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Full text of "San Francisco Unified School District newsletter"




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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 



DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 

DEC 9 1959 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 03475 4904 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant 



http://www.archive.org/details/sanfrancisc3940196769sanf 






' 



SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 






NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



SEPTEMBER 4, 1967 



NUMBER 1 




Dr. Donald A. Rhodes 



Dr. Rhodes Receives Appointment 
As New Assistant Superintendent 

At a special meet- 
ing of the Board of 
Education on August 
18, 1967, the Board 
approved the recom- 
mendation of Super- 
intendent Robert E. 
Jenkins and appoint- 
ed Dr. Donald A. 
Rhodes from Pasa- 
dena to be the new 
Assistant Superin- 
tendent of Elemen- 
tary Schools for San 
Francisco, effective 
September 1, 1967. 

Dr. Rhodes replaces 
Miss Tennessee Kent, 
who returned to a principalship at Robert Louis Steven- 
son Elementary School at her own request upon the 
retirement of former Superintendent Dr. Harold Spears. 

The new 41-year old Assistant Superintendent, chosen 
after a search inside and outside of the District for can- 
didates, received his M.A. and his Ed. D. from the Uni- 
versity of California, the latter in 1964. 

Varied experience in Pasadena Schools 

Dr. Rhodes served in the Pasadena Schools from 1950- 
1958 as an elementary teacher in all grades except grade 
2. He has been an elementary principal in three Pasa- 
dena schools of different sizes from 1958 to 1967. 

Superintendent Jenkins, who associated professionally 
with Dr. Rhodes for nine years while Pasadena Superin- 
tendent, describes Rhodes as "a grass roots elementary 
educator and a principal's principal." 

Rhodes has developed a reputation in Pasadena as an 
innovator with a strong interest in electronic and com- 
puterized aids to education. In addition, he has worked 
closely with programs for disadvantaged children. 

Chairman for League of Cooperating Schools 

In 1965, Dr. Rhodes became coordinating chairman 
for the League of Cooperating Schools, and in this ca- 
pacity worked closely with UCLA Dean of Education. 
Dr. John Goodlad. The League is carrying out many- 
new concepts in education. 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Requirements for Teachers Exam 
Announced by Personnel Division 

The Division of Personnel Service announces the new 
requirements for teacher employment relative to the 
National Teachers Examination as follows: 

1. The National Teachers Examination is now a re- 
quirement for placement on elementary, secondary and 
special educational services (child welfare) Eligibility 
Lists for 1968-69 in the San Francisco Public Schools. 

2. Teachers who wish to qualify for placement on the 
Eligibility Lists in a transfer between instructional divi- 
sions must submit scores from the National Teachers 
Examination to the Teacher Personnel Office. 

3. The National Teachers Examination will be held 
on Saturday, October 7, 1967, at the following test cen- 
ters: University of California at Berkeley, University of 
San Francisco, San Francisco State College. San Jose 
State College, and Stanford University. 

4. Registration forms for the October 7 examination 
must be mailed to the Educational Testing Center by 
Friday, September 8, 1967: National Teachers Examina- 
tion, Educational Testing Service, Box 911, Princeton. 
New Jersey, 08540. The exact time and location of the 
examination will be assigned by the Educational Testing 
Service. 

5. Regular registration fee for the common examina- 
tion plus one teaching area examination is $ 1 1 . 

6. Payment of an additional $3 late registration fee 
will permit acceptance of registration forms up to the 
late registration closing date of Friday, September 22, 
1967. 

(Continued on Page 7) 



NEW FORMAT FOR 'NEWSLETTER' 

With this issue the Public Schools Bulletin takes 
on a new name, a new look, and a new format. It 
will be called the Newsletter. It is the hope of the 
Superintendent that every administrator, every 
teacher, every clerk, and every custodian and engi- 
neer in the District will become part of the Public 
Schools Information Team. The new Newsletter 
format is designed to keep the team informed about 
developing District programs and activities of all 
types during the coming school year. 

Hugh E. Wire 

Supervisor 

Educational Information 



PUtiLlO LldriARY 



30CUMENTS DE.PT 



m* 



■i<i, iw 



NEWSLETTER 



September 4, 1967 



So 51SK- 






Administrative Appointments 
Approved by Board of Education 

Some 50 administrative appointments or assignments 
were made at the end of the school year and during the 
summer months by the Board of Education upon recom- 
mendation of the Superintendent. 

Elementary Division 

Principals recently appointed include: Mrs. Millie 
Liebes, Candlestick Cove; John Ward, Douglas; Mrs. 
Betty Anne Dilg, Fremont; Robert Anderson, John Muir; 
Mrs. Thelma Boyer, Sheridan; Mrs. Myrna Graves, 
(Acting) Diamond Heights; Michael Holway, (Acting) 
Golden Gate; and Tennessee Kent, Robert Louis Steven- 
son. 

Elementary Assistant Principals appointed include: 
Frederick A. Smith, Burnett; Lila Lea, (Acting) Com- 
modore Stockton; Robert Smirle, Emerson; Robert Jimi- 
nez, Diamond Height and Excelsior Schools; William 
Johnson, (Acting) Golden Gate; David Plyer, Grattan; 
Marjorie Manko, Guadalupe; Wilma Jones, (Acting) 
Hillcrest; Ben Adam, John McLaren; Mrs. Julita Mc- 
Leod, McKinley; William DeAvila, (Acting) Miraloma- 
Twin Peaks: Mrs. Douglas B'augh, Ortega; Noel Mer- 
tens, (Acting) Sir ] rtmcis Drake; Luther Wilson, Sutro. 
Junior High Division 

Junior high school principal appointments include: 
Henry Barsotti, Aptos; William Galant, James Lick; 
Paul Gay, Portola; Frank Verducci, (Acting) Horace 
Mann; and John F. Kearney, (Acting) James Denman. 

Junior high assistant principals include: William Au- 
bel, James Denman; Cornelius Murphy, (Acting) Hor- 
ace Mann; Burl Toler, Portola; George Stokes, Benjamin 
Franklin; John D. Falsarella (Acting) Everett; and John 
A. Diggins, (Acting) Luther Burbank. 
Senior High Division 

Senior high school principal administrative changes 
include: Reginald Alexander, Abraham Lincoln; Ralph 
Kauer, (returning from leave) Balboa; Reinaldo Pagano, 
(Acting) George Washington; Harry Krytzer, Mission; 
and Paul A. Lucey, (Acting) Polytechnic. 

Assistant principals include: Allen D. Torlakson, (Act- 
ing) George Washington; Emil Anderson, Lowell; Har- 
old Zimmerman, Mission; and James G Brown, Poly- 
technic. 

Adult Division 

Adult assignments include: Mrs. Evelyn R. Press, 
Principal of Mission Adult School; and William E. 
Tresnon, Acting Principal, Fifth Adult School (750 
Eddy Street). 

City College 

Lloyd D. Luckmann appointed Acting President of 
City College of San Francisco. 

Central Office 

Appointments in the Central Office include: Dr. Don- 
ald A. Rhodes, Assistant Superintendent for Elementary 
Schools; Margaret Holland, Director of Special Educa- 
tion; Mrs. Alice C. Henry, Director of Pupil Services; 
Margaret W. Rapson, Supervisor AA, Programs for the 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Many Fall In-Service Courses 
Available to District Teachers 

All regularly employed San Francisco teachers are re- 
quired, by Board of Education policy, to satisfactorily 
complete six semester units of acceptable work in order 
to advance from one salary "increment block" to an- 
other. 

Dr. Lester Steig, Salary Coordinator of the San Fran- 
cisco Unified School District, has compiled a list of the 
in-service courses which will be available to teachers of 
the District during the fall semester of 1967. 

San Francisco public school teachers have numerous 
opportunities for further studies, however, because of 
the District-sponsored In-service Training Program, and 
the late afternoon, evening, and weekend courses pro- 
vided by many Bay Area institutions of higher learning. 
Teachers benefit from many courses 

Teachers of the District will have the benefit of over 
500 university and college courses plus non-college in- 
service courses offered by the SFUSD during the fall 
term. 

These courses are designed with the viewpoint of 
furnishing teachers and administrators with the newest 
techniques and information in various subject areas. 

"Increment blocks" are defined as a period of time. 

Teachers on Classification I should complete six units 
every three years. 

Teachers on Classification II should complete six units 
during a four-year period. 

Teachers on Classification III have five school years to 
complete six units. 
Loss of normal salary increment's 

Failing to complete the required units in the allotted 
time will cause the teacher to lose the normal salary in- 
crements until such unit requirements have been fulfilled. 

Teachers who have reached their fifty-seventh birth- 
day are exempt from these requirements. 

It is noted that non-college, in-service units are usable 
as credit only within the San Francisco Unified School 
District, and are not transferable to other districts. 
(Continued on Page 6) 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 1 



September 4, 1967 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Aldolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 



September l, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



Superintendent's August Recommendations to Board Reviewed 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins became Superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School Eistrict on July 1, 1967 upon 
the retirement of Dr. Harold Spears. The Board of Education convened for its first meeting on August 1, 1967, follow- 
ing a July recess. Two regular and two special meetings were held in August at which the Superintendent made a 
number of major recommendations, all of which were approved by the Board of Education. These are summarized 
below. Future issues of the Newsletter will carry detailed stories of these recommendations. 



Meeting of August 1, 1967 

The Superintendent recommended: 

1. Adoption of the 1967-1968 Budget of $82,371,615. 

2. Authorization be granted to initiate contract nego- 
tiations to study the feasibility of closed circuit television 
for the San Francisco Unified School District, through 
several 2500 megacycle, fixed circuit channels. 

Special Meeting of August 10, 1967 

The Superintendent recommended: 

1. That to strengthen the instructional services to 
students and to provide the faculties in the secondary 
schools with additional assistance in the areas of coun- 
seling, discipline control, community relations and over- 
all leadership responsibilities, a third Assistant Principal 
be assigned to each junior and senior high school, the 
general responsibilities for each Assistant Principal to be 
designated in the areas of pupil-personnel services- 
counseling-discipline, instruction-classroom supervision, 
and administration, respectively; that the positions of 
Head Counselor for Girls and Head Counselor for Boys 
be established and the present position of one Assistant 
Head Counselor be discontinued in the junior high 
schools and the position of half-time Social Chairman 
be discontinued in the senior high schools. 

It was also recommended that a second Assistant 
Principal be assigned to John A. O'Connell Vocational 
and Technical Institute and the position of Head Coun- 
selor be discontinued. 

It was further recommended that this reorganization 
be phased in over a two-year period during 1967-68 and 
1968-69 and that an expenditure of $126,870 be author- 
ized from Undistributed Reserve to Instruction during 
1967-68 to complete the first phase of this reorganization 
in the junior and senior high schools. 

2. That the name of the Division of Child Welfare be 
changed to Special Educational Services Division. He 
further recommended that the Division be reorganized 
with a Director of Special Education and a Director of 
Pupil Services responsible to the Coordinator. 

It was also recommended that the following super- 
visors be responsible to the Director of Special Educa- 
tion: Supervisor, Physically Handicapped; Supervisor, 
Speech, Hearing and Visually Handicapped; Supervisor, 
Elementary Mentally Handicapped; Supervisor, Second- 
ary Mentally Handicapped; Supervisor, Educationally 
Handicapped; and that the following supervisors be re- 
sponsible to the Director of Pupil Services: Supervisor, 
Guidance and Counseling; Supervisor, Psychological 
Services; Supervisor, Social Work; Supervisor, Attend- 
ance Bureau; Supervisor, Guidance Service Centers. 

It was further recommended that this reorganization 
be phased in during the first and second semesters of 



1967-68 and that authorization be granted to transfer 
$47,113 from Undistributed Reserve to Instruction to 
implement the reorganization of the Division of Child 
Welfare. 

3. That the heavy A.D.A. overload in the Adult 
schools be reduced by establishing a fifth Adult school at 
the 750 Eddy Street Building and that one of the present 
Registrars be assigned as Principal and that $2,150 be 
transferred from Undistributed Reserve to Instruction. 

4. That the proposals of the Elementary, Junior, and 
Senior High School Divisions and School Clerk Section 
Committee, San Francisco City and County Employees 
Union, Local 400, be adopted over a three-year period 
with any appropriate modifications that might be possi- 
ble with the expansion of data processing and computer 
centers. As a first step, it is recommended that to provide 
fourteen (14) additional clerks at the elementary level, 
$59,270 be authorized from Undistributed Reserve to 
Instruction to implement the recommendations for 
needed clerical services in the elementary schools. 

5. That the establishment of libraries in the elemen- 
tary schools be implemented by adding five elementary 
librarians each year until the present ratio of one librar- 
ian for every fourteen schools has been reduced to a 
workable operating pattern based upon our experience 
over the years. It is, therefore, recommended that two 
additional librarians be provided for elementary schools 
during 1967-68, in addition to the three presently in the 
budget. 

It was also recommended that an additional half-time 
library clerk be assigned to each of the secondary librar- 
ies so that with the present half-time clerk designated 
for each school library, the secondary schools will have 
the equivalent of one full-time person in each junior and 
senior high school library. 

It was further recommended that $53,420 be author- 
ized from Undistributed Reserve to finance these services 
in 1967-68. 

Meeting of August 15, 1967 

The Superintendent recommended: 

That authorization be granted to contract with Ham- 
mett and Edison, Consulting Radio Engineers, to con- 
duct an engineering study to determine the feasibility of 
establishing a multi-channel instructional television sys- 
tem for the San Francisco Unified School District at a 
cost not to exceed $10,000 the study to be completed not 
later than December 31, 1967. 

Special Meeting of August 18, 1967 

The Superintendent recommended: 

That effective September 1, 1967, Dr. Donald A. 
Rhodes be appointed to the position of Assistant Super- 
intendent, Elementary Schools. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 4, 1967 



SCHEDULE OF DATES FOR 1967 - 68 FOR STAFF USE 

Following is a schedule for 1967-68 developed for the guidance of principals and 
members of the Central Office administrative staff: 



School Month 


Dates for 
Principals' Meetings 


Dates for Central Office 
Administrators' Meetings 


Fall 1967 

1. Sept. 4 - Sept. 29 

2. Oct. 2 -Oct. 27 

3. Oct. 30 - Nov. 24 

4. Nov. 27 - Dec. 29 

5. Jan. 1 - Jan. 26 


Fall 1967 

(a) Sept. 5 and Sept. 19 
Oct. 3 and Oct. 17 
Oct. 31 and Nov. 14 
Nov. 28 and Dec. 12 
Jan. 2 and Jan. 16 


Fall 1967 

Sept. 12 and Sept. 26 
Oct. 10 and Oct. 24 
Nov. 7 and Nov. 21 
Dec. 5 and (b) 
Jan. 9 and Jan. 23 


Spring 1968 

6. Jan. 29 - Feb. 23 

7. Feb. 26 - Mar. 22 

8. Mar. 25 - Apr. 19 

9. Apr. 22 -May 17 
10. May 20 -June 14 


Spring 1968 
Jan. 30 and Feb. 13 
Feb. 27 and Mar. 12 
Mar. 26 and (c) 
Apr. 23 and May 7 
May 27 and June 4 


Spring 1968 

Feb. 6 an Feb. 20 
Mar. 5 and Mar. 19 
Apr. 2 and Apr. 16 
Apr. 30 and May 14 
May 28 and June 11 



Principals' meetings are scheduled on the first and third Tuesdays of the School 
Month and Central Office administrators' meetings are on the second and fourth 
Tuesdays, with the exception of afternoons preceding holidays. 

(a) Institute meeting followed by afternoon meetings of school faculties. 

(b) Christmas vacation. 

(c) Easter vacation. 

Following are the dates established for report card periods for the school year 
1967-68. 





Fall 1967 






Spring 1968 




Period 


Date 


No. Days 


Period 


Date 


No. Days 


1st 


October 20 


32 


4th 


March 15 


32 


2nd 


December 1 


28 


5th 


May 3 


30 


3rd 


January 26 


29 


6th 


June 14 


29 



Total 



89 



Total 



91 



CHRONOLOGICAL AGE TABLE 
September 15, 1967 



YEAR OF BIRTH 



DATE OF BIRTH 



Jan. 1 to Jan. 31... . 

Feb. 1 to Feb. 29 

Mar. 1 to Mar. 31.. 
Apr. 1 to Apr. 30.... 
May 1 to May 31... 
June 1 to June 30... 

July 1 to July 31 

Aug. 1 to Aug. 31... 
Sept. 1 to Sept. 30.. 
Oct. 1 to Oct. 31.... 
Nov. 1 to Nov. 30... 
Dec. 1 to Dec. 31.... 



1962| 19611 1960| 1959| 1958 



5-8 

5-7 

5-6 

5-5 

5-4 

5-3 

5-2 

5-1 

5-0 

4-11 

4-10 

4-9 



6-8 

6-7 

6-6 

6-5 

6-4 

6-3 

6-2 

6-1 

6-0 

5-11 

5-10 

5-9 



7-8 
7-7 
7-6 
7-5 



-4 
■3 
■2 

■ 1 

-0 
6-11 
6-10 
6-9 



8-8 

8-7 

8-6 

8-5 

8-4 

8-3 

8-2 

8-1 

8-0 

7-11 

7-10 

7-9 



9-7 

9-6 

9-5 

9-4 

9-3 

9-2 

9-1 

9-0 

8-11 

8-10 

8-9 



1957 1 1956 1 1955 



10-8 

10-7 

10-6 

10-5 

10-4 

10-3 

10-2 

10-1 

10-0 

9-11 

9-10 

9-9 



11-8 

11-7 

11-6 

11-5 

11-4 

11-3 

11-2 

11-1 

11-0 

10-11 

10-10 

10-9 



12-8 

12-7 

12-6 

12-5 

12-4 

12-3 

12-2 

12-1 

12-0 

11-11 

11-10 

11-9 



1954 | 1953 |1952 



13-8 

13-7 

13-6 

13-5 

13-4 

13-3 

13-2 

13-1 

13-0 

12-11 

12-10 

12-9 



14-8 

14-7 

14-6 

14-5 

14-4 

14-3 

14-2 

14-1 

14-0 

13-11 

13-10 

13-9 



15-8 

15-7 

15-6 

15-5 

15-4 

15-3 

15-2 

15-1 

15-0 

14-11 

14-10 

14-9 



INSTRUCTIONS: Locate the date of pupil's birth in the Date of Birth column at the 
left. Find the year of birth at the top of the column. The pupil's age 
in years and months will be found in the space where the row and 
column meet. 
EXAMPLES: Date of Birth Chronological Age 

Jan. 24, 1961 6 years, 8 months 

May 6, 1955 12 years, 4 months 

Note: The above table is accurate to the nearest month only and must not be used to 
determine age at Kindergarten and First Grade entrance. A table for determining 
Chronological Ages as of September 1, 1967, appears in the State School Register 
for Public Elementary Schools. 



September I, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



SCHOOL CALENDARS FOR THE 1967 - 68 YEAR 



ELEMENTARY, JUNIOR AND SENIOR 
HIGH SCHOOLS 

Calendar 1967-68 



Fall, 1967 



school 
Month 

1. Sept. 4 - Sept. 29.. 

2. Oct. 2 - Oct. 27.. 

3. Oct. 30 - Nov. 24.. 

4. Nov. 27 - Dec. 29.. 

5. Jan. 1 - Jan. 26 



Days Holidays 
Taught State Local 



19 
18 
15 



School Holidays 
Labor Day, Sept. 4 
Institute, Sept. 5 
Columbus Day, Oct. 12 
Thanksgiving, Nov. 23-24 
Christmas Vacation, 

Dec. 18-29 
New Year's Day, Jan. 1 



6. Jan. 29 - Feb. 23.. 



7 2 1 Mid-term Recess, Jan. 29 

Lincoln's Birthday, Feb. 12 
Washington's Birthday, 
Feb. 22 

7. Feb. 26 - Mar. 22 20 

8. Mar. 25 - Apr. 19 15 .... 5 Easter Vacation, April 8-12 

9. Apr. 22 - May 17 20 

.0. May 20 - June 14 19 1 .... Memorial Day, May 30 

91 

school Days (89-4-91) 180 

Institute (9/5) 1 

Total Teacher Days 181 

The following days are designated as minimum school days: Sept. 6, Jan. 
25, 26, 30, June 13, 14. 

American Education Week, Nov. 6-10, 1967 

Public Schools Week, April 22-26, 1968. 



Spring, 1968 



CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Calendar 1967-68 

Fall, 1967 

School Days Holidays 

Month Taught State Local School Holidays 

1. Sept. 4 - Sept. 29 19 1 .... Labor Day, Sept. 4 

2. Oct. 2 - Oct. 27 20 

3. Oct. 30 - Nov. 24 18 1 1 Thanksgiving, Nov. 23-24 

4. Nov. 27 - Dec. 29 15 1 9 Christmas Vacation, 

Dec. 18-29 

5. Jan. 1 - Jan. 26 19 1 .... New Year's Day, Jan. 1 

91 



Spring, 1968 

6. Jan. 29 - Feb. 23 13 2 i 

7. Feb. 26 - Mar. 22 20 

8. Mar. 25 - Apr. 19 15 .... ', 

9. Apr. 22 - May 17 20 

10. May 20 - June 14 19 1 ... 

87 

School Days (914-87).... 178 
Institute 2 

Total Teacher Days 180 



Mid-term Recess, Jan. 29-31 
Institute, Feb. 1-2 
Lincoln's Birthday, Feb. 12 
Washington's Birthday, 
Feb. 22 

Easter Vacation, Apr. 8-12 

Memorial Day, May 30 



ADULT & VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS — 
PART-TIME TEACHERS 

Calendar 1967-68 

Summer Session, 1967 



School 
Month 

1. July 3 - July 28.... 

2. July 31 - Aug. 11.. 



Days Holidays 

Taught State Local School Holidays 

.... 19 1 .... Independence Day, July 4 

.... 10 



29 



Fall, 1967 



1. Sept. 4 -Sept. 30.. 



2. Oct. 2 - Oct. 28.. 



3. Oct. 30 - Nov. 25.. 

4. Nov. 27 - Dec. 30... 

5. Jan. 1 - Jan. 27 



23 

20 



1 17 



Labor Day, Sept. 4 
Institute, Sept. 5 
Admission Day, Sept. 9 
Columbus Day, Oct. 12 
Veterans Day, Nov. 11 
Thanksgiving, Nov. 23-25 
Christmas Vacation, 

Dec. 11-30 
New Year's Day, Jan. 1 



Spring, 1968 



6. Jan. 29 - Feb. 24.. 



7. Feb. 26 - Mar. 23 24 

8. Mar. 25 - Apr. 20 18 

9. Apr. 22 - May 18 24 

10. May 20 - June 8 17 

104 



Mid-Term Recess, Jan. 29 
Lincoln's Birthday, Feb. 12 
Washington's Birthday, 
Feb. 22 

Easter Vacation, April 8-13 

Memorial Day, May 30 



School Days (99- 
Institute (9/5) 



.104).... 203 
1 



Total Teacher Days 



ADULT & VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS — 
FULL-TIME TEACHERS 

Calendar 1967-68 
Fall, 1967 

School Days Holidays 

Month Taught State Local School Holidays 

1. Sept. 4 -Sept. 29 18 1 1 Labor Day, Sept. 4 

^Institute, Sept. 5 

2. Oct. 2 - Oct. 27 19 .... 1 Columbus Day, Oct. 12 

3. Oct. 30 - Nov. 24 18 1 1 Thanksgiving, Nov. 23-24 

4. Nov. 27 - Dec. 29 15 19 Christmas Vacation, 

Dec. 18-29 

5. Jan. 1 - Jan. 26 19 1 .... New Year's Day, Jan. 1 

89 

Spring, 1968 

6. Jan. 29 - Feb. 23 17 2 1 Mid-Term Recess, Jan. 29 

Lincoln's Birthday, Feb. 12 
Washington's Birthday, 
Feb. 22 

7. Feb. 26 - Mar. 22 20 

8. Mar. 25 - Apr. 19 15 .... 5 Easter Vacation, Apr. 8-12 

9. Apr. 22 - May 17 20 

10. May 20 - June 14 19 1 .... Memorial Day, May 30 

91 

School Days (89-1-91).... 180 
Institute (9/5) 1 

Total Teacher Days 181 

*Full-time teachers may elect to attend the September 5 Day Institute or 
the Adult and Vocational Evening Institute. 

In addition to the above calendar, apprenticeship training classes may be 
held on the following days: November 24, December 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 28, 
April 8, 9, 10, 11, June 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 24, 25. 
Public Schools Week, April 22-26, 1968. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 4, ] 



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. . . Fall In-Service Courses Are Listed 

(Continued from Page 2) 
Increment and classification credits are given for in- 
service courses satisfactorily completed. 

"Application for approval" form should be filed 

Prior to starting the in-service course or any other 
college or university course for a salary credit, the 
teacher should file an "application for approval" form 
with Dr. Steig. This form is to be signed by the principal 
of the teacher concerned. 

Previously an attempt was made in the Newsletter to 
publish a comprehensive list of courses offered by the 
leading Bay Area institutions of higher learning. How- 
ever, these lists were not always complete, due to the 
inability to publish all courses offered. 

To make it easier for the individual teacher, Dr. 
Steig's office has sent packets of college course bulletins 
to the principals of each school. In the packets are bulle- 
tins from the University of California at Berkeley and 
the U.C. Extension, University of San Francisco, Stan- 
ford University, San Francisco College for Women, and 
San Francisco State College. 

Teachers are urged to contact school principals for 
these catalogs. 

The following in-service courses are offered by the 
District during the fall 1967 semester: 

Arboretum 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays, 
4 to 6 p.m. at Strybing Arboretum, Golden Gate Park. 
Instructor, Gary Brackon. Course starts September 14, 
1967. For elementary teachers only. Pre-registration is 
required. Call 863-4680, Extension 237. 

Instructors will explore with teachers the ways in which the Arboretum 
can be used as an educational resource to vitalize the science, social studies, 
and language arts curriculum. Content will include botany, ecology, and 
horticulture as well as additional information about animals that frequent 
the Arboretum; plants, their uses, history, native habitat, legends, and 
literary references. 

Composition 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
days, 4 to 6 p.m. at Robert Louis Stevenson Elementary 
School. Instructor, Edwin James Knapton. Course starts 
September 13, 1967. Pre-registration is required. For 
elementary teachers only. Call 863-4680, Extension 237. 

Th's course is designed to assist elementary teachers to answer the 
following questions about the oral and written expression of children: What 
is good oral and written expression? How can weak expression be improved? 



BOARD POLICY — SALARY CREDIT 

"The maximum credit that will be accepted for 
salary classification purposes of teachers engaged 
in full-time teaching will be six semester hours, or 
six quarter hours, or the equivalent, for any one 
semester or quarter, exclusive of summer sessions. 
A maximum of right semester hours or twelve 
quarter hours, exclusive of summer sessions, will be 
accepted for any one school year for salary classifi- 
cation purposes. All units will be converted into 
semester credits for classification and/or in-service 
purposes in accordance with School Board regula- 
tions." 



Primary Literature 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings. Wedne: 
days, 4 to 6 p.m. at 170 Fell Street, Room 10. Instructor 
Rose Mary Colligan. Course starts September 13, 1967 J 
For elementary teachers only. Pre-registration is re 
quired. Call 863-4680, Extension 237. 

A course to acquaint primary teachers with the curriculum possibilities a 
the books on the Elementary Basic List and its supplements. Attention wil 
also be given to the correlation of books with other instruct : onal aids, sucl 
as films, filmstrips, specimens, exhibits, study prints, and field trips. Individ 
ual teachers will receive help in tailoring a literature course for their specih 
classroom needs. 



Intermediate Literature 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays 
4 to 6 p.m. at 170 Fell Street, Room 10. Instructor, Rose Qertn 
Mary Colligan. Course starts September 14, 1967. Foi 
elementary teachers only. Pre-registration is required 
Call 863-4680, Extension 237. 






h 



Itko 



A course to acquaint intermediate teachers with the curriculum poisib'li f, 1! 
ties of the books on the Elementary Basic List and its supplements. Atten 
tion will also be given to the correlation of books with other instructiona 
aids, such as films, filmstrips, specimens, exhibits, study prints, and fielt 
trips. Individual teachers will receive help in tailoring a literature course fo 
their specific classroom needs. 



Intermediate Mathematics 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
nesdays, 4 to 6 p.m. at West Portal Elementary School 
Instructor, Arden Ruddell. Course starts September 13 
1967. For elementary teachers from Grades 3-6 only 
Pre-registration is required. Call 863-4680, Extension 
237. 

A course in intermediate grade mathematics designed to extend and enrich 
the mathematics program through the introduction of new methods and * 
materials. 



* 

BIT. 

Jlilll 

IVl 

10 I 

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Science for Elementary Teachers 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays 
4 to 6 p.m. at Galileo High School. Instructors from Lux 
Laboratory Staff. Course starts September 14, 1967 
For elementary teachers only. Pre-registraticn is re- 
quired. Call 863-4680, Extension 237. 



nil 

I.' 



!R 



biological and 
iity to becomef 
r superior ele- 



Spccialists will develop content and method for teaching the 
physical sciences. In addition, enrollees will have an opportun 
acquainted with the Lux Laboratory after-school program for supc 
mentary students. 

Social Studies 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays 
4 to 6 p.m. at 170 Fell Street, Room 39. Instructor, Edith 
Teeple. Course starts September 14, 1967. For elemen- 
tary teachers only. Pre-registration is required. Call 863- 
4680, Extension 237. 

The purpose of the course is to help develop background for teaching] 
social science. Teachers will have an opportunity to hear resource speakers! 
discuss important topics and will receive instruction in the use of a variety 
of materials, newspapers, books, magazines, pamphlets, films, filmstrips, 
records, study prints, and tapes. 

Basic Arts 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
days, 4 to 6 p.m. at Diamond Heights Elementary 
School. Instructor, Alice Stone. Course starts September 1 
13, 1967. For elementary teachers only. Permission of' 
instructor is required. Phone Mrs. Ruth Davis, 863-4680, 
Extension 323. 

Course will cover paper processes, picture making, decorative paper mak- 
ing, and dimensional materials suitable for children in the elementary grades. 
Includes developing skills in handling classroom art materials for special and 
everyday projects. 

Basic Arts 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays, 
4 to 6 p.m. at Diamond Heights Elementary School. In- 
structor, Verla Leonard. Course starts September 14, 
1967. For elementary teachers only. Permission of in- 



tember 4, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



ructor is required. Phone Mrs. Ruth Davis, 863-4680, 
Extension 323. 

Course will cover paper processes, picture making, decorative paper mak- 
ng. and dimensional materials suitable for children in the elementary 
irades. Includes developing skills in handling classroom art materials for 
ipecial and everyday projects. 

Earth Science 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
days, 4 to 6 p.m. at Aptos Junior High School, Room 
f. 1 230. Instructor, Dr. York T. Mandra. Course starts 
".September 20, 1967. 

This course will center around the principles of earth science and their 
ipplicat : on in the Bay Area. There will be study of erosion, earthquake 
faults, glaciation, and ancient life in this region. Other subjects will include 
jceanography, geology, the atmosphere, and weather. Dr. Mandra will ar- 
1 -ange a number of field trips to locations of interest. 

°s Electronics 

Foi Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays, 

T to6 p.m. at Presidio Junior High School, Room 207. 

Instructor, Maxwell C. Gillette. Course starts September 

14, 1967. 

This course will explore the modern concepts of electricity and electronics 
,vith emphasis on junior and senior high school sciences and industrial arts 
zourse content. Areas covered will include current flow, basic A.C. and D.C. 
;ircuits, Ohm's Law, vacuum tubes, semi-conductors (transistors), sight and 
iound transmission and reception. Included also will be electrical measuring 
instruments and how to use them. Experiments and demonstration units 
iuitable for classroom use will be developed to emphasize and clarify lecture 
:heory. 

Junior High School English 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays, 
Ho 6 p.m. at Aptos Junior High School. Instructor, 
Albert L. Lavin. Course starts September 14, 1967. 



The purpose of this course is to help junior high school English teachers 
preDare for the introduction of the newly adopted State English textbooks 
in the fall of 1S68. There will be discussion of some of the "new" approaches 
n grammar and the relationship of grammar to the teaching of composi- 
tion. Emphasis will be placed on classroom practice and applications. 

Curriculum Development in Health, Grades 4-12 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays, 
to 6 p.m. at A. P. Giannini Junior High School. In- 
structor, Dr. Frances Todd. Course starts September 14, 
1967. Pre-registration accepted. Limited to 75. Call Mrs. 
Val Ryan, 863-4680, Extension 324. 

Four areas of subject matter will be covered: Narcotics and Dangerous 
Drugs, Venereal Diseases, Alcohol, and Tobacco. The activities planned 
include: 1. A study of available curriculum materials and the development 
of guidelines for effective classroom use of the materials selected; 2. The de- 
velopment of courses of study on each instructional level and in each sub- 
ject area. 

Curriculum Problems in Industrial Arts 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
days, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at Herbert Hoover Junior High 
School, Room 14. Instructor, Dr. Jesse Rathbun. Course 
starts September 20, 1967. 

The class will meet in general sessions on designated days. Study groups 
will meet on a special interest basis. Section meetings will be formed in 
-pecific arc~s sccord'ng to inteiests of members. Enrollment closes Septem- 
ber 27, 1967. (For junior and senior high school levels.) 

Techniques of Large Group Instruction in 
Lifetime Sports 

One unit, non-college credit, 8 meetings, Wednesdays, 
4 to 6 p.m. at various schools. Various instructors. Course 
starts September 20, 1967. For information contact Mrs. 
Viola Mails, 863-4680, Extension 356. 

Schedule September 20 and 27, Tennis, Barbara Prato, Lowell High 
School: October 4 and 11, Badminton. Claudine Hodgin, Galileo High 
School; October 18, Archery, Doris Mullin, Woodrow Wilson High School; 
(October 25 and November 1, Golf, Louie Haas, Galileo High School; 
November 8, Bowling, Norman Sui, Luther Burbank Junior High School. 

Speech, Language, and Hearing Development 
in the Classroom 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays, 
4 to 6 p.m. at George Peabody Elementary School. In- 
structor, A. Donald Cross. Course starts September 14, 
1967. For elementary teachers only. Call Edna Dwyer 
at 863-4680, Extension 326. 



Senior High School In-Service Courses 

Announcements concerning the In-Service Education 
being planned for the senior high schools will be included 
in a later Newsletter. Principals have suggested the fol- 
lowing major areas of emphasis: Reading, Bilingual 
Education, Science Education, and Administrative Train- 
ing. 

Two Supervisory Positions Open 

At a special meeting of the Board of Education on 
August 10, 1967 the Child Welfare Division of the San 
Francisco Unified School District was reorganized and its 
name changed to the Special Educational Services Divi- 
sion. Two new supervisory positions are expected to be 
filled immediately — Supervisor, Social Work Services 
and Supervisor, Attendance Services. 

Applicants must possess either a general Pupil Person- 
nel Credential or the Standard Supervision Credential 
with successful full-time experience in the field of service 
of the basic credential. The positions will be classified as 
Supervisor A, with a beginning salary of $13,980 and a 
work year of approximately 197 days. 

Applications for either position must be made in writ- 
ing on appropriate forms available in the Office of Per- 
sonnel and returned to Milton Reiterman, Coordinator, 
Personnel Division, not later than September 8. Inter- 
views will be scheduled during the following week. 

... Dr. Rhodes Heads Elementary Division 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Dr. Rhodes was this year's president of the Pasadena 
Elementary Administrators Association and a director 
of the Civitan Club. He is a member of the Phi Delta 
Kappa and Kappa Phi Kappa. He was one of 30 educ- 
cators from the United States to have been commis- 
sioned by the West German Government to attend the 
Adult Education Conference in Salzberg in 1966 along 
with representatives from 1 1 other countries. 

The September, 1966 issue of the California Parent- 
Teacher has an article by Dr. Rhodes entitled "That 
Two-Way Street" in which he discusses communicating 
with the PTA. 

Dr. Rhodes is married and has two daughters, ages 17 
and 15. 



. . . National Teachers Exam Scheduled 

(Continued from Page 1) 

7. The following scores must be submitted: (a) Ele- 
mentary, Secondary, Juvenile Court Classes — Common 
Exam and Teaching Area Exam and (b) All other areas 
of Special Education Services — Only Common Exam. 

8. Applicants who have taken the National Teachers 
Examination within the last five years may submit these 
scores to the Personnel Office, unless they wish to up- 
grade their scores by retaking the test. 

9. The only alternate date for qualifying for the 
1968 Eligibility List will be the National Teachers Ex- 
amination which will be administered on Saturday, 
February 23, 1968. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 4, 196™ 



Announcements 



• SAN FRANCISCO FACULTY BOWLING 
LEAGUE TO START 

The San Francisco Faculty Bowling League will begin 
the fall 1967 season on Thursday, September 14, 1967, 
at the Park Bowl, 1855 Haight Street. The league will 
start promptly at 4 p.m. 



ALL TEACHERS: 

A new credential structure became operative on 
January 1, 1964, with additional requirements. 

If your credential is allowed to expire, you will 
be required to meet the new standards now in 
effect. You may keep your present credential valid 
by completing all renewal requirements indicated 
on the front or reverse side of the credential before 
its date of expiration and by filing application for 
renewal before midnight of its expiration date. 

Credential fee is $10 per credential. 

It is important that you keep your credentials 
in force and record them in the Personnel Division 
when renewed. 



• SAN FRANCISCO BOYS CHORUS 
TO HOLD AUDITIONS 

Tryouts for membership in the San Francisco Boys 
Chorus will be held by appointment for Bay Area boys 
on Saturday, September 16, 1967, at 50 Scott Street. 

Auditions are open to all boys in public, private, or 
parochial schools, grades three through eight, ages 8 
through 12, with good, unchanged voices. 

Application forms mays be obtained from the San 
Francisco Boys Chorus, 333 Franklin Street, telephone 
431-5450, and must be submitted along with a written 
recommendation from a school teacher, music teacher, 
or choir director. .. . . ... 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, September 5, 1967, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is hereby given of the following custodial 
vacancies: 

2724 — School Custodian, Male: City College, George 
Washington and John O'Connell; Aptos, Luther Burbank 
and Francisco Junior High; Alamo, Dudley Stone. 
George Peabody and Spring Valley Elementary Schools. 
2704 — School Custodian, Female; Andrew Jackson. 
Excelsior, Paul Revere and Sarah B. Cooper Elementary 
Schools. 



• MORRISON PLANETARIUM PROGRAMS 
ARE AVAILABLE 

Interested teachers may secure printed programs an 
nouncing the topics and dates to be featured at the 
Morrison Planetarium during the 1967-1968 year by 
calling the Planetarium at 221-5100, Extension 69, and 
requesting them. 

These schedules give teachers an opportunity to see 
when a topic is offered and to plan their teaching units 
accordingly. Eight special astronomical lecture-shows 
will be featured from October, 1967 to June, 1968 at 
1 1 a.m. Wednesday through Saturday. 

Topics will include "The Solar System," "Time andj 
the Seasons," "The Universe," "The Earth in Space, : 
"The Nature of the Moon," "The Sun as a Star," "Ex- 
ploring the Skies," and "Satellites and Space Travel." 



PRINCIPALS' MEETINGS 

Your attention is called to the Board of Educa- 
tion regulation R 4131.1 relative to the days to 
be used by school principals for calling teachers' 
meetings: 



The principal shall call teachers' meetings after school hours on 
the first or third Tuesday of each school month, or both, 
such other times as, in his judgment, meetings seem neccssa 
Except in cases of emergency, the principal shall avoid c 
teachers' meetings during school hours. Unless excused by the pi 
cipal. a teacher shall attend all teachers' meetings called by the 
principal. Principals shall see that teachers attend meetings tc 
which they are called by the Superintendent, Assistant Superintend' 
ents, Directors, Coordinators, or Supervisors. 



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. . . Administrative Appointments Listed 

(Continued from Page 2) 
Educationally Handicapped; Mrs. Josephine Cole, Su> 
pervisor A, Student Relations, Senior High Schools 
Wellington L. Chew, Supervisor A, Guidance Service 
Centers; Leslie V. Russell, Principal of Court Schools 
James T. Kilkenny, Assistant Principal of Log Cabir 
and Hidden Valley Ranch Schools; George Moscont 
(Principal of Horace Mann) on leave to Centra 
Office, ESEA Title I, Supervision; George Boisson (for 
XtiS') ^ "^ er Principal of Horace Mann Junior High) to Super- 
» M ^VygjT o ^J&isorAA, Personnel Division; Mrs. Elfrida Noland (Prin 

J.ASK:iyy d3o ^ ' °IT8n<Jcipal of Golden Gate Elementary School) on leave t< 
■iCOjygjPersonnel Division; Mrs. Mary W. Byrd (Assistani 



*JilV; 



iJ3 T ' 



JsAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



NEWSLETTER 



■■h 



SEP 1 1 1967 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



VOLUME 39 



^g=@ 



SEPTEMBER 11, 1967 



NUMBER 2 



Personnel Division Being Reorganized 



:; ! ) 



Reorganization of the District's Personnel Division and 
expansion of its services to teachers, proposed during the 
spring 1967 term, are being implemented and expanded 
over a two-year period under the administration of Dr. 
Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dr. Jenkins has stated, "A vital and effective person- 
nel service division is absolutely essential if the goals of 
education in a school district are to be met with dis- 
tinction." 
Praise . . . and determination 

While praising the traditionally high personnel stan- 
dards that the San Francisco schools have maintained for 
over a century, including such accomplishments as the 
first tenure system in the nation, Dr. Jenkins has indi- 
cated that he and his assistant superintendents have all 
agreed that more than ever the personnel department 
should be modernized so that the divisions can devote 
more time to instructional leadership, and also effect a 
greater personalization of teacher recruitment and identi- 
fication of specific personnel needs. The enlarged person- 
nel department will coordinate the recruitment, selection, 



ate 
"En 



Dr. Jenkins Meets New Teachers 



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Ann Austin, newly appointed teacher at Polytechnic High School, 
and Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins are seen reviewing Mayor 
John F. Shelley's Proclamation setting "Welcome Teachers 
Week" as September 9-15, 1967. 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins extended greetings 
to some 500 new teachers on August 30, 1967 in Nourse 
i v|ffl Auditorium as part of the District's Orientation Pro- 
gram for New Teachers. 

The Superintendent told the new teachers, "I want 
(Continued on Page 4) 



and placement of certificated and classified personnel, 
with the approval of the respective divisional superin- 
tendent, to the end that the increasingly complex needs 
of the large San Francisco school system will best be 
served through a centralized personnel unit. 

According to the Personnel Coordinator, Milton F. 
Reiterman, the most pressing need is to increase the 
number of qualified teacher applicants in order that an 
adequate supply of top-flight candidates for every kind 
of position will be in existence at all times. He feels that 
San Francisco should begin to make known locally and 
throughout the United States the many attractive op- 
portunities that exist for highly competent school per- 
sonnel in the District. 
Key additions to staff made 

In order to implement the more intensive approach 
to teacher recruitment and to expand all personnel serv- 
ices, a number of key personnel have been added to the 
staff, as follows: 

George Boisson, formerly principal of Horace Mann 
Junior High School, has been appointed as Supervisor 
AA to coordinate certificated employment. 

Mrs. Mary Byrd, on leave as assistant principal at 
Balboa High School, will work in the area of senior high 
school recruitment and selection. 

Dr. E. Kemp Frederick, on leave as principal of Poly- 
technic High School, will be involved in the reorganiza- 
tion of the operational and research aspects of the Per- 
sonnel Division. 

Mrs. Elfrida Noland, on leave as principal of Golden 
Gate School, will be involved with teacher recruitment 
and selection on the elementary school level. 

Thomas Wilson, formerly of City College of San 
Francisco and the Adult Division, will continue half time 
in the Adult Division and will serve half time in the re- 
cruitment and selection of personnel for the Adult and 
Vocational Division. 

Immediate and longer-range plans in the Personnel 
Division include the development with the assistance of 
all members of the teaching and administrative staff of 
many additional functions of the Personnel Division. 
These include the improvement in service to retiring 
teachers, the future introduction of data processing to 
increase the efficiency of all personnel operations, the 
expansion of physical facilities to make possible the 
handling of the increased load, and the reorganization 
and consolidation of many existing and proposed serv- 
ices. These will be discussed in the NEWSLETTER as 
they develop. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 11, 1967 



Data Processing Courses Held 




Two in-service courses in data processing were offered to District 
teachers during the summer, utilizing facilities and equipment of 
International Business Machines. Mr. Al Carter, IBM systems 
analyst (left), is seen demonstrating to Eldoris Cupp (Benjamin 
Franklin), Arnold Jacobson (Curriculum Assistant and coordinator 
of the courses), Mrs. Eileen Sorensen (Sheridan), John Chan 
(Portola), and M. Marjorie Maher (District Research Assistant). 
Miss Maher conducted two of the sessions. 



Nine San Francisco Filmstrips 
Released by Dr. Sanborn's Office 

Climaxing many months of research and work, the 
Division of Instructional Materials has announced the 
September, 1967 release of nine (9) new filmstrips on San 
Francisco. The materials are specially keyed for use 
within the middle grades of the San Francisco elementary 
schools. All elementary schools will be furnished with a 
complete set. 

The filmstrip series is entitled, San Francisco — Our 
City and County, with individual filmstrips entitled: 

San Francisco Profiles, Part I ; San Francisco Profiles, 
Part II; Transportation In and Around San Francisco; 
While San Francisco Sleeps; Utilities Serving San Fran- 
cisco; Recreation in San Francisco; The Port of San 
Francisco; San Francisco: Government and Community 
Services; Earning a Living in San Francisco. 

Developed and produced under the direction of Dr. 
William B. Sanborn, Director, Division of Instructional 
Materials, the filmstrips were photographed by Mr. James 
Martin, edited by Mrs. Pauline K. Levie, with the assist- 
ance of an elementary advisory committee including Mrs. 
Gail Giovannini, Mrs. Ruth Tisdale, Mrs. Thelma Boyer, 
and Mrs. Dorothy Dudley. 

It is believed that these materials are quite unique 
within any large city school system in the nation. Their 
production is in direct response to many inquiries from 
classroom teachers for local materials of this type to help 
interpret San Francisco. Technical production of the 
strips was by Society for Visual Education, Inc., of 
Chicago. 



September 5 Board Appointments 
Of New Administrators Listed 

The following administrative appointments or assign- 
ments were approved by the Board of Education at its 
September 5, 1967 meeting upon recommendation of the 
Superintendent: 

Junior High Division 

Junior high principal appointment: Carl H. Hanson, 
Jr., Everett (acting) . 

Junior high assistant principals appointed include: 
Joseph Johns, A. P. Giannini; Marcella J. Brosio, Aptos; 
John D. Falsarella, Everett; Emile F. Fanfelle, Everett; 
Raymond Del Portillo, Francisco; James A. Carroll, 
Herbert Hoover; Cornelius M. Murphy, Horace Mann; 
Samuel L. Edmondson, James Lick; John A. Diggins, 
Luther Burbank; Leland H. McCormick, Marina; Wil- 
liam P. Keesey, Pelton (on leave); William P. Cashman, 
Portola; Bessie H. Schiffman, Roosevelt; Helene London, 
Benjamin Franklin; Thomas F. McCarthy Jr., Horace 
Mann; Arnold M. Steinbach, Aptos (acting); Peter G. 
Kardassakis, James Denman (acting); Elmer A. Galle- 
gos, Jr., Luther Burbank (acting); Luke Angelich Jr., 
Marina (acting); Dolores Booth, Pelton (acting); Rob- 
ert S. Lustenberger, Presidio (acting); James Pravettoni, 
Benjamin Franklin (acting); Marianne Cotter, Herbert 
Hoover (acting); Yvon O. Johnson, Presidio (on leave); 
Frank Verducci, Herbert Hoover (on leave); Edward 
L. Bispo, Benjamin Franklin (on leave). 

Junior high head counselor appointments include: 
Ann Georgia McHugh, Francisco; Carlos V. Cornejo, 
Horace Mann; Mary Kearney Murphy, James Lick; 
Mildred G. Daily, Luther Burbank; Joseph R. McCaff- 
rey, Marina; Matthew T. Gaffney, Pelton; Lionel C 
Marcus, Roosevelt; Walter G. Phillips, Benjamin Frank- 
lin; Claire Gustafson, A. P. Giannini; Elvira L. Fusco 
Everett (acting); Myron Johnson, James Denman (act- 
ing); Gladys E. Rolfe, Presidio (acting); Arnold M 
Steinbach, Everett (on leave). 

Senior High Division 

Senior high principal appointment: Lewis F. Morris, 
(Continued on Page 4) 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 2 



September 11, 1967 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 
Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Alan H. Nichols 



Edward Kemmitt, 

Vice President 
Reynold H. Colvin 
Adolfo de Urioste 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 



September 11, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



Secondary Changes Are Underway 



The Board of Education began the first phase of 
mplementing the administrative reorganization of the 
;econdary schools at its meeting last Tuesday night, 
September 5, 1967, when it made a number of adminis- 
rative appointments. 

On the recommendation of the Superintendent, the 
3oard earlier approved the new plan at a special meet- 
ng on August 10, 1967. The plan adds a third assistant 
srincipal for pupil personnel services — counseling and 
discipline, and a head counselor for boys, and a head 
;ounselor for girls to each junior and senior high school 
)ver a two-year period. 
Phase One is underway 

At the high school level only George Washington, 
Balboa, Polytechnic and Mission will be reorganized 
vim the entire team during Phase One. The Junior 
rligh Division will add only the third assistant principal 
n the first phase. Total cost will be $126,870 for the two 
divisions. 

In addition, a second assistant principal will be as- 
ligned to John O'Connell High School in Phase One. 

The addition of the new assistant principals will 
trengthen instructional services to students and provide 
;he faculties in the secondary schools with additional 
assistance in many areas including pupil personnel serv- 
ces, counseling and discipline. 







IDEE AEMI1IISTRATIVE REORGANIZATION 
SECONDARY SCHOOLS 
















?hune 


a 1 und II 1967-6 1 ) School Y 


ear 
















Iph-iiicipali 






-" 1 ^ 




[ ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL 


ASSISTANT PHIKCIPAL 
PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES - 
COUNSELING AIH) DISCIPLINE 


ASSISTANT FHDICIPAI 


| SSS^S— 


| Admlni titration 




Changes in the administrative organization of the secondary 
schools are depicted in the chart above. 

Meeting the problems 

At the recent Administrative Workshop the Superin- 
tendent stated that he feels this plan is tooling up to 
meet the kinds of problems and to provide the kind of 
administrators which insure the quality of leadership 
that is so necessary in large urban secondary schools. 

He added that strengthening counseling, strengthen- 
ing discipline control, and strengthening the overall 
leadership in instructional improvement will make it 
possible for the school Principal to be a creative leader. 



Administrative Applications Are Due 



Phase I of Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins' plan for 
the reorganization of the Secondary Field Administra- 
tors has already been implemented for the 1967-68 school 
year. Because of this reorganization, there is a need to 
augment the present administrative application lists. 

Although specific vacancies are not now known, inter- 
views will be held by the Personnel Division during the 
month of November, 1967, for applicants for administra- 
tive assignments. Deadline for filing applications is 
November 1, 1967. 

Available positions are listed 

Applicants for the following positions will be inter- 
viewed: 

1. Senior High School Principal and Assistant Prin- 
cipals. (Note: Senior High School Summer School Ad- 
ministrators will be selected from applicants for Senior 
JHigh Assistant Principals or from applicants for Head 
Counselors. ) 

2. Senior High School Head Counselors for boys and 
girls. 

3. Senior High School Department Heads (in all 
subjects). 

4. Junior High School Principal and Assistant Princi- 
pals. 

5. Junior High School Head Counselors for boys and 
girls. 



6. Elementary Principal and Assistant Principal. 

7. Elementary, Junior High Summer School Admin- 
istrators. 

Interview appointment is necessary 

Even though an application has been submitted, it is 
necessary to make an appointment for an interview at 
this time if desired by applicant. 

Names of those interviewed previously will be con- 
sidered along with new applicants even though no inter- 
view is requested at this time. 

All applications on file will be considered and therefore 
these applicants need not apply for an interview. Each 
applicant should be sure that the information on his 
application blank is up to date by actually examining the 
blank previously submitted. 

Minimum requirements are listed 

Minimum requirements are set forth in Adminis- 
trative Regulations R4131.2 available in each principal's 
office. In addition to these regulations the position of 
Assistant Principal, Pupil Personnel Services — Coun- 
seling and Discipline will require the pupil personnel 
credential as well as the administrative credential. 

Applicants who do not now meet these requirements, 
but who will do so by August, 1968, may request an 
interview at this time if they so desire. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 11, 19G7 




TERM REQUISITIONS ARE DUE 

Spring term requisitions lists are due in the Divi- 
sion of Supplies Warehouse, 1000 Selby Street, At- 
tention: Mrs. Elaine Hung, as follows: 

Janitorial Supplies Lists — due before September 
15, 1967. 

Instructional Supplies Lists — due before October 
13, 1967. 



• SFCTA TO MEET SEPTEMBER 18 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association's 
general membership meeting will be held Monday, Sep- 
tember 18, 1967, at 4 p.m. in Nicholas Hall of the 
Marines Memorial Building. 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools, will 
be the guest speaker. 

The meeting will be followed by a reception for new 
teachers from 5 to 7 p.m. in the 11th floor lounge of the 
Marines Memorial Building. ' 



• ARMY FIELD BAND TO PERFORM 

The famed United States Army Field Band and the 
Soldiers' Chorus will perform in public concert at George 
Washington High School on Tuesday, September 19, 
1967, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. 

The event is being sponsored by the District's ROTC 
office. 

During its more than 20-year history, the Army Field 
Band, officially the only touring musical representative 
of the Department of the Army, has appeared in all 50 
states, Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, Europe, 
and the Far East, using "an international form of com- 
munication" to make new friends for the United States 
and the Army. 



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THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, September 19, 1967, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• UNITED CRUSADE DRIVE 

District teachers will be asked again this year to par- 
ticipate in the United Crusade Drive to raise funds for 
the 176 health, welfare, and recreational agencies receiv- 
ing United Crusade assistance. 

Multipurpose pledge cards will be forwarded to all 
school personnel in September providing for contribu- 
tions through the School Department. 



. . . New Teachers Welcomed to District 

( Continued from Page 1 ) 
you to feel the spirit of the organization of which you 
are a part. I am determined to make this fine school 
system the best in the nation. Our goal is educational 
excellence." 

He went on to say that he considers the principals 
with whom the teachers are working to be the adminis- 
trative and instructional leaders of each school. 

Dr. Jenkins smilingly told the new teachers, "We have 
spent a lot of time and money to find you. We don't want 
a lot of turnover. All our services and resources are at 
your call for you to succeed. Don't be afraid to ask for 
help. The District has a wealth of instructional ma 
terials." 

He concluded his remarks with the admonition, "You 
must be enthusiastic. You selected us; we you. Don't let 
anyone dampen your enthusiasm. Keep your hopes, your 
dreams, and your visions." 

New teachers receive one unit of in-service credit for 
salary purposes for attending the two-day session plus 
six school site meetings during the semester. 



: 



. . . Board Appointments Are Announced 

(Continued from Page 2) 
Jr., Balboa (acting). 

Senior high assistant principal appointments include 
M. Marjorie Maher, George Washington (on leave) 
Mary W. Byrd, Balboa (on leave); Beverly H. George 
Mission; Marie M. Schmidt, Balboa; John W. Welch 
Polytechnic; Alice Elaine Wilson, Samuel Gompers 
Celia Strauss Cain, Woodrow Wilson; Florence Cohen 
Balboa (acting); Richard C. Date, Balboa (acting) 
Leslie F. Burke, George Washington, (acting). 

Senior high head counselors include: Richard W 
Murphy, Balboa (Boys); Madeleine Gallagher, Balboa 
(Girls); John D. Moriarty, George Washington (Boys) 
Carolyn J. Caniglia, Mission (Girls); Beverly Eigner 
Polytechnic (Girls). 

Central Office 

Appointments in the Central Office include: Ralpl 
Kauer (Principal of Balboa) on leave, Supervisor A^ 
Building Utilization and Research, Division of Building; 
and Grounds; Dr. George Karonsky (former Assistan 
Principal Herbert Hoover) Supervisor A, Junior Higl 
Division. 



lN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



SEP 1 1967 



i ISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



EWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



© 



SEPTEMBER 18, 1967 



NUMBER 3 



Data Processing Enters Second Year 



During the 1966-67 school year the District embarked 
>n an educational data processing program executed 
hrough the Division of Research under the guidance of 
Harold Weeks, director, and M. Marjorie Maher, re- 
:earch assistant. 

The San Francisco Regional Educational Data Pro- 
:essing Center is funded under PL 89-10, the Elementary 
ind Secondary Education Act of 1965, Title III. Guide- 
ines for the implementation of the project have been 
istablished by the State Department of Education. 

During the past school year the Division of Research 
las undertaken the introduction of the State-sponsored 
jupil personnel package of services to two senior high 



Student Activities, Athletics 
Funding Needs Reviewed 

At its last meeting the Superintendent reviewed 
with the Board of Education the need to increase, 
by a net amount of some $20,030, the District's sup- 
port of the Student Activities and Athletics Pro- 
gram for 1967-68 in varying amounts depending 
upon the finances of the Student Associations in 
each high school. 

This plan will adapt the new subsidy to the 
need of each school so that the eight high schools 
will be able to carry on the same student activity 
and athletic program. Samuel Gompers High will 
receive a lower amount due to its size and facilities. 

Commissioner Zuretti L. Goosby indicated that 
this was another important step toward equalizing 
educational opportunity in the District. With the 
new subsidy each school will be able to have its 
athletic teams equipped with identical equipment, 
have money to stage top term plays, help with stu- 
dent newspapers, and do the many other student 
activities so vital to school morale. 

Income from student activities has greatly de- 
clined in recent years. For example, ticket sales for 
athletic contests have decreased; state legislation 
now prohibits profits from food vending machines 
to be given to student bodies; and there has been a 
general reduction in the sale of student body cards, 
admissions to plays, dances, and other revenue pro- 
ducing; events. 



schools (Mission and Woodrow Wilson), two junior high 
schools (Aptos and Pelton), and two elementary schools 
( Edison and E. R. Taylor) . 

Various services provided 

For the secondary schools the services have included 
the scheduling of pupils into classes, the printing of re- 
port cards, record maintenance, and attendance account- 
ing. For the elementary schools the services, to date, have 
been limited to attendance accounting. 

The greatest change effected has been the substantial 
reduction of the clerical burden on teachers. Despite 
some unreliable machine production, teachers have re- 
acted in a highly favorable manner. Teachers have been 
relieved of the preparation of lists of pupils and posting 
of grades on report cards and on permanent scholarship 
records. Advance knowledge of pupils assigned to their 
classes at the opening of a new semester produces benefits 
to teachers. In addition, the issuing of report cards via 
data processing appears to be a less disturbing routine 
within the school. 

The greatest impact experienced by the pilot schools 
was focused upon the administrative and clerical staffs. 
Introduction of data processing shifted some burdens 
from teachers to the school office, and in the changeover 
from manual operation the requirements exceeded staff 
capabilities. 

More staff help added 

To support the schools in this venture for 1967-68, the 
Board of Education has underwritten, with local funds, 
the addition of a full time clerk-typist to each junior and 
senior high school. Further, in each of the junior high 
schools, a half-time certificated person has been allocated 
to provide professional coordination at the school. 

Under a continuation of the Federal grant during 
1967-68, the intent of the program is to carry forward 
the schools and activities launched during the 1966-67 
year, and to expand the pupil personnel package imple- 
mentation to include all of its elements, including some 
test processing and pupil scholarship record maintenance 
services. Yvon O. Johnson has been assigned to the pro- 
ject as a one-half time research assistant. 

Frank Nardi is now coordinating the program in the 
junior high schools. 

During the fall 1967 term, secondary school services 
will be expanded to include Abraham Lincoln and Bal- 
boa High Schools. While expansion of services might 
provide for all senior high schools within the next three 
(Continued on Page 4) 



NEWSLETTER 



September 18, 1967 



Young Audiences Concerts 
Expanded During Current Year 




Young Audiences, Inc. will present 150 concerts to District 
school children during the 1967-68 school year, an increase of 
30 over last year. Top musicians' from the San Francisco Sym- 
phony introduce a wide variety of musical instruments to the 
students and perform a variety of musical compositions. Above, 
Roland Kohloff of the Percussion Ensemble lectures and demon- 
strates to his interested audience. 

An increase from 120 to 150 in the number of concerts 
to be presented by Young Audiences, Inc. to District 
public school children was approved by a Board of 
Education at its September 4, 1967 meeting. 

Under the current arrangements the District is respon- 
sible for financing 120 concerts, and Young Audiences 
will provide one free concert for every four purchased, or 
an additional 30 concerts for a total of 150. 

Young Audiences is a nation-wide, non-profit organi- 
zation which presents demonstration chamber music con- 
certs to school children during school hours as part of 
the regular curriculum. 
Purposes are outlined 

Its purposes are to help children appreciate good music 
as an enrichment of every day life, to encourage musical 
participation by introducing a wide variety of orchestral 
instruments at close range in a relaxed, intimate atmo- 
sphere, and to build future audiences for symphony, 
opera, and concerts. 

A well-rounded program by four different ensembles 
(string, wind, percussion, and brass) is presented each 
season. 

Many top caliber musicians of the San Francisco Sym- 
phony are carefully screened and coached in the aims of 
Young Audiences. They are both musically proficient and 
able to speak engagingly about their instruments and 
music. 

For the past nine years the San Francisco schools have 
benefitted from this program. Through the encourage- 
ment and support of Dr. Albert A. Renna, Director of 
Music, it began with 22 concerts and quickly expanded 
to 120. During the past school year, Young Audiences 
presented 550 concerts in the Bay Area. 



District to Join UC in Program 
To Aid Spanish-Speaking Interns 

Action was taken by the Board of Education at its last 
session to help meet the needs of the Spanish-speaking 
community particularly in the city's Mission District. 

The Board approved a plan whereby the District will 
participate with the University of California in a three- 
year pilot program which is an extension of the Graduate 
Internship Program of Teacher Education at the Berkeley 
campus. 

One of the major purposes of the new proposal is to 
offer qualified Latin American professionals residing in 
or near the Mission District an opportunity to utilize their 
skills and talents. 

Off-campus center to be established 

To accomplish this goal, the University of California 
will establish an Off-Campus Teacher Education Center 
in the Mission District. Here some 15 qualified intern 
candidates will be recruited each year from among Bach- 
elor degree holders from Latin America who reside in or 
near the Mission District. 

The University will staff the Education Center with 
two supervisors who will screen and select the applicants 
subject to final approval by the San Francisco Unified 
School District. 

It is planned that candidates will be recruited, screen- 
ed, and accepted during the early fall and that the 
Teacher Education Center will operate during this com- 
ing year to give successful candidates a pre-internship 
period of preparation. This will be provided by the Uni- 
versity at the Center with interns being paid from sup- 
porting foundations or federal grants with no cost to the 
School District. 

Reciprocal services provided 

This pre-intern preparation during this coming year 

will provide the School District with significant services of 

the 15 interns under the supervision of two full-time 

University supervisors. In turn, the District will provide 

(Continued on Page 4) 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 3 



September 18, 1967 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



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September 18, L967 



NEWSLETTER 



Child Welfare Division Is Reorganized 



I At its August 10, 1967 meeting the Board of Education 
[approved the Superintendent's recommendation that the 
liame of the Division of Child Welfare be changed to 
phe Special Educational Services Division and that the 
•Division be reorganized with a Director of Special Edu- 
cation and a Director of Pupil Services responsible to 
•Coordinator Martin J. Dean. 

I At its August 15, 1967 meeting the Board approved 
the appointment of Margaret Holland, Supervisor, Coun- 
seling and Guidance, to the position of Director of Spe- 
cial Education, and the appointment of Mrs. Alice C. 
Kenry, Supervisor, Child Guidance Services, to the posi- 
tion of Director of Pupil Services. 

Responsibility is outlined 

The two Directors and the Principal of the Court 
(Schools, Mr. Leslie Russell, are directly responsible to the 
Coordinator of the Special Educational Services Division. 

t Reporting to the Director of Special Education are the 
lollowing supervisors with their areas of responsibility 
, jjshown : 

'"l 1. Supervisor for the Physically Handicapped (Classes 
for Physically Handicapped, Hospital and Home Instruc- 
tion, Program for Pregnant Girls) ; 

2. Supervisor, Programs for Speech, Hearing, and Vis- 
lally Handicapped (Programs for Speech Handicapped, 
classes for Aurally Handicapped, Classes for Aphasic, 
classes for Visually Handicapped, Visual Screening 
Technician) ; 

3. Supervisor, Programs for Elementary Mentally Han- 
licapped (Elementary Classes for Educable Mentally 
Retarded, Classes for Trainable Mentally Retarded) ; 

vf] j 4. Supervisor, Programs for Secondary Mentally Han- 




ski T 

Jni 



Martin J. Dean, Coordinator of the Special Educational Services 
Division (formerly Child Welfare Division), is seen discussing 
reorganization plans with Margaret Holland, who was recently 
appointed Director of Special Education, and Mrs. Alice C. 
Henry, who is now the Director of Pupil Services. 

dicapped (Secondary Classes for Educable Mentally Re- 
tarded, Development Center for Severely Handicapped, 
Sheltered Workshop) ; 

5. Supervisor for Educationally Handicapped (Pro- 
grams for Educationally Handicapped, Reading Centers) . 

Responsible to the Director of Pupil Services are the 
following: 

1. Supervisor, Guidance and Counseling (Secondary 
Guidance and Counseling, Elementary Guidance and 
Counseling, Student Records) ; 

2. Supervisor, Psychological Services (School Psychol- 

( Continued on Page 4) 



5 Sabbatical Leave Reports Due District Joins Chamber Program 



When a teacher or administrator takes a sabbatical 
eave, a report concerning this trip must be submitted to 
he Personnel Coordinator within sixty days of the per- 
on's return to duty. 

Board of Education Administrative Regulation R4155 
efers to the sabbatical leave report as follows : 

; Upon completion of the leave and within 60 days of 
he teacher's return to duty, a detailed itinerary, and a 
vritten report of not less than 2,500 words shall be sub- 
nitted to the Personnel Division setting forth the teach- 
r's reaction to the trip and a statement of the benefits 
eceived from it. A description of the trip will not satisfy 
his requirement. This report shall be referred to the 
Assistant Superintendent of the division in which the 
eacher serves, the Salary Coordinator, and the Personnel 
joordinator for approval." 

Every effort to complete this obligation within the time 
pecified should be made, inasmuch as no extension of 
ime can be allowed by the Personnel Coordinator. 



The District has entered into an agreement with the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce to provide a num- 
ber of instructional services so as to better prepare adults 
for employment upon the completion of a two-week 
training program. 

Course instruction will include vocational orientation 
and personal development for students screened and se- 
lected by the Chamber. Upon completion of the two- 
week session, adults will receive on-the-job training in 
Chamber-member firms. 

The District's role will be to instruct the students in 
such areas as grooming, employer expectations, good work 
habits, and the like. 

The Chamber will pay the District for the instructional 
services (not to exceed $33,780) for the period Septem- 
ber 18, 1967 through March 18, 1968. The program has 
been developed under the provisions of the Economic 
Opportunity Act by the Chamber. 

The District's Adult and Vocational Education Divi- 
sion is coordinating the two-week instruction sessions. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 18, 1967 



Announcements 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCY 

Notice is hereby given of the following custodial 
vacancy: 

2704 — School Custodian, Female — Glen Park Ele- 
mentary. 



SABBATICAL LEAVE 

Teachers or administrators planning to take a 
Sabbatical Leave during the spring term 1968 for 
travel or study are reminded that requests are due 
in the Personnel Division prior to October 1, 1967. 



• TIME SHEET PICK-UP 

September time sheets for teachers will be picked up at 
the schools at 8:30 a.m. on September 29, 1967, for 
senior, junior and elementary teachers. 

The adult schools will deliver their full-time and part- 
time teachers' time sheets on September 29 at 9 a.m. 

Time sheets for clerks and janitors for all schools, in- 
cluding the adult schools, for September 16 through Sep- 
tember 30 will be picked up at the schools at 8:30 a.m. 
on September 25, 1967. 

Sheets are to be completed and signed by the deadline 
dates above to enable delivery service to keep the sched- 
ule. 

The number of days in September for principals and 
assistant principals is 20 ; the number of days for teachers 
is 19. 



FILE CREDENTIAL NOW 

New teachers are reminded that they must file 
their credentials with the Personnel Division im- 
mediately. No teacher can be paid until a credential 
is on file. 



• BASKETBALL OFFICIALS ARE NEEDED 

Personnel interested in Basketball Officiating for the 
1967-68 year are asked to contact Ron Gaggero — 
Telephone 681-0346. 



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THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, September 19, 1967, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



. . o Data Processing Program Continues 

(Continued from Page 1) 

terms, extension to all elementary and junior high schools 
would probably require four to six semesters. Some minor 
adaptations to the program to render the services more 
efficiently in terms of local needs will be undertaken. 

New center for production 

This past year the actual data processing services were 
purchased through the facilities of the City and County 
of San Francisco, as the District's own installation does 
not possess the capacity for the added production. For 
1967-68 the San Francisco center has contracted with the 
Santa Clara Regional Educational Data Processing Cen- 
ter for the machine production. 

Under the terms of the grant, the Division of Research 
has the responsibility to implement specific, though limit- 
ed, services designed under the guidance of the State 
Department of Education. The current project does not 
give the Research Office the opportunity of developing 
programs unique to San Francisco, but rather proceeding 
under the guidelines established by the State. 



SA 



. .-. Teacher Intern Project Approved 

(Continued from Page 2) 

a laboratory situation in which the interns' professional 
preparation can be achieved. 

Beginning next September the interns who are sched- 
uled to teach in San Francisco will be assigned full 
teaching responsibilities with full beginning teacher's pay 
in schools of the Mission District or nearby schools with 
a large Spanish-surnamed student population. 

During the internship year, program members will 
teach on the credential granted to members of recognized 
internship programs. At the end of the year and upon 
completion of the internship program, they will be 
recommended for a regular teaching credential. 

This procedure will be repeated with 15 additional 
intern candidates during the three-year pilot program. 



. . . Special Educational Services 

(Continued from Page 3) 

ogists, School Psychometrists, Diagnostic Clinics, Reading 
Clinic, Screening Committees) ; 

3. Supervisor, Social Workers (School Social Workers) ; 

4. Supervisor, Attendance Services (Attendance Work- 
ers, Health Services) ; 

5. Supervisor, Guidance Service Centers (Guidance 
Service Centers). 

This reorganization will be phased in during the first 
and second semesters of 1967-68. Total cost will be 
$47,113. 



$AN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



SEP 



NEWSLETTER 



/OLUME 39 



® 



SEPTEMBER 25, 1967 



NUMBER 4 



_ 

Three Guidance Service Centers Operating 



The District's program to establish five Guidance 
iervice Centers in the city to handle pupils with extreme 
ni\ lehavior problems is continuing to develop since its in- 
fer eption last spring. 

To date, three centers are in operation. The center for 
enior high school students is located in the John Adams 
tn ^.dult School building, the junior high center is at 65 
Borland Street, and the elementary school center is 
rch Roused in separate facilities at Geary Elementary School. 




itaff members of the Guidance Service Centers are observed 
neeting with Wellington Chew, Supervisor. Pictured are (stand- 
rig, left to right) Edward Kloster, John Freeman, Nick Brough- 
101 on, Mrs. Germaine O'Brien, Neil Dunlap; (sitting) Mrs. Alberta 
k iarber, Mr. Chew, Mrs. Fannie Preston, Mrs. Jannie Wu, 
taymond Yesson. 



Wellington L. Chew, former head counselor at Fran- 
:isco Junior High School, has been appointed Supervisor, 
uidance Service Centers, and is coordinating the pro- 
gram which is under the Division of Special Educational 
services. 
Staff assignments made 

There are seven teachers currently assigned to the three 
:enters: two at Geary School, two at John Adams, and 
:hree at the Dorland Street office. In addition, two social 
workers and two psychologists have been assigned full- 
:ime to the program. 

The original proposal as approved last year called for 
:he establishment of five centers with a total faculty as- 
ignment of twelve teachers. Plans to expand the program 
:o the projected number are being delayed due to a 
reduction in anticipated federal funds. The program is 
Deing funded under PL 89-10, the Elementary and Sec- 



ondary Education Act of 1965, Title I, which has been 
cut back to 80 per cent of proposed funding, and from 
District funds. 

The purpose of the Guidance Service Centers is to pro- 
vide a rehabilitative educational experience for pupils 
whose behavior in school has been anti-social in the ex- 
treme and to provide the opportunity for the regular 
classroom teacher to perform his educational duties with- 
out disruption. The centers are geared to provide a con- 
centrated therapeutic type program, utilizing specialized 
personnel, facilities, teaching materials, and curriculum. 
Flexibility is encouraged 

The centers have been organized to allow flexibility in 
working with the students. Classes have a maximum 
limit of 15 students per teacher. Some pupils are seen on 
an individual basis for an hour a day, while others are 
programmed on a minimum day basis with allowances 
for individual and small group instruction. A concerted 
effort is made to determine the specific needs of each 
child and to understand each child's personal problems. 

Candidates for the Guidance Service Centers are 
screened by a school site committee made up of at least 
three of the following: the principal or his designate, a 
teacher, the school social worker, the school psychologist, 
the attendance worker, a counselor, the school nurse, 
and/or others who have knowledge of the pupil. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



NEW HOURS FOR TEACHERS 
PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY 

The Teachers Professional Library is now open 
from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. This is an increase of two and 
a half hours ; a half hour earlier in the morning, the 
noon hour, and an hour later in the evening. 

Over the years many teachers and administrators 
have requested that the library extend its hours so 
that they could make more extensive use of the 
services. The additional half-day schedule of the 
experienced clerk will enable the staff to spread 
the present services over the longer hours. 

For the information of new teachers in the dis- 
trict, and as a reminder to all others, the Profes- 
sional Library is maintained by the Board of Educa- 
tion to provide a current working collection of edu- 
cational materials for the needs of the personnel of 
the San Francisco Unified School District. It is 
located on the Fell Street side of the Court at 135 
Van Ness Avenue, Central Office. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 25, 196'! 



Teachers Eligible for Grants 
To Teach in Foreign Countries 

The Personnel Division has been requested by the 
United States Department of Health, Education, and 
Welfare to make known to the members of the staff the 
availability of grants to teach abroad during the 1968-69 
academic year and to attend summer seminars overseas. 
These opportunities are a part of the U.S. International 
Educational Exchange Program authorized by the Ful- 
bright-Hays Act. 

Under this program, U.S. elementary and secondary 
school teachers, as well as instructors and assistant pro- 
fessors at the college level, may apply to teach for a year 
in a foreign country. Some of the positions involve an 
exchange with a teacher from abroad, while others are 
one-way placements. Americans who teach foreign lan- 
guages or social studies may also apply for summer semi- 
nars to be held overseas. 

Interested teachers should write before November 1 to 
obtain copies of the bulletin, Opportunities Abroad for 
Teachers, 1968-69, and for appropriate application forms. 
Their requests should be addressed to Teacher Exchange 
Section, International Exchange and Training Branch, 
U.S. Office of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202. 



District Science Labs Commence 

The Lux Electronics Laboratory at Polytechnic High 
School, the Lux Bio-Chem Laboratory at Galileo High 
School, and the Woodrow Wilson After-School Science 
Program will commence their fall programs on Monday, 
October 2, 1967. 

All public elementary school students planning to at- 
tend any of the classes must be cleared and obtain 
registration forms through the office of Agatha Hogan 
at 135 Van Ness Avenue. 

All junior and senior high school students may obtain 
registration cards by merely attending the first class 
sessions. 

Information concerning the science programs may be 
obtained from the following: 

Galileo — John Rocky — 673-6217. 

Polytechnic — Al Guittard — 661-0865. 

Woodrow Wilson — Chuck Oliveira — 584-6142, 
Extension 19 



PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Membership in Professional and Employee Or- 
ganizations. The Board of Education has approved 
the following policies for the district covering 
membership in professional and employee organi- 
zations (Policies, S.F. Bd. of Ed., P4135, Art 4) : 

1, Teachers and all other employees of the Board of Education 
shall have complete freedom in selecting the professional or employee 
organizations which they may wish to join, without coercion of any 
kind from any administrative officer or other school employee. 

2, Whatever courtesies are extended to any employee organization 
in the schools shall be fully and unreservedly extended to all em- 
ployee organizations. 

3, The use of any coercion or pressure by any principal or other 
administrative officer or other school employee to influence any 
teacher or other employee to join or refrain from joining any or- 
ganization shall he deemed to be unprofessional conduct. 



To Educational Conferences 

Request for Travel Procedure 
Covered by District Regulation | 

Within the policy of the Board of Education there i 
provided a reasonable amount of absence to attend edu 
cational conferences. Administrative regulation R413I 
covers the procedure. 

Requests for travel to educational conferences are t( 
be submitted by the teacher directly to the principal 
who in turn routes the request to the Assistant Superin 
tendent of the Division. The principal indicates the need 
for a substitute, if any. The teacher is notified of thil 
disposition of the matter just as soon as possible by th<| 
Division of Fiscal Control. 
Board clearance is necessary 

Absence from school to attend a conference must b(| 
cleared by a Board of Education resolution if expensi| 
to the District, such as transportation or substitute, i 
involved. As an exception, the Superintendent may ex 
cuse a teacher for no more than two days, to engage ii 
a school related educational endeavor which seem 
profitable, providing there is no expense to the District 
(See p. 4150, paragraph 2.) 

Travel requests are to be filed well in advance of th 
conference, six weeks if possible. This schedule is neces 
sitated by the bulk of work involved in preparing ane 
processing the agenda for Board of Education meetings 
Early application is to the teacher's advantage. 
Mutual benefits are derived 

Attendance at educational conferences implies return 
to the School District as well as to the individual partici 
pant. A report need not be written, but instead it is sug 
gested that worthwhile experiences be shared later witl 
other teachers as occasions arise. Thus meetings oftei 
effect action as well as stimulate thought. 

All City College travel requests will be cleared by Di 
Lloyd D. Luckmann, acting president. 

The above is applicable to administrators as well a 
teachers. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 4 



SeDtember 25, 1967 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilicnthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



September 25, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



'64 School Building Program Moves Ahead 




'?" Diamond Heights Elementary School, located at 350 Amber Drive, opened its doors to San Francisco school children for the first time 
seen >n September 6. The new school was constructed with funds from the 1964 School Building Program. The new facility has two kinder- 
■ garten rooms, 17 classrooms, a multipurpose room, and an instructional materials center. Mrs. Myrna Graves has been appointed acting 
principal, and Robert Jiminez is assistant principal. 

and Knowles, Architects) — in preliminary drawing 
stage. 

El Dorado Elementary School (Addition) (Maherand 
Martens, Architects) — out to bid. 

Visitacion Valley Junior High School (Gardner 
Dailey, Architect) — final working drawings being com- 
pleted. 

Grattan Elementary School (Replacement) (De Mars 
and Wells, Architects) — in preliminary drawing stage. 

Cabrillo Elementary School (Replacement) (Clarence 
W. Mayhew, Architect) — in preliminary drawing stage. 

Abraham Lincoln High School, Math and Science 
Classrooms (Masten and Hurd, Architects) — in work- 
ing drawing stage. 

The preceding does not include the modernization and 
rehabilitation phases of the '64 Building Bond Program. 
These aspects of the program will be reviewed in future 
issues of the Newsletter. 



principal, 

In November, 1964, the voters of San Francisco ap- 
proved a bond issue of $31,464,500 for the construction 
, a Df new buildings and the modernization and rehabilita- 
tion of existing schools. 

The opening of Diamond Heights Elementary School 

this fall marks the completion of one of the major con- 

n struction projects of the 1964 School Building Program. 

The Diamond Heights structure, completed at a cost 

of $974,900, is but one of a number of school building 

it projects included in the proposal. 

rogram's progress summarized 

The following is a summary of the construction pro- 
jects to date: 

Diamond Heights Elementary School (Corlett and 
Spackman, Architects) — completed, open September, 
1967. 

Diamond Heights High School (Reid and Tarics, 
Architects) — preliminary drawings being redesigned. 

City College, Educational Services Building (Milton 
T. Pflueger, Architect) — is under construction; Labora- 
tory and Classroom Building (same Architect) — is 
going to bid. 

Potrero Hill Junior High School (Corwin Booth and 
Associates, Architects) — final preliminary drawings 
approved by Board of Education; working drawings now 
being completed. 

Paul Revere Elementary School Annex (Spencer, Lee 
and Busse, Architects) — old building razed, new build- 
ing under construction. 

Buena Vista Elementary School (Aleck L. Wilson and 
Associates, Architects) — old building razed, new build- 
ing under construction. 

Burnett Elementary School Annex (Schubert and 
Friedman, Architects) — old building razed; out to bid. 

Bret Harte Elementary School (Addition) (Hertzka 



Music Instructors Elect Officers 

New officers for the 1967-68 year have been elected by 
the Association for Instructors in Music. They include 
the following: 

Norman Rubinf eld, president ; Robert Giambruno, vice 
president; Barbara Dobrinen, recording secretary; Helen 
Dilworth, corresponding secretary; Kow Takemoto, 
treasurer. 

The area representatives include Herb Welch, high 
school instrumental ; Fred Wilkins, high school vocal ; 
Joseph Rosenblatt, junior high school instrumental; 
Robert Landis, junior high school vocal; and Richard 
Shuster, elementary. 

The first general meeting will be held Monday, Octo- 
ber 2, 1967, at 4 p.m. at Abraham Lincoln High School. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 25, 1967 



Announcements 



• ELEMENTARY SUPPLY COMMITTEE TO MEET 

The Elementary Supply Committee will meet at Visi- 
tacion Valley School at 1:45 p.m. on October 4, 1967. 
Principals having items for discussion are requested to 
submit these to their representatives prior to September 
29, 1967. 



• CHORAL SOCIETY RESUMES REHEARSALS 

The San Francisco Choral Society, under the direc- 
tion of Helen Dilworth, has resumed its weekly re- 
hearsals on Tuesdays from 7 to 9 p.m. in Room 177 at 
Abraham Lincoln High School. 

All interested persons are invited to attend the sessions 
which are admission-free. This community choral group 
is offered as a public service under the auspices of the 
Adult and Vocational Education Division of the Dis- 
trict. Additional information may be secured by tele- 
phoning 431-4899. 



• ASSOCIATION FOR CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

The San Francisco E;-anch of the Association for 
Childhood Education (ACE) announces a series of 
special events for the new school year. 

Present plans call for a fall art show to be held in con- 
junction with a tea honoring teachers new to the District. 
A "Concepts in Science" program will be presented in 
the spring, and a seminar study of the classroom handi- 
capped child will be scheduled near the end of the school 
year. Specific dates for these events will be announced 
soon. 

Membership information in ACE may be obtained 
from school building representatives. 



• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE TO MEET 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet Wednes- 
day, September 27, 1967, at 1:30 p.m. in Room 10, 
Central Office, Building B, 170 Fell Street. 



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THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, October 3, 1967, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 1 70 Fell Street. 



1 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is hereby given of the following custodial va- 
cancies: 

2724 — School Custodian, Male — Balboa and Lowell 
High Schools, Herbert Hoover Junior High, and Bay- 
view and Patrick Henry Elementary Schools. 



• PHYSICAL EDUCATION GROUP TO MEET 

The first meeting of the San Francisco Unit of the 
California Association for Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation will be a "Get-Acquainted Party" on 
Tuesday, October 3, 1967, at Diamond Inn in Diamond 
Heights. 

Dr. Eula West, president-elect of the local unit, is in* 
charge of arrangements. Orron Quails of Balboa High 
School is the 1967-68 president. 



. . . Guidance Service Centers 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Principals are asked to make every effort to find solu- 
tions to problems of discipline prior to referral to the 
centers. When efforts for rehabilitation have been ex- 
hausted, the principal requests the District Student 
Placement Committee to staff the case for placement by 
completing the Request for Placement Form and for- 
warding it to the proper division. The principal notifies 
the parent that the pupil has been referred to this com- 
mittee for disposition. 
Recommendation is considered 

The District Student Placement Committee considers 
the recommendation of the site screening committee for 
transfer of the pupil to the Guidance Service Centers 
when the Request for Placement form is properly com- 
pleted. The pupil will be approved for the Guidance 
Service Centers if his problems fit the criteria and if there 
is space available. If the child is not placed in a center, 
the Special Educational Services staff will recommend 
one of the following: 1.) expulsion or exclusion; 2.) ex- 
emption with parent's consent; and 3.) transfer to an- 
other school or another program. 

Mr. Chew and his staff of teachers, social workers, and 
psychologists conduct weekly meetings to appraise the 
program, suggest changes, and develop innovations. This 
past summer the seven teachers visited and studied other 
programs in the Bay Area which work with students with 
severe behavioral problems. 

With the advent of recent legislation limiting the num- 
ber of days of suspension for any given pupil in a school 
year to a maximum of ten, the District is required to pro- 
vide continuation-type classes before a long term suspen- 
sion can be invoked. Prior to suspending a pupil beyond 
ten days, it is felt that the pupil should have every oppor- 
tunity to make an adjustment which will enhance his 
learning in the public schools. The Guidance Service 
Centers are an attempt to provide the specialized per- 
sonnel, facilities, and programs to accomplish that end. 



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BAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 






NEWSLETTER 



1 - i SCO 

public li- 



VOLUME 39 



OCTOBER 2, 1967 



NUMBER 5 



Television Feasibility Study Is Underway 



Each District public school will be studied within the 
lext three months to determine its ability to receive 
xiicrowave television transmission. This is part of an 
"■' aigineering study to determine the feasibility of estab- 
ishing a multi-channel instructional television system for 
the District. 

On August 15, 1967, upon recommendation of the 
Superintendent, the Board of Education agreed to auth- 
3rize a contract with Hammett and Edison, Consulting 
Radio Engineers, to conduct the study at a cost not to 
sxceed $10,000, to be completed not later than December 
31, 1967. The project is being coordinated through the 
bffice of Dr. William B. Sanborn, Director, Division of 
Instructional Materials. 
Individual analysis of each school 

The study, which is now in progress, will be a highly 
tailored analysis of each public school's ability to receive 
microwave transmission in any sort of pattern of signal 
distribution. Once completed, the report will determine 
whether it is feasible, quality-wise and cost-wise, for the 
District to engage in a four channel, closed circuit in- 
structional television system. 

The survey is a very complex and complicated one. 
3an Francisco presents a number of unique problems 
Decause of its location and terrain. A number of physical 
features present here can affect microwave transmission 



in a variety of ways. Such phenomena as the tall build- 
ings, the many hills and valleys, the bridges, being sur- 
rounded by water on three sides, the freeways, and 
atmospheric conditions all present their own problems. 
Survey to be in detail 

As a result, Hammett and Edison will survey every 
school building to determine if it is physically possible to 
receive quality television pictures with equipment now in 
use. The survey is predicated on the construction of a 
new television tower to be built on Mt. Sutro which the 
District's channels would be able to use. 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools, has 
indicated his interest in a system-wide, multi-channel, 
microwave television system in his address to the Ad- 
ministrative Workshop in August, in his speech at the 
Teachers' Institute in September, and in a number of 
television appearances. Dr. Jenkins has urged quick 
action as the Federal Communications Commission is 
running out of closed circuit channels. 
Possibilities are unlimited 

Dr. Jenkins has indicated that the possibilities of in- 
structional television properly planned and effectively 
utilized are boundless. He has cited a few examples such 
as direct instruction by master teachers who can assist 
classroom teachers in the inner city schools for the cultur- 
( Continued on Page 4) 



Report Reveals Elementary, Senior High Testing Results 



The results of the 1966-67 State Testing Program 
for the elementary and senior high schools of the 
San Francisco Unified School District were released 
in a detailed report at the September 19, 1967, 
meeting of the Board of Education. Copies were 
distributed to those in attendance and are available 
to the public in the Educational Information Office, 
135 Van Ness Avenue. 

The summary of intelligence and achievement 
scores, including a school by school analysis, was 
prepared by the District's Division of Research, 
Harold L. Weeks, Director. This marks the first 
time such scores have been publicly released on an 
individual school basis. 

Immediate follow-up of the tests results was be- 
gun on Wednesday and Thursday after the Board 
meeting by the District's Elementary, Junior High, 
and Senior High Divisions. 



Dr. Donald A. Rhodes, Assistant Superintendent, 
Elementary Schools, and Mr. Weeks met with ele- 
mentary school principals and reviewed the test 
data. Principals have scheduled meetings with their 
teaching staffs in preparation for teacher-parent 
conferences at which the testing results will be 
explained. 

Junior high school principals met on Thursday 
with Mr. James Dierke, Assistant Superintendent. 
An additional meeting has been planned at which 
Mr. Weeks will review the test data, and staff 
meetings at each school will be held. Follow-up 
meetings involving teachers and parents are being 
set up. 

Senior high school principals met with Dr. Lewis 
Allbee, Assistant Superintendent, on Thursday. 
Principals will discuss the test results at subsequent 
faculty meetings in preparation for future discus- 
sions with parents at P.T.A. meetings. 



NEWSLETTER 



October 2, 1967) 



Teachers May Participate 

Tax Sheltered Annuity Program 
Implemented by School Board 

The Personnel Division has released the following in- 
formation relative to Tax Sheltered Annuities : 

The Board of Education on June 6, 1967 authorized 
the implementation of a program of tax sheltered an- 
nuities for the purpose of qualifying under the provisions 
of Section 403 (b) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 
of the United States of America. 

Under Section 403 (b) and 501-c (3) of the U. S. 
Internal Revenue Code and Section 17512 of the Cali- 
fornia Revenue and Taxation Code, employees of certain 
non-profit organizations, including school districts, may 
reduce their income with instructions for the employer 
to purchase an annuity for them. Said reduction in in- 
come is not subject to income tax in the year earned but 
is deferred until the years after retirement. 
Organizations may recommend company 

Each certificated and classified employee organization 
with 250 or more members is permitted to recommend 
for Board approval a private insurance company or 
agency from which tax sheltered annuities may be pur- 
chased on behalf of their members or other interested 
employees, provided, however, that employees can obtain 
any broker and/or company for purchasing a tax shelter- 
ed annuity. 

THE APPROVAL BY THE BOARD OF EDUCA- 
TION OF A COMPANY OR AGENCY DOES NOT 
CONSTITUTE A RECOMMENDATION OF ANY 
SUCH COMPANY, AGENCY OR PLAN, NOR DOES 
IT GUARANTEE THE VALIDITY OR MERIT OF 
ANY INDIVIDUAL TAX SHELTERED ANNUITY. 

In order that employees may obtain information about 
tax sheltered annuities, the following guidelines have been 
established. These guidelines were established in order 
that employees may request and receive information, and 
to protect them from unrequested solicitations and insure 
non-interference with regular school district business. 
Guidelines are established 

Each organization, insurance company and/or agency 
agrees : 

( 1 ) The seller's agency shall not contact an employee 
except at the specific request of that employee. 

(2) The use of school district telephone facilities to 
arrange appointments or discuss any phase of these plans 
is prohibited. 

(3) Officially recognized employee organizations may, 
on behalf of their members, solicit buyers through their 
publications or through the school mail. The written 
material may include tcar-offs requesting an appointment 
with an agent of any such selling company or agency. 

(4) Conferences between employees and a seller 
agency may be held at the place of employment in ac- 
cordance with Board Policy. 

(5) Representatives of an approved company or 
agency may make presentations to employee groups when 
invited or requested by a recognized employee organiza- 
tion. 



KQED Series Will Summarize 
Weekly Educational News Events 

Teachers and school administrators in Northern and 
Central California can keep abreast of new developments 
and trends in curriculum, teaching methods and mater- 
ials through a series of weekly programs to be shown over 
educational television station KQED (San Francisco), 
beginning October 3, 1967. 

The new series, entitled Education in Motion, will 
offer a 15-minute weekly summary of significant news 
and events in the field of education, as well as inside looks 
at many of the new teaching techniques and course ma- 
terials now being explored in the expanding field of edu 
cational research and development. The series will be 
produced jointly by KQED and by the Far West Labora- 
tory for Educational Research and Development. 

Announcing the new series, John K. Hemphill, Far 
West Laboratory Director, said : 

"We are pleased to continue our successful relationship 
with KQED, which began last Spring with our pilot 
series, Perspectives for Learning. Based upon responses 
from school personnel to this initial effort, we feel out 
new series, Education in Motion, will provide a valuable 
means whereby teachers and school administrators may 
keep up with the many events and innovations in the 
field of education." 

Each program will be shown twice a week, initially at 
4 p.m., Tuesdays, and again at 7:45 p.m., Fridays, over 
KQED, Channel 9, San Francisco. Viewers outside the 
KQED area should consult their local educational tele 
vision station for showing times and dates. 



• CREDENTIAL FEES ARE RAISED 

The State Department of Education has announced] 
that the fee for new credentials, credential renewals] 
life diplomas, and evaluations is now $15. This inJ 
crease became effective October 1, 1967. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 39, No. 5 October 2, 1967 

135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif . 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 






Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



October 2, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



Volunteers Sponsor Training Sessions 



IThe San Francisco Education Auxiliary announces 
that it is sponsoring a series of six morning workshop 
(training sessions beginning Wednesday, October 11, 1967. 
The meetings are open to all persons interested in the 
school volunteer program, especially new, prospective, 
1 and current members. 

Co-sponsors of the volunteer training sessions include 
jSan Francisco State College, the Volunteer Bureau of 
'San Francisco, and the District's Adult and Vocational 
: Education Division. 




*Ars. Nancie Oyama, San Francisco Education Auxiliary volun- 
teer, is seen working with fourth grade students at Dudley Stone 
, ilomentary School. Mrs. Oyama has brought artifacts from Japan 

or the students to enjoy and has presented explanatory talks 
' emphasizing the cultural significance of each item. She is one of 

one 300 SFEA volunteers who serve weekly in 30 District 

chools. 

Programs slated for mornings 

Each morning's program will begin at 9:30 a.m. and 
.•onclude at 12 noon. They will be held in Room 30, the 

i'' 3oard of Education meeting room. 

lis The schedule follows: 

i«': October 11 — "Understanding the Disadvantaged or 
Differentiated Child," featuring Dr. Phillip L. Shew of 

_ ian Francisco State College. 
I October 18 — "How Children Learn" with Dr. Lewis 
I. Falik, San Francisco State College. 
j October 25 — "Helping Children with Reading and 
ipeech Problems," featuring Dr. Lawrence Carrillo, San 
r rancisco State College, and Mrs. Mary Herman, Fred- 
ric Burk School. 

November 1 — "Working with Teachers in the School 
Environment," presented by Dr. James E. Bixler, San 
Francisco State College. 

j November 8 — "One-to-One Relationships (Guides 
|.nd Techniques)" with Mrs. Annabelle Markoff, San 
j'rancisco State College. 
November 15 — Summary and Conclusion Session. 

Volunteers aid schools 

The San Francisco Education Auxiliary is an organi- 
ation of volunteers providing services for pupils in the 
:an Francisco Unified School District. It traces its be- 
inning back to 1963 when it had members working in 



two schools. Through the years it has shown continuous 
growth so that in 1967 its membership has risen to over 
300, providing services in 30 schools. 

Volunteers perform a number of services within the 
city's schools under teacher supervision. They may help 
in one or more of the following areas : 

• relieving school personnel of non-teaching duties 

• giving general assistance in the classroom, office, or 
library 

• extending friendship and providing academic help 
for an individual child or group of children 

• providing enrichment through the arts, science, 
music, drama, and story telling 

• arranging for lay and professional community people 
to share their special knowledge by volunteering to lec- 
ture, show slides, and give demonstrations in the class- 
room. 

• assisting with the arrangement and supervision of 
field trips 

• stimulating support for public schools and building 
better understanding of problems facing education. 
Assigned on written request 

Volunteers are placed only in schools where the prin- 
cipal has made a written request, and only in classrooms 
where the teacher has asked for such services. 

The Auxiliary has offices in Room 213-A of the Cen- 
tral Office. A full-time secretary, Mrs. Fern Barney, is 
present to take calls, answer questions, and coordinate 
the Auxiliary's services. She can be reached at 863-4680, 
Extension 386. 

Mrs. Joan Reichert is president of the local organiza- 
tion. She reports that the number of requests this past 
year for volunteer services has greatly increased and that 
more volunteers are needed to help in the schools. 

Mrs. Reichert feels that the coming training sessions 
can do much to prepare volunteers for their work with 
the school children. She reports that Mrs. Margaret 
Duffy, Registrar for Training and Education of the Vol- 
unteer Bureau of San Francisco, and Mrs. Mildred 
Blumenkrantz of the Auxiliary, have done outstanding 
work in helping prepare the six morning sessions to be 
held in October and November. 



DR. TODD ON KTVU PROGRAM 

Dr. Frances Todd, District Curriculum Assistant 
in Family Life Education, will be one of the fea- 
tured panelists on KTVU's Channel 2 production 
of Doctors' News Conference on Sunday, October 
8, starting at 5 : 30 p.m. 

The topic for discussion is "Sex Education in the 
Schools." 

Other panelists include Dr. Alvin Jacobs of the 
San Francisco Medical Society and member of the 
Family Life Education Advisory Committee of the 
San Francisco Unified School District, and Dr. 
Ronald Minkler, gynecologist and obstetrician from 
Oakland. 



NEWSLETTER 



October 2, 196" 



Announcements 



• PHI DELTA KAPPA TO MEET 

Gamma Iota Chapter of Phi Delta Kappa will hold its 
first meeting of the current academic year on Thursday, 
October 5, in the A & B Dining Rooms at San Francisco 
State College. It will start at 7:30 p.m. after an informal 
dinner scheduled for 6 : 30 p.m. 

Dr. Hobart Banks, clinical psychologist with the Deuel 
Vocational Institution at Tracy, will be the guest speaker. 
His topic will be Deuel Vocational Institution, a Unique 
Program of Rehabilitation for Youth. 



TERM REQUISITIONS LISTS ARE DUE 

Spring term requisitions lists are due in the Divi- 
sion of Supplies Warehouse, 1000 Selby Street, 
Attention Mrs. Elaine Hung, as follows : 

Instructional Supplies Lists — due before Octo- 
ber 13, 1967. 



• TEACHERS INVITED TO CONSTITUTION PLAY 

The California Bodies of the Scottish Rite of Free- 
masonry has extended an invitation to District teachers 
and selected civics class students to attend the Friday, 
October 13, performance of Architects of Freedom. 

Written by Judge Newcomb Condee of the Superior 
Court of Los Angeles, the play concerns the signing of 
the United States Constitution. 

The performance is scheduled at the California Scot- 
tish Rite Memorial Temple, 19th Avenue and Sloat 
Boulevard, beginning at 8 p.m. 

• SFCTA REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL TO MEET 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association 
Representative Council will meet at 4 p.m. on Mon- 
day, October 9, in Nicholas Hall of the Marines Me- 
morial Building, 609 Sutter Street. 

Instructional Television Survey Starts 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ally diverse and disadvantaged children; direct instruc- 
tion for bilingual children of which San Francisco has 
two major groups, the Spanish-speaking and the Chinese- 
speaking; parent education and adult basic education for 
the parents of the culturally diverse and disadvantaged 
children so that the home and school can work more 
closely together. 

He also sees great potential in individualized instruc- 
tion for children of different abilities, interests, and back- 
grounds at all levels of the school system; sharing of 
talents of master teachers via instructional television so 
that the inspiration and know-how of outstanding teach- 
ers can be shared on a broader basis throughout the 
entire school district ; more effective use of various kinds 
of audio visual programs through the multi-channel ap- 
proach; eventual tie-in of microwave with data retriev- 
ing systems for the further individualization of instruc- 
tion ; and in-service educational classes for teachers at all 
levels from kindergarten through college. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, October 3, 1967, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 1 70 Fell Street. 



• DR. RHODES TO ADDRESS AUXILIARY 

Dr. Donald A. Rhodes, Assistant Superintendent 
Elementary Schools, will address the San Franciscc 
Education Auxiliary as part of a morning Orientation 
Workshop to be held Wednesday, October 4, in Roorr 
30, 170 Fell Street, at 9:30 a.m. 

Dr. Rhodes will discuss "From Here . . . Where foi 
Volunteers?" 



• TEACHERS' UNION MEETING SCHEDULED 

The San Francisco Federation of Teachers will hold it: 
regular membership meeting on Monday, October 2, at 
7:30 p.m. at Lowell High School. Candidates for the 
office of Mayor will address the group. 

• DEPARTMENT HEADS TO MEET 

The Department Heads Association of San Fran 
cisco Senior High Schools will hold its first meeting o: 
the school year at Abrahom Lincoln High School or 
Wednesday, October 4, in the teachers' cafeteria 
2:45 p.m. 

• FOREIGN LANGUAGE CONFERENCE SLATEE 

The Foreign Language in Elementary School Asso 
ciation announces that its fall conference will be helc 
Saturday, October 21, 1967, at Frederic Burk School 
San Francisco State College. The conference theme i 
Community and Foreign Languages. Dr. Edwin Feld 
man, San Mateo school principal, will speak. 

Information and reservation forms may be secure( 
by contacting Mrs. Yolanda Thompson, 156 Lunadi 
Court, San Francisco 94127. 



• FIELD LIBRARIANS TO MEET 

The Field Librarians will meet at Presidio Junior Higl! 
School library at 4 p.m. on Thursday, October 5. A! 
elementary, junior high, and senior high school libraria: 
are invited. Presidio is located at 450 - 30th Avenue. 




BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO, 
PERMIT No. 396( 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL D 
135 VAN NESS AVE. 



DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 
S. F. PUBLIC LIBRARY 
LARK IN &. MC ALli,£st3R 
SAM FRANCISCO, CALiF 



RETURN REQUEST 
3T3. 

94102 



SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



OCT 1 1167 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



W?@ 



OCTOBER 9, 1967 



NUMBER'"? 1 



Burbank Installs New Officers 




Dr. Zuretti L. Goosby, Board of Education Commissioner (left) 
[and Dr. Donald A. Rhodes, Assistant Superintendent, Elemen- 
tary Schools (right), were recent guests at the installation 
ceremonies for new student body officers at Luther Burbank 
'Junior High School. They are seen with Michael Lind, new 
\ 'Student body president. 



li Liberty Bell Competition 

ROTC Units Will Participate 
In Columbus Day Festivities 

The San Francisco High School ROTC Brigade will 
parade during the city's Columbus Day festivities at 1 
-Jp.m. on Sunday, October 15, 1967, with each school pro- 
viding a marching unit, drill team, drum and bugle corps, 
, national and school colors, and color guards. 
% Immediately following the parade, the Annual Liberty 
Bell Drill Competition will be held at North Beach Play- 
ground, Lombard and Powell Streets, matching special 
: ( 'drill teams from the eight city ROTC units. 
,. Major General J. F. Franklin, Jr., Deputy Command- 
ling General, Sixth United States Army, will be the re- 
viewing officer for this event, which is sponsored by the 
si [Reserve Officers Association, Chapter 90. 

Polytechnic High School has captured the coveted 
First Place Award for the past two years. A victory on 
October 15 would give the school permanent possession 
af the Liberty Bell Trophy. 

This event is one of the highlights of the San Francisco 
ROTC cadet program. A cordial invitation is extended 
to all school personnel to attend. 



Summer Projects Aim to Improve 
Non-English Speaking Program 

District efforts to continually develop and improve 
the program of instruction for non-English speaking stu- 
dents were advanced this past summer as the result of 
demonstration classes and an in-service course conducted 
at the junior high school level. One objective of the sum- 
mer project was to develop a bilingual and a bicultural 
program. 

Two demonstration classes designed to use the latest 
techniques in teaching English to foreign-born students 
were held at Horace Mann and Benjamin Franklin 
Junior High Schools. The Horace Mann classes were for 
Spanish-speaking students and enrolled 65 pupils, and 
the Benjamin Franklin class was for Chinese-speaking 
students and included 47 enrollees. 
Horace Mann classes 

At Horace Mann the students were divided into two 
classes and Carlos Cornejo served as master teacher. 
Florencio Ortega taught one group Spanish for Spanish- 
speaking Students and English as a Second Language. 
Ronald Cabral taught Citizenship and Social Studies — 
the development of self-image and the appreciation of 
the cultural heritage of the Spanish-speaking peoples — 
and typing. All three teachers are bilingual. 

At Benjamin Franklin, Aldo Disgrazzi taught English 
as a Second Language to his Chinese students. At both 
schools the latest equipment, books, and teaching aids 
were utilized. 

While these two demonstration classes were in prog- 
ress, a demonstration in-service course for junior high 
school teachers of non-English speaking students, A Pro- 
gram for the Teaching of English as a Second Language , 
was in progress at Horace Mann. 
Purposes are explained 

The purpose of the course was to familiarize teachers 
with techniques, materials, books and equipment used in 
various ESL and bilingual programs. The teachers ob- 
served the demonstration classes at Benjamin Franklin 
and Horace Mann. Near the end of the course they 
engaged in practice teaching sessions in which they 
taught lessons to selected students from the demonstra- 
tion classes. These sessions were conducted with other 
course members observing so that each teacher's methods 
and approaches could be constructively criticized by fel- 
low teachers. The practice sessions were also taped for 
self -evaluation. 

The students in the demonstration classes were care- 
fully screened by their junior high school counselors. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



NEWSLETTER 



October 9, 1967! 



. . . Programs for Non-English Speaking John Muir Displays News PhotOS 



(Continued from Page 1) 
They were tested at the beginning of the summer classes 
and at the conclusion. A test was developed to determine 
the Spanish and English language skills of the students. 

There were ten teachers enrolled in the m-service 
course, six interested in teaching Spanish-speaking and 
four specializing in teaching Chinese-speaking students. 
Mr. Elmer Gallegos served as instructor and coordinated 
the total summer demonstration project. 

This fall term a Committee on Bilingual Education has 
been formed to coordinate and further develop the Dis- 
trict's program. It includes the following: Mrs. Lucille 
Baker, principal, Hawthorne School; Mrs. Barbara 
Brackett, instructor, City College; Mrs. Susan Chang, 
curriculum assistant; Wellington Chew, supervisor, Guid- 
ance Service Centers; Mrs. Rosemary Colligan, elemen- 
tary school librarian; Rafael Cons, teacher, Mission High 
School; Carlos Cornejo, head counselor, Horace Mann 
Junior High School; Elmer Gallegos, junior high school 
project head; Dr. Joseph B. Hill, curriculum coordina- 
tor, chairman; Dr. Fern Kelly, teacher, Samuel Gompcrs 
High School; Phillip Lum, curriculum assistant; Mrs. 
Theresa Mahler, director, Children's Centers; Dr. Mary 
McCarthy, supervisor, elementary schools; Ann McHugh, 
head counselor, Francisco Junior High School; Ceasar 
Orsini, principal, Commodore Stockton Elementary 
School; and William Tresnon, principal, Fifth Adult 
School. Miss Beatrice Sutherland is serving as consultant. 
Mrs. June McKay, coordinator, English as a Second 
Language, University of California, and Dr. Thurston 
Womack, professor of English, San Francisco State Col- 
lege, are advisers. 

All District elementary, junior high and senior high 
schools are currently taking part in a survey on bilingual 
education being conducted by the Curriculum Office. 
The survey will reveal by school and grade level how 
many students have a native language other than English 
and how many are, by reason of language, unable to 
function effectively in a regular class. The survey will 
also show how many students are currently in special 
classes at least part of the day for instruction in English. 



TIME SHEET PICK-UP 

October time sheets for teachers will be picked 
up at the schools at 8:30 a.m. on October 30, 1967, 
for senior, junior, and elementary teachers. 

The adult schools will deliver their full-time and 
part-time teachers' time sheets on October 30 at 
9 a.m. 

Time sheets for clerks and janitors for all schools, 
including the adult schools, for October 16 through 
October 31 will be picked up at the schools at 8:30 
a.m. on October 25, 1967. 

Sheets arc to be completed and signed by the 
deadline dates above to enable delivery service to 
keep the schedule. 

The number of days in October for principals 
and assistant principals is 21; the number of days 
for teachers is 2 1 . 




Mr. Robert Anderson, principal, and a number of students front 
John Muir Elementary School ave observing a display of photo 
graphs taken at John Muir on the opening day of school. The 
pictures were donated to the school by the San Francisco 
Chronicfe which used several in a published article on back-to- 
school activities. 

New Appointments Announced 

The following administrative appointments or as- 
signments were approved by the Board of Education at 
its October 3, 1967, meeting upon recommendation ol 
the Superintendent: 

Junior High Division 

Assistant principal appointment: Louis F. Roth 
Luther Burbank (acting). 

Senior High Division 

Principal appointment: Lewis F. Morris, Balboa. 

Assistant principal: Mrs. Florence Cohen, Balboa. 
Central Office 

Appointments in the Central Office include: Ross R 
Miles, Supervisor A, Attendance Services; Marjorie 
Anne Kuhl, Supervisor A, School Social Work Services 
Elmer A. Gallegos, Jr., Project Head, Bilingual Educa- 
tion Program, Junior High School. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 6 



October 9, 1967 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilicnthal, President 
Edward Kcmmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Uriostc 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



i October 9, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



Eight Pilot Schools Prepare for Spring 



Family Life Education Program Progresses 



The District's Family Life Education Program for 
grades K through 12 has progressed to the point where 
classroom instruction is expected to begin during the 
spring, 1968 term in eight pilot schools. 

The schools included in the pilot program are Fair- 
Imount, Jedediah Smith, and San Miguel Elementary 
Schools; A. P. Giannini, James Lick, and Pelton Junior 
High Schools, and Galileo and Mission High Schools. 
Working closely with the program at the Central Office 
JQevel are: Dr. Lewis Allbee, Mr. James Dierke and Dr. 
| Donald Rhodes, Assistant Superintendents ; George Can- 
l|rinus, Coordinator, Health, Physical Education, Athletics 
;and Recreation; Martin Dean, Coordinator, Special Ed- 
ucational Services; Joseph Hill, Coordinator, Curricu- 
Jllum; Mrs. Viola Mails, Supervisor, Health and Physical 
> Education, Secondary Schools; Kathleen McGillicuddy, 
"Director, Homemaking Education; Mrs. Frances Miller, 
j Director, Family Life Education Services, Adult Division; 
and Dr. Frances Todd, Curriculum Assistant. 
Spring course attracted large group 

Last spring the District sponsored a Family Life Edu- 
cation in-service course which attracted over 600 teach- 
ers, parents, members of the clergy, medical people, and 
representatives from private and parochial schools. Cur- 
riculum development proceeded concurrently with the 
course. 

This term a Workshop in Family Life Education Cur- 
riculum Development is being conducted by the District 
for teachers who are participating in the development of 
[courses of study and teacher-learning experiences in 
family life education. Teachers from the eight pilot 
schools are participating in the program. 

In addition, three working committees have been cre- 
mated at the elementary, junior high, and senior high 
'levels as part of the larger Family Life Education Cur- 
! riculum Committee. 
The committees are organized 
Elementary: Jane Sarlin (McKinley), chairman; Gail 
'Giovannini (Central Office), co-chairman; Jean Mc- 
j^Caye (Fairmount), K-2 grade chairman; Irene Gibson 
i(Jedediah Smith), 3-4 grade chairman; Russell Kiernan 
(San Miguel), 5-6 grade chairman; Jacqueline Young 
'(Sunshine), Special Educational Services; Joseph Stal- 
lone (Jedediah Smith), administration. 

Junior high: Claire Gustafson (Giannini), chairman; 
Even Anderson (Pelton), co-chairman; Shirley Knipe 
(James Lick), and Con Dempsey (Giannini), health and 
physical education; Lucille Winnett (Pelton), home- 
toaking; John Freeman (Pelton), social studies; George 
Taylor (James Lick), science; Verne Hall (Giannini), 
.Special Educational Services; Marion Schmidt (Fran- 
pisco), administration. 

Senior high: Frank Ingersoll (Mission), chairman; 
ifiatherine Mowbray (Galileo), co-chairman; Peggy 
ikanlon (Mission) and Patricia Gillespie (Galileo), new 
bourses; Harry Krytzer (Mission), administration. 
: Impetus to the current program has come from the 



Second District, California Congress of Parents and 
Teachers, which has advocated and supported strong 
family life education in the city's public schools. 
Advisory Committee in operation 

An Advisory Committee on Family Life Education was 
established last spring, composed of teachers, administra- 
tors, medical personnel, religious leaders, and parents. 
This group has served as a valuable resource and has 
given direction and guidance in curriculum development. 

Dr. Frances Todd, Curriculum Assistant, states that 
the aim of Family Life Education is self-directed, mature, 
responsible behavior in personal, familial, and social rela- 
tionships. She adds that sex education and human re- 
production are only part of the total program. 

