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Full text of "The San Francisco directory for the year .."

./'.^vi 






V'.. '/ '•' 



HEFEfi^NCE 



DEPARTMENT 




Accession 



917.Qit <^9?7— 



1906 



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY 



FORM 3427 5000 10-48 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

San Francisco Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/sanfranciscodire1874lang 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ill 



Connecticut Mutual 



INSURANCE COMPANY. 



SDRPLUS (at 4 per cent.) over - - $4,000,000 
LOSSES paid to date, - - - - $18,000,000 

Ratio of Expense of Management to Receipts, - - - 7.62 



THIS COMPANY HAS HAD 

AN EXPERIENCE OF NEARLY 28 YEARS. 



IT IS STRONG! 

ECONOMICALLY MANAGED! 

Pays its Losses promptly, and is one of the most Safely Managed 
Life Insurance Companies in the "World. 



JAMES B. ROBSHTS, 

315 CALIFORNIA. STREET, 

GENERAL AGENT FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 



'iV SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PACIFIC MAIL^STEAMSHIP CO, 

NEW YORK LINE, VIA PANAMA. 

steamships Henry Ohauncey, Rising Star, Montana, Arizona, Nevada 

Constitution (Side- wheel, 3,000 Tons each) ; COLIMA, Aeapulco, 

Colon, GRANADA, Costa Pica, Iron Screws, 2,500 tons each; 

Leave New Yori even m day; leaye San Francisco every Utli day, at 12 o'cM Noon. 

All Steamers call at Mazatlan, Manzanillo, and Aeapulco. First steamer 

Of the month will call at the following Central American Ports • 

San Jose de Guatemala, Acajutla, and Punta Arenas 



Steamers OEIZABA, SENATOR, PACIFIC and CALIFORNIA, 

Leave as advertised in Daily Papers. 

California Carries Freight, Cattle and Combustibles only. 

Central American and Mexican Line. 

steamers HONDURAS, SALYADOR, WINCHESTER (Iron Screws, 2,000 Tons each) • 
ST. LOUIS, ANCON f Side- wheel, 2,500 each) ; leave Panama 10th, 20th and 30th for 
Aeapulco and Intermediate Ports. Leare Aeapulco for Panama 9th, 19th and 30th. 

SteameK CHINA, COLORADO, SEEAT BEPDBLIC, JAPAN. ALASKA 

Leave S.n --'- --^ -.y^J-h, «U^^-*=^ ^ ' kelr""^' -"-«"« 

8HANCHAE, via HIOCO and NAGASAKI. 

SHANGHAE^RANCH. 

Steamers GOLDEN AGE, OREGONIAN, NEW YORK and 
COSTA RICA (Side-wheel, 2,600 Tons), 
Leave Yokohama for Shanghae, via Inland Sea of Japan, calling at Hioeo and Nfl<,«c«t,- 
four times a month, and for Hagodate on the 1st of every month ^ 

For Freight or Passage, apply at the Office of the Company, in San Francisco, 

Corner Sacramento and I^eidesdorff Streets. 

EDWARD HIGGINS, Agent. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, 



PACIFIC R OLLING MILL GO. 

CAPITAL STOCB:, - $1,000,000. 



Established for the manufacture of Railroad and Merchant Ibok. Every variety of 
Shafting, including all sizes of Steamboat Shafts, Cranks, Pistons, Connecting 
Rods, Etc. Car and Locomotitb Axles and Frames, and Hammered Iron of 
every description and size. 

3 and 5 FRONT STREET, - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Orders afllressei to PACIHC ROLLING MILL CO, P. 0. Boi 2032, will laye iiietliate attention. 

HIGHEST PBUJE PAID FOR SCRAP IRON. 

PRESIDE J^T, -..--. WM. ALVORD, 

riCE-PRESTDEJ^T, - - - - L. B BEJ^CHLEY, 

SVPERIXTEKBEKT, - - - - B. P. BRVJ^ER, 

SECRETARY, ----- SAM'L I. C. SWEZEY. 



FACIFIG on. AND LEAD WORKS. 



CiPITAL STOCK. - - $600,000. 



Established for the manufacture of Linseed, Castor and other Oils, and of White 
Lead, Zinc and other Paints. "Works are now in operation, and prepared to furnish Oils 
of first quality, and quantity sufficient for the supply of the Pacific Coast. Also, Oil 
Cakes and Meal in quantities required. 

Highest price paid for Flax Seed and Castor Beans, delivered at the Company's 
"Works, King Street, near Third. 

0rFICE--3 & 5 FRONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Orders addressed to "Pacific Oil and Lead Works," P. O. Box 1443, will have 
immediate attention. 

President, _ _ . - - JOHN BENSLEYf 

Vice-President, . . - - H. O. MILLS, 

Manager, L. B. BENCHLEY, 

Secretary, - . _ - - SAM'L I. C. 8WEZEY. 



Vlll SN FRANCISCO DIRECTOKY, 



Colorado Steam Navigation Co, 




FOU GUAYMAS AND LA PAZ. 



Regular Steamship Line to Mexican Ports, 

Sailing Every Twenty Days. 

< » « » » 

FREIGHT AT REDUCED RATES. 



THE FAVORITE STEAMERS, 

MONTANA, - - - A. N. McDoDnough, Captain, 
NEWBERN, - - - - Wm. Metzger, Captain. 



apply to **^^* "* BEDUCED BATES, or Passagre, haTing superior accommodations, 

EDWARD NORTON, Agent, 

610 FKOISTT STREET, S. E. 



Agencies : Yuma and Ehrenberg, - - A. T. 
Guaymas and La Paz, - - Mexico. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. IX 



WELLS, TARGO & CO. 

Exchange, Banking 



.A-KriDI- 



EXPRESS COMPANY. 

CAPITAL, - - $5,000,000 



PRINCIPAL OFFICES: 

No. 65 Broadway, - - - - New York 

N. W, corner California and Montgomery Streets, San Francisco 



E2:FZISSS ZiZlTSS 



TO ALL PARTS OF CALIFORNIA, NEVADA, tFTAH, WYOMING, COLORADO, 
MONTANA, NEBRASKA, KANSAS, OREGON, WASHINGTON AND IDAHO 
TERRITORIES, BRITISH COLUMBIA, LOWER CALIFORNIA, AND MEX- 
ICAN PORTS, NEW YORK, ATLANTIC STATES, AND EUROPE. 



BILLS OF EXCHANGE AND TELEGEAPH TEANSFEES 

On New York, Boston and Philadelphia, payable in the principal cities of the United States 

and Canada. Also, Bills on London, Dublin and Paris. Letters of Credit 

issued on our New York House, exchangeable for Circular 

Letters, payable in all parts of Europe. 



COLLECTIONS AND COMMISSIONS 

Of all kinds executed, and General Express Business attended to promptly in all parts of the 
United States, Europe and Canada. Orders for Passage furnished from Queens- 
town, London, Liverpool, Hamburg and Havre to New York. Al^o 
from New York to San Francisco— Overland or by Steamer. 

LLOYD TEVIS, President. 
■W. G. FARGO, Vice-President. 
JAMES HERON, Secretary. 
H. S. KING, Treasurer. 
J. J. VALENTINE, Gen'l Supt 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



«i- T 13: E3 — 



Bank of California 

SA.ISr FRA-NCISCO. 



CAS*JTA% * * ♦Sj©©0^®(0©# 



W. C. RALSTON, - - _ . President. 
THOMAS BROWX, - - - - Cashier. 

In New York, Messrs. LEES & WALLER, 

In Boston, TREMONT NATIONAL BANK. 

In London, .... ORIENTAL BANK CORPORATION 



The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, Gold Hill, "White Pine, and 

Correspondents at all the principal Mining Districts and 

Interior To"wns of the Pacific Coast, 



LETTERS OF CREDIT ISSUED, 

Available for the purchase of Merchandise throughout the United States, Europe, 
India, China, Japan, and Australia. 



EXCHANGE FOR SALE ON THE ATLANTIC CITIES. 



LONDON, LEIPSIC, 

DUBLIN, FRANKFORT-ON-THE-MAIN, 

PARIS, AUCKLAND, 

ST. PETERSBURG, MELBOURNE, 

AMSTERDAM, YOKOHAMA, 

HAMBURG, SHANGHAE, 

BREMEN, HONGKONG, 

VIENNA, SYDNEY. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XI 



London and San Francisoo Bank, Limited 

{Incorporated under the Joint Stock Companies^ Acts of 1863 and 1867 — Great Britain)^ 
with which has been consolidated the business of 

PARROTT & CO , BANKERS, SAN FRANCISCO. 



CAFITiiLi, 



$5,000,000, GOZ.D, 



Of which $3,000,000 is fully paid up. 



RESERVE FUND, 



$500,000, GOLD 



HEAD OFFICE, 22 O LD BROAD S TREET, - LONDON. 

FREDERICK RODEWALD, London, Chairman. 

E. H. GREEN (late of Russell & Sturgis, Manila), London, Deputy Chairman. 
H. L. BISCHOFFSHEIM (of Bischoffsheim & Goldschmidt) , London. 
J. F. FLEMMICH (of Fred. Hnth & Co.), London. 
JULIUS MAY (late of San Francisco), Frankfort-on-the-Main. 
J. S. MORGAN (of J. S. Morgan & Co), London. 

JOHN PARROTT (of the late firm of Parrott Co., Bankers), San Francisco. 
ROBERT RYRIE (of Gladstone, Ewart & Co.), London. 
BARON H. de STERN (of Stern Brothers). London. 

RUDOPH SULZBACH (of Sulsbach Brothers), Frankfort-on-the-Main. 
Manager, - R. D. PEEBLES. Secretary, - JAMES M. STREETEN. 

London Bankers— Bank of England ; London Joint Stock Bank. 



San Francisco Branch, 

MII.TON S. L-ATHAM, President. 
CAMIL.O MARTHV, Ass't Managfer. 



California Street. 

Cashier, ARTHUR SCRIVENER. 
Aci'ouniant, ALFRED aANIVIftjTER. 



This Bank is prepared to grant Letters of Ckedit available in any part of the world ; to transact every description 
of Banking and Exchange Business, and to negotiate Californian and other American Securities 

in Europe. 
San Francisco, Cal., March, 1874. MILTON S. LATHAM, President. 

AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS. 

The following are Agents and Correspondents, on any of whom, as also on the Head Office of the Bank 
Letters of Credit will be granted, and Drafts drawn : ' 



London— London Joint Stock Bank; Bischoffshelm & 
Goldschmidt; Friihling & CJoschen ; Fred. Huth <fe 
Co.; J. S. Morsfan & Co.; Stern Brothers ; Imperial 
Bank, Limited. 

New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. 

Boston— Third National Bank. 

Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. 

Paris— Bischotfsheim, Goldschmidt & Co.; A. J. Stern 
& Co. : Drexel, Harjes & Co. 

Bi>rlin— Deutsche Bank. 

Vienna— Schoeller & Co. 

Frankfort-on-the-Main— Gebrflder Sulzbach ; Bank of 
Saxe Moiningen. 

HamburK— John Berenberg. Gossler & Co. 

Dresden— Robert Thode & Co. 

Kome— Plowden Cholmeley & Co. 

Amsterdam— La Banque de Credit et de DSpfit des 
Pays-Bas. 

Antwerp— Nottebohm Brothers. 

Naples and Florence— Anglo-Italian Bank. 

Genoa— Henry Dapples. 

Valparaiso and Lima— Fred. Huth, Griining <ft Co. 

China and Japan— Hongkong and Shanghai Banking 
Corporation ; Comptoir d'Escompte de Paris ; Deut- 
sche Bank. 

Manila— Russell & Sturgis. 

Elver Plate— Mercantile Bank of the Kiver Plate, 
Limited. 



Australia and New Zealand— Union Bank of Aus- 
tralia ; Bank of New South Wales : Victoria, New 
South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tas- 
mania, New Zealand. 

Ireland— Provincial Bank of Ireland : Armagh, Ath- 
lone, Belfast, Ballina, Eanbridge, Ballymena, Ban- 
don, Ballyshannon, Cork, Cloiimel. Coleraine, Cavan, 
Cootehill, Carrick on Suir, Carrick on Shannon, Clog- 
heen, Dungarven, Dungannon, Drogheda, Ennis- 
killen, Enuiscorthy, Ennis, Fermoy, Galwav, Kil- 
kenny, Kilrush, Limerick, Londonderry, Monaghan, 
Mallow, Newry, Nenagh, Newcastle (Co. Limerick), 
Omagh, Parsonstown, Sligo, Strabane, Skibbereen, 
Iralee, Templemore, Wexford, Waterford, YoughaL 

The nndermeutioned are Correspondents 
ot the Bank : 

English Bank of Bio de Janeiro, Limited, Eio de 

Janeiro. 
Alzuyeta Brothers, Acapulco, Mexico. 
Southern Bank, New Orleans. 
Geo. C. Smith & Bro., Chicago. 
Gilmore, Dunlap & Co., Cincinnati. 
Lucas Bank, St. Louis. 



xn 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



THE 



^^lo ' (ihliio^^ih^ S^i\k 



(LIMITED). 



London Office, 

San Francisco Office, 



3 Angel Comrt. 
412 California Street. 



Authorized Capital Stock, - - $6,000,000 

Subscribed, ------ 3,000,000 

Paid in, - 1,500,000 

Remainder subject to call. 



DIRECTORS IN LONDON: 



Hon. HUGH MeCULLOCH, 
WM. F. SCHOLFIELD, 



BEFBE5 D. SASSOON, 
ISAAC SELlGMAJr, 



JULIUS SINGTOJI, 
JOSEPH SEBAG. 



CORRESPONDENTS AND AGENTS: 



J. & W. SELIGMAN & CO., 
SELIGMAN, HELLMAN & CO., 
MASSACHUSETTS NATIONAL BANK, 
SELIGMAN, FRERES & CIE, 
SELIGMAN & STETTHEIMER, 
GEBRUDJER MEIER, - - - . 



NEW YORK. 

NEW ORLEANS. 

BOSTON. 

PARIS. 

FRANKFORT. 

BERLIN. 



CHINA AND JAPAN: 

HON&KONG AND SHANGHAE BANKINQ COEPORATION. 

EAST INDIES: 

CHARTEED MERCANTILE BANK OF INDIA, LONDON AND CHINA. 



BILLS OF EXCHANGE, COMMEKCIAL and TRAVELEES' LETTERS OP 
CREDIT issued on the most favorable terms, for use in the United States, British 
Possessions, South and Central America, Europe, China and Japan. 



MANAGERS IN SAN FRANCISCO: 

KICHABD G. SNEATH. IGNATZ STEINHART. 



ADVERTISI]*G DEPARTMENT. XIU 



THE Um OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, 

iNCORPORATEJy BT ROYAL CHARTER, 

Sontheast Corner California and Sansom Streets. 
PAID UP CAPITAL, - - $1,490,000 

In $14,900 Shares, of $100 Each, 

WITH POWER TO INCREASE TO $10,000,000. 

London Office, 5 East India Avenue, Leadenhall Street 

O H -A_ I 1=1. ilS/C .A- 3sr, 
T. W. L. MACKEAN, London (Late of the firm of Turner & Co., China) j 

DEPUTY CHAIRMAN, 
ROBERT GILLESPIE, Esq., Director of Banli of Montreal, London j 
COUKT OF DIRECTORS IN LONDON: 

James Andbrbon, Esq. (Messrs. Anderson, Anderson & Co.); 

Eden Colyilb, Esq. (Director of the Hudson's Bay Company) ; 

H D Habbison, Esq. (Messrs. Falkner, Bell & Co., San Francisco) ; 

Sib John Kose, Babt., K. C. M. G. (Messrs. Morton, Kose & Co., London). 

PORTLAND, OREGON ; VICTORIA AND CARIBOO, 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



.^.OEKrTS, 



■NToTiT- Vnrlc Agency Bank of Montreal 

cicada Bank of Montreal 

Mexico and Soutli America... London Bank of Mexico & South America 
China and Japan... Oriental Bank Corporation and Chartered Bank of 

India, Australia and China. , . « . . _ , . 

Australia and New Zealand... Bank of Australasia; Commercial Banking 

Company of Sydney, and Bank of New Zealand. . . _ . , 

England.. .National Provincial Bank of England; Bank of Liverpool; 

North and South "Wales Bank. ^ .^. ^ ^ . ^ . t^ i 

cior^+inTid British Linen Company's Bank. 

l-ew.. ::::::':.:.:.:. Bankofireiand. 



Deposits received on Curi^nt Account, subject to Check, or on Special Deposit. 
Exchange sold in sums of £l and upwards on the Agencies of the Bank of Ireland and 
British Linen Company. . „ . . , ^ , 

Exchange, also, sold on London, New York and Canada, and on Victoria, British Columbia, 

and Portland, Oregon. r. , . . » . v ■ j -nt 

Commercial Credits granted on Europe, China, Japan, South Amenca, Australia and New 

Zealand. 
Discount approved Paper and make Advances on Collateral Securities. 
Collect Bills and transact a General Banking Business. 

W. H. TILLINGHAST, Manager. 



XIV 



SAN PRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Incorporated in Genera, Switzerland, January 20th, 1878. 



HEAD OFFICE IN GENEVA. 



tmOl BRI 



ONE QUARTER PAID UP. 



President, - - . HENRY HENTSCH, 

3DII?.ECTOItS : 

FRANCIS BERTON, ROBERT WATT. 



SAN FRANCISCO BRANCK 

Successor to Messes. HENTSCH & BEKTON, 



This Bank is prepared to grant Letters of Credit on Europe, and to transact every kind of 
Jianking, Mercantile and Exchange Business, and to negotiate American Securities in Europe. 

DEPOSITS RECEIVED. 



BILLS 


OF EXCHANGE ON 


New York, Berlin, 


Chanx-de-Fouda, 


liiverpool. 


Frankfort, 


Solotlinrn, 


Lioudon, 


Geneva, 


Lausanne, 


Paris, 


Zurick, 


Baden, 


Lyons, 


Basel, 


Ckur, 


Bordeaux, 


St. Gall, 


SkaflThansen, 


Marseille, 


Wintertkur, 


Fribourg, 


Brussels, 


Bern, 


Lncern, 


Hamlturjn^, 


Neuckatel, 


Aarau, 


Bellinzona, 


Locarno, 


liUierano, 
Blendrlsio. 



«n^^ni^®^1"^ OFFICE is annexed to the Bank. Assays of gold, silver, quartz ores 
and sulphurets. Keturns in coin or bars, at the option of the depositor. 
Advances made on bullion and ores. 

t>,r.?,"l* w'^ii^^'ii'''' ''^^ ^^ forwarded from any part of the country and returns made 
through Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks. 



Consul for Switzerland and Portugal, FRANCIS BERTON. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XV 



THOS. H. SELBY & CO. 

Nos. 116 and 118 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, 

« 

IlvlP'ODE=^TB"EaS OIF" 






I 



CA.ST STEEL, 



AND ALL KINDS OF 



AND MANTJFACTUKEKS AT THE 



Cor, of Howard and First Sts.^ San Francisco. 



OF 



SHEET LEAD, DROP SHOT, ETC. 

ALSO, PROPKIETOES OP THE 

SELBY LEAD AND SILVER SMELTING WORKS, 



SJ^HT nt-A-ITCISCO. 



€W&Bl 



PUROHA.SED. 



MAIN OFriCE, 116 and 118 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



XVI SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 



GEOKGE HOWES. j^BEZ HOWES. 

George Howes & Co. 




SHIPPING AND COMMISSION 

MERCHANTS, 

NO. 302 CALIFOENIA STEEET, 

s^isr FR^isroisco. 



i 



NO. Ill WALL STREET, - NEW YORK. 



DISPATCH Vm CLIPm SHIPS 



I 



AGENTS FOR SUTTON & GO'S 
CLIPPER SHIPS from New York to San Francisco. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XVll 



PACIFIC CORDAGE CO 



This Company has constantly on hand a large assortment of 

^WHALE LINES, 

STEAM PACKING YARN, 

And are prepared to fill orders for 

I?, O IP E , 



Of all sizes and lengths. 



The Works of the Company are so situated that its Fabrics can he 
shipped direct hy Bail or Water to any part of the State 
when so desired by purchasers. 

J. D. FAHWELZi, Agent, 

116 FROISTT STREET, 8. F. 



XVUl 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



UNION INSURANCE CO. 



OF SAN FRANCISCO. 



G^PIT^L, - - «750,000,GOLD 



THE CALIFORNIA LLOYDS') 

ESTABLISHED IN 1861, 



CASH CAPITAL, 
ASSETS EXCEED, 



S75O,000, GOLD 
Sl,000,000, COIN. 



Fair Rates, Prompt Settlement of Losses, Solid Security. 



X>IH.E3C:JTf(3H s 



J. Mora Moss, 
Moses Heller, 
M. J. O'Connor,' 
Daniel Meyer, 
Antoine Borel, 
Joseph Seller, 
I. Lawrence Pool, 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



Nicholas Luning, 
G. O'Hara Taaffe, 
M. D. Sweeny, 
Gustave Touchard, 
Geo. C. Hickox, 
J. H. Baird, 
James Otis, 
N. G. Kittle, 



W. W. Montague, 
Adam Grant, 
Charles Kohler, 
W. C. Ralston, 
A. Weill, 
Jas. Moffitt, 
Jabez Howes, 
N. J. T. Dana, 



Edward Cadwalader, 



J. G. Kittle, 



SACRABIENTO, 

J. F. Houghton, 

MARYSVUiliE, 

L. Cunningham. 
NEW^ YORK, 

Benjamin Brewster, 



John Parrott, 

J. Baum, 

Jos. Brandenstein, '^ 

G. Brignardello, 

T. Lemmen Meyer, 

T. E. Lindenberger, 

I. Steinhart. 



L. A. Booth. 



James Phelan. 



CHARLES D. HAVEN, Secretary. 
GEORGE T. BOHEN, Surveyor. 



GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President, 
N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

JAS. D. BAIUEY, General Agent. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XIX 



THE PACIFIC IRON ^ATORKS. 




est.a.b3l.isi3:eid iisr isso. 

EMBRACING 

Foundry, Machme, Boiler, Forging and Smithing, 

Pattern and Wood Work Departments, Drawing: and Library Rooms, Etc. 



GEORGE W. FOGG, 



Superintendent . 

ALBERT P. BRAYTON. 



IRA P. RANKIN. . . 

These works have now been in successful operation for the past twenty-four years, from a comparatively sm^l 
beginning in the year 1850, its increasing patronage has each year demanded larger facilities, until our establishment, 
in all its appointments, will compare favorably with that of any similar one in the country. . „ , , 

Our patterns, in variety and extent, are unsurpassed ; embracing the latest improvernents in all classes of ma- 
chinerv adapted to use on this coast. Our several departments are well equipped with skillful workmen, and efficient 
tools • enabling us to execute all orders intrusted to us promptly, and in the most workmanlike manner. W ith ample 
facilities for doing work, as also for procuring our supplies from first hands we are enabled to give our customers first- 
class machinery at prices frequently paid for inferior work. The most skillful designing and engineering talent, apply- 
ing to the various branches of mechanical work, constantly al the service of our customers. 

Orders for all classes of Machinery Casting, or Boiler work, promptly executed at the most rea.sonable rates. 

Particular attention given to Steamboat and Steamship Work. Minmg and Hoisting Machmery of the most 
approved construction. 

Agency of the Celebrated Prall Steam Pump— the cheapest and best 

Power Pump in use. Engines and Boilei s of superior construction constantly on hand. 

PIRST AND FREMONT STREETS, 

Between Mission and Howard, SAN FRANCISCO. 



XX 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Bank of British NortI) America 

ESTABLISHED IN 1836. 

INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER. 

PAID UP CAPITAL, - ^1,000,000. 



laiHJ^^ID OP^IF^IOE, 



124 BISHOPSGATE ST. (WITHIN), LONDON, ENGLAND. 

San Francisco Agency, 






COMMERCIAL CREDITS ISSUED 



For use in Europe, China, J.pan, the East Indies, South America and Australia; also, 
Circular Letters of Credit for Travelers, available in all parts of the world. 

,ni^7tT^ f * ?^'il',''^^''''^*"^^' P'^y^^l^ i° I^o°^oii a°<i elsewhere, bought and 
sold at current rates, also Telegraph Transfers. s ^ ai u 

'Yn.?^'^^^^^ ^^f^,^'' Scotland and Ireland, also on Canada, British Columbia, and New 
lork. Jiills collected and other Banking business transacted. 



A. McKIKLAY, 
A. S. FINNIE, 



Agents. 



JAMES OTIS. 



W. A. MACONDRAY. 



F. W. MACONDRAY. 



MACONDRAY & CO. 




IVIERCHANT©, 



AND IMPORTERS OF 

No. 206 SANSOM STREET, 

Agents for tlae Yang-Tze Insurance 
Association, Slianglaae, 

\HONGKONG LINE OF SAILING PACKETS. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXl 



J. C. MEERILL & CO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION 

AGENTS FOB 

REGULAR DISPATCH LINE HONOLULU PACKETS, 



AND 



Australian and American Mail Steamship Company, 

204 and 206 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

8AM FRAN©!®©©. 



WM. T. COLEMAN ^ CO. 

Commission and Shipping 



SAN raAXTOlSCO AND NB"W YORK. 



Receive Consignments from all quarters; 

Make Advances on Approved Shipments; 

Fill Orders for Staple Goods in all Markets; 

Effect Marine and Fire Insurances— Local and Foreign. 
Buy and SeU and Charter Vessels for all Trades. 



ALL INTERESTS INTRUSTED TO OUR CARE WILL HAVE OUR MOST 
FAITHFUL AND WATCHFUL ATTENTION. 



^^^^ SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

INCORPORATED JULY 23, 1857. 

OFFIOJE, NO. 619 CL^Y STREET, 

s.A.3sr i^i=^.A.nsroisoo. 

OI* !■ IODEH.S : 

E. W. BURR, President; CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier; 

A. H. RUTHERFORD, Auditor; BENJ. O. DEVOE, Surveyor. 

BOAwI^ID OF 33II?.EaXOE,S : 

BeS. g^SvOE, K TliSr- ^- ^TpTVT^Jpam-n i- M- SHOTWELL. 

ISAAC HYDE, ANNISMERMtL. H. L. KING™^^' E. F. NORTHAM. 



DEPOSITS EECEIYED FROM TWO AND ONE-HALF DOLLARS DP TO ANY AMOUNT. 

Dividends declared semi-annually—in January and July of each year. 



LOGAN & CO. 

No. 19 MoBtjonierf Street, 107 am! 109 Sitter Street, 



IMPORTERS AND DJEAZERS IN 



FANCY GOODS, 

BERIIW SEPHim WOOLS, 



EMBROIDERING FLOSS AND TWIST, 

And all other Articles for Needle Wort, at Wholesale and Retail. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. ■ XXlll 



SAN FRANCISCO 

OFFICE, 532 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Corner of Webb, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

PAID IN, $218,804.S 
Amount Deposits held, $5,430,1 32.^ 

OFrXOEIiS = 

President JAMES De FREMERY. 

Vice-President, ALBERT MILLER. 

C. ADOLPHE LO"W, CHARLES BAUM, 

GEORGE O. POTTER, WASHINGTON BARTLETT, 

CHARLES PACE, DENNIS J. OLIVER, 

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, Sen. 

Cashier and Secretary, - - - - LOVELL WHITE. 

Surveyor, - JOHN AKCHBALD. I Auditor, - THEODOKE LOESSEL. 

Accountant, - J. A. LANGSTKOTH. | Attorney, - HENEY C. CAMPBELL. 



McCAIN, FLOOD & McCLURE, 

IMPOKTERS AND JOBBERS OF 

FOREICIT and DOMESTIC 

DRY GOODS, 

Clothing, Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, 

HOSIERY, WHITE GOODS, BLANKETS, Etc. 

Between Front and Battery, SAN FRANCISCO. 



XXIV SAN F&ANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 



OFFICE, N. E. COfi. MONTGOMERY AND MARKET STS. 



The objects for which this Association is formed are, that by its operations the members thereof 

may be enabled to find a 

Secure and Profitable Investment for Small Savings, 

And may have an opportunity of obtaining from it the use of a moderate capital, on giving 
good and sufficient security for the use of the same. 

orncEnsr 

VicI-Pefs Wt ■ - "- "c D^Vr^f^)?^- I ?^^su«««. - - EDWARD MARTIN 

viut i^KJ-.sioiBfT, - C. 1». U. hULLlVAN. j Attokney, - - - RICHARD TOBIN. 

Any person can become a member of this Society on paying an entrance F.ie of TWO DOLLARS * 
«Gi5. r> -i 1. , » ^^"^ subscribing to the By-Laws. ' 

»- Deposits can be made of any sum from TWO DOLLARS AND FIFTY CENTS to any amount. 

I-OAJVS MADE ON SBCURITT OF REAL ESTATE WITHIN THE CITY AND COUNTT. 



FAR WELL & CO. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

Ship Chandlery, 



105 and 107 CALIFORNIA STREET, 



W. a. PAKWEU,, ^„_ „_ BAN«C»M. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXV 



MASOXTZC 



;^kvii:\^^ ki\d I<okr( Skr^k, 



GUARANTEED CAPITAL, 



$150,000. 



Office, No. 6 POST ST., MASONIC TEMPLE 



President, _ - - 

Vice-President and Cashier, - 



LEONIDAS E. PRATT. 
WM. H. CULVER. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS : 



LEONIDAS E. PKATT, 
M. E. ROBERTS, 
CALEB S. HOBBS, 
C. H. WETHERBEE, 



PETER DEAN, 
GEORGE ROBINS, 
FRANCIS SMITH, 
WM. H. CULVER, 
ERANK EASTMAN. 



Secretary, 



JOHN F. SNOW, 
HIRAM T. GRAVES, 
JONATHAN KITTREDGE, 
W. T. GARRATT, 

GEORGE ROBINS. 



Office Hours from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M. daily. Extra Hours on Saturday, from 7 to 9 P. M., for receiving 
Deposits only. Loans made on Real Estate and Collateral Securities at usual rates of interest. Oertm- 
cates of Deposit issued, transferable by indorsement. Remittances from the interior, through any of the 
usual channels, may be sent, the Bank not being accountable for their safe delivery. The signature ot 
the depositor should accompany his first deposit. A pass-book will be delivered to the agent by whom the 
deposit is made, or sent by mail if desired. Deposits received from One Dollar upwards. 



First Premrnm awarded wliereTBr exlMted— Fair ol Mecliaiiics' Jastitnte, 1865-8— State Fair, 1?68. 
ESTABLISHED, 1856. 



CHARLES BERNARD, 

MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 

FAMILY CHARTRES COFFEE 

ALWAYS ON HAND, 

AND SPICES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also. SALERATUS, CARBONATE OF SODA, CREAM OP TARTAR, 
and BAKING POWDER. 

KTo. 'TOT S-A.STS03M: ST]E1.E!ET, 

Corner of Gold, between Jackson and Pacific Streets, San Fbancisco, Cal. 



XXVI SAN TRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



JOHN SKINKEE, 

No. 108 BATTERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, 

SOLE AGENT EOK THE PACIFIC COAST FOE 

DUPONT'S CANNON, MUSKET, 

I 



Lake Superior and Pacific Fuse Company's 

HSTE'VEIi-F.A.ILIlSra- 






WINCHESTEE REPEATING ARMS CO'S 
RIFLKS^ GARBIl^SS^ MUSKBTS^ 

And Cartridges for same, as well as for all other Eifles and Pistols of 
American manufacture. 



E. MA AS, San Francisco. C. SAAS, Paris. 

C. (& E. KAAS c& CO. 

IMPORTERS OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

WOOLEHS m) TAILOBS' TBIMMIHaS 

616 SACRAMENTO STREET, ABOTE MONTGOMERI. 



J. SEOTJFE. L. H. SWEENEY. J. E. EUGGLES. 

SROUFE, SWEENEY & CO. 



liit@® Mi)f®toffiti 



And WHOLESALE DEALERS IN PROVISIONS, 

NO. 406 FRONT STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXVll 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE CO. 

OF LONDON AND ABERDEEN. 



Subscribed Capital, - - - $10,000,000 

Accumulated Funds, - - - 6,750,000 

Annual Fire Premium, - - 1,180,000 

LOSSES PROMPTLY PAID IN U. S. GOLD COIN. 



"W. Zi. BOOHSIl, - - - Agent, 

319 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

The Policies of this Company are not only guaranteed by the Capital, but also by 
the unlimited personal responsibility of nearly one thousand shareholders. 



EOTAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 

mm® sit ^Jk&lP#®MlA e^msB^® 
Notice is lereDy giyen ilat arrangements liaye tieeii entered into lietween tie 

ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY 

AND THE 

wAmwm MMi iiiABiiiP mmwAMw.^ 

FOR the forwarding of treasure to the Bank of England, and to the 
Bank of France, in Havre, by the steamships of the two companies 
by means of through bills of lading, to be granted by the commanders 
of the Ships of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, for delivery 
to the Agent of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, to be sent 
across the Isthmus, and embarked on the Ships of the R. M. S. P. Co. 
For par'iculars as to through rate of freight, apply to the undersigned. 

Arrangements can be made for the shipment of Gold and Silver Ores 
from Aspinwall by the Company's Steamers on favorable Terms. 

The Steamships of the R. M. S. P. Co. leave Aspinwall for Plymouth, calling at St. Thomas, on the 
6th (7th when there are 30 days in the previous month, and 22d of each month. 

Passages, at reduced rates, can be secured on application to the undersigned, who will give any further 
particulars that may be required about the Company's business. 

"VST. ij. :booi^bi=l. 




XXVIU SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



HELBING & STRAUS, 



IMPORTEES AND DEALERS IN 



Crockery 

Glass and China Ware, Cutlery, Lamps, 

SILVER-PLATED & BRITANNIA WARE, 

102 & 104 BATTERY STREET, 

CORNER OF PINE, SAN FRANCISCO. 



COFFEE AND SPICE MILLS 

625 A.ND 627 FRONT ST. 



MANUFACTORY OF THE 

ORIGINAL CHARTRES COFFEE, 

First iutioduced into this country in Jnne, 1851, by G. Yenard. 



aEISrUlNE IVLOCHA. COFFEE. 



ALL KINDS OF GREEN, ROASTED AND GROUND COFFEES. 

ALSO, SPICES AND OALIFOENIA MUSTAKD. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXIX 



MOST EXTENSIVE SADDLERY HOUSE IN THE UNITED STATES. 



MAIN & WINCHESTER, 

2U and 216 BATTERY STREET, - - SAN FRANCISCO, 

Offer to the Public the most complete Stock of SADDLERY GOODS ever offered 
in the United States, consisting in part of 

Saddlery "Ware, 
SridleSy 




Collars^ ^J^ ITITliipSy 

LEATHER OF ALL KINDS, 

Horse Clothing, Fine Fur and "Woolen Robes— in fact every article 
pertaining to this line of business. 



Transatlantic Fire Insurance Co. 

cd:b^ i3:.^ivn:BXj:E=LO. 

CAPITAL, ■ $750,000. 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., Agents, 

316 SANSOM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



G. W. Cheslet. R. J. Van Vooehies. J. Siebe. J. S. Jones. 

G. W. CHESIiEY <& CO. 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in Fine 



IMli 4N® M< 



SOLE PROPRIETOKS OF 

CUNDUEANGO BITTEES, 

414 Front Street, San Francisco. 51 Front Street, Sacramento. 



XXX SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SULLI7A1T, KELLY & CO. 

(Successors to KELLY, WALSH & CO.) 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in 

Paints, Oils, Glass, 

Etc., Etc. 

101, 103 and 105 Front Street, and 110 Pine Street, 



Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast for the sale of Chance's 21 oz. and 26 oz. C S Glass 
Also, Agents for the London and Manchester Co's White Plate Glass. 

JAMES E. KELLY. C. D. 0. SULLIVAN. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

CORDAGE MANUFACTORY 



Ponstantly on hand, a Large and Complete Assortment of 

i 



WHALE LINE, BALE ROPE, TARRED MANILA ROPE, 

ETC., MANXJFACTUEED EROM 

PURE Mu^N-ILi^ HEMP 



OFFICE AT TUBB8 & CO., 611 and 613 FRONT STREET. 
m:a.nxtfa.ctoi£y a.t the potrero. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXI 



SUGAR 



^ STOCK COMI^j^NY. V 



Number of Shares, 3,000. $500 per Share. 



yww® 



iisrooi^i^oii A.TEID j^:e>:rxil, s, isst- 



C. SPRECKELS, - President and Manager. 
D. SPRECKELS, - - Secretary. 



BO-A.Il.I3 OF TPITJSTEES : 

C. SPRECKELS, GEO H. EGGERS, PETER SPRECKELS, 

CLAUS MANGELS, F. HAGEMANN. 



SIO California Street. 



WORKS, S. W. CORNER EI&HTH AND BRANNAN STREETS. 

This Refinery, having recently trebled its capacity, is better prepared 
to supply the great demand for its various kinds of 

SUGARS AND SYRUPS. 



XXXll 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



THOMAS THOMPSON. 



THORNTON THOMPSON. 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, 

EUREKA FOUNDRY, 



129 and 131 BEALE STREET, 



Between Mission and Howard, 



B&n Francisco, Cal. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Castings of Every Desciiption. 



ALBANY BREWERY, 

SPRECKELS & CO., Proprietors. 



*f> 







t?4 



«y> 



Bet. Third and Fourth, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



This Establishment has been enlarged for the third time during the past season, and now possesses 
facilities unsurpassed by any competition for the production of 

SUPERIOR ORE^M ^LE, 

To supply the mcreasing demands of the public. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXXlll 



ARMES & DALLAM, 



MANUFACTUKEKS AND IMPOKTEKS OF 



WOOD AND WILLOW WARE, 

Brooms, Brushes, Baskets, Pails, Tubs, Churns, 
Twines, Matches, Blacking, Clothes Wring- 
ers, Paper Bags, Feather Dusters, Sta- 
tionery, Fishing Tackle, Cordage, 
Coffee Mills, Washboards, Axe 
Handles, Etc., Etc. 



}©m®r ai Mtiii© r mr Mimii 

215 and 217 SACRAMENTO ST., 
s-A-isr ra-A-iT CISCO. 





HENRY NIEMANN 
ARTIST 
Shirt Maker^ 



204 Montgomery Street, Room 3, San Francisco. 



^^^1^ SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



HENRY B. WILLIAMS. TTTCTg^RV T> ut a Arr^tr a t>t> 

HENKY P. BLANCHARD. CHARLES B. MORGAN, 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & GO. 
Shipping & Commission 

IKEERC HANTS, 

iVo. 218 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

SAN- FEA.NCISOO. 



IHBIA RI6E MILL, 

Corner Mission and Fremont Streets, 

SASr ERAFCISGO. 

WM. M. GEEENWOOD, Proprietor. 



E. B. DEAN. UATID WILLCOX. C. H. MERCHANT 

E. B. DEAN & CO. 

BILLS OUT TO ORDER. 
ORHGON PINE, SPRUCE AND CEDAR. 

MARSHPIELD MILLS, COOS BAY. 

CORNER CALIFORNIA AND DRUMM STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXXV 



3E3 




OF CALIFORNIA. 

FIRE A-ND MA.RIN^E1. 



W. W. DODGE, 
CLAUS SPRECKELS, 
SELDEN S. WRIGHT, 
W. B. CUMMINGS, 
C. F. MacDERMOT, 
JAMES M. BARNEY, 
C. W. KELLOGG, 



A. W. JEE, 
PETER DEAN, 
JOHN H. "WISE, 
C. J. DEERING, 
LEVI STEVENS, 
JAMES GAMBLE, 
E. T. GILE, 
E. S. ERE E MAN. 



CHARLES MAIN, 
W. B. HOOPER, 
G. L. BRADLEY, 
JAMES PHELAN, 
D. H. HASKELL, 
H. S. CROCKER, 
N. D. THAYER, 



OFFICE in SAN FRANCISCO, No. 228 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



H. G. HORNER, Secretary. 



C. W. KELLOGG, President. 



|f f tf tilt §mftmth% 



CASH ASSETS, 



$13,000,000. 



FIRE RISKS AT CURRENT RATES. 



CROSS & CO., General Agents, 

316 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



XXXVl 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



JAMES LINFORTH, JOHN BENSLEY, L. B. BENCHLEY. 



IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 



Hardware 



AGEIOULXUEAL 



IMPLEMENTS 



AND 



TOOLS. 




GENERAL AGENTS FOR 



POWELL TOOL GO'S 



AXES & EDGE TOOLS, 



j BLACK DIAfflOHD FILES, 



SanMy Tool Go's Planes, 



Etc., Etc.. Etc. 



ITOS. 3 cSSs 5 FROITT STREET, 

JTear JVLarket, San Francisco. 



JfiBAll, lllli] 



And Commercial Agents of the 

GIAITT PO"WDER COMPAlTTr- 

OFFICE, 210 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXVll 



400 and 402 BATTERY STREET, cor. OLAT, 

COMMISSION liaCHAITS, 



JA.IVX3 i>:b.a.Ij:e3i«.s irr 



HIDES, TALLOW, PELTS, OIL, 

LEATHER OF ALL KINDS 

INCLUDING FRENCH, EASTERN, AND CALIEOENIA, 

Importers of Tanners' Tools and Materials. 
Also, Agents for Jas. S. Mason & Go's Blacking. 

Pay the Highest Cash Market Prices for Hides, Tallow and Pelts, 
MARK CONSIGNMENTS-A. C. N. & CO., SAN FRANCISCO. 



W. J. T. PALMER & CO. 

Cabinet Makers, 

Warerooms, 323 California Street, 

Manufactory, - 105 and 107 Mission Street, 

NEAR SPEAR, SAN FRANCISCO. 



xl SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



HALLET, DAVIS & GO'S 



CE31iEBI^.A-TEI> 



i=>i^iNros. 



CEORGB "WOODS <& GO'S 



WILLIAM G. BADGER, SOLE kGEHT , 

Nos. 7 and 13 SANSOM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



«T£3rr"^ 'SS,'!lf«lSc''l^,Tr'|Ji|['j 



HYDRAULIC ELEVATORS 

Are now considered the best, inasmuch as others have been taken out and replaced by the 
Stebins Patent. The Patent " Safety . Clutch " is without doubt the best in use. These 
Elevators may be seen in full operation at Heynemann & Co., Triest «& Friedlander, Feigen- 
baum & Co., Heller Brothers, Greenebaum & Co., Bachman Brothers, Goodkind, Fech- 
heimer & Co., Steinhardt Brothers, Howard's Building (Government Offices), Milton S. 
Latham's private residence (Menlo Park), Hecht Bros., Bradley & Eulofson, Parrott's 
Stores, Neustadter Brothers. 



DUEYEA'S SATIN GLOSS STARCH, 

Duryea's Improved Corn Starch, 

Are the best in the world. Use them once and you will use no other. 
DURYEA'S SATIN CLOSS STARCH.— It is the whitest; it is the purest: it is the strong- 
est; it is the most glossy; it is the easiest to use; it is the best Starch; it is the most economical. 

EGERTOX, ALLE^ & CO. 

XOO OAlifo3:*3:i.iA St., S£tzx DF"3?^xxGisco. 

sous AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST, CHINA, JAPAN, MEXICO, CENTRAL. 
AMERICA, AND THE WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



Xli 









I 






.^^^'^ 



^i^ 












'%^ 



DIRECTED BY THE FATHERS OF THE SOCIETY OF JESUS. 

FOUNDED IN 1851. INCORPORATED IN 1855. 

■\V1TU A FT'LL STAFF OF 

PROFESSORS AND TUTORS, 

— AND A 

THOROUGH SYSTEM OF INSTRUCTION 

IN — 

LATIN, MATHEMATICS, HISTORY, 

GREEK, NATURAL SCIENCES, GEOGRAPHY, 

ENGLISH, ARITHMETIC, USE OF THE GLOBES, 

MENTAL PHILOSOPHY, BOOK-KEEPING, PENMANSHIP, 

FRENCH, SPANISH, ITALIAN, GERMAN, 

TSSAl All Ilif llMllf 41 MMBW 
AXTD DKAT^ZZTCp 

DIVIDED INTO TWO EE&ULAB COURSES : 
BESIDES A 

FIlSFAB.^TOB.? DSFAZITMS2TT. 



