famous towns and ports pasted by, 
Some took, sonic burnt, some unassaultrd then, 
As that Port Rico, place of misery, 



84 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Where (O !) great Hawkins and brave Clifford lie : 
The taking of the city Hatch conceal, 
Nor many other brave attempts reveal. 

Only two base ignoble places tell, 

Famous for nothing but for death and dread ; 

Where (O !) that, which my muse laments, befell, 

The stages where our tragedy was played, 

Th' one Scudo, th' other Portobella said : 

Both to be razed out of memory 

But for memorial of this tragedy. 

wherefore should so many famous places, 
Worthy eternal memory of fame, 

Be here concealed unworthy such disgraces, 
And these two should be registered by name, 
Though meritorious of eternal blame ? 

But some are sometime named to their shames, 
And therefore must I tell these places names. 

Whether of both was in the greatest fault, 

1 know not, nor I care not much to know : 
(Far deeper passions now my mind assault :] 
Thus much I know (O that I knew not so I] 
Both jointly joined to aggravate our woe ; 

Since he on whom his country's hope relied, 
At Scudo sickened, at Port Bella died. 

He that the bravest captain was accounted 
Boldly to encounter with the proudest foe : 
Now from his stately courser is dismounted, 
And hath by death received an overthrow, 
Unto the world's inconsolable woe ; 

The tournament turned to lamenting fears, 
And all the triumphs into ruthful tears. 

What say they ? Death doth grief and sorrow end ? 
O how they are deceived in saying so ! 
Death only did this grief and sorrow send ; 
Death was the only agent of our woe, 



DKAKl. AM) HAWKINS 85 

Death was our dreai I foe : 

death himself xulHlued Drake, 
Tin- world beside could not him captive m.-i' 

:\- comfort is unto us let 

in so great distress !) 
1 Spaniard hath his life bereft, 
nan may boast he caused our wretchedness, 

!>h he subdued ear t dines*: 

Hu ith our treasure hath bereven 

1 that was due to earth he gave to heav< 

As one that vows a solemn pilgrimage 
To some canonised saint's religious shrine, 

is solitary hermitage, 
And with a new incensed seal divine, 
I'n to devotion doth his mind mrln 

Passing the way and day in meditation 

on. 

At 1< 'tis race, 

Ah* mg Saints successive aid. 

sanctified place, 
re after all his orisons are said, 

And due oblations to the saint are |> 

Ravished in d seal, 

Becomes a priest and will not home repeal. 

So Drake the pilgrim of the world i 

A vowed voyage u hrine, 

At length his pilgrimage in heaven had ending, 
re ravished with the joys more than dr.. 

That in the temple .f 1 1,,- (rods do si, 
lli. r. .lid a never dying life renew, 
Bidding base earth, and all the world, an 

We weep in vain because for him we weep, 

li- with saints in th<m^lit-stinni>iintin^ joy, 
ve's great fe*' li revel keep, 

6 neither scarcity doth him am 



86 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Nor loathed satiety his mind accloy : 

O since that he from us is gone to bliss, 
We do lament our own mishap, not his. 

Spain, clap thy hands, while we our hands do wring, 
And while we weep, laugh thou at our distress, 
While we do sob and sigh, sit thou and sing, 
Smile thou, while we lament with heaviness, 
While we our grief, do thou thy joy express, 

Since he who made us triumph, and thee quake, 
Hath ceased to live ; O most victorious Drake ! 

Known to the heavens by honour long before, 
Now by the presence of the immortal soul, 
O new-made saint, (for now a man no more) 
Admit my tender infant Muse to enroll 
Thy name in honour's everlasting scroll : 

What though thy praises cannot live by me ? 

Yet may I hope to live by praising thee. 

Phoebus himself shall chronicle thy fame, 

And of a radiant sunbeam make the pen ; 

The ink the milk whence Via Lactea came ; 

The empyrean heaven, the volume shall be then ; 

To register the miracle of men : 

The sun and moon the letters capital 
The stars the commas and the periods all. 

Jove's silver foot-stool shall be library 

That shall their acts and monuments contain ; 

Which that they may to after ages tarry 

And as a true memorial still remain, 

Eternity is the adamantine chain 

And that the heavens still on Drake's praise may look, 
The gods shall read and saints peruse the book. 

Quis Martem tunica tectum adamantina 
Digne scripserit ? 

CHARLES FITZ-GEFFERY 



TO THK VIKCIMAN VOYAGE 



FROM AI.HIOVS KNGLAND 

OF world-admired Drake (for of his worth what argues 

more, 
Than Fame envied? some, for was his so rich thought 

th.-irs to poor), 
And his brave breeder Harrkiru (yet be honoured every pen, 

. howsoever, honour them as high-resolvrd m 
In fiction, or in mystery, to read would less delight 
Than would significantly some their glorious journeys 

write: 

would requite. 

<-rt,Grtm its to make up five, 

All in th.-ir letter parts with God, with men their fames 

alive: 

urn, Oxnam, Fenton, We. v, another Drakf, 

i divers here not catalogued, and for a chiefest take 
All-actions Ctrnduh, and of these eternal pen-work make. 

Omitted men, and named men, and lands (not here, indeed, 
So written of as they deserve) at large in Hakluyt read. 

\Vnu\M \\MtNER 



TO THK \IIU.1\I \\ \oYAGE 

t>r.i\- h. mic minds, 

Mtry's name, 

>ue, 

-t lit ring hinds 
l.tirk here a A ah shame. 

Go, and subdue. 

Britons, you stay too long, 
Quickly abroad bestow you, 
And with a merry gale 
Swell your stretched sail, 

h vows as strong, 
As thr \Miuls that blow you. 



88 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Your course securely steer, 
West and by south forth keep, 
Rocks, lee-shores, nor shoals, 
When Eolus scowls, 
You need not fear, 
So absolute the deep. 

And cheerfully at sea, 
Success you still entice, 
To get the pearl and gold, 

And ours to hold 

Virginia, 
Earth's only Paradise. 

Where Nature hath in store 
Fowl, venison, and fish, 
And the fruitful' st soil, 
Without your toil, 
Three harvests more 
All greater than your wish. 

And the ambitious vine 
Crowns with his purple mass, 
The cedar reaching high 

To kiss the sky ; 

The cypress, pine, 
And useful sassafras. 

To whose, the golden age 
Still Nature's laws doth give, 
No other cares that tend, 
But them to defend 
From winter's rage 
That long there doth not live. 

When as the luscious smell 
Of that delicious land, 
Above the seas that flows, 
The clear wind throws, 
Your hearts to swell 
Approaching the dear strand. 



THK HONOl'K OF 1MISTOI. 89 

In kenning of the shore 
(Thanks to God first givt 
u, the happiest men, 
Be frolic then, 

Frighting the wide heavt 

And in regions far 

h hrrm-N bring ye forth, 
As those from whom we came, 
And plant our name 

Not known unto our north. 

And as there plenty grows 
Of laurel everywhere, 
Apollo's sacred tree, 

it may see, 
A poet's brows 
To crown, that may sing there. 

Thy voyages attt : 
Industrious Hakh, 
Whose reading shall inflame 

Men to seek fame, 

And much comm 
To after-times thy wit 

MICHAEL DRAYTOM 



Till HONOUR OF BKI- 

ATTEND you and give ear awhile, 

And you shall understand, 
Of a Battle fought upon the Sea, 

By a Ship of Command ; 
The fight it was so famous, 

That all Men's Hearts do fill, 
And makes them cry, " To 

With the Angel Gabriel." 



90 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The lusty ship of Bristol, 

Sail'd out adventurously, 
Against the Foes of England, 

Their strength with them to try : 
Well victual'd, rig'd, and rnann'd, 

With good Provision still, 
Which made them cry, " To Sea 

With the Angel Gabriel" 

The Captain, famous Nethervay, 

So he was call'd by name, 
The Master's name John Mines, 

A man of noted Fame : 
The Gunner Thomas Watson, 

A Man of perfect Skill, 
With other valiant Hearts 

In the Angel Gabriel. 

They, waiving up and down the Seas, 

Upon the Ocean Main, 
" It is not long ago" quoth they, 

"Since En gland fought with Spain, 
Would we with them might meet 

Our minds j or to fulfil, 
We would play a noble Bout 

With our Angel Gabriel." 

They had no sooner spoken, 

But straight appear'd in sight, 
Three lusty Spanish vessels, 

Of warlike Force and Might ; 
With bloody Resolution, 

They fought our Blood to spill, 
And vow'd to make a Prize 

Of our Angel Gabriel. 

Then first came up their Admiral, 
Themselves for to advance, 

In her she bore full forty-eight 
Pieces of Ordnance ; 



noNoru <>r HRISTOL 91 



The next that thru eame near US, 
U th- Vu-e- Admiral, 
;i shot most tun.. i, 
At the Angel Gabriel. 

Our gallant Ship had in her 

v ti^htini: M< 
With twenty pie. inance, 

\\ e play'd about them tie 
Ami with' IWder. Shot. and Hn' 

iiil einpl. 
And thuN he-'. 
With mtr Angel ( 

Our Captain to our Master I 
" Take courage, Matter fx> 
Master to the - 
^taruiftui, my Heart* o 
The < --st, 

heart*, be valiant it til, 

*T 

urAngtlGtl 



i em a Broadside, 
Win. h shot their Mast asunder, 
tore the Bow Spret of their SI 
U Inch made the Spaniards won* 
! caused them to cry, 
h voic-es loud and shrill, 
[>, kelp, orebewe rink 

desperately they boarded us, 

r all our valiai 

ir hi-st ti^htini: M 
Upon our Decks were got ; 
. then, at their first entrance, 

11; 

And thus we cleared the de 
the Angel < 



92 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

With that, their three ships boarded us, 

Again with might and main, 
But still our noble Englishmen 

Cry'd out, " A fig for Spai?i ! " 
Though seven times they boarded us, 

At last we shew'd our skill, 
And made them feel the Force 

Of our Angel Gabriel. 

Seven hours this Fight continued, 

And many Men lay dead, 
With purple Gore, and Spanish blood, 

The Sea was coloured red ; 
Five hundred of their Men, 

We there, outright, did kill, 
And many more were maim'd 

By the Angel Gabriel. 

They, seeing of these bloody Spoils, 

The rest made haste away, 
For why, they saw it was no boot, 

Any longer for to stay ; 
Then they fled into Coles, 

And there they must lye still, 
For they never more will dare to meet 

With our Angel Gabriel. 

We had within our English Ship 

But only three Men slain, 
And five men hurt, the which I hope 

Will soon be well again ; 
At Bristol we were landed, 

And let us praise God still, 
That thus hath blest our Men, 

And our Angel Gabriel. 

Now let me not forget to speak 
Of the Gift giv'n by the Owner 

Of the Angel Gabriel, 

That many years had known her j 



FROM BRIT \\AI\- PASTORALS 93 

hundred Pounds in Coin and Plate, 

I Ir care \\ith tree good will, 
tin-in that bravely fought 
In the Angel Gabriel. 



FROM BRITANNIA'S PASTORALS 

TIME never can produce men to o'ertake 

tames of Grenville, DHVU-N. (iilbert, Drake, 
worthy Hawkins, or of thousands more 

If power made nian short 

Mock the proud Tagus ; for whose richest sj> 

: li-rt the Indian s,.i! 

Bankrupt ot store, kin)\%in^ it would quit cost 
1 1 in- thi>>, though all the rest were lost. 
As oft the sea-nymphs on IK -r strand have set, 
Learning of fishermen to knit a net, 

dishevelled ha 

have beheld the frolic mariners 
For exercise (got early ir beds) 

ban of silver, and east golden sleds. 

Where Plym and Tamar with embraces meet, 

iow, and all her fl< 

Leaving that spacious Sound, within whose arms 
I have those vessels seen, whose hot alarms 
Have made Iberia tremble, and her towers 

ite themselves before our iron showers ; 

roud builders' hearts have been inclined 
To shake, as our brave ensigns, with the wind. 

( ) by heroes were we led of yore, 
\nd by <>ur drums that thunder' d on each shore, 
t h amazement countries far and near ; 
Wh inhabitants, like herds of deer 

By r. i.ased, fled from our arras. 

If any did oppose instructed swarms 
(M'iur;i mnnail'd, Fate drew them on to be 
A greater fame to our got vnt<>i \ . 



94 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

But now our leaders want ; those vessels lie 
Rotting, like houses through ill-husbandry ; 
And on their masts, where oft the ship-boy stood, 
Or silver trumpets charmed the brackish flood, 
Some wearied crow is set ; 

and daily seen 
Their sides, instead of pitch, caulked o'er with green. 

Ill-hap (alas) have you that once were known 
By reaping what was by Iberia sown, 
By bringing yellow sheaves from out their plain, 
Making our barns the storehouse for their grain ; 

When now as if we wanted land to till, 
Wherewith we might our useless soldiers fill ; 
Upon their hatches where half-pikes were borne, 
In every chink rise stems of bearded corn : 
Mocking our idle times that so have wrought us, 
Or putting us in mind what once they brought us. 

WILLIAM BROWNE 



AN EPIGRAM UPON HIS MAJESTIES GREAT 
SHIP (THE SOVEREIGN OF THE SEAS) 
LYING IN THE DOCKS AT WOOLWICH 

W T HAT artist took in hand this ship to frame ? 

Or who can guess from whence these tall oaks came ? 

Unless from the full grown Dodonian grove, 

A wilderness sole sacred unto Jove. 

What eye such brave materials hath beheld ? 
Or by what axes were these timbers felled ? 
Sure Vulcan with his three Cyclopean swains, 
Have forged new metals from their active brains, 
Or else, that hatchet he hath grinded new, 
With which he cleft Jove's skull, what time out-flew 
The armed virago, Pallas, who inspires 
With Art, with Science, and all high desires 
She hath (no doubt) raptured our undertaker 
This machine to devise first, and then make her. 



AN Kl'KiK AM 95 

-< nnild 

ised, 

Whose bulk a thousand armed Mined) 

but a toy (eompur'd) and that icd, 

he bean tnrice his lumlm, hath here 

Hut i V them be made, 

! y sea the gods to invade. 
Argo, stellitied because 'twas ra 

i-boat scarcely might compare. 

in tliat 

With oars in hand, upon their tnuistrae sat. 
I !! aneii \panst and wide, 

to wrestle a^ <1 ami ti 

i It T i .ike that massy chain 

tin 

Tweene Sestos and Abydos, to make one 
i>e and Asia, by that line alone. 

right lanterns lustre round the seas, 

five of th- xrvrii Hyades : 

\\ hose clear eyes, should oft weeping, fail 

H\ thcM-. ur seai. ; t to sail. 

ii ulnrh bears the greatest light) 
guard a* nid ujn_ 

a conspicuous ray did it dart t 
tiion- than a Titainan lustre. \s 

In that one orb, together both appe.i 

i whom seven other stars had then their station, 

That lamp, the great Colosse held, who bestrid 

The spacious Rhodian sea-arm, never 

Cast such a beam, yet ships of tallest sise, 

Past, with their masts erect, between his thighs. 

Her main mast like a Pyramis appears, 

Such as the Egyptian kiu^ \*-r- many years, 

.< tr great charge, uinNt tlu-ir pleasure 

To mount them high, did <}uiu- exhaust their trea 
Whose brave top-top-top n> ing bars, 

By day, to brush the sun, by night the stars. 



96 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Her mainsail (if I do not much mistake} 
For Amphitrite might a kirtle make : 
Or in the heat of summer be a fan 
To cool the face of the great ocean. 

She being angry, if she stretch her lungs, 
Can rail upon her enemy, with more tongues 
(Louder than Stentor's, as her spleen shall rise) 
Than ever Juno's Argus saw with eyes. 
I should but lose my self, and craze my brain, 
Striving to give this glory of the main 
A full description, though the Muses nine 
Should quaff to me in rich Mendaeum wine. 
Then O you marine gods, who with amaze, 
On this stupendous work (emergent) gaze. 
Take charge of her, as being a choice gem, 
That much outvalue's Neptune's diadem. 

THOMAS HEYWOOD (1629?) 



THE FAMOUS FIGHT AT MALAGO 

OR THE ENGLISHMEN'S VICTORY OVER THE SPANIARDS 

COME all you brave sailors 

That sails on the main, 
I'll tell you of a fight 

That was lately in Spain ; 
And of five sail of frigates 

Bound to Malago, 
For to fight the proud Spaniards, 

Our orders was so. 

There was the Henri/ and Ruby 

And the Antelope also, 
The Greyhound and the Bryan 

For fireships must go ; 
But so bravely we weighed, 

And played our parts 
That we made the proud Spaniards 

To quake in their hearts. 



THE FAMOUS 1 Kill 1 AT MALAGO 97 

Then we came to an anchor 

Sonitfh to the Mould. 

,lish 

Do grow very bole 
Hut we came to an aiu-hor 

So near to the town, 
That some of th< ties 

W t - soon battered down. 

They hung out their flag of truce, 

For to know 
And they sent out ti. oat 

To know what we mea 
Hut our Captain he answered 

Them bravely, it was so, 
" For to burn all your shipping 

Before we do go." 

" For to burn all our shipping 

-t us excuse, 
ive sail of frigates 
ill make us to muse ; " 
But we burnt all their shipping 

And their gallies also, 
And we 1 : 

Full many a widow. 

" Come then," says our Captain, 

" Let's fire at th 
And down came their bell 

Which grieved them much ; 
And down came the steeple, 

**> high, 
\\hu-h mailr thr proud Spaniards 

To th- nunnery fly. 

So great a contusion 
is made in the tov 

That thrir 1.. ings 

Came t 



9 8 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Their wives and their children 
For help they did cry. 

But none could relieve them 
Though danger was nigh. 

The flames and the smoke, 

So increased their woe, 
That they knew not whither 

To run nor to go ; 
Some to shun the fire 

Leapt into the flood, 
And there they did perish 

In water and mud. 

Our guns we kept firing, 

Still shooting amain, 
Whilst many a proud Spaniard 

Was on the place slain ; 
The rest being amazed 

For succour did cry, 
But all was in vain, 

They had nowhere to fly. 

At length, being forced, 

They thought it most fit, 
Unto the brave English men 

For to submit ; 
And so a conclusion 

At last we did make, 
Upon such conditions 

As was fit to take. 

The Spanish Armado 

Did England no harm, 
Twas but a bravado 

To give us alarm ; 
But with our five frigates 

We did them bumbaste, 
And made them of Englishmen's 

Valour to taste, 



VICTORY BY ADMIRAL BLAKL 99 



When this noMf vu-tory 

did obtain, 
Then home we returned 

To r'.nirlnml atja.' 

When we were received 
i welcomes of joy, 
Because with five frigates 

.lid them (U- 



()N THL VICTORY niJTAINU) HV ADMIRAL 



OVER THE SPANIARDS, IN THE BAY or SANTA CRUZ IN 
r: ISLAND or TENCRIFFE, 1657 

Now does Spain's fleet her spacious wings uir 
leaves the new world, and hastens for the 

nd was fair, they slowly swum. 
Freighted with acted guil ;lt to come; 

I iey are, 

Was raised by tyranny, and raised for war. 
ry capacious galleon's womb was filled 
With what th- I M ; 

The new world's wounded entrails they had tore, 

wealth wherewith to v e more; 

Wealth which all other's a 

i them canted as much fear, as 

tli-- main themselves they saw 
That N empire, where you give the law; 

wind's and water's rage they fearful be, 
Hut much more fearful are your Hags to see. 
Day, that to those who sail upon the d< 
More wished for and more welcome is than sleep, 

dreaded to behold, lest the sun's light, 
W ,h streamers should salute their sight : 

In thirkest darkness they would choose to st 
So that such darkness might suppress their fear : 
At length it vanishes, and t'ortum- smiles, 
they behold the sweet Canary isles, 



ioo A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

One of which doubtless is by nature blessed 

Above both worlds, since 'tis above the rest. 

For lest some gloominess might stain her sky, 

Trees there the duty of the clouds supply : 

O noble trust which heaven on this isle pours, 

Fertile to be, yet never need her showers ! 

A happy people, which at once do gain 

The benefits, without the ills, of rain ! 

Both health and profit fate cannot deny, 

Where still the earth is moist, the air still dry ; 

The jarring elements no discord know, 

Fuel and rain together kindly grow ; 

And coolness there with heat does never fight, 

This only rules by day, and that by night. 

Your worth to all these isles a just right brings, 

The best of lands should have the best of kings. 

And these want nothing heaven can afford, 

Unless it be, the having you their lord ; 

But this great want will not a long one prove, 

Your conquering sword will soon that want remove ; 

For Spain had better, she'll ere long confess, 

Have broken all her swords, than this one peace : 

Casting that league off, which she held so long, 

She cast off that which only made her strong. 

Forces and art, she soon will feel, are vain, 

Peace, against you, was the sole strength of Spain ; 

By that alone those islands she secures, 

Peace makes them hers, but war will make them yours. 

There the rich grape the soil indulgent breeds, 

Which of the gods the fancied drink exceeds. 

They still do yield, such is their precious mould, 

All that is good, and are not cursed with gold ; 

With fatal gold, for still where that does grow, 

Neither the soil, nor people, quiet know ; 

Which troubles men to raise it when 'tis ore, 

And when 'tis raised does trouble them much more. 

Ah, why was thither brought that cause of war, 

Kind nature had from thence removed so far ! 

In vain does she those islands free from ill, 

If fortune can make guilty what she will, 



VICTORY BY ADMIRAL BLAKE 101 

But whilst I draw that scene, where you, ere long, 
Shall conquests act, you present are unsung. 

For Santa Cruz the glad fleet takes her way ; 
And safely there casts and'. bay. 

r so mam 

r saluted, wli 
Deluded men! Fate with y. u did t> 

'scaped the sea, to per 

Twas more for England's fame you should die there, 
- you had most of strength and least of fear. 
Teak's proud height the Spaniards all admire, 

breasts carry a pride much higher. 
Only to tin- vast hill a power is given, 
At once l>oth to inhabit earth and heaven. 
Hut tin- stupendous prospect did nut near 
Make them admire, so much as they did fear. 

met with news, which did produce 
A grief, above of grape's be 

They learned with terror, that nor summer's heat, 
r's storms, had made ;. retreat 

igainst such foes was vain, they knew, 
a did the rage of elements sub 
>n the ocean, that does horror give 
To all beside, triumph.. ive. 

h haste they therefore all their galleons moor, 
i from the neighbouring shore ; 
UTS, and sconces, all the bay along, 
They build, and act all that can make them strong. 

whilst such works they raise, 
They only labour to exalt your praise. 

h\ restless toil became at length, 
So proud and confident of their made strength, 
their boasting general heard 
\Vi,(, ;!,,',] tor that assault t feared. 

v iih he had, for now undaunted Blake, 
With winged speed, for Santa Crux does make. 



1 02 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

For your renown, the conquering fleet does ride. 
O'er seas as vast as is the Spaniard's pride. 
Whose fleet and trenches viewed, you soon did say, 
We to their strength are more obliged than they ; 
Wer't not for that, they from their fate would run, 
And a third world seek out, our arms to shun. 
Those forts, which there so high and strong appear, 
Do not so much suppress, as show their fear. 
Of speedy victory let no man doubt, 
Our worst work passed, now we have found them out. 
Behold their navy does at anchor lie, 
And they are ours, for now they cannot fly. 

This said, the whole fleet gave it their applause. 
And all assume your courage, in your cause. 
That bay they enter, which unto them owes 
The noblest wreaths which victory bestows ; 
Bold Stanier leads ; this fleet's designed by fate 
To give him laurel, as the last did plate. 

The thundering cannon now begins the fight, 
And, though it be at noon, creates a night ; 
The air was soon, after the fight begun, 
Far more enflamed by it, than by the sun. 
Never so burning was that climate known ; 
War turned the temperate, to the torrid zone. 

Fate these two fleets, between both worlds, had 

brought, 

Who fight, as if for both those worlds they sought. 
Thousands of ways, thousands of men there die, 
Some ships are sunk, some blown up in the sky. 
Nature ne'er made cedars so high aspire 
As oaks did then, urged by the active fire 
Which, by quick powder's force, so high was sent 
That it returned to its own element. 
Torn limbs some leagues into the island fly, 
Whilst others lower, in the sea, do lie ; 



VICTORY BY ADMIRAL 1U.AKK 103 

Scarce so bodies severed are so far 

death, as bodies there were by the v 

r sun ne'er gazed on such a sight, 
Two dreadful navies there at anchor fig) 

her have, or power, or will, to tly ; 
one must conquer, or there both must die. 

es yet engaged them thus. 
Necevsity ilici them, but choice did us 
A choice which did the highest worth express, 
And was attended by as high success ; 

>ur resistless ^ < re did r< 

By which we laurels reaped e'en 
So prosperous stars, though absent to the sense, 
Bless those they sl nee. 

ir cannon now tears every ship and sconce, 
And o'er two elements triumphs at < 

galleons sunk, their wealth the sea does 
The only place where it can cause no ill. 

would those treasures which both Indias have 
ried in as large, and deep a grave ! 

ipport with them would buried be, 
1 the land owe her peace unto the sea. 
Ages to come you ring arms will bless, 

y destroyed what had destroyed their peace ; 
ne war the present age may boast, 
The certain seeds of many wars are lost 

the foe's ships destroyed by sea or r 

us Blake does from the bay retire. 

His siege of Spain he then again pursues, 

1 there first brings of his success the news : 
The saddest news that e'er t uht, 

T rich fleet sunk, and ours with laurel fraugl 
Whilst faun place her trumpet blows, 

i tells the world how much to you it owes. 

AMWKW MAHVLI.I. 



104 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

THE EPITAPH ACROSTICK ON 
ROBERT BLAKE 

R EST here in Peace the sacred Dust 

O f valiant Blake, the good, the just, 

B elov'd of all on every side, 

E ngland's honour, once her pride, 

R ome's terror, Dutch annoyer, 

T ruth's defender, Spain's destroyer. 

B ring no dry eyes unto this place : 
L et not be seen in any case 
A smiling or an unsad face. 
K indie desires in every breast 
E ternally with him to rest. 

GEORGE HARRISON 
On board the Dunbar in the Downs, Aug. u, 1657. 



THE ROYAL VICTORY 

OBTAINED (WITH THE PROVIDENCE OF ALMIGHTY GOD) 
AGAINST THE DlJTCH FLEET, JUNE 2ND AND 3RD, 1665 

LET England, and Ireland, and Scotland rejoice, 

And render thanksgiving with heart and with voice. 
That surly Fanatick that now will not sing, 
Is false to the Kingdom, and Foe to the King ; 
For he that will grutch, 
Our Fortune is sutch, 

Doth deal for the Devil, as well as the Dutch ; 
For why should my nature or conscience repine, 
At taking of his life, that fain would have mine. 

So high a Victory we could not command, 
Had it not been gain'd by an Almighty hand, 
The great Lord of Battels did perfect this work, 
For God and the King, and the good Duke of York ; 



THE ROYAL VICTORY 105 

Whose courage was such 

Against the Low Dutch, 

That vapour'd and swagger'd, like Lords in a hutch ; 
But, It-t tlu- lx>ld Hollander burn, sink, or swim, 
They have honour to be beaten l>y him. 

Aire, Earth, and v seems were imployed, 

ivt t..r the Conquest which we have mj 

.;ir, or profit, or safety can spring, 
To those who do fight against God and the King ; 
The Battel was h 
Andbloudily lomrht, 
was like Haiti, and like Hail was ye SI. 
n this Ingagcment ten thousand did bleed 
( )f Fltmmmgt, who now are ye Lam Dutch indeed. 

In this cruel Conflict stout Opdam was slain, 

ic great Duke of York, and lyes sunk in ye Main, 
Twas from ye Duke's Fhgat that he had his doomc, 
And bv thf Duke's Valour he was overcome ; 
It was his good Fate, 
: ill at that Rate, 

s, are buried in Stale. 

Since Valour and Courage in one grave must lye, 
a great honour by great hands to dye. 

That gallant bold fellow, ye Son of Van Trump, 
Whose brains were beat out by the head of the Rump, 
Ingaffin: Intfs, a brave Captain of ours, 

ated to Neptune' t salt, waterie bowers: 
His Fate was grown g 
He no longer could swim, 

Hut h<> that caught Fishes, now Fishes catch him, 
They eat \\ ithout Reason or Lawes, 

Hut now they are going to pay for the Sawce. 

mock at men's miserie is not my aime, 
-r can add to an Englishman t fame, 
Hut I may rej<>\< th.it the Battel is woun, 
Because in the Victory, God's will is done ; 



1 06 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Whose Justice appears 
In such great affairs, 

Who will for Amboina plague them and their Heirs, 
For he that did comber his conscience with gilt, 
In shedding of blood, his own shall be spilt. 

In this cruel Contest (our fortune was such), 

We tooke seventeen Men-of-War from the Dutch, 

And likewise (as then the occasion requir'd 

And as God would have it) fourteen more were fir'd : 

At Amboina, when 

They Tortur'd our Men, 

They look'd not to have the same paid them agen, 
With Fire and with Water their Sinews they crack't, 
In Fire and in Water they dy'd for the Fact. 

According as our God of Battel commanded, 
The best of their Vessels were Fir'd and Stranded, 
All Ships, Men-of-War ; for what Power hath Man 
To fight with that Army, when God leads ye Van : 

They Steere and they Stem, 

But 'twas so extream, 

But men were neer dying, with killing of them ; 
They lost, when ye Muskets and Cannons so thunder'd, 
Twice so many Thousand, as we have lost hundred. 

'Twould make a brave Englishman's heart leap to see't, 
But forty Ships made an escape of their Fleet, 
Which our Men pursue with much courage and strength, 
'Tis doubtless but we shall surprize them at length : 

If God be our guide, 

And stand by our side, 

We shall be befriended with fair Wind and Tide, 
If Providence prosper us with a good gale, 
The Dutch, nor the Devil shall ever prevaile. 

Prince Rupert, like lightning flew through their Fleet, 
Like Flame mix'd with Powder, their Army did meet, 
Ten thousand slain Bodies the Ocean ore spread, 
That in few hours distance, were living and dead ; 



THE SECOND OF NOVEMBER 107 

Their Admirals all, 
Save one there did tall, 

And I)r:ith had command like a I hi< f General : 
Brave Smith in the Mary did shave out his way 
As Reapers do Wheat, or as Mowers do Hay. 

Stout LofMON and Minn there did play both their parts, 

emies* hearts, 

The bin hrnen being cut out in Slips, 

The Vessels did look more like ShamMi-- than Ships, 
God prosper th 
And send they may meet 
DC Ruitcr to make up the Conquest compleat, 
God bless all the Princes, and every thing 
That fights for ye Kingdom and prayes i ug. 



THE SECOND OF NOM'.MHl 

IT was one November the second day 

The admiral he bore away, 

Intending for his native shore. 

The wind at sou'-sou'-west did roar ; 

re was likewise a terrible sky, 
Wlm-h made the sea to run mountains high. 

The tide of ebb it was not done, 
But fiercely to the west did run ; 
Whirh put us all in terrible fear, 
Because there was not room for to veer. 

wind and weather increased sore, 
And drove ten sail of us on shore. 

Ashore went the Northumberland, 
The Harwich, and the Cumberland, 

Lion and the Warwick too ; 
But the Elizabeth had the most to rue 
She came stem on her fore-foot broke, 
And she sank the Gloucester at one stroke. 



io8 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

And now remains what is worse to tell, 
The greatest ships had the greatest knell ; 
The brave Coronation and all her men 
Was lost and drowned every one, 
Except the mate and eighteen more 
What in the long boat com'd ashore. 

And thus they lost their precious lives ; 
But the greatest loss was to their wives, 
Who, with their children left on shore, 
Their husbands' watery death deplore, 
And wept their loss with many tears 
(But grief endureth not for years). 

Now you who've a mind to go to sea, 
Pray take a useful hint from me, 
And live at home, and be content 
With what kind Providence has sent ; 
For they were punish'd for their misdeeds, 
In grumbling when they had no needs. 

Now God preserve our noble Queen, 
Likewise her Ministers serene ; 
And may they ever steer a course 
To make things better 'stead of worse, 
And England's flag triumphant fly, 
The dread of every enemy. 



ADMIRAL BENBOW 

OH, we sail'd to Virginia, and thence to Fyal, 
Where we water'd our Shipping, and so then weigh'd all ; 
Full in view on the sea, boys, seven sail we did espy, 
So we hoisted our topsails, and sail'd speedily. 

O we drew up our Squadron in a very nice line, 
And we fought them courageously for four hours' time ; 
But the day being spent, and the night coming on, 
We let them alone till the darkness was gone. 



THE DKATH or ADMIRAL HKNBOW 109 

The very next morning the engagement prov'd hot, 
Ami brave Admiral Benbow received a . >t ; 

O when he was wounded, to his merry men he did say, 
" Take me up in your arms, boys, and carry me away. ' 

O the guns they did rattle, and the bullets did fly, 

le brave Admiral Benbow tor h- 

" Carry me down to the Cockpit, there is ease for my smarts, 
If my merry men should see me, 'twould sure break their 

"hearts.'" 

The very next morning, by the break of the day, 

hoisted our topsails, and so bore away ; 
We sailed for Port Royal where the people flocked much 
To see brave Admiral Benbow carried to Kingston Church. 

Come all you brave fellows wheresoever you have bet 
drink a good health to the King and the Quo- 
0od health to th< it we know, 

And a third in remembrance of brave Admiral Benbow. 



HIE DEATH OF ADMIRAL BENBOW 

(To the tune of Samtul Hall, or At I Sail**) 

COME all you sailors bold, 

Lend an ear, 
Come all you sailors bold, 

Lend an ear: 

Tis of our Admiral's fame, 
Brave Benbow called by name, 
How he fought on the main 

You shall hear. 

Brave Benbow he set sail 

to fight, 

Brave Benbow he set sail 
For to fight : 



no A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Brave Benbow he set sail, 
With a fine and pleasant gale, 
But his captains they turned tail 
In a fight. 

Says Kirkby unto Wade, 

" I will run," 
Says Kirkby unto Wade, 

" I will run : 
I value not disgrace, 
Nor the losing of my place, 
My foes I will not face 

With a gun." 

'Twas the Ruby and Noah's Ark, 

Fought the French, 
'Twas the Ruby and Noah's Ark, 

Fought the French : 
And there was ten in all, 
Poor souls they fought them all, 
They recked them not at all 

Nor their noise. 

It was our Admiral's lot, 

With a chain-shot, 
It was our Admiral's lot, 

With a chain-shot : 
Our Admiral lost his legs, 
And to his men he begs 
" Fight on, my boys," he says, 

"Tismylot." 

While the surgeon dressed his wounds, 

Thus he said, 
While the surgeon dressed his wounds, 

Thus he said, 

" Let my cradle now in haste 
On the quarter-deck be placed, 
That the Frenchmen I may face/ 

Till I'm dead." 



ADMIRAL HOSIKirS GHOST in 

<l there bold Benbow lay, 
Crying out, 
1 there bold Benbow Uy, 

:!ig out : 

" O let us tack once more, 

1 drivr tin-in to the shore, 
As our fathers did before 
Long ago." 



ADMIRAL HosiKirs (iHOST 

' ' Was a party song written by the ingenious author of Lsent'Jas, on the 
taking of Porto Bello from the Spaniards by Admiral Y< 

:iber 1739. The case of Hosier, which is here so pathetically 
represented, was briefly this: In April 1726, that commander was 
sent with a strong fleet into the Spanish West Indies, to block up the 
galleons in the ports of that country, or, sh resume to come 

out, to seize and carry them into England ; he accordingly arrived at the 



near Porto Bello, but being employed rather to overawe 
than to attack the Spaniards, with whom it was probably not our interest 
to go to war, he continued long inactive on that station, to his own 
great regret. He afterwards removed to Carthagena, and remained 
ig in those seas, till far the greater part of his men perished 
deplorably by the diseases of that unhealthy climate. This brave man, 
seeing his best officers and men thus daily swept away, his ships exposed 
to inevitable destruction, and himself made the sport of the enemy, is 
said to have died of a broken heart. Such is the account of Sn. 
compared with that of other less partial writers." Bishop Percy'* Not*. 

As near Porto Bello lying 

At midnight with streamers flying 
Our triumphant navy rode: 

sate all-glorious 
m the Spaniards' late defeat: 
And his crews, with shouts victorious, 
Drank success to England's fleet : 

i sudden shrilly sounding, 
1 1 uleous yells and shrieks were heard ; 
Then each heart with fear confounding, 
A sad troop of ghosts appear'd. 



112 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

All in dreary hammocks shrouded, 
Which for winding-sheets they wore, 

And with looks by sorrow clouded 
Frowning on that hostile shore. 

On them gleam'd the moon's wan lustre, 

When the shade of Hosier brave 
His pale bands were seen to muster, 

Rising from their watry grave, 
O'er the glimmering wave he hy'd him, 

Where the Burford l rear'd her sail, 
With three thousand ghosts beside him, 

And in groans did Vernon hail. 

Heed, oh heed our fatal story, 

I am Hosier's injur'd ghost, 
You who now have purchas'd glory 

At this place where I was lost ! 
Tho' in Porto Bello's ruin 

You now triumph free from fears, 
When you think on our undoing, 

You will mix your joy with tears. 

See these mournful spectres sweeping 

Ghastly o'er this hated wave, 
Whose wan cheeks are stain'd with weeping ; 

These were English captains brave. 
Mark those numbers pale and horrid, 

Those were once my sailors bold : 
Lo, each hangs his drooping forehead, 

While his dismal tale is told. 

I, by twenty sail attended, 

Did this Spanish town affright ; 
Nothing then its wealth defended 

But my orders riot to fight. 
Oh ! that in this rolling ocean 

I had cast them with disdain, 
And obey'd my heart's warm motion 

To have quell'd the pride of Spain ! 
1 Admiral Vernon's ship. 



ADMIRAL HOSIKirs GHOST 113 

For A-e I could fear none, 

But with twenty ships had clone 
What thou, brave and haj n, 

Hast achi<-\ d with six al. 
Then the Ba >s never 

Had our t'oiil dishonour seen, 
Nor the sea the sad receiver 

Of this gallant train had been. 

. like tli. Spain dismaying, 

And her galleons leading home, 
oondemn'd for disobeying, 
I had met a traitor's doom. 
To have fallen, my country en 

He has play'd an Kn^lish part, 
Had been better far than dying 
Of a griev'd and broken heart 

Tliy successful arms we ha 
But remember our sad st 

And let Hosier's wrongs prevail. 

..id dime to langi. 
hat thousands fell in vain, 
Wasted with disease and anguish, 
Not in glorious battle slain. 

ice with all my tra ling 

M their oozy tombs below, 
Thro' the hoary mam asc 
1 1'-re I feed my constant * 
the Bastimentos 

recall our shameful doom, 
And our plaintive cries re: 
Wander thro' the midnight gloom, 

O'er these waves for ever mourning 

' I we roam depriv'd of rest, 
> Britain's shores retun 

i neglect my just request; 
8 



ii 4 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

After this proud foe subduing, 

When your patriot friends you see, 

Think on vengeance for my ruin, 
And for England sham'd in me. 



BRAVE NEWS FROM ADMIRAL VERNON 

(1740) 

COME, loyal Britons all, rejoice, with joyful acclamation, 
And join with one united voice upon this just occasion, 
To Admiral Vernon drink a health, likewise to each brave 

fellow 
Who with that noble Admiral was, at the taking of Porto 

Bello. 

From Jamaica he did sail, with Commodore Brown to 

attend him, 
Against the Spaniards to prevail, for which we must 

commend him, 

At Porto Bello he arrived, where each brave gallant fellow 
With Admiral Vemoii bravely fought at the taking of 

Porto Bello. 

Two men-of-war of twenty guns, likewise five guarda 

costa, 
They in the harbour quickly took, to surrender they were 

forced, sir, 
And then the town he summoned straight, to surrender 

to his will, O, 
Which they refusing, he did shake the town of Porto Bello. 

He did bombard it above two days, and they again re- 
turned it, 

The bombs and mortars they did play, he vowed that he 
would burn it, 

Which, when they came to understand he was so brave a 
fellow, 

They did surrender, out of hand, the town of Porto Bello. 



BRAVT FROM ADMIRAL VERNON 1 1 5 

Then with his men he went on shore, who straight began 

to plum 
Tis as they served our ships before, and therefore 'tis no 

wonder ; 
With plt-iit v of rum and good strong wine, our men did 

soon get mellow, 
They sw - a house should stand in the town 

of Porto Bello. 

The governor to the Admiral sent, and to him made an 

offer, 
And thin v thousand pieces of eight, the houses to save 

iiil proffer ; 
The which the Admiral did accept with a right and good 

free wi! 
And therefore let the houses stand, in the town of Porto 

Bello. 

Castle he destroyed, and all the guns he seised, 
Spaniards ne'er were more annoyed, he did just what 

The Nouthsea, snow, he did release, and many an English 

fell. 
From plundering these could not be kept, in the town of 

Porto Bello. 

Besides, brave Vemon freely gave, amongst his men as 

follows. 

Wh,, themselves behave, full thirty thousand 

Tin- ir courage animate, each Tar is a rich fellow, 

And this is good encouragement, tor the taking of Porto 
Bello. 

While trumpets they did loudly sound, and colours were 

displ.-iy 

The -. ' away, while sailors were huzzaying ; 

they to Jamaica came, a u ile to tell, O, 

Of the noble actions they had dour in the taking of Porto 

Bello. 



n6 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

To our good King, now loudly sing, may Providence attend 

him. 
To Admiral Vernon, toss a glass, may Heaven aye defend 

him, 
To Commodore Brown, toss another down, and to each 

gallant fellow 
Who did so bravely play his part at the taking of Porto 

Bello. 



BOLD SAWYER 

(1758) 

COME all ye jolly sailors, with courage stout and bold, 
Come enter with bold Sawyer, he'll clothe you all in gold, 
Repair on board the old Nassau, 
We'll make the French to stand in awe, 
She's manned with British boys. 

Commodore Keppel with his good design, 
Commanded the squadron, five sail of the line, 

The Prince Edward of forty guns, 

The Firedrake and Furnace bombs, 

To take Goree, it must be done, 
By true British boys. 

The 29th of October, from Spithead we set sail, 

Kind Neptune convey 'd us with a sweet and pleasant 

gale, 

So, steering on the Barbary shore, 
Distance about ten leagues or more, 
The wind, at West, aloud did roar. 
Stand by, ye British boys. 

So, steering on the lee shore until the break of day, 
We spy'd a lofty sail on the Barbary shore to lay, 
In great distress she seem'd to be, 
Her guns all overboard threw she, 
Which prov'd the Litchfield for to be, 
With all her British 'boys. 



BOLD SAWYER 117 

The wind blowing hard we could give tin-in no relief, 
..M: on tli. u-li'd at Teneriff, 

So watering the -liips at Santa Cruz, 
Taking good \\im- tor our >hip\ use, 
We sold our cloaths good wine to boose, 
Like bnive British boys. 

hip being water'd, and plmty of good v 
\S c : :p our topsails and crost the tropic b'ne, 

The wind at West the leading gale, 
-r gallant .ship did s\vi-i 
.tdy along, she neYr will tail, 



Steady a port ! don't bring her by the lee ! 
Yonder i- the flag staff at Goree, I do see, 

We brought the < ;r sight, 

Anchored in Goree Bay that night, 

ir il <>ur ships ready to fight, 
Like brave British boys. 

y the ne\ me* Edward of forty guns, 

Was station 'd off the Island, to cover our two bombs, 

\au she led the van, 
h all her jovial fighting men, 
The drums did beat ; to quarters stand, 
Like brave British boys. 

We sail'd up to their batteries as close as we could lay, 
Our guns in. in the top i ,d |>oop aloud did play, 

Which made the French cry, " Morl> 

Diable ! what shall w< 

Here comes bold Sawyer, and all his crew, 
They're all British boys. 

Then foil Dunkirk and Torbay, 

The guns aloud d :!, xlirlU aloud did play, 

Which made the I r n, h their batteries shun, 
And from their trenches for to run, 

flag was struck, the fight was done, 
Oh, huzza, my British boys. 



n8 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Boast not of Frenchmen, nor yet of Maclome, 
Sawyer's as big a hero as ever you did hear, 
Whilst the shot around him did flee, 
In engaging twice the Isle of Goree, 
As valiant men as ever you see, 
They are all British boys. 

Here's a health to King George, our sovereign majesty, 
Likewise to Bold Sawyer, that fought the French so free, 

Our officers and all our crew, 

Are valiant men as e'er you knew, 

So here's a health to all true blue, 
My brave British boys. 



HEART OF OAK 

COME, cheer up, my lads ! 'tis to glory we steer, 
To add something more to this wonderful year : 
To honour we call you, not press you like slaves ; 
For who are so free as the sons of the waves ? 
Heart of oak are our ships, 
Heart of oak are our men, 
We always are ready : 
Steady, boys, steady ! 
We'll fight and we'll conquer again and again. 

We ne'er see our foes but we wish them to stay, 
They never see us but they wish us away ; 
If they run, why, we follow, or run them ashore ; 
For if they won't fight us we cannot do more. 
Heart of oak, etc. 

They swear they'll invade us, these terrible foes ! 
They frighten our women, our children and beaux ; 
But should their flat bottoms in darkness get o'er, 
Still Britons they'll find to receive them on shore. 
Heart of oak, etc. 



ON THE LOSS OF THF. K<>Y.\T. GEORGE 119 

Britannia triumphant, her ships sweep the sea; 

r standard is Justice her \ 1, Be free." 

Thru eherr up. my laiU ! uith one heart K t us sing, 
" Our ft statesmen, and king." 

Heart of oak, 

D\VID GARKK K 

THE LOSS OF THE KnYAL GEOR< 

TOLL for the brave ! 

The brave that are no more ! 
I sunk beneath the wave, 
Fast by tin ir native shore! 

Bight hundred of the brave, 

Whose courage well was tried, 
Had made the vessel 1. 
1 laid her on her - 

A land-breese shook the shrouds, 

And she was overset ; 
Down went the Koifal George, 
thall hercrewcomph 

To brave! 

Br.ur K- Mipenfelt is gone; 
His last sea-fight is t 

I L, port "t' glory dti 

It was not in the bat* 

No tempest gave the sho< 
She sprang no fatal leak ; 
no rock. 

i I is sword was in its sheath. 

His fingers held the | 
When Kempcnfelt went down, 
h twice four hundred men. 

he vessel up, 

Once dreaded by our foes ! 
And mingle \\\\\\ <mr cup, 
The tears that England owes. 



120 A SAILORS GARLAND 

Her timbers yet are sound, 

And she may float again, 
Full charged with England's thunder, 

And plough the distant main. 

But Kempenfelt is gone, 

His victories are o'er, 
And he and his eight hundred 

Shall plough the wave no more. 

WILLIAM COWPER 



ADMIRAL RODNEY'S TRIUMPH ON THE 
12TH OF APRIL 

TRUE Britons all of each degree, 

Rejoice around the nation, 
Full bumpers drink and merry be, 

Upon this just occasion, 
Let mirth on every brow appear, 
Rodney victorious is, we hear, 
For he has drubbed haughty Mounseer, 

Success to gallant Rodney. 

This fierce engagement did begin, 

About six in the morning, 
And held till seven in the evening, 

To yield both parties scorning, 
But when brave Rodney he came nigh, 
He made De Grasse peccavi cry, 
And forced the proud Mounseers to fly, 

Success to gallant Rodney. 

Though they had thirty-seven sail, 
They could not save their bacon, 

Their numbers nothing did avail, 
Their Admiral was taken. 



1'AKKKK THE DELEGATE 121 

Though Rodney had but thirty-four, 
He forced th ^eers to give o 

ess to gallant Hoi 

He t- the line, 

And one was sunk in bat 
Til- rs did the fight decline, 

Awed by his thunder'* r.v 

tars did ply their guns so fast 
Their leaded pills they made them taste, 
De Grasse was forced his ship at last, 
d to gallant Rodney. 

Our gallant tars they played their part, 

And like true sons of thin 
They made the hau^ n seer smart 

And forced him t.. knock un.i 
They mauled their masts, and rigging, too, 

eir small shot just like hailstones flew, 
The Mounsecrs roared out Sacre Dieu, 

And flew from gallant Rodney. 

Upon the 12th of April last 

. was Fool's Day by old style), 
He made a fool of famed De Grasse, 

Which sure will make you all si 
Brave Rodney showed them George shall rule, 

k Rodney's health in hampers full, 
Who made De Giasse an April 1 ool, 
ess to gallant Rodney. 

A NEW SONG ON PARKER THE DELEGATE 

HEAD OP THE M KERN EM 

(To the tune of the Vitar of Bray) 

I WILL not sing in Parker's praise, 

is the st<> 
Nor yet to seamen tune my lays, 

;iow their glory; 



122 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Fell Faction's head they proudly rear, 

'Gainst Country and 'gainst King, sir, 
And on their land they now do try 
Destruction for to bring, sir. 

Then Britons all, with one accord, 

Fight for your Constitution, 
And let surrounding foes behold 
We want no Revolution. 

