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Full text of "The San Francisco directory for the year .."




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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

San Francisco Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/sanfranciscodire1871lang 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ill 



OCCIDENTAL 



INSURANC 




©® g^ir wMAwmm^Q, 






CASH CAPITAL, $300,000 GOLD COIN. 
CASH ASSETS, $500,000 " 






OFFICE, 436 CALIFORNIA STREET, opp. Merchants' Exchange. 



< »■» > 



Insure against loss or damage by Fire, on dwellings and all kinds of build- 
ings, merchandise, household furniture, and other personal property, on the most 

REASONABLE TERMS. 

Issue Foreign and Domestic, Open and Special Policies, on Cargoes, 
Freights, Treasure, Commissions and Profits. Also, Time, Voyage and Harbor 
Risks on Hulls. 



< »m» » 



ALL LOSSES PAID IN U. S. GOLD COIN.' 






DIREOTOHS : 



.1. A. DONOHOE, of Donohoe, Kellv & Co. 

JACOB SCHOLLE, of Scholle Bros." 

IRA P. RANKIN, of Goddard & Co. 

JOHN SIME, of John Sime & Co. 

M. B. CARPENTER, Merchant. 

JACOB GREENEBAUM, of Greenebaum Bros. 

J. Y. HALLOCK, late of J. Y. Hallock & Co. 

A. G. STILES, Pres't Occidental Insurance Co. 
BENJ. BREWSTER, late of Jennings & Brewster. 
J. BAUM, of J. Baum & Co. 

ISAAC HECHT, of Hecht Bros. & Co. 
JOSEPH SELLER, of Goldstein, Seller & Co. 
JOHN ANDERSON, Capitalist. 
J. H. BAIRD, Merchant. 
MICHAEL REESE, Capitalist. 
HENRY GREENBERG, Real Estate. 

B. ROTHSCHILD, Sec'y, 



N. VAN BERGEN, of John Van Bergen & Co. 

J. P. NEWMARK, Merchant. 

J. W. BRITTAN, of Brittan, Holbrook & Co. 

C. CHRISTIANSEN, of Auger, Christiansen & Co. 

JACOB C. JOHNSON, of J. C. Johnson & Co. , 

MARTIN SACHS, of L. & M. Sachs & Co. 

L. KLINE, of L. Kline & Co. 

A. GOLDSMITH, of Goldsmith Bros. 

JAMES THOMAS BOYD, Attorney-at-Law. 

A. D. MOORE, of Moore Bros. 

W. W. DODGE, of W. W. Dodge & Co. 

A. J. BOWIE, Phvsician. 

S. SILVERBERG,' of E. N. Fish & Co. 

CHARLES KOHLER, of Kohler & Frohling. 

J. J. WILLIAMS, Attomey-at-Law. 

C. H. SHERMAN, Merchant. 

A. G. STILES, I*res'L 



IV SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



MERCHAXTTS' MT7TT7iiL 
Mi^RIlsrE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

Of San Francisco. 



ORa^lSriZED ^PRIL 3, 1863. 



OFFICE, 

No. 406 CALIFORNIA ST., 



*2 M SP^_^ ,^ 1^ ^ ^v J% #^ 



LOSSES PAID PROMPTLY IN U. S. GOLD COIN. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

C. L. TAYLOR, JABEZ HOWES, 

F. ROEDING, A. L. TUBES, 

ISAAC E. DAVIS, C. ADOLPHE LOW, 

J. B. SCOTCHLER, W. J. ADAMS, 

A. M. SIMPSON, R. E. RAIMOND, 

JAMES IRVINE, JAMES P. FLINT, 
WILLIAM SCHOLLE. 

J. S. SCOTCSZiSIl, JABSZ SOT^EIS, 

President Vice-President. 

£. "W- BOUniTB, 

Secretary. 



This Company is engaged exclusively in Marine Insurance. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



PACIFIC OIL & LEAD WORKS. 



« »«^ > 



Capital Stock, - - - $600,000. 

• 1 » t 

Established for the manufacture of Linseed, Castor and other Oils, and of 
White Lead, Zinc and other Paints. AVorks are now in operation, and pre- 
pared to furnish Oils of first quality, and quantity sufficient for the supply of the 
Pacific Coast. Also, Oil Cakes and Meal in quantities required. 

Highest price paid for Flax Seed, delivered at the Company's Works, King 
Street, near Third. 

0FF1CE--3 and 5 Front Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Orders addressed to "Pacific Oil and Lead Works," will have immediate 
attention. 

President - - - - JOHN" BENSLEY, 

Vice President, - - - Jl.. B. BENCHLEY, 
Superintendent, - - B. P. BPUNNER. 

Secretary, - - - - SAM'L I. O. S^VEZEY. 



PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO. 



mwwAh m§m 



Established for the manufacture of Railroad and Merchant Iron. Every 
variety of Shafting, including all sizes of Steamboat Shafts, Cranks, Pistons, 
Connecting Rods, &c. Car and Locomotive Axles and Frames, and Ham- 
mered Iron of every description and size. 

3 AND 5 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO. will have immediate attention. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR SCRAP IRON. 

PRE SIDE J^T, ----- WM. ALVORD, 

VICE PRESIDENT L. B. BEJ^CELEY, 

SUPERIJVTEJ^DEJ^T, - - - B. P. BRUJ\rJ^ER, 
SECRETARY, SAM'L I. C. SWEZEY. 



VI 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 




^ifl'^ 



CA.LIFOR]SriA. 

ill' 




m 



D, 



Organized March 1st, 1854. 



Capital Stocl<, $2,500,000. 



Tlie folloiving are the Officers for the Years 1870-71. 

President B. M. HARTSHORNE ; Vice President, "W. H. TAYLOR ; Secretary, S. 0. PUTNAM ; 
Trustees B M. HARTSHORNE, W. H. TAYLOR, A. HAYWARD, W. C. RALSTOX, WM. 
ALVORD A. REDIN'GTON, LLOYD TEVIS, JOHN BENSLET and S. F. BUTTERWORTH. 
Agents— Sacramento, ALFRED REDINGTON; Marysville, C. H. KIMBALL; Red Bluff, SAMUEL 
JAYNES; Stockton, T. C. WALKER. 




Departure from. Broadivay Wharf^ 

CARRYING THE UNITED STATES MAILS. 

Steamer CAPITAL Capt. E. A. POOLE. 

Steamer YOSEMITE Capt. E. A. POOLE. 

Steamer CHRYSOPOLIS Capt. A. FOSTER. 

Steamer ANTELOPE Capt. JOHN K. BROWNE. 

Steamer JULIA Capt. W. BROMLEY. 

Steamer AMADOR Capt. CHAS. THORNE. 

ONE OF THE ABOVE STEAMERS WILL 

Leave every day, at four o'clock, P.M. 

(SUNDAYS EXCEPTED) FOE 

SAGRAIVIBl^rTO and STOCKTON^ 

Connecting with the Light-Draught Steamers for 

MARYSVILLE, COLUSA AND RED BLUFF. 

) ^ > 

For further particulars, apply at the OFFICE OF THE COMPANY, 

N. E. Cor. Jackson and Front Sts., San Francisco, 

B. M:. HA-XtTSHORNE, President. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Vll 



@E^H PAOIffl© 






DISPATCH STEAMERS REGULARLY TO THE FOLLOWING PLACES : 

NORTHKRIff ROUTS, 

Sitka, Victoria^ Portland^ Gardner City, Eureka, 
Trinidad and Crescent City. 



THZSRN ROITTZS, 

Santa Cruz, Monterey ^ San Simeon, Santa Bar- 
bara, San Luis Obispo, Los Angeles 
and San I>iego, 



MEXICAN ROUTE, 

STEAMER EVERY THIRTY DAYS. 

San Bias, Guayinas, JSIazatlan and La Baz, touching at 

Cape St, Lucas, 



HONOIaUIiU ROUTES 

STEAMER EVERY THIRTY DAYS. 

BConolulu, Auckland, Sydney and Melbourne, 



OFFICE, 217 SA.lSrSOM STREET. 

HOLLADAY & BRENHAM, Agents. 



Vlll SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 




EXPRESS AHB EXCH ANGE GO. 

CAPITAL, - - $5,000,000, 



No. 84 Broadway, New York. 

N.W. cor. California and Montgomery Sts., San Francisco. 



EXPRESS LINES 

TO ALL PARTS OF CALIFORNIA, NEVADA, UTAH, COLORADO, MONTANA, 

NEBRASKA, OREGON, WASHINGTON AND IDAHO TERRITORIES, 

BRITISH COLUMBIA, LOWER CALIFORNIA AND MEXICAN 

PORTS, NEW YORK, ATLANTIC STATES, EUROPE. 



BILLS OF EXOHAN&E AND TELEaEAPH TRANSFERS 

On New York, Boston, and Philadelphia, payable in the principal cities of the United States 
and Canada. Also, Bills on London, Dublin, and Paris. Letters of Credit 
issued on our New York House, exchangeable for Circular 
Letter, payable in all parts of Europe. 



COLLECTIONS AND COIVIMISSIONS 

Of all kinds executed, and General Express Business attended to promptly in all parts of the 
United States, Europe, and Canada. Orders for Passage furnished from Queens- 
town, London, Liverpool, Hamburg, and Havre to New York. Also, 
from New York to San Francisco — Overland or by Steamer. 

W. G. FARGO, President, "^ 

LLOYD TBVIS, Vice President, I New York. 

THEO. r. "WOOD, Secretary, C 

CALVIN GODDARD, Treasurer, J 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

Jf'O^^,^?^^^' I San Francisco. 
D. O. MILLS, > 

CHARLES E. McLANE, Supt Bank, San Francisco. 

J. J. VALENTINE, Gen'l Supt. Express, " 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. IX 



THE 

Bank of California, 

SA.N" FRANCISCO. 



« »»^ t 



a B ^^5^^®^l2)||)y)«, 



< »»» t 



D. O. MILLS, - - - President. 

W. C. RALSTON, - - - Cashier. 

AG^ENTS : 

In New York Messrs. LEES & WALLER. 

In Boston " TREMONT NATIONAL BANK. 

In London ORIENTAL BANK CORPORATION. 



< »« » > 



The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, Gold Hill, White Pine, and 
Correspondents at all the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the 
Pacific Coast. 



< »»» t 



LETTERS OF CREDIT ISSUED, 

Available for the purchase of Merchandise throughout the United States, Europe, 
India, China, Japan and Australia. 



< mmm > 



EICHANGE FOR SALE ON THE ATLANTIC CITIES. 



« mmw > 



DHA^TT DIRECT ON 

LONJyON, LBirSIC, 

D VBLINf FBANFORT- ON- MAIN, 

JPABIS, AUCKJLANI), 

ST. PETERSBURG, MELBOURNE, 

AMSTERDAM, YOKOHAMA, 

HAMBURG, SHANGHAE, 

BREMEN, HONGKONG, 

VIENNA, SYDNEY, 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



OH^CTJUj-A-R.. 



LONDON & SAN FRANCISCO BANE 

Incorporated under the Joint Stock Companies' Act of 1862, of Great Britain. 

SAW FRANCISCO OFFICE, No, 423 CALIFORNIA ST. 

London Office, 22 Old Sroad Street. J^ew York sigency, 53 Exchange S^ace. 



O.^MT.^L, - - - #5,000,000 

Of which $2,500,000 is fully paid up as present Capital, and will be increased as the growth of the business requires. 



DIRECTOBS. 

FREDERICK RODEWALD, Esq., Chairman. 

H. L. BISCHOFFSHEIM, Esq., (Messrs. BischoffsheimA Goldschmidt.) 

J. F. FLEMMICH, ESQ. (Messrs. F. Huth & Co.) 

E. H. GREEN, Esq. (Messrs. Russell & Sturgis. of Manila.) 

JULIUS MAY, Esq. (of San Francisco,) Frankfort-on-the-Main. 

J. S. MORGAN, Ei'Q. (Messrs. J. S. Morgan & Co.) 

BARON H. DE STERN, (Messrs. Stem Brothers.) 

RUDOLPH SULZBACH, Esq. (Messrs. Sulzbach Brothers) Frankfort-on-the-Main. 

Manager in London, R, D. Feehles, Fsq, 

Auditor, G. T. Srooking, JEsg. 

Manager in San Francisco, Milton S, Latham, Fsq. 

Assistant Jfanager, (San Francisco,) Camilo Martin, 
siccountant, (San Francisco,) Arthur Scriyener. 

London Bankers, THE LONDON JOINT STOCK BANK. 
London Offices of the Bank, 22 OLD BROAD STREET, E. C. 



The Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Business, in London and San Fran- 
cisco, and between said Cities and all parts of the world. . , ^ ,. 

The San Francisco Office is authoriKed to draw Bills of Exchange or issue Letters of Credit upon either of the 
undernamed Founders and Proprietors of the Bank, or (at the option of the buj-er) upon the following Houses, with 
whom the Bank has established credits, viz : 

LONDON The London Joint Stock Bank, No. 5 Princess Street. 

do Messrs. Bischoffsheim, Goldschmidt & Co. 

do Messrs. Fruhling & Goschen. 

do Messrs. Frederick Huth & Co. 

do Messrs. J. S. Morgan & Co. (successors to Messrs. Geo. 

Peabody & Co.) 
do Messrs. Stern Brothers. 

NEW YORK CITY Messrs. Dabney, Morgan & Co., 53 Exchange Place. 

PARIS Messrs. BischoflFsheim, Goldschmidt & Co. 

do Messrs. A. J. Stern & Co. 

FRANKFORT-ON-THE-MAIN Mr. Sigismund Sulzbach. 

do Mr. Jacob S. H. Stern. 

GERMANY The Bank of Saxe Meiningen. 

AMSTERDAM Banque de Credit and de Depot des Pays Bas. 

ANTWERP Messrs. Nottebohn Brothers. 

do Mr. P. B. BischofiFsheim. 

HAMBURG Messrs. John Berenberg, Gossler & Co. 

BERLIN Messrs. Morritz, Guterbock & Co. 

GENOA and NAPLES The Anglo-Italian Bank. 

VALPARAISO and LIMA Messrs. Fred. Huth, Gruning & Co. 

MANILA Messrs. Russell & Sturgis. 

CHINA and JAPAN.. Hongkong and Shanghae Banking Corporation. 

AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY and MEL- 
BOURNE Union Bank of Australia. 

IRELAND Provincial Bank of Ireland, and all its branches, viz. 

Di-.blin, Waterford, Youghal, 

Cork, Galway, Enniskillen, 

Limerick, Armagh, Monafihan, 

Clonmel, Athlone, Banbridge, 

J ondonderry, Colerainc, Ballymena, 

Sligo, Kilkenny, Parsonstown, 

AVcxford, Ballina, Cavan, 

Belfast, Tralee, Omagh, 

Special attention paid to selling California Securities in Europe, 

Collections, Purchases of Real Estate and Mining Shares, and Investments of all kinds in California. 

MILTON S. LATHAM, Manager. 

!_.._ - - - -^ - - . _ 



Dungannon, 


Kilrush, 


Templemore, 


liandon, 


Skibbereen, 


Carnck-on-Suir, 


Ennis, 


Enniscorthy, 


Carrick-on-Shannon, 


Ballyshannon, 


Fcrmoy, 


Clogheen, 


Strabane, 


Newry, 


Newcastle, Co. Limerick 


Dungarvan, 


Drogheda, 




Mallow, 


Ncnagh, 




Cootehill, 







ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, 




OF SAN FRANCISCO. 



CAPITAL STOCK, ONE MILLION DOLLAES, 



Office^ No. 421 California Street. 



This Company will transact all kinds of legitimate Banking business on the 
most favorable terms. 

Deposits received and accounts kept in Gold and Silver Coin, or National 
Currency, payable in kind. 

Exchange drawn on New York in Gold or Currency, avilable at par in any 
part of the United States, and Exchange furnished on Europe, India, China, etc., 
at lowest rates. 

Collections and Disbursements made at all accessible points, and proceeds 
remitted without delay. 

Interest allowed on Certificates of Deposit, Savings Accounts, Trust Funds, 
and on average daily balances of desirable check accounts. 

Money to loan on U. S. Bonds, State, City and County Bonds, Local Stocks, 
Staple Merchandise, Real Estate and other good securities. 

The Company will act as correspondent for Banks and Bankers, and as Agent 
in the transaction of all kinds of financial and trust business. 

Bonds, Stocks, Papers, Jewelry, Silverware, etc., kept on special deposit in its 
large fire and burglar proof vaults and safes, at moderate charges. 



PRESIDENT, 
CASHIER, 



HENRY H. HAIGHT, 
JOHN H. BAIRD, 
HKNllY BAKKGILHET, 
HENRY L. DAVIS, 
CHARLES M. PLUM, 
HENRY J. BOOTH, 
WM. BLACKWOOD, 



HENRY L. DAVIS. 
D. W. C. THOMPSON. 



TRIG STBBS 

JOHN CURREY, 
JACOB C. JOHNSON, 
JOHN O. ELDRIDGB, 
CHAS. J. DEERING, 
MOSES KOSENBAUM, 
S. HEYDENFELDT, 
HENllY C. LEE, 



WILLIAM H. SHARP, 
CHAS. W. HATHAWAY, 
SAMUEL CRIM, 

DONALD Mclennan, 

WALTER B. CUMMINttS, 
F. 8. WENSINGER. 



NEW YORK CORRESPONDENT, 



Xll SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



ITOHTS BRITISH 

MERCANTILE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 



p H « ^MWfWWW^^W^® 



fl^ 



Deposited in Oregon, according to Law, - - $50,000. 
Limit on Single Risks, 100,000. 



SAN FRANCISCO BANKERS, 



Branch Office, S.E cor. Sansom and California Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Insurances effected on the most favorable terms on Buildings of both BRICK 
and WOOD throughout the Pacific States and Territories, whether occupied as 
DWELLINGS, STORES OR WAREHOUSES, together with their contents. 
VESSELS IN PORT, with or without Cargoes, also insured. 

LOSSES PAID HERE IN GOLD COIN. 



TILLIIsrGH:A.ST BROTHERS, 

General Agents for the Pacific States and Territories. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Xlll 



THOS. H. SELBY & CO. 

Nos. 116 AND 118 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, 





Iron, 



r 



AND ALL KINDS OF 

PLUMBING GOODS, 

AND MANUFACTURE AT THE 

Cor, of Hoivard and First Streets, San Francisco, 
3Lji 3ES j£kL X> 3F^X 



Slieet lead, Drop Shot, &c. 

ALSO, PROPRIETORS OF THE 

SELBY LEAD k SILVER SMELTING WORKS, 

s-A-KT m-A.isrcisc o. 



OEUDE LEAD AND SILVEE BARS 



MAIN OFFICE, 116 and 118 CALIFORNIA STREET, 



XIV 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



THE PACIFIC IRON WORKS 




est-a.bXjISP3:eid iisr isso- 



EMBRACIXG 



MACHINE, BOILER, FORGING AND SMITHING, 

PATTERN AND WOOD WORK DEPARTMENTS, DRAWING AND LIBRARY ROOMS, &c. 

George W. Fogg, Superintendent 



IRA P. KANKIN. _^_ ALBERT P. BRAYTON. 

These 'R-oTks have now been in successful operation for the past twenty years, from a comparatively sm^^^^ 
beginning in the year 1850. its Increasing patronage has each year demanded enlarged facilities, until ourcstablisli 
ment in all its appointments, will compare favorably with that of any similar one in the country. „,,.„„„ „f „„ 

•iuriiatterns in variety and extent, are unsiirpassed ; embracing the latest improvements in all classes of ma- 
chinery adapted to use onTl is coast. Ou.: several departments are well equipped with skil ful ^vorkme", ?.;; elhcient 
tools- enablin- us to execute all orders entrusted to us promptly, and in the most workmanhkc manner. W ith ample 
faciiu'ies Cdolng work, as also^^^^^^^ our supplies from first hands, we are enabled to give oui customers tlrst- 

class raLhinerv,Vt prices frequently paid for inferio'i- work. The most skilful designing and cng.necrmg talent, apply- 
ing to the various branches of mechanical work, constantly at the service ot our customers. 

Orders f .r all classes of Machinery. Castings, or lloiler Work, promptly executed at the 
rates. Sole agents for Hlntoon's Patent Governor, the best Kngine Kcgulator in use. 

Particular attention given to .Ste«mboat and Steamship fl ork. Mining and lioistii 
approved construction. Depot for the Haksbeow Plmps. 

GOX>X>ARO & CO 



most reasonable 



Mining and Hoisting Machinery of tho most 



First and Fremont Sts., Between Mission and Howard, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, 



XV 



GEORGE HOWES. 



JABEZ HOWES. 



GEORGE HOWES & CO. 



J»^P ^^^ 






A.1ST1D 



COlIISSIOIf lEECHAITS 

302 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 



i^jB^^j^ -yopiK:- 



« »»^ » 



DISPATCH LINE 

CLIPPER SHIPS FOR NEW YORK. 



< »*m > 



AGENTS FOR SUTTON 8b GO'S 

Clipper Ships from New Yori< 



TO 



S^ISr FRA.lS'CISCO. 



XVI 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



BAKER 2^ HAMILTON, 

S1H]F®IE'^I^IE^ ©IP 

S3 



pa:q 



OC2 



(S> 



^ .&: 







1=1 



c>a 



;^=> 



^^ 



33 






AGRICULTURAL 

IMPLEMENTS, 

Portable Steam Engines, Hardware, Etc. 



< » I ^ I » » 



Nos. 13, 15, 17 and 19 Front Street, San Francisco. 

Nos. 9, 11, 13 and 15 J Street, Sacranfiento. 

Eastern Office, 88 Wall Street, New York. 



IKE. JJiMlMlBnLANN t£ CO. 

Importers and Dealers in 

Beaver, Broadcloth, Cassimere, 



628 & 630 Sacramento Street, 



Between Montgomery and Kearny^ 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XVll 



DIRECT IMPORTERS OF 



IHK/I^l 



11 






IPHBl 



'^JlJUvO 




Silks, Zlibbons, Ziaces, 



m m 



And General Millinery Goods. 
No. 1 SUTTER ST., Corner of Market 

SAN FRANCISCO, 



483 Broadway. 



PARIS : 

131 BoaleTnrd de Sebastopol. 



WM. 



GLASS ITITORKS. 



XTEVTMAXT <& DT7VAL, 

OFFICE AND WORKS, 
FOOT OF FOURTH STREET, 

MANUFACTURE ALL VARIETIES OF 

GREEN AND BLACK HOLLOW WARE GLASS. 



PRIVATE MOULDS FOR ALL KINDS OF BOTTLES 

Furnished at from Ten to Thirty DoPars. 



XVlll 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



sAiyr FRAiyrcisGO 

SAVINGS UNION, 



OFFICE: 



N.E. Corner California and Webb Streets, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



President, JAMES de FREMERY. 

Vice Pres'ident, - - - WASHINGTON BARTLETT- 

DIRECTORS, 

CHARLES BAUM, CHARLES PACE, 

ALEX. CAMPBELL, Sen. GEORGE C. POTTER, 

C. ADOLPHE LOW, ROBERT B. SWAIN, 

DENNIS J. OLIVER. 
secretary, cashier, 

JOHN ARCHBALD. LOVELL WHITE. 

See General Review for a J^otice of the Operations of this Institution 



Uo. 19 Moitgiiiiierj Street, 10? and 109 Sntter Street, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 




i^ ^2^1^ '^^ M 











EMBROIDERIES, PATTERNS, CANVAS, 

EMBROIDERING FLOSS AND TWIST, 
And all other articles for Needlework, at Wholesale and Retail. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XIX 



IHASONIC 

si¥ii§s 111 mm Mil 

Gnarante ed Capital, - - $150,000. 

OFFICE, TN^O. 6 FOST ST., MASONIC TEMFLE 



< »«» > 



I»ItESII>ElirX, VICE rKESIIJElJrX, 

LEONID AS E. PRATT. WILLIAM H. CULVER. 

BOA.RD OF DIRECTORS : 

LEONIDAS E. PRATT, H. ROSEKRANS, JOHN F. SNOW, 

M. R. ROBERTS, GEORGE ROBINS, HIRAM T. GRAVES, 

CALEB S. HOBBS, FRANCIS SMITH, JONATHAN KITTREDGE, 

C. H. WETHERBEE, WM. H. CULVER, W. T. GARRATT, 

FRANK EASTMAN. 

SECRETARY, 

GEORGE ROBINS. 



Office Hours from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M., daily. Extra Hours on Saturday, from 7 to 9 P. M., for receiving 
Deposits only. Loans made on Real Estate and'ColIateral Securities at usual rates of interest. Certificates of 
Deposit issued, transferable by endorsement. Remittances from the interior, through any of the usual chan- 
nels, may be sent, the Bank not being accountable for their safe delivery. The signature of the depositor 
should accompany his first deposit. A pass-book will be delivered to the agent by whom the depo.^^it is made, 
or sent by mail if desired. Deposits received from One Dollar upwards. 



McGAIN, FLOOD & McGLURE, 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 

Foreign and Domestic 

HOSIERY, WHITE GOODS, BLANKETS, ETC. 

tm mmM III Wimm mtwmm% 

Between Front and Battery, . SASS" Jf IEASr(SnS(g®o 



XX SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



■yy y T^J ■ygit TF^ 3Nr 3E jAl 

SAYINGS 8c LO AN SOCIETY. 

IIsrCOIiI>OI*^ft.TEID ISXH A.I>R,IL, 1859. 

(D ;; ^ ;^ (9 ;2 ^ 

K E. COB, MONTGOMEEY AND MARKET STREETS, 



The objects for which this Association is formed, are, that by its operations, the members 
thereof may be enabled to find a 

Secure and Profitable Investment for Small Savings, 

and may have an opportunity of obtaining from it the use of a moderate capital, on giving 
good and sufficient security for the use of the same. 

PRT?mnF\T M. D. SWEENY. 

vrpp PRfVtdFNT C. D. 0. SULLIVAN. 

TREASURER ;■.;■■.. EDWARD MARTIN. 

ATTORNEY .' i.'. V.'.".' '.'.'.l'.'...^.. RICHARD TOBIN. 

Any person can become a member of this Society on paying an entrance Fee of TWO DOLLARS, 

and subscribing to the By-Laws. 

Deposits can be made of any sum from TWO DOLLARS and FIFTY CENTS to any amount. 

^-LOA>'S MADE ON SECUBITT OF KXAL ESTATE WITHIN THE CITY ASP COUNTY .^ 



JAMES OTIS. W. A. MACONDRAY. F. W. MACONDRAY. 

MACOIf DRAY & GO. 




MERCHAITTS, 

NO. 206 SANSOM STREET, 

sAisr FPi-A.isrcisao- 



ACENTS FOR THE 

YANG-TZEINSURANCEASSOCIATION,SHANGHAE 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXI 



First Premiums awarded wherever exhibited — Fair of Mechanics' Institute, 1865 &8 — State Fair, ISfiS 

ESTABLISHED 1850. 



STSAM COFFEE AND SPICE ffilLS, 

CHARLES BERNARD, 



MANUFACTDRER AND DEALER IN 



FAMILY GHARTBES COFFEE. 



ALWAYS ON HAND 



IMST All iEOIID f OFFll^ 

AND SPICES OF ALL KINDS. 
Also, Saleratus, Carbonate of Soda, Cream of Tartar & Baking Powder 

^0. 70 7 Sansom Street, corner of Gold, 

Between Jackson and Pacific Streets, SAN FRANCISCO, Cal. 



Geo. 0. WniTjiET, ^ i J. Waylaxd Kimball, 

Chas. M. Kiuball, >- \ No. 19 Lindull St., Boston, and 

San Francisco. ) (158 Chatham St., New York. 

GEO. O. WHITNEY & CO. 



mwmi k 




Kos. 315, 317, 319, and 321 PINE ST, (South Side) 

Between Montgomery and Sansom. 



PIONEER FURNITURE WARERQOMS. 



Particular attention paid to Drapery and Decorating. 



xxii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



HENRY B. WILLIAMS. HENRY P. BLANCHARD. CHARLES B. MORGAN. 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & GO. 

Shipping & Commission 

MERCHANTS, 

No. 218 California Street, 
San Francisco. 



BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO. 

COMMISSIOISr J^IERCH^ISTTS, 
430 CAI^IFORIfflA STRCCT, 

S^N FRANCISCO. 



BALFOUR, WILLIAMSON & CO.' - - - Liverpool, England. 
WILLIAMSON, BALFOUR & CO. - - - - Valparaiso, Chile, 



Give special attention to the execution of orders for all descriptions of Foreign 
Merchandise. 

They are prepared to make liberal advances on Wheat, Barley, Flour and other 
descriptions of Produce, consigned for sale to their friends in England, Chile and 
other countries. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXlll 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS 



AND 












AOENTS OF THE 



Regular Dispatch Line of Honolulu Packets, 

AND REGULAE LINE OF OREGON PACKETS. 



PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAID TO 

Fom'arding and Transhipment of merchandise. Sale of W^halemen's Bills and other Ex- 
change, Insurance of Merchandise and Specie under open Policies, 
Supplying fV^haleships, Chartering Ships, Etc. 

Nos. 204 and 20G California Street^ 

SAN FRAISTOISCO. 



George Platt. L. H. Newton. Wm. T. Coleman, Special Partner. 

PLATT & NSIATTON, 

Successors to WM. T. COLEMAN & CO. 

siippnG- & coiiissioi 



"CALIFORNIA LINE OF CLIPPER SHIPS." 



t »«» t 



NEW YORK, SAN FRANCISCO, 

117 Front Street. Cor. California and Front. 



XXIV 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



iiNimf I, iiiiiii' 



IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 



American^ English and Grerman 



§ 



Agricultural 



IMPLEMENTS ■ 



AND 

MINING 

TOOLS. 




General Agents on the Pa- 
cific Coast for the 

World Mower 

AND 
AND 

TORNADO 

THRESHER. 



Nos. 3 c£ 5 Front St. 

Near Market. BAN FRANCISCO. 



tis- STRICTLY WHOLESALE. Orders respectfully solicited. 





animEm$ Bfielsen 

& COHHISSION 

And Commercial A8:ents of the 

(SIAHT PQWDEH CaiiPJ^IfT. 

OFFICE, 210 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



XXV 



COX 4& NICHOLS, 

417 Battery Street, Cor. Merchant, 

iiiiiiiiii ■iiiiiif s 



AND DEALERS IN 



LEATHER, HIDES, OILS AND TALLOW, 

TANNERS' TOOLS AND MATERIALS. 



-A.a-E1JQ"TS rOE. 



IAS. S. MASON & GO'S CHALLENGE BLACKING 

FOR THE PACIFIC COAST, 



JAMES W. COX, 

Late Cox, Wilcutt & Co. 



A. O. NICHOLS. 



EI>]HITSI> JOIVES, 7 

> Santa Cruz. 
JOSEPH BOSXUir,^ 



SAMlJi:!. C. ORA.Y, 

San Francisco. 



GRAY, JONES & CO. 

DEPOT OF THE 



Sllf 1 illl f lllllf. 



thads 



. E.J0NES&C9 ^ 



XiCA-ZlZ. 



IS^O. 418 BATTERY STREET, 



Manufacturers exclusively of the best quality of 



&M 



XXVI 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 



No. 108 BATTERY STREET, SAJV FRANCISCO, 

A-GJ-ENT FOR, 

DUPONT'S CANNON, MUSKET, BLASTIN& AND SPOETINrr 



< »»» » 



Lake Superior and Pacific Fuse Company's 

NEVER- FAILING 

"EAGLE" SAFET? 



< m»^ > 



WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO^S 

Rifles, Carbines, Muskets and Fixed Ammunition. 



mi 



41111 PiWlIl iiHPASm 



p. L. WEAVER, 



[Successor to EDWARD H. PARKER,] 



.^kk^ 



i»»i«stttt 




m 



J 




■•♦♦■*#> 



118 FRONT STREET, 

Between California and Pine, SAH FBANCISCO. 



A m^m t 



Importer of Eley Bros/ Percnssion Caps and Gon Wads. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXVll 

I 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE CO. 

Of London and Aberdeen. 



GAPITAIii^ - - $10^000^000. 

1 ^ > 

Net Fire revenue exceeds $700,000. Net Life revenue exceeds $400,000. 



INSMANCE EFFECTED ON BUILDINGS, lERCHANDISE 

, « M > 

LIFE POLICIES ISSUED. 



"W. Zi. BOOSHER, Agent, 
No. 319 OA.LIFOJRlsriA. STREET. 



ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 



No. 319 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

Notice js tereDy given aat arrangements \m Seen entered into between tlie 
ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY 

AND THE 

PAf 111© 1(411 P114MilIP iOMPAK¥, 

FOR the forwarding of treasure to the Bank of England, and to the Bank 
of France, in Havre, by the steamships of the two companies, by means 
of through bills of lading, to be granted by the Commanders of the Ships 
of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, for delivery to C. A. HENDERSON, 
Agent of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, to be sent across the 
Isthmus, and embarked on the Ships of the R. M. S. P. Co. For particulars 
as to through rate of freight, apply to the undersigned. 

Arrangements can be made for the shipment of Gold and Silver Ores from Aspinwall by the 
Company's Steamers, on favorable terms. 

The Steamships of the R. M. S. P. Co. leave Aspinwall for Plymouth, calling at St. Thomas, on 
the 6th (7th when there are 30 days in the previous month) and 22d of each month. 

Passages, at reduced rates, can be secured on application to the undersigned, who will give any 
further particulars that may be required about the Company's business. 

~Vl. L. BOOKEIl. 




XXVlll SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Helbing & Straus, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



W fi O W ZS £j aL dh 9 

Glass and China Ware, Cutlery, Lamps, 

SILVER - PLATED AND BRITANNIA WARE, 

LOOKING GLASSES, ETC. 
AND 104 BATTERY STREET, COR. OF PINE, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



C. VEXTAHD, 



pif f II Mi 



625 A.]Srr) 627 FROISTT ST. 



« »«» > 



MANUFACTORY OF THE 



ORIGINAL CHARTRES COFFEE, 

First introduced into this country in June, 1851. 



< »»» t 



All kinds of Green, Roasted and Ground Coffees. 

ALSO, SPICES AND OALIFOENIA MUSTARD. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXIX 



MAIN & WINCHESTER, 

illlMlf Wllllilil, 

MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 

Harness, Bridles, Saddles, Whips, 

COLLARS, SAODLEWARE, ETC. 



AND 



LlAf 111 Of l¥iS¥ Dlj 



^Viliil-W 



Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast for 

HILL'S CONCORD HARNESS AND COLLARS. 



Nos. 214 and 216 Battery St., San Francisco. 



W. F. RXTSSELL, 

SPECIAL AaENT FOR 

illll ilCll llPIlIlf 

OF HONG KONG, 



A.isjy 



HONG KONG DISTILLERY CO. 

[LIIVCITED.] 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



XXX 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SULLIVAN, KELLY & CO. 

(Successors to Kelly, Walsh 8f Co.) 
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



nm 1 




mskW X"^^ 





GLASS, &:e. 

101, 103 h 105 Front St,, ^ 110 Pine Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



■A'". B. — The Largest Stock of Goods in the City, at 

Lowest Rates. 



JAMES R. KELLY. 



0. D, 0. SULLIVAS. 




SAN FRANCISCO 







Constantly on hand, a Large and Complete Assortment of 



WHALE LINE, BALE ROPE, ETC. 

MANUFACTURED FROM 

PURE MA^ISriL^ HEMP. 



Office at TUBES & CO., 611 and 613 Front Street. 

DMA.NXJF'A.CTOR^Sr AJT THE POTBERO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXXI 



At the great field trials at Sedalia, Mo. and at Xenia, Ohio, in the summer of 1869, the 



o 

W 
O 

< 



o 






h4 



Q 
W 
W 




o 


> 


f 


C^ 


l-H 




w 


H 




Cfi 


^ 




t-* 


^ 


o 


O 


^ 


>d 


Ol 





TFcts aivarded the First Premiums arid Gold 3Iedal 

over some forty competitors. It is the only Mower that has the true Centre Draft in accordance with 
correct mechanical principles. The adjustability of the Finger Bar to cut high or low without 
stopping the team is worth $25.00 on any machine. Farmers, 

THE " CLIPPER " IS THE HORSE'S ERIEND ! 

Send for Circular ! Investigate ! Remember that we warrant the machine. 

We offer also to Farmers, the justly celebrated " Marsh Harvester," Wood's, McCormack's and 
Cayuga Chief Machines, and the Geiser Threshers. Also, a full assortment of Agricultural Tools 
and General Hardware. 

HAWLEY & CO., S. E. Cop. California and Battery Streets. 




fill llli, 

Z,W, Corner Battery &i Washington Streets. 

■ « ^ > 

07^ hand, Large Stock of Breech- Loading Rifles, 
Carbines and Pistols^ of the latest improvements. 
Also for Powder and Ball, at Manufacturers' Prices 

to the Trade. 



ALBERT E. CRANE, 

Sole Agent for Pacific Coast. 



XXXll 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



THOMAS THOMPSON. 



THORNTON THOMPSON, 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, 

129 & 131 BEALE STREET, BETWEEN MISSION & HOWARD, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Light and Heavy Castings of every description 

Manufactured. 



ClALLEIf&E FEED IIII, 

For Grinding all kinds of Grain for Feed, 



CO 

or 



o 

CL. 



GO 

CO 

o 




en 



ZJD 



M. S. BOWDISH, SOLE AGENT FOR CALIFORNIA AND OREGON, 
at Hawley & Go's, S.E. Cor. California and Battery Streets, and Atwood & Bod- 
well's, 211 and 213 Mission Street, San Francisco, Cal. 






ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXlll 



E S T^ B L I S H E r) IN 1852. 



Importers, Manufacturers and Jobbers 

WOOD AND WILLOW WARE 



T^vines, Baskets, 

^iiiifOMii.M mukm 



iMiKi.iijii^ij^jEi^i) PAPBB BAfi^Sf H 



PR-OPRIETORS OF THE 

Armes' Star Extra Broom 



AGENTS OF 



SHERMAN'S IMPROVED GOG WRINGERS 



Our Stock is the largest on the Pacific Coast, and our facilities 
for importing and manufacturing enable us to sell goods at the 

lowest market price. 

i ^ t 

SALESROOM AND WAREHOUSE AT 

ITos. 215 c& 217 Sacraznezito St. 

SA.isr FRA.lsrOISCO. 



JcrK^K^^r 



Distances from Son Froncisco. 
\ ■ €»*r WAiTSmi, MUM 

7h Vn//fjo . .-. . .:'. .,.,.. . . .i^-. t. . . J?J 

^ Sft/:m/>im/o ...........4..,..,,,. ,... . J2.t 

\i/ar-ysvil/e , . ..^,,, , JffO 

\ _ Sir «ti|jr«,a»9i«*.' 

From Vf/Z/f/n ft> Shrrri/n rnf-O .,^.»«»^.- OO 

, yrr/Zr/nfoAfrrrrsr/i/f/. ..,,...,..,..,.. . Sti 

> Vf///f/o to Cfr//s/Mf/a- -^^ 

..: Sft.rrfJJ7trM/o t-rfi C./'/f.ft. to N.y. . 3000 

. ' Mciry.yytlU' ta OroyUle- ' ■ 30 

ProtfvSanfrantisco to San.Jn.re. SO 

Sfnt/ttori, ...,./2.i 

Sacjtj/ii^nto . . ..-J,.... r /7S 
1^1 a OfrA/fT/?// tn SnrrfiJ7>Yn/o i35 

From. SAN FRANCISCO via.\M.\.ZiO to S(lcra7ru://.f4f Ji3 



/I'pprrfjrar/.. 







F I. A\cr E If 









iC 



Tn^ 



^^Yfj/jw '■ 






SAc/rAMCf/ra 



^^.. 



VSA< 



^^^^ 



?f*fe* ^r <»! 



> 



^j 







^snCKTOH 




S AWT A 



Showin>5 Its n^Uitjve position" 
tu other Rail Koads. 

Fitjfn t?H! /tfrf//ufrTn/i»yrftf>hy r/f^ Sttde 
fftt.*Jfnmr/ 'MmM^T fAf n'r^Urn TcrmtMtts 
ori'it. /'rtitftc /Uitl /!i>iui-c'nt/ iJu; SvuiA- 
■crii Urmuiuj oftfse OrrgonJiaUJioucL 

UhBiftnilAIUr.S.K 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXV 



AND 



STEAMER NEW IVORIiD 

FAVORITE VALLEJO ROUTE. 

80 MILES SAVED in distance from Marysville to San Francisco, and THREE HOURS 
in time. 52 MILES SAVED from Sacramento to San Francisco. TWO BXPRESS 
TRAINS DAILY (except Sunday) each -way, carrying U. S. Mail and all Fast Ex- 
press. On Sunday, one Express each way. 



GOING SOUTH. 

ramento, 7.15 A.M., and Calistoga 



MORNING EXPRESS TRAIN '■'""'""^""""''^*'^'" 

IMO A. M., arriving in San Francisco at 11.30 A. M. 

AFTERNOON EXPRESS TRAIN ^^^:^'t.r^.l 

and Calistoga 2.30 P. M., arriving at San Francisco at 7.30 P.M. 

GOING NORTH. 

STEAMER NEW WORLD J^r^enrCfS 

Wharf, San Francisco, at 8 A. M., connecting at Vallejo with cars of California Pacific Railroad, 
by which passengers arrive at Sacramento at 12.30 P.M., Marysville at 2.15 P. M. and Calistoga at 
12.45 P. M. 

STEAMER NEW yMORLD ^::zv;^z:^f^ 

M., by which passengers reach Sacramento at 8.20 P.M., Marysville, 9.30 P.M. and Calistoga, 7.45 P.M. 

S'O'XTD.^'7 TRiiZXTS iiXTD BOAT. 

SUNDAY EXPRESS TRAINS .o'intsir.r 

mento 2.30 P. M., and Calistoga at 3 P. M., arriving at San Francisco at 6.45 P. M. 

STEAMER NEW WORLD J.Tf„rT»ioY>r 

passengers arriving at Vallejo at 10.15 A. M., Sacramento, 12.45 P. M., Marysville, 5 P. M., and Cal- 
istoga, 12.40 P. M. RETURNING, leaves Vallejo on the arrival of trains from Calistoga and Marys- 
ville, at 5 P. M., arriving at San Francisco at 6.45 P. M. 

PASSENGERS, taking the Morning Express Train from Maryfrville at 6 A. M., Sacramento 7.15 A. 31., 
and Calistoga 7.30 A. M., arrive in San Franciisco at 11 30 A. M., giving thorn nearly four hours in the city. 
Kelurning at 4.0O P. M.. and reaching Sacramento at 8.20 P. M., Mary srlUe 9.30 P. M., and Calistoga 7.45 P. 
M., of the same day. 

Procure tickets at 306 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, or on board the steamer Kew World. Baggage 
called for and checked from Residences, Hotels, etc., by the S. F. Package Express Co. 

FKEIOflT 9rOTIC£. 

The New Freight Steamers VALLEJO and MOULTON, of the above line, will run daiiy (Sun- 
days excepted) between San J'rancisco and Vallejo, connecting at Vallejo with cars of the California 
Pacific Railroad and Napa Valley Railroad. 

Freight to Vallejo will be taken for $1 per ton ; to Sacramento, $2.50 per ton. 

Freight for Marysville will arrive there at 2 o'clock P. M. the following day. 
FREFGHT. for Sacramento, San Francisco, Vallejo. Marysville, Calistoga, Kapa, Davisville, Knight's 
Landing, Woodland, and all way Stations, taken through as low as by any other route. 

The VALLEJO or MOULTON will leave the berth, Front Street Wharf, San Francisco, each 
day at 4 P. M. Returning, arrive in San Francisco at 4 A. M. the following morning. With the new 
and commodious barge NAPA, they are prepared to carry grain, machinery, aud heavy freight of 
all kinds. 

J. P. JACKSON, President. 



XXXVl SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



The Bank of British Columbia, 

PAID UP CAPITAL., - - $1,490,000 

In 14,900 Shares, of $100 Each, 
WITH POWER TO INCREASE TO $10,000,000. 

LONDON OFFICE, 5 EAST INDIA AVENUE, LEADENHALL STREET. 



CHAIRMAN. 

T. W. L. MACKEAN, Esq., Loudon, (late of tbe firm of Turner & Co., China.) 

DEPUTY CHAIRMAN. 

ROBERT GILLESPIE, Esq., (Messrs. Gillespie, Molfatt & Co., London.) 

COURT OF DIRECTORS IN LONDON. 

JAS. AlVDERSON, Esq., (Messrs. Anderson, Thomson & Co., London,) 
EDEW COLYILLE, Esq., Fenchurch Buildings, London. 
HEKRY McCHLERY, Esq., (Messrs. Cavan, Lubbock & Co., London.) 
MARTIN RIDLEY SMITH, Esq., 1, Lombard Street, London, (of Messrs. 
Smith, Payne & Smiths, Bankers.) 



PORTLAND, OREGON; VANCOUVER ISLAND, AND BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Wew York, AOEBTCY BAIVK. OF MOTVTREAI.. 

Canadaand British BTortli American Provinces, BAliTK OF MOaTTREAt.. 

Mexico and Soutb America,.. I.OIVI>09r BAIVK OF MEXICO <Sz SOITTH AMERICA. 

Australia and the East ORIEBTTAl. BAIVK CORPORATIOIT. 

England, WATIOHTAl. PROVISCIAK. BAIVK OF ElSei.AlKB. 

England WORTH «Sc SOUXH TPA1.K8 BA]VK. OF I.IVERPOOK,. 

Scotland, BRITISH I^iaTEIT COMPASTT'S BATTK. 

Ireland,.. BAHTK OF IREI^AWB. 



This Bank is now open for Business, and is prepared to receive Deposits on Current Account 
or on time ; to buy and sell Exchange and Bullion ; collect Bills ; discount Approved Paper; make 
advances on good Collateral Securities ; grant Credits, and transact a general Banking Business. 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE : 

S. H. COR. CAUFOHHIA AMD SAHSOM STHEETS. 
WILLIAM H. TILLINGHAST, Manager. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



XXXVll 



fill All ■Allll IlSIlAlil* 



INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF BAH FEANCISCQ. 
(The ' California Ziloyds,' esta'blisb.ed in 18S1.) 

Nos. 416 and 418 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



mmm'M emmMml 



if §•*••§ ®©M* 




^S=^ Fair Rates. 
Prompt Settlement of Losses. 
US'* Solid. Security. 



< »««» > 



DIRECTORS: 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



J. Mora Moss, 
James Otis, 
Moses Heller, 
Joseph A. Donohoe, 
M. J. O'Connor, 
W. W. Montague, 
Daniel Meyer, 



Adam Grant 
William Scholle, 
Charles Kohler, 
Joseph Seller, 
W. C. Ralston. 
I. Lawrence Pool, 
A. Wassermann, 
Geo. C. Johnson. 



Jos. Brandenstein, 
N. G. Kittle, 
Jabez Howes, 
Nicholas Luning, 
John Parrott, 
Milton S. Latham, 
L. Sachs, 



T. E. Lindenberger. 



M. D. Sweeny, 
E. H. Winchester, 
Gustave Touchard, 
Michael Castle, 
Nicholas Larco, 
Geo. C. Hickox, 
Morton Cheesman, 



SACRAMENTO. MARYSVILLE. PORTLAND, O. 

J. F. Houghton. L. A. Booth. L. Cunningham, Peter Decker. Henry Failing. 



J. G. Kittle, 



NEW YORK. 

Benjamin Brewster, 



James Phelan. 



< »mm > 



GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. 

CHARLES D. HAVEN, Secretary. 



N. G. KITTLE, Vice President. 
GEO. T. BOHEN, Surveyor. 



XXXVlll 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



JOHN TAYLOR & GO. 

512 AND 514. ^^^ASHINGJ^TON STIiEET, 

ISIPORTERS OF AKI* I>EAI<£RS TN 

•IIMISW fiMiSWAlI 

A-ISTD SUISTDHIES. 

The latest styles of Glassware and Fixtures for first-class Drug Stores, 

With Glass Labels, Counter and Prescription Scales, Druggists' 

Sundries, Perfumery and Liquor Labels in good variety. 



ASSAYERS' MATERIALS AND CHEMICALS. 



Bullion and Assay Balances, 

Humid Assay Apparatus, 
Cupelling Furnaces, 



French and Sand Crucibles, 

Dixon's Celebrated Black Lead Crucibles, 

And everything required in an Assay Office. 



P»K[OTOail A PHIC aOODS. 

We have purchased Mr. Wm. Shew's Entire Stock of Photographic Matwialsand Chemicals, and 
have now the most complete and desirable stock of goods in this line in the City, which we are sell- 
ing at low prices. 

Agents of PACIFIC GLASS ITITORKS 

All Orders will have prompt and careful attention. 





GARDEN SEEDS FOR 1871. 



NEW lOBK SEED IREBOUSE 



C. L. KEIiliOGG, 

427 SANSOM ST,, near Clay, SAU FEANCISCO, OAL. 

IIs<fl:i>OHXEIi A-InTID 3DE-A.I.ER, IlSr 

FtOWEE 



GARDEN, 

FIELD, 



m 




AND 



I »»^ > 



BOMBAY OPIUM. POPPT SEED— WHITE AND PURPLE. 

.''ee'ls will be packed in tlic best manner, to go any distemce, and forwarded as desired. LIglit kinds of .^eeds c.in b". 
forwnrded tbronKli tlie mMll, poslajje paid. .All orders, bjr mail or otlierwisc, (wlih rcmittanees) will be attendi'd lo witb 
oare and dispatcli. l he i^rcHlest care will be taken to have all .Seeds sold by nu- pure, reliable, «iid llie ^ery bent mid 
cliolcest of their kind. A Linr.itAi, Discount ji.\dk to tiik Tiiadk. TIii' AjtiMits of Wells, Fargo tte C.v'a Kx)iress, 
and Postmasters gener.ally, are requested to act as agents for reoiving orders for seeds, iioxcs of Seeds, contjining 
lOU I'apers, or more, put up for the Country Trade, in such assortments as desired. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXIX 



SPRING VALLEY 

WATER WORK 



i »-» I 



Incorporated under Act of the Legislature, April 8, 1858. 



« » j » » 



CAPITAL DISTRIBUTING STOCK - - - - ,„,„„„ 

Divided into 80,000 Shares of $100 Each. 



-« *»» » 



MABN RESERVOIR, 

X^ jAl Ct T7 XV j£k l£3L€>J?Srxyj^^ 

Capacity, 34,000,000 Callons. 

College Kill Reservoir, Capacity 14iOOO,000 Gallons. 
Francisco Street " " 7,000,000 

Russian Hill " " 4,000,000 

Buchanan Street " " 2,000,000 

Brannan Street " " 500,000 

Dam— Pillarcitos Creek, Capacity - - 1,045,000,000 Gallons. 

San Andreas " « - - 4,650,000,000 






^5 F "F I O B I^ S 

President, ' . . W. P. BABCOCK. 

Vice President, JAMES D. WALKER. 

Secretary, E. M. MILES. 

TR.TJSTEES, 

JOHN PARROTT, W. F. BABCOCK, 

L. TEVIS, JAS. D. WALKER, 

N. LUNING. CHAS. MAYNE, 

CHAS. E. McLANE. 



OFFICE OF THE C03IPANT, 



xl 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



BADGER Sc LINDENBERGER, 

XTo. 7 SAITSOM STREET, 

ADJOINING COSMOPOLITAN HOTEL, 

S^N FRiLNCISOO, CA-LIFOHlsriA.. 



ii^aii'OitxEns wA.3^Tr> jobbbi^s ob 






^ 





w 




" /^ 



if 



Agents Willamette Woolen Mills, Salem, Oregon. 
Agents Hallet, Davis k Co.'s Pianos, Boston, Mass. 



HXSiriffZSiaANN «£ Go. 



IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 



DRY GOODS & CARPETS. 

♦.-►^.^►—♦-^ 

©oi^i: alOejdvts for 

Veuve Xavier, Jouvin & Go's Paris Kid Gloves, and Dachez Shawls. 



« »«» > 



OBI>£KS ICECEIVi:i> FOR A.11^ l>E8CBIPTI09r OF 

BLAHKETg, FLANNELS ANB €ASSIMEEES 

Manufactured by the San Francisco Pioneer Woolen Factory. 

AGENCY OF THE OAKLAND BURLAP MILLS. 

HIDES AND WOOL BOUGHT AT HIGHEST MARKET RATES. 



EXCHANGE ON ENGLAND, FKANOE, GERMANY AND NEW YORK. 

mo-, i mAmBom BTmmmTf 



ADJOINING COSMOPOLITAN HOTEL. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, 



xli 




DIRECTED BY THE FATHERS OF THE SOCIETY OF JESUS. 



WITH A FULL STAFF OF 



PROFESSORS AND TUTORS, 



AND A 



THOROUGH SYSTEM OF INSTRUCTION 

IN 

IL<atlii, ]Mat:lieiiiatlcs, History, 

Greelc, N'atxiT'al Sciences, Geograplay, 

EInglisli, Aritlimetic, XJse of the G«-lo"bes, 

Miental riiilosojpliy. 33ool5:-Iieeping, I»en.raansliip. 

FRENCH, SPANISH, ITALIAN, GERMAN, 

YOCAL AKB mSTRBMEMTAL MOSIC, 
AND DRA^VING, 

DIVIDED INTO TWO EEGULAE COURSES : 



BESIDES A 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



TERMS: 



Board and Lodging, Tuition in either Classical or Commercial Department, Washing and 

Mending, Stationery, Medical Attendance and Medicines ; Fuel, Baths, per week $8 00 

Total per Session, of ten months, $350, payable half-yearly in advance. 

N. _B. — If more than two brothers enter the College, each additional one pays only $200 per Session. 



For further information, or for Catalogue of the College, apply to Rev, A. Varsi, President of 
Santa Clara College, Santa Clara County, or to St. Ignatius College, 841 Market Street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 



xlii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



STENCIL. PLATES 



THtrWOEfHT, 

821 FRONT STREET, CORNER COMMERCIAL, 

©A.N l?K-A.]VCI©CO, CAL. 

STENCIL PLATES, ■when handsomely executed, present the cheapest and best mode of advertising that 
can be ariopted. This is the experience of all who use tnem. 

STENCIL PLATES OF EVEKY PATTEKN cut at this Establishment in a style unequalled by any 
other workmen in California. 

Merchants and others are invited to call and examine specimens in proof of the above assertion. 

Orders from abroad, as well as those givem in person, promptly executed and forwarded. J'arties sending 
orders by letter arc particularly requested to write plainly and give the exact space thky wisu the 

LE1TER8 TO OCCUPY. 

By close application and superior execution of work during an experience of thirteen years, .Mr. TRU- 
WOKTHY has extended his business to its present proportions. His present facilities for rapid and tasteful 
execution of air work in his line are far superior to those of any other in this State or in the Union. 

Having purchased all the late John Hall's Stencil Tools, Plates and Impressions, and everything per- 
taining to his business, I am prepared to furnish his customers with fac-similes of his work. 

REM BEM BER THE PLACE. 

321 Front Street, Corner Commercial, (Up StairsJ San Francisco, California. 



Hew BiislaEt larllii 
BATH HOUSE, 

Wov ltail@s ami SeBtlemeQ, 
528 PACIFIC ST., BET. MONTGOMER Y AND KEAENY. 

Dr. ZEILE informs the public that his New Bath House is now open for the 
accommodation of patrons. Neither pains nor expense have been spared to make this 
the best and most commodious establishment of the kinil either in Europe or America. 
Convenient and separate apartinents are afforded for the administration of Bathing by 
Steam, by Hot Air, and by Plain or Medicated Waters. Trained and polite attendants 
will use their best efforts to give complete satisfaction. 

Dr. Zeile has also attached to his Bathing Establishment a few handsomely furnished 
Suites of Rooms, where he will receive and entertain patients for treatment, who are not 
infected with any contagious or infectious disease. 

To secure this accommodation, it will always be necessary for engagements to be 
made in advance of the arrival of the patient. 

N.B. — Everything on ground floor — no basement. 



IMPOKTEB OF 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xlui 



Vr STOCK COMI^^NY. ^^ 



wmwmwkm « ^8p^«)'ifiiii'# 



P¥lfi/A\¥f. MsWil:/^m\ ^ ^«K.£ 



Number of Shares, 3,000. $100 per Share. 
< ^ > 

IlS"COIlPORA.TED -A.FRIL 3, 1867. 



iPElilllS^ f r§ill#irt & Hmamg» 



BOABO OF TRUSTEES. 

C. SPRECKELS, GEORGE H. EGGERS, C. H. VOIGT, 
H. HORSTMANN, F. HAGEMANN. 



COMMERCIAL AGENTS, 



210 CALIFOBNIA STREET. 



Works, S.W. cor. Eighth and Brannan Sts. 

1 ^ > 

This Refinery, having recently trebled its capacity, is 

better prepared to supply the great demand for 

its various kinds of 

SUGARS AND SYRUPS 



xliv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 



HUNTINGTON'S IlPBOfED SHINGLE MACHINE, 

These machines are in use at the mills owned by the following parties: 



•S " . . 



— O "^ - 

S f-i S S^ 3 




•< cc 



Steam Engines, Sawmills, Lath and Picket Machines, etc., made to order at short notice. 

Manufactured and for Sale by F. A. HUNTINGTON, at 

ISTos. 18 and. 20 Fremont Street, San Francisco. 

ForKimplicity. durability, and rapidity of action, theise machines have no equal, and are now used by all the prin- 
cipal Jiillmtn on the Pacific Coast. 

Price, complete, with one Saw 8425. OO 

Jointer Frame, extra, price 35. OO 



EUREKA HAIR! 



CHEAP & SUPERIOR 

ARTICLE 

AS A SUBSTITUTE 

FOB 

CURLED HAIR 

FOR. 

Upholsterers' Use, 

AND SOLD AT 

ONE-FIFTH THE PRICE. 




The i:i7KEK.A. 

HAIR MATTRESSES 

FOR. 

llastlellF, 
DURABILITY 

COMFORT, 

Are now generally acknowledged 

To have no Equal. 



Beware of Inferior Imitations, manufactured of uncleansed 
Fiber, now being offered to the Public. 

E'D'HSZA IIAZK Co. 

DUXCH FLAX, CA3J- 

AGENCY, 573 Mission Street, bet. Ist and 2d. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



xlv 



C/) 



o 



C9 










o 

o 

o 



(/) 



vs^x^x«k.A-;i'!A^\^. 



Nos. 213, 215, 217 and 219 MARKET ST. 

9 AlTD 11 BSAZiS STHSST, 



liBBS. ClLKill & Of. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



BOXE 




ALSO, 






FOR S^LE, 



AND OTHER FANCY WOOD. 



^"We are now manufacturing and will receive orders for the manufacture of 
different kinds of Agricultural Machines. 



xlvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Sawing and Planing Mill. 



p. A. Macdonald, I 
Joseph McGill. y 



(J. H, 
I H. C 



Macdonald, 
Chapman. 



D. A. MACDONALD & CO. 

lS4:-A.lsrXjr.A.CTXTKEK,S OF 

Doors, Sasles, BlMs ani loiilMS 

217 to 225 Spear St. and 218 to 226 Steuart St., 

Between Howard and Folsom, . . . . . SAN FRANCISCO. 



FZXTZSXIZXTG "WORK 

For Buildings, constantly on hand and got up to order. 





POLLARD & CARVILL MANUFACTURING CO. 



lElLERS m AND MINOFACTURERS OF 



ifl 



gxQ'M'i) 



Nos. 1 80 & 1 82 JESSIE ST., running through to 1 84 & 1 86 Stevenson St. 
%rd\St^°n"inTrrY.r'i SAN fhaitcisco. 



Tbird Streets, near Market 



Repairing, BlackomithinK, Paintins «Cc TrimMine, execnted 'wltk Bfeatness <fe Dispatch. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



xlvii 



'OUMDHT 



A.]srx> 







GO-OPEHATIVE, 

Nos. 235 to 259 FIRST STREET, 
SA.]sr iTR^jsrcisco. 



This Establishment is now working on the Co-operative Plan, which has 
proved eminently successful, and we are now manufacturing 



BMmiiBT mw 



Of all kinds at lower rates than ever before. We can turn out work to better ad- 
vantage and at less prices than any other shop on this coast or elsewhere. 




[M 



kf^ 




m 



1 




P'Oi'^i 



I 



C. SPRECKELS k CO., Proprietors. 



U) 



CO 




txi 



GO 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



This Establishment has been enlarged for the third time during the past season, and now pos- 
sesses facilities unsurpassed by any competition for the production of 

SUPERIOR GRXSAM ALiXS^ 

To supply the increasing demands of the public. 



xlviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



1^ 



® 



ilHSHSPHlBf 



f 



FIRST PREMIUM 



BILLIARD MANUFACTURER 

Sole Agent for the Pacific Coast of the celebrated 

KAVANAGH Sl DECKER'S PATENT CUSHIONS. 

Patented December 18th, 1866, and March 9th, 1869. 





My Tables have taken the First Premium at seveu different Fairs, every time they were presented. 

537 Sacramento Street, below Montgomery, San Francisco. 



UNION BOX FACTORY 

Nos. 11^ and 116 Spear Strest, 

Between Mission and Howard, SAH FRAHCISCO* 



Boxes of all kinds Made to Order by hand or 

DOVE-TAILED BY MACHINERY 

WITH PROMPTNESS AND DISPATCH. 



I 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



xlix 



IT. CIIA7 ■Si CO. 

UNDERTAKERS, 

641 Sacramento Street, 



Comer of Webb, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



THE TRADE SUPPLIED WITH 

COFFINS, AND EVERY ARTICLE IN THE LINE 



ON LIBERAL TERMS. 




Sole Agents for Barstow's Patent Metallic 

Burial Cases and Caskets. 



p. S. HIBBERD. 



A. I. SANBORN. 



W. A. BYRNES. 




HIBBERD. SANBORN & CO. 



MILLER & HALEY'S MILLS, 

BEHRY STREET, 

Between Third & Fourth (water front,) SAN FRANCISCO. 



California File Manufacturing Co. 



437 BRANNAN STREET, 



Between Third and Fourth, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



New Files of every description on hand and made to order. Old Files Re-Cut and 
warranted equal to new. Reaper and Mower Sections, Bars, etc., made to order at short 
notice. Orders from the country promptly attended to. 

BRONNER & CLARK, - Corner Tenth and J Streets, Sacramento. 

CHICARD & CO., . - . - . Levee Street, Stockton. 

W. WUSTUOFF. L. KRAMER. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



ALBERT G. IT'2'E, 



IMPORTER OF AND DEALER IN 



W^'' 
^ 



VID WMMm. 



^M Mm 



1 ElSf 10 



Chromos^ Engravings and Photographs^ 
STATIONERY, 

FANCY GOODS AND POCKET CUTLERY, 

ITo. 29 THZHD STB.EET, near Market St., 

8A.N^ FH A.ISrOISOO. 



TJie Trade Supplied at the Lowest Prices, 



JOHN SPRUANCE. 



JAMES SPRUANCE. 



C. C. CHAPMAN. 



J 



« 




SP 




E, 



SUCCESSORS TO J. C. HOIIA.N & CO. 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in 

WINES k LIQUORS 

No. 415 FRONT STREET, 



S»jAlXV dp* XI. .ifk 3Nr O X &> o o 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



EDTl^ARD IHABXIIV. 



». V. B. HKKTARIE. 



E. MARTIN 6c GO. 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 






^V— - 



408 FROWT STRBBT^ 

SAH FBAHDSCO. 



Gannon's Cigar Store. 

PETER T, GANNON, 

RETAIL DEALER IN THE 

tacit Iraiii lavaia ilgarii 

Corners of Montgomery, Post and Market Streets, 



GEO. W. PATCH, 

.if 

4:05 Front Street, Corner Clay, 

ROOM No. 11. SAN FRANCISCO. 

^mmm 

BOBNIHG BHANGS A SPECIALTYI 

A Superior Quality of Stencil Inks, Brushes, etc. on hand. Also Agent for Merriam's Patent Marking Can. 



A.. TFASOir. 



p. a. MOBRIS. 



T^ASOXT (& MORRIS, 

HOUSE, SIGH AHD FRESCO PAfflTERS, 

Gilding and Glassing, Imitations of Wood and Marble, 

Importers and Dealers In 

Paints, Oils, Turpentine, Varnislies, Brushes, Glass. Etc., Etc. 

No. 38 CALIFORISIIA STREET, 

Two Doors below Davis Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 

coT73smi-Y o:rjd:eiti& soliciteid. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Ho. 415 Mission Street, 



Adjoining Mechanics' Mill, ) 

Between First and Fremont Streets,! 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



SCROLL SJ^^^rTlS^G^ ^NL> TLTRlSriNa. 



Constantly on hand and made to order. Stair Rails, Posts, Balusters, Etc., Etc. 



M. M. COOXS <& SOXTS, 

BEALF.RS IN 



FIRE CAPS AND BELTS, 

eviiiaif loii 4MP piBi iu0Ei^s. 

Agency for the Douglass Artificial Limbs, 

801 Battery Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 



« »«» > 



BEXjT XjE^A-TIiEK. rOE, S-A.IjE. 



iAlMll lilMl MM W©1I 

SOZiZi^DiiV c& BK£1THA2«£, iigents. 



Manufacture and offer to the Trade the above SUPERIOR SALT, for Table, 
Dairy and Packing Purposes, in assorted bags. Also, constantly on hand the best 
brands of LIVERPOOL SALT, in large and small bags. 

MILL, 249 STUART STREET. 

OFFICE, 423 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



E. C. BOOBAR <& CO. 

PILE BEIYEES & €SNT1 A€TOBS 

WHARVES BUILT, 

WATER LOTS PILED AHD CAPPED. 
Foundations for Brick Buildings Piled and Capped, Piles and Square Timber 

OFFICE— S.W. Oor. Steuart and Howard Streets. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



liii 



LEOPOLD KUH, 

(Formerly of the U. S. Branch Mint, S. F.) 




& 





No. 611 Commercial Street, 



A. W. VON SCHMIDT, 

OFFICE, PIONEER BU!L01NG, 
MONTGOMERY STREET, NEAR JACKSON, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



MEEKER, JAMES <Sc CO. 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 



Corner California and Davis Streets, 



©A.]V F-KA.NCISCO. 



R. C. WALRATH. JOHN V. HUNTER. Z. AMOS. 

WALRATH, HUNTER & CO. 

Importers und Dealers in all kinds of 

ilEEIMl a WA'iOl gfiil. 

Hardwood Lumber ^ Oak, Ash, Hickory, Maple, Whitewood, Black 
Walnut, Ship JPlank, Oak Timber, 

LOCUST TREENAILS, MOULDINGS AND VENEERS, STAVES AND HEADINGS, 

Nos. 108 «fe 110 Market Street, opp. Main, 

AND NOS. 5 AND 7 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



< »»» > 



11:^° We pledge that Orders shall receive special and prompt attention. 



liv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



PACIFIC 



In, 



Location at Polrero, beyond Long Bridge, 

Have on hand Coopers' Stock of all descriptions ; and are fully prepared to manufacture to order 

packages of all kinds and sizes. 

FLINT, PEABODY & CO., AGENTS. 



N. P. lANGlAND, 

STAIR BEDER 

ASD 

Wood Turner, 

485 AND 487 BRANNAN ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 




Paper, Oil Cloth, Window Shades and Furniture Warehouse. 

American Flags and Eegimental Banners constantly on hand and Made to Order. 

Removed from Clay. Street and Corner Sansom and California Streets, 
OPPOSITE Ne^v Bank of California, to 

51*^ Market axxd 21 Sutter Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



TJivriD 




METALLIC AND WOOD COFFINS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION FURNISHED AT THE 

SHORTEST NOTICE. 

XTo. 651 SiLCK^MSXTTO STB.EST. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



Iv 




) AND HAT MATERIAL 

AT AVHOLESALE, 

N.E. Cor. Montgomery and Bush Streets, 

S^N" FRANCISCO. 



J. C, leussdorffer & Brother 



IMPORTERS OF AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 













9 



Hatters' Flushes, 



f lis, f lIHHIMSp lii 

And everything requisite for the manufacture of Hats. 



Our long experience in San Francisco, and extensive connections in Europe 
and the East, enable us to be in constant receipt of the choicest qualities and 
latest styles. 

Our stock is the largest and most select, and our facilities superior to any other 
House on this Coast. 

Dealers who buy on short time, or for cash, will find it greatly to their advan- 
tage to favor us with a call at 

y.U, cor, Montgomery and Bush Sts., San Francisco, 



ItEXA-IIj STORES : 
Nos. 200 and 202 Montgomery Street, comer Biisb, 
Nos, 635 and 637 Commercial Street, - - - 

No. 647 "Washington Street, - - - - . 

No. 105 J Street, 

Comer Front and Monisson Streets, - - - 



San Francisco 

San Francisco 

San Francisco 

Sacramento 

Portland, O. 



Ivi SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



MARI NE AlTD FIRE. 

californiaInsurance CO. 

Oflice-No. 318 California Street. 

One roor East from Sansom SIrfel, SiJf i']Kiilf'CIS€'®, €&!,. 

> ^ > 

Guarantee Capital Paid up (in gold) $300,000. 
Assets, Nov. 15th, 1870, - - $400,000. 

I ^ » 

C. T. MOFKINS, Frest. M. B. TICHEI«, Yice Frest. 
E. CMOWELIL, Secretary. 

THE ONLY MUTUAL! 



All Insurance profits divided annually among the holders 
of i>a»'*icfi)a<ingr j^^licies. 



r S M 1 A I 



FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LONDOlSr. 

Established 1803. 

CAPITAL, $8,000,000. 

Insures Buildings and Merchandise in them, on the most moderate terms; also Frame 
Buildings and Merchandise or Furniture contained in same. 



LOSSES PAID HERE IN CASH IMMEDIATELY ON ADJUSTMENT, 

IlSr TJ. S. C3-OIj3D OOIHSr. 



FALZSXTER, BELL <& CO. 

AGENTS FOR CALIFORNIA. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



Ivii 



B. CASEBOI^T. 



I>AVII> KERR. 



COACH AID CAB BDILDERS, 

Importers and Dealers in 

CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, WAGONS, 




AND ALL KINDS OF 



Carriage & Wagon Stock, Trimmings, etc. 
Corner Market and Fifth Streets^ 



Wagons and Carriages of every description made to order, stored and sold on Commission ; also, 
Bougln and Exchanged, and General Jobbing done with Neatness and Dispatch. 

Parties wishing Carriages of an_y description can have them ordered through us from the leading 
Coach Builders in the Atlantic cities. 



< ■»«» > 



ORUERS FROM THE COUHfTRY PROMI»Tr.Y ATXEXOEW TO. 



PIOMEER PAPER MILL, 

TAYLORVILLE, MARIN CO., CAL. 

S. p. TAYLOR & CO., - - - Proprietors. 

Manufacturers and Importers of all kinds of 

PAPEB AKD PAPER BAGS, TWINE, ETC. 

PAPER WAREHOUSE, NO. 416 CLAY STREET, 



^11112 ^Id^HISS^ SQ&IIC9S ^^3S> Q^(D^ ^Hd^S^ ^(£)1P«S9 ;3<Q«(3« 



Goznmission Merchant, 

SAH FRAHCISCO. 



iOMSlSMMBiraS* 



Iviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



FIRE INSURANCE AGENCY 

No. 219 SANSOM STREET, 



between California and Pine, 



SAJH" FRANCISCO. 



SAIBTIRG-BREIEI 

fill IlilBIIil 



Oanital, 



m 



m 



m 



$i,iii,ii§ 



DIRECTORS: 



AT HAMBURG. 

WM. GOSSLER, Esq., Pres't. 
AUG. JOS. SCHON, Esq. 
H. MUNCHMEYER, Esq. 
J. F. W. RELMERS, Esq. 
A. F. WOLDSEN, Esq. 

AT BREMEN. 

LOUIS DELIUS, Esq. 
CARL MELCHERS, Esq. 
CARL TEWES, Esq. 



NOTARY, 

EDUARD SCHRAMM, J. U. D. 



AT HAMBUnG, 



DIRECTOR, 

ALFRED KLAUHOLD, Esq. 



AT HAMBUnO. 



CALIFORNIA AGENCY, 

MORRIS SPEYER & Co. Agents, 

SAN PEANCISCO. 



The undersigned, Agents for California, for the above highly renowned Com- 
pany, are prepared to issue policies against loss by Fire, on the most favorable 
terms, in all parts of the City and State, on 

STORES, MERCHANDISE, DWELLINGS, FURNITURE, ETC. 

1^* All claims will be paid by the undersigned immediately after the amount of 
loss is ascertained, particular arrangements for that purpose having been made. 

MORRIS SPKYSR & GO.^ Agents, 

219 SANSOM STREET, between California and Pine. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



lix 



H. M. NEWHALL. 



J. O. ELDRIDGE. 



G. PALACHE. 



H. M. NEWHALL <Si CO. 

AWCW1©WBHBS^ 

AND "* 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

SALESROOM, FIRE PROOF BRICK, 

309, 311, 313 Sansozn. Street. 

REGULAR SALE DAYS; 

MONDAY and THURSDAY — Catalogue Sale of Boots, 
Shoes, Clothing, Hardware, Fancy Goods, etc. 

WEDNESDAY — Catalogue Sale of Dry Goods. Silks, Em- 
broideries, French Goods, etc. 



(BA©SL AIDf ASfiglS ©M ffllSIE^SAlgfM^l ^DIE §MM^ 



HENRY F. WILLIAMS. 



ROBERT C. PAGE. 



HENRY F. WILLIAMS & 



lu*J 






XTo. 20 Stevenson's Building, 



ics 



< *■» > 



Prompt d^iention will be given to all matters pertaining to REAL ESTATE, 

such as 

Buying and Selling on Commission, Negotiating Loans, 
Collecting Rents, etc. 



Ix 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



SAfllGS MD LOAN SOCIETI 



Qmmp»mte# Cepltml^ $M%§m» 



® 



OFFICE, 513 CALZFOnXTZA ST. 

South Side, between Montgomery and Kearny Streets. 



M^^ Office Hours, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Extra hours on Saturdays from 7 to 8 p.m., for receiving of Deposits only. 
Loans made on Real Estate and other Collateral Securities, at current 
rates of interest. 

GSOB.GK ZiSTTS, Z«. GOTTZG, 



m^ SEE GENERAL BEVIEW FOR A NOTICE OF IHE OPERATIONS OF TfflS INSTITUTION..^ 



THEODORE VOIZIX. 



GUSTAYUS RIS. 



VOIZIIT, RIS <& C 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 



mm 



la ^WWHEBf A^ailom®©!^® 



115 AlTD 117 BITSH STREET, 

BETWEEN SANSOM AND BATTERY. 



SALE DAYS: 

TUESDAY & FRIDAY— Catalogue Sales of Clothing, Boots, Shoes, Hard- 
ware, Fancy Goods, etc. 
THURSDAY — Regular Catalogue Sale of American, English and French Dry 
Goods, Silks, Embroideries, etc. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



L- 



XI 



GEO. C. SHREVE. 



GEO. BONNY. 



GEO. C. SHREVE & CO. 



IIwfl:i>ORXEIiS OF 





SILVERWARE, ETC. 

No. 110 Montgomery St,^ Occidsntal Hotel Building, 



Watches carefully repaired hy experienced Workmen at 

©BO® c® gHmBVH ^ mmm^ 



n. r.. SIMOIk', A. TVEIL.!. <fe E. AJSIVSXCI9r, 8. 'WEII.I^, H. IT. STEIKT, 

San Francisco. New York. Paris. 



WHIIft PlM®lf ^ ©©• 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



BROADCLOTHS AP CASSIHERES 

Vestings, Tailors' Trimmings, Billiard Cloths, 

Ladies' Cloakings and Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, 

Was. 632 and 634 Sacramento Street, 
And 631 and 633 Commercial Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 



AGENCY FOR THE CLOTHS, CASSIMERES, TWEEDS, &c. 

Manufactured bv the Mission Woolen Mills. 



in-orders for EUROPEAN AND AMERICA.^ GOODS promptly and carefully filled, for a 
reasonable commission, by our Houses — 28 Rue de L'Echiqcier, Paris, and 155 Chambers Street, 
New York. 



Ixii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



.LIS TlHi 



GO- 






ijlC MM' III M' w IT ItT 10 



9 



Straw and Fancy I 

XTo. 13 SAITSOM STREET, 

Between Bush and Sutter, next to Cosmopolitan Hotel, 

Wo. 32 Hue du Fauboiirff-Poissonniere, — JPAHIS. 



PIONEER WOOLEN FACTORY, 



I^OCjI^TEO jSlT 



BLACK POINT, SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 

MANUFACTORY OF ALL CLASSES OF 





SUCH AS 

BLANKETS, CASSIMERES, TWEEDS, FLANNELS, OVERSHIRTS, 
TEAMSTERS' SHIRTS, FIREMEN'S SHIRTS, UNDER- 
SHIRTS & DRAWERS, SLUICE BLANKETS, &c. 

Depot and Ofrice--Ho. 115 Battery Street. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



Ixiii 



Mil, lillllS a it. 



IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 



BOOK, lEWS, WEITII& 




Paper Bags, Straw and Binders' Boards, 

Black and Colored Inks, 

No. 516 SACRAMENTO & 519 COMMERCIAL STREETS, 

San Francisco. 



FRAXCIS BLAKE, ) 

JAMES MOFJ-ri I-, J San Francisco. 

CHAS. K. KOBBINS, ) 

JAMES W. TOWiSE, New York. 



B, 



|UZLLA3^ <& SOIT, 



IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 



If 



9 










9 
LOOKING GLASSES, 

Engravings, Chromos, Lithographs, Etc. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 

Nos. 209 & 211 Leidesdorff St. 

Between Commercial and Sacramento, SAN FRANCISCO* 



« »»m > 



Pictures, Diplomas, and Business Cards Framed on the most reason- 
able terms. RE-GILDING done in the best style. 



Ixiv SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



L. FELDMANN. H. CORDES. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

WOOD AND WILLOW WARE 

Twines, Lines, Children's Gigs, Bird-Cages, 

TOYS AND FANCY GOODS, Etc. 

AND AGENTS 

SAH FRANCISCO BRUSH FACTORY, 



3IANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 



MACHINE BRUSHES, 

315 and 317 Sacramento St., San Francisco. 

253 \\^asMiigtoii Street, - - - NEW YORK. 



MICHELS, FRIEDLANDER & CO. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

LADIES' AND 6ENTS' FURNISHIM GOODS 

French, English and German Fancy Goods, 

WHITE GOODS and HOSIERY, with a general assortment of Bovs' and Youths' 
Furnishing Goods. Manufacturers and Importers of the IMPROVED YOKE 
AMERICAN SHIRT. 

7 and 9 Battery Street, Oriental Block, San Francisco. 



J THOS. SULLIVAN. A. M. FRATINGKR. GEORGE NOLL C^ 

SUi;iI-lV-A.lT, FRATIITGEB. A CO. 

Successors to MEYER JONASSON & CO. 



Ct#AK H#WSHf 



If 

No. 14 Montgomery Street, 

First Cloak store from Market street, SAN FRANCISCO. (^ 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixv 



FLINT, PEABODY & CO. 







ITo. 408 Califorxxia Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 
AND NO. 114 STATE STREET, BOSTON. 



MORRIS SPEYER &; CO. 

J\o. 219 SANSOM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, 

Wim Ip#m^ OMam Wmwm^ 

FB.EITCI I -WIITES, CHIC ORY, Ac- 
sole AGENTS FOR E. LAGARDE & CO.'S COGNAC BRANDIES 
AND C. CHATELAIN DE MONTIGNY & GO'S CHAMPAGNE. 



ADELSDORFER BROTHERS, 



IIVEI^OIITEIIS OF 




)t( 



MT7SZCAZ. ZZTSTIIT7ME1TTS, 

tioaery & (Seaeral Merciaadisi 



NOS. 21 & 23 BATTERY STREET. 

Between Pine and Bush, SAN FRANCISCO, 



MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 

(SUCCESSORS TO EUGENE KELLY & CO.) 

ii»*a:i»oiia?Eits of 




Corner Sansoxn and Bush, Streets, 
SA.2sr n^-A.:N"oisoo- 



Ixvi SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



KTonon-osss db oo. 

No. 32 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 

MlUf 11¥ mmB, 111 AU4S, 

FLAG^S, BA^^^]S^EIlS, ETC., 

Ladies' Dress Trimmings, Under Linen, Hosiery, Zephyr, 

AND 

FURNISHING EMPORIUM, NO. 32 KEARNY STREET. 



A. B. ELFELT A CO. 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 

CLOTHING AND FUMISHmG GOODS, 

111 Battery Street, San Francisco. 



ELFELT, LEVI & CO., No. 132 Church Street, New York. 



GALZFOB.ITZA MILLS, 

N.W. Corner Howard and Spear Streets. 



SAWIM Am PLAHM, 

TURNING AND SCROLL SAWING, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



M@li®IM^S, S^ 



BZ.ZXTBS, DOOHS, ETC. 



II in IISDS if MMffi 



ADAMS, BLINN & CO. C. J. PRESCOTT. J. D. TANEY. JAMES TANEY. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



Ixvii 










Fully authorised to adjust and pay losses. 

Frame, Habe & Lockwood NEW YORK 

Charles A. Laton CHICAGO ILLINOIS! 

Bell, Nott & Co LIVERPOOL. 

Alsop & Co. VALPARAISO. 

KussELL & Co SHANGHAI. 

Russell & Co..... HONGKONG. 

Walsh, Hall & Co YOKOHAMA. 

Bishop & Co HONOLULU, H. I. 

William Nelson PANAMA. 

Alsop & Co LIMA. 

J. Robertson Stewart , VICTORIA V l' 

Walker Bros SALT LAKE CITy! 

Frank Palmer DENVER, COL. 

Wm. Sharon VIRGINIA. NEV. 

Ladd & liLTON PORTLAND, OREGON. 



DIRECTORS 



S-A.Isr FI?,.A.3SrCISCO 



SACRAMENTO : 



W. C. Ralston, 
A. L. Tubbs, 
Wm. Alvord, 
Jonathan Hunt, 
A. B Forbes, 
A. G. Stiles, 
A. Seligman, 
L. B. Benchley, 
Wm. Sherman, 
L. Sachs, 
James DeFremery, 
J. G. Bray, 
David Stem, 
D. q. Mills. 
I. Friedlander, 
Moses Heller, 
H. M. Newhall, 
G. T. Lawton, 
Myles D. Sweeny, 



Chas. Mayne, 
E. L. Goldstein, 
J. O. Earl, 
Lloyd Tevis, 
Thos. H. Selby, 
Adam Grant, 
Alpheus Bull, 
S. M. Wilson, 
D. J. Oliver, 
W. Scholle, 
Thos. Brown, 
C. R. Peters, 
Oliver Eldridge, 
J. B. Roberts. 
J. C Wilmerding, 
P. L. Weaver, 
Wm. Hooper, 
J- D. Fry, 
A. Hayward, 



T. L. Barker, 
Alex. Weill, 
Chas. ^leyer, 
Chas. t;. McLane, 
M. Rosenbaum, 
Chas. Main, 
A. J. Ralston, 
T. Lemmen Meyer, 
Geo. C. Hickox. 



NEW YORK : 

Louis McLane. 
Fred'lc Billings, 
James Lees, 
J. G. Kellogg, 
Moses Ellis. 



Edgar Mills, 
J. H. Carroll, 
C. T. Wheeler, 

MARYSVILLE : 
J. H. Jewett. 

SAN JOSE: 

E. McLaughlin. 

PORTLAND, OREGON; 

W. S. Ladd, 
Jacob Kamm. 

VIRGINIA. NEVADA : 

Wm. Sharon. 



ladiTTidual Liability of Stockh-olders. 

LOSSES EQUITABLY AND PROMPTLY AD.JUSTED AND PAID. 



A. J. RALSTON, 

Secretary. 



J. HUNT, 

President. 



A. BAIRD, 

Marine Secretary. 



WM. ALVORD, 

Vice President. 



Ixviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



"SWEEPSTAKE GANG PLOW. " 



m 







card 



OFFICE, 17 A 19 FRONT ST., 
SA-IsT FRANCISCO. 



1849. 



1871 




Hi 



^i 



ITos. 225 A 227 BEALE STB.EET, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Between Howard and Folsom, 

KITTREDGE ^sTlEAVITT, 

Steel I*ilieA ^^^^^^^^^ Wrought Iron 



BANK VAULTS, 

BURGLAR, FIRE-PROOF 

And Silverware Safes, 

PRISON CELLS, 

FERE-PROOF 

DOORS, 




GIRDERS, 

Bussey's Patent 

Combination Burglar Proof 

BANK VAULT 
SAFE LOOKS, 

Containing millions of changes. 

DETiCH\BLE KNOBS, NO KEY. A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF COMBINATION AND 
i;i!.iAv.n, ^^^ LOCKS ON HAND. 

Latest Improved Shears, Punches, Dies, etc., for Cold Iron Works. 
e@P8STAI»TrtY ©PC MANO A LAEl@ii AS§©aTMliOT @F PBRi PEI©Or 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixix 



Laurel iIill C 



EMETERY, 

(FORMERLY LONE MOUNTAIN) 

Office, 601 California Street, S. W. corner Kearny 

ROOM No. 1. 



W. K. Van Alen, H. L. King, M. S. Latham, 

N. LuNiNG, James Otis, N. Gray, 

H. M. Newhall, C. C. Butler, J, H. Redington. 

JAMES OTIS, President, 
W. C. RALSTON, Treasurer, 

C. C. BUTLER, Secretary, 

C H. CROWELL, Acting Sup't. 



Ixx 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



W. G. WEIR, 



MANUFACTURER OF 




ii:iii:»!|!'""iil'tli[''i., 1 1 liifeiiiiiiiiiiiliii'CisiKSii 

ITo. 113 Hayes Street, 



Near the Junction of Market and Ninth Streets, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



Ixxi 



FAGIFIG MAIL STEAMSHIP GO. 

The following named Steamers comprise the line be- 
tween J^ew YorJc, San Francisco, and China, via the 
Isthmus of Panama: 

From New York to AspinwaH - - - ,^8^2, 

Leaving on the 4th and 20th of every month. 
Steamers, - HENRY CHAUNCEY, OCEAN QUEEN, AND RISING STAR. 

(3000 tons each.) 

From Panama to San Francisco - 

{Touching at ports in Cential America and Mexico.) 
Steamers, - COLORADO, CONSTITUTION, 

- MONTANA, Sacramento, and Arizona, 



(Distance, 
3250 Miles.) 



4000 tons each. 
3000 " 



From San Francisco to Hongkong, '"■'^T^::^"' 

(Distance to Yokohama, 4,800 Miles ; to Hongkong, 6,400.) 

Leaving on the 1st of every month ab noon. 

Steamers, - AMERICA, JAPAN, GREAT REPUBLIC CHINA, AND A.LASKA, 

4,500 tons each. 

Branch Line from Yokoliama, ^:^;^^TTJJ:r21 

Four times a month. 
Steamers, - GOLDEN AGE, OREGONIAN, NEW YORK, COSTA RICA, AND ARIEL, 

3,000 tons each. 

« » > — 

Schedule of Departures, Arrivals, dkc. 

LEAVE NEW YORK ON THE 4th AND 20th OF EACH MONTH. 

Steamer of 4th calls at Acapulco, Manzanillo and Mazatlan. 

" 20th " Acapulco, San Jose de Guatemala and Punta Arenas. 

LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO FOR PANAMA, 3rd AND 18th EACH MONTH. 

Steamer of 3rd calls at Mazatlan, Acapulco, San Jose de Guatemala and Punta Arenas. 
" 18th " Acapulco and Manzanillo 

All Steamers call at San Diego, do-wni and up. 

CHINA LINE. 



OUTWAIiD. 



Lkave 
San Kkakcisco. 



Feb. 1 

Mar. 1 

April 1 

May 1 

June 1 

July 1 

Aug. 1 

Sept. 1 
Sept. 30 

Nov. 1 

Dec. 1 



DUK AT 

Yokohama. 



1871. 

Jan. 26 
Feb. 27 
Mar. 27 
April 27 
May 24 
June 24 
July 24 
Aug. 24 
Sept. 24 
Oct. 26 
Nov. 27 
Dec. 27 



Due at 

Ho^GKONG. 



1871. 

Feb. 3 

Mar. 7 

April 4 

May 6 

June 2 

July 3 

Aug. 2 

Sept. 2 

Oct. 2 

Nov. 3 

Dec. 5 



Jan. 4, 1872. 



hom:ew.IlR,d. 



Leave 
Hongkong. 



1871. 

Jan. 12 
Feb. 11 
Mar. 13 
April 12 
May 12 
June 12 
July 12 
Aug. 12 
Sept. 12 
Oct. 12 
Nov. 11 
Dec. 12 



DUK AT 

Yokohama. 



Jan. 20 

Feb. 19 

Mar. 21 

April 19 

May 19 

June 20 

July 19 

Aug. 19 

Sept. 20 

Oct. 20 

Nov. 19 

Dec. 20 



Due at 
San Fuancisoo. 



Feb. 16 

Mar. 18 

April 17 

May 13 

June 12 

July 14 

Aug. 12 

Sept. 12 

Oct. 17 

Nov. 16 

Dec. 16 

Jan. 16, 1872. 



Office of the Company in San Francisco at their Wharf, cor. First & Brannan Sts. 
£LDRIDG£ &, IRWIN, AGENTS. 



Ixxii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



H. A. CRANE. W. H. BRIGHAM. R. A. SANFORD. 

CRAXTE <& BRZCSAM, 

"WHOLESALE 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



DRUGS, MEDICINES, PROPRIETARY ARTICLES, 

FAITCV GOODS, 

Druggists' Sundries, Perfumery, etc., etc. 

322, 324 and 326 FRONT STREET, 

Corner of Clay, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



JOSEPH ROTH. HENRY VIDEAU. 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in 

FINE WINES, LIQUORS 

Brandies and Whiskies, 

809 MONTaOMERY STREET 

Between Jackson and Pacific, 

Opposite the Pioneers' Hall, ^A'SS IFIBillJC^nSOCDo 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixxiii 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

Office, XTo. ei9 CLA? STREET, 

SAH FRANCISCO, 

E. W. BURR, President, CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier, 

JAMES O. DEAN, Auditor, BENJ. O. DEVOE, Surveyor. 

BO-A-ItOD OF IDIH-ECTOItS : 

E. W. BURR, WM. BOSWORTH, J. W. CUDWORTH, J. M. SHOTWELL, 

BEiVJ. 0. DEVOE, R. J. TIFFANY, T. L. RUTHERFORD, E. F. NORTHAM, 

ISAAC HYDE, ANNIS MERRILL, H. L. KING. 

Deposits, $7,500,000. Reserve Fond, $250,000. 
Deposits received from two and one half dollars up to any amount. 

Dividends declared semi-annually — in January and July of each year. 



^? 



FRANK C. SNOW. JOSEPH ROOS. THOS. J. BLAKENEY, 

»BPOT OF GOtJFJ-b & CO- 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Plain and Colored Litbograpbs, Oil Paintings, 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, &c. 

« m»m » 

ALL PATTERNS AND STYLES OF 

OVAL FRAMES, ROSEWOOD A«D GILT MOLDINGS, 

ICEFX coivrsx.A-3srTL-Y oisr ia:A.]srnD. 



! i 



Manufacturers of Gold Leaf, Gold S Carved Frames of every Variety & Style. 

Orders from the Country solicited, and promptly attended to. 



« »»» > 



No. 21 Kearny Street^ near Market^ 

PORTLAND, O. LONDON, ENG. 



Ixxiv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



MATHEMATICAL 




im. JO 



Transits, 

Theodolites, 

Solar Compasses, 

Y Leveling Instruments, 

Leveling Staves, 

Compasses, 

Mountain Barometers, 

Distance Rods, 

Chains, 

Meridian Transits, 

Bullion Balances, 

Assaying Scales, 

Etc., Etc. 



REPAIRS EXECUTED IN THE BEST MANNER 
No. 420 Montgomery Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxv 



64a A^^^SHIlSrQTOlSr street, 642 



MANUFACTOREK OF 



FLAGS, BANNERS, SCARFS, AND ROSETTES 

ALSO IMPORTER OF 

FAHCy GOODS AHG TOYS 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



143 FOURTH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, 

Manufacturers and exclusive Agents for Westley's "Elysian Chair," Westley's " Twin 

Divans," Westley's "Gem Sofa Bed," Westley's "Kitchen Commode," Westley's 

Concealed Bed, " The Cache," Westley's Improved Spring Bed, " The Pacific." 



« »•» > 



MESSRS. N. P. COLE Sc CO., 

220, 222, 224, 226 Bush Street, San Francisco, 

Agents in California for "WESTLEY'S CELEBRATED MAGIC DIVAN," the most popular 

Sofa Bed ever introduced. 



JOHN WINTER, 



IMPORTER OF 




And Bremrers^ Stock. 

AGENT OF THE SOUTH PARK MALT HOUSE. 

XTo. 31S Sacraznento Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 




Select your own lot, within 2^ miles of the City Hall, accessible by two lines of 
Street Railroad, one fare to any part of the City. 

Immediate possession given on payment of $50 to $200— balance in payments of 
$10 per month, without interest. 

Size of lots 25x120, on wide streets: property graded. Price of lots $350 to $850. 

Also, lots on the Cliff House Road, and on the New Clement St. and CHff House 
Horse Railroad. Terms, $20 Cash, balance $10 per month. Apply to 

P. H. BLAKE, REAL ESTATE AGENT AND HOMESTEAD SECRETARY, 

No. 511 California Street, Rooms Nos. 12 and 13, over German Savings Bank. 

r. O. BOX 578, Oa TOLL HOUSE, CLIFF ROAD. 



Ixxvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 




CITY DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, 

S. E. CORNER OF STOCKTON AND GEARY STREETS. 
1 ■ » — 

Founded in 1859, and Incorporated in 1861, under liie name of University College. 



TRUSTEES: 

HON. THOMAS H. SELBY, PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD. 



Hon. H. P. Coon. M.D. 

Vice President. 
J. B. Roberts, Secretary. 
A. J. Kalston, Treasurer. 
Gov. H. H. Haight, 



Rev. W. A. Scott, D. D. 
Rev. S. Wooiibridge, I). D., 
Kev. H. M. Scndder, D. D. 
Kcv. Thoroas Fraser, 
Rev. T. M. Cunningham, D.D. 



Rev. Frederick Buel, 
J. D. Thornton, 
H. M. Newhall, 
R. B. "Woodward, 
F. Henderson, 



N. G. Kittle, 
A. J. Ralston, 
A. Campbell. 
H. H. Bancroft, 
W. C. Ralston. 



IHE DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION ARE AS FOLLOWS, VIZ: 

C O L L.E O E. 

REV P V VEEDER. D. D.. Acting President and Professor of Moral and Mental Philosophy. 

KFV" THOMAS KIRKLAND, A. M, Protestor of Latin and Greek. 

ThMs A ROBINSON Professor of Mathematics and Book-Keeping. 

GC ARNOLD; Ph. D., Prof of Physics and Modern Languages. 

HENRY MOURON, Professor of French. 

CUAS. PROESCil, Professor of Drawing. 

Sclool of Practical Clieioiistry ami Assaying. 



THOMAS PRICE, M. D., 



Professor of Chemistry. 



THE OOLLEGhE SCHOOL. 



REV. P. V. VEEDER, D. D. 



Principal. 



senior English and Classical "epartMent-Bjv^THOMAS^^^AKA Master. 

Junior English and Classical Department.— \ jj^gg MABY E. CLAKK, Assistant. 

Primary Department.-Miss MARIA G. CLARK and Mrs. A. W. VEEDER. 

The College Professors also give instruction in the College School. 
■ Book-Keeping carofujly^taugh^t in the Junior ?n^Jf„"jo^,J'/„P^fXd"epkrtments of the School. 




the practical study of Chemistry m all its branches. 

The Trustees have erected on tlieir College property, Kno 
Plaza, a new and beautiful College Edlfloe which has been . 



known as the University Mound, situate five miles from the 
open binci January, i870, for the recepUon of boardmg and 



Sessioks. — -. „ , - T I 

Jn the first week in January, and the first week m July 



Primary DepaTtment. per month $6 00 

Junior "English and Classical Department, per 

month $7 00 to 8 00 

Senior English and Classical Department, — 

month '9 



college 9V>^ 

Each Modem Language,. ■ • • ■■■ ■Vi w 

Drawing, Commuii aud Architectural 51 00 to J W 

Stationery : S 

to 10 00 Repairs of Gymnasium, per session *»» 



Bills nayable in the middle of each month. .„ „„^„ 

i^^Mu-cMLCaaff^'^ ^s Tc^S^^ntr;n'l\rc"h^raKr''^-upils from the country boarding .n re-^ 
*PTdeduciion'of o'e-h^lf the usual charge, is made in case of absence beyond two wf ks on account of sickness. 
For circulars with other pariiculars, and a list of patrons to whom reference may be made, address 

Rev. I». V- VEEDER, D. I>., Principal. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxvii 




Ixxviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



mmi 



im:f»or,te:r8 of 




Qtutnc 



-A.^TID 



GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, 

NOS. 3 and 5 BATTERY STEEET, 

ORIENTAL BLOCK, 
S A. N FH A. JST O I S C O. 



84 Thomas Street^ Ngw Torki 



m:a]vxjfa.ctxjjrino 



Cytlers, Locksmiths i Bell-Hangers, 




o 



K 



I 

a 

H 

GQ 

H 

O 



O 

fel 
1-3 
CP 
O 

w 

Importers and Manufacturers of all kinds of CUTLERY. Bell-Hanging done in any part of the 
Pacific Coast. Cutlerv ground and repaired. Sole Agents for HEINISCH'S CELEBRATED SCIS- 
SORS and JACKSON'S PATENT HOTEL AND ELECTRIC ANNUNCIATORS. All kinds of 

Tools on hand and made to order. Country Orders by mail or express promptly attended to. 

ALL KINDS OF FARO TOOLS ALWAYS ON HAND AND MADE TO ORDER. 
FREDEKIOIK A. -WILL, JULIUS FIITCK, 



Cutler and Surgical Instrument Maker. 



Bell-Hanger and Locksmith. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



Ixxix 



L® MJLi) 



ilfWilf 

FZOXTESH. 





OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Also®) W®mm®pe ®mfl OtoppI®: 



And Exporters of Sides and Leather, 



COUuSTTRY OHDERS SOLICITED. 



Salesroom, at Factory on Fell St., near Franklin. 
Office, Collection Days, at Hobart, Wood & Go's, 15 Sansom St. 



MAB»HW m 



MANUFACTURERS OF THE 



Celebrated Family Coffee 



WHICH TOOK THE 



FIRST PREMIUM 



iK-EA* mmmi 



AT THE — 



M m 



ALSO, MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

SPICES AND HERBS OF A SUPERtOR QUALITY, 

WHICH CAN BE FOUND IN QUANTITIES TO SUIT AT 



mu 



S^N FR^ISTCISCO. 



Ixxx 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 




J. K. PRIOR 

Importer and Dealer in all kinds of 



IMix^^ 









\if fffrvi 






m^ 



730 Montgozxiery Street, 

NEAR JACKSON ST., OPP. METROPOLITAN THEATER, 
S^N FRANCISCO. 



< »»» > 



FANCY AMD PLAIN WASH BASINS, 

Silver -Platsd Cocks^ Bath Tubs, Sheet Zina, 

SHEET LEAD, LEAD PIPE 

CfALVANIZED AND PLAIN IRON FIFE, 



A.1L.3L. SIZE©, FOR 



Gas, Steam and W^ater 

In lots to suit, together with Elbows, Tees, Return Bends, Stop Cocks, Plugs, 
Bushings, Nipples, etc. ; Rubber Hose, Hose Bibbs, Hose Pipes, etc. 

Ci^ST IRON PIPE, 

COFFSB. BOZZ.EIIS, STC. 
Gas and Steam Fitting and Plumbing in all its Branches. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



Ixxxi 





DARLING & CO. 
& 

629 "Wasliixxgton St. Saa Francisco, Cal. 
» »«» > 

Merchandise, Machinery and Supplies Purchased and 
Sold on Commission at Lowest Importers' Rates. 






GENERAL AGENTS FOR THE 

GARDNER AUTOMATIC SAFETY STOP GOVERNOR, 

NATHAN & DREYFUS' 

PAl^SWS ©It OWPS^ 

GARDNER & ROBERTSON 

LovT "^^ater Detector, 

AND FOR 

Drsyfus' Patent Cylinder Lubricators. 

K. H. COZiCORD, Traveling Agent. 



mml MM Imamvmmm i«® 



Ts/LJ^xisr:E. 



Twenty-Two Years Successful Bu siness. A ssets, $6,000,000. 

LEADING FEATURES: 

Lo-wer Cash Rates than any other Purely Mutual Company. 

Shows the Largest Increase of every business in 1870 of any company reporting 

to the Insurance Commissioner of California. 
Light Expenses, Interest and Receipts in Excess of Losses and Expenses. 

H. H, JOHNSTON & CO,, General Managers Pacific Coast. 

S. W. Cor. KEAMIY & CAUFOKNIA STEEETS, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Privats Lessons in the French Language 



Mm JO 



Wm 



f 



Graduate of the University of Paris, late Professor of De La Mennais Normal School for Teachers, and of 

St. Mary's College, London. 

Quincy Place, So-ath. Side of Fine Street, 

(Between Kearny and Dupont.) 

KEFRRESrCES.— Most Rev. J. Alemany, Arclibi.shop; Mons. Edmond 15 (Uil, French Consul Ocneral; Mons. 
tmile Belcour, Cliancelleiir do. ; also Col. Hiram Leonard, U.S.A. ; J. B. E. Cavauiur, President San Francisco Stock 
and p:xcliange Board; Gustave Mahe, Director French Savings: Joseph Emeric, S.W. cor. Washington and Sansom; 
Bemhard Gattel, General Agent Gerniania Life Insurance Company; Jlessrs. John C. Pelton ; Gustave Touchard, 
Prest. Union Ins. Co.; Judge O. Hoffman; Judge K. J. Tobin ; Rev. J. Croke, Vicar General; David D. Colton, F. 



Wandelbanm, N. Scheeline, J. Brandenstein, JI. Esberg, JI. Uosenhaum and Martin Heller. 

Private Lessons given at the Residence of the Pnpil. 
6 



Evening Classes. 



Ixxxii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



NATIONAL 

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 

It is a NATIONAL COMPANY, Chartered by Special Act of Congress. 

It ofifers the lowest responsible Rates of Premium. 

It furnishes larger Insurance than other Companies for the same money. 

It is a Home Company in every locality. 

Its Policies are exempt from attachment. 

All Policies are Non-Forfeiting. 

It makes an annual addition of one hundred per cent, to the Policies of the 

Premium paid. 



C I. HUTCHINSON, Genl Agent, 

338 MONTGOMERY ST., 

ROOMS 6 and, 7. 



EST A.]BlL,ie»HEr>, 1851. 

FISHER & CO. 

Importers and Manufacturers of 



300 MONTQOMERY STREET, 

CORNER PINE, SAN FRANCISCO. 




C. S. "WAXSELEE <ft CO. 

Farms, Farming Lands L City Real Estate 

LOANS NEGOTIATED. 

601 CAZiZFORXTZi^ STREET, 

S. W. Corner Kearny, g^Jf iF!Mlf€2S€<&. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxiii 



R. SAVAGE. 



R. H. SAVAGE. 



EMPIRE FOinTDB."?, 

SAVAGE & SON, Proprietors. 

llSBsals; 292 &, 291 Howard Sts., San Francisco, 



< »«» > 



MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN 



Stoves, PorlaWe Ranps, Grates anft Feniers of everj JescriBtioii. 



< ■»»» ► 




House Front, Steam Engine, Agricultural, Iron 
Railing, Ornamental Work, and every variety of 
Castings, both heavy and light. Water, Gas and 
Steam Pipe manufactured to order. Sash Weights 
in any quantity. 

OUR PORTABLE RANGES, 

THE FIRST 

imlUtf aim ito¥®i® 

Patronize Home Manufacture. 



JOHN A. MAGEE, Jr. 



ARTHUR W. MOORE. 



^ M©®BBi 



§ 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Shoe lanufacturers' Groods, 



41S Market Street, 



BETW^EEN SANSOM AND BATTERY, 



^AMOIi 



Ixxxiv SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



ESTABLISHED 1854. 



THE ONLY 

Watch Case Manufacturer 

OlSr THE PJ^OIFIC CO^ST. 



ALSO, SOLE AGENT FOR 

F. H. Mathez Freres' Tramclan Watches, 

ROSKOFF'S PATENTED WATCH, 

622 ClaAir STREET, 



A. J. SMITH, 




And Sole Proprietor and Manufacturer of the 

CELEBRATED HUDSOH FORCE PUMPS 

Smith's Copper-Lined Pumps, Plumbers' Force Pumps, 

Air and Sabraerged Pnnips, Beer and Hot Liqaor Painps, 

ALSO, PATENT WATEH CLOSETS. 

XTO. 908 MAKHET STREET, 

SAN FEA.IsrCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxv 



PHCENIX IRON WORKS 



JONATHAN KITTREDGE, 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Iron Doors, Shutters, 



AND ALL KINDS OF HOUSE SMITH WORK. 



-< »-» »- 



Fire and Burglar-Proof Safes 



Constantly on hand and made to order at the shortest notice. 



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(f) O 



Nos. 18 and 20 Fremont St., near Market, San Francisco. 



Welded Steel and Wrought-Iron Safes. Forging and Machine Work. 



Ixxxvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



A. S. HALLZDZE, 

Importer, Dealer and Manufacturer of 

IRON & STEEL WIRE ROPE 

AMD WIBE OF ALL KIHDS. 



MANUFACTURING WORKS, NORTH BEACH, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

Sole Agency of R. S. NEWALL & CO., Gateshead, on Tyne. 

AND OF 

RICHARD JOHNSOiV & NEPHEW, MANUFACTURERS OF WIRE, MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 



MINING COMPANIES, FERRYMEN AND, SHIPMASTERS, 

Are Informed that Wire Rope can he furnished them, considerably under tlie cost of Hemp or JIanila Kope, of equal 
strength. 

WiKF, Rope does not stretch or shrink by tlie change of weather. It weighs 40 per cent, less than Hemp ; is less than 
one lialf the diameter: it is as easily spliced under all circumstances; is as pliable for equal strength, and is from three 
to ttvc times as durable as the best of Hemp or Blanila Kope. 

It is almost exclusively used throughout the principle mining regions, and by the leading shipowners; and thirty 
years experience has tested its merits and proven its great economy and superiority over any other kind of Kope. 

We have entirely remodeled our Manufactory with new and improved maehinerj', and by the careful selection of the 
best material, the Wire Kopes turned out fiom our establishment we guarantee to be equal to any made. 

Round Iron Wire Eope, i to i| inches diameter; Plat Iron Wire Rope, 2|x| 

to 5x1 inch, for hoisting from Inclines and Shafts. 
Round Steel Wire Rope, I to l inch diameter, for Derrick Fall Ropes and 

Hoisting purposes. 
Flat steel Wire Rope, 2|xJ to S^x^, for hoisting from Deep Shafts. 

Ungalvanized or Galvanized Round Wire Rope, I to 2^ inches diameter, for 

Ships' Rigging, Derrick Guys, Buoy and Flying Ferry Ropes. 
Ungalvanized and Galvanized Iron and Copper Wire Cord, lo to | inch 

diameter, for Hanging Window Shades, Dumb Waiters, Signals, etc. Suitable 
Sash Pulleys furnished with Sash Cord. 

Galvanized Iron Wire Strand, i to f inch diameter, for Fencing in Lands, etc. 

Note.— steel 'Wire Rope weighs about 60 ner cent, of Iron Wire Rope, or 35 per cent, of Manila, of equal 
stren(!tli. It is admirably adapted for Fall Ropes for Derricks, with suitable Sheeves, and for hoisting purposes, where 
there is much rough work. Its extreme ligliiness eftects quite a .saving in freight to remote points, Manila or Hemp, ot 
equal strength, weighing three times its weight. Sec comparative weight, strength and sizes of 



Steel Wire Rope. 


Iron "Wire Rope. 


Hemp Rope. 


Working Load of Eaeh. 


Circumference, 
a 3-8 


Wt. of 100 Ft. 

55 
83 


CircTimference. 

3 1-3 
3 


Wt. of 100 Ft. 

88 
130 


Circumference. 
T 1*4 


Wt. of 100 Ft. 

130 
185 


3,roo ii>s. 

5,000 " 



A full scale of weights and strength, with prices, can be obtained from any of our Agents, or by sending to the manu- 
facturer, who will forward the same by return mail. 

WIRi: SUSPENSION BRIDGES. 

We are prepared to contract for the erection of .Suspension Bridges and Aqueducts, guaranteeing our work, and can 
refer to the many Bridges erected under the personal superintendence of A. S. Hallidic, C.E., during the last ten years 
on this Coast, of spans irom '200 to 400 feet. Material for Wire Suspension Bndge construction furnisbed low. Wire of 
all kinds constantly on hand. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixxxvil 



CIVIL. ENGINEER 

AND 

Practical Surveyor. 

Also, LATE STATE LOCATING AGENT FO R SCHOOL LANDS. 

Having been engaged in the construction and management of the Public Works of the State of 
Ohio for twenty years, and having had charge of the Public Surveys of the State of California for 
seven years, and the disposition of the School Lands of the State for ten years, and having provided 
his office with maps of all the Public Surveys of the State, as well as with the Land Laws, Instruc- 
tions, Rules and Regulations of the State and the United States, he deems himself prepared to give 
any desired information relating to the lands of the State, or to transact any business appertaining 
to the entry, location, purchase or sale of the same. 

15^°' Maps and Plats furnished -when required. 

Field Notes of Intricate Surveys platted, and quantities calculated. 
Deeds vrith difficult descriptions carefully drawn. 

Field Work, either Surveying oj- Leveling, executed promptly, and every other kind of business 
connected with Public Works or Lands attended to with dispatch. 

Office, No. 522 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



WILLIAM CRAINE, 



XTo. Q3^ Washington Stree't, 

BAH FRAHCISCO, 

OFFERS HIS SERVICES FOR THE PREPARATION OF ACCURATE 

Designs, Plans, SpGcifications kt Drawings, 
FOR BUiLDiisras 

Of every Description, and to Superintend the Erection thereof. 



BUILDINQS IKSPSCTED, MEASURED &> VALUED. 



Ixxxviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PHILADELPHIA 



»««W««T 



^ 




Corner of Second and Folsom Streets, 



I take the present opportunity of thanking my Friends and Customers for the 
Hberal support heretofore extended to the 

PHILADELPHIA BREWERY, 

And notify them that I have added to my Establishment 

HEW MD EXTEHSIYE BUILDIIIGS, 

By which I hope, through the greatly increased facilities now possessed by me, 

to furnish, as usual, a 

SUPERIOR ARTICLE of XXX ALE and LAGER BEER 

That shall not only equal that previously furnished by me, but 
convince them that I am determined to merit their continued patronage and support. 

JOHN WIELAND. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixxxix 



Pluinl3er and G-as Fitter 



IMPORTER AND DEALER IN 



Chandeliers, Gas Fixtures, Show Window Reflectors 
PNEUMATIC GAS MACHINES, 

Iron JPipe and Fittings^ Copper Hollers and Bath Tubs, 

Light and Heavy Sheet-iron Worker , Artesian and 

Deep Well Pumps, all sizes made to order. 

918 Market Street, 

Opposite St. Ignatius College, SiiSS" If ^B^SS'OUgO®© 



HYDRAULIC PIPES 

MANUFACTURED IN THE BEST MANNER AND AT LOWEST MARKET RATES. 



WILLIAM SHERMAN & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 

CLOTHZITC, 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, Trunks and Valises. 

AVe are receiving, by every steamer, Superior and Medium Clothing of our 
own manufacture, all of which we warrant to be of the most superior make. Our 
Merchant Tailoring Department is complete. 



Sole Leather Tranks, Ladies' French Traveling Trnnks 

VALISES AND SACKS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

608 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

EAST SIDE, NORTH OF CLAY. 

Orders for CUSTOM CLOTHING will receive our most careful and prompt attention. 



xc 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 




ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



XCl 



TOLAUD 





San Francisco, CaL 



The annual Course of Lectures of this Institution commences on the first Monday of June, and terminates on 
the 31st clay of October. 

During tlie regular term, the students will have an opportunity of visiting the various hospitals of the city, 
under circumstances which will enable them to observe medical and surgical treatment, to listen to clinical 
teaching, and make records of the progressive development of diseases, with the results of Medicine and 
Hygiene. The Faculty desire to call attention to the following local advantages : 

1st. There is no climate, perhaps, in the world, which has a more invigorating effect upon persons coming 
from the interior of our States and Territories, thereby qualifying the votaries of study with essential health 
and inspiration. 2d. No city of the same population has more ample hospital facilities or greater opportuni- 
ties for organizing and maintaining the very best elements of clinical teaching. 3d. The singular characteris- 
tics of our climate are such, that every branch of Medical study can be prosecuted during the entire year. In 
winter or summer, dissections can be made without detriment to the health of the student. 

Fees and Regulations. 

The aggregate Fees of the Professors for a full term $130 00 

The Matriculation Fee (this fee is paid but once) 5 00 

The Graduation Fee 40 00 

The Demonstrator's Ticket 10 00 

JtEQTTIREMENTS FOU OMAHUATION. 

1st. The candidate must be 21 years of age. 

2nd. He must have attended two full Courses of Medical Lectures, one of which must have been delivered m 
this Institution. 

3d. He must have attended a Course of Practical Anatomy in the dissecting room. 

4th. The candidate must have studied Medicine for three years (the terms of attending Lectures included) 
under the direction of a respectable medical practitioner. 

5th. He must write a Medical Thesis, and submit the same to the Faculty two weeks prior to the commence- 
ment. 

Graduates from other Medical Colleges, in good standing, are required to Matriculate only. 

BOABDiyG. 

Students can obtain good Board in the city, at prices varying from five to ten dollars per week. 
Application for further information may be addressed to the Dejn. 



Board of Trustees. 



J. B. FELTON^, President. 



IK,A. I». 



Ex-Gov. F. F. Low, 
Ex-Lieut. Gov. T. N. Machin, 
Hon. Milton S. Latham, 
Hon. Stephen J. Field, 
Hon. George Pearce, 
Ira P. Rankin, Esq., 
John 0. Earl, Esq., 



E. J. Pringle, Esq., 
A. Hollub, Esq., 
Thos. H. Selby, Esq., 
Ex-Gov. P. H. Burnett, 
Ex-Gov. John G. Downey, 
Hon. H. P. Coon, 
Hon. Frank McCoppin, 
Andrew Glassell, Esq. 



RA^lVItllV, Secretary. 

James P. Whitney. M.D., 
J. B. Felton, Esq., 
Sam'l J. Bridge, Esq., 
Lloyd Tevis, Esq., 
Wra. Blanding Esq., 
Jno. Sime, Esq., 
A. J. Bowie, M. D. 



Medical Faculty. 

H. H. TOLAND, M. D., Professor of Principles and Practice of Surgery; R. BEVERLY COLE, 
M. D., Professor of Obstetrics and Clinical Diseases of Women ; GEO. HEWSTON, M. D., Pro- 
fessor of Principles and Practice of Medicine ; W. 0. AYRES, M. D., Professor of Physiology ; 
JOHN HEWSTON, M. D., Professor of Chemistry ; C. T. DEANE, M. D., Professor of Diseases 
of Women and Children and Clinical Obstetrics ; C. M. BATES, M. D., Professor of Clinical Medicine ; 
E. TRENOR, M. D., Professor of Medical Jurisprudence and Mental Diseases ; A. A. O'NEIL, 
M. D., Professor of Anatomv ; W. T. BRADBURY, M. D., Professor of Materia Medica and 
Pharmacy ; W.F. SMITH, M. D', Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology; W. A. DOUGLASS, M. D., 
Adjunct to the Chair of Clinical Medicine ; W. H. JOHNSON, M. D., Adjunct to the Chair of 
Obstetrics and Clinical Diseases of Women; CHAS. TOLAND, M. D., Prosector to the Chair of 
Surgery; WM. H. JOHNSON, M. D., Curator of the Museum. 

R. BEVERLY COLE, M. D., Dean of Faculty, 

Office, No. 1 6 Geary Street, above Kearny. 



XCll 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 




ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XCIll 



C. WATERHOUSE, San Francisco. 



Mrs. J. W. LESTER, New York. 



WAfiiiora: 



IMS^BB 



ii 



IlS^CI>OIiTER,S OF 



Hard Wood Lumber, 




GOACH, CARRIAGE & WAGON 

MATERIALS, 

m wm® mW am if u 1 mM. ^ 4 mm 1 mm mmm M ». 



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SA-CHA-MENTO. 



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LESTER & ^VATERHOUSE, 

121 AND 123 FRONT STREET, NEW YORK. 



XCIV SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Illf EM PAilf li IMIilMl. 



< »mm > 



Quick Time and Cheap Fares 

FI^03VE 

CHINA AND JAPAN TO NEW lOEK AND LIVERPOOL. 



< ^«» > 



THE GREAT OYERLAKD ROUTE 

VIA. 

Central Pacific Railroad 




Is now in complete running order from 

SAN FRANCISCO TO THE ATLANTIC SEABOARD. 



Througli Express Trains leave San Francisco Daily, 

Making prompt connections with the several Railway Lines in the Eastern States for all the Cities of the 
UNITED STATES AND CANADAS, and connecting at New York with the several steamer lines to 

Sxigland, France and all European Forts. 



SILVER PALACS SLEEPINQ COACHES, 

Second to none in the world, are rnn daily from San Francisco to New York and intermediate points. These 
Drawing Room Oars by day, and Sleeping Cars by night, are unexcelled for comlbrt and convenience to the 
passenger while en route — combining the elegance of a private parlor and all accommodations pertaining to a 
well-furnished chamber, with comfortable couches, clean bedding, etc. A competent Porter accompanies each 
Car to attend to the wants of our patrons. 



GREAT REDUCTION IN THROUGH FARES. 

Children not over Twelve (12) years of age, HALF FARE. Under Five (5) years of age, FREE. 
100 pounds of Baggage per Adult Passenger, FREE. 50 pounds of Baggage, per child between 
5 and 12, FREE. 

1 M > 

TlroBEl Ticiet Office, 422 CALIFORNIA ST., San Francisco. 

1 ^ > 

Through Freights between San Francisco and New York, and other Eastern Cities, contracted through at 
low rates. Mark Goods " Cake C. P. R. R." B^" Money saved by purchasing Tickets at the 
Company's Offices. 

T. II. GOODMiiXT, Ji,. IT. TO'WZTS, 

Gen'l Freight and Passenger Agent. General Superintendent. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XCV 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

c/T French, English and Domestic 



CO 




/ 36 MONTGOMERY STREET, COR. SUTTER, ^. 

Cjt> SATST FRANCISCO. \^T 



GEORGE D. NAGLE, 

C01TTRA.CT0II, 

Office, 418 MONTQOMERY STREET, 

Si^nsr FRA.NCISOO. 



ESTIJM^TKS GHVE]V ON 



BUILDINGS, BRIDGES, 

And all Descriptions of Contract "Work. 



— < »»^ > 



BRICKS ON HAND AND FOR SALE IN ANY REQUIRED QUANTITY. 



XCVl 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



J. r» L .A.T e: 



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GEORGE MORROW, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

HAY, aRAIN AND FEED OF ALL KINDS 

39 Clay Street and 28 Commercial Street, 



Between Drumm and East Streets, 



SA:\^ FRANCISCO, CAL. 



« »*m > 



Consignments Solicited. Orders from the Country promptly attended to. 



DR. SMITH'S HYGEIAN HOME WATER CURE, 

ii37 California Street, opj). St. Mary's Cathedral, S. F. 

This is the only regular Water Cure in San Francisco, and by far the most extensive and complete Hygienic Insti" 
tute on the Pacific Coast. 

Dr. Smith claims to have made discoveries in the science of Phrenology that enable him, either blindfolded or other- 
wise, by an examination of the head, to determine the diseases to which the person is constitutionally sut)ject, or 
whether the disease at the time afflicting the person is the result of an accident or hereditary weakness, whether con- 
sumptive, dyspeptic, rheumatic, apoplectic, neuralgic or seminal. Especially does the form of the head indicate the 
strength of the uterine and reproductive system. 

The head is also an index of the natural strength of the lungs, heart, stomach, liver, kidneys, spleen, back or verte- 
bra, and it determines the power of the system in warding off and overcoming diseases of all kinds. 

Phreno Examinations and Consultations in reeard to Health, Free, from lO A.. 'SH. 
to 3 P. M. 

We have the Electro, Russian, Turkish and Thermal Baths, and every form of Medical Baths for Ladies and Gen- 
tlemen, from 9 to 6, and on Sundavs, from 7 A. JI. to 1 1'. M. 

GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICES.— We now give patients four weeks Hygienic Medical Treatment, with Board 
and Room, for |60, (In ordinary cases). Board. 86 per week ; with room, from $7 to 910. Medical Baths, from 50 cents 
to $1 each, or VI for $10 ; 20 for f 15. ^^^ We have a separate Medical Department for Ladies, which is attended by a 
thoroughly competent woman, while the private residence of Dr. Smith, whicli is connected with the Home, is chiefly 
devoted to the accommodation of ladies desiring Hygienic Treatment. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



XCVll 



'Br. 



*!!,■• mai ■■it® iltn 



Will not be removed to Kearny Street, as announced, 

BUT WILL CONTINUE AT THE OLD STAND, 621 and 623 CLAY ST. 

Where extensive Alterations are being made, 
And will shordy be completed, making one of the most commodious and conveniently 
arranged Music Stores in the United States. The largest and best selected stock of 
AMERICAN AND FOREIGN SHEET MUSIC, MUSIC BOOKS, Musical In- 
struments OF Direct Importation, for sale at lowest market prices, wholesale or 
retail. M. CJRAY, 621 and 623 Clay Street, Saw Francisco. 

GRAY'S MUSIC STORE 

Nos. 621 and 623 Clay St., San Francisco, Cal. 
AGENCY FOR STEINWAY & SON'S 



Am# 




i WPai©H* 



PI A IT OS, 

ERNEST GABIER'S, HAINES BROS. & KRANICH, BACH & COS PIANOS. 



THE BURDETT ORGANS, 

School, Church and Parlor Organs. 



THE LEADING ORGAN OF THE WORLD. 



Send for Price List and Descriptive Catalogue. Observe that we have made such arrangements 
with our California Agent as to enable him to supply at similar currency prices as ourselves in 
Chicago, thereby saving to the Wholesale and Retail Customer the cost of Overland Transportation. 

LYON & HEALY, (^n'l Ag'ts for the Manufacturers, Chicago, III. 

M. GRAY, San Francisco, General Agent for California. 



XCVIU SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SAN BRUNO ROAD, S. F. 
Between Twenty-Sixth and Twenty-Seventh Streets. 



< »»» > 



JOHN REYNOLDS, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Oil of Vitriol, 

LCuriatic and XTitric iicids, 

Slue Stone, Copperas, Sal Soda, 

Prussian Blue, Glauber Salts, 
Heynolds' Fat. Sol. Fruss. of Fotash., 
Reynolds' Fat. Gliemical Soap, 



ENOWLES' PATENT STEM PDHP 

Am L. FZSH, Agent. 




"«(X^4^»S^ti^V~;^.. 



No. 9 First Street, near Market, San Francisco, Cal. 






SELDOFS STEUM PACKING. FOR STUFFING BOIES. 



'J 



All Kinds of Kew k SecondMHand Machinery 

IN STOCK AND SUPPLIED. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XCIX 



KOOPMANSCHAP & CO. 

ttniMif 1 ■■iranf i 

And Cliixiese Emigration Agents, 

S.W^. OOHNER OALIFORIsTIA AND DAVIS STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



BOOK BINDER 



.A. T^ I> 



BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER 

No. 509 CLAY STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



.AUGUST KOEHLER, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Trusses, Elastic Shoulder Braces 

FOR EXPANDING THE CHEST, 

Ladies' Belts and Supporters, Instruments for Club Feet, Knock-Knees, Bow-Legs, Weak Ankle- 
Joints, Curvature of the Spine, Piles and Prolapsus. Also, a very superior article of Silk Thread, 
Elastic and Lace Stockings (for enlarged or varicose veins of the leg, &c.) Elastic Female Belts, 
Knee Caps, Children's Trusses, Surgical Belt and Bandage, and all kinds of Suspensories. 

718 Washington St., opp. the Plaza, San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



A. WELCH, San Francisco. R. D. WELCH, Liverpool. 

WELCH & CO. 

Imprters, SiiiiQ£ & CoMission lercMnts, 

BaiTTAH*S BOILOIHG, 109 CAUFORNIA ST. 

&AJr^ X«X1..A.3>3-OXSOO, CA.JLJ. 

AGENTS, MOODY'S SAW MILLS, BURRARD INLET, B.C. 

Andrew Welch S Co., 19 Tower Chambers, Liverpool, England. 



^VM. H. & D. M. MOORE, 

BRASS FOUMDERS AND FINISHERS, 

ITo. 112 Beale Street, 

Between Mission and Howard, SAM FKiVHCISCO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 



Brass and Bell Castings, Force and Lift Pumps, 

COCKS AND VALVES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION MADE AND REPAIRED. 

AdiNTS mw> mmmeiQi'U^^m q>w 

C. W. TEESDALI'S PATENT SELF LUBBICATOE 

For Marine, Locomotive and Stationary Engines. 

-A.X.SO FOlEl THE E.A.a-LE P>.A.OK:i3SrC3-3 

A new Article, adapted either for Steam or Water. 

Agents for HATCH'S PATENT GUIDES AND SUPPORT- 
ING COLLARS for Variety Moulding Machines. 



A. S. ROSENBAUM & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF 

FINE HAVANA CIGARS, 

TOBACCO, ETC. 

And Sole Agents for the celebrated Peach Cake Wavy Tobacco 

COR. CLAY AND BATTERY STS. 

162 xpu'.AJrjEsii. s'X'xi.zixs'X', Ta-:Ei\sr ■^srolE^.^, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



CI 



miiEUJ 



MfllS 








FRAXTXS EASTMAXT, 




M 



BOOK, CARD AND FANCY 



mf 



iMT .CTBIR, 








Near Sansom, 



SAN FaANCISCO. 



Every style of work required by Merchants, Mechanics, Law- 
yers, Insurance Companies, Banks, etc., correctly, tastefully, speed- 
ily and elegantly executed at this long established House. 

The proprietor has added every desirable improvement in 
PRINTING, TYPE AND MACHINERY that the business 
demands. Novelty and originalty of design in the execution of 

Flail ani Fai®7 J#i PriailBs 



Will receive his prompt attention, and he hopes, by fair dealing 
and low prices, to suit all who may favor him with their patronage. 



Cll 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



o^o HOtr^ 



c 




^. 



Corner Commercial, 



3)P*®)®S|) 



SAIT FKAXTCZSCO. 



r». O. BOX 1129. 



ROOMS TO LET 

By the Day, Week or Month. Open all Night. 



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< *.» » 



City Front and Lone Mountain, South Park and North Beach 
and Mission Cars pass the House every five minutes. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. ClU 







Corner of Clay, SAIT FRiilTClSCO- 



In Building formerly known as Kohler, Chase & Co's 
Music Establishment, j^^ q^ BOX 1129. 



ROOMS TO LET 

By the Day, Week or Month. OPEK ALL KIQHT. 



< »«» > 






® Mi 



City Front and Lone Mountain, South Park and North 
Beach and Mission Cars pass the House every five minutes. 
Newly furnished with spring beds and hair mattresses. 



CIV 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 




^^ 



$650,000. 



HOMK 



MUTUAL 



INSURANCE COMPANY 



mw mMMMEwmmwEAm 



® 



Office^ ^33 California St., Merchants' Exchange Bldg, 



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ri^i^iif-rii 



JOHN H. REDINGTON, 
GEO. H. HOWARD, 
CHARLES R. STORY, 
N. B. EDDY, 
H. H. BIGELOW, 



President 
- Vice-President 

Secretary 
Marine Secretary- 
General Manager 



SPECIAL Coi.i.i-oiiUi'^S 



THE 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 

For the Year commencing April, 1871 : 

EMBRACING A 

GEiNERAL DIRECTORY OF RESIDENTS 

AND A 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY; 

ALSO, 

A DIRECTORY OF STREETS, PUBLIC OFFICES, ETC. 
AND A NEW MAP OF THE CITY: 

TOGETHER WITH 

The Consolidation Act and its Amendments ; Officers of the Municipal Government, 
Societies and other Organizations, and a great variety of Useful 
and Statistical Information, '■ 

EXHIBITING AT A GLANCE 



TWELFTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. 



COMPILED BT 

HENRY a. LANQLEY, 

EDITOR Or"rACIFIC COAST BCSIKBSS DIKECTORT," " 8TATK EEGISTEB " AND "PACIFIC COAST ALMANAC.' 



DEPOTS FOR THE SALE OF THIS WORK : 

Office of the Directory, No. 612 Clay Street, up stairs; A. Eoman & Co., 419 Montgomery Street; 

SUMKER Whitney, 613 Clay Street ; A. L. Bancroft & Co., 721 Market Street; White & Baueb, 

413 Washington Street, and W. E. Loomis, S.E. corner Washington and Sansom streets. 

PJRICE FIVE nojLZAns, GOZn COIK. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, PUBLISHER, 612 CLAY STREET. 
Bacon &. Company., Excelsior Steam Presses, 536 Clay Street. 

1871 . 



Recently Published. One Vol. 8vo., 1040 pp. Price Five Dollars. 



TKCE 



PACIFIC COAST BDSIISS BIEECTOBY 

FOR 1871-73, 

CONTAINING THB 

NAMES, BUSINESS AND ADDRESS 

or OVER 

Forty Thousand Merchants, 

MANUFACTURERS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN, 

IN THK 

STATES OF CALIFORNIA, OREGON AND NEVADA, 

THE 

Territories of Washington, Utah, Arizona, Idaho, Montana and Alaska, 
and the Colony of British Columbia. 

With a Gazetteer of the Counties, Cities and Towns of the Pacific Coast, and the Names of 
the OBBcers governing the same, Federal, State and Municipal. 

^^o'^'^^^HENRY G. LANGLEY, Publisher, 

•^ *^ \ Iz 612 Clay Street, San Francisco. 

1923 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year one tliousand eiglit hundred and seventj-one, 

By HENBY G. LANGLEY, 

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington, 



THE PACIFIC COAST ALMANAC 

And Year Book of Facts for 1871. 
ONE VOLUME, 12mo, 112 pp. PRICE, FIFTY CENTS. 



The Trade of the Pacific, 

A QUARTERLY JOURNAL, 

Representing the Industrial Interests of the Pacific Coast. Is published in quarto form, 
on the first day of July. October, January and April of each year, and regularly mailed 
FREE to every Merchant, Professional and Hotel Proprietor on the Pacific Coast. Each 
edition 11,000 copies. Terms of Advertising reasonable. 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, 

Publisher, 612 Clay Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



F^REIT^TOIIY. 



The pages of this, the twelfth volume of the San Francisco DinECTORY, contain abundant 
evidence of the general prosperity and continued growth of this city. In almost every depart- 
ment of industry will be found an improvement over that of last year, and, notwithstanding the 
continued existence of business depression which affects almost every branch of trade, a decided 
improvement is manifested that augurs well for the future. 

The population of this city, as returned by the Federal Census, is 150,361. From the invest- 
igations made during the progress of the canvass for the present volume, these figures are found 
to be nearly thirteen per cent, less than our estimate for the present year, 172,750. The data 
upon which this statement is made, together with the results of an examination of the Census 
rolls of a part of this city will be found contained in the article on population, on page 11, to 
which attention is respectfully invited. 

The number of buildings erected during the year is nine hundred, of which eight hundred and 
sixty-seven are of wood. Total number in the city and county, nineteen thousand four hundred 
and fifty-nine. The value of improvements for the year ending June 30th, 1870, is estimated at 
three millions of dollars, exclusive of the amount expended by the Superintendent of Streets, one 
million two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 

The Appendix contains a variety of information connected with our municipal organization, 
the Consolidation Act, with its Amendments arranged under each appropriate head, and several 
Acts of the Legislature connected therewith, to which has been added an analytical index which 
will facilitate reference thereto. There will be also found in this department of the work a 
large number of references to the difierent organizations in this city, embracing lists of the Fed- 
eral, State and Municipal OEBcers, notices of local Societies and Associations, Churches, Military 
Organizations, Incorporations, etc. Attention is invited to a new Map of the City and County 
of San Francisco, and the new Street Directory, including the correct system of numbering the 
buildings, both of which have been compiled from official sources, and carefully compared with 
each street and locality named therein. 

The Introductory and General Review present a diary of the interesting local events of the 
year, brief notices of Schools — public and private. Benevolent Associations, Banks and Insur- 
ance Companies, and references to the difTerent mechanical enterprises in operation at the present 
time in this city, together with other subjects worthy of special mention, and historical data of 
present interest, well calculated to make the book a valuable work of reference to future gener- 
ations. But the particular features of this department of the work are a series of valuable 
Meteorological Observations of the Climate of this city, from 1850 to 1870, contributed by 
Henry Gibbons, M.D., and articles on the Railroads of the Pacific Coast, and the progress of 
Manufactures in this city during the past year, by Myron Angel, Esq. ; also a review of the 
improvements made from January to December, 1870, and a statement of the number of build- 
ings within the city limits. 

The compiler would respectfully tender his thanks for the prompt cooperation extended by 
public officers, particularly to John Hanna, Esq., County Clerk, and other gentlemen who have 
been applied to for information for the work. To his numerous patrons for their substantial evi- 
dences of good will, and to Messrs. Bacon & Company, to whom the typographical department 
was intrusted, he would especially offer his thanks. The thirteenth volume of the San Francisco 
Directory will be issued in April, 1872. 

San Francisco, April 15th, 1871. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

PKOORESSOF THE CITY : 9 

Assessments and Kates of Taxation 9 

Jlunicipal Expenditures 18(i5-18(0 10 

Bonded Debt 10 

Annual Revenue 10 

ropulation San Francisco, 1870-71 11 

Federal Census San Francisco, 1870 11 

Population San Francisco, 1871 14 

Improvements 1* 

Prosperity of the City 14 

Board Tide Land Commissioners 15 

City Front and Bullchead 15 

City Hall Commissioners 16 

City Park Commissioners 16 

Market Street Commissioners 16 

Lagunn Survey Commissioners 17 

New Montgomery Street Commissioners 17 

Montgomery Avenue Commissioners 17 

Board of Health 17 

Marine Board 18 

Streets and Highways 18 

Pavements 18 

Street Railroads 20 

K ew B uildings 20 

Number of Buildings 26 

Real Estate, 1870 26 

Commercial Statistics. 1870 26 

Shipments Treasure, 1848-1870 26 

Mortality San Franciseo, 1869-70 2fi 

RAILROADS PACIFIC COAST 27 

METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS 30 

UNITED STATES REVENUE STATISTICS, San 

Francisco, 1870 32 

CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY 33 

GENERAL REVIEW 37 

Public Scliools, Locations, etc., of. 37 

Historical Sketch 39 

University of California 41 

Private Educational Institutions 42 

City College 42 

Santa Clara College, San Jos6 43 

Medical Colleges 43 

Heald's Business College 43 

Sabbath Schools 43 

BENEVOLENT AND SOCIAL SOCIETIES 44 

Young Men's Christian Association 45 

San Francisco Benevolent Association 45 

('alifornia Labor and Employment Exchange 45 

California Immigrant Union 45 

HOSPITALS 46 

ASSOCIATIONS— PROTECTIVE, LITERARy, ETC 46 

LIBRARIES 46 

Jlercantile Library Association 47 

Odd Fellows' Library Association 47 

Mechanic's Institute Library Association 47 

San Francisco Law Library 47 

FIRE DEPAKMENT 4S 

BANKING INSTITUTIONS 48 

Savings Banks 48 

Private Banks and Bankers 48 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 48 

CEM El'ERIES 48 

WATER CO.MPANIES 48 

Spring Valley 48 

Lake Tahoe 49 

New Enterprises 49 

MANUFACTURES 49 

Iron Foundries and Metallurgical Works 51 

Wool and Woolen Goods 51 

Cotton and Cotton Goods 52 

Silk— Sugar Refineries 52 

Boots and Shoes— Clothing 52 

Linseed Oil— Flax Cultivation 52 

Acids— Ink — Powder 53 

Spirituous and JIalt Liquors 53 

Flour— Cigars— Type— Hlank Books 53 

Cordage— Hemp and AVire 53 

M isccllaneous— Ink — Glass — Stoves, etc 84 

CHANGES AND RE.MOVALS 55 

REGl.STER OF NAMES 63 

BUILDINGS. BLOCKS, HALLS, ETC 693 

Public Huildings 693 

Halls— Blocks— Rows— Wharves 694 

Places of Amusement 695 



PACE. 

Prominent Places 695 

KEY TO PUBLIC OFFICES 695 

State 695 

Ci tv and County 695 

Federal 696 

CITY ORDINANCE- Hack and Cab Fares 696 

.STREET DIRECTORY 697 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY, TRADES, ETC 713 

CONSOLIDATION AC f 789 

Municipal Elections 795 

Paid Fire Department 796 

Police Judge's Court 800 

Harbor Police Regulations 801 

Alms House and Hospital 832 

Personal Property Tax 838 

Delinquent Taxes 840 

Justices' Court 842 

Municipal Court 842 

Q uarantine 844 

Analvtical Index 846 

MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 849 

Board of Supervisors 849 

Board of Ed ucation 850 

City and County Officers 850 

Election Districts 853 

State Congressional Districts 8.53 

Judicial Districts 853 

City and County Districts 85J 

Police Department 8.53 

Fire Alarm and Police Telegraph 854 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 855 

Otlicers and O rganization 856 

FEDERAL AND STATE OFFICERS a'57 

Custom House 859 

United States Treasury f59 

Branch Mint 860 

• Surveyor General 860 

Post Office 860 

COURTS 861 

CHURCHES 862 

Baptist 862 

Congregationalist 863 

Episcopal 864 

Evangelical Lutheran 865 

Hebrew 866 

Methodist 866 

Presbyterian 868 

Roman Catholic 870 

Swedenborgian 871 

Unitarian 872 

Chinese Mission Houses 872 

Mariners' Church 873 

Disciples of Christ 873 

Relormed Church 873 

Independent German Congregation 873 

Greek Church v 873 

LvceuMi for Self Culture %^^ 873 

ASSOCI.VriONS AND SOCIETIES 873 

Religious 873 

Benevolent 875 

Masonic Fraternity.... 886 

I. 0. of Odd Fellows 889 

Temperance 891 

Protective 892 

Literari*. 896 

Historical 896 

Social .•.^. ... 897 

MILITARY .... 900 

NEWSPAPERS 770 

PERIODICALS 770 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 750 

HOMESTEAD AS.'iOCIATIONS 747 

MINING COMPANIES 768 

TELEGRAPH LINES 785 

RAILROADS 777 

OCEAN STEAMERS S04 

STKAM BOATS 904 

STAGES 181 

EXPRESSES 737 

INCORPORATED COMPANIES 749 

CONSULS 732 

HOSPITALS 748 

CEMETERIES 904 

ADVERITSING DEPARTMENT 905 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 



PACK. 

Adelsdorfcr Bros Ixv 

Alger James A Co., reg- 
ister of names 71 

American Clock Co., 

regibter of names 70 

Amnes & Dallam xxxiii 

Atwood & Bodwell.. .4 and 7 

Austin & Co xcv 

Bacon & Company, reg. of 

names, 8 and front cover 

Badger* Lindcnberger. .xl 

Baker & Hamilton xvi 

and Ixviii 
Balfour.Guthrie & Co..xxii 
Bandmann, Nielsen <S:Co. 

xiiv 
Bank of British Colum- 
bia xxxvl 

Bank of California ix 

Barrett <fe Sherwood ii 

Bell John C liv 

Bcnner George L 37 

Bernard Charles xxi 

Blake P. H Ixxv 

Blake, Kobbins ACo...lxiii 
Boericke A Tafcl, regis- 
ter of names 107 

Bonnet B 42 

Boobar E. C. & Co lii 

Booker W. L xxvii 

Borchard C 28 

Bosqui Kdward Jc Co., 
rcg. of names. . .side line 

Bowdish SI. S xxxii 

BowcnBros 16 and back 

of volume 

Bradley & Rulofson 30 

Bragg Robert 34 

Branch House ciii 

Braverman & Levy front 

cover 
Brittan. Holbrook A Co., 

register of names 770 

Britton & Key, register 

of names 7b0 and 761 

Brooks A Co 31 

Brown A Wells 8 

Bryant A Strahan 31 

Burnham James W. A 

Co 17 

Burns H. J 36 

Buswell A. xcix 

Butler Warren C 24 

California File Manu- 
facturing Co xlii 

California Ink Co., reg. 

of names 750 

California Ins. Co Ivi 

California Jewelri' Co., 

register of names — 752 
California Planing Mills 

Ixvi 
California Paciflc Bail- 
road xxxivand xxxv 

California Steam i«avi- 

gation Co vl 

CAlifornia Sugar Kefln- 

cry xliii 

California Trust Co xi 

Cannen Isl'd <altWorks..lli 

Casebolt A Kerr Ivii 

Central Pacific K. R xcir 

City College Ixxvl 

Clark A Fox . . .45 

Code P. D. A Co., regis- 
ter of names 751 

Comerford P. A Co 23 

Connecticut M. L. Ins. 
Ccregister of names. 723 

Cook C. Mrs 43 

CookM. M. A Sons lii 

Coso House cii 

Cox A Kichols xxv 

Craine William Ixxxvii 



PAOB. 

Crane A Brlgham Ixxli 

Crane Albert E xxxi 

Crockard H 37 

Cubery A Co.... back cover 

Curtis J. P 34 

Daniel John A Co 27 

Darling A Co Ixxxi 

Davidson J. W. A Co. 

back cover 

D.iy Thomas front cover 

Dobrzensky M 43 

Doerger Charles 43 

DoUiverA Brother 27 

Eastman Frank ci 

Eitner Rudolf. Ixxvil 

Elfclt A. B. A Co Ixvi 

Empire M. L. Ins. Co il 

Eureka Hair Co xlir 

Everson A Middlemiss 20 

ExceWorMill Co 31 

Falkenau Louis 49 

Falkner, BellACo Ivi 

I' eldmann L. A Co Ixiv 

Fenkhausen A Gerichten.23 

Finlcy Thomas E 23 

Fireman's Fund Ins. Co. 

front cover 

Fish A. L xcviii 

Fisher A Co Ixxxii 

Flint, Peabody A Co. . . .Ixv 

Freeman B. H lii 

Friel William 38 

Frontier P. A Co 35 

Fulton John A 34 

Galpen Edward A Co 30 

Gannon Peter T li 

Gamiss J. R register 

of names, sideline 

Garratt A Co 12 

Gedge A Thayer 27 

German S. A L. Society.. Ix 

Gerzabck Oscar V 18 

GhirardcUi D 19 

Giannini P. A Ixxxiv 

Glasgow Iron and Metal 

Importing Co 9 

Goddard A Co xiv 

G racier A Heald 9 

Gray, Jones A Co xxv 

Gray M xcvii 

GravJJ. A Co xlix 

Grosh A Rutherford 28 

Guardian M. L. Ins. Co. 

reg. of names, side line 

Hagar A Co 44 

Hall John A Son 33 

Hallidie A. S Ixxxvi 

Hamburg Bremen Fire 

Insurance Co Ivlii 

Hanscom A Co lo 

Haskell A Co back cover 

Hawkins A Cantrell 12 

Hawley A Co xxxl 

Hcald's Business College, 
back cover and regis- 
ter of names 731 

Helbing A Straus xxviii 

Held Brothers xvii 

Herve A Perry 27 

Hcuck Herman 23 

Heverin M 46 

Hcynemann A Co xl 

Hibberd, Sanborn A Co.xlix 
HIberniaS. AL. Society, xx 

Hicks D. A Co back of 

volume and inside back 
cover 

Hinckley A Co 16 

HInz Carl 37 

Hoagland A Newsom 13 

Hohbs, Gllmore A Co ilv 

Holt W.-»rrcn 48 

Home Mutual Ins. Co...cir 
HorstmanuH. A Co 26 



PAQB. 

Houseworth A Co. 

front cover 
Howes E. K A Co., reg- 
ister of names 339 

Howes George A Co xv 

HowlandB. F. A Co 41 

HuntE. O « 

Huntington F. A xllv 

Hutchinson C.I Ixxxii 

Hyde A Chester 41 

Imperial Fire Ins. Co Ivi 

Imperishable Stone Block 

Company 41 

Ircdale A.S 43 

Irvine, Harker A Co 28 

Jesse A Drew 34 

Johnson J. C. A Co 18 

Johnson T. Rodgers, inside 

back cover 

Johnston H. H. A Co. Ixxxi 

Johnston William B 1 

Jones, Pullman A Co., reg. 
of names, bottom lii.e 

Jordan A. H 25 

Josset J Ix.Kxi 

Kallenberg Theodore 35 

Kellogg C. L xxxviii 

Kirby R. C. A Co 3 

Kittredge A Leavitt. . .Ixviii 
Kitlrcdge Jonathan. .Ixxxv 

Knowles George B 38 

Knowlton A Co., regis- 
ter of names 750 

Koehler A Kilter, regis- 
ter of names 70 

Koehler August xci.x 

Kohler A Frohling front 

cover 
Koopmanschap A Co..xclx 

Korbel F. A Brothers 8 

Kuh Leopold liii 

Kuner A 25 

Langland N. P Ilv 

Langley H. G., 50 and 

register of names 730 

Laurel Hill Cemetery. ..Ixix 
Levison Brothers, regis- 
ter of names 752 

Libby A Swett, register 

of names 106 

Liesenfeld P xlviii 

Linforth, Kellogg A Co. 

xxiv 
Liverpool and London and 
Globe Insurance Co — 1 

Llewellvn A Co 14 

Locan A Co xvill 

Locke A Montague 12 

London and S. F. K.ank x 

Low C. Adolphe A Co. . . .20 
Lyford L. D., register of 

names 513 

Lyon A Co., register of 

names 722 

Macdonald D. A. A Co..xlvi 

Macken James 15 

Macondray A Co xx 

Magee A Moore Ixxxiii 

Magill R. H., back of volume 

Main A Winchester xxlx 

Mallon A Boyle 32 

Manhattan Ins. Co 21 

Marden A Mvrick Ixxix 

Martcll John 2 

Martin E. A Co U 

Martin Padey, register 

of names 512 

Masonic S. A L. Bank. ..xix 

Massey A Yung liv 

Mayer Joseph 32 

Maze Montgomery 32 

Mc.\fee, Spiers A Co 8 

McCain, Flood A McClure 
xix 



FAOB. 

McGregor A. E 36 

McGregor J 36 

McMillan A Kc»ter 2 

McNultv C. A 19 

McQuillan B. A Son....lxili 
Mechanics' Mill and Man- 
ufacturing Co 33 

Meeker, James A Co liii 

Merchants' Mutual Ma- 
rine Insurance Co iv 

Merrill J. C. A Co xxiii 

Merrill P 25 

Meussdorffer J. C. A Bro. .Iv 

Meussdorffer K "29 

Michels, Friedlander A Co. 
Ixiv 

Miller Leopold '22 

Mills A Evans 18 

Miners' Foundry xlvii 

Mission and Pacific Wool- 
en Mills xc 

Mitchell J. E. A Co 38 

Molineux Henry, regis- 
ter of names 70 

Moore W. H. A 1>. M c 

Morgan A Co., register 

ot names 771 

Morrow George xcvi 

Murphy, Grant A Co ixv 

Mutual Life Ins. Co. of 
New York... back cover 

Xagle George D xcv 

Nahl Brothers, register 

of names 770 

Nathan B. A Co., regis- 
ter of names 71 

National Life Ins. Co.lxxxii 
National Watch Co., 

register of names 753 

New England Mutual 

Life Ins. Co '20 

Newbauer A Co 26 

Newhall H. M.& Co lix 

Newman A Duval xvii 

NileM. D 26 

Norcross A Co Ixvi 

Nortli British and Mer- 
cantile Ins. Co xii 

North Pacific Transpor- 
tation Co vii 

Northern Assurance Co. 