The District has purchased the latest materials and 
aids for courses of this nature, and they will be utilized 
in the pilot schools. 

Current emphasis is being placed in the areas of cur- 
riculum development, training of pilot teachers, training 
of teachers to be phased in during the coming terms, and 
educating the community as to the program's aims and 
progress. 



District Hosts Foreign Guests 

A number of distinguished visitors from foreign coun- 
tries have visited the District during the month of 
September. They have included the following: 

From Brazil — Mrs. Sylvia Alambert, Brazilian Na- 
tional Director of the Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation — visited Hawthorne and Edison Elementary 
Schools; From Japan — Three teachers' union officials 
— visited Yerba Buena Elementary, Marina Junior 
High, and Galileo High Schools; 

From Surinam — Anna Starke, principal — visited 
Polytechnic High School; From Japan — Ten school 
officials — visited Argonne Elementary and Presidio 
Junior High Schools; 

From Germany — Erica Philipps, Ministry of Educa- 
tion — visited Sunshine School and Hawthorne Elemen- 
tary School; From Germany — Dr. M. Bauer, Teachers' 
Training Institute — visited Lowell High School; From 
Iceland — Thordur Einarsson, Ministry of Education — 
visited John O'Connell Vocational High School and 
Central Office. 



AMERICAN EDUCATION WEEK, NOV. 5-11 

American Education Week 1967 will be observed 
November 5 through 11. The theme this year is 
"How Good Are Your Schools?" 

District schools that are planning programs, ex- 
hibits, assemblies, displays, or meetings in observ- 
ance of American Education Week are asked to 
notify the Office of Educational Information, 863- 
4680, Extension 388 or 389, of such plans in order 
that they can be announced in the Newsletter. 



NEWSLETTER 



October 9, 1961 



Announcements 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is hereby given of the following custodial 
vacancies: 

2724 — School Custodian, Male — Hancock Elemen- 
tary School; 

2704 — School Custodian, Female — Louise Lombard 
School. 



• TEACHERS ASSOCIATION TO MEET 

The Teachers Association of San Francisco (TASF) 
will meet Monday, October 16, at A. P. Giannini Junior 
High School, 3151 Ortega Street, at 4 p.m. 



• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE TO MEET 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet at 1 : 30 
p.m. on Wednesday, October 11, in Room 10, Central 
Office, 170 Fell Street. 



• CAEYC CONFERENCE IS PLANNED 

The California Association for the Education of 
Young Children will hold its annual 1967 conference 
on Wednesday, November 4, 1967, in the Gold Room 
of the Sheraton-Palace Hotel in San Francisco. 

Dr. Neil Sullivan, Superintendent of the Berkeley 
Unified School District, will speak on "The Key to a 
Successful Curriculum for All Children." 

For information and registration contact Mrs. Es- 
telle Farber, 1221 Clayton Street, San Francisco 
94114. 



• COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 
DINNER PLANNED FOR OCTOBER 10 

The San Francisco Council for Exceptional Children 
(Chapter 127) has scheduled a dinner for Tuesday, Oc- 
tober 10, at 6 p.m. in the Statler Wing, Smith Hall, San 
Francisco City College. 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools, will 
be the honored guest and speaker. He will discuss his 
views on the education of exceptional children. 



• SFCTA REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL TO MEET 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association 
Representative Council will meet at 4 p.m. on Mon- 
day, October 9, in Nicholas Hall of the Marines Me- 
morial Building, 609 Sutter Street. 



LOUISE M. LOMBARD OFFICE 

AT JEFFERSON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

While the Louise M. Lombard School is closed 
for renovations, Mary E. Smyth, principal, has her 
office located in the Jefferson Elementary School, 
1725 Irving Street, telephone 664-2368. 

The faculty and students of Louise M. Lombard 
are conducting classes in the auditoriums of Jeffer- 
son, Lafayette, and Cabrillo Elementary Schools 
until the school re-opens. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, October 17, 1967, 4:00 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 1 70 Fell Street. 



• STANFORD EDUCATION CLUB DINNER 

An evening of good fellowship and entertainment ha 
been planned by the San Francisco chapter of the Stan 
ford Education Club. The Fall Dinner will be held at th< 
Royal Room of Sabella's Restaurant on Wednesday 
November 1, at 6:30 p.m. 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools, wil 
be the guest speaker. The price of the dinner is $5.00, al 
inclusive. Checks should be made to the Stanford Educa 
tion Club and forwarded to Michael Kittredge, 59( 
Gellert Drive, San Francisco 94132. 



© READING ASSOCIATION PLANS CONFERENCi 

The California Reading Association announces it 
second annual conference to be held November 2, 3, anc 
4, 1967, in San Diego. 

For detailed information contact Mr. Stan Wilson, Sai 
Diego City Schools, 4100 Normal Street, San Diegi 
92103. The conference theme is Reading in California 
Issues and Emerging Practices. 



• SECONDARY SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS 
TO MEET OCTOBER 16 

The San Francisco Association of Secondary Schoc 
Administrators (CASS A District No. 6) will hold 
general membership meeting on Monday, October 16 
1967, at Lowell High School at 4 p.m. 



• 'MAGIC FLUTE' ON RADIO OCTOBER 17 

Radio Station KKHI (1550 AM and 95.7 FM) wi 
highlight the music from Mozart's Magic Flute at 1 p.rr 
on Tuesday, October 17. 

Magic Flute is the San Francisco Opera Guild studer 
matinee feature this season. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO, d| 
PERMIT No. 396i| 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL E? 
135 VAN NESS AVE. 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

CIVIC CENTER 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 94102 



RETURN REQUEST)) 

ii 

w 



,n AN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 




OCT \ 6 \96f 



EWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



OCTOBER 16, 1967 



NUMBER 7 



San Francisco Symphony to Perform 



Chamber Orchestra Concerts Scheduled 



. District school children will benefit this year from a 
teries of 30 concerts to be presented by a 40-member 
San Francisco Symphony Chamber Orchestra as part of 
p. program to bring fine symphonic music to the schools. 
I The first concert will take place for City College of 
jian Francisco in the auditorium at Riordan High School 
it 1:15 p.m., Monday, October 23. This is the third con- 
lecutive year the San Francisco Symphony Association 
jtnd the Board of Education have jointly participated in 
he program. 

During a three-week period, 30 concerts plus rehears- 
,1s will be presented at 15 different schools, servicing, in 
.11, 25 District schools, including a number of "target 
schools. 

Vorkshops and Lectures Featured 

" : ! Workshops and lectures will be an integral part of the 
"lirogram, along with participation by principal members 
If the District's All-City Honor Orchestra as ensemble 
Jnembers. Principal members of the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra will be soloists. 
.J Tailored to elementary, junior high, senior high, and 
p nj ollege audiences, the programs will directly involve over 
0,000 students. Mr. Verne Sellin, conductor-commenta- 
(i,,,. or, will direct the orchestra. 

Two concerts will be given in each school each day to 

How the entire student body and those of neighboring 

chools to attend. After the concerts, musicians will hold 

""/orkshop sessions for instrumental students. Mr. Sellin 

—•/ill also lead informative discussions on the program just 

E resented. 

ncrease Is Noted 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools, has 
oted that the pilot programs of in-school concerts, 
'hich began two years ago with six concerts and last 

jjjear increased to ten, has expanded to 30 this fall. Dr. 
slsnkins has commented, "This program has proved so 

gj|iccessful that both the scope and number of in-school 
oncerts has been greatly increased. In doing so, we are 
■cognizing two basics: one, that the San Francisco 
ymphony Orchestra is one of the great cultural re- 
)urces of this city, and, two, that the intimate contact 
ith this great orchestra should be an integral part of a 
lild's total education. We have every reason to feel 
lat this program will be a vitally important phase of 
leir total cultural experience." 
Dr. Albert A. Renna, District Director of Music and 



3. CI 



long a leading exponent of the in-school concert concept, 
emphasizes that the program is a far-reaching addition 
to the fine arts program. He states, "It is important for 
all children to understand and appreciate fine arts early, 
not just a talented few. This plan, involving a great 
resident orchestra, should eventually directly involve 
every child in the San Francisco public school system, 
which is our goal." 

The schedule of concerts is as follows: 

Monday, October 23, at 1:15 p.m. and 2:15 p.m. City College 
Concert at Riordan High School auditorium, 175 Phelan Avenue 
(across from City College.) Rehearsal in Riordan auditorium, 
9:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. 

Tuesday, October 24, at 1:30 p.m. and 2:25 p.m. Lowell High 
School auditorium, 1101 Eucalyptus Drive. 

Wednesday, October 25, at 1:25 p.m. and 2:20 p.m. Mission 
High School auditorium, 3750 - 18th Street. 

Thursday, October 26, at 9:55 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. George 
Washington High School auditorium, 600 - 32nd Avenue. 

Friday, October 27, at 10:38 a.m. and 11:25 a.m. Galileo 
High School auditorium, 1150 Francisco Street. 

Monday, October 30, at 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. Elementary Pro- 
gram at James Denman Junior High School auditorium, 241 
Oneida Avenue. 1 p.m. concert: Ortega (grades 6), Miraloma 
(grades 5 and 6), Excelsior-Monroe (grades 4, 5, and 6), Glen 
Park (grades 5 and 6). 2 p.m. concert: San Miguel (grades 4, 
5, and 6), Sheridan (grade 6), Commodore Sloat (grades 5 and 
6) . Rehearsal at James Denman 9 a.m. to 12 noon. 

Tuesday, October 31, at 9:45 a.m. and 10:35 a.m. Balboa 
High School auditorium, 1000 Cayuga Avenue. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Gifted Report Goes to Board 

A report evaluating programs for gifted and aca- 
demically talented students in the San Francisco 
Unified School District for the period July 1966 to 
July 1967 was presented to the Board of Education 
at its October 3, 1967 meeting. 

The report was written by Dr. Frederick J. Mc- 
Donald, Professor of Psychology and Education, 
Stanford University, and Dr. G. Wesley Sowards, 
Associate Professor of Education, Stanford Uni- 
versity. 

Copies of the report were distributed at the Board 
meeting and are available to the public in the Office 
of Educational Information, Room 213, 135 Van 
Ness Avenue. Copies of the 74 page report have 
been forwarded to each District school. 

Further discussion on programs for the gifted and 
academically talented will be scheduled by the 
Superintendent at future Board meetings. 



NEWSLETTER 



October 16, 191 



New Officers Installed at Pelton 




Mr. Alan H. Nichols, Board of Education Commissioner, was a 
guest at the recent installation ceremonies of new student body 
officers at Pelton Junior High School. Mr. Nichols delivered a 
motivational message. He is viewed here with the new Pelton 
officers. 



Applications for Supervisor Due 
In Personnel Office by Nov. 1 

The position of Supervisor, Programs for the Physically 
Handicapped — Special Educational Services Division of 
the S. F. Public Schools — is currently vacant. 

Applicants must possess the M.A. degree, Standard 
Administration Credential, Standard Supervision Cre- 
dential, or a General Administration Credential, teaching 
and/or administrative experience with physically-handi- 
capped children. 

Primary responsibility will be to administer programs 
for the orthopedically handicapped, homebound, and 
hospitalized. The position will be classified as Supervisor 
A in accordance with the Salary Schedule. The salary 
range is $13,980 to $17,725 and a work year of approxi- 
mately 197 days. 

Applications for this position must be in writing on 
appropriate forms available in the Office of Personnel 
and returned to Mr. Milton F. Reiterman, Personnel 
Coordinator, Personnel Division, not later than Novem- 
ber 1, 1967. 

Interviews will be scheduled during the following 
weeks. 



• A. DONALD CROSS TAKES OFFICE 

A. Donald Cross, speech and hearing specialist for the 
San Francisco Unified School District, began his term of 
office on September 1 as state president of the California 
Speech and Hearing Association, a professional organi- 
zation for personnel specializing in communicative dis- 
orders and employed in schools, hospitals, universities, 
centers, and in private practice. It is affiliated with the 
American Speech and Hearing Assn. Mr. Cross can be 
contacted by telephone at 922-2072. 



Twenty-two District Students 
Named 1967 Merit Semifinalists 

Twenty-two students in the San Francisco Unifie 
School District have been named semifinalists in tl 
annual National Merit Scholarship Awards competitic 
for 1967. 

The semifinalist group is composed of the highe 
scoring students in each state and in the United Stat 
territories. Each has now moved a step closer toward tl 
goal of a four-year Merit Scholarship. 
Winners from Finalists 

At least 97 per cent of past semifinalists have becon 
finalists. Winners of the awards are selected from amor 
the finalist group. They will be announced in late sprir 
of 1968. The exact number will depend upon the extei 
of sponsor support which comes from some 340 corpor. 
tions, foundations, colleges, unions, trusts, profession 
associations, other organizations, and individuals. 

High school grades, creative accomplishments, leade 
ship qualities, extracurricular activities, and school cil 
zenship of the students are evaluated along with te 
scores in selecting Merit Scholars. 
Four-year Awards 

Each Merit Scholarship is a four-year award coverii 
the under-graduate college years. The winner's stiper 
is tailored to his need, up to a maximum of $6,000 f 
the four years in most cases. For the student alreac 
financially able to attend the college of his choice, tl 
award is $400 for the four years. Winners choose the 
own colleges and courses of study. 

District semifinalists include the following: 

Balboa: Karl G. Ruling. 

Galileo: Gloria Gee. 

George Washington: Mark Dukeminier, Kirk Johnso j, 
Victoria Lindsay, Frances Tomsovic, Hans Van Boldri 

Lowell: Barbara Becker, Wallace Chan, Joni Davi 
son, Edward Dong, Marguerite Donnelly, Cheryl Fon 
Kathryn Keller, Barry Kernfeld, Nathan Krumm, Ja< 
Margid, Carol Snow, Georgette Takeshita, Kenne 
Tani, Robert Winthrop, Susan Wright. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 39, No. 7 October 16, 1967 

135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



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NEWSLETTER 



Dn the Elementary Level 



Board Approves Increase in Librarians 



™ t Upon recommendation of the Superintendent and 

''approval of the Board of Education five additional ele- 

10 nentary school librarians have been included in the 

1967-68 school budget. 

The proposal further calls for the addition of five 
' ibrarians in each subsequent year until the 1966-67 
ratio of one librarian for every 14 schools has been re- 
duced to a workable operating pattern based upon pre- 
vious experience. The ratio for 1967-68 has been re- 
duced to one librarian for every seven or eight schools 
%s a result of the Board action. 

The total elementary librarian picture is complicated 
by the fact that there are two categories of elementary 

■ librarians by virtue of funding source. These include 
sion. 

1.) those hired and paid with Elementary and Secondary 

Education Act, Title I, funds to serve specifically the 28 

', . ESEA "target schools" and 2.) those hired and paid 

with SFUSD funds to serve 62 non-ESEA elementary 

ichools. 



ik, 



ilM 



Sixteen in '66-'67 

During the 1966-67 school year, there were 16 ESEA 

J P™ jlementary librarians — one assigned as Resource Li- 

"brarian, one assigned by Board action to John Muir 

i™ School, and the remaining 14 assigned to serve the other 

"27 target schools. There were four non-ESEA librarians 

serving 61 schools. Each was assigned to a "headquarters 

school" and responsible for approximately 14 other 

schools. 

During the summer the District was advised that 
available funds for hiring ESEA librarians were to be 
reduced by approximately 50 per cent. As a result it 
became necessary to absorb the ESEA staff within exist- 
™ing programs. 

In order to retain the greatest number of librarians 
within funds available, the five highest salaried ESEA 
librarians were transferred into the regular District 
program. This permitted the continued service of nine 
ESEA elementary librarians. 

Field Staff of 18 

Due to the reduction in ESEA funds, and irrespective 
of adding five new librarians to the District program, 
the overall field staff of elementary librarians is currently 
18. Last year the figure was 20. 

In addition to increasing the number of District- 
funded elementary librarians, the Board also approved 
the assignment of an additional half-time clerk to each 
rf the secondary libraries so that with the present half- 
time clerk designated for each school library, the second- 
iry schools have the equivalent of one full-time clerk 
in each junior and senior high school library. 

Three resource librarians are currently assigned to 
Dffer a variety of consultant services to the over-all ele- 
mentary library program. Mrs. Rose Mary Colligan and 
Miss Edith Teeple are resource librarians for the 62 
District-funded schools, and Mrs. Helen Bowden serves 



the 28 ESEA schools in this capacity as well as being 
the librarian for Golden Gate School. 

Reorganization in Progress 

A District program to organize and reorganize all 
elementary school libraries according to accepted library 
standards has progressed to the point where all 28 ESEA 
libraries have been reorganized, and 30 District-funded 
libraries will have been reorganized by the end of the 
fall 1967 term. 

This reorganization takes place in a number of schools, 
designated "headquarters schools," depending upon per- 
sonnel available each year. This year there are eight 
such libraries. Each "District" iibrarian is assigned to a 
"headquarters school" and provides services for seven or 
eight other schools. 

In the "headquarters school" the librarian concen- 
trates on the reorganization of that library for one term, 
often with the help of the local Parent Teachers Associa- 
tion and volunteers from the San Francisco Education 
Auxiliary. Each year the "headquarters schools" are 
changed so that eventually all District school libraries 
will undergo the reorganization process. 

A Functioning Program 

The ESEA libraries have all completed this phase, and 
the librarians can devote more time to the development 
of a functioning program in these schools. Such a pro- 
gram includes a.) preparing lists for special topics for 
class use; b.) assisting to assemble materials on special 
topics for classroom use; c.) suggesting ways of planning 
and using the library period; d.) demonstrating ways of 
stimulating children to read; e.) contributing to the 
literary program of the school by story telling, film 
showing, book reviews, displays, demonstrations planned 
with teachers, and book talks planned with teachers; 
f. ) teaching library skills. Currently ESEA librarians 
are assigned either three or four schools in which they 
work. 

On the secondary level schools with over 1,500 enroll- 
ment are assigned two full-time librarians. Schools under 
this figure have one full-time librarian. A full-time clerk, 
as mentioned previously, is now available in each second- 
ary school. 

The coordination of District school libraries is carried 
out under Dr. William B. Sanborn, Director, Division of 
Instructional Materials, and Miss Geraldine Ferring, 
Supervisor, Libraries and Textbooks. 



O FRANCISCO TEACHER'S ARTICLE PUBLISHED 

The summer edition of the Gifted Child Quarterly 
contains an article written by Roland Demarais, curricu- 
lum assistant at Francisco Junior High School, entitled 
"Planning Occupational Experiences for the Culturally 
Disadvantaged Gifted." 

Featured in the article is a photograph of Dr. William 
B. Sanborn, Director of Instructional Materials, discuss- 
ing Indian artifacts with the students. 



NEWSLETTER 



October 16, 1967 




IN-SERVICE COURSE 

(The following District in-service course is sched- 
uled to begin October 25, 1967, and is available to 
teachers at all grade levels.) 

English as a Second Language. 

One unit, non-college credit. 8 meeting on Wed- 
nesdays. Course begins Wednesday, October 25, 4 
to 6 p.m. at James Lick Junior High School. Pre- 
registration is desirable, but not required. To pre- 
register, call the Curriculum Office at 863-4680, 
Extension 367. 

Some of the sessions will be conducted by Dr. Kenneth 
Croft of San Francisco State College, with films on the 
teaching of a second language supplementing the presen- 
tations; in other sessions elementary and secondary teachers 
will meet separately for consideration of materials and in- 
structional procedures at their respective levels. 



• SUMMER SCHOLARSHIP WINNER 

Audrey Eichelberger, teacher of the educationally 
handicapped at Woodrow Wilson High School, was the 
recipient of the California Association for Neurologic ally 
Handicapped Children (CANHC) scholarship for the 
San Francisco area. Miss Eichelberger attended a special 
summer program in the field of educational handicap at 
San Francisco State College. 



• SECONDARY SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS 
TO MEET OCTOBER 16 

The San Francisco Association of Secondary School 
Administrators (CASS A District No. 6) will hold a 
general membership meeting on Monday, October 16, 
1967, at Lowell High School at 4 p.m. State Senator 
George R. Moscone will be the guest speaker. 



. . . Symphony Chamber Concerts Planned 

(Continued from Page 1 ) 

Wednesday, November 1, at 9:30 a.m. Spring Valley and 
10:30 a.m. Sherman in the Sherman Elementary School audi- 
torium, 1651 Union Street. 

Thursday, November 2, at 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Marshall Annex 
School auditorium, 1950 Mission Street. 

Friday, November 3, at 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Elementary 
Program at A. P. Giannini Junior High School, 3151 Ortega 
Street 9:30 a.m. concert: Robert Louis Stevenson (grades 4, 5, 
and 6), Mark Twain (grades 5 and 6), Francis Scott Key 
(grades 5 and 6); 10:30 a.m. concert: Jefferson (grades 5 and 
6), Lawton (grades 4, 5, and 6), Ulloa (grades 5 and 6). 

Monday, November 6, at 1:15 p.m. and 2:10 p.m. A. P. 
Giannini Junior High School auditorium, 3151 Ortega Street. 
Rehearsal 9:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. 

Tuesday, November 7, at 9:30 a.m. and 10:35 a.m. James 
Denman Junior High School auditorium, 241 Oneida Avenue. 

Wednesday, November 8, at 1:15 p.m. and 2:10 p.m. Portola 
Junior High School auditorium, 350 Girard Street. 

Thursday, November 9, at 9:50 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Benjamin 
Franklin Junior High School auditorium, 1430 Scott Street. 

Friday, November 10, at 1:15 p.m. and 2:10 p.m. Francisco 
Junior High School gymnasium, 2190 Powell Street. (Perform- 
ance in Annex Building on Francisco near Stockton Street.) 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, October 17, 1967, 4:00 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 1 70 Fell Street. 



• FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHERS, 
CONFERENCE SLATED FOR NOVEMBER 

Foreign language teachers are reminded that the Cali- 
fornia Conference of Foreign Language Teachers will be 
held November 4 and 5, starting at 8:30 a.m. at the 
International Inn of the Los Angeles International Air- 
port. The importance of the conference is emphasized by 
the large number of outstanding foreign language lead- 
ers to be present from all parts of the United States. 

The exhibits of publishers and manufacturers will be 
extensive. Teachers who wish to attend the sessions of one 
day only will find meetings arranged to meet their needs. 
Those who wish to remain the night must contact the 
International Inn directly as soon as possible. The con- 
ference is the most extensive to be held in the Western 
states for two years. Guest speakers include Dr. Paul 
Hadley (noon), Dr. Walter Starkie (afternoon), and 
Dr. Richard Barrutia (evening) . 

• PRINCIPAL'S ARTICLE PUBLISHED 

An article by Dr. Lane E. De Lara, principal of Fran 
cisco Junior High School, entitled, "What Is a Frill?" has 
been published in the June, 1967 issue of the California 
Parent-Teacher magazine. 

The article highlights the outstanding work of Mrs, 
Barbara Dobrinen, vocal music teacher. 



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• TEACHERS INVITED TO LECTURE 

Interested teachers are invited to attend a lecture by 
Robert Langner of Marine Exchange, Incorporated, en- 
titled Watch On the Golden Gate on Thursday, October 
19, at 4 p.m. in the library of Diamond Heights Elemen- 
tary School at 350 Amber Drive. 

Mr. Langner's discussion of shipping on San Francisco 
Bay will include descriptions of different types of freight- 
ers and how cargo is handled at various port facilities 
with emphasis on the new Army Street shipping terminal. 
Valuable background material for social science classes 
at all levels of the elementary school will be included. 



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kEWSLETTFR 



/OLUME 39 



OCTOBER 23, 1967 



NUMBER 8 



Personnel Recruitment Team Plans Trip 



The District Personnel Division's new program of 
eacher recruitment will be further implemented next 
veek when a "three-man" recruitment team departs for 
he East to interview interested teacher applicants and to 
amiliarize placement centers with San Francisco's needs 
ind offerings. 

This is the first time the District has actively engaged 
n teacher recruitment as part of an organized effort to 
mcourage and seek the highest quality teacher appli- 
ants throughout the nation. 

, The District recruitment team will leave San Francisco 
>n Sunday, October 29, for a two-week trip. Team mem- 
bers include Mrs. Mary Byrd, personnel supervisor, and 
two additional staff members from the District. 
light Major Cities Included 

The cities and recruitment locations they will contact 
nclude the following: Denver, Colorado — Placement 
Office, University of Denver; Chicago, Illinois — Place- 

nent Office, Roosevelt University; Cincinnati, Ohio 

'lacement Office, Miami University; New York City 

Teachers College Placement Office, Columbia Univer- 

ity; Washington, D.C. Student Placement Office, 

loward University; Nashville, Tennessee — Student 
'lacement Office, Fisk University; Houston, Texas — 
'lacement Office, Texas Southern University: Albuquer- 
[ue, New Mexico — Skills Bank at Albuquerque, U. S. 
department of Labor and Office of Economic OpDor- 
unity. 

Recruitment team members will undergo two days of 
mentation at the Central Office prior to departure. The 
; hree divisions — elementary, junior high, and senior 
iigh — are represented by the team. 



Compensatory Report Coming 

A special meeting of the Board of Education will 
be held Wednesday, November 1, 1967, at 4 p.m. 
at which time a summary report evaluating the 
compensatory education program of the San Fran- 
cisco Unified School District for the period July 
1966 to July 1967 will be presented to the Board. 

The report was written by Dr. Philip H. Soren- 
sen, senior psychologist, and Dr. Thomas C. 
Thomas, operations analyst, of the Stanford Re- 
search Institute. 

Copies of the summary will be available at the 
Board meeting and have been forwarded to each 
school principal. 



Much time and effort have gone into the teacher 
recruiting program. A bulletin of information on the 
National Teachers Examination, a District requirement, 
was sent to over 150 colleges and universities in August. 
Some 1,050 brochures, postcard packets, and covering 
letters were sent to placement offices over the country. 
Bulletins and brochures were also forwarded to Negro 
fraternity and sorority national headquarters for incor- 
poration in journals and newsletters and to Spanish- 
surname people referred by Horizons Unlimited. 
Arrangements Are Completed 

In addition, the placement offices to be visited have 
been contacted and interview arrangements have been 
made. Letters of appointment schedules have gone out to 
interested teachers in the areas on the visit itinerary. 

The teacher recruitment program is one phase of the 
major reorganization of the Personnel Division started 
last spring, further supported by Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, 
Superintendent of Schools, and approved by the Board 
of Education. Mr. Milton Reiterman, Personnel Co- 
ordinator, has effected the various changes to date. (The 
Newsletter of September 11, 1967, contained an article 
on Personnel Division reorganization.) 

The District recruitment program is a two-pronged 
operation: recruitment within the SFUSD and recruit- 
ment outside of San Francisco. In addition to seeking 
the highest quality applicants, it is attempting to attract 
qualified teachers in shortage-areas in such suppiy that 
the District has a selection factor in filling vacancies in 
these areas. A further objective is to provide a teaching 
and administrative staff for a cosmopolitan city which 
reflects an integration of ethnic, geographic, and cultural 
factors. 
Highly Selected Areas 

The recruitment teams will go to those areas which 
have recognized and outstanding schools and universities 
within them, and which are geographically located to the 
convenience of interested applicants within areas where 
teams will not be able to recruit. Qualified applicants 
will now be able to arrange interviews without facing 
the problem of traveling long distances to San Francisco. 

To gain additional insight into recruitment planning, 
Mrs. Mary Byrd and Mrs. Elfrida Noland, personnel 
supervisors, recently attended a recruiters' workshop in 
Olympia, Washington, sponsored by the University of 
Washington Placement Services and the Northwest 
School Personnel Association. The workshop theme was 
"Planning, Implementing and Evaluating Teacher Re- 
cruitment Programs." 



NEWSLETTER 



October 23, 196' 



Task Force to Review Report 

A Gifted Program Task Force has been formed 
by Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins to review and 
analyze the recent report evaluating programs for 
gifted and academically talented students presented 
to the Board of Education at its October 3 meeting. 

The report written by Dr. Frederick J. McDon- 
ald and Dr. G. Wesley Sowards of Stanford Univer- 
sity will be studied in depth by Task Force mem- 
bers, who will make recommendations to the Super- 
intendent within the next three or four weeks. 

Superintendent Jenkins comments that this is 
the initial application in the San Francisco public 

1 1 r A, T^~~l. 17--^.=. r.-r-.r.r'r.nr'h wVurVl !l35 

scnoois ui Lue a&siv i^.^ ,» rr »~— .., ..—_-- -- - 
received wide acceptance in school districts 
throughout the state and which has been recom- 
mended by governmental analysts at the state and 
local levels. An advisory committee is being formed 
to work with the Task Force. 

Task Force members include the following: Mrs. 
Alyse Buchdruker and Mrs. Ruth Tisdale at the 
elementary level; George Moscone and Roland 
Demarais at the junior high school level; and Dr. 
Robert Bahnsen, chairman, at the senior high 
school level. The Gifted Program Task Force wel- 
comes suggestions and comments from all staff 
members. 



In-service Course to Commence 

A new District in-service course, Teaching English as a 
Second Language, was announced in last week's News- 
letter. The course is scheduled to begin Wednesday, 
October 25, from 4 to 6 p.m. at James Lick Junior High 
School, and is open to teachers at all grade levels. 

The following is the schedule for the coming eight 
meetings: 

October 25 — Mr. Eddie Hanson, Jr., Consultant, 
English as a Second Language, State Department of 
Education. 

November 1 through December 6 — Dr. Kenneth 
Croft, Professor, Anthropology and Education,- San 
Francisco State College, will conduct discussions based 
on the MLA film series English as a Second Language. 

This period will be covered as follows : November 1 — 
The Nature of Language; November 8 — The Sounds of 
Language; November 15 — The Organization of Lan- 
guage; November 29 — Words and Their Meanings; 
December 6 — Modern Techniques in Language. 

December 13 — Instructional Materials and Proced- 
ures featuring Mrs. Susan Chung, Carlos Cornejo, Elmer 
Gallegos, and Philip Lum. 

January 3 — Dr. Theodore Parsons, Professor, Anth- 
ropology of Education, University of California, discuss- 
ing Language in Culture. 

One unit, non-college credit will be offered. Prercgis- 
tration is desirable, but not required. Call the Curriculum 
Office to preregister and for information at 863-4680, 
Extension 367. 






Teachers Invited to Cancer Film 

A new film, showing for the first time how livin| 
human lung cancer cells behave, will be previewed in thi 
A. P. Giannini Junior High School auditorium at 4 p.m 
on Thursday, October 26, as part of the District in 
service course in health education. All teachers and schoa 
personnel are invited to view this special showing. 

Featuring microscopic time-lapse photos, the film alsi 
documents for the first time how lymphocytes actual! 
enter other cells of the body for the possible purpose o 
checking on their health. 
Time-lapse Photography Used 

With the help of time-lapse photography, continuin 
actions which take place over a period of several hour 
are in some sequences condensed into a minute or less o: 
the motion picture screen. 

Human lung cancer cells in living tissue are shown fo 
the first time on film carrying out the growth process c 
multiplication, or mitotic division. Their process of divi 
sion, like many of their other functions, is shown to b 
defective. 
Cancer Cell Behavior Viewed 

One spectacular scene shows abnormal cancer ce 
behavior in which the cytoplasm of the cell whirls aroun 
it. Another shows an island of lung cancer cells violent! 
exploding as the cells die. 

The film will be shown as part of four meetings o 
smoking and health being sponsored by the Interagenc 
Committee on Smoking and Health. Interested teachei 
are invited to attend any of the four sessions beginnin 
October 26. 
Future Topics Listed 

Three future meetings will be held on narcotics anl 
dangerous drugs starting November 30, and the subjei 
of alcohol education will be covered in three meetin; 
starting January 4, 1968, under the sponsorship of th 
San Francisco Council on Alcoholism. 

One unit of increment credit may be obtained t 
attending any eight sessions of the in-service series. Aud 
tors are welcome at any meeting. For more informatioi 
call Mrs. Viola Mails, 863-4680, Extension 356. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 8 



October 23, 1967 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



.ijj, 



October 23, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



District: Tele-class Geared for Homebound 



District students who are confined to their homes for 
long periods of time because' of illness or injury can now 
continue their schooling through a communications sys- 
tem called Tele-class, a joint project of the SFUSD and 
Pacific Telephone. 

Miss Lulu M. Carter, teacher at Sunshine Orthopedic 
J (School, instructs the Tele-class from her desk. Miss Car- 




Miss Lulu M. Carter, teacher at Sunshine Orthopedic School, can 
be seen operating the District's Tele-class equipment. Students 
confined to their homes for extended periods of time are being 
taught with the use of the lastest electronic equipment. 

iter assembles her class by dialing each student from a 
[console containing a card dialer. She puts a card in the 
(slot in the console, presses a bar, and the number is auto- 
matically dialed. When the telephone rings, students 
know class is ready. 



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Equipment Is Checked 



When all of the children have been alerted, Miss Car- 
ter makes sure all equipment is working and materials 
are at hand. Each student has a headset and speaker- 
phone. The speakerphone acts both as a microphone and 
loudspeaker. The student can hear his teacher and the 
other youngsters in the class, and they can hear him. 

Usually four 30-minute classes are held daily. The 



DEADLINE FOR TRANSFER REQUESTS 

All permanent teachers are reminded that No- 
vember 1 is the deadline for turning in requests for 
transfers that will become effective at the begin- 
ning of the spring semester. If such requests have 
been on file two years or longer, new applications 
should be submitted to the Personnel Office. 

Each school should have a copy of the Adminis- 
trative Regulations Manual in the principal's office. 
This manual, which is printed on yellow paper, 
describes the transfer procedures in detail. (See 
R-4115.) Applicants are advised that "triplicate 
requests shall be submitted to the Personnel Office 
on forms provided by that office." 



time in between is taken up by reading and homework 

assignments. Tele-class provides the pupils with daily 

class for which they receive full credit. Every effort is 

made to keep the students up with their classmates in the 

schoolroom. 

Individuals Can Be Contacted 

A push-button operation enables the teacher to isolate 
a student and talk to him privately. During a test, the 
teacher can use a "split-key" to prevent talking between 
students, but allow two-way transmission between herself 
and the class. 

Tele-class service also provides optional auxiliary con- 
ference bridges for groups of ten lines. Any number of 
lines up to ten may be switched to a secondary conference 
bridge. This means the Tele-class teacher can dial a re- 
mote teacher and transfer selected students to that teach- 
er, or, if she wishes, play taped instructions for certain 
students. 
Three Sessions in Operation 

This permits three separate classroom sessions. For 
instance, the teacher might split off one group to study 
math with another teacher, split off one group to study 
Spanish, and conduct a history lesson with her remaining 
group. 

The District is ready to incorporate additional Tele- 
class facilities into the school program whenever the 
number of students increases to a point where such facili- 
ties are needed. 



ROTC Cadets to Parade Nov. 12 

San Francisco Unified School District ROTC cadets 
have been invited and will participate in the Annual 
Veterans Day Parade on Sunday, November 12, 1967. 

The high school cadets will march en masse with eight 
battalions, eight drum and bugle corps, and eight color 
guards. 

Parade units will assemble and move out on parade at 
1 p.m. along the following line of march: Montgomery 
to Post, Post to Grant Avenue, Grant to O'Farrell, O'Far- 
rell to Polk, turn on Polk passing in review at the review- 
ing stand in front of the City Hall. 

This patriotic occasion is dedicated to the nation's 
fighting forces and veterans, and an open invitation is 
extended to all to attend this tribute to past and present 
servicemen. 



• PRINCIPAL'S ARTICLE PUBLISHED 

Dr. Lane E. De Lara, principal of Francisco Junior 
High School, has an article published in the September, 
1967 issue of California Parent-Teacher magazine. The 
article is entitled "Stimulating Attendance," and it de- 
scribes the work of Mr. James F. Jaeckle in building 
attendance for the Francisco Parent-Teachers group. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Martha Goldberg 
Kathleen M. Raisner 



NEWSLETTER 



October 23, 1961, 




IN-SERVICE COURSE 

(The following District in-service course is sched- 
uled to begin November 1, and is available to 
teachers at all grade levels.) 

Freedom and Responsibility — The Bill of Rights 
One unit, non-college credit. 5 meetings on 
Wednesdays plus one Saturday workshop at City 
College. Course begins Wednesday, November 1, 
4 to 6 p.m. in Room M 23 of George Washington 
High School. Course dates are November 1, 8, 15, 
29, and December 6 plus a workshop at City Col- 
lege on Saturday, January 13, 1968, from 9:30 a.m. 
to 2:30 p.m. For information call Dr. Robert Bahn- 
sen, 863-4680, Extension 391. 

This District in-service course is being sponsored by the 
California State Department of Education and the San 
Francisco Council of Social Studies Teachers, using the 
case study approach and designed to assist teachers in 
their approach to the teaching of the Bill of Rights. 

Presentations will be made by members of the San 
Francisco Bar Association. Topics will cover the five 
major parts of the recent State Department of Education 
publication, ' The Bill of Rights — A Source Book for 
Teachers. These include 1.) The 14th Amendment and 
Federal Power; 2.) Equal Protection under the Law; 
3.) Criminal Due Process; 4.) Freedom of Expression; 
and 5.) Freedom of Religion. 

Mr. Dorman Commons, president of the State Board 
of Education, will be the principal speaker at the City 
College workshop. Dr. Robert E. Brown, coordinator of 
the Source Book project for the Department of Educa- 
tion, will be one of the speakers who will cover methods 
and media designed for the teaching of the Bill of Rights. 



• ITALIAN CONTEST WINNERS 

Four District students have won recognition in the 
1967 American Association of Teachers of Italian Con- 
test. 

Levei II — Yolanda Vannucci. Abraham Lincoln 
High, honorable mention. Teacher — Miss Lina Maini. 

Level III — Anne F. Graham, Galileo High, 1st place. 
Teacher — Miss Edith Catelli; Ugo Pignati, Galileo 
High, 7th place. Teacher — Miss Edith Catelli; Sal 
Martinelli, Galileo High, honorable mention. Teacher — 
Miss Edith Catelli. 



• FREEDOMS FOUNDATION SCHOOL AWARDS 

The Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge reminds 
teachers and administrators that now is the time to start 
saving samples of student work and taking photographs 
of displays, exhibits, and bulletin boards for nominations 
of patriotic and citizenship-building activities for the 
1967-68 school year. Toward the end of the school year 
the materials should be coordinated and sent to the Free- 
doms Foundation before the June 30, 1968 closing date 
to be eligible for the awards program. 

Interested individuals may secure additional informa- 
tion on this program by writing to Freedoms Foundation, 
Valley Forge, Pennsylvania 19481. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Wednesday, November 1, 1967, 4:00 p.m. Special 
meeting, 170 Fell Street; Tuesday, November 7, 
1967, 7:30 p.m. Regular meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• PTA DINNER PLANNED OCTOBER 24 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools, wil 
be the featured speaker at the 20th annual Presidents 
and Principals' dinner sponsored by Second District 
California Congress of Parents and Teachers, to be helc 
at 6 p.m., Tuesday, October 24, in Smith Hall, San Fran 
cisco City College. 

School principals will be guests of the PTA unit presi 
dents, with the dinner prepared and served by student; 
of City College. PTA delegates are invited to a 7:30 p.m 
business meeting following the dinner. 

• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE TO MEET 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet at 1:3( 
p.m. on Wednesday, October 25, in Room 10, Centra 
Office, 170 Fell Street. 



• LOWELL GIRL REIGNS AS QUEEN 

Ayn Cavallini, 16 year old junior of Lowell Higl 
School, was selected to reign as "Queen Isabella" ove 
the Columbus Day Celebration on October 12. 

Ayn was selected on the basis of a competitive contes 
involving the writing and presentation of an oral essa 
before a panel of judges. 

• COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE ASSOCIATIOh 
TO MEET OCTOBER 26 AT A. P. GIANNIN 

The first general meeting of the San Francisco Coun 
seling and Guidance Association will be held Thursda) 
October 26, at A. P. Giannini Junior High School a 
4 p.m. 

The speaker for the first meeting will be Mrs. Alice C 
Henry, Director of Pupil Services, who will speak o 
How Organization Affects Structure. All old membeii 
and prospective new members are encouraged to attend.. 



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Paid 

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>AN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



f'RANCISCO 



NEWSLETTER 



/OLUME 39 «*®*>© 



OCTOBER 30, 1967 



NUMBER 9 



ROTC Scholarships Available 



.EEI 



Approximately 800 four-year scholarships will be 
warded to high school seniors graduating during the 
11 urrent school year as part of the Army Reserve Officers 
raining Corps Scholarship Program. 
The scholarships pay tuition, cost of textbooks, and 
^boratory fees, and a $50 per month subsistence allow- 
ance. The students may attend any college or university 
ijfTering the four-year Army ROTC program. 
! The students will, in addition to their normal studies, 
lake approximately 360 hours of military science courses, 
s'larticipate in scheduled drills, and attend a six- week 
""limmer camp between their junior and senior years. 

[ Upon successful completion of military science and 
*«achelor degree requirements, a student will be com- 
&al bissioned as either a Regular or Reserve Second Lieu- 

inant. The student agrees to serve on active duty for at 
ast four years. 
Explanatory letter and request forms for application 
iuD<ackets have been sent to senior high school principals 
sdafnd counselors. Applications must be completed and 
objeturned postmarked not later than January 15, 1968. 
Applicants should also take the College Entrance Exam- 
teCfiation Board tests this fall. 
<t( Interested students should see their head counselors 
r application forms. 



jtegro Semifinalists Are Named 

) Seven District high school seniors have been named 

iemifinalists in the National Achievement Scholarship 
""''rogram for outstanding Negro students. 
They include the following: 

George Washington: Robyn Amos, Hilda Frances 
vllis, Sharyon Hamilton. 
Mfl Lowell: Virginia Smyly. 

Polytechnic: Melanie Jackson. 

Woodrow Wilson: Emanuel Maxey, Gerald Norman. 
The seven students are among 3,000 selected from 
esi 7,000 throughout the nation who took part in the 1967 
rogram. 

About 1,000 semifinalists will be named finalists in 
Jovember, having completed examinations in Septem- 
er. They will become eligible for NASP scholarships 
'hich range in value from $1,000 to $6,000. 
The NASP program, financed by the Ford Founda- 
on, seeks to identify, honor, and encourage superior 
cademic achievement by Negro high school students. 



-J 



525 Students Participate 



Neighborhood Youth Corps Age 
Reduced to Include 14 Year Olds 




Mr. Bryant Lane, Supervisor, Occupational Preparation, is seen 
congratulating Susan Adolph, the first junior high school student 
sworn into the neighborhood Youth Corps under the new lowered 
age requirements. Susan is a home student attached to Francisco 
Junior High School. She works eight, hours each week at Treasure 
Island School, performing clerical duties. Mr. Norman Glattree, 
District NYC project head, and Mr. James T. Rodman, Treasure 
Island principal, were present to wish Susan well in her new 
endeavor. 

Junior high school students in the 14-15 year-old age 
bracket are now able to participate in the District's 
Neighborhood Youth Corps Program as the result of a 
reduction in the minimum age limit from 16 to 14 years. 

Some 105 junior high school students and some 420 
high school students are currently employed as aides in 
schools, school playgrounds, Children's Centers, libraries, 
and the Central Office as part of the program. This is an 
increase of 125 over the 1966-67 school year. Plans in- 
clude placing aides in positions with the San Francisco 
Housing Authority as well. 

Previously, the Work-Study Program offered work ex- 
perience opportunities to students as young as 15 years 
old, but this program ceased operation as of June 30, 
1967. The Neighborhood Youth Corps has increased its 
program from 400 to 525 participants and reduced its 
minimum age to 14, creating openings for junior high 
school students. 
Part-time Work for Youth 

The Neighborhood Youth Corps is a work-training 
program which provides part-time jobs for boys and girls 
ages 14-21. It is funded under the Federal Economic 
Opportunity Act of 1964, P.L. 88-452. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



NEWSLETTER 



October 30, 196 * 



A Joint Effort 

Board Approves Policy Changes 
Relating to Maternity Leaves 

Upon joint agreement of the Negotiating Council of 
the San Francisco Unified School District and the Super- 
intendent, a recommendation was made to and approved 
by the Board of Education at its October 17, 1967 meet- 
ing that the existing Board of Education policy affecting 
maternity leave be changed to read : 

1. Period of Leave 

A certificated employee shall absent herself from duty 
for a period of at least two months before the anticipated 
birth of her child and has the option to return after one 
month following the date of birth, and shall return not 
later than six months following the date of birth. Prior to 
returning to work the employee must have approval of 
the attending physician. The leaving or returning date 
must not fall within two weeks from the end of any 
semester. 

In case of miscarriage or death of the child, the leave 
of absence for maternity may be abridged at the begin- 
ning of any semester upon the recommendation of the 
Superintendent and the approval of the Board provided 
that the health certificate from the Medical Adviser 
states that the teacher is physically and mentally able to 
resume her duties. 



. . . Neighborhood Youth Corps Expands 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Students enrolled in the program must be in economic 
need. The purpose is to provide them with an incentive 
to complete their high school education by providing a 
situation which will offer financial assistance for work 
performed. Its aim is to help enrollees become informed, 
responsible, and self-supporting citizens. 

Students may serve in a variety of capacities such as 
audio visual, recreation, locker room, shop, teacher, or 
library aides. Those of junior high school age may work 
up to eight hours per week, while those of senior high 
school age may work up to 15 hours per week. All re- 
ceive $1.35 per hour. 

Office of Occupational Preparation 

Supervision of the program is coordinated through the 
District's Office of Occupational Preparation. Norman 
Glattree is presently serving as NYC project head. He 
replaces Myron Johnson, who received an appointment 
as acting head counselor of James Denman Junior High 
School. Mr. Glattree has served as employment place- 
ment adviser at Abraham Lincoln and George Washing- 
ton High Schools. 

He states that job quotas for NYC positions arc given 
to District schools to be filled. To date, there have been 
more applicants than jobs. He believes that the recent 
lowering of the minimum age has had positive effects in 
reaching more young people at a time when the pressures 
of economic need become increasingly apparent. 



6 : 



Gompers ROTC Program Opens 

Samuel Gompers High School has embarked on 
an ROTC Pilot Program effective October 24, 
1967. 

Under authorization of Headquarters, Sixth 
United States Army, the establishment of an ROTC 
Detachment for a one-year period has been ap- 
proved. 

If this pilot program is successful and the 
strength of the cadet enrollment is such to apply 
for an independent charter, action will be taken to 
accomplish this end. 

During the initial period and pilot test, noncom- 
missioned officer instructors and senior cadets from 
Mission High School will supervise and instruct 
the Samuel Gompers contingent. 






Red Cross Volunteers Impress 

One thousand and ninety-two school students gav 
67,472 hours this summer as Red Cross volunteers. Eac 
principal will soon receive a report of the students in h 
school who volunteered along with the service performe 
and the hours expended. 

The volunteer work varied from filling gift kits fc 
Vietnamese children to working with hospitalized vei 
erans and the aged, teaching swimming, vision screening 
working at United Bay Area Crusade and the Depar 
ment of Social Work Boarding Home. They worked wit 
children from depressed areas and in Red Cross fc 
Transportation Service, Disaster Service, Nursing Sen 
ice, Red Cross Youth, First Aid and Water Safety, an 
Public Information. 

In Cross-Town Reach, a new program last summe 
student volunteers on a one-to-one basis took childre 
from Golden Gate Elementary School on eight field trif 
and also worked with them on eight other days with fine 1 
ing ways to share their new experiences. The hours volur 
teered this past summer by all students represents 3 
work years. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 39, No. 9 October 30, 1967 

135 Van Ness Avenue. San Frnn ciscn. Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



< October 30, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



District Transfer Regulations Are Reviewed 



In the fall of 1966 revisions in the Transfer Regula- 
tions were effected. They are reprinted at this time for 
'the information and convenience of District school per- 
1 sonnel. 

Administrative Regulations Manual R 4115 

ARTICLE 4 — PERSONNEL — 

CERTIFICATED 

ASSIGNMENT AND TRANSFER — 

PERMANENT PERSONNEL 

Preamble: 

The objective of this transfer procedure is to assure effective 
education in the schools of the San Francisco Unified School 
District by helping to promote the highest possible level of 
teacher morale. 

1. Initiation of Transfer Proceedings 

a. Transfer may be requested by the teacher, the princi- 
pal, or the head of the instructional division. 

b. Teacher initiated requests. Triplicate requests shall be 
submitted to the Personnel Office on forms provided by that 
office. One is filed there, another with the head of the in- 
structional division concerned, and one will be kept by the 
teacher. A conference with the instructional division head is 
recommended. 

If it is a transfer-appointment from one division to another, 
cards should be filed in the offices of both divisions. 
Such requests may be submitted at any time. If transfer is 
not accomplished within 2 years of the date submitted, the 
teacher's request shall become invalid and the teacher so 
advised by the Personnel Division. The teacher may then 
submit an additional request if he so desires. Requests may 
be removed on the written request of the teacher at any time. 
A list of teachers desiring transfer, or transfer and appoint- 
ment to other instructional divisions, shall be prepared by 
the Personnel Division immediately following November 1, 
and April 1. These lists shall show the teacher's name, 
school (s) to which transfer is desired, school to which 
teacher is presently assigned, subject or grade level desired 
(must be in accordance with certification), and date of 
transfer request. Names shall be listed in order of seniority 
in the District, but probationers within a division shall be so 
identified. 

Copies of the transfer list shall be furnished to each instruc- 
tional division head and to each elementary and secondary 
principal. Any teacher may have access to the list in the 
principal's office. 

In staffing the schools, instructional division heads shall fill 
vacancies by transfer where educationally feasible before 
recommending a probationary appointment. In considering 
transfer requests, recognition of tenure in the District as 
well as tenure in the division will be taken into consideration. 
Consultation with principals, or other supervisory personnel 
may be necessary or desirable in discharging this responsi- 
bility and is recommended in difficult cases. 
Vacancies created by transfer should also be filled by trans- 
fer, whenever educational considerations permit. Requests 
for teachers whose names appear on the transfer list may be 
submited by principals, but the division head shall be re- 
sponsible for any transfer recommendations made. 
By January 20 and June 1, a preliminary list shall be pub- 
lished for distribution to the schools by division, showing the 
transfers made to date. 

By February 15 and September 15 a supplemental list shall 
be published for distribution to the schools by division, show- 
ing the transfers and/or transfer- appointments made. 
The teachers may have access to such lists in the principal's 
office. 

c. Teacher transfers requested by principals. When a 
principal concludes that the transfer of a teacher is required, 
he shall submit a written request for the teacher's transfer 
to the head of the instructional division concerned. 
If the services of the teacher have been unsatisfactory, the 
request shall take the form of an evaluation of teaching 
services which will set forth the nature of the unsatisfactory 
services, and such report shall be discussed with, and signed 
by, the teacher in question. 
If the services of the teacher have been satisfactory, this 



request shall be made in writing and a copy of the letter 
shall be furnished the teacher, setting forth the reason for the 
transfer. 

d. Teacher transfers initiated by instructional division 
heads. When such transfers are made, the teacher shall be 
notified by the principal or the instructional division head, 
in writing or in conference, concerning the reason for the 
transfer, except during a period when a teachers is on leave 
of absence. 

Teachers on leave of absence, whose positions have been 
transferred during their absence, shall be notified by the 
Personnel Division of the transfer and may request, in writ- 
ing, re-transfer to a position in the school to which assigned 
at the time the leave was granted. Such requests will be ap- 
proved whenever possible. 

e. Transfer within schools. Transfers of teachers to other 
subjects or grades may be made by the principal of the 
school, with the approval of the appropriate instructional 
division head. Certification regulations must be respected in 
all cases. 

Probationary teachers in the junior or senior high schools 
are required to serve at least 50 per cent of their assignments 
in the subject field (s) in which they were originally ap- 
pointed. Upon completion of the probationary period, they 
may be reassigned in accordance with certification and the 
administrator's discretion. 

2. Transfers between Divisions 

a. Teachers may qualify for transfer between instruction- 
al divisions by placement on an appropriate eligibility list. 

b. When no eligibility lists exists, a transfer may be 
effected by recommendation of the head of the division to 
which transfer is desired. 

c. Not more than 4 per cent of the teachers in any in- 
structional division may be transferred and appointed to any 
one division in any school year. Exceptions are placement on 
the eligibility list and agreement by the heads of the two 
divisions concerned. 

d. Teachers shall have the right to a conference regard- 
ing transfer procedures with the principal, instructional 
division head, and/or other administrative/supervisory per- 
sonnel, and if desired, may utilize the grievance procedures 
of the District. 

e. If the head of the instructional division to which trans- 
fer and appointment is desired approves the qualifications of 
the teacher desiring the change, he must recommend, prior 
to June 1 or December 1, the transfer and appointment of 
the teacher, notifying the head of the instructional division 
from which transfer is being recommended of his action. 

3. Balance among Schools 

It is recognized that it is the responsibility of the division 
head to maintain at all times a balance of instructional serv- 
ice among the schools of his division. 

• STATE COMMITTEE APPOINTMENT 

Mr. James J. Hamrock, principal of Luther Burbank 
Junior High School, has been invited to serve on the 
State Department of Education - San Jose State College 
Innovation Practices Committee for the 1967-68 school 
year. 



ADMINISTRATIVE APPLICATIONS 

Because the Personnel Service Division is in the 
process of reorganizing its files, all administrative 
applications which have been submitted prior to 
January, 1965 will be removed from the active file. 
Applicants who wish to be considered for admistra- 
tive positions should confirm their interest by noti- 
fying the Personnel Administrative Secretary, Miss 
Mildred Dold, in writing, by 4 p.m., Friday, No- 
vember 3. 

Applicants should also make a separate applica- 
tion for each category for which they are interested. 



NEWSLETTER 



October 30, 1967 1 



Announcements 



• FEDERATION OF TEACHERS TO MEET 

The San Francisco Federation of Teachers will hold 
its regular monthly membership meeting on Monday, 
November 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the Lowell High School 
cafeteria, 1101 Eucalyptus Drive. Members will be asked 
to ratify the list of proposals contained in Achievement 
'68. 

• MICROBIOLOGY CONFERENCE SCHEDULED 
The Bay Area Biologists Society and the American 

Society of Microbiology will sponsor A Conference on 
Microbiology in Science Education on Saturday, Novem- 
ber 11, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at California State 
College in Hayward. 

For information and reservations contact Arlene Chin, 
22100 Princeton Street, Hayward 94541. 

• ELEMENTARY SUPERVISORS CONFERENCE 
Dr. Mary C. McCarthy and Miss Agatha Hogan, 

Supervisors, Elementary Schools, will attend the Eighth 
Conference for Supervisors of Elementary Education in 
Large Cities on November 13-15 in Washington, D.C. 

They will serve as chairmen of several major confer- 
ence sessions. 

• CAEYC CONFERENCE ON NOVEMBER 8 
The California Association for the Education of Young 

Children will hold its annual 1967 conference on Wed- 
nesday, November 8, in the Gold Room of the San Fran- 
cisco Sheraton- Palace Hotel. 

For information and registration contact Mrs. Estelle 
Farber, 1221 Clayton Street, San Francisco 94114. 

• PHI DELTA KAPPA 

A presentation of candidates for Mayor of San Fran- 
cisco will highlight the joint meeting of Golden Gate 
Field Chapter and San Francisco State College Campus 
Chapter of Phi Delta Kappa at 6 : 30 p.m. on Wednesday, 
November 1, 1967. The meeting will be held at the Sig- 
mund Stern Lodge, Sigmund Stern Grove, 19th Avenue 
and Sloat Boulevard, San Francisco. 

The menu will include barbecued New York cut steak 
with all the trimmings. The cost will be $1.85. 

Interested members who have not sent their reserva- 
tions should phone John Falsarella at 558-0213 or Carlos 
Ruling at 334-5860. 



NATIONAL TEACHERS EXAMINATION 

The National Teachers Examination, which is a 
requirement for placement on the San Francisco 
Unified School District Eligibility Lists, will be next 
administered on Saturday, February 3, 1968. This 
will be the last examination from which applicants 
who are interested in qualifying for the 1968-69 
eligibility lists may submit scores. 

Application blanks may be obtained from the 
Educational Testing Service, Box 911, Princeton, 
New Jersey 08540. Regular registration closes on 
Friday, January 12, 1968. Late registration with a 
$3 penalty closes on Friday, January 19, 1968. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Wednesday, November 1, 1967, 4:00 p.m. Special 
meeting, 170 Fell Street; Tuesday, November 7, 
1967, 7:30 p.m. Regular meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• CITY COLLEGE TO PRESENT 'SAINT JOAN' 

The drama department at City College of San Fran 
cisco announces its presentation of George Bernard 
Shaw's Saint Joan on four nights, Wednesday through 
Saturday, November 1-4, in the College Theater. 

Curtain time is 8 p.m. Tickets sell for one dollar. They 
may be obtained at the door or by calling the box office 
at 587-7272. 

Walter Krumm is directing the production, Paul 
Crowley has designed the sets, and Margaret Aff alter has 
created the costumes. 

• DEPARTMENT HEADS TO MEET 

The Department Heads Association of San Francisco 
Senior High Schools will meet on Wednesday, November 
1, in the teachers' cafeteria of Balboa High School at 
2:45 p.m. 

• URBAN LEAGUE SEEKS TEACHER AID 

The Bay Area Urban League is seeking the aid of a 
volunteer teacher of Business English for a group of ter 
to twelve young women, one night per week, for a pro. 
gram lasting approximately six months. The women are 
training to become legal secretaries in a program spon- 
sored by the Urban League, the San Francisco Bar Asso. 
ciation, and the San Francisco Legal Secretaries Associa- 
tion. 

Any teacher with a background in business or Englisl 
with one free night a week to spare who is interested ir 
and knowledgeable about the problems of minority per 
sons is asked to contact Pat Reycraft, Bay Area Urbai 
League, 2505 Bush Street, 567-1835. 



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NEWSLETTER 



/OLUME 39 



NOVEMBER 6, 1967 



NUMBER 10 



Schools Observe American Education Week 

Schools across the nation join together this week in The same evening at 7:30 p.m., James Lick Junior 

Ibserving American Education Week, November 6-10. High will offer "Latin American Night," a program 

The theme "How Good Are Your Schools?" lends itself sponsored by a representative committee of parents, 

j p the preparation and presentation of a number of ac- faculty, and students. The theme, "Getting to Know 

ftvities involving the school, the home, and the commun- You . . . Better," will feature the Latin American com- 

ty. munity and will highlight its many cultural contributions. 

Other schools reporting programs include the follow- 
ing: 

Bret Harte — Thursday, November 2 — PTA program 
in auditorium featured Reverend Richard Veehuizen as 
speaker and musical presentation by students of Sonja 
Soehnel and Harold Greenleaf. Parent-teacher confer- 
ences followed in the auditorium and cafeteria. 
Clarendon — Friday, November 10, 9:30 a.m. — Stu- 
dent body meeting featuring several musically talented 
parents, followed by classroom visitations. 
Columbus — Wednesday, November 8, 7:30 p.m. — 
Auditorium meeting in which a panel of faculty mem- 
bers will outline the term's program, to be followed by a 
question and answer period. 

Douglas — Wednesday, November 8, 8 p.m. — PTA 
meeting and Open House. 

Emerson — Wednesday, November 8, 12:30 p.m. — 
PTA meeting and Book Fair. 

Francis Scott Key — Thursday, November 9, 7 p.m. — 
Back to school night and a display of Japanese children's 
art work. 

(Continued on Page 2) 




he culminating activities of the San Francisco Symphony 
hamber Orchestra Concerts in the public schools will take place 
uring American Education Week, November 6-10. Mr. James 
ierke. Assistant Superintendent, Junior High Schools, will make 
ic introductory comments at today's concerts at A. P. Giannini 
iinior High School. Pictured above reviewing the Chamber 
rchestra's 30-concert schedule are (left to right) Dr. Robert E. 
snkins. Superintendent of Schools; Mr. Verne Sellin, Conductor- 
lommentator; Dr. Albert A. Renna, Director of Music; and Mr. 
hilip S. Boone, President, San Francisco Symphony Association. 

Many District schools have contacted the Central 
~" Office, indicating that they will present programs, meet- 

lgs, and exhibits during the week showing how good 

'E ,ieir schools are. 



ymphony Concerts Continue 

One of the highlights of the week's activities will be 
l ie culminating concerts in a number of schools by the 
: an Francisco Symphony Chamber Orchestra. Mr. James 
)ierke, Assistant Superintendent, Junior High Schools, 
/ill deliver the introductory remarks at today's concert 
;t A. P. Giannini Junior High School. Other concerts 
lis week will be given at James Denman, Portola, Ben- 
imin Franklin, and Francisco Junior High Schools. 

The various schools of the Central Section Parent 
'eachers Association will join together at Mission High 
chool at 1 p.m. on Thursday, November 9, 1967, to 
bserve a program, "Mission High Tells Its Story." 
reneral discussion, classroom visitations, and a tea will 
allow. 



IMPORTANT AUDIO VISUAL NOTICE 

The Bureau of Audio Visual Education an- 
nounces that it is experiencing exceptionally heavy 
requests for materials. 

With the limits of materials and available staff, 
the Bureau is able to ship (outgoing) 300 motion 
pictures per day. With the 300 that are being re- 
turned from the schools, this means a daily turn- 
over of 600 films. 

The Bureau has been forced to operate with a 
smaller staff than last year since some ESEA staff- 
funded positions were eliminated in September. 

As of this date, the Bureau will be unable to book 
any additional materials for a Monday, Wednes- 
day, or Friday, until about the first of February, 
1968. In other words, the daily "quota" of 300 
films is completely filled by prior confirmed requisi- 
tions. 



NEWSLETTER 



N3\er.i"er G. 193' 



. . . American Education Week Programs Special Courses for Unemployed 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Frank McCoppin — Wednesday, November 8 — Dem- 
onstrations of regular classroom work will be presented 
throughout the day. 

Garfield — Wednesday, November 8, 7 p.m. — Open 
House program with Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superin- 
tendent of Schools, as guest speaker. 
Lafayette — Monday, November 6, 7 p.m. — Open 
House featuring student work and meetings with teach- 
ers. 

Madison — Wednesday, November 8, 9:20 a.m. — Liter- 
ature program in auditorium for all primary grades, 
"American Authors and Illustrators," featuring Mrs. 
Doris Bloom, teacher; Thursday, November 9 — Art 
program in auditorium for all upper grades, "Art and 
Techniques," featuring Jean Halpert Ryden, Society of 
Western Artists. 

Sheridan — Tuesday, November 7, 12:30 p.m. — PTA 
meeting followed by classroom visits; Wednesday, No- 
vember' 8, 7 p.m. — Schools in the Community Educa- 
tion Planning Project will attend an enrichment pro- 
gram in music at James Denman Junior High School. 
Starr King — November 6 .through 10 — Parent and 
teacher meetings scheduled each afternoon. 
Sunnyside — Monday, November 6, 7:30 p.m. — Open 
House program, "Getting to Know You," featuring visits 
to the school's classrooms. 

Aptos — Thursday, November 16, 7:30 p.m. — Back to 
school night in which parents will follow their child's 
daily program through abbreviated periods. 
Herbert Hoover — Wednesday, November 15, 7:30 p.m. 
Back to school night in which parents will meet teach- 
ers and go through the daily schedule. 
Horace Mann — Thursday, November 16, 7 p.m. — 
Evening program for parents featuring Edward Sharkey, 
State Adjutant of the American Legion and presenta- 
tions by the school's instrumental, vocal music, and 
speech groups; Friday, November 17 — Assembly pro- 
gram for students commemorating Veterans' Day and 
American Education Week. 

Roosevelt — Thursday, November 9, 8 p.m. — Musical 
program featuring each of the three advanced music 
groups — orchestra, band, and chorus. 
Samuel Gompers — November 7, 8, and 9 — Student 
representatives from Social Studies, English, and Busi- 
ness Departments will meet with Student Council to 
discuss "How Good Is Our School — A Speakout." 
Discussion findings will be reported back to the class- 
room. Dr. Fern G. Kelly and Mrs. Janice Isaly are co- 
ordinating the program. 



• YOUNG CITIZEN AWARD PROGRAM 

For the third consecutive year Cable Car Clothiers has 
announced that it will sponsor the San Francisco Young 
Citizens Awards in the city's senior high schools. The 
awards arc based on outstanding performance in school, 
community, and civic activities. 

The first student honored this year is Charlcen Ber- 
naucr of Abraham Lincoln High School. 



c 



The Adult and Vocational Education Division of thi 
San Francisco Unified School District is again cooperat 
ing with the San Francisco Retailers Community Rela 
tions Group, the Human Rights Commission, th< 
Greater San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, and thi 
Youth Opportunity Centers in developing a special train 
ing and employment program for unemployed out-of 
school youth between the ages of 17-21. 

The program is designed to provide some 200 unem 
ployed young people with intensive training in retailinj 
in order to qualify them for employment during th( 
Christmas season. 
Course of Instruction 

The District's role is to train the youth in a 20-houi 
course of instruction. Two sessions of the course will b< 
offered: Session 1, November 6-17 and Session 2, Novenv 
ber 20 - December 1. Courses will be given at Missior 
Adult School from 6 : 30 to 9 p.m. 

Course content will include such topics as persona 
grooming, application forms, job interviews, telephoni 
use, salesmanship techniques, basic math review, use o: 
the cash register, to list a few. 

Various instructors will cover the different topics. The; 
include store managers, business teachers, and counselors 
Wide Program Support 

The San Francisco Retailers Community Relation 
Group will provide the jobs, assisted by the Humar 
Rights Commission, the Youth Opportunity Centers, anc 
San Francisco merchants. The Youth Opportunity Cen 
ters will coordinate the placement of the students upor 
completion of the course. 

John F. Harrington, work experience adviser, is co 
ordinating the project for the District. He states, "Thi! 
project will be patterned after the Christmas Training 
Program developed last year. Hopefully, a number o! 
these people will be offered permanent positions at thf 
end of the Christmas holidays." 

"Kick-off" ceremonies for the program were conducteci 
last week in the Mission auditorium with representative 
from the cooperating groups present. 



Jti 



Tii 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 10 



November 6, 1967 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Alan H. Nichols 



Vice President 
Reynold H. Colvin 
Adolfo de Urioste 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



November 6, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



Compensatory Report Presented to Board 



Better patterns of education for minority and disad- 
! vantaged youngsters will be found when special education 
programs in poverty areas are more concentrated and 
planned to answer specific questions. 

This was the main recommendation of a report by a 
! Stanford Research Institute study team that has been 
1 evaluating the results of San Francisco's Compensatory 
J Education Program for the past 18 months. The report 
I was made at a special board meeting last Wednesday, 
(November 1, 1967. 

"In the first year and a half, the compensatory educa- 
| tion program presented a wide variety of projects — 
almost literally something for everyone," noted Philip 
'Sorensen, SRI psychologist. "The value of some of the 
'projects is quite clear. In other projects, however, the 
[objectives are so broad and the variations from school to 
Ischool and teacher to teacher are so great that we can't 
J lyet sort out for sure which practices are most effective." 

Special Board Meeting 

Dr. Sorensen's remarks were made Wednesday at a 
special meeting of the Board of Education assembled to 
[Jttiear an evaluation of how effective the compensatory 
,education program has been in raising the levels of aca- 
demic achievement among minority and disadvantaged 
[school children. 
Jl The compensatory education program had a budget 
|for the school year 1966-67 of about $3.7 million from 
■ Federal and State sources. About half the money goes 
, |toward reducing class sizes, decreasing pupil-teacher 
ratios and providing specialized teachers in 28 elemen- 
Ikary schools, 12 junior high and 5 high schools in the 
I so-called "target areas." Also included are 13 non-public 
. schools in the "target areas" and 17 public schools out- 
, side of the "target areas" that receive pupils bussed from 
i ^he "target areas". The other half of the budget provides 
prekindergarten centers, improved library services, a 
, .reading clinic, speech and hearing specialists, in-service 
. training for teachers, community teachers, social workers, 
leld trips for pupils, and instructional equipment and 
.materials. 

Major emphasis of SRI's oral report was on how these 

1 expanded services have affected pupil achievement in 

-eading. The findings were summarized by Dr. Sorensen 

ind Dr. Thomas Thomas, SRI operations analyst. High 

6iB3oints of the presentation were as follows: 

; High Points Summarized 

1. Kindergarten pupils who attended prekindergarten 



ADMINISTRATIVE INTERVIEWS 

Appointments for administrative interviews will 
be scheduled by the Personnel Coordinator in the 
office of the Personnel Service Division. All appli- 
cants will be notified by that office of the date and 
time for their interviews. 

Administrative interviews will begin in Novem- 
ber and will continue into December and January. 



in 1966 did better in tests of reading readiness in the 
spring of 1967 than did kindergartners who had not par- 
ticipated in the prekindergarten program. The program 
was especially helpful to youngsters from homes where 
English is not the first language. 

2. Four different tests of verbal and non verbal intelli- 
gence given to pre-kindergarten children in the "target 
areas" indicates a higher level of ability among children 
in disadvantaged communities than is often assumed. 
While one test showed an average IQ of 84, three other 
tests showed average IQ's between 94 and 102. The pop- 
ulation average on IQ tests is 100. 

3. In the four schools receiving the most concentrated 
extra services and class size reductions, mean scores in 
reading at grades 1 and 2 were significantly higher in 
1967 than in 1966. By contrast, the other 24 schools 
which received fewer services showed little or no differ- 
ence in reading ability between 1966 and 1967. At grade 
3, however, reading ability in both groups of schools was 
higher in 1967. This was probably due to the fact that at 
the third grade the concentration of services was about 
the same for all 28 target area schools, the study team 
pointed out. 

4. In grades 4 through 12, the median gain in reading 
achievement for students in a special reading program 
was 5 months during the school year. Most of these stu- 
dents assigned to the program are considerably below 
grade level in reading ability. The range of improvement 
among individual students was very wide. One fourth of 
the students gained 1 2 months or more during the school 
year. 

5. Poor readers seem to experience substantial losses in 
reading ability during summer months, causing a portion 
of the school year to be spent in "catching up" to the 
level they had attained at the end of the previous school 
year. The study team suggested that the Board give 
serious consideration to an enlarged summer program, 
even at the expense of cut-backs elsewhere in the pro- 
gram during the school year. 

6. Pupils in grades 4 through 6 from 4 schools were 
bussed to schools outside their neighborhoods so that class 
sizes could be reduced in the lower grades. These trans- 
ferred students performed as well as students receiving 
special services in their regular target area schools. At 
the same time, youngsters regularly enrolled in the re- 
ceiving school performed as well as ever by gaining an 
average of a month in reading achievement for each 
month in school. 

"Although many parts of San Francisco's compensa- 
tory education program have demonstrated their value, 
results from the program's major effort are most difficult 
to judge," Sorensen and Thomas said in summary. "At 
present, half the total funds go to reducing class sizes and 
increasing the number of teachers. If we really want to 
find out how much class size affects pupil performance, 
the question should be approached like an experiment. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



NEWSLETTER 



November 6, 1967 




DINNER FOR MARGARET V. GIRDNER 

The University of San Francisco announces a 
special dinner honoring Margaret V. Girdner, 
founder and co-director of the Library Science 
Program, on the occasion of her 50th year in library 
work. 

The dinner will be held Friday, November 17, at 
8 p.m. in the University Commons, preceded by a 
social hour at 7 p.m. Dinner reservations are $6. 
Reservations and information may be secured from 
the Alumni Association, University of San Fran- 
cisco, San Francisco 94117. 

Miss Girdner will be remembered by District per- 
sonnel for her years as teacher and librarian at 
Commerce and Galileo High Schools, and Director, 
Libraries and Textbooks, for the District. 



• COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATIVE WOMEN 

The National Council of , Administrative Women in 
Education will hold its fall dinner meeting on Wednes- 
day, November 15, at Giovanni's in Ghirardelli Square. 
A social hour will start at 6 p.m. followed by dinner. 

Reservations may be secured by sending checks for 
$5.40 to Miss Marjorie Maher, Division of Research, 
Room 2-A, 135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 94102 
or to 15 Poplar Drive, Kentfield, California 94904. 



• SFCTA REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL TO MEET 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association 
Representative Council will meet at 4 p.m. on Monday, 
November 13, in Nicholas Hall of the Marines Memorial 
Building, 609 Sutter Street. 



• ELEMENTARY SUPPLY COMMITTEE 

The Elementary Supply Committee will meet at Visita- 
cion Valley School at 1 : 45 p.m. on Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 8, 1967. Principals having items for discussion are 
requested to submit these to their representatives. . 



• FIELD LIBRARIANS TO MEET 

The Field Librarians will meet on Thursday, Novem- 
ber 9, at 4 p.m. in the library of Presidio Junior High 
School, 450 - 30th Avenue. All elementary, junior, and 
senior high school librarians are invited. 



. . . Compensatory Report Summarized 

(Continued from Page 3) 
With present resources, this probably means more inten- 
sive efforts in fewer schools. It would also mean that 
some pupils would be taught in radically smaller classes 
while others would be taught in larger groupings by vari- 
ous combinations of teachers and aides. We must be both 
more bold and better disciplined if we hope to find those 
innovations that rnake the most difference." 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, November 7, 1967, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



O ASSOCIATION FOR HANDICAPPED TO MEET 

The San Francisco Chapter of the California Associa- 
tion for Neurologically Handicapped Children will meet 
Thursday, November 9, at 8 p.m. at Aptos Junior High 
School. The speaker will be Dr. Robert T. Elliott, con- 
sultant in Education of the Educationally Handicapped 
Bureau for the Educationally Handicapped of the State 
Department of Education. 



• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE MEETING 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet at 1 : 3C 
p.m., Wednesday, November 8, in Room 10, Centra 
Office, 170 Fell Street. 



• ACE TO HOST NEW TEACHERS 

The San Francisco branch of the Association for Child 
hood Education will host new District teachers at a toui 
of the San Francisco Museum of Art on Monday, No 
vember 20, at 4 p.m. 

Robert A. Whyte, education curator of the Museum 
will conduct a guided tour and present a film. The pro 
gram is designed to offer significant implications for th( 
teaching of art in the schools. 

Experienced teachers as well as new teachers are in> 
vited to attend the presentation. The Museum is locatec 
at McAllister and Van Ness Avenue. For additional in 
formation please contact Mrs. Barbara Webber (Norieg; 
Home School) or Noel Mertens (Sir Francis Drake). 



• FEDERATION OF TEACHERS TO MEET 

The San Francisco Federation of Teachers will hold 
its regular monthly membership meeting on Monday! 
November 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the Lowell High Schoo ,i;| 
cafeteria, 1101 Eucalyptus Drive. Members will be askec 
to ratify the list of proposals contained in Achievement I 
'68. 



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VOLUME 39 



NOVEMBER 13, 1967 



NUMBER 11 



Conductor Gunther Schuller 
Visits Lowell Symphonic Band 

™ Members of the Lowell High School Symphonic Band 

were given a rare treat last week when Mr. Gunther 

ia ! chuller, noted composer and conductor, paid a visit to 

keir 7 : 50 a.m. class. Mr. Schuller is in San Francisco to 

ionduct three performances of his opera The Visitacion, 

'eing performed by the San Francisco Opera Company. 

, Mr. Schuller visited the early morning class as Mr. 

ack Pereira, Lowell instrumental music instructor, was 

. shearsing the students in one of Mr. Schuller's composi- 

ons, Meditation, for concert band. 

and Performs 

' The opera conductor listened to the band play his 

imposition and then addressed the music students. He 

>ent some time commenting on their performance and 

, fferiner constructive criticism. He concluded the session 

m . 

' y conducting the band as it played his work, comment- 

. fig, encouraging, and criticizing as the group progressed. 
■ Mr. Schuller's visit to Lowell was arranged by Mr. 

"pseph Alessi, music instructor at City College of San 
rancisco and long-time friend of the conductor, and 
jr. Albert A. Renna, Director of Music for the San 
rancisco Unified School District. Mr. Schuller and Mr. 

oltllessi played together in the Metropolitan Opera Com- 

bjany Orchestra in New York. 

■ owell Concert Planned 

led Meditation will be featured by the Lowell Symphonic 

mi&nd as part of an evening concert to be presented 
'ednesday, November 15, which will also feature the 
owell Orchestra. Student John Foreman will be the 

~~'md soloist on Sonatina for Timpani by Tcherpnin. 

—•he orchestra will play the complete Firebird Suite by 

I ■ ravinsky, and student Michael Asher will be the soloist, 
(Continued on Page 4) 



{ 



.'i 



RETIREMENT FOLDERS ARE AVAILABLE 

The State Teachers' Retirement System an- 
nounces the publication of three information 
pamphlets designed to answer specific questions 
relating to the Retirement System. 

The titles of the pamphlets are Selecting a Plan 
of Retirement Payment, Service Retirement Allow- 
ances and Options, and Refunds and Deposits of 
Member Contributions. 

The pamphlets will be mailed to members upon 
request. The address is as follows: State Teachers' 
Retirement System, 1416 Ninth Street, Sacramento, 
California 95814. 



"Operation Forethought" 

City College Summer Program 
Attracts High School Students 

An experimental program conducted at San Francisco 
City College this past summer brought 222 high school 
students to the City College campus to participate in 
regular summer session classes. 

Dubbed "Operation Forethought," the program's over- 
all purpose was to discover if appropriate pre-planning 
and counseling can lead to more realistic selection of a 
vocational and educational objective. Students, who are 
now in their low and high senior year, were allowed to 
enroll in two of the college's semi-professional courses, an 
elective, and two group counseling courses. Joining the 
students in the program were 29 high school counselors 
who attended workshop and evaluation sessions. 

The experiment was conceived by Dr. Louis Batmale, 
Coordinator of Semi-Professional Education, and Thomas 
Nesbitt, Dean of Instruction. Dean Nesbitt supervised 
the program. The two counseling courses were concerned 
with study habits and orientation to college and were 
conducted by Howard Schoon and Kenneth Meitz. 

Two Funding Sources 

The program was funded through grants made to The 
Foundation of City College by the Hebrew Technological 
Institute of New York and the local Miranda Lux Foun- 
dation. 

It was a concerted effort to determine to what extent 
meaningful pre-planning would reduce the college drop- 
out rate and reduce the time lost by switching of majors, 
based upon a thorough exploration of options and possi- 
bilities. It also attempted to discover to what extent such 
pre-planning would provide students with, motivation to 
achieve in high school, in preparation for their college 
courses. 

The degree of success of the program cannot be mea- 
seured until the participants have completed their senior 
year in high school and have begun their college courses. 

Preliminary Results 

Dean Nesbitt has indicated that some results of the 
summer phase of "Operation Forethought" suggest that 
there is reason to believe the program will have positive 
results. Of the 222 who began the program, 192 com- 
pleted it. Those 192 earned 719 units and 1913.5 grade 
points for a grade point average og 2.66. None of the 
students received an "F". Their performance in college 
classes compared favorably with that of regular students, 

(Continued on Page 4) 



NEWSLETTER 



November 13, 1967; 




Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 



Mrs. Lilienthal, Dr. Goosby 
Win Voter Approval to Board 

San Francisco voters confirmed Mayor John F. Shel- 
ley's nomination of Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal and Dr. 
Zuretti L. Goosby to the San Francisco Board of Educa- 
tion in the November 7 city election. They will assume 
their new five-year terms in January, 1968. 

Mrs. Ernest R. 
Lilienthal began her 
first term as a new 
member of the 
Board of Education 
in January of 1958. 
She served as Presi- 
dent of the Board in 
1961. 

Mrs. Lilienthal 
began her second 
five-year term in 
1963 and is serving 
as president for the 
second time in 1967. 
An active leader 
in both civic and 
educational affairs, 
she has served as President of the League of Women 
Voters, on the Board of Directors of the American Can- 
cer Society, and on the Board of the World Affairs 
Council. 

Mrs. Lilienthal attended Madison Elementary School 
and is claimed by alumni of the former Girls' High School 
as one of the school's illustrious graduates. She is a 
graduate of the University of California. 

Dr. Zuretti L. 
Goosby, San Fran- 
cisco dentist, was 
sworn in as Board 
of Education Com- 
missioner on May 9, 
1967. Dr. Goosby is 
completing the un- 
expired term of Mr. 
James Stratton to 
January, 1968. 

A native of Oak- 
land, California, he 
is a graduate of the 
University of Cali- 
fornia and of the 
U. C. Dental Col- 
Dr. Zuretti L. Goosby lejre 

He has served on the Human Rights Commission 
since his appointment in 1964 and was a member of the 
Mayor's Task Force on Education. During World War 
II he served in the U. S. Air Force from 1943 to 1944, 
and in the Korean conflict he served in the Dental Corps 
from 1953 to 1955. 

Dr. Goosby's new appointment will mark the beginning 
of his first full five-year term as a Board Commissioner. 




TIME SHEET PICK-UP 

November time sheets for teachers will be picked 
up at the schools at 8:30 a.m. on November 28, 
1967, for senior, junior, and elementary teachers. 

The adult schools will deliver their full-time and 
part-time teachers' time sheets on November 28 at 
9 a.m. 

Time sheets for clerks and janitors for all schools, 
including the adult schools, for November 16 
through November 30, will be picked up at the 
schools at 8:30 a.m. on November 22, 1967. 

Sheets are to be completed and signed by the 
deadline dates above to enable delivery service to 
keep the schedule. 

The number of days in November for principals 
and assistant principals is 20; the number of days 
for teachers is 20. 



Foreign Guests Visit Schools 

The District has served as host to a number of out-of- 
town visitors during the month of October. They havt 
included the following: 

From Mexico — Mrs. Maria Amelia Escalante, ele- 
mentary teacher — visited Hawthorne Elementary 
School; From Japan — 12 visiting educators — visitec 
Lafayette Elementary School and George Washingtor 
High School; From Japan — Mr. Saburo Eguchi anc 
Mr. Yohten Kuwano, principals — visited Marina Jun 
ior High School; 

From Japan — Mr. H. Ibayashi, graduate student — 
visited Sunshine Orthopedic School; From Indonesia 
Miss Guus Bakarbessy, program assistant — visitec 
Woodrow Wilson High School; From South Africa — 
Mr. Anton Murray, headmaster, St. Alban's College 
visited Lowell High School; 

From Scotland — Dr. Elizabeth A.M. Dougary, schoo 
counselor — visited Everett and Horace Mann Junio: 
High Schools, Mission High School, and the Centra 
Office; From England — Miss Hilda Mary Eastwood 
headmistress — visited Galileo Hisrh School. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 11 



November 13, 1967 



135 Van Ness Avenue. San Francisco. Calif. 9410 2 

Puhlished each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



November 13, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



Superintendent's Message 



The Pursuit of Excellence- Dream or Reality 



by Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools 




Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 



All large cities seem to 
share the same general 
problems of urban growth 
and leading school systems 
are seeking the "new" ways 
to meet head-on the multi- 
tude of educational prob- 
lems of the large city. 

New and bold ways must 
be found to stimulate, 
motivate and better pre- 
pare our young people to 
meet the tremendous chal- 
lenges in this age of new 
dimensions. 

Where and how do we get this "best mix" of teaching 
curriculum materials and instructional aids? 

From California to New York to Florida there are a 
few exciting "lighthouse schools" operating on the basis 
of individualized instruction. Each student has the op- 
portunity to have the kind of education that most bene- 
fits him. They bring into practice the theory of taking 
each student as far as he can go in accordance with his 
abilities and talents. 

The goal of these "model or experimental schools" is 
the maximum development of each student's talents no 
matter how unequal these talents may be. This is equal 
opportunity. As the leaders of the unique Nova schools 
which I recently visited in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 
have said, "Exposure of young people to exciting teach- 
ers, in an exciting method, creates exciting minds among 
teachers, students and parents." 

The inspiring concept in some of these experimental 
schools leads me to reshare with all of you some of the 
ideas that I was privileged to present at the California 
Advisory Council on Educational Research at the 
Eighteenth Annual State Conference on Educational 
Research here in San Francisco last November, and 
which I have also emphasized in recent talks in San 
Francisco. 

As we think about the future of education, these 
thoughts have even more meaning when we recognize 
the persistent importance of two basic principles: 

1. The individualization of teaching and learning is 
more vital than ever as a motivating force to help 
each child grow to his maximum. 

2. Flexibility is essential in order that we may cope with 
and take advantage of rapid change. 

Following these principles are several hypotheses which 
need to be studied, researched, and evaluated as we build 
tomorrow's schools today: 

1. Age may be the least reliable of all criteria for group- 
ing students. As more and more elementary and high 
schools operate on an ungraded basis with large 
blocks, such as primary, intermediate, junior high, 
and senior high, more students may be able to learn 



more effectively at their own rate in a much more 
individualized type of program. 

2. Not all lessons or subject areas may require the same 
amount of time for all students. Flexible scheduling 
and the short time-module are opening up new possi- 
bilities for improving instruction. 

3. Class size may be varied according to lesson and 
subject. Large groups, small groups, and independent 
study may be ways of better utilizing the creative 
abilities of teachers and may provide better learning 
opportunities for children and youth. 

4. Teachers have unique and varied abilities and all 
may not be equally capable, even in the same area of 
knowledge. This means that more and more schools 
may find it effective to have some teachers serve as 
team leaders, some as instructional members of the 
team, and others as associate teachers or teacher as- 
sistants. 

5. In an age of technology, resourceful and effective 
teachers may find that the newest technological and 
electronic aids can greatly strengthen the teacher's 
effectiveness and improve learning. Television, listen- 
ing-viewing centers, the computer, and data retriev- 
ing centers may have unusual possibilities. 

6. Memorization of facts may need to be subordinated 
to the use of facts, to the understanding of principles 
and concepts, to knowing when and how to get facts 
quickly. This means that more and more we may find 
a need for libraries to be expanded into educational 
media, or knowledge resource centers, with individual 
study carrels located near data retrieving centers that 
will give the student ready access to a wealth of 
information. 

Dream or Reality? Elements of every one of these prin- 
ciples and hypotheses are now being carried out in some 
school districts in California. With planning, research, 
and development we will find the answers. We will find 
the most successful ways to individualize instruction and 
to provide the finest educational opportunities for every 
student. This is truly the pursuit of excellence. 



• ROTC FIELD DAY AND SEMINAR 

San Francisco Unified School Eistrict ROTC cadets 
and their regular Army officers and non-commissioned 
officer instructors will conduct a field day and seminar at 
Ft. Barry - Cronkite (Marin County) on Saturday and 
Sunday, November 18 and 19. 

The Commanding Officer of the Presidio and the 91st 
Infantry Division (Reserve) are making this overnight 
field trip possible by providing transportation, billets, sub- 
sistence, and facilities for use by the cadet brigade during 
the entire period. 

The program planned includes cadet officers' seminar, 
training classes, and recreation. Intra-mural competition 
in basketball, volleyball, and softball between the eight 
battalions from each high school will be part of the pro- 
gram. 



NEWSLETTER 



November 13, 1967 



Announcements 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is hereby given of the following custodial 
vacancies : 

2724 — School Custodian, Male — Pacific Heights 
Adult, Balboa High, Hillcrest, Hawthorne, Woodrow 
Wilson High (nights), Aptos Junior High (nights). 

2726 — School Custodian Sub-Foreman — James Lick 
Junior High, James Denman Junior High, Jedediah 
Smith. 



• COACHES TO MEET NOVEMBER 13 

The San Francisco Association Athletic Coaches and 
Physical Education Teachers will hold its first general 
meeting of the fall term Monday, November 13, at 7:30 
p.m. in Room B-4 of Abraham Lincoln High School. 



. . . Summer Program at City College 

( Continued from Page 1 ) 
and in many instances, their instructors were not aware 
of their special status. 

The 26 who withdrew totaled 11.7% of the group, a 
figure comparable to the regular student pattern for 
summer session. 

Counselors who participated in the program included 
the following: Milton Axt, Polytechnic; Mrs. Doradia 
Banuet, Central Office; Mrs. Ruth Berg, Abraham Lin- 
coln; Frank Bradbury, Balboa; Mrs. Mary Byrd, Central 
Office; Ivor Callaway, Samuel Gompers; Carolyn Canig- 
lia, Mission; Vito Ciarfaglio, Portola; Gerald Cohn, 
Galileo; Ray Del Portillo, Francisco; Jean Devich, Poly- 
technic ; Donald Diety, Woodrow Wilson ; Mrs. Kathleen 
Erlich, Presentation; Mrs. Beverly Eigner, Polytechnic; 
Edgar Fielding, Abraham Lincoln; Mrs Alice Frederick, 
Lowell; Mildred Fusco, James Lick; Yvonne Gaul, Bal- 
boa; Eleanor Holland, Polytechnic; Vincent Levon, 
Samuel Gompers; Pat McGuigan, Pelton; Louis A. 
Meyer, Sacred Heart; Joan Monte, George Washington; 
Mrs. Doris Mullin, Woodrow Wilson; John A. Rossi, 
John O'Connell; Paul Rusanoff, John O'Connell; 
George Sutherland, Polytechnic; Catherine Wood, Sam- 
uel Gompers; and Catherine Williams, Cathedral. 



. . . Lowell High Music Concert 

(Continued from Page 1) 
playing the Piano Concerto in B Flat by Mozart. The 
Lowell program is open to the public and starts at 8 p.m. 
Mr. Schullcr, who is also president of the New Eng- 
land Conservatory of Music, expressed pleasure at the 
reception and attention given him by the Lowell students. 
His interest in young people and their music was evi- 
denced following the rehearsal as he took time to speak 
with students individually and answer their questions. 
His concern was further enforced when he said, "If 
composers don't write for our students, how can we 
expect them to play modern music." 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, November 21, 1967, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 

The San Francisco chapter of the Council for Excep- 
tional Children will meet Thursday, November 16, at 4 
p.m. at A. P. Giannini Junior High School. The guest 
speaker will be Dr. Helen Gofman of the University of 
California Medical Center. Dr. Gofman will discuss 
Screening Neurological Deficits in Children. 



• ARCOSS MEETING ON NOVEMBER 18 

The Bay Area Association for Retirement Credit for 
Out-of-State Service will meet Saturday, November 18, 
from 9 to 12 at Rossmoor Leisure World, Walnut Creek, 
Clubhouse 1. Mr. Hall Stannard will be present to re- 
view present and future plans. All interested individuals 
are asked to attend. 



Mi 



• TEACHERS ASSOCIATION WILL MEET 

The Teachers Association of San Francisco will hold 
its regular meeting on Monday, November 20, at 4 p.m. 
at A. P. Giannini Junior High School, 39th Avenue and 
Ortega Street. 



• ACE TO HOST NEW TEACHERS 

The San Francisco branch of the Association for Child- 
hood Education will host new District teachers at a tour 
of the San Francisco Museum of Art on Monday, No- 
vember 20, at 4 p.m. 

Experienced teachers as well as new teachers are in- 
vited to attend the presentation. The Museum is located 
at McAllister and Van Ness Avenue. For additional in- 
formation please contact Mrs. Barbara Webber (Noriega 
Home School) or Noel Mertens (Sir Francis Drake). 



• SFCTA REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL TO MEET 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association 
Representative Council will meet at 4 p.m. on Monday, 
November 13, in Nicholas Hall of the Marines Memorial 
Building, 609 Sutter Street. 



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NEWSLETTER 



/OLUME 39 =^M 



NOVEMBER 20, 1967 



NUMBER 12 



Activities Are Varied 



Mi 

Ten Community Teachers Serve in District 



At the present time there are ten community teachers 
erving some 27 ESEA "target area" schools and 1 1 re- 
eiving schools within the District. 

One of their primary aims is to establish and maintain 
jositive and wholesome lines of communication between 
chool and community. 

How the ten community teachers work to accomplish 
■his goal can best be seen by examining some of the 
ctivities in which they are involved. The following is 
ot intended to be a complete listing but examples of 
urrent services being performed. 

Parent Association Activities — attending Execu- 
ive Board and regular PTA meetings, helping plan such 
neetings, assisting with PTA membership drives, work- 
ing with PTA committees. 

• Parent Involvement in School — coordinating the 
hools' parent workshop programs, assisting in the 

f Ij. lanning, implementing, and conducting of courses for 
tjifj arents, enlisting parent volunteers for class trips, kin- 
dergarten registration, and library service. 

• Individual Parent Contacts — assisting parents with 
idividual school problems and referrals to appropriate 
:hool authorities, making home visits on referral from 
■rincipal, alerting parents to opportunities for adult 

h ducation, helping make contacts with school social 
|i 'orkers, assisting when called upon to interpret and 
ni xplain to individuals or groups reports and programs, 

ach as the 1966-67 State Testing Program results and 
; ne SRI Compensatory Education Report. 
_J. • Community Involvement — participating in meet- 

lgs of community organizations, preparing surveys of 
, ammunity resources and personnel for school use, mak- 



y- 




w 



Mrs. Margaret Baikie, 1st grade teacher at Raphael Weill School, 
has been taking part in meetings with parents to discuss the 
school program as it functions at the classroom level. The meet- 
ings were followed up with individual conferences whenever 
possible to discuss the children's progress. The program was 
effected through cooperative efforts of administrators, faculty, 
parents, and the community teacher. 

ing contacts with local civil rights groups, assisting the 
community in founding youth groups, helping form 
community relations committees of parents, professional 
staff, and neighborhood associations, participating in 
community-sponsored fairs, art shows, and programs. 

• Involvement with School Personnel — developing 
human relations committees, helping plan for teachers' 
orientation to the community, arranging faculty discus- 
sion sessions, conferring with teachers. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



co.c 



Recruiting Team Returns from Trip to Eight Major Centers 



The San Francisco Unified School District's initial 
•:cruitment trip to interview prospective teacher appli- 
"jints has been called ". . . an historic program because 
was the first of its kind in the long history of San 
iiEirt ra ncisco's public schools" by Milton F. Reiterman, 
ersonnel Coordinator, in a report to the Superintend- 
it's Cabinet last Monday. 

The recruitment team visited the following centers: 
'enver, Colorado (University of Denver) ; Chicago, 
linois (Roosevelt University) ; Cincinnati Ohio (Miami 

(niversity at Oxford) ; New York (Columbia Univer- 
ty) ; Washington, D.C. (Howard University) ; Nash- 



ville, Tennessee (Fisk University) ; Houston, Texas 
(Texas Southern University) ; and Albuquerque, New 
Mexico (Skills Bank, Office of Economic Opportunity). 
Interviewers from District 

A total of seven interviewers from the District partici- 
pated at one or more of the centers. Three people were 
at all eight. This latter group included Mrs. Mary Boyd, 
Personnel Supervisor; Sylvester Kelly, principal of Roos- 
evelt Junior High ; and Bernard Branco, elementary 
teacher at Patrick Henry School. 

Mrs. Elfrida Noland, Personnel Supervisor, partici- 
( Continued on Page 4) 



NEWSLETTER 



November 20, 1961 



. . . Community Teacher Role Explained 

(Continued from Page 1) 




Mrs. Anita Provist, 2nd grade teacher at Jedediah Smith Annex, 
meets with a group of parents to better acquaint them with the 
school's program and the activities within her classroom. Some 
224 parents visited Jedediah Smith and Jedediah Smith Annex 
recently to participate in such meetings with faculty members. 

In many respects the community teacher functions as 
an extension of the school site principal. He helps orient 
the school to the community and the community to the 
school. 

A current example of an activity involving the com- 
munity teachers in improving school-parent understand- 
ing is the series of meetings being held at Jedediah 
Smith, Jedediah Smith Annex, Raphael Weill, and 
Golden Gate Schools. 

Through cooperative efforts of administrators, teach- 
ers, and community teachers, meetings with parents at 
the classroom level have been going on to explain the 
school program and how it functions. 

The classroom teachers have been describing course 
content, showing books and materials used, explaining 
standards of work and conduct, indicating how parents 
can help the teachers to do the best possible job in edu- 
cating their children, reviewing the meaning of report 
card marks, and answering questions raised by the par- 
ents in attendance. 

It is hoped that such sessions will help parents become 
more knowledgeable about the school, develop a better 
understanding and closer working relationship between 
the home and school, and increase cooperation with the 
school staff. 

In terms of operation, there are three centers to which 
the community teachers are assigned. These, and the 
schools the teachers are responsible to, are as follows: 

Jedediah Smith Center - - Ellen Benjamin (Bret 
Harte, Jedediah Smith and Annex, Burnett, Hunters 
Point I and Hunters Point II); Marvin Gentz (Sir 
Francis Drake and Annex, Bessie Carmichacl, Lincoln, 
Irving M. Scott, and Bayview). 

Golden Gate Center — Kelly Husbands (Golden 
Gate, Raphael Weill, Hancock, Redding); Mrs. Mae 
Threadgill (John Swett, Anza, Fremont); Ann Lacher 
(John Muir — full time); Mrs. Joyce Clay (Lawton, 
Francis Scott Key, Miraloma, Laguna Honda, and Dud- 
ley Stone). 



Patrick Henry Center — Bernard Branco (Marshall 
Annex, Buena Vista, Patrick Henry); Nora Haymond 
(Marshall, Bryant, Emerson, Daniel Webster, John Mc- 
Laren); Mrs. Leonia McQuillister (Fairmount, Lake- 
shore, Robert Louis Stevenson, Parkside, and Haw- 
thorne). 

Rosemary Chan is not assigned to one of the centers, 
and she is serving as community teacher at Commodore 
Stockton, Garfield, and Washington Irving. 

The community teachers are funded under the Ele- 
mentary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, Title I 
They were under the Special Educational Services Divi- 
sion until this term when they were transferred to th( 
Human Relations Division under Dr. William L. Cobb 
Assistant Superintendent. Junius Camp, Field Represent 
ative in the Human Relations Office, is supervising tfo 
work of the teachers. Each teacher is requested to pro 
vide a schedule and weekly log of activities to help as ai 
on-going evaluation of the program. 



Noted Composer Visits Schools 



"fn 

Ji 



Mi 

toil 




Noted composer-conductor Gunther Schuller (far right) was 
recent guest-visitor at Lowell High School and City College > 
San Francisco. Mr. Schuller was in San Francisco to conduct thre 
performances of his opera, The Visitation. Mr. Schuller spent 
session working with the Lowell Symphonic Band in preparatic 
for a school concert. On hand to greet the guest were (left 
right) Joseph Alessi, City College; Jack Pereira, Lowell; and D 
Albert A. Renna, Director of Music. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 12 



November 20, 1967 



135 Van Ness Avenue. San Francisco, Calif. 94102 



Published each Monday during the school year 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 



Edward Kemmitt, 

Vice President 
Reynold H. Colvin 
Adolfo de Urioste 



Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 
Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Alan H. Nichols 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



I 
Cfgori 

■ 

u 






pisei 



"I 



I November :J0, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



1 i "Freedom and the Law' 



fM. 



Junior High Forensic League Begins Season 




ok 



Ready and anxious to begin another year of service to the speech activities of the San Francisco Junior High School Forensic League 
rare the various school sponsors and officials (Top Row, left to right) Clement Zannini, Herbert Hoover; John Shankel, Horace Mann; 
I Jean Sheridan, James Denman; Rene French and Nadeen Johnson, Luther Burbank; Sherry Heakin and Mary Lee, James Lick; David 
» Cooper, Aptos; James Keolker, League Co-ordinator; (Bottom Row, left to right) Fred Romagnolo, Roosevelt; Harry Warren, Pelron; 
j Harvey Samuels, Portola; Gerald De Ryan, Marina; Thomas Heafy, A. P. Gianm'ni; Leo Lowe, Francisco; Eugene Block, Everett. Absent 

were Carole Hartgogian, James Denman; Tom Palmer, Benjamin Franklin; Joe Tanzi, Marina; Mrs. Pauline Levie, League Consultant; 
[land Dr. George Karonsky, League Chairman. 



I, 

Freedom and the Law is the provocative topic chosen 
fjjby the sponsors of the San Francisco Junior High School 

'/ II Forensic League for the fourth annual Public Speaking 
I Contest to be held at Luther Burbank Junior High 

,■' -ill School, Wednesday, December 13. 

The contest has earned the reputation as one of the 
jllmost successful local school activities due to the partici- 
H pation of all 15 junior high schools, interested speech 
.J educators who act as judges, the Lions Clubs of San 
■ Francisco, and the San Francisco Barristers Club, the 
I latter two assisting in the sponsorship of League awards. 
BjThe contest is divided into three categories: original 

Ml *»| oratory, oral interpretation, and extemporaneous speak- 

'JJl, ,ing. Freedom and the Law will be the topic used in all 

jrspeijicategories. 

. i.,! Spring Debate Tournament 

"'" j League sponsors are currently at work preparing 

lidebate teams for the ninth annual Spring Debate Tourn- 

! ament, another of the League's speech activities. Students 
lare presently beginning research on a topic related to 
freedom and law enforcement, "Resolved: That the 
Federal government should regulate possession and use 
i,19ii! of fire arms." The tournament will be held in May, 1968, 
~~"j and the finals will be telecast on KRON-TV, Channel 4. 
', — J Mr. James Keolker, Luther Burbank Junior High 
\riil School, has been chosen League Co-ordinator for this 
i year's program. He is being assisted by Dr. George 
Karonsky, Supervisor, Junior High Schools, League 
Chairman, and Mrs. Pauline Levie, Bureau of Audio 
Visual Education, League Consultant. Advanced plan- 
ning is organized by the League's Steering Committee 
comprised of local judges, barristers, and community 
groups interested in furthering public speaking activities 
in the junior high schools. 

In hopes of expanding activities to be an even broader 
>ase, Mr. Keolker has asked the League to consider the 



possibilities of an annual dramatics contest to provide 
even greater opportunities for students who enjoy and 
need public performance. Plans are being considered for 
the spring semester. 

The League began with a modest invitational debate 
program in 1959 when Mr. James Dierke, Assistant Su- 
perintendent, Junior High Schools, felt there was a 
definite speech need to be filled. Since that time, the 
League has consistently grown in size and scope under 
Mr. Dierke's guidance. 



,D> 



EMPLOYMENT AFTER RETIREMENT 

A person retired for service may be authorized 
by the State Retirement System to serve as a substi- 
tute in a position requiring certification qualifica- 
tions, or as a curriculum writer, a consultant in a 
field in which he is especially qualified, or as a 
teacher in a rest home for the aged, or in a com- 
munity center operated exclusively for the aged. 

This employment may not exceed 90 days in a 
fiscal year nor may the earnings therefrom exceed 
$1,800 within that period of time. 

A retired teacher who is serving as a substitute is 
responsible for determining that his service and/or 
salary does not exceed the limits explained above. 

Any service which is rendered after that point, 
or any substitute service which is rendered by a 
retired person without proper authorization as ex- 
plained above, shall be ruled invalid. The teacher 
may not accept salary, or must return salary which 
has been paid, for service which has been ruled 
invalid. 



NEWSLETTER 



November 20, 1967 



«: 



Announcements 



• ELEMENTARY ADMINISTRATORS 

The San Francisco Elementary Administrators Asso- 
ciation has called a special meeting for Monday, Novem- 
ber 20, at 3:30 p.m. at Robert Louis Stevenson Elemen- 
tary School. 

Guest speaker will be Mr. Milton Reiterman, Person- 
nel Coordinator, who will discuss the reorganization of 
the Personnel Division. He will explain personnel pro- 
cedures as they affect teachers and administrators and 
will answer questions from the audience. 



SABBATICAL LEAVE NOTICE 

Teachers or administrators planning to take a 
sabbatical leave during the fall term 1968 for travel 
or study are reminded that requests are due in the 
Personnel Division Office prior to March 1, 1968. 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES: 

Notice is hereby given of the following custodial vacan- 
cies: 

2704 — School Custodian, Female — Burnett and 
Douglas Elementary Schools, Herbert Hoover Junior 
High. 

2727 — School Custodian Foreman — Lowell High 
School. 

• TEACHER AID REQUESTED 

The California League for the Handicapped, Inc. an- 
nounces a need for home economics teachers to donate 
one or two Saturdays to teach a group of blind teen-agers 
cooking and the use of household appliances. Interested 
teachers are asked to contact Rose Resnick, Executive 
Director, at 776-3022. 

• TEACHERS ASSOCIATION WILL MEET 

The Teachers Association of San Francisco will hold 
its regular meeting on Monday, November 20, at 4 p.m. 
at A. P. Giannini Junior High School, 39th Avenue and 
Ortega Street. 

. . . Recruiting Team Returns Home 

(Continued from Page 1) 
pated through Washington, D.C.; Mr. Reiterman and 
Bryant Lane, Supervisor of Occupational Preparation, 
joined the tour at New York; and George Boisson, Per- 
sonnel Supervisor, took part in Albuquerque. 

A total of 162 applicants were interviewed; 32 per 
cent were representatives of minority ethnic groups. 
Outstanding Applicants Interviewed 

The recruiting team believes that many outstanding 
applicants were interviewed. All have either taken the 
National Teachers Examination or must arrange to do 
so. Each must fulfill all of the steps to employment as 
prescribed by the Board of Education. 

The purpose of the recruitment trip was to provide 
the necessary interview and thus save the applicants the 
expense of costly trips to San Francisco for that purpose. 
Additional recruiting efforts will be scheduled from time 
to time throughout the year. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 








Tuesday, November 21, 


1967, 


7:30 p 


m. 


Regular 


meeting, 1 70 Fell Street. 











FINAL 1967 

School 

1. Benjamin Franklin 

2. Everett 

3. Horace Mann 

4. Marina 

5. Presidio 

6. Francisco 

7. Roosevelt 



BASEBALL 
Division A 

Won 

4 
4 
4 
4 
2 
2 
1 



STANDINGS 



Lost 
2 
2 
2 
2 
4 
4 
5 



Per 666 age W 
.666 
.666 
.666 
.333 
.323 
.166 









Division B 








School 




Won 


Lost 


Percentage 


1. 


Herbert Hoover 




6 


1 


.857 


2. 


James Denman 




6 


1 


.857 


3. 


Luther Burbank 




4 


3 


.571 


4. 


A. P. Giannini 




4 


3 


.571 


5. 


Portola 




3 


4 


.429 


6. 


James Lick 




3 


4 


.429 


7. 


Pelton 




1 


6 


.142 


8. 


Aptos 




1 


6 


.142 






Division A Playoffs 






School 




Won 


Lost 


Percentage 


1. 


Everett 




1 





1000 


2. 


Horace Mann 




1 





1000 


3. 


Benjamin Franklin 





1 


.000 


4. 


Marina 







1 


.000 



rl soi 
for I 



Championship Playoffs 

School Won Lost Percentage 

1. Herbert Hoover 2 1000 

2. James Denman 1 1 .500 

3. Everett 1 .000 
3. Horace Mann 1 .000 

• FREEDOM CONFERENCE CALLED 

A conference jointly sponsored by the California State 
Board of Education, the Constitutional Rights Founda- pi 
tion, and the California Teachers Association entitled 
Challenges to Freedom in Our Schools will be held Sat- 
urday, December 2, at the San Francisco Hilton Hotel 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools, anc "'!' 
Dr. Zuretti L. Goosby, Board of Education Commission 
er, are conference participants. Dr. Jenkins will extenc 
welcoming greetings. 

Additional information may be secured from the Cali- 
fornia Teachers Association, 1705 Murchison Drive 
Burlingame 94010. 



1 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PERMIT No. 3966 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL D: !' 



135 VAN NESS AVE. 



D0CUM2JIT3 DEPARTUSJJT 
S. F. PUBLIC LIBRARY 
LA.RKIfJ & MC A&L'rSTES 

SAN FRA:i0IoC0, CALif 



RETURN REQUESTI 



ST3. 

94102 



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Hi, 
red i 



Uan,) 



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UUUUMENTS 

JAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



(2 o a 



AN FRANCISCO 
UBUC LIBRARY 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



NOVEMBER 27, 1967 



NUMBER 13 



n-Service Course Draws Crowd 




Vif 



onsiderable interest has been shown in the District's in-service 
>urse English as a Second Language as evidenced by the fact 
lat some 160 teachers enrolled in the course being offered 
ach Wednesday afternoon for eight weeks at James Lick 
unior High School. Teachers from all grade levels are taking 
art. Pictured above at one of the course meetings are (left to 
ight) Mr. William Galant, principal of James Lick; Mrs. Regina 
ebre, teacher at Samuel Gompers; Louise Lyman, teacher at 
bhn Adams Adult; Dr. Kenneth Croft, professor of English and 
nthropology at San Francisco State College and one of the 
>urse instructors; Barbara Gee, teacher at Commodore Stock- 
in; Beatrice Sutherland, consultant for the District; and Dr. 
sseph B. Hill, curriculum coordinator. 



Drive. 



i,C 



OLDI 



s 



Vide Interest Is Expressed in 
Jan Francisco Filrcistrip Series 

Reaction to the filmstrip series entitled San Francisco 
■ Our City and County, which was developed and pro- 

uced under the supervision of Dr. William B. Sanborn, 

(irector, Division of Instructional Materials, has been 

ighly favorable. 
Many requests to purchase these new filmstrips have 

een received from other school districts and teacher 



•aimng institutions. 

The District has entered into an agreement with the 
ociety for Visual Education, Inc., the firm which did 
le technical production of the filmstrips, whereby the 
ociety will assume all costs of production, canning, 
.beling, packaging, and merchandising of the filmstrips 
rid pay a royalty to the School District of ten per cent 
f the selling price. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



From the Personnel Office 

Teachers Retiring This Semester 
Should Take Appropriate Action 

Those teachers who contemplate retirement at the 
close of the current fall semester should initiate action in 
the near future in order that retirement payment may 
not be delayed unnecessarily. 

It is suggested that teachers seeking to initiate retire- 
ment proceedings should, if possible, submit a letter to 
such effect by December 15, 1967, to Mr. Milton Reiter- 
man, Personnel Coordinator. 

It is suggested that teachers follow this procedure: 

1. Submit a letter to the Personnel Coordinator indi- 
cating your intention to retire, and the proposed date of 
retirement. Copies of this letter should be submitted to 
the appropriate assistant superintendent. 

2. Write to the State Teachers' Retirement System, 
1416 Ninth Street, Sacramento 95814, notifying that 
office of your intention to retire and requesting the neces- 
sary forms. 

3. Notify the City Employees Retirement System, 450 
McAllister Street, of your intention to retire. 

4. Make requests to both the state and city retirement 
systems for assistance in determining which retirement 
program will be more advantageous in your circum- 
stances. 

5. If you determine that the State Retirement System 
will provide greater benefits in your case, you should sub- 
mit a letter to the Personnel Coordinator resigning from 
the School District. This is necessary in order that you 
may withdraw your funds from the local retirement sys- 
tem for deposit in the State Retirement System. 

Because processing of applications take some time, it is 
important that they be submitted sufficiently in advance 
to enable a proper consideration period, and to be sure 
the first retirement check is received on time. 



Teachers of Art Elect New Officers 

The San Francisco Teachers of Art announces its new 
officers for the 1967-68 school year as follows: Frank 
Lillef , Abraham Lincoln, president ; Daniel Froloff , Mis- 
sion, vice president; Emily Heron, James Denman, secre- 
tary; and Venita Lobdell, treasurer. 

The group's first meeting was held at the San Francisco 
Museum of Art and was hosted by Robert Whyte, educa- 
tion curator. 



NEWSLETTER 



November 27, 196V 



Sarah B. Cooper and John Hancock 

Schools Hold Educational Fai 




An "Educational Fair" was held on a recent evening for the 
parents of children enrolled at Sarah B. Coop:r and John Han- 
cock Elementary Schools. The school program was explained to 
the parents, and a number of displays and demonstrations were 
presented. Above, Miss Cecil Casey, assistant principal (left), 
and Mrs. Vicki LaBarr, second grade teacher (right) of Sarah B. 
Cooper, are seen with a group of primary children using a tape 
recorder in their reading program. The students are Laurie 
Williams, Julie Gee, and Elaine Dekker. Mrs. Patricia E. Crocker 
is principal of both schools. 



Supplies Purchase Expedited 

Changes in policy which will greatly expedite the 
purchase and delivery of supplies and materials 
were approved by the Board of Education at the 
November 7, 1967 meeting. 

The changes, recommended by Superintendent 
Robert E. Jenkins, are designed to minimize delays 
created by the processing of papers in School Dis- 
trict and city offices. 

The Board action sets in motion the following 
changes : 

1 . That requisitions requiring Board approval be 
submitted daily to the Purchasing Department and 
then covered at a subsequent Board meeting. 

2. That the ceiling on requisitions requiring in- 
dividual authorization by the Board be raised from 
$500 to $3,000. (The original ceiling was $250, 
which was subsequently raised to $500, and is now 
set at $3,000.) 

Since the Board normally meets twice monthly, 
the former procedure resulted in delaying requisi- 
tion transmittal until Board action had been taken. 
Now such transmittal will be effected daily. The 
raising of the ceiling on requisition amounts requir- 
ing Board approval will also eliminate holding 
many orders for Board approval. 



Supervision Scholarship Offered Loca , studentS ' Poems Are Pub , ished 



The California Association for Supervision and Cur- 
riculum Development announces that applications for 
the 1968 Helen Heffernan Scholarship are being ac- 
cepted. 