Parker the means has brought about 

Our seamen to corrupt, sir, 
And like a daring traitor bold, 

Our trade doth interrupt, sir ; 
The ships at Sheerness rear the flag, 

The emblem of defiance, 
With sorrow strikes us to reflect 

On them we've no reliance. 

An Admiral he calls himself, 

Takes a Commander's station, 
On board the Sandwich doth insult 

And braves the English nation ; 
Gives law, dispenses life and death, 

Or punishment disgraceful, 
And by his arbitrary deeds 

Hath made himself most hateful. 

A terror to each merchant ship, 

Detains, and doth them plunder, 
And if they offer to sail by 

His guns do at them thunder ; 
Whate'er he likes he from them takes, 

And should they dare refuse, sir, 
The captain's ordered to be flogged, 

Thus doth he them ill use, sir. 

Five hundred pounds is the reward, 
The traitor to bring in, sir, 

Who thus the bloody flag hath reared 
'Gainst Country and 'gainst King, sir ; 



THE ARETHUSA 123 

lain quickly will 
To punishment be brought . 
Who like a daring 

His com .sir. 

Then Britons all, with one accord, 

..n^tituti. 

And let surrounding foes behold 
We want no Revolution. 



THE ARETHUSA 

COME, all ye jolly sailors bold, 

Whose hearts are cast in hn<>ur\ mould, 

\\lulr Knglishgl. 

Huzza for the Ardktua ! 
She is a frigate tight and brave, 
As ever stemmed the dashing wave ; 
Her men are staum h 
To their fav'rite launch, 
And when the foe shall meet our fire, 
Sooner than strike, we'll all expire 

On board of the Arcthmta, 

Twas with th< Meet she went out 

English Channel to cruise aboc 
Win nch sail, in show so Kt 

Bore down mi the Artthtua. 

WfeahMd 

The Arrthiua scorned to fly, 
a sheet, nor a ta< 

i brace did she slack ; 

Tho i hman laughed and thought it stuff, 

Hut they knew not the handful of men, how tough, 
On board of the Arcthiua. 

On deck five hundred men did dance, 
The stoutest they could find in France; 
We with two hundred did advance 
On board of the Arcthuta. 



124 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Our captain hailed the Frenchman, " Ho ! " 
The Frenchman then cried out, " Hallo ! " 

" Bear down, d'ye see, 

To our Admiral's lee ! " 

"No, no," says the Frenchman, "that can't be." 
"Then I must lug you along with me," 
Says the saucy Arethusa. 

The fight was off the Frenchman's land, 
We forced them back upon the strand, 
For we fought till not a stick could stand 

Of the gallant Arethusa. 
And now we've driven the foe ashore 
Never to fight with Britons more, 
Let each fill his glass 
To his fav'rite lass ; 

A health to the captain and officers true, 
And all that belong to the jovial crew 
On board of the Arethusa. 

PRINCE HOARE 



A NEW SONG ON LORD NELSON'S 
VICTORY AT COPENHAGEN 

DRAW near, ye gallant seamen, while I the truth unfold, 
Of as gallant a naval victory as ever yet was told, 
The second day of April last, upon the Baltic Main, 
Parker, Nelson, and their brave tars, fresh laurels there 
did gain. 

With their thundering and roaring, rattling and 

roaring, 
Thundering and roaring bombs. 

Gallant Nelson volunteer'd himself, with twelve sail 

formed a line, 
And in the Road of Copenhagen he began his grand 

design ; 



NELSONS VICTORY AT COPENHAGEN 125 

His tars with usual courage, their valour did display, 
And destroy 'd the I ivy upon that glorious day. 

tl'tt/i their, etc. 



With strong floating batteries in van and rear we t; 

The enei t re had six ships of the line ; 

At ten that glorious morning, the fight begun, 'tis true, 

_cen set on fire, my boys, before the clock 

H' it h their, < 



this armament we had destroy'd, we anchor'd near 
the town, 
And with our bomb* were fully bent to burn t! 

I M ; 
Revenge for poor Matilda's wrongs, our seamen swore 

the-y'd have, 

But they sent a flag of truce on board, thrir -ity for to 
save. 

<h their, , 

For the loss of his eye and arm, bold Nelson does declare, 
The foes of his country, not an liem he'll spare ; 

The Danes he's made to rue the day that they ever Paul 

diil 
Eight ships he burnt, four he sunk, and took six of the 

line. 

With thrir, , 

Now drink a health to gallant Nelson, the wonder of the 

world, 
Who, in defence of his country his thunder loud has 

hurl 
And to hu hold and valiant tars, who plough the raging 

sea, 

And who never were afraid to face the daring enemy. 
With their, * 



126 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

THE BRAVE TARS OF OLD ENGLAND 

(To the tune of The Old English Roast Beef) 

LONG time of the sea had old England been Queen, 
When republican France thought to alter the scene, 
So she worked day and night to make up a marine, 

To fight the brave tars of old England, 

And to fight with the bold British tars. 

But the day they met Howe on the seas they may rue, 
For to show them the difference he very well knew, 
Twixt tri-coloured cockades and true British blue, 

Huzza, for the tars of old England, 

And huzza for the bold British tars. 

They were swept from the sea on the land high and dry, 
Till they ventured their luck in a fog once to try ; 
But a storm sent them back pleased in harbour to lie, 

Secure from the tars of old England, 

Secure from the bold British tars. 

Yet unwilling with Britain's domain to agree, 
They made up some rods of their Liberty tree ; 
And with them they lashed other folk out to sea 

To fight the brave tars of old England, 

To fight with the brave British tars. 

Spanish dons in great force of big ships they were seen, 

But Jervis and Nelson to fight them were keen, 

So they fought and they beat twenty-seven with fifteen, 

Mann'd by the brave tars of old England, 

Mann'd by the old bold British tars. 

Then the French crammed their principles down the 

Dutch throats, 

And forced the Mynheers for to alter their notes, 
And to don the red cap and become Sans Cullotes, 

And to fight the brave tars of old England, 

And to fight with the bold British tars. 



THE BRAVE TARS OF OLD ENGLAND 127 

To recover their Cape soon a squadron was found, 
They split us, ami there they got safely and sound, 
But Klph: and, 

d>!ed 1>. Id Kngland, 

They were nabbed by the bold British tars. 



Then say . your trade is all lost, 

Rig a fleet i's coast," 

But ' it minding their host, 

Without thinking of tars of old England, 

Without thinking ot' bold British tan. 

For to block up Brest harbour Lord Bridport set sail, 
And the mouth of the Texel our fleet did not fail, 
To shut up and keep the Dutch rogues in their jail ; 

Hemmed in by the tars of old RgUtM^ 

Hemnic he t>old British tan. 

Our fleet to refit it had just sailed away, 

When, the cat h.-in-: | mouse came out to play ; 

But this play it became woeful earnest that day, 

ie tan of 
Lai, he iMild 

the news ig had scarce reached our ears, 

When our anchor- fie\\ he sound of three cheers; 

the Tex uhcers, 

Away went the tan ot .m<I, 

Away went the bold British tars. 

With their Liberty hulks to sheer off was in vain, 

For, as we got between, they their port c-< 

So they took the resolve a hard t uaintain, 

Aga brave tars of old England, 

Against the old bold British tars. 

is twelve when the signal for action was given, 
Our rom heav< 

And by three the Dutch fleet off the water was driven, 

Smashed to pieces by 

Smashed to pieces by bold British tars. 



128 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Their hulks were a riddle, their canvas a rag, 

Ten struck with their Vice and their Admiral's flag ; 

Their friends on the shore had no reason to brag 

Of success against tars of old England, 

Of success against bold British tars. 



Then Gallia, exerting the strength of her power, 
Sent a fleet out a skulking to Africa's shore, 
To plunder and rob the Egyptian store, 
And elude the brave tars of old England, 
And to bilk all the brave British tars. 



But Nelson, that bold British Boy did set sail, 
And in their concealment the Frenchmen did nail, 
He destroyed their fine scheme, pulled the sting from 
their tail, 

And played them the tars of old England, 

To the tune of the bold British tars. 



On their ships and their batteries, so fierce did he fall, 
That he burnt, sunk, and took and destroyed them all. 
A piping hot supper of powder and ball 

They received from the tars of old England, 

Piping hot from the bold British tars. 



Britannia's high trident, still waving on high, 
Bids her tars all be true, and their foes all defy ; 
To avenge all her wrongs they will conquer or die, 

Like brave jolly tars of old England, 

The conquering brave British tars. 



Now fill up a glass, while a bumper we have, 

To Howe, Jervis, Duncan, and Nelson the Brave ; 

To the bold British tars, who now rule on the wave, 

Huzza for the bulwarks of England, 

And health to each bold British tar. 



TRAFALGAR 129 

TRAFALGAR 
1 805 



'TwA '"^' <t tliat dark morn 

On I ir Hero, rt'iuiiHTmg, died, 

That every seaman's heart was t 

:e of sorrow ai le; 

that one short day would show 
cds of eternal splendour done, 
Full twenty hostile ensigns low, 
And twenty glorious victories 



Ofjrrief, of deepest, tenderest pr 
That He, on every sea and shore, 
brave, beloved, unconquer'd Q 
uld wave his ig no more. 

Sad was the eve of that dire da 

r was the night, 

i human rage had ceased the fray, 
And elements maintain'd the fight 

All shake ist, 

The navies fear'd the tempest loud 

The gale, that shook the groaning mast 
The wave, that climb'd the tatter'd shroud. 

By passing gleams of sullen light, 

worn and weary seamen view'd 
The hard-earn'd prises of the ti 

ng, in the midnight flood : 

And oft, as drowning screams they heard, 
And oft, as sank the ships around. 

Some British vessel lost they fen 

And mourn d some British brethren drown'd. 



130 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

And oft they cried (as memory roll'd 
On Him, so late their hope and guide, 

But now a bloody corse and cold), 
" Was it for this that NELSON died ? " 



For three short days, and three long nights, 
They wrestled with the tempest's force ; 

And sank the trophies of their fights, 
And thought upon that bloody corse ! 



But when the fairer morn arose 

Bright o'er the yet-tumultuous main, 

They saw no wreck but that of foes, 
No ruin but of France and Spain : 



And victors now of winds and seas, 
Beheld the British vessels brave, 

Breasting the ocean at their ease, 
Like sea-birds on their native wave : 



And now they cried (because they found 
Old England's fleet in all its pride, 

While Spam's and France's hopes were drown'd, 
" It was for this that NELSON died ! " 



He died, with many an hundred bold 
And honest hearts as ever beat ! 

But where's the British heart so cold 
That would not die in such a feat ? 



Yes ! by their memories ! by all 

The honours which their tomb surround ! 
Theirs was the noblest, happiest fall 

Which ever mortal courage crown'd. 



THK HATTI LGAR 131 

Then bear them to their glorious grave 
With no weak tears, no woman's sighs ; 

Theirs was the deathbed of the brave, 
And manly be their obseqi; 



rom on high, 
down the flags of \u-tory lower :- 

the sky, 
Let all your concju'ring cannon roar; 



That every kindling soul may learn 
I low to resign its patriot breath ; 
1 from a grateful country, earn 

The triumphs of ;i trophied dt 



I UK BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR 

ARISE, ye Sons of Britain, m chorus join .md 
Great and joyful news is come unto our Itoyal 
' gage-men t we have had by sea 
i France and Spain, our enemy, 
we've gained a glorious victory 
Again, my brave boys. 



( >n the twenty-first of October, at the rising of the sun 
We form d thr line for action, every man to his p 

Brave Nelson to his men did say, 

" The Lord will prosper us this day, 

( live them a broadside, fire away, 
My true British boys." 



1 32 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Broadside after broadside, our cannon balls did fly, 
The small shot, like hailstones, upon the deck did lie. 
Their masts and rigging we shot away, 
Besides some thousands on that day 
Were killed and wounded in the fray 
On both sides, brave boys. 



Lord reward brave Nelson, and protect his soul, 
Nineteen sail the combin'd fleets lost in the whole ; 
The Achille blew up amidst them all, 
Which made the French for mercy call ; 
Nelson was slain by a musket-ball, 
Mourn, Britons, Mourn. 



Each brave commander in tears did shake his head, 
Their grief was no relief when Nelson he was dead ; 
It was by a fatal musket-ball, 
Which caus'd our Hero for to fall, 
He cried, " Fight on, God bless you all, 
My brave British Tars." 



Huzza, my valiant Seamen, huzza, we gain'd the day, 
But lost a brave commander, bleeding on the lay ; 
With joy we'd gain'd the victory, 
Before his death, he did plainly see, 
" I die in peace, bless God," said he, 
"The victory is won." 



I hope this glorious victory will bring a speedy peace, 
That all trade in England may flourish and increase, 
And our ships from port to port go free 
As before, let us with them agree, 
May this turn the heart of our Enemy. 
Huzza, my brave boys. 



VICTORIA 133 

VICTORIA 
(JUNE 22ND, 1893) 

" There was absolutely no panic, no shouting, no rushing aimlessly 
about. The officers went quietly to their stations. Everything was 
prepared, and the men were all in their positions. ... I can further 
testify to the men below in the engine-rooms. ... In all the details 
of this terrible accident one spot especially stands out, and that is the 
heroic conduct of those who to the end remained below, stolidly yet 
boldly, at their place of duty." Captain BottrkSs Statement. 



' \Vh.it N this that comes 
Borne on thy rolling drums 
At sunrise from the far 

Svn.in Uirders * 
Sped from the flags that 
Half-mast at Tripoli, 
Where float the ships of war, 

Thy Virgin warden? 



tarries she who should 
Captain that sisterhood, 
Named with thy name, and own 

Offspring of 

Deep, eigh i us deep, 

She, with her crew asleep, 
Recks not the signal flowjt , 

Vain, valedictory. 



Not in thy day of wrath 
LordGodofSabaoth. 
i |K>n rock or sand 
Hemmed with thy breath r 

But leading tranquilly. 
Upon a tranquil sea, 

at a sister > I 
Took she her death-wound. 



134 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Launched on the fatal curve, 
Too late to stay or swerve, 
Starkly the Camperdown 

Bounded, descended, 
Struck saw, and backward reeled, 
As he who on the field 
By Oxus smote his own 

Sohrab, the splendid. 



But She, the stricken hull, 
The doomed, the beautiful, 
Proudly to fate abased 

Her brow Titanic. 
Praise now her multitude 
Who, nursed in fortitude, 
Fell in on deck and faced 

Death without panic. 



Heaven, that to admirals, 
Assigns their funerals, 
To some the battle's ridge 

Full-starred, to die on 
Took not the spirit proud 
From him she less allowed. 
Calm, cool, upon the bridge, 

Sank the brave Tryon ! 



Now for the seamen whom 
Thy not degenerate womb 
Gave thus to die for thee, 

England, be tearless : 
Rise, and with front serene 
Answer, thou Spartan queen. 
" Still God is good to me : 

My sons are fearless." 



VICTORIA 135 

Back to the flags that fly 
Half-mast at Trip. 
Back on tin- stilU-n drum 

Mourning / 

Loud, ay, and jubilant, 
Hurl thiiu* iinj>erial chant 
" In morie talium 

Stai mains gloria 

.' ii. i nt-( 



POEMS OF SAILORS AND OF 
LIFE AT SEA 

THE SHIPMAN 

A SCHIPMAN was ther, wonying fer by weste : 

For ought I woot, he was of Dertemouthe. 

He rood upon a rouncy as he couthe, 

In a gowne of faldying to the kne. 

A dagger hanging on a laas hadde he 

Aboute his nekke under his arm adoun. 

The hoote somer had maad his hew al broun ; 

And certainly he was a good felawe. 

Ful many a draught of wyn had he drawe 

From Burdeux-ward, while that the chapman 

sleep. 

Of nyce conscience took he no keep. 
If that he foughte, and hadde the heigher hand, 
By water he sente hem hoom to every land. 
But of his craft to reckon well the tydes, 
His stremes, and his dangers him besides, 
His herbergh, and his mone, his lodemenage, 
Ther was non such from Hulle to Cartage. 
Hardy he was, and wys to undertake ; 
With many a tempest hadde his berd ben shake. 
He knew wel al the havenes, as thei were, 
From Scotland to the Cape of Fynestere, 
And every cryk in Bretayne and in Spayne ; 
His barge y-clepud was the Magdelayne. 

GEOFFREY CHAUCER 

136 



SAILING or Tin: PILGRIMS 137 

THE SAILING OF THE PILGRIMS FROM 
-\\D\\ICII TOWARDS BT, .IAMKS OF 

IMF08TELLA 

A POEM Of THE EARLY 1 Mil CENTURY 

MEN may leve all gamys 
That saylcn to Sent Jamys ; 
For many a man hit grainy* ; l 
i they begyn to sayle. 

For when they have take the see, 

he, or at Wynchylsee, 
At Bristow, or where that hyt bee, 
1 lu-yr herts begyn to fay! 

Anone the mastyr commauiuleth fart 
To hys shyp-men in all the hast, 
To dressc hem sone about the mast, 
Theyr takelyng to make. 



bowtl hl then they cry, 
hat, hoist i mate thow stondest to ny, 2 
I'liy felow may nat hale the by ;" 
Thus they begyn to crake. 

A boy or tweyne anone up-sty 
An warte the sayle-yerde lyen ; 

how ! ti he remenaunte cr\ 

And pull with all tlu \r myght. 

" Bestowe the boote, 4 bote-swayne, anon, 
That our pylgryms may pley there- > 
I som ar lyke to cowgh and grone, 
Or lnt I'M; full mydnyght" 

1 Gramys, troubles. 

1 A>, too near, too close, so that the next man cannot haul. 

j/Ya, O, tally on, take bold and haul. 
4 Boote, ship's boat. 



138 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

" Hale the bowelyne ! now, vere the shete ! 
Cooke, make redy anoone our mete, 
Our pylgryms have no lust to etc, 
I pray God yeve him rest." 



" Go to the helm ! what, howe ! no nere ? l 
Steward, felow ! a pot of bere ! " 
(t Ye shall have, sir, with good chere, 
Anone all of the best. 



" Y howe ! trussa ! 2 hale in the brayles ! 
Thow halest nat, be God, thow fayles, 
O se how well owre good shyp sayles ! " 
And thus they say among. 

" Hale in the Wartake ! " 3 " Hit shall be done." 
" Steward ! cover the boorde anone. 
And set bred and salt thereone, 
And tarry nat to long." 

Then cometh oone and seyth, " Be mery ; 
Ye shall have a s tonne or a pery." 4 
" Hold thow thy pese ! thow canst no whery, 
Thow medlyst wondyr sore." 

Thys menewhyle the pylgryms ly, 
And have theyr bowlys fast them by, 
And cry afthyr hote malvesy, 

" Thow helpe for to restore." 

And som wold have a saltyd tost, 
For they myght ete neyther sode ne rost 
A man myght sone pay for theyr cost, 
As for oo day or twayne. 

1 No nere, steer no nearer the wind. 

2 Trussa, a call or hauling shout. " O truss her up." 

3 A warp. 4 A pery , a danger. 



SIR PATRICK SPENS 139 

Som layde theyr bookys on theyr kne, 

And rad so long they myght nat se ; 

"Alias! imiu- lu-de woll cleve on thrv ! 

Thus ^i-yth ain.tluT certayne. 



Then commeth oure owner lyke a lorde, 
And speketh many a myall worde, 
And dresseth bym to i horde 

To see all thyng be v 

Anone he calleth a cmrpentere, 
And biddyth hym bryng with hym hys gere, 
To make the cabans here and there, 
Withmany afebyl cell. 

A sak of strawe weir there r}'ght good 
^om must lyg tlu-tn in tlu-yr hood, 
I had as lefe be in the wood, 
'limit mete ordrynk. 

For when that we shall go to bedde, 
The pumpe was nygh our bedde hede, 
A man were as good to be dede, 
As smell thereof the stynk > 



SIR PATRICK SPENS 

THE King sits in DunfVnnlinc town, 

iking the blude-red wine : 
" O whaur will I get a skeely skipper 
To sail this new ship o* mine ? 

O up and spake an eldern knight, 

Sat at the King's right knee : 
" Sir Patrick Spens is the best sailor 

That ever sailed the sea." 

1 The water which leaks into a tight wooden ship generally rots in 
the bilges. The smell of this rotten water is abominable, but the 
of the smell indicates that the leak is inconsiderable. 



140 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Our King has written a braid letter 

And sealed it wi' his hand, 
And sent it to Sir Patrick Spens, 

Was walking on the strand. 

" To Noroway, to Noroway, 

To Noroway o'er the faem ; 
The King's daughter to Noroway, 

'Tis thou maun bring her hame." 

The first word that Sir Patrick read, 

Sae loud, loud lauched he ; 
The neist word that Sir Patrick read, 

The tear blinded his ee. 

" O wha is this has done this deed, 

And tauld the King of me, 
To send us out at this time o' year 

To sail upon the sea ? 

" Be it wind, be it weet, be it hail, be it sleet, 

Our ship must sail the faem ; 
The King's daughter to Noroway, 

'Tis we must bring her hame." 

They hoysed their sails on Monday morn 

Wi' a' the speed they may ; 
They hae landed in Noroway 

Upon a Wodensday. 

They hadna been a week, a week, 

In Noroway, but twae, 
When that the lords o' Noroway 

Began aloud to say : 

" Ye Scottishmen spend a' our King's goud 

And a' our Queenis fee." 
" Ye lie, ye lie, ye liars loud, 

Fu' loud I hear ye lie ! 



SIR PATRICK SP! 141 

" For I brought as mickle white monie 

As gaiie my men and 
And I brought a half-fou o* gude red goud 

( )ut o'er the sea wi* me. 

" Mak' ready, mak' ready, my merry men a' ! 

( )ur gude ship sails the m< 
" Now, ever a lake, my master dear, 

I fear a deadly storm. 

" I saw the new moon late yestreen 

lie auld moon in her arm ; 
if we gang to sea, mas- 
I fear we'll come to harm." 



y hadna sailed a league, a league, 
A league but barely three, 

Wlu-n tlu lnt grew dark, and the wind blew loud, 
And gurly grew the sea. 

where will I get a gude sailor 

ik' mv helm in hand, 
Till I - u- up to the tall topmast 

" O here am I, a sailor gude, 
To tak' the helm 

. ou gae up to the tall topmast ; 
But I fear you'll ne'er spy land." 

He hadna gane a step, a step, 

A step but barely ane, 
When a bolt flew out o' our goodly ship, 

And the salt sea it came in. 

"Gae fetch a web o' the silken Haiti., 

llT (>' tllf t\\ 

And wap them into nr Chip's - 
And letna the sea com 



142 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

They fetched a web o' the silken claith, 

Anither o' the twine, 
And they wapped them round that gude ship's side, 

But still the sea cam' in. 

O laith, laith were our gude Scots lords 

To weet their milk-white hands ; 
But lang ere a' the play was ower 

They wat their gowden bands. 

O laith, laith were our gude Scots lords 

To weet their cork-heeled shoon ; 
But lang ere a' the play was played 

They wat their hats aboon. 

O lang, lang may the ladies sit 

Wi' their fans intill their hand, 
Before they see Sir Patrick Spens 

Come sailing to the strand ! 

And lang, lang may the maidens sit 

Wi' their goud kaims in their hair, 
A' waiting for their ain dear loves ! 

For them they'll see nae mair. 

Hauf ower, hauf ower to Aberdour, 

It's fifty fathoms deep, 
And there lies gude Sir Patrick Spens 

Wi' the Scots lords at his feet. 



FROM THE TEMPEST 

ACT I. 

SCENE I. On a Ship at Sea. A tempestuous noise of 
Thunder and Lightning heard. 

Enter a Ship-Master and a Boatswain. 
Master. Boatswain ! 
Boats. Here, master : what cheer ? 

Mast. Good, speak to the mariners : fall to 't yarely, or 
we run ourselves aground : bestir, bestir. [Exit. 



FROM TUt: TEMPEST 143 

Enter Mariners. 

Boats. Heigh, my hearts; rhrn-ly. eh. -erl\ , my heart-; 

re. Take in tin- the ma* 

whittle. Blow till tlum bur>t thy wind, if room enough! 

Enter ALONSO, SCBASTI >NIO, FERDINAND, 

GONZALO, and others. 

Alan. Good boatswain, have care. Where's the master ? 
Play the men. 

Boats. I pray now, keep below. 
Ant. Where is the master, boatswa 

its. Do you not hear him ? You mar our labour. 

i do assist the storm. 
a. Nay, good, be patient 

Boats. When the sea is. Hence! What care these 
roarers for the name of king ? To cabin : silence ! trouble 

Go*. Good, yet remember whom thou hast aboard. 

that I more love than myself. You are a 
counsellor : if you can command these elements to silence, 
and work the peace of the present, we will not hand a 
rope more ; use your a u cannot, give thanks 

d so long, and make yourself ready 
cabin mischance of the I so hap. Che 

hearts ! Out of our way, I say. 

n. I have great comfort from this fellow : metninks 
he hath no drowning mark upon him; his complex! 
perfect gallows. Stand fast, good Fate, to his han^r 
make the rope of his destiny our cable, for our own < i 
little advantage : if he be not bom to be hanged, our case 
is miserable. | Exeunt. 

Re-enter Boatswain. 

its. Down with the topmast : yare ; lower, lower. 

Hrini; her to try with main-course. [A cry within. \ A 
plague upon hey are louder than the 

weather, or our office. 



144 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Re-enter SEBASTIAN, ANTONIO, and GONZALO. 

Yet again ? what do you here ? Shall we give o'er, and 
drown ? Have you a mind to sink ? 

Seb. A pox o' your throat, you bawling, blasphemous, 
incharitable dog ! 

Boats. Work you, then. 

Ant. Hang, cur, hang, you whoreson, insolent noise- 
maker, we are less afraid to be drowned than thou art. 

Gon. I'll warrant him for drowning, though the ship 
were no stronger than a nutshell, and as leaky as an un- 
stanched wench. 

Boats. Lay her a-hold, a-hold ! Set her two courses ; off 
to sea again ; lay her off. 

Enter Mariners, wet. 

Mar. All lost ! to prayers, to prayers ! all lost ! 

[Exeunt. 

Boats. What, must our mouths be cold ? 

Gon. The king and prince at prayers ; let's assist them, 
For our case is as theirs. 

Seb. I am out of patience. 

Ant. We are merely cheated of our lives by drunkards. 
This wide-chopped rascal, 'would, thou might'st lie 

drowning, 
The washing of ten tides ! 

Gon. He'll be hanged yet, 

Though every drop of water swear against it, 
And gape at wid'st to glut him. 

[A confused noise within.] Mercy on us ! 

We split, we split ! Farewell, my wife and children ! 
Farewell, brother! We split, we split, we split ! 

Ant. Let's all sink with the king. [Exit. 

Seb. Let's take leave of him. [Exit. 

Gon. Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for 
an acre of barren ground ; long heath, brown furze, any- 
thing. The wills above be done, but I would fain die a 
dry death. [Exit. 

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 



A BALLAD OF SEA FAKDINGERS 145 



HIE SAYLOITS 



WE Seamen are the bonny boys 

That fear no storms nor rooks-a, 
Whose music is tin- Cannon's noise, 

Whose sporting is with knocks-*. 

brave to see a ship to sail 
With all her trim gear on-a, 

\s though tlu- D-\il wrrr at her tail 
She with the wind will run -a. 

Come let us reck'n what ships are ours, 

The Gorgon, and the Dragon ; 
The Uon, which in fight is bold 

The Hull with bloody flag 

The Bear, the Dog, the F<> 

That stuck fast to the Rv 
They chased the Turk in a day and night 

From Scanderoon to Dover. 

A health to brave sea-soldiers all, 
Let cans a-piece go romul-a ; 

lYll-mrll let's to the battle full 
And lofty music sound-a. 

ry, 1682) 



A KALLAD OF SEA FAHDIMiERS, 
DESCRIBING EVIL FORTUNE 

WHAT pen can well report the plight 
Of those that travel on the sea ? 
{>ass the weary winter's nL 

t ormy clouds wishing for day, 
'i waves that toss them to and fro, 
Their poor estate is hard to show. 
10 



146 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

When bolstering winds begin to roar 
On cruel coasts, from haven we, 
The foggy mists so dims the shore, 
The rocks and sands we may not see, 
Nor have no room at sea to try, 
But pray to God, and yield to die. 



When shoals and sandy banks appear, 
What pilot can direct his course ? 
When foaming tides drive us so near, 
Alas ! what fortune can be worse ? 
Then anchor's hold must be our stay, 
Or else we fall into decay. 



We wander still from luff to lie, 
And find no steadfast wind to blow r 
We still remain in jeopardy, 
Each perilous point is hard to show ; 
In time we hope to find redress, 
That long have lived in heaviness. 



O pinching, weary, loathsome life, 
That travel still in far exile, 
The dangers great on seas be rife 
Whose recompense doth yield but toil. 
O Fortune, grant me my desire, 
A happy end I do require. 



When frets and storms have had their fill, 
And gentle calm the coast will clear, 
Then haughty hearts shall have their will, 
That long hast wept with mourning cheer ; 
And leave the seas with their annoy, 
At home at ease to live in joy. 

(Shane MS. 2497 fol. 47) 



SIR WALTER RALEIGH 147 

SIR \YALTKR RALEIGH SAILING IN TIIK 
LOWLANDS 

(To the Tune of Sailing in the Ltmbutds of Holland) 

Shewing how the famous Ship called the Sweet Trinity was taken 
: ilse Galley, and how it was again restored by the craft of a little 
Sea- boy, who sunk the Galley ; as the following Song will declare. 

i.is built a Ship, in the Netherlands ; 

Sir V, - has |,u,!t a Ship, in the N'etherUl.. 

Ami 

it was taken by the false Gallaly, sailing in tin 
Ix>wlands. 

there never a Seaman bold in U ; 

i Seaman bold in the Neth 
That will go take this false Gallaly, 

redeem the S**ct Trinity, sailing in the Low- 
Ian 

sjx.kc tho little Ship-b>y, in the Netherlands; 

in the Netherlands; 
" Master, what will you give me, an I take this false 

Uly, 
And release the .Vrr/ Trinity, sailing in the Lowlands 

" I'll e gold, and I'll give thee fee, in Up- 

lands ; 
I'll p -old, and I'll give thee fee, in the Nether- 



And my eldest daughter, thy wife shall be, sailing in the 
Lowlands." 

He s<t his breast, and away he did swim, in the Nether- 
lands ; 
He set his breast, and away he did swim, in the Net 

lands, 
Intil In- rame in the false Gallaly, sailing in the Lowl.-i. 



148 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

He had an Augur fit for the nonce, in the Netherlands ; 
He had an Augur fit for the nonce, in the Netherlands, 
The which will bore fifteen good holes at once, sailing in 
the Lowlands. 

Some were at Cards, and some at Dice, in the Netherlands ; 
Some were at Cards, and some at Dice, in the Netherlands, 
Until the salt water flashed in their eyes, sailing in the 
Lowlands. 

Some cut their hats, and some cut their caps, in the 

Netherlands ; 
Some cut their hats, and some cut their caps, in the 

Netherlands, 
For to stop the salt water gaps, sailing in the Lowlands. 

He set his breast, and away did swim, in the Netherlands ; 
He set his breast, and away did swim, in the Netherlands, 
Until he came to his own ship again, sailing in the Low- 
lands. 

" I have done the work I promised to do, in the Nether- 
lands ; 

I have done the work I promised to do, in the Nether- 
lands. 

I have sunk the false Gallaly, and released the Sweet 
Trinity, sailing in the Lowlands. 

" You promised me gold, and you promised me fee, in the 

Netherlands ; 
You promised me gold, and you promised me fee, in the 

Netherlands ; 
Your eldest daughter my wife she must be, sailing in the 

Lowlands." 

"You shall have gold, and you shall have fee, in the 

Netherlands ; 
You shall have gold, and you shall have fee, in the 

Netherlands ; 
But my eldest daughter your wife shall never be, sailing 

in the Lowlands." 



HIE GOrDEX VAXITEE 149 

"Then fare you well, you cozening Lord, in the Nether- 
Ian 

Then fare you well, you ro/enin- Lord, in the Nether 
lain 1 

ig you are not so good as yen: ailing in the 

Lowhui 

And thus I shall conclude my Song of the sailing in the 

Wishing all happiness to all Seamen nig, 

In their sailing in the Lowlands. 



THK (.uri.DEN VANITEE 

UK was a gallant si i gallant ship was she, 

Ik iddle du, and the Lowlands 

she was called the Gould tn I' an 
As she sailed to the Lowlands low. 

ailed a league, a league but only three, 
Ik iddle du, and the I xjwlands low ; 
U hen she came up with a French gallee, 
As she sailed to the Lowlands low. 

Out spoke the little cabin boy, out spoke he, 

In, and the Lowlands low ; 
\N h t u k that French gallee, 

As ye sail to the Lowlands low ? " 

iH)ke the Captain, out spoke he, 
1 k iddle du, and the Lowlands low ; 
" We'll give ye an estate in the North countree, 
As ye sail to the Lowlands low." 

row me up tight in a black bull's skin, 
Ik iddle du, and the Lowlands low ; 
And throw me o'er deck-board, sink I or 
As ye sail to the Lowlands 



ISO A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

So they sewed him up tight in a black bull's skin, 

Ik iddle du, and the Lowlands low ; 
And threw him over deck-board, sink he or swim, 

As they sail to the Lowlands low. 

About and about and about went he, 

Ik iddle du, and the Lowlands low ; 
Until he had swam to the French gallee, 

As she sailed to the Lowlands low. 

O some were playing cards, and some were playing dice, 

Ik iddle du, and the Lowlands low ; 
When he took out an augur, bored thirty holes at twice, 

As she sailed to the Lowlands low. 

And some they ran with cloaks, and some they ran with 
caps, 

Ik iddle du, and the Lowlands low : 
To try if they could stop the salt water drops, 

As she sailed to the Lowlands low. 

About and about and about went he, 

Ik iddle du, and the Lowlands low ; 
Until he came back to the Goulden Fanitee, 

As she sailed to the Lowlands low. 

" Now heave me o'er a rope, and sway me up aboard, 

Ik iddle du, and the Lowlands low ; 
And give me the farm land, as good as your word, 

As ye sail to the Lowlands low." 

" We'll heave you no rope, nor sway you up aboard, 

Ik iddle du, and the Lowlands low ; 
Nor give you an estate, as good as our word, 

As we sail to the Lowlands low." 

Out spoke the little cabin-boy, out spoke he, 

Ik iddle du, and the Lowlands low ; 
" I'll sink ye as I sunk the French gallee, 

As ye sail to the Lowlands low." 



THE GOLDEN VANITY 151 

They hove him o'er a rope, and they swayed him up 

aboard, 

Ik iddle du, and the Lowlands low ; 
And proved to him much better than their 

word, 
As they sailed to the Lowlands low. 



Till: (,<t/.DEN VANITY 
MODKHN \KH.-ION l 

A SHIP I have in the North countree, 

ihe name ot the Golden Vanity, 
I fear she will be taken by a Turkish galla-lee, 
At the tail* by the Lotdamdt Ion. 

Then up and says our little cabin-boy, 
\Mnt gold 1.)" them destroy ? 

It I sink In -r in the seas that she never more am. 
As we tail by the Limlandt lorn f " 

I will give you red gold, and silver good store, 
And of acres of corn-land I'll give to you a score, 
And my daughter t<> marry, it' we ever come ashore, 
,u tit* her in the Lovlandt low.' 1 

< Boy he bent his breast, and away he jumpt in. 
He swam till ho came to the Turkish ffallev-in, 
And the salt sea water was cold upon his sk 

At he swam by the Lowlandt low. 

And out he took an augur, and bored holes thrice, 
And some were playing cards, and some were playing 

dice, 

When the w.-itor Bowed in, it dazaled their eyes, 
And they tank by the Inland* lorn. 

1 There are countless other versions of this old ballad ; and perhaps 
Devon and Cornwall would furnish variations from 
the beautiful original. 



152 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The Boy he bent his breast, and he swam back again, 
And the salt sea water was cold upon his brain, 
And he cried, " O take me up, or I shall be slain, 
/ am drowning in the Lowlands low." 



"I'll not take you up, you can climb up her side, 

I will not take you up," the master replied ; 

"I will kill you, I will shoot you," the cruel master 

cried, 
(t You may sink in the Lowlands low." 

The Boy he swam round all by the starboard side, 
And they laid him on the deck, and there he soon died, 
And they sewed him up tight in a black bull's hide, 
And they hove him into the sea to go down with the 

tide, 
And sunk him in the Lowlands low. 



THE STORM 

ENGLAND, to whom we owe what we be and have, 

Sad that her sons did seek a foreign grave, 

For Fate's or Fortune's drifts none can soothsay : 

Honour and misery have one face, and way 

From out her pregnant entrails sighed a wind, 

Which at the air's middle marble room did find 

Such strong resistance, that itself it threw 

Downward again ; and so when it did view 

How in the port our fleet dear time did leese, 

Withering like prisoners, which lie but for fees, 

Mildly it kiss'd our sails, and fresh and sweet 

As to a stomach starved, whose insides meet, 

Meat comes it came ; and swole our sails, when we 

So joy'd, as Sarah her swelling joyed to see. 

But 'twas but so kind as our countrymen, 

Which bring friends one day's way, and leave them then. 



HIE STORM 153 

D mighty kind's. \\hieh dwelling far 
ANUIU! against a third to war. 

-mith anil \\e-a \\imK joined, and, as they blew, 

ke a rolling trench bet. threw. 

Sooner than you read this lino, did the gale, 
feared till felt, our sails assail ; 
And what at first was called a gust, the sane 
i 1 ah nw a storm's, anon a tempest's name. 
Jonas, I pity thee, and curse those men 

when the >tonn raged most, did wake thec then. 
Sleep is pain's easiest salve, and doth fulfil 

offices of death except to kill. 
Hut uhm I waked, I saw that I saw i 
Ay, and the sun, which should teach me, had forgot 
East, west, da\ and I could only say, 

world had lasted, now it had been < 
usands our noises were, yet we 'mongst all 
Could none by his right name, but thunder, call. 
ig was all our li^ht, and it rained more 
Than if the sun had drunk the sea before. 
Some abins lie, equally 

d that they are not dead, and yet must 

rdened souls from grave will creep 
At the last day, some forth their cabins peep, 
And trembling ask, " What news?" and do hear so, 
As jealous husbands, what they would not know, 
on the hatches, would seem there 
Vous gazing to fear away fear. 

'iey the ship's sicknesses, the mast 
Shaked with an ague, ami th< hold and waist 
With a salt dropsy clogged, and all o nigs 

Snapping, like too-too-high-stretched treble strings. 
And r tattered sails rags drop down so, 

As from one hanged in chains a year ago. 
n our ordnance, placed for our defence, 
es to break loose, and 'scape away t ice. 

Pumping hath tired our men, and what's the gain r 
Seas into seas thrown, we suck in again ; 
Hearing hath deaf 'd our sailors, and if they 

\v how to hear, there's none knows what to say. 



154 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Compared to these storms death is but a qualm, 
Hell somewhat lightsome, the Bermudas calm. 
Darkness, light's eldest brother, his birthright 
Claims o'er the world, and to heaven hath chased 

light. 

All things are one, and that one none can be, 
Since all forms uniform deformity 
Doth cover ; so that we, except God say 
Another Fiat, shall have no more day. 
So violent, yet long, these furies be. 

JOHN DONNE 



SHORTENING SAIL 

As the proud horse, with costly trappings gay, 
Exulting prances to the bloody fray ; 
Spurning the ground, he glories in his might, 
But reels tumultuous in the shock of fight ; 
E'en so, caparison'd in gaudy pride, 
The bounding vessel dances on the tide. 
Fierce and more fierce the southern demon blew, 
And more incens'd the roaring waters grew. 
The ship no longer can her topsails spread, 
And every hope of fairer skies is fled. 
Bowlines and halliards are relax'd again ; 
Clue-lines haul'd down, and sheets let fly amain ; 
Clu'd up, each topsail, and by braces squar'd ; 
The seamen climb aloft on either yard. 
They furl the sail, and pointed to the wind 
The yard, by rolling tackles 1 then confin'd. 
While o'er the ship the gallant boatswain flies, 
Like a hoarse mastiff, thro' the storm he cries : 
Prompt to direct the unskilful still appears ; 
Th' expert he praises, and the fearful cheers. 

1 The rolling tackle is an assemblage of pullies used to confine th< 
yard to the weather side of the mast, and prevent the former fron 
rubbing against the latter by the fluctuating motion of the ship. 



SHORTENING SAIL 155 

\v some to strike top-gallant yards l attend ; 
Some travellers'-' up the weather l>aek-stavs :; send : 
At eaeli mast-head the top-rop< Fl hend. 

The you .l.irs from the yards above 

Their parrels, 6 lifts/ 1 and !>r 
Then topt an end, and to the travellers tieil. 
Chared with th- they down the back-stays 

.de. 

1 lit yards secure along the booms 7 reclin'd ; 
While some the My ing cords aloft confin'd. 
Their sails teduc'd, and all the rigging clear, 
Awhile the crew relax from toils severe. 
Awhile their spirits, with fatigue oppn 
In vain expect th' alternate hour of rest : 
Hut with redoubling force the tempests blow, 
And iiills in fell Mieeessu.n : 

A dismal shade o'ercasi wnin^ sjh 

troubles grov 

season t' duty to di-seend ! 

All hands on deck, th' eventful hour attend, 
d , t he sacred lamp of day 

dipt in western douds his parting ray ; 

ick'zdng fires. in ambient haze, 

ict along the dusk a crimson blaze ; 

1 It was usual to send down the top-gallant yards on the approach of a 
storm. 

3 Travellers were slender iron rings encircling the back-stays, and 
used to facilitate the hoisting or lowering of the top-gallant yards, by 

np them to the back-stays, in their ascent or descent, so as to 
prevent them from swinging about by the agitation of the vessel. 

tays are long ropes extending from the right and left side of 
the ship to the mast heads, which they are intended to secur 
counteracting the efforts of the wind upon the sails. 

4 Top-ropes are the cor-ls by which the top-gallant yards were hoisted 
up from the deck, or lowered again in stormy weather. 

8 The parrel, which is usually a movable band of rope, is employed 
to confine the yard to its respective mast. 

are ropes extending from the head of any mast to the 
extremities of its particular yard, to support the weight of the latter ; 
to retain it in balance ; or to raise one yard-arm higher than the other, 
which is accordingly called topping. 

7 The booms in this place imply masts or yards lying on the deck in 
reserve, to supply the place of others which may be carried away. 



156 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Till deep immerg'd the languid orb declines, 

And now to cheerless night the sky resigns ! 

Sad evening's hour, how different from the past ! 

No flaming pomp, no blushing glories cast ; 

No ray of friendly light is seen around : 

The moon and stars in hopeless shade are drown'd. 

The ship no longer can her courses l bear ; 
To reef the courses is the master's care : 
The sailors summon'd aft, a daring band ! 
Attend th' unfolding brails at his command. 
But here the doubtful officers dispute, 
Till skill and judgment prejudice confute. 
Rodmond, whose genius never soar'd beyond 
The narrow rules of art his youth had conn'd, 
Still to the hostile fury of the wind 
Releas'd the sheet, and kept the tack confm'd ; 
To long tried practice obstinately warm, 
He doubts conviction, and relies on form ; 
But the sage master this advice declines ; 
With whom Arion in opinion joins. 
The watchful seaman, whose sagacious eye 
On sure experience may with truth rely, 
Who from the reigning cause foretels th' effect. 
This barbarous practice ever will reject. 
For, fluttering loose in air, the rigid sail 
Soon slits to ruins in the furious gale ! 
And he who strives the tempest to disarm, 
Will never first embrail the lee yard-arm. 
The master said ; obedient to command 
To raise the tack the ready sailors stand. 2 
Gradual it loosens, while th' involving clue, 
Swell'd by the wind, aloft unruffling flew. 
The sheet and weather-brace they now stand by ; 3 
The lee clue-garnet and the bunt-lines ply. 

1 The courses are generally understood to be the mainsail, foresail, 
and mizzen, which are the largest and lowest sails on their several masts. 

2 It has been remarked, the tack is always fastened to windward : 
accordingly as soon as it is cast loose, and the clue-garnet hauled up, 
the weather clue of the sail mounts to the yard. 

3 It is necessary to pull in the weather brace whenever the sheet is 
cast off, to preserve the sail from shaking violently. 



SHORTF.MNG SAIL 157 

Thus all prepar'd, " Let go the sheet," he cries ; 
Impetuous round the ringing whet-Is it Hies : 
Shivering at first, till, by the blast impell'd, 
High o'er the lee yard-ami the canvas swell'il ; 
By spilling-lines l < -mhr ar'd with brails confin'd, 
It lies at length unshaken by the wind. 
The fore-sail then secur'd. with equal care 
Again to reef the main-sail they repair. 

e some high mounted over-haul the 
Below the down haul-tackle * others ply. 
Jen:- and brails, a seaman each attends ; 

iast the willing yard descends. 
Wh( -i d sufficient they securely brace, 

And i;\ tit' rolling-tackle in its place. 

s 4 and their earings now prepar d. 

is, 6 they man the yard. 
Far < ies two able hands appear, 

Arion there, the hardy boatswain I. 
That in the van to front the tempest hi; 
This nuind the lee yard-arm, ill-om- ">g: 

Each earing to his station first they bend . 
The reef band ' then along the yard ext< 

1 The spilling lines, which are only used on particular occasions in 
tempestuous weather, are employed to draw together and confine the 
belly of the sail when it is inflated by the wind over the yard. 

1 The violence of the wind forces the yard so much outward from the 
mast on these ocrsskms, that it cannot be easily lowered so as to reef 
the sail, without applying a tackle to haul it down on the mast. This 
is afterwards converted into rolling tackle. 

1 Jears are the same to the mainsail, foresail, and miz*en, as the 
halliards are to all the inferior sails. 

4 Reef lines are only used to reef the mainsail and foresail. They 
are passed in spiral turns through the eyelet holes of the reef, and over 
the head of the sails between the rope band legs, till they reach the 
extremities of the reef, to which they are firmly extended, so as to lace 
the reef close up to the yard. 

* Shrouds are thick ropes stretching from the mast-heads down- 
wards to the outside of the ship, serving to support the masts. They 
are also used as a range of rope- ladders, by which the seamen ascend or 
descend to perform whatever is necessary about the sails and rigging. 

* The reef band is a long piece of canvas sewed across the sail, to 
strengthen the canvas in the place where the eye-let holes of the reef 
are formed. 



158 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The circling earings, round th' extremes entwin'd, 
By outer and by inner turns l they bind. 
From hand to hand, the reef-lines next receiv'd. 
Thro' eye-let holes and robin-legs were reev'd. 
The reef in double folds involv'd they lay ; 
Strain the firm cord, and either end belay. 

Hadst thou, Arion, held the leeward post, 
While on the yard by mountain billows tost ; 
Perhaps oblivion o'er our tragic tale 
Had then for ever drawn her dusky veil ; 
But ruling Heav'n prolong'd thy vital date, 
Severer ills to suffer and relate. 

For, while their orders those aloft attend, 
To furl the mainsail, or on deck descend, 
A sea 2 upsurging, with tremendous roll, 
To instant ruin seems to doom the whole. 
" O friends, secure your hold ! " Arion cries ; 
It comes all dreadful, stooping from the skies ! 
Uplifted on its horrid edge, she feels 
The shock, and on her side half-bury'd reels : 
The sail, half-bury'd in the whelming wave, 
A fearful warning to the seamen gave : 
While from its margin, terrible to tell, 
Three sailors with their gallant boatswain fell. 
Torn with resistless fury from their hold, 
In vain their struggling arms the yard enfold ; 
In vain to grapple flying cords they try ; 
The cords, alas ! a solid gripe deny ! 
Prone on the midnight surge, with panting breath 
They cried for aid, and long contend with death. 
High o'er their heads the rolling billows sweep, 
And down they sink in everlasting sleep. 

From WILLIAM FALCONER'S Shipwreck 

1 The outer turns of the earing serve to extend the sail along the 
yard ; and the inner turns are employed to confine its head rope close 
to its surface. 

2 A sea is the general name given by sailors to a single wave ; when 
a wave bursts over the deck, the vessel is said to have shipped a sea. 
( The notes are Falconer's. ) 



nn: CALM 159 

ran CALM 

lorm is past, and that storm's tyrannous rage 
A stupid caln : >th 'suage. 

The fable is invrrU-d, and tar in 
A block afflicts, now, than a stork before. 
Storms chafe, and soon wear out themselves or 
In calms, Heaven laughs to see us languish thus. 
As steady as I could wish my thoughts were, 

th as thy mistress* glass, or what shines there, 
ili' sea is now, and, as these isles which we 
Seek, when we can move-, our ships rooted be. 
As water did in storms, rh runs out ; 

As lead, when a fired church becomes one sj>< 
And all our beauty and our trim decays, 
Like courts removing, or like ended plays. 
The fighting-place now seamen's rags suj 
And all the tackling is a fripp< 
No use of lanthorns ; and in one place lay 
Feathers and dust, to-day and yesterday. 
Earth's hollownesses, which the world's lungs are, 
Have no more wind than th' upper vault of air. 
We can nor lost friends nor sought foes recover, 

or-like, save that we move not, ho\ 
v the calenture together draws 
Dear friends, which meet dead in great fishes maws ; 
And on the hatches, as on altars, lies 

BH and own sacrifice, 
icledo mult i ; 
re walkers in hot ovens do not die. 

t these we swim, that bath 
No more refreshing than a brimstone hat 
Hut from the sea into the ship we turn, 
Like parboil'd wretches on tin- r...iK t.. burn. 