TER,]iw^S : 



Board ixnd Lodging, Tuition in either Classical oi- Commercial Department, AVashing 
and Mending, Stationer^-, Medical Attendance and Medicines, Fuel, Baths, 

per week ^8 00 

Total, per Session of ten months, $350 — payable half-yearly in advance. 
N. B. — If more than two brothers enter the College, each additional one pays only $200 
per Session, 

For further information, or for Catalogue of the College, apply to Rev. A. Varsi, 
President of Santa Clara College, Santa Clara County, or to St. Ignatius College, 841 
Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



xlii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



STENCIL PLATES 



CXJT B"'Z' 



F. M. TRU^^^ORTH Y, 
XO IF'rorxt Street;, 



STENCIL PLATES, when handsomely executed, present the cheapest and best mode of advertising 

that can be adopted. This is the experience of all who use them. 

STENCIL PLATES OF EVERY PATTERN cut at this establisement in a stylo unequaled by any 
other workmen in California. 

Merchants and others are invited to call and examine specimens in proof of the above assertion. 

Orders from abroad, as well as those given in person, promptly executed and forwarded. Parties send- 
ing orders by letter are particularly requested to writk plainl,y and give the kxact space thky wish 

THE LETTERS TO OCCUPY. 

By close application and superior execution of work during an experience of thirteen years, Mr. TRU- 
WORTHY has extended his business to its present proportions. His present facilities for rapid and 
tasteful execution of all work in his line are far superior to those of any other in this State or in the Union. 

Having purchased all the late John Hall's Stencil Tools, Plates and Impressions, and everything per- 
taining to his business, I am prepared to furnish his customers with fac-simiies of his work. 

BRUSHES, INK AND MARKING POTS FOR SALE. 

REMEMBER THE PLACE, 

318 FRONT STREET, corner Commercial (Up Stairs), San Fiancisco, California. 



^W. P. RUSSELL. 



W. G. HARRISON. 



W. F. RUSSELL & CO. 




O I^ P^ I O E3 



38 AND 40 CALIFORNIA STREET, 



©AH fSAifeii©®. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xliii 





GOODALL, NELSON &. PERKINS, 

AGENTS FOR 

STEAMERS 

AND 

SAIL VESSELS 

RUNNING TO 

Tomales, Salinas, Moro Bay, Moor's Landing, 

Olema, Castro ville, Cayucos, San Buenaventura 

Half Moon Bay, "Watsonville, San Luis Obispo, Hueneme, 

Pigeon Point, Pajaro, Point Sal, San Pedro 

Santa Cruz, Moss Landing, Gaviota, (Los Angeles), 

Soquel, Monterey, Carpenteria, Anaheim, and 

Aptos, San Simeon, Santa Barbara, San Diego. 

ALSO, AGENTS FOR 

Tug Boats ITITizsrd and VBTater ITVTitcliy 

And for tho supply of Spring Valley Water for Shipping at the Wharves or in the Bay. 

Office, up stairs, cor. Clay and East Streets, San Francisco. 



B X: R G S O N , 

nter and Builder, 

No. 506 Montgomery Street, 

Near Sacramento, ^^^ SAN FRANCISCO. 

Cabinet Work and Fitting up Offices also promptly attended to. 



Carpe 



TreE«.£3TJLi-o E3o.:s:es a^ncL Tr'i-a.3rs ni£tcle to Oi'cJox-. 



ROWLAND, SULLIVAN & CO., 

FIRE AND LIFE lifsURANCE COMPANIES, 

Stamp Mills and all kinds of Machinery, Real Estate, Mining 

Stock, and G-eneral Merchandise Salesmen. 

OFFICES: 

Main Street, - - - salt Lake City, 

AND 

338 Montgomery Street, - San Francisco. 

i^° Collections made and promptly remitted. ""^S 



Xliv SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



EMERSON CORVILLE L CO. 

MERCHANTS. 

IMPORTERS dJVD PLAJ^TERS, 



jS^ OYSTER BEDS:^^^ 

San Bruno, San Mateo, Millbrae, Raccoon 

Straits, Brooks Island, Oakland, 

and Sierra Point. 

llillflli llPiT a liiEt illEl iT» 



Wholesale Department and Offices, 412 Pine Street. 



Tlie Saddle Hock, 410 Fine St 



New York, Baltimore, Virginia, Mexican, Shoalwater Bay, Native California and 

Yaquina Transplanted Oysters, furnished in any quantity, at the lowest 

rates. "We also furnish all kinds of Oysters and Oyster Plants direct 

from the Atlantic States, by the barrel or car load. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xlv 



A. D. WHITNEY, SAN FRANCISCO. 

FREIGHT NOTICE. 



WHITITE"y c& CO. 

^mmdtv^ mu\ ii)mnnxmmx 



"We •will Receive, Por-ward and Deliver any and all Goods 
CJonsigned in our Care for 

And VIRGINIA; 

AND ALL ORDERS LEFT AT OUR OFFICE 'WILL RECEIVE 
PROMPT ATTENTION. 



FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS, PLEASE APPLY AT OUR OFFICE, 

226 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



JOHN P. CLABROUGH. JOSEPH CLABROUGH. 

c:Ji-»ja.:i3n.oxJC3ria: ess lerto-, 

630 Montgomery 8t. (2d door South of Washington), SAN FRANCISCO, 

And No. 8 WHITTALL STREET, Bikmingham, England, 

GUN, PISTOL AND RIFLE MANUFAOTUREBS. 

Importers of every description of 

FIRE ARMS AND GUN MATERIALS, 

Colt's, Smith & Wesson'?, Sharp's, Henry's, and Spencer's KIFLES and PISTOLS. 
Dixon's Powder Flasks, Shot Pouches, etc. Wostenholm's Pocket Cutlery, 
Eley's Caps, Wads and all kinds of Breech-Loading Ammunition. 
Sole Agents for Stanton's Patent Eebounding Gun Lock. New Work made to order. 
Kepairing done in the best manner, and warranted to give satisfaction. 



Xlviii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 



Mineral Spring Water, 

WAUKESHA, WISCONSIN. 



Wholesale mid Retail Depot of Supply, 
230 SUTTER STREET, - SAN FRANCISCO. 



This wonderful Water is moefing with almost iiiiprecodentoci success in ( ffeeting the euro 
of diseases hitherto incurable, such as Bright's Disease of the Kidney, Diabetes, Calculus, 
or Stone in the Bladder, Dyrpepsia, Gout and all Affections of Kidney, Liver atid Bladder. 
Call or address 

! 
Ajzerits Vox- the Pacific-! Coast J 



Fashionatle Clothing Emporium 

a:i3 MONTGOMERY ^STl^EET. 
RUSS HOUSE BLOCK, SAN FRANCISCO. 

"Wholesale and Ketail Dealer in Men's, Youths' and Boys' fine Custom-made CLOTHING 
and FURNISHING GOODS, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Satchels, etc. 



WADSWORTH HOUSE. 



EN SUITE AND SINGLE, 

225 BUSH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xllX 



NATHANIEL GRAY. 



H. M. GRAY. 



N. GRAV <£ CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

UNDERTAKERS, 

641 Sacramento Street, 

Corner of Webb, SAN FRANCISOO, CAL. 

THE TRADE SUPPLIED IVITH 

Coffins & Coffin Trimmings, Hearses & Hearse Plumes 

I AND EVERY ARTICLE IN THE LINE ON LIBERAL TERMS. 

Sole Agents for Bartow's Patmt Metallic 

Burial Gases & Gaskets. 




J. H. KICHARDSOX. 



D. D. HOLLAND. 



BEALE STREET MILL. 



RICHARDSON & HOLLAND, 

CORNER BEALE AND MISSION STREETS, 
Office, 304 Mission Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MOULDINGS BRACKETS, FRAMES, SASH, BUNDS, DOORS AND ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS OF WOOD-WORK FINISH. 



MICHAKL B. MORAGHAN. HENRY LYNCH. 

MORAGHAN & LYNCH, 



And all kinds of SHELL FISH, 

STALL 68 CALIFOKNIA MARKET, - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

PUBLIC AND PRIVATE PARTIES, FAMILIES, HOTELS, SHIPPING, 
AND RESTAURANTS SUPPLIED. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



WATER WORKS. 



Incorporated under Act of the Legislature, April 8, 1858. 



9 - W^9^^^^^^9^^^^^^^ 

Divided into 80,000 Shares, of $100 Each. 



San Andres, 
Pilarcitos, 

LAKE HONDA, 
COLLEGE HILL, 
FRANCISCO STREET, 
RUSSIAN HILL, 
BUCHANAN STREET, 
BRANNAN STREET, 



ill J 



Capacity 4,650,000,000 Gallons 
« 1,045,000,000 « 

34,000,000 

14,000,000 

7,000,000 

4,000,000 

2,000,000 

500,000 



President, 

Vice-President, 

Secretary, 



0^:p2C€3l$ 



T3ltrSTSS:S 



W. F. BABCOCK. 

JOS. DURBROW. 

E. M. MILES. 



JOHN PARROTT, 
"W. F. BABCOCK, 
LEWIS CUNNINGHAM, 
JOSEPH DURBROW, 



JOHN ROSENPELD, 
THOMAS MENZIES, 
OHAS. E. McLANE. 



OFFICE OF TSE "WORISS, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, 



PETER T. GANNON, 



Retail Dkaler in thk 



Iramii lavaia ilr^^' 



:M:EBIR.SOEa:^^TJ3Sd: IF^IIE'ES, Etc. 

Corners of Montgomery, Post and Market Streets, 



EDWARD MARTIN. D. V. B. HENARIE. 

WHOLISALE DEALERS l^ 




WINES AND LiqUORS 

'^OS FB.OXTT STKSST, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



B. L, SOLOMON & SONS, 

IMPORTERS OF 

Curtain Materials, Furniture Coverings 

AND UPHOLSTERY GOODS, 

OP EVERY DESCRIPTION, 

410 Market Street, between Sansom and Battery, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



HENRY GERKE, 



DEAIilf^R IN 



MintSp MmnUi 



The production of his own Vineyard, at Vina, Tehaua County. 



GSO, XIAMZ.Z2T, Manager, 
Depot, 4 1 8 and 420 Market Street, corner Sutter, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



lii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTOllY. 



13. HE. FREEMAlSr & CO. 

Nos. 413 and 415 Mission Street, 
SCROLL S^yVllSSOr i^LlSTD TURNII^G. 



MAHOGANY, BLACK TVALNUT AND CEDAR FOR SALE. 

Constantly on hand and made to order, Stair Rails, Posts, Balustors, etc., etc. 



OAK LEATHER BELTING AND HOSE 

MANUFACTURED BY 

ieh:. zst. oooie^, 

dlo MARKET STREET, - - SAK FBANCIStO. 



MINING HOSE, SUCTION HOSE, FIRE BUCKEFS, FIRE HATS, MAIL BAGS, ETC. 

AGENCY OF THE SILSBY MANUEACTUKING CO. 
Rotary Steam Fire Engines and Patent Combination Hose. 



A. CRAWFORD <fe CO. 

Ship Chandlers, 

26 and 27 MARKET STREET, 



\«rE PROTECT THE GROCER! 



PIONEER MACCARONI & VERMICELLI FACTORY, 

558 MISSION STREET (North Side), 
Between First and Second Streets, SAN FRANCISCO, 

By J. P. TENTHOREY & CO. 

Our Manufactory of Maccaroni and Vermicelli is, in every respect, the best in the State of California. 
Wo have always on hand tor trade a largo quantity of the finest Maccaroni, Vermicelli, Farina and 
Paste of all descriptions, in French and Italian style. 

3SrO K.EX-A.IXi IlSr OTJE. F-A-CXOIt^S'- 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. UU 



(Formerly of tho U. S. Branch Mint, S. P.) 

ASSiYEE & lETALlDRGICAL CIEMIST, 

(OPPOSITE THE U. S. BRANCH MINT,) SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

PIONEER WOOLEN FACTORY 

LOCATED AT 

Blacls Point, San Francisco, Cal. 

MANUFACTORY OF ALL CLASSES OF 

W#©tHII «##»» 

SUCH AS 

BLANKETS, CASSIMERES, 'XWEEDS, FLANNELS, OVERSHIRTS, 

TEAMSTERa' SHERTS, FIREMAN'S SHIRTS, UNDERSHIRTS 

AND DRAWERS, SLUICE BLANKETS, &c. 

Depot and Office, ■ - - No. 115 Battery Street. 



Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

WAGON AND CARRIAGE MATERIALS, 

COR. CALIFORNIA AND DAVIS STREETS, 



liv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PACIFIC BARREL AND KEG FACTORY, 

Location on Brannan Street, bet. Seventh and Eighth, 

Office, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

HAVE ON HAND COOPERS' STOCK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

And are fully prepared to manufacture to order packages of all kinds and sizes. 

FI.1NT, i^ElABODY & CO., Agents 



N. P. LANGLAND, 

STAIR BUILDER, 

WOOD TURNER 

AND 

SCROLL SAWYER, 

No 485 Branuan Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 




GOLDEN EAGLE HOTEL 

402, 404. AND 406 BROADWAY, 

CORNER MONTGOMERY. 

HARTNETT & BARRY, - - Proprietors. 



MANUFACTURER AND IMPORTER OF 






MACHINE SCREWS, TWIST DRILLS, i ETC. 

312 BUSH STREKT, 



KTABUSHtD_eHAS.©Tf OV S.F 



312 Bush St. 



Between Montgomery and Kearny, 



ADVERTISINa DEPARTMENT. Iv 

HATS AND HAT MATERIAL 

AT WHOLESALE, 

Northeast Corner Montgomery and Bush Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

J. a MEUSSDOEFPEE ^ BBOTHEB, 

IMPORTERSIOFIAND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

HATS & CAPS, 

XZatter's Flushes, 

And everything requisite for the manufacture of Hats. 

Our long experience in San Francisco, and extensive connections in Europe 
and the East, enable us to be in constant receipt of the choicest qualities and latest 
styles. 

Our stock is the largest and most select, and our facilities superior to any other 
House on this Coast. 

Dealers who buy on short time, or for cash, will find it greatly to their advant- 
age to favor us with a call at ; 

Northeast Corner Montgomery and Bush Streets, San Francisco. 

I«,Ba?A;Ii:. STORES? 
Nos. 200 and 202 Montgomery Street,' corner Bush, - - San Francisco. 

Noa 635 ^nd 637 Commercial Street, - San Francisco. 

No. 647 Washington Street, - San Francisco. 

No. 105 J Street, - --------- Sacramento. 

No. Ill Front Street, bet Morrison and Alder Street, - - - Portland, O. 



Ivi SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



dvc^^i^luntb a-Ktid i^^ip^id. 



T ! I K 



CALIFORNIA INSURANCE CO. 

OFFICE, NO. 318 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

ONE DOOU EAST FROM S^NSOAf, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CAPITAL PAID UP (IN GOLD) - - - $300,0001 
ASSETS - - - - -. - - 450,000 

THE OLDEST OF ALL THE LOCALS. 



C. T. HOPKINS, Prest. H. B. TICHENOR, Vice-Presl. 

Z. CROWELL, Secretary. 



xivi:i=>:h]:f\.i.a. x_, 



li©# lamiaiiii ®i 



IvUfiliM^^r 



oin LoisrjDOJsr. 

ESTABLISHED 1803. 

Capital Stock Subscribed - - $8,000,00000 
do do Paid up in Cash - - 3,500,000.00 

Surplus, Over 2,500,000.00 

Cash Assets Nov. 1st, 1872, over - 6,500,000.00 

Insures Buddings and Merchandise in them, on the most moderate terms; also Frame Buildings 
and Merchandise or Furnituie contained in same. 



LOSSES PAID HERE IN CASH IMMEDIATELY ON ADJUSTMENT 
lasr xj. s. ooxjid ooinsr. 



FALKNER, BELL & CO. 

AGENTS FOR CALIFORNIA, 



ADVERTISINCx DEPARTMENT. IvH 



CTTBERT <a COMPAN"?, 

414 MARKET STREET, below Sansom, 

P. O. BOX 1819. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Orders for every description of Printing gratefully received and promptly executed^ 



SYLVESTER E. SIMMONS, PROPRIETOR, 

N. E. CORNER STOCKTON AND UNION STS. 



PIONEER PAPER MIlMlji, 

TAYLORVILLE, MARIN COUNTY, CAL. 
S. P. TAYLOR & CO., - - - Proprietors. 

Also, Agents Saratoga and Eagle Paper Mills. 

Manufacturers and Importers of all kinds of 

PAPER AND PAPER BAGS, TWINE, ETC 

PAPER WAREHOUSE, NO. 416 CLAY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

The Highest Price paid for Rags, Rope, Etc. 



CALIFORNIA ITALIAN PASTE COMPANY. 

PRUSSO & SPLIVALO, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

laccaroDi, Terinicelli, Faicy Paste, Farifla, 

ETC., ETO. 

NOS. 704 and 706 SANSOM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Iviii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



BWRd^r^BsRE 



mi 



Fire Insurance 



COMPAUV. 



SWISS LLOYD 



■* N^t^eCs* *«itv ■»»,^,,) «i, 4s»^^uau '^sia ^ 



COMFAXT7. 



mORRIS SPISITKR £ CO. 

General Agents, 

No. 13 MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE, 

425 CALZFOnXTZA STREET. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



lix 



H. M. NEWHALL. 



Cif 



J. O. ELDRIDGE. 



G. PAL ACHE. 






m^. 




S.A.IjEiSI=LOO]Vi:, 

FIRE-PROOF BRICK, 



^f, ill ^ml il 



d l»)Iii&Jili 



MONDAY and THURSDAY— Catalogue Sale of Boots, Shoes, Clothing, 

Hardware, Fancy Goods, etc. 
■WEDNESDAY — Catalogue Sale of Dry Goods, Silks, Embroideries, 

French Goods, etc. 



CUct/Sln. .A.ci.-«7-£*,2a.c©js OXJ. 



Iwa:orcl3.£fcxi.ca.is© fox- JS«^le>. 



H. r. WILLIAMS & CO. 

Real Estate Agents 



740 FOTTRTH STREET, 



Ix 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



1 ^MBM^M 

MIS A i LOAi SDCIETI 

526 GAIiIFORIffIA ST. 



S^" Office Hours, from 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. 

Extra hours on Saturdays from 7 to 8 p. m., for receiving of Deposits only. 
Loans made on Real Estate and other Collateral Securities, at current rates of 
interest. 

GEORGE LETTE, L. GOTTIG, 

See General Review for a notice of the operations of this Institution. 



AID UNION. 



INCORPORATED JUNE 13, 1873. 



omoEPis 



J. A. BAUER, 
E. r. SUTTEE, 
WM. GIRZIKOWSKY, 
J. B. GOLLY, 



President. 

Vice President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



The Aid Union supports, at reasonable monthly contributions, its sick members, with $10.00 
or $20.00 a week, and pays the heirs of its members $500.00 or $1,000.00, seciued by an insur- 
ance upon the life of its members in the Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company. 

OFFICE, - 417 BUSH STREET, 

F. W. BRUGGEMANN, - - Manage/-. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixi 



GEO. C. SHREVE & CO 



lm.:port©rs of 



AVATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

110 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

Make a Specialty of the 

Gorham Manufacturing Company's 



fiti Sllttf Witn 




Particular attention is requested to the many attractive designs now 
being produced by this celebrated Company. "With works projected 
on a scale unparalleled for magnitude in the world, together with the 
best talent for designing, the most skilled workmen, the best labor- 
saving machinery, and the immense amount of goods produced, they 
are enabled to offer the best made and most artistic articles at the 
lowest possible price. 

B^° The standard of Silver used is British Sterling. 



IXll 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



HUNTINGTON'S 




Smmm MscsiXi^. 



For simplicity, durability, and rapidity of action, these Machines have 

no equal, cutting from 3,500 to 4,000 per hour. They are now 

used by all the principal Millmen on the Pacific Coast. 



PRICE, Complete, with One Saw, 



$450.00. 



ALSO, 



HUNTINGTON'S PORTABLE SAW MILLS, 

With Improved I'atent Open-Nut Head-Blocks, and Improved Friction Feed Works— capable 
of cutting from 8,000 to 12,000 feet per day. 



STEAM ENGINES, SAW MILLS, PLANING, LATH AND PICKET 
MACHINES, Etc., made to order at short notice. 

F. A. HUNTINGTON, 



143 and 145 Fremont Street, 



San Francisco. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixiii 



BLAKE, ROBBINS & CO. 



IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 



Book, News, Writing, 

AjSTD 

WRAPPING PAPER; 

STRAW AND BINDERS' BOARDS, 

BLACK AND COLORED INKS, 



ALSO, MANUFACTURERS OF 



9 

Nos. 516 SACRAMENTO and 519 COMMERCIAL STREETS, 

JAMES MO^FFifT; X San Francisco. f Between Sansom and Montgomery, 

CHAS. F. ROBBINS, J \ 

JAMES W. TUWNE. New York. ( SAM W^gk^Ql^Q^Q)^ 



IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER OF 

WALNUT, KOSEWOOD AND GILT 

LOOKIjSTG glassks. 

ENGRAVINGS, OH ROM OS, LITHOGRAPHS. 

And Depot for CURiJIER & lYES' PICTURES, 

WHOI.ESALE AXD RETAIL, 

NOS. 209 AND 211 LEIDESDORFF STREET, 

AND NO. 629 COMMERCIAL STREET, 
Between Commercial and Sacramento, Montgomery and Sansom, San Francisco. 



Pictures, Diplomas and Business Cards Framed on the most reasonable 
terms. RBGILDING done in the best style. 



Ixiv SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



P 

27 and 29 Beale Street, &^^ Fm^^m&€@. 

Manufacturers and Importers of and Dealers in 

OAE, ASH, HIQEORT, 

MA^I'LE, BA^SS and W^HITE^VOOD, 
HUBS, SPOKES, FELLOES, RIMS, POLES, SHAFTS, 

Neck Yokes, Whiffietrees, Bolsters, Hickory Axles, 

Elto-, E]tc- 

"Our Manufactory is situated at Concord, New Hampshire, where labor is cheap, and good 
material plentiful. We save the profits of one or two middle men, and will give wagonmakers 
the benefit of this saving." 

OUR PRICES ARE LOW AND TERWIS REASONABLE. 
j^» Parties ordering, not known to us, will please send reference or cash. 

Orders by Mail or Express solicited and promptly filled. 



MICHELS, TRIEDLANDER & CO. 

Iixxj^ortei-s etuci JooToors of 

LADIES' AND GENT'S FURNISHING GOODS, 

FRENCH, ENGLISH AND GERMAN FANCY GOODS, 

White Goods and Hosiery, with a general assortment of Boys' and 

Youths' Furnishing Goods. Manufacturers and Importers of the 

Improved Yoke American Shirt. Sole Agents for the 

Celebrated JOSEPH KID GLOVES. 

Nos. 7 and 9 Battery Street, Oriental Block, San Francisco. 

JOHIT L. HALL, 

MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 

Nos. 11 and 13 CALIFORNIA STREET, 
I^os. 114. and 116 MARKET STREET, 



ADVERTISINa DEPARTMENT. Ixv 



SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

ITo. 4:08 CAZiZFOZlXTZ^ STKSST, 
And 41 INDIA WHARF. BOSTON, MASS. 



MORRIS SPEYER & CO. 

No. 13 Merchants' Exchange, 

425 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Draw on Jsfew York, London, Paris, Hamburg, Bremen, 
Berlin, Frankfort, Vienna, 

-A.3SriD OTKCEIt OITIES IIST E"ari?.OI*E_ 



WILLIAM P. BUEKE, 

Importers of Ladies' and Gent's Fine 

iiiTI, IMiES, SUITERS, 

113 SUTTER STREET, LICK HOUSE, 



Ladies' Gaiters manufacttired to order, in a superior manner. 



MURPHY, GRANT «fe CO. 

(SUCCESSORS TO EUGENE KELLY & CO.) 



Oorner of Sansom and B-asli Streets, 

_ _ _ __ _______ 



Ixvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



LOUIS SLOSS. 



SIMON GREENEWALD. 



LEWIS GERSTLE. 



LOUIS SLOSS & CO. 

Successors to A. WASSERMANN & CO. 





L 





Nos. 310 and 312 SANSOM STREET, 




« 



Liberal Cash Advances made on Shipments through us to our Houses 
in Ne-w York and London. 



NORCROSS & CO. 

No. 4 Post Street, Masonic Temple, San Francisco, 

ARMY AND NAVY GOODS, REGALIA 

FLAGS, BANNERS, Etc. 



And ADJUSTER, 

No. 113 LEIDESDORFF STREET, - - SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixvii 



ARIiI <£ GO. 









609 CLA.Y STREET, ^ 

Above Montgomery, SAN FRANCISCO. 

PANTS, made to order, $6. BUSINESS SUITS, made to order, $25. 

Dress Suits made to order in the most elegant styFes, and at prices to defy competition. 
French and English Cloths expressly imported from Europe for our House. 



OI^^E! TJ 



^^ c^5i.rji_i. 



SOLOMON GUMP. 



GUSTAVE GUMP. 



1 

r, 



m^^mmWy, 



IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 




X I^SOft $ 



LOOKIJVG GLASSES, LOOKING GLASS PLATES, 
PICTURES, PICTURE FRAMES, PHOTO- 
GRAPE OVALS, MOLDIJ^GS, Etc. 

117 and 119 SANSOM STREET, 



Between Bush and Pine, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



FACTORY— Market Street, between Seventh and Eighth. 



IXVin SAN FRANCISCO DIUECTORY. 




THE GOTHIC CHIMNEY TOP 

AND 

wm It ^iXa^^'om. 

Down drafts impossible when this Top is used. Do not fail to see it before purchasing 

any other. 

Sole Aj^ent for the Pacific Coast. 



Manufacturer of SHIP STOVES, 

AND DEALER IN OFFICE AND COOKING STOVES, , 
TIN, COPPER AND SHEET IRON WARES, 

No. 3 STEUART STREET, corner of Market, San Francisco. 

TO CAPTAINS OF VESSELS.-I do all kinds of Repairinir for Galley Stores and Fixtures, Pumps 
and Plumbing Work, in the best possible manner, and at reasonable rates. 

AGENT FOR BRENTWOOD STOVE LINING COMPANY. 



PIONEER IRON WORKS, 

Nos. 225 and 227 BEALE STREET, 

Between Howard and Folsom, SAN FRANCISCO. 

CHARLES H. LEAVITT, 

Stoel Ij 1 IX e ca. .- ___ :_^= - .. WROUGHT IRON 

BANK VAULTS, ^^^^^ ^^^ ^ S^ 1 M © M ® g , 

BURGLAR, FIRE FROOF^H^Hi^^B bussey'S patent 

AND SILVERWARE SAFES, BS^HhI M [^^^slHp Combination Burglar Proof 

PRISON C E LLS.PlMHim^BHB BANK VAULT 



FIRE-PROOF 




SAFE LOCKS, 

Containing Millions of changes. 



Detachable Knobs, no Key. A large assortment of Combination and Key Locks on 
band. Latest ImproTed Shears, Punches, Dies, etc., for Cold Iron Works. 

Constantly on hand a large assortment of 

FIRE PROOF DOORS AND SHUTTERS. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixix 

ALEX. ELDER. WM. A. STUART. 

STUART & ELDER, 

WHOLESALE 

COMMISSION 

DEALERS 

California Dair3r Frcduce. 

No. 204 Front Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



IMPORTER AND WHOLESALE DEALER IN 



ITo. 125 SAXTSOM STHSST, 

Between Bush and Pine, SAN FRANCISCO. 



m BLACK DIAMOND COAL tIMG CO. 

AND THE 

BELLINGHAM BAY COAL COMPANY. 

Steam and House Coals by the Cargo, and to Ships 

and Dealers. 

Office on Spear Street, at Rincon Wharf. P. B. CORNWALL, Pres't. 



]XX SAX FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



THE 



MUTUAL BENEFIT 

Life Insurance Co. 



OF IfBWiLEE, If. J. 



#p^®M^©€ f^ ^® 



# 



^tfidtly >iutuaL 



Assets, January 1, 1874, - - ^^^ $28,620,956 27 

Paid Claims by Death and Endowment, $15,209,666 61 

Paid Cash DiTidends (to Members only), $14,772,609 87 

Total Gross Surplus, January 1, 1874, $5,689,830 27 

Average expense to income, in 1878, only 8 and 59-100 per cent. 



JAMES MUNSELL, Jr. 

Managing Agent for Pacific Coast. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxi 



XGELSIOR IflON WoRKS, 

151 & 153 Beale Street and 200 Howard Street, 



i^jA.3sr rR,A.3srGisco. 



^Jli 



m%f 



MANUFACTURER OF ALL KINDS OP 



ArcMtectiral ani Orimeiital Iroi Ml, 

BURGLAR AND FIRE - PROOF VAULTS AMD SAFES, 

Doors, Shutters, House, and Cemetery Railings, Stairs, Etc., Etc. 

jobbing attended to with dispatch. 
objdebs from the country promptly executed. 



MMEWWe P#TTH 



IT 



CORNER 31st AND J STREETS, SACRAMENTO, 

Depot, No. 3 California Street, - - San Francisco. 



« C%.A^^ ^ C0# 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




Fire Brick, Earthen and Stoneware, 



'5 
WATER AND SEWERAGE PIPE. 

-Argent. 



J. B. ow^Eisrs, 



Ixxii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



H. A. CRANE. "W. H. BRIGHAM. R. A. SANJORD. 

CHAXTE <& BRZGHAM, 

"WHOLESALE 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



DRUGS, MEDICINES, PROPRIETARY ARTICLES, 
Druggists' Sundries, Perfumery, Etc., Etc. 

322, 324 and 326 FI\ONT STI\EET, 

Corner of Clay, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



JOSEPH ROTH. HENRY TIDEATJ. 



Importers and "WTiolesale Dealers in 



FINE WINES, LIQUORS 



Brandies and Whiskies, 

SOLE AGENTS OF THE CELEBRATED BENEDICTINE. 
214 AND 316 PIIsTE STREET, 

Between Sansotn and Battery, 

s .^ xg* :f^ XI. ..^ za" o z s o o. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. IxXUl 



HASKELL & BODE, 



MANTJFACTURKES OF 



SASH, DOORS, BLINDS AND SHDTTERS, 

No. 439 Brannan Street, 

Between Third and Fourth, SAN FRANCISCO- 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



SAN FRANCISCO, 

Importer, Stj iiit j CoMi ssion Herctai 

CONSIGNMENTS OF GOODS FROM ABROAD, AND ORDERS THENCE 

FOR WHEAT, FLOUR, ORES, AND OTHER CALIFORNIA 

PRODUCE RECEIVE DUE AHENTION. 



Adyanci's Made oa Shipments of Wheat and other Approved 
Merchandise to Europe. 

Orders for Goods from Abroad Promptly Attended to. 

Spcial Attention gim to Buying, Selling, and Clartering of Yessels. 

EXCHANGE BOUGHT AND SOLD. 

GRAIN BAGS AND BURLAPS ALWAYS ON HAND. 



GKORGK O. MCMULLIN. THURLOW MCMULLIK. 

GEORGE 0. McMULUN & GO. 



IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



GROCERIES and PROVISIONS 

112 and 114 CALIFORNIA STREET, 



Ixxiv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



WM. SCHMOLZ, 

MATHEIHATIGAL INSTRUMENT MAKER. 




TRANSITS, 

THEODOLITES, 

SOLAR COMPASSES, 

y LEVELING INSTRUMENTS, 

LEVELING STAVES, 

COMPi\SSES, 

MOUNTAIN BAROMETERS, 

DISTANCE RODS, 

CHAINS, 

MERIDIAN TRANSITS, 

BULLION BALANCES, 

ASSAYING SCALES, 

Etc., Etc. 



Repairs Executed in the Best Manner. 



WM. SCHMOLZ, 
No. 420 Montgomery St., 



S-A-jsr rR,-A.2srcisco. 



o-<3s:e3x*x3: tt^-a^cs-ko-esh.. 



I \3 and I 15 Mission Street, 



San Francisco. 




MANUFACTURKE OP 

FRENCH BURR 
MILL-STONES 

— AND — 

PORTABLE MILLS. 

— ALSO- 
Especially adapted for 
C=:=^^^^^^^ Grinding Quartz. 
AGENT FOR DUFOUR & CO.'S CELEBRATED 

DUTCH ANCHOR BOLTING CLOTHS. 

Bolting Cloths Made Up. _^ 

Eureka Smut Machines, Bran Dusters, Mill Irons, -^= 
Spindles, Bails, Drivers, Steps, Regulating Screws, Silent ~ 
ieoders. Pulleys, Proof Staffs, Hoisting Screws, Bails and ? 
Pins, Conveyor Flights, Plaster and Leather Belting. 
Slill Picks, Mill Picks Pressed, mill Stoneit Be- 

liaired and Rebnilt. 

Mill Stones Balanced with Pellenbaum's Patent Balance, of which I am sole proprietor for California. 
Oregon, and Washington Territory. 




ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. JXXV 



64=2 and 644 A^:^ASHINGTOIS^ STREET, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

FLAGS, BANNERS, SCARFS AND ROSETTES, 

ALSO, IMPORTER OF 



'9 
TOYS and REGAIilAS of every description. 



CHARLES MAYER, 

wmm 



Importer and Manufacturer of the Latest Novelties of 

CLOAKS, SUITS, Etc. 

NO. 20 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
OPPOSITE THE LICK HOUSE, SAWS S^^^lfCISCO. 



liA FLOR D£ LA MARIPOSA, 

631 PACIFIC ST. nMnBr' SAN FRANCISCO. 




AND LA FLOR DE LA CORONA 

GIGARITOS MANUFACTORY. 

Have constantly on hand a lot of YELLOW and WHITE paper Cigaritos of the best quality at the 

lowest rates. Cigaritos of La Viuda de Garcia, La Honrradez, Cabanas, Figaro, etc. 

Orders from the interior promptly attended to. 



SAH FRANCISCO JEffELEY MAHDFACTORY 



9 

ITo. 610 MSnCXZiilTT STIISST, 

Between Montgomery and Kearny Streets, SAN FRANCISCO. 

WATCHES AND CHAINS, AHETHTST AND TOPAZ, BROOCHES, 

BAR-RlNaS, SLEEVE BUTTONS AND RINGS. 

Diamond Setting, Enameling and all kinds of Repairing done. Jewelry for Sale, Wholesale and Retail, 



Ixxvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



W. W. WALMSLEY, 



lnMb« 



^ < 

IKPOBTEK MHiD ]>EAL£K IK 



W' 



iti© 



I Chandeliers, Gas Fixtures, Show Window Reflectors, 

PNEUMATIC GAS MACHINES, 

Iron Pipe and Fittings, Copper Boilers and Bath Tubs, Light and 

Heavy Sheet Iron Works, Artesian and Deep Well 

Pumps, all sizes Made to Order. 

920 MARKET STREET, 



Opposite St. Ignatius College, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



AKD 

MAjrurACTUBED IN THE BEST MANSER AKD AT LOWEST MARKET RATES. 



CALIFORNIA BELLOWS MANUFACTURING CO. 

No. 32 Ffeifloit St., 

SA5 FRA5CISC0. 




Constantly on hand, a full assort' 
ment of our Improved 

NON-EXPLOSIVE 

BELLOWS 

With Adjustable Nozzle. 

The patr€Hiage of the Trade mosf 
respectfully solicited. 

N. B.— Bellows of every description made to order. Repairing neatly and promptly executed art low priees^ 
JAMES CAMPBELL, Superintendent. 



NEWBAUER & CO. 



MANUFACTtTRERS 01* 



METROPO LITAN MATCHES 

Our Matches are Sure, and are Warranted to withstand Dantpness of 
every Climate, and be good for any length of time. 

FACTORY, POTRERO. 

OFFICE, No. 107 SANSOM STREET, Between PINE and BUSH. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxvli 




Ixxviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



W. & I. STEINHART & GO. 



IIwH>OItXEIlS OF 



CLOTHING 



.J^lsTTD 



GEHT'S FUHITISHIM GOODS, 

XTos. 3 azid 5 Battery Street, 

ORIENTAL BLOCK, SAN IBANCISCO. 
84 Thomas Street, - New York. 



)oyyi'iips v^ 



OlMl 



ffGi 



Co. 



HEA.33 OFFICE, - aLA.SGOW^. 



CAPITAL, 



$5,000,000. 



-A.CCEI>TS K-ISKIS IIST 



California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington Territory. 



HART, BLAIR & CO. 

AGENTS, 
319 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. IxXlX 



McNALLT & HAWKINS, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

And aU kinds of PLUMBING MATERIAL, 

334 PINE STREET, 

Buildings Fitted up with Gas, "Water and Steam Pipes. Country- 
Orders promptly attended to. 



EXCELSIO R MILL COMPANY 

FRAMES, SASH, BLINDS, DOORS I SHUTTERS, 

441 TO 445 BRANXAN STREET, 

Between Third and Fourth, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Always on hand and made to order, all kinds of Outside and Inatde Finish and Sfonldines 

Brackets and Scroll Sawing and Wood Turning in all their branches, done with dispatch. ' 



COFFEE AND SPICE MILLS, 

No. 212 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

BETWEEN FRONT AND DAVIS, 



IXXX SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Importer and Dealer in all kinds of 

GAS FIXTURES 

730 Montgoxnery Street, 

Near Jackson Street, San Francisco. 



FANCY AND PLAIN WASH BASINS, 

Marble Slabs^ 

Silver-Plated Cocks^ 

Bath Tubs, Sheet Zinc, 

Sheet Lead, Lead Pipe, 

(jALYAIIllB MB PLAII lEOI nm. 

_A.IjIj sizes. 

For Gas, Steam and Water, 

In lots to suit, together with Elbows, Tees, Return Bends, Stop Cocks, Plugs, Bushings, 
Nipples, etc. ; Rubber Hose, Hose Bibbs, Hose Pipes, etc. 

CAST IRON PIPE, COPPER EOILEKS, Etc. 

Gas and Steam Fitting and Plumbing in all its Branches. 



^1 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. IXXXI 



LONDON # LANCASHIRE, 

Fire Insurance Co. 

HEAD OFFICE, 11 DALE STREET, LIVERPOOL. 
OA.PTTA.L, -^ €B5,000,000. 

ACCEPTS RISKS IN 

California, Nevada, Oregon I Washington Territory. 

HART, BLAIR & CO., Agents, 

8X9 Oa^liforixia, Streot, 



S-A.lSr F:RJ^TSTCISCiO. 



1f> 



Jeweler, 

Importor of Watches, Diamonds & Jewelry, 

No. 7 KEARNY STREET, 

Between Geary and Post Streets, SAN FRANCISCO. 



H. SCHUSSLER, 

mmmut mid civit z%^mzt% 

Consulting Engineer Spring Valley Water Works, 
OFFICE, 616 CALIFORTSTIA. STREET. 



Ixxxii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Everything Required by Printers, Bookbinders, Lithographers and 
Engravers, furnished promptly, at the lowest rates. 



IF'J^CIiFIO 



T¥f>{ Fomon 



^^:sriD 



nmw numn mmmi, 



aiifp ^^^ 



n. G. HATTITKS, 



- Manager. 



This is a Branch of the well-known CHICAGO TYPE FOUNDRY, now 

one of the most extensive and perfectly arranged Foundries in 

the country. Orders filled from any specimen book. 



J. B. WOOSTEK. 



C, P. HUBBELL. 



D. D. SHATTUCK. 



WOOSTEH, SHATTUCK & CO. 
Commission Merchants, 

AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Provisions, Butter, Cheese, !Lard, Hams, Bacon, 
317 and 319 FRONT STREET, 

Corner Commercial, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISINa DEPARTMENT. Ixxxiii 



BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO. 



SOS SANSOM STREET, 



BALFOUB, WILLIAMSON Ss CO. - - LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. 
WILLIAMSON, BALFOUR & CO. - - - VALPARAISO, CHILE. 



Give special attention to the execution of orders for all descriptions of Foreign 
Merchandise. 

They are prepared to make liberal advances on Wheat, Barlej', Flour, and other 
descriptions of produce, consigned for sale to their friends in England, Chile, and other 
countries. 



©ii®s^B Hs Tmw M C©. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



STOVES, 

Iron Pipe^ Pumps, Zinc VflivG^ 

Tinners' Stock, Tools and MaoMnes, House - Furnisliing Hardware, 

And Manufacturers of Tin, Sheet Iron and Copper Ware, 

l\/OS. 614, 616 AND 618 BATTERY ST. 

Agents Richmond Stove Company, Norwich, Conn. 

Agents New Haven Copper Company. 



Ixxxiv SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



HENRY WINBXE & CO. 




WINES and BRANDIES 

S. E. corner Sacramento and LeidesdoriF Streets, 



■:smASs r<otme>fiT 

A.ND y UMI:^ FA CTORY. 

A. JTSMITH, 

IP L TJ im: B E I^ , 

And Sole Proprietor and Manufacturer of the 

Celebrated Hudson Force Pumps, 

Atwood & Bodwell Windmill Brass Pumps, 

SMITH'S COPPER-LINBD PUMPS, PLUMBERS' FORCE PUMPS. 

Special attention paid 1o Brewers', Distillers', Beer and Hot Lfqnor Pnnips, and Wine 
Pnmps. Particular attention paid to Alii PIIMP8, also to 

D/ VERS' SUBMARINE PUMPS, 

ARTESIAN WELL PUMPS Made to Order. 

AI.SO, PATENT WATER CI.OSETS. 

XTo. 220 FRBMOXTT STREET, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. IxXXV 



Importer, Dealer and Manufacturer of 

IRON AND STEEL WIBE SOPE, 

AND WIRE OF ALL KINDS. 

ESTABLISHED 1851. 

No. 113 and 115 PINE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Sole Proprietor of the 

PATENT ENDLESS ROPEWAY 

( Wire Tramway) for transporting Ores, etc., over mountainous places. 



Agent for Pacific Wire and W. R. Manufacturing Company, of California, 

AND OP 

Richard Johnson & Nephew, Wire Manufacturers, of Manchester, England. 
MINING COMPANIES, FERRYMEN, AND SHIPMASTERS 

Are informed that Wire Kope can be furnished V^«Vrv1&Sf"weutVer' Tt'weighl'°4S per^clSAss 

rh^-^'h^Tihes^Kre-tert-h^erLte^ 

equal strength; and is from four to live times as durable as the best Hemp or Manila iiope. 

For Uoiding from Deep Mines, the economy of it, application is immense. 
The Wire from which iny Ropes are made is manufact.ire.1 *" San Francisco by the 

Pacific Wire Manufacturing Company, from the very best of Sstocli. 

v^n,^ «TVwr WUiV ROPE weishs about six-tenths of Iron Rope, or one-third of Hemp of equal 
streS'llIfx^t^em'IniLS'SvrsllrgVy^^^^ 
mends it for hoisting purposes, etc. See table of comparative weights, strengths, and aizes ot 



Steel Wire Rope. | Iron Wire Rope. Hemp Rope. 

Wt. pr. 100 ft. I Circumference! Wt. pr. lOO ft 



Circumference Wt. pr 100 ft. Circumference 



inch. 



2'-^ " I 100 



60 lbs. 



2%, inch. 



8>^inch. I ItJiJ lbs. 
4i " I 284 " 



Working 
load of each. 



3,800 lbs. 
7,000 " 



ENDLESS WIRE ROPEWAY, 

( Wire Tramway) secured by numerous patents. 
By means of the Ropeway ores, rock and other material can be t,,„,p^^^^^^ r/d.^TSffie? £; 
tlA^^Z^l'^ZlfXi.l^^T^':^^^^^^^^ ^Vgt. above snow and other ob- 

struct can be used when other°modes of transportation would be impossible. 