The purposes of the scholarship are to recruit qualified 
and successful teachers into the field of supervision and 
curriculum development and to encourage members of 
the profession to engage in graduate study. 

The scholarship consists of a gift in the amount of 
$1,000. A loan of $1,000 is available in addition to the 
gift and is interest free, to be paid back over a four-year 
period. The scholarship was established in recognition of 
the educational leadership of Helen Heffernan, Chief, 
Bureau of Elementary Education, California State De- 
partment of Education. 

Application forms may be secured by contacting 
Margery Fessier, Chairman, Helen Heffernan Scholar- 
ship Committee, 604 South Tamarind Street, Compton, 
California 90220. 



A folio of poems by San Francisco poets aged 12 to II 
years has been published in a limited edition by th> 
Friends of the San Francisco Library. It is called Priz 
Poems 1965-1967. 

The young poets were finalists in three annual poetr 
contests sponsored by the Friends in April of 1965, 1966 
and 1967 as part of National Library Week. 

The 32-page folio may be ordered at cost from th 
Friends of the San Francisco Public Library, Mail 
Library, Civic Center, San Francisco 94102. 



• LOWELL MUSICIANS ON RADIO 

Radio stations KKHI AM and FM Stereo will feature 
performances by the Lowell High School Orchestra and 
the Symphonic Band on Saturday morning, December 9, 
from 9 to 10 a.m. as part of the station's Our Youth in 
Concert series. 

The groups, under the direction of instructor John 
Pereira, will perform Stravinsky's Firebird Suite and 
Sonatina for Timpani by Tcherpnin. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



i* 



Vol. 39, No. 13 



November 27, 1967 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Puhlished each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo dc Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 



Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



I November 37, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



I j Foi Information Purposes 

{Grievance Procedure 

For the information and convenience of District school 
I personnel the Grievance Procedure Policy adopted by 
[the Board of Education in the fall of 1966 is reprinted at 
this time. 

i Policy Manual P 4130 

ARTICLE 4 — PERSONNEL, 

CERTIFICATED 
GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE 
Introduction 

Teachers are encouraged to ask the principal for assistance 
, I on any matters that relate to their school duties. The school 
1,1 llproblems of a teacher should first be taken to the principal and 
.-■; j (afterwards, generally with the approval of the principal, to other 
supervisory or administrative officers in the District. Nothing in 
this regulation should be construed as denying to any teacher 
lithe opportunity to consult with any supervisory or administra- 
tive officer in the District. 
JjTo Implement a Spirit of Good Working Relationships, the 
ii.i. Following Procedure Has Been Established: 
Mi 1. Definitions 

! a. Problem — A problem is a complaint or misunderstanding 
on the part of a professional staff member which arises from 
in the application and interpretation of Board of Education policies 
jj s j. land/or administrative regulations. 

I ; b. Grievance — A grievance is an unresolved, aggravated 
'' 'problem which becomes a grievance when either party to a 
III 1 disagreement states that a grievance exists and requests that the 
ijir. i (procedures contained herein be invoked. 

;„„ j c. Conferee — A conferee is a fellow faculty member, depart- 
ment head, supervisor, administrator, or professional organiza- 
tion representative. 
— I [2. Procedure 

1 I a. Problems shall be discussed by private conference between 
] the parties involved without conferees. 

(1) At least one private meeting between the parties 
-'" to a disagreement shall take place before the grievance 
In i procedure is invoked. More are ordinarily expected. 

( 2 ) The parties shall seek to adjust the difficulty at the 
point of origin by: 

(a) Obtaining advice from any appropriate division 
of the Central Office Staff and/or 

(b) Consulting with conferees, 
b. If the problem is not resolved at private conference, then 

either party may declare that a grievance exists and the follow- 
ng procedure invoked, 
rincipal's Level (Level I) 

a. Any certificated employee may present a statement of 
grievance in writing to his principal within ten school days 
ollowing the act or condition which is the basis of his com- 
olaint. 

b. The principal shall communicate his decision to the em- 
ployee in writing within ten school days after receiving the 
:omplaint. 

c. Either party to the grievance shall have the right to re- 
mest a personal conference with conferees in order to resolve 
he grievance. If both parties agree, conferees may also be 
>resent. 

d. Should either party deem it inadvisable to have such a 
neeting, or to hold a meeting at which conferees attend, the 
;rievance shall then move up to the Assistant Superintendent's 
..evel II. 
Vssistant Superintendent's Level ( Level II ) 

a. An employee may appeal in writing this decision to the 
Assistant Superintendent within ten school days after receiving 
t. A copy of the appeal shall be furnished by the principal, who 
i hall forward a report to the Assistant Superintendent. 
| b. The Assistant Superintendent shall investigate and confer 
'ith the employee within a reasonable period of time. The 
mployee, at his discretion, may bring in a conferee of his 
hoice. 

i c The Assistant Superintendent shall communicate the out- 
ome of the conference (s) to the principal and the employee in 
' friting within ten school days. 



d P; 

1 pofi 
3, 



Pr 



ISSi 



Policy is Reviewed 

Superintendent's Level (Level III) 

a. The employee may appeal this decision to the Superin- 
tendent within ten school days after receiving it, and may re- 
quest a meeting. A copy of the appeal shall be furnished the 
Assistant Superintendent, who shall forward a report to the 
Superintendent. 

b. The meeting shall be held within ten school days, at which 
time the employee may bring in a conferee of his choice. 

c. The Superintendent shall communicate his decision to the 
employee in writing within ten school days after the meeting. 
Copies shall be sent to the Assistant Superintendent and the 
principal. 

Board of Education Level (Level IV) 

a. The employee may appeal this decision directly to the 
Board of Education in writing, within ten schoo: days after the 
receipt of it. A copy of the appeal shall be furnished the Super- 
intendent. 

b. Upon receipt of the appeal, the Superintendent shall with- 
in ten school days furnish a full report to the Board of Educa- 
tion. This report shall include the teacher's statement of com- 
plaint and other pertinent materials. 

c. The Board of Education shall determine whether or not 
a hearing shall be granted. If a hearing is granted, the nature 
and extent of the hearing shall be determined by the Bojrd of 
Education. The decision of the Board shall be communicated 
in writing to the employee, with copies to the Superintendent, 
Assistant Superintendent, and principal. The de'is'on of the 
Board of Education shall be binding to the extent (hat no rights 
of the aggrieved to further legal action are abrogated. 
Grievances of Certificated Personnel Not Under the Supervision 
of a Building Principal. 

The procedures outlined in Levels I through IV shall apply 
to all certificated employees except that where a staff member's 
superior is someone other than a building principal, that person 
shall constitute authority at Level I. Where the Assistant Super- 
intendent is the aggrieved's immediate superior, the procedure 
shall begin at Level II. 




"Indians of North America" was the theme of a recent program 
in the World of Art series at Lawton Elementary School. Dr. 
William B. Sanborn, Director, Division of Instructional Materials 
(on the left), was the guest speaker, and he presented an illus- 
trated talk on "American Indians, Fact and Fantasy." Mrs. 
Helen Dahlgren (on the right) is coordinating the program for 
the school, while Mrs. Verla Leonard, Art Supervisor, directs the 
program. Dr. Sanborn is showing a California Indian basket to 
students Duane Walker, Melanie Brazil, Lori Wiimoth, and 
Wayne Ogi. Mrs. Marion Heimsoth is the principal of ELawton. 



NEWSLETTER 



November 27, 1967 



Announcements 



• COACHES' BOWLING TOURNAMENT 

The annual Bowling Tournament and Play Day for 
the San Francisco Association Athletic Coaches and 
Physical Education Teachers will be held on Friday, 
December 15, at 4 p.m. at the Westlake Bowl in Daly 
City. A buffet dinner will follow the day's activities. 
Reservations for the occasion may be made with Curtis 
Decker or Ernest Domecus at San Francisco City College. 

• DRIVER EDUCATION ARTICLE 

The Summer 1967 issue of Analogy magazine contains 
an article entitled "Questions from the Community — 
Answers from the Experts" in which five authorities in 
the field of traffic safety answer eight questions often 
asked of driver education programs. 

One of the five educators questioned in the article is 
Robert Perussina, head of the driver instruction program 
for the San Francisco Unified School District. 

• MUSEUM CHRISTMAS TOURS 

Beginning December 4, special Christmas tours will 
replace the general public tours in the European wing 
of the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum. The tours 
will feature "The Christmas Story," as expressed in the 
paintings and sculptures of the Museum, augmented by 
76 prints and drawings from the Achenbach Foundation 
for the Graphic Arts of the California Palace of the 
Legion of Honor. 

These drawings and prints, some of which are owned 
by the de Young Museum and are on loan to the Achen- 
bach Foundation, were selected by Dr. E. Gunter Troche, 
curator for the Foundation. 

The one-hour tours, scheduled at 11 a.m. and 2:30 
p.m. daily (except the holiday weekends) will be pro- 
vided by the docents from the Docent Council of the 
Museum, sponsored by the Junior League of San Fran- 
cisco, Inc. These special tours will not affect the tours in 
the Asian wing of the Museum. 

The Christmas tours will be offered by appointment to 
groups and school classes on weekdays only. Appoint- 
ments for either 10 a.m. or 1 : 30 p.m. tours may be made 
by calling the Docent Council office at 387-5922. The 
special Christmas tours will be offered up to January 5. 

. . . District Filmstrips Are in Demand 

(Continued from Page 1) 

There are nine filmstrips in the series which are keyed 
for use within the middle grades of the elementary 
school. Each District elementary school will be furnished 
with a complete set. 

Dr. Sanborn reveals that this is the first of a number of 
series which will be developed by the Division of Instruc- 
tional Materials. 

The San Francisco series was photographed by James 
Martin and edited by Mrs. Pauline Levie with the assist- 
ance of an elementary advisory committee including Mrs. 
Gail Giovannini, Mrs. Ruth Tisdale, Mrs. Thclma Boyer, 
and Mrs. Dorothy Dudley. 



• HORACE MANN, BALBOA HOST VISITORS 

Horace Mann Junior High School and Balboa High 
School served as hosts to some 41 visiting social studies 
students last week from Hill Junior High School in 
Novato, California. 

The students were accompanied by their teacher, John 
F. Burgoa, and spent the morning at Horace Mann and 
the afternoon at Balboa. Mr. Ron Cabral and Mr. Gene 
Phillips handled the arrangements at their respective 
schools. 

The Novato students were interested in meeting stu- 
dents from an urban school system and in exchanging 
ideas on a variety of topics. At both District schools an 
orientation program was planned, including a tour of 
the school plants. 

The visitors sat in on classes and were able to ask and 
answer questions related to urban and suburban prob- 
lems, school programs and offerings, recreation and lei- 
sure activities, and a number of topics of concern and 
interest to young people. 

The guests and hosts will follow up on the visit by 
holding class discussions at their respective schools on 
what they learned from the day's proceedings. 



i 



e PTA NARCOTICS MEETING 

The Presidio Junior High School Parent Teachers 
Association in a joint effort with the George Washington 
High School unit will present a program Narcotics — 
Effect on Youth on Tuesday, November 28, at 7:30 p.m. 
in the Presidio auditorium at 30th Avenue and Clement 
Street. 

Featured speakers include Lt. Norbert H. Currie of the 
Narcotics Bureau, Dr. Richard Leonards, pediatrician 
and Mrs. Frances Miller, Director, Family Life Educa- 
tion Service, SFUSD. The meeting is open to all inter- 
ested persons. 

• FIELD LIBRARIANS TO MEET 

The Field Librarians will meet Thursday, Novembei 
30, at 4 p.m. in the library of Presidio Junior Higl 
School, 450 - 30th Avenue. All elementary, junior anc 
senior high librarians are invited to attend. 



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SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



DSP 4 



1967 



SAN F"R ANC i S «. C iv 
pUBUO LIBRARY 



NEWSLETTER 



/GLUME 39 



DECEMBER 4, 1967 



NUMBER 14 



lurvey Indicates Needs 



Bilingual Program Summarized in Report 



I A report on the status of bilingual education in the 
.. [an Francisco Unified School District was presented to 
i he Board of Education at its November 21 meeting by 
j |)r. Joseph B. Hill, Coordinator of Curriculum. 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins had directed that a 

urvey be taken by the Curriculum Office to reveal by 

l .chool and grade level how many students have a native 

1 anguage other than English and how many are, by 

eason of language, unable to function effectively in a 

legular class. 

As a result of the bilingual survey, the Board approved 

ipie recommendation of Dr. Jenkins to appoint two full 

.me project coordinators to work with the problems of 

t -* ie Chinese and Spanish-speaking students in the Dis- 

„ rict. Both coordinators will work under the direction of 

°>>.Hill. 

mer 

roject Coordinator Announced 

oftbj! The Spanish Project Coordinator will be Elmer Galle- 
riciaijos, currently working in this area at the junior high 




Ql'C ree planting ceremonies were held recently at Patrick Henry 
lementary School as part of the city-wide street beautification 
rogram. Students from the primary and intermediate grades 
:>served as trees were planted along Vermont, 1 9th, and Rhode 
land Streets. Mr. Norvell Gillespie of the Anti-Litter League 
Jdressed the group, which included Dr. Mary C. McCarthy and 
Ir. Wilbert Vestnys from the Central Office and various civic 
id community officials. Above, Miss Peggy O'Brien, chairman 
'■ Trees for the City, helps Elizabeth Hernandez, Patrick Henry 
: udent body president, and Duncan Reid, a first grader, in the 
:tual planting. 



school level. His work will be expanded to cover all levels 
of instruction. 

A Chinese Project Coordinator will be appointed as 
soon as possible. 

Each coordinator will form an advisory committee in 
his area to help in planning and implementing a pro- 
gram of action. 

The problem is particularly pressing in the Chinatown 
area in view of the fact that some 1,000 school-age youth 
are arriving here from Hong Kong each year. 

Report Shows Totals 

The Bilingual Report presented to the Board shows 
totals by grade going from Children's Centers, Pre- 
Kindergarten and Kindergarten to the 12th grade. New 
students were listed as "beginning" — those whose native 
language is not English and who are in their first year of 
instruction in the English language; and "others" — 
those who are beyond the beginning level, but who need 
more work in English to be able to do well in a regular 
class. 

The survey lists 917 Chinese in the "beginning" cate- 
gory and 1.539 listed as "others." The Spanish group 
shows 831 listed as "beginning" and 1,059 as "others." 

In addition to the two major groupings, there are 730 
District students who speak some 40 different languages 
and all needing special English instruction. 

English as a Second Language 

District classes in which the governing objective is to 
help students learn to communicate in English are known 
as English as a Second Language or ESL classes. Instruc- 
tion in these classes is carefully planned, in the same way 
that foreign language instruction given to English speak- 
ing students is planned. The audio-lingual approach is 
the one followed, with understanding and speaking given 
first emphasis and reading and writing following in due 
course. 

While emphasizing the learning of English, ESL pro- 
grams also recognize the importance of the student's 
native culture and include in the content of instruction 
relevant material drawn from that culture. The appro- 
priate use of field trips, resource persons, and current ac- 
tivities and events in the community are included. 

In ESL classes English is the medium of instruction 
and the native language is used, if at all, only for neces- 
sary explanations. This helps insure that the main objec- 
tive, mastery of English, be achieved as rapidly as possi- 

( Continued on Page 2) 



NEWSLETTER 



December 4, 1987; 



Valor Award to Lowell Student 

Lowell High School ROTC Cadet Lt. Colonel Rich- 
ard L. Hayes has been announced as the recipient of the 
Legion of Valor Bronze Cross for Achievement Award. 

The award will be conferred at special ceremonies on 
Tuesday, December 5, at 8 a.m. on the Lowell High 
School football field. 

The award is presented by the Legion of Valor of the 
United States of America, Inc., a society composed of 
winners of the Medal of Honor, the Distinguished Serv- 
ice Cross, the Navy Cross or the Air Force Cross. 

The purpose of the medal is to recognize cadets of the 
ROTC who have achieved scholastic excellence in both 
academic and military subjects and who have demon- 
strated outstanding leadership ability. 

The Bronze Cross is presented annually to one out- 
standing cadet selected from the 47 high school ROTC 
units located in the XV United States Army Corps Area 
— California, Arizona, and Nevada. 

Richard is the fourth Lowell student to be so honored 
in the past five years. 



. . . Bilingual Report Reviews Program 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ble. A 1967 amendment to the Education Code permits 
that "The governing board of any school district and any 
private school may determine when and under what cir- 
cumstances instruction may be given bilingually." 

Spanish Offerings Noted 

The report notes that Spanish as a language is offered 
at all grade levels from 6 through 12, and suggests that 
the Spanish classes can be a useful vehicle in reinforcing 
pride of Spanish-speaking students in their native back- 
ground and culture. Classes in Mandarin Chinese, pro- 
viding like benefits, are offered in two elementary schools, 
two junior high schools, and four senior high schools. 

A committee representing all instructional levels was 
formed in September to review programs being carried 
on by the School District. The committee has recom- 
mended that the District should compare and evaluate 
the programs and approaches in the bilingual program 
to determine their relative productiveness as a guide for 
future development. 

The committee also suggested that the District con- 
tinue to develop materials for use by the teachers of ESL 
classes, search for new and innovative procedures in the 
teaching of ESL classes, provide in-service courses, and 
develop additional units on the contributions and culture 
of the groups represented in the schools. 



• CITY COLLEGE CONCERT 

The City College of San Francisco Symphonic Band 
will perform in concert Sunday, December 10, in the 
Lowell High School auditorium at 5 p.m. 

The concert will feature Paul Renzi as guest soloist 
and Jack Pereira as guest conductor. Tickets are $1 for 
adults and 50 cents to student body card holders. 

Conductor Joseph Alessi announces that proceeds from 
the concert will be used for music scholarships. 



A District 1 Requirement 

National Teachers Examination 
Scheduled for February 3 r 1968 

The Division of Personnel Service announces the re 
quirements for teacher employment relative to the 
National Teachers Examination as follows: 

1. The National Teachers Examination is now a re- 
quirement for placement on elementary, secondary anc 
special educational services (child welfare) Eligibility 
Lists for 1968-69 in the San Francisco Public Schools. 

2. Teachers who wish to qualify for placement on th< 
Eligibility Lists in a transfer between instructional divf 
sions must submit scores from the National Teacher: 
Examination to the Teacher Personnel Office. 

3. The National Teachers Examination will be helt 
on Saturday, February 3, 1968, at the following tes 
centers: University of California at Berkeley, Universit; 
of San Francisco, San Francisco State College, San Josi 
State College, and Stanford University. 

4. Registration forms for the February 3 examinatioi 
must be mailed to the Educational Testing Center fa- 
Friday, January 12, 1968: National Teachers Examina 
tion, Educational Testing Service, Box 911, Princeton 
New Jersey 08540. The exact time and location of thi 
examination will be assigned by the Educational Testins 
Service. 

5. Regular registration fee for the common examina 
tion plus one teaching area examination is $11. 

6. Payment of an additional $3 late registration fe 
will permit acceptance of registration forms up to th 
late registration closing date of Friday, January 19, 196f 

7. The following scores must be submitted: (a) Ele 
mentary, Secondary, Juvenile Court Classes — Commo:! 
Exam and Teaching Area Exam and (b) All other area, 
of Special Education Services — Only Common Exam. 

8. Applicants who have taken the National Teacher 
Examination within the last five years may submit thes 
scores to the Personnel Office, unless they wish to up 
grade their scores by retaking the test. 



:■ 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 39, No. 14 December 4, 1967 

135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



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December 4, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



Technical Track' Is Integrated 
Into District's ROTC Program 

Department of the Army has given to the San Fran- 
1 cisco Unified School District the authority to establish 
[| "Technical Track" ROTC, a new concept, that will be 

integrated into the present ROTC program. 

This form of ROTC offers the interested male student 

ROTC credit for selected technical courses that he is 
j|now pursuing in his established program. The selected 
I courses must be of a type that will fit into Army specialty 

technical areas such as clerical, automotive, welding, 

printing, woodwork, electronics, chemical and other such 
I technical courses now being taught in senior high schools. 

Course Content Listed 

In addition to the student taking and earning ROTC 
i (credit for the technical courses mentioned above, the 
[(student cadet will take a minimum of ROTC courses to 
Bfulfill his ROTC requirement. The ROTC courses will 
{include leadership, courtesy and discipline, drill, map 
t ireading, teaching methods, rifle marksmanship, first aid 
and military history among others. 

The two programs are not separate but are integrated, 
ljand the privileges, rank, and promotions within the 
1 'Cadet Brigade are equally available to all regardless of 
J whether a cadet is enrolled under the academic track or 
Itechnical track ROTC. 
. Main Difference Noted 

The main difference is that the student cadet taking 
|lthe technical track will receive a lesser amount of in- 
.1 structional hours in military subjects since the majority 
J of his time is devoted to technical courses as explained in 
f paragraph 3. Another difference is that the technical 
Jitrack student cadet will have opportunity to earn but 
five credits per school year while the full time ROTC 
J "academic" track cadet now earns ten credits per year. 

The new program of ROTC technical track now opens 

J .the door to all male students desiring ROTC but who 

(heretofore could not take advantage due to their already 

1 programmed courses. Now they can count that selected 

technical course, take a minimum number of ROTC 

H hours and receive credit for both. The Army instructors 

will utilize the morning "O" period, 7:55 a.m. to 8:50 

lia.m., two or three periods per week for those student 

:adets who wish to include technical track ROTC in 

g their present program. 

" Additional Opportunity 

[^ The revitalized concept offers a great opportunity for 

r :he student to not only take ROTC along with his present 

.chedule but earn five additional credits with little 

•hange in his present program. 

Student athletes will be particularly interested since 

H 'his early morning program will not interfere with their 

Activities and will allow them to participate in both of 

hese exciting, interesting, and competitive courses, RO- 

— TC and athletics. 



Apprentice Programs Discussed 




District assistant principals in charge of pupil personnel, head 
counselors, and vocational counselors took part in a recent pro- 
gram presented by the San Francisco Labor-Management Joint 
Apprenticeship Committee. The subject of the meeting was a 
general discussion of apprenticeable trades and allied job clusters. 
Pictured are a number of the participants: (standing, left to 
right) George Harter, Executive Manager, S. F. Electrical Con- 
tractors; Bernard Miles, Secretary-Treasurer, Machinists JAC; 
James Brooks, Consultant, Division Apprenticeship Standards; 
Edward Hibbert, General Supervisor of Personnel, American Can 
Co.; Gil Davidson, Area Supervisor, Area A; Al Figone, President, 
Carpenters Union No. 483; (seated) Mrs. Alice Henry, Director 
of Pupil Services; and Dr. Edward D. Goldman, Assistant Super- 
intendent, Adult and Vocational Education. 



Everett Students in Food Drive 

Students at Everett Junior High School recently com- 
pleted their 12th Annual Thanksgiving Box Drive in which 
each homeroom decorated a box and collected nonperish- 
able food items to fill it. On the final day of the drive, a 
frozen turkey was added to each box, and, with the help 
of the Everett Parent Teachers Association, the boxes 
were distributed to deserving families of Everett students, 
resulting in a happier Thanksgiving for both the givers 
and receivers. 

Another successful Everett activity was an "Olympic 
Warm-Up" program, which featured the Everett music 
department and various talented students. Everett's 
theme for the year is "Olympic — brotherhood of people 
and peaceful competition." Several hundred parents and 
guests attended the program, which also included art- 
work and displays from the school's art classes. 



IN MEMORIAM 
Evangeline Powell 



GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE CORRECTION 

The November 27, 1967, issue of the Newsletter 
contained a reprint of the District Grievance Pro- 
cedure Policy. In part "a" under Assistant Superin- 
tendent's Level (Level II) the wording should 
read : "A copy of the appeal shall be furnished the 
principal, who shall forward the report to the As- 
sistant Superintendent." This eliminates the word 
"by" from the phrase ". . . furnished by the prin- 
cipal. . . ." 



NEWSLETTER 



December 4, 1967 



Announcements 



• BILL OF RIGHTS WORKSHOP 

The California State Department of Education and 
the San Francisco Social Studies Council will sponsor a 
one-day workshop, Freedom and Responsibility — The 
Bill of Rights, on Saturday, January 13, 1967, from 9:30 
a.m. to 2 : 30 p.m. at City College of San Francisco. 

The morning program will consist of sections devoted 
to investigations of media and methods in the teaching 
of Constitutional Rights. Sections will be divided by 
teaching level to cover all grades, K through 14. 

The afternoon program will consist of a luncheon 
meeting and will feature introductory remarks by Dr. 
Laurel Glass, Board of Education Commissioner and 
Trustee of the Constitutional Rights Foundation. The 
luncheon address will be given by Dr. Dorman Commons, 
President of the California State Board of Education. 

For information and reservations contact Norman 
Durieux, 1390 Skyline Drive, Daly City 94015. Registra- 
tion deadline is December 12. 



• MORE EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS FILM 

The San Francisco Federation of Teachers announces 
that the 30-minute color film, What's the Tallest I Can 
Grow?, about the More Effective Schools Program can 
be obtained for showing to faculty and community 
groups by contacting the office of the Federation, 4349 
California Street, telephone 387-1000, or the San Fran- 
cisco Federation of Teachers Elementary Committee 
Chairman, Mrs. Constance Benz, 4421 - 19th Street, 
telephone 626-1493. 



• PHI DELTA KAPPA MEETING 

The December meeting of the Golden Gate Field 
Chapter Phi Delta Kappa will be held on Tuesday, 
December 5, at 6:30 p.m. in the Board of Directors 
Room, Fosters Restaurant, Golden Gate Avenue and 
Polk Street. 

Mr. Robert H. Mendelsohn, San Francisco supervisor- 
elect, will speak on the topic "A Supervisor Looks at Our 
Education System." 

• DEPARTMENT HEADS MEETING 

The Department Heads Association of San Francisco 
Senior High Schools will meet on Wednesday, December 
6, in the teachers' cafeteria of Galileo High School at 
2:45 p.m. 



• CITY COLLEGE WINTER LECTURE SERIES 

City College of San Francisco announces three winter 
evening lectures as part of a series dealing with urban 
problems. The lectures will begin at 8 p.m. in the Col- 
lege Theater. There is no admission charge. 

Monday, December 4 — Mayor-elect Joseph Alioto 
will discuss "What City Hall Can Do." 

Monday, December 11 — Supervisor Terry Francois 
will highlight "Urban Renewal." 

Monday, January 15 — Board of Education Commis- 
sioner Dr. Zuretti L. Goosby will talk about "Solutions 
Schools Can Provide." 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, December 5, 1967, 4:00 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 1 70 Fell Street. 



• SECONDARY SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS 

The San Francisco Association of Secondary School 
Administrators (CASS A, District 6) will hold a Yule- 
tide Reception in honor of all newly appointed secondary 
school administrators on Friday, December 8, from 4:30 
to 6 : 30 p.m. at the White Whale Restaurant. 



ALEMANY ADULT SCHOOL 

Upon recommendation of Superintendent Robert 
E. Jenkins and with the approval of the Board of 
Education the fifth adult school at 750 Eddy Street 
has been officially named Alema'ny Adult School. 

The facility was formerly under John Adams 
Adult School and listed as John Adams Annex. 






• TASF PLANS DECEMBER 11 MEETING 

The Teachers Association of San Francisco will hold 
a regular meeting on Monday, December 1 1, at 4 p.m. at 
A. P. Giannini Junior High School. 



• ELEMENTARY SUPPLY COMMITTEE 

The Elementary Supply Committee will meet at Visi- 
tation Valley at 1:45 p.m. on Wednesday, December 6. 
Principals having items for discussion are requested to 
submit these to their representative prior to the meeting. 

• STANFORD EDUCATION CLUB 

The Stanford Education Club of San Francisco an- 
nounces its Second Annual Winter Fun Trip to South 
Shore Lake Tahoe on January 13-14, 1968. Included are 
the round trip transportation via Greyhound bus, ac- 
commodations at a Stateline motel, dinner on Saturday 
night and brunch on Sunday morning, shuttle service to 
the casinos, and other extras. Total cost is $26.50 per 
person (for twin-bedded rooms; $5 extra for single 
rooms) . A $7 cash refund reduces the total cost to $19.50. 
Reservations deadline is December 15. Checks should be 
made payable to Stanford Education Club of San Fran- 
cisco and sent to the Stanford Snow Trip, 2346 - 43rd 
Avenue, San Francisco 941 16. 



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X2 dL_-/-i— "1 jC' C£> Jr%} ^d^L^~<L-*-J&-~Q--r^— -J 'FRANCISCO 



NEWSLETTER 

•QLUME 39 «^»® DECEMBER 11, 1967 NUMBER 15 



Cinema* 1967! 



a jWes&age of ?|ope 

• That the true spirit of Christmas will fill our hearts 
and minds with good will for today and tomorrow. 

• That the fear and disillusionment of these troubled 
times will give way to courage and confidence. 

• That we will have a renewed faith in ourselves and 
in each other, and faith in the beliefs that we hold 
most dear. 

• That we will be ever mindful of the blessings that 
are ours as free men in a free land. 



• 



That this will be a joyful time for you and yours with 
a future filled with happiness and success. 

MERRY CHRISTMAS 
and a 
HAPPY NEW YEAR 





Superintendent of Schools 




i 



NEWSLETTER 



December 11, 196' 



Symposium on Handicapped Set 

The San Francisco Chapter of the California Associa- 
tion for Neurologically Handicapped Children will pre- 
sent a symposium, Learning Disabilities — A National 
Dilemma, on Friday evening, January 12, and Saturday, 
January 13, at the Scottish Rite Memorial Temple, 2850 
19th Avenue. 

The symposium has been planned for professionals in 
the field and for parents concerned with educationally 
handicapped children. 

Speakers and their topics during the two-day sym- 
posium include the following: 

Friday evening, January 12, 1968 — 

7:30 p.m. — Jean E. Lukens, M.S., Coordinator of the 
Perceptual Development Program, Oakland Schools, 
Michigan — "A Public School Program in Action" 

Saturday morning, January 13 • — 

9:30 a.m. — Richard L. Masland, M.D., Director, 
National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blind- 
ness, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 
— "Children with Minimal Brain Dysfunction — A 
National Problem" 

10:45 a.m. — Naomi Zigmond, Ph.D., Language 
Pathologist, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts 
General Hospital, Boston — "Auditory and Visual 
Learning Disabilities — Diagnosis and Prescription" 

Saturday afternoon, January 13 — 

12 noon — Luncheon — Lloyd D. Luckmann, Ll.B., 
Ed.D., Acting President, City College of San Francisco. 

1 :30 p.m. — Sam D. Clements, Ph.D., Director, Na- 
tional Project on Minimal Brain Dysfunction in Chil- 
dren, U. S. Department of Health, Education and Wel- 
fare; Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Direc- 
tor, Child Guidance Study Unit, University of Arkansas 
Medical Center, Little Rock — "A New Look at Learn- 
ing Disabilities" 

2:15 p.m. — Lester Tarnopol, Sc.D., Vice President, 
California Association for Neurologically Handicapped 
Children; Research Director, Delinquency Control Pro- 
ject, San Francisco, U. S. Department of Health, Educa- 
tion and Welfare; City College of San Francisco — 
"Learning Disabilities and Delinquency — Some Causes 
and Effects" 

3 p.m. — Sidney J. Adler, M.D., Chief of Staff, Chil- 
dren's Hospital of Orange County, Orange, California — 
"The Pediatrician and Drug Therapy for Children with 
Learning Disabilities" 

Robert T. Elliott, Consultant, California State De- 
partment of Education, Bureau for Educationally Handi- 
capped and Mentally Exceptional Children, and Martin 
J. Dean, Coordinator, Special Educational Services Di- 
vision, SFUSD, will welcome the two sessions. 



• NEW DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

Mr. Martin J. Dean, Coordinator, Special Educational 
Services Division, announces that the State Department 
of Education has approved the establishment of a second 
Development Center for Handicapped Minors. This 
facility will be located at the Francis Scott Key Annex 
site. 



Applications Are Being Accepted 
For Three Supervisor Positions 

The Personnel Division announces that application: 
are being accepted for three positions which have re- 
cently been established and are currently vacant in th( 
Special Educational Services Division. The positions anc 
their requirements are as follows: 

Supervisor, Psychological Services — Applicants mus 
possess the doctorate or equivalent, certification as < 
school psychologist in California, and a Standarc 
Supervision Credential, Standard Administrative Cre 
dential, or General Administrative Credential. Primar 
responsibility will be the supervision of a staff of schoo 
psychometrists and school psychologists and the develop 
ment and expansion of psychological services for stu 
dents in various and general special education programs 

Supervisor, Guidance and Counseling — Applicant 
must possess the doctorate or equivalent, certification a 
a school counselor in California, and a Standard Super 
vision Credential, Standard Administrative Credential 
or a General Administrative Credential. Primary respon 
sibility will be the supervision of a staff of school coun 
selors and administrators and the development and ex 
pansion of Pupil Personnel Functions for students in th 
elementary and secondary schools. 

Supervisor, Programs for Secondary Mentally Handi 
capped — Applicants must possess at least the Maste 
of Arts degree, certification as a teacher of the mentall 
retarded in California, and a Standard Supervisio: 
Credential, Standard Administrative Credential, 
General Administrative Credential. Primary responsi 
bility will be the supervision of teachers and departmer 
heads of the Secondary Mentally Handicapped prograr 
and the improvement and expansion of educational an 
vocational opportunities for students of this program. 

All three of these positions have been classified 
Supervisor AA in accordance with the Certificated Pei 

(Continued on Page 4) 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



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Vol. 39, No. 15 



December 11, 1967 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



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December 11, 1967 



NEWSLETTER 



Pre-Kindergarten Centers Fill Many Needs 



Four-year-old are going to school regularly today in 
[seven elementary schools in the District. As part of San 
[Francisco's ESEA project, financed by Federal funds, the 
'first prekindergarten centers were opened in February, 
'1966, in the target areas of the city. Today in twelve 
llclassrooms a total of 480 children, ranging from three 
I years and nine months to kindergarten age, are attending 
la special program designed to help compensate for the 
lidisadvantages of a culturally deprived background. 

Each classroom enrolls a morning and afternoon group 
Kof twenty children for a 2^ -hour session and is staffed 
iwith two professional teachers, specially trained for this 
Learly childhood education project. In addition, each 
(class has an aide to assist the teachers, and the services 
pf a nurse, doctor, social worker, speech therapist, and 
■psychologist. A hot meal is served to each group, either 
| breakfast or lunch. 
Curriculum Emphasizes Special Needs 

The prekindergarten curriculum is drawn from long- 
established nursery-school practice, with emphasis on 
the special needs of these children. Children are given a 
maximum of individual attention and provided with a 
, wide range of experiences, all with the intention of build- 
ing self-confidence and stimulating cognition. Where 
IjEnglish is not the home language, a variety of activities 
,s offered to develop verbal skills. 

Their parents, too, are continuously involved in the 
i'3rekindergarten program in the hope that establishing a 
j dose school-parent relationship may serve as a motivating 
['actor for the remainder of the child's school career. 
! Specifically, the prekindergarten daily program con- 
sists of a number of carefully designed free-choice activi- 
ties intermixed with appropriate teacher-directed ex- 
Deriences. The room environment — which in pre- 
kindergarten is the fundamental "textbook" — is 
jlanned to encourage the child's participation at his 
wn pace. The curriculum includes the following leam- 
'ng experiences: 

Creative Arts: Painting, drawing, finger painting, 

>aper construction, and collage, working with crayons, 

"halk, paint, brushes, scissors, paste, glue, clay, and tem- 

>era in order to encourage creative expression. 

• Dramatic Play: Acting out real life roles and fantasies, 

itilizing such playhouse equipment as stove, refrigerator, 

; ink, telephone, pots and pans, dress-up clothing and 

■ nany household accessories to develop a sense of ident- 

Table Toys and Games: Manipulating with a large 
,iumber and variety of put-togethfr materials, building 
T 'ets, puzzles, and games, to teach and relate concepts of 
ize, number, quantity, and sequence. 

Children's Books: Making books available so children 
■am their use and value and have the experience of 
,Dcusing attention and being able to handle books freely. 
- Nature Study: Experiencing natural phenomena di- 
:ctly by introducing live animals, growing plants, food 
xperimentation, aquariums, pictures and charts, and 
mple science tools to satisfy and stimulate the child's 
uriosity about the physical world. 



Teaching Aids: Using tape recorders, phonographs, 
slides, flannel boards, and cameras to reinforce the many 
learning experiences. 

Following periods of individual free-choice activity, 
the children participate in short periods of activities in- 
volving group contact and outdoor play. Here the teach- 
ers introduce games, conversation, or songs which stimu- 
late the use of language. Excursions in and around the 
school building and out on field trips to other parts of 
the city help to broaden experience with the real world. 
Through these and other means the teachers encourage 
the development of vocabulary and concentration, stim- 
ulate intellectual growth, and attempt to overcome the 
lack of experience that in the past has put these chil- 
dren at such a disadvantage in the elementary grades. 
Center Locations Listed 

A prekindergarten center is located in the school 
buildings of Commodore Stockton, Dudley Stone, Haw- 
thorne, Hunters Point I, John Swett, and Raphael Weill; 
another center is adjacent to John McLaren. The serv- 
ice is available to children residing in the designated 
poverty areas of Chinatown, Hunters Point-Bayview, 
Mission, and the Western Addition. At present there are 
waiting lists for nearly all the classes. 

Mrs. Madelon Halpern is serving as project head of 
the prekindergarten program, under the direction of 
Theresa S. Mahler, Director, Children's Centers Divi- 
sion. 



Diamond Heights To Be Dedicated 




The newest San Francisco public school. Diamond Heights Ele- 
mentary School, will be officially dedicated on Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 12, in special ceremonies. The facility is one of a number of 
school building projects included in the 1964 School Building 
Program. The school is located at 350 Amber Drive and opened 
its doors for the first time this fall semester. 

Formal dedication ceremonies for the new Diamond 
Heights Elementary School will take place Tuesday, De- 
cember 12, at 10 a.m. 

The opening of the school at 350 Amber Drive on 

(Continued on Page 4) 



NEWSLETTER 



December 11, 1967 



Announcements 



• POLY TOTS CHRISTMAS PARTY 

Santa will be arriving early for the little brothers and 
sisters of Polytechnic High School students. He will be in 
the cafeteria on the last day of school before Christmas 
vacation, December 15, from 2:30 to 5 p.m. to give the 
youngsters a Poly Holiday greeting. Committees of stu- 
dents are handling the party arrangements, including 
invitations, publicity, decorations, entertainment and re- 
freshments. The afternoon's highlight will be the opening 
of the presents under the tree. The Polytechnic students 
will see that each little guest begins the Holiday Season 
with a happy heart. 

• ELEMENTARY ADMINISTRATORS 

The third general meeting of the San Francisco Ele- 
mentary Administrators Association will be held Mon- 
day, December 11, at 3:45 p.m. in the cafeteria of A. P. 
Giannini Junior High School. All members are encour- 
aged to attend. 

• SFCTA REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL 

The San Francisco Classroom Representative Council 
will meet Monday, December 11, at 4 p.m. in Nicholas 
Hall of the Marines Memorial Building, 609 Sutter 
Street. 



. . . Diamond Heights Dedication 

(Continued from Page 3) 
September 6 marked the completion of one of the major 
construction projects of the 1964 School Building Pro- 
gram. 

Completed at a cost of $974,900, the Diamond Heights 
structure has two kindergarten rooms, 17 classrooms, a 
multipurpose room, and an instructional materials cen- 
ter. Myrna Graves is the acting principal and Robert 
Jiminez is serving as assistant principal. 

Honored guests at the ceremonies will include Mrs. 
Ernest R. Lilienthal, President, Board of Education; Dr. 
Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools; Dr. Don- 
ald Rhodes, Assistant Superintendent, Elementary 
Schools; and Mr. Wilbert Vestnys, Assistant Superin- 
tendent, Buildings and Grounds. 

The Diamond Heights Glee Club, August Padula di- 
recting, will be featured in several selections. 



. . . Applications for Supervisor Due 

(Continued from Page 2) 
sonnel Salary Schedule. The salary range is $16,850- 
$19,925 and the work year is approximately 231 days. 

Application for these positions must be in writing on 
appropriate forms available in the Personnel Division 
Office and should be returned to Milton Reiterman, 
Personnel Coordinator, Personnel Division, not later 
than January 22, 1968. 

Interviews will be scheduled after the application has 
been filed. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, December 19, 1967, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



TIME SHEET PICK-UP 

December time sheets for teachers will be picked 
up at the schools at 8:30 a.m. on December 15, 
1967, for senior, junior, and elementary teachers. 

The adult schools will deliver their full-time 
teachers' time sheets on December 15 and part- 
time teachers' time sheets on December 27 at 9 a.m. 

Time sheets for clerks and janitors for all schools, 
including the adult schools for December 16 
through December 31 will be picked up at the 
schools at 8: 30 a.m. on December 22, 1967. 

Sheets are to be completed and signed by the 
deadline dates above to enable delivery service to 
keep the schedule. 

The number of days in December for principals 
and assistant principals is 1 1 ; the number of days 
for teachers is 1 1 . 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCY 

Notice is hereby given of the following custodia 
vacancy: 

2724 — School Custodian, Male — Alvarado Elemen 
tary School. 

• PORTOLA RETIREMENT DINNER 

The Portola Junior High School faculty announces 
retirement dinner honoring Mrs. Frances Moore anc 
Miss Alicia Unger on Friday, January 19, 1968, at thi 
Presidio Officers' Club. A social hour will commence a 
6:30 p.m. with dinner being served at 7 : 30 p.m. 

Persons interested should make checks in the amoun 
of $7.50 payable to Clarence Meltesen, Portola Junio 
High School, 350 Girard Street, San Francisco 94134 
Checks should be mailed before January 10, and par 
ticipants are asked to indicate a steak or lobster dinne 
preference. Gift contributions are invited from those un 
able to attend. For further information call 585-2044. 



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SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



JAN 2 1960 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



JANUARY 1, 1968 



NUMBER 16 



Community Forums to Consider Alternatives 



Report Stresses School Equality/ Quality 



A number of imaginative and innovative proposals de- 
signed to provide equality and quality in education for 
San Francisco schools were presented by Superintendent 
'Robert E. Jenkins to the Board of Education at the De- 
cember 19, 1967 meeting. 

The proposals were contained in a detailed report en- 
titled Educational Equality / 'Quality , Report #1 . . . 
'Program Alternatives. 

In commenting on the report, Dr. Jenkins stressed that 
, all San Franciscans should be provided an opportunity to 
, discuss the alternatives for improving racial balance and 
educational quality in the schools. 

He proposed that in the next three months a series of 
community forums be held to consider the measures, and 
that representative citizens, teachers, and administrators 
be asked to review, study, and evaluate them. 
Recommendations to Be Made 

At the conclusion of these activities, the Superintend- 
ient will present his recommendations to the Board of 
Education. Dr. Jenkins emphasized that decisions will 
have to be made soon, and that only as a result of com- 
munity response to the proposals and alternatives will 
;the priorities for action by the Board and schools be 
determined. 

He explained that the title of the report stemmed 
from his belief that it is not enough to propose measures 
to improve racial balance unless the quality of education 
is improved as well. 

The report was submitted in response to the Board's 
request that the Superintendent evaluate the alternative 
plans proposed by the Stanford Research Institute, re- 
gained by the Board in 1966 to determine ways in which 
racial balance could be improved in the District. It was 
suggested that the Superintendent and staff select ap- 
proximately three of the twelve plans for further con- 
sideration. 

i Besides fulfilling this goal, the report also offers eight 
.idditional program alternatives for educational equality 
imd quality. It further establishes five components which 
lave evolved from the consideration of equality and 
Quality objectives, each component calling for a re- 
mentation of either the roles to be filled by professionals 
,n the classroom, or of the services performed by the 
;chool system, or of the content and methods of the in- 
structional program. 
"io Comprehensive Solutions Offered 

Dr. Jenkins indicated that none of the alternatives 
)roposed by the Stanford Research Institute provides a 



comprehensive solution to the problem of imbalance in 
the San Francisco schools. The three plans chosen for 
consideration and further study involve all the major 
alternatives the Institute analyzed. They have their 
strengths and weaknesses which must be considered 
carefully. 

The first (B-3) would revise attendance boundaries 
and would bus 2,270 elementary and 3,840 secondary 
students. It would not improve racial balance to any 
significant extent. 

The second (C-3) would reorganize elementary schools 
as K-l-2-3 or K-4-5-6, would revive attendance bound- 
aries, and would bus 2,770 elementary and 3,640 second- 
ary students. It would result in a fair increase in racial 
balance. 

The third (D-2) would reorganize elementary schools 
as K-l-2-3 or K-4-5-6, would combine into pairs some 
with extreme imbalance, would bus 6,930 elementary 
and 8,440 secondary students, would make Lowell a 
comprehensive high school, would close Polytechnic, and 
would make Benjamin Franklin the academic high 
school. It would result in a good increase in racial bal- 
ance, but involves extensive busing and high costs. 
Eight Innovative Approaches 

The eight innovative approaches to improve quality 
and extend integrated experiences which go beyond the 
specific SRI studies on racial imbalance as outlined by 
the Superintendent include the following: 

1. All-Year Outdoor Education Program — Students 
in the fifth and sixth grades would spend a school week 
in a camp outside the city. They would experience learn- 
ing opportunities in such areas as astronomy, geology, 
meteorology, plants and animals, conservation, marine 
biology, map and compass, personal hygiene, social liv- 
ing, arts and crafts, music, and outdoor recreation. Each 
field experience would be preceded and followed by a 
reading, language, and mathematics lesson directly re- 
lated to the child's experiences. Social contacts would 
involve children of various races and from many neigh- 
borhoods. 

2. Outdoor Science Resource Center — This facility 
would be located in an outdoor area of the city. It would 
provide an opportunity for students from various schools 
to participate on a daily basis in intensive science instruc- 
tion which would include the newest techniques and pro- 
cedures in the life sciences and physical sciences. It 
would also provide for in-service training of elementary 

(Continued on Page 2) 



NEWSLETTER 



January 1, 1968 



. . . Alternative Plans Proposed 

(Continued from Page 1) 
teachers who could observe and participate in exemplary 
science programs for elementary children. 

3. High School Resource Centers — Each compre- 
hensive high school in the city could serve as a Resource 
Center for an exemplary, in-depth educational program 
in an academic, pre-technical or fine arts area. The 
Center in each school would provide unique opportuni- 
ties for students from any area in the School District to 
take regular courses in their resident high schools and 
to elect to attend resource centers for two hours a day. 
An exchange student program would make it possible 
for students to attend the high school or Resource Center 
of his choice on a full-time basis. The designated high 
schools would offer a particular curriculum not avail- 
able in any other school. 

4. Supplementary Educational Center — This Center 
would provide a common teaching-learning facility 
which could be used by all elementary pupils of the Dis- 
trict. It would offer in-depth and extended learning 
through media that are not available in established 
schools, in museums, or permanent exhibits, or by way 
of television or radio. The Center would include a variety 
of technical, scientific, cultural and civic displays, and 
would have large conference rooms where resource lead- 
ers from the community could meet with students. 

5. A "Garden School" Complex — In connection 
with current planning for redevelopment of a large tract 
in the Hunters Point area, the proposal has been made 
by the Director of Redevelopment that the District par- 
ticipate actively in rehabilitation of the area as an inte- 
grated neighborhood through the building of an attrac- 
tive, innovative "Garden School" complex as well as 
another elementary or junior high school. The complex 
of buildings would serve various functions such as child 
care, nursery school, elementary instruction from K 
through sixth grade, teacher training and counseling, 
and adult education and community service during after- 
school hours and evenings, including a community cre- 
ative arts program. 

6. The Exemplary Model School — Such a school 
should reflect total educational planning for the most 
effective combination of promising and proven educa- 
tional innovations. It could include an ungraded instruc- 
tional program with team teaching, large group-small 
group instruction and independent study, multi-media 
resources with new technological aids, and learning re- 
source centers. The new Bayview Elementary School is 
already in the planning stage with a school-community 
committee and State Department consultants working 
with District staff on plans for an exemplary model 
school. This will be a malleable, flexible building de- 
signed to serve an innovative educational program when 
it opens. 

7. An Educational Complex in the Southeast Area — 
A large area in the southeast corner of the city offers 
the opportunity to develop an educational complex in- 
corporating some of the features included in the Educa- 
tional Park concept. The four-square-mile section en- 



compasses Hunters Point, Visitacion Valley, Bayview, 
McLaren Park, Bret Harte, Sunnydale, Portola, and 
Silver Terrace. There are 21 public school buildings 
situated in this compact area, with two additional build- 
ings nearly ready to go out for construction bids. The 
completion of these buildings in about two years would 
provide the additional school housing required for the 
reassignment of students to effect better racial balance. 

8. Educational Park — This concept provides large, 
modern flexible facilities which provide opportunities for 
the use of a wealth of innovative techniques, with a con- 
centration of students in each grade level at elementary 
and/or secondary levels. The Educational Park can 
draw students from many areas, thereby providing op- 
portunities for the student population to include various 
ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds. The 
District is currently negotiating for the acquisition of a 
portion of the Army property at Fort Mason. An area 
consisting of 35.2 acres was requested in the District's 
application, with highest priority being placed on a 16.5 
acre parcel at the southwest corner. Galileo High and 
Marina Junior High are in close proximity, and thel 
Galileo-Marina-Fort Mason complex would be a protO' 
type for others in San Francisco, a teaching and re 
search laboratory, and a demonstration of the possibili 
ties for school integration in this city. 
Selected Component's for Quality Education 

In addition to recommending the three SRI alterna 
tives and suggesting the eight innovative approache: 
summarized above, Dr. Jenkins listed five component: 
for increased quality of education to stimulate furthej 
community and school analysis and evaluation. 

The components are related to two fundamental con 
siderations: Availability (How much time must be al 
lowed before the component could be effective in 
school or classroom?) and Resource Requirement; 
(What types of investments are called for in order t( 
implement the component?) 

The five components and some of the examples of eacl 
follow: 

1. Personnel Roles and Responsibilities — increase! 
(Continued on Page 4) 



' 






SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 16 



January 1, 1968 ! 



135 Van Ness Avenue. San Francisco. Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, President 
Edward Kemmitt, Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



January 1, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Superintendent, Board Discuss Class Size 



The subject of class size was reviewed by Superintend- 
;nt Robert E. Jenkins and the seven members of the 
Board of Education in the first of a series of proposed 
alanning sessions in which the Board met as a commit- 
tee of the whole on December 13, 1967. 

This first planning meeting in an informal setting 
jave the Superintendent and the Board an opportunity 
:o discuss all aspects of the topic. No action on the mat- 
ter was taken by the Board, and Dr. Jenkins will review 
;he various proposals presented in the Class Size Report 
iind will make his own recommendations later. 

At the opening of the meeting Superintendent Jenkins 
lummarized the proposals in the report and indicated 
hat there were several important points to be made in 
'elation to the reduction of class size. 
Vital Points Listed 

■ They included: 1.) reduction of class size must be ac- 
■ompanied by a strengthening of quality education; 2.) 
'eduction of class size must increase individualized in- 
truction and creativity in the classroom; 3.) reduced 
■■lass size must be related to new staffing problems in- 
volving small, medium, and large sized groups; and 4.) 
educed class size and staffing pattern should reflect a 
areful use of a balanced budget. 

Present District policy does not specify class sizes. It 
issigns teachers to schools on the basis of the number of 
mpils enrolled. At the elementary level one teacher is 
Allotted for each 27 kindergartners, one for each 26 
irst-graders, one for each 31 second and third graders, 
nd one for each 34 fourth, fifth, and sixth-graders. 
' The School District presently allots a teacher for 
very 27 students in junior high schools of 1,099 students 
t less and a teacher for every 29 students in the larger 
chools. At the high school level a teacher is provided 
,or every 29 students in high schools over 1,500 and for 
very 27 students in schools under this figure. 
Vide Cost Range 

The Class Size Report presented to the Board contains 
Toposals to reduce class size that would range in cost 
ram $1,025,000 to over $19,000,000. The least expensive 
if the plans would add 121 teachers, while the most 
xpensive would add 1,488 staff members, including 
)me administrative and supporting personnel. 

Since a tax increase of approximately 5 cents is re- 
uired to raise $1,000,000, the plans submitted would 
wolve tax increases ranging from about five cents to 
bout 99 cents. 

The proposals considered by the Board were submit- 
:d by four advisors to the Board's Curriculum Com- 
littee. They included Mrs. Florence Rawson Cohen, 
[ead of the English Department at Balboa High; J. 
l/esley Huss, a certified public accountant; Dr. Bernard 
1. McKenna, Associate Dean of the School of Educa- 
on, San Francisco State College; and Donald G. Moss, 
:acher at West Portal Elementary School. 
ther Reports Submitted 

In addition, reports were submitted by the San Fran- 
sco Federation of Teachers, the San Francisco Class- 
ram Teachers Association, the San Francisco Elemen- 



tary Administrators Association, and Dr. Lewis Allbee, 
Assistant Superintendent for Senior High Schools. 

Mrs. Cohen recommended adoption of the plan put 
forth by Dr. Allbee. It pertains solely to high schools 
and would add 121 teachers, ranging in cost from $1,- 
025,000 in the first year to $1,476,000. 

It calls for class sizes based on subject matter and in- 
cludes recommendations for some 20 kinds of classes. 
Among other suggestions, it proposes a range of 25-30 
students for classes in English, social studies, mathe- 
matics, foreign languages, science, art, and business. 
Ratio Plan Suggested 

The most expensive plan was proposed by Dr. McKen- 
na. His plan proposes a ratio of 60 professional persons, 
mostly teachers but including administrators and sup- 
porting staff, for every 1,000 pupils. This would add 
1,488 staff members to the District; the present District 
ratio on this basis is about 44 per 1,000 students. The 
cost is an estimated $19,635,000. 

He also proposed an alternate plan that would add 841 
teachers so that no classroom would be larger than 25 
pupils and no classroom in kindergarten through third 
grade would be larger than 22. This alternate proposal 
would cost $6,846,000 the first year, when teachers were 
paid beginning salaries, and $11,056,000 in two or three 
years as teachers moved up the scale. 

The San Francisco Federation of Teachers recom- 
mended a plan that would add 765 teachers. It would 
range in cost the first year from $6,276,000 to $8,923,000 
when the teachers drew average salaries. The plan 
recommends a maximum class size of 25 pupils in kin- 
dergarten and first grade, 28 in second and third grades, 
and 32 in grades four through six. 
Achievement Factor Considered 

In schools where half the pupils were achieving one 
year or less below their grade level, the classes would be 
smaller with no more than 20 in kindergarten and first 
grade and not more than 25 in second through sixth 
grades. For secondary schools the recommendation was 
for class sizes based on the subject matter taught. 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association plan 
would add 1,007 teachers at a beginning cost of $8,213,- 
000 with a later average cost of $11,651,000. It recom- 
mends maximum class sizes of 18 in kindergarten, 24 in 
first and second grades, 25 in third grade, and 30 in 
fourth through sixth grades. 

It recommends special sizes for schools with a high 
percentage of culturally disadvantaged students. In "poor 
achiever" schools the maximums would range from five 
to six pupils less per classroom. In secondary schools the 
maximums would be 30 in junior high and 35 in senior 
high. A limit of 24 in junior high and 28 in senior high 
"poor achiever" schools would be set. 
Elementary Adminstrators' Plan 

The San Francisco Elementary Administrators Asso- 
ciation's plan was for elementary schools only and would 
add 358 teachers and range in cost from $2,875,000 to 
$4,049,000. This plan would limit kindergarten and 
(Continued on Page 4) 



NEWSLETTER 



January 1, 1968 



Announcements 



• COACHES' MEETING 

The San Francisco Association Athletic Coaches and 
Physical Education Teachers will hold a general meeting 
on Monday, January 8, at 7:30 p.m. in Room B-4 of 
Abraham Lincoln High School. 



• DEPARTMENT HEADS MEETING 

The Department Heads Association of San Francisco 
Senior High Schools will meet on Wednesday, January 3, 
at George Washington High School at 2 : 45 p.m. 



DR. JENKINS ON 'ENCOUNTER' PROGRAM 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools, 
will be the featured guest on the KPIX, Channel 5, 
program Encounter on Sunday morning, January 7. 
The program will be shown at 9 a.m. 



. . . Innovations for District Schools 

(Continued from Page 2) 
number of professionals, team teaching, special associate 
of assistant teachers, teacher aides, teacher planning 
time, instructional exchange between schools, continuous 
professional growth — carefully planned in-service pro- 
grams and techniques. 

2. Student Grouping and Time for Instruction — un- 
graded instructional program, large group, small group, 
and independent study, flexible and modular schedu- 
ling, comprehensive pre-school program, year-round 
school. 

3. Program Content and Design — joint planning 
with universities and colleges, and industry and business, 
stress on inquiry — search for truth through inquiry, 
provision for continuous progress — in accordance with 
needs and abilities, wide availability of instructional 
materials, learning aids, and supplies, individualized 
programs for culturally diverse, gifted, physically and 
mentally handicapped. 

4. Information Presentation and Storage — instruc- 
tional materials centers, closed circuit television, com- 
putor assisted instruction. 

5. Expanded Supporting Services — remedial labora- 
tories, comprehensive health facilities in selected loca- 
tions, instructional consultants and planning services, 
auxiliary professional assistance, psychologists, social 
workers, school-community teachers, etc., full counseling 
and guidance. 



. . . Class Size Plans Reviewed 

(Continued from Page 3) 
first-grade classes to 20 pupils, second and third grades 
to 25, and fourth to sixth grades to 30 pupils. 

Mr. Huss and Mr. Moss did not recommend specific 
maximums or minimums in their reports to the Board. 

It was noted at the meeting that if the present formu- 
las of the District were reduced by one pupil, it would 
fequirc 142 additional teachers at a cost of from $1,155,- 
000 to $1,637,000, depending on salaries of the teachers. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, January 2, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 1 70 Fell Street. 



• SUPERVISOR APPLICATIONS DUE 

The Personnel Division announces that applications are 
being accepted for a newly created position of Super- 
visor, Division of Fiscal Control. 

Applicants must possess the administrative or super- 
visory credential, or assurance must be given of comple-. 
tion of necessary work to secure such a credential within 
a reasonable time. 

Under administrative direction, a Supervisor is respon- 
sible for a group of sections of the Division of Fiscal Con 
trol. These sections deal with payroll, budget preparation 
budget control, general and subsidiary ledgers, federa 
and state specially funded programs, state and federa 
reports, revenues and billings, construction projects, in 
surance, data processing, school cafeterias, and studen 
body audits. 

The position will be classified as Supervisor AA ir 
accordance with the Salary Schedule. The salary range 
is from $16,850 to $19,925 in four increments. The worn 
year is 1 1 months or 23 1 days. 

Applications for this position must be in writing or 
appropriate forms available in the Office of Personne 
and returned to Mr. Milton Reiterman, Personnel Co- 
ordinator, Personnel Division, not later than January 15, 
1968. Interviews will be scheduled in the following weeksi 

• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is hereby given of the following custodial va< 
cancies: 

2724 — School Custodian, Male — Francis Scott Ke' 
Elementary, Lafayette Elementary, and City Colleg 
(nights). 

• SFCTA REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Representativ 
Council will meet Monday, January 8, at 4 p.m. i| ) 
Nicholas Hall of the Marines Memorial Building, 60i 
Sutter Street. 



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I 



SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



JAN 8 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



JANUARY 8, 1968 



NUMBER 17 



EDP Learning Laboratory Project 



Lockheed Co., District Join in Program 



Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins has announced that 
the Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale 
will join with the School District in a bold new project 
to introduce the world of the computer to a group of 
students at Pelton Junior High School. 

The EDP Learning Laboratory Project will start in 
the spring term and will continue through six to eight 
weeks of the summer, involving some 28 low and high 
^nine boys and girls. (EDP stands for Electronic Data 
^Processing and also for Education to Develop Perform- 
ance. ) 

The proposed program is designed to signficantly up- 
grade (as much as two years) the reading and mathe- 
matics skills of ninth grade pupils who, in addition to 
qualifying for Senate Bill 28 program support, are also 
clearly identifiable as strong potential school dropouts. 

Restructure School Environment 

The program will restructure completely the operating 
school environment by placing students in a computer 
or computer-simulated environment where the emphasis 
on reading and mathematics is totally instrumental; that 
is, reading and mathematics will be treated as essential 
tools for solving problems that are all relevant to work- 
ing effectively and professionally with electronic data 
processing equipment and procedures. This equipment 
Will be moved into the Pelton building and a laboratory 
;et up. 

The EDP Program will make students continually 
ware of the close match of school-acquired skills with 
occupational skill requirements and will give the stu- 
dents those skills that have been identified as critical for 

' iuccessful in-school performance. 

Such activities as receiving and responding to verbal 

' nstructions, interpreting written assignments, and struc- 
:uring data to satisfy adult requirements are common to 
he role of the student and the world of work. The 

' ..earning Laboratory Program will bring students to the 

• joint where they see the relationship of the roles and 
respond positively to them. 

leading and Mathematics Skills 

The curriculum of the EDP Program will relate read- 
ng and mathematics skills that are measurable through 
he use of standardized tests to meaningful performance 
>y the student in the world of the computer. The student 
vill acquire proficiency in the following occupational 
.reas: programming, coding, board wiring, keypunching, 
nd computer operations. 



The traditional role of the teacher will be altered by 
the Learning Laboratory Program. Instruction will be 
through individual student activities in the main. Spe- 
cialists in electronic data processing from the Lockheed 
Missiles and Space Company will function at team ad- 
visors, as professionals from whom the students will ac- 
quire information in give-and-take situations. 

The teacher's role will be one of relating the Labora- 
tory objectives to the on-going school program. The 
development of in-service training is an important part 
of the total program. This will be accomplished through 
the use of video taping and gaming/simulation tech- 
niques that will bring the teacher new understandings of 
the student population being involved in the laboratory 
and new skills for dealing effectively with this student 
population. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Superintendent Calls Jan. 17 
Meeting of Certificated Staff 

In addition to the nine community forums being 
planned for the end of January to review and dis- 
cuss the Superintendent's Report titled, Educational 
Equality /Quality, Report No. 1 . . . Program 
Alternatives, Dr. Robert E. Jenkins is calling a 
meeting of the entire San Francisco Unified School 
District certificated personnel (except City College) 
for 2:15 p.m. on Wednesday, January 17, 1968 at 
the Masonic Auditorium. 

At this meeting Superintendent Jenkins will pre- 
sent his report to the teachers and administrators 
so that each one will be fully informed. All certifi- 
cated regular personnel, including full time adult 
teachers, are expected to attend this meeting. 

Wednesday, January 17, 1968 will be declared a 
minimum day. This will provide time for teachers 
and administrators to reach the Masonic Auditor- 
ium located at California and Taylor Streets. It is 
suggested that teachers plan to use car pools to 
avoid parking problems. The meeting will be com- 
pleted by 3 : 15 p.m. at the latest. 

City College faculty members will attend an In- 
stitute Meeting at the college on February 1, 1968 
at 11 a.m., when Dr. Jenkins will present his report 
to them. 



NEWSLETTER 



January 8, 1968 I 



Tutoring Services Are Available 



Community Study Centers in Operation 



Study Centers sponsored by community groups are 
now in operation in various parts of the city. Volunteer 
assistants come from San Francisco State College, the 
University of San Francisco, San Francisco College for 
Women, City College of San Francisco, and from many 
community groups. 

Study Centers have facilities and staff to provide indi- 
vidual and small group tutoring and a place for young- 
sters to study. Some Study Centers have reference librar- 
ies for students to use, and in some centers, the staff pro- 
vides additional cultural experiences for students. 

Information about known study centers and the serv- 
ices being offered in each appear below: 

WESTERN ADDITION 

Booker T. Washington Community Center 

800 Presidio Avenue, Phone 921-4757 

Miss Toshi Koba or Miss Sandra Wechler 

Study Center, Elementary Children 

Open: Wednesday, 7:00-9:00 p.m. 

Tutoring in the home also available 

Y.M.C.A. — 1530 Buchanan Street 

Study Center, Elementary Children 

Open: Thursday, 7:00-9:00 p.m. 

Family Service Agency — 1010 Cough Street 

Tutorial Program, Elementary Children 

Open: Monday & Wednesday, 4:00-6:00 p.m. 

Additional information: Mr. Husbands 

Phone 771-5875 (after 4:00 p.m.) 

Holy Cross Church— 1818 Eddy Street 

Study Center, Mon. & Wed., 3:15-5:00 p.m. (Grades 1 thru 6) 

Tuesday, 7:15-9:15 p.m. and by appointment (Grades 7 thru 12) 

Reverend Francis T- Curran, S.J., Phone JO 7-2800 

Holy Cross Study Hall, 1818 Eddy Street 

Thursday, 7:00-9:00 p.m., Junior High and High School 

Will not operate in January. Transportation provided if needed; 

also, individual tutors available. 
Pete Byram, Phone 751-4900 
Y.W.C.A. — 1830 Sutter Street 
Wednesday, 3:00-6:00 p.m., Elementary Children 
Thursday, 3:00-6:00 p.m., Junior High School 
Mrs. Alberzine Freeman, Phone 921-3814 
San Francisco Venture — 584 Page Street 
Wednesday, 2:30-3:30 p.m., Grades 1-3 
Wednesday, 3:30-4:30 p.m., Grades 4-6 
Louis Sloss, Phone 626-6776 

First and St. John's Methodist Church Tutorial Center 
Charles Yve 
474-6219 

1600 Clay Street 

Monday — 4 to 6 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. All grade levels. 

Wednesday — 4 to 6 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. All grade levels. 

SOUTH OF MARKET 

Canon Kip Community House — 8th & Natoma Streets 

Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3rd Grade thru High School 

Mr. T. H. Lugone, Phone 861-6803 

POTRERO HILL 

Potrero Hill Neighborhood House — 953 De Haro Street 

Monday thru Friday, 3:30-5:00 p.m., Elementary School 

Mr. Sanchez, Phone 647-0885 

VISITACION VALLEY 

Visitacion Valley Community Center — 50 Raymond Avenue 

Tuesday, 3:30-5:00 p.m., 1st thru 3rd Grade 

Wednesday, 3:30-5:00 p.m., 4th thru 6th Grade 

Thursday, 3:30-5:00 p.m., 1st thru 3rd Grade 

GailDobie, Phone TU 5-1735 or 585-6714 

CHINATOWN-NORTH BEACH 

Chinatown-North Beach Tutorial Program — 965 Clay Street 

Phone 392-6130, 982-3922 

Miss Shirley Sun, Coordinator, Phone 392-7691 

Tutoring takes place at YWCA, 965 Clay Street; 

Telegraph Hill Neighborhood House, 660 Lombard; 

and First Methodist Church, 1600 Clay 



Monday & Wednesday or Tuesday & Thursday 

4:00-6:00 p.m., 7:00-9:00 p.m. 

Cameron House — 920 Sacramento Street 

Tuesday, 3:30-5:00/7:30-9:00 p.m., Grade School 

Wednesday, 3:30-5:00/7:30-9:00 p.m., Grade School 

Mr. Bennett Tom, Phone 781-0401 

OCEAN VIEW, MERCED HEIGHTS, INGLESIDE 

COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT & STABILIZATION 

PROJECT 
Ingleside United Presbyterian Church — 1345 Ocean Avenue 

Phone 587-4472 
Wednesday, 3:30-5:30 p.m., Elementary Children 
Deborah Schafer, Phone 585-7808 
St. Francis Tutorial Service — 399 San Fernando Way, 

Phone 334-1590 
Monday, 3:30-5:00 p.m., Elementary Children 
Cindy Harris, Phone 387-4639 

Tuesday, 3:30-5:00 p.m., El_ementaxy_ Children . m 

Mrs. Lloyd Baumann, Phone 334-6694 

Person in Charge: Mark L. Walters, Phone 584-8188 

St. Michael's School — 55 Farallones Street, Phone 585-4781 

Tuesday, 3:00-5:00 p.m., Grades 1-5 

Mrs. Kathy McAvoy, Phone 661-9272 

Wright Chapel A.M.E. — 627 Capitol Avenue, Phone 584-1346 

Monday, 3:30-5:30 p.m., Grades 3 and 4 

Linda Grady or Sue Wright 

Phone BA 1-3488 or BA 1-2722 

James Denman Jr. High School — 241 Oneida, Phone 333-1619 

Tuesday, 3:00-5:00 p.m., Grades L7-H9 

Mrs. Linda Tompkins, Phone MO 4-3204 

Lick-Wilmerding Center — 755 Ocean Avenue, Phone 333-4021 

Tuesday, 3:30-5:00, Grades 4-6 

Judith Kowalski, Phone 751-9986 

Cosmopolitan Baptist Church — 199 Farallones Street, 

Phone 584-7776 
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, 3:00-5:00 p.m., Grades 4-6 
Mrs. Edna Pratt, Phone 587-3207 

Valencia Gardens — 255 Guerrero #172, Phone MA 1-4899 
Monday thru Thursday, 7:00-9:00 p.m., 6-12 years 
Adriana Gross, Phone 922-5956 
Crafts and Recreation — 1345 Ocean Avenue 

(Ingleside Presbyterian Chuiich) 
Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 
A program for children 7-14 years of age 
Golden West Y.M.C.A. — 333 Eucalyptus Drive, 

Phone 731-1900 
Thursday, 3:30-5:30 p.m., Seventh Grade 
Patricia Calabrese, Phone 992-9048 
Sharlene Urakawa, Phone 681-2264 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 17 



January 8, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue. San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Edward Kcmmitt, President 

Laurel E. Glass, Ph.D., Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 

Vice President Alan II. Nichols 

Reynold II. Colvin Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



: 



January 8, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Board Elects Kemmitt, Dr. Glass 
To Serve As Officers for 1968 

Commissioner Ed- 
ward Kemmitt was 
elected to the posi- 
tion of President of 
the Board of Educa- 
tion on January 2, 
1968. Mr. Kemmitt 
is serving his second 
five-year term on the 
Board, having first 
taken office in 1961. 
He is an official of 
the San Francisco 
Labor Council and 
Secretary - Treasurer 
of Local 24 of the 
American Bakery and 
Confectionery Work- 
ers International Union. Mr. Kemmitt served as Board 
Vice President in 1967 and as President in 1963. 




s: 

id! ° 



Commissioner Dr. 

Laurel E. Glass was 
..,-,. elected to serve as 

Vice President of the 

Board of Education 

Ifor 1968 at the Janu- 
j, ary 2 meeting. Dr. 

31ass is serving her 
"'■ ;econd year as a 

Soard member, hav- 
ing taken office in 

fanuary 1967. She is 

m associate professor 

)f anatomy at the 

Jniversity of Califor- 

lia Medical School. 

5r. Glass is active in 
i number of profes- 

ional, educational, and civic organizations 




Dr. Laurel E. Glass 



► DATA PROCESSING AWARD 

Francisco P. Nardi, teacher-at-large coordinating the 
unior High Division in the Data Processing Program, 
as received a Certificate in Data Processing award from 
le Data Processing Management Association. The award 
• issued for achievement on a nation-wide examination. 



i DR. JENKINS ON KQED 

1 Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins will appear on two 
-QED, Channel 9, shows during January. He will be 
matured on the Point of View program on Tuesday, 
anuary 9, at 7 p.m. This show will be repeated Wednes- 
ay, January 10, at 4 p.m. 

Dr. Jenkins will also be seen on Profile Bay Area on 
hursday, January 18, at 9 p.m. This program will be 
peated Sunday, January 21, at 6 p.m. 




March of Dimes Drive To Start 

San Francisco school 
children, protected from 
polio through the vac- 
cines developed with 
March of Dimes funds, 
will have a chance to con- 
tribute to the health 
agency's fight against 
birth defects next week. 

The annual "March of 
Dimes School Day" has 
been proclaimed by Su- 
perintendent Robert E. 
Jenkins for next Tuesday, January 16. Contribution en- 
velopes will be distributed by teachers, and returned by 
pupils the next day for processing by PTA unit presi- 
dents in each school. 

High school donation envelopes point out that today's 
odds that a child will be born normal and healthy are 
still only 15 to 1 in the United States, adding up to a 
quarter-million American babies born damaged in body 
or mind every year. 

Since the March of Dimes entered the fight against 
birth defects in 1958, a nationwide network of children's 
Birth Defects Centers has grown from two to 100 coast- 
to-coast. More than 700 children are diagnosed and 
treated every year at the local Birth Defects Center in 
Children's Hospital. 

School children will have their first chance to aid the 
March of Dimes this week, when they will deliver 
Mothers' March recruitment envelopes to their homes 
and return them signed the following day. Mrs. Alfred 
Piana, junior past president of the Second District PTA, 
is general chairman for the annual Mothers' March on 
January 29-30. Mrs. Richard A. Wilson, president of 
Second District PTA is co-chairman, with Mrs. John Y. 
Chin, Catholic PTA Groups president. 

• TEACHER'S ARTICLE PUBLISHED 

Philip Montesano, teacher at James Denman Junior 
High School, is the author of an article appearing in the 
current November-December issue of Urban West, en- 
titled "Social and Cultural Life of the Negro Community 
in San Francisco in the Early 1860's." 



SABBATICAL LEAVE 

Teachers or administrators planning to take a 
Sabbatical Leave in the fall of 1968 are reminded 
that requests are due in the Personnel Service Divi- 
sion prior to March 1, 1968. The State law requires 
a minimum of seven years of teaching in the Dis- 
trict following appointment or last Sabbatical 
Leave, whichever is more recent. The regulations 
of the Board of Education also limit the number of 
such leaves to not more than two percent of the 
certificated staff of the District. Many more eligible 
members apply than the two percent factor will 
allow, and a list will be created after March 1, 
1968, on the basis of the seniority factors men- 
tioned above. 



NEWSLETTER 



Jamiirv 8 IS."8 






Announcements 



• FEDERATION MEETING 

The San Francisco Federation of Teachers will hold 
its regular monthly membership meeting on Monday, 
January 8, at 4 p.m. in the Lowell High School cafeteria. 
The Executive Board will make important recommenda- 
tions to the membership. Members are asked to take note 
of the change in time from 7 : 30 to 4 p.m. 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancies: 
2724 — School Custodian, Male — Sutro Elementary, 

Polytechnic High, Galileo Adult at Marina (nights). 
2704 — School Custodian, Female — Marshall Annex 

and Junipero Scrra Elementary. 

• ASSOCIATION FOR CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

The San Francisco Branch of the Association for 
Childhood Education (ACE) announces that a meeting 
will be held on Monday, January 15, 1968, at Columbus 
School at 3:45 p.m. All members are encouraged to at- 
tend. Refreshments will be served. 



• SFCTA REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Representative 
Council will meet Monday, January 15 at 4 p.m. in 
Nicholas Hall of the Marines Memorial Building, 609 
Sutter Street. 



• DR. GOOSBY TO SPEAK AT CITY COLLEGE 

Dr. Zuretti L. Goosby, Board of Education Commis- 
sioner, will be the final speaker on the Problems of City 
Living Winter Evening Lecture Series sponsored by the 
Associated Students of City College. He will speak in 
the College Theatre at 8 p.m.. on Monday, January 15 
on the subject "What the Schools Can Do." 



. . . EDP Learning Laboratory Project 

(Continued from Page 1 ) 

One of the fascinating aspects of the program is the 
degree of involvement of the parents. They will be en- 
couraged to come to school and use the machines with 
their children. They will be able to see their child's 
progress as each student will be video-taped as he pro- 
gresses through the program. They will be encouraged 
to go on extended field trips for three or four days at a 
time to computer centers with their children. 

The program will be carefully evaluated according to 
Dr. Jenkins, who has expressed his gratification at this 
close cooperation between industry and the schools in 
such a project. This teaming together with industry to 
provide a meaningful curriculum, innovative in-service 
training, and direct community involvement offers a 
unique, comprehensive approach to the task of improv- 
ing reading and mathematics skills. 

Coordinating the program for the District are Dr. 
Myron Moskowitz, Pelton Junior High School principal, 
and William P. Keesey, Project Director. The program 
is being funded through Senate Bill 28 provisions. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, January 16, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• RETIREMENT MEETING 

The California Teachers Association, Bay Section, is 
planning its Ninth Annual Retirement Meeting for mem- 
bers expecting to retire within the next three years. The 
meeting will be held at Mills High School, 400 Murchi 
son Drive, Millbrae, on Saturday, January 20, 1968, from 
9:30 a.m. to 12 noon. 

The primary purpose is to explain the Retirement Law 
and retirement procedures. Interested members are asked 
to write for admission tickets which are available at the 
CTA Bay Section office, 1845 Magnolia Avenue, Burlin- 
game 94010. 

A discussion of Medicare will be included in the pro- 
gram. A question and answer period will follow the 
initial presentation. 

• 'YOUTH AND BUSINESS' PROGRAM 

Mr. Arnold Jacobson, District Head, Vocational Busi- 
ness Education Project, and three senior high school 
business education students will appear on the Sunday. 
January 14, Editors Forum program on KTVU-TV, 
Channel 2, at 1 p.m. The program will explore the atti- 
tudes of students to business today and the District's! 
occupational preparation programs for business careers' 
The program's subject is "Youth and Business." 



• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE TO MEE 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet at 1 : 3C 
p.m. on Wednesday, January 10, in Room 10, Centra! 
Office, 170 Fell Street. 



• TASF TO HOLD MEETING 

The Teachers Association of San Francisco (TASF! 
will meet at 4 p.m. on Monday, January 15, at A. Pi 
Giannini Junior High School, 39th Avenue and Orteg;! 
Street. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO, C 
PERMIT No. 396( 



L 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL D 
135 VAN NESS AVE. 



RETURN REQUEST 



DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 
S. F. PUBLIC LIBRARY 
LARK IN & MC ALLIJTER 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



ST 3 . 
9 4102 






SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



UUUUIVIU.1N la 

JAW 1 G 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



JANUARY 15, 1968 



NUMBER 18 



January 25, 29, 31 Selected 



Nine Community Forums to Discuss Report 



' Superintendent of Schools Robert E. Jenkins has an- 
nounced that nine Community Forums will be held to 
discuss his report titled Educational Equality /Quality, 
' Report #1 . . . Program Alternatives which was presented 
to the Board of Education on December 19, 1967. 

Three forums will be held on each of three dates. 
Meetings will be held at Abraham Lincoln High School 
v (2162 - 24th Avenue), Galileo High School (1150 Fran- 
. :isco Street off Van Ness) and Patrick Henry Elemen- 
j :ary School (693 Vermont Street between 18th and 19th 
j- streets) on Thursday, January 25, 1968. 
.J On Monday, January 29, 1968, three meetings will be 
. leld at Woodrow Wilson High School (400 Mansell 
r Street), Mission High School (3750- 18th Street), and 
it Balboa High School ( 1000 Cayuga Avenue) . 
. The last series of meetings will be at George Washing- 
|[ (on High School (600 - 32nd Avenue), Benjamin Frank- 
i. :in Junior High School ( 1430 Scott Street near Geary) , 
J ;ind at Herbert Hoover Junior High School (2290 - 14th 
■Vvenue) on Wednesday, January 31, 1968. 
Meetings To Start at 7:30 p.m. 
All meetings will start at 7:30 p.m. and will close at 
\j ipproximately 10 p.m. Copies of the Report will be avail- 
j able to each person attending. 

J , It is the hope of Superintendent Jenkins to do three 
hings at the Community Forums: 1.) acquaint those 
vho attend with the contents of the Report, 2.) have a 
luestion and answer period of some 30 minutes with 



questions to be submitted on cards, and 3.) scan the 
range of thinking of those attending by having two or 
three minute responses from the floor. The meetings will 
be recorded for future reference and planning. 

At each meeting a team representing District divisional 
levels will make the presentation and provide answers to 
questions. Each meeting will have a moderator in charge. 

Making the presentation at Patrick Henry, George 
Washington, and Balboa will be Dr. Donald A. Rhodes, 
Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Schools. His 
team will include Dr. Lane De Lara (Principal of Fran- 
cisco Junior High School), Miss lone Mathisen (teacher 
at Galileo High), and Dr. Mary McCarthy (Supervisor, 
Elementary Division). 
Team Assignments Listed 

The team at Galileo and Herbert Hoover will be led 
by Dr. Lewis Allbee, Assistant Superintendent for Senior 
High Schools. Assisting him will be Dr. William Cobb 
(Assistant Superintendent for Human Relations), Dr. 
George Karonsky (Supervisor, Junior High Schools) , and 
Mrs. Evelyn Draper (teacher at Alvarado Elementary). 

Speaking at Abraham Lincoln and Woodrow Wilson 
will be Mr. James Dierke, Assistant Superintendent for 
Junior High Schools. His team will include Mr. James 
Kearney (Supervisor, Senior High Schools), Mrs. Doro- 
thy Vukota (Supervisor, Elementary Division), and Mr. 
Kelly Husbands (Community Teacher) . 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Certificated Personnel To 

In advance of the nine community forums listed 
above for the end of January to review and discuss 
the Superintendent's Report titled Educational 
Equality/ Quality, Report No. 1 . . . Program 
Alternatives, Dr. Robert E. Jenkins is calling a 
general faculty meeting of the entire San Francisco 
Unified School District certificated personnel for 
2:15 p.m. on Wednesday, January 17, 1968, at the 
Masonic Memorial Temple. 

Wednesday, January 17, 1968, will be a mini- 
mum day. This will provide time for teachers and 
administrators to reach the Masonic Memorial 
Temple located at California and Taylor Streets. 
It is suggested that teachers plan to use car pools 
to avoid parking problems. The meeting will be 
completed by 3 : 15 p.m. at the latest. 



Attend General Faculty Meeting 

The Municipal Railway is providing additional 
service for transportation to the Masonic Memorial 
Temple. Additional buses or cable cars will be made 
available on California Street heading east from 
Van Ness Avenue and also on California Street 
heading west from Market Street. 

At this meeting Superintendent Jenkins will pre- 
sent his report to the teachers and administrators 
so that each one will be fully informed. All certifi- 
cated regular personnel, including full time adult 
teachers, are expected to attend this meeting. 

City College faculty members will attend an 
Institute Meeting at the college on February 1, 
1968, at 11 a.m., when Dr. Jenkins will present his 
Report to them. 



NEWSLETTER 



January 15, 1968 



Mrs. Lilienthal, Dr. Goosby Begin New Five-Year Terms on Board 




Dr. Zuretti L. Goosby and Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal were administered the oath of office as Board of Education Commissioners in thtj 
offices of Mayor John F. Shelley' by Superior Court Judge Alvin E. Weinberger. Mrs. Lilienthal began her third five-year term thi: 
month. Dr. Goosby started his first full five-year term, having been appointed to the Board in May, 1967 to complete the unexpirec 
term of James Stratton. Pictured above (left to right) are Mayor Shelley, Dr. Goosby, Mrs. Lilienthal, Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins 
and Judge Weinberger. 



Program Explores 'Brain Damage' 

"Who are the 'Brain-Damaged?' " is the question 
which will be explored by a panel of distinguished medi- 
cal investigators on the Sunday, January 21, Doctors 
News Conference program at 5:30 p.m. on KTVU, 
Channel 2. 

Three physicians active in the research and diagnostic 
programs of the United Cerebral Palsy Association will 
discuss the problems of identifying, educating, and caring 
for "brain-damaged" children. The panel will be ques- 
tioned by a group of science writers on such problems as 
the learning and behavior difficulties associated with 
cerebral palsy, and the educational methods and medi- 
eal management which can improve- the functioning of 
the cerebral palsied child. 



JANUARY TIME SHEET PICK-UP 

January time sheets for teachers will be picked 
up at the schools at 8:30 a.m. on January 26, 1968, 
for senior, junior, and elementary teachers. 

The adult schools will deliver their full-time and 
part-time teachers' time sheets on January 26 at 
9 a.m. 

Time sheets for clerks and janitors for all schools, 
including the adult schools, for January 16 through 
January 31 will be picked up at the schools at 8:30 
a.m. on January 24, 1968. 

Sheets are to be completed and signed by the 
deadline dates above to enable delivery service to 
keep the schedule. 

The number of days in January for principals 
and assistant principals is 22; the number of days 
for teachers is 21. 



C: 



1 Cent Stamps in Supply 

New Postal Rates Go Into Effect 

Effective January 7, 1968, the change in postal rate* 
for First Class and Air Mail is as follows: First Clasl 
envelopes, 6 cents; Post Cards, 5 cents; and Air Mai i 
envelopes, 10 cents. 

The Division of Supplies has on hand a sufficient quan! 
tity of the 1 cent stamps for use with the existing 5 cen| 
stamps in the schools for First Class letter mailings. 

Schools desiring postage stamps to fulfill the new postj 
age rates may submit a general requisition to the Divisioi ' 
of Supplies. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 18 



January 15, 1958 



135 Van Ne.ss Avenue. San Franr-iVo. Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 






'■![, 



: 

'■ 

K 
lit 



January 15, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Application Deadline Date for 
Supervisor Positions Extended 

The Personnel Service Division announces that the 
closing date for filing applications for three new super- 
visor positions in the Special Educational Services Divi- 
sion has been extended to March 15, 1968. The closing 
date had been announced as January 22. In addition, 
there have been some revisions in job specifications. The 
positions and their requirements are now as follows: 

Supervisor, Psychological Services — Applicants must 
possess the doctorate or equivalent, must be able to re- 
ceive certification as a school psychologist in California, 
and must possess a Standard Supervision Credential, 
Standard Administrative Credential, or General Admin- 
istrative Credential. Primary responsibility will be to 
supervise a staff of school psychometrists and school 
psychologists and the development and expansion of 
psychological services for students in various general and 
special education programs. 

Supervisor, Guidance and Counseling — Applicants 
1 1 'must possess the M.A. degree and additional college 
,':. .work, have a minimum of five years or more of experi- 
ence in guidance and counseling programs, have re- 
— lated administrative experience, must be able to receive 
certification as a school counselor in California, and 
must possess a Standard Supervision Credential, Stan- 
J. jdard Administrative Credential, or General Administra- 
"' 'tive Credential. Primary responsibility will be to super- 
r :|jvise a staff of school counselors and administrators and 
( jthe development and expansion of Pupil Personnel and 
y Guidance Functions for students in the secondary 
■schools. 

Supervisor, Programs for Secondary Mentally Handi- 
;',, capped — Applicants must possess the M.A. degree and 
further related study or experience, must be able to re- 
ceive certification as a teacher of the mentally retarded 
' ' :n California, and must possess a Standard Supervision 
Credential, Standard Administrative Credential, or 
general Administrative Credential. 
All three positions have been classified as Supervisor 
" \A in accordance with the Certificated Personnel Salary 
Schedule. The salary range is $16,850 - $19,925, and the 

»' work year is approximately 23 1 days. 
Applications for these positions must be in writing on 
SI appropriate forms available in the office of Personnel and 
■eturned to Milton F. Reiterman, Personnel Coordinator, 
[_; 'ersonnel Division, not later than March 15, 1968. Inter- 
„J 'iews will be scheduled after the application has been 
iled. 



» SMOKING AND HEALTH PROGRAM 

The San Francisco Interagency Committee on Smok- 
tig and Health has announced that "The National 
imoking Test" will be televised on KPIX, Channel 5, on 
Tuesday, January 16, from 10 to 11 p.m. The test will 
over the following three main areas: 1) How you feel 
bout smoking 2) What you know about smoking and 
; ) Why you smoke. 



Two District Members To Serve 
On State-wide Planning Project 

Isadore Pivnick, Coordinator, Federal/State Projects, 
and Albert Silverstein, Director of the Supplementary 
Education Center, Title III, have been named as par- 
ticipants in the 1967-68 training program of Operation 
PEP, a state-wide project to prepare educational plan- 
ners for California. 

The project is funded by a grant issued by the U. S. 
Office of Education under Title III of the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act of 1965. The primary 
purpose of the 1967-68 year is to train 100 key Califor- 
nia educators in the use of a "system approach" to edu- 
cational planning and management. 

The project represents an effort on the part of the 
educational community in California to perfect an in- 
structional program for educational planners and mana- 
gers. 

Operation PEP is designed to identify and define key 
educational planning and management functions and 
develop models relative to these functions. 

A task force approach will be used in the analysis of 
these functions in order to determine what skills and 
competencies are required, to design an instructional 
program for training, to specify relevant educational 
planning and management resources, and to implement 
a training program. 



latin American Night' Featured 




The recent observance of American Education Week was high- 
lighted at James Lick Junior High School by a Latin American 
Night program, featuring the theme "Getting to Know You . . . 
Better." The school-community project was sponsored by a com- 
mittee of parents, teacher, and students. Pictured are a number 
of the participants (back row, left to right) Mrs. Theodore Alli- 
son, President, James Lick PTA; Mildred Fusco, teacher and co- 
chairman; Im.lda Dollard, Assistant Principal; Mr. Julio Fernan- 
dez, Police Community Relations Unit; Mr. Elmer Gallegos, 
Spanish Bilingual Education; Mr. William Galant, Principal; 
(front row, left to right) Mrs. Margaret Cruz, President, Mexican 
American Political Association; Mr. Leonardo Soto, guest 
speaker and Director, Arriba Juntos; Pat Maldonado, Girls' 
Traffic Squad Captain; Sue Zalkaske, Student Body President; 
Dave Martinez, Student Body Vice President. 



NEWSLETTER 



January 15, 1968 1 



Announcements 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, January 16, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 1 70 Fell Street. 



FALL SEMESTER 1967 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION DATES 

Date Time Location 

January 24 8 p.m. A. Lincoln Auditorium 

January 24 8 p.m. Balboa Auditorium 

January 23 8 p.m. Masonic Temple 

January 24 8 p.m. G. Washington Auditorium 

January 24 2 p.m. Masonic Temple 

January 23 8 p.m. Mission Auditorium 

January 24 8 p.m. Polytechnic Auditorium 

January 25 8 p.m. Masonic Temple 

January 23 8 p.m. S. Gompers Activities Rm. 

January 19 8 p.m. J. O'Connell Gymnasium 



School 


Day 


Abraham Lincoln 


Wednesday 


Balboa 


Wednesday 


Galileo 


Tuesday 


George Washington 


Wednesday 


Lowell 


Wednesday 


Mission 


Tuesday 


Polytechnic 


Wednesday 


Woodrow Wilson 


Thursday 


Samuel Gompers 


Tuesday 


John O'Connell 


Friday 



• COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE MEETING 

The regular meeting of the San Francisco Counseling 
and Guidance Association will be held Thursday, Janu- 
ary 18, at 4 p.m. in Room 221 of A. P. Giannini Junior 
High School. Representatives of Pupil Personnel Services 
will discuss their functions. 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancies : 
2724 — School Custodian, Male . — Fairmount Ele- 
mentary and Marina Junior High Schools. 

2704 — School Custodian, Female — Junipero Serra, 
Longfellow, and Visitacion Valley Elementary Schools. 



• CREDIT UNION MEETING 

The San Francisco Federated Teachers Credit Union 
will hold its annual meeting on Monday, January 15, at 
4 p.m. at 4349 California Street. 



• OUTSTANDING ENGLISH STUDENT 

Robert Gary Steel of Woodrow Wilson High School 
has been cited as one of the outstanding high school stu- 
dents of English in the country. The National Council of 
Teachers of English has named him a 1967 national 
runner-up in its annual Achievement Awards competi- 
tion. 

Last spring a committee of English teachers from the 
high school nominated Robert to represent Woodrow 
Wilson in the competition. Robert's English teachers at 
Woodrow Wilson have been Richard Curnow, Richard 
Hastings, and James Marshall. 



. . . Community Forum Dates Are Set 

(Continued from Page 1) 

The presentations at Mission and Benjamin Franklin 
will be made by Dr. Lloyd Luckmann, Acting President 
of City College.. His team will be Mr. Edward Schulman 
(Principal of Bryant Elementary), Mr. James Keolker 
(teacher at Luther Burbank), Mr. Reginald Alexander 
(Principal of Abraham Lincoln), and Mr. Isadore Piv- 
nick (Coordinator, Federal/State Programs). 



• SECONDARY ADMINISTRATORS TO MEET 

The San Francisco Association of Secondary School 
Administrators (CASSA, District #6) will hold a genera! 
membership meeting Friday, January 19, at Lowell High 
School at 4 p.m. State Senator Milton Marks will address 
the group. 

• SFCTA WEEKEND TRIP 

There a few days remaining to join the SFCTA Tahoc 
Winter Wonderland Weekend Trip scheduled for Janu- 
ary 27 and 28. Price includes bus transportation, accom- 
modations, three meals, and champagne party. Deadline 
for reservations is Thursday, January 18. For details con- 
tact your CTA building representative or call Stelk 
Zdrodowski at 931-1001, evenings only. 



• SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS MEETING 

A general meeting of the San Francisco Association o 
School Administrators will be held Thursday, Januar 
18, in the auditorium of A. P. Giannini Junior Higl 
School at 3 : 45 p.m. All members are urged to attend a 
an important report on the structural reorganizatioi 
of the ASA will be presented by Victor Rossi, chairman 



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NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



JANUARY 22, 1968 



NUMBER 19 



K-7 To Convert in Fall, 1969 



Board Approves Annual Promotion 



j A change from semi-annual promotion to annual pro- 
motion for District school children was approved by the 
[Soard of Education at its January 16, 1968 meeting upon 
jecommendation of Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins, 
the Negotiating Council and the Teachers Association 
f San Francisco gave full support to the recommendation. 
Under the provisions of the change, the entire elemen- 
ary division will convert to annual promotion in the fall 
f 1969, with subsequent year-by-year changeover taking 
,lace in the junior and senior high divisions. 
j At the same time that the elementary schools change 



iu; 



Community Forum Meetings 
Scheduled January 25, 29, 31 

Beginning this week, nine Community Forums 
will be held to discuss Superintendent Robert E. 
Jenkins' report titled Educational Equality /Quality, 
Report #7 . . . Program Alternatives. 

The dates and locations are as follows: Thurs- 
day, January 25, 1968 - Abraham Lincoln High 
School (2162 - 24th Avenue), Galileo High School 
(1150 Francisco Street), and Patrick Henry Ele- 
mentary School (693 Vermont Street) ; Monday, 
January 29, 1968 - .Balboa High School (1000 
Cayuga Avenue), Mission High School (3750-18th 
Street), and Woodrow Wilson High School (400 
Mansell Street); Wednesday, January 31, 1968 - 
George Washington High School (600 - 32nd 
Avenue), Benjamin Franklin Junior High School 
(1430 Scott Street), and Herbert Hoover Junior 
High School (2290 - 14th Avenue). 

It is the hope of Dr. Jenkins that the Community 
Forums will accomplish three objectives: 1.) ac- 
quaint those who attend with the contents of the 
Report; 2.) have a question and answer period of 
some 30 minutes with questions to be submitted on 
cards, and 3.) scan the range of thinking of those 
attending by having two or three minute responses 
from the floor. 

All meetings will start at 7:30 p.m. and will close 
at approximately 10 p.m. Copies of the Report will 
be available to each person attending. A team 
representing District divisional levels will make the 
presentation and provide answers to questions at 
each meeting. 



to annual promotion, the junior high schools will start 
annual promotion in the low seven grade. Annual pro- 
motion will then progress year-by-year through the sec- 
ondary schools. 
Spring-enrolled Classes Affected 

Plan 1 adopted by the Board (Plan 1-A in the report 
listed below) calls for 75 per cent of the spring-enrolled 
elementary classes being accelerated and 25 per cent 
being retained in the fall of 1969. In the previous spring 
(spring, 1969), no low kindergarten class will be admit- 
ted, and none will be admitted in any subsequent spring 
semester thereafter. 

At the secondary school level the change to annual 
promotion will evolve on a year-by-year progression of 
elementary school students through the secondary schools. 
Using 1969-70 as a base, six years will be required to 
make the complete transition. 

A detailed presentation of the annual promotion ques- 
tion was made to the Board of Education by Dr. Jenkins 
in a study titled Implications of Annual Promotion for 
the San Francisco Unified School District. 
Study Reviews Pros and Cons 

The study was based upon investigation of the pros and 
cons of changing to an annual promotion plan by a Task 
Force of teachers and administrators appointed by the 
Superintendent in August, 1967. The conclusions demon- 
strated that such a change was feasible and had definite 
educational values. 

Two plans were suggested in the study, Plan 1 and 
Plan 2. Estimates of projected enrollment were establish- 
ed on two bases and reported as Plans 1-A-and 1-B. Plan 
1-A is described above, and Plan 1-B is identical with the 
exception that the percentage of students to be acceler- 
ated would be 50 per cent and the percentage to be re- 
tained would be 50 per cent. 

Plan 2 would have retained semi-annual promotion in 
kindergarten and the low first grade, the changeover to 
annual promotion taking place in grades 2 through 6, 
with 50 per cent of the spring-enrolled classes being 
accelerated and 50 per cent being retained. 
Attention to Grade Placement Adjustment 

The study pays special attention to the problem of ad- 
justing the grade placement of all elementary pupils who 
will enter school in spring, 1969 in the high first, high 
second, high third, etc., grades. ... i. 

It will be necessary to allow sufficient time for individ- 
( Continued on Page 4) . 



NEWSLETTER 



•January 22, 1968) 



Mid-winter Concert To Feature 
Honor Symphony Orchestra, Choir 

The San Francisco Public Schools Honor Symphony 
Orchestra and Honor Choir will present a mid-winter 
concert on Saturday, January 27, 1968, at 8:30 p.m. in 
the Lowell High School auditorium. 

Open to the public, the concert marks the end of a 
series of weekly Saturday morning rehearsals at Lowell 
High School for a large number of dedicated students 
from the city's junior and senior high schools. 

Dr. Albert Renna, Director of Music, feels that this 
program for the musically gifted student offers many 
talent-refining activities which directly add to the culture 
of the community. 
Wide Support for Program 

Dr. Renna is most grateful for the support received 
from the administration and music faculty in encourag- 
ing and supporting the honor music groups to realize the 
values that this phase of advancement adds to the total 
music program. 

The Honor Symphony Orchestra will be conducted by 
Alan Clark,. Presidio Junior High School, and the Honor 
Choir will be under the direction of John Land of James 
Lick Junior High School. 

Radio Station KKHI will tape the concert for the Our 
Youth in Concert series to be broadcast Saturday, Febru- 
ary 10, from 9 to 10 a.m. 
District Personnel Serve 

Serving as coordinator of the city-wide program is 
Conrad Morgen (Abraham Lincoln) . The assistant choir 
director is Helen Dilworth (Everett). Section leaders for 
the orchestra include Howard Bennett (James Denman) , 
Joseph Rosenblatt (A. P. Giannini), Suzanne Stillwell 
(Roosevelt), Marshall Smith (Pelton), Joseph Alessi 
(City College), and Jack Pereira (Lowell). 

Earlier this semester, the principal players of the Honor 
Symphony Orchestra had the unique experience of per- 
forming in high school concerts with the San Francisco 
Symphony Chamber Orchestra. 

Featured orchestral works at Saturday's concert will 
be Romanian Folk Dances by Bela Bartok and Symphony 
No. 2 D Major by Jean Sibelius. The Honor Choir will 
sing Ravel's Trois Chansons, Bartok's Three Hungarian 
Folk Songs, and Thomas Tallis's The Lamentations of 
Jeremiah. 



ESL POSITIONS OPEN 

Positions for teachers interested in teaching Eng- 
lish as a Second Language to Chinese-speaking 
children are expected to become available in the 
near future in the elementary schools. 

In order that a list of interested applicants may 
be compiled for consideration, applications for these 
positions must be in writing on special forms avail- 
able in the office of Personnel and returned to Mr. 
Milton F. Reitcrman, Personnel Division, not later 
than March 1, 1968. Interviews will be scheduled 
after the application has been filed. 




1 [< ; : llBHI : t 

A joint meeting of children's librarians from the San Franciscc 
Public Library staff and San Francisco Unified School Districl 
elementary librarians was held recently in the Board of Educatior 
meeting room. Central Office. Mrs. Doris Linnenbach, elemen- 
tary curriculum assistant and teacher at Bret Harte, and Patrici; 
Meehan, teacher at Lawton, explained and demonstrated hov 
they have used library books in two special projects. Participant 
included Effie Lee Morris, Coordinator of Children's Services' 
Mrs. J. Henry Mohr, Library Commissioner; Dr. William B. San 
born. Director of Instructional Materials; Geraldine Ferring 
Supervisor, Libraries and Textbooks; and children's librarians 
District elementary librarians, resource librarians, and curriculun 
assistants. Pictured above and representing those in attendant 
are (left to right) Mrs. Alice Jacobs, Portola Branch; Mr. Philii 
Place, Bookmobile; Mrs. Anne Sparks, Bayview Branch; Moll' 
Regan, librarian for Bret Harte, John McLaren, and Washingtoi 
Irving; and Mrs. Doris Linnenbach, elementary curriculun 
assistant. 



• ADMINISTRATORS' ARTICLE PUBLISHED 

An article by Mrs. Lucille K. Baker, Principal, an< 
Mrs. Shirley R. Donahue, Assistant Principal, of Haw 
thorne Elementary School appears in the December, 196 
issue of California Parent-Teacher magazine. Entitlei 
"Away We Go," the article summarizes the trip-centered 
language-oriented program as a means for stimulatin 
and strengthening learning activities. 



i 



. ; 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39. No. 19 



January 22, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue. San Francisco. Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 






I 



January 22, 1988 



NEWSLETTER 



Bilingual Education Program Will Expand 



The recommendation of Superintendent Robert E. 
Jenkins to expand the District's bilingual education pro- 
gram for Chinese-speaking and Spanish-speaking stu- 
dents for the spring, 1968 semester and to provide for a 
broad summer school offering during the summer of 
1968 was approved by the Board of Education at its 
January 16, 1968 meeting. 

At the elementary level, the program for Chinese- 
speaking students will result in the formation of 28 self- 
contained classes of 15 students each in some seven 
schools. Fourteen of these classes will be taught by teach- 
ers presently assigned to the schools under the established 
formula. For the other classes, 14 teachers above formula 
will be required. 

In the junior high schools, four additional teachers 
JJwill be added, three at Marina Junior High and one at 
!■ 'Francisco Junior High. At both levels the in-service work 
'in teaching English as a second language that was begun 
k I during the fall semester will be continued, and curricu- 
'.;' 'lum development and the production of materials will be 
i .maintained. The program will offer services to approxi- 
" imately 500 additional students. 

jl Program for Spanish-Speaking Students 

J In the Spanish bilingual program, emphasis will be 
>(' fplaced on an experimental program based on the use of 
" 'curriculum materials developed at the Southwest Edu- 
cational Development Laboratory in Austin, Texas. 
I These materials are founded on extensive research; 
they are unique in that they emphasize the use of Spanish 
„', 'as a means of induction into English. Lessons in science, 
I isocial studies, and other subjects are provided in both 
'■■ (Spanish and English, with a view to helping students 
.. paintain pace in the content subjects while they are 
jj, .learning English. 

Professor Theodore Parsons of the University of Cali- 
fornia, who is associated with the Southwest Laboratory 
in an advisory capacity, will work with the District as a 
consultant. Dr. Elizabeth Ott, staff member of the 
Southwest Laboratory, will also assist the District. In- 
service training will be an important part of the total 
ft project, and curriculum development in terms of adapt- 
"Z, ing the Southwest materials to District needs will go 
— forward. 

Auxiliary Services To Be Utilized 

I An added feature of the San Francisco program will 
I.S. i3e the use of home-school teachers and speech therapists, 
ul .vho will coordinate their work with that of the classroom 
:eacher. Teacher aides, also, will be used in the program. 
__ At the elementary level, three teachers above formula 
will be needed. Two of these, added to the present staffs 
sf two schools, will permit the formation of four self- 
contained classes for the project in those schools. A third 
iatlD " ! :eacher at another school will work with several students 



at a time for one-hour periods throughout the day. In the 
self-contained classes, groups as large as 22 to 24 will be 
permitted, to allow evaluation in terms of classes of that 
size. These classes will be ungraded. 

In the junior high schools, two teachers above formula 
will be added to James Lick Junior High to permit that 
school to be part of the project, and at Horace Mann 
Junior High one-half teacher will be added to strengthen 
the program there. Students with native languages other 
than Spanish will be included in the James Lick program. 
The program will serve approximately 225 additional 
students. 

Program Is an Additional One 

It is to be noted that the program described herein is 
in addition to the on-going bilingual programs that are 
currently underway in the schools. 

An extensive summer school program is planned to 
serve some 1,000 Chinese-speaking and 700 Spanish- 
speaking students at all grade levels, as well as speakers 
of other languages. The regular summer school schedule 
for the respective levels will be followed. Ninety-four 
teachers in all for the summer bilingual program, plus 
additional administrative support, will be necessary. 

Elmer Gallegos, Supervisor, Spanish Bilingual Educa- 
tion, and Wellington Chew, Supervisor, Chinese Bi- 
lingual Education, are coordinating the District-wide 
bilingual programs. They are currently in the District 
Curriculum Office with Dr. Joseph B. Hill, Curriculum 
Coordinator. 

Funding of Expansion Outlined 

Part of the added cost of the expanded bilingual pro- 
gram will be covered by Elementary Secondary Educa- 
tion Act funds, subject to the District's ESEA allocation 
arriving as scheduled. The remainder of the additional 
cost will come from District sources, as will the funding 
of the summer school program. 

Cost of the program as outlined above is as follows: 
From School District Funds: For Spring, 1968— $56,507; 
For summer through June 30 — $20,174; Total — 
$76,681. From ESEA Funds: $100,003. Grand Total; 
$176,684. 

• SOCIAL STUDIES PANELIST 

Dewey W. Roberts, teacher at Presidio Junior High 
School, was a panelist at the recent National Council for 
the Social Studies Conference held in Seattle, Washing- 
ton. Mr. Roberts chaired a section URBANISM — Myth 
and Reality, based upon a paper given by Dr. James 
Coke, Director, Center for Regional Urbanism, Kent 
State University, Ohio. 



IN MEMORIAM 
Mrs. Frances E. Lyons 



NEWSLETTER 



January 22, 1961 



Announcements 



• 'DISCIPLINE' MEETING ON JANUARY 24 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins and the members of 
the Board of Education will hold the second in a series 
of planning sessions with the Board meeting as a commit- 
tee of the whole on Wednesday, January 24, 1968, at 4 
p.m. in Room 30, 170 Fell Street, to discuss the subject 
of discipline. 

Reports to the Curriculum Committee by the advisors 
on discipline and a District summary of the topic will be 
discussed. 



POLYTECHNIC, GOMPERS GRADUATION 

The fall semester Polytechnic High School grad- 
uation will be held at the Hall of Flowers in Golden 
Gate Park on Wednesday, January 24, 1968, at 8 
p.m., not in the Polytechnic Auditorium as an- 
nounced. 

The Samuel Gompers graduation will be held at 
the Bayview Federal Savings and Loan Association 
Office, 22nd and Mission Streets, at 8 p.m., Tues- 
day, January 23, 1968, not in the Samuel Gompers 
Activities Room as announced. 



• LOWELL HIGH RETIREMENT DINNER 

Friends and colleagues of Norval Fast, history and 
civics teacher at Lowell High School, are invited to 
attend a special bay cruise and dinner party in honor of 
his retirement from the District. The affair will be held 
Sunday, February 11, 1968. 

I Participants are to embark from the Harbor Cruise 
pier at 2 p.m. for the Galleon Restaurant in Alameda. 
For information and reservations contact Mrs. Ella 
Driscoll at 585-5474. 



. . . Annual Promotion Approved by Board 

(Continued from Page 1) 

u'al evaluation of the achievement and potential academic 
placement of each child. In this respect, the recommenda- 
tions of the teachers and administrators must be con- 
sidered. The ultimate placement of each child will be 
the result of joint conferences between the teachers and 
the parents. 

i Dr. Jenkins expressed deep appreciation to Dr. Myron 
Moskowitz, Chairman, and to the members of the Task 
Force for a most comprehensive and intensive study of 
the promotion problem and congratulated them on a 
job well done. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, February 6, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 1 70 Fell Street. 



\ 



• PUBLIC SCHOOLS WEEK COORDINATOR 

David Monasch, III, teacher at Longfellow Elemen 
tary School, has been appointed 1968 Public School 
Week/E-B Day coordinator. Mr. Monasch will be in thi 
Office of Educational Information, Room 213, Centra 
Office, during the periods of January 22-26 and Marcl 
18 - May 3. He may be contacted at 863-4680, Extensioi 
388. 



• NDEA FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTITUTES 

A listing of the 1968 NDEA Foreign Language Insti 
tutes has been received at the Central Office and ha 
been placed in the Special File in the Teachers Pro 
fessional Library. Interested persons must write direct! 
to the institute director for further information and appli 
cation forms. Participants at these institutes pay no tuitioi 
and receive stipends of $75 per week plus $15 for eacl 
dependent. Application deadline is March 15, 1968 



l! 



; .l 



• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE TO MEET 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet at 1 : 3( 
p.m. on Wednesday, January 24, in Room 10, Centra 
Office, 170 Fell Street. 



• 

■V 



r. 
tat 

A 



It 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancies 
2724 — School Custodian, Male — Garfield and Cor 
bett Elementary Schools. 



il 



ADMINISTRATIVE INTERVIEWS 

Interviews will be held by the Personnel Division 
during the month of April, 1968 for applicants for 
Junior High School administrative assignments. 
Those applicants who have already applied and 
wish an interview are to notify Mr. Milton Reiter- 
man, Personnel Coordinator, in writing. 



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NEWSLETTER 



Ml VOLUME 39 

tki 



JANUARY 29, 1968 



NUMBER 20 



Employment and Training 



arcl 

"New Careers Aide Program Is Approved 



EET 



Approximately 100 aides will become available to the 
San Francisco Unified School District for assignment in 
jre-school classes, Children's Centers, elementary, junior 
ligh, senior high, and adult and vocational schools as a 
esult of Board of Education action approving the Dis- 
rict's participation in the Economic Opportunity Coun- 
il's New Careers Program. 

Upon recommendation of Superintendent Robert E. 
enkins, approval was given at the January 16, 1968 
neeting to a program in which the District will employ 
letween 30-38 New Careerists and 68 Neighborhood 
fouth Corps trainees as aides. 
' They will serve in the schools one-half time and re- 
ieive training the other half. It is proposed that the basic 
ducational and on-the-job training components be 
irovided by the District through the Adult and Voca- 
ional Division and City College of San Francisco. 
Jistrict to Employ Portion 

The 30-38 New Careerists represent a portion of a 
Dtal of 160 young people who will be employed in vari- 
es city government offices and agencies. 

New Careerists (Scheuer Act aides) must be 22 years 
f age or older; Neighborhood Youth Corps aides must 
e 16 through 21 years of age. All aides, regardless of 
3urce, may serve as classroom aides as well as school or 
ommunity aides. 

The specific objectives of the program are 1.) to 

stablish new career type trainee positions, 2.) to insure 

flat each position created has upward and lateral mo- 

ility, 3.) to insure within each position created that 

lore is a reasonable expectancy of permanence, and 4.) 

~~'i provide additional para-professional help to teachers 

„ nd administrators. 
AGE i .»,»... 

assigned to Divisions 

Plans call for 16 Scheuer Act aides to be assigned to 

S.Cjich of the junior and senior high divisions and that six 

■*!; assigned to the Adult Division. It is recommended 

■"""jiiat they be assigned to schools in teams of four if possi- 

\ l e 

-sjj Neighborhood Youth Corps aides will be assigned to 
re-kindergarten and elementary grades. 
The program is a two-part operation: employment 
id training. It is proposed that the aides receive basic 
eracy training through the Adult Division and job up- 
ading opportunities through a special program offered 
City College. 

During the first year of the pilot program, all Scheuer 
:t aides are employed by the Civil Service Commission. 



Initial screening is conducted by the California State 
Department of Employment as well as other city agencies 
and the San Francisco Unified School District. Aides 
will be directly under the supervision of the classroom 
teacher and sometimes a department head. 
Reassignment Is Possible 

Reassignment of aides is possible between teachers 
and/or schools. Aides may be returned to Civil Service 
Pool if there is a performance problem. They are con- 
sidered District employees' after the first year and may 
be discharged according to established procedures. 

The New Careers Program is a three-year program 
which does not involve any expenditure of School Dis- 
trict funds for the first year. It provides for the following: 
First year — 10 per cent matching in kind by the Dis- 
trict; Second year — 50 per cent share of the cost by the 
District (approximately $100,000 District funds) ; Third 
year — 100 per cent share of cost by District (approxi- 
mately $200,000 District funds) . 

(Continued on Page 8) 

Bilingual Program Moves Ahead 




A number of administrative appointments at the Central Office 
have been approved by the Board of Education upon recommen- 
dation of the Superintendent during the month of December. 
Pictured above with Dr. Joseph B. Hill, District Curriculum Co- 
ordinator (center) are Elmer A. Gallegos, appointed to the posi- 
tion Supervisor A, Spanish Bilingual Education (left), and Welling- 
ton Lum Chew, appointed Supervisor A, Chinese Bilingual 
Education. Additional appointments included Robert F. Cunning- 
ham, appointed to the position of Supervisor A, Programs for the 
Physically Handicapped, and Dr. Gordon T. Carlson, Supervisor 
A, Guidance Service Centers. 