XXTil 

Northwestern Mut. Life 

Insurance Co 45 

Nye Albert G 1 

0'"Dav William 46 

O'Dohncll Cornelius 'ii 

Occidental Ins. Co ill 

Otto Charles A Co 46 

Oulif. Wiener A Dato 47 

Pacific Barrel and Keg 

Factory lir 

P.aciflc Ins. Co Ixvii 

Pacific Iron Works xiv 

Paciflc Mail S.S. Co. . . .Ixxl 
Pacific Oil and Lead 

Works T 

Pacific Rolling Mill Co T 

Pacific Saw Manufact'g 

Co., rcg. of names 338 

Pages J. F 20 

P.ilm House 49 

Palmer AV. J. T. A Co., 

register of names 106 

Parker George F 40 

Patch George W li 

Pasquale E Ixxv 

Peoples Ins. Co register 

of names, bottom line 

Phenix Ins. Co 21 

Phoenix A Home Ins. Co. 

back of volume 

Plate A.J xcvi 

Piatt * Newton xxiil 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



PAGE. 

Pollard * CarviU Manu- 
facturing Co xlvi 

Popcfc Talbot 33 

Porlinann J. H. C 35 

Pracy George T 3!) 

Prior J. K Ixxx 

I'rinz Jolin 36 

Kansom Leander Ixxxvii 

Keilington.Hostctter <fc Co., 
rt-g. of names, top line 

BeynoUls John xcviil 

Kichardson, Bell <fc Co. . . .33 

Riotte 4t Luckliardt 39 

Kisdon I. & L. Works 9 

llisser A. L Ivii 

Koberts J. B., register of 

names 723 

Rogers George W 30 

Ro.senbaum A. S. & Co c 

Roth & Videau Ixxli 

Rothschild & Ehrcnpfort..l9 
RountroeA JIcJlullin....28 
Royal JIail Steam Pack- 
et Co xxvii 

Russell W. F xxix 

a. F. Cordage Manu- 
factory XXX 

S. F. Glass Works xvii 

S. F. Pioneer Woolen 

Factory Ixii 

S. F. .Savings Union xvili 

Santa Clara College xli 

Saul&Co 30 

Savage it Son Ixxxili 



PAGB. 

Savingg and Loan Society 
Ixxiii 

.Schafcr J. F. A H. H 26 

Sclimolz William Ixxiv 

Seamans.Iob Jl. <fc Co. .. .37 
Security Savings Bank... 50 

Severance, Holt & Co 49 

Sclby 'Ihomas H. A; Co..xiii 

ShepJirdsonH. F 45 

Sherman William & Co. 

Ixxxix 
Shreve George C. & Co. .Ixi 

Skinker John xxvi 

Sims John U 14 

Smith A. J Ixxxlv 

Smith Barlow J xcvi 

Smith C. W. M., register 

of names 731 

Smith William 42 

Snook G.& W 38 

Snow & Roos Ixxiil 

Spaulding J. <fe Co 5 

Spaulding N. AV., regis- 
ter of names 338 

Spcyer Morris & Co Ixv 

Spreckels <t Co xlvii 

Spring Valley Water 

Works xxxix 

Spruance J. A J 1 

St. Croix McEachran B. 

D 32 

Steele James G. <fc Co., 

register of names f>92 

Stein, Simon & Co 1x1 



PAGB. 

Steinhart W. & I. & Co. 

Ixxviil 

Stockman J. M 15 

Sirahle Jacob & Co 31 

Sullivan, Fratingcr <fc Co. 

Ixiv 
Sullivan, Kelly <fe Co...xxx 

Swain R. B. <fc Co 21 

Swan, Dunbar & Co.. .xlvlii 
Tavlor John <fc Co...xxxviii 

Taylor .«*. P. & Co Ivli 

Tenc6 Charles <fc Co Ixii 

Thompson Brothers... xxxii 

Thomson Thomas 22 

Thurnaucr <fe Zinn 17 

Tillinghast Bros xii 

Toland Medical College. xci 

Truworlhy F. M xlii 

Tubbs & Co XXX 

Tustin W. 1 5 

Ullmann M. <fe Co xvi 

Union Ins. Co xxxvii 

Union Mut. Life Ins. Co. 

Ixxxi 
University of Pacific — 

Medical Department.513 
VanSchaack C. P. & Co., 

reg. of names, top line 

Venard G xxviii 

Voixin, Ris & Co Ix 

Von Rhein O. F. ifc Co ii 

Von Schmidt A. W liii 

Vulcan Iron Works Co... .11 
Wakelee C. H. & Co..lxxxii 



PAGB. 

Walmslcy W. W. . . .Ixxxix 
Walrath, Hunter <fc Co.. .lill 

Wason & Morri* li 

Waterliousc <fe Lester... xcill 
AVatkins C. E., xcii and 
register of names, 712 

and 751 

Weaver P. L xxvi 

AVeed ifc King well 15 

Weichhart J 14 

AVeir AV. G Ixx 

AVelch & Co c 

AVells, Fargo i Co vlii 

AVentworth I. M. & Co. 

Ixxix 

AVestlcy & Havens Ixx v 

AVhat Cheer House 47 

AVhat Cheer Laundry 47 

AVhitncy Geo. O. & Co..xxi 
AVhitncy Sumner, regis- 
ter of names 107 

Widow and Orplian Fund 

Life Insurance Co 45 

AVieland John Ixxxviii 

AVicsterA Co 42 

AVill >fc Fiiick Ixxviii 

AVilllams. Blanchard & 

Co xxii 

"Williams H. F. & Co lix 

Winkle Henry 35 

AVinter John Ixxt 

AVittmann George 25 

Zeile Carl xlii 

Zeile Frederick xlii 



CLASSIFIED LIST OP ADVERTISERS. 



Adjusters. 

McKulty C. A., (customs). 19 
Agricultural Impl'ts. 

Baker & Hamilton xvi 

and Ixviii 

Hawley & Co xxxi 

Apothecaries. 
Boericke <fc Tafel, regis- 
ter of names 107 

Steele J. G. & Co., register 
of names, 692 

Zeile Carl xlii 

Architects. 

Craine AVilliam Ixxxvii 

Hoagland & S ewsom 13 

Jordan AlDert H 25 

Artesian "If ell ISor's. 

Thomson Thomas 22 

Asphnltnm ^Vorkers. 

Bonnet B 42 

Assayers. 

Falkenau Louis 49 

Kuh Leopold liii 

Riotte & Luckhardt 39 

Assayers Materials. 

Taylor John & Co. . .xxxviii 

Auctioneers. 

Merrill J. C.& Co xxiii 

Newhall Ii. M. & Co lix 

Voizin, Ris it Co Ix 

Bakeries. 

Winkle H 35 

Banks. 
Bank British Columbia 

xxxvi 

Bank California ix 

California Trust Co xi 

London and S. F. Bank x 

Wells, Fargo & Co viii 

Baths. 
S. F. Hygcian Home. . .xcvi 
Zeile Frederick xlii 

Beds and Bedding;. 

Eureka Hair Co xliv 

Schafer J. F. & H. H 26 



Bell Hangrers. 

Will <fc Finck Ixxviii 

Billiard Xablc Jllan'f. 

Liesenfcld P xlviii 

Strahle Jacob & Co 31 

Bitters. 

McMill.an & Kcster 2 

Blacksmiths. 

Pracv George T S9 

AVeichhart J *. 14 

Boat Builders. 

Benner George L 37 

Boiler "Works. 

McAfee, Spiers & Co 8 

Risdon Iron and Locomo- 
tive AVorks 9 

Book Binders. 

Bosqui Edward <fc Co., 

register of names 

side line 

Buswell A xcix 

Hicks J). A Co. .inside back 
cover and back of volume 
Booksellers. 
Libby & Swett, register 

of names 106 

Whitney Sumner, regis- 
ter of names 107 

Boot and Shoe Man'f. 
AVentworth I. M. & Co 

Ixxix 
Box Makers. 

Ilobbs, Gilmorc& Co xlv 

Swan, Dunbar <fc Co.. xlviii 
Brass Foundries. 

Dobrzensky M 43 

Garratt ii, Co 12 

Moore AV. H. <fc D. M c 

AVeed & KingwcU 15 

Brewers. 

Lj-on & Co., register of 

names 722 

Spreckels C. <fc Co xlvii 

AA'icland John Ixxxviii 



Broom Makers. 

Armes & Dallam xxxlii 

Howes E. K. & Co., reg- 
ister of names 339 

Butchers. 

Miller L 22 

Car Builders. 

Casebolt <fc Kerr Ivii 

Carpenters and 
Builders. 

Curtis John P 34 

Carpet Beating. 

MerriilP 25 

Mitchell J. E. <fe Co 38 

Spaulding J. <fe Co 5 

Carpets. 

Bell John C liv 

Burnham James AV. & Co. 17 
Carriage Depots. 

Casebolt <fe Kerr Ivii 

Mills* Evans 18 

Pollard & Carvill Manu- 
facturing Co xlvi 

Saul<fc Co 30 

Carriage Stock. 

Meeker, James <fc Co liii 

AValrath. Hunter & Co. . .liii 
AA'aterhouse <fc Lester, .xciii 
Carvers and Oilders. 

Brj'ant&Strahan 31 

Cement Pipe. 
Martin Padey, register of 

names 512 

Cemeteries. 

Laurel Hill Ixix 

Chemicals. 

Reynolds John xcviil 

Chocolate. 

Ghirardelli D 19 

Cigars and Tobacco. 

Gannon PeterT 11 

Hcuck Herman 23 

Roscnbaum A. 8. & Co....c 



Civil Engineers. 

McGregor A. E 36 

Ransom Leander Ixxxvii 

Von Schmidt A. AV liii 

Cloaks. 

Sullivan, Fratii'ger <fc 

Co Ixiv 

Clocks. 
American Clock Co., reg- 
ister of names 70 

Clothing. 
Badger & Lindenberger..xl 

ElfeltA. B. <fc Co Ixvi 

Sherman William & Co. 

Ixxxix 
Steinhart W. & I. & 

Co Ixxviii 

Van Schaack C.P. <fe Co., 
register of names, top line 
Cloths. 
Badger <fe Lindenbergcr. .xl 

Heynemann & Co xl 

Stein, Simon & Co Ixi 

Ullmann M.& Co xvi 

Coal Dealers. 

Howard Street Fuel Co.. 31 

Coffee and Spices. 

Bernard Charles xxl 

Ghirardelli D 19 

Marden ifcMyrick Ixxlx 

A'^cnard G xxviii 

Colleges. 

Tity College Ixxvi 

Ileald's Business Col- 
lege, back cover and 

register of names 731 

Santa Clara xli 

Toland Medical xci 

University of Pacific — 
Med'l Dept., register 

of names 513 

Com. Merchants. 
Balfour, Guthrie & Co. .xxli 
Bandmann, Nielsen & 

Co xxlv 

Cox <ft Nichols XXV 

Darling A Co Ixxxi 

Fhnt, Peabody & Co Ixv 



CLASSIFIED LIST OP ADVERTISERS 



PAGE. 

Ghirardetli D 19 

Howes George & Co xv 

Koopmaiiscliap <fcCo..xcix 
Low C. Adolphe & Co. ...HO 

Macondray <fc Co xx 

Merrill J. C. &Co xxiii 

Piatt & Newton xxiil 

Kisser A. L Ivii 

Welch <fc Co c 

Williams, Blanchard <fe 

Co xxii 

Conrectioners. 
Borchard C. 



Rothschild & Ehrenpfort. . 19 

Contractors. 

BoobarE. C.<fc Co lii 

Fulton John A 34 

Hyde <fc Chester 41 

Nagle George D xc v 

Coopers. 

Pacific Barrel and Keg 

Factory liv 

Coppersmith. 

Mackcn James 15 

Cordage. 
Hallidie A. S.,(wire).lxxxvi 
San Francisco Cordage 

Factory xxx 

Cordials, etc. 

McMillan <t Kester 2 

Crocl^ery. 
Helbing <fe Straus ..... xxvili 
Nathan B. & Co., regis- 
ter of names 71 

Taylor John & Co., 

< glassware) xxx viii 

Cutlers. 

WUl<t Finck Ixxvill 

Diamoud I>riII. 

Severance, Holt & Co 49 

JDiamoud Setters. 

Frontier?. & Co 35 

Koeliler &■ Kitter, regis- 
ter of names 70 

Levlson Bros., register 

of names 752 

Distillers. 
Hong Kong Distillerj' 

Co xxix 

Doors, Sash, etc. 
California rianing Mills 

Ixvi 

Excelsior Mill Co 31 

Hall John & Son 33 

Macdonaid D.A. ifc Co. .xlvi 
Mechanics' Mill and 

Manufacturing Co 33 

Richardson, Dell & Co... 33 
Druggists. 

Crane <fe Brigham Ixxii 

Redington, Hostetter <fe 
Co., register of names 

top line 
Steele J. G. <fc Co., reg- 
ister of names 692 

Dry O-oods. 

Austin & Co xcv 

Davidson J. W. <fc Co. .back 
cover 

Heynemannifc Co xl 

McCain, Flood & Mc- 

Clure xix 

Murphy, Grant & Co Ixv 

Embalmers. 
Lyford L. Dexter, regis- 
ter of names 513 



Engravers. 

Butler Warren C 24 

Eitner Rudolf Ixxvii 

Kuner A 25 

OttoChas. & Co 46 

Pages Jules F 20 

Engravings. 
Alger James & Co. (pho- 
tographic) register of 

names 71 

Houseworth Thos. (pho- 
tographic)., .front cover 



PACK. 

McQuillan B. & Son....lxiii 

NileM. D 26 

Nye Albert G 1 

Snow & Koos Ixxiii 

Watkins C. E. (photo- 
graphic) xcil and reg- 
ister of names 751 

Expresses. 

Wells, Fargo <fc Co viii 

Fancy Ooods. 

Adelsdorfer Bros Ixv 

Held Brothers xvii 

Jones, Pullman & Co., 
register of names — bot- 
tom line 

Locan <fc Co xviii 

Michels, Friedlander <fc 

Co Ixiv 

I'asquale E Ixxv 

'fence C.& Co Ixii 

Thurnauer & Zinn 17 

Van.Schaack C.P.& Co., 

reglstcrofnaraes top 

line 
Feed lUills. 

Bowdish M. S xxxii 

File Makers. 
California File Manufac- 
turing Co xlix 

Fire Arms. 
Remington Arms Co. . .xxxi 
Winchester Repeating 

Arras Co .xxvl 

Flour Dealers. 

Grosh& Rutherford 28 

Foundries. 

Goddard & Co xiv 

Hanscomifc Co 10 

Hinckley <fe Co 1« 

Llewellyn & Co 14 

Miners' Foundry xlvii 

Savage <fcSon Ixxxiii 

Thompson Bros xxxii 

Vulcan Iron Works Co... 11 

Fur Dealers. 

MeussdorlTer J. C. & Bro. .Iv 

Furnishing Ooods. 

Adelsdorfer Bros Ixv 

ElfeltA. B.&Co Ixvi 

Gedge & Thayer 27 

McCain, Flood <fc Mc- 

Clure xix 

Michels, Friedlander & 

Co Ixiv 

Steinhart W. & I. & Co. 

Ixxviii 

Furniture. 

Bell JohnC liv 

Holt Warren 48 

Horstmann H. <fc Co 26 

Palmer W. J. T. & Co., 

register of names 106 

Schafer J. F.&H. H 26 

WeirW.G Ixx 

Westley & Havens Ixxv 

Whitney George O. & 
Co xxi 

Garden Seeds. 
Kellogg C.'.L xxxvili 

Gas Fixtures. 

Day Thomas front cover 

Iredalc A. S .• 43 

Prior J. K Ixxx 

Snook G. <fc W 38 

Gas SCeter BEauuf. 

Dobrzensky M 43 

Glass and Glassware. 
Taylor John & Co. .xxxvili 

Glass Stainers. 
Mallon <fc Boyle 32 

Glass VTorks. 
Newman & Duval xvii 

Gold Beaters. 

Rogers George W 30 

Groceries. 

Bowen Brothers 16 and 

back of volume 



PAGE. 

Haskell & Co back cover 

Irvine, Harker ifc Co 28 

Rountree <fc MciluUin 28 

Gunsmiths. 

Plate A. J xcvi 

Dair Jewelry. 

Cook C.Mrs 43 

Hardware. 

Hawley & Co xxxi 

Linforth,Kelloge & Co.xxiv 



Otto Charles A Co 46 

Sclby T. H. & Co xlii 

Harness, etc. 

Johnson J. C. A Co 18 

MainA Winchester xxix 

Hats and Caps. 

Fisher & Co Ixxxii 

Mcussdorft'er J. C. & Bro. .Iv 

Meussdorfler K 29 

Hay and Grain. 

Morrow George xcvi 

Hops and Corks. 

Winter John Ixxv 

Hotels. 

Branch House ciii 

Coso House cii 

Palm House 49 

What Cheer House 47 

House Kaisers. 

Hyde A Chester 41 

Ink SKanuracturers. 

California Ink Co., reg- 
ister of names 750 

Knowlton & Co., regis- 
ter of names 750 

Instrument Depots. 
Alger James <fe Co., reg- 
ister of names 71 

Houseworth Thomas <fc 

Co front cover 

Koehler August xcix 

McGregor J 36 

Schmolz W Ixxiv 

Insurance Agents. 
Balfour, Guthrie & Co. .xxii 

Booker W. L xxvii 

Clark & Fox 45 

Everson & Middlemiss 20 

Falknor, BellACo Ivi 

Forbes A. B back cover 

Garniss J. R.. register of 

names, side line 

Hutchinson C. I Ixxxii 

Johnston H. H. & Co. .Ixxxi 

Johnston W. B 1 

Low C. Adolphe & Co.... 20 

Macondray <fc Co xx 

Magill U. H.back of volume 
Roberts J. B., register of 

names 723 

ShepardsonH. F 45 

Speyer Morris <fe Co Iviii 

Swain K. B. <fc Co 21 

Tillinghast Bros xii 

Von UheinO. F. &Co....ii 
Insurance Cu's. Some. 

California Ivi 

Fireman's Fund, front cover 
Home Mutual Fire and 

Marine civ 

Merch. Mutual Marine... iv 

Occidental iii 

Pacific Ix vii 

Peoples register of 

names, bottom line 
Union xxxvii 

Iron and Bteel. 
Glasgow Iron and Metal 

Co 9 

Sclby T.H.& Co xili 

Iron Doors, etc. 
Kittredge & Leavitt. .Ixviii 
Kittredge Jonathan. .Ixxxv 
Sims John R 14 

Jewelers. Manuf. 
Braverraan&Levy. front cov 
California Jewelry Co., 

register of names 762 

Frontier P. & Co 35 



PAGE, 

Koehler <fc Ritter, regis- 
ter of names 70 

Levison Bros., register 
of names 752 

Seamans Job M. & Co. ...37 

Sherwood Robert ii 

I^and Agent. 

Ransom Leandcr Ixxxvii 

Ijuundries. 
What Cheer « 

Xicather Hose and 
Uelting. 

CookM. M.& Sons \\\ 

Leather Dealers. 

Cox cfe Nichols XXV 

Dolliver<fc Brother 27 

Grav, Jones & Co xxv 

KirbyR. C. A Co 3 

Main <fc Winchester xxix 

Liquor Dealers. 

Comerford P. & Co 23 

Fenkhausen & Gerichten,23 

Finley 'J'homas E 'l^ 

JIariiii E. & Co li 

McMillan & Kester 2 

I'arker (icorgc F 4U 

_liUJ»<Iohn 36 

Roth ik Videau Ixxii 

Speyer Morris & Co Ixv 

Spruance J.&J 1 

Lithographers. 
Britton <fc Rej", register 

of names 760 

Locks. 

Gerzabek Oscar V 18 

Locksmiths. 

WillA Finck Ixxvili 

Locomotives. 
Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works 9 

Looking Glasses, 
Mirrors, etc. 
McQuillan B. & Son. . . .1x111 
" <fc Co., register 



Nathan B 

of names 71 

Nile M.D 26 

Lumber Dealers. 

Knowles George B 38 

Pope & Talbot 33 

Machine Shops. 

Hawkins k, Cantrell 12 

Kallenbcrg Theodore 35 

Pracy George T 39 

Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works 9 

Machinery. 

Darling & Co Ixxxi 

Marble Yards. 

Daniel John '27 

Heverin M 46 

Match Mannfact'rs. 

Newbauer & Co 26 

Mill Furnishing. 

GracierA Hcald 9 

Millinery Ooods. 

Held Bros xvii 

Oulif, Wiener A Dato....47 

Tence Clias. A Co Ixii 

Model Makers. 

Kallenberg Theodore 35 

Stockman J. M 15 

Musical Instruments. 
Badger A Lindcnbergcr. .xl 

Gray M xcvli 

nrative 'twines. 
Fenkhausen A Gcrichten.23 
Kohler A Frohling. front cov 

Oil fV^orks. 
Pacific Oil and Lead 

Works V 

Opticians. 
Alger James A Co., rcg- 
I ister of names 71 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



HoQgeworth Thomas & 

Co front cover 

Orsan Builder* 

Mayer Joseph 32 

Oysters. 
Morgan <fe Co., register 

of names 771 

Paints and Painters. 
Sullivan, Kelly & Co...xxx 

Wason & Morris li 

Paper Dealers. 
Blake, Bobbins & Co...lxiii 

Taylor S.P. & Co Ivii 

Patent Agents. 
Smith C. W. M., register 

of names 731 

Patent Brokers. 

WiesterA Co 42 

Pavements. 
Imperishable Stone Block 

Co 41 

Photosraphers. 

Bradley* Rulofson 30 

Howland B.F.<fcCo 41 

Kahl Bros., register of 

names 770 

Photo. £nsraviuBS. 
Alger Jamas <fe Co., reg- 
ister of names 71 

Housevrorth T. <t Co... front 
cover 

Watkins C. E xcii 

and reg. of names, 751 
Pickles and Pres'v's. 
Code P. D. <fc Co., regis- 
ter of names 7-51 

Picture Frames. 
McQuillan B. & Son...lxiii 

NileM. D 26 

Nye Albert G 1 

Snow & linos Ixxiii 

St Croix McEachren B. 
D 32 

Plumbers, etc. 

Day Thomas front cover 

Ircdale A. S 43 

Prior J. K Ixxi 

Smith A. J Ixxxiv 

Snook G.& TV 38 

Walmsley W. W....lxxxix 

Poivder Dealers. 

Giant Powder Co xxiv 

Skinker John xxvi 

Weaver P. L xxvi 



PAGB. 

Printers. 

Bacon & Company, reg. of 
names 8 and front cover 
Bosqui E. <t Co., register 

of names side line 

Cubery & Co back cover 

Eastman B'rank ci 

Publishers. 

Langley Henry G 50 

and reg.' of names, 730 

Pump STakers. 

Fish A. L xcviii 

Smith A. J Ixxxiv 

Kailroads. 
California Pacific ...xxxiv 
andxxxv 

Central Pacific xciv 

Real Estate Agents. 

Blake P. H Ixxv 

Wakelee C. H. & Co.lxxxii 

WiUiams H. F. <fe Co lix 

Regalia. 
Johnson T. Bodgers. .inside 
back cover 

Korcross <fe Co Ixvi 

Restaurants. 

TVittmann George 25 

Rolling Blill. 

Pacific Rolling Mill v 

' Salt Dealers. 
Carmen Island Salt Co. .lii 
Savings and Lioan 
Societies. 
German Savings and 

Loan Society Ix 

Hibernla Savings and 

Loan Society xx 

Masonic .Savings and 

Loan Bank xix 

San Francisco Savings 

Union xviii 

Savings and Loan So- 
ciety Ixxiii 

Saw Makers. 
Pacific SawManufactui^ 
ing Co., register of 

names 338 

Spaulding N. "W., regis- 
ter of names 338 

Saw- Stills. 

KorbelF. & Bros 8 

Schools. 

Josset J Ixxxi 

Searcher of Records. 
Maze Montgomery 32 



PAGE. 

Shingle UKachine. 

Huntington F. A xliv 

Ship Joiners. 

Bragg Robert 34 

Shipsmiths. 

Crockard Hugh 37 

Shoe Findings. 

DoUiver <fe Brother 27 

Magee>k Moore Ixxxiii 

Shot and I<ead Pipe. 

S. F. Shot Tower xiii 

Silver Platers. 

Martell Jolin 2 

Soap manufacturers. 

Porlmann J.H. C 35 

Soda lirorfcs. 

Herve & Perry 27 

Stair Builders. 

Brown & Wells 8 

Freeman B. H lii 

Hibberd. Sanborn & Co.xlix 

Jesse & Drew 34 

Langland N. P liv 

Steamers. 
California Steam Nav. Co . vi 
North Pacific Transpor- 
tation Co vli 

Pacific Mail S. S. Co... Ixxi 

Royal Mail xxvii 

Steering-wheels. 

Bragg Robert 34 

Stencil Cutters. 

Burns H.J 36 

Otto Charles i Co 46 

Patch George W li 

Truworthy F. M xlii 

Stoves, etc. 
Brlttan.Holbrook & Co., 
register of names. . . .770 

Friel William 38 

Locket Montague 12 

Savage <fe Son Ixxxiii 

Snook G.<fc W 38 

Sugar Refineries. 

California xliii 

China xxix 

Tanners. 

O'Donnell Cornelius 22 

Tool Makers. 

Hinz Carl E 37 

Weichhart J 14 

Trunk Manufactu'rs. 
Galpcn E. <fc Co 30 



PAGE. 

Truss Mannfactu'rs. 

Koehler August xclx 

Turners. 

Docrger Charles 43 

Gracicr & Heald 9 

Type Founders. 

HagarA Co 44 

Undertakers. 

Gray N. <fe Co xlix 

Massey it Yung liv 

'Varnishers. 

O'Day William 46 

IFatch Case Manuf. 

Giannini P. A Ixxxiv 

'Watch MannfactVs. 
National Watch Co., reg 

ister of names 753 

"Watches and Jew- 
elry. 

Braverman & Levy ft-ont 

cover 

Giannini P. A Ixxxiv 

Levison Bros., register 

of names 752 

McGregor J 36 

SeamansJob M. & Co 37 

Sherwood Robert .ii 

Shreve George C. & Co.. .Ixi 

W^ater Closets. 

Smith A. J l.xxxiv 

Smith William 42 

TVater "Works. 

Spring Valley xxxix 

mrillow -Fare. 

Armes & Dallam xxxiii 

Feldmann L. & Co Ixiv 

Thurnauer & Zinn 17 

"Wind Mill Mannf. 
Atwood &■ Bod well, .4 and 7 

Hunt E.O 6 

Tustin W.I 5 

fVindow Screens. 

Hoagland & Ncwsom 13 

IVirellVorkers. 

Hallidie A. S Ixxxvi 

Wood and Coal. 

Howard Street Fuel Co... 31 

'Wooa -Vare. 

Armes <fc Dallam xxxiii 

Howes E. K. ifc Co., reg- 
ister of names 339 

Feldmann L. A Co Ixiv 

"Woolen Mills. 

Mission and Pacific xc 

San Francisco Pioneer.. Ixii 



Recently Published. One Vol. 8vo., 1040 pp. Price, Five Dollars. 



THE 



PACIFIC COAST BUSIMSS DIRECTORY 



FOR 1871-73, 

CONTAINING THK 

NAMES, BUSINESS AND ADDRESS OF OVER 40,000 MERCHANTS, 



MANUFACTURERS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN 

In the States of California, Oregon and Nevada, the Territories of Washington, 
Utah, Arizona, Idaho, Montana and Alaska, and the Colony of British Columbia, 
with a Gazetteer of the Counties, Cities and Towns of the Pacific Coast, and the 
names of the Officers governing the same, Federal, State and Municipal. 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, Publisher, 

612 Clay Street, San Francisco, 




^ tx^i o! Letter-Press Printl,^ s^^^^^^ _ 

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Me. SS§ ^Mj Mtr@@i 







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SAN FRANCISCO 

•^"tiif Market, hsln-TT 



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Labels, 
Sermons, 
Tax Lists, 
Shop Bills, 
Catalogues, 
JS'eivspapevs, 
Flock Cards, 
Concert Bills, 
Road JS'otices, 
School BepoHs, 
Concert Tickets, 
Festival Tickets, 
Railroad Tickets, 
Excursion Tickets, 
Tags of every style, 
Apothecaries' Labels, 
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Rewards of Merit, 
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Bills Lading, 

Prices Current, 

Deposit Checks, 

Wedding Cards, 

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Lnsurance Policies, 

Certificates of Stock, 

Certificates of Deposit, 

Bills of Exchange, 

Railroad Receipts, 

Letter Headings, 

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PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 




1871. 



The City of San Francisco was, for the first 
time, incorporated by the Legislature in May, 
1850, the organization of the County having been 
effected in the month previous, by the election of 
a Sheriff and other oflScers, thus establishing two 
distinct systems of government. The Consolida- 
tion Act took effect on the first day of July, 1856. 
Under its stringent provisions, our municipal affairs 
have been administered with energy and fidelity, 
and a thorough reform has resulted. The enor- 
mous outlay consequent on the dual system of 
_ government has been entirely abolished or seri- 

ously redu^XwhilTthe checks upon lavish expenditure were so well devised as to 
defy evasion, and the contraction of debts has been inhibited. The financial history 
of all this is sufficiently indicated in the exhibit* of the Aggregated Annual Expendi- 
tures of the City and County of San Francisco from 1850 to 1870-8ince the first 
legislative organization of the government— cxcZ«sjt;e of the sums paid m liquidation 
of the principal and interest of the bonded debts : 

Assessment and Rates of Taxation from 1850 to 1870. 



FiscAt. Years. 



1850-51. 
1851-52. 
1852-53. 
1853-54. 
1854-55. 
1855-56. 
1856-57. 
1857-58. 
185»-59. 
1859-60. 
1860-61. 
1861-62. 
1862-63. 
186»-64. 
1864-65. 
1865-66. 
1866-67. 
1867-68. 
1868-69. 
1869-70. 



Total 
Annual 
Rates. 



|2 00 


4 10 


4 411 


3 88J 


3 851 


3 855-6 


2 30 


2 30 


2 45 


3 169-10 


2 85 


2 87 


2 741 


2 10 


2 98 


3 12 


3 10 


3 00 


3 05 


3 08 



Particular Class of Assessments. 



Real Estate. Improvements. Person'l Prop'ty 



$16,849,054 
11,141,463 
15,676,356 
17,889,850 
19,765,285 
18,607,800 
17,827,617 
15,576,545 
13,554,565 
14,172,235 
25,283,685 
31,871,897 
37,016,102 
43,116,538 
47.292,903 
49,137,312 
53,485,421 
58,207,862 
63,631,721 
69,776,603 



la Personal. 

In Personal. 

In Personal. 

$6,158,300 

9,159,935 

8,394,925 

8,345.667 

7,394,296 

5,946,585 

6,523,985 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 



$4,772,160 

2,875,440 

2,805,381 

4,852,000 

5,837,607 

5,073,847 

4,194,970 

12,426,335 

11,224,800 

9,323,002 

10,683,814 

9,973,222 

29,540,554 

34,002,627 

33,443,262 

39,129,145 

43,214,976 

51,152,964 

42,782,308 

44,982,908 



Total 

Annual 

Assessments. 



$21,621,214 
14,016,903 
18,481,737 
28,900,150 
34,762,827 
32,076.572 
30,368,254 
35,397,176 
30,725,9.50 
30,019,2^ 
35,967,499 
41,845,119 
66,556,656 
77,119,165 
80,736,165 
88,266,457 
96,700,397 
109,360,826 
106,414,029 
114,759,511 



• For tabic of Municipal Expenditures from 1850 to 1865, see Sau Fbancisco Dirkctort for 1866, pag© W. 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 1J6 San^om St., Ladies' »nd Qentleman's Linen Hmndkerohiafikk 



BEDHHarON HOSTETTEH ft CO.. The great Drug and Patent Medicine Depot 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



The amount absolutely collected on is much les3 than the aggregate valuations for 
the last two years. For the year 1868-9, the delinquent li.t amounted to $429 709 
on an assessed value of $13,500,000, and in 1869-70 to S5or>,320, on $18,062,340. ' 

Municipal Expenditures for 1865-6, 1866-7, 1867-8, lS68-9,and 1869-70. 



Years. 



1865-6. . 
i 866-7.. 
1867-8.. 
1868-9.. 
1869-70. 



Current 
Expenses. 



Permanent 
Iraprov'm'tB. 



Interest. 



Rednctioa 
of Debt. 



Old 
Claims. 



$916,934 45 
939,285 05 
1,215,925 00 
1,9.37,925 41 
2,098,610 00 



$90,995 90 
188,073 75 
165,.559 24 



$256,198 38 
213,353 06 
200,644 07 
373,050 &3 
224,198 00 



$154,055 00 
354,686 82 
206,457 70 
148,233 81 
361,625 001 



$19,097 47 
71,166 66 



Total. 



$1,437,281 20 
1,766,565 34 
1,788,586 07 
2,459;210 05 
2,684,433 00 



*i^^ft iT ^l^^'ff^. ^^ ^^^ Department of Streets during the year 1869-70 is 
$l,248,ld0, which, added to the sum included in the above table, $2,684 433 makes 
the total expenditures of the Municipal Government for 1869-70, $3,932,563. 

The Special Fee Fund aggregated $152,420, of which the Recorder paid $44 891 
the County Clerk $40,683, (he Sheriff, $12,459, the Tax Collector, $18,515,' and 
the Clerk of the Justices' Court, $15,993. ' » " 

For the year ending June 30, 1870, the following amounts were paid for the dif- 
ferent departments of the City Government : Salaries, $306,284. Police Depart- 
ment, $156,840. Fire Department, $177,446. School Department, $484,484. 
Street Lights $187,508. Hospital Expenses, $99,502. Alms House, $61,023. 
Industrial School, $36,418. Redemption of Bonds, $361,625. Interest, $224,198, 

. Bonded Debt June 30th, 1870. 



Iseoed in 



1&51 

1855.,... 

1858 

1862-3... 

1863 

1864 

1864 

1865 

1866-7... 

1867 

1870 

Totals. 



By the 



City 

Cny 

City and County 

City and County for San 

J 086 Railroad 

City and Co. City Slip.. 
City and Co. City Slip.. 
Central Pacific R. R. Co 
Western Pacific R.R. Co 

School Department 

Jndgment 

School Department 



Payable 



1871 

1875 



1877-8 

1883 

1884 

1894 

1895 

1881 

1887 

1890 



Anitoal Intjcuest. 



Pr cent Payable in 



10 
6 
6 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



San Francisco. 
New York. ... 
San Francisco. 

San Francisco. 
San Francisco ] 
San Francisco 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Fi-ancisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 



Annual 
Sinking 
Fund. 



Xone 

About $23,000 00.. 
About 47,000 00.. 

About 23,000 00.. 

About 47,000 00.. 

Commences in 1873 
Commences in 1873 
About 15,0(!0 00.. 
About 14,000 00.. 
About 15,000 00.. 



About $184,000 00 



Bonds ia 
Circulation. 



$1,176,000 00 
196,000 00 
979,500 00- 

207,500 00 
708,500 00 
23,000 00 
400,000 00 
250,000 00 
212,000 00 
304,000 00 
150,000 00 



$1,606,500 00 



The amount of available funds held by the Fund Commissioners June 14th, 1870 
for the payment of the Funded Debt of 1851, is $1,367,122.91, which, deducted 
from the aggregate debt, leaves $3,239,377.09 as the actual debt. 

Annual Revenue for 1865-6, 1866-7, 1867-8, 1868-9, and 1869-70-* 



Years. 



1865-6.. 
1866-7 .. 
1867-8.. 
1868-9.. 
1869-70 . 



Taxes. 



$1,361,876 26 
1,482,476 31 
1,509,162 50 
1,786,129 43 
1,966,827 00 



State and Co. 
Licenses. 



$89,253 25 

93,901 50 

99,484 74 

100,4.54 69 

110,353 12 



Municipal 
Licenses. 



$28,799 25 
31,762 80 
38.895 90 
62,560 50 
41,646 50 



Sale of 
Bonds. 



$61,050 00 
125,965 .38 
47,500 00 



Other 
Sources. 



Total. 



$83,429 30 i$ 1,624.408 06 
107,647 97 1,841,753 96 
271,263 78 1,826,306 88 
507,040 67 2.446,185 29 
752,365 93] 2,871,192 55 



State. 



$944,812 35 
987,105 77 
1 ,095,586 71 
1,044,835 20 
1,049,505 09 



* For toblcofJtcvenue collected in San Francisco from 1850 to 1865, see Sax FBAyc.sco D.bectokt for 1S66, p. 10 



PEOPLES INSURANCE COMPANY. 16 Merchant.' Exchange. California Street. 8. P. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Boots and Shoes. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 



11 



POPULATION— SAN FRANCISCO, 1870-71. 

Few subjects referred to in this worlc possess greater importance than the population of this city, 
and every movement calculated to develop its extent, wealth and character is of public interest and 
its results eagerly anticipated. Fully appreciating this feeling, and believing that he possessed 
peculiar advantages therefor, the compiler of this work has annually prepared and published a state- 
ment of the population of this city, which has been accepted generally in the absence of " official 
figures " as a fair approximation to the actual number. In the preparation of these statements, the 
greatest care has been observed to consult only data of a reliable character — the experience obtained by 
carefully noting the progress of the city since its foundation and the annual observations of able and 
experienced canvassers have been, however, chiefly relied upon for the figures contained therein. 

In no other section of the United States were the results of the Ninth Federal Census awaited 
with more interest than in the State of CaUfornia, for the reason that the two previous censuses had 
failed to do justice to the State. Various causes had contributed to produce that result, which 
time and a more perfect organization of society had, to a gi-eat extent, eradicated ; and so far as the 
City of San Francisco was concerned, it was expected that there, at least, a reasonable showing 
would be made and the true rank of that city established by official authority. While anticipating 
the most favorable results from the labors of the Census Marshal, the community was surprised at the 
first published estimate (Morning Call of July 23d, 1870) of the population of this city at 125,000, 
of which 10,000 were Chinese, The publication of this statement in the face of the returns of nearly 
59,500 adult males in the City Directory and 45,617 children under 15 years of age in the School 
Census, of that year, was received with universal surprise and disappointment. These figures were 
subsequently increased in the columns of the daily press to 140,000, then to 145,000, and finally, by 
the publication of the official returns, to 150,:i61, which are in excess of the number (149,482) reported 
by the Census Bureau at Washington. 

Census Returns for San Franoisoo for 1870. 



Q 

cl 

> 
St 

ci 

d 

> 

IH 
DO 

> 

Q 

O 
p 



Under 15. Born in Cal. 



Mars F'm's Mai's F'm's Slal's F'm's 



ClilllESB. 



Umler 15 B"ii Cal. 



Under 15 B*n Cal. 



l8t 

2d 

8d 

4th 

5th 

6ih 

lib. Ist Precinct. 

" 2d Trecinct..! 
8th, l8t Precinct. 

'• 2d Precinct.. 

9th 

10th, 1st Precinct.' 

" 2d Precinct.. 1 

" 3d Precinct..! 

" 4th Precinct 
11th, l8t Prtcinct-j 

" 2(1 Precinct.. 

" 3d Precinct.. 

" 4th Precinct 
12th, 1st Procinct.i 

" 2d Precinct..' 



7,187 


3,239 1 


1,389 


5,8B8 


5..W0 


2,226 


l,fi6i) 


543 


132 


6,3.58 


4,314 


1,016 


2,111 


679 


151 


3.192 


3.058 


865 


3,087 


2,395 


7.59 


2,607 


2,100 


7.56 


3,87.5 


3,202 


976 


4,293 


4,818 


1,590 


5,480 


5,084 


2,030 


2,814 


2,404 


902 


2.302 


2,153 


833 


3,071 


2,886 


1.094 


3,262 


3,202 


\:im 


4, '162 


4.004 


2,313 


4,787 


3,930 


1,959 


1,307 


1,2.54 


542 


643 


511 


200 


2,4-M 


1,930 


860 


4,214 


3,766 


1,837 



1.397 1,158 1.188 

2,260 1,803 1,898 

144 104 108 



939 
133 
864 
797 
726 
1,020 



175 
81 
728, 
532 
5.59 
868 



95 

719 

5.!3 

566 

829 

1,672 1,3311 1,393 

1.980 1,.5.56 1,479 

810 573 596 

8.58 614, 584 

1,130 8,591 848 

1,285 987' 988 

2,237 1,562 1.648 

1,6.57 1,565 1.312 

563 408 403 

261 160 216 

836 702 663 

1,692 1,424 1,362 



M. ' F. ' M. i F. I M. 



M. 



F. M. 



68 
76 

5 
229 

2 
101 

4 

3 

34 
16 
21 

4 
14 

3; 



9 2 4 12! 303 -2 48 

61 27. 18, 26 9, 316 8 39 

1 ....I.... I I| 545 16 53 

160 35 35, 31 30 3,898 1,593 234 



.11 50 



20 22 2,540 394 171 



8 3 

2 ....I 
6, 2 



107 

70 . 
203 , 
198 
211 

75 

&4 

89 

60 
409 
203 
129 

27 
178 
112 



F. M. , F. I 



II 
17 
52 
50 
20 
15 

4 
12 
15 
34 
40 . 

5 . 

3 . 

22 . 

23 . 



ToUls '75.824 61.577 23.722 23.26118 346 18.219 1626 468 108 117 £5 84 9.777 2,040 877 271 



Kcal. Person.al. 



l9t 

2d 

3d 

4th 

5th 

6th 

7th, 1st Precinct. ! 
" 2d Precinct.'! 

8th, 1st Precinct. 
" 2d Precinct.. I 

9tli 1 

lOlh, Ist Precinct. ! 
" 2d Precinct..;' 
" 3d Precinct., i 
" 4th Precinct j 
11th, 1st Precinct. M 
" 2d Precinct.. 1 
" 3d Precinct.. I 
" 4th Precinct ; 
12th, Ist Precinct.. 
" 2d Precinct..! 



7,4.S1,300 
10.939,8251 
4,193,500 
7.913..500I 
1.H49..500I 
20,619..5.50, 
1,695,050 
6.667.2.50 
16,662,340, 
13,662,110 
11,011.605 
6.603,810 
3,43.5.215 
5.170,780 
3,3;)4,176 
7,978,840 
11,802,700 
3,408,550 
3,711,720 
4,240,430 
10,898,020 



Own. by Chinese 



Personal. 



Keal. 



7,407,900 
5,005.275 . 
3,154,6051 
7 396.650 
7,172,690 

11.7S6,,575 

775.116 

4,115.6.50 

11.676,735 
6,109,150 
5,980,900 
4,5.5'<..55.5 
2,004,240 
2,081,0.59 
802,965 
3.930,6801 
5,206,865 
1,276,315 
316,993 
1,734,115 
5,323,708 



540,000 
' 34 ,666 



Totals ' $163,259,7711897,796,741 $74,800 $1,188,080.31,701 



13,000 
5,000' 
46,700 
230,300 
8.600 
788,000| 



14,U.50 

2,ioo; 



700 

lOOj 

39,930 

29,.%50 

4,500, 



4,300 
1,2.50 



W. 



3,1,55 
2,098 

985 
1,.5.50 
1,523 
1,711 
1,639 
1,256 
1,738 
1,916 
2,298 
1,337 

917 
1,177 
1,422 
1,882 
1,6,59 

585 

258 
1,029 
1,566 



^2 



363 
399 

,55 
696 

26 
113 
282 

i7o: 

128 

337 

217 

235' 

4 

263 

90 

196 

200 

120 

45 

64 

294 



No. 



1,171 

2.485 

83 i 

1,575 

204 

1,4,50 

782 

1.027 

1,302 

1,-502 

1,985 

9-27 

826 

921 

1,178 

1,875 

1,760 

.5i5 

262 

981 

1,' 



352! 3,370 4,297! 125.266 



E'tj 



125 

481 

140 

22 

100 

S3 

120 

162 

154 

182 

38 

12 

31 

166 

138 

188 

34 

51 

164 

252 



2,603 



Kl 



t3 



1,243 



1,8931.446 



1,452 



JONE3, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Straw Hats and Trimminga. 



KEDINGTOK HOSTETTER & CO., Importers Choice Fancy Goods, Perfumery, etc., sta 



12 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



The male population of this city, according to the returns of the census,*is 75,824 ; of this number 
23,722 are under 15 years of age. No separate figures are presented of the adult portion or the 
number between 15 and 21, and in order to arrive at an approximation of these elements, about 35 per 
cent, of the number under 15, the ratio according to the census returns of 1860, of Massachusetts, 
Ohio, and Oregon, should be added thereto, and the aggregate made thereby, taken from the entire 
census of males, will produce the following result: Under 16, 23,722, add 35 per cent., 8,302 
for those between 15 and 21 ; total under 21, 32,024, which deducted from 75,824 will leave as the 
adult population, 43,800. 

Satisfied from the above examination of the imperfections of the census, the canvassers engaged 
upon the San Francisco Directory for 1871 were instructed to make note of such information connected 
with that work, as would facilitate a more thorough investigation of the accuracy of its returns, than 
the published aggregates afforded. The result of their labors has been the collection of a variety 
of data of an important character, which has been used in testing the accuracy of a part of the enum- 
eration in the following manner : 

The names of the adult male population contained on the oflBcial rolls of the Third, Fifth, Sixth and 
Eighth Wards, deposited in the office of the County Clerk, have been copied and arranged for easy 
reference. To each of these Wards attention has been directed, with the following results : 

Third Ward. — Male Adults : Census, 1798. Voters' names on poll list, election September, 1870, 
1,305; votes cast, 869, of which 343 appear on the census rolls. Deficiency of census from poll 
list, 962 ; from votes cast, 526. Of the latter, 253 are recognized as having been residents of the 
AVard during the progress of the census, and of this number, 163 remain there, and their addresses can 
be found in the present volume. The general accuracy of the census returns of this Ward may be 
estimated by the fact that there are residing, at the different hotels and lodging houses alone, an 
average permanent adult population throughout the year of over 1,400. In addition to this element, 
there are the occupants of private dwellings, and a considerable number of persons living in the 
vicinity of the water front; also a numerous class engaged in navigating the Bay, who claim this 
Ward as their residence, of whom but a small percentage has been enumerated. Houses: Number 
census, 832; empty, 481. Directory count, March, 1871 : Number, 607; excess of census, 225, or 37 
per cent.; empty, 37. At no period during the year 1870 has the number of empty houses exceeded 
50. The figures of the census set forth that there were 481, fifty-eight per cent, of the houses of this 
Ward, empty in July and August, 1870, while the aveiage percentage of the remaining Wards was 
only nine per cent., an interesting " official " fact to be referred to in illustration of the general 
prosperity of the city, and the Third Ward in particular. 

Fifth Ward. — Male Adults: Census, 1,852; poll list, 1,538; votes cast, 889, of which 353 are on 
the census rolls. Deficiency: From poll list, 1,185; from votes cast, 536. Of the latter, 332, and of 
the former, who did not vote, nearly 100, a total of 432, are recognized as having been residents of the 
Ward during the progress of the census. Of this number, 305 are still residents of the Ward, and 
their addresses can be found in the present volume. Average number of adults residing at the 
hotels and lodging houses, 1,520. Houses: Census, 204; Directory, 289. Deficiency of census, 
85. The list of omitted names in this Ward embraces many of the most prominent residents. Mer- 
chants, public officers, and others engaged in almost every walk of life appear to have been overlooked, 
and in several instances, buildings containing from 10 to 20 occupants each, entirely omitted. An 
intimate acquaintance obtained by an annual canvass of the residents of this Ward for the past 
twelve years, warrants the statement that, not to exceed 65 per cent., of the adult population has 
been enumerated by the census. 

Sixth Ward. — Male adults, census, 2,336; poll list, 1,797; votes cast, 1,023, of which 635 are on 
the census rolls. Deficiency from poll list, 1,162; from votes cast, 388; of the latter, 182, and of 
those on the poll list who did not vote, 73, a total of 255, are still residents of the Ward, and their 
addresses can be found in the present volume. In the list of omissions, the names of a large number of 
the oldest residents are recognized ; and a comparison of the names enumerated with the votes cast at 
the last election, develops, when the character of the voting population is considered, almost as 
imperfect a canvass as that of the Fifth Ward. Houses, census, 1,450; Directory count, 1,063; 
excess of census, 387, or thirty-six per cent. 

Eighth Ward. — First Precinct, male adults, census, 2,496; poll list, 1,239; votes cast, 890, of 
which 511 are on the census rolls. Deficiency from poll list, 728; from votes cast, 379 ; of the 
latter, 168, and of those on the poll list, who did not vote, 33, a total of 201, are still residents of 
this precinct, and their addresses can be found in the present volume. Second Precinct, male adults, 
census, 2,416; poll list, 1,977; votes cast, 1,423, of which 734 are on the census rolls. Deficiency 
from poll list, 1,243; from votes cast, 689; of the latter, 301, and of those on the poll list who did 
not vote, 76, a total of 377, are still residents of this precinct, and their addresses can be found in 
the present volume. An examination of the 578 unenumerated names of the two precincts, 
exhibits the same want of care as that of the preceding Wards. No district in this city presents 
fewer obstacles to a thorough enumeration than this Ward. Its population is of a permanent 
character, and the yearly changes are much below the average throughout the city. Houses, First 
and Second Precincts, census, 2,804; Directory count,2,063; excess of census, 741, or thirty-six percent. 



* In addition to the aggregates contained in the table, on the preceding page, the official returns embrace also the 
following: Attending school, vrlilte males, 11,796: females, 11,756: colored males and females. 97 ; tot.il, 23,649. Cannot 
read or write, males, 3,370 ; females, 4,297: total, 7,667. Number of blind, 52; deaf and dumb, 24; insane, 33; idiots, 17. 
Number of Chinese families keeping house, 255. 



Insure with the PBOPIj&B INSUBAIf C£ CO. and avoid law suits. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO.. 708, 712. 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Clothing, eto. 



PROGRESS OP THE CITY. 13 

Th? aggrep;ate white males, of all ages, in the four Wards under consideration, returned by the 
census, is 15,437, and the number of white citizens, 7,953. According to our classification, the 
adult males reach 10,898, and the voting poll lists 7,856 ; of the latter, 5,094 voted at the election in 
September, 1870, and of that number but 2,576 appear on the census rolls. Of the unenumerated 
voters, numbering 2,518, forty-five per cent., or 1,11!', were found in these Wards by our canvassers 
five months after the census had been completed. This number is exclusive of the names of 182 
persons on the poll lists of the Sixth and Eighth Wards, unenumerated, who did not vote, and whose 
addresses, with those last referred to, a total of 1,301, may be found in this work. 

Reference may be made here to the fact that in these comparisons, the changes which have taken 
place during the period from the date of the completion of the census, September 1st, 1870, to the 
close of the Directory canvass, January, 1871, equal to about fifteen per cent., in favor of the 
census, and the probable deficiency in enumerating the females and children, have not been taken 
into consideration. 

In making this examination, such parts of the city have been selected as would comprise a fair 
average of the different material of which the whole population is made up. Objections might be 
made to the Third and Fifth Wards, on account of the increase of voters therein just previous to the 
election ; but so far as this element is concerned, it has not been considered, except that portion 
which forms a part of the permanent population. The Sixth and Eighth Wards are two of the most 
desirable districts in this city to test the accuracy of any census. Their population shows less change 
during the year than that of any other section of the city, and with the exception of a small 
percentage that may have removed into the Ward just before the election held in September last- 
(which may be considered a part of the permanent population, as no local questions were then in- 
volved in the result) no more reliable list of the permanent residents of these Wards, at that date, 
can be obtained than the names of those who voted at the election referred to. 

In the above investigation attention has been directed to the white population only. The published 
table of returns, which is said to be " oflficial," comprises several aggregates that would, if analyzed, 
exhibit imperfections of the same character as those heretofore referred to. The returns of the colored 
population, for example, present some curious features. According to the enumeration of 1 860, the total 
population amounted to 1,176, of which 786 were males and 390 females, divided as follows : Males, 
under 15, 75; over 15, 711 ; females under 15, 99; over 15, 291. The figures for 1870 are, total, 
1,094, of which 626 are males and 468 females, as follows: Males under 15, 108; over 15, 518; 
females under 15, 117; over 15, 351. These returns show that the males over 15 have decreased 
twenty-seven per cent., while the females and males under 15 have increased about twenty-four per 
cent, since 1860. The census also enumerates 352 colored citizens, while the Great Register contains 
445. The names of colored persons engaged in business, contained in this volume, are forty per cent, 
in excess of those published in the Directory for 1860. Well informed persons assert that "great 
injustice has been done by the late census to this class of our population, and that, of the male adult 
population alone, not more than sixty per cent, has been enumerated." 

The number of marriages for the year are set forth at 296, while the County Clerk reports the 
number of licenses issued at 2,121. 

The number of houses is reported at 25,266, of which 5,290 are in the Third, Fifth, Sixth and 
Eighth Wards. From a recent count in the Wards named, the aggregate amounts to 4,022 ; the 
"official figures" are therefore in excess of the actual number thirty-one per cent., or 1,268 build- 
ings. The empty houses are reported at 2,603, exclusive of the First Ward from which there are 
no returns. The error in the Third Ward, previously referred to, is sufficient of itself to cloud the 
accuracy of the entire returns ; and when the fact is considered that the law for taking the census 
does not call for an enumeration of the " empty houses," the motive for publishing the data referring 
thereto, may be well questioned. 

The number of adult male residents referred to in the San Francisco Directory for 1871, including the 
names of officers connected with the diflFerent Associations contained therein, and not obtained in the 
regular canvass, is about 57,850, a slight decrease fr6m the aggregate of 1870. Experience has 
proved that not over 95 per cent, of the permanent male adult population is usually obtained for that 
work. Various causes exist to produce this result, the principal of which is the refusal of a num- 
ber of persons to give their names for publication under the apprehension that it will subject 
them to the performance of jury duty and annoyances of various kinds. In addition to this 
class, there are a number who escape the canvass altogether, and a large foreign element 
that does not speak the English language. These, together with a considerable number of 
persons residing in disreputable neighborhoods, aggregating over 3,000, should be included as a 
part of the permanent population. This, added to the number previously stated, (57,850) will make 
the entire aggregate of permanent adult population 60,850, an excess of 17,050 over the number 
(43,800) returned by the Federal Census. These figures do not include a class of persons residing 
in the city, usually called "floating," and which is included in our population table under that 
head. 

In the foregoing remarks the Compiler of this work has endeavored to show how far his estimate 
of the population of San Francisco for 1869-70 (170,250) is entitled to consideration when compared 
with the "official figures;" and if, in the investigation incident thereto, he has developed an ineffi- 
ciency or a want of proper care on the part of the agents entrusted with the superintendence of the 
late Federal Census, it is the duty of the public to hold them to a strict accountability for their acts. 



JONES, FDXiIjAIAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street. liaces and Shnbroideriei. 



KEDINGTON'S FLAVOBINQ EXTHACTS are the best and cheapest for family xise 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 



Population San Francisco, January, 1871. 
The following table, compiled from reliable data obtained during the progress of the 
canvass for the present volume, is presented as an estimate of the population of the 
City of San Francisco, January 1st, 1871, and in directing attention thereto, the com- 
piler believes it to be a fair approximation to the actual figures : 

White males over twenty-one, names in the present volume 57,850 

" Females over eighteen, estimated 30,400 

" Males under twenty -one and females under eighteen, estimated .56,500 

" Males, names refused, and foreigners, estimated 3,000 

Chinese, male and female* 9,000 

Colored, male and female 2,000 

Total permanent population 1 64,750 

To which should be added a large element of our population known as " floating," wliich 
consists of: 1st. Transient boarders, etc., at hotels, boarding-liouses, etc. id. Soldiers 
at the fortifications in the harbor. 3d. Persons engaged in navigating the bay, who 
claim this city as their residence. 4th. A large number of persons who have no perma- 
nent place of abode, together amounting to about 8,000 

Total population 172,750 



IMPROVEMENTS. 



The records of the progress and improvements, made annually in the City Directory, constitute 
the most succinct and concise history of San Francisco that could be written. Less elaborate and 
diffuse than the daily newspaper, it still contains in the briefest possible space brought directly to the 
eye, all that tells of advances made from year to year, congregated with the names of citizsns ; the 
municipal officers ; the financial condition ; state of trade ; public institutions ; condition of streets ; 
extent ; population ; laws, and principal events. In previous numbers of the Directory, the chief 
points in the history of the City, as well as of California, have been mentioned — first the discovery of 
the bay by Gov. Portala in 1769 in an expedition by land from San Diego, then the founding of the 
Mission Dolores, by the monks Francisco Palou and Benito Cambon in 1776 ; the subsequent establish- 
ing of the pueblo of Yerba Buena in 1 836 ; the transfer to the United States in 1846 ; the survey and 
change of name to San Francisco in 1847 ; the discovery of gold in 1848 ; followed by the rapid rise 
to the present time when it promises to become one of the greatest commercial cities of the world. 

The first census, made in 1847, reports a population of 459, and the last, in 1870, gives a popula- 
tion of 150,361. The great influx of population, commencing in 1849, has continued to the present 
day, sometimes fluctuating, but with such general regularity that the future may be confidently calcu- 
lated upon. Since the occupation of the city by Americans, there have been periods of rapid advance- 
ment followed by stagnation and depression. The natural inference is, that a city with such a basis 
as this — a harbor of unequaled capacity backed by a country of extraordinary resources, and front- 
ing an ocean that washes countless islands of great fertility, and countries of the oldest civilization 
and greatest wealth of the earth — should progress with a certainty, and that there could be no such 
thing as recession. The very confidence so t-trongly felt in the future, has, at different periods, so 
impelled investments and improvements that the city has grown beyond the necessities of business ; 
C )nsequently there have been times of halting in the advance, a partial suspension of improvements 
and a depression in prices. 

There was a wild rush of investments in city property during the first five or six years following 
the gold discovery, when there came a period of depression, and property outside of the main business 
streets sold for less than the costs of the improvements on it. This depression, commencing with the 
failure of the leading express and banking companies in 1855, continued until 1858, when the 
development of the agricultural resources of the State gave greater confidence in the producir.g capac- 
ity and stability of the country. This was followed by the discovery of silver in Nevada, in mines of 
fabulous wealth, givingsuch an incentive to mining enterprise that business of all kinds was carried for- 
ward with it. Then for the first time was the attention of the capitalists of San Francisco directed to 
mining investments, the consequence of which was the exploration of the hitherto unknown regions 
of the Pacific Coast, opening valuable mines in every section of the vast interior, and correspondingly 
extending the commerce and influence of this city. The opening of the mining regions of Idaho, 
Nevada, Arizona and Mexico created a great demand for machinery, and foundries and other manu- 
factures flourished most prosperously. The spread of mining explorations throughout the distant 
Territories and the development of the agricultural interests continued with great energy and success, 
with San Francisco as the center of operations, although suffering severe losses from illconsidered 
investments but reaping the reward of the general activity and prosperity, that city rapidly increased in 
population and wealth. During this period the trans-continental railroad was commenced and finished 



* The Federal Census (September, 1870) rcturna the aggregate Chinese population at 11,817. Aasiimins tlies.- flauros 
to have been correct, it is believed that this number has been reduced since by recent departures to the figures included 
in our table. 



THB FEOFIiES HfSUJ^AlTCE CO. ft I<iye Company. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Jewelry and Albums. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 15 



and the trans-Pacific line of steamers established. These great enterprises were the natural conse- 
quence of the progress of empire, and over their path is destined to be earned the chief commerce 

"^ SincTthe completion of the Trans-Continental Railroad, there has been a continuance of general 
depression and complaints of business, but notwithstanding this, there has been a coutmual advance- 
ment in improvements, the trade of the city is in a very healthy condition, and great wealth .3 every 
where manifest Lines of magnificent steamers are established connectmg the city with every sea- 
port on the west^oast of the continent, the Japan and Cliina line is in successful operation, and 
monthly steamers now running via the Hawaiian Islands and New Zealand to Australia, presage the 
ooenin- of a new channel of commerce of the highest importance to San Francisco and America 

In the interior of the State numerous lines of railroads have been constructed aiding the develop- 
ment of the country and sending the trade to this city. Other interior roads, and two grand trans- 
continental railroads, are contemplated and will soon be in course of construction. Both the Northern 
and Southern Facific Railroads terminate at noble harbors, but neither can ever be considered as 
completed until perfect and direct connection is made with San Francisco, the center of commerce on 
the western coast. 

BoAun OF TiDK Lanr Commissioners.— The proceedings of this Board since it went into opera- 
tion in 1868 have been of great importance, saving from spoliation a vast amount of most valuable 
land and netting to the Treasury a large sura of money. By an Act of the Legislature of 1868, the 
commissaon was formed with powers to survey and dispose of the salt marsh and tide lands of 
the Citv and County of San Francisco, also to reserve blocks, channels and basins for the public use 
as the necessity of the future commerce might demand. Under this authority there were surveyed 
all the«ilt marsh and tide lands— lands lying under water— belonging to the State of Cahfornia 
situate *.lous the Bay of San Francisco and in this city and county, and lying withm a depth of 
twentv-four feet at the lowest tide, and extending from Fort Point to the southern boundary of the 
countV The principal and most valuable body of these lands was that lying south of Second street, 
constituting the Southern Division; the Northern Division comprised the area between the Western 
charter line of 1 8§0 and Fort Point. In the Southern Division, a body of sixty acres was reserved from 
sale as a donation to the Southei-n and Western Pacific Railroads for depot purposes, and large areas 
in convenient localities were reserved for docks, piers, slips, basins and other purposes of commerce, 
as China Basin, Central Basin, India Basin, Dry Dock Basin, and South Basin. In June 1869 the 
first sale occurred of the most southerly portion of the Southerly Division, resulting in the sale of two 
thousand four hundred and forty full lots, of fifty by one hundred feet each, and two hundred and 
thirty-four fractional lots, aggregating the sum of $328,467.63, twenty-five per cent of which, to wit ; 
J82 116 89 was paid at the time of sale. A second sale took place m September, disposing of three 
thousand, and eighteen full and four hundred and six fractional lots, aggregating $484,6ol 11, ol 
which $121 160 27 was paid on the day of sale. This sale showed an average price of $146,64 
for a full lot or at the rate of $1,277.52 per acre. This high rate was not maintained at subsequent 
Bale<» owin-'tothe stringency in monetary affairs and the abatement in the land speculative lever, 
con-sequently some purchasers permitted the twenty-five per cent., paid at the time of sale, to be for- 
feited afterwards buying the same ground on more advantageous terms. Notwithstanding the 
"hard times^' complained of, the sales of tide lands have been large, realizing up to Jan. 1st, 1871 
about *l 000 000 During the ensuing year jmblic sales of these lands will continue monthly. Ihe 
present B'oard of Commisijioners consists of Messra B. F. Washington, L. L. Bullock, and Rodmond 
Gibbons, with William S. Bvrne, Secretary and George F. Allardt, Chief Engineer. The office is on the 
southw^ corner of Kearnf and Clay .streets. By Act of the Legislature of 1869-70 the authority 
of the Board was extended over all tide lands within five miles of the boundaries of San Irancisco, 
and under this a large area of land has been surveyed in Marin and Alameda counties. 

Ths City Fhont and Bulkhead,— The construction of the bulkhead, or sea wall, has not pro- 
gressed to a very great extent during the past year. The Act providing for its construction was ap- 
proved AprU 24th, 1863, but it was not until 1867 that any of the bulkhead was built. The first 
section alon<- Front Street from the North line of Union Street to the South line of Vallcjo Street was 
completed in March 1868, and has since been continued from Pacific Street along East Street to 
within 52i feet of the North line of Howard Street. The delay in construction awaits the accumu- 
lation of funds received from harbor dues to carry on the work. Originally it was designed that 
this structure should consist of a foundation of rock dumped into a channel dredged for the purpose, 
on which was to be laid a wall of cut stone, or concrete masonry. The embankment of rubble, how- 
ever seeming to answer all purposes, the ornamental facing has been abandoned as a useless ex- 
pense. The channel has been dredged at an expense of fifty cents per cubic yard, and the embank- 
ment laid ax a cost of two hundred and forty dollars per lineal foot, the total amount expended being 
about $681,000. When completed, as designed, from Chestnut Street on the North to Harrison 
Street on the South, the total length will be eight thousand three hundred and thirty-seven feet. 
From the line of the sea-wall, wharves constructed on piles, extend to the water front, being from five 
to six hundred feet in length. The Front Street Wharf is appropriated to the uses of the California | o 
Pacific Railroad, the Broadwav Wharf also to the purposes of the California Pacific R. R. Company; g> 
at Davis and Pacific Streets are the landings of the Oakland and Alameda ferries, being the terminal B 
passen-'er depot of the Central Pacific Railroad ; on East Street at the foot of Folsom is the ex- 
j tensive°landing of the North Pacific Transportation Company ; the Pacific Mail Steamship Company 



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JONES. PUIiliMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Pocket Cutlery and Scissors. 



TEBBA SANTA, • ramarkable and nerer-failine remedj Jor Kheumatiain. 



16 SANPRANCISCODIRECTORY 



occupy the wharf at the foot of First Street, and the freight depot of the Central Pacific Railroad is 
at the foot of Second Street. These great transportation companies, among the most important of 
the world, have but slight and quite inelegant structures for the terminal depots of their extended 
routes. Capacious sheds have been erected, protecting passengers, employees and goods from sun 
and rain, but while fulfilling these requirements do not give full accommodation for the great traffic 
nor are they architectural ornaments to the City front. The other wharves, as the Vallejo Street, 
Pacific Street, Jackson Street, Washington Street, Clay Street, Commercial Street, Market Street^ 
La Rue's, Mission Street, and Howard Street are under the immediate control of the State Board of 
Harbor Commissioners and devoted to the general purposes of commerce. The gross revenues aris- 
ing from port charges amount annually to about $235,000. The high rates of dockage are often 
condemned, but the Commissioners contend that the port charges bear no unfavorable comparison 
with those of other States ; saying that, " while it is true that our rates of dockage are largely in ex- 
cess of those established in Boston, New York and some other Eastern harbors, our rates of wharf- 
age and tolls are very materially less. The object of this discrimination was to impose the greater 
burden on the ship rather than on the shipper or consignee, and a sound reason exists for it, in the 
fact that the facilities afforded here are greatly superior to those furnished in most of the laro-'e ports 
of the United States." 

The completion of the sea-wall along the greater portion of the City front has removed the ob- 
jections formerly raised to the construction of heavy buildings in that quarter. The broad streets 
and convenience to the wharves where the great commerce of the City is carried on invite the con- 
struction of stores, warehouses, etc., of the first class but instead, the City front, both that in pos- 
session of the great companies and that owned by individuals, is most meanly built and forms the 
most shabby part of San Francisco. 

City Hall Commissio.vers.— The Legislature of this State, at its session of 1869-70, enacted a 
law providing for the appointment of three Commissioners by the Governor to superintend the erection 
of a new City Hall on the tract of land known as Yerba Buena Park. The Commissioners are to receive 
an annual salary of $3,000 each, and they are authorized to employ a Secretary at a salary of $1,800 per 
annum, and to rent an office at a monthly expense of $50; to take possession of Yerba Buena Park; 
to have the same graded, to have a portion of it laid out in lots and sold at public auction, the pro^ 
ceeds from which are to form the building fund ; to have maps prepared; to appoint an architect ; who 
shall prepare specifications, plans, etc., for the building and superintend its erection ; to make con- 
tracts for the furnishing of suj. plies, etc. The Commissioners are Messrs. P. H. Canavan (President), 
Charles E. McLane and Joseph G. Eastland ; Robert George, Secretary. The plans and specifica- 
tions presented by Mr. Augustus Lavar have been adopted and that gentleman chosen architect. The 
sale of the lots has not yet been advertised, but probably will be at no distant day. The law pro- 
vides that all the work shall be done in three years, but it is doubtful if it can be done within that 
time. 

In accordance with the provisions of the law, contracts have been awarded to the Steam Paddy 
g I Company for the grading, which has been completed, and to Mr. J. R. Meyer for the excavations 
for the foundations, who has already commenced operations. 

City Park Commissioners.— The law of 1869-70 provides for the appointment by the Governor of 
three Commissioners who shall have control of the " Golden Gate Park," "Buena'Vista Park " and 
that piece of land marked " avenue " upon the map of the outside lands of the Citv and County of San 
Friincisco. The Commissioners are to hold their offices for the term of fourvears, without anv compensa- 
tion for their services. Messrs. S. F. Butterworth (President), C. F. McDermott and D. W. Connelly have 
been appointed Commissioners and Andrew J. Moulder elected Secretarv. The law gives the Commis- 
sioners full and exclusive power to govern, manage and direct said parks and avenues ; to lay out, 
regulate and improve the same; to pass ordinances for the regulation and government thereof; to 
appoint such engineers, surveyors, clerks and other officers as may be necessary ; to prescribe and 
define their respective duties and authority ; to fix the amount of their compensation, and to have the 
management of the funds provided for the improvement thereof. Thev are also empowered to lease 
such portion of the grounds as they in their judgment may deem fit and' proper, and to expend during 
the year next ensuing their appointment the sum of $100,000 ; during the second ye.ir, $75 000 and 
annually thereafter for the next three years, $50,000. The Commissioners are also authorized to 
issue bonds from time to time in sums of not less than $300 nor more than $1,000, which bonds shall 
not exceed mthe aggregate $225,000, and shall be payable in fifty years, or sooner, as the Legislature 
shall hereafter provide. These bonds cannot be sold for less than their par value. They are pay- 
able in gold coin and bear interest at six per cent, per annum. In July, 1870, $100,000 worth of 
bonds were advertised for sale, but only a small amount was purchased. A topographical survey 
has been made of the various parks, a green house erected, and the seeds for some fifty thousand 
trees procured. It is believed that the trees can be grown from the seeds fully as well as from 
plants and at a far more economical price. The Topographical Engineer has also prepared 
and filed with the Commissioners, a plan for the improvement of the avenue, but owing to the 
inability of the Commissioners to dispose of the bonds, they find it difficult to carry out the proposed 
improvements. . ^ i- r 

Market Street Commissioners.— The Act of the Legislature of 1869-70, providing for the exten- 
sion of Market Street, appointed Messrs. Frank MeCoppin, Charles D. Carter and" Edward Barry 
Commissioners to assess damages arising from the opening of Market Street on a straight line from 



THE PEOPLES INSURANCE CO. a Liberal Company. 



C. p. VAJf SCHAACK & CO.. 708. 712. 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 



PROG RJ S^ JQ JLJ.H^ J) I J Y . 17 



Valencia to Seventeenth streets and of Seventeenth Street from Valencia to Noe The Board com 
menced operations in January, 1871, and filed their report on the 9th of March, having completed the 
duty assigned to it in sixty days. This Commission only appraised damages, and a second set of 
Commissioners will have to be appointed to assess the benefits arising from the opening of the street 
as proposed by the law. f 6 « oiieeu 

Laguna Survey Commissioners.— The provisions of the law of 1869-70 authorizes the County 
Judge to appoint three Commissioners, and in accordance therewith, Messrs. Scott Tidball Mathew 
tannavan and Charles M. Hitchcock have been selected as Commissioners, who are empowered 
to condemn certain private property within the boundaries of what is known as the Laguna Survey 
for the purpose of extending Green, Union, Filbert, Greenwich, Lombard, Chestnut, Polk and Frank- 
lin streets and Van Ness Avenue through said survey, and assessing the damages, benefits etc 
arising therefrom. ° ' > ^ ^-j 

The Commissioners have had maps of all the property made by the City and County Surveyor and 
have taken the testimony of the owners of property relative to its value, and are now enga^^ed in 
taking testimony as to the benefits. They think they will be able to file their report by the Ist ofjune 

^Ew MoNTGOMKRY Street Commissioners.— During the session of the Legislature of 1869-70 a 
bill was introduced providing for the extension of New Montgomery Street on a direct line from How- 
ard btreet to the Bay. Notwithstanding the bill met with serious opposition from a number of 
property owners, it passed both Houses, and was sent to the Governor for his signature On the tenth 
day thereafter Governor Haight returned the bill to the Senate with his veto, but that body had 
adjourned a few minutes before its arrival, and a question was raised as to whether the Gov- 
ernor s veto was valid under the circumstances. The matter went to the Supreme Court 
on a statement of facts, and that body held that the veto was worthless and the bill became a 
aw. The County Judge, under the provisions of the Act requiring him to appoint Commissioners 
to assess the damages and benefits, appointed Messrs. Robert E. Doyle, Duncan L McDonald a 
Isaac G Messec. The Board organized by the election of R. E. Doyle, President and N M 
thadwick, Secretary, and have been engaged for nearly ten months in preparing a recort of thp 
whole subject, which will be ready by the 16th of April. F " "* me 

Montgomery Avenoe Commissioners.— The Act of the Legislature providing for the opening and 
extending of this thoroughfare, authorizes the County Judge to appoint three Commissioners to 
superintend the carrying into effect of the provisions thereof, apd in accordance therewith Messrs 
J. C. Maynard, R. H. Sinton and A. M. Hay were appointed Commissioners. These appointees have 
been organized as a Board of Commissioners with J. C. Maynarft as President and R. J Bush as Sec 
retary. Mr. A. C. Peachy has been appointed Counsel and Messrs. T. P. Riordan, John Calvert 
and Samuel Purdy as Experts, to examine and report upon tae benefits and damages ♦-> the build 
ings affected by the proposed improvement. 

The Commissioners are authorized to assess the damages am benefits resulting from the opening ol a 
street commencing on the westerly side of Montgomery gtreet seventy-six feet, measured on said 
line of said street, north of the northern line of WashingtQ* Street ; thence to a point on the northern 
Ime of Vallejo Street one hundred and forty-six feet wes^ of the western line of Dupont Street, pass- 
ing near to, but not touching or including any portion of the Church of San Francisco de Assi • 
thence continuing in the same straight line to the norffaern line of Beach Street ; thence southerly 
and perpendicular to the first line eighty feet; thence southeasterly parallel to the first line to the 
Bouthwest corner of Montgomery and Washington streets, thence to the place of beginning The 
report of the Commissioners will be completed by tVe 15th of April next. 

Board of Health.— The law of the Legislature ofl869-70, provides for the re-organization of the 
Board of Health for the City and County of Say Francisco, and also for the establishment of n 
more perfect system of quarantine, and authorize? the Governor to appoint the members of the 
Board of Health, who, with the exception of the/Mayor of San Francisco, who is declared to be a 
member of the Board and ex officio President J^iereof, are to be members of the medical faculty 
in good standing. 

The law provides for the appointment by th^ Board of Health of a Health Officer, at a salan- of 
$2,400 per annum ; Deputy Health Officer, a^a salary of $1,800 per annum ; Secretary, at a salary 
of $2,100 per annum ; Clerk, at a salary of $900 per annum ; two Health Inspectors, at a salary of 
$1,200 per annum each ; one Market Inspector, at a salary of $1,200 per annum ; one Messenger 
at a salary of $900 per annum, and two Boafmen, at $900 per annum each. ' 

The Board of Health, through their suboriinate officers, are to have charge of the City r.'id County 
Hospital, the Alms House, the Industrial School, the City Prison and the County Jail, and in me*!tir 
the requirements of the law which gives .his authority, they created an office for another physicia 
viz: Visiting Physician of the City Prison and the County Jail. The Board of Health was al ' 
given general supervision of all mattes appertaiaing to the sanitary condition of the City ai 
County of San Francisco, and empowered to adopt such orders and regulations as to them seem* 
best to promote the public w>lfare. Tiider this clause of the lav , the Board passed ordinanccB pr 
viding for the cleansing and fLmigatipu of vessels ; the removal ' i butchers' offiil ; the sale of adult*, 
ated milk ; the depositing of rubbish, decayed vegetables or fn its ; the following of dangerous a 
detrimental pursuits ; the regiila\ioD of foul or oflFensive vaults .r drains ; the sale or exposing for s.i 
of unwholsome meat, fish or fow'.*; the washing of animals and carriages, etc., etc. 

Thesalaries of the various officers and employes authorized by this law exceed $46,000 per arr . 

JONES. rTTLLMAN A CO., 116 Bansom St«,et. Periumepy and Fancy Soa; ~ 



1018 



^Ka'3 BA-ImKL fer Dytentery, »ii<3 at XHseasea of the Btomaoli •nd Bowels. 

SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



In addition to this amount, there are incidental expenses, which increases this sum to over $.50,000. 

Notwithstanding the excellent organization and the results anticipated therefrom, there are grave 
doubts an to its effi' lency when compared with the old system, which did not cost the city and county 
mof" than one half as much. 

Makine Board.— The law creating the Marine Board authorizes the Governor to appoint three 

Slomuiibsioners, to be known as the Marine Board of the Port of San Francisco, who are authorized 
jid empowered to grant or revoke licenses to conduct the business of keeping a sailor boarding house ; 
a prescribe badges to be worn by the runners employed by such boarding houses as may have 
been licensed ; to regulate the shipping of seamen and to prevent their being shipped while under 
the influence of liquor, etc.; also to guard against the imposition of false and outrageous charges against 
sailors that have been shipped. The law also provides for the re-capture of deserters, and in fact 
to stand between the humble seaman and the rapacious sailor boarding-house-runner and landlord. 
John H. "Wise J. F. Cowdery and P. Crowley are the Commissioners and J. L. Bissell is the Clerk. 

Streets and Hiohwats. — The general suspension of improvements in the past year has been ac- 
companied by a suspension of street extension, but notwithstanding this the various improvements in 
our hio-hways have been marked and important. There has been no Second Street Cut to make, nor 
Potrero Hill to Dierce, yet other quite heavy works have been carried on. The total length of streets 
in the city exceeds one hundred miles, of whicn fifty-four and a half miles are sewered. The total cost 
of street work up to July, 1869, had amounted to $8,512,086.40, and for the fiscal year ending July 
1st, 1870, $1,248,130.05, making a total for street work of $9,760,216.45. 

From'the report of Mr. M. C. Smith, Superintendent of Streets and Highways, is compiled the fol- 
lowing tabular statement of work etc., for the fiscal year ending July 1st, 1870: 



WOHK. 


Measubement. 


Amount. 


Cost. 






1,520,263 

2,380,171 

23,1234 

8.695} 

461,255 

22,965 

79,204 

3,121.461 

61,298 

1.749 

105,612 


$478,031 11 






109,663 82 




Linebl feet 


213,480 79 




Linea'. feet 


53,529 78 




iSquart feet. Stow 


115,988 70 




" " Nicolson 

" " cobble stones — 
One thoi«and feet 


6,923 37 


„ 


14.134 17 


_„ _ 


105.411 69 




Front fea 


75,326 81 




Lineal fee\ 


3,292 71 


Oarbs. . 


Lineal feet, 


53,944 29 



Since the date of the report of the superintendent, extensive grading operations have been carried 
on. Yerba Buena Park, the site for the new City Hall, formerly a succession of sand dunes, has been 
made a level plain. Streets and Avenueshave been laid out upon it, and soon will be erected thereon 
one of the most beautiful structures that g-aces any city in the Union. The broad and beautiful Market 
Street, the dorsal column of the city, has been extended by deep cuttings through the hill near the Pro- 
testant Orphan Asylum, giving direct and ef.sy access to an extended tract of country in that direction. 
Extensive grading has also been done on Sacramento Street, rendering the localities more accessible in 
that high quarter of the city known as Russim Hill. Within the past year a large amount of grading 
has been done on both sides of McAllister Strtet, between Polk and Franklin, and the excavated sand 
fills the water lots of Mission Bay. The broad Van Ness Avenue, seemingly destined to become one 
of the handsomest thoroughfares and a desirable quarter for residences, has been the scene of active im- 
provements during the year. Sacramento, Clay and Washington streets, and Webster and Fillmore 
streets and the blocks formed by their intersection in the Western Addition, have also been greatly 
improved. Heavy grading has continued during th^ year on Townsend Street and others in the vicinity 
of Third, leveling the blocks and opening passage "vay in that quarter. 

Pavements. — From the earliest dawn of civilization, when mankind have congregated in cities, the 
greatest desideratum of street engineering has been to prepare such a kind of pavement as would 
nearest approach indestructibility and fulfill the maiiy other requisites. Massive granite and lava 
blocks were anciently used, and perhaps many other devices of which we have no record. From the 
expensive manniT in which the cities, anterior to the Oaristian Era were paved, it is natural to sur- 
mise tb'.'l the subject was as great a study then as at the present day, and that inventors, street con- 
( ■'fetors, and property owners planned and experimented as now. But there seems to have been a 
Miark a<»e" of a very long period in the matter of pavinj, which recent studies promise to illume. 
• ■^o^ing this long " dark age," the standard pavement has been of cobblestones, the rounded boulder 
' it^the glacial period. This, having superseded the elaborate work of the ancients, came to be con- 
' '"Aered the non plus ultra of paving, and the " car rattling o'er the stony street" was a punishment 
i'Ojemed unavoidable by those living in cities. Within the last quarter )f a century reflecting men have 
K, — i.,j„^ that thf noise and unpleasantness of the cobble pavement could be avoided, and, as all 

■ ' * '■ '» owoitpH the successful inventor 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny St., Table and Pocket Cutlery. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 19 



while In a semi-plastic condition, pressed and cut in grooves by enormous iron rollers. This seems 
not to have been successfully manufactured and laid but in a few cities of continental Europe, conse- 
quently its adoption has not been general. Perhaps Babylon was paved in this manner, as it is certain 
that asi)haltum was used extensively at that time, it being the cement with which the great walls, en- 
circling the mighty city, were constructed. This very useful mineral, had for a great number of centu- 
ries passed almost entirely from use, but the abundance in which it exists in California has drawn to 
it the attention of the scientist and the inventor, by whom it is appropriated to some of the many 
purposes designed by nature, and it bids fair to resume its place in the arts it formerly held. 

The Belgian, Russ, MacAdam and several kinds of wooden pavements have been tried in various 
cities in Europe, each taking the popular favor for a short time, and giving fortune and fame to the 
inventor. A section of Battery Street, in front of the Custom House, was laid with the Russ Pavement 
several years since, and while lasting well is objectionable from its slippery surface, noise and cost. 
The Mc Adam is used on Mission and several other streets, and while answering well for country roads 
becomes too dusty in summer and too muddy in winter for a city like San Francisco. In 1863 the 
Nicolson wooden pavement was patented and became the rage, and it was believed that perfection 
had been attained. This was laid extensively in every progressive city in the Union, and its popularity 
was unbounded. This popularity, and the fortune made, were great incentives to invention, and a large 
number of patents for different styles of pavement were obtained. The rapid decay of the Nicolson 
Pavement soon destroyed its popularity and it is no longer laid in our streets. 

The Stow Pavement, an invention of this city, has superseded the Nicolson, and bids fair to have 
an equal popularity. This was patented in December, 1867, since which date there have been laid of 
it in the streets of San Francisco 906,931 square feet, costing twenty-five cents per square foot. This 
pavement is of blocks of wood, the grain, or fibre, standing vertical, resting on a smooth bed of sand, 
into which is driven a wedge made of board of the length of the block, holding the latter in place. 
Gravel, and hot coal tar, or bitumen, is spread on the surface and into the spaces between the blocks. 
It is simple, neat and easily laid, but the question of durability, contraction and expansion, must be 
tested by time. The City Paving Company say that, having thoroughly tested all the various styles of 
street paving now in use, they have arrived at the conclusion that the Stow Foundation Pavement is 
preeminently the best, and as a consequence of this conviction have entirely discarded all others and 
that this particular pavement is greatly growing in demand. 

The " Imperishable Stone Block Paving Company" is a new organization of San Francisco, founded 
on a species of pavement, the combined invention of Messrs. Skinner, Bonnet and Forge, and patented 
in July and November, 1870. This is a concrete of eighty per cent crushed rock and twenty per cent 
asphaltum, heated and mixed together, and while plastic formed under great pressure into blocks 
similar to those used in wooden pavement, but with corrugated sides, and is then laid on a bed of 
sand with slight interstices between the blocks, which spaces are filled with a softer substance of the 
same material as the blocks. A section of this pavement was laid in July, 1870, between the rail 
tracks on Montgomery Street, at the intersection of California, and awaits the trial of use to prove its 
value. This pavement has also been laid in a few other localities of the city, but being a recent in- 
vention and awaiting the perfecting of machinery for manufacturing the blocks, has not yet come 
into extended use. The material cannot be affected by the weather, and it is claimed that the concrete 
as prepared and pressed for use will support a greater pressure than the hardest granite. The essentials 
of a perfect pavement are cheapness, durability, abundant supply of material, smooth surface while at 
the same time it affords a good foothold for horses, noiselessness, cleanliness and that it may be eabily 
taken up and replaced. All these qualities are claimed by the "Imperishable Stone Block Paving 
Company" for their asphaltic concrete, and they propose to lay the pavement for twenty-five cents per 
square foot. A machine, which is an ingenious piece of mechanism, has been made for the manufac- 
ture of these blocks, and this style of pavement will undoubtedly be tried in every part of the Union an 
honor to California invention, and furnishing a market for one of her many mineral productions. 

Many of the streets of San Francisco were formerly planked, but the rapid and irregular wear of 
this style of pavement has forbidden its extension or reconstruction. The pavements now in use here 
are the Cobblestone, MacAdam, Stow and Imperishable Stone. The contour of San Francisco's site, 
being of hill and plain, requires different styles of pavement, as that cheapest and best suited for a 
level street would not answer for a steep hillside. As yet the matter is quite experimental. The old 
style of cobblestone is still extensively used, its first cost being but from eighteen to twenty cents per 
square foot, and the material lasting and cheap. 

On the third day of January, 1870, a Resolution was adopted in the Board of Supervisors as follows : 

Resolved, That the question of the condition of streets and sidewalks, be and is hereby referred to 

a special committee, with authority to investigate the whole subject and report to this Board, the 

form or forms of carriage or foot pavement deemed by them best for this city, and giving any other 

information Avhich in their opinion will be of value to this Board in this connection. 

The committee, after several months of investigation, eliciting some of the facts which have been 
presented in this article, and receiving proposals and explanations of some twenty different kinds of 
paving, concluded with the following recommendations : 

Cobble Pavemj^nts. — Your committee recommends that a thorough investigation be made of the 
hitherto cost of repairs of our cobbled i treets, with a view to a plan for repairing or replacing them all. 

Asphalt. — We r,ecommend that the present popular plan of making sidewalks of this material 
be continued and er couraged. 



JONES, PULItMAN & CO., 116 Sanaom Street. Yankee Notions. 



YSBBA. SANTA is suitable for all ages and both sexes. 



20 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Planking Stueets and Sidewalks. Your committee recommends that all the sidewalks here- 
after laid down by property-holders in this city within the fire limits, shall be of materials that will 
not decay. In this, as in other street work, the interest of the public is paramount. 

Belgian Pavement. — This pavement has never been laid in this city, and your committee hopes 
to see the experiment with Amador County trap rock tried by some property-holders on a street 
where the travel is purely commercial. We ought to know more of its advantages by actual com- 
parison with cobble pavement. 

Preserving Wood. — From all the information gathered on this subject by your committee, the 
Bethel and Robins processes Crepresented as being substantially identical) are undoubtedly the best. 

Tests. — Your committee recommends that this Board shall designate Battery, Front and Davis, 
also California and Market, easterly from Battery, as streets for samples to be accepted and tested 
by the city, believing that pavements that will prove satisfactory on those streets will resist the wear 
of any transportation to which they will be subject in this city. 

Best Foundation for Wooden Pavement. — Your committee believes that sand, securely confined) 
furnishes the best possible foundation for pavements, as all space is occupied, approximately, as ef- 
fectually as if by water. 

A Wood Pavement exempt from Royalty. — Your committee recommends an experiment at the 
expense of the city, in front of city property, with a pavement constructed of blocks of wood, 
eight inches deep, laid upon a firm sand foundation, with grain of the wood in a vertical position, the 
rows of blocks to be separated by strips of boards transversely to the block and coming to the sur- 
face of the pavement, being held in position by nailing with cut nails (which have been tempered by 
being heated and cooled) to the blocks ; the blocks and strips to be subjected to the most approved 
process for wood preservation and a coating of asphaltum and dry clean beach sand to be spread over 
all. The presumption is that the strips would be perpetually worn by the calks of the horses' shoes 
sufiBciently to secure good foothold. 

Impartiality. — Your committee has earnestly sought, throughout this report, to maintain impar- 
tiality and at the same time a just appreciation of ^eal mej-ii. 

Respectfully submitted, Chas. R. Story. 

Monroe Ashbury. 
Alex. Badlam. 

Street Railroads. — The street railroads of San Francisco now permeate it in every direction, 
affording convenience to travelers and residents throughout its limits, and greatly enhancing the 
value of property in the remote parts. From North to South through diflFerent streets run the cars 
of the Omnibus Co., and of the North Beach and Mission Co., which also have lines running from the 
business center via Howard and Folsom Streets to the Western limits. The Central, and the Front 
Street and Ocean Companies run from the city front through the central portion of the city and with 
various termini in the Northern, Western and Southern suburbs. The Market Street Railroad, the 
pioneer of the class, extends from First through Market and Valencia to Twenty-sixth Street, with a 
branch to the Pavilion in Hayes Valley. The City Railroad, recently constructed, has its starting point 
at the junction of New Montgomery and Market Streets and runs on the former and Mission to Twenty- 
sixth Street. The Potrero and Bay View Railroad connects with the North Beach and Mission on 
Fourth Street, crosses Mission Bay, through the deep cut of the Potrero, over the long bridge of Islais 
Creek, by Butchertown and South San Francisco to its terminus at Bay View. A branch of the City 
Front and Ocean Railroad has been constructed within the past year, leading from Polk Street to 
Laurel Hill Cemetery, and another from Broadway to Harbor View near Presidio, making it, with its 
branches, the longest of the city. The aggregate length of street railroads in San Francisco is about 
forty-five miles, giving accommodation to almost every part, the especial friend of the poor man, but 
patronized by all classes, rich and poor aUke. 

Churches. — Usually in cities, the most conspicuous architectural monuments are those edifices 
devoted to religion, but San Francisco is an exception to the rule. The churches here show but 
little of architectural beauty in proportion to their cost. Those completed or undertaken during the 
year are the St John's Presbyterian, (formerly St. James') the United Presbyterian, St. Patrick's, St- 
Boniface, First Congregational, Sherith Israel, Powell Street M. E. and the Chinese Mission. 

The first is situated on the north side of Post Street between Mason and Taylor streets. The 
United Presbyterian is a pleasant appearing, wooden edifice, on the west side of Mason Street 
between Eddy and Ellis streets. The Roman Catholic Church, St. Boniface, is on the south side of 
Tyler Street between Jones and Leavenworth. St Patrick's Church on the north side of Mission 
between Third and Fourth streets, was fully described in the Directory of 1870. This is to be the 
grandest ecclesiastical structure on the Pacific Coast, and its construction has so far progressed as to 
give an idea of its noble proportions. Its dimensions are 90 feet front by 160 feet in depth. The 
walls are of brick laid in cement, of great thickness and strength and from basement to eaves of 
wings are 30 feet in hight. From the wings rise the walls of the main building, resting on iron 
pillars, and aroof of slate with apeak 100 feet above the pavement crowns the structure. The front 
entrance is surmounted by a tower, the total hight of which is to be 240 feet, ^''or 120 feet the tower 
is of brick, from the top of which a wooden spire extends 120 feet higher, making it the loftiest spire 
in the State, and surpassed by but very few in America. The interior of this greaft building will present 



A knowledge of the business and fair dealing are combined in the .'PEOFIiES. 



C. p. VAN SOHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, White Shirts. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 21 



a vast hall of the dimensions allowed by the outer walls, with a ceiling TS feet high, and sup- 
ported by two rows of graceful iron pillars. The design of the architect is to make it both earth- 
quake and fire-proof, and it is assumed that the iron pillars will support the roof should the brick 
walls be shaken down. The date of completion of this grand edifice or its cost cannot as yet be 
estimated. 

The First Congregational Church in course of erection on the southeast corner of Post and Mason 
streets, will rival in dimensions, architectu'-al appearance and altitude of spire, the great St. Patrick's. 
The spire of this church will have an altitude of two hundred and thirty feet, and as the church 
stands on high ground, it will have a most commanding efiect. The cost of the edifice is estimated 
at SI 00,000. 

The svnagogue, Sherith Israel, on the east side of Taylor Street between Sutter and Post 
is one of the most pleasing architectural ornaments, of the city. A capacious brick basement fur- 
nishes a convenient school and lecture room. The superstructure is of wood, and the interior is 
tastefully and elegantly furnished, the lofty ceilings, arched and frescoed in imitation of the sky at 
night when dazzling with stars, the whole presenting a most beautiful appearance. 

School Houses. — The building of school houses has progressed during the past year to a greater 
extent than during any previous year of San Francisco's history. The style of architecture and in- 
terior arrangement is that of the most approved plan, designed and superintended by Messrs. Raun 
& Taylor, architects to the Board of Education. The glorious free-school system, the keystone of 
the Republic and preserver of our liberties, is the pride of all good citizens. Richly endowed by a 
benificent government, the erection of grand academic structures is possible and a support is assured 
that gives education to every class. 

The school houses erected by the Board of Education comprise, the Girls' High School, three 
Grammar Schools, the City Front Primary School and Point Lobos Avenue School. 

The first, the Girls' High School, situated on the north side of Bush Street, bet HFydeand Larkin, 
is a building of basement and three stories, surmounted by an observatory. The main building has 
a front of 54 feet 8 inches, by a depth of 82 feet 4 inches, and two wings, each 21 feet 5 inches front 
by 50 feet 6 inches deep. The first and second stories are each 14 feet 6 inches high, and the third 
story is 16 feet in the clear. The basement, used as a play ground, is 10 feet in the clear. This 
latter portion, and the foundation are of brick, but the superstructure is of wood. In the building 
are 10 class rooms, a large assembly room, teachers' rooms, lecture rooms, halls, closets, cloak rooms, 
library, etc. The necessary water conveniences are ample, each cloak room, teachers rooms, library, 
and lecture hall, having a marble topped wash stand, and in closets for that purpose a fire hose 
bibb, and the basement has a sink with the necessary water service. The yard is planked and at 
the rear are located the water closets, and a shed with sink and water. 

The three Grammar schools are precisely alike, one erected on the east side of Eighth Street 
between Harrison and Bryant, one on the north side of McAllister Street between Gough and 
Franklin streets, and the other on the east side of Valencia Street between Twenty-second and 
Twenty-third. These are similar to the Girls High School. They are of three stories and base- 
ment, with brick foundations and wood superstructures. The dimensions on the ground are for the 
main building, 51 feet 8 inches front, by 79 feet 1 inch deep, on each side of which is a wing 
38 feet 2 inches wide, by 3^ feet 7 inches deep. There are 16 class rooms, teachers rooms, halls, 
lecture rooms, closets, etc., as in the first described. The yards are divided into two equal parts by 
a close board fence, and are supplied with water closets, sheds, etc. 

The City Front Primary School is situated on the north side of Broadway, between Montgomery 
and Sansom streets. This is a two story building, and contains eight class rooms, teachers rooms, 
closets, etc. The main building is 48 feet 3 inches front by 79 feet deep, with a wing on each side 
10 feet 3 inches wide, by 37 feet 6 inches in depth. There is no assembly room, but the class rooms 
in the second story are connected with sliding doors in such a manner as to make two large rooms. 
The teachers' rooms are furnished with marble-topped washstands, and hose is provided for washing 
purposes and as a protection against fire. 

The Point Lobos Avenue School is a one story building, containing four class rooms. The main 
building has a front of 71 feet and a depth of 51 feet. A wing in front of 27| feet wide by 9^ deep, 
contains the front entrance and two cloak rooms, and a similar one in the rear contains the rear 
entrance and two cloak rooms. A wide hall runs from front to rear connecting the two entrances. 
On either side of this are two class rooms separated by sliding doors, which enables the transforma- 
tion into two large rooms. The building is entirely of wood, and is surmounted by a cupola. 

The disastrous fire at the Lincoln School necessitates the partial reconstruction of that splendid 
edifice, which will be made to appear again as the original. 

The Boys' High School, soon to be built, will be located on the south side of Geary Street between 
Scott and Pierce streets. The Main building will have a frontage of 55^ feet on Geary Street, by a 
depth of 90 feet, with a wing on each side of 27^ by 52 feet dimensions. The basement will be for a 
gymnasium, the first, second and third stories for class rooms, halls, reception or lecture rooms, etc. 
The whole to be crowned by a Mansard roof. The design proposes a most elegant building, worthy 
the noble purpose for which it is to be erected. All these are from plans by Raun & Taylor, 
architects, and the work is done under their superintendence. The contractors are, Mr. Michael 
Casey, for the Girls'High School ; Mr. John C. Casey, for the Grammar Schools, Mr. John C. Murphy, 
for the Point Lobos Avenue School, and Mr. Thomas H. Day, for the City Front Primary School. 



JONES. PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dress Trimmings. 



BEDINOTON, HOSTETTEB & CO., exclusive Agents for Hostetter's Bitters. 



22 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 

New Mint. — The construction of this grand and most useful public building has so far progress- 
ed as to exhibit its proportions and give some idea of its character and artchitectural appearance. 
The style of architecture is a composite, being of the Doric-Ionic order. The new mint occupies the 
100 vara lot forming the northwest corner of Mission and Fifth Streets. The lot was purchased by 
the United States Government for the sum of $100,000 and work was commenced in the latter part 
of 1869, and the foundation laid. The ground plan of the building embraces an area fronting 221i 
feet on Fifth Street by 166^ on Mission Street. Over the entire area an excavation ofseven feet in depth 
was made and filled with a solid bed of concrete, even with the surface. When this was perfectly 
hardened, the basement, with outer walls of granite and partition walls of brick, was laid upon it. 
The basement forms a noble story by itself, being all above ground, is 13f feet high, and is built of 
granite ashler from the Penryn Quarries, on the Central Pacific Railroad in Placer County. This had so 
far progressed that on the 24th day of May, 1870, the corner stone was laid with imposing ceremony by 
the Masonic Order, for which purpose many gathered from all parts of the country. From this basement 
the building rises two stories of 18|-feet each, constructed of freestone from Newcastle Island in the 
Gulf of Georgia, from the possessions of our Northern neighbor. This is a very handsome gray rock, 
and is quite easily cut and polished to a smooth surface. A broad flight of granite steps leads to the 
front entrance on Fifth Street. The vestibule will be graced with six magnificent pillars, each of a 
single block of freestone, 27 feet high by 5-^ feet in diameter at the base and 4^ at the top. From 
the pavement to the crown of the roof will be 70 feet. Above the roof two chimney stacks, built 
as towers, will rise to the hight of 150 feet. The roof will be of copper, the floor beams of rolled 
iron, and the floors of marble tiling so that no wood except wainscoting, doors, and furniture of 
offices will enter the building, making it perfectly fire-proof. The wood used will be of California 
laurel, in keeping with the general elegance of the establishment. The granite ashler dressed for laying 
cost $2.70 per iSlbic foot, and the freestone cut plain is furnished at $2.50 per cubic foot, and the 
entire building wtthout machinery and furniture is expected to cost $1,500,000. The architect is A. 
B. Mullett, architect to the Treasury Department, and W. P. C. Stebbins is superintendent of the work. 

New Bdtchertown. — The necessities and growth of the city demanded the removal of the 
slaughtering establishments from the Butchertown of Brannan Street, and for the accommodation of 
this business the Legislature of 1868 granted to William Dunphy and associates the area bounded 
on the northeast by First avenue, on the southeast by I Street, on the south and southwest by the 
natural shore line of the bay, and on the west by Kentucky Street or Railroad Avenue, comprising 
about fifty blocks of submerged land. Islais Creek Canal runs along the North of this tract and 
India Basin is at the extreme southeast. This valuble plat is devoted to slaughtering purposes and is 
the locality of the New Butchertown. During the past year extensive improvements have been made, 
principally on First Avenue, and altogether near one hundred buildings erected. These comprise ex- 
tensive slaughter houses, stables, boarding houses, restaurants, saloons, offices, etc. The new town 
and streets are built on piles over the water of Islais Creek Bay, thus, apparently, giving quick drain- 
age of offal, but the rising tide carries the same towards shore, lodging much upon the shallow 
places from which, at low tide, arises the ofi^ensive effluvia of decaying animal matter. The filling 
up of these places and the construction of sewers will obviate this difficulty and accomplish the ob- 
ject of locating the slaughtering establishments here. The Potrero and Bay View street railroad 
passes through Butchertown, as does also the adopted route of the Southern Pacific Railroad. 

South San Francisco. — South of Islais Creek is the growing and pleasant suburb of South San 
Francisco. This occupies a ridge of land running into the bay and terminating at Hunter's Point. 
During the year a number of private residences have been constructed, several stores and public 
buildings. Conspicious among all is the new Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum, a large wooden struct- 
ure, fronting on Connecticut street and from its elevation commanding an extended view of city and 
bay and surrounding country. Here, on the corner of Eleventh Avenue and P Street, the California 
Silk Manufacturing Company has erected a building of wood, two stories in hight, having a front 
50 feet, and a depth of 125 feet for a factory, intending to add this noble branch to the many industries 
of the State. 

On the corner of Railroad and Twelfth Avenues, Messrs Bowen Brothers, the extensive grocers, 
have erected a block of stores nine in number. These are of wood and one story in hight. The 
Potrero and Bay View Railroad gives easy and ready access to this Southern portion of the city. 

The White House. — This name applies to the elegant building owned by Messrs Lazard Freres, 
on the corner of Kearny and Post sti-eets, a building of three stories high and basement, fronting 87^ 
feet on Kearny Street and 108 feet on Post. This fine structure is built of brick and iron so com- 
bined as to be considered safe against all earthquake shocks with which San Francisco is threatened. 
The style of architecture is of the light, airy, ornamental order of which iron enables the construct- 
ion, and is coming in vogue in this city, and which may properly be styled " San Franciscan." The 
budding of this order can be seen in the few iron front buildings, or those of partial iron erected 
within the past two years, and which the architectural genius of the Pacific Coast is called upon to 
perfect. The White House takes its name from its color, being painted white in most pleasing 
contrast to the dingy sand hill color generally prevailing, but which seems now to be changing, 
as many of the old, as well as new houses have recently exchanged the sombre hue to the cheerful 
white. This fine structure is occupied as dry goods stores, the corner, with fifty feet front on Kearny 
Street, by J. W. Davidson & Co., and the balance by Rosenblatt's Palace of fashion. 



Fair rates and prompt payments by the F£OPLiES. 



C. p. VAJf SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 aud 716 Kearuy Street. P»»rnishinu Goods. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 23 



Next to the White House on Kearny Street, Mr. Van Bergen is building a similar structure. It 
is of brick, has three stories and a basement, and occupies a frontage on Kearny Street of 65 feet 
by a depth of 108 feet. The front and the upper floors are supported by cast iron pillars, of which 
there are twenty-six in all. The first story will be occupied by Keane, O'Connor & Co., as a dry 
goods store and the Howe Sewing Machine Co., the basement by Ackerman Bros, for fancy goods, 
and the upper story by William Shew, as a photographic gallery. The dry goods stores will com- 
mand a rental of $1,200 or $1,300 per month. The building will cost $50,000. 

Bancroft's Building. — This handsome structure, on the south side of Market Street between 
Third and Fourth, wa^ commenced in 18(39, and completed and opened for business in July, 1870. 
The building is massive and, at the same time, graceful in appearance, its lofty and peculiarly orna- 
mented front being one of the chief attractions of the street. In dimensions it has a front of 
76 feet on Market Street, running through to Stevenson Street where, with a slight L, it has a front- 
age of 80 feet. Its altitude, from foundation to front cornice, is 100 feet, and it is divided into five 
stories and basement. The necessity of great strength has been observed in the construction, the 
walls being of brick and the first story of the front of iron. The window casings are of iron, and 
iron pillars cast in pleasing patterns give strength and beauty to the front. The top is crowned with 
a bold, projecting cornice, from which protrude eight figures, two representing Punch, two Squibob, 
and the others images of fancy, altogether unique and attractive. Two strong brick walls inclose a 
hall-way and divide the building through the center, the eastern portion being occupied as a book and 
publishing house of A. L. Bancroft & Co., and the western portion as a furniture store and for other 
purposes. Through the center of the main rooms, which extend from street to street, a distance of 
one hundred and seventy feet, are rows of iron pillars, thirteen in each, and they are repeated through 
three stories, making seventy-eight in all, the three upper stories having wooden pillars. The 
establishment of A. L. Bancroft & Co. comprises all of the different departments of bookmaking, and 
it has the reputation of being one of the most complete of its character in the United States. The 
cost of the building was $140,000. 

Parisian Hotkl. — This is a large tenement house corner Broadway and Maxwell streets be- 
tween Polk and Larkin, three stories in hight, fronting 42 feet on Broadway and running through to 
Vallejo 275 feet. The house has been constructed with the aim of giving every comfort to the families 
occupying it, with gas and water throughout and a large yard for the use and convenience of all. 
Oregon lumber is the material of which it is constructed, the floors being double, with a stratum of 
three inches of puddled clay between the layers of flooring, thus deadening the sound to the story be- 
low. A neat balcony surrounds the building, giving it an airy and graceful appearance. This fine 
block has been erected at a cost of $30,000 under the superintendence of Mr. Thomas Turnbull the 
architect. 

Tocker's Block. — Mr. J. W. Tucker, the well-known jeweler, has erected a most pleasant collec- 
tion of forty cottages on the block bounded by Webster, Buchanan, Jackson and Washington streets. 
These are neat, one story buildings two in a body, with bay windows and other ornamentations, 
painted a cheerful white and surrounded by space adapted for gardens. These are sold on the home- 
stead plan, each house and lot for $3,000, which the purchaser, or tenant, pays by an advance of $500 
and then monthly installments of $40. The locality is a pleasant one, and a branch of the Front Street 
aud Ocean Railroad running by the premises, renders them convenient of access. 

Real Estate Associates. — An organization known as the Real Estate Associates, has graded 
three blocks in the Western Addition, the first bounded by Webster, Fillmore, Sacramento and Clay 
streets ; the second by Steiner, Fillmore, Sacramento and Clay ; and the third by Steiner, Pierce, Sacra- 
mento and Clay. Upon the second block thirteen houses, two stories each, have been built, twenty 
feet front by thirty-two in depth, divided into seven rooms having bay windows and modern conven- 
iences, altogether making a fine appearance. These houses and lots are sold on the homestead prin- 
ciple, each for $3,200, of which $800 is in advance and the remainder in monthly payments of $50. 
Ih3 extension of different branches of the Front Street and Ocean Railroad throughout the Western 
Addition has given a great impetus to improvements in that quarter. 

Duncan's Building. — The old block of 411 and 413 California Street has been torn down and 
the beautiful iron front, three stories and basement structure, known as Duncan's Building, has taken 
its place. This now c(mforms to the general fine architectural appearance of this portion of California 
street, the quarter of banks, insurance, brokers and exchange. Graceful architecture, strength of 
material, broad passageways, large windows and capacious apartments are the characteristic features 
and which must at once attract and favorably impress the stranger. The building is occupied by 
offices for various purposes and in it is the hall of the Board of Brokers. 

College Building. — On the north side of Post Street, between Montgomery and Kearny, occupying 
lots numbering 22, 24, 26 and 28, Messrs. O'Brien, Plum & Ewing, have erected a fine building of 
brick and iron, having a front of 77^ feet, a depth of 122^ feet, having three stories and a basement, 
with an aggregate hight of 63 feet above the sidewalk. Three elegant and capacious stores occupy 
the first floor, offices and store-room the second, and the upper story is devoted entirely to the various 
departments of Heald's Business College which gives the name to the building. The western store 
is occupied as the salesroom of the Womens' Cooperative Union, the middle is the carpet and furnish- 
ing warerooms of Plum, Bell & Co., and the third or eastern room is the gas-fixture and plumbing 



JOJSTES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sanaom Street, Suspenders and Week Ties. 



MASON ft FOIjIiABD'S FUjIjS cure Fever and A^ue. 



24 SANFRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



establishment of J. H. O'Brien & Co. This is one of the finest structures of the past year, and adds 
greatly to the appearance of the neighborhood. Its cost was $45,000. 

Wormser's Bcilding. — On the south side of California Street, near Sanson), Mr. Isaac Wormser has 
erected a substantial three story iron front building of 25 feet front by 80 in depth, taking- the place 
of one of the olden style which was in unpleasant contrast with the handsome architecture of its 
neighbors. This improvement completes the financial quarter of California street at least on the 
southern side, which now, from Montgomery to Sansom streets, presents a front of architectural 
beauty seldom surpassed. The cost of the alteration has been $25,000. 

On the corner of Mission and Beale streets, Mr. Henry Droger has erected a large wooden build- 
ing in place of others destroyed by fire on the night of October 20th, 1870. This has a frontage of 
137^ feet on Beale Street by 45 feet 10 inches on Mission. The corner is occupied as a store and the 
remainder by the saw mill of Richardson, Dell & Co. On Beale Street north of Mission the extensive 
carriage factory of Casebolt k Co., burned last year, has been re placed by a strong brick struct- 
ure of the same dimensions as the one destroyed, and business is resumed as though never inter- 
rupted by the fire fiend. 

Central Pacific Railroad Depot. — Great changes have been made during the past year at the 
foot of Second Street where is the freight depot of the Central Pacific Railroad. Substantial wharves 
have been built, upon which a capacious shed of several hundred feet in dimensions has been erected. 
Within this the necessary ofiices of the company have been made and over the wharf runs a laby- 
rinth of tracks conveying to one on an adjustable apron which can be raised or lowered so as to per- 
mit cars to or from the deck of a steamboat by which they are transferred with their cargoes to the 
main track on the opposite side of the bay. A track also extends to the wharf of the Pacific Mail 
Steamship at the foot of First street, whereby cargoes direct from China, Japan or wherever those 
steamers ply, can be transferred at once to the cars for the journey overland. The works are ex- 
tensive and answer the purpose designed but do not constitute such a depot as is worthy the great 
transcontinental road nor of the Metropolis of the Pacific. Two thirty acre tracts of tide lands 
south of the present landing have been granted by the State to the Southern and Central Pacific 
Railroad Companies for depot purposes but these are yet unimproved. 

Light Gcarps' Armory. — This building erected on the northwest corner of New Montgomery 
and Howard streets, has a front of 146 feet on New Montgomery and 80 feet on Howard streets. It 
is built of brick in the most substantial manner, and of a pleasant style of architecture. The main 
upper story is devoted to the purposes of the S. F. Light Guard as au armory, drill room and gymna- 
sium, and the lower story is rented in stores. 

Miscellaneous. — Mr. John Conly has had built a block of six houses on O'Farrell Street betweert 
Jones and Leavenworth. These are of two stories and basement, of wood and cost about $16,000. 

A fine two-story house, with ornamental grounds, has been added to the improvements on Leav- 
enworth Street between Ellis and O'Farrell, cost $6,000. Similar ones, under the same superintend- 
ance, were built on Folsom Street between First and Second, cost $8,000; another between Eighth and 
Ninth, cost $4,000 ; one on California Street near Leavenworth, cost $4,000 ; one on Harrison Street 
between Third and Fourth, cost $5,000, and one on Twenty-fourth Street between Mission and Valen- 
cia, cost $7,000. 

On Larkin Street near Sutter, Mr. L. Brown has erected four tenement houses, costing $5,500. 
On the same near the corner of Post, Mr. Bashim has built a two-story dwelling of ten rooms with a 
studio for working casts in plaster and stucco, cost $4,000. At the corner of Ellis and Larkin streets, 
a fine three story dwelling has been constructed for Mr. E. Conlay, cost $4,000. On Post Street east of 
Larkin, Mr. Russell has erected a tenement block of three stories, having a frontage of 22| feet on 
Post Street by a depth of 60 feet. Each floor forms a separate tenement of seven rooms, cost $4,500. 
On the corner of Larkin and Post streets, a two-story tenement house costing $2,000, and on Pine Street 
near Larkin is a similar house costing $3,000, lately constructed. Mr. S. H. Carlyle has built on Larkin 
Street near California a block of fine private residences three stories in hight, costing $14,000. Each 
.dwelling contains eight rooms and bath room. On Geary Street near Hyde, Mr. Tiesig has built a pri- 
vate dwelling of two stories and basement, costing $4,500. Mr. Folkers has a similar house on Hyde 
Street near Sutter, built at a cost of $4,000. On the corner of Turk and Taylor streets, Mr. Max Eng- 
lander has erected a three-story boarding house, containing twenty-four rooms, cost $10,000. In this 
vicinity, corner of Tyler and Hyde streets, Mr. Wolf has in course of construction a block of seven 
dwellings to cost $14,500. Another, by the same proprietor, at the corner of Hyde and McAllister 
streets, two stories high, cost $3,500. On Willow Street, west of Larkin and south of Ellis, is a block of 
four buildings two stories, and six rooms each, cost $8,000. Messrs. Norton, Morehouse and Capt. Nor- 
ton have built each a private residence on Larkin Street near Turk at the aggregate cost of $10,000. 
Mr. Davison, on Tyler Street above Larkin has erected a fine dwelling house, cost $3,500. On the 
corner of Fulton and Franklin streets, Mr. S. D. Gary has built a store and dwelling at a cost of $4,000. 
Mr. Kloppenburg, City Treasurer, has erected three private dwellings on the corner of Grove and 
Franklin streets, each three stories high, costing $9,000. On Post Street above Mason, a three-story 
dwelling has been erected at a cost of $3,000. On Ellis Street near Jones, Colonel Fray has built a 
dwelling costing $3,000. Mr. Turner has erected on California Street between Stockton and Powell a 
fine private dwelling of ten rooms, cost $4,000. On Clay Street between Stockton and Powell, Mr. 
McCormick, Detective Ofiicer of the Insurance Companies, has erected a dwelling at a cost of 3,000. 



In insuring yovir property, place the risk writh the PEOPLES- 



C P VAN SCHAAC X & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 25 



On Filbert Street near Mason, Mr. Patterson has erected a dwelling, costing $2,000. Mr. Altmann has 
erected a house of three stories for three tenants, on Green Street east of Dupont, cost $2,500. 
A similar building at a like sum has been built on Green Street above Powell. On Dupont Street 
above Union, Mr. Cognio has erected a row of four tenement houses of three stories, costing $4,000. 
On Stockton Street, Mr. Benson has built a beautiful private residence of three stories, with a richly 
ornamented roof, cost $12,000. 

On the east side of New Montgomery Street on the corner of Minna, the Real Estate Associate 
Company are erecting a large brick building, two brick stories and Mansard roof in hight, having a 
front of 135 feet on New Montgomery and a depth of 80 feet. On the west side of Third Street, near 
Howard, has been erected a fine brick block of four stories in hight, the first story being divided into 
two large and handsome stores. Two tiers of large bay windows adorn the front, making this a con- 
spicious ornament to the street. The building cost $40,000. On the west side of Taylor Street be- 
tween Ellis and Eddy, Mrs. Mish has erected a block of three large wooden buildings of two stories 
and basement in hight and of a general fine appearance. These are used for dwellings. On 
Dupont Street, near Post, has been erected a fine brick block by Mr. Osborne, of three stories and 
basement, the front and upper stories being supported by iron pillars. The basement and front of 
the first story will be divided into three stores, and the back of the first story used as the residence 
of the tenants of the stores. The upper stories are divided into tenements. The cost of this build- 
ing is $20,000. 

On the corner of Pacific and Sansom streets. Dr. Henry Adolphus has erected a wooden block of 
three stories, for stores on the first story, and boarding house above, to be called the Sedan House. 
The basement is of brick, which with the front of the first story will be divided into seven large 
stores, and the remainder will comprise the hotel. The building will have a front of 107 feet on 
Sansom Street and 65 on Pacific Street. Cost $37,000. On the corner of Bush and Stockton streets 
has been erected, at an expense of $18,000, a hotel building occupying a space seventy-one by eighty- 
one feet and three stories high. The owner is Mr. Barrett. 

Tobin's Residence. — As a sample of one of the most elegant private residences recently constructed, 
that of Richard Tobin, Esq., corner of Taylor and California streets, is worthy of particular notice. 
The building is of three stories and basement, with the addition of a towering observatory seventy- 
five feet in hight, affording a grand view of city and bay, the surrounding country, the Contra Costa 
and the blue Pacific beyond the Golden Gate. The ground plan of the main structure covers an area 
of forty-eight feet front by fifty deep, and a wing thirty -two by twenty feet. An octagonal vestibule 
thirteen and a half feet diameter leads to the reception room of the same size. Four allegorical figures, 
representing the Seasons, of life size, and imported from Italy for the purpose, ornament the vestibule. 
On the south front are the library and sitting-room connected by folding doors of black walnut, 
and capable of being thrown into one. There can be had from these apartments a complete view of 
the city, from Lone Mountain and over the bay to Oakland Pier. From the sitting room a door opens 
to a conservatory, and a billiard room in the back wiug. At the junction of this wing with the main 
building, is a stair-case running from the basement to the top story, fifty feet in hight. From the 
vestibule in the main hall a stair-case of black walnut 4^ feet wide, and with balusters of most elabo- 
rate design, leads to the second story hall. This communicates by sliding doors with an oratory fitted 
up with altar, etc., and having stained glass windows. When the oratory and hall are thrown into one, 
there is formed a chapel forty feet long. The attic or upper story is divided into children's play-rooms 
and dressing-rooms. The building is lighted by 71 windows, thirty-five of which are in front, having 
ornamental pilasters, and projecting caps and fillet mouldings. The cost will be $50,000. 

Iters' Residence. — On O'Farrell Street near Larkin, Mr. Richard Ivers has erected one of the 
elegant residences of the city. The building is of three stories and basement, has a fancy roof and 
a richly decorated front. The rooms are sixteen in number, including a billiard room for private en- 
tertainment. Cost $12,000. 

Bancroft's Residence. — On the southwest corner of California and Franklin streets, Mr. H. H. Ban- 
croft has built one of the most attractive residences that adorns this part of the city. The premises oc- 
cupy a one and a half 50-vara lot, in such a position as to command a view of the extended portions of 
the broad and beautiful bay, its islands, fortifications, the shipping at anchor, the busy tug and ferry 
boat, and the pleasant landscape of the Contra Costa shore. The size of the building is 45 by 50 
feet, with an L, and the height 50 feet, being of three stories and a basement. The foundation is of 
brick, the superstructure of wood, with a Mansard roof Upon the grounds is a stable built to form 
an appropriate adjunct to the residence, being 30 by 30, by 35 feet in dimensions, and sur- 
mounted by a Mansard roof. The cost is about $60,000. 

Recapitulation. — Since our last review of the improvements of the city, there have been about 
nine hundred buildings of every class constructed, finished, or commenced, of which nine have been 
churches, six school houses, U. S. Branch Mint, hotels, elegant residences and structures of every 
class, the aggregate expenditure for which may be estimated as exceeding three million dollars. The 
foundations of the principal buildings have been of brick, but with the exception of some ten blocks 
and two churches of brick, all have been of wood. The general change from brick to wood, has 
been caused in part from fear of earthquakes also from the more pleasant and healthy character of 
such structures, their economy and facility for ornamentation, the confidence and efJBciency of the 



JONES, PULIiBfAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Ladies' and Children's Woolen Goods. 



TERBA SANTA, a remarkable and never-failing remedy lor Bheumatism. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Fire Department and the low rates at which such buildings may be insured. Highly decorated fronts 
is the adopted stvle in San Francisco, and raany houses on the most prominent streets have been re- 
built in order to conform to the prevailing fashion. In the most business portions, iron is greatly 
used in house fronts, its great strength and the feasibility of being cast in various forms rendering 
this material peculiarly adapted to architectural purposes. Of the buildings in course of construct- 
ion at the time of our last report the Grand Hotel, Bancroft's Building and the Occidental Hotel ad- 
dition were the most prominent. These have been finished and are now among the most prominent 
features of the city. 

Number of Buildings.— Toia\, December, 1869, 18,059; erected during the year 1870, 900; of 
this number "lOO replaced old buildings. Total, December, 1870, 19,459, of which 4,380 are of 
brick and 15,079 are of wood. The Federal Census, 1870, returns the total number at 25,266. 
(See article on Population, page 11.) 

Real Estate. — The following table, taken from Charles D. Carter's Real Estate Circular, shows 
the number and value of the real estate sales made in the City and County of San Francisco in the 
year 1870 : 

January, 333 sales, value, $1,163,266; February, 339, $1,078,957; March, 406, $1,383,806; 
April, 531, $1,732,675 ; Mav, 482, $1,939,293 ; June, 293, $1,451,748; July, 290, $1,000,756; Au- 
gust,' 479,' $1,336,826; September, 403, $1,241,406; October, 381, $925,130 ; November, 383, 
$1,211,229; December, 357, $1,166,180. Total sales for the year, 4,677 ; value, $15,630,272. 

' This was a very small real estate business, as compared with that transacted in the two previous 
years. The sales made in 1869 reached 6,908 in number, and $29,937,717 in value; while those ef- 
fected in 1868 amounted to 26,724 in number, and to $27,217,026 in value. Both 1868 and 18G9were 
years of great real estate excitement, altogether unjustifiable increase of sales and inflation of prices. 
Real estate was very dull of sale in 1870. Prices of all property outside of Ninth and LarUin streets, 
and on all second and third class business streets in the southern portion of the city, tended down- 
ward, the full average fall amounting to about 20 per cent. 

There is really nothing discouraging about this reduction, either of prices or sales. The people 
have simply learned that neither the true prosperity of a city or State lies in excitement, and in real 
estate sales and inflation of prices. While sales of land have been dull, buildings have increased 
rapidly all over the city, but especially in suburban districts. 

Though real estate sales were dull and prices had a downward tendency in 1870, general confidence 
in the stability of the property, and of the future of the city have not been in the least shaken ; and 
the spring of 1871 opens with every prospect of renewed real estate activity. No general advance 
on present prices is anticipated for a year or so, everything connected with the business having set- 
tled down to a quiet and legitimate' basis. One of the most encouraging signs of the times con- 
nected with real estate, is the reduction by the savings banks of the rate of interest to 10 per cent, 
per annum. The largest of these banks "is now loaning at this reasonable rate in small sums, and all 
of the others are willing to let money at the same rate in large amounts. 

Those who were disposed to take a gloomy view of real estate prospects two years ago, prophe- 
sied that a panic in prices would occur, and tllat the foreclosure of real estate mortgages would con- 
sequently become general. None of these prophesies have been fulfilled. Prices have undoubtedly 
given wa'y some, but not to any general extent ; while the services of the Sheriff were not in greater 
requisition, in connection with real estate foreclosures in 1870, than they were in 1868 or 1869. 

Commercial Matters. — The following figures, compiled from the Commercial Herald of January 
13, 1871, show the extent of the principal commercial transactions of the Port of San Francisco for 
the year ending December 31, 1870: 

the exports of treasure were $32,983,140, against $37,287,117 for 1869. The total gross value of 

_ i_ ^c 1 j:_. i„ r : J J„~„,»:„ .„^ — *„ ;„ 1 CTA ^oo *T7 B/ia 1 AH atrniimt S^O SSfi 001 



vessels, with a tonnage of 1,166,509, in 1869. The number of vessels which left port was 763, with 
a tonnage of 573,582. The receipts from Customs were $7,739,248, against $8,339, :^.84 in 1869. 
The aggregate Federal receipts in the First District was $11,479,785, against $12,224,589 in 1889. 
The entire coinage of the U. S. Branch Mint was $20,355,000, against $14,363,550 in 1869. The 
amount of the sales of mining and other stocks amounted to $51,186,460, against $69,089,731 in 
1869. 

Shipments of Treasure from San Francisco, 1848-70. 

1848 $58,500; 1849, $4,921,450; 1850, $27,676,346; 1851, $42,582,695; 1852, $46,586,134; 




1868, $35,444,395 ; 1869, $37,287,117 ; 1870, $32,983,140. Total, $935,916,697. 



Mortality— San Francisco, 1869-70. 

The Report of the Health Officer for the year ending June 30th, 1870, places the number of deaths 
as follows: Males, 2,055 ; females, 1,188 ; total, 3,243— of which 2,989 were white persons. The 
total deaths during the year 1869 was 4,093. 



' Fair dealing and prompt payments "—the motto of the PEOPJjES. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 718 Kearny Street, Tobacco and Cigars. 



RAILROADS. 27 



BAILBOADS. 

San Francisco, being the center of trade on the Pacific Coast, is directly interested in the ica- 
proveraent of every channel of commerce tending to facilitate trade or open new avenues of travel, 
in whichever part of our vast territory they may be. No narrow minded jealousy should conspire to 
oppose any such improvement, whether in the remotest North, or extreme South, for all will find 
their center here and unite in giving it prosperity. This centrality is unalterably fixed by nature, — 
by the unrivaled harbor and noble bay which indent the coast, the branching streams of navigable 
water, giving hundreds of miles of steam communication into a country the most fertile and lovely 
of the earth, with mines of precious and useful metals in great profusion, and forests and scenery of 
unparalleled grandeur opening to it by natural routes, while on the other hand the winds and 
oceanic currents so favor the latitude as to forbid a rival to the port. San Francisco is in the path 
of empire. The accidents or the designs of nature have fixed the condition and marked its destiny. 
At such a point, where all natural lines concentrate, there too must all artificial lines. Trans-con- 
tinental railroads may seek a harbor either north or south, at each extreme of our territory, but 
none will have a terminus until it reaches the central point of the western coast. 

The railroad is the most simple and complete of all the artificial highways yet conceived by man. The 
strong iron bars form a smooth and uniform tracli over rocks and marsh alike, crossing rivers, plains, 
mountains, and desert sands, with no hindrance to the whirling wheels nor fatigue to the powerful 
machine, which like a living monster, drags his mighty train along, with a speed unattainable by 
other means. No roads of history, ancient or modern, exhausting the resources of an empire at the 
command of a despot to construct, can compare in efficiency to the two simple iron rails, scarcely 
observable as they lie upon the plain. This grand consummation of genius and science, in this most 
practical age of the human race, has now come to aid the development of the country, and give ease 
and comfort to man, and is now regarded as indispensable to progress. Great minds appreciate the 
rising importance of railroads, and with strong will and untiring energy are working like giants in their 
construction. Throughout the Pacific Coast the work goes on, the most pleasing assurance of the 
extraordinary wealth of the country and the determination of capital to reap the reward of its de- 
velopment. 

This is now the age of railroads. With the completion of the Pacific transcontinental railroad a 
new era of aid and advancement was opened for the western slope. Although other railroads had 
been built and in operation a number of years, the great impetus was given and the change effected 
by the last. From this date progress may be expected in this manner of constructing this most per- 
fect of highways, until every road throughout the country where there is daily travel will have its 
iron track. 

Much attention has recently been paid to the narrow gauge railroad that has proved such a suc- 
cess at Festiniog, in Wales. A track of but twenty-three inches in width, with engines of but five 
tons weight, was found practicable, performing a great amount of service, and operating in the most 
economical manner. Such roads, cheap in construction and cheap in operation, are peculiarly well 
adapted to the mountainous and sparcely settled regions of the Pacific Coast, and many places by their 
means will be reached by the iron horse which would otherwise remain isolated for an indefinite period. 
This style of road is soon to be tried in several parts of the country. A company has been formed 
in this city for the purpose of entering upon the construction of narrow gauge railroads, and one 
from the Central Pacific to Grass Valley and Nevada is proposed. 

In the neighboring State of Nevada, by Act of the Legislature, the eastern counties have been 
authorized to vote a subsidy for the purpose of aiding in the construction of a narrow gauge road 
running south from the Central Pacific at Elko to the town of Hamilton in White Pine County, 
with the probable extension to Pioche and to the Colorado river. For this important work a com- 
pany has been organized and the work of survey undertaken. 

The history «f railroading on the Pacific Coast can, at this date, be told in a few brief paragraphs. 
Washington Territory, though one of the youngest in its organization, and, until recently, backward 
in its settlement, yet has the honor of having the pioneer railroad. This was made in 1852, for the 
passage of the Cascades, or falls of the Columbia. This is six miles in length, connecting the two towns 
of Cascades and Upper Cascades, and does a thriving business. Above and below these places, goods 
and passengers are transported in boats of the Oregon Steam Navigation Company. 

To the Sacramento Valley Railroad is usually accorded the honor of being the first constructed 
west of the Rocky Mountains, but this properly belongs to the Cascade Railroad. The Sacramento 
Valley, however, was the first of California, and the first for a number of years in importance. This 
was constructed in 1855 and 1856, from Sacramento to Folsom, a length of twenty-two and a half 
miles, at a cost of about $1,100,000 — a very large sum, considering the level country over which it 
was made. For a number of years, this short road transacted a large business ; but through the 
decline of prosperity in the section of its patrons, accompanied by the construction of the Pacific 
Railroad running from the same point and supplying to a great extent the same territory, it lost a 
large portion of the trade, and now but little more than pays its running expenses. 

The Sacramento Valley and Placerville Railroad is an extension of the first, running from Folsom 
to Shingle Springs, in El Dorado County, a distance of twenty-six miles. This route is quite circuit- 
ous to its present terminus, and remains incomplete. The business of the road is the transportation 
of passengers and merchandise of Amador and the southern part of El Dorado Counties. 



JONES, PUIiIiMAN & CO.. 110 Sansom Street, Combs and Brushes. 



HEDINuTON, HOSTETTEH. & CO.. Sole Agents for sale of Quicksilver. 



28 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



The San Francisco and San Jos^ Railroad, now a part of the Southern Pacific, fifty miles in 
length, between the two cities whose names it bears, was a great advance in the construction of this 
noble means of travel. The business of this road has always been large, passing as it does, many 
of the most pleasant localities chosen as the suburban residences of citizens of San Francisco ; also 
aflfording convenient means to market for a large and very productive section of country. 

The Southern Pacific Railroad is an extension of the latter fro'n San Jose to Gilroy, a distance of 
thirty miles, and was constructed in 1869. At present it accommodates the passenger travel and 
carries the mail for the southern and southeastern part of the State ; stages branching from the 
terminus at Gilroy to Yisalia, also to Watsonville, Monterey, Los Angeles and intermediate points. 
The main road is now soon to be extended through the great valley of the San Joaquin and Tulare, 
and by way of Tehachipa Pass and Los Angeles to a jumjtion with the Texas Pacific Railroad at 
some point to be designated by the authorities at Washington, 

The Texas Pacific Railroad has recently been provided for by Act of Congress. This will con- 
stitute a transcontinental road by the thirty-second parallel route with termini at San Diego on the west 
and New Orleans on'the east, forming the important portion of our Southern railroad system. A main 
trunk is provided for from Marshall, on the eastern border of Texas, to the Colorado river at Fort Yuma. 
The main line is expected to terminate at San Diego, but a branch at Fort Yuma via Los Angeles to 
the Southern Pacific Railroad will make San Francisco the real terminus. From Marshall eastward 
branches are provided for to Vicksburg, Baton Rouge and New Orleans. The length of this road 
from New Orleans to San Diego will be about 1,800 miles, and to San Francisco about 2,200. The 
construction of this road and its branches will undoubtedly be vigorously entered upon the present 
year, and a new life instilled into the southern country. 

The Northern Pacific Railroad is the great project of the North. Magnificent grants have been made 
to this road by Congress, and work upon it has been already commenced. Duluth, at the western ex- 
treme of Lake Superior, has been designated as its eastern terminus, and the new town of Kalama, on 
the Columbia river, sixty miles from its mouth, has been made temporarily the western terminus, 
though ultimately it will reach to one of the grand harbors of Puget Sound. 

The Central Pacific Railroad is the great achievement of the age. This in California has borne 
the names of Central Pacific and Western Pacific ; but these are now merged in one. The Central 
Pacific now extends from the borders of San Francisco Bay to Ogden, in Utah Territory a distance 
of eight hundred and eighty miles, there connecting with the Union Pacific, one thousand and thirty- 
two miles, to Omaha, and at that point with other roads, to every part of the East and to the Atlantic 
seaboard, making a continuous line across the continent of three thousand three hundred and five 
miles to New York. This is one of the noblest works of the age, and is one of the great measures in 
fulfilling the destiny of the United States. The principal credit for its inception and construction is 
due to Messrs. Stanford, Huntington, Hopkins, Crocker and Miller, who have exhibited an enterprise 
and energy never before surpassed in boldness or skill of execution. This company now owns the 
Sacramento Valley Railroad, the Southern Pacific as far as constructed, the San Joaquin Valley 
Road, and the California and Oregon. The former roads known as the San Francisco and Oakland, 
connecting San Antonio with the San Francisco and Oakland Ferry, and the San Francisco and Ala- 
meda, from the ferry to Haywoods, are now combined with the Central Pacific ; and the California 
Central, from Junction to Lincoln, and the Yuba Valley, from Lincoln north a few miles, now consti- 
tute portions of the California and Oregon Railroad. The Central Pacific has also a branch fourteen 
miles in length, from Niles to San Jose' where it joins the Southern Pacific. 

The San Joaquin Valley Railroad, joining the Central at Wilson, is completed to the town of 
Modesta on the Stanislaus River, and is a most important adjunct to the main branch. 

The California and Oregon has been rapidly extended during the past year, and is now completed 
to near the head of the great Sacramento Valley, opposite Red Bluff, one hundred and thirty-five miles 
from Sacramento City. This is a most important road, passing through a fertile agricultural section, 
and destined to join the Oregon Central Railroad, now building south from Portland, and, when both 
are completed, making a continuous line of six hundred and thirty miles in length. 

The Southern Pacific, including the San Francisco and San Jose Railroad, has been extended 
thirty miles to Gilroy, and the design is expressed of extending it to the Colorado River, at some point 
not yet designated, and thence to the Mississippi Valley, in connection with Eastern roads. Another 
Southern Pacific road is proposed, from San Diego eastward, and several companies have been organ- 
ized for the purpose, and aid of Government asked, but no further advance made. 

The California Pacific Railroad, with its branches, is next in Importance to the great transcon- 
tinental road. This runs through the richest agricultural sections of the Pacific Coast, and gives the 
shortest passage from Sacramento and the northern part of the valley to San Francisco. Its main 
line is from Vallejo to Sacramento, sixty miles in length. The first branch is the Napa Valley Rail- 
road, leaving the main line seven miles from Vallejo, and extending to Calistoga, thirty-three miles 
from the junction. At Vaca station, a railroad four miles in length connects with Vacaville. At 
Davisville, an important branch forty-five miles in length leads to Marysville, passing through 
Woodland, and crossing the Sacramento River at Knights Landing. At Marysville, connection is 
made with the Northern California Railroad, of twenty-nine miles in length, to Oroville, thus giving a 
continuous line of one hundred and forty miles from San Francisco, including twenty-three miles of 
steamboat connection from Vallejo. This valuable road was first projected by the citizens of Marys- 
ville, of whom D. C. and J. W. Haskin and the late D. W. C. Rice were the principal ; and as early 



Insure yftur Building, Vessel, or Cargo, in the FEOFIJES. 



C. p. VAN SCHAAC3K & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Keamy Street, Yankee Notions. 



as 1860, work was done in preparing the road-bed from Marysville toward the Sacramento River. 
Still another branch is proposed, extending from Woodland up the west side of the Sac ramento 
River, to the head of the valley. Such a road would command the trade of the greater part of the 
valley ; consequently its future is to be one of the greatest arteries of trade and travel on the Pacific 
Coast. Another branch is now in course of construction ; to connect Vallejo with the Russian River 
Valley, passing through the lovely valley of Sonoma. Work has been commenced both at Santa 
Rosa, its northern terminus and at Vallejo, with promise of its early completion. This company has 
purchased recently the steamers, barges, etc., of the California Steam Navigation Company, which 
will be employed in connection with their lines of railroad. 

The Stockton and Copperopolis Railroad, so long in contemplation, is becoming an accomplished 
fact. Tt\ important work is now being rapidly completed by our enterprising and energetic 
townsman. Col. J. P. Jackson, President of the California Pacific Railroad. A section from Stock- 
ton to Peters has been finished, and the work of transporting goods and passengers over it has 
commenced. When the entire road is made to Copperopolis, it will have a length of forty miles, 
from which point it is designed to continue it easterly to Sonora, a further distance of seventeen 
miles. This road will aid in the reopening of a valuable mining region, as well as forwarding the 
development of a rising agricultural and horticultural section. 

The Stockton and lone Railroad Company is an incorporation proposing to build a branch to the 
Copperopolis road, tapping it at a point ten miles from Stockton, and extending to lone City, a dis- 
tance of twenty-five miles. 

The Stockton and Visalia Railroad is a project held in statu quo by the action of Courts restraining 
the paying of subsidies by cities and counties along its route. 

From Antioch a railroad is proposed up the west bank of the San Joaquin, a distance of twenty- 
eight miles, to Ellis, where it will intersect the Central Pacific. The route is over a level and fertile 
plain, the right of way has been granted by property-owners, money subscribed, and the prospect of 
the early construction of the road is favorable. The project includes the continuance of the road up 
the west side of the San Joaquin to Watson's Ferry, thence to Visalia. The line has been surveyed, 
and the route found exceedingly favorable. 

The Los Angeles and Wilmington is the only railroad in the southern part of the State. This has 
a length of eighteen miles, and connects the city of Los Angeles with the port of San Pedro, at W 1- 
mington. 

The Pittsburg, and the Black Diamond, two railroads, each seven miles in length, have been con- 
structed from the coal mines of Monte Diablo to landings on Suisun Bay; one terminating at Pitts- 
burg landing, and the other at New York of the Pacific. Over these roads 13,000 tons of coal are 
transported monthly. 

The San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad, formerly intended to run from Saucelito north, 
has had its initial point changed to Donahue, near Petaluma, and has been completed as far as Santa 
Rosa, fifteen miles, being in one of the richest sections of California. It is now extending to Clover- 
dale, at the head of Russian River Valley. 

The San Rafael and San Quentin Railroad, three and a half miles in length, connects with the 
ferry to San Francisco. This has been constructed during the past year, and is in successful opera- 
tion. 

The Virginia City and Truckee Railroad, in Nevada, has a length of thirty-five miles, and connects 
the first named place with the Carson River near Carson City, and is used chiefly for the transporta- 
tion of silver ore from the mines to mills on the river, and returning with fuel, lumber, etc. 

The Dalles railroad, fifteen miles in length, from the town of Dalles to Celilo, making the portage 
of these falls of the Columbia, is an important road of Oregon. At Oregon City is another portage 
railroad, passing the falls of the Willamette, connecting the lower with the upper river. Though 
short, this is an important road, and accommodates a large amount of business. 

The Utah Central Railroad, from the Pacific Railroad at Ogden to Salt Lake City, completes the 
list of railroads of the Pacific Coast. This has a length of thirty-six miles, and was built in 1869. 
It is an important road, and will probably be extended within a short period to other points in the 
Territory. 

A large number of other roads are proposed, and the ensuing summer promises to be a busy one in 
this important line of improvement. The principal of these already mentioned are the Southern, Texas 
and Northern Pacific, which several years will be required to complete. At Santa Cruz, work is pro- 
gressing on a railroad up the valley of the San Lorenzo, sixteen miles in length, accommodating the 
various interests of agriculture, manufactures, lumber, and lime-making, for which this section is noted. 
This it is proposed to extend to a junction with the Southern Pacific Railroad, and thus make direct 
connection with San Francisco. 

Several branches to the Central Pacific, leading to the diflFerent mining districts of Nevada, are con- 
templated ,and the character of the recent mineral developments throughout that Stated emands the con- 
struction of one or more. Lines are proposed from San Jose to Alviso ; from Gilroy to Watsonville ; 
from Salinas City to Monterey ; from Wilmington, via Anaheim, to San Bernardino ; also, others of 
less prospect of early construction. Surveys have been made recently for a railroad between San 
Francisco and Sacramento, by the most direct route from Oakland north, crossing the Straits of Car- 
quinez at or near Benicia, by ferry or bridge. This is undertaken by the Central Pacific Company, 
and will be an important addition to their road. 



JONES, PTTT.T.WATW A CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dreaa Buttons in sreat variety. 



EEDIKQTOM HOSTETTEB & CO., Importers Choice Fancy Gtoods, Perfumery, etc., etc. 



30 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 

With the extensive railroad building now commencing upon the Pacific Coast must come a great 
revival of business. The roads are not only at the two extremes of north and south, but are through- 
out the entire extent of our territory. Both the new transcontinental roads are well endowed, their 
routes lay through portions of the country of great resources, they are a necessity, and their pros- 
pects of business are good. Avast extent of our own and foreign territory is to be supplied, and peo- 
pled and made productive. New and prosperous States will be added to the Union by them, and the 
now sparsely settled regions, from British Columbia on the north to Mexico on the south, will become 
busy with miners, farmers, lumbermen and manufacturers, making it one of the most important grand 
divisions of the Republic. The California and Oregon and the Southern Pacific Railroads will connect 
the Northern Pacific with the Texas Pacific, thus constituting a grand trunk line from the northern to 
the southern border, from the Columbia to the Colorado. With the many minor lines projected, there 
appears a prospect for a generous employment for labor, and a busy time for all. 



Meteorological Observations made at San Francisco from January, 1850, to 

December, 1870. 

BY HENRY GIBBONS, M.D. 

In the following tables the reader will find, in a condensed form, the results of twenty years' dili- 
gent observation of the climate of San Francisco, with more particular reference to rain. A single 
glance at the rain tables will present the quantity of rain which has fallen in each month since 1850 
the quantity in each season ; the quantity before and after the end of the year ; the date of the be 
ginning and ending of each rainy season, and the date of the first and last scattering rains. The 
following are some of the deductions presented by this record : 

Rain has fallen in every month of the year. In July it has rained only in one year ; August has 
furnished rain in four years ; June in six years ; September in seven years ; October in eleven years. 
No account is made of a mere sprinkle, nor of the deposit of Summer mist. The greatest 
quantity of mist which ever falls in twenty-four hours is about three-hundredths of an inch. But 
this quantity is very rare. Near the ocean the mist is much more copious. 

The driest season was 1850-1, which gave only seven inches. Next to that was 1863-4, with 
eight and one-half inches. The winter of 1867-8 gave the most rain — forty .inches. The average 
is between twenty-one and twenty-two inches. 

The earliest setting in of the rainy season was November 1st ; the latest, January 12th. An early 
beginning and an abundant supply are apt to go together, but there is no rule in this respect. The 
latest beginnings have been followed by an average supply. 

The average date of the beginning of the rainy season is November 28th ; of the termination, 
April 10th. March is as certain to bring rain in liberal amount as any other month. In one year 
out of every three, there is no rain of importance after March. The last showers of the season 
come, with remarkable uniformity, about the third week of May. 

The middle of January is the average dividing point of the rainy season. The mean quantity 
before January 1st is about equal to the mean quantity after January 31st. 

December gives the greatest average quantity ; January is not far behind ; February, March and 
November come next, and are nearly alike ; then April, May, and October, in the order named. 

The greatest amount of rain in any one month was in January, 1862, when there fell the enormous 
quantity of eighteen inches. 

It is worthy of note that, in the driest seasons, there has been an abundant supply for agricultural 
purposes, had it been distributed evenly. Three inches in December, with one inch in each of the 
four following months would answer all purposes. 

The rain-table of San Francisco may be made the basis for estimating the fall in other parts of the 
State. The mountains of the north have from two to three times as much, and the southern section 
of the State about half as much, or even less in some localities. The valley of the Sacramento has 
nearly the same quantity as San Francisco ; that of the San Joaquin one-fourth or one-third less, the 
quantity diminishing southward. 

By reference to the tables showing the extremes of heat and cold, it appears that the coldest 
weather was in January, 1854, when the mercury fell to 25°. At that time, the mud in the streets 
was frozen solid, and the shallow ponds were covered with ice strong enough for boys to skate on. 
But such weather is extremely rare, though since that time the ground has been frozen several times 
so as not to thaw fully in the shade for a day or two. The coldest noonday embraced in the record 
was 37°. Often the entire winter passes by ■without bringing the thermometer so low as the freezing 
point. In 1853 it fell at no time below 40''. 

The extreme of heat was on the 10th and 11th of September, 1852, when the thermometer reached 
97° and 98° on the two days respectively. This, however, was entirely exceptional, and might not 
occur again in half a century. The air was dry as a sirocco, and caused the woodwork of houses to 
crackle and the plaster to break on the wooden walls. 

With the exception just noted, the hottest day on record was 93° on the 6th of July, 1867. In 
October, 1864, and in September, 1865, it reached 91°, and in July, 1855, it reached 90°. Thus it 
appears that there were only six days in twenty years when the thermometer rose as high as 90°. 



THE FEOPIiES INSUBAIfCE CO.— Buocesafiil, Popular, Beliable. 



C. p. VAN SCHA^C i & CO., 708. 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks ai 



METIlOROLOaiCAL OBSERVATIONS. 

The table of mean temperature shows that our summer does not come till the summer 
passed by. September is the warmest month in the year, and October next ; then coi 
July, the hottest month elsewhere, is the fourth here, or ranks with June; next comeAj 
then March and November ; then February, and finally January and December, which £ 
winter months, if indeed we have any weather that deserves the name of winter. 

Twice the ground has been covered with snow. On the 29th of December, 1856, it 
fast for several hours, and two or three inches gathered, but it melted before night. On 
January, 1868, it snowed fast before day, so that two inches collected. But it disapp 
sunrise, so that but few persons enjoyed the rare spectacle. 

The extraordinary evenness of the climate depends on the adjacent ocean, the wat 
flowing in a current from the north, is always at a temperature of about 50°, summer 
The sea breeze of Summer, which chills the air at noonday, leaves no place for hot ni 
is not, on an average, one night in the year, when it is warm enough to sit out of doors 
with thin clothing. 



Table I. 



-Shotring the amount of Bain in each Month since 1850 ; and the Total Am 
Rainy Season. Note. — Each Column represents one Rainy Season. 





'50. 


'51. 

.1 
1.0 

.2 
2.2 
7.1 

'52. 

.6 
.1 

6.4 
.2 
.3 


^52. 

.0 

.0 

.8 

6.3 

11.9 

'53. 

4.1 

1.2 

4.8 

5.1 

.8 


'63. '64. 
.0 .0 


'65. 


'56. 


'67. 


'58. 

~1 

'k'.i 

.5 

4.8 

'59. 

1.0 
5.2 
2.5 
.3 
2.0 


'59. 


'60. 


'61. 


'62. 

"!i 
2.7 

'63. 

3.3 
3.3 
2.4 
2.9 
.4 


'63. 

".i 
'i'.'b 

1.7 

'64. 

1.3 
.0 

1.4 
.9 
.6 


'64. 

.2 

.1 

.1 

7.6 

6.9 

'65. 

3.9 
.8 
.6 
.7 
.4 


•65. 

'".% 
.1 

'66. 

11.0 
1.6 
2.6 

.1 
1.8 

.2 


'66. 

"2'7 
13.1 

'67. 

6.6 
6.2 
2.2 
1.1 
.1 


'67. ' 

■■;i ■ 

.6 
8.1 
12.1 

'68. ' 

9.6 
6.2 
6.4 
2.2 

■■;2 . 


Aug.. 


.0 

:2 

1.3 
1.1 

'51. 

.6 

.4 

1.9 

1.1 

.7 


Sept. 
Oct .. 
Nov.. 
Dec. . 

Jan... 
Feb. . 
Mar'h 
April. 
May- 
June. 
July.. 


.0 

.1 

1.4 

2.1 

'54. 

4.3 
8.4 
3.2 
3.3 
.1 
.1 


.0 

2.1 

.4 

.4 

'55. 

4.6 
4 6 
4.3 
6.6 
2.2 


■i!2 

5.4 

'56. 

8.4 

.5 

1.6 

3.2 

.9 


.1 

.5 
2.9 
4.0 

'67. 

2.1 
8.6 
1.6 

".'i 
.1 


■ .9 
3.0 
4.2 

'68. 

4.4 
1.3 
8.9 
1.1 
.1 
.1 


■5;4 

1.6 

'60. 

1.1 
1.4 
3.1 
1.7 
2.6 

"is 

17.1 


.1 

.9 

.2 

4.8 

'61. 

1.2 

2.8 

3.4 

.3 

.7 

.2 


"z'.k, 

6.1 

'62. 

18.1 

6.1 

1.7 

1.1 

.9 

.2 


Total. 


71 


18.2 


33.5 


23.0 


24.1 


21! 


20.0 


19.0 


19.8 


14.6 


38.0 


isl 


8.0 


21.3 


iTi 


32.0 


40.6 2 



Table II. — Date of the First and Laat Rains, and 0/ the Beginning and Ending- of each Ri 
also, tlie Amount of Rain which Fell before the End of the Year, and the Amount aftt 
tlie Year, in each Season, since 1850. 





First 


Last 


Rainy Season. 


Before 


Afr 




First 


Last 


Raihy Season. 




Rain. 


Rain 






Dec. 




Rain. 


Rain. 








Begins. 


Ends. 






Begins. 