Bajaset encaged, the shepherd's s< 
Or like slack-sinew'd Samson, his hair off, 
Languish our ships. Now as a myriad 
Of ants durst th' emperor's loved snake invade, 
crawling gal lies, sea-gulls, fimu (hips, 
t brave our pinnaces, now bed-r 



160 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Whether a rotten state, and hope of gain, 
Or to disuse me from the queasy pain 
Of being beloved and loving, or the thirst 
Of honour or fair death, out-push'd me first, 
I lose my end ; for here, as well as I, 
A desperate may live, and coward die. 
Stag, dog, and all which from or towards flies, 
Is paid with life or prey, or doing dies. 
Fate grudges us all, and doth subtly lay 
A scourge, 'gainst which we all fl^rget to pray. 
He that at sea prays for more winljl, as well 
Under the poles may beg cold, heat in hell, 
What are we then ? How little more, alas, 
Is man now, than, before he was, he was ? 
Nothing for us, we are for nothing fit ; 
Chance, or ourselves, still disproportion it. 
We have no power, no will, no sense ; I lie, 
I should not then thus feel this misery. 

JOHN DONNE 



NEPTUNE'S RAGING FURY, OR 
THE GALLANT SEAMAN'S SUFFERINGS 

You Gentlemen of England, 
That live at home at ease, 
Full little do you think upon 
The Dangers of the Seas : 
Give ear unto the Mariners, 
And they will plainly show, 
The cares and the fears 

When the stormy winds do blow. 

All you that will be Seamen, 
Must bear a valiant heart, 
For when you come upon the Seas, 
You must not think to start : 



\i:rn \r> u.\<;i\c; rruv 

e to be faint-hearted, 
"r r.iin. or snow, 
.hrink. nor to shrink, 

,< 



The bitter storms and tempests 
Poor Seamen must endure, 

li day and night with many a fight, 
We seldom rest secure : 

r sleep it is disturbed 

strange to kn 
And .ams, on the Streams, 



In clasps of roari 

\Vhii-h darkness ii 

Wr oftrn tiin! I. ^ ; ; !i t stniv 

Beyond our won 

Which o.uisrth tf rr;i t distraetionftj 

And sinks our hearts full low, 

n /, 

Ship is lost in waves, 
And every man expert 
e Sea to be their graves: 

n, up aloft she m 
And down again so )< 
Tls with the- waves. ( ) with waves, 

n /,,.., 

ii down again we fall to pn 
h all our might and t 
When refuge all doth fail 
Tis that must bear us out ; 
To God we call for sue. 
For He it is, we know, 
That must aid us and save us, 



II 



1 62 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The Lawyer and the Usurer, 
That sit in gowns of Fur, 
In closets warm, can take no harm, 
Abroad they need not stir ; 
When winter fierce, with coM doth pierce, 
And beats with hail and snow, 
We are sure to endure, 
When, etc. 

We bring home costly merchandise, 
And Jewels of great price, 
To serve our English Gallantry, 
With many a rare device : 
To please the English Gallantry 
Our pains we freely show, 
For we toyl, and we moyl 
When, etc. 

We sometimes sail to the Indies 
To fetch home Spices rare, 
Sometimes again, to France and Spain 
For wines beyond compare ; 
While gallants are carousing 
In Tavern in a row, 
Then we sweep o'er the deep, 
When, etc. 

When tempests are blown over, 
And greatest fears are past, 
Ay, weather fair, and temperate air, 
We straight lye down to rest ; 
But, when the billows tumble, 
And waves do furious grow, 
Then we rouse, up we rouse, 
When, etc. 

If enemies oppose us, 
When England is at wars, 
With any foreign Nations, 
We fear not wounds and scars ; 



Till'. DISTRESS]-]) SAILOR'S (iAKLAND 163 

Our roaring guns shall teaeh 'em 
Our Valour tor to know, 
Whilst they reel, in the K 
n hen, etc. 

ire no cowardly shrinkers, 
Englishmen true bred, 
1 play our parts with valiant hearts, 
And ne\er Hy tor dread; 

l>ly a r business nimbly, 
Where er we come or go, 
With our Mate, to the Straights, 
etc. 



Then courage, all brave Marriners, 
never be dismaid, 

we have bold adventurers, 

ill want a trade ; 
chants will imploy US, 
To t. no wealth, I know, 

Then be bold, work for gold, 
When,* 



Wh 



return in safety, 
i wages for our pains, 
Tapster and the Vintner 
Will help to share our gains ; 

1 1 call for liquor r< 
And pay before we go, 

n we'll roar on the shore, 
When the stormy winds do blow. 

MARTYN PARKER 



IIIK DISTRESSED SAILOR'S GARLAND 

WHEN first I drew the breath of life, 

Twas in the merry month 

The fourt. rnth day as I ai 

When flowers they were in their bloom ; 



1 64 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

It was in seventeen hundred and five, 
(That was the very date of the year), 
My parents did for me provide 
The best of learning I declare. 

When I grew up they asked me, 

"What trade must we prepare for thee ? " 

My answer was to them again, 

" I mean to range the roaring sea ; " 

My whimsical brain did falsely show 

The pleasures men enjoy at sea, 

But oh, the sorrow, grief, and woe, 

They suffer in extremity. 

If there be pleasure on the sea, 

'Tis when the wind and weather's fair, 

With a bowl of punch, " Here's to thee, Jack," 

"Thanks, Tom, let's drink to drown all care." 

Hardships full well we know there be, 

From which we dare not flinch, you know, 

Dark dismal nights, and lofty sea, 

Contrary winds, hail, rain, and snow. 

When we are on the roaring main, 
The wind right aft and a pleasant gale, 
We have our wish and heart's desire, 
'Tis then we spread a crowd of sail ; 
Our mainsail hauled up in the brails, 
Our foresails drive us clearly through, 
Main topsails and top-gallant sails 
We'll hoist and make a gallant show. 

Fore and fore topsail stunsails set, 
So cheerily then we drive along ; 
When this is done then down we sit, 
To a bowl of punch and a merry song : 
We drink a health unto our wives, 
The pretty girls our sweethearts, too, 
The captain and the officers, 
Our good-like ship and jovial crew. 



THK DISTRl I I) -AMOR'S GARLAND 165 

The wind won't stand, I am afraid, 
It beareth forward still, I see, 
Get the fort- iead 

And ride it d<>un with a passaree ; 
Down stm M in;: sails, alow and al< 
And lay tlinn !. ops a win 

And hoist your staysails fore and aft, 
trim your sails all to the wind. 

Oh, now she'll hardly lie rse, 

letter get our tack on board, 
Our sheets close aft and IN>W lines hauled, 
And all things handily prepar. 
We must expect to head the sea, 
1 he foaming billows break and roar, 
Like hills and death they look, you see, 
And now our pleasant sailing's o'er. 

It was "Steady, steady" ; now 'tis " Luff," 

And I> <n f til! off. " and MO near." 

is blows, the rigging squeaks, 
The sky looks dismal, I 
So in top-gallant sails, my boys, 
Haul down your topmast staysails, too, 
1 meet a tartar, I'm at 

ur three topsails now. 

Come, boys, we'll reef whilst we have time, 
topsail halliards now, 
'. i id fore top bowlines are gone, 
Let u.-.it h-r braces now; 

And spill the sails, my hearts of gold, 
And haul out your reef-tackles too, 

it will blow, I plainly see, 
So clew tlu-iii up whilst you are below. 

Three single reefs in each topsail, 

d then we'll furl t 1 agreed, 

So bear a hand, my hearts of j: 
And make haste down with a nimble speed ; 



1 66 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

And see the geers cleared fore and aft, 
The downhaul tackles hooked also, 
And all things readily prepared 
Both up aloft and here below. 

Brail up the mizzen snug, my boys, 
So, cheerily lower away the yard, 
The petrel shows herself, I vow, 
Which tells us plainly it will blow hard : 
You nimble fellow at the helm, 
Pray keep her under your command, 
A good rack full and away with her, 
" No near," my boys, " no near you can." 

A good hand stand to the main sheet, 
And see I all clear to let her fly ; 
It looks as thick as buttermilk, 
And will be with us by and by ; 
So hard-a-weather goes the helm, 
Let fly your main sheet now with speed, 
The furious squall will soon be over, 
It breaks apace you may perceive. 

So gather aft your sheet again, 

Look round, my boys, let's lose no ground, 

The sky looks dark and dismal wet, 

We'll surely lower our foreyard down. 

So forward now, my hearts of gold, 

See clear the lifts in the first place ; 

A sturdy fellow to the geers, 

Strength is required at the brace. 

The down haul tackles must be manned, 
Clew garnets, bowlines, leech-lines too, 
Loose off the sheet, let's rise the jack ; 
Come now, my boys, and raise her clew ; 
Belay the lifts, secure the yards, 
And up aloft and furl him snug, 
Coil up your ropes and then lay aft ; 
We'll all hands tipple the nut-brown jug. 



THE DISTRESSED SAILOR'S (.ARLAND 167 

our helm is lashed a-lee, 
And all i 

. at the helm, pray mind the glass, 
How she comes up, likewise tails off; 

reases stronger still, 
It blows a reef in our main 

Consent let us reef it now, 
ourage never fail. 

So to your stations, now, my boys, 

And stand by, sailors, ev< 

So, lower away the yard, 

s gone ; 
When this is done, then d..\\n we come, 

see what more we have to do. 
. II lose ..ur nu/./en now, my boys, 
II balance him and set him too. 

Now it is balanced in a tn 
Sway up the yard, haul aft the she 
No sooner set but away she flies ; 
And leave* t ..j..- m his stead. 

Our ship lies-to most dangerou 

the roaring sea, 
Whit h takes as on our broads: 
And o\cr us makes a a^.i-r,. ( rrr . 



sea does run prodigiously, 

s sake, boys, what must we do ? 
see the danger we are 
lietter sound than thus lie-to. 

let it be agreed, 
in readiness prepare all things, 
And bun* fast, 

An scud under our goose-wings. 

THE SECOND PART 

i ml a weather goes the helm : 
Ho! Will she wear, or v ..it? 

Away she flies before the wind, 
She veers apace, thanks to Fortune kind ; 



1 68 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Sway up the yard, haul aft the sheet, 
Belay the braces, make all fast ; 
Two able sailors to the helm, 
It blows a hurricane at last. 

Steady, steady is the cry, 

Pray mind your helm, and steady, starboard, 

Away she flies, meet her again, 

And stop her there, now, hard a-larboard : 

Pray, mind the motion of her head, 

For your sake, boys, don't broach her to, 

For all our lives lie at the stake, 

Our goodly ship and jovial crew. 

No sooner spoke, but to she flies, 
Alas, we drove but all in vain. 
She ships it green, and down she lies, 
As if she'd never rise again : 
And now, in all our great distress, 
We cut our mizeii mast away, 
Thinking to right her once again. 
'Tis all in vain, so down she lay. 

The gale increases stronger still, 

More grief to us it does afford ; 

To have our lives and goodly ship, 

We cut our mainmast by the board : 

The seas we shipped were wondrous high, 

They staved our boat in pieces small, 

Of all our lofty rearing masts, 

Our foremast stood, and that was all. 

THE THIRD PART. 

The wind is down, the weather's fair, 
Oh, what a blessed change is this, 
Strike open ports, let in the air, 
Oh, sound and see what leak there is. 
Oh, carpenter, come rig the pump. 
'Tis nought, we'll quickly pump her free : 
We'll dry our clothes by the galley-fire 
After their soaking in the sea. 



A (iAIJE OF WIND 169 

We are near to port, the sailors cry, 

;>irc beyond the r- 
At anchor \ery soon we'll 
Delivered from the ocean's shocks. 
With iroinl rum punch Nvr'll play our part, 
Witi 1 love to be. 

1 1 ly satisfied 
But when in their sweet company. 

o conclude, and make an end. 
It I had known as much before, 

-idd have cried, "Sweep : Chimney Sweep ! " 
And " Black your Shoes," from door to door 

I had gone upon the sea, 
Where foaming billows loud do roar; 
So all young men be warned by me, 
And always live upon the shore. 



A i OF WIND 

LOUD Boreas opened wide his m< 

And puffed the Frigate toward the south, 
puff grew more severe, 
n the clear, 
urse was fair, 
\v our Hero did not care ; 
< he waa of another mmd 

r they came to haul their *ind. 
- dog-watch from six to ei^r ' 

i deck, lie turned in straight, 
But such a screeching still did keep 
The Beams and Guns, he could not sleep, 
He yawned and turned times without number, 
i, restless, painful slum! 

!'-cks, too, was hot, 

fohn a midship birth had got; 
o'er his head there was a leak 
Which often dripped upon his cheek; 



1 70 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Then water down the hatchways gushing, 
And chests adrift athwart-ships rushing, 
And clanking Pumps, and tones like thunder, 
Exclaiming " Bouse ! " or, " Stand from under ! " 
Made up a concert so composing, 
'Twas odd that John was shy of dozing ; 
In short, to shorten much our tale, 
We'll say at once, it blew a gale. 

At four o'clock, with great coat dripping, 
The Quarter-Master came down tripping, 
And by the head-clues holding on 
To stay himself, awakened John. 

Quoth John " Pray tell me, how's the weather?" 

" It blows, rains, thunders, all together ; 

You'd best heave out, Sir, I expect 
The hands will soon be called on deck ; 
The Captain's there now and the Master ; 
The squalls come faster on, and faster ! " 
Quoth John " Tho' all night long this rout 
Has kept me waking here's turn out ! " 

When down on deck his feet he set, 
Slap o'er his ankles came the wet ; 
For all the steerage was on float ; 
" Confound it all, where' s my great coat ? " 
John soon discover' d, to his cost, 
That his warm Flushing Coat was lost ; 
So, at the hazard of his neck, 
He crawled up to the Quarter-deck, 
There, by the life-lines held on fast, 
And stared astonished and aghast ; 
The foaming seas, the roaring wind, 
The hail and lightning, all combined : 
The ship that sometimes seemed to rise 
As if she'd pierce the sable skies, 
Now down the black abyss to glide, 
Now hang suspended on its side, 
Amazed him ! Every lurch she gave 
The gangways rolled beneath the wave, 



A (i ALE OF WIND 171 

And large blue seas each other chased, 
Cascading over down tin \saM. 
1 his breath 

it' he saw the t'.u-e of death ; 
AinuUt thr roar tin-re came a crash, 

I away a Top-mast, smash ! " 
All hands to elear away the wr 
in an instant turned on de 

n hammock starting out alt 
Up flew each seaman in his shirt ! 
John said it r<- illy did him good 
To see their reckless hardihood ; 
And up the straii they swarm, 

Growling and swearing at the storm 

The wreck secured, or cut away, 
She snug beneath a trysail lay. 

At eight, in spite of John's alarm, 

Breakfast he thought would do no harm, 
But sorry was he, and surprised, 
1 the Tea-kettle capsized, 
water pouring all about, 
put the swinging stove quite out : 
.lohn did cry 
ve got for Dinner a Sea-pie." 
At twelve o'clock, he hoped at last 
To make a delicate repast. 

The 1'easebags, Ridgelines on the Table, 
To save the Dishes scarce were al>lr, 
So Johnny, like his messmates, sate 

.1 one hand holding fast his plate, 
Himself beneath the Scuttle seat 

1 ! might see what he was eating ; 
And faith he thought himself quite subtle, 
To get a birth so near the scuttle. 

Down came the saucepan John, we ween, 
As any Tiger-cat was keen ; 



172 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

But, oh ! his term of joy was soon up, 
For scarcely had he ta'en his spoon up, 
When, lo ! a sea with vengeful stroke 
The scuttle glass to shivers broke ! 
One second filled the cabin brimming, 
And set, like frogs, the Reefers swimming. 
They soon escaped, but John was bother' d 
So to get out, he was half smother' d, 
The Flushing coat he'd missed that morn, 
Now reappeared on torrent borne, 
From some dark nook it floated out, 
All sopped, just like a large dish-clout, 
And in the lieu of some old rug 
Or swab, 'twas used for scuttle plug ; 
In which capacity 'twas fated 
To serve until it moderated. 



Drenched, hungry, tired, John wished for close 
Of day, that he might get repose ; 
But when he did his hammock seek, 

'Twas wringing wet through, from the leak. 

Nor ceased his fag, when daylight ceased, 

The fury of the gale increased, 

Until at length, as aft she sent, 

The collar of the Forestay went ; 

To save the Masts while yet they stood, 

Dale chose immediately to scud : 

By much dexterity and care 

They safely brought the ship to wear ; 

Away ! she shot before the wind, 

Fast followed by the surge behind. 



All cold on deck all wet below 

Our hero knew not where to go ! 
And in no enviable plight 
You may believe he passed the night. 
CAPT. JACK MITFORD, R.N. 
(Adventures of Johnny Newcome in the Navy) 



THi: /;/-:.V./.M//.V'.V LAMENTATIONS 173 
THK BENJAMIN'S LAMENTATIONS 

FOR THEIR SAO LOtt AT SEA BY STORMS AND TEMPESTS 

CAI-I VER'S gone to Sea, 

I Boys, O Boys, 
With all his Compam 
Captain ' gone to Sea, 

With all his Company, 

In the brave Benjamin 

Thirty Guns thr Ship did bear, 

I Hoys. Hoys, 

They were bound fair, I. 

Thirty guns his Ship did bear, 
And a hundred men so dear, 
In the brave Benjamin 

But onus at Sea. 

f Hoys, O Boys, 

Misery, I. 

by ill Storms at Sea, 
We were drove out o' th* way, 

In the brave Benjamin, O. 

W- had more Wind than we could bear, 

I Boys, O Boys, 
Our Ship'it would not ste 

had more Wind that we could bear, 
< >ur Masts and Sails did tear 

In the poor Benjamin, 

The first harm that we had, 

I Boys, O Boys, 
It makes ray heart so sad, 1 

rirst harm we had, 
We lost our fore-mast head, 

O, the poor Benjamin 



1/4 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The Seas aloud did roar, 

I Boys, O Boys, 
We being far from shore, I. 
The Sea no favour shows 
Unto Friends or Foes, 

O, the poor Benjamin, O. 

The next harm that we spy'd, 

I Boys, O Boys, 
Then we to Heaven cry'd, I. 
Down fell our Main-mast head, 
Which struck our senses dead, 

In the poor Benjamin, O. 

Thus we with Seas were crost, 

I Boys, O Boys, 
And on the Ocean tost, I. 
Thus we with Seas were tost, 
Many a brave man was lost, 

In the poor Benjamin, O. 

The next harm that we had, 

I Boys, O Boys, 
We had cause to be sad, I. 
The next harm that we had, 
We lost four men from the yard, 

In the poor Benjamin, O. 

Disabled as I name, 

I Boys, O Boys, 
We were drove on the Main, I. 
So the next harm we had, 
We lost our Rudder's head 

In the poor Benjamin, O. 

Then we all fell to Prayer, 

I Boys, O Boys, 

The Lord our lives would spare, I. 
Then we fell to Prayer, 
And He at last did hear, 

Us in the Benjamin, O. 



Tin: LEADSMAN NC; 175 

Although we sail'd in fear, 
>ys, O Boys, 

Th,- Lord our Ship did steer, I. 

y ere so fti re, 

we had passage clear, 
Into brave Plymouth Sound . * 

ame to Plymouth Sound, 
1 Boys, O Boys, 
hearts did then resound. I. 
.1 we came to Plymouth Sound 
Our grief with joy was crown'd, 
1 he poor Benjamin, O. 

When we came all on shore, 

I lloys, O Boys, 

y Man at his door. I 

we came all on shore, 
Our grief we did deplore, 

In tin- |xx>r Benjamin, O. 

You gal la i men all, 

1 Boys, O Boys, 
Tis unto you I call, I. 
Likewise brave Seamen all, 
Lament the loss and fall, 

Of the poor Benjamin, O, 



THE LEADSMAN^S SONG 

FOR England, when with favouring gale, 
Our gallant -diip up Channel steered, 

ler easy sail, 

The ln-li l>lue western lands appeared. 
To heave the lead the seaman sprang, 
And to the pi rly sang 

" By the deep Nine." 



1 76 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

And bearing up to gain the port, 
Some well-known object kept in view, 
An abbey tower, a ruined fort, 
A beacon to the vessel true. 
While oft the lead the seaman flung, 
And to the pilot cheerly sung, 
" By the mark Seven." 

And as the much-loved shore we near, 
With transport we behold the roof 
Where dwelt a friend or partner dear, 
Of faith and love and matchless proof. 
The lead once more the seaman flung, 
And to the watchful pilot sung, 
" Quarter less Five." 

Now to her berth the ship draws nigh, 
With slackened sail she feels the tide, 
Stand clear the cable is the cry, 
The anchor's gone, we safely ride. 
The watch is set, and through the night, 
We hear the seaman with delight 
Proclaim" All's well." 



CHRISTMAS AT SEA 

THE sheets were frozen hard, and they cut the naked 

hand; 
The decks were like a slide, where a seaman scarce could 

stand ; 

The wind was a nor'-wester, blowing squally off the sea ; 
And cliffs and spouting breakers were the only things 

a-lee. 

They heard the surf a-roaring before the break of day ; 
But 'twas only with the peep of light we saw how ill we lay. 
We tumbled every hand on deck instanter, with a shout, 
And we gave her the maintops'l, and stood by to go 
about, 



CHRISTMAS AT SKA 177 

All day \ve lacked aiul Uckcd bcl\\ccn the South Head 

h ; 
All (lav \\c hauled the frozen sheets, and got no further 

h ; 

All Id as charity, in bitter jiain and dread, 

}>r very lite and nature we tacked from head to head. 



We gave the South a wider berth, for there the tide race 
roared ; 

Hut every tack we made brought the North Head close 
aboard : 

So's we saw the cliffs and houses, and the breakers run- 
ning high, 

coastguard in his garden, with his glass against 
his eye. 



frost was on l.ige roofs as white as ocean 

foam ; 

good red fires were burning bright in every 'long 
shore home ; 

lows sparkled clear, and the chimneys volleyed 

\v we sniffed the victuals as the vessel went about. 
a the church were rung with a mighty jovial 

on how (of all days in the 
year) 

our adversity was blessed Christmas morn, 
And .^e above the coastguard's was the house 



O well I saw the pleasant room, the pleasant faces there, 
My mother's silver spectacles, my father's silver I. 
And well I saw the firelight, lik." a rii>{ht of homely elves, 
Go dancing round the china, plates that stand upon the 

Ives. 

12 



i;8 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

And well I knew the talk they had. the talk that was of me, 
Of the shadow on the household and the son that went to 

sea; 

And O the wicked fool I seemed, in every kind of way, 
To be here and hauling frozen ropes on blessed Christmas 

Day. 

They lit the high sea-light, and the dark began to fall. 
" All hands to loose topgallant sails," I heard the captain 

call. 
" By the Lord, she'll never stand it," our first mate, Jackson, 

cried, 
..." It's the one way or the other, Mr. Jackson," he 

replied. 

She staggered to her bearings, but the sails were new and 

good, 
And the ship smelt up to windward, just as though she 

understood. 

As the winter's day was ending, in the entry of the night, 
We cleared the weary headland, and passed below the 

light. 

And they heaved a mighty breath, every soul on board but 

me, 

As they saw her nose again pointing handsome out to sea ; 
But all that I could think of, in the darkness and the cold, 
Was just that I was leaving home and my folks were 
growing old. 

ROBERT Louis STEVENSON 
(Ballads i) 

THE WHALE 

IT was in the year of ninety-four, in March the twentieth 

day, 

Our gallant tars their anchors weigh' d, and for sea they 
bore away, 

Brave boys, 
And for sea they bore away. 

1 Published by Messrs. Chatto & Windus. 



THE WHALE 179 

Speedicut was our captain's name, our ship was the Lyon 

bold, 
And we have gone to sea, brave boys, to face the storm 

and cold, 

To face the storm and the cold. 

When that we came to the cold country where the frost 

and the snow did lie, 

\Vh< >-t, and t uid the whale-fish so blue, 

and the < 'a never gone, 

Brave boys, 
And the daylight's never gone. 

Our boatswain went to topmast high, with his spy-glass in 

his h.-uid. 

" A whale,* whale, a whale," he did c-rv, " and she blows at 
every span, 

Hr.ive- lxys, 
She blows at every span." 

Our captain the quarter-deck, and a clever little 

man was hr, 

.nl. Ut the wind-tackle fall, and to 
laun l>oats so free, 

llravr hoys, 
And to launch your l>oats so free! " 

llu-re's harpooneers, and line coilers, and line 1 colecks also, 

re's boat-steerers and sailors brave, 

To the whale, to where she blows, to the whale, to where 
she blows, 

Brave boys, 
To the whale, to where she blows. 

We struck the whale, and away she went, casts a flourish 

with hrr tail, 

Hut. ( >h, and alas, we've lost one man, and we did not kill 
that whale 

I' rave hoys, 

And we did not kill that whale 
1 So in my original. 



I8o A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

When that the news to our captain it did come, a sorrowful 

man was he, 

For the losing of his prentice boy, and down his colours 
drew he, 

Brave boys 
And down his colours drew he. 

Now, my lads, don't be amazed for the losing of one man ; 
For fortune it will take its place, let a man do all he can, 

Brave boys, 
Let a man do all he can. 



SPANISH LADIES 

FAREWELL and adieu to you, fine Spanish ladies, 
Farewell and adieu to you, ladies of Spain ; 

For we have received orders 

For to sail to old England, 
And perhaps we shall never more see you again. 

We'll rant and we'll roar, like true British sailors, 
We'll rant and we'll roar across the salt seas ; 
Until we strike soundings 
In the Channel of old England, 
From Ushant to Scilly 'tis thirty-five leagues. 

We hove our ship to, with the wind at sou'west, boys, 
We hove our ship to, for to strike soundings clear ; 

Then we filled the main topsail 

And bore right away, boys, 
And straight up the Channel our course we did steer. 

And the first land we made, it is called the Deadman, 
Next Ram Head, off Plymouth, Start, Portland, and 
the Wight ; 

We sail-ed by Beachy, 

By Fairly and Dungeness, 
And then bore away for the South Foreland Light. 



THE GREENWICH 1'F.NSIONER 181 

the signal was made for the grand fleet to 
and 

All in the hat night for to ni 

Then stand by your stoppers, 
See clear your shank painters, 
Haul all your clew garnets, stick out tacks and sheets. 

Now let every man take off his full bumper, 
Let every man take off his full bowl ; 

For we will be jolly. 

And drown mela 
With a health to each jovial and true-hearted soul. 



Till: (i KEEN WICI I PENSIONER 



TWAS in the good ship 

I sailed the world all round, 

three yean and <> 
.e'er tout ! ish 

At length in England Ui 
I left the roaring main, 
Found all relations stranded, 
And went to sea aga 
And went to sea aga 

That time Ix.miil Itn ugal, 

u r ht fore and aft we bore, 
But when we made Cape Ortegal, 

A gale blew off the shore ; 
She lay, so did it shock her, 

A log upon the main, 
Till, saved t'roin I )avy's locker, 

\v, put to sea again, 

We put to sea again. 

Next sa. . frigate 

I got my timber toe. 

I never more shall jij it 
As once I used to d<> , 



1 82 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

My leg was shot off fairly, 
All by a ship of Spain ; 

But I could swab the galley, 
I went to sea again, 
I went to sea again. 

And still I am enabled 
To bring up in the rear, 

Although I'm quite disabled 
And lie in Greenwich tier. 

There's schooners in the river 
A riding to the chain, 

But I shall never, ever 
Put out to sea again, 
Put out to sea again. 



A COMFORTABLE SONG ON THE POOR 
SAILORS 

(1794) 

How little do the landmen know, 

What we poor sailors feel, 
When waves do mount and winds do blow, 

But we have hearts of steel : 
No danger can affright us, 

No enemy shall flout, 
We'll make the Monsieurs right us, 

So toss the can about. 

Stick close to orders, messmates, 

We'll plunder, burn, and sink, 
Then, France, have at your first-rates, 

For Britons never shrink ; 
We'll rummage all we fancy, 

We'll bring them in by scores, 
And Moll and Kate and Nancy, 

Shall roll in louis d'ors. 



POUT ADMIRAL 183 

While here at I )ra ing, 

With our noble I'mir. 

<>ur wages free, bo\ 

And thru to SIM tor more: 
In peace we'll drink and sing, boys, 

In \var we'll never fly, 
Here's a health to George the King, boys, 

And the Royal Fann 



SAILOR'S 1)1.1. K.1IT 

v are we now the wind is abaft, 

Ami tin- Boatswain he pipes, " Haul both our sheets aft/' 
" Steady," says the Master, " it blows a fresh gale, 
We'll soon reach our port, boys, 

If the \vin.l d..t: 

\ (though the ship roll, 
II save our rich li< 
By slinging our ! 



PORT ADMIRAL 

TWAS at the landing-place that's just below M 

Wyse, 
Poll lean '(I against the sentry's box, a tear in both 

eyes; 
IK-r apron tuistr inns, all for to keep tl 

warm, 

Being a v ristmas Day, and also a snowstorm. 

And Bet and Sue 
Both stood there too, 
A-shivering by her side ; 
< v both were dumb, 
And both look'd glum, 

As they wat ng ti.l.-. 



1 84 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Poll put her arms a-kimbo, 

At the admiral's house look'd she, 
To thoughts before in limbo 

She now a vent gave free. 
You have sent the ship in a gale to work, 

On a lee shore to be jamm'd, 
I'll give you a piece of my mind, old Turk, 

Port Admiral, you be d d. 

Chorus. 

We'll give you a piece of our mind, old Turk, 
Port Admiral, you be d d. 

Who ever heard in the sarvice of a frigate made to sail 
On Christmas Day, it blowing hard, with sleet, and snow, 

and hail ? 

I wish I had the fishing of your back that is so bent, 
I'd use the galley poker hot unto your heart's content. 
Here Bet and Sue 
Are with me too, 

A-shivering by my side ; 
They both are dumb, 
And both look glum, 

And watch the ebbing tide. 
Poll put her arms a-kimbo, 

At the admiral's house look'd she, 
To thoughts that were in limbo 

She now a vent gave free. 
You've got a roaring fire, I'll bet, 

In it your toes are jamm'd : 
Let's give him a piece of our mind, my Bet, 
Port Admiral, you be d d. 

Chorus. 

Let's give him a piece of our mind, my Bet, 
Port Admiral, you be d d. 

I had the flour and plums all pick'd, and suet all chopp'd 

fine, 
To mix into a pudding rich for all the mess to dine ; 



PORT ADMIRAL 185 

I pawn'd my ear-rings for the beef, it weigh'd at least a 
ne, 

v tam-y man is sent to sea, and I am left alone. 
1 Ure's Bet and Sue 
Who stand IHTO too, 

ring by i: 

They bot ;mb, 

They both look p! 

And watch the ebbing tide. 
Poll put her arms a-kimbo, 

At the admiral's house look'd she, 
To thoughts that were in limbo, 
She now a vent gave free, 
ve got a turkey, I'll be boi 

!i \vhirh you \\ill be cramm'd : 
I'll give you a bit of my mind. >!d hound, 
Port Admiral, you be d d. 

Ckonu. 

I'll give you a bit of my mind, old hound, 
1 Admiral, you be d d. 

I'm sure that in this weather they cannot cook their meat, 
To < t mas Day will be a pleasant treat ; 

But let us all go home, girls ; it's no use waiting here, 

: hope that Christmas Day to come they will have 
T cheer. 
So Bet and Sue, 

t stand here too, 
A-sl by my side: 

Don't keep so dumb, 
loot so glum, 
Aatrh tin- !! 

I ut her arms a-kii 

lu admiral's house look'd she, 
To thoughts that were in limbo 

She now a vent gave free. 
So while th--. ir raw salt junks, 

With dainties you'll be cramm'd, 



1 86 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Here's once for all my mind, old hunks, 
Port Admiral, you be d d. 

Chorus. 

So once for all our mind, old hunks, 

Port Admiral, you be d d. 

FREDERICK MARRYAT 



THE CAPTAIN STOOD ON THE CARRONADE 

THE Captain stood on the carronade " First lieutenant," 

says he, 
" Send all my merry men aft here, for they must list to 

me : 
I haven't the gift of the gab, my sons because I'm bred 

to the sea ; 
That ship there is a Frenchman, who means to fight with 

we. 

Odds blood, hammer and tongs, long as I've been to sea, 
I've fought 'gainst every odds but I've gain'd the 

victory. 

" That ship there is a Frenchman, and if we don't take 

she, 

'Tis a thousand bullets to one, that she will capture we ; 
I haven't the gift of the gab, my boys ; so each man to 

his gun ; 
If she's not mine in half an hour, I'll flog each mother's 

son. 

Odds bobs, hammer and tongs, long as I've been to sea, 
I've fought 'gainst every odds and I've gain'd the 

victory. 

We fought for twenty minutes, when the Frenchmen had 

enough ; 
"I little thought," said he, "that your men were of such 

stuff;" 



THE PRESS-GAN 7 G 187 

The captain took the Frenchman's sword, a low bow made 

to he ; 
" I haven't the gift of the gab, monsieur, but polite I wish 

l>e. 

!> bobs, hammer and tongs, long as I've been to sea, 
1 \r fought 'gainst every odds and I've gain'd the 
vie: 

Our captain sent for all of us ; " Nfy merry men," said he, 
" I haven't the gift of the gab, mv'l.uN. Imt yet I thankful 

\e done your duty handsomely, each man stood to 

If you hadn't, you as sure as day, I'd have flogg'd 

each mother's son. 

( )dds bobs, hammer and tongs, as long as I'm at sea, 
I'll fight 'gainst every odds and I'll gain the victory." 

FREDERICK MARIO 



I! SS-GANG 

HERE'S the tender coming, 
Pressing all the men ; 

dear honey, 
i it shall we do th< 
s the tender coming, 
; '.-it Sl.i.-lds r, 
's the tender coming, 
. of mm of war. 

Here's the tender coming, 
ding of my dear; 

r y 

tore, 

foreign, 
For t 

Her* ing, 

1 of red marines. 



1 88 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 



CAPTAIN BOVER 

WHERE have you been, my canny honey ? 
Where have you been, my winsome man ? 

I've been to the norrard, 

Cruizing back and forrard, 

I've been to the norrard, 
Cruizing sore and lang. 

I've been to the norrard, 

Cruizing back and forrard, 
But I dare not come ashore, 

For Bover and his gang. 



THE FLASH FRIGATE 

I SING of a frigate, a frigate of fame, 

And in the West Indies she bore a great name 

For cruel hard treatment of every degree. 

Like slaves in the gallies we ploughed the salt sea. 

At four in the morning our day's work's begun, 
" Come lash up your hammocks, boys, ev-er-y one," 
Seven turns with the lashing so equal must show, 
And all of one size through a hoop they must go. 

The next thing we do is to holystone decks, 
Mizzen-topmen from the fore-hatch their buckets must 

fetch ; 

And its " Fore and main-topmen," so loudly they bawl, 
" Come broom aft the sand with your squilgees and all." 

The decks being scrubbed, and the rigging coiled down, 
It is now, " Clean your bright work," which is found all 

around, 

Your gun-caps and aprons so neatly must shine, 
And in white frocks and trousers you must all toe a line. 



Till-: MAVO'-WAR 189 

The next thing we hear N All hands to make sail, 
Way aloft," and " lay out," and " let fall " is the hail, 

kysails, ami your moonsaUs so 
high. 
At the sound of the call they must all be let fly. 

But now. < boys, comes the best of the fun : 

" All han hi{> and reef topsails," in one. 

.is the helium goes down, 
cw down your topsails/' as the mainyard 
swings round. 

" Trice up, and lay out, and take two reefs in one," 
And all in a moment this work must be <i 
Then man your head-braces, topsail-halliards, and all, 
And it's " hoist away topsails," as you " let go and haul 

Our senior lieutenant, you all know him well, 
He comes upon deck, and he cuts a great swell. 

s "bear a hand here, boys," and mind what you're 

t," 
And at the lee gangway he serves out the cat 

There is no games aboard her, and so you will find, 

If you spit mi h-r decks, w! loath- warrant's signet!. 

So all yon bold seamen who sail the salt sea, 

Beware of this frigate wherever you be. 



Tin: MAN -<)--\\ AK 

HE that has sail'd upon the dark blue sea 

Has vi< ines, I ween, a full fair sight ; 

\\hcn the fresh breeze is fair as breeze may be, 
white sail set, the gallant frigate tight ; 

Masts, spires, and strand retiring to the right, 
glorious main expanding o'er the bow, 
convoy spread like wild swans in their flight, 

The dullest sailer wearing bravely now, 
So gaily curl the waves before each dashing prow. 



190 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

And oh, the little warlike world within ! 
The well-reeved guns, the netted canopy, 
The hoarse command, the busy humming din, 
When, at a word, the tops are manned on high : 
Hark to the Boatswain's call, the cheering cry ! 
While through the seaman's hand the tackle glides ; 
Or schoolboy Midshipman that, standing by, 
Strains his shrill pipe as good or ill betides, 
And well the docile crew that skilful urchin guides. 

White is the glassy deck, without a stain, 
Where on the watch the staid Lieutenant walks : 
Look on that part which sacred doth remain 
For the lone chieftain, who majestic stalks, 
Silent and fear'd by all not oft he talks 
With aught beneath him, if he would preserve 
That strict restraint, which broken, ever balks 
Conquest and fame : but Britons rarely swerve 
From law, however stern, which tends their strength to 
nerve. LORD BYRON 

(Childe Harold's Pilgrimage) 



JACK ROBINSON 

(To the tune of College Hornpipe) 

THE perils and dangers of the voyage past, 
And the ship to Portsmouth arrived at last ; 
The sails all furled, and the anchor cast, 
The happiest of the crew was Jack Robinson. 
For his Poll he had trinkets and gold galore, 
Besides of prize-money quite a store ; 
And along with the crew he went ashore, 
As coxwain to the boat, Jack Robinson. 

He met with a man, and said, " I say, 

Mayhap you may know one, Polly Gray ? 

She lives somewhere hereabouts : " the man said, "Nay, 

" I do not, indeed" to Jack Robinson. 



JACK ROBINSON 191 

Jack to him, " I've left my <hip, 
And to my messmates gi\ en the 
Mayhap take of a good can of flip, 

," says Jack Robinson. 

In a piiMic-huiiM- y both sat down, 

And talked of Admirals of high renown, 
And drank as much grog as came to ha If-a -crown, 
This here strange man and Jack Robinson. 

i Jack called out the reckoning to pay, 
The landlady came in, in fine array, 
\1\ eyes and limbs, why, here's Polly Gray; 
Who'd thought of meeting here?" toys Jack Robmton. 

The landlady staggered back against the wall, 
-t she said she knew him not at all ; 
me," says Jack, " why, here's a pretty squall, 
,me, don't you km* poor Jack Robinson f 

i know this handkerchief you gave to me, 
Twas three yean ago, before I went to sea ; 
Every day I look'd at it, and thought of thee, 
Ujyon my soul, I have;' toys Jack Robinson, 

Says the lady, says she, " I've changed my state," 

mean," says Jack, " that you've got 
a mate, 
know you promised me/' Says she, " I couldn't 

no tidings could 1 gain of you, Jack Robinson. 

omebodv one day came to me, and said, 
That somebody else had somewhere read, 
In some newspaper as how you was dead 
"Tve not been dead at all," says Jack Robinson. 

Ili.-n In- turned his quid and finished his glass, 
And hitched up his trousers: "Alas, alas! 
That ever I should live to be made such an ass, 
To be bilked by a woman," says Jack Robinson. 
" Hut to fret and stew about in vain, 

I'll get a ship and go to Hollan . and >; 

Nomatterwhere,toPortsmouth.ril nevercome again." 
And he rras of before they could say Jack Robinson. 

>MAS HUDSON 



192 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 



THE FIGHT 

THE look-out Seaman loudly bawled, 
And Johnny to himself recalled ! 
To th' Officer the seaman said, 
" I see a sail, Sir, right ahead ! 
She's running large on t'other tack, Sir ! 
She'll be on board us in a crack, Sir ! 
She is, too," mutter'd low the Sailor, 
" A man-of-war or I'm a Tailor ! " 

" Zounds ! " cried the other in a rout, 
" Turn up the watch to go about ! 
Young Gentlemen ! quick ! quick, Sir ! fly ! 
And tell the Captain what we spy." 
John soon returned, and took his place 
As usual by the cross-jack brace 
Round came the ship, and when about, 
The Captain bade them to hang out 
Two Lanthorns of an equal height ; 
The private signal for the night 
Which, plain 'twas, was not comprehended 
By those for whom it was intended. 
The Drummer then to Quarters beat 
The Quarter-Masters fast and neat 
Stowed all the Hammocks in the netting 

" She's bearing up, and Studd'ng Sails setting ! ' 

The Look-outs cried then growl' d " And why ! 

Why, 'cause she is an Enemy ! 

What makes her else run down to leeward ? " 

The topsail sheets and yards secured ; 

The fighting Lanthorns one by one 
Disposed by every main-deck gun ; 
The swabs, and sand in buckets ready, 
The Decks to damp and Footing steady ; 
Each hatch close down and woollen skreens 
Nailed up to save the Magazines ; 
The Surgeons in the Cockpit set 
With Knife, and Saw, and Tourniquet ; 



THE FIGHT 193 

other duties numberless 
Which we can't easily express, 
Being all arranged in or 
And duly all reported too ; 

Pronounced the Frigate fit for action ; 
Which havin-r to the Captain sti 
He with his trumpet anxious wa 

Many a night-glass with keen intent 
Upon the stranger had been In 

was a Rogue they did not doubt ; 

< was not made ot 

She i: hey could di\ 

Be single or of the Line 

Hut they njoiced when Captain Dale 
T..K1 Smart to wear and make all sail- 
is no starter, 

ir too keen to catch a Tartar ; 
And therefore guessed he would not close 
Chase Ix dawn arose, 

Mr, Bunt, 1:1 far less time 
Than we've been hammering out this rhyme, 
IS made sail too in a tr 
uking their a 

With li* V, throu -ht 

ranger*. lit, 

1 towards morn found her, by the glass, 
: irgest class ; 

was the sequel, 
;ng seemed so equal ; 
Win-ne'er the wind aj>|>eared to - 
Away, the other seemed to : 
Hut u!i< M it freshened up again, 
\ hoped their object to atta 

Just as the morning watch was done 
A firm top-gallant breeze came < 

twas no more a question called 

If they the ot :i au!< d : 

'3 



194 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Nay 'twas so plain, that now the Chase, 
To do things with a decent grace, 
Since running could no more avail, 
Haul'd close up, under easy sail. 

A Flag he hoisted at the Fore, 
And at his Peak the Tricolor : 
The Capricorn s, when up it went, 
With three hurrahs their welcome sent : 
Thought they " Jean Crappeaus mighty stout, 
He surely means to fight it out." 
Our Frigate's kites were just ta'en in, 
When he thought proper to begin. 

His Broadside made a precious row, 
As she bore down, against her bow ; 
But when she quietly had got 
Her distance, scarce a pistol shot 
Upon his weather beam, why then, 
Our Frigate talked to him again. 

Upon the Quarter-Deck stands John, 

In quality of Aid-du-Camp 
We will not tell you how he feels, 
Whether he stands on head or heels, 
Just now 'twould puzzle him to tell 
Yet not through fear we know full well, 
It is not terror, but amaze 
That makes him shake his ears and gaze 
He shakes himself to find out whether 
His carcase yet sticks all together ; 
His gaze, too, is a gaze of wonder, 
At all the havoc, smoke, and thunder ; 
Thought he " Tho' I have heard on shore 
Of Bullets' whiz, and Cannons' roar, 
So piercing, spiteful, shrill a hiss 
I ne'er supposed they had as this ! " 
Meanwhile they whistle closely past 
His nose and ears, amazing fast 



THE FIGHT 195 

D the deck In- 

lier knocked t 

And as he turns round in the smoth< 
Against him wounded reels another ; 

ne'er saw human blood before, 
And it atl'rrU-d him the more 
But soon with orders to the VVu 

in haste, 
ficers desire 

A little to depress their Fire- 
Not e'en in fancy, John had seen 

-ight as he saw then, we ween ; 
Seamen toiling 'midst the clatter ; 
i uige flowing like bilge water ; 
The Heat, the Noise, the Smoak, the Sim 11 
Of Sulphur, imu-li resembled Hell; 

1 lying shatter'd, jammed, 
Writhing and howling like the Damned ; 
The tout ensemble of the fuss, 
Reminded him <>t Tartarus. 
The third Lieutenant next he found 

o John's mouth he clapped his ear 
it he had got to say, to hear ; 

And as hr ^tooprd a \ui-krd shot 

i tenant's skull to pot, 
Whose brains dislodged thus from their case, 

w smomking hot in Johnny's face ; 
And those who witnessed the disast 
Remark'd quite drily "tight work, Master!" 
He looked about in rueful pus/ 
And mopped the plaistcr from his muzzle, 
Till Shaughnessy observed him stare, 
And guessed that he might orders bear 
Disburden'd of his missive load, 
He turned back by a clearer road ; 
< >recastle he skipped, 

! aft along the gangway tripped 
Wli.-n he regained the Quarter-Deck, 

dire had grown the strife and wreck ; 



1 96 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

For splinters flew and spars were falling 
And every other man was sprawling. 

The Enemy, it since appears, 
Had near an hundred Musqueteers 
Beside his usual crew, and these 
Poured in their small shot thick as peas. 
John missed his Captain by ill luck 
A splinter 'gainst his knee had struck 
He rested on the weather side 
Abreast the wheel, on a Gun-slide, 
Serenely viewed the hurly-burly, 
And gave his orders not in surly, 
But calm, and even cheerful tone, 
As if he felt no broken bone 
John found him, and reported what 
Had been the third Lieutenant's lot 
The Captain bade him near remain, 
Until he wanted him again ; 
But scarcely was the sentence said, 
Ere John was knocked heels over head ! 
In half a second up he jumped, 
And first one leg, then t' other stumped 
Upon the deck then stretched each arm 
To find out where he'd got the harm 
'Twas either splinters, or the wind 
Of bullet passing him behind 
Which knocked him down ; but in his fall 
His side received a Musquet ball, 
A flesh wound only but the part 
Began to bleed apace, and smart, 
And when the blood began to trickle, 
Thought John " I'm in a pretty pickle ! 
It may be mortal and if so, 
I'll have a slap before I go ! " 

With that he snatch' d in anger keen 
A musquet from a dead Marine. 
" Before now I've knocked down a Partridge ! 
And if I can but find a cartridge, 



THE FIGHT 197 

I'll pepper yonder tatterdemalions 
Here's one Have at ye ! ye rascalions ! " 
With pouch and firelock in his hand, 
He by the gangway took his stand, 
A in! might and main began to bellows 

blur fury at the Fellows; 
While Shaughnessy, who stood below, 
At every shot exclaimed, " Bravo ! " 

The French mainstay 1 t at last, 

Down staggering came the batter'd mast ! 
The Mizxen, too, to see it fall so, 
Took huff, and therefore tumbled also 
1 done, by Jasus ! "bellowed Pat, 
" Newcome, 'twas you knocked do\\ n all that ! " 

igate forged a head, and now 
Lay right athwart the Frenchman's bow, 
\\ ho after a few broadsides more, 
Was glad to give the business o'er. 

Along her bowsprit in procession 

lish marched and took possession ; 
And John ran too, with eager eyes 
Among them, to explore the Prise. 

Her ri\rn deck was sheeted <>' 
Complct i flood of gore ; 

And everj' corner shew'd remni 
Of legs, and arms, and hair. 

Masts were cru^l 

Whose blood" in all directions gushed, 

-n a man hath happed to place 

1 1 foot on one o' th' Beetle race ! 

li.N. 
(Adventure* ofjokmty NeiKome t the Navy) 



THE STORY OF JONAH. POEMS 
OF MERMAIDS AND OF THE 
SEA SPIRITS 

THE STORY OF JONAH 

JONAH rose up to flee unto Tarshish from the presence of 
the Lord, and went down to Joppa ; and he found a ship 
going to Tarshish : so he paid the fare thereof, and went 
down into it, to go with them unto Tarshish from the 
presence of the Lord. 

But the Lord sent out a great wind into the sea, and 
there was a mighty tempest in the sea, so that the ship 
was like to be broken. 

Then the mariners were afraid, and cried every man 
unto his god, and cast forth the wares that were in the 
ship into the sea to lighten it of them. But Jonah was 
gone down into the sides of the ship ; and he lay, and 
was fast asleep. 

So the shipmaster came to him, and said unto him, " What 
meanest thou, O sleeper ? Arise, call upon thy God, if 
so be that God will think upon us, that we perish not." 