NEWSLETTER 



January 29, 196S 



Administrative Appointments 
Announced at Board Meeting 

A number of administrative appointments and assign- 
ments were made at the January 16, 1968 meeting by the 
Board of Education upon recommendation of the Super- 
intendent. It is suggested that all schools include this 
information in their copies of the School Directory. 
Elementary Division 

Principals appointed include: Myrna Lee Graves, 
Diamond Heights; Adelaide N. Howard, Argonne-Ca- 
brillo; Anna Aurora Robbins, Ulloa; Walter W. Morris, 
Jose Ortega; Mary A. Anastole, Francis Scott Key (Act- 
ing) ; John W. Whisman, Alvarado (Acting) . 

Assistant Principals appointed include: Kelly Hus- 
bands, San Miguel; Wilma N. Jones, Hillcrest; Noel A. 
Mertens, Sir Francis Drake; William R. DeAvila, Mira- 
loma-Twin Peaks; Marybeth Barrett, West Portal (Act- 
ing) ; Alyse J. Buchdruker, Hawthorne (Acting) ; Evelyn 

D. Draper, Winfield Scott-Yerba Buena (Acting) ; Ruth 

E. Tisdale, Commodore Sloat (Acting) . 

Junior High Division 

Principals appointed include: Ernest J. Delucchi, 
Staging Site for New Visitacion Valley Junior High 
School; Carl H. Hanson, Jr., Everett; John F. Kearney, 
Jr., Pelton (Acting) ; Rose K. Makower, A. P. Giannini 
(Acting). 

Assistant Principals appointed include : Luke Angelich, 
Jr., Marina; Betty Gandel, A. P. Giannini (Acting) . 

Head Counselor appointment includes: Elvera L. 
Fusco, Everett. 

Senior High Division 

Principal appointment includes: Walter J. Odone, 
Galileo (Acting) . 

Assistant Principal appointments include: James F. 
Beckwith, John O'Connell (Pupil Personnel and Disci- 
pline) ; Doris H. Mullin, Galileo; Leslie F. Burke, Galileo 
(Acting) ; Alberta M. Snell, Polytechnic (Acting) (Cur- 
riculum and Instruction) ; Allan D. Torlakson, George 
Washington (Acting) (Curriculum and Instruction) . 

Head Counselor appointment includes: Arnold M. 
Steinbach, Mission (Boys) . 

Central Office 

Appointments in the Central Office include : Grandvel 
A. Jackson, Human Relations Field Representative; 
Junius Camp, Human Relations Field Representative. 

• TEACHERS OF ENGLISH CONFERENCE 

The California Association of Teachers of English an- 
nounces that the Tenth Annual Conference will be held 
Febraury 23, 24, and 25 at the Hilton Hotel in San Fran- 
cisco. The 1968 theme will be "And gladly wolde he lerne 
AND GLADLY TECHE" (The Creative Teacher in 
California) . 

Outstanding speakers and participants will include 
NCTE President Alfred Grommon of Stanford, Dr. Fred 
Stocking of Williams College, Massachusetts, Dr. Jose- 
phine Miles of UC at Berkeley, and Dr. Richard Armour 
of Scripps College. Registration information can be se- 
cured from Harvey Farr, Elk Grove High School, Elk 
Grove, California 95624. 



Student Council at Work 

Gompers Teachers Are Honored 



S 




1 

ED, 

ft 



The Student Council at Samuel Gompers High School recentl 
celebrated "Be Kind to Teachers Day" which coincided with th 
final day of American Education Week. The council presented 
large greeting card to the faculty members, signed by th 
council members, which was placed by the faculty sign-in boo 
along with a box of apples. Pictured are student body officei 
Gary Chong, Vice President; Julie Louie, Treasurer; Mr. Albei ic 
Benson, art and typing teacher; Mabel Leung, Secretary; an 
Manuel Delgado, President. 



• HELP FOR NEEDY FAMILIES 

Fourteen needy families in the Western Addition are 
received food packages this Christmas season due to th 
efforts of Benjamin Franklin Junior High and Georg sb; 
Washington High School students, it was announced b 
Robert R. Marcus, Benjamin Franklin principal. Th 
packages, including a turkey gift order, were prepared fc 
delivery by the Benjamin Franklin PTA and delivere 
by members of the school's faculty. 

The canned and packaged food and the money for gi: 
orders were contributed by students from George Wasl 
ington, under the direction of Sanford Chandler, teache 
Though only five of Mr. Chandler's classes were involve 
in this project, over 25 cartons of food were collected 
addition to cash gifts to aid families in need. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 20 



January 29, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue. San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



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jjanuary 29, 19G8 



NEWSLETTER 



Variety of Subjects Offered 



Spring In-service Courses Are Announced 



j All regularly employed San Francisco teachers are re- 
jjquired, by Board of Education policy, to satisfactorily 
Hcomplete six semester units of acceptable work in order 
llio advance from one salary "increment block" to an- 
IJJDther. 

Dr. Lester Steig, Salary Coordinator of the San Fran- 
isco Unified School District, has compiled a list of the 
n-service courses which will be available to teachers of 
e District during the spring semester of 1968. 
San Francisco public school teachers have numerous 
pportunities for further studies, however, because of 
e District-sponsored In-service Training Program, and 
e late afternoon, evening, and weekend courses pro- 
ided by many Bay Area institutions of higher learning. 
eachers benefit from many courses 
Teachers of the District will have the benefit of over 
]1( ,j)00 university and college courses plus non-college in- 
itifcervice courses offered by the SFUSD during the spring 
jH':erm. 

3, These courses are designed with the viewpoint of 
dwurnishing teachers and administrators with the newest 
Techniques and information in various subject areas. 
"Increment blocks" are defined as a period of time. 
Teachers on Classification I should complete six units 
ait (-very three years. 

oil Teachers on Classification II should complete six units 
m; (during a four-year period. 

•i\ Teachers on Classification III have five school years to 
Tt :omplete six units. 
■"' .oss of normal salary increments 
11,1 Failing to complete the required units in the allotted 
ime will cause the teacher to lose the normal salary in- 
crements until such unit requirements have been ful- 
filled. 

W Teachers who have reached their fifty-seventh birth- 
■ (: lay are exempt from these requirements. 
w'| It is noted that non-college in-service units are usable 
^ credit only within the San Francisco Unified School 

— Oistrict and are not transferable to other districts. 

Increment and classification credits are given for in- 
Jervice courses satisfactorily completed. 
'Application for approval" form should be filed 
tg Prior to starting the in-service course or any other 

— ollege or university course for a salary credit, the 
10! :acher should file an "application for approval" form 

dth Dr. Steig. This form is to be signed by the principal 

f the teacher concerned. 

Previously an attempt was made in the Newsletter to 

ublish a comprehensive list of courses offered by the 

] -ading Bay Area institutions of higher learning. How- 

Iver, these lists were not always complete, due to the 

lability to publish all courses offered. 

,- To make it easier for the individual teacher, Dr. 

teig's office has sent packets of college course bulletins 

> the principals of each school. In the packages are bulle- 

, Ins from the University of California at Berkeley and 

ie U.C. Extension, University of San Francisco, Stan- 

1 



ford University, San Francisco College for Women, and 
San Francisco State College. 

Teachers are urged to contact school principals for 
these catalogs. 

The following in-service courses are offered by the 
District during the spring 1968 semester: 

Methodology of Mathematics 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays, 
4 to 6 p.m. at West Portal Elementary School. Dr. 
Robert Wirtz and Mrs. Phyllis Abad, instructors. Course 
starts February 8, 1968. Pxe-registration is required. 
Call Elementary Division at 863-4680) Extension 237 
(for elementary teachers only). 

A course designed to help teachers upgrade the mathematics program in 
grades 3-6. New content and techniques will be introduced. Teachers will 
have an opportunity to participate in trying out materials and reporting 
results. Attention will be gives to specific instructional and learning 
problems. 

Natural Science 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays, 
4 to 6 p.m. at the Arboretum in Golden Gate Park. Gary 
Brackon, instructor. Course starts February 8, 1968. 
Pre-registration is required. Call Elementary Division at 
863-4680, Extension 237 (for elementary teachers only). 

Instructor will explore with teachers the ways in which the Arboretum, 
Junior Museum, Academy of Sciences, and other field trip resources can be 
used to vitalize the science, social science, and language arts curriculum. 
Content will include botany, zoology, ecology,' marine biology, and horti- 
culture. 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Museum Science-Art Workshops 




Something new and exciting in the enrichment program at John 
Muir Elementary School has been taking place at the Josephine 
D. Randall Junior Museum, which is under the San Francisco 
Recreation and Park Department. Under the direction of A. K. 
Conragen, Senior Curator, Thomas A. Mandas, Curator of 
Natural Science, and Mrs. Henry F. Anido, Curator of Arts, the 
students have been attending a series of science-art workshops. 
The morning sessions are devoted to lectures, exhibits, slides, 
and live animal studies, while in the afternoons the children have 
a related art experience using various media. Pictured in one of 
the afternoon sessions are (left to right) Michelle Legare, Mrs. 
Anido, Dougal Young, Mrs. Constance Anderson, Intermediate 
Resource Teacher at John Muir, Marilyn Campbell, and Franklin 
Chun. 



NEWSLETTER 



January 29, 1968 ' 



Schedule of Dates for 1968-69 Staff Use 

Following is a schedule for 1968-69 developed for the guidance of principals and 
members of the Central Office administrative staff: 



School Month 

Fall 1968 

1. Sept. 2 - Sept. 27 

2. Sept. 30 - Oct. 25 

3. Oct. 28 - Nov. 22 

4. Nov. 25 -Jan. 3 

5. Jan. 6 - Jan. 31 

Spring 1969 

6. Feb. 3 -Feb. 28 

7. Mar. 3 -Mar. 28 

8. Mar. 31 - Apr. 25 

9. Apr. 28 -May 23 
10. May 26 -June 13 



Dates for 
Principals' Meetings 

Fall 1968 

(a) Sept. 3 and Sept. 17 
Oct. 1 and Oct. 15 
Oct. 29 and Nov. 12 
Nov. 26 and Dec. 10 
Jan. 7 and Jan. 21 

Spring 1969 

Feb. 4 and Feb. 18 
Mar. 4 and Mar. 18 
(d) and Apr. 15 
Apr. 29 and May 13 
May 27 and June 10 



Dates for Central Office 
Administrators' Meetings 

Fall 1968 

Sept. 10 and Sept. 24 
Oct. 8 and Oct. 22 
Nov. 5 and Nov. 19 
Dec. 3 and (b) 
Jan. 14 and Jan. 28 

Spring 1969 

(c) and Feb. 25 
Mar. 11 and Mar. 25 
Apr. 8 and Apr. 22 
May 6 and May 20 
June 3 



Principals' meetings are scheduled on the first and third Tuesdays of the School 
Month and Central Office administrators' meetings are on the second and fourth 
Tuesdays, with the exception of afternoons preceding holidays. 

(a) Institute meeting followed by afternoon meetings of school faculties. 

(b) Christmas vacation. 

(c) Day before Lincoln's Birthday. 

(d) Easter vacation. 

Following are the dates established for report card periods for the school year 
1968-69. 





Fall 19G8 






Spring 1969 






Period 


Date 


No. Days 


Period 


Date 




No 


. Days 


1st 
2nd 
3rd 


October 18 
November 27 
January 30 


32 
27 
31 


4th 
5th 
6th 


March 14 
May 2 
June 13 






29 
30 

29 




Total 


90 






Total 




88 



San Francisco Unified School District Bureau of Research 

To Determine Chronological Ages of Pupils at Date of Testing* 

Chronological Age Table — February 15,1 968 



YEAR OF BIRTH 



DATE OF BIRTH 

Jan. 1 to Jan. 31 

Feb. 1 to Feb. 29 

Mar. 1 to Mar. 31 

Apr. 1 to Apr. 30 

May 1 to May 31 

June 1 to June 30 

July 1 to July 31 

Aug. 1 to Aug. 31 

Sept. 1 to Sept. 30 

Oct. 1 to Oct. 31 

Nov. 1 to Nov. 30 

Dec. 1 to Dec. 31 



1962 

.6-1 

..6-0 

.5-11 

..5-10 

..5-9 

..5-8 

..5-7 

..5-6 

..5-5 

.5-4 

..5-3 

..5-2 



1961 

7-1 

7-0 

6-11 

6-10 

6-9 

6-8 

6-7 

6-6 

6-5 

6-4 

6-3 

6-2 



1960 

8-1 

8-0 



7-4 
7-3 
7-2 



1959 

9-1 

9-0 

8-11 

8-10 

8-9 

8-8 

8-7 

8-6 

8-5 

8-4 

8-3 

8-2 



1958 

10-1 

10-0 
9-11 
9-10 
9-9 
9-8 
9-7 
9-6 
9-5 
9-4 
9-3 
9-2 



1957 

11-1 

11-0 

10-11 

10-10 

10-9 

10-8 

10-7 

10-6 

10-5 

10-4 

10-3 

10-2 



1956 
12-1 
12-0 
11-11 
11-10 
11-9 
11-8 
11-7 
11-6 
11-5 
11-4 
11-3 
11-2 



1955 

13-1 

13-0 

12-11 

12-10 

12-9 

12-8 

12-7 

12-6 

12-5 

12-4 

12-3 

12-2 



1954 

14-1 

14-0 

13-11 

13-10 

13-9 

13-8 

13-7 

13-6 

13-5 

13-4 

13-3 

13-2 



1953 

15-1 

15-0 

14-11 

14-10 

14-9 

14-8 

14-7 

14-6 

14-5 

14-4 

14-3 

14-2 



1952 

16-1 

16-0 

15-11 

15-10 

15-9 

15-8 

15-7 

15-6 

15-5 

15-4 

15-3 

15-2 



Locate the date of pupil's birth in the Date of Birth column at the left. Find 
the year of birth at the top of the Column. The pupil's age in years and 
months will be found in the space where these two columns meet. 

Example: Date of Birt h Chronological Age 

8 years, 10 months 
1 2 years, 5 months 



Instructions: 



April 24, 1959 
*Not to be used to determine ages at first grade entrance. Sept. 12, 1955 



January 29, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



School Calendars for the 1968-69 Year 



ELEMENTARY, JUNIOR AND SENIOR 
HIGH SCHOOLS 

Calendar 1968-69 



Fall, 1968 



School 
Month 

1. Sept. 2 - Sept. 27 

(Classes begin Sept.4) 



School Holidays 
Days State Local 



2. Sept. 30 

3. Oct. 28 

4. Nov. 25 ■ 



-Oct. 25..._. 

Nov. 22 

Jan. 3 — 



5. Jan. 6 - Jan. 31 

(Classes end Jan. 30) 



90 



School Holidays 

2 1 Labor Day, Sept. 2 

Institute, Sept. 3 
Admission Day, Sept. 9 

1 .... Veterans Day, Nov. 11 

3 12 Thanksgiving, Nov. 28-29 

Christmas Vacation, 

Dec. 16-31 
New Year's Day, Jan. 1 
.... ,' 1 Mid-term Recess, Jan. 31 



Spring, 1969 



Lincoln's Birthday, Feb. 12 



Easter Vacation, 
Mar. 31 - Apr. 4 

Memorial Day, May 30 



j 6. Feb. 3 - Feb. 28 19 1 

(Classes begin Feb. 3) 

I 7. Mar. 3 - Mar. 28 20 

8. Mar. 31 -Apr. 25..._. 15 

9. Apr. 28 May 23 - 20 

ilO. May 26 - June 13 14 1 

(Classes end June 13) — 

School Days (90 + 88).... 178 
Institute (9/3) 1 

(total Teacher Days 179 

irhe following days are designated as minimum school days: Sept. 4, 5; 
fan. 29, 30; Feb. 3, 4; June 12, 13. 

IVmerican Education Week, Nov. 11-15, 1968. 

I'ublic Schools Week, April 21-25, 1969. (Education-Business Day, April 24). 



CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Calendar 1968-69 

Fall, 1968 



School School Holidays 

Month Days State Local 

1. Sept. 2 -Sept. 27 18 2 .... 

2. Sept. 30 - Oct. 25...„ 20 

3. Oct. 28 - Nov. 22 19 1 .... 

4. Nov. 25 - Jan. 3 15 3 12 

5. Jan. 6 , Jan. 24. 15 

87 



School Holidays 
Labor Day, Sept. 2 
Admission Day, Sept. 9 

Veterans Day, Nov. 11 
Thanksgiving, Nov. 28-29 
Christmas Vacation, 

Dec. 16-31 
New Year's Day, Jan. 1 



Spring, 1969 

6. Jan. 27 - Feb. 28 19 1 5 Mid-term Recess, Jan. 27-29 

Institute, Jan. 30-31 
Lincoln's Birthday, Feb. 12 

7. Mar. 3 - Mar. 28._ 20 

8. Mar. 31 - Apr. 25 15 .... 5 Easter Vacation, 

Mar. 31 - Apr. 4 

9. Apr. 28 - May 23 20 

10. May 26 - June 13 14 1 .... Memorial Day, May 30 

88 
School Days (87 + 88).... 175 
Institute (Jan. 30-31) 2 

Total Teacher Days 177 



ADULT & VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS — 
FULL-TIME TEACHERS 

Calendar 1968-69 



chool 
[onth 

i. Sept. 



!. Sept. 

5. Oct. 



Fall, 1968 

School Holidays 
Days State Local 



2 - Sept. 27 17 



30 -Oct. 25.. 
28 - Nov. 22.... 
25 - Jan. 3.... 



20 
19 
15 



Jan. 6 - Jan. 31- 



School Holidays 

2 1 Labor Day, Sept. 2 

♦Institute, Sept. 3 
Admission Day, Sept. 9 

1 .... Veterans Day, Nov. 11 

3 12 Thanksgiving, Nov. 28-29 

Christmas Vacation, 

Dec. 16-31 
New Year's Day, Jan. 1 
1 Mid-term Recess, Jan. 31 



Spring, 1969 



19 
20 
15 

20 
|. May 26- June 13 14 



Feb. 3 - Feb. 28 

Mar. 3 - Mar. 28.. 
Mar. 31 - Apr. 25.. 

Apr. 28 - May 23.. 



Lincoln's Birthday, Feb. 12 

Easter Vacation, 

Mar. 31 - Apr. 4 
Memorial Day, May 30 



find 



hool Days (90 + I 
titute (9/3) 



178 
1 



>tal Teacher Days 179 

ull time teacher may elect to attend the September 3 Day Institute or 

le Adult and Vocational Evening Institute. 

i addition to the above calendar, apprenticeship training classes may be 

:ld on the following days: Nov. 29; Dec. 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 23, 24, 26, 

', 30, 31; Jan. 31; Mar. 31; April 1, 2, 3; June 16, 18, 23, 25, 27. 

ublic Schools Week, April 21-25, 1969. 



ADULT & VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS — 
PART-TIME TEACHERS 

Calendar 1968-69 

Summer Session, 1968 

School School Holidays 

Month Days State Local School Holidays 

1. July 1 - July 26 19 1 .... Independence Day, July 4 

2. July 29 - Aug. 9 10 

29 

Fall, 1968 

1. Sept. 2 - Sept. 28 21 2 1 Labor Day, Sept. 2 

Institute, Sept. 3 
„ Admission Day, Sept. 9 

2. Sept. 30 - Oct. 26 23 .... 1 Columbus Day, Oct. 12 

3. Oct. 28 - Nov. 23 23 1 .... VeteransDay.Nov.il 

4. Nov. 25 - Jan. 4 12 3 21 Thanksgiving, Nov. 28-30 

Christmas Vacation, 

Dec. 9-31 
New Year's Day, Jan. 1 

5. Jan. 6 - Feb. l..._ 22 .... 2 Mid-term Recess, 

— Jan. 31 - Feb. 1 

101 

Spring, 1969 

6. Feb. 3 - Mar. 1 22 2 .... Lincoln's Birthday, Feb. 12 

Washington's Birthday, 
Feb, 22 

7. Mar. 3 - Mar. 29 24 

8. Mar. 31 - Apr. 26 18 .... 6 Easter Vacation, 

Mar. 31 - Apr. 5 

9. Apr. 28 - May 24 24 

10. May 26 - June 7 10 1 1 Memorial Day, May 30-31 

98 
School Days (101 + 98).. 199 
Institute 1 

Total Teacher Days 200 



NEWSLETTER 



January 29, 19681 



. . . In-service Courses Listed 

(Continued from Page 3) 
San Francisco Harbor — Its Trade and Shipping 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
days, 4 to 6 p.m. at Hancock Elementary School. Robert 
Langner, instructor. Course starts February 7, 1968. Pre- 
registration is required. Call Elementary Division at 
863-4680, Extension 237 (for elementary teachers only). 

A course designed to present information for science and social science 
about San Francisco's harbor today — its trade, shipping, ships, and cargo 
handling; review of the development of the port; the future for the Bay and 
its shipping. Possible field trips; waterfront inspection; use of visual aids. 

Teaching Children's Literature Through the 
Elementary School Libraries 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
days 4 to 6 p.m. in Room 10, 170 Fell Street. Rose Mary 
Colligan, instructor. Course starts February 7, 1968. 
Pre-registration is required. Call Elementary Division at 
863-4680, Extension 237 (for elementary teachers only). 

The purpose of the course will be to acquaint teachers with the curricu- 
lum possibilities of the books on the Elementary Basic List and its supple- 
ments. Attention will also be given to the correlation of books with other 
instructional aids such as films, filmstrips, specimens, exhibits, study prints, 
and field trips. Individual teachers will receive help in tailoring a hterature 
course for specific classroom needs. 

Physical Education in the Elementary School: 
Techniques of Organization and Instruction 

(Grades K, 1,2, and 3) 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
days, 4 to 5:30 p.m. in the Activity Room of Lakeshore 
School. Various instructors. Course starts February 7, 
1968. Pre-registration is required. Call Mrs. Valerie 
Ryan, 863-4680, Extension 324. 

This course covers work in the physical education guide. Instructors will 
include recognized leaders in particular activity areas. 

Physical Education in the Elementary School: 
Techniques of Organization and Instruction 
(Grades 4, 5, and 6) 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
days, 4 to 5:30 p.m. in the Ulloa School gymnasium. 
Various instructors. Course starts February 7, 1968. Pre- 
registration is required. Call Mrs. Valerie Ryan, 863- 
4680, Extension 324. 

This course covers work in the physical education guide. Instructors will 
include recognized leaders in particular activity areas. 

China and Her Neighbors 

One unit, non-college credit, 8 meetings, Wednesdays, 
4 to 6 p.m. at George Washington High School. Various 
instructors. Course starts February 14, 1968. 

This course will consist of eight presentations by experts from the diplo- 
matic, academic, and business communities in the areas of their special 
interests and knowledge and will provide teachers with current information 
about China, India and other Asian nations. The course is being presented 
with the cooperation of the San Francisco Council of Social Studies Teach- 
ers and the World Affairs Council of Northern California. Further informa- 
tion about the course may be obtained from Dr. Robert Bahnsen, Special 
Projects, at 431-5379. 

Developmental Reading for Bilingual Students 
in Regular Classes 

One unit, non-college credit, 8 meetings, Thursdays, 
4 to 6 p.m. at Horace Mann Junior High School. Alice 
McCallion, instructor. Course starts February 29, 1968. 

The purpose of the course will be to adjust the materials and content of 
the regular course of study to the needs of bilingual and other students 
who have adequate oral skills but inadequate reading and writing skills. 
The course should be of special interest to junior high school teachers whose 
students need help with the basic communication and computational skills. 



English as a Second Language for 
Chinese-speaking Students 

One unit, non-college credit, 8 meetings, Wednesdays, 
4 to 6 p.m. at Francisco Junior High School. Various 
instructors. Course starts February 14, 1968. Mr. Well- 
ington Chew, coordinator. To pre-register call the Cur- 
riculum Office, 863-4680, Extension 367. 

The course will cover the sociological background of Chinese-speaking 
students, modern methods and techniques in the teaching of English as a 
Second Language, and materials and audio-visual aids. Sessions will be con- 
ducted by college instructors, community resource persons, and School 
District teachers in the Chinese bilingual program. 



1 



:. 



Family Life Education: Biological Backgrounds 

One unit, non-college credit, 5 meetings, Thursdays 
7 to 9:45 p.m. at the San Francisco Medical Society 
Auditorium, 250 Masonic Avenue. Instructors: Ellswortl 
Quinlan, M.D., "Anatomy and Physiology of Repro- 
duction"; Pieter De Vries, M.D., "Embriology"; Jerolc 
Lowenstein, M.D., "The Endocrine Glands"; Charle 
Epstein, M.D., "Genetics"; Hulda Thelander, M.D. 
"Normal Growth and Development"; R. G. Patton 
M.D., "Emotional Development of the Child in tb 
Family Including the Child's Growing Awareness o 
Sex"; H. Vandervoort, M.D., "Behaviorial Science As 
pects of Human Sexuality"; and Stephen L. Kaufman 
M.D., "Psychodrama as a Teaching Tool in Sex Educa jl 
tion." Course starts February 15, 1968. Pre-registratioi ™ 
is necessary. Call Dr. Frances Todd, 863-4680, Extensioi 
368. 



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L 



Sin 



.This course is given by the San Francisco Medical Society for teachet 
to prepare them for the new health and family life curriculum. 

Junior High School English 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wedm 
days, 4 to 6 p.m. at Luther Burbank Junior High Schoo 
Albert Lavin, instructor. Course starts February 14, 196? 

The purpose of this course is to help junior high school English teache 
prepare for the introduction of the newly adopted state English textboo 
in the fall of 1968. There will be discussion of some of the "new" : 
proaches in grammar and the relationship of grammar to the teaching 
composition. Emphasis will be placed on classroom practice and application 

Methods of Teaching Data Processing 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wedne: 
days, 4 to 6 p.m. at City College of San Francisct "' 
Charles Ohman, instructor. Course starts February 1' * 
1968. Pre-registration is necessary. Call Arnold Jacol 
son, 863-4680, Extension 247. 



H 



aid 
irtf 



The course will deal with methods and hands-on experience with da 
processing equipment. 

Problem Solving with Computers 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wedne 
days, 4 to 6 p.m. at Galileo High School. Robert Albrecl 
of Portola Institute, instructor. Course starts Februai 
7, 1968. Pre-registration is required. Call lone Mathist 
at 771-3150. 

An introduction to various types of electronic computing equipmei 
Training in the operation and classroom use of specific machines. Te< 
niques of flow charting and field trips to large computer installations. 

Typewriting Workshop 

One unit, non-college credit, 2 meetings, Saturda' 
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Marina Junior High School. E 
Fred Winger, co-author of Gregg General Typewritin 
and Dr. Larry Erickson, co-author of Southwestern, 20 
Century Typewriting. Course starts February 17, 196 
Pre-registration is required. Call Arnold Jacobson, 86 
4680, Extension 247. 

This is a workshop in methods of teaching typewriting. 



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ij January 29, 1988 



NEWSLETTER 



|Dr. Luckmann of City College 
;To Retire Effective Feb. 16 

J Dr. Lloyd Luckmann, Acting President of City College 
of San Francisco, will retire effective February 16, ending 
J nearly 33 years of service with the college, from the day 
■Jit opened in 1935. He will become Associate Dean of the 
"{Colleges of Liberal Arts and Science at the University of 

jSan Francisco. 

I Dr. Luckmann was one of the 72 members of the 
ifounding faculty of City College. He was present in the 

fWar Memorial Opera House when the college, then 
'[without a campus, held opening-day ceremonies August 
"f 6, 1935. 

J From instructor in political science and speech, Dr. 
rlLuckmann was named Assistant to President A. J. Cloud 

In 1946, Dean of University Courses in 1949, and Co- 
ordinator of Instruction in 1951. In that position he has 
:erved as a virtual vice president to the present president, 



, Or. Louis G. Conlan. 
m Since July, 1967 Dr. Luckmann has been Acting Presi- 
j lent of City College during the sabbatical leave of Dr. 
tin Ionian. 

% MISSION HIGH PARTICIPATES 

lt l , A group of 16 Mission High School boys recently par- 

icipated in a program aimed at increasing self-motiva- 

ion and awareness of career objectives, sponsored by the 

lue 5ay Area Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi. 

ta Termed "Live a Day," the program matched the boys 

ft.yith fraternity members on a one-to-one basis, based 

J upon general field of interest. The boys were picked up 

l!t school in the morning by the members and proceeded 

JSd the place of employment to spend the day. 

Each boy observed the member in his daily activities 

. nd asked questions relating to the job and its require- 

. lents. In this way the boys were able to gain first-hand 

Xnowledge about their field of interest and evaluate the 

' lemands placed upon men in the field. 

1 Careers represented included management consultant, 

.acher, veterinarian, recreation director, accountant, 

raftsman, lawyer, professional athlete, electrical engineer, 

ilesman, veterans official, school administrator, and 

dministrative assistant. 



;!iii 



i:lf 
3 

».* 



CREDENTIAL INFORMATION 

A new credential structure became operative on 
January 1, 1964, with additional requirements. 

If your credential is allowed to expire, you will 
be required to meet the new standards now in 
effect. You may keep your present credential valid 
by completing all renewal requirements indicated 
on the front or reverse side of the credential before 
its date of expiration and by filing application for 
renewal before midnight of its expiration date. 

Credential fee is $15 per credential. 

It is important that you keep your credentials 
in force and record them in the Personnel Division 
when renewed. 



BOARD POLICY — SALARY CREDIT 

"The maximum credit that will be accepted for 
salary classification purposes of teachers engaged 
in full-time teaching will be six semester hours, or 
six quarter hours, or the equivalent, for any one 
semester or quarter, exclusive of summer sessions. 
A maximum of eight semester hours or twelve 
quarter hours, exclusive of summer sessions, will be 
accepted for any one school year for salary classifi- 
cation purposes. All units will be converted into 
semester credits for classification and/or in-service 
purposes in accordance with School Board regula- 
tions." 



Measles Immunization Required 
Of All Entering New Students 

By action of the State Legislature no pupil may be 
admitted to a public or private school unless prior to his 
first admission to school in California he has been im- 
munized against regular measles (Rubeola). The effec- 
tive date of this requirement was set as January 1, 1968. 

The basic regulations concerning measles immuniza- 
tion include the following: 

1. No pupil may be admitted unless prior to his first 
admission to school in California he has been immunized 
against regular measles (Rubeola). This applies only to 
those persons seeking their first admission and does not 
apply to pupils presently enrolled. Tranfer pupils from 
other California school districts will have met the re- 
quirement at their former school. No further cheeking 
is necessary. 

2. A pupil who has not been immunized may be ad- 
mitted on condition that within two weeks he shall meet 
the regulation. 

3. A pupil who has had measles shall be considered 
immune. 

4. Pupils seeking immunization shall be referred to 
their family physician. Those in need of Public Health 
Department assistance shall be referred to their District 
Health Center. 

5. Immunization shall not be required if it is contrary 
to the pupil's beliefs. 

6. Immunization shall not be required if the pupil's 
physical condition is such, or medical circumstances are 
such that immunization is not considered safe. 

7. In the event that written records cannot be obtain- 
ed, the parents may sign that the immunization has been 
obtained. 

8. "Pupil" means an individual admitted to public or 
private elementary or secondary schools, including kin- 
dergarten and junior colleges. 



SABBATICAL LEAVE NOTICE 

Teachers or administrators planning to take a 
sabbatical leave during the fall term 1968 for travel 
or study are reminded that requests are due in the 
Personnel Division Office prior to March 1, 1968. 






NEWSLETTER 



January 29, 1968' 



Announcements 



• ADDITIONAL STUDY CENTERS 

The January 8, 1968 edition of the Newsletter con- 
tained a listing of Community Study Centers. The follow- 
ing are to be added to that list : 
CHINATOWN - NORTH BEACH 
Garfield Elementary School 
Wednesdays — 7 to 9 p.m. 
North Beach Housing Project 
660 Francisco Street 

Monday through Thursday — 4 to 6 p.m. 
36 Waverly Place 

Monday through Friday — 4 to 6 p.m. 
EOC Office 
1074 Stockton Street 
Monday through Friday — 4 to 6 p.m. 



FALL TERM 1968 REQUISITION LISTS 

Fall term 1968 requisition lists are due in the 
Division of Supplies Warehouse, 1000 Selby Street, 
attention Mrs. Elaine Hung, as follows: 

Janitorial Supplies Lists — February 9, 1968. 

Instructional Supplies Ljsts — March 15, 1968. 



• NDEA ESL INSTITUTES ANNOUNCED 

Information regarding NDEA-sponsored summer in- 
stitutes in English as a Second Language is available in 
the Teachers' Professional Library or from the Curricu- 
lum Office. Interested teachers and administrators are 
urged to consult the listing in order to make application 
to the college or university of their choice. 

This summer, ESL institutes will be held on campuses 
ranging from Manila to Puerto Rico. In California, 
Pasadena College, USC, and UCLA will host sessions. 



• DISTRICT TEACHER AUTHORS BOOK 

McGraw-Hill Book Company announces that it has 
published a book authored by Helaine Dawson, District 
teacher with the Adult Education Division. The book is 
entitled On the Outskirts of Hope: Educating Youth 
from Poverty Areas.' 

The McGraw-Hill announcement states, in part. 
"What makes this book outstanding is the creativity-used 
to make learning an adventure, extending education be- 
yond the classroom into every facet of daily living. It is 
an unorthodox approach to teaching, simply written with 
no educational, psychological, or sociological jargon. It 
is based on practical solutions rather than theoretical and 
technical explanations. At the same time it is scientific in 
its treatment of behavioral problems and its understand- 
ing of the psychology of learning." 



. . . New Careers Aide Program 

(Continued from Page 1) 
: A District New Careers Aide Program project head 
will be appointed to help develop additional guidelines, 
to establish necessary liaison with school personnel, Civil 
Service, and other participating agencies, and to become 
involved in the selection process. The program is sched- 
uled to start at the beginning of the spring, 1968 term. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, February 6, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 1 70 Fell Street. 



• BOARD COMMITTEES APPOINTED 

Board of Education committee assignments were an 
nounced at the January 16, 1968 meeting by Mr. Edward 
Kemmitt, President. They include the following: 

Curriculum Committee: Mr. Alan H. Nichols (Chair- 
man), Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, and Mr. Reynold 
Colvin. 

Building and Grounds Committee: Mr. Adolf o de 
Urioste ( Chairman ) , Dr. Laurel Glass, and Dr. Zuretti 
L. Goosby. 



• GEORGE WASHINGTON STUDENT HONORED 

Kirk Johnson of George Washington High School has 
been cited as one of the outstanding high school students 
of English in the country. The National Council of 
Teachers of English has named him a 1967 national 
runner-up in its annual Achievement Awards competi 
tion. 

Kirk's English instructors at George Washington have 
been Susan Stapleton, Mrs. Barbara Lee, JoAnn Stewart, 
and Mrs. Florence Armstrong. 

• PRINCIPAL'S ARTICLE PUBLISHED 

Dr. Lane E. De Lara, principal of Francisco Junioi 
High School, has an article published in the December 
1967 issue of The Clearing House. The article is entitled 
"Teacher Aides in the Junior High Schools" and de 
scribes the work of the volunteers from the San Franciso 
Education Auxiliary. 



I 



' 



• NDEA INSTITUTE FOR GERMAN TEACHERS 

Lewis and Clark College announces an NDEA Institute 
for Advanced Study to be held in Munich, Germany, foil 
secondary school teachers of German (grades 7-12) tfljj 
be held June 13-August 15, 1968. A brochure giving par 
ticulars is on file in the Teachers Professional Library 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE I 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO, C>L 
PERMIT No. 3966 I 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL D ( l 
135 VAN NESS AVE. S|l| 



RETURN REQUEST! 



DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 
S. F. PUBLIC LIBRARY 
LARKIN & MC ALLISTER 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, 



9 4102 



SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



DOCUMENTS 



SEP 3 ',£69 



f?,Afl FHANCIBCO 



NEWSLETTER 



/OLUME 39 



FEBRUARY 5, 1968 



NUMBER 21 



public Speaking Contest 



Vesidio, Hoover Speakers Win 




.residio and Herbert Hoover Junior High Schools took top honors 
the Fourth Annual Junior High School Public Speaking Con- 
st held 3t Luther Burbank Junior High School. Forty contest- 
its from 15 junior high schools participated. Pictured above 
eft to right) are Earl Mack (Presidio), first place in Original 
iratory; Kathleen O'Farrell, Presidio public speaking coach; 
jobert White (Presidio), first place for Extemporaneous Speak- 
g; Emily Honig (Herbert Hoover), first place in Oral Reading; 
id Clement Zannini, Herbert Hoover public speaking coach, 
fsntest judges included Ted Moore (Abraham Lincoln), Thomas 
alo (Woodrow Wilson), and Norman Durieux (Galileo). Dr. 
eorge Karonsky is serving as San Francisco Junior High School 
irensic League Chairman, and James Keolker (Luther Burbank) 
as the Contest Coordinator. 



Balboa Adult Education Classes 
Scheduled To Start in February 

The Board of Education, upon recommendation of 
Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins, has given approval to 
the opening of Adult Education classes at Balboa High 
School beginning Monday, February 19, 1968. 

The decision to offer adult courses at Balboa resulted 
from meetings and consultations between Dr. Edward D. 
Goldman, Assistant Superintendent for Adult and Voca- 
tional Education, and the Ocean View-Merced Heights- 
Ingleside (OMI) Project Education Sub-committee on 
Adult Education. 

Rollin E. Haggard, OMI Project Coordinator, had 
earlier indicated the need for adult classes to serve the 
OMI area. A questionnaire was circulated among OMI 
residents, the results indicating a strong desire for a 
variety of adult class offerings. Balboa High School was 
recommended as the most acceptable site. 

Classes will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. on Mondays and 
Wednesdays and include the following: Conversational 
Spanish, New Mathematics, Refresher English, Typing — 
all levels, Shorthand — beginning. Office Practice and 
Business Machines, Speed Reading, Public Speaking, 
Americanization and Citizenship, Dressmaking, Art — 
oil and water colors, History — accent on Negro history, 
Civil Service Preparation, Family Life Education, World 
Affairs Lecture (one night weekly) , and Investment Lec- 
ture Series (one night weekly) . 

The Adult Education office under Dalton Howatt, Co- 
ordinator, is handling this expansion of Adult Education 
offerings. 



* 



F Education Auxiliary To Sponsor Volunteer Training Program 



The San Francisco Education Auxiliary announces 
iat it is sponsoring a spring training program for school 
;>lunteers beginning February 7, 1968. 
■ Four orientation meetings will be conducted on Febru- 
y 7, 14, 19, and 28 in Room 30, 170 Fell Street. These 
eetings will serve to explain the role, opportunities, and 
^ligations of the SFEA, how to work closely with 
achers, the importance of understanding children, and 
jw children can be helped to learn. 
A series of skill sessions will follow and will be held on 
liarch 7, 14, 21, 28, April 4, 18, 25, and May 2. The 
iill sessions will cover a variety of topics including how 
ilunteers may help children with reading, mathematics, 
usic, and art. Other sessions will cover helping bilingual 



children, pre-kindergarten children, and helping children 
through tutorial relationships. 

Both the orientation and skill sessions are free and 
open to the public. They will be held from 10 a.m. to 12 
noon on the dates indicated above. 

Sponsors of the spring training program include the 
SFEA, the Adult and Vocational Division of the District, 
the Volunteer Bureau of San Francisco, and San Fran- 
cisco State College. 

For further information about the SFEA school volun- 
teer program, contact Mrs. Fern Barney, 135 Van Ness 
Avenue, Room 213-A, telephone 863-4680, Extension 
386. 



NEWSLETTER 



February 5, 196' 



Red Cross Volunteers 



Galileo Students Give Service 




Galileo High School students proved that today's youth want and 
are able to produce in-service assignments of considerable re- 
sponsibility, when, for 1 1 days during the Christmas holidays, 
students operated a temporary Red Cross office to record mess- 
ages for servicemen and their families. Under the leadership of 
Robert Lew and Annie Tom, Red Cross Leaders at Galileo, 36 
students (33 from Galileo) gave 400 hours to this project. The 
students manned the office from 12 noon to 6 p.m., operated 
the tape machines, and walked (he streets with flyers and port- 
able tape recorders to inform the public of this free Red Cross 
service. United Airlines loaned the office the students utilized. 
Galileo volunteers included (left to right) Robert Lew, Kathy 
Poon, Frank Brown, Annie Tom, David Lee, and Morris Lee. 



Openings Announced in Special 
Educational Services Division 

The Personnel Service Division announces the following 
openings in the Psychological Services section of the 
Special Educational Services Division of the District : 

School Psychologist — Duties include the administra- 
tion of individual psychological tests to assist in the 
evaluation of selected pupils with learning difficulties 
and/or emotional or social adjustment problems, inter- 
views with parents and pupils as referred, consultation 
with school staff regarding effective planning for pupils. 

Certification as a school psychologist with the Master's 
degree is required. Salary will be arranged according to 
Section 6.01 of the 1967-68 Salary Schedule. 

School Psychometrist — Duties include the adminis- 
tration of individual intelligence tests to pupils who are 
candidates for special educational programs, under su- 
pervision of a school psychologist. 

Certification as a school psychometrist is required. The 
salary scale is the same as the Basic Single Salary Sched- 
ule for Teachers, Section 7.01 of the 1967-68 Salary 
Schedule. 

Applications for these positions should be made in 
writing to Mr. Milton Reiterman, Personnel Coordinator, 
Personnel Division, immediately. 



• SCHOOL MUSICIANS TO PERFORM 

The San Francisco Public Schools Honor Symphony 
Orchestra will be featured in concert on radio stations 
KKHI AM and KKHI FM on Saturday, February 10 
from 9 to 10 a.m. 






SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 21 



February 5, 1968 



Pupil Personnel Credential 
Applications Due by September 1 

The Standard Pupil Personnel Credential on a partia 
fulfillment basis will be issued only to those applicant 
who have their applications for such credential in th 
Credentials Office of the State Department of Educatio 
BEFORE September 1, 1968. 

In order to meet the requirements for such a credentia 
one must a) have two years of successful teaching ex 
perience in the public schools or private scools of equiva 
lent status; b) complete six (6) semester hours of cours 
work selected from the following areas: Pupil Personnc 
Services Concepts and Procedures, Dynamics of Indi 
vidual Behavior, Counseling Theory and Procedure: 
Measurement Theory and Procedures, Group Proce; 
Theory and Procedures, Educational and Career Plar 
ning, Research Methodology, Remedial and Special Edt 
cation, Laws Relating to Children, and Organization c 
Pupil Personnel Services; and c) submit a written state 
ment that he intends to complete all requirements for th 
credential. 

Once the applicant receives the Pupil Personne 
Credential on a partial fulfillment basis, he may renei 
it for successive two-year periods when verification 
established by means of official transcripts that durin 
the valid period of the credential being renewed te 
(10) semester hours of the additional course work n 
quired for a regular credential have been completec 
However, the first partial fulfillment credential must t 
applied for before September 1, 1968. 

• DR. TODD ON WORKSHOP-FORUM PROGRA/ 

Dr. Frances Todd, District Curriculum Assistant fd r 
Family Life Education, will be one of the feature i, 
speakers at the "Semantics and Sexuality" workshc l| 
program to be held February 23, 24, and 25 at the Fai i 
mont Hotel and San Francisco State College. 

San Francisco State College is the sponsoring organ 
zation of the three-day forum. For information conta 
the Faculty Program Center at the College, 1600 Holli 
way Avenue 94132, telephone 469-1205. 






135 Van Ness Avenue. San Francisco. Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



February 5, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



In-service Course To Cover 
Group Counseling Techniques 

(The following in-service course will be offered 
this semester by the District to any and all inter- 
ested teachers, counselors, and administrators.) 
Group Techniques for School Counseling 

Two units, 15 meetings, Wednesdays, 4 to 6 p.m. 
at Samuel Gompers High School. Mrs. Cleodel 
Russelle, instructor. Course starts February 7, 1968. 

The sessions will cover introduction to group theory, including 
the structure and dynamics of groups; intake planning and forma- 
tion of groups; the group in action, including the role of the leader, 
activities within the group, and recording group sessions; and 
diagnosis and evaluation of groups. 



• BALBOA GRADUATE IN CONCERT 

Words of praise have been heaped upon Sherlyn Chew, 
lUniversity of California undergraduate and Balboa High 
^School graduate, for her recent concert presented in 
Hertz Hall on the UC campus. 

Miss Chew and her father, Ronald P. L. Chew, per- 
formed ancient and classical Chinese music, played on 
'instruments which trace their origin back as far as 5000 
'B.C. 

Oakland Tribune music critic Paul Hertelendy wrote, 
"At her hands (Miss Chew's), the pipa (instrument) 
'gained the versatility of a mocking bird with the expres- 
siveness of a guitar." He summed up the performance by 
saying, "All in all, it was an absorbing and well-attended 
oresentation conducted on a high plane." 



1 School's Role Explained 

] Starr King Holds Community Day 




itirt 



tarr King School recently held a Community-Education Day with 
5 community leaders attending the program which explained 
le objectives, methods, and special programs at the school to 
ie participants. Visitors received an orientation to the school, 
>ured classrooms, met with teachers, and took part in a group 
iscussion involving community leaders and representatives from 
ie faculty who were Mrs. Mary Ellen Brady and Mrs. Fannie 
eagler. Pictured above are community leaders representing 
irious Potrero Hill organizations (left to right) Mrs. Babette 
refke. Treasurer, Booster's Association; Earl Cruser, Executive 
irector. Neighborhood House; Mrs. May Brown, Counselor, 
ission Rebels; Mrs. Lois Watson, Starr King Principal; Robert 
oble. Chairman, Action Committee; William Finnesey, Assistant 
anager. Housing Authority; and Mrs. Rosa Walker, President, 
arr King PTA. 



Students' Letters Well-Received 

The lives of some 4,000 crewmen aboard the USS 
Coral Sea on duty in the Gulf of Tonkin were brightened 
this past holiday season by 3,000 letters from children 
in the District's elementary schools. 

Prior to Christmas, Mr. L. Jack Block, Chairman of 
the Coral Sea Committee, suggested to Dr. Donald A. 
Rhodes, Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Schools, 
that the men of the Coral Sea would appreciate receiving 
letters from home. 

By December 14, over 3,000 letters reached Dr. Rhodes' 
office, whereupon they were forwarded to the 12 th Naval 
District Office for delivery. 

Since the letters were sent, District schools have been 
receiving letters of warm appreciation from the men of 
the Coral Sea. Typical of the response is the following 
letter received by Andrew Jackson School: 
Andrew Jackson School 
San Francisco, California 

Dear Students: 

On behalf of the 4,000 sailors aboard the USS Coral Sea, 
please allow me to extend to each and every one of you our 
heartfelt thanks for your wonderful Christmas messages. 

Your words brought the Christmas spirit these many miles out 
to sea and have brightened our days. 

The cards have been distributed to the men, and I'm sure 
many of you will be hearing from crewmembers personally. 
Some of the messages were printed in the ship's newspaper and 
others were read on the ship's television station. 

When the Coral Sea returns to San Francisco, I hope you 
will find time to visit our ship so that we can, in some small way, 
repay you for your kind thoughts. 

Enclosed you will find a picture of the Coral Sea which I 
hope you will enjoy. 

Again, our thanks and best wishes for a very happy holiday 
season to all of you. 

Sincerely, 

James J. Hill 

Lieutenant Commander, US Navy 

Public Affairs Officer 



Music Supervisor Position Open 

The Personnel Service Division announces that appli- 
cations for the position of Music Supervisor (A) will be 
accepted by the Personnel Office until February 16, 1968. 

Under the Director of Music, the Supervisor of Music 
(A) is responsible for the supervision of both vocal and 
instrumental programs in the elementary and secondary 
divisions; the preparation of the budget for music sup- 
plies and instruments; the development of the summer 
school music program; the coordinating of the All-City 
Orchestra and Honor Choir; and the coordinating and 
supervising of the in-school music projects. 

All applicants must possess the M.A. degree; a Stan- 
dard Supervision, Standard Administrative, or a General 
Administrative Credential; and at least five years of ex- 
perience in teaching or administering music programs. 

The position has been classified as Supervisor A in 
accordance with the Certificated Personnel Salary Sched- 
ule. The salary range is $13,980 to $17,725, and the work 
year is approximately 197 days. 

Applications for this position must be in writing on 
appropriate forms available in the Personnel Division 
office. They must be returned to Milton F. Reitcrman, 
Personnel Coordinator, not later than February 16, 1968. 



NEWSLETTER 



February 5, 1968 \ 




EMPLOYMENT AFTER RETIREMENT 

Recent legislation passed in Sacramento pertains 
to teacher employment after retirement. 

Section 14376 of the Education Code is amended 
to read: 

14376. Any person who retired for service may 
be employed as a substitute in a position requiring 
certification qualifications, or as a teacher who pro- 
vides remedial instruction, or as a home teacher, or 
as a hospital teacher, or as a curriculum writer or 
consultant in a field in which he is specially quali- 
fied, or as a teacher in a rest home for the aged, 
or in a community center . . . and may be paid not 
to exceed two thousand five hundred dollars 
($2,500) in any one fiscal year. Such employment 
shall not operate to reinstate the person as a mem- 
ber of this system, or to terminate or suspend his 
retirement allowance, and, no deductions shall be 
made from his salary as contributions to this system. 
Such person may be reemployed only if able to pass 
a physical examination prescribed by the State 
Board of Education. 



• SUPPLIES WAREHOUSE ANNUAL INVENTORY 

. The Annual Inventory of the Division of Supplies 
Warehouse will be taken during the latter part of Febru- 
ary, according to Edgar Lahl, Supervisor of Supplies. 
Therefore, the warehouse will be closed from February 
15 through February 29, 1968. 

Requisitions received in the Division of Supplies by 
Wednesday, February 7, will be processed through the 
warehouse before inventory. 

Deliveries from the warehouse will also continue dur- 
ing the inventory period to complete delivery of those 
supplies processed before warehouse closing. The Division 
of Supplies Warehouse will re-open on Friday, March 1, 
1968. 



• RED CROSS ELEMENTARY DAY 

Toes will tap and straw hats will twirl as Red Cross 
secondary student volunteers explain "That's Where 
Your Money Goes" to fifth and sixth grade representa- 
tives from elementary schools at the Spring Elementary 
Day, February 12, 1968. Held at the Golden Gate Chap- 
ter, located at 1625 Van Ness Avenue, the meeting begins 
at 9 a.m. and ends at noon. 

Terrie Trabert, an active Galileo junior, is Chairman 
of the meeting that teaches elementary students the mean- 
ing of Red Cross Youth and how these representatives 
may assist their teacher-advisors in conducting an enroll- 
ment for membership drive. 

Assisting Terrie will be secondary student leaders 
from schools throughout San Francisco that attend the 
Red Cross City-Wide Council meetings. These leaders 
take complete charge of the day, and help the elementary 
students pack their enrollment supplies, and teach them 
in workshops ways to publicize an enrollment drive. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, February 6, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE TO MEET; 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet at 1 : 30 
p.m. on Wednesday, February 7, 1968, in Room 10, Cen- 
tral Office, 1 70 Fell Street. 



• NATIONAL COMMITTEE INVITATION 

Bert Mason, Assistant Principal of Francisco Junior 
High School, has been invited to take part in a study of 
the problems facing secondary education in the central 
cities. The study has been proposed by the National Com 
mittee on Secondary Education of the National Associa 
tion of Secondary School Principals. 

Dr. Robert Havighurst will be in charge of the project 
which will hold its first committee meeting to develop 
proposed plans on Sunday, February 11, as part of the 
NASSP's annual convention in Atlantic City. 



• SCIENCE, MATH RESEARCH PARTICIPATION 

The National Science Foundation has issued a new 
brochure listing the institutions offering Research Par 
ticipation Projects for High School Teachers of Science 
and Mathematics for the summer of 1968. Copies have 
been placed on file in the Teachers Professional Library, 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCY 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancy: 
2704 — School Custodian, Female — Mark Twain 
Elementary School. 



• FIELD LIBRARIANS DINNER MEETING 

The first meeting of the Field Librarians for the spring 
semester will be a dinner on Wednesday, February 14, 
Time and location are to be announced. All elementary, 
junior high, and senior high librarians are welcome. 



• NDEA SUMMER INSTITUTES 

Information on the following NDEA summer institute; 
has been placed on file in the Teachers Professional 
Library. Interested teachers and administrators must 
write directly to the institutions involved for applications! 

• Institute in Advanced Study in English (for Cali 
fornia Secondary Teachers of English, Grades 6-12 
University of Southern California, June 17 to August 9 
1968. 

• Institute for Advanced Study in Reading (Grade: 
1-6) , University of Oregon, June 17 to August 9, 1968 

• Institute for Advanced Study in English as a Seconi 
Language/Dialect, University of Southern California 
June 24 to August 10, 1968. 

• Institute in History in the Areas of South and Eas 
Asia, the Middle East, and Africa (Grades 6-9) , Univer 
sity of Bridgeport, Connecticut, July 1 to August 9, 1968 

• Institute for Advance Study in Spanish (Grade 
K.-8) , California Lutheran College, June 17 to August 9 
1968. 



93 '■ ^ SU/c 

SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



FEB i 3 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



/OLUME 39 



FEBRUARY 12, 1968 



NUMBER 22 



Task Force Report 



Programs for Gifted to be Recommended 



The Task Force Report on Programs for Gifted and 
Academically Talented Students will be presented to the 
lioard of Education at tomorrow night's special meeting, 
nd Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins will recommend 
'hat authorization be granted to implement such pro- 
;Tams with available State funds. (Note: The Board 
neeting of February 6, 1968 was adjourned to a special 
leeting on February 1 3 at which the regular agenda will 
e completed.) 

i The Task Force Report suggests a number of ways in 
/hich special provisions can be made for District gifted 
:udents and provides for flexibility by permitting indi- 
idual schools to select the programs most suitable for 
le students. 

The Report's recommendations suggest allocations of 
:acher time that schools will need to carry on the vari- 
us programs. The extent to which such allocations can 
e provided will depend upon budget determinations that 
re made as all the needs of all the students are con- 
dered together. 

tanford Study Serves as Guide 

The work of the Task Force was based upon the prob- 
•ms identified and directions suggested in a study of 
rograms for District gifted and academically talented 
udents made by Dr. Frederick J. McDonald and Dr. 
': Wesley Sowards of Stanford University. 

Until this year, the State has apportioned $40 for each 
ifted student in a special program for a school year, 
'hich amount has had to cover the cost of identifying 
ifted students. This year under new legislation the 
mount is increased to $60 per student per year plus $40 
i :>r each student identified as gifted. The new figure, 
owever, falls far short of the amount that would be 
seded to support the programs outlined in the Report. 



MRS. LILIENTHAL'S STATEMENT 

Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal, past president of the 
Board of Education, reaffirmed at the Board of 
Education meeting last Tuesday night, February 6, 
1968, that Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins was 
requested by the Board to reduce the 12 Stanford 
Research Institute alternatives to two or three when 
he came to San Francisco in July. She emphasized 
that the record should be clear that the SRI part of 
the Educational Equality /Quality Report was pre- 
pared for and at the request of the Board. 



Emphasis during the current semester will be placed 
on school-by-school planning and the development of 
estimates of cost for next year. 

If the Superintendent's recommendation is approved, 
the present gifted resource teacher positions in the Cen- 
tral Office will be continued and one will be added at 
the elementary level, the salary of this teacher being paid 
from the added State apportionment. There will then be 
three elementary resource teachers, and one junior high 
and one senior high resource teacher. These teachers will 
work under the direction of the respective assistant super- 
intendents, with coordination between instructional levels 
provided by the curriculum division. 

Work with Individual Schools 

The resource teachers will be assigned to work with 
individual schools in assessing, and, where feasible, modi- 
fying present programs in terms of the guidelines of the 
Report. Present school schedules in effect for the spring 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Ribbon Cutting Ceremonies 

Wilson Rifle Range Is Opened 




One of the finest small bore rifle ranges in the country was 
opened recently at Woodrow Wilson High School with a formal 
parade and ribbon cutting ceremonies. Participating in the cere- 
monies are (left to right) Saul Madfes, Assistant Principal; 
Colonel James Farren, Senior Army Instructor; Cadet Lt. Colonel 
Carlos Lynn; Barton Knowlcs, Principal; and MSG Richard Ryan, 
ROTC Instructor. The range was initiated by Mr. Knowles, 
Colonel Farren, and Mr. Madfes when they fired at an "elephant 
sized" bullseye, which they centered with unusual accuracy. 



NEWSLETTER 



February 12, 196 I 



Special February 13 Meeting 



Board to Consider Variety of Proposal* 



A number of major recommendations to the Board of 
Education will be made by Superintendent Robert E. 
Jenkins at the February 13, 1968 special meeting of the 
Board. All of the proposed measures are summarized 
below and will be reviewed in subsequent Newsletter 
articles. 
Program for the Gifted 

The Superintendent will recommend that authorization 
be granted to implement programs for gifted and aca- 
demic students with the available State funds on the 
basis of the "Report of the Superintendent's Task Force 
on Programs for Gifted and Academically Talented Stu- 
dents." (The work of the Task Force is based upon the 
problems identified and suggested directions in the report 
presented by Professors McDonald and Sowards of Stan- 
ford University. See story on page one.) 
Reading Program — Massive Pilot Project 

The Superintendent will recommend that authorization 
be granted to use the Sullivan Programmed Reading 
Materials with approximately 12,500 students in 25 or 
more elementary schools during the spring semester. It is 
also recommended that a project coordinator be assigned 
during the spring term to coordinate all details (pre- 
service, in-service and implementation) , and to serve as a 
liaison with the Director of Research on the evaluation 
of the pilot so that valid hard data will be available by 
the end of the semester for considering the possible con- 
tinuation or expansion of the program in 1968-69. It is 
further recomended that $150,000 for this project be 
transferred from Undistributed Reserve, with the under- 
standing that State or Federal funds will be used if 
possible. 
Garden School Complex 

Continued review of the request from the Redevelop- 
ment Agency and report to the Board on the serious 
interest of the Redevelopment Agency and the Bayview- 
Hunters Point Joint Housing Committee on the Redevel- 
opment Agency's proposal that the School District pur- 
chase sites for two new schools, one in the area of Oak- 
dale and Jennings, and the other in the area of Hudson 
and Keith, and provide for the modernization of Jede- 
diah Smith as part of the inter-related Garden Complex 
being proposed for the Hunters-Point area. 
OMI-EPICS Guidance Proposal 

The Superintendent will recommend that authorization 
be granted to submit an application for funds from the 
National Institute of Mental Health, Department of 
Health, Education & Welfare, for the OMI-EPICS pro- 
posal, "Interdisciplinary Team Approach to Elementary 
Guidance." 

(This project is one of many being developed as a part 
of the OMI Comprehensive program, EPICS (Educa- 
tional Programs to Insure Community Stabilization). It 
provides a team of pupil personnel specialists including 
a school psychologist, school social worker, elementary 
counselor and learning specialists to provide assistance to 
faculty members, parents and pupils enrolled in the 5 



public and 2 non-public schools in the area. Of partici 
lar interest is the relatively high staffing ratio of counse 
or-learning specialists provided, which should make ; 
possible to offer immediate service to children who ar 
experiencing learning difficulties. The opportunity t 
have a counselor and learning specialist available ful 
time at the school site should provide needed relief t 
the principals and faculties of these schools. 

(The project offers a unique opportunity to develop 
program which demonstrates the effectiveness of a clo; 
working relationship between the San Francisco Unifie 
School District, the community and San Francisco Sta' I 
College, to the end of early identification and preventicl I - 
of difficulties which may tend to impede learning. )- 
Revised Personnel Policies and Procedures 

a. Revised Personnel Policy, Articles 2 and 4 — • Rr| | 
organization of the Personnel Service Division. 

The Superintendent will recommend that two majjj 
sections of the policy, Article 2 and Article 4, be revise, 
to formally implement the centralized functions of tl 
Personnel Service Division, as outlined in his repot 
Total reorganization of the division will be effecte 
through the adoption of these policies and the Superii 
tendent will modify administrative regulations to coi 
form with the revised policies. The legal adviser of tl 
Board of Education has reviewed the submitted revision 

The Superinendent's reorganization of the Personn 
Service Division will be completed in the 1968-69 scho 
year and budget considerations will be included to car 
out the functions outlined in the report. 

(The Negotiating Council and the San Francisco Fei 
eration of Teachers have supported the Superintendenil 
efforts in expanding and strengthening the Personn 
Service Division.) 

b. Long-term Substitute Report 
The Superintendent will recommend that the propos; 

of the Long-term Substitute Report be adopted and th 
(Continued on Page 3) 






k 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 39, No. 22 February 12, 1968 

135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 



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Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



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February 12, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



. . . Board Agenda Items Scheduled 

(Continued from Page 2) 

authorization be granted to implement the recommenda- 
arr | tions and the Superintendent be authorized to implement 
; ; changes in the administrative procedure which have been 
e . j agreed to by the Negotiating Council and the San Fran- 
1 | cisco Federation of Teachers. 

; : c. Grievance Procedure 

The Superintendent will recommend that in accordance 
'with agreement reached with the Negotiating Council 
and the San Francisco Federation of Teachers the Board 
| authorize a policy revision which would grant a teacher 

,; I the right, when initiating a grievance, to have the right 

r ; 'to be accompanied by conferees at all levels in the Griev- 
' ! ance Procedure. 

The Superintendent further will recommend to the 
Board the adoption of a policy stating that the responsi- 
ble administrator, upon receipt, shall forward to the Per- 

" ■ 'sonnel Service Division copies of all correspondence re- 
lating to grievances and that the Personnel Service Divi- 

' L - 'sion shall be responsible for the administration and oper- 

"'■"'■ iation of the grievance procedure. 

„, |d. Children's Centers 

rjtf | The Superintendent will recommend that in accordance 
; u3 - with agreement reached with the Negotiating Council 
and the San Francisco Federation of Teachers that all 
r , ; jiecessary revisions shall be made in existing Board policy 
(i, -in order to insure that teachers in the Children's Centers 
fl y.iare considered and treated as an integral part of the 
,i, School District and that their employment and selection 
i . I lis a function of the Personnel Service Division. 

The Superintendent further will recommend that care 
i(( ,i should be taken in these revisions to insure that all per- 
,,[,); ,ionnel procedures of the San Francisco Unified School 
! tT , r; (District shall be applicable to the Children's Center em- 
ployees. 

Data Processing 

l 1 ' ' The Superintendent will recommend the establishment 
a ')f the following positions in the Data Processing Section: 

Dne Manager (Supervisor AA), one Systems Analyst, 
— 'ind three Programmers, effective February 7, 1968, util- 

zing funds available in the Data Processing Center ap- 

iropriations for this purpose. 

?oard Meeting Dates 
I l9t> Review agreement on date for Board planning meeting 
J m Discipline. Review of possibility of changing regular 
^- neeting scheduled for Tuesday, February 20 to Tuesday, 
,1 vc / 'ebruary 27. 

ipecial Education 

The Superintendent will recommend that authorization 

Ul |ie granted to expand the Special Education Services 

rogram (Physically Handicapped, Speech-Hearing-and 

Usually Handicapped, Mentally Retarded, Educational- 

. . i/ Handicapped, Psychological Services, School Social 

Vork Services, and Guidance Service Centers), within 
•ie limit of the new State funds provided in AB 272 for 
lis purpose and subject to specific recommendations to 
rS'- :: e submitted by the Superintendent. 



Western Opera Theater To Give 
Eighteen School Performances 

The Western Opera Theater's spring series of 18 one- 
hour performances to be presented in District schools 
will commence on Monday, February 19, 1968, at Ma- 
rina Junior High School. The 2 p.m. performance will 
feature the Barber of Seville.] 

Following each presentation, the artists, conductor, 
and producer will discuss various techniques of opera as 
an art form with selected students from music, art, dra- 
ma, foreign language, and English classes. 

These post-performance seminars will give the students 
an opportunity to participate in a give-and-take discus- 
sion of the opera the students have just witnessed. 

The Western Opera Theater is a traveling repertory 
company, under the supervision of Kurt Herbert Adler, 
director of the San Francisco Opera. It presents highly 
trained professional singers in fully staged presentations, 
complete with costumes and sets. 

Performances for the opening week in February in- 
clude the following: 

Monday, February 19, 1968, at Marina Junior High 
School, 2 p.m. Barber of Seville. Armond DeMartini, 
Principal. 

Tuesday, February 20, 1968, at Roosevelt Junior High 
School, 9:52 a.m. Barber of Seville. Sylvester Kelly, 
Principal. 

Wednesday, February 21, 1968, at Herbert Hoover 
Junior High School, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Barber of 
Seville. Walter S. Nolan, Principal. 

Friday, February 23, 1968, at Luther Burbank Junior 
High School, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Barber of Seville. 
James J. Hamrock, Principal. 

• KOREAN DANCE LECTURE-DEMONSTRATION 

Dr. Won-Kyung Cho, noted Korean musician and 
dancer, will appear on the City College of San Francisco 
campus on Thursday, February 15, and Friday, February 
16. 

On Thursday, Dr. Cho will present a lecture on Ko- 
rean music at 9 : 30 a.m. in the Choral Room of the Arts 
Hall. At 11 a.m. he will give a lecture-demonstration on 
Korean dance in the College Theatre, and he will follow 
this with a dance master-class at 1:15 p.m. in the 
Women's Gymnasium. 

On Friday, Dr. Cho will lecture in the Choral Room 
at 9 a.m. on Korean poetry and at 10 a.m. on Korean, 
Japanese, and Chinese theatre. His campus stay will be 
climaxed by a public dance recital of both rustic and 
formal Korean dances in the College Theatre at 8 p.m. 
on Friday. 

Dr. Cho has performed widely and with great success 
in Asia, Europe, and the United States. A graduate of 
Yonsei University, he holds his doctorate from Mon- 
mouth College in Illinois. He has studied at Juilliard and 
with Martha Graham, and he has been a visiting lecturer 
at the University of Wisconsin and the University of 
Washington. 

Reservations for the Friday night dance recital may be 
made by calling 587-7272, Extension 218. 



NEWSLETTER 



February 12, 1968 




TIME SHEET PICK-UP 

February time sheets for teachers will be picked 
up at the schools at 8:30 a.m. on February 26, 
1968, for senior, junior, and elementary teachers. 

The adult schools will deliver their full-time and 
part-time teachers' time sheets on February 26 at 
9 a.m. 

Time sheets for clerks and janitors for all schools, 
including the adult schools, for February 15 
through February 29 will be picked up at the 
schools at 8:30 a.m. on February 21, 1968. 

Sheets are to be completed and signed by the 
deadline dates above to enable delivery service to 
keep the schedule. 

The number of days in February for principals 
and assistant principals is 19; the number of days 
for teachers is 19. 



• SFCTA REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL MEETING 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association 
Representative Council will meet Monday, February 19, 
1968, at 4 p.m. in Nicholas Hall of the Marines Memor- 
ial Building, 609 Sutter Gtreet. 



• TASF TO MEET FEBRUARY 19 

; The Teachers Association of San Francisco will meet 
at 4 p.m. on Monday, February 19, at A. P. Giannini 
Junior High School, 39th Avenue and Ortega Street. 



. . . Gifted Task Force Report 

(Continued from Page 1) 

semester will not be disturbed, but attention will be given 
to strengthening present programs and, where possible, 
adding new ones. 

To accomplish this end, the added appropriation due 
from the State (as explained above) will be utilized. The 
amount of this appropriation will be about $65,000 be- 
yond that for which the program is presently budgeted. 
This amount will permit the addition of eight teacher 
positions for an entire year, or if such a plan proves 
desirable, 16 positions for one semester. 

Additional psychometrists will be employed to do test- 
ing for identification of gifted students. State funds to be 
received at the rate of $40 for each student identified as 
gifted will make this possible. It is estimated that about 
500 students will be identified this year, resulting in an 
appropriation of some $20,000 for identification. 



SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD: 

A special meeting of the Board of Education 
will be held Tuesday, February 13, 1968, at 7:30 
p.m., 170 Fell Street, for the purpose of concluding 
the Board of Education agenda of February 6, 
1968, and completing discussion of regular Board 
businesss. 



• NDEA SUMMER INSTITUTES 

Information about the following NDEA summer insti- 
tutes is now on file in the Teachers Professional Library. 
Interested parties must write directly to the institution 
involved for applications. 

• Institute for Advanced Study in Economics for High 
School Social Studies Teachers of Economics (Grades 
7-12), State University of New York at Oneonta, July 1 
to August 16, 1968. 

• Institute in Chinese for Elementary and Secondary 
School Teachers of Chinese, San Francisco State College, 
June 24 to August 16, 1968. 

• Institute for Advanced Study in Speech for Elemen- 
tary and Secondary Teachers of Speech Who Are Non- 
Speech Majors, California State College at Fullerton, 
June 17 to July 26, 1968. 

• Institute for Advanced Study in Spanish to be held 
in Mexico for Elementary Teachers of Spanish (Grades 
K-8), Sonoma State College at Rohnert Park, June 17 
to August 9, 1968. 

• Institute for Advanced Study in Italian for Teach- 
ers of Italian (Grades 7-12) to be held in Florence, Italy, 
Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington, June 25 to 
August 27, 1968. 

• Institute for Advanced Study for High School 
Teachers of Spanish to Spanish Speakers of the South- 
west to be held in Guadalajara, Mexico, University of 
Arizona, July 1 to August 9, 1968. 

• Institute for Foreign Language Supervisors and For- 
eign Language Department Heads with Competence in 
Spanish, San Francisco State College, June 24 to August 
9,1968. 

• Institute for Secondary School Teachers of French, 
Colorado State University at Fort Collins, June 17 to 
August 3, 1968. 



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NEWSLETTER 



- ; OLUME 39 



FEBRUARY 19, 1968 



NUMBER 23 



[reject Read to Start This Spring 



leading Program Receives Board Approval 



A program geared to bring San Francisco's under- 
thieving, inner-city school children up to or above grade 

Ivel in reading and the language arts was approved by 
le Board of Education at its February 13, 1968 meeting 

jpon recommendation of Superintendent Robert E. 
bnkins. 

I In addition to the regular project, Commissioner Alan 
"ichols amended the recommendation so that five addi- 
onal schools in non-culturally deprived areas will be 
icluded in the program at an added cost of $30,000. 
Project Read, as the program is termed, will utilize a 
•ries of reading materials developed to solve the prob- 
,m of students who are not learning to read adequately 
hen taught by conventional methods. Under a Carnegie 
pundation grant to Dr. Allen D. Calvin and Dr. M. W. 
jllivan, a team of linquists, psychologists, and educators 
?vised and perfected a linguistically structured reading 
rogram to achieve this goal. 
: The recent release of reading test scores in San Fran- 

hell Training Course Completed 
SHEL L Train 



Q-cei 




' lie Shell Oil Company, in cooperation with the District's Office 
', Occupational Preparation, again provided a one-week course 
' training and management for 15 San Francisco public high 
hocl students. Pictured with the students are (left) Jerry 
avers. Sales Supervisor; Ray Laney, Training Instructor; (right) 
b Cox, Sales Supervisor; Richard MacDonald, Retail Training 
structor; and Harvey Pleasant, Shell Representative. The pro- 
am, conducted at Shell's Training School in Mountain View, is 
t one of the supportive activities provided by the company to 
a District. Over 95 San Francisco public school students have 
1 rained specialized training and employment through the pro- 
am. 



cisco, New York, and Los Angeles has confirmed beyond 
doubt that many students in large urban school systems 
have serious reading problems, and a high proportion of 
them are functionally illiterate. The scores of inner-city 
minority group students are particularly depressed. 
Year's Progress in One Semester 

The stated objective of Project Read is to have the 
average participating student make a year's progress in 
one semester, as measured by national norms. Compared 
with national standards, the average student will double 
his rate of progress. Compared with previous perform- 
ance levels in San Francisco's inner-city schools, the aver- 
age student will triple or quadruple his rate of progress. 

The program embodies a one-to-one sound-symbol re- 
lationship, and it incoporates all of the advantages of 
programmed instruction. The student works at his own 
pace, participates actively and gets a chance to respond 
personally and individually, and experiences success and 
receives strong reinforcement as his reading improves. 

A unique feature of the Sullivan reading materials is 
the linguistic placement examination that indicates the 
precise starting point in the program for each individual 
student. This is essential for the remedial student, who 
often does not need the entire sequence of materials. The 
placement exam is also a valuable diagnostic device for 
the teacher. It shows the teacher exactly where the stu- 
dent is experiencing difficulty. 
Program to Start This Semester 

Project Read will begin this February, and its initial 
phase will be completed by the end of the semester in 
June, 1968. Thirty elementary schools (K-6) will 
be selected. These schools will average 500 students, and 
the total number of students involved will be 15,000. 

All of the students, except those in kindergarten, have 
taken the Stanford Reading Achievement Test. Students 
in the 30 Project Read schools will also be given the 
Sullivan Placement Test. On the basis of diagnostic data 
obtained from this test, the students will be placed in the 
appropriate stage of the Sullivan reading materials. Stu- 
dents in kindergarten and some students in first grade 
will begin in Readiness in Language Arts, the initial 
phase of the Sullivan materials. 

The Sullivan reading materials are carefully sequenced 
to lift a child from the status of "non-reader" to the 
status of "good reader." After taking the Sullivan Place- 
ment Test, the student begins at the stage of the ma- 
terials appropriate for him as an individual. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



NEWSLETTER 



February 19, 196>* 



. . . Project Read Plans Outlined 

(Continued from Page 1) 

The materials contain these major units: 1.) Reading 
in Language Arts — this program is entirely teacher- 
administered, and all responses are oral. Its specific ob- 
jectives are the teaching of basic skills, the alphabet, and 
reading and spelling; 2.) Reading Readiness — these 
materials prepare a beginning student who already 
knows some basic concepts for work in the Sullivan 
Reading Program. Four textbooks are utilized; 3.) The 
Sullivan Reading Program — twenty textbooks and 28 
correlated readers make up this program. The program 
textbooks perform a "decoding" process for the student, 
training him in the elements of the English language. 

Each of the teachers in the 30 schools that use the 
Sullivan materials will receive pre-service training. 
Teachers will be thoroughly grounded in the fundamen- 
tals of the materials. Their training will include a visit to 
actual classroom sites where the materials are being used. 
They will also have the opportunity to work directly 
with students under expert supervision. In this way, the 
teachers will have an initial successful experience with 
the Sullivan materials in the classroom. They will be 
equipped to.be successful in their own schools. Pre- 
service training will be supervised by Frances Olsen, 
Principal of the Stevens Creek School, Cupertino, Cali- 
fornia; Barbara Schmidt, Language Arts Consultant, 
McGraw-Hill Book Company; and Lewis Miller, Editor- 
Consultant, McGraw-Hill Book Company. 
Coordinators to Present Material 

With the assistance of consultants from Behavioral 
Research Laboratories, Palo Alto, the 30 coordinators 
will introduce teachers in their own schools to the project 
and its materials. Miss Olsen and six teachers who have 
participated in past in-service training will supervise this 
part of the program. 

Consultants from Behavioral Research Laboratories 
and McGraw-Hill Book Company will visit each school 
weekly to assist the Project Read Coordinator in imple- 
menting the program. Behavioral Research will also con- 
duct a weekly meeting of coordinators. Ideas and experi- 
ences will be exchanged in these meetings, which also 
serve to insure that the program is running at maximum 
effectiveness. A videotape of Project Read teachers using 
the Sullivan materials in their own classrooms will serve 
to form the basis for group discussions. 

Workshops to review the project's progress and to plan 
a follow-through phase in September, 1968, will be con- 
ducted at the end of the school year. During the summer, 
five Project Read Coordinators will participate in an 
ongoing seminar to prepare an in-service training manual 
based on the data collected during the project. Behavior- 
al Research consultants will aid in the preparation of this 
manual and related teacher aids. 
Understanding of Parents Necessary 

To be sure that parents understand Project Read and 
its implications for the inner-city student, community 
relations programs will be established which will include 
facc-to-face meetings with parents, packets of literature 
explaining the project, series of open classroom displays 



for parents, and information for local and national new 
media. 

As part ofthe program's evaluation, the Stanford Read 
ing Achievement Test will be given again in June to al 
San Francisco students. The gains of students who hav< 
used the Sullivan materials will be compared with th 
gains of students who have had conventional instruction 
In addition, comparisons will be made with student: 
records in the same school last year. The District's Divi 
sion of Research will perform the evaluation. 

A standard Basic Resource Center of Sullivan mater 
ials will be established in each of the 30 Project Rea> 
schools. Each Center will include the textbooks, reader: 
placement tests, teachers' manuals, and progress tests fo 
an entire school. The Board of Education has authorize' 
that $180,000 for this project be transferred from Ur 
distributed Reserve, with the understanding that State c 
Federal funds will be used if possible. There is no charg 
for pre-service training, in-service training, communit 
relations, or any other support activities. 
Individualization and Flexibility 

In his recent report, Educational Equality /Quality 
Program Alternatives, Dr. Jenkins wrote, "We recogniz 
the persistent importance of two basic principles: 1 
The individualization of teaching and learning is moi 
vital than ever as a motivating force to help each chil 
grow to his maximum, and 2.) Flexibility is essential i 
order that we may cope with and take advantage 
rapid change." 

Project Read applies these principles of individualiz; 
tion and flexibility to one of San Francisco's most pres 
ing problems in education. Based on previous exper 
mental findings, the project offers San Francisco the o] 
portunity to capitalize on the knowledge and dedicaticj 
of its teachers and administrators by emphasizing tl| 
one-to-one dialogue between teacher and pupil. It is fej 
that Project Read is an in-depth and comprehensi\ 
approach that will reverse current trends. 

Administrators of the program will include Dr. M. \ 

Sullivan, President, Sullivan Associates; Lewis Mille 

Editor-Consultant, Webster Division, McGraw-Hill Boc 

Company; Dr. Allen D. Calvin, President, Behavior! 

(Continued on Page 4) 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 






Vol. 39, No. 23 



February 19, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco. Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



" 



s I February 19, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Gifted Supervisor Position Open 

The Personnel Service Division announces that appli- 
cations for the position of Supervisor (A) of Programs 
j for the Gifted will be accepted by the Personnel Office 
! immediately, and will be accepted until March 1, 1968. 

The person assigned to this position shall be responsi- 
ble directly to the Curriculum Coordinator and shall 

1) Develop, implement and coordinate programs for 
the gifted 

2 ) Direct curriculum development 

3) Provide for articulation of elementary, junior high 
and senior high school gifted programs 

4) Develop plans for evaluation 

5) Plan in-service training for teachers engaged in the 
: programs 

6) Prepare and administer the budget 

7) Coordinate programs with the services of the Divi- 
sion of Research, and the Division of Special Educational 
Services 

8) Coordinate and give direction to Resource Teach- 
ers in implementing the gifted program 

9) Perform such other duties as may be necessary for 
the development of total program for the gifted. 

Applicants must be serving as administrators in the San 
Francisco Unified School District and be credentialed 
to serve as an administrator on the Elementary and Sec- 
ondary levels. 

The position has been classified as Supervisor A in 
accordance with the Certificated Personnel Salary Sched- 
ule. The salary range is $13,980 to $17,725, and the work 
'year is approximately 197 days. 

Applications for this position must be in writing on 
■appropriate forms available in the Personnel Division 
•Office. They must be returned to Milton F. Reiterman, 
Personnel Coordinator, by March 1, 1968. 

• READING THEME FOR DINNER MEETING 

The San Francisco Bay Area Reading Council and the 
University of San Francisco will co-host the Third Re- 
port '67-'68 in their Prescription for Reading series on 
Thursday, February 29, at 7 p.m. in the Phelan Hall 
Dining Room on the USF campus. The dinner meeting 
nvill feature Dr. Constance McCullough, who will speak 
Ipn "Operation: Organic Comprehension," and is in 
lonor of Dr. Edward Griffin. For information and reser- 
/ations contact the San Francisco Bay Area Reading 
Council, 28 El Campo Drive, South San Francisco 94080. 



: 



tl 



• SCHOOLMASTERS DINNER ON MARCH 6 

The annual Schoolmasters Dinner will be held at 6 : 30 
! p.m. on Wednesday, March 6, at the City College of San 
?rancisco campus. Speaker of the evening will be Dr. 
George Armacost, President, University of Redlands, and 
'resident, Association of Independent Colleges and Uni- 
versities. Cost of the dinner is $4.25. Reservation forms 
ire being sent to all schools. 



_- DEADLINE FOR BLUE PAYROLL BLANKS 

Completed blue blanks for the month of Febru- 
' ary must be in the Payroll Department by 4 p.m. 
„,,: on February 26, 1968. 



PTA Objective Is Stressed 

In an effort to increase interest and membership 
in the California Congress of Parents and Teachers, 
the San Francisco Second District office is periodic- 
ally focusing attention on ways to better implement 
the objectives of the PTA. 

Attention this February is centered on the PTA's 
fourth objective : "To bring into closer relation the 
home and the school, that parents and teachers 
may cooperate intelligently in the training of the 
child." 

The Second District office has issued the follow- 
ing statement relative to this objective: "Parents 
and teachers need to know each other in some un- 
pressured situation. Only in this way can parents 
come to accept their responsibilities as their child's 
first teachers and understand that they are respon- 
sible for sending a teachable child to school. Only 
in this way can teachers succeed in teaching each 
child, as an individual, understanding his home and 
the parents to whom he returns each afternoon." 

The Second District encourages all teachers to 
join the PTA and work toward this important ob- 
jective. 



From Sacramento to Los Angeles 

Two in Teenage Safety Drive 




Mr. Robert Perussina, Head, District Driver Instruction Depart- 
ment (center), is seen going over the route Larry Thude of Lowell 
High (left) and Bruce Murphy of Mission High (right) followed 
in the Governor's Teenage Safety Drive. The two boys repre- 
sented the District in the event which stresses the importance of 
highway safety in general and among teenage drivers in particu- 
lar. Participants were graded solely on the manner in which they 
operated their vehicles in the drive from the State Capitol in 
Sacramento to Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. Mr. Perussina 
served as assistant coordinator of the state-wide program. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Miss Grace Perret 
Miss Kathryn Purvis 



NEWSLETTER 



February 19, 1968 




LOYALTY OATH REVISION 

Irving G. Breyer, Legal Adviser to the Board of 
Education, has advised the Board that the present 
loyalty oath must be revised so that it sets forth 
only the first paragraph of the oath that has been 
administered to all incoming school personnel. The 
revision is necessary because of a decision of the 
California Supreme Court on December 21, 1967, 
in the case of Robert S. Vogel v. County of Los 
Angeles, 68 A.C. No. 1. Stricken from the oath are 
references to membership in any organization that 
now advocates the overthrow of federal or state 
government by force or violence or other unlawful 
means. 

The United States Supreme Court on January 
22, 1968, upheld the constitutionality of a loyalty 
oath required by teachers under the New York 
statute. This oath is similar to the first paragraph 
of the oath of the State of California, and it is 
therefore still required for public officers and em- 
ployees. The revised California oath reads as fol- 
lows: 

"I, , do solemly swear (or 

affirm) that I will support and defend the Consti- 
tution of the United States and the Constitution of 
the State of California against all enemies, foreign 
and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegi- 
ance to the Constitution of the United States and 
the Constitution of the State of California; that I 
take this obligation freely, without any mental res- 
ervation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well 
and faithfully discharge the duties upon which I 
am about to enter." 



• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE TO MEET 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet at 1 : 30 
p.m. on Wednesday, February 21, in Room 10, Central 
Office, 170 Fell Street. 

. . . Sullivan Reading Materials Plan 

(Continued from Page 2) 
Research Laboratories; and Barbara Schmidt, Language 
Arts Consultant, McGraw-Hill Book Company. Special 
consultants to Project Read, who will take part in the in- 
service training program, include Dr. Robert L. Green, 
Associate Professor of Education, Michigan State Uni- 
versity; Dr. Abraham S. Fischler, James Bonn Pro- 
fessor of Education and Dean of Graduate Studies at 
Nova University; Dr. Shuell H. Jones, Professor of Edu- 
cation at the Center for Teacher Education, Tulane Uni- 
versity; Dr. James V. MrConncll, Professor of Psychol- 
ogy, University of Michigan; Dr. Robert Ruddcll, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Education, University of California; 
Dr. Robert Bainbridge. Professor, School of Education, 
San Jose State College; and Dr. John McNeil. Director, 
Teacher Training, UCLA. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, February 27, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• SFCTA MEMBERSHIP MEETING 

There will be a general membership meeting of the 
San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association at 4 p.m. 
on Monday, February 19, at Everett Junior High School, 
450 Church Street. (This notice supersedes the notice in 
last week's Newsletter.) 



• SPANISH COMMITTEE MEETING 

The second meeting of the Committee of Spanish- 
speaking/ Spanish Surnamed Teachers will be held on 
Thursday, February 29, at 3:45 p.m. at the Arriba Juntos 
Center, 1249 Alabama Street. 



APPLICATIONS FOR A LIFE DIPLOMA 
AGAINST AN EXPIRING CREDENTIAL 

The Personnel Coordinator wishes to advise any- 
one whose credential will expire on June 30, 1968, 
and who intends to apply for a life diploma against 
the expiring credential that he must have his appli- 
cation in to the Personnel Service Division by 
March 1, 1968, or forfeit the opportunity. 

The Personnel Coordinator wishes to emphasize 
that this notice applies only to those whose creden- 
tials expire June 30 and who wish to apply for a 
Life Credential based on the renewed credential. 



• ACE MEETING SCHEDULED MARCH 5 

The Association for Childhood Education cordially 
invites all interested kindergarten and nursery school 
teachers to a discussion meeting concerning proposed 
kindergarten reorganization as outlined by the California 
Association for Childhood Education. The meeting will 
be held March 5 at 3:45 p.m. at Grattan School. Re-i 
freshments will be served. 



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NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



FEBRUARY 26, 1968 



NUMBER 24 



Two Groups of Recommendations 



Long-Term Substitute Changes Goto Board 



] A series of recommendations concerning the status of 
District long-term substitutes by Superintendent Robert 
E. Jenkins will be presented to the Board of Education at 
;he meeting of February 27, 1968. 

■ The recommendations are contained in a report 
titled Superintendent's Report on Long-Term Substitutes 
ind are divided into two groups. 

Those recommendations in Group I may be imple- 
mented in various phases as the Superintendent deems 
feasible as they do not involve any changes in Board 
policies and they do not require any capital outlay. 
i Those in Group II will be presented to the Board for 
its information only. The later adoption by the Board of 
any or all of this group will depend on their inclusion in 
;he forthcoming budget. 
lecommendations in Group I include the following: 

1. Probationary appointments should be made to fill 
'acancies created when teachers are granted leaves-of- 
ibsence for 75 per cent or more of a school year. 1A. 
'robationary appointments should be made to replace all 
'eachers who are assigned to federal/state programs and 
■o the Central Office for 75 per cent or more of a school 
j'ear. 

' 2. Long-term substitutes should continue to be appoint- 
d to fill vacancies created by teachers on leave for one 
emester. 

3. A waiver procedure should replace the present con- 
ract leave. 

, 4. The Superintendent's moratorium on paper transfers 
hould be made permanent. 



STRIKE LEGALITY OPINION 

In response to a request as to whether or not it 
would be legal for teachers to strike in California, 
Irving G. Breyer, Legal Adviser for the San Fran- 
cisco Unified School District, submitted a detailed 
opinion which was presented to the Board of Edu- 
cation at the meeting of February 6, 1968. 

After reviewing a number of court cases relative 
to the question, Mr. Breyer wrote, "In view of the 
above there can be no doubt that under existing 
law teachers in California do not have the right to 
strike. If they did engage in a strike, it would be 
grounds for dismissal from employment." 

Copies of the agenda of the Board meeting of 
February 6, 1968, have been placed in the Teachers 
Professional Library for information purposes. 



5. When no eligibility list exists for a given subject 
area, the traveling team of the Personnel Service Division 
will be empowered to offer employment to candidates, 
through the Personnel Coordinator, subject to approval 
of the Superintendent and the Board of Education. 

6. The present procedure in the Elementary Division 
of assigning long term substitutes to the bottom of the 
eligibility list after five consecutive years of successful 
substitute teaching should be shortened to a period of six 
semesters, and it should apply to all divisions. 
Recommendations in Group II include the following: 

7. A corps of probationary teachers should be appoint- 
ed and assigned to the Personnel Service Division for ap- 
pointment as a percentage of the total number of day-to- 
day substitutes. (Possibly 50 out of the daily average of 
200.) 

8. A newly appointed probationary teacher should be 
allowed credit for increment purposes on the basis of one 
increment for each year of verified outside teaching as a 
full time permanent or probationary teacher. 

(Continued on Page 2) 

Counselors See Hospital Program 




Senior high school counselors recently attended an orientation 
meeting at Mt. Zion Hospital in which the wide range of oppor- 
tunities for students of all abilities in the allied medical fields 
and the background needed for these positions were discussed. 
The program was presented in dramatic form with a patient shown 
entering a hospital and being attended by some 15 different 
hospital people representing various occupations. It was pointed 
out at the meeting that by the year 1 970 the health services field 
is expected to be one of the two largest employers in the United 
States. The meeting was possible through the cooperation of the 
District's Office of Occupational Preparation and Mrs. Anne 
Gross, Coordinator of Auxiliary and Special Services, and her staff. 



NEWSLETTER 



February 26, 196} 



Fall PTA Scholarships Awarded Board Makes New Appointments 




Mrs. M. J. Bellezza, Scholarship Chairman, Second District Cali- 
fornia Congress of Parents and Teachers (center) is seen present- 
ing the awards to the District fall, 1 967 scholarship winners from 
the senior high schools. Recipients included (left to right) Marvin 
Dea, Polytechnic, $200; George Samayoa, Mission, $100; Robert 
Terrell, Balboa, $200; Nadia Hairabedian, Polytechnic, $200; 
and Erma Bob, Abraham Lincoln, $100. Ruth Braverman, Abra- 
ham Lincoln, $200, was unable to be present at the ceremonies 
which took place in the Board, meeting room of the Central 
Office. 



EMERGENCY SICK LEAVE 

The Personnel Coordinator wishes to remind all 
personnel that requests for up to six days of emer- 
gency leave which the teacher wishes to have 
charged against sick leave must be in writing and 
must be countersigned by the principal. Failure to 
have the principal's signature on the letter necessi- 
tates that it be returned in order that the signature 
may be added. 



. . . Long-Term Substitute Report 

(Continued from Page 1) 

9. A newly appointed probationary teacher, upon the 
evaluation and recommendation of the Personnel Co- 
ordinator and the approval of the Superintendent, may 
be allowed credit for increment purposes for verified re- 
lated employment experience. 

10. A "Teacher Opportunity Program" (TOP) of 
probationary teachers should be established; the inten- 
tion of TOP will be the staffing of target schools with 
teachers of the highest quality who are able and willing 
to meet the unique demands of these schools. 

Some of the recommendations contained in the Report 
have been made possible because of action initiated by 
the Board of Education last spring and since implement- 
ed by Superintendent Jenkins. The Personnel Service 
Division has started (during the fall semester of 1967) 
the practice of active recruitment of teachers locally as 
well as throughout the rest of California and the nation. 
Two such recruiting trips have already been completed, 
and will be followed with a carefully planned schedule 
of subsequent recruitment trips. 

The Superintendent's Report on Long-Term Substitutes 
has the agreement of the Negotiating Council and the 
San Francisco Federation of Teachers. 



The following administrative appointments and as 
signments were approved by the Board of Education a 
the February 6, 1968 meeting upon recommendation o 
the Superintendent. 

Central Office 

Paul G. Gay (on leave from his position as Principal 

Portola Junior High School) and transferred to the Jun 

ior High School Office on special assignment. 

Junior High School 

George Karonsky (on leave from his position as Super 
visor, Junior High School Office) and transferred to th> 
position of Acting Principal, Portola Junior High School 

John W. McColgan appointed Acting Head Counselor 
Boys at Portola Junior High School. 

Elementary School 

Gerald J. Foley appointed Assistant Principal of Gran 
School. 

The above information should be added to all copie 
of the current School Directory. 



i 



• DR. GOOSBY TO SPEAK AT JAMES LICK 

Dr. Zuretti L. Goosby, Board of Education Commis 
sioner, will be the guest speaker at the "All Island Night' 
program at James Lick Junior High School on Wedne: 
day, March 6. 

The theme of the program is "No Man Is an Island 
and will emphasize the cultural contributions made b 
island peoples to the American culture. The program wi 
include music and folk legends of island peoples as pre 
sented by students, parents, and teachers. Dr. Goosby 
talk will be centered around the evening's theme. 

Refreshments will be served in the cafeteria followin 
th program. 



'■!: 



• SUMMER SCIENCE, MATH INSTITUTES 

A booklet listing all summer 1968 institutes for second j 
ary school teachers of science and mathematics has beei 
issued by the National Science Foundation and has bee 
placed on file in the Teachers Professional Library. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 39, No. 24 February 26, 1968 

135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



February 26, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Mrs. Josephine Cole at Work 



Student Relations Supervisor Sets Goals 



_, . 



In September, 1967, the position of Student Relations 
Supervisor was established in the Senior High School 
Division under the direction of Dr. Lewis Allbee, Assist- 
ant Superintendent. Mrs. Josephine Cole, who had been 
serving as Project Head of the Guidance Service Centers, 
was appointed to fill the new position. 

During the past five months, Mrs. Cole has been busy 
defining the responsibilities of her office, establishing ob- 
jectives and goals for which to work, evaluating current 
Iprograms in existence in the District, and initiating a 
program which will do the most effective job. 

Mrs. Cole sees her basic responsibility as Student Rela- 
tions Supervisor to concentrate on helping those boys and 
girls of high school age who are not succeeding in school 
and whose problems indicate a need for individualized 
.coordination of the resources of the School District. 
Concentration in Two Areas 

To work toward accomplishing this goal, Mrs. Cole 
has found it necessary to concentrate initial efforts on 
two areas of priority in urgency and immediacy of need : 
1.) the expelled and long-term suspended students for 
whom no educational facilities are available in the public 
school system; and 2.) the "psychological drop-outs," 
those students experiencing a kind of restless dissatisfac- 
tion which accompanies low motivation and minimum 
berformance levels of achievement. 

i Referrals to Mrs. Cole's office come from the Student 
placement Committee in the Special Educational Serv- 
ices Division, from assistant principals, parents, counsel- 
ors, and teachers, from Youth Opportunity Centers, and 
Tom youth-serving community agencies such as the Mis- 
.ion Rebels, Youth for Service, Boys' Clubs, and the Eco- 
iomic Opportunity Center offices, among others. 

Mrs. Cole has found it important to work closely with 
.chool counselors, school occupational preparation staff, 
.chool work experience staff, Guidance Service Centers, 
State Employment Service, the Job Corps, and commun- 
ty agencies for the purpose of helping to re-orient and 
re-motivate students who need such help. 
Meetings with Students, Parents 

Follow-up activities on referrals include interviews and 
neetings with individual students and home visits with 
>arents. Mrs. Cole has found that frequently she must 
nterpret the school's role to parents and students who 
lave developed hostilities to the schools. Much of her 
ime is spent in making arrangements for drop-out stu- 
lents to get back into some kind of meaningful learning 
ituation — 4/4 programs, continuation classes, voca- 
lonal preparation, or work experience programs. 
• Because of the nature of the problems of the students 
vith whom she deals, most of Mrs. Cole's contacts are on 
n individualized basis. Students and parents come to 
alk to her in her office in Room 212-A at 135 Van Ness 
Avenue, or she will meet with them in the schools or in 
heir homes. 

| In an effort to get at the problems of low motivation 
nd low achievement, Mrs. Cole devised a Tutorial 




: 



In one of her many roles as Student Relations Supervisor, Mrs. 
Josephine Cole is seen above at the Pelton Junior High School 
Career Day Program. She and students from the Senior High 
Tutorial Workshop explained how tutors from Abraham Lincoln 
High School are aiding students from the various District high 
schools who are having difficulty succeeding in school. Both the 
tutors and tutees stressed the importance of staying in school and 
receiving the fullest education possible. 

Workshop last term in which a number of gifted students 
from Abraham Lincoln High School served as tutors to 
a group of suspended and expelled students. 
Workshop Idea Takes Hold 

The supervisor reports that the workshop took hold 
immediately, and soon 12 tutors were working with 14 
tutees. Because the out-of-school youth are not permitted 
to utilize school premises, Mrs. Cole held the workshops 
in her home, which had orginally been incorporated in 
1960 as a non-profit student center for Balboa High 
School students. 

From once-a-week sessions, 3:30 to 6 p.m., the work- 
shop expanded to twice-a-week meetings. Tuesdays and 
Thursdays became the official days. Tutors contacted 
tutees and personal appointments were made. Sixteen 
workshop sessions were held during the fall term, each 
tutee receiving about seven hours help per week. 

The Tutorial Workshop will be continued during the 
spring term. Students from Abraham Lincoln will again 
serve as volunteer tutors. 

Mrs. Cole emphasizes that her office is available to 
students from all of the District's senior high schools and 
that she stands ready to give help and assistance where- 
ever and whenever they are needed. Her telephone num- 
ber is 863-4680, Extension 246. 
Variety of Experience 

Mrs. Cole finds the demands of her new office both 
challenging and satisfying, and she brings a variety of 
experience to it. Mrs. Cole started in the District as an 
elementary teacher at Raphael Weill School in 1944. She 
then accepted a position in the English Department of 
Balboa High School in 1948. Her work with English 
(Continued on Page 4) 



NEWSLETTER 



February 26, 1968 1 



Announcements 



• GEORGE WASHINGTON SPEECH ACTIVITIES 

Cathy Cary, junior speecli student, and State Supreme 
Court Justice Stanley Mosk were recipients of awards 
presented at the George Washington High School Masque 
and Gavel Speech Team's semi-annual Awards and 
Booster Club Dinner. 

Cathy received the Churchill Cup, awarded to the 
outstanding junior speaker. Judge Mosk received the 
team's "Speech of the Year Award" for his address on 
"Freedom of Expression" presented to the California 
School Boards Association and California Association of 
School Administrators in San Francisco in December. 

Danise and Sanford Chandler are co-head coaches of 
the Washington Speech Team. They are assisted by 
Joseph B. Harris (drama), Effie Pandell (debate), and 
Mrs. Martha Cook (original oratory) . 



• INDUSTRIAL ARTS INSTITUTES 

Some 29 institutes funded under Title XI of N.D.E.A. 
are being offered this summer to industrial arts teachers 
and supervisors. A sampling includes: 

• Institute in Wood Technology (Grades 7-12) at San 
Diego State College, June 17 to July 26, 1968. 

• Institute in Drafting and Graphic Arts (Grades 9- 
12) at the University of Northern Iowa, June 17 to 
August 9, 1968. 

• Institute in Space Age Technology at Florida State 
University, June 24 to August 16, 1968. 

Detailed information on all 29 institutes is available 
through the Industrial Arts Office, Room 28-A, 170 Fell 
Street. Contact Mr. R. Orchid at 863-4680, Extencion 
370. All institutes provide a stipend of $75 per week plus 
$15 lor each dependent. 



; . . Student Relations Supervisor 

(Continued from Page 3) 

seminars and the establishment of the Balboa English 
Laboratory received widespread attention. The labora- 
tory was the subject of her Masters thesis at the Univer- 
sity of California in 1958. 

In 1964 she accepted a position as Youth Opportuni- 
ties Education Counselor for the San Francisco schools 
in the Hunters Point area, and in 1966 she became a 
community resource consultant to Dr. Lewis Allbee to 
work with the drop-out problem. She became Project 
Head of the Guidance Service Centers early in 1967, but 
after only five months was given her current supervisorial 
appointment in September. 

The constant need for upgrading skills to meet the 
challenge of change, computerized education, and the 
many other expected developments on the District's new 
horizons is keenly felt in the office of Student Relations. 
Mrs. Cole plans to continue work at the University of 
California as time permits. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, February 27, 1968, 4:00 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• KQED-SFUSD TO GIVE WORKSHOP 

District teachers and administrators are invited to at- 
tend a "Time of Your Life" series workshop on Family 
Life and Sex Education directed toward teachers of 4th, 
5th, and 6th grade classes which is being co-sponsored by 
KQED, Channel 9, and the SFUSD. 

The workshop will be held Monday, March 4, in the 
auditorium of West Portal School, 5 Lenox Way, begin- 
ning at 3:45 p.m. The purpose of the session is to assist 
teachers in utilizing the 15 "Time of Your Life" tele- 
vision programs in the classroom. 

The workshop narrator will be William C. Ayres, 
M.D., and the workshop instructors will be Mrs. Marilyn 
McCurdy, TV teacher of the series, and Mrs. Betty Ann 
Berkman, Field Representative, Educational Services, 
KQED. No pre-registration is necessary. 



TO ALL PRINCIPALS — IMPORTANT 

All PTA membership dues (35 cents per capita) 
must be turned in to the District Office, Room 
32-A, 135 Van T<ess Avenue, by March 1 to count 
for the 1967-68 year and in order to reach the State 
Office on time. Principals are asked to see that all 
dues is submitted by the above date, delivered by 
messenger, if necessary, to the Central Office. 

The PTA goal is 30,J00 memberships by March 1. 



• NDEA SUMMER INSTITUTES 

Information on the following NDEA summer institutes is' 
now in the Teachers Professional Library. Teachers must, 
write directly to the institutions involved for applications! 

• Institute for Advanced Study in Russian to be held 
at Indiana University (Bloomington, Indiana) and ir, 
the Soviet Union, June 19 to August 27, 1968. 

• Institute in Italian for in-service and pre-service 
secondary school teachers of Italian at the State Univer- 
sity of New York (Buffalo) , June 24 to August 9, 1968. 



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» 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



MARCH 4, 1968 



NUMBER 25 



Invest-in-America Contest Begins 

Role of Individual Is Stressed 




'he Invest-in-America Dinner honored over 200 superintend- 
ents, principals, business education, social science and econom- 
:s department heads and teachers from San Francisco Bay Area 

,.. ublic and parochial senior high schools in connection with the 
nnual School Economic and Journalism competitions. Shown 
ere (left to right) are: Dr. Lewis All bee, Assistant Superintend- 

{ (f nt for Senior High Schools, San Francisco Unified School Dis- 

x y ,'ict; Dr. Dwayne Orton, Chairman, Editorial Board, Think Mag- 
azine, and Educational Consultant, International Business 

HO Machines, New York; Bernice Blennerhassett, Social Studies 
lead, Abraham Lincoln High School, San Francisco; Mr. Lewis F. 
iorris, Jr., Principal, Balboa High School. 

t» ' Over 200 superintendents, principals, business educa- 
bs ion, social studies and economics department heads and 

eachers from 92 San Francisco Bay Area public and 

larochial high schools, with enrollments exceeding 100,- 
— 100 students, participated in the 13th annual Invest-in- 
__ .America dinner held in San Francisco February 15, to 
« tart the annual Invest-in-America Schools competitions. 
1GI Emphasizing the important role of the individual in 

■ur economy, Dr. Dwayne Orton, Chairman. Editorial 
,. ioard, Think Magazine, and Educational Consultant, 

nternational Business Machines, New York, said, "Mod- 

1 ,rn machines can produce practically any information 

ml ]/e need, but we must develop young men and women, 

,ur leaders of tomorrow, who will know what and how 
id lo ask the machines if they are to give them the desired 

nswers." 

This Invest-in-America Schools Program is part of a 
road economic educational program, conducted through- 
ut Northern California. It aims to stimulate economic 
iscussions in the classrooms and through school news- 
apers to bring about a better understanding of the essen- 

( Continued on Page 2) 



Thirteen New MDTA Projects 
To Start at Three Adult Schools 

Thirteen new Manpower Defense Training Act (MD- 
TA) projects have recently been funded, according to 
Dr. Edward D. Goldman, Assistant Superintendent for 
Adult and Vocational Education. The 13 projects have 
a total budget of $8 1 2, 1 09. 

The new programs are listed below under the schools 
in which they will be taught, the figure in parenthesis 
indicating the number of trainees to be enrolled. 

John Adams Adult — Clerk Typist (two sections, one 
of 40 and one of 20), Insurance Rating (20), Stenogra- 
pher (20), Clerk Typist — Spanish Speaking (20), Bill- 
ing Clerk (20), Basic Education and Pre-Vocation 
(100), English Communications — Mexican and Span- 
ish Speaking (150). 

John O'Connell Adult — Auto Metal Worker (30), 
Welder, Combination (two sections, each with 20), Auto 
Body Repairman (30). 

Pacific Heights Adult — English Communications — 
Chinese Speaking (150). 

Since the program's inception in 1962, when only one 
project was offered in the District, to January 31, 1968, 
some 112 MDTA programs have been started in the San 
Francisco public schools. Of this total, 79 have been 
completed and 33 are currently in progress. 

The total number of trainee positions created by the 
program (as of January 31, 1968) stands at 7,070 
(4,487 for completed projects and 2,483 in projects al- 
ready started; these figures do not include drop-outs or 
trainees placed during the training period). The total 
budget figure for District MDTA projects to January 
31 is $5,750,477. 

According to Dalton Howatt, Coordinator, Adult Ed- 
ucation, during the period since 1962, 66.2 per cent of 
those adults who enrolled in MDTA classe have com- 
pleted them. This compares favorably with the state- 
wide figures, which indicate that 55.7 per cent of those 
enrolling in MDTA projects have completed them. 

The various training areas in which MDTA course 
offerings are grouped come under four general headings: 
business, trade and industrial, basic English and pre- 
vocational, and hospital. 



LOUISE M. LOMBARD SCHOOL RE-OPENS 

The Louise M. Lombard School (for the Train- 
able Mentally Retarded) at 1099 Hayes Street has 
re-opened upon completion of renovation work. 
Mary E. Smyth is Principal. The telephone number 
is 861-1821. 



NEWSLETTER 



March 4, 19681 



At Raphael Weill 

Students Study Rapid Transit 




"Moving Ahead with Rapid Transit" was the theme of the 
Raphael Weill School mid-term Promotion Assembly which was 
the summary of a study of the Bay Area Rapid Transit System by 
the upper grade students as a team teaching project directed by 
Mrs. Lois Sims, Resource Teacher. Large exhibits which thi- 
children made showing various phases of the BART project were 
included in the program and are now on display at BART Head- 
quarters, 814 Mission Street. KQED, Channel 9, filmed a number 
of the exhibits for two 20-minute programs which were shown 
in February. The Raphael Weill program was researched, plan- 
ned, and presented under Mrs. Sims' direction, and Lawrence 
Ferolie, BART Public Relations Representative, was the con- 
sultant. Mrs. Virginia Wales is the Principal of Raphael Weill 
School. 

• ACADEMIC YEAR MATHEMATICS INSTITUTE 

San Jose State College is offering an Academic Year 
Mathematics Institute for Junior High School Teachers 
and Supervisors from September, 1968, to June, 1969, 
sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Informa- 
tion on the program is now in the Teachers Professional 
Library. 

. . . Invest-in-America Competition 

(Continued from Page 1) 
tial role that individual savings and business profits, wise- 
ly invested, play not only in the individual's but in the 
nation's economic future. 

The program culminates with written essays on the 
subject, "The Role of Savings in Our Economy: The 
Past; The Present; The Future," and with articles on 
the same subject, published in school newspapers. Entries 
must be submitted by April 4. 

The Freedoms Foundation this week has awarded the 
Invest-in-America Northern California Council its 12th 
award in the past 12 years in recognition of "its achieve- 
ment in bringing about a better understanding of the 
American Way of Life." 

All senior high school social studies department heads 
have been supplied with information about the competi- 
tion, including a "Guide for Teachers," which outlines 
the procedures to be followed. 



Tax Tips' TV Program Featured 

The California Teachers Association, Bay Section, ir 
cooperation with the Internal Revenue Service anc 
KQED, is again presenting "Tax Tips for Taechcrs," 
live one-hour program answering questions phoned in b) 
viewing teachers. 

The program is scheduled for 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. or 
Wednesday, March 6, over KQED, Channel 9. Bccausi 
of this excellent time spot, many faculties are arranging 
after-school coffee klatches to view the program anc 
phone in questions of interest to members of the group 
Questions may be phoned in to 391-1000 where they wil 
be answered on the air. 

With recent changes in the Internal Revenue Servici 
regulations last year, many teachers will find it easier t( 
secure educational deductions. Teachers and adminis 
trators who undertook or completed work during thi 
past three years may wish to file amended returns baset 
on the new regulations which liberalize deductions when 
course work led to an administrative credential. 

Participants on the show this year include moderator 
John Muir of CTA, Bay Section, and guest experts fron 
the Internal Revenue Service, Mr. Charles Roddy, Grou] 
Supervisor, Field Audit Branch, and Miss Linda Kuril 
Tax Technician, Office Audit Branch. The program i 
directed by Buzz Anderson. 



'I 

K 

'I 

s 



• DANCE LESSON AT CITY COLLEGE 

On Friday, March 8, Ruth Beckford, specialist ii 
Afro-Haitian dance, will conduct a master lesson in th 
Women's Gymnasium at City College of San Franciscc 
College and high school students and their instructors ar 
invited to the afternoon session from 2 to 3:30 p.m. ; 
participating limit of three from each institution will b ' 
necessary due to limited studio space. 

This lesson is under the sponsorship of the City Colleg 
Recreation Association and the Women's Physical Edv. 
cation Department. 

Interested persons may call Mrs. Lene Johnson, Citl ' 
College, at 587-7272, Extension 208, for further inform*! 
tion. 






: 

7.1 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 25 



March 4, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue. San Francisco. Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor. Educational Information 



iMarch 4, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



INDEA Summer Institutes Listed 

Information relating to the following NDEA summer 
iinstitutes has been placed on file in the Teachers Pro- 
fessional Library. 

• Institute on the Developing Nations (for teachers 
of Social Studies, Government, and History) at Pitzer 
;College, Claremont, California, from June 24 to August 

lb, 1968. 

• Institute in History for Secondary Teachers and 
^Supervisors (Grades 9-12) on Recent Europe, United 
States, and the non-West at Arizona State University 

Iffrom June 17 to August 9, 1968. 

• Institute in Italian for Undergradutes Preparing to 
Teach Italian (Grades 7-12) at Fairleigh Dickinson Uni- 
versity, Madison, New Jersey, from June 24 to August 9, 
11968. 

• Institute for Advanced Study in Economics for Ele- 
mentary Supervisors of Curriculum and Elementary 
Principals at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, 

(from June 24 to August 2, 1968. 

• Institute for Advanced Study in German for Ele- 
jmentary and Secondary School Teachers of German 
l( Grades 3-12) at Montana State University, Bozeman, 
■from June 24 to August 9, 1968. 

• Institute for Critical Languages, School of Russian 
ind Soviet Area Studies, at Windham College, Putney, 
Vermont, from June 28 to August 10, 1968. 

• Institute for Advanced Study in Spanish to be held 
,11 Madrid and Alicante, Spain, for secondary school 
:eachers of Spanish who teach advanced-level Spanish 
:ourses, sponsored by Fairfield University, Fairfield, 
Connecticut, from June 24 to August 23, 1968. 

• Institute in U.S. History, the role of Minority 
.Groups in American History (for elementary and junior 

tigh school social studies teachers, Grades 5-8), at San 
."ernando Valley State College, Northridge, California, 

rom June 1 7 to August 2, 1968. 



GIFTED SUPERVISOR POSITION CHANGE 

The February 19 issue of the Newsletter an- 
nounced that applications for the position of Su- 
pervisor (A) of Programs for the Gifted were 
being accepted by the Personnel Service Division. 

The announcement stated that applicants must 
be serving as administrators in the San Francisco 
Unified School District. This requirement has now 
been changed to read, "Applicants need not be 
serving as administrators in the San Francisco Uni- 
fied School District. Teachers who possess adminis- 
trative credentials for both the Elementary and 
Secondary levels are encouraged to apply." 

The deadline for applications has been extended 
from the announced date of March 1, 1968, to 
March 15, 1968, because of the above change. 



> STUDENT SUMMER SCIENCE PROGRAMS 

The National Science Foundation has published a new 
lirectory titled Science Training Programs for High 
ibility Secondary School Students Summer 1968. A copy 
iow on file in the Teachers Professional Library. 



Dates Are Set for 



Junior Hiqh Division Deadlines 



The Personnel Service Division announces the follow- 
ing interview dates: 

Junior High School Division Administrative Interviews 
— Friday, March 8, 1988 (Revised date) 

Junior high administrative interviews, including head 
and assistant head teachers for 1968 summer schools, 
will be held on Friday, March 8, 1968. It is suggested 
that candidates who are interviewed within the last 
three years need not apply for an interview at this time 
unless they feel they have special reason to do so. 
Applications for Junior High Division Summer School 
Teaching Positions — Thursday, March 15, 1968 

All teachers desiring to teach in the Junior High Sum- 
mer Schools are requested to file completed summer 
school applications in the Personnel Service Office not 
later than Friday, March 15, 1968. Up-to-date and valid 
junior high school credentials are required for teachers 
assigned to Junior High Summer Schools. 