Ends. 
April 5 


1850-1 Nov. 10 


May 20 


Dec. 5 


May 1 


2.4 


4.7 


1860-1 Oc^. 4 


May 22 


Dec. 6 


1851-2 Sept. 6 1 May 17 


Dec. 19 


Mar. 31 


10.5 


7.7 


1801-iS;Nov. llMay 12 


Nov. 10 


April 14 


1852-3 Oct. 28 


May 12 


Nov. 9 


April 29 


18.0 


16.5 11862-31 Nov. 5|May 19 


Dec. 18 


April 26 


1853-4 Sept. 15 


April 28 


Jan. 12 


April 28 


3 6 


19.4 


1863-4! Sept. 19'May 17 


Nov. 11 


April 4 


1854-6 Oct. 4 


Slay -JO 


Dec. 31 


April 17 


2.9 


21.2 


11864-5 'Nov. 15|May 19 


Nov. 23 


March 4 


1855-6 Nov. 10 


Jtay 25 


Nov. 10 


April 14 


6.6 


14.6 


1865-6iSept. 24lJuuo 8 


Nov. 13 


Mar. 31 


1856-7 'Sept. 10 


Mar. 31 


Nov. 16 


Mar. 31 


7.6 


12.5 


1866-7! Nov. SiMay 17 


Nov. 16 


April 12 


1857-8, Oct. 6 


Mav 21 


Nov. 24 


April 7 


8.1 


10.9 


1867-8; Sept. 14 June 23 


Nov. 19 


April 13 


1858-9 Oct. 21 


May 22 


Dec. 4 


April 10 


8.8 


11.0 


1868-9 Oct. IMay 19 Dec. 17 


Mar. 29 


'59-60 Kov. 9 


May 22 


Nov. 9 


April 8 


69 


10.2 


•69-70 Sept. IMay 19 Dec. 7 
Mean | |Nov. 28 


April U 
April 10 



Table III. — Mean Temperature of each Month since 1850, deduced from Two Daily O 
One at Sunrise, the other at Noon ; also, the Mean Temperature of each Yea 



'51. 



'52. '53. ^54. '56. '56. '57. 



'68. '59. '60. 



'6L 



'62. '63. '64. '65. 



January — 
February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

Auirust 



49-3 
51.1 
53.8 
57.7 
57.0 
58.8 
57.9 
63.2 



50.8 52.0 
53.1 54.1 

52.9 55.9 
55.4 58.3 



55.1 
60.4 
61.4 
61.2 



60.7 
61.9 
60.3 
60.0 



48.2 
53.6 
54.1 
69.8 
56.8 
58.5 
61.3 
60.3i62.5i59.6 



51.0 
56.8 
59.4 
57.7 
57.7 
59 



48.8 
63.7 
65.9 
55.9 
66.2 
59.1 



6L!2!59'.4 



61.2 
51.4 
55.9 

68.8 
67.5 
60.9 
59.2 
59.1 



46.3 
68.1 
52.0 
65.7 
67.6 
68.7 
60.7 
61.9 



46.6 
48.8 
49.0 
53.6 



47.8 
50.5 
53.0 
53.0 



57.2 64.0 
61.5'57.9 

59.3 61.3 
61.1162.5 



47.6 
61.1 
£3.7 
67.1 
67 5 
57.6 
53.5 



47.6 
46.7 
50.2 
51.3 
55.6 
61.2 
61.7 
62.0 



57.7 52.5 
50.9 55.9 

57.8 65.6 
56.7 57.9 

57.6 58.9 
58.2 58.3 

69.7 67 6 
61.1 60.0 



49.4 49 
61.0;63 
53.364 
6.5.5'58 
«2.0'58 
61.262. 
61.159, 
60.059. 



51.2 4 
4:52.05 
3 50.5 6: 
4'67.5,6i 
68.3'5: 
60.216: 
6 63.2 6! 
0!60.46! 



RBA SANTA purifies the Blood and strenetliens the Nervous Syptem. 
SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



-Maximum Quantity of Bain in each Mnnth, Minimum Quantity in each Month, and 
Average Quantity in each Month, since 1850. 



Jan. 



18.1 
0.6 
4.8 



Feb. 



0.0 
3.3 



Mar. 



6.4 
0.6 
3.0 



April. 



6.6 
0.0 
1.7 



May. 



2.0 
0.6 
.60 



June July. 



0.2 0.3 

0.0 0.0 

.04 .01 



Aug. 



0.2 
0.0 
.01 



Sept. 



1.0 
0.0 
.05 



Oct. 



3.4 
0.0 
.37 



Nov. Dec. 



7.6 
0.1 
2.4 



13.1 
04 
6.0 



'able v. — Extremes of Heat in each Month since 1850 ; also, in each Year. 



'51. 


•52. 


'53. 


'54. 


'55. 


'56. 


■57. 


'58. 


•69. 


'60. 


'61. 


'62. 


'63. 


'64. 


'65. 


'68. 


'67. 


•68. 


•69. 


64 


64 


62 


69 


72 


60 


67 


62 


65 


62 


60 


62 


63 


70 


63 


61 


61 


58 


64 


. 71 


65 


67 


69 


72 


70 


68 


70 


65 


74 


61 


58 


64 


73 


65 


70 


64 


68 


69 


. 74 


81 


77 


72 


78 


80 


74 


73 


70 


76 


82 


72 


79 


74 


71 


69 


65 


70 


72 


. 84 


82 


75 


83 


78 


69 


81 


80 


80 


83 


79 


7>» 


82 


84 


75 


88 


85 


75 


70 


n 


67 


81 


73 


83 


69 


75 


87 


85 


73 


76 


76 


78 


75 


87 


79 


87 


86 


86 


. 78 


80 


87 


74 


82 


74 


87 


77 


85 


74 


76 


79 


78 


70 


87 


85 


86 


72 


72 


73 


79 


78 


84 


90 


78 


72 


86 


82 


82 


78 


86 


72 


70 


79 


76 


93 


75 


74 


83 


76 


76 


85 


79 


80 


83 


73 


80 


86 


76 


87 


82 


78 


75 


75 


73 


75 


75 


75 


98 


88 


87 


84 


85 


88 


88 


87 


88 


76 


84 


82 


86 


91 


77 


88 


70 


85 


83 


78 


85 


83 


79 


79 


83 


79 


89 


79 


83 


84 


?i 


91 


80 


80 


79 


86 


85 


73 


80 


73 


72 


67 


74 


72 


73 


71 


70 


69 


70 


72 


76 


72 


70 


75 


73 


. 61 


63 


69 


71 


61 


58 


60 


69 


63 


61 


63 


64 


69 


63 


60 


64 


66 


63 


64 


. 84 


98 


88 


87 


90 


85 


88 


88 


89 


83 


83 


87 


87 


91 


91 


88 


93 


86 


86 



69 
70 
67 
72 
87 
74 
83 
80 
78 
76 
72 
62 

87 



Table VI. — Extremes of Cold in each Month since 1850; also, in each Year. 



•61 


•52. 


'53. 


'54. 


•55. 


'56. 


'57. 


•58. 


'59. 


'60. 


'61. 


'62. 


•63. 


'64. 


'65. 


'66. 


•67. 


•68. 


'69. 


30 


,35 


41 


25 


33 


.33 


.32 


.30 


30 


31 i 29 


29 


40 


38 


.35 


,38 


37 


.32 


,35 


.33 


40 


42 


!« 


41 


40 


31 


.30 


34 


32 1 88 


iH 


,38 


43 


38 


42 


37 


31 


36 


.34 


36 


41 


38 


44 


41 


41 


.36 


,35 


37 


37 


37 


44 


44 


,36 


42 


88 


38 


44 


42 


.37 


46 


45 


40 


40 


44 


38 


.34 


89 


40 


36 


43 


40 


40 


45 


43 


42 


43 


45 


41 


47 


43 


44 


43 


43 


40 


.39 


39 


43 


38 


44 


47 


46 


43 


47 


44 


47 


49 


49 


.50 


47 


49 


46 


50 


44 


45 


45 


49 


49 


50 


48 


49 


49 


48 


45 


48 


47 


49 


51 


46 


51 


48 


.50 


48 


48 


46 


49 


49 


.50 


48 


.50 


49 


.52 


46 


,52 


50 


49 


51 


60 


53 


49 


.50 


49 


48 


,50 


47 


49 


51 


48 


50 


,50 


51 


49 


48 


50 


45 


.50 


46 


.50 


.51 


.50 


44 


43 


47 


47 


42 


53 


48 


47 


.50 


50 


49 


48 


47 


46 


49 


46 


51 


41 


45 


36 


.38 


40 


40 


.50 


42 


47 


47 


49 


41 


45 


45 


41 


40 


44 


47 


42 


4(t 


31 


.34 


.36 


39 


35 


44 


43 


42 


44 


44 


44 


45 


,36 


35 


36 


40 


38 


29 


35 


34 


27 


32 


32 


35 


38 


40 


38 


27 


42 


39 


41 


28 


30 


35 


40 


25 


29 


33 


31 


27 


30 


31 


29 


29 


38 


88 


27 


38 


37 


31 


28 



•70. 



38 
38 
39 
45 
47 
63 
56 
54 
42 
40 
32 

32 



Coinage San Francisco Branch Mint, San Francisco, 1870." 

$1,660,000; Febnwry, $985,000; March, $2,155,000; April, $1,330,000; May, $2,083,000 
6,000 ; July, $1-20,000 ; August, $2,370,000 ; September, $2,030,000 ; October, $1 ,875,000 ; N( 
965,000 ; December, $1,066,000. Total, $20,3.55,000. 

Qnt of coinage by the Branch Mint in this city duiing the year 1870 has never been exceede 
nz : in 1855 and 1856. During the former the coinage amounted to $21,121,752, and in 1856t 
. The coinage for 1870 is $5,991,450 in excess of that for 1869. When the new building, no' 
3f erection, shall have been finished, greatly enlarged and needed facilities will be availabli 
)rk can be prosecuted with far more dispatch, regularity, and less waste. The entire coinas 
ich Mint since its org.uiization, in 1854, has been $291,877,163, 

Beceipts of Customs, 1870.* 

$491,354.87; Febrnarv, $.595,990.49; March, $802,310.04; April. $679,429.64; May, $62S 
ae, $800,427.68; Julv, '$582,788.88 ; Angnst, $769,963.43; September, $828,727.44 ; 'Octobe 
; November, $506,444.18 ; December, $419,296.49. Totol,.$7,739,248.26 

Internal Bevenue Collections, First District, Cal., 1870.'* 

from spirits, $1,040,137.65; tobacco, $686,537.78; cigars, $300,642.19 ; fermented liqnoi 
1; banks and bankers, $214,864.20 ; gross receipts and sales, $236,411.98 ; incomes, $570,660.9 
es, (licenses) $95,363.80 ; gas, carriages, legacies, peualties, $84,795.56. Total, $3,368,226,1 



Federal Bevenue, San Francisco, 1870.* 



C p. VAJy SCHAACE & CO.. 708.712. 714 and 716 Kearny Street. Paper and Enveloi 



CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF PRINCIPAL EVENTS. 

Prom December Ist, 1869, to December 5th, 1870. 



December 1. 1869. 800 Chinese sail for their 

native land The publishers and compositors hold 

a meeting to reduce printers wages Frederick 

Zahn commits suicide by hanging. 

Dec. 2. The Eureka Typographical Union de- 
cline to reduce printers wages J. C. Pelton 

elected Superintendent of Industrial School E. 

Fagin and G. Cogan arrested for robbing Newber- 
ger & Go's safe on the 29th ultimo. 

Dec. 3. John Driscoll and two others arrested 
for garroting and robbing Ernest Blum. 
Dec. 4. H. D.Woolf and David Levi arrested for 

arson Mary Regan arrested for infanticide 

Grand Ball at Piatt's Hall, in aid of the Italian Be- 
nevolent Society. 

Dec. 8. J. 0. Rawlins, brother of the late Sec- 
retary of War, died from injuries received at the 

Golden Gate Sugar Refinery In suit of the 

United States vs. San Fiancisco Sugar Refinery, in- 
volving sugar to the amount of $-24,000, judg- 
ment was rendered in favor of plaintiff. 
Dec. 12. George M. Thompson, died suddenly 

The body of J. E. Dixon found in the bay. 

Dec. 15. F. N. Neuval arrested for the murder 

of Cari-ie Diamond Camilla Urso proposes a 

Grand Concert in aid of the Mercantile Library. 

Dec. 19. Isaac S. Josephi, a prominent 'mer- 
chant, absconds 300 Chinese leave for Texas to 

labor on railroad. 
Dec. 20. Mrs. Bridget Cnsic fatallv burned. 
Dec. 21. Kate Smith, a kleptomaniac, tried for 
stealing $20,000 worth of jewelry. 
Dec. 24. VV. C. McElroy, an old pioneer, dies. 
Dec. 27. W. P. Walch, after attempting to mur- 
der Mary Williams, committed suicide. 
Dec. 30. Mrs. Mary A. Eaton committed suicide. 
Dec. 31. Mrs. Kate Smith, kleptomaniac, sent- 
enced to State Prison four years and four months. 
January 1. 1870. Emancipation dav celebrated 
by the colored population P. J. Devine, a prom- 
inent sculptor, died Telegraph operators strike for 

higher wages The Steamship Companies and 

Wells, Fargo & Co. reduce the wages of their em- 
ployees. 
Jan. 3. John Burke arrested as a counterfeiter. 
Jan. 4. James McGowan, a tinsmith, fell from 
a scaffolding, and was killed. 
Jan. .5. A child of Mrs. 3IcQuicken had its foot 

cutoff by the streetcars Bulletui commenced 

using an eight cylinder Hoe Press John Cavan- 

augh fell from the yard arm of the Royal Edward 
and was killed. 
Jan. 8. Billiard game for championship between 

Cyrille Dion and John Deery. won by latter 

Jackson Temple appointed Justice of Supreme 

Court M. 6. Searing thrown from a buggy and 

fatally injured. 

Jan. 9. Remains of A. Hirschfelder drowned 
July 1868 found on Alameda shore Annie Shep- 
herd pretended deaf mute, creates a sensation 

Charles F. Knoll dies suddenly. 

Jan. 10. Margaret Scannell commits suicide Feb 17 

Mrs. Meehan, aged 60 , was lined $200 for horse- damage 
whipping Colonel Murphy, who bad insulted her. Feb. 19 

Jan. 12. Woman Suffrage Convention meet at Benjamin 

Uashaway Hall James Hefierman attempted Feb 20 

suicide. »' Pj.3_ 22 



Jan. 13. R. B. Monk, an old resident, died 

James A. Dw^er was shot in the hand by A. 

Wohler, who in turn was killed by the former 

saloon affray. 

Jan. 14. Strike among the journeyman ma 

cutters Clement B. Ellis, a pioneer.dies sudd* 

Jan. 15. Dion beats Deery 181 pointsi n 100 
a carom table. 
Jan. IC. Sophia Sands commits suicide. 
Jan. 18. The P. M. 8. S. Colorado sailed 
Panama with passengers, and $1,160,987 in spe 
Jan. 19. Charles Haley broke his leg by b 
thrown from a wagon. 
Jan. 20. Billiard game between Dion and Ds 

won by former Burglars rob M. B. Schweit 

residence of jewelry to the value of $2,000. 

Jan. 21. Zabriskie Irwin was injured by b 
thrown from his horse. 

Jan. 23. Maggie Ryan, a child six and one 
years old, is ravished and then murdered under 

wharf Charles Goodhope drowned in the b£ 

Jan. 25. Charles Quinn arrested for the mc 

of Maggie Ryan Captain Edward Cordell 1 

Coast Survey, died suddenly in the street A 

flag of California product on exhibition. 

Jan. 29. C. T. Carvalho, for years Chinese 
prefer, dies. 
Jan. 30. Chinese celebrate their New Year 

appropriate ceremonies Anderson & Raudo 

store on Montgomery Street robbed of a 1 
amount of jewelry. 

Jan. 31. John Devine arrested for garroting 
robbery. 
February 1. Ninteenth Anniversary of 

testant Orphan Asylum, at Piatt's Hall Mir 

F. F. Low and family sail for China. 

Feb. 2. Gen. D. D. Colton's residence enten 

burglars and a large amount of silver ware sto 

Feb. 3. Match billiard game between Deery 

Dion, won by former. 

Feb. 5. Golden Gate Iron Works destroye( 

fire Two thousand children rehearse at Mec 

ics' Pavilion for the Grand Concert. 

Feb. 7. Ole Bull arrived AugustHahnfa 

injured by machinery John Hartz, an in 

man, commits suicide. 

Feb. 8. The tobacco factories of Ruble & 
and Hull & Co., destroyed by fire.and a Chiuest 

burned to death John Berry killed bv Th. 

Lloyd. 

Feb. 10. Large flag of California silk comp 
for Capitol at Washington. 
Feb. 12. Sale of tickets for Mercantile Lib 

Concert; $3,200 paid for grand box Merca 

Library Gift Concert Bill passes California L 

lature. 

Feb. 14. A. P. Rudolphe, billiardist, arrive 

Feb. 15. F. G. W. Tittel, a pioneer, and H. 

Wattson, secretary Spring Valley Water Wc 

die Mrs. Gen. D. D. Colton is thrown frc 

buggy. 

Shock of earthquake at 12 J p. m. 

William Harris shot by his bro 

Cherry trees in blossom. 

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34 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Ureo ill aid of Mercantile Library, commenced with 
an orcliesira of 200 instruments, and a chorus of 
1,!>00 voices, an audience of 10,000 persons present. 

P. M. S. S. Golden City -wrecked on Cape 

Laziiro, Lower California. 

Feb. 23. Fifteen thousand persons in attendance 

at the Second Urso Conceit George W. Currier 

and Moses Franklin severely injured by the pre- 
mature discharge of a cannon during the perform- 
ance. 

Feb. 24. Grand ball at Pavilion for benefit of 
Camilla Urso. 

Feb. 26. Last Urso Concert Festival netted 

$19,412 Francis Duraartheray died of apoplexy. 

Iron Ship Golden Gate arrived from Liverpool 

in 100 days — the shortest passage on record. 
Feb. v8. Charles M. Armstrong commits suicide. 
March 1. Matthew Rowe, thrown from a wagon 

and fatally injured Particulars of loss of U. S. 

steamer Ouei^a received by arrival of bark Bene- 
factress. 

March 3. James Smilie attempts to kill a Mexi- 
can woman and then commits suicide. 
March 4. William Robinson, a teacher in the 

Lincoln School arrested for flogging a pupil 

$18,000 damages awarded to Harry C. Logan for 
au attempt made on his life by A. Guerrero. 

March 5. Great Champion billiard match be- 
tween John Deery and A. P. Rudolphe, won by 
latter. 

March 7. William Heffron and William Iron 
severely stabbed by Bernard Connor. 
March 9. Herman Joeleke commits suicide. 
March 10. Capt. John H. May, a pioneer died. 

The remains of H. M. Wtiitmore, a pioneer 

merchant, found floating in the Bay. 
March 11. Corner stone of Synagogue Sberith 

Israel laid John C. Brewer killed by Frank 

Smith. 

March 12. George Miller was killed by Nicho- 
las Johannes Peter Donahue presented St. Pat- 
rick's Church with a chime of bells. 

March 14. Eddy Richel, aged ten years, sent 
to Insane Asylum. 

March 15. John Stratman arrested for libel on 
J. C. Duncan. 

March 17. St. Patrick's Day celebrated by a 
military and civic parade, and religious exercises 
in several churches. 

March 18. A billiard match between Deery and 
Rudolphe, for charitable purposes, won by former. 

Mnjor John Hill, a Mexican veteran, dies. 

March 19. A quantity of powder was exploded 
under a dwelling on Powell street, without causing 
personiil injury to the occupants. 

March ii2. Five hundred workmen assemble at 
Yerba Buena Park in search of employment. 
March 24. Chinese testimony admitted at the 

County Court Charles Williams beaten and 

robbed in the suburbs. 
March 25. Large quantity of smuggled opium 

seized Remains of Col. Thomas Hayes lie in 

state at Plait's Hall. 
March 26. A fire at 1111 Dnpont ; loss, $5,000. 
March 27. Funeral of Col. Thomas Hayes was 
attended by 4,000 persons. 

March 28. Maj. Gen. Geo. H. Thomas dies of 
apoplexy Two and one half million dollars cur- 
rency arrives from Washington. 

March 29. Grand Sire Farnsworth, I. O. O. F. 
arrives. 
March 30. Senators Hager and Saunders hung 

in ettigy A. H. McEwen, of steamer Pacific, 

drowned in the bay. 

March 31 . The workmen at Yerba Buena Park 
make such manifestations that the military are placed 
in readiness to check any riotous demonstrations. 

April 2. Blight shock of earthquake shortly be- 
fore noon Bieistadt, the artist, arrives. 



April 3. Large meeting of citizens in favor of 
cutting down Rincon Hill. 
April 4. One hundred and forty persons are 

indicted for making false income retnrns Two 

thousand people assemble at Yerba Buena Park to 

commence grading M. Emanuel, aged 7 years, 

run over by a truck and fatally injured. 

April 5. The colored citizens celebrate the adop- 
tion of the Fifteenth Amendment. 

April 7. First bar of tin made in the United 

States presented to the California Pioneers One 

hundred and fifty feet of sea wall sinks five feet. 

April 8. H. B. Gill committed suicide Beau- 
tiful display of auroral light Serious tight be- 
tween rival" Chinese cigaimakers, on Battery Street 

Verdict of $5,000 rendered against the city, for 

causing the death of Florence Meyer, by being 

run over by a steam tire engine August King 

injured hisarm in the belting at Spauldiniyr's Mill. 

April 11. Steam elevator introduced In Cosmo- 
politan Hotel. 

April 12. Grand Commandery of Knights Tem- 
plar hold their annual meeting. 

April 13. Annual banquet of Jetfersonian Soci- 
ety at Cosmopolitan Hotel Schooner Maid of the 

Mist burned near the Presidio. 
April 14. Widow of Sir John Franklin arrives. 
April 16. Adolph F. Marqnard commits suicide. 
April 17. Riot among the Chinese population, 
several Chinamen wounded. 
April 20. J. M. Doherty commits suicide. 
April 23. Blossom Rock, in the Bay, is de- 
stroyed by a submarine blast D. McGinness cuts 

bis father's throat, and then attempts suicide. 

April 24. Charles Bradley's residence on Rin- 
con Hill destroyed by tire, and his infant son 

burned to death A tire at 648 Mission Street; 

loss $5.000 Slight shock of earthquake. 

April 25. Lady Franklin and niece sail for Sitka, 
on the U.S. steamer Newborn. 

April 26. The Odd Fellows celebrate their fifty- 
first anniversary. 
April 27. Mrs. Annie Schneider commits suicide. 
April 29. Three hundred Chinese laborers leave 
for Minnesota on contract. 

April 30. May Day festival at Woodward's 
Gardens to the school children and teachers. 
May 1. Turn Verein Festival at City Gardens. 
May 2. M. Ramirez, Peruvian Consul, dies. 
May 4. Pacific Coast Billiard Congress organ- 
ized John Savage, Fenian Execuiive, arrives. 

May 5. Steamship Idaho arrives, with the firsts. 

through passengers and mails from Australia ' 

Benjamin C. Howard dies. 

May 6. W. G. Weir's furniture factory destroyed 

by fire ; loss $150,000 Adam Scliuppert, au old 

resident, dies Mercantile Library Gift Concert 

duly announced. 

May 7. Excessive warm weather throughout the 
State. 

May 9. Sixteenth session of the Grand Encamp- 
ment I.O.O.F. 
May 10. Session of Grand Lodge I.O.O.F. 
May 13. Destructive fire on Geary Street ; loss 

$20,000 Twelve hundred and seventy-six Chinese 

arrive on S.S. Japan. 

May 14. Hickox &. Spear, bankers, pay a forged 
check for $14,600. 

May 16. Col. M. Martinez, a distinguished 

Mexican, dies George L. Howard and George 

and Louis Brotherton arrested for passiii;; a forged 
check on Hickox At Spear Julia Wiuant at- 
tempts and John Leary commits suicide. 

May 17. The Pacific Coast Billiard Tournament 
terminates, and the silver cue is awarded to Little. 
May 20. P. T. Barnum lectures on the art of 
money making Josephina PlaiofT is liurned fa- 
tally, and Theresa Siegelmeier seriously, by the 
bursting of a kerosene lamp. 



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35 



U 



May 21. Capt. C. Godfrey commits suicide. 

May 2'J. A large number of Cliiiiamen engage in 
a riot at the Joss House, during which several of 
them are severely injured. 

Mav 24. Bayard Tiiylor arrives. 

May '25. The corner stone of the new U. S. 
Branch Mint is laid, with Masonic ceremonies. 

May 23. W. M. Zabriskie and H. O. Gough, 
prominent citizens, die. 

May '29. Fire at 52 Everett Street, caused by 
explosion of a kerosene lamp. 

May 30. Memorial day celebrated by decorating 

tlie graves of deceased conii-ades Hyltou, editor 

of the Mazeppa, shot by W. G. Lansing. 

May 31. Street rencontre between A. P. Dudley 
and son, and Ed. Ingham, during which several 
wounds are intlii-ted. 

June 1. Arrival of the Boston excursion party 

The Mercantile Library Lottery office is 

opened for sale of tickets Ed. Ingham tires two 

shots at Dudley on Montgomery Street. 

June 2. Seventy-five Chinamen leave for North 
Adams, Mass., to make shoes. 

June 5. Britisii sliip William Wilson is seized 
by the U. S. Marshal, whose authority is resisted, 
and the ship goes to sea. 

June 6. Revenue cutter Wyanda goes in pursuit 
of the William Wilson. 

June 7. The question of granting a subsidy to 
the Southern Pacific Railroad is decided adversely 
by the people. 

June 8. Grand Grove Ancient Order of Druids 
in session. 

June 9. Peter McLaughlin shot by John Carter, 
on Montgomery Street. 

June 10. Siimples of tea on exhibition, grown in 
El Dorado County. 

June 12. James H. Cutter, a useful and promi- 
nent citizen, dies. 

June 14. John A. Stanly appointed County 

Judge, vice Lake resigned The sale of tickets 

for tlie Mercantile Library Gift Concert enjoined. 

June 16. Daniel Ross commits suicide. 

Junk 18. Hilliard match for the championship 
of the Pacific Coast between Little and McCleery, 
is won by the former. 

June 19. The body of Louis Seligman found in 
San Mateo County ; money and papers to the value 
of $10,000, and also bottles of drugs, are found on 

his person College building belonging to Mission 

Dolores destroyed by fire ; loss $5,000 Victor 

Clirtigneau, a pioneer, dies. 

June 22. H. Henry is thrown from his horse, 

at the Mission, and killed Bloody affray at the 

San Francisco Hospital, between William I'roy and 
Henry Prague. 

June '23. Squatter difficulties at the Potrero.... 
Opposition ferry to Oakl-ind reduce the fare to ten 
cents. 

June 27. Three frame buildings on Tyler Street 

burned; loss $5,000 D. W. Martiudell seriously 

huit by a runaway horse. 

July ;>. Walter Walsh thrown from a bnggy 

and killed F.Alexander accidentally killed on 

Market Street F. N. Neuval exonerated of the 

murder of Miss Carrie Diamond Weather ex- 
cessively warm. 

July 3. A fire at 205 Third Street ; slight damage. 

July 4. Anniversary of American independence 
is celebrated by a military parade, and appropriate 

exercises at the Metropolitan Theater Edward 

Meyers is killed by George Connor. 

July 5. The last Mexican flag flying in this city 
in 1846, presented to the Pioneers. 

July 7. The last Pullman Hotel train leaves to- 
day. 

July 8. Major G. M. Wright dies Great 

anti-Chinese meeting at Piatt's Hall Twelve 

I hundred Chinese leave to labor in Georgia. 



July 9. Explosion at the Giant Powder Works, 
killing the superintendent, John Harry, and injuring 

two Chinamen F. W. Marriott, editor of the 

News Letter, assaulted by John Stratman. 

July 10. The body of J. H. Von Straaten found 
in San Antonio Creek. 

July 11. MnjorGeneral John M. Schofield, 
Commander of the Division of the Pacific, arrives. 

July 12. Two Chinamen are arrested for counter- 
feiting bills on the Bank of India. 
July 13. Lieutenant-Colonel John W. Winters 

dies from an injury received on the 4th of July 

Hall of the Order B'nai B'rith on Post street is 
dedicated F. W. VoU found guilty of man- 
slaughter for killling Michael Walsh. 

July 15. News received of a declaration of war 
by France against Prussia. 

July 16. Joseph Emeric, a French resident, of- 
fers $500 reward to the capturer of the first Prussian 
flag. 

July 17. Imposing display at the funeral of 
Lieutenant-Colonel John W. Winters. 
July 18. Enthusiastic meeting of Frenchmen to 

aid their countrymen in their war with Prussia 

Fire on Jessie street ; loss $6,000. 

July 19. Mass meeting of Germans to aid their 
countrymen in their war with France. 

July 22. Rev. A. C. Eiden severely injured by 
being thrown from a bugu;y. 

July 25. Cricket match between the officers of 
H. B. M. frigate Zealous and the California Eleven; 
won by the latter. 

July 26. John Riordan is killed by falling 
from a ladder. 

July 29. An excursion party of agricultural Ed- 
itors arrives from the East. 

July 30. James Dobson is killed by John 
Tyler on Montgomery Street. 

July 31. The Jesuits celebrate the 330th anni- 
versary of St. Ignatius Loyola, the founder of the 
Order. 
August 1 . The printers strike for higher wages. 
Aug. 2. F. L. A. Pioche presents the State Uni- 
versity with a valuable cabinet of minerals. 

Aug. 3. The Grand Jury decline to interfere 

with the Mercantile Library Lottery D. W. C. 

Rice, former President of the California Pacific 
Railroad, dies. 
Aug. 6. Annual regatta of the S. P. Yacht Club. 

Charles Quinn, the murderer of Maggie Ryan, 

found guilty. 

Aug. 7. Intense excitement over the war news 
from Europe. 
Aug. 9. Shooting aff'ray between John O'Con- 

neland Michael Mulcahy on Kearny Street John 

Stratmauisfoundguilty of libelon 3. C. Duncan 

Admiral John F. Winslow arrives. 
Aug. 11. U. S. Branch Mint damaged $6,000 by 

fire Charles Quinn sentenced to the State Prison 

for life. 

Aug. 12. Large subscriptionB made by the 
French and German residents to their countrymen 
inarms The Eureka Typographical Union pro- 
nounces the recent printers' strike a failure. 

Aug. 13. John Stratman is sentenced to six 
months imprisonment for a libel on J. C. Duncan. 

Aug. 15. News received of the death of Admiral 
Farragut, U. S. N. ; universal respect paid to his 
memory. 

Aug. 16. — Henry Durant elected President of the 
State University. 

Aug. 19, H. A. Cobb commissioned Major-Gen- 
eral of State Militia. 

Aug. 23. Great rejoicing by both German and 
French over the war. 

Aug. 24. Hon. Wm. H. Seward arrives, en 
route around the world Mr. Jacks severely in- 
jured by a stationary wash basin at the Russ House. 
Aug.' 25. F. W. Horn commits suicide. 



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SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Aug. 26. The Synagogue Sherith Israel dedi- 
cated with imposing ceremonies. 

Aug. 27. Second annual regatta of the S. F. 
Yacht Club Destructive fire on Twelfth Street. 

Aug. 29. A horticultural and pomological fair is 
held at the Mechanics' Pavilion. 

September 2. Hon. William H. Seward and 
party leave on S. S. China. 

Sept. 2. Thomas Moouey, the banker and histo- 
rian, disappears. 

Sept. 3. Intense excitement over the surrender 
of the Emperor Napoleon at Sedan. 

Sept. 5. Supervisor A. J. Sbrader indicted by 
Gland Jury, afterwards acquitted. 

Sept. 6. Patrick Kiernan was killed by falling 
from a horse car. 

Sept. 7. General W. T. Sherman, U. S. A., ar- 
rives from the East Municipal election, resulting 

in the election of the Tax Payers' ticket with two 
exceptions Paul Cox, a pioneer, dies suddenly. 

Sept. 8. Commencementof the German Sanitary 
Fair at the Pavilion. 

Sept. 9. The anniversary of the admission of 
California is celebrated by the Pioneers by a grand 
excursion to Mare Island, in which Gen. W. T. 
Sherman and other distinguished persons partici- 
pate. 

Sept. 10. Gen. Sherman visits the German La- 
dies' Sanitary Fair and is extensively kissed Fire 

at 831 California Street. 

Sept. 15. Grand ball at Lick House in honor of 
Gens. Sherman and Scbofield. 

Sept. 16. The Mexicans celebrate the sixteenth 
anniversary of their independence. 

Sept. 18. Excursion party of Eastern railroad 

agents arrives George Gordon, a veteran of the 

Mexican war, dies. 

Sept. 19. Annual Fair of the Bay District Agri- 
cultural Society L. C. and G. C. Brotherton con- 
victed of forgery. 

Sept. 20. M'ary F. Baker recovers $10,000 dam- 
ages from the California Stage Co. for killing her 
husband. Mary Grady injured at the same time re- 
covers $3,000. 

Sept. 22. Receipts of the French Sanitary Fair 
reach $38,000. 

Sept. 24. Imposing auroral display. 

Sept. 2.5. Jewish New Year duly observed by 
the Israelitish population. 

Sept. 29. Arrival of the U. S. sloop Kearsage. . . 
Miss Cornelia Wise commits suicide News re- 
ceived of the loss of the S. S. Continental otf the 
Mexican coast. 

Sept. 30. First rain of the season OttoRabbe 

coinniits suicide at Lone Mountain. 

October 3. Young ladies admitted as students 

to the State University D. McFarland is killed 

by a sand cart. 

Oct. 6. Run on the Hibernia Bank Synod of 

the Pacific, in session A lire in Central Place, 

loss $3,000. 

Oct. 7. Mary Murray arrested for arson. 

Oct. 11. Grand Lodge P. and A. M. commences 
its annual meeting. 

Oct. 12. G. IJrsicb commits suicide Institu- 
tion of the Grand Consistory of California, of the 
Scottish Rites of Freemasonry. 

Oct. 14. Billiard contest between J. W. Little 
and J. F. B. McCleery, won by the former. 

Oct. 16. A Japanese prince and several natives 
of high rank, arrive 'The Italian residents cele- 
brate the unification of Italy. . 

Oct. 19. The California State Medical Society is 
organized. 

Oct. 20. Destructive fire in the vicinity of Mar- 
ket and Beale streets, destroying several manufact- 
uring establishments and other buildings, valued at 
$400.000. . . .First National Gold Bank of San Fran- 
cisco organized. 



Oct. 22. John Petit killed while digging a well. 

Oct. 23. Italian residents celebrate the occupa- 
tion of Rome, by a procession etc. 

Oct. 26. W.' C. Schuyler's body found in the 
bay. 

Oct. 27. News of the surrender of Metz by 
B:izaiue creates intense excitement. 

Oct. 29. Tod Robinson, a distinguished lawyer 
and Supreme Court Reporter, dies at Crystal Springs, 
California. 

Oct. 31. Mercantile Library Gift Concert com- 
mences at the Pavillion, in the presence of 15,000 
persons, creating intense excitement. 

Novembers. A.P.Crittenden, a distinguished 
lawyer, is mortally wounded by Mrs. Laura D. 
Fair, in the presence of his family on the Steam- 
boat El Capitan while crossing from Oakland 

Eniil Hirch commits suicide. 

Nov. 4. Joseph Dion, a distinguished billiardist, 

arrives William Brown accidently kills himself 

Mrs. De Rossa commits suicide. 

Nov. 6. Mrs. Sarah DaW8ey,a colored woman, 

dies, aged 113 years A. P. Crittenden dies from 

the efi'ect of the wound received on the 3d inst. 

Nov. 7. Joseph Taylor dies from poison 

Second Mercantile Library Lottery Concert, prize a 
grand piano. 

Nov. 9. John Sullivan is stabbed by Hugh Mc- 
Inerny. 

Nov. 10. Fire on Dupont Street, three buildings 
destroyed. 

Nov. II. Destructive fires on California and Sac- 
ramento streets, loss $50,000 Hellman, who 

drew the $100,000, prize, gives $5,000 for charitable 

institutions in this city S. M. Cohen arrested for 

procuring an abortion on Mrs. Fanny Lawler. 

Nov. 12. Society of El Dorado Pioneers organi- 
zed. 

Nov. 13. Seventy-five meteors are observed by 
Prof. Davidson. 

Nov. 15. Archbishop Alemany returns from 



Rome. 

Nov. 16. 
dies. 

Nov. 17. 

Nov ' 
Cue a 

No\ 



Eli Alexander, a veteran of Waterloo, 



Wm. T. Brittan commits suicide. 
' McCleery beats Little for the Silver 
i.ijj,,^pion8hip of California. 
, „i ,.' linterrupted telegraphing to Plaster 
Cove, i.y. ,, '.' ' "\ San Francisco, 4,605 miles. 

Nov. 2ii. n Pierre Carpie, dies from inju- 

ies received 1 'lorse. 

Nov. 23. T. . Jazneau appointed Adjutant 

General Dra. Li i*o Tai and Chan Tin Phoey, 

leading Chinese physicians, are severely injured by 

an explosion of gas Five million dollars in 

greenbacks arrive overland from Washington. 

Nov. 24. The St. Augustine Cadets arrive on a 
visit Regatta of the Pioneer Rowing Club. 

Nov. 25. Peter O'Connor accidently killed while 
digging a well. 

Nov. 26. Match game of billiards between 
Joseph Dion and John Deery, won by the former. 

Nov. 28. Robert Evans killed by Isaac E. Bro- 

kaw J. B. Chevallier, an esteemed citizen and 

teacher of languages, dies A four horse team 

is accidentally driven over an embankment on the 
Potrero road, and John Marks seriously injured. 

Nov. 29. A fire, 6 p. m., at 615 Pacific Street, 
damage $2,000. 

Nov. 30. Timothy Lord dies suddenly at Cliff 
House. 

December 3. Captain Frank B. Las Casas, a 
pioneer Californian, dies, aged 40 years. 

Dec. 5. George O'Connor sentenced to the State 

Prison for ten years for killing Edward Meyers 

The Pacific Law Report makes its first appearance 

M. De Senles, a native of France found dead in 

his bed Patrick Sullivan falls overboard from the 

ship Prima Donna, and is drowned. 



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QENEE^L, REVIEA^^. 



Public Schools. 

The operations of the Public School department 
during the past year, have exhibited the same pro- 
gress and prosperity as that of former years. It 
should b gratifying to every citizen to know that 
while the material wealth and prosperity of our city 
have been seriously retarded by linancial embarrass- 
ment and business depression, the general progress 
and attendance of the Public Schools have been 
greater than any preceding year. 

The average school attendance at this date (Mc'h 
28th, 1871) ie 20,000, showing an increase of nearly 
5,000 since the report of the Superintendent, Jnne 
30th, 1870, when it was 15.394. About one-third o^ 
this number attend the Cosmopolitan Schools in 
which the German and French languages are taught 
in addition to the ordinary English course of study. 

One of the most notable features in the progress 
of the Department, is the erection and completion 
during the year 1870 of five laige and convenient 
school buildings which will attord, for some years to 
come, ample accommodation for the growing wants of 
the Department in the southern section of the city. 
Provision for the payment of the expenses of these 
additions was made by the last State Legislature by 
the passage of an act, authorizing the Mnyor, Audi- 
tor, and Treasurer to issue from time to time in such 
sums as may be required. School Bonds, not to ex- 
ceed in the aggregate $300,000, the proceeds there- 
of, after paying the deficit in the school fund of 
1869-70, to be used exclusively for purchasing lots 
and erecting school houses. .8' .< 

The Lincoln School Building which wad fartially 
destroyed by fire on the evening of the' twenty- 
second of February last is to be restored to its original 
condition at an expense of $"J5,0U0. 

The law for the election of the Superintendent of 
Common Schools having been changed by the Legis- 
lature of the State, 1869-70, Mr. James H. Widber 
was elected in September last to that office and in 
accordance with the provisions of the general 
school law, Mr. John Swett, exState Superintend- 
ent has been appointed Deputy Superintendent. 
Few gentlemen have rendered more efficient ser- 
vices in promoting our system of school education 
than the present Superintendent and Deputy Super- 
intendent, and there is scarcely a doubt but that the 
operations of the Public Schools during their admin- 
istration will exhibit the same gratifying progress 
as they have during any former period of their 
history. 

General Statistics, June 30, 1870. 

Number of children under 15 years of age, (in- 
crease for the year 4,129) 45,617. 

Number of children between 5 and 15 years 

of age, (increase for the year 1,270) 27,055. 

Number of pupils enrolled in the Public 

Schools, (increase for the year 2,267) 22,152. 

Average number belonging to the Public 

Schools, (increase for the year 2,237) 16,371. 

Average daily attendance of pupils, (increase 

during the year, 2,281) 15,394. 

Average daily absence of pupils, (increase for 

the year, 64) 1,043. 



Number of School Houses, High, 2 ; Gram- 
mar, 10 ; Mixed, 3; Primary, 35 ; Total, 
50, of which 17 are rented at an annual 

expense of $13,868.50. 

Number of Teachers, 369 ; Classes, 489. 
Expenditures. Salaries, Teachers, $321 .091.45 ; Jan- 
itors, $22,446,32; Secretary's $1,355,00; Car- 
penters, $1,800,00 ; Total Salaries, 346,692,77 ; 
Census Marshals, $1,505,25 ; Fuel and Lights, 
$7,077,17; Books and Supplies, $15,861,65: 
Kents, $13,868,50; Sundries. $3,730,30; Total 
(actual running expenses) $388,735,64. 
The following is a comparative statement of tlie 
daily attendance of all the public schools from 1852 
to 1869, being a period of seventeen years: 1852 
445 ; 1853, 703 ; 1854, 1,011 ; 1855, 1.484 ; 1856, 2,516 
1857, 2,155; 1858, 2,521 ; 1859, 2,829; 1860, 2,837 
1861,3,377; 1862, 3.794; 1863, 4,389; 1864, 5,470 
1865, 6,718; 1866, 8,131 ; 1867, 10,177 ; 1868, 11,871 
1869, 13, 113; 1870, 15,394. Subjoined is a statement 
of the yearlv expenditures of the department since 
18.52 to the present time .— 1^32, $23,125; 1853, $35,- 
040 ; 1854, $159,249 ; 18.55, $136,580 ; 1856, $125,064 ; 
1857, $92,955; 1858, $104,808; 1859, $134,731 ; 1860, 
$156,407; 1861. $158,855; 1862, $134,567; 1863, 
$178,929; 1864, $228,411; 1865, $346,862; 1866, 
$361,668; 1867, $507,822; 1868, $376,392; 1869, 
$400,842 ; 1870, .$-543,519, making a total expendi- 
ture, in seventeen years, of $4,205,826. 

Location of Schools. 
Number of Pupils Enrolled, the Average Attend' 
fince. Average Number to each Teacher, and 
the Monthly Expense of Tuition, based upon 
the Teachers' and Janitors' Salaries of School 
Month ending May 27, 1870. 

Boy's High School (location east side of Powell 
Street near Clay). — Pupils registered, 107 ; average 
attendance, 106; percentage of attendance, .99; 
number to each teacher, 18 ;'monthly tuition of each 
pupil, $9.38. 

Girls' High School (location south side of Bush 
Street near Stockton). — Pupils registered, 155; aver- 
age attendance, 152 ; percentage of attendance, .98 ; 
number to each teacher, 25 ; monthly tuition of each 
pupil, $4.90. 

City Training School (location south side of 
Bush Street near Stockton). — Pupils registered, 232; 
average attendance, 208 ; percentage of attendance, 
.95^ ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.70. 

Li.vcoLN Gkammar School (location eastside of 
Fifth Street near Market).— Pupils registered, 960; 
average attendance, 924 ; percentage of attendance, 
.97 ; number to each teacher, 44 ; monthly tuition of 
each pupil, $1.80. 

Denman Gra.mmar School (location northwest 
corner of Bush and Taylor streets). — Pupils regis- 
tered, 676 ; average attendance, 630 ; percentage of 
attendance, .96 7- 10; number to each teacher, 40; 
monthly tuition of each pupil, $2.14. 

RiNcoN Grammar School (location Vassar 
Place, leading from Harrison Street between Second 
and Third). — Pupils registered, 543; average at- 
tendance, 500 ; percentage attendance, .98 : number 
to each teacher, 39 ; moathlv tuition of each pupil, 
$2.15. 

Broadway Grammar School (location north 
side of Broadway, between Powell and Mason 



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SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



streets). — Pupils registered, 5'iO ; average attend- 
ance, 474 ; percentage of attendance, .94 ; nnmher to 
each teacber, 40 ; montlily tuition of each pupil, $3.18. 

South Co.smopolitan Gram.mah School (loca- 
tion north side of Post Street between Dnpont and 
Stockton). — Pupils registered, 359 ; average attend- 
ance, 317 ; percentage of attendance, .93 ; nnmber to 
each teacber, 32 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, 
$3.07. 

Union Grammar School (location north side of 
Union Street, between Montgomery and Kearny). 
--Pupils registered, 4.54 ; average attendance, 4l7 ; 
percentage of attendance, .95^ ; number to each 
teacher, 42 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $2.14. 

Washington Grammar School (location south- 
west corner of Mason and WHshington streets). — 
Pupils registered, 430 ; average attendance, 403 ; 
percentage of attendance, .9ti ; number to each 
teacher, 40 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $2.19. 

Spring Valley Grammar School (location 
sonth 8i<le of Broadway, between Larkin and Polk 
streets) Pupils registered, 464 ; average attend- 
ance, 447 ; percentage of attendance, .96^; number 
to each teacber, 45 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, 
$2.05. 

Mission Grammar School (location west side 
of Mission Street, between Fifteenth and Sixteenth). 
— Pupils registered. 671 ; average attendance, 609 ; 
percentage oi attendance, .94 ; number to each 
teacber, 51 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.79. 

Shotwell Street Grammar School (location 
east side of Shotwell Street, between Twenty- 
second and Twenty-third) — Pupils registered, 677 ; 
average attendance, 578 ; percentage of attendrtnce, 
.94 4-10 ; number to each teacher, 44 ; monthly tui- 
tion of each pupil, $1.89. 

North Cosmopolitan School (location north 
side of Filbert Street, between Jones and Taylor). 
— Pupils registered, 579 ; average attendance, 519 ; 
percentage of attendance, .94>i ; number to each 
teacher, 47 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.70. 

Tenth Street School (location west side of 
Tenth Street, between Howard and Folsom). — 
Pupils registered, 698 ; average attendance, 629 ; 
percentage of attendance, .96 ; number to each 
teacher, 48 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.57. 

South San Francisco School (location South 
San Francisco, near Railroad Avenue). — Pnpils 
registered, 178; average attendance, 160; percent- 
age of attendance, .94^; number to each teacher, 
53; monthly tuition of each pupil, $2.03. 

Tkhama Primary School (lof-ation south side 
of Teliaina Street, near First) . — Pupils registered, 
854: average attendance, 758; percentage of at- 
tendance, .92 4-10 ; number to each teacber, 45 ; 
monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.65. 

Lincoln Primary School (location southeast 
corner of Market and Fifth streets). — Pupils reg- 
istered, 692; average attendance, 565; percentage 
of attendance, .93 4-10 ; number to each teacher, 43; 
monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.73. 

Fourth Street Primary School (location 
northwest corner of Fourth and Clara streets). — 
Pupils registered, 534 ; average attendance, 498 ; 
percentage of attendance, .95 ; number to each 
teacher, 45 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.56. 

South Cosmopolitan Primary School (loca- 
tion north side of Post Street between Dupont and 
Stockton) . — Pupils registered, 482 ; average at- 
tendance, 434 ; percentage of attendance, .95 ; num- 
ber to each teacher, 43 ; monthly tuition of each 
pupil, $1.70. 

Bush Street Cosmopolitan School (location 
southeast corner B^^h and Stockton streets). — Pu- 



pils registered, 500 ; average attendance, 463 ; per- 
centage of attendance, .94 2-10 ; nnmber to each 
teacher, 46 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.60. 

Mason Street Cosmopolitan Primary School 
(location east side of Mason Street between Post 
and Geary). — Pnpils registered, 342 ; average at- 
tendance. 290 ; percentage of attendance, .91 8-10 ; 
number to each teacher, 48 ; monthly tuition of 
each pupil, $1.50. 

Greenwich Street Cosmopolitan Primary 
School (location south side of Greenwich Street 
between Jones and Leavenworth). — Pupils regis- 
tered, 444 ; average attendance, 371 ; percentage of 
attendance, .93; number to each teacher, 46; month- 
ly tuition of each pupil, $1.52. 

Powell Street Primary School (location 
west side of Powell Street between Jackson and 
Washington). — Pupils registered, 482 ; average at- 
tendance, 443 ; percentage of attendance, .95 ; num- 
ber to each teacher, 55 ; monthly tuition of each 
pupil, $1.38. 

Union Primary School (location northwest 
corner of Filbert and Kearny streets). — Pupils regis- 
tered, 479 ; average attendance, 419; percentage of 
attendance, .92 9-10 ; number to eacQ teacher, 46 ; 
monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.59. 

SiLVEu Street Primary School (location 
north side of Silver Street between Second and 
Third). — Pupils rei.'i8tered,606 ; average attendance, 
.530; percentage of attendance, .94 4-10; nnmber to 
each teacher, 53 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, 
$1.52. 

Mission and Mary Street Primary School 
(location corner of Mission and Mary streets). — Pu- 
pils registered, 2.57 ; average attendance, 228 ; per- 
centage of attendance, .94 6-10 ; number to each 
teacher, 45 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.53. 

Mission Street Primary School (location 
south side Mission Street between Fifth and Sixth). 
^Pupils registered, 320 ; average attendance, 279 ; 
percentage of attendance. .90 2-10 ; number to each 
teacher, 56; monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.53. 

Pink and Larkin Street Primary School 
(location southwest corner of Pine and Larkin 
streets). — Pupils registered, 636; average attend- 
ance, 565; percentage of attendance, .91 8-10; num- 
ber to each teacher, 43 ; monthly tuition of each 
pupil, $1.86. 

Eighth Street Primary School (location 
east side Ei>;hth Street between Harrison and Bry- 
ant). — Pupils registered. 577 ; averaa'e attendance, 
531; per centage of attendance, .95; number to 
each teacher, 47; monthly tuition of each pupil, 
$1.55. 

Hayes Valley Primary School (location north 
side Grove Street between Franklin and Goughl. — 
Pupils registered, 238 ; average attendance, 222 ; 
percentage of attendance. .96 2-10; number to each 
teacher, 55 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.43. 

Hayes Street Primary School (location south 
side Hayes Street nearLagnna). — Pupils rejiistered, 
111 ; average attendance, 97 ; percentage of attend- 
ance, 94 ; number to each teacher, 48 ; monthly tui- 
ition of each pupil, $1.62. 

Spring Valley Primary School (location south 
side Union Street between Franklin and Gough). — 
Pupils registered, 230; average attendance, 199; 
percentage of attendance, .91 7-10; number to each 
teacher, 47 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.42. 

Drumm Street Primary School (location 
northeast corner Sacramento and Drurnm streets). — 
Pupils registered, 135; average attendance, 116; 
percentage of attendance, .93 ; number to each 
teacher, 39 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.82. 



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39 



PoTRKRO School (location eouthwest corner 
Kentucky and Napa streets) — Pupila re;;istered, 
101 ; average attendance, 88 ; percentage of at- 
tendance, .95 4-10 ; number to each teacher, 44 ; 
monthly tuition of each pupil, $2.00. 

Pine Street ScHoor, (location north side Pine 
Street between Scott and Deviaadero). — Pupils reg- 
istered, 87 ; average attendance, 77 ; percentage of 
attendance, .91; number to each teacher, 38; monthly 
tuition of each pupil, $2.04. 

■p^LER Street School (location north side Ty- 
lerotreet between Scott and Pierce). — Pupils reg- 
istered, ','32; average atteiidance,190; percentage of 
of attendance, .89 7-10; number to each teacher, 47 ; 
monthly tuition of each pupil, $1.49. 

West End ScHooL(location near Six-mile House). 
— Pupils registered, 40 ; average attendance, 34 ; 
perceutaure of attendance, .89 ; monthly tuition of 
each pupil, $2.44. 

San Bruno School (location San Bruno Road 
near Toll-gate). — Pupils registered, 10.5; average 
attendance. 87 ; percentage of attendance, .92; num- 
ber to each teacher, 46 ; monthly tuition to each pu- 
pil, $1.71. 

Ocean House School (location near Ocean 
House). — Pupils registered, 21 ; average attendance, 
18; percentage of attendance, .95 ; monthly tuition 
of each pupil, $4.62. 

Lacuna Honda School. — Pupils registered, 31 ; 
average attendance, 28 ; percentage of attendance, 
.93 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $2.94. 

Fairmount School (location Fairmount Tract). 
— Pupils registered, 137 ; average attendance, 73 ; 
percentage of attendance, 87.5 ; number to each 
teacher, 36 ; monthly tuition of each pupil, $2.00. 

Colored School (location northwest corner 
Taylor and Vallejo streets) . — Pupils registered, 70 ; 
average attendance, 60 ; percentage of attendance, 
.89 5-10; number to each teacher, 30; monthly tuition 
of each pupil. $3.04. 

Chinese School (location north side Powell 
Street between Jackson and Washington). — Pupils 
registered. 31 ; average attendance, 25; percentage 
of attendance, .83 ; mouthlv tuition of each pupil, 
$3.20. 

Historical Sketch. 

Ex-Superintendent Denman, in his Annual Report, 
1870, gives the following brief history of the first 
schools established in San Francisco : 

The first American school in San Francisco was 
organized in April, 1847, in a small shanty ou the 
block between Broadway and Pacific streets, west 
of Dupont Street. Here were collected from twenty 
to thirty pupils, which then comprised nearly all the 
children m the city. It was a private institution, 
supported by the tuition fees from the pupils, and 
the contributions of the citizens. 

It was taught by Mr. Marsten, who is entitled to 
the honor of being the first Yankee school-master 
upon the Pacific coast. Although he continued his 
school but a few months, yet he performed an im- 
portant part in the early history of our schools, 
which should entitle his name to be held in grateful 
remembrance bv every friend of education. 

Late in the fall of 1847, active measures were first 
taken by the citizens of San Francisco to organize a 
public school, which resulted in erectinga comforta- 
ble one-etory school house ou the southwest part of 
Portsmouth Square, fronting on Clay Street where 
it now joins Breiiham Place. 

An engraving of this first public school house in 
San Francisco has been preserved in the " Annals 
of Sail Francisco " as oue of the most valued relics 
of the past. The history of this old building is 
cherished by the early pioueers with many pleasing 



associations. Every new enterprise here germi- 
nated into existence. Here the churches lield their 
first meeting, and the first public amusements were 
given. Alter the discovery of gold, it was deserted 
for school purroses and dignified into a court house, 
under Judge Almond. It was again degraded into 
a police office and used as a station house until de- 
molishel by the city in 1850. It is to be regretted 
that this first public school edifice of San Francisco, 
unpretending as it was, could not have been pre- 
served so that the future citizen might contrast this 
hnmble commencement with the beautiful school 
edifices which will yet adoru every hillside and val- 
ley of our expanding city. 

'On the 28th of February, 1848, the first town 
meeting for the election of School Trustees was held, 
wliich resulted in the choice of Messrs. C. L.lloss, J. 
Serrine and Dr. J. G. Townsend. These gentle- 
men, with the characteristic energy of our pioneers, 
immediately commenced the organization of aschool. 

A census of the town was soon afterwards taken 
by C. L. Ross, a gentlemen to whose energy and 
liberality in the early history of our city the cause 
of education and benevolence will ever be greatly 
indebted. This enumeration showed that the entire 
population of the town, including the Indians and 
Mexicans, was about eight hundred, fifty of whom 
were children of suitable age to attend school. 

Ou the 3d of April following, the school was 
opened in the building I have described, under the 
instruction of Rev. Thomas Douglas, a graduate of 
Yale College, and an able and zealous pioneer in the 
cause of education. 

Although it was regularly organized as a public 
school, under thecontroland managementof the trus- 
tees, yet it was mainly supported by private tuition 
fees from the pupils. The success and usefulness of 
this school was soon paralyzed by the great discovery 
of gold, which rapidly depopulated the town, leaving 
the teacher minus scholars, parents, trustees, or 
tuition and salary. The teacher therefore closed 
school, and joined in the general scramble for the 
new El Dorado of untold wealth. In the general 
excitement and confusion which followed the first 
rush to the mines, the school enterprise was for a 
time abandoned. 

The education of the children, who were rapidly 
increasing from the flood of immigration pouriut 
into San Francisco from every part of the world, 
was entirely neglected until the 23d of April, 1849, 
when the Rev. Albert Williams opened a small se- 
lect school, which he taught for a few months. 

In October, 1849, Mr. J. C. Pelton and wife 
opened a school in the basement of the Baptist 
Church on Washington Street, near Stockto.i, 
It was at first commenced as a private en- 
terprise, being supported by such compensation as 
the "friends of the school were disposed to con- 
tribute ;" but on the first of April following, it was 
made a public school by an ordinance of the Com- 
mon Council, and Mr. Pelton and wife were em- 
ployed as teachers at a salary of $.500 a month. 

I'^his school commenced with only three pupils; 
but under the popular instruction of these early 
pioneers, it rapiuly increased in numbers and popu- 
lar favor until it was broken up bv the disastrous 
fires of 1850 and 1851, when Mr. Pefton left the city 
to engage in other occupations. 

In July, 18.50, the " Happy Valley School" ^as 
opened in a little dilapidated building in what was 
then a beautiful little valley in the suburbs of the 
city, near the corner of Second and Minna streets. 
It waa first taught by Mr. Samuel Newton, who re 
mained but a short time, when he was succeeded 
by Mr. Rogers, a teacher of energy and ability, 
who also soon abandoned the school for a more lu- 
crative occupation. 

The school was next taught by Mr. Cooly, a gen- 
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SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



encceeded in bailding op a flonriebing Bcbool for 
Bcveral montbe, nntil the proeperity of the city waa 
aliHOfft deetroved by the great fires of 1851 . 

This Rchoof wag Bnpported by tuition fees, volnn- 
tary contribntiona and appropriations from the Com- 
mon Conncil ; and altboutrh it was commenced as a 
private enterprise, yet it was free to all who were 
too poor to pay for the edncation of their children. 

lu the Spring of 1851. a scbixjl was established by 
a few benevolent gentleman in Spring Valley, in a 
small bailding which was then n^ed as a cbnrcb, a 
school house, and for the general meeting of the 
citizens in that vicinity. It was located on the site 
of the present Spring Valley Primarv School, and 
•was first taught by Mr. Freeman Like the other 
schools mentioned, "it was both private and public 
in ite character, being supported by tuition fees and 
public contributions, and was free to ail who wished 
to attend. 

I have thufl briefly noticed these schools, ajs they 
were the real pioneer institutions in sowing the 
seeds which have rince ripened into oar noble sys- 
tem of Public Schools. 

Other small schools were taught during 1850 and 
1851, before the organization of the present system 
of free schools. 

Mr. W. K. Osbom had a gmall select school in 
the Congregational Church 

Quite a larjre and popular private school was 
taught by the Bev. F. E. Preveanx, in a part of the 
building now occupied by the Powell Street Pri- 
mary School. 

The Rev. Dr. VerMehr was also a teacher of a 
small select school. 

Several quite large parochial schools were also 
taught in the Catholic cnurches of the city. 

Bat as all of these schools were organized as pri- 
vate or f«ectarian institutions, and had no immediate 
connection with our public schools. I do not con- 
sider it important to dwell upon their history in this 
place. As pioneer Institutions in the great cause of 
education, they are entitled to oar regard, and to 
the grateful remembrance of every friend of public 
instruction. 

After the great fires of May and Jnne, 1851, and 
during the social revuUions of society which fol- 
lowed the terrible events of that memorable year of 
crime and disaster, but little attention for some 
time was given to the instruction of the youth, who 
were left to roam the streets and educate them- 
selves in all the crimes and vice of the gambling 
saloons which then infested every part of the city. 

In the early part of the autumn of that year, as 
the city began to arise from her ashes, and give evi- 
dence of permanent pro8f>erity and future greatness. 
a few benevolent and fiublic spirited citizens united 
in a noble effort to provide for the edncation of the 
large number of children constantly flocking to our 
city from every part of the world. The subject of 
thus early estalilishing a permanent system of free 
schools was atrilated in the press and the city gov- 
ernment until the 25th of September, 1851, 'when 
the Common Council, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of an Act of the Legislature, approved 
April 14th, 1851, conferring power upon the city to 
orgiutize Common 8cho<.>li* and to levy taxes for 
their support, passed a "Free School Ordinance," 
providing for the organization, support and regula- 
tion of the Common Schools of San Francisco. The 
adoption of this excellent ordinance, which carefully 
provided for the details of a well organized system 
of Public Schools, was mainly secured by T. J. Ne- 
vins, Ew^., a gentleman whose name should ever be 
held in grateful remembrance for bis interest and 
enthasiasm in the cause of education and philan- 
thropy. 

Ou the twenty-first of October following, the first 
Board of Eduf:ation in California was elected by the 
Common Council of the city, consisting of C. J. 



Brenham, the Mayor, C. L. Ross, Alderman. Joseph 
Atwell, Assistant Alderman, and Genera] .Tohn 
Wilson, and Henry E. Lincoln, Esq. The Board 
completed its organization by electing T. J. Nevins, 
Esq., Superintendent of Pnblic Schools. Altlion^fh 
other attenjpts had been made in 1849 and 18.'>0 to 
establish free schools, yet this is the first successful 
effort that has come down intact to us. 

On the seventeenth of November, 1851, our pres- 
ent system of Free Schools was inaugurated, which 
has since proved such a frlorioua success. It may be 
true, that previous to this date, other schooh Jiad 
been taught for a short time in San Fruncisco, which 
were free to all who desired to attend ; but they 
were not repnlarly organized under anv Boaid of 
Education, and were soon abandoiietf by their 
teachers to enter more lucrative occupations. Ihir- 
ing the first year, ending November 1st, 18.52, the 
Board of Education organized seven schools in dif- 
ferent sections of the city, which, according to the 
fourth quarterly report of the Superintendent, num- 
bered seven nnndred and ninety-one pupils in 
attendance. A census was taken in October, 18.52, 
by the teachers, which showed that the whole num- 
ber of children in the city between fmr and eig:hteen 
years of age was two thousand and fifty. All these 
schools (except No. 2 at North Beach) have contin- 
ued their organization intact, and now constitute the 
princifial Grammar Schools of the city. 

The first Public School under the present orj^-an- 
ization was opened on the seventeenth of November, 
1851, in a small dilapidated one-story building near 
the comer of Secona and Minna streets. It was then 
named the " Happy Valley School," District No. 1, 
which included all that portion of the city south of 
Pine Street. The first teachers were James Denman, 
Principal, and Mrs. A. Hyde, As-sistant. 

On the same date the " Noith Beach School," 
District No. 5, located on the northeast corner of 
Powell and Filbert streets, was instituted under the 
instruction of Mr. Joel Tracy, Principal, and Mrs. 
Milhury, Assistant. This school was tranbferred in 
1854 to the large brick school-hoiiFe which was 
erected on the southwest corner of Francisco and 
Stockton streets, where it remained until 18.57, when 
the building was used bv the city as a hospital, and 
the school was merged into the Union School and 
the Powell Street Grammar School. 

On the twenty-second of December, 1851, Central 
School, District'No. 2, (now the Washington School) 
was organized in a one story building on Dnpont 
Street near Jackson, under the instruction of F. E. 
Jones, Esq., Principal, and Mrs. E. W. Baldwin, 
Assistant. 

On the eighth of January, 1852, the " Happy 
Valley School," District No. 1, was divided, and tne 
present Kincon Schfjol was organized in the southern 
portion of the city, in a small room near the corner 
of First and Folsom streets. 

On the ninth of February, 1852, the present 
Spring Valley Grammar School was opened in the 
old church atid school-house on the site of the Spring 
Valley Primary School, on Union Street between 
Franklin and Goujrh. 

On the tenth of May, 1852, the Mission Dolores 
School wa« organized in a small building near the 
old Mission Church. 

On the seventeenth of June, 1852, the Clarke's 
Point School (now the Union Grammar .School) was 
opened in an old wooden bniidin^f on the northwest 
comer of Montgomery and Broadway streets. 

On the twenty secjnd of Mav, 18.04, the Colored 
School was organized, under tbe instruction of the 
Rev. J. J. Moore, in the basement of the Colored 
Church, on the corner of Virginia Place and Jackson 
Street. This school was subsequently transferred to 
the Colored School building on Broadway, near 
Powell Street, and is now permanen'ly located on 
the comer of Taylor and Vallejo streets. 



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GENERAL REVIEW. 



41 



The Chinese School was first organized in Sep- 
teinl>er. 1859. ander ibe inetroction of Mr. B. Lane- 
to». in the baeement of the Chine* Chapel, comer 
of Sioctton and Sacramento street*. For want of 
scholars and a lack of interest amoog the Chinese 
to appreciate the henefita of free school iaerraclion, 
it waa 8nspended in Jane, 1860, ae a dav school, bat 
has since been taagfat as an evening scb'ooi. 

Daring Angnst. 1856, the Evening Schools were 
opened in the hasement of the Cathedral, comer 
C^fomia and Dopt-nt streets. They were first or- 
^lanized by )(es$rs John Hamill. John Swett. Ahira 
Holmes, and James Denman, who volunteered their 
aervioes antil the Board of Edncation was convinced 
of the success of the schools, and the importance 
and osefialnes? of the Evening School inMmction. 
The Evening Schools have continued with varyiiisr 
■access, nnti! now they are among the most osefo] 
and prosperous of oar Public Schools. 

Oar present High Schools were first inaugurated 
on the 16th of Antrum, 1856. under the instrnttion 
of Mr. Ellis H. Holmes. Principal, George W. 
Minns, and Miss Anna C. Parks, Asfeistants. At 
first the school was opened as a " Union Grammar 
School.'' and consisted of eighty puplU — thirty-Jive 
boys «aijorty-nr€ girle — wRo were selected from 
the most advanced pupils of the highest grammar 
classes of the city. After thorongbly testing the 
experiment for three terms, and proving the useful- 
ness and success of the school, the Board of Edaca- 
tion, on the Sih of January, 1858, resolved to re- 
organize it as a permanent High School, with a 
more complete ana extended course of study. 

The school was first opened in Dr. Bonne's 
chiuvb, on the present site of the Boys" High School, 
This building was remodeled and rebuilt m 1860, 
and was fonnally dedicated on the 19th of Septem- 
ber, with interesting ceremonies, by the Kev. T. 
Starr King and others. 

In June, 1S64. the sexes were separated in the 
High School, and the young ladies were transferred 
to the old brick building corner Stockton and Bush 
streets, where the Girls' High School was opened 
under the instruction of the present PrinHpal. Mr. 
E. H. Holmes, with Misses M. F. Austin and M. S. 
Bodwell, and Madame Brisac. Assistants. This 
school was reoiganired in July, 1867. as a Girls' 
High and Normal School, with a training depart- 
ment for preparing young ladies for the profession 
of teaching. 

In 1853, the Legislature of the State of California 
ptassed the following Act, by which the Catholic, or 
" Ward " schools, were organized as a part of the 
public schools of the city. Sec. three. '• The Coun- 
ty Saperintendent may. and is hereby empowered, 
in incorporated cities, to appoint three School Com- 
missioners for any common school or district, upon 
a petition of the inhabitants thereof requesting the 
same." Sec. four. " Such schools sliall f>e and are 
hereby entitled to all the rights and privileges of any 
other city or common schools, in the pro rata divi- 
sion of school money raised by taxation, and shall 
receive their proportion of money from the State 
School Fond in the annual distribution, provided 
they are conducted in accordance with the require- 
ments of this Act." This law remained in force till 
1855. when it was repealed by the revised school law 
which abolished separate school funds, and provided 
that no sectariHU books should be used, and that no 
sectarian doctrines should be taught in any public 
school, under penalty of forfeiting the pnblic funds. 
The first Commissioners appointed under this law 
were Dr. P. M. OBrien, Frank Soule. Esq., and 
Dr. S. R. Harris. 

The following schools were organized under this 
system : In the Second Ward, connected with the 
&. Francis' Church, there were one Grammar, one 
Intermediate and two Primary Schools, divided 
into m;ile and femhle departments, numbering "299 



boys ai>d 255 girls — total. 554. In the Sixth Ward, 
in 'connection with the Caihedral, there was the 
same arrangement of schools, in which were tautrht 
131 boys and 124 girls, in all 255 pupils. In the 
Seventh Ward, in connection with Si. PaT.ncus' 
Church, there was the same arrangemeni of s^ r xls, 
in which were taagfat 254 bovs and 358 girls, m.tkinir 
inan612. 

Thus there were educated in the Ward Schools 
1421 pupils, for the edncation of whom the city ap- 
propriated the sum of $39,690.50. 

The male departments were taught by gentlemen 
instrnctors, and the female departments by ladies 
belonging to the followine religions orders of :be 
city : Sisters of Charitv, Sisters of Mercy, and Sis- 
tere of the Presentation. 

In 1855. these Ward Schools were merged ino 
the city public schools, forming one uniform system. 
All the teachers, except those belonging to the difiT- 
erent religious orders, were employed by the City 
Board of Education. 

CMVERSITT or C.^LirORSIA. 

This institution, now in active operation in the 
City of Oakland, was organized by .\ct nf the 
Legislature, approved March 23dj 1868. It em- 
braces five distinct colleges, viz.: A Collejre of Ag- 
riculture, of the Mechanic Arts, of Civil Engineer- 
ing, of Mines, and Letters. 

The management and control of the University 
are intrusted to a Board of Regents, composed of 
the following gentlemen : 

Resentf of the Unirfrtiiy. — Ex-officio : His Ex- 
cellency Henry H. Haight. Governor, and Presi- 
dent of the Board ; His Honor William Hi lot-n, 
Lieutenant - Governor : Hon. George H. Rosers, 
Speaker of the Assembly: Hon. and Rev. O. P. 
Fitzgerald. D. D.. Stale Superintendent of Public 
Instruction ; Hon. Charles F. Reed, President of 
the State Agricultural Society, and A. S. Hal!:die. 
Esq., President of the Mechanics' Institute of San 
Francisco. Apitoinifd .• Hon. Samnel Merriii. M. 
D.. Oakland : John T. Dovle. Esq.. Menlo Park ; 
Hon. Richard P. Hammond. San Francisco : Hon. 
John W. Dwindle. Oaklatid : Rev. Horatio Steb- 
bins, San Francisco ; Hon. Lawrence Archer. San 
Jose ; William Watt. Esq.. Grass Valley ; Hon. 
Samuel B. McKee, Oakland. * Honorary .■ Louis 
Sachs. San Francisco, Hon. Edward Tompkins, Oak- 
land. J. Mora Moss. Esq.. Temescal. S. F. Butter 
worth. Esq.. San Francisco. Hon. John .S. Hager. 
San Francis<H>. A. J. Bowie, M.D., San Francisco, 
William C. Ralston Esq., San Francisco, John B. 
Felton Esq.. Oakland. 

Officers of the Board of Re^entf. — His Excel- 
lency Henry H. Haight. President ; Andrew J. 
Moulder. Esq., Secretary ; William C. Ralston. 
E^., Treasurer. Office, Xo. 300 California Street, 
San Francisco. 

The University was inaugurated on the twentv- 
third of September. 1869. in the buildings formerly 
occupied bv the Collesre of California, in tJbe City 
of Oakland. The following are 

The Faculty and Officers .—Renry Durant. A.M., 
President ; John LeCoute, M.D., Professor of Phy- 
sics and Industrial Mechanics : Joseph Le Conte, 
M.D.. Professor of Geology. Natural History, and 
Botany ; Martin Kellosc. A.M.. Professor of Ancient 
Langtiages ; W. T. Welcker. Professor of Mathe- 
matics ; Paul Pioda, Professor of Modem Lan- 
guages; Ezra S. Carr. M.D.. Professor of Chemistry, 
Aericnlture. Agricultural Chemirfry and Horti- 
culture ; William Sainton, A.M.. Professor of Eng- 
lish Language and Literature, including Rhetoric 



•The term '• Honorarv "' 
cat«s onlj- the mode o:' • 
the e-T-i^-cio and Appoir 
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42 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



and Logic ; Robert E. Oj^ilby, Instructor of Draw- 
ing ; Frank Soul6, Jr., Assistant Professor of Ma- 
thematics; George Tait, Assistant Professor of 
Ancient Languages, and Master of the 5th Class. 

The session opened with about Kfry students, dis- 
tributed into four classes, and attached to the 
various coilpges. There are now, (April, 1871) 
two hundred and eighty students in the Univei-sity 
proper and Preparatory Department, and five hund- 
red students at large in the Mechanic Aits College, 
a branch of which is located in San Francisco. 

The University is now open to young ladies on 
equal terms, in every respect, with males. Quite a 
number of voung ladies have regularly entered. 

The whole course of instruction in each of the 
colleges, occupies four yeai-s. In each year there 
are three terms, ending, respectively, on the twenty- 
second of December, the sixtli of April, and nine- 
teenth of July, the last date being Commencement 
Day. 

Method of Instruction. — In all the different col- 
Ifgis, the method of instruction is by means of lec- 
tuies and the study of text books, accompanied in 
either case by rigid daily examinations. 

Optional Uon.rses. — Besides the students pursuing 
the regular courses, any resident of California, of 
approved moral character, has the right to enter 
himself in the University as a student at large, and 
receive tuition in any branch or bi-anches of instruc- 
tion at the time when the same are given in the reg- 
ular course. 

Expenses. — The University is absolutely free in 
the four higher classes. There is a small charge for 
tuition in the 5th class or Preparatory Department. 
There are no dormitories and no commons connected 
with the University except for the 5th class. Stu- 
dents can obtain board and lodging at reasonable 
rates in private families in the City of Oakland. 
By forming clubs tbey can much reduce the price 
of board. 

Equipment. — The University has been superbly 
equipped with apparatus of all kinds, of the most 
improved pattern. It has been selected wiih great 
care, and at a large expense, in the Atlantic States 
and Europe. Instruction in every branch of study, 
capable of illustration, is aided by instiuments and 
appliances of the most approved workmanship and 
latest device. 

The Site. — The University owns a beautiful tract 
of two hundred acres at Berkeley, situated four and 
a half miles north of Oakland. On this site, ar- 
rangements have been made to put up permanent and 
spacious buildings, capable of acoomodiitiug five 
hundred students, and provided with all tlie modern 
conveniences which experience can suggest. The 
whole cost is estimated at $250,000. Meantime 
the University is located in spacious buildings in tde 
City of Oakland. 

Private Educational Institutions. 

The total nnmber of colleges and private schools 
in this city is sixty-five; of which fifteen are under 
the control of the Catholic denomination. Many of 
these institutions are in a very flourishing condition; 
and the private schools will compare favorably with 
the public schools for thoroughness of instruction 
and excellence of discipline. 

From the report of the school census for 1870, it 
■will be seen that the number of children between six 
and fifteen years of age that have attended private 
schools for the year ending June 30th, 1870, was 
four thousand five hundred and eighty-two. The 
number attending public schools for tbe same period, 
eighteen thousand three hundred; an increase for 
the year ending June 30, 1870, of four thousand six 
hundred and sixty six. 

In addition to the attendance of the private schools, 
there are uhout eight hundred and fifty children 



under six years of age at the diflferent infant schools, 
and about nine hundred attending the higher private 
schools and colleges, the whole aggregating six 
thousand one hundred and sixty, an iuciea.se during 
the past year of two thousand three hundred and 
thirty-two. 

CITY COLLEGE. 

The City College was esfablisljed in 1859, by the 
Rev. Geo. Bnrrowes, D.D., in the basement of the 
old Calvary Church on Bush Street, from which it 
was removed to its present site, on tiie southeast 
corner of Stockton and Geary streets, in 18C1. It 
was incorporated under the name of University 
College in 1863, the valuable property previously 
acquired being then placed in the hands of a Board 
of eighteen Trustees, among whom may be specially 
named, the Hon. Thomas H. Selby. Mayor of San 
Francisco, Gov. H. H. Haight, Ex-mayor H. P. 
Coon, and James B. Roberts, Esq. Pursuing a lib- 
eial and enlightened policy, the Trustees have not 
only provided ample grounds and buildings, admira- 
bly situated in the most accessible part of the cily, 
and furnished with chemical and philosophical ap- 
paratus, but also secured extensive and valuable 
grounds for University purposes, situated in the 
suburbs of the city and known as the University 
Mound, on which they have erected and furnished 
a beautiful college edifice, in the French Gotliic 
style, now ready for the reception of students. 

The city department, popularly known as the City 
College, has already completed the eleventh year of 
its existence. During the first six years of its his- 
tory, it grew, under the presidency of the Rev. Dr. 
Burrowes, from small beginnings to the proportion 
of a college, with a number of students nearly 
ready for graduation, some of whom have since re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Since the 
resignation of Dr. Burrowes in 1865, on account of 
the temporary failure of his health, the college lias 
been under the direction of the Rev. P. V.Veeder, 
A.M., formerly tutor in Union College, Sche- 
nectady, N. Y. A Chemical Laboratory has also 
been erected, fronting on Stockton Street, and 
placed under the care of Prof. Thomas Price, M.D.. 
lu which the best facilities are afforded for obtaining 
a thorough practical knowledge of chemistry in all 
its applications to assaying, mining, pharmacy, and 
the manufacturing arts. 

The main college building is forty feet wide by 
one hnndied and thirty feet long, and contains five 
large and well-lighted and ventilated halls for 
study, capable of accommodating two hundi'ed stu- 
dents; a philosophical hall for lectures and experi- 
ments; Kiepert's mural maps of ancient geography, 
and a neat observatory rising from the roof fur the 
telescope. A corps of able professors and teachers 
conduct the instructions. The Classical Department 
is under the care of the Rev. Thomas Kirkland, a 
graduate of the University of Edinburgh. Instruc- 
iioii is given in mathematics by Prof. T. A. Robin- 
son; in English studies and mi'litary drill by Prof. 
J. K. P. Wilson; in physics and modern languages, 
by Prof. G. C. Arnold, of the University of Eilan- 
gen, and in French, by Henry Mouron, and draw- 
ing by Charles Proesch. The Preparatory and Pri- 
mary departments are amply provided with able and 
faitliful teachers, and are well attended. 

In the rear of the college buildings is a spacious 
playground provided with gymnastic apparatus, and 
sheds for shelter from rain. Here Military Instruc- 
tion is regularly ^iven, and attention paid to the 
physical culture of the pupils. In the new building 
on University Mound, a school will be opened early 
ill 1872, under the name of the University Mound 
Institute and Boarding School, by the Kev. 
George Burrowes, D.D., assisted by a corps of able 
instructors — young men and boys will here be fur- 
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43 



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SANTA CLARA COLLEGE, SAN' JOSE. 

This estnblishmeut is under the superintendence 
of the Fathers of the Societv of Jesiis, and is open 
to all who chooee to avail tliemselves of its advan- 
tages. It is situaled in the beauii+'nl valley of Santa 
Clara, so celebrated for the mildneiis and salubrity 
of its climate, and is about three miles distant trom 
San Jose and quite close to the San Jose and San 
Francisco Railroad. 

The College was founded in 1851. On the twenty- 
eighth of April, 1855, it was incorporated and em- 
powered to confer degrees and academical honors, 
and to exercise all the rights and privileges common 
to any other literary institution in the United States. 
It has a full staff of professors, and presents advan- 
tages for the mental, physical, and moral training of 
the students unsurpassed in California. It pos8e88es 
a complete philosophical apparatus, purposely made 
in Paris for Santa Clara College, and furnished with 
all necessary instruments for experiments in me- 
chanics, hydraulics, pneumatics, caloric, electricity, 
magnetism, optics, acoustics, and surveying. New 
and important additions are being made every year 
to keep pace with the progress of science. 

The cneniical laboratory is provided with a full 
assortment of chemicals, a very good set of furnaces, 
and all that is necessary for the different kinds of 
chemical analyses. The museum of natural history 
comprises a collection of mineralogy of more than 
one thousand five hundred specimens ; also three 
thousand specimens of shells and other natural curi- 
osities. As an accessory to the scientific department 
there is a photographic gallery, where the students 
who wish may learn photography in all its different 
branches. Practical lessons are given also on the 
electric telegraph. The college library numbers 
aboQt twenty-five hundred volumes. — (See adver- 
tisement, page xli.) 

MEDICAL COLLEGES. 

The clinical instruction of our colleges is unsur- 
passed by any other city of its population, owing to 
our ample hospital facilities, ana the evenness of 
the temperature of our climate, which affords 
opportunities of witnessing all the varied types 
or phases of diseases during any month of the year. 
The woi Id cannot boast of a climate so peculiarly 
adapted to the practical teaching of anatomy by dis- 
sections. 

There are two medical colleges in this City : the 
" Toland Medical College," and "The University 
of the Pacific." Both have a very efficient corps of 
professors — the most eminent physicians of the state. 
The attendance upon these colleges is not large ; yet 
from some cause, both are continued with good as- 
surances of success. 

There are peculiar advantages to students of med- 
icine in attending at least one, if not both courses 
of medical instruction in the locality where they 
intend to practice. The most prominent of these 
reasons is the experiences of the facultv in the dis- 
eases incident to the climate, and the observance of 
the peculiarities of these diseases under clinical in- 
struction. 

The ample hospital facilities afforded by the nu- 
merous public institutions for clinical instruction 
are unsurpassed by any other city of its population, 
and the even temperature of the climate permits the 
witnessing during any month of the year of all the 
different types or phases of diseases, and the prac- 
tical teaching of anatomy by dissections. 

The healthful and invigorating influence of our 
climate is an additional inducement to strangers to 
visit here to pursue the studies of medicine, and it is 
to be hoped that the physicians and surgeons of the 
Pacific Coast shall receive the degree of " Doctor of 



Medicine " from our own home ii. ititntions, which 
will guarantee the success of ou .nedical colleges. 

HEALD'S business COLLEGE. 

This institution, of which we gave a description 
last year, under the heading of the " California 
Business University," has made numerous imjjrove- 
ments since our last issue. The College has been 
moved from its old quarters at the corner of Bush 
and Montgomery streets, into its new and commod- 
ious rooms in College Building, 24 Post Street, be- 
tween Montgomery and Kearny. These rooms were 
constructed expressly for this school, and are said to 
be the finest and most expensively furnished rooms 
that are occupied by any business college in the 
country. The main school-room is one hundred and 
twenty feet long by about sixty feet in width, and is 
capable of accommodating over four hundred pupils. 
It has been fitted up witli new desks and business 
offices, and affords, when filled with students carry- 
ing on business among themselves, a very pleasing 
spectacle to the visitor. 

The design of this school, as its name implies, is 
to educate boys and young men with a special view 
to business. Its purpose is not to impirt a classical 
education, but a practical one. Instruction is given 
in all the branches of an ordinary English education, 
as well as in all the departments of bookkeeping 
and accounts, in Commercial Calculations, Spen- 
cerian Penmanship, Mercantile Law, Business Cor- 
respondence, Political Economy, Phonography, 
Telegraphy, Mechanical Drawing, Modern Lan- 
guages, etc. Nor does the instruction terminate 
with the theories and principles of the various 
branches taught, but extends to the actual practice 
of the same. Thus after learning the theory of ac- 
counts each student enters into business on liis own 
account, and puts into practice the principles he 
has learned. Vinally he enters the Jobbing, Im- 
porting, Real Estate, Insurance, Commission, Ex- 
press, Merchandising, and Banking Offices where 
ne learns business as it is transacted by the leading 
firms of this <'ity. Young men about to enter into 
business, or desiring to obtain good situations, find 
a course of study at this school of great assistance. 
Many of our businessmen send to the College lor 
clerks, bookkeepers, etc., thus giving its graduates 
situations at once. 

Heald's Business College is one of the Bryant and 
Strattcm Colleges which are located in all the princi- 
pal cities of the United States and Canada. Its schol- 
arships are good for tuition in any of the thirty-six 
colleges comprising the association. These schools 
are popularly known throughout the whole country, 
and a diploma from one of them is of equal value 
in any of our commercial cities. The Principals of 
the different schools in the Association meet in con- 
vention once every year, for the discussion of mat- 
ters pertaining to the interests of the different col- 
leges and the subject of commercial education. It 
is from this source that most of the improvements 
in this system of education have arisen during the 
past ten years. 

There are at present about two hundred and fifty 
students attending this school, including both day 
and evening classes. A visit to its rooms will explain 
the whole system and, doubtless, prove interesting 
to the visitor. 

Sabbath Schools. 

The organizations connected with the different 
churches are in a very prosperous condition. The 
aggregate enrollment will reach, it is estimated, 
nearly twenty thousand children, and the average 
attenclance twelve thousand. Of this number over 
one third are connected with the different Catholic 
organizations. Number of schools (1869) seventy- 
six. For the officers and data of the different schools 
see Churches, page 862. 



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44 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Benevolent and Social Societies. 

The acquisition of California by the Americnn 
Republic drew the attention of the world to this 
coast, and when, a shoi-t time subsequently, the an- 
nouncement was made of the marvelous fields found 
here, the bold, the enterprising and the adventur- 
ous of every country, race, religion and character, 
turned their steps hither, and the most cosmopolitan 
state of our Union was created. A people of such 
elements, widely separated from their native homes, 
friends .nnd associations, and governments, natur- 
ally gathered each to his class, order, or nation, and 
thus, at an early date, at the central port of the 
country, were formed some of those societies of 
grand benevolence which now form so distinguish- 
ing a feature of San Francisco's society. The very 
isolation, so far removed from the succour of rela- 
tives or the protection of their flag made these or- 
gauijations a necessity, and the geiierousand kindly 
spirit pervading the brave pioneer class with the 
abundant wealth the soil gave, rendered such as- 
sociations more than usually effective. Sickness and 
death are inevitable, and want, through accident, 
disease or improvidence, is the lot of some, how- 
ever bountiful the country, or genial tlie clime. 
To relieve suffering, assist the depressed, and bury 
the dead, have been the objects of the benevolent 
societies formed. The good deeds performed, and 
the constant care and watchfulness exercised, have 
given to San Francisco a world-wide reputation 
which is richly deserved. Aside from the organized 
societies, the popular benevolence is proven by the 
large sums often given for various objects at the 
call of charity or sympathy. Millions of dollars 
have been sent abroad when the good heart thought 
it was required to alleviate distress either among 
our own people or those of foreign lands, and never 
is relief called in vain for any individual case of 
destitution found in our midst. Fortunately cases 
of destitution are rare, and the provisions made by 
the law and by social organizations prevent any 
necessity for such distress as drives to importunate 
beggary. 

The large sums sent with such a willing hand to 
aid the sick and wounded of the Union armies dur- 
ing the war of the rebellion and which constituted 
such a noble support, will always be referred to, in 
this connection, with just pride. Recently a similar 
exhibition of benevolence and patriotic sympathy 
has been manifested on the part of the German an'd 
French citizens, each party having sent to their suf- 
fering countrymen nearly a quarter of a million dol- 
lars to aid the wounded of the battle field, assist the 
widows and orphans, and restore prosperity as far 
as it lay in their power. The grand piles of gold 
sent to the distant home will stand as lasting monu- 
ments of the golden state of the far West, and of 
the munificence of her people. Upwards of four 
hundred thousand dollars were collected and remit- 
ted in the brief space of six months, the free contri- 
butions of those classes of our citizens. 

As individuals, and the citizens en masse, have 
shown unequaled benevolence, so do they manifest 
the same disposition in their numerous organizations 
for social and charitable purposes. There are now 
seventy such organizations in the city and many of 
these are divided into lodges, groves, stamms, ver- 
eins, councils, posts, etc., making a total of one 
hundred and fifty-three, some having upwards of a 
thousand members. These are of every class of re- 
putable orders, and include those of every nation- 
ality that make up our population. From their 
nnmber and strength it would appear that nearly 
all the people of San Francisco were members of 
one or other of these orders. Their wealth is shewn 
in the possession of asylums, halls, hospitals, and 
schools, and the fine appearance members make on 
days of public celebration. 



As their name implies, the general object of the 
societies is benevolence, assisting unfortunate mem- 
bers, or their wives and children, when in sickness, 
burying them when dead, or, if of foreign birth, 
aiding their return to their native land. B'ut by no 
means do all limit their charities to their members. 
Several of these noble organizations are controlled 
by ladies whose care is for the orphan, the sick, and 
needy of all classes, and for the reclamation of the 
degraded of their own sex. Two asylums, generous 
homes for the tender orphans, are under their con- 
trol, and the excellent condition of the charge is 
evidence of the care bestowed. As early as 1851, 
the gentle Sisters of Charity, as ever devoting their 
lives to the holy cause of doing good to others, 
founded the Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum on 
Market street, and have continued itwith the ad- 
dition of schools and further extensions to the pre- 
sent. The Protestant Orphan AsvJum founded by 
prominent ladies of this city in 18.54, and on Laguna 
street near Market, have erected an elegant and 
commodious building, costing $60,000. At the asy- 
lum are two hundred and forty children unfortunate 
in their orphanage, but most fortunate in having 
such a noble home and parental care as the benevo- 
lent ladies have prepared for them. 

But the ladies charity has not ended here. The 
San Francisco Female "Hospital ; the Lying-in and 
Foundling Asylum ; the Magdalen Asylum ; the St. 
Mary's Ladies Society and others, attest the scope 
of their ministering care. The kind attention and 
the liberal expenditures by the ladies of San Fran- 
cisco, without distinction of nationality, race, or 
religion, is most honorable and praiseworthy, and 
is a subject of just pride to every citizen of San 
Francisco. 

The broad field of labor of the San Francisco 
Benevolent Association has been well filled, the 
members exercising a generous guardianship over 
the distress and wants of the City. No member- 
ship of other societies, nor any race or condition, 
forbids their action, but their compassion, like the 
cloak of charity, covers all. The Young Men's 
Christian Association occupies a noble position 
among the benevolent societies of San Francisco. 
Possessing a fine hall, with library, gymnasium, 
baths etc., it is well enabled to extend the Land of 
charity to all, to guide the erring and to give plea- 
sure and instruction to its members and proteges. 

The benevolent societies, composed of people of 
foreign birth, for the object of aiding their fellow- 
countrymen, are numerous and efiicient. The Eng- 
lish, Scotch, Welsh and Irish have their organizations 
divided into several classes and divisions, all with 
a large number of members. The British Benevo- 
lent Society exercises a supervision over tne wants 
of the subjects of that empire. Tne Germans, 
French, Italians, Russians, Portugese, Mexicans, 
Greeks, Scandinavians, Sclavonians, Hebrews and 
Chinese maintain organizations for the same pur- 
pose, showing a benevolence of the highest charac- 
ter, and most worthily occupying their appropriate 
field of usefulness. The German General Benevo- 
lent Society is a large and effective organization, 
having one thousand three hundred and forty-two 
members residing in the city, and four hundred and 
eighty in the interior. This generous society main- 
tains a hospital worthy of its high character, and 
which would be an honor to any city or state. 

The French Benevolent Society is an institution 
in keeping with the most noble of its class here, 
where the rank is of the highest grade. This 
society has one of the finest hospitals of the State, 
occupying a spacious block bounded by Fifth and 
Sixth streets, and south of Bryant street. This is a 
spacious edifice of brick, with pleasant gardens and 
ornamented grounds surrounding it, making it a 
most desirable home to the invalid. Other nation- 
alities maintain their hospitals and their homes, thus 



The Stockholders of the " PEOPLES" are the leading Bankers and Merchants on this Coast. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Clothing, etc. 



GENERAL REVIEW. 



45 



indicating the care taken of all, and the unbouuded 
benevolence of all classes and peoples who have 
made San Francisco their abiding place. 

The secret orders and societies are in great nnm- 
ber and of high standing. Masonic, Odd Fellows, 
Druids, Red Men, etc., are bodies of great wealth 
and usefulness, and fill an important place in the 
society of San Francisco. Several of these possess 
stately edifices, have extensive libraries, maintain 
banks, publish papers, and in various ways manifest 
their importance and perform their duties. Added 
to these are the Immigrant Aid Association, Prison 
Association, Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Animals, and numerous others, showing the 
broad field occupied. The extent and character of 
these compare favorably with the Social and Bene- 
volent societies of any other land, and are a matter 
of just pride to every citizen. Their maintenance 
usually depends upon voluntary contributions or 
exactions by the rules of membership. To some of 
these, efficient support could not be obtained in 
such a manner, and being of general benefit, aid 
from the State was obtained. Thus, in part, are the 
two Orphan Asylums, Foundling Hospital, Prison 
Commissions, Magdalen Asylum, Lying-in Hospital, 
and Ladies Protection and Relief Society, main- 
tained. Unusual aid was given by Mr. A. Hellman, 
the winner of the gx-eat prize of §100,000 given by 
the Mercantile Library Association, who generously 
devoted §5,01)0 to the various benevolent societies 
of San Francisco. This needed aid was most appro- 
priate, and an honor to the generous donor. 

YOUNG MF.NS' CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This association, founded in 1853, has for its ob 
ject the moral, mental, and social improvement of 
young men. It has, at its elegant building on Sut- 
ter Street, a fine reading room, library, gymnasium, 
lecture room, etc. It is also the design of the asso- 
ciation to provide, so far as possible, employment, a 
place of social comfort and resort, and a local point 
of pleasant attraction for young men arriving here 
without other acquaintance than those made here. 
The library contains aboutfour thousand volumes of 
well-selected and valuable works, embracing all 
branches of literature ; and the reading room is 
supplied with the best newspapers aud leading 
periodicals of the country. 

The regular meetings of the association are held 
on the third Monday evening of each month, when 
the usual business is transacted ; and when there is 
not a pressure of business, literary aud musical ex- 
ercises are held. 

The building of the association is on the north 
side of Sutter, oetween Kearny and Dupont streets ; 
is built of brick, with a massive and ornate stone 
front ; and is one hundred and twenty feet deep by 
fifty-four and a half feet wide. The basement and 
ground floors are occupied by stores, the second floor 
by the library, reading room, ladies' rooms, chess 
room, ante-rooms, and a hall for lectures, etc., 
which lia.s a capacity for seating seven hundred and 
fifty persons. Beneath the lecture room is a gym- 
nasium ; and in the third story are committee rooms, 
hall for meetings of the association, and apartments 
for offices, etc., for rent. The edifice is well arrang- 
ed with every convenience for comfort and for the 
purposes for which it was designed. 

SAN FRANCISCO BENF.VOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

Of all the benevolent institutions established in 
our city, none have been productive of more real, 
substantial and lasting good, in proportion to the 
means employed, than the San Francisco Benevo- 
lent Association. Although only six years old, 
filling up, as it has done, a most important hiatus 
in the benevolent institutions of the day, this asso- 
ciation has, in a quiet and unpretentious way, been 
productive of incalculable good. 



The number of persons assisted since its organ- 
ization is as follows : From April, 18tJ5, to April, 
1866, seven thousand six hundred and thirty two ; 
April, 1866, to April, 1867. seven thousand four 
hundred and five; April, 1867, to April, 1868, six 
thousand seven hundred and eighty two ; April, 

1868, to April, 1869, seven thousand one hundred 
and forty -eight ; April, 1869, to April, 1870, seven 
thousand and twenty-four; April,' 1870, to April, 
1871, eight thousand one hundred and sixty — mak- 
ing a total of forty-four thousand one hundred and 
fifty-one persons, at a cost of $1()-I.3i5.75. 

The particular business and objects of the Asso- 
ciation are the elevation of the physical aud moral 
condition of the indigent ; and so far as is compati- 
ble with these objects and the means at control, the 
relief of their immediate necessities. 

Officers. — Robert B. Swain, President : J. W. 
Stow, Treasurer ; I. S. Allen, Secretary. The rooms 
of the Association are at No. 10 Webb Street. 

CALIFORNIA LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGE. 

This institution designed to furnish labor for all 
applicants, irrespective of sex or nationality, was 
organized in the early part of April, 1867. No fees 
are exacted from those to whom employment is fur- 
nished, the expenses of the Exchange being de- 
frayed by a State appropriation of §500 per month, 
as per Act of the Legislature, approved April Ist, 
1870. From the commencement of operations, April 
27tb, 1868, until July Ist, 1870, employment had 
been supplied to twenty-four thousand five hundred 
and eighty-one persons, six thousand seven hun- 
dred and twenty-six of whom were females. The 
applicants were made up of all nationalities and 
callings, the greater portion consisting of farm la- 
borers and mechanics, though situations were se- 
cured for persons of every vocation, where practica- 
ble. The total amount expended for the support of 
the Labor Exchange, from April 27th, 1868, to July 
Ist, 1870, was $19,187.44. The office and head- 
quarters are at 819 Montgomery Street, where the 
very efficient Secretary of the establishment, A. 
Zeehandelaar, and Mrs A. L. P. Bidleman, matron 
of the female department, will be found in attend- 
ance. 

THE CALIFORNIA IMMIGRANT UNION. 

The immediate cause of the establishment of this 
society was the attempt of Mr. W. H. Martin, of 
Baltimore, to form in this city a branch of the In- 
ternational Union, of which he was General Agent. 
The commitee of merchants and others to whom the 
subject was referred, at a meeting of the Chamber 
of Commerce, reported in favor of a distinct organ- 
ization for California ; and accordingly in October, 

1869, the California Immigrant Union was formed 
for the promotion of immigration to California. 
This it was proposed to do by the publication and 
dissemination of information concerning the re- 
sources of the State, and the inducements offered to 
immigration, its vacant government and private 
lands, and the means and cost of coming here, and 
facilitating by every possible means the travel of 
immigrants, and their location and settlement upon 
their arrival, and the establishment of foreign agen- 
cies for the same purpose. At the session of the 
Legislature of 1869-70, a strong ettbrt was made to 
procure an appropriation of public monies to carry 
out these objects under the management of Com" 
missioners appointed by the Governor or otherwise, 
acting independently or in conjunction with the of- 
ficers of the Union. Differences of opinion as to 
the amount of such an appropriation, and the details 
of such a bill, prevented any legislation upon the 
subject and the effort failed. 

The merchants of San Francisco, though discour- 
aged, were so thoroughly impressed with the im- 
portance of the movement, tliat in April, 1870, they 
subscribed the funds necessary for the support of 



JONBS, FDTiIiMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Ijaces and Bmbroideries. 



TEKBA SAKTA we know to be an infallible Blood Purifier. 



46 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



the Union, though its operations were necessarily 
more restricted than was originally contemplated. 
Since then it has heen actively enu;aged in its work, 
and a large utnoiuit of printed information relative 
to the climate and resources of California has been 
circulnted throughout the Eastern States, Canada, 
Australia, England and Europe, and supplied in 
answer to a very extensive correspondence request- 
ing such information. Immigrants upon their arri- 
val, on application at the ottice of the Union, are 
supplied with such information as they desire con- 
cerning the government lands, private lands, etc., 
and routes and expense of travel, and otherwise fa- 
cilitated in iheir settlement. Correspondence is 
replied to and information supplied gratuitousljr lo 
those abroad who desire to be iiiformed concerning 
the State, and every legitimate effort made to in- 
duce those coming westward to select California as 
their future home and assist in the development of 
its resources. No fee or charge whatever is made 
for services rendered. The ottice of the Union is at 
No. 316 California Street. Its officers are : C. T. 
Hopkins, President ; Charles S. Capp, First Vice- 
President and Manager ; W. H. Martin, Secretary 
and General Agent. 

Hospitals. 
In 80 far as number and size are concerned, the 
hospitals of San Francisco will compare favorably 
with other cities of its extent and population. Pri- 
vate institutions abound. The Germans and French 
have for years had tine hospital buildings, the one 
belonging to the latter having recently received ex- 
tensive additions. The Sisters of Mercy own a large 
structure on Rincon Hill ; and the Italians have 
within a year or two completed a commodious hos- 
pital four miles from the business part of the city. 
The special purpose of these hospitals is to provide 
for the necessities of certain classes of our popula- 
tion, but all who desire to avail themselves of their 
advantages are adtnitted. The buildings are not 
only commodious but are well adapted for the pur- 
poses designed. It is to be regretted that the same 
remark cannot be made of the one belonging to the 
city. Several years since, authority was given 
the Supervisors to cause to be erected a hospital 
building, suitable to the requirements of our rap- 
idly glowing city, and $250,UU0 were appropriated 
for the purpose. For some reason or other, no 
steps, beyond procuring plans, toward the con- 
struction of this much needed building have yet been 
laken. Tlie buildings now in use are altogether 
inadequate for their purposes. The principal one 
was consiructed for a school house and converted 
into a hospital in 1857. Some years later, a large 
wooden building — little better than a barn, was put 
up on the same lot. As the city grew and the num- 
ber of " indigent sick" increased, various means 
were adopted to supply immediate necessities. In 
1867 a large Almshouse was commenced near Lake 
Honda. The removal of the superannuated and 
permanently disabled to this place, from the City 
and County Hospital, where they had been accumu- 
lating for years, relieved the latter of a serious in- 
convenience and increased its capacity for those 
actually sick. The Hospital, however, was soon 
filled to overflowing again, and so great had this 
overcrowding become at the beginning of 1870, that 
it called forth a remonstrance from the San Fran- 
cisco Medical Society, which appointed a committee 
to institute suitable investigations. This committee 
fonnd that the hospital contained 408 beds scarcely 
one of which was vacant ; that the average space 
to each bed was 490 cubic feet, some having as low 
as 260 cubic feet and none having so much as a thou- 
sand, while in ail properly constructed hospitalsof the 
present day, not less than 1200 cubic feet are allowed 



to each patient. In consequence of this report, 
an additional building was erected upon the 
hospital lot, thus relieving, in large part the ever- 
crowding, but greatly curtailing the grounds. As 
this was but a temporary measure, it is probable 
that work upon the new hospital will be commenced 
within the year. The building, as designed, will 
be three stories and an attic high, and is to measure 
four hundred and forty-five feet front, including two 
front wings. It is to "have two rear wings each one 
hundred and twenty feet long, and is so arranged 
that other wings may be added at any time if re- 
quired. 

The United States Marine Hospital at Rincon 
Point, is the largest structure of the kind on the 
Pacific Coast, and is capable of accomodating 
about eight hundred patients, though it rarely had 
over one hundred inmates. When built, in 1^53, it 
was far out of town, but now the city has so ex- 
tended around it aa to render its site" exceedingly 
desirable for commercial purposes. Extensive grad- 
ing of the surrounding property has left the build- 
ing upon a high embankment, and somewhat im- 
paired its foundation, though it is believed that any 
further injury to the building may be prevented by 
proper care. The hospital has been vacant since 
the severe earthquake of 1868, the patients now 
being accomodated in the buildings formerly used 
as the State Deaf and Dumb Asylum. It is uncer- 
tain what disposition will be made of the structure 
on Rincon Hill, or what provision will be made for 
the patients in the future. 

Besides the institutions enumerated above, there 
are several smaller ones which have been estab- 
lished through the munificence of our citizens, and 
whose names indicate their special uses ; these are 
the State Woman's Hospital, the San Francisco 
Woman's Hospital, the Foundling and Lying-in 
Asylum, etc., etc. 

At a rough estimate, it may be stated that our 
city hospitals, public and private, (exclusive of the 
old Marine Hospital building, now vacant) can ac- 
commodate from thirteen hundred to fourteen hun- 
dred patients, and that the average number which 
they actually contain does not vary much from one 
thousand. 

In the fall of 186.5 was created the San Francisco 
Health Office ; before this time no mortuary records 
had been preserved by the city. In ]8'7II, a bill 
passed the Legislature organizing a city Board of 
Health, and giving it control of tbe Health Office 
and the appointments in all the public charitable 
institutions of the city and county. From a small 
beginning, the Health Department has grown into a 
very important branch of the city government. It 
controls appointments involving an expense to the 
city of several thousand dollars a montli, and has a 
general oversight of all sanitary affair's. If its oper- 
ations are conducted with wisdom, foresight and 
intelligence, this department is calculated to be of 
great benefit to tbe city. 

Associations— Protective, Literaryt Etc. 

For a description of the different associations, the 
reader is referred to the Appendix, pages 892-900, in 
which will be found the officers and operations of 
each during the past year. The progress made by 
many of these associations reflects credit upon the 
members thereof, and is worthy of the liberality bo 
generously extended in their support. 

liibraries. 

It may be set down as a fixed fact that there is no 
surer indication of the progression and prosperity of 
a community than the number and condition of its 
libraries. In this department, San Francisco may 
safely challenge competition with any city of its 



A sound basis for Underwritins— the $500,000 Assets of the PEOPIiES. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Yankee Notions, 



GENERAL REVIEW. 



61 



iron railing and bedsteads, of water cloBet8._ of 
pumps, of gun locks, of saws, wire rope, lead pipe, 
shot, sheet lead, gold leaf, refined gold and silver, 
etc. 

The iron foundries are the most prominent. Of 
these are the Union, Miners, Fulton, Vulcan, ^tna, 
Pacific, Golden State, Phoenix, Pioneer. Lincoln, 
Portland, California, Atlas, Eureka, San Francisco. 
Columbia, the Risdon Boiler Works and the Pacific 
Rolling Mill Co. These, although not working 
during the past year with the energy and demand of 
business that caused their erection, still have been 
more or less employed and aggregnting a vast 
amount of work. The total value of iron manu- 
factures has exceeded three million dollars with 
cost of material and labor impossible to estimate. 
Locomotives, steamboat machinery, engines of all 
classes, new inventions, building material and ar- 
chitectural ornaments, mining and quartz crushing 
machinery have been the chief products of the 
foundries. Many inventions, of which the patent 
right is held in the East, gives Eastern foundries 
great advantage and excluding those of San Fran- 
cisco from their work; but of mining inventions and 
mining machinery, this city has the lead. The 
mining maihinery, including hoisting works, en- 
gines, batteries, stamps, pans, etc. , made in San 
Francisco, have proven superior to that of Eastern 
or Foreign manufacture and have excluded impor- 
tation. 

The gold, silver, lead and copper working estab- 
lishments are growing into importance, but bear no 
comparison to the interest of the matter. The Pacific 
Coast being the great producer of those metals it 
should reap the rewards for preparing them for the 
markets of the world. There are some twenty 
smelting, assaying and refining works, besides thir- 
teen manufactories of ware of the precious metals. 
But these, with perhaps a single exception, are, 
through lack of capital, science and other causes, 
unequal to the necessities, and large shipments of 
most valuable ores are constantly made to the At- 
lantic States and to England for reduction. There 
is a bright future for this interest, and the grand 
fortunes with nobility of rank gained in Wales may 
be repeated here. The single complete establish- 
ment 18 the Selby Metallurgical Works, which sur- 
passes any other in America, but still comes far 
short of that perfection the mineral productions of 
the country demand. In the year 1870, the product 
of this establishment was $1,500,000, and its in- 
crease of capacity will enable it to add a million to 
its product the present year. Included in the pro- 
duet of the last year was some $800,000 of gold and 
silver extracted from the ores and metals reduced. 
From four to five hundred tons of lead are shipped 
monthly to the East, and about one hundred tons per 
month are used to supply the home demand. These 
works were established at a cost of about $450,000 
and employ one hundred and twenty men constant- 
ly. The business is susceptible of indefinite exten- 
sion and the enterprising proprietors are endeavor- 
ing to comply with the demand. The annual con- 
sumption of lead in the United States is about 
thirty-two thousand tons, of which sixteen thous- 
and tons are provided by the mines of Illinois, 
Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri, and other sections East, 
and seven thousand from the lead works of San 
Francisco. The balance is imported, but as the ar- 
gentiferous lead regions of California, Arizona, 
Nevada and Utah are developed, and railroads are 
provided for cheap transportation, the home demand 
will be supplied by home production. The Selby 
Smelting Works promise to so increase their capa- 
city as within five years to entirely supply the wants 
of the country. 

The shot tower and lead pipe manufactory on the 
southeast corner of Howard and First streets, are 
nnder the same management as the smelting works. 



A want, formerly felt to a great extent, has been 
supplied by these works, and importations of pipe, 
shot and sheet lead have ceased. The product of 
1870 was four hundred tons of shot, four hundred 
tons of pipe, three hundred and fifty tons of sheet 
lead, and one hundred tons of other products. Some 
of these manufactures are shipped to the Eastern 
States. 

Of gold and silver ware manufactures, there are 
thirteen different establishments, with an aggreerate 
capital of $200,000, and employing one hundred 
men. The products of these amount in value to 
about $400,000 annually, and some of their exti-aor 
dinary pieces of work have been described iu pre- 
vious numbers of the Directory. 

The San Francisco Assaying and Refining Works, 
devoted to the purpose of assaying and refining 
gold and silver bullion, are located on Brannan 
Street, near Seventh, and occupy a brick strnciure 
one story high, one hundred and thirty feet long, 
and sixty feet wide. Tiiis establishment, for the 
purpose designed, is one of tbe most extensive aside 
from the assay offices of the United States, and is 
fitted up witb'all the necessary apparatus for the as- 
say ingand refining of gold and silver in large qnan- 
tities. 

No section of the world offers better facilities for 
those classes of manufactures that bear a connec- 
tion with metallurgy. In these are coloring matter, 
dyes, acids, paints, medicines, and every species and 
form of metals used in the arts. Minerals and 
metals of every description abound in great profu- 
sion, and are at hand to aid the metallurgist, or for 
him to operate upon in the production of whatevei' 
he may desire. The metailurgical works of San 
Francisco are already quite extensive. About one- 
half, or $20,000,000 of the gold and silver product of 
the Pacific Coast is refined in San Francisco, the 
remainder being sold and sent abroad as it comes 
from the mills, and assay offices of the interior. 
Nitric and sulphuric acid are made in large quanti- 
ties, sufficient for all demands. There remains a 
great necessity for a manufactory of lead paints, of 
which millions of pounds are used annually, all 
being imported, while every material for its produc- 
tion is obtained here and sent abroad for a market. 

The wood manufactures of San Francisco are of 
great importance. That which is built mostly of 
that material and elaborate ornamentation is the 
chosen style both indoors and out. The grand for- 
ests of this Coast of soft and hard woods for com- 
mon and fancy work, enables the taste to be indulged 
in to the greatest extent. The establishments for 
working wood comprise saw mills, sash and door 
factories, box, furniture, pianos, billiard tables, coach 
and car, cooperage, wooden ware, and other fac- 
tories, numbering in all one hundred and twenty-two, 
and producing nearly $4,000,000 worth annually. 

The woolen manufactures are among the mosi 
prominent of the city and State; but from the fai-l 
that the great bulk of the woolen goods used are iin- 
ported,is evidence that the field is not fully occupied. 
Three woolen mills have been constructed in thii< 
city: the Pioneer, Mission and Pacific, the two lat- 
ter having consolidated with the intention of re 
building and extending operations. 

So favorable is California pasturage and climate 
to the rearing of sheep, that men of foresight, 
energy, and intelligent enteiprise have engaged iu 
that branch of husbandry, and large fortunes hav.- 
been the reward. Flocks are numbered by thon 
sands and tens of thousands, showing the most up 
proved breeds and the finest fleece. With snch .i 
product, and with every natural facility formannfaci- 
nring, the impolicy of sending the wool abroad to l>e 
carded, spun, and woven, adding the freight of many 
thousands of miles, the profits claimed by many 
hands, and large import duties, was manifest, and 
its manufacture at home was urged by every reason 



JONES, FULIjMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Straw Hats and Trimmings. 



BSDIN GTON, HOSTETTEB & CO., Importers of Druseists' Glassware, ota 



62 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



of political econoitiy, but bitterly opposed by persons 
engaged in exporiinif wool and importing tbe man- 
afat:tnred goods. Woolen mills have been success- 
fully established, but have not entirely triumphed 
over tbe opposition. This triumph will not have 
been attained until the manufactories are established 
thittn^iture invites by the abundant power atibrded, 
and our wool is exported in perfected fabrics. Tbe 
product of tbe past year amounted to 20,000,000 
pounds, valued at 14,000,000, Of tbe amount grown, 
4,000,000 pounds were reserved for the manufactories 
of California, and the balance exported to tbe E^ist. 
and foreign countries in the raw state. A proof of 
the capacity of the country to manufacture for ex- 
port is shown in the large order of the principal 
retail merchant of New York for woolen goods, 
amounting to upwards of $300,000. 

A large capital is required in establishing a wool- 
en mill at tbe present day. The preparing of wool 
by hand, for home spinning and weaving, was su- 
perceded by the cardintr machine, and to this is now 
added entire manufacture. Where wool is washed, 
there it is woven, fulled and colored, and prepared 
for the market. Those already established in Cali- 
fornia are tiie Pioneer, Mission and Pjicilic Consoli- 
dated, at San Francisco; Capitol, at Sacramento; 
Marysville.at Marysville; Merced Kails, in Merced 
County; San Jos6 and Los Gatos, in Santa Clara 
County, and the Stockton Mill at Stockton. Their 
products are blankets, ruga, buggy robes, shawls, 
flannels, cassimeres, cloths, tweeds, and military 
cloths, generally of the highest order of manufac- 
ture. 

No other clothing goods than woolen can be 
enumerated in the list of California manufactures. 
A cotton mill was established at Clinton, Alameda 
County, known as the Oakland Mill, in 186(3, de- 
pending for its raw cotton on the plantations under- 
taken in Mexico. The opposition of importers, with 
the expense and uncertainty of supply, etfecied tbe 
failure of the enterprise. The story of the mill, 
and its projectors, the Ritcher Brothers, will stand 
as a monument in the history of California manu- 
facturing when the cotton product will constitute 
one of the greatest staples of the country, and its 
manufacture into the endless variety of articles of 
use and commerce becomes one of the great indus- 
tries. 

That cotton can be successfully grown in Califor- 
nia has been demonstrated. Col. J. M. Strong, an 
experienced cotton grower of Alabatna, has for 
several years grown fields in Merced County of 
tbiit most useful plant, producing attiie rate of one 
and a half bales per acre, and of a very fine quality. 
Tbe whole experiments have proven the adapta- 
bility of California to the production of cotton at a 
greater profit than in other sections of the Union, 
and in unlimited quantities. The rise in this manu- 
tacture will accompany tbe production of tbe fibre, 
and in it is a store of great eventual prosperity. 

Tbe cotton mill referred to was forced by circum- 
stances to change its plans, and the manufacture of 
burlap succeeded. This class of goods is used iu 
making grain and wool sacks. The custom of the 
country in storing and siiipping grain in sacks, which 
has proven the best system, creates an enormous de- 
maud for burlap, and made tbe manufacture profit- 
able. The amount expended annually in California 
for grain sacks will approximate two million dollars, 
the greater portion being imported from Dundee, 
Scotland. The Oakland mill has lately been in- 
creased to a capacity of 5,000 sacks per day, still not 
one-tenth tbe number required. 

The sugar refineries of San Francisco are pro- 
perly classed among the important manufactories. 
Of these, there are four grand and extensive estab- 
ments, supplied with the most complete machinery, 
and prepared to do work equal to any of their class 
in the world. Their aggregate capacity is 60,000,000 



pounds per annum, but usually turn out from 30,- 
000,000 to 40,000,000. All the s'ugar of the Pacific 
Coast is from these refineries, and their trade is ex- 
tending into the newly opened countries east- 
ward. 

Tbe past year has witnessed an important ad- 
vance in silk manufacture. In this can be seen one of 
the great industries of the future. Millions of people 
in various parts of the world derive their subsistence, 
and their countries their wealth and power, from 
the tiny thread of the silkworm. Our own fair 
State has proven herself, in this as well as many 
other things, of superior capacity to most oilier parts 
of the world. The mulberry tree grows luxuriantly, 
the delicate spinners are healthy and vigorous, and 
the silk of the very best quality. The product may 
be extended indefinitely, and most profitably even 
for export. It remains, then, for intelligent enter- 
prise to perfect the scheme by establishing manu- 
factories. Two glorious flasfs, one for the State 
Capitol and the other for Washington, have been 
made, with coloring and all complete, as samples of 
capacity. Their bright colors and fine texture are 
proof that the artizans are here to aid capital in 
whatever advances it may make. The California 
Silk Manufacturing Company has been organized 
and a factory built in South San Francisco, and the 
further progress that the great opportunity offers is 
looked for. The building for the factory is a hand- 
some and spacious structure, two stories iu bight, 
and fifty by one hundred and twenty-five feet iu 
dimensions. 

The manufacture of boots, shoes and slippers has 
recently assumed an important position among the 
industries of California. Several millions of dollars 
are annually expended for covering the pedal ex- 
tremities, the principal portion of which going to 
the Eastern States and Europe. The home manu- 
facture, however, is increasing, rendering the State 
independent of importation, and adding to the gene- 
ral wealth. The adaptability of the Chinese to 
that class of manufacture, and tbe availability of 
that species of labor, give such advantages that at 
no distant day the production will bo exceed the 
consumption within the State that boots and shoes 
will become a portion of San Francisco's exports. 

Of other species of clothing the importation far 
exceeds the home product. The wool is here growu 
and woven, but the cloth is sent to distant mauiifac- 
turing establishments to be returned for use. The 
bad economy of such a course is evident, and in- 
vites the manufacturer to occupy tbe field. Tbe 
treasure sent abroad for clothing reaches annually 
to the enormous sum of $22,000,000. while, witL 
all our tailor shops and other factories connected 
with furnishing goods, we manufacture less than 
one-fifth of that amount. The various clothing, hat, 
shirt, necktie, glove, and other factories of that class, 
now give employment to about two thousand per- 
sons, while the imports show that ten or twelve 
thousand could be profitably engaged. Thus a sin- 
gle branch of very necessary and simple manufac- 
ture, fully developed, could add to our population 
such a number of producing people as would con- 
stitute a respectable city by itself. The labor field 
is by no means fully occupied while such instances 
can be pointed out. 

Numerous oil works have recently been estab- 
lished, aiding greatly in developing other industries. 
The Linseed Oil Works of San Francisco constitute 
all of that class in the State. These have a c ipacity 
to consume 2,500 tons of flaxseed annually, and 
manufacture castor and other vegetable oils. The 
castor bean is grown extensively in Yuba ("ounty, 
and a mill has been constructed for making the 
oil. Sunflower and other seeds, some grnwn in 
the country and others imported, are also used for 
making oil, and the business being profitable pro- 
misee a large increase. 



PEOPLES INSUBANCE COMPANY. Cash AssAta Half a Million DoUari. 



C. p. VAN SCHAAOK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Tobacco and Cigar». 



GENERAL REVIEW, 



53 



The manufacture of acid?, ink, powder, shoe- 
blacking, axle-grease, and articles of that class, is 
improviiisr, and although importations of most varie- 
ties continue, the demand promises soon to be sup- 
jtlied by the home product. For ink alone some 
$30, 000 "are expended annually for the supply of the 
PaciHc Coast, mostly Koi'ig t*^ the great nmuufacro- 
ries of the East. Thei e are now two establishments 
in San Francisco endeavoring to supply the want 
and stop further importation. 

The manufacturing and refining of spirituous and 
malt liquors engage a large capital, and constitute 
an enormous business. There are three distilleries 
which produce $2,000,000 worth of alcohol and al- 
coholic liquors annuiiUy. Besides these, are four 
refineries and four factories of cordials, bitters, etc. 
Twenty -eight breweries furnibb one hundred and 
twenty thousand barrels of beer annually to the 
thirsty people of the city, for which eighteen mil- 
lion pounds of barley are used. Throughout the 
State. breweries are numerous, and in all the gr.ipe- 
growing districts are manufacturers of wine and 
brandy. The climate and soil of California being 
most favorable for the growth of the grape, it may 
be considered one of our most important resources, 
and at some day, when civilization and its appetites 
have e.xtended throughout the countries bordering 
the Pacific, will become one of the chief articles of 
export. 

The manufacture of flonr and its many producfs 
figures largely in our statistics of home industry. In 
the city are six flour mills, produciii}^ upwards of 
three hundred thousand barrels of tiour annnally. 
Throughout the State are one hundred and fifty- 
eight flour mills, with a capacit}' of producing 
16,727 barrels of flour daily. The market for this 
is found in our own and neighboring States and 
Territories, the islands of the Pacific, and a large 
and increasing demand in the Eastern States and 
Europe. 

Cigar manufacture is rapidly increasing in ex- 
tent and importance and the reputation the cigar 
makers of San Francisco have obtained has brought 
iheni considerable business from the East. There 
are in this city upwards of one hundred cigar facto- 
ries which turn out aninially goods to the value of 
$2,5U'l,0u0. This work is done mostly by Chinese, 
whose skill, and faithfuinessof labor have done more 
to build up the business than cheap rates of labor. 

The type foundries, of which there are three, have 
so increased their capacity as to be able to supply 
all the demands of the coast, and the islnnds and 
countries of the Pacific. As our civilization and 
language spread over the ancient countries of Asia, 
recivilizing the oldest of nations, the type maker 
will play a prominent part in the course. The 
mines of our section give the type founders in this 
city an advantage they can ever maintain. From 
the Montezuma mine of Humboldt county, Nevada, 
an excellent type metal is obtained, which with but 
the siuiplest preparation is ready to be cast into let- 
ter. 

The making of wire rope and cordage is exten- 
sively carried on by three different establishments, 
producing of wire rope $100,000 worth, and of hemp 
rope $500,000. 

For the manufacture of blank books, there are 
seven establishments, giving employment to nearly 
two hundred persons, and producing goods to the 
value of $-'35,000 per annum. 

Such is a brief review of the piincipal manufac- 
tures of San Francisco, already important, con- 
stantly extending and with inducements to further 
extension until it becomes one of the leading manu- 
facturing cities of the Union. Coal, the thing neces- 
sary for the propulsion of machinery in this city, is 
found in abundance near at hand, and in many lo- 
calities along the northern coast. It is the favorite 
element of power, and notwithstanding the many 



flue mill streams throuf^hout the State, four-fifths of 
all the manufactures of California are establibhed in 
San Francisco where all machinei^ is propelled by 
steam. 

The manufactories of the State are far less in im- 
portance than the interest demands or the opportu 
nity offers. In no country of the world is a greater 
or more convenient water power, nor is there a 
country of greater consumers. Agriculture, the 
mines, and forests supply the raw material in infin- 
ite variety, and in turn demand every manufacture. 
These features should attract the attention of the 
enterprise and capital of the world. California is 
the empire State of the Pacific and with the mineral 
regions constitutes one of the most independent, self- 
sustaining sections of the globe. 

It is a country of hills and valleys, mountains and 
plains, with a, fertile soil, majestic forests, rich 
mines of every mineral, and a climate devoid of 
tempests, floods and frosts. No storms of destruc- 
tive force, nor lightning of uncontrollable power, 
threaten danger; the freshets are marked and reg- 
ular, from wTiich the slightest precaution gives se- 
curity, and here is no winter's cold to dog the 
streams with ice or stop the moving machinery. 
The lofty Sierra gathers its reservoir of snow and 
sends it down in pereimial stre.ims, affording a con- 
tinuous power sufficient to propel all the machinery 
of the world. The very abundance of these streams 
and the infinite power tney would give, have caused 
tbem to be neglected. From north to south, along 
the western slope of the Sierra Nevada, for full five 
hundred miles, these torrents rush from mountaini* 
clothed with mighty forests and stored with the 
richest mines, and debouche upon one of the I'l.jBt, 
magnificent and fertile valleys of the world. Many 
of these rivers, soon after entering the valley, be- 
come navigable streams, showing the immense vol- 
ume of water that comes tumbling down from the 
mountain heights. All the manufacturing machinery, 
which has made Rochester the great city it is, could 
be propelled by the Feather river at Oroville; the 
American at Folsom would turn all the spindles and 
wheels of Lowell and Lawience; the Tuolumne 
would answer for the James at Richmond; and the 
Merced, Fresno, Kern and countless others of our 
own State, at eligible and most convenient sites, 
could give motion to all the machinery of the Union. 

South of the great valleys, the rivers are not so 
numerous, nor do they otter such facilities for man- 
ufacture; but there iire several flowing from the 
mountains of San Gabriel and San Bernardino, of 
rapid fall and large volume, Avhich would give great 
power were they properly applied. 

Flowing into the ocean, from the northern coast 
mountains, are a large number of noble mill streams 
many of which are already appropriated to manu- 
factiiring purposes, in cuttnig up into merchantable 
lumber the forests of redwood which cover the sea 
ward slope of the range. The principal of these are 
the Russian, Walhalla, Garcia, Novarra. Albion, 
Big River, Noyo, Matoli, Eel, Mad River, Red- 
wood, Klamatli and Smith rivers, with their 
branches and other smaller streams. The Klamath 
is one of the great rivers of the Pacific coast, and 
pours an immense and impetuous torrent into the 
sea; but by cause of its deep canons and its winter 
floods, sometimes raising it ninety feet above low 
water, it is least available for the purposes of tnrning 
machinery. The others, however, possess great value 
and furnish the sites ready at hand for the enter- 
prise of the manufacturer. 

Such are the facilities throughout California for 
obtaining the most effective and inexpensive of p"W 
ers. Reference has been made only to those points 
where the streams afford power contiguous to »he 
great valleys or channels ot commerce, and to the 
higher branches of manufacture. Entering the moon- 
tains, the infinity of power the many streams affoid, 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO.. 116 Sanaom Street, Combs and Brushes. 



KEDINQTON'S TLAVOBING EXTRACTS, Articles of real merit and worth their valua. 



54 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



will impress the beholder with amazement. This 
i!> greatly atigmeuted, or brought to convenient ap- 
plication, by the vast number of canals constructed 
to curry water to wash the placers. Thousands of 
miles of these canals have been made, and the wa- 
ter taken to the high ridges where it can be applied 
to manufacturing purposes safely, economically, and 
ettectivelv. When it is seen what nooks, and cor- 
ners and" out-of-the-way places are sought in other 
countries, where water power can be obtained, a 
fhiiit idea may be had of the great importance of 
the privileges so complete and so abundant in Cali- 
fornia. 

Ink Manufacture.— Messrs. Knowlton & Co., 
(Pacific Ink Factory) are now entraged in the 
niannfacture of every description of writing inks, 
stenoil and markini; inks, all grades of mucilage, 
and liquid blueing for laundry use. These writing 
inks are nsed in the public schools of this city, and 
a large number of the colleges and private schools 
on this coast, and at the last State Fair at Sacra- 
mento, and the Mechanics' Institute Pair in this 
citv, they received the highest premiums. Amount 
of 'capital, $10,00(1. Men employed, 6. Sales in 
1870. $46,000. 

The California Ink Factory (W. Faulkner agent, 
■105 Sansora Street) is also manufacturing every 
variety of writing inks, mucilage, liquid blueing, 
sealing wax, etc., of a superior quality. 

Gi-Ass Making.— The consumption of glass on 
the Pacific Coast is enormous, probably exceeding, 
in proportion to population, any other section of 
ihe.dobe. When it is known that all the material 
use'ci' in the composition of this beautiful product is 
found in great abundance close at hand, it may be 
considered strange that all the glass used is not man- 
ufactured here. The principal factory of the State 
is the San Francisco Glass Works of Messrs. New- 
man and Duval, South Beach, near the foot of Fourth 
Street, San Francisco. Here a large establishment 
has been erected, during the past season, for the 
manufacture of the most common articles of glass 
used on this coast — such as demijohns, carboys, 
wine, pickle, spice, soda, and medicine bottles, 
window glass, etc. The building is constructed of 
wood and iron, on a brick basement, and has a front 
of seventy-eight feet bv a depth of sixty-seven, and 
cost about $20,000. The arrangements are com- 
plete in every respect, and the factory is capable of 
turning out about $350 worth per day, giving em- 
ployment to about forty workmen. 

The Pacific Glass Works are situated near the 
Potrero, and are engaged in the profitable business 
of manufacturing this fragile material. 

Stovks. — Messrs. Savage & Son, 1 45 Beale Street, 
have invented and are now manufacturing a new 
cooking stove, called the " Empire Range." This 
is the only stove made on this coast. The castings 
used are of a superior quality, being very heavy 
and of an extremely smooth snrface. The interior 
arrangement and construction of this range, to- 
gether with the fact that it is an article of home 
production, will undoubtedly make it a general 
favorite with housekeepers. 

Nevada Metallurgical Works. The success- 
ful working of ores, or reliable information respect- 
ing their value and component parts is a matter of 
the utmost importance to the mining interest, and 
the establishment of metallurgical works in this city, 
where such returns can be made, will constitute one 
of the most prominent and valuable of her indus- 
tries. Such an establishment, planted with the ex- 
pectation of growth from intrinsic merit, is that of 
Messrs Riotte and Luckhardt, called the Nevada 
Metallurgical Works, at the Golden Gate Foundry 
on First Street, which has commenced operations 



during the past year. These eentlemen are gradu- 
ates of the best of German Metallurgical Universities, 
and have had the experience of many years in the 
mines of California and Nevada. 

The Diamond Drill. — One of the most expens- 
ive of mining and engineering operations is that of 
boring the deep working and drain tunnels of the 
placers; or for the passage of the railroad through 
the mountains. Whoever aids in this work is a public 
benefactor. Many of the mines of California have 
been opened by bed rock tunnels at the expense 
of the fortunes of the projectors, and through 
years of the severest toil. The Diamond Drill has 
come to the relief of labor as well as capital, a tireless 
machine performing the work of many men, and 
by its expedition enabling the opening of mines in a 
short time which otherwise would remain nntonch- 
ed; as the long years, if not the expense, required 
by hand labor, would deter capitalists from the 
attempt. The diamond drill tunnelling machine of the 
patent of Severance, Holt & Co., made at the Fulton 
Foundry of this city, consists of a frame of iron resting 
on four car wheels. Two small cylinders working 
by steam or compressed air, give motion to the drills, 
of which there are four. These are attached by ad- 
justible arras and so held that they may be pointed 
in every direction. These drills consist of long iron 
cylinders, or gas pipe, on the end of which is at- 
tached the diamond holder. By means of a hose 
connected with the opposite end of the pipe, a stream 
of water may be forced through it, thus constantly 
keeping the hole clear of the borings or grit made in 
drilling. The drills are rapidly revolved by means 
of cog wheel gearing, and moved forward by auto- 
matic motion as they cut away the rock. A core is 
left within the pipe, and broken off by a slight blow 
and extracted when the hole is completed. The 
value of such a machine to California is beyond es- 
timate, as such an appliance is required in opening 
the ancient river channels of the Sierra Nevada, 
which have heretofore defied the works of man. 
The oflace of the Company is at 318 California St. 

Boot and Shoe Manufacture. — The manufac- 
ture of boots and shoes has greatly increased in the 
past year, and with such success as promises to stop 
importation, to the great injury of the innwriers 
and the manufacturers of Lynn and Philadelphia. 
Mr. I. M. Weutworth is most extensively engaged 
in this enterprise, having recently added great im- 
provements to his already extensive establishment 
on Fell Street between Franklin and Gongh. The 
main building is of wood, 40 feet front by 80 feet 
depth, and three stories in bight. To this has been 
added a tine brick fire-proof wing, for the safe stor- 
age of stock, 30 by 24 feet in dimensions, and three 
stories high, also a wooden extension 50 by 24 
feet on the ground, giving increased room for 
manufacturing purposes. The capacity of the fac- 
tory is for working three hundred bands, and 
more than two hundred have been employed during 
the past season. Machinery, which is propelled by 
steam power, comes largely to the aid of man in 
the work of shoe making and here it is fully em- 
ployed, this being the only establishment of the 
Kind on the Pacific Coast wliere steam power is used. 
The cost of the buildings has been about $20,000, 
and the annual product about $500,000 in value. A 
tannery is also connected with the establishment, 
producing each year $25,000 worth of leather. Be- 
sides the leather made here, large quantities of kid, 
calf, and cloth are used in the business, imported 
from the east and Europe. Notwithstanding the 
value of the boots, shoes and slippers made in San 
Francisco exceeds $2,000,000, annually, the import- 
ation 18 still large ; but with the success of such 
establishments as Wentworth's, this drain upon our 
treasures will be stopped. 



Insure in the best Iiooal Company, " THE FEOPIiES." 



C P VAW SCHAACK & CO.. 708. 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, CHANGES, ETC., 

RECEIVED TOO LATE FOR REGULAR INSERTION. 



Ahern John M., drayman, dwl NW cor Larkin 
and Ash Avenue 

Alison Charles, assistant engineer P. M. S. S. Japan 

Allen James, assistant engineer P. M. S. S. Colorado 

Allen William, storekeeper P. M. S. S. Colorado 

AMSTERDAM BOARD UNDERWRITERS, of- 
fice 710 Sansom 

Anderson Charles E., (Ander&on <fc Halley) dwl 9 
Perry 

Anderson Elliott, (Anderson 8c Halley) dwl 9 Perry 

AND ERSON& HALLE Y,,<(7/iaW«£. AndcnonSf 
Willimn, Halley) accountants and general 
agents, 44 Merchants' Exchange 

Anderson & Hallev, (Elliott Anderson and Wil- 
liam McGee 'Halley) cigars and tobacco, NE 
cor Market and Second 

Andrade Evariste, compositor Courrier de San Fran- 
cisco 

ANDREI ADOLFO, physician, office 6 Brenham 
Place, dwl 317 First 

Angelo C. Aubrey, correspondent, dwl 923 J Har 

Arnold Otto, messenger London and San Francisco 
Bank, dwl 810 Leavenworth 

Arzaga Jose, books and stationery, 1320 Stockton, 
dwl 408 Greenwich 

Aehmead Gustavus S., (Ashmead & Kellum) dwl 
cor Mariposa and Florida 

ASHMEAD & KELLUM, (Gustavus S. Ashmead 
and Charles D. Kellnm) cai-penters and build- 
ers, 5 Beale, and Florida bet Mariposa and So- 
lano 

At Lee Samuel Y., editor New Age, office 421 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 37 Second 

Atkins Joseph, laborer P. M. S. S. Japan 

BiBcocK George A., printer with S.F. Cooperative 

Co., dwl 1502 Leavenworth 
Babcock Henry S., vice-president Security Savings 

Bank, office 304 Sansom, dwl 11 Essex 
Bacon T. F., secretary Security Savings Bank, 

office 304 Sansom, res Oakland 
Bacquie Henry, dwl 612 California 
Bailey T., laborer P. M. S. S. Co.'s Wharf 
Bainbridge Peter, salesman with F. & P. J. Cassin, 

dwl Orleans Hotel 
Baker Frederick D., employment office, 603 Kearny 
Baker J. B. Miss. milliner and millinery,20.5 Kearny 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., ( Robert Balfour 

and Alexander G nlhrie ) comm\6i\on merchants 

and general agents British and Foreign Marine 

Insurance Co., office 308 Sansom 
Banner Simon, (of Banner Bros.) (Virginia, Nev. 

and Nevada, California) office 221 Sansom, dwl 

325 O'Farrell 
Barker J. H., storekeeper P. M. 8. S. America 
Barron Henry, (Barron 4" Rosenthal) dwl 13 

Third 
Barron James, captain steamer Hope, res Union City 
Barron Richard, captain steamer Emma res Eden 

Landing 
Barron & Rosenthal, (Henry Barron and Moritz 

Rosenthal) hairdressers 13 Third 
Barrv B. V., with J. S. Wall <t Co., dwl 1814 Mkt 
BARRY CHARLES E., searcher records, office 

619 Montgomery, dwl 1010 Jackson 
Barry D., laborer P. M. S. S. Co.'s Wharf 
Barry Edward, real estate, office 331 Montgomery, 

room 8, dwl 1904 Stockton 
Barter A. B., (widow) nurse, dwl 231 Second 



Bassett Cynes, second officer P. M. S. S. Montana 
Bassett Daniel, asst engineer P. M. S. S. Japan 
Batty John, (Lennon & Co.) dwl N s Post bet 

IBaker and Broderick 
Baumberger Jacob, bookkeeper with Lowry, Breeze 

& Co. , dwl 6 Pratt Court 
Baurhyte Isaac, asst engineer P. M. S. S. Montana 
Bawden William G., (Bawden & Forbes) dwl 44 

Third 
Bawden & Yothe^, (William G. Ban-den and John S. 

Stnart Forbes) book and job printers, 317 Cal 
Bayreuther Amalie Mrs., (Mrs. and Miss Bayreut- 

her) dwl SE cor Mission and Fourth 
Bayreuther Clara Miss, (Mrs. & Miss Bayreuther) 

dwl SE cor Mission and Fourth 
Bayreuther Mrs. &. Miss, (Amalie and Clara) 

dressmakers and milliners, SE cor Mission and 

Fourth 
Beach Horace, cashier U. S. Branch Mint, 610 Com 
Beach OiTin, assistant appraiser Custom House 
Beale Thomas, local agent Peoples Ins. Co., dwl 

N s Chestnut bet "raylor and Jones 
Beaver Samuel E., assistant cashier U. 8. Assistant 

Treasurer's Office, dwl 246 Third 
Bee Pascal, grinder, dwl 1413 Mason 
Beckman Fritz, liquor saloon, 110 Dupont 
Bell W.. laborer P. M. S. S. Co's Wharf 
Bell William H., State Inspector stamps, office 601 

California, dwl W s Valencia nr Sixteenth. 
Benken John, drayman P. M. S. S. Go's W^barf, 

dwl South Park Place 
Bennett William, assistant engineer P. M. S. S. 

Great Republic 
Bent Silas E., carriagemaker, dwl 741 Market 
Berkley Homestead Association, office 418 California 
Bernstein M. C. & Co., ( W. L. Byckman) furni- 
ture, 517 California 
Berz George, liquor saloon, 512 Clay 
Bien Joseph, machinist, 220 Battery, dwl 714 T^rkin 
Bigelow Elijah, real estate, office 313 California, res 

Oakland 
Billings David, produce commission, 211 Drumm, 

dwl 17 Clinton 
Binder George J., bookkeeper with Schreiher, Rohr 

& Co., dwl 915 Howard 
BISHOP AMASA W., attorney at law, and editor 

Masonic Mirror, office 608 Mkt, dwl .505 Powell 
Bishop Duncan M., (Bishop Sf DeMottJ dwl 521 

Clay 
Bishop & DeMott, (Duncan M. Bishop and Wil- 
liam DeMott) job printers, 521 Clay 
Black Henry M. & Co., importers and coach mann- 

facturers, 1120 and 1122 Market, dwl 14 Russ 
Blackburn L. F., with James Eddington, dwl 322 

Sutter 
Blaisdell Isaac, Quartermaster P. M. 8. S. Montana 
Blaisdell S. G. Mrs., furnished rooms, 627 Post 
BLAKE CHARLES E., dentist, office 21 Post, 

dwl 22 Oak Grove Avenue 
Blake George M., receiver Hayward ta Coleman, 

414 Front, dwl 328 Minna 
BLAKE GEORGE W. & CO., (John Murphy) 

real estate agents, office 305 Montgomery, room 

l,dwl Russ House. 
Blanchard John J., street contractor, dwl 435 Pine 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS. Montgomery 

Street Extension, office 1, 2 and 3 Mont Block 
Bogovich John, barkeeper with John Chiuona, dwl 

516 Commercial 



JON£S, PULIiMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Iiadies' and Clmdren's Woolen aood» 



BBDINQTON, HOSTETTEK & CO., Importers of Foreign and Domestic Druga. 



56 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Bonnard Francis A., president S. P. Co-operative 

Printing Co., dwl 1409 Jaci<8on 
BONNET B., Bupt Imperisliable Block Pavement 

Co., office 308 Sansom 
Bordwell George, architect, oflBce 410 Kearny, dwl 

i:i9 Silver 
Boutelle Percy, seaman P. M. S. S. China 
Bovee William H., real estate agent, office 331 

Montgomery, dwl 1515 Powell 
Bowman William, Rev., asst pastor Mission Dolores 

Church, dwl W s Dolores nr Sixteenth. 
Bradbury G. J., asst engineer P. M. S. S. Montana 
lirHiWey'John A., f^ Read, B. & Co.; dwl 34 Eleventh 
Bragg George, clerk with F. A. Waterhonse, Grand 

Central Market 
Bragg Robert, joiner P. M. S. S. Go's Wharf 
Brandon W. M., (Brandon & ManzerJ dwl 12^ 

Stockton 
Brandon &, Manzer, fW. M. Brandon and John 

Manzer) real estate agents, 626 Montgomery 
Brandt Bernard L., house and sign painter, ^^^O 
Battery, dwl SW cor Geary and Van Ness Av 
Branger John, fH. Parker & Co. J dwl NE cor 

Powell and Clay 
BRAUNSCHWEIGER & SCHLUTER, (Her- 
mann Brannschweiger and, C. H. SchhtterJ 
groceries and liquoi's, W s Fourth nr Berry 
BRAY BROS., (Watson A. Bray) commission 
merchants and agents Alviso Flour Mills, 226 
Clay 
Bray John, (Bray dk Co.) dwl 321 O'Farrell 
BRAY & CO., (John Bray and William Fulton) 

wood and coal, 706 Bush 
Breslaner Theodore, cloaks and mantillas, 12 Kearny 
P,!;«-.v.^ter F. T, clerk London and San Francisco 
f;- ,1 Bank, dwl 11 O'Farrell 

I 2 ,rice Barney, blacksmith helper P. M. S. S. Go's 
Uh% Wharf, dwl 134 Folsom 

»% trice James, blacksmith P. M. S. S. Go's Wharf, 
4a dwl 214 Seventh 

IgfjRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSUR- 
!- ANCE CO., Balfour, Guthrie & Co., general 
^$ agents, office 308 Sansom. 
wgBritt William, laborer P. M. S. S. Co's Wharf 
I JgBrodie William, manager California Foundry, NW 
cor Main and Harrison, dwl 84 Everett 
Brooks George J., real estate, dwl Occidental Hotel 
BROOKS W. H. J., State Searcher, office 621 Clay, 
dwl 1008 Clay 
5 Brown A., laborer P. M. S. S. Co's Wharf 
^ Brown Benjamin B., drayman U. S. Bonded Ware- 
^^1 hoa.se, dwl E 8 Jones bet O'Farrell and Eddy. 

;ii Brown C. F., real estate, office 408 Cal., (and Cali- 
A\ fornia Chemical Paint Co.) dwl 66 Clementina 
lA Brown Emmett, printer Bulletin, dwl W s Valencia 
gS bet Twenty-third and Twentv-fourth 

c- Brown George', cook P. M. S. S. Colorado 
-- BROWN JOHN P., book and job printer, 420 
•.Montgomery, dwl 1707 Dupont 
Brown Nathan, importer and jobber clothing, 108 

Battery, dwl S s Bryant nr Downey 
Brown Theodore, clerk 'Tax Collector's office, dwl 

1418 Powell 
Brown W.. laborer P. M. S. S. 8. Co's Wharf 
Bruce H., laborer P. M. S. S. Co's Wharf 
Bruntou Henrv, Globe Restaurant, 520 and 522 

Clav 
Bryan VVilliam, (Hahn & B.) dwl 33 John 
Bryant Thomas, cook P. M. S. S. Colorado 
Bnck William, (Lennon & Co.) dwl 24 Zoe 
Bullard James H., produce commission, 228 Clay, 

dwl E 8 Hyde bet Filbert and Greenwich 
Bnrke John, dry goods, 634 Market, dwl 265 Stev- 
enson 
Burns Hugh, coal passer P. M. S. S. China 
Burt Samuel, compositor with Frank Eatstman, dwl 

908 Clav 
BUSWELL ALEXANDER, bookbinder, 509 Clay, 
dwl SW cor Jones and Union 



Butler George E., bookkeeper Union InsuranceCo., 

dwl 32 Ellis 
BUTLER'S LIFTING CURE, J. H. Swain k Co., 

proprietors, 24 Post 
Byrne Matthew J., horticulturist, dwl Quincy 

House 

Caffrey William, coal passer P. M. S. S. China 

California Bleaching Soap Works, Hitch & Hall 
proprietors, SW cor Folsom and Si.xfeenth 

CALIFORNIA CHEMICAL PAINT GO.,(G.W. 
Oxborn, C. F. Brown, M. C. Jewell and Jexxe 
Healyj office 408 Ciil, manufactory, NW cor 
Fourth and Towiisend 

California Cracker Co., 803 Battery 

California Grape Wine Vinegar Vv'orks, D. R. Pro- 
vost manager, 423 Front 

California Peat Co., office 560 Natoma 

Callaghan William, waiter P. M. S- S. Sacramento 

Callahan Cornelius, liquor saloon. 869 Folsom 

Campbell Will, (Campbell & Turiier) dwl 995 
Market 

CAMPBELL & TURNER, (Will Campbell and 
William E. Turner) attorneys at law, office 
rooms 1 and 2, 708 Montgomery 

Camper Frederick, cook with John Steinmann, dwl 
512 Fourth 

Cane F. P., workman Beale St. Planing Mill, dwl 
Coso House 

Cannavan Elizabeth Mrs., Beehive Auction Store, 
811 Kearny, dwl N 8 Lombard nr Kearny 

Capital Homestead Association, office 418 Cal 

Carolan Isabella, (widow) dwl 238 Taylor 

Carr Frank D., salesman, 332 Mont, dwl 19 Rausch 

Carroll I., laborer P. M. S. S. Co's Wharf 

Carvill Almon D., bookkeeper with Pollard & Car- 
vill Manufacturing Co., dwl 322 Pine 

Carvill Onn S., president Pollard & Carvill Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 184 Jessie. 

CASEBOLT J. D. & CO., importers hardware, 
wagon materials, etc., 24 ana 26 Beale, dwl 34 
Tyler 

Castle Stephen W., (Gorley & C.) dwl 709 Mont- 
gomery 

Cave McRae, clerk with John G. Hodge & Co., 
dwl 26 Hampton Place 

Cayot FranQois, cook P. M. S. S. Japan 

Champlin John L., clerk with I. M. Wentworth & 
Co., dwl 25 Sixth 

Cheadle R. commission merchant, dwl Willow Av- 
enue bet Buchanan and Laguna 

Chielovich Andrew, barkeeper with J. C. Sack &■ 
Co., 306 Kearny 

Chiuona John, coffee saloon, 516 Commercial 

CHOYNSKI ISIDOR N., staiinnery, SW cor 
Fourth and Jessie, and 146 Second, dwl 524 
Howard 

CITY COAL YARD, Loughlin & Nicholson pro- 
prietors, 775 Market 

City Extension Homestead Association, office 8 Stev- 
enson's Building 

Clancy John, liquor saloon, SE cor Fifth and Fol 

Clark Alvah K., ground coffee and spices, 13 Sec 

Clark Edgar B., (Ross <b C.) dwl 928 Washington 

Clark R. Frank, entry clerk Custom House, dwl 
N 8 Pine bet Webster and Lincoln 

Clark Titus, carpenter with Ross & Clark, dwl 928 
Washington 

CLEVELAND INSURANCE CO., (fire and mar- 
ine, Cleveland, Ohio) Julius Jacobs, general 
agent, office 440 California 

Close Charles P., clerk with R. H. Magill, dwl 627 
Post 

COFFIN J. W. & CO., ship chandlery, 331 East 

Coghill Andrew J., (Coghill & Harrison) dwl 42 
Sixth 

Coghill &. Harrison, (Andrew J. Cogliill and John 
W. Harrison) shipping and coramiBsion mer- 
chants, 318 Front 



THE PEOPLES INSUKANCE CO. insures againrt Pire and Marine hazards. 



C. p. VA.N SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearcy Street. Pumishinis Goods. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC, 



57 



COnX JACOB M., importer general mercbandise, 

306 Sansom, dwl 1007 Harrison 
Colburn A., poultry and game, 84 California Mar- 
ket, res Oatvland 
Connolly Patrick, laborer, dwl 63 Natoma 
Conrad Cbristian, iiqnor saloon, 50 Tbird, dwl NE 

cor Howard and Fifth 
CONTINENTAL HOTEL, Herman Droste pro- 
prietor, 519-529 Pacific 
Cook Aaron, merchant, office 34 Saneom, dwl N s 

Post bet Gon<rh and Franklin 
COOK BROTHERS, rl^anc and John A. J impor- 
ters dry jroods, 8 Battery 
Cook Isaac^ f Cook Brothers J dwl 731 Geary 
Cook John A., (Cook Brothers) res New York 
Cool George VV., dentist, office .ind dwl 14 Kearny 
Cooper E. Brnce, bookkeeper with Miller & Haley, 

dwl 517 OFarrell 
Copp Frank P., clerk, dwl 54 Third 
Copp Nathaniel P., merchant, dwl 54 Tbird 
CORBETT SAMUEL J., physician, office 5^ 

Kearny, res Oakland 
CORBETT S. J. MRS., physician.office SJ Kearny, 

res Oakland 
Corcoran William, State Inspector stamps, office 

601 California 
Cording Joseph H., (Crane & G.) dwl Eighteenth 

Avenue nr J, South San Francisco 
Corlies James L., conductor City R. R., dwl SE 

cor Mission and Fourteenth 
Cornwell Altana, (widow) dwl 1123 Powell 
Cosgrove John P., teacher, dwl 356 Third 
Cotrel William B., guns and pistols, and agent 

Schuyler, Hartley & Graham, New York, office 

708 Montgomery, dwl i!73 Minna 
Coughlan John, butcher. '2 Occidental Market 
Covey Harris R., Turf Gallery Stables, 'J09 Sutter, 

dwl 311 J Jessie 
Cowan Robert H., surgeon and chiropodist, 310 

Kearny, dwl Twentieth bet Fol and Harrison 
CRANE ADDISON M., attorney at law, office 522 

Montgomery, dwl 1814 Mason 
CRANE ALBE'RT E.. agent for Remington Arms, 

office -522 Mont, dwl NE cor Mason and John 
Crane & Cording, f Hmry A. Crane and Joseph H. 