And they said every one to his fellow, " Come, and let us 
cast lots, that we may know for whose cause this evil is 
upon us ; what is thine occupation ? and whence comest 
thou ? what is thy country ? and of what people art thou ? " 

And he said unto them, " I am an Hebrew ; and I fear 
the Lord, the God of Heaven, which hath made the sea 
and the dry land" 

Then were the men exceedingly afraid, and said unto 

198 



CAITAIN 



i 99 



him," Why hast thou done i 1 W the men kiu-wthat 

he fled from the pretence of the Lord, because he hail 
told them. 

Then said they unto him, " What shall we do unto thee, 
that the sea may be calm unto us ? " for the sea wrought, 
and was tempestuous. 

And he said unto them, ''Take me up, and cast me forth 
into the sea ; so shall the sea be calm unto you . tor I know 
tor my sake the great tempest u upon you." 

Nevertheless the men rowed hard to bring it to the 
land ; but they could not : for the sea wrought, and was 
tempestuous against them. 

Where! d unto the Lord, and said \\ V 

beseech Thee, O Lord, we beseech Thee, let us i 
for this man's life, and lay not upon us innocent 1>1 
< ' Ixrni, hast done as it pleased thee." 

So they took up Jonah, and cast him forth into the sea; 
and tfir sea ceased 

Thru the men feared th reedingly, and offered 

Now the Lord had prepared a great fish to swallov 
Jonah. And Jonah was in the belly of the fish three days 
and three nights. 

CAPTAIN GL1 \ 

THERE was a ship, and a ship of far 

1 off the stocks, bound to the main, 
!i a hundred and fifty brisk young m 
Was picked and chosen every < 

VMS !li-ir captain's name, 
He was a brisk and a tall young man, 
As bold a sailor as went to sea, 
And he was bound for New Barbary. 

Th- \,,ril VC d.d set sail, 

Blest with a pleasant prosperous gale ; 
bound to New Barbary, 
With all our whole ship's company. 



200 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

We had not sailed a league or two, 
Till all our whole ship's jovial crew, 
They all fell sick but sixty-three, 
As we went to New Barbary. 

One night the captain he did dream, 
There came a voice which said to him, 
ee Prepare, you and your company, 
To-morrow night you must lodge with me." 

This waked the captain in a fright, 
It being the third watch of the night, 
Then for his boatswain he did call, 
And told to him his secrets all. 

When I in England did remain, 
The Holy Sabbath I did profane, 
In drunkenness I took delight, 
Which does my trembling soul affright. 

There's one thing more I do rehearse, 
Which I shall mention in this verse, 
A squire I slew in Staffordshire, 
All for the love of a lady fair. 

" Now 'tis the ghost, I am afraid, 
That hath in me such terror bred ; 
Although the King hath pardoned me, 
He's daily in my company." 

" O, worthy captain, since 'tis so, 
No mortal of it e'er shall know ; 
So keep this secret in your breast, 
And pray to God to give you rest." 

We had not sailed a league but three, 
Till raging grew the roaring sea : 
There rose a tempest in the skies, 
Which filled our hearts with sad surmise. 



CAPTAIN GLEN 201 

mainmast sprung by break of day, 
Which made our rigging all give way, 
And did our seamen sore affright, 
1 In terrors of that fatal night 

Up then spoke our foremast man, 
As hi (iul l>\ yard stand; 

He cried, "The Lord receive my soul,' 
So to the bottom he did fall. 

The sea did wash both fore and aft, 
Till scarce one sail was left aloft ; 

v.irds were sprung, our rigging tore, 
The like you never saw before, 

The boatswain straitly did declare 
captain was a murderer. 
i so enraged the whole ship's crew, 
The captain overboard th.-y threw. 

Our treacherous captain being gone, 

d lately there was a ca 
The winds did calm, and the raging sea, 
As we went to New Barbary. 

Now, when we came to the Spanish shore, 
Oar goodly ship for to rej) 
The people all were amazed to see 
Our dismal case and misery. 

So when our ship was in repair, 

i gland then our shi{> did steer; 
\inl u hen we came to London to* 
Our dismal case we then made known. 

uany wives their husbands lost, 
i ' -y lamented t ost ; 

Which caused them to mourn b 
These tidings from New Barba 



202 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

A hundred and fifty brisk young men, 
Did to our goodly ship belong ; 
Of all our whole ship's company 
There now remained but sixty-three. 

Now, seamen all, where'er you be, 
I pray a warning take by me, 
As you love your life, still have a care 
You never sail with a murderer. 

O, never more do I intend 
For to cross o'er the raging main, 
But live in peace in my own country, 
And so I end my tragedy. 



BROWN ROBYN'S CONFESSION 

IT fell upon a Wodensday 

Brown Robyn's men went to sea, 

But they saw neither moon nor sun, 
Nor starlight wi' their ee. 

" We'll cast Kevels us among, 

See who the unhappy man may be ; " 
The Kevel fell on Brown Robyn 

The master-man was he. 

" It is iiae wonder," said Brown Robyn, 

" Altho' I dinna thrive, 
For with my mither I had twa bairns 

And with my sister five. 

" But tie me to a plank o' wood, 

And throw me in the sea ; 
And if I sink, ye may bid me sink, 

But if I swim, just let me be." 



WILLIAM GRISMOND'S DOWNFALL 203 

Tin L pl.mk of wood, 

Anil thrown him in tin- sea; 
He di.ln.-i sink, though they bade him sink : 
swimd, and they bade let him be. 

He hadna been into the sea 
Mur but barely three, 
Till by it came Our Blessed Lady 
Her dear young Son her wi'. 

Will ye gang to your men ag 

w ill ye gang wi' me ? 
Will ye gang to the high heavens, 

my dear Son and me ? " 

" I wiiina gang to my men again, 
v would be feared at me ; 

heavens, 
With thy dear Son and thec." 

"Us for nae honour ye did to me, Brown Robyn, 

Its for nae good ye did to mee ; 
But a* is for your fair confession 
\ e made upon the 



FROM WILLIAM <;KISMn\I 1)<>\\\ 
1 M.L 

>< broom 1 killed her, 
li my accursed ki 
There hatefully I kill 

Wh,, l..ved me as her 1, 
1 nit hrr throat, 1 killed her, 
Wh I have been ray wife. 

And for mine offence I must die. 



204 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Three days she lay there murdered,, 
Before that she was found,, 

But then the neighbours searching 
Within that broomy ground, 

Did find her there uncovered, 
And with a bloody wound. 

And for mine offence I must die. 

The neighbours having found her 
Where I did do this deed ; 

There in the broom they found her 
Where I her blood did shed ; 

But when I did perceive that, 
I ran away with speed. 

And for mine offence I must die. 

No sooner had they found her, 

But away I did go, 
And thought to go to Ireland, 

The very truth is so ; 
But God he would not suffer me 

To run my country through. 

And for mine offence I must die. 

Yet I was got on ship-board, 
As you may understand, 

But the ship was troubled, 
I must go back to land ; 

I could not get away so, 

With guilty heart and hand. 

And for mine offence I must die. 

There is some wicked person 
The shipmen they did say, 

Within the ship we know it, 
That cannot pass away ; 

We must return to land here, 
And make no more delay. 

And for mine offence I must die. 



TH1 ANCIKNT MAIUM 205 

Then m-.ir unto \\Vstchester, 

I taken was at last, 
And thru in ( luster prison 
I suddenly was cast ; 

.mv:ht IP ford, 

To answer what is past. 

And for mine offence 1 mutt die. 

But thru my loving father 

i^old he il pare, 

To save me from the gallows 

! I had of me great care ; 

But it would not be granted, 

The gallows was my share. 

And for mine offence I mutt 

My fault it was so heinous 
It would not granted be, 

t for an example 
Hang on the gallows tree ; 
God grant that I a warning 
For all young men may be. 

And for mine offence I must die. 1 



THE RIME 01 THE ANCIENT MARINER 

i s an ancient Mariner, 
And he stoppeth one of three, 
" By thy long grey beard and glittering < 
Now wherefore stopp'st thou me ? 

" The Bridegroom's doors are opened * i 
And I am next of ki 

May'st hear the merry din." 

1 He died for his offence at Lc- in t wartime, in Herefordshire, upon 
he scene of his crime, 1650. 



206 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

He holds him with his skinny hand, 

" There was a ship," quoth he. 

" Hold off! unhand me, grey-beard loon ! " 

Eftsoons his hand dropt he. 

He holds him with his glittering eye 
The Wedding-Guest stood still, 
And listens like a three years' child : 
The Mariner hath his will. 

The Wedding-Guest sat on a stone, 
He cannot choose but hear ; 
And thus spake on that ancient man, 
The bright-eyed Mariner. 

The ship was cheered, the harbour cleared 

Merrily did we drop 

Below the kirk, below the hill, 

Below the lighthouse top. 

The Sun came up upon the left, 
Out of the sea came he ! 
And he shone bright, and on the right 
Went down into the sea. 

Higher and higher every day, 

Till over the mast at noon 

The Wedding-Guest here beat his breast, 

For he heard the loud bassoon. 

The bride hath paced into the hall, 
Red as a rose is she ; 
Nodding their heads before her goes 
The merry minstrelsy. 

The Wedding-Guest he beat his breast, 
Yet he cannot choose but hear, 
And thus spake on that ancient man, 
The bright-eyed Mariner. 



THI: ANCIENT MARINER 207 

And now the storm-blast came, and he 

nu-k with his o'ertaking wings, 
And ch;iM- 'h along. 



I masts and dipping prow, 
A> who purMU-d with veil anil I 

hodowof his foe, 
And forward bends his head, 
The ship drove fast, loud roared the blast, 
And southward aye we fled. 

And now there came both mist and snow, 
And it grew wondrous cold : 
And ice, mast-high, came floating by, 
As green as emerald. 

And the drifts the snowy clifts 

liapes of men nor beasts we ken 
was all between. 



c was here, the ice was there, 
e was all around . 

racked and growled, and roared and howled, 
es in a swound ! 

At length did cross an Albatross : 
Thorough the fog it came ; 
As if it had been a Christian soul, 
it in God's name. 

It ate the food it ne'er had eat, 
And : it flew. 



208 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

And a good south wind sprung up behind ; 

The Albatross did follow, 

And every day, for food or play, 

Came to the mariners' hollo ! 

In mist or cloud, on mast or shroud, 

It perched for vespers nine ; 

Whiles all the night, through fog-smoke white, 

Glimmered the white moon-shine. 

" God save thee, ancient Mariner ! 
From the fiends, that plague thee thus ! 
Why look'st thou so ? " With my cross-bow 
I shot the Albatross ! 



PART THE SECOND 

The Sun now rose upon the right : 
Out of the sea came he, 
Still hid in mist, and on the left 
Went down into the sea. 

And the good south wind still blew behind, 
But no sweet bird did follow, 
Nor any day, for food or play, 
Came to the mariners' hollo ! 

And I had done a hellish thing, 

And it would work 'em woe ; 

For all averred, I had killed the bird 

That made the breeze to blow. 

Ah wretch ! said they, the bird to slay 

That made the breeze to blow ! 

Nor dim nor red, like God's own head, 

The glorious Sun uprist : 

Then all averred, I had killed the bird 

That brought the fog and mist. 

'Twas right, said they, such birds to slay, 

That bring the fog and mist. 



THI AM IKNT MAKINKU 209 

The fair breeze blew, t. >am 

flew, 
The furrow streamed off free : 

-re the first t! 
Into that silent 



Down dropt the brvtvr, the sails dropt 

down, 

Twas sad as sad could be ; 
And we did speak only to break 
The silence of the sea ! 

ii a hot and a copper s! 
bloody S >on, 

t up above the mast did stand, 
>igger than tin- Mi ion. 

y, day after day, 

on; 

As idle as a painted si 
Upon a painted ocean. 

r, water, every wh 
And all the boards ttkj 

i- very wh 
Nor any drop to drink. 

very dec i ^t! 

I this should be! 

Yea, slimy things did eraul with legs 
Upon the slimy 



About, about, in reel and rout 
The death-fires danced at i 
The water, like a witch's < 
Burnt green, and blue and v, i 

4 



210 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

And some in dreams assured were 
Of the spirit that plagued us so : 
Nine fathom deep he had followed us 
From the land of mist and snow. 

And every tougue, through utter drought, 
Was withered at the root ; 
We could not speak, no more than if 
We had been choked with soot. 

Ah ! well-a-day ! what evil looks 
Had I from old and young ! 
Instead of the cross, the Albatross 
About my neck was hung. 

PART THE THIRD 

There passed a weary time. Each throat 

Was parched, and glazed each eye. 

A weary time ! A weary time ! 

How glazed each weary eye ! 

When looking westward, I beheld 

A something in the sky. 

At first it seemed a little speck, 
And then it seemed a mist ; 
It moved and moved, and took at last 
A certain shape, I wist. 

A speck, a mist, a shape, I wist ! 
And still it neared and neared : 
And as if it dodged a water-sprite, 
It plunged and tacked and veered. 

With throats unslaked, with black lips baked, 

We could nor laugh nor wail ; 

Through utter drought all dumb we stood ! 

I bit my arm, I sucked the blood, 

And cried, A sail ! a sail ! 



THE A\( II NT MARINER II 

With throats unslaked, with black lips baked, 
Agape they heard me call : 
Graraercy! they for joy did grin, 

their breath drew in, 
As they were drinking all. 

See ! see ! (I cried) she tacks no more ! 
Hither to uork us weal; 

:umt a breeze, without a ti. 
She steadies with upright keel ! 

western wave was all a-flame, 
The day was well nigh done ! 
Almost upon the western wave 
Rested the broad bright Sun ; 

i that strange shape drove sudtl< 
vixt us and the Sun 

straight the Sun was flecked with ban, 
(Heaven's Mother send us grace !) 

Mgeon grate he peered, 
With broad and burning face. 

Alas! (thought I, and my heart beat loud) 
How fast she nears and nears ! 
Are those her sails that glance in the Si. 
Like restless gossameres ? 

Are those her ribs through which the Sun 

[>cer, as through a grate ? 
\\\<\ is that Woman all her ercw? 
Is that a DEATH ? and are there two ? 
Is DEATH that woman's mate ? 

lips were red, her looks were free, 
Her locks were yellow as gold ; 
Her Am was as white as leprosy, 
The night-mare LIFE-IN-DEATII was she, 
Who thicks man's blood with cold. 



212 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The naked hulk alongside came, 
And the twain were casting dice ; 
"The game is done ! I've won, I've won ! 
Quoth she, and whistles thrice. 



The Sun's rim dips ; the stars rush out : 
At one stride comes the dark ; 
With far-heard whisper, o'er the sea, 
Off shot the spectre-bark. 



We listened and looked sideways up ! 

Fear at my heart, as at a cup, 

My life-blood seemed to sip ! 

The stars were dim, and thick the night, 

The steersman's face by his lamp gleamed 

white ; 

From the sails the dew did drip 
Till clomb above the eastern bar 
The horned Moon, with one bright star 
Within the nether tip. 

One after one, by the star-dogged Moon, 
Too quick for groan or sigh, 
Each turned his face with a ghastly pang, 
And cursed me with his eye. 



Four times fifty living men, 
(And I heard nor sigh nor groan) 
With heavy thump, a lifeless lump, 
They dropped down one by one. 



The souls did from their bodies fly,- 
They fled to bliss or woe ! 
And every soul, it passed me by, 
Like the whiz of my cross-bow ! 



THK ANCIKNT MAUINKK 213 



I- MIT THE FOl'IlTH 



, nt Mar: 

I fear thy skinny hand ! 
And thou art long, and lank, and brown, 
As is the ribbed 



" I fear thee and thy glittering eye, 
Thy skinny hand, so brown." 
Fear not, fear not, tin..-. ^-Guest ! 

ixxly dropt not down. 

Alone, alone, all, all alone, 
Alone on a wide wide sea ! 
And never a saint took pity oa 

' 

Tlu- many nu-n, M> beautiful '. 

And they all dead 

And a tlwtffftnd thousand slimy things 

I looked upon the rotting sea, 

\v my eyes away ; 
I !.- the rotting deck, 

i tlu -re the dead men lay. 

I looked to Heaven, and tried to pray ; 

T a prayer had gusht, 
A wicked whisper came, and made 
My heart as dry as du 

I closed my lids, and kept them close, 
And the balls like pulses beat ; 

the sky and the sea, and the sea and the 
.ky 

Lay, like a load on my weary < 
t IK- dead were at my feet 



214 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The cold sweat melted from their limbs, 
Nor rot nor reek did they : 
The look with which they looked on me 
Had never passed away. 

An orphan's curse would drag to Hell 

A spirit from on high ; 

But oh ; more horrible than that 

Is the curse in a dead man's eye ! 

Seven days, seven nights, I saw that curse, 

And yet I could not die. 

The moving Moon went up the sky, 
And no where did abide : 
Softly she was going up, 
And a star or two beside 

Her beams bemocked the sultry main, 

Like April hoar-frost spread ; 

But where the ship's huge shadow lay, 

The charmed water burnt alway 

A still and awful red. 

Beyond the shadow of the ship, 

I watched the water-snakes : 

They moved in tracks of shining white, 

And when they reared, the elfish light 

Fell off in hoary flakes. 

Within the shadow of the ship 

I watched their rich attire : 

Blue, glossy green, and velvet black, 

They coiled and swam ; and every track 

Was a flash of golden fire. 

O happy living things ! no tongue 

Their beauty might declare : 

A spring of love gushed from my heart, 

And I blessed them unaware : 

Sure my kind saint took pity on me, 

And I blessed them unaware. 



THE ANCIENT MARINKR 215 

elfsame moment I could pray ; 

And from inv iu-ck so ! 

roU till off, and sank 
Like- lead into the sea. 

FART THE FlfTH 

Oh sleep! it is a gt-ntK- thing, 
Beloved from , 

To Mary Queen the praise be gi 
She sent the gentle sleep from Heaven, 
into my 

buckets on the deck, 
had so long remained, 
I dreamt that they were filled with dew ; 
And when 1 woke it rained. 

My lips were wet, my throat was cold, 

My pirnu-nN all \\rrr dank ; 

Sure I had drunk dreams, 

And 

ved, and could not feel my limbs : 
I was so light almost 
I thought that I had died in sleep, 
And was a blessed ghost 

And soon I heard a roaring wind : 

1 not come anear ; 

But with its sound it shook the sails, 
That were so thin and sere. 

The upper air burst into life ! 
And a hundred fire-flags sheen, 
To and fro they were hurried al> 
And to and fro, and in and out, 
The wan stars danced between. 

And the coming wind did roar more lo> 
And the sails did sigh like sedge ; 
And the rain poured down from one black cl 
The Moon was at its edge. 



216 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The thick black cloud was cleft, and still 
The Moon was at its side ; 
Like waters shot from some high crag, 
The lightning fell with never a jag, 
A river steep and wide. 

The loud wind never reached the ship, 
Yet now the ship moved on ! 
Beneath the lightning and the Moon 
The dead men gave a groan. 

They groaned, they stirred, they all uprose, 
Nor spake nor moved their eyes ; 
It had been strange, even in a dream, 
To have seen those dead men rise. 

The helmsman steered, the ship moved on ; 

Yet never a breeze up blew ; 

The mariners all 'gan work the ropes, 

Where they were wont to do : 

They raised their limbs like lifeless tools 

We were a ghastly crew. 

The body of my brother's son 
Stood by me, knee to knee : 
The body and I pulled at one rope, 
But he said nought to me. 

" I fear thee, ancient Mariner ; " 
Be calm, thou Wedding-Guest ! 
'Twas not those souls that fled in pain, 
Which to their corses came again, 
But a troop of spirits blest : 

For when it dawned they dropped their arms, 
And clustered round the mast ; 
Sweet sounds rose slowly through their mouths, 
And from their bodies passed. 

Around, around, flew each sweet sound, 
Then darted to the Sun ; 
Slowly the sounds came back again, 
Now mixed, now one by one. 



Till. ANCIKNT MAK1NKR 

Sometimes a-dropping sky 

I heard the si ng ; 

Sometimes all little birds that are, 
How they seemed to till the sea and air 
With tluir sweet jargon ; 

And now 'twas like all instrunu- 

. like a lonely flute; 
And no\\ it i> BnangeTi ^n\^, 
That makes the heavens be mute. 

It ceased ; yet still the sails made on 

on, 

A noi f a hidden brook 

In the leafy month of J 
That to the sleeping woods all night 
Singeth a quiet tune. 

Till noon we quietly sailed 

'ver a breese did breathe : 
y and smoothly went the ship. 
cd onward from beneath. 

Under the keel nine fathom deep, 
From the land of mist and snow, 
The was he 

That made the ship to go. 

tils at noon left <> me, 

And the ship stood still also. 

The Sun, right up above the mast, 
Had fixed her to the ocean ; 

ite she 'gan stir, 
With a short uneasy mo 
Backwards and forwards ha! <jth, 

With a short uneasy motion. 

like a pawing horse let go, 
She made a sudden bound : 
It flung the blood into my head, 
And I fell down in a s 



21 8 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

How long in that same fit I lay, 
I have not to declare ; 
But ere my living life returned, 
I heard, and in my soul discerned 
Two voices in the air. 

" Is it he ? " quoth one, " is this the man ? 
By Him who died on cross, 
With his cruel bow he laid full low, 
The harmless Albatross. 

" The spirit who bideth by himself 
In the land of mist and snow, 
He loved the bird that loved the man 
Who shot him with his bow." 

The other with a softer voice, 

As soft as honey-dew : 

Quoth he, " The man hath penance done, 

And penance more will do." 



PART THE SIXTH 

First Voice 

But tell me, tell me ! speak again, 
Thy soft response renewing 
What makes that ship drive on so fast ? 
What is the ocean doing ? 

Second Voice 

Still as a slave before his lord, 
The ocean hath no blast ; 
His great bright eye most silently 
Up to the Moon is cast 

If he may know which way to go ; 
For she guides him smooth or grim, 
See, brother, see ! how graciously 
She looketh down on him. 



THE ANCIENT MARINER 



First Voice 

Hut \\l\\ drives on that ship so t 
Without or wave or wind ? 

Second Voice 

The air is cut away before, 
And closes from behind. 

Brother, fly ! more high, more high ! 
Or we shall be belated : 

low and slow that ship will go, 
When the Mariner's trance is abated. 

I woke, and we were sailing on 

As in a gentle weath* 

Twas night, calm ni.nlit. the Moon was high ; 

The dead men stood toget! 

All stood together on the deck, 

i charnel-dungeon fitter : 
All fixed on me their stony eyes, 
That in the Moon did glitter. 

The pang, the corse, * h they dietl, 

Had never passed awa 
I could not draw my eyes from theirs, 
Nor turn them up to pray. 

And now this spell was snapt : once more 

I viewed the ocean green, 

And looked far forth, yet little saw 

01 Nvh.it h.ul dM 



Like one, that on a lonesome road 

. ;ilk in fear and dread, 
And having once turned round, walks on, 
And turns no more his hea 
Because he knows, a frightful fiend 

h close behind him tread. 



220 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

But soon there breathed a wind on me, 
Nor sound nor motion made : 
Its path was not upon the sea, 
In ripple or in shade. 

It raised my hair, it fanned my cheek 
Like a meadow-gale of spring 
It mingled strangely with my fears, 
Yet it felt like a welcoming. 

Swiftly, swiftly flew the ship, 
Yet she sailed softly too : 
Sweetly, sweetly blew the breeze 
On me alone it blew. 

Oh ! dream of joy ! is this indeed 
The lighthouse top I see ? 
Is this the hill ? is this the kirk ? 
Is this mine own countree ? 

We drifted o'er the harbour-bar, 
And I with sobs did pray 
O let me be awake, my God ! 
Or let me sleep alway. 

The harbour-bay was clear as glass, 
So smoothly it was strewn ; 
And on the bay the moonlight lay, 
And the shadow of the Moon. 

The rock shone bright, the kirk no less, 
That stands above the rock : 
The moonlight steeped in silentness 
The steady weathercock. 

And the bay was white with silent light, 
Till rising from the same, 
Full many shapes, that shadows were, 
In crimson colours came. 



THE AM 'IK NT MARINTK 

A little cli ,>row 

Those crimson shadows wer 

I turned my CVCS upon the drck 

A hat saw I tli- 
Each corse lay flat, lifeless and flat, 

>ly rood! 

A man all light, a seraph-man, 
very corse there stood. 

This seraph-band, each wared his hand 
It was a heavenly sight ! 

v stood as signals to the land. 
Each one a lovely light : 

This seraph-band, each waved his ha 

ire did they impart 
No voirr ; but nee sank 

1 ike music on my heart 

.><>n I lir.-ird the dash of oars, 
1 heard the Pilot's ch< 

icad was turned perforce away, 
And I saw a boat appear. 

The Pilot, and th Pilot's boy, 
I heard them < ist : 

Dear !.<>nl in Heaven! it was a joy 
The dead men could not blast 



I saw a third I heard his v< 
he Hermit good ! 

He MII-- 'ii !....! i,: u">dly hymns 
That he makes in ! 

He'll shrieve my soul, li- II wash away 
The Albatross's blood. 



222 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 



PART THE SEVENTH 

This Hermit good lives in that wood 
Which slopes down to the sea. 
How loudly his sweet voice he rears ! 
He loves to talk with marineres 
That come from a far countree. 

He kneels at morn, and noon, and eve 

He hath a cushion plump : 

It is the moss that wholly hides 

The rotted old oak stump. 

The skiff-boat neared : I heard them talk, 
' ' Why, this is strange, I trow ! 
Where are those lights so many and fair, 
That signal made but now ? " 

" Strange, by my faith ! " the Hermit said 

" And they answered not our cheer ! 

The planks looked warped ! and see those sails, 

How thin they are and sere ! 

1 never saw aught like to them, 

Unless perchance it were 

Brown skeletons of leaves that lag 

My forest-brook along : 

When the ivy-tod is heavy with snow, 

And the owlet whoops to the wolf below, 

That eats the she-wolfs young." 

" Dear Lord ! it hath a fiendish look " 
(The Pilot made reply) 
" I am a-feared " " Push on, push on ! " 
Said the Hermit cheerily. 

The boat came closer to the ship, 
But I nor spake nor stirred ; 
The boat came close beneath the ship, 
And straight a sound was heard. 



TH1 AM HAT MARINER 223 

r the water it rumbled on, 
Still louder and more dread : 
It reached -pi it the bay, 

(i.mn like lead. 

Stunned by that loud and dreadful sound, 
\Vhi.-h sky and ocean smote, 
Like one that hath been seven days drowned, 
My body lay aflo i 

But swift as dreams, myself I found 
ot's boat 

Upon the whirl, where sank the ship. 
The boat spun round and round ; 
And all was still, save that the hill 
Was telling of the sound. 

I moved my lips the Pilot shrieked 
And fell down in a 
The holy Hermit raised his eyes, 
And prayed where he did sit, 

I took the oars : the Pilot's boy, 

Who nou il'tli rrasy go, 

Uughed loud and long, and all the while 

His eyes went to and t 

juoth he, "full plain I tee 
il knows how to row. ' 

And now, all in my own countrec, 

I stood on the firm lai 

The Hermit stepped forth from the boat, 

And scarcely he could stand. 

" O shrieve me, shrieve me, holy man : 
The Hermit crossed his brow. 
"Sa, (ninth hr, - I bid thec say 

What manner of man art th 

s frame of mine was wrench* . I 
i a woeful ago 

1 1 f >rced me to begin my tale ; 
And then it left me free. 



224 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Since then, at an uncertain hour, 
That agony returns ; 
And till my ghastly tale is told, 
This heart within me burns. 

I pass, like night, from land to land ; 
I have strange power of speech ; 
That moment that his face I see, 
I know the man that must hear me : 
To him my tale I teach. 

What loud uproar bursts from that door ! 
The wedding-guests are there ; 
But in the garden-bower the bride 
And bride-maids singing are ; 
And hark the little vesper bell, 
Which biddeth me to prayer ! 

O Wedding-Guest ! this soul hath been 
Alone on a wide wide sea : 
So lonely 'twas, that God himself 
Scarce seemed there to be. 

O sweeter than the marriage-feast, 
'Tis sweeter far to me, 
To walk together to the kirk 
With a goodly company ! 

To walk together to the kirk, 

And all together pray, 

While each to his great Father bends 

Old men, and babes, and loving friends, 

And youths and maidens gay ! 

Farewell, farewell ! but this I tell 
To thee, thou Wedding-Guest ! 
He prayeth well, who loveth well 
Both man and bird and beast. 



THE FOKSAKKX Ml.KMAN 225 

He prayeth best 

All th : i great ami Mn.-ill ; 

ie dear God v ' !i us, 

He made and loveth all. 

The Mar >se eye is bright, 

\Mi..se beard with age is hoar, 

Turned tr-mi the bridegroom's door. 

Mi- unit hkr one that 

A sadder and a wiser man, 
He rose the morrow m< 

I . COLERIDGE 



THE FORSAK1.N MI.KMAN 

ir cliiKlrrn, l-t in away ; 
i way below. 

tar; 

tlif great winds short-wards blow ; 

* s seawards flow ; 
No\v tin- \vild \v ! '-splay, 

' and toss in the spray. 

I away! 

This way, this way ! 
Call her once before you go. 
Call once yet 

In a voice that she will know : 

Margaret! Margar 
Idrrn's voices should be dear 
(Call once more) to a mother's ear : 
u's voices, wild with pa 
rely she will come aga 
Call her once, and come away. 
i is way. 

'5 



226 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

" Mother dear, we cannot stay." 
The wild white horses foam and fret. 
Margaret ! Margaret ! 

Come, dear children, come away down. 

Call no more. 

One last look at the white-walled town, 
And the little grey church on the windy shore. 

Then come down. 
She will not come though you call all day. 

Come away, come away. 

Children dear, was it yesterday 

We heard the sweet bells over the bay ? 
In the caverns where we lay, 
Through the surf and through the swell. 

The far-off sound of a silver bell ? 

Sand-strewn caverns, cool and deep, 

Where the winds are all asleep ; 

Where the spent lights quiver and gleam ; 

Where the salt weed sways in the stream ; 

Where the sea-beasts, ranged all round, 

Feed in the ooze of their pasture-ground ; 

Where the sea-snakes coil and twine, 

Dry their mail and bask in the brine ; 

Where great whales come sailing by, 

Sail and sail, with unshut eye, 

Round the world for ever and aye ? 
When did music come this way ? 
Children dear, was it yesterday ? 
Children dear, was it yesterday 
(Call yet once) that she went away ? 
Once she sate with you and me, 
On a red gold throne in the heart of the sea, 
And the youngest sate on her knee. 

She combed its bright hair, and she tended it well, 

When down swung the sound of the far-off bell. 

She sighed, she looked up through the clear green sea. 

She said : " I must go, for my kinsfolk pray 

In the little grey church on the shore to-day. 



THE FORSAK1 N MKHMAN 227 

Twill be Easter-time in the world ah me ! 

And I lose my poor 

I said : ( ID up, dear heart, through the waves ; 

Say thy prayer, and come back to tin kind sea-caves ! " 

up through the surf in the bay. 
Children dear, was it yesterday ? 

Children dear, were we long alone? 
The sea grows st< little ones moan ; 

Long prayers," I said. in the world they say. 
Come/' I said, and we rose through the surf in the bay. 
\V< \\rnt up the beach, by the sandy down 
When- the sea-stocks bloom, t.> thr \\hite-ua!'.' 

.jh tlu- narrow paved streets, where all was still, 
To the little grey church n the windy hill. 

irch came a muni . at their prayers, 

Hut we stood without in the cold bin* ing airs. 
U climbed on the graves, on the stones, worn with 

rains, 

And we gased up the aisle through the small leaded 
punev 

e sate by tin- pill.-ir ; we saw her clear: 
" Margaret, hist ! come quick, we are here ! 
Dear heart," I said, " we are long alone. 

sea grows stormy, the little ones moan." 
ah, she gave me never a look, 
her eyes were sealed to the holy book. 
" Loud prays the priest ; shut stands the door." 
Come away, children, call no more ! 
Come away, come down, call no more ! 

Down, down, down. 
Down to the depths of the tea. 
She sits at her wheel in the humming town, 

Singing most 

Hark what she sings : " O joy, () j< 
For the humming street, and the child \\ith its toy. 
the priest, and the bell, and the holy well. 
For the wheel where I sp 
And the blessed light of the su 



228 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

And so she sings her fill, 

Singing most joyfully, 

Till the shuttle drops from her hand, 

And the whizzing wheel stands still. 
She steals to the window, and looks at the sand ; 

And over the sand at the sea ; 

And her eyes are set in a stare ; 

And anon there breaks a sigh, 

And anon there drops a tear 

From a sorrow-clouded eye, 

And a heart sorrow-laden, 

A long, long sigh 
For the cold strange eyes of a little Mermaiden 

And the gleam of her golden hair. 

Come away, away children. 
Come children, come down. 
The hoarse wind blows colder ; 
Lights shine in the town. 
She will start from her slumber 
When gusts shake the door ; 
She will hear the winds howling, 
Will hear the waves roar. 
We shall see, while above us 
The waves roar and whirl, 
A ceiling of amber, 
A pavement of pearl. 
Singing : " Here came a mortal, 
But faithless was she. 
And alone dwell for ever 
The kings of the sea." 

But, children, at midnight, 
W T hen soft the winds blow, 
When clear falls the moonlight ; 
When spring-tides are low : 
When sweet airs come seaward 
From heaths starred with broom ; 
And high rocks throw mildly 
On the blanched sands a gloom : 



DOLOR OOGO 229 

Up the still, glistening beaches, 
Ip the creeks we will i 
Over banks of bright seaweed 

leaves dry. 

\V, will gaze, from the sand-hills, 
At the white, sle rn; 

At the c-h . lie hill-side 

And then come back down, 

.g : " There dwells a loved one, 
But cruel is she. 
She left 1< rver 

The kings of the sea." 

MATTHEW ARNOLD 



DOLOR OOGO 

THIRTEEN men by Kuan Shore, 
Dolor Oogo, Dolor Oogo 
Drowned men Mince 'eighty-four, 

On the cliff against the sky, 
AiUa, wife of Malachi- 
That cold woman 
I and kniU eternally. 

By her silent husband's side 

-Dolor Oogo, Dolor Oogo 

Stretched awake, she hears the tide 
Moan in Dolor Oogo : 

1 athwart the caster gale 
Hark! th- nu-rry dead men hail 

'i'.! i cold woman, 
Take the lantern from the nail ! " 

Rising in her chilly sark 

Dolor Oogo, Dolor Oogo 
Forth she fares by Behan Pare, 
t to Dolor Oogo. 



230 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Kneeling there above the brink, 
Lets her long red tresses sink 

That cold woman 
For the sailor men to drink. 

Then the sailor men beneath 

Dolor Oogo, Dolor Oogo 
Take the ends between their teeth, 

Deep in Dolor Oogo. 
" Lusty blood is this to quaff: 
(So the merry dead men laugh) 

<e O, cold woman, 
Hath thy man as good by half? " 

" Drowned men by Ruan Shore 

Dolor Oogo, Dolor Oogo 
Lost aboard the Elsinore 

Down by Dolor Oogo 
If the gulls behind the share 
Yesterday had called " Beware, 

Thy cold woman ! " 
Paler now had been my hair. 

" Socks I knit you each a pair 

Dolor Oogo, Dolor Oogo 
Half of yarn and half of hair, 

Over Dolor Oogo." 
" Dripping, dripping on the tide, 
What red dye thy hair hath dyed, 

Thou cold woman ? " 
" It hath brushed upon his side." 

Knitting with her double thread 

Dolor Oogo, Dolor Oogo 
Half of black and half of red- 
Over Dolor Oogo, 
On the cliff against the sky, 
Ailsa, wife of Malachi, 

That cold woman, 
Wipes her hands incessantly. 

A. T. QUILLER-COUCH 



MKRMAX KOSMKH 231 



MKKMAN KOSM1.K 

THERE dwells a lady in Denmark, 

Lady Hilln-N nu-n IUT ca' ; 
And she's gar'd bigg a new castt-11, 

That shines o'er Denmark a'. 

H<T daughter was stown awm frae her ; 

She sought for her wiil--\\ here ; 
But the mair she sought, the less she fand ; 

That works her mickle care. 

And she's gar'd bigg a new ship, 
vanes o' flaming gold, 
iony a knight and mar 
Sae stark in stour, bestowed. 

She's followed her sons down to the strand 

And seen them sailing free, 
And wull and war >t lang yean 

They sailed upon the 



And eight years wull and waif, they sailed 

hat seemed sae lang ; 
Syne they sail'd afore a high cas 
And to the land can gang. 

And the young daughter Svane lyle, 

In the bower that was the best, 
Says, " where frae come you foreign swains 
Ljht to guest ?" 

Then up and spak her youngest brithcr 
Sae wisely ay spak he ; 

are a widow's three poor sons, 
Lang wilder'd on the 



232 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

In Denmark were we born and bred, 
Lady Killers was our mither ; 

Our sister frae us was stown awa, 
We find na where nor whither." 

" In Denmark were ye born and bred ? 

Was Lady Hillers your mither ? 
I can nae longer hold frae thee, 

Thou art my youngest brither. 

And hear ye this, my bonny boy, 
Why came ye o'er the faem ? 

Thy bonny neckbone will be cut 
When my gudeman comes hame." 

She's set him in the weirst nook 
She in the house can meet : 

She's bidden him for the high God's sake 
Neither to laugh nor greet. 

When Rosmer hame from Zeeland came, 

He took on to ban ; 
" I smell fu' weel, by my right hand, 

That here is a Christian man." 

" There cam a bird," quo' the Svane lyle, 
" Wi' a man's bone in his mouth ; 

He coost it in, and I cast it out, 
As fast as e'er I couth." 

But wilily can she Rosmer win ; 

She claps him tenderly, 
" It's here is come my sister's son ; 

Gin I lose him, I'll dee. 

It's here is come my sister's son, 
Frae baith our father's land ; 

And I ha'e pledged him faith and troth, 
That ye will not him ban." 



MERMAN ROSMER 233 

"And is thy sister's son, 

Frae thy '. "uul to ti 

Tlu -n I will >wear ray highest aith 

He's dree nae scaith frae me." 



'Twas then the high King Rosmcr, 

He ca'd on pages twae : 
" Ye bid Queen Svane's sister's son 

To the chamber afore me gae." 

When proud Queen Svane's brither stood 
By the high king Rosmer's ku 

A strong quake quook in his blood, 
Sae as he scarce coud stand. 



And Itusjiier took the young wee lad 

Upo his laidly knee ; 
He clappit him SM luHsoinery, 
He turned baith blue and 



And up and spak Queen Svane ly le, 
" Sir Room* i bo learn, 

That fingers arena 

To clap sae wee a bai 



PART tt< 

He has stayed there till, the fifteenth year, 
He greeii'd for hame and land ; 

With Help roe now, dear Svane lyle, 
To be set on the white sar 



It was proud Lady Svane K 

doth sUiu'l : 



Itosinrr 

" This lad sae lang i' the sea has been, 
He greens for hame and land." 



234 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

" If the lad sae lang in the sea has been, 
And greens for hame and land, 

Then I'll gie him a kist o' gold 
Sae fitting till his hand." 

" And will ye gie him a kist o' gold, 

Sae fitting till his hand ? 
Then hear ye, my noble heart's dear, 

Ye bear them baith to land." 

Then wrought proud Lady Svane lyle, 

What Rosmer little wist ; 
For she's ta'en out the gold sae red, 

And laid herself in the kist. 

He's ta'en the man upon his back ; 

The kist in his mouth took he ; 
And he has gane the lang way up 

Frae the bottom o' the sea. 

" Now I ha'e borne thee to the land ; 

Thou seest baith sun and moon, 
Thank Lady Svane for the grace, 

I beg thee as a boon." 

And Rosmer sprang i' the salt sea out, 

And jauped it up i' the sky ; 
But when he cam to his castell hame 

Nae Svane lyle could he spy. 

When he cam till the castell in 

His dearest awa was gane ; 
He stampit strang as he were thrang 

'Drew sparks frae the flint stane. 

But blithe was the Lady Hillers' house, 

Wi' welcome joy and glee ; 
Hame to their friends her bairns were come, 

That had been lang in the sea. 



HO FOR LUBBERLAND! 235 



HO FOR LUBBERLAND I 

U a slsip. \v- understand, 

She iv me from Lubberland, 

1 he like I think was never. 
" You that a lazy life do love, 

I'd have you now go 
They say the land is not above 

Two thousand leagues from Dover." 

The captain and the master, too, 

Do give us this relation ; 
And so do all the whole ship's crew, 

Concerning this strange na 
They say they scorn to tell you lies, 
it they are not mistaken, 

streets are paved with pudding-pies 
Nay, powdered beef and bacon. 

The King of Knaves and the Queen of Sluts 

Reign there in peace and qui< 
There is good plum-porridge stored in butts, 

They have such store of diet. 
There you may live released from care, 

ke hogs set up to fatt< 
The garments that the people wear 

Are silver, silk, and satin. 

The lofty buildings of this place 
r many yean have lasted ; 
nutmegs, pepper, cloves, and mace, 
The walls are there rough-casted. 
In ist\ --pudding boiled, 

And most ingenious carvii 
Likewise they are with pancakes tiled, 
Sure, here's no fear of starving. 



236 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The captain says, " In every town, 

Hot roasted pigs will meet ye. 
Then in the streets run up and down, 

Still crying out, Come eat me." 
Likewise he says, " At every feast, 

The very fowls and fishes, 
Nay from the biggest to the least, 

Come tumbling to the dishes." 

The rivers run with claret fine, 

The brooks with rich canary, 
The ponds with other sorts of wine, 

To make your hearts full merry : 
Nay more than this, you may behold 

The fountains flow with brandy, 
The locks are like refined gold, 

The hills are sugar-candy. 

Rose-water is the rain they have, 

Which comes in pleasant showers, 
All places are adorned brave, 

With sweet and fragrant flowers. 
Hot custards grow on every tree, 

And jellies by the ditches ; 
And the pebbles down beside the sea 

Are comely bacon-flitches. 

There's nothing there but holy-days, 

With music out of measure ; 
Who can forbear to speak the praise, 

Of such a land of pleasure ? 
There you may lead a lazy life, 

Free from all kind of labour ; 
And he that is without a wife, 

May borrow of his neighbour. 

There is no law nor lawyer's fees, 
All men are free from fury, 

For every one does what he please, 
Without a judge or jury. 



rM vi) THI: siw 237 

La warm, they say, 
The winter's ne'er the colder ; 

no landlord's rent to pay, 
a freeholder. 

You that are free to cross the seas, 

Make no more tlispir 
In I.ublx-rl.uul you'll live at ease, 

li pleasant re< 
The Captain waits but for a gale 

prosperous wind and weather, 
then they soon will hoist up sail, 
'- haste away together. 



ULYSSES AND Till: SIKKNS 

leantime flew our ships, and straight we fetch d 
'I he Siren's isle ; a spleenless wind so stretch'd 
\ ings to waft us, and so urged our keel, 
iving re isle, we could not feel 

The least gasp lead, 

And all th- sra in prostrate slumber spread, 
hann'd all. I p tin -n flew 
work, struck sail. r drew, 

1 under hatches stow'd them, sat, and plied 
The polished oars, and did in curls d 
The white head waters. My part then came on : 
A mighty waxen cake I set up. 

Chopp'd it in fragments with my sword, and wrought 
Will. ill were s 

The great power < -i in such a beam 

hen flew lmrninu r from his di/id, 
To liquefaction helped us. Orderly 

p'd their ears; and they as fair did 
M\ fed md hands with cords, lie mast 

i other hawsers made me soundly fast 
Th.n took they seat, and forth our passage strook, 
'1 'he foamy sea beneath their labour shook. 



238 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Row'd on, in reach of an erected voice, 
The Sirens soon took note, without our noise, 
Tuned those sweet accents that made charms so strong, 
And these learn' d numbers made the Sirens' song : 
Come here, thou worthy of a world of praise, 
That dost so high the Grecian glory raise, 
Ulysses ! stay thy skip, and that song hear 
That none past ever but it bent his ear, 
But left him ravish' d, and instructed more 
By us, than any ever heard before, 
For we know all things whatsoever were 
In wide Troy labour d ; whatsoever there 
The Grecians and the Trojans both sustain d 
By those high issues that the Gods ordain d. 
And whatsoever all the earth can show 
T inform a knowledge of desert, we know. 
This they gave accent in the sweetest strain 
That ever open'd an enamour'd vein. 

GEORGE CHAPMAN 

THE STORY OF ULYSSES 

IN other thing who that recordeth 
Like unto this sample accordeth, 
Which in the tale of Troy I find. 
Sirens of a wonder kind 
Be monsters as the books tellen 
And in the great sea they dwellen. 
Of body both and of visage 
Like unto women of young age 
Up from the navel on high they be 
And down beneath (as men may see), 
They bear of fishes the figure. 
And over this of such nature 
They be, that with so sweet a steven 
Like to the melody of heaven 
In women's voice they sing, 
With notes of so great liking, 
Of such measure, of such musike 
Whereof the ships they beswike, 



THE GREAT SILKIE OF SULE SKKKHIE 239 

That passen by the costes there. 

For when th<- shipmrn lay an ear 

t'nto tli- 

Thev ween it be a pa: 

Whieh after is to them a h 

I or AMMO may not with them dwell, 

When thry the greatlustes hear 

ships steer, 
he note 
They hearken, and in Mich wise assote, 

rse and way 
ijet, and t their ear obey, 

ill it sobefal 

,t they into the peril fall, 
Where as the ships be to draw, 
And they be with the monsters slaw. 
But from this peril nevertheless, 
With hi, wisdom Kinjr Ulysses 
Escapeth, and it overpasseth 

1 compasseth 
man of his company 
. po\\i-r unto that folly 
His ear for no lust to cast. 
For he them stopped all so fast 
That none of them may hear them sing. 
So when they eomr forth sailing, 

e was such governance on band 
That the monsters have withstand 
And slew of them a great party. 
.us was he safe, " it h his navy, 
This wise King, through governance. 

s GOWKR 

THE GREAT SILKIE OF SULE SKERKIK 

AN earthly noun-ice ] sit and sings, 
And aye she sings \ wean, 

Little ken 1 my b.uni; 
Far less the land that he stops 
a nurse. 



242 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 



THE MERMAID 

ON Friday mom as we set sail, 

It was not far from land, 
O, there I spy'd a fair pretty maid, 
With a comb and a glass in her hand. 
The stormy winds did blow, 
And the raging seas did roar, 
While we poor sailors went to the top, 
And the land-lubbers laid below. 

Then up spoke a boy of our gallant ship, 

And a well-speaking boy was he, 
" I've a father and a mother in Portsmouth town, 

And this night they weep for me." 
The stormy, etc. 

Then up spoke a man of our gallant ship, 

And a well speaking man was he, 
" I've married a wife in fair London town, 

And this night she a widow will be." 
The stormy, etc. 

Then up spoke the Captain of our gallant ship, 

And a valiant man was he, 
" For want of a boat we shall be drown'd, 

For she sunk to the bottom of the sea." 
The stormy, etc. 

The moon shone bright, and the stars gave light, 
And my mother was looking for me, 

She might look and weep with watery eyes, 
She might look to the bottom of the sea. 
The stormy, etc. 

Three times round went our gallant ship, 

And three times round went she, 
Three times round went our gallant ship, 

Then she sunk to the bottom of the sea. 
The stormy, etc. 



POEMS OF LOVE AND THE 
AFFECTIONS 

THE LASS OF LOCHROYAN 

will shoe my bonny foot ? 
And w h " ill glove my hand ? 
And who will hind my middle jimp, 
With a langlang linen bar 

will comb my yellow hair, 
h a haw bay berry con: 
And who will be my babe's father, 
Till Gregory come home ? " 

" Thy father, he will shoe thy foot, 

thrr will .rlovr thy'hai 
I hy mother will bind thy middle jimp, 
It a long long linen band ! 



Thy >!->'<] \M!! a yellow hair, 

With ;i haw bay berry comb ; 

lu- thy babe's father, 
Till (iregory come home." 

" And who will build a bonny ship. 
And set it on the sea ? 

I will go to seek my love, 
My own love Gregory." 
us 



242 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 



THE MERMAID 

ON Friday mom as we set sail, 

It was not far from land, 
O, there I spy'd a fair pretty maid, 
With a comb and a glass in her hand. 
The stormy winds did blow, 
And the raging seas did roar, 
While we poor sailors went to the top, 
And the land-lubbers laid below. 

Then up spoke a boy of our gallant ship, 

And a well-speaking boy was he, 
" I've a father and a mother in Portsmouth town, 

And this night they weep for me." 
The stormy, etc. 

Then up spoke a man of our gallant ship, 

And a well speaking man was he, 
" I've married a wife in fair London town, 

And this night she a widow will be." 
The stormy, etc. 

Then up spoke the Captain of our gallant ship, 

And a valiant man was he, 
" For want of a boat we shall be drown'd, 

For she sunk to the bottom of the sea." 
The stormy, etc. 