Hancock Teacher Receives Award 




Mrs. Helen Robinson (left), currently serving as a compensatory 
teacher and formerly a sixth grade teacher at John Hancock 
Elementary School, has been presented a National Freedoms 
Foundation Award for her work at Hancock School when her 
class carried on correspondence with the USS Hancock during its 
tour of duty in Vietnam. Mrs. Alice Shea (right), representative 
from the Freedoms Foundation, presented the award. Witnessing 
the ceremonies were Diane LaRocca and Melody Lim, former 
Hancock students of Mrs. Robinson, now at Francisco Junior 
High School. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Miss Joan Nourse 



NEWSLETTER 



March 4, 1968 



Announcements 



• SFCGA MEMBERSHIP MEETING 

A general membership meeting of the San Francisco 
Counseling and Guidance Association will be held Thurs- 
day, March 21, at 3:45 p.m. A. P. Giannini Junior High 
School, Room 221. Eight highly qualified panelists will 
discuss a number of special services provided children 
attending San Francisco schools. 



• DEPARTMENT HEADS TO MEET 

The Department Heads Association of the San Fran- 
cisco Senior High Schools will meet at Mission High 
School on Wednesday, March 6, at 2:45 p.m. in Room 
240. The agenda will include a discussion in regard to 
changing the constitution to include junior high schools 
and also to request additional time for department heads 
to perform their duties. 



• COACHES TO MEET MARCH 5 

The San Francisco Association Athletic Coaches and 
Physical Education Teachers will hold the first general 
meeting of the spring term on Tuesday. March 5, at 7:30 
p.m. in Room B-4 of Abraham Lincoln High School. 



• ELEMENTARY ART WORKSHOP 

District elementary teachers are invited to attend an 
art workshop given by Alva McGarah, consultant for 
Binney Smith Company, on March 13 or March 14 
from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Lawton School Cafeteria, 
1570 -31st Avenue. 

A number of new ideas will be demonstrated, and 
teachers will have an opportunity to try them out. Inter- 
ested teachers are asked to call the District Art Depart- 
ment Office at 863-4680, Extension 233. 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCY 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancy: 
2704 — School Custodian, Female — Washington 
Irving Elementary School. 



• ELEMENTARY SUPPLY COMMITTEE 

The Elementary Supply Committee will meet at Visi- 
tation Valley School at 1:45 p.m. on Thursday, March 
7, 1968. This is a change in the date previously an- 
nounced as March 6. 



• CHORAL GROUP AUDITIONS 

Auditions for the newly formed Little Shamrock Sing- 
ers Choral Group will be held at the Eureka Valley 
Recreation Center at Collingwood and 18th Streets on 
Saturday, March 9, at 9:30 a.m. Auditions are open to 
girls from eight years through high school and to boys 
from eight to 13 years. 

The group is sponsored by the Irish Center of San 
Francisco, and children receive training in voice and 
musicianship on Saturdays from 10:30 a.m. to 12 noon. 
For information contact Mrs. Aquinas Whooley at 621- 
2200. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, March 5, 1968, 
meeting, 



7:30 p.m. Regular 



170 Fell Street. 



• RETIRED TEACHERS LUNCHEON 

Mayor Joseph Alioto will be the guest speaker at the 
Tuesday, March 12, luncheon of the San Francisco Re- 
tired Teachers Association at 12 noon at the Red Chim- 
ney in Stonestown. Mayor Alioto will discuss "What the 
City of San Francisco Is Doing and Will Do for Its 
Retired Citizens." 

Luncheon reservations are required and may be ob- 
tained from Mrs. Kathryn Brazill, 1770 Pacific Avenue, 
San Francisco, Telephone 776-3567. Ticket cost is $2.50. 
Reservation deadline is Saturday, March 9. (No tickets 
will be sold at the door.) 



• SFCTA REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association 
Representative Council will meet Monday, March 1 1 , at 
4 p.m. in the cafeteria of George Washington High 
School, 600 - 32nd Avenue. 



• TEACHERS ON PANEL 

Donald Koors, Adult Education Division, and Earl 
Minkwitz, Polytechnic High School Social Studies De- 
partment, will participate in a panel discussion on the 
topic "What Alternatives Do Our Under-Educated 
Have?" at the Bethel AME Church, 916 Laguna Street, 
on Tuesday, March 5, at 8 p.m. The focus will be on th 
problems faced by young people between the ages of 16 
and 25. The discussion is co-sponsored by the First Uni- 
tarian Church. For further information contact Mrs 
Nancy Lawrence, 921-1779. 



; 



Is 



FALL TERM 1968 REQUISITION LISTS 

Fall term 1968 requisition lists are due in the 
Division of Supplies Warehouse, 1000 Selby Street, 
attention Mrs. Elaine Hung, as follows : 

Instructional Supplies Lists — March 15, 1968. 



W 



• 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO, 
PERMIT No. 3961 



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S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL D| 
135 VAN NESS AVE. 



DOC 
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LAR 
SAN 



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RETURN REQUEST 



94102 



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-SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

JvOLUME 39 «^=@ MARCH 11, 1968 NUMBER 26 

Superintendent's Agreements Listed 

During the past two months, a number of signed agreements have been made between the Superintendent and 
!'< fepresentatives of the Negotiating Council and between the Superintendent and representatives of the San Francisco 
federation of Teachers. For the information of School District personnel, the agreements are listed below. The "X" 
;o the right indicates those areas for which formal signed agreements are now a matter of record. The brief descrip- 
tions which follow are not necessarily the exact wording contained in each signed document, but are rather a sum- 
nary statement of the agreement. In some cases, discussions are in progress which may lead to other agreements. 

The agreements are grouped into three categories. Agreements in Group I are changes in administrative pro- 
f A edures. Some have already been implemented by the Superintendent, and others will be carried out as expeditiously 
,s possible, consistent with good administrative procedures. Agreements in Group II are the Superintendent's recom- 
mendations to the Board of Education for possible Board approval. Agreements in Group III involve policy and/or 
budgetary considerations and require fiscal studies this semester in order that they may be presented to the Board 
'• vith complete information as to their probable effect on the 1968-69 budget. 

GROUP I 

Agreements in Group I are changes in administrative procedures. Some have already been implemented by the 
. juperintendent, and others will be carried out as expeditiously as possible, consistent with good administrative pro- 
.. edures. 

}; Negotiating 

ubject Of Agreements: Federation Council 

— 'overage for Teachers Absent X 

Provides that when a faculty member is absent and when all efforts to obtain a substitute have 

lit een unsuccessful, teachers assigned to cover the classes of the absent teacher shall be chosen from 

"Covering List," posted in the principal's office, which shows the cumulative periods of coverage for 

ach teacher; the teacher assigned to "cover" shall be the available qualified teacher with the lowest 

umulative coverage total. 

Assignments: Major and Minors X X 

Provides that teachers with general secondary credentials may be assigned to teach only in the 
eld of their major or minor unless the teacher agrees to the assignment or the principal files a 
declaration of Need which is approved by the Superintendent or his designee. 

__ ransfer and Appointments X X 

TE Provides that a teacher's seniority be taken into consideration in transferring between divi- 
. ons and that the teacher requesting the transfer should be exempt from the normal eligibility list 
it,: rocedures; not more than four per cent may leave a division during a semester; a joint committee 
ill review the transfer policy for the purpose of revision, clarification, and strengthening. 



robationary Appointments, Teachers on Leave > 

Provides that probationary appointments should be made to fill vacancies created when teachers 
te granted leaves-of-absence for 75 per cent or more of a school year. 

robationary Appointments, Federal/State Programs and Central Office > 

Provides that probationary appointments should be made to replace all teachers who are as- 
gned to federal /state programs and to the Central Office for 75 per cent or more of a school year. 

ong Term Substitute Appointments > 

Provides that long term substitutes should only be appointed to fill vacancies created by teachers 
l leave for one semester. 

/aiver Procedure > 

Provides that a waiver procedure should replace the present contract leave. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



NEWSLETTER 



March 11, 196) 



Superintendent's Agreements Listed 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Negotiating 
Federation Council 



Elimination of Paper Transfers ) 

Provides that the Superintendent's moratorium on paper transfers should be made permanent. 

Committee Appointments ) 

Provides that when no eligibility list exists for a given subject area, the traveling team of the 
Personnel Service Division will be empowered to offer employment to candidates, through the Per- 
sonnel Coordinator, subject to approval of the Superintendent and the Board of Education. 

Probationary Appointment of Long Term Substitutes ) 

Provides that the present procedure in the elementary division of assigning long term substi- 
tutes to the bottom of the eligibility list after five consecutive years of successful substitute teach- 
ing should be shortened to a period of six semesters, and it should apply to all divisions. 

Date of Payment of Teachers > 

Provides that teachers be paid on the first of each calendar month and that this change of date 
become effective as soon as the technical details can be worked out. 

Appointment-and-Contract Agreement Form > 

Provides that the appointment action form presently in use by the Personnel Service Division 
be revised to become an appointment-and-contract agreement form and will cover all certificated 
employees. 

One Personnel File , > 

Provides that there exist one personnel file for each certificated employee, located in a central- 
ized file complex in the Personnel Service Division, and that this file be the source for any official 
action relating to certificated personnel. 

In-Service Class Excused Absences > 

Provides that teachers of Board of Education sponsored in-service classes be given the authority 
to excuse teacher absences without the necessity of assigning make-up work on the basis of at least 
one absence per unit of course work. 

Rotation of Teachers, Administrators 

Affirms agreement with the report of the committee on the Regular Rotation of Teachers and 
Administrators that steps should be taken to increase the holding power of good and experienced 
teachers in the schools within poverty areas and recruitment of teachers for poverty areas; further 
affirms agreement that the Board of Education should not adopt a policy that would require "the 
regular transfer of teachers and administrators on some type of regular basis." 

Non-Teaching Duties 

Provides that the Superintendent initiate a survey of non-teaching assignments in each build- 
ing. 

Administrative Selection Procedures 

Provides that the procedures for administrative selection should be clearly defined and pro- 
mulgated to all District personnel. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



TIME SHEET PICK-UP 

March time sheets for teachers will be picked up 
at the schools at 8:30 a.m. on March 29, 1968, for 
senior, junior, and elementary teachers. 

The adult schools will deliver their full-time and 
part-time teachers' time sheets on March 29 at 
9 a.m. 

Time sheets for clerks and janitors for all schools, 
including the adult schools, for March 15 through 
March 31 will be picked up at the schools at 8:30 
a.m. on March 26, 1968. 

Sheets are to be completed and signed by the 
deadline dates above to enable delivery service to 
keep the schedule. 

The number of days in March for principals and 
assistant principals is 21; the number of days for 
teachers is 21. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



X 
X 



Vol. 39, No. 26 



March 11, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco. Calif. 9 4102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 






March 11, 1968 NEWSLETTER 



Superintendent's Agreements Listed 

(Continued from Page 2) Negotiating 

Federation Council 

Evaluation of Certificated Personnel X 

Provides that a task force be established for the purpose of revising and strengthening the pro- 
cedures for evaluating certificated personnel. 

Improvement of School Supplies System X X 

Provides for a number of specific improvements aimed to aid the teacher in securing class- 
room supplies. 

Lounges, Washrooms, Lavatories X 

Provides for an on-site survey of physical facilities, i.e., lounges, washrooms, and lavatories to 
, determine if they meet minimum health and safety standards. 

Health Plan Exemption Procedure X X 

Provides that the requirement that Health Service exemptions must be renewed annually by a 
personal appearance at the Health Service System be abolished. 

Library Book Selection, Purchasing and Processing X X 

Provides that the procedures for selecting, purchasing, and processing library books should be 
simplified. 

Secondary School Library Clerk X X 

Provides that one full-time clerk shall be assigned to each secondary school library; only in 
case of emergency shall this clerk be assigned other duties. 

Procurement and Selection of Library Books X X 

Provides that in order to eliminate lengthy delays in obtaining library books such books will be 
purchased under an "A" type contract and the current procedure for selecting such books should be 
simplified. 

GROUP II 

Agreements in Group II are Superintendent's recommendations to the Board of Education for possible Board 
approval. 

Subject of Agreements: Federation Council 

Grievance Procedure X X 

Provides that teachers, when initiating a grievance, should have the right to be accompanied 
by a conferee at all steps; that the responsible administrator forward to the Personnel Service Di- 
vision copies of all correspondence relating to grievances and that the Personnel Service Division be 
responsible for the administration and operation of the grievance procedure; that the Grievance 
Policy be reviewed for the purpose of revision and strengthening, and that a committee be desig- 
lated to make recommendations to the Superintendent as soon as possible. 

Children's Centers X X 

Recognizes that employees in the Children's Centers Division are an integral part of the School 
District and personnel employment and selection is a function of the Personnel Division; that all 
personnel procedures of the District shall be applicable to Children's Centers employees. 

Policy Revisions: Personnel X X 

Establishes agreement as to the reorganization of the Personnel Service Division and the cen- 
:ralizing of functions and responsibilities of personnel practices; affirms support of Board policy re- 
visions pertaining to personnel; provides that the Personnel Service Division will be responsible for 
personnel administration of all certificated and classified personnel. 

GROUP III 

-,i 

- Agreements in Group III involve policy and/or budgetary considerations and require fiscal studies this semester 

ii n order that they may be presented to the Board with complete information as to their probable effect on the 1968- 
969 budget. 



S Subject of Agreements: Federation 

Annual Promotion 

Recommends adoption of annual promotion for the District with implementation to begin in 
__ the fall of 1969. 

'reparation Period X 

Agreement in principle provides that a curriculum preparation period will be available to every 
eacher K through grade 12, subject to budgetary considerations. 

111 (Continued on Page 4) 



Negotiating 
Council 



NEWSLETTER 



March 11, 1968 V 



Superintendent's Agreements Listed 



(Continued from Page 3) 



Federation 



Negotiating 
Council 



M.D.T.A. Salaries X 

Agreement in principle provides that M.D.T.A. teachers receive the same pay as Adult Educa- 
tion teachers, to take effect July 1, 1968, subject to budgetary considerations. 

Year-for-Year Credit X 

Agreement in principle provides that a newly appointed probationary teacher shall be allowed 
credit for increment purposes on the basis of one increment for each year of verified outside teach- 
ing as a full-time permanent or probationary teacher, subject to budgetary considerations. 

Corps of Day-to-Day Substitutes X 

Agreement in principle provides that a corps of probationary teachers should be appointed and 
assigned to the Personnel Service Division for appointment as a percentage of the total number of 
day-to-day substitutes, subject to budgetary considerations. (Possible 50 out of the daily average of 
200). 

Credit for Related Experience X 

Agreement in principle provides that a newly appointed probationary teacher, upon the evalua- 
tion and recommendation of the Personnel Coordinator, and the approval of the Superintendent, 
may be allowed credit for increment purposes for verified related employment experience, subject 
to budgetary considerations. 

Teacher Opportunity Program X 

Agreement in principle provides that a "Teacher Opportunity Program" (TOP) of probationary 
teachers should be established; the intention of TOP will be the staffing of target schools with 
teachers of the highest quality 'who are able and willing to meet the unique demands of these schools, 
subject to budgetary considerations. 

New Careers Program X 

Agreement in principle with the New Careers Program as described in the New Careers Pro- 
gram summary fact sheet and adds that the New Careerist will be under the direct supervision of a 
classroom teacher or in some cases the department head, subject to budgetary considerations. 

Health Insurance X 

Agreement in principle provides that a joint committee be established to develop recommenda- 
tions and present them to the Board covering a comprehensive health insurance plan including all 
medical and dental services, special services, and payment for medicinal drugs which must be pur- 
chased by the Board for all teachers, including long-term substitutes, and their respective depend- 
ents to the fullest extent allowable by law, subject to budgetary considerations. 

Class Size X 

Agreement in principle that class size policy should be based on either maximum teacher-stu- 
dent contact hours per week or maximum class size, whichever is determined to be a more effective 
method, subject to budgetary considerations. 

Programming and Counseling Clerical Service X 

Agreement in principle provides that sufficient clerical staff shall be made available to perform 
the necessary clerical aspects of programming and counseling, subject to budgetary considerations. 



Announcements 



• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE TO MEET 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet at 1 : 30 
p.m. on Wednesday, March 13, in Room 10, Central 
Office, 170 Fell Street. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO, CJ 

PERMIT No. 39661 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL DM 
135 VAN NESS AVE. SJW 



JUNIOR HIGH SUMMER SCHOOL 

All teachers desiring to teach in the Junior High 
Summer Schools are requested to file completed 
summer school applications in the office of the Per- 
sonnel Division not later than Friday, March 15, 
1968. Up-to-date and valid junior high school cre- 
dentials arc required for teachers assigned to the 
Junior High Summer Schools. 



RETURN REOUESTE 

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 
S . F. PUBLI C LIBR \RY 

la:: ;i ... . 3T3 . 

SA;; FP> 3C0, CAHF. 94102 



I 

I 



h 



SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



MAR i 8 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



MARCH 18, 1968 



NUMBER 27 



Roy Minkler Is Program Coordinator 



Thirty Project Read Schools Announced 



! Project Read, the District's extensive pilot reading 
oroject involving 30 elementary schools, began operating 
his past week, according to Dr. Donald A. Rhodes, As- 
istant Superintendent for Elementary Schools. 
\ Roy Minkler, Principal of Anza School, has been ap- 
>ointed coordinator of the project and has set up head- 
[uarters in Room 213-A of the Central Office, 135 Van 
<Jess Avenue. 

Project Read, which is geared to bring under-achieving 
hildren up to or above grade level in reading and lan- 
guage arts, was recommended by Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, 
Superintendent of Schools, and approved by the Board 
if Education at its February 13, 1968 meeting. The 
Soard further approved $180,000 for use of Sullivan 
>rogrammed instruction reading materials at selected 

fhree-day Berkeley Session 

Feathers Attend Bilingual Meet 




I three-day pre-semester training workshop for teachers of the 
panish Bilingual Education Experimental Project was held re- 
"' [2ntly at the University of California. The purpose of the work- 
11 J ,iop was to familiarize and train the teachers in the use of new 
irriculum materials to be implemented in the project schools 
g uring the spring semester. Dr. Theodore Reller, Dean, UC 
chool of Education, greeted the teachers. Project teachers in- 
uded Mrs. Nora Haymond and Mrs. Graciela Kennedy (Mar- 
lall), Mrs. Carmen Lopez and Mrs. Cecile Steelman (Sanchez), 
Irs. Carmen Trasvina, Esten Kapp, and Florencio Ortega (James 
ick), and Rafel Cons (Mission). The workshop was conducted 
V Dr. Theodore Parsons (UC), Mrs. Alma Gregory and Mrs. 
ercilia Toscano, Coordinators (from San Antonio, Texas), and 
mer Gallegos, District Supervisor, Spanish Bilingual Educa- 
on. Pictured above Mrs. Toscano demonstrates some techniques 
• presenting a lesson to Spanish-speaking students of Franklin 
:hoo! in Berkeley. 



"disadvantaged" and "advantaged" schools. 

Dr. Rhodes has announced that the 30 schools in- 
volved in the project include the following: Anza, Bay- 
view, Bessie Carmichael, Bret Harte, Bryant, Burnett, 
Candlestick Cove, Columbus, Commodore Sloat, Dudley 
Stone, Emerson, Garfield, Golden Gate, Hunters Point 
I - II, Jedediah Smith, John McLaren, John Muir, John 
Swett, Marshall, Noriega, Ortega, Patrick Henry, P. A. 
Hearst, Raphael Weill, Redding, Sheridan, Sir Francis 
Drake, Starr King, Twin Peaks, and Ulloa. 

Approximately 15,000 children from kindergarten 
through the sixth grade will take part. All of the students, 
except those in kindergarten, have taken the Stanford 
Reading Achievement Test. Students in the 30 Project 
Read schools have also been administered the Sullivan 
Placement Test. On the basis of diagnostic data obtained 
from this test, the students will be placed in the appropri- 
ate stage of the Sullivan reading materials. 
Test Again in May 

As part of the project's evaluation, the Stanford Read- 
ing Achievement Test will be given again in May to all 
San Francisco students. The gains of students who have 
used the Sullivan materials will be compared with the 
gains of students who have had conventional instruction. 
In addition, comparisons will be made with students' 
records in the same school last year. The District's Divi- 
sion of Research will perform the evaluation. 

Published by Behavioral Research Laboratories (BRL) 
in Palo Alto and by McGraw-Hill, the texts are named 
for Dr. M. William Sullivan, who, with Dr. Allen Calvin, 
President of BRL, worked in a Carnegie Foundation pro- 
gram which combined a phonetic reading method with a 
psychologically motivational learning theory to produce 
the programmed instruction texts. 

Materials used in the program include over 50 re- 
medial and basal reading texts for the first six grades; 
Readiness in the Language Arts, a four-textbook reading 
readiness program ; and correlated tests and work papers. 
Training Program Continues 

Teacher pre-service training in the Sullivan materials 
has been completed, and in-service and on-the-job train- 
ing is underway. During the next several weeks more than 
60 consultants will be working with teachers in the 30 
schools to aid them with programmed reading proced- 
ures. Mr. Minkler emphasizes that the consultants are 
there to help and advise, not to observe or supervise the 
teaching as such. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



NEWSLETTER 



March 18, 1968 



Personnel Division Notices 

The Personnel Coordinator wishes to remind all 
permanent teachers that they may request transfers 
to other schools within their divisions or transfers 
from their present schools and appointment to 
another division in accordance with Administrative 
Regulation #41 15, copies of which are on file in the 
offices of all principals. The deadlines for receipt of 
these requests from permanent teachers in the office 
of the Personnel Service Division are November 1 
and April 1. 

Teachers who may be deciding to resign from the 
District should give the Personnel Service Division 
and their principals as much prior notice as possi- 
ble. It is expected that at least thirty days of such 
prior notice (P4112) shall be given in order that 
adequate preparation may be made for suitable 
replacements. It is similarly desirable that those 
who may be planning to retire should give as much 
prior notice as possible. Your cooperation in these 
matters will be greatly appreciated. 



• FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION 

Teacher interest and response to the District's Family 
Life Education in-service courses has been especially 
high, according to Dr. Joseph B. Hill, Curriculum Co- 
ordinator. 

Last spring some 400 teachers took part in a series of 
15 afternoon sessions in a survey course to acquaint 
teachers at all grade levels with current research in the 
behavioral and biological sciences relevant to human 
relationships and family stability. 

Last fall 60 teachers, and this spring 40 teachers, en- 
rolled in courses of eight sessions which give opportunity 
for curriculum development and materials evaluation. 

Several weeks ago another in-service course com- 
menced, meeting for five evening sessions, with speakers 
provided by the San Francisco Medical Society in the 
Society's auditorium on Masonic Avenue. Some 190 
teachers registered for the course, which is titled Family 
Life Education; Biological Backgrounds. 

Dr. Frances Todd, District Curriculum Assistant, has 
been responsible for planning the in-service work and is 
serving as co-chairman with Dr. Alvin Jacobs, School 
Health Committee, San Francisco Medical Society, on 
the newest course. Dr. Todd has worked closely with 
George Canrinus, Coordinator of Health, Physical Edu- 
cation, Athletics and Recreation, and Mrs. Viola Mails. 
Supervisor of Health and Physical Education. 

. . . Project Read Schools Announced 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Mr. Minklcr, who can be reached by telephone at 
431-5381, states that he has been encouraged and im- 
pressed by the enthusiasm of the teachers who are in- 
volved in the program. 

A detailed description of Project Read was published 
in the February 19, 1968 issue of the Newsletter, copies 
of which are available in the Office of Educational In- 
formation. 



Extra School Supplies Catalogs 
Made Available to Teachers 

The new School Supplies Catalog (No. 15) has been 
released to all schools. The Catalog reflects all changes 
and lists all new supplies items now available to schools. 

Extra copies of this Catalog have been made available 
to all schools and have been placed in the School Library 
or other appropriate area within the school for direct 
access to all teachers. 

For this new project, special binders containing the 
Catalog and reflecting the imprinting School Supplies 
Catalog — Reference Copy — Not to be Removed fron, 
This Room were provided. These extra catalogs now 
available to all teachers will provide for better selectior 
and utilization of supplies. 

The Joint Committee of the Negotiating Council anc 
the San Francisco Federation of Teachers initiated th( 
request for additional Catalogs and worked closely wit! 
Edgar Lahl, Supervisor of Supplies, to make this projec 
possible. 

• MENTAL HEALTH FORUM 

"Stresses on Today's Youth" will be the topic at Sai 
Francisco's Second Annual Youth Mental Health Forum 
it was announced today by Justice John B. Molinari 
President of the San Francisco Association for Menta 
Health, sponsor of the event. 

Popular music columnist Ralph J. Gleason will be th 
featured speaker at the Forum, to be held in Nours 
Auditorium, Hayes and Franklin Streets, at 7 p.m., Wed 
nesday, March 20. There will be no admission charge 

The Forum is intended for high school students, pai 
cnts and teachers. The Association sponsors Mentj( 
Health Clubs in five San Francisco high schools (botji 
public and parochial.) 

A panel of Club members will react to Mr. Gleason : 
discussion. They include Gary Goodlett, George Wash 
ington High School; Rosie Vella, Mission High Schoof 
Victor Pavloff, Riordan High School; and Gail Burn 1 
Cathedral High School. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 27 



March 18, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 



Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



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March 18, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Woodrow Wilson Basketball Team 
Wins Tournament of Champions 

The sense of accomplishment that victory brings came 
to Woodrow Wilson High School last week as the school's 
! varsity basketball team won the championship of the 
Tournament of Champions, played in the Oakland Coli- 
seum. 

In addition to taking the TOC crown, the Woodrow 
Wilson rooting section was declared the best in the tour- 
ney, and three team members — Ansley Truitt, Eli Neal, 
i and Larry Haren — were named to the All-TOC team. 

The event marked the first year since 1957, when Poly- 
'technic won the title, that a San Francisco school has 
been victorious. It was also the first time that a city 
public school has won the rooting section award. 

Since the final night's victory, words of praise have 
been heaped on the Wilson team, its coach, and the 
school's rooters. 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins sent his personal 
congratulations to the student body and the team, saying, 
'"Congratulations to the Champions! we are proud of 
Woodrow Wilson High School." 

Principal Barton H. Knowles received congratulations 
from Mayor Joseph L. Alioto through a telegram which 
stated, "Until I can salute you personally, heartiest con- 
gratulations on having the best basketball team, the best 
1 rooting section, and the best school spirit not only in San 
Francisco, but all of California. All of San Francisco is 
'very proud of Woodrow Wilson." 

George Canrinus, District Coordinator of Health, 
Physical Education, Athletics, and Recreation, an- 
nounced, "The achievements of the Woodrow Wilson 
.basketball team and student body in winning the Tourn- 
ament of Champions and being named the outstanding 
rooting section are among the most gratifying experiences 
I have shared during my many years in athletic adminis- 
tration." 

Coach Frank Ingersoll, who announced that this is his 
final season as basketball coach, remarked, "The un- 
precedented achievements of our team and rooting sec- 
i tion represent a magnificent example of cooperation, 
sportsmanship, and self-discipline. From such beginnings, 
outstanding traditions are eventually established." 

Sue Greendorfer, Wilson Student Activities Adviser, 
commented, "The TOC was our finest demonstration of 
a combined effort of all the student talents at Wilson — 
the team, the band, the drill team, elected officers, and 
participating rooters. If ever any victory were proof of 
cooperation, school spirit, and complete group inter- 
action, it has been the outcome of this year's Tournament 
of Champions." 

Principal Barton Knowles echoed these sentiments in a 
special message to the student body, adding, ". . . Now 
Woodrow Wilson High School has grown up. Its students 
have shown that in student activities they are in a big 
league. Let us carry over this spirit, dedication, effort, 
and pride into every phase of the school program — par- 
ticularly into the classroom." 



Hunters Point Sites Tentative 

Tentative approval was given to two sites for develop- 
ment of new schools at Hunters Point by the Board of 
Education at its February 27 meeting at the request of 
San Francisco's Redevelopment Agency. 

The sites tentatively approved are near the intersec- 
tions of Hudson Avenue and Keith Street and Oakdale 
Avenue and Jennings Street. 

The new schools would be part of a "Garden Complex" 
proposed for the Hunters Point area which would also 
include the modernization of Jedediah Smith School. 



SABBATICAL LEAVE TRAVEL REPORTS 

The Personnel Coordinator wishes to remind 
those who have returned from travel sabbaticals 
that Administrative Regulation 4155 requires that 
"Upon completion of the leave and within 60 days 
(March 29 this year) of the teacher's return to 
duty, a detailed itinerary and a written report of 
not less than 2,500 words shall be submitted to the 
Personnel Division, setting forth the teacher's re- 
actions to the trip and including a statement of the 
benefits received from it. ... A description of the 
trip will not satisfy the requirement." 

Please turn in completed reports to Room 116, 
Central Office, to Milton F. Reiterman, Personnel 
Coordinator. 



Training Program Is Completed 




"This is how you do it!" Mrs. Sue Thorlaksson, Education Mana- 
ger, Emporium Stores, Palo Alto, demonstrates to five of the 124 
out-of-school unemployed youth, who graduated from the Dis- 
trict's Second Annual Christmas Training Program, the proper 
technique for operating a National Cash Register. Three repre- 
sentatives from NCR (left to right) Ed Wade, Manager, Total 
Systems; James Allison, Retail Systems Account Manager; and 
John Ogro, Retail Systems Department Manager, participated in 
this one phase of the 20-hour Christmas training program. Sara 
Hurt (left) representative from the Youth Opportunity Centers, 
and Mrs. Evelyn Press (right), Principal of Mission Adult School, 
coordinated efforts to employ and train these young adults. 
Participating also in these training and graduation activities were 
Brig. General James W. Courts (Ret.), Chairman of the San 
Francisco Community Relations Group; Mrs. Josephine Pagan de 
Ward of the Human Rights Commission; Clark Reynolds, Branch 
Manager, NCR; and Dr. Edward D. Goldman, Assistant Superin- 
tendent for Adult and Vocational Education. This program was 
sponsored by the San Francisco Community Relations Group 
working in coperation with the Human Rights Commission, 
Youth Opportunity Centers, the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, and the SFUSD. 



NEWSLETTER 



March 18, 1968 



Announcements 



• VISITORS FROM GERMANY 

The School District will be serving as host to a number 
of teachers from Germany during April. The group has 
asked to stay in the homes of local residents for two eve- 
nings, April 15 and April 16. District teachers and admin- 
istrators who would be interested in housing any of the 
visitors on these two dates are asked to call Mrs. Richard 
Wilson at the Second District PTA office, 861-0538. Your 
help is appreciated. 



• PUBLIC SCHOOLS WEEK COORDINATOR 

David Monasch, III, 1968 Public Schools Week/E-B 
Day coordinator, will be in the Office of Educational 
Information, Room 213, Central Office, from the period 
of March 18 through May 3. He may be contacted at 
863-4680, Extension 371. 



• CTEVH CONFERENCE SCHEDULED 

The San Francisco Unified School District will host 
the Ninth Annual Conference of California Transcribers 
and Educators of the Visually Handicapped (CTEVH) 
to be held March 29-31 at Del Webb's Towne House. 

The conference will afford teachers, administrators, 
and transcribers the opportunity to work together toward 
the production of more effective textbooks and other in- 
structional materials in special media. Intensive study 
sessions will be directed toward meeting "The Challenge 
of '68," the theme of the conference. 

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Emerson Foulke, Di- 
rector, Center for Rate Controlled Recordings at the 
University of Louisville, Kentucky. His topic will be 
"Reading by Listening." 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancies: 
2724 — School Custodian, Male — City College and 
Dudley Stone Elementary School. 



• STANFORD EDUCATION CLUB FLIGHT 

The Stanford Education Club of San Francisco an- 
nounces that space is available on its Pan American Air- 
ways flight to Hawaii which departs San Francisco, Satur- 
day, April 6, and returns Sunday, April 14. Interested 
teachers should contact Bill Bardoli at 566-8898 or the 
Stanford Education Club, 2346 - 43rd Avenue, San 
Francisco 94116. 



Final 1968 Academic Athletic Association Varsity 
and 130's Basketball Standings 

VARSITY 130's 

Team Won Lost Team Won Lost 

1. W. Wilson 8 1. Sacred Heart 7 1 

2. Polytechnic 7 1 2. G.Washington 7 1 

3. Sacred Heart 6 2 3. Galileo 6 2 

4. Lowell 5 3 4. Lowell 4 4 

5. A. Lincoln 4 4 4. Mission 4 4 

6. Mission 3 5 4. A. Lincoln 4 4 

7. Balboa 17 7. Polytechnic 3 5 
7. G.Washington 17 8. Balboa 1 7 
7. Galileo 17 9. W.Wilson 8 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Monday, March 18, 1968, 4:00 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• SACRAMENTO MATHEMATICS MEETING 

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics 
announces that its Sacramento meeting will be held 
March 29 through 31, 1968, in the Memorial Auditor- 
ium, 1515 J Street. 

The three-day session will feature such speakers as Dr. 
Francis J. Mueller, Tampa, Florida ("The Public Image 
of School Mathematics") ; Professor Charles B. Morrey, 
U.C., Berkeley (panelist on "The Twelfth Grade Math 
Program" and "Town Meeting on Mathematics") ; and 
Professor Stewart Moredock, Sacramento State College 
("Exploring Geometry"). 

SFUSD personnel involved include William G. Chinn, 
Executive Director, Statewide Mathematics' Advisor)' 
Committee Research Projects, who will speak on "Some 
Directions Indicated in the Second Round," and William 
P. Keesey, who will preside at a section meeting. 

• CANHC EVENING LECTURE MARCH 27 

The San Francisco Chapter of the California Associa- 
tion for Neurologically Handicapped Children announces 
that it is sponsoring a public information lecture on Wed- 
nesday, March 27, 1968, featuring Mrs. Marguerite Rap- 
son, SFUSD Supervisor, Programs for the Educationally 
Handicapped. 

Mrs. Rapson will speak on "Perspective on the Pro 
gram for Educationally Handicapped Minors" at Aptos 
Junior High School, 105 Aptos Avenue. The program 
will commence at 7:30 p.m. 

• SFCGA MEMBERSHIP MEETING 

A general membership meeting of the San Francisco 
Counseling and Guidance Association will be held Thurs- 
day, March 21, at 3:45 p.m. A. P. Giannini Junior High 
School, Room 221. Eight highly qualified panelists will 
discuss a number of special services provided children 
attending San Francisco schools. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO, CM. 
PERMIT No. 39661 j 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL DIl 
135 VAN NESS AVE. SB 



RETURN REQUESTF 

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 

S. F. PU3LI C L . 

LARK IN [ 3TS. 

SA!J .-'.:.. IC ' , :AL1F. 941 32 



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SAN FRANCISCO ^UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



MAR 2 5 1968 



B>VjBkM 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



MARCH 25, 1968 



NUMBER 28 



Reorganization in Progress 



Board Approves Personnel Policy Changes 



A number of recommendations formulated to revise 
'[specific District personnel policies and procedures were 
'presented to the Board of Education at its March 12, 
1968 meeting by Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins and 
'were subsequently approved by the Board. 

The recommendations are divided into four categories 
and are summarized as follows: 

Revised Personnel Policy, Articles 2 and 4 — Reorgani- 
zation of the Personnel Service Division — P2136, P41 10, 
)P4111, P4112, P4115 in two major sections of the Per- 
sonnel Policy, Article 2 and Article 4, have been revised 
to formally implement the centralized functions of the 
Personnel Service Division, as outlined in Dr. Jenkins' 
report, Superintendent' s Revised Personnel Policy, dated 
February 13, 1968. 

• Total reorganization of the Division will be effected 
through the adoption of these policies, and the Superin- 
tendent will modify administrative regulations to con- 
form with the revised policies. The Superintendent's re- 
organization of the Division will be completed in the 
1968-69 school year, and budget considerations are in- 
cluded to carry out all personnel administration functions 
outlined in his report. 

The Coordinator of Personnel is directly responsible 
'to the Superintendent for the administration, planning, 
md implementation of the following personnel functions: 
i.) recruitment, selection, placement, and transfer of 
certificated personnel; b.) operations within the Person- 
al Service Division, and research; c.) certificated and 
classified staff relations, and wage and salary administra- 
tion; d.) recruitment, selection, and placement of classi- 
fied personnel, subject to the Civil Service Provisions of 
:he City and County of San Francisco (clerical, teacher 
aides, crafts, custodial, cafeteria, housemothers and mis- 
cellaneous employees). 

It is noted that the Negotiating Council and the San 
Francisco Federation of Teachers have supported the 
-Superintendent's efforts in expanding and strengthening 
he Personnel Service Division. 

1 Long-Term Substitutes Report — The proposals of 
he Superintendent's Report on Long-Term Substitutes, 
teted February 13, 1968, have been adopted and will be 
mplemented. (See February 26, 1968 issue of the News- 
etter for a detailed description of this report.) The Su- 
perintendent will effect the changes in administrative 
procedure which have been agreed to by the Negotiating 
Council and the San Francisco Federation of Teachers. 



Grievance Procedure (P4110) — In accordance with 
agreement reached with the Negotiating Council and 
the San Francisco Federation of Teachers, this policy 
revision grants a teacher the right, when initiating a 
grievance, to be accompanied by a conferee at all levels 
in the Grievance Procedure. 

In addition, the responsible administrator, upon re- 
ceipt, shall forward to the Personnel Service Division 
copies of all correspondence relating to grievances and 
that the Personnel Service Division shall be responsible 
for the administration and operation of the grievance 
procedure. 

Children's Centers — In accordance with agreement 
reached with the Negotiating Council and the San Fran- 
cisco Federation of Teachers, all necessary revisions shall 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Students Prepare Projects 

Science Fair fo Start March 30 




Three of Roosevelt- Junior High School's six contestants in the 
Bay Area Science Fair to be held March 30 to April 3 at the 
California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park are pictured 
above. The three, Dede Miller, Susie Greenspan, and Jesse Jud- 
nick, took second, first, and third place, respectively, in the 
fourth annual Roosevelt Science Fair. Susie's project involves the 
effects of sex hormones on the reproductive organs of guppies. 
Dede's project is entitled "The Effects of Antihistamines on 
Limb Regeneration," and Jesse's deals with "What is the Nature 
of Light." Judges came from Lowell, George Washington, Ben- 
jamin Franklin, James Denman, Herbert Hoover, and Roosevelt. 
The Roosevelt fair was under the direction of Lionel Marcus, 
Thomas Fletcher, Charles Corsiglia, and Sandra Johnson. 



NEWSLETTER 



March 25, 1968 



Looking to the Future 

Bayview Visits Marin School 




In planning for the new Bayview Elementary School, a group of 
parents, children, teachers, and administrators visited the Gra- 
nada Elementary School in Marin County recently. Granada 
School has incorporated a number of new and innovative con- 
cepts in its building design, including movable walls which allow 
for teaching areas of various sizes for a variety of purposes. The 
school also operates with an ungraded program. Pictured above 
are some of the Bayview students as they boarded the bus for 
the day's trip. The children spent the morning with a similar age 
group, while the teachers and parents met with school officials 
and toured the school plant. 

• TEACHER-EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Four teachers at Miraloma School and three at Sir 
Francis Drake School are participating in the second 
phase of a teacher-education program developed by the 
Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and 
Development, Berkeley, California. 

The same San Francisco teachers participated in a 
three-week basic field test last November. At that time, 
via videotape recorder and with handbooks created by 
the Laboratory, the local teachers were trained in "Ef- 
fective Questioning Techniques in Classroom Discus- 
sion." Recent work, coordinated by Mr. Pete Petrafeso 
of the Laboratory staff, aims to check on the degree and 
permanence of improvement in teaching skills. 

Teachers involved in the program include Susan Per- 
ry, Margaret Charles, John Oddone, and Irene Siroskey 
of Miraloma and Mrs. Lee Russel, Benjamin Murphy, 
and Mrs. Sylvia Webb of Sir Francis Drake. According 
to Mr. Petrafeso the testing program has been made 
possible through the efforts of Dr. Mary McCarthy, 
Supervisor of Elementary Schools, and Mrs. Ellamae 
Beseman and Kathryn Lockhart, principals of the two 
participating elementary schools. 

. . . Personnel Policy Revisions Approved 

(Continued from Page 1) 
be made in existing Board policy in order to insure that 
teachers in the Children's Centers are considered and 
treated as an integral part of the School District and 
that their employment and selection is a function of the 
Personnel Service Division. Care will also be taken in 
these revisions to insure that all personnel procedures of 
the District shall be applicable to the Children's Centers 
employees. 



PROCEDURES TO BE FOLLOWED IN 
SECURING DAY-TO-DAY SUBSTITUTES 

The Personnel Coordinator wishes to remind all 
administrators and teachers that requests for day- 
to-day substitutes should be directed to the Per- 
sonnel Service Division. The effort of school ad- 
ministrators and regular teachers to secure their 
own substitutes sometimes results in confusion. A 
centralized approach is both desirable and neces- 
sary, as it is Board policy. 

An automatic answering and recording telephone 
(863-2391 ) will receive requests at any hour of the 
night, 4:40 p.m. to 7 a.m. Be sure to report: 

1. Your name (last name first, please) 

2. Your school 

3. The grade level or subjects you teach 

4. The anticipated length of your absence 
Between the hours of 7 a.m. and 4:40 p.m., tele- 
phone calls are handled by the regular switch- 
board (863-4680). Ask for the Certificated Per- 
sonnel Division. 

School secretaries are reminded to continue to 
call the Personnel Service Division to report the 
return or the continued absence of a teacher. 

The cooperation of all concerned will improve 
the procedure. 



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• POSTER WINNERS ANNOUNCED 

In 

Winners in the 1968 "Trees for the City" poster con- jj| 
test have been announced. They include the following a | 
Grand Prize, Robert Green (Lowell) ; 2nd, Lamont King 
(Mission); 3rd, Sue Hennigh (Mission); 4th, Michae i 
Mebine (A. P. Giannini) ; 5th, Nancy Bromberger (Ab- 
raham Lincoln); 6th, Milton McMullin (James Den- 
man) ; 7th, Mike Moydel (Pelton) ; 8th, Caroline Mots' ! 
(Mission) 

The Grand Prize winner received a $50 Savings Bond 
2nd through 6th, $25 Savings Bonds; and 7th through 
8th, $10 cash awards. The winning posters are on dis- ■) '.' 
play at the Fox Plaza 

Bit 



4 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 28 



March 25, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco. Calif . 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



C) 



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- 



March 25, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



New Foreign Language Programs 
For Teachers Are Announced 

The California State Department of Education, Office 
jof Foreign Language Programs, has released the follow- 
ing information which may be of interest to foreign 
(language teachers: 

Mexico Study Program — Arrangements have been 
[completed for an eight-week Summer Spanish-ESL 
Study Program to be held at the University of Mexico 
tfrom June 24 to August 16, 1968. Designed primarily for 
Experienced teachers of ESL and Spanish (including 
feixth grade and other elementary teachers of ELES 
(Spanish), the program will include intensive study of 
Spanish, Applied Linguistics, Teaching Methods and 
[Materials, and Mexican History and Culture. A variety 
bf other courses will be open to participants at the Uni- 
versity, in both Spanish and English. 
: Additional information and program information may 
be obtained by contacting Robert Landen at the San 
Diego County Department of Education. 
' Scholarships for Teachers of German — The Goethe 
Institute in Munich is offering 14 summer scholarships 
[or teachers of German in California. Stipends will in- 
clude the full costs of the course, from July 4 to August 
^8, 1968, and transportation as well as lodging and food. 
\lso included are a short orientation period and a five- 
Jay trip to Berlin. The actual instruction will be given 
n Aibling (Upper Bavaria) or Ebersburg (near 
Vlunich) . 

j Interested teachers may secure information and ap- 
alication forms by writing to Professor H. Guenther 
tferjes, Department of German, University of California, 
Oavis 95616. 

• Workshop for Teachers of Foreign Languages — A 
>ractical training workshop for teachers of foreign lan- 
,iiage is being planned by the Office of Foreign Lan- 
uage Programs on April 26 and 27. Demonstrations by 
naster teachers will be given in the preparation and use 
f instructional materials, and teachers will be able to 
bserve and construct similar materials at the workshop. 
• ■ Additional information may be obtained by contact- 
ig the Office of Foreign Language Programs, Room 
30, California State Department of Education, 721 
!apitol Mall, Sacramento 95814. 



- » LOWELL ORCHESTRA AT PATRICK HENRY 

l '' 

- A program of music featuring the 96-piece Lowell 

f» ligh School orchestra was presented recently to the en- 
re student body of Patrick Henry School. The orchestra, 
nder the direction of Jack Pereira, instrumental instruc- 

S. >r, offered a program specially prepared for young 

i. steners. 

Children from the audience were selected to perform 

__ ith the orchestra in the Toy Symphony. Principal Frank 
lontoro declared that the program was beautifully exe- 
lted and that student reaction was highly favorable. 
The experience," he stated, "will be remembered for a 

* -ry long time by all." 



Television Appearance 

'Youth and Business 




Arnold Jacobson (right), Head, Vocations! Business Education 
Project, and three District students (left to right), Christopher 
Burton (Polytechnic), Joe Clark (George Washington), and Nancy 
Piol (George Washington), recently appeared on the KTVU, 
Channel 2, program Editor's Forum to discuss "Youth and Busi- 
ness/' The discussion covered the positive attitudes of young 
people toward business careers as well as the District's Voca- 
tional Buiness Education Program. Ray Jacobs (left) of the 
KTVU-TV staff moderated the show which was arranged with 
the cooperation of Litton Industries' Monroe International 
Division. 



District Appointments Listed 

The following administrative appointments and as- 
signments were approved by the Board of Education at 
the March 5, 1968 meeting upon recommendation of the 
Superintendent. This information should be included in 
all copies of the School Directory. 

Central Office 

Frances A. Caine, serving as Supervisor A, Atypical 
Classes, appointed to the position of Supervisor AA, 
Mentally Handicapped — Elementary. 

Elementary 
Donald W. Johnson appointed Acting Principal of 
Anza School (Principal Roy S. Minkler on leave to 
Central Office as project coordinator for the Sullivan 
Program Reading Project). 



Supervisor Position Opens 

The Personnel Service Division announces that 
applications are being received for the position of 
Supervisor A, Attendance Services until Friday, 
April 5, 1968. 

Applicants must have the M.A. degree and 
must possess either a general Pupil Personnel Cre- 
dential or the Standard Supervision Credential 
with successful full-time experience in the field of 
service of the basic credential. 

The position will be classified as Supervisor A, 
with a beginning salary of $13,980 and a work year 
of approximately 197 days. 

Applications must be made in writing on ap- 
propriate forms available in the Office of Personnel 
and returned to Milton F. Reiterman, Coordinator, 
Personnel Division, not later than April 5, 1968. 
Interviews will be scheduled during the following 
week. 



NEWSLETTER 



March 25, 1968 1 



Announcements 



• SUMMER SCHOOL TEACHING APPLICATIONS 

Applications for teaching positions in summer schools 
for the following divisions are available in Room 116 of 
the Personnel Service Division and also from the main 
office clerk in each school: 

Elementary 

Junior High 

Senior High 

Friday, March 29, 1968, is the final date for filing 
applications for the three divisions. 



• SPANISH COMMITTEE MEETING 

The next meeting of the Committee of Spanish-Speak- 
ing/Spanish Surnamed Teachers will be held at Sanchez 
School on Thursday, March 28, at 7:30 p.m. in the 
auditorium. The occasion is a parent orientation meet- 
ing to the Spanish bilingual education program at the 
school and will take the place of the committee's meet- 
ing scheduled for this month. 

The orientation program is being planned jointly with 
parents, community organization representatives, and 
school personnel. Teachers and their Spanish experi- 
mental bilingual classes will demonstrate the new cur- 
riculum and materials. Dr. Theodore Parsons, project 
consultant, and other project staff members will be 
present to answer questions from the floor. 



• FORENSIC LEAGUE DINNER 

The San Francisco Junior High Forensic League will 
hold a 10th anniversary dinner at Veneto's Restaurant, 
Bay and Mason Streets, on Wednesday, April 3, at 
7 p.m. 

Prices for the dinner, including tax and tip, are $6 for 
prime rib and $4.75 for chicken or fish. Reservations and 
checks should be sent to Roland Demarais, Room 213-A, 
Central Office, 135 Van Ness Avenue 94102, by April 1. 
A 6 p.m. social hour will precede the dinner. 



• MEXICO CULTURAL STUDY-TOUR 

The Department of Foreign Languages at Chico State 
College will conduct a five-week Spanish Linguistics 
Cultural Study-Tour for Spanish teachers in Mexico 
from July 14 to August 20, 1968. For information con- 
tact Dr. L. Charles Pierce, Associate Professor of Foreign 
Languages, Foreign Language Department, Chico State 
College, Chico, California 95926. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS WEEK EXHIBITS 

The District's Art Department has been asked to 
prepare displays for Public Schools Week at the 
following locations: Emporium Downtown, Stones- 
town Shopping Center. Cable Car Clothiers, and 
City Savings and Loan Company. 

School personnel having work to display at these 
locations are asked to contact the Art Department 
Office at 863-4680, Extension 232. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, March 26, 1968, 4 p.m. Special meet- 
ing, 170 Fell Street. 

Tuesday, April 2, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular meet- 
ing, 170 Fell Street. 



• DINNER FOR RETIRING ADMINISTRATORS 

The San Francisco Association of School Administra-i 
tors announces that the annual dinner honoring retiring 
administrators will be held in the Imperial Ballroom of 
the Hilton Hotel on Wednesday, May 29, 1968. Interest- 
ed parties are asked to save this date. Detailed informa- 
tion will be distributed in the near future. 



• PTA CONVENTION WORKSHOP MARCH 30 

"Teach in, Speak out, Follow through" is the theme 
of the Second District, California Congress of Parents) 
and Teachers' Convention Workshop for new unit offi- 
cers and chairmen to be held Saturday, March 30, 1968. 
at Lowell High School from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Principals, teachers, and interested PTA members arei 
invited to participate and become informed about PTA 
policies and procedures. The morning session will feature 
Mrs. Doyle Hoffman, State Director of Extension, a 
keynote speaker. 

The afternoon session from 1 to 3 p.m. will consist ol 
workshop conferences for unit officers and chairmen 
There is a 50 cent registration fee. Participants are tc 
bring their lunches, and coffee and tea will be provided 



DIRECTORY CHANGES 

All school staff members are asked to include the 
following additions or changes in their copies of the 
School Directory: 

Page 12 — New telephone number for Herbert 
Hoover Act. Asst. Principal — Marianne Cotter is 
681-9340. 

Page 24 — John Muir Asst. Principal should 
read Mrs. Yvette C. Kelly. 

Page 34 — Add address to Alemany Adult 
School — 750 Eddy Street. 



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PERMIT No. 396( 



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SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



DOCUMENTS 
APR 1 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



APRIL 1, 1968 



NUMBER 29 



Too Late for Regrets' 



Driver Education Film Presented 




Robert E. Perussina (left), head of driver instruction for District 
schools, is seen discussing the auto theft prevention educational 
film "Too Late for Regrets" with C. A. DesChamps (right), vice 
president in charge of claims in the San Francisco home office 
:>f Firemen's Fund American Insurance Companies. The nation- 
wide insurance group presented the film to the District to aid in 
explaining to driver education students how a conviction for auto 
'heft can have tragic consequences for the offender in later life. 
Mr. Perussina states that the film will be seen by more than 
>,000 sophomore level driver education students each year dur- 
ng the regular school year and summer months. 



Audio Visual Dates Are Booked 

The Bureau of Audio Visual Education, Division of 
Instructional Materials, announces that all available 
sooking dates for audio visual materials for April have 
seen filled, and that by the time outstanding requisitions 
.in hand have been processed, May and June will be 
looked out. 

' The volume of requests for materials has been excep- 
ionally heavy this year. Each day the Bureau books 300 
! ilms outgoing and 300 films incoming for a daily turn- 
over of 600 films. In addition, there are over 100 out- 
;oing shipments per day within the filmstrip, realia, study 
irint, etc. section. 

R Dr. William B. Sanborn, Director, Division of Instruc- 
ional Materials, announces that it will be physically im- 
lossible to book any additional materials (other than 

:hose involving emergency situations) for April, May, 
ind June. 



Expansion Program for Special 
Education Division Implemented 

Expansion of the District's Special Educational Serv- 
ices Division program within the limits of $750,000 in 
new state funds provided in AB 272 was approved by the 
Board of Education at its March 12, 1968 meeting upon 
recommendation of Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins. 

In order to further implement the expansion plans, the 
Board subsequently approved at its March 18 meeting 
the establishment of a number of positions in the Special 
Educational Services Division. Some $243,625 of AB 272 
funds have been allotted for this phase of the program. 

The following positions will be established: 

Teachers — Teleteaching, secondary (1), Classes for 
Aphasic Children (2), Audiologist (1), Resource, Hear- 
ing Handicapped ( 1 ) , Traveling, Visually Handicapped, 
secondary (1), Speech and Hearing (5), Educationally 
Handicapped, elementary (6), Educationally Handi- 
capped, secondary (3), Educationally Handicapped, 
Y.G.C. (1), Reading Center (6), Multi-handicapped 
(2), Educable Mentally Retarded, elementary (4), Ed- 
ucable Mentally Retarded, secondary (4), and Psycho- 
metrist ( 1 ) . 

Additional positions will include Social Worker 
Special Service Centers ( 1 ) , Guidance Counselor — 
Special Service Centers (1), School Psychologist (4), 
School Social Worker ( 1 ) , Clerk-Typist ( 1 ) , Transcrib- 
er-Typist (2), Clerk-Stenographer (1), Teacher Aides 
(12), and Extended Service of one hour per day for 4 
Social Workers, 1 School Psychologist, and 1 Speech 
and Hearing Teacher. 

(Continued on Page 2) 

| Supply Items Are on Display | 

A display of new materials available to schools 
through Warehouse stock has been established at the 
School Supplies Warehouse, 1000 Selby Street. This 
exhibit is a perpetual one in that as new items are made 
available to schools, they will be displayed in the exhibit 
area at the Warehouse. 

Teachers and administrators are encouraged to view 
the exhibit at their convenience. The Warehouse and 
display facility are open each day from 8 a.m. to 4:45 
p.m. 

The Joint Committee of the Negotiating Council and 
the San Francisco Federation of Teachers requested this 
display to help acquaint teachers with new supplies that 
have become available. 



NEWSLETTER 



April 1, 1968| 



First Place Trophy 

Abraham Lincoln Rifle Team Wins 




The Abraham Lincoln High School rifle team took top team 
and individual honors in the 15th Annual UCLA High School 
Rifle Meet. The winning five-man team consisted of (left to 
right) Kevin Rugani, Arnold F. Yee, Robert W. Alyward, Allen 
F. Yee, and Walter E. Rugani, seen above with their trophies. 



Administrative Positions Listed 

The following administrative appointments and as- 
signments were approved by the Board of Education at 
the March 18, 1968 meeting upon recommendation of 
the Superintendent: 

Central Office 

Alfred D. Beseman appointed Supervisor A, Depart- 
ment of Music. 

Howard C. Clay (on leave from his position as Assist- 
ant Supervisor, Attendance Bureau) appointed Project 
Head, New Careers Program. 

City College 

Dr. Louis F. Batmale appointed to the position of 
Vice-President. 

Jules Fraden appointed Dean of Instruction. 

Dr. Jack H. Aldridge appointed Assistant Dean of In- 
struction. 

Elementary School 

David Monasch, III, appointed Acting Assistant Prin- 
cipal of Anza School (on leave to Central Office as 1968 
Public Schools Week/E-B Day coordinator) . 

These changes, where applicable, should be included 
in all copies of the School Directory. 



. . . Special Education Expansion Begins 

(Continued from Page 1 ) 
It is to be noted that eight elementary ESEA classes 
have been transferred to District Educationally Handi- 
capped classes and 12 secondary school Social Worker 
positions have been transferred to the Special Educa- 
tional Services Division for funding under the provisions 
of A.B 272. 



Public Schools Week Coming 

The 49th Annual Public Schools Week will take 
place April 22-26, with the theme being The Public 
School — ■ Cornerstone of Liberty. 

The chairman of the San Francisco Citizens' 
Committee supporting Public Schools Week is Mr. 
Elroy D. Joyce, owner of the Joyce Sheet Metal 
Works. 

Serving as coordinator of Public Schools Week 
for the District is Mr. David Monasch, III, Acting 
Assistant Principal of Anza Elementary School. He 
will also supervise the annual visit of businessmen 
to the schools on Thursday, April 25, which is 
known as Education-Business Day. 

Most of the District schools will hold "open 
house" or some type of program during Public 
Schools Week, such as exhibits, special programs, 
assemblies, and demonstrations. 

The Annual Elementary Schools Song Fest will 
serve as the opening ceremony to start the celebra- 
tion of Public Schools Week. The Song Fest will be 
held on Monday, April 22, 1968, in the rotunda of 
City Hall at 12 noon. Choruses from Clarendon 
School and Diamond Heights School will sing. The 
public is invited to attend this event. 



| 



• DANCE LECTURE AT CITY COLLEGE 

On Thursday, April 4, Ruth Currier will appear a 
City College of San Francisco to present a lecture demon 
stration of modern dance in the College Theater a! 
11 a.m. 

A master class conducted by Miss Currier will be helfj 
in the dance studio of the Women's Gymnasium fron 
2 to 3:30 p.m. 

High school students and their instructors are invitee m 
to participate in the master class. Space necessitates ; i 
limitation of two students per school. For further infor m 
mation interested persons should call Mrs. Lene Johnson: is 
City College, 587-7272, Extension 208. 

Guest tickets for the lecture demonstration may b 
secured by calling Dean Warren White, Extension 218. 



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April 1, 1968 i "if 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 39, No. 29 

135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



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April 1, 19G8 



NEWSLETTER 



Implementation of Agreements Underway 



Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins has issued a num- 
ber of bulletins to the certificated and classified staffs 
detailing the implementation of various agreements 
made between the representatives of the Negotiating 
Council and the San Francisco Federation of Teachers. 
Superintendent's .Bulletins number 10 through 20 were 
distributed last week to all schools. Listed below are the 
titles and effective date, where applicable, of each bulle- 
tin. 

Superintendent's Bulletin #10 dated March 25, 1968 

— To: All Certificated and Classified Staff — Subject: 
Revision by the Board of Education of Personnel Pro- 
cedures. 

Superintendent's Bulletin #11 dated March 25, 1968 

— To: All Certificated Staff — Subject: Teacher Griev- 
ance Procedure — Effective date: March 25, 1968. 

Superintendent's Bulletin #12 dated March 25, 1968 
To: All Certificated Staff — Subject: Declaration of 
Need — Assignment, Major and Minor — Effective 
date: July 1, 1968. 

Superintendent's Bulletin #13 dated March 25, 1968 

— To: All Certificated Staff — Subject: Transfer and 
Appointment Procedures — Effective date: March 25, 
1968. 

Superintendent's Bulletin #14 dated March 25, 1968 

— To: All Certificated Staff — Subject: Personnel Files 



Effective date: April 15, 



•■ear 



Summer Study Grants Available 

District teachers of special education classes and 
teachers who will be employed by San Francisco Unified 
School District to teach mentally retarded or physically 
handicapped classes in the fall may apply for grants of 
financial assistance to pursue courses in these areas dur- 
ing the coming summer. 

Teachers who will take summer courses for completion 
of certification requirements to teach physically handi- 
capped or mentally retarded youngsters may avail them- 
selves of these state grants. 

Grants may be made up to $50 per unit or a possible 
maximum of $300 to successful applicants. Funds for 
this program are subject to passage by the Legislature 
ind approval by the Governor. Grants will be paid after 
successful completion of the course work. 

Interested District personnel may secure applications 
: rom the office of Margaret Holland, Room 19, Central 
Dffice, Telephone 863-4680, Extension 288. 

Completed applications should be in the Special Edu- 
lational Services Division by May 3. 



;t:K 



IN MEMORIAM 

Hale P. Benton 

Mrs. Dorothy J. Fong Lee 

Hubert Visick 

Mrs. Gladys B. Wood 



for Certificated Employees 
1968. 

Superintendent's Bulletin #15 dated March 25, 1968 

— To: All Certificated Staff — Subject: In-Service Ex- 
cused Absences — Effective date: January 30, 1968. 

Superintendent's Bulletin #16 dated March 25, 1968 
To: All Certificated Staff — Subject: Waiver Procedure 

— Effective date: July 1, 1968. 

Superintendent's Bulletin #17 dated March 25, 1968 

— To: All Certificated Staff — Subject: Probationary 
Appointments for Teachers on Leave — Effective date: 
July 1, 1968. 

Superintendent's Bulletin #18 dated March 25, 1968 

— To:: All Certificated Staff — Subject: Long-Term 
Substitutes. 

Superintendent's Bulletin #19 dated March 25, 1968 

— To: All Certificated Staff — Subject: Elimination of 
Paper Transfers — Effective date: March 25, 1968. 

Superintendent's Bulletin #20 dated March 25, 1968 

— To: All Certificated Staff — Subject: Coverage for 
Teachers Absent — Effective date: April 1, 1968. 



Counseling Suite 



Gompers Dedicates New Offices 




Dedication ceremonies for the opening of a new suite of counsel- 
ing offices at Samuel Gompers High School were held recently. 
Dr. Lewis Allbee, Assistant Superintendent for Senior High 
Schools, cut the ribbon which signified completion of the project 
and official recognition that the offices are "open for business." 
Refreshments were served in the homemaking room to faculty 
members and a number of Central Office guests. Pictured above 
are (left to right) Ivor Callaway, Principal; Dr. Allbee; Philip 
Cali, Supervisor, Buildings and Grounds; Mrs. Alice Wilson, 
Assistant Principal; and Wendell Lathrop, Head Counselor. 



N EWSLETTER 



April 1, 19 



Jil 



Announcements 



• COACHES' GOLF TOURNAMENT 

The San Francisco Association Athletic Coaches and 
Physical Education Teachers will hold its annual Golf 
Tournament on Monday, April 8, at Marin Country 
Club. Golfers will tee-off with a shot-gun start at 10 a.m. 
Green fees are $6.25. Golfers are requested to contact 
Bill Firpo of George Washington High School immedi- 
ately. 

• RECEPTION FOR JUDGE O'CONNOR 

The Juvenile Court Employees Association announces 
that it will hold a reception for the Honorable Raymond 
J. O'Connor on his third anniversary as Judge of the 
Juvenile Court at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, April 3, at the 
Youth Guidance Center. 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancies: 
2724 — School Custodian, Male — Lakeshore and 

Junipero Serra Elementary Schools. 

2704 — School Custodian, Female — Laguna Honda 

Elementary School. 



• FIELD LIBRARIANS TO MEET APRIL 18 

The Field Librarians will meet Thursday, April 18, at 
4 p.m.. at Presidio Junior High School, 450 - 30th Av- 
enue. All elementary, junior high, and senior high librar- 
ians are welcome. 



• DEPARTMENT HEADS TO MEET 

The Department Heads Association of San Francisco 
will meet Wednesday, April 3, at Polytechnic High 
School in the teachers' cafeteria at 2:45 p.m. The agenda 
will include a discussion of final approval of the revised 
proposal regarding additional time for department 
heads. 



• MOCK TRIAL — A DAY IN COURT 

The Constitutional Rights Foundation announces that 
it is sponsoring a special program, "Mock Trial — A 
Day in Criminal Court," a demonstration for teachers, 
to be held Saturday, April 27, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 
at the Federal Building, 450 Golden Gate Avenue. 

Because attendance is limited, interested teachers are 
asked to make reservations early by sending a check for 
$2.50 (includes lunch, registration, and materials) to the 
Constitutional Rights Foundation, Office 406, 503 Mar- 
ket Street, San Francisco 94105. 

Co-sponsoring organizations include the San Francisco 
Bar Association, Department of Education, Archdiocese 
of San Francisco, the San Francisco Police Department, 
the Marin County Social Studies Council, and the 
SFUSD. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, April 2, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular meet- 
ing, 170 Fell Street. 



• ELEMENTARY SUPPLY COMMITTEE MEETIN' 

The Elementary Supply Committee will meet at Vis 
tacion Valley School at 1 :45 p.m. on Thursday, April 1 
Principals having items for discussion are requested i 
submit them to their representatives. 

Three copies of the March Supply Committee minut 
will be distributed to each elementary school. This polic 
will be continued in the future so schools will have a 
extra copy for posting. 



• PHI DELTA KAPPA DINNER MEETING 

The Golden Gate Chapter of Phi Delta Kappa dinnc 
meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Apr 
3, in the Board of Directors Room of Fosters Restauran 
Golden Gate Avenue and Polk Street. Dr. Robert 1 
Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools, will be the feature 
speaker. Dinner cost is $2. 



TRANSFER CARD DEADLINE EXTENDED 

The deadline for the filing of teacher transfer 
cards has been extended from Monday, April 1, 
to Monday, April 8. Transfer cards in duplicate 
are to be filed with the Personnel Service Division 
in Room 116. A third copy of the request is to be 
retained by the teacher. 



• PRINCIPALS' ARTICLE PUBLISHED 

Two District principals have collaborated on an artic 
which has been published in the January, 1968, issue 
the Journal of Secondary Education. The authors are R( 
S. Minkler, Principal of Anza School, and Dr. Lane 
De Lara, Principal of Francisco Junior High School. Tl 
title of the article is "Mental Health and Staff Rel 
tions." In addition to his administrative responsibilitit ( 
Mr. Minkler is also a lecturer in education at the Ur| 
versity of San Francisco. 



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SAN FRANCISCO ; 
PERMIT No. 39( 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL 
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D0CUMEJ1TS DEPARTMENT 

S. F. PUB! : L ' 

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SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT APR 1 5 1968 
^fc*tK£ll5SfY 

NEWSLETTER 



aiVisf 
Wl^VOLUME 39 



APRIL 15, 1968 



NUMBER 30 



Reorganization in Progress 



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Personnel Policy Revisions Effected 



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Significant revisions in personnel policies and proced- 
ures have been effected to date as part of the District's 
$ m reorganization of the Personnel Service Division. 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins has expressed pleas- 
ire that the Board of Education has taken the steps 
jvhich bring San Francisco in line with the most ad- 
vanced and up-to-date school personnel procedures in 
he nation. 

Total reorganization of the Personnel Service Division 
■vill result from the adoption of revisions in the Policy 
vfanual. Such reorganization has been projected to 
:over a two-year period, to be completed at the con- 
tusion of the 1968-1969 school year. 

New Board Policies 

Under the new Board policies, all certificated and 
Jassified personnel matters are now fully consolidated 
ind vested in the Personnel Service Division. This cen- 



/icrory Ceremonies 



woodrow Wilson Hails Champions 




Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins (left) presents the Tournament 
»f Champions trophy to Coach Frank Ingersoll of Woodrow Wil- 
son High School in special ceremonies held recently on the 
school's athletic field. The Wilson varsity basketball team won 
the Northern California Championship, and the school's student 
body won the prized rooting section trophy. Mayor Joseph L. 
Alioto was present to congratulate the team and students on 
their fine showing at the Tournament. 



tralization and modernization of personnel services and 
functions will result in increased efficiency and greater 
personalization in the identification of specific personnel 
needs. 

The division now has the same status as other major 
divisions in the District (such as the elementary, junior 
high, senior high, adult and vocational, buildings and 
grounds, etc.). It will now give direct service to princi- 
pals in the assignment of teachers. 

All personnel matters pertaining to certificated staff 
members (except City College) and to classified staff 
members are now the primary responsibility of Milton 
F. Reiterman, Coordinator of the Personnel Service 
Division. 
Functions Spelled Out 

As a result of the reorganization the division's func- 
tions now comprise all the activities essential in applying 
State laws, District policies, and administrative regula- 
tions bearing upon the recruitment, eligibility, selection, 
assignment, ranking, efficiency in service, promotion, 
transfer, tenure, resignation, dismissal, and retirement 
of all certificated employees in the District — to the end 
that the increasingly complex needs of the school system 
will be best served through a centralized personnel unit. 

Specific personnel revisions recommended by the Su- 
perintendent and approved by the Board include the 
following: 

Teacher Grievance Procedure — Changes in the 
Grievance Procedure include the following: 1.) copies of 
all correspondence relating to grievances will be for- 
warded to the Personnel Service Division; 2.) the Per- 
sonnel Service Division will be responsible for the ad- 
ministration of the Grievance Procedure; 3.) teachers 
have a right to be accompanied by a conferee at all 
levels. 

Declaration of Need — Assignment, Major and Minor 
— Teachers with general secondary credentials may be 
assigned to teach only in the field of their major or 
minor unless the teacher agrees to the assignment or the 
principal files a Declaration of Need which is approved 
by the Superinendent or his designee. A special form has 
been developed for reporting these exceptions. 

Transfer and Appointment Procedures — Establishes 
that the factor of seniority be considered as one of the 
bases for determining transfers between divisions and 
that the teacher requesting the transfer should be ex- 

( Continued on Page 2) 



NEWSLETTER 



April 15, 1968 I 



. . . Policy Revisions Carried Out 

(Continued from Page 1) 
empt from the normal eligibility list procedures. Not 
more than 4 per cent may leave a division during a 
semester. 

Personnel Files for Certificated Employees — One 
personnel file for each certificated employee will be lo- 
cated in a centralized file complex in the Personnel 
Service Division and this file will be the source for any 
official action relating to certificated personnel. All spe- 
cial personnel files which may be in existence in the 
various divisions will be transferred to the Personnel 
Service Division. 

Waiver Procedure — A waiver procedure will replace 
the present contract leave. If an applicant on the eligi- 
bility list has already accepted a position in another 
school district, he will be given a waiver until the follow- 
ing March 1, and the next person on the eligibility list 
will be given a probationary appointment. This will pro- 
tect the rights of the person on the list and eliminate the 
necessity for hiring a long-term substitute. 

Probationary Appointments for Teachers on Leave — 
Probationary appointments will be made to fill vacancies 
created when, teachers are granted leaves-of-absence for 
75 per cent or more of a school year, including teachers 
who are assigned to federal/state programs and to the 
Central Office. 

Long-Term Substitutes — Long-term substitutes will 
continue to be appointed only to fill vacancies created 
by teachers on leave for one semester. 

Elimination of Paper Transfers — The Superintend- 
ent's moratorium on paper transfers, initiated November 
21, 1967, has been made permanent. 

Probationary Appointments for Long-Term Substi- 
tutes — The longtime practice in the Elementary Divi- 
sion of granting probationary appointments to successful 
long-term substitutes after five years has been extended 
to all divisions, and the time has been shortened to three 
years. 

Types of Appointment (Policy4112) — Under the direc- 
tion of the Superintendent, the Personnel Service Divi- 
sion is authorized and empowered to make appointments 
and assignments in accordance with the procedure out- 
lined in Policy 4112, Section 4. This responsibility for 
selection and assignment will apply to candidates for 
assignments in the respective divisions of the San Fran- 
cisco Unified School District. This includes: 

a) regular probationary appointments; b) long-term 
substitute appointments; c) day-to-day substitute ap- 
pointments; d) hourly assignments; e) appointments to 
special Federal/State projects; f) intern appointments, 
student teachers; g) summer school. 

When probationary selections are not made from the 
eligibility list, a process of committee appointments may 
be employed. The administrators of the Personnel Divi- 
sion are authorized to offer probationary employment 
in areas where no lists exist, subject to approval by the 
Superintendent and the Board of Education. Exceptions 
would be instances as outlined in Item 5, 6, and 7, in 
Policy 4112 of the Policy Manual. 



The Personnel Coordinator is authorized to establish'!) 
appointment committees locally and on recruitmeml 1 I 
trips. In both instances the committee is empowered tc if 
offer employment to candidates through the Personnel || 
Coordinator, subject to approval of the Superintendent 
and the .Board of Education. 

Children's Centers Teachers — It is recognized thai 
teachers in the Children's Centers are an integral pan 
of the School District and that their selection and em 
ployment is a function of the Personnel Service Division 
All personnel procedures of the District are applicabli 
to Children's Centers employees. 

In addition to the revisions described above, the Per 
sonnel Service Division embarked upon an extensivi 
teacher recruitment program on local, state-wide, an< 
national levels. Three recruiting trips have been com 
pleted, marking the first time the District has activel; 
engaged in teacher recruitment as part of an organizec 
effort to encourage and seek the highest quality teache 
applicants locally throughout the nation. 

In order to implement the first phase of a more inj 

tensive approach to teacher recruitment and to expam 

all personnel services, a number of key personnel havj 

served the Personnel Service Division staff during th 

1 
current school year. They include George Boisson, Perl 

sonnel Supervisor of Certificated Recruitment and Selecl 

tion; Mrs. Mary Bryd, senior high school recruitment 

and selection; Mrs. Elfrida Noland, elementary schoc 

recruitment and selection; and Dr. E. Kemp Fredericl 

operational and research aspects of the division. 

Goals to be Filled 

Though a great deal has been accomplished in les 

than a year's time, Mr. Reiterman has stated that ther 

is still much to do in implementing the policy and pre 

cedural changes and in reorganizing and consolidatin 

many of the existing and proposed services. The Pei 

sonnel Service Division will seek to improve service t 

retiring teachers, expand facilities to make possible th 

handling of the increased load, and will strive for th 

eventual introduction of data processing to increase tr 

efficiency of all personnel operations. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



If I 

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SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 39, No. 30 April 15, 1968 

135 Van Ne^s Avenue. San Francisco. Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



I en 



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April 15, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Personnel Division Releases 
{Credential Renewal Information 

Letters are being mailed soon to all certificated per- 
sonnel whose credential (or credentials) expire in June 
■™jof 1968, according to Mr. Milton F. Reiterman, Co- 
' '■ : ordinator of Personnel. 

If a teacher's present service is authorized by the cre- 
'■'dential, he must make immediate application for its re- 
1 Inewal or his salary must be withheld effective June 30, 
'1968. 
"I The California Education Code requires that a valid 
1 Reaching credential authorizing the type of service per- 
- iformed be on record in the personnel office at all times. 
: '(This applies to all teachers on a leave of any type). 
Renewal Date 

1 A credential may be renewed at any time after Janu- 

"■' |ary 1 of the year in which it is to expire, provided all 

, renewal requirements are completed, evidence of such 

] [completion is submitted, and the application for renewal 

is filed before midnight of the expiration date of the 

'(credential to be renewed. (It now takes from 10 to 12 

'• [weeks to receive the renewal credential after application 

," due to back-log in Sacramento). 

The credential must be renewed on or before June 30, 
1968 to avoid loss of salary. 
How to Renew 

The following documents must be submitted in con- 
mection with an application for credential renewal: 

kl. Credential application Form 41-4 (One applica- 
on for each credential being renewed). 
| 2. $15.00 fee in form of money order or check, for 
1 each credential. 

3. Official verification of completion of requirements, 
if any, listed in the credential. 
Loss of Position 

The letters referred to in paragraph one of this article 
notify the teacher that his employment "under this cre- 
dential" is not authorized after June 30, 1968. 

This means that if the credential is allowed to expire 
and is the one under which the teacher is presently 
_- working, he cannot be legally employed after that date, 
^ny credential now held, but allowed to lapse, will be 
ost and can only be renewed under the new regulations 
Dresently in effect. 



Discusses Dental Field 



,. Policy Revisions Carried Out 

(Continued from Page 2) 
Other goals will include increased classified service, 
mprovement in staff relations, career counseling, and 
he establishment of internship programs. Many of these 
ispects of good personnel procedures will be realized 
vhen the necessary staff and space have been provided. 
The Superintendent has already included the budget 
ecommendations to realize these goals in the 1968-69 
chool year. As staffing for new positions opens up, an- 
nouncements will be made in the Newsletter. The final 
eorganization which will take place on July 1, 1968, has 
leen approved by the Board of Education. 



Pelton Students Hear Dr. Goosby 




Dr. Zurerri L. Goosby (right), Board of Education Commissioner, 
was a guest speaker at Pelton Junior High School recently, where 
he addressed the members of the school's academically talented 
classes. Dr. Goosby, a graduate of the University of California 
Dental School, discussed the field of dentistry with the students. 
Pictured (left to right) are James F. Kearney, Acting Principal; 
students Iraida Segovia and Annette Stephens; and Dr. Goosby. 



B. Franklin Wins Photo Honors 

In competition with schools of Northern California, 
Benjamin Franklin Junior High School took top honors 
in the Regional Scholastic Magazine Contest sponsored 
by Eastman Kodak. Some 41 entries were selected for the 
New York finals where they will compete in the national 
contest. 

In the past three years the Benjamin Franklin Photog- 
raphy Club has been first in the state in the junior high 
division for the number of awards won. Students receiv- 
ing finalist honors include Leamon Lovelace, Peter Ho- 
mann, Alden Horn, Donnie Yates, Glenn Sugiyama, 
Harold Pfohl, and Lindsay Homann (the latter two now 
at George Washington High School) . 

Gerald Buckley, sponsor of the club, states that the 
members spend many hours after school and on weekends 
with their projects. Any cash awards they have won go to 
purchase materials and to finance field trips. 



ADDITIONAL SUPERINTENDENT'S 
BULLETINS 

The following Superinendent's Bulletins have 
been issued to certificated staff members in addition 
to those listed in the latest (April 1, 1968) News- 
letter: 

Superintendent's Bulletin #21 dated March 25, 
1968 — To: All Certificated Staff — Subject: 
Children's Centers Teachers — Effective date: 
March 25, 1968. 

Superintendent's Bulletin #22 dated March 25, 
1968 — To: All Secondary School Principals — 
Subject: Secondary School Library Clerk — Effec- 
tive date: April 15, 1968. 



NEWSLETTER 



April 15, 1968 



Civic Auditorium Program 

ROTC Review Due April 26 

The 1968 San Francisco High Schools ROTC 
Brigade Review and Drill Competition will be held 
at the Civic Auditorium, Grove and Polk Streets, 
commencing at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 26. 

The San Francisco ROTC Brigade organized 
into eight battalions and totaling over 1,100 cadets 
will participate in a military review, individual 
platoon, and drill competition. 

Performing also will be two of the top high 
school girls' drill teams from Polytechnic and Mis- 
sion High Schools plus the 91st Division Military 
Band. 

The event is one of the major highlights of the 
cadet year. A cordial invitation to attend is ex- 
tended to all. 



School Opera Dates Announced 

The Western Opera Theater's series of one-hour per- 
formances in District schools will continue Monday, 
April 15 at James Denman Junior High School with 
performances of the Barber of Seville at 10:30 a.m. and 
2 p.m. 

Following each presentation, the artists, conductor, and 
producer will discuss various techniques of opera as an 
art form with selected students from music, art, drama, 
foreign language, and English classes. (See story in the 
Newsletter of February 12, 1968, for additional details.) 

The schedule for the remainder of the spring term is as 
follows : 

Monday, April 15, at James Denman Junior High 
School, 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Barber of Seville. Law- 
rence Webber, Principal. 

Tuesday, April 16, at Benjamin Franklin Junior High 
School, 2 p.m. Barber of Seville. Robert R. Marcus, 
Principal. 

Wednesday, April 17, at A. P. Giannini Junior High 
School, 10:30 a.m. and 1 : 15 p.m. Barber of Seville. Mrs. 
Rose Makower, Acting Principal. 

Thursday, April 18, performances at A. P. Giannini 
at 10 a.m. and 1:15 p.m. for the following elementary 
schools: Mark Twain School, 5th and 6th grades, Mrs. 
Helen Whigam, Principal; Robert L. Stevenson School. 
5th and 6th grades. Tennessee Kent, Principal; Francis 
Scott Key School, 4th, 5th, and 6th grades, Mary Ana- 
stole, Acting Principal. Barber of Seville. 

Friday, April 19, at James Lick Junior High School. 
9:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. Barber of Seville. William Galant. 
Principal. 

Tuesday, April 30, at Presidio Junior High School, 10 
a.m. and 1:30 p.m. La Boheme. Dr. Julian Rcinhertz. 
Principal. 

Monday, May 6, at Galileo High School. 10 a.m. La 
Boheme. Walter Odone, Acting Principal. 



Retiring Teachers Should Take 
Appropriate Personnel Action 

Those District teachers who anticipate retirement at 
the close of the school year 1967-68 should initiate ac- 
tion in the near future in order that retirement payment 
may not be delayed unnecessarily, according to Mr. 
Milton Reiterman, Personnel Coordinator. It is sug- 
gested that teachers seeking to initiate retirement pro- 
ceedings, should, if possible, submit a letter to such effect 
by April 30, 1968. 

In encouraging such action, Superintendent of Schools 
Robert E. Jenkins has shown concern that teachers make 
proper retirement provisions to serve their own personal 
welfare. 
Suggested Procedures 

Suggestions outlined for teachers in handling retire 
ment problems are as follows: 

( 1 ) Submit a letter to the Coordinator of Personnel 
indicating your intention to retire, and the proposed 
date of retirement. 

(2) Write to the State Teachers' Retirement System 
1416 - 9th Street, Sacramento, California, notifying thai k 
office of your intention to retire and requesting thi 
necessary forms. 

(3) Notify the City Employees' Retirem;nt System 
450 McAllister Street, of your intention to retire. 

(4) Request both the state and city retirement sys 
terns for assistance in determining which retirement pro 
gram will be most advantageous in your circumstances. 

(5) If you determine that the State Retirement Sys 
tern will provide greater benefits in your case, yoi 
should submit a letter to the Personnel Coordinator 
before June 1, 1968, resigning from the School District 
This is necessary in order that you may withdraw you 
funds from the local retirement system for deposit in th 
State Retirement System. 

(6) Submit the required forms early in order to expe 
dite action in each retirement system. 
Time Factor 

Because processing of applications takes some time, i; 
is important that they be submitted sufficiently in ad 
vance to enable a proper consideration time, and to bfr 
sure the first retirement check is received on time. 



• 



• PARENT EDUCATION WORKSHOP 

The California Congress of Parents and Teachers _ 
sponsoring a parent education workshop in leadcrshi II 
training to be held at California Western University. Sa 
Diego, from July 17 through 27, 1968. The theme of t 
workshop is "Developing Leadership for Our Times 
and it is planned primarily for PTA leaders, parent edt KH 
cation teachers and lay leaders, and administrators n 
sponsible for Parent Education Programs. 

Full and partial scholarships arc being offered to qua 
ified applicants. Applicant's endorsement by the Distrii j( 
president is required. Necessary forms may be secur 
from the Second District office, 170 Fell Street. Rooi 
32-A. Applications must be returned by May 24. 



April 15, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



New Volumes Added 



John Muir PTA Gives Books 




' Principal Robert Anderson has announced that the John Muir 
School library has received some $300 worth of books purchased 
as a gift to the school from the Parent-Teacher Association. At 
a recent meeting of the organization, PTA members distributed 
the new volumes. Pictured (left to right) are Mrs. Rosetta Cooper, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Stafford (Vice-President), Mrs. Eunice Morrison 
(Financial Secretary), and Mrs. Joyce Bell. John Muir students 
looking at the collection include James Callier, Gerrold Woods, 
Gene Williams, Michael Hunter, and Garner Broxton. 



Rapid Transit Offers Materials 

The Bay Area Rapid Transit District has available to 
, teachers a variety of materials explaining the plans, con- 
struction, and operation of its rapid transit project. 
, In addition to some excellent printed materials on the 
project, the operation of the trains, and various unique 
engineering feats, the BART office is able to furnish (on 
[ a limited basis) speakers and slide presentations applic- 
iable to school assemblies or large combined class meetings 
:n the secondary schools. 

The office can also provide speakers for specialized 
itudy groups, such as in the field of business administra- 
tion and in engineering and science. 

BART also offers various 16mm motion pictures which 

I nay be classified as construction progress reports. These 

ilms are available through Association Films, Inc., 25358 

Cypress Avenue, Hayward, California. The materials are 

ree, the school only having to pay the return postage. 

Staff members interested in BART materials and serv- 
ices in the instructional field should contact Mr. Napo- 
eon Britt, Community Relations Officer, Bay Area Rapid 
Transit District, 814 Mission Street, San Francisco 94103. 



» CAHPER SPRING BARBECUE 

The California Association of Health, Physical Educa- 
ion, and Recreation will hold its annual barbecue at the 
jake Merced Sports Center on Thursday, May 9, start- 
ng at 6:30 p.m. Cost is $2.50 and a social hour will pre- 
ede the dinner. Checks should be made payable to 
Jretchen Yost, 2341 Union Street, Apt. #2, San Fran- 
isco 94123. Reservation deadline is April 29. 



Elementary Schools Song Fest 
Heralds Public Schools Week 

The Elementary Schools Song Fest by the San Fran- 
cisco Public Schools will be presented in observance of 
the 49th annual Public Schools Week, April 22 to April 
26, 1968, and will be held in the City Hall Rotunda on 
Monday, April 22, from 12 noon to 1 p.m. The master 
of ceremonies will be Dr. Albert A. Renna, Director of 
Music. 

The George Washington High School R.O.T.C. will 
open the program with the presentation of the colors 
which will be followed by the Pledge of Allegiance and 
The Star Spangled Banner sung by the combined chor- 
uses and audience. 

Greetings to the audience will be given by Mayor 
Joseph L. Alioto and Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintend- 
ent of Schools. 

The Clarendon School Chorus will sing five numbers 
directed by Eileen Atkisson. Bob Martens is the instru- 
mental instructor and will be the program accompanist. 
Mrs. Harriett Wollesen is the principal of Clarendon 
Elementary School and Bertha Widmer is the Music 
Supervisor. 

The Diamond Heights School Chorus will sing several 
selections including medleys of folk songs and service 
songs. August Padula is the director and George Salner 
is the instrumental instructor. Myrna Graves is the prin- 
cipal of Diamond Heights Elementary School and Lor- 
raine Walsh is the Music Supervisor. 

The combined choruses will sing America the Beautiful 
directed by Dr. Renna. 

Concluding remarks will be made by Elroy D. Joyce, 
Chairman of the Citizens Committee, San Francisco 
Public Schools Week. David Monasch, III is serving as 
the 1968 coordinator. 



• GEORGE WASHINGTON PROGRAM 

George Washington High School recently held a day- 
long program entitled "Breakthrough" in which the stu- 
dents turned their attention to a consideration of barriers 
to interracial understanding. 

The special school day started at 8:30 a.m. and con- 
cluded at 4:30 p.m. Under the guidance of Assistant 
Principal Allen Torlakson the students organized the 
event, working with faculty members. 

Two large group meetings and some 100 small group 
meetings took place during the day. Special guest speak- 
ers included Reverend Larry Jack Wong of the Economic 
Opportunity Council; Eugene McCreary, University of 
California professor; Reverend Cecil Williams, director 
of the Glide Foundation; and Assemblyman Willie L. 
Brown, Jr. Bishop C. Kilmer Myers also attended the 
event. 

Principal Ruth Adams stated that the goal of the spe- 
ial school day was to try and meet some of today's prob- 
lems with a concentrated social studies curriculum for 
everyone. A follow-up committee is presently engaged in 
evaluating the program. 



NEWSLETTER 



April 15, 1968 



Adult Education to Conduct 
Classes at Treasure Island 

Two adult education teachers will soon be teaching 
classes to men serving hard labor sentences in the U. S. 
Naval Brig at Treasure Island as part of a new program 
designed to help the men earn high school diplomas, 
according to Dr. Edward D. Goldman, Assistant Super- 
intendent, Adult and Vocational Education. 

Some 15 brig inmates are currently taking part in a 
six-week course in U. S. history and civics being taught 
by a Treasure Island instructor. When this class is com- 
pleted, two District teachers will be assigned to teach at 
the base, expanding course offerings to include mathe- 
matics and science as well as history and civics. 

Courses will be geared to help students pass the Gen- 
eral Educational Development Test, thereby qualifying 
them to receive a high school diploma issued by the 
District. 

The brig school is funded under Public Law 89-750, 
which makes it possible for individuals in low income 
categories to study for high school diplomas. 

Lt. T. L. Brown, brig officer, is responsible for imple- 
menting the Treasure Island program. A two-year study 
he conducted showed that brig inmates had an average 
school level of nine years. 



EXCHANGE TEACHER POSITION 

The Personnel Service Division has word that a 
teacher of the mentally retarded in the Tucson 
Public Schools, Tucson, Arizona, is interested in an 
exchange position with a teacher in the SFUSD for 
the 1968-69 school year. The exchange teacher for 
the Tucson schools would not necessarily have to be 
in the field of special education. Interested teachers 
should contact the Personnel Office for further in- 
formation. 



FINAL 1968 ACADEMIC ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION SCORING LEADERS 





Varsity 








Player 


School 


F.G. 


F.T. 


Pts. 


Jerry Oldham 


Mission 


64 


36 


164 


Ansley Truitt 


Wiidrow Wilson 


58 


42 


158 


Peter Timoney 


Sacred Heart 


43 


42 


128 


Thomas Kurpinsky 


Polytechnic 


49 


24 


122 


Mike Murphy 


Sacred Heart 


50 


18 


118 


Larry Clark 


Lowell 


41 


36 


118 


Kenneth Harrison 


Balboa 


47 


17 


111 


Joe Smith 


Polytechnic 


48 


14 


110 


Michael Stewart 


Polytechnic 


36 


27 


99 


Larry Haren 


Woodrow Wilson 

130's 


36 


25 


97 


Player 


School 


F.G. 


F.T. 


Pts. 


Larry Dere 


Abraham Lincoln 


60 


47 


167 


Don Campos 


George Washington 


51 


40 


142 


James Brooks 


George Washington 


62 


10 


134 


Hyrum Nawahine 


Lowell 


54 


23 


131 


Joe Lopes 


Woodrow Wilson 


51 


26 


128 


Tony Ramos 


Lowell 


46 


?,0 


122 


Willie Pearson 


Polytechnic 


53 


13 


119 


Dave Pasero 


Sacred Heart 


44 


29 


117 


Robert Wright 


Galileo 


48 


20 


116 


Richard Catelli 


Sacred Heart 


37 


35 


109 



Social Security Amendments 

Benefits for Disabled Changed 

"More young disabled workers will now be able to 
receive monthly benefits than ever before," according to 
Social Security District Manager J. Leland Embrey. The 
1967 Amendments to the Social Security Act provide 
that persons who became unable to work before age 31 
may be eligible for benefits after working as few as 1 J/2 
years in some cases. 

The new law states that if a worker becomes disabled 
between ages 24 and 31, he will need work credits for 
only half the time between age 21 and the time he be- 
came unable to work. If he is disabled before age 24, he 
will need only 1 J/> years of work credits out of the 3 year 
period ending when the disability began. 

All persons who feel that they may qualify under these 
new provisions are urged to contact the nearest Social 
Security Office now for more details. Benefits under the 
new law may be paid for February, 1968, so its is im 
portant for eligible persons to file their applications as 
soon as they become disabled. The Social Security offices 
in San Francisco are located at 303 Golden Gate Avenue 
and 761 South Van Ness Avenue. 



O AMERICAN LEGION AWARDS 

Recipients of the American Legion's District Seven 
School Awards for the fall 1967 semester in the junior 
high division have been announced. They include the 
following: 

Howard Spindel and Joanne White (A. P. Giannini) 
Lawrence Faulks and Jocelyn Lau (Aptos), Michae 
Gash and Angela Cheer (Benjamin Franklin), Sear 
McBride and Gail Horn (Everett), William Yim anc 
Roxanne Chang (Francisco), Jeffrey Bortin and Lind; 
Lord (Herbert Hoover), David Podesta, Patricia Ranca 
tore, and Sandra Pearson (Horace Mann), Garry Lev 
and Karen Weissman (James Denman) , Daniel Lewiji 
and Joanne Tiner (Luther Burbank), Ford Zimmermail 
and Susan Zalaske (James Lick) , Kathleen Kennedy anc) 
Barbara Sugaya (Marina), William Davis and Pamela 
Watson (Pelton), Jackson Chun, Wilbur Wong, ana 
Noreen Tonegato (Portola), George Korsh and Sydnej 
Cannon (Roosevelt). 

Hope Kennedy, chairman of the Legion's school awan 
program, stated that these outstanding students werj 
selected by their respective faculties for possessing tl 
qualities of leadership, honor, courage, scholarship, ci 
zenship, and unselfish service to their schools. 



bile 
Fail 

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• SYLVESTER L. KELLY TESTIMONIAL DINNEl 

The faculty of Roosevelt Junior High School 
nounces a testimonial dinner honoring Principal SylvestS 
L. Kelly on his retirement on Friday evening, May 2l 
1968, at the Miyako Hotel, Post and Laguna Streets, 
social hour will begin at 7 p.m. with dinner at 8 p.m. Tr 
price of the dinner is $7.50, all inclusive. 

Checks should be made out to the Roosevelt Faculj 
Fund and forwarded by Friday, May 17 to Willia 
Coolidge, Roosevelt Junior High School, 460 Argue!! 
Blvd. 94118. 



L( 

I "Co, 

lap, 

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Kv, 



April 15, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Civil Service Waiver Procedure Changed 



To: Permanent Civil Service Employees 
From: Milton Reiterman, Personnel Coordinator 
Re: WAIVERS 

On February 26, 1968, the Civil Service Commission 
adopted amendments to Civil Service Rules 21 and 22, 
thereby changing the waiver procedure. It is hoped that 
j the following paragraphs will eliminate some of the 
present confusion surrounding the waiver question. 
Automatic Waiver 

Failure to respond to a notice of inquiry or of prob- 
able appointment relating to a temporary or a perma- 
nent position automatically places an eligible under 
waiver. The response may be in person, or by letter, 
telephone or messenger, but must be made within three 
.working days. 
Waiver of Certification 

All waivers other than the automatic waiver men- 
tioned above must be in writing and must state whether 
,the position being waived is temporary or permanent. 
'.Waiver of a permanent position also places the eligible 
:under waiver for a temporary position in the same class. 
.However, waiving a temporary position does not place 
la person under waiver for a permanent position. 

Only one waiver of a permanent position will be 
granted on either an entrance or a promotive list. 

Failure to accept the second offer of employment re- 
moves the elegible's name from the list. 

No waivers will be granted if the examination an- 
nouncement provided for recruitment on a continuous 
basis. 

j If an eligible is on more than one list for the same 
. classification, a waiver of appointment applies to all lists. 

A person on a current promotive list who has already 
I .waived a permanent position prior to February 26, 1968 
will be given one more opportunity to waive before his 
pame is removed from the eligible list. 
. Exempt Waiver Positions 

A position may be classified as "exempt waiver." A 

• ESEA INFORMATION EXCHANGE 

A. Donald Cross, District Coordinating ESEA Speech 

i ind Hearing Specialist, addressed a group of San Mateo 

Oounty speech and hearing clinicians in San Mateo re- 

I gently. Mr. Cross spoke on the subject "Social Dialects 

; Ghetto Language) : Implications for Language Evalu- 

ition and Therapy." The address was given as part of an 

xchange of information among school districts partici- 

l)l bating in ESEA programs. 



F»» 



> BILL OF RIGHTS TEACHERS CONTEST 

j The Constitutional Rights Foundation announces its 
nnual awards of $1,200 for the best descriptions of suc- 
cessful experiences in teaching the principles of the Bill 
f Rights, grades K through 12. Cash prizes of $300, $200, 
'nd $100 will be awarded. Interested teachers may secure 
'dditional information by writing the Constitutional 
■.ights Foundation, 609 South Grand Avenue, Los An- 
gles 90017. 



person may waive appointment to a position so classified 
and still be permitted another waiver. 

Departmental Waiver 

A person, after receiving written notice of eligibility 
on either an entrance or promotive list, may place a 
permanent waiver against a certain department or de- 
partments. This means that the individual will not be 
called for employment in these departments until he has 
passed another examination for the same class. 

The departmental waiver must be filed in writing 
before the adoption date of the list. 

Eligibles on lists adopted prior to February 26, 1968, 
are allowed one more opportunity to file a departmental 
waiver. 
Withdrawal of Waiver 

Withdrawal of waiver of permanent employment and 
of temporary employment must be requested separately 
and must be in writing. 

Only one withdrawal of waiver for either entrance or 
promotive positions is permitted. 

The withdrawal of waiver goes into effect on the day 
it is filed. However, when a list of eligibles is exhausted 
and vacancies exist, automatic withdrawal of waiver 
goes into effect immediately. 
Further Information 

The Certification Division of the Civil Service Com- 
mission, Room 151, City Hall, is the department to con- 
tact concerning the placement or withdrawal of waiver. 



Something for Everyone 

Poly Variety Show Scheduled 




Simulated fog rolling across special lighting effects will be just 
one of the highlights of the Spring Variety Show scheduled for 
April 19 and 20 at Polytechnic High School. Faculty sponsor 
Robert Over (left) and student directors Greg Burrell and Brenda 
Wade have organized an evening of comedy skits, exotic danc- 
ing, and vocal and instrumental music. The event is scheduled 
to start at 8 p.m. in the school auditorium. Tickets will be sold 
at the door, $1 for adults and 75 cents for students. An evening 
of "sophisticated and polished entertainment" is promised for all. 



i 



NEWSLETTER 



April 15, 1968 ' 



Announcements 



• DINNER TO HONOR DR. JOSEPH B. HILL 

Friends and colleagues of Dr. Joseph B. Hill, Curricu- 
lum Coordinator, will meet to honor him and Mrs. Hill 
on the occasion of his retirement from the District at a 
dinner to be held at the Olympic Country Club, Lake- 
side, at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, June 5, 1 968. 

Interested individuals are urged to reserve this date 
and make the necessary reservations for themselves and 
their guests. Dinner tickets may be obtained by sending 
checks for $12 (inclusive) to Marjorie Maher, Office of 
Research, 135 Van Ness Avenue, or to James Hamrork, 
Principal, Luther Burbank Junior High School, 325 La 
Grande Avenue, not later than May 24. A social hour 
will precede the dinners at 6 p.m. 

» CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancies : 
2724 — School Custodian, Male — Ulloa Elementary 

School, A. P. Giannini Junior High, and Lowell High 

School (nights). 



• SPEECH TOURNAMENT AT G. WASHINGTON 

George Washington High School's Masque and Gavel 
speech organization will host a local invitational speech 
tournament for San Francisco public and parochial 
schools on Saturday, April 20. Information regarding 
the tournament may be secured from Sanford Chandler, 
Washington speech adviser. 

Mr. Chandler has been elected to the position of vice- 
president of the Golden Gate Speech Association for 
1968-69. The organization has 45 Bay Area member 
schools. 



• ARCOSS MEETING ON APRIL 20 

The Association for Retirement Credit for Out-of- 
state Service announces a meeting to be held Saturday, 
April 20, from 10 a.m. to 12 noon at the CTA State 
Building, Rooms A and B, 1705 Murchison Drive, Bur- 
lingame. The subject of the meeting is "Facts About 
Your Retirement." 

The latest legislative and action programs for teachers 
with out-of-state teaching experience will be discussed. 
The meeting should be of particular interest to San 
Francisco teachers now that all San Francisco teaching 
experience can be transferred from the city to the state 
at retirement. 



• GUIDANCE SERVICE CENTERS POSITIONS 

Interviews will be scheduled during the last week of 
April for teaching positions for 1968-69 in the Guidance 
Service Centers of the Special Educational Services Di- 
vision. A Pupil Personnel Credential is not a necessary 
requisite for this teaching position. Persons who are in- 
terested in working in this special area are encouraged 
to apply. Please contact Mrs. Mary W. Byrd, Personnel 
Supervisor, in Room 119 by calling 863-4680, Extension 
380 or 381, in order to make an appointment for an 
interview. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, April 16, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• COACHES PLAN ANNUAL EVENT 

The San Francisco Association Athletic Coaches and 
Physical Education Teachers will hold its annual dance 
Saturday, May 18, at Sam's of Tiburon. The group will 
leave from Pier 43 to the Tiburon location. Accommo- 
dations are limited to 60 couples. Cost is $16.50 per 
couple. Reservations may be made through Chairman 
Don Daniels of Abraham Lincoln High School. 



• TASF TO MEET APRIL 15 

The Teachers Association of San Francisco will meet! 
at 4 p.m. on Monday, April 15, at A. P. Giannini Junior 
High School, 39th Avenue and Ortega Street. 



• SFCTA REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL TO MEET 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Associatior 
Representative Council will meet on Monday, April 15 
at 4 p.m. at George Washington High School in the 
cafeteria. 



• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE MEETING 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet at 1 : 3( 
p.m. on Wednesday, April 17, in Room 10, Centra 
Office, 170 Fell Street. 



• COACHES EXECUTIVE MEETING 

The San Francisco Association Athletic Coaches an< 
Physical Education Teachers Executive Board will mee 
on Monday, April 15, at the home of President Erv Deli 
man, 37 Tourquoise Way, at 7:30 p.m. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PERMIT No. 3961 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL iH 
.135. .VAN NESS AVE. 

F. PUBLIC LlBKAR? EfU ^™| 
LARKIN fc MC ALL! .'• ■ 
SAM FRAMCISC0, CAL1S 



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9 1102 



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: S£N FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



APR 22 1969 




/OLUME 39 



APRIL 22, 1968 



NUMBER 31 



POO New Teachers 



Class Size Reduction Proposal Approved 



Last Tuesday evening, April 16, 1968, Superintendent 
lobert E. Jenkins presented a massive class size proposal 
.'hich will add 900 teachers to reduce class size in the 
)istrict's elementary, junior high, and senior high schools. 
°he proposal was unanimously approved by the Board 
| if Education. 
,Jp I The proposal was based upon a combination of the 
Jegotiating Council and San Francisco Federation of 
"eachers recommendations. The class size reductions will 
e based on establishing maximum class sizes and maxi- 
1 aum teacher-student contact periods per week by grade 
level. 
u,i j Dr. Jenkins' recommendation provides that 900 class- 
pom teachers be added to reduce class size, to individu- 
lize instruction, and to provide planning periods for 
eachers so that the quality of education and innovative 
istructional planning can be strengthened at all levels. 
The increased staffing, j will be implemented by in- 
reasing the number of classroom teachers by 300 each 
ear over a three-year period starting in the 1968-69 
> a chool year. 
d: The salary cost for 300 teachers each year would be 



$2,400,000; the total for 900 teachers at the end of three 
years would be $7,200,000. 

The program will be carried out in accordance with 
the statement of Guiding Principles for Reducing Class 
Size, dated April 16, 1968, which follows -in detail so that 
each administrator and teacher may see the entire pro- 
posal as presented to the Board of Education. 

Guiding Principles for Reducing Class Size 

After consideration of agreements signed with the 
Negotiating Council and with the San Francisco Federa- 
tion of Teachers, and based upon early estimates of K-12 
teacher needs, it is anticipated that approximately 900 
teachers will be required to implement a program of re- 
ducing class size and providing for planning periods for 
all such teachers. With this in mind, and because of the 
limitations placed on the School District due to fiscal, 
recruitment and programming concerns, the Superin- 
tendent recommended that this program be imple- 
mented over a three year period, or 300 additional teach- 
ers each year starting in 1968-69. 

The following guiding principles have been developed 
(Continued on Page 2) 



49th Annual Public Schools Week Observance Commences Today 



The 49th Annual Public Schools Week opens today, 
April 22, 1968, with the Elementary Schools Song Fest 
from 12 noon to 1 p.m. in the City Hall Rotunda. Par- 
ticipating in the program will be the George Washington 
High School R.O.T.C. Color Guard, the Diamond 
Heights School Chorus, the Clarendon School Chorus, 
and the combined choruses. The program is under the 
direction of Dr. Albert A. Renna, Director of Music. 

Greetings will be extended to the audience by Mayor 
Joseph L. Alioto and Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superin- 
tendent of Schools. The public is cordially invited to 
attend this ceremony. 

The State-wide theme of Public Schools Week this 
year is The Public School — Cornerstone of Liberty. 
Elroy D. Joyce, owner of the Joyce Sheet Metal Works, 
is serving this year as the 1968 Citizens Committee Chair- 
man. 

At the District level, Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor of 
Educational Information, and David Monasch, III, Act- 
ing Assistant Principal of the Anza Elementary School, 
are making plans to show several hundred businessmen 
and members of the Citizens Committee many of the 
(Continued on Page 3) 




ayor Joseph L. Alioto (seated) accepts his copy of the poster 
oclaiming Public Schools Week April 22-26 at ceremonies in 
hich he signed the Public Schools Week Proclamation com- 
emorating the annual event. Participating in the Mayor's offices 
pre (left to right) Eugene S. Hopp, M.D., Grand Master of 
asons for the State of California; Elroy D. Joyce, 1968 Public 
hools Week Citizens Committee Chairman; and David Mo- 
isch, III, District coordinator of Public Schools Week. Copies of 
e Mayor's Proclamation were sent to all District teachers. 

I 



.VEWSLETTEK 



April 22, 196S 



. . . Class Size Reduction Passed 

(Continued from Page 1) 
as a means of (a) reducing class size based on maximum 
class size and maximum teacher-student contact periods 
per week by grade levels and (b) providing for planning 
periods. 

1. That the School District implement the following 
class-size maximums wherever space is available. 

(a) In low-achieving schools, class size shall be no 
larger than 25 on the elementary level and 28 in general 
academic classes on the secondary level. 

(b) In all other schools, classes shall be no larger than 
32 on the elementary level and 32 on the secondary level 
in general academic classes. 

(c) The above limits may be exceeded only: 

(1) For demonstrated lack of space. This implies 
~"That adjacent non-school building- facilities 

have been fully explored for lease or pur- 
chase. 

(2) For specialized or experimentl instruction, 
which will enhance the educational pro- 
grams. 

2. That the School District will implement the fol- 
lowing student contact hours wherever space is not avail- 
able to achieve the maximum class size limits above and 
to further individualize instruction and to ultimately 
lower class size below the above limits as space permits : 

(a) Elementary: 

( 1 ) 500 student contact hours per week — Kin- 
dergarten 

(2) 600 student contact hours per week — Grades 
1 and 2 

(3) 625 student contact hours per week — Grade 
3 

(4) 750 student contact hours per week — Grades 
4, 5, and 6 

(b) Secondary: 

(1) 750 student contact hours per week for all 
academic subjects (excepting English) and 
for commercial courses in the secondary 
schools, grades 7-12. 

(2) 625 student contact hours per week for Eng- 
lish in the secondary schools, grades 9-12, 
with the understanding that this class size will 
be applicable to all English classes in grades 
7 and 8 as soon as building space permits. 

(3) 700 student contact hours per week for non- 
academic subjects (exclusive of physical edu- 
cation) in the secondary schools, grades 7-12. 

(4) 925 student contact hours per week for physi- 
cal education classes in the secondary schools, 
grades 7-12. 

(c) In low-achieving classes, the maximum student 
contact hours shall be reduced by 20%. 

(d) Where a traditional classroom situation is main- 
tained, the following maximum class sizes will result at 
the end of the three-year period from the application of 
the student contact hours formula: 

Kindergarten — 20 pupils 
Grades 1-2 — 24 pupils 



30 pupils 



Grade 3 — 25 pupils 
Grades 4-6 — 30 pupils 
High School 

Academic Subjects, except English 
English — 25 pupils 
Physical Education — 37 pupils 
Other non-academic subjects — 28 pupils 
Low-achieving classes shall be defined as follows: 
Grades K-6 50% — 12 months below grade 
Junior High 50% — 18 months below grade 
Senior High 50% — 24 months below grade 
In order to implement the recommended programs o 
reduction in class size and to provide for plannin; 
periods, there will be a 3 year "phasing-in" prograrr 
During the first year a total of 300 additional teacher 
will be employed. 

1. to reduce class size on the basis of the 1967 spac 
utilization study in general academic , classes and fo 
specialized or experimental instruction, which will en 
hance the educational program. 

2. to enable secondary school teachers to have 
planning period. 

3. to provide for teacher-specialists in elementar 
schools, which in turn will make it possible to provid 
planning periods for upper grade elementary schrx j ;| 
teachers. In implementing this part of the program, eac 
grade level will be progressively phased in. Where it 
more practical in terms of effective use of staff tim 
within a single building, planning time shall be provide 
for more than one grade level. 

In implementing the program, priority will be give 
to schools where space is available or which have sped; 
needs. Provision will be made for securing addition; 
space by 

1. partitioning large classrooms into smaller teachin 
areas whenever possible. 

2. acquisition of and/or transfer of portable buih 
ings 

3. seeking neighborhood facilities which can serve ; 
teaching stations, and finally, by 

4. initiating a request for a Bond issue 

(Continued on Page 3) 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39. No. 31 



April 22, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue. San Francisco. Calif. 94102 



Published each Mondav during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby. D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire. Supervisor, Educational Information 



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April 22, 1968 



N E W S L E T T E K 



. . . Class Size Reduction Passed ^''^°: petition 



(Continued from Page 2) 
It is understood that in the absence of space, consider- 
ation will be given to: 

1. employing teachers to serve as co-teachers, asso- 
ciate teachers, team teachers, or special teachers. 

2. introducing the zero period and/or extended day 
at the secondary level. 

3. scheduling of classes during an additional lunch 
period in secondary schools. 

4. planning of additional creative approaches to the 
problem of reducing class size or pupil-teacher contacts. 

i Implementation of Guiding Principles for Reducing 
Class Size 1968-69 

Senior High School Division 

1. Will effect a maximum class size of 32 in general 
[academic classes (English, mathematics, social science, 
modern foreign language, general science, business edu- 
cation); requires 39 teachers 

2. Will provide a planning period for all 
teachers, including Gompers and O'Connell; 

[requires 32 teachers 

Total 71 teachers 

Several scheduling techniques will be used, including: 

Addition of a zero period, beginning at approximately 
7:50 a.m., or an extended day. 

Addition of a third or overlapping lunch period. 

Flexible scheduling. 
Junior High School Division 

1. Will effect a maximum class of 32 or 160 pupil 
teacher contacts per day in general academic classes 
(English, mathematics, social science, modern foreign 
language, general science, business education); requires 

49 teachers 

2. Will provide a planning period for all 
teachers; requires 33 teachers 

Total 82 teachers 

Utilization of 408 classroom spaces unoccupied during 

the 4th and 5th lunch periods will accommodate the 

.otal teachers required. 

Elementary School Division 

1 . Will move toward the goal of establishing a maxi- 
num class size of 25 in low achieving schools and 32 in 
he other schools, based upon Stanford Achievement 
Test scores. 

Of the approximately 300 teachers needed at the ele- 
nentary level to accomplish the entire goal, this initial 
■{ equest is for 100 teachers 

; Where space is available, new class will 
le established. 

, Recognizing that space is at a premium, 
eachers will also be assigned to serve as co- 
eachers, associate-teachers, team teachers, 
>r specialist teachers. 

2. Will provide a 40 minute planning 
ieriod for each 5th/6th combination and 

ach sixth grade teacher; requires 47 teachers 

£ Total 147 teachers 



ROTC Review Slated for Friday 

m 




Top girls' drill teams from Polytechnic and Mission High Schools 
will perform at the 1968 San Francisco High Schools ROTC 
Brigade Review and Drill Competition on Friday, April 26, at 
7:30 p.m. in the Civic Auditorium. Pictured above are represent- 
atives of the Polytechnic team displaying the trophy they won at 
the St. Patrick's Day Parade (left to right) Sybil Manigo, Debbie 
Landry, Anne James, Davia Crowder, Lana Clark (team com- 
mander), Cathy Francois, and Carolyn Henderson. Team mem- 
bers not in the picture include Deborah Burroughs, Paula Moss, 
Judy O'Neal, Alice Williams, Felita Jason, and Velma Smith. 



. . . Public Schools Week Celebrated 

(Continued from Page 1) 
District schools on Thursday, April 25, 1968 during 
Education-Business Day. The visitors will be the personal 
guests of the teachers for lunch. , 

Another highlight of Public Schools Week will be the 
1968 San Francisco High School R.O.T.C. Brigade Re- 
view and Drill Competition at the Civic Auditorium, 
Friday evening, April 26 at 7 : 30 p.m. Colonel James H. 
Farren, Senior Army Instructor of the School District, 
says over 1100 cadets will participate in the program. 
The public is invited to attend. 

Student art displays will be featured in the windows 
and the Mall of Stonestown and the Downtown Empor- 
ium, and an OMI display will be on view at the Temple 
Methodist Church, 19th Avenue and Junipero Serra. The 
displays have been arranged by Herbert Simon, Art Di- 
rector, and Mrs. Alice Stone and Verla Leonard, Art 
Supervisors. 

A unique method of publicizing this week has been the 
hanging of banners, provided by the Citizens Committee, 
on the SFUSD Central Office Building and at various 
locations throughout the city. 

In preparation for Public Schools Week two press con- 
ferences have been held. In the office of Mayor Joseph L. 
Alioto the Proclamation for Public Schools Week, April 
22-26, 1968 was signed. (See picture.) Reproductions of 
the Mayor's Proclamation have been sent to all District 
teachers. Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins met the press 
to announce the various activities planned for the week. 