A. S. HaLLIDIE, 113 and 115 Pine Street, San Francisco. 

Circulars sent on application. 



Ixxxvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



EDUCATE FOR BT7SI1TESS. 

1f>rij3RYANT & STRATTON "TJWT 

Business COLLEGE 

'SANFRANCISCO' 



A practical education is valuable to all. 
Heald's College educates thoroughly for busi- 
ness. It is universally acknowledged to be the 
Leading Commercial Scliool of tlie Pacific. 

Its graduates are practical accountants and obtain 
lucrative positions. Its scholarships are good for 
tuition in the thirty-six Bryant & Stratton Colleges 
located in all our principal cities. 

Tie Leafliof iBstilnle of Mmm Mm upon lie Paciic Coast. 

Jfo otlier Business College in the State can compare with the niimher of Students, 
size and elegance of Rooms, number and experience of Teachers, Course of Studies, 
or school discipline. Theory and Actual Business Practice are combined in 
siich a manner to obtain the advantages of both. The Student Bnys, Sells, Ships, 
Barters, Consigns, Discounts, Insures, draws Checks, Notes and Drafts, gives Leases, 
Deeds, etc.— in fact, goes through the entire routine of actual business. 

The School Eoom is elegantly iitted up with 
iVTEROHANDISING, JOBBING AND IMPORTING- EMPORIUMS, GEN- 
ERAL AND NATIONAL BANKING OFFICES, COMMISSION 
FORWARDING, REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, 
EXPRESS AND POST OFFICES. 



A Ladies' Department is in successful opera- ^^ 
tion, and all ladies wishing to fit themselves 
thoroughly for positions as Clerks, Cashiers, 
Copyists, Book-Keepers, or Telegraph Operators, 
will find the best facilities at 






SINGLE AND DOUBLE ENTRY BOOK-KEEPINC, PENMANSHIP ARITH- 
'^l]}fl,<'^^^^SPO^O^f*CE, GRAMMAR. READINgTspeLLJNC. MER- 
BAN^'itic'^' ,nS«l^^ BUSINESS, COMMISSION, INSURANCE, 
BANKING, JOBBING, IMPORTING, MINING, RAILROADING, 
BROKERAGE, EXCHANGE, TELEGRAPHY, PHONOG- 
RAPHY, MECHANICAL DRAWING, SURVEY- 
ING, AND MODERN LANGUAGES. 

r.rH^^^^^^' I^'''0'^M-\'!"iON.— Sessions continue day and evening throughout the year Students 
can commence at any time. Scholarships for full six months Business Course ^ItV For fu 1 
particulars, call at the College Office, 24 Post Street, or send for ' ^^' 




^ddSs^ilJ'^' P'P""' published monthly by the College, and sent free of charge to any person 
President Business College, San Francisco, Cal. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. IxXXvii 



;e^<s^in_ :p-^j^T,>?s>^s^ 



"Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 



unmAM uAtm* 

424 KEARNY STREET, 

Between California and Pine, SAN FRANCISCO. 



SAZK ! HAIR!! 

The largest stock of HUMAN HAIR GOODS in the city. Eetailed at wholesale 
prices. I can offer to the public inducements which cannot be superseded by any of my com- 
petitors. All goods warranted as represented. 

HAIR SWITCHES, New Style at $5 

CURL $1 

POMPADOUR BRAIDS, from $2 50 to $4 

GRAY HAIR at moderate prices. 

Remember--'' PYAT'S," 

No. 424 KEARNY STREET, BET. CALIFORNIA AND PINE. 



GEORGE CAMPBELL. E, D. HEATLEY. 

DICKSON, DE WOLF &. CO. 




410, 412 and 414 BATTERY STREET, 



CAMPBELL, HEATLEY & CO. 

11 GEORGE YARD, LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 



SOLE AGENTS OF THE CEIiEBRATED 

Viz.— A. A. A.— CENTURY— EUREKA— CRANSTON— Etc. 



Ixxxviii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PHILADELPHIA 



i 




COB,. SECOXTD AITB FOZiSOM STREZTS, 
SASr ERAJfGISGO. 



I take the present opportunity of thanking my Friends and Customers for the liberal 
support heretofore extended to the 

PHILADELPHIA BREWERY, 

And notify them that I have added to my establishment 

Hew and Extensive Buildings, 

By -which I hope, through the greatly increased facilities now possessed by me, 
to furnish, as usual, a 

mm MTiciE OF m ME tn ucsi m. 

That shall not only equal that previously furnished by me, but convince them that I 
am determined to merit their continued patronage and support. 

JOHN WIELAND. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixxxix 



ELECTRICAL 



FACTORY AND SALESROOM, 

No. 134 SUTTER STREET, SAK FRANCISCO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN ALL KINBS OF 

TELEGRAPH AND ELECTRICAL MACHINERY AND SUPPLIES, 

Wire Insulators and Poles, Hotel Annunciators, Blasting Machines and Fuses, 
Burglar Alarms, Signaling Apparatus, etc. 

CONTRACTORS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF 

Commercial and Private Telegraph Lines, Submarine Telegraph 
Cables, Fire Alarm Telegraphs, etc. 

MAKE TO ORDER, 

Working Models, Experimental Apparatus, and 

Fine Work in Brass and Steel. 



t 



GLOTHIEBS, HERGHANT TAH-OBS 



AND DEALERS IN 



MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS, 

TRUNKS, TRAVELING BAGS, VALISES, ETC. 
e08 MOIVTGOiaBRY STRBST, 

East side, North of Clay, SAN FEAN CISCO. 



Our Merchant Tailoring Department is complete, and all orders from the Country will 
receive prompt attention. Stylish and perfect fitting garments always guaranteed. 

WM- SHERMAN & GO. 



XC SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 

C. D. MOKKZSOXT <& CO. 

SHIPPffle AND FORI ARDINIi MERCHAHTS. 



j^ G E ]SF T S 



STAR Xh LINE, 



PA.CIFIC CO^ST PA^CKETS, 

TO PORTLAND, OREGON, 

PUCET SOUND, W. T. 

OFFICES. 

I 0. 88 FRONT STREET, PORTLAND, OREGON, 

No. 40 CALIFORNIA ST, SAN FRANCISCO. 



SASH, BLIND AND DOOR FACTORY 

3Nr. -W". 003L.E: dte GO. 



ORDERS FOR WORK SOLICITED. 



No. 203 Montgomery Street, near Bush, San Francisco. 

mannfactarer and Impovter of 

Surveyor's Transits, Spectacles, Sextants, 

Leveling; Instruments, Telescopes, Microscopes, 

Compasses, Aneroid Barometers, Magnifying Glasses, 

Leveliug Rods, Mountain Barometers, Magnetic Machines, 

Chains and Scales, Marine Glasses, Hydrometers, 

Drawing Instrniaents, Opera Glasses, Thermometers. . 

Brazilian Pebbles. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 



XCl 



PUBLISHERS' AGENTS, 

413 WASHINGTON STREET, 

Opposite Post Office, ' SAJf FRAJ^CISCO. 



Supply all the Eastern and European 

AT THE LOWEST RATES, 

IN ADVANCE OF THOSE SUBSCRIBING DIEEOT. 



Per 



Popular Science Monthly. 

Overland Monthly 

Harper's Magazine 

Every Saturday 

Atlantic Monthly 

Scribner's Monthly 

The Galaxy 

Lippincott's Magazine 

Catholic World 

Phrenological Journal 

Appleton's Journal 

Chambers' Journal 

International Keview 

North American Review... 

St. Nicholas Magazine 

Godey's Lady's Book 

Leslie's Lady's Magazine. 

Demorest's 

Peterson's Magazine 

Eclectic Magazine 

London Society 

London Belgravian , 

All the Year Round 

London Art Journal 

London Illustrated News. 
London Graphic 



Year. 

^5 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
6 00 
3 00 
00 



Per 



.12 00 
.13 00 
.13 00 



London Dispatch 

London Punch 

Harper's Weekly 

Harper's Bazar 

Leslie's Pictorial 

Leslie's Chimney Corner 

New York Police Gazette 

New York Clipper 1 

New York Ledger 

New York Weekly 

New York Tribune 

New Y'ork Times 

New York Herald 

Scientific American 

Banner of Light 

New York Nation 

A. and N. Journal 

Wilkes' Spirit 

The four Reviews and Blackwood. 

Weekly Sacramento Union 

Weekly S. P. Bulletin 

Weekly S, F. Alta 

Weekly Examiner 

Weekly S. F. Chronicle 

Weekly S. P. Mining Press 

Weekly Commercial Herald 



Year. 
5 00 
8 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
, 5 00 
. 6 00 
. 6 00 
.16 00 
. 5 00 



s^ Complete Price Lists furnished Free on Application. 



XCll SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



»®«ii© Ami mmmmwi, 

Nos. 22 AND 25 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

pPPOSITE THE piCK jioVSE ^NTRANCE. 



PORTRAIT AND LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHS. 



"Work of the finest quality only will be sent from this Gallery. Pictures Colored 
in Crayon, Water or Oil by the best artists. 

OLJR COLLECTIOISr OF 



§t$tiittfll 



#> 



COMPRISING LARGE AND MEDIUM, 

For Portfolios, Framing and Stereoscopes, is the largest and best in the United 
States, if not in the world, securing for us the 



Awarded by the Paris Exposition for Landscape Photographs in California. 

"We cordially invite all to spend a leisure hour or two in examining olir collection, and 
thereby visiting the wonders and beauties of 

Tosemite, the Mammotli Grores, 

COZiUMBZii H.ZVSB., 

And all other places of interest on the Pacific Coast. 



STEREOSCOPIC VIEWS, $1.50 per dozen. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XCIU 



WATERHOUSE & LESTER, 



h^i^opitehs of 




And all kinds of" 



PS . 

as S 



PS 
PS 




O 

2 



S =^ 



COACH, CARRIAGE AND WAGON MATERIALS. 



Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast for 

CLARKE'S ADJUSTABLE 

Carriage UmlDrella 

AND 

WOOLSEY'S 




ini 



Nos. 



CAEEIAGE AND BUG&Y BODIES. 



122 and 124 Market St., and 19 and 21 California St. 

S-A.ISr FK,.A.3SrCISCO. 

17, 19 and 21 SETENTH STREET, BETWEEN I and J, 



NEW^ YORK OFFICE, 
121 and 123 FRONT STREET, - NEW YORK. 



XCIV 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



[FIRST ESTABLISHED SEPTEMBER, 1849.] 

The Pacific Neivs Company 

SUCCESSOHS TO 

J. W. SULLIVAN'S NEWS AG-ENCY. 



J. IZ. STILL <& CO., Managers, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



Booksellers, Stationers, and General Subscrip- 
tion Agents for American and Foreign 
Books, Cheap Publications, News- 
papers and Periodicals. 

NO- 421 W^^SHHSTGTON STREET, 
And No. 1024 MARKET STREET, 

ABOVE FIFTH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

We beg leave to call the attention of the friends of the two old Pioneer Establishments of the Pacific 
Coast, to the consolidation of these two old and popular News Agencies, and return thanks for the very 
liberal patronage bestowed on them for the past twenty-five years. Having tnade very favorable arrange- 
ments with the Eastern publishers, we are now prepared to supply everything in our line with promptness 
and dispatch. We deliver subscribers their papers and magazines to any part of the city free of charge. 



NEWSPAPERS. 

Per Year. 

Appleton's Journal S5 00 

Army & Navy Journal ti 00 

Boston Weekly Journal 3 00 

Boston Pilot 3 00 

Banner of Light 4 00 

Clipper, N. \ 5 00 

Chimney Corner 5 00 

Days Doings 5 00 

Forest and Stream 5 00 

Frank Leslie's Newspaper... 5 00 

" 111. Zeitung.. .5 00 

" " Lady's Jourl 5 00 

Harpers' Weekly 5 00 

Harpers' Bazar 5 00 

Herald, N.Y 3 00 

Hearth and Home 4 00 

Irish American 3 00 

Irish Wiirld 3 00 

Littell's Living Age 8 00 

Ledger, N. Y 3 00 

New Sensation 5 00 

Nation. N. Y 6 00 

N. Y. V^arieties .5 00 

Nat, Police Gazette 5 00 

Police News, Illustrated 5 00 

Saturday Night 3 00 

Scientific American 4 00 

Scottish American 4 00 

Tribune, N. Y 3 UO 

Times, N. Y 3 00 



Per Year. 

World, N. Y 3 00 

Wilkes' Spirit of Times 6 00 

Weekly, N. Y 3 00 

FOREIGN. 

Art Journal 12 00 

Boys of England 3 00 

Bow Bells (13 Nos.) 4 .50 

London Society 6 00 

World of Fashion 5 00 

Young Men of G. Britain 3 00 

Y. Lady's Journal (13 Nos.) 4 50 

London Illustrated News 14 00 

London Illustrated Graphic. 14 00 
London Illustrated Queen... Ifi 00 

London Punch 7 Ou 

London Public Opinion 10 00 

CALIFORNIA PUBLICATIONS. 

S. F. Weekly Alta California 5 00 

Bulletin 3 00 

" Daily Bulletin 12 00 

" Chronicle H 00 

" Call 6 00 

Sacramento Weekly Union... 5 00 

S. F. Weekly Examiner 5 00 

Golden Era 3 50 

" " Monitor 5 00 

" " Cath. Guardian 5 00 

" Scientific & Min. Press.. 4 00 
" Courier de S. Francisco 10 00 



S. F. News Letter 7 00 

" Commercial Herald and 

Market Review 9 00 

Overland Monthly 4 00 

Pacific Kural Press 4 00 



MAGAZINES. 



Atlantic Monthly 

Aldine,The 

Boys of America 

Ballou's Magazine 

Budget of Fun (comic) 

Blackwood's Magazine 

Do. with 4 Reviews 

Comic Monthly 

Demorest's Magazine 

Eclectic Magazine 

Every Saturday, Mo. Parts.. 

Frank Leslie's Magazine 

Galaxy Magazine 

Godoy's Lady's Book 

Harper's Magazine 

Le Bon Ton (Fashions) 

Nick Nax (comic) 

Peterson's Magazine 

Popular Science Monthly 

Scribner's Monthly 

St. Nicholas Magazine 

Wildcats 

Yankee Notions 



4 00 

5 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
4 00 

15 00 

2 00 

4 00 

5 00 
5 00 
4 00 
4 00 

3 00 

4 00 
ti 00 
2 00 

2 00 

5 00 
4 00 

3 00 
3 00 
2 00 



fl^^Any other Jfewspaper or Magazine not in this List will be Supplied to Order. 



CHARLES W. STILL, NO. 1024 MARKET STREET. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XCV 



HAWKINS & CANTRELL, 

Nos. 210 and 212 Beale Street, 

Near Howard, SAN FRANCISCO. 



MiA.IS^XJF'A.CTrrRERS OJF" 



i@.nim 



rii 



llfH 



And all kinds of 



Mill and Miziing Machinery. 

N. B.--JOBBING AND REPAIRING DONE WITH DISPATCH. 



NEWMAN & BENNETT, 



mw 



mo. 411 WASHINGTON STREET, 

P. O. Box 1369. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

RESIDENT AGENTS FOR 

McKESSON & KOBBINS, Drugs and Chemicals New York. 

HAGEKTY BKOTHERS & CO., Druggists' Glassware, etc New York. 

READ HOLLIDAY'S SONS, Aniline Dyes, etc.Huddersfield, Eng., and N. Y. 

HOADLEY & LECKLER, Herbs, Roots, etc New York. " 

JOHNSTON, HOLLOWAY & CO., Patent Medicines, etc Philadelphia. 

J. H. GEMRIG, Surgical Instruments, etc Philadelphia. 

CHARLES LIPPINCOTT & CO., Soda Water Apparatus, etc Philadelphia. 

BULLOCK & CRENSHAW, Sugar Coated Pills and Granules Philadelphia. 

TURNER & WAYNE, Druggists' Fancy Goods Philadelphia. 

J. C. GARWOOD, Fine Perfumeries Philadelphia. 

GIBSON & CO., Lithographers, etc Cincinnati. 

F. E. SUIRE & CO., Fluid and Solid Extracts, etc Cincinnati. 

EUGENE RIMMEL, Fine Perfumeries London and Paris. 



XCVl 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



H A. Plate. 



FJUA^TE &, CO., 




Wm. B. Coteel. 



€f» 









«. n* QA999T 



* 



^ 




No, 585 MARKET STREET, NEAR SECOND, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XCVll 



GRAY'S MUSIC STORES, 

623 and 625 CLAY ST. and 101 FIRST STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO, 

PIANOS, 

STEINWAY & SONS, 
Haines Bros., 

Guild, Church & Co. 
Kranich & Bach, 

And the be?t Upright Pianos imported, made to 
any order, by Carl Reonisch, in Dresden. Every 
Piano guaranteed for Five Years. 



PORTLAND, OR. 

ORG-ANS, 

THE BURDETT, 

National, 
Celeste and 
Combination Organs, 

Are pronounced by all who hear them to be the 
perfection of genius in reed instruments. They are 
fully warranted to stand every climate. 



The attention of all interested is called to the fact of my having the largest and best 
selected stock of American and Foreign Sheet Music, Books and Musical Instruments of 
direct importation, for sale at lowest market prices, wholesale or retail. 



GEORGE MORROW. 



WILLIAM SCOTT. 



GEORGE MORROW & CO. 

Commission Merchants, 



AND DEALERS IN 



:Wi 



39 CLAY STREET and 28 COMMERCIAL STREET, 

Between Drumm and Bast, SAN PRANOISOO. 



St Louis Art and Photographic Gallory, 

FROM 315 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
'Will Ox>Oix ^ 3>3"E3T7^ ®TXJl>ic> 

CORNER POST AND KEARNY STREETS, 

Opposite the White House, JULY 1st, 1874. 

All work guaranteed. 



The very best Artists employed. 



10 



XCVlll 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 



AGENT FOR 

lASTlBI lANDMGTnSIBS, 

ITo. 316 Clay Street, San Francisco, 

IR.B:F'T=l.ESElSn?IKrO- : 

The NEW ENGLAND GLASS CO., of Boston, manufacturers of 
fine Table-Ware, Kerosene Lamps, etc. ^ „ .^ ^ 

The BOSTON INDEXICAL SOAP CO., manufacturers of Toilet 
Soaps in large varieties. ^. o, , * 

J. W. TUFTS, manufacturer of the celebrated Arctic Soda Appara- 

WM. PICKHARDT & KUTTROFF, New York, importers of Chemi- 
cals, Dye Stuff's, etc. 

A. POIRRIER, Paris, France, celebrated Aniline Dyes. 

C. F. KNAPP, Philadelphia, Perfumery 

W H SAVOURroiN. Philadelphia, Toilet Powders. 

LEHLYEAN & BOLTON, Philadelphia, Druggists' Labels and Books. 

PEET VALVE CO., Boston, Steam, Gas and Water Valves. 

WM. R. WARNER & CO., Philadelphia, manufacturers of Sugar 
Coated Pills, Medicinal Elixirs, Fluid Extracts, etc. 



EATOH & IBWARB! 

Counting House, Bank and Insurance 



> 



DIKE CT IMPORTERS OF 



F. & I Atmlln Writmi liili I CQ|jjmg III, 

WHATMAN'S DEAWING & WRITING PAPERS, 



• AND- 



JOSEPH GILLOTT & SONS' STEEL PENS, 

All of which will he offered in quantities to suit, at reasonable rates. 

Nos. 413 and 415 Sansom Street, corner of mmercial. 



ADVERTISINO DEPARTMENT. XCIX 



A. BiCSWllIiljf 

BOOK BINDER, 



-AND- 



BLANK BOOK HANDFAGTDBES, 

No. B09 CLAY STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 









CH? ZiT7XTC A CO. 

IMPOKTERS AND DKALERS IN 

CANTON CRAPE EMB. SILK SHAWLS, 

LACQUERED WOOD FANS, 

SHiK HANDKERCHIEFS, GRASS OLOTH, SATIN 
APRONS, and all kinds of CHINESE GOODS, 

640 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

Between Kearny and Montgomery, SAN FRANCISCO. 



^ 



^ 



CHINESE AND JAPANESE BAZAAR 



Wmm^y C#o4i» mm.4 Cmrl^slM^s 

Received Direct from China and Japan by every Steamer. 

The finest collection in the city, at lowest rates. 

CHIN Li:£ &, CO., 324 Kearny St., bet. Pine and Bush. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 




HXTTHmGH & CO. 

HOiU 






Brittan's Building, 109 California Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
AGENTS MOODY'S SAW MILLS, BURRARD INLET, B. C. 



ANDREW WELCH & CO. W^ELCH, RITHET & CO. 

19 Tower Chambers, Liverpool, Eng. Victoria, British Columbia. 



ISAAC E. DAVIS. HENRY CO WELL. 

DAVIS «& CO'^ELZ., 



DEA-LERS IN" 



SANTA CRUZ AND SACRAMENTO LIME, 

Cement, Plaster, Hair, Marble Dust, Fire Tile, 
COR. FRONT AND WASHINGTON STREETS, 



. J". mV.IC3rHT', 

(Successor to JOB M. SEAMANS,) 

Manufacturing Jeweler, Watchmaker, 



And DEALER IN 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, DIAMONDS, Etc. 

Repairing of every description neatly executed and warranted. 

No. 138 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



A. S. ROSENBAUM & CO. 

FINE HAVANA CIGrARS, 

TOBACCO, ETC. 

And Sole Agents for the Celebrated Peach Cake Navy Tobacco, 

COR. CALIFORNIA AND BATTERY STS. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. CI 








FRANK EASTMAN, 

Book, Card and Fancy 

JOB PRINTER 

509 GImAY STREKT^ 

NEAR SANSOM, &^J^ WMm^€IB€Q. 



Every style of •w^ork required by Merchants, Mechanics, Lavryers, In- 
surance Companies, Banks, etc., correctly, tastefully, speedily 
and elegantly executed at this long established House. 

The Proprietor has added every desirable improvement in 

PYJPl AMI MAmilEl 



That the business demands. 
Novelty and Originality of Design in the execution of 

i^lk.ii\ ki\d S^ki^dy Job -Lfintiq^ 

Will receive his prompt attention ; and he hopes, by fair dealing and low prices, to suit 
all who may favor him with their patronage. 



CIV SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PARROTT & CO. 

• ■ . 

IMPORTERS 



jQ^lSTJD 



niyommission J^)erchants, 



1 



HM if £111 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



I 



RODGERS, MEYER & CO, 



S-A.lsr FI^.A-ITCISOO. 



ROBERT RODGERS & CO. 



• ■ ^ w ■ ■ 








fCiltS, 



5 

GRAIN SHIPPERS. 



Dra^v Exchange on Europe. 



AL/VERTISING DEPARTMENT 



CV 



T. H. KING <£ CO. 

(Successors to J. D. CASEBOLT Ss CO.) 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IX 

CARRIAGE AND WAGON MATERIALS, 



Carriage Hardware, 
Mail or Coach Axles, 
Half Patent Axles, 
Concord Axles, 
Axle and Spring Clip, 
Carriage & Hre Bolts 
Fifth Wheels, 
Carriage Steps, 
Dash Frames, 
Felloe Plates, 
Whiffletree Bolts, 
Whiffletree Plates, 
Carriage Springs, 




Hubs, 

Spokes, 

Rims, 

Felloes, 

Shafts, 

Poles, 

Whiffletrces, 

Neck Yokes, 

Bows, 

Oak, 

Ash, 

Hickory, 

Whitewood. 



MALLEABLE IRON I CARRIAGES and WAGONS, 
Carriage Trimming Goods, 

ENAMELED LEATHERS, DUCK DRILLS AND RUBBER CLOTH, 

LINING AND TUFTING NAILS AND BUTTONS— ALL COLORS, 

SHELTON TACKS, CARRIAGE KNOBS, 

SEAMING CORDS, TWINE, BUCKRAM, 

CARRIAGE LACES, FRINGES, TASSELS, CORDS AND CLOTHS, 

CARRIAGE MOUNTINGS -SILVER OR GOLD PLATED, 

POLE AND SHAFT TIPS, HUB BANDS, DOOR HANDLES. 

SARVEN PATENT WHEELS; 

WAGON, BUGGY AND PHAETON BODIES; 

CARRIAGE, STAGE AND BUGGY LAMPS. 

11 



CVl 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



TKCE! 



Washington 



< 

3 



LU 
0. 





< 

a 
m 

z 
o 

> 
z 
z 
c 
> 



I<ife Ii\^ufcLr^de Corqpaiiy 



OF' jsriDATV "^of^k:. 



CASH ASSETS, near - $5,000,000.00 

[Policies I-Ield Oood bv Dividends. 



The following instances, taken from the Books of the Company, show the effect of the 
Non-Forfeitable feature of Dividends in THE WASHINGTON. Each Policy was 
paid by the Company, although the last payment remained unpaid at the death of the 
Policy holder. 

Policy No. 2,480— W. H. .Johnson, Mass., $2,500; premium due January 11, 1868; amount of dividend, 
:S24 94. carried Policy to Ai>ril IS', ISi.S. Died March 14, 18^8. 

Policy No. 12,172— M. L. Ta,\ lor. Ills., $5,000; premium due Dctober 20, 1869; amount of dividend,. 
831 54, carried Policy to December 25, ISiiii. Died November 10, ISo'.t. 

Policy No. 8;)4— S. Carman, N. Y., $1,000 ; premium due February 2ij, 1871 ; amount of dividend 
852 85, carried Policy to February 24, 187:5. Died September 16, 1871. 

Policy No. IH.OdO— H. Shippen, I'a., S5,000 ; premium due December 11, 1871; amount of dividend 
$92 73, carried Policy U .January 22, 1872. Died January 19, 1872. 

Policy No. 1,779—1. B. Swift, N. Y., Sl.OOO; premium due May 14, 1871; amount of dividend $34 02 ; 
carried Policy to November 11, 1872. Died March 3. 1872. 

Policy No. 5.563— B. Windofier, ()., jfl.OOO ; premium due January 2:^, 1872 ; amount of dividend 37 50, 
carried Policy to April 2«, 1872. Died April 13, 1872. 

N. B. — No Solicitors employed. The Commissions usually allowed to them will be 
given in Cash to those Persons applying directly at the OtBces for their insurance. 

EIDTVZXT ZiS'WZS, Manager, 

433 Montj2;omei*y Street, 
Over Donohoe, Kelly & Go's Bank, San Francisco. 
JNO, E. KOKLER, M. D., Medical Director Pacific Coast, 514 Kearny St., S. F, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. CVll 



S C « S X * T 

SAVINGS BANK 



President - - JOHN PAKROTT. | ViOE-PRTisrDKNT, JEROME LINCOLN. 

3D II^"B CT OE.S - 

F. D. Atherton, James Oti^, John Parrott, James D, Walker, 

L Friedlander, Adam Grant, John Morton, Jerome Lmcoln, 

S. L. Jones. 

Secrktary, - - T. F. BACON. | Attorney, - - SIDNEY V. SMITH. 

ORDINARY AND TERM DEPOSITS RECEIVED. 



3SrO O H A. T?, C3- E r O I?, E IST T I?, A. IST O E EEE 



Loans made on Real Estate and other approved Securities. 



0ffic3, No. 304 Sausom S:., Frieilander's Bldg., opp. Bank of California. 



CHARLK8 CLAYTON. JOS?- W. JORDAN. 



Commission Merchants 

IN GRAIN AND FLOUR, 

AGENTS FOR THE "SANTA OLAM" FLOUE MILLS, 

Northeast Corner Front and Clay Streets, 



HERMAN WENZEL, 

I3S<d*OT^TER. OE 

Watches, Jewelry and Clocks, 

NO. 13 MONTGOMERY AVENUE, 

S.W. Side, between Washington and Jackson Streets, SAN FRANCISCO. 



CVlll 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



!E^qkir\eled kr\(i JVE^fMei^ed 




IRON MANTELS 



These Mantels are in general use in the Eastern States, and are, for 
cheapness, durability and beauty, preferred. They "will not Rust, Chip, 
Stain, or Warp, and are perfect imitations of the Marbles they Repre- 
sent. These Mantels are placed in the following first-class Hotels in 
Chicago, viz.: Palmer, Sherman, Gardner and Madison; also, in most of 
the Buildings, public and private, erected since the G-reat Fire. They 
are also placed in the Elegant Cincinnati Hotel in Cincinnati, just com- 
pleted, and the G-ibson House, recently enlarged and remodeled — both 
first-class. 

I am instructed by the Manufacturers to give full guarantee to 
everybody as to durability, etc. 

Purchasers should make selections Thirty Days in advance, in order 
to give ample time for transit of goods. I cordially invite inspection. 

6. A. POTTBR, 

AGEMT FO^R THE (PACIFIC COAST, '■ 

1214 M^RKST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, 



CIX 








VIEWS OF BUILDINGS, 

MACHINERY, PORTRAITS, 
SEALS, AUTOGRAPHS, 

MAPS, PAPER HEADINGS, 
TINTED ENVELOPES, 

MONOGRAMS, CATALOGUE 

And book ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Designs and information given fraeof chargoon application, by mail or otherwis3. Tartias living at 
a distance can havo engravings mada by foi.ding a photograph of the article or sketch on paper, and 
they may rely on the work b.ingdone with proinptnesfi and in a satisfaclorj mar.ner. 



FOR BEAUTY OF DESI&W AKD CAREFUL EXECUTION. 

POSTERS AND THEATRICAL SHOW BILL WORK A SPECIALTY. 



Special attention given to 



COLORED WORK. RAILROAD HEADINGS, ETC. 



528 CALIFORNIA STREET, ROOM 14, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ex 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



i^^ ^^'IS'= "'^r,,^^ 




i 



Market Street 



Near Kearny, 



nn f 



We Cut more or less Spring, as desired. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED "SIGNET" WHISKY. 

^OHN KIRKPA TRICK, 



im 



J. s, Mcctri 

mPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Fine Wines and Liquors| 

313 PINE STREET, San Francisco. | 

Sole Agents for the Celebrated Flint Stone Rye. 



t} 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Cxi 

C A ft f* S T S • 

WALL PAPER WAREHOUSE. 

tWe keep constantly on hand the largest assortment on the Pacific Coast of 
VELVET, BODY BRUSSELS, AXMENSTER, 

Tapestry Brussels, Belgique, Three-Ply Ingrain, 

UTCH, HEMP & VENETIAN CARPETS, 
COTELINES, REPS, TERRY, DAMASK, PLUSH, 

And a full and well - selected Stock of 

UTAIITS & ITPHOLSTEEY GOODS, 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, 



ALSO, 



^Mi PAPER AND DECORATIONS. 

OF THE NEWEST STYLES AND PATTERNS. 

i Call and see us before purchasing elsewhere. We will endeavor to suit you, both as to 
liuality and price. 

Do not forget the Store, as it is the only Carpet Store on Clay Street. 

FRANK G. EDWARDS, 

628, 630, 632 and 634 CLAY STREET, 

AND 



CXii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



^^^,,V#AtD TOBACCO COMP,^^ 



GIL.ROY CIGARS, 

MADE OF CALIFORNIA-UROWN TOBACCO. 

(Zz^ ALSO, v^r:? 

SMOKING TOBACCO, 

tTnequaled for Delicacy and depth of Flavor by any Tobacco for Pii 

Smoking or Cigarette. 

Golden Thread Smoking Tobacco, 

MANUFAOTUBBD AND FOR SALE BY THE 

CONSOLIDATED TODAGCO GOIBP^ 



304 PINE STREET, 

SADIST FI^A-ITOISCO. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 

For the Year commencing April, 1874, 

EMBRACING A 

GENERAL DIRECTORY OF RESIDENTS 

A KD A 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY; 

ALSO, 

A DIRECTORY OF STREETS, PUBLIC OFFICES, ETC. 

AND A RELIABLE MAP OF THE CITY. 

TOGETHER WITH 

The Consolidation Act and its Amendments; Officers of the Municipal Government, 
Societies, and other Organizations, and a great variety of Useful 
and Statistical Infornaation. 

EXHIBITING AT A GLANCE 

THE PAST HISTORY AND PRESENT CONDITION OF THE CITY. 



FIFTEENTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. 



COMPILED BY 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, 

EDITOR OF " PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTORY," " STATE REGISTER," AND " PACIFIC COAST ALMANAC." 



DEPOTS FOR THE SALE OF THIS WORK: 

Office of the Directory, No. 612 Clay Street, up stairs; A. Eoman <fe Co., 11 Montgomery Street ; 

Sumner Whitney, 613 Clay Street ; A. L. Bancroft & Co., 721 Market Street ; White & Bauer, 

413 Washiugtoa Street, and W. E. Loomis, S. E. corner Washington and Sansom streets. 

PJtICE, FIVE DOLZABS, GOLD COIN. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

HENRY Q. LANGLEY, PUBLISHER, 612 CLAY STREET. 

Francis & Valentine, Commercial Steam Presses, 517 Clay Street. 
18 7 4. 



:E^rojDa.rii:Lg for TxxxrxxGc3i±SLt& I^TJLTolication.. 

SAN Francisco" illustrated, 

C3::S=- ® W I D IE m >a & m ^:^:r^ . 
SAN FRANCISCO AND ITS ENVIRONS j 

EXHIBITING AT A GLANCE 

What can be seen in and around the METROPOLIS OF THE PACIFIC, and How to See It with 
References to the Early History of the City, Its Early Settlers, Public Buildings, etc. ' 

ILLUSTRATED WITH NUMEROUS ENGRAVINGS, MAPS, Etc. 

One Volume, 12 mo, 21Q pages. p,,-,,^ ^^^^ DOLLAR. 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, Publisher. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year one thousand eight hundred and seyenty-four. 
>'n \ r\ H- In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



19G6 

/. j^EW jVIORE ^ETS ONLY JIemAIN ON HaND. 



THE 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 

FROM 1854 to 1873. 

Sixteen Volumes Octavo, the whole For-nxing 

A COMPLETE AND RELIABLE HISTORY OF THE 

CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

From its first settlement to the present time. I 

i^ox- Sa.le, - - - lE^rlco, S30.00. 
HENRY G. LANGLEY, Publisher, 

61S CIjA.''2' STK-EET- 



I>REFA.TO]RY. 



The most abundant evidences of the continued and prosperous growth of the city are to be found 
throughout the pages of the present vohime. Notwithstanding the rapid increase of former years it 
is believed that this cky has made greater progi'ess during the past twelve months than any similar 
period in its history. 

The number of references contained in the present volume is 109,210, as follows : General R gister, 
75,210; Business Directory, 21,000; Appendix, 13,000. The population of the city is estimated at 
200,770, a gain since March, 1873, of 12,447, or about seven per cent. The article on population, on page 
13, contains valuable data on this subject to which attention is respectfully invited. 

The number of buildings commenced and erected during the year ending March 1, 1874, is 671, of 
which 53 are of brick. In addition to numerous extensive buildings for business purposes, a number 
of elegant private residences have been erected that would ornament any city of the Union. The 
entire cost of these improvements is estimated at $4,250,000. The number of buildings in the city and 
county is estimated at 22,600, of which 4,200 are of brick. 

The expense of maintaining the Municipal Government for the year ending June 30, 1873, is 
$3,780,000. The Bonded Debt, March 1, 1874, is $3,237,000. Actual Debt, including floating, $3,503,000. 
Total assessed real and personal property October 1, 1873, $212,208,535. 

The appendix contains a variety of valuable information connected with the Municipal Organiza- 
tion of the city, and the Consolidation Act, with the Amendments, and the important laWs reftrring 
thereto, adopted by the Legislature of the State, Session 1873-74, including the Acts regulating the 
Fire Department, abolishing the City Hall Commissioners, regulating the levying and collection 
of taxes. Board of Health, providing for public Water Works, etc., each of which is arranged under its 
appropriate head, to which has been added an Analytical Index of the whole, which will facilitate 
reference thereto. There will be also found in this department of the work a large number of refer- 
ences to the different organizations in this city, embracing lists of the Federal, State, and Municipal 
Officers, notices of local Societies and Associations, Churches, Military Organizations, Incorporations, 
etc. Attention is invited to a corrected Map of the City and County of San Francisco, and a revised 
Street Directory, including the new system of numbering the buildings, both of which have been 
compiled from official sources, thoroughly revised, and carefully compared with each street and 
locality named therein. 

The Introductory and General Review present a diary of the interesting local events of the year, 
brief notices of Schools, public and private, Benevolent Associations, Mining and other Incorpora- 
tions and references to the different mechanical enterprises in operation at the present time in this 
city, together with other subjects worthy of special mention and historical data of present interest, 
well calculated to make the book a valuable work of reference to future generations. But the most 
interestii)g features of this department are valuable contributions on the Population of the City; 
Meteorology and Climate of San Francisco from 1851 to 1874, by Henry Gibbons, Sen., M.D. ; the 
Current History and progress of the City, 1873-74 by Thomas Magee, Esq.; Hospitals, public and pri- 
vate, by Henry Gibbons, Jr., M.D.; the Progress and Present condition of the Public Schools, by 
Prof. E. Knowlton, etc.; also, a statement of the operations of the Benevolent and other Societies of 
the city during the past year; a review of the manufacturing interests of the city, and a statement of 
the number of buildings within the city limits. 

The compiler again respectfully tenders his acknowledgments for the prompt co-operation 
extended by the different public officers, and other gentlemen who have been applied to for informa- 
tion for the work. To his numerous friends for their liberal patronage, and to Messrs. Francis & 
Valentine, by whom the typogi-aphical department was executed, he would especially tender his 
thanks. The sixteenth volume of the San Fbancisco Dteectoey will be issued in March, 1875. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

ALPHABETICAL LISTS OF ADVERTISERS 5 and 9 

CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS 6 

PROGRESS OF THE CITY 11 

Assessments and Rates of Taxation 1850- 1874.... 11 

Municipal Expenditures 1865-1873 12 

Bonded Debt 12 

Annual Revenue 13 

Population San Francisco, 1873-1874 13 

Federal Census San Francisco, 1870 14 

CURRENT HISTORY 15 

Real Estate, etc 16 

Buildings erected in 1873 16 

Number of Buildings City and County 18 

Value of Ctiurch Property 18 

Leading Hotels, etc ." , 19 

Rates of Interest, Savings Banks 19 

United States SUnt Operations, 1873 19 

Postal Facilities of San Francisco 19 

Central Pacific Railroad 20 

Southern Pacific Railroad 20 

California Pacific Railroad 20 

Street Railroads 21 

Ocean Steamship Lines 24 

Shipping and Lumber Trade 27 

Growth and Manufacture of Tobacco 28 

Places of Amusement 28 

Parks and Pleasure Resorts 30 

Drives in the Vicinity 31 

BANKING AND INSURANCE 32 

Savings Banks 32 

Commercial Banks 33 

National Gold Banks 34 

METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS 34 

CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY 37 

GENERAL REVIEW 43 

Our Public Schools 43 

General Statistics, 1871-72 51 

Location of Schools and Average Attendance... 52 

Private Educational Institutions 53 

St. Ignatius' College 53 

Santa Clara College 53 

Heald's Bu.siness College 53 

Medical Colleges 54 

California College of Pharinacy 54 

BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATIONS 54 

HOSPITALS 56 

CEMETERIES 58 

ASSOCIATIONS-PROTECTIVE, ETC 5S 

MANUFACTURES 58 

Iron Foundries 58 

Pacific Saw Manufacturing Co 58 

Selby Smelting Works...... 58 

Woolen Mills 5J 

A. S. Hallidie's Wire Works 59 

San Francisco Cordage Factory 59 

Leather and Harness 60 

Silk Manufacture 60 

Cigar Manufacture 60 

Pacific Chemical Works 60 

Browell's Salamander Chimnej' Stacks 60 

WATER COMPANIES 60 

Spring Valley Water Works 60 

CHANGES AND REMOVALS 61 

REGISTER OF NAMES 63 

BUILDINGS, BLOCKS, HALLS, ETC 707 

Public Buildings, Halls, 7.')7 

Blocks, Rows, Wharves 708 

Places of Amusement 708 

Prominent Places 708 

KEY TO PUBLIC OFFICES 709 

State 709 

City and County 709 

Federal 709 

CITY ORDINANCE-Hack and Cab Fares 710 

STREET DIRECTORY 711 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY, TRADES, ETC 729 

CONS. ILIDATION ACT 837 

Municipal Elections 843 

Paid Fire Department 844 

Coroner and Duties 848 

Police Judge's Court 853 

Harbor Police Regulations 854 

Increased Police Force 854 

Amended School Law 8-58 

Finances Board Education 862 

New Street Law.^ 864 

Vacating Streetsand Market Places 875 

Drifting Sand on Improved Streets 875 

LegUlizing Grades of Certain Streets 876 

Finance Committee . 884 

Roads and Highways 885 

Opening and Extending Streets 8S6 

Modif3'lug Street Grades 886 



PAGE. 

CONSOLIDATION ACT— (Continued). 

Establishing Street Grades 888 

Changing Grades of Streets 888 

Police Contingent Fund 889 

Additional Powers Board of Supervisors, and 

Salaries 889 

Authorizing Payment of certain Claims, 1874 889 

Authorizing payment of deficiencies of 1873 890 

Abolishing City Hall Commissioners 891 

Organizing Justices' Courts 893 

Authorizing Sessions Supreme Court to be held 

in San Francisco 894 

Estabhshing Municipal Court 895 

Collection State and Municipal Licenses 896 

Assessment and Collection of Taxes, 1874 897 

Providing for Building House of Correction 898 

Management of Industrial School 899 

Authorizing Public Water .Works 900 

Quarantine Law 905 

Analytical Index 909 

MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 911 

Board of Supervisors 911 

Board of Education 912 

_ City and County Officers 913 

ELECTION DLSTRICTS 914 

Congressional 914 

Judicial 914 

City and County 914 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 915 

FIRE ALARM AND POLICE TELEGRAPH 916 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 917 

Officers and Organization 917 

FEDERAL OFFICERS 919 

Custom House 920 

United States Treasury 920 

United States Mint 921 

Surveyor-General 921 

Po.st-Office 922 

STATE OFFICERS 922 

STATE APPOINTEES 923 

COURTS 923 

CHURCHES ■.".■.■.;■. .'.■.■.■.; ..'.".■........ 924 

Baptist 924 

Congregationalist 925 

Episcopal .j_a26_ 

Evangelical Lutheran ..J«928l> 

Hebrew 929 

Methodist 930 

Presbyterian 931 

Roman Catholic 933 

Swedenborgian 935 

Unitarian 936 

Universalist 936 

Mariners' Church 936 

Swedish Evangehcal Union 936 

Second Advent Christian 9-36 

Seventh Day Adventists , 936 

Disciples of Christ 936 

Independent German 937 

Re-organized Church of Latter Day Saints 937 

Christain Brethern 937 

Russian Church 9-37 

Spiritualist Union 937 

Independent Spiritualists 937 

Lyceum for Mutual Culture 937 

Lyceum for Self Culture 937 

ASSOCIATIONS AND SOCIETIES 937 

Religious 937 

Benevolent 939 

Masonic Fraternity 950 

I. O. of Odd Fellows 953 

TemlJerance 954 

Protective 956 

Literary 960 

Historical 960 

Social 962 

MILITARY 965 

NEWSPAPERS 806 

PERIODICALS 806 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 779 

HOMESTEAD ASSOCIATIONS 776 

MINING COMPANIES 803 

TELEGRAPH LINES 831 

RAILROADS 817 

OCEAN STEAMERS 968 

STEAMBOATS 968 

STAGES 825 

EXPRESSES 763 

INCORPORATED COMPANIES 777 

CONSULS 756 

HOSPITALS 776 

CEMETERIES 968 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. i and 969 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF ADVERTISERS 

[Numerals refer to advertisements in front and figures to the end of volume.] 



PAGE. 