The moon shone bright, and the stars gave light, 
And my mother was looking for me, 

She might look and weep with watery eyes, 
She might look to the bottom of the sea. 
The stormy, etc. 

Three times round went our gallant ship, 

And three times round went she, 
Three times round went our gallant ship, 

Then she sunk to the bottom of the sea. 
The stormy, etc. 



POEMS OF LOVE AND THE 
AFFECTIONS 

T1IK LASS 01 I .<)( IIROYAN 



\MI<> will shoe my bonny foot? 
And who will glove my hand? 
And who will bind my middle jimp, 
With a lang laiig linen bat 

O who will comb my \rllow hair, 

h a haw bay berry com 
And who will be my babe's father, 
Till (in-gory come home?" 

iy father, he will ll foot, 

!>r..thrr vsill -love- thy hand, 

her will bind thy middle jimp, 
h a long long linen band ! 

Thy if* ..ml) thy yellow hair, 

h a haw bay berry comb ; 
The Almighty will be thy babe's father, 
Till Gregory come home." 

id who will build a bonny ship, 
And set it on the sea ? 
For I will go to seek my love, 
My own love Gregory." 

HI 



244 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Up then spake her father dear, 

A woeful man was he ; 
" And I will build a bonny ship, 

And set her on the sea. 

And I will build a bonny ship, 

And set her on the sea, 
And ye shall go and seek your love, 

Your own love Gregory." 

Then he's gar'd build a bonny ship, 

And set her on the sea, 
With four-and-twenty mariners 

To bear her company. 

O he's gar'd build a bonny ship, 

To sail on the salt sea ; 
The masts were of the good red gold, 

The sails of cramoisie. 

O he's gar'd build a bonny ship, 
'Was fair with the pearl-shell ; 

At every needle-tack was in't, 
There hung a silver bell. 

Her sides were of the good stout oak, 
The deck of mountain pine, 

The anchor of the silver sheen, 
The ropes of silken twine. 

She had not sailed but twenty leagues 
But twenty leagues and three, 

When she met with a rank rover, 
And all his company. 

" Now are ye Queen of Heaven high, 
Come to pardon all our sin ? 

Or are ye Mary Magdalene, 
Was born at Bethlehem ? " 



TIIF: LAflB OF I.OCIIROYAN 245 

" I'm not the Queen of Heaven high, 
Come to pardon ye your v 

Nor am I Mary Ma:d dene, 
Was born ir 

But I in the lass of Lochroyan, 

1 I sailing ^C*, 

see If 1 can fir ve, 

My own love Gregory." 

:n>t ve yon l)onny 

f-d o'er with tin : 

\\ li- .ist sailed it round about, 

d (ircgory is within." 

And when she saw the 

!><th ! 

Built on a rock of height. 

Says, " Row the boat, my mariners, 

to the ! 

M-r ii iv lore's castle, 
>< by the salt sea rtraiK I.- 
She sailed it round, and sailed it rou 
.1 loud and l"ii<i cru-d 
w hreak, now break your fairy charms, 
And set my true-lore free." 

She r arms, 

And to the door she's gone, 
And long she knocked, and sore she called, 

But answer got she none. 

For here's the lass of Lochro 

Come far from kith and kin. 



246 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

O, open the door, Lord Gregory ! 

O, open and let me in ! 
The wind blows loud and cold, Gregory, 

The rain drops from my chin. 

The shoe is frozen to my foot, 
The glove unto my hand, 

The wet drops from my yellow hair, 
No longer can I stand." 

O, up then spake his ill mother, 
An ill-death may she die, 

" Ye're no the lass of Lochroyan, 
She's far out o'er the sea. 

Away, away, ye ill woman, 

Ye're not come here for good ; 

Ye're but some witch or wild warlock, 
Or mermaid of the flood." 

" I am neither witch nor wild warlock, 

Nor mermaid of the sea ; 
But I am Annie of Lochroyan, 

O, open the door to me." 

" If ye be Annie of Lochroyan, 
As I trow thou be not she, 

Now tell me of some love-tokens 
That past 'tween thee and me." 

O, dinna ye mind, love Gregory, 

As we sat at the wine, 
We changed the rings from our fingers ? 

And I can shew thee thine. 

O yours was good and good enough, 
But ay the best was mine, 

For yours was of the good red gold, 
But mine of the diamond fine. 



Till- I.ASS OF UK'IIROYAN 247 

Yours was of the good red gold, 

Min. 

Mine was ot' tlu- purot troth, 
But thine was false within. 

" If ye be the lass of Lochroyan, 

As I know not thou be, 
Tell me some more ot -tokens 

Past between thee and me." 

Jo not ye mind, love Gregory, 
As we sat on the hill, 
Thou twined me of my maidenhead, 
Right sore against my \M i 1 .- 

Now open the door, love Gregory, 
Open the door, I pray ; 

in my arms, 
And will be dead ere day." 

woman, 

For tin- Lorhroyan 

Is far out o'er the sea. ' 

round alxmt : 
II, since that it be so, 

- r woman that has borne a son 
Have a heart so full of woe. 

Take down, take down, that mast of gold, 

Set up a mast of tree ; 
It does not become a forsaken lady 

To sail so royally. 

cock had era wn, and the day did dawn, 
And the sun began to peep, 
Up then rose Lord Gregory, 
And sore, sore did he weep. 



248 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

" O I have dreamed a dream, mother, 
I wish it may bring good 

That the bonny lass of Lochroyan 
At my bower-window stood. 

O I have dreamed a dream, mother, 
The thought o't gars me greet, 

That fair Annie of Lochroyan 
Lay dead at my bed feet." 

" If it be for Annie of Lochroyan 
That you make all this moan, 

She stood last night at your bower-door, 
But I have sent her home." 

et O woe betide ye, ill woman, 

An ill death may ye die, 
That would not open the door yourself, 

Nor yet would waken me." 

O he's gone down to yon shoreside, 

As fast as he could dree, 
And there he saw fair Annie's bark 

A-rowing o'er the sea. 

" O Annie, Annie," loud he cried, 
"O Annie, O Annie, bide," 

But ay the more he cried Annie, 
The braider grew the tide. 

" O Annie, Annie, dear Annie, 

Dear Annie, speak to me." 
But ay the louder he gan call, 

The louder roared the sea. 

The wind blew loud, the waves rose high, 
And dashed the boat on shore ; 

Fair Annie's corpse was in the foam, 
The babe rose never more. 



IHl SK AM AYS HAPPY RETURN 249 

Lord Gregory tore his golden locks, 
And made a woeful moan ; 

Annie's corpse lay at his t 
1 1 is bonny son was 



herry was her cheek, 

uair, 
And coral, coral * ips, 

< might with hrr compare." 

Then first he kissed her pale, pale cheek, 

And syne he kis^ 
And syne he kissed her wan, wan lips, 

There was no breath then 

( > woe betide my ill mother, 
An ill death may she 
She turned my true love from my door, 
Who came so far to me. 

O woe betide my ill moth* 
An ill death may she die, 

ias not been the death of one, 
c has been the death of three." 

Then he's taken out a little dart, 
! lung low down by his gi 

:-u,t it through and through his heart 
And words spake never more. 



Tin: SKAMAYS HAITY KKTI UN 

WHEN Sol did cast no light, 

And the dark time of ni^ht 

Did the skies cover. 
Illuming a river by, 

There were ships sailing, 
A maid most fair I spied, 

Crying and wailing. 



250 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Unto this maid I stept, 

Asking what grieved her, 
She answered me and wept, 

Fates had deceived her : 
" My love is prest," quoth she, 

" To cross the ocean, 
Proud waves do make the ship 

Ever in motion. 

We lov'd seven years and more, 

Both being sure, 
But I am left on shore, 

Grief to endure. 
He promised back to turn, 

If life was spared him, 
With grief I daily mourn 

Death hath debarred him." 

Straight a brisk lad she spied, 

'Made her admire, 
A present she received 

Pleased her desire. 
" Is my love safe," quoth she, 

" Will he come near me ? " 
The young man answer made, 

" Virgin, pray hear me : 

Under one banner bright, 

For England's glory, 
Your love and I did fight 

Mark well my story : 
By an unhappy shot 

We two were parted ; 
His death's wound then he got, 

Though valiant-hearted. 

All this I witness can, 
For I stood by him, 

For courage, I must say, 
None did outvie him : 



THE SEAMAN'S HA1TY K1<TIR\ 251 

He still would foremost be, 

Striving tor honour; 

But Fortune is a whore, 

.i^eance upon ! 

But ere he was quite dead, 

Ml In-art broken, 
To me these words he said, 

' Pray give this token 
To my love, for there is 

ui she no fairer ; 
Tell her she must be kind 
And love the bea 

Entombed he now cl< 

In stately manner, 
'Cause he fought valiantly 

love and honour. 
The right he had 

To me he gav< 

Pray let me hav< 
She, raging, fled aw a 

what she acted. 
So last she curst her fate, 

And showed her an^r- 
Saving, " Friend, you come too late, 

111 have no stranger. 

To your own house return, 

I am best pleased, 
Here for my love to mourn, 

Since he's deceased. 
In sable weeds I'll go, 

Let who will jeer me ; 
Since Death has served me so, 

None shall come near me. 



252 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The chaste Penelope 

Mourned for Ulysses, 
I have more grief than she, 

Robbed of my blisses. 
I'll ne'er love man again, 

Therefore, pray hear me ; 
I'll slight you with disdain 

If you come near me. 

I know he loved me well, 

For when we parted, 
None did in grief excel, 

Both were true-hearted. 
Those promises we made 

Ne'er shall be broken ; 
Those words that then he said 

Ne'er shall be spoken." 

He, hearing what she said, 

Made his love stronger, 
Off his disguise he laid, 

And staid no longer. 
When her dear love she knew, 

In wanton fashion 
Into his arms she flew, 

Such is love's passion. 

He asked her how she liked 

His counterfeiting, 
Whether she was well-pleased 

With such like greeting ? 
" You are well versed," quoth she, 

" In several speeches ; 
Could you coin money so, 

You might get riches." 

O happy gale of wind 
That waft thee over, 

May heaven preserve that ship 
That brought my lover. 



TWO CONSTANT LOVERS 253 



" Come kiss me nw . my sweet, 
Time love's no slander ; 

te, 
I thy Leander. 

Dido of Carthage queen 
Loved il as, 

my true love is f< 
re true than he was. 

ne'er fonder was 
Of young Adonis, 
Than I will be of thee, 

. e her own it." 

n hand in hand they walk, 

ii mirth and pleasure, 
They laugh, they Idss, they talk 
Love knows no rnMMffC. 

u U.tli do sit and sing- 
Hut she sings clearest ; 
l.ik.- nightingale in Spring, 



\\ ADMIRAHIJ: NEW NORTHERN STORY 
\\ O CONSTANT LOVERS 

(To the lone of / m*Ud t*m wtH for Strrwsfivr?) 

Two lovers in the north, 
Constance and Anthony, 
Of them I will set forth 
A gallant history : 
They loved exceeding well, 
As plainly doth appear, 
But that which I shall tell, 
Tin- like you ne'er did hear. 
ics, Anthuny, 

My bonny Anihu, 

Gang ikou by land or sea, 

ill wend along vith thee. 



254 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Anthony must to sea, 
His calling did him bind, 
" My Constance dear," quoth he, 
ff I must leave thee behind : 
I pr'y thee do not grieve, 
Thy tears will not prevail ; 
I'll think on thee, my sweet, 
When the ship's under sail." 
But still she cries, Anthony, 
My bonny Anthony, etc. 



" How may that be ? " said he, 
" Consider well the case ; " 
Quoth she, " Sweet Anthony, 
I'll bide not in this place. 
If thou gang, so will I, 
Of the means do not doubt : 
A woman's policy 
Great matters may find out." 
Still she cries, Anthony, 
My bonny Anthony, etc. 



" I would be very glad, 
But pr'y thee tell me how ? " 
et I'll dress me like a lad, 
What say'st thou to me now ? " 
"The sea thou canst not brook." 
" Yes, very well," quoth she, 
" I'll scullion to the cook 
For thy sweet company." 
Still she cries, Anthony, 
My bonny Anthony, etc. 



Anthony's leave she had, 
And dressed in man's array, 
She seemed the blithest lad 
Seen on a summer's day. 



TWO CONSTANT l.ovr.US 255 

O see what Love can do, 
At hon: 11 not bide ; 

h her true love she'll go, 
Let weal or woe betide, 

ie cries, Anthony, 
My bonny Anthony, etc. 

In the hip it was hrr 
To be the Under- Cook ; 
And at the fire 1 

iderful pains she took. 
She served everyone 

Jegree ; 

And now and then alone, 
She kissed Anth 

x-cries, Anthony, 



Gang thorn by land or tea, 
I'll mend along nnth tkee. 

THE SECOND PART 

Alack and welladay ! 

< rapest on the Ma 

I -hip was cast away 
Upon the coast of Spain ; 
To the mercy of the waves, 

. all committed were, 
Constance herself she saves, 

i she cries for her dear. 



A/V Inmny Anthtn^ % 

Gang ikon by land or tea, 
I'll vend along nnth thee. 

aming upon a plank, 
lulboa she got ashore, 

I leaven thank, 
ii she lamented sore. 



256 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

" O woe is me," said she, 
" The saddest lass alive, 
My dearest Anthony, 
Now on the sea doth drive." 
My bonny Anthony, 
My bonny Anthony, etc. 

" What shall become of me ? 
Why do I strive for shore ? 
Sith my sweet Anthony, 
I never shall see more ? " 
Fair Constance, do not grieve, 
The same good Providence 
Hath saved thy lover sweet, 
But he is far from hence. 
Still she cries, Anthony, 
My bonny Anthony, etc. 

A Spanish merchant rich, 
Saw this fair-seeming lad, 
That did lament so much, 
And was so grievous sad. 
He had in England been, 
And English understood, 
He having heard and seen, 
He in amazement stood. 
Still she cries, Anthony, 
My bonny Anthony, etc. 

The Merchant asked her 
What was that Anthony : 
Quoth she, " My brother, sir, 
Who came from thence with me. 
He did her entertain, 
Thinking she was a boy, 
Two years she did remain. 
Before she met her joy. 

Still she cries, Anthony, 
My bonny Anthony, etc. 



TWO < ON9TANT I.o\KHS 257 

ii j was ta'en 

-h renegade, 

With ' did remain 

At the sea-roving trade : 
In tin- nature of a slave 
He did in thr i?alli-y row, 
Thus he his life did save, 
Hut Constance did not know : 

Still she cries, Anthony, 

My bonny Anthony, etc. 



Now mark what came to past ! 
See how the Fates did work ! 
A ship that her Master's was, 
Surprised this English Turk, 
And to Hilhoa brought 
All that aboard her were ; 
Constance full little thought 
Anthony was so near. 

11 she cries, Anthony, 
My homy Anthony, etc. 



Anth In- rest, 

She who was sad before, 
Was now with joy possessed ; 

The nvrrh.mt much did muse 
At this so sudden change, 
He did demand the news, 
Winch nut., him was strange. 

>rs, Anthony, 
My bonny Anthony, etc. 



I p'n her knees she fell 
Unto her master kind, 
And all the truth did tell, 
Nothing she k.-pt behind : 



258 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

At which he did admire, 
And in the ship of Spain 
Not paying for their hire, 
He sent them home again. 
Now she cries, Anthony, 
My bonny Anthony) etc. 

The Spanish merchant rich 
Did of his bounty give 
A sum of gold, on which 
They now most bravely live. 
They were joined hand in hand, 
Constance and Anthony, 
And now in Westmoreland, 
They live in mirth and glee. 
Now she says, Anthony, 
My bonny Anthony, 
God's Providence we see, 
Hath guarded thee and me. 



FROM THE TRAGEDY OF DIDO 

Aeneas. So much have I received at Dido's hand 
As, without blushing, I can ask no more : 
Yet, Queen of Affrick, are my ships unrigged, 
My sails all rent in sunder with the wind, 
My oars broken, and my tackling lost, 
Yea, all my navy split with rocks and shelves : 
Nor stern, nor anchor, have our maimed fleet ; 
Our masts the furious winds strook overboard : 
Which piteous wants, if Dido will supply, 
We will account her author of our lives. 

Dido. Aeneas, I'll repair thy Trojan ships, 
Conditionally that thou wilt stay with me, 
And let Achates sail to Italy : 
I'll give thee tackling made of rivelled gold, 
Wound on the barks of odoriferous trees, 



STEPHANOS SON(, 259 

Oars of massy ivory, full of holes, 

ugh which the water shall delight to play : 

nn crystal rocks, 

h, it' thoi. ibove the waves: 

The masts, whereon thy swelling sails shall hang, 
Hollow pyramidea of silver plate: 
The - M, where shall be wrought 

roy, but not Troy's overthrow: 
:pty Dido's treasu 
Take v ill. hut leave Aeneas here. 

i shalt be so clad, 

thorn Nymphs shall swarm about thy ships, 
\nd wanton mermaids court thee with sweet songs. 
MAS NASHE AND CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE 



STKHfANCTS SOMi 

THE master, the swahl xtatswain and I, 

!iate, 

nd Meg, and Marian, and Margery, 
But none of us cared for Kate: 

had a tongue with a tang, 
ting: 

i tailor might scratch her where'er she did r 
sea, boys, and let her go hang. 

I.IAM SHAKESPEARE 
Temped) 



THE LOWLANDS OF HOLLAND 

ve has built a bonny ship, and set her on the sea, 
With seven score good mariners to bear her company; 
There's tlu-.-f MOM ll sunk, a-id three score dead at sea, 
And the Lowlands of Holland have twin'd my love and me. 



260 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

My love he built another ship, and set her on the main, 
And none but twenty mariners for to bring her hame ; 
But the weary wind began to rise, and the seas began to 

rout, 
My love then and his bonny ship turned withershins about. 

There shall neither coif come on my head, nor comb come 

in my hair, 
There shall neither coal nor candle light shine in my 

chamber mair ; 

Nor will I love another one until the day I dee, 
For I never loved a love but one, and he's drowned in the 

sea." 



" O hold your tongue, my daughter dear, be still and be 

content, 

There are more lads in Galloway, ye need not so lament." 
" O there is none is Galloway, there's none at all for me, 
For I never loved a love but one, and he's drowned in the 

sea." 



THE MAYDENS OF LONDON'S BRAVE 
ADVENTURES 

(To the tune of A Taylor is a Man] 

COME all you very merry London girls, that are disposed 

to travel, 
There is a voyage now at hand will save your feet from 

gravel. 
If you have shoes you need not fear for wearing out the 

leather ; 

For why, you shall on shipboard go, like loving rogues 
together. 

Some are already gone before, the rest must after follow, 
Then come away, and do not stay, your guide will be 
Apollo. 



THF MAVDEN'S' ADVENTrRES 261 
Peg, Nell, and Sis, Kate, Doll, and Bess, Sue, Rachel, and 

Joan, Prue, and Grace have took their place, with 

Deborah, Jane, and Mary, 
Fair WinitVrd, and Bridget bright, sweet Rose and pretty 

Nanny, 

With Ursula neat and Alice complete that had the love of 
Any; 
All thest brave girls, and other* mare, conducted by 

Uuif tn't-n t/n-tr mmm and air ^nif /f//r, and their 
Love, will after folia*. 



Then why should those that are behind slink back and 

dare not venture ? 

you shall prove the seamen >nce the ships you 

rn: 
You shall be fed with good strong fare, according to the 



Biscuit, salt beef, and English beer, and pork well boiled 

And since thai fame are game before, Ike rest with joy 

may folia*, 
To bear each other company, conducted by Apollo. 



n you come to the appointed place, your minds you 
need not trouble, 
For every groat that you got here, you shall have three 

double. 

there are gold and silver mines and treasures much 
abounding, 

As plenty at Newcastle cods, at some parts may be found 
in. 

Then come away, make no delay, all you that mean to 

folio*; 

The ships are ready bound to go, conducted by 
Apollo. 



262 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

THE GALLANT SEAMAN'S RESOLUTION 

(To the tune of Think on thy Loving Landlady'} 

A GALLANT youth at Gravesend lived, a seaman neither 

rich nor poor ; 

But when his means were almost spent, he bravely went 
to sea for more. 

Turn to thy love, and take a kiss, this gold about thy 

wrist I'll tie 

And always when thou look'st on this, 
Think on thy loving Landlady. 

His father being dead and gone, he loved his mother as 

his life, 
And did maintain her gallantly, it was well known he had 

no wife. 

Turn to thy love, etc. 

He was beloved of rich and poor, and still kept company 

with the best. 
A gallant widow in the town her love unto him thus 

exprest ; 

Turn to thy love, etc. 

Young man, could I thy favour win, or might thy company 

but crave, 
To come and live at home with me, I'd make thee Lord 

of all I have. 

Turn to thy love, etc. 

Fair Mistress, I am for the seas, here's gold and silver in 

my hand, 

And when the drums and trumpets sound, I'll bid adieu 
to fair England. 

And if thou wilt with patience stay, 
Till I from sea return again, 
For every kiss thou lendest me 
I will repay thee ten times ten. 



THE GALLANT sr.\M.\\ JQLOT1QN 

Do but resolve to stay at home, I'll put another in thy 
place. 

will be a shame, quoth he, and to my name a 
foul disgrace. 

ft to thy love, etc. 



I have five hundred pounds, at least, of silver which I 

ne\< 
Besides, I have in store for thee five hundred pounds in 

good red gold. 

Turn to thu love. tic. 



If you could give me all the wealth tha !.-]>< did 

aff> 
A faithful promise I have made, and 1 will not be worse 

than my word. 

And tftko* mU mik patience stay, r 



r strength nor policy CM r me in my design, 

Remain a constant friend to me, and I for ever will be 
thine. 

Timi to thy hoe, 

Ami i it breath and life doth last, to me this t 

n: 

Though you at sea, and I on shore, I'll pray for thy pros- 
per 

-n to iky lave, etc. 



Heaven bless the ship thou sailest in, whether it swim 

with wind or 
And all that with thee comes or goes, I hope that Nej 

will them guide. 
Turn to % love, etc. 



264 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

From pirates, blows, and bloody knocks, I pray great Mars 

protect thee still, 
Nor may quick-sands or stony rocks have power to do 

thee any ill. 

Turn to thy love, etc. 

And whilst thou art in foreign parts, in Holland, Flanders, 

France, or Spain, 
As thou in safety didst launch forth, God bring thee 

safely home again. 
Turn to thy love, etc. 

If I may speak without offence, my heart will never 

quiet be, 
Till thou give me full recompense, and sayst that I thy 

wife shall be. 

Turn to thy love, etc. 

Yet one thing here I beg of thee, before from me thou 

dost depart, 
That thou wilt let no woman know the thoughts and 

secrets of thy heart. 
Turn to thy love, etc. 

When thou art gone out of my sight, and com'st where 

pretty lasses are, 
Thou 'It fall in love with some of them ; that is the thing 

I most do fear. 

Turn to thy love, etc. 

If I should hear, in any case, that thou abroad should 

married be, 

Then would I weep, lament and grieve, and break my 
heart for love of thee. 

Turn to thy love and take a kiss, 
This gold about thy wrist I'll tie, 
And always when thou look'st on this. 
Think on thy loving landlady. 



TIIK SKAMAVS REPLY 265 



THK SKAMAVS KKI'LY 

HARK, hark, I hear the trumpet sound ; it calleth me to 

come away, 

Therefore in haste I must be gone, I can, nor will, no 
longer stay. 

And if tkou nrilt in patience ttay, 
Till I from tea return again, 
every kiss tkou lendett me 
I mil repay ikee ten times ten. 

Therefore sweet lady, now farewell, more than a thousand 

times adieu, 
Where'er I past, by land or sea, I'll still be faithful unto 

And if thorn trill, 



This --.;,!.-:: ribbon which you tied about my wrist-band 

'lire love, 
Shall be a token whilst I live, that I to you will constant 

And if tkou wilt, etc. 

And when that I return again, if God affords me breath 
and life, 

that are now my landlady, shall then be made my 
wedded wife. 

And if tkou mlt, etc. 

The bells shall ring melodiously, the music shall most 

sweetly play, 

And all our friends will then rejoice to see our happy 
wcdilini: (l.iy. 

And if tkou wilt frith patience stay, 

I from tea return again, 
every kiss tkou lendett me 
I will return tkee ten times ten. 



266 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 



THE GALLANT SEAMAN'S RETURN FROM 
THE INDIES 

Observe this song, which is both neat and pretty, 
'Tis on a seaman in his praise of Betty. 

(To the tune of Five Sail of Frigots, or Shrewsbury for Me) 

I AM a stout seaman, and newly come on shore, 

I have been a long voyage, where I never was before ; 

But now I am returned, I am resolved to see 

My own dearest honey, whose name is Betty. 

I have been absent from her full many a day, 
But yet I was constant in every way ; 
Though many a beautiful dame I did see, 
Yet none pleased me so well as Betty. 

Now I am intended, whatever betide, 

For to go and see her and make her my bride ; 

If that she and I can together agree, 

I never will love none but pretty Betty. 



THE GALLANT SEAMAN'S SONG AT 
HIS MEETING OF BETTY 

WELL met, pretty Betty, my joy and my dear, 

I now am returned thy heart for to cheer ; 

Though long I have been absent, yet I thought on thee, 

O my heart it was always with pretty Betty. 

Then come, my own dearest, to tavern let's go, 
Whereas we'll be merry for an hour or two ; 
Lovingly together we both will agree, 
And I'll drink a good health to my pretty Betty. 



A SAII.nit 267 



I will kiss thee and hug thee all iiiirht in my arms, 
I'll be careful of thee and keep thee from harms, 
I will love thee dearly in every degree, 
For my heart it is fixed on prett 

For thee I will rove and sail far and near, 

The dangerous rough sea shall not put me in fea 

isurc I'll bring it to thee, 
And I'll \ m tun- my lih- tor m\ 

And more than all this, I can tell thee, my dear, 
I will bring thee home som< -vels to wear, 

And many new fashions, I will provide tt 
So that none shall compare with pretty H 

Then come, my own dearest, and grant me thy love, 

loyal and constant to t 

It that tt ut trust and belief in me, 

I vow ne'er to love none bat pretty Bet 



A SAILOR 

A SAILOR is blythe and bonny O, 
His lips are sweet as honey O, 

< > how happy an 

When mv sailor is by, 
And sings love-songs to his Mol 

A sailor is full of bravery O 

He knows not of rogues or knavery O ; 

n his prince doth him call, 
He mans the wooden wall, 
That defends us from Popery and slavery O. 

When my sailor goes to sea, and leaves me O, 
Alas s and grieves me O ; 

But when he doth com 

There's an end of all my moan, 
For kisses from his lips do please me O. 



268 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Who would not be a sailor's lassy O, 
Rather than a meagre lady O ; 

He sails from east to west, 

And brings home the best 
Of jewels and silks to his deary O. 

A soldier brags of his bravery O, 
And says when he's by we're in safety O, 
But the riches of Peru, 
And the gold of Ophir, too, 
Are brought by the sailor to his country ^ 

The wine that revives our spirits O (?) 
We have by the sailor's merits O ; 
How can they have chagrin 
Or be troubled by the spleen, 
That such blessings do inherit O. 

O praise ye the jovial sailor O, 
No red-coat, tinker, or tailor O, 

Can e'er with him compare, 

For liveliness and air, 
And all we enjoy's through his labour O. 

Now I must conclude my ditto O, 
For want of words, it's a pity O, 

But all your voices raise, 

To sound a sailor's praise, 
In country, town, and city O. 



TO ALL YOU LADIES 

Song written at sea, in the first Dutch war, 1665, the night before 
an engagement. 

To all you ladies now at land 

We men at sea indite ; 
But first would have you understand 

How hard it is to write : 



TO ALL YOU LADIES 269 

The Muses now, and Neptune too, 
implore to write to you, 
With a fa, la, la, la, la. 



For though the Muses should prove kind, 

i till our empty brain ; 
Yet if rough v rouse the wind, 

To wave the azure main 
Our paper, pen, and ink, and we, 
Roll up and down our ships at sea, 
thafa, i- 



Then, if we write not by each post, 

ik not we are unkind ; 
Nor yet conclude our ships are lost 
By Dutchmen, or by wind : 

tears we'll send a speedier way, 
The tide shall bring 'em twice a day. 
With a fa, < 



The king with wonder and surprise 
Will swear the seas grow bold ; 

Because the tides will higher rise, 
Than e'er they used of old : 

But let him know it is our tears 

hrin-; tUids of grief to Whitehall-stairs. 
thafa, e 



ild foggy Opdam chance to know 

sad and dismal story ; 
The Dutch would scorn so weak a foe, 

1 quit their fort at Goree ; 
what resistance can they find 
From men who've left their hearts behind :- 
With a fa, e: 



270 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Let wind and weather do its worst, 

Be you to us but kind ; 
Let Dutchmen vapour, Spaniards curse, 

No sorrow we shall find ; 
'Tis then no matter how things go, 
Or who's our friend, or who's our foe. 
With a fa, etc. 



To pass our tedious hours away, 
We throw a merry main ; 

Or else at serious ombre play ; 
But why should we in vain 

Each other's ruin thus pursue ? 

We were undone when we left you. 
With a fa, etc. 



But now our fears tempestuous grow, 
And cast our hopes away, 

Whilst you, regardless of our woe, 
Sit careless at a play : 

Perhaps permit some happier man 

To kiss your hand, or flirt your fan. 
With a fa, etc. 



When any mournful tune you hear, 

That dies in ev'ry note, 
As if it sighed with each man's care, 

For being so remote ; 
Think then how often love we've made 
To you when all those tunes were play'd 
With a fa, etc. 



In justice, you can not refuse, 
To think of our distress, 

When we for hopes of honour lose 
Our certain happiness ; 



THE SKAMA\> ru.Ml'ASS 271 

All those designs are but to prove 
Ourselves more worthy of your love. 
With a fa. c 



And now we've told yon all our loves, 
And likewise all our fears ; 

In h..|>c> tliis declaration moves 
Som< | r tears; 

much of that at sea. 
i a fa, la, la, la, la. 

CHARLES SACKVILLE, EARL or DORSET 



Till EKE \M mOT COMPASS 

A dainty new ditty composed and penned, 
The deeds of brave seamen to praise and commend 
Twas made by a Maid that to Gravesend did pan, 
Now mark, and you quickly shall hear how it was. 

(To the Tune of Tkt Tyrant katk stolen) 

As lately I travelled 
Towards Gravescn< 1 , 
1 heard a fair Damsel 
A Seaman coinnv 

1 AS in a tilt-boat 

l^assed along, 
In praise of brave Seamen 
She sung this new song : 
Come Tradesman or Merchant, 

Whorvrr In- be, 

There* none but a Seaman 
Shall marry mik me. 



272 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

A seaman in promise 
Is faithful and just, 
Honest in carriage 
And true to his trust : 
Kind in behaviour 
And constant in love, 
Is firm in affection 
As the turtle dove : 
Valiant in action 
In every degree. 

O s none but a sailor 
Shall marry with me. 



The seamen adventure 
Their lives on the seas, 
Whilst landmen on shore 
Take pleasure and ease ; 
The seamen at all times 
Their business must ply, 
In winter and summer, 
In wet and in dry. 
From toil and pains-taking 
They seldom are free, 

And none but a sailor 
Shall marry with me. 



Moreover, I'd have you 

For to understand, 

That seamen bring treasure 

And profit to land ; 

Above and beneath ground 

For wealth they have sought ; 

And when they have found it, 

To England 'tis brought, 

With hazard of lives, 

By experience we see : 

There's none but a sailor 
Shall marry with me. 



''HI: H:. \M.\VS COMPASS 273 

Seamen ^fiom beyond the sea. 

"ring silver, -i- 

Moat rare to behold ;* 

' 



N'ith silks aii. i vets 

'* r gy ladies 
! ""tgosobrave. 

This nuke, my heart merry 

As merry nuy be, 
' 



The 

And . 

rave 
To drink with their 

Wien they nuOce a feast ; 
eet ftgs, prunes, and raisins 
*ht home be, 

'e* nome bid a icamam 
any m* me, 



S\vrc-t 

Bv 



1 8 



comfort poor people 
I he seamen do strive, 

"'in- in maintenance 
'eep them alive, 
As raw , ilk and cotton-wool 
To card and to sj: 
And so labours 

livings come in . 
Most men are belmld 
To seamen we see. 

.///'/ i,,,,,,- l,,,t a MBMN 

SkM marry mtk me. 



274 A SAILORS GARLAND 

The mercer's beholding, 

We know well enough, 

For holland, lawn, cambric, 

And other gay stuff, 

That's brought from beyond seas 

By seamen so bold, 

The rarest that ever 

Men's eyes did behold. 

God prosper the seamen 

Wherever they be. 

There's none but a seaman 
Shall marry with me. 



The merchants themselves 
Are beholding also 
To honest seamen 
That on purpose do go, 
To bring them home profit 
From other strange lands, 
Or else their fine daughters 
Must work with their hands, 
The nobles and gentry 
In every degree. 

0, none but a sailor 
Shall marry with me. 



Thus for rich men and poor men 

The seamen does good, 

And sometimes comes off with 

Loss of much blood : 

If they were not a guard 

And a defence for our land 

Our enemies soon will get 

The upper hand, 

And then in a woeful case 

Straight should we be. 

There's none but a seaman 
Shall marry with me. 



,\ fOUMG M W8 FANCY 275 

To draw to conclusion 
And so make an < 
1 hope that great 
My love will befriend, 
And send him home safely 

h health ami 
1 hen shall I with jo\ fulness 
Soon be his * 

That seamen's loves be, 
Jam prayers ivtik me. 



God bless all brave 

From quicksands and rocks, 

From loss of their blood, 

And from enemies' knocks, 

Fron rig and thunder, 

And tempests so strong, 

From shipwreck and drowning, 

And all other wrong, 

And they that to these words 

W)ll not say amen, 

'Tit pity they *Hauld 
Ever tpeak word age*. 



A YOUNG MAN^ FANCY 

ALL the sheets are clacking, all the blocks are whining, 
The sails are frozen stiff, and the wetted decks are sin 
The reefs in the topsails, and it's coming on to blow, 
And I think of the de.i eft long ago. 

eyes, and her hair w;is lung and honnv, 

. .id \n-r \ honey, 

And I was but a dog, and a mad one, to despise 
The gold of her hair and the grey of her eyes. 



276 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

There's the sea before me, and my home behind me, 
And beyond there the lands where nobody will mind me, 
No one but the girls with the paint upon their cheeks, 
Who sell away their beauty to whomsoever seeks. 

There'll be drink and women there, and songs and laughter ; 
Peace from what is past, and from all that follows after ; 
And a fellow will forget how a woman lies awake 
Lonely in the night-watch crying for his sake. 

Black it blows, and bad, and it howls like slaughter, 
And the ship she shudders as she takes the water, 
Hissing flies the spindrift, like a wind-blown smoke, 
And I think of a woman, and a heart I broke. 

R. E. McGowAN 



THE FAIR MAID'S CHOICE OR THE 
SEAMAN'S RENOWN 

BEING a pleasant song made of a sailor, 
Who excels a soldier, miller, and a tailor, 
Likewise brave gallants that go fine and rare, 
None of them with a seaman can compare. 

As lately I journeyed through Winchelsea town, 
I spied a gallant lady in a brave golden gown ; 
Like a thrush upon a thombush so sweetly sang she, 
0, of all sorts of tradesmen a sailor for me. 

Of all sorts of gallants so gaudy and fine, 
That with gold lace and silver so bravely do shine, 
The seaman doth pass them in every degree, 
And of all sorts of tradesmen a sailor for me. 

For a seaman will venture his life and his blood, 
For the sake of his King and his countrie's good ; 
He is valiant and gallant in eveiy degree, 
So of all sorts of tradesmen a sailor for me. 



THE FAIR MAID'S ('HOICK 

He ventures for traffic upon the salt seas, 
To pleasure our gentry who live at their ease, 
Through dangerous places right . 

(ill torts of tradesmen a tailor for me. 



all your tradesmen and merchant* so brave, 
I can't set my fancy <>. \\\ to lm\ 

A seaman tr..m 15 ^hall be, 

For all sort* of tradesmen a sailor for me. 

h a scarlet coat soldier in a bold bandoleer, 
Who fires a great musket for crusts and small beer, 
With all such fierce firebloods I <t agree, 

So of all torts < 

With a dusty-cap miller 1 will il, 

For out of a bushel a peck he will steal ; 
I will have no society with rogues such as he, 
But of all torts of tradesmen a sailor for me. 

Also the carpenter and the shoemak 
The blacksmith, the brewer, and likewise the baker, 
Some of them use knavery, and some honesty, 
Bui of all sorts of tradesmen a saiioi for me. 

e a seaman as 1 love my life, 
And I am resolved to be a seaman's wife, 
No man else in England my husband shall be, 
Fur oj all sorts of tradesman a sailor for me. 

Now I'll tell yon why I love a seaman so dear, 
I have to my sweetheart a seaman most rare, 
He is a stout proper lad, as you shall see, 
And of all sorts of tradesman a sailor for me. 

If that I were worth a whole ship-load of gold, 
My lov- should possess it, and with it make 1> 
I would make him the master of every penny, 

if all sorts of tradesman a sailor for me. 



278 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Through fire and water I would go, I swear, 
For the sake of my true love whom I love so dear, 
If I might have an earl, I'd forsake him for he ; 
Then of all sorts of tradesman a sailor for me. 

Here's a health to my dear, come pledge me who please, 
To all gallant seamen that sail on the seas. 
Pray God bless and keep them from all dangers free, 
So of all sorts of tradesman a sailor for me. 



THE SAILOR LADDIE 

My love has been in London city, 
My love has been at Port Mahon, 
My love is away at Greenland, 
1 hope he will come back again. 
Oh ! my bonny sailor laddie, 
Oh ! my bonny sailor, he, 
Well I love my sailor laddie, 
Blythe and merry may he be. 

Greenland altho' it is no City, 
Yet it is a bonny place, 
Soon will he come back to England, 
Then to court his bonny lass. 
Oh ! my bonny, etc. 

Fisher lads go the fishing, 
Bonny lasses to the braes, 
Fisher lads come home at even, 
Tell how their fishing goes. 
Oh ! my bonny, etc. 

Sailor lads come home at even, 
Casting off their tarry cloaths, 
Calling for their own true lovers, 
And telling how their trading goes. 
Oh ! my bonny, etc. 



THF, SAIUW LADDIE 
Sailor lads has gold mil rih 

.r-r l.-uls has nought but brass, 
! I love my sailor ladd 
Because I am a sailor's lass. 
Oh ! my Aomty, 

( )ur i ml ile Captain's gone 0, 

Oh! preserve tin ie press, 

him satV-ly back to T 
There to omrt hi. bonny lav. 
Ok ! my bonny, , 

How can I be blythe and merry, 
1 my true love so far from me, 
When so man sailors, 

Are prest, and tak sea. 

Ok! my bonny,, 

Wl: he was in Terry, 

He came and saw me once a night ; 
Hut now he's prest to t **, 

And is k* of my sight 

Oh ! my bonny, < 

1 all thr wars was at a' 

ih! be merry with hi- 
I / my bonny, < 

Here has been so much disturbance, 
r sailor lads dare not look 

ink unli tlu-ir own lasses, 
to have a single rout. 

O/i .' ;;/v tunny, flc. 

My love, he's a bonny lad< : 
HI \ th- and merry may he be, 
If the wan were at an end, 
He would come and marry me. 
Oh! my family, etc. 



280 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Some delight in jolly farmers, 
Some delight in soldiers free ; 
But my delight's in a sailor laddie, 
Blythe and merry may he be. 
Oh ! my bonny, etc. 



Oh, I wish the war was over, 
And peace and plenty come again, 
Then every bonny sailor laddie, 
Would come sailing o'er the main. 
Oh ! my bonny, etc. 



If the wars they were all over, 
And all our sailors were come home, 
Then every lass would get her laddie, 
And every mother get her son. 
Oh / my bonny, etc. 



Come you by the Buoy and Nore, 
Or come you by the Roperie, 
Saw you of my love sailing, 
Oh, saw you him coming home to me. 
Oh ! my bonny sailor laddie, 
Oh ! my bonny sailor, he, 
Well I love my sailor laddie, 
And my sailor he loves me. 



SONG TO MARY 

THE topsails shiver in the wind, 
The ship she casts to sea ; 

But yet my soul, my heart, my mind, 
Are, Maiy, moored with thee : 

For, though thy sailor's bound afar, 

Still love shall be his leading star. 



THK NORTH OH \TKY < oLLIER 281 

Shi in Id landsmen flatter when we're sailed, 

O doubt tin i iles; 

No gallant sailor ever failed , 

1 filled his scti 
Thou art the compass of my soul 

!i steers my heart from pole to pole. 

Sirens in every port we meet, 

More fell than rocks and waves ; 
But sailors of tiu British fleet, 

Are lovers, and not slaves, 
No foes our courage shall subdue, 
Although we've left our hearts with you. 

These are our cares ; l> i re kind, 

We'll scorn t !.- dashing main, 
The rocks, the billows, and the wind, 

< powers of France and Spain. 
Now Britain's glory rests * 
Our sails are full sweet girls adieu. 

I \j-i M\ THOMSON 



Tin: NORTH COUNTRY cOLLir.it 

At the head of Wear Water, about twelve at noon, 
I heard a maid a-Ulktng and this was her tune, 
There are all sorts of callings, in every degree, 
But of all sorts of callings a collu-r tor me. 

may know a jolly collier as he walks on the street, 
: i) thing is so handsome, and so neat are his 1< 
With teeth as white as ivory, and his eyes as black as 

sloes, 
You may know a jolly collier wherever he goes. 

You may know a jolly collier: he's a swaggering young 

blade, 
When he goes a-courting of his buxom fair maid, 



282 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

With his lips he so flatters her, and he spends his money 

free, 
You may know a jolly collier wheresoever that he be. 

You may know a jolly collier as he sails the salt sea ; 
As he ploughs the wide ocean he sets his sails three, 
The foresail for to lift her, and the mainsail to drive, 
And the little pretty crojick for to make her steer wild. 

I'll build my jolly collier a castle on a hill, 

Where neither Duke nor Squire can work me any ill, 

For the Queen can but enjoy the King, and I can do the 

same, 
And I am but a sheep-girl, and who can me blame ? 



THE BOLD PRIVATEER 

O, FARE you well, my Polly dear, since you and I must 

part, 
In crossing of the seas, my love, I'll pledge to you my 

heart; 

For our ship she lies waiting, so fare you well, my dear, 
For I just now am going aboard of a bold privateer. 

She said, " My dearest Jemmy, I hope you will forbear, 
And do not leave your Polly in grief and in despair ; 
You'd better stay at home with the girl you love so dear, 
Than venture on the seas your life in a bold privateer. 

You know, my dearest Polly, your friends they do me 

slight ; 

Besides, you have two brothers would take away my life ; 
And from them I must wander, myself to get me clear, 
So 1 am just now going aboard of a bold privateer. 

And when the wars are over, if God does spare our lives, 
We will return safe back again to our sweethearts and our 

wives, 

And then I will get married to my charming Polly, dear, 
And forever bid adieu to the bold privateer. 



TOM HOWLING 283 



TOM BOWI.IM; 

HERE, a sheer hulk, lies poor Tom Bowling, 

Th< i r crew; 

No more he'll hear the tempest howling, 
For death has broached In- 
rm was of the manliest ben 
> heart was kind and s. 
Faithful, below, he did his d 
But now he's gone aloft. 

in his \\ortl departed, 
virtues were so rare ; 
His friends were many and true-hearted, 

ills Poll was kind and fair: 
And then he'd sing so blithe and jolly, 

Ah. many'* t md oft! 

Hut mirth is turned to melancholy, 

shall poor ! .-in tii id pleasant weather, 
Win n lie, who all commands, 
Shall give, to call life's crew together, 

The word t,. pipe all hands. 

I'liu^ D.-.ith. \%h.. kind's and Ur-, di switches, 
In has dot! 

his body's undrr hatches, 
I l:s soul has gone al< 



POEMS OF PIRATES AND 
SMUGGLERS 

JOHN DORY 

As it fell on a holy day, 

And upon a holy tide-a, 
John Dory bought him an ambling nag 

To Paris for to ride-a. 



And when John Dory to Paris was come 

A little before the gate-a ; 
John Dory was fitted, the porter was witted, 

To let him in thereat-a. 



The first man that John Dory did meet, 
Was good King John of France-a : 

John Dory could well of his courtesy, 
But fell down in a trance-a. 

A pardon, a pardon, my liege and king, 
For my merry men and me-a : 

And all the churls in merry England 
I'll being them bound to thee-a, 

And Nichol was then a Cornish man, 

A little beside Bohyde-a ; 
And he manned forth a good black bark, 

With fifty good oars on a side-a. 



HKNRY MARTYN 285 

Hun up, i! -ito the main-top, 

!mt thou canst spy-a ; 

i good ship I do see, 
I trow it be John Dory-a. 



They hoist their sails, botli top and 
ie mixsen and all was tried-a ; 
Ami every man stood to \\\^ lot, 
itever should betide-a. 



The roaring cannon 

And dub-a-dub went the drum-a ; 
The braying trumpets loud they cried, 

To courage both all and sorae-a. 



The grappling hooks were brought at length, 
brown bill and the sword-a; 

y l at length, for all his strength, 
Was clapt fast under board-*. 



HKNKY M \RTVN 

THERE were three brothers in merry Scotland, 
In merry Scotland there were three, 

And each of these brothers i cast lots 

To see which should rob the salt sea. 



Then this lot did fall on young Henry Mart 
The youngest of these broth, rs three, 

So now he's turned robber on all the salt seas, 
To maintain his two brothers and he. 

1 One Nicholas, son to a widow near I -ughi bravely at 

sea with one John Dory, (a Genowey, as I conjecture) set forth by 
John, the French king, and, after much bloodshed, . . . took and 
slew him." Carew, Survey of Cornwall. 



286 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

He had not sailed one long winter's night, 

One cold winter's night before day, 
Before he espied a rich merchant-ship, 

Come bearing straight down that way. 

" Who are you ? Who are you ? " said Henry Martyn, 
" Or how durst thou come so nigh ? " 

" I'm a rich merchant-ship for old England bound, 
If you please, will you let me pass by ? " 

" O no ! O no ! " cried Henry Martyn, 

" O no, that can never be, 
Since I have turned robber all on the salt seas, 

To maintain my two brothers and me. 

Now lower your topsails, you alderman bold, 

Come lower them under my lee ! 
Seeing I am resolved to pirate you here, 

To maintain my two brothers and me." 

Then broadside to broadside to battle they went, 

For more than two hours or three ; 
At last Henry Martyn gave her a death wound, 

And down to the bottom went she. 

Bad news, bad news, to England has come, 

Bad news I will tell to you all, 
'Twas a rich merchant-ship to England was bound, 

And most of her merry men drowned. 



A BALLAD OF DANSEKAR THE DUTCHMAN 

A LATE FAMOUS PIRATE 

SING we seamen now and then 

Of Dansekar the Dutchman 
Whose gallant mind hath won him great renown ; 

To live on land he counts it base, 

But seeks to purchase greater grace 
By roving on the ocean up and down. 



A UAl.LAl) OF DANSFK Alt 287 

Mg, 

That now h ''il 

i ,i worthy MI 

The land hath far too little ground, 
Tlu- sea is of m larger 
And of a greater dignity and fame. 

And many a worthy galla ! 

ige now most valiant, 

With him hath pi; me* to the sea; 

All i about have heard 

Dansekar and English Ward, 
And ot their proud adventures every day. 

There is not any Kingdom, 

In Turkey or in* Christendom, 
Hut by these pirates ha\e received loss; 

Merchantmen of every la: 

Do daily in great danger star 
And much do fear the ocean main to 



. make children fatherless, 

ress, 
In shedding blood they took too much delight ; 

hers they bereave of sons, 
Regarding ii ans, 

So much they joy to see a bloody fight 

They count it gallant bear 

hear the cannons roaring, 
And musket shot to rattle in the sk 
I h.-ir glories would be at the highest, 

tight against the foes of Christ, 
And such as d< ristian faith <i 

Hut their cursed villainies, 

And their bloody piracies, 
Are chiefly bent ag istian fri 

light in e. 

That they become the sons of devils. 
And for the same have many shameful ends. 



288 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

England suffers danger, 
As well as any stranger, 

Nations are alike unto this company ; 
Many English merchantmen, 
And of London now and then, 

Have tasted of their vile extremity. 



London's Elisabeth, 

Of late these rovers taken have, 
A ship well laden with rich merchandize ; 

The nimble Pearl and Chanty, 

All ships of gallant bravery, 
Are by these pirates made a lawful prize. 



The Trojan of London, 

With other ships many a one, 
Hath stooped sail and yielded out of hand, 

These pirates, they have shed their bloods, 

And the Turks have bought their goods, 
Being all too weak their power to withstand. 