Cording) miinufacturing chemists, cor Sixth 

Avenue and D, South S. F., office 324 Front 
CRITTENDEN PARKER, notary public and com- 

uiibsioner of deeds, 340 Mont,dwl 920 Pine 
Cronise T. F., secretary St. Patrick Gold M. Co., 

office 411 5 California, dwl Occidental Hotel 
Crosett Truman, teacher music Public Schools, dwl 

512 Valencia 
Crowell Charles I., (J. M. Goeieey & Co.) dwl 723 

Ellis 
Crowell H. W., (Crowell & Odermatt) dwl 225 

Bush 
Crowell & Odermatt, rH. W. Crowell and F. A. 

Odermatt) dentists, office 225 Bush 
Crowley Michael, porter with Hooker & Co., dwl 63 

Natoma 
Crowther George T., commission merchant, dwl E s 

Potrero Avenue bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Cudworth James W., capitalist, dwl 127 Kearny 
Cullen John J., engraver %vith California Jewelry 

Co., dwl 995 Market 
Cullen William, property clerk City Hall, dwl 25 

Clementina 
CURRAN HUGH, proprietor Franklin Hotel, 414 

Pacific 
CUSHING JOHN J., homoepathic physician, of- 
fice and dwl 319 Gearv 
CUSHMAN CHARLES D., president Red Mens' 

Savings and Loan Bank, 340 Bush, dwl NW 

cor Twentv-fourth and Guerrero 
Cutler E. B., (Felton & C.) dwl Lick House 

Danglada Manuet,, real estate, dwl Fifteenth bet 
Guerrero and Dolores 



Dann Fred P., attorney at law, office 604 Merchant, 

dwl 1123 Powell 
Dannenberg Amalie Mrs., ladies' and childrens' 

furnishing goods, 24 Montgomery, dwl 502 Bush 
Darby W. E., attorney at law, office 20 Mosiigom- 

e'ry Block 
Darling Wilkie./'Dar/i/in- & Co.;dwl 517 O'Furrell 
DART PUTNAM C, shipping and comuiission 

merchant, office 313 California, res Oakland 
Davidson Meyer, merchant, (Mokelunine Hill) office 

416 Market, dwl 324 Minna 
Davis Ainsley G.. retail fancv goods, 419 Kearny 
Davis Daniel, ( Wolf Si- D.) dwl 43 Third 
Day Thomas S., with Thomas Day, 732 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 2346 Washington 
De Lacy Charles, assistant assessor U. S. Internal 

Revenue, dwl Lick House 
De Mott William, (Bhhop & Dc M.) dwl .521 Clay 
De Wolf S. I., (widow) dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Dean Harry, assistant property man California 

Theatre, dwl Adams House 
Deane C. Tennyson, physician, office SE cor Mont 

and Sutter, dwl 804 Stockton 
Delprat George R., clerk Mutual Life Insurance 

Co.. dwl ftjO Sacramento 
DEMING H. A., a«ent Howe sewing machine 

and Butterick's patterns, 113 and 115 Kearny, 

dwl 632 Sutter 
Diedereichsen Charles, (IIachmeyer& I).) dwl NE 

corLarkin and California 
Diersch Charles, hairdresser, 9 Second, dwl 742 

Folsom 
Division of Telegrams and Report for the Benefit of 

Commerce, office 43 Merchants' Exchange 
Dixon James E., (Dixon & Hamilton) Jwt Ti"?, 

Market 
Dixon John J., plumber andgasfitter, 316 Pine, dwl 

32 Clara 
DIXON & HAMILTON, (James E.Dixon, James 

Hamilton, and .,4. F.G/een; general auctioneers 

and commission merchants, 727 Market 
Dodge Nathan, superintendent Grand Central Mar- 
ket, dwl Es Church bet Twenty-second and 

Twenty-third 
Doe Charles F., (Knowland&D.) dwl 127 Res my 
DOLAN THOMAS, livery stable, SW cor Foltom 

and Eleventh, dwl 359' Eleventh 
Dorn Richard (Putzman,^D. <fc Co.y dwl 323.Tefsie 
Dornin George D., general agent Fireman's Fund 

Ins. Co., 403 Cal, res Oakland 
Downey George W., salesman with J. S. Wall &. 

Co., dwl cor New Montgomery and Howard 
Drake Josiab, real estate, office 16 Montgomery 

Block, dwl 1511 Dupont 
Drathmann W. F., ( Heineken, D. & Co.) dwl 117 

Taylor 
DUFFY BERNARD C. cigar manufacturer, 950 

Market, dwl 553 Jessie 
Dunbar George F. , watch, and musical box mal^;:, 

203 Mont, dwl 424 Sansom • 
Duncan William Ij., stock broker, office 422 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 33 South Park 
Dunlop Daniel, fDunlop db Hayes) dwl NE cor 

Franklin and Hayes 
Dunlop <fc Hayes, (Daniel Dunlop and James J. 

Hayes) furniture, 6 Fourth 
Dunsbee Cornelius E., ( Dunshee, Ellis <fc Stewart) 

dwl S 8 Fifteenth Av bet P and Q, South S. F.) 
Dunshee, Ellis (fe Stewart, (C. E. Dunshee, B. F. 

EIHs. and William E. Stewart) c&rTpemor»md 

builders, SW cor Fifteenth Av and P., South 

S. F. 

EcoNO-MiCAL Mutual Life Insurakce Co., 
George N. Williams, agent, 6 Merchants' Exeh. 

Eddington James, Alhambra Saloon, dwl N s Jack- 
son bet Battery and Front 

Edgar Will M., deputy City and County Assessor, 
dwl 30 Kearny 



JOI^ES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Suspenders and Neck Ties. 



HEDINO-TON, HOSTETTEB & CO.. exclusive Agents fop Drake's Plantation Bitters. 



58 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Eidenmnller George, physician, office 410 Kearny 
Ellioli diaries, city Buperiiitendent Spring Valley 

Water Works,' dwl 629 O'Frtrrell 
Ellis Benjamin F., fDunshec, E. & Stewart) dwi 

SW cor Fifteenth Av and P, South 8. F. 
Ellis Henry U., captain police, City Hall, dwl 306 

Lombard 
Ellis William H., local agent Occidental Insurance 

Co., dwl 119 Silver 
EMPIRE FOUNDRY, Savage & Son proprietors, 

145 Beale and '294 Howard 
Ensign George H., Lake Tahoe Water Works, 

office 808 Montgomery, dwl 1005 Stockton 
Epson Frederick, publisher and proprietor La So- 

ciedad, office 621 Sansom, dwl 813 Vallejo 

FAHEnTY William J., observer sergeant Signal 

Service, U. S. A., office 43 Merchants' Exchange 
Falkenstein A., shirt manufacturer, 125 Sansom 
Farrell Michael, proprietor O'Farrell House, (for- 
merly Brookline), 217 Broadway 
Faulkner Francis W., clerk with California Type 

Foundry Co., dwl 514 Stockton 
Faulkner George,clerk with P. T. Nongues.dwl 1313 

Kearny 
Fell Jacob, cigar dealer, dwl 128 Kearnv 
Felton H. T., { Fellon & Cutler) dwl Grand Hotel 
FELTON & CUTLER, fHotvnrd T. Felton and 

E. B. Cutler) general agents Wilcox & Gibbe 

Sewing Machines, office 113 Post 
Ferrer Manuel Y., teacher music, office 523 Clay, 

res Oakland 
Finger Henry, clerk with Charles E. Hinckley, dwl 

32 Post 
Finnegan Simon, groceries and liquors, NE cor 
■ ' Fifth and Shiple'v 

Fitzheniy James, saloon. 534 Com, dwl 44 Jessie 
Fletcher Richard F., (Fletcher Sf Greenhood) res 

Oakland 
FLETCHER & GREENHOOD, (Richard F. 

Fletcher and Otto Greenhood) City Agents 

Phoenix, Home, and Travelers Insurance Cos., 

office 424 California 
Folks Samuel, fo/" Wolffdi: F., San Bernardino) 

office NW cor Battery and Market, dwl 333 

Tehama 
Follis Richard H., butter, cheese, eggs, etc., 90 Cali- 
fornia Market, dwl 15 Park Avenue 
Forbes John S. Stuart, (Bawden &■ F.) dwl 44 

Third 
Ford Dennis, marble cntter, dwl SE cor Geneva and 

Brannan 
Foster W. W., (Mead & F.; dwl 7101 Mission 
Fox Henry A., merchant, office 509 Sacramento, dwl 

318 Taylor 
Frank Louis P., insurance broker, office 220 Bat- 

terv, dwl 625 O'Farrell 
FRANKLIN HOTEL, Hugh Curran proprietor, 

414 Pacific 
-Prltsclii Rudolph, clerk with Morris Speyer & Co., 

dwl 6 Pratt Court 
Fulton William, (Bray Sf Co.) dwl 513 Post 
FUNDED DEBT COMMISSIONERS OF 1851, 

office 305 Sansom 

Gardiner George D., (Norton & G.) dwl 1917 

Polk 
Gardiner Martin V. B., railroad agent, dwl 622 El- 
lis, rear 
Gardner August, (Gardner & Page) dwl 1207 

Dnpont 
Gardner & Page, (August Gardner and Julius 

Pase) St. Helena lager beer depot, 16 Geary 
Garn William, cap manufacturer, 434 California, 

dwl 37 Jessie 
GARVEY JAMES, bellhanger, silver plater and 

locksmith, 29 New Mont, dwl 114 Minna 
GATES JAMES H., druggist and apothecary, NW 

cor New Mont and Howard, dwl ISlj Silver 



Gautier Louis M., laundiy and blanket cleaning, 

1719 Powell 
GERZABEK OSCAR V., commission merchant and 
manufacturers' agent general hardware, 563 
Market, dwl 613J Stockton 
Ginnochio G. , commission merchant, oiBce 421-4:^3 

Battery, dwl 1512 Powell 
Glaser Charles, (0. Glaxer & Co.) (San Luis 
Obispo) office NW cor Battery and Market, dwl 
113 Fifth 
Glassman Jacob, exchange broker, office 334 Mont- 

goineiy, dwl 314 Jones 
Gleeson Thomas J., apothecary with J. H. Widber, 

dwl 422 Sutter 
Gleeson William H., (Mark* ^ G.) dwl 439 Minna 
Goldman Bernard, clerk, dwl 618 Green 
Good William, waiter with John Malone, dwl 227 

Minna 
GOTTIG LAWRENCE, president German Sav- 
ings and Loan Society, 513 California, dwl 1915 
Taylor 
Gourdon Charles, watchmaker and jeweler, 327 

Third 
Gowenlock Robert, dwl 1822 Market 
Graves Augustus B., clerk, dwl 1711 Mason 
Gray George D., mining engineer, dwl 822 Powell 
Gray John T.. (Sutherland & G.) dwl 23 Ellis 
GRAY MATTHIAS, importer, wholesale and re- 
tail dealer music and musical instruments, 623 
and 625 Clay, dwl SW cor Kearny and Lomb 
Green A. V., (Dixon & Hamilton) dwl 104 Kearny 
Grimes George T., agent Patent Spiral Broom, of- 
fice 405 Front, dwl 924 Jackson 
Griswold Josiah, (Griswold 4" Berry) dwl 2530 

Webster 
Gross Herman, (Isnacx & G.) res New York 
Guerin Michael, (Gnerin Se Kelly) dwl 503 Third 
GUERIX& KELLY, (Michael Guerin and Pat- 
rick Kelly) boots and shoes. 327-329 Bush 
GUIDE, (triweekly) B. C. Vandall, proprietor, 
office 521 Clay 

Hachmeyer Adam, (Hackmeyer & DiederichsenJ 

dwl 1 36 Jessie 
HACHMEYER & DIEDERICHSEN, (Adam 
Hachmeyer and Charles Diederichsen) White- 
hall Restaurant, NW cor Spring and Summer 
Haferkorn Anton, /'iVe/Zer ^ H.J dwl 26 Howard 

Court 
Hall Charles E., (Hitch & H.) dwl SE cor Pol- 

Bom and Sixteenth 
Hall John C, clerk Morning Call, dwl 759 Market 
Halley J. J., printer with A. L. Bancroft & Co. 
Halley William, journalist correspondent Toronto 
Globe, {and Anderson & H) office 44 Mer- 
chants' Exchange, dwl 404 Bryant 
Halley William McGee, (Anderson & H.J dwl 670 

Harrison 
Hamilton James, (Dixon Sf H.) dwl S s Twenty- 
third nr Bryant 
Hammond Charles Y., chemist, dwl 32 Silver 
Hanford Benjamin T., nightwatchman U. S. Asst. 

Treasury, dwl 1001 Market 
HARDY LOWELL J. Jr., attorney at law, office 

6.37 Kearny, dwl 908 Clay 
Harmon Henry, (Wright & Co.) dwl 630 Sac 
Harrison John W., (Co^hill Sf H.) dwl 127 Turk 
Harrison Randolph, engineer's clerk with Major G. 
H. Mendell, dwl NE cor Clay and "Van Ness 
Avenue 
Harrison Street Homestead Association, office 511 

California 
HARRISON WILLIAM P. & CO., wholesale gro- 

cere, 421 Clay, dwl 14 Geary 
Harron W. K.,('Knowlton & Co.; dwl 618 Pine 
Hart Joel M., boots and shoes, 1412 Stockton 
Hartman A. E., watchmaker and jeweler, 16 Third 
Hartog Edward, interpreter and general agent, of- 
fice 716 Montgomery, dwl 630 Sacramento 



THE FEOPIiES INSUBANCE CO. pays iOl losses in Gold Coin. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street. White Shiitg. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC 



59 



Hartfborn & McPhun, (Edmund F. Hartshorn and 

William McPhun) agents self-acting shade 

rollers, 140 Fourth ,,„„,»»• 

Haskell George S., fEnskell & Go.) dwl 1324 Miss 

Haskin Henry R., fS. F. Co&perative Printing Co.) 

411 Clay, dwl 1410 Larkin 
Hayes James J., (Dunlop Jj- H.) dwl NE cor 
Fraukin and Linden , ~.o, 

Hayhoe John, clerk with Weil & Co., dwl 748J 

" Market _ . 

HEALD EDWARD P.. president Heald's Business 

College, 24 Post, dwl 5 Stockton 
Heald John, fHeald d Davis) dwl 5 Stockton 
Healy Jesse, (€al. Chemical Paint Co.) dwl NW 

cor Fourth and Townsend 
Heiueken A. C./Heineken, Brathmann <fc Co.) 5J7 

Market ^ „ . 

HEINEKEN, DRATHMANN & CO.. (A. G.Hein- 
eken.W. F. Draihmann,Georfre Siebe and Loins 
F. Holtz) wholesale grocers and comnaission 
merchants, 537 Market opp SanHoin 
Helmers Nil* S., teacher music, dwl 40 South Park 
Hennessy Michael, gardener, dwl 31 Sixth 
Henry Charles D., carriage painter, 519 Market, 

dwl 928 Pine . , „,.„. 

HerinKer John C. Jr., salesman with William P. 
Harrison &. Co., dwl S s O'Farrell bet Fillmore 
nnd Steiner 
HERRERA FRANCISCO, Consul U. S. Columbia, 
Bolivia, Costa Rica, and Consul General for Ni- 
caragna.and real estate agent and money broker, 
office 331 Montgomery, dwl 542 Howard 
Hewson Robert, agent Union Gas Machine. 302 

Montgomery, res Alameda 
Hill Jame's L. M., varnisherwith Schreiber, Bohr & 

Co., dwl 119 Second 
HILLER FREDERICK, homoeopathic physician, 

ottice and dwl 226 Post 
HINCKLEY CHARLES E., chemist and apothe- 
cary, 32 Post 
Hinders Henry, boots and shoes, 332 Kearny, dwl 

315 O'Farrell _ 

HINRICHS C. H. & CO., {A. Volhracht) Havana 

and domestic cigars, 316 and 318 Commercial 
Hitch Horace Y., ( Hitch & Hall) dwl SW cor Fol- 

soni and Sixteenth 
Hitch & Hall, (Horace Y. Hitch and Charles E. 
Hall) propnetors California Bleaching Soap 
Works, SW cor Folsom and Sixteenth 
Hoair Horace, (Horace Hoag & Co.) dwl N s 

Twenty sixth bet Mission and Bartlett 
Hoag Hora<e & Co., real estate agency and employ- 
ment office, SE cor California and Kearny 
Hochholzer Hutio, architect, office NW cor Sacra- 
mento and Montgomery, dwl 1209 Clay 
HOLBROOK T. W. J., special State agent Home 
Mutual Insurance Co., office 433 California, 
dwl Grand Hotel ,.„„„... 

Holland Daniel, fruits, 305 Wash, dwl J28 Third 
Holly Oak Park Co., (Napa City) office room 8 Stev- 
enson House 
Holman F. A., physician, ofiBce 235 Kearny 
Holmes George R., glazier with Miller & Haley, 
dwl 421 Green , , ^ , ro, 

Holtz Louis F., (Heineken, Drathmann db Co.) 637 
Market » >-, , j i 

Hooper William B., (Hooper, Whting ^ Co.) dwl 
SE cor Hyde and Chestnut , , .,, 

Howland Charles F., (Howland 4- Go.) dwl 34 

HOWLAND & CO., (Charlea F. Howland) apoth- 
ecaries, NE cor Post and Mason 

Hudson George B., salesman witii Julius Platshek 
& Brothers, dwl 13 Willow Avenue 

Hulbert T. Fisher, interpreter, office 716 Montgom- 
ery, dwl SE cor Union ana Stockton 

Hurley Daniel J., dwl 109 Shipley ^ „^ „ 

Hyatt John B., Bay City Stables, 413 and 415 Mar- 
ket, dwl 314 Bush 



HYDE HENRY C, attorney at law, office 411 i 

California, dwl 8 Essex 
Hyland Silver Mining Co., (Elko Co., Nev.) office 

28 Merchants' Exchange 



Ijams John D., clerk with R.H. McDonald & Co., 

dwl 915 Howard 
INSPECTOR (STATE) STAMPS, office 601 Cal 
Irwin Robert, (Jones, Pullman <fc Go.) dwl 2116 

Larkin , .„. „ 

Irwin Samuel, (Boberts & I.) dwl 124 Fourth 
Isaacs Benjamin, metallic sign manufacturer, 414 

Sacramento, dwl 25 Rausch 
Isaacs Morris, (Isaacs & Gross) dwl 109 Mont 
Isaacs & Gross, (Morris Isaacs and Herman 

Gross) manufacturers clothing, 221 Sansom 
Ivers Richard, dwl 825 O'Farrell 

Jackson A. W.,( Powers &J.)'Sb Clark nr Dmmm 
JACOBS JULIUS, general agent Cleveland Fire 
Ins. Co., oflice 440 California, dwl 1307 Larkin 
JafTe Max, bookkeeper, dwl 314 Bush 
Jameson James S., bookkeeper with Garland & 
Moore, dwl 521 O'Farrell . „ . , , „,„ 

Jewell M. C, (Cal. Chemical Paint Go.) dwl NW 

cor Fourth and Townsend 
Job Peter, restaurant, confectionery and ice cream 

saloon, 227 Kearny, dwl 422>i Sutter 
Johnson George H., purser North Pac. Trans Go's 

S. S. Pacific, dwl 17 Verona Place 
Johnson T. D., physician, office and dwl 202 Bush 
JOHNSON T. RODGERS, manufacturer regalia 

and military goods, 325 Montgomery 

JOHNSTON & GO'SZALiEZ/J.Sproat Johnston, 

and Dominick Gonzalez) real estate agents, 

office 228 Montgomery .,o « . 

JONES CYRUS W., stockbroker, oflice 418 Mont, 

dwl 1608 Howard , . „.„ c 

Jones Warren, collector, 206 Mont, dwl 249 Stev 
Jones Winfield S., teller Security Savings Bank, 

dwl Occidental Hotel 
Jordan August, (Miiriset & J.) dwl 1116 Stockton 
Jordan W. Mrs., chop house, 229 Pacific 
Jordan William T., copyist, dwl 1009 Kearny 
Kane Michael, ^M'a«<i, K. 8r Co.) dwl 20 Turk 
Keegan James, plumber and gasfitter, 808 Pacific, 

dwl 225 Sutter ^ „ 

Kellum Charles D., (Ashmead Sj- K.) dwl W s Po- 

tiero Av nr Eighteenth 
Kelly Patrick, (Guerin Sf K.) dwl 223 Jessie 
Kercheval Robert, bookkeeper Odd Fellows' Sav- 
ings Bank, dwl 108 Taylor 
Kern John, real estate, dwl 231 Pacific 
KIMBALL MANUFACTURING CO., (George 
P. Kimball and Richard L. Ogden) carnage 
and car manufacturers, cor Fourth and Bryant, 
salesroom 535 Market 
Kimball Matthew H., roller skate manufacturer, -W 

New Montgomery, dwl 114 Minna 
KINNEY BROTHERS, (Albert W. and Marskut. 
J. Kinney) agents Salem (Oregon) Flour Mills, 
ll^Ciay , „ ,. , 

KIRBY R. C. & CO., (Joseph Perkins) manu- 
facturers and dealers leather, office 402 Battery, 
tannery Santa Clara 
Kiikpatrick John, wholesale liquors, 604 and bUb 

Front, dwl 533 Post 
Kiss Albert, (Kiss & Pyser) dwl 246 Clementina 
Kiss & Pyser, (Albert Kiss and Henry b. Pyser) 
merchant tailors, 157 Third . 

Knapp S. S. Miss, teacher South Cosmopolitan Pri- 
mary School, dwl 521 O'Farrell 
Knight Edward, reporter, dwl SW cor Kearny and 

Jackson .^. 

Knight Harriet A. Mrs., furnished rooms, isW cor 

Kearnv and Jackson 
KNIGHT "WILLIAM H., broker, office 3,U Mont, 

res Oakland , _^_ ^ , . 

Knowlton J. J.. (Knowlton & Co.) dwl 2207 Larkin 



d 

M 

I 

o 
1*1 

(' 
( 



JONEa, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dress Trimmings. 



KEDIWOTON, HOSTETTER & CO.. Headouartera lor DrugsiBts on the Pacific Coast. 



60 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



I 



3? 



KNOWLTON & CO., (.LJ. Knowlton and W. H. 

Harron) manufacturers inks, 2^0 Brannaii 
Kollock John M., superintending surgeon Marine 

HoBpiials Pacific Coast, office Custom House, 

tliiidfloor 
Kransffrill Jacob, fKraxisgrill dj- Petry) dwl 522 

Filbert 
KrauKgrill <fe Petry (Jacob KrnusgriU and Jnhn 

Pctry) polishers and gilders, o(l8 Commercial 
Kunhardt Fabian, stationery and newspapers, 1320 

Stockton 

LA SOCIEDAD, (semi-weekly) Frederick Epson, 
publisher and proprietor, office 621 Sansom 

LAIDLEY JAMES, assessor U. S. Internal Reve- 
nue, office 419 California 

Landsberg Henrv, cigars and tobacco, 123 Sansom, 
dwl 708 Hvde 

LAW GAZET'TE, (daily) George A. Ware, pro- 
prietor, office 511 Siinsom 

LAWTON FRANKLIN, notary public, office 321 
Montgomery 

Lawton Orlando, ( Hnynea&L.) di\i;\ Grand Hotel 

Ledden John A., bookkeeper with J. S. Wall tfe Co., 
dwl W 8 Larkiii bet Tyler and Turk 

Lederer Simon W., dry goods, 26 Third, dwl fi09 
Jones 

Lee Henry C, importing stationer, 313 California, 
res Oakland 

Levy Michael, dry goods, 9 Kearny, dwl 1423 
Stockton 

Levy Morris B., real estate and money broker, 300 
Kearny, dwl'Sl? Post 

Lichtensteiu M. H., pawnbroker, NW cor Kearny 

.... s,.d Pine, (and Myers & L.) dwl 1024 Hvde " 

Lindberg John, tuner with M. Gray, dwl S s Pfeiffer 
nr Diipont 

LINDSEY WILLIAM, real estate agent and col- 
lector, 509 Montgomery, dwl 613 Union 

Livermore Obadiah, with Pioche & Bayerque, dwl 
31b Pine 

Locke Lewis, interpreter Chinese.Police Conrt,dwl 
908 Clay 

LORD CHARLES G. & CO., wood and coal, 11 
Tavlor, dwl 312 Haves 

LORILLARD FIRE INSURANCE CO., (New 
York) William N. Olmsted, general agent, 
office 306 California 

LOUGHLIN & NICHOLSON. ,'£^«ar(f /,07/n'A- 
lin and Donald Nicholson) City Coal Yard, 775 
Market 

LUNDBOKG J. A. W., dentist, office 12 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 1012 Larkin 

LYFORD L. DEXTER, embalmer, office 7 Kear- 
ny, dwl 110 Sutter 

Lyne William, agricultural machinist, 115 Davis, 
dwl 918 Vallejo 

Lyster Frederick, teacher music, dwl 621 Bush 

Mac'ire Joseph M., salesman with J. S. Wall & 

Co., dwl 719 Harrison 
Mansfield Charles, dwl 26 Laurel Place 
Manzer John, f Brandon & M.) res Hay wards 
MARKET FIRE INSURANCE CO., (New York) 

J. K. Wharton, general a^ent, office 408 Cal 
Mauran J. Russell, civil engineer and draftsman, 

410 Kearny, dwl 535 Post 
McAran P., merchant, office NE cor Market and 

Montgomery, dwl 1326 Mission 
McCann P. C., carpenter, dwl 6 Qnincy 
McCarthy Edward F., (McCarthy & Nougues) dwl 

207 Kearny 
McCarthy & iioagaes, (Edward F. McCarthy and 

Peter T. NouguesJ attorneys at law, office 539 

California 
McCurrie Charles H., salesman with M. Grav, dwl 

1019 Polk 
McKinley James, saloon keeper, dwl 307 Minna 
McLane John, ^Anner S,' McL.) Avil 418 Drumm 



McLellan David 8., general agent Mutual Benefit 
Life Ins. Co., office 312 Mont, res San Mateo 

Mead L. G., fMead& Foster) res Alameda 

Mead & Foster, ( L. G. Mead and W. W. Foster) 
produce commission, 216 WaBhin<;ton 

Meade Calvert, bookkeeper with H. B. Tichenor & 
Co., dwl 26^ Kearny 

Mecartney Amos, merchant, dwl 517 Mission 

Mendel D., (Mendel & Coalson) dwl 179 Perry 

MENDEL & COALSON, (D. Mendel and Jackson 
Coalson J wholesale wines and liquors, 217 Bat 

MILLER DAVID D., importer and manufact- 
urer carriages, 715 Market, dwl 105 Fifih 

Moll C. W.. commission agent, office 50 Munt Block 

MONTGOMERY STREET EXTENSION COM- 
MISSIONERS, office 1, 2 and 3 Mont Block 

Moore Charles W., phvsician, office 314 Bush 

MOORE MICHAEL, liquor saloon, 133 Third, dwl 
815 Market 

Morgan Thomas W., civil engineer and surveyor, 
office 248 Montgomery 

Morrill Charles, musical' instrument maker, S 8 
Hardie Place nr Kearnv 

MORSE GEORGE D., photographic galleries, 315 
and 417 Montgomery, dwl 776 Howard 

Mossmer August, steward with John Steinmann, 
dwl 512 Fourth 

Muir James, bricklayer, dwl 706 Jones 

MULLER GEORGE, Philadelphia Restaurant, 408 
Pine, dwl 608 Powell 

Munro J. McK., veterinary surgeon, office 577 Mkt 

Munro John, engineer U. S. Appraisers Store, dwl 
354 Brannan 

Murphy John, (George W. Blake & Co.) dwlNs 
Tehama bet Eighth and Ninth 

Mutual Benefit Life Ins. Co., (Newark, N. J.) D. 
S. McLellan general agent, office 312 Mont 

MYERS M. H.. secretary San Francisco Commer- 
cial Association, office 312 Cal, dwl 940 Geary 

Nash H. A. & Co., (William P. Pratt J commission 
boots and shoes, 15 Sansom 

Neller Leopold. fNeller & Haferlcorn) dwl NW cor 
Bush and Monttromerv 

NELLER &, HAFERKORN. ( Leopold Neller and 
Anton Haferkorn) wines and liquors and bil- 
liards, NW cor Bush and Montgomery 

Newby James B.. attorney at law, office 614 Mer- 
chant, dwl 915 Montgomery 

Newell William W., manulacturer printers' rollers, 
532 Clay 

Newmark Valentine, phj'eician, office and dwl 1805 
Powell 

Nicholson Donald, (Loughlin & N.) dwl 410 .lones 

Noble Ilamden H.. stockbroker, office 428 Califor- 
nia, dwl 1119 Mission 

Nougues Peter T., (McCarthy & N.) attorney at 
law, office 539 California, dwl 408 Bryant 

Nugent & O'Neil, ( William Nugent and John 
O'Neil) produce commission, 104 Clay 

O'Brien Michael J. , miner, dwl 63 Natoma 

O'Donnell Charles C, physician, office and dwl 
825 Kearny 

O'Farrell House, (late Brookline) Michael Farrell 
proprietor, 217 Broadway 

Oaklana View Homestead Association, office 8 
St-evenson's Building 

OCCIDENT, (weekly)Rev. Sylvester Woodbridge 
publisher and proprietor, office 326 Sansom 

Odermatt F. A., (Crowell (Sf 0.) dentist, office and 
dwl 225 Bush 

OLMSTED WILLIAM N., shipping and commis- 
sion merchant, and general agent Lorillard Fire 
Ins. Co., 306 California, dwl Lick House 

Osborn George W., real estate, office 408 California, 
(and California Chemical Paint Co.) dwl Ws 
Howard bet Erie and Fourteenth 

Osborne Anna, (widow) dsvl 831 Clay 



Keep California Capital in California, insure in the "PEOPLES." 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & C O.. 708. 712. 714 and 716 Kearny St.. Table and Pooket Cutlery 

61 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC. 



Otevseu Herman, (Remmel& OJ dwl Orleanb Hotel 
Owen John W., ( Wight & 0.; attorney at law, 
office 716 Montgomery, dwl 1123 Powell 

Pacific Protective Association, office 418 Mont 
Pardow Alfred A., attorney at law, office b05 Clay, 

dwl 1025 Clay . , , om »,- 

Parker E. Miss, teacher music, dwl 3o9 Minna 
Peck James B., with B. H. Ramsdell 110 Jackson 
Pennvcook James, metal roofer, dw .■)12 Linden 
Petvv'john. ^AVfl't^^rtV/cS- i'.; dwl 522 l- ilbert 
Pickett William, shipping and forwarding merchant, 

318 Front, dwl 829 Broadway 
Pierce Samuel S. Jr., 24 Post, res Clinton 
Polack &. Hariman, (Samuel Polack and bo/omon 
Harlvian) fancy goods and dresstnmmings, 1» 
Kearny, and 1012 Stockton 
Prag Conrad, exchange broker, 311 Battery, dwl 

1021 Post. . „ _, ., 

Pratt William P., agent C. Benkert & Sons Phila- 
delphia, hoots and shoos, 15 Sansom, (and H. 
iV«sA cfc Co.; dwl 618 Turk 
Price Benjamin, (Rosensiock, P. .?• Co.J dwl Cos- 
mopolitan Hotel , 
PUTNAM STILLMAN N., attorney at law and 
real estate, office 704 Mont, dwl 1512 Howard 

Quick Robert P., shuttermaker with Kittredge & 

Leavitt, dwl 1014 ^lission 
QUINN CHARLES** .irpenter and builder, bL cor 

Lilly and Gongh'' dwl 133 Oak 
Quinn John, liquors, NW cor Stockton and Jackson, 

dwl 39 Natoma 



Radovich JjxZKRVsJJ.C.Sack & Co./M&Keavnj 
Read, Bradley & Co., (Ellis Head and John A. 

Brartley) groceries and liquors, 540 Market 
Read Ellis, (Read, Bradley if Go.) dwl 36 

Eleventh _ . , m 

REAllDEN TIMOTHY H., attorney at law, office 

507 .Montsfomery , room 7, dwl 216 Bnsh 
Reillev Charles J., plumber and gashtter, 1014 

Kearny, dwl 1012 Filbert 
Rice John R., physician, office and dwl 732 Howard 
Richardson Edward, portrait painter, studio 240 Mont 
Richardson Frederick, accountant, dwl SW cor Oak 

and Laguna , , ,t c o n .. 

Robinson John A., chief clerk U. S. Surveyor Gen- 
eral, dwl W 8 Folsom nr Twenty-hrst 

Rogers George H., ganger liquors, dwl NE cor Oc- 
tavia and Filbert u i ^^ 

ROGERS GEORGE W., manufacluier gold leaf, 
112 Morton „ . , 

BOHR JOHN &. SON, (J. B. Rokr) furniture and 
bedding, 539 Market j_i e „ 

Root Nathan T., United States Ganger, dwl S a 
Clay bet Fillmore and Steiner 

Roper Edward, house and sign painter, 511 Com- 
mercial, dwl 521 Turk , , _, _, , 

Rorke & Co.,/' Felix M. Rorke and George GleasonJ 
produce commission, 122 Washington 

ROSENTHAL, FEDER & CO., (Morr^i Rosen- 
thal, Louis Feder and Simon BrombergerJ 
wholesale boots and shoes, 18-20 Battery 

Rosenthal Joseph, importer engravings, moldings, 
paintings, etc., 105 Third 

Roufstone A. J., dwl N s Miuna nr Seventh 

Rowley Ridgway G., attorney at law, office 614 
Merchant, dwl 540 Mission 

Sack J. C. & Co., (Lazarus Radovich) wines and 

liquors, 306 Kearny . . 

San Diego Homestead Association Union, Ira G. 

Hoitt, secretary, office 42-5 Kearny 
SAN FRANCISCO COMMERCIAL ASSOCIa-^ 

TION office 312 California „ 

SAN FRANCISCO PACKAGE EXPRESS, E. 

A. Rowe president, Edward Hall secretary, 

office 306 Montgomery 



S. F. Cooperative Land and Building Association, ^ 
H B CouKdon, secretarv, office 306 Mont y 

SATURDAY MATINEE, Saturday Matinee Pub- q 
lishing Co. proprietors, office 423 Washington £ 
Save Plaeido, florist, dwl Brooks nr Market 
Scharowski Albert, ( Scttaroicski & Wessenhergj 
dwl 810 Washington , . , 

Scharowski & Wessenberg,/'y4/i<?/-i! Scharowski and 
Peter WessenbergJ butter, cheese, eggs and 
poultrv, 81-82 California Market 
SCHREIBER CHR. &. CO., (John W. Meyer J fur- 
niture manufacturers, NE cor Mam and Mission 
Schwab & Kuhn, (Israel Schwab and Solomon 

KuhnJ importers tobacco and pipes, 120 San 
Scott William P., office 619 Merchant, dwl 533 Union 
Seales Daniel, (colored) real estate, dwl 1336 Dup 
SECURITY SAVINGS BANK, 304 San wra 
Sherman Obadiah D., expressman dwl 106 T'lrk 
Shew Jacob, photographer, 612 Clav, dwl b29 Clay 
Shew Myron, with William Shew, dwl S s Caliior- 

nia bet Jones and Leavenworth 
Shilling Levi, hides and wool, NE cor Market and 
Battery, dwl 632 Market , r, , ..07 

Siebe George, (Heineken, Drathmann <£ Co.y OJ/ 

Sloan William R., clerk, 608 Market, dwl 1203 
Howard , „ ^ 

SMITH ALFRED J., plumber and manufacturer 
pumps and water closets, 908 Market, dwl S s 
Twenty-sixth nr Mission 

Smith E. & C, wholesale butchers, New Butcher- 

Smith" Edwin, ^i;. <fc G. Smith) dwl 961 Harrison 
Smithson Thomas B., (Smithson & Ward) dwl 318 

SMITHSON & WARD, (Thomas B. Smitftshn^ 
and William Ward) importers ale and porter » 
509 Sacramento , .,, , ^ o , 

SON BROTHERS, (Adolph A. and Albert A. Son J ■i 
importers pipes, smokers' articles, cutlerv, sta- •* 



tionery and notions, SE cor Sansom and oac ^ 
Standerwick James S., house and sign painter, 60/ ^ 

Merchant, dwl 626 Jessie i 

STATE UNIVERSITY BOARD OF REGENTS, 

office 320 California 4 

STEWAR r GEORGE, real estate agent, 332 Mont, 3 

dwl 22 Rondel Place ' 

Stewart William E., (Dunshee, Llhs & S.) dwl 

N 8 Twelfth Av bet P and Q, South S. F. 
Sully John, plumber, NW cor Stockton and Post, 

dwl N s Post bet Broderick and Baker 
Sury Paul, manager Helvetia Hotel, 431 Pine 
SUTHERLAND & GRAY, (Robert Sutherland 

and John T. Gray) plumbers and gashtters, 

230 Sutter , . . „ o,t. . 

Swain Joseph H., hygienic physician, office 24 Post, 

(andJH. Swain & Co.) dwl 417 Folsom 
SWAIN J. H. & CO., proprietors Butler's Lifting 

Cure, 24 Post 

TARPEY M. & CO., produce commission, 107 Clay 
Tayker John J., collector Mercantile Library, 216 

Bush . , ,xr ,, T-l < 

TEVIS LLOYD, vice-president Wells, Fargo & 
Co., office NW cor Mont andCal, (andHaggin 
<fc r.; office 41 1 J California .,,,•. 

Thomas James, painter with Cal. Chemical Faint 
Co. dwl NW cor Fourth and Townsend 

Thompson William, Jr.. real estate, dwl Valencia 
bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 

TILDEN H. L.. attornev at law, office 5.33 Kearny 

TOWNSEND CLARE^fCE F., attorney at law, 
office room 22, 636 Clay, dwl 405 Sutter 

Trask Jas. L., broker, office 306 Mont, dwl 28 Geary 

Tucker J. C, physician, office 121 Montgomery, dwl 
Valencia nr Nineteenth 

Union Gas Machine, Robert Hewson, agent, 302 
Montgomery 



JONES. PULLMAN & CO.. 116 Sansom Street, Yaakee NoUoai. 



TBBBA SANTA gi^es Immediate and permanent reliel In Dyspepsia. 



62 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



c 



Vaughan Frederick, news and periodical stand, 
514 MontKoniery 

Vimont John N., merchant, dwl 850 Market 

Vogelsdortr B. W. Sc Co., stock and money brokers, 
ottice 42:2 Montgomery 

Volbracht August, fC. H. Hinricks <fc Co.,) dwl 
1114 Stockton 

Von Pfister Francis M., bookkeeper Hibernia Sav- 
ings and Loan Bank, dwl 520 Eddy 

Von Phster R., dwl 520 Eddy 

Walker Samuet,, landscape painter, studio 232 
Sutter, dwl W s Devisadero bet Sutter and Post 

Wall Jesse S., (J. S. Wall <& Go. J res Oakland 

WALL J. S. & CO., wholesale groceries, 121 
Front 

Warburton Joseph & Co., real estate agents, office 
720 Market 

Ward William, (Smithson & WJ dwl 924 Jackson 

Waterman E. R. &. Co. .railroad advertising agency, 
608 Market 

Waters George F., clerk, dwl 115 Stockton 

Watson William S., civil and mining engineer, 410 
Kearny, dwl 212 Powell 

Weitz Samuel, clerk with Stolz Bros., dwl 405 
Leavenworth 

WELCH &, CO., (Andrew and R. D. Welck) im- 
portinK and commission merchants, and agents 
Moody's Burrard Inlet Saw Mills, British Co- 
lumbia, office 109 California 

WELLMAN, PECK & CO., (Bela WeUman, John 
M. Peck and Timothy L. Barker) importers 
and wholesale grocers, 416 and 418 Front 

Wessenberg Peter, f Scharotoski & W.J dwl N s 
-Francisco bet Stockton and Powell 

Wettman Henry, boot and shoemaker, 546 Clay, dwl 
1122 Pacific 

WHARTON J. R.. general agent Market Fire In- 
surance Co., office 408 California , res Brooklyn, 
Alameda county 



Whitehead Charles, clerk with Bayer, Reich & Co., 
dwl 719 Vallejo 

WHITING M. S. & CO., wholesale and retail 
liquors, Hayward's Building 

Whitney George, dwl 1118 Howard 

Wichelhausen Rudolph, agent, 210 Montgomery, 
dwl NW cor Natoma and Russ 

Wiener Albert, clerk with Stolz Brothers, dwl 253 
Jessie 

Wiener Michel, clerk with Henry L. Weil, dwl 
253 Jessie 

Wightraan John & Co., American Eagle tobacco 
agency, 318 Front, dwl S s Tbirteeiiib bet How- 
ard and Folsom 

Willard Joseph W., salesman California Powder 
Works, dwl 521 O'Farrell 

Williams George N., general agent Economical Life 
Ins. Co., office 6 Merchants' Exchange 

Wilson Thomas H., engineer with L. & E. Emanuel, 
dwl SW cor Fourth and Berry 

Wolfe James E. Jr., (.James E. Wolfe Sj- Son) dwl 
E s Fair Oaks hiet Twenty third and Twenty- 
fourth 

WOODBRIDGE SYLVESTER REV., pastor 
Howard Street Presbyterian Church, and pub- 
lisher and proprietor Occident, office 326 San- 
som, dwl W B Valencia near Twenty-third 

Worley Alfred E. T., iournalist, dwl E s Hyde 
bet Washington ana Clay 

Worrell Henry, clerk with S. J. Clarke, dwl 16 
Folsom 

Wurkheim Max, importer clothing, 22 Sansom, dwl 
508 Leavenworth 

Zerman Emanuel, clerk with William P. Hum- 
phrevs, dwl 540 Bryant 

Zerman John N., dwl 540 Bryant 

ZIEGENBEIN JOHN & CO., (M. K. Thorn- 
burgh) produce commission, NVV cor Sacra- 
mento and Davis 



-I 1 Recently Published. One Vol. 8vo., 1000 pp. Price, Five Dollars. 



OJ ] 



Is I 



THE 



PACIFIC COAST BUSIMiSS DIRECTORY 

FOR 1871-73, 

CONTAINING THE 

NAMES, BUSINESS AND ADDRESS OF OVER 40,000 MERCHANTS, 

MANUFACTURERS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN 

In the States of California, Oregon and Nevada, the Territories of Washington, 
Utah, Arizona, Idaho, Montana and Alaska, and the Colony of British Columbia, 
with a Gazetteer of the Counties, Cities and Towns of the Pacific Coast, and the 
names of the Officers governing the same, Federal, State and Municipal. 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, Publisher, 

612 Clay Street, San Francisco, 



The direotory of the " PEOPLES " is composed of the best business m<^n of California. 



O. P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Jewelry and Albums. 



GENERAL REVIEW 



47 



age in the range of civilization. The Public Libra- 
ries are numerous and respectable, and notwith- 
standing the act,ivity and energy exhibited by her 
citizens in every department of life, the statistics of 
these institutions prove beyond controversy that 
they are at the same time essentially a reading peo" 
pie. Not physical alone, but mental activity is a 
prominent characteristic of our population. 

In addition to these libraries, several of the hotels 
of the city are provided with large and well-select- 
ed collections of books for the use of guests. That 
belonging to the What Cheer House numbers about 
seven thousniid volumes of well-selected works, 
connected with whitli is an extensive cabinet of 
specimens in natural history, and a large number of 
paintings, with a marble bust by Powers, copied by 
that artist from his statue of California, and a fancy 
head in marble by Gaulr, an eminent sculptor. 

Want of space prevents a reference in detail to 
the numerous public libraries in this city, prominent 
among which may be named the Mercantile Library 
Association, containing thirty thousand volum- 
es; Odd Fellows', twenty thousand ; Mechanics' 
Institute, eighteen thousand ; San Francisco Law 
Library, four thousand ; Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation, four thousand ; California Pioneers, two 
thousand live hundred ; San Francisco Verein, four 
thousand. 

MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

The spacious and well-arranged rooms of this as- 
sociation are located in the Mercantile Library 
Building, designed for the purpose, on the corner of 
Montgomery and Busli streets. The Society was 
organized January '■24, 1853, by the election of the 
following officers : President : David S. Turner ; 
Vice-President: J. P. Haven ; Treasurer: C. C. 
Bowers ; Recording Secretary : Dr. Henry Gib- 
bons ; Corresponding Secretary : W. H. Stevens ; 
Directors: E. P. Flint, E. E. Dunbar, D. H. 
Haskell, and J. B. Crockett. 

The Library contains 20,500 judiciously selected 
and well arranged and classified volumes of stand- 
ard and miscellaneous works, of which 3,788 have 
been added since January 1870 ; the Library for 
reference numbering 8, QUO ; to which important ad- 
ditions have been added during the current year — 
several copies of each popular work being purchased 
for the Library immediately after its issue from the 
press. The number of members is '2,020 of which 
337 are Life, 78 Honorary and 1,605 Subscribing. 
The average number of books taken from the Libra- 
ry each month, amounting to 6,880, clearly sustains 
the assertion previously made that the citizens of 
San Francisco are esseniially a reading community. 

In the commodious, convenient and comfortably 
fitted-up Reading Room attached to the Library are 
to be found all the leading local, domestic and for- 
eign newspapers and periodicals, magazines and 
reviews — neither pains nor expense being spared to 
render this department an attractive resort to mem- 
bers and visitors. The walls are adorned with a 
number of line paintings, portraits of distinguished 
individuals, and historical pieces. Adjoining this is 
the Chess Room, where members partial to this 
healthy and invigorating mental exercise meet for a 
trial of skill, and to indulge in their favorite pastime. 
Although the rooms are thronged nightly with a 
crowd, everything is quiet, orderly, and decorous — 
all the affairs of the Association moving along like 
clock-work. The admirable niauagetueni of t'le 
librarian's department is due to the ability ai.d 
attention of the Librarian, Mr. Alfred Stebbins, 
whose uniform urbanity, in connection with his as- 
sistants, renders a visit to the roome of the institution 
both pleasant and agreeable. 

The financial embarrassments, which at one time 



almost threatened the permanency of this most use- 
ful institution, have been entirely removed by the 
results of the Gift Entertainment, held in October 
last, by authority of legislative enactment and its 
atfairs placed upon a firm and prosperous basis that 
must insure for its future a position as one of the 
most prominent literary institutions in the country. 

ODD fellows' library ASSOCIATION. 

This Library was organized December 30, 1854, 
with but about one hundred volumes. It now con- 
tains over 18,000, among which are a large number 
of rare and valuable works on the history of this 
coast. The greater part of the works of the old 
Spanish writers on this subject have been collected 
with great care and research, and form a very at- 
tractive feature of this collection. Agents are now 
employed by the Asociation, both in the Atlantic 
States and in Europe, collecting all that is extaut 
upon this important and interesting subject. 

Connected with the Library is a reading room 
where all the leading journals of the day are to be 
found constantly on file, and also an extensive, Cab- 
inet of valuable curiosities, embracing various speci- 
mens of the mineralogy, botany, conchology, orni- 
thology, entomology, and zoology of California, in 
fact a miniature museum of the wonderful I'esources 
of our Pacific home. The value of the Library and 
Cabinet is upwards of $44,102. When we consider 
that the Library is supported only by Odd Fellows, 
it speaks well for the literary taste of its members. 
A great deal of the success of the Association is due 
to the untiring eneivy and unwavering interest in its 
progress manifested by its deceased and honored 
President S. H. Parker, under whose fostering care 
the Library and reading rooms became models of 
neatness, elegance and utility. The administration 
of his successors has contributed to advance the in- 
terest of the Association and at the present time the 
Library and Cabinet are regarded as one of the 
most valuable on this coast. 

Under a recent change in its organization, this 
Association will be in receipt of greater resources 
than it has heretofore enjoyed, by which its con- 
ductors will be able to cari'y out the ambition of itb 
much respected and deceased founder to make it one 
of the leading literary societies of the Pacific Coast. 

mechanics' institute library. 

This Library, organized in 1855, contains 18,000 
volumes, of which 12,.500 are arranged as a refer- 
ence library consisting principally of sets of Re- 
ports of Learned Societies, viz : the London Agri- 
cultural, the Zoological, the Geological, the Insti- 
tute of Civil Engineering, etc. Connected with the 
Library is a reading room well supplied with the 
leading scientific, and literary periodicals of the 
day and an interesting cabinet containing several 
hundred specimens of interesting objects in natural 
history, models of machinery, and other interesting 
and curious matters. This library occupies the main 
hall of the elegant building of the Association on 
Post Street between Montgomery and Kearny. 

SAN FRANCISCO LAW LIBRARY. 

Organized 1865. Reorganized March 9th, 1870. 
The importance of an extensive and suitable library 
of reference to meet the growing demands of the 
legal profession of this city and vicinity has been 
recognized by the enactment of a law by the Legis- 
lature of the State at its last session, providing a 
revenue for the support of this Library which al- 
ready contains nearly 5,000 volumes of standard 
works in every department of legal science, to- 
gether with complete reports of American, English, 
Irish and Scotch decisions. The rooms of the Lib- 
rary, located in Montgomery Block, are commodi- 
ous, well arranged, and are provided with all the 
standard legal publications of the day. 



JONES, PULLMAN .& CO., 116 Sanaom Street, Pocket CuUery and Scissora. 



TERBA SANTA completely restores the system when impaired by disease. 



48 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Terms of membership : Life Members, $100 ; 
anmirtl members, $30. Officers. — J. P. Hoge, 
President ; J. W. Wiuans, Treasurer; Albert Hart, 
Librarian ; J. DeWitt, Assistant. 

Fire Department. 
The new paid Fire Department has been in opera- 
tion since December 3d, 1867, and has fully met the 
expectations of those under whose direction its 
management is placed. On page 796 of this volume 
will be found the law organizing the Department ; 
and on page 855 is a description in detail, in which 
will be found a mass of information concerning the 
different companies, useful to its members and in- 
teresting to every citizen. 

Banking Institutions. 
The last report of the Savings and Loan Societies 
of San Francisco, for the six months ending De- 
cember 31st, 1870, presents the following figures, 
together with the aggregate of their operations 
since January, 1866 : 



Xame. 


Dep'rs 


Deposits. 


Earning t 
$ 23,343 


Res. F-d 


Far. AiMech. B. S. 


364 


$ 288,924 


$ 11,000 


French S. & L 


5,000 


4,476.721 


250,184 


76,246 


German S. & t, 


2,701 


l,5f?5,36o 


91,910 


69,297 


HiberniaS. & L.... 


14,391 


11,191,181 


624,262 


440,.i78 


Humboldt S. A L.. 


346 


253,293 


11, .563 


40,000 


Masonic S. & L 


412 


l.W,869 


7,934 


13,278 


Odd Fellows' S. B.. 


2,771 


2,326,429 


122.862 


17,143 


Red Jlcn'sS. B.... 




42,866 






S.F. Savings Union 
Savings &Loan.... 


4,962 


3,500,196 


202,783 


119,7.56 


5,915 


7,464,706 


438,031 


270,758 


Totals 


$36,862 
31,974 


$31,289,550 
24,773,078 


$1,772,872 
1,409,6.54 


81,058,036 
822,816 


Report July, 1869. . 


Report Jan., 1869... 


29,893 


22,:t72..508 


1,134,087 


725,887 


Report July, 1868.. 


26,065 


19,678,364 


95.5,6.56 


551,988 


Report Jan., 1868... 




16,833,259 


843,917 


485,700 


Report July, 1867.. 




13,833,259 


694,311 


470,079 


Report Jan., 1867... 




10,3.58,888 


564,470 


328,919 


Report Julv, 1866.. 




8,760,164 


493,791 


2.52,918 


Report Jan., 1866... 




7,005,061 


306,061 


236,936 



The above returns show a most satisfactory con- 
dition of affairs, and reflect great credit upon the 
officers intrusted with the management of tliis most 
important department of our home finances. The 
total amount on deposit is $31,289,550, which, if 
divided among 36,86i depositors, will average to 
each, $348 — a large increase over that of the year 
preceding. 

The dividends declared by these institutions, for 
the above period, vary from nine to twelve per 
cent, per annum. The Hibernia, Savings and Loan, 
and Savings Union, each paid ten per cent. 

A new association, the Secnrity Savings Bank, 
with a capital of $300,000, has just been organized, 
with a number of leading capitalists as directors. 

" If the deposits at our Savings Banks indicate 
anything, they exhibit a prosperous condition of 
the industrial classes of the city. There is no city 
in the United States, and certainly not outside of 
this Slate, that can show so large a line of de- 
posits in proportion to the number of banks, or so 
nigh an average to the credit of the depositor, 
while it is unquestionably true that no where else 
are depositors so well paid for their money as 
here." 

In addition to the amount accumulated by the 
savings societies, there is a commercial baiiking 
capital in this city, estimated at from $12,000,000 to 
$15,00(1, (JOO, which is in demand for commercial, 
manufacturing, and mining purposes. The number 
of banking establishments in the city is thirty, of 
which eight are banks, twelve private banking 
houses, and ten savings and loan societies. Two 



new banks, the Merchants' Exchange and the San 
Francisco Gold Bank, each with a capital of 
$1,000,000, have been established during the past 
year. 

Insurance Companies. 

There are eight local insurance companies devo- 
ted to lire and Marine risks, one of which the Mer- 
chants Mutual Marine attends to Marine business 
only. The aggregate paid up capital is $1,153,600, 
assets $2,203,113, total $6,3.56,713. The amount of 
dividends paid for the year 1870 was $534 ,927, against 
$146,314 for the year 1869. In addition to the home 
companies, there are sixteen Eastern and eleven 
foreign companies represented in this city by agents. 

There are forty -live Life Insurance Companies 
transacting business in California, with agencies in 
this city, of which only two are home institutions, 
the California Mutual of this city, and the Pacific 
Mntnal of Sacramento. 

Cemeteries. 

There is, perhaps no feature connected with a 
prominent city that occupies a greater degi'ee of in- 
terest in the estimation of strangers and visitoi-s 
than its cemeteries. One of the most attractive 
Bp)Ot« to the visitor to the great American metropolis 
is the " City of the Dead" at Greenwood. The 
peaceful shades of Mount Auburn have a melan- 
choly charm to those who make a pilgrimage to the 
great capital of the Bay State ; and no one enters 
the City of Brotherly Love, without seeing the 
classic monuments tastefully laid out, beautifully 
adorned and admirably-kept grounds at Laurel 
Hill. Other cities, of lesser extent and fewer years, 
exhibit equal taste and regard for the depositories 
of their dead. Spring Grove at Ciuciuuati, Mount 
Hope at Rochester, tUe Albany Cemetery, and nu- 
merous others, are examples of taste in ilie selection 
of the location and beauty of adorning and an auge- 
ment. In all modern places selected for the repose 
of the departed, good taste has retained the primi- 
tive forest trees — the monarch of the groves them- 
selves being tittiug monuments "not made with 
hands." In point of beauty of locality, our own 
Laurel Hill and Calvary cemeteries, situated as 
they are in full view of that grandest of all 
monuments — the mighty ocean — are nowhere sur- 
passed. There is a tituess and sublimity in their 
contiguity to the waves of the Pacific and the en- 
trance to the Golden Gate, that never fails to im- 
press every beholder. In the way of monuments 
erected to the memory of the departed l)y the hand 
of affection and regard, many may be found in the 
city cemeteries which are alike models of artistic 
elegance and pure aud refined taste. 

There are eight cemeteries in this city. The Mis- 
sion Burial Ground, (no longer used as a place of 
interment) established in 1776 ; Laurel Hill (late 
Loue Mountain) in 1854 ; Calvary in 1860; Masonic 
in 1864; Odd Fellows in 1865 ; ^'evai Sualome in 
1865 and the Gibboth Olom in 1865. 

"Water Companies. 

SPRING V.ILLEV WATER WORKS. 

The original Spring Valley Water Company was 
incorporated in June, 1858, and in July, IStU, the 
water from Islais Creek was introduced into the city 
by the company. 

The present organization is formed by a consolida- 
tion of the San Francisco City , and Spring Valley 
Water Works companies. Date of incorporation, 
January, 1865. 

The present works receive their supply from two 
sources — Lobos and Pillarcitos creeks. Lobos Creek 



^500,000 Qold Assets-the foundation of the PEOPLES. 



C. p. VAN SCHA.A.CK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valises. 



GENERAL REVIEW. 



49 



ie a stream of pure, fresh water, emptying into the 
bay near Point Lobos, which Bupplies two millions 
five hundred thousand gallons daily. The distance 
of the stream from the Plaza is tln^ee and a half 
miles, in a direct line. The water is elevated by 
four double acting pumps, with a capacity of four 
millions of gallons daily, propelled by two steam en- 
gines of two hundred and fifty horse power each, to 
the distributing resei'voirs on the adjacent hills, the 
highest being thiee hundred and eight feet above 
the city base, located at the corner of Hyde and 
Greenwich streets ; the second, which is situated 
immediately below, at the intersection of Hyde and 
Francisco streets, is one hundred and forty-five feet 
above the city base. The capacity of the first is 
four millions of gallons, and that of the lower, seven 
millions. 

Pillarcitos Creek is situated east of the coast range 
of mountains, distant from San Francisco about fif- 
teen miles, in a southerly direction, and seven hun- 
dred feet above the level of the sea. 

A large dam has been constructed in the Pillarci- 
tos Valley, which is ninety-two feet in bight, and 
six hundred feet long, containing one thousand mil- 
lions of gallons, and is diawu from, as required in 
the city reservoirs. From the east end of tunnel num- 
ber one, the water is conducted by a Hume five by two 
feet, into a filter and sand-box, in its passage through 
which it is cleansed from vegetable matter and sed- 
iment ; it then enters tunnel number two, where 
the Water undergoes another purification, and after 
passing through thirteen miles of thirty-inch 
wrought iron pipe, and one mile of forty-inch flume 
enters tunnel number three, from whence Lake 
Honda and the city distributing reservoirs are sup- 
plied. 

Lake Honda baa a capacity of thirty-five millions 
of gallons, and supplies the city by means of three 
miles of cast iron mains to the reservoir on the cor- 
ner of Buchanan and Market streets, which con- 
tains two millions of gallons, and is the main dis- 
tributing reservoir, supplying two-fifths of ihe city. 

The Company has this year constructed a new 
reservoirof fourteen millions of gallons capacity near 
Holly Park, called College Hill Reservoir, which 
will be the main distributing reservoir for the lower 
part of the city. There is also a large reservoir in 
San Andreas Valley, thirteen miles south of the city, 
containing four thousand six hundred and fifty mill- 
ions of gallons. The water level is four hundred 
and thirty feet above the city base, from wliich the 
city will tave a never-failing supply of the pure ele- 
ment. 

The present amount of pipe laid down in the city 
proper is one hundred and twenty-three miles. 
Capital stock of the company, $S,UOO,0(IO, in eighty 
thousand shares of $100 each. 

LAKE TAHOE AND SAN FKANCISCO WATER WORKS. 

The rapidly increasing population of San Fran- 
cisco has caused our citizens to study the momentous 
questionof its water resources. Asit is possible that 
at no distant day the present means of supply may 
become entirely insufficient forour demands, a num- 
ber of gentlemen conceived the idea of bringing 
the waters of Lake Tahoe into this city. To show 
the vastncss of the undertaking, we give the follow- 
ing extent and cost of the work : Lake Tahoe has 
a superficial area of two hundred and forty square 
miles, with an average depth of fifteen hundred 
feet ; it is situated in the Sierra Nevada mountains, 
at an elevation of six thousand feet above the sea, 
and distant from Sun Francisco one hundred and 
fifty miles. The company have constructed a dam 
on the Truckee river — four miles below its outlet — 
near Squaw Valley. From thence the water is to 
be conveyed by aqueduct to the eastern mouth of the 
tunnel on Forest Hill Divide, which includes Michi- 
gan Bluff. Bath, Iowa Hill, Wisconsin Hill, Yan- 



kee Jim's, Forest Hill, and numerous other mining 
camps, with an abundant supply of cheap water. 
The water required for towns and cities will be 
taken out of the river at a point above the mining 
grounds, and run in an open canal, to or near Au- 
burn, and thence by pipe one hundred and eight 
miles to San Francisco, supplying on its route Sa- 
cramento, Vallejo, Benicia, Stockton, Oakland, etc., 
and affording along its entire course ample quan- 
tities for towns, mines, mills, and agricultural pur- 
Soses. The capital stock of the company is $"-20, 000, 
00, divided into twenty thousand shares of $1,000 
each. The estimated cost is $10,000,000. The offi- 
cers are : President and Chief Engineer, A. W. 
Von Schmidt ; Trustees ; A. W. Von Schmidt, Da- 
vid Hughes, Robert Simson, Joseph Trench, and 
G. H. Ensign. Office Pioneer Building, 808 Mont- 
gomery Street. 

To bring the water to San Fitincisco, a tunnel two 
and a half miles will be constructed through the 
mountain, connecting the lake with one of the forks 
of the American River, through the bed of which 
the waters will be carried. 

NEW WATER COMPANIES. 

Several new enterprises, having for their object 
the supplying this city with water, have been incor- 
porated recently. The San Mateo Water Co., or- 
organized September, 1866 ; capital, $1,000,000. 
Messrs. W. E. Barron, F. D. Atherton, T. H. Selby, 
S. M. Macy and B. Lathrop, Trustees. The San Fran- 
cisco Water Co., organized July 24th, 1867 ; capital, 
$6,000,000. Messrs. James T. iBoyd, Milo Hoadley, 
and John H. Turney, Trustees. Bay View Water 
Company, organized July 13th, 1867 ; capital, 
$1,000,000 ; Messrs A. W. Von Schmidt, Thomas 
Hardy, and W. H. Patterson, Trustees. Tamalpaie 
Water Company, organized January 17th, 1868 ; 
capital, $5,000,000, Messrs. O. L. Shafter, James 
McM. Shafter, Trustees. Mountain Springs Water 
Company, organized April 23rd, 1869 ; capital, 
$500,000. Samuel R. Throckmorton, Charles R. 
Bond, and S. R. Throckmorton, Jr., Trustees. Con- 
tra Costa Water Company, organized July 2(ith, 
J 869; capital, $500,000. H. W. Carpentier, George 
Leviston, Jr., and K. R. Carpentier, Trustees. 

Manufactures. 
In the review of the industrial resources of San 
Francisco, it is pleasant to notice the great progress 
made in manufactures, and the important bearing 
they have upon the welfare of the city as well as of 
the State. By careful canvas, also from the statis- 
tics furnished by assessors, a knowledge is obtained 
of the extent, growth and condition of this most 
civilizing branch of industry. San Francisco, being 
the center of commerce on the Pacific Coast, natur- 
ally becomes the center of manufactures, wealth 
and refinement, and in proportion to the develop- 
ment of the interior will be the grandeur of the me- 
tropolis. The resources of the regions contributory 
to this city are of such a character as to stimulate, 
by their demands, manufactures of every variety, 
and thus tend to build up here the most extensive 
establishments for their supply. The great resource 
is mining, the prosecution of which is more destruc- 
tive of articles made by man than is any other 
labor hy which the riches of the earth are made 
available. The destruction affects almost every 
branch of manufacture, and the results furnish the 
wealth that pays for all. To break in upon and pen- 
etrate the rocky crust of the earth, and rend from 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., UQ Sansom St., Iiadiea' and Gentlemen's Iiinen Handkerchiefib 
4 



BEDIUaTON'S PLAVORrNG EXTRACTS enjoy the highest reputation among the ladies. 



the depths thereof by all the powers of human 
force and engineering ekill, the treasures of useful 
and precious. metals, the salts, and minerals of eveiy 
description hidden therein, require an enormous ex- 
penditure of labor and material. Iron, in its multi- 
tudinous uses as implements, working and crush- 
ing machinery, enters largely into the business of 
mining. Powder, lumber, every substance con- 
nected with machinery, every comfort and luxury 
demanded by prosperous miners, the many busi- 
nesses consequent upon mining, all give employ- 
ment to the manufactories of the center of supply. 
The metals and minerals in turn demand the erec- 
tion of metallurgical works and the labors of assay- 
ers and refiners, and these require and enable the 
manufacture of acids and combinations of untold 
number, and thus, in the circuit, from the minerals 
arises the most extensive svstem of manufactures, 
creative of the greatest wealth. The mines of En- 
gland, iron, coal, tin and copper predominating, have 
been the foundation of her manufactures, and as a 
consequence, of her commerce, making her the 
richest nation on the globe. 

Important as mining is, it is by no means the only 
resource of the Pacific Coast demanding and foster- 
ing manufactures. Agriculture, although its pur- 
suit is not so destructive of material as mining, is 
one of the most reliable dependencies of a country, 
and a sure foundation of wealth. The great pros- 
perity and power of the American Union is based on 
agriculture, the principal states having the cultiva- 
tion of the soil for their chief resource. From such 
a source, the grandest manufactories have arisen, 
building noble cities, and creating a commerce 
reaching to every portion of the globe. The capa- 
city of our Western slope for agriculture is almost 
without limit, and, adding the products of the for- 
ests, and of the flocks and herds, the vastness of 
which cannot be denied, and the future of our man- 
ufactures may be faintly limned. 

Coal, which is an important element in England's 
manufacturing system, is found in California, and 
in great quantities at various localities on the Coast. 
Added to this source of power, there are, for interior 
manufactures, streams without number and with 
power beyond estimate. But in the great cities, 
manufactories do like to congregate, and with the 
present excellence of steam machinery, the power 
of the engine is preferred to that of the swift-run- 
ning water. From this fact, San Francisco has be- 
come the center of manufactures, and as a conse- 
quence may be expected to continue so and increase 
in importance with the growth of the countrv. 

The manufacturing establishments of this city, 
now in operation, number upwards of eight hun- 
dred, employing a capital of $17,000,000. con- 
suming annually material of the value of $23,000,- 
000, and producing goods worth $45,000,000. The 
present state of this great interest can only be told 
in figures, but a grand exposition will be made at 
the Mechanics Institute Fair in September next, 
which is awaited with bright anticipation. 

The growth of the system to this magnitude 
within the few years that manufacturing has been 
sncceesfuUy inaugurated, shows the great import- 
ance of the interest, and presages well for the fu- 
ture. These comprise a great variety and produce 
a vast amount of articles of necessity, comfort and 
luxury, satisfying the wants, fancies and vices of 
the people of the cit^ and interior, as well as some 
things for exportation. The importation of large 
quantities of goods which could as well be made 
here, is proof that our home manufacturing estab- 
lishments have not reached their limit, and that a 
broad and inviting field is open for more. When, 
at a former day, it was cnstomary to send wheat of 
California growth to the mills of the Atlantic coast 
to be ground into flour and returned, or when our 
wool was sent abroad to be returned as blankets and 



other fabrics, there may have been more business 
for shipping and labor at the wharves, but there 
could be no general and lasting prospeiitv. Some, 
there are, who deplore the extent to which manu- 
factures have arisen and oppose most bitterly their 
further encouragement; but such a course can only 
be urged by the most narrow minds, and prompted 
by purely selfish motives. It is now generally real- 
ized that manufacturing is to be one of the most im- 
portant interests of San Francisco, from the material 
of home production and from the fertile islands of 
the Pacific. The cheapness of labor, abundance of 
capital, and energy of enterprise in rival cities will 
be no obstacle toiler advancement. The resources 
of the country are such in both material to be man- 
ufactured and subsistence for operatives, that there 
can be no question of the ability to compete with 
any people of any section of the world. The pro- 
lific soil of California produces food for the manu- 
facturing centers of the old woild, produces all the 
material to be made into articles of use, and all the 
elements of wealth, thus showing the capacity of 
the country to make for itself all that is consumed by 
the inhabitants. Gold and silver and jewels we take 
from the earth, wine and silk and delicious fruits 
are the product of our wide spread vineyards and 
orchard groves. All luxuries and necessities which 
elsewhere are gathered from many lands we have 
from our own resources. To make all, the manufac- 
turer has, besides the material at hand, the addi- 
tional advantage of the isolation of the Pacific 
Coast, giving the tariff of freight in their favor. 

A point is made by the opponents of manufac- 
tures, that less ships enter the port than when we 
did nothing else than extract gold from the conven- 
ient placer, and wool, hides and wheat were the 
shipments, but examination shows that prosperity is 
greater, comfort more general, and wealth enhanced 
with less imports and less product of gold. To ex- 
tend manufactures should be the aim of capital and 
be encouraged by every class desiring the prosperity 
of the country. The many millions of dollars lying 
in the banks of this city waiting to be loaned on 
real estate at a high rate of interest, would serve 
its fortunate owners and the general public far bet- 
ter were it invested in the manufacture of articles 
of home consumption. The policy which forces us 
to send abroad tor the great number of things of 
common use, not only represses advancement but is 
most ruinous. It would be equally consistent in 
sending our horses to Pennsylvania to be shod, or 
to England, where the iron is psoduced, as to send 
our wool to be made into clothing, our lead to be 
made into paint, our rags to be made into paper, onr 
wheat or corn to be made into starch, or of export- 
ing many other products and importing them as 
manufactured for consumption at greatly increased 
cost, giving employment to the labor and capital of 
other countries at our own expense. 

The most important, as well as the earliest of our 
manufactures, are the workers of iron and other 
metals. Blacksmithing is one of the most ancient 
and honorable of the class of metal workers, re- 
quiring strength and some knowledge of arts and 
sciences in its successful accomplishment. In the 
early days of civilization, those nobles and knights 
who achieved the greatest triumphs in war and in 
the chase, were their own armorers and horse shoers, 
and thus established the art and gave the foundation 
for the numerous family of Smiths. There are some 
eighty such establishments in this city, using a large 
capital and employing a great number of men. Of 
other branches of metal workers, there are upwards 
of ninety establishments, of which twenty-eight are 
foundries, machine shops, boiler works, etc., five 
brass foundries, six tin works, five tool manufac- 
tories, four cutlery establishments, three file cutting 
houses, one of mathematical instruments, manufac- 
tures of springs, of screen work, of screw bolts, of 



THE PEOPLES INSUBAWCE CO. a growing Company. 



C. P, VAN SCHAA.CK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 



THE 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 

For the Year commencing February 1st, 1871. 



|^= Notice.— JVflwies too late for regular insertioji, removals, changes, etc., which have occurred 
during the printing of the work, will be found on the pages immediately preceding this. 

For List of Boarding Houses, Hotels, Lodgings, etf., see Business Directory, pp. 718, 748, 
and 761 ifor Packets— Sail and Steam, see pp. 771 and 782 ; for the location of the offices of the different 
Mining Companies, see Business Directory, p. 768. 



-A. B B R E V I ^a^ T I o 3sr s 



abv Above 

acct Accountant 

agt Agent 

aes'n Associailon 

atty Attorney 

av Avenue 

bldg.Building or Buildings 

bds Boards 

bet Between 

blk Block 

C. H Custom House 

elk Clerk 

col'd Colored 

com Commission 

cor Corner 

dept Department 

dwl Dwelling 

E East 

E.H.L.EiKht Hour League 

exch Exchange 

forwd Forwarding 



Int. Rev. Internal Revenue 

F. P Fort Point 

h House 

imp Importer 

lab Laborer 

manuf. Manufacturer 

mec Mechanic 

mcht Merchant 

Mis Dol. .Mission Dolores 

mkr Maker 

mkt Market 

N North 

nr Near 

off. Office 

opp Opposite 

pi Place 

P. M Pacific Mail 

P. O Post Office 

Preo Presidio 

pro Protective 

prod Produce 



proptr Proprietor 

res.. Resides or Residence 

Rev Reverend 

rms Rooms 

S South 

8 Side 

S.F.F.D....S. F. FireDep 
stm . Steamer or Steamship 

Supt Superintendent 

Treas Treasurer 

U.S.B.M. .U.S.Br'ch Mint 

wkm Workman 

wks Works 

W West 

STREETS. 

Bat Battery 

Bdwy Broadway 

Bran Brannan 

Cal California 

CAem Clementina 

Com Commercial 



Dup Dnpont 

Fol Folsom 

Har Harrison 

How Howard 

Jack Jackson 

Leav Leavenworth 

Leid Leidesdorff 

Lomb Lombard 

Merch Merchant 

Mln Minna 

Miss Mission 

Mont Montgomery 

Pac Pacific 

Pow Powell 

Sac Sacramento 

San Sansom 

Sec Second 

Stev Stevenson 

Steu Steuart 

Stock Stockton 

Wash Washington 



Aarens Simon, shoemaker, bds 122 Leidesdorff 
Aaron Abraham, boots and shoes, 604 Kearny, dwl 

27 Ritch 
Aaron Annie, (widow) dwl 131 J Perry 
Aaron David, patternmaker, dwl 626 Vallejo 
Aaron Harry, waiter with Mandel & Ohnstein, dwl 

548 Mission 
Aaron Joseph, barber, 5:14 Third, dwl 131 J Perry 
Aaron Simon, merchant, dwl 733 Folsom 
Abadie Pene Mme., midwife, dwl 705 Vallejo 
Abbey Homestead Association, off 507 Montgomery 
Abbey Isidora, (widow) dwl 630 Green, rear 
Abbey Richard, supt Spring Valley Water Works, 

dwl Rnss House 
Abbondio Adam, cook, 623 Commercial 
ABBOT, DOWNING & CO., manufacturers Con- 
cord carriages. Concord, N. H. Hill & East- 
man agents 411-415 Battery 
Abbott Anne F. B., bottling establishment, W 8 

Gongh bet Fulton and Grove 
Abbott Frank, cook Metropolitan restaurant, dwl 

617 Mission, rear 
Abbott George, money broker, dwl 934 Folsom 
Abbott G. F., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Abbott Joseph E., scroll sawyer with D. A. Mac- 

donald & Co., dwl 8 Perry 
Abbott Henry, general railroad ticket agent, oflSce 

208 Montgomery, dwl Russ House 
Abbott J. C, carpenter, dwl Coso House 



Abbott Osborn, stock broker, dwl E s Capp bet 

Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Abbott Samuel S., carpenter Woodwards Gardens, 

dwl 12 Ridley 
Abbott Sophi-onia E., (widow) dwl 945 Howard 
Abbott Thomas, conductor Omnibus R. R. Co., dwl 

644 Howard 
Abbott William, clerk Methodist Book Depository, 

dwl 513 Minna 
Abbott William, mariner, dwl 116 Steuart 
Abel Albert, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Abel Charles, boatman, dwl N W cor Steuart and 

Howard 
Abel Christian, seaman, dwl 1 Goodsell Place 
Abel George A., porter with J. P. Raymond & *^o., 

dwl 31 Welsh 
ABELL ALEXANDER G., Grand Sec'y Grand 

Lodge F. and A.M., office Masonic Temple, dwl 

1027 Washington 
Abell Frank, photographer with William Shew, dwl 

662 Bryant 
Abell Mary J., (widow) dressmaker, dwl 945 Mis- 
sion 
ABEND POST, (German daily and weekly) Hnef- 

ner, Herzer & Schindler proprietors, office 521 

Clay 
Abercrombie A. R., clerk with P. M. S. S. Co., 

dwl NE cor Second and Folsom 
Aberg John, mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Perfumery and Fancy Soaps. 



lS"E"WEIili'3 PITIjXOKAKY BYBUP. the best family Cough Medicina 



64 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



Abernethy James, mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 
Abiia Mariano, tailoi', dwl Caroline Place nr Powell 
Abila Zenovia Mrs., restaurant, 527 Broadway 
Aborn E. S., oculist and aurist, office '^2 Kearny 
Abrador Josi'-, cigar maker witli Weil & Co., dwl 

1111 Mason 
Abraham Gabriel, merchant tailor, 33-35 Second, 

dwl 916 Harrison 
Abraham Hermann, cigars and tobacco, 130 Third, 

dwl 68 Jessie 
Abraham Joseph, clothing, 818 Montgomery. 
Abraham Louis, ( M. Spi'ro & C'o.ydwl 735 Union 
Abraham Marks, hair dresser with Simon Abraham, 

dwl 818 Montgomery 
Abraham Max, fruit peddler, dwl 248 Clementina 
Abraham Meyer, tailor, dwl NW cor Mason and 

Post 
Abraham Morris, peddler, dwl 513 Filbert 
Abraham Oscar, cook, dwl 407 Drumm 
Abraham P. & Co., (Philip Schluechierer) dry 

goods, 44 Sixth 
Abraham Philip, (P. Abraham & Co. J dwl 9 Sev- 
enth 
Abraham Simon, hair dresser and baths, 210 Pacific, 

dwl 818 Montgomery 
Abi'ahamas John, furniture, 624 Battery, dwl 48 

Jessie 
Abrahams Anna, (widow) dwl 605 Stevenson 
Abrahams Henry, bats and caps, 1012 Dupont 
Abraham John, furniture dealer, dwl 48 Jessie 
Abrahams Louis, clothing, 6 Clay, dwl 148 Perry 
Abrahams Morris, dwl NE cor Clay and Powell 
Abrahams S., dwl 926 Geary 
Abrahamson Alex&uder , f Sheyer 4' -^J dwl 319 

Kearny 
Abrahamson Gustave, (Lezynsky & A.J dwl 644 

Sacramento 
Abrahamson Jacob, furniture, dwl 644 Sacramento 
Abrahamson Julius, cleik with Myers & Lichten- 

stein, dwl 818 Kearny 
Abrahamson Nelson, longshoreman, dwl SlSFolsom 
Abrahamson Peter, stoves and tinware, 439 Bush, 

dwl 1022 Hyde 
Abrahm Herman, milk ranch, Guerrero nr Twenty- 
eighth 
Abrams David, merchant, dwl Tyler bet Van Ness 

Avenue and Franklin 
Abrams Edward C, trimmer with E. Galpen & Co., 

dwl W s Folsom nr Seventeenth 
Abrams Henry, printer, dwl 778 Folsom 
Abrams Isaac, tailor, 433 Pacific 
Abrams John, f Healhjield, Bogel & Go.) dwl Lick 

House 
Abrams Jonas, shoemaker, dwl N s Olive Avenue 

bet Van Ness Avenue and Polk 
Abrams Marcus, dwl 786 Folsom 
Abrams Samuel, f Abrams <£ Greenber/rJ 310 Mont 
Abrams Susan, (widow) dwl 305 Filbert 
Abrams & Greenberg, C Samuel Abrams and Henry 

Greenbergj real estate agents, 310 Montgomery 
Abramson Alexander, clerk with Gabriel Abraham, 

dwl 916 Harrison 
ABRAMSON EDWARD & CO., apothecaries, 753 

Clay 
Abrego Ysmael, salesman with Linforth, Kellogg & 

Co., dwl 318 Pine 
Academy of Natural Sciences, rooms 622 Clay 
Acclimatizing Society, rooms 622 Clay 
Acei'et Jacob, gardener Masonic Cemetery, dwl 57 

Shipley 
Acker Frances Mrs, dressmaker, 213 Dupont 
Acker Valentine, miner, dwl 213 Dupont 
Ackerman Adam, carpenter, dwl 1402 Stockton 
Ackerman Benjamin J., clerk with U. S. Marshal, 

dwl Branch House 
Ackerman Brothers, (Samuel S. and Hart S.J 

Dollar Store, 123 Kearny 
Ackerman David, butcher with Bernard Strauss, 

dwl 115 Perry 



Ackerman Frederick, mariner, dwl 12 Steuart 
Ackerman Hart S., (Ackerman Brothers) dwl 918 

Sutter 
Ackerman Herman, barkeeper with Otto Boye,dwl 

cor Seventeenth and Mission and Ocean Beach 

road 
Ackerman Isidor H., bookkeeper with Ackerman 

Brothers, dwl 918 Sutter 
Ackerman Isidor S., salesman with Ackerman 

Brothers, dwl 918 Sutter 
Ackerman James L., carpenter, dwl E s Valencia nr 

San Jo86 R. R. depot 
Ackerman Samuel S., (Ackerman BrothersJ dwl 

918 Sutter 
Ackerson Charles H., Chief Engineer S. F. F. Dept., 

office 23 Kearny, dwl 21.'i Kearny 
Ackerson Frank, stoker Steamer No.6, S. F. F. D., 

dwl 311 feixth 
Ackerson John W., (Hanson, A. <& Co. J dwl 215 

Jones 
Ackland Edw. T., porter, 111 Pine, dwl 106 Hickory 
Ackley Edward N., wheelwright, dwl Thirtieth nr 

Mission 
Ackley Ezra, carriage maker with Kimball Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 828 Folsom 
Ackley Helen M., (widow) dwl 340 Fifth 
Acklin Joseph K., compositor Morning Call, dwl 55 

Second 
Acosta Frederick, waiter S. S. Gussie Telfair, North 

Pac. Trans. Co. 
Acton Martin, expresswagon, dwl 569 Minna 
Acton Richard, harnessmaker with J. C. Johnson & 

Co., dwl N s Vallejo bet Kearny and Dupont 
Acton Robert, bootmaker with Buckingham & Hecht, 

dwl 551 Howard 
Adair George B., salesman with Hooker & Co., dwl 

659 Howard 
Adair William B., clerk with G. H. Mendell, dwl 

101 Powell 
Adam Peter, carpenter, dwl W s Vallejo Place nr 

Vallejo 
Adam Pierre, laundry, 633 Third 
ADAM THOMAS, liquor saloons, junction JIarket 

and Geary, Old Corner, 516 Mont cor Commer- 
cial, and New Corner, junction Market and 

Post, dwl 207 Dupont 
Adami Conrad, dwl mT Broadway 
Adami Henry, laborer Broadway Brewery, dwl 637 

Broadway 
Adami John, expresswagon SW cor Stockton and 

Jackson, dwl Virginia nr Pacific 
Adamina Felix, waiter SE cor Dupont and Com- 
mercial, dwl 132 Vallejo 
Adamir William, calker, dwl 233 First 
ADAMS ALBERT F., Assistant Assessor U. S. 

Internal Revenue, 419 Cal, dwl 1131 Howard 
Adams Alexander P., surveyor, dwl 543 Second 
Adams Aloiizo C, cabinetmaker with William G. 

Weir, dwl 528 Stevenson 
Adams Anthony, carpenter, dwl 236 Sutter 
Adams Arthur, carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
ADAMS. BLINN & Co.. ( William J. Adam.'<, Sam- 

iiel P. Blinn and Peter Taylor) lumber and 

office Puget Sound Line Packets, piers 17 &■ 18 

Steuart 
ADAMS CALVIN B., shoecntter with Bucking- 
ham & Hecht, dwl 26 Third 
Adams Charles, longshoreman, dwl 114 Sacra- 
mento 
Adams Charles, master mariner, dwl NE cor Iowa 

and Solano 
Adams Charles, driver City railroad, dwl E s First 

Av bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Adams Charles D., clerk with Loop & Somers, dwl 

21 Silver 
Adams Charles W., packer with Adams <& Co., dwl 

18 First 
Adams Christopher, gunsmith with Charles Meyer, 

dwl 627 Broadway 



THE F£OFIj£S INSUBANCS CO. is the most progresBive Company on the Coast. 



C p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708,712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY. 



65 



Adams Cyrus, mamifaetiirer fine-cut tobacco, 419 

Jaclvsbn, dwl 430 Post 
Adams Edimiud, waiter 538 Clay, dwl Pacific Lodg- 

iiitr ll(nise 
Adani.s Emerson, ^ Adams S^- Co.) dwl 21 Silver 
Adaiiia Francis, laborer, dwl 417 Unsii 
Adiims Frederick, vegetable jieddkr. dwl 81 Natoma 
Adams George F., printer with Charles VV. Gordon, 

dwl 8^ Freeloii 
Adams George G., clerk with Frank Johnson, dwl 

\'2f) Sansom 
Adams George M., cutter U. S. B. Mint, dwl 347| 

Grove 
Adauis George W., salesman with Charles L. Ding- 
ley, pier 4 Stewart 
Adams Grove, fCal. Commercial and Mainifacttir- 

insr Co. J dwl 9i20 Pine 
Adams Henry G., shoemaker with John Irwin, dwl 

2(J Third 
Adams Herman, tailor, 204 Leidesdorff, dwl 235 

Keainy 
Adams Horace, machinist, dwl 1408 Bnsh 
Adanis House, George F. lieeve proi)rietor, 537 

Sacramento 
Adams Howard N., carpenter, dwl 363 Jessie 
Adams Hngli, barkeeper with John S. Black, 238 

Steuart 
Adams Isaac, hairdresser with Henry T. Engle, dwl 

235 Kearny 
Adams J., plasterer, dwl 236 Sutter 
Adams Jacob, diiver Mason's Brewery, dwl 620 

Lombard, rear 
Adams James, supervisor Tenth Ward, dwl 962 

Mission 
Adams James H., shoemaker, dwlNE cor Hyde and 

Delgardo Place 
Adams James S , f Adams & Butler) dwl E s Lar- 

kin nr Turlc 
Adams Jolm, miller, dwl 20 Jessie, rear 
Adams John Q., mail agent C. P. R. R., dwl 6 

Montgomery 
Adams John Q., clerk with William Hayes, 604 

CL.y 
Adanis John R., clerk forwarding dept. Wells, 

Fargo &. Co., dwl 722Califi)ruia 
Adams Joseph V>.,( Adams & Go.) dwl 721 Market 
Adanis .loseph W., (Adams dk Co. J dwl 525 Pine 
Adams Josepliine M. Miss, with Singer Manufac- 
turing Co., 137 Alontgomery 
Adams J. S., freight clerk' C. P.' R. R. Co., Second 

street wli;irf, dwl 938 Mission 
ADAMS LAWSON S., f of Adams. McNeil & Co., 

Sue.) ottice 4(15 Front", dwl 1014 Bush 
Adams Morgan, clerk with John W. Ballard, dwl 

SW corner Stockton and Broadway 
Adanis Nelson, ship joiner. Ship Joiners' Ass'n, Ex- 
celsior Hall 
Adams Nelson B., (Adams & Co. J dwl 721 Market 
Adanis Oscar B., physician, off and dwl 1120 How- 
ard 
Adams Otis, engineer California Planing Mills, dwl 

426 Folsom 
Adams Prosper F., carpenter, dwl 85 Freelon 
Adams Q.L., dentist, dwl 1515 Leavenworth 
Adams Rlioda (colored) (widow) dwl NW cor Mason 

and Brondway 
Adams Richard, butcher, dwl N 8 Brannan nr 

Eighth 
Adams Robert H., clerk with Jones, Pullman &. 

Co., dwl NW cor Montgomery and Green 
Adams Robert H., hats and caps,' 641 Washington, 

dwl 511 Lombard 
ADAMS ROSS ftl., hatter, 657 Washington, dwl 

NW cor Montgomery and Green 
ADAMS SAMUEL & CO., apothecaries, 218 Bush, 

dwl 814 Bush 
Adams Samuel W., blacksmith, W s Kentucky nr 

Nevada 
Adams Sarah Mrs., furnished rooms, 125 Sansom 



Adams Wesley, laborer, dwl 1206 Folsom 

Adams William, stevedore, dwl 331 Green 

Adams William H., barkeeper with James W. Dun- 
bar, stnir El Capitan, Oakland ferry 

Adams William H., compositor Evening Bulletin, 
dwl 1 10 Eddy 

Adams William Henry, porter with French & Gil- 
man, dwl Ss Guerrero bet Twenty-tilth and 
Twenty-sixth 

Adams William J., f Adams, Blinn Sj- Co. J rea Fair 
Oaks 

Adanis Ziibdiel B., salesman 216 Battery, dwl W s 
Fillmore bet Eddv and Ellis 

ADAMS &. BUTLER. (James S. Adamsand Thos. 
J. Butler J hay and grain, 53 Clay 

Adams & Co., (Emerson Adams and Charles East- 
brook) market 155-157 Second 

Adams &, Co., (Joseph W. Adams) manufacturers 
soap and washing powders, 27 Commeiciiil 

Adams &, Co., ( Selson B. and Joseph B. Adams J 
manuf's Eakins egg powder, office -i'SS Wash 

Adamson William R. H., bookkeeper, 28 Sansom, 
dwl NW cor Lombard and Leavenworth 

Adcock John T., clerk with Page & Cowell, dwl 
9 Hubbard 

Adcock William, porter 15 Sansom, dwl 50 Tehama 

Addicks Cliarles, seaman Moses Taylor, North Pae. 
Trans. Co. 

Addison John E., dwl 113 Taylor 

Addison Sarah Mis., dwl 841 Mission 

Addison W. A., dwl 225 Bush. 

Addonis Samuel K., salesman with Armes & Dal- 
lam, dwl cor Thirteenth Av and N, South S. F. 

Adelkemp Bernard, wooil and coal, dwl 424 Third 

Adelphi Social Club, rooms 232 Sutter 

ADELSDORFER BROS., (Zacharias and Joseph 
and Liiduyig P. Dormitzer and. Max Frankin- 
thal) importers and jobbers gent's furnishing 
goods, cutlery, etc., 2l-il3 Battery 

Adelsdorfer Ernest, bookkeeper, 21 Battery, dwl 502 
Bush 

Adelsdorfer Isaac, peddler, dwl 231 Sixth 

KAtilndovf&v do&fiY}^\, ( Adelsdorfer Bros.) res New 
York 

Adelsdorfer Zacharias, (Adelsdorfer Bros.) res Ba- 
varia, Germany 

Adelstein Bariiet, glazier, dwl 510 Post 

Adier Aaron, salesman, 3 Battery, dwl 703 Po.st 

Adler Alexander, compositor with Leo Eloesser, dwl 
502 Bush 

Adler Bar, real estate, dwl 748 Howard 

Adler Bernard, clothier, 427 Pacific, dwl S s Vallejo 
bet Powell and Mason 

Adler Charles, bookkeeper with Levi Strauss & Co., 
dwl 1023 Powell 

Adler Chailes, salesman, 110 Bnsh, dwl 415 Eddy 

Adler (Jliarles, waiter Grand Hotel 

Adler Charles, (W. & I. Steinliart Sf Co.) dwl 703 
Post 

Adler David, market, 24 Stockton, dwl 1049 Howard 

Adler Gustave, sales^man with Ackeiuian Brothers, 
dwl309O'Karrell 

Adler Hermann, clerk with Thurnauer <fc Zinn,dwl 
137 Third 

Adler Jacob, (Gohlmann & A.) dwl N W cor 
Bush and Dujiout 

Adler John, dwl E s Eleventh nr Rliesion 

Adler Julius, solicitor Union Ins. Co., 416 California 

Adler Leopold, (ISchwerdt JJ- A.) dwl 28 Mary 

Adler Louis, boots and shoes, 333 East, dwl 22 Clay 

Adler Maurice, butcher, 302 I3eale, dwl N s Folsom 
bet Tenth and Eleventh 

Adler Moses, merchaul, dwl S E cor Sixth and 
Folsom 

Adler Moses, salesman, 3 Battery, dwl 703 Post 

Adler Solomon, dwl 23 Taylor 

Adlington David M., carpenter, dwl 1125 Kearny 

Adolphus Henry, physician and druggist, 511 Jack- 
son 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom St., Ladies' and Gentlemen's Linen Handkerohiefis. 
5 



EEDINGTON, HOSTETTER & CO.. Agents for Hall's Hair Kenewer. 



66 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY, 



Adonis Bvron, correspondent, dwi 631 Sacramento 
Adraiti Williiini, merchant, dwl G29 California 
Adranti' Tiionias, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Adsit L. H.. stock broker, otiice 402 Montgomery 
ADVOCATE, (weekly) ottice711 Mifsioii 
Aeils Eisso, clerk with Druhe and Tobbenboske, 

dwl (ilil Howard 
Aerden James H. Rev., pastor St. Francis E. C. 

Cliurcii, 519 Green 
^RIAL STEAM NAVIGATION COMPANY, 

ottice 6:J3 Montgomery 
^TNA INSURANCE CO., Hartford, Conn., (Fire) 
George C. Boardman, Manager; Henry Carlton, 
Jr., Agent, oHice 14 Merchants' Exchange 
iEtna Life Insurance Co. (Hartford, Conn.) M. P. 

Morse, General Agent, office 504 Kearny 
iETNA IRON WORKS, Hanscom & Co, Proprie- 
tors, SE cor Fremont and Tebania 
Aifrauchino A. Rev., Professor Classics and English 

Grammar St. lj;natius College. 841 Market 
AGAED, FOULKES & CO., (WUliam B. Agard 
and Thomas FoulkesJ importers and commis- 
sion merchants, 4)2 Front 
Agai d Geoi ge E., travelling agent with M. Rosen- 
shine, ihvl 31 1 Green 
Agard William B., (Agard, Foulkes & Co., J dwl 

311 Green 
Agate William, merchant, dwl W^hat Cheer House 
Ager George, painter, dwl 1 Burtham Place 
Ager James E., bookkeeper with Bacou & Co., dwl 

W 8 Second Avenue nr Seventeenth 
Ager John E, bookkeeper Mutual Life Insurance 

Co., dwl W s Second Avenue nr Seventeenth 
Agnew Gilmore, compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 124 

Fifth 
Aguew John, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Agnew John J., employee S. F. Gas Co., dwl 27>^ 

Fourth 
Agnew John J.,Patchen livery stable, 38 Sixth, 

dwl 508 Jessie 
Agnew Luke, receiver Omnibus R. R., dwl 211 Sev- 
enth 
Aguew Patrick, caulker, dwl 7 Natoma 
Agiiew Thomas, Supeiintendent Market Street Rail- 
road, otiice junction Market and Valencia, dwl 
36u' Seventeenth 
Agostini Louis, watchman Washington street Fish 

Market, dwl 515 Merchant 
Agricultural Park, James R. Dickey manager, Clift 

House road 5 miles west of City Hall 
Aguadio Germano, carpenter with Lazzaro Caetag- 

nino, 427 Filtjert 
Agnayo Antonio, dwl 907 Dupont 
Aguila Jose M., carpenter, dwl S s Dupont Alley 
Aguilar Lorenza, (widow) dwl Lombard bet Gough 

and Octavia 
Aguilar Nicholas, carriagepainter with George D. 

Clark, dwl SVV cor Dupont and Broadway 
Aguire Thomas, porter, dwi SW cor Broadway and 

Dupont 
Aguirre Juan M, real estate, dwl cor Dupont Place 

and Gardner Alley 
Agun Thomas, waiter, Russ House 
Ahearu Patrick, lamplighter with S. F.Gas Co 
Ahearn William, laborer, dwl 12 Natoma. rear 
Aheran Johanna Miss, dressmaker, dwl 176 Jessie 
Aliern Bartholomew, laborer, dwl 33 Ritch 
Ahern Cornelius, helper Union Iron Works, dwl 

236 Sutter 
Ahern Daniel, laborer, dwl 523 Mission 
Ahern Daniel, longshoreman, dwl N 8 Union bet 

Calhoun and Sansom 
Ahern Daniel, seaman, dwl W s Main bet Folsom 

and Harrison 
Ahern James, laborer, dwl 309 Fifth 
Ahern Jeremiah, groceries and iiqaors, NW cor 

Shipley and Willow 
Ahern Jeremiah, shipcarpenter, dwl 1236 Folsom 



Ahern John M., drayman Commercial Flour Mill, 

dwl NW cor Larkin and Ash 
Ahern John M., groceriesaud liquors, W s Larkin nr 

McAllister 
Ahern Margaret, (widow) boarding, 269 Minna 
Ahern Martin, fruits, 712 Kearnv, dwl 122 Leides- 

doi-fF 
Ahern Maiy Miss, assistant teacher Tenth Street 

Grammar School 
Ahern Mi<hael, hostler Fashion stable, dwl 1 Mar- 
garet Place 
Ahern Michael, laborer with Hancock and Kelso 
Ahern Owen, tailor with Nicholas Sweeny, dwl 42 

Louisa 
Ahern Patrick, butcher with Smith & Brown, dwl 

16 Boardman Place 
Ahern Patrick, tailor, dwl 1604 California 
Ahern Patrick O., bookdealer, dwl 519 Post 
Ahern William C, cook with John C. Olmsted, dwl 

S s Jlinna nr Second 
Aherne Jeremiah, drayman, dwl 265 Stevenson 
Ahlborn Charles, (Ahlborn & GranerJ dwl 415 

Pine 
Ahlborn Minnie, (widow) furnished rooms, 31 Second 
Ahlborn & Graner, ( Charles AhJhnrn and Charles 

Grauer) proprietors Hanaa liotel, 429 Buth 
Ahlers George, clerk, NW cor Hvde and Post 
Ahlers J. H., fj. H. Ahlers & 'Co. J dwl SW cor 

Powell and Vallejo 
AHLERS J. H. &. CO., (Richard Strothoffj gro- 
ceries and liquors, SW cor Powell and Vallejo 
Ahlers Louis, (Becker & A.) dwl SE cor Mission 

and Fremont 
Ahlers W., workman Cal. Sug. Refinery, cor Bryant 

aud Eitrhth 
Ahlgrew Charles, baker, dwl 8 Harlan Place 
Alilsirom Frederick, clerk with Page & Cowell, NE 

cor Mission and Spear 
Ahlstrom Frederick, (Frederick Alihtrom & Co. J 

dwl W 8 Drumm bet Jackson and Oregon 
Ahlstrom Frederick & Co., (John. Miller) coffee 

saloon, W 8 Drumm bet Jackson and Oregon 
Ahms Hermann, carpenter, dwl 218 Minna 
Ahrens Albert, mariner, dwl 7 Washington 
Ahrens Christian, watchmaker and jeweler, 843 

Dupont 
Ahrens Henry, groceries and liquors, 520 Broadway 
Ahrens Ht-ury, groceries and liquors, 600 Third 
Ahrens Jacob H.. liquor saloon, 218 Commercial, 

dwl 508 Vallejo 
Ahrens Kate, (widow) dwl 6 Prospect Place 
Ahrens W., driver S. F. Stock Brewery, dwl SE 

cor Po^-ell and Francisco 
Ahumada Joseph M., real estate agent, 510 Wash 
Aicber Frank, blacksmith with J. G. lis, dwl 1618 

Stockton 
Aigeltinger Leopold, furrier with Adolph Muller, 

dwl 1069 Howard 
Aiken Andrew, carpenter, dwl S s Greenwich bet 

Montgomery and Sansom 
Aiken Hugh, laborer, dwl 45 Louisa 
Aiken James, laborer, dwl 12 Miller Place 
Aiken John, sailmaker with William J .F. Douglass, 

dwl W e Fillmore nr Ellis 
Aiken Thomas, stevedore, dwl NW cor Davis &nd 

Pacific 
Aiken William E., bookkeeper Overland House, 

dwl 16 Sutter 
AIKEN WILLIAM H., attorney at law, office 34 

Montgomery Block, dwl Lick House 
Aime Paul, waiter 623 Commercial, dwl John nr 

Powell 
Aine Frederick, vamisher with Goodwin & Co., dwl 

371 Jessie 
Aine Henry E., carpenter, dwl 1822 Powell 
Ainea James M., warehouse clerk, Naval Office 

Custom House, dwl 305 Lombard 
Ainsley James, printer S. F. News Letter, dwl SE 
cor Market aud Seventh 



The StocklLoIders of the " FEOFIiES" are the leading Bankersand Merchants on this Coast. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



67 



Ainsley .lolm, shoepolislier U. W. M. B. &. S. Co., 

(Iwl SE cor Seventh ;iii(l Market 
Ainsley William, painter, dwi 7 Howan] Conrt 
Ainsworth Peter, shoemaker, dwl 0"29 Niitonia 
Aiiil Darling, engineer with Charles Harlev, dwl 

Il-> Kirst 
AitcliiiiBoii John, carpenter with D. A. Macdonald &■ 

Co., dwl 2-23 Stevenson 
Aitken C, boilennaker, Vnlcan Iron Works 
Aitken Charles H.. market, 5 Washington, dwl Ss 

Broadway bet Polk and Van Ness Avenue 
Aitken David, mariner, dwl 894 Kront 
Aitken .lames, muchinist Vnlcau Iron Works, dwl 

cor Cupp and Twenty-fifth 
Aitken James, (Moyinhnn&, A.) dwl 308 Seventh 
Aitken James, Jr., hoilermaker Portland Boiler 

Works, dwl 308 Seventh 
Aitken John, butcher with Charles II. Aitken, dwl 

S 8 Broadway bet Polk and Van Ners Avenue 
Aitken John F., milkman with Koj' «!t Taplau, dwl 

W s 8au Brnno i-oad iir Twenty -ninth 
Aitken Samuel Mrs., (widow) dwl NW cor Capp and 

Twenty-Fifth 
Aitkins A. fe., jeweler, dwl 608 Market 
Aker Nicholas, miner, dwl Fourteenth Av nr 

Kailroad Av, South S. F. 
Akmann William, (Meyer Sr A.) dwl SW cor 

Drumm and Siicramento 
Alameda Express, Lovejoy & Co., proprietors, office 

42.'j Davis 
ALAMEDA FERRY, Davis nr Pacific 
ALAMEDA PARK ASYLUM, otlice 330 Mont- 
gomery 
ALASKA COMMERCIAL CO., office, 425 Sacra- 
mento 
ALASKA HERALD, (bi-monthly,) Agapius Hon- 

ch:irenko, proprietor, 611 Cl.iy 
Alaskey Joseph W., cabinet maker with William G. 

Weir, dwl cor Alice and Willow Avenue 
Alatorie Tiotilo, waiter, 2.i3 Stewart 
Albach Peter, cnrpenter, dwl Tib Mission 
ALBANY BREWERY, Spreckels & Co., proprie- 
tors, 71-75 Everett 
Alberg Peter, mariner, dwl 531 East 
Albers Anton, foreman with Lewis Brothers, dwl 

340 Fifth 
Albers August, oysterman with George Mayee, 

dwl 222 Jessie 
Albers H., workman Cal. Sug. Refinery, cor Bryant 

and Eight 
Albers Henry, (Gatke & A.J dwl NW cor Seventh 

and Mission 
Albers Henry, laborer, dwl 11 Pacific 
Albers Marcus, groceries and liquors, NE cor 

Fointh and Clara, and 225 Perry 
Albeit Charles, loiigshorenian, dwl 906 Pac, rear 
A\he\\lj&v;\»,( Lewis Albeit Jj- Co. y dwl 148 Tehama 
Albert Lewis & Co., (John W. Norton Jr., and 

George Hall) teamsters, pier 1 Stenart 
Albert Rudolph, physician, office and dwl 720 How- 
ard 
Alberti F., musician, dwl SW cor Broadway and 

Dupont 
Alberto Antonio, musician, dwl N s Dupont alley 
Albertson J. A., physician, office and dwl 105 

O'Farrell 
Albion House, 1320 Stockton 
Alborilla Anthony, upholsterer with Goodwin & 

Co., dwl 528 Bush 
Albrecht August, (Schroder & A.) res Sacramento 
Albrecht John, laborer Broadway Brewery, dwl 637 

Broadway 
Albrecht John, tailor, 443 Bush 
Albrecht John B., clerk, dwl NW cor Seventeenth 

and Dolores 
Albrecht Joseph, proprietor Broadway Brewery 

631 Broadway 
Albrecht Joseph, waiter with Mrs. Mann, 850 

Market 



Albrecht Louis, jeweler with Charles Lemme, dwl 

909 Kearny 
Albrecht Richard, baker and confectioner, 109 Tay- 
lor 
Albright Andrew, milk ranch, Courtland Av nr 

San Bruno road 
Alburn Luce, teamster, dwl E s Sanchez bet Seven- 
teenth and Eighteenth 
Alcavaga Jos6, groceries and fruits, 527 Broadway, 

ilwl 5J8 Vallejo 
Aid Henry, painter, dwl SW cor Front and Wash 
Alden Abbey W., furnished rooms, 52 Second 
Alden Edgar, photographic printer with C. E. Wat- 
kins, dwl N s Pac bet Mont and Kearny 
Alden Gottlieb, waiter 627 Commercial 
ALDEN RICHARD C, chief clerk Subsistence 
Department U. S. A., 703 Market, res Oakland 
Alden Samuel B., policeman City Hall, dwl S s 

Green nr Polk 
Aldermaun Oscar, laborer, dwl 113 Minna 
Aldred Robert, laborer with San Francisco Gas Co., 

dwl 46 Jessie 
Aldrich A. L. Miss, dressmaker, 314 Bush 
Aldrich Allan, wireworker, dwl 1113 Stockton 
Aldrich George C, upholsterer, S E cor Third and 

Tehama, dwl 217 Third 
Aldrich W. A., merchant, dwl Grand Hotel 
Aldridge Robert, laborer with S. F. Gas Co. 
Aldridge William, laborer with William H. Nor- 
ton, dwl Austin nr Gongh 
ALEMANY JOSEPH SADOC, Most Rev. Arch- 
bishop of San Francisco, dwl 628 California 
Alers August, physician, (and Alers <& LchmknhlJ 

dwl 722 Montgomeiy 
Alers William, merchant, dwl S W cor Howard and 

Russ 
ALEKS & LEHMKUHL, {Avguxt Alers and Hu- 
go H. Lehmkiihl) proprietors Russian and Turk- 
ish baths, 722 Montgomery 
Alex Joseph F., National Restaurant, 725 Pacific, 

dwl 10 Union Place 
Alexander Adolph, tailor, 737 Market, dwl 268 Te- 
hama 
ALEXANDER BARTON S., Brevet Brigadier- 
General U. S. A., office 533 Kearny, dwl 30 
South Park 
Alexander Charles, cigar dealer, dwl 6 Taylor 
Alexander Charles, foreman Cal. Dry Dock, dwl 

Hunter's Point 
Alpxauder Charles M., clerk, dwl 558 Howard 
Alexander D. &. Co., manufacturers cigars, 224 Cal- 
ifornia 
Alexander David (D. Alexander & Co.) dwl 570 

Minna 
Alexander David G., carpenter and builder, dwl 

cor Twenty-first Avenue and K, South S. F. 
Alexander Depas (colored) whitener, N E cor Fifth 

and Howard 
Alexander Eli, fruits and vegetables, 18 Metropoli- 
tan Market, dwl 984 Hari'ison 
Alexander George, cooper, dwl 331 Fourth, rear 
Alexander George W., carrier Bulletin, dwl 209 

Austin 
Alexander Israel, jeweler with B. Morris &. Co., 

dwl 14 Scott 
ALEXANDER J. & CO., {Jacob and Leo Ash) 
importers and jobbers clothing, N W cor Bat- 
tery and Bush 
Alexander Jacob A., cigars and tobacco, 2 Clay, dwl 

144 Silver 
Alexander James, bookkeeper, dwl 235 Sixth 
Alexander James, tailor, dwl 223 Stevenson 
Alexander James, tailor, dvs'l W s Columbia nr 

Twenty-fifth 
Alexander James, wood and coal, 434 Sixth 
Alexander John, laborer with North Pac. Trans. 

Co., dwl N W cor Main and Folsom 
Alexander Joseph {J. Alexander & Co.) dwl 319 
Ellis 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dress Buttons in great variety. 



BEDINQTON , HOSTETTEB & CO., Tlie Wholesale Druggists of the Pacific Coast. 



68 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY. 



Alexander Joseph D., nielter S. F. Assaying and 

defining Works, dwl lUKi Green 
Alex indei- Jjuiira Mrs., (ii-essiiiiiker, ti Taylor 
Ale.\:ind:r L. L., cai-penter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Alexander Loui.s, drayman, dwl W s Gnngh nr Grove 
Alexander Lvmau, lioop skirt nidniiikcutrer, 504 

Sixth, dwl 01)8 Sixth 
AIexai;(ler Maggie Mit-s, wliipmaker with Main & 

Wiuiiiester, dwl ■i'-J3 Stevenson 
Alexander Manuel, slioemaker, dwl G3 Shipley 
Alexander l\Iaiy,(<-olored) (widow)dwl lOlJti Wash 
Alexander Mendel, hoots and slices, 508 C'omnier- 
i-ial. dwl \V 8 Eleventh bet Folsom and IIarri.-jOii 
Alexander Meyer, laundryniaii, dwl (>JJ Vallejo 
Alexander Miichell, groeer, {While Pine) dwl 347 

Clenieminii 
Alexander Robert, sliip carpenter, dwl 167 Silver 
Alexander Philip, fancy goods, llOUi Stockton 
Alexiiider Samuel, clothing, 144 Steuurt 
Alexander Saninel O., (S. 0. Alexander <& Co. )dwl 

125 0'Fariell 
Alexander S. H., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Alexander Simon, hats and caps 1100^ Pacific, dwl 

1125 Dupont 
Alexanders. O. & Co., {Abraham Marcux) manu- 
facturers and importers clothing, 4 Battery 
Alexander Theodore, dwl !I14 Jackson 
Alexander Thomas, cook with Nicholas Castis, dwl 

N .s Jlinna hei Tliird and Fourth 
Alexander \V. F., express wagon, SW cor Clay and 

Dupont, dwl NE cor Gouyh and Valejo 
Alexaudt-r W. H., (colored) waiter, dwl 1407 Dupont 
.Alexandie Candine, (widow) dwl 171 1 Mason 
Alexis Mine., French laundry, 409 Sutter 
Alferiiz Peter, ( Dcllepiune & Co.) dwl 437 Green 
Alfei's Jack, workman Cal Sugar lietiuery, cor Bry- 
ant and Eighth 
Alfrance Charles, restaurant, dwl 845 Dupont 
ALGER JAAIES & CO., opticians, and California 
Views, 311 Montifomery, dwl N s Pine nr Polk 
Algren John, carpenter, dwl 958 Mission 
Alnanihra HiiildinLr. 3j5 Bush 
ALHA.MBRA THEATER, William H. Smith pro- 
prietor, 32.J Bush 
Allan John, heraldic aud stone seal engraver, 302 

Montgomery 
Allan -^larv, (widow) dressmaking and trimmings, 

311 Kitth 
ALLARDT GEORGE F., Chief Engineer Tide 
L;ind Survey, otlice SVV cor Clay and Kearny, 
res Oakland 
Allari Henry L., trader, dwl N s Waller bet Web- 
ster and Buchanan 
Allari Jo.-eph. preserved meats, 52 California Mar- 
ket, dwl 9 Hardie Place 
Alhlach Joseph, porter, 301 Front, dwl 225 Sutter 
Alleghany Consolidated S. M. Co., (Sierra Co. Cal.) 

oOice 37 New Merchants' Exchange 
Allemaud John, cook, 647 Commercial, dwl G18 

"V'allejo 
Allen A., havher, dwl 19 Powell 
Allen Addison F., Couduclor N. B. & M. R. R., dwl 

::()3 Third 

Allen Adeline F. Miss, dressmaker, 131 Montgomery 

Allen Alhert J., foreman 6t.il)le8 Market Street R. 

R., dwl N s Sixteenth bet Valencia and Second 

Avenue 

Allen Alexander, watchman S. F. Pioneer Woolen 

Mills, dwl cor Larkiu and North Point 
Allen Alexander, weaver, dwl W s Shofwell bet 

Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Allen Alfred D., miner, dwl W s Second Av bet 

Camp and Seventeenth 
Allen Benjamin, merchant, dwl 515 Minna 
Allen B. K., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Allen Bridget Miss, seamstress with E. C. Kennedy, 
217 Bush 



Allen C. C. H., dyer, dwl 18 Third 

Allen Charles, drayman, dwl 109 Seventh 

Allen Charles, mariner, dwl 134 Steuart 

Allen diaries, waiter, dwl 111 Morton 

Allen Charles E., salesman with Linforth, Kellogg & 

Co., dwl SE cor Mission Av and Seventh 
Allen Charles R., clerk with Bellingham B<iy Coal 

Co.. dwl 614 Third 
Allen Charles Kussell, clerk with U. S. Quartermas- 
ter, dwl 1009 Mission 
Allen Curtis C, wireworker and cagemaker, 437 

Biannan, dwl 613 Jlission 
Allen Daviii H., clerk, dwl 1412 Sacramento 
Allen E., builder, hds American Exch;inge 
Allen E. &. Co., CAuf^iisie l^uAe/wy seedsmen and 

florists, 16 Post 
Allen Edward, conductor Market street E. B., dwl 

depot 
Allen Edward, lodgings, 589 ^Market and 11 Second, 

(and E. Allen & Co.) dwl .589 Market 
Allen Edward, mariner, dwl 510 Davis 
Allen Edward F.saw mnker with Pacific Saw Man- 
ufacturing Co., dwl 1303 Mfinlgomery 
Allen Edward O. H., druggist, dwl 910 Leaven- 
worth, lear 
Allen lidwin, cutter with I. 51. Wentwortb & Co., 

dwl 34 Haves 
Allen E. M., dwl 5 26 Hownrd 
Allen Esther, (widow) dwl -..67 Minna 
Allen Eugene A., sawyer with B. & J. S. Doe, dwl 

75 Clementina 
Allen Frances, (widow) dwl S 8 Thirteenth het 

Valencia and Mission 
Allen George, clerk with Renton, Smith & Co. 
Allen George, longshoreman, dwl E s Main bet 

Howard and Folsoin 
Allen George A., steamboat pilot, dwl 911i Folsoni 
Allen George F., paints and glass dealer, dwl W s 

Capp bet Tweniy-Fii SI and Twenty-Second 
Allen Hannah, iwidow) dwl .59 Jessie 
Allen Heniy, bookkeeper with Alfred S. Iredale, 

A\\\ 565 Mission 
Allen Henry H., whitener and plasterer, 17 Fourth, 

dwl 338 Minna 
Allen Heiirj" M., merchant, dwl 321 Eddy 
Allen Hugh, nurseryman and florist, SW cor Bu- 
chanan aud McAllister 
ALLEN ISAAC S., secretary San Francisco Benev- 
olent Association, office 10 Webb, dwl 10:^8 
Pine 
Allen James, boilermaker Vulcan Iron Works 
Allen James, (colored) cook, dwl San Jose Road 

nr Five Mile House 
Allen James, hostler Front St. M. & O. E. E , dwl 

N s Pacific l)et Gough and Octavia 
Allen James, laborer with Pacific Ridling Mill Co., 

dwl Eighth Av bet C and D, South S F 
Allen James, m.iriner, dwl 214 Sieu;irt 
Allen James, taiLir, dwl 8 Hunt 
Allen James Mrs., dwl 1121 Hyde 
Allen James N., atrent, dwl 826 Greenwich 
Allen J. C, teamster with R. & J. Jloiton 
Allen Jeremiah E.. liijuor saloon, 18 Washington 
Allen John, boatnian, dwl 16 Ritch, rear 
Allen John, carpenter, dwl NE cor Broadway and 

Leavenworth 
Allen John, diayman with Turner &, Harvey, dwl 

1303 Montgomery 
Allen John, hardware, 735 Pacific, dwl W 8 First 

Av bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Allen John, laborer, dwl 47 Everett 
Allen John, longshoreman, dwl Green's Court nr 

Howard 
Allen John, tailor with Henry Collin, dwl 1309 

Pacific 
Allen John, teacher music, dwl 1914 Mason 
Allen John, waiter, dwl SW' cor Wash and .Sansom 
Allen John P. Jr., assistant secretary San Francisco 
Benevolent Association, 10 Webb 



THE PEOPLES INSUHANCiiJ CO, is the most progressive Company on the Coast. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny St., Table and Pocket Cutlery. 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



69 



Allen Jolm S., liquor saloon, 724 Pacific 

Allen Joseph, blacksmith, dwl N 8 Branuan nr 

Ei^lith 
Allen J. W., dwl What Cheer House 
Allen L. Mrs., asHistant teacher Tyler St. Primary 

School, dwl ISOCMiison 
Alien Leverett I, oj'sters and clams, Union Market, 

dwl :)0-) Fifth 
Allen L. H., merchant, dwl Grand Hotel 
Allen Lizzie S., adjuster U. S. B. Mint, dwl 902 

Montgomery 
Allen Lorenzo D.. principitl Wasltinpjton Grammar 

School, dwl N E cor Pine and Laguiui 
Allen Lorenzo II., clams and oysters, dwl Long 

Bridge 
Allen L S. & Co., (Daniel S. Small) shipwrights, 

cauliiers and sparmal<ers, 8 Culifornia 
Allen Lumber S., [L. S. Alkn & Co.) res Oakland 

Point 
Allen !\Iary Miss, dwl 7G Clementina 
Allen Michael, groceries and liquors, S W cor Minna 

and Mary 
ALLEN JL'VV. & CO.. carriage manufacturers, S 

E cor Fourth and Silver 
Allen Myron W., {M. W. Allen Jr Co.) dwl 149^ 

Silver 
Allen Oliver P., bookkeeper Bank of California, 

dwl 1421 Hyde 
Allen Peleg C, asphaltiun roofer, dwl 1G4 Jessie 
Allen Peier, clerk with Lazard Freres, dwl 2217 

Howard 
Allen Prter H., teamster with J. Schwegerle & Co., 

dwl 549 Fouith 
Allen Peter J., teamster, dwl Ws Valencia bet Six- 
teenth and Seventeenth 
Allen liobert, laborer, dwl W s Kentucky nr Sierra 
Allen Robert E. O. ii., compositor Morning Call, 

dwl IMO Leavenworth, rear 
Allen Smith M., teamster. 515 Market 
ALLEN THEODORE H. A- CO., r Thomas YoungJ 

stevedores, ofliee Cowell's wharf 
Allen Theodore H., {Theodore H. Allen 4' Co. J dwl 

Lick House 
Allen Thomas, gasfitter, dwl 41 Everett 
Allen Thomas, operator Western Union Telegraph 

Co., dwl 267 Minna 
Allen Thomas, pressman with Cubeiy & Co., dwl 

2(5? Jessie 
Allen William, carpenter, dwl 225 Jessie 
Allen William, laborer, 535 Mei'chant, dwl 514 Pine 
Allen William, laboier with Fletcher & Bellmer, 

dwl S E cor Sacramento and Leidesdorlf 
Allen William, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Allen William, molder Risdon Iron Works, dwl 313 

Beale 
Allen William, watchman Front St. M. &. O. R. R. 

depot, dwl S 8 Austin nr Polk 
Allen William, Jr.. sci-oll sawyer with Kragen & 

Geishaker, dwl 311 Beale 
Allen William A., stevedore, dwl 124 Bernard 
Allen William B., reporter Evening Bulletin, dwl 

i 010 Powell 
Allen William F., clerk with Junius G. Foster, Cliff 

House 
Allen William H., attorney at law, office -522 Mont- 
gomery, dwl N W cor Powell and Ellis 
Allen William R., bookkeeper with Walmsley & 

Siiiirh, dwl W s Scott bet Turk and Tyler 
Allen William R., real estate, dwl 810 Leav. rear 
Allen W. T., actor, dwl 325^ Bush 
Allen— See Allyn 

Allers Charles W., night watchman California Mar- 
ket, dwl 906 Folsom 
Alley Alfred G., coo])er, dwl 9 Verona Phice 
Alley Charles H., stocktttter with Buckingham &. 

Hecht, dwl Market nr Twelfth 
Alley Diniel, capitalist, dwl 427 Bush 
Alley William H., stevedore, dwl N s Greenwich 
bet Sansom and Montgomery 



.\IIione Francisco, chop house , 1324 Stockton 
Allione Henry, waiter with Francisco Allione, 1324 

Stockton' 
Alliot Emanuel, ladies' hairdresser, 504 Bush 
Allis Philip S., ( Ansbro & Co.) dwl S W cor Bush 

and Steiner 
Allison Charles, shipwright, dwl 317 Fremont 
Allison David E., (Al/isnn & Co.) dwl 316 Davis 
Allison Frank J., s. desman with Bravei man & Levy, 

dwl 615 Mason 
Allison Oscar, porter with Feldbusch & Co., dwl 

10 Natoma 
Allison Ranch M. Co., (Grass Valley) office 411^ Cal 
Allison Thomas R., bookkeeper A. R. C. Ice Co., 

dwl 718 B.itfery 
ALLISON & CO., {David E. Allison) fruit and 

produce commission, 309 and 311 Washington 
AUis.son F'rancois, cook, dwl NE cor Broadway 

and Kearny 
Alluian .John, capitalist, dwl Grand Hotel 
Allinan John, tanner, dwl 6-iO Brainian 
.\ll|)ort Thomas H., mariner, dwl 915 Montgomery 
Allwordeu John, bar-keeper 931 Kearny, dwl NVV 

cor Kearny and Broadway 

Allvne John W. {All>/nc& ^\hitf■) dwl 919 Jackson 

ALLYNIO & WHITE, (John W Alhjne. & Wm. 

H. White) importers and jobbers oils, lumps, 

etc., 121-125 Cal, and proprietors Pacific Oil 

and Kerosene Works, cor Chestnut and Taylor 

Almeda Francisco, mariner, dwl S s Commercial 

bet Diumm and East 
Almi-do Manuel, cook, 6-^0 Pacific 
ALMSHOUSE CITY AND COUNTY, A\ miles 

from City Hall 
Almy Moses 13., salesman with Wilmerding & Kel- 
logg, dwl 5 Kearny 
Almyglirun Charles, baker, International Hotel 
AInut Walter, waiter, Brooklyn Hotel 
Alonso Joseph, cigar maker with Weil & Co., dwl 

3 St. Charles Place 
Alonzi Ch., cook, dwl NE cor Bdw)' and Kearny 
Alpen Hermann, bo:itman. dwl 15J5 Dupont 
ALPERS CHARLES, Metropolitan Band, office 
228 Bush, dwl SE cor Powell and Greenwich 
Alpers Peter, laborer with Eisea Bros., dwl 16 

Stevenson 
Alpha Consolidated S. M. Co., (Gold Hill, Nev.) 

office 419 Cal 
Alphouse Hyaciulhe, hairdresser, dwl 729 Wash- 
ington 
Alsaldo Roccho, laborer with D. Ghirardelli, dwl SE 

cor Broadway and Sansom 
Alsdorf Bertha Miss, saleswoman with Abraham 

Regan 
Alsenz Jacob, shoemaker, 915 Post, dwl 1510 Post 
Alsgood Frederick, clerk with Heury Lange, dwl 

SW cor Dora and Folsom 
Alsgood Frederick, vegetables, Grand Central Mark- 
et, dwl 547 Jessie 
Alsina Frederick, fisherman, dwl S s Merchant bet 

Druinm and E ist 
Alsop John, umbrella maker, 346 Bush, dwl 4 Clara 

L'lne 
ALSOP'S BUILDING, 411 and 413 California 
Alsiiom John, bootmaker, dwl 1316 Dupont 
Alt Christopher, bootmaker, 608 Vallejo 
Alt Martha Mrs., drt-ssmaker, dwl 6I35 Stockton 
ALTA CALIFORNIA BUILDING, 529 Cal 
ALTA CALIFORNIA NEWSPAPER (daily and 
weekly) Fred. MacCrellish & Co. proprietors 
and publishers, office 529 Cal 
ALTA LODGINGS, Ralston <fe Cottrell proprie- 
tors, .536 Sacramento 
Altenius John <fe Co., (George Roller) bakery, W s 

Folsom bet Twenty-first and Twenty-second 
Altenberg Peter F., merchant, 528 Kearny 
Altent)erg Rosalie Mrs., cloaks and millinery, 528 

Kearny 
Altenburg Charles, cook, 228 Kearny 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO.. 116 Sansom Street. Tankee Notions. 



HEDINGTON HOSTETTEB & CO., Tho great Drug and Patent Medicine Depot 



70 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



Altenbui'^ Ernest, bookkeeper witli A. S. Rosen- 

banm &. Co., dwl 822 Greenwich 
Altbausen George, brewer Philadelphia Brewery, 

dwl 228 Second 
Altbof Puniest (T.& E. Allhof) dwl 622 Market 
Altbof Herniauu [Althnf df Bahh) dwl 11 OTar- 

rel 
Altbof Tbeodore & Ernest, Bay Oyster Saloon, 626 

Market 
Altbof Tbeodore [T. & E. Althof) dwl 622 INFarket 
Altbof & Balila, {Hermann Althof & J. ^^'. F. 
Bahh) bookbindera and blank book mauu- 
facturertu, 42o Clay 
Altmun Harris, tailor, dwl 30 Everett rear 
Altaian T., (widow) dwl o Filbert Place 
Altuiann Jacob, tailor with Heuiy Borkbim, dwl 

536 Pacific 
A\\.mi\\(^v K:dvo\\, (Einstein Bros. Sf- Co.) dwl 115 

EHdv 
Altniayei- Abraham, (Einstein Bros. Sf Co.) dwl 

11*5 Taylor 
Altmon Jacob, piinter, dwl 209 Leidesdorff 
Alton Frank, grain sampler with I. Friedlander, 

dwl 904 Jackson 
Alton J. A., (widow) boarding, 904 Jackson 
Altoona Gravel Mining Co., (Grass Valley) office 28 

Merchants' Exchange 
Altpeter Charles, cabinet maker, dwl Amherst nr 

Henry 
Abridge Joseph, butcber Lick House, dwl 12 Hunt 
Altscliul Eiiiil, bookkeeper with William Meyer & 

Co., dwl 736 Vallejo 
Altscliul Leopold, (Mayfeld Sf Co.) dwl 655 Mission 
Altecbul Ludwig, ( Ludwig Altschvl Sf Co.) dwl 

1007 Powell 
Altscbul Ludwig & Co., (Louis Taussig) importers 

and jobbers wines and liquors, 709 Sausom 
Altsbnlers Levi, variety store, S a Sixteenth nr 

First Avenue 
Altube Bernard, real estate, dwl 1414 Kearny, rear 
Altube Pedro (Louis Feres di- Co.) dwl 9 Dikemau 

Place 
Altvater David, laborer National Mills, dwl 1227 

Diipont 
Alvardo Juan C, attorney at law, 73 Montgomery 

Block, res Oakland 
Alvarado Juan Y., hostler with Nathan & O'Neil, 

dwl 207 Sutter 
Alvarado Pascuala Mrs., dwl 5 Prospect Place 
Alvard John, U. S. mail agent, dwl N\V cor Wash- 
ington and Sansom 
Alvarez Augustine, sinchemaker, dwl Caroline 

Place 
Alvarez Francisco, cigarmaker with Cobo, Martinez 

&. Co., dwl 301 Vallejo 
Alvarez &. Co., (Chinese) cigar manufacturers, 25 

Webb 
Alver John, waiter, dwl NW cor Broadway and 

Kearny 

Alves, Estelita & Moreiro, (Jesse Alves, Miguel 

Estclita and Rodriguez Moreiro) proprietors 

Azorians and Americans Hotel, 420-422 Drunim 

Alves Jesse, (Alves, Estelita Jp Moreiro) dwl 420 

Drumm 
Alves Joseph, mariner, dwl 116 Steuart 
Alvey Charles W., stoves aud tinware, 911 Kearny, 

dwl 1813 Stockton 
Alviar Francisco, sorter with Charles Harley tfc 

Co., dwl cor Vallejo and Dupont 
Alvord Alfred, dwl 564 Folsom 
Alvord Frank, carpenter with T. M. Quackenbush, 

dwl 416 Green 
ALVORD WILLIAM, President Pacific Rolling 
Mill Co., and \'ice- President Pacific Ins. Co., 
office 422 California, dwl 564 Folsom 
Alwav James, carpenter, dwl Empire Lodgings 
AMADOU MINING CO., (Amador county) office 

410 Montgomery 
Amaris B., laundry, dwl 805 Filbert 



Amark Frederick, cigar maker with Cobo, Marti- 
nez & Co., dwl 460 Sixth 

Amberg .Joseph, barber, N s Sixteenth nr Valencia 

Ambler Benjamin, ( Wilson & Co.) dwl 873 .Mission 

Anibournson L. G., shipcarpenter, dwl 727 Union 

Anil)rose , pjinter, dwl 431 Pine 

Ambrose James, (Burns & A.) dwl S s Grove bet 
Octavirt and Laguna 

Ambrosio B., with Prosper May, dwl 37 Sic 

Ambrosins Maas, butcher with" Leopold Miller, 94 
California mai'ket 

Ame Paul, laundry, 11 John 

Aniedee Peter, merchant, dwl 409 Poet 

Amend Charles W., druggist with Emil Frese, 324 
Clay 

Amend Emil, carpenter, dwl 731 Pacific 

AMERICAN CLOCK CO., General Agents E. N. 
Welch, New Haven, SetbTbomas, Gilbert Manu- 
facturing Co., Welch, Spring &, Co., A. S. Hoicb- 
kiss & Co., and Setb Thomas' Sons & Co., 
Henry Molineux. agent, 310 Sansom 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL, Timothy Sar- 
gent proprietor, 319-325 Sansom 

American II. & Co., gents' furnishing goods, 614 
Market 

American Henry, (H. American & Co.) dwl 351 
Minna 

American Home Missionary Society, Rev. J. H. 
Warren Superintendent, office 502 Montgomery 

American Lloyds, Amos Noyes, agent, 406 Cal 

American Mining Co., (Gold Hill, ?\cv.) office 37 
New Merchant Exchange 

AMERICAN RUSSIAN COMMERCIAL ICE 
CO., D. E. Martin Siip«rintcr.dent, office 718 
Battery 

AMERICAN SAW CO., S. O. Putnam, general 
agent, office 606 Front 

American Sundny School Union, William F. Peters 
agent, office 420 Montiromerv 

AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY, Rev. Frederick 
E. Shearer, district secretai'v, 757 Market 

Amerige George, printer, dwl 100 Stockton 

Amerman Isaac, ( Amerman & Howell) res San Le- 
andro 

AMERMAN & HOWELL, (Lsaac Amerman and 
Joseph L. HoiccU) stationery, 624 .Montgomery 

Ames A. A., local editor Alta California, dwl 1423 
California 

Ames Benjamin F., drayman with Davis & Cowell, 
dwl oil Stevenson 

Ames F. G. Miss, assistant teacher Silver Street 

Primary School, dwl 333 Jessie 
Ames Fisher, attorney at law, dwl 373 Brannan 
Ames Frank M., salesman with Haynes & Lawton, 

dwl 611 Market 
Ames Fred. F., clerk with Reid & Brooks, dwl 25 

Ellis 
Ames George H., freight clerk P. M. S. S. Great Re- 
public, dwl 1512 Folsom 
Ames Mary, (widow) nurse, dwl Es Laguna urLily 
Ames Orville T., real estate, dwl SE cor Eighth 

and Clementina 
Amesbury Thomas, (Longfellow & A.) dwl Islais 

Creek nr Seventeenth Avenue 
Amling Freak L., special policeman, dwl 1624 

Powell 
Amner Thomas, machinist Jitua Iron Works, dwl 

503 Fourth 
Amos Frederick R., agent New England Soap and 
Tallow Works, office 219 Clay, res Alameda Co. 
Amos John, silversmith with W. K. Vanderslice & 

Co., dwl 810 Mongomery 
Amos John T., millwright, dwl 1506 Leavenworth 
Amos Zachariah, lumberdealer, dwl 536 Ellis 
Amrine Henry, tailor with Augustus Imhrie, dwl 

207 Post 
Amundsen August, upholsterer with E. C. Kennedy, 
dwl E 8 Harrison bet Twenty-third and Twenty- 
fourth 



THE PEOFIiES INSUKAIfCE CO. is the soundest Company on the Coast. 




AMERICAN CLOCK CO 



"P^ 




SOLE AOEVTS FOR THE: 

E. N. Wklch Mankg. Co. ; New Haven Clock Co. ; 

Seth Thomas Clock Co. ; Seth Thomas' Sons & Co. • 

GiLHERT Manfg. Co. ; Welch, Spring & Co. 



TIMII 



and 



CI.OCK MATERIAL, 

OF KVERY UKSCKIPTIOK. 

Agents for Jones & Go's Eegulators for Jewelers. 

A. S. HdTCHKISS & COS TOWER CLOCKS. 

Catalogues and Price Lists sent on application. 
OFFICE AND WAREROOMS, 

310 Sansom Street^ San Francisco. 



KOEHLER & BITTER 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Jtw^lry ami illTtr Wiw% 




O-^'O 



ftlso, DIAMOND, ENAMELED AND QUARTZ JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER. 



XTo. 620 MSB-CKiilTT STIIBST, 

Between Keainv and MoiU'^omerv, SAN FRANCISCO. 





70* 



'<M^ 




^ B. llTATHAIT c& CO. 

IMI'ORTKKS, JoliliKKS AND Kl'.T Ml.KKS IN 

CHINA, GLASS AND EARTHEN WARE, 

Britannia and Plated Ware, 

LAMPS, CHIMNIES, ETC. 

340 Kearny Street, 




NKAR SACKAMKNru. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Particular attention paid to fitting up Saloons, , 
Restaurants, etc. ; also, to packing Goods for 
the Interior or Coast Trade. 




JAS. ALGER k CO., OPTICIANS, 



IDEA.I1.EPIS IN" 



Optical, Mathematical & Philosophical Instruments, 

BRAZILIAN PEBBLE SPECTACLES, 

Stereoscopes and Stereoscopic Vie'^^s. 

WifctMmM^ OibMf ojpjala Vte^^s Imw M^^%®^ 



311 MONTGOMERY STREET, bet California and Pine, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 





C. P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Jewelry and Albums. 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



71 



Amy Gnstave, salesman, 17 Battery, dwl 403 Kearny 
Amy Oscar, clerk with Samuel Brauiian, dwl 1301 

Mason 
Anceriui John, gardener, dwl 215 Broadway 
Anchor Consolidated Mining Co., (Treasure City, 

iVciJ.; office 41 9 California 
Anda Rasmus, co()k Baltic House, 20 Commercial 
Anderfuien Cliarles, jiatternmaker with John M. 

Stockman, <i\vl 753 Mission 
Auderfuren John, tailor, 755 Mission 
Anderfureii W. G., p.itternmaker with J. M. Stock- 
man, dwl 755 Mission 
Anderle Adrien, laborer with August Weyer, dwl 

1709 Powell 
Anderluud Heiuiau, carpenter, dwl 535 Howard, 

rear 
Andersen John, shipcarpenter, dwl 1031 Mont 
Andersen Peter, cabinetmaker, dwl 1031 Mont 
Anderson Abraham, cabinetmaker, dwl 235 Steven- 
son 
Anderson Alexander, mariner, dwl 156 Steuart 
Anderson Anders, carpenter, bds 20 Coiiinieicial 
Anderson Andrew, captain schooner Brilliant, pier 

13 Steuart 
Anderson Andrew, liquor saloon, 250 Spear 
Anderson Andrew, tnariner, dwl 32 Steu;irt 
Anderson Andrew, mariner, dwl 30 Pacific 
Anderson Andrew, special policeman, dwl 349 

Tehama 
Anderson Andrew P., flour packer National Flour 

Mills, dwl 258 Minna 
Anderson A. P., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Anderson August, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anderson Augustus H., pressman, dwl 3 Hardie 

Place 
Anderson Benjamin, carpenter C. P. R. R., dwl cor 

Berry and Madden 
Anderson Bowley, (Anderson Sf Brother) dwl 

221 xMinua 
Anderson C. A. Mrs., assistant teacher Lincoln 

Grammar School, dwl 200 Stockton 
Anderson Carl G. G., barkeeper, 531 California, dwl 

704 Powell 
Anderson Catherine Mrs., upholsteress with Frank 

G. Edwards, dwl ti Prospect Place 
Anderson C. Elliot, clerk, dwl 34 Perry 
Anderson Charles, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Anderson Charles, collector, dwl 916 Vallejo 
Anderson Charles, longshoreman, dwl NE cor 

Spear iuul Mission 
Anderson Charles, lumberman, dwl cor Spear and 

Hijward 
Anderson Charles, seaman, bds SW cor Market and 

Steuart 
Anderson Charles A., (Anderson & Go. J dwl 525 

Tehama 
Anderson Charles D., ( DaU.on A., i^ Gray) dwl 

18 Moss 
Anderson Charles E., attorney at law, dwl 34 

Perry 
Anderson Christian, fisherman, dwl S s Lombard, 

bet Kearny and Montgomery 
Anderson Christian, seaman, bds 20 Commercial 
Anderson David, watchmaker, dwl 1117 Kearny 
Anderson Edmund, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Andei-son Edward, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anderson E. N., tailor, dwl 235 Sutter, rear 
Anderson Francis, (colored) furnished rooms, 828 

CL.y 
Anderson Francis, cabinet maker, dwl 142 Perry 
Anderson Francis A., (Anderson & Bro.) dwl 221 

Minna 
Anderson Fiuncis B., (McCusker & Co.) dwl W s 

Eleventh nr Folsom 
Anderson Frank, dwl 119 O'Farrell 
Anderson Frank O., cabinet maker with L. & E. 
Emanuel, dwl 142 Third 



Anderson Frank P., special policeman, dwl 612 

Greenwich 
Anderson Frederick, cabinetmaker with N. G. 

Norden,dwl 13 Clinton 
Anderson Frederick, fiameraaker with Snow & 

Roos. dwl 275 Clara 
Anderson Frederick, mariner, dwl 26 Steuart 
Anderson George, bricklayer with Geo. D. Nagle 
Anderson George, clerk, dwl SW cor Washington 

and Sanson! 
Anderson George, machinist, dwl 2.t^ Zoe 
Anderson George, restaurant East bet. Jackson and 

Pacific, dwl 10 Jackson 
Anderson George W., driver with Samuel E. Oak- 
ley 
Anderson Gnstave, cook, dwl E s White bet Green 

and Vallejo 
Anderson Henry, laborer, dwl 329 Vallejo 
Anderson Henry A., printer with A, Waldstein, dwl 

3 Hardie Place 
ANDERSON HENRY C, oysters, 45 Washington 

Market, dwl 917 Greenwich 
Anderson Hugh, photographer, dwl 27i Fourth 
Anderson Isaac, laborer Genesee flour mill, res 

Oakland 
Anderson James, bookkeeper with Thomas Boyne, 

45 Vallejo 
Anderson James, hostler Omnibus R. R., dwl 241 

Tehama 
Anderson James, laborer S. F. Cordage Factory, 

dwl SW cor Iowa and Sierra 
Anderson James, bds 20 Commercial 
Anderson James, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anderson James, sea captain, dwl 8 Freelon 
Andei'son James, tailor, dwl G41 Pacific 
Anderson James, waiter S. S. Senator, North Pac. 

Trans. Co 
Anderson James, (Anderson Sf Randolph) dwl 169 

Minna 
Anderson James W., jeweler with Hubash & Kutz, 

dwl 169 Minna 
Anderson Jehu, carpenter, dwl S s Eddy bet Scott 

and Pierce 
Anderson John, dwl 421 Bush 
Anderson John, captain schooner Loreuz and Wil- 
liam, Com. street wharf 
Anderson John, carpenter, dwl NW cor Berry and 

Third 
Anderson John, farmer, oflice 622 Clay, dwl De 

Haro nr Solano 
Anderson John, laborer with Black Diamond Coal 

Co., dwl 230 Folsom 
Anderson John, laliorer -with Hodgkin & Co., dwl 

Eighth Avenue nr L, South S F 
Anderson Jolui, longshoreman, dwl NE cor Folsom 

and Beale 
Anderson John, lumberman, dwl SE cor Market and 

East 
Anderson John, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anderson John, proprietor Ocean House, 407 and 

409 Drumm 
Anderson John, tailor, dwl 742 Pine 
Anderson John, tailor, dwl 1316 Dupont 
Anderson John, restaurant, 783 Market, dwl 834 

Market 
Anderson John, watchman Merchants Dry Dock 
Anderson John, (Anderson i!j- Matheson) dwl 306 

Green 
Anderson John Jr., captain schooner Ino, dwl 335 

Bryant 
Anderson John F., (colored) painter, 958 Mission 

dwl 1021 Pacific 
Anderson John M., (widow) dwl .539 O'Farrell 
ANDERSON JOHN M., wood and coal, 775 Mar- 
ket, dwl 200 Stockton 
Anderson Joseph D., clerk with Phipps & Flenni- 

ken, dwl 1632 Sacramento 
Anderson Julius, cigars and tobacco, 130 Kearny, 
dwl 212 Post 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Pocket Cutiery and Scissors. 



CHAMPIilWS LIQUID PEARL restores the Face to the beauty of Youth. 



72 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



Anderson Julius, pliipcarpenter, dwl John G. 

Noi'IIi'r wave, Poiieio 
AnderBon Lars, laundry, dwl 1315 Jnckson 
Aiiderson Laiiclilan C, moldei- Pacific Iron Works, 

dwl 37 Tehama 
AnderBon Maria Mrs., ladies nnrse, 266 Minna 
Anderson Marshal, wood and coal, dwl 200 Stockton 
Anderson Mary Mrs., dwl 20 Mission, rear 
Anderson Matliew A., ninsician, dwl 630 Sntier 
Anderson Niels, steward Jiiissian batiis, dwl .')24 Pac 
Anderson Niles E., steaoiboat captain, dwl 10 Oak 

Grove Avenne 
Andeison N'ils. seaman, bds 20 Commercial 
Anderson N. Thomas, stevedore, dwl W a Sansom 

bet Union and Green 
Anderson Oliver, tanner with Funcke & Wasser- 

nian, dwl W b Seventh nr Brannan 
Anderson Peter, cabinetmaker with Schreiber, 

Eobr it Co., dwl 1031 IMontgomery 
Anderson Peter, editor and proprietor Pacific Ap- 
peal, office SW cor Merchant and Sansom, dwl 
Hinckley Place 
Anderson Peter, mariner, dwl 20 Folgom 
Anderson Peter, mariner, dwl 531 East 
Anderson Peter, mate schooner Mary Ellen, Wash- 
ington St. wharf 
Anderson Peter, sea captain, dwl 976 Folsom 
Anderson Peter W., f Anderson <Sr Irving) dwl 713 

Bush 
Anderson Philip, laborer with William Patterson, 

dwl W 8 San Bruno Road nr Twenty-Eighth 
Andeison Pierre A, wiiiebottler with Eberhardt & 

Lachman, dwl 90 Everett 
Anderson Richard, mariner, dwl 32 Stenart 
Anderson Robert, carpenter, dwl Mount Hood House 
Anderson Robert, clerk, dwl 325^ Bush 
Anderson Robert H., longshoreman, dwl 15 Fred- 
erick 
Anderson Samuel H., master mariner, dwl 2 So- 
noma Pliice 
Anderson Simon, clerk, 737 Jackson, dwl 717 Vallejo 
Anderson T., laborer vi'ith Carmen Island Salt Co., 

dwl 42 Ecker 
Anderson Thomas, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

ANDERSON THOMAS, Empire Coal Yard, 737 
Jackson, (and Pres. Mutual Provident Associa- 
tion, 409 California) dwl 408 Eddy 

Anderson Thomas, seaman, dwl 34 Frederick 

Anderson Thomas, shipcarpenter, dwl 632 Third 

Anderson Walter B., special policeman, dwl 807 
Mason 

Anderson Warren, jeweler, dwl Es Selina Place 

Anderson William, engineer S F. Cordage Factory, 
dwl W 8 Indiana nr Sierra 

Anderson William, extraman H. and L. Co. No. 1, 
S. F. F. D., 22 0'Farrell 

Anderson William, laborer, dwl Ecker nr Folsom 

Anderson U'illiain, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 

Anderson William B., clerk with H. B. Tichenor 
& Co., dwl 335 Bryant 

Anderson William G., shipcarpenter, dwl E 8 
Illinois bft Shasta and Napa 

Anderson William H., (colored) barkeeper, 822 
Pacific 

Anderson William H., shipcalker, dwl 311 Har- 
rison 

Anderson W. R., barkeeper Boston House, 31 
Pacific 

Anderson & Brother, Ci?ott7ey Sr Frank Anderson) 
carriage bnildei-s, 815 Market 

ANDERSON & CO., ( Charles A. Anderson) vi'mes 
and liquors, 2')y Jackson 

ANDERSON & IRVING, (Peter W. Anderson & 
Samuel Irving) gents' furnishing goods, 141 
Montgomery 

ANDERSON & M\TnY.?^0^, (John Anderson & 
Archibald Mothcson) real estate agents, office 
312 Montgomery 



ANDERSON & RANDOLPH (Jamc^ Anderson 

Sf Willinm C. Randolph) watches, jewelry, 

di.Tmonds, etc., 112 Montgomery 
Andlaner Jacob, cabinetmaker with J. F. & H. H. 

Schafer, dwl 409 Third 
Audonnelte John, carver, dwl 28 O'Farrell, rear 
Andrade Antonio, carpenter, dwl 1317 Diipont 
Andrade V^\-»r\if\o, f Andrade & Co.) t\\\\ 10 Auburn 
Andrade GuillermoY&'^.T/«/(7 <jE; .,4.ydwl4l9 Brvant 
ANDRADE^ & CO., (Evaristo Andrade & Fred- 

erico Epson ) publishers and pioprietora La 

Sociedad, SW cor Sansom and Ja<-kson 
Andreas Gustav. machinist, dwl 228 Bush 
Andreas John G , machinist, dwl 228 Bu-<h 
Andreas John H.. tanner with Phillip Degao, dwl 

San Jose Road nr Industrial School 
ANDREI ADOLFO, phvsician, oflice 204 Sutter, 

dwl 317 First 
Andreis B. D., chemist, dwl 119 Silver 
Andres Christ, tnusitian, office 207 Montgomery, dwl 

19 Stockton Alley 
Andres John P., clerk with Asa M. Simpson, dwl 13 

Geary 
Andresen Brothers, (Christian and John) carriage 

makers and blacksmiths, 61)7 Battery 
Andrei^en Christian, {Andresen Brothers) dwl 607 

Battery 
Andresen John, (Andresen Brothers) dv;\ 607 Bat- 
tery 
Andresen Peter, cutter with Purdy& Litchfield, dwl 

6.39 California 
Andrew Elizabeth, (widow) dwl N s Jackson bet 

Larkin and Polk 
Andrew Herman, carpenter California Mills, dwl 535 

Howard 
Andrew H. P., bookkeeper People's Ins. Co., dwl 

127 Keamy 
Andrews A. B. school teacher, dwl 102 Sixth 
Andrews AInaham, dwl Nucleus House 
Andrews Alexander, laborer Laurel Hill Cemetery, 

dwl Point Lobos Avenne 
Andrews Amasa B., Auditor's Department, Custom 

House, dwl 9.32 Mission 
Audiews Ann M., (widow) dressmaker, dwl 517 

Minna 
Andrews Charles, (colored) steward Tide Laud Sur- 
vey, dwl 837 Bioadway 
Andrews Charles N., woodturner with L. &. E. 

Emainiel. dwl 5 Stockton 
Andrews Charles R., gilder with Snow & Eoos, 

dwl 517 Minna 
Andrews Edward, packer with O. H. Byring, dwl 

S E cor Jackson and Battery 
Andrews Edwin O., (Fancher 4r A.) and carpenter, 

dwl 230 Kearny 
Andrews Ellen, (w-idow) dwl 1208 Pacific 
Andrews Frank, embosser with A. L.Bancroft &. 

Co., dwl 932 Mission 
Andiews Frank, steward Sprinsr Valley Water 

Works, San Jos6 road nr Six Mile House 
Andrews Frederick J., carpenter, dwl W e Treat 

Av nr Twenty second 
Andrews George, paniter with Frost & Richards, 

dwl 313 Harrison 
Andrews George, stevedore. Riggers & Stevedores' 

Association, 429 Pacific 
Andrews Granville B., diiver Front St. M, & O. R. 

R., dwl W 8 Polk nr Bush 
Andrews Hannah, (widow) furnished rooms, 15 

Second 
Andrews Harry, gatekeeper Woodward's Gardens, 

dwl ¥. 8 Minna bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Andrews Henry, insurance agent, dwl 200 Stockton 
Andrews Hiram N., carpenter, dwl N s Natoma nr 

Ninth 
Andrews James, poultryman, dwl 8 s Grove bet 

Gouifh and Octavia 
Andrews Jeremiah, fireman str Amador, dwl 4 Cal- 
houn 



THE PEOPLES LNSUB.ANCE CO. recognizes individual liability. 