^tna Ins. Co., register 

of names side line 

Aid Union -.Ix 

Allen C. C 21 

Amos <fe Davis 32 

Angell, Palmer & Cc.xlvii 
Anglo-Californian Bank.xii 

Armes & Dallam xxxiii 

Atlas Fire Ins. Co., reg. 

of names 70 

Atwood & Bodwell 4 

Bacon & Co., back of 

volume 

Badger W. G xl 

Baker & Hamilton 3 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., 

Ixxxiii 
Bandmann, Nielsen & 

Co xxxvi 

Bank British Columbia.xiii 

Bank British N. A xx 

Bank of California x 

Barli A. & Co Ixvii 

Bay Sugar Retlnery 28 

Beers John B 3 

Belling'm Bay Coal Co.lxix 

Bennett & Page ciu 

Bergson Ole xliu 

Bernard Charles xxv 

Beth esda Mineral Spring 

Water xlviii 

Betts Spring Co 32 

Bl'k Diamond Coal Co..lxix 

Blake. Bobbins & Co Ixiii 

Boericke & Tafel, regis- 
ter of names 108 

Boesch Emile 26 

Bonnev O. Jr W 

Bosqui EiUvard & Co., 

reg. of names.. .side line 
Boston Cracker Bakery.,.49 

Bowen Bros 16 and back 

of volume 

Brader Henry 57 

Bragg Robert 47 

Braverman & Levy.. ..front 
cover 

Brigham C. O. & Co ciii 

Brittan, Holbrook & Co., 

register of names 827 

Britton & Rey, register 

of names 792 

Browell Jeremiah..3, 29, and 
45 

Burke William F Ixv 

Burnham James W. & 

Co 17 

BuswellA xcix 

Butler Theodore A 35 

California Bellows Man- 
ufacturing C0..24 and 

Ixxvi 

California Ins. Co Ivi 

California Italian Paste 

Co Ivli 

California Ore Sampling 

Mills 27 

California Sugar Re- 
finery xxxi 

Cameron & Hull 52 

Chesley G. W. & Co xxix 

Chin Lee & Co xcix 

China Trans-Pacific S. 

S. Co vii 

Chinese Ins. Co. (Limit- 
ed), reg. of names 764 

Church T. R xlviii 

Church & Clark, regis- 
ter of names 765 

Chy Lung & Co xcix 

City Iron Works 29 

Clabrongh <fe Bros xlv 

Clark N. <fe Co Ix.xi 

Claussenius George 55 

Clayton C. & Co cvii 

Cole N. W. <& Co xc 



PAGE. 

Coleman W. T. *; Co xxi 

Colorado Steam Navi- 
gation Co viii 

Commercial Ins. Co...xxxv 
Connecticut Mutual Ltfe 

Ins. Co in 

Consolidated Tobacco 

Co cxii 

Cook C. Mrs 43 

Cook H.N Ill 

Corin Joseph 31 

Corville Emerson & Co xliv 

Crane & Brigham Ixxu 

Crawford A. L. & Co In 

Croskey & Whan 57 

Crowell J. P 34 

Crystal Soda Water Co..lvii 

Cubery & Co Ivn 

Culver & Leonard 33 

Cummings W. H 31 

Curry F. 1 12 

Curtis J. P 34 

Davis & Cowell c 

Day Thomas front cover 

and reg. of names 10!) 

Deacon & Bulger 23 

Dean E. B. & Co xxxiv 

Dickson, DeWolf & 

Co Ixxxvli 

Doane & Co., register of 
names, 809, and back 

cover 

Dobrzensky M 43 

Dolliver & Brother 27' 

Eastman Frank ci 

Easton John 56 

Eaton & Edwards xcviii 

Edwards Frank G cxi 

Egerton, Allen & Co xl 

Eitner Rudolf. Ixxvii 

Electrical Const. Co..lxxxix 

Excelsior Mill Co Ixxix 

Farmers' and Mechan- 
ics' Bankof Sav xlvii 

Farnsworth & Clark, reg. 
of names, bottom line 

Farwell & Co xxiv 

Fenner O. B 45 

Fireman's Fund Ins. 

Co front cover 

Flint. Peabody & Co Ixv 

Florence S. M. Co., bot- 
tom edge of volume 
Francis & Valentine, 

register of names 11 

Fratinger & Noll, regis- 
ter of names 567 

Frear Stone Co 18 

Freeman B. H. & Co Hi 

Friedhofer Paul 18 

Friel William 58 

Gadsby E. H xcvi 

Gallagher James J Ixxi 

Gannon Peter T li 

Garratt W. T 12 

Gerke Henry 11 

German Savings and L. 

Society Ix 

GillerC. L 41 

Oilman & Mellon 53 

Glasgow Iron and Metal 

Importing Co 9 

Goddard & Co xix 

Golden Eagle Hotel liv 

Goodall, Nelson & Per- 
kins, reg. of names.. .826 
and xlili 

Goodwin & West 13 

Gracier Francis J 9 

Gray M xcvil 

Gray N. & Co xlix 

Greene Charles 52 

Greenwood William M., 

xxxiv 

Griffith A. J 36 

Grosh & Rutherford 28 



PAGE. 

Gump S. & G Ixvii 

Haight A. J...xxxviii and c 

Hall John L Ixiv 

Hallidie A. S Ixxxv 

Hamburg Bremen Fire 

Insurance Co Iviii 

Hanlv George T. & Co 54 

Hanscom & Co 10 

Haskell & Bode Ixxm 

Hawkins <fc Cantrell xcv 

Heald's Business Col- 
lege, Ixxxvi, and reg- 
ister of names 321 

Helbing & Straus xxvni 

Hendy Joshua 21 

Hering F. A 38 

Heverin M.inside back cov 
HiberniaS. &L. Society 

xxiv 
Hicks D. & Co., register 

of names 739 

Hinckley C. D 33 

Hinckley & Co 16 

Hinz Carl 37 

Hirshfield R Ixix 

Holt Bros Ixiv 

Home Ins.Co. (New York) 

back of volume 
House worth Thos. & Co. 
front and back covers, 
reg. of names 619, and ii 

Howes George & Co xvi 

Howland B. F. & Co 41 

Howland, Sullivan & 

Co xliii 

Hucks, Lambert & Greene 
53 

HuntE. 6 

Huntington F. A Ixii 

Hyde & Chester 41 

Imperial Fire Ins. Co Ivi 

India Rice Mill xxxiv 

Iredale A. S 43 

Irwin R. B. & Co xvn 

and register names...764 

Jesse & Drew 34 

Johnson J. C. & Co U 

Johnson T. Rodgers, in- 
side back cover 
Jordan M., Ixxxi, and 

front cover 

Kallenberg Theodore 35 

Keller Henry &. Co. , reg. 

of names 739 

Kellett William F., back 

cover 
Kelly Pa trick.... back cover 

Kendall, Klinger & Co 2 

Kennedy L. W., register 

of names top line 

King T. H. & Co cv 

Kirkpatrick <fe McCue ex 

Knowles George B 38 

Koehler & Ritter, regis- 
ter of names 108 

Kohler & Frohling front 

cover 

Kuh Leopold liii 

Kuner A 25 

Laird D. W..lxxv and 

register of names 738 

Langland N. P Uv 

Langley H. G., reg. of 
names 610 and 908, 

bottom line, and 37 

Larklns & Co 57 

Lasswell M. D 7 

Laurel Hill Cemetery cii 

Leavitt Charles H Ixviii 

Ledden, Whipple & Co. ciii 

Leffel & Myers 40 

Llbby & Swett, register 

of names 738 

Linforth, Kellogg <fe Co. 

LleweUyn & Co 23 



PAGEl 

Locan &Co xxij 

Locke & Montague 13 

London and Lancashire 

Fire Ins. Co Ixxxi 

London and S. F. Bank...xl 
London Assurance Cor- 
poration XXXV 

Low C. Adolphe & Co 20 

Lorillard Ins. Co., reg. of 

names 764 

Lund Henry Ixxm 

Lyon & Co., register of 

names 741 

Lyons E. G. & Co 49 

Macdonald D. A. & Co-xlvi 

Macken James 15 

Maeondrav & Co xx 

Magill R. H Ixvi 

Magill & Denison..back 

of volume 
Maguire's New Theater, 

register of names 423 

Main & Winchester xxix 

Makins & Co 37 

Mallon John 14 

Marden & Myrick Ixxix 

Marsh H. F xcvm 

Martell John 2 

Martin E. & Co li 

Martin P., register of 

names 432 

Martin & Turrill....."i6and57 
Masonic Savings & Loan 

Bank xxv 

Massey & Yung '. xlvi 

Mathews E. G. & Co cm 

Mayer Charles Ixxv 

Mayer Joseph 38 

McAfee, Spiers & Co 8 

McCain, Flood & Mc- 

Clure xxui 

McMillan & Kester 2 

McMuUiu George O. & 

Co Ixxm 

McNally & Hawkins..lxxix 

McNulty C. A 19 

McQuillan B Ixiii 

Meeker, James <& Co liil 

Meriden Fire Ins.Co. , reg. 

of names 74 

Merrill J. C. & Co xxi 

Merrill & Co 25 

Meussdorffer J.C. & Bro...lv 
Meussdorfifer K., register 

of names 467 

Meyer Charles 32 

Michels, Friedlander <fe 

Co Ixiv 

Mills & Evans 54 

Mississippi V. F. & M.Ins. 

Co., reg. of names 78 

Moore H. H., land reg- 
ister of names 494 

Moraghan & Lynch xlix 

More Joseph J 24 

Morelos A Ixxv 

Morgan & Co., register 

of names 808 and 809 

Morrison C. D. & Co xc 

Morrow George xcvii 

Moynihan *; Aitken 8 

Murphy, Grant & Co.. ..Ixv 
Mutual Benefit Life Ins. 

Co...lxx and back cov 
Mutual Life Ins. Co. of 

New York.. .back cover 
Nathan B. & Co., regis- 
ter of names 495 

Nelson <fe Doble 53 

Newbauer »fe Co Lxxvi 

Newhall H. M. & Co lix 

Newman & Bennett xcv 

Nichols A. C. <fe Co...xxxvil 

Niemann Henry xxxiii 

NileM. D 26 

Norcross & Co Ixvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



PAGE. 

North America Life In- 
surance Co 55 

North British and Mer- 
cantile Ins. Co.. .back of 
volume 
Northern Assurance Co. 

xxvii 
Norton & Gardiner, regi.s- 

ter of names 467 

O'Doiinell Cornelius 3.S 

O'Neil James .31 

Opera House (Maguire's) 

reg. of name.s 422 

Oregon S. S. Co vi 

Orient Fire Ins. Co., reg. 

of names 86 

Otto Charles <& Co liv 

Overland House 42 

Pacific Barrel and Keg 

Factory liv 

Pacific Cordage Co xvii 

Pacific File Works 25 

Pacific Mail S. S. Co iv 

Pacific News Co xciv 

Pacific Oil and Lead 

Works V 

Pacific Rolling Mill Co v 

Pacific Saw Manufact- 
uring Co., register 

of names 618 

Pacific Tj'pe Foundry 

Ixxxii 
Pacific Wood Engrav- 
ing Co., register of 

names 495 and cix 

Pages J. F 35 

Palmer W. J. T. & Co. 

xxxvii 

Parrott&Co civ 

PasqualeB Ixxv 

Patent Improved As- 
phalt Co 42 

Patterson William 56 

Pellet & Fischer 46 

Phoenix Ins. Co. , back of vol 

Plate A. J. & Co xcvi 

Plum, Bell & Co.. front cov 
Pollard & Carvill M. Co...20 

Porter G. W 41 

Potter G. A cviii 

Pratt H. G 7 

Price M.. 36 

Prior J. K Ixxx 



PAGE. 

Prinz John 36 

Pyat Felix Ixxxvii 

Raas C. & E. & Co xxvi 

Racouillat H. & Co 11 

Ray W. S Ixviii 

Read Enis,reg. of names. 109 
Republic Ins. Co. reg. of 

names 433 

Richards & Harrison 29 

Richardson & Holland 

xlix 

Riotte <fe Luckhardt 39 

Risdon I. & L. Works n 

Roach John 17 

Rochicioh R. F 19 

Rodgers, Caspari & Co., 

reg. of names 566 

Rodgers, Meyer & Co.. ..civ 

Rosenbaum A. S. & Co c 

Roth & Videau Ixxii 

Eothschild<feEhrenpfort..l9 
Royal Mail Steam Packet 

Co xxvii 

Russell W. F. <fe Co xlii 

S. P. Cordage Manu- 
factory XXX 

S. F. Fire Ins. Co., reg. 

of names 18 

S. F. Gas Light Co 27 

S. F. Last Factory 27 

S. P. Manufacturing Co.. ..55 
S. F. Pioneer Woolen 

Factory liii 

S. F. Savings Union.. ..xxiii 

Sack John C xc 

Sanborn & Byrnes 24 

Santa Clara College xli 

Saul & Co 26 

Savage & Son 46 

Savings and Loan Society 
xxii 

Schmolz William Lxxiv 

Schussler H Ixxxi 

Scottish Commercial In- 
surance Co Ixxviii 

Seaborn & Heney 25 

Security Savings Bank.cvii 
Selby Thomas H. <fe Co...xv 

Sellers James C 33 

Sherman Wm.& Co..lx.xxix 

and reg. of names 827 

Sherwood Robert ii 

Short M 44 



PAGE. 

Shreve George C. & Co., 
edge of volume and...lxi 

Sims John R .58 

.Skinker John xxvi 

Sloss Louis & Co Ixvi 

Smith A. J Ixxxiv 

Smith Barlow J 48 

Smith C. W. M., register 

of names 611 

Smith W. H :m 

Smith William 30 

Snook G. (& W 38 

Snow John F 47 

.Snow & May back cover 

Solomon B. L. & Sons li 

Spaulding J. & Co 11 

Spaulding N. W., regis- 
ter of names 618 

Speyer Morris & Co 

Iviii and Ixv 

Spreckels & Co xxxii 

.Spring Menzo 23 

Spring Valley W. Works 1 

Springfield F. & M. Ins. 

Co., reg. of names 80 

Sroufe, Sweeney & Co., 

xxvi 

St. Denis & Chesney 17 

St. Ignatius College...xx.xix 
St. Louis Art & Photo- 
graphic Gallery xcvii 

Stebins Hydraulic Ele- 
vator xl 

Steiger <fe Boland 22 

Steinhart W. & I. & Co. 

Ixxviii 

Stockman J. M 15 

Stoddart David 51 

Strahle Jacob <fe Co, reg. 

of names 433 

Straut & Hamilton 28 

Stuart <fe Elder Ixix 

Sullivan, Kelly & Co... xxx 

Sullivan <fe Moorhead 

xxxviii and register 

of names 466 

Swasev G. A xlvi 

Swett D. L. & Co 52 

Swiss-American Bank....xiv 
Swiss Lloyd Mar.In.Co.Iviii 

Tay Geo. H. <fe Co Ixxxiii 

Taylor John & Co.. .xxxviii 
Taylor S. P. & Co Ivil 



Tenthory J. P. & Co lii 

Tesmore Solomon 43 

Teubner & Hofifman .56 

Thompson Brothers.. .xxxii 

Thomson Thomas 30 

Traders In.s. Co., register 

of names 764 

Transatlantic Fire Co..xxix 

Truworthv F. M xlii 

Tustin W. 1 5 and -50 and 

top edge of volume 

Union Insurance Co xviil 

Union Pacific Silk Mfg 

Co., reg. of names 740 

Van Schaack C. P. cS: Co., 
reg. of names, top line 

Venard G xxviil 

Vice Martin 30 

Vogeley J. & Bro .56 

Vulcan Iron Works Co.. ..18 

Wadsworth House xlviii 

Wagner Joseph lxxiv 

Walkington & Kidd 39 

Walmsley W. W Ixxvi 

Warner & Silsby 46 

Warren <fe Schiller 47 

Washington Life Ins.Co.cvi 
Waterhouse <fe Lester.. xciii 

Watliins C. E xcii 

Watt & McLennan, re- 
gister of names 619 

Watts William 32 

Week L. E. & Co 26 

Weed & Kingwell 15 

Weichhart J 14 

Welch <fe Co 

Wells, Fargo & Co ix 

Wells, Russell & Co 22 

Wenzel Herman evil 

Whalen John ox 

What Cheer Laundry 47 

White Bros 24 

White & Bauer. xci 

Whitney & Co xlv 

Wieland John Ixxxviii 

Williams, Blanchard <fe 

Co xxxlv 

Williams H. P. & Co lix 

Winkle Henry & Co.l.xxxiv 
Wooster, Shattuck & Co., 
Ixx.xii 

Wyman G. D 42 

Yang Tze Ins. Co xx 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 



Adjusters. 

McNulty C. A.(Customs)..19 
MagUl R. H. (Insur- 
ance) Ixvi 

AgricuKiiral Inipl'fs 

Baker <fe Hamilton 3 

Bonney O. Jr 14 

Linforth, Kellogg & Co. 

xxxvi 
Amalganiafiug: 9Ia- 

chiues. 
Hendy Joshua... 21 

Amasemeiiis— Places 
of. 

Maguire's New Theater, 
register of names 423 

Opera House ( Magu ire's), 
register of names 422 

Aiunionia. 

S. F. Gas Light Co 27 

Apothecaries. 

Boericke * Tafel, reg- 
ister of names 108 

Artesian Well Bor's. 

Thomson Thomas 30 

Artiincial liiuibs. 

Spring Menzo 23 

ArtiiScial Stone. 

Frear Stone Co 18 



Artists' Materials. 

Snow & May back cover 

Aspbaltuni Workers. 

Patent Imp. Asphalt Co..42 

Assajers. 

Kuh Leopold liii 

Riotte & Luckhardt 39 

Auctioneers. 

Cummings W. H 31 

Merrill J. C. & Co xxi 

Newhall H. M. & Co lix 

Axle Crease. 

Greene Charles 52 

Hucks,Lambert&Greeue53 

Bakeries. 

Boston Cracker Bakery...49 

Banks. 

Anglo-Californian Bank.xii 
Bank British Columbia.xiii 
Bank British North 

America xx 

Bank California x 

London and S. F. Bank...xi 
Swiss-Anaerican Bank...xiv 
Wells, Fargo <& Co ix 

Baths. 

S. P. Hygeian Home 48 



Beil Springs. 

Hincklev C. D 33 

Warner & Silsby 46 

BelIO¥«-s Ittanu'fs. 

California Bellows Man- 
ufact'g C0..21 and Ixxvi 

Billiard Table Man- 
ufacturers. 

Strahle 'Jacob & Co., 
reg. of names 433 

Bitters. 

McMillan <fe Kester 2 

Blacksmiths. 

Friedhofer Paul 18 

Nelson & Doble 53 

Weichhart J 14 

Boat Builders. 

Vice Martin 30 

Boiler Works. 

Currv F. 1 12 

McAfee, Spiers & Co 8 

Moynihan & Aitken 8 

Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works 9 

Book Binders. 

Bo.squi Edward & Co., 
reg. of names.. .side line 

Buswell A xci.x 

Hicks D. & Co., register 
of name-s 739 



Books — Subscription 
Agents. 

Keller Henry & Co., reg- 
ister of names 739 

Booksellers. 

Libby & Swett, register 
of names 733 

Moore H. H., 1 and reg. 
names 494 

Boot and Shoe Manfs. 

Burke William F l.xv 

Kelly Patrick ...back cover 

Brass Foundries. 

Dobrzensky M 43 

Garratt W. T 12 

Smith A. J Ixxxiv 

Weedife Kingwell 15 

Brewers. 

Lvon & Co., reg. names 741 

Spreckels & Co xxxii 

Wieland John Ixxxviii 

Brokers, Commer- 
cial. 

Marsh H. F xcviii 

Newman & Bennett xcv 

Cabinet Makers. 

Easton John 56 

Palmer W. J. T. & Co. 

xxxvii 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS 



PAGE. 

Carpenters and 
Ruilders. 

Bergson O xliii 

Curtis John P 34 

More Joseph J 24 

Porter G. W 41 

Pratt H. G 7 

Carpet Beating. 

Merrill & Co 25 

Spaulding J. & Co 11 

Carpets. 

Burnham Jas. W. <fe Co....l7 

Edwards Frank G cxi 

Plum,Bell<ftCo., front cover 

Carriage Depots. 

Larkins & Co 57 

Mills & Evans 54 

Pollard & Carvill M. Co...2n 
Saul & Co 26 

Carriage Stock. 

Holt Bros Ixiv 

King T. H. & Co cv 

Meeker James & Co liii 

Straut <fe Hannilton 28 

Waterhouse <fe Lester.xciii 
White Bros, 24 

Car-rers-Orn anient al 

S. F. Manufacturing Co....o5 
Warren & Schiller 47 

Cement Pipe. 

Browell Jereiiiiah..3, 29, 

and 45 

Clark N. <fe Co Ixxi 

Martin P., reg. of names.432 

Cemetery. 

Laurel Hill cii 

Cliurn Mannftnrers. 

Armes & Dallam xxxiii 

Pratt H.G 7 

Cigaritos. 

Morelos A. <fe Co Ixxv 

Cigars and Tobacco. 

Consolidated Tobacco 

Co cxii 

Gannon Peter T li 

Kosenbaum A. 8. <fe Co c 

Civil Engineer. 

Schussler H Ixxxi 

Cloaks and Snits. 

Fratinger & Noll, reg- 
ister of names 567 

Mayer Charles Ixxv 

Sullivan & Moorhead, 
xxxviii and register 

of names 466 

Clocks. 

Wenzel H cvli 

Clothing. 

Church '1'. R xlviii 

McCain, Flood <fe Mc- 
C'lure xxiii 

ShermanWm.<fe Co...lxxxix 
and reg. of names 827 

Steinhart W. & I. <fe 
Co Ixxvlii 

Van Schaack C. P. & Co., 
reg. of names, top line 

Cloths. 

Raas C & E xxvi 

S. F. Pioneer Woolen 

Factor}' liii 

Coal. 

Belllngham Bay Co Ixix 

Black Diamond Co Ixlx 

Coffee and Spices. 

Bernard Charles xxv 

Hanly George T. & Co M 

Marden & Myrick Ixxlx 

Venard G xxvlU 

Coke. 
S. F. Gas Light Co 27 



PAGE. 

Colleges. 

Heald's Business, Ixxxvi 

and reg. of names 321 

Santa Clara xli 

St. Ignatius xxxix 

Com. Merchants. 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., 

Ixxxiii 
Bandmann, Nielsen & 

Co xxxvi 

Bennett & Page ciii 

Brigham C. O. * Co ciii 

Clayton C. & Co cvli 

Coleman W. T. .?• Co xxi 

Dickson, DeWolf & Co., 

Ixxxvii 

Egerton, Allen & Co xl 

Flint, Peabody & Co Ixv 

Howes George &Co xvi 

Howl and, Sullivan & 

Co xliii 

Irwin Richard B. & Co., 

register of names 764 

Ledden, Whipple & Co..ciii 

Low C. Adolphe & Co 20 

Lund Henry Ixxiii 

Macondray & Co xx 

Marsh H. F xcviii 

Mathews E. G. & Co ciii 

Merrill J. C. & Co xxi 

Newman & Bennett xcv 

Nichols A. C. & Co...xxxvii 

Parrott & Co civ 

Read Ellis, register of 

names 109 

Rodgers, Caspari & Co. , 

register of names .566 

Rodgers. Meyer & Co... civ 

Russell W. F. <fe Co xlii 

Speyer Morris & Co Ixv 

Sroufe, Sweeney & Co..xxvi 

Stuart & Elder Ixix 

Watt & McLennan, reg. 

of names 619 

Welch & Co c 

Whitney & Co xlv 

Williams, Blanchard <fe 

Co xxxiv 

Wooster, Shattuck & 

Co. Ixxxii 

Confectioners. 

Pellet & Fischer 46 

Rothschild &Ehrenpfort.l9 

Vogeley J. & Bro 56 

Con tractors. 

Browell Jeremiah 3, 29 

and 45 

Hyde & Chester 41 

Watts William 32 

Coopers. 
Pacific Barrel and Keg 

Factory liv 

Coppersmith. 

Macken James 15 

Cordage. 

Hallidie A. S. (wire)..lxxxv 

Pacific Cordage Co xvii 

San Francisco Cordage 
Factory xxx 

Cordials, etc. 

McMillan & Kester 2 

Crockery. 

Helbing & Straus xxvili 

Nathan B. & Co., regis- 
ter of names 495 

Cutlers. 

Price Michael 36 

Dentists. 

Beers John B 3 

Crowell J. P 34 

Doors, Sash, etc. 

Cole N. W. <fe Co xc 

Excelsior Mill Co Ixxix 

Hall John L Ixiv 

Haskell <fe Bode Ixxiii 

Macdonald D. A. <fe Co..xlvi 
Richardson & Holland.xlix 
S. F. Manufacturing Co.. .55 
Wells, Russell & Co 22 



PAGE. 

Drng^ists. 

Crane & Brlgham Ixxii 

Dry Ooods. 

McCain, Flood & Mc- 

CUire xxiii 

Murphy, Grant & Co.. ..Ixv 

Dyeing and Sconring 

Snow John F 47 

Electricians. 

Electrical Construction 
Co Ixxxix 

Engravers. 

Butler Theodore A .^5 

Eitner Rudolph Ixxvii 

GillerC. L 41 

Kuner A 25 

Pacific Wood Engrav- 
ing Co., cix and reg. 

of names 495 

Pages Jules F 35 

Engravings. 

Gump .=5. & G Ixvii 

McQuillan B Ixiii 

NileM. D 26 

Snow & May back cover 

Expresses. 

Wells, Fargo & Co ix 

Extract of Meat. 
Church cfe Clark, regis- 
ter of names 765 

Fancy Goods. 

Locan & Co xxii 

Mlchels, Friedlander & 

Co Ixiv 

PasqualeB Ixxv 

Van Schaack C. P. & 

Co., reg. of names... 

top line 

Fancet Makers. 

Gracier Francis J....... 9 

File Mannfacturers. 

Pacific File Works 25 

Fire Arms. 

Plate A. J. & Co xcvi 

Fish. 

Grifath A. J 36 

Flags. 

Johnson T. Rodgers, in- 
side back cover 

Norcross <& Co Ixvi 

PasqualeB Ixxv 

Flonr Mills. 

Grosh & Rutherford 28 

Foundries. 

Angell. Palmer <fe Ccxlvil 

Citv Iron Works 29 

Goddard & Co xix 

Hanscom & Co 10 

Hinckley <fe Co 16 

Huntington F. A Ixii 

Llewellyn & Co 23 

Steiger & Boland 22 

Thompson Bro.s xxxil 

Vulcan Iron Works 18 

Fruits and Confec- 
tionery. 

Church & Clark, regis- 
ter of names 765 

Furniture. 
Burnham James W. & 

Co 17 

Easton John 56 

Palmer W. J. T. & Co.... 

xxxvii 
Swasey G. A. (tables).. .xlvi 
Furniture— School. 
Libby & Swett, register 

of names 738 

Palmer W. J. T. & Co.... 

xxxvii 



PAGE. 

Oas Fixtures. 

Day Thomas front cov- 
er and reg. of names..l09 
MoNally & Hawkins..lxxix 

Prior J.K Lxxx 

Walmsley W. W IxxvJ 

etas Meter Man'f. 

Dobrzensky M 43 

Olass and Olassii'are. 

Taylor John & Co....xxxviii 
Olass Stainers. 

Mallon John 14 

©roceries. 

Bowen Brothers..l6 and 

back of volume 

Croskey A Whan 57 

Ledden. Whipple & Co..ciii 
Martin & Turrill...36 and 57 
McMuIlin George O. & Co. 
Ixxiii 
Richards & Harrison 29 

Ounsmifhs. 

Clabrough & Bros xlv 

Meyer Charles 32 

Plate A. J. & Co xcvi 

Hair Jewelry. 

Cook C. Mrs 43 

Hardware. 

Baker & Hamilton 3 

Glasgow L and M. Im- 
porting Co 9 

Llnforth, Kellogg &Co... 

xxxvi 

Nelson <fe Doble 53 

Otto Charles & Co liv 

Selby T. H. & Co xv 

Harness, etc. 

Johnson J. C. & Co 11 

Main & Winchester.. ..xxix 

Hats and Caps. 

Meussdorffer J. C. & Rro..lv 
Meussdorffer K., regis- 
ter of names 467 

Hay and Orain. 

Morrow George xcvii 

Hides and W^ool. 

Sloss Louis & Co Ixvi 

Hose and Belting. 

Cook H. N lli 

Hotels. 

Golden Eagle Hotel liv 

Overland House 42 

Hydraulic Elevators 

Stebins' xl 

Instrument Depots. 

Electrical Construction 

Co Ixxxix 

Houseworth Thomas & 
Co. , f ron t and back cov- 
ers reg. names 619,and..ii 

Roach John 17 

Sack John C xc 

Schmolz William Ixxiv 

Insurance Agents. 

Boardman Geo. C, reg- 
ister of names side line 

Booker W. L xxvil 

Claussenius George 55 

Cox Henry reg. names. ..433 

Cross <fe Co XXXV 

Falkner, Bell & Co Ivi 

Farnsworth & Clark, reg. 
of names bottom line 

Forbes A. B back cover 

Hart, Bialr & Co Ixxviii 

and Ixxxl 
Irwin Richard B. <fe Co. 

register of names 764 

Kennedy L. W., register of 
names top line 

Lewig Edwin cvl. 

Macondrav & Co xx 

MagillR.H Ixvi 



SAK FKAN CISCO DIRECTORY. 



PAGE, 

Magill & Denison..back; vol 

Marcus Geo. & Co xxix 

Munsell Jas. Jr Ixx 

and back cover 

Roberts J. B iii 

Speyer Morris & Co Iviii 

Webb Watson 55 

Insurance Co*s. JEast- 
ern and Foreipn. 

Mtna. fHartford), regis- 
ter of names side line 

Atlas Fire (Hartford), 
register of names 70 

Chinese (limited ) (Hong- 
kong;, reg. of names..764 

Connecticut Mutual Life 
(Hartford) iii 

Hamburg-Bremen Fire 

Iviii 

Home (New York ), back 

of volume 

Imperial Fire (London)..lvi 

London and Lanrashire 
Fire (Liverpool).. ..Ixx3!;i 

London Assurance Cor- 
poration XXXV 

Lorrillard fNew York), 
register of names 764 

Meriden Fire (Connecti- 
cut), reg. of name.s 74 

Mississippi Valley Fire 
and Marine (Mem- 
phis), reg. of names.. ..78 

Mutual Benefit Life 
(Newark).. .Ixx and 

back cover 

Mutual Life (New York), 

back cover 

North America Life 
(New York) 55 

North British and Mer- 
cantile (London and 
Edinburgh)..back of 

volume 

Northern Assurance 
(London) xxvii 

Orient Fire CHartfordi, 
register of names 86 

PhcEnix(Hartford).back 

of volume 

Republic Life, reg. of 
names 433 

Scottish Commercial 
(Glasgow) Ixxviii 

Springfield Fire and 
Marine (Mass.), reg. 
of names so 

Swiss Lloyd Marine Iviii 

Trader's (Chicago), reg. 
of names 764 

Transatlantic Fire (Ham- 
burg) xxix 

Washington Life (New 
York) cvi 

Yang-Tze (Shanghai) xx 

Insurance Co's. Some. 

California ivl 

Commercial Insurance 

Co., California xxxv 

Fireman's Fund...fr't cover 
S.F. Fire Insurance Co., 

see register, page IS 

Union xviii 

Iron and Steel. 

Glasgow Iron and Metal 

, Co 9 

Nelson & Doble .53 

Selby Thomas H. & Co ..xv 
Iron Doors, etc. 

Gallagher Jas. J Ixxi 

Leavitt Charles H Ixviii 

Sims John R 58 

Iron IWantels. 

Potter G. A cviii 

Jewelers. Ilan'fs. 

Braverman <fe Levy 
_. . front cover 

Haight A. J...xxxviii and c 

Hirshfleld R ixlx 

Jordan M ixxxi 

and front cover 
Koehler & Ritter, regis- 
ter of names 108 

Laird D. W Ixxv and 

register of names 738 1 



P.4GE. 

Norton & Gardiner, reg- 
ister of names 467 

Sherwood Robert ii 

Shreve Geo. C. <fe Co 1x1 

and edge of volume 

Iiam i>;7Ian ufacta rers 

BoeschEmil 26 

liast Factories. 

S. F. Last Factory 27 

Iianndries. 

What Cheer 47 

lieatber Dealers. 

Johnson .1. C. & Co 11 

Main <fe Winchester xxix 

Nichols A. C. & Co...xxxvii 

O'Donnell Cornelius 33 

Week L. E. & Co 26 

Iiinie and Cement. 

Davis & Cowell c 

I^ithogrrapliers. 

Britton & Rey, register 
of names 792 

I^ocomotives. 

Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works 9 

liOdg^ingrs. 

Wadsworth House xlvill 

Xioohing; Olasses, 
Mirrors, etc. 

Gump S. <fe G Ixvii 

McQuillan B ixlli 

Nathan B. & Co., regis- 
ter of nanaes 495 

Nile M. D 26 

Snow & May back cover 

Iiuniber Dealers. 

Dean E. B. & Co xxxiv 

Knowles George B .38 

>Iacs{roni, Vermicel- 
li, etc. 

California Italian Paste 

Co ivii 

Tenthorey J. P. & Co lu 

Slacbine Sbops. 

Deacon & Bulger 23 

Fenner O. B 45 

Hawkins <fe Cantrell xcv 

Hendy Joshua 21 

Huntington F. A Ixii 

Kallenberg Theodore .35 

Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works 9 

Walklngton & Kidd 39 

macliinery. 

Stoddart David .51 

marble Xards. 

Heverm M ln.side back 

cover 

Match_Mannfact'rs. 

Newbauer & Co Ixxvi 

Mattress Makers. 

Kendall, Klinger & Co 2 

Smith W.H 34 

Merchants — Cbinese. 

Chy Lung & Co xcix 

Chin Lee & Co xclx 

Metal Signs. 

Patterson William 56 

Mill Famishing. 

Grader Francis J 9 

Leffel & Myers 40 

Wagner Joseph Ixxiv 

Millivrigbts. 

Amos & Davis 32 

Mineral Water. 

Bethesda Mineral Spring 
Water xlvili 



PAGE. 

Model Makers. 

Culver* Leonard 33 

Kallenberg Theodore 35 

Stockman J. M 15 

Musical Instruments 

Badger W. G xl 

Gray M xcvii 

Mutual Protective 
Association. 

Aid Union ix 

Native Wines. 

GerkeH 11 

Kohler & Frohling 

front cover 

Prlnz John .36 

Winkle Henry & Co.lxxxiv 

Bfeckties. 

Makins & Co 37 

Bfews Agents. 

Pacific News Co xciv 

White & Bauer xci 

Xurseries. 

Herlng F. A _ 38 

Oil W^orks. 

Pacific Oil and Lead 
Works V 

Opticians. 

Houseworth Thos *ICo. 
front and back cov- 
ers reg. names 619 and.,ii 

Roach John 17 

Sack John C xc 

Ore Samplers. 

California Ore Sampling 

Mills 27 

Riotte & Luckhardt 39 

Organ Builder. 

Mayer Joseph 38 

Oysters. 

Corville Emerson & Co. 

xliv 

Doan e & Co. , reg. names 809 

and back cover 

Moraghan & Lynch xlix 

Morgan & Co., register 

of names 808 and 809 

Tesmore Solomon 43 

Paints and Oils. 

Sullivan, Kelly & Co...xxx 

Painters. 

Gad.sby E. H xcvl 

Gilman & Mellon .53 

St. Denis <fe Chesney 17 

Paper Dealers. 

Blake, Robbins ife Co.. .1x111 
Read Ellis, register of 

names 109 

Taylor S. P. & Co Ivil 

Paper Hangings. 

Edwards Frank G cxi 

Patent Agent. 

Smith C. W. M.,reg. of 



..611 



Photographers. 

Houseworth Thos.A Co. 
front and back cov- 
ers, reg.namesGig and 11 

Howland B. F. & Co 41 

St. Louis Art and Pho- 
tographic Gallery..xcvii 

Watkins C. E xcil 

Photo. Engravings. 

Houseworth T. & Co., 
front and back cov- 
ers, reg.names, 619 and 11 

Watkins C. E xcii 

Plaster Decorations. 

Kellett Wm. F...back cover 
O'Neil James 31 



PAGE. 

Plunil>ers, etc. 

Day Thomas.front cov- 
er and reg. of name8..109 

Iredale A. S 43 

Prior J. K Ixxx 

Smith A. J Ixxxlv 

Smith William 30 

Snook G. & W 38 

Walmsley W. W. bcxvl 

Pottery. 

Clark N. & Co ixxi 

Powder Dealers. 

Giant Powder Co xxxvi 

Sklnker John xxvi 

Printers. 

Bacon & Co back of 

T, ■ ^ volume 
Bosqui E. & Co., regis- 
ter of names side line 

Cubery & Co Ivli 

Eastman Frank ci 

Francis & Valentine, 

reg. of names 11 

Swett D. L. & Co 52 

Produce Commiss'n. 

Bennett & Page clii 

Brigham C. O. & Co clii 

Clayton C. & Co evil 

Mathews E. G. <fe Co clii 

Provisions. 

Ledden, Whipple & Co..cuI 
McMullin Geo. O. <fe Co. 

Ixxili 
Sroufe, Sweeney*; Co. xxvi 

Stuart <fe Elder Ixlx 

Wooster, Shattuck & 
Co Lxxxil 

Publisher. 

Langley Henry G., reg. 
of names 610 and 908, 
bottom line, and 37 

Pulverizers. 

Wyman G. D 42 

Pumps. 

Goodwin & West 13 

Lasswell M. D 7 

Smith A. J IxxxlV 

Stoddart D 51 

Pyrotechnists. 

Church & Clark, regis- 
ter of names 765 

Real Estate Agents. 

WiUiams H. F. & Co lix 

Regalia. 

Johnson T. Rodgers.lnside 
back cover 

Norcross & Co Ixvi 

Pasquale B Lxxv 

Rice Mills. 

India Rice Mill xxxiv 

Rolling Mill. 

Pacific RoUing Mill v 

Rope Moldings. 

Culver & Leonard 33 

Safes. 

Leavitt Charles H Ixviil 

Savings and Iioan 
Societies. 

Farmers' and Mechan- 
ics' Bank .;tlvll 

German Savings and 
Loan Society Ix 

Hibernia Savings and 
Loan Society xxlv 

Masonic Savings and 
Loan Bank xxv 

San Francisco Savings 
Union xxlii 

Savings and L. Societ.v..xxii 

Security Savings Bank..cvii 



ALPHABETIC A E LIST OF BTSINESS CARDS 



PAGE. 

S^w Makers. 

Bonney O. Jr 14 

Pacific Saw Manufact- 
uring Co., register 

of names 618 

Spaulding N. W. ,regis- 
ter of names 618 

Saw Mills. 

Macdonald D. A. & Co..xlvi 
Richarfison <fe Holland sJix 
S. F. Manufacturing Co.. .55 
Wells, Russell & Co 22 

Sewing Macliines. 

Florence bottom 

edge of volume 
Ship Chandlers. 

Crawford A. L. & Co lii 

Farwell & Co xxiv 

Shipring and For- 
warding. 

Coleman W. T. & Co xxi 

Flint, Peabody & Co Ixv 

Goodall, Nelson & Per- 
kins xllii and reg. of 

names. 826 

Howes George & Co xvi 

Irwin Richard B. & Co., 

register of names 764 

Low C. Adolphe & Co 20 

Lund Henry Ixxili 

Macondray"& Co xx 

Merrill J. C. & Co xxi 

Morrison C. D. & Co xc 

Parrott & Co civ 

Rodgers, Caspari <fe Co., 

reg. of names 566 

Wliitney & Co xlv 

Williams, Blanchard <fe 

Co xxxiv 

Sbirl Manafactnrers. 

Niemann Henry xxxiii 

Shoe Findings. 

DoUiver & Brother 27 

Week L. E. & Co 26 

Sbot and liead Pipe. 

S. F. Shot Tower xv 

SIiow Case Makers. 

Teubner & Hoffman .56 

Silk Mannfactnrers. 

Union Pacific Silk M. 
Co., reg. of names 740 

Silver Platers. 

Kartell John 2 

BochicioU R. F 19 



PAGE. 

Soda IVater Mann- 
faeturers. 

Crystal Soda Water Co...Ivii 
Spring Makers. 

Betts Spring Co 32 

Stair Builders. 

Freeman B. H. & Co lii 

Jesse & Drew 34 

Langland N. P liv 

Sanborn <& Byrnes 24 

Starcb Dealers. 

Egerton, Allen & Co xl 

Stationers. 

Eaton & Edwards xcviii 

Libby & Swett, register 
of names 738 

Steamship liines. 

China Trans-Pacific S. 

S. Co vii 

Colorado Steam Navi- 
gation Co viii 

Goodall, Nelson <fe Per- 
kins xliii and reg. of 

names 826 

Oregon S. S. Co vl 

Pacific Mall S. S. Co iv 

Royal Mail xxvii 

Steering Wheels. 

Bragg Robert. 47 

Stencil Cutters. 

Truworthy F. M xlii 

Stoves, etc. 
Brittan, Holbrook & 

Co., reg. of names 827 

Friel William 58 

Locke <fe Montague 12 

Ray W. S Ixviii 

Savage & Son 46 

Snook G. & W 38 

Tay Geo. H. & Co Ixxxiii 

Sngar Refineries. 

Bay 23 

California xxxi 

Tailors. 

Barli A. cfe Co Ixvii 

Short M 44 

Whalen J ex 

Tanners. 

O'Donnell Cornelius 33 

Telegraphic Instru- 
ments. 
Electrical Construction 
Co Ixxxix 



PAGE. 

Tin and Sheet Iron 
Workers. 

Brittan , Holbrook & Co. , 

reg. of names 827 

Friel William 58 

Locke <fc Montague 12 

Ray WUliam S Ixviii 

Snook G. & W 38 

Tay Geo. H. & Co Ixxxiii 

Tobacco Orowers. 

Consolidated Tobacco 
Co cxii 

Tool Makers. 

Hinz Carl 37 

Weichhart J 14 

Trunk Mannfactn''rs. 

Corin Joseph 31 

Turners. 

Cameron & Hull 52 

Gracier Francis J 9 

S. F. Manufacturing Co.. ..55 
Seaborn & Heney 25 

Tj-pc Dealers. 

Pacific Type Foundry... 

Ixxxii 
Read EUis.reg.of names..l09 

Umbrella— Adjust- 
able. 

Waterhouse & Lester...xciii 
Undertakers. 

GrayN. <fe Co xlix 

Massey & Yung xlvi 

Upholsterers. 

Solomon B. L. & Sons li 

Varnishes. 

Sullivan, Kelly & Co...xxx 

Watches and Jew- 
elry. 

Braverman & Levy, 

front cover 
Haight A. J....xxxviiiandc 

Jordan M Ixxxi 

and front cover 
Norton & Gardiner, reg. 

of names 467 

Sherwood Robert ii 

Shreve George C. & Co...lxi 

and edge of volume 
Wenzel H cvii 

Water Closets. 

Smith A. J Ixxxlv 

Smith WiUiam 30 



PAGE. 

Water Pipe. 

Browell Jeremiah. 3, 29 

and 45 

Clark N. & Co Ixxi 

Martin P., register of 
names 432 

Water W^heels. 

Leflfel & Myers 40 

Water W^orks. 

Spring Valley 1 

Whiteners. 

Sellers J. C 33 

W^ig Makers. 

Pyat Felix Ixxxvii 

Willow Ware. 

Armes <fe Dallam xxxiii 

W^ind Mill Manufs. 

Atwood (feBodwell 4 

Hunt E. O 6 

Tustin W. 1 5,.50, and 

top edge of volume 
Window Shades. 
Burnham James W. & 

Co 17 

Edwards Frank G cxi 

Wines and Iiiqnors. 

Brader Henry 57 

Chesley G. W. <fe Co....xxix 

Kirkpatrick &McCue ex 

Lyons E.G. & Co 

Martin E. & Co 49 

McMillan & Kester 2 

PrinzJohn .36 

Racouillat H. & Co 11 

Richards & Harrison 29 

Roth ife Videau Ixxii 

Winkle Henry & Co 

Ixxxiv 
W^ire Workers. 