Of Hull the Bonaventure, 
Which was a great frequenter, 

And passer of the Straits to Barbary ; 
Both ship and men late taken were, 
By the pirates Ward and Dansekar, 

And brought by them into captivity 



SECOND PART 

English Ward and Dansekar, 

Begin greatly now to jar, 
About dividing their goods ; 

Both ships and soldiers gather head, 

Dansekar from Ward is fled, 
So full of pride and malice are their bloods. 



A FAM(H> 9U riCHT 289 

Ward doth only promise 
To keep abou 
And be < H Turkish seas ; 

,-hn.l Dunsekar, 
car unto 
And tlu-rr rs now displays. 

By God is soon provided, 
In secret sort to work each other's woe ; 

>es cannot stand, 
il thus puts in his hiu 
And God will give them soon an overthrow. 



A FAMOUS SEA IK.HT BETWEEN 

C \1T.\I\ \VAK1) AM) Till. /,'.//.\ 

STRIKE i isty galla 

. . 
we have descried a R* 

il name is Captain Ward, 

ver 
i > t housand year : 

hath sen* rig, 

January, 
Desiring that h< -im- m 

And it' your Kinjr will l-t me come, 

Till 1* my tale have told, 
I will bestow for my rans< 

Full thirty ton of gold. 

nay," then said our King, 

nay. thi"^ t DC, 

To yield to such a Rover, 
Myself will not agree : 

19 



290 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

He hath deceived the Frenchman, 
Likewise the King of Spain, 

And how can he be true to me, 
That hath been false to twain ? " 

With that our King provided 

A ship of worthy fame, 
Rainbow is she called, 

If you would know her name : 
Now the gallant Rainbow 

She rows upon the sea, 
Five hundred gallant seamen 

To bear her company. 

The Dutchman and the Spaniard, 

She made them for to fly, 
Also the bonny Frenchman, 

As she met him on the sea. 
When as this gallant Rainbow 

Did come where Ward did lie 
"Where is the Captain of this ship ? " 

This gallant Rainbow did cry. 

" O, that am I," says Captain Ward, 

" There's no man bids me lie, 
And if thou art the King's fair ship, 

Thou art welcome to me." 
" I'll tell thee what," says Rainbow, 

" Our King is in great grief, 
That thou shouldst lie upon the sea, 

And play the arrant thief. 

And will not let our merchants' ships 

Pass as they did before ; 
Such tidings to our King is come, 

Which grieves his heart full sore." 
With that, this gallant Rainbow 

She shot, out of her pride, 
Full fifty gallant brass pieces 

Charged on every side. 



A FAMOl> I FIGHT 291 

And yet these gallant shooters 

Prevailed not a \ 

Though they were brass on the outside, 
Brave Ward was stcrl \\itliin : 
i<K>t on, shoot on," says Captain Ward, 

ur sport well pleaseth me, 
And he that first gives over, 
Shall Yield unto the sea. 

I never wronged an English si 
Hu k and King of Spa 

the jovial Dutchman, 
As I met on the 
It I h.ui known your K 
Hut one two years before, 

1 have saved brave Essex 
Whose death did grieve me sore. 

inland, 

reigns King of all the land, 
I * _ r at sea." 

With that the gallant Rambom ihot, 

shot ana shot in vain, 
And left the Rover's company 
And return'd home again. 

of Engla: 

V aid's ship is so strong 
era will be ta'en." 

says our King, 
I have lost jewels three, 
Which would have gone unto the seas, 
And brought proud Ward to me. 

irst was Lord Clifford, 
The Earl of Cumberland ; 
The second was Lord Mountjoy 
As you shall understand ; 



292 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The third was brave Essex 
From field would never flee, 

Which would have gone unto the seas, 
And brought proud Ward to me." 



AS WE WERE A-SAILING 

As we were a-sailing unto the Spanish shore, 

Where the drums they did beat, boys, and the guns they 

did roar, 
We spied our lofty enemies come spooming down the 

main, 
Which caused us to hoist our topsails again. 

There was a gallant damsel, a damsel of fame, 

She was daughter of the Captain, and Nancy was her 

name, 

She stood on the deck, and gallantly she calls, 
" O stand to your guns, boys, and load with cannon-balls." 

O broadside to broadside to battle then we went, 

To sink one another it was our intent ; 

The very second broadside our captain got slain, 

And the damsel she stood up there his place to maintain. 

We fought for a watch, for a watch so severe, 
We scarcely had a man left was able for to steer ; 
We scarcely had a man left could fire off a gun, 
And the blood from our deck like a river it did run. 



For quarter, for quarter, the Spanish lads did cry, 
" No quarter, no quarter," this damsel did reply ; 
" You've had the best of quarter that I can afford, 
You must fight, sink, or swim, my boys, or jump over- 
board." 



THE SALCOMBE SEAMAN S FLAUNT 293 

So now the battlt r '11 drink a can of wine, 

And you will drink to your love and I will drink to 

mine ; 

Good health damsel who fought upon the main, 

And here's to the royal shij> the Rainbow by name. 



THK SALCOMBF SEAMAN'S FLAUNT TO 

Till: FKOFl) FIKATF. 

A LOFTY ship from Salcombe came, 
Blow high, blow low, ami to ttuled me; 

She had golden trucks that shone like flame, 
On the bonny coatt* of Barbary. 

Masthead, masthead/' the captains hail, 
Blow high, blow low, and so taiM ,. 

" Look out and nun id ; d ye see a sail ? " 
On thf bonny coatt* of Barbary. 

"There's a ship what looms like Beachy Head/' 

ir high, blow low, and to tailed we ; 
" Her banner aloft it blows out red/' 
On tke bonny coaaff oj Barbary. 

" Oh, ship ahoy, and where do you ste< 
Blow high, blow low, mnd 90 Mailed me; 

; nan -of- war, or private* 
On the bonny coast* oj Barbary. 

" I am neither one of the two/' said she, 
Blow high, blow low, and to tailed we ; 

be, looking for my fee," 
On the bonny coatt* of Barber*. 

1 in a jolly piratr. <>ut for go 

Blow high, blow low, and to tailed me ; 
" 1 will rummage through your after h< 
On the bonny coattt of Barbary. 



294 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The grumbling guns they flashed and roared, 
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we ; 

Till the pirate's masts went overboard, 
On the bonny coasts of Barbary. 

They fired shot till the pirate's deck, 
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we ; 

Was blood and spars and broken wreck, 
On the bonny coasts of Barbary. 

" O do not haul the red flag down," 
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we ; 

" O keep all fast until we drown," 
On the bonny coasts of Barbary. 

They called for cans of wine, and drank, 
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we ; 

They sang their songs until she sank, 
On the bonny coasts of Barbary. 

Now let us brew good cans of flip, 
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we ; 

And drink a bowl to the Salcombe ship, 
On the bonny coasts of Barbary. 

And drink a bowl to the lad of fame, 
Blow high, blow low, and so sailed we ; 

Who put the pirate ship to shame, 
On the bonny coasts of Barbary. 



TEACH THE ROVER 

WILL you hear of a bloody Battle, 

Lately fought upon the Seas, 
It will make your Ears to rattle, 

And your Admiration cease ; 
Have you heard of Teach the Rover, 

And his Knavery on the Main ; 
How of Gold he was a Lover, 

How he lov'd an ill-got Gain. 



\( H Tin: KOM:K 295 

When the Act of Grace appeared, 

Oij < // with all his im 

Unto Carolina steered, 

\\hrrr tlu-y kindly us'd him then; 
There he marry'd to a Laci 

And gave her five hundred Pound, 
But to her lu pro\'d unsteady, 

r he soon march'd off the Ground. 

ued, as I tell \ 
To his Robbery as before, 
Burning, sinking Ships of va 

them wr re; 

When he was at Carolina, 

To the Governor ia, 

That he might assistance lend. 

Then the Man-of- War's Commat 
Two small Sloops h< t 

Men he put on board. 
\\lio resolv'd to stand it . 

t enant he commanded 
B< . >op, and you shall hear, 

How before he landed, 

He suppress'd them \'. :car. 

mt Maynard as he sailed, 

Soon the Pirate did espy, 

I lu-, Trumpet he thm h.iiled, 

An- ' rcjily : 

"Caj Commander," 

Maynard said, " he is the Man, 
NVh to hang, . v 

Let him do the best he 



repl\ed unto Maynard, 



Hut be han^d on - vard, 

^ <>u and all your Compan 



296 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Maynard said, " I none desire, 

Of such knaves as thee and thine, 

None I'll give." Teach replied, 

" My Boys, give me a Glass of Wine." 

He took the glass and drank Damnation, 

Unto Maynard and his Crew, 
To himself and Generation, 

Then the Glass away he threw ; 
Brave Maynard was resolv'd to have him, 

Tho' he'd Cannons nine or ten ; 
Teach a broadside quickly gave him, 

Killing sixteen valiant Men. 

Maynard boarded him, and to it 

They fell with Sword and Pistol too ; 
They had Courage, and did show it. 

Killing of the Pirate's Crew. 
Teach and Maynard on the Quarter, 

Fought it out most manfully, 
Maynard 's Sword did cut him shorter, 

Losing his head, he there did die. 

Every sailor fought while he, Sir, 

Power had to wield the Sword, 
Not a coward could you see, Sir, 

Fear was driven from aboard ; 
Wounded Men on both Sides fell, Sir, 

'Twas a doleful Sight to see, 
Nothing could their Courage quell, Sir, 

O, they fought courageously. 

When the bloody Fight was over, 

We're informed by a Letter writ, 
Teach' s Head was made a Cover, 

To the Jack Staff of the Ship : 
Thus they sailed to Virginia, 

And when they the Story told, 
How they kill'd the Pirates many, 

They'd Applause from young and old. 



THK LAST BUCCANEER 297 



THE LAST Br(VA\I.l R 

OH England i* a pleasant place for tin in that's rich and 

_h. 

Hut Ki inland is a cruel place tor such poor folks as I ; 
! such a port for mariners I ne'er shall see again 
' pleasant Me of Aves, beside the Spanish Main. 

There were forty craft in Aves that were both swift and 

sto 
All furnished well with small arms and cannons r< 

about ; 

And a thousand men in Aves made laws so fair and free, 
r valiant captains and 

Thence we sailed against the Spaniard with his hoards ot 
\Vlm-li \\e wrung with cruel tortures from Indian folk of 
Likewise the merchant captains, with hearts as hard as 
Who flog men and keel-haul them, and starve them to 



Oh, th- jwilms grew high in Aves, and fruits that shone 

!>ris and parrots they were gorgeous to be- 
bd 

negro maids to Aves from bondage fast did flee, 
To welcome gallant sailors, a-sweeping in from sea. 

Oh, sweet it was in Aves to hear the landward breeze, 
Mg with good tobacco in a net between the trees, 
With a negro lass to fan you. whilr you listened to the 

mar 

<-rs on the reef CM iat never touched 

the shore. 



298 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

But Scripture saith, an ending to all fine things must be ; 
So the King's ships sailed on Aves, and quite put down 

were we. 
All day we fought like bull-dogs, but they burst the 

booms at night ; 
And I fled in a piragua, sore wounded, from the fight. 

Nine days I floated starving, and a negro lass beside, 
Till for all I tried to cheer her, the poor young thing she 

died: 

But as I lay a-gasping, a Bristol sail came by, 
And brought me home to England here, to beg until I 

die. 

And now I'm old and going I'm sure I can't tell where ; 
One comfort is, this world's so hard, I can't be worse off 

there : 

If I might but be a sea dove, I'd fly across the main, 
To the pleasant Isle of Aves, to look at it once again. 

CHARLES KINGSLEY 



THE LAST BUCCANEER 

THE winds were yelling, the waves were swelling, 

The sky was black and drear, 

When the crew with eyes of flame brought the ship 
without a name 

Alongside the last Buccaneer. 

" Whence flies your sloop full sail before so fierce a gale, 
When all others drive bare on the seas ? 

Say, come ye from the shore of the holy Salvador, 
Or the gulf of the rich Caribbees ? " 

" From a shore no search hath found, from a gulf no line 
can sound, 

Without rudder or needle we steer ; 
Above, below our bark dies the sea-fowl and the shark, 

As we fly by the last Buccaneer. 



THE SMUGGLER 299 

" To-night there shall be heard on the rocks of Cape de 

A loud crash and a louder roar ; 
And to-morrow shall the deep with a heavy moaning 

sweep 
The corpses and wreck to the si. 

The stately ship of Clyde securely now may ride 
I'M the breadth run shades ; 

And Severn's towering mast securely now hies fast, 
Through the seas of the balmy Trades. 

St Jago's wealthy port, from Havannah's royal 

The seaman goes forth without fear . 
^ince that stormy night not a mortal hath had sight. 
Of the flag of the last Buccaneer. 

Lou> M \. M : \N 



1H1. -MlGGLER 

(Air: Wkto 



. e's a smuggler and sails upon the sea, 
1 u<i!d I were a seaman to go along with he; 
To go along with h<- tor the satins and tt 
And run the tubs at Slapton when the stars do shine. 

Hands is a good drink when the nights are cold, 
And Brandy is a good drink for them as grows old. 
There is lights in the cliff-top when the boats are home- 

bou 
And we run the tubs at Slapton when the word goes 

round. 

Thr Ku>u r he is a proud man in his grand red coat, 
Hut 1 d*> love a smuggler in a little fishing-boat ; 

he runs the Mailing lace and he spends his money 

And i would I were a seaman to go along with he. 



CHANTIES 



A CHANTY is a song sung by sailors when engaged in the 
severest of their many labours. The word chanty is gener- 
ally mispronounced by landsmen. It is not pronounced 
as spelt, like the word chant with an added y final. It 
is pronounced shanty, to rhyme with scanty, the ch soft 
and the a narrow. The verb to chanty is frequently used, 
as in the order "Chanty it up, now," or the injunction 
" Heave and chanty." 

There are three varieties of chanty, each kind adapted 
to its special labour. There is the capstan chanty, sung 
at the capstan when warping, or weighing anchor, or 
hoisting topsails with the watch. There is the halliard 
chanty, sung at the topsail and top-gallant halliards, when 
the topsails and top-gallant sails are being mast-headed. 
And there is the sheet, tack, and bowline chanty, used 
when the fore, main, and crossjack sheets are hauled aft, 
and when the tacks are boarded and the bowlines tautened. 
Formerly, in the days when ships were built of wood, and 
leaked from an inch or two to two or three feet a day, 
there used to be pumping chanties, sung by the pumpers 
as they hove the brakes round. Now that ships are built 
of steel or iron, which either leak not at all or go to the 
bottom, there is no pumping to be done aboard, save the 
pumping of fresh water from the tanks in the hold for 
the use of the crew, and the daily pumping of salt water 
for the washing down of the decks. I have passed many 
miserable hours pumping out the leaks from a wooden 
ship, but I was never so fortunate as to hear a pumping 
chanty. 

Strictly speaking, there is a fourth variety of chanty, 

200 



riIANTII> 301 

but it is a bastard va: ry seldom used. The true 

chanty, of the kimU I have m is a song >vi 

solo part and one or two choruses. The solo part consists 
of a line of rhyme which is repeated by the solo man 
after tht torus has been shouted. The bastard 

variety which I have just mentioned has no solo part. It 
is a runaway chorus, sung by all hands as they race al 
the- tU-i-k with the rop< a-ar it in Uckmir ship. It 

is a good sonj: hm th- main and mizzen yards are 

being swung simultaneously. All hands are at the braces 
straining taut, and 

the great yards round \\ith 

a crash. It is a most cheery kind of chanty, and the 
f the moment, and the sight of the great 
yards spinning round, and the noise of the stamping feet 
impress . mind. The favourite runaway chorus 

is: 

" What shall we do with a drunken sailor? 
What shall we do with a drunken sailor? 
What shall we do with a drunken sailor, 
Early in the rooming? 
hay, there she rues, 
hay, thrre she rites, 
Way, hay, there she rises, 
Early in the rooming. 

" Chuck him in the long-boat till he gets sober, 
Chuck him in the long-boat till he gets sober, 
Chock him in the long-boat till he gets sober, 
Early in the morning. 
hay, there she ruea, 
M.IV, there she rises, 
Way, hay, there she rises, 
Early in the morning. 

. to a vigorous tune i time. It is the 

1 sailors to stamp with their feet at each 
i\. ' 1 he effect is very spirited, 
the chanties proper, the capstan chanties are the 
most beautiful, the halliard chanties the most comm 
heard, and the sheet, tack, and bowline chanties the most 
ancient. In a capstan chanty the solo man begins \\ith 
his single line of verse. Before he has spoken the last 



302 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

word of it the other men heaving at the bars break out 
with the first chorus. Immediately before the chorus has 
come to an end the solo man repeats his line of verse, 
to be interrupted at the last word by the second chorus, 
which is generally considerably longer than the first. It 
is a glorious thing to be on a forecastle-head, heaving 
at a capstan bar, hearing the chain coming clanking in 
below you to the music of a noisy chanty sung by a score 
of sailors. 

The Solo, or Chanty-man. In Amsterdam there dwelt a maid. 
The. Sailors. Mark well what I do say ! 

The Solo, or Chanty-man. In Amsterdam there dwelt a maid, 
In Amsterdam there dwelt a maid. 
The Sailors. And I'll go no more a-ro-o-ving 

With you, fair maid, 
A-roving, a-roving. 
Since roving's been my ru-in, 
I'll go no more a-ro-o-ving with you, fair maid. 

That is the most beautiful of all the chanties. It is sung 
to an old Elizabethan tune which stirs one's blood like a 
drum-tap. The song, or solo of it, is strangely like the 
song in one of Thomas Heywood's plays. Several of the 
couplets are identical. The curious will find the song in 
Lucrece, in the fifth act. I cannot quote it here. 

A halliard chanty is begun by the solo-man in the 
manner described above. It has generally two choruses, 
but they are of the same length not short and long, as in 
the case of the anchor chanty. The solo man is always a 
person of some authority among the crowd. He begins 
his song after the first two or three pulls upon the halliards. 
There are countless halliard chanties, and new ones come 
into use each year. Those which one hears occasionally 
ashore are nearly always old ones, little used at sea. The 
sailors have grown tired of them. I do not know what 
chanties are most used now at sea. In my time we used 
to get the yards up to 

The Chanty-man. A long, long time and a long time ago, 
The Sailors. To me way hay, o-hz-o ; 

The Chanty-man. A long, long time and a long time ago, 
The Sailors. A long time ago. 



CHANTIES 303 

Tht Chanty-ma*. A smart Yankee packet lay out in the bay, 
The Sailor*. To me wav hay, o-Ai-o ; 

The Chanty-ma*. A smar -ackct lay out in the bay, 

The Sailors. A long time ago (etc. ). 

Th.- pulls upon the rope arc delivered during the choruses 
: tls I have italicised. Another very popular 
chanty was : 

The Chanty-man. Come all you little nigger-boys, 
The Sailor*. And roll the cotton down ; 

The Chanty-ma*. O come all you little nigger-boys, 
The Sailors. And roll the cotton down (etc. ). 

The t It puts you in a 

good temper to be singing it. Beautiful 

chanty is that known as Hanging Johnny. It has a melan- 

it is one of the saddest things I have 
heartl . I heard it tor the first time off the Horn, in a 
snowstorm, when we wen topsails after heavy 

weatl iore was a heavy, grey sea running and the 

d.-.-ks were awash. The skies were sodden and oily, shut- 
ui the sea about a quarter of a mile away. Some 
about us, screaming. 

The Chanty -man began. They call me Hanging Johnny, 
The Sailors. Away-i-oh ; 

The Chanty-ma*. They call me Hanging Johnny, 
Th* Sailors. Bo BSflft " 



light at the time that it was the whole scene set to 
music. I cannot repeat those words t<> 
wav< it seeing the line of yellow oilskins, 

tin wet deck, the frozen ropes, and the great grey seas 

running up into the sky. 

UK! bowline chanties the oldest is 

the lion \\ was certainly in use in thr reign 

of H-nry MIL It is still vrry poj.tdar. though the bowline 
K no loii^.-r tin- rope it wa :i slow, stately melody, 

tnding with a jerk as the men fall back with the rope. 

The Chanty-man. Haul on the bowline, the fore and maintop bow- 
line. Haul on the bowline. 
The Sailors. The bowline haul. 



304 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Another excellent chanty in this kind is the following : 

The Chanty-man. Louis was the King of France afore the Revolu- 

ti-on. 

The Sailors. Away, haul away, boys ; haul away toge-e-ther; 

The Chanty-man. But Louis got his head cut off, which spoiled his 

consti-tu-ti-on. 
The Sailors. Away, haul away, boys ; haul away 0. 

The chanty is the invention of the merchant service. 
In the navy they have what is called the silent routine, 
and the men fall back upon their ropes in silence, ' ' like 
a lot of soldiers," when the boatswain pipes. It must be 
very horrible to witness. In the merchant service, where 
the ships are invariably undermanned, one sings whenever 
a rope is cast off the pin. You haul a brace to the cry of 
"O, bunt him a bo," " O rouse him, boys," "Oho, Jew," 
" O ho ro, my boys," and similar phrases. You clew up a 
sail to the quick " Lee-ay," " Lee-ay," " Ho ro," " Ho," 
(t Aha," uttered in a tone of disquiet or alarm. You furl 
a course to the chant of " Paddy Doyle and his Boots." 
Without these cries and without the chanties you would 
never get the work done. " A song is ten men on the 
rope." In foul weather off the Horn it is as comforting 
as a pot of hot drink. A wash and a song are the sailor's 
two luxuries. 

Those who wish to obtain the music of the commoner 
chanties will find Miss Laura Smith's Music of the Waters 
and the anthology of Dr. Ferris Tozer of use to them. 
Several may be found in the songbook of the Guild of 
Handicraft. I have also seen a collection of them 
published (I believe) by Messrs. Metzler. The files of the 
Boys Own Paper y The Cadet, and the publications of the 
Folk-Song Society may also be consulted with advantage. 

In the following pages I have included only a few of 
the chanties in general use. Many familiar chanties have 
been excluded owing to lack of space. 



LOWLANDS 305 

LO \V LANDS 
(I I \LLi\iu) CH\NTY) 

I DREAMT a dream the other ni^ 

Lowland*, Lowland*, hurrah, my John; 
I dreamt a dream m-ht, 

My Lowland* a-ray. 

I dreamt I saw my own true love, 

Lowland*, Lowland*, hurrah, my John; 
I dreamt I saw my own true love. 

.V V L,n-i, tn .h 



He was green and wet with weeds so co 
t lands, Iceland*, hurrah, my John ; 
He was green and wet with weeds so c<> 
My Ijowlands a-ray. 

" I am drowned in the Lowland seas/' he said, 

I Airlands, Lowland*, hurrah, my John ; 
" I am drownrti n> th< Lowland seas/' he said, 
My l**4and* a-ray. 

" I shall never kiss you again/' he said, 
Lowlands, Lnrland*, hurrah, my John ; 
" I shall never kiss you again/' he ^ 

My ' 



breasts until 

Lowlands, Lowlands, hurrah, my John ; 
\ will cut my breasts u v bleed, 

My Lowland* a-ray. 

I will cut away my bonny hair, 

Lnn-Unuls, Lnnlands, hurrah. //<_;/ John . 
I will cut away my bonny hair, 

My Lowland* a-ray. 
20 



306 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

No other man shall think me fair, 

Lowlands , lowlands, hurrah, my John; 
No other man shall think me fair, 
My Loivlands a-ray. 



O my love lies drowned in the windy Lowlands, 

Lowlands, Lowlands, hurrah, my John ; 
O my love lies drowned in the windy Lowlands, 
My Lowlands a-ray. 



STORM ALONG 

(HALLIARDS) 

OLD STORMY he was a good old man, 
To me way hay ; storm along, John ; 

Old Stormy he was a good old man, 

Come, along, get along. Storm along, John. 



Old Stormy he is dead and gone, 
To me way hay ; storm along, John ; 

Old Stormy he is dead and gone, 

Come along, get along. Storm along, John. 



Old Stormy died, and we dug his grave, 
To me way hay ; storm along, John ; 

Old Stormy died, and we dug his grave, 
Come along, get along. Storm along, John. 



In sailor town up Mobile Bay, 

To me way hay ; storm along, John ; 

In sailor town up Mobile Bay, 

Come along, get along. Storm along, John. 



WHISKF.Y ! .10HNAY! 307 

WHISKEY! JOHNS 

(HALLIARDS) 
O WHISKEY is the life of man, 

whiskey is the life of man, 

Whiskey for my Johnny. 

1 drink it out of an old tin can, 

key ! Johnny / 
I (In- <>f an old tin can, 



I drink whiskey when I can. 

Whiskey ! Joknny ! 
I drink whiskey when I can, 

' 



I drink it I-.-:, I drink 

I dr.- :rmk it r 

H'hiskeyjor my Johnny. 

I drink it new, I drink it old, 

n 

I drink it new, I drink it old, 
Whiskey Jor my Johnny. 

Whiskry killed my poor old dad, 



Whiskey killed my poor old dad, 
Wli+tyfrmyMmy. 



Whiskey makes me pawn my clothes, 

\Vlii>k-y makes me pawn my clothes, 
Whiskey for my Johnny. 



30 8 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Whiskey makes me scratch my toes (gout ?), 

Whiskey ! Johnny / 
Whiskey makes me scratch my toes, 

Whiskey for my Johnny. 

O fisherman, have you just come from sea ? 

Whiskey ! Johnny ! 
O fisherman, have you just come from sea ? 

Whiskey for my Johnny. 

O yes, sir, I have just come from sea, 

Whiskey ! Johnny ! 
O yes, sir, I have just come from sea, 

Whiskey for my Johnny. 

Then have you any crab-fish that you can sell to me ? 

Whiskey ! Johnny ! 
Then have you any crab-fish that you can sell to me ? 

Whiskey for my Johnny. 

O yes, sir, I have crab-fish one, two, three, 

Whiskey I Johnny ! 
O yes, sir, I have crab-fish one, two, three, 

Whiskey for my Johnny^ 



JOHN FRANgOIS 

(HALLIARDS) 

BONEY was a warrior, 

Away-i-oh; 
Boney was a warrior, 

John Francois. 

1 At this point the ballad becomes a little gross. The curious will 
find the remainder of the tale in a discreet little book published by the 
Percy Society, from the relics of Bishop Percy's collection. The 
ballad dates from the sixteenth century. It is still very popular at sea. 



BLOW THE MAN DOWN 309 

Boney fought the Proosh-i-ans, 

Away-i-oh ; 

Bom the Proosh-i-ans, 

>tn Fran$oit. 

Bonej fought the Roosh-i-ans, 

Anray-i-vh ; 

Boney f Koosh-i-ans, 

hn Francois. 

Drive her, captain, drive her, 

Atvay-i-< 
Drive her, captain, drive her, 

John 



Give her gallant sails, 

. I // ( I f/ - f -O f I t 

top-gallant sails, 
John Francois. 

i weary way to Baltimore, 
Away i ok ; 
It's a weary way to Baltimore, 

John 



BLOW THE MAN DOWN 

(HALLIARD*) 
BLOW the man down, bullies, blow the man down, 



A way -hay blow ike man dorrn ; 
Blow the man down, bullies, blow him right down, 
Give us a chance to blot* the man donm. 

Blow him right down from the top of his crown, 

Away-hay blow the man donm ; 
Blow him right down from the top of his crown, 
e us a chance to blow the man donm. 



310 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

As I was a-walking down Paradise Street, 

Arvay-hay blow the man down ; 
As I was a-walking down Paradise Street, 

Give us a chance to blow the man down. 

A pretty young girl I chanced for to meet, 

Away -hay blow the man down ; 
A pretty young girl I chanced for to meet, 

Give us a chance to blow the man down. 

This pretty young girl she said unto me, 

Away -hay blow the man down ; 
This pretty young girl she said unto me, 

Give us a chance to blow the man down. 

"There's a fine full-rigged clipper just ready for sea," 

Away-hay blow the man down ; 
"There's a fine full-rigged clipper just ready for sea," 

Give us a chance to blow the man down. 

The fine full-rigged clipper to Sydney was bound, 

Away-hay blow the man down ; 
The fine full-rigged clipper to Sydney was bound, 

Give us a chance to blow the man down. 

She was very well manned and very well found, 

Away-hay blow the man down ; 
She was very well manned and very well found, 

Give us a chance to blow the man down. 

As soon as the clipper was clear of the bar, 

Away-hay blow the man down ; 
As soon as the clipper was clear of the bar, 

Give us a chance to blow the man down. 

The mate knocked me down with the end of a spar, 

Away-hay blow the man down ; 
The mate knocked me down with the end of a spar, 

Give us a chance to blow the man down. 



ROLL Tin: COTTON DOWN 311 

As SOOfl as the dipper had - > sea, 

Aivay-hay blow the mam down ; 
As soon as the Hipper had got out to sea, 
< us a chance to blow ike man down. 

u-1 hard treatment of every degree, 
Away-hay blow ike wum donm ; 

hard treat: every degree, 

>- us a chance to blow the man down. 

I'll give you a warning afore we belay, 

Away-hay blow the man down ; 
I'll give you a warning afore we belay, 

Give u* a chance to blow the man down. 

Don't ever take heed of what pretty girls say, 



ever take heed of what pretty girls say, 

HA ,: , fnitu-f to A //*;/ .'/,< man d'nnn. 



ROLL I Hi: COTTON DOWN 

COME roll the < own, my boys, 

Roll the cotton down ; 
Come rl lown, my boys, 

// the cotton down. 

Come hither, all you nigger boys, 

'i donm ; 

Com ">ggcr b< 

O roll the cotton down. 

A dollar a day is a white man's pay, 

the cotton down ; 

A dollar a day is a white man's pay, 
O roll the cotton down. 



312 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Ten dollars a day is a black man's pay, 

Roll the cotton down ; 
Ten dollars a day is a black man's pay, 

roll the cotton doivn. 

The white man's pay is rather high, 

Roll the cotton down ; 
The white man's pay is rather high, 

roll the cotton down. 

The black man's pay is rather low, 

Roll the cotton down ; 
The black man's pay is rather low, 

roll the cotton down. 

Around Cape Horn we're bound to go, 

Roll the cotton down ; 
Around Cape Horn we're bound to go, 

roll the cotton down. 

So stretch it aft and start a song, 

Roll the cotton down ; 
So stretch it aft and start a song, 

roll the cotton down. 



REUBEN RANZO 

(HALLIARDS) 

O DO you know old Reuben Ranzo ? 

Ranzo, boys, Ranzo ; 
O do you know old Reuben Ranzo ? 

Ranzo, boys, Ranzo. 

Old Ranzo was a tailor, 

Ranzo, boys, Ranzo ; 
Old Ranzo was a tailor, 

Ranzo, boys, Ranzo. 



ROLL AM) GO 313 

Old Ranso was no sail 

Ranso, boy*, Ran. 
( )M 1 tan 10 was no sailor, 

Ramo, boy*, Ranto. 

So he shipped aboard of a whaler, 

Ranzo, fmyx, Iianzu ; 
So he shipped aboard of a whaler, 
Ranso, boy*, Rant*. 



But he could not do his duty, 
Ranso, boy*, Ranso ; 

..t do his duty, 



ROLL AM) GO 
(HALLIARDS) 



THERE was a ship the sailed to Spain, 

RoUamdgo; 

There was a ship she sailed to Spain, 
O ~ 



There was a ship name home 

<>. Roll and go; 
There was a ship came home again, 
O Tommy'* on tke toptail 



What (1 yr think was in her hold? 
O. Roll and go; 
a d'ye think was in her hold ? 
O Tommy' * on tke toptail yard. 

There was diamonds, there was gold, 

<>. 



There was diamonds, there was gold, 
Tommy'* on the toptail yard. 



314 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

And what was in her lazareet ? 

0. Roll and go ; 
And what was in her lazareet ? 
Tommy s on the topsail yard. 

Good split peas and bad bull meat, 

0. Roll and go ; 

Good split peas and bad bull meat, 
Tommy's on the topsail yard. 

Many sailormen gets drowned, 

0. Roll and go ; 
Many sailormen gets drowned, 
O Tommy's on the topsail yard. 



COME ROLL HIM OVER 

(HALLIARDS) 

OHO, why don't you blow ? 

Aha. Come roll him over ; 
Oho, why don't you blow ? 

A ha. Come roll him over 

One man. To strike the bell, 
Aha. Come roll him over ; 

One man. To strike the bell, 
Aha. Come roll him over. 

Two men. To take the wheel, 
Aha. Come roll him over ; 

Two men. To take the wheel, 
Aha. Come roll him over. 

Three men. Top-gallant braces, 
Aha. Come roll him over ; 

Three men. Top-gallant braces. 
Aha. Come roll him over. 



SAI.LV BKOWN 315 

HAMilVi JOHNNY 
(HALLIARDS) 

THEY call me Hanging 

Away-i- 
They call me Hanging Johnny, 

So hang, hoy, hang. 

!mng my mother, 
Aivay-i-oh ; 

iny mother, 
hang, boy*, kang. 

Then I hung my brother, 

Atvay-i-oh ; 
Then I hung my brother, 

So kang, boy*, kang. 

A rope, a beam, and a ladder, 

. i //'</// - i-<iri ,' 
A rope, a beam, and a lad- 

111 hang you all together, 

Aivay-t-ok ; 
I'll hang you all togetlu t . 

So kang, boy*, kang. 

SALLY IWOWN 

(HALLIARDS) 

O SALLY BROWN of New York ti 

Ay ay, roll and 
O Sally 1 

/'// tpend my money on Sally Bronm. 



316 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

O Sally Brown, you are very pretty, 

Ay ay, roll and go ; 
O Sally Brown, you are very pretty, 
I'll spend my money on Sally Bronm. 



Your cheeks are red, your hair is golden, 

Ay ay, roll and go ; 

Your cheeks are red, your hair is golden, 
Til spend my money on Sally Bronm. 



POOR OLD JOE 

(HALLIARDS) 

OLD Joe is dead, and gone to hell, 

we say so, and we hope so ; 
Old Joe is dead, and gone to hell, 
poor old Joe. 



The ship did sail, the winds did roar, 

we say so, and we hope so ; 
The ship did sail, the winds did roar, 
poor old Joe. 



He's as dead as a nail in the lamp-room door, 

we say so, and we hope so ; 
He's as dead as a nail in the lamp-room door, 
poor old Joe. 



He won't come hazing us no more, 

we say so, and we hope so ; 
He won't come hazing us no more, 
poor old Joe. 



A LONG TIME AGO 317 

TOMMY'S GONE TO HILO 

(HALLIARDS) 

TOMMY'S gone, what shall I do ? 

Tommy t gone to Hilo ; 
Tommy's gone, what shall I 

Tommy t gome to Hilu. 

town is i 
Tommy' t gome to Hilo ; 

Tommy's gome to Hilo. 

He never kissed his girl good-bye, 

Tommy's gome 
He never kissed his girl good-h 

Tommy' t gome to Hilo. 

He signed for three pound ten a month, 

Tommy', gone to Hilo; 
He signed far three pound ten a mot 

Tommy', gone to Hilo. 



A LONG TIME AGO 

(HALLIARDS) 

A LONG, long time, and a long time ago, 
To me way ha*, oito; 

A long, long time, and a long time ago, 
A longtime ago. 

A smart Yankee packet lay out in the bay, 

To me way hay, oh 
A waiting for a fair wind to get under way, 

A long time ago. 



3i8 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

With all her poor sailors all sick and all sore, 

To me way hay, ohio ; 
For they'd drunk all their lime-juice, and could get no more, 

A long time ago. 

With all her poor sailors all sick and all sad, 

To me way hay, ohio ; 

For they'd drunk all their lime-juice, and no more could 
be had, 

A long time ago. 

She was waiting for a fair wind to get under way, 

To me way hay, ohio ; 
She was waiting for a fair wind to get under way, 

A long time ago. 

If she hasn't had a fair wind she's lying there still, 

To me way hay, ohio ; 
If she hasn't had a fair wind she's lying there still, 

A long time ago. 



BLOW, BULLIES, BLOW 

(HALLIARDS) 

THERE'S a Black Ball barque coming down the river, 

Blow, bullies, blow ; 
There's a Black Ball barque coming down the river, 

Blow, my bully boys, blow. 

And who d'ye think is Captain of her ? 

Blow, bullies, blow ; 
O who d'ye think is Captain of her ? 

Blow, my bully boys, blow. 

Why, bully Hains is the Captain of her, 

Blow, bullies, blow ; 
Why, bully Hains is the Captain of her, 

Blow, my bully boys, blow. 



lu.mv. nrij.iEs. HLOW 319 

He'll ma \vas dead and buried, 

Blotv, but tie*. 
He'll make you wish you was dead and buried, 

Blow, my bully boys, blow. 



', I brighten brass, and you'll scrape the cable, 

Blow, bullies, blow; 
You'll brighten brass, and you'll scrape the cable, 



And who d'ye think is mate aboard 

,blo*>; 
O who d'ye think is mate aboard h< 

/>;, ,,y hull, W, ifaft 



Santander James is the mate aboard her, 

Bio*, bullies, bio* ; 
Santander James is the mate aboard her, 



He'll ride you down like you ride the sj> i 

Blow, bullirst blotv ; 
He'll ride you down like you ri<I<- the spanker, 

Blow, my bully bout, blow. 



And who d \- think is the second mate of her? 

,biow; 
O wh nk is the second mate of her? 

, mi/ Intlly boi/s, hltrn-. 



Some ugly case what hates poor sailors, 

M-, bullin, blow ; 
Some ugly case what hates po< 
Blow, my bully boys, blow. 



320 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

THE RIO GRANDE 

(CAPSTAN) 

WHERE are you going to, my pretty maid ? 

away Rio ; 

Where are you going to, my pretty maid ? 
We are bound to the Rio Grande. 
away Rio, 
away Rio, 

Ojare you well, my bonny young girl, 
We are bound to the Rio Grande. 

Have you a sweetheart, my pretty maid ? 

O away Rio ; 

Have you a sweetheart, my pretty maid ? 
We are bound to the Rio Grand. 
O away Rio, 
away Rio, 

fare you well, my bonny young girl, 
We are bound to the Rio Grande. 

May I go with you, my pretty maid ? 

away Rio ; 

May I go with you, my pretty maid ? 
We are bound to the Rio Grande. 
away Rio, 
away Rio, 

Ofare you well, my bonny young girl, 
We are bound to the Rio Grande. 

I'm afraid you're a bad one, kind sir, she replied, 

away Rio ; 

I'm afraid you're a bad one, kind sir, she replied, 
We are bound to the Rio Grande. 
away Rio, 
away Rio, 

OJare you well, my bonny young girl, 
We are bound to the Rio Grande. 



nil-; IJANKS 01 TIIK SACRAMENTO 
BKBASPOFOL 

(CAPSTAN) 

uean war is o\ 
(utopol if taken ; 

:iean war ia over now, 
Sebottoool it token. 
So sing cheer, boys, cheer, 

Sebattopol it token ; 
And sing cheer, boys, cheer, 
<>lond gained the day. 



The Russians they was put to flight, 

Sebattopol it taken ; 
The Russians they was put to flight, 

Sebattopol u taken. 
So sing cheer, boys, cheer, 

Sebattopol it taken ; 
And sing cheer, boys, cheer, 

old 



Our soldiers they are homeward bound, 

Sebattopol it taken ; 
Our soldiers they are homeward bound, 

Sebattopol it taken. 
So sing cnecr, boys, cheer, 

Sebattopol it taken ; 
And sing cheer, boys, cheer, 

Old England gained ike day. 

THE BANKS OF THE SACRAMENTO 
(CAPSTAN) 

IN the Black Ball Lim I served my time, 
To me hoodah. To me hood ah ; 

In the Black Ball Line I served m 
So hurrah for the Black Ball Line. 

21 



322 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

Blow, my bullies, blow, 
For California 0. 
There s plenty of gold, 
So I've been told, 
On the banks of the Sacramento. 



From Limehouse Docks to Sydney Heads, 

To me hoodah. To me hoodah ; 
From Limehouse Docks to Sydney Heads, 
So hurrah for the Black Ball Line. 
Blow, my bullies, blow, 
For California 0. 
There's plenty of gold, 
So I've been told, 
On the banks oj the Sacramento. 



We were never more than seventy days, 

To me hoodah. To me hoodah ; 
We were never more than seventy days, 
So hurrah for the Black Ball Line. 
Blow, my bullies, blow, 
For California 0. 
There's plenty of gold, 
So I've been told, 
On the banks of the Sacramento. 



We cracked it on, on a big skiute, 
To me hoodah. To me hoodah ; 
We cracked it on, on a big skiute, 
So hurrah for the Black Ball Line. 
Blow, my bullies, blow, 
For California O, 
There's plenty of gold, 
So I've been told, 
On the banks of the Sacramento. 



HAND OVER HAND 

THE MAID OF AMSTERDAM 

(CAPSTAN) 

IN Amsterdam there dwelt a maid, 

Mark **U wkat I do toy ; 
In Amsterdam there dwelt a mai.l, 
was mistress of her tra. 

And FU go no more a-rwmg 



A-rovtng, a-roving, 
nee roving' t been my ru-i-n, 
ni go no more a-rovmg 
h yott, fair maid. 

Her cheeks was red, her eyes was brown, 

hecks was red, her eyes was bmu n, 

Her h.iir like ^1>\\- worms hanging down. 
And /'// go no more a-rvring 
h yo*,J air 



ire roving' M been my rn-i-n, 
/'// go no more a-roving 
With you, fair 



HAND OVKK HAND 
\nt 1 1 \VD) 

A HANDY ship, and a handy crew, 

1 1, in,! /I. my bout, to kaitdy ; 
A h c-w, 

llnndy, my buys, array 

1 For the rest of the solo, sec the song in The Rape of Lwrect, by 
Thomas Heywood, Act iv. Scene vl. 



324 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

A handy skipper and second mate, too, 
Handy, my boys, so handy ; 

A handy skipper and second mate too, 
Handy, my boys, away oh. 



A handy Bose l and a handy Sails, 2 
Handy, my boys, so handy ; 

A handy Bose and a handy Sails, 
Handy, my boys, away oh. 



HAUL AWAY O 

(SHEET, TACK, AND BOWLINE) 

AWAY, haul away, boys, haul away together, 
Away, haul away, boys, haul away ; 

Away, haul away, boys, haul away together, 
Away } haul away, boys, haul away 0. 



Louis was the King of France afore the Revolu-ti-on, 
Away, haul away, boys, haul away ; 

Louis was the King of France afore the Revolu-ti-on, 
Away, haul away, boys, haul away 0. 



But Louis got his head cut off, which spoiled his con- 

stitu-ti-on, 

Away, haul away, boys, haul away ; 
But Louis got his head cut off, which spoiled his con- 

sti-tu-tion, 

Away, haul away, boys, haulaway 0. 
1 Boatswain. 2 Sailmaker. 



HAUL THE BOWLIM 325 

HAUL THE BOWLINE 
(SHEET, TACK, AND BOWLINE) 

H u i upon the bowline, the fore and main top bowline, 

/ the bowline, the bowline haul ; 
Haul upon the bowline, the fore and main top bov. 
Haul the bowline, the bowline haul. 

H ml upon the bowline, so early in the i 

Haul upon the bowline, so early in the n 
./ the bomlme, the bowline hind, 

Haul upon the bo* 

Haul upon the bowline, the bonny ship's a-sail 

Haul upon the bowline, Kitty is my darling, 
dthebo,, WMUA</ 

i I. mi ( ty is my d 

Haul the botrline, the bowline hauL 

1 upon the U>\ verpool, 

<dthebo*itnt t thebolmeha 

Haul upon the bov verpool, 

// the botrtne, the bowline ha 

Haul upon the bov .erpool's a fine town, 

.-!/ the bovine, the bovine hu- 
\ laul upon the bov . erpool's a fine town, 

Haul the bolme, the bowline haul. 

Haul upon the lx>v to pay-day, 

'/ the bowlme, the bowline ha 
Haul upon the bowline, it's a far cry to pay-day, 

nd the bowline, the bowline haul 



326 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 



A RUNAWAY CHORUS 

WHAT shall we do with a drunken sailor ? 
What shall we do with a drunken sailor ? 
What shall we do with a drunken sailor ? 

Early in the morning. 

Way, hay, there she rises, 

Way, hay, there she rises, 

Way, hay, there she rises, 

Early in the morning. 

Chuck him in the long-boat till he gets sober, 
Chuck him in the long-boat till he gets sober, 
Chuck him in the long-boat till he gets sober, 

Early in the morning. 

Way, hay, there she rises, 

Way, hay, there she rises, 

O boy, there she rises, 

Early in the morning. 

What shall we do with a drunken soldier ? 
What shall we do with a drunken soldier ? 
What shall we do with a drunken soldier ? 

Early in the morning. 

Way, hay, there she rises, 

Way, hay, there she rises, 

Way, hay, there she rises, 

Early in the morning. 

Lock him in the guardroom till he gets sober, 
Lock him in the guardroom till he gets sober, 
Lock him in the guardroom till he gets sober, 

Early in the morning. 

Way, hay, there she rises, 

Way, hay, there she rises, 

Way, hay, there she rises, 

Early in the morning. 



LEAVE HER JOHNNY 327 

PADDY DOYLE 

(FURLING) 
To my, 

Ay, 

And we'll>r/, 

Ay, 
And pay Paddy Doyle for his boots. 

We'll *i*g, 
And 7 we'll heave, 

Ay, 

And pay Paddy Doyle for his boots. 



Ay, 



Ay, 

And pay Paddy Doyle for his boots. 



KNVOI LEAVE IIKK lollNNY 
(FoR PUMPING AND HALLIARDS) 

I THOUGHT I heard the captain say, 
Leave her, Johnny, leave her ; 

i nay go ashore and touch your pay, 
It's time for ut to leave her. 

You may make her fast, and pack your gear, 

Leave her, Johnny, leave h 
And leave her moored to the West Street Pier, 

//'* time for ut to leave her. 



328 A SAILOR'S GARLAND 

The winds were foul, the work was hard,, 

Leave her, Johnny, leave her ; 
From Liverpool Docks to Brooklyn Yard, 

It's time for us to leave her. 

She would neither steer, nor stay, nor wear, 

Leave her, Johnny, leave her ; 
She shipped it green and she made us swear, 

It's time for us to leave her. 

She would neither wear, nor steer, nor stay, 

Leave her, Johnny, leave her ; 
Her running rigging carried away, 

It's time for us to leave her. 

The winds were foul, the trip was long, 

Leave her, Johnny, leave, her ; 
Before we go we'll sing a song, 

It's time J or us to leave her. 

We'll sing, Oh, may we never be, 

Leave her, Johnny, leave her ; 
On a hungry ship the like of she, 

It's time for us to leave her. 

Coil down. 
So Long. 



Printed by MORRISON & GIBB LIMITED, Edinburgh 



A SELECTION OF BOOKS 
PUBLISHED BY METIH 
AND CO. LTD. LONDO 
36 ES5 T 

W.C. 



CONTEN 



Llt.ratmt 
AncUut MM 

y Bock* 
i Shki|.r. 
Cl.s*ici of Art 
'CvnpUta Srii 
CooaoUsur t Library 

Handbooks of English 

History 

Hand bocks of Tlieoiogy 
H*lth Sri* . 
1 Horn* Life ' Series 
Laalrt of Religion 
Library of Dvotioo 
Books on Art 
Llttla Guides . 
Llttl. Library 
LlttU Qvirto Shik..p.r . 



Llbtarjr 
Nw Lltraff of Mcdl. 
y uf Mu.. 
. I Uibgi *(,...> 
PUyi 



Wttmhitr Commcu 



Books ou .' 
Bucks oo Italy 



Books for Boys ar. 
Shilling Morals 
Soru^. . 



A SELECTION OP 

MESSRS. METHUEN'S 
PUBLICATIONS 



IN this Catalogue the order is according to authors. An asterisk Jenotes 
that the book is in the press. 

Colonial Editions are published of all Messrs. METHUEN'S Novels issued 
at a price above it. 6d.. and similar editions are published of some works of 
General Literature. Colonial Editions are only for circulation in the British 
Colonies and India. 

All books marked net are not subject to discount, and cannot be bought 
at less than the published price. Books not marked net are subject to the 
discount which the bookseller allows. 

Messrs. MKTHUKN'S books are kept in stock by all good booksellers. If 
there is any difficulty in seeing copies, Messrs. Metbuen will be very glad to 
have early information, and specimen copies of any books will be sent on 
receipt of the published price plus postage for net books, and of the published 
price for ordinary books. 

This Catalogue contains only a selection of the more important books 
published by Messrs. Metbuen. A complete and illustrated catalogue of their 
publications may be obtained on application. 



Indrewei (Lancelot). PRECES PRI- 
VATAE. Translated and edited, with 
Notes, by F. E. BRIGHTMAN. Cr. %vo. 
61. net. 

Irlatotla. THE ETHICS. Edited, with 
an Introduction and Notes, by JOHN 
BURNET. DtHiy Ivo. to*. f,iL net, 

Atfclnon (T. D.). ENGLISH ARCHI- 
TECTURE. Illustrated. />/ 4 F.elitifn. 
Fcap. trt>o. 3*. 6J. net, 

A GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED IN 
ENGLISH ARCHITECTURE. Illus- 
trated. Secttui Editwn. Reap. BJV. 3*. f>d, 
net, 

ENGLISH AND WKLSH CATHE- 
DRALS. Illustrated. Dt>ny 8m 101. td. 
net. 