N EWSLETTEK 



April 22, 1968 



Announcements 



• 'EQUALITY/QUALITY' TASK FORCE 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins has announced the 
formation of a Task Force of teachers and administrators 
to consider the Superintendent's Report to the Board of 
Education, Educational Equality /Quality Report #1 . . . 
Program Alternatives, and other suggestions from the 
community pertaining to this subject. 

The Superintendent has asked Dr. William L. Cobb, 
Assistant Superintendent for Human Relations, to chair 
the Task Force. It will be the duty of the Task Force to 
study the Report, evaluate the discussions in the recent 
pine public forums, study written suggestions from the 
community, and, as a result of discussions with selected 
citizens from the community, suggest approaches to 
equality/quality in education which might be success- 
fully initiated. 

• The Task Force held its first meeting last Friday. 
-Members include the following: 

Senior High School Division: lone Mathiesen, teacher, 
Galileo; Dan Jackson, teacher, Balboa; Patrick King, 
teacher, Special Educational Services; Homoiselle Davis, 
teacher, Abraham Lincoln; and Reinaldo Pagano, as- 
sistant principal, George Washington. 

Junior High Division: Ben Fonsworth, assistant super- 
visor, Attendance Office; Carlos Cornejo, counselor, 
Horace Mann; James Keolker, teacher, Luther Burbank; 
Ruth McHugh, teacher, Aptos; and Dr. Lane De Lara, 
principal, Francisco. 

Elementary Division: Donald Johnson, acting princi- 
pal, Anza ; Mayme Chinn, resource teacher, Compensatory 
Education, Central Office; Mrs. Margie Baker, teacher, 
Patrick Henry; Peter Gonzales, teacher, Winfield Scott; 
and Lulu Carter, teacher, Sunshine. 



DATE OF PAYMENT OF TEACHERS 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins has announced 
that the School District will start paying its regular 
certificated personnel, including Children's Center 
certificated personnel, on the first of the month 
starting on May 1, 1968. Heretofore, these em- 
ployees have been paid on the fifth of the month. 

When the first occurs on Saturday, Sunday, or a 
holiday, they will be paid on the next following 
business day. 

Part-time, hourly, day-to-day substitutes, etc., 
will continue to be paid on their present schedules. 

The Superintendent recently signed agreements 
with the Negotiating Council and the San Fran- 
cisco Federation of Teachers which requested that 
teachers be paid on the first of each calendar 
month, and that this change of date become effec- 
tive as soon as technical details could be worked 
out. 

Payroll clerks in each school will be notified of 
the specific details by the Payroll Division of the 
District Fiscal Office. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, May 7, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular meet- 
ing, 170 Fell Street. 



TIME SHEET PICK-UP 

April time sheets for teachers will be picked up 
at the schools at 8:30 a.m. on May 1, 1968, for 
senior, junior, and elementary teachers. 

The adult schools will deliver their part-time 
teachers' time sheets on April 30 and their full-time 
teachers' time sheets on May 1 at 9 a.m. 

Time sheets for clerks and janitors for all schools, 
including the adult schools, for April 15 through 
April 30 will be picked up at the schools at 8:30 
a.m. on April 24, 1968. 

Sheets are to be completed and signed by the 
deadline dates above to enable delivery service to 
keep the schedule. 

The number of days in April for principals and 
assistant principals is 17; the number of days for 
teachers is 17. 



• A. P. GIANNINI RETIREMENT DINNER 

The faculty of A. P. Giannini Junior High School 
announces a dinner honoring Mrs. Peg McDonnell, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Wierdsma, and Alan Popes on their retirement 
from the District. The dinner will be held on Wednesday 
evening, May 22, 1968, at the Fort Mason Officers Club. 

The dinner will be served at 8 p.m., preceded by a 
social hour starting at 7 p.m. The cost is $7.50, including 1 
tax and gift donation. Reservations may be secured by 
contacting Colonel Sarcander at A. P. Giannini Junior 
High School, 3151 Ortega Street 94122. 

• FLORIDA EVERGLADES TO BE FEATURED 
Teachers and students may be interested in viewing aj m 

special television showing of "No Solid Ground to Stand J 
On: The Florida Everglades" to be presented on KPIX 
Channel 5, on Wednesday, April 24, from 8:30 to 9 p.m 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO, C 
PERMIT No. 3966 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL D 
135 VAN NESS AVE. 



DOCUMENTS DEPART!! 

S. F. PI 

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SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 






NEWSLETTER 



/OLUME 39 



APRIL 29, 1968 



NUMBER 32 



Expanded Services included 



1968 Summer School Program Is Approved 



; Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins' proposal for an 
rxpanded Summer School Program for 1968 was ap- 
iroved by the Board of Education at its April 16, 1968 
meeting. 

j District services for the summer will include the fol- 
jjwing areas: City College; Senior High School; Junior 
iigh School; Elementary School; Adult and John O'- 
llonnell Vocational High Schools; Sunshine, Gough, and 
jouise Lombard Schools; Hospital, Juvenile Court, and 
jpecial Classes; Pupil Services; Homebound; Develop- 
ment Centers for Handicapped Minors; Student Inter- 
iewing Service; Music Advancement Workshop — 
unior High; and Bilingual Education Program. 

The City College, Junior High School, and Elemen- 
ary School programs will run from June 24 through 
lugust 2; the Senior High School Program will com- 
mence June 19 and conclude August 9. The Adult 
chool Program will start July 1 and end August 9, and 



'hysical Fitness Award 



ames Lick Receives Recognition 




imes Lick Junior High School received an "excellent perform- 
|ice" award at the California State Physical Fitness Clinic held 

California State College at Fullerton. Over 1,500 coaches, 

lysical education teachers, and members of the public attended 

two-day conference which featured discussion on exercise 

I the medical and nutritional aspects of fitness. The presenta- 
an was made by C. Corson (center). Chief, Bureau of Health 
lucation. Physical Education, and Recreation, California State 
epartment of Education, to Pierce J. Powers (right), James Lick 
>ys' Physical Education Department Chairman, and John Grimes 
iff), James Lick Boys' Physical Education Department teacher, 
imes Lick is a California State Physical Education Demonstra- 
>n Center (Boys), and Galileo High School is a Demonstration 
snter (Girls) on the senior high school level. 



John O'Connell will begin June 17 and finish August 9. 

Schools in operation will incude the following: Senior 
High Schools — Balboa, Galileo, George Washington, 
and Lowell; Junior High Schools — Everett, Francisco, 
Herbert Hoover, Luther Burbank, Pelton, and Roose- 
velt; Elementary Schools — Alamo, Alvarado, Bryant, 
Commodore Sloat, Commodore Stockton, Lawton, Mon- 
roe, Raphael Weill, Sir Francis Drake, and Treasure 
Island. 

John Rocky, Science Department Head of Galileo 
High School, is in charge of the Summer Senior High 
School Program. He has offices in Room C of the Cen- 
tral Office and can be reached at 863-4680, Extension 
307. 

Joseph McCaffrey of Marina Junior High School is 
Supervisor-Head Teacher of the Junior High School 
Program and is working with George Moscone, Junior 
High Division. The telephone number is 863-4680, Ex- 
tensions 240-241. 

Agatha Hogan, Elementary Supervisor, is in charge 
of the Elementary Summer Program. 



I Britannica Gift to District 

Three District elementary schools and two secondary 
schools have been announced as recipients of the gift of 
a "Presidential Reference Library" donated by Encyclo- 
paedia Brittanica on the occasion of its 200th Anniver- 
sary during 1968. 

The schools include John Muir, Raphael Weill, and 
John McLaren Elementary Schools, Pelton Junior High 
School, and Woodrow Wilson High School. Encyclo- 
paedia Britannica announced the bicentennial gift pro- 
gram recently in a ceremony at the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion in Washington attended by President Lyndon B. 
Johnson. 
Office of Education Selection 

The books are being distributed to 665 elementary 
and 335 high school systems, public and private, selected 
by the U.S. Office of Education of the Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare, with the advice of a 
committee of leading educators. 

Each library contains between 57 and 62 volumes, 
depending upon the age level, with a formal imprint 
(Continued on Page 2) 



NEWSLETTER 



April 29, 1968: 



Spring Concert in Opera House 

Dr. Albert A. Renna, Director of Music, an- 
nounces that the Spring All City Concert, featuring 
the District's musically talented students, will be 
held on Sunday, May 26, at 2 p.m. in the War 
Memorial Opera House. 

This marks the first time that the semi-annual 
music program will be held in the Opera House 
and heralds the beginning of a series to be pre- 
sented in the new setting. 

The concert will feature the All City Honor 
Orchestra conducted by Jack Pereira, Lowell High 
School instructor, and the All City Honor Choir, 
conducted by John Land, James Lick Junior High 
School instructor. 

All District school personnel and parents are en- 
couraged to attend. Admission is free and tickets 
will be forwarded to secondary school music teach- 
ers and to elementary principals and music repre- 
sentatives. 



. . . Presidential Reference Library 

■ (Continued from Page 1) 
citing President Johnson's contributions to education. It 
is dedicated to "The Children of the U.S.A." Retail 
value of the 1,000 libraries is estimated at $750,000. ^ 

A letter from the U.S. Commissioner of Education, 
Harold Howe II, announcing the gift of the libraries to 
the five San Francisco public schools stated, "This 
should be an inspiration to your community to supple- 
ment these volumes and to build a reference library that 
will provide children in the area with the most necessary 
aids to further their education." 
Dr. Jenkins Responds 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins responded to the 
gift by writing to Charles E. Swanson, President, Ency- 
clopaedia Brittanica, saying, in part, "On behalf of the 
Board of Education and the staff, it is a pleasure to 
accept Brittanica's gift to the children of the San Fran- 
cisco Public Schools. As one of the great cities in the 
nation, we are determined in San Francisco to develop 
an outstanding school system with the strongest empha- 
sis on quality education and excellence. The Britannica 
gift is a fine contribution to our continuous efforts to 
strengthen our resource and reference materials." 

Included among the books are the 24-volume Encyclo- 
paedia Britannica, the 10-volume Gateway to the Great 
Books, the 24-volume Compton's Encyclopedia, G. and 
C. Merriam Company's Webster's Third New Inter- 
national Dictionary, and other works on science and 
literature. 

• WOODROW WILSON CONCERT BAND 

The Woodrow Wilson High School Concert Band, 
under the direction of John Arnaudo, officially greeted 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra at the San Fran- 
cisco International Airport on Friday as the group re- 
turned from its Japanese tour. The Wilson contingent 
played several rousing numbers as the plane landed at 
8 a.m. 



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Monitoring Sessions in Schools 

Education Conference on May 11 

KQED, Channel 9, will present day-long coverage ol 
the Conference on Public Education scheduled for Satur- 
day, May 11, from 9:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Sponsors of the event are The League of Womer 
Voters, The Coro Foundation, and the Service Commit- 
tee on Public Education. 

Three panel discussions dealing with the School anc 
Community, Quality Education, and Integration will b( 
broadcast by KQED during the morning hours. 

Schools Will Monitor 

Facilities to monitor the panels- will be set up in somi 
31 schools around the city. Following the panel presenta 
tions, the monitoring audiences will have approximate!; 
an hour and a half to prepare questions to be presentee 
to the panelists in the afternoon session. 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association 
the San Francisco Federation of Teachers, the Seconc 
District California Congress of Parents and Teachers 
and the San Francisco Association of School Administra 
tors are coordinating the organization of the vi 
groups. 

Studio Audience Reaction 

In addition to viewing groups in the school buildings 
there will be a studio audience at KQED to react to thi 
panelists. 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins has indicated tha 
the District will extend full cooperation and assistances 
for the success of the program. 

The schools where the program can be monitora 
include the following: Alvarado, Argonne, Bret Hartc 
Burnett, Cleveland, Commodore Sloat, Commodor 
Stockton, E. R. Taylor, Fairmount, Francis Scott Ke^ 
Frank McCoppin, Glen Park, Golden Gate, Hancock 
Cooper, Hawthorne, Jedediah Smith, Jefferson, Johj 
Muir, Junipero Serra, Longfellow, Madison, Marshall! j;^, 
Miraloma, Ortega, Visitacion Valley, West Portal, and)] i 
Winfield Scott. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 32 



April 29, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Husrh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



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April 29, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



NYC Projects Funded Through August 31 



Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins has announced that 
,the District Neighborhood Youth Corps project has been 
funded to include the period from March 1 through 
jlAugust 31, 1968, in a two-part program. 

The first part provides 525 in-school jobs for the 
March 1 to June 15 period, and the second part opens 
1,050 summer jobs for the June 15 to August 31 summer 
period. Most of the regular school enrollees will con- 
tinue on into the summer program. 

The cost of the project outlined above will be $608,520 
with the federal government supplying $533,400 of the 
total, and the School District making up the difference. 

Program Provides Encouragement 

The Neighborhood Youth Corps (NYC) is a work- 
f raining program which provides part-time jobs for boys 
and girls ages 14 through 21, encouraging them to com- 
plete their high school educations by providing financial 
assistance for work performed. Students enrolled in the 
Droject meet a series of criteria centered around eco- 
nomic need. 

The students work as aides in the following areas: 

uidio visual, building and hall patrol, library, neighbor- 

lood clean-up, school shop, classroom, telephone opera- 

or, food service, office, recreation, and various miscel- 

i. aneous capacities. 

I As of March 13, 1968, NYC enrollees have been em- 

)loyed in the following areas: SFUSD Central Office 

'33), junior high schools (80), senior high schools (152), 

.dult schools (26), Children's Centers (32), elementary 

chools (24), school yard playgrounds (33), city public 

in ibraries (85), UC Medical Center (4), US Department 

I 'f Labor (1), and San Francisco State College (1). 

10b Placement Expansion 
til C. Norman Glattree, NYC project head, reports that 
in I taesent plans include placing students in a variety of 
i ederal and state offices and in non-profit social agencies 
r i ii the near future. 

I, i The project operates under Title I-B of Public Law 

8-452 of the Federal Economic Opportunity Act of 

_ -964. Enrollees are paid at a rate of $1.35 per hour. 

During the regular school term enrollees 16 years and 

liver may work a maximum of 15 hours per week, while 

4 and 15 year olds may work up to eight hours per 

eek. During the summer phase of the program, en- 

* Jlees will work ten weeks at a maximum of 26 hours 

,|M sr week. 

ummer Vocational Class 

t , It is expected that all enrollees will be obligated to 
:tend a weekly vocational information class of two 

Ipurs to be given at the summer senior high schools. 
' In addition to the work experience and financial as- 
stance the enrollees receive, legal and medical services, 
.mnseling, remedial education, cultural enrichment, and 



jtt"- 



supplementary supervision opportunities are available 
to them. 

Mr. Glattree reports that a review of student drop- 
out rates for senior high school students in the District 
reveals that the drop-out rate for all senior high schools 
is 58 per cent greater than the NYC enrollee drop-out 
rate. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Michael R. Martin 



Massive State Aid Is Sought 

A master plan which would pump new life into the 
public schools of California's major cities — a plan call- 
ing for the restructuring of the educational systems by 
an infusion of massive human and financial resources — 
was unveiled last Wednesday by school superintendents 
from the five largest districts in the state. 

The five, representing both northern and southern 
sections of the state, called for emergency legislation 
which would eventually provide $703 million yearly in 
new money to the 25 largest school systems in California. 
Of this amount, $173.1 million would be allocated next 
year. 

The funds are needed, they said, to head off a crisis 
which faces education in California urban centers. The 
funds would provide programs urgently required to meet 
the needs of the nearly two million students enrolled in 
the 25 districts. 

Announcing the plan and the call for emergency ac- 
tion from the Legislature were Superintendents W. Odie 
Wright from Long Beach, Jack P. Crowther from Los 
Angeles, Stuart Phillips from Oakland, Ralph Dailard 
from San Diego and Robert E. Jenkins from San Fran- 
cisco. 

The announcement by the five superintendents was 
made in three flying press conferences starting in San 
Francisco, to take the plight of California's big city 
schools "directly to the people." 

The plan for urban area financial help actually calls 
for an additional $400 per child over what is now being 
given to each district by the state. The allocation would 
be spread over a four-year period, starting with $100 in 
1968-1969 and adding an additional $100 in each of 
the next three school years. 

The plan would cost $173.1 million the first year, 
$349.8 million the second year, $526.5 million the third 
year, and $703 million in 1971-72. 

"This we feel is the way we can save the cities in 
California from deteriorating into vast ghettos and in- 
stead remain as thriving communities in which citizens 
of all backgrounds can live and work together," said 
Dr. Jenkins. 

"We emphasize this is additional state aid, across the 
board, not categorical aid. We've got to have quality 
education in every school in each of our districts. We've 
got to keep people in our cities. We don't want them 
moving out. We have to show people we mean business 
in providing education that we hope will be comparable, 
if not superior, to that provided in the best suburbs and 
affluent areas of the state," Jenkins added. 



NEWSLETTER 



April 29, 1968 ■ 



Announcements 



• LUNCHEON TO HONOR DR. STEIG 

A luncheon to honor Dr. Lester R. Steig, Salary Co- 
ordinator, upon his retirement from the SFUSD will be 
held Tuesday, May 21, at 12 noon at Rocca's Restau- 
rant. 5^5 Golden Gate Avenue. The cost of the luncheon 
is $5, inclusive, and the choice of luncheon will include 
Italir.n pot roast or chicken. Friends and colleagues of 
Dr. Steig are asked to save the date. Reservations and 
checks should be sent to Mrs. Dorothy Burns, 135 Van 
Ness Avenue, Room 119, San Francisco 94102, not later 
than May 17. 

• WAREHOUSE VISIT WEEK 

Edgar Lahl, Supervisor of Supplies, has announced 
that May 13-17, 1968 will be "Open House" at the 
School District Warehouse. Teachers and administrators 
are invited to visit the Supplies Warehouse during this 
week. Tours will be conducted each day at 3 : 45 p.m. to 
observe the supplies handling operation. The warehouse, 
located at 1000 Selby Street, comprises an area approach- 
ing that of a. city block, and stores both supplies and 
furniture. 

Originally, this building was used as a warehouse by 
the Marine Corps during the second World War. The 
School District acquired ownership in 1961, at a very 
nominal sum, after the building was declared "surplus" 
by the Federal Government. 

• FRENCH SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 

The American Institute for Foreign Study is again 
offering a scholarship to a deserving student of French 
in the SFUSD. The scholarship will consist of free en- 
rollment, including air transportation from Oakland to 
Europe, in the June 1968 semester program at a French 
university. The scholarship is valued at $890. Full board 
and lodging, tuition, and the services of qualified chape- 
rons will be included. 

Senior high school foreign language department heads 
have submitted the names of all nominees to Fortunata 
Oliva, Curriculum Assistant, Foreign Languages, and a 
selection committee of French teachers, a representative 
of the Second District PTA, and Miss Oliva will inter- 
view the nominees and select a winner on May 15. 

Last year Joyce Ng of Galileo High School was 
awarded the scholarship to the University of Dijon in 
France. Joyce spent six weeks in France participating in 
the University's Foreign Language and Civilization 
course and sightseeing in Paris. 

Mrs. Use Sternberger, Area Secretary, is coordinating 
the program for American Institute for Foreign Study. 

• FREE FRENCH LESSONS 

Teachers and students interested in learning French 
through the use of new techniques are invited to partici- 
pate in a class conducted by Salvatore Billed, retired 
District teacher, at the Ornamental Horticulture Build- 
ing at City College on Wednesdays from 7 to 9 : 30 p.m. 
The lessons are free. For additional information call 
333-6457. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, May 7, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular meet- 
ing, 170 Fell Street. 



• GEOGRAPHY TALK SLATED MAY 2 

District teachers are invited to hear John Porterfield, 
Professor of Geography at Diablo Valley College, who 
will speak at Commodore Sloat School, 50 Darien Way, 
on Thursday, May 2, at 4 p.m. Professor Porterfield will 
present ideas that both elementary and secondary teach- 
ers will be able to use in making geography an exciting 
part of their classroom presentations. 

• DEPARTMENT HEADS' FINAL MEETING 

The final meeting of the Department Heads Associa- 
tion will be held at Woodrow Wilson High School, May 
1, at 2:45 p.m. in the teachers' cafeteria. Nomination of 
officers for next year and consideration of this year's 
salary proposal are on the agenda. 



• CERAMIC SCULPTURE, POTTERY DISPLAY 

Rita Yokoi, ceramics teachers with the Adult Educa- 
tion Division, will have a one-woman show of her potter) 
and ceramic sculpture works from April 28 to May 25 ai 
the Anneberg Gallery, 2721 Hyde Street. 



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• CUSTODIAL VACANCY 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancy: 

2724 — School Custodian, Male — Samuel Gomper ji 

(nights). J 

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iSAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBHASV 



NEWSLETTER 



A'OLUME 39 



MAY 6, 1968 



NUMBER 33 



Advisory Committee Is Formed District Winners Announced 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins has announced the 

formation of a Citizens Advisory Committee to consider 

'the Superintendent's report to the Board of Education on 

'Educational Equality/ Quality, Report # 1 . . . Program 

Alternatives and other suggestions from the community 
' that relate to the problem of providing integrated educa- 
tional opportunities of the highest quality in the San 

Francisco schools. 

The Citizens Advisory Committee, reflecting a cross 

section of community viewpoints, can be of significant 
K help to the Task Force of teachers and administrators 
J which is studying the Report, evaluating the discussions 
... pf the recent nine public forums, studying written sug- 
: '*estions of the community, and which will suggest ap- 
proaches to equality/ quality in education that can be 

successfully initiated in San Francisco. 

' In its advisory capacity, it is hoped that the Committee 

will help in finding answers that will greatly strengthen 

the District's educational program for children of all 
i: racial, social, and economic backgrounds and will help 

in unifying the city in the development of a great city 

school system. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Business Scholarships Presented 




] 'he Administrative Management Society recently presented tour 
. .cholarships to San Francisco high school students who are going 
n into business education. Some 18 candidates from 11 high 
chools were considered for the awards. The four winners are 
j pictured above receiving their scholarships. From left to right 
re Mrs. Betty Oxborow Root, Chairman, Education Committee, 
kMS; Lorraine Kohn, $300, Abraham Lincoln; Donna Wong, 
1500, Galileo; Olivier Rochon, $300, George Washington; 
tobert Malm, $500, Sacred Heart; and Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, 
uperintendent of Schools. Honorable mention award pins went 
a Joan Butcher and Lorena Henriques, St. John Ursuline; Nehe- 
liah Damian and Georgia Murdock, Balboa; John Natsume, 
leorge Washington; Gail Ruggeri, Abraham Lincoln; Socorro 
omero, Samuel Gompers; Carmel Parodi and Denise Castillon, 
vathedral; Betty Ann Johnson and Mary Wong, Polytechnic; 
renda Fung, Galileo; Jean Carlson, Mission; and Karen Fong, 
owed. 



In Invest-in-America Awards 

Thirty students from San Francisco public, paro- 
chial and private senior high schools received shares of 
stock and deposits in savings accounts ranging from $25 
to $50 in the Thirteenth Annual Invest-in-America Eco- 
nomic Discussion Competition and for articles published 
in their school newspapers on the general subject of "The 
Role of Savings in Our Economy: The Past — The 
Present — The Future." 

Eugene Gee, a 17-year-old senior from George Wash- 
ington High School, was the overall winner in the eco- 
nomic discussion category among the hundreds of stu- 
dents participating from twenty-three schools. His prize 
was one share of the common stock of Standard Oil 
Company of California, which the Invest-in-America 
Council had purchased in the open market. 

Second prize winner was Sharon Casazza, a 17-year- 
old senior from Cathedral High School. 

A 17-year-old senior from Galileo High School, Joanne 
Dong, third prize winner, received one share of common 
stock of the Wells Fargo Bank. 

Journalism Winners Announced 

In the Journalism Contest, first prize consisting of $50 
in cash was awarded to Harry Dea of Samuel Gompers 
High School for an article entitled "Capitalism — What 
Does It Mean?", which appeared in that school's publi- 
cation Horn. The second prize of $35 was awarded for 
an article by Ray Paton, published in the Polytechnic 
High School's Parrot on the subject "Savings and You." 
Third prize was awarded to Leslie Ong of Mission High 
School consisting of $30. Additional prizes of $25 each 
were awarded to Jean Reber for articles published in 
Presentation High School's Reflector and to Shirley Louie 
in Galileo High School's Pendulum. 

George Washington High School, in addition to hav- 
ing the top individual winner, was also awarded the 
Kiwanis Club perpetual trophy as the school whose over- 
all entries showed the best understanding of the subject. 
Best School Entries 

In addition to the three over-all prizes for the Eco- 
nomic Discussion Program, awards were presented to the 
following who had submitted the best entry from their 
particular school: 

Debra Smith, Abraham Lincoln; Julie Peck, Balboa; 
Robert Salazar, Galileo; Vivian How, George Washing- 
ton; Rand Nathan, Lowell; Susan Hobbs, Mission; Mar- 
garet Minkwitz, Polytechnic; Nora S. Mui, Samuel Gom- 
pers; and Janice Marcellino, Woodrow Wilson. 



N E VV S I, E IT E K 



May 6, 1368 



Programs for the Gifted 

Supervisor Position Is Open 

The Personnel Service Division announces that appli- 
cations for the position of Supervisor (AA) of Programs 
for the Gifted will be accepted by the Personnel Office 
immediately, and will be accepted until May 15, 1968. 

This position has been reclassified as Supervisor AA 
from its previous rating of Supervisor A. This change 
is indicated due to the necessity of this position working 
the 231-day calendar. 

The person assigned to this position shall be responsi- 
ble directly to the Curriculum Coordinator and shall 

1) Develop, implement and coordinate programs for 
the gifted 

2) Direct curriculum development 

3) Provide for articulation of elementary, junior high 
and senior high school gifted programs 

4) Develop plans for evaluation 

5) Plan in-service training for teachers engaged in 
the programs 

6) Prepare and administer the budget 

7) Coordinate programs with the services of the Di- 
vision of Research, and the Division of Special Educa- 
tional Services 

8) Coordinate and give direction to Resource Teach- 
ers in implementing the gifted program 

9) Perform such other duties as may be necessary for 
the development of total program for the gifted. 

Anyone who applied for the position of Supervisor A 
prior to March 1, 1968 will be included in interviews for 
the new classification of this position. 

This position has been classified as Supervisor AA in 
accordance with the Certificated Personnel Salary 
Schedule. The salary range is $16,850 to $19,924, and 
the work schedule is approximately 231 days. 

Applicants must possess the Elementary or Secondary 
Administrative or Supervisory Credential. They must 
also agree to complete work within three years to obtain 
the credentials they may lack at the time of application. 

Applications for this position must be in writing on 
appropriate forms available in the Personnel Office. 
They must be returned to Milton F. Reiterman, Person- 
nel Coordinator, by May 15, 1968. 

. . . Citizens Advisory Committee 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Members of the Citizens Advisory Committee include 
the following: Al Alstrom, (Chairman), Mrs. Richard 
Barnes, Lester S. .Barry, Alan K. Browne, Mrs. Robert 
G. Bull, Ricardo A. Callejo, H. Leroy Cannon, Dr. 
Daniel Collins, Sal Cordova, Mrs. Babette Drefke, Mrs. 
Beatrice Dunbar, Steve Jeong, George Johns, Mrs. Ruth 
Kadish, Judge Joseph D. Kennedy, Rev. Charles E. Lee, 
Mrs. Morris Lemlow, John Levinsohn, Leon Markel, 
Mrs. Walter Miller, Lawrence McDonnell, Kenneth L. 
Newkirk, Arthur Padilla, Earl Raab, Mrs. Martin Salan, 
Warren Saltzman, Father Edwin Smith, Hannah Surh, 
Mrs. Albert Vipiana, Dr. Raymond L. Weisberg, and 
Mrs. Richard A. Wilson. 



Personnel Service Division 
Seeks Supervisor Applications 

The Superintendent announces that applications for 
the following positions in the Personnel Service Division 
will be accepted until May 15, 1968: 

Director, Personnel Service Division 
Supervisor AA, Personnel Service Division 

These positions will be under the direction of tht 
Personnel Coordinator. Applicants must possess a Mas- 
ter's degree and one of the following administrative 
credentials: Standard Supervision, Standard Adminis- 
tration, or General Administration. 

The responsibilities of the Directors and Supervisor: 
in the Personnel Service Division are those which are 
assigned by the Personnel Coordinator, and changes ir 
assignments will be made as required to meet changing 
needs and demands. Applicants should be familiar witr 
all phases of public school personnel work including the 
following: 

Personnel policies and procedures; organizationa 
planning and job design; operating a program of recruiti 
ment, selection, employment, processing, and initial as, 
signment of employees; maintaining records of employ, 
ment, classification, assignment, evaluation, salary 
leaves, and retirement; and assisting in the program oi 
personnel research and appraisal. 

The positions of Director and Supervisor AA will 
carry salaries in accordance with the Certificated Per! 
sonnel Salary Schedule. The work year is one of ap 
proximately 231 days, and the positions will becomj 
effective July 1, 1968. Further job specifications may b| -■ 
obtained by contacting the Personnel Coordinator. 

Applications for these positions must be in writing oi 
appropriate forms available in the Personnel Servic 
Division office. They should be returned to Milton F 
Reiterman, Personnel Coordinator, not later than Ma 
15, 1968. Interviews will be held following the filing c 
the applications. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 33 



May 6, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



May 6, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Summer School Program Offerings Listed 



A broad and varied program will be offered by the 
, District as part of the 1968 Summer School Program 

I approved by the Board of Education at its April 16, 1968 
meeting. (See April 29 issue of the Newsletter.) 

The Elementary School Summer Program, which will 
run from June 24 through August 2, and will offer 
courses in arithmetic, reading, language arts, science, 
social studies, art, music, and physical education. Pref- 

II 'erence will be given to students requesting help in re- 
' ; medial reading and/or arithmetic and related language 

arts. 

Eleven schools will be operated at the following sites: 

Alamo, Alvarado, Anza, Bryant, Commodore Sloat, 

Commodore Stockton, Lawton, Monroe, Raphael Weill, 

Sir Francis Drake, and Treasure Island. Agatha Hogan, 

t- Elementary Supervisor, is in charge of the program. 

: Junior High School Program 

The Junior High School Program, scheduled from 

June 24 to August 2, will include classes in the following 

subjects: remedial arithmetic, developmental arithmetic, 

ltu 'remedial reading, developmental reading, journalism- 

Pi creative writing, speech arts, beginning conversational 

: Spanish, advanced conversational Spanish, mechanical 

"P 1 " 'drawing, homemaking, metal shop, multiple purpose 

'shop, wood shop, instrumental music, vocal music, sci- 
01 ':nce, beginning typing, arts and crafts, English as a 

;econd language, and music advancement workshop. 
\ i i The special District-wide Music Advancement Work- 
1 f« ihop will include a broad study of music and its rela- 
)i if fionship to other branches of the humanities. Students 
:cl fvill be given an opportunity to study beginning music 
BMheory, to receive instrumental training, and to gain 

xperience in choral and instrumental ensembles. 
ins Six junior high schools will hold daily sessions. They 
leni nclude Everett, Francisco, Herbert Hoover, Luther 
ton I iurbank, Pel ton, and Roosevelt. Joseph McCaffrey will 
jMi ierve as Supervisor-Head Teacher and is coordinating 
loiii (he program with George Moscone, Junior High Divi- 

ion. 

— nenior High School Program - v 

The Senior High School Program will be conducted at 
aur sites — Balboa, Galileo, George Washington, and 
-owell. John Rocky is coordinating the program which 
g ./ill run from June 19 through August 9. 

— Specific courses will be offered in the following fields: 
110! rt, business education, English, foreign language, home- 

laking, industrial arts, mathematics, music, science, 
scial studies, occupational education, special education- 
jdjustment, English as a second language, compensatory 
Jucation, and driver education. 

' The list includes such courses as Asian Studies, Ma- 
ne Ecology (Oceanography), Negro History, Human 
,elationships, and Music Advancement Workshop. This 
itter course will give students an opportunity to study 
nd analyze a variety of musical literature through lis- 
■ning and their own participation and performance in 
|istrumental and choral ensembles. Emphasis will be 
laced upon music and its relationship to the other cre- 



u-ai 



ative arts. A team teaching approach will be utilized. 

A priority system for enrollment will be followed for 
the senior high schools, based upon the student's objec- 
tive for enrollment. The enrollment priorities are as 
follows: 1. To complete graduation requirements (High 
12 students planning to graduate from summer school); 
2. To take enrichment courses, to promote acceleration, 
or to take subjects that are difficult to fit into their regu- 
lar program: of study, or that are not available in their 
home schools; 3. To take special courses in English and 
social studies for those students whose native language 
is not English; 4. To make up high school failures; 5. To 
raise low grades by repeating courses for no additional 
credit; 6. Enrichment for entering low 10's. 

Other Services Included 

District services, in addition to those described above, 
include the following: City College (June 24 through 
August 2) ; Adult School and John O'Connell Vocational 
High School (July 1 through August 9 and June 17 
through August 9, respectively) ; Sunshine, Gough, and 
Louise Lombard Schools (July 1 through August 2); 
Hospital, Juvenile Court, and Special Classes; Pupil 
Services; Homebound; Development Centers for Handi- 
capped Minors; Student Interviewing Service; and Bi- 
lingual Education Program. 

The Bilingual Summer Education Program will cover 
education for both Chinese and Spanish. Where possible, 
classes have been scheduled in the regular summer school 
buildings. Classes will be in operation in the following 
school buildings: Elementary — Garfield and Jean Par- 
ker (Chinese) and Hawthorne (Spanish); Junior High 
— Francisco (Chinese) and Everett and Luther Bur- 
bank (Spanish); High School — Balboa (Spanish) and 
Galileo (Chinese). 



• FIELD LIBRARIANS TO MEET MAY 8 

The Field Librarians will meet Wednesday, May 8, 
at 4 p.m. in the library of Presidio Junior High School, 
450 - 30th Avenue. All elementary, junior high, and 
senior high librarians are invited. 



jtji* 



• APTOS INTERNATIONAL DAY CONFERENCE 

Aptos Junior High School will hold a day-long Inter- 
national Day Conference on Friday, May 10, according 
to Principal Henry Barsotti. Approximately 120 ninth 
grade students will participate in the program designed 
to improve the students' understanding of international 
relations. 

Each student will select one country in Asia and one 
country from the Middle East or Africa for depth study. 
The Aptos students will meet in small groups with stu- 
dents from City College of San Francisco serving as 
discussion leaders. 

Dr. Joseph Jacobsen is coordinating City College's 
role in the program, and Beverly Doran and Louise 
Lombardi are handling arrangements at Aptos. Effie 
Argyres and Roland Demarais, Central Office, have 
helped with many of the details. 



NEWSLETTER 



May 6, 1968 



Announcements 



• CONFERENCE ON PUBLIC EDUCATION 

Some 31 District schools will serve as monitoring sta- 
tions for the KQED, Channel 9, television coverage of 
the Conference on Public Education scheduled for Sat- 
urday, May 11, from 9:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins will deliver the 
opening remarks. Casper Weinberger will serve as mod- 
erator of the morning session, and Wanda Ramey will 
moderate the afternoon session. 

Facilities to monitor the panels, which will discuss such 
topics as school integration, quality education, and school 
and community problems, will be available in the fol- 
lowing schools: 

Alvarado, Argonne, Bret Harte, Burnett, Cleveland, 
Commodore Sloat, Commodore Stockton, E. R. Taylor, 
Fairmount, Francis Scott Key, Frank McCoppin, Glen 
Park, Golden Gate, Hawthorne, Jedediah Smith, Jeffer- 
son, John Hancock, John Muir, Junipero Serra, Long- 
fellow, Madison, Marshall, Miraloma, Ortega, Sanchez, 
Sherman, Starr King, Ulloa, Visitacion Valley, West 
Portal, and Winfield Scott. 

During a morning break in the program, viewers in 
the schools will be able to prepare questions to be pre- 
sented to the television panelists in the afternoon session. 
A studio audience at KQED will also be able to react to 
the panelists. 

• GALILEO GIRLS TO PERFORM 

San Francisco Giant fans arriving early at Candle- 
stick Park on Saturday, May 18, will be able to enjoy a 
performance of rhythmic gymnastics by over 100 girls 
from Galileo High School. Directed by Sue Nepstead, 
the girls will demonstrate a part of their regular physical 
education program. Precision routines using balls and 
Indian clubs will be featured, beginning at 12:30 p.m. 

• RECEPTION FOR MARTIN R. LEHRBERGER 

A reception honoring Martin R. Lehrberger, Principal 
of Visitacion Valley School, will be held on the occasion 
of his retirement from the SFUSD after 47 years dedi- 
cated to education. The affair will be held at the Cali- 
fornia Club, 1750 Clay Street, 8 p.m., Saturday, May 18. 

Reservations should be made as soon as possible by 
sending a check for $5 per person to Rita Sullivan, 
Visitacion Valley School, 55 Schwerin Street, 94134. 
Gift contributions may be included with the above re- 
mittance. 

• ACE HOSTS SULLIVAN READERS 

The Association for Childhood Education invites all 
interested teachers to a 3 : 30 p.m. meeting at Anza School 
on Tuesday, May 14, 1968, to hear a discussion of the 
Sullivan Reading Program and the materials now in use 
in 30 pilot schools. Speakers will be Dr. Allen D. Calvin 
from Behavioral Research Laboratory and Barbara 
Schmidt of McGraw-Hill. 

Roy Minkler, Head of Project Read, will host the 
group. Refreshments will be served, and school yard 
parking will be available. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, May 7, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular meet- 
ing, 170 Fell Street. 






• GUIDANCE INFORMATION CONFERENCE 

The Northern California Guidance Association wil 
hold its spring conference at the new DeAnza College ir 
Cupertino on Saturday, May 11, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.mt 
The theme of the conference is "Group Guidance." 

Dr. Lloyd Luckmann, Associate Dean of Arts and 
Sciences of ttie University of San Francisco, is the lun- 
cheon speaker! Dr. Margaret Bennett, psychologist am 
author, Dr. Virginia Block, Professor of Psychology a 
San Francisco State College, and Dr. Roger Cummin; 
Assistant Professor of Counseling at San Francisco Stat 
College will present panel discussions. 

District personnel who will participate in the confer; 
ence include: Mrs. Elaine Wolfe, Social Worker; How 
ard Schoon, City College Counselor; and Dr. Erik; 
Chance, Consulting Clinical Psychologist. The District' 
Guidance Service Centers will be represented on a pani 
by the following: David Jamieson, School Psychologist 
Neal Dunlap and Edward Kloster, Secondary Teachers 
and Mrs. Germaine O'Brien and Mrs. Fannie Prestor 
Elementary Teachers. George Stokes, Al Scialanca, am 
Pearl Lapidaire of Benjamin Franklin Junior Higl 
School are in charge of registration. 

Dr. Gordon T. Carlson, Supervisor of the Guidanc 
Service Centers, is president-elect of the NCGA and pro 
gram chairman for the conference. District personni 
who plan to attend should contact Mr. Stokes at Benja 
min Franklin. 

• ELEMENTARY SUPPLY COMMITTEE 

The Elementary Supply Committee will meet at tl 
Supplies Warehouse, 1000 Selby Street, at 1:45 p.m. oj 
Thursday, May 9. Principals having items for discussioj 
are requested to submit these to their representative; 
Again three copies of the Supply Committee minute 
will be distributed to each elementary school. This polic, 
will be continued in the future so schools will have a 
extra copy for posting in the library alongside of th 
Supply Catalog for Teachers' Use. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 



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SAN FRANCISCO, (J. 
PERMIT No. 396 



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^ c ft ~ - j^s^ n f ranc i SCO ' S D'a.rc Of^ dlk CArtion u °CUMENTs 

SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT i I960 

SallC*Lmi 6C0 

NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 «^^=@ 



MAY 13, 1968 



NUMBER 34 



11 



Partial Fulfillment Basis 

Credential Information Given 

Milton F. Reiterman, Personnel Coordinator, 
wishes to remind all teachers who desire to apply 
for the positions of Head Counselor-Boys or Head 
Counselor-Girls that they must possess a Pupil 
Personnel Services Credential. Such a credential 
may be on a partial fulfillment basis, but the ap- 
plication must be made to the State Department 
of Education before September 1, 1968. 

The Pupil Personnel Services Credential is also 
required for many other positions involving special 
work with students. It is a most valuable profes- 
sional aid, and interested teachers are urged to 
make application, for it immediately. 

More detailed information in regard to obtaining 
this credential appeared in the February 5, 1968 
edition of the Newsletter on page 2. Application 
forms and answers to special questions may be ob- 
tained from the Personnel Service Division. 



District Discipline Procedures 
To Be Developed by Task Force 

A Task Force of teachers and administrators has been 
appointed by Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins and is 
working to develop specific regulations applicable to the 
implementation of the Discipline Statement of Principle 
and Policy approved by the Board of Education on 
March 26, 1968. 

The Discipline Statement was the result of a series of 
reports submitted by the advisors on discipline to the 
Curriculum Committee of the Board of Education, Alan 
H. Nichols, Chairman. 

The Discipline Committee Task Force is currently 
holding meetings to develop and refine procedures rela- 
tive to discipline matters consistent with the policy state- 
ment and to further study the Addendum of Policy State- 
ment of Board submitted by Commissioner Nichols on 
March 25, 1968. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Active Forensic Program Supported by District Senior High Schools 



i The culminating activities in a year-long program of 
i.peech and debate events at the senior high school level 
sook place recently at Stanford University when the 
iState Speech Finals were held. 

: Three District schools were represented in the finals: 
Abraham Lincoln High, George Washington High, and 
'.owell High. 

During the school year, students from District and 
'5ay Area schools participated in a variety of league 
sponsored and independently sponsored competitions. 
■ The latter group were arranged by colleges and univer- 
ities and local service organizations. 

The Golden Gate Speech Association consists of some 
i5 Bay Area public, private, and parochial high schools 
.nd sponsors eight individual events tournaments and 
. ight debate tournaments throughout the year, includ- 
ing the state finals in these two broad categories. Four 
District high schools are active in this organization: 
Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Lowell, and 
ilission. The forensic sponsors at these schools are Ted 
.foore, Sanford Chandler, Jack Anderson, and Mrs. 
Jloria Pyne. Mr. Chandler is vice-president of the asso- 
iation, and Mr. Anderson serves as executive director. 
National Forensic League 

Three schools — Abraham Lincoln, George Washing- 
bn, and Lowell — are also members of the National 
,'orensic League which sponsors events leading to district 




Participating District senior high schools have once again of- 
fered a full program of forensic activities to interested stu- 
dents. Pictured above, reviewing the achievements of the 1967- 
68 season, are (seated) Dr. Lewis Allbee, Assistant Superintend- 
ent for Senior High Schools; Judge Joseph Karesh of the Su- 
perior Court; (standing) senior high school forensic sponsors 
Sanford Chandler (George Washington), Ted Moore (Abraham 
Lincoln), Mrs. Gloria Pyne (Mission), and Jack Anderson (Lowell). 
Judge Karesh, long-time supporter of the public school forensic 
program, emphasized the importance of speech activities in 
developing self-confidence and intellectual growth and under- 
standing among senior high school students. 

championships and ultimately to national champion- 
ships. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



NEWSLETTER 



May 13, 19681 



. . .Forensic Program Reviewed 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Independent speech and debate tournaments are spon- 
sored locally by such institutions as San Francisco State 
College, San Jose State College, St. Mary's College, Uni- 
versity of California, University of San Francisco, and 
Stanford University. Contests are further sponsored by 
many organizations such as the American Legion, Lions 
Clubs, and Optimist Clubs, which recognize the im- 
portance of encouraging students in speech activities. 

Speech and debate tournaments are sequential and 
developmental. In the fall, emphasis is given to the de- 
velopment of speech skills which are refined and polished 
in the spring. Subject matter is drawn from two major 
disciplines — English and social studies. Motivation is 
encouraged through presentation of awards and scholar- 
ships for excellence of performance. Students work and 
prepare through the entire school year, competing in 
tournament after tournament leading to the state finals. 
It is interesting to note that student participation in 
forensic activities is voluntary. Groups meet before and 
after school to arrange tournaments, conduct business, 
and hold practice sessions. League tournaments are held 
on Saturdays, and non-league contests are held after 
school, evenings, and on weekends. Some of this year's 
tournaments have attracted as many as 800 participants. 
Official Events Listed 

The official events in tournament competition include 
the following: Debate — one topic is fully explored for 
the entire year (chosen by the National University Ex- 
tension Service); Oratory — a ten minute memorized 
individual speech on a social issue of significance; Ora- 
torical analysis — a ten minute analysis of a speech 
with comments on the speaker and the historical setting 
of the speech; Oratorical interpretation — a ten minute 
performance of a significant speech which has been 
given by a famous individual with the emphasis on the 
elements of delivery; 

Impromptu speaking — a five minute speech given 
after two minutes preparation time on a challenging 
subject; Extemporaneous speaking — a seven minute 
speech given after one half hour's preparation on a topic 
drawn from current periodicals; Dramatic interpreta- 
tion — a solo, ten minute memorized performance of the 
portion of a play or story; Humorous interpretation — 
same as the previous with the emphasis on humor. 

Jack Anderson, Lowell speech instructor, whose indi- 
vidual events entrants in forensic competition have been 
undefeated in the past six years, stresses the importance 
of the forensic program in bringing together public, pri- 
vate, and parochial school students in a situation con- 
ducive to an intellectual exchange of ideas. 

District students who qualified for the state finals in- 
cluded the following: Abraham Lincoln — Marsha Kra- 
mer; George Washington — Peter Alpert, Connie Bush- 
nell, Cathy Cary, Vicki Linsay, Debbie O'Neal, and 
Jannis Warner; Lowell — Gloria Auerbach, Ayn Caval- 
lini, Carol Daniels, Kathy Haskin, Richard Hays, Theo- 
dore Levy, Francis McCarthy, Deborah Muller, George 
Parsons, Victoria Reiter, Ron Reeves, Deborah Schafer, 
Jeff Schultz, Eunice Wallace, and Ronald Wcismann. 



Invest-in-America Winners Feted 




District winners in the 1968 Invest-in-America Economic Dis-j 
cussion Competition and Journalism Awards were feted at a 
special luncheon at the Fairmont Hotel recently. Pictured (left: 
to right) are Reinaldo Pagano, Assistant Principal, George 
Washington (George Washington won the Kiwanis Club Per- 
petual Trophy for over-all excellence of entries); Eugene Gee, 
1st prize winner, George Washington; Harry Dea, 1st prize' 
winner (journalism competition), Samuel Gompers; Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Shaffer, Journalism Adviser, Samuel Gompers; Joanne 
Dong, 3rd prize winner, Galileo; Ivor Caliaway, Principal, Sam- 
uel Gompers; and George Ritter, Business Education Depart- 
ment Head, George Washington. (For additional details see 
article in May 6 issue of the Newsletter.) 

. . . Discipline Committee Task Force 

( Continued from Page 1 ) 

Committee members include the following: Central Of-i 
fice — Mrs. Alice Henry, Ross Miles, and Junius Campi 
Senior High — George Crippen (Galileo) , Harvey Chris] - 
tensen (Abraham Lincoln), Ann Ahokas (Mission), ancfc 
Warren Johnston (Polytechnic) ; Junior High — Frank 1 I 
Verducci (Horace Mann), Thomas Sammon (Pelton) j 
Peter Cinquini (Aptos), and Mildred Fusco (Jame. ! 
Lick) ; Elementary — Mrs. Dorothy Vaio (Fairmount)l - 
Jack Hartman (John McLaren), Mrs. Fermene Coturr 
(Bret Harte), and Charles Robinson (Kate Kennedy). 

In addition to the above members, Negotiating Counj 
cil sub-committee members are Mrs. Margaret Dennj 
(Washington), Robert Landis (Giannini), and Mrs] 
Etienne Simon (Ufloa)'. The next meeting is May' 15. j 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 39, No. 34 May 13, 1968 

135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



MNE 



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May 13, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Galileo Unit Wins Top Spot 
In 91st Division Competition 

ROTC cadets from Galileo High School won the 91st 
Division trophy when they took top honors in the ROTC 
drill competition held recently in the Civic Auditorium. 

More than 1,000 students from eight District high 
schools took part in the 22nd annual event, a major high- 
light of the cadet year. 

The Galileo drill team, commanded by Cadet Lt. Col. 
Irving' Chew, compiled the most points in various events 
to win the trophy. Presenting the award was Major 
General Stuart D. Menist, Commanding General of the 
91st Division. 

■ Abraham Lincoln High School placed second, and 
Lowell High was third. 

i Other award winners included the following: Galileo, 
drill platoon competition; Galileo, drill team competi- 
tion; and Lowell, 91st Division honor high school trophy 
:or scholastic achievement. 

! Individual winners of the manual of arms competi- 
tion were Cy Yee, Abraham Lincoln, first year; Spencer 
George, Balboa, second year; and David Wong, Galileo, 
hird year. 

The competition is sponsored each year by the 91st 
Division, California's largest Army Reserve component, 
ind the 91st Infantry Division League. Colonel James H. 
7 arren, Senior Army Instructor for the School District, 
oordinated the program. 



ADMINISTRATIVE APPOINTMENTS 

The following administrative assignments were 
approved by the Board of Education at its April 
17, 1968 meeting, upon the recommendation of the 
Superintendent: 

Central Office 

Joseph P. McElligott, Fiscal Officer, appointed 
to the position of Administrative Officer, assigned 
to the Superintendent's Office. , 

James Porter, Assistant Fiscal Officer, appointed 
to the position of Acting Fiscal Officer. 



yea! 



► PHI DELTA KAPPA DINNER MEETING 

The Golden Gate Field Chapter of Phi Delta Kappa 
nounces a dinner meeting to honor Dr. Sherman 
•own, San Francisco State College, to be held Satur- 
ay, May 18, at 6:30 p.m. at the Lakeside Inn, 558 
■ellevue Avenue, Oakland. The cost is $3.50, and reser- 
ations may be made by contacting John Falsarella at 
21-6164. 



i DINNER FOR SYLVESTER L. KELLY 

A reminder . . . the testimonial dinner honoring 
ylvester L. Kelly, Principal of Roosevelt Junior High 
chool on his retirement, will be held Friday, May 24, at 
le Miyako Hotel, Post and Laguna Streets. A social 
our will begin at 7 p.m. with dinner at 8 p.m. 

Price of the dinner is $7.50, inclusive. Checks should 
: made to the Roosevelt Faculty Fund and forwarded 
f May 17 to William Coolidge, Roosevelt Junior High 
:hool, 460 Arguello Boulevard, 94118. 



58 Blood Donations 



OXonnell Counselor Sets Example 



/ i 




Eileen Cronin, nurse at Irwin Memorial Blood Bank, is seen tak- 
ing a blood sample from the finger of Robert Ro~si while his 
brother, John Rossi, Jr., and father, John Sr., wait ihzir turn at 
the medical history desk. Mr. Rossi, a guidance counselor at 
John O'Connell Vocational High School, has made 58 voluntary 
blood donations (totaling over seven gallons) at the blood bank 
over the years. Due to his example, his sons Robert, 22, and 
John, 19, have been steady donors at the blood bank ever since 
the day of their 18th birthdays. Robert now has 17 donations to 
his credit and young John has donated five timas. The Irwin 
Memorial Blood Bank of the San Francisco Medical Society is 
located at 270 Masonic Avenue and has weekend hours for 
donors who cannot give during the week — Saturday, from 8:30 
a.m. to 2 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 



• FRANK INGERSOLL TESTIMONIAL DINNER 

After 17 years of basketball coaching, climaxed by 
this year's undefeated championship season, Frank Ing- 
ersoll of Woodrow Wilson High School has announced 
his retirement from the coaching ranks. To honor him 
for his many years of service to San Francisco youth, a 
testimonial dinner has been planned for Wednesday, 
May 29, at the Sons of Italy Hall, 5051 Mission Street. 
The cost is $5 per person, all inclusive. A no-host social 
hour will start at 6 p.m. Reservations should be directed 
to Roger Johnson, Woodrow Wilson High School, 400 
Mansell Street, 94134. 



• A. P. GIANNINI RETIREMENT DINNER 

The faculty of A. P. Giannini Junior High School 
cordially invites the families and friends of Mrs. Peg 
McDonnell, Mrs. Elizabeth Wierdsma, and Alan Popes 
to a dinner in their honor to be held Wednesday eve- 
ning, May 22, 1968, at the Fort Mason Officers Club. 

The dinner will be served at 8 p.m., preceded by a 
social hour starting at 7 p.m. The cost is $7.50, including 
tax and gift donation. Reservations may be secured by 
contacting Colonel Sarcander at A. P. Giannini Junior 
High School, 3151 Ortega Street, 94122. 



NEWSLETTER 



May 13, 196ff 




TIME SHEET PICK-UP 

May time sheets for teachers will be picked up 
at the schools at 8:30 a.m. on June 3, 1968, for 
senior, junior, and elementary teachers. 

The adult schools will deliver their part-time 
teachers' time sheets on May 28 and their full- 
time teachers' time sheets on June 3 at 9 a.m. 

Time sheets for clerks and janitors for all 
schools, including the Adult Schools, for May 15 
through May 31 will be picked up at the schools 
at 8:30 a.m. on May 23, 1968. 

Sheets are to be completed and signed by the 
deadline dates above to enable delivery service to 
keep the schedule. 

The number of days in May for principals and 
assistant principals is 22; the number of days for 
teachers is 22. 



• WORKSHOP FOR MUSIC SUPERVISORS 

The Opera for Students Committee of the San Fran- 
cisco Opera Guild in cooperation with the SFUSD's 
Music Department will present a workshop for Bay Area 
Music Supervisors at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, May 21, in 
the cafeteria of the Central Office, 135 Van Ness Av- 
enue. Film strips, piano accompaniments, and illustra- 
tions of various teaching aids will be featured to provide 
further in-school programs for schools outside San Fran- 
cisco. All interested parties are invited to attend. 

• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancies: 
2727 — School Custodian, Foreman — Male — Hor- 
ace Mann Junior High School. 

2726 — School Custodian, Sub-Foreman — Male — 
Roosevelt Junior High School. 

• WAREHOUSE VISIT WEEK 

Open House at the School District Warehouse begins 
today and will continue through Friday, May 17. All 
interested School District Personnel are cordially invited 
to visit the Warehouse and observe the supply handling 
operation. A tour through the Warehouse will be con- 
ducted at 3:45 p.m. and lasts approximately one-half 
hour. The exhibit of new supplies items that was pre- 
pared recently to acquaint teachers with new items avail- 
able through Warehouse stock will be viewed. 

A short briefing will be held prior to the tour in the 
employees lunch room at the Warehouse. Refreshments 
will be served. 

The Warehouse is located at 1000 Selby Street. It may 
be reached heading South on the old Bayshore Highway 
from Army Street to Oakdale Avenue (first stop light). 
Turn left (east) at Oakdale and proceed approximately 
three blocks to Selby Street — turn left one block. The 
entrance to the Warehouse is located directly under the 
new freeway section that crosses over the Produce Mart 
area. Lost? If you need help in directions, please tele- 
phone the Warehouse at 285-2686. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, May 21, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular meet- 
ing, 170 Fell Street. 



• SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS' DINNER 

The San Francisco Association of School Administra- 
tors announces that its banquet to honor all retiring ad- 
ministrators will be held Wednesday, May 29, in the 
Imperial Ballroom of the Hilton Hotel. 

The cost is $8.50, inclusive, and dinner will be servec 
at 7 p.m., preceded by a 6 p.m. social hour. Reservatior 
deadline is Friday, May 24, and checks should be madi 
payable to San Farncisco Association of School Admin 
istrators, c/o Mrs. Harriet Wollesen, Clarendon School 
500 Clarendon Avenue, 94131. ' 



• SOCIAL STUDIES COUNCIL DINNER 

The San Francisco Council for the Social Studies an 
nounces that its final event of the school year will be 
social hour and dinner starting at 6 : 30 p.m. on Wednes 
day, May 29. Dr. Richard Gross, Professor of Education 
Stanford University, will be the guest speaker. 

Dinner choice is prime ribs of beef at $4.85 or chickei 
at $3.85. Checks should be made payable to the S. 
Social Studies Council, 1390 Skyline Drive, Daly Cit) 
94015. Reservation deadline is May 20. 



• LUNCHEON TO HONOR HATTIE FISHEL 

The faculty of John Adams School will honor Hatti 
Fishel with a luncheon on the occasion of her retiremer 
from the SFUSD after more than 30 years service to thi 
District. Miss Fishel was formerly associated with Cor 
tinuation High School. 

The luncheon will be held Friday, June 14, at Bren^ 
wood Lodge, South San Francisco, and will be served e 
1:15 p.m. Cost is $4.25 including tax and gift donatioi 
Checks should be sent to Mrs. Frances Fried, 1860 Have 
Street, 94117, no later than June 5. 



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iSAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



MW a 01968 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



MAY 20, 1968 



NUMBER 35 



de Urioste on Executive Committee 

Board Commissioner Appointed 

Commissioner Ad- 
olfo de Urioste, now 
serving his fifteenth 
year as a member of 
the San Francisco 
Board of Education, 
was appointed to the 
Executive Committee 
of the Research 
Council of the Great 
Cities Program for 
School Improvement 
at the recent spring 
meeting held in Bos- 
ton. 

Sixteen large cities, 
including San Fran- 
cisco, Los Angeles, 
and San Diego on the 
West Coast, have 

' oined together to study the many problems of the urban 

,:ities. 
As Mr. de Urioste has said, "In my opinion this is one 

)f the most dedicated group of people in public school 

jducation. I am extremely proud to have been elected to 

crve on the Executive Committee." 

Continued on Page 2) 




Project 'Fair Share' Seeks 
More State Aid for Urban Areas 

Project "Fair Share," the legislative program of Cali- 
fornia's 25 largest urban area school districts to achieve 
a more equitable share of the state school apportion- 
ments, is receiving the full support of the San Francisco 
Unified School District. 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins, in calling a District- 
wide leadership meeting on May 9, stressed the need for 
massive support of Senate Bill 702, referred to as the 
Urban Factor Bill, and called upon District administra- 
tors to take the lead in a crash program to send at least 
20,000 letters to Governor Ronald Reagan in support of 
the bill during May. 

Senate Bill 702 would provide, in 1968-69, an addi- 
tional $100 of state aid — above formula apportionment 
— for each unit of average daily attendance in the 25 
urban area school districts. This would be increased by 
another $100 in 1969-70, another $100 in 1971, and 
another $100 in 1972. After four years, the additional 
state aid would amount to $400 for each unit of ADA. 

Dr. Jenkins recommended that each principal proceed 
to name and organize a committee of key parents, com- 
munity contacts, PTA units, and school employees to 
send an "avalanche" of letters to the Governor to prove 
the vital need of urban areas for increased state income. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



-City Spring Concert Scheduled for Opera House on May 26 





ill 



No.. 



The musically talented students of the San Francisco 
>ublic schools will be featured in concert Sunday, May 
6, 1968, at 2 p.m. at the War Memorial Opera House, 
ccording to Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins. 
The eighth annual All-City Spring Concert will fea- 
ure performances by the students of the Honor Orches- 
ra and Honor Choir. 

Dr. Albert A. Renna, Director of Music for the San 

'rancisco Unified School District, announces that this is 

tie first time the Opera House will be used as the setting 

v the program and marks the beginning of an annual 

ncert to be held in this cultural center. 

All-City Honor Orchestra and Honor Choir member- 

ip is made up of the musically gifted students from the 

ty's secondary schools. The students meet on Saturday 

ornings during the year in rehearsal sessions which cul- 

nate in two concert performances, one in the fall term 

d one in the spring term. 



The Sunday concert will feature the premier perform- 
ance of Vaclav NelhybePs Sine Nomine, a modern com- 
position in twelve tone style with chord clusters. 

Calvin Simmons, Balboa High School student organist, 
will perform with the orchestra in Camille Saint-Saens' 
Symphony No. Three, Op. 78 and will accompany the 
choir in Franz Schubert's Mass in F and in American 
Folk Song Sketch by Gail Kubik. 

Two senior high school vocal instructors, Dale Black- 
burn (Lowell) and Vahan Toolajian (Mission), will be 
featured soloists in the Coronation Scene from Boris 
Gudnov by Modest Moussorgsky. 

Alfred Beseman, District Music Supervisor, is coordin- 
ating the Spring Concert. The Honor Orchestra will be 
conducted by Jack Pereira, Lowell High, and the Honor 
Choir will be led by John Land, James Lick Junior High. 

Mayor Joseph L. Alioto has commended the school 
(Continued on Page 2) 



NEWSLETTER 



May 20, 19681 



All-City Spring Concert 



Continued from Page 1) 




Students from the All-City Honor Choir and the All-City Honor 
orchestra will appear in concert at the War Memorial Opera 
House on Sunday, May 26, 1 968, at 2 p.m. The students have 
been meeting regularly in Saturday morning rehearsal sessions 
since the beginning of the school year. The concert is ths cul- 
minating activity for the District's musically talented students. 
Admission tickets are free and have been distributed to the 
various schools. Members of the Honor Choir are viewed above 
in one of the rehearsal sessions in preparation for the concert 
next Sunday. 

music groups in a special proclamation, praising the 
Board of Education and the School Department for their 
support of the music program. 

Dr. Jenkins, in commenting on the significance of the 
event, has stated, "The creative arts are a vital and stim- 
ulating part of the school curriculum. As Superintendent, 
I am sure that I can express for the Board of Education 
and the administration, the significant position that music 
holds for the School District." Dr. Jenkins further added 
that as a tribute to the students and music teachers com- 
munity support of the concert will add to the success of 
the performance as the schools strive to achieve the goals 
of their equality/quality educational program. 

Invitational tickets are available at the Music Office, 
135 Van Ness Avenue, with a limited number at the 
War Memorial Opera House Box Office. 

. . .Commissioner de Urioste Appointment 

(Continued from Page 1) 

The Research Council has a 32-man Board of Direc- 
tors made up of the 16 superintendents and 16 board 
members. 

In addition, the Research Council Executive Commit- 
tee is composed of the president, vice president, secretary- 
treasurer, and six additional persons elected for over- 
lapping three-year terms. 

The Research Council was originally started by former 
Superintendent of Chicago Schools Ben Willis. Each city 
Board of Education pays dues to the Research Council 
to support its projects. 

• EXCHANGE POSITION OPEN 

Teachers interested in a possible exchange position in 
7th and 8th grade mathematics with the Eastchester 
Public Schools, New York, ase asked to contact Milton 
F. Reitcrman, Personnel Coordinator, for further infor- 
mation. 



i 
i 



Summer Recreation Plans Set 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins has announced that 
plans for the School District's summer recreation pro- 
gram have been finalized and that San Francisco youth 
will have multiple opportunities for a summer of worth- 
while educational and recreational experiences. 

Recreation centers will be established at 52 school 
playground sites, and the hours of operation will be ex- 
tended from the normal 3 to 6 p.m. schedule to a 10 a.m 
to 5 p.m. operation, Mondays through Saturdays. The 
schoolyard playgrounds will feature daily game activities, 
special events programs, local and out-of-town trips, and 
excursions to the Silver Tree Day Camp, operated by the 
Park and Recreation Department. 

Fourteen gymnasiums, including five at the schoolyard 
playground sites, are planned for operation between the 
hours of 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Mondays through Fridays. 
Twelve of these gymnasiums will also be open from 2 
p.m- to 5 p.m., Mondays through Saturdays. 

Fourteen of the school playgrounds are located in tar- 
get areas, and ESEA Title I funds have been granted t< 
provide a summer enrichment program at these loca- 
tions. Included are additional personnel to work with 
small groups, more field trips to points of interest, and a 
greater variety of recreational activities. 

Some 154 Neighborhood Youth Corps boys and girl: 
will be employed as recreation aides in the District': 
program. 

George R. Canrinus, Coordinator of Health, Physica 
Education, Athletics, and Recreation, states that particu- 
lar care has been exercised to make certain that all dis 
tricts are served, and consideration has been given t< 
assure that all age groups have the opportunity for par 
ticipation. He adds that the School District recreation L 
program has been considerably expanded over past sum: f 
mers and provides greater opportunities in jobs for manij Jl 
youths as well as recreation for all young people. 



il, 






SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 39, No. 35 May 20, 1968 

135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



II 



isit 






May 20, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Teachers Receive Pay on First City College Summer Program 




The smiles observed on the above faces were multiplied many 
[times over as District certifcated personnel received their pay 
| checks on the first of the month instead of the fifth. Joseph 
vtcElligorr, Fiscal Officer, is seen presenting a check to 
Virs. Virginia Ryder, Resource Teacher, Elementary Gifted Pro- 
gram, on May 1, marking a change that resulted from a signed 
igreement by Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins with the Nego- 
iating Council and the San Francisco Federation of Teachers. 
'revious to May, District teachers had been paid on the fifth of 
he month, and the new agreement changed the date of payment 

the first. 

1 COACHES ASSOCIATION MEETING 

: The San Francisco Association Athletic Coaches and 
3 hysical Education Teachers will hold its final meeting 
if the spring term on Monday, May 20, at 7:30 p.m. in 
» .loom B-4 of Abraham Lincoln High School. 

» STANFORD EDUCATION CLUB 

Reminder . . • Stanford Education Club annual on- 
ampus party at the home of Dr. and Mrs. J. Paul 
lanna on Sunday, May 26 . . . social hour 3:30 to 5:30 
l.m., dinner at 5:45 p.m. . . • send checks for $7.50 to 
'/[ichael Kittredge, Treasurer, 590 Gellert Drive, San 
i : 'rancisco 94132. 



For the second year City College of San Francisco will 
open its campus to high school students and faculty and 
to members of Youth for Service and the Neighborhood 
Youth Corps as part of a summer program made possible 
by grants from the Hebrew Technical Institute of New 
York and the Miranda Lux Foundation of San Francisco. 

The student phase of the summer program is planned 
so that enrollees may learn to better understand them- 
selves and relate this understanding to opportunities in 
the world of work. Students may earn up to six units of 
college credit, and, if desired, may apply the credits 
toward high school graduation. 

Participating students may choose one or more of the 
following options : 1 . ) Enroll in Psychology G 1 1 , a two- 
unit course designed to help students in the selection of 
realistic occupational objectives; 2.) Enroll in one or 
more of the college's orientation courses which are offer- 
ed in the first semester of most of the 42 occupational 
programs; 3.) Enroll in a special workshop course in one 
of the following areas: a.) Visual Arts Production b.) 
Ornamental Horticulture c.) Radio and Television Pro- 
duction d.) Stagecraft and Drama Production. 

Junior and senior high school counselors will be offer- 
ed an opportunity to learn about the college's technical 
curriculums and to work directly with the high school 
students. Counselors will attend seminars, confer with 
industry-oriented instructors, meet employed graduates 
of the college's occupational program, visit classes, and 
work with enrollees in a practical, realistic vocational 
guidance internship. Scholarship-type stipends of $75 
per week will be awarded to counselor participants. 

It is hoped that from 350 to 450 students will partici- 
pate in the program which is designed to fill many needs 
of the age group preparing to enter the world of work. 



School District, Strybing Arboretum Cooperate in 'Project Grow' 



(Editor's note: The news article which follows was 
jritten by the students in Jean Burman's fourth grade 
'ass at Jefferson School and submitted for publication 
ii the Newsletter. The' project described herein is but 
ne of many in which the School District and the staff 
•t Strybing Arboretum have cooperated to enrich the 
iucational opportunities of the students.) 

PROJECT GROy/ 

Miss Jean Burman's fourth grade class at Jefferson 
;:hool has planted a vegetable garden at Strybing Arbor- 
um in Golden Gate Park. The project began in the 
,11 term. Mr. P. H. Brydon, Arboretum Superintendent, 
t aside a 40 by 50 foot plot of land. He said that if this 
lot project is successful, other children might have a 
iance to do it, too. 

Before any seeds could be sown, the class studied what 
>es into making good soil. They learned how treated 
iter is supplied to the park and how important it is to 

(Continued on Page 4) 




Alesandra Kosturos and Sally Van Loon, two Jefferson School 
fourth graders, are busy working in their class vegetable gar- 
den at Strybing Arboretum. Joseph Anclli, Arboretum gardener 
and expert seed-grower, is ever-present to offer help and guid- 
ance to the students in Jean Burman's class who have been 
working on the project since the fall term. The students are so 
proud of their "Project Grow" that they submitted the accomp- 
anying article for Newsletter publication. Mrs. Ina Cokeley is 
Principal of Jefferson. 



NEWSLETTER 



May 20, 19i 



Announcements 



• DINNER FOR DR. JOSEPH B. HILL 

A reminder ... the dinner honoring Dr. Joseph B. 
Hill, Curriculum Coordinator, on his retirement will be 
held at the Olympic Country Club, Lakeside, at 7 p.m. 
on Wednesday, June 5. A social hour will precede the 
dinner at 6 p.m. Dinner tickets may be obtained by send- 
ing checks for $12 (inclusive) to Marjorie Maher, Office 
of Research, 135 Van Ness Avenue, or to James Ham- 
rock, Luther Burbank Junior High, 325 La Grande Av- 
enue, by May 24- 



... Aid for Urban Area School Districts 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Packets of informative material were distributed to 
each District administrator including copies of Senate 
Bill 702, a fact sheet on Project "Fair Share," suggested 
messages, and specific instructions for mailing. Each Dis- 
trict employee has been encouraged to write and send a 
personal letter and have two or more friends do the same. 

Community endorsements of the resolution supporting 
passage of Senate Bill 702, which was approved by the 
Board of Education on May 7, have been encouraged. 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information, 
and David Monasch, III, Campaign Coordinator, are 
organizing the letter writing campaign and related ac- 
tivities. They can be reached at 863-4680, Extension 371. 



. . . 'Project Grow' at Jefferson School 

(Continued from Page 3) 

conserve our soil and water. During the winter season, 
they experimented with hydroponics — growing plants 
without soil. They found out that plants need nitrogen, 
phosphorus and potash as well as light and water. 

The children divided the land so that teams of two 
children each could prepare their own seed-beds. They 
learned how to use a trowel, hoe, rake and shovel (with- 
out getting blisters!) Mr. James Lucey, supervisor, and 
Mr. Joseph Anelli, gardener, have taught them how to 
plant radishes, beets, potatoes, beans, lettuce, chard and 
many other vegetables. Each week they can hardly wait 
to see how their plants are growing. They cultivate the 
soil, thin the plants, and pull weeds. Even though the 
snails, insects, birds, rabbits and squirrels have eaten 
some of the crops, the children are hoping to harvest 
some vegetables soon. 

The class has become very interested in weather and 
what it does to their crops. They have built a weather 
station at school and watch it carefully every day. It helps 
them decide when they should plan to work in their 
gardens. 

Several of the students now have home gardens, too. 
They are finding out that it is a lot of work to have a 
good garden, but it is worth it. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, May 21, 1968, 7:30 p.m. Regular meet- 
ing, 170 Fell Street. 



I 



• BILINGUAL IN-SERVICE COURSE 

(The following demonstration in-service course f 
junior and senior high school teachers will be offered tl 
summer.) 

Two units, non-college credit, 10 meetings, 9 a.m. 

12 noon, July 8 through July 19, 1968, at Luther Bu 

bank Junior High School. Instructor: Anthony E. Rarr 

rez. Open to all interested junior and senior high scho|| 

teachers. For further information call Elmer Gallegc 

431-5379. Registration deadline is Friday, May 24. 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize teachers who a 
interested in learning about the techniques, materials, boo 
and equipment which are being used in bilingual programs. T 
workshop will include demonstration teaching and observatio] 
Curriculum resource personnel and specialists in the field 
bilingual education will be invited to meet with the teache 
The participants will be called upon to prepare materials a 
teach in the bilingual classes being held this summer at Luth 
Burbank. Video tapes will be employed for analysis of instri. 
tional techniques. Fluency in Spanish is not required. 

• CUSTODIAL VACANCY 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancy 
2724 — School Custodian, Male — Douglas Eleme 
tary School. 



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• CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 

A curriculum development project on the Negro 
American life and history is planned for the 1968- ™ 
school year. Any teacher who would be interested 
taking leave from his or her regular work and being 1 ■•'" 
signed as curriculum assistant in this project is invit 
to contact Dr. Joseph B. Hill, Coordinator, Curricula 
135 Van Ness Avenue, telephone 863-4680, by the e 
of May. 

Working with committees of teachers, the curricul 
assistant will write instructional guides and evalu 
materials relating to Negro history and the contributi 
of the Negro to American life and culture. Emph; 
will be at the elementary level, but attention will 
given to all instructional levels. 



J 



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-SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



NEWSLETTER 

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WAY 27 1968 



SAN FRAM6IS6© 
PUfcLIC LSBRASV 



VOLUME 39 



© 



MAY 27, H 



NUMBER 36 



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Bu Board Highlights 

Superintendent Proposes Budget 



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At the Tuesday, May 21, 1968 meeting of the Board of 

iducation, Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins presented 

lis 1968-1969 Preliminary Budget Proposal to the Board 

Education. (A more detailed outline of the budget 

iiimtontents will appear in the next Newsletter.) 

The General Fund budget now being proposed by the 
uperintendent totals $91,602,249, before any salary in- 
srease. This is an increase of $9,230,634 over the 1967-68 
ludget of $82,371,615 and is accounted for by inclusion 
if items required to conform to legal provisions or es- 
ablished policy, maintenance of present programs, class 
ize reduction (a $2,474,637 item), programs approved 
y the Board for 1968-69, negotiated agreements, and 
uperintendent's proposals. 

Total resources to finance the budget come to $94,- 
76,805. It is to be noted that 1.) the budget resources 
Exceed the expenditures by $2,774,556 and 2.) the ex- 
>enditures at the present time do not include any salary 
aises for certificated or classified personnel. 



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itew Aids for Hearing in Use 




>»id i-ec, a rive-year-old at Gough School (for children with 
EQVlSfnpaired hearing), learns to speak aided by some new equipment 
'Cquired by the District. New instructional media machines and 
laterials are being used in all District classrooms for children 
'ith impaired hearing. Mrs. Maurine Dolson, teacher at Gough, 
i seen supervising the use of some new overhead projection 
Equipment. 

Instructional media — a term used for what some call 
udio visual aids — is having and will have an even 
irger part to play in the education of hearing handi- 

( Continued on Page 4) 




Nathaniel H. Brooks, new 
Polytechnic Principal 



Board Appoints First District 
Negro High School Principal 

The first Negro 
high school principal 
in San Francisco was 
appointed to head 
Polytechnic High 
School by the Board 
of Education at its 
Tuesday, May 21, 
1 968 meeting with 
the strong recom- 
mendation of Super- 
intendent Robert E. 
Jenkins. 

He is Nathaniel H. 
Brooks, age 46, an 
outstanding Negro 
educator in East Palo 
Alto. Since the fall of 
1966 Mr. Brooks has been Vice Principal and Dean of 
Boys at Ravenswood High School in East Palo Alto. 

Dr. Jenkins says, "The record of Mr. Brooks makes 
it abundantly clear that he is qualified to be an out- 
standing principal of any high school. He has been out- 
standingly successful at Ravenswood High School in 
meeting the needs of all students including the large 
number of students from various ethnic groups." 

Brooks was born in Genoa, Arkansas. He is married 
with two children. He attended high school in Texar- 
kana, Arkansas, graduating in 1941. He received his 
AB degree in history and social sciences in 1948 from 
Arkansas AM & N College of Pine Bluff, Arkansas, and 
his MA in Education in 1964 from the University of 
California. 

Brooks has had experience as a teacher and coach in 
Yerger High School in Hope, Arkansas, from 1946 to 
1949, attended the University of California from 1950- 
51, and joined the Richmond Unified School District in 
1951 where he served as teacher, chairman of a mathe- 
matics department, as a counselor-dean and then as a 
counselor in DeAnza High School in Richmond, Cali- 
fornia- 

In 1965, Brooks was a member of the University of the 
Pacific summer faculty and served on a committee plan- 
ning a teacher training course on "Problems of the Dis- 
advantaged Youngster." 

(Continued on Page 4) 



NEWSLETTER 



May 27, 1968 



Compensatory Summer Program to Stress Continuous Education 



A Summer Reading Program designed to provide con- 
tinuing instruction in the language arts, especially read- 
ing, for students presently enrolled in the compensatory 
education program has been announced by Superintend- 
ent Robert E. Jenkins. 

The program has been planned to provide maximum 
flexibility of operation so that innovative approaches 
may be applied to the challenge of raising the reading 
achievement and motivational levels of students in- 
volved- 

The major focus of the program will be on reading: 
the aim of the program will be to strengthen the reading 
skills and the reading interests of the students so that 
their reading performance does not regress during the 
summer. It is hoped that in addition to holding their 
own, the students will show progress because of the sum- 
mer program. 

A major feature of the program will be the use of high 
school students and a few City College students from the 
target areas as aides to teachers and students in the 
program. 

Students in the classes will have the opportunity of 
receiving individual assistance from the aides and of 
identifying with someone who knows the world in which 
the student lives. The aides will be paid for doing a job 
that demands effort, responsibility, and may well be a 
spur to greater competence on the part of the aide. 

According to Victor Rossi, Supervisor, Compensatory 
Education, the general framework of the program at all 
divisional levels — elementary, junior high, and senior 
high — will be as follows: 

1. Each teacher will have 24 students for a specific 
length of time. The total number of students served will 
be 964. 

2. Each teacher will have eight student aides, that is, 

Galileo Takes Top ROTC Honors 



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Galileo High School was declared the winner for the third time of 
the ROTC Brigade Review and Drill Competition held recently at 
the Civic Auditorium in which over 1,100 high school cadets par- 
ticipated. Taking part in the award ceremonies from left to right 
are Major General Menist, Commanding General of the 91st 
Infantry Division; Walter Odonc, Acting Principal of Galileo; 
Cadet Lr. Col. Chin, Galileo; Col. J. H. Farren, Senior Army 
Instructor; Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins; and Sgt. Grady 
Benton, Senior Resident Army Instructor at Galileo. 



one aide for each three students; 256 aides will be em- 
ployed. 

3. There will be four teachers assigned to each schoo 
having the program; 32 teachers will be employed. 

4. The schools in which the program will be locatec 
are in the target area. (One exception is Balboa Higr 
which will serve students from the target area-) 

5. Supportive services and personnel will be available 

6. The program will be under the direction of th( 
Office of Compensatory Education through a specialh 
appointed coordinator. 

Schools involved in the program include the following 
Elementary — Anza, Bryant, Commodore Stockton 
Raphael Weill, and Sir Francis Drake; Junior High — 
Everett; Senior High — Balboa and Galileo. 

The recent evaluation report on the ESEA program 
by the Stanford Research Institute suggested that ;! 
"long-term program of sustained low intensity extending 
over the entire year may be more effective than a long 
term program of high intensity for nine months that i 
followed by a three-month period of zero intensity." 

This recommendation came as a restult of evaluatin; 
test scores which showed growth from October to Ma 
but a recession in scores the following October as co: 
pared to results in May. 



• SOCIAL SERVICES MONTHLY PROGRAM 

The San Francisco Social Service Department has an 
nounced that it sponsors a monthly "Person to Persoi 1 
Program" which may be of interest to principals, coun 
selors, and teachers. 

The program is designed to inform citizens of th! 
range of services the department provides and the jo( 
the staff does in helping people in need to become mor! 
self-sufficient. 

The program is held on the third Friday of eacl 
month from 12 noon to 4 p.m. For information abou: 
the program contact the Social Services Commissioj 
Secretary, telephone 558-4018. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 36 



May 27, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



May 27, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Language Arts Enrichment Through Typing 



Enthusiasm is running high this semester at Sheridan 
School for a pilot program designed to enrich the school's 
language arts program through an audio lingual ap- 
proach to typing. 

Through the cooperation of the IBM Company, 16 
"Selectric" typewriters and two IBM "Executaries" (lis- 
tening equipment with headsets) have been loaned to 
« the school to use in this unique program. 
ll By using this equipment and Dr. Allen Lloyd's You 
al Learn to Type recordings and books (as well as original 
drills and instructions taped by the participating teach- 
in ers), the 100-plus children involved in the program have 
in. experienced new dimensions in the language arts, 
i . According to Mrs. Thelma Boyer, Sheridan Principal, 
hot only have the students learned to type — an accomp- 
li [lishment in itself for this age group — but improvement 
il has been noted in the students' achievement in the whole 
& range of English skills. 

. Many of the typing assignments are actually subtle 
ai , lessons in mathematics, punctuation, spelling, grammar, 
history, capitalization, and so on. Some of the lessons are 
,ii E presented in the form of word games, requiring students 
\l, to think through answers before typing them out. 
m '. The program at Sheridan involved over 50 students in 
the fall term and includes over 100 students this spring 
i:erm. In addition to children participating from regular 
classes, students enrolled in classes for the gifted, men- 
tally retarded, educationally handicapped, and in the 
15 :t ;ompensatory program have also taken part. 

Reaction from the children to the program has been 

coin highly favorable. Many feel that it has helped them to 

listen, concentrate, read, and spell better. They say it has 

» 'I riven them skills they never would have had an oppor- 

» I 1 unity to develop before. 



EVALUATIONS DUE NEXT MONTH 

The Personnel Division has announced that rat- 
ings are due for probationary personnel by June 7, 
1968. Rating forms are being sent to principals and 
other administrators. 

The Policy Manual of the Board of Education 
states, in part (P 4117): 
"The Principal, near the end of each semester, 
on dates to be established by the Personnel 
Coordinator, shall submit to the Superintend- 
ent, on forms prepared for the purpose, written 
reports on the service of all full-time proba- 
tionary and long-term substitute teachers; on 
any probationary assistant principal or de- 
partment head; on any teacher, when re- 
quested by the Superintendent because of 
recent transfer or other reason; or on any 
teacher whose service has been found unsatis- 
factory." 



IN MEMORIAM 

Arthur Swart 
Elnora Fuller 



In order to properly evaluate the program and obtain 
hard core data, the District's Bureau of Research is 
assisting in the tabulation of test data. Mrs. Boyer says 
that thus far the initial reactions and test results look 
most favorable. 




Students at Sheridan School have been given enrichment experi- 
ences in the language arts program this school year through a 
unique typing course utilizing electric typewriters on loan from 
the IBM Company. Pictured above watching student Ben Barfield 
go through a typing exercise are (left to right) Mrs. Thelma 
Boyer, Principal; James Healy, Assistant Principal; and Mrs. 
Barbara Locher, Teacher. 

• PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES CREDENTIAL 

Some administrative positions, as well as all secondary 
counseling assignments, are dependent on the applicant 
possessing a Pupil Personnel Services Credential. Milton 
F. Reiterman, Personnel Coordinator, urges teachers to 
apply now for a Standard Designated Services Creden- 
tial with a specialization in Pupil Personnel Services 
which will be issued on a partial fulfillment basis, pro- 
viding the application is filed before September 1, 1968. 

The credential will be granted to an applicant meet- 
ing all of the following requirements: a.) Two years of 
successful teaching experience in the public schools or 
private schools of equivalent status; b.) Completion of 
six semester hours of course work selected from the fol- 
lowing areas: dynamics of individual behavior; pupil 
personnel services concepts and procedures; counseling 
theory and procedures; measurements theory and pro- 
cedures; group process theory and procedures; educa- 
tional and career planning; research methodology; re- 
medial and special education; laws relating to children; 
and organization of pupil personnel services; c.) State- 
ment that applicant intends to complete all require- 
ments for the credential. 

A credential granted on the basis of a partial fulfill- 
ment of requirements under these regulations authorizes 
service as a pupil personnel worker in the areas of child 
welfare and attendance and pupil counseling, including 
rehabilitation counseling. 

Special questions about this credential may be direct- 
ed to Mrs. Ursula McHugh, Credentials Secretary, 
Room 116, 135 Van Ness Avenue, telephone 863-4680, 
Extension 206. 



NEWSLETTER 



May 27, 196a 



Announcements 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, June 4, 1968, 4 p.m. Regular meeting, 
170 Fell Street. 



SPRING SEMESTER 1968 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION DATES 



School 

Abraham Lincoln 

Balboa 

Galileo 

George Washington 

Lowell 

Mission 

Polytechnic 

Woodrow Wilson 

Samuel Gompers 

John O'Connell 



Day 

Tussday 

Thursday 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Friday 

Tuesday 

Friday 



Date 


Time 


June 11 


8 p.m. 


June 13 


8 p.m. 


June 10 


8 p.m 


June 12 


8 p.m 


June 13 


2 p-m. 


June 11 


8 p.m 


June 12 


8 p.m 


June 14 


8 p.m 


June 11 


8 p.m 


June 7 


8 p.m 



Location 

Masonic Temple 
Masonic Temple 
Masonic Temple 
U.S.F. Gymnasium 
Masonic Temple 
U.S.F. Gymnasium 
Masonic Temple 
Masonic Temple 
Bayview Federal Savings 
Mission High Auditorium 



• DINNER FOR ROSE M. LAGOMARSINO 

A dinner honoring Rose M. Lagomarsino, Principal of 
Jean Parker School, will be given by the faculty at the 
Fairmont Hotel at 7 p.m., Thursday, June 6, on the 
occasion of Miss Lagomarsino's retirement from the Dis- 
trit. Inquiries can be made by calling Mrs. Chan at 474- 
1468 or Mrs.,Chu at 474-8885 after 4 p.m. before May 
29. 



... New Polytechnic Principal Appointed 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Brooks has worked as a consultant in minority prob- 
lems for the J. C. Penney Company in Richmond, Cali- 
fornia, and has served as a master teacher with the Uni- 
versity of California Intern Teacher Program for train- 
ing teachers to serve in "depressed area" schools. 

The new principal is a member of Phi Alpha Theta 
(Honorary Historical Society), Sigma Nu (Honor Stu- 
dents Society), Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, and is a 
member of the NAACP. 

Brooks will assume his new principalship effective 
July 1, 1968. 

. . . New Equipment for Handicapped 

(Continued from Page 1) 
capped students in the San Francisco schools. 

The new machines and materials are being put to use 
by teachers as the equipment becomes available from 
Captioned Films for the Deaf, a section of the Office of 
Education in the Department of Health, Education, and 
Welfare. 

Overhead projectors are currently being used in all 
classrooms for children with impaired hearing. Each 
classroom is equipped with two projection screens, one 
angled for use with the overhead projector and the other 
for use of 16 millimeter films, 35 millimeter slides, and 
other materials to be projected. The new projectors 
being supplied are remotely controlled so that the teach- 
er may stay in front of the class and explain the material 
that is seen on the screen. 

When used properly, teachers have found that instruc- 
tional media stimulates interest in subjects, makes ma- 
terial more interesting, and helps students learn faster. 



SUMMER READING DIAGNOSTIC CLINIC 

Referrals to the Summer Reading Diagnostic Clini 
are due at the Central Office, attention of Mrs. Mar 
Ellen Born on or before June 1 . Children will be seen i 
Golden Gate School for three or four appointments dui 
ing vacation for intelligence and reading tests as well a 
social work and medical services in order to furnis 
schools and parents with a complete reading diagnosi: 
In addition, children completing the diagnostic batter 
will be considered for one-to-one remediation during th 
school year by the 10 specialists of the Reading Center 

: 






• SCOPE TO HOLD ANNUAL MEETING 

The Service Committee on Public Educatio 
(SCOPE) announces that its annual meeting will ri 
held at 8:15 p.m. on Monday, May 27, at Homestea — 
Savings and Loan, 22nd Avenue and Geary Boulevaro 'j. 
Dr. Bernard McKenna, Associate Dean of Education " 
San Francisco State College, will speak on the top 
"Newer Patterns of School Staffing." Election of office 
will also take place. 



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SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



JUN3 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 39 



JUNE 3, 1968 



NUMBER 37 



$91,602,249 General Fund Proposal 



Preliminary Budget Presented for Study 



On Tuesday, May 21, 1968, Superintendent Robert E. 

Jenkins presented his 1968-1969 Preliminary Budget to 

the Board of Education in what he termed a work sheet 

_ ,or programmed budget approach. The Board of Educa- 

f htion was not asked to take action on this Preliminary 

i Budget. Superintendent Jenkins has stated, "This Pre- 

y. Jiminary Budget contains many workable, viable, urgent- 

. ,ly needed plans which we can and should complete as 

funds are available." 

'•°"1 The General Fund budget now being proposed by the 
1 - Superintendent totals $91,602,249, before any salary in- 
"llcrease. This is an increase of $9,230,634 over the 1967-68 
"'■ budget of $82,371,615 and is accounted for by inclusion 
'" >of items required to conform to legal provisions or estab- 
lished policy, maintenance of present programs, class size 
reduction (a $2,474,637 item), programs approved by 
the Board for 1968-69, negotiated agreements, and Su- 
perintendent's proposals. 

I'.:' 

si" II Total resources to finance the budget come to $94,- 
Tour of Facilities 



Feathers See District Warehouse 




he School District Warehouse was visited by groups of teachers 
nd other school personnel during the recent Open House. Ap- 
roximately 125 teachers toured the facilities at 1000 Selby 
treet to observe the supplies and furniture storage and handling 
Deration. In the picture above, Edgar Lahl, Supervisor of Sup- 
lies, is showing a group of teachers a supplies order that is 
eing filled and readied for shipment to the schools. Each 
sacher who toured the warehouse was appropriately presented 
ith a personal desk pen set with the inscription "SFUSD — 
Warehouse Visit Day." 



376,805 using the maximum tax rate. It is to be noted 
that 1.) the budget resources exceed the expenditures by 
$2,774,556 and 2.) the expenditures at the present time 
do not include any salary raises for certificated or classi- 
fied personnel. 

The Superintendent has been meeting with the various 
groups who have made salary proposals during the past 
week or so, and will come to the Board of Education 
with his salary recommendations during June. 

Superintendent Jenkins has expressed his hope that ad- 
ditional funds for the District may be forthcoming from 
a possible increase in the assessment valuation of the city 
and from several State bills, such as SB 702 (Petris), 
AB 2080 (Brown), AB 866 (Burton), and SB 256 
(Marks-Moscone) , which may bring extra monies to San 
Francisco if they pass. 

If the extra money is not available, the Superintendent 
has indicated that at least some of the budgeted programs 
must be phased in over a longer period of time. 

The State Education Code prescribes that each school 
district is legally required to conform to the following 
calendar in taking action on its budget: 



1. On or before July 1 
budget 



2. July 25 to 31 
official newspaper 



adoption of publication 
publication of the budget in the 



3. August 1 to 7 — public hearing of the budget 

4. On or before August 10 — adoption of final budget. 



•GOVERNOR'S DELINQUENCY CONFERENCE 

Robert Figone, District vocational counselor at the 
junior high school level and former member of the Cali- 
fornia Youth Authority Board, participated in the Gov- 
ernor's Conference on Delinquency Prevention in Sacra- 
mento. 

Mr. Figone was nominated by the San Francisco Ju- 
venile Justice Commission to represent the city. The pur- 
pose of the conference was to identify specific community 
problems relating to crime and delinquency and the 
techniques for developing prevention programs at the 
community level. 

Follow-up will include meetings to deal with the pre- 
vention of juvenile delinquency and will involve various 
agencies and community leaders. 



NEWSLETTER 



June 3, 1968 ( 



Health Career Scholarships 

Five health career scholarships totaling $2,500 are 
being offered local senior high and college students by 
the San Francisco Chapter, National Foundation — 
March of Dimes. 

Vincent I. Compagno, Chapter chairman, said the 
awards are made annually as "starter incentives" to help 
fill critical shortages in the health fields. 

To qualify, high school seniors must be planning to 
enter a regionally accredited college or university this 
fall as full-time students preparing to complete either 
diploma or degree requirements in nursing, occupational 
therapy, physical therapy, speech pathology, and audi- 
ology. 

Medical social work awards will be made to college 
sophomores, and medical awards will be made to final 
year college undergraduates who have been accepted 
for admission this fall to an AMA-approved medical 
school. Funds may be used for any educational expense, 
Compagno said. 

Application forms have been supplied all high school 
principals and administrative offices of San Francisco 
State and City Colleges. 



© 'OLD TYPE' CREDENTIALS AVAILABLE 

Milton F. Reiterman, Personnel Coordinator, has re- 
ceived a report from the State Department of Education, 
marked urgent, which requests that he notify all person- 
nel of the immediate effectiveness of Senate Bill 31 which 
has been signed into law by the Governor. SB 3 1 provides 
that "old type" teaching credentials will be issued by the 
State Department until September 15, 1968, but not 
thereafter, as follows : 

1. Any individual who had completed two years of 
college or was teaching in a foreign country on November 
1, 1963, and has completed the requirements for the 
credential by September 15, 1968, inclusive, may obtain 
any of the following: "General" teaching credentials 
(Elementary, Junior High, Senior High, Junior College) ; 
Librarianship ; Credential for Exceptional Children; 
"Specials" — Music, Art, Industrial Arts, Homemaking, 
etc.; Driver Education; and Adult Credential in Desig- 
nated Subjects. 

2. Any individual who had completed all requirements 
for an "old type" credential authorizing service in a 
supervisory or administrative position by December 31, 
1963, inclusive, and who had not previously been issued 
such an administration or supervision credential can ob- 
tain any such "old type" credential by applying for it. 
Credentials affected by this section are the following: 
Elementary Administration; Secondary Administration; 
General Administration; Secondary School Administra- 
tion Credential in Technical and Industrial Education; 
Supervision Credential; General Pupil Personnel Services 
Credential; Health and Development Credential; Voca- 
tional Class A Credential (with coordination and super- 
vision authorization) . 

Direct all questions concerning the above to Mrs. 
Ursula McHugh, Credentials Secretary, Room 116, 135 
Van Ness Avenue, telephone 863-4680, Extension 206. 



For Handicapped 

Free Swimming Therapy Offered 

The San Francisco Lodge No. 3 of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks has a free program of physical 
therapy through swimming. This activity is limited to 
boys who have muscular disabilities (post polio, etc.) or 
other physical problems that can be aided by aqua- 
therapeutic exercise. 

The Elk's program of swimming and physical educa- 
tion for handicapped children is under the supervision 
of Byron Summers, a world champion long-distance 
swimmer and holder of seven world swimming records. 
It should be especially noted that this program is free, is 
open to all crippled children except those suffering from| 
disabilities (i.e. bowel or bladder control) that woul 
preclude participation and is conducted each Sunday o: 
the year by Mr. Summers, Joseph D'Acquisto, and othe: 
members of the B.P.O.E. #3. 

Teachers in San Francisco are invited to seek further 
information or applications to forward to parents from 
Mr. Cornelius Murphy, Assistant Principal at Horao 
Mann Junior High School. 

• BENJAMIN FRANKLIN PHOTO AWARDS 

The Benjamin Franklin Junior High School Photog- 
raphy Club has won ten National Awards in the Schol- 
astic Magazine Contest sponsored by Eastman Kodak 
more than any junior high school in the country. Onh 
11 National Awards were made in the state of Cali- 
fornia. 

Winners included Peter Homann (one first, twe 
thirds, three honorable mentions); Donnie Yates (twe 
honorable mentions); Glenn Sugiyama (one honorabk 
mention); and Alden Horn (one honorable mention) 
Harold Pfohl, a junior at George Washington Higl 
School, won an honorable mention in the senior division 
The total prizes amounted to $230. A special award bV 
the club's members went to Leamon Lovelace who waj 
a subject in three of the winning entries. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 39, No. 37 June 3, 1968 

135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



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June 3, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



For Hunters Point-Bayview Area 



Submit Project SEED Funding Application 



The submission of an application to provide funds 
under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Edu- 
cation Act for the Southeast Educational Development 
proposal (Project SEED) was approved by the Board of 
-Education at the May 21, 1968 meeting upon recom- 
mendation of Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins. 

The primary purpose of the SEED program is to 
bring the Hunters Point-Bayview Community and the 
School District together in a close, cooperative relation- 
ship so that better educational programs can be provided 
for that community — programs which may also prove to 
be relevant to social integration as well as being exemp- 
lary to the rest of the School District and other metro- 
ipolitan areas. Specific objectives for the SEED program 
iare organized under two major components: the plan- 
ning phase and the operational phase. 

The United States Office of Education invited the 
.School District to submit a proposal concerned with 
some of the major problems facing the schools, and the 
Hunters Point-Bayview was selected as the area for the 
project which has been developed. 

"There has been intensive community involvment and 
participation in the identification of needs, in the deter- 
mination of project components, and in the development 
of the written proposal," says Dr. Jenkins. He added that 
this project is a partnership of the community and Dis- 
trict, but within the legal framework of the District. 

The initial application requests funds for the planning 
of program, for conducting pilot activities, and for op- 
eration of program. Development would be in three 
phases and would require funding as follows: July 1, 
1968 to June 30, 1969 — $906,933; July 1, 1969 to June 
:30, 1970 — $1,342,444; and July 1, 1970 to June 30, 
[1971 — $1,480,329. The total figure requested is 
$3,729,706. 
, Funding of the program would make it possible to 

1. establish a school-community educational planning 
affice in the Hunters Point-Bayview area 
, 2. create three pilot first grade demonstration classes 
n the SEED area to begin September, 1968 

3. plan and design an elementary school relevant to 
:he special needs of the children in the area to begin 
operating in February, 1969 

4. sensitize school personnel to present-day racial and 
:ultural realities through a variety of means, including 
n-service training 

• COACHES' SCHOLARSHIP AWARDED 

Dwight Spilman, graduating senior from Mission High 
.School, has been awarded the San Francisco Association 
Athletic Coaches and Physical Education Teachers Ath- 
etic Scholarship for 1968. The scholarship and the John 
Clarke Trophy were awarded during the AAA Champ- 
onship baseball game by Erv Delman, Association Pres- 
dent. Dwight achieved an outstanding scholarship rec- 
■rd and has captained the cross country and varsity 
rack teams. 



5. acquaint parents and community with the philoso- 
phy and dynamics of the schools 

6. evaluate programs planned under SEED and im- 
prove and expand the best of them 

7. evaluate present school practices and determine 
needed changes 

8. expand and improve training programs foi school 
and community aides 

According to Dr. Jenkins, the proposal as finally de- 
veloped should provide for programs in the following 
areas: pre-school experiences, more individualized in- 
struction, staff development, orientation entry into the 
world of work, curricular changes (including the inte- 
grated curriculum), parent and community participa- 
tion and involvement, health needs, and social and psy- 
chological needs. 

In addition to providing for the Hunters Point-Bay- 
view area, the proposal includes a request for funds for 
the Ocean View-Merced Heights-Ingleside area (OMI 
Program). If granted, it will enable the education com- 
ponent of the OMI program to continue and extend 
special services needed to help reverse the threatened 
ghettoization of the area, and, in fact, help to stabilize 
and improve the community. Included are the opera- 
tional and planning phases. The planning section will 
cover the clustering of schools into a sub-unit, the intro- 
duction of school-community liaison workers, and the 
development of outstanding programs. In the operational 
section will be developed a Block Action Structure and 
a Tutorial Program. 



Dr. Steig, Dr. Hill 

Key Administrators to Retire 




Two Central Office Administrators, Dr. Lester Steig, Coordinator, 
Salaries (left), and Dr. Joseph B. Hill, Coordinator, Curriculum 
(right), will retire from the District at the conclusion of the 
school year. Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins (center) is seen 
extending his best wishes at a recent staff meeting. Dr. Steig has 
served the District for 22 years, as salary coordinator for 21 
years. Dr. Hill has been with the District for 33 years, having 
served as Teacher, Principal of Abraham Lincoln High School, 
and Curriculum Coordinator. 



NEWSLETTER 



June 3, 1968J 



Urban-Suburban Proposal 

Mill Valley Offer Is Approved 

A proposal by the Mill Valley schools to accept some 
25 students from San Francisco target area schools was 
approved by the Board of Education at its May 7, 1968 
meeting upon recommendation of Superintendent Robert 
E. Jenkins. 

The plan will involve students in grades K through 5, 
with participation in the program on a voluntary basis. 
The project marks the beginning of an innovative con- 
cept in urban-suburban education. 

The State funds normally received for the 25 children 
per ADA will be relinquished to the Mill Valley District, 
and bus transportation to Mill Valley will be provided 
by the Marin County Schools. 

The new program will start in September, 1970, unless 
federal funding can be procured to provide prefabricated 
buildings. 

• VISIT TO WORK TRAINING PROGRAM 

Two groups of educators visited the Out-of-School 
Work Training Program at Ft. Miley Veterans Hospital 
recently during the California State Federation for Ex- 
ceptional Children meeting at the Jack Tar Hotel. Mrs. 
Peggy Lucas, Director of Volunteer Services, who has 
helped build the work training program for adjustment 
classes for the past five years, conducted a tour of the 
work training stations in the hospital. Visitors were able 
to see students in the work-study situations and talk 
with them about the jobs they are doing. 

The visitors were impressed by the manner in which 
the students were performing their tasks and the ability 
with which they were able to discuss their particular 
phase of the work. The enthusiastic support of the hospi- 
tal staff and the pride of accomplishment expressed by 
the students have contributed to the program's success. 



Future Homemakers Hold Picnic 




Food, fun, and friendship were the order of the day when some 
200 Future Homemakers of America members from A. P. Gian- 
nini, Aptos, Francisco, James Denman, James Lick, Luther Bur- 
bank, and Polytechnic gathered at Sigmund Stern Grove recently 
for the group's annual picnic and playday. 




Diamond Heights Receives Flag 
From Purple Heart Organization 

The Woodrow Wil- 
son Unit No. 15 of 
the Ladies' Auxiliary 
to the Military Or 
der of the Purple 
Heart presented an 
American Flag to the 
Diamond Heights 
School at a brief 
ceremony during a 
recent assembly. The 
members who made 
the presentation are 
all past presidents of 
the organization 

Pictured in the ac- 
companying photo- 
graph are Mrs. Wil- 
liam Goggin, Department Hospital Chairman; Mrs. 
Charles Oliveira, Department Chaplain; Mrs. Tessie 
Simon, Patriotic Instructor; Myrna Graves, Diamonc 
Heights Principal; and Mrs. Charles Carlston, Depart- 
ment Parliamentarian. 



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Flag presentation ceremonies at 
Diamond Heights. 



Scholarship Winners Announced 

The State Scholarship Commission has announced the 
names of the District students who are winners in the 
1968 Awards Program. The students are now eligibl 
for scholarship aid up to $1,500 annually for tuition am 
fees. The awards are renewable each year if academii 
and financial eligibility is maintained. The winners are 
as follows: 

Abraham Lincoln: James Christman, Minnie Gee, Rober 
Simon, Barbara Stutting. 

Balboa: Kip Brockman, Lance Elberling, Frank Gonzales 
Arthur Schmitt. 

Galileo: Thomas Gin, Lorraine Horn, Dack Lee, Lawrenc 
Lee, Paul Perdue, Lester Toy, Linda Won, James Wong. 

George Washington: Beth Abiko, Joanne Bernstein, Lelan 
Chan, Tim Chin, Beverly Ching, William Dukeminier, Johi 
Fong, Pamela Hee, Kirk Johnson, Alexandra Laboutin, Viole 
Lee, Roger Matsui, Gita Metzger, Glenn Omi, Judi Sui, Lloyq 
Taketa, Louise Wong, Reynold Wong, Shelton Yee. 

Lowell: Mary Anderson, Regina Basuino, James Branch, Wal- 
lace Chan, Perry Chia, David Chin, Alvin Chun, Wilbert Chunl 
Joni Davidson, Patricia Dilucchio, Cheryl Fong, Edison Fong 
Hanlon Fong, Glenn Gan, Edward Gin, Robert Gordon, Doug 
las Grano, Aden Hoh, Wendell Horn, Alexander Ivanoff, Shir 
ley Jang, Teresa Jen, Deborah Jew, Mary Jew, Richard Jew 
David Kapahu, Katherine Karass, Kenneth Keller, Barry Kern 
field, Laura Kransdorf, Cecilia Lee, Russell Leong, Samnr 
Leong, Henry Lew, Susan Loderse, Steven Louie, John Low 
Tailen Mak, jack Margid, Joseph Matranga, Francis McCarthy 
Fred Mourad, Mabel Ng, Nelda Ong, Maxine Orr, Marvii 
Quan, Leon Starno, Lynn Trent, Robert Wang, Paul Wilnei 
Albert Wong, Annie Wong, Francis Wong, Marilyn Won 
Maurice Wong, Norman Wong, Walter Yuen. 

Mission: Susan Hennigh, Richard Holman. 

Polytechnic: Jose Castromayor, Mary Rexroth. 

Last year the District had 42 finalists; this year then 
are 96, the number more than doubling. 



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1* June 3, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



ix Week Summer Course 



Marina Students to Attend Exeter Academy 



! Marina Junior High School will have the privilege 
his year of sending five students and one teacher-ob- 
;erver to the summer program of Phillips Exeter Aca- 
lemy at Exeter, New Hampshire. 

This is the third year that San Francisco has partici- 
jated in the program which will send 470 students to the 
\cademy from various parts of the nation to enrich 
iheir academic backgrounds through the Special Urban 
program (SPUR). 

■ Marina students Charlene Lai, Kevin Fong, Laureen 
fang, Marcia Wong, and Vicki Downey will be accomp- 
inied by William Armstrong, social studies teacher. The 
urogram will run for six weeks. 

I For the past two years Horace Mann Junior High 
'School provided the students for the SPUR program, 
vlarina will send students this year and next year. 

The five students will take courses in English composi- 
ion and literature as well as work in mathematics geared 
.specially for students who expect to study a first course 
.a algebra the next school year. 

; At Exeter the students will live in single room dormi- 
tory facilities. They will be able to avail themselves of 
he following activities: library, music and art, field 
rips, and a supervised sports program. 
; The program is designed to "elevate personal stan- 



dards of achievement, to create and enforce the belief 
that there is opportunity if the student will aspire." 




Five Marina Junior High School Students and one teacher-observ- 
er will take part in the summer program at the Phillips Exeter 
Academy in New Hampshire this summer. Participants in the six- 
week program are viewed above with Armond DeMartini, Marina 
Principal. The students who will attend are (left to right) Lau- 
reen Jang, Maria Wong, Vicki Downey, Charlene Lai, and Kevin 
Fong. 



1968 Summer School Administrative Appointments Approved by Board 



1 The following Summer School administrative appoint- 
nents were approved by the Board of Education at its 
slay 7, 1968 meeting upon recommendation of the 
uperintendent: 

Senior High 
Balboa — Alan B. Fibish, Principal; Billie T. Scott 
nd Warren E- Johnston, Assistant Principals; Galileo — 
.eslie F. Burke, Principal; Frances Tywoniak and Philip 
i. Lum, Assistant Principals; George Washington — 
ohn A. Rocky, Principal; Barbara F. Avery and Adolph 
lubamersky, Assistant Principals; Lowell — Allen D. 
:'orlakson, Principal; Patricia Keenan and Albert F. 
: futi, Assistant Principals. 

Junior High 

. Everett — Carlos V. Cornejo, Head Teacher; Victoria 
rooks, Assistant Head Teacher; Herbert Hoover — 
aymond L. del Portillo, Head Teacher; Dolores V. 

iianna, Assistant Head Teacher; Luther Burbank ■ — 
imes J. Keolker, Head Teacher; Doris Wecsen, Assist- 
it Head Teacher; Pelton — William P. Keesey, Head 
eacher; Pearl Lapidaire, Assistant Head Teachers; 

joosevelt — Walter G. Phillips, Head Teacher; Norma 
1. Shepard, Assistant Head Teacher; Francisco (Sum- 
er Bilingual Program) — Roland Demarais, Head 
eacher; Ann G- McHugh, Assistant Head Teacher. 
The following summer appointments were approved 

t the May 21 meeting of the Board: 



Elementary 
Alamo — Carol B. Choye, Head Teacher; Leonard E. 
Silverman, Assistant Head Teacher; Alvarado — Mary 
E. Patteson, Head Teacher; Edwin G. Waters, Assistant 
Head Teacher; Anza — Thomas P. Alexander, Head 
Teacher; Nancy Lee Baker, Assistant Head Teacher; 
Bryant — William E. Humphreys, Head Teacher; Gwyn 
E. Peakes, Assistant Head Teacher; Commodore Sloat 

— Hal J. Solin, Head Teacher; Mae E. Threadgill, As- 
sistant Head Teacher; Commodore Stockton — David 
Freed, Head Teacher; Joyce S. Wooster, Assistant Head 
Teacher; Lawton — Doris S. Linnenbach, Head Teach- 
er; John G. Campbell, Assistant Head Teacher; Monroe 

— Lois Ann Sims, Head Teacher; Sofia L. Prudenciado, 
Assistant Head Teacher; Raphael Weill — Adrienne L. 
McKelvie, Head Teacher; Robert D. Cook, Assistant 
Head Teacher; Sir Francis Drake — Milton J. Bonzell, 
Head Teacher; Paul B. Reinhertz, Assistant Head 
Teacher; Treasure Island — George Kochian, Head 
Teacher; Pauline G. Harris, Assistant Head Teacher; 
Chinese Bilingual Program, Garfield — Roger M, Walsh, 
Head Teacher; Rosemary Chan, Assistant Head Teacher; 
Jean Parker — Mayme Chin, Head Teacher; Victor 
Low, Assistant Head Teacher; Spanish Bilingual Pro- 
gram, Hawthorne — Peter J. Gonzalez, Head Teacher; 
Ernestine F. Trujillo, Assistant Head Teacher. 



NEWSLETTER 



June 3, 196) 



Freedoms Foundation 

Clarendon School Award Made 




Clarendon School is the proud recipient of a 1968 Freedoms 
Foundation Award earned by the school's gifted class for its 
study of the legislative, judicial, and executive functions of the 
national government and the subsequent development of a school 
constiution. Participating in the award ceremonies were Mrs. 
Harriet Wolleson, Principal; Mrs. Alice Shea of the Freedoms 
Foundation; Michael Scafini, Clarendon sixth grade student; and 
Carol Held, Teacher in Charge of the Gifted Class. The group is 
posed before an oriental garden created by the students in Marie 
Mathio's sixth grade class. 

• CITY COLLEGE JOB FAIR 

Fifty professional recruitment teams representing lead- 
ing business, industry, and government organizations 
from the five San Francisco Bay Area counties partici- 
pated in the 13th Annual City College of San Francisco 
Engineering-Business Graduate Recruitment Day re- 
cently- 
Initiated 13 years ago to facilitate the transition of the 
college graduate from the campus to the world of work, 
the annual Job Fair brings together the prospective em- 
ployer and the trained graduate in a professional setting 
during which personal interviews are conducted leading 
to offers of full-time positions in a wide variety of occu- 
pational areas. 

The Job Fair is an activity of the college placement 
program and is coordinated by Joseph A. Amori, Direc- 
tor of Personnel Placement Services. 



• NSF IN-SERVICE INSTITUTE 

The National Science Foundation announces an in- 
service institute in the "Earth Science Curriculum Pro- 
ject Approach" to be held at San Francisco State Col- 
lege from September, 1968 through May, 1969. In gen- 
eral, classes will meet on Saturday mornings. For 
information and applications, interested teachers should 
contact Dr. Raymond Sullivan, Director, Department of 
Geology, San Francisco State College, San Francisco 
94132. Applications must be received by July 1, 1968. 

• NAVAL RESERVE APPOINTMENT 

James Witt, District driver training instructor at John 
O'Conncll Vocational High School, has recently received 
his captaincy in the Naval Reserve. Mr. Witt is now 
commanding officer of the Naval Reserve Mobilization 
Division 12-6 (M) in San Mateo. 



I 

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Community, Pupil Center Opens 

The opening of the District's first Community am 
Pupil Services Center, located at 5273 Third Street, wa 
celebrated recently with a special Open House Day 

Residents of the Hunters Point area, parents, busines 
representatievs and workers in the area, and police offi 
cers shared refreshments with school principals and facul 
ties, nurses, social workers, community teachers, psychol 
ogists, speech therapists, and attendance supervisors i: 
the Center offices, a remodeled store on Third Street, 

Representatives from the following agencies in th 
community attended the function: Legal Assistanc 
Foundation, Office of Economic Opportunity Home an 
Health Service, Child Psychiatric Clinic, Mt. St. Joseph 
Home for Girls, Neighborhood Co-op, and Special Serv 
ices Centers for Pregnant Girls. 

The opening of the Center offices marks an expansio 
of the school-community relations program — a broac 
ening of the dialogue between District personnel an 
community residents. Supportive services staff membei 
work as a team to serve the schools and people living i 
the Hunters Point - Bayview District. 



• BALBOA HIGH GRADUATES HONORED 

Two recent Balboa High School graduates have bee 
honored by appointments to United States Servic 
Academies. 

Lance Elberling, class of June, 1967 has received a 
appointment to Annapolis, and Caesar Lucas, class ( 
February, 1968 has been honored with an appointmer 
to West Point. 

Caesar's brother, Cornelio, Balboa class of Januar 
1967 is a Congressional nominee for the Air Fori 
Academy and is waiting for a decision on his status. 