C. p. VAN" SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Smokers' Articles. 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



73 



Andrews Jolin R., pjiinter, dwl 1325 Sacramento 
Andievvs Joseph, painter with Hopps ife Sous, 22f) 

Sansoin 
Andrews M;iry J. Miss, dressmaker, dwl 1208 Pacific 
Andrews Oliver, wboieeale butcher, dwl 3 Harrison 

Avenue 
Andrews P. B. Mrs., furnished rooms, 5 Hardie 

Place 
Andrews Richard, seaman, dwl Mount Hood House 
Andiews Kiclinrd, stevedore, dwl S s Alta bet San- 

soui and Moutiironiery 
Andrews .*^ns;in Mrs., dwl 257 Stevenson 
Andrews T. H., foreman Sprinff Valley Waterworks 
Andrews T. H., carjienter. H.(L Leairue, l'J8 Kearny 
Andrews Tiiornas G., painter California Theatie, 

dwl I20S Pacific 
Andrews Tliotnas ,T., maltster, 43() Brannan 
Andrews William, conductor Market Street Railroad 

dwl W s Dolores bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Andrews William, stonecutter new U. S. Branch 

Mint, dwl S s Washington bet Fillmore and 

Webster 
Andrews W. 0.. dwl W e First Av bet Fourteenth 

and Fifteenth 
ANDKOS MILTON, attorney at law. office 18 U. 

S. Court luiilding, dwl 649 Howard 
Andrns Thoni;is J., compositor Figaro, dwl ,W s 

Mason bet P.icilic and Broadway 
Andi'zejowski J. W., dwl 702 Bush 
Andy ()., teamster with Hancock & Kelso 
Antrel J. AI.. carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
ANGEL MYRON, office 432 Montgomery, dwl 809 

Mission 
Angel. — See Angell 
ANGELI J. &, CO., f Richard Brne^ and E. M. 

Frank) importers and wholesale liquors211 and 

213 California 
Angeli Joseph, agent Ludwitr Altschul & Co., 709 

Sanson), dwl 507^ Leavenwoi'th 
Angeli Joseph, (J. A/isrcli & Co. J dwl W s Leaven- 

wortli nr O'Farrell 
Angelis August, tinsmith with Martin Prag, dwl 

5.51 Natoma 
Angelius Diederick, driver Albany Brewery, dwl 

J 2 Everett 
Angeli Andrew J., hotel keeper, dwl 533 Sacramento 
Anyeil Hoi ace B., f Angeli, Palmer <& Co.) dwl 11 

ClementiMa 
ANGELL JONATHAN W., apothecary NW cor 

Fir.-^l and Kolsom, dwl 24 Oak Grove Av 
ANGELL, PALMER & CO., (Horace B. Angell 

and Cyrnx Palmer) proprietors Minors Foundjy 

247-2.V7 First 
Angeli William C, physician, office NW cor First 

and FolsDUi, dv\i 500 Folsora 
Angell. — See Angel 
Angellis Theodore, jmveler with D. W. Laird, dwl 

1023 Powell, rear 
Angello Charles A., correspondent, dwl 604 Clem- 
entina 
Augelo Raymo, laborer with Brader Bros., dwl 

SW corner Union and Jones 
Angelo Sarah, (widow) dwl E s Eighth bet How- 
aid and Folsom 
Angelo Theodore, apolhccnry with James H. Wid- 

ber, dwl SW corner Third and Market 
Angelo William, cigars and tobacco, 236 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 212 Post 
Angerer Charles, bootmaker, 124 Seventh 
Angli, Kee & Co., (Chinese) merchants, 738 Sacra- 

inento 
Angier Eloise V. Madame, dressmaker, 115^ Sutter 
Anglin Patrick, laborer, dwl E s Bryant bet 

Twenty-fourth and Tweniy-fift!) 
An<:lin Thomas, laborer, dwl 721 Minna 
Anglin William, laliorer, dwl 814 Sansom 
Auglum John, laborer, Brauuau St. Warehouse, dwl 

2 California, rear 
Angney L. J., dwl Portsmouth House 



Angus John A., Superintendent Pioneer Woolen 
Factory, dwl NE cor North Point and Van Ness 
Av 
Angus William, weaver Pioneer Woolen Factory, 

dwl North Point bet Larkin and Polk 
Ankele George, baker, dwl N s Branuaii bet Fifth 

and Si.xtli 
Annaches Frederick, laborer with Lnke Doyle 
Annie, (Chinese) physician, 607 Dupout 
Annis A he, tailor, 645 Mission 
Annis Adolph, tailor, 235 Sutter 
Annis James, carpenter, dwl 418^ Natoma 
Annis Samuel, foreman with Green <fc Searle, dwl 

13-'9 Sansom, rear 
Annis William, cattledrover, dwl 327 Biyant 
Anshro Thotnas, (Anxhro <$■ Co J dwl 023 Union 
ANSBRO & CO., fTlwma.s Anshro, P. S. Allis 
and Henry .Jnknxon) private detective and in- 
quiry office, 411^ California, rooms 17 and 18 
Ansbuig B., (B. Ansbnrg Jj' ^o) <iwl NE cor 

Broadway and Montgomery 
Ansburg B. & Co., (Adam .lack) butchers, NE cor 

Broadway and Montgomery 
Anschel Levi, tailor, 204 Commercial 
Ansell Thomas, cook with F. A. Bergman, dwl 105 

Prospect Place 
Ansella Ernst, shoemaker, dwl 522 Pine 
Anser Antonio, liquor saloon, 019 Broadway 
Ansitjiioni Henry, real estate, dwl -523 Pine 
Anson Patrick, painter with Wason & Morris, dwl 

N s Filbert nr Larkin 
Anson Ricluird, painter, dwl 909 Geary 
Anson William, frescopainter, dwl 909 Geary 
Anspacher Abraham, real estate, dwl 808 Geary 
Anspacher Philip, clerk with Geo. F. and William 

H. Sharp, dwl 808 Geary 
Anthes Frederick, nnisician. dwl 27 Morton 
Anthes Peter, {Anthes & Fleischman) dwl Sophie 

Terrace 
ANTHES & FLEISCHMANN, (Peter Antkex and 
Charlex N. Fleischmann,) bairdressing saloon, 
315 Kearny 
Anthony Abraham, trimmings, 1116^ Folsom 
Anthony Abraham, shoemaker, dwl 22 Second 
Anthony Albert G., physician, office and dwl 128 

Kearny 
Anthony Charles W., stiulent Pacific Theological 

Seminary, res Oakland 
Anthony Edward T. & Co., repackers, 321 Sacra- 
mento, dwl N s Oak bet Franklin and Gough 
Anthony Emma, (widow) dwl 12 Sunnier 
Anthony Henry, barkeeper with John Prinz, dwl 

49 Second 
Anthony Hymau, peddler, dwl 769 Bryant 
Anthony James M., sheriff's officer, dwl 176 Minna 
Anthony .Juliet Miss, assistant teacher Greenwich 

Street Cosmopolitan School, dwl 914 Market 
Antiiony Mary Mrs., dwl 257 Stevenson 
Anthony M. E. Mrs., nurse, dwl 30 Kearny 
Anthony Richard M., bookkeeper with W. Sher- 
man & Co., dwl 214 Stockton 
Anthony William T., clerk, dwl Joncerie House 
Ami Coolie Laundry Association, laundry. Four- 
teenth Avenue bet Pand Q, South S F 
Anton Fisher, machinist with John G. lis, dwl 345 

Bush 
Anton Thomas, dairyman, dwl Courtland Ave nr 

Mission 
Antonason Henry, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Antoni Andreas, bakery and confectionery, 1006 

Ffdsom 
Antoni Henry, cutler with Will & Fiuck, dwl 522 

Filbert 
Antonia Eugene, cook with William Hillman, dwl 

Cariboo Hotel 
Antonio Covacich, liquors, NW cor Polk and Broad- 
way 
Antonio Joseph, deckhand stm Vallejo, dwl S s Val- 
lejo bet Front and Davis 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Braids of all kinds. 



KEDINGTOWS FLAVOKING EXTKACTS, Articles of real merit and worth their value. 



74 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



(Antunovick Sf Russell) dwl 
cofl'ee saloon, SW cor East 



Anttinovich Floiio. 

7 1 '2 Green 
Antunovich Nicliolas 

and Commercial 
Antunovich <fe Russell, fFlnrio Antunovich and 

John RiisseU) coffee saloon, NW cor Clay and 

East 
Antz Henry, (Moock & A.) dwl 558 Stevenson 
Anzola Juan, carpenter, dwl 2 Dnpont Place 
Aoper A., carpenter, H. C. LeaKne, 128 Kearny 
Apel Frank, baker with R. R. Swain & Co., dwl 11 

Pinckney Place 
Apel John, architect, office 608 Sacramento, dwl 832 

Folsoni 
Apel's linilding, 410 Kearny 
Apelt Morris, engineer with Frederick Zeile, dwl 

521 Pacific 
Aphold IJernliard, cooper with T. F. Neagle & Co., 

dwl 39 Jackson 
APOTHECARIES' HALL, Benjamin B. Thayer 

manager, and Wni. J. Bryan druggist, Grand 

Hotel, SE cor New Montgomery aiid Market 
App Matthias J., furnished rooms, 128 Kearny 
Appa George, laborer Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 

145 Tehama 
APPEAL, (weekly) Peter Anderson editor and pro- 
prietor, office SVV cor Sansom and i\terchant 
Appel John C, cabinetmaker, dwl NW cor Sixth 

and Bryant 
Appel Samuel, beer saloon 425 Bush, dwl 333 Ste- 
venson 
Appel Samuel, oil clothing manufactory, 25 Drumm 

dwl 521 Stevenson 
Appel Simon, tailor, dwl 303 Third 
Appiarins Henry, clerk with H. Schuldt, dwl NW 

cor Third and Harrison 
Appiarns William, driver with Erzgraber & Goetjen 
Apple Sarah Mrs., fancy goods, 201 Kearny, dwl 

295 Clementina 
Apple Wolf, merchant, dwl 295 Clementina 
Appleby Hawley, teamster 12 Steuart, dwl N s 

Eddy bet Scott and Pierce 
Appleby John, cook, NW cor Spring and Summer 
Appleby John, teamster, dwl W s Mission bet 

Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Appleby Paul, cook with Frank Lacoste & Co., G17 

Saciainento 
Appleby Thomas, nurseryman and florist, NE cor 

Twenty second and Alabama 
Appleby Williiim, florist, NE cor Twenty Second 

and Alabama 
Applegarth Edward, (Eherhardt Co.) office 320 

Jlontgomery 
Applegate J. Henry Jr., bookkeeper with John H. 

Carmany & Co., dwl 204 Lombard 
Applegate Jblni J., bookkeeper Standard Soap Co., 

dwl 130 Fifth 
Appleg;ite Josiah H., attorney at law, office SW cor 

Jackson and Montgomery, dwl 219 Stevenson 
Applegate Uriah, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Appleton Abram, porter with Buckingham & Hecht, 

dwl 5(5 Everett 
Appleton D. E. Mrs., (widow) dwl 1010 Pine 
Ajjpleton John N., carpenter, dwl Ellis nr Laguna 
Appleton Morris, merchant, dwl 462Natoma 
Appleton Thomas Jr., superintendent Pacific and 

Mission Woolen Jlills, dwl W s Folsom bet 

Ninteenth and Twentieth 
Appleton Wellington, conductor S. F. and 0. R. R., 

dwl 504 Eddy 
Appo Julius B., porter, dwl Fourteenth Av nr R, 

South S. F. 
Appo Louis, cook with Dennis Mattarango, dwl 673 

Howard 
Appoll George, ^^/?;7o//cfc Fmj^-eryi'es Redwood City 
Appolt & Finger, (Gcorfra Appolt and Herman 
/'■'zw^ez-y tannery, S s Twenty-seventh bet How- 
ard and Folsom 



Apps William, furnished rooms, 720 Market 

April Nicholas, stev^'ard, 122 Leidesdorff 

Apted Walter, mariner, dwl 1021 Pacific 

Arans Maria, (widow) shirtuiaker, dwl SW cor 

Broadway and Dupont 
Arata Pietro, laborei' with D. Gliirardelli, dwl 

Union Place bet Green and Union 
Arbogast Fred, upholsterer with F. G. Edwards, 

dwl 720 California 
Arbondin Henry, manufacturer smoking tobacco, 

1626 Stockton 
Arbuckle Henry, groceries and liquors, NE cor 

Howard and Sixteenth 
ARCHBALD JOHN, secretary San Francisco 

Savings Union, office 532 Cal., dwl 1312 Powell 
Archer John, sash and blindmaker, dwl 61 Minna 
Archer William, macninist, dwl 415 Fifth 
Archibald Andrew, produce. Grand Central Market, 

dwl23Si.\th 
Archibald Jesse G., driver N. B. & M. R. R., dwl 

312 Tehama 
Archibald Prescott L., conductor Central Railroad 
Archibald William, molder Golden State Iron 

Works, dwl 24 First 
Archimandritofl' Illirian, mariner, dwl 515 Bnsh 
Archy Annie, (colored) (widow) dwl 27 John 
Arees Jean P., f A. Drnyevr & (jo.) dwl 433 Pacific 
Arellano Fortunato, jeweler, dwl S s Dnpont alley 
Arellano Ygnacio, bootblack with Adam Grimm, 

Lick House 
Arens Gertrude Mrs., seamstress with I. Zacharias 

& Co., dwl 1123 Dupont 
Arents Edward, barkeeper with James K. McCor- 

mick, dwl 749 Market 
Ar6valo Miguel S., teacher music, dwl 914 Stockton 
Arey Chailes, captain bark Nitk Biddle, pier 3 

Steuart 
Arey Joseph, mate ship Marmion, pier 3 Steuart 
Arey Robert B., first mate S. S. Gussie Telfair, North 

Pac. Trans. Co., dwl 422 Sutter 
Arey Theodore R., mate bark Gem of the Ocean, 

pier 7 Steuart 
Arey Walter W., bookkeeper with Jacob Underbill 

&, Co., dwl 6 Vassar place 
Arfort John B., wagonmaker, 218 Post, dwl NW 

cor Octavia and Fulton 
Argall John, machinist Vulcan Iron Works, dwl 323 

Fifth 
Argenti S. M. Co., (Mountain City, Ncv.) office 419 

California 
Argenti Tulio, marblecutter with Leon K. Myers 

&. Co., and varieties, W s Mission bet Twenty- 
fifth and Twenty-sixth 
Aria Anizeto, sinche manufacturer, dwl 105 Cham- 
bers 
Arias Benancio, longshoreman, dwl N s Commer- 
cial bet East and Diumm 
Arick Frank, dairyman with Richardson & Bro., 

dwl NE cor Nineteenth and Dolores 
Arjo Manuel, driver with G. Venard, dwl 1409 

Hyde 
Arkinson George, laborer, dwl 314 Folsom 
Arland Robert, cook, 638 Pacific 
Arling Isaac, stevedore with C. P. R. R. Co., dwl 

26 St Clair 
Arliiifrton Mary Miss, glovemaker with Shoenberg 

& Levinsky, dwl 545 Howard 
Arman Edward, barber, dwl 77 Everett 
Armand J. E., compositor S. F. Chronicle, dw^l Jones 

nr Pacific 
Armand Joseph W., tailor, 120 Leidesdorff 
Armand L.. tailor, bds 122 Leidesdorff 
Armand William, engineer, cor California and 

Drumm, dwl 823 Montgomery 
Armann Edward, (Armann & KtrschJ dwl S 8 Ev- 
erett nr Fourth 
Armann & Kirsch, (Edward Armann and Joseph 

KirschJ barbers, 106 Post 
Armbruster Henry, cabinetmaker, dwl 1135 Folsom 



The «• PEOPLES " is a home institution. 



C p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708. 712, 714 & 716 Kearny St., Rubber Goods and Umbrellas. 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



75 



Armbruster Julius, engraver, SW cor California 

and Kearny 
Aimer Max, fK nil man & A.) dwl 631 O'Farrell 
Arnier Robert, Li borer, dwl .") Washoe place 
Anner Tlionias, cook willi Saulmaun & Lauensteiu, 

dwl 5 Washoe place 
Amies Aiitoue, hairdresser with H.Lewis, dwl 2002 

Montgoiiier}' 
Armes C. W., (Armes & Dallam) res Oaldand 
Amies George W., { Armes & Dnllam) res Oakland 
ARMES Si. DALLAM, fC. W. and George VV. 
Armes and Richard B. Dallam) manufacturers 
tubs and p:iil8, !J2 and 24 California, and im- 
porters wood and willow-ware and manufac- 
turers brooms, 215 and 217 Sacramento 
Armiger John R., boilermaUer, dwl San Francisco 

Hotel 
ARMORY HALL BUILDING, N E cor Mont- 
gomery and Sacramento 
Armour William, bteward Atlantic House, 210 

Pacific 
Arms Moses, nigbt inspector Custom House, dwl 322 

Third 
Arms Richard D., inspector Custom House, dwl 322 

Third 
Armstrong Abraham, mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 
Armstrong Andrew, lahorcr, dwl 26 Louisa 
Armstrong Catherine Mrs., fancy goods, 132 Fourth, 

dwl 128 Fourth 
Armstrong Charles, liquor saloon. Central Ocean 

Roadnr Soring Valley Water Works 
Armstrong Cliarles H.," teamster with Sproul & 

Twing, dwl fjoS Howard 
Armstrong Chiistofiher, clerk with Michael Connell 

dwl N W cor Folsom and Harriet 
Armstrong David, merchant, dwl 808 Howard 
Armstrong Dennis, clerk, dwl TJS Fourth 
Armstrong Frank, porter with Redington, Hostetter 

& Co., dwl 1113 Sacramento 
Armstrong Frank, porter with Rockwell, Coye & 

Co., dwl 7 Nunan's Av 
Armstrong Henry, dwl 116 Tehama 
Armstrong James, dwl cor Fair Av and Mission 
Armstrong James, engineer with City Paving Co., 

dwl 12^ Harriet 
Armstrong James, farmer, dwl 115 Ellis 
Armstrong James, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Armstrong James, tinsmith, 242-216 Sixth 
Armstrong James, waiter Lick House 
Armstioug James, waiter What Clieer restaurant 
Aruistiong Joanna, (widow) dwl S s Tehama bet 

Eighth and Ninth 
Armstrong John, hihorer, dwl N s Tyler bet Jones 

and Leavenworth 
Armstrong John, laborer Dexter stable, 223 Bush 
Armstrong John, plasterer, dwl 46 Clara 
Armstrong JolinG., cooper with Cutting & Co., dwl 

247 Fourth 
Armstrong Jolin S., (Armstrong <& Moore) dwl 5 

Latham Place 
Armstrong Robert, carpenter, dwl N s Fulton nr La- 

guna 
Armstrong Samuel C, salesman, 309 Montgomery, 

dwl 943 Folsom 
Armstrong Thomas, cook, dwl 32 Steuart 
Armstrong Truman B., tinsmith with Brittan, Hoi- 

brook & Co., dw! 924 Stockton 
ArmstroiiM: William, graiuer, dwl S s Eighteenth 

bet Ca[)p &. Mission 
Armstrong William H., clerk U. S. Medical Di- 
rector, 703 Market, dwl 155 Tehama 
Armstrong William W., chief Deputy Assessor City 

and County, dwl 1712 Clay 
Arnaud Charles, wagonmaker with Maugeot &. La- 

caze. dwl 636 Pacific 
Arnaud Francois, scissoigrinder, dwl 636 Pacific 
Arnaud Peter, boxniaker with John S. Gibbs, dwl 

Willow bet Valencia and Mission 
Arnest John, photographer, dwl 43 Natoma 



Arnheim Julius S., clerk with Samnel S. Arnheim, 

dwl N W cor Fourth and Mission 
Arnheim Samnel S., druggist and chemist, N W cor 

Fourth and Mission, and 8 Steuart 
Arnheim Saul, clothinj^, 315 Pacific 
Arnhold Hugo, traveling agent with Fenkhausen & 

Gerichten, 2-Jl California 
Arnold A., bds Lick House 
Arnold Aaron J., miner, dwl Overland House 
Arnold Ames, teamster with Blyth & Wetherbee, 

dwl E s Fair Oaks nr Tvi-enty-third 
Arnold Augustus D., sawyer with B. & J. S. Doe, 

dwl 24!) Stevenson 
Arnold Austin, bookkeeper with Marcus C. Hawley 

& Co., bds Lick House 
Arnold Benjamin E., wholesale butcher, dwl 1112 

Folsom 
Arnold Benjamin F., conductor, N. B. & M. R. R., 

dwl 829 Folsom 
Arnold Charles (colored) mechanic, dwl 5 Berry 
Arnold Cyrus, f Brown & A.) dwl 410 Kearny 
ARNOLD ELDRIDGE F., books, stationery and 

periodicals 427 Kearny, dwl 822 Filhert 
Arnold Ferdinand D., butcher, dwl 43 Tehama 
Arnold Francis W., cooperage, 708 Front, dwl 519 

Octavia 
Arnold G. C, professor modern languages, City Col- 
lege, dwl 430 Geary 
Arnold George IL, agent, dwl 305 O'Farrell 
Arnold John, mariner, dwl W a Valencia bet Fif- 
teenth and Sixteenth 
Arnold John C., clerk, dwl W s Valencia bet Fif- 
teenth and Sixteenth 
Arnold John F., expresswagon, 320 Jackson, and 
agent H. & L. axle grease, dwl S a Washington 
bet Leavenworth and Hyde 
Arnold Joseph, (McLean Sf 'A.) dwl 707 Mission 
Arnold Lewis, compositor Evening Bulletin 
Arnold L. L. commission merchant, ortlce 407 Cali- 
fornia, res Alameda 
Arnold Louis, grocer, dwl NE cor Vallejo and 

Powell 
Arnold Louis, longshoreman, dwl 11 Pacific 
Arnold Marcus P., clerk with P]. F. Arnold, dwl 822 

Filhert 
Arnold Matthew, machinist Union Iron Works 
Arnold Noah S., secretary California Type Foundry 

Co., 407 Sansom, dwl 918 Capp 
Arnold Otio, messenger London and S. F. Bank, 

dwl SW cor Powell and Geary 
Arnold Philip, miner, dwl 431 Turk 
Arnold Richard, mason, Sloiie Mason's Ass'n, NE 

cor Bush and Kearny 
Arnold Rufus, laborer with Joseph Sedgley, dwl 

Folsom bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Arnold Thomas C, clerk with Hecht Bros & Co., 

dwl 337 Jessie 
Arnold Thomas J., engineer Board State Harbor 

Commissioners, office 414 Mont, res Oaklaml 
Arnold William, laborer, dwl N a Green bet Leav- 
enworth and Hyde 
Arnold William A., carpenter, dwl W s Natoma 

bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
ARNOT NATHANIEL D., President Vulcan Iron 
Works Co., and Front street M. & O. Railroad 
Co., dwl 319 First 
Arnot Nathaniel D. Jr., secretary Front st. M. & 

O. R. R. Co., office 1336 Bush, dwl 319 First 
Arnstein Eugene, ('^Vem, Simon & Co.y dwl 507 

Lombard 
Aruystron Th., engineer, dwl NW cor Berry and 

Third 
Arolla J. I., cartman, dwl 1 Pacific alley 
Arou Henry, clerk with Peter T. Gannon, dwl 

18 Sutter 
Aron Joseph, ( Weil & Co.) dwl E s Van Ness Ave- 
nue nr Sutter 
Aronsohn Sigmund, salesman, 532 Kearny, dwl 5iU 
O'Farrell 



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tn 
d 

p 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 SauTom Street, Silk and Velvet Bibbons. 



ITE'WEIilj'S PTJIjMONAKY" SYRUP, the best family CouEh Mediclna 



76 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



Aronsobn Siymnnd, peddlei", dwl 3 Monroe 

Aionson J)avid, pictures, dwl 18 Mary 

Aiontum George, dwl 1399 Clemeiitiiifi 

Aiouson Gustuve, pawubroker, 110 Keainy, dwl 299 

Cleineiitiiia 
ARONSTEIN ADOLF, pbysiciau, office 216 Kear- 
ny, dwl 417 Post 
Arp Peter, stonecutter, dwl 11 Pacific 
Arper Thomas, millwriglit with F. Korbel & Bros., 

dwl 609 Third 
Arqiies Joaquin It., live stock, office 708 Moutgom- 

eiy, les Santa Clara 
Ari-aiiil)ide John B., wholesale cattle dealer, dwl 

600 Jones 
Arrendt Harris, merchant, office 108 Bush, dwl 502 

Bush 
Arriiigton J. W., (widow) dwl 1309 Mason 
Arriola Edward F., gilder with M. D. Nile, dwl 

404 Green 
Arriola Fortunato, land.scape painter, dwl 404 Green 
Arris Samuel, clerk, dwl 404 Post 
Arrison Henry, carpenter, dwl 828 Union 
Arrowsmiih David B., local atrent New York Life 

Insurance Co., dwl G07>2 Pine 
Arrowsniith John, laborer, dwl 5 Zoe Place 
Arthur Edwin ]\I., bullion and note clerk with 

Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 1027 Bush 
Arthur George N., (J. I). Arthur & Son) dwl N 8 

Wiisliington bet Polk and Van Ness Av 
ARTHUR J. D. & SON, (George N. Arthur) 

impoiters and jobber.^, niacliiuery and wagons, 

SW cor California and Davis 
Arthur John D., (J. D. Arthur Sr Son) dwl 1027 

Bush 
Arthur Thomas, frunkmaker with E. Gilpen & Co., 

dwl Columbia bet Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
Arthur William S., mariner, dwl 312| Clementina 
Aitigues Louis, wholesale butcher. New Butcher- 
town, and retail, 14 San Francisco Market, dwl 

New Buti-hertown 
Arzaga Agustin, compositor L'Eco della Patria, dwl 

1031 Dupont 
Arzag.i Edward, tinsmith with Brittan, Holbrook 

& Co., dwl W 8 Dupont bet Union and Green 
Arzaga Jose, compositor with M. D. Carr & Co., 

dwl 408 Greenwich 
Arzberger Charles, butcher with John Martens, dwl 

New Atlantic Hotel 
Arzberger M., whitener, 5 Belden Place 
Ascher Samuel, peddler, dwl 459 Jessie 
Ash Charles, drayman, 425 Battery, dwl 434 Fifth 
Ash David, horee-shoe nailmaker, 13 First, dwl 13 

Minna 
Ash Jacob, fj. Alexander ^- Co.) re? New York 
Ash Leo, (J. Alexander Sf Co.) dwl 723 O'Farrell 
Ash Louis, upholsterer, dwl 90 Stevenson 
Ash Mary, (widow) dwl 7 Mary 
Ash Matthew, porter, 236 Montgomery, dwl 334 

Third 
AbIi Peter, laborer, dwl 551 Minna 
Ash Thomas P., conductor N. B. and M. R. R., dwl 

908 Folsom 
Ash Thomas P., phonographic reporter with S. J. 

Claike, Jr., dwl 13 Minna 
Ash William H., salesman, 209 Montgomery, dwl 

249 Minna 
Ashburne Alexander, (colored) bootblack steamer 

El Capitan, Oakland Ferry, res Oakland 
ASHBURNER WILLIAM, mining engineer, office 

24(1 Montgomery 
ASHBURY MONROE, Auditor City and County 

San Francisco, office 3 City Hall, first floor, dwl 

204 Montgomery 
Ashby J;ime8, cattle dealer, dwl 1320 Sansom 
Ashby Mark T., miner, dwl 514 Greenwich 
Asbcom James E., register clerk Fourth District 

Court, dwl 850 Market 
Ashcrofi William, captain steam tug Water Witch, 

dwl 1208 Jackson 



Ashdown Archibald, dwl 514 Sutter 
Ashe Richard P.. physician, dwl 540 Second 
ABhenberg M. Miss, clerk U. S. B- Mint, dwl Nu- 
cleus House 
Asher A. F., clothing, 405 P;ici(ic, dwl 1596 Bush 
Aslier Frank, truckman, dwl 420 Post 
Asher James, stevedore. Rig. and Stev. Ass'n, 429 

Pacilic 
Asher Julius, photographer with Bayley & Winter, 

dwl 30 Everett 
Asher Rachel, (widow) dwl 30 Everett 
Asher S., teamster cor California and Kearny 
Asher Simon, clothing, 47 Sacramento 
Asherton Emil, clerk Hebrew Observer, dwl 430 

Tehama 
Ashley D. R., dwl 712 Bush 

Ashley George, longshoreman, dwl SW cor Wash- 
ington and Sansom 
Ashley Pacilicus S.. dwl 712 Bush 
Ashley Samuel, painter with Wason &- Morris 
ASHLEY SYDNEY J., Supei-intendent Streets and 
Hijfbwavs, office room 2, basement, City Hall, 
dwl 160(3 Pacilic 
Ashman Richard, engineer, dwl cor Indiana and 

Sierra 
Ashmead Gustavus S., carpenter and builder, SE 

cor JIariposa and Florida 
Ashmore Thomas, clerk Grand Central Market, dwl 

745 Alai'ket 
ASHTOX CHARLES, real estate agent and col- 
lector, office 608 Market, dwl Ellis nr Stockton 
Ashton Jolin, dver Mission and Pacific Woolen Mills, 

dwl no;) Folsom 
Ashton William C, clerk with Renton, Smith & 

Co., dwl 522 Folsom 
Ashworth Tliomas, [James Perrin Stevens & Co.) 

dwl 520 Geary 
Askey Armstrong, wharfinger Market street wharf, 

dwl 304 Minna 
Askwith Thomas, carpenter with D. A. Macdonald 

& Co. , dwl 36 Natoma 
Askwith William C, steward, dwl 107 Welsh 
Asmus John, porter Commercial Flour Mill, dwl 

724 O'Farrell 
Asmusen Charles W., carpenter, dwl 38 Rausch 
Asmussen Willi. im A., groceries and liquors, NE cor 
Harrison and Eighth, dwl N s Hei'on in' Eighth 
ASPHALTUM AND MASTIC ROOFING CO., 

(George Duncan «fe Co.) 6-32 Market 
Asphaltum Piessure Pipe Co., office 645 Market 
Aspriel William, calker, dwl 230 Folsom 
Assalino Salvatore, restaurant, 518 Merchant, dwl 

81 3i Vallejo 
Asselin Bertha, actress, dwl 708 MoJitgomery 
Asseliu John, carpenter California Mills, dwl 73 

Tehama 
Asselin Susan, (widow) dressmaker, dwl 708 Mont- 

goinerv 
ASSESSOR CITY AND COUNTY, office 22 City 

H;ill. first rtnor 
ASSESSOR UNITED STATES INTERNAL 

REVENUE, office 419 California 
Assion Henry, tailor, dwl 223 Sutter 
Assion Joseph, merchant tailor, 205 Montgomery, 

dwl 348 Third, rear 
Assmanu Adolph, (Assman & Neuberl) dwl 4 Fella 

Place 
Assmann & Neubert, (Adolph Assmann and Ru- 
dolph NenbertJ butter, cheese, eggs, etc., 10 
California Market 
Astalos Samuel, cabinetmaker with Schreiber, Rohr 

& Co., dwl 114 Main 
Asten John, expre.sswagon, Oakland ferry, dwl NE 

cor iMontgomery and Pacific 
Asteto Benjamin, waiter Lick House 
Aston F., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Aston James, teadealer, office with Macondray & 

Co., dwl 461 Jessie 
Astor Block, 627 Sacramento 



PEOPLES INSURANCE CO.— Their Losses are promptly paid. 



C. p. VAN SCHA/LCK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valises. 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY. 



77 



ASTREDO ANTHONY, Astredo's Exchange, 635 
VN'asliiiigton, dvvl 914 Vnllejo 

Atcliiiison B. M., [B. M. Alchiuson Sf Co.) resides 
Brociklyn, Alameda Co 

ATCHlNSbN B. M. & CO., {Bciijnmin W. Hnyex) 
butter, cheese, eggs, etc.. 7 Ociidental Mfirket 

Atdiison Joliii, carpenter, California Mills, dwl ''2'2'i 
Stevenson 

Atliearn Charles G. (Aikearn <fc Co.), dwl 909 Mc- 
Allister 

Atliearn Charles JI., niillvnian, dwl 1313 Larkin 

AMiearn Joseph H., (Athcarn Sf Co.) dwl 1021 
GeiiiT 

ATHKAfiN & CO., (Charles G. and Joseph H. 
Afhci7 nt J gvoceries, provisions and ship stores, 
8 CIhv 

ATHENJEUM building, SE cor Moutgomery 
and California 

Atlieitou h\ D., c?.pitalist, office 705 Sansom, res 
F.iir Oaks, San Mateo Co 

Atliy Andrew, laborer with Hancock & Kelso, dwl 
~H)G Uitch, lear 

Athy UoiiiinicU, butcher with Reardou & Cough- 
lan 

Atkins Eben, porter with Allyne & White, dwl 742 
Washington 

Atkins George, waiter stm Idaho, dwl 132 Folsom, 
re:ir 

Atkins Henry B., groceries and liquors, SE cor 
Jones and O' Fail ell 

Atkins Robert C, (Orr & A.) dwl 608 Geary 

Atkins William, suilmaker with Harding & Brann 

Atkinson C. Ehvood, car builder with Kimball 
Manufacturing Co., dwl 218 Shotwell 
Road, iir Ostego 

Atkinson David 6., shoemaker, dwl Ocean House 

Atkinson Frank, fireman sir No. 6, S. F F. D., dwl 
3I'i Sixth 

Atkinson George, mariner, dwl W s Guerrero ur 
Twenty-fourth 

Atkinson George, wagonniaker with Lane & Mur- 
phy, dwl 10-,' Silver 

ATKINSON JAMES, Market Exchange Saloon, 538 
Market, dwl 41 Tehama 

Atkinson Johanna, boarding and lodging, 660 Mis- 
sion 

Atkinson Joseph H., patent agent, dwl 1032 Broad- 
way 

ATKINSON L. & CO., importers shirts and col- 
lars, 310 California 

Atkinson L. A., dwl 36 Geary 

Atkinson Lewis, (L. Atkinson & Co.JAvil Occiden- 
tal Hotel 

Atkinson Nathan, (Hancock Sf A.J dwl 769| Mis- 
sion 

Atkinson Rose H., (widow) dwl 365 Minna 

Atkinson Samnel, foreman car shoj) Kimball Mauuf 
Co., dwl 218 Shotwell 

Atkinson Thomas, real estate agent, dwl Green's 
Court nr Hovvard 

Atkinson Thomas E., carbuilder with Kimball 
Manuf Co., dwl 218 Shotwell 

Atkinson Thomas T., bookkeeper with Lyon & Co., 
dwl 108 Hyde 

Atkinson Williani, laborer, dwl S s Geary nr Larkin 

Atkinson William, sail maker with John S. Blaki- 
ston, 8 Clay 

ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC TELEGRAPH CO., 
(Central Pacitic Division) Leland Stanford 
President, F. L. Vandeuburgh, Gen'l Sup'i, 
office .503 California 

Atlantic House, M, McDonald proprietor, 210 and 
212 Pacitic 

Atlantic Mutual Life Insurance Co., (Albany, N. Y.) 
T. Hart Hyatt, General Agent, office 420 Mont- 
gomery 

Atlee Henry, sawyer with Swan, Dunbar & Co., 
dwl What Cheer House 

Atmospheric Gas Co., office 310 Montgomery 



Atterbury Alexander, bookkeeper with James N. 

McC'une, dwl 408 Shipley 
Attey H., dwl What Cheer House 
Attiiiger Frederick, tailor, dwl '236 Sutter 
Attinger Gottlieb, (Mnller 4- A.J 242 Sutter 
Attinger John, tailor, dwl 2 Monroe 
Attridge Arthur, shuemaker with Metropolitan B & 

S Co., dwl 282 Minna 
Attridge Edward, porter with H. Webster &, Co., 

dwl 1010 Filbert 
Attridge James, porter with L. P. Sage, dwl 

Morse PLice 
Attridge Thomas, porter Cowell's Warehouse, dwl 

5 8 Broadway bet Hvde and Larkin 
ATTWOOD MELVILLE, Secretary Eberhar.il, 

Mill and Mining Co., and Aurora Consolid ited 
S. M. Co., office 3U2 Montgomery, dwl 722 Bush 

Atwell A. B., physiiiau, office 24 Post 

Atwill Josepli F, merchant, dwl 512 Bryant 

Atwood Chailes E , shoemaker U. W. M. B &. S. 
Co., dwl 67!) iMission 

Atwood C. L. Mrs., assistant teacher Boys' High 
School 

Atwood Ephraim A., (Atwood & BudwcUJ dwl 
1806 Mason 

Atwood George, teamster with William H. Nichols, 
NW cor Sacramento and Drumm 

Atwood George A., macliinist, dwl E s Shotwell 
bet Tweiuy-second and Twenty -third 

Atwood George W., teatnster with Lane &, Rich- 
ardson, dwl SE cor Turk and Fillmore 

Atwood William T., bookkeeper with B. C. Horn 

6 Co., dwl 207 Kearny 

ATWOOD & BODWELL. (Ephraim A. Atwood 

and Harry H. BodwcUJ wind mill and tank 

manufacturers, 211-213 Mission 
Atzel Pierre, laborer, dvvl 435 Pine 
Aub Ernest, dwl Branch House 
Aub Michael D., bookkeeper, 106 Sansom, dwl 407 

Sutter 
Aubert Albert, pork butcher, 10 San Francisco Mar- 
ket, dwl 3 Graham Place 
Aubert M. 31., physician, office 235 Kearny 
Aubert Paul J., jeweler, dwl 514 Bush 
Aubert Paul L., jeweler, dwl N a O'Farrell bet Oc- 

tavia and Laguna 
Aubert Victore, laborer Miners' Restaurant, dwl 634 

Pacific 
AubeTy William, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 

Aubrey , machinist, dwl 431 Pine 

Aubrey Francis O., carpenter, W s Valencia nr Six- 
teenth, dwl Chattanooga nr Twenty-third 
Aubry Bernard, waiter, NW cor Spring and Summer 
Aubry Charles, tinsmith with G. & W. Snook 
Aubry Edward, trunk and valise manufacturer, 505 

Jackson 
Aubry Joseph, trunkmaker with Edward Aubry, 

505 Jackson 
Audiffred Hypolite, wood and charcoal. Mission St. 

wharf, dwl 224 Austin 
AUDITOR CITY AND COUNTY, office 3 City 

Hall, tirst floor 
Audurland Hemy, carpenter, dwl 40 First 
Auer Thomas, (Streitbcrger & A.J dwl Scott nr 

Lombard 
Auerbach 'Lieo\>6\A, (of Auerbnch & Bro., Helena, 

Montana J dwl NWcor Pine and Jones 
Auerbach Louis, cigars and tobacco, What Cheer 

House, dwl 340 Turk 
Auerbach Louis, clerk with Jacob A. Alexander, 6 

Clay 
Aufrichtig Moritz, jeweler with Hubash & Kutz, 

dwl 234 Stevenson 
Auger B. Eugene, (Auf;er, Christiansen & Co. J 

dwl 841 Howard 
AUGER, CHRISTIANSEN & CO., (B. Eugene 

Auger and Christian Christiansen) importers 

and commission merchauts, 409 Battery 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 110 Sansom Street, Dress Trimmings. 



TE^BA SANTA purifies the Blood and strengthens the Nervous System. 



78 



SAN FRANCISCO [A] DIRECTORY 



Auger Jean, bakery. 911 Pacific 

AiigsUnrgli Frederick, f Faivceit Sf A.) dwl G3 Minna 

Augsteiii Henry, hairdresser with A. iMorgeustern, 

clwl '^4 Minna 
August John, cook, dwl 21 Stevenson 
August John, laborer with J. B. Kemp, dwl cor 

Kentucky and South 
August John, hiundryman, dwl 114 Sacramento 
Augustine Morris, bookkeeper, 24 Battery, dwl 215 

Kearny 
Augustus Joseph, painter and extraman S.F. F. D., 

41il Pacitic 
Auld James, salesman with David Porter, dwl 1517 

LnpKiu 
Ault Joseph, hostler, 17 Sutter, dwl 545 Xatoma 
Ault Mathias O., miller, dwl 54 Third 
Auradou Jules, provision dealer, dwl 1611 Leaven- 

woith 
Auradou Leon, game, poultry, etc., 507 Merchant, 

dwl 5_'4 Merchant 
Aureau Frances Miss, glove, lace and silk cleaner, 

6()!) Howard 
AURORA CONSOLIDATED S. M. CO., (White 

Pine) office 30:2 Montgomery 
Aurouze Mariiis, hairdressing saloon, 647 Pacific, 

dwl S 8 V^allejo bet Dupout aud Stockton 
Austen John G.. clerk California Insurance Union, 

4IG California 
Austernhler Charles, waiter Grand Hotel 
Austin A. C, ni:<chinist, dwl 120 Eleventh 
AUSTIN ALEXANDER, tax collector City and 

County, office 1 City Hall first floor, (and Aus- 
tin & Co. J dwl Lick House 
Austin Amos, (McKenna & Co. J dwl Bryant nr 

Garden 
Austin B. C, tin can and box manufacturer, 419 

Battery, res Oakland 
Austin Charles, cook, dwl Half Way House, Long 

Bridge 
Austin Edward, clerk, dwl 136 Perry 
Austin Edward, laborer steamer Chrysopolis, C. S. 

Nav. Co 
Austin Emilius, tinsmith, dwl E s Selina Place 
Austin George L., carpenter, dwl 126 Morton 
Austin Henry, clerk, dwl SE cor Harrison and Park 

Avenue 
Anstin Henry, dentist, office and dwl 634 Wasb'n 
Austin Josepl), drayman with W. J. Jones & Co., 

dwl 15 Folsom Avenue 
AUSTIN JOSEPH, port warden, office 525 Front, 

dwl 438 Second 
Austin Marcus E., (Elmer <fc Co.) res Brooklyn, 

Alameda Co 
Austin Mary Mrs., bakery and confectionery, 224 

Fifth 
Austin M. F. Miss, assistant teacher Girls' High 

School, dwl 520 Sutter 
Austin Reuben, teamster, dwl S s Townsend bet 

Third and Fourth 
Austin Thomas, foreman with John Lochhead, dwl 

2-24 Fifth 
AUSTIN & CO., f Alexander Austin) dry goods, 

SE cor Montgomery and Sutter 
Austine J., merchant, dwl 229 Kearny 
Austrian Benevolent Society, otBce 633 Market 
Authur Thomas, trunkmaker, dwl E 8 Columbia bet 

Niiiteenth and Solano 
Automatic Lubricator Co., office 428 California 
Auxilly Samuel, (colored) barkeeper, dwl 916 Pacific 
Aveline Louis D., (Avelirie & MoissonJ dwl 319 

Battery 
Aveline &, Moisson, (L. D. Aveline and John Mois- 
sonJ manufacturers shoes and slippers, 319 

Battery 
Avenue House, Mrs. M. A. Hafley proprietress, 807- 

819 Kearny 
Averill Chester C, clerk, dwl 14 Quincy 
Averill Jackson L., bookkeeper with Black <k Miller, 

dwl 923 Harrison 



Averill M H. Mrs., physician, dwl 923 Harrison 
Averill Wilson, teamster, dwl 1 Clara Lane 
AVERY BENJAMIN P., Bulletiu editorial rooms, 

517 Clay, dwl 44 Third 
Avery Charles, mariner, dwl 1016 MoTitgomer\' 
Avery Clark, carpenter, dwl N s Greenwich nr 

Scott 
Avery Francis, office 411 California, dwl 717 Post 
Avery D., dwl What Cheer House 
Avery Dean R., vegetables and fruits, 41 and 42 

Washington Market, dwl 1911 Polk 
Avery James Mrs., trimmings, dwl cor Solano and 

Iowa 
Avery Mary, (widow) dwl 27 Jessie, rear 
Avi Jacinto, wireworker with J. M. Eckfeldt & Co., 

dwl 819 Greenwich 
Avilla Mariano, farmer, dwl 828 Broadway 
Avisseau Charles, wines and liquors, 743 Clay, dwl 

217 Post 
Avisseau Heloise Mme., French laundry, 217 Post 
Avry R. B., chief mate S.S. Gussie Telfair, N. P. 

Trans. Co 
Axman Henry, cabinetmaker, dwl 236 Sutter 
Axt Louis, shoemaker, dwl 936 Howard 
Axtell Samuel B., (Cook & A.) attorney at law and 

M. C, office room 1, 729 Montgomery, dwl Nu- 
cleus House 
Axtell William F., compositor Golden Era, dwl 52 

Third 
Axtman Herman, with George B. May & Co., dwl 

Sutter nr Dupont 
Ayala Calletano, steward, .527 Broadway 
Ayer George, driver with Potrero and Bay ViewR. 

R. Co., dwl Kentucky, Potrero 
Ayer James, laborer, dwi 342 Ritch 
Ayer Joseph Y.. contractor and builder, dwl W s 

Folsom bet Twentieth and Twenty first 
AYER WASHINGTON, physician, office 410 Kear- 
ny, dwl 4-J8 Post 
Ayers Charles H., assayer, dwl 957 Howard 
Ayers Charles P., tinsmith with Ellis Ayers, dwl 

121 Ellis 
Ayers Ellis, (estate of) stoves and tinware, 417 

Washington 
Ayers Grosvenor P., bookkeeper, 417 Washington, 

dwl 207 Keary 
Ayers Ira F., bookkeeper with George F. Bragg & 

Co.. dwl S W cor New iMontgomery and Market 
Ayers James J., editor, dwl 915 Market 
Ayers John C, policeman. City Hall, dwl 311 Clem- 
entina 
Ayers John C. Mrs., dwl 311 Clementina 
Ayers Lorenzo, paper carrier, dwl 7J8 Market 
Ayers Maria D., (widow) furnished rooms, 608 Third 
Ayeis Robert E., machinist with F. A. Huntington, 

dwl 311 Clementina 
Ayhans P. G., butcher, dwl 1014 Stockton 
Ayhens Appoline, (widow) laundry, 231 Ritch 
Ayhens Paul, butcher with Bertz & Co., dwl 231 

Ritch 
Aying, (Chinese) physician, 621 Dupont 
Ayleit William D., physician, office and dwl 736 

Market 
Aylmer Stephen, hackman, Plaza 
Aylward Michael, machinist Miners' Foundry, dwl 

Clinton and Brannau 
Ayres F. W. Mrs., blacksmith shop, 19 Sutter, dwl 

407 Sutter 
Ayres Gilbert, clerk, dwl 1232 Folsom 
Ayres Humphrey, blacksmith with Albert Folsom, 

dwl NE cor Fillmore and Fell 
Ayres Jolin, painter with J. W. Whitaker, dwl 438 

Natoma 
Ayres John G., (Ball & A.) dwl 26 Hampton Place 
Ayres Joshua I., real estate, dwl 3.51 Eleventh 
Ayres Lorenzo, engineer, dwl SW cor Bush and 

Powell 
Ayres Thomas J., real estate dealer, dwl 351 Elev- 
enth 



Insure with the PEOPIiES INSURANCE CO. and avoid law suits. 



•C. P VAN" SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Merchandise Brokers. 



SAN 



FRANCISCO [ li ] DIRECTORY 



79 



Ayres William, compositor Alta California, dwl 815 
Stockton 

Ayres William, sliip calker, dwl Twelfth Avenue 
near M, 8outli S F 

Ayrea William {Wtlliam Ayres & Co.) dwl 1018 
Wasliiiigton 

Ayres William & Co., f Joseph vl.T^'borf.so?0 proprie- 
tors Law Kepoiter, office 312 Wasliiiigton 

Ayres William H., carpenter, dwl N s Santa Clara 
nr Caiolina 

AYRES WILLIAM O., physician, office 14 Kear- 
ny, dwl 2o Hawthorne 

B 

Baagkan John, laborer, dwl 249 Binxome 
Baas Cliai les, liquors o3'J Jackeon, dwl N\V cor Pa- 
cific ;ind Kearny 
Baas John, seaman, dwl New Atlantic Hotel 
Baazar Ferdiiiaiul, laborer with CaL Com. & M. Co., 

dwl cor Scott and Chestnut 
Babbitt John H., porter with Sroufe, Sweeney & 

Co., dwl 'Si Filth Avenue 
Babcock Annie Mrs., furnished rooms, 84.0 Dupont 
Babcock Benjamin E., office 24 Sansom, dwl 1034 

SlcAllister 
Babcock U. W., sawyer with Hobbs, Gilmore & Co., 

dwl 18 Minna 
Babcock George, {Babcock & Sutton) dwl E s 

Second Avenue nr Sixteenth 
Babcock George A., compositor with Wade & Co., 

dwl 1502 Leavenworth 
Babcock Henry S., office 412 Montgomery, dwl 11 

Essex 
Babcock John, porter, dwl 719 Cal 
Babcock John Mrs., furnished rooms, 719 Cal 
Babcock Kiley P.. {.James Perrin Stevens iSj' Co.) 

dwl 802 Sitockton 
BABCOCK WILLIAM F., president Spring Val- 
ley Water Works Co., (and Farrult <ic Co.) 

ottice ."Jlti Cal, dwl 11 Essex 
BABCOCK <fe SUTTON, {George Babcock and 

William SiittonJ produce commission, and 

agents Lane's and Marysville Flour Mills, 315 

liavis 
Babcox J. T., supervisor deposits, melting dep't U. 

S. Branch Mnit, dwl 10/ Fifth 
Babitt Lizzie Miss, dressmaker, 11 Mason 
Babler John, cartman, cor Filbert and Dupont 
Bahson Edward. (C. L. Taylor & Co.) res Boston 
BACA P. & CO., (Andres Calderou) wholesale 

butchers, Fifth Avenue near Railroad Avenue, 

South S. F., office 533 Kearny 
Baca Pablo, (P. Baca <&: Co.) dwl 533 Kearny 
Baccary John, express wagon, 314 Pacific 
Baccio Thomas, cook with Autoine Radovich, W s 

Stenart nr Folsom 
Baccus Benjamin, gastitter, dwl 515 Stockton 
Baccus George A., machinist with W. T. Garratt & 

Co., dwl 515 Stockton 
Baccus John B., physician, dwl 515 Stockton 
Baccus John B. Jr., compositor Morning Chronicle, 

dwl 515 Stockton 
Baccus Hichard T., butcher with Louis Rosenberg, 

dwl 514 O'Farrell 
Baccus Robert J., butcher with Louis Rosenberg, 

dwl 532 O'Farrell 
Baccus Robert, J. F., tinsmith, dwl 515 Stockton 
Bach Frederick W., clerk, dwl 827 Vallejo 
BACH JOHN, guns and sporting materials, 325 

Kearny, dwl o08 Taylor 
Bachelder "Frank J., clerk, 310 Sansom 
Bachehier Hiram, carrier Bulletin, dwl 523 Kearny 
Bachelder J. W., attorney at law, dwl 613 Union 
Bachelder T. V.,f Bachelder 8f Marrinerj attorney 

at law, office 607 Kearny, dwl 1107 Mason 
Bachelder Timothy, captain bark Oakland, pier 1 
Steuart 



BACHELDER & MARRINER, {T. F. Bachelder 
and Rvfiis K. Marrinerj attorneys at law, 
office 60/ Kearny 
Bachelder — See B.itchelder and Batchelor 
BaclieldorJ. R.,caipenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bachere Jacques, butcher with Hahn & Genguagel 
Bachert August, salesman with B. Nathan <to Co., 

dwl 531 Kearny 
BACHMAN BROTHERS, {Herman 8., Nathan 

5. and David. H.J importers and jobbers dry 
goods, 10 Battery 

Bachman David S., (Bachman BrcthcrsJ dwl 23 

Kearny 
Bachman Herman S., (Bachman BrothersJ Tes'^avf 

York 
Bachman Leopold, salesman with Bachman Bros., 

dwl 9 Kearny 
Bachman Nathan S., {Bachman BrothersJ dwl Lick 

House 
Bachman Simon, fEsberg & B.J dwl 14 Eddy 
Bachrach Isaac, salesman, 400 Kearny 
Baciala Louis, cook, 540 Commercial, dwl S E cor 

Sacramento and Stockton 
Bacigalupi Augustine, vegetable peddler, dwl 816 Pac 
Bacigalupi Giovanni, laljorer with A. Bourgoiug 

6. Co., dwl E 8 Dupont bet Union and Filbert 
Bacigalupi Joseph, wood carver with Bryant & Stra- 

han, dwl 1805 Mason 
Bacigalupi Peter, clerk with Luther P. Fisher, dwl 

1805 Mason 
Backer John, barkeeper, dwl 639 Broadway 
Backer William, Pioneer Bakery, N E cor Clay and 

Mason • 

Backland John, seaman, dwl 20 Commercial 
Backus Oscar J.,(' 'Pay, Brooks & B.) res Oakland 
Backus Philip M., commission broker, dwl GO!J Pine 
Backus S. 'VV^, secretary Columbia River Manufac- 
turing Co., office 111 Wash, dwl 1520 Mason 
Bacon Dean, carpenter, dwl 1120 Mission 
Bacon Ellen, dwl 52 Second 
Bacon Frank, clerk, dwl 36 Geary 
Bacon Gaston E., clerk with Painter & Calvert, dwl 

5 Quincy Place 
Bacon George W., clerk with S. S. Butler, dwl 1009 

Kearny 
Bacon Henry, groceries and liquors, NW cor Mc- 
Allister and Buchanan 
Bacon Henry D., office 428 California, res Oakland 
Bacon Hiram, miner, dwl SW cor Pacific and Gough 
Bacon Jacob, (Bacon & CompatvyJ res Oakland 
Bacon James H., laborer Miners Foundry, dwl 78 

Natoma 
Bacon Joseph S., agent Boston Board Underwriters, 

office 4-~8 Calilornia 
Bacon Louis S., sculptor, dwl 5 Quincy Place 
Bacon Truman F., bookkeeper with Linforth, Kel- 
logg k, Co., resides Oakland 
Bacon William, hostler, Omibns R. R. 
Bacon W. J., laborer, dwl 624 Comm 
BACON & COMPANY, (Jacob Bacon and R. E. 
C. Stearns J book and job printers, 536 Clay 
opp LeidesdorfF 
Bacquie Henry, liiiuora, 704 Montgomery 
Badaraggo Jolin, wood and coal, a\v\ 1803 Mason 
B;ide Henry, cabinetmaker, dwl 415 Braniiau 
BADENHOP HENRY F., groceries and liquors, 

SE cor Harrison and Twenty-Fourth 
Badger James, expresswagon, cor Kearny and 

Clay, dwl 22 Langton 
Badger 'Oliver, book agent, dwl 304 Minna 
Badger Thomas W., marine surveyor Peoples In- 
surance Co., res Oakland 
Badger William G., (Badger & LindenhergerJ 

res Fruit Vale, Alameda County 
BADGER & LINDENBERGER, (William G. 
Badger and Thomas E. Lindenberger ) Im- 
porters and Jobbers Clothing, Agents William- 
ette Woolen Mills, (Oregon) and Hallet, Davis 
& Go's pianos, 7 Sansom 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Suspenders and Neck Ties. 



BEDINGTON, HOSTETTEB & CO., exclusive Agents for Drake's Plantation Bitters. 



80 



SAN FRANCISCO [BJ DIRECTORY. 



Badgley Eugene F., galesninn with J. W. Tucker 

& Co., dwl NVV cor Wash and Bncbiimin 
Bad^Hey Henry D-, clerk, dwl '.^9 Kearny 
Bailgley William, tailor, 324 Dnpont 
Badglev William H., U. S. Inspector Tobacco, 

Sniitt'aiid Cigars, dwl 29 Kearny 
Badlam Alexander Jr., ( B<i<l lam Sf Berry ) and 

Supervisor Sixth Ward, office 41S Montgomery, 

dwl 708 Cililornia 
BADLAM & BEKRY, (Alexander Badlam, Jr. 

and FhUoii, G. Berry J real estate agents, iiouse 

brokers and rent colleciors, office 418 Mont 
Badt Alexander L., bookkeeper, 106 Battery, dwl 

927 Suiter 
Badt " Morris, (Badt & Cohn, Elko J office 222 

Sanson), dwl .307 Turk 
Bad/,n;i Philip, liaker, dwl 3 Welsh 
Baelii' Feidinaiid, f William Backr Sf Co.) dwl 

170'S Sacramento 
Baehr William, (William Baehr Sf Co.) dwl 713 

Eilis 
BAEHR WILLIAM & CO., (Ferdinand Baehr) 

mannt'ai-tnring jewelers, 649 Sacramento 
Balii CliriBtine iMrs., dwl 502 SioiUton 
Bagamau John C, engraver, dwl 320 Sansora 
Baggs Isaac, attorney at law, office 712 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 3::2 Sixth 
Baggs John, cartman, Larkin nr Geary 
Baggs Montgomery M., compositor Alta California, 

dwl 3:^2 Sixth' 
Bagley Cliarles O., sawmaker with American Saw 

Co., 606 Front 
Bagley Daniel, stone^tter, dwl 5 Rauscli 
Bagley David T., mining secretary, office 403 

California, dwl 116 Eleventh 
Bagley Eugene, pressman with Cubery & Co., dwl 

2? Rauscli 
Bagley Hanora Miss, doakmaker with Lesser Les- 

zynsky, dwl 546 Mission 
Bagley Johannah, eeamstress, Grand Hotel 
Bagley John W ,<ieputy naval officer Custom House, 

dwl Russ House 
Bagley Townsend, attorney at law, office 522 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 45 Everett 
Bagley William P., laborer new U. S. Branch Mint, 

dwl 6 Moss 
Bagnell Eliza, (widow) dwl 728 Vallejo 



gro( 
Bra 



Seventh iind iirannan 
Bahdorf Michael, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Bahen Ste|)hen, laborer with Hancock «fe Kelso 
Bahler Cliailes, bootmaker, dwl E s Folsom nr 

Twenty-second 
Bahlmann Henry, clerk Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 

832 Harrison 
Balils J. W. F., (Althof & B.J dwl 11 O'Farrell 
Babrs Andrew, groceries and liquors, NE cor Davis 

and Jackson 
Bailey A. M. Rev., pastor M.,E. Church South, Min- 
na bet Fourth and Fifth," dwl learchnich 
Bailey Anioa.i., (Bailey & GarJieldJ dwl ^22 Sutter 
Bailey Ann, (widow) shoelitter, dwl 233 Jessie 
Bailey Anne M., (widow) dwl 1423 Kearny 
Bailey Byron, cabinetmaker, dwl 166 Tehama 
Bailey Ciiarles, barkeeper, dwl 27 Zoe 
Bailey Charles, hatter with Robert H.Adams 
B.iiley Charles A., carpenter with D. A Macdonald 

&c Co., dwl 654 Howard 
Bailey Charles G., clerk with Onesti & Biagi, dwl 

Sixteenth nr Valencia 
Bailey Charles P., clerk San Francisco Postoffice' 

dwl i>24 California 
Bailey F. P., miner, dwl NW cor Kearny and 

Geary 
Bailev Frank, carpenter, dwl 166 Tehama 
Bailey Frank, clerk with D. C. Hall & Co., dwl 

423 Post 
Bailey Frank, liquor saloon, 10 Washington 



Bailey George, ^C^arA, J5. .^- Co.) dwl 533 Com- 
mercial 
Bailey Henry, barrel dealer, dwl 23 Garden 
Bailey Henry, laboier S. F. Coidage Factory, dwl 

iQ W cor Chestnut and Van Ness Avenue 
Bailey Isaac L., teamster, dwl 911 Harrison 
Bailey Jacob E., bricklayer and extraman steamer 

No. 4, S. F. F. D., dwl Jessie bet First and 

Second 
Bailey James D., general agent Union Insurance 

Co., 416 California, dwl Giand Hotel 
Bailey John, painter with J. Brewster, dwl 257 

Clemeniiiiii 
Bailey John G., driver Market St. R. R., dwl S s 

Sixteenth bet Valencia and Alission 
Bailey Joseph H., crockery and glassware, 1513 

Stockton, dwl 830 Union 
BAILEY LEWIS IL, proptr Portsmouth House, 

1 Brenliani Place 
Bailey M. F., dwl Mississippi nr Santa Clara 
Bailey Natlian, (Alfred W. Murgensteru & Co.) 

dwl 448 Brannaii 
Bailey Orrin, upholsterer with H. A. Gullixson, dwl 

1423 Kearny 
Bailey Oscar J., carpenter with Hobbs, Gilmore & 

Co., dwl 705 Ellis 
Bailey P., laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Bailey Patrick, barrel dealer, dwl 71;) Branuan 
Bailey Richard, (Rout & B.J res Oakland 
Bailey Sarah, (widow) dwl -'57 Clementina 
Bailey Sarah M., (v^'idow) dwl 757 Howard 
Bailey Thomas, clerk, dwl 1319 Montgomery 
Bailey William, seaman, dwl Ecker nr Folsom 
Bailey William H., painter with J. Brewster, dwl 

4 14 Jones 
Bailey William J., proptr Isthmus House, 54 First 
Bailey & Garfield, (Amos J. Badey aud Henry L. 

Garjield) club rooms, 305 Moulgomery 
Bailie Alexander, bootmaker with Bncl<ingham & 

Hecht, dwl Ivy nr Hayes 
Bailie Thomas, longshoreman, dwl 25 De Boom 
Baillie Emily P. (widow) dwl 70 Clementina 
Baillif Julieii, waiter, 516 Pacific 
Bailly Achille, (Bailly Bro/.hersJ dwl .')14 Filbert 
Bailly Arthur, (Bailly Brothers J dwl 514 Fill)ert 
Bailly Brothers, (Arthur and AchilleJ pork and 

sausages, 71 California Market 
Bailly Jules, waiter v^'itb Jean B. Guillemette, dwl 

516 Pacific 
Baily Alexander H., hotelkeeper, dwl 309 Fell 
Baily David, carpenter, dwl 309 Fell 
Baily William, re.il estate, dwl 124 Silver 
Baily. — See Bayley, Bayly, and Bailey 
Bain Alexander, longshoreman, dwl 4Sj Greenwich 
Bain James S., rnacliiuist Phoenix Iron Works, and 

extraman steamer No. 6, S. F. F. D., dwl 45 

Clementina 
Bain John, blacksmith, dwl 27 Ritch 
Bain Maria, (widow) (colored) dwl 13 Scott Place 
Bain William, driver Omnibus railroad 
Bainbridge Aruop, policeman City Hall, dwl 7 La- 
layette Place 
Baine Katie M., adjuster U. S. B. Mint, dwl 127 

Kearny 
Baine Robert, bricklayer, Bricklayers' Ass'n, Young 

Men's Christian Ass' n Hall 
Baird Andrew, marine secretary Pacific Insurance 

Co., 422 California, dwl 20 Laurel Place 
Baird James, compositor with A. L. Bancroft & Co., 

dwl 1305 Powell 
Baird Robert, clerk, dwl 162 Silver 
Baiid Samuel H., clerk, dwl 1305 Powell 
Baiyrn Michael, liquor saloon, 546 Mission 

Baker , dwl 719 Market 

Baker A. G., carpenter, dwl 54 Third 

Baker A. J., carrier Alta California 

Baker Albert, clerk, dwl 824 California 

Baker Alfred D., clerk with Rouse & Laws, dwl 

124 Geary 



THE PEOPLES INSUBANCE CO. a Liberal Company. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO.. 708. 712. 714 and 716 Keamy Street, Clothing, etc. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



81 



Baker Alfred S., grainer, 522 Market 

Baker Caspar, carriage trimmer, 733 Mission, dwl 

466 Tehama 
Baker Caspar, tanner, dwl San Bruno road bet 

Twenty-seventh and Twenty eiglith 
Baker Cliarles, boilertuaker Vulcun Iron Works, 

dwl 50 Natonia 
Baker Charles, cij,'ar maker, dwl 5 Cottage Place 
Baker Charles, tVnits, 145 Post 
Baker Charles, ship rarpenter, dwl 39 Jackson 
Baker Charles, tinsmith, dwl 333 Hush 
Baker Charles, waiter with John Reawn, 614 Mont 
Baker Charles E., teamster with L. Washburn, dwl 

SK cor Ellis and Leavenworth 
Baker Colin C, f Stevens, Baker & Co. J res Provi- 
dence, R. I., 
Baker Conrad, assayer S. F. Assaying and Refining 

AVorks. dwl 5-.'7 Tehama 
Baker David, salesman with Samuel Baker, dwl 35 

South Park 
Baker Edward, drayman Golden Age Mills, dwl 429 

Ellis 
Baker Eilward, laborer with M. H.Turrill, dwl 2810 

BiU'hanan 
Baker Eliza Miss, seamstress, dwl 9 Auburn 
Baker Eugene J., teamster, dwl 764 Harrison 
Baker Francis, marinei-, dwl 20 FoLsom 
Baker Frederick, candy maker, 6 Clara Lane 
Baker Frederick, seaman, dwl SW cor Market and 

Steuart 
Baker Frederick D., (George Sleioart S- Co.) dwl 

618 California 
Baker George, laborer with Eisen Brothers, dwl 16 

Stevenson 
Baker George, saloon, dwl 630 Green, rear 
Baker George, te;imster with Hancock & Kelso 
Baker George H., lithographer, office 408 Califor- 
nia, dwl S s Vallejo bet Leavenworth and Hyde 
Baker George L., melter S,. F, Assaying and Refin- 
ing Works, dwl 18 Ransch 
Baker George L., sash maker with D. A. Macdon- 

ald & Co., dwl 318 Folsom 
Baker George W., carpenter, dwl 151 Tehama 
Baker George W., clerk with John Kirkpatrick, 

dwl Russ House 
Baker Gershom A., machine hand with Miller &. 

Haley, res Oakland 
Baker H., wagon, cor JIcAllister and Buchanan 
Baker Hannah, (widow) dwl N s Linden bet La- 

guna and Octavia 
Baker H. B., annealing department U. S. B. Mint, 

res Oakland 
Baker Henry, clerk New U. S. B. Mint, ofBce 

922 Mission, dwl 23 Moss 
Baker Howard, salesman with John A. Roth, dwl 

432 Third 
Baker H. Y., engineer with D. A. Macdonald & Co., 

res Oakland 
Baker Isaiah, broker, office 219 Washington, dwl 

1514 Mason 
Baker Israel, longshoreman, dwl 906 Pacific, rear 
Baker James, carpenter, bds 122 Leidesdortf 
Baker James E., painter, dwl 5 Verona Place 
Baker Jane B. Miss, saleswoman with A. U. Suplee, 

dwl 9 Auburn 
Baker Jeremiah, miller, bds 33S Bush 
Baker John, laborer S. S. Gussie Telfair, North 

Pacific Transportation Co 
Baker Jolin, mariner, dwl cor Louisiana and Sierra 
Baker John, watchman S. S. Senator, North Pacific 

Transportation Co 
Baker John B., clerk with E. E. Evre, dwl 1215 

Polk 
Baker John E., coachman Occidental Hotel, dwl 

West End 
Baker John F., ClVasso7i tfc Co. J dwl 437^ Clemen- 
tina 
Baker John H., clerk with Feldbush & Co., dwl 900 
Clay 



^Baker John H., milkman, Point Lobos 
Baker John S., clerk San Francisco Directory office 

dwl 131 Montgomery 
Baker John T., wai,'on, cor Ritch and Plarrison 
Baker Jonathan W., master mariner, dwl SE cor 

Howard and Second 
Baker Joseph, butcher with Herman Hertz, dwl SE 

cor Seventh and Minna 
Baker Joseph, carpenter, dwl 867 Mission 
Baker Joseph, drayman with E. W. Dore, dwl N & 

Harrison bet Third and Fourth 
Baker Joseph, policeman, City Hall, dwl 409 Green 
Baker Joseph, sawyer with Hobbs, Gilmore & Co., 

dwl Dupont Alley 
Baker Josiah Q., fiV. J. Laveri/ & Co.; dwl 925 

Vallejo 
Baker Judah, Jr., (Stevens, Baker & Go.) dwl 327 

First 
Baker Levy S. Mrs., dwl 1118 Folsom 
Baker Lewis, wood carver, dwl 318 Folsom 
Baker L. G., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Baker Livin>rston L., (Baker & Hamilton) d\vl 

Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Baker Lou E. Mrs, seamstress with John C. Bell. 

dwl 512 Brannan 
Baker Louis, baker, dwl 801 Union 
Baker Louis F., produce commission, 402 Davis, 

dwl 1014 Leavenworth 
Baker Louis F. Jr., clerk with Louis F.Baker, dwl 

1014 Leavenworth 
Baker Lucy A., (widow) dwl 1090 Union 
Baker M., teamster, cor Sacramento and Battery 
Baker Maria, (widow) Golden Gate Ranch, dwl S 

8 Bryant bet White Place and Eighth 
Baker Mary, (widow) dwl 114 Perry 
Baker Mary F., (widow) dwl 226 Third 
Baker M. C, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Baker Orriu V., machinist with Tay. Brooke & 

Backus, res Oakland Point 
Baker Osborn F., stevedore and extraman Steamer 

No. 1, S. F. F. D., dwl 419 Pacific 
Baker Peter, cook S. S. California, North Pacific 

Transportation Company 
Baker Raphael, lamplighter S. F. Gas Co., dwl 271 

Minna 
Baker Robert B., carpenter, dwl 1090 Union 
Baker Samuel, bookkeeper with Stevens, Baker & 

Co., dwl 215 Geary 
Baker Samuel, boots and shoes, 906 Market, dwl 10 

Sixth 
Baker Samuel, porter with D. Samuels, dwl Minna 

bet Third and Fourth 
Baker Samuel D., collector, dwl 839 Mission 
IHaker Sarah H., (widow) lodgings, 101 Jessie 
Baker S. B., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearnv 
Haker S. F., caipenler, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Baker Stephen N., wharfinger, dwl 108 Silver 
Baker Terry J., ( Ross^ S,- B.J dwl 225 Bush 
Baker Thomas, bricklayer, Bricklayers' Association, 

Yountf Men's Christian Ass'n Hall 
Baker William, cook with E. iMayrisch, dwl 811 

Vallejo 
BAKER & HAMILTON, (Livingston L. Baker 
and Robert Uimilton) importers and jobbers 
agricultural implements, machines, haidware, 
etc., 13 and 19 t'ront. and 9-15 J street, Sac 
Backstein Henry, clerk, dwl 814 Montgomery 
Balan Mercedes, (widow) dwl SW cor Bro'adway 

and Dupont 
Balbeck H. F., carpenter, II. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Balch Horace M., repairer musical iustruuieuts, 228 

Sutter, dwl 614 Taylor 
Balch J. W., captain ship David Hoadley, pier 12 

Steuart 
Balch Stephen M., (Brigham & B.) res Oakland 
Baldeman Adolph, expresswagon, dwl SW cor Bush 

and Franklni^ 
Baldes Lagolio, musician, dwl 25 Hinckley 
Baldisare Croce, cook, 518 Market 



JONES. PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street. Porte Monnaies and Keticoles. 
6 



^■r » tm-oTKcn T?-5rT-RA.CTS are the beat and cheapest for family uae 
KEDINGTON'S FLAVOKIUG EXTK-fl-t^ia ^ 



82 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTOKY 



a: 



BaldrLl-e Michael, salesman with William Sherraau ' 

.^'.(fo.. dwl 5"i8 Fine , ■, . i 

Baldwh" Abbie Mrs., assistant teacher Lincoln 

Giamniai- School, dwl 5'Jb Keainy _ 
Baldwin Addison II., watches and jewelry, 12 b.xtli 
BALDWIN ALBERT S., physician aud surgeon, 

office and dwl 208 Kearny 
Baldwin Alexander R., merchant, office 216 Fiout, 

bds Grand Hotel j„wia Afhina 

Baldwin Alfred W., contractor, dwl 418 M nna 
Baldwin Anios B., butcher with L. Mottat & Co., 

dwl First Av nr Kentucky ^ r-^ j tpr 

Baldwin Charles H., (C. Adulphe Low & Go.) res 

BauSrJltles K., compositor with Dewey & Co., 

BakU^l/cL^S M., special policeman, dwl cor 

Bald^^'^bil- M., teamster, ^^^l'^^^^^^^^^,,^ 

,is^in^.^sr;s:^i^^^ii?Gi^^^'^^i 

Baldw G. B., butcher, dwl 428 Broadway 
' Ba win George E., dwl 1305 Stockton 
B^ iwin H . w^agon, cor Eddy and Mason 
Saldwln Henry C., bakery and conlectionery, 9-36 

BALmVIN HIRAM S., physician aud surgeon, 

office 612 Clav, dwl 609 Suiter , „ ^ ,, 

Baldwin jTunes t'., porter with Nathan R. Lowell, 

BalcS^utJeS. distiller, dwl E s Columbia bet 

, BALDWIN 'iLm'D::a«or^ at law, office 502 

MontLronierv, dwl 613 Pine , j , 

Baldwin Ma"curM.,ri»^. ^- ^-^^wrn Sr Go.) dwl 

Baldwh. Mefv"n D., wharfinger, office Greenwich 
nock dwl 636 Commercial , , ^ „ , 

BAI DWiN M. M. & CO., (Gharhs H. pen-cy) 
impctersand manufacturers watches, jewelry, 

BairinSrrS assistant teacher Union 
G, "mmar School, dwl 1305 Stockton 

Baldwin Oliver T., clerk overland dept., Wells, 
Kar-o & Co., dwl 1411 Pacihc 

Bahiwin Sidney F , law student with John B. Fel- 

Baldwln'^.~ s! porter with Miller & Co., dwl 
Baldwtn'^Sm H., shipca^enter, dwl 7 Liberty 

Riilt Michael barkeeper Occidental iiotei 
SaLFOUR GUTHRIE & GO., (Robert Balfour 
and .iilrander Guthrie) commission merch ts, 

BjS^,^';^^^^'^rie<,Go.)resBroo^. 
Bali^^yO^S^J^eSwith Joseph C Deo:ello, 

Balfr^;' Wiliiaml'shoemaker dwl 562 Bryant 

Balink Herman, furniture. 24D Fourth 

Balk Amelia Miss, wbipmaker with Mam & win 

rhexter dwl 709 Broadway 
Balk Frederick, seaman, dwl 21 Sonora Place 
Balk Sleiiben S., dwl 1117 Broadway 
|,L William, boarding, S W cor Battery and 

Balldrs.*^ saloon, dwl 331 Montgomery . 

Sail A. Everett, clerk with Sawyer & Mynck, dwl 

Ball Albert, physician, office 615 Sacramento 

Ball B.E.: carpenter with Miller & Haley, dwl 741 

Ball^bSs, carpenter, dwl 741 Market 
§a cSes, porter with E. ComminB & Co., dwl 
Ss Fifteenth bet Mission aud Valencia 



Ball Charles T., cook with A. A. Jennings 
Ball David H., bookbinder, dwl 54 Minna 
Ball George, oysterman, dwl 3 Hardie 1 lace 
Ball George, stevedore, dwl 134 Steuart 
Ball George A., bookkeeper with Adams, Blum & 
Co., dwl 726 Bush , n ., 

Ball Henry, (colored) bootblack with Campbell & 

Conrad, dwl N s Broadway nr Battery 
Ball Joel, dentist 645 Clay, dwl 1210 Union 
Ball John S., machinist, dwl E 8 Octavia nr lel 
Ball Nicholas, conductor Lront St. M. & U. it. i*-, 

SE cor Polk & Austin . 

Ball R. C, architect, office 302 Montgomery, resides 

Oakland , ,,.,„,, 

Ball Thomas A., {Ball & Ayre^) dwl 112 Mason 
Ball Thomas M., compositor Slock Report, resides 

Oakland 
Ball William, steward, dwl 18 Minna 
Ball William, teamster, dwl 127 Jackson 
BALL & AYRES, (Thomas A. Ball and John O. 
1 AyrexJ general agents Piedmont and Arlington 

Life Ins. Co., office 315 Cal 
Ballantine Robert, salesman with John Wigmore, 

dwl 330 Sutter , , ,„„„ ^, , 

Ballard Duane, (Ballard & Hall) dwl 1006 Bash 
Ballard E. J., carpenter, H. C League, 128 Keainy 
BallardGeorge, painter dwl 179 Miuna 
Ballard John, (W. B. Marliu & Co.) 240 Mont- 

Ballard"jalin W., produce, poultry, etc., 509 San- 
som, dwl 569 Stevenson ,.,,„.yr,* i .-.^ 

Ballard Joseph, shipping clerk, dwl 1107 Stockton 

B-^LLARD & HALL, fDnane B/dlard mid Uaac 
R Hall) commission mercliauts, 10b Davis 

Ballaun Joseph, tailor, dwl 6 Berry 

Balleau Thomas, Custom House officer, dwl U» 

Austin . 1 .ri 1 r> 1 

Ballenberg N., teacher music dwl 711 Lai 
Ballentine James, mason and builder, office o24 han- 
som, dwl N s Jessie nr Ninth 
Ballentine John P., mason, N s Jessie bet Ninth 

Bailey Edward J., broker, dwl 1613 Washington 
BalUiaus Frederick, dairyman, dwl ^y s Lea % en- 
worth bet Greenwich and Lombard 
Ballhaus Frederick B., carriagesmith with i . GeU- 

BallheLer Charles H., clerk with Voizin, Ris & 

Co., 115 Bush, dwl 704 Larkin 
Ballhorn Henry, mariner, dwl 39 Pacihc 
Ballinger Andrew, foreman Rmcou Wool Depot, 

dwl 19 Gilbert , .j 

Ballinger Frank J., clerk with James Mee, dwl 1/ 

Ballhiger John, {Ro.wdl & i?.; dwl 974 Harrison 
Ballinger Patrick R. "P>^i^,l«^«j;'r[, ^^''^ ' ,^^%.*;^: 
W^liitney & Co., dwl E s Gilbert bet Brjant 
and Bra'nnan , ,, , rr ♦ i 

Ballinger William G., clerk Orleans Hotel 
Ballinger William M., printer, dwl b s Lincoln bet 

Taylor and Jones . „ 

Ballou 'Nelsons., carpenter, dwl Thirtieth nr San 

Jose Road , .rm tt«^„.,i 

Ballou William, civil engineer, dwl 704 Howaid 
Ballser Charles, butcher with M. Brandenstein & 

Co., dwl Fifteenth Avenue nr Q, boutb b t 
Baloun Joseph L., tailor with Peter Short, dwl 9 

Balthrsar Gertie, machinist with Theodore Kallen- 
bert,', dwl 224 Ritch , „ . .^^ , . p„ 

Baltz Charles, malster with Martin Mangels & Co., 
dwl S s Francisco nr Taylor 

Balz Adolph, clerk Chief Quartermaster Mil. Divi- 
sion Pacific, dwl San Miguel Ranch 

Balzer Ferdinand, bookkeeper with A. Pfister & 
Co., dwl 24 Ellis .^ ,, i roi rr„_i, 

Balzer Henry, ( ^'cl, Bertheau & GoJi^-^-lo^XT^^vk 

Bamber John, (Bamber ^ Cc's Express) dwl lOU 
Montgomery 



^^^;i;^^l^^^^I^;c^COMPANY. Cash^a^s Half a Million DoUars. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO.. 708, 712. 714 and 716 Kearny Street, White Shirts. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIKECTORY. 



83 



Bamber Joseph J., (Bamber Sf Co.'s Expreasj dwl 
I0i2 Moiitjroniery 

BAJIBER & COS EXPRESS, office SW cor 
Davis and Jaclison 

Baiiilbrd Alfred, vocjilist, dwl 65 Everett 

Bauiniin Heiirv, teanisier witli TliomuB C. Clifford 
& Co., dwl 714 O'Farrell 

Banaliaii Henry, hostler Fashion stable.dwl 333 Bnsh 

Baualiau Patrick, hotsller Fabhioii stable, dwl 333 
Bush 

Bauay Richard, laborer S. F. & P. Sua;ar Co., dwl 
i^tiO Clara 

Bancheco Antonio, gardener, Visitwcion Valley nr 
San Brnno road 

Bancroft A. A., dwl SW cor California and Franklin 

BANCROFT A. L. & CO., (Hubert //. Bnncmflj 
publishers, in)portinj; booksellerts and stationers, 
printers, book-binders, litLogiapLers, engravers, 
etc., 7-2i Market 

Bancrolt Albert L., fA.L. Bnncmfl & Co.) dwl 
\V s Franklin l)et Pine and Calitornia 

Bancroft C. A., bricklayer, Bricklayers' Association, 
Youny Men's Chi'lslian Association Hall 

Bancroft E. A., builder, dwl 515 Bush 

Bancroft Fied. A., clerk with A. L. Bancroft & Co., 
dwl 721 Market 

Bancroft Ci. F., bricklayer, Bricklayers' Association, 
Young Men's Chiistian Associalion Hall 

Bancroft Ht-nry Jj., cleik with A. L. Bancroft & Co., 
dwl SW cor C ilifornia and Franklin 

Bancroft Hubert H., (A. L. Baiicrofl & Co.) dwl 
SW cor California and Franklin 

BANCROFT'S BUILDING. 723 Market 

Band Joseph, butcher with William Maessen, dwl 
i 17 Clara 

Bandlioldc Frederick, farmer, dwl 736 Minna 

Bandnumn Julius, (Bdiidmaun, Nielsen Jj' Go) dwl 
514 Lombard 

BAND.MANN, NIELSEN & CO, fjnliu:^ Band- 
vuinn and H. NieUeuj importers and commis- 
sion merchants, and general agents Giant Pow- 
der Co., 210 Front 

Bandy Aaron N., porter with Larzelere &. Beach, 
dwl 5 South Park 

Bane. — See Bain and Baine 

BANGLE EDWARD, paints, oil, glass and paper- 
hangings, 426 Sansom, res Brooklyn, Alameda 
Conniy 

Bangs Edward, mate steamer Santa Cruz, Washing- 
ton Street Wharf 

Bangs H. Frank, clerk Home Mutual Insurance Co., 
dwl 30 McAllister 

Banhani Joseph, deckhand steamer Santa Cruz, dwl 
317 Tehama 

BANK BRITISH COLUMBIA, William H. Till- 
inghast manager, SE cor California and Sansoni 

BANK BRITISH NORTH AMERICA, William 
Walker &. Alexander S. Finnic agents, NE cor 
California and Sansoni 

BANK CALIFORNIA, NW cor California and 
Si nsom 

BANK CALIFORNIA BUILDING, NW cor 
California and Sansom 

BANK EXCHANGE, George F. Parker proprie- 
tor, SE cor Montgomery and Washington 

Bank Joseph, billiard lablemaker with J. Strahle, 
dwl 5 Quincy 

Banks George S., proprietor Pacific Livery Stable, 
W 8 Jones bet Sutler and Post 

Banks James, tireman steamer Clirysopolis, Califor- 
nia Steam Navigation Co., dwl 316 Davis 

Banks John, cigars and tobacco. Grand Central Mar- 
ket, dwl Mission nr Second 

Banks Mary, lodgings, 316 Davis 

Banks Oscar W., draftsman with S. C. Bugbee & 
Son, dwl 1419 Washington 

Banks Patrick, laborer, dwl 106 Beale 

Banks Robert B., teamster with Waters & Co., 32 
Spear 



3annen Hugh, laborer, dwl 214 Prospect Place 
ianner Simon, (of Banner Bros., Virginia, Nev., 



Banks Thomas C, exchange and bill broker, office 
13 Merchants' Exchange, dwl 724 California 

Banks William, (Banks Jf- Galvin) dwl 1419 
Washington 

Banks William O., clerk with S. C. Bugbee &. Son, 
dwl J 4 19 Washington 

Banks it Galvin, (William Banks and Garet Gal- 
vin) merchant tailors, 518 .Sacramento 

Bannan John, ale bottler, 514 Green, dwl 512 
Green 

Bi 

Ban , _._ ^...__ 

and Nevada, Cal.) office 12 Bu8iir'd'wr"3'25 
O'Farrell 

Bannerman John, sawyer with Miller & Haley, dwl 
cor Bryant and Tliird 

Bannerot Eugene A., machinist with Garciu <t 
Periam,dwl 232 .lessie 

Bannett Harris, dwl 235 Kearnv 

Bannett H. Jlrs., furnished rooms, 235 Kearny 

Banneit Louis, jeweler with William Baehr & Co., 
dwl 235 Kearny 

Bannett Mary, South Park Laundry, .555 Bryant 

Banning John, inspector, dwl 11 Kearny 

Bannan Philip, molder Vulcan Iron Wo'rks 

Bannister Alfred, assistant accountant, dwl Grand 
Hotel 

Bannister B. B., contractor, dwl NE cor Washing- 
ton and Kearny ° 

Bannister Frederick, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 

Bannister John, shipcarpenter, dwl 39 Stanford, 
rear 

Bannister Joseph, upholsterer, dwl 425 Fremont 

Bannon Charles, steward, Cliff House, Pt. Lobos 
Road 

Bannon John, boatman, Vallejo street wharf, dwl 
2114 Powell 

Bannon Michael, laborer S. F. Gas Co., dwl 609 
Third 

Bannon Patrick, laborer, dwl SE cor Columbia and 
Solano 

Bannon Patrick, tanner with Joseph Sedgley, dwl 
Mission Creek nr Eigliteenth 

Bannon Philip, watchman, dwl N 8 Tehama nr 
Eighth 

Bansaa William, carpenter, dwl 11 Pacific 

Bansch August, laborer, dwl 757 Mission 

Bansch Maria Mrs., midwife, dwl 757 Mission 

Banscher John, butcher with F Reinle, dwl SE cor 
Hayes and Octavia 

Bansteen C. B., bricklayer, Bricklayers' Association, 
Young iMen's Christian Association Hall 

Bantle George, clerk 113 Montgomery, bds Broad- 
way Hotel 

Banz John, shoemaker, dwl cor Van Ness Avenue 
and Market 

Baptis John H., machinist, 208 Leidesdorff, dwl 
W s Main bet Folsoni and Harrison 

Baptist Roliert, (colored) dwl Jliles Place 

Baptiste Alphonse Jean, lithographic printer with 
G. T. BroAvn & Co., dwl 3 Cadell Alley 

Baptiste John, locksmith, dwl 10 Anthony 

Baquet Pierre, tailor with Eugene Boucher, 537 
Sacramento 

Baraty V\-^ni^Ww,( Garran & i?.y dwl 241 Stevenson 

Barbara Angel, watchman, International Hotel 

Harbaste Anton, laundry, 838 Clay 

Barbat John, physician and apothecary, 910 Pacific 

Barbatta Frederlco, iisherman, dwl 2/ Clay 

Barbe Jean, florist, NW opcjiiish and Baker 

Barbee John, exchange 'broli&iv office 422 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 1090 Union \ 

Barber Enos W., ( Law ton & Co.) (^wl 741 Market 

Bai-ber Henry, helper with Philander F. Tripp, 
dwl 681 Howard 

Barber Henry P., attorney at law, office and dwl 
240 Montgomery 

Barber James B., porter with Wilmerding & Kel- 
logg, dwl 520 Howard 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Combs and Brushes. 



YERBA SATJTA, a remarkable and never-failing remedy lor Eheumatism. 



84 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Barber .lolin A., (colored) plasterer, dwl 58 Beruard 
B.iiber O., dwl -m^ Jei^sie , „ ,, ^. 

Barber Rolieil L., fR'sley & B.J dwl 3-7 Pine 
Barber Tbonias H , pilot and special policeman, dwl 

1222Pacilic .^,^ ^ 

Barber William, (colored) barkeeper, dU Broadway, 

liwl l-JUiDiipont 
Barber William, niacbinist with L. & E. Emanuel, 

dwl lilli) Third 
Barber W'illiatn, I'Doi/Je & B.) attorney at law, 

ollice •1-1\ Sansom, res San Rafael 
Barber Williatii M., blacksmith, dwl W 8 Capp bet 

Twenty tittb and Twenty-sixth 
Barber Zadiary, conductor Central Railroad, dwl 

13 Clinton 
Barberi Ifrank X., waiter Miners' Restaurant, dwl 

108 Proi-pect Place 
Baibeite Loni.s bacUinan Plaza, dwl 1015 Stockton 
Barbier Alfred, (salesman with Phillips, Brown & 

Co., (lwliM9 Howard 
Barbier Andrew, laborer, 435 Bnsh 
Barbier Arnioiul, special polic;man, dwl 9U) Howard 
Barbier Eugenie, (widow) teacher, dwl 618 Minna 
Barbier Eunice Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 614 Cal 
Birbier Louis, painter with Jules St. Denis, dwl 

California bet Stockton and Powell 
Barbier Paul L., Veto saloon, 6:23 Kearny, dwl N "S\ 

cor Minna anil Julia 
Barbier Pauline Mrs., laundry, 435 Bnsh 
Bane William, ship caulker, dwl 312 Beale 
Bavcelliis Jo^e & Co., (Antonio SiivaJ proprietors 
Luzitania House, S \Y cov Druinm and Oregon 
Barcellos Jose, /'./«•■;« Barcelloa & Go, J dwl S W cor 

Diiiiiiin and Oregon 
BAKCKHaUSEN JULIUS, agent German Gen 1 
Benevolent Society, office 73-J Washington, dwl 
E s Franklin bet Turk and Tyler 
Barclay David, superintendent laborers Custom 

House, dwl345i Third 
Barclay Jennie, shoebinder with I. M.\\entworth & 

Co.. dwl Dora bet Ful-omand Harrison 
Barclay John, stevedore, dwll34 Steuart 
Barclay Robert H.. carriagemaker with Kimball 

Manufacturing Co., dwl 731 California 
Bardeaii Pierre, tailor, dwl 18 St. Charles 
Bardelliui Angelo, ( Angelo BardcUim & Co.) dwl 

iiO Washington 
Bardelliui Angelo & Co., (Mariano tacwfpo) hsh, 

•27 Washington Market 
Burden Patrick, carpenter, dwl Sixth Avenue nr L, 

South San Francisco 
Bardenwerper Charles P., drayman, 208 i ront, dwl 

Eleventh bet Howard and Folsom 
Bardet Alexander, collector, dwl ;) Pinkney Place 
Bardet Constance Mrs., millinery, 1112 Dupoiit 
Baniwell Charles, lumberman with Swan, Dunbar 

&. Co., dwl 14 Qnincy 
Bardwell John V,.J Burduell & Co.; dwl t rank s 

building, Brenham Place 
Bardwell iV Co., (John L. Bardwell J bag factory, 

lOSClav ^ , 

Barreilles Thomas, (Barcilles 4' Cassou) dwl cor 

Octavia and Greenwich 
Bareilles &- Cassou, (^ T'/tom^.s BareiUes and John 
C'a.ssoJty uiilknien. cor Octavia and Greenwich 
Baretta Louis, clerk, dwl 236 Sutter 
Barg John, laborer with J. H. Teiijen, 415 Brannan 
Bargen John V., workman Sugar Retineiy, cor 

"Brvaut and Eighth 
Barger Henry, clerk with Cantus & Boss, S W cor 

Stockton and O'Fairell 
Barger Michael, laborer with C. P. R. R. Co., dwl 

N W cor Berry and Third 
Barghorn August, cook. New Atlantic Hotel 
Barghnsen Jacob, carpenter, dwl 617 Davis 
Bargman Jacob, milkman, dwl Filbert nr Pierce 
Bargiuie Leonardo, porter with Pascal, Dubedat& 

Co., dwl 2218 Mason 
Bargon Martin, tailor, dwl 522 Pine 



Bargstream George G., hainessmaker with Main & 

Winchester, dwl 3 Miles Court 
Bartrstrom G. M., tailor, dwl 15 Pincknev 
Baiichievich John, restaurant, 1018 Market 
Bariiio & Co., (Chinese) cigar inanufactnrerB, 23 

Webl) 
Bark William, sceuenaintcr, dwl 815 Dupont 
Balkan Adolph, oculist and aurist, office and dwl 
722 Montgomery 

r5avker , carpenter, hds 122 Leidesdortf 

Barker Abner H., real estate, office 434 California, 

dwl 205 Post 
Barker Alfred, painter, dwl 111 Sixth 
Barker B. H., miner, dwl N s Hayes bet Larkin 

and Polk 
Barker C. L., seaman S. S. Moses Taylor, North 

Pac. Trans. Co. 
Barker Frank, carpenter, dwl Sixteenth Av bet P 

and Q, South S F 
Barker G. Frederick, corresponding clerk with J. 

C. Merrill &. Co., dwl 14 Stanley Place 
Barker George L., piinter, dwl 102 Powell 
Barker Grace, (widow) dwl SE cor Folsom and 

Eleventh 
Barker Henry N., trnnkmaker with E. Galpen & 
Co., dwl Alabama bet Twenty-seventh and 
Twentv-eighth 
Barker Isaac jr., dwl E s Capp bet Eighteenth and 

Nineteenth 
Barker Jacob, trnnkmaker with H. Behrendt & 

Co., dwl 17 Welsh 
Barker James L., salesman with Marsh, Pilsbury &r. 

Co., dwl 91 1 Bush 
Barker Joshua, bookkeeper with Coghill, Lyons & 

Co., res Oakland 
Barker Thomas, bricklayer, dwl SW cor Seventh 

and Harrison 
Barker Timothy L., (WeUman, Peck & Co.) dwl 28 

O'Farrell " 
Barkhans Diederich, (F. W. Sf D. Barkhaus)dw\ 

10 Turk 
Barkhans Frederick W., (F. W. & D. Barkhans) 

dwl 1004 Sutter 
BARKHAUS F. W. & D., German books and sta- 
tionery, 535 Kearny 
Barklev A. J., printer, dwl lOlP Pine 
Barkley George T. N., clerk Oriental Bonded \Yare- 

honse. dwl SE cor Union and Leavenworth 
Barkley William, dwl SE cor Union and Leaven- 
worth 
Barks Thomas, molder, dwl 22 Sumner 
Barlage Heiirv, cabinetmaker with George 0. 

Wliiinev «Si Co., dwl 3 Cushman 
Barlcon E., '(widow) dwl 1328 Stockton 
Barlera William, stevedore, dwl NW cor Lily and 

Franklin 
Barlett Robert, driver with Smith & Smith, dwl 

3*2 Brannan 
Barli Alexander, cutter with Michael Short, dwl S s 

Broadway bet Powell and Stockton 
Barlow Carrie Miss, assistant teacher Washington 

Grammar School, dwl 909 Clay 
Barlow Charles ( R. G. Dun & Co.) resides New 

York 
Barlow Elisha T., millwright, dwl W s Channel 

nr Fourteenth 
Barlow John, engineer Golden Gate Sugar Ref y, 
dwl Capp bet Twenty-second and Twenty-third 
Barlz Jessie, (widow) 'dwl NE cor Vallejo and 

Mason 
Barman Heinrich, waiter, dwl 134 Steuart 
Barman Jonas, dwl 321 Minna 
Barmjin Jonas S . clerk with M. Barman, SW cor 

Jlission and Fifteenth . 

Barman M., groceries and liquors, SW cor Mission 

and Fifteenth 
Barnabe Jan., carriage maker with T. D. Lamer, 

dwl N 8 Seventeenth nr Guerrero 
Barnard Edward, special policeman, dwl 735 Markt 



PEOPLES INSURANCE COMPANY. 16 Merchants' Exchange. California Street. S. F. 



C. p. VA.N SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Furnishing Goods. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



85 



BARNARD FRANK, coal, 213 Jackson, dwl 418 

Ed.iy 
Barnard Georpe H., drayniim with Tlioe. H. Selby 

& Co., dwl S s Linden nr Octiivia 
BARNARD ISAAC D., real estate and ^(eneial 

Imsiuess agent, ottice 204 Moulgoiuery, dwl 

Ru88 House 
Barnaul Matthew, slioeniiiker with Buckiu>;batn &. 

Hecht, dwl .531 Stevenson 
Barnard M. L. Miss, saleswoman, 635 Kearny, dwl 

12261 Folsnm 
Barnard Moses S., cooper, dwl l'J2()| Folsom 
Barnard R., assistiint engineer S S Pacific, North 

Pacilic Trans. Co. 
Barnard Tlioniaa (i., contractor and builder, dwl 32 

Rincon Place 
Bni-nard W. L., wagon, cor Sansom and Washington 
B irner John, stevedore, dwl 134 Stenart 
Barnes Charles, clerk, dwl 303 Clementina 
Barnes Charles A., plasterer, dwl SW cor Howard 

and Twenty-foui th 
Barnes Con., waiter. Lick House 
Barnes David, collector, dwl 320 Sansom 
Barnes E.. wagon, 1120 Fourth 
Barnes Eliza B. Miss, assistant teacher Denmau 

(iraininar School, dwl 932 Howard 
Barnes George Ed., editor, dwl 815 Stockton 
Barnes James, blacksmith with Patrick Brannan, 

dwl 12 Hunt 
Barnes Patrick, laborer Vulcan Iron Works, dwl 

17 Hunt 
Barnes H., waiter. What Cheer Restaurant 
Barnes Robert L. C, bookbinder with A. L. Ban- 
croft & Co., dwl 728 Market 
Barnes William, dwl 107 Sansom 
Barnes William, carpenter. 1)13 Market 
Barnes William, poiter with R. F. Osborn & Co., 

dwl cor Liberty and Guerrero 
Barnes William Jr., carpenter, dwl 913 Market 
Barnes Wiilium H. L., f Barnes & Bowie J dwl SW 

cor Fillmore and McAllister 
BARNES & BOWIE, (W. H. L. Barnes and 

Henry P. Boicie) attorneys at law, office 438 

Calilurnia 
Barnett Christopher, conductor Front M. and O. R. 

R., dwl NE cor Gough and Austin 
Barnett Joseph, jobber, dwl 551 Telmma 
Barnett Joseph P., f W. Levy & Co.) dwl 456 

Clementina 
Barnett Slonis S., graindealer, 210 Davis, dwl 1011 

Stockton 
Barnett Norman W., driver with Murray Bros., 

IS Tyler 
Barnett Rebecca Miss, forewoman, 20 Montgomery, 

dwl 335 Tehama 
Barnett Hubert P., civil engineer, dwl 812 Howard 
Biiiiett — See Barnert and Bannett 
Barney Benjamin A., with Hooper, Whiting & Co., 

dwl SW cor Ellis and Van Ness Av 
Barney James 'S\., ( Hooper, Whiting & Go.) res 

Arizona City, A. T. 
Barney John, dwl 530 Folsom 
Barnbardt Lawrence, soda water maker, dwl 740 

B;oadway 
Barnbill Agnes Jliss, cor8etmaker,dwl 713 Howard 
Barnhisel E. R., carrier Alta California 
Barnhisel Henry, clerk with Toklas, Brown & Co., 

dwl 31) Moss 
Barniiisel Olivia, (widow) dwl 30 Moss 
Barniim C. S. Mrs., boarding, 809 Stockton 
Barnum Edward, cook, dwl 423 East 
Barnnm William, laborer Pacilic Barrel and Keg 

Co., dwl W 8 Kentucky nr Sierra 
Barnwell '!'. F., minstrel Maguire's Opera House 
B-.irnwell Thomas F., housesuiith with John R. Sims, 

dwl 212 Pacific 
Baron Abraham, tsiilor, dwl 35 Pacific 
Baron Adolpb, cutter with Buckingham & Hecht, 

dwl 5 Rausch 



Baron Edouard, proprietor Baron House, 1006 

Dnpont 
Barou Henry, tailor, 35 Pacific 

Baron Henry, (Bnron Sf Rosenthal) dwl 13 Third 
Baron House, Edouard Baron proprietor, lOUti 

Dnpont 
Baron (Jscar, mariner, dwl 32 Slenart 
Baron & Rosentlml, (Henry Baron and Moritz 

Rosen/ha/ J hair dressing saloon, 13 Third 
Baroteau Anguste, liquor saloon and extraman H. 

and L. Co. No. 2, S. F. F. D., 625 Broadway 
Barouqnaire Ellenore, (widow) dwl I4i Mason 
Barquin Fian9()is, liquor saloon, 1021 Market 
Barr Jacob, butcher with William Smith, dwl N s 

First Av. bet Kentucky and Bay 
Barr J. D. &, Co., /Bernardo Lyon) umbrella mak- 
ers, 323 Bush 
Barr John, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Barr John, machinist with S. F. Gas Co., dwl 264 

iMinna 
Barr John D., fj. D. Barr & Co.) dwl 409 Clem- 
entina 
Barr Neil, molder Columbia Foundry, dwl SE cor 

Twenty-third and Harrison 
Barr S. A. i\Iiss, assistant teacher Girls' High School, 

dwl 615 Post 
Barr William H., mariner, dwl N s Bay bet Leav- 
enworth and Hyde 
BARKA EZEKIEL I., tobacconist, 114 First, dwl 

4 Minna 
BARRA'S HALL, 118 First 
Barradas Francisco C, hairdresser with Antonio C. 

Cordan, dwl SW cor Drumm and Oregon 
Barraillac Charles, basUetmaker, 236 Fifth 
Barrassa B , wagon, cor Green and Dnpont 
Barraud Louis, porter, 533 Kearny 
Barrell Samuel, stockbroker, 446 California, dwl 44 

Third 
Barrellari G.,(Beluzzi, Peirano & Co.; dwl 723 

Sansom 
Barres Adolphe. baker, dwl 5 Central Place 
Barrett Addison Capt., Q. M. D.. U. S. A., oflRce 

cor Market and Bush, dwl 122 Taylor 
Barrett Alexander P., (Barrett & Shannon) dwl 

SW cor Bryant and White Place 
Barrett, Alfred, watchmaker, 13 Second, dwl 230 

Seventh 
Barrett Dennis, laborer. Laborers' Protective Ben- 
evolent Association, Irish American Hall 
Barrett Edward, helper Union Iron Works, dwl 

26 Clementina, rear 
Barrett Edward, laborer, dwl 607 Natoma, rear 
Barrett Edward, laborer, Laborers' Protective 

Benevolent Association, Irish American Hall 
Bariett Francis A., carpenter, dwl Seventeenth Av 

nr J.. South San Francisco 
Bariett G. A., cariman, 16 Sixth 
Barrett George, hostler with D. C. King, dwl 552 

Bryant 
Barrett Jimies, bookkeeper Portland Boiler Works, 

dwl 318 Clementina 
Barrett James, painter, dwl 112 Dora 
Barrett James A., (Barrett & Duane) dwl 515 

Stevenson 
Barrett John, laborer, dwl NE cor Nevada and 

Kansas 
Barrett John, paper carrier, dwl 734 Harrison 
Barrett Marv, (widow) saleswoman with Samuel 

Hill, dwl 606 O'Farrell 
Barrett Jlary Miss, tuinished rooms, 1206 Stockton 
Barrett Michael, boilermaker Portland Boiler Works, 

dwl 318 Clementina 
Barrett Michael, coachman, dwl 1214 Taylor 
Barrett Paul, stonesetter. New U. S. Branch Mint, 

res Oakland 
Barrett Richard, storekeeper with Forbes Bros & 

Co., 805 Sansom 
Barrett Robert, laborer, dwl E a Boardman Place 

nr Braimau 



JOWE3, PULLMAW & CO., 116 Sanaom Street, Straw Hats and Trimmings. 



BEDIM QTOJNT'S FLAVOKING EXTRACTS enjoy the highest reputation among the ladies. 



86 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Barrett R. T., picture frameinaker with J. C. Parkin- 
son, liwl 4:J5 Stevenson 

Barrett Sitnon, will) Henry Goldsmith, 619 Sacra- 
mento, (iwl DKJ Siiciaiuento 

Barrett Wallace C, clerk with Hanson, Ackerson 
& Co , res Oakliuid 

Barrett Wiiliaui, laborer with J. B. Kemp, dwl 537 
Bryant 

Barrett William F., nii')lder Eureka roundry, dwl 
SW cor Folsom and Beale 

Barrett William G., cashier S.F. Gas Co.,SE cor First 
and Natoma, dwl N VV cor Pine and Taylor 

Barrett & Duane, ^./(r??«es A. Barrett and Edward 
Duonc) biitcliers. Grand Central Market 

Barrett &Sliannon, ( Alexander P. Barrett and Mi- 
chael ShaiiHonJ market, S W cor Brvaut and 
White Place 

BAUliETT & SHERWOOD, f Robert Sherwood, 
i«cfesso/-y importers and dealers, watches, jew- 
elry, diamonds, etc., 517 Montgomery 

Barretia Lewis, cook, S W cor Kearny and Pacific 

Barringer Elizabeth Mrs., teacher and dress patterns, 
830 Market 

Ban inger William, carpenter, 624 Fonrth 

Barrinuton Francis, mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 

Bariington George, ^We;-«er & B.J dwl cor Polk 
and Clay 

Barriiigton .lolm, mailingclerk, San Francisco P. 0., 
dwl JOS Seventh 

Barriiigton John, compositor Examiner 

Barriiigton William B., storekeeper with Dickson, 
DeVVolf & Co., dwl S .s Twenty-Fourth nr Noe 

Barris Henry D., market, 930 Post 

BarrisLaveine, mining, dwl 912 Bush 

Bariisen George, laborer with O. Krentz, dwl cor 
Goutrh and Filbert 

BARROILHET HENRY, fBelloc Frere^^J and 
Consul for Chili, otlice 524 Montgomery, res 
Oakland 

Barrois Armand, compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 229 
Minna 

Barron Cornelius J., painter, 815 Market 

Barron Edward, capitalist, 410 California, res Santa 
Clara 

Barron John, house painter, dwl 2 Francisco 

Barron Joseph. ^J?f^/■ro« J|' Co. J res Europe 

Barron Michael, carpenter California Mills, dwl Mis- 
sion bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Barron Peter, cook, 538 Clay, dwl 333 Vallejo 

Barron William K.,f Barron ii^ Co. y dwl 6i)(i Stock 

Barron William R., sliipcarpeuter, dwl Middle bet 
Pine and California 

BARRON & C0.,{Wi//la7nE. Barron, Joseph Bar- 
ron and, Thoina.'i Bell J commission merchants, 
office N W cor Calil'ornia and Sansom 

Barrow Charles F., clerk, 323 Montgomery, dwl 319 
Clementina 

Barrow Samuel, salesman, dwl 319 Clementina 

Barrow Samuel M., traveling agent, dwl 442 How 

Barrows Daniel V., (Lee & B.J dwl 709 Mission 

Barrus Daniel, foreman workshop California Jew- 
elry Co., dwl 442 Green 

Barry Augustus, driver Market Street Railroad, dwl 
Valencia bet Si.xteentli and Seventeenth 

Barry Charles, (colored) steward, dwl 27 John 

BARRY CHARLES E., searcher records, oflice 603 
Commercial, dwl 1513 Taylor 

Bari'y Cliailes J., teamster, dwl 567 Bryant, rear 

Barry Daniel, clerk with S. F. Gas Co., dwl 165 
Perry 

Barry Diivid, laborer, dwl 365 Natoma 

Barry David, laborer with James R. Doyle, dwl N 
8 Gaven bet Stockton and Powell 

Barry David, painter with Gallagher & Eodecker, 
dwl 636 Commercial 

Barry David, sailmaker with Wood^ & Reynolds, 
dwl 365 Natoma 

Barry Edward, carriagemaker, dwl S s Thirteenth 
nr Valencia 



Barry Edward, laboi'er Union Iron Works, and fur 

nislied rooms. 27 Anthony 
Barry Edward, niilkranch, San Bruno road W of 

Islais creek 
BARRY EDWARD. President Real Estate Associ 

atea, office 408 Montgomery, dwl 1904 Stockton 
Barry James, foreman with Nelson & Doblc, dwl 211 

Taylor 
Bariy James, laborer with John W. Kelly 
Barry James, moulder, dwl 21 Rausch, rear 
Barry James, sliipcarpenter, dwl Frederick nr First 
Barry James F., macliiuehand with D. A. Macdon- 

aid & Co.. dwl 21 Rausch 
Barry James H.. compositor with Spaulding & Bar- 
to, dwl 1306 Jackson 
Barry James H., laborer, dwl 412 Post, rear 
BarrV James J., watchman City Park, dwl ]ll>i 

Fifth 
Barrv John, baker with Robert Stein, dwl 238 

Fifth 
Barry .lohn, coachman with W.F. Babcock, dwl 418 

Folsom 
Barry John, laborer, dwl 12 Hinckley 
Barry John, laborer, dwl 25 Clinton 
Barry John, laborer, Fulton Foundry 
Barry John, painter, dwl 3.59J^ Clementina 
Barry John, shoemaker with Metropolitan B. & S. 

Co., dwl E 8 Ninth nr Harrison 
Barry John B., laborer, dwl S 8 Sacramento bet 

Fillmore and Steiner 
Barry John C.jobwagon, NE cor Bush and Kear- 
ny, dwl 660 Minna 
Barry Jolni H., delivery clerk Western Union Tel- 
egraph Co., dwl 211 Taylor 
Barry John T., (Lyon.i & B.J dwl NE cor Geary 

and Buchanan 
Barry Josephine Mrs., dwl 5 Fourth 
Barry M., wagon. Main nr Folsom 
Barry Martin, tailor with John O'Donnell, dwl N s 

Busl) nr Buchanan 
Barry Mary, (widow) dwl Emmet Place nr Stockton 
Biirry Mary, (widow) dwl N s Francisco nr Kearny 
Barry Mary Miss, dressmaker with Mrs. L.Ruggles, 

dwl 1306 Jackson 
Barry Mary Miss, dressmaker with Mrs.L.Schwalm, 

dwl N s Francisco bet Kearny and Dupont 
Barry Mary Mrs., laundress, dwl 35 Valparaiso 
Barry Matthew, peddler, dwl S 8 San Bruno road 

nr Girard 
Barry Michael, bootmaker,948 Market, dwl 10 Anna 
Barry Michael, carpenter with Miller &. Haley, dwl 

34 Natoma 
Barry Michaei, cook, dwl 209 Leidesdorff 
Barry Michael, laborer, dv^'l 506 Minna 
Bari'v Michael, ( Tubin & B.J dwl N 8 Market opp 

Fifth 
Barry M. J., fruits, dwl 517 Sacramento 
Barry Owen, dwl S s California bet Devisaderoand 

Broderick 
Barry Patrick, calker witli S. V. Water Co 
Barry Patrick, groceries and liquors, NW cor Fol- 
som and Rausch 
Barry Patrick, laborer, dwl Ws Eighth nr Howard 
Barry Patrick, policemiin City Hall, dwl N s Ivy 

Avenue bet Franklin and Gougli 
Barry Patrick, wagonmaker, dwl 110 William 
Barrv P. Oliver, clerk County Recorder's Office, 

dwl 923 Pacific 
Biirry Richard, barkeeper, dwl 12 Anthony 
Barry Richard, junk dealer, dwl 42 Sacramento 
Barry Richard, laborer S. F. & P. Sugar Refinery, 

dwl 260 Clara 
Barry Robert, bookkeeper, dwl 109 Montgomery 
Barry Robert, tailor, dwl Trinity Court 
Barry Sarah, (widow) dwl 1306 Jackson 
Barry Theodore A., (Barry <& PattenJ dwl 709 

Geary 
Barry Tiierese, (widow) tailoress, dwl 1 Noble 

Place 



Insure in the best Iiocal Company, " THE PEOPLES." 



C. P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street. Importers and Jobbers. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] BIRECTORY. 



87 



Barrj' Thomas, carpenter, H. C. Leaijne,l28 Kearny 
Barry Thomiis, clerk, dwl '2^3 O'Karrell 
Barry Thomas, clerk Central House, 814 Sansom 
Barr'v Thomas, shoemaker with Metropohtun B. & 

S. Co., dwl 2 Eddy Place 
Barry Thomas, ttablekeeper, dwl 419 Folsoni 
Barry Thomas T., salesman with Keane, O'Connor 

& Co., dwl -223 O'Karrell 
Barry Vinton B.. dwl 1814 Market 
Barry William, actor Maguire'a Opera House, dwl 

84.5 Dupont ^, ,^ ^ ,. 

Barry William, apprentice with W. K. Vanderalice 

& Co., dwl 3.5 Valparaiso 
Barry William, blacksmith, dwl 233 First 
Barry William, carpenter, dwl '28 Ililch, rear 
Barry William, driver with William Lambert, dwl 

'J3 Ho\Yard Court 
Barry William, laborer, dwl 630 Jessie 
Barry William, shipcarpenter, dwl ~'l Rausch 
Bany William, teacher, dwl 200 Stockton 
Barry William, (colored) waiter, dwl 1 Adele Alley 
Barry William Mrs., dressmaker, 23 Howard Court 
Barry William K.. teamster, dwl N a Austin bet 

Gouijh and Ocfavia 
Barry W. M. G., recorder Tide Land Survey, office 

SW cor Clay and Kearny 
B4RliY &. PATTEN, f Theodore A. Barry and 
licnjamin A. PaUen) wines and liquors, 413 
Montgomery 
Barse William, calker, Calkers' Association, Excel- 
sior Hall 
Barsh Hugo, barber, dwl 23(5 Sutter 
Barshold Charles, tailor with Gahriel Abraham, 

dwl 1104 Montgomery 
Barsoti VirKilio, veLfetahle peddler, dwl 1002 Pacific 
Barstow Alfred, U. S. Postal Ajjent, office 7 Mont- 
gomery Block, dwl 615 Lombard 
Barstow An.son, weigher Custom House, residence 

Oakland 
Barstow D. P., attorney-at-law, office 6 Montgom- 
ery Block, res Oakland 
Barstow George, (Barstow, Stetson & Houghton) 

dwl 927 Pine 
Barstow Joseph, dwl 138 Fourth 
Barstow Simon F., compositor with Bacon & Co., 

dwl 1005 California 
BARSTOW, STETSON & HOUGHTON, {George 
Baratow, Edirard Gray Sletsoa and Roscoe 
E. Hoitiihton) attorneys at law, office 315 Cal 
Barstow William, mariner, dwl 116 Steuart^ 
Barstow William, newspaper writer, U. S. Court 

building, NE cor Batterv and Washington 
Barstow William A., physician, office 1234 Stockton, 

dwl 1248 Montgomery 
Bart John D.. laborer, dwl N a Natoma bet Lafay. 

ette and Eleventh 
Bartalloni Ermino, moulder with Damino Mancari- 

ni, dwl 264 Jessie 
Bartel Julio, carrier La Voz del Nuevo Mundo, 728 

Montgomery 
Bartels Conrad, musician, dwl 1518 Powell 
BartelsFiederick, waiter, dwl 18 Sansom 
Bartels George II., upholsterer, dwl 273 Stevenson 
Bartels Henry, buker with B. Stumpf, dwl 226 

Pacitic 
Bartels Henry, cook, dwl 7 Washington 
Bartels Henry L., upholsterer with J. A. Shaber, 

dwl 273 Stevenson 
Bartels Max., teacher music, dwl .511 Dupont 
Barters Richard, clerk with Thaddeua Faulstick, 

dwl 526 Mission 
Bartet Jean Baptiste Mrs., teacher, dwl 715 Green 
Bartfcld Ernest, carpenter, dwl 610 Greenwich 
B.irlh Charles H., «lerk U. S. A. Quartermaster, 

• dwl S a Jackson bet Webster and Buchanan 
Barthen Frank, (Barthen ^ 2'ostmann) dwl 1021 

Post 
Barthen & Tostmann, (Frank Barthen and Henry 
Tostmann) cigars and tobacco, 710 Market 



Bartholomann John, workman Cal. Sug. Refinery, 

cor Bryant and Eighth 
Bartholomew Henry A., expresswagon, cor Front 

and Pine, dwl E » Devisadero bet Clay and Sac 
Barthrop Edward, (Barthrop & Casey) dwl 424 

Geary 
Barthrop & Casey, (Edward Barthrop and James 

Crt-sej/; butchers, 432 Geary 
Bartiloni Aronian, statuary, dwl 264 Jessio 
Bartlet — , dwl NE cor Bush and Stockton 
Bartlett Ada F., (widow) dwl 314 Bush 
Bartlett Alhert J., drayman Commercial Flour Mill, 

dwl 122 Eddy, rear 
Bartlett Alfred, real estate, dwl 1007 Market 
Bartlett B. S., dwl Rush House , ,, ^, . , 

Bartlett Charles H., paperhanger, dwl 54 Third 
Bartlett Columbus, [Bartlett & Pratt) dwl 30- 

Bartle'u Earl. {Bartlett Sf Bergin] <i\v\ 212 Green 
Bartlett E. E., piledriver with C P. R. R- Co., bds 

cor Berry and Madden 
Bartlett James H.. carpenter, dwl 30S Tehama, rear 
Bartlett Job C, drayman Commercial Hour AliU, 

dwl 122 Eddy . J , XT T7- , . u 

Bartlett Jonathan D., painter, dwl N s Eighteenth 

nr Dolores . , „ 1 1 n,^^ i 

Bartlett Joseph J., planer with Hobbs, Gilmore & 

Co., 219 Market . t.i 

Bartlett Nathaniel, flour packer Golden Age h lour- 
ing Mills, dwl Battery bet Bdwy and Vallejo 
Bartlett Pliny, {Hallett, B. & Dalton) resides Oak- 
land Point , oo, iiT 
Bartlett Robert B., porter 206 Sansom, dwl 3.3 j Moss 
■BARTLETT WASHINGTON, attorney at law, 
office 636 Sac, and State Harbor Comimssiouer, 
office 414 Montgomery, dwl 850 Market 
Bartlett W. B.. dwl What Cheer H.nise 
BARTLETT WHITE LEAD AND ZINC CO., 

C. Adolphe Low &, Co. agents, 208 Cal 
BARTLETT WILLIAM C, Bulletin Editorial 

Rooms, 517 Clay, res Oakland 

Bartlett William S., bookkeeper California Irust 

Co., dwl 314 Jones , nr- ; » 

Bartlett & Bergin, (Earl Bartlett and Michael 

Berrrin) attorneys at law. office .35 M.onl 131ocK 

BARTL'ETT & FliATT, fColnmbus Bartlett ajid 

Lconidas E. PrattJ attorneys at law, office 630 

Sacramento , , ,or t> 

Hartley Frank, boilermater, dwl Mo Dora 

Bartley George, niolder Eureka Foundry, dwl 140 

Dora ^ 

Bartley William, clerk, dwl 416 Post, rear 
Bartling William, (Bartling Sr Kimball) resides 

Oakland „^.^,. r, ^i- 

BARTLING & KIMBALL, f William Bartling 
and Henry Kimball) bookbinders and blank 
book manufacturers, 505 Clay 

Bartman A., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Bartman Ferdinand, carpenter, Pioneer Woolen 
Factory, dwl Filbert bet Dupont and Stockton 

Bartmann John C, musician, dwl 519 Filbert 

Barto Harrison, [Spaulding & B.) dwl 908 Howard 

Barto Mary, (widow) dwl 24 Si.\th 

Bartola N.". wagon. San Pedro Raiich 

Bartole Peter, tanner with Wolf Bloom, dwl Mis- 
sion Railroad Depot 

Bartomer H., wagon, 816 Pacific 

Barton Benjamin F., (B. F. Barton & Co.) dwl 23 

BARTON' B. F. & Co., proprietors Pioneer Salt 

Works, depot 211 and 2)3 Sacramento 
Barton Charles C, laborer with Conroy & O Con- 
ner, dwl 11 Ritch 
Barton George, engineer, dwl 27 Freelon 
Barton James, bootmaker, 815 Batterv 
Barton James, engineer, dwl 27 Freelon 
Barton John, president Union Pacihc Salt CO., Jio 

Sacramento, dwl 15 Laurel Place 
Barton John C, {Barton & Rutter) res New York 



» 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Perfumery and Fancy Soaps. 



MASON & POLIjAHD'S PILLS cure Fever and Ague, 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Barton Joshua H., steward San Quentin Prison, 

dwl 181 Jessie 
Barton Robert, mininsr enjfineer. dwl Grand Hotel 
Barton Tlionias S., clerk with N. B. Edgerly, dwl 

71ii Howard 
Barton Willard T., clerk with Union Pacific Salt 

Co., dwl 15 Lamel Place 
Barton William, painter, dwl 1232 Union 
Barton William, rigger and stevedore, dwl Ws 

Stockton bet Francisco and Bay 
Barton William H., stockbroker, office 19 Mer- 

cliantB Exchatio-e, dwl 1223 Washinjjton 
BARTON & RUTTER, f.John C. Bnrlouand R. A. 

RulicrJ guns, pistols, cutlery etc., 609 Clay 
BaFucli Isaac, merchant, dwl 108 Seventh 
Barut Raymond, market, 1402 Stockton 
Barutli E. & Co., ( Ernnf, Barnth (mil Henry Hol- 

linirsj groceries and liquors, NW cor Post and 

Hyde 
Barutli Ernst, fE. Baruth & Co.) dwl NW cor 

Hyde and Post 
Baruth Simon, cutter with Henry Goldsmith, dwl 

913 Sacramento 
Barz August, (Crooks, B., 4' SuhlJ dwl 6^ Cleve- 
land 
Bascli Arthur, clerk, 133 Montgomery, dwl 225 

Bush 
Basch Hugo, hairdresser with Adam Erbe, dwl 

Sutter St House 
Bascom Louis S., compositor with Francis &. 

Valentine, dwl 1324^ Stockton 
Bascom Ray, pressman with Francis & Valentine, 

dwl 1324 5 Stockton 
Bascombe Anna Miss., dressmaker, dwl NE cor 

Bush and Powell 
Baselliiii Alexander, interpreter City and County 

Hospital 
Basford Jacob K., druggist, NE cor Post and Ma- 
son 
Bash H. & Co., f Charles Coleman) collectors and 

general business agents, 501 Kearny 
Bash Henry, (H. Bash & Co.) dwl 773 Folsom 
Bash Hyuian, tailor, 202 Bush, dwl 3 Shipley 
Basliam Fredeiick, merchant, dwl 307 Eddy 
Basilia Joseph, engineer with Black Diamond Coal 

Co., dwl NW cor Green and Sansom 
Basini B.. wiigon. Five Mile House 
Baskerville Richard D., hairdressing saloon, 672 

Howard, dwl 34 Fifth Avenue 
Basler George A., painter, dwl 3 Harriet 
Bass Chester, (colored) (Bass and Starkey) dw 1919 

Broadway 
Bass David, (colored) cook with Monroe W. Tav- 

lor, dwl 21 Scott 
BASS, NEWMAN & CO.,,' 7/iowas J. Bass and 

James Newman) importers paints, oils and glass, 

735 Market 
BasBThovaas, J., f Bass, KeJi-m 071 & Co.) dwl Es 

Fillmore bet Bush and Pine 
Bass & Starkey, (colored) (Chester Bass and Alex- 
ander F. Starkey) hairdressers, 531 Pacilic 
Basse Thomas & Co., commission merchants, office 

220 From 
Basset t Charles F., (Bassett & White) dwl N s 

Jlission opp Twelfth 
Bassett Daniel, engineer, dwl 23 Clementina 
Bassett Frank W., gasliiter, dwl NW cor Minna 

and Eleventh 
Bassett John, deckhand, steamer Salinas, Washing- 
ton St. Wharf 
BASSETT JOSEPH, wholesale flour and grain, 

and agent Clinton Flour Mills, 221-223 Clay, 

res Fruit V^ale, Alameda County 
Bassett Martin L., carpenter, dwl N s Jersey nr 

Church 
Bassett Nathaniel, doorkeeper California Theatre, 

dwl cor Eleventh and Minna 
Bassett Robert, bookkeeper, dwl N s Union bet 

Hyde and Leavenworth 



Bassett William H., assayer, dwl NW cor Minna 

and Eleventh 
Bassett &l White, (Charles F. Bassett and Albert 

IV. WliiteJ produce commission, 212 Wash 
Baesetti Giacomo, waiter, 515 Merchant 
Bassine Edward, gaslitter, dwl 523 Pine 
Bassini Bernardo, gasfitter with S. F. Gas Co., dwl 

1443 Leavenworth 
Bassity Matliew F., plasterer, dwl 211 Minna 
Bastable Geoige D., clerk, dwl 305 Montgomery 
Bastheiin Joseph, (Einstein Bros. Sf Co.) dwl 43 

O'Farrell 
Bastian Frank, laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl 509 Ei-hth 
Bastian Frederick, blacksmith with C. Grosso, dwl 

814 Montgomery 
Bastian Jacob, { Mesner & B.) dwl 721 Sansom 
Bastian John, blacksmith, dwl 814 Montgomery 
Bastian John, laborer California Sugar Refineiy, 

dwl 509 Eighth 
Bastian Joseph, laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl 509 Eighth 
Bastian Philip, nianufactnrer axle grease, 390 Fran- 
cisco, dwl 71! Lombard 
Baston Abner F., teamster with Miller & Hall, dwl 

N s McAllister bet Buchanan and Webster 
Batavia P & Co., (-Jospph Hahish) hairdressers and 

wigniakers, 641 Kearny 
Batavia Philip, fP. Batavia & Co.) dwl 751 Clay 
Batchelder David F., special policeman, dwl N s 

Brannan nr Sixth 
Batchelder L. L., stevedore, dwl 1026 Clay 
Batchelder. — See Bachelder 

Batoheldor John R., carpenter, dwl 1523 Mission 
BATCHELOR EDWARD P., attorney at law, 

office 10 Moritgomery Block, dwl NW cor Fol- 
som and Seccuid 
Batchelor William H., house mover, dwl 114 Austin 
Bate William H., cabinetmaker, 211 Stevenson 
Bateman Henry, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Bateman Henry, clerk, dwl 660 Howard 
BATEMAN HENRY C, Catholic bookseller, sta- 
tioner and bookbinder, 203 Kearny, dwl 225 

Sutter 
Bateman James, shoemaker, 204 Commercial 
Bateman Michael C, real estate, dwl SE cor Pacific 

and Gougli 
Bateman Miles, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Bateman Morris, dwl 8 Virj:inia Place, nr Pine 
Bateman Patrick C, dwl SE cor Pacific and Gongh 
Bateman William A., produce dealer, dwl 733 Pine 
Batendo P., drayman, 210 Powell 
Bates A. Caroline Miss, assistant teacher University 

School, dwl 1001 Powell 
BATES ASHER B., attorney at law and register 

in bankruptcy, office 10 Court Block, 636 Clay, 

dwl 705 Bush 
Bates Catherine M., (widow) dwl 764 Harrison, 

rear 
BATES CICERO M., physician and health officer 

Board of Health, office 521 Jackson, dwl 209 

Geary 
Bates Dudley C, clerk Pacific Insurance Co., dwl 

NE cor Bush and Stockton 
Bates Elizabeth, (widow) dwl 1001 Powell 
Bates Felix P. W., carpenter with Edwin O. Hunt, 

dwl 558 1 Bryant 
Bates George, principal University School, dwl 1001 

Powell 
BATES JOSEPH C, attorney at law. office rooms 

1 and 2, 704 Montgomery, dwl 708 Pine 
Bates Marshall A. K., clerk Merchants' Mutual Ma- 
rine Insurance Co., dwl 705 Bush 
Bates Morris S., clerk with Williams, Blanchard &. 

Co., dwl 705 Bush 
BATES WILLIAM, street contractor, dwl SW cor 

Harrison and Clieslev 



The directory of the " PEOPLES" is composed of the best business men of CaUfomia. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Yankee Notions. 



SAN FKANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



89 



Bateson .Tnmes H., tailor, dwi 7 Cleineiitina 
BatioiieD. B., paymaster, U. S. Navy, bds Lick 

House 
Batisse John, hairdreeser -with G. Held, dwl IG 

Ohio 
Batista Leone, gardener, dwl SE cor Broadway 

and Sansoni 
Batsen Pliilip, liquor saloon, cor Twenty-ninth 

and Mission 
Batsere Jolm, cook, dwl 1019 Sutter 
BattaiuH William, salesman with Locke & Montague, 

dwl fill Mason 
Batten George, laborer with William Harris, dwl 

Aha Lodgings 
Batten Samiison, (Batten & MidlenJ dwl S 8 Cali- 
fornia bet T5al<erand Broderick 
Batten & Mullen, f Snmp/O'ji Batten & Michael Mul- 

lenj stoneyard, Point Lobos Av nr Geary 
Batteinmn Edward, baker with Conrad Thaler, 22 

Dupont 
BATTEUX DANIEL, liquor saloon, 34 Kearny, 

dwl 11 Carlos Place 
BATTERY ST. U. S BONDED WAREHOUSE, 

George C. Bode proprietor, NW cor Battery and 

Filbert 
Battiste Joseph, waiter. Grand Hotel 
Battles John, proprietor Battles House, 23 Vallejo 
Battles Luke, steward C. S. Nav. Go's steamer 

Antelope 
Battles William W., assistant appraisei-, Custom 

House, dwl 811) Post 
Battmale Justin, laborer with John B. Berges, dwl 

Presidio Road nr Mountain Lake 
Batturs Edward T., bookkeeper with Frank G. 

Edwards, dwl 51!1 Leavenworth 
Batty John, carpenter, dwl N s Post bet Baker and 

Broderiek 
Baucli Peter G., custom house broker, 508 Battery, 

dwl 719 Union 
Baudin John P., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Bauer Abraham, fBnner BrothersJ d\v\ 1102 Pine 
Bauer Ailolph G. V. H., friugemaker with William 

Euirlandei', dwl 728 Market 
Bauer Brothers, (Abraham and Max) fancy goods, 

410 Kearny 
Bauer Carl, land agent, dwl 610 Howard 
Bauer Charles, butcher with Breiling &. Bro., dwl 

965 Mission 
Bauer Chailes. laborer, New U. S. Branch Mint, 

dwl 20 Tulare 
Bauer Charles, longshoreman, dwl 26 Sfeuart 
Bauer Chailes, (Charles Bauer & Co. J SE cor 

Kearny and Connnercial 
Bauer Charles, (Baver Sc HirihJ dwl 18 Sansom 
Bauer Cliarles & Co., (Max SchrlkleJ wine cellar, 

SE cor Kearny and Commercial 
Bauer Edward, laborer with Taylor & Bendel, dwl 

S s Bush bet Montgomery and Kearny 
Bauer Emile, ( While <jk Bauer J dwl 402'Green 
Bauer Emile E. ( Sass &B.J dwl NE cor Seventh 

and Cluavelaud 
Bauer Prank, lalxn-er with F. & J. N. Stand, dwl 

William Tell House 
Bauer George, varuisher with N. P. Cole & Co., 

dwl 852 Washington 
Bauer George Jlrs., nurse, dwl 852 Washington 
Bauer Gustave A., cooper with Lvon & Co., dwl 

822 Powell 
Bauer Henry, upholsterer with John C. Bell, dwl 

1511 California 
Bauer Hermann, gilder with G. Hoefer, dwl SW 

cor Washington and Waverly Place 
Bauer John, (Chapman & B.J dwi 13 Howard 

Court 
BAUER JOHN A., manufacturing chemist and 

druggist, 101 Post, dwl 620 Greenwich 
Bauer Joseph, liquor dealer, 1042 Folsom 
Bauer Leonard G., soap maker, dwl 432 Greenwich 



Bauer Max, (Baner Bros.) resides Paiis 
Bauer Peter, blacksmith, dwl 1323 Stockton 
Bauer Samuel, salesman, 410 Kearny, dwl 1102 Pine 
Bauer Simon, porter City of Paris, dwl 431 Pine 
Bauer William, baker with John Fisk.dwl 37 Rausch 
Bauer William, confectioner with Schroder «fe Al- 

brecht, dwl N E cor Kearny and Counnercial 
Baner William, iipholsterer with N. P. Cole &, Co., 

dwl 1511 California 
Baner & Hirth, (Charles Baiter and Charles Ilirth) 

proprietors German Hall, 16 and 18 Sansom 
Bauerle John, carpenter with L. F. Haussler, dwl 

S s Pacific bet Kearny and Dupont 
Bauerle John, liquor saloon, Gl 1 Pacific 
Bauerle Mitniie Miss. lecturess,dwl 823 Montgomery 
BAUGH THEODORE E., proprietor U. S. Court 

building, N E cor Battery and Washington, dwl 

308 Stockton 
Baugh William W., warehouse keeper, dwl 320 San 
Baughau Richard, mariner, dwl l\:i P.icilic 
Baul Leonard, cigarmaker, dwl 25 Morton 
Bauler William, cook, dwl 78 Clementina 
Baulsir Niuu'od, blockmaker with Thomas F. Mitch- 
ell, dwl 1332 Washington 
BAUM CHARLES, Custom House broker and Con- 
sul Argentine Republic, office 510 Battery, dwl 

1705 Powell 
Baum David A , local agent Liverpool and London 

and Globe Insurance Co., dwl 18 Prospect Place 
Baum Gustave, furniture, 709 Pacilic 
BAUM J. & CO., (Henry and Morris Shrier) man- 
ufacturers, importers and jobbers clothing, 222 

Sansom 
Baum John T., (Bnnm Sf Ladd) dwl 330 Sutter 
Baum Julius, /^eir. i?rt?/»tt Sf Co.) dwl Ws Van Ness 

Avenue bet Post and Geary 
Baum Simon, booklieepei-, 222 Sansom, dwl 721 Ellis 
Baum William, porter Orleans Hotel 
Baum & 'L&Ad/(John T. Baum. and C. J. Ladd) 

office furniture, cabinetmakers and upholsterers, 

605 California 
Bauman Charles, tailor with F. W. King, dwl 1622 

Stockton 
Bauman Edward, laborer with H.W.Gray &. Co., 

dwl 331 Kearny 
Bauman Emma Miss, (Bauman Sisters) dwl 1103 

Stockton 
Bauman Frederick, barkeeper with Frederick Lo- 

haus, dwl 7 Washington 
Bauman G. Lewis, tailor, dwl 1108 Stockton 
Baimian John, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bauuian Joseph, gun and locksmith, 510 Broadway 
Bauman Joseph, clerk with Biommer &, HoUings, 

dwl cor Buchanan & Bay 
Bauman Lena Miss, (Bauman Sisters) dwl 1108 

Stockton 
Bauman Sebastian, clerk with Brommer & Hollings, 

dwl cor Buchanan & Bay 
Bauman Sisters, (Misses Emma and LenaBanman) 

millinery, 1108 Stockton 
Baumann John, musician, dv^'l 29 Morton 
Banmann Louis F., confectioner with George Haas 

6i. Co., dwl 116 Morton 
Baumberger Jacob, wood carver with Bryant & 

Straban, dwl 995 Market 
Baumeister Frederick, barkeeper with Baumeister 

&. Co., dwl 1308 Howard 
Baumeister John A., (Baumeister ^ Co.) dwl 1038 

Howard 
BAUMEISTER & CO., (John A. Baumeister and 

John C. Beckler) Alaska Saloon, N W cor Bush 

and Kearny 
Baumgardner E. M. Mrs., assistant teacher Denmau 

Grammar School, dwl 514 Sutter 
Baumgardner S. J., commission merchant, dwl 514 

Sutter 
Baumgart Philip, waiter Woodward's Gardens 
Baumgarten Anton, (M. Ullmnnn & Co.) dwl 630 

Sacramento 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street. Laces and Embroideries. 



REDINQTON, HOSTETTER & CO., Importers of Druggists' Glassware, etc. 



90 



SAN FRANCISCO [K] DIRECTOKY. 



Bauni,t,'arten Carl, (M. Ullmann & Co. J res Pesth, 

Hungary 
Bannigarten Christiini, mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 
Bauiiigartnei- Valentine, (Hcerdink & Co. J dwl 8 

William 
Baumgariner William, restaurant, N s Haj'es nr 

Van Ness Avenue 
Baum Jasper, baker with William Pohlman, dwl 114 

Market 
Biinp John, butcher with P. Bacn & Co., dwl Fifth 

Ave nr Railroad Ave, South San Francisco 
Baurliyte Isaac S., engraver, dwl 170 Silver 
Baurliyte Ivobert H., engineer C. S. Nav. Go's 

steamer Antelope, dwl 7013 Post 
Bans Philip, waiter Palm House 
BAUS.AIAN WILLIAM, local editor Morning Call, 

dwl .552 Minna 
Bauten Francis, tailor, 717 Snnsom, dwl 1313 Stock 
Bauten Nicholas J., (Nicholas J. Bauten & Co.) 

dwl NE cor John and Brannan 
Bauten Nicholas J. & Co., ( Willinm Miiehe) grocer- 
ies and liquors, NE cor Brannan and John 
BAUVILLE AUGUST, proprietor City Front 

House, 025 Davis 
Bavaria Brewery, Jacob Gundlach & Co. prop'rs, 

C20-62-2 Vallejo 
Bawden William G., job printer, 317 California, 

dwl 44 Third 
Baxter Charles E. A., shipping clerk with J. C. 

Merrill & Co., dwl 1109 Howard 
Baxter Charles 51., captain steamer Clinton, Vallejo 

Street Wharf, res Petaluma 
Baxter Edward H., salesman with Crane & Brig- 
ham, dwl 1109 Howard 
Baxter Hall W., bookkeeper with Crane & Brig- 
ham, dwl 1109 How.ird 
Baxter James, engineer with E. C. Boohar & Co 
Baxter John T., cai-penter, dwl N s Thirteenth bet 

Mission and Valencia 
Baxter John T., market, N s Sixteenth bet Valencia 

and Second Avenue 
B;ixter Joseph P., special policeman, dwl 515 Sacra- 
mento 
Baxter Lydia L., (widow) dwl 1109 Howard 
Baxter Mathew, laborer with Cornelius O'Donnell, 

dwl SW cor Seventh and Biannan 
Baxter Samuel, linenman, P. M. S. S. Montana 
Baxter Sutclitfe, bookkeeper Belliugham Bay Coal 

Co., dwl 247 Second 
Baxter William H., clerk S. F. Assaj'ing & Refining 

Works, dwl718Ciilifornia 
Bay City Laundry, offices 602 Market and 228 

Montg<micry 
Bay City Soda Water Co., office 89 Stevenson 
Bay District Agricultural Association, office 212 

Sutter 
Bay Park Addition Homestead Association, office 

312 Montgomery 
Bav Park Homestead Association, office 312 JTont 
BAY SUGAR REFINERY, SW cor Battery and 

Union 
Bay View Chemical Works, San Bruno Road nr 

Twenty-Eighth, office NW cor Bush and Powell 
Bay View Homestead Association, office 415 Mont 
Bay View Park Hotel, Bay View Park, 5 miles 

from City Hall 
Bay View Railroad Homestead Club, office 415 Mont 
BAY WAREHOUSE, A. R. Van Damme prop'r, 

Sanson! bet Lombard and Greenwich 
Bayer Joseph, packer with Marden &. Myrick, dwl 

1014 Stockton 
Bayer Julius, peddler, dwl N 8 Heron nr Eighth 
Bayeique'E. M. Madame, (widow) dwl 819 Mission 
Bayerque Romaiu, with Pioche & Bayerque dwl 

8(16 Stockton 
Bayestrof Fiederick, seaman steamship Oriflamme, 

N. P. Trans. Co 
Bayle John, butcher with P. Baca & Co., dwl Fifth 

Avenue nr Railroad Avenue S San Francisco 



Bayless Charles H.. compositor with Waters, New- 
hoff tfe Co., dwl Geneva nr Brannan 

Bayless Frederick, longshoreman, dwl 12 Stenar 

Bayless Margaret, (widow) ladies' nurse, dwl SW 
cor Sixth and Howard 

Bayless Thornton J., bookkeeper, dwl 204 Mont 

Bayless William H., architect, dwl E s Genoa bet 
Brannan and Townsend 

Bayley Alexander, shoemaker, N s Ivy nr Liguna 

Bayley Charles A., barkeeper with Philip Moysev, 
21 Vallejo 

Bayley Geoige, cook, dwl 45 Everett 

Bayley Geoi'ge, teamster, dwl S s Linden bet La- 
guna and Octavia 

Bayley George, teamster, dwl E 8 Howard bet 
" Twelfth and Thirteenth 

Bayley George B., bookkeeper Bank California, res 
Oakland 

Bayley Henry E., bookkeeper with N. B. Edgerly, 
dwl SE cor Howard and Second 

Bayley Thomas, boarding and lodgings, N s Oregon 
bet Davis and Drumm 

Bayley Wilbur F., (Bailey & Winter) dwl 1J08 
Stockton 

Bayley & Winter, ( Wilbur F. Bailey & Robert 
Wilder J photographers, artists, 618-620 Wash- 
ington 

Bayly Charles A., (Bayly & Clawson) dwl 426 
" Kearny 

Bavlv Pauline, (widow) dwl 163 Tehama 

BAYLY & CLAWSON, (Charles A. Bayly & 
Joseph W. Clawson) apothecaries, 512 Kearny 

Bayly — . See Bailey and Baily 

Bayina Joseph Rev., President St. Ignatius College, 
dwl 841 Maiket 

Bayrenther Amalie Mrs., (Mrs. & M'css Bayreu- 
ther) dwl 430 Bush 

Bayrenther Clara Miss, (Mrs. & Miss Bayrculhcr) 
dwl 430 Bush 

Bayrenther Mrs. &, Miss, (Amalie and Clara) mil- 
Imeis and dressmakers, 4:i0 Busli 

Bays Henry, ship carpenter, dvs-1 8 Liberty 

Bays John, contractor, dwl 825 Larkin 

Bazel August, New Butcher's Home, Railroad Ave- 
nue nr Sixth 

Bazilia C, boilermaker, Vulcan Iron Works 

Bazin Victor, tailor, 445 Bush, dwl 1213 Powell 

Bazo Felix, apprentice with W. T. Garratt & Co., 
dwl 19 Stone 

Bazzurro Fiank, (Preda Sf Co.) dwl 501 Clay 

Beach A. C. iSt Co., (Alexander B. Pntrament) 
Mechanics Mill, and sash, doors and blind man- 
ufacturers, SW cor Jlissiou and Kreuiont 

Beach Andrew C, (A. C. Beach Sf Co., and Beach 
Ss- Co.) dwl 954 Folsom 

Beach Anson B., drayman with Richard Perry, dwl 
SE cor Bush and Polk 

BEACH CHILION, books and stationery, 5 Mont- 
gomery, Masonic Temple, dwl Grand Hotel 

Beach Eliz'a, (widow) dwl 1312 Taylor 

Beach George, clerk with R. A. Swain & Co., dwl 
5171 Jessie 

Beach George IL, salesman with Weil & Co., dwl 
517^ Jessie 

Beach Henry H., clerk with Wellman, Peck & Co., 
dwl 619 Sixth 

BEACH HENRY MARTIN, local agent Pipifax, N 
E cor Battery and Sacramento, dwl SVd Stock 

Beach John C, clerk, Adams House 

Beach John H., carpenter with A. C. Beach & Co., 
dwl 17 Veroiiii 

Beach Joseph D. C. (Larzelere & B.) dwl SW cor 
Howard and Eighteenth 

Beach Lewis, porter, 200 Montgomery, dwl S s Clay 
bet Leavenworth and Hyde 

Beach Thomas P., cashier North Pacific Transpor- 
tation Co., dwl 905 Market 

Beach Treat S., grain dealer and shipper, office 
402 Front, dwl 1405 Taylor 



THE PEOPLES INSURANCE CO. pays all losses in Gold Coin. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Boots and Shoes. 

91 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Beach & Co, f Andrew G. Bench & Alexander B. 
Piitrameut) frrocevies and liquors, 954 Folsom 
Beadle Donald, (Mnas Sc B.J dwl fr>3 Third 
Beahan John, butcher, dwl 22 Boardman Place, 

Beakley J. Sloat, homojopathic physician, office 230 
Kearny 

Beal George, clerk Chief Quiirtermaster. 703 JIarket, 
dwl N 8 Lombard bel Kearny and Dupont 

Beal Rufus J., carpenter. H. C. League, 12S Kearny 

Beal Samuel, bedding manufacturer, etc., 575 and 
.577 Mission, dwl 70 Silver 

Beal William, mariner, dwl NE cor Folsom and 
Beale 

Beal William, mnviner. dwl 120 Davis 

BEALE STREET SAWING AND PLANING 
MILLS, Richardson, Dell & Co. proprietors, N 
W cor Benle and Mission 

Beale Street Warehouse, Beale street wharf 

Beale Street Wharf, foot Beale 

Beals C. R. Mrs., assistant teacher Girls' High 
School, dwl !»23 Powell 

BEALS HENRY CHANNING, editor Commercial 
Herald and Market Review, office 40'J Wash- 
ington, dwl 1506 Taylor 

Beals .John P., music printer with M. Gray, res San 
Mateo 

Beals .Joseph, steward S. S. Moses Taylor, N. 
P. Trans. Co ^, ^ ■, 

Beam Peter G., passenger agent Council Bluff and 
St. Joseph R R, dwl Lick House 

Beaman Alfred, carpenter, dwl 810 Powell 

Beamer Joseph, laborer, dwl Coso Ave nr Pros- 
pect Avenue 

Beamish John, shoemaker with I. M. Wentworth 
& Co., dwl cor Oiik and Gongh 

Beamish Percy, (Beamish Sf Gibson) 218 Mont- 
gomery 

Beamish ifc Gibson, f Percy Beamish and John G. 
Gibson) gents' furnishing goods, 218 Mont- 
gomery 

Beamontella Joseph, mariner, dwl 33 Hinckley 

Bean Archibald E., carpenter, dwl J 64 Perry 

Bean Charles, printer, dwl 1006 Dupont 

Bean Charles T., calker, dwl 1910 Mason 

Bean Charles T., with E. H. Knight, dwl S s Green- 
wich nr Fillmore 

Bean David, drayman with David L. Farnsworth, 
dwl 310 Mason 

Bean Edward, laborer, dwl Sullivan nr Crescent Av 

Bean Edwin F , (Bean ^- Black) dwl 44 Third 

Bean Francis W., special policeman, dwl cor Har- 
rison and Spear 

Bean Frederick, seaman S. S. Oriflarame, North Pac. 
Trans. Co. 

Bean George, teamster, dwl W s Juniper bet Fol- 
som and Hariison 

Bean James, printer, dwl 1006 Dupont 

Bean James D., cook, dwl 636 Cummercial 

Beau Joseph, carpenter, dwl 224 Second 

Bean Joseph W., carpenter, California Mills, dwl 
129 Second 

Bean Moses W., master mariner, dwl 1910 Mason 

Bean Redmond, stevedore, dwl 50a Howard 

Beau William, clerk, dwl 25 Ellis 

Bean William, teamster with Isidor Gutte, dwl 111 
Ellis 

BEAN & BLACK, (Edjvin F. Bean and James J 
B/nc/c) Va,c\i\c Coast Advertising Agency, 410 
Montgomery 

Beanston George, secretary Board of Education, 22 
City Hall, dwl E s Webster bet O'Farrell and 
Ellis 
Beanston Peter, blacksmith with Pollard Sc Carvill, 

dwl W s Hollis bet Ellis and O'Farrell 
Beard Charles C, deputy sheriff, City Hall, dwl 704 

Howard 
Beard George, stevedore, dwl N s Greenwich bet 
Sansom and Montgomery 



dwl 



Beard John, laborer, dwl 240 Townseud 

Beard Joseph R., broker, office 15 Montgomery 

Block, dwl 704 Howard 
Beard Samuel, dwl 1305 Powell 
Beard Samuel, plasterer, Plasterers' Pro Ass'b, 727 

Market 
Beardslee Cyrus W., carpenter, dwl 436 Union 
Beardslee Paul F., planer, California Mills, dwl 7 

Yerba Buena 
Beardsley James, engineer, dwl 552 Natoma 
Beardsle'y James Jr., engineer with George Rud- 
dock, dwl 552 Natoma 
Beardsley John H., bookkeeper Pacific Ban 

1007'Povvell 
Beardslev Sophia, (widow) dwl 223 O'Farrell 
Bearing Charles, shipcarpenter, dwl 439 First 
Bears John H , bootblack, SW cor Third and How 

ard, dwl Welch 
Bearwald Beniamin, metermaker with M. Dobrzen- 

skv. dwl 528 Tehama 
Bearwald George, furniture wagon, cor Fourth and 

Mission, dwl 115 Dora 
Bearwald Henry, metermaker with M. Dobrzensky, 

dwl .528 Tehama 
Bearwald Louis, drayman, dwl .5281 Tehama 
Bearwald Tobias, furs, 106 Kearny, dwl 528^ Te- 
hama 
Beaslev William, laborer, dwl 7 Kent 
Bealh J. M., dwl Anieritan Exchange Hotel 
Beaton Angus, shipcarpenter, dwl 17 Perry 
Beaton John J., shipcarpenter with T. Bigley & Co , 

dwl 17 Perry 
Beaton Norman, laborer, Golden Gate Sugar lle- 

linery, dwl 151 Polk 
Beaton Peter, shipcarpenter, dwl 17 Perry 
Beatiie David J., carpenter, dwl 116 Perry 
Beattie James O., shipcarpenter, dwl 56l)i Natoma 
Beatty Hugh, hackdi'iver with Boutou & Sou, dwl 

1128 Stockton 
Beatty James, laborer, dwl N s Brannan nr Ninth 
Beatty John, miner, dwl 1414 Howard nr Tenth 
Beattv John J., paints, oils and wallpaper, and 

painter, 140 Third, dwl 408 Minna 
Beatty L., dwl What Cheer House 
Beattv Patrick, mattresstnaker with N. P. Cole & 

Co., dwl 531 O'Farrell 
Beatty Samuel, bootmaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 109 Oak 
BEATTY SAMUEL G. Jn., (Gunnison Sr B.) 

attorney at law, office 604 Merchant, dwl SE cor 

Mason and Ellis 
Beauchamp Fred., laborer with Kohler, Chase & 

Co., dwl 77 Natoma 
Beauchamp Julia Mrs., dwl 1151 Folsom 
Beauchamp Onesime, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearuy . , ,, • o 

Beanchemi'n Hypolyte, amalgamator with Morns & 

White, dwl 503 Greenwich 
Beauharnais S. A. (widow) dwl NE cor Broad- 
way and Dupont 
Beanjardin Theodore, teacher music, dwl 823 Bdwy 
Beanman Charles, milkman, nr Odd Fellows' 

Cemetery 
Beaumont Henry, attorney at law and land agent, 

office 712 Montiromery, dwl Brooklyn Hotel 
Beaumont W. H.," carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny t, -^ t. h- 

Beauregard Napoleon, machinist. Pacihc KoUing 

Mill, dwl SE cor Shasta and Michigan 
Beaut is E. H., dwl What Cheer House 
Beautie Adolph, dwl W s Valencia nr Seventeenth 
Beautiger Mary, (widow) dwl E s Mission nr 

Nineteenth ^ ,„ r, 

Beavens John, laborer S. S. Idaho, N. P. Trans. Co. 
Beaver George W., mining, office 414 Calitornia 
Beaver Samuel E., assistant cashier U. S. Assistant 

Treasurer's office, dwl 14 Geary . 