Atterlrtge (*. H.). FAMOUS LAND 
FIGHTS. Illustrated. Cr. $v*. 6j. 

5&!n (F. W.). A DIGIT OF THE MOON: 

A HIMDOO LOVE STORY, filevfn.'.k Edition. 

Fc*p. 3s70. 3*. 6rf. net. 
THE DESCENT OF THE SUN : A CVCLB 

or BIRTH. Sixtk Edition. Fcap. 8vo. 

3j. f>d. net, 
A HEIFER OF THE DAWN. Ninth 

Edition. Feat. Ivo. zs. M. net. 
IN THE GREAT GOD'S HAIR. Sixth 

Sdititn. Fcap. Ivo. w. 6rf. net. 
A DRAUGHT OF THE BLUE. Fifth 



AN ESSENCE OF THE DUSK. F^th 

Edition. Fco>,p. 3vo. aj. 6< net. 
AN INCARNATION OF THE SNOW. 

Third Edition. Fcap. &vo. 31. (sd. net. 
A MINE OF FAULTS. Fntrth Edition. 

Fcap. tve. 3^ . 6c. net. 
THE ASH KS OF A GOD. Second Rditien. 

Fcnp. 3?/*. 3*. W. net. 
BUBBLES OF THE FOAM. Second 

Edition. Fca.p. </*. j. net. Als0 Fcap. 

8w. }J. 6 i. net. 
A SYRUP OF THE BEES. Fc*p. #*. 

S3. net. Also Fc&p. Sz>0. 3*. 6J. ntt. 

Befoul 1 (Graham). THE LIFE OF 
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON. Fif- 
tetnth Edition. In one ISflumt. Cr. 8#. 
tn, 6t. ntt. 



t(H9n. Maurice). LANDMARKS 
USSIAN LITERATURE. Third 
Ediiitn. Cr. Iva. 6j. net. 
THE RUSSIAN PEOPLE. Second 
Editw*. Demy Ivf. 15*. net. 

Baring-Gould (8.). THE LIFE OF 

NAPOLEON BONAPARTE. Illustrated. 

Second and CAfa/er Edition. Royal 8o. 

ioj. eW. net. 
THE TRAGEDY OF THE CAESARS: 

A STUDY OF TKB CHARACTERS or TH 

C^SARS OF THE JUL1AM AND Cl.AUDIAN 

HOUSES. Illustrated. Seventh Edition. 
ro.r. & *ft. 



RATURB 



A BOOK 






A BOOK Of DARTMOOR. 

74,-- V4 

- &r * 









(I.) .nrf lbpr 



t * 






Of 



SonfS 

. ... 



1. -' 



. 






fcf!r.g-Go tf (B.V, lhnrd (H F ), aW 

*..<< Cot* 

of th 

tW WM- - 

s 



l*rtir (E.v THF. P01 

\K1S- 
TOT. 



J~ 



Bcktt (I 

U yi. w 



chl 

HI* 



Bclloc (H.V. PARIS 

, '. V* ^ 

I SKA 

/.*^. &*. v 



ON kVJ KVlHlSt; 74. 
BM, 

MKTH1NC. 



FIRST AND LAST 



JUTS 



I 



Dtmy IM 



SUB 



I 



HER. 

\,.J -/ iw V 

U Ai- 

' /'* U/ i M 

uMni4. 

?.*,; ~* /- l^. 74. M 

BonU (Arnold). 

>i<M. 

r* 

t OK TM 
WaSTBHk ' ^~ 

Bfft (W. H.V A PR1MLR OF 

lM. ,i U. 



v- PARIS AND HER 

-..:. 



'.at nor. by 1 

BImriKo (BUhoa of). ARA 

lOl^SV. 
Snimtk *.4it*. Lr. M. 3 J. 

E. 

kM. >J. t . 



'. - >J. '- 

I Br%h*ni(F. fl.>. RAMBLES IN Si 

.; L ' i e. 

Braid Jam ( >. K.D GOLF 

IM ^ 

Bull.y <M < 

.nuJ. Cr.JW. 

Calmau (W OF 



Jia*^ 

7 krit ft. ***>. L '. Bw. sif. 
*</. 


. tut. 

Charabar* (Mr. Lambert). LAWN 

lT/. M. (W. M/. 



METHUBN AND COMPAMY LIMITED 



Rhasterfleld (Lori). THE LETTERS OF i 
THE EARL OF CHESTERFIELD TO ! 
HIS SON. Edited, witb ar Introduction by j 
C. STKACHZT, and Notes by A. CAI.THKOF. I 
Tw* Vtlumet. Cf. to*. \*t. net. 

Chwtorton (6. K.). CHARLES DICKENS. ! 
With two Portrait* IP Photogravure. Eighth 
Kduti**. Cr. bro. 6f. net. 

THK BALLAD OF THK WHITE HORSE. 
Mftk. Edition. 5*. tut. 

ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. Tenth 

ILttiti**. Fcofi. 8r*. 5*. 

TRKMKNDOUS TRIFLfcS. Fifth Edi- 
ti**.. Feet}. Bv. y. 

ALARMS AND DISCURSIONS. Sttiui 
Edition. Fca+. Se*. y. 

A MISCELLANY OF MEN. Second 
Editie*. Fc*j>. te*. 5*. 

WINE, WATER, AND SONG. Sixth 
Fcap. Ivo. is. tut. 



Claaaun (George). ROYAL ACADEMY 
LECTURES ON PAINTING. Illustrated. 
Cr. tno. f>s. rut. 



Glutton -Brok (*.) 
THE WAR. Nint 



THOUGHTS ON 
'inth Edition. Fern*, tot. 
is. net. 

MORE THOUGHTS ON THE WAR. 
Third F.ditiim. Fc*p. 8w>. is, net. 

Canned (Joseph). THE MIRROR OF 
THE SEA : Memories and Impressions. 
Fourth Edition. Fca.fi. 8w. 5*. 

CouJton (Q, 6.V CHAUCER AND HIS 
ENGLAND. Illustrated. Second Edition. 
Demy 8z*. ins. 6d. net. 

Cowpr (WUJJam). POEMS. Edited, with 
an Introduction and Notes, by J. C. BAILKT. 
Illtutrated. Demy foa. los. 6d. net. 

Cox (J. C.). RAMBLES IN SURREY. 

Illustrated. Secend Edition. Cr. &vt. 

6s. net, 
RAMBLES IN KENT. ^Illustrated. Cr. 

Ivo. 6s. net. 



Dayt (H. W. C.). ENGLAND UNDER 
THE NORMANS AND ANGEVINS : 
1066-1272. Fourth Edition. Dtmy too. 
jot. (xt. net. 



Dearmer (Habnl), A CHILD'S LIFE OF 
-1ST. Dlnstraf.'-d. Sgc*n**ndChe*1>r 
M. /. M. ttaf. 



Dickinson (Q. L.). THE GREEK VIEW 
OF LIFE. Tenth Edition. Cr. 8*v. 
a*. 6of. net. 

Ditehfleld (P. H.). THE VILLAGE 
CHURCH. Illustrated. Cr. 81*. v . 
net. 

THE ENGLAND OF SHAKESPEARE. 

Illustrated. Cr. 8zw. 6s. net. 

netrden (J.). FURTHER STUDIES IN 
THE PRAYER BOOK. Cr. 8t*. 6s. net. 

Dnrhara (Tho Earl of). THE REPORT 
ON CANADA. Witk aa Introdoctorr 
Note. Sec+nd Edition. Demy tot. 41, 6d. 
net. 

E)(rtOtt (H. R.). A SHORT HISTORY 
OF BRITISH COLONIAL POLICY. 
Ftvrtk Edition. Detny 8w. 71. M. net. 

BTn (Herbert A.). CASTLES OF 
ENGLAND AND WALES. Illustrated. 
Demy 8cw. its. 64. net. 

Palrbrethar (W. H.), THE PHILO- 
SOPHY OF T. H. GREEN. Stc+ii* 
Edition. Cr. 8e. 3*. 6rf. net. 

ffoulkeK (Charles). THE ARMOURER 

AND HIS CRAFT. Illustrated. Reymi 

4 ft. ,t|a as. net. 
DECORATIVE IRONWORK. From the 

xith to the xvinth Century. Illustrated. 

Rtyetl 4/*. >z as. net. 

Firth (C. H.). CROMWELL'S ARMY. 
A History of the English Soldier during the 
Civil Wars, the Commonwealth, and the 
Protectorate. Illustrated. Second Edition. 
Cr. to*. 6*. net. 

Fisher (H. A. L,). THE REPUBLICAN 
TRADITION IN EUROPE. Cr. fc*. 
fa. net. 

FItz3rald (Edward). THE RUBAlYAT 
OF OMAR KHAYYAM. Printed from 
the Fifth and lust Edition. With a Com- 
mentary by H. M. BATSON, and a Biograph- 
ical Introduction by E. D. Rose. Cr. Bt<. 



Flax (1. W.). ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES. 
Demy &vf. is. 6J. net. 

Frtuar (B.). THE SOLDIERS WHOM 
WELLINGTON LED. Deeds of Daring, 
Chivalry, and Renown. Illustrated 
Bvt. w. net. 

THE SAILORS WHOM NELSON LED. 
Their Doings Described by Themselves. 
Cr. Jo*. 54. net. 



GENERAL LITKRATURB 



eibblni (H. B.V INDUSTK 
! S I O R I C A L 
Mapt tod 
Kdit\a*. Drmy lev. iw. 6-/. */. 

INDUSTRIAL HISTORY OF 
Map* tad i PUa. 
(.'. Ir, 



Olbb*0 (Kd 

: OK TH 



lM}ito (W Ewart) SPEECHES. 
Dt~,f *+. itj t. 

Qiovar fT. l.V rtlCT OF 

- it*. 

t- - 

FROV 

l~. T' 
VIRGI AA/iM ~.y \ 



H <- 






:lPr 

v 



Orim, Mi itRh'r H C k 

M. 



Half K (. 









IM. LJ ut. 



Hall (H. P.). THE AK< 



Han. ay fD.). A TURY Of 






,N 



Marker (irrd) THK HIS- 

With 

'Jiagraou lad Plates. D*my *. 
laj. ( 

Harp*- o.). THE 'AUTOCAR 

With Mapa, 

- 71. 64. Mf. 
Vol. I. SOUTH or TMB THAHBV 

Vd 

AMB WBT Mn i AM us. 

Vol. 111. EAST AWOLIA AMU EAST 

LAMM. 

Vo or EHOLAJID AMD 



Hit. a 

7f. 6a 

BtnSiT (W. E.I. 



i KB 



UFfr 
Dtm, r 









/>> lv. 104. f - 






!D1 TO S' 
AM B.cMap. Cr.N 



KNOWLI 

IP*. MM. 44 *. 

r. CV. lv. tj &^. IM/. 
PKOBLKM 

THK 

Poo*. Eiftok J . u u 

BLEU OF THF 
ECONOMY Poucr. SixtJk 4it+. c 

' SD WAGES: W, TN ^ 

-IHATJOM Or TM i. 

.SrW J-.4ut-.0m Cr. IM. v ' 



I Aw 
txatr< />/ |M. . 

^orth (W. ,). y OF 

ii LJIW. 

MM. - 



METHUEN AND COMPANY LIMITED 



Hutt (C. WA CROWLEVS HYGIKNE 
OF SCHOOL LIFE. Illustrated. Second 
and Rtvistd Edition. Cr. \vo. y. 64. ntt. 

Button (Edward). THE CITIES OF 

UMBRIA. Illustrated. Fi/tk Kditin. 

Cr. 8e*. 6s. ntt. 
THE CITIES OF LOMBARDY. Illus- 

trmted. Cr. 8w. 6s. nft. 
THE CITIES OF ROMAGNA AND THE 

MARCHES. Illustrated. Cr. It*. 61. 

met. 

FLORENCE AND NORTHERN TUS- 
CANY, WITH GENOA. lliuitrated. 

Tkird Edition. Cr. .-y#. &j. ntt. 
SIENA AND SOUTH KRN TUSCANY. 

Illustrated. Sttfnd R<*i;i*. Cr. *M. 6t. 

int. 
VENICE AND VENET1A. Ilfastimted. 

Cr. tv. to. tut. 
ROME. Illustrated. 7**W Jiti*n. Cr. 

to*. 6s. net. 
COUNTRY WALKS ABOUT FLORENCE. 

Itlvstrated. Second Edition. I<c** %vt. 

55. net. 
THE CITIES OF SPAIN. Illustrated. 

F**rtk Edition. Cr. fc*. 6j. ntt. 
MAPLES AND SOUTHERN ITALY. 

HSuMrattd. Cr. 8w (b. ntt. 

lbR <Hnrtk). BRAND. A Dramatic 
Poem, translated by WILIJAM WILSON. 
F**rtk Edition. Cr. fc*. y. <W. m*i. 

Inge(W.R.). CHRISTIAN MYSTICISM. 
(The Bampto* Lee tarts of 1899-) Tkird 
Edition. Cr. IM>. 5*. ntt. 

Innes (A. D.). A HISTORY OF THE 
BRITISH IN INDIA. With Maps and 
Plans. Stctnd Edition. Cr. &&#. 6*. 

ENGLAND UNDER THE TUDORS. 
With Maps. Ftvrtk Edition. /?/ *. 



(Mtry). SCHOOLS OF PAINT- 
ING. Illtntrated. Stetnd Edition. Cr. 



JBkfl (K.)- AN OUTLINE OF ENG- 
LISH LOCAL GOVERNM ENT. Tkird 
Edition. Revwcd by R. C. K. ENSOR. Cr. 
b*. *j. fci. *?!. 

A SHORT HISTORY OF ENGLISH 
LAW : FtoM THK EARLIEST TIMES TO 
THE END or TK? YEAR 1911. Dtmy 8*. 
x*f. U. nti. 

;hnton (SIT H. R.). BRITISH CEN- 
TRAL AFRICA. Illustrated. Tkird 
Edition. Cr. 4/. 181. M/. 

THE NEG*O IN THE NEW WORLD. 



Julian (Lady) of Horwlch. REVELA- 
TIONS Of DIVINE LOVE. Edited by 
GRACF WARRACK. /^f/M Edition. Cr 



Kat(JohnV POEMS. Edited, with latro, 
duction and Notes, by E. de S^LINCOURT. 
With a Frontispiece in Pbotagravure. 
Third Edition. Dttny t*. js. 6tt. ntt. 

Keb)(JehM). THE CHRISTIAN YEAR. 
With an letroduction and Notes by W. 
LOCK. Ilimitraied. Tkird Edition. PC**. 
Ivf. 3 f. fid. 

Kcrapii (Thotnai k,). THE IMITATION 
OF CHRIST. Fr*w tbe Latin, with an 
Introduction by DEAN FARRAX. Illustrated. 
F**rtk Rdititn. Fc*f>. **t. y. 6d. 

THOMAE A KEMPISDE IMITATIONS 
CHRIS TI LIBRI IV. Edited by Dr. 
ADRIAN FOUTESCUB. Cr. 4*9. i lot. ntt. 
Limited t* 



Klpl'.ng (Rudyard). BARRACK - ROOM 
BALLADS. 167/4 Thousand. Ftrty 
stvtntk Edititn. Cr. tew. B*ckram, 6s. 
. 6d. nft ; itatktr, 



Also a Service Edition. 7W Vtlumet. 
Sfiutn/caf SM. E*ck *i. id. ntt. 

THE SEVEN SEAS. is 7 /A Tkwand. 
Tkirtittk Edition. Cr. Sew. Bnctram, 
6s. At** Fca^. lev. CUtk, 4*. 64. ntt; 
IttUker, $r ntt. 

Als a Service Edition. Tut* Y*l*mtt. 
f. Saw. Each *s. kd. ntt. 



THE FIVE NATIONS. 105** Tk*vs**4. 
Nmttetntk Edition. Cr. let. Bnckram, 
6i. Als Fta*. to*. CM*, 41. id. ntt; 
Itautker, 5^. ntt- 

Abo a Service Edition. 7W 
*. Etuk v. 6d 



DEPARTMENTAL DITTIES 76/4 Tk*n- 
*nd. Twtnty-Sixtk Edition. Cr. to*. 
Buckram, 6s. A Is* FcmJ. 8vo. CMk, 41. 
M. ntt; Itatktr, $s. ntt. 
Also a Service Edition. Tw* V*tumts. 
Sf**rt/c*t. to*. Emck ts. 6d. nft. 

HYMN BEFORE ACTION. Illuminated.' 
Fc*+. 4**. is. net. 

RECESSIONAL, Illuminated. Fc*f. 4 t*. 
is. ntt. 

Lamb (Charles and Mary). THE COM-i 
PLETE WORKS. Edited by E. V. LOCAS. ] 
A Nnu nnd R raised Edition in Six V*/vmes, 
With Fmtis&ects. Fc*j. Iso. Etuk 51. ' 
Tbe voiume are : 

I. MlACKLLAKCOOS PROSE. II. ELIA ANB 
T LAST EX.SATS OF ELIA. HI. BOOKS 
FOK CHILDREN, iv. PLATS AND POEMS. | 
r. ad vi. LTT*. 



GENERAL LITERATURE 



LJUMPooU (Stanley*. Y OP 

irA-.ed. StC**J EJiltom, XrvM- 
to*. &j. *4t. 

Lanke.Ur (Sir Ray). 
*:. 6*. 

Sec**J Sfr , 
Cr. loo i/. 

'V. Jt.. Cu. 

inucd. Cr. to*. &/. <w/. 
L.w (Edward). KDWARD CAR 

*ND AM Al-l- 

TtOM. S**m4 JUiti**. Cr. 8e. j. 



Lock (WaJtarV SI. P- 

- Ji/IML 

c'. jj O^- " 
Cr. lex 

Lodfe SIP Ollr>. N 
or ^ 

LBXK.B DPCM :- 

t/4 A^MiM. 
5. */. 

Umi 




tr. 



tLtMS, Cr. IP*. 51 M/. 
TRKATUC OH LIFB AMD 



Cr. If, 

THIl 
IQIJ ' 



Loreburn (Eu 

- . lr. u. W. M/. 



Lorlmer (0or|( Hora, 

. Cr. SM. y. 6/. 

i** Cr. tt^ 
AUf Cr. iff. u. met. 



Lorlniw (lormmX BY THE WA ! 
Illutraud. Tki*4f.i 
Cr. ftp*. 6j. tut. 

LUCAI 

</ ' 
8ew. 7 "1. mtt. 

. - r *,/ 



Illui 
irat. 
to*. - 

i> to*. 6j i 

, crated. 
**. &*. 

*t. 

<K*Jk 

H U. < 

frmrtk . 


to*. <*. Cu 

' MkN. 

g 

fcv. s^ 

A^WN/4/ 

AM/- 8t - " t- 

to*. / &> 

-.*. to*. 
$* 

K TO THE I AND 

.-LRET. 

Jr*. u. 6JL M//. 

:< LOUVAIN I A ! 
BOOK or LIBERTY A> 
Pref 

-tl 



METHUKN AND COMPANY LIMITED 



Lydekke? (R.). THE OX AND ITS 
KINDRED. Illustrated. Cr. too. 6s. net. 

Macaulay (Lord). CRITICAL AND 

HISTORICAL ESSAYS. Edited by F. 
C. MONTAGUE. Three Volumes. Cr. lw>. 
iSf. net. 

Macdonald (J. R. W.). A HISTORY OF 
FRANCE. Three. Volume Cr. 8f*. 
Each ft. 



ll (William). AN INTRODUC- 
TION TO SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 
Tenth Kditien. Cr. 800. 5 *. rut. 
BODY AND MIND: A HISTORY AND A 
DKKKNCE OK ANIMISM. Third Edition. 
Demy 3*0. tos. dd. nut. 

Maeterlinck (Maurice). THE BLUE 

BIRD: A FAIRY PLAY IN Six ACT*. 

Translated by ALKXANPER TBIXEIKA JDS 

MATTOS. Fcaj>. 8z>0. Decklt Edges. 35. 5</. 

net. An Edition, illustrated in colour by 

F. CAYI.EY ROBINSON, is also pubii.-had. 

Cr. 4(0. i is. net. Of the abovt book 

Thirty-nine Editions in all Law ben is'juf d. 
MARY MAGDALENE: A PLAY IN THREE 

ACTS. Translated by ALEXANDER TKIXKIRA 

DE MATTOS. Third Edition. Fca.fi. 8f>0. 

Decklt Edges. 31. (td. net. 
OUR ETERNITY. Translated by ALEX- 

ANDER THSXKIKA DB MATTOS. P'caf. Svo. 

5<f. net. 
THE UNKNOWN GUEST. Translated 

by ALEXANDER TEIXKIRA OB MATTOS. 

Second Edition. Cr. %vo. 5*. net. 
POEMS. Translated by BKRNARD Mi ALL. 

Second Edition. Cr. Zvo. +s. net. 
THE WRACK OF THE STORM. Second 

Edition. Cr. 8z>tf. 5^. net. 

Maeterlinck (Mme. M.) (Georgette 
Leblanc). THE CHILDREN'S BLUE- 
BIRD. Translated by ALEXANDEK 
TFIXEIRA HE MATTOS. Illustrated. Fcap. 
3r><?. 51. net. 

Mahaffy(J. P.). A HISTORY OF EGYPT 
UNDER THE PTOLEMAIC DYNASTY. 
Illustrated. Second Edition. Cr. 8r<. 6s. 
net. 

Maltland (P. W.). ROMAN CANON LAW 
IN THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND. 
Royal &DO. ft. 6d. 

arett (R. H.). THE THRESHOLD OF 
RELIGION. Third Edition. Cr. Ivo. 



arrloti (J. A. R.). ENGLAND SINCE 
WATERLOO. With Mapi. Second 
, Revised. Dtvty SM. o*. *d. net. 



Mn.86flo.1d (Johut). SKA LIFE IN NEL- 
SON'S TIME. Illustrated. Cr. 8w. 
-'. net. 

A SAILOR'S GARLAND. Selected and 
Kditfcd. Sn-*d Edition. Cr. too. 3*. Gd. 
tut. 

*t*rroan (0. P. O.) TENNYSON 
AS A RELIGIOUS TEACHER. Second 
Edition. Cr. ftv*. *. net. 

THE CONDITION OF ENGLAND. 
Fenrth Edititn. Cr. \vf. 6s. net. 

Kd!ey (D. J.). ORIGINAL ILLUSTRA 
flONS OF ENGLISH CONSTITU- 
TIONAL HISTORY. Cr. 3w. 7 s.6d. net. 



(Eastaca). LIFE AFTER LIFE; 

OR, THH THEORY OF RKINCARNATIOW. 

Cr. 8. a. fid. net. 
THE POWER OF CONCENTRATION 1 

How TO ACQUIKE IT. Fifth Edition. 

Cr. 800. jj. 6rf. net. 
PREVENTION AND CURE. Second 

Edition. Crtwn 8r;o. j*. d. net. 



Kllea (Mru. Sostace). ECONOMY IN 
WAR-TIME; OK, HEALTH WITHOUT 
MBAT. Second Edition, fca^.Sot. is.net. 

HlllaU (J. Q.). THE LIFE AND LET- 
TERS OF SIR JOHN EVERETT 
MILLAIS. Illustrated. Third Edition. 
Demy 8. 7*. Ad. net. 

Milne (J. Q.). A HISTORY OF EGYPT 
UNDER ROMAN RULE. Illustrated. 
Stcfnd Editifn. Cr. Hvo. 6t. net. 

Morfat (Mary H.). QUEEN LOUISA OF 
PRUSSIA. IlluitraUd. Fourth Edition. 
Cr. Sro. f>s. 

Money (BU< Leo ChiozzaX RICHES AND 

POVERTY, 1910. Eleventh Edition. 
Detny 8t>0. $J. net. 

Moatatfue (C. B.). DRAMATIC VALUES. 
Second Editifn. Fcap. lv*. 51. 

Sovea (Alfred). A SALUTE FROM THE 
FLEET, AND OTHER POEMS. Third 
Edition. Cr. Kvff. $s. net. 

RAD A : A BRLGIAN CHRISTMAS EVK. Illus- 
trated. Fc<i-j>. 8r<0. 4S. 6d. net. 

Oman (C. W.C.). A HISTORY OF THE 
ART OF WAR IN THE MIDDLE 
AGES. Illustrated. Demy Ivo. los. td. 
net. 

ENGLAND BEFORE THE NORMAN 
CONQUEST. With Maps. Third EM- 
if en. Revised. Demy 8e*. lot. 6rf. </. 



JKAL LITERATURE 



xtAft*< (John,. 

KXSK. 

4tt E*tie+. Sm+:. 
fa?" -fr.:s. u. 

*&, 1* tf 



IW 

J. ft.. 



(Oern 



fa i/ (w/. ^V.W/ / . . W 

Mf. 

N. or 

PaJ.*- K Or 

CktAfif JMifivn 

C". S** < 

PtrU (W. H. ri'ndn.) A 

IT TO TM 



Cr. 8, . 
V. 1 

T<x_ ; 
DT. 

Yoc. I 









PT. rROM 



from the 



EGYPTIAN IVE ART 

i. Cr. Sr. w <W. -w- 

P0l!r 

tile i 

Prir PROGRESS Or 

THr A New Edition. Edited 

>y F. W. HIUT. Dtmy iii ^i n * 



Pow>r (J. C'C-nnrtrV THF. MAKING OF 



Cr. &**. li. <w/. 

id -s or 

^Br#. 
iV. ,- wJ 

. IOJ &! 



OLD OAK KT 

/ , |c. 



io. W MT. 



Roll* 

Rylejr (A B*rtfordi OLD PASTE. 






a*' (H. H. BunroV. J 
>'** */ 

AI.D IN 



chldrewlu (Philip) RUI. 
trmtcd. $*<** / 



(KdmnndV TOMM 
ANI 

u. W. 

Sf+tntA *<:,em. J-i.i, 

K'.o.tratcd. Cr.8w. 6, 

hnkepr (William). 

166^ Each ^ 4 4 

/ f- 

'vRt. With i 
by GEomc* WTWDHAU. 
r*-, i+t. H M.'. 



or a comp. 



10 



METHUEN AND COMPANY LIMITED 



BhI)ey (Percy ByuBh*). POEMS. With 
an Introduction by A. Ci UTTON BROCK and 
notes by C. D. LOCOCJC. Tvoc Volumts. 
Dttny 8tw. 1 is. tut. 



Uaden (DoutfaiV SICILY: THK NEW 

WINTKK KtsoxT. An Encyclopaedia cf 
Sioiiy. Wiih 2:14 Illustrations, a Map. and 
a Table of th.- kail way System of Sicily. 
Second Edition , Rtrnstti. Cf. 8A jr. tut. 

Slesoar (H. H.), TRADE UNIONISM. 
Cr. bvo. -u. (>d. net. 



Smith (Aitam). THE WEALTH OF I 

NATIONS. EtHtr.ol by EDWIN CANNAN. i 
yoi^tnea. Demy 3tJ. {,1 is. Met. 

Smith (0. P. Herbert). GEM-STONES ' 

ANOTHK.IR DISTINCTIVE CKARAC- i 

TERS. Illustrated. Second Edition. Cr. 
too. 6s. K t. 

StancIIffe. GOLF DO'S AND DONT'S. | 
Sixth Edition.. Fcaj>. SPO. is. net. 

$Svenson (R. L.). THE LETTERS OF 
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON. Edited 
by Sir SIDNEY CoLvm. A New Re- 
a,~ran*tJ Edition in/our volumes. Fourth 
Edition. <MJ>. 8z>*. Each $s. net. Leather^ 
each 6s. net. 

Burtcei (H. 8.). HANDLEY CROSS. 

Illustrated. Sixth Edition. Fceip. 8*. 
Gilt tof>. 3*. 6ei. net. 

V5R. SPONGE'S SPORTING TOUR. 
Illustrated. Third Edition. Fcap. 9*. 
Gilt top. 3J. bd. net. 

A.SK MAMMA; on, THE RICHEST 
COMMONER IN ENGLAND. Illus- 
trated- Fca.j>. ft**. Gilt top. 3J. 6rf. net. 

JORROCKS'S JAUNTS AND JOLLI- 
TIES. Illustrated. Fifth Ediiit*. Fcap. 
fc><. Gilt tap. 3*. 6ff ttft. 

MR FACEY ROM FOR TVS HOUNDS. 
Illustrated. St.cend Editi&i*, Fca,p. SJ, 
Gilt top. 3.1. 6^. net. 

HAWBUCK GRANGE; OR, THF SPORT- 
ING ADVENTURES OF THOMAS 
SCOTT, ESQ. Illustrated. Fcap. &. 
Gilt top. 31. M. tut. 

PLAIN OR RINGLETS? Illustrated. 
Fcap. Ivt. Gilt top. y. 6d. net. 

Buso (Henry). THE LIFE OF THE 
BLESSED HENRY SUSO. By HiMSEi.r. 
Translated by T. F. KNOX. With an Intro- 
duction by DEAN INGE. Second Edition. 
Cr. too. 3*. 6d. net. 

gwanton (B. W.). FUNGI AND HOW 
TO KNOW THEM. Illustrated. Cr. too. 
6s. net. 

BRITISH PLANT - QA.LW. Cm to*. 
4 *** 



ymei (J. E.). THE FRENCH REVO- 
LUTION. Second Edition. Cr.tvo. ax. W. 

fabor (Margaret E.). THE SAINTS IN 
ART. \Vith their Attributes and Symbol* 
Alphabetically Arranged. Illustrated. 
Third Edition. Fcap. &vo. 3*. 6d. net. 

Taylor (A. E.). ELEMENTS OF META- 
PHYSICS. Fourth Edition. Dtmy B>. 
ioj. tx/. net. 

Taylor (J W ). THE COMING OF THE 
SAINTS. Second Edition. Cr. 8t>o. 5*. 
net. 

Thomas (Edward). MAURICE MAE- 
TERLINCK Il'ustrated. Second Edition. 
Cr. 80. sj. net. 

A LITKRARY PILGRIM IN ENGLAND. 
Illustrated. Demy %ra. js. 6d. net. 

Thompson (Francis). SELECTED 
POEMS OF FRANCIS THOMPSON. 
With a Biographical Note by WILKRIB 
MKYNKLL. With H Portrait in Photogravure. 
7'uttnty -eighth Tkrusond. Fcap. Ivo. $s. 
net. 

TlIestoB (Mary W.). DAILY STRENGTH 
FOR DAILY NEEDS. Twenty-third 
Edition. Mtdiu** i6tnt. *?. 6d. net. 
Also Veh*t Persian Yapp, y. 6J. net. 

Top^ara (Anna). MEMORIES OF THE 
KAISER'S COURT. Illustrated. Tenth 
*iti*n. Cr. 8zw. ar. 6rf. net. 

Toyftb (Pagot). DANTE ALIGHIERI. 
His Lira AND WORKS. With 16 Illustra- 
tions. Fourth and Enlar t& EtUtion. Cr. 
Hw. 5*. net. 



(G. M.). ENGLAND UNDER 
STUARTS. With Maps and Plan*. 
Seventh Edition. Demy Sfo. sos. M. net 



(H. Ini<0). TOWN PLANNING! 
PAST, PRESENT, AND POSSIBLE. Illustra- 
ted. frsmul Edition. Widt Rty** 5ro 
X5J. net. 

Underbill (Evelyn), MYSTICISM. A 
Study in the Nature and Development of 
Man s Spiritual Consciousness. Sixth 
Edition. Demy 8ro. i5J. net. 

Yardon (Harry). HOW TO PLAY GOLF. 
Illustrated. Ninth Edition. Cr. to*. 
xs. 6d. net. 

Vernoo (Hon. W. Warren). READINGS 
ON THE INFERNO OF DANTE. Witb 
an Introduction by the Rev. Dr. MOORE. 
TttKt V*bt-m*x. Stoned KdifieM, Rtnpritte*. 
Cr. Sew. %%f. nft. 



GENERAL LITERATI 



ii 



the i*;e D*AM ' 

:y U 
r or RiraM. A/ 

C>. M*. i 

Ylciert (Etnn.f 
IM. KM. e.i 



ITS 



Wells (J.V D OXFORD 

j Map*. O. to*. 



Wad* (0 W. and J. H.V RA 

-iL Cr. I-.- 



Wafn.r (Kleha. 

Nt 



OWB tpU/-- 
lion*. By Ai.it LCK. 

jMr. F*+f. . 
THB RINO or TM- 



TAHMMAl'tBI AMU TMB U A ST BatlHOBBS 

or N 

^aurhouM /Kllxablh 



WhltUO ,Wi:fr*d>. 









i. LOUD ATMU* SAVILJC'S CRIMC 
IKK PoirKAiT or M. 

-A:>MI!, A .1 IAI 



ANL. 



A HOUSE Of PL 






A 






> U*. xC' > 



THE HOUSE BY 

.ood Scrrn o' LmW HuU. 

. M. **. 

COMPANIONS OF THE WAY BMM 
Scitciii.a* fa* Morning a4 EMW< Read- 
kg. /.*r t>- - .' 

THOUGHTS Or A Th 

M+ r*<ii~ u. *. 

ES. 



A LITTLE BOOK Or 

,tk K 



LIFE AND 

t**. 

-: 



! ULFTORS. 

te. it. W - 

Wti(ai: (Arthur E. P.). A 

TrtK MiuiriKS or u 




/OM AlTlMJk TO TMK 

rnoirrtBK. Illus 

i*, M ~i. ~' 



W.od (Sir Evtl> 

. !tv. 7 j. CKI 



Wood (LUat W. B.) r .' 
J. K 

/. 

Wordwor;h (W ub an 

> i-t C 





Taati 



'MT. B.V A i 

.^. CV. K*. 



METHUEN AND COMPANY LIMITED 



PART II. A SELECTION OF SERIES 

Ancient Cities 

General Editot, SJR B. C. A. WINDLB 

Cr. 800. 4*. 6rf. ntt each volume 
With Illustrations by E. H. NEW, and other Artists 



KTOL. Alfred Harvey 
CANTERBURY. J. C. Cox. 
CHKSTSR. Sir B. C. A. Windle. 
T>UILIN. S. A. O. Fitzpatrick. 



EDINBURGH. M. G. Williamson. 
LINCOLN. E. Mansel Sympsoa 
SHREWSBURY. T. Auden. 
WELLS and GLASTONBORY. T. S. Holmes. 



The Antiquary's Books 

General Editor, J. CHARLES COX 

Demy 800. Jt. 6d. net each votume 

With Numerous Illustrations 



ANCIENT PAINTED GLASS IN ENGLAND. 
Philip Nelson. 

ARCHEOLOGY AND FALSE ANTIQUITIES. 
R. Munro. 

BELLS OF ENGLAND, THE. Canon J. J. 
Raven. Stcond Edition. 

BRASSES OF ENGLAND, THK. Herbert W. 
Mackliu. Third Edition. 

CASTLES AND WALLKD TOWNS OF ENGLAND, 
THK. A. Harvey. 

CKLTIC ART IN PAGAN AND CHRISTIAN 
TIMRS. J. Romilly Allen. Stcond Edition. 

CMUKCHWARDRNS* ACCOUNTS. J. C. Cox. 
DOMESDAY INQUEST, THE, Adolpbas Ballard. 

VMGLISH CHURCH FURNITURE. J. C. Cox 
taA A. Hawvssy. 



ENGLISH COSTUME. From Prehistoric Times 
to the End of the Eighteenth Century. 
George Clinch. 

ENGLISH MONASTIC LIFK. Cardinal Gasqaet 
Frurth, Ediiien. 

ENGLISH SEALS. J. Harvey Bloom. 

FOLK-LORE AS AN HISTORICAL SCIENCE. 
Sir G. L. Gomme. 

GILDS AND COMPANIES OF LONDON, THK. 
George Unwin. 

HERMITS AND ANCHORITES OF ENGLAND 
THB. Rotha Mary Clay. 

MANOR AND MANORIAL RECORDS THK 
Nathaniel J. Hone. Second Editio*^ 

MEDIEVAL HOSPITALS OF ENGLAND, THE 
Rotha Mary Clay. 

OLD ENGLISH INSTKOMBNTS OF Music. 
V. W. Galpin. ,SW*W Edition. 



GENERAL LITERATURE 



The Antiquary 1 ! Booki continued 



OLD Hweusu LIRRARH 



ETMAI 



OLD SCRTICB BOOK* or fl 

CHURCH. Christopher Wordsworth, ao4 

Henry LiuUhftiM. 



PAKJSM Lire IM 
Cardinal G**quet. >**<* / . 



UTERI or 



RBMAIMS or THB Ptr- 

ROMAN ERA IN BRITAIN, IN* J. V. 

KOMAHO-B*. 

J Ward. 

ROYAL Konsr* or fcwui^Ni., I HK 

SCHOOL* or MK 

A. F. Le.cb. A'/Crf.ui A . 



J CCa. 



SHRINKS or Bcti 



Wall 



The Arden Shakespeare 

Dtmy SP. 2J. 6< IM/ o-.4 r!umt 

An edition of Shako Playt;e*c: :!) Introdu, 

Textual Notes, and a Commentary * 

KLL THAT ENM W.LU 
ANTON T AMD CLBorATRA. St;~vt f. 
As You Lit* 

CTMRBLINB, S**4 BMH^n. 
COMRDV or EBBOR* 
HAMUT 
JULIO* 

^T. L 

KING HBMRV T. 

Kmo HBMRT ^ 

KIHU HBMRT 
KINO LBAR. 
KINO . 

KING r 

Lif ASU I'ATN or K 
LOTS'* LAAOOR'S LOCT. 



MACRCTH. 

MBASURB roR MBA 

MRRCNANT or VK:< 

MBRBT V\ . . ' IK 

, DllKAM. A 

OTHBLLO. 



ROMBO AMD J 

SOMNBTl AND A LOVXR COMP' AIKT 
<W. 1 MR 

^T, TUB. 

MBMS. 
TwKLrTN NlCNT. 

Two GBHTUBMBM or V> 
WIMTBR* TALB. : 



Ciataics of Art 

Edited by DK. J. H. W. LAING 
Wi:k itumtrt*} hluitn ::cn r . Widt 



ART or THE C*BBK< 

tu. .. 



ART or TMA 
i Si. . 

CAM>IH. H. L. A. FM 






^1. 

r 

ntt. 



METHUEN AND COMPANY LIMITED 



Classics of Art continued 

GHIRLANDAIO. Gerald S. Davies. Second 
Edition, ioj. Sd. ntt. 

LANTRRNCK. Sir Walter Armstrong. &\ it. tut. 

MICHELANGELO. Geiaid S. Davies. xa*. td. 
ntt. 

RAPHAEL. A. P. Oppe*. its. M. tut. 

REMBRANDT'S ETCHINGS. A. M. Hind. 
Two Volumes, an. tut. 



RUBKNS. Edward Dillon. $x. ntt. 

TINTORETTO. Evelya March Pbillipp& 154. 
tut. 

TITIAN. Charles Kieketts. 151. rttf. 

TORNHR'S SKETCHES AND DRAWINGS. A. J. 
Finberg. Stcond Edition. i2S. 6>/. ml. 

VELAZQUEZ. A. do Beructe. 101. &J. tut. 



The 'Complete' Series 

Fully Illustrated. Demy 8t> 



COMPLETE AMATKPR BOXKR, TH. J. O. 

Rohna Lynch. 5*. tut. 
COMPI.KTB ASSOCIATION- FOOTBALLER, THB. 

6. S. vers and C. . tiugbes-Davies. 

5J. tut. 
COMPLETE ATHLKTIC TRAINKR, THK. S. A. 

Mussabini. 54. tut. 
COMFLBTK BILLIARD PIJLTKK, T. Cbarlw 

Roberts. ioi. 6</. tut. 
COMPLETE COOK, THS. Lilian Whhiir.j. 

7*. 6^. //. 
COMPLETE CRICKETER, THE. Albert E. 

KNIGHT, js. M. tut. Stand Editiftt. 
COMPLETE FOXHUNTEK, THK. Charles Rich- 
ardson, laj. &/. *?. Second Edition. 
COMPLETE GOLFER, THK. Harry Vardon. 

io. 6J. tut. FeurtetHth Edition, Rtvistd. 
COMPLETE HOCKKT-PLAVKR, THE. Eustace 

E. White. $s. ntt. Stcond Kditin. 
COMPLETE HORSEMAN, THE. W. Scarth 

Dixon. Second Edition, tor. 6d. tut. 
COMPLETE JOJITSOAN, THE. W. H. Garrod. 



COMFI.KTB L*^WN TENNIS PLATER, THB. 
A. Wallis Myers. XM. <W. rut. Feurtl 



COMPLETE MOTORIST, THK. Filson Young 
and W. G. Aston. 5J. nti. Revittd Editicn. 

COMfLBTB MOOMTAINEER, THE. G. D. 
Abraham. 15*. nit. Stcond Edition. 

COMPLKTE OARSMAN, THE. R. C. Lehmann. 
105. dd. ntt. 

COMPLETE PHOTOGRAPHER, THE. R. Child 
Bayley. 101. 6d. ntt. Fifth Edition, 
Rtvised. 

COMPLETE ROGBY FOOTBALLER, ON THE NEW 
ZEALAND SYSTEM, THE. D. Gallaher and 
W. J. Stead, icw. 6d. ntt. Stcond Edition. 

COMPLETE SHOT, THE. G. T. Teasdale- 
Buckell. iaj. M. ntt. Third Edition. 

COMPLETE SWIMMER, THE. F. Sachs, js. 6d. 
tut. 

COMPLETB YACHTSMAN, THE. B. Heckstall- 
Smith and E. do Boulay. Stcond Edition, 
Rtviud. 1:51. nttt. 



The Connoiseeur's Library 

With numerous Illustrations. Wide Royal 8o. 25*. net each volume 



ENGLISH COLOURED BOOKS. Martin Hardie. 
ENGLISH FDRNITORB. F. S. Robinson. 
ETCHINGS. Sir F. Wedmore. Stcond Edition. 
EUROPEAN ENAMELS. Henry H. Cmiyng- 

hame. 

FINE BOOKS. A. W. Pollard. 
GLASS. Edward Dillon. 
GOLDSMITHS' AND SILVHRSMITHS' WORK. 

N>IM u I.awson. Stcond Edition. 
ii.i.uviNvnr.rj MANUSCRIPTS. /. A, Herbert. 

tf.rvt Edition 



IVORIES. Alfred MaskelL 

JKWELLESY. H. Clifford Smith. 
Edition. 



Stcond 



MEZZOTINTS. Cyril Davenport. 
MINIATUSKS. Dudley Heath. 
PORCELAIN. Edward Dillon. 
SEALS. Walter de Gray Birch. 

Woon SCULPTORS. Alfred MaskelL Stcond 
Edition. 



GENERAL LITERATDRI 



Handbooks of English Church History 

Cnum 8r. u. W. // <*4 

RmroEHATiGW PVKIOO, I 

Srioocui WITH I Bract 



or TM* LMGLI&M CMCICH, Tim. 



SAXOM CM. 
THE 

liKMJBVAL CMOKM AMD TM* i 
A.. C. 



. 



ibooks of Thcologj 






t. 



. 

!NTODOCTIO TT r KKLIOCM 



"JCTOH TC 
C ' xr-iA, ' Dtm? Jr* 

PHIUMU>rMf Or P ' i> AMD 

SMk 



XX 
An. K B. Irvooi. ^i .'A AJttti* . . 



A. F. B Irvoa 



U ijj tW *.' 



Health Series 



j.-->tt INK F 
CAAB o- 



HBALTII 





How T Liv Low. 

Hr6nri cr T*B SKID, TMK. G. 



O K W.,-*a M 
MMAr AM* EAB T.r 



IK* O Hilds 



The Home Life ' Series 

-i) 8:. li. U IOJ. fc 



* 
Bosbty. Stc^dl 

1 trv IN CNIMA. I. Taylor 
HOMK L:r if FAMC. Mi 



GOMAHT. llrv A S; ' 



H >MI L>ri 



D. 5- 



HOME 



H&Mt. LirB iw NORWAY. 



Du(! Gordoo 



.:F IK Rc% 



r<5 



METHUEN AND COMPANY LIMITED 



Loader* of Religion 

Edited by H. C. BEECHING. With Portrait* 
8 rv. 2f. net tack volume 



C%*T".WAI. NHWMAN. R. H, Hatton. 
&*;>*. 

JOHX WSSLKV. J. H. Overt OB. 

Bit HOP WiLBBRroRCK. G. W. Daniel!. 

CARDINAL MANNING A. W. Hutton. Stcend 



CHARLR* SIMJTOV H. C. O. 

JOHW Kxox. F WacConn. Second Rditisn. 

JOHN Ilowv. R. F. Hmtoa. 

THOIA. K?N. F. A. Clarke. 

f}r<+Gf Fox, THE QlTAKEB- T. 



JOHN KKBLR. Wait** Lock. Stvenik Rditltn. 

THOMAS CHAI.WF.VS. Mrs. Qlipbant. Second 
Edition. 

LANCELOT ANDREWS*. R. L. Ottley. Second 
Edition. 

ADGCSTINE or CANTERBURY, E. L. Catts. 

WILLIAM LADB W H. Hutton. Fourth 
Edition. 

JOHN DONNE. Augustas Jessop. 
THOMAS CRANMEK. A. J. Masoa. 
LATIMER. R. M. and A J. Carlyle. 
BOTLBK. W. A. Spooae; 



Tbe Library of DeYotion 

With Introductions and (where necessary} Notes 
Small Pott 8w f tlotk, 2s,; leather ; 2s. 6d. m e<wk 
fs ar ST. AUGUSTINE, THE. 



IMITATION or CHRIST, THR Eifkth Edition. 
CHRISTIAW YEAR, THK. Fifth Edition. 
LVKA INNGCKMTIC!*. Third Edition. 
TKMPLrt, THF, Scctnd B. ditto*. 
BOCK: or I>i?roTipis, A. Steansf Rditi**. 
SKRIOWI; CAM. TO A DBVOUT AND HOLT 



l.ir k . A. ftftk 
GVIDK TO ETERWITT, A. 
I*wn WAT, THB. Tkird Edi<i*. 
OK THR LOVK OP GOD. 
PSAI.W? or DAVID. THBL 
LTRA APOSTOLICA. 
SOKG OF SONGS, THK. 
THOUGHTS or PASCAL, TKF. S*r.o*d Edition. 

MANDAI. or CONSOLATION rROM TH SAIKTS 
AM* FATKKW., A. 

rsoM Tiit APOCRYPHA. 
COH*T, TKJ. 



DEVOTIONS or ST. ANSEI.M, THR- 
BISHOP WIJ^ON'S SACPA PKIVATA. 

ABODNDING TO THE CHTEV or Si*- 



LTSA SACRA. A Book f Sacred Vrse. 
Second Edition. 



DAT BOOK rROM TH> SAINTS 
A, 



BOOK or HEAVKKI.Y WIJ.DQM, A. 
Scivction from tb Englbh 



LIGHT, Lirs, and IX>TK. 
the German Mystics. 



A Stkertlo* frwio 

IHTKODCCTTOK TO THS DEVOOT LIJTC, AM. 

LITTLE F^nwr.rs or THr GLORIOU* MKSSVK 
ST. FKANCIS AND or MIS FRIAKS, THS. 

DEATH ANP IMMORTAUTT. 

SPIRITUAL GUIDE, THE. Third Edi'tien. 

DEVOTION* roR EVERY DAV IH THK WBKX 
AHD TH* GREAT FESTIVALS. 

PRJTCXS PKIVATAR. 



MYBTICAB. A Day B<x* from the 
Wntiofft tl Mytkc *f VC<w 7 



GENERAL LITERATURB 



\Vitk 



Little Book! OB Art 



. D*my \6rnt. tf. W. nit t+k 



E*ch tdumc consists of about aoo pages, and contains from 30 to 40 Illustration*. 
. Including i Krontupirc* in PhotograYure 



ALCMT OORER. L. J 

J<PAN. TMO. J 

1 -nack. 

Borncaxu. Kary L. Boooor 
BPRME JOKES. J. 6* U>: 
Curt. 

tx Mrv H. 

CMRMT m A*r. Mrv H. JMUMT 
CIAOD. E. DOIom. 

CON*TALB. H 



A Polkrd tad E HaTKla-gl 

EARLT EMCUAM WATH C. OUR. C E. 



EMAMRIO. Mr. N. DWMM .fmU KJiti**. 
roH. A. Carkraa. 

i 



G*son AMD BOUCHER. E. F. 
HOL*KIH Mrs. G. FortcscM. 

IATD MAMOKmrri. J W. F 
JvwvtxBinr. C. I)vrnport V/i^V / 
JOHN Horrxsft. H. P. K 
SIR JOANVA RXTMOCC*. J. 

MiLurr. N. P.*cock J, 

iTnport. . 