5th Graders from Hawaii 

Commodore Sloat Greets Guest 



:\ 




A group of 31 fifth-graders from Pauoa Elementary Sch 
Honolulu, Hawaii, were recent guests at Commodore Sloat Schoc 
The visit was the culminating activity of the class' study of tl 
United States. Cathy Nakamaru (left) of Pauoa School and 
pen pal, Michelle Dennis of Commodore Sloat (right), are set 
taking turns completing a lesson during the visit. The Paul 
children were luncheon guests at the school and spent ten daj 
touring California. 



line 3, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



In-service Course 



Luther Burbank Looks at Human Relations 



: "Human Relations — A Mingling of Minds — A 
tudy of important social issues, community programs, 
nd new ways of translating our knowledge into better 
.nderstanding." 

'< This is the summary which is found on the opening 
iage of the program booklet of the Human Relations 
ourse which has been conducted at Luther Burbank 
lunior High School this past year. 

[ It has set the tone for the ambitious program which 
[ (as been spearheaded by Principal James J. Hamrock, 
"|!r. and planned and executed by the school's faculty. 

[ The concept of this unusual in-service course was en- 
! endered some two years ago by a faculty Human Rela- 
} |.ons Committee which was seeking ways of helping stu- 
dents, parents, teachers, and community members to 
' 'etter understand each other. 

I Ideas for the course were discussed, sifted, and re- 
fined, and a proposal recommending the project for the 

,uther Burbank faculty was submitted to and approved 

lly James Dierke, Assistant Superintendent for Junior 

[igh Schools. 

fr '|l Mr. Hamrock gave his full support to the proposal, 

llnd, in September 1967, the faculty-run in-service pro- 

■ram was initiated with one unit of non-college credit 

1 1 iffered to those who were interested. 

During the semester the faculty took a long, hard look 

lit social and educational programs for minority group 

'lembers, studied techniques for solving social problems, 

[■nd discussed recommended changes where problems 

" I , <risted. 

I I Faculty response to the semester program was positive, 
lis revealed in responses to a questionnaire, and in Feb- 
• lary 1968 the number of meetings scheduled was 

publed and two units of non-college increment credit 
'ere offered. 

Weekly meetings held at the school have drawn from 
) to 80 faculty members at each session. According to 
oris Wecsen, one of the planners, teacher support of 
le program has been good because the sessions have had 
■mething important to say, teachers were deeply in- 
)lved, and lines of communication between school, 
)me, and community were kept open. 

The weekly meetings featured a large number of 
lests who came to the school to talk to and with the 
i.culty. They included social workers, doctors, teachers 
nd students from other schools and other districts, psy- 
niatrists, administrators, artists, entertainers, attorneys, 
immunity leaders, community organizers, radio per- 
jnalities, government employees, civil rights leaders, 
id professors. 

', An evaluation committee of Luther Burbank teachers 
• compiling a list of recommendations for possible 
aanges at the school which resulted from insights 
idned through the course. A second list of recommenda- 
l>ns with District- wide ramifications will be presented 
■ Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins. 



Mrs. Clarice Miles, school social worker and course 
planner, states that the close teamwork of the faculty 
and the willingness of so many to listen to all kinds of 
ideas and expressions of values contributed significantly 
to the success of the program. 

Members of the Luther Burbank Human Relations 
Committee have included Joseph Luppino (chairman), 
Mrs. Clarice Miles (assistant chairman), Mrs. Betty 
Baham, Joan Catelli, Anthony Clancy, Lee Diamond, 
John Klobucar, Mrs. Florence Morris, Victor Ohashi, 
Louis Roth, Richard Scramaglia, Doris Wecsen, and 
Charles Williams. 





The Luther Burbank Junior High School Human Relations in- 
service course has featured a number of speakers and guests at 
its weekly sessions during the current semester. Pictured above 
at one of the meetings are (left to right) Donald Warden, At- 
torney, Civic Leader, and Businessman; Mrs. Clarice Miles, 
School District Social Worker; Mrs. Betty Baham, Luther Bur- 
bank, Homemaking Teacher; and Eugene Jones, Actor, Singer, 
and Consultant to the Oakland Public Schools. (See th2 accomp- 
anying article for details on the Burbank program.) 



• DR. JENKINS HONORED AT DINNER 

Superintendent of Schools Robert E. Jenkins was 
honored recently by the presentation of two plaques for 
his interest and support of programs for exceptional 
children. 

The awards were presented at a special dinner by the 
Council for Exceptional Children, Chapter 127, and Aid 
Retarded Children. Mr. Martin Dean, Coordinator of 
the Special Educational Services Division, has served as 
president of the Council for Exceptional Children during 
the past year. 

Other groups present at the dinner giving their sup- 
port to the District programs were United Cerebral 
Palsy of San Francisco, Louise Lombard PTA, Second 
District PTA, Association of Parents of Hearing Im- 
paired Children of San Francisco, Parents of Gough 
School Club, San Francisco Hearing and Speech Center, 
National Aid to Visually Handicapped, California Asso- 
ciation for Neurologically Handicapped Children, De- 
velopment Centers for Handicapped Minors Parents 
Group, Sunshine School PTA, Recreation Center for 
the Handicapped, Coordinating Council on Mental Re- 
tardation, Community Effort for Disturbed Children, 
and the Archdiocese of San Francisco. 



NEWSLETTER 



June 3, 1961 



Announcements 



• CLASS SIZE AND SUMMER SCHOOL 

At the last meeting of the Negotiating Council with 
Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins it was decided that 
notice should go out to District personnel in the News- 
letter stating that the massive class size reduction (900 
more teachers over a three-year period) will start in 
September and does not apply to this coming summer 
school, although efforts will be made to maintain reduced 
class sizes where possible. 

The Negotiating Council proposes to set up a study for 
the over-all appraisal of this summer's program and to 
then make recommendations to the Superintendent as to 
goals, principles of operation, salaries, and possible long- 
range policies for future summer schools. 



• SAMUEL GOMPERS GRADUATION CHANGE 

The graduation date for Samuel Gompers High School 
has been changed from Tuesday, June 11, to Friday, 
June 7. 

• JOHN ADAMS ADULT SCHOOL GRADUATION 

John Adams Adult High School will hold its gradua- 
tion ceremonies on the afternoon of Thursday, June 13, 
at 1 p.m. Ceremonies will be conducted in the auditor- 
ium of Benjamin Franklin Junior High School, Scott and 
O'Farrell Streets. 

Dr. Edward Goldman, Assistant Superintendent for 
Adult and Vocational Education, will deliver the main 
address, and Edward H. Fowler, Principal of John 
Adams, will award the diplomas to the 201 adult stu- 
dents. 



© TASK FORCE ON DISCIPLINE 

Norma Arroyo, teacher at Commodore Stockton 
School, and Richard Sweeney, teacher at A. P. Giannini 
Junior High, representing the Teachers Association of 
San Francisco, have been added to the District Task 
Force Committee on Discipline. 



• ADDITIONAL STUDY CENTERS 

The January 8 and January 29, 1968, issues of the 
Newsletter contained a listing of Community Study Cen- 
ters. The following are to be added to those lists : 
Visitacion Valley Community Center — 50 Raymond Avenue 
Monday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. — lst-6th grades 
Wednesday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. — 4th-6th grades 
Miss Becky Brown — 585-6714 

Sunnydale Housing Project — 1654 Sunnydale Avenue 
Tuesday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. — lst-3rd grades 
Thursday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. — lst-3rd grades 
Mrs. Gail Dobie — 885-1735 or 585-6714 
Eichler Geneva Towers — 1001 Sunnydale, Recreation Room 
Monday, 3:30-5:00 p.m. — lst-6th grades 
Mrs. Harriet Smith — 584-5054 

Richmond Park Cultural Center — 600 - 21st Avenue 
Individual tutoring for high school students through arrange- 
ment. 
Mr. John Cucgucn — 387-0188 

Program Advance, a college and career preparation course 
will start June 24, 1968, and run for eight weeks, one night a 
week. Further information may be obtained by phone. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, June 4, 1968, 4 p.m. Regular meeting, 

170 Fell Street. 



• IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP 

( The following District in-service workshop is sched 
uled for July 8 through July 19, and is available to teach 
ers at all grade levels.) 
English as a Second Language for Chinese-Speakinil 
Students 

Two units, non-college credit, 10 meetings daily fronj 
9 a.m. to 12 noon, July 8 through July 19, at Franciso 
Junior High School. Instructors will include professors 
community resource persons, District teachers, and con 
sultants. To pre-register, call the Curriculum Office a 
863-4680, Extension 367. 

The workshop will include general sessions dealing with the theory an 
practice necessary for effective second language programs. Contrastin 
analysis will be made regarding the Chinese language and culture. In som 
of the sessions elementary and secondary teachers will meet separately fo 
consideration of materials and instructional procedures at their respectiv 
levels. Special provisions will be made to include demonstration teachin 
by ESL teachers, observations in classrooms, and practice teaching b 
participants. 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCY 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancy: 
2726 — School Custodian Sub-Foreman — City Co 
lege of San Francisco (nights) . 






• DISTRICT FENCERS WIN 

The following high school students were chosen fo 
the Junior Olympic Squad in fencing as a result of th 
Northern California Junior Olympic Championship 
held at the University of San Francisco recently: 

Boys — 1st — David Payez (Samuel Gompers); 2n 
— Oswald Contreras (Samuel Gompers); 3rd — Da 
Hampton (Balboa); 4th — David Bardoff (Abrahar 
Lincoln); 5th — Damon Ou (George Washington) 
6th — Tommy Wong (George Washington). 

Girls — 1st — Barbara Cute (Polytechnic); 2nd - 
Regina Wilson (Balboa) ; 3rd — Linda James (Balboa) 
4th — Grace Nonomura (George Washington). 






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JUN 1 1965 

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NEWSLETTER 



/OLUME 39 



® 



JUNE 10, 1968 



NUMBER 38 



Superintendents Message 

The Years Ahead 

As we come to the end of the school year, we 
close a period of mourning for the tragic assassina- 
tion of another national leader. 

Our hearts are heavy, but now we turn again to 
the months and years ahead and consider what we 
can do to preserve our great nation as a bulwark of 
freedom under law. 

Our President has made a strong plea to the 
nation, pointing out that it is wrong to ignore the 
connection between such crimes and the general 
climate of lawlessness, hatred and unreason in the 
country. 

As educators let us rededicate our lives to helping 
children, young people and adults in our schools to 
learn the meaning of responsible freedom, to equate 
our duties as citizens in a land of freedom with our 
rights that can only be preserved under rule by law. 

Together we have directly faced many urgent 
problems this year and together we have found 
some answers. I wish to express my deep apprecia- 
tion to all of my colleagues in this great school sys- 
tem in San Francisco. Thank you for a job well 
done. We will continue to move forward together 
in 1968-69. 

I wish each and every one of you a restful and 
rewarding summer so that we can better meet the 
challenges of the year ahead. 

Sincerely, 




Superintendent of Schools 



> WASHINGTON TEACHER RECEIVES GRANT 

Mrs. Florence Verducci Armstrong, teacher of English, 
atin, and German at George Washington High School, 
as received a Ford Foundation "Special Career Fellow- 
lip" in the Humanities, a five-year grant in the amount 
f approximately $14,000- 

Mrs. Armstrong plans to work for the Ph.D. degree in 
lomparative Literature with the main emphasis on 
atin, Sanskrit, and Greek Epic Poetry. Mrs. Armstrong 
■ a second generation San Francisco teacher, the 
aughter of the late Joe Verducci, who taught and 
Dached at George Washington and Polytechnic High 
chools and St. Mary's and San Francisco State Col- 
leges. 



Board Considers Policy Statement 
On Integrated Quality Education 

At its June 4, 1968 meeting, the Board of Education, 
upon recommendation of Superintendent Robert E. Jen- 
kins, considered the Proposed Board of Education Policy 
Statement on Integrated Quality Education as developed 
by the Task Force on Equality/Quality Education and 
approved in final form by the Citizens Advisory Commit- 
tee on Educational Equality/ Quality. After considerable 
discussion from the floor, the Policy Statement was held 
over for the special Board meeting at 4 p.m. today. Only 
discussion by Board members will be permitted today 
before voting. 

The statement reads as follows : 

"The Board of Education of the San Francisco Unified 
School District accepts its responsibility to exercise leader- 
ship in the development of policies and programs leading 
toward improvement of quality education through the 
orderly integration of its schools. To do less is to abdicate 
its responsibility to a citizenry dedicated to the ideals of 
freedom, equality, and justice for all. To do less is to 
deprive children during their school years of democratic 
experiences in the pluralistic society of which they are a 
part. 

"As a public institution the school has the obligation 
to provide educational experiences of the highest quality 
for all students. This obligation mandates the maximum 
development of each individual's potential from the very 
beginning to the end of his formal school experiences, in 
a democratic environment in which students of all racial, 
cultural and ethnic backgrounds have the opportunity to 
interact. It is an additional part of the obligation to in- 
sure the knowledge of common values, cultural contribu- 
tions of various racial and ethnic groups, and the preser- 
vation of different cultural heritages. 

"The processes of integration must be divorced from 
prejudice and considered on the cognitive level. The 
struggle for social and economic justice and full equality 
must be a concern of the classroom; it must not be left 
to be resolved through battle in the streets. The school is 
the place where ideas are generated, analyzed, weighed 
and evaluated. A fundamental purpose of the school, the 
search for truth, carries with it the responsibility to teach 
men to live by truth. 

"Public education must fulfill its purpose as a bold 
social enterprise which leads rather than follows, which 
meets challenges rather than avoids them, and which 
serves the needs of the total society. To accomplish this 
we seek the understanding and active support of the com- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



NEWSLETTER 



June 10, 196i 




Dr. Kermoian 



District Principal Appointed 
To Federal Educational Post 

Dr. Samuel B. Kermoian, principal 
of Edison School, has been appointed 
Regional Director of Elementary and 
Secondary Education by the United 
States Office of Education. 

In this position he will be responsi- 
ble for the policy direction and ad- 
ministration of all federal elementary 
and secondary education programs for 
the states of New York, Pennsylvania, 
New Jersey, and Delaware. 

His task will be to identify regional 
problems, develop comprehensive 
long-range plans for meeting educational needs, and 
evaluate the status and effectiveness of programs and 
professional services. 

Dr. Kermoian has served as a teacher and administra- 
tor with the San Francisco Unified School District since 
1946. He received his Bachelors Degree through San 
Francisco State College in 1943 while overseas as a 
bombardier with the Eighth Air Force. 

He took his graduate work at Stanford University 
where he received his Masters Degree in 1949 and his 
Doctorate in 1956. 

During 1962-63, Dr. Kermoian served in Brazil as a 
UNESCO Diplomat and Expert in Administration and 
Educational Planning. He was asked to represent the 
United States at a Symposium on Educational Adminis- 
tration held in San Salvador da Bahia in 1965. 

Dr. Kermoian has served on the faculties of San Fran- 
cisco State College, University of California, University 
of Michigan, University of Nevada, University of Puget 
Sound, and University of Sao Paulo. He is the author of 
numerous professional articles published in this country 
and South America. 

Dr. Kermoian will be on leave from the District to 
accept the position. He will work out of the New York 
Regional Office. He will be joined in New York by his 
wife Jeanette, who is a teacher at Hawthorne School, and 
their two children, Rosanne, aged 15, and Peter, aged 13. 



• COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE REPORT 

A Report on Counseling and Guidance in the San 
Francisco Unified School District will be presented to 
the Board of Education at today's meeting. 

The Report was prepared by the Special Educational 
Services Division and contains material contributed by 
the Advisors on Guidance of the Curriculum Committee, 
the San Francisco Counseling and Guidance Association, 
and Assistant Principals of Pupil Personnel Services. 

The detailed document covers such areas as the back- 
ground of counseling and guidance in the District, coun- 
seling services in the secondary schools, counseling serv- 
ices in the elementary schools, 1967-68 counseling and 
guidance accomplishments, counseling and guidance 
needs, and proposals for improvement of guidance and 
counseling. 



Presidio Takes Debate Honors 




Presidio Junior High School's team was declared the winner i 
the 1968 Debate Tournament of the Junior High Forensic Leagt 
held in the studios of KRON-TV. The final contest featured th 
teams of Presidio and Herbert Hoover Junior High Schools con 
peting for the championship. Judge Gerald S. Levin of rt 
Superior Court and Judge Janet Aitken and Judge S. Lee Vavur 
of the Municipal Court served as debate final judges. Picture 
above at the conclusion of the finals are Clem Zannini, Herbe 
Hoover sponsor; Penny Preovolos, Hoover debater; Superintem 
ent Robert E. Jenkins; Robert Larissou, Hoover debater; Judc 
Gerald S. Levin; Art Finley, program moderator; Greg Derin ai 
Larry Goldberg, Presidio debaters; and Kathleen O'Farrell, Pn 
sidio sponsor. 






• ADMINISTRATIVE APPOINTMENTS 

The following administrative appointments were aj 
proved by the Board of Education at the June 4, 196 
meeting upon the recommendation of the Superintenc 
ent: 

Central Office 

Henry F. Warnken appointed to the position of Supe: 
visor AA, Psychological Services, Special Education; 
Services Division. 

Douglas A. Boyce appointed to the position of Supe: 
visor AA, Mentally Handicapped, Special Education; 
Services Division. 

James J. Hamrock appointed to the position of Si 
pervisor AA, Counseling and Guidance, Special Educ; 
tional Services Division. 

Howard C. Clay appointed to the position of Supe) 
visor A, Attendance Services, Special Educational Sen 
ices Division. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 39, No. 38 



June 10, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 



Hugh E. Wire, Supervisor, Educational Information 



: 



1 









lane 10, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



District Seeks Federal Funds 

The submission of four applications for federal funds 
for projects to be administered by the Special Educa- 
tional Services Division was approved by the Board of 
Education at its May 21, 1968 meeting upon recom- 
mendation of Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins. 

Funding would be under Title VI-A of the Elemen- 
tary-Secondary Education Act and includes the following 
projects : 

1.) Itinerant Teacher Services for Borderline Retard- 
■ ed Students — An application for $266,785 to establish 
I an educational program for approximately 300 border- 
line retarded children (70-90 I.Q) in grades 1 through 
"J '6, who would be served on an itinerant teacher basis. The 
J ,three-year program would serve 200 public school chil- 
li i idren and 100 in the parochial schools. 
J [ 2.) Habilitative Educational Facility for Deaf-Blind 
» Children — An application for $65,261 to establish an 
* 'educational program for pre-school deaf-blind children 
i,j 'whose ages range from two to six years, the first program 
,<<!of this type here. 

3.) Educational Services for the Functionally Retard- 
ed — An application for $185,399 to establish a three- 
year program of two pilot classes for functionally retard- 
;d children, each class having a capacity enrollment of 
1 .not more than eight pupils. 

4.) A Therapeutic Education Center — An application 

for $418,286 to establish a center for children too emo- 

„[. tionally disturbed to fit into the regular classroom, serv- 

r ; ing approximately 20 children whose ages run from six 

i to nine years at the time of enrollment. 



Scholarship Winner 



Modernization Study Approved 

Authorization for the School District to participate in 
I :he "New Life for Old Schools" study of the Research 
Council of the Great Cities Program for School Improve- 
iient was granted by the Board of Education at its June 
1, 1968 meeting upon recommendation of Superintendent 
Robert E. Jenkins. 

The program calls for a feasibility study for the mod- 
ernization of San Francisco schools constructed between 
1922 and 1932, with an architectural firm to be retained 
>y the Research Council. 
Ijjl The firm would be charged with the responsibility of 

- lefining the similarities and differenes in these buildings, 
! • nvestigating the site problems, and defining ways in 

- ivhich these schools should be modernized to accommo- 
date changing educational programs. 

I The results of the study, as approved by the Board, 
. vould be financed by a contemplated bond issue which 
■rauld include the complete modernization of approxi- 
mately 30 separate school plants. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Jessie Borge 

Enid Cohan 

Wilfred Prout 



Galileo Senior Going to France 




Lorraine Horn, Galileo High School senior, is seen being con- 
gratulated on having been awarded the American Institute for 
Foreign Study scholarship to study in France this summer. Lor- 
raine was selected to receive the award from a group of advanced 
French students representing the District's senior high schools. 
The scholarship provides round-trip transportation to France and 
tuition and living expenses during a six-week period in Europe 
where she will attend the University of Vichy. This is the second 
year a Galileo student has received the award. Wishing Lorraine 
well are her French teachers Mrs. Denise Ollagnier and Mrs. 
Jacqueline Idiart, and Walter Odone, Acting Principal of Galileo. 



Teachers to Meet in September 

The 1968 Teachers' Institute will be held again this 
year at the Masonic Temple located at California and 
Taylor Streets on Tuesday, September 3, 1968, starting 
at 10 a.m. Teachers are reminded that this is a salary day 
and that they are expected to attend the Institute. 

Parking in the area around the Masonic Temple poses 
a number of problems, especially for late arrivals. It is 
suggested that teachers form car pools, where possible, 
and allow time for parking. 

Parking space is available in the basement of the 
Masonic Temple, in the parking garage at California and 
Mason Streets, and in the Fairmont Garage at California 
and Powell Streets. 

The city garage at Sutter and Stockton is a short cable 
or cab ride up the hill, as is the Downtown Center Garage 
at Mason and O'Farrell. Teachers should also plan to 
park outside the congested area and use public transpor- 
tation when possible. 

Teachers will attend school faculty meetings at 1:30 
p.m. on September 3. 



• FRANCISCO WINS CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 

The Francisco Junior High School Chess Club, spon- 
sored by William Kim, has won the 1968 All-City Chess 
Championship. Francisco's team was the victor over 
teams from Herbert Hoover and Portola in a round- 
robin playoff of league champions. The perpetual trophy 
will remain at Francisco during the 1968-69 school year. 
Each team member received a gold medal. 



NEWSLETTER 



June 10, 196S 



Announcements 



FREEDOMS AWARD TO EDISON 

Edison School has 
received its fourth 
George Washington 
Honor Medal from 
the Freedoms Foun- 
dation at Valley 
Forge. 

The award was 
presented at a recent 
assembly program and 
was given to the 
school for a project 
developed by Gloria 
M. Strauss, Assistant 
Principal, based on 
the themes "People 
from Many Lands" 
Edison School earns its fourth Freedoms and the "Three 
Foundation award. Promises Made by the 

United Nations to Us." 

Pictured at the presentation are (left to right) Dr. 
Samuel Kermoian, Principal; David Wong, Student Body 
Vice-President; Stephen Bicknell, Student Body Presi- 
dent; Miss Strauss; and Richard H. Foltz, Executive 
Vice-President, Western Region, Freedoms Foundation. 




• COACHES ELECT NEW OFFICERS 

The San Francisco Association Athletic Coaches and 
Physical Education Teachers has elected the following 
officers for the 1968-69 school year: Erv Delman (Abra- 
ham Lincoln), President; Robert Des Mueles (Everett), 
Vice-President; Ernest Domescus (City College), Secre- 
tary; Don Shepherd (James Lick), Treasurer; Ed Cas- 
silagio (A. P. Giannini), Ed Nevius (Balboa), Armand 
Quartini (James Denman) , Chad Reade (George Wash- 
ington), and Rich Scramaglia (Luther Burbank), Exec- 
utive Committee. 



. . . Integrated Quality Education Policy 

(Continued from Page 1) 
munity. Further we must provide an adequate and effec- 
tive structure for both communication and constructive 
participation within the schools. 

"The Board of Education, therefore affirms its re- 
sponsibility to promote racial and ethnic integration in 
every feasible way in the public schools in San Francisco. 

"The Superintendent is hereby authorized to formu- 
late and submit for Board approval feasible plans to 
bring about, as soon as possible, the greatest amount of 
integrated quality education in the following phases : 

(1) Immediate (1968-69) 

(2) Intermediate (to be implemented not later than 
1971-72) 

(3) Long-range {developmental, beginning 1968- 
69)." 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Monday, June 10, 1968, 4 p.m. Special meeting, 
170 Fell Street. Tuesday, June 18, 1968, Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• TIME SHEET PICK-UP FOR JUNE 

June time sheets for teachers will be picked up 
at the schools at 8:30 a.m. on June 14, 1968, for 
senior, junior, and elementary teachers. 

The adult schools will deliver their part-time 
teachers' time sheets on June 24 and their full-time 
teachers' time sheets on June 14 at 9 a.m. 

Time sheets for clerks and janitors for all schools, 
including the adult schools, for June 16 through 
June 30 will be picked up at the schools at 8:30 
a.m. on June 21, 1968. 

Sheets are to be completed and signed by the 
deadline dates above to enable delivery service to 
keep the schedule. 

The number of days in June for principals and 
assistant principals is 18; the number of days for 
teachers is 14. 



O CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancy: 
2724 — School Custodian, Male — Parkside Elemeni 
tary School, Abraham Lincoln High School. 

2704 — School Custodian, Female — City College. 

• MUSIC ADVANCEMENT WORKSHOP 

A Summer School Music Advancement Workshop de 
signed to provide continuing instruction in music fo 
students presently enrolled in the elementary instru 
mental program, grades five and six, will be held at th 
Anza School, 40 Vega Street, beginning Monday, Jum 
24, and ending August 2, 1968. 



• AUGUST WORKSHOP ANNOUNCED 

A District-sponsored "Workshop in Health and Faml 
ily Life Education" will be held August 26-30, 1968, a 
City College from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 



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SAN FRANCISOO 
L'BLIC LIBRARY 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 40 



© 



SEPTEMBER 2, 1968 



NUMBER 1 



For 1968-69 School Year 



$97.5 Million Budget Wins Board Approval 



■ Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins took the School 
District to the maximum of its taxing limit for this com- 
ing school year in a bold move to put the District ahead 
an many fronts. 

"This tremendous shot of adrenalin into the educa- 
tional programs of the District which amounts to over 
|pl5 million," says Dr. Jenkins, "is an opportunity that 
conies very seldom to move a great school system for- 
ward." 

The Board of Education, upon recommendation of 
:he Superintendent, unanimously adopted the final pro- 
posed operating budget of $97,517,740 at its August 6, 
1968 meeting. 

I The $97.5 million figure is $1,933,286 higher than the 
oublication budget approved by the Board on June 25. 
ft further reflects an increase of $15,146,125 over the 
1967-68 operating budget. 

Major items included in the $15.1 million dollar in- 
crease are: 

' 1. $2,145,142 — Required to conform with legal pro- 
visions or established policies such as, operation of salary 

William B. Cummings 

tew Gifted Supervisor Appointed 




'r. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools (right), is seen 
elcoming William B. Cummings to the SFUSD. Mr. Cummings 
as been appointed Supervisor A A, Programs for the Gifted. Mr. 
ummings is a native of Pennsylvania, having completed his 
ndergraduate work at Moravian College and his M.A. from 
emple University. He has had extensive experience in the field 
F educating gifted children, and most recently held the position 
; Supervisor, Programs for the Gifted, Department of Public 
istruction. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 



schedule, enrollments, price increases, and fixed changes. 

2. $5,256,100 — Increase in salary schedules. 

3. A deduction of $260,033 — Normal maintenance of 
present programs including such items as added positions, 
reclassifications, and transfers. 

4. $2,474,637 — Class size reduction. First step in hir- 
ing 300 of 900 teachers over a three-year period. 

5. $2,390,843 — Programs approved by the Board for 
1968-69 including summer program expansion ($114,- 
168), bilingual program ($319,793), special educational 
program ($724,492), mentally gifted ($355,000), sec- 
ondary reorganization ($270,440) and clerical ($37,260), 
elementary Hbrarians ($36,500), City College staffing to 
reduce class size ($225,240) , Personnel Division reorgani- 
zation ($1 15,800) , data processing ($79,150) , and educa- 
tional planning, research, and development ($113,000). 

6. $1,967,886 — Negotiated agreements including den- 
tal and drug plan ($1,272,252), aides ($100,000), corps 
of substitutes ($85,000), year-for-year credit ($293,034), 
library and text clerks ($47,600), and processing and 
procuring books ($170,000). 

7. $1,171,550 — Supplemental programs including 
such major items as staging area for Portola Junior High 
($298,810), Opportunity School ($170,200), free meals 
for needy students ($222,200) , Guidance Service Centers 
($203,606), and miscellaneous items ($276,734). 

The final operating budget will be financed by $70,- 
243,962 to be raised by School District taxation, and 
$27,273,778 to come from other sources including state 
and federal funds. 

The budget will serve a projected K-through-twelfth 
grade enrollment of 93,368 students and a City College 
enrollment expected to reach 10,300. 

The final operating budget as approved puts the Dis- 
trict at its legal taxing ability limit. The possibility of 
going to the voters in order to raise the District's taxing 
authority was considered by the Board when it met as a 
committee of the whole on Tuesday, August 13, 1968, 
and final approval was given on Tuesday, August 27, 
1968, to ask the voters for an increase of 98 cents in the 
tax limit to raise it to $3.53. 

Dr. Jenkins indicated that the District will need an 
additional $17.5 million for 1969-70 and 1970-71 in order 
to maintain present programs. This would require 88 
cents, allowing ten additional cents for future new pro- 
grams. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 2, 196fl 



Major District Reorganization Effected! 




A major step in Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins' reorganization plan for the San Francisco Unified School District was taken thi 
summer with the creation of three new divisions to administer the schools. Pictured above with the Superintendent are the three me 
who will lead the new administrative units. Left to right. Dr. Edward D. Goldman, Associate Superintendent, School Operational Sen 
ices; Dr. Lewis Allbee, Associate Superintendent, Educational Planning, Research, and Development; Superintenednt Jenkins; Joseph I 
McElligott, General Administrative Officer. (See accompanying article for additional details.) 



Major changes in the organizational structure of the 
San Francisco Unified School District were recommend- 
ed by Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins and approved 
by the Board of Education during the summer. 

What has been termed "one of the most modern ad- 
ministrative structures in the nation" has created three 
new divisions which will greatly improve the efficiency 
of District operations. 

The reorganization was accomplished for about $35,- 
000 which is slightly over the amount required for the 
Deputy Superintendent position which has been a part 
of the administrative organization for many years, but 
the Superintendent chose not to fill it at this time. 

Instead of having 21 staff members reporting directly 
to the Superintendent as in the past, Dr. Jenkins' plan 
has reduced the number to seven. 

They now include the following: Irving G. Breyer, 
Legal Adviser; Dr. Louis G. Conlan, President of City 
College of San Francisco (at the Associate Superintend- 
ent level); Milton F. Reiterman, Assistant Superintend- 
ent, Personnel Services; Hugh E. Wire, Administrative 
Assistant, Educational Information; and the three new 
divisional heads. 

The latter include Joseph P. McElligott, Chief Admin- 
istrative Officer; Dr. Edward D. Goldman, Associate 
Superintendent, School Operational Services; and Dr. 
Lewis Allbee, Associate Superintendent, Educational 
Planning, Research, and Development. 

Mr. McElligott (formerly District Fiscal Officer) will 
have two staff members on the Assistant Superintendent 
level reporting directly to him. They include Wilbert G. 
Vestneys, Assistant Superintendent, Buildings and 
Grounds, and James Porter, Fiscal Officer. 

Dr. Goldman (formerly Assistant Superintendent, 
Adult and Vocational Education) will have four Assist- 
ant Superintendents reporting to him. They include 



Martin Dean, Assistant Superintendent, Special Educa 
tional Services; James Dierke, Assistant Superintended 
Adult and Occupational Education; Dr. Donald 
Rhodes, Assistant Superintendent, Elementary Educa 
tion; and Ralph Kauer, Assistant Superintendent, Sec 
ondary Education. 

Dr. Allbee (formerly Assistant Superintendent, Senii 
High Schools) will work directly with Dr. William 
Cobb, Assistant Superintendent, Human Relations; Is; 
dore Pivnick, Assistant Superintendent, Innovative Plar 
ning; and a yet to be named Assistant Superintenden 
Instructional Development and Services. 

A future issue of the Newsletter will highlight reorgai 
izational changes at the level below Assistant Superii 
tendent. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 40, No. 1 September 2, 1968 

135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 









Laurel Glass, Ph.D. 

Vice President 
Reynold H. Colvin 
Adolfo de Urioste 



Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 
Alan H. Nichols 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Administrative Assistant, 
Educational Information 



September 2, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



New Administrative Appointments Made 



The following administrative appointments were ap- 
proved by the Board of Education during the summer 
upon recommendation of the Superintendent: 
Central Office 
Joseph P. McElligott appointed General Administra- 
tive Officer; Dr. Lewis Allbee appointed Associate Super- 
intendent, Planning, Research and Development; Dr. 
Edward D. Goldman appointed Associate Superintend- 
ent, School Operational Services; James Porter appoint- 
ed Fiscal Officer; Isadore Pivnick appointed Assistant 
superintendent, Innovative Planning; Milton F. Reiter- 
|nan appointed Assistant Superintendent, Personnel 
Service Division; Martin Dean appointed Assistant Su- 
perintendent, Special Educational Services Division: 
ames Dierke appointed Assistant Superintendent, Adult 
md Occupational Education; Ralph Kauer appointed 
Assistant Superintendent, Secondary Education; George 
Soisson appointed Coordinator, Personnel; Hugh E. 
>Vire appointed Administrative Assistant, Educational 
nformation; William B. Cummings appointed Super- 
visor AA, Programs for the Gifted; Robert E. Perussina 
ippointed Supervisor AA, Driver Instruction Program; 
i)r. E. Kemp Frederick appointed Director, Personnel 
Service Division; Dr. Charles Guichard appointed Su- 
>ervisor AA, Personnel Service Division; Robert C. Sey- 
nour appointed Supervisor AA, Personnel Service Divi- 
ion; Raymond L. Del Portillo appointed Supervisor A A, 
'ersonnel Service Division; George Moscone (Principal, 
ienjamin Franklin Junior High School) assigned half 
lime to Central Office, SB 28, as Evaluator for the Lamp 
''rogram and half time to Junior High Administration; 
'loy S. Minkler (Principal, Diamond Heights School) 
ssigned Project Head for the Sullivan Program Read- 
ng Project; Ivor F. Callaway (Principal, Galileo High 
■chool) assigned to Central Office, Secondary Division; 
■Jorbert V. Deggendorfer appointed Coordinator A, 
Occupational Education; Dr. Myron Moskowitz (Prin- 
ipal, Herbert Hoover Junior High School) assigned to 
Central Office, Secondary Division; Dr. James C. Morena 
'ppointed Supervisor AA, Building Utilization and Re- 
?arch, Division of Buildings and Grounds. 
City College 
Ethel Crockett appointed Head Librarian; Thomas F. 
lumiston appointed Director of Testing and Research: 
Lenneth V. Castellino appointed Financial Aid Assist- 
nt; Lawrence R. Lawson appointed Director of Student 
.ctivities. 

Secondary Division 
Principal Appointments — Thomas J. Sammon, Pelton 
unior High School; Frank R. Verducci, Horace Mann 
unior High School; Harvey L. Christensen, new Op- 
ortunity High School; Burl G. Toler, Benjamin Frank- 
n Junior High School (acting); James W. Kearney, 
^alileo High School (acting); John F. Kearney, Jr.. 
ierbert Hoover Junior High School (acting); Saul 
ladfes, Woodrow Wilson High School; Dr. George 
aronsky, Portola Junior High; Paul Gay, Luther Bur- 
tink Junior High. 
, Assistant Principal Appointments — Paul Lucey. 



Lowell High; Leslie Burke, Galileo High; Delores E. 
Booth, Pelton Junior High; Victoria Brooks, Everett 
Junior High; Marianne Cotter, Herbert Hoover Junior 
High; Vincentine M. Contrero, Pelton Junior High; 
Matthew T. Gaffney, Pelton Junior High; Peter G. 
Kardassakis, Portola Junior High; Robert J. Lusten- 
berger, Presidio Junior High; James L. Pravettone, 
Benjamin Franklin Junior High; Alfred C. Simmons, 
A. P. Giannini Junior High; Roland W. Demarais, 
Francisco Junior High (acting) ; Billie T. Scott, 
Portola Junior High (acting); Betty E. Gandel, Aptos 
Junior High; John A. Rocky, Samuel Gompers High 
(acting) ; Allan D. Torlakson, George Washington High; 
Stephen Ebert, Polytechnic High; Alan B. Fibish, 
Woodrow Wilson High. 

Elementary Division 

Principal Appointments — Michael J. Holway, Golden 
Gate; Felix Duag, Raphael Weill; Leola M. Harvard, 
John Muir; Donald D. Langendorf, Visitacion Valley, 
Visitacion Valley Annex and El Dorado Home School; 
Betty McNamara, Jedediah Smith (acting); John B. 
Dougherty, Sheridan (acting); John W. Whisman, Edi- 
son; Gloria M. Strauss, Starr King; Donald W. Johnson, 
Anza; Christine Bianco, Dudley Stone; Shirley R. Dona- 
hue, Diamond Heights (acting); Mary A. Anastole, 
Daniel Webster - 1. M. Scott (acting). 

Assistant Principal Appointments — Leonia McQuil- 
lister, Raphael Weill; Ralph Kermoian, Paul Revere; 
Samuel Wright, Burnett (acting); Constance K. Ander- 
son, John Muir; Lois Ann Sims, Golden Gate; Robert D. 
Cook, Jedediah Smith; Marybeth Barrett, West Portal; 
Alyse Buchdruker, Ulloa; David Monasch, III, Anza; 
Evelyn C. Draper, Winfield Scott and Yerba Buena; Lila 
L. Makrynassios, Commodore Stockton; Jerome O'Brien, 
Dudley Stone (acting); William J. Johnson, Starr King: 
Peter J. Gonzalez, Hawthorne (acting) ; Ruth E. Tisdale, 
Commodore Sloat. 



PTA Awards Senior Scholarships 




Scholarships to June graduates from the Second District Califor- 
nia Congress of Parents and Teachers were presented at a recent 
District meeting. The recipients, pictured above, include Salud 
Dacumos, Polytechnic, $100; Helena Weil, Abraham Lincoln, 
$200; Geraldine Vasquez, Balboa, $200; Rosemaric Hirschler, 
Abraham Lincoln, $100; Mrs. M. J. Bellezza, Chairman, Schol- 
arship Committee; Marion Rockwell, Balboa, $100; Sharion 
Rockwell, Balboa, $100; Betty Ann Johnson, Polytechnic, $100. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 2, 1988! 



Fall I968 In-Service Courses Listed 



All regularly employed San Francisco teachers are re- 
quired, by Board of Education policy, to satisfactorily 
complete six semester units of acceptable work in order 
to advance from one salary "increment block" to an- 
other. 

Dr. Kemp Frederick, Director of Personnel of the San 
Francisco Unified School District, has compiled a list of 
the in-service courses which will be available to teachers 
of the District during the fall semester of 1968. 

San Francisco public school teachers have numerous 
opportunities for further studies, however, because of 
the District-sponsored In-service Training Program, and 
the late afternoon, evening, and weekend courses pro- 
vided by many Bay Area institutions of higher learning. 
Teachers benefit from many courses 

Teachers of the District will have the benefit of over 
500 university and college courses plus non-college in- 
service courses offered by the SFUSD during the fall 
term. 

These courses are designed with the viewpoint of 
furnishing teachers and administrators with the newest 
techniques and information in various subject areas. 

"Increment blocks" are defined as a period of time. 

Teachers on Classification I should complete six units 
every three years. (Includes teachers in Children's Cen- 
ters. ) 

Teachers on Classification II should complete six units 
during a four-year period. 

Teachers on Classification III have five school years 
to complete six units. 
Loss of normal salary increments 

Failing to complete the required units in the allotted 
time will cause the teacher to lose the normal salary in- 
crements until such unit requirements have been ful- 
filled. 

Teachers who have reached their fifty-seventh birth- 
day are exempt from these requirements. 

It is noted that non-college in-service units are usable 
as credit only within the San Francisco Unified School 
District and are not transferable to other districts. 

Increment and classification credits are given for in- 
service courses satisfactorily completed. 
"Application for approval" form should be filed 

Prior to starting the in-service course or any other 
college or university course for a salary credit, the 
teacher should file an "application for approval" form 
with Dr. Frederick. This form is to be signed by the 
principal of the teacher concerned, 

Previously an attempt was made in the Newsletter to 
publish a comprehensive list of courses offered by the 
leading Bay Area institutions of higher learning. How- 
ever, these lists were not always complete, due to the 
inability to publish all courses offered. 

To make it easier for the individual teacher, Dr. 
Frederick's office has sent packets of college course bulle- 
tins to the principals of each school. In the packages are 
bulletins from the University of California at Berkeley 
and the U.C. Extension, University of San Francisco, 



■■ 



and Stanford University. 

Teachers are urged to contact school principals for 
these catalogs. 

The following in-service courses are offered by the 
District during the fall 1968 semester: 
English 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
days, 4 to 6 p.m. at Ulloa School. Dr. Alice Scofield 
instructor. Course starts September 11. Pre-registration 
is required. Call Elementary Division at 863-4680, Ex 
tension 237 (for elementary teachers only). 

A course designed to help in the classroom implementation of the New 
State English Framework and the interpretations of the New English 
adoption. 

Language Arts 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
days, 4 to 6 p.m. at Diamond Heights School. Kris h 
Gronfeldt, Gwyn Peakes, and Ruth Omatsu, instructors, 
Course starts September 11. Pre-registration is necessary 
Call Elementary Division at 863-4680, Extension 23/ 
(for elementary teachers only). 

A course designed to assist teachers in the skill development needed 
improve the language arts program. Help will be given in the selection 
content to stimulate language development. 

Teaching Children's Literature in Intermediate Grade 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes 
days, 4 to 6 p.m. in room 10, 170 Fell Street. Rose Mar} 
Colligan, instructor. Course starts September 11. Pre 
registration is required. Call Elementary Division a' 
863-4680, Extension 237 (for elementary teachers only) 

The purpose of the course will be to acquaint intermediate teachers will 
curriculum possibilities of the books on the Elementary Basic List and it: 
supplements. Attention will also be given to the correlation of books witl 
other instructional aids such as films, filmstrips, specimens, exhibits, stud 
prints, and field trips. Individual teachers will receive help in tailoring 
literature course for specific classroom needs. 

Teaching Children's Literature in Primary Grades 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays 
4 to 6 p.m. in room 10, 170 Fell Street. Rose Mary Colli 
gan, instructor. Course starts September 12. Pre-regis 
tration is required. Call Elementary Division at 863 
4680, Extension 237 (for elementary teachers only) 

The purpose of the course is to acquaint primary teachers with currict 
lum possibilities of the books on the Elementary Basic List and its supple 
ments. Attention will also be given to the correlation of books with othe 
instructional aids such as films, filmstrips. specimens, exhibits, stud 
prints, and field trips. Individual teachers will receive help in tailoring 
literature course for specific classroom needs. 

Marine Biology 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays 
4 to 6 p.m. at Lawton School. Arnold Borley am 
Roberta Posz, instructors. Course starts September 12 
Pre-registration is required. Call Elementary Division a 
863-4680, Extension 237 (for elementary teachers only) 

practical course designed to help teachers incorporate a study 



marine biology into the elementary curriculum. 

Natural Science 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursday: 
4 to 6 p.m. in the Arboretum in Golden Gate Park. Joh 
Kipping, instructor. Course starts September 12. Pre 
registration is necessary. Call Elementary Division a 
863-4680, Extension 237 (for elementary teachers only) 

Instructor will explore with teachers the ways in which the Arboretun 



I 

Hi 

Junior Museum, Academy of Sciences, and other field trip resources can \ \,. 
used to vitalize the science, social science, and language arts curriculun 
Content will include botany, zoology, ecology, marine biology, and hort [^ 
culture. 

Photography 

Two units, non-college credit 



H 






1 

ii 



September 2, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Wide Variety of Offerings Included 



High School. Herb Strongin, instructor. Pre-registration 
| is required. Call Elementary Division at 863-4680, Ex- 
tension 237 (for elementary teachers only). 

A course designed to help teachers in the elementary classroom. Empha- 
' sis will be on ways of using photography as a means of recording for 
; reference work. 

' Methodology of Mathematics 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays, 
4 to 6 p.m. at West Portal School. Dr. Robert Wirtz and 

! Mrs. Phyllis Abad, instructors. Course starts September 

, 12. Pre-registration is required. Call Elementary Divi- 
sion at 863-4680, Extension 237 (for elementary teachers 

i only). 

A course designed to help teachers upgrade the mathematics program in 
grades 3-6. New content and techniques will be introduced. Teachers will 
■have an opportunity to participate in trying out materials and reporting 
[results. Attention will be given to specific instructional and learning prob- 
lems. 

iPrintmaking in the Elementary Grades 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
days, 4 to 6 p.m. at Phoebe Apperson Hearst School, 
'Bungalow B. Alice B. Stone, instructor. Course starts 
September 11, 1968. Pre-registration is necessary. Phone 
'Mrs. Ruth Davis at 863-4680, Extension 323 (for ele- 
mentary teachers only). 

1 Printmaking techniques using materials suitable for elementary children. 
, Includes pressing with objects, carving into materials, building reliefs with 

'scrap material and drawing directly into a medium. Problems will include 
, -holiday cards, program and workfolder covers, decorative prints and textile 

designs for gifts. 

Picturemaking Techniques for the Elementary Grades 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Thursdays, 
ll to 6 p.m. at Phoebe Apperson Hearst School, Bunga- 

,ow B. Alice B. Stone, instructor. Course starts Septem- 
: jjer 12. Pre-registration is necessary. Phone Mrs. Ruth 

Davis at 863-4680, Extension 323 (for teachers of grades 

1, 5, and 6 only). 

, This course will assist teachers in methods of motivating children toward 
Vorthwhile and rewarding classroom art experiences. The use of crayon, 
,halk, watercolor and tempera will be covered. 

Jasic Ceramic Processes 

; Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 

i lays, 4 to 6 p.m. at Abraham Lincoln High School. 

lugh Aanonson, instructor. Course starts September 11, 

968. Pre-registration is required. Call Mrs. Ruth Davis 

I : .t 863-4680, Extension 323 (for elementary teachers 

inly). 

Course will include ceramic techniques suitable for elementary children, 
.icluries basic processes, glazing and firing in the elementary school kiln. 

enior High School English 

. Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
ays, 4 to 6 p.m. at Polytechnic High School. Dr. Niel K. 
nortum, instructor. Course starts September 18. Pre- 
igistration is necessary. Call 863-4680, Extension 367. 

This course is designed to help senior high school English teachers, 
pecially teachers of tenth grade English, make effective use of the newly 
lopted textbooks in grammar and composition. "New" approaches to the 
jdy of grammar and the relationship of grammar to composition skills 
11 be discussed. The instructor will also deal with general background 
iterial in the study of English language and composition in order to give 
.1 , rticipants a framework within which they can structure their classes. 

frican Studies and the Contemporary Curriculum 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
1 ays, 4 to 6 p.m. at Lowell High. Dr. Doris H. Linder, 
istructor. Course starts September 11. Pre-registration 
necessary. Call 863-4680, Extension 367. 

This course is designed to acquaint teachers with the history and nature 
African civilizations and cultures and the ways in which these under- 
ndings can be related to the curriculum. Particular emphasis will be 
iced on sub-Saharan Africa since 1500 and the links between Africa and 
'- Americas during this period. About two-thirds of each meeting will be 
\ ./oted to lectures and discussion of these themes and one-third to related 



curriculum materials (books, magazine articles, maps, slides, films, examples 
of handicrafts, records of musical expression). Course is limited to two 
teachers from each secondary school. 

Curriculum Problems in Industrial Arts 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, Wednes- 
days, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at Herbert Hoover Junior High 
School. Dr. Jess Rathbun, instructor. Course starts 
September 18, 1968. Pre-registration is necessary. Call 
863-4680, Extension 234. 

Course content will be related to the Industrial Arts curriculum develop- 
ment program and will be of particular interest to all industrial arts 
teachers. Use of the curriculum guides, junior-senior high school articula- 
tion, teaching aids, adapting course content to specific situations, and 
evaluation will be the major areas of concern. 

Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties 

One unit, non-college credit, 8 meetings, Thursdays, 
3:20 to 4:45 p.m. at Diagnostic School for Neurologically 
Handicapped Children, Lake Merced Boulevard and 
Winston Drive, San Francisco. Instructors from the 
Ellen K. Raskob Learning Institute and College of the 
Holy Names, Oakland. Pre-registration is necessary. Call 
Mrs. Marguerite Rapson at 863-4680, Extension 397 
(course is for staff with prior service in E. H. Program, 
San Francisco Unified School District). 
Introduction to the Elementary Mentally Retarded 
Program 

One unit, non-college credit, 8 meetings, alternate 
Tuesdays, 3 to 5 p.m. at Louise M. Lombard School. 
Mrs. Lucille Vanderford, instructor. Course starts Sep- 
tember 24, 1968. Pre-registration is necessary. Call 
Frances A. Caine at 863-4680, Extension 287 (course is 
restricted to new teachers of Elementary Mentally Han- 
dicapped classes). 

Behavioral and Attitudinal Barriers to Effective Com- 
munication in the Secondary Schools 

One unit, non-college credit, or one quarter unit col- 
lege credit is available ( college credit fee for one quarter 
unit is $20), five Wednesdays of television presentations, 
in secondary schools of District. Course starts October 2, 
1968. Pre-registration is necessary. Call 863-4680, Ex- 
tension 209. 

To help open up communication within the schools and lead to a better 
understanding of all students and their problems, this training program 
will be presented to San Francisco and Oakland secondary school teachers. 
It will consist of television broadcasts interlinked with carefully planned 
study sessions. Its purpose is to locate and clarify those patterns of behavior 
that antagonize, alienate, and impair communication between school per- 
sonnel and students and parents and the community. The program is being 
developed by a consortium, consisting of the San Francisco and Oakland 
schools, University of California Educational Extension, and the Far West 
Laboratory for Educational Research and Development at Berkeley, in 
cooperation with KQED Instructional Television. 



BOARD POLICY — SALARY CREDIT 

"The maximum credit that will be accepted for 
salary classification purposes of teachers engaged 
in full-time teaching will be six semester hours, or 
six quarter hours, or the equivalent, for any one 
semester or quarter, exclusive of summer sessions. 
A maximum of eight semester hours or twelve 
quarter hours, exclusive of summer sessions, will be 
accepted for any one school year for salary classifi- 
cation purposes. All units will be converted into 
semester credits for classification and/or in-service 
purposes in accordance with School Board regula- 
tions." 



NEWSLETTER 



September 2, 1968| 



Schedule of Dates for 1968-69 Staff Use 



Following is a schedule for 1968-69 developed for the guidance of principals and 
members of the Central Office administrative staff : 



School Month 
Fall 1968 

1. Sept. 2 - Sept. 27 

2. Sept. 30 - Oct. 25 

3. Oct. 28 - Nov. 22 

4. Nov. 25 -Jan. 3 

5. Jan. 6 - Jan. 31 

Spring 1969 

6. Feb. 3 -Feb. 28 

7. Mar. 3 -Mar. 28 

8. Mar. 31 - Apr. 25 

9. Apr. 28 -May 23 
10. May 26 - June 13 



Dates for 
Principals' Meetings 

Fall 1968 

(a) Sept. 8 and Sept. 17 
Oct. 1 and Oct. 15 
Oct. 29 and Nov. 12 
Nov. 26 and Dec. 10 
Jan. 7 and Jan. 21 

Spring 1969 

Feb. 4 and Feb. 18 
Mar. 4 and Mar. 18 
(d) and Apr. 15 
Apr. 29 and May 13 
May 27 and June 10 



Dates for Central Office 
Administrators' Meetings 

Fall 1968 

Sept. 10 and Sept. 24 
Oct. 8 and Oct. 22 
Nov. 5 and Nov. 19 
Dec. 3 and (b) 
Jan. 14 and Jan. 28 

Spring 1969 

(c) and Feb. 25 
Mar. 11 and Mar. 25 
Apr. 8 and Apr. 22 
May 6 and May 20 
June 3 



Principals' meetings are scheduled on the first and third Tuesdays of the School 
Month and Central Office administrators' meetings are on the second and fourth 
Tuesdays, with the exception of afternoons preceding holidays. 

(a) Institute meeting followed by afternoon meetings of school faculties. 

(b) Christmas vacation. 

(c) Day before Lincoln's Birthday. 

(d) Easter vacation. 

Following are the dates established for report card periods for the school year 
1968-69. 



Elementary Schools 



Period 

1st 
2nd 
3rd 



Fall 1968 

Date 

October 18 
November 27 
January 30 



Total 



No. Days 

32 
27 
31 

90 



Period 

4th 
5th 

6th 



Spring 1969 

Date 

March 14 
May 2 
June 13 



Total 



Secondary Schools 



Period 

1st 
2nd 



Fall 1968 

Date 

November 8 
January 30 



Total 



No. Days 

47 
43 

90 



Period 

1st 
2nd 



Spring 1969 

Date 

April 11 
June 13 



No. Days 

28 
30 
29 

87 



No. Days 

43 
44 



Total 



87 



1968-69 SCHOOL CALENDARS 

Due to passage of Assembly Bill 1399 this summer which provides that when school holidays fall on Satur- 
day the public schools will close on the preceding Friday, it will be necessary to revise the 1968-69 School 
( lalendars, usually published in the first issue of the Newsletter. The revised Calendars will be printed in a 
future issue. 



September 2, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Junior, Senior High Consolidation 



Ralph Kauer Appointed Secondary Head 



The appointment of Ralph Kauer to the position of 
: Assistant Superintendent, Secondary Education, was ap- 
; proved by the Board of Education upon recommenda- 
tion of Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins at the August 
27, 1968 meeting. 

The new position consolidates the junior and senior 
high school offices under Mr. Kauer's direction. 

Mr. Kauer has served the past year as Supervisor AA, 
Building Utilization and Research, Division of Buildings 
,and Grounds, to which he was appointed in September 
11967. 

Prior to 1967 he served ten years as Principal of Bal- 
jboa High School (1957-1967), five years as Assistant 
'Principal of Mission High School (1952-1957), and four 
Jyears as Head Counselor of Abraham Lincoln High 
(School (1948-1952). Mr. Kauer first joined the District 
in 1946 as a teacher at Abraham Lincoln. 

Personnel Saturday Openings Set 

The Personnel Service Division will remain open on 
the last three Saturdays in September (the 14, 21, and 
;28), in order to give credential assistance to all teachers, 
according to Milton F. Reiterman, Assistant Superin- 
tendent, Personnel Service Division. 

Although all San Francisco teachers and other per- 
sonnel have valid credentials in order to hold their pro- 
. fessional positions, he says, some have been granted on a 
Temporary or a Partial Fulfillment basis. Others are 
scheduled to erpire at the end of this school year. Still 
i other credentials are not the highest for which the 
i teacher is qualified. Many teachers are eligible for vari- 
ous Life Credentials, and these should be secured when- 
ever possible in order to avoid recurring renewals. 
i It is hoped that assistance may be given to many who 
should investigate the possibility of receiving administra- 
tive, supervisory, or Pupil Personnel credentials. Mr. 
Reiterman notes that otherwise well-qualified personnel, 
.vho would be happy to receive certain appointments, 
nust be passed over because they have neglected to ob- 
tain or to renew certain of these special credentials. 
Mr. Reiterman states that anyone having questions 
nvolving the securing or maintenance of any type of 
chool credential, may visit the Credentials Office in 
loom 116, 135 Van Ness Avenue at any time. The Office 
vill be open to help teachers during the last three Satur- 
i lays in September. 



.- 



CHRONOLOGICAL AGE TABLE 

The publication of the Chronological Age Table 
usually printed in the first Newsletter of the school 
term has been discontinued. Individuals interested 
in utilizing such a table may refer to the one pub- 
lished in the State School Register under the title 
"Table for Determining Chronological Ages as of 
September 1, 1968." 



During the summer a number of principalship ap- 
pointments and transfers were effected at the secondary 
level. Appointments and assignments for the current 
semester are as follows: 

Senior High — Abraham Lincoln, Reginald Y. Alex- 
ander; Balboa, Lewis F. Morris, Jr.; Galileo, James 
Kearney (Acting); George Washington, Ruth Adams; 
Lowell, Barton H. Knowles; Mission, Harry M. Krytzer; 
Polytechnic, Nathaniel H. Brooks; Samuel Gompers, J. 
A. Perino; Woodrow Wilson, Saul Madfes; John O'Con- 
nell, Robert R. Gonzalez; Opportunity (new), Harvey 
Christensen. 

Junior High — A. P. Giannini, Charles R. Gerst- 
bacher; Aptos, Henry Barsotti; Benjamin Franklin, Burl 
Toler (Acting); Everett, Carl H. Hanson, Jr.; Francisco, 
Lane E. DeLara; Herbert Hoover, John F. Kearney, Jr. 
(Acting) ; Horace Mann, Frank R. Verducci; James 
Denman, Lawrence Webber; James Lick, William Gal- 
ant; Luther Burbank, Paul Gay; Marina, Robert R. 
Marcus; Pelton, Thomas J. Sammon; Portola, George 
Karonsky; Presidio, Julian Reinhertz; Roosevelt, Walter 
S. Nolan; Staging Site for New Visitacion Valley Junior 
High School, Ernest J. Delucchi. 



Summer Programs Employ Youth 




Helen Fong of George Washington High School was one of 1,400 
economically disadvantaged youth who earned credit and pay 
this past summer in the work experience projects of the Occupa- 
tional Preparation Office, Vocational and Adult Education Divi- 
sion of the SFUSD. Helen, a Neighborhood Youth Corps enrollee, 
is seen with William T. Bragg, Inhalation Th:.-apist, U. S. 
Veterans Administration Hospital at Ft. Miley. The summer pro- 
gram was coordinated by Bryant Lane, Supervisor, Occupational 
Preparation, and three project heads, Norman Glattrae (NYC), 
John Harrington (Work Study 1), and Bruno Zzchary (Work 
Study 2). 



NEWSLETTER 



September 2, 1968 j 



Announcements 



• SPANISH WORKSHOP SESSIONS 

To introduce the newly adopted Spanish series La 
Familia Fernandez, two workshop meetings will be held 
on the afternoons of Wednesday, September 4, and 
Thursday, September 5, in room 220 of Lowell High 
School, 1101 Eucalyptus Drive. 

The meetings will begin a 2 p.m. as both days involved 
are minimum days. The meetings are planned to con- 
clude at about 4 p.m. 

The workshop sessions will be conducted by Mr. Ray 
Baker and Mr. Paul de Landa, consultants provided by 
Encylopedia Brittanica Films Inc. 

All teachers of Spanish are encouraged to attend these 
meetings, especially teachers who will have first-year 
Spanish classes during 1968-69. 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancies : 
2704 — School Custodian', Female — City College, 
George Washington High, Pelton Junior High, Alvarado, 
Bayview, Diamond Heights, Frank McCoppin, Lawton, 
Marshall Annex, John Adams Adult. 

2724 — School Custodian, Male — City College (4) 
nights, Abraham Lincoln High (nights), George Wash- 
ington High, Lowell High, Benjamin Franklin Junior 
High, Herbert Hoover Junior High (nights) , James Lick 
Junior High (nights), Pelton Junior High (nights), 
Presidio Junior High, Alvarado, Diamond Heights, Hill- 
crest, John Muir (nights), Lawton, John Adams Adult. 



PROCEDURES TO BE FOLLOWED IN 
SECURING DAY-TO-DAY SUBSTITUTES 

The Personnel Office wishes to remind all 
administrators and teachers that requests for day- 
to-day substitutes should be directed to the Per- 
sonnel Service Division. The effort of school ad- 
ministrators and regular teachers to secure their 
own substitutes sometimes results in confusion. A 
centralized approach is both desirable and neces- 
sary, as it is Board policy. 

An automatic answering and recording telephone 
(863-2391 ) will receive requests at any hour of the 
night, 4:40 p.m. to 7 a.m. Be sure to report: 

1. Your name (last name first, please) 

2. Your school 

3. The grade level or subjects you teach 

4. The anticipated length of your absence 
Between the hours of 7 a.m. and 4:40 p.m., tele- 
phone calls are handled by the regular switch- 
board (863-4680). Ask for the Certificated Per- 
sonnel Office. 

School secretaries are reminded to continue to 
call the Personnel Service Division to report the 
return or the continued absence of a teacher. 

The cooperation of all concerned will improve 
the procedure. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, September 10, 1968, Regular meeting, 
170 Fell Street. 



NEW OPPORTUNITY 
HIGH SCHOOL POSITIONS 

Secondary teachers who are interested in teach- 
ing in the new Opportunity High School should 
contact Mrs. Mary Bryd, Supervisor in the Person- 
nel Service Division, at 863-4680, Extension 380, 
immediately. 

The Opportunity High School is designed to pro- 
vide a program of individualized instruction to 
meet more adequately the needs of those students 
whose interest in school has decreased to the point 
that effective learning is no longer taking place in 
the regular school. 

The teacher-pupil ratio will be much smaller 
than in the regular school. There will be four 
scheduled classes, one preparation period, and one 
advisory period. 

For additional information, call Harvey Chris- 
tensen, Principal, at 863-4680, Extension 367. 



• SCIENCE AND MATH INSTITUTES 

A National Science Foundation booklet, Directory 
1968-69 In-Service Institutes for Secondary School 
Teachers and Supervisors of Science and Mathematics, 
has been placed in the Special File in the Teachers Pro- 
fessional Library for the information of interested 
teachers. 



SABBATICAL LEAVE NOTICE 

Teachers or administrators planning to take a 
sabbatical leave during the spring term 1969 for 
travel or study are reminded that requests are due 
in the Personnel Division Office prior to October 
1, 1968. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO, C 
PERMIT No. 3966 



11 

k 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL D 
135 VAN NESS AVE. 



RETURN REQUEST! 



documents DS?,\R7'.::-: - ;r 

5 . F . PUBLIC L 1 8 R 

1, IRK IN 5 U ' A :,!.:.' . ■-'■'. 

sa:i fra:icisco, calif. 9410: 



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BAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



SEP 1 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 40 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1968 



NUMBER 2 



Five Cities to Participate 



National Humanities Faculty Program Set 



j San Francisco has been chosen as one of the five Amer- 
can cities to take part in a pilot program of the National 
Humanities Faculty in the first effort on a national scale 

help secondary schools update their teaching in the 
Humanities. 

1 The Board of Education approved the District's par- 
icipation in the project upon recommendation of Super- 
intendent Robert E. Jenkins at the August 27, 1968 meet- 

' The purpose of the program is to make use of univer- 
■ity scholars in a variety of ways as resources for the im- 
)rovement of high school teaching in the arts, history, 
anguages, literature, philosophy, and the social sciences. 
! Under the general plan of operation the National 
humanities Faculty will pay the stipends of university 
cholars for the equivalent of 20 man-days per year for 
jive years. This will enable the District to bring about 
our consultants per year to San Francisco for the next 
ive years, each for a week, to work primarily with teach- 
ers and administrators on making more effective use of 
he Humanities in teaching young people. 

The District will pay for the travel, board, and room 
)f those university scholars who come to San Francisco. 
! It is proposed that the scholars be used to sensitize the 
taffs of the District's senior high schools as to some of the 
nore exciting developments being carried on in the uni- 
versities and how these may be interrelated and program- 
ned to promote effective programs in the Humanities. 

The scholars will be used to work with small interested 

joups of the faculty to develop "team approaches" to 

' 'he teaching of the Humanities. By interchanging ideas, 

lew insights may be developed that will provide new 

hallenge and inspiration for working with students. 

It is further proposed that he scholars have contact 
ivith the parents and citizens of the community and that 
■nembers of the faculties of neighboring universities be 
'rivited to participate in these interchanges of ideas with 
,he visitors. 

The District will allocate up to 96 days of substitute 
eacher time each year (equivalent of three teachers per 
chool for one day per week for four weeks for eight 
:hools) to enable teachers from eight schools to meet 
'agether for in-depth discussions and interchanges of 
leas. 

The plans of five cities were chosen by the Board of 
le National Humanities Faculty from a large number of 
roposals received from school systems all over the coun- 
,ry. Cities selected in addition to San Francisco include 



the Utica, New York area; Minneapolis, Minnesota; 
Grosse Pointe, Michigan; and Gainesville, Georgia. 

The National Humanities Faculty is sponsored by Phi 
Beta Kappa, the American Council of Learned Societies, 
and the American Council on Education. 



Orientation Day 

New District Teachers Welcomed 




Some 750 teachers, new to the SFUSD, were greeted by Superin- 
tendent Robert E. Jenkins at a special Orientation Day Program 
at Baiboa High School prior to the opening of school. Pictured 
above are new teachers, representative of the larger group, as 
they met Dr. Jenkins. Left to right are Cheryl Ward, Marilyn 
Belluomini, Dr. Jenkins, Carole Chuck, Jean Rollins, and Jane 
Gordon. 

Teachers new to the San Francisco Unified School 
District participated in a special Orientation Day Pro- 
gram on Wednesday, August 28, 1968, at .Balboa High 
School from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 

The new teachers were welcomed by John Levinsohn 
of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce and Dr. 
Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools. Members 
of the Superintendent's staff were introduced, and Mil- 
ton F. Reiterman, Assistant Superintendent, Personnel 
Services, and members of his staff discussed the topic of 
professional rights and responsibilities. 

Representatives of the various teachers' professional 
organizations addressed the new teachers. Three hundred 
of the teachers are part of 900 to be added in a three year 
period as part of the District's program to reduce class 
size. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 9, 196J 



Summer Workshop 



Industrial Arts Teachers Develop Guides 



Teacher-developed curricula in the field of industrial 
arts have resulted from an innovative summer workshop 
program this year. Nine District industrial arts teachers 
have compiled course material in accordance with deci- 
sions of teachers in the field and have edited it into the 
form of instructors' guides in Automechanics, Drafting, 
Graphic Arts, Metals, Multipurpose Shops, and Woods. 

The project is under the direction of Dr. Jess E. Rath- 
bun, Coordinator, Industrial Arts. The project heads are 
John H. Queiser and Robert G. Orchid. Workshop mem- 
bers include Ronald Adams, Blake Deaver, Kent Don- 
dero, Harry Duff, Melvin Levy, William Johnson, Shun 
Ochi, Frederick Peterson, and Norman Tauber. 

Participation of District industrial arts teachers in de- 
veloping the curricula was achieved through in-service 
courses, steering committee members in each school, cor- 

Goal of $16.5 Million 

United Bay Area Crusade Opens 

The United Bay Area Crusade campaign, giving all 
Bay Area residents the annual opportunity to voluntarily 
help their neighbors in need, opens today, to raise funds 
for 176 community agencies. 

Thousands of citizen fund-raisers have set their 1968 
target at $16,500,000 for a wide variety of agencies in 
Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco and San 
Mateo counties. 

District teachers will be asked once again to participate 
in the Drive. Multipurpose pledge cards will be forward- 
ed to all school personnel in September providing for 
contributions through the School Department. 

Among services and agencies financed through United 
Crusade contributions are boys' clubs, neighborhood cen- 
ters, visiting nurse and homemaker services, Catholic 
Social Services, Jewish Welfare Federation, USO, free 
and part-pay medical and psychiatric clinics, Boy and 
Girl Scouts, Camp Fire Girls, CYO, YMCA, Salvation 
Army, hospitals, legal aid societies, Red Cross and others. 

Because the job of collecting and distributing the 
money is done by unpaid workers, the cost is kept at a 
minimum, with more than 90 cents of each dollar con- 
tributed going to help. More than 1,000,000 Bay Area 
people were served by these many agencies in 1967. 

"Without Crusade's annual drive, there would have to 
be separate solicitations of funds to finance the 176 affili- 
ated agencies, meaning much high costs and great dupli- 
cation of work," UBAC Campaign Chairman Jerome W. 
Hull pointed out. 



• JOHN O'CONNELL ACCREDITATION 

The Western Association of Schools and Colleges an- 
nounces that the Accrediting Commission for Secondary 
Schools has granted a full term of accreditation, expiring 
June 30, 1973, to John O'Connell Vocational High 
School and Technical Institute. 



respondence, and visitations of the project heads witl 
individual teachers and at department meetings. 

The teachers' decisions were made with regard to th 
objectives, content, technical and related informatior 
and student and teacher activities. Further decisions wer 
made to determine the levels of instruction at which th 
various topics should be presented to students to insur 
horizontal articulation and to provide the continuity c 
vertical articulation to industrial arts education. 

The plan for the fall semester phase of the project wi 
be to put pre-publication copies of the guide into th 
hands of the teachers and to begin to organize the coir, 
munications and mechanics of an articulation plan be 
tween the ninth grade basic courses in the junior hig 
schools and the basic and advanced courses in the senii 
high schools. 




Participating in the industrial arts summer workshop prograr 
this year were (left to right) Dr. Jess E. Rathbun, Coordinate 
Industrial Arts; Norman L. Myers, State Department of Educ 
Hon; Robert Orchid, Project Head; Dr. Robert L. Woodwar 
Industrial Arts Consultant, State Department of Education; an 
John H. Queiser, Project Head. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 40, No. 2 



September 9, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Administrative Assistant, 
Educational Information 



September 9, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Lines of Responsibility 



Major Organizational Changes Outlined 



(The September 2, 1968 issue of the Newsletter report- 
ed the major changes in organizational structure of the 
School District at the top administrative level from the 
office of Superintendent through the Assistant Superin- 
tendents. The following is a description of the lines of 
responsibility under the new organization from the As- 
sistant Superintendents through Principals.) 
School Operational Services 

Dr. Donald A. Rhodes, Assistant Superintendent, Ele- 
. mentary Education — Directly responsible to Dr. Rhodes 
! are Mrs. Theresa Mahler, Director, Children's Centers; 
' three Supervisors AA, Elementary Education, Agatha 
IHogan, Dr. Mary McCarthy, and Mrs. Dorothy Vu- 
! kota; and the Elementary Principals. Responsible to Mrs. 
'Mahler are two Supervisors, Children's Centers, Mrs. 
Helen DeRenzo and Loretta Juhas, and the Children's 
i Centers Head Teachers. 

Ralph Kauer, Assistant Superintendent, Secondary 
j Education — Directly responsible to Mr. Kauer are 
Robert Perussina, Supervisor AA, Driver Education; 
i I Bryant Lane, Supervisor A A, Occupational Preparation; 
two Supervisors A, Secondary Education (Secondary 
Principals Ivor Callaway, Dr. Myron Moskowitz, and 
George Moscone are on leave to the Central Office to 
work in this capacity) ; Mrs. Josephine Cole, Supervisor 
A, Student Relations; Col. James Farren, Senior Army 
Instructor; and the Secondary Principals. 

James Dierke, Assistant Superintendent, Adult and 
Occupational Education — Directly responsible to Mr. 
Dierke are Dalton Howatt, Coordinator A, Adult Edu- 
cation, and Norbert Deggendorfer, Coordinator A, Oc- 
cupational Education. Responsible to Mr. Howatt are 
tthe Adult Education Principals; to Mr. Deggendorfer 
fare Alvan Waltz, Supervisor AA, Trade and Technical 
Education, and the Occupational Education Principals. 

Martin Dean, Assistant Superintendent, Special Edu- 
cational Services — Directly responsible to Mr. Dean are 
Mrs:- Alice ■ Henry, Director, Pupil -Services; Margaret 
Holland, Director, Special Education; and Leslie Russell, 
Principal, Court Schools. Responsible to Mrs. Henry are 
James J. Hamrock, Supervisor AA, Guidance and Coun- 
seling; Henry F. Warnken, Supervisor AA, Psychological 
Services; Marjorie Anne Kuhl, Supervisor A, Social 
Work Services; Howard C. Clay, Supervisor A, Attend- 
ance Services; and Dr. Gordon Carlson, Supervisor A, 
Guidance Service Centers. Responsible to Miss Holland 
ire Valentine Becker, Supervisor AA, Speech, Hearing, 
[find Visually Handicapped; Douglas A. Boyce, Super- 
Ij/isor AA, Secondary Mentally Handicapped; Frances A. 
baine, Supervisor AA, Elementary Mentally Handicap- 
ped ; Mrs. Marguerite Rapson, Supervisor A A, Educa- 
,ionally Handicapped; Robert F. Cunningham, Super- 
ior A, Physically Handicapped; and the Principals of 
Special Schools. Responsible to Mr. Russell is James Kil- 
kenny, Assistant Principal. 

Lducational Planning, Research, and Development 
William L. Cobb, Assistant Superintendent, Human 



Relations — Directly responsible to Dr. Cobb are Junius 
Camp, Human Relations Field Representative (Elemen- 
tary) and Grandvel A. Jackson, Human Relations Field 
Representative ( Secondary ) . 

Isadore Pivnick, Assistant Superintendent, Innovative 
Planning — Directly responsible to Mr. Pivnick are Vic- 
tor Rossi, Supervisor AA, Innovative Programs, and the 
PACE Center. 

Assistant Superintendent, Instructional Development 
and Services (to be appointed) — Directly responsible 
to this Assistant Superintendent are George Canrinus, 
Coordinator A, Health, Physical Education, Athletics, 
and Recreation; Dr. Jess E. Rathbun, Coordinator B, 
Industrial Arts; Herbert Simon, Director, Art; Kathleen 
McGillicuddy, Director, Homemaking; Dr. Albert A. 
Renna, Director, Music; William B. Cummings, Super- 
visor A A, Programs for the Gifted; Elmer Gallegos, 
Supervisor A, Spanish Bilingual Education; and Welling- 
ton Chew, Supervisor A, Chinese Bilingual Education. 
Responsible to Mr. Canrinus are Elwood Lang, Super- 
visor AA, Secondary Physical Education; Mrs. Viola 
Mails, Supervisor A, Health and Physical Education; 
and three Supervisors A, Elementary Physical Education, 
Harold Fox, Uarda Schuldt, and Armenag Terzian. Re- 
sponsible to Mr. Simon are two Supervisors A, Art, 
Verla Leonard and Mrs. Alice Stone. Responsible to Dr. 
Renna are Alfred Beseman, Supervisor A, Music (Ele- 
mentary and Secondary), and two Supervisors A, Music 
(Elementary), Lorraine Walsh and Bertha Widmer. 

Directly responsible to the Associate Superintendent 
of this Division are Dr. William B. Sanborn, Director, 
Instructional Materials; Harold Weeks, Director, Re- 
search and Program Evaluation; and a Director, Budget 
Planning, to be appointed. Responsible to Dr. Sanborn 
is Geraldine Ferring, Supervisor AA, Libraries and 
Textbooks. 
General Administrative Officer 

Wilbert G. Vestneys, Assistant Superintendent, Build- 
ings and Grounds — Directly responsible to Mr. Vest- 
neys are Philip Cali, Supervisor AA, Building Mainten- 
ance and Repair (Daily), and Dr. James Morena, Su- 
pervisor AA, Building Maintenance and Rehabilitation 
(Major). 

James Porter, Fiscal Officer — Directly responsible to 
Mr. Porter is the Assistant Fiscal Officer (to be ap- 
pointed). 

Responsible directly to the Chief Administrative Offi- 
cer are Wendell Muntz, Supervisor A A, Food Service; 
Edgar Lahl, Supervisor AA, Supplies; and a Supervisor, 
Educational Data Processing (to be appointed). 



IN MEMORIAM 

Mrs. Muriel R. Barbour 
Mrs. Grace B. Keenan 
Mrs. Phyllis B. Perley 
Mrs. Margery Souder 



NEWSLETTER 



September 9, 1968 1 



Announcements 



• ADDITIONAL VOLUNTEERS SOUGHT 

The San Francisco Education Auxiliary is sending out 
a call for men and women who are interested in serving 
as volunteers in the city's public schools. 

The Auxiliary has scheduled a recruitment meeting 
Wednesday, September 11, in the Fellowship Hall of 
Ebenezer Lutheran Church, 678 Portola Drive, at 10:30 
a.m. 

The School Volunteer Program will be thoroughly ex- 
plained. Last year some 300 volunteers in 59 schools 
helped children with remedial reading, art, music, science, 
field trips, library work and special projects. Hundreds of 
additional volunteers are needed for the new school year. 

For additional information, call 399-3739. 



SPRING REQUISITIONS 




Spring requisition lists are due 


in the Division of 


Supplies Warehouse, 1000'Selby 


Street, Attention: 


Mrs. Elaine Hung, as follows: 




Janitorial Supplies Lists — due before September 


16, 1968. 




Instructional Supplies Lists — 


due before Octo- 


ber 14, 1968. 





• TEACHER'S BOOK PUBLISHED 

Mrs. Joyce Lancaster Wilson, parent educator in the 
District's Adult Education classes, has had a book pub- 
lished recently. The book, Tobi, is for children ages three 
to six. It has its setting in San Francisco and deals with 
family and community relationships in a way meaningful 
to young children and their parents. The book is illus- 
trated in color by Ann Thiess. 



PERSONNEL PROCEDURAL CHANGE 

The Personnel Service Division announces that 
the following change in procedure has been adopt- 
ed by the Board of Education: 

Teachers now have until December 1, instead of 
November 1, to file records of academic work for 
salary increment. The work must have been com- 
pleted before the beginning of this term. 

Teachers with salary questions are invited to 
write or telephone the Salary Office, Personnel 
Services, at 863-4680, Extensions 423-4-5. 



• VISITORS FROM AMERICAN 

Lewis Wittlinger, summer principal 
Vocational High School, and Bruno 
Occupational Preparation, hosted a £ 
from American Samoa in August. 

The group toured John O'Connell 
served a brunch. The visit was part of 
by Stanford University and financed 
of Health, Education, and Welfare. 



SAMOA 

at John O'Connell 
Zachary, Office of 
;roup of 26 visitors 

facilities and were 
a project sponsored 
by the Department 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, September 10, 1968, 7:30 p.m., Regu- 
lar meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



IN-SERVICE COURSE INFORMATION 

The following in-service course will be offered 
this semester and should be added to the list printed 
in the September 2 issue of the Newsletter: 
Kindergarten Methods 

Two units, non-college credit, 15 meetings, 
Thursdays, 4 to 6 p.m. at Hancock School. Marilyn 
Diamond and Virginia Seymour, instructors. 
Course starts September 12. Pre-registration is 
necessary. Call Elementary Diyision at 863-4680, 
Extension 237 (for kindergarten teachers only). 

A course in kindergarten curriculum designed to help teachers 
with content, methods, and skill development. 

Photography 

The meeting date for the photography course 
announced in the last Newsletter has been set as 
Wednesdays. The course will start on September 11. 



• BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION ELECTS OFFICERS 

The Northern California Basketball Officials Associa- 
tion has announced its new officers for the 1968-69 sea- 
son. They include Erv Delman (Abraham Lincoln). | 
president; Owen Kashevaroff, vice-president; Howard 
Powleson, secretary; Irv Weintraub, treasurer; and exec-! 
utive board members Ron Gaggero (Marina) , Dick Mur- 
ray (Herbert Hoover), and Ron Ealy. 

The association recently honored James Witt, formeij 
District basketball coach and winner of many AAA anq 
TOC titles, who is retiring as an official after 20 years 
of service. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO, cjti 
PERMIT No. 3966 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL Din 
135 VAN NESS AVE. S? 



RETURN REQUEST! 



DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 
S. F. PUBLIC LIBRARY 
LARKIN & MC ALLI8TER 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



STS. 

94102 



SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



SEP 1 6 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 40 



® 



SEPTEMBER 16, 1968 



NUMBER 3 



Emphasis on Individualized Instruction 



New Opportunity School to Open This Fall 



San Francisco will add a new public senior high school 
to its secondary school roster in mid-October when the 
Opportunity High School opens its doors for the first 
time. 

The new facility will be a small high school of some 
210 students, designed to provide a program of individu- 
alized instruction to more adequately meet the needs of 
those students whose interest in school has fallen to the 
'point that effective learning is no longer taking place in 
•the regular school. 

The emphasis will be on providing an individualized 
program for students who show potential, but who, for 
one reason or another (irregular attendance, unaccept- 
able behavior, lack of motivation, etc.), have not met 
with educational success. 

The school will stress the development of positive atti- 
tudes and the acquisition of basic skills and will provide 
opportunities for work experience. Students will receive 
instruction in speaking, reading, spelling, writing, litera- 
ture, social science, mathematics, creative arts, business 

Student Relations Benefits 



iift Made to District Office 




"he Jolliettes Civic and Social Club recently presented a check 
or $500 to the School District as a donation to be used by the 
tudent Relations Office in its work with suspended and expelled 
'oys and girls. Pictured above at the time of presentation are 
left to right) Mrs. Josephine Cole, Supervisor, Student Relations; 
ames Porter, Fiscal Officer; Mrs. Leora Grayson, President, 
olliettes Civic and Social Club; and Elizabeth Aldrich, Student 
delations Office. 



education, industrial arts, and occupational preparation 
and will spend part of the day in on-the-job situations. 

The major emphasis of the schools will be to help each 
individual 

• to identify himself as a person capable of learning 
and functioning as an effective member of our society 

• to develop positive attitudes toward himself, toward 
life and living, toward his associates and fellow men, 
toward his school and work, and toward change 

• to build confidence in himself and in his own abili- 
ties to cope satisfactorily with the realities of the world 
in which he will be living for the next 75 years 

• to learn the basic tools of oral and written commun- 
ication and how to use them effectively 

• to learn the basic concepts of mathematics and sci- 
ence needed to understand and function successfully in 
the world of work 

• to learn about the realities of the world in which he 
is living, the problems that need to be solved, and the 
great challenges that he must face if his world is to be 
one of understanding, dignity, respect, and accomplish- 
ment, and 

• to learn how to enjoy some of the countless wonders 
of the world in which he is living and to appreciate the 
fruits of our great civilization. 

There will be two four-hour sessions each day from 
8:15 to 11:45 a.m. and 12:15 to 3:45 p.m. Students who 
attend the morning session will have work experience in 
the afternoon, whereas students who attend the afternoon 
session will have their work experience in the morning. 

Teachers will instruct four classes of 15 each (or the 
equivalent) and have one period each day in which to 
advise students, follow up on their individual problems, 
help them with their homework, make home visits, check 
on attendance, provide for their needs of security and 
belonging, and help them in every way to succeed in 
school and in their work. 

The school will provide for individualized instruction, 
ungraded curriculum, flexible scheduling, contract meth- 
od of teaching, team teaching, personal guidance and 
help, as well as group guidance for occupational prepar- 
ation and post-high school education. It will be a racially 
integrated school — with both an integrated staff and an 
integrated student body. 

Harvey Christensen has been appointed principal of 
the Opportunity High School, and Mrs. Lillian Powell 
(Continued on Page 2) 



I 



NEWSLETTER 



September 16, 1968 



Public, Parochial Participants 

EH Workshop Hailed a Success 

Phase I of a three-year In-Service Training Program 
for teachers of educationally handicapped children was 
completed at Herbert Hoover Junior High School this 
summer. 

The workshop, planned jointly by the administrative 
staffs of the public and parochial schools of the city, was 
developed by Mrs. Marguerite Rapson, Supervisor, Edu- 
cationally Handicapped, and directed by Dr. John Rob- 
erts, formerly Coordinator, Child Welfare Division of the 
SFUSD. Mrs. Margaret Wallace served as resource 
teacher. 

The project, financed through Title VI, ESEA, enroll- 
ed 53 participants. Twenty-eight were parochial school 
teachers and 23 were public school teachers of regular or 
special classes. 

The three-week In-Service Program featured large- 
group lecture demonstrations and small discussion ses- 
sions, each devoted to a specific topic and shared by an 
experienced teacher and group leader. 

Highlights of the workshop included lectures given by 
Dr. William Morse, University of Michigan, who dis- 
cussed the emotionally disturbed child, and lectures given 
by Dr. Frank Hewett, University of California, Los An- 
geles, who described teaching and learning in an "engi- 
neered classroom." 

One of the leaders of the small group sessions was 
Donald Mayhew, teacher of an engineered classroom 
under Dr. Hewitt's direction at the UCLA Neuropsychi- 
atric Institute. Other highlights included a series of ses- 
sions at the University of California Child Study Unit 
under the direction of Dr. Helen Gofman and material 
given by Joyce Kohfeldt, Specialist in Learning Disabili- 
ties, Michigan State University and Ingham County 
Schools. 

One innovation was the recording on video tape of a 
number of demonstrations of how to work with educa- 
tionally handicapped children, both in individual and 
classroom situations. 

Program participants indicated they had benefitted 
from their new insights into the nature of minimal cere- 
bral dysfunction and the educational problems it imposes 
on a child. They felt they had benefitted even more from 
the demonstrations of how to turn these new insights into 
practical, workable classroom procedures. 

Finally, the group offered many suggestions which will 
form the basis for planning the continuing program to be 
carried out during the three-year life of the project. 



• COMPLETES MINORITY GROUP NDEA COURSE 

Mrs. Joyce Robinson, teacher at Hunters Point II 
School, successfully completed a summer NDEA Institute 
in U. S. History on the "Role of Minority Groups in 
American History" at San Fernando Valley State College. 
The U. S. Office of Education sponsored this program 
for experienced teachers of grades 5, 6, 7, and 8. Mrs. 
Robinson was one of 45 participants selected from nearly 
400 applicants from the Western United States. 



. . . Opportunity School to Open 

(Continued from Page 1) 
has been appointed assistant principal. They will help 
supervise a staff of some 14 teachers. 

Each comprehensive high school will recommend i 
own candidates for the school to the Student Placeme 
Committee, which, with the Opportunity School princ 
pal's help, will make the selection and assignment of st 
dents to the Opportunity School. 

The criteria to be used in the recommendation of stu- 
dents for the school are 

• students who are normal and potentially able to| 
succeed if provided the right opportunity and encourage 
ment 

• students whose attendance patterns are so irregular 
that they interfere with good progress in a regular school| 

• students whose behavior is so disruptive that it -int> 
feres with their own learning as well as with the learnin 
of other students 

• students whose behavior is so apathetic and indiffer 
ent that they are not achieving satisfactorily. 

It should be noted that students who are severe 
emotionally disturbed do not belong in this school, but i: 
one of the Guidance Service Centers. 

Teachers for the new school will be volunteers fron 
within the District. (See announcement on page 4 of this 
issue. ) 

The site of the Opportunity School is currently undo 
consideration and will be announced in the near future 



• HEALTH, FAMILY LIFE WORKSHOP 

A five-day workshop from August 26 through Augus 
30 in Health and Family Life Education was presentee 
by the SFUSD at City College of San Francisco. A largt 
number of specialists in health and social sciences com 
prised the workshop staff, and some two dozen Distric 
teachers served in a resource capacity. 

Dr. Frances Todd and Frank Ingersoll, Curriculun 
Assistants, Health and Family Life Education, served a 
workshop director and assistant director, respectively. 






SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 40, No. 3 



September 16, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Administrative Assistant, 
Educational Information 



: 

: 
J 



September 16, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



One of the First 



Unique Bilingual Summer Program Offered 




One of the first public bilingual schools in California was in session at the Hawthorne Elementary Summer School. Instruction for most 
students was given in Spanish and English. Native English-speakers as well as Spanish-speaking and other non-English-speaking pupils 
learned some helpful new skills in both languages. District personnel who worked in the summer program are pictured above. Top row r 
left to right: Emily Delasalas, Maria Brenner, Paula Conray, Rosalino Quema, Jon Lucero, Sally Gordon, Marie Morrison, Nanci Pengra, 
iPeter Gonzalez (Head Teacher); Middle row: Graciela Sprietz, Lolita Martin, Teresa Rameriz, Nan Degelman, Jean Rameriz, Josefina 
Reyes; Front row: Elmer Gallegos, Supervisor, Spanish Bilingual Education; Eleanor Aragon, Ernestine Trujillo, Margaret Garza, Minerva 
Limon, Jay Sanchez. 

Computer Programming Project Approved 



District participation in a two-year pilot project for 
Computer-based Instruction in Elementary Programming 
at Woodrow Wilson High School was approved by the 
Board of Education, upon the recommendation of Super- 
intendent Robert E. Jenkins, at the August 27, 1968 
meeting. 

The project is being financed by the National Science 
Foundation through a grant to Dr. Patrick Suppes, Di- 
rector of the Institute for Mathematical Studies in the 
Social Sciences, Stanford University. 

It will consist of a course designed to provide instruc- 
:ion which assists in preparing students to enter the field 
of data processing. 

The school will have 15 teletype terminals which will 
i )e connected by phone lines directly to the computer 
omplex of Stanford. 

The District will provide a classroom with facilities for 

ipproximately 20 pieces of electrical equipment, teacher 

ime of approximately seven periods a day, and the in- 

itallation of phone lines. The course will accommodate 

5 students a period. 

Stanford University can accept transmission from the 
eletypes until 9 p.m., creating the possibility that the 
ourse may be made available to adults in the evening 
>rogram. 

> The course will be available to all levels and abilities 
,'f students. The vocational significance of the project is 



that students will have adequate training and back- 
ground to be qualified to enter specialized training pro- 
grams of banks, department stores, and governmental 
units that use data processing. 

It is felt that this course in computer programming will 
be an excellent companion to the present courses at 
Woodrow Wilson in Introduction to Data Processing and 
Key Punch Training and an excellent follow-through for 
those students currently enrolled in the Lockheed-EDP 
program at Pelton Junior High School (see Newsletter of 
January 8, 1968). 

Three District teachers designated to teach the course 
will be compensated by Stanford to work during the sum- 
mer of 1969 to help revise the program for the course. 

The project will start as soon as all of the nececsary 
arrangements can be completed. 



TEACHERS' MEETINGS 

Your attention is called to the Board of Educa- 
tion regulation R 4131.1 relative to the days to 
be used by school principals for calling teachers' 
meetings: 

The principal shall call teachers' meetings after school hours on 
the first or third Tuesday of each school month, or both, and at 
such other times as, in his judgment, meetings seem necessary. 
Except in cases of emergency, the principal shall avoid calling 
teachers' meetings during school hours. Unless excused by the prin- 
cipal, a teacher shall attend all teachers' meetings called by the 
principal. Principals shall see that teachers attend meetings to 
which they are called by the Superintendent, Assistant Superintend- 
ents, Directors, Coordinators, or Supervisors. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 16, 19681 



Announcements 



• AIRPORT PROGRAM SUCCESSFUL 

An experimental eight-week course designed to train 
unemployable youths so they can get jobs has produced 
encouraging results in a new school at the San Francisco 
Airport. 

The course was conducted by Otto Wendehost of the 
District's John O'Connell Vocational High School. 

Instead of dropping out of the course, 1 1 of the first 
14 have qualified for what are termed "ramp service jobs" 
with the airlines. 

To finance this pilot program, the Neighborhood 
Youth Corps paid the students $11.20 a day, and other 
costs were underwritten by American Airlines, Air West, 
Pacific Southwest Airlines, Butler Aviation Co., Inter- 
national Flight Service, Western Airlines, and Lockheed 
Aircraft Co. 



1968— VARSITY FOOTBALL SCHEDULE— A.A.A. 



Date 

Fri. Sept. 20 



Thu. Sept. 26 
Fri. Sept. 27 

Thu. Oct. 3 
Fri. Oct. 4 

Fri. Oct. 11 
Fri. Oct. 18 



Thu. Oct. 31 
Fri. Nov. 1 

Fri Nov. 8 



Thu. Nov. 14 
Fri. Nov. 15 



Thu. Nov. 21 
Fri. Nov. 22 
Thu, Nov. 28 



Home Team 

Balboa 

Woodrow Wilson 
Abraham Lincoln 

Mission 
Galileo 

Polytechnic 

George Washington 
Sacred Heart 
Galileo 
Woodrow Wilson 

Mission 
Sacred Heart 

Lowell 

Abraham Lincoln 
George Washington 

Balboa 

George Washington 

Abraham Lincoln 

Lowell 

Polytechnic 

Woodrow Wilson 

George Washington 

Mission 

Galileo 

Lowell 

Balboa 

Abraham Lincoln 
Lowell 

Woodrow Wilson 
Sacred Heart 

Sacred Heart 

Mission 

Lowell 
Polytechnic 

Balboa 

Polytechnic 

Galileo 

George Washington 

Woodrow Wilson 

Abraham Lincoln 

Polytechnic 

Balboa 
Sacred Heart 
Galileo 

Mission 

Play-Offs 
Play-Offs 
Championship 



Visitor 

Sacred Heart 

Lowell 

George Washington 

Polytechnic 

Bye 

Lowell 

Balboa 
Mission 

Abraham Lincoln 
Bye 

Woodrow Wilson 
Polytechnic 

Galileo 
Balboa 
Bye 

Mission 
Galileo 

Woodrow Wilson 
Sacred Heart 
Bye 

Balboa 
Sacred Heart 
Abraham Lincoln 
Polytechnic 
Bye 

Galileo 

Polytechnic 

Mission 

George Washington 

Bye 

Galileo 

George Washington 

Abraham Lincoln 
Woodrow Wilson 
Bye 

Balboa 
Mission 
Lowell 

Sacred Heart 
Bye 



George Washington Kezar 



Stadium 

Balboa 

Woodrow Wilson 
Abraham Lincoln 
Kezar 



George Washington 

Kezar 

Galileo 



S.F. City College 
Kezar 



Lowell 
Kezar 



Balboa 

George Washington 

Abraham Lincoln 

Lowell 



Woodrow Wilson 
George Washington 
Kezar 
Galileo 



Balboa 

Abraham Lincoln 
Lowell 
Woodrow Wilson 



S.F. City College 
Kezar 

Lowell 
Kezar 



Kezar 

Galileo 

George Washington 

Woodtow Wilson 



Lowell 
Abraham Lincoln 

Woodrow Wilson 
Bye 



Balboa 
Kezar 

Galileo 



Kezar 
Kezar 
Kezar 



Starting Times: 

Prior to October 26, 3-30 P.M. 
After October 28, 3:00 P.M. 
Championship, 11:00 A.M. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, September 24, 1968, 7:30 p.m., Regu- 
lar meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



OPPORTUNITY HIGH SCHOOL POSITIONS 

Secondary teachers who are interested in teach- 
ing in the new Opportunity High School are asked 
to contact Mrs. Mary Byrd, Supervisor, Personnel 
Services, at 863-4680, Extension 380, by this com- 
ing Friday, September 20, 1968. 

The new school is designed to provide a program 
of individualized instruction for students whose in- 
terest in school has decreased to the point that 
effective learning is no longer taking place in the 
regular school situation. 

The new facility will feature a much smaller 
teacher-pupil ratio, and teachers will have four 
scheduled classes, a preparation period, and an 
advisory period. 

Friday, September 20, 1968 has been set as the 
deadline for contacting the Personnel Services 
Office. 



• AFTER-SCHOOL SCIENCE POSITION 

The Woodrow Wilson After-School Science Progran 
is seeking a teacher qualified to offer a "ham radio' 
course. Interested teachers should contact Herb Strongir 
or Chuck Olivera at 584-6140, Extension 19. 



• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE TO MEET 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet at 1:3( 
p.m. on Wednesday, September 25, in room 10, Centra 
Office, 170 Fell Street. 



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NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 40 



® 



SEPTEMBER 23, 1968 



*fr2a 



869- 



NUMBER 4 



Southeast Educational Development Project 



Project SEED Funds Approved by Board 



The Board of Education, upon the recommendation 

of Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins, voted to appropri- 

j ate $545,760 for the Southeast Educational Development 

; Program (Project SEED) at its September 10, 1968 

j meeting. The project is being funded under Title III of 

the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. 

Project SEED is an educational enrichment program 
which calls for active community involvement in the 
Hunters Point-Bayview area schools. 

Its primary purpose is to bring the Hunters Point- 
Bayview Community and the School District together in 
a close, cooperative relationship so that better educational 
programs can be provided for that community — pro- 
l grams which may also prove to be relevant to social inte- 
i gration as well as being exemplary to the rest of the 
1 School District and other metropolitan areas. 

In order to clarify the question of determination of 
t school policy and the role of the SEED Project Board, 
' the following five guidelines were approved by the Board 
of Education: 

• The SEED Project Board will formulate policies for 
the operation of the SEED program within the frame- 
work of existing state law, local Board of Education poli- 
cies, and sound educational practice. 



• The interim SEED Project Board will, after the 
project is funded, make recommendations to the Superin- 
tendent of Schools for a SEED Project School-Commun- 
ity Coordinator. The interim Project Board will set up a 
mechanism for screening applicants to all SEED project 
positions and for recommending them for appointment. 

• The School-Community Coordinator will be respon- 
sible for the necessary coordination and liaison between 
the community (SEED Board) and the Superintendent 
of Schools. 

• The Supervisor, Community Relations, will serve 
under the direction of the School-Community Coordina- 
tor. 

• The Supervisor, Education, working in cooperation 
with the School-Community Coordinator, is responsible 
for the planning, coordination, and direction of all phases 
of the instructional program planning, development, and 
implementation. 

The eight schools which will participate in the project 
include the following: Public — Bayview, Bret Harte, 
Burnett, Fremont, Hunters Point I, II, and Annex, Jede- 
diah Smith and Annex, and Sir Francis Drake and 
Annex; Parochial — All Hallows School. 



New School Supply Items Are on Display 



District personnel may now take advantage of a display 
of new supply items available to teachers for the fall term. 
The exhibit is a permanent addition to the Division of 
Supplies and is located at the School Supplies Ware- 
house, 1000 Selby Street. 

The display was prepared last May to coincide with an 
"Open House" held at the warehouse for teachers, ad- 
ministrators, and other school personnel as a means of 
informing school staffs of the many supplies items avail- 
able to them. 

Both the Negotiating Council and the San Francisco 
Federation of Teachers had requested a supply exhibit 
to be established in a convenient location. The perma- 
nent display will be changed frequently to show new 
items available to teachers. 

In an effort to make supplies readily available to teach- 
ers, an extra copy of the School Supplies Catalog was 
sent to each school specifically for teacher use. This cata- 
log has been placed in the school library or other approp- 
( Continued on Page 2) 




Victor B. Graff, Past President, San Francisco Classroom Teachers 
Association (center), and a group of District teachers are seen 
reviewing the new items listed in the School Supplies Catalog. 
Behind the group is the School Supply Exhibit which displays 
all of the new supplies items available for fall 1968. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 23, 1968 



Mayor Announces 



Sanchez Named to School Board 




David J. Sanchez, Jr. 



David J. Sanchez, 
Jr. has been named 
by Mayor Joseph Ali- 
oto to the San Fran- 
cisco Board of Edu- 
cation. 

Mr. Sanchez will 
replace Board Com- 
missioner Adolfo de 
Urioste, whose third 
five-year term will end 
in January 1969. 

The new Board 
member is the first 
Mexican - American 
in the city's history to 
hold this position. He 
also has the distinc- 



tion of being the youngest member ever appointed. He 
is 29. 

Mr. Sanchez is currently studying for his doctorate at 
the University of California in Berkeley. He has done 
substitute teaching and community relations work for the 
School District since 1963. 

He attended the University of San Francisco and San 
Jose State College, receiving his BA degree from the 
latter in 1963. He received his MA degree from San Jose 
in 1965. 

Mr. Sanchez was on active duty in the U.S. Naval Air 
Reserve from 1958 to 1960 and was honorably discharged 
in 1963. 

He is affiliated with the Catholic Council for Spanish 
Speaking; the American G.I. Forum (San Francisco) ; 
Northern California Constitutional Rights Foundation; 
U.C. Community Committee; San Francisco Counseling 
and Guidance Association; San Francisco Council for 
Social Studies; Western Historical Association; Organiza- 
tion of American Historians; and U.C. Graduate Ad- 
visory Committee. 

Mr. Sanchez, a native San Franciscan, and his wife 
Barbara Marie reside at 1 18 Clinton Park. 

His appointment is subject to voter confirmation in 
the coming November elections. 



• ADMINISTRATIVE WOMEN 

The San Francisco Chapter of the National Council 
of Administrative Women in Education will hold its first 
dinner meeting Wednesday, October 9, at The Leopard, 
140 Front Street. A social hour will begin at 6:30 p.m. 
with dinner at 7:45 p.m. Cost is $5.85 inclusive. 

The organization is currently in a membership drive, 
and all women in administration arc encouraged to join. 
Dues is $4 per year. Checks for the dinner and/or dues 
should be sent to Kay Lockhart, Principal, Sir Francis 
Drake School, 350 Harbor Road, San Francisco 94124. 



Salary Placement Discussed 

The Personnel Service Division announces that 
every effort has been made to place each teacher in 
his proper salary classification and on his proper 
increment rating or step. 

Due to the demands of classifying 300 additional 
teachers this summer and the requirement that all 
records must be placed in proper form for data 
processing, some teachers may not receive full credit 
in their checks on October 1. 

In most cases this will be due to the fact that col- 
lege transcripts and verification of prior service 
were not received in time. 

As soon as such records have' been received, sal- 
ary adjustments will begin, on the month following, 
retroactive to the beginning of the school year. 
Original transcripts of college work completed be- 
fore September 3, 1968, must be filed prior to 
December 1, 1968. 

The Salary Office will verify outside teaching 
experience. Additional salary credit for outside 
teaching experience is limited this year to those who 
have not already reached the fourth step or rating. 



j 
: 

jj 



. . . Supply Items Are Displayed 

(Continued from Page 1) 
riate area within the school to afford easy access by all 
teachers. 

Effective with requisition lists for supplies for spring 
1969, which have already been released to the schools, 
an extra set of Supply Requisition Lists was sent to each 
school for teacher use. These lists are displayed in the 
faculty lounge, pinned on the teacher bulletin board, or 
on display in the school library. 

Although these extra lists are identical to those sent to 
the principal of each school, they are intended for use of 
showing the availability of supplies. Ordering for the 
school is the responsibility of the principal, and teachers 
are encouraged to work closely with the principal in 
supply ordering for the school. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 40, No. 4 



September 23, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Administrative Assistant, 
Educational Information 



September 23, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Board Approves Family Life Program 



Implementation of the District's Family Life Educa- 
tion program was approved by the Board of Education, 
\ upon recommendation of Superintendent Robert E. Jen- 
kins, at the September 10, 1968 meeting. The program 
I was passed by a 5-2 vote. 

The approved version of the Family Life Education 

'Preliminary Curriculum Guide was reviewed by the 34- 

member Advisory Committee of lay and professional 

I people prior to the September 10 meeting and included 

12 recommendations. 

The 12 are as follows: 

• Do not use the KQED Time of Your Life series 
| during the fall 1968 term 

• Rewrite the sections on "Masturbation" 

• Increase the emphasis on moral and spiritual values 
|in certain sections of the Guide 

• Watch and evaluate grade placement, particularly 
within the K-4 sections 

• Consider another term for "mating" as used for 
'human beings 

• Consider reinforcement of "maleness" in the boys of 
[junior and senior high schools who do not naturally fit 
the strong, virile image 

• Provide in grade 12 a block of time on "Child 
Care," including rearing and training of young children, 
itoilet training, and the philosophy of discipline 

I • Prepare, for teachers, suggested questions or devices 
to start discussions on desired topics 

• Plan for total faculty enlightenment and under- 
standing of the program 

• Recognize the prevalence, in our culture, of divided 
couples and broken families, and consider the students 
who are victims of such situations 

• Provide for appropriate parent orientation prior to 
introducing the program in each pilot school, and excuse 
any pupil from the instruction upon his parent's request. 

• Consider a loose-leaf format for the next edition of 
the Guide to facilitate additions or deletions as necessary. 

Extensive preparation for the introduction of the Fam- 
ily Life Education curriculum in the District has been 

• EVERETT JUNIOR HIGH CELEBRATION 

Everett Junior High School will celebrate its 40th 
anniversary with a special dinner on Friday, October 11, 
it 6: 30 p.m. at the Red Chimney in Stonestown. 
|i All Everett teachers and administrators from 1928- 
1968 are invited to attend the affair which will feature a 
tot and cold buffet dinner and special entertainment. 
' The cost is $5.25 and checks be made out to Everett 
[unior High School and sent to Mrs. Mary Nardi, 450 
Ohurch Street, San Francisco 941 14. 



SCHOOL AS USUAL ON OCTOBER 11 

Friday, October 11, 1968 is not a school holiday. 
Columbus Day, October 12, falls on a Saturday 
this year. District schools will be open on Friday, 
October 11, and classes will be conducted as usual. 



made during the past three years. A pilot program was 
successfully conducted in three elementary and five sec- 
ondary schools during 1967-68. 

Ten in-service courses for teachers were provided be- 
tween February 1967 and August 1968. The Preliminary 
Curriculum Guide on Health and Family Life Education 
was developed from February 1967 to February 1968 
through the efforts of the Advisory Committee, two cur- 
riculum assistants, several hundred teachers who par- 
ticipated in the in-service education program, and George 
Canrinus, Coordinator, Health, Physical Education, Ath- 
letics, and Recreation. 

Instruction is now being expanded from the eight pilot 
schools to 66 schools, ranging from kindergarten through 
the 12th grade. 

The Curriculum Guide calls for instruction in such 
broad areas as drug use and misuse, consumer health, 
family health, physical fitness, oral health, food and nu- 
trition, diseases and disorders, mental and social health, 
environmental health, and community health. The ma- 
terials become more detailed as they progress through the 
grades. 

Audio Visual Has New Address 

(The following notice has been issued by Dr. William 
B. Sanborn, Director, Instructional Materials.) 

Please note that the Bureau of Audio Visual Educa- 
tion has moved from 135 Van Ness Avenue to 1440 Har- 
rison Street. 

All films, filmstrips, exhibits, study prints, etc., as well 
as all equipment services are now located at the Harrison 
Street address. 

All requisitions and inquiries regarding materials and/ 
or equipment should be addressed to: 

Bureau of Audio Visual Education 
1440 Harrison Street 

The office of the Director, A/V Curriculum Assistant, 
and all preview activities remain at 135 Van Ness Av- 
enue. For further details please see the 1968-69 Informa- 
tion Guide ■ — ■ Services and Facilities, The Division of 
Instructional Materials, several copies of which have been 
forwarded to each school. 

Regarding telephone contacts: please consult pages 19 
and 20 of the above mentioned GUIDE furnished all 
schools. 

Inquiries regarding materials, equipment, and related 
services at 1440 Harrison Street — call 863-4680, Exten- 
sions 420-421. 

For Dr. Sanborn's office, Mr. James Martin, or pre- 
view activities (Mrs. Videen) at 135 Van Ness — call 
863-4680, Extensions 320-321. 

The Bureau of Audio Visual Education is open from 
8 a.m. until 4:40 p.m. Booking of materials is closed 
at 4:30 p.m. There is limited parking available for teach- 
er use. 

1440 Harrison is between 10th and 1 1th Streets and on 
the north side of the street. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 23, 1968 



Announcements 



• GERMAN TELEVISION COURSE 

Guten Tag, a beginning course in German, is currently 
being featured on KQED Channel 9. The first program 
may be seen on Monday, September 23, at 10:20 a.m. 
and 3 p.m. 

It is the first German language course for television 
made in Germany. Simple conversational German is 
taught through amusing stories about the experiences of 
five foreigners in Germany, one of whom is an American 
student. 

The 26 film sequences of 15 minutes each give informa- 
tion about the people, the towns, and the country side of 
Germany today. For additional information contact Dr. 
Egon Olessak, Goethe Center of San Francisco, 432 Clay 
Street, 94111, telephone 391-0370. No in-service credit 
is involved. 



• TASF MEETING TODAY 

The Teachers Association of San Francisco will hold 
its first monthly meeting today, September 23, at 4 p.m. 
in the Board of Education meeting room, 170 Fell Street. 
All schools are urged to have a representative in attend- 
ance. This is an important meeting in order to implement 
the program for the coming year. 



SABBATICAL LEAVE REMINDER 

Teachers are reminded that requests for sabbati- 
cal leaves for study or travel during the spring term 
of 1969 must be submitted to Personnel Services, 
Room 116, prior to October 1 (see Newsletter of 
September 2, 1968). Application blanks are avail- 
able in the Personnel Services office. 



• ALL-CITY MUSIC GROUPS 

The first of a series of Saturday rehearsals of the Dis- 
trict's All-City Orchestra and Honor Choir was held at 
Lowell High School on September 14 starting at 9 a.m. 

Musically talented students from the District's second- 
ary schools will meet on Saturdays throughout the semes- 
ter and will appear in concert during the winter season. 

John Pereira, Lowell High School, is conducting the 
Honor Orchestra, and John Land, Polytechnic High 
School, is directing the Honor Choir. 

In addition to these two advanced groups, an All-City 
Preparatory String Orchestra will meet each Saturday at 
Lakcshore School, adjacent to the Lowell building. This 
unique group will be instructed by Paul Zahtilla, Marina 
Junior High School. 

On Saturday, September 28 from 9 to 10 a.m., portions 
of the May Concert at the Opera House featuring the 
All-City Honor Orchestra and Honor Choir will be 
broadcast on KKHI, FM and AM. 

The featured work will be Mussorgsky's "Coronation 
Scene" from Boris Gudounov with guest soloists Dale 
Blackburn, tenor and music instructor, Lowell High, and 
Vahan Toolajian, baritone and music instructor, Mission 
High. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, September 24, 1968, 7:30 p.m.. 
lar meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



Regu- 



,<HI 



I! 



• CREDENTIAL SERVICE 

The Personnel Service Division will remain open this — 
Saturday, September 28, in order to give credential as 
sistance to all teachers, it was announced by Milton F. ' 
Reiterman, Assistant Superintendent, Personnel Services. 

Although all San Francisco teachers and other person- 
nel have valid credentials in order to hold their profes. 
sional positions, he says, some have been granted on a 
Temporary or a Partial Fulfillment basis. Others are 
scheduled to expire at the end of this school year. Still 
other credentials are not the highest for which the teacher 
is qualified. Many teachers are eligible for various Life 
Credentials, and these should be secured whenever possi- 
ble in order to avoid recurring renewals. 

It is hoped that assistance may be given to many whc 
should investigate the possibility of receiving administra- 
tive, supervisory, or Pupil Personnel credentials. Mr. 
Reiterman notes that otherwise well-qualified personnel 
who would be happy to receive certain appointments, 
must be passed over because they have neglected to ob- nidi 
tain or to renew certain of these special credentials. 

Mr. Reiterman states that if you have any questions m 
involving the securing or maintenance of any type oi 
school credential, please visit the Credentials Office in| 
Room 116, 135 Van Ness Avenue at any time. 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancies: 
2724 — School Custodian, Male — Marshall an( 
Columbus Schools. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 40 



© 



SEPTEMBER 30, 1968 



NUMBER 5 



Geared for Specific Improvements 



District Takes Part in Two Math Projects 



The San Francisco Unified School District is partici- 
pating in two projects under the Miller Mathematics 
Improvement Programs, Senate Bill 999, which began 
this summer. 

The first, referred to as the Specialized Teacher Pro- 
ject, established for grades 2 and 5, allowed for teacher 
participation in a specially designed in-service mathe- 
matics workshop from August 5 through August 16. 

Teachers in this project in the same schools will be 
'paired for the purpose of trading off certain teaching 
•periods during the day. Each teacher who is designated 
"Specialized Teacher in Mathematics" will teach mathe- 
matics to her own class for one period and to the class of 
■the trade-off teacher for another period each day. 

The trade-off teacher is also designated as a "Special- 
ized Teacher," but in a subject area other than mathe- 
matics. As in the case of the "Specialized Teacher in 
Mathematics," the trade-off teacher teaches the subject 
in her own specialty to her own pupils and to the pupils 
lin the other teacher's class. 

This project called for the establishment of three re- 
gional workshops in Fullerton, Sacramento, and San 
Diego. Three District teachers who attended the Sacra- 
mento workshop were Marilyn Gagne (Anza School), 
IjPeter Youdall (Le Conte School), and John Moore 
(Bayview School) . 

Other District teachers involved in the project include 
Hollister Boss and Virginia Helleskov (Anza School), 



Osa Chapman (Le Conte School), Doris Allen and 
Nancy Sequeira (John McLaren), and Sam Louie (Mc- 
Kinley School) . 

The second project, the Test Development Project, 
established for grades 3 and 6, will involve approximately 
580 children in 1 1 schools. 

This project is an outgrowth of the Statewide Mathe- 
matics Advisory Committee's study of mathematics test- 
ing in the grade schools. 

The Committee felt that commercially produced tests 
that are currently available do not reflect accurately, the 
kinds of mathematics that are being taught and, for that 
reason, contribute toward distorted interpretation of the 
mathematics achievements of the children. None of the 
existing instruments seem to probe into conceptually- 
oriented problems to the extent desired by the Committee. 

It is the intent of this project to construct instruments 
that might measure the degree to which overall objectives 
of the mathematics program are being met. 

The District's role will be to help the State Department 
of Education obtain baseline data for the norming of the 
instruments. Statewide, more than 100 school districts 
will participate in the project, involving approximately 
46,000 children in 1,550 classes. 

The State profile of performance for specified concepts 
on various cognitive levels will be constructed, and no 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Local Proposition T Would Increase Tax Limit for Schools 



Superintendent of Schools Robert E. Jenkins 
has announced that Benjamin H. Swig, President 
of the Fairmont Hotel, has accepted the chairman- 
ship of the Citizens Committee for Proposition "I." 
This proposition will place on the November 5, 
1968 ballot a 98 cent increase in the permissive 
tax limit under which the Board of Education 
would operate the schools. 