Allen C. C 21 

Hallidle A. S Ixxxv 

Wooden Ware. 

Armes & Dallam •yyiriii 

Wool Dealers. 

Watt & McLennan, reg- 
ister of names 619 

W^oolen Mills. 

San Francisco Pioneer....liii 

Yeast Powders. 

Church & Clark, regis- 
ter of nanaes 765 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BUSINESS CARDS. 



[See Business Directory, pages 729-836.] 



Adams, Blinn & Co 795 

Adams, Springer & Co. 

741, 793 

American Clock Co 752 

Ammerup G 810 

Antisell Thos. M. & Co.,.813 

Armes & Dallam 7.34, 744 

(2), 749, 809. 824, 832, S36 
Auger B. E. & Co.. ..748, 784 

797, 806 

Austin B. C 831 

Baker George H 792 

Balch H. M 805 

Bancroft A. L. & Co..736,738 
(4), 762, 783, 792, 805, 813 
(2), 815, 816, 825 
Bandmann, Nielsen cfe Co. 

797, 815 
Bank of San Francisco.. .7:?4 

Banner Brothers 752 

Bartlett & Randolph 818 

Barton B. F. <fe Co.. 836 

Bayley W. F. & N. J 811 

Betarens James 784 



Berry & Capp 818 

Betts Spring Co 748 

Betzel & Cohn 7.52 

Bien Joseph 793, 795 

Bigley T. & Co 822 

Bishop & Co 784, 785, 829 

Black H. M. & Co 748 

Blake, Bobbins & Co 810 

Borger C. 753 

Bost & Jenkins 818 

Bradley H. W 811 

Bradlev & Rulofson 811 

Braeg '& Frank 784 

Bree Thomas W. & Co.. .741 

Browell J 814 

Brown G. T. & Co 793 

Bryan Brothers 776 

Buckingham <fe Hecht...740 
Buena Vista Vinicultur- 

al Societv 748 

Burkardt Max 813 

Burke Francis G 836 

Burnham J. W. & Co 747 

Burr C. C. & Co 8)5, 824 



Bush & Milne...._ 768, 814 

Butler Theodore A 762 

California Ins. Co 781 

California Jewelry Co. ...781 

Callaghan D 8.36 

Cartan, McCarthy & Co..784 

Central Baths 734 

Charter Oak Life Ins.Oo. 779 

Chevalier F. & Co 784 

Clark George W 810, 835 

Clark William H. T 823 

Cogswell J. L 758 

Collins John D. & Co 824 

Conroy, O'Connor & C0..774 

Cook H. N 735 

Cook John 746 

Corville Emerson & Co. 

808 (:) 

Craig R. R. & J 805 

Crocker H. S. & Co 7.36, 

815, 825 

Cronan William 830 

Croskey R. & Co 784 

Cuddy & Hughes 815 



Cnmmings W. H 798 

Cutting & Co 813, 815 

Daly & Hawkins 818 

Davis Hetiry C 758 

Davis (The) Sewing Ma- 
chine 821 

Davis & Cowell 784 

Day Thomas 768 (2), 814 

Day Thomas J 762 

Dewey C. H 781 

Du Rose F. F 734 

Duff (feBrokaw 818 

Dunbar cfe Hendry 802 

Duncan George cfe Co... 820 
Eaton cfe Edwards. ..736, 825 

Eckfeldt J. M. cfe Co 835 

Einstein Bros, cfe Co 740 

Eitner Rudolph 762 

Electrical Construction 
and Maintenance Co. 

735, 761, 8.35 

Farjeon S. cfe Co 834 

Feigenbaum cfe Co 748,805 

831 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



PAGE. 

Fellows E. p. & Co....760,768 
782 

Figer Brothers Hi 

Florence Sew'g Machine 

'Samuel Hill) S21 

Folkers J. H. A. & Bro. 

758,827,832 
Frankenthal & C0...758, 836 

Fratinger & Noll 752 

Freese F. A 745 

Gates J. R. & Co 760 

Germania Fire Ins. Co.. .779 

Ghirardelli D 7.53 

Gilbert & Moore 767, 821 

Giller C. L 763 

Goddard <fe Co 765 

Goldsmith W. E. & Son..763 

Goodwin A Co 767 

Goodyear & Blake 762 (2) 

Goodyear Rubber Co 776 

Gray Matthias 805, 813 

Gray Samuel C 783, 829 

Greenebaurn & Co 798 

Grover & Baker S. M. 

Co. (R. G. Brown) 821 

Guittard E. & Co 753 

GuIIixson Henry A 747 

Gunn W. J 818 

Hall's Safe and Lock Co_820 

Handy N. A 821 

Hanly Geo. T. & Co 829 

Hanover Fire Ins. Co 779 

Harrison John 788 

Harrison W. P. 815 

Hartford Fire In.s. Co 779 

Hawkins & Cantrell 795 

Hawley Chas. A. & Co.. .775 
Heald's Business College 

754, 821 

Hecht Bros. & Co 7-38 

Heller .Joseph 767 

Herring William J 763 

Heynemann & Co.. .747, 761 

Hinz Carl 831 

Hirshfield R 781 

Hobbs, Pomeroy & Co.. .740 

Hobson William G 830 

Hodge J. G. & Co 736, 825 

Hoffman & Schenck. 763,826 

Holt Brothers 748 

Holt Warren 821 

Home Ins. Co. of N. Y...780 
Home Mutual Ins. Co.. ..781 
Home Sewing Machine..821 

Houghton F. T. & Co 734 

737, 744 (2), 747, 752, 764 
796, 810, 820, 835, 836 
Houseworth Thomas & 

Co 758, 763, 808, 811 

Howe (feRosenbaum 731 

Hueter G 730, 810, 833 

Hughes J. F. 815 

Hunt E. 817, 834 

Hutchinson C. <fe Son 747 



PAGE. 

Hyde & Chester 777 

Isaacs B 800 

Jewell A. M. & Co 817 

Kabath & Ladd 775, 802 

Kaindler & Co 761 

Keeler J. M. <fe Co 798 

Keene C. C 805 

Kellett Samuel 814 

Kelly P 739 

Kendall, KIniger <fe Co..,836 

Kennedy E. C 747 

Kesseler J. & P 796 

Kittredge Jonathan..759, 820 

Koehler August 8.32 

Koehler & Bitter 781, 823 

Kohler, Cha.se & Co 813 

KollmyerW. A 813 

Kruger August 763 

Lane Edmund 814 

Leary A. J 738 

Leavitt C. H 765 

Libby & Swett...738, 758, 817 
821,825(2) 

Linsley & Collins 816 (2; 

Little John T 818 

Locke & Montague 827 

Loomis W. E 806 

Lowry J. W 748 

Lund William & Co 835 

Lyle J. B. & Co 818 

Macdonald T>. A. <fe Co... 802 

Macondray & Co 829 

Magee Thomas 818 

Magill Arthur E 780 

Main & Winchester..775,834 
Manhattan Fire Ins Co. 

of N. Y 779 

Manhattan Marble Co.. ..796 

Marsh H. F 760, 761, 769 

824 (2) 

Martin & Co 795 

Martin E. & Co 784 

Martin Wheeler 753, 772 

Marwedel C. P 79R 

McCurrie <fe Weber 805 

Melntyre John B 738 

McNally & Hawkins 814 

Menomy E. T 814 

Merrill Charles A 795 

Merrill F. H. & Co...814, Si- 
Merrill & Co 747 

Methodist Book Depos- 
itory 7.38 

Mills & Evans 833 

Mission and PaciflcWool- 

en Blills 836 

Mitchell G. H. <fe Co 747 

Morgan's Sons E. E..798, 822 

Morrison John C. Jr 784 

Mountain & Raye 747 

Moynihan <fe Aitkin 7-37 

Muiler C 797, 808 

Murdock C. A. & Co 815 

Murphy,Grant& Co..761,769 



PAGE. 

MurthaW. 749 

Mutual Benefit Life Ins. 

Co 779 

Mutual Life of N. Y 780 

Napa Soda Springs 802 

National Life U. S. A 780 

Neustadter Brothers 767 

Nevada Soda Co 824 

New England Mutual 

Life Ins. Co 780 

Newton Bros. & Co 830 

Nevlan & Young 795 

Nichols A. C. & Co 783 

Nile M. D 813 

Noble & Gallagher 809 

Norcross <fe Co 800, 819 

Noriega Brothers 775 

North British and Mer- 
cantile Ins. Co.of Lon- 
don and Edinburgh..780 
Nutting Calvin <fe Son. ...759 

Nye Albert G 741,813 

Oakley R. O. <fe Co 818 

Oester Charles 736 

Pacific Cordage Co 757 

Pacific Electro-Deposit- 
ing Works 807,823 

Pacific Oil and Lead 

Works 807 

Pacific Rolling Mill Co.. .820 
Pacific Wood Engraving 

Co 763,782 

Pages J. F 759, 763 

Palmer, Knox <fe Co 765 

Patch George W 826 

Patrick Richard & Co.. ..775 

Percy P 757 

Peters & Ham 810 

Pettigrew J. J 754 

Pforr John 819 

Phillips, Taber & Co 769 

Phenix Fire Ins. Co. of 

N. Y 780 

Phoenix Ins. Co. of Hart- 
ford 780 

Pohley <fe Koster 833 

Preble & Co 833 

Putzman Fr 785 

Reed Henry R 822 

Reid John 829 

Republic Life Ins. Co 780 

Reubold M 7.39 

Rochieioli R. F 823 

Rodgers, Caspari & Co.. 799, 

822 

Roman A. & Co..7.36, 738 (3), 

817, 825 (2) 

Rosseter <fe Smith 783 

Roth & Videau 785 

Rudolf G. <fe Co 805 

Ruhl Brothers 748, 781 

San Francisco Gold and 
Silver Plating Works 

758, 823 



PAGE. 

San Francisco Laundry..783 
San Francisco Percus- 
sion Match Co 798 

Sanborn & Byrnes 825 

Saul <feCo 748 

Saulnier John & Co 785 

Schleifer F. & Co 749 

Schmidt* Buehler 793 

Schrader Otto 809 

Schraubstadter <fe Co 813 

Schuiz & Fischer 823 

Schuster Brothers 827 

Schwiering & Westall...764 

Seregni Fulgenzio 831 

Shew William 811 

Smith Francis & Co 814 

Smith, Lucy & Co 824 

Smith W. H 734, 797 

Spink James A 823 

Stallmann & Briigge- 

mann 829 

Standard Soap Co 824,833 

State Investment and 

Ins. Co 781 

Steiger & Boland 765 

Stockman J. M 805,810 

Stockton Woolen Mills...836 

Strahle Jacob & Co 735 

764, 832 

Studley B. W ...834 

Sullivan & Moorhead 752 

Swain J. H 739 

Tay George H. & Co 827 

Taylor John & Co 769 

Truworthy F. M 826 

Turner & Harvey 835 

Tustin W. I 834 

Underwriters' Agency 

(New York) 780 

Union Pacific Salt Co 820 

Van Court John F. 748 

Walmslev W. W 814 

Warner & Silsby 7.34 

Watkins C. E 811 

Watson & Co 757, 784,831 

Weaver & Taylor 776 

Week L. E. & 'o 784 

Weed & Kingwell 741 

Weichhart John 831 

Weil Brothers 735 

Wellman, Peck & Co 769 

Wensinger F. S 819 

Wheeler <fe Wilson Sew- 
ing Machine Co. (B. 

W. Harrul) 821 

White & Bauer. 806 

Williams C. L. & Co 779 

Wilson Sewing Machine 

(G. A. Norton) 822 

Wolfe <fe Son 7.30 

Wood Geo. M. & C0..763, 826 
Woodworth, ,ScheU <fe 

Co 813 

Young & Paxson 819 



PMMJPAMING- FOM IMMEJDIATM I'lIBLICATIOW, 



THE PACIFIC COAST 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY 

FOR 18 74-76. 

Containing the Names, Business and Post-office Address of over Fifty Thousand Merchants, Manufacturers 

and Professional Men, in the States of California, Oregon and Nevada, the Territories of Washington, 

Utah, Arizona, Idaho, Montana and Alaska, and the Colony of British Columbia, with a 

Gazetteer of the Counties, Cities and Towns of the Pacific Coast, and the Names of the 

Officers governing the same, Federal, State and Municipal, and Finances thereof. 

TO WHICH WILL BE ADDED 

AN EXHIBIT OF THE RESOURCES OF THE PACIFIC COAST, 

And a variety of other items of information, the whole forming one of the most valuable 
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C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and VaUses. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY, 

1874. 



The City of San Francisco was, for the first time, 
incorporated by the Legislature in May, 1850, the organ- 
ization of tlie county having been eftected in the month 
previous, by the election of a Sheriff and other officers, 
thus establishing two distinct systems of government. 
The Consolidation Act took eflect on the first day of 
•Julj'^, 1856. Under its stringent provisions, our munic- 
ipal affairs have been administered with energy and fidel- 
ity, and a thorough reform has resulted. The enormous 
outlay consequent on the dual system of government has 
been entirely abolished or seriously reduced, while the. 
checks upon lavish expenditure were so well devised as 
to defy evasion, and the contraction of debts has been 
inhibited. The financial history of all this is sufficiently 
indicated in the exhibit* of the Aggregated Annual Expenditures of the City and County 
of San Francisco from 1850 to 1874 — since the first legislative organization of the government 
-exclusive of the sums paid in liquidation of the principal and interest of the bonded debts : 
Assessment and Rates of Taxation from 18SO to 1874. 




Fiscal Yeak. 



Total 
Annual 
Kates. 



Particular Class op Assessments. 



Real Estate. 



Improvements 



Personal Property. 



Total 

Annual 

Assessments. 






18-10-51.. 
18r>l-52.. 
1852-.58.. 
1853-54.. 
1854-55.. 
18.5.5-5!).. 
18.5l)-57. 
1857-58.. 
1858-59. 
185;)-()0. 
1800-61. 
18'il-i)2. 
18H2-t)3. 
18'53-fl4. 
18S4-65. 
1885-6(5. 
18i)f)-(>7. 
1867-68. 
1868-6!). 
1860-70. 
1870-71. 
1871-72. 
1872-73. 
1873-74. 



$2 00 
4 10 

4 41^^ 
3 88!^ 
3 85^ 

3 85 5-6 
2 .SO 
2 30 

2 45 

3 169-10 
2 85 

2 87 
2 74)^ 
2 10 

2 98 

3 12 

5 10 
3 00 
3 05 
3 08 

2 843^ 
2 97 
1 50 
1 60 



ei6,8 19,0.54 
11,141,463 
15,67.i,356 
17,880,850 
19,765,285 
18,607,800 
17,827,617 
15,576,545 
13,554,565 
14,172,235 
25,283,685 
31,871,897 
37,906,102 
43,116,.538 
47,292,^)03 
49,1-37,312 
53,485,421 
58,207,8 )2 
63,631,721 
69,776,603 
75,145,717 
76,124,551 
180,571 ,()40 
130,871,138 



In Personal. 

In Personal. 

In Personal. 

$6,1.58,300 

9,1.59,935 

8,394,92-5 

8,34-5,6(67 

7,-394,296 

5,946,585 

6,-523,985 

In Ueal. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

In Real. 

37,182,680 



$4,772,160 

2,875,440 

2,805,381 

4,8-52,000 

5,837,607 

5,073,847 

4,194,970 

12,426,-3-35 

11,224,800 

9,323,002 

10,683,814 

9,973,222 

29,-540,-5-54 

34,002,627 

33,443,262 

39,121,145 

43,214,976 

51,1-52,964 

42,782,308 

t44,982,908 

31,246,1-59 

28,900,988 

108,011,617 

44,154,717 



$21,621,214 

14,016,903 

l!-,i.>i,- .7 

2J>,;'00,I.')0 

34,7.;2,827 

32,076,-572 

30,3;;8,254 

3-5,3! i7, 176 

30,72-5,9.50 

30 ,01! 1, 222 

35,9o7,499 

41,845,119 

66,55(i,656 

77,1111,165 

80,736,165 

88,2)6,4-57 

96,700,397 

]0!i,'60,826 

106,414,029 

114,7.59,511 

106,391,876 

105,025,-539 

1288,583,2-57 

§212,208,-535 



The amount absolutely collected on for the last four years is much less than the aggregate 
valuations. For the year 1868-69, the delinquent list amounted to ^429,709 on an assessed 
value of §13,500,000 ; in 1869-70 to $556,320 on §18,062,340; in 1870-71 to $170,603 on 
$5,996,584; in 1871-72 to $237,787 on $8,006,311, and in 1872-73, $;,182,115 on $78,807,648. 



■•' Foi* table of Miinicipiil Expenditures from 18.50 to 186.5, see .'^Ax Francisco Directory for 1866, page 10. 

t Exclusive of Mortgages, wbicli amounted in 186:)-70 to near !?16.n(in,iKin, now held to be exempt from taxation. 

; The large increase in the value of real and personal property, 1872-73, was occasioned by the operation of the 
New Code. 

J Solvent debts, including those secured by mortgage are not Included, held to be exempt by the Supreme 
Court of the State. 






PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIKECTOBY contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



KENNEDY'S INSTJKANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, represents $12,000,000. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



The large delinquent list of 1872-73 is due to the fact that many of the heaviest taxpayers of 
the city and county questioned the legality of the levy and commenced suit thereon. In 
addition to the amount delinquent of 1872-73, |331,675 were paid under protest. 

The value of the real and personal property of the City and County of San Francisco, Octo- 
ber, 1873, was assessed as follows: Real Estate, |130,871,138 ; Improvements, §37,182,680; 
Personal Property, ^36,228,884 ; Money, 7,925,833 ; Total, $212,208,535. The total value of 
the real and personal property of the State of California, 1872-73, is ^637 ,232,823. Total State 
tax levied, §3,175,480, of which San Francisco was assessed forty-five per cent. 

9Iunicipal Expendilnres from 1SS3 to 1873. 



Current Permanent | 
Expenses. Improvm'ts 



Redaction 
of Debt. 



Old 

Claims. 



Total. 



186.5-66.. 
186(3-67.. 
1867-68.. 
1868-fj9.. 
1869-70.. 
1870-71.. 
1871-72.. 
1872-7.S., 



916,9:34 45 
939,285 05 
1,215,925 00 
1,937,92.5 41 
2,098,610 00 
2,417,110 00' 
2,783,843 OOl 
2,826,670 98 



S90,995 90 S256,198 38 
188,073 75 21.3,353 06 



165,.S59 24 



200,644 07 
373,050 83 
224,198 00 
225,462 00 
223,402 00 
232,935 55 



$154,0.55 00 
354,686 82 
20l),4.57 76 
148,233 81 
361,625 00 
177,045 00 
55,461 00 
213.909 46 



$19,097 47 
71,166 66 



51,437,281 20 

1,766 ,.565 34 

1,788,586 07 

2,4-59,210 05 

2,684,4.33 00 

2,819,617 00 

3,062,766 00 

3,273,515 99 



The amount expended by the Department of Streets during the year ending June 30, 1873, 
was §506,098 (against §380,698 in 1871-72, §843,415 in 1870-71, and §1,246,125 in 1869-1870), 
which, added to the amount included in the above table, makes th© total expenditures of the 
Municipal Government for the year ending June 30, 1873, about §3,780,000. 

For the year ending June 30, 1873, the following amounts were paid for support of the 

different departments of the Municipal Government : Salaries, city and county officers, §409,167; 

police, §158,022; fire (including fire alarm telegraph), §214,442; school, §607,889; street lights, 

§230,912; ho.«pital, §101,260; Alms House, §45,558; redemption of bonds and interest, §446,845. 

The number of salaried employes connected with the Municipal Government exceeds one 

thousand, who receive for salaries, per annum, an aggregate of one million one hundred 

thousand dollars. 

Bonded Debt April I, 1874. 



By the. 



.862-63.. 



863.. 



864 

865 

866-67.. 

867 

870 

870 

.871 

872 

873 

873 



City 

City and County 

City and County for San 

Jose Railroad 

City and Co. City Slip. 
City and Co. City Slip 
Central Pacific 11. R. Co.. 
Western Pacific R. R. Co 

School Department 

Judgment 

School Department 

Park Improvement 

Hospital 

School Department 

Park Improvement 

Hospital 



1875 
1888 

1877-8 

1883 

1884 

1894 

1895 

1881 

1887 

1890 

1890 

1891 

1882 

1893 

1893 



AUNUAL iNTEBESy. 



Pr. ct. Payable in. 



New York 

San Francisco. 



ban 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 



Francisco.... 

Francisco \ 

Francisco j ' 

Francisco.... 

Francisco.... 

Francisco.... 

Francisco.... 

Francisco.... 

Francisco.... 

Francisco.... 

Francisco.... 

Francisco.... 

Francisco.... 



Annual 
Sinking Fund. 



About 839,000 00 
About 41,000 00 

About 26,000 00 
About 47,000 00 

None 

None 

About 20,000 00 
About 17,000 00 
About 15,000 00 



About 9,000 00 
About 10,000 00 



Bonds in 
Circulation. 



$157,.500 00 
590,000 00 

115,000 00 

473,.500 00 

11,000 00 

377,000 00 

2.50,090 00 

197,000 00 

246,000 00 

285,000 00 

1.50,000 00 

170,000 00 

100,000 00 

75,000 00 

40,000 00 



Totals About $224,000 00 83,237,000 00 

Funded Debt, April 1, 1874, §3,237,000 ; Floating Debt, §500,000 ; Total debt, §3,737,000. 
Cash in the treasury, §234,000. Actual debt, §3,503,000. 

The Legislature of the State has authorized the following bonds in addition to those enumer- 
ated in the above table, which are to be issued as circumstances require : for Public Park 
improvement, §250,000, payable in thirty years at six per cent.; City Hall, §750,000, thirty 
years at six per cent.; School Department, §200,000, twenty years at six per cent,, and for 
building a House of Correction, §150,000, twenty years at seven per cent. 

The bonds issued for the opening and improvement of Montgomery Avenue amount to 
§1,500,000; they are redeemable in thirty years, bear interest at the rate of six per cent, per an- 
num, and for their payment the property directly benefited, valued at §60,000,000, is pledged. 



Fire Insurance at Tariff Bates ; Losses promptly paid by FABNSWOKTH & CLARK. 



C. p. VAN" SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Glasswai-e and Toys. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 



13 



Annoal Revenue from 1865 to 1873. 



186.5-t)()., 
186(5-67. 
1897-68.. 
1868-69.. 
1839-70. , 
1870-71.. 
1871-72.. 
1872-73.. 



Sl,-S61,876 26 
1,482,476 31 
1,509,162 .50 
1,786,1*29 43 
1,966,827 00 
1,93.5,902 00 
2,062,204 .58 
1,814,669 00 



StateandCo. 
Licenses. 



S89,253 2.5 

93,901 .50 

99,484 74 

100,4-54 69 

110,3,53 12 

106,1.57 00 

146,043 18 

190,443 00 



Municipal 
Licenses. 



828,799 2-5 
31,762 80 
88,895 90 
52,.560 50 
41,646 50 
40,067 00 
42,414 05 
55,.522 00 



Sale of 
Bonds. 



§61,0.50 00 
12.5,965 38 
47,-500 00 



Other 
Sources. 



$83,429 30 
107,647 97 
271,263 78 
507,040 67 
7.52,365 93 
716,263 00 
812,68;^ 04 
1,138,814 00 



Sl,624,408 06 
1,841,7,53 96 
1,966,303 92 
2,446,185 %) 
2,871,192 ,55 
2,798,389 00 
3,063,346 85 
3,199,448 00 



State. 



$944,812 35 

987,105 77 

1,095,-586 71 

1,044,8:35 20 

1,049,.505 03 

965,9.57 00 

947,399 83 

904,065 00 



The Special Fee Fund for 1872-73 aggregated $140,949, of which the Kecorder returned 
$34,051 ; the County Clerk, $41,179; the Sheriff, §20,835; the Tax Collector, $12,491, and the 
Clerk of the Justices' Court, $9,359. 

Population of San Francisco, 9Earcli 1, 1874. 

The following estimate of the population of this city has been prepared from careful inves- 
tigation made during the progress of the canvass for the present volume and other reliable data; 
and in directing attention thereto, the compiler believes that the aggregate presented is a fair 
approximation to the actual number : 

White Males over twenty-one 65,092 

" Females over eighteen (estimated) 39,100 

" Males under twenty -one (estimated) 39,611 

'• Females under eighteen (estimated) 34,367 

" Males, names refused, and foreigners not taken in the canvass (esti- 
mated) 1,600 

Chinese, Male and Female 14,500 

Colored, Male and Female 1,600 



Total permanent population 195,870 

To which should be added a large element of our population known as "floating," 
which consists of: 1st. Transient boarders, etc., at hotels, boarding houses, etc. 
2d. Soldiers at the fortifications in the harbor. 3d. Persons engaged in navi- 
gating the baj', who claim this city as their residence. 4th. Inmates of Alms 
House, Hospitals, and other charitable institutions. County Jail, etc. 5th. A 
large number of persons who have no permanent place of abode, together 
amounting to about 4,900 

Total population, March 1, 1874 200,770 

The estimate of the males over twenty-one in the above table is based upon the aggregate of 
names contained in the present volume, as follows: The number of references in the register of 
names is 74,556, of which 64,092 are male residents of this city. These figures are exclusive of 
a numerous list of names included in the Business Directory and the Appendix, containing the 
names of officers of societies, incorporations, etc., not obtained in the regular canvass, estimated 
at 1,000, making a total of 65,092. The two latter named departments of the Directory are 
compiled from information collected just previous to the publication of the work, and include 
many names not to be found in the regular list. 

The number of females over eighteen is estimated at 39,100, upon the basis of the Federal 
Census of 1870. The number of females of all ages enumerated, as published in this city, 
amounts to 61,577, of which 23,261 are under fifteen years. According to the average of the 
Census throughout the United States, about sixteen per cent, of the number under fifteen 
(3,721) should be added thereto to represent the element between sixteen and eighteen, which 
would give an average as follows : Under eighteen, 26,982 ; eighteen and over, 34,595. The 
difference between the last-named figures (34,595) and those included in the table (39,100), 
amounting to 4,505, will not be considered an over-estimate for the increase since August, 1870. 

The estimates of the males under twenty-one, and the females under eighteen, are based upon 
the figures of the School Census, June, 1873. According to these returns the number of 



* For table of Revenue collected in San Francisco from 1850 to 1S65, see Saij Francisco Directory for 1866, p. 10. 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOKY, 1874-6, H. G. Langley, Pub'r, S. P. Pfice i 



SAN FRANCISCO INSURANCE CO. (Fire and Marine), office 411 California, 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



children of fifteen and under, at that date, was 54,469; increase to March 1, 1874, (estimated) 
4,500. Total, 58,969, estimated as follows : Males, 29,342; females, 29,627. ,To these should 
be added thirty-five per cent, (the average of the Census throughout the United States) for the 
males between sixteen and twenty, both inclusive, and sixteen per cent, for the females between 
fifteen and eighteen. This will give the following result : Males, fifteen and under, 29,342 ; 
between sixteen and twenty-one, 10,269. Total under twenty-one, 39,611. Females, fifteen 
and under, 29,627; between fifteen and eighteen, 4,740. Total under eighteen, 34,367. 

The remainder of the data in our estimate explains itself, and to those who are acquainted 
with the diflPerent elements referred to therein, the figures relating thereto will not be considered 
over-estimated. 

The aggregate of the present year (200,770), as compared with that of last year (188,323), exhib- 
its a gain of 12,447, or about seven per cent., a much greater increase than has taken place for 
the same period for several years past. The number of names enumerated in the register of 
the present volume, exhibits an increase of eight per cent, over that of last year, an unmis- 
takable evidence of the rapid growth of the city during the past twelve months. 

Por the purpose of reference, we republish from the San Francisco Directort for 1871 
the figures of the Census of the City and County of Sau Francisco, as compiled in this city ; 
also the official table of the Census Bureau at Washington. The totals of the latter diflfer 
materially from those contained in the former ; for instance, the aggregate population is given 
at 149,473 ; the colored population at 1,341, and the Chinese, 12,018. The native population 
numbers 75,753; foreign, 73,720. 

Federal Census of San Francisco, 1870. 

[San Francisco Compilation.] 



1st 

2d 

3d 

4th 

5th 

6th 

7th, 1st Precinct... 

" 2d Precinct.... 
8th, l.st Precinct... 

" 2d Precinct... 

9th 

10th, 1st Precinct... 

" 2d Precinct.... 

" 3d Precinct.... 

" 4th Precinct... 
11th, 1st Precinct.... 

" 2d Precinct.... 

" 3d Precinct 

" 4th Precinct. 
12th, 1st Precinct.. 

" 2d Precinct 



Mal's'Fm'siMal's 



7,187 
5,86S 
1,966 
6,358 
2,111 
3,192 
3,087 
2,607 
3,875 
4,293 
5,480 
2,814 
2,302 
3,071 
3,26r 
4,962 
4,787 
1,307 
648 
2,433 
4,214 



3,239 
5,500 

543 
4,314 

679 
3,058 
2,395 
2,100 
3,202 
4,818 
5,084 
2,404 
2,158 
2,886 
3,202 
4,604 
3,9:30 
1,254 

511 
1,930 
3,766 



Totals |75.824'61. 



1,389 

2,226 

132 

1,016 

151 

865 

759 

756 

976 

1,590 

2,030 

902 

833 

1,094 

1,292 

2,313 

1,959 

542 

200 

860 

1,837 



r-m's 



3.T22, 



1,397 

2,260 

144 

939 

133 

864 

7!>7 

726 

1,020 

1,672 

1,980 

810 

858 

1,130 

1,285 

2,237 

1,657 

563 

261 

836 

1,692 



23.261 



Ma 'Is Fm 's 



1,158 


1,188 


1,803 


1,898 


104' 


108 


808 


775 


95' 


81 


719, 


72S 


523; 


532 


566 


559 


829; 


86S 


i,33r 


1,393 



1,556 1,479 



573 
614' 

859j 
9871 

1,562; 

1,565; 
408 
160 
702 

1,424' 



596 

584 

848 

988 

1,648 

1,312 

403 

216 

663 

1,362 



20] 22 
1 2 

■■3|""2 
1 
5 







Undr 15 


B'n 


Cal 


Mai's 


|Fm's 


M. 


F. 


M. 


|F. 


303 


2 


48 








316 


8 


3<; 


2 


1 


2 


515 


16 


n," 


? 






3,898 


1,593 


ZS4 


191 


140 


10^ 






4 
171 


"72 


44 




2,.540 


394 


'"24 


107 


2 


11 


1 


? 


1 


70 




17 
52 
50 








203 










198 


2 


1 






211 


5 


20 
15 








75 








54 


i 


4 


1 




1 


89 




12 
15 
34 








60 










409 


2 


1 




1 


203 


10 


40 




1 




129 


5 


ft 




1 




27 




3 








178 










112 




23 








84 I 9,777| 2,040| 877| 27l| 189 



Federal Census of San Francisco, 1870. 

[Census Bureau Compilation.] 



First 

Second . 
Third... 
Fourth . 

Fifth 

Sixth. 



4, .316 
6,069 
945 
5,527 
1,671 
3,953 



Seventh | 5,178 



6,451 
5,762 
2,019 
11,028 
1,142 
5,447 
5,201 



10,385 

11,359 
2,400 

10,284 
2,758 
6,139 

10,228 



305 
5 322 

,....! 551 
....! 5,650 

12! 3,033 
ll 1:34 



10,767 

11,831 
2,964 

16,555 
2,813 
9,400 

10,379 



Ward. 



Eighth 

Ninth , 

Tenth 

Eleventh .... 
Twelfth 

Totals.. 



9,474 
5,964 
12,367 
12,853 
7,436 



75,753 




73,720 136059 



12,018 



16,.503 
10,689 
22,325 
22,66G 
12,581 



149473 



School Census, Children Fifteen Tears and Under, June, 1873 

First Ward, 2,659 ; Second Ward, 4,249 ; Third Ward, 274 ; Fourth Ward, 3,022 ; Fifth 
Ward, 282 ; Sixth Ward, 1,754 ; Seventh Ward, 3,303 ; Eighth Ward, 5,614 ; Ninth Ward, 
1^594; Tenth Ward, 9,120; Eleventh Ward, 12,425; Twelfth Ward, 7,173; Total, 54,469. 

SPRINGFIELD FIR^^^lIi^INS.CO.; Assets. $1.100.000 ; Farnsworth & Clark. Aijt.. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 15 



oxmr=L:E:]sra? :E3:isTo:Fi."y.* 



In briefly referring to the current history of the city and State for the past year, it is grati- 
fying to state that that year was, on the whole, the most prosperous yet experienced in the 
annals of both. Some, with the remembrance of the prosperity of the early days of placer 
mining ; some, with the remembrance of the early days of Washoe mining, and some, with 
the remembrance of the real-estate excitement and rapid money-making era of 1868-9, will 
be inclined to peremptorily contradict this assertion ; yet, that the past year was the most 
prosperous this city and State have ever witnessed, all things considered, is susceptible of 
unmistakable proof from the statistics of wheat, gold, and wool production, and from the 
unexampled activity in building operations here, and consequent plentifulness of work for all 
classes. The elements of that which is enduring and that which is transitory must be given 
an important place in this connection. We undoubtedly have had ygars in which the appar- 
ent prosperity was much greater ; but those years and that prosperity was due, in many cases, 
either in whole or in part, to causes that were purely speculative — often to the verge of gam- 
bling — or to industries that were neither lasting or reliable. The progress of the past year, 
however, had nothing in it either speculative or unreliable. It was a progress to which there 
can be no retrogression, because it was advancement all along the line of agriculture, mining, 
manufacturing, and healthy city growth, as well as increase of population and development of 
general resources. 

Despite the want of late rains in March, April, and May — which greatly reduced the grain 
crops in the San Joaquin Valley — and the heavy frosts in the early portion of April — which 
blighted the grape blossoms and greatly reduced the grape yield — the crops of 1873 proved to 
be exceptionally large. Of gold and silver the product of 1873 exceeded that of the previous 
year by nearly §10,000,000. The dividends from the mines were in excess of those of 1872 by 
nearly §6,000,000. Of wheat, wool, and other home products over $10,000,000 worth more 
were exported in 1873 than in the previous year. 

The increase of home manufactures and population is shown by the fact that, while our 
mines yielded $10,000,000 more in 1873 than in 1872, we sent away nearly $2,000,000 less in 
treasure. The gain in population was equally gratifying. The total arrivals from all quarters 
exceeded the total departures by thirty-four thousand seven hundred and forty-seven. This is 
an increase for 1873 of sixteen thousand. Of the first-mentioned increase nearly twenty-one 
thousand came by the overland railroad. The arrivals by that route were composed mostly of 
mechanics, farmers, working girls, and invalids. The latter class came to California to enjoy 
the salubrious climate of our Southern Coast. That portion of the State is now almost uni- 
versally recognized as one of the most desirable and beneficial resorts in the world for con- 
sumptives and other invalids suffering from atrophic diseases. The rush thither is so great 
that the hotels and private boarding houses in Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Anaheim, San 
Diego, and San Bernardino are now nearly always full to overflowing at all seasons of the year. 

The value of the climate and scenery of California, in a pecuniary point of view, are only 
now beginning to be realized. It is no exaggeration to say that the tourists who come to see 
the one, and the invalids who come to be benefited by a residence in the other, spend §1,500,000 
yearly in the State, and the numbers coming, and the amounts they will spend, are both 
increasing rapidly. 

The city and State are also making satisfactory progress in the culture of influences that are 
both refining and elevating in a social and aesthetic sense. The State University has been 
most liberally endowed. The reputations of several of its professors are national, while the 
advantages offered by the institution have been placed within the reach of the children of those 
of limited, no less than of those of ample, means. The era when people looked upon this city 
and State as places of temporary sojourn in which to make money has passed away ; and, in 



* We are indebted to the politeness of Mr. Thomas Magee, the editor of the Real Estate Circular, for 
this valuable and interesting record of the city's progress during the year 1873. — Compiler. 



PAQIPIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 1874-0, H. G. Langley, Pub'r, S, F. Price $5, 



li. W. KENNEDY, Qeneral Insurance Agent, Tire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. ^ 



16 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



consequence, homes and houses of a character altogether unknown in the earlier history of the 
State are now and have for five years past been rapidly increasing — not only in this city but 
all over the State. Land, too, is being turned to more profitable and reliable uses than con- 
stant, hap-hazard wheat-raising, under a slovenly system of plow-scratching that has been dig- 
nified by, but is really unworthy of, the name of farming. The progress in this direction is 
not by any means as rapid as is desirable ; but the conviction is gradually gaining ground that 
farming, as generally conducted in the past in this State, is unreliable, and but too frequently 
unprofitable, while, as a means of soil impoverishment, it could not be surpassed. 

Some of the matters here referred to relate more to the State than the city, yet they have 
all an important bearing upon the growth and prosperity of the latter, and, in that connection, 
are of appropriate mention. 

Seal Estate, STew Buildings, Etc. 

Real Estate in San Feancisco. — Three thousand one hundred and thirty-four real-estate 
sales were made in the City and County of San Francisco in the year 1873. The total value 
of the land sold, with the dwellings and buildings thereon, was §12,383,752. Eeal estate was 
very dull of sale from the time of the completion of the Pacific Railroad until the beginning 
of the year 1873. Prices and sales havB both greatly improved since then — especially since 
November last. Business property has also greatly improved in price, especially on that por- 
tion of California Street lying between Kearny and Battery streets, and on those portions of 
Montgomery and Sansom streets which lie between California and Market streets. The 
prominent sales of business property made recently were as follows : North side California 
Street, sixty-seven and one half feet west of Sansom, forty by eighty in size, with three-story 
brick building, $150,000 — $3,750 per front foot ; gore-lot on Montgomery, Market, and Post 
streets, ?300, 000. The lot has a frontage on Montgomery of eighteen and one quarter feet 
only, one hundred and twenty-nine and one quarter feet on Market, and one hundred and ten 
feet on Post by ninety-seven and one half on the western line. There is only some six 
thousand nine hundred square feet in the lot ; the price paid was, therefore, at the rate of §43 .50 
per square foot. Land on the best inside residence streets of the city, distant ten to twenty 
minutes' walk from the business center, is now worth §150 to §350 per front foot, §225 being 
about the average. Homestead lots in locations suitable for people of limited means can still 
be bought for §800 to §1,500 each, and are distant one and a half to two miles from the busi- 
ness center of the city. The average value of each real estate sale made in the City and 
County of San Francisco in 1870 was §3,342; in 1871 it was §3,167; in 1872, §3,500, and in 
1873 each sale had an average value of §3,951. The value of the real estate of the city and 
bounty is now at least $10,000,000 more than it was at the close of 1872. 

Buildings Erected in San Francisco in 1873 and those in Process of Erection. — 
During the year 1873 six hundred and seventy-one new brick and frame buildings, of all 
classes, were erected in San Francisco. Of these, ninety were of one story ; five hundred and 
thirty -three were of two stories ; forty-two were of three stories, and six were of four stories,. 
Of these, the majority were built between June and October. The total expenditures on these 
buildings was fully four million of dollars. During the intervening months the greatest 
activity in building operations prevailed, and it was frequently impossible to find mechanics. 
A large proportion of the new houses were of the very best class. The cloth-and-paper-house 
era of San Francisco passed away for ever about the year 1860. The houses which are now 
built here, in point of solidity, roominess, and comfort, will compare favorably with those of 
any of the large cities of the United States. As a rule, the finest private houses were erected 
between Larkin, Franklin, Sutter, and Turk streets, although the hills above and west of 
Hayes Valley, and Fillmore and Turk streets, were also in favor. The buildings on the best 
business streets of a great city generally undergo three transformations. The first era is that 
of cheap and common brick-front buildings ; the second is that of larger and more commo- 
dious buildings of the same class, with stone-dressed fronts, and an occasional one entirely of 
stone; the third era is that of stately stone and marble structures, of the most solid, ornamental, 
and costly class. New York, Boston, and Philadelphia (the three largest and oldest cities of 



PABNS WORTH & CIiARK, Gen'l Fir© and Marine Insurance Agency; office 230 Cal. St. 



ill 



C. prVAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 17 



1 



the United States) have alone advanced to the third era ; San Francisco has entered on the 
second. Old, small, crantiped, and plain brick buildings, erected on our best business streets, 
between 1849 and 1859, have become superannuated, and are gradually being supplanted by 
more stately, light, roomy, and ornamental structures. 

The most important building now in course of construction here is the Palace Hotel, owned 
by William Sharon. It will have a frontage of two hundred and seventy-five feet on Market 
Street (between Second and Third) by a depth and front on Montgomery Street South of three 
hundred and forty feet. It will be six stories high, and will cost about $600,000. The new 
building to be erected on west side Montgomery, between Pine and Summer streets, will cost 
§250,000, and will be known as the Nevada Block. Plood & O'Brien are the owners of the 
land. K. C. Johnson, the iron merchant, owns a large lot on Sutter Street, above Montgom- 
ery, on which he is about to erect a stately brick building, to cost $150,000. The Mechanics' 
Institute have secured a long lease, on nominal terms, from A. B. McCreary, of a lot of land 
on Market, Eighth, and Mission streets, two hundred and seventy-five by five hundred and 
fifty in size. A new Mechanics' Fair building, to cost $50,000 to $70,000, will soon be erected 
on this land, and a fresh opportunity will thus be afforded for the display of California 
mechanical, artistic, agricultural, and metallurgical skill, industry, and progress. The new 
United States Government buildings, on the lot opposite and west of the Post-oflSce and 
Custom House, are progressing slowly but satisfactorily. The Congressional appropriation 
for the construction of these buildings was $408,000, of which but a comparatively small 
amount is yet expended. Much dissatisfaction has recently been expressed at the heavy cost 
of the new City Hall, and also at the unsuitable location of it on a site so far distant from the 
city center as that near Market Street, between Seventh and Ninth. In consequence of this 
dissatisfaction, the work will, for the next two years, be confined to the completion of contracts 
already entered into. The expenditure allowed under this legislative restriction is $750,000. 
The Board of City Hall Commissioners has been abolished, and the work referred to is to be 
carried on under the control of the Board of Supervisors. One of the largest and finest markets in 
the United States is now being erected by Charles K. Peters on the two fifty- vara lots on the 
southeast corner of Sutter and Dupont streets. The cost will be $75,000. This market will 
soon be ready for occupancy. A new and stylish frame Amphitheater was recently erected on 
the southeast corner of New Montgomery and Mission streets, by Mr. John Wilson, the circus 
manager. The obstructions to the opening of Montgomery Avenue — from Montgomery to 
Stockton streets at least — have now about been removed, and a large number of new buildings 
are immediately to be erected on the line of the new street. A new and large brick building 
is now being erected, by John Parrott, on the northeast corner of Sacramento and Front 
streets, on the lot sixty feet square. A new three-story brick building, to be divided into 
ilegant stores, is now being erected on the northeast corner of Post and Kearny streets, on 

lased ground. The gore-lot, at the junction of Market, Montgomery, and Post streets (recently 

lid at the extreme price of $300,000), is soon to be improved by the erection of a brick 
luilding and stores, which will cost $100,000. The calculation of the owner is that he can rent 
the building for $5,000 per month. A large, new brick building is to be erected by James 
W. Burnham & Co. on the lot adjoining on Market Street, on the west. The most of the block 
bounded by Market, Geary, Kearny, and Dupont streets is owned by one person. The property 
has long been under lease, and is now covered with old frame buildings. These leases will soon 
expire, and as first-class buildings are now a necessity on such valuable land, it is almost 
certain that such structures will soon be erected there. A new four-story frame and brick 
building, to cost $75,000, is now being erected on the gore-lot at the junction of Market, Ma- 
son, and Turk streets. A new building, to cost $70,000, is soon to be erected on the southeast 
corner of Pacific and Kearny streets. A commodious three-story brick building is now being 
erected upon the lot (sixty by seventy in size), northeast corner of Kearny and Sutter streets. 