Beaver Thomas W., passenger agent Michigan 

Central R. R., office 422 California 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Sewing and Embroidering Silks. 



TJSB COOPER'S BA.I1M for Dysentery, and all Diseases of the Stomach and Bowels. 



92 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Beban Bocco, reetauiant, SE corner Broadway and 

DnponI, 
Beccom William, bostler Omnibus R. R., dwl 308 

MiniiH 
Becbei- Henry, cook Russ House, dwl S s Ash bet 

Liigiiiia and Buchanan 
Becberer Chiirles K., compositor Abend Post, dwl 

ISiet,'fried'8 Hotel 
BeclilerJdsepli, packer -with Deming, Palmer & Co., 

dwl G21 California 
Beclitel Jacob, tinsmith with E. Boesch, dwl 909 

Keiirny 
Beclitel Mary, Mrs., dressmaker, 835 Clay 
Becbtel Max', bookkeeper, dwl 835 Clay 
Beck A., cariman, 16 Es'erett 

Beck Adolpbus G., accountant and teacher of book- 
keeping, 432 Montgomery 
Beck Andrew P., mariner, dwl 156 Steuart 
Beck Anthony H., musician, dwl 81)7 Union 
Beck August, cook, dwl S 6 Francisco nr Stock- 
ton 
Beck Carl, dyer Pioneer Woolen Mills, dwl Bay 

nr Van Ness Avenue 
Beck David L., merchandise broker, dwl 18 Stanly 

Phice 
Beck David L. Jr., clerk with Jones & Co.. dwl 18 

Stanly Place 
Beck Eugene B., dwl 310 Mason 
Beck Eugene B., salesman with Jones & Co., dwl 

N s Jessie bet Seventh and Eighth 
Beck Francis E., clerk with A. G. Beck, dwl 432 

Montgomery 
Beck Frederick, tanner with John F. King, dwl SE 

cor Foisom and Eighteenth 
Beck George, machinist, Union Iron Works, dwl 

510 Howard 
Beck Hans S., r.6ecA; <e Kaiser) dwl 1618 Powell 
Beck Henry, ( Dietk & B.) dwl 28 O'Fanell 
Beck Jacob, bricUlayer, dwl N s Seventeenth bet 

Guerrero and Dolores 
Beck James G., painter, dwl 351 Jessie 
Beck John, brewer, Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 228 

Second 
Beck Jolin, shoecutter with Orrin Jones, dwl 636 

Mission 
Beck Mury, (colored) (widow) dwl E s Spear bet 

JliKsion and Howard 
Beck NichoLis P., local policeman and boarding and 

lodging, l56Steuait 
Beck Peter, groceries and liquors, SW cor Eleventh 

and Mission 
Beck Rebecca Mrs., dwl 130 Second, lear 
Beck Eicliiird F., mariner, dwl J 56 Steuart 
Beck William, shoemaker with J. G. Werlin, dwl 

1411 Stockton 
Beck William, tinsmith with James Armstrong, dwl 

NE cor Spear and Howard 
Beck William J., cook, Grand Restaurant, dwl 8 

Lick Alley 
Beck & Kaiser, (Hans S. Beck and G. A. Kaiser J 

j)Listereis, 300 Sutter 
Becke George, messenger with Hope, McKillop & 

Co., dwl N s Post bet Powell and Stockton 
Beckedoitf Chiislian C, packer, dwl 38 Russ 
Beckedortf George H. C., cigars and tobacco, SE 

cor Kearny and Merchant, dwl 38 Russ 
Beckenbongh Sarah Mrs., teacher, dwl 220 Third 
Becker Albeit, laborer, new U. S. Branch Mint, 

dwl 742 Foisom 
Becker August, silversmith with Koehler & Ritter, 

620 Merchant 
BECKER B. ADOLPH, Havana ciuars and tobacco, 

600 Montgomery, dwl 808 California 
Becker Caspar, carriage trimmer, 733 Mission, dwl 

466 Tehama 
Becker Charles, clerk with Duden Freree, dwl 706 

California 
Becker Charles, shipcarpeuter, dwl New Atlantic 

Hotel 



Becker Charles, tanner, dwl 210 San Bruno Road 

cor Twenty-Eighth 
Becker Charles H., clerk with John Kahrs, dwl 124 

First 
Becker Christiansen, baker with E. A. Eugelbei'g, 

dwl 136| Shipley 
Becker Diedrich, liquor saloon, SE cor Drumra and 

Pacific 
Becker Frank, porter, 220 Sansome, dwl 435 Pine 
Becker Frederick W., cigars and tobacco, 705 

Diivis 
Becker FrederickW., sawyer with City PavingCc, 

dwl 12^ Harriet 
Becker George, liquors and cigars, 1321 Stockton, 

dwl 630 Green 
Becker George J., caterer, dwl 436 Bush 
Becker Gustav, with Fenkhausen & Gerichten, 

dwl 275 Stevenson 
Becker Henry, f Becker dc Jacohy) dwl 348 Third 
Becker Joseph, crockery, 227 Dnpont 
Becker Jost, special policeman, dwl Hinckley Place 
Becker Julius G., porter, 221 California, dwl Conti- 
nental Hotel 
Becker Louis, baker with Wm. Hessler, dwl 715 

Pacitic 
Becker M., (Becker & Aiders J divil SE cor Mission 

and Fremont 
Becker Mary, saleswoman with B. Stumpf, dwl 226 

Pacilic 
Becker Nicolaus, porter with Rothschild & Ehrenp- 

fort, dwl NE cor O'Farrell and Gough 
Becker Otto F., f Bitter & B.J dwl Prescott House 
Becker Peter, baker, SE cor Dupont and Berry 
Becker Peter, shoemaker, 1105 Dupont, dwl 515 

Green 
Becker William, basketmaker, dwl 129 Morton 
Becker \<\l\\a.m,( Becker & Co.) dwl NW cor Mis- 
sion and Spear 
Becker & Ahlers, (M. Becker and Louis AhlersJ 

house and sign painters, SE cor Fremont and 

Mission 
Becker & Co., (William Becker and Peter Miller J 

groceries and liquors, NW cor Mission and 

Spear 
Becker &, Jacobv (Henry Becker and Julius Jaco- 
hy) dry goods, 348 Third 
Beckers J. Henry, (Kahrs Sf B.) dwl SE cor 

Geary and Larkin 
Beckett Solomon, (colored) cook, dwl 14 Freelon 
Beckhuseu Henry G., clerk with John C. Droge, 

dwlSW cor Washington and Stockton 
Beckler Conrad, baker, dwl 149 Shipley, rear 
Beckler John C, (Baumeister & Co.) dwl Shipley 

bet Fifth and Sixth 
Beckley Absalom, laborer, dwl SW cor Ninth and 

Jessie 
Beckman Enos, clerk with Richard Draper, dwl 

NE cor Eleventh and Natoma 
Beckniiin Frederick, cabinetmaker, dwl NE cor 

Polk and Hayes 
Beckman John N., (Beckman & Wahden) dwl N s 

Minna nr Ninth 
Beckman William, clerk with Matthias Wilkins,- 

dwl NEcor Chestnut and Mason 
Beckman &L\\-A\\den,( Jokn N. Beckman and Henry 

T. WahdenJ groceries and liquors, NE cor 

Ninth and Minna 
Beckmann Jacob, siiowcase maker,with Teubner &. 

Hoffman, dwl Philadelphia House 
Beckmann John, groceries and liquors, NE cor 

Geary and William 
Beckwith E. G. Rev., pastor Second Congrega- 
tional, Taylor nr Geary 
Beckwith Elliot S., ship carpenter with Joseph Gil- 
man, dwl 532 Commercial 
Beckwith James R., driver S. F. Transfer Co., dwl 

350 Jessie 
Beckwith John W., policeman City Hall, dwl 565 

Tehama 



Keep California Capital in California, insure in the "PEOPLES. 



C. P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712. 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Hats and Caps. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



93 



Beckwitli Setli L., boatbuilder, dvvl S b Hayes nr 

PoUc ^ „- , 

Bedell William, inacliinist, Vulcan Iron Works, 
dwl E s Mission Av bet Seventeenth and Light- 
eenth -..r i 

Bedford J, deck hand steamer Santa Cruz, Wasli- 

iiifftoii St wharf 
Bedfonl .John, mate S. S. Idaho, N. P. Trans. Co 
Bee S. Lonise Mrs., adjuster U. S. B. Mint, dwl 

1J07 Stockton 
Bee. Sing & Co., (Chinese) cigar manufacturers, 

607 Dupont 
Bee Theodore C, messenger Mayor's Office, dwl 

5:28 l{roadway 
Beebe George W., with Cutting & Co., dwl bd-i 

Minna , 

Beebe 11. F., patternmaker Risdon Iron Works, 

dwl 71 Natoiiia 
Beebe R H , broker, dwl Orleans Hotel 
Beebe William S., packer with Cutting tfc Co., dwl 

1G12 Bush 
Beebee Roland, dentist, dwl 71 Natoma 
Beeching Robert, aujeut Califorina Prison Commis- 
sion, office 30-2 Montiiomery, dwl lOIC Taylor 
Beecroft John T., machinehand with Miller & 

Haley, dwHfi Zoe 

Beedy W'. T., carpenter, H. C. Leasrue 128 Kearny 

BEEHIVE BUILDING, NE cor Washington and 

Dupont •■on 

Beeke Frank, upholsterer with Mitchell & Bell, 

dwl I3i Sutter 
Beeke Henrv, wilder, dwl 417 Sutter 
Beeknum Charles W., mariner, dwl 49 Sacramento 
Beeler Jacob, laborer, dwl "21 Jnnsen 
Beetnan J. H.. (widow) dwl 1309 Mason 
Been Martin, longshoreman, dwl 'iti Rich 
Beenken Emilie Mrs., matron Thiele's Hospital, 7b2 

Beer Gotleib, bookkeeper with "Weil «& Co., dwl 1020 

Lark in 
Beer Julius, f Weil & Co.) res New York 
Beennan Henry, cooper, dwl W s Janseu bet Lom- 
bard &, Greenwich 
Beers Bariit, dentist with John B. Beers, dwl 4,17 

Tyler 
Beers; Blair & Mavnard, (Herbert M. Beers, La- 
fayctte Blnir and Duncan D. Mui/nardjmnua- 
factnrers and retail boots and shoes, 238 Kearny 
and 720 Market 
Beers Herbert M., (Beers, Blair & Maynard) dwl 

716 Howard 
BeersJohnB., dentist, office 109 Montgomery, dwl 

437 Tyler 
Beeson Frederick P., drayman with J. M. Goewey 

& Co., dwl 714 O'Farrell 
Beetman Henry, carpenter, dwl 530 Folsom 
Beevan Is^aac, 'porter with Schoufeld and Bremer, 
421 Sacramento , , ,^ t^ , 

Beez August, baker with John Fisk, dwl37 Rausch 
Beez Frederick, (Beez & De LongeJ dwl 708 Pine 
Beez &. de Longe, (Frederick Beez and John B. De 

LoncreJ shoemakers, 315 Bush 
Beggs Harry, bookkeeper S. F. Gas Co., dwl 33o 

O'Farrell 
BegKS James, engineers. F. Gas Co., dwl bU8 Post 
Beggs Jolin, hostler with George Eggleton, dwl 616 

Battery 
Begins Thomas, laborer, dwl 122 "William 
Begis Tlmnias, laborer with S. F. Gas Co. 
Begiev Michael, molder Miners' Foundry, dwl W s 

Siierman bet Seventeenth and Eighteenth 
Begley Peter, laborer, dwl U. S. Hotel 
Begly Honora, cloakmaker with Lesser Lezynsky, 

dwl 546 Mission 
Beglv James, laborer, dwl 132 Folsom, rear 
Begiie Bidau Joseph, real estate, dwl 924 Dnpont 
Beguelin Henry, machinist, dwl 154 Tehama 
Begnhl Adolph, house and sign painter, dwl 120 
Ellis 



Beham Charles, compositor Evening Bulletin, dwl 

Branch House 
Behau Dennis, ( Bchnn Sf Earrohl) dwl 803 Howard 
Beban James G., compositor Evening Bulletin, dwl 

Branch House 
Behau John, butcher with James Nelson 
Belmn Jolin, compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 1006 

Dupont 
Behau N., dravman, lis Post „ , ,o 

Behan Peter, laborer Front St. M. & O. R. R.,dwl b 

s Bush bet Polk and Van Ness Avenue 
Behan Thomas H., conductor Central Railroad 
Behau Timothy, barkeeper with Behan & Harrold, 
dwl 807 Howard , , , t,^ 

Behan & Harrold, (Dennis Behan and John W. 
Harrold) liquor saloons, S W cor Fourth and 
Howard, and 771 Market 
Behlow Charles 3.,(H. Liebcs & Co.) dwl SIO I) il- 

bert . . 

Behui Fenton, real estate, dwl 1233 Mission 
Behu Walter, bookkeeper with T.iylor & Bendel, 

dwl 632 Broadway 
Behnemann Henry, clerk with John Horstmann.dwl 

N W cor Basil and Powell 
Behiike Albert, mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 
Behnken John, expressman, dwl Park Lane 
Behr Herman H., physician, office 646 Market, dwl 

646 Bryant ,.,., ^ ■ 

Behr John." clerk with Nicholas Bruns, 617 Dav;s 
Behr Otto, porter with Henry Brickwedel & Co., 

dwl 213 Minna 
Behre Francis, tinsmith, dwl E s Larkm nr Turk 
Behre Frederick, driver with Lewis Heutrich, dwl 

SE cor Turk and Lark in 
Behre Robert L., clerk, dwl E s Larkm nr Turk 
Behrend John, mariner, dwl 7 Washington 
Behrends D., workman California Sugar Refinery, 

cor Bryant and Eii.'lith 

Behrendt H. & Co., (Michael Lorn;) trunkmakers, 

factory, King bet Third and Fourth, salesroom 

16 Sansom , , , ,.i.-i 

Behrendt Herman, (H. Behrendt & Co.) dwl 1432 

Pine omi • J J 1 

Behrens George H., cigars and tobacco, 3 1 bird, dwl 

970 Harrison 
BEHRENS H. C. F., physician, office 8 Stockton, 

dwl 235 Seventh . . 

BEHRENS JAMES, importer wines and commission 

merchant, office 405 Battery, dwl 89 Chesuut 
Behrens John, boatman, dwl 3J Jackson 
Behrens John, cabinetmaker with George B. May & 

Behrens Joseph, groceries and liquors, SE cor Polk 
and Turk 

Behrens, . See Berrins 

Behrmau F. E., carpenter, dwl 115 Morton 
Behrniann Frederick, (Bchrmann & Beisser) dwl 

336 Third 
Behrmanu John H., cabinetmaker, dwl 12 1 erry 
Behrmann Mary Mrs, midwife, dwl 12 Perry 
Behrmann &. Beisser, (Frederick Behrmann and 

Richard Beisser) b.ikery, 336 Tliud 
Bebriis Henry, carpenter, dwl 120o Dupont 
Beicher Albert, dwl 54!t Howard 
Beier Henry, clerk with Caspar Di.x, dwl NL cor 

Fillmore and Filbert 
Beigle George, clerk with Schlueter & Volberg, 

dwl 823 Folsom 
Beine John, laborer Golden Gate Sugar Rehnery 
Beinert David, boots and shoes, N s Sixteenth 

bet Valencia and Mission 
Beirne Bartholomew, proprietor First Street House, 

SE cor First and Mission _ 

BEIRNE PATRICK, proprietor Empire Hotel, .ill 

313 Pacific . -,. 

Beisel Jacob, tannery, NW cor Mariposa and Mis- 
sissippi, dwl Santa Clara nr Carolina 
Beisiegel Andrew J., waiter, dwl 32 R ' ".^ch 
Beisser Richard, (Behrmann & B.) dwl 33b Third 



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JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sanaom Street, Best Paper and Linen CoUars. 



YSBSA. SANTA is suitable for all ages and both sexes. 



94 



SAN FRANCISCO [ B ] DIRECTORY 



Beita John, boardinj,' lioiise, 532 Vallejo 

Beittes Jolii), liaiidresser with FraiUv Lacua, dwl 

8:^8 VVasiiiuKtou 
Bekeart Philip, hardware, 305 Third 
Btla Felix, iron sliiitterinaker, dwl 17 Lewis 
lielaco Ahiaham. merchant, dwl 853 Harrison 
Belaudo Peter, (Bclando dr Co.) dwl 1210 Powell 
Beliiudo (St Co., ( I'eler Belaudo 4' Manuel MorllcJ 

wood and coal, l^'IO Powell 
Belasquev J., grocer, 13:i0 Dupont 
Belcher Elizaheth B., (widow) dwl 34 Welsh 
Belcher Frederick P., dravniaii, 318 Baitery, dwl 

1013 Union 
Belcher Robert H., expresswagon, 536 California, 

dwl 1015 Union 
Belcher S. M. Co., (Gold Hill, Nev.j office 419 

California 
Belcour Jules, chancellor with Consul General of 

France, dwl S s Grove nr Octuvia 
Belden Block, SW cor Montgomery and Bush 
Belden Heniy K., bookkeeper Hartford Fire Ins. 

Co., dwl x!l(j Stockton 
Belden Joseph W., bookkeeper Odd Fellows Saving 

Bank, dwl 10;iO Geary 
Belden Orin, millwright, dwl 105 Mason 
Beldon Emma, ladies' and childreus' undergarments, 

ii'-i Geary 
Belduke Joseph, carriagemaker, dwl 411 Clemen- 
tina 
Belender Charles, foreman varnishers with George 

O. Whitney &. Co., dwl 5 Mason 
Belew Thomas, porter Grand Hotel 
Bellils George, laborer with G. Venard, dwl S s 

Union bet Dupont and Stockton 
Beltils Peter, porter with G. Venard, dwl 625 

Front 
Belgrave Richard B., receiver N. B. & M. R. R., 

dwl 302 O'Farrell 
Belhomme Frank, tin and coppersmith, dwl 1530 

Stockton 
Belinge F. A. A., resident physician St. Mary's 

Hospital 
Belknap David P., {Winana & £.) attorney at 

law, office 604 JVIerchant, dwl 502 Powell 
Bell Alexander D., secretary Pacitic Pneumatic 

Gas Co., office 206 Sansoiu, dwl 1 102 Taylor 
Bell Amory F.. {Mitchell 4- B.} dwl S s Sacramento 

bet Sieiner & Pierce 
Bell August, waiter S. S. Orifiamme, North Pac 

Trans. Co 
Bell Charles, carpenter with Packard, Knapton & 1 

Co., dwl 15 Second ' 

Bell Ciiarles, waiter Grand Hotel 
Bell Daniel P., bookkeeper, dwl Ns Fern Avenue 

nr Van Nets Avenue 
Bell Eliza, (widow) dwl 325 Ritch 
Bell F. Vinton, clerk with Patterson & Stow 
Bell G. Henry, carrier Guide, dwl 1014 Post 
Bfll George, (colored) dwl 1007 Pacific 
Bell George H., (Bell & Co.) dwl 1014 Post 
Bell Henry, dwl 524 Turk 
Bell Henry, plumber and gasfitter with Root & 

Nye, dwl 231 Sutter 
Bell Henry H., coumiission agent, dwl 782 Harrison 
Bell James, gasfitter, dwl 231 Sutter 
BELL JAMES, [Faulkner, B. & Go.) resides 

Loudon 
Bell James H., (colored) hairdresser, dwl Ankeny 

Place nr Powell 
Bell James R., propertvman, dwl Bella Union 

Theater 
Bell John, driver N. B. & Mission R. R., dwl 829 

Folsom 
Bell John, plumber with P. R. O'Brien, dwl 15 

Second 
Bell John, shipjoiner, Shipjoiners' Association Ex- 
celsior Hall 
Bell John, (Bell& Wendt) dwl E s Jones bet Clay 

and Sacramento 



Bell John, [Plum, B. & Co. J dwl Occidental Hotel 
BELL JOHN C, carpets, upholstery and funii- 

tuie, warei'ooms 524 Market and 2'l Sutter, dwl 

502 Greenwich 
Bell John C. Jr., clerk with John" C. Bell, dwl 502 

Greenwich 
Bell John P., attorney at law, office 411 1 Cal, dwl 

808 Taylor 
Bell John W., carpenter, dwl 14 Virginia 
Bell John W., clerk overland dept Wells, Fargo & 

Co., dwl 50S Third 
Bell Joseph W., clerk Lick House 
Bell Lucy J., (widow) dwl 1061 Market 
Bell Mary, (widow) dwl 715 Lombard 
Bell Peter, piiinter with T. P. Jones, dwl 163 Jessie 
Bell Peter, tinsmith, dwl N 8 Fern Avenue nr Van 

Ness Avenue 
Bell Peter C, tinsmith with P. D. Code & Co., dwl 

Coso House 
BELL PHILIP A., (colored) editor and proprietor 

Elevator, office and d\\\ 616 Battery 
Bell Richard, clerk with Alexander Cainpbell, dwl 

cor Gough and Rose 
Bell Samuel L., carpenter, dwl 263 Third 
Bell Sarah E., (widow) glovemaker,dwl 639 Markt 
Bell Thomas, longshoreman, dwl SW cor Gilbert 

and Bryant 
Bell Thomas, porter, 114 Sansom, dwl 27 Ransch 
Bell Thomas, {Barron & Co.) dwl 606 Stockton 
Bell William, (colored) bootblack with John J. 

Hyyden, dwl Prospect Place 
Bell Williiim, engineer Risdon Iron Works 
Bell William, lahoier, dwl 17 Welsh, rear 
Bell William, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl N s 

Shasta nr Illinois 
Bell William, plumber with J. H. O'Brien & Co 
Bell William, porter with Cutting &. Co., dwl 141 

Natoma 
Bell William, sliipcarpenter, dwl S s Gilmore nr 

Kentucky 
Bell William, sliipcarpenter, dwl N s Greenwich 

bet Polk and Van Ness Avenue 
Bell William, stonecutter New U. S. B. Mint, 

dwl 728 Market 
Bell William A., conductor N. B. &i. M. R. R., dwl 

419 Pine 
Bell William H., dwl 264^ Tehama 
Bell William H., laundryman with S. F. Laundry 

Association, dwl NW cor Turk and Fillmoi-e 
Bell William H., inspector stamps, office 321 Califor- 
nia, dwl W s Valencia bet Sixteenth and Seven- 
teenth 
Bell Zadog F., nurse, dwl 407 Third 
Bell & Co., ( George H. Bell J booksellers, stationers, 

and nev^sdealers, 337 Kearnv 
Bell & Wendt, rJolm Bell und Charles E. WendlJ 

sailmakers, 25 and 27 Market 
Bella Union Theater, Samuel Tetlow proprietor, 

803 and 8(15 Kearny 
Bellaiider Eiric, silversmith with Koehler ARitter, 

dwl 31 Virginia 
Bellanger Joseph, liquor saloon, 536 Merchant 
Bellars William S., extramau steamer No. 4 S. F. 

F. D., dwl Engine House W s Sec nr Howard 
Belle Cherry, actress, dwl 818 Pacific 
Belle Edward, dentist, office and dwl 408 Pine 
Belle H., market, 1524 Broadway 
Belle- Vue House, Mrs. Ann S. Belleau proprietress. 

1018 Stockton 
Belleau Ann S. Mrs., proprietress Belle-Vue House, 

1018 Stockton 
Bellemere August, (Frontier & Co.) dwl HI Powell 
Bellemere Lewis, dwl 1163 Mission 
Bellermann Emile, bookkeeper Bavaria Brewery, 

dwl 5 Kent 
Bellet Joseph, shoemaker with P. Rosenzweig, dwl 

407 Pacific 
Bellet Louis, carpenter with B. & J. S. Doe, dwl 10 

Commercial 



THE PEOPLES INSURANCE CO. insures against Fire and Marine hazards. 



C. p. VAN" SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 718 Kearny Street, Tobacco and Cigars. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



95 



Bellew James H., upholsterer with Goodwin & Co., 

(Iwl 17 Ohio 
Bellew Jolin, boardinj,', 17 Ohio 
Belliiitaiite Anita Miss, shirtfinisher, dwl 112 Shipley 
Bellinfiinte Eliza, (widow) shiitiiiiiaher, dwl 112 

Shiplev 
Bellin«all iPeter W., deputy U. S. Sars-eyor port San 

Friim-isco. les OaUiaiid 
BELLINGHAM BAY COAL CO., Rincou Wharf, 

Spear bet Folsoin and Harrison 
Belliiigham Hobert, slioeniaker, dwl N s Vallejobet 

Leaveuworth and Hyde 
Bellisle FiaiiU N., foreman Southern Pacific R. R., 

dwl Sixteenth bet Folsom and Howard 
Bellman Vincent, laborer S. F. Cordage Factory, 

dwl S s Teniiefsee iir Shasta 
Bellnier Frederick, liquors, dwl S s Natoma nr Ninth 
Belhiier Henry, driver with John Prinz, dwl S 8 

Natouia nr Ninth 
Bellmer John H. C, (Fletcher & B.) dwl SE cor 

Sacriimento and Leidesdorff 
Bellmere Mine, astrologer, dwl 742 Market 
Belliiow Louis, e-xtrainan steamer No. 3, S. F. F. D., 
dwl Engine House, S s Sutter bet Jones and 
Leavenworth 
Belloc Benjamin, (Belloc FriresJ res Paris 
BELLOC FliKliES, (Irenee and Bcujatmn) bank- 
ers, .'3~4 Montgomery 
Belloc Irenee, (Belloc FrereaJ res Paris 
Bellof J;icol), laborer Broadway Brewery, dwl 637 

Broadway 
Belloly Joseph A., butcher, dwl E s Potrero Av 

nr Santa CLira 
Bellov Peter, in;iiiner, dwl 39 Pacific 
Bellows E. St. Jolui, assistant bookkeeper U. S. As- 
sistant Treasurers Otfice, dwl 28 Stanly Place 
Bellows Henry, clerk, dwl 28 Stanly Place 
Bells v., laborer, dwl 1316 Dupont 
Bellstedt John, engineer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl \V 8 Decatur nr Bryant 
Beloiio Victorian!) B., bootblack with Jacobs and 

-Busse, dwl 3175 Union 
Belou Michael, tailor, dwl 1317 Kearny 
Belshaw Moninier W., mining, dwl 109 Mont 
Bell A. M., freight clerk S. S. California, N. P. 

Transport;! tion Company 
Bellon Philip M., clerk S. F. & P. Sugar Refinery, 

dwl 19 Hanison Avenue 
Belus Frederick A., stevedore. Lumber Stevedore's 

Association. Barra's Hall 
Beliizzi, Peiraiio & Co., fPietro Beluzzi, Barto- 
lomeo Fiiifino, and G. BarrillariJ proprietors 
Hotel de Itiilico, 723 Sansom 
Beluzzi Pietro, (Beluzzi, Peirano Sf Co.) dwl 723 

Sausom 
Belville Eli, broommaker with Van Laak & Gules- 
pie, dwl 272 Teliauia 
Beman JL E. Mrs., clairvoyant physician, office 

128 Kearny 
Beniis Charles C, U.S. Inspector Boilers, office, 

room 11 U. S. Court building, dwl 449 Bryant 
Bemus James, with California Powder Works Co., 

dwl 6U9 Pine 
Ben Franklin, Homestead Association, office 27 

Merchants Excliaiige 
BENARD AUGUSTE F., wines and liquors, NE 

cor Fifth and Howard, dwl 262 Tehama 
Benchley Frederick P., bookkeeper Pacific Oil and 

Lead Works, dwl 1019 California 
BENCHLEY L. B., vice president Pacific Rolling 

Mill Co., office 3 Front, dwl 1019 California 
Bencing John, shoemaker with Charles Lester, 12 

Steuart 
Bend Charles, hatter, dwl 347 Minna 
Bendel Ernest, cook Russ House, dwl 30 Clemen- 

Bendel Hermann, ( Taylor Sf- B.J dwl 1024 Stock- 
ton 
Bender A. W. clerk, dwl New Atlantic Hotel 



Bender Charles, importer and dealer leather and 

shoe linilings. 114 Sutter 
Bender Christopher, watchman S. F. Stock Brew- 
ery, dwl 1 Chestnut alley 
Bender Jacob A., I)ricklayer, dwl 1413 Clay 
Bender Joseph, bricklayer. Bricklayers Association, 

Y'oung .Mens Chrisiiau Association Hall 
Bender Josiah P., bricklayer, dwl 40 Clarice Place 
Bendit Benno, hairdresser with J. Brougham, dwl 

1019 Dupont 
Bendit Henry, fire mai-shal policeman, dwl 1019 

Dupont 
Bendit Isaac, peddler, dwl 533 Tehama 
Bendit Morris, e.xpresswagon, NE cor Montgomery 

and California, dwl 6J8 Stevenson 
Bendit Samuel, furniture, 1019 Dupont, dwl 1025 

Dupont 
Benedict Adolph, grocer, dwl 34C Third 
Benedict Charles V., porter with Kline & Co., dwl 

20 Sansom 
Benedict Clarence W., clerk with Sumner Whit- 
ney, dwl SE cor Howard and Sixteenth 
Benedict C. S., (Benedict Jr Co.) dwl W s Val- 

entiabet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Benedict H , wagon. McAllister nr Laguna 
Benedict Jacob, refiner, S. F. Assaying and Refin- 
ing Works, dwl W a Castro bet Fifteenth and 
Sixteenth 
Benedict Newton, patent agent, office 207 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 305 Sixteenth 
Benedict Salome Miss, artist with William Shew, 

dwl 212 Second 
Benedict William A., shipbroker, dwl 20 Sansom 
Benedict & Co., fO. S. Benedict) gents furnishing 

goods, 3 Second 
Beueke Bros., (Bicdrich <& .John) groceries and 

liquors, SW Bryant and Downey 
Beueke Diedrich, clerk wiih H. Cornahrens, dwl 

NE cor Howard and Sixth 
Beneke Diedrich, f Beueke Bros.) dwl SW cor Bry- 
ant and Downey 
Beneke John, ^-B6'/icA;eJS/-os.; dwl SW cor Bryant 

and Downey 
Bene Ugh Bernard, waiter, dwl 861 Folsom 
Benfeldt Conrad, boatman, dwl 9 Cook 
Beuham Calhoun, attorney at law, office SW cor 

Jackson and Sansom 
Benham J., deck hand steamer Santa Cruz, Wash- 
ington St. Wharf 
Benham J. A., mail agent, dwl American Exchange 

Hotel 
BENICIA CEMENT CO., George F. Bragg & 

Co., agents, office 116 Front 
Bening Henry, waiter, 8 Kearny, dwl 618 Cali- 
fornia -1, J I 
Benitas Theodore, bootblack with Jacob Streib, dwl 

1332 Dupont 
Benitz Frank J., clerk, 334 Montgomery, res Oak- 
land 
Benjamin Asber, employee Occidental Hotel 
Benjamin Carrie V. Miss, principal Powell Street 

Primary School, dwl 1107 Stockton 
Benjamin Edward C, carpentfer California Mills, 
dwl 222 Post ^ ^ , . „ , , 

Benjamin F. Miss, teacher Pine and Larkm School, 

dwl 32 Jessie . 

Benjamin Frederick A., mining superintendent 

White Pine, dwl 737 Harrison 
Benjamin H. A., real estate, dwl Russ House 
Benjamin Henry, (Bavis <Sb B.) dwl 34 Harriet 
BENJAMIN JACOB, Public Administrator City 
and County S. F., office 430 Cal, dwl 1 145 Mission 
Benjamin Joseph, peddler, dwl E s Laskie nr Mis- 
sion „ ■> , ax 

Benjamin Moses H., clerk County Recorder s office, 
dwl 1145 Mission . 

Benjamin Thaddeus, clerk with Jacob Benjamin, 
dwl 1145 Mission . > % -^ 1 

Benjamin William K., clerk, dwl 32 Jessie .-'^ j9 



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JONES, PUIiliMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, White Goods. 



KEDINGTOK KOSTETTER & CO., Importers Choice Fancy Goods, Perfumery, etc, etc 



Beiikelmanti Adam, liquor saloon, dwl W s Potrero 

iir Alameda 
Benn George, teamster with James Dunn, dwl 117 

Bernard 
Benn James, malster Hibernia Brewery, dwl 209 

Eijihth 
Benn Mary A., (widow) dwl SE cor Sumner and 

Clementina 
Benn Thomas, malster Hibernia Brewery, dwl 209 

Eightli 
Benn Walter C, macliinist, dwl 177 Perry 
Benneciie Rohei't, mariner, dwl 46 Steu irt 
Benner Fredericlc M., raeiter U. S. Branch Mint, 

res Oal\land 
BENNEli GEORGE L., boatbuilder, S s Howard 

het Spear and Stenart, dwl 324 Beile 
Beunersclieidt Bruno, br.isslinisher with M. Dobr- 

zensky, dwl 43(3 Bush 
Bennet Cinirles A., clerk with H. W. Bennet, dwl 

NE cor Third and Stevenson 
Bennet Geor^re F., siioemaker with Thomas Mill- 

aret, dwl 504 P;u-i[ic 
BENNET HENRY W., druys and medicines, 21 

Tliird, dwl NEeor Third and Stevenson 
Bennett Abraham, clerk, bl9 Sacramento, dwl 913 

Sacramento 
Bennett Alfred, f Bennett & Co.) dwl 512 Sixth 
Bennett Alfred E., sashmaker with D. A. Macdonald 

&L Co., dwl 1119 Leavenworth 
Bennett Alfred W., (colored) porter, dwl 1006 

Washington 
Bennett A. M., carpenter, H. C. Leajjue, 128 Kearny 
Bennett Anthony, "jDldbeater with George W. Eog- 

eis, dwl cor Mission and Seventli 
BENNETT A. P., agent S. B. Whipple, office 313 

Mission 
Bennett Charles D., teacher penmanship Heald's 

Business Collet,'e, dwl lOJSj Folsoni 
Bennett Edward, bookkeeper, dwl 23 Kearny 
Bennett Edward D., stamper with A. L. Bancroft 

6 Co , dwl Folsom bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Bennett Frederick, stevedore, dwl 5 Welsh 
Bennett Geortre, barkeeper with Patrick Gerrity, 

dwl 651 Mission 
Benneit George, captiau schooner Lizzie Derby, dwl 

7 Washington 

Bennett (Teorge, painter, dwl 545 Mission 
Bennett George, waiter Wliat Cheer Restaurant 
Bennett George W., salesman, 100 Kearny, dwl 552 

Folsom 
Bennett George W., shoecutter with Orrin Jones, 

dwl 311 Pine 
Bennett Gilbert L., tinsmith with Brittan, Hol- 

brook & Co., dwl 1 Taylor Place 
Bennett H. C., U. S. Pension agent, and secretary 
Chinese Protection Society, office 423 Washing- 
ton, dwl 1108 Clay 
Bennett Henrietta Mrs., teacher music, dwl 512 Sixth 
Benneit Henry, (Bennett Sr Co.) dwl 512 Sixth 
Bennett Herbert W. , teacher music, dwl 225 Bush 
Bennett J., seaman S. S. Pacific N. P. Trans. Co 
Bennett James, dwl Adams House 
Bennett James, mariner, dwl 32 Stenart 
Bennett James C, fBeHnetl 4" C-J.y dwl Iowa nr 

Mariposa 
Bennett Jolin, machinist, dwl 19 Minna 
Bennett .John, mariner, dwl 32 Stenart 
Bennett John W., clerk Morning Call, dwl Folsom 

ur Twentieth 
Bennett Joseph, dock hand, Dry Dock, dwl Hunter's 

Point 
Bennett Alary E. Miss, assistant teacher Shotwell 
Street Grammar School, dwl Folsom bet Nine- 
teenth and Twentieth 
Bennett Maurice, laborer, dwl 1604 Bush 
Bennett Michael, shoemaker, 504 Commercial, dwl 

546 Bryant 
Bennett Miles W., bookkeeper U. S. ABsistaut Treas- 
urer's office, dwl 22 Hawthorne 



BENNETT NATHANIEL, attorney at law, office 

SW corner Montgomery and Clay, dwl 831 

Howard 
Bennett Oivin D., foreman with Miller & Haley, 

dwl 1 17 Hayes 
Bennett Peter B., lish dealer, 31 and 32 Washington 

Market, dwl 715 Vallejo 
BENNETT E. H. & CO., commission merchants, 

310 Davis 
Bennett Robert H., fR. N. Bennett ^ Co.) res 

Oakland 
Bennett Samuel, farmer, dwl 1336 Pacific 
Bennett Samuel Jr., bookkeeper with Louis Jaflfe, 

dwl 2017 Mi.-<sion 
Bennett Sophia S., (widow) furnished rooms, SW 

cor Stockton and Pine 
Bennett Stephen, laborer, dwl 533 Mission 
Bennett Thomas, painter with Donovan «& Haves 
BENNETT THOMAS, physiiian, office 17 Post, 

and Dean and Professorof Principles and Pi-ac- 

tice of Medicine, State University, dwl 716 Pine 
Bennett T. L., tinsmith, bds 33S Busli 
Bennett William, barkeeper Keystone House, 127 

Jackson 
Bennett William, real estate, dwl 512 Sixth 
Bennett William, shipjoiner, Shi pjoiners' Association, 

713 Mi.ssion 
Bennett William, (Bennett <Sk Gooksey) dwl NE 

cor Pacific and Montgomery 
Bennett & Co., (Henry and Alfred Bennett) plas- 
terers and whiteners, 225 Fifth 
Bennett & Co., (James C. Bennett and John Tay- 
lor) proprietors Pacific Glass Works, cor Iowa 

and Maiiposa. office 51 4 WashiuLrton 
BENNETT & COOKSEY, ( William Bennett and 

John Cookxey) liquors, 420 Pacific 
Benuing Henry, waiter, 626 Market, dwl 610 Cal 
Beurimo Joseph, dwl 745 Clay 
Bensabot Jacob, salesman, 431 Montgomery, dwl 51 

Jessie 
Bensau Conrad, with Brommer & Hollings, dwl cor 

Buchanan and Bay 
Beusen Henry, clerk with D. Brommer & Co., dwl 

NE cor Sixth and Bryant 
Bensintrer Daniel, dwl E s Howard nr Twentieth 
BEN.SLEY JOHN, President Pacific Oil and Lead 

Works Co., office 3 Front, dwl Grand Hotel 
Benson Andrew, longshoreman, dwl Sausom bet 

Greenwich and Filbert 
Benson Andrew, stevedore, Riggers' and Stevedores' 

Association, 42It Pacific 
Benson Benjamin C, pilot, dwl 1811 Leavenworth 
Benson Benjamin F. M., clerk with S. J. Clarke, 

Jr., dwl 3J3 Jessie 
Benson Charles A., captain schooner Cora, dwl 933 

Folsom 
Benson Elizabeth, (widow) ladies' nurse, dwl 310 

Minna 
Benson Henry, mariner, dwl 32 Stenart 
Benson Henry C. Rev., editor Califoinia Christian 

Advocate, office 71 1 Mission, res Santa Clara 
BENSON JAiMES, secretary Odd Fellows' Savings 

Bank, 325 Montgomery, dwl W s Sixth bet 

Brannan and Towusend" 
Benson James A., drayman, SE cor Drumm and 

Clay 
Benson James E., pressman Alta Job Office, dwl W 

8 Sixth bet Brannan and Tovvnsend 
Benson John, seaman, dwl 32 Stenart 
Benson John, shoemaker, dwl 32 Stenart 
Benson Paulns, mariner, dwl 22 Washington 
Benson S. Mrs., dwl 411 Powell 
Bent Charles, blacksmith Risdon Iron Works, dwl 

Main bet Howa.-d and Folsom 
Bent Cornelius, clerk, dwl 240 Fremont 
Bent Edward F., cashier with Pope & Talbot, dwl 

304 Third 
Bent James li., conductor Central R. R., dwl 108 

O'Farrell 



THE PEOPLES INSURANCE CO. the best California Insurance Co. 



C. P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Merchandise Brokers. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY, 



97 



Bent Jolni T., salesman with Hooker &. Co., dwl 
323 First 

Bent William, clerk, dwl 2 10 Fremont 

Beutliam Ileiiry, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 
30 Clt»tneiiiina 

Bentley H. , dwl Wiiat Cheer House 

Beutley Horace N., (colored) laborer, dwl 1006 
Washington 

Bentley James, shoemaker, 235 Sutter, rear 

BentlyRoliert Rev., pastor Central M. E. Church, 
dwl .531 Jessie 

Benton Helen, (widow) dwl E s Howard bet Twen- 
ty-tifth and Twenty-sixth 

Benton J. E. Mrs., teacher of drawing, South S. F. 
Grammar School 

Benton John E., accountant Custom House, res 
Oakland 

Benton Joseph A. Rev., Professor Biblical litera- 
ture. Pacific Theological Seminary, 502 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 1032 Pine 

Benton Marti u, driver with Brader Brothers 

Benz John, laborer National Mills, dwl 426 Clemen- 
tina 

Benz John C, clerk with J. H. Kessing, dwl 607 
Vallejo 

Benzen Harriet C, (widow) dwl SE cor Jones and 
Geary 

Beohm Nicholas, l:iborer, dwl 106 William 

Bepler Alexander, rectifier of spirits, dwl 129 Oak 

Beppler Jolin, market, SE cor Filbert and Dupont 

Beqnette Derville, millwrii(ht, 111 Stevenson 

Beran Emanuel, bootmaker, dwl 1620 Powell 

Berard F., laundry, 724 Filbert 

Beraud Brothers, (Felix and Louis) bakers, 
Third 

Beraud Felix, (Beraud Brothers J Awl 26 Third 

Bei-and Louis, (Beraud Bros.) dwl 26 Third 

Berbeiich August, waiter, 435 Pine 

Berdsoit Adam, fanner, dwl .522 Union 

Beresford John, storekeeper Rnss House 

Beretta Peter, machinist Union Iron Works 
109 Minna 

Beretta William B., collector Italian Benevolent 
Society, dwl 9U6 Vallejo 

Berg Bertha Miss, seamstress with H. L. Weil, dwl 
418 Clementina 

Berg Carl F., physician and surgeon, office aud dwl 
904 Keiirny 

Berg Diter, seaman, dwl 20 Commercial 

Berg Frederick, /^j¥r/ye/- 4- B.J dwl 225 Sixth 

Berg Hector, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 

Berg John A., laborer with I. C. Sorrenson, 14 
Drunim 

Berg Julius, shoemaker with Utschig & Hanson, 
dwl 5 Berry 

Berg Maurice A., gilder with M. D. Nile, dwl Gerke 
Alley bet Filbert and Greenwich 

Berg Peter, moulder, dwl 535 Howard, rear 

Bergametti Charles F. A., cook, dwl NW cor Clin- 
ton and Brannan 

Bergantz Peter, watchmaker, dwl 642 Filbert 

BEKGE ERICK O., groceries and liquors, NE cor 
Green and Calhoun 

Bergen Elizabeth, (widow) laundress New England 
Laundry, dwl N s Branuan bet Fifth and Sixth 

Bergen. — See Bergin 

Bergeiidahl Daniel, mariner, dwl 7 Washington 

Berger Frederick, machinist, dwl 12 Third 

Berger Julius, salesman with Edward Cohn, dwl 

627 Clay 
Bergerot John, private school, 738 Vallejo 
Berges John B., gardener, dwl Presidio Road nr 

Mountain Lake 
Berget Adolpli, knifegrinder, dwl 31 Morton 
BERGGREN AUGU.ST, dealer legal tender notes, 

336 Montgomery, dwl 1111 Stockton 
Berghauser's Building, W a Kearny bet Jackson 

and Pacific 
Berghofer Conrad, butcher, dwl 542 Folsom 



26 



dwl 



Bergholte William, beer saloon and billiards, NW 

cor Fourtli and Mission, dwl 317 Minna 
Bergin Ellen Miss, real estate, dwl 1520 Powell 
Bergin James J., soap manufacturer, SE tor Greeu 

and Powell 
Bergin John, laborer, dwl S s Sixteenth nr Channel 
Bergiu Michael, ( Bartlett & B.J attorney at, law, 

office 35 Montgomery Block, dwl 1009 Powell 
Bergin Thomas I., (McAllisters Jj- B.J attorney at 

law, office 528 California, dwl Russ House 
Bergiu. — See Bergen 
Bergman Alexander, longshoreman, dwl SW cor 

Battery and Vallejo 
Bergman Frank A,, restaurant, dwl 745 Market 
Bergman Frederick, bookkeeper, with William 

Keir, 903 Battery 
Bergman Henry, clerk, dwl SE cor Folsom and 

Main 
Bergman Jacob, bookkeeper, 21 Battery, dwl SW 

cor Powell and Washington 
Bergman Samuel, butcher with John Robl, dwl 

331 Kearny 
Bergmann Abraham, confectioner with Schroder &. 

Albrecht, dwl 517 Green 
Bergner J. Alfred, painter, 230 Mission 
Bergold Charles, (Mullcr 4- B.) dwl 739 Pine 
Bergold Edward, waiter, 408 Pine, dwl 739 Pine 
Bergson Ole, carpenter and builder, ill LeidesdorfF, 

dwl N s Fulton bet Franklin and Gough 
Bergst Louis, hairdresser, dwl 5 Annie 
Bergstein Henry, medical student with L. C Lane, 

dwl SE cor Folsom and Sixth 
Bergstein Louis, drygoods, 301 Sixth 
Bergstrom John, organ builder, dwl W 8 Lundy 

Lane, Bernal Higiits 
Beri Carlo, milkman, dwl 314 Pacific 
Bering John P., secretary Pacific Wire Rope manuf. 

Co., office 519 Front, dwl N s Chestnut bet 

Mason and Taylor 
Berk Maurice G., cigars and tobacco, 332 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 319 Bush 
Berka" Frank, ladies hairdresser with S. Monks, 

dwl 824 Pacific 
Berkeley Homestead Association, office 409 Cal 
Berker John, driver with F. Korbel & Bros, dwl 

571 Biyant 
Berkowitz Mever, manufacturer cloaks, mantillas, 

etc, 1102 Stockton, dwl 626 Filbert 
Berl Jacob, dwl 743 Pacific 
Berl Mary Mrs, clothing, 743 Pacific 
Berleman Bernhardina, (widow) dwl W s Gilbert 

bet Bryant and Brannan 
Berlen Charles, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Berii Solomon, gardener, dwl 1313 Stockton 
Berliner Abraham, tailor, 115 Geary 
Berliner Emil, teacher piano, dwl 154 Clara 
Berliner Herman N., (Diainant & B.J dwl 326 

Minna 
Berliner Isidor A., tailor, 353 Third 
Bermann Otto, salesman, 20 Montgomery, dwl 119 

Stockton 
Bermingham Edward, compositor Examiner, dwl 

W 8 Montgomery bet Jackson and Pacific 
Bermingham Edmund R., ( Dohcrty & ^y dwl 20 

Sanson! 
Bsrmingham Thomas, dwl 20 Sansom 
Bermingham Thomas Jr., harnessmaker, with A. 

Tillman, dwl 20 Sansom 
Bermingham. — See Birmingham 
Berms C, workman Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl cor 

Bryant and Eighth 
Berna Frederick, /'^/•opAy & B.J dwl 1715 Dupont 
Bernal John, cook Roma Hotel, 215 Broadway 
Bernard Alexander, cook, dwl 262 Tehama 
Bernard Alexander, waiter, 707 Pacific 
Bernard Bernard, upholsterer with Johu C. Bell, 

dwl 2210 Sixteenth 
Bernard B. W., mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 
Bernard Charles, dwl 519 Folsom 



JONES, FUIiLMAN & CO.. 116 Sansom Street. Braids of all kinds. 
7 



BTE'WKLIj'S PDTiMOKARY SYBUP, the best family Couj;h Medioina 



98 



SAN FRANCISCO [ B ] DIRECTORY 



BERNARD CHARLES, coffee nnd spice manufac- 

tiiier, 707 Sansora, dwi 31'i Oak 
Beruiird Cliarles A., house and sign painter. NE cor 

Clay and Mont<.'onierv, dwl 11 Selina Place 
Bernard Florence, exprepswaffou, dwl ll'J Shipley 
Bernard Francis, carpenter and builder, dwl 1318 

Larkin 
Bernard Frederick, shoemaker, dwl E s Folsom nr 

Fonrth 
Bernard G. M., milkman, Presidio 
Bernard Harris, hairdresser with C. Sturm, dwl 264 

Third 
Bernard Henry, mariner, dwl 20 Folsom 
Bernard Isaac, varieties, N s Sixteenth bet Valencia 

and Mission 
Bernard J. Frank, porter, HI Battery 
Bernard John, blacksmith, dwl 2 Gardner Alley 
Bern^ird John, mariner, dwl 15 Oak Grove Avenue 
Bernard Joseph Jesus, dwl SE cor Seventeenth and 

Chuich 
Bernard Jnlius, furniture, 1120 Stockton 
Bernard Michael D., porter, 216 Battery, dwl 1323 

Montgomery 
Bernnrd Samuel H., (Bernard Sf Co.) dwl 543 

Tehama 
Bernard Ulric, driver with William J. Davis, dwl 

23i Second 
Bernard Wiossi, fWiossi Bernard & Co.) dwl 

Chestnut bet Franklin and Van Ness Avenue 
Bernard Wiossi & Co., (Giovanni Joppini) milk- 
men. Chestnut bet Franklin and Van Ness 

Avenue 
Bernard & Co., (Samuel H. Bernard and William 

Loudonj fruits and vegetables, 16 Occidental 

Maiket 
Berne Martin, laborer Laborers Protective Benevo- 
lent Association, Irish American Hall 
Berner Frederick, shoemaker, dwl 776 Folsom 
Berner Henry, groceries, dwl 814 Montgomery 
Berner John H. D., cigar manufacturer, dwl 776 

Folsom 
Bernhamer Henry, California Market Restaurant, 7 

Summer, dwl 5 Central Place 
Bernliaid Beinhard, hairdresser with John Stable, 

dwl 215 Prospect Place 
Bernliardt Cliarles, clerk with Herman Droste, 

dwl Continental Hotel 
BERNIS BUILDING, 626 California 
liERNlS G., piopiietor California House, 626 Cal 
Beraius Frederick, special policeman, dwl cor First 

and Biannau 
Bernstein Abraham, peddler, dwl 2 Rassette Place 
Bernstein Daniel, salesman, 528 Sacramento 
Bernsrein David, tailor, 779 Folsom 
Bernstein Elias, furniture, 249 Third 
Bernstein George, florist, 106 California Market, 

dwl 253 Minna 
Bernstein Hermann, tailor, 907 Bryant 
Bernstein Israel, clerk, dwl 614 Pine 
Bernstein Joseph, furniture dealer, dwl 608 Post 
Bernstein Julius C, expresswagon, N W cor Kearny 

and Pine, dwl 228^ Perry 
Bernstein Louis, clerk with Michael W. Jacobs, dwl 

249 Tliird 
Bernstein Louis, salesman, 1004 Stockton, dwl Vir- 
ginia Block 
Bernstein M. C, furniture, 517 California, dwl 628 

Vallejo 
Bernstein Solomon, drygoods, 1004 Stockton, dwl 

927 Jackson 
Bernstoff Nicolaus, mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 
Bernzott Frank, boots and shoes, 619 Post 
Beronio G., (P. & G. Beronio) dwl 215 Broadway 
Beronio P., (P. & G. Beronio) dwl 215 Broadway 
Beronio P. & G.,prop'rs Roma Hotel, 215 Broadway 
Berran William, conductor Omnibus R. R 
Berries Adolphe, butcher with A. Geantit, dwl 1220 

Dupont 
Berringer Christian, trunkmaker, dwl 2015 Mission 



Berringer Frank, fireman steamer Moulton, dwl 617 
Davis 

Berrv Alexander G , cnptain sloop J. W. Crawford, 
dwl E s Gilbert l)et Bryant and Brannan 

Berry Daniel, hihorer, dwl 316 Beale, rear 

Berry David, dwl 9 Harlan Place 

Berrv Edward, carpenter, dwl NW cor Berry and 
Third 

Berry Edwin W., compositor Spirit of tlie Times, 
dwl 18 First 

Berry Fulton G., (Badlam & B.) dwl 2212 How- 
ard 

Berry George, wood and coal, dwl 9 Bagley Place 

Berry George A. B., salesman with Napa' Wood 
Co., dwl 307 Third 

Berry George W., teamster with John S. Gibbs 

Berry Gideon M., deputy recorder City and County, 
dwl 445 Bryant 

Berry Henry, waiter North Pacific Transportation 
Co.'s S. S. Oritiamme 

Berry James, carpenter North Pacific Transporta- 
tion Co.'s S. S' California 

Berry John, carpenter, dwl 12-38 Bush 

Berry John, (Griswold 4- B.J Awl 1200 Folsom 

Berry John D., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Berry Julia, (widow) furnished rooms, 120 Fourth 

Berry Louis, (colored) driver, dwl Ankeuy Place 
nr Powell 

Berry Lucretia S., (widow) dwl 1419 Taylor 

Berry Patrick, deck hand stmr Vallejo", Front st 
wharf 

Berry Patrick, plumber with Spring Valley Water 
Co., dwl 649 Stevenson 

Berry Peter, laborer, dwl 512 Post 

Berry Peter, molder with Savage & Co., dwl 535 
Howard 

Berry Richard, boilermaker, dwl 543 Howard 

Berry Robert, ropeniaker, dwl S s Sixteenth bet 
Guerrero and Dolores 

Berry Thomas, carpenter with Miller & Haley, dwl 
114 Welsh 

Berry William, helper Risdon Iron Works 

Berry William D., compositor Spirit of the Times, 
dwl 18 First 

Berry William L., proprietor Berry House, 18 First 

Berrv W. (). M.. (Berry & Place) dwl 1716 Turk 

BERRY & PLACE, ( W. 0. M. Berry and James 
F. Place) importers woolen and wood working 
machinery and steam pumps, etc., 112 and 114 
California 

Berrvman Frederick M., bookkeeper with William 
Kerr, dwl 9J3 Clay 

Berrvman Henrv, bookkeeper with James R. Doyle, 
dwl 614 O'Farrell 

Bersou A. Mrs., laundry, 828 Washington 

Berson A. &. Son, ( Adolph and Guatave Berson) 
carpets and upholsterers, 712 Washington 

Berson Adolph, (A. Berson iSf Son) dwl 828 Wash- 
ington 

Berson Gustave (A. Berson & Son) dwl 828 Wash- 
ington 

Bert Anrelia Miss, dwl W s Sbotwell bet Twentieth 
and Twenty-first 

Bert Bernard, (Henry Shroder Sf Co.) res Bor- 
deaux, France 

Bert Edward G., Jr.. clerk letter department Wells, 
Fargo & Co., dwl W s Stiotwell nr Twenty-first 

Bert Emma Miss, dwl W s Shotwell bet Twentieth 
and Twenty-first 

Bert, Frederick W,, clerk Morning Call, dwl W s 
Shotwell, bet Twentieth and Twenty-first 

Bert.- — See Burt. 

Bertelsen Christian, shoemaker with F. C. Weber, 
dwl 807 Clay 

Bertelsen Otto, expressman, dwl 927 Greenwich 

Bertelsmann Karl C. F., upholsterer with William 
J. Heney, dwl 1112 Pacific 

Berthelot Charles L., porter with John Flanagan dt 
Co., dwl 608 Minna 



THE PEOPIiES INSUBANCE CO, is the soundest Company on the Coast. 



C p. VAlsr SCHAACK & CO., 708. 712. 714 & 716 Kearny St., Bubber Goods and Umbrellaa 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



99 



Beitlielot Prank, waiter, dwl 1014 Sacianiento 
Berthier Albert C, porter with A. Hollub & Co., 

dwl 316 Third 
Berthold Louis, butcher, 206 Broadway, dwl SE 

cor Battery and V'allejo 
Berti Jose])li, laborer, 73S Washington 
Bertody Charles, physician, office and dwl 1005 

Stockton 
BEliTON FRANCIS, consulate for Portugal and 

Switzerland, (and Hcnlsch & B.) office SVV cor 

Clay and Leidesdorif, dwl 83.^ Howard 
Bertram Fritz, (Forlmarui & Co.) dwl NW cor 

Steiiart and Howard 
Bertiani Tlieophilus, oysterman, dwl NE cor Bdwy 

and Frankliu 
Bertram Thomas, stoves and tinware, 303 Sixth, 

dwl 6 Garden 
Bertran Ferdinand, cabinetmaker with L. &. E. 

Emanuel, dwl August Alley bet IPowell and 

JMasoii 
Bertrand Alfred, barkeeper. SE cor Dnpont and 

Commercial 
Bertrand Andrew, furrier, 750 Washington 
Bertrand Joseph, cook, 22S Kearny 
Bertrand Uosina, (widow) seamsirese, dwl 12Jan8en 
Bertrand William, stonecutter, dwl <J15 Brannan 
Bertrandias Alphonse, carpenter, dwl 135 Post 
Bertz Jacob, (Bertz & Co. J dwl West End Hotel 
Bertz & Co., (Jacob Bertz and James A. Murpky) 

New York Bakery restaurant, 6:^6 aud 628 

Kearny 
Berwick Thomas, eailmaker with John L. Prior, 

dwl 812 Fillbert 
Berwin Morris, (P. Bericin & Bro.) res New York 
Berwin P. & Brother, [Morns Berwin) importers 

and jobbers hats and caps, 106 Battery 
Berwin Pincus, (P. Benvin & Bro.) dwl 828 Post 
Besallia Joseph, engineer, dwl 204 Green 
Besby Heniy, Senate liquor saloon, 312 Kearny, 

dwl 343 Grove 
Besby Martin, slioeraaker, dwl 12 Cleaveland 
Bescheinen August, watchmaker with George C. 

Shreve & Co., dwl 832 Broadway 
Bescheinen William, watchmaker with George C. 

Shi-eve & Co., dwl 832 Broadwiiy 
Beschormann Adolph A., upholsterer with Schlueter 

<fe Volberg, dwl 60 Everett 
Beschormann Augustus H., dwl 60 Everett 
Beschormann Charles, barkeeper, dwl 721 Union 
Beschormann Frederica A. Mrs., dwl 60 Everett 
Beschormann Matilda Miss, niilliuer with Samuel 

Zemausky, dwl 60 Everett 
Beschormann Otto, upholsterer with George O. Whit- 
ney & Co., dwl 60 Everett 
Bezeke William, ( Wagener & B.J dwl 1512 Stock- 
ton 
Beson F. P., drayman, dwl 714 O' Fan-ell 
Besse J. O., salesman City of Paris, dwl 11 Kearny 
Bessemer Frances Madame, perfumer, dwl 14 

Mary 
Bessemer Henry L., chemist and perfumer, dwl 

J 4 Mary 
Bessey K. W., (widow) fancy goods, children's 

clothing, etc., 30 Second 
Beeson Felix, waiter with Fran9oia Lermitte, 530 

Merchant 
Besson Gustave, waiter 530 Merchant, dwl Valiejo 

Place 
Best Hannah Mrs., dwl 650 Mission 
Best John, (Johnson & B.) dwl 1817 Leavenworth 
Best John T., engineer clerk with Lt. Col. R. S. Wil- 
liamson, dwl 509 Kearny 
Best William, laborer San Francisco Market, dwl 

532 Commercial 
Best William, stairbuilder with D. A. McDonald 

& Co., dwl 516 Leavenworth 
Best & Belcher M. Co., (Virginia City, Nev.) office 

419 California 
Bester John H., saloon, dwl 3 Medau Place 



Besthorn Herman, waiter, 640 Market, dwl 739 

Brannan 
Beston James, gasfitter with James Reading, dwl 

920 Montgomery 
Beston Thomas, stagecarpenter Metropolitan The- 

tre, dwl 817 Montgomery 
BESTOR HENRY T., architect, office 302 Mont- 
gomery, dwl W s Chattanooga bet Twenty- 
second and Twenty-third 
Bctaux Louis, foreman with Prosper May, dwl 1100 

Powell 
Betbeze D., saddle and harnessmaker, 510 Bdwy 
Betge George, cook with Bermeister & Pourcho, 

dwl S s Pine bet Kearny and Dnpont 
BETGE ROBERT J., importing bookseller and 

stationer, 217 Montgomery 
Betge William, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Betger Charles E., jeweler with Cal. Jewelry Co 
Betger Edward, bootmaker, dwl 740 Valiejo 
Beth Adolf, waiter with Saulmann &. Lanenstein, 

dwl 645 Commercial 
Bethel Thomas W.. melter Eureka Foundry, dwl 32 

Tehama 
Betkowski Peter, jobwagon, NW cor Bush and 

Montgomery, dwl 23 Silver, rear 
Betner John, patternmaker Miners' Foundry, dwl 

32 Clementina 
Betrand Begue, market, 1224 Dupout, dwl 731 Pa- 
cific 
Bets Robert, saddler, dwl 812 California 
Betshard Antonio, cabinetmaker with W. J. T. 

Palmer & Co., dwl 30 Eleventh 
Betteu Geor^ife E. H., clerk with Frederick Janssen, 

dwl SVV cor Mason and Clay 
Bettendge James, compositor Alta California, dwl 

511 Pine 
Bettiger Christian, mnsician, dwl 418 Powell 
Bettincurt F. P., pantiymau S. S. Moses Taylor. N. 

P. T.ans. Co. 
Bettis William R., express clerk stmr Wm. Tabor, 

dwl Russ House 
Bettman Moses, Chemical Olive Soap Works, S s 
Brannan bet Eighth and Ninth, office 311 Com- 
mercial, dwl 1028 Clay 
Betts Charles, teamster California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl NE cor Brannan and Eighth 
Betts J, machinist, dwl 313 O'Farrell 
Betts Peter M., (Betts Sf Bro. J dwl E s Howard nr 

Twenty-fitth 
Betts William M., (Betts 4- Bro.) dwl cor Twenty- 
third and Mission 
Betts & Brother, ( William M. and Peter M.J car- 
riagespringraakers, SW cor Fifth and Market 
Betz Christ, brewer Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 228 

Second 
Betz Jacob, nialster with Lyon & Co., dwl S s 

Francisco bet Powell and'Mason 
Betzel Louis, manufacturer boys clothing, 125 San- 

som, dwl 613 Geary 
Betzold Jacob, butcher with Joseph Heine, dwl SE 

cor Sixth and Harrison 
Betzold Mathes, driver with Conrad Thaler, 22 Du- 

pont 
Benchel Gottlieb, tailor, dwl 1718 Mason 
Beutler Frank B., shadehanger with George W. 

Clark, dwl Steinmann's Hotel 
Beutler John B., professor music, dwl 762 Mission 
Bevan James, laborer, dwl W s Valencia nr Thir- 
teenth 
Bevans C, barkeeper with William Craig, dwl 

SWcor Broadway and Dnpont 
Bevans Daniel, cariienter, dwl SW cor Broadway 

and Dupont 
Bevans T. P., druggist, dwl 1311 Valiejo 
Bevans William, printer, dwl SW cor Webster and 

Tyler 
Beveir C, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bevell Richard M., purser P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 29 
Park Avenue 



JONES, PUIiLMAN & CO., 116 Sanifom Street, Silk and Velvet Ribbons. 



BEDINGTON, HOSTETTEB & CO.. exclusive Agents for Drake's Plantation Sitters. 



100 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Beveri(1>fe Horatio, clerk witli Falkner, Bell & Co., 

dwl 615 Siocktoii 
BeverleiKli & Co., (chinese) cigar manufacturers, 

313 Battery 
Beversen Bios'., {Charles and CorsfenJ groceries 

and liquors, N W c-or Fifth and Natoma 
Beversen Gii\-%ie\\,(Bever»en Bros. J NW cor Fifth 

and Nafomn 
Beversen Charles, groceries and liquors, ■'iGS Mis- 
sion, [and Beversen Bros. J dwl .570 Mission 
Bevins James, waiter with John Keagan, 613Mont- 

goniery 
Bevins Thomas, shijijoiner, dwl 30 De Boom 
Bewley William J. H., clerk Seven Mile House, 

San Bruno Koad 
Beyat Kniil, pantryman Miners Restaurant, dwl 

* :213Dupont 
Bevea James L., bookkeeper Pacific Iron Works, 

137 First, dwl 11 Kearny 
Beyer Louie, hairdresser, 801 Battery, dwl 625 Val- 

lejo 
Beyer Louis, Jr., hairdresser with L. Beyer, dwl 

6-J5 Vallejo 
Beyerle J. Ernest, coppersmith with J. G. Us, dwl 

13 Virginia 
Beversdorf John, engineer sir Washington, Cowell's 

■ wharf, dwl 28 Pi>8t 
Beyersdorf Louis, barkeeper Bank Excliange, dwl 

136 Shipley 
Bevreiss (lodfrey, framemaker. Market bet Seventh 

' and Eigiith.'dwl Prescott House 
Bhan Tliomas, clerk, dwl E s Hampshire nr Sauta 

Clara 
Biaggi Carlo, driver, dwl 21 Dunn Alley 
Biagi Daminieo, ( Onesti & B.Jdsvi 925 Washington 
Bianchi Carlo, {Biancki Jj- GuiieoJ dwl W b Mout- 

gomery nr Pacific 
Bianchi &. Cuneo, (Carlo Bianchi and Aui^ustine 

Cnnco) niarbieworUs, 3 Powell 
Bibb Emma, (widow) dwl SW cor Twentieth and 

Folsom 
Bibbins Tracy L., real estate agent, office 230 
Kearny, dwl SW cor Leavenworth and Wash 
Bibeau Alfred, shoemaker with I. M. Went.worth 

& Co , dwl cor Twenty fourth and Mission 
Bibeau Isaac, (Willard dj-'B.) dwi NE cor Mission 

and Twenty-fourth 
Bibend Ferdinand, machinist, dwl Ns Lombard nr 

Polk 
Bibend O. C, dwl W s Twelfth bet Howard and 

Folsom 
Biber Adolph, watchmaker and jeweler, 329 

Kearny, dwl 132 Clara 
Biher Robert, cigars and tobacco, 528 Third 
BICHAUD NICHOLAS, coal, Ss Howard bet Spear 

and Steuart, dwl 365 First 
Bickel Conrad, real estate, dwl N s Haight bet 

Gough and Octavia 
Bickford Chauncy A., cook with J. Y. Wilson & 

Co., dwl cor Buchanan and Bay 
Bickmore George, carpenter, dwl 61 Clementinaj 

rear 
Bickuell Freeman, bootmaker, 21 Dupont 
Bicknell Janie.^, gilder, dwl 1908 Powell 
Bicknell James N., steward, 1019 Jackson, dwl 1908 

Powell 
Biddell Clarissa, (widow) dressmaker, dwl E s 

Guerrero bet Sixteenth and Camp 
Biddell Mary Miss, dwl 830 Howard 
Biddell Philip, stockraiser, dwl 830 Howard 
Biddle E. W., with S. H. Roberts, dwl 142^ Fourth 
Biddle Frederick W., bookkeeper with Hooper, 

Whiting k Co., dwl 127 Kearny 
Biddolph James, machinist Golden State Iron 

Works, dwl 619 Mission 
Bidleman A. L. P. Mrs., matron California Labor 

Exchange 
Bidleman Joseph B., broker, oflSce and dwl 742 
Washington 



Bidleman Enoch G., dwl 742 Washington 
Bidleman William A., clerk with Edward Martin & 

Co., dwl SW cor Ninth and Folsom 
Bidwell Stephen S., moliler with W. T. Garratt 

& Co., dwl Wheeler House 
Bieber Julius, bookkeeper with Jacob M. Cohn, 

dwl 1007 Hariison 
Biede Henry, mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 
Biedeiibach August, wines and liquors, NE corner 

Third iind Mission, dwl 214 Minna 
Biedenweg Louis, mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 
Biedermnn Charles, clerk, SE cor Montgomery and 

Bush, dwl 103 Leavenworth 
Biedert Albert, musician California Theatre, dwl 4 

St. Mary 
Bieglile George, salesman, dwl 823 Folsom 
Biehl Julius, clerk with G. O'Hara Taatie, NE cor 

California and Sansom 
Bielawski Casimir, draftsman, dwl 242 Stevenson 
Bielski Max, (Max Bielski & Co.) dwl 1012 Stock- 
ton 
Bielski Max & Co., (Joseph Jacoby) butter, cheese, 

eggs, etc., 2 Occidental Market 
Bien Joseph, machinist, 303 Battery, dwl 714 Lar- 

kin 
Bien William, machinist, dwl 613 Mission 
Bienenfeld Elias, fancy goods, 1229 Stockton 
Bieutz Pkeinhard. waiter, 225 Bush, dwl N s Pine 

bet Kearny and Dupont 
Bierbrauer Carl, laborer with Erzgraber & Goet- 

jen, dwl 405 Green 
Bierbrauer John, cabinetmaker with N. P. Cole & 

Co., dwl SU Vallejo 
Bierce Albert S., helper U. S. Branch Mint, res 

Oakland Point 
Bierce Ambrose G., editor S. F. News Letter, res 

Oakland Point 
Bierce Frank A., clerk Pope & Talbot, dwl 324 Beale 
Bierschwale Charles, carpenter, 731 Mission 
BIESTA FEDERICO, editor and proprietor L'Eco 

Delia Patiia, office 637 Washington 
Bigelow Ciiarles P., bricklayer, dwl NE cor Liberty 

and Dolores 
Bigelow Daniel, machinist, California Sugar Refin- 
ery, dwl W 8 Dora near H irrison, rear 
Bigelow Edwin, bricklayer, Brickmakers' Associa- 
tion, Young Men's Christian Association Hall 
Bigelow Elijah, real estate, office 419 Front, res 

Oakland 
Biijelow Francis H., compositor Evening Bulletin, 

" dwl 27 i Welsh 
Bigelow George H., general agent Peoples Insur- 
ance Co., 16 Jlerchants' Exchange, dwl 405 
Brannan 
BIGELOW HENRY H., general niannger Home 
Mntuiil Ins. Co., office 15 Merchants' Exchange, 
dwl W 6 First Av bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Bigtlow John, bricklayer Brickmakers' Associa- 
tion, Young Men's Christian Association Hall 
BIGELOW JONATHAN E., special agent Home 
Insurance Co , office 15 Merchants' Exchange, 
dwl 607 Sutter 
Bigelow S., driver City Railroad 
Bigelow Samuel C, real estate, office 204 Mont 
Bigge A., cabinetmaker with George O. Wliituey 

Si, Co., dwl 317 Bush 
Bigger Alexander, steward P. M. S. S. Co. 
Bigger William, butcher with Kichard O'Neill, dwl 

425 Pine 
Biggi A. & Co., (An^elo Biggi and Giuseppe Fon- 
Lana ) watchmakers and jewelers, 1106 Dupont 
Biggi Angelo, (A. Big-^i cfc Co. J dwl 1106 Dupont 
Biggins Patrick, hostler, £8 Sixth 
Biggs Jesse E., carpenter with Miller & Haley, dwl 

517 Leavenworth 
Biggs John E., Flume House, E s San Bruno Road 

bet Twenty-sixth and Twenty-seventh 
Biggy Terrence, hostler Central Railroad, dwl O'- 
Farrell bet Devisadero and Broderick 



T^e stockholders of the " PEOPLES" are the leading Bankers and Merchants on this Coast. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street. Smokers' Articles. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



101 



Bi<:ia I)., fruits, dwl 925 Wasliingtoii, rear 

Bigler Joliii. Siil'ion, dwl 108 Mmboii 

B1GLI':Y HROTHKRS, (Jokn and Daniel Bigley) 

yiocei ies, 128 Clay 
Bigley Catherine, (widow) furnished rooms, 1028 

Market 
Bigley George, clerk with Bigley Bros., dwl 1028 

Market 
Bisilev Daniel, (Bishy Bros.) dwl 1028 Miirket 
Bigley John, (BipUy Brox.) dwl 707 Lai kin 
Bigley Lonian, (widow) dwl 320 Dnpont 
BIGLEY T. <fe CO., shipwrii^hts, calUers and spar- 

niaUei-8, 13 and 15 Spear 
Bidey Thomas, f T. Bifr/ey & Co. J dwl 832 Mission 
Biglo E., dwl What Cheer House 
Bigwood Joseph, blacksmith, dwl W s Colnmbia nr 

Twenty-lifth 
Bilay Anthony F., clerk with Eherhardt & Lach- 

miin, dwl S s Ridley nr Mission 
Bilfinger August, carrier Guide, dwl 623 Broad- 
way 
Bilfiiiger Mary, (widow) diessmaker, dwl 623 

Broadway 
Bilhack Louis, real estate, dwl POi Kearny 
Bill A. W., cal)inetmaker with Goodwin & Co., dwl 

673 Broadway 
Bill Conrad, waiter, 236 Sutter 
Bill Geoige, cook with Alfred May, NE cor Second 

and Townsend 
Bill M.irgaret, (widow) dwl 725 Broadway 
Bill Philip, real estate, dwl 2!) Riteh 
Bill Theodore, carpenter, dwl 26 Steunrt 
Billega:i Giegorio, porter with John S. Manson, dwl 

7-2 Broadway, rear 
Biller Frederick, cook, dwl 814 Jrontpomery 
]5iller8 Henry, liquor saloon, 351 Third 
Billinghnrst Ray, hostler with Thomas Kelly, SE 

corGearj' and Lesivenworth 

Billings , dwl 316 Third 

Billings David R., f Billings & Sherry) dwl 17 

Clinton 
Billings Frederick, real estate, office i'd Montgom- 
ery Block 
BillinfeTH George E., clerk with A. Roman & Co., 

dwl 1701 Polk 
Billings John F., carpenter, dwl 1704 Polk 
Billing.^ Joseph, tanner with John F. King, dwl 

SE cor Folsom and Eighteenth 
BilliuLTS & Sherry, {David R. Billings and James 

i7(c/T^y produce commission, 211 Drnrain 
Billis James, ( Bttlis & B'lnen) dwl 737 Howard 
Billis Robert, (Burns & B.J dwl 737 Howard 
Billis & Bowen, f James Billis and James Bowen) 

porkpa(!l<ers, 16 and 18 Union Market 
Billy Lorenzo, harnessmaker, 410 Jackson, dwl S s 

Pacilic bet Kearny and Dupoiit 
Biltv Theodore G., ( Mokrhardt & B.J dwl 1309 

Powell 
Biiz John, tailor, dwl 934 Kearny 
Binaud Leon, hairdresser with Bernard Puyoou, 610 

Kearny 
Binder George J., bookkeeper with Christian 

Schreiber & Co., dwl 411 Tehama 
Binder Randolph, paperhanger, dwl '227 Sutter 
Bine Solomon, { Maaxhack Sf B.J dwl 773 Folsom 
Bingenlieiiner Christopher, cooperiige, W s Druuim 

nr California, dwl N s Geary nr Larkin 
Bingham W. Frank, bookkeeper with Cubery & 

Co., dwl 
Binn Thomas, malster with Mathew Nuuan, dwl 29 

Eighth 
Binswanger Lewis, gents' furnishing goods, 513 

Kearny 
Birbe Henry C, groceries and liquors, E s Potrero 

nr Eldorado 
Birch Alexander, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Birch Ann, (widow) dwl 217 Clara 
Birch Charles Henry, longshoreman, dwl N s Ore- 
gon bet Davis and Drumm 



Birch Mary L. Miss, upholsterer with E. C. Ken- 
nedy, <iwl 217 Clara 
Birch William, carpenter, dwl 217 Clara 
Birch William H., foreman machinists Vulcan Iron 

Works, dwl 802 Jones 
Bird Anne S., (widow) dwl 12.38 Bush 
Bird George, silverplater and electric machinemak- 

er, 639 California, dwl 1408Kenrny 
Bird H., deik Golden Gate Sugar Refiueix dwl 533 

Grove 
Bird J. W., bricklayer. Bricklayers' Association, 

Young Men's Christian Association Hall 
Bird Miirgaret, (widow) laundress, dwl 439 Clem- 
entina 
Bird Marion F., bricklayer, dwl 108 Minna 
Bird Nelson J., physician and surgeon, office and 

dwl 230 Kearny 
Bird Patrick, laborer, dwl 504 Taylor 
Bird Robert, manufacturing jeweler, dwl 315 Mont- 
gomery 
Bird Thomas, architect, dwl NE cor Montgomery 

and Vallejo 
Bird William, tailor, dwl 232 Clementina 
Bird — See Burd 
Birdsall George, liquor saloon, 526 Third, dwl 434 

Brainian 
Birdsall George Jr., liquor saloon, 129 Clay, dwl 

120 Welsh 
Birdsall George W., special policeman, dwl 514 

Third 
Birdsall John, engineer, dwl cor Louisiana and 

Sierra 
Birdsall Jonathan M., teamster, dwl S s Ash Avenue 

nr Polk 
Birdsall William, driver City railroad 
Birdsall Wyatt, engineer 8te;imer Clinton, Vallejo 

Street VVharf, res Petalnma 
Birdsall Zephaniali, driver with Wells, Fargo & Co., 

dwl 920 Clay 
Birdsall.— See Burtsell 

Birge James J., dentist, office and dwl 410 Kearny 
Birgle Charles, tannery, Texas bet Sixteenth and 

Santa Clara 
Birmingham Michael, shoemaker Metropolitan B. 

and S. Co., dwl 14 Everett 
Birmintfbam — See Berniingham 
Biron Hyman, physician, office and dwl 10 Central 

Place 
BIRRELL ANDREW, treasurer Metropolitan 

Theatre, dwl 220 Third 
Birrell George, machinist Vulcan Iron Works, dwl 

220 Third 
Birth Robert, seaman, dwl 12 Howard Court 
Bisagno Bartolouieo, (Bisagno Bros. J tea Chiavari, 

Italy 
Bisagno Brothers, (Louis and Bartolomeo) im- 

p(u-ters and jobbers hardware, crockery, cut- 
lery, etc., 420 Battery 
Bisagno ViQi\\\i,( Bisagno Brotliers.) A\\\ 924 Pacific 
Bischoff Anton, clerk with Kleimer & Co., dwl 717 

Folsom 
Bischoff Henry, dwl cor First Av and Kentucky 
Bischoff Richard, clerk with Nicholas Boschen, dwl 

108 Fifth 
Biscons Auguste, barkeeper with Charles Collin, 

dwl nil Dupont 
BISHOP AMASA W., attorney at law and editor 

Masonic Mirror, ti08 Market, (and Bishop, 

Sliermau dc Carrick), dwl NE cor Mission and 

Eleventh 
Bishop Benjamin F., jeweler with Cal. Jewelry Co., 

dwl 836 Market 
Bishop Charles, freight clerk with C. P. R. R. Co., 

dwl SE cor Brannan and Ritch 
Bishop D. M., printer, dwl NE cor Wash and Dupont 
Bishop Edgar, (Bishop Sr Co. J dwl :>{)3 Sutter 
Bishop Gurdon, miner, dwl 5 Florence 
Bishop Henry, liquor saloon, NW cor East and 

Clay, dwl 225 Chesnut 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dress Trimmings. 



CHAMPLIN'S LIQUID PEARL restores the Face to the beauty of Youth. 



102 



SAK FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Bishop James W., sawyer with L. & E. Emanuel, 

dwl 535 Mission 
Bishop J. H., carpenter, H. C. League. 128 Kearny 
Bishop John K., clerk with William Wilkens, 2:25 

Sutter 
Bishop J. W., cahinefmaker, dwl 103 First 
Bishop Lester, gardener with George Treat, dwl 

cor Twenty-fourti) and Harrison 
Bisliop N. G., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bishop Oliver H., teamster, dwl SVV cor Juniper 

and Harrison 
Bishop Ransom B. .mechanic Southern Pacific R. 

Road, dwl 734 Sixteenth 
Bishop Richard, drayn)an, dwl 325 Minna 
Bishop Richard, (Roche & Kendrick) dwl 421 Val- 

BISHOP, SHERMAN & CARRICK, (Ama!<a W. 

Bishop, Edtvin A. Sherman and Frederick R. 

(JarrickJ pnhlishers and proprietors Masonic 

Mirror, 605 Market 
Bishop Thomas B., (Bishop & Gerald) dwl 536 

Second 
Bishop William, drayman, dwl 325 Minna 
Bishop William, teamster, dwl 435 Fifth 
BISHOP & CO., (Edgar Bishop, Lawrence W. 

Palvier and VVilharn ,jfe,'. Moses J grocers, 716 

Market 
BISHOP & GERALD, (Thomas B. Bishop a7id 

D. V. Gerald) attorneys at law, office 414 

California 
BISSELL JAMES L.. seoretarv Commissioners Ma- 
rine Board Port S. F., 607 Front, dwl 817 Miss 
Bisfeli James, (iwl 817 Mission 
Bistiup William, tailor, NW cor Turk and Masoi> 
Biter William, assistant apothecary City and County 

Hospital 
Bitter VVilliam, (Bdter & Becker) dwl Prescott 

House 
BITTER & BECKER, (Wil/iam Bitter and Otto 

F. Becker) proprietors Prescott House, SW 

cor Keainy and Pacific 
Bitterinau Charles, drayman, comer Folsoni and 

Twenty-second 
Biven Robert, rigger, dwl 305 Main 
Bivens Mary, (colored) (widow) dwl 16 Scott 
Bixby Llewellyn, (Perkins, Flint Sc Co.) res San 

Juan, Monterey Co 
Bixby — See Byxby' 
Bixio Joseph Rev., dwl 841 Market 
Bjerke Hans T., grainer, dwl 986 Harrison 
Bjerremark Charles, salesman with Fenkhausen & 

Geiichten, dwl .534 Natoiiia 
Bjorkman Ellen, (widow) dwl 233 Perry 
Bjorkniann August, diayman with Kruse & Euler, 

dwl 243 Tehama 
Blach Charles, physician, office 514 Kearny, dwl 

631 Post 
Blacher George, miller with Cal. Com. & M. Co., 

dwl cor Pierce and Chestnut 
Black Adam, bootmaker with J. H. Swain, dwl 

1209 Mission 
Black Alexander, lumberman, dwl 318 Folsom 
Black Alexander, plumber with Thomas Day, dwl 

23 Ellis 
Black Ann, (widow) dwl 707 Stockton 
Black Ann Miss, dressmaker with Mrs Mclntyre & 

Miss M. Smith, dwl 1209 Mission 
Black Charles, blacksmith, dwl 152 Silver 
Black Charles E., blacksmith with Kimball Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 663 Howard 
Black D., deckhand steamer Santa Cruz, Washing- 
ton street wharf 
Black David, laborer SS Moses Taylor, N. P. 

Trane. Co. 
BLACK DIAMOND COAL MINING CO., B. P. 

Cornwall agent, Riucon wharf. Spear bet Fol- 
som and Hariison 
Black Diamond S. M. Co., (White Pine) office 37 

Merchants' Exchange 



Black Edwin H., painter with Millman & Smith, 
dwl NE cor Cnmp and Guerrero 

Black George, bricklayer, Biicklayers' Association, 
Young Men's Christian Ass'n Hall 

Black George, civil engineer, office 622 Clay, dwl 
N s Eddy bet Devisadero and Broderick " 

Black Hairy, wines and liquors, SE cor Merchant 
and Monfgomerv, dwl 13 Sutter 

Black Henry M., [Black & Miller) dwl 14 Russ 

Black James J., {Bean & B.) dwl American Ex- 
change 

Black Jane, (widow) dwl 433 Minna 

Black Jeremiah, driver Market St. Railroad, dwl 
Cincinnati Hotel 

Black John, restaurant, 1208 Dupont 

Black John, longshoreman, dwl 327 Beale 

Black John, spinner, Mission & Pacific Woolen 
Mills, dwl Harrison bet Fourteenth and Fif- 
teenth 

Black John, npbolsterer with Goodwin & Co., dwl 
O'FaiTell bet Jones and Leavenworth 

Black John S., proprietor Oregon House, 238 
Steuart 

Black John W., collector with Thomas H. Selby 
& Co , dwl 50 Clementina 

Black Juliet, (widow) dwl 1.58 Tehama 

Black Patrick J., farmer, dwl S s Eddy bet Pierce 
and Scott 

Black Patrick W., conductor Central Railroad, dwl 
435 Turk 

Blnck Peter R., ehipjoiner, dwl 116 Natoma 

Black Richard, carpenter, dwl 444 Sixth 

Black Robert H., liquor saloon, dwl 419 Pine 

Black Robert M., {Love & B.) dwl Lick House 

Black William, driver, dwl 514 Bryant 

Black William, harnesscleaner with George Poult- 
nev 

Black 'William, {Black & Mulany) dwl 543 Stev- 
enson 

Black William K., carpenter, dwl 663 Howard 

Black William W., pi-oprietor Howard Exchange, 
SW cor Howard and Seventh 

Black & Miller, [Henry M. Black & David I). 
Miller) importers, and carriage and coach man- 
ufacturers, 1120 and 1122 Market 

Black & Mnlaney, {William Black and John Mu- 
laney) uiarl)le works, 807 Market 

Blackburn Frederick, saloon, dwl 229 Kearny 

Blackburn Isaac, book agent with A. L. Bancroft 
& Co., dwl 930 Fobom 

Blackburn L. S., saloon, dwl 229 Kearny 

Biackington A., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 
Kearny 

Blackmail Cassius H., salesman with Wilmerding 
&. Kellogg, dwl 609 Fols<.m 

Blackman Henry, clerk, dwl 922 Folsom 

Blackman William H., cook, dwl 1127 Folsom 

BLACKWOOD WILLIAM, commission mer- 
cliant, room 13, 1(19 California, dwl NW cor 
Bryant and Oak Grove Ave 

Blackwood William, miner, dwl Niantic Hotel 

Blagitch John, barkeeper, NWcor Polk and Broad- 
way 

Blaikie" Andrew, draftsman Risdon Iron Works, 
dwl 350 First 

Blaikie James L., real estate agent, office 507 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 121 Prospect Place 

Blaikie Richard T,, shipjoiner, dwl S s Sutter bet 
Fillmore and Webster 

Blaikie SarRh, (widow) dwl S s Sutter bet Fillmore 
and Webster 

Blain Rodman P., bookkeeper, dwl NE cor Sacra- 
mento and Leavenworth 

Blair Archibald, hydrographical engineer Tide Land 
Survey 

Blair Charles, shoemaker, dwlNE cor Montgomery 
and Broadway 

Blair Chauncey S., patternmaker Etna Iron Works, 
dwl 18 Verona Place 



THE PEOPLES INSURANCE CO. recognizes individual liability. 



C. P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Jewelry and Albums. 



SAN FRANCISCO [ B ] DIRECTORY 



103 



Blair David B., fMacfarlane, B. & Co.) res Oak- 
land 
Blair Frank, messeuperU. S. Branch Mint, dwl 333 

Jessie 
Blair James C, soaprnaker, dwl 5 Zoe rear 
Blair J. A. W., boatlinislier with J Sullivan, dwl 

NEcor Montgomery and Broadway 
Blair Lafayette, ^iJws, B. <& Maynard) Avi\ 319 

Bush 
Blair M. &• Co, fW. W. Chase) hay and grain mar- 
ket opi) Sail Jose Kailroad Depot 
Blair Matlliew, ( M. Blair & Co.) dwl 18 Haifjhl 
Blair Phiueas S.. vainisher with J. A. Shaber, dwl 

'J 10 Stevenson 
Blair Robert, machinist Vulcan Iron Works, dwl 8 

Zoe 
Blair Samuel, mariner, office pier 10 Stewart, dwl 

47 Teliama 
BLAIR THOMAS M., sergeant-at arms S. P. Stock 

and Exchange Board and agent Pacific Halls, 

dwl 518 Bush 
Blair William, painter, dwl 205 Riteh 
Blair William A., teamster, dwl Fifteenth Ave nr 

Islais Creek, South San Francisco 
Blaisdell H. O., (Severance & B.J dwl 226 Third 
Blaisdell Jay P., shoemaker, dwl 5 Morion 
Bliiisdcll J. L., quaitermaster P. M. S. S. Co 
Blaisdell Solon, stall 17 Grand Central Market, dwl 

1007 Mission 
Blaisdell.— See Blasdell 
Blake Chailes, f Blake & Thing:) dwl N a Oak nr 

Franklin 
BLAKE CHARLES E., dentist, office 30 Kearny, 

dwl 2-> Oak Grove Av 
Blake Edwin, drayman with C. F. Chadbourne, dwl 

6 Jasper Place 
Blake Elizabeth, (widow) dwl 121 Shipley 
BLAKE FRANCIS, (Blake, Rabbins Sf- Co.) res 

Oakland 
Blake George, cook, dwl 820 Jackson 
Blake George M., bookkeeper, dwl 328 Minna 
Blake George W., real estate agent, office 336 

Montgomery, dwl 523 Kearny 
Blake Grecnleaf A., teamster with E. Kennedy, 

dwl NE cor Oak and Franklm 
Blake H. A., (colored) bootblack and chimney 

sweep, 804 Market, dwl Brooks 
Blake Henry C, real estate agent 415 Montgomery, 

resides Encinal, Alnmedsx 
Blake Henry H., (H. H. Blake &■ Co.) dwl 118 

Eddy 
BLAKE II. H. & CO., general agents Continental 

Life Insurance Co., office 302 Montgomery 
Blake James, laborer, dwl 142 Clara 
Blake James, physician and piofessor obstetrics To- 

land Medical College, office and dwl 202 Bush 
Blake James, porter Lii;k House 
Blake Jauies, sailmaker with John S. Blakiston, 

dwl 915 Montgomery 
Blake John, bootmakerj 931 Folsom 
Blake John, bricklayer. Bricklayers AsBOciation, 

234 Sutter 
Blake John, carpenter, dwl 240 Perry 
Bhike John, clerk, dwl 120 Geary 
Blake John, merchant tailor, 413 Sutter 
Blake John J., clerk with William A. H. Godfrey, 

dwl 671 Harrison 
Blake John R., (colored) steward, 127 Montgomery, 

dwl 914 Pacific 
Blake Mary J., (widow) nurse, dwl W p Leroy PI 
B ake Maurice B., (M. 0. and M. B. Blake) dwl 

641 Folsom 
Blake Maurice C, (M. C. and M. B. Blake) dwl 

Dorland bet Church and Sanchez 
BLAKE M. C. and M. B., attorneys at law, office 

637 Kearny 
Blake Michael, groom U. S. Government stables, 

413 Taylor 
Blxke M. R., (widow) dwl 310 Stockton 



Blake Nicholas, teamster, dwl 538 Natoma 

BLAKE PHILIP HENRY, homestead secretary 
and real estate agent, office 511 California, dwl 
Toll House, Point Lobos Road 

BLAKE, ROBBINS & CO., rFrancu Blnke, 
Charles F. Robbing, James Moffit and Jitvies 
W. 7'o«'«ey importers and jobbers book, news, 
•wilting and wrapping paper, 516 Sacramento 
and 519 Commercial 

Blake Sumner C, stationery, 707 Montgomery, dwl 
1502 Leavenworth 

Blake Theodore A., (Goodyear Sf B.) 216 Bush 

Blake Walter, painter, dwl 339 Clementina 

Blake William, painter, dwl 27 Hunt 

Blake William G., hairdresser with Heider & 
Hilberer, 310 Bush 

Blake & Thing, (Charles Blake & A. F. Thing) 
tenmsters, office Gennesee Mills, Gold nr San- 
som 

Blakeley Francis, carpenter, dwl 109 Powell 

Blakeley Guy, butcher, dwl 430 Shipley 

Blakeley John, laborer S. F. Gas Co., dwl 159 Minna 

Blakeley John M., bookkeeper Market Fire Insur- 
ance Co., dwl 214 Stockton 

Blakeley Joseph W., bookkeeper, dwl 430 Shipley 

Blakeley Samuel, laborer S. V. Water Co., dwl 430 
Shipley 

Blakely Calvin, carpenter with Excelsior Mill, dwl 
Rutledge Avenue, Bernal Hights 

Blakely Edward, ammonia maker S. F. Gas Co., dwl 
48 Minna 

Blakely William H., expreeswagon, cor Batterv and 
Merchant, dwl 46 Silver 

Blakeney John, laborer, Laborers' Pro. Ben. Associ- 
ation, Irish American Hall 

Blakeney Thomas J., (Snow & Roos) dwl 313 Fre- 
mont 

Blakey John, pressman with Francis & Valentine, 
dwl 510 Vallejo 

Blakiston John S., sail loft 8 Clay, dwl 130 Sutter 

Bhinc Alexander, real estate, dwl 117 Dora 

Blanc Cesarine Mrs., laundry, 11 Virginia 

Blanc Henry, tailor, dwl 521 Geary 

Blanc Maurice, dwl 293 Clementina 

Blanc Stewart, bootmaker, 705 Battery, dwl 517 
Tehama 

Blanch Bernard, coachmaker with Black & Miller, 
dwl 274 Minna 

Blanchard Alexander, contractor, dwl 503 Ellis 

Blanchard Augnstin, baker with Gienouilleau Bro- 
thers, dwl 619 Vallejo 

Blanchard David, laborer, dwl 122 William 

Blanchard Emile, chocolate dealer, dwl 8 Polk 
Lane 

Blanchard Francis G., coachman with Pope &, Tal- 
bot, dwl 10 Guy Place 

Blanchard Francis H.,(Dam ,^- B.,)dwl 201 Taylor 

Blanchard Henry P., (Williams, B. &■ Co.) dwl NE 
cor Sacramento and Leavenworth 

Blanchard Jean, laborer, 710 Commercial 

Blanchard Jules, hardware, 44 Fourth, dwl 511 
Minna 

Blanchard Lott, messenger, Custom House dwl 201 
Taylor 

Blanche Emma Miss, teacher music and painting, 
dwl 759 Howard 

Blanche Euphemia Mrs., artist, dwl 759 Howard 

Blanchet Henry, tailor, dwl 539 Vallejo 

Blanchette Louis, (Blanchette & LncierJ dwl 443 
Jessie 

Blanchette & Lucier, (Louis Blanchette & Joseph 
Lncier) boots and shoes, SE cor Mission and 
Sixth 

Blanchfield Edward J., butcher with J. H. Menomy, 
dwl NS Oak bet Gough and Octavia 

Blanchfield Thomas, laborer, dwlNS Oak bet Gough 
and Octavia 

BLANCKAERT VICTOR J., wines and liquors, 
907 Dupont 



JOJSTES, PUIiliMAN & CO., 116 Sajiaom Street, Suspenders and Neck Ties. 



REDINOTON HOSTETTEB & CO., The great Drug and Patent Medicine Depot 



104 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Blanckenburg Theodore, bookkeeper with E. K. 

Howes & Co., dwl N 8 Green bet Powell and 

Mason 
Blanding Edwaid J., (Phelps & B.J dwl E s Capp 

between Twentyliftb and Twenty-sixth 
Biandiiiff Henry, laborer, S S Orizaba, North Paci 

tic Trans. Co. 
Blanding Lewis, assayer, office 133 First, dwl Russ 

House 
BLANDING WILLIAM, attorneyat-law, office 

•OSS Clay, res Oakland 
Blando Maiia Miss, nurse, dwl l(il3 Wasbington 
Bliine George, carpenter, H. C. League, l'.^8 Kearny 
Blaney James, (Conwny Sf B.J dwl 22~ Jessie 
Blaiiey John, iminter, dwl 507 Ellis 
Blaney Jolin H., bookkeeper with Sullivan, Kelly & 

Co., dwl 530 Jessie 
Blaney Patrick, porter, S. S. Idaho, North Pacific 

Trans. Co 
Blaney Patrick, seaman, dwl 504 First 
Blank Charles, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Blank M., physician, dwl Russ House 
Blakennn Henry, Six Mile House, San Brnno Road 
Blankenberger Adam, dwl 29 Morton 
Blankenhoru Gottleib. billiard tablemaker with J. 

Stralile, dwl cor Sixteenth and De Haro 
Blanket Jacob, fireman Pioneer Woolen Factory, 

dwl cor Polk and North Point 
Blankman Henry, steward, 113 Leidesdorff, dwl cor 

Harrison nnd Folsom 
Blanksteiu Henry, clerk, dwl 122 O'Farrell 
Blaiistield James, laborer, dwl 35 Baldwin Court 
Blanz Pietro, bathman with Louis Corriveau, dwl 

315 Montgomery 
Blasdell George E., bagmaker with E. Detrick &. 

Co.. dwl 54 Third 
Blasdell LawrenceB., jeweler with Charles Lemme, 

dwl 564 Howard 
Blasdell Samuel F., liquidating clerk, Custom 

House, dwl 34 Tehama 
Blasdell S. G., receiver Atlantic and Pacific Tele- 
graph Co 
Blasdell S. J., (widow) dwl 510 Maaon 
Blasdell — see Blaisdell 
BLiss John, laborer w^ith McMillan & Kester, dwl 

N 8 Jackson bet Davis and Drumm 
Blass Merer, merchant, dwl 251 Clara 
Blase Michael, waiter. 236 Sutter 
Bluszkower Mai ks, salesman with Edward Cohn, 

dwl S s Clementina bet Fourth and Fifth 
Blnszkower Pauline, (widow) dwl 337 Clementina 
Blatcliely Ambrose, civil and mining engineer, of- 
fice 247 First, dwl 515 Folsom 
Bbiter Henry, mechanic, dwl l426Dnpont 
Blath Sigmund, bookkeeper with Patent Brick Co., 

dwl Berry bet Thiid and Fourth 
Blatner N., hackman, Plaza, dwl 1014 Stockton 
Blatt Ludwig, bootmaker with Richard Pahl, dwl 

77 Fourth 
Blaftner John J., contractor, dwl 425 Third 
Blaut Simuel, butcher with Henry Sylvester, dwl 

307 Sixth 
Blautiii G., fPcndo & BlaxUin) dwl 715 Davis 
Blantin Pnblo, manuf medical wine, 715 Davis 
Blauvelt Richard D. Jr., deputy recorder City and 

County, dwl 320 Ellis 
Blechcr Christian, shoemaker, 808 Pacific 
Bleecher William, cook, 626 Market, dwl309 Tehama 
Bleie John L., laborer with Hobbs, Gilmore & Co., 

dwl SW cor Main and Mission 
Bleu Lewis W., teamster, pier 17 Steuart, dwl 722 

Shotwell ni- Twenty second 
Blennerhassett John, bootmaker with A. C. Royer, 

dwl 555 Mission 
Blennerhassett Richard, shoemaker, dwl 538 How- 
ard, rear 
Blesdill Johannah, (widow) dwl 17 Jessie 
Blese Henry, painter with Frost &. Richards, dwl 

69 Natoma 



Blesi Sebastian, cutter with Buckingham & Hecht' 

dwl 431 Pine 
Blethen J. H. Capt., insurance agent, dwl 208 Eddy 
Blethen Robert W.. painter, dwl 137 Monttroniery 
Bley Abraham, clothmg, M Third dwl 101 1 Mission 
Bleymann Edward, upholsterer with F. G. Edwards, 

dwl W s Vallejo Place 
Blick Peter, carpenter, dwl S s Twenty-third nr Al- 
abama 
Bligh Catherine, (widow) dwl 528 Union 
Blinn Cbailes H., clerk forwarding department. 

Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 42 Sixth 
Blinn Cyrus A., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearnv 
Blinn Samuel P., (Adams, B. <fc Co. J dwl 542 Sec- 
ond 
Bliss Benjamin B., salesman with Tubbs &. Co., dwl 

630 Howard 
Bliss George D., wholesale butcher. Fourth Ave nr 

Railroad Ave, South S. F., dwl 1.597 Pacific 
Bliss John, cigar manufacturer, 717 Saneom, dwl N 

s Union bet Sansom and Montgomery 
Bliss Theodore H.. stevedore, dwl N s Filbert bet 

Sansom and Montgomery 
Bliven Albert P., captain bark Dublin, pier 17 

Steuart 
Bliven James I., (Fa^nn, B. & Co.) dwl 821 Folsom 
Blix August, clerk, 42 Merchants Exchange, dwl 

344 Fourth 
Bloch Abraham B., gents furnishing goods, 1107 

Dupont 
Bloch Isaac F., (Klein Sr B.) dwl 1108 Post 
Bloch John, dry goods, 3 Virginia Block, dwl 615 

Green 
Bloch John, laborer, dwl LTnion bet Calhoun and 

Broadway 
Bloch William, boots and shoes, 1010 Dupont 
Blochman Abraham, (Blochmon and Cerf, A. 

BlochmniL ^ Co., and I. Blum 4- Co. J dwl 

11 04 Post 
Blochman E. Mrs., millinery, 5 Kearnv, dwl 211 

Eddy 
Blochman Emanuel, wholesale and retail millinery, 

5 Kearny, office 4 Battery, dwl 211 Eddy 
Blochman &. Cerf, (Abraham Blochman & Moses 

Cerj'j commission merchants, 220 Sansom 
Block Abram, merchant, office 115 Battery, dwl 

108 Taylor 
Block Bernard, bookkeeper with Glazier & Seligs- 

berfr. dwl 809 Leavenworth 
Block Catherine, (widow) dwl 530 Vallejo 
Block Daniel, (merchant, Virginia, Nevada) olBee 

26 Sansom, dwl 530 Ellis 
Block Henry, mariner, dwl 134 Steuart 
Block James N., bookkeeper, 115 Battery, (and 

Leon R. Myers & Co.) dwl 108 Taylor 
Block John, clothing and gents furnishing goods, 

507 Kearny, dwl 324 Mason 
Block John, laborer, S. F. & P. Sugar Co., dwl cor 

Union and Sansom 
Block Maurice, salesman with Ackerman Brothers, 

dwl 547 Mission 
Block Robert M. C foreman dredger Winneroucca, 

C. S. N Co. dwl 1006 Clay 
Blodes Theodore, (Blode.t & Brodek) dwl 47 Third 
Blodes & Brodek, ^7'/?eo<io/e Blodes and Samuel 

Brodek j hairdressing saloon, 602 Market 
Blodgett Charles, physician, office and dwl N s 

Sixteenth bet Mission and First Avenue 
Blodgett Edwin A., porter with Brittan, Hol- 

brook A; Co.. dwl 6 Second 
Blodgett Ellen P., (widow) shoefinisher, dwl SW 

cor Sixth and Howard 
Blodgett Ellen T., (widow) dwl cor Potrero Ave 

and Sixteenth 
Blohm Alfred, carpenter Southern Pacific R. R. . dwl 

Alabama l)et Twenty-Fourth and Twenty-Fifth 
Blohm Frederick, car inspector Southern Pacific 

R. R., dwl Alabama bet Twenty-Fourth and 

Twenty-Fifth 



The "PEOPIiES " is a home institution. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny St., Table and Pocket Cutlery. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



105 



Blolini Ileinricli, w.niter, dwl 134Stenart 

Bloljin Henry, giocerieB and liqnorg, NE cor Fifth 

and Clara (nnd Blolim & HillenJ 
Blolini John, h:irUeeper, 619 Pacific 
Blohni Peter, (Blohm & Gerken) dwl NE cor Miss- 
ion and Benle 
Blohni & Gerken, fPrter Blohm and Claua Ger- 
ken) groceries and liquors, NE cor Mission aud 

Beiile 
Blohm & Hillen, (Henry Blohm and Dicdrich 

Hillen) gioceriea and liquors, NW cor Pine 

and Lark in 
Blohuie H., ('G'ro^/icer J(- B.) dwl NW cor Sutter 

and Polk 
Blohnie John, clerk -with Paulsen &. Siebe.dwlNE 

cor Fourth and Everett 
Blom John, shipcaulker, dwl Hodges Place nr 

Valleji) 
BlonHell Thomas, jobwagon, 223 Cal, dwl N 8 

Fulton liet Laguiia and Buchanan 
Blonigen Joseph, gmceries and liquors, 722 Pacific 
Blood" Jaiiiep, quarantine boatman, dwl NE cor 

Fiancipco and Stockton 
BLOOD J. II., attorney at law, notary public and 

commissioner deeds, office and dwl 23 and 24 

Jloutgonierv Block 
Blood Levi L., bookkeeper with Edward Kennedy, 

dwl 610 Powell 
Blood i\Iarv L. Mrs., millinery, 307 Kearny 
Blood VV. H., (widow) dwl 1707 Polk 
Blood William, quarantine boatman, dwl NE cor 

Fiancifco aud Stockton 
Blood William F., clerk, 212 Sansom, dwl 1707 

Polk 
Bloom Charles, sawj-er with B. & S. J. Doe, dwl 

33 Hues 
Bloom George, liquor saloon, SW cor Brannan and 

Fourth 
Bloom Herman, merchant, dwl 119 Third 
Bloom Herman, tatiner with Wolf Bloom, dwl 

Folsoui, bet Eighteenth and Ninteenth 
Bloom Isaac, brooui manufacturer. 113 First 
Bloom Jacob, dry goods, 42 Fourth, dwl 316 0'Par- 

rell 
Bloom John G., laborer, dwl W s Kentucky nr 

Sierra 
Blnoin Mary Mrs., furnished rooms, .119 Third 
Bloom Samuel, dwl E s Howard bet Fifteenlb and 

Sixteenth 
Bloom Wolf, woolfactor and tanner, cor Folsom 

and Twentieth, dwl 25 Harriet 
Bloomer Hiram G.,signpainter, NE cor Clay and 

Jlontgoniery, dwl 1012 Taylor 
Bloomer H. Reynolds, portrait and landscape 

painter, dwl 1012 Tavlor 
Bloomer J. G.. operator Western Union Telegraph 

C... dwl 304 Third 
Bloomer Theodore H., bookkeeper with E. B. 

Swain & Co., dwl 1012 Taylor 
Bloomlield 11., engineer, dwl Occidental Hotel 
Bloonifield James T., newt<papeis and periodicals, 

8U4 Washington, dwl :vJ-2 Green 
Bloomfield Marv, (widow) dwl 212 Francisco 
Bloonifield Thomas, carpenter, dwl 322 Green 
Blouuiiugdale E., merchant, dwl 607 Union 
Blooiiiquist Olof, watchmaker with John Revalk, 

511 Montgomery 
Bloor George W., compositor with M. D. Carr & 

Co.. dwl 10 Prospect Place 
Bloss Henry A., dwl W 8 Shotwell nr Twenty- 
second 
Blosa Joseph, porter with DeWitt, Kiltie & Co., 

dwl 107 Eighth 
Blosbom Thomas, conductor North Beach and Mis- 
sion Railioad, dwl 761 Howard 
BLOSSOM WILLIAM H., Pantheon Saloon, 321 

CMlitornia, dwl 824 Howard 
Blote Henry F. B., clerk S. F. Chronicle, dwl 933 
Hovk'ard 



Blount David T., (Blounl, Cranna & Go.) dwl 726 

Califoniia 
BLOUNT. CRANNA & CO., (David T. Blonnl 
and WiUiayn R. Cranna) general agents Loril- 
lard File Ins. Co., 317 California 
Blow Walter W., clerk with Haggiu & Tevis, res 

Oakland 
Blucher George, miller with California Com. & M. 

Co., dwl cor Pierce and Cliesiuut 
Blucher John C, farmer, dwl 1520 Broadway 
Blue Anchor, Louis Schroder proprietor, 7 and 9 

Washington 
Blue Robert, laborer, dwl 104 Beale 
Blue Rose g. M. Co., (White Pine) office 419 Cal 
Bluett James W., solicitor Hartfiud Fire Ins. Co.. 

313 California, dwl 142^ Fourth 
Bluhm Henry, laborer, dwl 7 Washington 
Blum H., bds Lick House 
Blum Henrv. bakery, 1817 Powell 
Blum I. & Co., (merchants Santa Cruz) office 220 

Sansom 
Blum Isidor, salesman with George O. Whitney & 

Co., dwl 411 Montgomery 
Blum Jacob, merchant, (Silvey ville) office 222 Cali- 
fornia, dwl .'J28 Ellis 
Blum Jacob, peddler, dwl 1325 Pacific 
Blum John, calker, Calkers' Association, Excelsior 

Hall 
Blum John, carpenter, dwl NW cor Berry and 

Third 
Blum John, woodcarver with Bryant & Strahan, 

dwl Brenliani Place 
Blum Leon, (J. SclineHzer <& Co. J dwl 23 Kenrny 
Blum Rose Mrs., fancy goods and trimmings, 1325 

Pacific 
Blum Simon, jobwagon, 227 Sansom, dwl 31j Fre- 
mont 
Blumba Peter, mariner, dwl 510 Davis 
Blumherg J. F., dwl cor Natoma and Lafayette 
Blume Louis, junk dealer, dwl 3 William 
Bluniel L., tailor, dwl E s Columbia bet Twenty- 
Fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Blumenberg Joseph H.," (Patent Brick Co.) dwl 311 

Pine 
Blumenberg's Building, SW cor Pine and San- 
son) 
Blumenthal Adolph, barkeeper, dwl Ocean Beach 

Road one mile from Ocean House 
Blumenthal Edward M., waiter. Grand Hotel 
Blumenthal Henrv, butcher, dwl 120 Dora 
Blumenthal Henry M., dwl 5 Caroline 
Blumenthal Isaac, merchant, dwl 451^ Tehnma 
Blumenthal L., gents' clothing and fuiuishing goods, 

907 Kearny 
Blumquist ChaVles, seaman, dwl 20 Commercial 
Bluudell James Mrs., furnished rooms, 1123 Stockton 
Blunt Amy Miss, fringemaker with Norcross &, Co., 

dwl 610 Powell 
Blunt John P., clerk with Hecht Bros. <t Co., dwl 

610 Powell 
Blunt Phiiieas U., assistant storekeeper Custom 

House, dwl 610 Powell 
Blunt William 6., machinist, dwl 610 Powell 
Blute Michael, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, Potrero 
Bluxome Isaac, (Bluxome & CassebohmJ dwl 1414 

F(d8om 
BLUXOME JOSEPH, physician, office and dwl 

30b Stockton 
BLUXOME & CASSEBOHM, (Isaac Bluxome 
and William Cassehokm) merchandise brokers, 
office 316 California 
Bly Leander A, machinist with Excelsior Mill Co., 

dwl 811 Mason 
Blvmau Edward, upholsterer with Frank G. i:-a- 

' wards, dwl W s Vallejo Place nr Vallejo 
Blyth Henry, (Blyth Sf Wctherbcc) dwl 405 tol- 

som . ,,T 1 1 

Blyth Henry, Jr., clerk with Blyth & Welherbee, 
dwl 405 Folsom 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Letter and Note Paper and Euvelouea. 



106 



YERBA SANTA is endorsed by your leading Physicians. 
SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



BLYTH & AVETHERBEE, (Henry Bh/lh and 
Seth H. WetherbeeJ lumber, SVV cor' Market 

and Spear 
Blytlie William J., Jr., musician, dwl 2127 Stevenson 
Boag VViibe, laborer with E. Detrick & Co., dwl N 

8 Oregon bet Front and Davis 
BOARD OP COMMISSIONERS City Hall, office 

4:52 Montgomery 
BOARD OF FISH COMMISSIONERS, office 401 

California 
BOARD OP COMMISSIONERS Funded Debt 

1851, office 305 Sansom 
BOARD OP COMMISSIONERS Funded Debt 

18.55, office Citv Hall 
BOARD OP COMMISSIONERS LagunaSurvev, 

office 603 Wasliington 
BOARD OP COMMISSIONERS Market Street, 

office NW cor Mont and Clay 
BOARD OP COMMISSIONERS Montgomery 

Avenue, office 1 2 mid 3 Mont-iomerv Block 
BOARD OP COMMISSIONERS Montgomerv 

Street South, office 415 Montgomerv 
BOARD OP COMMISSIONERS San Francisco 

Fire Department, office 23 Keiirnv 
BOARD OP EDUCATION, room 23, City Hall, 

second floor 
BOARD OF ENGINEERS U. S. A. for the Pa- 
cific Const, office 30 South Park 
BOARD OP EQUALIZATION, office 3 City Hull, 

second floor 
BOARD OF HEALTH, office 521 Jackson 
BOARD OP PILOT COMMISSIONERS, office 

525 Front 
BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS, room 

II Citv Hall, first floor 
BOARD OF PORT WARDENS, office 525 Front 
BOARD OP REGENTS University of California, 

A. J. Moulder secretary, office 320 California 
BOARD OF RELIEF, (Masonic) office Masonic 

Temple 
BOARD OP SAILOR BOARDING HOUSE 

Commissioners, (Marine Board) office, 607 Front 
BOARD OP SAN FRANCISCO PARK Cora- 

niissioners, office 320 California 
BOARD OP STATE Harbor Commissioners, office 

414 Montgomerv 
BOARD OF STREPyT Assessment Commissioners 

office 606 Montgomery Room 3 
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS, room 3 City Hall, 

second floor 
BOARD OP SUPERVISORS, clerk of, office 4 

Citv H.iJi, second floor 
BOARD OP TIDE LAND COMMISSIONERS, 

office SW cor Clay and Kearny 
Board of Undei'writeiB, (Boston) Joseph S. Bacon 

agent, office 428 Ciilit'oniia 
BOARD OP UNDERWRITERS, Hie, Charles D. 

HHven secretary, office 416 Cnlifornia 
BOARD OP UNDERWRITERS, marine, (San 

Francisco) C. T. Hopkins secretary, office 318 

California 
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS, (New York) A. 

T. Fletcher agent, office 318 California 
Board of Underwriters, (Philadelphia) A. T. 

Fletcher agent, office 318 California 
BOARDMAN GEORGE C, manager ^tna Insur- 
ance Co., office 14 Merchants' Exchange, res 

Menlo Park 
Boardman George T., cigars and tobacco, 226 Mont- 
gomery, dwl SW cor Mission and Second 
Boardman John H., clerk with V. Koppel & Co., 

dwl 433 Jessie 
Boardman Joseph, dwl NE cor Fraucisco and 

Dupont 
Boarman Louis, waiter Grand Hotel 
Boas Judah, manager with Jacob Jacoby, NE cor 

Kearny and California, dwl 1023 Clay 
Boas Michael, cartman, 949 Folsora 
Boas Paule Miss, dwl 119 Stockton 



Bobenrieth John, driver National Brewerv, dwl 

NW cor O'Farrell and William 
Bobet Leon, brassfinisher with W. T. Garratt & Co., 

dwl 231 Pell 
Bobin B., hostler City Railroad 
I5ob.st Cvrus E., salesman, dwl 911 Bush 
Hobst Thomas Scott, watchmaker, 312 Eishtb 
Boccardo Luigi, laborer with Brignardello, Macbi- 

avello & Co., dwl 704 Sansom 
Boch Peter, clerk with Louis Artigues, dwl New 

Bnlchertown 
Bock Henry, gilder with H. G. Hoefer, dwl 813 

Washington 
Bock Jacob, tailor with C. C. Hastings & Co., dwl 

Mission bet Second and Third 
Bock Jr)bn, teamster, dwl NW cor Bush and De- 

visadero 
Bocken Henry, restaurant, 645 Washington, dwl 

811 Union, rear 
Bocker John, basketmaker, dwl 407 Pacific 
Bockman Frederick, laborer S. P. R. R., dwl Ala- 
bama bet Twenty-fourth and Twentv-fifth 
Bockman Henry, rectifier Pacific Disullery, dwl 

735 Green, rear 
Bockman John C, grocer, dwl 38 Freelon 
Bockmann Diedricli H., clerk with John C. Haake, 

dwl E 8 Main bet Polsom and Hnrrison 
Bockmann Frederick, waiter, 520 California, dwl 

1 08 Prospect Place 
Bockmann George, (Mueller S^- B.J dwl 4 Filla 

Place 
Bockmann Henry, laborer with California Com. and 

M, Co., dwl cor Pierce and Chestnut 
Bocks James, carpenter, dwl Dame iir Thirtieth 
Bocqiieraz Antoine, (Shea, B. & McKce) dwl 

1910 Stockton 
Bode Adolphus W., machine hand with Cole & 

Haskell, dwl 600 Third 
Bode Charles, merchant, dwl 826 Mission 
Bode Eide, machine hand with Cole & Haskell, dwl 

600 Third 
BODE GEORGE C, proprietor Battery Street U. 

S. Bonded Wai'ehouse, dwl 826 Mission 
Bode Henry, cabinetmaker with Gustave Erlin, dwl 

415 Biannan 
Bode Henry, machine hand with Cole & Haskell, 

dwl 600 Third 
Bode Louis, wheelwright, dwl W s Washington 

Avenue near Mission 
Bodecher George, steward Russian, Roman and 

Turkish baths, dwl 524 Pacific 
Bodecker Louis, musician, dwl 403 Union 
Bodecker William, musician, dwl 403 Union 
Bodell L. S., bricklayer, Bricklayers' Association, 

Young Men's Christian Association Hall 
Boden John P., courtroom clerk, Fourth District 

Court, dwl 707 Greenwich 
Boden John Yi.., (John H. Boden & Co. > dwl 705 

Greenwich 
Boden John H. & Co., (Julius QuinchardJ Custom 

house brokers, 504 Battery 
Boden P., (widow) dwl 705 Greenwich 
Boden Thomas, bricklayer, Bricldayers' Association, 

Young Men's Christian Associiiiion Hall 
Bodenhoff Valdimar, mariner, dwl 156 Steuart 
Bodfish William H., attorney at law, office G12 Clay. 

dwl 15 Moss ^ 

Bodkin Eliza, dressmaker, dwl 609 Post 
Bodkin Sarah, dressmaker, dwl 609 Post 
Bodkin Thomas, plasterer, dwl 1 19 Shipley 
Bodwell Harry H., (Atwood <& -By dwl S s Bartlett 

nr Twenty fourth 
Bodwell Joseph R., shoecntter with Orrin Jones, 

dwl 1316 Dupont 
Body William, waiter S. S. Oriflamme North Pacific 

Transportation Co. 
Boeckmann Prank, hostler, dwl 728 Market 
Boehm Ferdinand, porter with Joliu A. Bauer, 103 

Post 



PEOPLES INSUKANCE CO.— Their Losses are promptly paid. 




FliANK H. SWETT. 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



LIBBT <& STVETT, 

Wholesale and 




sw*< 



Publishsrs, Manufacturers and Importers. 



A.GENTS FOR 
A. S. BARNES & CO., - - - New York and Chicago. 
WOOLWORTH. AINSWORTH & CO., New York. Boston and Chicago. 
M. D. CARR & Co., San Francisco, 

Law Book Publishers and Printers. 

3 New Montgomery Street, Grand Hotel Building/ 

SAM FRAJMCISCO. 




W. J. T. PALMER & CO. 



MAXfFACTUREnS OF 




School Furciture on hand and Made to Order. 
105 and 107 Mission Street, San Francisco. 



106' 





HOMGESOPATHIC 





llllill!!:!l'llii!|iiir:liiilllii;iii.llililillW,lilllliri!'Wll'i'iiyii:uJi':n '■iirii ilNiiJM.'is'i , iinuMmiii'lll 

PHARMACEUTISTS AND PUBLISHERS 



234 Sutter St., Young Men's Christian Aasociation Bldg, San Francisco, 

Homosopathi: Medicinss, Homosopathic Books, 

MEDICINE CASES for Physicians and Families. This is the only Establishment 
on the Pacific Coast exclusively devoted to Homoeopathy. 



fii 






•W1 



s 



Law PuWislier, Importer 



BOOISSEZ.LER, 

AND DEALER IN 

LEGAL BLANKS AND STATIONERY. 

No. 613 CLAY STREET, 

SAN PEAWCISCO. 





lOT 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods, 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



107 



Boehme Frederick, musician, dwl 431 Vallejo 

Boehme. — See Bolim 

Boelin Dane, steward C. S. Nav. Co.'s steamer 
Chrysnpolis 

Boell Cliai les L., compositer with Cuddy & Hughes, 
dwl N B Pacific bet Hyde and Larkin 

Boer Henry, laborer witli Eureka Salt Co., dwl 61 
Natoiua 

Boerdt William, clerk with D. H. Urban <& Co., dwl 
NVV cor Mason and Pacific 

Boericke Francis E., (Buericke Sf Tafel) resides 
Philadelphia 

Boericke William, manager with Boericke & Tafel, 
234 Slitter 

BOERICKE & TAFEL, (Francis E. Boericke 
and Adolph TafeJj druggists, (homoeopathic 
pharmacy) "i'M Sutter 

Boes Michael, cartman, dwl 919 Folsom 

BOESCH EMIL, lamps, reflectors, spinning and 
turning metals, ]0i7 Kearny, dwl NE corner 
Kearny and Broailway 

Boese Diederich, painter, dwl NW corner Pacific 
and Dnpont 

Boese H. J., market, SE cor Davis and Clark, dwl 
2110 Mason 

Boetz Henry, waiter, dwl 434 Seventh 

Boetz Joim, restaurant, dwl 434 Seventh 

Boefz Peter, clerk, dwl 434 Seventh 

Bofer William, ( William Bofer Sf Co.) 610 Sacra- 
mento 

BOFER WILLIAM & CO., f Adolph Mnrquard) 
importers aud retail hardware, 610 Sacramento 

Bofinger Jacob, gold aud silverplater, 648 Sacra- 
mento, (and ISandcrs dt B.J dwl 648 Sacramento 

Bogan Charles, printer, dwl 1324 Jackson 

Began Charles, tanner with Cornelius O'Donnell, 
dwl 626 Sixth 

Bogan Philip, longshoreman, dwl 327 Beale 

BOGARDUS JOHN P., editor and proprietor Fig- 
aro, office 532 Merchant, dwl N s Delgardo 
Place nr Hyde 

Bogaidus William, merchant, dwl 418 Folsom 

Bogart John M., (John M. Bogart & Co. J resides 
Onkland 

Bogart John M. & Co., dealers flour and grain, 206 
Davis 

Bogart Orlando H., bookkeeper, with R. H. Mc- 
Donald & Co., dwl 1.512 Mission 

Bogasch Chailes, clerk with John Sneider, dwl 
6 Charles Place 

Bogee Andrew, carpenter, dwl 30 Eleventh 

Bogel C. H., groceries and liquors, SW cor Wash- 
ington and Waverly Place 

Bogel Charles, drayman with Strauss and Frank, 5 
Battery 

Bogel Frederick, driver with Strauss and Frank, 5 
Battery 

Bogel Theodore, {Hcnthfeld, B. & Co. and B. 
Lefevre & Co.) dwl 1015 Jackson 

Boger Edward, tnolmaker. Berry bet Fourth and 
Fifth, dwl 113 Silver 

Boger William, waiter with Hemme & Renter, dwl 
30 Morton 

Boger William, (Goldswith & Co.) dwl 343 Minna 

Bogert Jacob C, mariner, dwiy05 Market 

Boggan Owen, groceries and liquors, NE cor Bush 
and Buchanan 

Boggs A. W.. carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Boggs Paul B.., (A.M. Cnpen & Co. J dwl NVV cor 
Guerrero aud Twenty-fourth 

Bogie William, gardener, dwl E s Cemetery Ave 
bet Post and Sutter 

Bogle Joseph H., special policeman, dwl 642 Jessie 

Bogle R., dwl Ocean House Flat nr Ocean House 

Bogle William H., special policeman, dwl 759 Mis- 
sion 

Bogovich John, barkeeper, 629 Davis 

Bogue Bernard, laborer, dwl 29 Fifth Avenue 

Bogue Michael, dairyman, dwl 431 Greenwich 



Bohem Christina, (widow) dwl 423 East 

Bohen Archibald, stevedoie. Riggers aud Stevedores' 

Association, 429 Pacific 
Bohen Benjamin F., policeman. City Hall, dwl 536 

Ellis 
Bohen George T., surveyor Union Insurance Co., 

416 California, dwl 617 Pine 
Bohen James, gardener, dwl 20 Oak Grove Avenue 
Bohen John, hostler City Stables, 332 Bush 
Bohen Michael, laborer, dwl 15 Geary 
Bohen Patrick, hostler, dwl E s Buchanan nr Mc- 
Allister 
Bohen Timothy, laborer, Laborers' Pro. Ben. Asso- 
ciation, Irish American Hall 
Bohen William, laborer San Francisco Wool Ex- 
change, dwl 520 Mission 
Boheur Jules, stairbuilder with N. P. Langland, dwl 

409 Dupont 
Bohle William, laborer, dwl 7 Washington 
Bohler H., carpenter, dwl 317 Bush 
Bohling Henry, clerk with C. Doscher, dwl SE cor 

Third and King 
Bohling Louis, clerk with F. Bruns & Brother, dwl 

SWcor Folsom and Spear 
Bohlmann Louis, safemaker with Kittredge & Lea- 

vitt, dwl E s Second bet Folsom and Clementina 
Bohls John H., clerk with John Wintgen, dwl NW 

cor Seventh and Minna 
Bohm Simon, salesman with S. Simon & Co., dwl 537 

O'Farrell 
Bohm Wiiliam.manufacturing jeweler, 604 Merchant, 

dwl 1 13 Franklin 
Bohn Andrew, driver Central Railroad, dwl NEcor 

Devisaderoand Post 
Bohn Christian, tinsmith with John Bohn, dwl 418 

Union 
Bohn J., tailor, dwl SW cor Broadway and Dupont 
Bohn Jacob, teamster, dwl 814 Montgomery 
Bohn John, tinsmith, 1218 Dupont and 112 Seventh 
Bohn Mary Ann, (widow) dwl S 8 Vandewater nr 

Powell 
Bohn Peter, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bohn William A., clerk with Charles D. Zeile, dwl 

528 Pacific 
Bohr William, bootmaker with F. Koeper, dwl 221 

Rich 
Boice Charles, waiter, dwl NW cor Berry and Third 
Boice Charles De S., (Boice & DunlapJ dwl 18 

Hampton Place 
Boice <fe Dunlap, (Charles De 8. Boice and. David 

L. DunlapJ cigars and tobacco. Russ House 
Boido Domingo, boots and shoes, 1434^ Stockton 
Boie George, packer. Golden Gate Mills, dwl 11 

Lewis 
Boikovich John, barkeeper with John Ivancovich, 

dwl SE cor Merchant and Kearny 
Boiro Louis, salesman, 618 Kearuv, dwl 15 Morey 

Alley 
Bois Autoine B., harnessmaker, 510 Davis 
Boissard Augustus, trunkmaker with Mauritzen &. 

Co., dwl 2219 Mason 
Boisse Eugene, hairdressing saloon, 526 Commercial, 

dwl 1515 Stockton 
Boisseau Jean Emile, boot and shoemaker, 324 

Dupont 
Boisson Francis, clerk with Lemoine, Gambert & 

Co., dwl NE cor Montgomery and Pacific 
Boisson Jean, laundry, 1013 Sutter 
Boitano Jacob, carpenter, dwl 11 Union Place 
Bok Joseph, baker with Jacob Schneider, dwl S s 

Grove nr Franklin 
BOKEE DAVID M., accountant and collector, 

office 328 Montgomery, dwl 1015 Leavenworth 
Boker Frederick, seaman S. S. Oriflamme, North 

Pac. Trans. Co 
Boker John, basketmaker with V. Navlet, dwl 407 

Pacific 
Bokmann Bendix F., hostler with Kelly &Fennessy, 

dwl 773 Market 



JONJES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sanaom Street, Ladies' and Children's Woolen Goods. 



BEDIN'QTON, HOSTETTEB & CO., The "Wholesale Druggists of the Pacific Coast. 



108 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



Bokmann Henry, liqnor shIooii, 931 Kearny 
Boiadci ■loaqnin, rejil estate agent, office, room 2, 

716 Montffonieiy, dwl o2fi Sutter 
Bulan jMicli.iel J., resident phytsician City and 

County IloBpital, dwl SW cor Stockton and 

Friiiicieco 
Bolaiui Brid-ret, (widow) dwl 109 Sbipley 
Bolaiid Frank, clerk, dwl 631 Siicianiento 
Bolaud James, casliier Vulcan Iron Works, 135 

Fremont, dwl SW cor Second and Mission 
Bolai\d Jolin, cliainpagne mead manufacturer, dwl 

701 O'Farrell 
Boland Jolin Jr., butclier, 4 Occidental Market, dwl 

SE or Taylor and O'Farrell 
Boland John Sen., butcher with John Boland Jr., 

dwl -^27 Second 
Boland Jolin H., ea'esman with Dake, McKown & 

Co , l.'J Kearny 
Boland Margaret Aliss, cloakmaker with Mrs. R. Alt- 

cnl)erg, .')28 Kearny 
Boland Martin, laborer, dwl 14 Hinckley 
Bcland Michael C., harnessmaker with J. O'Kane, 

dwl 13 Sherwood Place 
Boland William, bookkeeper, dwl 47 Natoma 
Biilander Catharine, furnished rooms, 736 Market 
Bolander Frederick A., niolder with Savage & Co., 

dwl 73(5 Market 
Bolander Henry M., principal South Cosmopolitan 

Gi Mmmar School, dwl 1231 Mission 
Boldt Henrv, maiiner, dwl 7 Washington 
Boldt Otis, mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 
Bole James, bookkeeper with Forbes Brothers & 

Co., dwl 040 Bryant 
Bole John, teamster with William Kerr, dwl 903 

Battery 
Boley Susan, (widow) boarding, 54 Third 
Bulger Anne Mrs., furnished rooms, 20 Tehama 
Bdlger John, boilermaker, dwl 260 Clementina 
Bolger John, groceries and liquors. 448 Clementina 
Bolger Thomas, bookkeeper with McNally & Haw- 
kins, dwl S 8 Fell nr Scott 
Bolin fJeorge, bricklayer. Bricklayers' Ass'n, Young 

Men's Clirisiian Ass'n Hall 
Boliiiger William A., real estate agent, office 226 

Mdntgomery, dwl 852 Folsoni 
Bolland John H., (Gnss & Co.) dwl 748 Harrison 
Bolle Henry, cooper, dwl 412 Di'umm 
Bollenhagen Henry, clerk with Alexander Gerdes, 

dwl 25 Fourth 
BOLLKR FRANK J., market, 1230 Dupont, dwl 

516 Filbert 
Bolles Frederick, captain S. S. Idaho, North Pac. 

Trains. Co., office 217 Sansom, dwl 23 Oak 

Grove Av 
Bolles — See Bowles 

Bolleyn Jonathan, bricklayer. Bricklayers' Associa- 
tion, Young Men's Christian Association Hall 
Bollin Philip, waiter, 236 Sutter 
Bulling George K., musician, dwl 27 Natoma 
Bollinger John C, collector, office COS Merchant, 

dwl 1509 Leavenworth 
Bollinger Joseph, porter, dwl 431 Pine 
Bollinger Nicholas, butcher with Charles H. Aitken, 

dwl406Vallejo 
BollingerWilliam, liquor saloon and bakery, SW cor 

Kentucky and Butte 
BoUuian G., (widow) dwl 607 Greenwich 
Bolluiau John, (John BoUman £(■ Co.) dwl 607 

Greenwich 
Bollnian John & Co., ^<7b/tw PflZwer^ manufacturers 

cigarritos, 510 Broadway 
BoUo Thomas & Co., groceries' and liquors, NW cor 

Clay and Stockton 
Bolognesi Rnffaello, importer alabaster and marble, 

dwl 14J1 T.I y lor 
Bolster Patrick, liquor saloon, 816 Howard, dwl 20 

Howard Court 
Bolster Samuel, printer, dwl 719 Clay 
Bolstod LarsM., laborer, dwl 258 Clementina 



Bolt Henry, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bolte Henry, proprietor Kearny Street House, 1023 

Kearny 
Bolte W. ij., merchant, dwl 919 Jackson 
Boltmann George, clerk with Schumaker <fc Trumpf, 

dwl SE cor Filbert and Battery 
Bolton A., insurance agent, dwl 330 Ellis 
BOLTON JAMES R., real estate, office 618 Mer- 
chant, dwl NW cor Greenwich and Jones 
Bolton John, engineer, dwl 901 Sacramento 
Bolton John H., cashier with Miller & Lux, dwl 

618 Merchant 
Bolton John S., machinist Fulton Foundry, dwl W 

s Stockton nr Sacramento 
Bolton Robert, laborer, dwl W s Leidesdorff nr Cal- 
ifornia 
Bolton Robert, (colored) steward, dwl 25 Hinckley 
Bolton W. S., bookkeeper with Er7.graber& Goetjen 
Bolts John, liquor saloon, SE cor Mission and Fre- 
mont 
Bolt/, Albert, waiter with Deutsch & Co., dwl 420 

Green 
Bomer James W., clerk, 26 Metropolitan Market 
BONA ANGELO, Sqnarza's punches, wines, etc., 

118 and 120 Leidesdorff 
Bona John, tailor, dwl W s August bet Union and 

Green 
Bona Pietro, clerk with A. Bona, dwl 1139 Broad- 
way 
Bonal John, bootmaker, dwl 634 Vallejo 
Boualdi G. B., (G. B. Bonaldi & Co.) dwl W s 

Broadway bet Dupont and Stockton 
Bonaldi G. 15. & Co., (David ToiettiJ wines and 

liquors, 505 Siinsom 
Bouar David, cabinet maker and upholsterer, dwl 

1608 Stockton 
Bonavia Nicholas, fresco painter, dwl 572 Folsom 
Bond Alfred, carpenter, H. C. Le«gue, 128 Kearny 
Bond Charles E., salesman w-ith Eisen Brothers, 

dwl 11 Silver 
BOND CHARLES R., secretary Fireman's Fund 
Insurance Co., office SW cor California and 
Siinsora, dwl 1021 Washington 
Bond G. W., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bond John, stevedore. Riggers' and Stevedores' As- 
sociation, 429 Pacific 
Bond Richard L., carpenter and builder, dwl 1114 

Pacific 
Bond Samuel D., hairdresser with John Greif, dwl 

349 Minna 
Bond Thomas H. I., carpenter and builder, dwl 1114 

Pacific 
Bondolphi Peter, laborer, dwl 26 Morey AUev 
BONDY ADOLPH, secretary S. F. Pioneer'Wool- 

en Mills, office 115 Battery, dwl 1023 Powell 
Bone Henry, porter with Landsherger & Co., dwl 

E 8 Dupont bet Union and Filbert 
Bones J. W., architect and builder, office 622 Clay, 

res Alameda 
Bouesteel Charles A., salesman with John G. Hodge 

& Co., dwl 740 Pine 
Bouestel Charles D., (H. Payot & Co.) dwl 837 

California- 
Bonestel Willis T., clerk with John G. Hodge & Co., 

dwl 350 Jessie 
Bonestell John T., (California Jen-elry Co.) and 

manager, 616 Merchant, dwl 740 Pine 
Bonestell Louis H., manager John G. Hodge & Co., 

dwl 512 Stockton 
Bonev John, job wagon, dwl 220 Stevenson 
Bonfiglio John B., baker with Ratto & Co., 427 Pac 
Boufiiilio Nicola, fruits and confectionery, 802 
Kearny, dwl S s Broadway bet Stockton and 
Dupont 
Bongert John M., drayman, dwl 641 Broadway 
Bouglet Celesline Mrs., laundry, 527 Haves 
Bonheimer Engel, laborer, dwl N s Fell bet Fill- 
more and Webster 
Bonheimer Francis, dwl cor Page and Webster 



Insure with the PEOPLES INSUKAITCE CO. and avoid law suits. 



C p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708,712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



AN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



109 



Bonheur Alesandriue D. Mrs., furnished rooms, 409 

Uupont, 
Bonheur Jules, cabinetmaker, dwl 409 Dnpont 
BouilieM James T., stevedore, dwl 4 Beale Place 
Bonis Maiallin, mai ket, NW cor Dnpont and Morton 
Bonis Pierre, veterinary surgeon and blacksmith, 

;2I4 Stevenson 
Bonn Frederick, Rev., pastor Broadway German 

M. E. Church, dwl 728 Broadway 
Bonnard E. A., assistant teacher Spring Valley 

Primary School, dwl 1409 Jackson 
Bonnard Kiancis A., compositor with Bacon & Co., 

dwl 1409 Jackson 
Bonnefond Gustave J., bookkeeper French Mutual 

Benevolent Society, dwl -351 Minna 
Bonnefous Virj^ile. salesman with J. W. Davidson 

<fe Ci)., dwl NE cor Bush and Stockton 
Bonnell Allison C.. cashier S. F. Bulletin Co., dwl 

cor TwcLty-fifth and Capp 
Bonnell Edwin, bookeeeper Savings and Loan 

Society, dwl 709 Taylor 
Bonnell Henry, clerk with F. A. Rouleau, dwl W s 

Capp nr Twenty-fifth 
Bonnell John T., upholsterer with Cummings and 

Terry, dwl 307 O'Farrell 
Bonnell J. T., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bonnell Lucy Miss, assistant teacher Pine and Lar- 

kin St School, dwl \V s Capp ur Twenty-Kfth 
Bonnell S. S., carpentei', H. C. League, 1"28 Kearny 
Bonner John, plumber, Plnnibers Association 
Bonnet Alphouse, waiter, S2-i Dupont 
BOXNET B., brickmaker and asphaltum worker, 

and superintendent Imperishable Block Pave- 
ment Co., office 40'2 Montgomery, dwl SW cor 

Valencia and Twenty-Kfth 
Bonnet Bernard, dwl 522 Pine 
Bonnet Paul, bookkeeper with B. Dolbeguv, dwl 

21.5 Post 
Bennett Laurent, laborer with 6. Venard, dwl 625 

Front. 
Bonney Alfred, carpenter, dwl S a Twentieth bet 

Guerreio and Dolores 
Bonney H. I. Mrs, dwl Virginia Block 
Bonney Joseph, housemover, dwl 414^ Clementina 
Bonney Olpha Jr.. joiner and millwright with Gra- 
der & Heald, dwl SsTwentietli bet Dolores and 

Guerrero 
Bounititfld James, lumber stevedore, dwl 4 Beale 

Place 
Bonny George, (George G. Shreve Sf Go.) dwl 

Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Bonwetlier Charles, drayman, dwl Ws Eleventh nr 

How;ird 



/ How;ird 1 and N, South S. F 

/ - rBonvnge C. W., stockbroker, 6 Express Building, (Bootbby William L., foreman with R. & J. Morton 

7 dwl 821) Sutter ^ dwl 106 Turk 

Bon/i Antonio, cook. 515 Merchant ' Boothe Andrew G.. attornev at law. office 604 Mp.r- 



ionv 
d 

Bon/i Antonio, cook, 515 Merchant 

BOOBAR E. C. & CO., ( Wandell L. Richardson) 
pile drivers and dock builders, NW cor Howard 
and Steuart 

Boobar Elijah C, (E. 0. Boobar <fc Go.) dwl 854 
Folsom 

Boobar James, pile driver with E. C. Boobar & 
Co., dwl 554 Folsom 

Booker Harry T., salesman with Conroy & O'Con- 
nor, 107 Front, dwl 629 O'Farrell 

Booker Helen E. Mrs., fancy goods and dress trim- 
mings, J 4 Second, dwl 64 Tehama 

BOOKER W. LANE, H. B. M. Consul, agent 
Northern Assurance Co. and Royal Mail Steam 
Packet Co., office 319 California, dwl Union 
Club rooms 

Booknieyer Otto W., ahipcarpenter, dwl 7 Wash 

Bookstaver Charles H., butcher with Brown & 
Currier, dwl 8 Bernard 

Bookstaver Samuel J., market inspector, office 521 
Jackson, dwl 8 Bernard 

Bool Nelson, tailor, dwl 23 Jessie, rear 

Boole Frank A., clerk with Fliut, Peabody & Co., 
dwl -27 Silver 



Boole George, shipbuilder, dwl 27 Silver 

Boole William A., (Middlevias ^ B.) dwl 310 

Fremont 
Boom Perry, (colored) cook, dwl W s Leavenworth 

bet Green and Union 
Boomsma Albert, bngsewer with Reynolds, Howell 

& Ford, dwl SVV cor Clay and East 
Boone Henry W., surgeon P.' M. S. S. Co. 
Boone John L., (Dewey & Co.) dwl S s Twentieth 

bet Guerrero and Dolores 
Boone William T., (colored) whilener, dwl 1304 

Powell 
Boop John D., doorkeeper U. S. Branch Mint, dwl 

104 Sixth 
Boos Henry, cooper with M. Fulda & Sous, dwl Ns 

Commercial bet Fiont and Davis 
Booth Adam, (Adam Booth & Co. J dwl S s Seven- 
teenth nr Valencia 
BOOTH ADAM & VO., (Riifus Ket/:ier)Tprodnce 

commission, 326 Davis 
Booth Charles S., machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 

115 Second 
Booth David, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 

115 Second 
Booth George, attorney at law, dwl 523 Kearny 
Booth George A., plasterer, dwl 765 Mission 
Booth Henry J., (H. J. Baolk & Co.) res Europe 
BOOTH H: J. Ik. CO., (Geoije W Presctt and 

Irving M. tScott) prop'rs Union Iron Works, 

NE cor First and Mission 
Booth Hosea, dairyman with N. Simonds, dwl cor 

Twenty-fourth and Vermont 
Booth James, cigars and tobacco, 323 Bush, dvvl 27 

Stone 
Booth .lames, wonlspiimer Pioneer Woolen Mills, 

dwl SE cor Lombard and Hyde 
Booth James R., attorney at law, office 604 Mer- 
chant, dwl 318 Brannan 
Booth Lucius A., real estate, office 402 Front, res 

Oakland 
Booth M., stevedore lumber. Stevedore Association, 

Barra's Hall 
Booth Midiael, laborer, dwl 45 Ecker 
Booth 'Nnwtoii, t of Booth & Co., Sacramento) oSice 

405 Front, dwl 920 Washington 
Booth Robert, tatmer with Christian Hellwig, dwl 

Dolores bet Fourteenth and Fifteeuth 
Booth Samuel, spiLiner Mission Woolen Mills, dwl 

W s Shotwell bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Booth William, merchant, dwl 42 Tehama 
Bootbby Adolph, restaurant, 10 Sacramento 
Bootbby E/.ekiel, laborer, dwl Seventh Av bet, M 

and N, South S. F 



Boothe Andrew G., attorney at law, office 604 Mer 

chant, dwl 523 Kearny 
Boothman James, cooper, 417 Commercial, dwl 714 

Howard 
Boothroid Alfred, driver with John McAndrews, 

dwl Midway nr Bay 
Bootz Adam, (Adam Bootz & Co.) dwl cor Twenty- 
second and Fair Oaks 
BOOTZ ADAM & CO., (Adam Hachmeyer) 

Whitehall Exchange Restaurant, NW cor Spring 

and Summer 
BOOTZ HOTEL, Julius Osiander prop'r, 435 Pine 
Boozane John, blacksmith, dwl 227 Second 
Bopp August, market, 1717 Stockton 
Boquet Alfred, laborer with Louis Teruon, dwl E s 

Long Bi'idge 
Borbeck John, cigars, 942 Kearny, dwl 934 Kearny 
Borchald John, carpenter, H.C. League, 128 Kearny 
BORCHARD CHARLES, wholesale confectioner, 

413 Davis, dwl 1007 Washington 
Borchardt Herman, commission merchant, dwl 424 

Clementina 
Borcher William, captain schooner Felicity, dwl SE 

cor Folsom and Main 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, fancy Dry Goods. 



TEHBA SANTA purifies the Blood and strengthens the Nervous System. 



110 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Borchers Fabian, groceries and liquors, SW corner 

Siinsom and Gi^envvich 
Borchers J. C, pliysician, office and dwl 719 Clay 
BORCHERS J.H., groceries and varietie8,532 First 
Borchers J.T., clerit, 31 Metropolitan Market, dwl 

S 8 Green nr Kearny 
Borchers T. H., {isherinan, dwl 15 Sonora Place 
Borchers William, laborer, dwl U43 Clara 
Borcbert August H., salesman, 405 Battery, dwl 545 

Alinna 
Borde Antoinette Mrs., laundry, 803 Stockton 
Borde Frederick, express wagon, corner Montgom- 
ery and Sacramento, dwl 161(5 Powell 
Borde J., crimper, dwl 12J8 Dupont, rear 
Borden Gale, bricklayer. Bricklayers' Association, 

231 Sutter 
Borden Jolin, laborer, dwl 2 Liberty 
Borden Joseph, carrier Alta California 
Borden Michael, boilermaker, dwl 911 Folsom 
Borden Jlicbael, teamster with Collins & Bro., dwl 

N s Mission bet Seventh and Eighth 
Bordenove Peter, baker, 539 Broadway 
Bordet Silas, dwl 615 Dupont 
Bordi Batlista. fruits, 843 Pacific 
Boiirdinave, Peter, bakery, 539 Broadway 
Bordner Jacob, carpenter, dwl Russ House 
Bordwell George, architect, office 432 Montgomery, 

dwl 139 Silver 
Bordwell George A., draughtsman with George 

Bordwell, dwl 139 Silver 
Bordwell Henry W., millwright, dwl 530 Bryant 
Borel Alfred, {Alfred Borel i^- Co.) dwl 
BOREL ALFRED & CO., (Antome Boreljha.nk- 
evs, NW cor Jackson and Montgomery 
Borel Antoine, {Alfred Borel & Co.) and Vice- 

Consul for Switzerland, dwl 70 California 
Borel F. A., wholesale butcher, dwlS s Santa Clara 

nr Hiimpshire 
Borel Floreiit, pantryman Miners' Restaurant, dwl 

NVV cor Merchant and Sausom 
Borel Gustave, wholesale butcher, Railroad Avenue 
nr Sixth Avenue, South San Francisco, dwl S s 
Santa Clara nr Hampshire 
Borg Charles, laborer, dwl S s Mission bet Beale 

and Main 
Borgen E., laborer Berlin Plaster Works, dwl Bum- 
boat Exchange, Berry nrThiid 
Borger Christian, assayer, dwl 315 Folsom 
Borghgren Nils, tailor, dwl 742 Pine 
Borgstrom Charles, shoemaker with Ut8chig& Han- 
som, dwl Pinckney Place 
Borgstrom Peter, tailor with George L. Reynolds, 

dwl 1125 Stockton 
Borhan William, bar pilot S S. California, North 

Pacific Transportation Co. 
Boris Lambert, laundry, 604 Bdwy, dwl 536 Green 
Borkhiin Henry, regimental tailor, 30 Geary 
Borkhanu George, waiter with E. A. Eugelberg, 416 

Kearny 
Borkowsky Morris, butcher, dwl 242 Clementina 
Borland James, driver with James Donnelly, dwl 2 

Tehama 
Borland Louis, miller with Samuel E. Oakley, dwl 

210 Sacramento 
Borland Samuel H. dwl 42 Everett 
Borland S. H. Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 42 Everett 
Borle Gustave, carpenter, dwl 545 Jessie 
Borle Louis, mattressmaker with J. F. & H. H. 