.V^,u rf 

Ooa LADV in AIT. Mis. H. J*nof. 
R A rA>U A R 
Row*. MurUI 

VAMVTCK. M. G. SnuJIrod. 

f oro* and 

WATT- 



The Little Qnidei 

kMU by E. H Ntw and other artUt and fro photofrmpt't 

11. 6J. tut w 



The ma: fMturo / the Gvidetarc (l) a kandf and charming foi 
tntioot from photographs *rvi by wel 

(4) ar 4' that U n 

Atur, iiorf, archjcology, and architect mordistr 



CAMBKIDOI AMD rr 

*tW 

. lacAMiM, THE. E. K 
KOunM LAUV TMI. F. G. 
!*. or WIGHT. Turn. G. Och. 
Lono* G. 



WAIJK 



A H 



Oxro AND ITS 
Edit**. 






ST. PAUL'* CATMKX.BA.L. G. Oincb. 

>rK4IK'S C'/UHTRT. Sir P. C A. 



Sovm Waun. G. W. aW J. H. W%d. 
. THR H. H. L. Bot. 

O. I. TrMtWck. 



METKUEN AND COMPANY LIMITED 



The Little Qu\d<& continued 

BERKSHIRE. F. G. Brabant 

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. E. S. Roscoe. Second 
Edition, Revised. 

CAMBRIDGESHIRE. J. C. Cox. rf 
CHBSHIRB. W. M. Gallichan. * 
CORNWALL. A. L. Salmon. Stcond Edition. 
DERBYSHIRE. J. C. Cox. Stcond Edition. 
DEVON. S. Baring-Gonld. Third Edition. 
DORSET. F. R. Heath. Fourth Edition. 
DURHAM. J. E. Hodgkin. 
ESSEX. J. C. Cor. Stcond Edition. 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE. J. C Cox. 
HAMPSHIRE. J. C. Cox. Stcond Edition. 
HERTFORDSHIRE. H. W. Tompkins. 

KENT. J. C. Cox. Second Edition, Rt- 
written. 

KERRY. C. P. Crane. 

LEICESTERSHIRE AND RUTLAND. 
and V. B. Crowther-Beynon. 

LINCOLNSHIRE. J. C Cox. 
MIDDLESEX. J. B. Firth. 
MONMOUTHSHIRE. G. W. and J. H. Wade. 

NORFOLK. W. A. Dott. Third Edition, 
Retnitd. 

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. W. Dry. Second 
Edition, Revued. 



Second Edition. 

A. Harvey 



NORTHUMBERLAND. J. E. Morris. 

NOTTIXGHAMSHIRX. L. Guilford. 

OXFORDSHIRE. F. G. Brabant Seconc Edition. 

SHROPSHIRE. J. E. Auden. 

SOMERSET. G. W. and J. H. Wacfe. Third 
Edition. 

STAFFORDSHIRE, C. Masefield. 

SUFFOLK. W. A. Dutt. 

SURREY. J. C. Cox. Second Edition, Re- 
written. 

SUSSEX'. F. G. Brabanl. Piurth Edition. 

WARWICKSHIRE. J. C, Co*. 

WILTSHIRE. F. R. Heath. Second Edition. 
THE EATT 



YORKSHIRE, 

Morris. 
YORKSHIRE, THE NORTH 

Morris. 
YORKSHIRE, 



RIDING. J. E- 
RIDING. J. E 
THE WEST RIDING. J. E. 



Morris, y. 6d. ntt. 



BRITTANY. S. Baring-Goald. Second Edition 
NORMANDY. C. Scudamore. Second Edition, 
ROME. C. G. Ellaby. 
SICILY. F. H. Jackson. 



The Little Library 

With Introduction, Notes, and Photogravure Frontispiece 
Small Poti$-D6, Each Volume, cloth, is. 64, net 

BSftJcs (WUIlam). SELECTIONS PROM 
THE WORKS OF WILLIAM BLAKE. 

LAVENGRO, Twc 



A LITTLE BOOK OF ENGLISH 
LYRICS. Second Edition. 

JUiiteB (Jane). PRIDE AND PREJU- 
DICE. Two Volutxts. 
NORTHANGER ABBEY. * 

Bacon (Francis). THE ESSAYS OF 
LORD BACON. 

Barham (B. H.). THE INGOLDSBY 
LEGENDS. Two Volumes. 

Barnett (Annie). A LITTLE BOOK OF 
JENGLISH PROSE, Third Edition. 

Beakford (William). THE HISTORY OF 
THE CALIPH VATHKK. 



Borrow (Gaorge). 

Volume*. 
THE ROMANY RYE. 

Browning (Robert). SELECTIONS FROM 
THE EARLY POEMS OF ROBERT 
BROWNING. 

Canning (George). SELECTIONS FROM 
THE ANTI-JACOBIN : With some later 
Poems by GEORGB CANNING. 

Gowley (Abraham). THE ESSAYS OF 
ABRAHAM GOWLEY. 



GENERAL LITERATURH 



The Little Library continual 
Crbb4 (0orf). 2 NS FROM 

THr 



Craih 



hard). THE 
kD CR 



Dane* Alfchlarl. PURGATORY. 

PAkA 

Darley (George). 'ROM 

THk PUKMS C 

Dleent(Ghar|i). CHRISTMAS BOOKS. 
7W V,i*m tt . 

(Mri.V CRANFORD. 



itm. 
Hawthorn* (HathaaUI). .RLJCT 

KlniClaKa (A. W.). KOTHEN. St<e4 

Lockr(F.). LONDON LVRICS. 

arve:t : Andrew). 1 HE POEMS OF 

llton (John). THh. MINOR POEMS OF 
TON. 



Molr(D. .). MANS1E WAUCH. 
Hlcholi(Bowyar). A LITTLE BOOK OF 

mlth( Horace and JamM). REJECTED 
rnM). A SENTIMENTAL 

ufrd, Lord). THE EARLY 

- 









THE POEMS OF 



Yaorfhaa (Hnry). 

WaUrhouM (Elisabeth). A LITTLE 


F WILLIAM W 

Wordsworth (W.) *.-! CoUrtd^t (S. T.). 



The Little Quarto Shakespeare 

. CRAIG. With Inti 

Pitt i6mf. 40 I'olumtt. 1 eniher, priu it. net tcuk 9clutnt 

Bock CAS*. lor. rut 



Dtmy 



Miniature Library 

Isatktr, is. tt tvk 

Pouoxiut; .1 Wl and Modem in 



urH ,ft on Ycotb. Edward I 

-raid 
OMAI KHATTiM. fcdtnud i 



The New Library of Medicine 

Edited by C. \V y 8 



Am AMD HEALTH. Ronald C Macfie. ,i. U 

m. 

m F. Cmvaaafh. 
t^ Rdtti** ji. 6J. lut. 

Hoo. Sir John 
71. W 

u or Occu* 
M //. Stffnd t^- 

Diuct AND THE Dtoc HABIT. rf. Salos- 
bury ?' W. </ 



K DISBASBS. V I'. Scho- 

: /. 

Kor Mixn, TM*. Sir T. S. Gouitoo. 

71. W. M/. 

IMFANT MoRTauTT. Sir George Newman. 
7*. 6.; 



PVT.NTIOK Of TOBRKCtlLOSiS 

il. 



20 



METHUEN AND COMPANY LIMITED 



The New Library of Music 

Edited by ERNEST NEWMAN. Illustrated. 2>emy 8n>. 7*. 6d. net 
BRAHMS. J. A. Fuller- Maitland. Second | HANDEL. R. A. Streatfeild. Second Edition 

| HUGO WOLF. Ernest Newman. 

Oxford Biographies 

Illustrated. Fcap. 80. Each volume , cloth, 2s. 6d, net ; leather^ 35. 6d. tut 



DANTB ALIGHIBRI. Paget Toyubee. Fifth 
Edition. 

GIKOI.AVO SAVONAROLA. E. L. S. Horsburgh. 
Sixth Edition. 

JOHN HOWARD. E. C. S. Gibson. 



Si* WALTER RAJLKIGH. I. A. Taylor. 

EKASMUS. E. F. H. Capey. 

CHATHAM. A. S. McDowall. 

CANNING. W. Alison Phillips. 

FRANCOIS OB FENELON. Viscount St. Cyret. 



Seven Plays 

Fcap. Sva. 2s. net 

HONEYMOON, THB. A Comedy in Three Acts. 
Arnold Bennett. Third Edition. 



GREAT ADVKNTURE, THE. A Play of Fancy in 
Four Acts. Arnold Bennett. Fourth Edition. 

MILESTONES. Arnold Bennett and Edward 
Knoblauch. Seventh Edition. 

WARS CAS, THB. 



IDEAL HUSBAND, AN. Oscar Wilde. Acting 
Edition. 

KISMKT. Edward Knoblauch. Third Edi- 
tion. 

TYPHOON. A Play in Fonr Acts. Melchior 
LerigyeL English Version by Laurence 
Irving. Second Edition. 
George Playdell. 



FLYING, ALL ABOUT. Gertrude Bacon. 
GOLFING SWING, THB. Burnham Hare. 

Fourth Edition. 
GYMNASTICS. D. Scott. 



Sport Series 

Illustrated. Fcap. 8zv. is. net 

SKATING. A. E. Crawley. 
SWIM, How TO. H. R. Austin. 
WRKSTLING. P. Longharst. 



The States of Italy 

Edited by B. ARMSTRONG and R. LANGTON DOUGLAS 

Illustrated. Demy 8w> 

MILAN UNDER THB SFOKZA, A HJSTOR? *y, I VEKOMA, A HISTOMY or. A. M. 
Cecilia M. Ady. los. fxt. net. MS. &/. net. 

PERUGIA, A HISTORY or. W. HeywoocL is*. 6rf. net. 

The Westminster Commentaries 

General Editor, WALTER LOCK 
Demy Svo 



ACTS or THB APOSTLBS, THB. Edited by R. 

B. Rackham. Seventh Edition, icu. 6d. 

net. 
FIRST EFISTLB OF PAOL THB APOSTLE TO 

THB CORINTHIANS, THE. Edited by H. L. 

Goudge. Fourth Edition. 6s. net. 
BOOK OF AM9S, THE, Edited by E. A. 

Edghill. With aa Introduction by G. A. 

Cooke. 6s. net. 
BOOK OF EXODUS, THK. Edited by A. H. 

M'Neik. With a Map and 3 Plans, iat.64. 

net. 
BOOK OF EZBKIBL, THX. Edited by H. A. 



BOOK OF GENESIS, THB. Edked, with Intro- 
duction and Notes, by S. R. Driver. Ttnth 
Edition, xof. 6rf. net. 

ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS IN TUB 
SEVENTH AND EIGHTH EDITIONS OF THK 
BOOK OF GENESIS. S. R. Driver. IJT. net. 

BOOK OF THB PROPHBT ISAIAH, THB. 
Edited by G. W. Wade. iw. 64. net. 

BOOK OF JOB, THB. Edited by E. C. S. 
Gibiow. SectnJ Edition, lu. net. 

EFISTUS F ST. JAMIK, THB. Edited, with 
btrdactioa and Notes, ky R. J. Kuwliag. 



GENERAL LITERATURE 



21 



The * Young 1 Series 

Illustrated. 



TOOMG BOTANIST. THE. W. P. W 
C S. Cooper. 3*. 6J. *<t. 

YOUNG CARPICKTRJC, TMB, CyiU Hall. *. 
-N. THE. Hammond Halt 



YOUNG K.N'.INKRR, THE. Hammond Hall 
Tlurii 

YOUNG NATURALIST, THB. W. P. Westell. 
I* 

YOUKQ ORNITHOLOGIST, THE, W. P. Weste 
S*. 



Methuen'a Shilling Library 



Fcap. 8t. 



ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. G. K ' 

BEST or LAM*, THB. K Loou. 

BLOB BIRD, THB. Maoric* Materlinck. 



OtCAI 



CHAJILXS DICKKNV G. K. 
CMARMIOBS, AMD OTMBI Pom*. 

. Story erf M iooc Sief . Sir 

RotMraon. 
CODITIO or LMCLAKD. IBB. G. F. G. 

erwMh 

>roHDt>. CKoar Wild*. 
FAMOOS Wrrs, A BOOK or. W. Jrrold. 
FROM MitHNifMAM TO FIRLO-MA 

HARVKT HOMR K V. Loca*. 

* IN FRAKOL M 

Hi 

P. 

\n. CkouWUda. 
or SBIMU EARMBJIT, IMB 
Cheat 

. Otcmr wud*. 

JOHN Bows, KING or TMB WA KIRUTO. 
John : 

,wrvKs FAN. CHcar N\ 






Lir* or KOBBRT Loui STRVRMSOM, THR. 

or KwRt 
LORD .* MB. OK* 

or TNR M ... -hrir. i HR Tickow 






MAM AND THB UNIWRSB. Sir Oliver Lodf . 

MART MACDALBNB. Maurice M 

MIRROR nr THB SRA, THK. 

OLD COUNTRY LIFR. S. Baring ' 

CKc AR WILOR : A Critical Study. Arthur 



PARISH CLBRR. THB. P. H. Ditchfield. 

PlCKRD Co r ANT, A. HiUiie i 

cr Lo*lte. 

v rnjM AN IAV CHAIR. Sit RAT 
Lank 

SBLBCT 

SCLXCTVD PWV.B. Owar \ 

OFOL, AMD Or MR* STORIRV Leo 

SHBrHBRr i LirB, A. W. H. Hodson. 
-.0 roR MY THOUGHTS, A 



t-JT- 
SOMB LRTTBRSor R. L. STEVYNSOM. Selected 



>r FAITH, Oliver 

Lo* 

SURVIVAL or MAN, TMB. Sir Oliver Lodf. 
TENNTSOM. A. C Benson. 
Totnr* or LONDON, THR 
Two A \dmiral Job; 

..A LETTERS. Kooeit Lo 
VICAR or M S. Bwrlng- 



22 



METHUBN AND COMPANY LIMITED 



Books for Travellers 

Crown %vo. 6s. net each 
Each volume contains a number of Illustrations in Colour 



AVON AND SHAKESFEARB'S COUNTRY, THE. 
A. G. Bradley 



BOOK OF THE. C. E. 



BLACK FOREST, A 
Hughes. 

BRWTONS AT HOME, THE. F. M. Gostling. 
CITIES or LOMBAKDY, THE. Edward Hutton. 

ClTlKS OF ROMAGNA AND THE MARCHES, 
THE. Edward Hutton. 

CITIES OF SPAIN, THE. Edward Hutton. 
CITIES OK UMBRIA, THE. Edward Hutton. 
DAYS IN CORNWALL. C. Lewis Hind. 
EGYPT, BY THE WATERS OF. N. Lorimer. 

FLORENCE AND NORTHERN TUSCANY, WITH 
GENOA. Edward Hutton. 

LAND OF PARDONS, THE (Brittany). Anatole 
Le Braz. 

NAPLES. Arthur H. Norway. 

NAPLES RIVIERA, THE. H. M. Vaughan. 

NEW FOREST, THS. Horace G. Hutchioson. 



NORFOLK BROADS, THE. W. A. Dutt. 
NORWAY AND ITS FJORDS. M. A. WyUie. 
RHINE, A BOOK OF THE. S. Baring-Gould 
ROME. Edward Hutton. 
ROUND ABOUT WILTSHIRE. A. G. Bradley. 
SCOTLAND OF TO-DAY. T. F. Henderson and 



Francis Watt. 



SIENA AND SOUTHERN 
Hutton. 



TUSCANY. Edward 
Mrs. A 



SKIRTS OF THE GREAT CITY, THE. 
G. Bell. 

THROUGH EAST ANGLIA IN A MOTOR CAR. 
J. E. Vincent. 

VENICE AND VSNETIA. Edward Hutton. 
WANDERER IN FLORENCE, A. E. V. Lucas. 
WANDERER IN PARIS, A. E. V. Lucas. 
WANDERER IN HOLLAND, A. E. V. Lucas. 
WANDERER IN LONDON, A. E. V. Lucas. 
WANDERER IN VENICE, A. E. V. Lncas. 



Some Books on Art 



ARMOURER AMD HIS CRAFT, THE. Charles 
ffoulkes. Illustrated. Royal tfo. a zs. 
net. 

ART, ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL. M. H. 
Bulley. Illustrated. Crown 8w>. 51. net. 

BRITISH SCHOOL, THE. An Anecdotal Guide 
to the British Painters and Paintings in the 
National Gallery. E. V. Lucas. Illus- 
trated. Fca.p. 8*. w. 6a. net. 

DECORATIVE IRON WORK. From the xith 
to the xvnith Century. Charles ffoulkes. 
Royal 4/0. 2 us. tut. 

FRANCESCO GUARD*, 171:1-1793. G. A. 
Simonson. Illustrated. ImperiaJ. +to. 
ja a*, rut. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BOOK OF JOB. 
William Blake. Quarto. i is. net. 

ITALIAN SCULPTORS. W. G. Waters. Illus- 
trated. Crown 8z>*. ^i. 6d. net. 

OLD PASTE. A. Beresford Rylcy. Illustrated. 
Royal 4*0. 2 2s. net. 

ONE HUNDRED MASTERPIECES OF PAINTING. 
With an Introduction by R. C. Witt. IHu*- 



ONE HUNDRED MASTERPIECES OF SCULPTURE. 
With an Introduction by G. F. Hill. Illus- 
trated. Dtrny 8zx. IOJT. &/. net. 

ROMNBY FOLIO, A. With an Essay by A. B. 
Chamberlain, Imperial Folio. ^15 154. 
tut. 

ROYAL ACA.DKMY LECTURES ON PAINTING. 

George Clausen. Illustrated. Crown too. 
5-s. out. 

SAINTS IN ART, THE. Margaret E. Tabor. 
Illustrated. Third Edition. Ft.*}. Ivo. 
3*. M. *tt. 

SCHOOLS OF PAINTING. Mary Imtes. Illus- 
trated. Cr. &z>f. 5^. tut. 

CELTIC ART SN PAGAN AND CHRISTIAN TIMES, 
J. R. Allen. Illustrated. Second Edition. 
Dtmy Ivo. js. 6<t. ntt. 

1 CLASSICS OF ART.' See page 13. 

' THE CONNOISSEUR'S LIBRARY. See page i*. 

1 Lrrrui BOOKS OM AXT.' S*e p* 17. 



GENERAL LITERATURE 



Borne Books on Italy 



ETKORIA AND Monr TC^A*Y, OLD. 
Mar* .I'tftmJ 

Editi**. Cr. Sro. &f 

FLOIU ' i u> the Fall 

/ U* Rer ~7 It* 

7. 6. 

FucR*cr., A \VAstRKR IN. E. V. Locat- 
or. It^ t/. 



AND MKI T> H. M 

Fur- 

.led. St<.*~< 
*W- ** V *" 

FLORCXCV AKO TM CiTIKS C> 

! UUOO. 

Illo, 

MA 

LOM. rxJ HaCtoo. 

atL Cr. f v 

Mil AM OMbKV TMB SrOIZA A HlSTOKT Of 
A(Mi >l^ |M. 
lew U 

> r^ : Put and Prex 

-.r.'-. A^ 



M VaoflMfl. 



T K. Hattaa. 

Cr. IM. 6 

|M IM. t 

>->. JIM. IltwtratW. Tk,-J 

, ^. ^ 

or P.dw*r<! Hulton. C ' lev e. 

r T F 
ROM lUrkex. 



i*l 
/ wr Ir*. CUfk, u. W <w.' ; 



f. H. Jmcko. 

'. v 



SICILY rt. Douglas 

Sladen. Illiutrated. Stt**d Kdititn, Cr. 



SI*A AMD SoDTNnnt ToscAtr?. Edward 
Hot ton. Illustrated. StctmJ Edition. Cr. 
fc* 6*. M/. 

UMBMIA, TMC CITIB* or. Edward Hntton. 
. Edition, Cr. IM. (a 



ANB VNmA Edward Hntton 
>ted. Cr. fc. 6j n*t. 

Va-u Y ON FOOT. H A Douglas. Him 
trated 5>r*^tf'A'.r . o. ^j.ntt 

VNK ANC HKR TRIA^UHZS H. A 
Douz"* IlluuratexL 



Vairos k -y or. A. M. Allen. 

Illustrated. Demy few. its <W **/. 

DAMTK AND HIS ITALY Lon*dale Raf(. 
llluMiated. Dtmy 8r*. tai. W. **/. 

DANTK AiKiMiEt; and Works. 

I'Ut Toyabec >^*-M A'^ 

( ' >c. 5 

l.lna Duff Gordon. 
Z>wr 8r. 



LAKU or NOTHKXN ITAIT, Ins. Richard 
; lllunrated. Site** RJiti**. >./ 

. TMB MAr.NiriCENT. E L. S. 
: rated. 5Cu/ / 

<-". IV- W 

MBCICI lor,. TM. H M. Vanjhan 

-* 

'. AMD HER TlMF 

By tv 

^*i' 



IM L/WFA or 
Brother Tkotoai f Clano. Cr. Irv. y 



^OLA, GIROI.AMO . bureb 

.' w . ..,?!. i,.*. Cr. to*. 



x: A Little Breviary for Tra 

.- 
y. **/. 






H. Uodtnrood. Dtmy 



METHUKK AND COMPANY LIMITED 



PART III. A SELECTION OF WORKS OF FICTION 



(B. Maria). SUSANNAH AND 

ONE OTHER. Fourth Edition. Cr. 

Sft. 6j. 
I KNOW A MAIDEN. Third Edition. 

Cr. too. 6s. 
THE INVINCIBLE AMELIA; OR, THF 

POLITB ADVENTURESS. Third Edition. 

Cr. too. 3*. 6d. 
THE GLAD HEART. Fifth Edition. Cr. 

too. 6s. 
OLIVIA MARY, Fourth Edition, Cr. 

too. 6s. 
THE BELOVED ENEMY. Second Edition. 

Cr to*, fa. 

Jtamoaier (Btacoy), OLGA BARDEL. 
Cr too. 5*. **t: 

B*ot (Richard), A ROMAN MYSTERY. 

Third Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 
ANTHONY CUTHBERT. Fourth Edition. 

Cr. too. 6s. 

LOVE'S PROXY. Cr. too. 6s. 
THE HOUSE OF SERRAVALLE. Third 

Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 
DARNELEY PLACE. Second Edition. 

Cr. 8*. 6;. 

Balto? (H. C.>. THE SEA CAPTAIN. 

Third Edition. Cr. 8w. 6t. 
THE GENTLEMAN ADVENTURER. 

Third Edition Cr. Boo. &. 
THE HIGHWAYMAN. STfaW JWt/w*. 

Cr. too. 6*. 
THE GAMESTERS. Second Ediiiott, Cr. 

to*. tf. net. 



- Goaltf (8.). THE BKOOM- 
SQUIRE. Illustrated. Fifth Edition. Cr. 
too. 6s. 

PABO THE PRIEST. Cr. 8r. 6. 

WINEFRED. Illustrated. ^*c/?</ edition. 
Cr. Saw. 6J. 

Han? (Robert). IN THE MIDST OF 
ALARMS. Third Edition. Cr. &vo. 6s. 

THE COUNTESS TEKLA. Fifth Edition. 
Cr. 8v*. 6*. 

THE MUTABLB MANY. Tkird 
Cr. faw. if. 



Begbi (Harold). THE CURIOUS AND 
DIVERTING ADVENTURES OF SIR 
JOHN SPARROW, BART.; OR, THE 
PROGRESS OF AN OPKN MIND. Stcond 
Edition. Cr. g?w. 6*. 



Bellco (H.). EMMANUEL BURDEN, 
MERCHANT. Illustrated. Second Edi- 
tion. Cr. too. 6f. 

A CHANGE IN THE CABINET. Third 
Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

Bennett (Arnold). CLAYHANGER. 

Twelfth Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 
HILDA LESSWAYS. Eighth Edition. 

Cr. too. 6s. 
THESE TWAIN. Fourth Edition. Cr. 

too. 6e. 

THE CARD. Thirteenth Edition. Cr. fa*. 

THE R.EGENT : A FIVK TOWNS STORY OP 
ADVENTURE IN LONDON. Fourth Edition. 
Cr. 8*w. 6s. 

THE PRICE OF LOVE. Fourth Edition. 
Cr. few. 6s. 

BURIED ALIVE. Svctk Edition. Cr. 

A MAN FROM THE NORTH. Third 

Kdj.tion. Cr. too. 6s. 
THE MATADOR OF THE FIVE TOWNS. 

Sscend Edition. Cr. too. 61. 
WHOM GOD HATH JOINED. A A r * 

Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 
A GPEAT MAN: A FROLIC. Seventh 

Edition. Cr. too. 6t. 



Benaon (B. F,). DODO : A DKTAJL F. THE 
DAT. Seventeenth Edition. Cr. Bw. 6f. 



Birmingham (George A.). SPANISH 

GOLD. Seventeenth Edition. Cr. Bvo. 6s. 
THE SEARCH PARTY. Tenth Edition. 

Cr. too. 6f. 
LALAGE'S LOVERS. Third Ed if ton. Cr. 

too. 6s. 
THE ADVENTURES OF DR, WHITTY. 

Fourth Edition, Cr. 87*. it. 
GOSSAME.R. Fourth Rdhhn. Cr. fc. 6t. 



FICTION 



fcon (MarJorU). 1 WILL MAINTAIN. 

r. t*V. 6f. 

DEFENDER OF THE FA1 I 
EJitiJ*. Cr. to*. 6*. 

WILLIAM, BY THE GRACK OF 
Cr. !#. 

OOD AND THE KING/ i'ljri* I 
Cr. t*. if. 

PRINCE AND HERETIC 7*AiW Afr/iM. 
Cr. ftt. 6/. 



A KNIGHT OF SPAIN. 
Cr. to*. 6f. 

THE QUEST OF GLORY. TMr4 
Cr. 1- 



THE l OF FLORENCE, fi/lk 

'. *j. 






Cr. 



1HESE THINGS 

: **/*. < V SW -. 



Caitla (AfnM Afld B|rUB). THK 

BARRIER 
-. fc. 



rOPLOKN ADVENTURERS. 

AT^t 



Conrad Jo-ph). 

r. * *J. 



K STERN EYES. 
/>. Cr. IM. 6j. 

u 
*. Cr. I**. 61. 



... Cr. IM 

Con 



ooren (Deroth**). 
>. &j. 



V MARKIKD. / 

|M 

OLD ANDY, 



Cor!'1 raiaria;. > TWO 



or OK FOB- 
' ' Cr. IfM. 



THE! 



AKDATH: THB STOKV or A DEAD SKI r 

/rM*M4 

WORV A DRAMA or PARIS. 

r. $1*9. 6S. 

TR> .. So*. 

Ic, 



THE 



TEMPORAL .T i 

:**. IJO/4 

Tk**t+md. Cr. I 

1M riB Low 

'v. Etfkttnsk X.. ; />* 

MW. Cr.lM. 

ORDERS < or A 

; . S*trJ XJtti<-+. ito/A 
Cr. Ic. 



ATOM. 

I 

A SK.TCM. 'Vi/iM. Cr. 

U 

CAMEOS. F(/t***tk f Jit if* Cr. ir* 
Mb 



:NO. 
Cror.:i (u. liiui- 

r. iff. 6*. 

' 
/i -..... Cr. IM. 6J. 



LAM -. Cr. tro 

Drake Hanrlo*). WO> 5^rf4 Kdition. 
Cr. lo.< 

Dadny(Vrt. H 
Fry (I* 

>Vt XJ.Hv*. Cr. to*. 6*. 



(Batrlo). THK 

- too. 
'ft. 

I OF 

UARE. XMmJ 



26 



METHUEN AND COMPANY LIMITED 



TONGUES OF CONSCIENCE. Fourth 

Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 
FELIX : THREE YEARS IN A LIFE. Seventh 

Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 
THE WOMAN WITH THE FAN. E&Uh 

Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 
BYEWAYS. Cr. too. 6s. 
THE GARDEN OF ALLAH. Twenty 

sixth Edition. Illustrated. Cr. toe. 6s. 
THE CALL OF THE BLOOD. Ninth 

Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 
BARBARY SHEEP. Second Edition. Cr. 

too. 3^. 6d. 
THE DWELLER ON THE THRESHOLD. 

Cr. too. 6s. 

THE WAY OF AMBITION. Fifth Edi- 
tion. Cr. to*. 6s. 



Hope (Anthony). A CHANGE OF AIR. 
Sixth Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

A MAN OF MARK. Seventh Edition. Cr. 
too. 6s. 

THE CHRONICLES OF COUNT AN- 
TONIO. Sixth Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

PHROSO. Illustrated. Ninth Edition. Cr. 
too. 6s. 

SIMON DALE. Illustrated. Ninth Edition. 
Cr. too. 6s. 

THE KING'S MIRROR. Fifth Edition. 
Cr. too. 6s. 

QUISANTE. Fourth Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

THE DOLLY DIALOGUES. Cr. too. 6s. 

TALES OF TWO PEOPLE. Third Edi- 
tion. Cr. too. 6s. 

A SERVANT OF THE PUBLIC Illus- 
trated. Fourth Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

THE GREAT MISS DRIVER. Fourth 
Edition. Cr. %vo. 6s. 

MRS. MAXON PROTESTS. Third Edi- 
tion. Cr. too. 6i. 

A YOUNG MAN'S YEAR. Secfnd Edition. 
Cr. too. 6s. 



Hyne (C, J. OnteMffe). MR. HORROCKS, 
PURSER. Fifth Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

FIREMEN HOT. Fourth Edition. Cr. 
too. 6s. 

CAPTAIN KETTLE ON THE WAR- 
PATH. Third Edition. Cr. too. 6s. * 



Jacobs (W. W.). MANY CARGOES. 

Thirty.tkird Edition. Cr. too. 3*. 6d. 
SEA URCHINS. Eighteenth Edition. Cr. 

too. y. bd. 
A MASTER OF CRAFT. Illustrated. 

Tenth. Edition. Cr. &t. *t M. 



LIGHT FREIGHTS. Illustrated. Eleventh 

Edition. Cr. too. 3*. 6d. 
THE SKIPPER'S WOOING. Twelfth 

Edition. Cr. too. 3*. 6d. 
AT SUNWICH PORT. Illustrated. Eleventh 

Edition. Cr. too. 3*. 6d. 
DIALSTONE LANE. Illustrated. Eighth 

Edition. Cr. too. 3*. 6d. 
ODD CRAFT. Illustrated. Fifth Edition. 

Cr. too. 3 j. 6d. 
THE LADY OF THE BARGE. Illustrated. 

Tenth Edition. Cr. too. 35. 6d. 
SALTHAVEN. Illustrated. Third Edition. 

Cr. too. y. 6d. 
SAILORS' KNOTS. Illustrated. Fifth 

Edition. Cr. too. y. 6d. 
SHORT CRUISES. Third Edition. Cr. 

fa*. 3*. 6d. 

King (Basil). THE WILD OLIVE. Third 

Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

THE STREET CALLED STRAIGHT. 
fourth Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

THE WAY HOME. Second Edition. Cr 

toe-. 6s. 
THE LETTER OF THE CONTRACT. 

Cr. toj. 6s. 

THE SIDE OF THE ANGELS. Cr. tot. 
$s. net. 

Lethbrldg* (Sybil C.). LET BE. Cr. too. 
6s. 

London (Jack). WHITE FANG. Ninth 
Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 



Lowndes (Mrs. Belloc). MARY PECHELL. 
Second Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

STUDIES IN LOVE AND IN TERROR. 
Second Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

THE END OF HER HONEYMOON. 
Third tLditicn. Cr. too. 6s. 

THE LODGER. Third Editum. Croum 

too. 6s. 

Lacaa (E. Y.). LISTENER'S LURE: AN 

OBLIQUB NARRATION. Eleventh Edition. 

Fca.p. too. as. 6d. net. 
OVER BEMERTON'S: AN EASY-GOING 

CHRONICLE. Thirteenth Edition. Fcap. 

too. as. ,d. net. 
MR. INGLESIDE. Tenth Edition. Fcaj. 

&v0. vs. 6d. net 
LONDON LAVENDER. Eleventh Edition. 

Fcap. too. 2J. 6</. net. 
LANDMARKS. Fourth Edition. Cr. too. 

In. 
THE VERMILION BOX. Second Edition. 

Cr. 3. jj. **t. 



FICTION 



Ly!l '*d*av DERRICK 

r. IM. 

MucnuufhUJi (.x THF. FORTU.' 

Cr. to* H. 

' AND JANE. J*r~ 



FECTION Cr to* < 

WIFE. 
- to* to 

THE HISTORY OF SIR RK 

ROM A I 

M to 

THE WA(;ESOFSIN 

'. tow to. 
THE CARISSIMA 



.ATELKSS BARRIER fi/Tk 

:~- 



(1. F w.v. 

,* < 

Maxwell (W. B.V. VIVIEN. Tki^Utntk 



THE OU/ ME. 

r,~ Cr. to* 4j 

ODD LENGTHS 



A* 



C- 



HILL RISE. r~k**ti*. Cr to* if 
THI RK-ST Cl'F.K /-*-r4 AV,.-,, . 



tin* ' 

to* *. 

THF HOLIDAY R' 
to 

ONCE A WEEK, Cr. l~ to 



A HIND LET LOOSE. 

. Cr 1.^ 

THF. MORNINGS WAR. S~J > 
Cr. to u 



rrlien (*rlhr OF MEAN 

~ M 

A CHI K JAGO. A 

Cr. H i/ 

THE HOLE IN THE WALL. r**rtk 
***** Cr. to*, to. 

PfYKftS VAMmU. rr to. *, 



'r.JMIpt). MASTER OF 

RA. IHottratcd 
.'n. Cr. 9^. 6j. 

ft: OF MR. ALFRED 

S MAN. 7VUrW JI^.-i.-. 
to. 

RKX OF MONTE CAF 

VfF.SSENCER. 
- *< to. 



- (John). 



r 



A wy 
/V** <t*ti*-< 

IM 

ROAD. 

H, AMD 

tow <u 

M> LAO1 Ol 

- tow 
LAUKls IONS. ^ **-.* X^w Cr. IM 



OF CARNE 
4* 

DEN ROSE. 

IM 

A**r.* / 
W* ! W 

ParVer (GlltortV PIFRRK 

VAGE. 

~ ( r ~ 

Illui 
&/. 



to*. 6j. 

R> . 

' ''*.- 6j 

to 

/r/A 

-OUSE 



28 



ME-THUEN AND COMPANY LIMITED 



Parnb*rton (Wax). THE FOOTSTEPS 
OF A THRONE. Illustrated. Fourth 
Edition. Cr. fc*. 6*. 

I CROWN THEE KING. Illustrated. Cr. 
B. 6s. 



Perrin (Mica). THE CHARM. Fifth 
Edition Cr. 8w. 6*. 

THE ANGLO-INDIANS. Fifth Edition. 
Cr. too. 6,. 

THE HAPPY HUNTING GROUND. 
Third Edition. Cr. too. fa. 



PhlllpoU* (Eden). LYING PROPHETS. 
Third Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

CHILDREN OF THE MIST. Sixth 
Edition. Cr. too. to, 

THE HUMAN BOY. WUb a Frontispiece. 
Strxnth Edition. Cr. 6. 6j. 

SONS OF THE MORNING. Second Edi- 
tion. Cr. tee. 6s. 

THE RIVER. Fcvrth Editu*. Cr. tot. 6s. 

THE AMERICAN PRISONER. Fntrtk 
Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

THE STRIKING HOURS. Second Edition. 
Cr. too. 6*. 

DEMETER'S DAUGHTER. Third Edi- 
tion. Cr. toe. 6s. 

THE HUMAN BOY AND THE WAR. 
Cr. fa*. 6s. 



Piflkth&il (UarmAdnXe). SAlD, THE 
FISHERMAN. Ttnth Edition. Cr. too. 
6*. 



PIeydIi (Georga). THE WARE CASE. 
Cr. too. 6s. 



Pryc (B.). DAVID PENSTEPHEN. Cr. 
too. 6s. 



0' (A. T. Quiller - Couch). MERRY- 
GARDEN AXD OTHER STORIES. Cr. 

too. 6s. 

MAJOR VIGOUREUX. Third Edition. 
Cr. 8v. 6s. 



Bidgc (W. PettV A SON OF THE 
STATE. Third Edition. Cr.foo. y.fd. 

SPLENDID BROTHER. Fourth Edition. 
Cr. Zoo. 6s. 

THANKS TO SANDERSON. Second 
Edition. Cr. 8w. 6s. 

THE RRMINGTON SENTENCE. Third 



THE HAPPY RECRUIT. S<c*nd Edition. 
Cr. &vo. 6s. 

THE KENNEDY PEOPLE. Stcond Edi- 
tion. Cr. too. 6s. 

MADAME PRINCE. Cr. lw. 5,. n*t. 



Bohmer (8*x). THE YELLOW CLAW. 
THE DEVIL DOCTOR. Cr. too. 6s. 

Bldgwick (Mm. Alfred). THE LANTERN- 
BEARERS. Third Edition. Cr. Kvo. 6s. 

ANTHEA'S GUEST. Fourth Edition. Cr. 
too. 6s. 

LAMORNA. Third Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 

BELOW STAIRS. Stcond Edition. Cr. 
too. 6s. 

IN OTHER DAYS. Third Edition. Cr. 
too. 6s. 

SALT AND SAVOUR. Cr. too. &. not. 

Bomenrllle (B. (B.) and Boaa (Martin). 
DAN RUSSEL THE FOX. Illustrated. 
Edition. Cr. too. 6s. 



BwJnnerton (F.). ON THF STAIRCASE 
Stcond Edition. Cr. 8w. 6*. 



Welia (H, Q.). BEALBY. Third Edition. 
Cr. few. &r. 



(StAnley). UNDER THE RED 
ROBE, illustrated. Thirtieth Edition. 
Cr. *o*. 6s. 

Williamson (C. H. and A. M.). THE 
LIGHTNING CONDUCTOR : TH 
STRANGK ADVENTURES OF A MOTOR CAR. 
Illustrated. Ttutnty-stcond Edition. Cr. 
too. 6s. 

THE PRINCESS PASSES: A ROMANCE 
OF A MOTOR. Illustrated. Ninth Edition. 
Cr. 800. 6s. 

LADY BETTY ACROSS THE WATER. 
Eltvexth Edition. Cr. fe*. 6s. 

THE BOTOR CHAPERON. Illustrated. 
Ttnth Edition. Cr. to* 6s. 

THE CAR OF DESTINY. Illustrated. 
Fifth Edition. Cr. 800. 6s. 

MY FRIEND THE CHAUFFEUR. Illus- 
trated. Thirteenth Edition. Cr. 8tw. 6s. 

SCARLET RUNNER. Illustrated. Third 
Edition. Cr. Bvo. 6s. 

SET IN SILVER. IllMtraUd. Fifth. 
Edition. Cr.Krc. fe. 



FlCTIOB 



LORD LOVELAND DISCOVERS 
AMERICA. Iltntrmted. S*U Rdititn. 
Cr. to*, t*. 

THE. GOLDEN SILENCE. Illustrated. 

THE GUK5TS Of HKRCULKS. life* 
trtL t-'*rtk F-Mti^ Cr. to*, fa. 

THE HEATHER MOON. Ill 
- to*, tt. 

IT. II 
St9**tA JUifum. Cr. to*, fa. 

A SOLDIER Of THE LEGION. 

Cr. to,. *. 



THE SHOP GIRL. Cr. to*. 6*. 

THE LIGHTNING CONDUCTRESS- 

Cr. to*. )J. M4i. 

SECRET HISTORY. Cr. to*. 61. 



THE LOVE PIRATE. Illustrated. 
2T***. Cr. to*. 6/. 

THE WAR WEDDING. Cr. N. .j. 

THIS WOMAN TO THIS MAN. C- 
ML M. Id 



Wdh*SM (P. 0) SOMETHING 
FRESH. Cr. *< cu 



Books for Boys and Girls 

i/W. Crnnt SM. 31. <W. 



DOBOTMT. Tarn. 
W. ILCliford. 



Mrv 



GIRL r rum Pvoru^ A, L, T. 
HO-OO.AMJ Mm, Tn. L. T. MMU. 
MASTCB Ru . OTA. W. CUrk 



OWLY 



GOARD-ROOM DL 



R, G.AGB. TNE, Mrv 

STO BBU.TOK: Tb Boy wh 
t Sa. G Mannlk Faa. 

WAJ 0tB 4 P 

M 



Mr.. M. E 



Mcthuen's Shilling Novels 

Fcmp, 8r*. u. M/ 



ov DR. WMIT-TT. TUB. 

THAN*, TMK. Alice Pwrin. 
AMA r TNK Fir* TOWHV Arnold 
RAI% IM TUB W,.or>. H. M. Croktt 
BAD TIMU, TMK. G. A. Kirmincha 
BAKBART SMEF. Robert Hichcos. 
EBMV, TM. K. 



CHAPIXON, THB. C N. and A. M. 
ruoo 

BOT. Marie CorellL 

BOKICO AUVB. Arnold Bcoactt. 

' THE BLOOD, TMK. Robert Hichcut. 
CARP, TMK. Arnold BeHMtt. 
OAMCR J. Coormd 



m TM* CARINKT, A HiUir 
TMK ARMOOB, THE. Mrk B*Iloc 



Tb. 



CmmotticLmt or A GERMAN Town. 

Author T " Mrrci. b Gcrvany.- 
COIL OF CARME. THE. John Oxcoaui 
COUITMU. or PrurECTiow, A. 
DAJT RVMBL THE FOE. E, GL 

MU Mania ROM. 

DEMOM, TMB. C N. d A. M. Wi!1Umon. 
DOOBL* LIFE or MR. AIFRRO BUXTOM, 

IMK. K. Pbillipt Oppr 
DUE* > MOTTO, THE. J. H. McCarthy. 
FIRE IN STUBBL*. Baronev O 

Of THE DUIK. Myrtle Reed 



METHUEN AND COMPANY LIMITED 



Methuen'i Shilling 



GATE OP THE DESERT, THE. John Oxenhara. 
GATES or WRATH, THE. Arnold Bsnnett. 

GENTLEMAN ADVENTURER, THK. H. C. 
Bafley. 

GOLMKM CufTirxD*, THK. L*nis Gerard. 

GOVERNOR *P ENGLAND, TUB. Marjerie 
Bowva. 

GCARDCB FI.AMB, THV. W. B. Maxwell 
HALO, THB. Baroness von Hctten. 

HEART OP THE ANCIENT WOOD, THB. 
Charles G. D. Roberts. 

HEATHSR MOON, THB. C. N. aad A. M. 
Williamson. 

HILL RISK. W. B. Maxwell. 

HOUSE or SKXKAYALLE, TXB. Richard 
Baeot. 

HYENA or KALLV, TMB. Louise Gerard. 
JANE. Marie CoreUi. 
JOSE. Frank Danby. 

LADY BUTTY ACROSS THB WATER. C. N. 
and A. M. Williamson. 

LALAGE'S LOVERS. G. A. Birmingham. 

LANTERN BEARERS, THE. Mrs. Alfred Side- 
wide. 

LAVENDER AND OLD LACE. Myrtle Reed. 
LIGHT F HEIGHTS. W. W. Jacobs. 
LODGER, THE. Mrs. Be'.loc Lowndes. 
LONG ROAD, THE. John Oxenham. 

LOVE PIRATE, THE. C N. and A. M. 

Williamson. 

MAYOR OP TROY, THE. "Q." 
MKSS DECK, THE. W. F. Shannon. 
MIGHTY ATOM, THE. Marie Corelli. 
MIRAGE. E. Temple Thurston. 

MUSSING DELORA, THE. . Phillips Oppen- 

beta. 

MR. WASHINGTON. Marjorie Bowen. 
MRS. MAXON PROTESTS. Anthony Hope. 

MY DANISH SWEETHEART. W. Clark 

Rusell 
Mv HUSBAND AND I. Leo Tolstoy. 

MYSTERY OP DR. FO-MANCHU, THE. Sax 
Rohmer. 

MYSTERY OF THE GREEN HEART, THE, 
Max Pemberton. 

NINE DAYS' WOXDKX, A. B. M. Croker. 
OCEAN SLEUTH, THE. Maurice Drake. 
OLD ROSE AND SILVER. Myrtle Reed. 



PATHWAY OP THE PIOHEEX, THE. Doli 

Wyllarde. 

PEGGY OP THE BARTONS. B. M. Crokw. 
PETER ANP JANE. S. Macnaught&n. 

QUMT OP THE GOLDEN ROSE, THE. John 
Oxenham. 

REGENT, THE. Arnold Bennett. 

REMINGTON SENTENCE, THE. W. Pen 
Ridge. 

ROUNB THE R* LAMF. Sir A. Cooaa Doyle. 

SAID, THE FISHERMAN. Mannadoke Pick- 
thaJl. 

SALLY. Dorothea Conyers. 

SANDY M ARRIED. Dorothea Cooyvn. 

SEA CAPTAIK, THE. H. C. Bailey. 

SEA LADY, THE. H. G. Welk. 

SEARCH PARTY, THE. G. A. Brrmineham, 

SECRET WOMAN, THE. Eden Phillpott*. 

SET IN SILVER. C N. and A. M. William- 
son. 

SHORT CRDISES. W. W. Jacobs. 
SPANISH GOLD. G. A. Birmingham. 
SPINNER IN THE SUN, A. Myrtle Reed. 
STREET CALLED STRAIGHT, THE. Basil 
King. 

TALES OF MEAN STREETS. Arthar Mormon. 

TERESA OP WATLINO STPJZBT. AraoUi 
Bennett. 

THE SECRET AGENT. Joh Conrad. 
THERE WAS A CROOKED MAN. Doif Wyllarde. 
TYRANT, THE. Mrs. Henry de la Pasture. 
UNDER THK RED ROBE. Stanley J. Weyman. 

UNOFPICIAL HONEYMOON, THE, Dolf 

Wyllarde. 

VIRGINIA PERKBCT. Peggy Webiing. 
WALLET OP KAI LUNG. Ernest Bramah. 
WARE CASE, THE. George Pleydell. 
WAY HOME, THE. Basil King. 

WAY OF THESE WOMEN, THB. E. Phillips 
Oppenheim. 

WEAVER OP WEBS, A. Joha Oxenham. 

WEDDING DAY, THE. C. N. and A. M. 

Willis 



Robert 



WHITE FANG. Jack London. 
WILD OLIVE, THE. Basil King. 

WOMAN WITH THE FAN, THE. 
Hichens. 

WO*. Maurice Drake. 



r ICTIOM 



Methuen's Sevenpenny Novels 

Ftap. 8tw. id. rut 



B. M. Croket 
BAXRARA RBBBLL. Mrv Bdloc Lowndts, 
BLONDCB or AM INMOCXNT, TMB. E. 



BROOM S<JUIRB, TMB. S. Baring-Goald. 
BY STICK E or Sw..> n Andrew Balfour. 
COVWT'S CMAurrBca. TMB. 



DtiRtcic VAUGHAM, N Edn 

Lyall 

DODO. E. F. Benson. 
DRAMA IK SDNSHIMC, A . e ll. 

Durr. L. T. Mde 
GIKKN GiArms or EALCOWRIB, TMB, JAM 

H Pir. 

HKART or Hit HBAKT. E. M. AftMUMci 
HOOSB or Ww!srs. TKB. W Tara ! 
QtMtUL 

HCWAM BOY, TKB. Rdra Pbillpottw 

I CBOWM TMFB KINO. Max 

IWTA'. T*r>ouB, J 

In TMB ROAX or TMB SBA. S. Bering Gould. 

UTO F 4 lie* 



KATHKRINB 
Croker. 



THB ARROGANT. Mrs. B. M. 



LA.->V IN THB CAR, THB, William Ic Queux. 

LATB IN Lira, Alice Pr: 

LONB PINK. R. B. Towruhend. 

MASTER or MKN. E. Phillips Oppenbelm. 

MISBR HOADLBT-S SBcRBT. A. W. Marcb- 



Miw MAVRIAGB. A. Mr*. T. E. Penny. 
MOMENT'S ERO, A. A. W. Marcbmont 
MOTHER SON, A. B. and C. B. Fry. 
PBTBR. A PARASITB. E. Maria AlbaooL 
PoMr nr THB LAVILBTTBS, TMB. Sir Gilbert 

M 

PRINCE RI-FERT TMB BUCCANBBB. C J. 

TUB. 



C. N. 



PRIKCEU VIMCINIA, 

PROFIT AND Loai. John Onham. 
RBO DERBUCT, TMB. Bertram Mitford. 
RED HOUIB. TMB. K. N*>bit. 
SIGN or TMB SriDBR, TMB. Brtiam Miifoid 
Son or TMB STAIE, A. W. Pett Kidra. 
Ma.ric. '.-. . 



***** i Bu dcr 4 T&nner. 



RETURN TO the circulation desk of any 
University of California Library 

or to the 

NORTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY FACILITY 
Bldg. 400, Richmond Field Station 
University of California 
Richmond, CA 94804-4698 

ALL BOOKS MAY BE RECALLED AFTER 7 DAYS 

2-month loans may be renewed by calling 
(510)642-6753 

1-year loans may be recharged by bringing 
books to NRLF 

Renewals and recharges may be made 4 

days prior to due date. 



DUE AS STAMPED BELOW 



AUG 2 5 2001 



Jv, 




UNIVERSITY OF CAUFORNIA LIBRARY