The above is, of course, necessarily, only a partial list of the buildings projected on our best 
business streets. Everywhere the old buildings of the past are being torn down to make room 
for costly, modern, substantial, and ornamental structures. These changes clearly indicate 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTOBY, 1874-6, H. G. Langley, Pub'r, S. P. Price i 
2 



' 



B£lN FBANCISCO INSUBANCE CO. (Fire and Marine), office 411 California. 



18 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTOKY. 



the growtli of the city, the great increase of its business, and the enhancement of rents and 
real-estate values. Banking, insurance, and other property, on California Street, and on 
Sansom and Montgomery streets, contiguous thereto, has greatly advanced in price, and the 
buildings there are generally very fine. The new London and San Prancisco Bank building 
would be an ornament to any city. It is situated on the northwest comer of California and 
Leidesdorff streets. Another new bank building is projected on the north side of California 
Street, west of Battery. The building formerly owned by an insurance company, on Cali- 
fornia Street, adjoining the Bank of California, recently changed hands. The building is 
now being remodeled. 

In few respects has San Francisco increased more within the past seven years than in 
first-class private residences. That of "William Sharon (not yet completed), on Sutter Street, 
above Powell; that of R. C. Johnson, southwest corner of O'Farrell and Leavenworth 
streets; that of William C. Ealston, on Pine, west of Leavenworth, being especially 
noticeable and ornamental. Leland Stanford, President of the Central Pacific Eailroad Com- 
pany, owns most of the block bounded by Powell, Mason, California, and Pine streets. He 
intends soon to erect on it a mansion which will cost at least $100,000. Charles Crocker, one 
of the managers of the same company, last year purchased a lot, two hundred and seventy -five 
by one hundred and thirty-seven and one half feet, on the northwest corner of California and 
Taylor streets, on which, on his return from China, it is understood he will erect a large and 
costly mansion. This is but an outline of what has been done or projected in the building 
line in this city during the past year. There has seldom been such a dearth of houses as 
existed here all of last year. Despite the imusually large number of new buildings erected, 
the supply was not nearly equal to the demand. In consequence of this fact, the cheapness of 
money and lumber, the unprecedented prosperity promised from large crops and a fruitful 
yield from the mines, there is no doubt but that more buildings and dwellings will be erected 
this year in San Francisco than in any previous year in its history since 1849 or 1850. The 
total cost of the buildings now under construction will not be less than f 3,000,000, not to 
speak at all of several hundreds of other dwellings, to cost from f 2,000 to $6,000 each, which 
will shortly be built. Those mechanics, therefore, who can not find work in the Atlantic States 
may confidently calculate on finding employment if they will direct their course westward. 

NuMBEB or Buildings. — The number of buildings in the city and county is estimated at 
twenty-two thousand six hundred, of which four thousand two hundred are of brick. The 
Federal Census of 1870 returns the number at twenty-two thousand two hundred and sixty- 
six. {See Article on Population, page 13.) 

Value op Church Property, etc., in San Francisco. — Some one has said that capi- 
tal seeking investment in a city will look to the manner in which it is provided with churches, 
schools, colleges, and charitable institutions as one of the true tests of the progress, stability, 
morality, and law-abiding character of the people resident in it. In this connection San Fran- 
cisco will bear favorable comparison with older, less isolated, and, therefore, more favored 
cities. The following table shows the present value of the land and cost of the buildings 
owned by the various religious sects of this city : 

Catholic Churches, Convents, Colleges, Asylums, Hospitals, etc 83,250,000 

Presbyterian Church property , 500,000 

Hebrew Church property 405,477 

Episcopalian Church property 380,500 

Methodist Church property 275,985 

Congregational Church property 265,000 

Baptist Church property 118,750 

Lutheran Church property 80,000 

Unitarian Church property 165,000 

Total miscellaneous property owned by all the religious sects of San Francisco (exclusive of the 
Catholic), Young Men's Christian Association, Ladies' Protective and Relief Society, St. 
Luke's Hospital, City College, Chinese Mission houses, Protestant Orphan Asylum, Bible 

Society, University Mound College, etc., etc 750,000 



Grand total $6,190,712 



PAENSWOBTH & CLARK, Gen'l Fire and Marine Insurance Agency; office 230 CaL St. 






O. p. VAN SCHAAOK & CO., 708. 712, 7KL. -!id 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 19 



The Leading Hotels, etc., of San Fbancisco,— San Francisco is not surpassed by any 
city in the United States, and probably by very few in the world, in the size, number, and excel- 
lence of its hotels. There are seven of them, in addition to the new Palace Hotel, now in 
course of erection. It will be the largest and most costly of them. The seven hotels alluded 
to have accommodations for two thousand one hundred and fifty guests. The value of the 
land on which they stand is nearly $3,000,000 ; the buildings cost ^1,365,000, and their fur- 
niture nearly $825,000. The rents paid by their landlords is from $1,000 to $4,000 per month. 
The largest of our present hotels has accommodations for four hundred guests. Their rates of 
board are from $2 to $3 per day. The number of hotels of all grades is sixty-five; of buildings 
devoted in whole or in part to lodgings, five hundred and twenty; occupied as boarding and 
lodging houses, three hundred and eighty. 

Rates of Interest at the Savings Banks, etc.— The ten savings banks of San Fran- 
cisco had, in the beginning of the present year, fifty-one thousand eight hundred and seven 
depositors, and deposits amounting to $47,362,555, or an average of about $910 to each depos- 
itor. These banks loan mostly on city and country real estate securities of the safest and most 
productive character. Their rates of interest range from eight to nine and a half per cent, per 
annum on city loans, and ten to eleven per cent, on country loans. 

Vnited States Slint and Post-Office. 

The United States Mint, Mining, etc.— The 8an Francisco Mint is no longer, as for- 
merly denominated, a " branch '' mint. By the Coinage Act of 1873 it was rendered inde- 
pendent of, because it has become far more important than, the old parent Mint at Phila- 
delphia, to which ours has heretofore, officially, been but supplementary. During the year 
1873 the following classes of coin were turned out of the Mint here : One million forty 
thousand six hundred double eagles— value, $20,812,000; twelve thousand single eagles— value, 
$120,000 ; thirty-one thousand half eagles— value, $155,000 ; twenty-seven thousand quarter 
eagles— value, $67,500. Total number of gold coins made, one million one hundred and ten 
thousand six hundred— total value, $21 ,154,500. Silver Coins : Seven hundred American dollars 
—value, $700 ; seven hundred and three thousand trade dollars— value, $703,000 ; two hundred 
and thirty-three thousand half dollars— value, $116,500; one hundred and fifty-six thousand 
quarter dollars— value, $39,000 ; four hundred and thirty-five thousand dimes— value, $45,500; 
three hundred and twenty-four thousand half dimes— value, $16,200. Total number of silver 
coins, one million eight hundred and seventy-one thousand seven hundred— total value, $920,900, 
Combined gold and silver pieces of all denominations coined in 1873, two million nine hun- 
dred and eighty-one thousand three hundred. Total combined value, $22,075,400. The 
total coinage of 1873 shows an increase of $5,727,956 over that of 1872. The importance and 
capacity of the San Francisco Mint is greatly restricted by the small and unsuitable building 
in which its operations are now conducted. The New Mint, a spacious and stately structure 
occupying the lot, two hundred and seventy-five feet square, on the corner of Fifth and Mission 
streets, will soon be completed and occupied. When finished, the business of the Pacific Coast, 
in connection with coinage, will be greatly facilitated. The San Francisco Mint is already the 
most important in the United States. The business of mining for the precious metals, next to 
agriculture, is the most important industry on the coast ; yet, in twenty years hence, twenty 
mines will be developed and worked where now there is but one. This prediction can be made 
with safety, without any allowance for new discoveries in the interim. The veins and lodes 
already discovered and partially tested will, of themselves, suffice to cause this increase ; while, 
remembering the vast districts in California, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, Idaho, and Montana, 
which are yet both undeveloped and unexplored, positive assurance is given that mining on 
this coast, vast as its present proportions are, is yet but in its infancy. The value of this fact 
to the agricultural and manufacturing interests is very great. In no portion of the world do 
the great industries of farming, mining, and manufacturing become of greater value, or act as 
more stable supports to each other than in California. 

The Postal Facilities of San Francisco.— Among the leading post-offices of the United 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTOBY contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



KENNEDY'S INSUBANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



20 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



States that of San Trancisco takes rank as about the third or fourth in point of importance. 
This position is due, not only to the local business transacted, but also to the fact that the San 
Francisco office is the point of distribution for a great portion of the European open and closed 
mails in transit to Asia, Australia, etc. These mails are received per overland railroad, and 
depart hence, by American steamers, for the countries named, monthly and semi-monthly. 
One hundred and eleven persons are on the pay-roll of the Post-office here, of which number 
forty-two are indoor employes, thirty-three are postal clerks and railroad and stage route 
agents, and thirty-six are employed in the distribution and collection of written and printed 
mail matter throughout the city. The system of iron postal boxes placed at convenient 
distances all over the corporate limits of the city is of great benefit and public convenience, 
facilitating rapid delivery, and saving the journey heretofore necessary to the General Post- 
office. The city is indebted to Postmaster IST. B. Stone and his predecessor Colonel Coey for 
the introduction of the public convenience referred to. The present able and efficient Post- 
master (Mr, Stone), is also to be credited with the introduction of many needed reforms in our 
local postal administration since he has held the office. Among others, his persistent effi)rts 
have been the means of introducing a new style of post-office bos and lock, which greatly 
increases the available space for such conveniences, and the number of boxes before in use, as 
well as adding a greater rental from the extra box-holders accommodated. These boxes are so 
constructed that the opening of any of them, by means of false keys, is impossible. There are 
now two thousand three hundred and sixty-five of these lock-boxes in our Post-office. The 
money-order system, adopted a few years since, has been found to work well, is of great public 
service, and is extensively availed of by all classes of our population. The sum of §615,579.46 
has, by this means, been sent to various portions of the world, through the San Francisco 
Post-office in 1873. This domestic and international method of sending money abroad has the 
tendency to direct and facilitate emigration hither, especially by the persons thus receiving the 
postal drafts. The money-orders issued from other post-offices in the United States during 
the same time, and payable here, amounted to §591,484.40. The San Francisco Post-office is 
the depository for the money-order receipts of all the other post-offices of this coast under United 
States jurisdiction. These various offices deposited $1,106,962 with the San Francisco Post-office 
during the year 1873. 

The Central Pacific and otiier Railroads. 

NtTMBER OF Employes, their Pay-roll, their Freight Statistics, etc. — During 
the year 1873 the annexed railroads brought to, and carried away from, San Francisco the 
appended number of tons of freight of all kinds : 

Name of Company . Received at S- F., tons. Sent from 8. F., tons. 

By Central Pacific K. R. Co 149,612 li9,287 

By Southern Pacific R. R. Co 91,944 37,862 

By California Pacific R. R. and Steamers 51,516 53,140 



Grand Totals 293,072 240,289 

The above statement of the Central Pacific Railroad does not include freight received at and 
shipped from Oakland. The business of all our railroads is increasing very rapidly. The 
unfinished lines are not being extended as rapidly as could be wished, owing to the difficulty 
of negotiating railroad bonds in Europe. This difficulty was, in part, due to the late commer- 
cial and financial panic, and, in part, to the hostility of a portion of the press, and the recent 
unsuccessful efibrts to reduce railroad fares and freights . 

The Central Pacific Railroad Company now employs, in San Francisco, Oakland, and on the 
ferry steamers, eight hundred and sixty -six persons, in all capacities, whose aggregate monthly 
salaries amount to §76,396, or about §920,000 per year. The Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company employs two hundred and fifty men, whose monthly wages amounts to §17,000, or 
about §204,000 per year. The California Pacific Railroad employs on its steamers two 
hundred and eighty-seven men in San Francisco, whose aggregate monthly wages account is 
now §9,220, or about §110,500 per year. The other employes of that company, resident here, 
number twenty-four, whose monthly salaries amount to §4,000, or a total of §48,000 per year. 



FABNSWOBTH & CIiABK furnish Safe and Beliable Insurance against Fire. 



C. p. VAW SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valises. 



PROGRESSOFTHECITY. 21 



These figures show that the three companies above named employ here and in Oakland, a total 
of one thousand four hundred and twenty-seven men, whose aggregate yearly salaries or wages 
amounts to §1,282,500, or an average of seventy-five dollars per month to each man employed. 
We frequently hear how the railroad has destroyed this or that small business which flourished 
prior to its advent, but we think these figures prove that it has destroyed in the atom only to 
restore in the lump, and that on a much more enduring, extended, and independent basis. It 
must be remembered too that, as yet, we have only begun to experience the benefits of railroad 
communication, and the consequent development of the mineral, agricultural, and manufact- 
uring interests which it fosters. 

street Railroads. 

The Horse-car Kailroads of San Francisco.— The multiplication and extension of 
lines of street railroad, when reasonable fares are charged, has a direct and most potent efiect 
in assisting a city to build up and extend its suburbs. This is especially true of United States' 
cities in general, but of San Francisco in particular. The annexed statistics show that, 
comparatively speaking, this city ranks second to none in the Union in point of easy, rapid, 
cheap, and plentiful means of street locomotion by horse-cars. Out of the eight street railroad 
companies of the city, but six (Market Street, Potrero and Bay View, Central, Clay Street 
Hill, City, and North Beach and Mission) have furnished us with the number of passengers 
carried by them during the year 1873. Upon this particular branch of their business the 
managers of the other two companies (Omnibus and Sutter Street) are disposed to be stupidly 
reticent. We give estimates of them. With these exceptions, all other particulars are officially 
given. 

Central Eailroad Company.— This company owns two (double track) main lines of 
railroad. One of the lines begins at the junction of Eighth and Brannan streets and runs to 
the corner of Front and Yallejo streets, a distance of two and seven eighths miles. The other 
main line starts from Taylor Street, between Eddy and Turk, and runs to the junction of Post 
Street and Cemetery Avenue, Lone Mountain. The distance of this line is two and one quarter 
miles. Total length of both lines owned and now operated by this company, inclusive of 
sidings, etc., five miles. A branch of this road is in process of construction from the corner of 
Turk and Fillmore streets, via Turk, Devisadero, and Fell streets, to the new Golden Gate 
Park entrance, a distance of one mile. This branch will be completed and opened for traflac 
as soon as the Park presents sufficient attractions to induce travel enough to warrant it. As 
the number of visitors to the Park is rapidly increasing, and the embellishment of the grounds 
being pushed forward with energy, the opening of this branch of the Central Koad to permanent 
travel can not long be delayed. Twenty-two cajs are in daily use on both lines of this com- 
pany sixteen on the line running to the City Front, and six on the Lone Mountain line. 

The company has eighty employes on its pay-roll, and owns and works two hundred and 
fifteen horses. The conductors and drivers, one to each car, are paid at the rate of §2.50 to 
§2.75 per day. Four tickets are sold on this road for twenty-five cents, passengers receiving a 
transfer ticket, when desired, to ride the whole length of the road, by change of cars, on either 
line. The total number of passengers carried by this road, in 1873, was two million six 
hundred and seventy thousand one hundred and sixty-two. Its gross earnings during the same 
period amounted to §171,610. c 

City Eailroad Company (Woodward's).— The cars of this line are small and light one*^ 
drawn by one horse, no conductors are employed on them, the fare being deposited in a pate 
box, into which each passenger drops his fare upon entering the car. Communication is hel«> 
with the driver, and change made by him, through an aperture in front of the car. The 
company own and operate one main and one branch line. The former runs from the corner of 
New Montgomery and Market streets, via Mission Street, to Twenty-sixth Street, a distance of 
three miles. The branch line runs from the corner of Bush and Dupont streets, via Dupont, 
Market, Fifth, and Mission, to Woodward's Gardens, corner of Fourteenth Street, a distance 
of nearly two miles. The company's books show that eighty men, in all, are employed by it. 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTOBY circulates throughout the Pacific Coast. 



KENNEDY'S INSURANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, represents $12,000,000. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



The number of regular cars running daily is twenty-six, and the number of horses owned is 
two hundred. The drivers on this line receive |2.50 per day. Five tickets can be purchased 
for twenty-five cents (including transfers). The total length of the City Kailroad, doable track, 
is four miles. The earnings of the road, for 1873, amounted to §130,000. The total number 
of passengers carried by it during the same period was three million five hundred thousand. 

Market Street Kailroad Company.— This line is owned and operated by the Southern 
Pacific Kailroad Co. It begins on Market Street, between Spear and Main, and runs, via 
Market and Valencia, to Twenty-sixth Street, a distance of three and two thirds miles. The 
Hayes Valley branch of this road begins at the junction of Market and Hayes streets, and runs, 
via Hayes, Laguna, and other streets, to the corner of O'Farrell and Devisadero streets, a dis- 
tance of nearly two miles. It is, we believe, the intention of this company to extend the Hayes 
Valley Branch to the Golden Gate Park before long. Twenty-three cars are daily run upon 
the main and branch lines of this company. Two hundred and nine horses and eighty men 
are owned and employed by it. Its conductors and drivers are paid $2.50 per day, and five 
tickets, including Hayes Valley transfer, are given for twenty-five cents. The number of 
passengers carried by this road, in 1873, was two million seven hundred and eighty-six thousand 
nine hundred and fifty-five, and the earnings amounted to $130,253. 

PoTRERO and Bat View Kailroad Compant.— This line begins atthe junction of Berry 
and Fourth streets, and runs {via Fourth and Kentucky streets and Kailroad Avenue) to Thirty- 
fourth Avenue, South San Francisco. It is also owned and controlled by the Southern Pacific 
Railroad Co. Its total length is nearly three and a half miles. Fifty-eight horses and nine 
cars are owned by the company. An average of thirty-three men, in all, are employed by this 
road. Its conductors and drivers are paid $2.50 per day. Four fares on this line cost twenty- 
five cents ; no transfer tickets are issued by it. The number of passengers carried over this 
route in 1873 was five hundred and thirty-seven thousand five hundred and seventy-eight, and 
the total gross earnings in the same time amounted to $33,984. The greater portion of this 
road crosses Mission Bay by means of a series of substantial trestle-work bridges. As the 
Southern Pacific Kailroad Company contemplate a change in their present trunk line from 
Valencia Street to the shore-line of Mission Bay, the latter will be gradually filled in and the 
present means of reaching South San Francisco by long wooden bridges will be done away with. 
The completion of such an undertaking will materially enhance the property and general in- 
terests of the Potrero and South San Francisco. This locality is destined in the near future to 
become the great ship-building and manufacturing center of the city. 

North Beach and Mission Kailroad Company.— This company runs two main lines of 

double-track railroad. The one runs fro A the junction of Fourth and Berry streets {via 

Fourth, Kearny, etc.) to the junction of Francisco and Mason streets, a distance of two and 

seven eighths miles ; the other line starts from the junction of California and Montgomery 

streets and runs to the corner of Folsom and Twenty-sixth streets, a distance of three and 

three quarters miles. Total length of both lines (double-track), about six miles. Thirty cars 

are run regularly every day on both lines. The company owns two hundred and fifty horses, 

^and employs in all one hundred and thirty men. Conductors and drivers are paid $2.50 per 

^day. Five tickets are sold for twenty-five cents (including transfers). The number of passen- 

^•rers carried by this road during the past year was four million two hundred and seventy-four 

j^jjiousand seven hundred and two. The gross earnings of the road in the same time were 

213,735. 

f Clay Street Hill Railroad Company.— This road has been completed and regularly 
running since October, 1873. Inclusive of that operated by steam and horse-power, its total 
length (double- track) is two and two thirds miles. The initial point of the road is at the junc- 
tion of Kearny and Clay, and its terminus is at Chestnut and Larkin streets. From Kearny 
to Leavenworth, up a grade of almost three hundred and seventeen feet to the half mile, the 
cars are operated by means of an endless steel-wire rope, one inch in diameter, running in a sub- 
way, and in no way impeding the travel of ordinary vehicles. The motive power is furnished 



ATLAS INS. CO. OF HAETFORD; Assets $325,000; Farnsworth & Clark, Agents. 



O. p. VAN SOHAACK: & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



PROGRESSOFTHECITY. 23 

by an engine of thirty -five horse-power, situated at the top of the grade. By means of "gripping- 
clamps " attached to a ** dummy " in front of the car, which reach the running rope through a 
center groove in the subway, the latter is seized or abandoned when necessary to propel or stop 
the car. When stopped, the car is kept stationary by a brake, which acts directly on the 
face of the rails ; this brake is operated by the conductor when the holding clamps release 
their hold upon the revolving rope. When the car reaches the top of the hill, the dummy 
preceding it is removed, and the car continues on to the end of the road with horses attached. 
Both mechanically and pecuniarily this road is a satisfactory success to its managers. It is 
their intention before long to extend westward that portion of the line operated by the wire- 
rope {via Clay and First Avenue) to the Golden Gate Park. Ten cars and twenty-two horses 
are at present in use on the road, and the number of employes is thirty-three. The number of 
passengers carried for the eight months the road has been in operation is given at the rate of 
one million ninety-five thousand per annum, Five tickets are sold for twenty-five cents. 

Omnibus Kailroad Compakt. — There are two main double-track lines owned by this 
company. One of them has its initial point at the junction of Fourth and Berry streets ; this 
line runs (via Montgomery, Sansom, Third, and other streets) to the junction of Powell and 
Bay streets, a distance of three miles. The other main line starts from the corner of Mont- 
gomery and Jackson streets, and runs (via Montgomery, Third, Howard, and other streets) to 
the junction of Howard with Twenty-sixth Street, a distance of three and a half miles. By 
last year's returns, eighteen cars were daily run on the former (North and South Beach) road, 
and twelve on the latter (Howard Street and Mission Dolores) line. At that time the company 
owned two hundred and eighty horses, and employed, in all capacities, one hundred and twenty- 
five men. Conductors and drivers receive $2.50 per day each. Five tickets are sold for twenty- 
five cents. Of the number of horses owned by the company twelve are daily used as "tow- 
horses " in the ascent of the steep grade on Jackson Street. The number of passengers carried 
in 1873 was about four million six hundred and seventy thousand, and the gross earnings about 
$233,500. 

Sutter Street Eailroad Company. — In 1872 this company had one main and three 
branch lines. The trunk road started from the junction of Broadway and Polk streets {via 
Polk, Sutter, and Battery) and terminated at the junction of Broadway and Davis streets, on 
the City Front, a distance of two and one third miles. The first branch extended from the 
corner of Sutter and Larkin {via Larkin and Ninth) to the junction of Ninth and Mission streets, 
a distance of seven eighths of a mile. The second branch extended from the corner of Bush 
and Polk streets {via Bush, Fillmore, and California streets and Cemetery Avenue) to Geary 
Street and Cemetery Avenue, a distance of one and seven eighths miles. The main line and 
these two branches are double-track roads. The Fort Point, Presidio, and Harbor View branch 
of this road forms a junction with the main line at its Polk Street terminus (corner of Broad- 
way), and runs out to Harbor View, on the Bay shore, a distance of three miles. This is a 
single-track, the cars passing each other by means of sidings diverging from the main line at 
regular intervals. The total length of the Sutter Street Kailroad (trunk line and branches) is 
eight and a quarter miles. In 1872 this company owned one hundred and eighty horses and 
nineteen cars. It then employed seventy-five men in all. Conductors and drivers are paid 
$2.50 per day. Four tickets only for twenty-five cents, including transfers on all branches but 
the Presidio, is the rate charged. The number of passengers carried on this road in 1873, was 
about one million seven hundred and fifty thousand, and its gross earnings about $113,750. 

The publication of the foregoing facts may be taken as a fair index of the rapid growth of 
San Francisco in all directions. None but large and growing cities have so many horse-car 
lines, employ so many men and horses, or carry so many passengers. The value of our street- 
car lines can hardly be over-estimated in causing building and settlement in suburban districts, 
and as an aid to increase in real-estate values. If it were possible to blot out the street-car 
lines of the city, property in the suburbs would immediately be shorn of half its value. It is 
certainly within bounds to say that, in such event, a reduction of fully $20,000,000 would 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTORY contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



L. W. KENNEDY, General Insurance Agent, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



24 SANFRANCISCODIRECTORT. 



occur in the value of that class of property. The total length of all the street-car lines in the 
city (double-track) is about forty-three miles. 

Steamsblp Iiines. 

The PACirrc Mail Steamship Compant— Our Trade with Asia, etc.— It is unneces- 
sary to enter into a detailed review of the past of this great corporation. Its history and that 
of the city and State, are, in many respects, interwoven. The chief events of its existence are 
of national as well as local significance. "With the exception of one English company (the 
Peninsular and Oriental), the Pacific Mail Steamship Company is the most important in the 
Anglo-Asiatic world. A few statistics as to its present condition and prospects is, therefore, 
sufficient for all purposes of this summary. The number of steamships owned or chartered by 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Company on its various deep-sea and coast routes, is as follows : 
San Diego and coast route, four steamships, of four thousand and six tons; Panama route, seven 
steamships, of sixteen thousand eight hundred and seventy-six tons ; in the Central American 
trade, etc., five steamships, of five thousand six hundred and thirty-nine tons ; on the China 
and Japan route, six steamships, of twenty-two thousand three hundred and eighty-two tons ; 
running between Yokohama and Shanghae, via Japanese Inland Seaports, four steamships, of 
seven thousand eight hundred and eighteen tons; running between Yokohama, Hakodate, 
Matsumai, and other northern Japanese ports, one steamship, of seven hundred and ninety-one 
tons ; engaged in harbor duty in San Francisco, one steamship, of one hundred and sixty-eight 
tons. The Nebraska, Dakota, and Moses Taylor (five thousand six hundred and thirty-nine 
tons), are laid up at the company's works at Benicia. This makes a total of thirty-one vessels, 
of sixty-three thousand three hundred and nineteen tons, at present in use in Pacific Coast and 
Asiatic waters. These figures are exclusive of the various vessels owned or chartered by the 
company in China and Japan, the statistics for which are not at present available. The num- 
ber of tons of freight landed in this city by the company's steamships for the year 1873 was : 
From Panama, twenty-one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven tons ; from China and 
Japan, twenty-nine thousand seven hundred and forty-seven tons. The export value of mer- 
chandise per the company' s steamers for the same period was as follows : By way of the Isthmus 
of Panama, ^1,140,000; to Japan; $715,658; to China, about |1,400,000. The treasure export 
by the company's vessels for 1873 was: To China, 16,335,353.50; to Japan, $2,206,157.12. 
The misfortunes which have attended this company for the past few years through marine dis- 
asters, mismanagement at headquarters, etc., still seem to follow it, so far as relates to the 
former of these causes. Despite of this, however, its carrying business has recently been greatly 
increased, and this in face of the opposition it meets with on the China and Japan route from 
the new China Trans-Pacific Steamship Company. The latter corporation proposes to run 
steamships monthly from this port to Yokohama and Hongkong. These vessels are to be of the 
largest size and most powerful capacity in point of speed. The trade between the Asiatic and 
American continents has recently increased so rapidly that there is now more room for and 
need of two lines to meet the demands of freight and passenger traffic than there was for one at 
the time the Pacific Mail Steamship Company inaugurated its line to China and Japan. The 
competition of the China Trans-Pacific Steamship Company, recently started, has materially 
reduced the rates of fare and freight between San Francisco and the centers of foreign trade in 
China and Japan. From Yokohama to San Francisco, by the Pacific Mail Company's steam- 
ers, the rate of passage is now only $150 in the chief saloon, and $85 in the steerage ; from Naga- 
saki (the Long Branch of foreigners in Japan and Southern China) the fare has been reduced to 
$205 in the cabin, and $100 in the steerage ; from Shanghai to San Francisco, through that 
beautiful lake of a thousand island-gems (the Inland Sea of Japan), the cabin fere is now but 
$280, and in the steerage but $100 ; from Hongkong to the western terminus of our overland 
railroad the rates of passage are only $200 in the saloon, and $100 in the steerage. Equally 
reasonable rates of fare (by reason of sharp competition) are charged from Swatow, Amoy, 
Foochow, Singapore, Penang, Calcutta, and other Asiatic cities in which foreigners congre- 
gate, until the visitor to the Atlantic States or Europe reaches a port from which to embark on 
one of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's homeward-bound vessels. The rates of fare 



Pire Insurance at Tariff Kates; Losses promptly paid by PARNSWOETH & CLARK. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, glassware and Toy s. 
PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 25 



aliove quotea, apply equally in going to Asia as in returning from it. Through tickets to or 
from all the places mentioned in Asia and Europe and Central and South America are sold 
according to alike schedule at all the agencies of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company in China, 
Japan, the settlements in the Straits of Sunda, Java, the Philippines, etc., all of which coun- 
tries are crowded hy Europeans and other foreigners, most of whom, when ahout to revisit their 
old homes, manifest an increasing desire to come by way of San Francisco and New York. 
Change from the route once passed over (that via the Bed Sea and Brindisi), as well as the 
advantages gained in point of time and cost by taking the American route in preference to the 
tropical discomfort of that via the Isthmus of Suez, are the main motives commending them- 
selves to these travelers. 

China Trans-Pacific Steamship Company (limited).— Prominent among the indications 
from which to predict the commercial future of San Francisco, are the lines of ocean steamships 
making this port their headquarters. Within the past few months no less than two new and 
large steamship lines have been established to ply between this port and China and Australia. 
One of these lines, the China Trans-Pacific Steamship Company, with an initial capital of 
§2,500,000, has now on the route between this port and Hongkong and Yokohama, two powerful 
iron, Clyde-built screw steamships, of three thousand tons, and of 2,750 horse-power each. 
Another steamship, of the same class with these two, is almost completed for this company, 
and will soon be on her way out here to take her place in the line. The building of a fourth 
ship, of like tonnage and power, is immediately to be commenced at Eenfrew, on the Clyde, 
by order of the Directors. "When the latter is completed, the company will then have four 
steamers constantly running between this port and Asia, of an aggregate of 12,000 tons. As 
trade and the company's connections develop, other steamers of a similar class are to follow 
as rapidly as their construction will admit of. Each of these steamships will accommodate 
seventy-three saloon, and seven hundred and fifty steerage passengers. The service for the 
present is a monthly one, and the company contemplate at an early day the establishment of 
a branch line from Yokohama to Shanghai, via the Japanese Island sea ports, to connect with 
the steamers of the main line. The company also intend that their steamers will eventually 
call at Vancouver's Island on both outward and return voyages. As trade increases, their 
steamers will also enter into competition with both foreign and native craft in the coasting 
traffic of Chinese and Japanese waters. The present enormous trade between this port and 
China and Japan, with their reputed population of four hundred millions, makes increased 
first-class facilities for carrying on the same absolutely indispensable. Indeed, the day is not 
far distant when the demand for steam conveyance across the Pacific, as we have elsewhere 
stated, will fully equal that existing on the Atlantic. The competition of the China Trans- 
Pacific, and the Pacific Mail companies, not to speak of transient steamers and sailing vessels, 
will materially cheapen fares and freights between the two continents. The voyage between 
this port and Yokohama will now be shortened from its present average length of twenty-two 
to say nineteen days, making the inducement still greater to select the American route from 
Asia to Europe via San Francisco, in preference to the long and tedious tropical voyage through 
the Bed Sea. From Yokohama to England, by way of this city, the voyage may now be 
accomplished in thirty-five or thirty-seven days, while the ordinary European route, via Suez, 
occupies forty-eight to fifty. By taking the American route, the journey between Hongkong 
or Shanghai and England can now be made in forty-five or forty-six days, while the Bed Sea 
route consumes between fifty and fifty-five days. The route via San Francisco is also cheaper 
for passengers and freight than that traversed by the Peninsular and Oriental, the Messageries 
Maritimes, or any other European company. By the steamers of the China Trans-Pacific 
line, sailing hence about the middle of each month, the cabin passage to or from Yokohama 
is only §150 ; steerage, $85 ; to or from Hongkong, cabin, §200 ; steerage, $100. In order to 
facilitate passenger and freight traffic between the centers of foreign trade in Asia and our 
Atlantic Coast, the Central Pacific Bailroad and the China Trans-Pacific Steamship Company 
have recently entered into an alliance. The steamers of the latter will hereafter discharge 
overland freight directly into the cars of the former. Extensive accommodations for this 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS PIRECTOBY, 1874-6, H. Q. Langley, Pub'r, S. P. Price $5. 



SAN FBANCISCO INSUBANCE CO. (Fire and Marine), office 411 Califomra.' 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



purpose are to be built at the foot of Second Street, a fact which will tend to materially enhance 
the value of property in that portion of the city. Through passenger tickets, by steamer and 
rail, are also issued by both companies. It is needless to reiterate that San Francisco will be 
the great entrepot for the traffic created by the rival lines of American- Asiatic steamships now 
existmg, and of all others to follow in the future. The great American firm of Kussell & Co., 
of Shanghai, and the well-known Oriental house of Macondray & Co., of this city, are the 
agents of the China Trans-Pacific Steamship Company at both ends of the route traversed by 
the vessels of this line. 

^ Australasian and American Mail Steamship Compant.— The establishment of this 
bne of steamships during the past year supplies the want long felt for more regular and rapid 
communication between California and the Anglo-Australian colonies than that hitherto 
aflxjrded by sailing vessels, however numerous. The similarity of pursuits between the people 
of those colonies and our own, and the greater comparative freedom from political and social 
trammels inherent to older States which is enjoyed by both, has caused the inauguration of 
this enterprise to be viewed with unanimous satisfaction by the public both in Australia and 
California. Five powerftil, Clyde-built, iron screw steamships now constitute this company's 
fleet for the service of 1874 between San Francisco, New South Wales, and New Zealand. 
These are the Macgregor, of two thousand one hundred and sixty-seven tons ; the Tartar, 
of two thousand two hundred and fifty-two tons; the Mongol, of two thousand two 
hundred and fifty-two tons ; the Mikado, of three thousand and thirty tons, and the 
Cyphrenes, of two thousand tons. These five steamships are only chartered by the com- 
pany until their own magnificent fleet of six iron screw propellers, built on the Clyde, and 
now nearly ready for launching, arrive in our bay to take their place permanently in the line. 
These vessels will all be of first-class construction, dimensions, and equipment, specially 
adapted for the service in which they are to engage. They are all of two thousand five hun- 
dred and three thousand five hundred tons, respectively. On their arrival here it is the inten- 
tion of the company, we believe, to increase the service between the points named to two trips 
per month, instead of once every four weeks as at present. The ships of this line are now 
dispatched hence on the fourth Saturday of each month, or as soon thereafter as the closed 
mails from Europe for Australia arrive in San Francisco, via the Overland Eailroad from 
New York. On the outward and return voyages the vessels of this line touch at Honolulu 
(Sandwich Islands) and at Kandavau (Fiji Islands). Through connections, on as near schedule 
time as possible, are made by this company with all points in the Atlantic States and Great 
Britain to or from any part of New South Wales or New Zealand. The following scale of 
fares from San Francisco to the places annexed have been adapted by the company for 1874 : 
To or from Honolulu, in the saloon, §75 ; in second cabin, §50 ; in steerage, $30. To or from 
Kandavau, $150, $125, and §90; Auckland, $200, $150, and $100 ; Wellington, §230, $175, 
and $120 ; Lyttleton, $230, $175, and $125 ; Port Chalmers, $235, $177.50, and $127.50 \ 
Sydney, $200, $150, and $100 ; Melbourne, §225, §162.50, and $110 ; Brisbane, $220, $160,' 
and $107.50 ; New Caledonia, $220, $160, and $107.50. This company is, in the strictest 
sense of the term, an international one, the capital invested being about equally divided 
between English and American shareholders. 

Coast Lines Steamships.— In addition to the steamships of the Pacific Mail Steamship 
Co., which stop at stated periods at the principal ports between this city and Panama, there 
are several lines which make regular trips to the difierent ports north of San Diego, the most 
important of which is that of Goodall, Nelson & Perkins. This line was inaugurated in 1864 
with a single steamship, the Santa Cruz. It has since grown to its present proportions by the 
sagacity and efficient management of its projectors. Every port from San Diego as far north 
as Tomales Bay, Marin Co., is visited regularly by one or more of the steamships connected 
with this line, by means of which the products of the different valleys contiguous to the coast 
can always be made available to meet the demands of this market. This advantage, it is 
claimed, gives the steamships of this line an aggregate of freight exceeding that of any other 



MEEIDEN FIRE INS. CO. OF CONN. ; Assets over $300.000 ; Farnsworth & Clark. Agts. 



i 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 



PROGRESSOFTHECITY. 27 

line on this coast. Number of steamships employed, nine, all screw, with an aggregate 
capacity of four thousand seven hundred tons. The Oregon Steamship Co. dispatch steamships 
regularly to Portland, Oregon, and Sitka, Alaska. Number of steamships employed, three ; 
aggregate capacity, three thousand five hundred tons. The business of this line is of growing 
importance to the commercial interests of this port, as it affords the only direct and speedy 
means of communicating with the ports of Oregon and Alaska. The Colorado Steam Navi- 
gation Co. dispatch a steamship every twenty days for the Colorado Eiver and ports on the 
Mexican Coast. By the facilities afforded by this line communication is secured with several 
important ports on the Southern Coast, and the extensive region of country bordering on the 
Colorado Kiver, including a large section of Southern Utah. Two screw steamships, Montana 
and Newbern, are employed in the service of this line. Two steamships, owned by different 
parties, make regular trips to Humboldt. The trade in this direction has increased threefold 
since the establishment of this route. A line of two steamships of five hundred tons each has 
been established between this city and Coos Bay, for the purpose of bringing the product of the 
coal mines in the vicinity of the latter place to this market ; ample accommodations are also 
provided for freight and passengers. Communication with Victoria, V. I., is maintained 
by the steamship Prince Alfred, which makes semi-monthly trips, carrying the mails between 
the two ports, for which a subsidy is paid by the British Government. 

Sbipplngr and I^nmber Trade. 

Price of Lumber — Cost of Building, etc. — Lumber and other building materials are 
cheap in San Francisco. Annexed are the present rates adopted by the Lumber Dealers' 
Exchange : Puget Sound lumber (rough) , $20 per M feet ; flooring and stepping, $30 ; three 
and four-inch street planks, $17; laths, $3.25; rough redwood, $20 per M; surface and 
tongued and grooved (first quality), $32.50; second quality, tongued and grooved, $22.50. 
These rates favor the buyer. Carpenters are at present paid $2.50 to $4 per day. 

The Shipping and Lumber Trade of this Port. — Three thousand six hundred and 
forty-seven vessels, of all classes and flags, arrived in the port of San Francisco during the 
year 1873. These represented a total tonnage of one million two hundred and ninety-three 
thousand three hundred and ninety-eight tons. Three thousand and thirty-four of these 
arrivals were American vessels from domestic ports, having a tonnage of seven hundred and 
thirty-four thousand one hundred and twenty tons ; two hundred and sixty-three, with an 
aggregate of two hundred and ninety thousand three hundred and thirty-four tons, were 
American vessels from foreign ports ; three hundred and sixteen, of two hundred and sixty- 
one thousand seven hundred and fifty-seven tons, were foreign vessels from foreign ports ; 
eleven, of one thousand one hundred and fourteen tons, were American vessels from miscel- 
laneous fishing voyages ; one foreign vessel, of one hundred and eighty tons, from a similar 
voyage ; twenty American vessels, of five thousand four hundred and ninety-five tons, from 
whaling voyages ; and two foreign vessels, of three hundred and ninety-eight tons, from sim- 
ilar voyages — aggregating the above total of arrivals and tonnage — three thousand six hundred 
and forty-seven vessels, of one million two hundred and ninety-three thousand three hundred 
and ninety-eight tons. Domestic Atlantic ports are represented by seventy of the above arriv- 
als, having an aggregate tonnage of eighty-seven thousand seven hundred and thirty tons ; 
and domestic Pacific ports by two thousand nine hundred and sixty-four vessels, of a total 
tonnage of six hundred and forty-six thousand three hundred and eighty-eight tons. The 
freight charges on the cargoes imported by both domestic and foreign vessels in 1873 amounted 
to $4,531,959. The tonnage entering this port during the past year has been increased by 
fifty-six thousand four hundred and fifty-one tons since the date of our last issue. The total 
duties paid to Government on the cargoes of the above vessels for 1873 was $7,873,460.86. 

The importance of one of the leading interests of this port (the lumber trade) is best shown 
by the total exports of that article for the past year. The number of feet sent to foreign coun- 
tries in 1873 was seventeen million four hundred and fifteen thousand two hundred and eighty- 
seven, having a total value of $350,024. 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTOBT contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



KENNEDY'S INSURANCE AGENCY. Pire, Marine, and Life. 411 California St.' 



28 SANFRANCISCODIRECTORY 



The foreign shipments of lumber made direct from the mill ports of our Northern Pacific 
Coast, during the same period, amounted in all to fifty millions of feet. The total amount of 
Puget Sound and Oregon pine lumber (both rough and dressed), laid down in San Francisco, 
for 1873, aggregated one hundred and five million three hundred and seventy-four thousand 
and seventy-eight feet. The addition of the redwood, fir, cedar, laurel, spruce, and maple 
lumber received at this port in the same time, makes the total lumber receipts of San 
Francisco for 1873 aggregate two hundred and three million three hundred and twenty-nine 
thousand four hundred and forty-one feet. 

A very fair percentage of the lumber cut on this coast during the year has been utilized at 
home in the construction of vessels for our coasting trade. Vessels of this class are in many 
instances built immediately at the mill-ports of Oregon, Puget Sound, etc., San Francisco only 
leading in the number turned out, in consequence of the greater facilities for construction 
obtainable here. In the business of providing both light and heavy spars for vessels of all 
sizes, this coast is fast asserting its superiority. For length, straightness, durability, elasticity, 
and freedom from natural blemishes, as well as the facility with which it can be worked, the 
fir produced by the forests of our Northern Pacific possessions, is second to none in the world. 
The admiration excited abroad by the unusual continuous length and strength of the spars of 
the ship Three Brothers, and other vessels fitted out here, is gaining for the fir grown upon this 
coast a deserved popularity among naval architects. 

The Growth and Manttfactitre of Domestic Tobacco. — Among the recently organized 
industries of San Francisco, the curing and manufacture of California-raised tobacco at Gilroy, 
is beginning to assume a very prominent place. The Consolidated Tobacco Company now 
employs over one hundred hands in the manufacture of cigars, who turn out an average of fifty 
thousand per week. Besides the cigars made, this company also manufactures about six thou- 
sand pounds of home-grown tobacco every week. Twenty-two men are engaged in this branch 
of the business alone, one half of whom are Chinese. At this date they are all working on the 
new crop, which is said to be superior to that raised in any preceding year. As experience in 
local tobacco culture increases, each succeeding crop proves superior to its predecessor. Good 
judges of raw and manufactured tobacco pronounce last year's California article to be fully 
equal, when properly cured, to imported tobacco from Cuba, and to far exceed in quality that 
imported to this city from Manila and other Asiatic countries. This tobacco-manufacturing 
industry bids fair, therefore, to make San Francisco an active and successful rival to foreign 
cities hitherto noted for an almost exclusive monopoly of this trade. Besides cigars, the com- 
pany referred to produces smoking tobacco of native growth fully equal to the best brands im- 
ported. We understand it is their intention to commence the manufacture of all grades of 
chewing tobacco. We also learn that this company proposes to plant six hundred acres of 
tobacco this season, from which over one million pounds of cured product may be safely 
anticipated. 

The Theaters of San Francisco. 