Schafer, dwl 547 Jessie 
Borman Frederick, liquors, SE cor Kearny and 

Jackson, dwl 330 Green 
Bormann George, laborer, dwl 216 Sixth 
Born Charles, (Bro.s & B.J dwl 417 Post, rear 
Bornemann Ferdinand H, bookkeeper with Wil- 
merding & Kellogg dwl S a Thirteenth bet 
Folsom and Howard 
Bornemann Francis G., cashier U. S. Assistant 
Treasurer's office, dwl S s Thirteenth bet Fol- 
som and Howard 



Bornholt Bendix, night cook with Bertz & Co., dwl 

15 Broadway 
Bornlioist Hermann, cabinetmaker with Schreiber, 

Rohr & Co., dwl 055 Mission 
Bornstein Abraham, expressman, dwl Rassette Place 
Bornstein Daniel, clerk, dwl 315| Third 
Bornstein I. M., salesman with Simon Cohn, dwl 

614 Pine 
Bornstein Julius, gents' furnishing goods, 112 Fourth 
Bornstein Julius, { Williams, B. & Co.>dwl919 Post 
Bornstein Louis, laborer, SW cor Washington and 

Sansom 
Bornstein Max, clerk with Julius Bornstein, dwl 

112 Fourth 
Borreu Kauman, upholsterer, dwl 56 Clementina 
Borrie George F., clerk, dwl Gi-and Hotel 
Borse Gilbert, laborer, dwl 1320 Sansom 
Borstell Henry, mariner, dwl 7 Washington 
Bort Edwin, mariner, dwl -32 Steuart 

Borthwick , tailor, dwl 1123 Stockton 

Borthwick Charles, bookkeeper with Pacific Saw 

Manufacturing Co., dwl 15^ Tehama 
BORUCK MARCUS D., {Chose & B.and Went- 

wortk & B.) office 302 Montgomery, dwl 327 

Eddy 
Bosal August, baker with R. R. Swain & Co., dwl 

140 Second 
Bosch Jacob, carpenter, dwl 14 Brooks 
Bosch Nicholas, clerk, dwl 830 Jackson 
Bosche Nicholas Jr., packer with Eberbart & Lach- 

nian, dwl 182 Stevenson 
Boschen Nicholas, groceries and liquors, NE corner 

Fifth and Minna, dwl 108 Fifth 
Boschert Rudolph, carpenter, dwl S s Lily Avenue 

bet Goughand Franklin 
Boschken Jacob, merchant, dwl 407 Powell 
Boscovich Edw.ird, waiter with N. Sarscen &. Co., 

dwl W B Third bet King and Berry 
Boscowitz Leopold, (Rntckinson, Kohl & Co.) dwl 

920 Washington 
Bose Charles M., clerk with Edward Koch, NW cor 

Clay and Polk 
Bose H., workman, California Sugar Refinery, cor 

Bryant and Eighth 
Bose John, laborer, dwl E s Nebraska nr El Dorado 
Bosher Emil, clerk with Carl Zeile, dwl 529 Pacific 
Bosler John, butcher, dwl 6 Howard Court 
Boslt Gustave, cigarmaker with Weil & Co., dwl 

Davis bet Clay and Washington 
Bosq Romain, { Lenormand <& Co.) dwl 1019 Sutter 
Bosquet Andrew, porter with A. P. Hotaliug, dwl 

1509 Leavenworth 
Bosqui Edward, {Edward Bosqui Sf Co.) dwl 814 

Lombard 
BOSQUI EDWARD & CO., printers, stationers, 

bookbinders and engravers, SE corner Clay and 

Leidesdorff 
Boss Duncan, steward S. S. Oriflamme, North Pacific 

Transportation Co. 
Bosselmann Henry, hackman. Plaza, dwl 746 Mis- 
sion 
Bossert Charles, baker with William Backer, dwl 

1036 Clay 
Bost John W., Surveyor General California, dwl 728 

Bush 
Bostelman Diederick, laborer with Funcke & Was- 

serman, dwl SE cor Eighth and Brannan 
Boston Board of Underwriters, Joseph S. Bacon 

agent, office 428 California 
BOSTON CRACKER CO., {Max Brooks and 

L. Van Orden) office and bakery S s Oregon 

bet Front and Davis 
Boston Furniture Co., Henry Luchsinger manager, 

649 Market 
Boston Joseph, {Gray, Jones & Co.) res Santa 

Cruz 
BOSTON LINE PACKETS, {Glidden ^ Williams 

Line) agency 218 California 
Boston Mary, (widow) dwl 468 Minna 



THE PEOPLES INSURANCE CO. a Liberal Company. 



C P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708. 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



Ill 



BOSTON RUBBER BOOT AND SHOE CO., 

Heclit Bros & Co agents, 104 and lOO S.insoni 
B'strom Gustaf. f^eaman, dvvl 20 Commercial 
Bostwick John H., farmer, dwl 818 Lombard 
BoBtwick Orsiiniiig, prompter Majjuire'a Opera House 
Bostwick Sarali Mrs., furnislied rooms, 3 Hardie 

Place 
Bosvvel! Frederick, barkeeper with James Irvine, 

dwl 351 Minna 
Boswell John, butcher with James M. Lewis, dwl 6 

Howard Court 
Boswell S. B., (Edward F. Hall db Co. J dwl 628 

Harrison 
Bosworth Elisba, miner, dwl 125 Ellis 
Boswortb George F., compositor Examiner, dwl 

lOiO JMoiitgomery 
Bosworth Henry M., teacher music, dwl 910 

Geary 
Bosworth Marcus, dwl 636 Commercial 
BOSWORTH WILLIAM, miuiug, office 432 Mont- 
gomery, dwl \'2d Ellis 
Both Richard, cooper, dwl 222 Jessie 
Botbe Louis, confectioner, dwl 266 Stevenson 
Bothe Sophie Mrs., midwife, dwl 266 Stevenson 
Botherm Louisa, dressmaker, dwl 8 August Alley 
Botbmann Frederick, expresswagon, cor Fourth 

and Mission, dwl Braunan Place nr Brannan 
Botta Guiseppe, fi.slierraan, dwl S s Merchant bet 

Druinni and East 
Bottanzini Giuseppe, dwl 122 Leidesdorff 
Bottaziui Louis A., pressman with Spaulding &, 

Barto, dwl SE cor Green and Powell 
Bottcher Diedeiich, barkeeper withH. Horstmann, 

dwl S s Union nr Kearny 
Bottger John, groceries and liquors, SE cor Mission 

and Seventeenth 
Bottlemace John, watchman California Susjar Re- 
finery, dwl S s Boyd nr Chesley 
Botto Feiise, gardener, dwl Bay View, South San 

Francisco 
Bottom ley Charles, blacksmith, dwl 1023 Market 
Bottomley Chailes, driver Central Railroad, dwl 

467 Jessie 
Bottomley Eliza H. Mrs., glovemaker, dwl 467 

tJcSSKi 

BOTTS CHARLES T., attorney at law, office 402 

Montgomery, dwl 127 Kearny 
Bouchard George, compositor L'Eco Delia Patria. 

dwl 1311 Dupont 
Bouchard Samuel, cabinetmaker with Schreiber, 

Rolir & Co., dwl 1235 Mission 
Boucher Cliarles, boatman, dwl S s Bertha nr Beale 
Boucher Edward, laborer with Miller ifc Haley, 

dwl 550 Stevenson 
BOUCHER EUGENE, merchant tailor, 537 Sacra- 
mento, dwl 536 Pine 
Boucher Jelferson, waiter with Mrs McAuliffejdwl 

b36 Commeicial 
Boucher John, miller, dwl Bay View distillery 
Boucher Thomas, ajiprentice with McAfee, Spiers & 

Co., dwl Bertha nr Beale 
Bouchier Arthur, with Miller & Haley, dwl 550 

Stevenson 
Bouchier James, porter with Hecht Bros. &, Co., 

550 Stevenson 
Boudan Alcide, laundry, dwl 2111 Mason 
Boudard Jacques, lauudryman with A. Ayhens, dwl 

231 Ritch 
Boudin Louis, upholsterer with Goodwin & Co., 

dwl Mission bet Twenty-fifth and Twenty- 
sixth 
Boudin & Gleizes, (Louis Boudin cfc Benjamin 

Gleizesj French bakery, 436 Green, rear 
Bouge Bernard, helper Golden State Iron Works, 

dwl 29 Fifth Avenue 
Bough Peter, laborer with John W. Kelly 
Boukofsky Emil, merchant, dwl 941 Howard 
Boukofsky Nelson, (J. M. Cohen ^ Co.) dwl 1013 

Howard 



Boulan Pierre, carpenter, dwl 517 Filbert 
Boulanger John, barkeeper with P. Giraud, dwl 532 

Pacific 
Boulanger John, furnished rooms, NE cor Kearny 

and Broadway 
Boulanger Marin C, charcoal, 1169 Howard 
Boulanger Pierre, real estate, dwl 626 C-.ilifornia 
Bouldeu A., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
BouUet Josepli, dwl 317 Clementina 
Boullel Joseph Jr., teacher music, dwl 317 Clemen- 
tina 
Boullon Peter, cook, dwl 535 Vallejo 
Bouloii Etienne, syrup manufacturer, dwl 613 

Union, rear 
Bourbeau Xavier, hairdresser with Samuel Plante, 

dwl 506 Bush 
Bourbon Louis, waiter, SE cor Dupont and Com- 
mercial 
Bourdeaux E. Mrs., ( Thomnnn & B.J dwl 735 Clay 
Bourdeaux Victor, f Ricaud ^ B.J dwl 735 Clay 
Bourdett John, clerk with G. D. Hall, dwl 730 Minna 
Bourdiu Andre, molder Vulcau Iron Works, dwl 137 

First 
Bourdon Pierre, printer with E. Jaubert, dwl 720 

Pacific 
Bourgeois Alexander, blacksmith, and foreman H. 

and L. Co. No. 2, S. F. F. D., 630 Broadway 
Bourgeois Louis, messenger with C. G. Savvtelle, 

417 Kearny, dwl Presidio 
Bourges Stephen, laborer, dwl 516 Pacific 
Bourgin Peter, gun and locksmith,. 530 Pacific, rear, 

dwl 1332 Dupont 
BOURGOING A. & CO., (Etienne Gnitta-dJ 

manufacturers Chartres coffee, chocolate, spices, 

etc., 526 Washington 
Bonrgoing Alphonse, (A. Bourgoing & Co.) dwl 

1018 Stockton 
Bourguinon August, boots and shoes, 1034 Kearny 
Bourke John, clerk with Charles Karau 
Bourke Patrick, laborer, dwl 824 Pacific 
BOURN WILLIAM B., capitalist, and President 

Empire M. Co., oHice SW cor California and 

Saiisom, dwl 1105 Taylor 
BOURNE ELISHA W., secretary Merchants' Mu- 
tual Marine Insurance Co., office 406 California, 

dwl 428 Bryant 
Bourne George M., physician, office and dwl 727 

Clay 
Bourne John B., bookkeeper with A. P. Hotaling & 

Co., dwl 1022 Jackson 
Bourne Richard A., shoemaker with Buckingham &. 

Hecht, dwl 21() Stevenson 
Bourne Richard M., clerk with McDonald & Whit- 
ney, dw'l 634 Sacramento 
Bourns John, laborer with Storm &. Co., dwl NW 

cor Berry and Third 
BOURQUIN CHARLES, surgeon dentist and of 

the French Mutual Benef. Society, office and 

dwl 802 Washington 
Bourquin Emile C,, minstrel Maguire's Opera 

House, dwl NE cor Filbert and Leavenworth 
Bours Leopold, laundryman with Jaaies Laidley, 

dwl SE cor Union aiid Gough 
Boursier Edward, butcher, 507 Merchant, dwl 506 

Vallejo 
Bousfield D. J., assayer with Hentsch & Berton, dwl 

42 Sixth 
Bousquet A. M. Madame, cleaning and scouring kid 

gloves, 217 Fourth 
Bouecjuet Eliza, (widow) dressmaker, dwl 1028 

Kearny 
Boutard Charles, French laundry, N 8 Hayes nr 

Laguna 
Boutelle William, watchman, dwl 154 Silver 
Boutes James F., barkeeper, 511 Washington, dwl 

Government House 
Boutinon S., barkeeper with Joseph Ballanger, dwl 

1018 Stockton 
Bouton Daniel, (Bouton & Son) dwl 1011 Stockton 



JONES, i^UIiLMAN & CO., U6 SanBom Street, Millinery Goods. 



KEDINQTOW, HOSTETTER & CO., Agents for Hall's Hair Kenewer. 



112 



SAN FKANCISCO [Bj DIRECTORY. 



Bouton Francis G., (Bouton & Son J dwl 1011 

Stockton 
IJoiiton & Son, (Daniel and Francis G. Bouton) 

Stockton street livery and sale stable, 1016 

Stockton 
Bout/, Leon, engineer with Brader Bros., dwl 736 

Broadway 
Bouvet Jnle, laundry, 716 Vallejo 
Bouwui in Bernard, shoemaker, dwl SW cor Co- 

lunil)ia and Twenty-fourth 
Bovee James S., miner, dwl 1610 Biiah 
Bovee Wllliara, clerk with A. A. Jennings, dwl 

Nianiic Hotel 
Bovee William H., general business agent, office 526 

California, dwl 151.5 Powell 
Bovee William H. Jr., bookkeeper with San Mateo 

Wood Co., dwl 1515 Powell 
Bovo Gabriel, (Gabriel Bovotb Go.) dwl 3 Margaret 

Place 
BOVO GABRIEL & CO., wholesale wines and 

liquors, 1300 Dupont 
Bovyer David, broker, dwl Russ House 
Bovyer William L., architect and builder, 107 

Leidesdortf, dwl 625 Sutter 
Bow Edwin, clerk, dwl 411 Brannan 
Bow Hannah Mrs., dwl X s Fultou bet Octavia and 

Laguna 
Bow William, laborer, dwl cor Guerrero and 

Quiun 
Boweher James ( Wood & B.J dwl 316 Jlinna 
Bowden Joseph, painter, dwl 1107 Filbert 
Bowden S. H. N., mariner, dwl 148 Silver 
Bowden S. M. Co., (White Pine) office 419 Cal 
Bowden William, housep.iinter, dwl 1113 Filbert 
Bowden Williim, steward, dwl 1113 Filbert 
BOWDISH M. S., agent Challenge Feed Mill, etc., 

office with Hawley & Co., SE cor California 

and Battery 
Bowen Archibald J., stevedore, dwl SE cor Mont- 
gomery and Alta 
Bowen Asa M., deputy sberifF, City Hall, dwl 7^0 

Lombard 
BOWEN BROTHERS, {Pardon M. 5«.wr«)wbole- 

sale and retail groceries and provisions, 432 and 

434 Pine bet Montgomery and Kearny 
Bowen C. C. Miss, fissistant teacher Denman 

Grammar School, dwl 8-J4 Bush 
Bowen David, driver. Central R. R., dwl E s Devi- 

sadero bet Sutter and Post 
Bowen Dennis, hostler with N. Gray & Co., dwl 3 

St Marys 
Bowen E. C., pressman, U. S. B. Mint, dwl S s Val- 
lejo bet Leavenworth and Hyde 
Bowen Eladsit T., [Bowen & 'Slocum) dwl 923 

Sutter 
Bowen Frederick, bookkeeper with Thomas Hart, 

894 Front 
Bowen George H., miller. Golden Oate Mills, dwl 

E 8 Devisadero bet Turk and Eddy 
Bowen Hannah, (widow) dwl 251^ Clementina 
Bowen Henry, teamster, dwl S s Ellis bet Fillmore 

and Webster 
Bowen James, bookbinder with A. L. Bancroft & 

Co., dwl 217 Broadw;iy 
Boweu James [Billix & B.) dwl 737 Howard 
Bowen Jennie Miss, (colored) dressmaker, dwl 28 

Stone 
Bowen John, brassfinisher with M. Dobizensky, 

dwl cor Pacilic and Kearny 
Bowen John L., tinsmith with Osgood & Stetson, 

dwl 1109 Jones 
Bowen Michael, laborer. dwlW s Main nr Folsom 
Bowen Pardon M., (.Bowen Brothers) dwl 1139 

Sutter 
Bowen Thomas, {Boicen Sf Slocum) dwl 925 Sutter 
Bowen Timothv, laborer, dwl Dupoiit Place 
BOWEN & SLOCUM, (Eladsit T. Bou-en, Lot 
T. Slocum & Thomas Bowen) livery stable, 

921 aud 923 Sutter 



Bower A. H. G. F., lacemaker, dwl Golden Gate 

Hotel 
Bower C. Miss, confectionery, 514 Third 
Bower Charles, dairyman with C. Rnhland, Cen- 
tral Ocean Road \ mile from toll gate 
Bower Christian, with G. W. Hattmun, Union bet 

Franklin and Gough 
Bower John, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bower John, cooper, dwl 182^; Powell 
Bower Louis, (F. Hartcnstcin & Co.) dwl 39 

Fourth 
Bowerman William, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Bowers Alonzo B., civil engineer and surveyor, 

dwl 522 Ji Howard 
Bowers Benjamin D., furniture wagons, SW cor 

Bush and Montgomery, dwl 24 Sixth 
Bowers Eneline Mrs., furnished rooms, 129 Second 
Bowers Hiiam, milkranch, San Jos6 Road nr Six 

Mile House 
Bowers .John, milkranch, San Jose Road nr Six 

Mile House 
Bov^'ers John, laborer, dw! 11 Howard Court 
Bowers J. T., local agent Occidental Ins. Co., dwl 

1007 Jones 
Bowers S. T., bricklayer, Bricklayers' Association, 

Young Men's Christian Association Hall 
Bowers Thomas J., dwl N s Page bet Franklin and 

Gough 
Bowers William I., bookkeeper JManhattan Life 

Ins. Co., dwl 921 Bush 
Bowers W. O.. engineer stmr Pilot, Cowell's wharf 
Bowes John, laborer, dwl O'Farrell nr Geary 
Bowes John J., dwl 43 Clementina 
Bowes Jonrdan, waiter, dwl 25 Hinckley 
Bowhan John, laborer, Laborer's Pro. Ben. Associ- 
ation, Irish American Hall 
Bowie Augustus J., (Bowie 4- Breeze) dwl NW cor 

Stockton and Sutter 
Bowie Augustus J. Jr., mining engineer, dwl 438 

Bryant 
Bowie George W., U. S. naval officer, office Custom 

House, dwl Grand Hotel 
Bowie Henry P., (Barnes & B.) atforney-at-law, 

office 438 California, dwl NW cor Sutter aud 

Stockton 
Bowie M;iry Miss, dwl 54 Jessie 
Bowie Wallace A., clerk with S. P. Taylor & Co., 

dwl 719 Howard 
Bowie William D., clerk County Recorder's office, 

dwl 1520 Mission 
BOWIE & BREEZE, (Augustus J. Bncic & 

Charles K. Breeze) physicians a'.id surgeons, 

office 622 Clay 
Bowlan Ellen Miss, dressmal^er, dwl 1036 Folsom 
Bowlen James, coachman Grand Hotel, dwl 47 

Everett 
Bowler James, mariner, dwl 123 Spenr 
Bowles Francis A., carpenter with N. P. Langland, 

dwl 5^ Willow 
Bowles George R., carpenter and builder, dwl 311 

Stockton 
Bowles James, salesman with Horace Little & Co., 

dwl 627 California 
Bowles Richard, helper Risdon Iron Works, dwl 

311 Pacific 
Bowles, — . See Bolles 
Bovvley Freeman S. , fireman Southern Pacific R.R., 

dwl 25 Prospect Place 
Bowley Henry L., with Chase & Bowloy, dwl 423 

Bryant 
Bowlev Jesse D., civil engineer, dwl 25 Prospect PI 
Bowley Simnel C, (Chase Sf B.) dwl 423 Bryant 
Bowlin Fi-ank, (Isaacs, Daughaday <£ B.) dwl 031 

Sacramento 
Bowman Arthur W., real estate, office 523 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 26 Essex 
BOWMAN C. C, merchant, office 723 Montgomeiy, 

room 4 



THE PEOPLES INSURANCE CO.-ii Live Company. 



C. p. VA.N SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street. Furnishing Goods. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



113 



Bowman Charles E., carpenter and rabinetmaker, 1 

Powell, dwl SE cor Eddy imd Scott 
Bowm:in Charles H., with Californiu Steam Navi- 

giition Co., office NE cor Front and Jacksou, 

dwl l'2n() Fol^5om 
Bowman Ferdinand, liquoi'g, dwl 330 Green 
Bowman Frank E., maebine baud California Mills, 

dwl 3 Lil)erty 
Bowman Geortce, fPfans & B.) dwl 531 Natoma 
Bowman George E., conductor Omnibus 11. U., dwl 

158 Tehama 
Bowman Geoi-re M., messenger Wells, Fargo &. 

Co., res Calistoga 
Bowman Hollis, merchant, dwl Grand Hotel 
Bowman James, engineer, dwl 514 Dii|>ont 
Bowman James, secretary S. F. Post Office, office 

7 Monlgomery Block, dwl 714 Broadway 
BOWMAN JAMES F., editor, dwl 10)5 Clay 
Bowman Joel K., boarding, 158 Tehama 
Bowman John, laborer with S. S. Butler, dwl 1009 

Keainy 
Bowman John, Inborer with Bernard Hagan, dwl 

Filliert nr Steiner 
Bowman John, mariner, dwl E s Main bet Howard 

and Folsom 
Bowman John, milkman, dwl Presidio Road nr U. 

S. Ileservation 
Bowman John, porter, Brooklyn hotel 
Bowman John C, groi-eries and liijuors, 523 Union 
Bowman John S., ( Liebes & B.J dwl Nucleus Hotel 
Bowman Michael, salesman with Jacob Schreiber, 

dwl 43 Sixth 
Bowman P. E., Mrs., dwl 1119 Montgomery 
Bowman Peter, laborer with John Bowman, dwl 

Presidio Road, nrU. S- Reservation 
Bowman Samuel, driver Market Siieet R. R., dwl 

5 8 Linden bet Laguna and Octavia 
Bowman William, carpenter, dwl 894 Front 
Bowman William, shoemaker with Buckingham 

6 llecht, dwl cor Octavia and Rose 
Bowman William, milkman, dwl N s Page nr 

Franklin 
Bowman. — See Bouwman 
Bowmer William, tailor, dwl 717 Stockton 
Bowue William F., real estate, office 311 East, dwl 

107 Powell 
Bowne William S., f Wright & B.J dwl Kimball 

Place 
Bownc's George, express wagon, cor Market and 

Fourth, dwl W s Tennessee ur Kentucky 
Bowren Thomas, driver str No. 4, S. F. F. D., dwl 

Engine House W s Second nr Howard 
Box Jaiues, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Boyard Charle,^, gardener with Charles \V. Wiu- 

gard, dwl W s Valencia nr Twenty -fourth 
Boyce Bros., (Jamta E. and Char/cx A. BnyceJ 

street car advertising agents, NW cor Wash- 
ington and Sansom 
BoyceCharles A., (Boyce Bros.) dwl 10 John 
Boyce James, laborer, dwl San Jose Road ur Six 

M ile House 
Boyce James E., (Boyce Bros. J dwl 10 John 
Boyce James R., porier with Wright & O'Connor, 

dwl N\V cor Drummand Commercial 
Boyce John, boatman, dwl NW cor Francisco and 

Powell 
Bovce John, fireman, San Francisco Sugar Refinery, 

' dwl 12 Chelsea 
Boyce John, laborer New U. S. B. Mint, dwl 234 

Minna 
Boyce Mary, (widow) dwl 1118 Taylor 
Boyce Samuel, with Thomas Boyce, dwl Tremont 

House 
BOYCE THOMAS, a<lverti8ing agent, office 30 

Merchants Exchange, dwl 526 Pine 
Boyce. — See Boise 

Boyd Alexander, (Boyd& Davis J dwl 500 Sutter 
Boyd Colin M., clerk County Recorder's Office, dwl 

917 Jones 



Boyd Edward, clerk with Lynde & Hough, dwl G16 

California 
Boyd Edward T., plumber and gas fitter, 38 Morton 
Boyd Franci.s, stevedore, Riggers and Stevedores 

Association, 429 Pacific 
Boyd Prank, pilot, dwl N s Greenwich nr Sansom 
Boyd George, foreman Fashion Stable, dwl Iti Sut- 
ter 
Boyd George W., captain bark Osmyn, dwl S s 

Columbia bet Guerrero and Dolores 
Boyd Henrv C, clerk, 304 Montgomery, dwl 318 

Fifth 
Boyd Henry C, proprietor Niantic Hotel, NW cor 
Clay and Sansom, and deputy sheriff, City Hall 
Boyd James, baker with John C. Carroll, dwl 72 

First 
Boyd James, machinist, dwl 159 Silver 
Boyd James, stevedore, dwl 1820 Stockton 
Boyd James, stonecutter, dwl 1404 Hyde 
Boyd James T., (McCiillongh & B.J attorney at 
law, NW cor Kearny and Commercial, dwl W 
s Sixteenth bet Shotwell and Folsom 
Boyd J. M., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Boyd John, drayman with C. Bernard, dwl 14 Wil- 
low Avenue 
Boyd John, furniture, 747 Folsom 
Boyd Jose[>h C, miner, dwl 142 Clara 
Boyd Oliver D., deputy assessor City and County, 

dwl 709 Greenwich 
Boyd Theodore C, wood engraver and stationer, 

910 Market, dwl 713 Taylor 
Boyd Thomas W., machinist .^tua Iron Works, dwl 

108 O'Farrell 
Boyd William, captain ship Marmion, pier 1, St«uart 
Boyd William, cook (il4 Montgomery, dwl NE cor 

Francisco and Dupont 
Boyd William A., brewer Empire Brewery, dwl 32 

Natoma 
Boyd William M., manufactnrer yeast powder and 

cream of tartar, 416 Battery, dwl 1001 Cal 
Boyd William W., conductor Front Street, M. ic O. 

Railroad, dwl SE cor Polk and Bush 
BOYD <fe DAVIS, (Alexanilcr Boyd and J. Z. 

Davis J capitalists, office 321 Front 
Boye George, miller Golden Gate Mills, dwl 9 

Lewis 
Boye Otto, proprietor Mountain Spring House, 
Seventeenth and Mission and Ocean Beach Road 
Boyed Henry C, clerk, dwl 318 Fifth 
Boyenval Armand, cellarmaster Landsberger & Co., 

dwl SW cor Broadway and Dupont 
Boyenval L., fouudryman, dwl SW cor Broadway 

and Dupont 
Boy er Andre, fireman French Hospital 
Boyer Louis W., bookkeeper with Bowen Brothers, 

dwl 619 Mission 
Boyer William, lamplighter with S. F. Gas Co 
Boyer William, shoemaker, dwl 36 Russ, rear 
Boyhan John, carriagetrimmer with Pollard & 

Carvill, dwl 445 Natoma 
Boyhan Patrick, carriagetrimmer with Pollard tfc 

Carvill, dwl 164 Jessie 
Boy Ian Bernard, porter Lake Vineyard Wine Co., 

dwl Auburn Place 
Boylan Jane A., (widow) dwl 441 Clementina 
Boy Ian Michael, gasHtter with S. F. Gas Co 
Boylan Patrick, laborer, dwl 165 Minna 
Boylan — see Boylen 
Boyland Francis, waiter Grand Hotel 
Boyle Annie (widow) furnished rooms, 212 Post 
Boyle A. O., laborer with Hancock &. Kelso 
Boyle Bernard, laborer. Laborers Pro. Ben. Ass'n, 

Irish American Hall 
Boyle Burnett, laborer, dwl 1615 California, rear 
Boyle Charles, mariner, dwl 623 Davis 
Boyle Daniel, groceries, cor Mary and Natoma, dwl 

E s Eighth bet Folsom and Harrison 
Boyle Daniel, mason, Stonemasons Association, NE 
cor Bush and Kearnv 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sanaom Street, Perfumery and Faacy Soaps. 
8 



BEDITrGTOWS FLAVOKIM'G EXTEACTS, Articlrs of real merit and worth their value. 



114 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Boyle Daniel, painter, dwi /iSS Mission 
Boyle Daniel {Ei^an & D.J dwl 438 Natoma 
Boyle David, gas machine iiiauufactuier, dwl 3G5 

Clementina 
Boyle Edward, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Boyle Edward, porter with Eggeis <fc Co., dwl A'S'Z 

Teliaina 
Boyle Edward P., express wagon, dwl NE cor 

Steiner and Eddy 
Boyle George, shoemaker, dwl Ufi5 Jessie 
Boyle George. shoemaUer with Donovan Brothers, 

dwl 811 Market 
Boyle George S., dentist, 653 Clay, dwl 18-21 Stock- 
ton 
Bovle Hannah, (widow) dwl 18t21 Stockton 
BUYLE HENRY, mining secretary, office 10 Stev- 
enson's Building, res Alameda 
Boyle Hugh A., secretary City Grading Co., office 

1 Court Block 636 Clay, dwl 1715 Stockton 
Boyle James, hriek layer Bricklayers Association, 

Young Men's Christian Association Hall 
Boyle James, hostler N. B. &, M. R. R., dwl 217 

Perry 
Boyle James, laborer, dwl 212 Broadway 
Boyle James, laborer, dwl E s Capp nr Twenty- 
fourth 
Boyle James, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Boyle John, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Boyle John, clerk with A. McBoyle & Co., dwl 

W 8 Ohio bet Broadway and Vallejo 
Boyle John, laborer, dwl 40'J Greenwich 
Boyle John, real estate agent, office 502 Montgomery, 

' dwl SE cor Hayes aud Pierce 
Boyle M., gardenei', dwl lOIJ Market 
Boyle Michael, baker with Thomas J. Cbadboume, 

1412 Dupont 
Boyle Michael, clerk Manhattan Honse, 707 Front 
Boyle Michael, lab.irer, dwl 318 Pacific 
Boyle Michael, heater Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl 

Piitrero Point 
Boyle Michael, seaman S. S. Senator, N. P. T. Co 
Boyle Xeal, laborer with Arthur M. Ebbets, dwl 37 

Minna 
Boyle Owen, carcleaiier Market Street R. R., dwl 

cor Fit'ieenlh and Valencia 
Boyle Patiick, caipenter, dwl W s Ohio bet Broad- 
way and Vallejo 
Boyle Patrick, laborer, dwl 6 Clarice Place 
Boyle Patrick, laborer, dwl 18 Natoma 
Beyle Peter, clerk, dwl 2'J First 
Boyle Peter, laborer S. S. Pelican, North Pacific 

Transjiortatioii Co. 
Boyle Peter, molder, dwl 55 Natoma 
Biyle P. S., draymin, dwl 2 California, rear 
Boyle Robert, '( Mnllon & B.J dwl N s Green bet 

Hyde and Larkin 
IJoyle S. J. Miss, assistant teacher South San Fran- 
cisco Grammar School, dwl Bush bet Laguua 
and Octavia 
Boyle Stephen, blacksmith, dwl 110 Minna 
Boyle Stephen J., machinist with Locke & Mon- 
tague, 114 Battery 
Boyle Thomas, shipjoiner, dwl N e Bosh nr Laguna 
Boyle Thomas J., clerk with Hambletou & Gordon, 

dwl NE cor Eddy and Stenier 
Boyle Timoihy, laborer, dwl Clarice Place 
Boyle William, coachman, dwl 31 Fifth Avenne 
Boyle Williaui, glasscutter with John Mallon, dwl 

34 Hayes 
Boyle William, waiter, dwl -533 Commercial 
Boyle William J., clerk with Kelly & Shay, dwl 

1615 California 
Boylen Bernard, porter with B. D. Wilson & Co., 

dwl 16 Auburn 
Boylen Charles, (Boylen & Co.) dwl NE cor Powell 

aud Green 
Boylen John, housemover, dwl 763 Mission 
Boylen Joseph, night inspector Custom House, dwl 
137 South Park Avenne 



Boylen & Co., Charles Boylen and (W. J. LeamanJ 

fruits, etc., NW cor Green and Stockton 
Boglen — see Boy Ian 
Boyling Thomas, captain ship Isaac Jeans, pier 17 

Stenart, dwl 334 Seventh 
Boyne George, mail clerk Alta California, dwl 

Codman Place nr Washington 
Boyne Joseph, laborer, dwl Codriuiu Place 
Boyne Thomas, proprietor Union Sailors' Home, 45 

■ Vallejo 
Boynton Charles Y,., carriagemaker with M. W. Al- 

' len &. Co., dwl 549 Bryant 
Boynton Lamour A., clerk U. S. Assistant Treasur- 
er's office, dwl 14 Geary 
Boynton Underbill, real estate agent, dwl 776 How- 
ard 
Boynton W, wagon, 737 Howard 
Boy sen Charles M., hatter with Konrad Meuesdorf- 

fer, dwl 1623 Powell 
Boysen Frank, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Boysen Hans, boatman, dwl 505 Union 
Boysen Henry C, cook, NE cor Pacific and Kearny 
Boysen Jes, mariner, dwl 156 Steuart 
Boysen Julius, hatter, 514 Pine 
Boyston John, barkeeper with Frank Kelly, dwl 

425 Fourth 
Boznai Antonio, cook, 515 Merchant 
Bozzia Edward, butcher, dwl .506 Vallejo 
Bozzo Emanuell, (Jovllin (fc B.) dwl 1422 Powell 
Braake Ernst, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Braasch Clans, porter New Atlantic Hotel 
Brack Osphelt, shoemaker, 1506 Franklin 
Brackaiiwagn Henry, cabinetmaker,dwl 430 Vallejo 
Bracken Geor^re. clerk with C. E. McCusker &Co., 

dwl 225 Sixth 
Bracken John, proprietor Five Mile House, San 

Bruno Road 
Bracken Lawrence, expresswagon, cor Mission and 

Third, dwl W s Dora bet Harrison aud Bryant 
Bracken Michael, speculator, dwl SE cor Geneva 

and Brannan 
Brackett Charles, clerk, dwl 117 Perry 
Brackett Joseph G., miller National Mills, dwl 1514 

Hyde 
Brackett Lawrence, wagon, cor Third and Mission 
Brackett Wiilter P., porter Tax Collector's office. 

City Hall, dwl 730 Union 
Brackett William L., (Brackett & KcyesJ dwl 412 

Taylor 
Brackett &. Keyes, f William L.Brnckelt and Or- 
son FT. KcyesJ Steuart St. Market, 50 .Steuart 
Bracle George, teamster with Jason Springer, dwl 

SE cor Spear and Mission 
Braclin William, laborer, S. F. Gas Co., dwl cor 

Third and Townseud 
Braconnier Louis, upholsterer, dwl 423 Green 
Bradbury Alfred W., carpenter with Atwood & 

Bodwell, dwl 1806 Mason 
Bradliury A. P., captain stmr Caroline, office 126 

Clay 
Bradbury Fred. M., (Rosenthal & B.} dwl 1021 

Hyde 
Bradbuiy L. J., engineer, P. M. S. S. Co 
Bradbury N. F., carpenter, dwl NW cor Van Ness 

Avenue and Bush 
BradbuiT William B., contractor aud builder, dwl 

14 1 6 Bush 
Bradbury William J., (Truett & B.) dwl 1905 

Stockton 
Bradbury William T., physician, office and dwl S s 

Twenty second bet Folsom and Shotwell 
Bradbury's Building. 52 Second 
Braddock William, Knickerbocker saloon, SE cor 

Leidesdorff and Halleck, dwl 118 Sacramento 
Braden Thomas, contractor, dwl SW cor Eddy and 

Steiner 
Brader Ann, (widow) dwl 740 Broadway 
Brader Christian, foreman with Brader Bros., dwl 

736 Broadway 



PEOPLES INSUBAIf CE COMPANY, 16 Merchants' Exchange, California Street, S. F. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO.. 708. 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, White Shirts. 



SAN FRANCISCO [ JJ ] DIRECTORY. 



115 



Brader Brotliers (Henry and Lonix Binder) whole- 
8 lie liqiiora, 6:::l Saiisom, aud Excelsior Soda 
Works, 738 Broadway 
Brader Henry, (Bmder Brothers) dwl 738 Bdwy 
Biailer Jobn, carpenter, dwl Ii2l Pacific 
Brader Louis (Brader Bruthem) res Careou City, 

Nevada 
Brader Peter, salesman with Brader Brothers, dwl 

809 Union 
Bradford C. H., real estate, dwl Grand Hotel 
Braiitoid George B., real estate agent, dwl 65 Te- 

liaina 
Bradford Gerslion, sub-assistant U. S. Coast Survey, 

otiice 629 Kearny, dwl Occidental Hotel 
Bradford James J., compositor with A. L. Bancroft 

ifc Co., dwl 1219 Sacramento 
Bradford Joseph, clerk, dwl 839 Mission 
Bradford L. A. Miss, assistant leather Broadway 

Gianimar School 
Bradford Luther T., ( FHch & B.) dwl 254 Eighth 
Bradford Samuel, dec^Uliand. dwl 728 jMarket 
Hrailford Thomas H.. dwl 65 Tehama 
Bradford Wallace, clerk with Plum, Bell & Co., 

dwl 1 Winter's Lane 
Bradford William, carpenter and contractor, dwl 

W 8 Mission nr TAventy-lirst 
Bradford William, ( Bradford & SanchesJ dwl 376 

Natoma 
Bradford Woodbury, printer Monitor oflSce, dwl 

N s Winter's Lane nr Mason 
Bradford & Sauches, ( VVilUam Bradford Sf R. P. 
SanchesJ carpenters and builders, 376 Natoma 
Bradlioof Henry, saloon, dwl 1.5U8 Powell 
Bnt<iiL,'an Nicholas, saloonUeeper. dwl 718 Market 
Bradinu: Henry, cook, SS Moses Taylor North Pa- 

cilic Trans. Co. 
Bradlee Frank, driver Market St. R. R., dwl Va- 
lencia bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Bradlee Stephen H. Jr., butcher with George A. 

Raabe, dwl 11-15 Folsoin 
Bradlee T. H., cari^enter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny > 
Bradley A." P., specnlator, dwl 331 Montgomery 
Bradley Benjamin, lauiidryraan, City and County 

H()si)ital 
Bradley Bennett T., wharfinger, Com. St. wharf, 

dwl 1209 Sutter 
Bradley Bernard, painter, dwl S s Willow Avenue 

nr Buihaiian 
Bradley Charles, longshoreman, dwl 249 Perry 
Bradley Daniel, laborer with Hancock & jielso, 

dwl 241) Tehama 
Bradley Eliza Mrs., furnished rooms, 1014 and 1016 

Stockton 
Bradley E. P. Mrs., assistant teacher Denmau 

Grammar School, dwl 31 Tehama 
Bradley George L., (Bradley & Oockrill) dwl 820 

Suffer 
BRADLEY HENRY W., importer photographic 
and ambioi,ype material, 61 'i and 62(t Clay (and 
Bradley & Rnlnfson.) resides Alameda 
Bradley Hugh, plasterer. Plasterers' Pro. Associa'n, 

727 Market 
Bradley John, laborer, 112 Post, dwl 171 Jessie 
Bradley John J., farmer, dwl 4.33 Uidou 
Bradley L. L., c e k, dwl 314 Bush 
Brailley Michael, laborer, dwl J3 Hunt 
IJiadley Nicholas, plasterer, dwl 333 Bush 
Bradley Othol., blacksmith with Saul & Co., dwl 

207 Clara 
Bradley Patrick, oarsman Tide Land Survey 
Bradley Peter, furnitui'e, 209 Fourth 
Biadley Peter, wagon, 1132 Market 
Bradley Richard B., (colored) caterer, office 424 

Montgomery 
Bradley Robert E., waiter, steamer Idaho North 

Pacific Transportation Co., dwl 111 Jessie 
Bradley Samuel, patternmaker Risdon Iron Works, 
dwl 2 Clementina 



Bradley Stephen H., etairbuilder with Hibberd, 
Sanborn k Co., dwl W .s Hollis nr Ellis 

Bradley Theodore, principal Boys' High School, 
dwl 34 Tehama 

Bradley Thomas, bookkeeper, dwl 112 Shipley 

Bradley T. W., (George W. Sawen Sf <Jo.) dwl 
NE cor Broadway and Stockton 

Bradley Williatn, laborer with J. B. Kemp, dwl cor 
Kentucky and South 

Bradley Williau), laborer with J. Y. Wilson & Co., 
dwl cor Buchanan and Bay 

Bradley William, watchmaker" with W. E. Bridge, 
dwl 14 1 Ransch 

Bradley William F., driver Bamber & Go's Ex- 
press, dwl 1012 Monrsromery 

BRADLEY & COCKRILL, (George L. Bradley 
and Theodore G. Cockrillj importers and job- 
bers liquors, .521 Front 

BRADLEY & RULOFSON, (Henry W. Bradley 
and William H. Jlu/ofson) photographic art 
gallery, 429 Montgomery cor Sacramento 

Bradriek Isaac, e.xpresswagon, corner Front and 
Washington, dwl 113 Dora 

Bradsliaw Catharine, cook Franklin Hotel 

Bradshaw Charles, laborer, dwl 567 Sixth 

Bradshaw Edward L., ( Marley Jf- B.) dwl cor 
Second and Mission 

Bradshaw George H., bookkeeper with Blake, Rob- 
bins & Co.. dwl 414 Ellis 

Bradshaw H. B.. collector with Nelson & Doble, 
dwl 474 Tehama 

Bradshaw Helen P. Miss, teacher music, dwl 474 
Tehama 

Bradshaw Melinda, (widow) dwl 474 Tehama 

Bradshaw Samuel C, assayer, dwl 414 Ellis 

Bradshaw Turell T., real estate agent, office 206 
Monti^omery, dwl 200 Tyler 

BRADSTREEt J. M. k SON, mercantile agency, 
CNew FocAy James P. Mosher, superintendent, 
office 313 California 

Bradt Charles, driver City railroad 

Bradt Garret G., dwl Miles Place 

Bradt J. M., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Bradt John, carpenter, dwl Seventeenth Avenue nr 
J, South S. F 

Bradt John A., carpenter, dwl 424 Stevenson 

Brady , butcher, dwl 269 Minna 

Brady Benjamin, general merchandise, 311 Com- 
mercial, dwl 628 Vallejo 

Brady Bernard, clerk with John B. Sbarboro. dwl 
21 Garden 

Brady Charles, molder, dwl 545 Howard, rear 

Brady Charles, shoetnaker with Met'n B. and S. Co 

Brady Charles P., waiter with Richard Williams, 
dwl 524 Mission 

Brady Daniel, market, 120 Fourth, dwl 331 Tehama 

Brady Edward, machinist Golden Gate Sugar Refin- 
ery, dwl Eifihth bet Harrison and Bryant 

Brady Edward, plumber. Plumbers' Association 

Brady Edward, restaurant, dwl 130 Turk 

Brady Edward M., conductor Central railroad, dwl 
130 Turk 

Brady Edward R., clerk 313 California.dwl 130 Turk 

Brady Edwin, artist, dwl 3 Tho npson Avenue 

Brady Frank R., finisher willi Savage & Co., dwl 
521 Howard 

Brady Henry A., clerk with Diedrich H. Wulzen, 
dwl NE cor Folsom and Ninth 

Brady Henry J., attorney at law, office 619 Mont- 
gi mery, dwl 1425 Hyde 

Brady Kate, ironer with IS. F. Laundry Association, 
dwl NW cor Turk and Fillmore 

Brady J., shoemaker, dwl 511 Mission 

Brady James, clerk with White & Bauer, dwl NW 
cor Pacific and Ohio 

Brady James, housesmith with John R. Sims, dwl 
1421 Taylor 

Brady James, laborer, dwl N s Filbert bet Sansom 
and Montgomery 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO.. 116 Sansom Street, Yankee Notions. 



KEDINGTON HOSTETTER & CO., Importers Choice Fancy Goods, Perfumery, etc., etc 



116 



SAN FRANCISCO [ K ] DIRECTORY 



Brady James, tinsmitb with G. & W. Snook, dwl 

Vincent Place 
Brady James F., insurance asfent, dwl E a Howard 

bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Brady James (i., compositor with Waters, Newhoff, 

Co.. dwl S s Filhert bet Mason and Taylor 
Brady James S., f Brady <ic Brady J dwl \i Sumner 
Brady J. M., carpenter, H. C. Leajiue, 128 Kearny 
Biady John, fireman, dwl 'J()9 Kitch 
Biad'y John, fruits, '227 Fifth 
Brady John, hoiisesuiith with John E. Sims, dwl 

1616 Miison 
Brndy Jolin, lal>orer, dwl 'M') Tehama, rear 
Brady John, laborer, dwl 603 Bnsh, rear 
Brady John, laborer, dwl Tehama bet Third and 

Fonrlli 
Brady John, law stndent, dwl 9 Howard Court 
Brady John, miner, dwl I St. Charles Place 
Brady John, oyster dealer, dwl 5 Verona Place 
Brady John, waiter with John IJeagau, 614 Mont- 

fiomery 
Brady John B., searcher of records and civil engi- 
neer, office and dwl 624 Meichant 
Bradv John C., (Brady Jj- Brady) dwl 5 Verona 

Place 
Bradv Jolin H., carpenter, dwl 415 Powell 
BKADY JOHN J., proprietor Central House, 814- 

816 Sanson! 
Bi'ady John K., laborer with Lyon & Co., dwl 160 

Jessie 
Bradv John T., snlesman with Charles Langley & 

Co., dwl 720 California 
Brady Joseph, clerk, dwl 1320 Sansom 
Brady Li/zie Mrs., confectioner!', 2.54 Fourth 
Brady 51. A. Miss, assistant teacher Eighth Street 

Piimary Scliool, dwl 423 Minna 
Biaily Martin, laborer, dwl 1616 Mason 
Bradv Martin, laborer, Kisdou Iiou Works, dwl 

606 Tiiird 
Brady Matliew, assistant engineer S. F. F. D., dwl 

cor Second and Natonia 
Brady Mat hew, steward S. S. Ajax North Pacific 

Trans. Co., dwl 351 Grove 
Biadv Michael, blacksmith with John R. Sims, dwl 

I'eU) Mason 
Bady Michael, miner, dwl 1142^ Folsom 
Br.'idy Michael, stone cutter, dwl 1812 Powell 
Brady Nicholas, marble polisher with Timothy Hor- 

gan, dwl 416 Stevenson 
Brady Owen, hostler, dwl cor Market and Laguna 
lirady Owen, ( Lciihnrl. & B.) dwl Lick House 
Brady Patrick, carpenter E s Devisadero ur Gearj', 

dwl cor Twenty-third atnl Dolores 
I5rady Patrick, miner, dwl 229 Si.xth 
Brady Patrick, plumber with Brady <fe Kramer, dwl 

W s Leroy Place in- Clay 
Brady Patrick, porter with James Mears, dwl W s 

Stockton bet Filbert and Greenwich 
Br.idy Patrick, tinsmith, dwl 21 Garden, rear 
Brady Patrick, waiter Russ House, dwl E s Kate 

nr Bryant 
Bradv Patrick F., upholsterer with Goodwin & Co., 

dwl 6i5Bnsh 
Biiidy Peter, laborer, dwl 6 Mission 
Brady Peter, shoemaker with Donovan Brothers 523 

Market 
Braily Philip, attorney at law, dwl 541 First 
Briidv Pi'ilip. blacksunth Union Iron Works, dwl 

254 Fourth 
Brady Piiiii|i. driver, dwl E s Gilbert bet Brannan 

and Townsend 
Br uly Philip, laborer, dwl 61 Minna 
Brady Philip, laborer with J. Y. Wilson & Co., 

dwl cor Buchanan and Bay 
Brady Philip, moiniter with S. &. G. Gump, dwl S a 

Liberty bet Valencia and Guerrero 
Brady Philip, printer, dwl 507 Bryant 
Brady Philip, shoemaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 318 Pacific 



Brady P. W., assistant surveyor, County Surveyor's 

office, dwl 507 Bryant 
Brady Richard, drayman with A. P. Hotaling 
Brady Richard, drayman, 511 Front, dwl 919 Harri- 
son 
Brady Robert, groceries and liquors, E 8 Valencia 

bet Tliirleenth and Fourteenth 
Brady Rose A., dressmaker, dwl .504 Seventh 
Brady Susan M., (widow) dwl 204 Montgomery 
Brady Terreuce, market, 776 Mission, dwl 242 

Jessie 
Brady Terrence. tinsmith with James J. O'Shea, 

dwl Es Vallejo Court bet Mason and Taylor 
Brady Terrence, ( Bmdy & Kramer ) res Oakland 
Brady Thomas, bricklayer, dwl S.iS Clementina 
Brady Thomas, broker, dwl 814 S.msom 
Brady Thomas, conductor Central Railroad, dwl NE 

cor Fourth and Clara 
Brady Thomas, draym m with John H Morris, dwl 

SE cor Jackson and Larkin 
Brady Thomas, laborer, dwl 113 Welsh 
Brady Thomas. laborer, dwl 231)6 Larkin 
BRADY THOMAS, liquor saloon, 613 Montgomery 

dwl Vincent bet Green and Union 
Brady Thomas H., wigmakerwith Mrs. B. Spitz, 

dwl W s Doloi-es nr Twenty -third 
Brady Thomas T., driver Front St. M. and O. R- R., 

dwl 31 Austin 
Brady Timothy, contractor, dwl Barllett nr Twenty- 
fourth 
Brady William, boilermaker Vulcan Iron Works 
Brady William, teamster withR. it J. Morton 
Bradv A\'illiam, boilermaker Risdon Iron Works, 

dwl 34 Rausch 
Brady & Bradj', (Jolin C. and James S.) oyster 

saloon, Occidental Market 
Bradv & Kramer, / 7'e/re//re Brady and. William 

Kramer J gasfitters and plnmiiers, 825 Wash 
Braeg Richard, /./ Angeli df Go. J dwl 410 Kearny 
Braendlin George, cabinetmaker with N. P. Cole & 

Co., dwl 147 Silver 
Bragg George F., /'GrPor^e F.Bragg & Co.) bds 

Lick House 
BRAGG GEORGE F. & CO., commission mer- 
chants and agents Benicia Cement Company, 

116 Front 
Bragg Mary J Miss., principal Tyler St. Primary 

School; dwl 322 Alain 
BRAGG ROBERT, manufacturer steering wheels, 

322 Main 
Braghi Nicholas, groceries and liquors, NE cor Sev- 
enth and Brannan 
Braiens Henry, dairyman, cor JIarket and Xoe 
Brailhard Eniil, laborer, dwl 735 Pacific 
Biainard Henry C, carrier Alta, dwl 24 Everett 
Biainard Richard, (Carroll B. & Co.) dwl 6U3 

Geary 
Brais.'^ant Louis, waiter, 617 Sacramento 
Brakenwagen Henry, cabinetmaker with Schreiher, 

Rohr<& Co., dwl 430 Vallejo 
Braley George A., fruits ami tobacco, NW cor 

Davis and Jackson, dwl 316 Uavis 
Braligan Nicholas, tanuer, bds SW cor Seventh and 

Brannan 
Bramall George, secretary Grand Division Sons of 

Temperance, dwl 36 Tehama 
Braman Jason J., physician, office and dwl 318^ 

Hayes 
Bramburv Thomas, laborer, dwl Franklin Hotel 
Bramstadt John H., (John H. Bramstadt & Co.) 

dwl SW cor Folsom and Steuart 
Bramstadt John H. &. Co., /'Ckarlcs Kuck) liquors, 

SW cor Folbom and Steuart 
Bramwell Aaron, groceries and liquors, NW cor San- 
som and Union 
BRANCH HOUSE, L. J. Ewell proprietor, 424 

Sansom 
Branch Joseph, seaman S. S. Senator, North Pac. 

Trans. Co 



$500,000 Gold Assets-lhe foundation of the PEOPLES. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Tobacco and Cigars. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



117 



Uranch William, (Branch df Go.) dvvl 1728 Leaven- 

WOltll 

Brancli & Co., (William Braiich and Samuel 

SwninJ proprietors Georgia Kestauraut, 518 

Pacilic 
BraiK-oli Ciriaco, elioemalver with E. Pardini, dwl E 

s Duiioiit nr Green 
Brand Aiistide, manager with John Saulnier &. Co., 

res .-Vlameda 
Biand Ernest, cigars and tobacco, 231 Bush, dwl 28 

Vm\\ Avenue 
BRAND HERMAN, mannfactnrer cigars and im- 
porter leaf lobacro, 304 Ba'tery, dwl 40i) Si.xt.h 
Brand Herman J., ( Hfiuici & B.j'il\\\ 120 Fourth 
Brand James W. C., clerii with G. O'Hara Tautf'e, 

dwl 545 Kolsom 
Brand John, (Montgomery Baths Co.) dwl 526 

Broadway 
Brand John G., billiard tahlemaker with J. Strahle, 

dwl 2S Park Avenue 
Brand Leonli;udf, (Eiilers & B ) dwl 428 Bdwy 
Brand Louis, baker with Diederich Heinrich, dwl 

SW cor Bush and Mason 
Brand Louis, boots and shoes, 818 Montgomery 
Brand Lucien, Custom House clerk and collector 

will) A. E. Sabatie &. Co , res Ahimeda 
Brandeu Michael, driver with Smith &. Smith, dwl 

342 Bninnan 
Brandenstein Herman, clerk with A. S. Rosenbaum 

& Co., dwl 313 Turk 
Brandenstein Herman H. , bookkeeper, 106 Sansom, 

dwl 121 E.idy 
Brundenslein Joseph, (A. S. Rosenbaum & Co.) 

dwl 121 Eddy 
Brandenstein M. & Co., (L. Godchnux) whole- 

Biile cattle butchers, cor Railroad Av and Fifth 

Av, South S. F..otiiie 319 Siiciaineuto 
Brandenstein Meyer, ( M. Brandenstein & Co.) dwl 

70!) O'F.irrell 
Brander Herman, barkeeper, 225 Clay, dwl 1313 

Moiitgouierv 
BRANDER JOHN S., liquor saloon, 225 Clay, dwl 

131 Oak 
Brundliofer Michael, tailor, dwl 612 California, rear 
Brandliii John, beer cellai', 037 Pac, dwl G3() Pac 
Brandon Henry, tinsmith with Win. Friel, dwl 321 

Jessie 
Brandon James, bellman Cosmopolitsin Hotel 
Brandon Joseph R., (Grey & B.) attorney at law, 

ollice 0114 Merchant, dwl 53:J Ellis 
Brandon Michael, hackmau, dwl Townsend nr 

Crook 
Brandon Patrick, laborer, dwl 214 Broadway 
Brandon Patrick, special policeman, dwl 554 Bryant 
Brandon William AI., (W. M Brandon ^ Co.) 

dwl SVV cor Mason and Ellis 
Brandon W. M. & Co , (James M. Perry) real estate 

iigents, 407 California 
Brands James, (Hinckley & Co.) dwl 202 Second 
BRAXDT ALOIS, proprietor California Hide De- 
pot, 11 and 13 Broadway, dwl 914 Pine 
B andt Alon/.o, boilermaker Vulc.in Iron Works 
Brandt Anne Mrs., dressmaker, 048 Howard 
Brandt Bernard L., house and sigup liiiter, 303 Bat- 
tery, dwl SW cor Geary and Van Ness Ave 
Braiwlt Ehhirt, tailor, dwl 421 Brondwiiy, rear 
Brandt Eric A., (Brandt & Conlou) dwl 018 How- 
ard 
Brandt George, sailmaker with John L. Prior, dwl 

S B Filbert bet Keainy and Dupont 
Brandt Hannah, (widow)'dwl 33S Third 
Brandt I. B. L , clerk with Whiting & Naphtaly, 

dwl SW cor Geary and Van Ness Av 
Bran'lt Jacob, cigar maker with C. C. Diez, dwl 818 

Montgomery 
Brandt Louis B', clerk with J. T. Helmken, dwl S 

W cor Van Ness Av and Geary 
Brandt Maurice, salesman with Colman Bros., dwl 

818 Montgomery 



Brandt Otto, upholsterer with N, P Cole &. Co., dwl 

507 Mission 
Brandt Otto, {Otto Brandt & Co.) dwl NE cor 

jAIiirket ami Mason 
BRANDT OTTO & CO., (Charles T/arr-Jo/ty gro- 
ceries and liquors, NE cor Market and Mason 

and Nli cor Market and Taylor 
BRANDT & CONLON, (Eric A. Brandt and 

Helen Conlou) gioceries and liquors, 131 Third 
Branger Jean, dwl 1000 Powell 
Brangon Richard M.,(T. H. Hatch & Co.) dwl N 

W cor Pine and Hyde 
Brann Alpheus C. sailmaker with Harding & Brann, 

dwl i^U Oak Grove Avenue 
BraiHi Augustus W., miner, dwl 554 Folsom 
Brann Loriii, groceries and market, cor Napa and Il- 
linois, dwl cor Missouri and Mariposa 
Brann Robert C, (Harding ^^ B.J dwl 9^ Oak 

Grove Avenue 
Brannan Charles, dwl .535 First 
Brannau Charles, oysterman with Junius G. Foster, 

dwl Clilf House, terminus Point Lobos Road 
Brannan Edward, laborer, dwl Ss Santa Clara nr 

Nebraska 
Brannan Hugh, laborer LHborer's Pro. Ben. Asso- 

ciition, Irisb-Ainerican Hall 
Brannan .James, laboiei, dwl 46 Louisa, rear 
Brannan .James, laborer, liwl 1721 Ijeavenworih 
Brannan James, laborer with Spring V. Water Co 
Brannan James, maUressmaker with Goodwin &. 

Co., dwl Clay bet ]?roderiek an<l Baker 
Braiman Jeremiah, hostler, riwl 17 Turk 
Bi-annan John, janitor Lincoln Grammar and Mission 

Primary Sciiools 
Brannan ,Iohn, laborer, dwl N s Pacific nr Franklin 
Brannan John, laborer with Hancock &. Kelso 
Brannan John, ( Cnrley Jj' B.) dwl 535 First 
Brannan John (J., expressman, dwl 18 Hailan Place 
Brannan John E., collector People's Insurance Co., 

dwl 1404 Leavenworth 
Brannan Joseph, carpenter, dwl 202 Second 
Brannan Martin, boarding, 1001 I^Httery 
Brannan Martin, bookkeeper with Savage & Co., 

dwl 70t) Bryant 
Brannan Mary F., (widow) dwl 1404 Leavenworth 
Brannan Michael, laborer Laborers' Pro. I$en. Asso- 
ciation, Irish American Hall 
Bi'iinnan M. T., bricklayer, Bricklayers' Associat'u, 

Young Men's Christian Association Hall 
Brannan Nicholas, shoemaker, dwl 415 Powell 
Brannan Patrick, horseshoer, 9 Webb, dwl SW cor 

Guerrero and Sixteenth 
Brannan Patrick T., ylassblower, dwl 9 Crook 
BRANNAN SAMUEL, real estate, office 420 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 920 Clay 
Brainian Samuel, Jr., commission merchant, dwl 317 

First 
Brannan Samuel Mrs., dwl 317 First 
Brannan Thomas, shoemaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 435 (Jlementina 
Brannan Thomas, (Clark & B.) dwl SE cor Twelfth 

and Howard 
Brannan Thouiiis C, laborer, dwl 1002 Howard 
Brannan Timothy, coachman, dwl 9 Esse.x 
Brannan William, laborer, dwl 305 Fremont 
Brannan William B., sawyer with Excelsior Mill 

Co., dwl 155 Clinton 
Brannigan Williatn, laborer, dwl 10 Anthony 
Brannon James, hostler, dwl 29 First 
Branscheirl William, /'G. Weber & Co.) dwl 820 Pac 
Bianson Ware, sailmaker with J<dni S Blakiston 
Brant Angn^t. cabinetmaker, dwl 507 Mission 
Brant Jolm H., drayman NE cor Davis and Clay, 

dwl 329 Eddy 
Brasche George H., special policeman, dwl 403 

Third 
Brarens Fredeiick, carpenter, dwl 322 Ritch 
Biasch William, stairbuilder with Jesse «& Drew, 
dwl cor Buchanan <fe Willow Avenue 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 110 Sansom Street, Combs and Brushes. 



BEDIM GTON'S PLAVOEING EXTRACTS enjoytliehiBhest reputation among the ladies. 



118 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Brash Elizabeth Miss, milliner with Misses Newby, 
dwl 10U6 Stockton 

Brasic EdwartI, mariner, dwl 32 Sfenart 

Biask Cliarles, liquor saloon, Ss Jackson betDrumm 
and D.ivif,, dwl NW (ror .Jackson &. Drumm 

Brass John, tinsmith, dwl 6 Front 

IJiassell Patric-k, hostler, dwl 51 Louisa 

Brastow Solonion D., travellinfr agent Wells, Fargo 
& Co., dwl (561 Howard 

Braner Alois, ('Frederick Hess & Co.) dwl 722 
Union 

Brauer William A., teacher mnsic. dwl 107 Fifth 

Braun Adolph, porter with Thomas Bi-yan, 324 San- 
80 m 

Braun Alois F. H., locksmith with Joseph Bieu, 303 
Battery 

Braun Andreas, baker, dwl 739 Market 

Braun Charles J., teacher music, dwl 141 Minna 

Braun C. H. F., cashier with B. Davidson & Co., 
res Oakland 

Braun Emile, engraver with Frontier & Co., res 
Oakland 

Braun Einest, laborer, dwl NE cor Union and 
Wel)ster 

Braun Fiederick, barkeeper with William Denham, 
dwl Hinckley 

Braun Henry, barkeeper, 300 Bush, dwl 515 Sacra- 
mento 

Braun J. W., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Braunschweiirer Heim;inn, ( Brnvjischiceiger if 
Shliiti:rJ dwl W' s Fouilh nrBerrv 

BRAUXSCHWEIGER & SCHLUTER, (Her- 
mann Brounschuciger ^ C. H. SchliiterJ W s 
Foiu'th nr Berry 

Braverman Louis, (Braverman & Levy) dwl 322 
Mason 

Braverman Max, watchmaker with Braverman & 
Lew, dwl 313Tavlor 

BRAVERMAN & LEVY, (Louis Braverman & 
John Levy) importers and retail watches jew- 
elry, diamonds, wlverware, etc., 119 Mont 

BRAY BROS., (WaUon A. Bray) commission 
merchant^ and agents Alviso Flour Mills, 226 

Bray Henry T., caraenter and builder, dwl 828 
Broadway C] 

Bray Jolin L., dwl 35l O'Fairell 

Bray Michael, shoemaker. 212 Fourth 

Bray Watson A., (Bray Bros.) res Fruit Vale, Ala- 
meda conntv 

BRA YTON ALBERT P., (Guddurd & Co.) resides 
Oakland 

Brazil Patrick, laborer with Whittier, Fuller & Co., 
dwl 2fi2 Clara 

Brazle George, teamster with Jason Springer, dwl 
815 Harrison 

Breck C, dwl Branch House 

Breck Charles E., lumber, dwl E s Beale nr Har- 
rison 

BRECK SAMUEL, Major, Ass't Adjutant General 
U. S. A., office 703 Market, dwl :.W Taylor 

Breda Celeste, (widow) dwl 638 Pacific 

Breden Thomas, cartman. Pierce nr Taylor 

Bredhoff Henry, (BredkoJ 4- Su/Uiiig) dwl 423 
East 

Bredhoff & &nh]]ng, (Henry Bredhoff^ Henry 
Siihlinsr) liquor saloon, 4i;3 East 

Bree John, bransfinisher with W. T. Garratt & Co., 
dwl 542 iMission 

Bree Thomas W., nnisician, dwl 542 Mission 

Breed Charles, capitalist, dwl 514 Sutter 

Breed Daniel C., merchant, office 405 Front, dwl 833 
Bush 

Breed Edward A., bookkeeper with Kimball Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 6 Brenham Place 

Breed Henrv L. , stockbroker, office 302 Sansom, 
dwl 1014" Stockton 

Breen James, plumber with Henry Wempe, dwl 
NW cor Fourth and Minna 



Breen John, hostler with Peter A. Finnegan,dwl 

34 Eddv 
Breen John, ( T. F. Nagle Sr Co.) dwl 628 Post 
Breen Michael J., cariier Bulletin. Alta California 

and Call, dwl 431 Bryant 
Breen Patrick laundryman Occidental Hotel 
Bi-een Peter, clerk, dwl 49 Natoma 
Breen Peter, laborer. Laborers' Pro. Ben. Associa- 
tion, Irish American Hall 
Breen Thomas, machinist, dwl cor Market and La- 

guna 
Breese Joseph C, salesman with Snow & Roos. dwl 

22 John 
BREEZE CHARLES K., (Bowie & B.) physician 

and surgeon, office 622 Clay, dwl 718 O'Farrell 
Breeze James H., harnessmaker with Kimball 

Manufacturing Co., dwl 164 Tehama 
Breeze Louis, (Breeze & Loughran) dwl 407 

O'Farrell 
Breeze Thomas, (Murphy, Grant Sf Co.) dwl 718 

O'Fairell 
BREEZE & LOUGHRAN, (Louis Breeze and 

I'komas Longhran) produce commission, SW 

cor Wasliiiigton and Davis 
Breffin Charles, steward Cliff House, Point Lobos 

road 
Breha M., (widow) dwl 6(15 Bush 
Brehemy Jam(?s, frnitpeildler, dwl 618 Natoma, rear 
Brehm Rudolph W., woodturner with Schreiber, 

Rohr& Co., dwl20i Welsh 
Breholliever Rnymond, tinsmith with Tay, Brooks, 

&. Backus, Washoe bet Drumm and East 
Breid F., ( Victor Cnppc dk Co.) dwl NW cor Cali- 
fornia and Baker 
Breidenbach Francis, cabinetmaker with Goodwin 

& Co., dvvl 317 Bush 
Breidenstein Leonhardt, manufacturer jewelry 

boxes and fancy articles, 615 Montgomery, dwl 

1209 Kearny 
Breier H., workman California Sugar Refinery, 

cor Bryant and Eighth 
Breig John, sodamaker with John F. Rohe, dwl 

606 Mission 
Breiling Frank, (Bcngler & B.) dwl 229^ Minna 
Breiliiig Jacob, (BreHin^ & Bro.) dwl 965 Mission 
Breiling & 'Qro. , (Jokn & Jacob BreiliJig) Vi&u^- 

lin market. 965 Mission 
Breiling John, (Breiling & Bro.) 965 Mission 
Breisacher Leopold, market, 903 Post 
Breisel Patrick, laborer, dwl 333 Bush 
Breitenliach Leopold, laundry, 1406 Mason 
Breitenbncher T., carpenter, dwl NW cor Berry 

and Third 
Breithaupt Felix, brewer Broadway Brewery, dwl 

637 Broadway 
Breithaupt George F., weigher with McKenna &. 

Bro., dwl E 8 Mission bet Twenty-sixth and 

Twenty-seventh 
Brekle George, saloon, dwl NE cor Mason and 

Broadway 
BREMEN BOARD UNDERWRITERS, office 421 

Battery 
Breman Thomas, firemnn P. M. S. S. Montana, dwl 

W 8 Sixth bet Brann m and Townsend 
Bremer Henry, (B. Brommer & Co.) dwl 768 Bry- 
ant 
Bremer Herman, ( Schonfeld. & B.) dwl 608 Sutter 
Bremer John, soapmaker with J. H. C. Pi)rtniarin, 

E s Channel bet Sixteenth and Brannan St. 

Bridge 
Bremer Joseph, (Bremer & Bro.) dwl 608 Sutter 
Bremer Williaai, driver with Lyou & Co., dwl 145 

Jessie 
Bremen William, shipcarpenter, dwl 39 Jackson 
Bremer William H., (Bremer Sf Bro.) dwl 608 

Sutter 
BREMER & BROTHER, (.Joseph Sr W. H. 

Bremer) importeis leaf tobacco and manufac- 

turei'S cigars, 310 Sacramento 



A sound basis lor Underwriting— the $500,000 Assets of the PEQPIiES. 



C. P, VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Yankee Notions. 



SAN FKANCISCO [ B ] DIRECTORY 



118 



Brems Frederick, cook, dwl l!i4 Stewart 

Bren William, salesman with Abmbaui Levingstou, 

dwl () Sixth 
Brendel Edward, cook Rnss House 
Brendel Fritz, waiter, 4IG Kearny, dwl IG Sutter 
Brendel Jacob E., haruessmaker, 11 Sutter, dwl 15 

Slitter 
Brenfjle Oscar, waiter, 253 Steiiart 
BKENHAM CHAIiLES J.,8ecretaiy North PaciKc 

Trans. Co., otfice dl7 Saiisom, fand Hulladuy 

<ir B.J dwl SW cor Howard and Sixteenth 
Brennan Anna, (widow) dressmaking, dwl 1145 

FoLsoni 
Brennan Daniel, brewer with Matthew Nunan, dwl 

205 Eighth 
Brennan Ellen Miss, seamstress, dwl 558 Howard 
Brennan James, contractor, dwl 452 Jessie 
Brennan James, hostler with M. Dalton,dwl 571 

Market 
Brennan James, laborer with George Dougherty, 

dwl SE cor Bay and Jones 
Brennan James, seaman, dwl 14 Frederick 
Brennan Jmnes E., salesman with P. J. Sullivan & 

Co.. dwl 558| Howard 
Brennan James F., barkeeper, dwl 1805J Stockton 
Brennan James M., merchant, dwl NE cor Nintli 

and ^Miiina 
Brennan John, janitor Lincoln Grammar School, 

dwl IG William 
Brennan John, oysterman with Brady &. Brady, 

dwl :{24 Bryant 
Brenn^m John, salesman, 9 Montgomery, dwl 526 

Pine 
Brennan John, seaman, dwl 20 Commercial 
Brennan Joini, shoemaker, 4 Trinity, dwl 317 Bush 
Brennnn John, stevedore, dwl N s Howard nr 

Steuart 
Brennan John Jr., clerk, 9 Montgomery, dwl Po- 

trero Avenue 
Brennan John J., (Brennan & Hart) dwl IG Wil- 
liam 
Brennan Josepli, pantryman with John lieagau, 

614 Montgomery 
Brennan Kate Miss, domesstic, 1308 Pine 
Breinian Martin, porter, 220 Sansom, dwl 5 La- 
fayette Place 
Brennan Michael, laborer, dwl 119 Morton 
Breiman Michael T., bricklayer, dwl 211 Clara 
Brennan M. T., hackman, Plaza 
Brennan Owen M., barkeeper. Agricultural Park 
Brennan Patrick, hostler with Bouton & Sou, dwl 

20 Salmon 
Brennan Patrick J., gilder, 202 Second, dwl 558^ 

Howard 
Brennan Richard P. Rev., secretary Archbishop J. 

S. Alem.my, dwl 628 Cal 
Brennan Thomas, laborer with M. H. Turrell, dwl 

2810 Buchanan 
Brennan Thomas W.. Old California Exchange, NE 

cor Kearny and Clay, dwl 931 Howard 
Brennan & Hart, (John J. Brennan and Michael 

II. Hart) poultry and gauie, Grand Central 

Market 
BrennerCharles M.. teacher music, dwl 955 Howard 
Brenner Martin, (Schmidt & B.J dwl 645 Com- 
mercial 
Breinier William H., (R. Johnson Sf Co.) dwl 

1219 P.icitic 
Brenning George A., laborer, dwl 232 Fremont 
Brerelon James, collector S. F. Gas Co., dwl 640 

Second 
Breslauer Bernard, clerk, dwl 705 OFarrell 
Bresiauer Henry, importer, dwl 705 O'Farrell 
Breslauer Theodore, cloaks and mantillas, 308 

Kearny 
Bresliii Daniel, laborer S. F. Gas Co., dwl 70 

Tehama, rear 
Breslin Henry, shipjoiner, Shipjoiuers' Association, 

Excelsior Hall 



Breslin John, stonecutter, dwl Ewer Place nr 

Mason 
Breslin John, (Carlin Sf B.) dwl 217 Beale 
Breslin Patrick, brasstinisher with W^eed & King- 
well, dwl 70 Tehama 
Breslin Patrick, miner, dwl Franklin Hotel 
Bresk Nicholas, laborer, dwl 236 Sutter 
Bresnahan Michael, shoemaker with J. McGrath, 

417 Pacihc 
Bresnahan Patrick, laborer, dwl 152 Silver 
Bresnahan Stephen, laborer with Haste & Kirk, 

dwl 546 Natoma 
Brcsnihan Cornelius, coachman Orleans Hotel, dwl 

Bartol in- Broadway 
Bresnihan Timothy, slioemaker with Metropolitan 

B. & S. Co., dwl 932 Market 
Bresnin Pattick, laborer, dwl cor Octavia and 

Greenwich 
Bresse Louis, ( Seiz & B.) dwl 211 Ellis 
Brestnahan Daniel, porter with Charles Nauman, 

dwl SW cor Folsom and Twenlytirst 
Bretschneider Frederick, malster Bavaria Brewery, 

dwl NE cor Jackson and Stockton 
Brett Geortce, bookkeeper with Piatt & Newton, 

dwl 913 Jackson 
Brett John, mining agent, dwl 2 Geary Place 
Brett Thomas, dwl Portsmouth House 
Brettenbeck John, driver Bavaria Brewery, dwl 

620 Vallejo 
Bretton Charles, law-copyist and collector, office 21 

Montgomery Block, dwl 167 Silver 
Breuer John T., liquors, 814 Kearny 
BREUIL EDMOND, Consul General for France, 

office 434 Jackson, dwl 114 Ellis 
Brevoort House, NW cor Mission and Fourth 
Brew Nathaniel, shipwright, dwl 27 Clara 
Brewer George W.. (McLanghlia ^' B.) dwl Ss 

Tvventieth bet Dolores and Guerrero 
Brewer Jacob, carpenter, dwl 938 Howard 
Biewer .lacob, pattern and modelmaker, 110 Geary 
Brewer John, carpenter, dv^'l 214 Broadway 
Brewer John, car[)enter, dwl 834 Vallejo 
Brewer John H., attorney at law, office 53 Mont- 
gomery Block, res Oakland 
Brewer Simeon, laborer with Pope & Talbot, res 

Oakland 
Brewer William, special policeman and extraman 

steamer No. 1, S. F. F. D., dwl 520 Howard 

Brewster . -, dwl 824 Wasliington 

Brewster Daniel E., rigger, 912 Vallejo, rear 
Brewster Ferdinand T., clerk Internal Revenue 

office, dwl 753 Howard 
Brewster John, painter and glazier, 529 Kearny, 

dwl S s Post bet Buchanan and Laj^una 
Brewster John Mrs., furnished rooms, 107 Leides- 

dorff 
Brewster M., furnished rooms, 223 Kearny 
Brewster Rolla E , mining, office 308 Sansom, dwl 

816 Powell 
Brewster Siirah E. Miss, dressmaker with Mrs. J. E. 

Warren, dwl 912 Vallejo 
Brewster Silas R., harnessuiaker with Main & Win- 
chester, dwl SE cor Kearny and Sutter 
Brewster William, rigger, N s Howard nr Steuart, 

dwl 912 Vallejo, rear 
Brewton James G., saloonkeeper, dwl 1029 Clay 
Brewton John, liquors, 563 Jackson, dwl 1029 Clay 
Brewton John C, lamplighter S. F. Gas Co., dwl 

SW cor Stockton and Sacramento 
Brian John, laborer with Hoag & Seeglitz, dwl 734 

Harrison 
Briant Joseph, ovster saloon, 17 Occidental Market, 

dwl 16 Sutter 
Briant.— See Bryant 

Brice Bernard, blacksmith, dwl 135 Folsom 
Brice William, cutter with Metropolitan B. & S. Co., 

dwl 612 Post 
Briceland John M., physician, office and dwl 942^ 

Harrison 



JONES, PtJLLMAN" & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dress Buttons in great variety. 



JREDINGTOW, HOSTETTER & CO , Importers of Druggists' Qlassware, etc. 



120 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Brie-eland Peter, laborer, dwl 225 Minna 

Brick Daniel, shoemaker with Charles Palmer, dwl 

18 Clara 
Brick Georj^e, boxmaker with John S. Gibbs, dwl 

18 Chira 
Brick ett J. W., fruits, 944 Market 
Brickley JameB, carpenter and bnilder, dwl 729J 

Clementina 
Brickley .John, carpenter, dwl 7^29 Clementina 
Brickley Peter, pecldler, dwl cor H;irrisoii and Dora 
Brickley William, baker Ameiican ExclianjLfe Hotel 
BrickuB Tliomas, (colored) (Brickus & Dunham) 

dwl 345 Third 
Brickus &, Dunliam. (colored) fThomax Brickus 

nn(\ Henry Dunham) wliiteninj^, 345 Third 
BRICKWEDEL CHARLES H., ' proprietor Con- 

Btilution Hotel, NW cor First ;ind Biannan 
BrickweHel Henry, (Henry Brick/cede/ & Go. J dwl 

SE cor Franklin and Fulton 
BRICKWEDEL HE:5:RY&. CO.. fJ/«r<m£r^«cAen) 

importers and jobbers wines and liquors, 208 and 

210 Front 
BrickwerielJacob, liquor saloon, 52 First 
Brickwedel John, liquor saloon, cor Post and Ceme- 
tery Avenue 
Brickwedel Rebecca, (widow) dwl N s Grove nr 

Octavirt 
Bridenon William, expresswagon, SW cor Pine and 

SaHKoni, dwl E s Howard nr Fifteenth 
Bridge Matthew, mason and builder, dwl W s Larkiu 

ur Jackson 
BRIDGE WILLIAM E., proprietor St. Lawrence 

Stable. 212 Sutter, dwl Occidental Hotel 
Bridges Edmund R., clerk, dwl S s Howard bet 

Eleventh and Twelfth 
Bridges Geoj-ge R., clerk with S. P. Tavlor & Co., 

dwl Ns McAllister l)et Webster &, Fillmoie 
Bridires Mary C., (widow) dwl S s Howard bet 

Eleventh and Twelfth 
Bridtres Richard E., clerk with Liuforth, Kellogg & 

Co.. 5 Front 
Bridgewood Samuel, clerk with Haggin &, TeviSjdwI 

Ss Lotiiliard nr Kearny 
Bridirewood Samuel, engineer, dwl Ss Lombard bet 

Kearny and Montgomery 
Bridgiiiau John W., ( Bridgman & Lee) dwl 121 

Olive Avenue 
Brid^uian & I^ee, {John W. Bridgman and John 

Lee) draymen, NE cor Front and (^lay 
Briel August, butclier with Metzger & McCansland, 

dwl Fifteenth Avnr N, South San Fmncisco 
Biiel Barhaia Mrs., furnished rooms, 105 Geary 
Brien John, laborer, dwl 734 Harrison 
Brier William, mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 
Brierly John, spinner Mission and Pacific Woolen 

Jlills, dwl Folsom nr Sixteeiuh 
Brigaertt* Gerard J„ sawyer California Mills, dwl 

cor Ellis and Boiu'bon Place 
Brigaeits Joseph H., hoxniaker with John S. Gibbs, 

dwl Bourbon Place bet Ellis and Eddy 
Briirgs Albert D., dwl 1707 Dupont 
Briggs Ada L., saleswoman, 621 Kearny, dwl 1017 

Mason 
Brit'gs .Alfred W., pncker with J. A. Folger & Co., 

'dwl 030 O'Farrell 
Briggs Castor, clerk with Henry Manning, dwl NE 

corner Clay and Kearny 
BRIGGS EDGAR. (Son 3c Briggs) and School Di- 
rector Eighth Ward, flwl 33 Erie 
Briggs George, restauraiit, 11 Sixth 
Brifigs George N., machinist, dwl 24 Silver 
Briggs .James, mariner, dwl 20 Folsom 
Brig>i8 Joseph D., clerk with John Reagan, dwl 615 

Sacramento 
Briggs Mary Mrs., fuinished rooms. 137 Montgomery 
Briirgs Kichard J-.stonesetter new U. S. Branch Mint 
Briggs Spencer R., clerk with Sou & Briggs, dwl 

411 Haves 
Briggs T. G. Mrs., dwl 1017 Mason 



Britrgs Walter, clerk with O'Brien & Co., dwl 316 

^Third 
Briggs William R., club rooms, 224 Montgomery, 

bds Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Brigham A., dwl Occidental Hotel 
Brigham Calvin O., (Brigham & Batch) resides 

'Oakhmd 
Brigliam CUarlea A.. (Brigham Sf Eaices) resides 

Rocklin. Placer County 
Brigham William H., (Crane S,- B.) res New York 
Biigham & Balch, (Calvin 0. Brigham and Stephen 

31. Balch) dealers butter and cheese, SE corner 

Fi-ontand Washington 
Brigham & Hawes, (Charles A. Brisham and 

Elisha Hawes) stonecutters, NE cor Third and 

King 
Bright John, cartman, dwl 218 Broadway 
Bright John, teamster with James Chase, dwl 231 

Pacific 
Bright Robert, dwl 28 Turk 
Brigm C, nniriner, dwl 510 Davis 
Brignardello G. B., clerk with Brignardello, Mac- 

chiavello & Co., dwl Vallejo bet Stockton and 

Dupont 
BRIGNARDELLO, MACCHIAVELLO & CO., 

( Slejano Brignardello,(Jiovrinni Batli.ifa AJac- 

ckiarcUo & N. Lorco) manufacturers maccaroni, 

and vermicelli, ship bread, etc.. 70() Sanson), 
Brignardello Nicola, clerk with Brignardello, Mac- 

chiavello & Co., dwl 1010 Montgomery 
Brignardello Santiago, ( Stempehnnnn Sf Co. and 

Brignardello & Brother) dwl 703 Stockton 
Brignardello Stefino, (Brignardello S;- Brother, 

and Brignardello, Macchiavello & Co.) res 

Italy 
Brignardello & Brother, ( Santiago and Slefano 

Brignardello) importers Italian marble, 2 Main 
Brill J., bootmaker, dwl W s Micliigan nr Shasta 
Brill John, waiter, 218 Pacific 
Briuiigion Samuel, teamster, pier 2^ Steuart, dwl 537 

Hayes 
Brin Victor, laborer with G. Venard, dwl 507 Green 
Brincatt Salvo, poultry, ijame, butter, etc., 517 Mer- 

chitnt, dwl NE cor Stockton and Broadway 
Brinckniann Fredeiick, clerk with Diediich C. Von 

Stiiden. SW cor i"Mi8siou and Steuart 
Brinckmann Frederick, clerk with John Drucker 

& Co., dwl NE cor Mission and Sixth 
Brind Caleb, candy manufacturer, IG Fourth 
Bringers Frederick, porter, dwl 2 113 Mason 
Brinke W.,workni:in California Sugar Refinery, cor 

Bjyant and Eighth 
Brinkmau Heniy, cigar manufacturer. 225 Pacific 
Brinkotter Herman, carri.igehuilder, dwl 171 Minna 
Biinkson A., lanndi-yman Russ House 
Briody John, (Brioiiy & Wagner) dwl 828 California 
Briody Mary, (widow) dwl 255 Clementina 
Briody Patrick, dwl 82S California 
Briody & Wagner, (John Briody & Frederick Wag- 
ner) plumbers and gasliiters, 2iJ Sutter 
Brion Frederick, liquors, 541 Jackson 
Brisac Felix, local agent Liverpool and London and 

Globe Insurance Co., dwl 1015 Pine 
Brisac V. G. Madame, teacher, dwl 1015 Pine 
Briscoe Michael, marblecutter with Patrick Kelly, 

dwl 3 Laskie 
Brisk .Julius, frents' furnishing goods, 544 Third 
Brister Andrew, (colored) junk dealer, dwl 1226 

Pacific 
Bristoe Levy, conductor, dwl 408 Geary 
Bristol Andrew, (Curry & B.) dwl 1226 Pacific 
Bristol Henry C, cooper with Pacific Barrel and 

Ke<r Co., dwl NE cor Braniuin and Fourth 
BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSUR- 
ANCE CO., (Liverpool) Falkner, Bell & Co., 

ajj-ents, office 430 California 
BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL- 
IFORNIA, rooms 731) Montgomery 
Britt James W., ( Devilt & B.) dwl 31o Third 



Detached Dwellings insured for a term of years by the PEOPIjES. 



C p. VAlSr SCHAA-CK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valises. 

121 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Britt Jolin, Iionsemover, dwl E s Eighth bet How- 
ard and Folsom 

Biitt Patrick-, laborer, dwl 2 California, rear 

Britt Kaciiel, (widow) dwl SW cor Washington 
and Leaveuwoi'tli 

Britt.iii\ William, bliicksmilh with Pollard & Car- 
vill, dwl S 8 Twenty second bet Valencia and 

BRITTAN, HOLBROOK &. CO., (John W. Brit- 
tan , Chfirlcs Holhrook, A. D. McDonald, John 
F. mid Ckarlcx Merrill i itnpoiters and jobbers 
stoves and metals. 111 and 113 California, and 
17 and 19 Davis 

Brittan Jolin W., ( Brittan, Holbrook <jb Co. J res 
San JNIateo 

Brittan Patrick, lonsrslioreman, dwl 53 Clav 

BlilTTAN'S BUILDING, SW cor Davis and 
CalitVirnia 

Britton George W., cashier with Goodwin & Co., 
dwl 1309 Tavlor 

Brition John, watchman, dwl 726 Clementina 

Britton Josepl), fBrilton & Rey) dwl SE cor Tay- 
lor and Union 

BRITTON & REY, fJoRcpk Britton, J. J. Rey 
and Henry 8Lcincgp:erj lithographers, SW cor 
Commercial and Leidesdortt 

Brizoliira Louis. /Brizolara & CutrocksJ dwl E s 
Wet more Place 

Brizolara iV. C'utrocks, (Louis Brizolara and John 
Cntrocksj wood and coal, 1015 Washington 

Broad Cliarlts, proprietor Champion Brewery, 12J2 
Biisli 

Broad Charles E., grainer, dwl 244 Minna 

Broiid Edward, plnmber with G. & W. Snook, dwl 
E s Taylor bet Chesnut and Lombard 

Broad James, laborer, dwl E a Taylor bet Chesnut 
and Loml)ard 

Broail Jane Mrs., fruits and vegetables, 224 Fifth nr 
Clementina 

Broad .lolni, peddler, dwl 224 Fifth 

Broad Robert, c;irder Pioneer Woolen Mills, dwl 
E s Tavlor l)et Chcsnnt and Lombard 

Broad William, laborer, dwl 1)24 Commercial 

Broadway Block, NW cor Broadway and Kearny 

Broadway Block Hotel, NW cor JJroadway and 
Kearnv 

BROADWAY BONDED WAREHOUSE, James 
Scott proprietor, SW cor Battery and Broad- 
way 

Broiilway Brewery, Joseph Albrecht proprietor, 
i)il Broadway 

BRO.ADWAY HOTEL, Daniel Hartnett propri- 
etoi'. 212 Broadway 

BROC.AS, PERKINS & FRANK, (John W. Bro- 
cas. Charter C. Perkins and Charles Frank) 
conniiission merchants, 5lb and 518 Sausom 

Brocas John W.. (Brocas, Perkins <& Frank! dwl 
Inleruational Hotel 

Broc'v Charles, carpenter, dwl 8! Natoma 

Brock Cbristiiin C, seannm, dwl 2 Uartmann 

Brocl< Oscar W., waiter, N W cor First and Brannan 

Brock Simnel, teamster, dwl Fifteenth Av nr 
Islais Creek, South San Francisco 

Brock Thomas, waiter, S.S. Pelican North Pac. 
Trans. Co 

Brock W.. 1 1 borer, dwl 424 Sansom 

BrocI; Williiim, laborer, dwl Sailors' Home, SW cor 
Ibilterv and Vallejo 

BrocUbaue' J. Frederick, searcher records with 
F. A. Ronleati, res Oakland 

BrocUho.7 Charles, groceries and liquors, NW cor 
Bryant an<l Twenty fourth 

Broclibotf W., clerk, NW cor Bryant and Twenty- 
fourth 

Brocklebank Manuel T., real estate agent, oflSce 539 
California 

Broekman Cliarles, mate steamer Yosemite C. S. 
Nav. Co 

Broekman Charles, upholsterer, dwl 275 Minna 



Broekman Nicolans, groceries and liquors, SW cor 

Jones and Geary 
Brockmann B. Miss", assistant teacher North Cos- 
mopolitan Grammar School, dwl 72fi Green 
Brocq Alfred, Bay View Nursery, cor Twenty -tirst 

Av and J, South S. F., depot and dw'l 619 

Sacramento 
Brocq J. Mrs., floiist, and depot Bay View Nursery, 

bl9 Sacramento 
Brod Emanuel, cook, 510 Market, dwl cor Clay and 

Keirnv 
Brodeck Davis, tailor, 703 Davis, dwl 441 Jessie, bet 

Fifth and Sixth 
Brodek George, clothing, dwl 813J Folsom 
Brodek Gustave, clothing, 532 Sacramento, dwl 20 

Brodek Philip, dwl 238 Jessie 

Brodek Samuel, (Blades & B.J dwl E s Lavkin bet 
Geary and O'Farrell 

Broder Patrick, hostler Market St. R. R., dwl Six- 
teenth bet Valencia and Second Av 

BRODER PATRICK, proprietor United States 
Hotel, 304 Beale 

Broderick Andrew T., shipwright, dwl 222 Fifth 

Broderick James, tinsmith with Freeman & Wiin, 
dwl Fair Av, Bernal Higlits 

Broderick John, boilermaker, dwl S s Shipley nr 
Tenth 

Broderick John, cooper, dwl 568 Mission 

Bro4erick John, lnhorer Golden Gate Sugar Refin- 
'ery. dwl E s Nevada bet Fulsoin and Harrison 

Broderick John, machinist Risdon Iron Works, dwl 
E 8 Main nr Harrison 

Broderick John C, attorney at law, dwl Baron 
House 

Broderick Michael A., clerk with John M. Ahern, 
dwl W 8 Larkin nr McAllister 

Broderick Patrick, coachman Cosmopolitan Hotel, 
dwl 407 Natoma 

Broderick Patrick, laborer, dwl S s Sixteenth bet 
Second Av and Guerrero 

Broderick Richard, sbipbroker, office 306 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 631 Sutter 

Brodei'ick Thomas, waiter Russ House 

Broderick Thomas J., shoe dealer, dwl 944 Mis- 
sion 

Broderick Walter, laborer, dwl 214 Broadway 

Broderick William, assayer, dwl 9 Garden 

Broderson J. B., mercliaMt. dwl 627 Commercial 

Broderson John, mariner, dwl 531 East 

Broderson William, porter with T. Lemmen Meyer, 
dwl 268 Clara 

Brodick Peter, steward Cliff House, Point Lohos 
Road 

Brodie James, pressman with Joseph Wiuterburn 
& Co., dwl 55 Natoma 

Brodie James, foreman machinist Fulton Foundry, 
dwl SsPine nr Fillmore 

Brodie James G.. apprentice Fulton Foundry, dwl 

5 s Pine nr Fillmore 

Brodie James G., patternmaker Risdon Iron Works, 
dwl 82 Natoma 

Brodie John, tinsmith and e.xtraman Steamer No. 5 
S. F. F. D., dwl 828 California 

Brodie John, tinsmith with P. D. Code & Co., dwl 
E B Bryant bet Twenty-third and Twenty- 
fourth 

Brodie S;imnel H., attorney at law, office 729 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 820 Washington 

Brodie William, foun(lryman,"dwl 82 Everett 

Brodie William, Jr., uiachiuist Mare Island, dwl 
82 Everett 

Brodigan Nicholas, moroccodresser with Reynolds 

6 Davidson, dwl SW cor Seventh and Biainian 
Brodwolf George, tailor, 135 Post, dwl 6 Pratt 

Court 
Brodwolf Michael, tailor with George Brodwolf, 

J 35 Post 
Broedel Adam, (Brocdel & Troell) dwl 403 Green 



JONE3. PTJLIiMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Porte Monnaies and Reticules. 



YERBA SANTA radically cures Scrofula, Salt Rheum and all diseases of the blood. 



122 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY, 



Broerlel & Troell, fAdam Broedel and Conrad 

TrocU) baiidi-esgerrt, 7'i9 C'liiy 
Broemel Herman, clerk with E. Esstnann, dwl 1031 

Montf^onieiy 
Broeraiiiel Ueilhold, clei-k witli John A. Bauer, 101 

POHt 

Brogaii Michael, real estate, dwl NE cor Broadway 
and Larkin 

BrO},'au Patrick, lal)orer Goldea Gate Sugar Refin- 
ery, dwl 60 Everett 

Brogah Par rick J., clerk with W. I. Reynolds & 
Co., dwl 73a Ft>l.soin 

Brogan'B Building, E 8 Third bet Howard and 
Clemeniina 

Brogden Samuel, blacksmith Pacific Rolling Mill 

Broili Antonio, veterinary surgeon, dwl 431 Pine 

Brol<aw Abniui, real estate, dwl 1431 Mission 

Bnikaw Henry V., dwl 716 Mission 

Broi August, tailor, dwl 16 Hinckley 

Brolly John C, waiter with A. A Jennings 

Mxovah&yQ&v ^\\lw\^, ( Rosenthal, Feder & Co., and 
of S. Bromheieer & Co., OrovilleJ office 304 
California, dwl 632 Market 

Bromide Flat M. Co., (Treasurer City Nev.J 
otiice 402 Montgomery 

Bromide Tnnuel Co., f White Pine J office 331 Mont 

Bromley Edward, clerk with C. P. R. R. Co., dwl 
330 Brannan 

Bromley fxeorge A., produce dealer, dwl 330 Bran 

Bromley Geor^re T., freight clerk with C. P. R. R. 
Co., dwl 330 Brannan 

Bromley Washington L., notary public and convey- 
ancer, (ittice 331 MontjJomery,d\vl 1224 Union 

Bromley William P., captaui steamer Julia, C. S. 
NaV. Co.,dwl 122 1 Clay 

Bvoramev CX&we,, ( Spreckels & Co.) dwl 108 Ele- 
venth 

BROMMER D. & CO., (Henry Bremer) groceries, 
liquors and market, Nli cor Sixth and Bryant 

Brotnuier Diederich, (D. Bromrner dt Co. J dwl 770 
Bryant 

Bromrner Henry, (Bromrner & KortsJ dwl NE cor 
Fianklin and Hayes 

Brommer John, (Bromrner and Hollin^sJ dwl cor 
Buc-liiinan and Bay 

Brommer & Hollings, (.John Brommer and Benja- 
min HoUingsJ milkmen, cor Buchanan and 
Bay 

Brouimer &. Korts, (Henry Brommer and. Henry 
Kor/xJ groceries and liquors, SE cor Franklin 
and Hayes 

Bromweli L. L., special agent and adjuster Phoe- 
nix and Home Insurance Go's, 424 California 

Broun Benjaniin R., porter with N. P. Cole & Co., 
dwl 435 Pine 

Bronn John F., saloon and lodgings, 1628 Stockton 

Brons Peter, laborer with James McEwin, dwl 630 
Pacific 

Bronsdon Phineas, roadmaster S. F. &. N. P. R. R., 
dwl 17 Moss 

Bronson John F., Assistant Secretary State Board 
Harbor Commissioners, 414 Montgomery, dw] 
cor Bush and Cemetery Avenue 

Bronui- Pietro, laborer with John Jury & Bros, 524 
Merchant 

Broock Signumd, clerk 219 Battery, dwl 570 Minna 

Brookes Albert M., delivery clerk San Francisco 
Post office, dwl .')8 Natoma 

Brookes Samuel M., portrait painter 611 Clay, dwl 
Beriiul Hights 

Brookings Joseph, waiter with Emerson Corville 
&. Co 

Brookliue House, Michael Farrell proprietor, 217 
Broadway 

BROOKLYN HOTEL, Kelley & Wood proprie- 
tors, 210 and 212 Bush 

BROOKLYN LIFE INSURANCE CO., (mutufd) 
A. J. Bryant & Co., General Agents, office 240 
Montgomery 



Brooklyn Park Homestead Association, office 415 
Montgomeiy 

Brooks A., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Brooks Aaron, furniture mauufaclurer, dwl 314 
Bush 

Brooks Adam, salesman with Cutting &. Co., dwl 
550 Natoma 

Brooks Allen, finisher Pioneer Woolen Mills, dwl 
837 Pacific 

Brooks A. S., mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 

Brooks August, carrier Eisibth District postal deliv- 
ery, dwl 4 St Mary Place 

Brooks B. C , dwl We'st End 

Brooks Bejijamin H., attorney at law, office 316 
California, dwl NW cor Chestnut and Jones 

BROOKS BENJAMIN S , attorney at law, office 
3, 4 and 5 Exchange Building, "dwl 631 Har 

Brooks Burgess, laundry man with James Laidley, 
dwl Filbert near Go'ugb 

Brooks Charles, saloon, dwl 309 Chestnut 

Brooks Charles, shipjoiner, Shipjoiners Associa- 
tion, 713 Mission 

Brooks Charles, propr Canterbury Hall 824 Kearny 
dwl S s Chestiuu bet Stockton and Powell 

Brooks Charles Wolcott, merchant and consul for 
Japjn, dwl Grand Hotel 

Brooks Eilmund, ( Reid \ B.) dwl 1117 Washinszton 

Brooks Edward, telegraph operator, dwl 636 Com- 
mercial 

Brooks E. L. B., attorney at law, office NW cor 
Montgomery and Jackson 

Brooks Elisha, teacher, dwl 1714 Pacific 

Brooks Francis, porter, dwl S s A.sli ni- Oclavia 

Bi'ooks Frank, dresser with I. M. Weutworih &. 
Co., dwlcor Goui;li and Page 

Brooks George, builder, dwl E s Kearny bet Lom- 
bard and Chestnut 

Brooks George J., haruessmaker, 848 Howard, dwl 
14 Quincy 

Brooks Hemy, laborer with Cole &- H.isliell, dwl 
245 Bluxome 

Brooks Henry B., (Tay,B. Sf Backus) dwl 766 
Folsom 

Brooks Henry E., porter with Bradley & Cockrill, 
dwl 924 Jackson 

Brooks Heniy S., miner, dwl W s Guerrero ur 
Seventeenth 

Brooks James, real estate, dwl 125 Sansom 

Brooks James, carpenter, dwl W s FoUom bet 
Twenty-first and Twenty-second 

Brooks James, hatter with Robert H. Adams 

Brooks James K., produce, 121 Washington, dwl 
28 Minna 

Brooks John, carpenter, H. C. League, 12S Kearny 

BROOKS JOHN L., merchant tailor, 710 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 1015 Stockton 

Brooks Joseph A., expresswagon, dwl W s Ken- 
tucky nr Sierra 

Brooks Joseph H., clerk, dwl 510 Washington 

Bi'ooks Joseph H., wooldealer, dwl 837 Pacific 

Brooks Marifaret, (colored) (widow) furnished 
rooms, 25 Stone 

Brooks Max, (Boston Cracker Co.) dwl 938 Pol- 
go m 

Brooks M. J. Mrs., furnished rooms, 314 Bush 

BROOKS NOAH, editorial department Alta Cali- 
fornia, dwl 926 Jackson 

Brooks Norman C., master mariner, dwl 120 O'Far- 
rell 

Brooks Orion, teacher bookkeeping Heald's Busi- 
ness College, dwl lO-'Sj Fol?om 

Brooks Patrick, hostler City Railroad, dwl Minna 
nr Fifteenth 

Brooks Robert C, distiller, dwl Islais Creek nr 
Ostego 

Brooks Samuel, bricklayer, dwl cor Louisiana and 
Sierra 

Brooks Samuel E., salesman with A. L. Bancroft & 
Co., dwl Bernal Hights 



Before the evil day insure in the PEOPLES. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Boots and Shoes. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



123 



Brooks SImdrach, cutter with J. L. Brooks, dwl 713 

Vallejo 
Brooks Stephen S., contractor, olBce 425 Kearny, 

dwl 804 Bush 
Brooks T., Iiostler City Railroad 
Brooks Thaddeus R., civil engineer, dwl 7'2l Har 
BrooliB Thomas H., salesman with Jones & Co., 

dwl S2i) Mission 
Brooks W. H. J , peareher records, office 316 Cali- 
fornia, dwl lOOH Clay 
Brooks Will, clerk U. S.A. Quartermaster, dwl 631 

Harrison 
Brooks William, (Brnolcs & Go.) dvvl 3 Rausch 
Brooks William H., laborer, dwl E s Drumm bet 

Clay and Merchant 
Brooks VVilliani M., shoemaker with Charles Palmer, 

dwl 3.;5 Broadway 
Brooks Wiiliain P., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
BROOKS & CO., (WilHnm Brookxand William 

Go}i<:h) Howard Street Ste^m Fuel Company, 

SE cor Howard and Raiisch 
Bro[)hy Ellen Miss, bakery, 1'224 Folsbni 
Brophy John B., laborer, dwl SW cor Mission and 

Twenty second 
Brophy Michael, (Brophy &, Bernn) dwl N s Bush 

bet Franklin and Van Ness Avenue 
Brophy Patrick, hostler with George Eggleton, 119 

Jackson 
BROPHY & BERNA, (Mickoel Brophy and 

Frederick Beruaj proprietors Kentucky Livery 

Stable, 420 Pacilic 
Bros George, (Bros & Born) dwl 6 Pratt Coiu't 
Bros .lacob, hairdresser with Bros ife Born, dwl 315 

Dupout 
Bros tt Born, (George Bros and Charles Born) 

haiidressing saloon and baths, 'J15 Sansorn 
Brose Julius, philosophic;il instrument maker with 

William Luudbert;, dwl 4v!3 Bush 
Brosins Hem-y, l)ookbiiuier with E. Bosqui & Co., 

dwl cor Fell and Laguiui 
Brosnaban Stephen, laborer, dwl 548 Natoma 
Biosiian John D., messenger, dwl 150 Tehama 
Brosiian Lizzie Miss, dressmaker with Mrs. F. 

Uzuav, dwl S s King bet Third and Fourth 
Brosnini lUichael, laborer, dwl S s King bet Third 

and F'ourth 
Brothers Michael, hostler City Stables, dwl Minna 

bet Fourth and Fifth 
Brotberton Rol)ert, caqjenter, dwl S s Broadway 

bet Polk and Van Ness Av 
Brotherion Robert, clerk with Orr & Atkins, dwl 

N 8 Broadway nr Polk 
Brotherton Ttioinas W. Rev., rector St. John's 

Church, dwl 11:2 Eleventh 
Brouders Michael, boilermaker, dwl 610 Natoma 
Brougham John, hairdresser, 918 Dupont, dwl 312 

Green 
B rough ton Napoleon L., dwl 1026 Bush 
Brou><st Chai les, laborer, dwl S W cor Broadway and 

Dupont 
Brouihers Michael, laborer, dwl Miller Place 
Browden Patrick, laborer Laborers' Protective 

Benevolent Association, Irish American Hall 
Browell James, shipcalker, dwl 425 Greenwich 
Browell Jeremiah, clerk with Edmund Scott, dwl 

217 Lombard 
Browell Jeremiah, carpenter and builder, 612 Com- 
mercial, dwl 217 Lombard 
Brower Audiew J., with Harry Black, dwl 432 

Green 
Blower Anne, (widow) dwl N a Grove nr Octavia 
Brower Celsus, clerk mustering and disbursing of- 
fice 224 Kearny, dwl 839 Mission 
Brower U.miel R., bakery, NE cor Vallejo and 

Stockton 
Brower Robert R., painter, dwl 532 Green 
Brown Aaron, teacher Hebrew and German, dwl 
115 Geary 



Brown Abraham B., carpenter California Mills, 

dwl 517 Howard 
Brown Abraham B., (colored) hairdresser with Isaac 

G. Gary, dwl 1508 Mason 
Brown Agnes Mrs., proprietress Columbia Hotel, 

741 Market 
Brown Albert, laborer with Bertz & Co., dwl 58 

Jessie 
Brown Alexander, engineer, dwl 617 Davis 
Brown Alexander, (Brown & (Jurrier) dwl 741 

Market 
Brown Alexander B., shipderk, dwl 219 Ritch 
Brown Alexander H., clerk, dwl Meiggs' Wharf 
Brown Alfred, laborer, dwl 422 O'Farrell 
Brown Alonzo F., fancy goods, 304 ^'Battery, dwl 

404 Sixth 
Brown Alonzo Fitch, with E. O. Brown, dwl 3 

Chatham Place 
Brown Andrew, longshoreman, dwl NE cor First 

and Frederick 
Brown Andrew D., liqnor saloon, S a Jackson bet 

Davis and Drumm 
Brown Anne, (widow) seamstress, dwl 40 Clara 
Brown Archibald, tinsmith with Thomas Bertram, 

dwl 216 Third 
Brown August, mariner, dwl 510 Davis 
Brown Augustus F. H., machinist, dwl 9 William 
Brown B. B. drayman, dwl E s Jones nr O'Farrell 
Brown Benjamin, teamster with U. S. Drayman 
Brown Benjamin B., painter, dwl 783Maiket 
Brown Benjamin W., (Smith, B. & (Jo.) dwl 961 

Hariison 
BROWN BRAINARD C, reporter Evening Bul- 
letin, dwl 32 Fourth 
BROWN BROTHERS* CO., (Morris and Lewis 

Brown and B'lhr Sheidcman) agents Oregon 

City Woolen Mills, 24 Sanstmi 
Brown Brown, carpenter, dwl 1821 Howard 
Brown Calvin, attorney at law, dwl 1606 Leaven- 
worth 
Brown Catherine, (widow) dwl E s Mission nr Six- 
teenth 
Brown Catherine C, (widow) dwl C25 Larkin nr 

Ellis 
Brown Catherine K., (widow) dwl 373 Brannan 
Brown Charles, barkeeper with Peter Ramsey, 104 

Steuart 
Brown Charles, barkeeper with Stoddard & Merkle, 

dwl 113 Tehama 
Brown Charles, carpenter, dwl 23 Rausch, rear 
Bx'owii Charles, clerk with J. H. Kessnig, dwl cor 

Eusr and Market 
Brown Charles, fireman S. S. Pelican, North Pac. 

Trans. Co 
Brown Charles, fisherman, dwl 2 California, rear 
Brown Charles, housemover, dwl 444 Sixth 
Brown Charles, liquor saloon and restaurant, SWcor 

East and Merchant 
Brown Charles, lumber stevedore, dwl 32 Steuart 
Brown Charles, mariner, dwl 134 Steuart 
Brown Charles, mariner, dwl 407 Drumm 
Brown Charles, porter, 217 Battery, dvvl 621 Cal 
BROWN CHARLES, real estate," dwl W s Dolores 

bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Brown Cliarles, stoves aud tinware, 724 Market, 

dwl 326 Ellis 
Brown Charles, waiter, 431 Pine 
Brown Charles, (Smilh & B.) dwl 415 Union 
Brown Charles A., collector Charter Oak Life Ins. 

Co., 331 Montgomery 
Brown Ch:irle» E. , clerk S. F. Package Express, 

dwl 1627 Mission 
Brown Charles F., draughtsman with Lt. Col. R. S. 

Williamson, res Oakland 
Brown Charles F., real estate agent, office 24 Mer- 
chants' Exchange, dwl 66 Clementina 
Brown Charles I , laborer, dwl 101 Jessie 
Brown Charles M.. express wagon, cor Sixth and 

Folsom, dwl 139 Shipley 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Pocket Cutlery and Scissors. 



MASON & POIiTjABD'S PILLS euro Fever and Ague. 



124 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Brown Clinrlcs M.. shipjiinji: and comniiBsion a<>rent, 

SVV cor Hariisou and Spear, dwl 15() Perry 
Brown ('haiit-s P., cook with Charles Brown, SW 

cor East and Mevcliant 
Brown Cliaiies P., laboi-er with Cutting & Co., dwl 

17 Clinton 
Brown Cliesler, {Brown & Wells J dwl 463 Bryant 
Brown Clnisiian. master mariner, dwl 134 Perry 
Brown Clnif<lopher, mariner, dwl "i'Z Sienart 
Browu Cide, compositor with B. F. Sterett, dwl NE 

coi- Stevenson and Fourth 
Brown Daniel, lanndrynian Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Blown Daniel T.. balier with Deeth, Starr &, Camp- 
hell, dwl 15 Nevada 
Brown David, carpenter, H. C. League. 128 Kearny 
Brown David, varnisher, dwl (i Tyson Place 
Brown David B., dealer coopeis' 'stocl;, 427 Davis, 

dwl 137 Chestnut 
Brown David L., { Munfrcy & Co.) dwl 837 Mission 
Brown David P. Jr., drayman with Brocas, Perliius 

& Frank, dwl 101 Jessie 
Brown Dt'uton D., surveyor, dwl 913 Clay 
Brown Doimhis J., janitor British Benevolent 

Society, dwl 315 Union 
Brown Elien, jiaper ruler with A. L. Bancroft c& Co., 

dwl 114 Minna 
BROWN EDfiAR O., real estate, office 535 Clay, 

dwl 3 Chatham Place 
Brown Edward, hroomniaber with M. Zan & Co., 

dwl QSi California 
Brown Edward, carpenter, dwl 517 Howard 
Brown Edward, cook S. S. California, N. P. T. Co 
Brown Edwaid, engineer with A. L. Bancroft &. 

Co., dwl SW cor California and Devisadero 
Brown lulwavd, oysterman with George Mayes, 

dwl 309 Stockton 
Brown Edwin, clerk, SE cor Montgomery and Bush, 

dwl 11)27 Mission 
Brown Edwin T., hootmaker with I. M. Wentworth 

& Co.. dwl 54 Third 
Brown E. F. Miss, assistant teacher Broadway 

Grammar School, res Oakland 
Brown Eleiinor Mrs., (colored) dwl 28 Stone 
Brown Elizabeth Miss, (colored) dwl cor Lombard 

and Gon,u;h 
Brown Elizabeth Mrs., furnished rooms, 277 Stev- 
enson 
Brown Eiizaheth, (widow) dwl 333 Beale 
Brown Emiiiet, compositor Evening Bulletin, dwl 

'J8G Stevenson 
Brown Francis A., farmer, dwl Overland House 
Brown Kiank, boatman, dwl 433 Union 
Brown Frank, carpenter, H. C. Leaqne. 123 Kearny 
Brown Fr^mk, expresswagon cor Howard and 

Stenart, dwl E s Spear bet Howard and Folsom 
Brown Fraid< Q., butcher cor Ritch and Bryant, dwl 

609 Bryant 
Brown Fivderick, clerk with Peter N. Ryan, dwl 

4:21 Folsom 
Brown Frederick, expresswagon, dwl 144 Steuart, 

lear 
Brown Frederick T., driver Potreio and Bay View 

R. R., dwl W sTennessee bet Solano and Butte 
Brown George, diiver, dwl 742 Market. 
Brown Geoige, real estate, dwl 251 Third 
Blown Georae F., porter with Wilmerding & Kel- 
logg, dwl 340 Third 
Brown George T., (G. T. Brown <fc Co.) dwl 727 

Cliv 
Brown Gideon H., dentist, office 223 Fifth, dwl 844 

Folsom 
Brown Gordon, carpenter, H. C. League, 128Kearnv 
BROWN G. T & CO, lithographers, 540 Clay 
Brown Gusiaf O., colfee saloon, 32 Steuart 
Biown Gustavus R. A., merchant, dwl 945 Howard 
Brown G. W., (c(di)red) expresswagon SW cor 

Clay and Kearny, dwl 924 Washington 
Brown Hamilton, porter with Brittan, Holbrcok & 

Co., dwl 109 California 



Brown Harvey S., bind agent Central Pacilic R. R. 

Co., office 419 Calif()inia, resides Oakland 
Brown Henry, barkeeper wilii Adam Smith, dwl 

515 Sacramento 
Brown Henry, boatman, dwl SWcor Front and Wash 
Brown Henry, brewer, dwl 434 Broadway 
Bi'own Henry, cook, dwl 7 Washington 
Brown Henry, lifjuor saloon, 130 Pacific 
Brown Henry, mariner, dwl 26 Stenart, 
Brown Henry, proprietor Brown's Hotel, S 8 Clark 

bet Drumm and Davis 
Brown Henrv, salesman, dwl E s Shotwell bet Nine- 
teenth and Twentieth 
Brown Henry, salesman with Mitchell & Bell, dwl 

126 Bernard 
Brown Henrv, special policeman, dwl Oregon nr 

East 
Brown Henry A., mariner, dwl Precita Avenue nr 

Howard 
Brown Henry C, fBrotcn Sf Wilson) dwl 617 

Mission 
Brown Henry J., expresswagon, dwl N s Rose bet 

Goutrh and Octavia 
Brown H. G., Lt. U. S. A., office SW cor Market 

and Third, dwl Point San Jose 
Brown Hugo, dressmaker, dwl 822 Clay 
Brown Hymai), merchant, 410 Sac, dwl 310 Sixth 
Brown Ireson C., (Brown Sf HuKney) dwl W e 

GueiTero between Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Brown Isaac W. W., market SW cor Eighth and 

Clementina, dwl 35 Oak Grove Avenue 
Brown J., deck hand C. S. Nav. Co.'s stm dredger 
Brown Jared C, blacksmith, cor Twenty-sixth and 

Nebraska 
Brown James, blacksmith, P. M. S. S. Co 
Brown James, cartman, cor Green and Battery 
Brown James, clerk with Jjeonard & Co 
Brown James, driver N. B. & M. R. R., dwl 507 

Eighth 
Brown James, laborer San Francisco Wool Ex- 
change, dwl 503 V^allejo 
Brown James, longshoreman, dwl SE cor John and 

Brannau 
Brown James, upholsterer, dwl 227 Green 
Brown James A., clerk, dwl 25 Stockton Place 
Brown James A., drayman. 315 Front, dwl 9 Riley 
Brown James E., (coloied) messenger Custom 

House, dwl 10 Scotland 
Browu James E. B., carpenter, dwl Steiuer in- 

Hayes 
Brown James F., carpenter California Mills, dwl 327 

Bush 
Browu James H., patternmaker Miners' Foundry, 

dwl 445 Fifth 
Brown James L., cabinetmaker, dwl E s Capp bet 

Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
Brown James R., (colored) hairdressinir saloon 

Brooklyn Hotel, dwl 1 1 08 Powell 
Brown James S., dwl S s Shipley bet Eighth and 

Ninth 
Brown James S., porter with J. & J. Spruance, dwl 

923J Harrison' 
Brown James W., furniture, 7 Fourth, dwl 81 Fourth 
Brown J. B., dwl Branch House 
Browu J. B , chief engineer S. S. Gussie Telfair, 

North Pacific Transportation Co. 
Brown J. E., laboiei- Custom House 
Brown Jennie Miss, hairdresser with Mrs. C. M. 

Chapman, dwl 913 Stockton 
Brown Jesse, fireman Cal. Pac. R. R. Co.'s str New 

World, dwl 406 Vallejo 
Brown Jesse P., barkeeper with Henrj' A. Nelson, 

dwl2llSieveM.^on 
Brown J. O. Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 530 Green 
Brown John, atiornev at law, dwl 21 1 Green 
Brown John, baker, dwl Ns Oregon bet Front and 

Davis 
Brown John, barkeeper, dwl Ws Capp nr Twenty- 
second 



More than fair rates never charged by the PSOFLSS- 



C. P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Hats and Caps. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



125 



Brown Jolni, boatman, dwl lOfi Jackson 

Brown John, boiler maker Union Iron Works, dwl 

Palmer nr Thirty-First 
Brown John, (colored) l)oofblack, 3 Fourth 
Blown John, bootmaker with James H. Swain, dwl 

917 Suiter, rear 
Brown John, butcher, dwl 320 Beale 
Brown John, clerk with Meigs &. Gawley, dwl 53 

Clementina 
Brown John, deck hand strar El Capitan, Oakland 

Ferry, dwl Urunun bet Jackson & Pacific 
Brown Joim, diiver Central R.R. Co., dwl 24 Clinton 
Brown John, t^ardener, dwl Wisconsin Hotel 
Brown John, laborer, dwl 13 Baldwin Court 
Brown John, laborer, dwl 115 Vallejo 
Brown John, liouor saloon, 13 Third, dwl247Stev 
Brown Jolin, longshoreman, dwl 533 Commercial 
B own John, mariner, dwl 32 Stenart 
Brown John, mariner, dwl 510 Davis 
Brown John, mariner, dwl SE cor Mariposa and In. 

diana 
Brown .lolin, stevedore, bds 127 Jackson 
Brown John, waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Brown Jnhn, waiter Lick House 
Browu John, f Brown i!j- JohnnonJ dwl 1422 Pacific 
Brown John A., messenger S. F. Transfer Co., dwl 

208 Aloiitgomery 
Brown John A , salesmnn, dwl 118 Geary 
Brown John U,, stonecutter, dwl 1008 Market 
Brown John B., (Brown & Dniiker) dwl 320 Beale 
Brown John D., baker with Thomas J. Cbadbourne, 

1^12Duront 
Brown. loll n D , liquor saloon. 112 First 
Brown J(.hn l<\, fHiealcr & B.)i.\\y\ 1707 Dupont 
Brown John H., shipwright, dwl 508 Howard 
Brown John K., captain stmr Antelope, C.S. Nav.Co 
Brown John L., laborer, dwl Fair Av nr Cal Av 
Brown John Murray, carpenter and builder, dwl 918 

Pacific 
Blown John 0., laboi'er, dwl 530 Green 
Brown John W., chief operator Western Union Tel. 

Co., dwl St. James Hotel 
Brown Joseph, compositor with A. L. Bancroft & 

Co., dwl 917 Sutter 
Brown Joseph, laborer Pioneer Woolen Mills, dwl 

Francisco bet Polk and Van Ness Avenue 
Brown Joseph, waiter Rnss House 
Brown Joseph L., gardener, dwl W s Bernal 

Highta nr Twenty-eighth 
Brown J. Thompson, hariiessmaker with R. C. Kirby 

& Co., dwl 9 Garden 
Brown Julia B. Miss, assistant teacher Fourth St. 

Primary School, dwl 809 Mission 
Brown Lawrence A., broker, dwl 14 Third 
Brown Lewis, (Brown Bros, dk Go. J dwl 824 

O' Fa ire II 
Brown Louis, laborer, dwl 144 Steuart, rear 
Brown Louis, mariner, dwl SW cor Market and 

Steuart 
Brown M. Augusta Mrs., fashion patterns, 14 Third 
Brown Margaret, (widow; dwl S s Mission bet 

Twelfth and Thirteenth 
Brown Margaret Mrs , laundress, dwl 818 Jackson 
Brown Maria, (colored) (widow) nurse, dwl 1616 

Leavenworth 
Brown Maria T., (widow) dwl 317 Ritch 
Brown Mark, calker, Calkers' Ass'n, 713 Mission 
Brown Martha, (colored widow) dwl 913 Stockton 
Brown Mary, (widow) dwl 135 Post 
Brown Matthew, plasterer, Plasterers' Pro. Asso- 
ciation, 727 Market 
Brown Midiael, drayman, dwl 138 Silver 
Brown Michael, laboi-er, dwl 216 Francisco, rear 
Blown Michael, watchman with S. F. Gas Co., dwl 

397 Eighth 
Brown Morris, (Brown Brothers <fc Co., and Tok- 

las, Hahn 4- 5.; dwl 822 0'Farrell 
Brown Moses P., harnessmaker with Main & Win- 
chester, dwl 404 Sixth 



Brown Nathiin, (Brown <& Hutchinson) dwl S 8 

Bryant nr Downey 
Brown Nicholas, l.i borer Golden Gate Sugar lie- 
finery, dwl 3 Lick Alley 
Brown Oscar, laborer with S. S. Butler, dwl 1009 

Kearny 
Brown Peter, housemover, dwl 927 Washington 
Brown Peter, ironmolder, dwl W s Janseu bet 

Lombard and Greenwich 
Brown Peter N., maciiiuist California Theater, dwl 

613 Bush 
Brown Raphael, bookkeeper 24 Sansom, dwl 824 

O'Farrell 
Brown Reuben W., foreman with Smith, Brown & 

Co., dwl 961 Harrison 
Brown Richard, real estate, dwl 818 Green 
Brown Richard, deputy sheriff City Hall, dwl S s 

Turk bet Pierce and Steiner 
Brown Richard, farmer, dwl N s Greenwich near 

Scott 
Brown Richard, fruits and vegetables, SE cor Fifth 

and Shipley 
Brown Richard, laborer, dwl 116 Shipley 
Brown Richaid, stevedore. Riggers' and Stevedores' 

Ass'n, 429 Pacific 
Brown Richaid T., painter with Wilson tfc B;o , 

dwl 8 Antliony 
Brown R. Nelson, jobber domestic goods, dwl 641 

Stevenson 
Brovi'ii Robert, cook, dwl 152 Silver 
Brown Hobert, mariner, dwl 39 Pacific 
Brown Robert, porter with T. H. Hatch & Co., dwl 

1321 Montgomery 
Brown Robert, salesman with Keane, O'Connor & 

Co., dwl 233 Stevenson 
Brown Robert L., sawyer with Miller & Haley, dwl 

178 Perry 
Brown Robert R., (colored) bootblack, dwl 1504 

Stockton 
Brown Robert T., extraman Hose Co. No. 5, S. F. 

F. D. 
Brown Robert T., whitener, dwl W s Alabama nr 

Twenty-fourth 
BROWN ROLAND G., agent Grover & Baker 

Sewing Machine Co., 116 Mont, dwl 532 Geary 
Brown Samuel, broker, dwl 208 Post 
Brown Samuel, (coloi-ed) seaman, dwl 751 MLiision 
Brown Samuel, special policeman, dwl 403 Beale 
Brown Samuel, stevedore, dwl E s White Place nr 

Bryant 
Brown Samuel E., compositor S. F. News Letter, 

dwl 1203 Bush 
Brown Samuel H., clerk, dwl 227 Green 
Brown Samuel H., farmer, office 304 Montgomery 
Brown Seth, carpenter, dwl SE cor Steiner and 

Ellis 
Brown S. L. Miss, assistant teacher Tenth Street 

Grammar School, dwl 215 Jones 
Brown Spencer R., decorator, dwl 533 Commerciiil 
Blown Stephen Mrs., (widow) dwl 703 Folsoin 
Brown Stephen G., hairdressing saloon, 202 Fourth 
Brown Sylvester B., drayman with J. A. Brown, 

dwl '1207 Clay 
Brown Theodore, clerk Tax Collector's office. City 

Hall, dwl 1418 Powell 
Brown Theodore, proprietor Dresdener House, 337 

Bush 
Brown Theodore, extraman stmr No. 1 S. P. F. D., 

dwl cor Clay and Prospect Place 
Brown Theodore A. P., clerk with Charles Baum, 

dwl 1628 Stockton 
Brown Thomas, assistant cashier Bank California, 

dwl 907 Sutter 
Brown Thomas, calker and shipcarpenter, dwl N s 

Dorland Lane bet Guerrero and Dolores 
Brown Thomas, laborer, dwl 1 Jasper Place 
Brown Thomas, laborer, dwl 7783 Harrison 
Brown Thomas, laborer, dwl N s Washington bet 

Fillmore and Steiner 



JONES, PULLMAN ft CO., 116 Sansom Street, Straw Hats and Trimmings. 



TERBA SANTA is the safest and best Blood Purifier ever before the Public. 



Brown Thomas, longshoreman, dwl SW cor Market 

and E:ist 
Brown Thonins, packer with Wangeiiheitn, Stern- 

lieim & Co., dwl 614 Natoma 
Brown ThouiHS, porter California Market, dwl 6 

Virginia Place 
Bi'own Thomas, salesman with Tieadwell & Co., 

dwl 919 Sutter 
Brown Thomas, stevedore, Riggers and Stevedores' 

AssnciHtion, 4"i9 Pacific 
Brown Thonins A., (Brown & Otto) dwl N s Na- 
toma bet Eighth and Ninth 
Brown Thomas S., carpenter, dwl McAllister nr 

Buchanan 
Brown W., engraver, dwl 636 Commercial 
Brown Waller, butcher with J. Y. Wilson & Co., 

(iwl cor Buchanan and Bay 
Brown Walter S., ( Phillips, B. & Co.) dwl 1606 

Leavenworth 
Brown W. Hall, capitalist, dwl T.'il Clay 
Blown W. Hall .Jr., pilot, dwl 751 Clay 
Brown Wilber K., drayman, dwl 230 Perry 
Brown Wilhelniina, (vvidow) dwl 144 Steuart, rear 
Brown Willard B., compositor Monitor, dwl 930 

Folsom 
Brown William, (colored) bootblack with Alexan- 
der Fert(U8on, 214 Montgomery 
Brown Willi nn, capitalist, dwl 20 Sansom 
Brown William, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Brown VVilliam, carriagemaker with Eugene 

James, dwl 837 Folsonj 
Brown William, cigars and tobacco, 41 Third, dwl 

909 Howard 
Brown William, cigardealer, dwl 1036 Howard 
Brown Willium, clerk, dwl 122 Taylor 
Brown Williiini, cooper with A. S. Gordon, dwl 

NE cor Front and Sacramento 
Blown William, crockery, dwl S s Turk nr Hyde 
Brown William, dockmaster, dwl cor Sierra and 

Maryland 
Brown William, driver S. F. Transfer Co., dwl 742 

JlarUet, 
Brown William, laborer, dwl 23 Clara 
Brown William, laborer, dwl E s Valencia nr 

Southern Pac. li. R. depot 
Brown William, lal)orer S. F. Cordage Factory, 

dwl Iowa nr Nevada 
Bro.vn William, laborer with Adams tfe Co., dwl 

28 i Garden 
Brown William, mariner, dwl SW cor Main and 

Riiicoii Court 
Brown VVilliam, mariner, dwl Serpentine Avenue 

nr Hari'ison 
Brown William, porter -with Matthew F. Smith, 

dwl 228 Mission 
Brown William, sawmaker, 222 Jackson, dwl 1808 

Taylor 
Brown William, stevedore, dwl N s Shipley nr 

Tenth 
Brown William, tenmster with Isadore Gutte, dwl 

Perry nr Fourth 
Brown William, watch brushmaker, dwl 113 Second 
Brown William A., (colored) barber, dwl 10 Vir- 
ginia 
Brown William A., engineer, dwl 419 Fremont 
Brown Willium C, veheelwright, dwl 22 Sumner 
Brown William D., mining engineer, dv^'l 42 Sixth 
Brown William D., soap manufacturer, office 27 

Commercial, dwl 28^ Giirden 
Brown William F., teamster, pier 3 Steuart, dwl 

21 Rar.sch, rear 
Brown William H., contractor night work, 211 

Sutter, dwl S s Market nr Ninth 
Brown William H., salesman with Treadwell & Co., 

dwl 1417 Hyde 
Brown William H., shoemaker, dwl 54 Third 
Brown William H., (Brown & Arnold,) dwl 605 

Howard 



Brown William J. A., contractor, dwl W s First 

Av bet Filleenth and Sixteenth 
Brown William M., mining engineer, dwl 3 Park 

Avenue 
Brown William P., groceries and liquors, SW cor 
Mason and .Jackson, (and Brown & Santini) 
dwl 1 14 Bernard 
Brown William P., policeman, City Hall, dwl 45 

Louisa 
Brown William S., (colored) bootblack, 106 Sixth, 

dwl 1014 Stockton 
Brown William W., printer, dwl 1114 Market 
BROWN & ARNOLD, (VVilliam H. Brown and 

CyruH Arnold) fruits and vegetables, 30 and 

31 California Market 
Brown & Cm-rier, (Alexander Brown and Albert 

Currier) t)ntchers, 46 Washington Market 
Brown & DunUer, (John B. Brown & Ckriatopher 

Blinker) Brown's Market, NE cor Folsoin and 

Fremont 
Brown & Huseey, (Ireson C. Brown and Albion C. 

Huxaey) carpenters, 707 Market 
Brown & Hutchinson, (Nathan Brown and T. R. 

Hutchinson) importers and jobbers clothing, 

1081iattery 
Brown &, Johnson, (John Brown and Peter John- 
son) S. F. Restaurant, 923 Kearny 
BROWN & OTTO, (Thomas A.' Brown nnd 

Richard Otlo) photographic gallery, 28 Third 
Brown & Santnii, (William P. Brown and John 

Santini) groceries and liquors, SE cor l)u- 

pont and Clav 
BROWN & WELLS, (Chester Frown and Asa R. 

Wells) stair builders, 411 Misdon 
Brown & Wilson, (Henry G . Brown and. William 

H. Wilson) asnhallum roolintr, 614 Mission 
BROWNE DAVli) S., printer," bookbinder nnd 

dealer stationery etc., 207 Clay, dwl 1018 Taylor 
Browne Edward, cook steamer California, dwl 118 

Shipley 
Browne Frederick A., clerk, dwl 815 Montgomery 
Biowne George, civil eutiineer, dwl 913 Clay 
Browne George, painter, dwl 1034 Folsom 
Browne Jame:< C, cooper, dwl 507 Eighth 
Brown John D, deputy suivevor San Mateo Co., 

office 302 Montgomery, dwl 266 Miima 
Browne Philip, ni-^Hit, watchman, dwl SE cor Mont- 
gomery and Filbert 
Browne Samuel C, salesman with C. C. Perkins, 

dwl 126 Perry 
Browne Thomas A., mariner, dwl cor Courtlandand 

North Av 
Brownell Charlotte S., (widow) dwl 261 First 
Browning August, gun and locksmith, 653 Washing- 
ton, dwl 15011 Leavenworth 
Browning George W., salesman. 321 Montgomery 
Browning Jacob, drayman, 111 Front, dwl SW cor 

McAllister and Larkin 
Brownnig .Jeremiah, drayman, 111 Front, dwl SW 

cor McAllister and Larkin 
BrovfiuugJohM, (Browning & Klein) dv/\ NW cor 

Folsom and Twenty -second 
Browning William, wines and liquors, 541 Clay, 

dwl 771 Folsom 
Browning & li.\e\n, f John Browninsr and Ernest 

Klein) groceries and liquors, NW cor Folsom 

and Twenty second 
Brownlee Janies S., laborer, dwl E s Diamond nr 

Nineteenth 
Brownlee John, sign and ship painter, SW cor 

Front and Washington 
Brown's Hotel, S s Clark bet Davis and Drumm 
Brownstein George (E. Goslinsky & Co.,) dwl 1017 

Post 
Brownstein George & Bro., (merchants. Red Bluff) 

office 219 Battery 
Brownstone Isaac, (of I. Broioiistone & Bro., Santa 

Cruz and Wulsonville) dwl 1002 Larkin 
Brownstone Moses, dwl 1002 Larkin 



TH£: FEOFIiES INSURANCE CO. the best California Insurance Co. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708. 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Clothing, eto. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



127 



Bro/.ius Frederick, barkeeper with F. Borman, dwl 
I'JO Vii'uiniii 

Brnce Alexander, tinsmith with G. & W. Snook, 
dwl E 8 Liigiina, bet Bush and Pine 

Brnce Ch;iiles, saddler with Main &. Winchester, 
dwl 783 Market 

BriK-e David, cjirpenfer, H. C. Lensjne, 128 Kearny 

BliUCK DONALD, book and job printer, 534 
Commercial, dwl 1016 LarUin 

Brnce Henry, longshoreman, dwl 5 Goodsell Place 

Bruce Henry, maviner, dwl 3"2 Stenart 

Bruce Herbt-rt E., dairyman with Murray & Noble, 
dwl cor Old San .lose Koad and Thirtieth 

Bruce James H., captain schooner Sarah, dwl 1218 
Jackson 

Bruce Joim, calker Ship Calkers' Association, Ex- 
celsior Hall 

Brnce Lewis P., painter, 725 Broadway, rear 

Bruce Lorin>r U., IVnit dealer, dwl Nfi cor Chatta- 
noo^'a and Tweiitylourth 

Bruce Ralph, cook S. S. Senator, North Pac. Trans- 
portation Co. 

Bruce Kohert, carpenter, dwl E s Laguua bet Bush 
and Pine 

Bruce Robert, clerk with Balfour, Guthrie & Co., 
dwl 3 Seventh 

Bruce Robert, marbleworker with John Daniel & 
Co 

Bruce Robert Jr., niarblecutter, dwl E s Laguua 
bet Bush and Pine 

Bruce Wasliington, shoemaker with John Irwin, 
dwl 111) Silver 

Bruce Willinm, carpenter, dwl 127 Jackson 

Bruce William, welldigger, dwl Jersey bet Castro 
and Nob 

Bruck Alexander A., physician, office and dwl NE 
cor Broadway and Powell 

Bruckmaini Henry, liquors, 1007 Battery 

Briickner John, news agent, dwl 304 Jackson 

Brueck Hermann Rev., pastor German Metliodist 
Church, dwl 86-1 Folsom 

Bruer .John, tanner with Funcke & Wasserman, dwl 
NE cor Eighth and Brannan 

Brugge Jacob, c.irpenler, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Bruggemau Henry, asphaltum roofer, dwl 31 Lang- 
ton 

Brufrgemann Henry, cutter with Isidor Eisenberg, 
dwl 5t).') Union 

Bruggy Patrick, teamster, dwl N s Bryant nr Bry- 
ant Av 

Brulin Hans P., mariner, dwl 156 Stenart 

Brnhn William, imiriner, dwl 7 Washington 

Bruhns Henry, mariner, dwl S s Greenwich bet 
Montgomery and Sansom 

Bruinagini Jacob H., merchant, office 36 Montgom- 
ery Blociv, res Bear Valley, Mariposa county 

BRUMAGIM JOHN W., attorney at law and gen- 
eral agent Great Western Life Insurance Co., 
office 36 and 37 Mont Block, dwl 1315 Mason 

Bruman Aaron, fruit peddler, dwl E s Ociavia nr 
Oak 

Brnmtield Bvrd, farmer, dwl 325^ Bush 

BRUM FIELD WILLIAM H., attorney at law, 
office 612 Clay, <lwl -115 Capp 

Brumley C. R., dwl 1-128 California 

Brumley M. I. Jlifs, assistant teacher Drumm Street 
Primary School, dwl 1428 California 

Brnnil Simon, porter, 222 Cal, dwl 404 Stockton 

Brumnier C. A., earlier Morning Call 

Brummer John, workman California Sugar Refin- 
ery, cor Bryant and Eighth 

Brumnier Ch., workman California Sugar Refinery, 
cor Bryant and Eighth 

Brundage tharles, waiter 538 Clay, dwl N s Teha- 
ma nr Second 

Brune August, cigar manufacturer, 717 Sansom 

Brune August, {Brune & Lemcke) dwl 129 Fourth 

Brune Henry, Central Saloon, NW cor Kearny and 
Geary, dwl 115 Morton 



Brune & \jQxnvk&,( Angnsit Brune and Otto Lemcke) 

hairdressing saloon, 129 Fourth 
Bruner Adam, dairyman with N. Simouds, dwl cor 

Twenty-fourth and Vermont 
BRUNER B. P., snpeiintendent Pacific Rolling Mill, 

3 Front, b%ls Occidental Hotel 
Bruner Eugene, wagon, cor Broadway and Dnpont 
Bruner John, bricklayer. Bricklayers' Association, 

Young Men's Christian Association Hill 
Bruner John, harnessnniker, dwl 428 Pacific 
Bruner J. S., bricklayer. Bricklayers' Assiciation, 

Young Men's Christian Association Hall 
Bruner Louis, brewer with Charles Metzler,dwl 713 

Greenwich 
BRUNER WILLIAM II., physician, office 21 Post, 

dwl 654 Folsom 
Brunet S., tailor, 414 Jones 
Brunier Eugene, bottles and rag dealer, SW cor 

Broadway and Dnpont 
Brunig Louis, laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl Es Kate nr Bryant 
Bruning Christopher, miller with Eisen Brothers, 

dwl 16 Stevenson 
Bruning William, ffifsrhen <£ B.J dwl 2 California 
BRUXINGS MARTIN, groceries and liquors, SW 

cor Third and Mission 
Brunje John A., clerk with B. Tinken, dwl 725 Jack- 
son 
BrunjesDiedrich, groceries and liquors, San Jo86 

Road nr 5 Mile House 
Brunjes Fred., porter with Taylor & Bendel, dwl 

:J0l3Ma8on 
Brunjes Henry, carpenter,dwl S 8 Howard bet Third 

and Fourth 
BRUNJES HENRY, groceries and lit^uors, NE cor 

Brannan and Zoe 
Brunjes Jacob, clerk, dwl 218 Pacific 
Brunn (lirsl name refused) clerk with Ziel, Ber- 

theau <!fe Co. 
Brunn T. O., porter, dwl SE cor M9ntgoniery and 

Jackson 
Brunner Jacob A., poultry and game, 31 Metropoli- 
tan Market, dwl 921 Greenwich 
Brunner Louis, clerk, dwl 424 Minna 
Brunning Annie, (widow) boarding and lodging, 658 

Mission 
Bruno Nicholas, fruits and confectionery, 405 Broad- 
way 
Brunotte Louis, tailor, dwl 4 August Alley 
BRUNS CHRISTIAN, physician, office and dwl 26 

Geary 
Bruns Conrad, laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl 658 Bryant 
Bruns Conrad, mariner, dwl 658 Bryant 
Bruns Conrad, ^i/«.si(/cA Jj- B.Jdv/\bl Minna 
Bruns Diedi'ich, cook with Von der Mehdeu & Co., 

SW cor Mission and Main 
Bruns Diedrich, cook with Charles A. Schroder, dwl 

NE cor Francisco and Powell 
Bruns Frederick. (Bmnx & Bro.j dwl SE cor 

Mission and Sixteenth 
Bruns Frederick, (Frederick Bruns & Brother J res 

Germany 
Bruns Frederick & Brother, (George Brnna) gro- 
ceries and liqiiors, SW cor Folsom and Spear 
Bruns George, (Bruns <fc Bra. J dwl SE cor Mission 

and Sixteenth 
Bruns George, (Frederick Bruns 4* Bro.) dwl SW 

cor Mission and Sixteenth 
Bruns Henry, boatman, dwl E s Spear bet Howard 

and Folsom 
Bruns Henry, cabinetmaker with Kragen & Geisha- 

ker, dwl 145 Silver 
Bruns Henry, groceries and liquors, 732 Filbert 
Bruns Henry, milkranch, old San Jos6 road nr Thir- 
tieth 
Bruns Henry H., grocer, dwl 1705 Leavenworth 
Bruns Herman, store bookkeeper Custom House.dwl 

J25 Seventh 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 110 Sansom St, Ladies' and Gentlemen's Linen Handkerchiefs. 



TERBA SA.NTA completely restores the system when impaired by disease. 



128 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTOKY 



Brnns Hermiiia Mpb., dressmaker. 770 Howard 
Biuiis John I), cal)inetimiker with George B. May 

& Co., (iwl lf)08 Diipont 
BRL'NS N. ife. P., groceriea and liquors, NW cor 

Heriy and Tliird 
BRUNS NICHOIjAS, groceries and liquors, 617 

Davis, (find N. & P. BrnnsJ dwl SE cor Guer- 
rero and Camp 
Brims Peter, dwl 530 Pacific 
B; nils Peter, (N. and P. BrnnsJ dwl 14 Haggin 
Bnius William, clerk with J. K. Ortmann, dwl 815 

Jackson 
BruiiB & Brother, <r/eo)'^e mid Frederick BnnixJ 

groceries and liquors, SE cor Jlission and Six- 
teenth 
Brunteii Henry, tinsmith with Henry G. FisUe, dwl 

20;- Pnst 
Brunsen Martin, driver with Brader Bros., dwl 738 

Broadway 
Brunsen Henry, apprentice with Saul & Co., dwl 

Post Streei House 
Brunt SaiDiiel. jobwagon, SE cor Kearny and Sut- 
ter, dwl \V s Biirtlett bet Twenty-fourth and 

Twenty-tifth 
Brunt William, luborer, dwl 114 Dora 
Brunt William N., (Conahmi & B.) dwl SE cor 

Howard and Sixteenth 
Bruntbch Charles C, with John H. Boden & Co. 

dwl 919 Jackson 
Biuny Bernard, miller with Cal. Com. and M. Co., 

dwl Greenwich nr Pierce 
Bruiiyes Henry, dwl G54 Howaid 
Hrnsco Giaconio, cook 515 Merchant 
Brush Albert, blacksmith, dwl SE cor Steiner and 

Eliis 
Brush Creek Gold and Silver 3Iining Co., office 326 

Davis 
Brush George A., graiuer, 623 Sacramento, dwl S s 

Ellis nr Steiner 
Brush Reuben G., bookkeeper with R. B. Swain & 

Co., dwl 1410 Pine 
Brusher Joseph, longshoreman, dwl 9 Pinckney 

Place 
Brusie James, patent agent, dwl W s Columbia bet 

Tweniy-filth and Twenty-sixth 
Brust Peter, dwl 1208 Folson'i nr Eighth 
Brutscher Adam M., harnessmaker with Main & 

Winchester, dwl SE cor Stockton and Sutter 
Brultig Peter, waiter with Junius G. Foster, dwl 

Cliff House, terminus Point Lolxis Road 
Bi-y;in Charles H., real estate, dwl S 8 Seventeenth 

bet Dolores and Guerrero 
Bryan Dudley C, health inspector, office 521 Jack- 
son, dwl 810 Stocktim 
Bryan Edward, porter 204 Sansom, dwl 121 Welsh 
Bryan Edwin, Jr., tinsmith with G. & W. Snook 
Hiyan Edwin H., (Bryan & CoeJ res Oakland 
Bryan E. H., physician, office 21 Post, dwl Lick 

Hoiii-e 
Bryan Frank, clerk Subsistence Department U. S. 

A., 703 iM;irkct, dwl 39 Kearny 
Bryan Frederick, clerk with Alexander Pallies, dwl 

553 Mission 
Bryan Henrietta Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 819 How 
Bryan John JI., stoves, tinware, and manufacturer 

hydraulic fiipes, 15 Second, dwl 620J Minna 
Bryan Thomas, blacksmith, dwl Gunnison Avenue 

nr Twentv-eighth, Bernal Highta 
BRYAN THOMAS, wines and liquors, 322 Sansom, 

dwl 1 107 Folsom 
Bryan Timothy, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl 

Poirero Point 
Bryan William, real estate, office 322 Sansom, dwl 

327 Ellis 
Btyan William H.,6urveyor, dwl 509 Bush 
Bryan William J., superintendent North Pacific 

Tnmsportation Go's wharf, dwl 301 Third 
BRYAN WILLIAM J., druggist and apotheenrv, 

NW cor Howard and Third, dwl 1203 Howard 



Bryan William J. & Co., real estate agents, office 

420 Montgnmerv 
BRYAN WILLIAM J. <t CO., apothecnries. NW 

cor Second and Howard, and Grand Hotel 
Bryan & Coe, f Edward II. Bryan and John T. 

Coc) general collectors and house brokers, 523 

Kearnv 
BRYANTA. J. &,C0., general agents Brooklyn 

Life Insurance Co., offii-e 240 Alontgomery 
Bryant Alexander, box manufacturer, dwl W s 

Folsoni bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Bryant Alfre<l, machinist, dwl Araeiicaii Exchange 
Bry.int Andrew J., (^^4. J. iJ/-aa«< <fc Co.y dwl 925 

Pine 
Bryant Caroline A., (widow) teacher music, dwl 

' 452 Sixth 
Bryant Charles R., f Bryant & Spratt) dwl SW 

corner Franklin and Eell 
Bryant Charles W., bookkeeper, dwl 331 Mont- 
gomery 
Bryant Daniel S., f Bryant & Cook) res Oakland 
Bryant George, cutter with P. Kelly, dwl SE cor 

Lombard and Dupont 
Bryant George, shoemaker, dwl 417 Broadway 
Bryant George H., (Neville & Co.) dwl 132;) Cali- 
fornia 
Bryant James E., (Center & B.J dwl N s Fulton 

bet Gongh and Octavia 
Bryant .Tolin, chief cook stmr Sacramento, P. M. S. 

S. Co.. dwl 535 First 
Bryant John, compositor Examiner, dwl NE corner 

Valencia and Twenty-fonrlh 
Bryant John, (Bryant & Slrakanj dwl 2226 How- 
ard 
Bryant John R., painter, dwl 22 Hayes 
Bryant M. M. Miss, oilpainting and teacher, dwl 272 

Clementina 
Bryant Richard, shoemaker, dwl 417 Broadway 
Bryant Robert, conductor Central Railroad, dwl 452 

Sixth 
Bryant Samuel, (colored) mechanic, dwl S s Green- 
wich bet Larkin and Polk 
Bryant Segardl, mariner, dwl 32 Stenart 
Bryant Thomas, mariner, dwl 32 Stenart 
Bryant Thomas S., painter with Charles H. Sykea, 

dwl 75 Fourth, rear 
Bryant Warren, box manufacturer, dwlWs Folsom 

bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Bryant William F., bookkeeper with David Conrad, 

dwl S W cor ftlontgomeiy and Califo;nia 
Bryant William J. O., (colored) physician, office 

and dwl 822 Pacific 
Bryant William P., bricklayer. Bricklayers' Associa- 
tion, Y'oung Men's Christian Association Hall 
Bryant William W., clerk, U. S. Postoffice, dwi 247 

Second 
Bryant Wolfert J., driver Front Street, Mission and 

Ocean Railroad, dwl 29 Austin 
Biyant& Cook, ^/-'/'//(te/ S Bryant and. David S. 

Cookj commission merclianis, 306 Davis 
Bryant &. Spratt, (Charlex R. Bryant and John 

Spratt) groceries and liquors, S\V cor Franklin 

and Fell 
BRY'ANT &STRAHAN, (John Bryant mid Simon 

SlrahanJ wood carvers, 218 Steuart, aud Berry 

bet Third and Fonrth 
Bryant. — See Briaut and Bi-yan 
Bryden George, drayman, dwl 39 Tehama 
Bryden James W., tinsmith with Brittan, Holbrook 

& Co.. dwl 423 Bush 
Brydges Marshal C, stoves and tinware, 11 Spear, 

dwl 146 Tehama 
Bryen Patrick, carpenter, dwl 592 Slevenson 
Brysou Andrew, bootmaker with William Jonier, 

dwl 623 Howard 
Bryson Cyrus W., (Reed & B.J dwl 813 Howard 
Brysou William, clerk steamer El Capitan, Oakland 

Ferry, res Oakland 
Bub Charles, waiter, dwl SW cor Ellis aud Mason 



THE PEOPLES INSUBANCE CO, is the Company for the People. 



C. P- VAN SCHAACK & CO.. 708. 712. 714 and 716 Kearny Street. Importers and Jobbers. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



129 



Buch Frederick, musician MaL'uire's Opera House. 

dwl 811 Union 
Buch Jacolt S., merchant, dwl 318 Pine 
Buchanan Alexander Mrs., (widow) dwl 18 Jessie 
Buclianan Catherine, (widow) dwl 29 Commercial 
Buchanan Krank, barkeeper with James Carolin, 

dwl 601 Third 
Buclianan Henry, liqnor dealer, dwl 33 Geary 
Buchanan James, farmer, dwl 107 Leidesdorff 
Buchanan John, carpenter, dwl SW cor Jones and 

Bernard 
Buchanan John, cook, 226 Third 
Buchanan Joseph, office with John McCombe, 405 

California, dwl E a Shotwell nr Nineteenth 
Buchanan Thomas, yrrainer with Simpson & Lemon 
Buchanan William G., Iwotmaker U. W. M. Boot 

and Shoe Co., dwl 519 Jessie 
Bnchanna John, dwl 569 Howard, rear 
Buchard Jnmea M. Rev., professor St. Iijnatius Col- 
lege, 811 Market 
Buchele Philip, hroommaker with Van Laak & Gil- 
lespie, dwl 7 St. Charles Place 
Buchert GeorKe, shipbuilder, dwl SE cor Chesnut 

and Taylor 
Buchollz Henry, clerk with Charles Brown, dwl WS 

Brook nr Market 
Buchholtz John Mrs., fBuckhoUz & KockJ dwl 624 

Pacific 
BUCHHOLTZ & KOCK.fMn^. John Buchholtz 
and Clous KockJ proprietors New Atlantic 
Hotel, 624 PaciKc 
Buchholy. Charles, dwl 337 Bnsh 
Buchhok Henry, cabinetmaker with William G. 