Mayor Joseph L. Alioto has accepted the posi- 
tion of Honorary Chairman for the Proposition "I" 
Committee. Mr. James A. Bachigalupi, Jr., Vice- 
president of the Crocker-Citizens National Bank, 
will serve as Treasurer of the Citizens Committee. 

The San Francisco Board of Education voted 
unanimously to place the tax limit request on the 



November ballot. In addition, the Board of Super- 
visors of the City and County of San Francisco, 
unanimously approved Proposition "I" for place- 
ment on the ballot. 

It is of interest to note that 98 per cent of all the 
school districts in California have been voted in- 
creases beyond their statutory tax limit. 

Dr. Jenkins has indicated to the Board of Edu- 
cation that this tax limit increase would be neces- 
sary to carry out the educational programs now in 
progress and to carry the District forward on many 
needed fronts. 

Jack Harrington, Room 213, Central Office, tele- 
phone 863-4680, Extension 307, is available to 
answer questions concerning Proposition "I." 



NEWSLETTER 



September 30, 1968 •} 



Summer Project 

Cooperative Art Program Cited 

An eight-foot cypress 
log was slowly being 
transformed into a totem 
pole. Fruit lugs became 
looms upon which multi- 
colored weaving pieces 
were being made. Baker's 
clay was being modeled 
into imaginative creatures 
to be baked, painted, and 
hung for decorations. All 
this creative activity hap- 
pened this summer at the 
Alvarado Elementary 
Summer School. 

The unique project was 
a cooperative effort plan- 
ned by interested parents 
and educators to give the 
children attending the summer session, as well as chil- 
dren in the neighborhood, additional art experiences. 

The parents' group was organized by Mrs. Sally Wood- 
bridge and Mrs. Ruth Asawa Lanier. Mrs. Mary Pette- 
son, Head Teacher, and Edwin Waters, Assistant Head 
Teacher of the summer school, provided guidance, and 
Robert Pult, teacher, represented the teaching staff. 

The workshop-type sessions were highly praised by 
the parents and students, and it is hoped that similar 
activities can be carried out during the school year. 




Mrs. Sally Woodbridge is assisting 
a young artist in mixing baker's 
clay. 



. . . Miller Math Improvement Programs 

( Continued from Page 1 ) 

attempt will be made for child-to-child or district-to- 
district comparison. 

Dr. Joseph B. Hill, former Curriculum Coordinator for 
the School District, initiated the proposals for participa- 
tion in the projects after planning with Isadore Pivnick, 
Assistant Superintendent, Innovative Planning. 

Mrs. Phyllis Abad, District Elementary Resource 
Teacher, has been designated project head in order to 
maintain liaison with the California State Department 
of Education. 



• ATTENDS NDEA COURSE IN SEATTLE 

Mrs. Gertrude DeVera, kindergarten teacher at Hun- 
ters Point I School, successfully completed a summer 
institute in Educational Media at the University of Wash- 
ington in Seattle. 

She was one of 50 participants from Pacific Coast 
states who worked together under the leadership of Dr. 
Gerald Torkelson and developed a model for educational 
specifications incorporating media facilities into the 
school and classroom. 

A copy of the model has been presented to the District 
by Mrs. DeVera. 



Retirement Changes on Ballot 

The Municipal Improvement League has asked 
that all School District personnel give special at- 
tention to Proposition "E" in the coming November 
election. 

Passage of this proposition will concern the em- 
ployees and families of the District because of its 
effect on retirement benefits. 

One of the proposition's provisions is the elimi- 
nation of the Social Security offset in city pensions. 
The measure also changes the composition of the 
Retirement Board, requires an annual appraisal of 
the financial condition of the retirement fund to 
assure a maximum return on investments, and 
brings pension benefits closer to those of private 
industry. 

The Municipal Improvement League recom- 
mends that city employees contribute two per cent 
of a month's salary to support the drive for passage 
of Proposition "E." 

For additional information contact the Munici- 
pal Improvement League Campaign Headquarters, 
1252 Market Street, San Francisco 94102, tele- 
phone 861-6486. 



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• AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORICAL EXHIBIT 

A special exhibit of historic Afro-American materials 
will be on display during the month of October at the 
Grace Cathedral, 1051 Taylor Street. Teachers are in- 
vited to bring classes to see the display which features the 
"Freedom Now" mural. 

This ten feet by eight feet work of art is cut from 
Tobasco Mahogany and depicts the history of the Ameri- 
can Negro, beginning with his African origin up to his 
current struggles in the United States. A slide-tape pro- 
gram describes the mural for visitors. 

The display is open daily from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visits 
can be arranged by calling 776-6611. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 40, No. 5 



September 30, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 



Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Administrative Assistant, 
Educational Information 



|t«!K 



September 30, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Overseas Positions Are Open 

Under the International Educational and Cultural 
Exchange Program authorized by the Fullbright-Hays 
Act, grants will be available to American elementary and 
secondary school teachers to teach abroad during the 
1969 academic year or to attend a seminar abroad dur- 
ing the summer of 1969. 

Teaching positions will be available in a number of 
countries in Europe, the Middle East, the Far East, and 
Africa. Some of the positions will involve an exchange 
of positions with a teacher from abroad, while others 
will be one-way assignments. 

A seminar for teachers of German will be held in 
Germany and a seminar for teachers of Latin will be 
held in Italy. Eligibility requirements include the follow- 
ing: United States citizenship, a bachelor's degree, three 
years of teaching experience for teaching grants; and 
two years of experience for seminar grants. 

Application forms and detailed information may be 
obtained between September 1 and November 1, 1968 
from Teacher Exchange Branch, Division of Interna- 
tional Exchange and Training, Institute of International 
Studies, U. S. Office of Education, Washington, D.C. 
20202. 



Teen Age Program 

March of Dimes Chairman Chosen 



• YOUNG CITIZENS AWARDS 

Eight District senior high school students have been 

awarded "San Francisco Young Citizens Awards" for 

! their "significant activity in school, community, and civic 

, projects" by Cable Car Clothiers, according to Charles 

: Pivnick, president. 

Honorees and their schools include: Charleen Ber- 
jnauer, Abraham Lincoln; Joyce Castellano, Balboa; 
Christine Yee, Galileo; Mark Dukeminier, George Wash- 
'ington; Ronald Reeves, Lowell; Shirley Mendoza, Mis- 
Ision; Tony Medina, Polytechnic; and Arthur Monte- 
negro, Woodrow Wilson. 



DR. JENKINS ON KPIX PROGRAM 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins will be fea- 
tured on the KPIX, Channel 5, program "KPIX 
Reports: Community Dialogue — Education" on 
Tuesday, October 1 at 10:30 p.m. 

The program will use a public forum format and 
will include representatives from various Bay Area 
organizations. The focus will be on two major 
problems facing the District : the lack of funds and 
how to educate and motivate the disadvantaged 
and minority students. 

Groups to be represented on the program in- 
clude the NAACP, Service Committee on Public 
Education, Parents and Taxpayers, Mothers for 
Neighborhood Schools, Classroom Teachers Asso- 
ciation, Mission Coalition, San Francisco Federa- 
tion of Teachers, Urban League, Chamber of Com- 
merce, Chinese American Community, League of 
Women Voters, and students from the District 
schools. 




Peggy Schwarzenberger, a Lowell High School senior, is desig- 
nated Teen Age Program (TAP) Chairman for the San Francisco 
Chapter - March of Dimes by Mrs. Richard A. Wilson, Chapter 
vice chairman. Peggy represented the Chapter at a three-day 
Young Adult Conference on Birth Defects sponsored by The 
National Foundation during July at the University of Utah, Provo. 
Mrs. Wilson is also President of the Second District, California 
Congress of Parents and Teachers. 

Peggy Schwarzenberger, Lowell High School senior, 
has been chosen Teen Age Program (TAP) Chairman 
for the San Francisco Chapter of The National Founda- 
tion - March of Dimes. 

Mrs. Richard A. Wilson, Chapter Vice Chairman 
heading youth volunteers and President of the Second 
District, California Congress of Parents and Teachers, 
said that Peggy was chosen because of her outstanding 
record of youth community service. This includes working 
as a "Candystripe Volunteer" at Mt. Zion Hospital, and 
volunteer tutoring of Hunter's Point and Chinatown 
children as a representative of the Y Teens Group of the 
San Francisco YWCA. She is the younger daughter of 
Mrs. Marianne Schwarzenberger, and formerly attended 
James Lick Junior High School. 

During July, the Lowell High senior represented the 
Chapter at a three-day Young Adult Conference on 
Birth Defects sponsored by The National Foundation at 
the University of Utah at Provo. 

As TAP Volunteer Chairman, Peggy will help coordin- 
ate youth-oriented education and community service 
programs in birth defects and prenatal care sponsored by 
the San Francisco Chapter. 



• SHORT STORY PUBLISHED 

Mrs. Florence Lewis of the English Department at 
Abraham Lincoln High School is the author of "The 
Pink Girl," a short story which appears in the mid-year 
(Number 67) issue of Trace magazine (a chronicle of 
living literature). Trace is published in England, but has 
a circulation in the United States as well. 



NEWSLETTER 



September 30, 1968 



•i 



} 



Announcements 



ADMINISTRATIVE APPOINTMENTS 

The following administrative appointments or 
assignments were approved by the Board of Edu- 
cation at the September 10, 1968 meeting upon 
recommendation of the Superintendent: 
Secondary Schools 

Billie T. Scott appointed Assistant Principal, 
Woodrow Wilson High School; Lillian T. Powell 
appointed Assistant Principal, Opportunity School; 
Ramona T. Galeno appointed Assistant Principal 
(Acting) , Portola Junior High School. 
Elementary Schools 

George Kochian appointed Assistant Principal 
(Acting) , Treasure Island School. 



• IN-SERVICE COURSE INFORMATION 

The instructor for the District in-service course "Pic- 
turemaking Techniques for the Elementary Grades" is 
Verla Leonard, Art Supervisor. This corrects the an- 
nouncement in the September 2, 1968 issue of the News- 
letter. 



• ADULT, OCCUPATIONAL MEETING 

An important meeting for all Adult and Occupational 
Education teachers will be held on Monday, September 
30, 1968, at 7:30 p.m. in the Franciscan Room, 9th floor, 
Bayview Federal Savings and Loan Association, 2601 
Mission Street. 

The purpose of the meeting is to establish a bargaining 
position for adult and occupational teachers to be sub- 
mitted to San Francisco Federation of Teachers mem- 
bers for inclusion in the bargaining package next year. 
Proposals discussed at the August 5 meeting will be re- 
viewed. 



REVISED 1968- 


— A.A.A. SOCCER 


SCHEDULE 




SENIOR 


HIGH SCHOOLS 


Date 


Home Team 




Opponent 


Stadium 


Tue. Oct. 1 


Washington 




Polytechnic 


Crocker Amazon £2 








Mission 


Beach Chalet #2 




Lowell 




Balboa 


Beach Chalet #1 




Gompers 




Lincoln 


Crocker Amazon #1 




Mission 




Wilson 


Crocker Amazon #2 




Polytechnic 




Lincoln 


Beach Chalet #2 




Balboa 




Galileo 


Crocker Amazon si 




Gompers 




Washington 


Beach Chalet #1 


Thur. Oct. 10 


Washington 




Lincoln 


Beach Chalet #2 




Balboa 




Wilson 


Crocker Amazon #2 








Mission 


Beach Chalet #1 




Polytechnic 




Gompers 


Crocker Amazon #1 




Mission 




Washington 


Crocker Amazon #1 








Polytechnic 


Crocker Amazon #2 




Wilson 




Lincoln 


Beach Chalet #1 




Galileo 




Gsmpers 


Beach Chalet #2 


Thur. Oct. 24 


Lincoln 




Lowell 


Crocker Amazon &1 




Mission 




Balboa 


Crocker Amazon #2 




Galileo 




Polytechnic 


Beach Chalet #2 


Thur. Oct. 31 


Washington 




Gompers 
Lowell 


Beach Chalet #1 
Beach Chalet #1 




Wilson 




Galileo 


Crocker Amazon #1 




Lincoln 




Balboa 


Beach Chalet #2 




Mission 




Gompers 




Thur. Nov. 7 


Galileo 




Washington 


Crocker Amazon #1 








Polytechnic 


Crocker Amazon #2 




Lincoln 




Mission 


Beach Chalet #1 


Tue. Nov. 12 


Wilson 


Sem 


Lowell 

Finals 


Beach Chalet #2 


Thur. Nov. 14 




Sem 


Finals 




Wed. Nov. 20 




Championship 




Tue. Nov. 2S 




Extra Championship 


Baiboa Stadium 


Starting Time: 










September 3:30 P.M.; 








October 3:30 P.M.; 








November 3:15 P.M. 









THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, October 8, 1968, 7:30 p.m., Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• COMMUNITY PANEL AT JAMES LICK 

James Lick Junior High School was the scene of i 
recent panel on community problems featuring commun 
ity leaders from the Noe Valley-Mission Districts. The 
purpose of the exchange of ideas was to bring the school 
and community closer together in dealing with mutual 
problems. 

The PTA-sponsored affair featured the following a: 
panel members : Mrs. Elizabeth Rote, President, Greatei 
Mission Citizens Council; Dr. Elmer Schmitt, Pastor 
Bethany Methodist Church; Francisco Ortega, Chair 
man, James Lick Bilingual Education; Ray Tobas, Mis 
sion Rebels; Mrs. Margaret Cruz, President, S. F. Mexi 
can- American Political Association; Sister Patricia Madi 
gan, St. Paul's High School; Rev. William Grace, Firs 
President, Great Mission Citizens Council; Frank Orms 
by, Upper Noe Valley Citizens Council; Walter Lipton fed 
Mission Neighborhood Centers; and Officer Julio Fer 
nandez, S. F. Police-Community Relations Unit. 

• CUSTODIAL VACANCY 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancy: 
2724 — School Custodian, Male — Columbus School 



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SPRING REQUISITIONS 

The following spring requisition lists are due in 
the Division of Supplies Warehouse, 1000 Selby 
Street, Attention: Mrs. Elaine Hung, as follows: 

Instructional Supplies Lists — due before Octo- 
ber 14, 1968. 



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• DEPARTMENT HEADS ASSOCIATION 

The Department Heads Association will meet Thuri 
day, October 3, at 2:45 p.m. in the teachers' cafeteria i 
Galileo High School. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO, 
PERMIT No. 396 



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RETURN REQUEST 



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SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT SAN fb^co 

NEWSLETTER 



/OLUME 40 



OCTOBER 7, 1968 



*Lt 



7 NUMBER 6 



lehabilitative Educational Program 



^, % 



Guidance Service Centers Report Presented 



A progress report on the District's Guidance Service 
Centers was presented to the Board of Education by 
Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins at the September 24, 
968 meeting. 

As originally conceived in April 1967, the Guidance 
lri| Service Centers were intended to provide a rehabilitative 
J ducational program for students of all ages who ex- 
tol tibited anti-social tendencies in the extreme and who 
favere unable to adjust and achieve in the regular school 
etting. 

As of August 1968 the Guidance Service Centers oper- 
Lte in five locations: two elementary centers located in 
jeary and Hillcrest Schools; two junior high school cen- 
ers operating in church school buildings at 65 Dorland 
street and 34th Avenue and Noriega Street; and one 
enior high center operating in the gymnasium of John 
^.dams Adult School. 

With the exception of the Noriega Center which will 
tave three teachers, all centers have two teachers. Dr. 
Jordon Carlson, Supervisor, serves as administrator and 
:oordinator of the total program. Two psychologists and 
wo social workers supplement the educational program 
py offering individual and group counseling to parents 
,nd students. 

Each center is organized to allow maximum flexibility 
Y working with students. An effort has been made to 
imit the teacher load to twelve students. Some students 
re seen individually while others may be programmed 
n a minimum day basis with allowances for individual 
nd small group instruction. The main objective is to 
:elp the child resolve his problems so that the can be 
eturned to his regular school. 

In the elementary classes the main emphasis in the 

urriculum is to improve basic skills in reading and 

3,( rithmetic. Art work has provided for a release of ex- 

ression. In the junior high classes instruction in Eng- 

""" sh, mathematics, social science, typewriting, art, and 

s omemaking is being offered. 

For senior high students an attempt is made to pro- 
ide each pupil courses which will meet graduation re- 
uirements as well as to offer the opportunity to make 
p for earlier academic deficiencies in reading and math- 
matics. 

The Guidance Service Centers progress report reveals 
te following: 

From April 1967 through June 1968, 206 students 

(172 boys and 34 girls) have been admitted to the 

program. 



:>i 



• Disposition of the 114 pupils who have left the pro- 
gram is as follows: 

52 (46%) were transferred to some regular school 
program. A follow-up of the transferred students 
shows that 51 were able to remain in school. 
31 (27%) pupils were placed in some special pro- 
gram, with an educational component, such as a resi- 
dential center, court facility, day treatment program, 
etc. 

31 (27%) pupils were demitted with no school pro- 
gram planned: i.e., exempted to work, suspended for 
an extended period, or moved, whereabouts unknown. 

• An analysis of the academic performance of pupils en- 

( Continued on Page 2) 



Developing Salable Skills 



New Shell Program at Log Cabin 




Through the cooperative efforts of Judge Raymond O'Connor, 
Juvenile Court, the Shell Oil Company, and the School District, 
a Driveway Salesmanship Program has been instituted at Log 
Cabin Ranch School this fall. Shell uniforms and a variety of 
Shell service station equipment are now being used by Log Cabin 
students. Young men successfully completing the course of in- 
struction will have salable skills enabling them to enter the labor 
market. Jack Anderson, instructor at Log Cabin, participated in 
a five-week intensive Shell training program conducted during 
the summer. Pictured above, reviewing details of the program, 
are (left to right) Bryant Lane, Supervisor, Occupational Prepara- 
tion; Martin Dean, Assistant Superintendent, Special Educational 
Services; John Finsland, Retail Training Manager, Shell Oil Com- 
pany; and Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of Schools. 
Shell Oil Company has supported the District in a variety of pro- 
grams over the years. 



NEWSLETTER 



October 7, 196' 



Progress Report - - - Guidance Centers 



(Continued 

rolled in the centers based on pre and post testing 
using the same standardized achievement test gives 
the following results: 

Senior high students on the average gained 1 grade 
in reading, 2/2 grades in arithmetic and nearly 1 
grade in spelling. In no case was there a regression. 
Junior high students on the average gained 2/2 grades 
in reading, 2 grades in arithmetic, 1 grade in spelling. 
Elementary students showed significant gains in read- 
ing, arithmetic, and spelling as shown by tests admin- 
istered by their teachers. 

• For senior high students a special behavior rating 
scale was devised which revealed significant gains in 
ability to work with others, to accept temporary frus- 
tration, to work alone without teacher aid, to accept 
responsibility and to share with others. The only area 
not showing a significant gain was the ability to do 
homework. 
Programs for students in the Centers are individually 

tailored in accordance witn the academic ability and 

behavior of each, and their ability to tolerate frustration 

and work in groups. 

Elementary students on the average attend one hour 

Forensic League Begins Season 

The San Francisco Junior High School Forensic League 
has a new look this year. It has become one of the special 
programs for the gifted. 

In its eleventh year of planning public speaking activi- 
ties for the junior high school students, the League has 
continued to expand and diversify. This year will mark 
the fifth annual public speaking contest, the eleventh 
year of the debate tournament, and it is hoped, the first 
year of a dramatics festival. 

The League will continue to be sponsored by the San 
Francisco Council of Lions Clubs, the San Francisco 
Barristers Club, and television station KRON. It is 
hoped that B'nai Brith and the American Conservatory 
Theatre will soon be added to that list. Programs for the 
gifted will provide the organizational time and help, 
according to James Keolker, League Co-ordinator. 

The Sponsors Committee, the large implementing 
group of individual public speaking teachers, will hold its 
first meeting Wednesday, October 9 at 2 p.m. at the 
Central Office Conference Room, Cafeteria, 170 Fell 
Street. 



from Page 1 ) 

and 45 minutes per day, junior high pupils two hour: 
and senior high pupils two and a half hours. In eacl 
center the goat is to increase the length of day as be 
havior improves. Efforts are also made to find othe 
programs to fill the balance of the school day for th 
older students. 

On the average, senior high students remain in th 
Centers for a period of three and a half months, am 
junior high and elementary pupils stay for about fiv 
months. 

Placement in the Centers is made by the Studer 
Placement Committee on the basis of requests fror 
school administrators, subject to the availability of open 
ings. Administrators use the following list of behavioi 
as a guideline in making appropriate selection of stu 
dents: threats of force or violence or physical attac 
upon a teacher; unprovoked assaults on other student: 
wilful disobedience, insolence, or insubordination; ope 
and persistent defiance of the teacher's authority; habil 
ual profanity or vulgarity; extreme lack of self contro 
and conduct inimical to the pupil himself or to others. 

The progress report concludes with the following state 
ments:"It would appear that the Guidance Service Cer 
ter offers one promising approach to the problems face 
by educators in working with pupils of all ages who: 
anti-social behavior is extreme. Administrators of regi 
iar schools find this facility a relief to them as they ai 
not able to provide the individual attention these pupi 
demand. Parents and pupils, after an initial understand 
able resistance, in general are enthusiastic about th 
services and educational program of the Centers 

"It is hoped that attention can be given to follow-u 
of those students who were enrolled to determine th 
long range effects of placement in the program. A moi 
thorough evaluation and report will be prepared at th 
end of this school year, with recommendations to eithi 
expand or dissolve the program." 



• ELEMENTARY SUPPLY COMMITTEE 

The Elementary Supply Committee will meet at Visita- 
cion Valley School at 1 : 45 p.m. on Wednesday, October 
9. Principals having items for discussion are requested to 
submit them to their representatives. 



• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE TO MEET 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet at 1:30 
p.m. on Wednesday, October 9, in Room 10, Central 
Office, 170 Fell Street. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 40. No. 6 



October 7, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Administrative Assistant, 
Educational Information 



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I October 7, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



, | Proposition T on Ballot 



Tax Limit Increase Proposal Outlined 



(On Tuesday, November 5, 1968, the voters of San 
Francisco will have an opportunity to vote on Proposition 
■jt"I," a measure which would increase the tax limit for the 
I' public schools from $2.55 to $3.53. This is the first of a 
' .series of information articles directed to District person- 
A.nel, designed to better acquaint them with the particulars 

of the tax limit proposition.) 
jl Like many other large American cities, San Francisco 
'■faces an educational crisis. The cost of education in San 
J .Francisco has increased so greatly during the past several 
'1 years, principally because of the extensive and rapid 
'"•'changes in the city's population, that the current school 
,",:tax limit makes it impossible for the public schools to 
\ 'continue, beyond this year, the programs now offered 
,,and, in addition, develop the many new programs neces- 
jlsary to meet the changea needs of the unusually diversi- 
fied school population of San Francisco. 

At present there is no reason to expect additional finan- 
cial aid from federal and state sources for general aid to 
large city districts in California. 

| ! Experience demonstrates that assessed valuation in San 
," Francisco will not increase sufficiently next year to pro- 
L " [vide the tax base required to continue the present pro- 
',' grams in San Francisco. 

[ Proposition "I" provides for increasing the tax limit 
1 for operating the city public schools from the present 
'Mimit of $2.55 for each $100 of assessed valuation to $3.53 
'ifor each $100 of assessed valuation. By unanimous vote, 
j the San Francisco Board of Education authorized the 
| Superintendent of Schools to place Proposition "I" before 
the people of the city. 

Some Important Questions and Answers Concerning 
Proposition "I" 

Q- Why is an election necessary to increase the school- 
: . tax limit? 

A. Under present law the school-tax rate can be in- 
creased only through an election. 

I Q. How does the school-tax rate for San Francisco 
compare with the rate in other California school districts 
In 1967-68? 

I A. More than 98% of the school districts in California 
J :iave found the statutory tax limits to be inadequate. The 
i voters of these districts have approved increases in the 
statutory tax limits in these districts. The total 1968-69 
31 ichool-tax rate for the San Francisco Unified School Dis- 
trict is lower than the school-tax rate in other large city 
school districts for 1967-68. In addition, the San Fran- 
!■ 'isco Unified School District is the only large-city school 
listrict that has not yet exceeded the statutory limit. 
[The school-tax data for school districts other than San 
Francisco is not yet available for 1968-69.) However, it 
:an be safely assumed that the school-tax rates for 1968- 
)9 in these districts will not be lower than for 1967-68, 
md that in most instances the rates will be higher. 

Q. How does the percentage of the total tax rate used 
or school purposes in San Francisco compare with the 



percentage levied in other major California school dis- 
tricts? 

A. As shown in the following table, the percentage of 
the total tax rate used for school purposes in 1967-68 was 
considerably lower in San Francisco than in other major 
California city school districts: 

Long Beach 49.18 per cent; Los Angeles 48.24 per 
cent; San Diego 48.03 per cent; Oakland 41.03 per cent; 
San Francisco 30.03 per cent. 

Q. Why have school costs increased in San Francisco? 

A. 1. Inflation has increased the cost of operation of 
the San Francisco public schools. 

2. The cost of operating the San Francisco public 
schools has increased because the heavy influx of children 
belonging to minority groups has created a critical need 
for additional educational programs and services. The 
cost of these has greatly increased the outlay for public 
education in San Francisco. 

3. Enrollment is increasing in the San Francisco pub- 
lic schools. Official projections show that enrollment will 
increase by 5,416 students during the years 1968-1973. 
This increase will require the District to employ 217 new 
teachers at a cost of $1,773,000. 

4. Five new public elementary and junior high schools 
will open in the years 1969-71. Custodial and clerical 
staffs, equipment, supplies, and operating costs for these 
schools will require an outlay of $531,700. 

Q. Why is the Board of Education asking that the 
school-tax limit be increased by 98 cents? 

A. The Superintendent of Schools has recommended 
as increase of 98 cents in the school-tax limit. The Super- 
intendent made this recommendation after making a 
thorough study of school finances in San Francisco. He is 
convinced, after careful consideration of all factors, that 
an increase of 98 cents is necessary in the years immedi- 
ately ahead if we are to provide a realistic program to 
meet the educational needs of the diversified population 
of San Francisco. 

Q. If the voters increase the school-tax limit by the 
amount proposed (98 cents), how much of this increase 
does the Board expect to use in the next school year and 
in succeeding years? 

A. Proposition "I" (eye) is a proposal to increase the 
permissive school-tax limit in San Francisco under which 
the Board of Education may operate the schools. It does 
not establish a tax rate. The Board of Education plans to 
use only a portion of the proposed . 98 cent school-tax 
increase next year since this increase is to go into effect 
over a period of several years. If unanticipated revenue 
should become available from other sources next year 
and in succeeding years, the portion of the 98 cents re- 
quired to finance the school program would be reduced 
accordingly and the tax rate in San Francisco for school 
purposes also would be reduced. 



NEWSLETTER 



October 7, 1968 



* 



Announcements 



• 'SHOES FOR NEEDY KIDS' PROGRAM 

The Civitan Club of San Francisco has sponsored a 
"Shoes for Needy Kids" program in the elementary 
schools for the past several years. This service club has 
provided 323 pairs of shoes this past school year. 

Any administrator may request a shoe order from 
Christine Bianco, Principal, Dudley Stone School, to be 
presented to a child in need. 

The project has District approval and is net a contest 
but a service program to obtain shoes for needy students. 
The shoe certificate may be used at Ferrara's Shoes, 2456 
San Bruno Avenue. The shoes are a basic black boys' 
style and an attractive girls' shoe. 



• NEWS SPECIAL TO BE RE-BROADCAST 

KGO-TV, Channel 7, announces that it will re-broad- 
cast its news special program on birth and reproduction, 
How Life Begins, on Monday, October 14, from 7 : 30 to 
8:30 p.m. 

• CUSTODIAL VACANCY 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancy: 
2724 — School Custodian, Male — Washington Irv- 
ing School. 



SCHOOL HOLIDAYS 

Some confusion has resulted from passage of As- 
sembly Bill 1399 this summer which provides that 
when school holidays fall on Saturdays the public 
schools will close the preceding Friday. This Bill 
applies only to State recognized school holidays. 
Columbus Day, October 12, 1968, is a local school 
holiday and is not affected by the Bill. San Francisco 
public schools will, therefore, be open on Friday, 
October 11, 1968. 



• SFCTA COUNCIL TO MEET OCTOBER 14 

The San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association 
Representative Council will meet at 4 p.m. on Monday, 
October 14, in the George Washington High School 
cafeteria. 



IN-SERVICE COURSE INFORMATION 

(The following in-service course will be available 
to interested junior high school teachers beghming 
Thursday, October 10, 1968.) 
Calligraphy 

One unit, non-college credit, 8 meetings, Thurs- 
days, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. in Room 315, Presidio 
Junior High School, 450 - 30th Avenue. Barbara 
Baumann, instructor. Class will be limited to 25 
interested junior high school teachers. Course starts 
Thursday, October 10, 1968. Interested teachers 
should call 752-9696. 

Miss 3aumann is very competent in chalk, pen, and brush letter- 
ing 111 the Roman and Gothic styles. Special attention will be given 
to achieving control of the various media, and there will be oppor- 
tunity for gaining facility through supervised practice. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, October 8, 1968, 7:30 p.m., Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



\ 



BOARD POLICY — SALARY CREDIT 

Attenion is called to a correction to an item in 
the Newsletter of September 2, 1968. The Board of 
Education has amended Section 7.07 of the Salary 
Schedule to read as follows: 

"The maximum credit that will be accepted for 
salary classification purposes of teachers engaged in 
full-time teaching will be six semester hours, or six 
quarter hours, or the equivalent, for any semester 
or quarter, exclusive of summer sessions. A maxi- 
mum of twelve semester hours or equivalent, exclu- 
sive of summer sessions, will be accepted for any 
one school year for salary classification purposes. A 
limit of twenty semester hours or equivalent will be 
the maximum allowable in four consecutive semes- 
ters." 



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• DR. MORENA TESTIMONIAL DINNER 

The faculty of Galileo High School extends an invita 
tion to all school personnel to attend a testimonial dinnei 
in honor of Dr. James Morena, Galileo principal for thi 
past 15 years, who is now serving as a supervisor in thi 
Buildings and Grounds Office. 

The dinner will be held on Thursday, October 17, a 



the San Francisco Athletic Club, 1630 Stockton StreetBsta 

myC 



with a 6:30 p.m. social hour and dinner at 7:30 p.m 
Checks for $7.50 should be made out to "Dr. Moren; 
Testimonial Dinner" and sent to Lou Haas or Herb Gee 
Galileo High School, 1150 Francisco Street, San Fran 
cisco 94109. For additional information telephone Mr 1 |pit 
Haas or Mr. Gee at 771-3150. 



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SAN FRANCISCO, Of 
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I 'SAN FHANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



OCT 1 6 1968 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LlBRARl 



NEWSLETTER 



'VOLUME 40 



© 



OCTOBER 14, 1968 



NUMBER 7 



Chamber Orchestra to Perform 



School Symphony Concerts Scheduled 



! District school children will benefit this year from a 
series of 30 concerts to be presented by a 40-member San 

I Francisco Symphony Chamber Orchestra as part of a 
srogram to bring fine symphonic music to the schools. 

The first concert will take place at Bret Harte Elemen- 
tary School today at 1 p.m. This is the fourth consecutive 
Vear the San Francisco Symphony Association and the 
■Board of Education have jointly participated in the 

I orogram. 

During a three-week period, 30 concerts plus rehearsals 
kvill be presented at 15 different schools, servicing in all, 

I 18 District schools, with an emphasis on poverty areas. 
. Workshops and lectures will be an integral part of the 

I Drogram, along with participation by principal members 
of the District's All-City Honor Orchestra as ensemble 

I nembers. Principal members of the San Francisco Sym- 

I ohony Chamber Orchestra will be soloists. 

Steering Committee Meets 

Forensic League Plans Readied 




;iager to begin an active year ahead are the key members of the 
leering Committee of the San Francisco Junior High School 
orensic League. Pictured left to right are William B. Cummings, 
upervisor, Programs for the Gifted; the Honorable Gerald S. 
evin. Judge of the Superior Court; Mrs. Pauline K. Levie, Re- 
earch Librarian of the Bureau of Audio Visual Education; Dr. 
ewis Allbee, Associate Superintendent, Educational Planning, 
iesearch, and Development; and James Keolker, Programs for 
he Gifted and League Co-ordinator. The Steering Committee 
let recently to formulate plans for the League's forthcoming 
'ublic Speaking Contest, Debate Tournament, and the newly 
rganized Drama Festival. 



Tailored to elementary, junior high, and senior high 
audiences, the programs will directly involve over 25,000 
students. Mr. Verne Sellin, conductor-commentator, will 
direct the orchestra. 

Two concerts will be given in each school each day to 
allow the entire student body and those of neighboring 
schools to attend. After the concerts, musicians will hold 
workshop sessions for instrumental students. Mr. Sellin 
will also lead informative discussions on the program just 
presented. 

Last year Dr. Robert E. Jenkins, Superintendent of 
Schools, commented, "This program has proved so suc- 
cessful that both the scope and number of in-school con- 
certs has been greatly increased. In doing so, we are 
recognizing two basics : one, that the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra is one of the great cultural resources of 
this city; and, two, that the intimate contact with this 
great orchestra should be an integral part of a child's 
total education. We have every reason to feel that this 
program will be a vitally important phase of their total 
cultural experience." 

Dr. Albert A. Renna, District Director of Music and 
long a leading exponent of the in-school concert concept, 
emphasizes that the program is a far-reaching addition 
to the fine arts program. He states, "It is important for 
all children to understand and appreciate fine arts early, 
not just a talented few. This plan, involving a great resi- 
dent orchestra, should eventually directly involve every 
child in the San Francisco public school system, which is 
our goal." 

The schedule of concerts is as follows : 

Monday, October 14, at 1 and 2:10 p.m. Bret Harte Elemen- 
tary School Auditorium, 1035 Gillman Avenue. Rehearsal in 
the auditorium from 9 a.m. -12 noon. 

Tuesday, October 15, at 9:15 and 10:15 a.m. Patrick Henry 
Elementary School Auditorium, 693 Vermont Street. 

Wednesday, October 16, at 9:15 and 10:15 a.m. Commodore 
Sloat Elementary School Auditorium, 50 Darien Way. 

Thursday, October 17, at 9:15 and 10:10 a.m. at Roosevelt 
Junior High School Auditorium, 460 Arguello Blvd. 

Friday, October 18, at 9:15 and 10:10 a.m. Lawton Elemen- 
tary School Auditorium, 1570- 31st Avenue. 

Monday, October 21, at 1:15 and 2:10 p.m. Pelton Junior 
High School Auditorium, 45 Conkling Street. Rehearsal in the 
auditorium, 9 a.m.- 12 noon. 

Tuesday, October 22, at 9:35 and 10:35 Aptos Junior High 
School Auditorium, 105 Aptos Avenue. 

Wednesday, October 23, at 9:20 and 10:25 a.m. Herbert Hoo- 
ver Junior High School Auditorium, 2290 - 14th Avenue. 

Thursday, October 24, 9:20 and 10:20 a.m. Luther Burbank 
Junior High School Auditorium, 325 La Grande Avenue. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



NEWSLETTER 



October 14, 1968|| 



Proposition "\" Background 



What If Tax Limit Is Not Increased? 



(This is the second in a series of informational 
articles for District personnel relative to Proposition 
"I" which would increase the tax limit for the 
public schools by 98 cents from $2.55 to $3.53.) 
What Will Happen If the School Tax Limit Is Not 
Increased? 

If the voters of San Francisco do not approve 
the proposal to increase the school-tax limit on 
November 5, the Board of Education, because it 
will not have enough funds, will be forced to take 
undesirable steps such as the following in operating 
the schools: 

1. Give up the vital three-year program to em- 
ploy a sufficient number of teachers to reduce class 
size (only one-third of this program has been ac- 
complished) 

2. Increase class size by reverting to the 1967-68 
levels 

3. Reduce rather than increase the present pro- 
grams in reading, in bilingual instruction, and for 
the gifted 

4. Delay the most essential expansion of support- 
ing services and specialists required for the varied 
school population of San Francisco including full 



counseling and guidance, special testing, work-ex- 
perience programs, tutorial programs, remedial 
work, psychologists 

5. Limit the number and scope of summer ses- 
sion programs 

6. Give up plans for developing new approaches 
to occupational training 

7. Reduce the adult education budget 

8. Give up plans to improve school library serv- 
ices 

9. Eliminate plans to provide auxiliary person- 
nel to assist classroom teachers 

10. Eliminate preparation periods for teachers 

11. Limit the purchase of essential supplies, 
equipment, and supplementary textbooks 

12. Curtail further the maintenance of school 
buildings and grounds which is presently well below 
acceptable standards. 

If these undesirable steps are taken, it will be 
difficult to attract good teachers to San Francisco. 
In addition, there is the possibility of losing good 
teachers, for many will want to work in other 
school districts in which they will not teach under 
handicaps such as those set forth above. 



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Family Life Lesson Planned in Seven School District Neighborhoods 



A demonstration lesson on "The Biological Transition 
from Childhood to Puberty and Adolescence" for par- 
ents, teachers, and students at the fifth and sixth grade 
levels will be presented in a number of District schools 
beginning October 15, 1968. 

As a community service, the University of California 
Medical School is offering the services of a team of doc- 
tors directed by Herbert Vandervoort, M.D., Psychiatrist 
and Behavioral Scientist, and Mary Malloy, M.D., Pedia- 
trician, and a number of physicians and advanced medi- 
cal students to explain the biological transition children 
experience as they grow into puberty and early adoles- 
cence. 

In each of seven neighborhoods a team of volunteer 
doctors will present the demonstration lession first to 
parents before a similar lesson is presented to fifth and 
sixth grade pupils in some of the elementary schools in 



each neighborhood. The lesson will illustrate the instruc- 
tion given by resource teachers in the schools which arc 
initiating the Health and Family Life Education progran 
during 1968-69 

The sessions for parents and teachers will be held or] 
Tuesday evenings from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. The first tw< 
meetings include: Richmond District — October 15 
George Peabody School, 250 - 7th Avenue; Western Ad 
dition, Central District — November 19, Raphael Weil 
School, 1501 O'Farrell Street 



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. . . Chamber Orchestra Concerts Set 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Friday, October 25, at 9:20 and 10:20 a.m. Presidio Junior 
High School Auditorium, 450 - 30th Avenue. 

Monday, Octobei 28, at 1:30 and 2:25 p.m. Abraham Lincoln 
High School Auditorium, 2126 -24th Avenue near Rivera 
Street. Rehearsal in auditorium from 9 a.m. -12 noon. 

Tuesday, October 29, at 1:25 and 2:30 p.m. Lowell High 
School Auditorium, 1101 Eucalyptus Drive. 

Wednesday, October 30, at 9:15 and 10:15 a.m. Woodrow 
Wilson High School Auditorium, 400 Mansell Street. 

Thursday, October 31, at 9:15 and 10:15 a.m. Mission High 
School Auditorium, 3750 18lh Street. 

Friday, November 1, at 9:05 and 10 a.m. Galileo High School 
Auditorium, 1150 Francisco Street. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 

Vol. 40, No. 7 October 14, 1968 

135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemrnitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolf o de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 

Superintendent of Schools 



Hugh E. Wire, Administrative Assistant, 
Educational Information 



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iOctober 14, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Effective November 1, 1968 



District Employee Dental Plan Is Approved 



At the Board of Education meeting on Tuesday, Octo- 
Iber 8, 1968, the Board of Education accepted the recom- 
;imendation of Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins to enter 
linto an agreement with the California Dental Service to 
provide a prepaid Dental Service for all certificated and 
Jjclassified personnel and their families of the District who 
Ijare members of the San Francisco Employee's Retirement 
[(System. The plan includes long-term substitutes. The ap- 
proximate cost will be $775,000. 

i During the spring the Superintendent agreed with the 
| Negotiating Council and the American Federation of 
[Teachers to recommend to the Board of Education that 
■the 1968-69 budget would include funds for a prepaid 
I dental and drug plan. However, funds for the purpose 
[were not authorized until the adoption of the final bud- 
jet on August 6, 1968. The Fiscal Office then took im- 
[ mediate steps to have various companies submit plans 
■"or consideration. 

The plan will become effective on November 1, 1968. 
[Employees and their families will be covered from that 
Bate. 

' The California Dental Service Plan is an incentive 
):ype plan which requires an employee or his dependent 
I'.o visit a dentist at least once each year of participation. 
Additional details of the plan follow : 



Treatment after loss of 
eligibility 



\nnual Max. Per Person 

Percentage Payable for 

3asic Benefits 

I 1st year 

: 2nd year 

; 3rd year 

I 4th & subsequent years 

I Vosthetic Devices & 



definition of Prosthetic 
)evices & Services 

)ependent Age Coverage 



itannous Floride 
^reatment 



Ueanings 



lentures provided prior 
) effective date of 
lental Plan 



$750 per calendar year 



70% 

80% 

90% 

100% 

50% 

Bridges, partial & 
complete dentures 

Birth to age 19, 
to age 23 if student 

Stannous Floride is 
provided up to age 18. 
If dentist requests 
treatment after age 18 
C.D.S. will honor claim. 

Cleanings can be 
provided more than twice 
a year if substantiated 
by attending dentist. 

Has no limitation as to 
the time denture has 
been installed prior to 
effective date of plan, 
except if paid for under 
any C.D.S. Plan. 



Basis of Payment 



Quality Control and 
screening; of claims 



Claims Cost Control and 
guarantee of dentists' 
usual and customary fee 



Route of Claims Form 



Optional Courses of 

Treatment 

Maximum 

preauthorization 

Rate guarantee 

Rates 

One Party 
Two Party 
Three Party + 



No time limit on pros- 
thetic devices if author- 
ized while patient was 
eligible. 60 day time 
limit on basic benefits 
if C.D.S. has not been 
notified by school 
district of termination 
of eligibility. 

Payment based on 
the participating 
dentist's individual 
fee listing on file in 
CDS offices. If dentist 
is not a CDS participating 
dentist, payment reverts 
to applicable percentage 
of CDS Schedule B. 

All claims reviewed by 
technically qualified 
personnel and regularly 
reviewed by professional 
and home office audits. 

Long established and 
effective cost control 
program. The mechanics 
of CDS cost control 
program are too extensive 
to enumerate. 

Patient visits a dentist 
of his choice. During 
first visit he advises 
dentist he is a member 
of CDS. Dentist com- 
pletes treatment form 
(from a supply which all 
dentists have in their 
office) and sends to CDS 
for verification of 
eligibility. CDS returns 
form to dentist, who 
proceeds with authorized 
work. Dentist returns 
form to CDS after com- 
pletion of work, and 
CDS reimburses dentist. 
Patient must accept 
lesser of two fees. 

$35 
2 years 

$ 5.54 

9.58 

13.79 



NEWSLETTER 



October 14, 1968 1 M 



Announcements 



• TEACHER RIGHTS TO BE DISCUSSED 

The Constitution and the Classroom Teacher: A Dia- 
logue, a day-long program sponsored by the Constitution- 
al Rights Foundation, the California Teachers Associa- 
tion, and the California Parent Teachers Association, will 
be held Saturday, October 19, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 
at A. P. Giannini Junior High School, 39th Avenue and 
Ortega Street. 

The $5 registration fee (which includes lunch, case 
materials, and panel sessions) should be mailed to the 
Constitutional Rights Foundation, Office 406, 503 Mar- 
ket Street 94105. 



• TASF TO MEET OCTOBER 21 

The Teachers Association of San Francisco will hold 
its general monthly meeting, Monday, October 21, at 4 
p.m. in the Board of Education meeting room, 170 Fell 
Street. All schools are urged to have a representative in 
attendance as the program of action and other important 
issues will be discussed. 



• STANFORD EDUCATION CLUB 

The Stanford Education Club of San Francisco an- 
nounces that its annual fall dinner will be held Thursday, 
October 24, at The Leopard, 140 Front Street. A social 
hour beginning at 6:30 p.m. will precede the 8 p.m. 
dinner. 

Cost of the dinner is $6.00, all inclusive, and checks 
should be made payable to Luke Angelich, 669 Haw- 
thorne Drive, Tiburon, 94920. 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancies: 
2704 — School Custodian — Mission High 
2724 — School Custodian — Francisco Junior High, 
Daniel Webster, and Sir Francis Drake 

2726 — School Custodian Sub-Foreman — John Mc- 
Laren 



NATIONAL TEACHERS EXAMINATION 

The Personnel Services office announces that the 
registration deadline for the National Teachers Ex- 
amination is Friday, October 18, 1968. Registration 
forms are available in Room 116, Central Office. 

All long-term substitutes, day-to-day substitutes, 
and teachers not on probationary status who wish 
to qualify for the 1969-70 eligibility lists in the San 
Francisco public schools must take the National 
Teachers Examination. 

The examination itself will be given on Saturday, 
November 9, 1968. The registration fee for the 
common examination plus one teaching area exam- 
ination is $11. 

Payment of an additional $3 late registration fee 
will permit acceptance of registration forms up to 
the late registration closing date of Friday, October 
25, 1968. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Monday, October 21, 1968, 7:30 p.m., Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



TIME SHEET PICK-UP 

October time sheets for teachers will be picked 
up at the schools at 8:30 a.m. on November 1, 1968, 
for senior, junior, and elementary teachers. 

The adult schools will deliver their part-time 
teachers' time sheets on October 29 and their full- 
time teachers' time sheets on November 1 at 9 a.m. 

Time sheets for clerks and janitors for all schools, 
including the adult schools, for October 16 through 
October 31 will be picked up at the schools at 
8:30 a.m. on October 21, 1968. 

Sheets are to be completed and signed by the 
deadline dates above to enable delivery service to 
keep the schedule. 

The number of days in October for principals 
and assistant principals is 23; the number of days 
for teachers is 23. 



1 



• CANHC TO MEET OCTOBER 16 

The California Association for Neurologically Handi- 
capped Children, San Francisco Chapter, announces thai 
its first meeting will be held Wednesday, October 16, i 
p.m., at Aptos Junior High School and will feature Dr 
Henry S. Richanbach who will discuss "The Medica 
Consultants in the EH Program." 



• FIELD LIBRARIANS TO MEET 

The Field Librarians will meet Thursday, October 17 
at 4 p.m. in the library of Polytechnic High School, 701 
Frederick Street. All elementary, junior high, and senioj] 
high school librarians are welcome. 



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U. S. POSTAGE | 

Paid 

SAN FRANCISCO, 
PERMIT No. 396fl 



S. F. UNIFIED SCHOOL 
135 VAN NESS AVE. 



RETURN REQUESTIIUj 



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SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT aAN ,MN<?im 



NEWSLETTER 



/OLUME 40 



OCTOBER 21, 1968 



NUMBER 8 



X-Ray Facility Change Noted 

The San Francisco Tuberculosis and Health As- 
sociation and the San Francisco Medical Society 
announce that X-ray services at 250 Masonic Av- 
enue will be discontinued on October 31, 1968. 

Because an appreciable number of school person- 
nel have used the 250 Masonic Avenue facility for 
their required tuberculosis test, it is important that 
they know that this X-ray location will cease oper- 
ating the end of October. 

Units that are available to provide this service 
include the following: Health Department, 101 
Grove Street; North East Health Center, 799 Pa- 
cific Avenue; and the Tuberculosis Association's 
X-ray truck at various locations. A fourth facility 
will soon be in operation at the Sunset Health 
Center. 



ndustrial Arts Honor 



ioosevelt Student Takes Award 




aseph Jentick, 8th grade student at Roosevelt Junior High 
'Chool, received an outstanding achievement award of $100 
ish and an all-expense paid trip to Sacramento, for his entry in 
le Eighth Annual Industrial Arts Awards Program held at Cal- 
<po this summer. Presenting the award is Dr. Eugene Gonzales, 
ssociate Superintendent of Public Instruction, California State 
epartment of Education. Orville Stocker, Joseph's instructor at 
oosevelt, is on the left. Joseph's entry was a pair of swag lamps, 
ther winners included Randy Weaver, Roosevelt, superior award, 
'laid checkerboard, Mr. Stocker, teacher; Group Entry, Roose- 
;lt, superior award, recipe booklet, Milton Schroeder, teacher; 
id Group Entry, Balboa High, superior award, silk screen design, 
icholas Germano, teacher. 



New Leadership Position 

Reverend Lee Is Appointed As 
Coordinator of Project SEED 

Reverend Charles H. Lee was appointed to the posi- 
tion of School-Community Coordinator of the Southeast 
Educational Development Program (Project SEED) 
upon recommendation of Superintendent Robert E. Jen- 
kins at the September 24, 1968 meeting of the Board of 
Education. 

Reverend Lee of the Ridgepoint Methodist Church was 
recommended to the Superintendent by the community 
members of the Interim SEED Board. In their nomina- 
tion of Reverend Lee for the position, it was stated that 
he possessed "the leadership quality which enables him to 
unify different factions within the community, to address 
themselves to a commonly shared goal — quality edu- 
cation." 

Reverend Lee will function as the community's top ad- 
ministrator in the $545,760 federally funded project. The 
School-Community Coordinator will be responsible for 
the necessary coordination and liaison between the com- 
munity (SEED Project Board) and the Superintendent 
of Schools. 

Project SEED, which calls for active community in- 
volvement in the Hunters Point-Bayview area schools, is 
an educational enrichment program, which will bring in- 
creased educational services to the schools. An office will 
be opened at 4602 Third Street to handle necessary de- 
tails. 

Reverend Lee's appointment to the post was approved 
by the Board of Education by a 4-1 vote. 

Reverend Lee has served as Chairman of the Education 
Committee, Bayview-Hunters Point Coordinating Coun- 
cil/Joint Housing Committee, and as Chairman, Board 
of Directors, Hunters Point Community Foundation. 
Other community activities have included membership 
on the Board of Directors, Hunters Point Boys Club; 
Acting Director of Ridgepoint Non-Profit Housing Cor- 
poration of the Ridgepoint Methodist Church; member- 
ship on the Citizens Advisory Committee on Educational 
Equality/Quality Report; and membership on the Pelton 
Junior High School-Parent-Community Relations Steer- 
ing Committee. 

He received his AB degree from Texas Southern Uni- 
versity, Houston, Texas, in 1960, and his BD degree 
from the Interdenominational Theological Seminary, 
Atlanta, Georgia, in 1965. He served in the U. S. Army 
from 1947 to 1956, progressing from the rank of private 
to captain. 



NEWSLETTER 



October 21, 196S 



To Aptos Library 



Autographed Volume Presented 




Dr. Howard Thurman is seen autographing a copy of the book 
Howard Thurman - Portrait of a Practical Dreamer for the Aptos 
Junior High School library. Dr. Thurman is standing in front 
of the Freedom Now sculpture which is part of the Afro-Ameri- 
can exhibit currently at the Grace Cathedral. Pictured with 
Dr. Thurman are (left to right) Mrs. Thurman; Mrs. Myron H. 
Johnson, John Adams Adult School teacher; Myron H. Johnson, 
Head Counselor — Boys, Aptos Junior High School. 

Dr. Howard Thurman, Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees of the Howard Thurman Educational Trust and 
organizer-founder of the San Francisco Fellowship 
Church of All Peoples, recently presented an autographed 
copy of the book Howard Thurman — Portrait of a 
Practical Dreamer by Elizabeth Yates to the Aptos Junior 
High School library. 

Dr. Thurman presented the autographed copy to My- 
ron Johnson, Aptos Head Counselor — Boys, at a lun- 
cheon commemorating the Afro-American exhibit at the 
Grace Cathedral. 

The exhibit features the renowned Freedom Now 
sculpture of artist Robert W. Ames, which is on display 
to the public and school children until October 31. 

Dr. Thurman's inscription reads as follows: "To the 
Aptos Junior High School, Make what you hunger for 
Real — No one can prevent you there!" 

• MUSEUM DONATION NOTED 

Maurice K. Schiffman, teacher at A. P. Giannini Jun- 
ior High School and authority on Japanese culture, has 
donated some 60 Japanese fans to the Lowie Museum at 
the University of California at Berkeley. A letter from the 
University states, in part, ". . . the documentation which 
you provided places an inestimable scientific value on the 
collection. . ." 

Mr. Schiffman has divided and donated his fan collec- 
tion, part of which is used by the schools within the Dis- 
trict. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Frances M. Reed 
Norman Wolfe 



i 



Multi-Culture Measure Approved 

A resolution approving cooperation between the Schoo! 
District and the Multi-Culture Institute was approved b) 
the Board of Education upon recommendation of Super- 
intendent Robert E. Jenkins at the September 24, 1968 
meeting. 

The resolution states that the School District will en- 
courage the Multi-Culture Institute to develop its pro< 
gram in such ways as to achieve maximum usefulness foi 
public and other large school systems and will offer con- 
sultation and guidance towards these ends. 

The resolution further states that when evaluation ol 
the Multi-Culture operational program begins, the Su 
perintendent will appoint a high level staff member oi 
committee to assist the Multi-Culture Institute in assess- 
ing possible implications and uses of the project for pub 
lie and other large school systems. 

A non-profit organization, the Multi-Culture Institutt 
has been endorsed by Mayor Joseph Alioto and the Boarc 
of Supervisors. It sponsors a unique educational approacl 
calculated to attack the roots of racial and ethnic hostili- 
ties in the cities. 

The focus of the program is a teaching plan whicl 
envisions children of different races and ethnic back 
grounds being deliberately segregated for part of the 
school day for special instruction in their group differ 
ences and cultural heritages. 



• PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Croft Educational Services announces that its new 
book, Successful Practices in Teaching Physical Fitness — 
Part II, contains a section devoted to the physical educa 
tion program at James Lick Junior High School. 

The book will be distributed nationally to physical ed 
ucators and administrators concerned with the physica 
education curriculum, and it contains some 34 reports o 
what are ". . . among the most outstanding physical fit 
ness practices in the nation." 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



... 



Vol. 40, No. 8 



October 21, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Administrative Assistant, 
Educational Information 



■ 



October 21, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



Mayor Calls Meeting 



Press Conference Features Proposition T 



(This is the third in a series of articles relative to Prop- 
\ osition "I," designed to keep School District personnel 
i informed about the tax limit measure which will appear 
J on the November 5 election ballot.) 

The significance of Proposition "I," the school tax 
i limit increase measure, was outlined by Mayor Joseph L. 
: Alioto in a press conference on Monday, October 14, 
1968. 

Present at the press conference were Benjamin H. 
iSwig, chairman of the Citizens Committee for Proposi- 
jtion "I," and Mrs. Bruce Cowan, "Grass Roots" Commit- 
tee chairman. 

Mayor Alioto strongly endorsed the measure in the 
ijmeeting with press representatives and stressed the effects 
,of inflation on the school financial picture and the grow- 
ling costs of educating children in urban centers. 

He further emphasized the city's need for quality edu- 
cation to help cope with a variety of current social prob- 
lems and the need for insuring something more than a 
imediocre education for urban children. 

Mr. Swig indicated the importance of increasing the 
ischool tax limit in order to provide the best possible edu- 
cational opportunities for all students. 

Mrs. Cowan commented on the necessity for continu- 
ous improvement in city schools to hold and attract mid- 
dle income families and stem the movement of such 
groups to suburban communities. She further stressed that 
passage of Proposition "I" would enable the School Dis- 
trict to maintain many of its new programs and allow 



for the development of future programs so vital to the 
changed needs of the city's diversified population. 

The Mayor outlined a number of possible conse- 
quences if Proposition "I" fails to receive a majority of 
the votes cast. He indicated the threat to the School Dis- 
trict's class size reduction program, curtailment of newly 
instituted programs, such as the bilingual programs, and 
a general cut-back in many of the school improvements 
initiated in the 1967-68 school year. 

Endorsements in support of Proposition "I" have been 

received from the following organizations: 

Andrew Jackson P.T.A., Burnett School P.T.A., Chinese Six 
Companies, Chinese Methodist Church, Civic League of Im- 
provement Clubs & Association of S. F., Coordinating Council 
for Integrated Schools, Federation of Public Employees, Greater 
Chamber of Commerce, Horizons Unlimited, Human Rights 
Commission, Ingleside United Presbyterian Church, Interna- 
tional Institute of San Francisco, Lafayette Club, Lakeshore 
School Faculty, Mark Twain Elementary School Parent-Teacher 
Association, Metropolitan Council of NAACP, San Francisco 
Association of School Administrators, San Francisco Association 
of Secondary School Administrators CASSA No. 6, San Fran- 
cisco Second District, California Congress of Parents & Teach- 
ers, San Francisco Classroom Teachers Association, San Fran- 
cisco Conference on Religion, Race and Social Concerns; San 
Francisco Council of Churches, San Francisco Council for Social 
Studies, San Francisco Division of California Retired Teachers, 
San Francisco Elementary Administrators Association, San 
Francisco Federation of Teachers, San Francisco Greater China- 
town Community Service Association, San Francisco Labor 
Council, San Francisco Retired Teachers Association, San Fran- 
cisco Women's Forum Board, St. Francis Square Apartments, 
Spanish Speaking/Surnamed Political Association, Spring Valley 
P.T.A., United Mission District Organizations, Winfield Scott 
P.T.A. 



Audio Visual Dates Are Booked 

j Dr. William B. Sanborn, Director, Division of Instruc- 
tional Materials, announces that there are no available 
dates open for Monday, Wednesday, or Friday for con- 
firming 16mm film materials for the months of October, 
November, and December. January of 1969 is almost 
''booked out," as are several days in February. 

Mrs. Pauline K. Levie, Research Librarian, Bureau of 
\udio Visual Education, explains that no more 16mm 
ilms can be booked for shipment on Mondays, Wednes- 
days, or Fridays during this period since the Bureau's 
Processing and shipping capacity for any given day has 
ilready been confirmed. 

During the summer months approximately 15,000 
1 6mm films were booked for delivery for the school year. 
Almost all of these were for fall and winter use. 

The bureau processes and ships materials to the known 
imit of available staff and delivery facilities. Numerous 
idditional requisitions have been received since the 
ipening of school for fall booking. Many of these will of 
lecessity be returned unprocessed since the dates are al- 
: eady filled. 



At Golden Gate School 

Disneyland Trip Is Scheduled 




The second trip to Disneyland for a group of Golden Gate School 
students has been planned for Saturday, October 26. Pictured 
above discussing the trip are (left to right) Michael Holway, 
Principal; Mrs. Thelma Bussey, 6th grade teacher; and Mrs. 
Vivian Tyrrell, Golden Gate PTA member. Mrs. Bussey's students 
and six adults, including Mr. Holway and a team of Golden Gate 
teachers, will make the trip. Transportation will be provided by 
Air California, and expenses will be extended through the cour- 
tesy of the San Francisco Council on Race and Religion. The 
group will leave at 6 a.m. on October 26 and return at 7:30 
p.m. the same day. 



NEWSLETTER 



October 21, 1968 



91 



Announcements 



• PATRICIA MEEHAN MEMORIAL FUND 

The faculty of Lawton School has established a me- 
morial fund in memory of Patricia Meehan, former 
teacher at Lawton School, who was killed in the tragic 
helicopter flight to Disneyland last August. This fund 
will finance creation of a mural in tribute to Miss Mee- 
han, which will be planned and organized in cooperation 
with the Art Department, Herbert Simon, Director. 

The activities of the pupils in this project will be un- 
der the direct supervision of Patricia Welch, Art Special- 
ist, at Lawton School. A dedication program will be held 
upon completion and at that time the mural will be un- 
veiled at its permanent place in the school library. 

Friends wishing to contribute to this fund are asked 
to send donations to Lawton School addressed to "Pa- 
tricia Meehan Memorial Fund," 1750 -31st Ave., San 
Francisco 94122. 

The fund will also be used to continue the literature 
project Miss Meehan established at the Fiailoa School 
on American Samoa. 



• FEDERATION COMMITTEE MEETING 

The San Francisco Federation of Teachers Elementary 
Problems Committee will meet at 10 a.m. on Saturday, 
October 26, in the Mission Room (9th floor) of the Bay- 
view Towers, 2601 Mission Street. The meeting is open 
to all elementary and special services teachers. Parking is 
available in the rear of the building. 

Panels composed of District teachers will discuss ad- 
ministrator-teacher relations, special services, reading 
(Sullivan and other series), classroom organization, cur- 
riculum, and supplies. 



• 20TH ANNIVERSARY DINNER 

The Department of Education of the University of San 
Francisco is celebrating the 20th anniversary of its found- 
ing with a special dinner sponsored by the University's 
Alumni Education Club. 

The dinner will be held on Friday, November 8, on the 
U.S.F. campus. Guest speaker will be Dr. James C. Stone, 
Professor of Education and head of teacher education at 
the University of California in Berkeley. Dinner reserva- 
tions can be made immediately by calling 752-6560. 



• CHILDREN'S FILMS TO BE SHOWN 

The 1968 San Francisco International Film Festival 
announces that it will present two children's films this 
year at the Masonic Auditorium, 1111 California Street. 

They are Walt Disney's Sleeping Beauty at 10:30 a.m. 
on Saturday, October 26, and a Swedish children's film 
Hugo and Josephine on Saturday, November 2, at 10:30 
a.m. 

Children's tickets are $1 and adult tickets are $1.50, 
and may be ordered from the San Francisco Film Festi- 
val, Special Services, 288 Turk Street. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Monday, October 21, 1968, 7:30 p.m., Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



} 



• PTA DINNER OCTOBER 22 

The 21st annual Presidents' and Principals' dinner 
sponsored by San Francisco Second District PTA will be 
held on Tuesday, October 22, 1968 at 6 p.m. in Smith 
Hall, City College of San Francisco. 

School principals and their spouses will be guests of 
PTA presidents and their spouses, with the dinner pre- 
pared and served by students of the Restaurant Division 
of City College. 

PTA delegates are invited to attend the 7 : 30 p.m. busi- 
ness meeting following the dinner to hear the Honorable 
Joseph Kennedy, Judge of the Municipal Court, as guest 
speaker. 

Central Office staff are also invited to attend the din- 
ner meeting. Dinner tickets may be purchased in the PTA 
Office, Room 32-A for $4.25 per person. 



DEADLINE FOR TRANSFER REQUESTS 

All permanent teachers are reminded that No- 
vember 1 is the deadline for turning in requests for 
transfers that will become effective at the begin- 
ning of the spring 1969 semester. If such requests 
have been on file two years or longer, new applica- 
tions should be submitted to the Personnel Services 
office, Room 116. 



• STANFORD EDUCATION CLUB DINNER 

The Stanford Education Club of San Francisco will 
hold its annual fall dinner on Thursday, October 24, at 
The Leopard, 140 Front Street, with a social hour at 
6:30 p.m. and dinner at 8 p.m. 

Dinner cost is $6.50, all inclusive (not $6 as announced 
last week), and checks should be made payable to Luke 
Angelich, 669 Hawthorne Drive, Tiburon 94920. 



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iSAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 40 



OCTOBER 28, 1968 



NUMBER 9 



Retail Training Course Begins 

The District Adult and Occupational Education 
Office is once again cooperating with the Human 
Rights Commission, the San Francisco Retailers 
Community Relations Group, and the Youth Op- 
portunity Center in developing a special training 
and employment program for unemployed, out-of- 
school youth between the ages of 16 and 21. 

A group of San Francisco retailers is planning 
some 200 job placements for such young people. 
They will be interviewed and hired before taking a 
special retail training course which will provide 
direct preparation for the anticipated jobs. 

Classes will be held at the Mission Adult High 
School with the first session being held from Octo- 
ber 28 until November 8. The second session will 
run from November 12 to November 22. 

The District's Occupational Preparation Office 
is coordinating the program. 



Scholarship Award 



ity College Student Commended 







itanald Guyton, student at City College of San Francisco, is seen 
eceiving a check for $500 from Hulsey S. Lokey, President, 
lost International. Donald was declared the winner of the organi- 
ation's 1968 scholarship award, which consists of a $500 grant 
or each of the two years he is enrolled in the Project FEAST 
'rogram under the City College Hotel and Restaurant Founda- 
ion. Pictured also are Mrs. Hilda Watson Gifford, Director of 
he Project FEAST Program, and George Hansen, San Francisco 
nternational Airport General Manager, as they participated in an 
ward presentation luncheon. Donald will be given the opportun- 
ty to gain work experience and additional financial assistance by 
n-the-job training as a management trainee at Host's airport 
acilities. 



To Grandvel A. Jackson 

Human Relations Award Is Made 

The San Francisco 
Foundation Award for 
1968 has been presented 
to Grandvel A. Jackson, 
Field Representative for 
the Human Relations Of- 
fice of the San Francisco 
Unified School District. 
The presentation was 
made by Daniel E. Kosh- 
land, Vice Chairman of 
the Foundation. 

The award is made an- 
nually "for exceptionally 
courageous and effective 
work in improving human 
relations." It is intended 
to recognize a significant 
contribution toward im- 
provement of the relationship between different ethnic 
groups making up the cosmopolitan population of the 
Bay Area. The award carries with it a plaque and a check 
for $500. 

Mr. Jackson has a long history of outstanding work in 
this area. Before coming to the School District, he did 
conspicuous service for the San Francisco Human Rights 
Commission. He was one of the key figures in establishing 
the Ocean View-Merced Heights-Ingleside Community 
Stabilibation Program, to which the Foundation has con- 
tributed in substantial amount. He was chosen for the 
1968 award from among some twenty nominations made 
to the Foundation early this year. 




Daniel E. Koshland presents 
the San Francisco Foundation 
Award for 1968 to Grandvel 
A. Jackson, Human Relations 
Field Representative. 



Defer Discipline Policy Decision 

A statement of the School District's Discipline 
Policy and the Discipline Handbook were reviewed 
and discussed by Board of Education members, 
teacher organization representatives, and parents 
at the Board meeting of October 21, 1968. 

After considerable comment from those in at- 
tendance, the Board referred the policy statement 
and procedures back to Superintendent Robert E. 
Jenkins for further study and evaluation. 

The Discipline Policy Statement and the Disci- 
pline Handbook will be resubmitted to the Board 
for adoption at a future meeting. 



NEWSLETTER 



October 28, 19681 



Unique Loan Plan 



New Copy Machines for Schools 




Emil Anderson, Assistant Principal, Lowell High School, is seen 
giving instructions in the operation of the new A. B. Dick 
Electrostatic Copy Machine now in use in District senior, junior, 
and adult high schools. Pictured also are Lowell students Dorothy 
Dowell and Fred Beckman, and Mrs. Doris Johnson, school secre- 
tary. 

District junior, senior, and adult high schools were 
recently furnished with Electrostatic Copy Machines free 
of charge by the A. B. Dick Company. 

Edgar Lahl, Supervisor of Supplies, reports that the 
District merely purchases the photocopy paper at the 
federal contract price, thereby establishing a copy cost 
of $0.47 1 per copy. 

This copy cost is identical to that paid for paper pur- 
chased for the several electrostatic copiers owned by the 
School District. This was not only the lowest cost avail- 
able through the bid procedure, but is particularly at- 
tractive because there was no capital investment for the 
equipment. 

This unique loan plan developed when the "copy cost 
concept" was explored by the District and when several 
vendors indicated an interest in furnishing the equip- 
ment, providing the District purchase the paper from the 
vendor. 

The A. B. Dick Company earned the right to the three- 
year contract (with a two-year extension option) estab- 
lished with the District on the basis of bidding the lowest 
cost per copy. 

The "free loan equipment plan" is the first of its kind 
in the nation for a school district, Mr. Lahl reports, and 
can be attributed in part to the efforts of pursuing the 
best available services for the lowest possible cost. In this 
case, there was no capital investment for equipment, 
saving the District approximately $30,000. 

• ART TEACHERS ELECTED 

Two San Francisco art teachers, Paula Steinbach 
and Venita Lobdcll, have been elected to both the Nor- 
thern Area and the State Councils of the California Art 
Education Association. Miss Steinbach is the Elementary 
Representative and Mrs. Lobdcll is the Secondary Rep- 
resentative on the two councils. 



Portola Has New Math Look 

LAM-G9, a Laboratory Approach to Mathematics 
Grade 9, is the first program of its kind to be introduced 
into the junior high schools of San Francisco. The pro- 
gram was field tested at Roosevelt Junior High School 
during the summer of 1968 and is now officially installed 
at Portola Junior High School. 

Essentially, the program seeks to motivate ninth grade 
students towards an exploration of mathematical con- 
cepts and skills through the use of the Divisumma 24GT. 
These are fully automatic high speed calculators with 
print tape output and two registers — one for the four 
basic arithmetic operations (with positive and negative 
multiplication and division) and the other, an accumu- 
lator wheh carries a running total of the first register. In 
addition, it features a memory device with transfer capa- 
bilities. 

Flow charting is used exclusively, not only to instruct 
students in the use of the machines, but as a method of 
analyzing and structuring the problem solving process. 

An unusual aspect of the program will be its attempt 
to introduce relevant materials to the student by asking 
the neighborhood merchants to provide mathematic- 
based problems drawn from their official business files. 
This type of cooperative community involvement will 
hopefully lead to open dialogue between school and com- 
munity from which will result a truly meaningful curricu- 
lum. Parents and friends of the students in the program 
will be invited to visit the laboratory for a more detailed 
presentation of the course. 

Three ninth grade classes of 24 students each are cur- 
rently enrolled in the program under Hattie Perkins, who 
not only teaches the course, but who also serves as the 
school-site curriculum writer. Miss Perkins is assisted by 
a graduate student from San Francisco State College 
Funding for LAM-G9 comes from ESEA sources, and 
the program is being evaluated by the District Research 
Office. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 40, No. 9 



October 28, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Administrative Assistant, 
Educational Information 



October 28, 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



World-Wide Guests Pay Visit 

The School District has been honored by recent visits 
from the following educational travelers: 

From Iceland — Johannes L. Helgason, University of 
Iceland — visited City College. 

From Africa (various countries) — Eight teachers — 
visited John Adams Adult. 

From Mauritius Island — H. E. Sookdeo Bissoondoyal, 
Government Minister — ■ visited Central Office. 

From Nigeria — Mrs. Christiana Odulana, Secondary 
Principal — visited Woodrow Wilson High. 

From Germany — Manfred Schulte, Bundestag mem- 
ber — visited Office of Occupational Preparation. 

From Venezuela — Ten teachers — visited Balboa 
High School. 

From Hong Kong — P. Y. Tang, businessman — 
i/isited Galileo High. 

From Philippine Islands — Cesar T. Lucero, City 
iouncilor — visited John O'Connell Vocational High, 

afayette, and George Washington High. 

From Australia — Margot Higgins, Balmain Teachers' 
lollege — visited Central Office and John Swett. 

From Denmark — Jens Winther, Social Studies teach- 
:r — visited Central Office. 

i From Japan — Sadahiro Sato, Japanese National 
committee for UNESCO — visited Central Office; 
jromoichi Naya, Professor, Denki College, Tokyo — 
fished Commodore Stockton, Mark Twain, Francisco 
Junior High, and A. P. Giannini Junior High. 



Historical Approach 



)ance Program at James Denman 




udents at James Denman Junior High School recently witnessed 
J unique program on the "Story of Tap and Jazz Dancing" per- 

rmed by Les Williams, professional dancer, actor, teacher, and 
Icturer. A Stanford University graduate, Mr. Williams limits his 
,'ogram geographically and historically to the United States, 

counting the growth of the tap and jazz dancing forms from 

>lonial days to present times. Pictured with Mr. Williams are 
[oris Wecsen, Head Counselor — Girls, and Lawrence Webber, 

'incipal of James Denman. 




Mrs. Bruce Cowan, Chairman, 
Citizens "Grass Roots" Com- 
mittee in support of Proposi- 
tion "I," joined Mayor Joseph 
L. Alioto in a recent press 
conference in which strong 
endorsement was given to the 
tax limit increase measure. 



Proposition "I" Plan 

Door-to-Door Drive Is Readied 

(This is the fourth in a 
series of articles directed 
to keeping school person- 
nel informed on matters 
relative to Proposition 
"I," the school tax limit 
increase measure.) 

A massive door-to-door, 
district-by-district drive in 
support of Proposition"!" 
will be conducted Satur- 
day, November 2, 1968, 
■ when volunteer School 
'' " District personnel partici- 
pate in a four-hour effort 
to enlist support for the 
tax limit increase measure 
for District schools. 
Teachers and adminis- 
trators will cover the city from 9:30 a.m. to 1 : 15 p.m. in 
this broad-based attempt to explain the school tax issue 
which will appear on the November 5 ballot. 

School District personnel are joining with the League 
of Women Voters, the Citizens' Committee for Proposi- 
tion "I," Second District, California Congress of Parents 
and Teachers, Mothers' and Parents' Clubs, and other 
interested citizens in the final weekend effort. Mrs. Eu- 
gene Bossi of the Citizens' Committee is helping to co- 
ordinate the drive. 

District elementary schools will serve as centers from 
which the volunteers will be given specific neighborhood 
assignments. Volunteers will work in pairs and will file 
brief reports upon completing their assignments. 

During the past week administrators and teachers vol- 
unteered for Saturday assignments in their home schools. 
They will be assigned to an elementary school as an oper- 
ational base for the November 2 program. 

• SERVES AS SUMMER DEAN 

Joan Houck, music teacher at Aptos Junior High 
School, served as Dean of Women at Brevard College, 
North Carolina, this past summer. 

• PARENT EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

A series of study-discussion groups on the subject "Sex 
Education for Our Children" is being offered at Robert 
Louis Stevenson School by the Parent Education Pro- 
grams Office, Adult Division, for parents of elementary 
and junior high school students on Monday evenings 
from 7 to 9 p.m. 

The program is being offered in cooperation with the 
Robert Louis Stevenson PTA. The sessions will be con- 
ducted October 28, November 4, 18, 25, and December 
2. 

For additional information call Mrs. Herst Pfendt at 
566-0956. 



NEWSLETTER 



October 28, 196H 



Announcements 



• ELEMENTARY SCIENCE SUPPLIES CHANGES 

A major revision was made during the school year 
1967-68 on the Elementary Science Supplies Requisition 
Lists. With the cooperation of the Elementary Supply 
Committee, headed by Donald Langendorf, Chairman, a 
committee revised the entire Science Supplies List. 

The revision brings the science supplies being furnished 
through warehouse stock in line with the new California 
State adopted texts, Concepts in Science, by Brandwein, 
Cooper, Blackwood, and Hone. 

Approximately 20 new items were added to the list and 
a number of items were modified to conform to the sci- 
ence text. The next Science Requisition List will reflect 
these changes and schools may avail themselves of these 
new supplies items for the teaching of science in the ele- 
mentary grades. 

Joseph P. Mannon, Supplies Analyst with the Division 
of Supplies, was instrumental in effecting these changes 
through work with the Supply Committee. 

• HANDBOOK FOR WOMEN EDUCATORS 

The Education Section of the American Association of 
University Women, San Francisco Branch, announces 
that it has prepared a new 25-page handbook, Continuing 
Education for San Francisco Women: A Handbook of 
Resources for Higher Education, Professional Training, 
and Vocational and Cultural Enrichment. Copies may be 
ordered from Dr. Iona Logie, 1845 Vallejo. 

• RACIAL STRIFE PROGRAM REPEATED 

KPIX-TV, Channel 5, announces that it will rebroad- 
cast One Nation, Indivisible , its three-hour examination 
of the racial crisis in America on Tuesday, October 29, 
from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. 

The final hour of the program will feature a panel of 
Bay Area students in a discussion of local aspects of 
racial strife. This is a change from the original program 
which featured a panel of local civic and business leaders. 

• FRANCISCO CONTINUES SERIES 

The Teacher Lecture Series, attended by a capacity 
audience of teachers and students at 8 a.m. every Thurs- 
day, is underway at Francisco Junior High School. Dur- 
ing the series, students speak and write through inter- 
viewing their teachers, writing the teachers' biographies, 
and introducing the teachers from the speakers' platform. 

In the opener of the Lecture Series, Mrs. Bobbye 
Blume, English teacher and director of student activities, 
told of her recent eight months in Australia. In the next, 
Ralph Madsen, who served as an Army officer in Korea, 
based his talk on aerial photographs of Korea. 

Future sessions will include James Boykin, librarian, 
who travels extensively every year, telling of the islands 
of the Atlantic, and Mrs. Linda Festa, who joined the 
faculty directly from the Peace Corps, speaking on El 
Salvador, where she and her husband lived for two years. 
Leo Lowe, chairman of the school's gifted program, is 
directing the series. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, November 12, 1968, 7:30 p.m., Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• ADULT PROGRAM AT APTOS 

The Aptos Junior High School PTA is presenting foui 
evening forums on the subject "Sex Education for Ado 
lescents" on Tuesday evenings from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. ii 
the school cafeteria. 

The sessions will be held October 29, November 12 
November 19, and November 26 and will feature Man 
K. Jones, lecturer and discussion leader. 

The program is being planned through the Paren 
Education Programs Office, Adult Division, Frances 
Miller, Director. 



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• CITY COLLEGE DIRECTOR SELECTED 

Joseph Amori, Director of Personnel Placement Serv 
ices, City College of San Francisco, has been selected h 
the American College Personnel Association to participat 
in the preparation of a monograph titled Exceptiona 
Practices in Junior College Student Personnel Program L 
in the United States. 

The monograph will include an overview of studen 
personnel programs in junior colleges, followed by a serie 
of chapters describing exceptional practices in selecte. 
areas of student personnel work. A summary chapter wi 
describe the trends and challenges in junior college stu y 



dent personnel programs. 

The selected areas of student personnel work include 
Counseling, Placement, Student Activities, Orientatior 
Articulation, Testing, Academic Advising, Registratio: 
and Records, Remedial and Developmental Program: 
Organization and Administration. 

Mr. Amori was selected by a panel of junior coi 
lege leaders in the United States who were appointed 
select outstanding junior college specialists who had e: 
ceptional practices. 



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CIVIC CENTER 
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DOCUMENTS 

NOV 4 $68 



NEWSLETTER 



_ 



VOLUME 40 



<§> 



NOVEMBER 4, 1968 



NUMBER 10 



Project SEED Positions Open 

"j Personnel Services is now accepting applications for 
tyhree certificated positions in the Southeast Educational 
Development Project (Project SEED). 

These positions are Supervisor, Education ; Curriculum 
Assistant and Evaluator ; and Guiding Teacher. 
Supervisor, Education, will be responsible for the plan- 
ing, coordination, and direction of the instructional 
al1 irogram. The Administration Credential and the Mas- 
M er's degree are required for this position. The annual 
alary will be equivalent to that of a Supervisor AA 
vhich begins at $17,870. 
The Curriculum Assistant and Evaluator will identify 
"find evaluate programs. The Administration or Super- 
vision Credential is required for this position. The an- 
imal salary will be equivalent to that of an Elementary 
t» School Principal which begins at $14,825. 

The Guiding Teacher will assist and guide teachers in 
(Continued on Page 2) 



U James Lick 



)ilingual Program Highlighted 




^ >s part of James Lick Junior High School's continuous program 
) improve school-community relations, the school's PTA re- 
ently sponsored an evening program, "Spanish Bilingual Educa- 
on in Action," presented by the teachers and student in the 
ilingual classes. Approximately 400 parents attended the event 
hich featured Latin music played by the school band and a 
sries of scenes depicting Columbus' arrival at the Spanish court 
f King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella. (See photograph above.) 
art of the program also included simulated classroom demon- 
rations showing how science and social studies are taught in the 
ilingual program. Guests included State Senator Milton Marks, 
r. Edward Goldman, Central Office, and representatives of the 
lission District community. 



Causes and Cures 

Birth Defects Conference Set 
November 16 at City College 

A conference on "Birth Defects — Causes, Preventives, 
and Cures" will be held Saturday, November 16, from 
9 a.m. to 11 :45 a.m. in the Creative Arts Building Audi- 
torium of City College of San Francisco. 

The conference will feature a distinguished profession- 
al panel which will present the following program and 
conduct open discussions on birth defects: 

"Genetics and Birth Defects and Drug Usage" — 
Charles J. Epstein, M.D., Associate Professor of Pedi- 
atrics and Medical Director March of Dimes Birth De- 
fects Center, U.C. Medical Center; 

"Preparing for Parenthood" — Howard Jacobson, 
M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 
U.C. Medical Center; 

"New Hope for Birth Defects Babies" — Jerome Med- 
nick, M.D., Pediatric Neurologist, Medical Director 
March of Dimes Birth Defects Center, Children's Hospi- 
tal of San Francisco; 

"Health Career Opportunities" — Jules Fraden, Dean 
of Instruction,- City College of San Francisco. 

The program is designed to be of interest to District 
teachers, and teachers attending this conference may re- 
ceive credit for three hours attendance applicable to an 
in-service course in health and family life education to be 
held during the spring semester, 1969. Attendance cards 
may be procured at the conference from Dr. Frances 
Todd, teacher-specialist. No preregistration is necessary. 

The conference is being presented by the San Francisco 
Chapter of the March of Dimes in cooperation with the 
San Francisco Unified School District, Department of 
Education, Archdiocese of San Francisco, City College of 
San Francisco, and the San Francisco Second District 
Parent-Teachers Association. 



• DR. MENNINGER VISITS SCHOOL 

Dr. Roy Menninger, president of the Menninger Foun- 
dation, recently visited E. R. Taylor School while in San 
Francisco to address the Commonwealth Club. 

Dr. Menninger has maintained a strong interest in 
schools since his work as director of the Foundation's 
Division of School Mental Health. Four SFUSD person- 
nel have served as consultants to this division: Oscar 
Galeno, Principal of E. R. Taylor School; Dr. Lane De 
Lara, Principal of Francisco Junior High School; Mayme 
Chinn, Compensatory Division; J. A. Perino, Principal, 
Samuel Gompers High School. 



NEWSLETTER 



November 4, 196 



At Spring Valley 



Survival Demonstration Scores 




A highly informative introduction to the year's science program 
at Spring Valley School was condutced recently when Fred Rod- 
gers, 4th grade teacher, presented an auditorium program on 
"Survival." The one-man, two-hour demonstration included tape 
recordings from a jet fighter, detailed explanation of flying gear, 
bail-out equipment, survival materials, projected photographs, 
and a motion picture. Mr. Rodgers is an officer in the Air Force 
Reserve and brought in a truck-load of equipment from Hamilton 
Air Force Base to use in his demonstration. Highlights of the 
program were the display and explanation of survival equipment 
(see photograph), the opening of a parachute, the inflation of a 
life raft on stage, and Mr. Rodgers' donning of flight suits and 
equipment. Spring Valley's principal is Elizabeth Hall. 

. . . Project SEED Seeks Applicants 

(Continued from Page 1) 
instructional experimentation. The salary will be that 
from the Basic Single Salary Schedule for Teachers. 

A more complete description of each of these positions 
has been sent to each school for posting. Application 
forms are available at the office of Personnel Services, 
Room 116, 135 Van Ness Avenue. Applications will be 
received until November 15, 1968. 

• CEC TO MEET NOVEMBER 13 

The San Francisco Chapter of the Council for Excep- 
tional Children will hold a general meeting Wednesday, 
November 13, at 4 p.m. in the Administration Building, 
Education 101, City College of San Francisco. 

Mrs. Mimi Foord, specialist for the educationally han- 
dicapped, will discuss "Language Development in Re- 
lation to Reading." 

• ACE ANNOUNCES NOVEMBER PROGRAM 

The San Francisco Association for Childhood Educa- 
tion invites all interested teachers to attend a program 
entitled "Adventures in Literature for Young People." 

The program will be held in cooperation with the ele- 
mentary school librarians on Tuesday, November 19, at 
3:45 p.m. at Grattan School. 



| Family Life Program for Parents 

A program for parents of pre-teenagers and young adc 
lescents dealing with "The Transition from Childhoo' 
to Puberty" will be held from 7 : 30 to 9 : 30 p.m. on Tues 
day, November 19, at Raphael Weill School, 1501 O'Fai 
rell Street. 

It is one of a number of similar evening program 
planned throughout the school year to acquaint parent 
with the District's revised Health and Family Life Edu 
cation curriculum. 

Herbert Vanderhoort, M.D., Psychiatrist and Behavi 
oral Scientist, and Mary Malloy, M.D., Pediatrician, wi 
present an outstanding program open to all adults fre 
of charge. 

The parent orientation .meeting is. concerned with 
small part of the total health program, namely, the edu 
cation of pre-teenagers about the biological changes the 
are experiencing as they grow into reproductive maturity 

Such instruction is intended to supplement that give: 
in the home and is not mandatory. A child may be e> 
cused from this part of the instructional program upo 
his parents' request. 

The doctors will discuss home and school instructio 
about sex and reproduction and will answer questions o 
human maturation. Two motion pictures will be shown 
Boy to Man and Girl to Woman. These films are recon 
mended by medical and educational specialists as suitabl 
instructional aids for children nearing puberty and earl 
adolescence. 

On November 27, the doctors will visit Raphael We 
School to assist resource teachers and boys and girls : 
the 6th grade with a part of the instructional program i 
health and science which includes biological maturation 

The November 19 evening program is for adults on! 
Parents who may wish to form study groups will be ei 
couraged to contact the PTA unit president or educatio 
chairman. The Adult Education Office will provide pn 
fessional leadership for the parent education courses. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 40, No. 10 



November 4, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Administrative Assistant, 
Educational Information 



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NEWSLETTER 



, Resolution Adopted 

[J I 

Board of Supervisors Support 
School Tax Measure on Ballot 

;; i! (This is the fifth in a series of information articles for 
school personnel relative to Proposition "I," the school 
A\tax limit increase measure.) 

. j On October 14, 1968, the Board of Supervisors of the 
' "City and County of San Francisco adopted the following 
| resolution: 

''^Urging an "aye" vote on local Proposition "I" on the 
('November 5, 1968 ballot which by increasing the San 
| Francisco Unified School District maximum tax rate 
will assure continuance of essential school programs. 

Resolution No. 679-68 
.1 WHEREAS, At the election to be held on November 
.5, 1968, the voters of San Francisco will be called upon 
. Jto cast their ballots on local Proposition "I" which is a 
'['proposed increase of ninety-eight cents in the maximum 
lltax rate on each $100 assessed valuation within the San 
''] Francisco Unified School District, commencing July 1, 
1969, to produce additional revenues which are to be 
C3l used for local kindergarten, elementary, high school and 
61 junior college purposes; and 

*| WHEREAS, Proposition "I" commends itself to all 
'- who are genuinely interested in maintaining and advanc- 
ing the scholastic standards and related activities in the 
:i! :San Francisco public school system, and approval of 
: Proposition "I" will enable the San Francisco Unified 
H School District to continue with its current innovative 
;U school programs and progress to even better programs in 
ilthe near future; and 

d: WHEREAS, In the absence of the additional revenues 
i contemplated by Proposition "I", the School District is 
. ,j of the opinion that most of its new programs of necessity 
■Lvill be eliminated to the obvious detriment of the chil- 
,\ dren who are directly affected and to the entire commun- 
ity; and 
J, WHEREAS, Proposition "I" has generated widespread 
' support among the public-spirited and civic-minded or- 
ganizations throughout the City, including that of the 
I League of Women Voters of San Francisco which has 
formed a citizens' committee to generate the whole-heart- 
j&d support which Proposition "I" justifies; now, there- 
" j:ore, be it 

' RESOLVED, That the Board of Supervisors of the 
ail pity and County of San Francisco do hereby endorse 
I, without reservation Proposition "I" on the November 5, 
['1968 ballot which will assure maintenance and advance- 
. ! nent of various essential programs within the San Fran- 
kisco school system, and do hereby commend an "aye" 
vote thereon to all San Francisco voters. 
j I hereby certify that the foregoing resolution was 
adopted by the Board of Supervisors of the City and 
JHounty of San Francisco at its meeting of Oct. 14, 1968. 

ROBERT J. DOLAN, Clerk 
Approved: Oct. 18, 1968 

JOSEPH L. ALIOTO, Mayor 



Dental Plan Cards Are Due 

All employees of the San Francisco Unified 
School District (certificated and classified) who are 
members of the San Francisco Employees Retire- 
ment System and all long-term substitutes are noti- 
fied that the prepaid dental plan with the California 
Dental Service, Group Number 652, became effec- 
tive November 1, 1968. 

In order that employees' dependents are covered 
effective November 1, it is necessary for each em- 
ployee to complete a "green" California Dental 
Service Membership Enrollment Card, listing 
spouse and all children who are under the age of 19 
(23 if a student) residing in the employee's home 
and who are dependent upon the employee for sup- 
port. 

The completed cards are to be returned to the 
employee's principal or building supervisor, who 
will forward the forms no later than November 8 
to the Fiscal Office, Room 314, 135 Van Ness Av- 
enue. 

Delay in receiving a list of the employee's de- 
pendents will result in a delay of dental coverage. 
Forms received by November 10, will qualify for 
coverage effective November 1. 



At Bessie Carmichael 



Efforts to Improve Math Skills 




Mathematics with the use of Cuisenaire rods is being taught in 
the third grade at Bessie Carmichael School, utilizing the talents 
of James T. Rodman, Principal of Treasure Island School (on the 
left). Mr. Rodman spends three mornings a week working with 
Mrs. Leona Williams, third grade teacher, in an effort to improve 
the mathematics skills of children in this "target area" school. 
Cuisenaire rods and prepared mathematics tapes are being used 
in the program, and the California Basic Skills Test is being 
given for evaluation purposes. Both Sidney Trager, Bessie Car- 
michael Principal (center), and Mrs. Williams (right) are most 
enthsiastic about the interest and response of the class to the 
program. 



NEWSLETTER 



November i, 1968 



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Announcements 



• GUIDED TOURS AT MUSEUM 

The Docent Council of the de Young Museum, spon- 
sored by the Junior League of San Francisco, is offering 
teachers and students of grades 4 through 1 2 an unusual 
opportunity to participate in an expanded program of 
guided tours. 

Tours can ge arranged on the following topics: 
Western Art — including 

( 1 ) Ancient World — Egypt, Greece and Rome 

(2) Masterpieces of European Art — Middle Ages, 
Renaissance, Baroque 

(3) American Painting and Furniture 

(4) Period Rooms — Furnished rooms in appropriate 
historical settings. 

Oriental Art — including 

Arts of China, Japan, India and South East Asia. 

A special in-school program is available which in- 
volves one visit to the school and one to the museum. 
Docents visit the classroom one week prior to the mu- 
seum trip. By means of slides and discussion, they famil- 
iarize the students with the objects they will see and give 
general background information. The same docent be- 
comes the gallery guide, meeting the class at the 
museum. 

Requests for Docent In-School visits should be made 
by telephoning the Docent Council Office, M. H. de 
Young Memorial Museum at 387-5922. Tours are offer- 
ed Monday through Friday between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. 
(approximately 45 minutes in length). Tours are to be 
scheduled at least two weeks in advance of museum visit. 
Foreign language tours can be arranged. 

Reports from teachers taking advantage of this fine 
service indicate that it has enriched their classroom 
program. 

• ART TEACHERS TO DISPLAY WORK 

An art show displaying the works of the San Francisco 
Teachers of Art will be featured at the Fox Plaza during 
the month of November. 

The show may be viewed on weekdays from 1 1 a.m. to 
3 p.m. and on weekends from 1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

A reception, inaugurating the opening of the show, was 
held this past Sunday afternoon at the Fox Plaza. All 
interested teachers are encouraged to view the show of 
work by their colleagues. 



• FIELD LIBRARIANS TO MEET 

The Field Librarians of San Francisco will meet at 4 
p.m., Thursday, November 21, at Polytechnic High 
School, 701 Frederick Street. All elementary, junior, and 
senior high librarians are invited to attend. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Edith E. Pence 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, November 12, 1968, 7:30 p.m., Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



• ENGLISH TEACHERS PLAN MEETING 

The regional meeting of the Central California Coun- 
cil of Teachers of English will be held Saturday, Novem- 
ber 16, at Contra Costa College, San Pablo, with registra- 
tion starting at 8 : 30 a.m. 

The over-all theme of the meeting is "English Power: 
New Ways of Seeing." The $1.50 registration fee and 
$1.50 luncheon cost should be mailed to the following 
address by November 5 : Registration Chairman, CCCTE 
Regional Meeting, Contra Costa College, 2600 Mission 
Bell Drive, San Pablo 94806. 



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• LUNCHEON FOR ARMOND DeMARTINI 

A retirement luncheon honoring Armond DeMartini 



former Principal of Marina Junior High School, will be 
held at Rocca's Restaurant, 555 Golden Gate Avenue 
Tuesday, November 26, at 12 noon. Cost is $4, and the 
luncheon choice is chicken or pot roast. Reservation; 
may be made by contacting Mrs. Dorothy Burns at 863 
4680, Extensions 380-381 






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• DEPARTMENT HEADS TO MEET 

The Department Heads Association will meet 
Thursday, November 7, at 2:45 p.m. in the teachers 
cafeteria at Abraham Lincoln High School. 



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PHOTOCOPY PRICE INCORRECTLY QUOTED 

The article in the October 28 issue of the News- 
letter relating to the A. B. Dick Photocopy Plan 
incorrectly reflected the cost per copy at $0,471. 
This should have been $0.0471, or less than 5 cents 
per copy. 



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iSAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 



NOV 1 2 1968 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 40 



NOVEMBER 11, 1968 



NUMBER 11 



Meeting with Airlines 



Exemplary Vocational Programs Discussed 



An exploratory meeting to consider the subject of 
^aircraft vocational training in light of recent amend- 
ments to the Vocational Education Act of 1963 was held 
;at the School District offices this week. 

Representatives from major airlines, the Human 
Rights Commission, the Bay Area Urban League, and 
the Schol Department exchanged information and ideas 
■ m relative to cooperative support in the identification, de- 
sign, and implementation of possible future programs. 

Mrs. Jane Mills, Technical and Vocational Education, 
™ State Department of Education, explained that Congress 
has recommended authorization for some $222 million 
to be spent for the development of exemplary programs 
during the next four years as part of the 1968 VEA 
t (Amendments. 

Mr. James Dierke, Assistant Superintendent, Adult 
and Occupational Education, stressed the need to de- 
elop plans for exemplary programs now so that appli- 
cations for funds under the VEA could be submitted in 
the near future. 

It was suggested that consideration be given to the 
development of programs to train young people at entry 
evel in a variety of jobs using facilities at the San 
jFrancisco International Airport. It was pointed out that 
— there is no room space available at John O'Connell Vo- 
cational High School to expand the present aircraft 
training courses currently being offered. 

Mr. Alvan Waltz, Supervisor, Trade and Technical 
Education, described the success of an experimental 
;ight-week training program for disadvantaged minority 
youths to prepare them for employment as ramp service 
attendants which was held at the San Francisco airport 
luring the last summer school vacation period. 

Because of the need to match skills with demands, it 
•vas suggested that the program would be designed as an 
xemplary program involving the cooperative effort of 
ducation, business, and the airline industry. 

Members present agreed that a study of the employ- 
ment needs of all airlines using the airport would be 
lelpful in determining the kinds of training programs 
which would be most desirable. The necessity of estab- 
ishing a well-defined program under the 1968 amend- 
ments to the 1963 VEA provisions and submitting it to 
he State Department of Education as soon as possible 
was emphasized. 

Airline representatives attending the meeting included 
[;; U. Lisec and Glen Clark, United Airlines; Wyatt 
Wisher, Pan American; Ken Larson and Bill Company, 




Alvan Waltz, Supervisor, Trade and Technical Education (right), 
is seen discussing the District's summer program at the San 
Francisco International Airport. Members of the airlines indus- 
try. Human Rights Commission, Urban League, and the SFUSD 
met recently to explore the possibilities of developing future 
exemplary programs with the airlines. Pictured (left to right) are 
Cornelius Wall, Human Rights Commission; James Dierke, As- 
sistant Superintendent, Adult and Occupational Education; Mrs. 
Jane Mills, State Department of Education; and Mr. Waltz. 



Air West; Dale Edwards, Western Airlines; and Carl 
Rogestsky, P.S.A. 

Also participating were Cornelius Wall and Herman 
Bossano, Human Rights Commission; Castrell Akrie, Ur- 
ban League; Al Price, Neighborhood Youth Corps; Nor- 
bert V. Deggendorfer, Coordinator, Occupational Prep- 
aration; Bryant Lane, Supervisor, Occupational Prepar- 
ation; Ray Hernandez, State Department of Education; 
Mervyn Murphy, staff member for the PACE Center; 
and Raymond E. Kohtz, Educational Information. 



Proposition T Victory Hailed 

Proposition "I," the school tax limit increase 
measure, won approval of San Francisco voters by 
a 124,316 yes count to a 104521 no vote in the 
November 5 election. Only a simple majority vote 
was necessary. 

The 98-cent increase in the school tax limit will 
make it possible to continue current programs 
aimed at providing quality education for all public 
school students and to move ahead with proposed 
plans to meet the educational needs of the city's 
diversified population. 



NEWSLETTER 



November 11, 1968 



'America Has a Good Thing Going 



American Education Week Programs Set 



The San Francisco Unified School District is joining 
with schools throughout the nation in observing Ameri- 
can Education Week, November 10 - 16. 

The theme this year is "America Has a Good Thing 
Going ... Its Schools." The annual event calls attention 
to the significance of the American educational system 
and helps focus the nation's attention on the successes 
and achievements of the schools. 

A number of District schools have contacted the Cen- 
tral Office indicating that they have planned special 
activities to call attention to their programs during the 
week. They include the following: 

Alamo — November 14, 9:15 a.m. — Auditorium pro- 
gram featuring students of the 4th, 5th, and 6th grades. 
Special music presentation under the direction of Mrs. 
Janice Soderberg, Music Specialist. 

Bret Harte — November 7, 7:30 p.m. — Auditorium 
program featuring Municipal Judge Joseph Kennedy as 
guest speaker. Presentation by school's Glee Club, di- 
rected by Mrs. Rhoda Keyson. Meetings with parents 
and teachers. , 

Columbus — November 13, 7:30 p.m. — Auditorium 
PTA meeting featuring Eugene Huber, teacher specialist 



At Lawton School 



Indian, Eskimo Cultures Studied 




Helen Zuelzke, 6th grade teacher at Lawton Elementary School, 
is seen showing members of her class, Dyantha Burton, Mary 
Ann Drocco, Susan Ayanian, and George Leeds, a Mitla Rose 
patterned serape. Miss Zuelzke shared her experiences of teach- 
ing Indian children of the Tsuque tribe from the Santa Fe - New 
Mexico area, with her students. Her collection of Indian jewelry 
and rugs added greatly to the school's over-all study of Eskimo 
and Indian cultures which started last year with an art apprecia- 
tion program conducted by Verla Leonard, Art Supervisor, Addi- 
tional programs have included a study of art and sculpture of 
Arctic Eskimos presented by Lilly Weil Jaffe, collector and lec- 
turer, and an ethnological overview of the American Indian pre- 
sented by Dr. William Sanborn, Director, Instructional Materials. 
The primary grade teachers are planning a literature program 
centered around the Eskimo and Indian cultures. Posters, stories, 
educational bulletin board, prints, and carvings, have added 
greatly to the children's appreciation of the cultures under study, 
according to Mrs. Marion Heimsoth, Lawton Principal. 



in health education, speaking on "Use of Narcotics by 
Young Children." 

Douglas — November 13, 7 to 10 p.m. — Open House 
program with the school's newly reorganized library 
being featured. Special recognition by PTA to school 
personnel responsible for modernizing the library. 

Emerson — Special showing of the sound filmstrip 
series Black History by Dr. Price Cobbs to parents. (Date 
to be announced.) 

Farragut — Initiation of intensive parent-teacher con- 
ference program to run over a two-week period. 

Francis Scott Key — Thursday, November 14, 7 to 9 
p.m. — "Parents Back-to-School Night," followed by 
PTA meeting and refreshments in the auditorium. 

Spring Valley — Wednesday, November 13, 9 a.m. to 
3 p.m. — Open House and classroom visitations, PTA| 
meeting at 1 p.m.; Friday, November 15, 10:10 a.m 
student body assembly. 

Sunnyside — Wednesday, November 13, morning] 
hours — Open House and classroom visitations; noon — 
PTA International Pot Luck Luncheon for parents and 
teachers; afternoon — PTA meeting featuring Dr. 
Frances Todd discussing Family Life Education; all 
week — PTA Book Fair in the school library. 

Marina — Thursday, November 14, 6:30 p.m. — Open 
House program with teachers available to meet with 
parents. PTA will serve refreshments. 

Portola — Wednesday, November 13, 7:30 p.m. 
Annual Open House Program featuring a band concert 
under the direction of Douglas Pleasure. Meetings with 
parents and teachers will be conducted. 

Mission — Student made poster display throughout 
the school in honor of American Education Week. Spe 
cial second floor showcase exhibit to commemorate the 
event. Extended home room guidance sessions to discuss 
the significance of American public education. 

John O'Connell — Daily tours of the school plant and 
classrooms from 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NEWSLETTER 



Vol. 40, No. 11 



November 11, 1968 



135 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 94102 

Published each Monday during the school year 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Edward Kemmitt, President 
Laurel Glass, Ph.D. Zuretti L. Goosby, D.D.S. 
Vice President Mrs. Ernest R. Lilienthal 

Reynold H. Colvin Alan H. Nichols 

Adolfo de Urioste 

Dr. Robert E. Jenkins 
Superintendent of Schools 

Hugh E. Wire, Administrative Assistant, 
Educational Information 



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NEWSLETTER 



Equipment Installed 



City College Receives Cable TV 




}r. Louis G. Conlan, President of City College of San Francisco 
left), and James Keller, Vice President of Television Signal Cor- 
poration, are viewed checking the newly installed cable closed 
:ircuit television reception which was recently incorporated at 
he college. 

City College of San Francisco became the first District 
ichool to be equipped with Cable TV as the installation 
if necessary equipment was completed recently. 

Dr. Louis G. Conlan, President of the College, James 
teller, Vice President of Television Signal Corporation, 
md Henry Leff, Television Department Head, partici- 
)ated in official acceptance ceremonies in the college's 
elevision control room. 

The installation of cable closed circuit television at 
jity College was completed in two days at an estimated 
ost of close to $5,000, all of which was paid by Tele- 
ision Signal Corporation. 

Cable TV will now enable the college to add stations 

6, 8, 10, 11, 12 and 13, to its reception. Over Master 
\ntenna Television, stations 2, 4, 5, 7 and 9 are received. 

Classroom receivers will not be capable of receiving 
"able TV, but if a specific program on Cable TV were 
esired for a special classroom showing this could be ac- 
omplished by remodulating to one of the closed circuit 
hannels 11 or 13. 



» INDUSTRIAL ARTS ASSOCIATION WORKSHOP 

The teachers of the San Francisco Industrial Arts As- 
jciation have organized a workshop to be held Saturday, 
Fovember 16, at A. P. Giannini Junior High School 

om 9 a.m. to 12 noon. 

Demonstrations of work with new materials and pro- 

t;sses by teachers and students will highlight the pro- 
ram. 
Representatives from industry will be on hand to ex- 
ibit and demonstrate tools and instructional aids in- 
uding materials and preparation techniques for teacher 
instruction of these aids. 



College Drama Series Readied 

The fall drama series at City College of San Francisco 
will get off to an auspicious start Wednesday, November 
13, when Royal Hunt of the Sun is presented at 8 p.m. 
in the College Theater. 

First performed in London only five years ago, this 
spectacle-drama by Peter Shaffer, deals with the con- 
frontation between Atahuallpa, ruler of the Inca Empire, 
and Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistadore. 

Royal Hunt of the Sun employs a large cast of 35. Two 
members of the faculty take leading roles : John Cochran 
and James Haran. The remaining nearly all-male cast 
is made up of City College students. 

Paul Crowley has designed the sets, and the 75 colorful 
costumes, both Inca and 16th Century Spanish, have 
been designed by Margrit Affolter. Choreography is by 
Lene Johnson. Special effects and music are by Robert 
Kuykendahl. 

The presentation will be performed eight nights, Wed- 
nesday through Saturday, November 13 - 16 and 20 - 23. 
The College Theater is located on Phelan Avenue be- 
tween Ocean and Judson. Tickets are $1.25 and seats are 
not reserved. 

Additional information may be secured by calling 587- 
7272, Extension 232. 



Voters Confirm Board Appointee 

The voters of San 
Francisco confirmed 
Mayor Joseph L. Ali- 
oto's nomination of 
David J. Sanchez, Jr., 
to the San Francisco 
Board of Education 
in the November 5 
election. Mr. Sanchez 
will assume his first 
five-year term in Jan- 
uary 1969. 

Mr. Sanchez will 
replace Board Com- 
missioner Aldolfo de 
Urioste, whose third 
five - year term will 
end this year. 
The new Board member is currently studying for his 
doctorate at the University of California in Berkeley. He 
is a former Portola Junior High School teacher and has 
done community relations work for the School District 
since 1963. 

Mr. Sanchez is the first Latin-American in the city's 
history to serve on the Board. In addition, he is the 
youngest member ever appointed. (He is 29.) 

He is a San Jose State College graduate, having re- 
ceived his BA degree in 1963, followed by his MA degree 
from San Jose in 1965. 

Mr. Sanchez's appointment was approved by a 159,870 
yes vote to a 39,210 no vote. 




David J. Sanchez, Jr. 



NEWSLETTER 



November 11, 1968 



Announcements 



• JAPANESE-AMERICAN TEACHER PROGRAM 

Some 40 teachers from Japan and ten interpreters are 
being hosted by the School District from November 4 
through 12 as part of the 1968 Japanese-American 
Teacher Program which is jointly administered by the 
Experiment in International Living and the Institute of 
International Education and funded by a Ford Founda- 
tion grant. 

Members of the group were greeted by Superintendent 
Robert E. Jenkins on Monday, November 4, as part of an 
orientation-day program conducted at the Central Office. 

The remainder of the guests' time will be spent in 
visiting District schools before their departure to Hono- 
lulu, Hawaii, on November 13. 

Present at the welcoming ceremonies were Professor 
George Z. F. Bereday of Columbia University, New York, 
Director of the Japanese- American Teacher Program; 
Professor Shigeo Masui, adviser to the group; and Bar- 
bara Symmes, Assistant Director of the program. 

Central Office staff members who spoke to the visiting 
teachers included Dr. Edward D. Goldman, Associate 
Superintendent, School Operational Services; Isadore 
Pivnick, Assistant Superintendent, Innovative Planning; 
Irving Breyer, Legal Adviser; Milton Reiterman, Assist- 
ant Superintendent, Personnel Services; Mrs. Mary W. 
Byrd, Supervisor, Personnel Services ; Agatha Hogan, Su- 
pervisor, Elementary Education; and George Moscone, 
Secondary Education. 

The teachers broke up into small discussion groups in 
the afternoon to explore their particular fields of interest. 

The visitors arrived in the United States on September 
16, 1968, and have visited school systems in Vermont, 
Massachusetts, New York, Washington D.C., and have 
spent three weeks in extended home-stays in towns in the 
Midwest. 



TIME SHEET PICKUP 

November time sheets for teachers will be picked 
up at the schools at 8:30 a.m. on December 2, 
1968, for senior, junior, and elementary teachers. 

The adult schools will deliver their part-time 
teachers' time sheets on November 25 and their 
full-time teachers' time sheets on December 2 at 
9 a.m. 

Time sheets for clerks and janitors for all schools, 
including the adult schools, for November 16 
through November 30 will be picked up at the 
schools at 8:30 a.m. on November 25, 1968. 

Sheets are to be completed and signed by the 
deadline dates above to enable delivery service to 
keep the schedule 

The number of days in November for principals 
and assistant principals is 18; the number of days 
for teachers is 18. 



• ELEMENTARY BOOK COMMITTEE TO MEET 

The Elementary Book Committee will meet at 1:30 
p.m. on Wednesday, November 13, in Room 10, Central 
Office, 170 Fell Street. 



THE BOARD WILL MEET: 

Tuesday, November 12, 1968, 7:30 p.m., Regular 
meeting, 170 Fell Street. 



APPLICATIONS FOR LIFE DIPLOMAS 

All applications for life diplomas received in 
Personnel Services after November 15, 1968, must 
carry a $20 fee. Life diplomas must be recom- 
mended by the Superintendent of Schools and ap- 
proved by the Board of Education. 

Since the State Department of Education uses 
the Board meeting date as the date of application 
for life diplomas, all such applications must go 
through the minutes of the last meeting of Novem- 
ber. 

Because of the research required for each appli- 
cation, Personnel Services must have life diploma 
applications in the office by November 15, 1968, 
for consideration at the meeting of November 26, 
1968. 



• CUSTODIAL VACANCIES 

Notice is given of the following custodial vacancies: 
2704 — School Custodian, Female — Parkside anc 
Redding Elementary and Everett Junior High. 

2724 — School Custodian, Male — Paul Revere Ele 
mentary, Francisco and Visitacion Valley Junior Highs 
and Mission High 

2727 — School Custodian, Foreman — City Collegf 
(nights). 

w- 



CREDENTIAL FEES TO INCREASE 

Beginning December 1, 1968, the fee for creden- 
tials, life diplomas, renewals, and evaluations for 
credentials will be $20. Any applications for cre- 
dentials received in Personnel Services after No- 
vember 30, 1968, must be accompanied by the new 
$20 fee. 



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PUBLIC LIBRARY 



NEWSLETTER 



VOLUME 40 



© 



NOVEMBER 18, 1968 



NUMBER 12 



Proposition "I" Passes 



School Tax Limit Measure Wins Approval 



The San Francisco Unified School District's efforts to 
! continuously improve the quality of education for public 
school students were given strong support by a majority 
of voters in the November 5 election with the passage of 
Proposition "I." 

The school tax limit increase measure provides for a 
I change in the present statutory limit of $2.55 for each 
$100 assessed valuation to a permissive limit of $3.53. 

The 98-cent increase was approved by 55 percent of 
I those citizens casting votes and will now make it possible 
!for the School District to continue its current programs 
to achieve urban excellence and to develop proposed 
I plans to meet the urgent needs of the city's diverse school 
! population. 

The District's programs to achieve quality and equality 
i in education will receive added impetus as a result of the 
[support given the tax limit increase. 

One of the most significant of these is the extensive 
[program to reduce class size. The District will now be 
: able to proceed with its initial plan to employ 300 addi- 
tional teachers a year for three years. 

The added staff will help assure smaller classes which 
result in better teaching and learning, more individual 
.attention for each student, increased emphasis on basic 
skills — reading, writing, and arithmetic, and greater 
opportunity for teachers to prepare for their classes, to 
correct assignments, and to interpret the results of as- 
signments to students. 

It will also assure continuance of a variety of special 
programs for special needs, notably, those affecting im- 
provement in reading, bilingual instruction, and in- 
creased attention to gifted students. 

It will now be possible to further plans to improve 
'school library services, to continue broadened summer 
'school programs, to provide auxiliary personnel to assist 
ij classroom teachers, to maintain a highly effective adult 
^educational program, to pursue the expansion of occu- 
pational preparation training, to achieve better mainten- 
ance of school buildings, grounds, and equipment, and to 
assure availability of necessary supplies and supplement- 
al ary textbooks. 

It is projected that the entire San Francisco commun- 
ity will benefit from the passage of Proposition "I" in 
that it will provide the kind of public education that will 
help stabilize the community by making it possible to 
compete with the suburbs in quality education. 




The smiles on the (aces of Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins, 
Benjamin Swig, and Mrs. Bruce Cowan, seen above as they board- 
ed a Proposition "I" cable car at Ulloa School on the day of the 
door-to-door campaign, were even broader the day after the 
election as the school tax limit increase measure was approved 
by a majority of San Francisco voters. Mr. Swig served as chair- 
man of the Citizens Committee for Proposition "I," and Mrs. 
Cowan was chairman of the Grass Roots Committee. 



The San Francisco business and industrial complex 
will be able to depend on a better trained supply of 
workers. Programs to reduce the number of drop-outs 
can be strengthened, thereby directly attacking the prob- 
lems of welfare, unemployment, delinquency, and crime. 

The unofficial vote tabulation relative to Proposition 
"I" showed 124,316 "yes" votes compared to 103,723 
"no" votes. 

Superintendent Robert E. Jenkins, on behalf of the 
Board of Education, has extended sincere thanks to the 
many citizens and school staff members who worked so 
successfully on Proposition "I" and to the newspapers, 
television, and radio for their strong support. 

Dr. Jenkins also expressed deep appreciation to the 
Citizens Committee and Chairman Benjamin Swig; to 
the Grass Roots Committee and Mrs. Ruth Cowan, 
Chairman; and to Dr. Louis Conlan, President of City 
College of San Francisco, who coordinated the school 
staff efforts. 



NEWSLETTER 



November 18, 1968 •<> 




Visit Completed 

Schools Host Japanese Teachers 

The members of the 
1968 Japanese - Am- 
erican Teacher Pro- 
gram completed their 
study of the San 
Francisco Unified 
School District last 
week and departed 
on November 13 for 
Hawaii on their re- 
turn home. The group 
of 40 teachers and 
ten interpreters spent 
Superintendent Robert E. J