The theaters and other places of public amusement in this city are both numerous and well 
patronized. The class of dramas, comedies, burlesques, etc., enacted at these houses is gen- 
erally of a high order of excellence — at least in so far as good stock and star acting in their 
rendition and the style of stage presentation can be said to make them so. Indeed, theater- 
goers and newspaper critics here are so fastidious and hard to please that managers are sure 
to lose money in the attempt to cater to the public taste with anything short of the best talent 
obtainable. The comparatively short time now taken to reach the Pacific Coast from the 
large cities of the Atlantic States renders the engagement of fresh faces and accompanying 
novelties in the theatrical line an easy matter to enterprising managers. The selections for 
this market, however, must be made judiciously. There is probably no city in the world in 
which an actor or actress sooner finds his or her true level than in San Francisco. No amount 
of preparatory trumpeting, newspaper puflfery, and printer's ink, prior to arrival, seems to 
influence the public verdict here in regard to an actor's merits or the reverse ; all depends on 
the manner in which he acquits himself on his first appearance. Theatrical people and public 



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PROGRBSSOPTHBCITY. 29 



lecturers often come here with a very mistaken notion of the intellectual status of the audiences 
before whom they are to appear. The result is that the visits of many such turn out complete 
failures, as far as any additions to either their fame or their purse are concerned, and they 
leave our shores thoroughly disgusted with the experience involved in their lack of power to 
please people so critical as Californians generally are. On the other hand, it not unfrequently 
happens that a San Francisco-made actor or actress, who has played here for years compara- 
tively unnoticed, perhaps, at one of our minor theaters, goes East and is suddenly transformed 
into a public pet and a star of the first magnitude. These somewhat erratic differences in public 
judgment on either side of the continent can perhaps best be reconciled by those who make 
such matters their study. We merely record the fact. 

The California Theater. — This is the largest theater in the State, and in the class of 
performances, the merit of the actors engaged, and the average public patronage bestowed upon 
it, is, comparatively, second to no theater in the Union. It was built in 1869, at a cost of 
about $125,000. It is located on the north side of Bush Street, between Kearny and Dupont, 
and covers a lot one hundred and sixty-five feet front by one hundred and thirty-seven and a 
half feet deep. The stage has a depth of seventy feet by a width of seventy-two feet; the audi- 
torium is seventy feet deep and sixty-two feet wide ; two thousand two hundred people can be 
comfortably seated in the house at one time. The management is under the charge of Mr. 
John McCuUough, proprietor, and Mr. Barton Hill, manager. The interior is divided into 
dress circle, parquette, family circle, and gallery ; $1 is charged for seats in the two former, 
and fifty and twenty-five cents for seats in the two latter. 

In addition to the above well-known places of public amusement, San Francisco is well 
supplied with minor theaters, melodeons, concert halls, lecture rooms, etc., more particular 
mention of which is not requisite. These are all well patronized in the respective uses to which 
they are devoted. 

The Opera House. — This favorite theater occupies a large lot on the north side of Bush 
Street, between Montgomery and Kearny. It has been open for public performances a little 
over a year, and is capable of comfortably seating twelve hundred people. It is owned and 
controlled by Mr. Thomas Maguire, the well-known California pioneer manager, whose career 
in that capacity and the theatrical history of the Pacific Coast are almost identical. His 
business tact and knowledge of the tastes of our theater-going public ranks him as the most suc- 
cessful theatrical manager we have ever had in California. The interior of the Opera House 
is divided into dress circle, parquette, and family circle ; f 1 is the price of admission to the 
two former, and fifty cents is charged for seats in the latter. The people engaged at the Opera 
House, in all capacities, generally averages from thirty to thirty-five persons. The range of 
performances presented is almost as versatile as the various actors who take part therein, and 
embraces opera, comedy, extravaganza, minstrelsy, etc., in uninterrupted succession during 
the whole year. 

Maguire's New Theater. — This popular house of public amusement is also situated on 
Bush Street, directly opposite the Opera House. It stands on a lot sixty-eight feet front by 
one hundred and thirty-seven feet deep, and is capable of seating sixteen hundred spectators. 
Mr. Thomas Maguire, its sole proprietor and manager, has recently rebuilt and opened this 
theater, which is one of the most elegant and attractive places of amusement in the city, and 
it is his intention to present a class of performances which will include the entire range of his 
managerial experience. The view of the stage from all parts of the auditorium is uninterrupted, 
and the acoustic properties are unexcelled by any other theater on this Coast. The auditorium 
is divided into dress circle, parquette, and balcony, and the prices of admission are one dollar 
and fifty cents, respectively. From forty to fifty people of all grades of ability generally 
constitute the strength of the company engaged at this theater. 

"Opera House and Art Building Association." — The structure thus designated is 
situated on Mission Street, one hundred and fifteen feet west of Third. It covers an area of 
one hundred and ten feet in front by two hundred and seventy-five feet in depth. Its erection 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTORY, 1874-6, H. G^angley, Pub'r, S. P. Price $5, 



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SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



30 



was commenced in August last and rapidly pushed forward until the second story was 
reached, m December last. Financial embarrassments then interrupted further progress 
Arrangements have since been entered into by the Association for the final completion of the 
buildmg, and it is confidently predicted that it will be formally opened to the public in October 
of the present year. The building will be one of the largest of its kind in the United States 
covermg the entire lot, one hundred and ten by two hundred and seventy-five feet in size It 
will be three stories high, and composed entirely of brick and iron. In addition to the main 
auditorium, the building will embrace a second public hall, art gallery, stores, studios, base- 
ments, cellars^ etc. The theater itself will be one of the largest and most complete on the 
continent The interior will be divided into four successive tiers, which will have a seating 
capacity for over two thousand five hundred persons, and will be characterized by elaborate 
elegance and comfort in every detail of modern improvement. When finished, this magnifi- 
cent house is to be devoted to the rendition of grand opera and the higher grade of standard 
dramas. The location is one of the best in the city for this purpose, being in the immediate 
vicinity of all the principal hotels and public buildings. The entire cost of the building will 
be ?2o0,000; it is owned by an incorporated company, with a capital stock of §300,000, divided 
into three thousand shares, of the par value of ^00 each. The building is already leased and 
will rent for ^3,000 per month. 

The Palace Amphitheater and Grand CiEcus.-Equestrian performances have 
always been a favorite class of amusement with the San Francisco public. The circus with 
its gorgeous paraphernalia, daring feats of horsemanship, and acrobatic skill has an irresisti- 
ble fascination for the rising generation everywhere, but here the parents and guardians of that 
hopeful portion of humanity seem to enjoy the delights of the hippodrome with as much zest 
as the boys and girls whom they are supposed to accompany thither as protectors. Hitherto 
m San Francisco the gratification of both old and young in this respect has been somewhat 
desultory and uncertain, and, when they have had a circus to attend, its pleasures have been 
enjoyed with the drawback of an uncomfortable canvas tent as a covering to the scenes of the 
arena. Their tastes in the future, however, are to be permanently and comfortably satisfied 
Tha irrepressible giant among showmen, Mr. John Wilson, has recently erected a costly and 
substantial wooden amphitheater at the corner of New Montgomery and Mission streets, which 
he promises to keep open nightly as one of the permanent public amusement resorts of the city. 
This establishment was opened for the first time on January 26, 1874, and was built expressly 
for the purposes of a circus and amphitheater, in the old Koman sense of those terms Its 
sole proprietor and manager is Mr. John Wilson, and its erection cost him over $20,000 * The 
structure covers a lot one hundred and twenty-five feet on Mission Street by one hundred and 
sixty feet on New Montgomery ; the interior is one hundred feet square, and the arena forty 
feet in diameter. The auditorium is divided into two parts, the dress and family circles, the 
former being elaborately furnished with oak chairs, upholstered in red morocco. In the rear 
of this circle there are fifteen private boxes, elegantly fitted. Connected with the main build- 
ing are magnificent show-stables, containing the carefully trained and well appointed stud of 
horses and ponies. These stables are fitted with every convenience, and are open to public 
inspection during each performance. Manager Wilson has been very successful in his venture 
since he opened the establishment, and the large troupe of star performers he has constantly 
engaged promises hopefully for the treasury in the future. The equestrian director is the 
famous Omar Kiqgsley (Ella Zoyara), and the able treasurer of the establishment is Mr. John 
Ihomson. 

Woodward's Gardens— Perhaps the cheapest and most popular place of public amuse- 
ment on the Pacific coast is the beautiful park known by this name. A visit to it combines both 
recreation and education-the former by its endless sources of amusement for all sexes and ages, 
and by the beautiful manner in which its grounds are cultivated and ornamented; the latter by 
the opportunity it affords for the study of art, natural history, and botany, in its menageries, 
aquarium, aviaries, picture galleries, conservatories, etc. These gardens are bounded by 



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PROGRESSOPTHECITY. 31 



Mission, Valencia, Thirteenth, and Fifteenth streets. Four of the principal lines of city street 
cars pass close to them, one of them belonging to the proprietor and known as the City Kail- 
road. The number of visitors to Woodward's Gardens during the year 1873 is given at 580,000. 
The price of admission to this delightful resort, including participation in all its pleasures, only 
costs the visitor twenty -five cents. 

The City Gardens. — This resort is a vigorous rival to Woodward' s Gardens for the patronage 
of the recreation-loving public. The class of attractions presented in it are somewhat akin to 
those ofiered at Woodward's, so far as theatrical representations, balloon ascensions, balls, 
natural wonders, etc., are concerned. The grounds are beautifully laid out and highly orna- 
mented with shade trees, shrubbery, fancy arbors, etc. They are bounded by Folsom, Harri- 
son, Eleventh, and Twelfth streets. These gardens are extensively patronized by pleasure 
parties generally. The charge for admission at all times is twenty-five cents. 

The Parks and Pleasure Kesorts of San Francisco. — Ifthiscity cannot boast of such 
parks as the New York Central, the London Kegent's, or the Paris Bois de Boulogne, it can 
point with pride to the fact that a view of the Pacific Ocean, from shore to horizon, may be 
had from its Golden Gate and other parks. This fact alone, from a hygienic and asthetic 
standpoint, is worth countless acres of inland pleasure grounds, however mature the vegeta- 
tion and elaborate the artificial ornamentation bestowed upon them. In the Golden Gate Park 
there are one thousand and eighteen acres of land, and in the avenue leading to it there are 
twenty-four acres more, making a total area of one thousand and forty-two acres. Of these, two 
hundred and ninety acres are now susceptible of cultivation, and the remainder, extending 
west to the ocean beach, can and will all be reclaimed to vegetation within a few years, by 
expedients adopted by the Park Commissioners, and at present being successfully demonstrated. 
The plans now being carried out for the improvement of Golden Gate Park will, in a few years, 
give to San Franciscans a finished pleasure ground commensurate with the population of the 
city. That portion of the park at present adorned with trees, shrubs, romantic mounds, and 
first-class macadamized roads, is nearly two miles in extent. The present Park Commission- 
ers have made a most economical and praiseworthy use of the money placed at their disposal 
by the Legislature, in the reclamation and ornamentation of the park itself, and the various 
approaches to it. The equestrian and pedestrian visitor can now enjoy over four miles of wide 
macadamized roads for driving and walking. About twenty thousand forest and other trees 
have already been planted, and one hundred and eighty men are at present employed in a vigorous 
prosecution of the objects contemplated to render the park worthy of the name. The total 
disbursements for this purpose by the Commissioners, from August 1, 1870, to December 1, 
1873, was $250,000. The last Legislature authorized an additional issue of $250,000 in bonds, 
for carrying on the work, of which $125,000 are now on the market. The Commissioners, 
feeling the necessity of concentrating their resources on the principal park, have as yet paid 
but little attention to Buena Vista Park, which, however, will not be much longer neglected. 
The fine prospects of bay and city scenery which it presents will, together with its other natural 
advantages, make it a most popular resort. The small park around Mountain Lake, as an 
indispensable feature to the general plan, will also be improved before long, and Congress will 
also, almost certainly, grant the use of the most of the Presidio Military Eeservation to the 
city for the purposes of a park. It will, therefore, be seen that San Francisco is in process of 
being liberally and well supplied with desirable places of out-door recreation. 

Drives in the Vicinity. — There are probably few cities that have more grand and beau- 
tifiil views, fine scenery, and more attractive drives than are to be found in the immediate 
vicinity of San Francisco. Take, for instance, the Point Lobos Koad to the Cliff House, 
where you see the broad Pacific spread before you "in the morning like a vast sheet of silver, 
and in the evening like one vast mass of molten gold ; " from thence to the Ocean View and 
Driving Park over the toll road which sweeps around the curve of the ocean beach, and for 
your homeward trip take the Central Koad over the Mission hills to the city, and you will 
have viewed & few oi the attractive spots in this vicinity. 



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32 SANFRANCISCODIEECTORY. 



Banklne and Insurance. 

Savings Banks of San Francisco. — The savings banks of a community afford the very 
best criterion upon which to form an estimate of its material, social, and moral status. It is 
here that we have to look for evidences of its thrift, economy, sobriety, and law-abiding 
tendency. The possession of means by the masses promotes independence of thought and 
action, and excites a deep interest in the permanence of institutions from which they derive 
substantial benefits. They constitute the best citizens in time of peace, and the most reliable 
soldiery in time of war, who are the proprietors of the projects they legislate for and defend. 
Savings banks are continual checks upon the designs of unscrupulous demagogues whose 
object it is to achieve political ascendency by instituting a conflict between labor and capital. 
They are silent but powerful reminders of the fact that the interests of all classes are homo- 
geneous, and that labor is as necessarily the friend and coadjutor of capital, as capital is the 
rewarder of labor. The millions of financial driblets which find their way into savings banks 
are there collected into grand reservoirs of loanable funds, which issue again in large and 
fertilizing streams, refreshing commerce, stimulating enterprise, promoting industry, and 
establishing manufactures ; all of which provide additional arsenals for labor, new workshops 
for the industrious, and return compound interest to the owners of funds deposited in the 
savings banks. The wealthier classes, through the agency of savings banks are constant 
borrowers from their employes, who, in turn, are steadily prospering by reason of the financial 
facilities they are collectively enabled to afford. To institute a comparison between the savings 
banks of the different sections is simply to demonstrate the difference of compensation paid to 
labor in those sections ; to determine the relative thrift and economy of their populations, and 
to show the recurrent benefits which capital receives from liberally recompensed service. 

The latest statistics received respecting Eastern savings banks indicate that they are increas- 
ing in number and importance in the States of New York, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, 
Massachusetts, Khode Island, and Connecticut. The combined capital deposited in the sav- 
ings banks of those States on the 1st of March, 1873 — since when no data have come to hand — 
exceeded $600,000,000, which is much in excess of the combined banking capital of the whole 
Union, exclusive of the savings institutions. The total number of depositors in all Eastern 
savings banks is stated to be one million seven hundred and sixty-Bix thousand three hundred 
and twenty-one, which gives an average of $343, currency, to each individual. The aggregate 
population of New England, as established by the last census, is three million four hundred 
and eighty-eight thousand, and there are, in that section, three hundred and eighty-one savings 
banks, with a combined deposit of $312,000,000. The number of depositors is nine hundred 
and eighty-nine thousand four hundred and sixty, equal to one depositor out of every four 
persons. The average to each depositor in the New England States is as follows : Massa- 
chusetts, $219.70 ; Connecticut, $352.17; New Hampshire, $284.60 ; Maine, $328.30 ; and in 
Khode Island, $455.43, which is considerably beyond that of the other New England States or 
New York, and the highest in the world outside of California. All the foregoing express 
currency alone. The returns from Vermont are deficient and unreliable. In some of the 
Eastern States investments are restricted to classified securities, while much wider limits 
are allowed by law in others. In New York the aggregate investments are in bonds and 
mortgages, United States stocks. New York State stocks, stocks of other States, and bonds of 
cities, counties, and towns of that State. One year ago her savings banks had $96,000,000 
loaned on bond and mortgage, and $156,000,000 invested in stocks. Massachusetts had 
$74,000,000 on bond and mortgage, $14,000,000 loaned to towns and cities, and $24,000,000 
invested in stocks. Connecticut had $38,000,000 loaned on real estate. Until within a few 
years the laws of California compelled her savings banks to confine their loans to real estate ; 
but they are now allowed a wider margin, and may furnish accommodations on California 
State and County Bonds, United States Mint Certificates of determined value, gold and silver 
bullion, United States Bonds, and real estate. 

The first savings bank, of which there is any historical record, was organized in England 
through the efforts of the Right Hon. George Eose, who obtained from Parliament, in 1817, 



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PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 



33 



the passage of "An Act to encourage the establishment of Banks of Savings in England." 
British savings banks are conducted on a principle quite different from that which obtains in 
this country. They are under governmental control, all the money deposited being loaned 
upon interest to the Government, and depositors are restricted in the amount of their lodg- 
tnents, so as to exclude all but the humbler classes. In 1861 post-office savings banks were 
organized in Great Britain, and they have, by the greater facilities they afford, and the 
undoubted security they offer, largely reduced the number of ordinary savings banks, and, 
fitill further, the amount of funds deposited in them. The total received from and paid to 
depositors in post-office savings banks throughout the United Kingdom, in 1870, was as 
follows : Keceived, including interest, £6,084,610 ; paid out, £4,227,056; computed capital, 
£13,524,200. The total amounts officially reported as received from and paid to depositors in 
ordinary savings banks, at the same date, were : Received, £7,667,735 ; paid out, £7,857,091 ; 
computed capital, £37,500,522, which, added to the computed capital of the post-office depos- 
itories, gives a grand total of £51,024,731, prudantially invested by the humble classes of the 
United Kingdom. Reducing pounds sterling to dollars and cents, at $4.86 to the pound, the 
aggregate of deposits in all the savings institutions of the United Kingdom is $247,980,192, 
and the population being twenty-eight million, the representative amount to each individual is 
^8.85. The combined populations of New York and the New England States is seven million 
eight hundred and seventy thousand six hundred and eighty-three, and the depositary repre- 
sentation for each individual is $76.10. The census of 1870 accords to this State a population 
of only five hundred and sixty thousand two hundred and forty-seven, of which seventy 
thousand are Chinese, and something like eight thousand are Indians, neither of whom make 
use of our savings banks. We have, then, only about four hundred and eighty-two thousand 
who are at all likely to be depositors, and the average depositary representation to each person 
is $111, in round numbers, being $35 in excess of the East, and $102.15 in advance of the 
United Kingdom. San Francisco makes a still more satisfactory exhibit. The population of 
this city, 1873, is estimated by the highest authorities to be one hundred and eighty-eight thou- 
sand, of whom twelve thousand are Chinese, leaving one hundred and seventy-six thousand liable 
to make deposits, which, on the 1st of January, 1874, reached $46,745,044, being a depositary 
representation of $265.75 to each inhabitant, and is far in excess of any other portion of the 
globe. Without further preface we subjoin a tabulated statement of the San Francisco savings 
banks as they were on the 1st of January, 1874 : 

Semi-Annual Statememt of San Francisco Savings Institutions, December 31, 1873. 



NAME. 

Savings and Loan Society 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

French Savings and Loan Society 

San i'rancisco Savings Union 

C)dd Fellows' Savings Bank 

Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank of Savings 

German Savings and Loan Society 

Masonic Savings and Loan Bank 

Humboldt Savings and Loan Society 

Security Savings Bank 

Totals, January, 1874. 

Totals, January, 1873 

Increase in one year 



Number 
Depositors. 



8,003 
16,174 
6,128 
5,581 
6,396 

506 
5,029 
2,188 
1,000 

802 



51,807 
46,060 



5,747 



Amount of 
Deposits. 



810,126,496 

12,827,745 

5,330,519 

6,430,133 

5,a56,508 

394,795 

4,145,517 

1.047,317 

666,201 

919,813 



$46,745,044 
42,474,935 



84,270,109 



Gross 
Earnings. 



$513,104 

565,766 

280,062 

270,013 

265,706 

26,163 

200,455 

59,035 

33.834 

52,086 



82,266,224 
2,233,890 



832,331 



Reserve 
Fund. 



8339,479 

729,869 

1.54,247 

218,805 

86,274 

50,000 

133,500 

26,145 

52,736 

300,000 



$2,091,055 
1,852,770 



8238,285 



Amount 
Divided. 



84.58,361 
475,829 
245,477 
243,448 
225,566 
17,.300 
167,987 
45,956 
2o,078 
43,608 



81,949,610 
1,818,408 



8131.204 



The average to each depositor is $902.25, gold, equal to $1,000, currency, in round numbers, 
and is therefore $545 more tlian the average of Rhode Island depositors, which, outside of Cali- 
fornia, is the highest known. A glance at the table will show the increased business for 1873 
as compared with 1872. 

Commercial Banks. — Banks of issue are prohibited by the Constitution of California, and 
all our commercial banks are operating within the limits prescribed by law. We hav6 taken 
much pains to arrive at something like a correct statement of the amount of money employed 



PACIPIC COAST BUSINESS DiaUCTOBY, 1874-6, H. G. Langley, Pub'r, B. P. Price i 
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SAN FKANCISCO INSUKANCE CO. (Fire and Marine), office 411 California, 



34 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



in the banking operations of California, and furnish the following synopsis as the result. Of 
the nineteen commercial banks operating in this city, the Bank of California occupies the 
foremost rank, both by reason of its larger operations, and its recognized standing in all 
business communities throughout the civilized world. Its capital and deposits amount to 
914,000,000, and its transactions are on a gigantic scale. The stockholders are all men of 
wealth, and its affairs have been managed with ability. Next in rank is the London and San 
Francisco Bank, limited. During the past year, the Anglo-Californian Bank has filled an 
important position, and all its contemporaries have been measurably successful. Not one of 
them sustained the slightest abrasion from the financial shock which demolished so many 
eminent Eastern banks. The united capital of our metropolitan commercial banks is about 
^20,000,000, controlling an equal amount of deposits, and if we add the $46,000,000 compris- 
ing the capital and deposits of our savings institutions, we have a working total of $86,000,000 
in this city alone. Interior savings banks hold $10,000,000 of deposits, and by making a 
liberal allowance of $5,000,000 more, for private interior banking capital, we find a grand 
total of $110,000,000 of funds employed in the business of this State. The rates at which 
discounts have been made in the metropolis were one to one and one quarter percent., monthly, 
in commercial banks, and nine to twelve per cent., per annum, on mortgage and State securi- 
ties, in the savings institutions. The amount of dividends disbursed by our banks of all classes 
during the past year, was about $10,000,000, of which the savings banks paid in the neighbor- 
hood of $5,000,000. 

National Gold Note Banks. — These institutions are peculiar to California, and operate 
in accordance with Federal regulations as established by Act of Congress passed in July, 1870. 
Their success in this State has been very satisfactory to shareholders, and they have largely 
contributed to the general ease of the money market. The capital is restricted by law to one 
million each, and for the privilege of issuing notes, each bank doing business on a million 
capital, is required to deposit with the United States Sub-Treasurer the sum of one million 
two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in Government six per cent, bonds, and to keep on 
hand gold enough to redeem its notes on presentation. Gold notes, received at first with hes- 
itancy, are now eagerly sought, as they are more readily transported in large sums than gold, 
and are exchangeable for gold at any time, but they are not receivable in payment of Custom 
House duties. 

The gold note banks of San Francisco are two in number, viz.: The First National Gold 
Note Bank of San Francisco, and the National Gold Bank and Trust Company of San Fran- 
cisco. The resources of the first named, as reported by the Controller on the 27th of February, 
1874, amounted to $3,511,508, and those of the National Gold Bank and Trust Company were 
14,758,825. "Whenever visited by the Controller these banks are summoned to give an exact 
account of their condition some two or three weeks anterior to the date of summons. They 
are flourishing institutions, and have thoroughly acquired public confidence. 

nieteoroloeical Observations made at San Francisco from Kovember, 1S50, to April, 

1874. 

BY HKNRT GIBBONS, M.D. 

In the following tables the reader will find, in a condensed form, the results of twenty- three 
years' diligent observation of the climate of San Francisco, with more particular reference to 
rain. A single glance at the rain tables will present the quantity of rain which has fallen in 
each month since 1850 ; the quantity in each season ; the quantity before and after the end of 
the year ; the date of the beginning and ending of each rainy season, and the date of the first 
and last scattering rains. The following are some of the deductions presented by this record : 

Rain has fallen in every month of the year. In July it has rained only in one year ; August 
has furnished rain in four years ; June in six years ; September in seven years ; October in 
eleven years. No account is made of a mere sprinkle, nor of the deposit of summer mist. 
The greatest quantity of mist which ever falls in twenty-four hours is about three hundredths 
of an inch. But this quantity is very rare. Near the ocean the mist is much more copious. 

The driest season was 1850-51, which gave only seven inches. Next to that was 1863-64, 
with eight and one half inches. The winter of 1867-68 gave the most rain — forty inches. The 
average is between twenty-one and twenty-two inches. 

The earliest setting in of the rainy season was November 1 ; the lat§gt, January 12. An 



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early beginning and an abundant supply are apt to go together, but there is no rule in this 
respect. The latest beginnings have been followed by an average supply. 

The average date of the beginning of the rainy season is November 28 ; of the termination, 
April 10. March is as certain to bring rain in liberal amount as any other month. In one 
year out of every three there is no rain of importance after March. The last showers of the 
season come, with remarkable uniformity, about the third week of May. 

The middle of January is the average dividing point of the rainy season. The mean quantity 
before January 1 is about equal to the mean quantity after January 31. 

December gives the gi'eatest average quantity ; .January is not far behind ; February, March, 
and November come next, and are nearly alike; then April, May, and Oct., in the order named. 

The greatest amount of rain in any one month was in January, 1862, when there fell the 
enormous quantity of eighteen inches. 

It is worthy of note that in the driest seasons there has been an abundant supply for agri- 
cultural purposes, had it been distributed evenly. Three inches in December, with one inch 
in each of the four following months, would answer all purposes. 

The rain-table of San Francisco may be made the basis for estimating the fall in other parts 
of the State. The mountains of the north have from two to three times as much, and the 
southern section of the State about half as much, or even less in some localities. The valley 
of the Sacramento has nearly the same quantity as San Francisco ; that of the San Joaquin 
one fourth or one third less, the quantity diminishing southward. 

By reference to the tables showing the extremes of heat and cold, it appears that the coldest 
weather was in January, 1854, when the mercury fell to 25°. At that time the mud in the 
streets was frozen solid, and the shallow ponds .were covered with ice strong enough for boys 
to skate on. But such weather is extremely rare, though since that time the ground has been 
frozen several times so as not to thaw fully in the shade for a day or two. The coldest noonday 
embraced in the record was 37°. Often the entire winter passes by without bringing the ther- 
mometer so low as the freezing point. In 1853 it fell at no time below 40°. 

The extreme of heat was on the tenth and eleventh of September, 1852, when the ther- 
mometer reached 97° and 98° on the two days, respectively. This, however, was entirely excep- 
tional, and might not occur again in half a century. The air was dry as a sirocco, and caused 
the woodwork of houses to crackle and the plaster to break on the wooden walls. 

With the exception just noted, the hottest day on record was 93° on the sixth day of July, 
1867. In October, 1864, and in September, 1865, it reached 91°, and in July, 1855, it reached 
90°. Thus it appears there were only six days in twenty years when the thermometer rose as 
high as 90°. 

The table of mean temperature shows that our summer does not come till the summer months 
have passed by. September is the warmest month in the year, and October next ; then comes 
August ;. July, the hottest month elsewhere, is the fourth here, or ranks with June ; next come 
April and May ; then March and November ; then February, and finally January and De- 
cember, which are the only winter months, if indeed we have any weather that deserves the 
name of winter. 

Twice the ground has been covered with snow. On the twenty-ninth of December, 1856, it 
snowed very fast for several hours, and two or three inches gathered, but it melted before night. 
On the twelfth of January, 1868, it snowed fast before day, so that two inches collected. But 
it disappeared before sunrise, so that few persons enjoyed the rare spectacle. 

The extraordinary evenness of the climate depends on the adjacent ocean, the water of which, 
flowing in a current from the north, is always at a temperature of about 50°, summer and 
winter. The sea breeze of summer, which chills the air at noonday, leaves no place for hot 
nights. There is not, on an average, one night in the year when it is warm enougl* to sit out 
of doors at midnight with comfort. 

Table I. — Showing the Amount of Main in each Month since 1850; and the Total Amount in each Rainy 
Season. Note. — Each Column represents one Jiainy Season. 



MON^TH. 



August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



January.... 
February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 



1851 1852 1853 1854 1855 1856 1857 1858 1859 1860 1861 ' 1862 186:^ 1864 18651866 1867 1868 1869 1870 1871 



2.2: 5.3 
7.111.9 



1852 1853 



.6 4.1 
.1 1.2 

6.4 4.8 
.2, 5.1 

.3 .3 



2.1 .5 

.4 1.2; 2.9 

.4 5.4: 4.0 

I 1 

18.55185618.57 



4.5 8.4' 2.1 

4.6 .5 8.6 
4.-3 1.6: 1.6 
5.6 3.2i 

2.2| .9! .1 



Totals 18.2 33.5 23.0 24.1 21.2 20.0 19.0 19.8 17.1 14.6 



5.4 
1.5 4.8 

1860 1861 



18. 1| 
6.1 

1.7| 
1.1 
.9 
.2!, 



.2 

.ll .2 
.1 .1 

7.6; 3.1 

6.9 .6 
18651866 



3.911.0 
1.5 
.6 
.7 
.4 



38.015.2 8.5 21.3,21.2.32,0 40.5 21.620.0813.08 33.10 



,2 .06 

.2 2.34 

1.2, 1.24 .49 

4.3i 4.50 3.04 



1869: 1870 1871 1872 



.04 
.13 

2.27 
13.40 



6.4 3.76, 2.34 6.50 



4.0t 4.53 
3.2 1.84 

2.2[ 1,49 
.11 0.36 



3.55 7.90 

1.24! 1.53 

2.05: 1.22 

.31 



.04 

.06 

2.90 

7.80 



2.27; 
3.40 

.74 
.37 



.56 
1.25 
9.59 



5.33 
2.49 
3.56 



1850.— Nov., 1.3; Dec, 1.1. 1851.— Jan., 0.6; Feb., 0.4; March, 1.9; AprU, 1.1; May, .7. Total, 7.1. 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTOBY contains Addresses of over 50.000 Merchants. 



KENNEDY'S INSURANCE AQENCT, Fire, Marine, and Life, 40.1 California St. 



36 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Table II.— Date of the First and Last Bains, and of the Be(;inning and Ending of each Rainy Season; 
also, the Amount of Rain which Fell before the End of the Year, and the Amount after the End of 
the Year, in each Season, since 1850. 



1850-51. 
1851-52. 
1852-53, 
1853-51. 
18.54-55. 
1855-56. 
18.56-57. 
1857-58. 
18.58-59. 
18.59-60. 
1860-61. 
1861-62. 
1862-63. 



First 
Kain. 



Last 
Baiii. 



Nov. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 



10 May 
6 May 
28 May 
]5AprU 
4 May 
10 May 
lOMar. 
6'May 
21 1 May 
9,May 
4May 
l|May 
5iMay 



RAunr Season. iBere 
Begins.! Ends. "^^^ 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Nov. 
Dec. 



5May 1 2.4 
WJMar. 3l! 10.5 

9 April 29, 18.0 
12 AprU 28 3.6 
3llAprU 171 
lOlApril 14 
15Mar. 31| 
24! AprU .7 

4 April 10 

9 AprU 8 

6 April 6 
10 April 14] 
18lApril 26 



After 
Dec. 



4.7 
7.7 
15.5 
19.4 
21.2 
14.6 
12.5 
10.9 
11.0 
10.2 
8.6 
28.1 
12.3 



First 
Bain. 



1563-64 Sept. 

1864-6.5 Nov. 

186.5-66 Sept. 

1866-67 Nov. 

1867-68 Sept. 

18RS-69 Oct. 

1869-70 Sept. 

1870-71 iNov. 

1871-72 'Oct. 

1872-7.3 Sept. 

1873-74 !Oct. 



Rainy Season. 



Begin.s. Ends. 



May 
May 
June 
May 
14|june 
Mav 
May 
Mav 
Mav 
April 



17 Nov. 
19 Nov. 
8: Nov. 
171 Nov. 
23!Nov. 
19 Dec. 
liiDec. 
28 'Dec. 
311 Dec. 
21 Nov. 
Dec. 



Mean., 



llApril 4 
23!Mar. 4 
13|Mar. 31 

16 AprU 12 
19 AprU 13 

17 Mar. 29 
7 AprU 11 
2 AprU r 

IfliApril 18 
28!Feb. 28 



Nov. 23: AprU 10 



Befe 
Jan. 



4.4 

14.9 
4.0 
15.8 
15.9 
5.7 
8.1 
3.5 
15.8 
10.8 
11.4 



After 
Dec. 



4.1 

6.', 
17.2 
16.4 
24.6 
15.9 
12.0 

9.3 
17.2 



Table III. — Maxitnum Quantity of Rain in each Month, Minimum Quantity in each Month, and 
Average Quantity in each Month, since 18.30. 



Maximum.. 

Minimum 



18.1 

0.6 

Mean I 4.8 



0.0 
3.3 



Ap'l. 



5.6 
0.0 
1.7 



May. June July. |Aug. Sept. Oct. 

2.0 0.2 0.3 

0.6 0.0 0.0 

.50 0.4 0.1 



0.2 I 1.0 3.4 
0.0 I 0.0 0.0 
0.1 .05 .37 



13.4 
0.4 
5.0 



Table IV. — Mean Temperature of each Month since 18-50, deduced from Two Daily Observations, one at 
Sunrise, the other at Noon; also, the 3Iean Temperature of each Year. 



Month. 


1851 


18.52 


18.53 1854 


18.55!l8.56 1857 


1853 


1850,1860 


18611862 


1863' 1864' 186.5 


1866 1867:1868 1869'l870 


1 
18711872 


1873 


January 


49.3 


•50.8 


52.048.2 


51.0 48.8.51.2 


46.3 


46.5'47.8!47.5'47.6 


.57.7 52.549.4 


49.0 .51. 214.5.9 


•51.2 .52.5 


•51.5 53.3 


55.5 


February 


.51.1 


53.1 


•54.153.6 


.56.8 5:i.7|.51.4 


.53.1 


48.8 50.51.51. 1146.7 


5U.9.55.9 51.C 


•53.4 •52.0.51.9 


.51.2.5:5.5 


51.0 55.0 


.50.0 


March 


X\M 


.52.9 


.55.9 54.1 


59.4,55.91.55.9 


.52.(1 


49.0 


53.0.53.7,50.2 


57.8 55.6.53.3 


.54.3.50.5.53.5 


.57.4.51.5 


53.2 55.6 


.55.1 


AprU 


•57.7 


.5.5.4 


.58.3 59.8 


.57.7 


55.9 


58. 8 


•55.7 


.5;<.H 


•53.0'57.l!51.3 


55.7 57.9.55.5 


58.4 57.5 55.3 


.56..5i54.8 


.54.2.54.5 


.54.8 


May 


•57.0 


.55.1 


69.7 56.« 


.57.7 


5H.2 


.57.5 


.57.6 


.57.2 


54.0|57.5 55.5 


.57.6 58.962.0 


.58.0 58..3i&8.0 


.58.51.58.4 


•55.3 57.6 


.5.5.1 


June 


58.8 


60.4 


61.9 58.5 


.59.9 


.59.1 


60.9 


58.7 


HI. 5 


■57.9 


.57.6:61.2 


•58.2.58.3 61.2 


62.0,60.2.58.0 


60.0.58.4 


56.5 60.0 


.5H.2 


July 


57.9 


HI. 4 


60.3 61.3 


61.2 


5y.4!59.2 


60.7 


59.3 


61.3 


.58.561.7 


•59.7 57.6 61.1 


•59.6 63.2io9.6 


60.2162.4 


58.0 59.7 


57.5 


August 


«3.2 


61.2 


60.0 60.a 


62. 5 


.59.61.59.1 


HI .9 


Hl.l 


62.5 


58.9;62.C 


61.160.6 60.1 


.59.0|60.4i59.8 
62.1161.3.59.3 


59.61M.3 


.59.5.59.8 


60.0 


September 


HI. 6 


63.1 


62.7 60.5 


62.4 


61.5i60.8 


62.4 


HI. 4 


62.9 


6n..i 


61.3 


63.6 60.3 63.3 


60.0|H1.5 


61.4,60.0 


.58.7 


October 


61.9 


.58. 7 


62.760.7 


61. H 


57.6 


K0.6 


.57.8 


.59.7 


•56.8 


•56.(1 


63. 3 


62.259.6i58.7 


62.0 58.2:60.8 


60..'.;.>S.O 


61.2 62.2 


.58.6 


November 


.56.3 


.5:(.5 


57.0,58.0 


.52.9 


.5:<.3 


.54.5 


.54.(1 


.53.5 


•52.8;.54.2 


.5K.2 


•57.3 56.0 57.6 


•56.6!5H.7 57.2 


56.4 .55.4 


56.6-58.0 


.56.4 


December 


51.3 


50.8 


52.153.8 


47.8 


47.0 


59.5 


44.8 


46.3 


49.2 51.7 


49.5 


.53.7j51.0 47.2 


54.7 55.3 53.2 


•50.7.51.0 


.54.751.3 


49.0 


Mean 


56.6 


56.5 


58.l|57.1 


.57.6155.7 


57.0 


55.4 


54.8 


55.155.4 


.55.5 


57.5,57.0 56.7 


•57.4 57.1156.1 


56.9 56.8 


&4.6!55.4 


55.7 


Table V. — Extrem.es of Heat in each Month since 1850 ; also, in each Year. 


Month. 


1851 


1852 


1853 


1854 


18.55 


1 
18561857 


18.58 


1859 


1860 


1 
1861 1862 


1863 


1864 


1865 


1866 


1867 


1868 


1869 


1S70 


1 
18T1 1872 


1873 




64 
71 
74 
84 
71 
78 


64 
65 
81 
82 
67 
80 


62 
67 

77 
75 
81 
87 


69 
69 
72 
83 
73 
74 


72 
72 
78 
78 
83 
82 


60 
70 
80 
69 
69 
74 


67 
68 
74 
81 
75 
87 


62 

70 
73 

80 
87 
77 


65 
65 
70 
80 
85 
85 


62 
74 
75 

83 
73 

74 


60 
61 

82 
79 
76 
76 


62 
58 
72 
75 
76 
79 


63 
64 

79 
82 
78 
78 


70 
73 
74 
84 
75 
70 


63 
65 
71 
75 

87 
87 


61 
70 
69 
88 
79 
85 


61 
64 
65 

85 
87 
86 


.58 
68 
70 
75 
86 
72 


64 

69 
72 

70 
86 


69 
70 
67 
72 
87 
74 


63 I 62 


69 




63 
72 
74 

76 

80 


65 
67 
70 
82 
91 


69 




78 


AprU 


77 




74 


June 


68 


July 


73 
82 
75 
83 
73 
61 

84 


79 
76 
98 

78 
80 
63 

98 


78 
76 
88 

a5 

73 
69 

88 


84 

a5 

87 
S3 

72 
71 

87 


90 
79 
84 
79 
67 
61 

90 


78 
80 

a5 

79 
74 
58 

1^ 


72 
83 
88 
83 
72 
60 

83 


86 
73 
88 
79 
73 
59 

88 


82 
80 
87 
89 
71 
63 

89 


82 
86 
88 
79 
70 
61 

88 


78 
76 
76 
83 
69 
63 

83 


86 
87 
84 
84 
70 
64 

17 


72 
82 
82 

87 

69 
87 


70 
78 
86 
91 
72 
63 

91 


79 
75 

91 
80 
76 
00 

91 


76 
75 
II 

80 
72 
64 

88 


93 
73 

88 
79 
70 
66 

93 


75 
75 
70 
85 
75 
63 

86 


74 
75 

85 
So 
73 
64 

86 


83 
80 
78 
76 

62 

87 


70 
80 
88 
80 
78 
64 

li" 


69 
75 
73 
82 
70 
65 

91 


rf, 




75 




7?. 




76 




7?, 




.57 


Year 


78 


Table W.— Extremes of Cold in each Month since 1850 ; also, in each Year. 


Month. 


1851 


1852 


18.53 


18.54 


18.S5 


18.56 


1857 


1858 


1859 


1860 


1861 


1862 


18631861 


1865 


1866 


1867 


1868 


1869 


1870 


1871 


1872 


1873 




30 
33 
34 


35 
40 
36 


41 
42 
41 


25 
38 
38 


33 
41 
44 


33 

40 
41 


.32 
31 
41 


30 
.30 
36 


30 
34 
35 


31 
32 
37 


29 
38 
37 


29 
34 
37 


40 I 38 


35 
38 
,36 


38 
42 
42 


37 
37 
.t8 


32 
31 

38 


35 
36 
44 


36 

38 
38 


34 
38 
39 


41 
40 
46 


45 




38 
44 


43 
44 


36 


March 


43 


AprU 


42 


37 


46 


45 


40 


40 


44 


38 


34 


39 


40 


36 


43 


40 


40 


45 


42 


42 


43 


39 


41 


40 


41 


May 


45 


41 


47 


43 


44 


43 


*{ 


40 


39 


;i9 


43 


38 


44 


47 


46 


43 


47 


44 


47 


45 


43 


47 


45 




49 
47 


49 
49 


50 
51 


47 
46 


49 
51 


46 

48 


50 
.50 


44 
48 


45 

48 


45 
46 


49 
49 


49 
49 


50 
50 


48 
48 


49 
50 


49 
49 


48 
52 


45 
46 


48 
.52 


47 

5;h 


46 
49 


51 
51 


49 


July 


,50 


August 


50 


49 


51 


.50 


53 


49 


.50 


49 


48 


.50 


47 


49 


51 


48 


50 


.50 


51 


49 


48 


.56 


.52 


.52 


,53 


September 


50 


45 


.50 


46 


50 


51 


50 


44 


43 


47 


47 


42 


53 


48 


47 


50 


50 


49 


4.S 


.54 


49 


48 


.52 


October 


47 


46 


49 


4H 


nl 


41 


45 


3H 


:« 


40 


40 


50 


42 


47 


47 


49 


41 


45 


45 


42 


45 


44 


45 


November 


41 


40 


44 


47 


42 


40 


31 


34 


36 


39 


35 


44 


43 


42 


44 


44 


44 


45 


36 


40 


38 


40 


46 


December 


3b 


36 


40 


38 


29 


35 


34 


27 


32 


32 


35 


;« 


40 


38 


27 


42 


39 


41 


28 


32 


38 


31 


32 


Year 


30 


35 


40 


25 


29 


33 


31 


27 


30 


31 


29 


29 


38 


38 


27 


38 


37 


31 


28 


32 


34 


31 


32 



FABNSWOBTH &, CLABK furnish Safe and Beliable Insurance against Fire. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valises. 



CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF CURRENT EVENTS, 

From February 30, 1873, to may 4, 1874. 



February 20, 1873. Henry Jager dies from the ef- 
fects of a self-inflicted wound in the throat. 

Feb. 21. The body of a man with his throat cut, 
and several pounds of iron attached to his body, is 
fished from the bay at Commercial Street Wharf. 

Feb. 22. The anniversary of the birth of Wash- 
ington is celebrated by a military parade, display of 
flaes, etc. 

Feb. 27. The ship Patrician, bound to Queens- 
town with a cargo of wheat, founders off the Heads. 
The American ship Young America and the Eng- 
lish ship La Escocesa leave the harbor for a race to 
Liverpool. 

Feb. 28. The wreck of the Patrician is sold for the 

sumofS;3.50 St. David's Eve is celebrated by the 

Welsh re.sidents by a ball and banquet at Piatt's 
Hall. , , 

March 1. The second trial of John Devine for kill- 
ing August Kamp results in a verdict of murder in the 

first degree Lizzie Gannon attempts to kill C. F. 

McDermott Robert J. Irwin, a well-known citi- 
zen, commits suicide. 

March 3. Catherine Tasney is fatally injured by 
being run over by a car. 

March 4. Dr. H. H. Toland generously transfers 
to the University of California the entire property of 
the Toland Medical College, valued at *7o,000. 

March .5. Brevet Brigadier-General Gary H. Frye 
U. S. A., a highly esteemed and accomplished officer, 
dies, aged sixty years. 

March 7. Emma Hopper is found dead in the street. 

March 8. James P. Flint, a highly respected pio- 
neer merchant of this city, dies in Oakland, aged 
seventy-one years. 