Weir, dwl 308 Dupont, rear 
Buchle Conrad, trnssmaker with J. H. A. Folkers 

& Bro, 118 Montgomery 
Buchlenkirchten Adolph, clerk with E. Essmaun, 

dwl 6 Quincy 
Buck Andrew J., driver City R. R., dwl W s First 

Av., bet Fomteenth and Fifteenth 
Buck C. Jlrs., fortune teller, 13 Dupont 
Buck Daniel, clerk 12 Change House, dwl Occiden- 
tal Hotel 
Buck George, engineer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl 

Potrero Point 
Buck Geort'e, job wagon, NW cor Montgomery and 

Clay, dwl 314 Third 
Buck George, {Buck & Covert) res Modesto, Stan- 
islaus Co 
Buck H., workman California Sugar Refinery 
Buck Henry, hairdresser with Herman Sonnenfeld, 

dwl 824 Harrison 
Buck Herman, workman Selby's Lead Works, dwl 

Houston nr Taylor 
Buck John, (Ohlaildt & Co.) dwl S s Eighteenth 

nr Potrero Av 
Buck Joshua S., engineer, dwl 71 Clementina 
Buck Louis, merchant, dwl 7 Carlos Place 
Buck Richard, laborer, dwl 22S Battery 
Buck William, stairbuilder, dwl 415 Brannan 
Buck & Covert, (George Buck and Henry M. Co- 
vert J produce commission, 324 Davis 
Buckarovich Peter, coffee saloon, NE cor Drumm 

and Clay 
Buckbee C A. Rev., pastor Fifth Baptist Church, 

dwl 207 Taylor 
Buckbee John R., register deposits U. S. B. Mint, 

dwl S s Nineteenth nr Valencia 
Buckelew Moses S., bookkeeper with Casebolt & 

Kerr, dwl 14 Ellis 
Buckhaber Hermann, jeweler with Koehler &, Rit- 

ter, dwl 6 Jolm 
Buckholtz Henry, mariner, dwl 32 Stenart 
Bnckie Francis, upholsterer, dwl 132 Sutter 
Bucking Diedrich, fUonhard & B.J dwl 412 

Drumm 
Buckingham Charles E., broker, dwl 331 Kearny 
Buckingham'Helen, (widow) dwl 717 Bush 
Buckingham T., laborer, dwl E 8 Octavia nr Grove 



Buckingham Thomas H., (Buckingham <& HechlJ 

dwl 428 Sutter 
Buckingham William H., clerk, dwl 410 Kearny 
Buckingham William P., clerk, dwl NW cor Haight 

and Gough 

Buckingham & Hecht, (Thomas H. Buckingham 

and Isaac and Louis Ilecht, Jr. J wholesale 

boot manufacturers, NW cor Haight and Gough 

Buckley Alfred A., cash boy with Bowen Bros., 

dwl N 8 O'Farrell bet Powell and Mason 
Buckley Christopher A., liquor saloon 612 Washing- 
ton, dwl 911 Stockton 
Buckley Cornelius, expresswagon, dwl 408 Beale 
Buckley Cornelius V., physician and surgeon, office 

and dwl 509 Kearny' 
Buckley Daniel, laborer, dwl 56 Minna 
Buckley Daniel, mariner, dwl 20 Folsom 
Buckley Daniel, (Stewart <fc B.J dwl 516 Minna 
Buckley David, carpenter, dwl 318 Folsom 
Buckley David, porter with A. C. Dietz & Co., dwl 

569 Mission 
Buckley Edmund, brickmason, dwl 218 Prospect 

Place 
Buckley Edward A., bricklayer, dwl 327 Filbert 
Buckley Edward J., actor California Theatre, dwl 

506 Bush 1 

BUCKLEY EDWARD P., license collector City 
and County of San Francisco, office 7 City Hall 
first floor, dwl 2006 Powell 
Buckley Edward P., manager What Cheer Restaur- 
ant, What Cheer House 
Buckley Ellen, (widowj furnished rooms, 407 Clem- 
entina 
Buckley Francis, carpenter and builder, 12 Anna, 
(and Buckley & EaganJ dwl Ws Devisadero 
bet Turk and Eddy 
Buckley J. A., bricklayer, Bricklavers'Association, 

Young Men's Christian Association Hall 
Buckley James, dwl 534 Folsom 
Buckley James, brick manufacturer, dwl N 8 Green 

nr Polk 
Buckley Jane, (widow) saloon, dwl SE cor Fran- 
cisco and Jones 
Buckley Jeremiah, laborer, dwl 518 Stevenson 
Buckley Jeremiah J., porter, 15 Sansom, dwl S s 

Hayes nr Webster 
Buckley Jerry, farmer, dwl Point Lobos Road nr 

Agricultural Park 
Buckley John, boilermaker, dwl 6 O'Farrell Alley 
Buckley John, bookkeeper, 215 Battery, dwl 407 

Clementina 
Buckley John, builder, dwl 911 Stockton 
Buckley John, clerk with Treadwell & Co. cor Mar- 
ket and Fremont 
Buckley John, cooper, dwl 925 Broadway 
Buckley John, laundryman San Francisco Laundry 

Association, dwl N W cor Turk and Fillmore 
Buckley John, mariner, dwl 898 Front 
Buckley John, mason, Stonemasons' Association, NE 

cor Bush and Kearny 
Buckley John A., boilermaker Vulcan Iron Works 
Buckley J. T., (widow) dwl SW cor Taylor and 

Jackson 
Buckley Lawrence, mariner, dwl 116 Stenart 
Buckley Mary (widow) dwl 213 Dupont 
Buckley M. E. Mrs., lodgings, 36 Gearv 
Buckley Michael, blacksmith Union Iron Works, 

dwl 145 Shipley 
Buckley Michael, laborer with C. P. R. R., dwl 708 

Mission 
Buckley Michael, porter, dwl W s Columbia bet 

Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Buckley Michael, porter, 11 Battery, dwl cor Twen- 
ty-second and Church 
Buckley Milton, commission merchant, dwl W s 

Capp bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Buckley Ned, Buckley's Varieties SW cor Sacra- 
mento and Kearny, dwl 631 Sacramento 
Buckley Patrick, blacksmith, dwl 206 Pacific 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO.. lie Sansom Street, Laces and Embroideries. 



BBDINQTOK, HOSTETTEK & CO., exclusive Agents for Hostetter's Bitters. 



Buckley Palrick, laborer, dwl 925 Broadway 
Buckley Piitiick, Inliorer Laurel Hill Cemetery, dwl 

5 s Bnsli bet Baker and L"oii 
Buckley B. H., dwl 626 Califoriiia 
Buckley liobert, mariner, dwl 510 Davis 
Buckley Sieplien, liostler with Nathau & O'Neil, 

'2U/ and ^09 Sutter 
Buckley Stephen R., driver with Milton H. Gar- 
land, dwl 412 Ellis 
Buckley Thomas, mariner, dwl 32 Stenart 
Buckley Tliotiias, miner, dwl 212 Broadway 
Buckley William, brick manufacturer, dwl W b 

Green nr Polk 
Buckley William E., clerk with Edward F. Hall 

6 Co., dwl 731 California 

Buckley & Eagan, ( Francis Buckley and Michael 
J. EiignnJ carpenters and builders, NW cor 
Ellis and Broderick 

Bucklin Jeremiah, porter, dwl S s Hayes bet Web- 
ster and Buchanan 

Bucklin John W., broker, office 306 Montgomery, 
dwl 311 Stockton 

Bucklin S. M. Co., (White Pine) office 40 Mer- 
chants' Exchange 

BUCKMAN BROTHERS, (George A. and Harry 
L.J Ca[)ital Saloon, 226 Montgomery 

Buck man Clara, assistant teacher Kiucon Grammar 
School 

Buck man George A., (Bnckman Brothers J dwl 323 
Kearny 

Buckman Hany L., fBuckman Brothers) dwl SE 
coi- Second and Mi.^siou 

BUCKNALL GEOKGE J., dermatologist, oHice 
523 Kearny, dwl 812 Bush 

Buckiiall M. J. Mrs, dwl 425 Sutter 

Bucknani Charles, salesman, 103 Kearny, dwl 22 
Stone 

Bucknam E/ra T. , stoves and tinware, 22 Steuart, 
dwl 850 Folsom 

Bucknam M. M., clerk stmr Salinas, Washington 
Street wharf 

Buckner Cliarles, carpenter and builder, 21 Geary, 
dwl '126 Tehama 

Buckner Jacob, (colored) shoeblack, NE cor Fifth 
and Howard 

BUDD WAYMAN C, stockbroker, office 509 Cal- 
ifornia, dwl 15 Guy Place 

Buddingion Walter, pilot, dwl 425 Kearny 

Budell Philip, tailor, dwl 1217 Kearny, rear 

Budelniann William, barkeeper Chicago Hotel, 
dwl 218 Pacific 

Budge Ilithard F., translator, interpreter and teach- 
er, 728 Montgomery 

Budgeman C. B., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 
Kearny 

Budiich Michael, (Buditch & NicolosJ dwl 826 
Kearny 

BUDiTCH & NICOLOS, (Michael Bidiick and 
(ieorge NicolosJ proprietors oyster and cottee 
saloon, 820 Kearny 

Budke Hermann, clerk, dwl 228 Bush 

Budwig Edward, ( Waller & B.J dwl 652 Market 

BuecliJ Louis E., manufacturer maccaroni with 
J. P. Tenthory & Co., dwl 558 Mission 

Buecher George, woodturner with L. & E. Eman- 
uel, dwl 531 Fourth 

Buechle ('onrad, dwl 909 Kearny 

Biieliler Jacob M. Rev., pastor St. Paul's German 
Evang. Luth. Church, dwl 953 Mission 

Buehler John C, clerk with E. H. Knight, dwl S s 
Greenwich nr Fillmore 

Buel Frederick Rev., agent Cal. Bible Society, office 
757 Market, res Clinton 

Buell Charles J., clerk with Redington, Hostetter 
& Co.. dwl Buss House 

Buena & Co., (Chinese) cigarmanufacturers, 723 
Sacramento 

Buena Vista Homestead Association, office 305 
Montgomery 



BUENA VISTA VINICULTURAL SOCIETY, 

oliice 409 Battery, up stairs 
Buenan A. von ]\Iiss, assistant teacher Bush Street 

Cosmopolitan School 
Buerinann Frederick, bookkeeper, 312 Sacramento, 

dwl 303 Mason 
Buessard Jules, ('/)!ii^ere(7M & B.J A\y\ SE cor Pa- 
cific and Montgomery 
Buessard Pierie, cook with J. B. Guillemette, dwl 

516 Pacific 
Buettner Hermann, teaclier piano, dwl 1511 Ma- 
son 
BUFFANDEAU EMIL B., collector, office 526 

Merchant, dwl 112 Sutter 
BUFFINGTON JOHN M, mining eecretarv. 

office 37 New Merchants' Exchange, dwl l'37 

Silver 
Buffington William H., clerk with Albert Dibblee, 

dwl 137 Silver 
Bufiord Henry L., agent Contra Costa Laundry 

Association, dwl W s Bartletl bet Twenty- 
second and Twenty-third 
Bufford James L., painter, dwl -505 Sutter 
Bufiord Simuel F., S. F. Laundry Association, dwl 

505 Sutter 
Bugbee Charles L., (S. C. Btigbee & SonJ dwl 30 

Hawthorne 
Bugbee John S., (Scripture & B.J attorney at law, 

office 224 Sansom, dwl 611 Harrison 
Bugbee S. C, ^<S'. C. Bugbee & SonJ dwl 641 Har- 

)-ison 
BUGBEE S. C. & SON, (Charles L. BugbceJ 

architects, office 402 Montgomery, room '27 
Bugbee Sumner W., business agent, office 402 

Montgomery, dwl 611 Harrison 
Bugia Nicholas, cofi'ee saloon, 605 Davis 
Buhl Chiistian C, engineer Sanitarium Baths, dwl 

2114 Powell 
Buliler August, apothecary and chen)ist, 905 Kearny 
Biihler John F., shoemaker, 529 Jackson, dwl SVV 

cor Dupont and Bioadway 
Buhlert Albert, /'./. iiuA/e;-< & Bro.J dwl 019 Clay 
Buhlert Julius, r.l. Bnhkrt & Bro.J dwl 7\ Tav 
BUHLERT JULIUS & BItO., (Albert Buhlert) 

wine and liquor saloon, SW cor Third and 

Market 
Bubmeier Frederick, cabinetmaker with Field & 

Frei, dwl 113 Silver 
Biihn D. Peter, barkeeper, 612 Jackson 
Buhr Benjamin F., clerk, dwl 31 Second 
Buhrer George, laborer with Cohlman & Co., dwl 

491 Brannan 
Buhrmeister John, repacker with E. T. Anthony & 

Co., dwl 229 Sutter, r^ar 
Buick John, painter, dwl E s Octavia bet Post and 

Sutter 
Buisson Charles, clerk, 119 Sutter, dwl 330 Sutter 
Bujan Antonio Jr., compositor Examiner, dwl S s 

Vallejo nr Dupont 
Buker Livy K., bricklayer, dwl 1318 Jackson 
Buking George E., cabinetmaker, dwl 236 Sutter 
Bultinch Charles, clerk with I. Friedlauder, dwl 211 

Stevenson 
BULGER MARTIN, Harbormaster, office NE cor 

East &. Clay, dwl 15 Russ 
Bulger Patrick, expresswagon, dwl S s Boyd nr 

Chesley 
Bulger Solomon, cartman, dwl 22 Folsom Avenue 
BULKELEY L. E., attorney at law, office 603 

Washington, dwl Lick House 
Bulkley David, carpenter, dwl 318 Folsom 
Bulkley Ichal)od, clerk with C. A. Hooper & Co., 

dwl Long Bridge cor Fourth and Channel 
Bulkley Milton, (Skertrood. B. <£ Co.) dwl W s Capp 

bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
BULL ALPHEUS, President Gould & Curry S. 

M. Co., 22 Merchants' Exchange, dwl NE cor 

Leavenworth and Francisco 
Bull James, merchant tailor, 225 Third 



Furniture and Dwellings Insured at lowest rates by the FEOPIjES. 



C. P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Merchandise Brokers. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY, 



131 



Bull.ird Jnnies H., produce commission, 121 Wash- 
ington, dwl E 8 Hyde bet Filbert and Green- 
wich 
Bulhii'd William P., clerk with Adam T. Green, dwl 

E s Hyile bet Filbert and Greenwich 
Bulled William, seaniMii, dwl E s Ueed nr Clay 
Bnllen Jonathan, brickhiyer, dwl 4 Centr,\l Place 
BnUen Tiipper, miner, dwl S & Tliirteeuth bet Va- 
lencia and Mission 
Bnlletii Constaniino, (Bnlletti & SelnaJ dwl I7I4 

Dnpont 
BULLETTI & SELNA, (Cotixtantino Bnlletti & 

Ubiddo SdnaJ fruit merchants, Pacific Fruit 

Market 
Bullesba/.h Anton, laborer, dwl 308 Dnpont, rear 
Bullinger .Joseph, celleriiian, 321 Montgomery, dwl 

42'J Pine 
BuUis Edward A., clerk with S. C Blake, dwl 611 

Union, rear 
Bullivant Herbert E., porter, 115 Pine, dwl SE cor 

Fifth and Harrison 
Bnlles H. JI., carpenter, H. C. Leajjne, 1"28 Kearny 
Bullock Ezekiel, wood turner vvith Kimball Manu- 

f.ictnriug Co., dwl Ib3 Silver 
Bullock Frank U., (Bullock & JoiiesJ dwl 331 Mont- 
gomery 
Bullock L. L., Tide Land Commissioner, office SW 

cor Clav and Kearny, dwl :;232 Francisco 
BULLOCK & J ONES, (Fmnk D. Bullock & 

Juhit. L. JoiwuJ ijent's furnishing goods and 

merchant tailoi-s, 421 Monlgomerv 
Bullwinliel John F., groceries and liquors, 25 

Louisa 
Biillmau James C, fruitdenler, 324 Sixth 
Bullniore Kobeit K., salesman with David Porter, 

dwl 1517 Larkin 
Bulson John, engineer tugboat Rabboni,dwl 1061 

Folsom 
Bnlte Peter, Kentucky House, SE cor Kentucky and 

Gil more 
Bnmm George S., local policeman, dwl 531 Geary 
Bumm George W., fj. M. Crane & Co. J dwl 531 

Geary 
Biimpus Peleg, miner, dwl 822 Vallejo 
Bunce S:nnuel, brii-Ulayer, Bricklayers' Association, 

Younvr Men's Christian Association Hall 
Buuce Willijim, bookkeeper with Hobbe, Gilmore& 

Co., dwl 132'.) Sacramento 
Bundsen Andrew, cook, 607 Sacramento, dwl 136 

Minna 
Bundshu Charles, bookkeeper with Smith, Brown & 

Co.. dwl 62(1 Vallejo 
Bundt Edward, clerk with Rothschild &Ebrenpfort, 

dwl oil Leavenworth 
Bundv Charles S. (colored) hairdresser stmr Great 

Republic, P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 12 Virginia 
Bundy John H. porter, U. S. B. Mint, dwl cor Six- 
teenth and Utah 
Bundy Jo.«eph, (colored) bootblack with H. W. 

Stalil, dwl cor Broadway and Dupont 
Bundy Tiiomas, (colored) hog ranch, dwl E s Utah 

nr Sixteenth 
Buueniiin H. &. Co., (Jacob TaiitphausJ wholesale 

wines and liquors, 407 Commercial 
Buueman Henry, (H. Biineman & Co.) dwl 802 

Union 
Bunemaini Charles, miner, dwl 903 Larkin nr Geary 
Bunker Alfred W., clerk Liverpool and Loudon and 

Globe Ins. Co., dwl 813 Mission 
Bunker Cromwell, clerk with Robert F. Bunker, 

dwl SE cor Leavenworth and Broadway 
Bunker Frederick H., clerk with Robert F. Bunker, 

dwl 117 Bernard 
Bunker Frederick R., bookkeeper with John W. 

Brumagim, 36 and 37 Montgomery Block 
Bunker George F., mariner, dwl 13 DeBoom 
Bunker George F. Jr., draftsman Pacific Iron 

Works, dwl 13 DeBoom 
Bunker George H., insurance agent, dwl 36 Stanford 



Bunker Henry Jr., clerk with Bunker & Wheeler, 

dwl N s Jlission bet Twelfth and Thirteenth 
BunKer Henry S., (Banker & Wheeler J dwl N s 

Mission bet Twelfth and Thirteenth 
Bnnlier J., deckhand C. S. Nav. Co.'s steam dredger, 
Bunker Paul, foreman Oriental Bonded Ware- 
house, dwl S 8 California bet Webster and Bu- 
chanan 
Bunker Robert F., porkpacker and cnrer meats, 74 

and 75 California Market, dwl 1610 Leav 
Banker Thomas C, collector Pacific Street Wharf, 

dwl 621 Clay 
Bunker William" M., Bulletin Editorial Rooms, dwl 

114 Perry 
Bunker W. \V., clerk, dwl SE cor Leavenworth 

and Broadway 
BUNKER &. WHEELER, (Henry S. Bunker and 

Henry T. Wheeler J custom house and shipping 

broke IS, 501 Battery 
Bunn Charles C, clerk, dwl 209 Leidesdortf 
Bunnell E. F., dentist, office 319 Kearny, res Fruit 

Vale, Alameda county 
Bunnell J. H., operator Western Union Telegraph 

Co., dwl Rubs House 
Bunner Stephen, policeman City Hall, dwl 524 Union 
Buusteu Andrew, stewaid, dwl 136 Minna 
Bunting Joseph, merchant, office 231 Kearny, dwl 3 

Freelon 
Buntoii Richard, porter Brooklyn Hotel 
Banyan Dennis, laborer, dwlSE cor Mississippi 

and Mariposa 
Banyan Thomas, packer with Bennett & Co., dwl 

Maripot^a nr Iowa 
Burbank Caleb, attorney at law, dwl SW cor Clay 

and Leavenworth 
Burbank Lester, shoemaker with I. M. Wentworth 

& Co.. dwl 3 15 Gongh 
Burbank Samuel, porter with Whittier, Fuller & 

Co., dwl SW cor Clay and Leavenworth 
Burbury William, scene painter Maguire's Opera 

Hou.se 
Burch Mary Miss, seamstress with E. C. Kennedy, 

217 Bush 
Burcham John, farmer, dwl 208 Tyler 
Bnrckes Henry W., carpenter, dwl 108 Turk 
Burckes Samuel S., ,'i?«rt^(,'s ^- Co.) dwl 12 Ellis 
Burckes & Co.. (^^'tfWffcZ iS. Barckes) real estate 

agents, J 28 Kearny 
Burckhardt Adolph, cutler with Michael Price, dwl 

42 Morton 
Burckhardt Max, (Cohntieim, B. & Reese) dwl 331 

Montgomery 
Burd Lawrence, bricklayer, dwl 178 Clara 
Burd Patrick, laborer, llaborers Protective Benevo- 
lent Association, Irish American Hall 
Burdell Galen, dwl Lick House 
Burdet Peter, bincher, dwl 730 Minna 
Burdett William W., trader, dwl 21 Powell 
Burdick Edward F., bookkeeper with H. M. New- 
hall & Co., dwl 5 Martha Place 
Burdick Jared C, (Petlit Sr Co.) dwl 209 Drurani 
Burduk Joseph D., wholesale wines and liquors, of- 
fice 311 Clay, dwl E s Gnerrei'o nr Twentieth 
Burdick William, ein,'ineer with Gracier &. Heald, 

dwl 320 Third " 
Burden Thomas, bookkeeper with Moody & Farish, 

dwl 1IU« Pine 
Burfeind Herman, farmer, Ocean House Road nr 

Alms House 
Burfeind John, (Martin Burfeind & Bro. J dwl SW 

cor Francisco and Mason 
Burfeind Martin & Bro., (John Burfeind) liquor 

saloon, SW cor Francisco and Mason 
Burg Emile, bookkeeper with John G. Nelson, dwl 

1009 Washington 
Burgans Charles, gunsmith with Wilson & Evans, 

dwl 637 Stevenson 
Burge Robert K., blacksmith Market St R. R., dwl 

117 Grove 



JONES, PUTiLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Sewing and Embroidering Silks. 



YEBBA SANTA is suitable for all ages and both sexes. 



132 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Biirjre William, te:imster with John B. Goldstone, 
dwl 1051 Howard 

Biir^emeister Angastus, tinsmith, 143 SecDnd 

Biu-f^er Jai-ol), liairdresser, Ids SVV cor Kearny 
mid Pa(;iHc 

Bui-frer Joseph, butcher with Philip Siebel, 35 
Gearv 

Burger William, waiter, dwl 31 Morton 

Burgeimeister Charles, barkeeper, dwl 1123 Stock- 
ton 

Burgers Henry, fisherman, dwl S s Serpentine Av 
bet Bryant and York 

Burges Tristram, register clerk Probate Court, dwl 
4 Powell 

Burgess Charles, dwl 773 Mission 

Burgess Charles A., salesman with Bullock & Jones, 
dwl 773 Mission 

Burgess Charles E., bookkeeper with Cyrus Adams, 
dwl 430 Post 

Burgess C. M., hostler, Cliff House, Point Lobos 
road 

Burgess George H., portrnit and landscape painter, 
studio 'Jlti Busii, dwl 12 Ellis 

Burgess Hubeit, teacher drawing public scbools, 
dwl McAllister bet Laguna and Buchanan 

Burgess James, cook with Anderson & Co., dwl 
71 JIarket 

Burgess John, laborer, dwl 240 Townsend 

Burgess Michael, laborer, Central Pac. R. R., dwl 
240 Townsend 

BURGESS OSCAR O., physician, office and dwl 
523 Folsom 

Burgess Richard E., actor, dwl 12 Metcalf Place 

Burgess Robert, longshoreman, dwl 351 First 

Burgess William, cook, dwl 741 Market 

Burgin Patrick, cook with Rosenkrans & O'Don- 
nell, dwl (39 Stevenson 

Burgiss Chiirles, dwl 5(i Tehama 

Burhams Jacob L., with Pacific Rolling Mill Co., 
dwl Potrero Point 

Burhans Willet S., real estate brol;er, dwl 517 Pine 

Burkhardt Max, f Sclnnidi & B.J dwl 627 Com 

Burke Albert J., clerk, dwl NE cor Filbert and 
Jones 

Burke Alfred J., stationery, newspapers and peri- 
odicals, 548 Washington, dwl Jones bet Green- 
wich and Filbert 

Burke Barbara, (widow) dwl N£ cor Filbert and 
Jones 

Burke Catherine, (widow) dwl 150 Clara 

BurUe Chiirles, carpenter, dwl 351 Jessie 

Bnike David, laborer, dwl 214 Broadway 

Burke Diivid, hostler with Charles Dyer, dwl 619 
Pacilic 

Burke David H., carpenter, dwl 946 Folsom 

Burke Edmund, clerk with White & Bauer, dwl 
NE corner Filbert and Jones 

Burke Edward, laborer, dwl 2 Tehama 

Burke Ethelbert, deputy collector Custom House, 
dwl 722 Turk 

Burke Francis G., (Bnrke & McAllister) and pro- 
prietor Excelsioi- shaved shingle manufactory, 
Humboldt, res Oakland 

Burke (iarrett, carpenter, dwl 946 Folsom 

Burke George T., laborer, dwl Twelfth Av nr P, 
South San Francisco 

Burke GiUiert, hostler with J. B. Dorr, dwl Second 
nr Brannan 

Burke Henry, barkeeper with James Vance, dwl 
527 Pine 

Burke James, conductor. Market St. Railroad. 

Burke James, heater Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl E s 
Michigan nr Sierra 

Burke James, laborer, dwl 228 Clementina, rear 

Burke James, laborer, dwl 718 Clementina 

Burke James, jilasterer. Plasterers' Protective Asso- 
ciation, 727 Market 

Burke James, porter with S. V. Water Company, 
dwl 516 California 



Burke James, tailor, dwl 1318 Kearny 

BURKE JAMES C, liquor saloon,' SE cor Fourth 
and Perry 

Burke James C, porkpacker with Harvey & Co., 
dwl N s Clementina nr Third 

Burke James L., laborer, dwl Tenth Av nr Railroad 
Avenue 

Burke Johanna Mrs., boarding and lodging, 51 
Alinna 

Burke John, bellman Occidental Hotel 

Burke John, billiard talde maker, dwl 720 Jlarket 

Burke John, blocklayer, City Paving Company 

Burke John, cook, dwl 115 Oak 

Burke John, expresswagon, cor Market and Stock- 
ton, dwl 30 Langton 

Burke John, gardener, dwl 36 Garden 

Burke John, hostler Market St, Railroad, dwl Val- 
encia nr Sixteenth 

Burke John, laboi'er, dwl 39 Minna 

Burke John, laborer, dwl 5.57 Howard 

Burke John, laborer, dwl 316 Beale, rear 

Burke John, laborer, dwl 512 Mission 

Burke John, laborer, dwl 561) Mission 

Burke John, laborer, dwl 947 Mission 

Burke John, laborer with R. D. (yhandler, 118 Pac 

Burke John, laborer with Reynolds, Howell & Ford, 
dwl Twentieth bet Dolores and Church 

Burke John, j)ainter with M. English, dwl Cle- 
mentina liet Second and Third 

Burke John, shoemaker, dwl S s Hickory nr Gough 

Bnrke John, (Burke iSj- Dowling) dwl 265 Stevenson 

Burke John E..dwl 722 Turk 

Burke John H., laundryman, dwl 257 Perry 

Burke John H., steward Hose Co. No. A. S. F. F. 
D.,dwl5Calhomi 

Burke ,Iolin H. , with Francis G. Burke, dwl Claren- 
endon House 

Burke John I., brickmason, dwl E s Yerba Buena, 
rear 

Burke John P., macbinist Southern Pacific Rail- 
road, dwl 130 Dora 

Burke Joseph, molder Union Iron Works, dwll59 
Shipley 

Burke Julia (widow) boarding and lodging, 2027 
Polk 

Burke Levs'is, molder Vulcan Iron Works, dwl SE 
cor ftlontgomery and Alta 

Burke M., physician, dwl 514 Folsom 

Burke Martin, driver with John McKew, dwl 6 
Sonoma Place 

Burke Martin J., { Madison & B. and Madiso7i, B. 
& Co.; dwl 714 Leavenworth 

Burke Matthew M., laborer, dwl 2 California, rear 

Burke Michael, farmer, dwl 540 Sixth 

Burke Michael, cigarmaker with Cobo, Martinez & 
Co., dwl 150 Clara 

Burke Michael, laborer, dwl 20 Willow Avenue 

Burke .Michael, laborer, dwl 51 Minna 

Burke Michael, laborer, dwl W s Capp nr Nine- 
teenth 

Burke Michael, laborer, dwl S s Brannan bet Se- 
venth and Eighth 

Burke Michael, laborer, dwl SE cor Washington 
and Fillmore 

Burke Michael, laboi'er, Laborers' Protective and 
Benevolent Association, Iiish-Americau Hall 

Burke Michael, woodturner, dwl SE cor Montgom- 
ery and Alta 

BurkeMichael P., baker with Rosenkrans & O'Don- 
nell, dwl 331 Tehama 

Burke Nancy, (widow) furnished rooms, 21 1 Fourth 

Burke Nicholas J., baker with Deeth, Starr & 
Campbell, dwl 515 Stockton 

BurUe Patrick, drayman, dwl S s Bryant bet Fifth 
and Sixth 

Bnrke Patrick, farmer, dwl W s Geneva bet Bran- 
nan and Townsend 

Burke Patrick, laborer, dwl S s Twenty-sixth nr 
Mission 



A knowledge of the business and fair dealing are combined in the FSOPLSS. 



O p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 & 716 Kearny St., Rubber Goods and Umbrellaa 



SAN FRANCISCO [ B ] DIRECTORY 



133 



Burke Robert, policeman, City Hall, dwl cor Front 

and Jiickeon 
Burke Steplien J., driver with Harvey &. Co., dwl 

N H Clementina nr Third 
Burke Tliomae, carpenter, dwl 517 Vnllejo 
Burke 'I'lioinas, house and sign painter, 917 Market, 

dwl SVV cor Fillmore and Fell 
Burke Thomas, teamster, dwl ;VJ7 Bryant 
Burke Thomas F., gasfitter with Thomas Day, dwl 

IMS Kearny 
Burke William, carpenter, dwl 232 Sixth 
Buike William, laborer, dwl 365 Natonia 
Burke William, laborer, 8W cor Bush and Pnlk 
Burke William, laborer Fjont St. M. and O. R. R. 

dwl SE cor Bush and Polk 
Burke William, molder Vulcan Iron Works, dwl 

cor Montgomery and Aha 
Burke AVilliam, policeman, City Hall, dwl 122 

Shipley 
Burke ^Vi^iiam A., musical instrument maker, 523 

Pine, dwl S s Clay nr Jones 
Burke William A. Jr i painter with John W. Cherry, 

dwl S 8 Clay nr Leavenworth 
BURKE WILLIAM F., importer, manufacturer 

and dealer boots and shoes, NW cor Montgom- 
ery and Pine, dwl 1213 Clav 
Burke'Williani G., clerk Evening Bulletin, dwl NE 

cor Filbert and Jones 
Burke <fe Dowling, (John Burke aitd Morris Bow- 

ling J dry goods, 634 Market 
Burke & McAIister, {Frnncis G. Burke and John 

H. McAIister J proprietors Rincou Wool Depot, 

E 8 Spear bet Folsoni and Harrison 
Burkett Alexander, ( Sperry <fc Co. J res Stockton 
Biirkhardt Christian, Union Bakery, 1216 Pacilic 
Burkhardt Frederick, carpenter, uwl N s Natoma 

nr Eighlh 
Burkhardt George, boot manufacturer, 509 Jackson, 

dwl 412 Sixth 
Burkhardt John G., dwl 1022 Dupont 
Burking James, (Burking & (jo.) dwl SW cor 

Bryant and Ritcb 
BUKKIN'G «fe CO., f James Burking and John 

Pihlprj groceries and liquors, SW cor Bryant 

find Ritch 
Burkirk H. Y.,(J. E. Johnson & Co.) dwl 825 

Harrison 
Burkitt John H., bookkeeper Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Co's warehouse, dwl 326 Geary 
Burkley Victor, glasscutler, dwl 9(14 Kearny 
Burkowitz Benjamin, salesman with S. Falk, dwl 

529 Tehama 
Burley Robertson, sbipcarpenter, dwl 811 Harrison 
Burling James W., stock broker, office 428 Califor- 
nia, dwl 1218 Fols(mi 
BURLING WILLIAM, stock broker, office 428 

California, dwl 1335 Fulsom 
Burlingame JohuD., (Smith iSb B.J dwl 221 Te- 
hama 
Burmester Charles, barkeeper, NE cor Pine and 

Keainy 
Burme.'iter Henry H., carpenter, dwl S s Dorland 

Lane bet Guerrero and Dolores 
Burmesler Jacob, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Burmeister Alrich, (Bcrmeisler Sf Mchrtcnsj dwl 

NW cor Califoinia and Leavenworth 
Burmeibter Chai les, engineer with E. Galpen &. Co., 

dwl Biyant bet Seventh and Eighth 
Burmeister Chris. H., laboi'er, dwl NW cor Filbert 

and Gavin 
Burmeister Frederick, trardener, dwl 3 Pratt Court 
Burniei.ster Henry, (Burmeister & Pourcho) dwl 

1222 Kearny . 
Burmeister Henry, (Meyer <fc B.) dwl 529 Valencia 
Burmeister It<aa<-, helper Risdon Iron Works 
Burmeister & Mebrtens, (Alrich Burmeister and. 

August Mfhrteus) groceries and liquors, NW 

cor California and Leavenworth 



BURMEISTER & POURCHO, ( Henry Burmeis- 
ter and Fred. Pourcho) restaurant, 536 Wash 

Burn Bartle, laborer, dwl 840 Market 

Burn John, cardriver, dwl 620 Giove 

Burn John, laborer, (\\y\ E s Columbia bet Nine- 
teenth and Solano 

Burn John C, carpenter, dwl 12 Hubbard 

Burn Thomas, expresswagon, dwl W s Franklin 
nr Hayes 

Burn. — See Byrne 

Burnap John, "groceries, crockery and hardware, 425 
Davis, dwl 420 Leavenworih 

Burnell Thomas, helper Union Iron Works, dwl 
110 Minna 

Burnell William, drayman with Hooker & Co., dwl 
411 Biannan 

Burner Henry, signpainter, dwl N s Mission bet 
Eleventh and Twelfth 

Burnet Marcellin, laborer with Herve & Perry, dwl 
3 Hinckley 

Burnett Frederick A., barkeeper Old Corner, dwl 
cor Fifth and Natoma 

Burnett George W., stock trader, dwl 1510 Pine 

BURNEIT G. G., apothecary and druggist, 330 
Montgomery, dwl 334 Ellis 

Burnett James, engineer, dwl 6 Clarice Place 

Burnett John, watchman U. S. clothing depot, cor 
Bush and .Market 

Burnett John M., attorney at law, and School Di- 
rector Twelfth Wardi office 5S and .59 Excliange 
Buildings, dwl NW cor Polk and Jackson 

Burnett Lambert, fruitdealer, dwl 783 Market 

Buinett Loui.s, sodamaker, dwl 31 Hinckley 

Burnett Mary, (widow) dwl Leavenworth bet 
Union and Filbert 

Burnett Michael, laborer, dwl N b Hyde nr McAl- 
lister 

Burnett Patrick, apprentice with A. Mogan & Co., 
dwl NE cor Hyde and McAllister 

BURNETT PETER H., President Pacific Bank, 
NW cor Sansom and Pine, dwl 610 Jones 

Burnett R. P., engineer pile drivers with C. P. R. R. 
Co., dwl cor Bei-rv and Madden 

BURNETT WELLINGTON C. City and County 
Attorney, office 13 City Hall, third floor, dwl 
NW cor Broadway and Lagnna 

Burnett William, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 

Burnett William, mechanical engineer, office 432 
Montgomery 

Burnham Andrew W., carriagemaker, SE cor Mar- 
ket and Beale 

Burnham Henry, painter with Frost & Richard, dwl 
Mills Place nr Dupont 

Burnham .Tames W., i James W. Burnham & Co.) 
dwl W 8 Dolores bet Twenty second and 
Twentv-third 

BURNHAM JAMES W. & CO., (John L. Eckley 
and Henry Eckley) importers carpets, uphol- 
stery goods, oilcloths and paperhaugings, 618 
Market, and 17 Post 

Burnham Samuel S., carriagemaker with Milo P. 
Holmes, dwl Howard bet First and Second 

Burnham William F., upholsterer with Hardie & 
Fredericks, dwl 115 Sixth 

Burnham Z. W., salesman with Sanderson & Horn, 
dwl American Exchange Hotel 

Burnie Charles W., clerk, dwl 29^ Third 

Burningham Margaret, (widow) dwl 533 Natoma 

Burns Aaron M., pilot, dwl 102l Bush 

Burns Andrew, bricklayer. Bricklayers' Association, 
Young Men's Christian Association Hall 

Burns Andrew, teamster, dwl 449 Jessie 

Burns Andi-ew, watchman with R. &. J. Morton, 
dwl NE cor Ellis and Taylor 

Burns Bart, laborer New U." S. Branch Mint, dwl 
840 Market 

Burns Bernard, laborer, dwl 166 Tehama 

Burns Bernard, stonecutter, dwl 325 Minna 

Burns Bernard, waiter Occidental Hotel 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 iSanaom Street, Best Paper and Linen Collars. 



USE COOPEK'S BAIjM for Dysentery, and all Diseases of the Stomach and Bowels. 



134 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



Burns Beinmd, (Flynn & B.) dwl 435 Fifth 
BUUNS B. J., jigeiit Stetefeldt Furnace Co. office 

4II5 California, res Alameda 
Burns Calliei'ine Mrs., dwl 1.50 Shiplej' 
Burns Cliristopiier, laliorer, dwl 16li Tehama 
Burns CorneliuH, laliorer Odd Fellow.^' Cemetery, 

dwl Point Lolios Road nr Odd Fellows' Cem 
Burns Daniel, ]iiiiiiter, dwl 34 Minna 
Burns Daniel, wliipinaker with Main & WinclieBter, 

dwl 2'J3 Stevenson 
Burns D. P.,reil estate, dwl Union Av nr Sullivan 
Burns E., watchman Kisdon Iron Works 
Burns Edward, e.\press\vaf.'on, SE cor Davis and 
Pacific, dwl W s Capp bet Twenty-lirst and 
Twenty-second 
Burns Ellen, (widow) dwl 15 Harrison Avenue 
Burns Francis J., captain bark Forest Queen, pier 4 

Steuart 
Burns Georfre 0., doorkeeper, dwl 505 Filbert 
Bums Hemy, hootmaker, dwl 148 Ellis 
Burns Henrv. boots and shoes, 210 Third, dwl 14 

Ellis ■ ■ 
Burns Henry, fRolilJs & B.J 223 Drnmm 
Burns Henry J., actor Calilornia Theatre, dwl 21 

Anthony 
BURNS HENRY J., stencil platecutfer and enirra- 
ver, What Cheer House, dwl NW cor Dorland 
and Church 
Burns Hugh, mariner, dwl 900 Geary 
Burns Isidore, sliipsmitli. 20 Steuait, dwl 227 Geary 
Burns James, clerk, 512 Kearny, dwl 1908 Polk 
Burns .lames, expresswagon, NW cor Davis and 

Broadway 
Burns James, shoemaker with J. Sullivan, dwl Har- 
rison Av liet Seventh and Eiuhth 
Burns James, teamster, dwl E s Laguna nr McAl- 
lister 
Burns J. F., carpenter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Burns John, baker North Pac. Trans. Co's S. S. Se- 
nator 
BURNS JOHN, boarding and lodging, S s Berry 

bet Third and Fourth 
Burns John, brickl-.iyer. Bricklayers' Association, 

Young Men's Christian Association Hall 
Burns John, carpenter, dwl 233 First 
15inns John, cook, dwl SW cor Wash and Sansom 
Bun;s John, driver Market St R.R., dwl Hayes Val 
Burns John, hostler, dwl 333 Bush 
Burns John, laborer, dwl 1313 Sacramento, renr 
Burns John,, ''£?/r7i.'; t6 Ambrose and Bnryis &Billis, 

dwl S s Page bet Laginia and Oitavia 
Burns John C, carneiiter H. C. League, 128 Kearny 
Bums John H., policeman City Hall, dwl cor Rail- 
road A v and Thirty fourth "A v South S F 
Burns Joseph, hnckman, dwl 6 Harrison Avenue 
Burns Joseph, laborer Custom House, dwl 227 

Second 
Bin-ns Joseph A., carpenter H.C. League, 128 Kearnv 
Bums J. W., carpenter with C. P. R. R. Co., dvvl 

cor Berry and Madden 
Burns Lewis, biicklayei', dwl 641 Washington 
Burns Martin, laborer, dwl W s White bet Green 

and Vallejo 
Burns Martin, laborer with Nicholas McDonald, dwl 

S 8 Geary nr Scott 
Burns Mariiii, steward P. M. S. S. China 
Burns Martin J., carpenter, dwl 1908 Polk 
Burns Michael, expresswagon, NW cor Montgom- 
ery and C.ilifornia, dwl 270 Clara 
Burns Michael, gardener IMagdalen Asylum, San 

Bruno road 
Burns Michael, groceries and liquors, NE cor Sixth 

and Tehama, dwl 209 Si.xth 
Burns Michael, laborer Laborers' Pro. Ben. Asso- 
ciation, Irish-American H^ill 
Burns Michael, machinist jEtna Iron Works 
Burns Michael, porter Grand Hotel 
Burns Michael, shoemaker with Metropolitan B. &, 
S. Co., dwl 29 Hunt 



Burns Myra, watercure physician, office and dwl 648 

Mission 
Burns Owen, laborer with George S. Hoag, dwl 27 

Ritch, rear 
Burns Patrick, groceries and liquors, SE corner La- 
guna and Oak 
Burns Patrick, horseshoer, 6.50 Mission, dwl cor 

Fifteenth Ave and S, South San Francisco 
Burns Patrick, hostler, dwl 214 Stevenson 
Burns Patrick, laborer, dwl 218 Ritch 
Burns Patrick, lalxjrer, dwl S s Parker nr Califor- 
nia Avenue, Bernal Hights 
Burns Patrick, laborer Calvary Cemetery, Point Lo- 

bos Road nr Calvary Cemetery 
Burns Patrick, liquor saloon, cor Devisadero and 

O' Far re 11 
Burns Patrick, shoemaker Metropolitan B. & S. Co., 

dwl 29 Hunt 
Burns Patrick D., steward Grand Hotel, dwl E s 

Tenth nr Harrison 
Burns Peter, drayman with Storm & Co., dwl cor 

Third and Berry 
Burns Peter, hostler, dwl NE cor Hayes and Octavia 
Burns Peter, hostler Maiket St. R. R., dwl cor 

Grove and L;iguna 
Burns Peter, laborer, dwl W s Alabama bet Twenty- 
second and Twenty-third 
Burns Richard, laborer, dwl 8 Anthony 
Uurns Robert, manager What Cheer Restaurant, 

dwl 517 Pine 
Burns Samuel, laborer, dwl cor Eighth Ave and L, 

South S F 
Burns Stephen, tanner, cor Gunnison Ave and 

Tweiity-eiglith 
Burns Thomas. b,irkeeper with C. Bucklev, dwl 225 

Bush 
Burns Thomas, boilermaker, dwl 150 Shipley 
Burns Thomas, dairyman with Patrick Keith, dwl 

Courtland Av nr Jefferson 
Burns Thomas, driver Front St., M. and O. R. R., 

dwl cor Franklin and Bush 
Burns Thomas, heli^er Golden State Iron Works, 

dwl 112 Tehama 
Burns Thomas, helper with W. S. Phelps & Co., 

dwl 527 Mission 
Burns Thomas, seaman North Pacific Transportation 

Co.'s S. S. Pelican 
Burns Tilman A., barkeeper, dwl 118 Fourth 
Burns Timothy, laborer, dwl 642^ Mission 
Burns William, cook with Mendel & Ohustein, dwl 

525 Mission 
Burns & Ambrose, (John Burns and James Am- 
brose) poultry and game, 14 Metropolitan 

Market 
Burns & Billis, fjohn Burns and Robert Billis) 

poultry and game. Union Market 
Burns. — See Burnes and Byrnes 
Burofsky Alfred, peddler, dwl 133 Shipley 
Buron Louis, clerk with E. Lenormand, iiwlNEcor 

Powell and Pacific 
Buron Victor, clerk with Louis Roncoli, dwl 236 

Ritch 
Burr Amos, conductor Southern Pacific R. R., res 

San Jose 
Burr Benjamin J., cutter with C. C. Hastings A 

Co, dwl 734Gieen 
Burr Charles H., (Burr & Co.) dwl 769^ Mission 
BURR CLARENCE C, {H. C. Hudson & Cn.) dwl 

NE cor Filbert and Van Ness Av 
BURR E. WILLARD, President Savings and Loan 

Society, office 619 Clay, dwl SE cor Van Ness 

Ave and Filbert 
Burr Edmund C, chemist, dwl SE cor Filbert and 

Van Ness Ave 
Burr Enoch, conductor Southern Pacific R. R., dwl 

110 Kearny 
Burr Fiaidv, barkeeper, 913 Kearny 
Burr George E., extraman Hose Co., No.l, S. F. F. 

D., dwl 916 Montgomery 



Fair rates and prompt payments by the PEOPLES. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street. Smokers' Articles. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



135 



Burr George W., molder Fulton Foundry, dwl 129 

Clara 
Run- Geor-fe W., (Burr & Co. J dwl 507 Mission 
Burr Henry P., master mariner, dwl <i7fi Harrison 
Burr Jolin, porter witii Josepii E. Selleck, dwl N s 

Vallejo liet Montgomery and Siinsom 
Bnrr John T., shoemaker, 4-Jl Bush 
Burr Levi, saloon, S s Bav bet Kearny and Dupont 
Burr & Co., (Ghnrlcs H. Burr and George W. 

Burr J pivot, action brace, 5 Second 
Burra-sT., teainsler with Hancock & Kelso 
Burre Mary Mrt!., laundress \vii;h A. Barbaste, dwl 

S\V corner Dupont and Broadway 
Burrell Cliarlcs, physician, office lit? Montgomery, 

dwl 836 Mission" 
Burrell Edward, foreman rollinor department U. S. 

Branch Mint, dwl 8:36 Mission 
Burrell John, master mariner, dwl N b Berry bet 

Third and Fourili 
Burrell. — See Birrell 

Burrill M. A. Miss, assistant teacher Dcnman Gram- 
mar School 
Burris Adella, (col'd) hairdresser, dwl 16 Freelon 
Burris Bnller, clerk with Brigbam & Hawes, dwl 

502 Bryant 
Burris Bnller, stonecutter, dwl Berry nr Third 
Burris Wiilinm. janitor Colored and Drumm Street 

Schools, dwl 16 Freelou 
Burro Consolidated M. Co., (New Mexico) office 

401 California 
Burro Joseph, gardener, dwl Presidio Road nr 

Filbert 
Burroughs Charles, f Burroughs & Scott J dwl SW 

cor Lonibar<i and Kearny 
Burroughs William, packer "with Haynes <fe Law- 
ton, dwl ()<.'8 Jessie 
Burroughs & Scott, (Gkarlcx Burroughs and Na- 
poleon B. Scott J dnb rooms, 127 Montgomery 
Burrow Uicliard. dwl 421 Bash 
BUUKOVVES GEORGE Rev., president Univer- 
sity Mound College 
Burrows James, cook North Pacific Ti'ansportalion 

Co's S. S. Oritlamme 
Burscougii Henry, clerk, dwl 457 Bryant 
Bursley Isaac, master mariner, dwl S 8 Grove bet 

Gough and Octavia 
Burson James N., clerk, dwl cor McAllister and 

Leavenworth 
Burster Claus. tailor, SW cor Sac and Davis 
Burt J. Gus, f Severance, Holt <fc Co. J dwl .'i2SPlne 
Burt J(jsepb IL, carpenter, dwl N & Fulton bet Oc- 
tavia and Lagniui 
Burl Philip, dwl W b Folsom bet Twenty-first and 

Twenty-second 
Burt Samuel, compositor with Frank Eastman, dwl 

801} Stockton 
Burl Silas S., foreman annealing department USB 

Mint, dwl SE cor Dupont und Lombard 
Burt William, dwl 14 Quiucy 
Burt William J., house mover, dwl 1130 Mission 
Burt W, P.. dwl What Cheer House 
Burl— See Bert 
Burtchell Samuel, laborer Laborers' Pro. Ben. 

Ass'n, Irish American Hall 
Burtman Ferdinand, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Burton Augustus A., porter, 215 Battery, dwl 1317 

Stockton 
BURTON CHARLES H., merchant, office 405 

Front, dwl 1018 Washington 
Burton Edward, dwl 1110 Mont 
Burton Elizabeth Miss, teacher music, dwl 206 Fourth 
Burton Henrv, cigarmaker with Arthur Haferkorn, 

dwl 26 lloward Court 
B irloirJohn, co )k P. M. S. S. Montana 
Burton M. A. Mrs., dwl Grand Hotel 
Burton Theod. L., fEpps & B ) dwl 1 Adona PI 
Burton William, carpenter H. C. League, 128 
Kearny 



Burtsell John M., salesman with Murphy, Grant <fc 

Co., bds cor Harrison and Second 
Burtt William W., tinsmith with Brittan, Holbrook 

& Co., dwl 14 Quiucy 
Burwell Leiia W. Aliss, assistant teacher Mission St 

Primary School, dwl 1107 Stockton 
Burwon T., machinist Vulcan Iron Works 
Bury James, coachman Lick House 
Bury John, clerk with Dean R. Aver}', dwl S 

8 Francisco nr Hyde 
Bury L., shoemaker, dwl SWcor Bdwy and Dupont 
Bury Thomas, collector, dwl 609J Howard 
Buryer Jacob, hairdresser with M. Cook, dwl Pres- 

cott House 
Busanich Antonio, barkeeper with Martin Gros- 

setta, dwl 803 Union 
Buscelle J. R., collector, dwl 921 Pacific 
Busch Geoige, driver Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 

228 Second 
Busch John, malster Albany Brewery, dwl 73 Eve- 
rett 
Buschell Adam, malster Bavaria Brewery, dwl NE 

cor Jackson and Stockton 
Buscher Henry, clerk with Charles L. Steylaars, dwl 

1209 Dupont 
Buschman John, barkeeper, 44 Steuart 
Busenich Antonio, clerk with George Jancovich, 
dwl E 8 Stockton bet Wasliingtm and Jackson 
Buser Ernest, clerk with E. G. Lyons & Co., 510 

Jackson 
Bush Alonzo, driver with Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 

331 Mont 
Bush Charles J., carver with George O.Whitney 
& Co., dwl Potrero Av bet Twenty-third and 
Twenty-fourth 
Bush Chnrles P., laborer Custom House 
Bush E<lward, laborer, dwl Bryaut nr Twenty- 

fourtli 
Bush Eliza A., (colored) widow, dwl 1006 Wash- 
ington 
Bush Frederick, laborer, dwl 415 Brannan 
Bush Henry, clerk with I. W. W. Brown, dwl Fol- 
som nr First 
Bush Henry, photographic gallery, junction Mar- 
ket and Kearny 
Bush Hynian P., clerk, dwl 114 Mason 
Bush James S. Rev., rector Grace Church, dwl 

1117 Stockton 
Bush John, boilermaker Miners' Foundry, dwl 413 

Green 
Bush John, laborer, dwl 1904 Mason 
Bush John Francis, boilermaker Miners' Foundry, 

dwl 413 Green 
Bush Jonathan P., physician, dwl 631 Sac 
Bush Louis, fBiish &McAllisterJ dwl 47 Clementina 
Bush Nathan, furniture, 116 Fourth, dwl 114 Fourth 
Bush Nicolas, hackman. Plaza, dwl 128 Shipley 
Bush O. P., clerk, dwl 338 Bush 
Bush Jonathan R., surgeon P. M. S. S. Sacramento 
Bush Richard J., secretary Montgomery Avenue 
Commissioners, office 1, 2 and 3 Jloiiigomery 
Block, dwl Ws Hyde bet Filbert and Greenwich 
Bush Street House, 333 Bush 
Bush & McAllister, f Louis Bush and William B. 

McAllister J dentists, 704 Market 
Bushee John L., (Bcnrdorffd, B.) dwl 225 Second 
Bushman William, patternmaker Pacific Iron Works, 

dwl 7()5 Mission 
Busbnell Amasa, laborer Custom House, dwl 813 

Stockton 
Bushnell W. A., newspaper carrier, dwl 267 Minna 
Bushnell William A., captain steamer El Capitan, 

Oakland Ferry, dwl 817 Mission 
Bushy Frank, boilermaker, dwl 48 Sacramento 
Biisiiig Ernest, druggist with A. Buhler, 905 Kearny 
Buss Jacob, driver Philadelphia Brewei'y, dwl 107 

Tehama 
Buase Christian C, (Jacob & B.J dwl Sophie Ter- 
race 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, White Goods. 



YERBA SANTA, a remarkable and never-failing remedy lor Bheumatism. 



136 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY 



Biisse John, baker, 228 Kenrny 

Busfey W. C, locksmith with Andre Camona, dwl 
Intei'iiational Hotel 

Biissier Jane, (widow) dwl E s Tehama nr Twenty- 
seventh 

Bussiufrer Frederick, brassfinisher with M. Dobrz- 
enBkv 

Bust William, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Bustainant Rosa, (widow) dwl II Pinkney 

Busiameiite Slary, (widow) dwl 1114 Powell 

Bustelli Carlo, waiter, 5-)0 Commercial, dwl cor 
Sacramento and Waverly Place 

Buster Hiram C, blacksmith, dwl 131 j\Iontgomery 

Buster Jlai'y Mrs., furnished rooms, 131 Monti^omery 

BustilloB Aianuel, apprentice with L. R. Meyers & 
Co., dwl 819 Broadway 

Bustillos Rafael, marbleworker with L. R. Meyers 
& Co., dwl Union Place 

BUSWELL AL?:XANDER, bookbinder, 409 Cal- 
ifornia, dwl SW cor Jones and Union 

Buswell Alexander Jr., clerk with Hooker & Co., 
dwl cor Twentieth and Guerrero 

Buswell William F., patternmaker, 19 Fremont, 
dwl NE cor Twentieth and Guerrero 

Butcher Albert, clerk with Martin Murken, dwl 29 
Clementina 

Butcher Henry, teamster, dwl 504 O'Farrell 

Butcher Jumes L., butcher with M. Selig & Co., 
dwl Sixth Avenue, South San Francisco 

Butcher Joim, waiter with Samuel F. Sanders, dwl 
SW cor Fourth and Berry 

Butenop Henry, groceries and liquor?, 625 Pacific 

Buthe Cliristian L., barkeeper, 211 Pine, dwl 3 
Minna 

Butler A. J. Mrs., clairvoyant, office and dwl 410 
Kearny 

Butler Alexander, cook, dwl N s Oregon bet Front 
and Davis 

Butler Alfred, lumber, 129 Fifth 

Butler Amy Miss, dwl 20 Montgomery 

Butler Ann, (widow) dwl 1.56 Silver 

Builer Andrew J., hatter, dwl 410 Kearny 

Butler B. F., (widow) dwl S s Tehama nr'Ninth 

Butler Charles C, real estate, dwl NE cor Sutter 
and Steiner 

Butler Charles H., captain brig Arago, Howard 
Street wharf 

Butler Charlotte W., (widow) dwl 286 Stevenson 

Builer C. W., carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 

Builer David, laborer, U. S. Appraiser's Store, dwl 
720 Howard 

Butler Edwin D., dwl 720 Howard 

Butler Elizabeth, dressmaker, dwl 22 Second 

Butler Frederick S., clerk, Pacific Insurance Co., 
dwl W 8 Guerrero bet Sixteenth and Seven- 
teenth 

Butler George E., bookeeper Union Insurance Co., 
dwl 1130 Market 

Butler George F., conductor Front Street M. & 0. 
R. R., dwl 35 Austin 

Butler George W., milkman, San Bruno Road, 7 
miles from City Hall 

Builer Henry, di'ayman, 121 Front, dwl SW cor 
Broadway and Dupont 

Butler Henry C, carpenter, dwl W s Wetmore 
Place 

Butler Henry M., master mariner, dwl 853 Folsom 

Butler Henry W., newspaper clerk San Francisco 
Postoffice, dwl 1024 Montgomery 

Butler James, bootmaker, U. W. M. B. &. S. Co., 
dwl 537 Stevenson, rear 

Butler James, gardener, dwl E s Minna bet Four- 
teenth and Fifteenth 

Butler James D., extraman stmr. No. 1 S. F. F. D. 

Butler J. N., insurance agent, dwl 127 Kearny 

Butler John, barkeeper, 37 Sutter, dwl 35 Clemen- 
tina 

Butler John, laborer, dwl NE cor Folaom and 
Bcale 



Butler John, laborer with Hancock & Kelso, dwl NE 

cor Folsom and Beale 
Butler John, mariner, dwl .39 Pacific 
Butler John B., inspector Custom House, dwl 721 

Howard 
Butler John W., printer with Edward Bosqui, dwl 

cor Haight and Webster 
Butler Joseph D., armorer, dwl SW cor Haight and 

Webster 
Butler Joseph J., clerk with W. <fel. Steinhart & Co., 

dwl Wetmore Place nr Washington 
Butler Joseph R., currier with Patrick H. Malone, 

dwl 736 Brannan 
BUTLER M. A. MRS., milliner and millinery, 28 

Montgomery, dwl 937 Howard 
Butler Margaret, (widow) dwl 519 Vallejo 
Butler Margaret, (widow) boarding, 215 Fourth 
Butler Martin, watchman with C. Kerrins &, Co., 

dwl 18i Sumner 
Butler Mary, (widow) dwl 521 Vallejo 
Butler Mary E., dressmaker, 639 Mission 
Butier Maiy H., (widow) dressmaker, dwl 809 

Jackson 
Butler Matthew, laborer, d\vl S 8 Filbert bet Kearny 

and Montgomerv 
Butler Matthew, f Hnngs 4- B.) dwl 1604 Bush 
Butler M. F., {Butler Sr Hochholzer) dwl W 8 

Guerrero nr Sixteenth 
Butler Michael, driver with S. V. Water Co 
Butler Michael, storekeeper Union Club 
BUTLER PATRICK F., merchant, oflice 28 Mont- 
gomerv, dwl 937 Howard 
Butler Patrick 'Y.jHognn & Go.) dwl 20 Folsom Av 
Builer Robeit, painter, dwl 215 Fouith 
BUTLER ROBERT B., proprietor Union House, 

511-513 Mission 
Butler Sarah E. Miss, teacher, dwl 839 California 
Butler Samuel S. , proprietor Pacific Lodging House, 

NW cor Kearny and Pacific, res Petaluuia 
Butler Theodore, eiigraver with Warren C. Butler, 

dwl 10 Wetmore Place 
Butler Thonuis, bricklayer, dwl 21 Russell 
Butler Thomas, carpenter, dwl 179 Minna 
Butler Thomas, laborer, dwl W 8 Tehama nr Pre- 

cita Avenue, Bernal Hights 
Butler Thomas, sheepshearer, dwl 512 Slission 
Butler Thomas J., {Adams Jf. B.J dwl 309 Third 
Butler T. Romeyn, assay department U. S. B. Mint, 

res Oakland 
Butler Walter, teamster, pier 2^ Steuart, dwl Fell 

bet Sieiner and Scott 
Butler Warren C. wood engraver, 611 Clay, dwl 

10 Wetmore Place 
Butler Williiim, dwl 245 Minna 
Butler William, dwl SW cor Clay and i\Iontgomery 
Butler William, laborer, dwl 712 Clementina 
Butler William R., clerk, 30 Occidental Market, dwl 

41 Minna 
Butler W. J., salesman, 125 Kearny 
Butler W. J. Mrs., millinerv, 125 Kearnv 
BUTLER &. UOCHnOLZEli, {M. F: BiHlcr and 

Hugo Hochholzer) architects, office NW cor 

Montgomery and Sacramento 
BUTLER'S LIFTING CURE, Swain & Pierce 

proprietors, 631 Sacramento 
Butniau Frederick A., landscape painter, office 331 

Kearny, dwl 743 Pine 
Butt Chris. C, {Butt & Turn Suden) dwl SW cor 

Bush and Stockton 
Butt Peter N., {Bull & Kiichmcister and Peter N. 

Butt 4- Co.) dwl 1336 Broadway 
Butt Peter N. & Co., (Henry W. Kiichmeister) 

groceries and liquors, SE cor Kearny and Pac 
Butt & Kuchmeister, (Peter N. Butt and Henry W. 

KuchmeiKterj groceries and liquors, NE cor 

Hvde and Broadway 
Butt &. Tnm Suden, (Chris. C. Bult and Peter H. 

Turn Suden) groceries and liquors, SW cor 

Bush and Stockton 



In insuring your property, place the risk with the PEOPLES. 



C. P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Jewelry and Albums. 



SAN FRANCISCO [B] DIRECTORY. 



137 



Butters Charles, clerk letter department Wells, 

Fargo &, Co., dwl 220 O'Farrell 
Butters Celemtine Jlifs, operator Western Uuion 

Telegraph Co., clwl 220 O'Fairell 
Butters Henry A., tanner, dwl 220 O'Favrell 
Butters John" S,, mate S. S. William Taber, dwl 

1327 S;icraniento 
ButterwortI) Edninnd S..macliinist, dwl Ws Dolores 

bet Twenty-first and Twenty second 
Butterwortli .lames, tinsmith with G. & W. Snook, 

dwl 2()2 Eijilith 
Butterwortli Kiciiard, spinner Pioneer Woolen 

Mills, dwl North Point nr Larkiu 
BUTTEUWCKTH SAM. F., president California 

Mutual Life Ins. Co., office 13 Merchants' Ex- 

chanj^e, and S. F. Park Commissioner, dwl SW 

cor Pine and Leavenworth 
Bultington Motes J. Capt., dwl 425 Geary 
BuUiier Charles, florist, dwl NW cor Post and Buch 
Buttiier Charles, machinist, dwl 32 Clementina 
Butiner Henry, drayman, 121 Front, dwl SW cor 

Battery and Green 
Bntlner Henry A., driver, dwl 21 Clara 
Butiner Jolni," machinist, dwl 524 Fourth 
Butiner John, patternmaker Miners' Foundry, dwl 

3x; Clementina 
Butts Hiirvey D., stevedore, dwl pier 4 Stenart 
Bulls William, dwl SW cor Kearny and Pacific 
Bu.xton George, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 

335 0FHrreU 
Buxtorf M. C, liookkeeper, dwl 720 California 
Buyer Charles, (Buyer, Reich Sf Co.) dwl 1013 

Washington 
Buyer, Keich it Co., {Charles Buyer, Leopold Reich 

and Leopold DiamniitJ fancy goods, 129 Kearny 

and 1015 Stockton 
Buzzini Mailin, ti ader, dwl Railroad Av and Garden 

Tract nr Bay View 
Byani Samuel L., porter with Edward Martin & Co., 

dwl cor Howard and Twenty-second 
Byers .John P., wharfinger Pacific Street Wharf, 

dwl SW cor Sanson) and Union 
Byers .Joseph JI., clerk Evening Bulletin, dwl 819 

Filbert 
Byington Horace W., (May & B.) dwl 32« Bush 
Byles Geoige, real es'ate agent, office 331 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 211) Clara 
Byriiig Ole H., repacker and contractor, 224 Jackson 
Byrne Anne, (widow) dwl 5 Pollard Place 
Byrne Bernard, i^rocer, dwl 350 Third 
Byrne Bridget, Mrs., furnished rooms, 119 Welsh 
Byrne C, printer, dwl 720 Market 
Byrne Charles, sail loft, 7 Clay, dwl W 8 Capp bet 

Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Byrne Daniel, collector Larue's Wharf, dwl 202 

Riich 
Byrne Daniel, cooper with T. F. Neagle <fe Co., dwl 

210 liitch 
Byrne Dennis, waiter, dwl 3 Clay Avenue 
Byrne Felix, curpenter. dwl 7 Park Avenue 
Byrne Francis J., enu'ineer, dwl W s Bryant Av 

bet Harrison and BryJlnt 
Byrne Frank E., repacker with E. T. Anthony & 

Co., dwl 32 Pine 
Byrne Garrett J., (Kcrby, Byrne & Co.) dwl 1108 

Bush 
BYRNE HENRY H., district attorney city and 

county S. F., office 20 City Hall, second floor, 

(and Byrne & Freelon) dwl 317 Sutter 
Byrne Henry L., dwl 533 Sutter 
Byrne Hugh, laborer, dwl NE cor Sixth and 

Branuan 
Byrne Kate Miss, dressmaker with Mrs. F. Uznay, 

dwl 78 Clementina 
Byrne James, laborer California Dry Dock, dwl 

Hunters Point 
Byrne James, iilnmher with Thomas O'Malley & 

Co., dwl 119 Welsh 
Byrne John, butcher, dwl 318 Pacific 



Byrne John, cooper with L. N. Handy & Co., 27 
Clay 

Byrne John, hostler with Thomas Ryan, dwl NE 
cor Hyde and Eddy 

Byrne John, laborer, dwl cor Louisiana and Sierra 

Byrne .lohn, painter, dwl 103 Saeratiiento 

Byrne John, waiter with John Anderson, dwl 132 
First 

Byrne John E., bookkeeper with Pascal, Dubedat 
& Co., dwl 533 Suiter 

Byrne John 51., importer, office 533 Kearnv, dwl 
533 Sutter 

Byrne ]\Iargie Miss, dressmaker with Mrs. F. Uz- 
nay, dwl 166 Perry 

Byrne Michael, coal and wood, 3 Sherwood Place, 
dwl 173 Minna 

Byrne Michael, teamster, dwl 132 First 

Byrne Michael, (Landers, B. & Go.) dwl 1517 
Leavenworth 

Byrne Morris, cooper with Francis W. Arnold, dwl 
210 Ritch 

Byrne Nicholas, housemover, dwl 247 Stevenson 

Byrne Patrick, laborer, dwl E s Minna bet Four- 
teenth and Fifteenth 

Byrne Patrick, laborer with William H. Norton, 
dwl N 8 Austin nr Gough 

Byrne Patrick, teamster with Thomas & Drake, 
dwl 62 First 

Byrne Patrick, wood and coal, SW cor Fourth and 
and Perry, dwl 324 Tehama 

Byrne Patrick J., porter, 7 Montgomery, dwl 369 
Jessie 

Byrne Peter, hostler with Nathan P. Hopkins, dwl 
679 Market 

Byrne Peter C, cook with Daniel Flood &, Brother, 
318 Pacific 

Byrne Robert, brewer, dwl 110 Dora 

Byrne Thomas, boots and shoes, 902 Dnpont, res 
New York 

Byrne Thomas, merchandise broker, office 210 Bat- 
tery, dwl N B Seventeenth nr Valencia 

Byrne Thomas, special policeman, dwl 226 Pacific 

Byrne Thomas, street contractor, dwl W s Frank- 
lin bet Page and O.ik 

Byrne Thomas, teamster, dwl 1029 Pacific 

Bj'rne Thomas S., clerk, 902 Dupont, dwl NE cor 
Dupont and Washington 

Byrne William, bricklayer, dwl 749 Market 

Byrne William, clerk, dwl 333 Bush 

Byrne William, clerk, 902 Dupout, dwl NE cor 
Dupont and Washington 

Byrne William, conductor Omnibus R. R., dwl 140 
Natoma 

Byrne Williiim, longshoreman, dwl N s Filbert bet 
Sanson! and Montgomery 

Byi'ue William, stevedore, Riggers and Stevedores' 
Association, 429 Pacific 

Byrne William J., laborer Gibbs' Bonded Ware- 
bouse, dwl 2.52 Minna 

BYRNE WILLIAM S., secretary Board Tide 
Land Commissioners, office SW cor Clay and 
Kearny, dwl OlOj Harrison 

BYRNE & FREELON, (Henry H. Byrne and 
Thos. W. FreelonJ attorneys at law, office 
729 Montj^omery 

Byrne.— See Burn 

Byrnes Daniel, carpenter, dwl I25 Harriet 

Byines David, teamster with R. &, J. Morton 

Byrnes Edward, laborer, dwl 166 Peiry 

Byrnes Harriet S. Mrs., millinery and dressmaking, 
734 Howard 

Byrnes James, longshoreman, dwl NW cor Union 
and Calhoun 

BYRNES JAMES, South Point Warehouse, res 
San Mateo 

Byrnes James F., drayman with Locke &■ Mon- 
tague, dwl Octavia nr Fulton 

Byrnes John, barkeeper, dwl '.^27 Second 

Byrnes John, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 Kearny 



JOWES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Braids of all kinds. 



EEDINGTON'S FLAVOBING EXTKACTS are the best and cheapest for family use 



138 



SAN FRANCISCO [C] DIRECTORY 



Byrnes John, fireman, dwl Monlton Place nr Mont 
Byi'nes John, waiter S. S. Moses Taylor, North Pa- 
cific Transportation Co 
Byrnes Li/zie Miss, seamstress with Norcross & Co., 

dwl Ui6 Perry 
Byrnes 5I-tr;.'aiet, (widow) dwl 11 Gai'den 
Byrnes M. F. Miss, assistant teacher Tenth St. 

Gramniiir Scliool 
Byrnes Patrick, dwl cor O'Farrell and Devisadero 
Byrnes Patrick, assistant sexton Trinity Church, dwl 

N\V cor Post and Powell 
Byrnes Patrick, laborer, Laliorers' Protective Ben- 

evoli'nt Association, Irish American Hall 
Byrnes Tlioiiias, laborer. S. F. Gas Company 
Byrnes William A.. ( Htbberd, Hanborn & Co. J 

dwl 7:U Howard 
Byrnes. — See Biirnes nnd Burns 
Byrns William, cook with F. A. Bergman, dwl 525 

Mission 
Byron Jeremiah, laborer, dwl 512 Mission 
Byron John, biicklayer, dwl I22'.{ Folsom 
Byron Michael, bricklayer, dwl E s Minna nr Fif- 
teenth 
Byron Michael, jobwagon, SWcor Bush and San- 

Hom, dwl 516 Bash 
Byron Patrick. [Byron & Regan) dwl NW cor 

Mason and Turk 
Byron Peter, steward Overland House 
Byron <fc Itegan. (Patrick Byron and T. J. Resran) 
groceries and liquors, NW cor Mason and Tmk 
Byrnm Ann S.. (widow) dwl S s Brannanbet Sev- 

entli and Eiglith 
Byriis James, plumber, Plumbers' Association 
BYXBEE JOtiX F., lumber and commission mer- 
chant and agent Duncan's Mills, W s Sleuart 
opp pier 11, dwHOS Eddv 
Bvxbee Robert G., ( H. B. Ticlienor & Go.) dwl 408 

" Eddy 
Byxby.— See Bixby 

G 

CabeSes & Co., (Chinese) cigar manufacturers, 323 

Ch,y 
Cables Alfred H., clerk with P. Garcia, 718 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 404 Vallejo 
Cabral Au'gusto, (Hermida & Co. J dwl NW cor 

Drnmm and Oregon 
Cachot M. A., physician and surgeon, office and dwl 

18 Third 
Cacioppo Mariano, (Angela Bardellini & Co.) 27 

Washington Market 
Cadenaiso Guisseppi, waiter with Carapi & Co. 
Cadenas.so Guiseppi, (Cadenasso & TubinojA\y\ 

240 Green 
Cadenasso Nicoilo, (Novella Sf G.) dwl 515 Mer- 
chant 
Cadenasso &■ Tubino fGinseppi Cadenasso and 

Dominick TubinoJ Italian Restaurant, 515 

Merchant 
Cadigan Patrick, laborer, dwl 333 Bush 
Cadigan William, laborer, dwl 43 Baldwin Court 
Cadiz Enueiiie (widow) dwl 90:) Jackson 
Cadmus William H. Mrs., dwl 1 Chatham Place 
Cadogan James, laborer, S. F. & P. Sugar Refinery, 

dwl W 8 Dora nr Hariison 
Cadogan James J., bookkeeper with E Chelovich 

«fe Co., res Oakland 
Cadogan Joseph, laborer -with Sanniel E. Oakley, 

dwl SWcor Druuim and Washington 
Cadoj/an Timothy, blacksmith S. F. & P. Sugar 

Retineiy. dwl W s Dora nr Harrison 
Cadogan, William, stevedore. Lumber Stevedores' 

Association. Barra's Hall 
CADUC PHILIP, presi.lent Benicia Cement Co., 

and general superintendent City Paving Co., 

office 019 Montgomery, dwl 722 Sutter 
Cady A. W. , hairdresser, stnir Yosemite 
Cady Delia Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 772^ Folsom 



C.idy Edwin A., watchman U. S. B. Mint, 3wl 601 

Dupont 
Cady George B., photographer with Edouart «fc 

Cobb, 504 Kearny, dwi 7725 Folsom 
Cady .John, boilermaker Union Iron Works, dwl 36 

Moss 
Cady Josephine (widow) teacher music, 138 Sutter 
CADY WILLIAM J., liquor saloon. SE cor Mont- 
gomery and California, dwl 425 Sixth 
Cady Willbtm J . miner, dwl 216 Stevenson 
Caens William S., sailraaker with John L. Prior, 

304 Davis 
Caferata Antonio, wood and coal, NE cor Taylor 

and Lombard 
Caffall George, stevedore, dwl Vincent nr Union 
Catt'erata Antonio, gardener, Sau Bruno road nr 

Bay View Tract 
Caffery J. H., plumber. Plumbers' Association 
Caffiere Frank, clerk with Tobias & Co., Grand 

Central Market 
Caffrey Edward, storekeeper Occidental Hotel, dwl 

Ss Eighteenth bet Noe and Castro 
Caff'iey James, woodcarver, dwl IGIO Mason 
Caffrev Patrick, boilermaker Vulcan Iron Works 
CagleJohn. ^Coo-Ze Sf iJ^c/t; 314 Bush 
Cagletfe Rich, fJohnCagle and Dornxtux W. Rich) 

club rooms, 314 Bush and bltj Sacramento 
Caglirei George, bookkeeper with Galli & Co.. dwl 

S 8 Hinckley bet Kearny and Montgomery 
Cagnt-y Mavtiii, laborer, dwl 4 \Villian) 
Cagney Edward, with Charles Waters, dwl W s 

Sanson! nr California 
C ihalan J. L.. carpenter, H. C. Lengue,128 Kearny 
Cahalan John, bootmaker, Valencia iirTwenty-sixtli 
Cahaliu John, salesman, 115 Pine, dwl 271 Stevenson 
Cahill Andrew, expresswagou, 38 Calitoruia, dwl 

444 Sixth 
Cahill Denius. laborer with .Jolin W. Kellv 
CAHILL E. & CO., stockbrokers, office 406 Mont- 

goniery 
Cahill Edward, waiter Grand Hotel, dwl Park Lane 
Cahill Edward, ('iS. Cahill & Co.) 406 Montgomery 
Cahill E. J., topographical engineer Tide Land Com- 
missioners 
Cahill James, clerk with E. Cahill & Co.. 406 Mont 
Cahill James, driver with N. B. & M. R. R. Co., dwl 

325 Fourth 
Cahill Janies, laborer, dwl S a Fulton bet Van Ness 

Avenue and Franklin 
Cahill James, porter 9 Montgomery, dwl SE cor 

Fell and Webster 
Cahill Janies H., carpenter, dwl S s Fulton bet Van 

Ness Avenue and Franklin 
Cahill John, painter, dwl 1208 Union 
Cahill John, porter with Rosenstock, Price ifc Co., 

dwl 333 Bush 
Cahill Kate M., dressmaker with Mrs. Mary Robert- 
son, dwl 19 Louisa 
Cahill Patrick, drayman with Wellman, Peck &, Co., 

dwl 1004 Leavenworth 
Cahill Patrick, gardener, dwl 112 .Jessie 
Cahill Patrick, laborer, d%-l 211 Tehama, rear 
Cahill Patiick, laborer S. F. & P. Sugar Refinery, 

dwl 12 Chesley 
Cahill William, shipwright, dwl 673 Harrison 
Calm Aaron, mercLiant, dwl 1 1 14 Post 
Cahn David, with Lazard Freres, dwl 1012 Pme 
Cahn Edmoud, clerk with H. Payot & Co., dwl 911 

Clav 
Cahn Hvppolite.derk with Weil <tCo.,dwl 911 Clav 
Caun Israel, (Uhljelder, Cahu & Co.) dwl 1120 

Post 
Cahu Jerome, dry goods, SWcor Folsom and Sev- 
enth 
CAHN LEOPOLD, agent San Francisco Pioneer 

Woolen Factory, 1 15 Battery, dwl NE cor Post 

and Van Ness Avenue 
Cahn L. M., merchant, office 219 Sansom, dwl 1114 

Post 



" Fair dealing and prompt payments"— the motto of the PEOPLES. 



C. p. VAN SCHAA.CK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny St., Table and Pocket Cutlery. 



SAN FRANCISCO [C] DIRECTORY 



139 



Cabn Maier A., saleeraan with Marcus C. Hawley & 

Co., (Iwl II 14 Post 
Ciihii Morris, (Herzos & 6'o.;dwl911 Clay 
Calm Koealie, (widow) dwl 1219 Sutter 
Q,.\\\\i'^s\^Am J hazard, Freres) AwWhM Powell 
Cuiiu. — See Knlii> 
Cahoon Frederick G., bookkeeper with G. & W. 

SiiooU 
Cahoon John, compositor Police Gazette, dwl SW 

cor Clay and Kearny 
Cain Dennis, laborer, Laborers' Protective Associa- 
tion, Irish American Hall 
Cain Edward, pressman and extraman Stenmer No. 

3 S. F. F. D., dwl SVV cor Sutter and Jones 
Cain Elizabeth, (widow) nurse, dwl 305 Union 
Cain Francis, stonecutter, dwl Bush bet Pierce and 

Scott 
Cain James, farmer, dwl 3v!0 Sansom 
Cain James, ironmolder with J. G. lis, dwl N 8 Fil- 
bert bet Montgomei y and Kearny 
Cain John, bricklayer, b'ds 214 Broadway 
Cain John, laborer, dwl 311 Pacitic 
Cain John, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Cain John, mariner, dwl 32 Stenart 
Cain Joseph, laborer, dwl 189 Folsom, rear 
Cain Michael, laborer, dwl 9 Gaven 
Cain Michael, laborer, dwl W s Mission nr Twen- 
ty-second 
Cain 'Rufns U., bricklayer, dwl S s Page bet Octavia 

an<l Laguua 
Cain Thomas, junkdealer, dwl E a Gilbert nr 

Towiisend 
Cain Thomas, shoemaker with Buckingham &. 

Hecht, dwl 5 Sherwood Place 
Cain — See Cane, Kain and Kane 
Cainen William J., dwl 1320 Stockton 
Caire Henry, salesman with Justinian Caii'e, dwl 

313 Green 
Caire Justinian, importer and jobber hardware and 
crockery, 530 Washington and 1028 Dupont, 
dwl 313' Green 
Cairncross James, clerk, dwl 107 Leidesdorft" 
Cairns John, foreman Golden City Chemical Works, 

dwl W 8 Seventh nr Brannan 
Cairns John, machinist Risdon Iron Works, dwl 344 

Shipley 
Cairns John, physician, dwl 1008 Jones 
Cairns Patrick, helper with Pacitic Rolling Mill Co., 

dwl Potrero Point 
Cairns Robert,, salesman, dwl 30 Hawthorne 
Cairns Thomas, painter, dwl 2.55 Tehama 
Cairns William, laborer Golden City Chemical 

Works, dwl W s Seventh nr Brannan 
Caizac Paul, salesman with Kaiudler, Scellier & 

Co., dwl 931 Pacitic 
Calback Henrv, carriagetrimmer with Kimball &. 

Co., dwl 818 Folsom 
Calbo Francis, dwl Branch House 
Caldon Daniel, laborer, dwl 120 Shipley 
Calder Alexander W., dentist, dwl 1071 Howard 
Calder William C, varnisher with Wheeler & Wil- 
son Sewing Machine Co., dwl 627 California 
Calderon Andres (F. Baca & Co.) res Santa 

Clara 
Calderwood David, carpenter, dwl Philadelphia 

House 
Caldwell Charles, molder Vulcan Iron Works, dwl 

55 Natoma 
Caldwell David, porter with Edward S. Spear & Co., 

dwl 1331 Sacramento 
Caldwell H. Maxwell, machinist Miners Foundry, 

dwl 308 Beale 
Caldwell J., lamplighter with San Fraucisco Gas 

C<inipanv 
Caldwell James, plasterer, dwl 1716 Leavenworth 
Caldwell John, laborer, dwl Bestole nr Vallejo 
Caldwell John, laborer with Miller & Haley, dwl 

19 Crook 
Caldwell John, miner, dwl 31 Everett 



Caldwell John J., steward steamer Montana, dwl 

535 First 
Caldweli M. E. Mrs., teacher Mission Grammar 
Scliool, dwl Dorland bet Church and Sanchez 
Caldwell R. Eugene, brakesman Southern Pacitic 

Railroad 
Caldwell Robert, teamster, dwl W a Juniper bet 

Folsom and Harrison 
Caldwell S., driver, City Railroad 
Caldvvell Samuel, carpenter, H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Caldwell Terrence, hostler with Edwin J. Foster, 
dwl S 8 Point Lobos Avenue, 2 miles from toll 
gate 
CALDWELL WILLIAM, proprietor Cyclops En- 
gine and Machine Works, 113 Beale, dwl Shot- 
well bel. Twenty-third and Tvveiiiy fourth 
Caldwell William T"., lanndryman wit.li San Fran- 
cisco Laundry Association, dwl NW cor Tuik 
and Fillmore 
Caldwell Violet S. Miss, dressmaker, dwl 217 Sixth 
Caledonia Milling Co., (Gold Hill, Nev.) office 414 

California 
Caler Isabella C, (widow) dwl E s First Avenue 

bet. FifieenUi and Sixteenth 
Calhoun Charles A., jobprinter, 540 Market, dwl 

215 Ma.son 
Calhoun James P. Mrs., dwl 938 Howard 
Calhoun Martha, (widow) dwl S s Willow Avenue 

nr Buchanan 
Calhoun William, laborer, dwl N a Harrison ur 

Eijibth 
CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCI- 

ENCKS. rooms 622 Clav 
CALIFORNIA ASSAY OFFICE, 512 California 
California Avenue Homestead Association, office 306 

Montgomery 
California Barrel Co., office Forrest Building: 
CALIFORNIA BEET SUGAR COMPANY, office 

338 iMonigomeiv. room 8 
California Bible Society, Frederick Buel agent, 757 

Market 
California Bleaching Soap Works, Hall & Wagner 

proprietors, Berry bel Third and Fourth 
CALIFORNIA BLOCK, SE cor California and 

Battery 
CALIFORNIA BORAX COMPANY, (Lake county, 

Cal.) office 320 California 
CALIFORNIA BRASS WORKS, Weed & King- 
well proprietors. 125 First 
California Building, Loan and Savings Bank, 405 

California 
California Chemical Works, San Bruno Road, 3 

miles from City Hall 
CALIFORNIA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, Rev. 

Eleazer Thomas agent, 7)1 Mission 
CALIFORNIA COMxMERCIAL AND MANU- 
FACTURING COMPANY, cor Pierce and 
Chestnut, office 411 Washington 
CALIFORNIA CONDENSED COAL CO., office 

119 and 121 Main 
CALIFORNIA DEMOKRAT, (German daily) 
Frederick Hess & Co. proprietors, office NW 
cor Sacramento and Kearnv 
CALIFORNIA DRY DOCK" COMPANY, Hun- 
ters Point, offices 28 Merchants Exchange and 
41 1 i California 
CALIFORNIA FARMER, (agricultural weekly) 
Wan en & Co. editors and proprietors, office 320 
Clay 
CALIFORNIA FILE MANUFACTURING CO., 
( Willtam Wusthqff' and Louis Kramer) 43/ 
Brannan 
California Foundry, William Brodie, manager, NW 

cor Main and 'Harrison 
Calif(n'nia Glove Company, fPlati and Frank G. 

Conklin) 4\& Ma.Uvvy 
California Grape Wine Vinegar Works, cor Brady 
and Market, office SE cor Mont and Bush 



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JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sau^om Street, Silk and Velvet Kibbona. 



TEBBA SAKTA we know to be an infallible Blood Purifier. 



140 



SAN FRANCISCO [C] DIRECTORY 



CALIFORNIA HIDE DEPOT, Alois Brandt pro- 
prietor, II anrl 13 Broadway 

CALIFORNIA HOTEL, Joseph Chapnis proprie- 
tor. SE cor Dnpoin and Commercial 

CALIKORXIA HOUSE, G. Bernis proprietor, 62G 
Cilifiirnia 

CALIFORNIA IMMIGRANT UNION, William 
• H. Miirlin general atrent, office 31(> California 

California Institute Architects, office 47 Merchants 
Exchange 

CALIFORNIA INSURANCE CO., (Fire and Ma- 
rine) C. T. Hopkins president, Zenas Crowell 
cecretarv, office 3)8 California 

CALIFORNIA JEWELRY CO., John T. Bones- 
tell man-.iger, 61(i Merchant 

California Lahor and Employment Exchange, 819 
]\I<)iitjroniery 

CALIFORNIA LINE PACKETS from New York, 
Plitt & Newton agents, SW corner California 
and Front 

C:iliforni:i Malt House, 436 Brannan 

CALIFORNIA MARKET, Tevis & Davis pro- 
pi-ietors, California to Pine bet Montgomery 
and Ivearny 

CALIFORNIA, MEXICO AND OREGON S. S. 
CO.. (now N. P. Trans. Co.) office -227 S msom 

CALIFORNIA MUTUAL BENEFIT ASSOCIA- 
TION, office No. 23 Exchange Building, Geo. 
T. Ernerv secretary 

CALIFORNIA MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 
CO., S. F. Biitterworth president, John Crockett 
secretary, and William R. Wlieaton general 
airent, office, 13 Merchants' Exchantre 

CALIFORNIA PACIFIC RAILROAD CO., J. P. 
Jackson president, L. C. Fowler secretary, office 
411 California, freight office corner Front and 
Vallejo 

CALIFORNIA PAVING CO., works N s Berry 
het Fourth and Fifth, office 31.5 Montgomery 

California Peat Co., office 2i5 Bush 

CALIKOUNIA PIONEERS, (Society of) rooms 
80S Mont>,fomerv 

CALIFORNIA PLANING MILLS, Adams, Blinn 
& Co., (Charles J. Prescotl, Josink D. Taney 
and Jnmes Taney) proprietors, NW cor How- 
ard and Spear 

California Plaster Paris Works, cor Bryant and 
Fremont, office 222 Battery 

CALIFORNIA POLICE GAZETTE, (weekly) 
F. S. Harlow proprietor, office NE cor Mont- 
gomery and Jack.sou 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS, (Santa Cruz) 
John F. Lohse secretary, office 314 C ilifornia 

California Prison Commission, office 302 Mont- 
gomery 

California Publishing Company, 31 Kearny 

California Rectifying and Depurating Co., office 
42.5 Battery 

CALIFORNIA SILK FACTORY, cor Eleventh 
Avenue and P, office and salesroom 125 Sau.som 

CALIFORNIA SOAP CO., factory W s Sausom 
nr Greenwich, office 520 Front 

CALIFORNIA STAATS ZEITUNG, (Genmn 
weekly) Frederick Hess & Co. proprietors, 
office NW cor Kearny and Sacramento 

CALIFORNIA STATE TELEGRAPH CO.. Geo. 
Hart Mumford president, Geo. S. Ladd secretary, 
office 522 California 

Califoiiiia State Woman's Hospital, cor Howard and 
Twelfth 

CALIFORNIA STEAM NAVIGATION CO., B. 
M. Hiirtsliorne president, S. O. Putnam secre- 
tary, office NE cor Front and J;ickson 

CALIFORNIA STOCK AND POULTRY ASSO- 
CIATION. Thom:is E. Finley manager, yard 
NW cor Washington and Laguna, office 113 
Leidesdortf 

CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY. SW corner 
Eighth and Brannan, office 210 California 



CALIFORNIA TEACHER, (monthly) Rev. O. P- 
Fitzirerald editor, office 240 Montgomery 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. John" McCullongh, 
lessee and manager, N s Bush bet Kearny and 
Diipont 

CALIFORNIA TRUST CO., Henry L. Davis pres- 
ident, D. W. C. Thompson cashier, office 421 
C ilifornia 

CALIFORNIA TYPE FOUNDRY CO., George 
L. F\iulkner manager, 405 and 407 Sansom 

California Wine Cooperate Co., depot SW comer 
Drnnim and Commercial 

CALIFORNIA WIRE WORKS. J. M. Eckfeldt 
& Co. proprietors, office 412 Clay 

Calish John, hairdresser with John Pilling, dwl 
1411 Sacramento 

Calish R. S., expresswagon, SE cor Broadway and 
Dnpont, dwl 1411 Sacramento 

Calisher Julius, California Shoe Factory, 515 Mar- 
ket, dwl 215 Seventh 

Calistoga and Geyser Turnpike Road Co., office 420 
Monttromeiy 

Calkir.s James, calker, Calkers' Association, Ex- 
celsior Hall 

Call James, laborer vrith Crooks, Barz & Suhl, dwl 
1614 Leavenworth 

Call Patrick, teamster with Arthur M. Ebbets, dwl 
W s Battery bet Vallejo and Green 

Call William VV., milkranch, 248 San Bruno Road 
nr Twenfy-niuth 

Callabota Sylvester, restaurant, 18 Folsom 

Callatflian Charles, wliarlinger Jackson Street 
Wharf, dwl 608 Ellis 

Callaghan Cornelius, laborer, dwl 60 Je.=sie 

CALLAGHAN DANIEL, mainifacturer Donnolly 
& Co's Yeabt Powder, 121 Front, dwl NW cor 
Howard and Fourteeuih 

Calhiglian David, laborer, dwl 158 Jlinna 

Callaghan Dennis, carpenter and builder, dwl E s 
Fulton nr McAllister 

Callaghan James, laborer, dwl N s Filbert bet San- 
som and Montgomery 

Callaghan James, shoemaker, 48 First, dwl 3 Lick 
Alley 

Callaghan Jane, (widow) dwl 39 Clementina 

Callaghan John, liquors, 222 Jackson 

Callaghan Michael, laborer, dwl 4 Lick Alley 

Callaghan Patrick, day nurse City and County Hos- 
pital 

Callaghan Patrick, driver with TuUy & Durkin,dwl 
512 ML-ision 

Callaghan Peter, Eclipse Livei-y Stable, 527 Pacific 

Callaghan Sherwood, clerk First National Gold 
Bank, dwl Grand Hotel 

Callaghan Thomas, laborer, dwl 39 Clementina 

Callaghan T. O., carpenter, dwl 128 Shipley 

Callaijhan William H., shoemaker, dwl 2 Jasper 
Place 

CALLAGHAN'S BUILDING, W s Dupont bet 
Clay and Washington 

Gallagher .John, laborer with S. F. Gas Co 

Callahan Bernard, chief engineer S. F. and P. Sugar 
Co., dwl 16 Russ 

Callahan Charles, laborer Laui'el Hill Cemetery, 
dwl E 8 Jackson bet Devisadero and Brod- 
erick 

Callahan Cornelius, butcher with William K. Die- 
trich, dwl 623 Geary 

Callahan Cornelius, laborer Pioneer Woolen Fac- 
tory, dwl E s White bet Green and Vallejo 

Callahan David, shoemaker, .304 Market 

Callahan Dennis, laborer with Cornelius O'Donnell, 
dwl 19 Fifth Ay 

Callahan Felix, laborer, dwl 207 Clara 

Callahan Francis, laborer, dwl 429 Clementina 

Callahan James, foreman North Point Dock Ware- 
house, dwl Filbert bet Sansom and Montgomery 

Callahan James, laundrymau with S. F. Laundry 
Association, dwl NVV cor Turk and Fillmore 



Prudent men insure in tjie PEOPLES. 



C. p. VAN SCHAA.CK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 



SAN FRANCISCO [C] DIRECTORY 



141 



Callahan James H., gasfitter witli Thomas Day, dwl 

NW cor Sixth and Brauiian 
Callrthan Jeremiah, barkeeper with J. A. Gethings, 

dwl 719 Market 
Callahan John, carpenter, dwl 9 Grand Ave 
Callahan John, hackmrtu with Thomas J. Morse, 

dwl 13 Third 
Callahan Jolin, hacUdriver, dwl 7-l'2 Market 
Callahan Jolni, stableman with Boweu & Slocum, 

dwl 7 Bernard 
Callahan John, Li borer with R. A. Thompson, dwl 

' 604 Natoma. rear 
Callahan John, liq^nors, cor Francisco and Kearny, 

dwl NE cor Sixth and Bramiau 
Callahan John P. Uev.. assistant pastor St. Bridget's 

Chnrch, dwl Van Ness Av nr Broadway 
Callahan M., (widow) dwl S s Oak nr Franklin 
Callahan Margaret Miss, dres.-sn)aker, dwl 106 Minna 
Callahan Mary Mrs., liquor saloon, NE cor Sixth 

and Braniian 
Calhihan Matthias B., merchant, (Hamilton, Nev.) 

dwl -131 Sixth 
Callahan Mich;iel, groceries and liqnors, 315 Eighth 
Callahan Michael, laborer, dwl 623 Geary 
Callahan -Morris, laborer, dwl N s Ivy nr Van 

Ness Av 
Callahan Owen, baker St. Mary's College, dwl 

Courtland Av nr Buena Vista 
Callahan Patrick, coachman, 913 Pine 
Callahan Patrick, tirenian, dwl 119 Silver 
Callahan Patrick, fruits, N s Sixteenth bet Valencia 

and Second Av 
Callahan Patrick, laborer Laborers' Pro. Ben. 

Association, Irish American Hall 
CalLihan Patrick, miner, dwl Xi06 Pacific 
Callahan Patrick, shoemaker with D.W.Emerson 

(fe Co.. dwl 433 Shipley 
CalLihan Patrick J., expresswagon cor Front and 

Market, dwl Chattanooga bet Twenty lirst and 

Tvi-enly-cecond 
Callahan Philip, molder, dwl 419 Fifth 
Callahan Philip, uiolder Vulcan Iron Works, dwl 

S 8 Br.innan nr Fourth 
Callahan William, farmer, dwl 2 Jasper Place 
Callahan William, grainer, dwl 244 Minna 
Callahan William, hostler with Bouton & Son, dwl 

2 Jasper Place 
Callahan — ^See Kallahan 
Callau Christopher, dwl E s Leroy Place 
Callan June Miss, bookfolder with D. Hicks & Co., 

res Oakland 
Callan John, laborer, dwl 410 Sixth, rear 
Callan John, seaman, dwl 60 Clementina 
Callan Thomas, (Callan dk GrdiisJ dwl 1 Harlan 

Place 
Callan &. Grellis, fThomaf Callan and John Grel- 

lisj liquor saloon, 210 Sutter 
Callanan William, fireman steamer Kalorama, 

Washington St. Wharf 
Calle Frederick, jeweler with Frontier & Co., dwl 

920 Market 
Callely Ana, (widow) dwl 231 Minna 
Calk'ly Michael, laborer, dwl SE cor Mason and 

Sutter 
Calien James, laborer, dwl .512 Mission 
Callender Henry A, jeweler, 62 Second, dwl 58^ 

Second 
Callender John T., (colored) boarding, 5 Bdwy 
Callender J. A., surgeon P. M. S. S. Montana 
Callghen Patrick, laborer, dwl N s Linden bet La- 

guna and Octavia 
Calligan P. J., mariner, dwl cor Laskieand Mission 
Callii gliam William J., insurance agent, dwl 1113 

Sutter 
Callsen Peter, carpenter, dwl 143.5 Pacific 
Callnudan Christian F., local policeman, dwl 214 

Tyler 
Callundan Fred, clerk with C. F. Richards dt Co., 

dwl 216 Tvler 



C.alnan Daniel, cartman, dwl 7.53 Mission, rear 
Calnan Daniel, laborer with Keefe & llaggatt, dwl 

120 Shipley 
Calnan David, liquor saloon, SE cor Fifth and Clara 
Calsing Martin, machinist ^tua Iron Works, dwl 

16 Louisa 
Calvary Cemetery, Cemeteiy Avenue opposite Ellis 
Calverly Robert, liquor saloon, NW C(U' F(]|somand 

Third, dwl Perry bet Second and Third 
Calverly Thomas, photographic printer with Brad- 
ley & Rulofson, dwl II Polouia bet Folsom and 
llarrison 
Calvert Celsus, engineer wuh Carmen Island Salt 

Co., res Brooklyn, Alameda Co 
Calvert Heiny W., manufacturer dental materials, 
SW cor Clay and Kearny, res Brooklyn, Ala- 
meda Co 
Calvert John, {Painter <& C.) dwl 12.5 Sansom 
Calvert John F., brickmason, dwl 706 Sutter 
Calvert John T., bricklayer, dwl W s Leroy Place 
Calvert William, dentist, oltice SW cor Clay and 

Kearny, res Brooklyn, Alameda Co 
Cambers Thomas, shoemaker, dwl 75 Minna 
Ciimbreleng U., coppersmith, dwl 10 Hartnian 
CAJIBRIAN HOUSE, Jeukins & Evans proprie- 
tors, 403 Broadway 
Cambridge House. Lawrence McKeon proprietor, 

304 Pacific 
Camden C. D., f widow) furnished rooms, 314 Post 
Camerdeu M., janitor, Laguna Honda School 
Cameron Angus, wooci turner and scroll sawyer, 218 

Steuart, dwl 216 Prospect Place 
Cameron Daniel, ( Farnhnm & C<>.) dwl 318 Beale 
Cameron Elizabeth, (widow) boarding, 312 Beale 
Cameron Elizabeth S. Miss., teacher. City Female 

Seminary, dwl 428 Post 
Cameron Gordon, butter, cheese, eggs etc., 90 and 

91 California Market, dwl Franklin Hotel 
Cameron Hugh, brassfinisher with W. T, Garratt 

& Co., dwl 1780 Folsom 
Cameron James, bakery. W a Folsom nr Fourteenth 
Cameron James, woodturner with Angus Cameron 

dwl 111 Free Ion 
Cameron John, dwl What Cheer House 
Cameron John A., clerk with Fordham & Jennings, 

dwl 318 Beale 
Cameron John V\^, salesman with P. D. Code & Co., 

dwl 550 Mission 
Cameron Julia A. Mrs., teacher music, dwl 147 

Third 
Cameron Mary Ann, (widow) fruils, etc, 214 Miss 
Cameron Nathan, bookkeeper, dwl 2.58 Jessie 
Cameron William, deputy license collector, City and 

County, dwl 312 Beale 
Cameron VVilliam, plasterer, dwl Adams House 
Cames Pierre, laundry, 405 Dupont 
Cametto Martin, ( Dupuy Sf Co.) dwl S 8 Polk 

Lane nr Stockton 
Camilo Navarro, painter ■with Casebolt & Kerr, 

dwl Broadway bet Stockton and Powell 
Caminetii Anthony, clerk with C^uint & Hardy, 

dwl SE cor Filbert and Latrnna 
Camiuetti Rocco, laborer, dwl Laguna nr Filbert 
CAMMAN A. CO., (Tliomas Slojerj ship chan- 
dlery, 1.52 Steuart 
Camman Augustus, (A. Camman & Co. J dwl 261 

Clara 
Cammet John, dwl NE cor Howard and Thirteenth 
Camons Andre, locksmith and bell hanger, 237 Sutter 
Camp James M., cigars and tobacco, Merchants' 

Exchange, dwl 737 Howard 
Camp Sarah, (widow) dwl .531 Greenwich 
Camp — (see Kanip and Kenip) 
Campa Angelo, laborer, dwl 3 Margaret Alley 
Campbell Alexander, attorney at law, office 26 Ex- 
change Building 606 Wash, dwl 313 Stockton 
Campbell Alexander, carpenter, dwl 728 Market 
Campbell Alexander, clerk with A. Roman & Co., 
dwl 1126 Market 



JONES, PULLMAlf & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Dresa Trimminga. 



TERBA SANTA, the great Blood Purifier, cures Eheumatism, WeuraTgia and Gout. 



142 



SA^Sr FRANCISCO [C] DIRECTORY. 



Campbell Alexander, butcher, dwl 107 Leidesdoiff 
Ciiiiipbell Alexander, ni:irket., car Gongli and Ruse 
Campbell Alexander, (Campbell, Fox & Campbell) 

resides Oalditnd 
Campbell Aniie T. Miss, assistant teacher Nortb 

Cosniopiijitan School, dwl Vlii) Jackson 
Cani|)bell Andrew, j,'iocerie8 and liquors, cor Precita 

Avenue and Harrison 
Campbell Andrew, hostler, dwl Flint Alley nr 

Battery 
Campbell Andrevv, seaman, bds 20 Commercial 
Campbell Annie, (widow) dressmaker, dwl 1426 

SioiUton 
Campbell Austin, cabinetmaker with A. Mogan & 

Co. 
Campbell Catherine, (widow) dwl S s Seventeenth 

nr IJonglass 
Campbell Charles, compositor Morning Call, dwl 

Branch House 
Campbfll Charles, engineer, dwl 6 Thompson Av 
C.impbell Charles, teamster with Timothy Ells- 
worth 
Campbell Charles B., -wireworker, dwl 1250 Jackson 
Campbell Cornelia E. Miss, assistant teacher Green- 
wich St. Cosmopolitan School, dwl 9.)3 Folsom 
Campbell Daniel, clerk with Taylor Brothers, dwl 

G27 Kearny 
Campbell Duncan, rigger and stevedore, dwl 1306 

Montgomery 
Campbell Dune m F., coalweigher with P. M. S. S. 

Co., dwl 10 Stanford 
Campbell Edward, laborer S. F. and P. Lead Pipe 

and Shot Works 
Campbell Eihvin R., editor, dwl 533 Commercial 
Campbell Eliza, (widow) dwl 2 Clarice Place 
(Juinpbcll Felix, laborer, dwl S 8 Turk bet Scott 

and Piei'ce 
CAMPBELL, FOX & CAMPBELL, (Alexander 

Campbell, Chirles N. Fox and Henry G. Camp- 
bell) attorneys at law, office 528 California 
Campbell Fiaiuis, butcher, dwl SE cor Twentieth 

and Dolores 
Campbell francis W., barkeeper, 432 Cal,dwl 613 

Pine 
Campbell Frederick, plumber with Walmsley & 

Smith, dwl E sGr'ant Place nr F()!8')m 
Campbell GeorKe, medical student with E. Bentley, 

dwl Point San Jose 
Campbell George, (Dickson, DeWolf & Co.) res 

Loudon 
Campbell Georijre J., hoilermaker Union Iron 

Works, dwl i)lO Mission, rear 
Campbell George W., drayman Pacific distillery, 

dwl Buchanan bet Greenwich and Lombard 
Campbell Harry, clerk with J. C. Morrison Jr., dwl 

320 Sixth 
Campbell Henry, carpenter, dwl 1904 Polk 
Campbell Heniy C, (Campbell, Fox & G-J attorney 

at law, office 528 Cal, resides Oakland 
Campbell Hu^fh, bootmaker with William Joiner, 

dwl 33 N.itoma 
Campbell Jacob A., foreman with Massey & Yung, 

dwl911 Hyde 
Campbell James, cook, SW cor Battery and Vallejo 
Campbell James, gilder with Currier & Winter, 

dwl 513 Minna 
Campbell James, laborer with Miller & Haley, dwl 

178 Perry 
Campbell James A., calker Calkers' Association' 

Excelsior Hall 
Campbell James B , carpenter, dwl 113 Ellis 
Campbell James S., clerk, dwl 136 Natoma 
CAMPBELL JAMES W. H., proprietor Cunning- 
ham's Warehouse, office cor Front and Green, 
dwl 1117 Montgomery 
Campbell Jane N., (widow) W s Shotwell bet Twen- 

ty-tifth and Twenty-sixth 
Campbell John, bookkeeper with Pope & Talbot, 
dwl 312 Brannan 



Campbell John, carpenter, dwl 741 Market 
Campbell John, express, SW cor Second and Mis- 
sion, dwl San Bruno nr Twenty fourth 
Campbell John, porter, dwl 9 Pincknev 
Campbell John, porter International Hotel 
Campbell Jolin J., clerk, dwl 363 Jessie 
Campbell Joseph F., (Campbell & Conrad) dwl 

266 First 
Campbell Joseph R., printer, dwl 1320 Stockton 
Campbell J. P. & Co., (Jamcx Wade) dry goods, 

124 Kearny, dwl 743 Pine 
Campbell Louisa, (widow) dwl 824 Howard 
Campbell M., laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Campbell Madison L., bricklayer, dwl cor Four- 
teenth Av and Railway Av South S F 
Campbell Mary Miss, dressniaker, dwl 638^ Mission 
Campbell Mary Ann, (colored) widow, dwl NW 

cor Mason and Broadway 
Campbell M. D., bricklayer Brickl.iyers' Ass'n, 

Young Men's Christian Ass'n Hall 
Campbell Michael, laborer, dwl 135 Tehama 
Campbell Michael, pressman with Francis & Valen- 

tme, dwl 633 Broadway 
Campbell Morris S., assay department U. S. B. Mint, 

res Oakland 
Campbell Murdoch.hard ware,5 Steuart,d w 131 SPine 
Campbell Nicholas, carpenter, dwl 777 Market 
Cani[)bell Patrick, insurance agent, dwl NW cor 

Shotwell nr Twentieth 
Campbell Patrick, laborer, dwl E s Folsom nr Ser- 
pentine Av 
Campbell Patterson A., (Deeth, Starr & Co.) dwl 

628 Pine 
Campliell Peter, laborer with W. M. Hendry, dwl 

W s Geneva betErannan and Townsend 
Campbell Peter A., shoemaker with I. M. Weut- 

worth &. Co., dwl cor Ash and Laguna 
Campbell Peter H., foreman cutting room U. S. B. 

Mint, dwl 1220 Jackson 
Campbell Peter T., joiner, dwl N s Shasta nr Olinois 
Campbell Philip, laborer S. F. Gas Co., dwl 513 

Minna 
Campbell Ralph, typefounder with Hagar &. Co., 

dwl 1318 Dupont, rear 
Campbell Robert, carpenter, dwl 46 Second 
Campbell Rol)ert, porter, 23 Fremont, dwl 9 Essex 
Campbell Robert A., clerk with Madison & Burke, 

dwl 1220 Jackson 
Campbell Sophia, (widow) dwl 363 Jessie 
Cam|)bell Thomas, blacksmith, dwl 268 Brannan 
Campbell Thomas, cirpenter, dwl 1006 Natoma 
Campbell Thomas, machinist with Pacific Rolling 

Mill Co., dwl Potrero Point 
Campbell Wallace D., shoemaker, dwl 202 Second 
Campbell Walter C, pattern and model maker, 20 

Fremont, dwl 718 Howard 
Campbell William, blacksmith, dwl 27 Ritch 
Campbell William, clerk with JL T. Brocldebank 

dwl 435 Pine 
Campbell Wdliam, mnriner, dwl 26 Stewart 
Camjibell William, niolder Risdoii Iron Works, dwl 

314 Folsom 
Campbell William, piledriver with Martin & Co., 

dwl 152 First 
Campbell William, porter with Junius G. Foster, 

dwl Clifi" House 
Campbell William, waiter North Pacific Trans. 

Co.'s S. S. Idaho 
Campbell William C, reporter Examiner, dwl 22 

Second 
Campbell William H., receiver Central Railroad, 

116 Taylor, dwl Nb Post bet Scotland and 
Devisadero 
Campbell William H., wliarfinger with J. W. H. 

Campbell, dwl 1117 Mont 
Campbell William J., agent Goodyear Dental Vul- 
canite Co., office 428 Cal, dwl'South S F 
Campbell & Conrad, (Joseph F. Campbell & Henry 

Conrad) hairdressing saloon, 266 First 



THE PEOPLES INSUHANCE CO.— Successful, Popular, Beliable. 



C p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708,712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



SAN FRANCISCO [C] DIRECTORY 



143 



Canipe Frederick, fCnmpe & Siemjdwl SW cor 
Second <ind Branuan 

Canipe George, porter, dwl SW cor Washington 
and Sansom 

Campe Henry, irroceries and liquors, NW cor Se- 
cond and Tehama, dwl 432 Fifth 

Campe Joliii, s,'i-ocer, dwl tTiS First 

Campe Maijiius, dwl ■132 Fifth 

Cauipe Justis, dwl 2'2 Lily Av 

Cauipe & S\em, f' FreJenck Campe <Sb John Siem) 
groceries and liciuors, SW cor Second and 
Bran nan 

Caniiie — see Camp and Kamp 

Caiijpi Giacouio, / Cnmpi & Co.) dwl 1015 Front 

Campi & Co., fCiiacomn Campi & Naiale Gtam- 
bonij Italian restaurant, ol9 Clay 

Campion E<iwar(l, lahorer, 912^ Folsom -^ 

Campion Michael, laundiynian with Mary Bennett, 
dwl SW cor Dora and Harrison 

Campion Alicliael Jr., driver with Snliivan & Dela- 
ney, dwl W s Dora nr Harrison 

Campion Thomas, drayman with Deeth, Starr tfc 
Caiiiphcll, dwl S.'Jli Stevenson 

Camjiion Thomas, varniisber with Goodwin &, Co., 
dwl 0() Shipley, rear 

Campione Samuel, pressman "with Francis & Valen- 
tine, dwl N W cor Montgomery and Jackson 

Campodonicc) P. & Co., ( Bencdeitv FassalacquaJ 
liquor saloon, 5:!3 Washington 

Campodonico Pasqnal, (P. Campedoiiico ^ Co. J 
dwl A Codmau Place 

Campodonico Siephen, marble ■works, 1130 Market, 
dwl GO 4 N atom a 

Canipton George, salesman with C. W. Howe & Co., 
dwl 730 Bush 

Campus Miinuel, restaurant, dwl SUO^ Broadway 

Cauas Manuel, porter with Henry T. Holmes, dwl 
E 8 Montgomery het Broadway and Vallejo 

Canavan Baiiholoniew, cabinetmaker, dwl S b Na- 
toma bet Eighth and Ninth 

Canavan James, longshoreman, dwl 14 Frederick 

Canavan James, milkman, dwl 16 Clara 

Canavan Mark, I, iborer, dwl Broderick bet Wash- 
ington and Jackson 

Canavan Matthew, chief field deputy assessor City 
and Couniy, and Commissioner Lagnna Sur- 
vey, dwl 11 Hariiet 

Canavan Patiick, livery stable, 1629 Howard 

CANAVAN P. H., importer wines and liquors, N 
^V' cor Front and California, and City Hall com- 
missioner, dwl W'-l-i Folsom 

Canavan — see Cannavan and Kennovan 

Caudage Wiley P., sawyer with Hobbs, Gilmore & 
Co., dwl 570 Howard 

Candeze Peter, waiter 337 Bush, dwl 106 Welsh 

Cane Gustave, hairdresser with Aaron Creamer, 
dwl 4G4 Teh a in a 

Cane Michiiel, janitor Shotwell St Grammar School 

Cane — see Cain, Kainand Kane 

Cauepe .Agosiino, barkeeper, 118 Leidesdorff, dwl 3 
Margaret Place 

Caney John, stockbroker, dwl SIS Stockton 

Caney Mary A. Mrs., dwl 552 Mission 

Canezza John, gardener, dwl 314 Pacific 

Canlield Charles, laundry, 507 Pacific 

Canlield Henry C, carpenter and builder, dwl oGSj 
Howard 

Canfielil Hohert, assistant engineer P. M. S. S. Co. 

Canfield Patrick, lal)orer, dwl 441 Clementina 

Canlield liutus J., clerk, dwl 827 Broadway, rear 

Canlield Thomas, varuisher with Goodwin &. Co., 
dwl 66 Shipley 

Canfield William, jeweler, dwl 1411 Stockton, rear 

Canhani Frederick, butcher with John Anderson, 
dwl SW cor Broadway and Dupont 

Canhani Thomas P., painter, dwl 217 Tehama 

Canhain William F., painter and glazier, dwl Ns 
California bet Van Ness Avenue and Franklin 

Cauip Joseph, laborer, dwl 9 Hinckley 



Cannavan Bartholomew, billiardtahle maker witli 
G. E. Phelan, dwl S 8 Natoma bet Eight and 
Ninth 
Cannavan Eliza Jliss, dressmaker, dwl 228 Bush 
Cannavan John, luniherinan, dwl 626, Jessie 
Cannavan Martin D., printer, dwl 1523 Leaven- 
worth 
Cannavan Jlichael, Beehive auction store, 803 

Kearny, dwl N s Lombaid nr Kearny 
Cannavan. — See Canavan and Kennovan 
Canney Christopher C, cutter with I. M. Went- 

worth i-Vr. Co., dwl 1114 Market 
Canning William, longshoreman, dwl E s Board- 
man Place nr Brainian 
Cannon Anthony, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Cannon Bernard, laborer with Weed & Kingwell, 

dwl 18 Natoma 
Cannon Daniel, dwl 511 Pine 
Cainion Edward, lilegrinder with California File 

Manufacturing Co., dwl 314 Ritch 
Cannon Frank, whitener and plasterer, 211 Mason, 

dwl Olympic Hotel 
Cannon Jaiiies, lahoi-er, dwl 214 Jlission.rear 
Cannon James, niolder with J.G. lis, dwl 14 Natoma 
Cannon James, plasterer, dwl 1 1 Perry 
Cannon James, sashlinisher with B. & J. S. Doe, 

dwl 23 Minna 
Cannon James, shoemaker with Metropolitan B. 

and S. Company, dwl 27 Minna 
Camion John, expresswagon, P. M, S. S. Go's wharf, 

dwl S 8 Twenty-third nr Columbia 
Cannon Patrick, niattvessmaker with N. P. Cole & 

Co., dwl 1061 Market 
Cannon William, engineer, dwl 12 Willow Av 
Cannon William, longshoreman, dwl NE cor Bat- 
tery and Green 
Canon John S., carriagenifiker with Kimball Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 12 Oak Av 
Canon Robert P., carriage painter, dwl 12 Oak Av 
Canterbury Hall, Charles Brooks propiietor, 824 

Kearny 
Cantin Joseph P., (Cantin & Everett) dwl 815 

Ellis 
CANTIN & EVERETT, fjos^cph P. Cantin and 
Angjixtus F. EvcrvttJsXocXi. and money brokers, 
506 Mongomery 
Cantlau Ricliaid, laborer, dwl 263 Jessie 
Canilin William, carpenter, dwl Central Ocean 

Roadnr Spring Valley Water Works 
Canton Joseph, calker Calkers' Association, Excel- 
sior Hall 
Cantor Jacob, clerk with William M. Searby, dwl 

874 Folsom 
Cantorowitz Heyman, merchant, dwl 627 Com 
Cantorowitz Morris, expressman, SW corTliirdand 

Harrison, dwl 646 Bryant 
Cantrell Joseph B., tinsmith with Brittan, Hol- 
brook (St. Co., dwl N s Eddy bet Buchanan and 
Laguna 
Cantrell Martha, dwl S s Wiilow Av nr Buchanan 
Cantrell Morris, laborer, dwl 247 Bluxome 
Cantrell Thomas G., (Haivkins & C.) dwl 1216 

Larkin 
Cantrell W. B., carpenter H. C. League. 128 Kearny 
Cantres Daniel, carpenter H.C. League, 128 Kearny 
Cantrowith Joseph, porter, 101 Battery, dwl 151 

Clara 
Cantus George, (Cantus & Eomsjivi] 119 O'Farrell 
Cantus & Hoss, (George Cnntus and John Hoss) 
groceries and liquors, SW cor Stockton and 
O'Farrell 
Cantwell Morris, laborer, dwl 247 Bluxome 
Canty Daniel, (Canty & Wagner J ({vf\lU\TaT^ 
Canty Michael, fruitdealer, dwl 28 Louisa 
Cantv Patrick, blacksmith with Isidore Burns, dwl 

27 Ritch 
Canty Thomas, confectioner, dwl 328 Third 
Canty Thomas F. R., harnessmaker with Main &. 
Winchester, dwl 28 Louisa 



JOI^TES, FUIjIiMAllf & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Suspenders and i;reck Ties. 



KEDIWQTON'S ESSENCE GINGER cures Dyspepsia and Indigestion, 



144 



SAN FRANCISCO [C] DIRECTORY 



Canty Titnolby, merchant tailor, 37 Sutter, dwl 16 

Sutler 
Caniy William W., foreman boilermakers Miners' 

Koiindrv, dwl 1 1 Minna 
CANTY &■ WAGNER, f Daniel Canty and Wil- 
/lom WdgnerJ inaniifactnrers and wholesale 
and retail confectioners, 107 Montgomery 
Canville Midiael, tallowchandler, dwl Central 

Ocean road nr Spring Valley Water Works 
Cany lulward, miner, dwl 108 Montgomery Block 
Cape William, plasterer Plasterers' Protective Asso- 
ciation, 727 Market 
Capelle D. Clayton, student at law with Tull'y R. 

Wise, dwl ''im Clay 
Capelli Aiitone, fruits, and confectionery, SE cor 
Kearny and Jackson, dwl NW cor Front and 
Jackson 
Capen Albert M., (A. M. Capen & Go.) resides 

New York 
Capen A. M. Q,o.,fPanl H. Boggs) importers bard- 
ware and carriatre bolts, l-ib Sansom 
Capital Building, NW cor Pine and Kearny 
Capital Homestead Association, office 409 Califoi'nia 
CAPITOL MILLS, Deming, Palmer & Co., pro- 
prietors, 113 Commercial and 116 Sacramento 
Caplice John, brewer, dwl N s Natoma bet Eighth 

and Ninth 
Caplice Richard, teamster with Matthew Nunan, 

dwl Folsom bet Seventh and Eighth 
Capp Charles S., manager California Immigrant 
Union, office 316 California, dwl SE cor Mc- 
Allister and Lincoln 
Cappiise Joseph, carpenter Public School Depart- 
ment, office N W cor Austin and Larkin, dwl 516 
Greenwich 
Capprise Lizzie Miss, assistant teacher Union Pri- 
mary School, dwl 516 Greenwich 
Ciiptoe William, (Captoe &, Holmes) dwl 21 Ritch 
Captoe & Holmes, ( Wdham Captoe & Mtlo P. 

Holmes) horseshoers, 15 Belden 
Capuro Angnstino, porter with Treadwell & Co., 

dwl 6 Lafayette Place 
Capuro Giuseppo, engineer with D. Ghirardelli 

dwl 6 L:ifayette Place 
Caput Frederick, blacksmith cor Mission and Third, 

dwl 451 Jessie 
Caradine Sarah Mrs., dwl 234 Folsom 
Caratfa Doniinico & Co., bakers, 1309 Dupont 
Caragliar Michael, hostler Front Street M. & O. E. 

R., dwl 33 Austin 
Caralier Michael, shoemaker with Metropolitan B, 

& S. Co., dwl 234 Clara 
Caraher Owen, laborer, dwl W e Salmon nr Pacific 
Caransa Tiliurcio Mrs., saloon, 508 Broadway 
Carauza Pedro, cigars and fruits, 531 Broadway 
Carbanos Alex:inder, cooper, dwl 616 Battery 
Carbery Corniick, carpenter, dwl 347 Minna 
C.irbery Henry barkeeper, dwl 439 Bush 
Carberry Henry, waiter, Occidental Hotel 
Carberry James, laundry mau Lick House, dwl 52 

Jessie 
Carberry James, shoemaker, 573 Howard, dwl 5.55 

Howard 
Carberry John, carpenter, dwl 17^ Garden 
f barberry Nicholas, laborer, dwl 545 Jlission 
Carl)erry Patrick, hooker Pacilic Rolling Mill, dwl 

Potrero Point 
Carberry Robert, carpenter, dwl 17 J Garden 
Carbis John, dwl 304 Minna 

Card B. F. S., clerk, 313 California, dwl 102 Eddy 
Card Duane VV^, lastmaker, dwl 49 Clementina 
Cai'd Elisha, plowmaker, 417 Market, dwl Berry 

House 
Card Russell, (Card & Woods) dwl 321 Sutter 
Card Stephen, president Saucelito Water and Steam 

Tng Co., oflice 405 E'ront, dwl 18 Eddy 
Card & Woods, fjin.tsell Card <fc Frederick N. 
Woods) poultry and game, 67 California Market 
Cardazo John, proprietor Lisbon House, 116 Jackson 



Cardell Joseph, fisherman, dwl 5 Washington 
Carden James, actor California Theater, dwl 514 

Dupont 
Cardiff M;iik, shoemaker, dwl 377 Jessie 
Cardifl' Miles, shoemaker, dwl 530 Sixth 
Cardiff Richard J., pluudier and gaslitter, 608 

Howard, dwl 557 Howard 
Cardinell John A., collector, office 32 Mont Block, 

dwl W s Valencia bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Cardinet Einile, baker, dwl 722 Lombard 
Cardwell C. G., miner, dwl 1107 Kearny 
Care Martin T., tailor, 26^ Sixth 
Caregl'.ino S., shoemaker, dwl NW cor Broadway 

and Kearny 
Carew James, laborer, dwl cor Haight and Buchanan 
Carew Patrick, expresswagon, 197 Stevenson 
Carew Thomas, drayman, 115 Battery, dwl NE cor 

Fell and Octavia 
Carew Thomas, porter with Locke & Montague 
Carew Thomas It., porter, 5 Sansom, dwl NE cor 

Fell and Octavia 
Carew William, carriagepainter Kinil)all Manufac- 
turing Co., dwl NE cor Fell and Octavia 
Carey Bridget, dwl 114 Hayes, rear 
Ciirey Charles, storekeeper, dwl 1 Raphael Place 
Carey Cornelius, teamster Golden City Chemical 

Works, dwl NW cor Seventh and Townscnd 
Carey Edward, bootmaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 234 Oak 
Carey Eugene W., foreman upholsterers with Good- 
win & Co., dwl 375 Minna 
Carey Henry, miner, dwl 920 Clay 
Caie'y James, laborer, dwl 308 Folsom 
Carey James A., stovemounter with Brittan, Hol- 

brook & Co., dwl 42 Ecker 
Carey James M., carpenter, dwl S s Mission nr 

Twelfth 
Carey J. H., teacher, dwl 211 i Geary 
Carey Jolui, porter, dwl N s Market nr Franklin 
Carey Lawrence, laborer, dwl 57 Sliipley 
Carey Martin, liquor saloon, cor Marliet and Gough 
Carey Maurice B., shoemaker, dwl 20 Howard 

Court 
Carey Michael, conductor Central E. R., dwl 

Sixth nr Folsom 
Carey Michael, laborer St. Mary's Hospital 
Carey Michael, waterman, dwl E s Geneva bet 

Brannan and Townsend 
Carey Michael C, bookbinder with Bartling&Kim 

ball, dwl E s Columbia bet Twenty-second and 

Twenty-third 
Carey Patrick, laborer Laborers' Pro. Ben. Associ- 
ation, Irish American Hall 
Carey Patrick, peddler, dwl 720 Tehama 
Carey Peter, brickmason, dwl N s Jersey nr Church 
Carey Thomas, bricklayer, dwl cor Louibard and 

Franklin 
Carey Thomas, laborer, dwl 21 Anna 
Carey Thomas, stevedore, dwl 217 Broadway 
Carey William, laborer with Hancock i.V Kt-lso 
Carey William R., patent spring bed manufacturer, 

151 Third, dwl SW cor Howard and Sixth 
Carey. — See Gary 
Cargill Andrew, laborer S. P. Cordage Factory, 

dwl S s Michigan nr Sierra 
Cargill Duncan, dwl .513 Powell 
Carhu Herrman, bakery, SE cor Jones and Geary 
Cariboo Hotel, Dubereau & Buessard, proijrietors, 

516 Pacific 
Cariguon Louis, machinist, dwl SE cor Green and 

Kearny 
Carl Christian, cook with Burmeister & Pourclio, 

dwl W s Stockton nr Pacific 
Carl Michael, cartman, dwl SE cor Buchanan and 

Tyler 
Carle J. A., carpenter H. C. League. 12S Kearny 
Carleu William, blacksmith, 724 Broadway, dwl 

733 Vallejo 
Carletou Harriet, (widow) dwl 418 Fremont 



Insure y»ur Building, Vessel, or Cargo, in the FEOPIJES. 



C P VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714 and 716 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



SAN FRANCISCO [C] DIRECTORY 



145 



Carleton Howard, compositor with Dewey & Co., 

dwl 14 Hampton Place 
Carleton Job n K., printer with A. L. Bancroft &. 

Co., dwl cor Pine and Powell 
Carleton Silas M., bookkeijper with Israel Eichards, 

dwl SE cor Mason and Cbestnut 
Carleton.— See Carlton 
Carli George, shoemaker with E. Pardini, dwl E a 

Dnpont nr Green 
Carlie Edwin J., shoemaker with J. Sullivan, dwl 

447 Tehama 
Carlile W. E., steward North Pacific Transporta- 
tion Co.'s S. S. OriHamrae 
Carlin Cliarles, janitor Driimni Street School, dwl 

SE cor Drmiini and Orei^on 
Carlin Daniel, (Carlin & BreaUn) dwl 217 Beale 
Carlin J., insnrance agent, dwl 8 O'Farrell 
Carlin ,lolin, laborer, dwll'J Natoma 
Carlin ,John, laborer, dwl 14 Harlan Place 
Carlin Roger, draymau, 438 Jackson, dwl 15 Fifth 

Avenue 
Carlin William, porter with Phillips, Taber & Co., 

dwl o3J Turk 
Carlin &, Brejilin, (Daniel Carlin and John B res- 

linj liquor saloon, 1217 Beale 
Carlin. — See Carlen and C.nion 
Carlisle Elleu Mrs., assistant teacher Shotwell 

Street Primary School, dwl 1412 Pine 
Carlisle George, special policeman, dwl 516 Green- 
wich 
Carlisle George O., carpenter, dwl 1412 Pine 
Carlisle S. H., real estate, dwl 710 Sutter 
Carlisle Thomas S., liquor saloon, SE cor Four- 
teenth and Mission 
Carlisle William, messman S.S. Moses Taylor, North 

Pacific Ti'ansportation Co 
Carliss William, shoemaker, dwl E s Folsom bet 

Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Carlo Ad.im, waiter, 623 Commercial 
Carlon William, (Carton & Herlahy) dwl 813 Fil- 
bert 
Carlon & Herlahy, ( William Carlon and Edward 

Herlahy) blacksmiths, 418 Pacific 
Carlos Tliomas P., restaurant, 103 Washington 
Carlos Tiburcio, saddler, 525 Pacific, dwl 828 Clay 
Carlson Andrew, cabinetmaker with N. G. Nordeu, 

dwl (527 Bi-anuan 
Carlson Charles, carpenter, dwl E s Mississippi nr 

Solano 
Carlson Edward, clerk, dwl 1708 Sacramento 
Carlson H. M., laborer Pacific Barrel and Keg 

Factory, dwl Gilmore nr Kentucky 
Carlson Lars, cabinetmaker with W. J. T. Palmer 

& Co., dwl 37^ Fifth Avenue 
Carlton Charles, clerk with Larkius & Catania, dwl 

13 i St. Marv Place 
CARLrON CHARLES C, proprietor Empire 

warehouse, 16 and 22 Beale, dwl 641 Folsom 
CARLTON HENRY, Jr., agent JEtna lusnrance 

Co., ottice 14 Merchants Exchange 
Carlton Henrv P., vice principal Stale Normal 

School, dwl 606 Sutter 
Carlton Joseph, laborer with Spence & Johnson, 

dwl cor Spring and Summer 
Carlton Oliver B., clerk, 80 California Market, dwl 

24 0;ik Grove Avenue 
Carlton W. H., surveyor, dwl Coso House 
Carlton William B., clerk str Monterey, Washing- 
ton street wharf 
Carljle Irving B., carpenter, dwl 226 Third 
Carman William, physician and surgeon, office and 

dwl 647 Howard 
Carmauy Cyrus W., cashier Savings and Loan So- 
ciety, dwl 923 Jack.sim 
Carmany John H., {John H. Carmany & Co.) 

dwl 923 Jackson 
CARMANY JOHN H. & CO., publishers Over- 
land Monthly, Commercial Herald, Occident, 
Pacific, etc., "office 409 Washington 



Carmany Ringgold, bookeeper Savings and Loan 

Society, dwl 923 Jackson 
Carmatz Adolplie, watchmaker and jeweler, 521 

Sausom, dwl 111 Montgomerj' Block 
Carmelich George, saddle and harness maker, .025 

Sausom, dwl 137 B'ifili 
CARMEN ISLAND SALT WORKS, HoUaday 
& Brenham agents, Folsom street wharf, office 
423 Front, mills 249 Steuart 
Carmichael Daniel, marblecutter with Leon R. 

Myers & Co., dwl 523 Minna 
Carmichael Neil, (Carmichael & McBride) dwl 67 

Clementina 
Carmichael Robert, plumber, dwl 545J Natoma 
Carmichael William, blacksmith U. S. B. Mint, dwl 

545| Natoma 
Carmichael & McBride, (Neil Carmichael and 
Thomas McBrideJ butter, cheese, eggs, etc., 
25 Occidental Market 
Carmody Edmond, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Ke.irny 
Carmody James, stevedore Lumber Stevedores 

Association, Berra's Hall 
Carmody Mary Miss, seamstress with Adolph Mai- 
ler, "dwl lOHardie Place 
Carmody Mary, (widow) dwl 316 Fourth 
Carmody John, peddler, dwl 536 Natoma 
Carmody Patrick, laborer, dwl 318 Folsom 
Carmona Priciliano, carriagemaker with Kimball 

Manufacturing Co., dwl 165 Silver 
Cam Daniel, miner, dwl 228 Minna 
Caruaby James, paperboxmaker with Max Waiz- 
mah, dwl W s Eighth bet Folsom and Howard 
Carnell Richard, dwl 25 Geary 
Carnes Frederick G., professor of music, dwl 32 

Fourth 
CARNES GEORGE A., librarian Odd Fellows 

Library, dwl 312 Post 
Carnes William, sailmaker with Harding & Braun 
Carney Edward, dwl 424 Sansom 
Carney Henry, hiborer with John W. Kelly 
Carney Isabella Miss, dressmaker, dwl 660 Howard 
Carney James, mariner, dwl 116 Steuart 
Carney John, mariner, dwl 116 Steuart 
Carney Margaret, dressmaker, dwl 325 Clementina 
Carney William, waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Carney.— See Kearney 

Carnigre Andrew, cal'ker Calkers' Association, Ex- 
celsior Hall 
Caro Morris, tailor, 306 Pacific 
Caro Samuel, clothing, 40 Third, dwl 965 Howard 
Caro Wolf, furniture, 323 Dupont, dwl 83 Everett 
Carolan Michael, laborer with J. B. Kemp, dwl cor 

Kentucky and South 
Carolin James, liquor saloon, SE cor Third and 

Brannan 
Caron Joseph, fruit, N a Brannan bet First and 

Second 
Caronte Joseph, urabrellamaker, 401 Bush 

Carpenter , laborer City Railroad 

Carpenter A. D., carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Carpenter Alexander, retorter, dwl E s Dolores nr 

Eighteenth 
Carpenter Alfred A., calker Calkers' Aaaociation, 

Excelsior Hall 
Carpenter Augustine D., captain ateamer Amelia, 

California Steam Nav. Co., dwl 1020 Jackson 
Carpenter Charles, carpenter H. C. League, 128 

Kearny 
Carpenter Charles A., (E. B. Martin <& Co.) dwl 

838 Mission 
Carpenter Daniel, janitor Denman Grammar 

School, dwl NE cor Washington and Jones 
Carpenter D. H., dwl OccidentalHotel 
Carpenter Dyer A., bookkeeper, dwl 215 Geary 
Carpenter Edmund P., jeweler with California 

Jewelry Co. , dwl 442 Green 
Carpenter Edward, shipbuilder, dwl 55 Natoma 



JON'ES, PULIjMAW & CO., 116 Sansom Street, Letter and Wote Paper and Envelones. 
10 



EEDIIfGTON", HOSTETTEB & CO., Headquarters for Druseiats on the Pacific Coast, 



146 



SAN FRANCISCO [C] DIRECTORY 



Carpenter George, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Carpenter George W., brasstinisher with W. T. 

Gariatt & Co., dwl llHTeliania 
Carpenter Harvey L., carpenter, dwl 27| Fourth 
Carpenter Jolin, attorney at law, office 28 Conrt 

Block, (i36 Clay, dwl (541 Sacramento 
Carpenter Louis, broominaker with M. Zan & Co., 

dwl :<24 Vallejo, rear 
Carpenter Patrick, laborer, dwl 189 Folsom, rear 
Carpenter Robert C, machinist, dwl Hayes nr 

Ociavia 

Carpenter Thomas, e.xpresswagon, SW cor Battery 

and Jackson, dwl E s Churcli nr Twenty -second 

Carpenter W. H., teamster, dwl cor Polk aiid Eddy 

Carpenter William, (colored} expressman, dwl 216 

Post 
Cnrpenter William, laborer, dwl 335 Ritch 
Carpenter William C, steward P. M. S. S. Sacra- 
mento 
Carpenter William H., gasfitter, dwl 129 Folsom 
Carpenter William L., policeman City Hall, dwl 

81".) Filbert 
Carpenlier Edward R., (Clarke <& C.J attorney at 

law, office 606 Washington, dwl 33 Kearny 
Caijientier Horace W., attorney at law, office 606 

Washington, res Oakland 
Carpliin John W., salesman with Glasgow Iron and 

Aietal Importing Co., dwl 1307 Pacific 
Carpy Charles, clerk 517 Sacramento, dwl 12 

Hon»ton 
Carpv Peter, drayman, 623 .Jackson 
Carr'A. L. Mrs., physician, office and dwl 523 Kearny 
Carr C \V., debenture clerk C. H;, dwl 20 Ellis 
Carr Daniel, blacksmith, dwl NE corner Napa ana 

Illinois 
Carr Edward, hostler with J. H. Swain, dwl 30 Jessie 
Carr Frank D., clerk, 30 Montgomery 
Carr James, dwl Coso House 
Carr .lames, mariner, dwl II William 
Carr James, seaman, dwl 778 Harrison 
Carr Jesse D., mail contractor, office 420 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 131 Montgomery 
Carr John, hackman, dwl 9 Freelon 
Carr John, laborer, dwl 1402 Powell 
Carr John, laborer Golden Age Flouring Mills, 

dwl 264 Minna 
CARR JOHN IRVING, land agent, office 305 

Montgomery, dwl 446 Minna 
Carr John S., {Hooper, Whiting ^- Co. J res Arizona 

City, A T 
Carr J. Thurston, salesman with Stone & Hayden, 

dwl 19 Rausch 
Carr J. Tyler, {Littlefield, Webb & Co.) dwl 813 

Vallejo 
Carr Matthew, saloonkeeper, dwl 19 Clara 
Carr Matthew D., (M. D. Carr & Co.) dwl 1016 

Pine 
CARR M. D. & CO., (C.A. Mnrdock and C. L. 

Qrnckborn) printers, 532 Clay 
Carr Nicholas E., tailor, dwl 36 Eddv 
Carr Patrick, hackman Plaza, dwl 3'42 Fifth 
Carr Patrick, laborer with James McDevilt, dwl W 

8 Sansora nr Vallejo 
Carr Patrick, soapmaker with Thomas Dolan, dwl 

S 8 Harrison nr Dora 
Carr Peter J., expresswagon, dwl N s Twenty-fifth 

nr Cabtro 
Carr Robert L., machinist, dwl E s Columbia nr 

Twenty-eighth 
Carr Samuel, peddler, dwl S s Ash nr Lagnna 
Carr Stephen, laborer with John W. Kelly 
Carr Thomas, calker, dwl 631 Green 
Cair Thomas, laborer, dwl N s Francisco nr Kearny 
Carr Thomas, laborer with Cal. P. R. R. Co., dwl 

N W cor Berry and Third 
Carr Thomas S., clerk Carmen Island Salt Co., dwl 

112 Natoma 
Carr Thomas W., assorter with Charles Harley & 
Co., dwl 114 Sacramento 



Carr W. A., carpenter H. C. Lengue, 128 Koamy 
Carr William, salesman, 204 Sansom, dwl < 15 Bush, 

rear 
Carr William B., contractor, dwl NW cor Valencia 

and Twenty -fifth 
Carr — see Kair 
Carraher James, foreman Dexter Stables, dwl 225 

Bush 
Carraii 3eam.,(Carrav & Barnty) dwl 1223 Mission 
Carran Joseph, butcher, dwl 1235 Mission 
Carrau Laurence Madame, furnished rooms, 540 

Washington 
Carrau & Baraty, (.Jean Carrau and Francis Ba- 

raty ) butchers, Clay Street Jlarket 
Carren Peter, engineer P. M. S. S. Montana 
Carrere Adolph, clerk with Henry Schroder & Co., 

dwl 634 Vallejo 
Carrere Emilio, clerk with Charles Baker, dwl 338 

Munlgomery 
Carrere J. Arrouy, real estate,dwl 917 Jackson,rear 
Carrick Daniel, second engineer steamer Monterey, 

dwl SW cor Dora and HiirriBOn 
Carrick Frederick R., (Bishop, tShermnn & C.) 

dwl 608 Market 
Carrick George N., bookkeeper S. F. & P. Sugar 

Co. , dwl 1 306 Montgomery 
Carrick James R., milkman, 199 Stevenson 
Carrick John, lather, dwl 312 Clementina 
Carrick Richard, fireman stmr Santa Cruz, dwl 340 

Shipley 
Carriere G. H., dwl 1024 Powell 
Carrigan Andrew, salesman with Conroy & O'Con- 
nor 
Carrigan Edward, painter, dwl 1221 Union 
Carrigan John, painter, dwl 27 Hunt 
Carrigan Mai-y, (widov^') dressmaker, dwl 1221 

Union 
Carrigan Patrick, hostler City Stables,bds333Bi;8n 
Carrigan Patrick, shoemaker with Buckingham ii. 

Hecht, dwl 73 Natoma 
Carrigan Peter, boilermaker Vulcan Iron Works, 
dwl Teliama nr Twenty-eighth Bernal Hights 
Carrigan Peter, laborer P. M. S. S. Go's wharf 
Carrigan Thomas, hostler, dwl S s Point Lobos Av 

15 miles from toll gate 
Carrigan Tiiomas, laborer with Murray & Noble, 

dwl old San Jose road nr Thirtieth 
Carrigg Henry T., pressman with Edward Bosqui & 

Co., dwl 32 Tehama 
Carrignon Adolph, clerk with M. Keller & Co. , dwl 

13 O'Farrell 
CarriLrnon Narcisse, clerk with M. Keller &. Co., dwl 

SE cor Bush & Dupont 
Carrington Jane, (widow) dwl 836 Sutter 

Carroll Miss, milliner, 44^ Sixth 

CarrnU Anna G. Miss, milliner and millinery, 24 

Kearny, dwl NW cor Pacific and Webster 
Carroll Anne Mrs , dwl 49 Jessie 
CARROLL. BRAINARD & CO., (Richard T. 
Carroll, Richard Brainard- and William. B. 
Ca-rollj importers and wholesale wines aud 
liquors, 305 and 307 Front 
Carroll Charles, laborer with Cutting & Co., dwl 50 

Natoma 
Carroll Charles, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Carroll Daniel, clerk, dwl cor Turk and Fillmore 
Carroll Daniel, molder Risdon Iron Works, dwl 37 

Minna 
Carroll David, wagon, 717 Brannan 
Carroll Dora, (widow) lodgings, 129 Third 
Carroll Edward, cartman, cor Natoma and Eighth 
Carroll Edward, laborer, dwl 538 Howard 
Carroll Francis, bookkeeper, dwl 318 Pacific 
Carroll George, mariner, dwl 32 Steuart 
Carroll Henry, hackman, cor Kearny and Washing- 
ton, dwl 1625 Powell 
Carroll James, cook Golden Age Hotel, 127 Pacific 
Carroll James, cutter U. W. M. B. & S. Co., dwl 
S 8 Stevenson bet Sixth and Seventh 



THE PEOPLES INSUBAWCE CO, a growing Company. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712. 714 and 716 Kearny Street. Furnishing Goods. 



SAN FRANCISCO [C] DIRECTORY. 



147 



Carroll James, fiist mate North Pac. Trans. Go's 

S. S. Ajax, dwl Folsom Street Wharf 
Cairoll Jatues, first, mate steamer California, N P 

T. Co., dwl 118 Sairaiiieiito 
Canoll James, laborer with Savage & Co., dwl :}35 

Kitch, rear 
Carroll James, porter, dwl SE cor Fell and Webster 
Carroll James, salesinan, dwl 4-_>l Powell 
Carroll James, teamster with R. & J. iMorton 
Caridll James, fS. F. Laundry Association) dwl 

l"-il 1 Turk 
Carroll Jjimes B., boilermaker Vulcan Iron Works 
Carroll James E., (Ueathjidd, Bogel &• Co.) dwl 

437 Eddy 
Carroll James L., manager with Taaffe &, Co., 9 

Jloutgomery 
Carroll John, blacksmith N. B. & M. R. R , dwl 

cor Miller Place and Folsonj 
Carroll John, bootmaker U. W. M. B. & S. Co., dwl 

S 8 Stevenson bet Sixth and Seventh 
Carroll .John, drayman with Cutting & Co., dwl 210 

Pacific 
Carroll John, filecutter with California File Manu- 

f.ictnring Co., dwl 18 Boardman Place 
Carroll John, laborer, dwl N s Bnsli nr Scott 
Canoll John, laborer with John W. Kelly 
Carroll John, lamplighter S. F. Gas Co., dwl 509 

Howard, rear 
Carroll John, miner, dwl E s Gilbert bet Bryant and 

Brannan 
Carroll John, raolder Pacific Iron Works, dwl 232 

Stevenson 
Carroll John, newsdealer, dwl 439 Bush 
Carroll John, plumber Plumbers' Association 
Carroll John, poultry. Metropolitan Market, dwl 211 

Stevenson 
Carroll Jolm, real estate, office 307 Front, dwl 437 

Eddy 
Carroll John, shoemaker, dwl 2.33 Jessie 
Cairoll John, wood and coal, SW cor Folsom and 

Eleventh 
Carroll John, ^Carroll Sf McAranj dwl SE cor 

Market and Spear 
Carroll John C, proprietor Eureka Bakery, 72rir.st 
Carroll John F., barkeeper, 236 Montgomery, dwl 

02I5 Tehama 
Carroll John F., driver steamer No. 5, S. F. F. D 

dwl 1219 Stockton 
Cari'oll John J., porter U. S. Medical Department, 

dwl 11.5 Fnst 
Carroll M.. carpenter, dwl 424 Sansom 
Carroll Martin, drayman with Brittan, Holbrook &, 
Co., dwl N 8 Liberty bet Guerrero and Dolores 
Carroll Mary, (widow) dwl 525 Stevenson 
Carroll Matthew, driver N. B. <fc M. R. R., dwl 302 

Fourth 
Carroll Michael, boots and shoes, 646 Commercial, 

dwl 2 Varenne 
Carroll Michael, laborer, dwl cor Taylor and Bnch 
Carroll Michael, master mariner, dwl 104 Francitco 
Carroll Michael, news stuud, Russ House 
Carroll Michael, quarantine boatman, dwl Ns Fran- 
cisco bet Tavlor and Mason 
'Carroll Michael 'l., stonecutter, dwl 6 Auburn 
Carroll Oliver C, street contractor, dwl 632 Fell 
Carroll Owen, machinist Union Iron works, dwl 

127 Dora 
Carroll Patrick, blacksmith City R. R., dwl 564 

Valencia 
Carroll Patrick, bookkeeper, dwl 564 Tehama 
Carroll Patrick, laborer, dwl 107 Chambers 
Carroll Patrick, laborer, dwl 421 Bush 
Carroll Patrick, laborer, dwl Filbert nr Pierce 
Carroll Patrick, laborer, dwl NW cor Greenwich 

and Montgomery 
Carroll Patrick, laborer with Hancock & Kelso 
Carroll Patrick, longshoreman, dwl 323 Clementina 
CarroU Patrick, porter Mission and Pacific Wool- 
en Mills, dwl 157 Minna 



Can-oil Patrick, stonecutter with Larseneur & 

Sheerin, dwl E s Lyon nr Bush 
Carroll Patrick, watchman with Swan, Dunbar & 

Co., dwl 308 Heale 
Carroll Patrick, {Carroll & Bra. J dwl 268 Minna 
Carroll Patrick Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 548 Tehama 
Carroll Peter, barkeeper, 621 Merchant 
Carroll Peter, plumber Plumbers' Association 
Carroll Richard, groceries and liquors, SW cor 

Harrison and Garden 
Carroll Richard, laborer, dwl 214 Broadway 
Carroll Richard T., (Carroll, Brainard & Co j 
dwl 724 Turk • '^ 

Carroll R. M., teacher dancing, dwl 518 Lombard 
Carroll Thomas, laborer with Locke & Montatrue 
1 1 4 Battery ^ ' 

Carroll Thomas, laborer with S. V. Water Co 
Carroll Thomas, peddler, dwl 160 Minna 
Carroll Thomas, shoemaker with Moore & Miirphv 

dwl 421 Stevenson 
Carroll Thomas, (Carroll Sf Bro.J dwl 268 Minna 
Carroll Thomas, (Carroll & Ryan) dwl 41 Third 
Carroll Thomas P.. cleik auditing dept. Wells 

Fargo & Co., dwl 518 Lombard 
Carroll William, dwl 514 Dnpont 
Carroll William, clerk, dwl 421 Powell 
Carroll William, coachman with Frank G. Ed- 
wards 
Carroll William, guard States Prison, dwl 72 First 
Carroll William, driver, dwl 323^ Third 
Carroll William, housemover, dwl 335 Broadway 
Carroll William, jobwagon, 415 Kearny 
Carroll William, second officer P. M. S S Co 
Carroll William B., (Carroll, Brainard & Co j 

dwl 437 Eddy 
Carroll William V., market. S s Sixteenth nr Mis- 

si(m, dwl Goldman I'lace 
Carroll & Biother, (Patrick and Thomas Carroll) 
groceries and liquors, NE cor Third and Minna 
Carroll & McAran, (John Carroll and James Mc- 
Aran) liquor saloon, SE cor Market and Spear 
Carroll »i. Ryan, (Thomas Carroll and Lawrence 
J. Ryan) liquor saloon, NW cor Third and 
Jessie 
Carron Dennis, cook What Cheer Restaurant 
Carron Niel M., varnisher with N. P. Cole &, Co., 

dwl cor Folsom and Fremont 
Carronn Patrick, porter Pacific Woolen Mills, dwl 

157 Minna 
Carruthers George, carpenter and builder, Clara 

Lane, dwl E s Yerba Buena nr Clay 
Carruthers John, driver with Marden & Myrick 

dwl E s Yerba Buena nr Clay 
Carry Thomas, fireman North Pac. Trans. Go's S. S. 

C.ilifornia 
Carson Bernard, engraver with J. W. Tucker &, 

Co., dwl 238 Jessie 
Carson Charles, engineer P. M. S. S. Sacramento 
Carson Charles, seaman, dwl 30| Zoe 
Carson Frederick, grocer, dwl 50? Bush 
Carson George, flourpacker with E. Kennedy, dwl 

1208 Powell 
Carson Henry W., varnisher with N. P. Cole & 

Co., dwl 261 i Jessie 
Carson Hugh, laborer with Knapp & Meacham, 

dwl cor Twenty-second and Mission 
Carson James G., notary public, office 9 Court 

Block, 636 Clay, dwl 507 Bryant 
Carson John, clerk with Hans Henry Doscher, dwl 

SE cor Seventh and Brannan 
Carson John, Junction House, San Jose Road op- 
posite Industrial School 
Carson John B., clerk with Pringle & Pringle, 

dwl 238 Jessie 
Carson John K., special policeman, dwl 71 Tehama 
Carson Louisa Miss, cloak maker, dwl 340 Fifth 
Carson Lucy Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 3lli Zoe 
Carson Martha, (widow) dwl 919 Stockton 
Carson Matthias N., carpenter, dwl 1520 Broadway 



JONES, PULLMAN & CO., 116 Sansom Street. Ladies' and ChUdren's Woolen Goods. 



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YERBA. SANTA gives immediate and permanent reliei in Dyspepsia. 



148 



SAN FRANCISCO [C] DIRECTORY. 



Cai-sou Theodore, messenger P. IM. S. S. America 
Carson Williniii, niacliinist Vulcan Iron Works, 

dwl IS First 
Carson William, plasterer, dwl 660 Howard 
Carson William, <£>o/iee/- <fc 6'.y res Eureka, Hum- 
boldt County 
Carson William O., clerk with TitcoQib & Wil- 
li .ms, dwl 623 Ellis 
Carss Uobert, btitelier, dwl 51 Louisa 
Carsten Fred., groceries and liquors, 500 Bush, dwl 

6U7 Bush 
Carsten Henry, laborer, dwl 617 Davis 
Carsiens CliaVles, clerk with J. Hasshagen, 326 

J ackson 
Carstens Hagenah, mariner, dwl 132 Steuart 
Carstens Frederick, porier wirli J. W. H. Campbell, 

dwl N 8 Union bet Sausouiand Battery 
Carstens Frederick, fLundt & V.J dwl NE cor 

Second and Stevenson 
Carstensen Julius, clerk witli John Horstmann, dwl 

NW cor Bush and Powell 
Carstensen Louis, barkeeper, SE cor Steuart and 

Folsom 
Carstensen Peter, workman California Sugar Re- 

tinery, SW cor Bryant and Eighth 
Carswell George \\ ., ( Carswell & Williams) Avil 

31 7 i Fell 
Carswell John D., compositor with Frank Eastman, 

res Brooklyn 
Carswell &, Williams, (Georpre W. Camn-ell and 

David WilliamsJ draymen, 20Lt California 
Carten James, deckhand steamer Kalorama, Wash- 
ington St. Wharf 
Carter Abram, bookkeeper S. F. Gas Company, dwl 

445 IJivant 
Carter Anna Mrs., furnished rooms, 15 Suttter 
Carter Benuird B., bakery, NE cor Van Ness Av 

and Hayes 
Carter C. Miss, assistant teacher F'ourth Street 

Primary scliool, dwl 320 Ellis 
Carter Cluirles, phisierer, office 326 Mon