March 10. Edward Doyle is found dead in his 
room. 

M arch 13. George Amerige, a pioneer printer, dies, 
aged sixty-four years. 

March 14. The body of Herman Beck is found in 
the bay. 

March 17. St. Patrick's day is celebrated by the 
Irish residents by a large military and civic proces- 
sion and literary exorcises at the California Theater. 
Michael Drew dies suddenly in the City Prison. 

March 19. Mrs. Mary Stewart, a popular and re- 
spected member of the dramatic profession, dies, aged 

fifty-four vears K.. D. Bogart, formerly Paymaster's 

Clerk in the U. S. Navy, is arrested by order of the 
Secretary of the Navy and imprisoned at Mare Island 
to await trial on charges of embezzlement and deser- 
tion. 

March 22. The body of Edward M. Connor is found 

in the bay Amasa Walker, a well-known political 

economist, arrives from the East. 

March 23. Two men are drowned near Goat Island 
by the capsizing of a boat. 

March 28. John Devine is re-sentenced to death 

for the murder of August Kamp Charleys Poppe 

commits suicide Timothy Riordan is killed by 

being thrown from a wagon The sum of S2,000 is 

donated by Michael Reese to the University of Cali- 
fornia to purchase for the institution the library of 
Dr. Lieber, deceased. 

March 29. Thomas Fannan falls down in a fit and 

expires The trial of Henry McCausland for killing 

Noah Mullendore results in a verdict of manslaughter 

.James Reynolds dies from the effects of a knife 

wound inflicted by one Kennedy. 

March 31. The anniversary of the ratification of 
the Fifteenth Amendment is celebrated by the col- 
ored people. 

April 1. The schooner Annie runs ashore near the 
Cliff House John P. Wilson commits suicide. 



April 2. The third trial of Joel H. Mansfield for 
an attempt to kill Miss Mary Hein results in a disa- 
greement of the jury John Moore is drowned 

James Mackey drops dead. 

April 3. Charles Prindle is killed by a fall from a 
building. 

April 5. The suit of Leander Quint vs. Laura D. 
Fair results in a verdict for the plaintiff for 32,980 

Henry McCausland is sentenced to two years in 

the State Prison for killing Noah Mullendore 

Manuel Escudero is mortally shot by Buenaventura 
Cienega in self defense. 

April t). Michael W. Cronin is found dead in his 
room Thomas Connell, a pioneer, dies aged fifty- 
three years. 

April 7. Two children named O'Day perish in a 
burning building on Rassette Place. _ 

April 8. Female Suffrage Convention assembles. 

April 9. An attempt is made to burn St. John's 

Presbyterian Church F'armers' State Union 

meet. 

April 10. E. A. Marchant is mortally shot by John 

Samuel John Murphy dies from the effect of a 

wound inflicted by George McDonald. 

April 11. John Kennedy attempts to murder his 

wife and daughter and then commits suicide Seven 

men are severely burned by an explosion in the Me- 
tropolitan Gas Works Henry Getz commits suicide. 

April 12. The ceremony of breaking of ground of 
the North Pacific Coast Railroad takes place at Sau- 

celito The body of Frederick Meyer, a suicide, is 

found near the Masonic Cemetery Three light 

shocks of an earthquake is felt. 

April 15. John Samuel is held to answer before 

the Grand Jury on a charge of murder The body 

of James Ronnie is found in the bay. 

April 16. Governor Henry S. Foote arrives from 

the East The epizootic makes its appearance in 

the city A Miss Collins is reported as having 

stigmata. 

April 18. Two companies of U. S. artillery leave 

for the scene of the Modoc War Obsequies of the 

Rev. Dr. Thomas, who was assassinated oy the Mo- 
docs while acting as Peace Commissioner Lieu- 
tenant E. S. Dennison U. S. N. commits suicide. 

April 20. The Central Presbyterian Tabernacle on 
Tyler Street and the Church of the Holy Cross on 
Eddy Street are dedicated. 

April 21. R. D. Bogart is remanded to the custody 
of the LF. S. naval authorities and taken to Mare Isl- 
and for trial F. E. R. Whitney is elected Chief 

Engineer and H. W. Burckes First Assistant En- 
gineer of the Fire Department. 

April 22. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis arrives to take 
command of the Department of the Columbia. 

April 24. The trial of William Bryan for killing 
Ah Wing results in a disagreement of the jury. 

April 25. The epizootic prevails to such an extent 
as to seriously interfere with business and almost 
suspend car travel. 

April 2ii. The fifty-fourth anniversary of the intro- 
duction of Odd Fellowship into the United States is 
celebrated by the Lodges of this city by a picnic at 

Alameda The suit of Helen C. Fraser vs. James 

W. Thrift results in a verdict for the plaintiff for 
$12,000. 

April 27. Charles McMillan is fatally injured by 
being run over by a car. 
April 28. The last performance takes place in the 

Metropolitan Theater The first shad caught on 

this coast is exhibited at the California Market. 

April 2 t. The trial of Hugh McMenomy for killing 
James Hogan results in a disagreement of the jury. 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTOKY circulates throughout the Paoiflo Coast. 



KENIJ-EDY'S INSUBANCE AGENCT, Fire, Marine, and Life, represents $12,000,000. 



38 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



_ May 1. A petition to Congress asking a modifica- 
tion of tho treaty with China so as to stop the influx 
of Chinese is being munerously signed. 

May 2. John Samuel, who killed E. A. Marehant, 
is exonerated by the (Jrand Jury and is discharged 
James McCann, convicted of robbery, is sen- 
tenced to State Pri-ion for life. 

May 4. All signs of the epizootic are fast dis- 
appearing. 

May 5. John Sampson, a bov, is sentenced to one 
day in the State Prison for killing John Peoples. 
May 8. The Fair of the Bay District Horticultural 

Society opens Jules Fabre is found dead in bed 

John Devine, undersontenceof death, is granted 

a respite for live days Tho bodies of Captain 

Thomas and Lieutenant Howe, killed in the Modoc 
War, arrive en route to the East, 
May ii. Joseph Henery commits suicide. 
May 10. John McNamara is sentenced to one year 
in the State Prison for killing Henry Woddi. 

May 12. William Eager is found dead in bed 

The remains of General Canby arrive from Portland, 
Oregon, en route to Indiana. 

May 11. The remains of General Canbv are es- 
corted from Military Headquarters to the Oakland 
boat by a large and imposing military and civic pro- 
cession A banquet is given by the merchants of 

San Francisco in honor of W. Lane Booker, the Brit- 
ish Consul, on tho eve of his departure for Europe 
John Devine is executed for the murder of Au- 
gust Kamp. 

May 1!J. Henry S. Babcock, Vice-President and 
Manager of the Security Savings Bank, a highly es- 
teemed citizen, dies, aged forty-live years A 

Frenchman known by the name of Napoleon is found 

dead in his room James Conley drops dead in the 

street. 

May 20. Forty-five Chinamen, found sleeping in 
'one room, are arrested on a chargeof violation of the 
sanitary laws. 

May 22. Henry Baker, a well-known pioneer citi- 
zen, is fatally injured by falling down a stairway in 
the new U. S. Mint. 

May 23. Postal cards are sold for.the first time in 
this city A banquet is given by the British Be- 
nevolent Society in commemoration of the birthday of 
the Queen of England. 

May 21. Charles Minturn, a pioneer merchant and 
President of the Contra Costa Steam Navigation Co., 
dies, aged fifty-eight years. 

May 2-5. John Voigt is fatally shot by SabasRuvis. 

May 26. Three Chinamen, with the small-pox, are 
found secreted on board a steamer just arrived from 

Hong Kong Several anti- Chinese ordinances 

passed to print by the Board of Supervisors. 

May 27. Charles A. Russell is sentenced to death 
for the murder of James Crotty. 

May 28. A man named Blake is instantly killed by 
being run over by a cart The several Chinese com- 
panies telegraph to Hong Kong to stop the emigra- 
tion of Chinese to this port A Chinaman is mur- 
dered on Clay Street, and Robert Manning and John 
Brennan are arrested on suspicion of being the mur- 
derers The People's Protective Alliance is organ- 
ized. 

May 2!). George Holland is killed by falling from 

the rigging of a ship The body of an infant is 

found in a cesspool A large anti-Chinese meeting 

IS held at Dashaway Hall. 

May 30. Decoration Day is appropriately observed 
by tho members of the Grand Army of the Republic 

Charles Bruns is found in the street in a dying 

condition. 

May 31. Chief Engineer Whitney recommends and 
a majority of the Hie Commissioners indorse the re- 
moval of forty members of the Fire Department. 

June 1. Asher B. Bates, a prominent and highly 
esteemed member of tho bar, dies, aged sixty-four 
years. 

June 2. A fire occurs on Third Street, near Mar- 
ket, supposed to be the work of an incendiary ; loss, 
8o,000. 

itt'^.VP" ^-^ Frederick D. Baker commits suicide 

Wilham Bulletti is found dead in bed. 

June 8. Cooperative printing office damaged by 
fire to the extent of $12,000. 

Juno 9. Mayor Alvord vetoes the anti-Chinese or- 
dinances. 

June 10. An investigation into the affairs of the 
City and County Rieordor's OflSce is commenced, in 



accordance with a resolution passed by tho Board of 
Supervisors A billiard match between Lance Per- 
kins and Henry Morriliold for SoOO a side results in 
the success of the former. 

June 11. Charles R. Bond, Secretary of the Fire- 
man's Fund Insurance Co., a highly respected pio- 
neer citizen, dies, aged fifty-six years George Fish- 
er, Consul for Greece, a well-known citizen, dies, aged 

seventy-eight years The body of a man, supposed 

to be Asa Corning, is found in the chaparral near 
Park Avenue. 
Juno 13. AVilliam Ross commits suicide. 
June 15. Henri Wieniawski, a celebrated violinist, 
arrives. 

June 16. Judson & Shephard's candle factory is 
destroyed by fire ; loss, S50,(X)0. 

June 17. The anniversary of tho Battle of Bunker 
Hill is celebrated by firing salutes and display of 

flags James Dryden is drowned off Black I'oint 

George F. Pettinos, a pioneer and well-known 

musician, dies, aged forty-one years. 

June 20. At a meeting of the firemen recently de- 
posed by the Board of Fire Commissioners, resolu- 
tions are adopted bitterly denouncing Chief Whitney 

and three of the Commissioners B. Kenny drops 

dead The schooners Laura May and Minnie G. 

Atkins collide ofi' tho Golden Gate, damaging the 
latter to such an extent that she is abandoned by her 
crew. 
June 22. George Lewis is drowned off Cowell's 

Wharf Seifert Nelson, a sailor, dies in the Marine 

Hospital, from the effects of brutal treatment by 
Captain Lewis and the mates of the ship Crusader 
......Julian der Stroth is found dead in his store. 

June 2.3. Isaac Costley commits suicide. 
June 21. A fire occurs on the northeast corner of 
Mason and Eddy streets destroying several dwelling 

houses The Coroner's jury in the Siefert Nelson 

case charge tho captain and mates of the ship Crusa- 
der with manslaughter. 

June 26. Two cases of small-pox are discovered in 
a Chinese lodging house on Clay Street. 

June 27. A dwelling house on Page Street is fired 
by an incendiary. 
June 2'J. A woman named Russell is found dead in 

her room The body of George Sargeant is found in 

the bay The Church of the Dominican Fathers, 

corner of Bush and Stoiner streets, is dedicated. 

July 4. Independence Day is celebrated by a mil- 
iary and civic procession, and literary exercises at 
Horticultural Hall, and a Regatta by tho Master 
Mariners' Association. 
July 7. William J. Wilson commits suicide. 
July 10. Captain Benjamin Pratt, for manv vears 
Commander of the National (Juard. dies, aged forty- 
four years A portion of the Grand Jurv are ex- 
cused by Judge Stanly for alleged informalities 

Robert O'Malley is sentenced to five years' impris- 
onment for killing Henry Hill. 

July 11. General Thomas N. Cazneau, a promi- 
nent and highly ^teemed pioneer citizen, dies, aged 

sixty-one years Charles Bundy commits suicide. 

July 12. H. P. Han.^on commits suicide. 
July 13. The remains of General Cazneau are es- 
corted to the grave by a large and imposing military 

procession Twenty-eight Chinese students arrive 

on the steamer Colorado, en route to Springfield, 
Mass. 

July 1.5. John Hoffman is seriou.sly shot by Wil- 
liam Peru James Devitt is killed by falling from 

a platform Joel H. Mansfield, who attempted to 

kill Miss Mary Hein, is discharged. 

July 16. During an affray between Benjamin Pal- 
mer and Edward Lemon, the former is fatally 

stabbed B. F. Davenport drops down in tho street, 

and soon after expires A baby show is held at 

Pacific Hall. 

July 18. Hon. Doles R. Ashley, a distinguished 
member of the Bar, who at different times ably filled 
offices of trust in California and Nevada, dies, aged 
47 years. 

July 21. Hugh McMenomy, indicted for killing 
Robert Hogan, is released on his own recognizance. 

James Anderson is drowned Andrew Cum- 

mings is killed, and John Galligan fatally injured 
by a falling bolder. 
July 22. John F. Ballou shoots Spooner Sanford. 
July 24. Jules Greenhood commits suicide. 
July 25. Charles A. Russell is executed for the 
murder of James Crotty. 



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CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY. 



39 



July 27. George Hanson commits suicide. _ 

July 29. S. D. Freeman is found dead in a chair 
in the Chicago Hotel. , p , 

August 2. The tirst car is run over the tracK of the 

Clay Street Hill Railroad Louis Ottman commits 

suicide. .... 

August 7. James Kupfor commits suicide. 
August 8. James Otis is nominated for Mayor, by 
the Tax Payers' Convention. 
August 9. Thomas Levy commits suicide. 
August 11. William Johnson is fatally shot by 

Thomas Curtin John J. Wurzen commits suicide. 

August 12. Henry P. Barber, a well-known law- 
yer and pioneer Californian, dies, aged 54 years 

Samuel E. Smith, a prominent lumber dealer, is 
killed by falling into the hold of the ship Carrier 
Dove. , . . 

August 14. Major A. H. Gillespie, who partici- 
pated in the conquest of California under General 
Kearny, dies, aged 01 years. 

■ August li. Jennie Daly is found dead in her room. 
August l(i. A body of a Chinaman, supposed to 
have died from small-pox, is found in a basket, at 
the foot of Pacific Street. 

August 18. The Chicago Brewery is partially des- 
troyed by fire. 

August 19. John Dennis is found drowned in a 
pool of water. , ,,„,,. 

August 20. Charles Burroughs is killed by falling 
down stairs. 
August 22. Mrs. Mary Kelso is crushed to death 

by the falling of an old building Desire Chala- 

fure is sentenced to two years' imprisonment for kil- 
ling Ramon Mott Henry Burton is found drowned 

in the bay. 

August 30. The billiard tournament for the cham- 
pionship of the Pacific Coast results in the first prize, 
a silver cup, being awarded to J. F. B. McCloery. 

September 1. William J. Bryan is sentenced to 
two years' imprisonment for killing a Chinaman. 
Sept. 3. John Gallagher is fatally shot by John F. 

Janes The election results in the success of the 

Independent Legislative ticket and the Taxpayers' 
Municipal ticket, with a few excentions. 

Sept. o. William Dwyer is fatally stabbed by John 
Harrington. 
Sept. 8. A woman named Williams is found dead 

in bed James Douglass commits suicide. 

Sept. 9. The admission of California into the Union 

is celebrated by the Society of California Pioneers 

John F. Janes, who killed John Gallagher, is exon- 
erated by the Police Judge and discharged. 

Sept. 11. A boy named Corcoran is fatally injured 
by being run over by a street car. 

Sept. 12. John Dunn is killed by falling upon a 
piece of rod iron. 
Sept. 13. Governor Booth arrives in the city and 

is enthusiastically received The examination of 

John Harrington for the killing of Dwyer results in 
his discharge. 

Sept. 14. Jack Sheppard, the pedestrian, com- 
pletes his task of walking one thousand miles in one 
thousand hours. 

Sept. 15. Patrick Carroll is found dead in bed 

The Veterans of the Mexican War celebrate the an- 
niversary of the capture of the City of Mexico. 

Sept. in. The Mexican residents celebrate the 
sixty-third anniversary of their national independ- 

,ence James Neely is found dead in the bushes 

near Golden Gate Park William M. Tweed ar- 
rives in the city. 
Sept. 17. The steamer Costa Rica runs ashore on 

the North Heads during a dense fog Mrs. Catha- 

rinelErni is found dead in her room, supposed to have 

been murdered by her son Joseph Tucker drops 

dead at Fort Point. 

Sept. 18. The sixty-third anniversary of Chilian 
independence is celebrated by a salute and a display 
of flags. 

Sept. 21. William Packer and Hermann Frank are 
drowned in the bay by the capsizing of a boat. 
Sept. 22. P. G. Postel falls dead on the street. 
Sept. 23. The Board of Underwriters el:ct Charles 
R. Story Fire Commissioner, to fill the vacancy occa- 
sioned by the resignation of John C. Merrill Wil- 
liam Conn is found drowned in the bay William 

P. Pritchard is found dead in his room Dexter 

Tafft, a pioneer Californian, dies, aged fifty-nine years 

John Curtin is killed by falling from a bluff on 

Telegraph Hill. 



Sept. 24. The steamer Costa Rica is hauled off the 
rocks and towed into the harbor. 

Sept. 25. Samuel J. Bookstaver, a well-known citi- 
zen, commits suicide Edward Kennedy, a well- 
known flour merchant, dies, aged thirty-eight years. 
Sept. 27. Several buildings, corner of Fourth and 

Market streets, are partially destroyed by fire The 

ship Sunrise arrives from New York, and the crew 
report excessive cruelties committed by the officers 

during the voyage Frank Kelly is drowned in the^ 

bay. ^' 

Sept. 20. The Oakland Ferry steamers cotBmence 
half-hourly trips. 

Sept. 30. The annual Fair of the Horticultural So- 
ciety opens at Horticultural Hall The commence- 
ment of the Day of Atonement is observed by reli- 
gions exercises in the Jewish synagogues Joshua 

Mallov drops dead in the What Cheer House. 

October 1. Patrick Kelly drops dead Captain 

Clarke of the ship Sunrise is arrested on charges of 
excessive cruelty to his crow. 

Oct. 2. Mary O'Neill is burned to death Rob- 
ert Burke, a member of the Police Force, commits 
suicide. 

Oct. 6. Mrs. Charles Belts commits suicide Ma- 
jor Charles E. Hinckley, an old and esteemed resi- 
dent, dies, aged forty-three years. 
Oct. 7. William Francis is found dead in his room. 
Oct. 10. The trial of Thomas Curtin for killing 
William Johnson results in his acquittal Thirty- 
three horses in the stable of David Stewart are poi- 
soned by some unknown person ; twelve cases prove 
fatal. 
Oct. 11. Herman Hnmpert is found dead in bed...... 

A man, known as Professor Allen, is killed by being 
run over by a train of cars on the Oakland Wharf. 

Oct. 12. The anniversary of the discovery of Amer- 
ica is celebrated by the Italian residents. 
Oct. 14. Ernest Reichart commits suicide. 
Oct. 15. The Judicial Election results in the elec- 
tion of E! W. McKinstry, Supreme Judge ; E. D. 
Wheeler, Nineteenth District Judge; and Davis Lou- 
derback, Jr., Police Judge. 

Oct. lt>. Owen Gillen is murdered in a bar-room on 
Drumm Street, and Lloyd Boll is arrested on suspi- 
cion of having committed the crime. 

Oct. 20. Mrs. Rachel Larkin, a highly esteemed 
lady and resident of California since 1832, dies, aged 

sixty-six years Timothy Tormoy is found in an 

out-house in a dying condition At a meeting of the 

.'Icademy of Sciences, the President, Prof. Davidson, 
announces that James Lick, Esq., proposes to appro- 
priate ample means to erect an astronomical ob- 
servatory in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, to be fur- 
nished with the largest and most perfect telescope 
which the skill of American mechanism can produce. 
Oct. 21. John Hogan is killed by falling down 

Oct. 23. The trial of Edward Lemon for killing 

Benjamin Palmer results in his acquittal Peter 

Thompson is found drowned in the bay. 

Oct. 24. The clipper ship Three Brothers, one of 
the finest vessels afloat, sails for Havre with a cargo 
of grain valued at «199,000. 

Oct. 25. The remains of Antone Wirtz, supposed to 
have committed suicide, are found near Lake Honda 

The billiard match between Anthony Kraker and 

John F. B. McCleory, for the championship of the 
Pacific Coast and the silver cue results in the success 
of the former. 

Oct. 27. Algernon Smith, an old and well-known 

citizen, dies, agod forty-three years Henry Franks 

commits suicide. 

Oct. 28. Christian Schreibor & Go.'s furniture fac- 
tory is partially destroyed by fire The trial of Cap- 
tain Clarke of the ship Sunrise results in a verdict of 
guilty on seven counts. 

Oct. 28. A raid is made by the police on a gam- 
bling establishment at 112 Sutter Street and several 
persons arrested. 

Oct. 30. Benjamin Collins drops dead. 

Oct 31. Mary Montgomery is sentenced to two 
years' imprisonment for killing Henry Sanchez. 

November 1. Edward Allen is fatally stabbed by 

an unknown person .James Gunning found on the 

street fatally injured, states that he was beaten and 
robbed by some unknown persons. 

Nov. 3, Bartlett J. Freel is arrested on suspicion 

of being the murderer of Edward Allen Richard 

Brand is drowned in the bay. 



PACIFIC COAST BUSIWESS DIRECTORY containa Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants.. 



Ii. W. KENII'EDT, Qeneral Insurance Agent, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



40 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Nov. 4. John Donaldson is shot by Bernard Mc- 

Aravy George A. Brady is killed by being run 

over by a truck True Blue and other noted trot- 
ting horses arrive from the East. 

Nov. 5. Harris, the first mate of the ship Sunrise, 
is arrested in a house on Clarence Place. 

Nov. 7. A man named Leonard is killed by falling 
from a scaffold. 

Nov. 8. Michael Clapp jumps overboard from the 
steamer Amelia and is drowned. 

Nov. 10. Seraphino Guidiro commits suicide 

The British steam frigate Repulse arrives. 

Nov. 11. Anna Callaghan is found dead in her 
room. 

Nov. 12. Hon. James Pollock, Superintendent of 
the U. S. Mint at Philadelphia, arrives. 

Nov. 13. David Scannell meets with an enthusi- 
astic reception on his arrival from the East Pat- 
rick Bnrr is killed by being struck by a descending 
coal car on the P. M. S. S. Co.'s wharf. 

Nov. 15. Joseph Faraday commits suicide during 
a fit of mental depression caused by the sudden death 
of Charles Dodge, an intimate friend The four- 
mile race between the noted horses Thad Stevens, 
True Blue, and Joe Daniels, for a purse of ?20,000, 
takes place at the Ocean View Race Course in pres- 
ence of a vast concourse of spectators, with the fol- 
lowing results : First heat won by Joe Daniels — time, 
7.45 ; second heat won by True Blue — time, 8.08 ; 
third heat won by Thad Stevens— time, 7.57 ; fourth 
heat won by Thad Stevens — time, 8.20%. 

Nov. 18. ThomasF.Neagle is found drowned near 
Saucelito. 

Nov. 22. A Centennial mass meeting, the first on 

the Pacific Coast, is held at Corinthian Hall A 

slight shock of earthquake is felt. 

Nov. 24. Horace A. Higloy, formerly Surveyor- 
General of California, dies, aged 45 years Patrick 

Burke is killed by the caving of a bank. 

Nov. 25. A fire in William J. Heney & Co.'s fur- 
niture establishment destroys property to the amount 

of S50,000 Frank Harris, mate of the Ship Sunrise 

is found guilty on twenty-four counts. 

Nov. 2'). Francis P. Carroll commits suicide. 

Nov. 27. Thanksgiving Day is appropriately ob- 
served Col. Robert Morrow, Paymaster in the 

U. S. Army, commits suicide. 

Nov. 28. The ofiicers of the ship Sunrise, convict- 
ed of excessive cruelty to the crew, are sentenced as 
follows: Captain Robert Clarke, to fourteen months' 
imprisonment in the County Jail, and 81,000 tine; 
Frank Harris, the first mate, four years' imprison- 
ment in the State Prison, and Dennis Maloney, the 
second mate, two months' imprisonment in the 

County Jail Eugene Casserly sends to Gov. Booth 

his resignation as a United States Senator from Cali- 
fornia. 

Nov. 29. The friends of Theodore G. Cockrill, 
Chief of Police elect, present him a handsome badge 
of office. 

December 1. The Atlantic Hotel is destroyed by 
fire. A man named Adams, perishes in the flames. 
At a meeting of the Board of Supervisors, May- 
or Alvord makes his farewell address, and Mayor 

Otis is inaugurated P. Crowley, ex-Chief of Police, 

is presented with a magnificent gold watch and chain 

by the members of the Police Department David 

Scannell is elected Chief Engineer by the new Board 
of Fire Commissioners. 

Dec. 2. The Fire Commissioners meet and organ- 
ize as two Boards, one consisting of Messrs. Torrey, 
Freeman, and Story, and the other, of Messrs. Ford, 
Edwards, and Sloss, each claiming the right to act. 

Dec. 3. David Scannell receives his certificate of 
election from the new Board of Fire Commissioners, 
and makes a demand on F. E. R. Whitney for the of- 
fice of Chief Engineer, which is declined by the lat- 
ter The first heavy rain storm of the season com- 
mences. 

Dec. 4. F. E. R. Whitney is arrested on a charge 
of misdemeanor, in refusing to surrender the office of 
Chief Engineer to David Scannell. 

Dec. 9. The Chamber of Commerce memorialize 
Congress for the removal of the wreck of the Patri- 
cian and Noonday Rock A valuable span of horses 

run off Front St. Wharf and are drowned John Ry- 
an is killed by being run over by a car. 

Dec. 10. A steam boiler in a candle factory ex- 
plodes, killing a Chinaman and seriously injuring the 
engineer Mayor Otis approves the bond of John 



P. Shine, as clerk of the Board of Fire Commission- 
ers Charles Cannon is found dead in a store. 

Dec. 13. George Metcalf and Belle Watson make 

unsuccessful attempts to commit suicide William 

Martin resigns the office of Clerk of the Board of 
Fire Commissioners, and turns over the keys and pa- 
pers in his possession belonging to the Department, 
to E. N. Torrey. 
Dec. 15. Aaron Neely commits suicide. 

Dec. IH. William O'Brien commits suicide H. 

J. J. Dibborn is found dead in his room. 
Dec. 17. The Italian frigate Garabaldi, with tha 

Duke of Genoa on board, arrives in the harbor W. 

S. Havens commits suicide. 

Dec. 19. Members of the Italian Benevolent So- 
ciety nnd officers of the Garibaldi Guard make an of- 
ficial visit to the Duke of Genoa on board the frigate 
Garibaldi. 
Dee. 20. Frank Callow is killed by being run over 

by a railroad car The ships Concordia and Mer- 

wanjee Framjee collide, causing the latter serioui 

damage Ellen Delaney arrested for shop-liftingr 

attempts suicide. 

Dec. 22. A special meeting of the Academy of Sci- 
ences is held to take suitable and fitting action upon 
the death of Prof. Louis Agassiz. Resolutions of sym- 
pathy and condolence with the family of the deceased 

are adopted Dennis Moloney, second mate of the 

ship Sunrise, dies in the County Hospital. 

Dec. 23. William E. Binoe is found dead in his 
room. 
Dec. 24. P. J. Noonan is found dead in his room 

At a special meeting of the new Board of Fire 

Commissioners the safe in the office of the Board is 
forced open and the records and papers of the De- 
partment handed over to John P. Shine, the newly 
elected Clerk of the Board. 

Dec. 25. Christmas Day is observed by an almost 
entire suspension of business and religious services in 

the different churches The race at Ocean House 

Driving Park between Joe Daniels and Nell Flaher- 
ty, for a purse of S2,0(>0 is won by the former Fran- 
cis Conroy is killed by being impaled on a fence picket 

Franklin L. Jones, President of the Exempt Fire 

Company, an active member of the old Volunteer 
Fire Department, and an esteemed citizen, dies, aged 
fifty-six years. 

Dec. 27. William F. Williamson, a pioneer Cali- 
fornian and highly respected citizen, dies, aged fifty- 
eight years. 

Dee. 28. The Sacred Heart College, on the corner 
of Eddy and Larkin streets, is dedicated. 
Dec. 29. J. Vick is found dead in his room. 
Dec. 30. Herman C. Hagedorn is found dead in his 

room Mrs. Mary Haley is found dead in her room. 

Dec. 31. Felix Merle commits suicide During 

the month of December eleven cases of small-pox 
prove fatal. •■ — - 

January 1\1874,^ The advent of the new year is cel- 
ebrated by fBeusual festivities Charles Muller 

commits suicide During an afi'ray Charles Smith 

is severely cut and Charles Gillen shot by Charles 
Streib. 
Jan. 2. David Stern, a highly respected pioneer 

merchant, dies, aged fifty-one years Colonel P. C. 

Lander, a well-known and esteemed pioneer Califor- 

nian, dies, aged sixty-eight years The body of 

John Bedford is washed ashore near the Ocean Side 
House. 

Jan. 3. The U. S. flag ship Saranae, Rear-Admiral 
Pennock commanding, arrives from Honolulu Po- 
lice Officer Frank Croon is shot by a desperado 

Scarlet fever prevails, several cases proving fatal. 

Jan. 4. James Le Maire commits suicide Jacob 

Borren, a child, dies from the effects of a dose of poi- 
son administered by mistake for medicine John R. 

Sharpstein is appointed Judge of the Twelfth District 

Court William Codington, a pioneer Californian, 

drops dead on the street, aged sixty-three years. 

Jan. 5. Alexander Lund is killed by the fall of a 
wall James Barton is killed by falling from a win- 
dow An order is passed by the Board of Supervis- 
ors increasing the Police Force to one hundred and 

fifty The new iron steamer Colima for the Pacific 

Mail Steamship Co. arrives. 

Jan. ti. The Merchants' Mutual Marine Insurance 
Co. resolve to disincorporate The Board of Edu- 
cation pass resolutions prohibiting the teaching of 
the French and German languages in all the public 
schools, except six. 



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i 



C. p. VAN" SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY. 



41 



Jan. 7. The conductors and drivers on the Bay 
View and Potrero Railroad strike on account of being 
overworked. 

Jan. 8. Colonel John Middleton, a prominent and 
esteemed pioneer Californian, dies, aged sixty-two 
years A meeting of property holders is held to con- 
sider the proposition to tunnel Russian Hill under 

Broadway Street, from Mason to Hyde The Calico 

Ball of the Ladies' United Aid Society at Union Hall 
is largely attended, the receipts amounting to about 

83,000 The trial of Johnny Tuers for killing James 

Bowling results in a disagreement of the jury 

George Rex is drowned in the bay. 

Jan. 10. The Duke of Genoa visits the Mint, Art 

Association, and other public places Annie Jones 

is crushed to death by a truck Charles Lawson is 

found dead in his room. 

Jan. 11. James Hassin commits suicide. 

Jan. 12. AValter Van Dyke succeeds Lorenzo D. 

Latimer as United States District Attorney Mary 

Shackelford is found dead in her room. 

Jan. 13. Mayor Otis gives a reception to the Duke 

of Genoa and the officers of the frigate Garibaldi 

Lawrence Burns drops dead. 

Jan. U. Mrs. Lulu Torrence commits suicide 

The North Beach Brewery is seized by the U. S. au- 
thorities for alleged fraud. 

Jan. 15. A severe rain and wind storm prevails. 

Jan. 19. Randolph Mitchell cuts his wife's throat 

and then commits suicide During a fracas between 

John F. Ford and Patrick Linehan the latter is killed 
by a blow on the neck Edward P. Marsellus suc- 
ceeds William Gouveneur Morris as U. S. Marshal. 

Jan. 20. The inquest over the body of Mrs. Lulu 
Torrence results in a verdict of suicide, but the Coro- 
ner dissents and arrests George Hogan and Gorham 
Beales, the former on a charge of murder and the lat- 
ter as accessory before the fact. 

Jan. 21. George Hogan and Gorham Beales are 
discharged by the Police .Judge. 

Jan. 22. A large meeting of property owners, op- 
posed to the opening of the so-called Potrero Avenue, 

is held Prof. James Allen, the aeronaut, arrives 

with his balloons, one of 65,000 feet capacity. .....A tel- 
egram is received announcing the loss of the ship Pan- 
ther of this port in Georgia Bay. 

Jan. 23. Mrs. Milligan is burned to death by a fire 
caused by the upsetting of a kerosene lamp. 

Jan. 24. Charles A. Leyner commits suicide...... 

George Hogan commences suit against Coronor Rice 

for false imprisonment Charles Grapel is found 

drowned in the bay Peter Bordeaux is found dead 

in his room. 

Jan. 25. The steamer Macgregor, the pioneer ves- 
sel of the Australasian and American line, arrives 
from Sydney. 

Jan. 26. William Stanton is found drowned in the 

bay The Board of Supervisors elect Edward P. 

Batchelor, Prosecuting Attorney of the Police Court. 

Jan. 27. John Foley, Manager of the San Francis- 
co office of the Atlantic and Pacific Telegraph Co., dies, 
aged twenty-seven years. 

Jan. 28. A. L. Wangenheim, a pioneer merchant 
and member of the Board of Supervisors, dies, aged 
fifty-five years. 

Jan. 29. A meeting of the officers of the National 
Guard is held to protest against the passage of Sena- 
tor Laine's Military Bill. 

Jan. 31. The publication of severe articles in the 
Chronicle and Sun, reflecting on the characters of the 
proprietors of the respective papers, culminates in an 
affray betwon Gustavus De Young and F. R. Fitzger- 
ald and the arrest of several parties connected with 

the Sun. on a charge of libel The trial of Robert 

Manning for killing a Chinaman results in a verdict 
of murder in the second degree. 

February 2. Charles and M. H. De Young are ar- 
rested on complaint of the editor of the Sun on 

charges of libel Gustavus De Young shoots at B. 

F. Napthaly while the latter is in custody. 

Feb. 3. Daniel M. Folsom dies from the effects of 
injuries received by a boiler explosion. 

Feb. 4. John O'Malley makes an attempt to kill 

J. B. E. Cavallier The British sloop of war Fawn 

arrives in the harbor. 

Feb. 5. Henry Jennings is killed by a ship's tackle 
block falling on his head. 

Fob. 6. James Howden, a well-known chemist, 
dies aged thirty-eight years. 

Feb. 8. The new steamer Vasco de Gama arrives 



from Yokahama, having made one of the quickest 
trips on record. 

Feb. 9. John Prichard, while in a state of som- 
nambulism, is killed by a fall from a window A 

large meeting of citizens is held to protest against the 
action of the Board of Education in abolishing the 

study of French and German in the public schools 

The School of Design, under the auspices of the S. F. 
Art Association, opens with forty-six pupils. 

Feb. 10. Forty police officers lately appointed are 
mustered into service. 

Feb. 14. The wrestling match between James Mc- 
Laughlin, of Detriot, Michigan, and Michael Whelan, 
of California, for S4,000 and the championship of 
America, results in the success of the former. 

Feb. 16. The Chinese New Year commences 

A carnival, in imitation of the great Carnival of Ven- 
ice, is held at Piatt's Hall under the auspices of the 
Italian Benevolent Society. 

Feb. 17. Henry Slupsky is shot by the accidental 
discharge of a pistol in the hands of Edward Baker 
Felix Heller is found drowned in the bay. 

Feb. 19. A meeting is held for the purpose of tak- 
ing measures to secure the Presidio Reservation for a 

public park Margaret Bray is found dead in her 

room. 

Feb. 21. Prof. Allen and several citizens make as- 
censions in a balloon from Woodward's Gardens. 

Feb. 22. A large meeting of ladies is held for the 
purpose of inaugurating a movement to prevent the 
indiscriminate sale of intoxicating liquors. 

Feb. 23. The one hundred and forty-second anni- 
versary of the birth of Washington is generally ob- 
served as a holiday. 

Feb. 24. JudgeStanlycharges thejury tothe effect 
that the City Treasurer and Mayor should be indicted 
for felony for depositing money belonging to the City in 
a bank, contrary to law. A communication in regard 
to the matter is also laid before the Board of Super- 
visors, who refuse to read it. and pass a resolution 
expressing confidence in the integrity of the Mayor 

and Treasurer A resolution is passed by the Board 

of Supervisors requesting the Board of Education to 
re-establish the study of the languages in the public 
schools. 

Feb. 26. A blast of four hundred pounds of giant 
powder blows off about one thousand eight hundred 

cubic yards of Rincon Rock Thomas A. Springer, 

State Printer and a well-known journalist, dies, aged 
fifty-three years. 

Feb. 27. At a meeting of merchants held in the 
Chamber of Commerce, resolutions of confidence in the 
Mayor and Treasurer and denunciatory of the County 
Judge are adopted. 

Feb. 28. The charges against the Mayor and Treas- 
urer are investigated by the Grand Jury, who report 
that there is nothing in the conduct of the parties im- 
plicated to entitle them to censure The twenty- 
fifth anniversary of the arrival of the steamship Cal- 
ifornia is celebrated by the surviving passengers by 

a trip around the bay and a banquet on board 

Captain William A. Thomson, a pioneer Californian, 
dies, aged eighty-four years. 

March 1. The body of Dr. George Campbell ia 
found in the bay. 

March 4. An oil painting of Samson and Delilah 
is sold at auction for the sum of Sl0,250. 

March 5. George Mason commits suicide. 

March 6. Robert Manning, convicted of murder- 
ing a Chinaman, is sentenced to State Prison for life 
A large meeting is held at Piatt's Hall and reso- 
lutions adopted indorsing Judge Stanly in his views 

in regard to the disposition of the public funds 

Robert Currie drops dead while at work in the Pio- 
neer Woolen Mills. 

March 8. Two burglars are detected in an attempt 
to rob the poor box in St. Mary's Cathedral. 

March 9. News is received of the death of ex- 
President Millard Fillmore. 

March 10. Miss Neilson makes her debut before 
the public of San Francisco in the character of Juliet 
John Anderson is found drowned in the bay. 

March 11. News is received of the death of Sen- 
ator Sumner. 

March 13. A meeting of colored people is held and 
resolutions of regret passed at the decease of Senator 
Sumner Robert B. Fordham, a well-known mer- 
chant, dies, aged forty-seven years. 

March 14. George Barber is drowned by the cap- 
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March 15. William Hanlon makes a murderous 
assault on Mrs. Mary O'Connor and her son, inflict- 
ing several danerorous wounds. 

March Hi. .Judge Dwinelle decides that David 
Scannell is entitled to the office of Chief Engineer of 
the Fire Department, and fines F. E. R. Whitney S:?01 
and costs, for usurpingand unlawfully holding said of- 
fice Col. Oliver P. Robie, a veteran of the War of 

the Hebollinn, commits suicide The fourth trial of 

the Black Will case commences in the Probate Court. 

March 17. St. Patrick's Day is celebrated by a large 
civic and military procession and literary exercises at 
theCaliforniaTheater A boat race between the Pi- 
oneer and South End Rowing Clubs for $550 results in 
the success of the former. 

March 18. The first and Second Regiments of the 
National Guard are inspected by the Military Com- 
mitt^e of the Assembly. 

Marc'i \'l. At a meeting of the Board of Fire Com- 
missioners Edward Flaherty is admitted to his seat in 
the Board and several officers and members of the 
Departm>nt removed A large mass meeting in fa- 
vor of the Temperance Crusade is held at Union Hall. 

March 20. Captain Barbiere, the aeronaut, arrives 
with the French mail balloon, LeSecours The Pa- 
cific Submnrine and Earthquake Proof Wall Compa- 
ny obtain judgment against the City Hall Commis- 
sioners for S10,000 damages for infringement of patent. 

March 21. James Brown is drowned in the bay. 

March 22. Arthur Mason drops dead on the street 
Mrs. Mary O'Connell commits suicide. 

March 2>i. The new and magnificent building of the 
London and San Francisco Bank, Limited, is dedicat- 
ed to business Louis Romero is found on the side- 
walk fatally stabbed ; subsequently Antonio Gonza- 
lez is arrested on a charge of having committed the 
deed. 

March 25. Dora Osborne and her infant child are 
found dead, the latter having been strangled soon 
after birth by its mother. 

March 2). John B. Beutler, a well-known musi- 
cian, commits suicide Martin Lyon drops dead. 

March 28. Captain Barbier makes his first ascen- 
sion from Woodward's Gardens in the French mail 
balloon Le Secours Thomas Dickinson is danger- 
ously stabbed by Charles Jones William Freder- 

ichson, an artist, commits suicide on the beach, near 
the Cliff House. 

March 29. James Barrett, ex-Supervisor of the 
Tenth Ward, dies, aged thirty-six years. 

March 30. Five notorious criminals escape from 
the County Jail. 

March 31. William Brady is drowned in a pond. 

April 1. A destructive fire on Sacramento Street, 

destroying property to the amount of SoO,000 

Thomas Bird is found dead in bed with his throat 
cut. 

April 2. The fourth trial of the long-contested 
Black Will case, results in a verdict that the testator 
was not of sound mind. 

April 3. The wife of Charles A. Sumner dies sud- 
denly at her residence. 

Aprils. Bob Durkin, a notorious convict, an es- 
cape from the County Jail, is captured Edward 

B. Condon mortally shoots Charles K. Kochenrath, 
and then kills himself. 

April (). Thomas Breeze, a pioneer merchant and 

esteemed citizen, dies, aged 53 years Rainfall of 

season to date 22.63 inches One hundred and fifty 

ladies meet in convention to establish a reform in 
female dress. 

April 7. Michael Fahey is mortally shot by E. M. 
Hopkins. 

April 8. M. P. Tennant attempts suicide by swal- 
lowing strychnine Elmer Caldwell is found dead 

in bed from the effects of a pistol shot in the head, 
and his roommate, Charles G. Maxey, is found on the 
floor dangerously wounded, the latter stating that he 
was shot by Caldwell, who then committed suicide. 
Several buildings on Pacific Street, near Stock- 
ton, are partially destroyed by fire John A. Cam- 
eron is drowned by falling overboard from a sail- 
boat. 

April 11. Thomas Enwright commits suicide by 
taking morphine. 

A pril 12. James Flemming is mortally stabbed by 
John Corbett. 

April 13. Gerald Massey lectures at Piatt's Hall. 
Abram Block succeeds A. L. Wangenheim, de- 
ceased, as Supervisor of the Eighth Ward James 



L. King is elected Fire Commissioner, vice Torrey, 
resigned. 

April 15. The California State Medical Society 

hold their annual Convention Dr. A. A. Farns- 

worth commits suicide Frederick Lind dies sud- 
denly. 

April 16. G. O'Hara Taaffe, Consul for Norway, 
Sweden, and Denmark, an esteemed citizen, dies, 

aged 49 years A Dickens Ball, in aid of the S. F. 

Female Hospital, is held at Union Hall. 

April 17. John Williams is drowned by falling 
from Oakland Wharf. 

April 18. The British Benevolent Society hold 

their eighth annual picnic Thomas . Dixon 

sustains severe injuries by being thrown from a 
wagon. 

April 19. The barracks on Alcatraz Island are de- 
stroyed by fire The balloon America ascends from 

Woodward's Gardens with several passengers who, 
in descending from an altitude of throe thousand 
feet, narrowly escape with their lives. 

April 21. Sixteen seamen on the ship David 

Crockett are arrested for mutiny W. S. Marks 

and friend are stopped by highwaymen on the Cliff 
House Road and relieved of their purses A Con- 
vention of State Grangers convene at Corinthian 
Hall, three hundred delegates in attendance. 

April 23. Walter C. Benn makes an unsuccessful 

attempt to commit suicide The ship James Ches- 

ton runs ashore on South Beach. 

April 24. A runaway near Butchertown results in 

a serious injury to Mrs. Jayne The «t500,000 prize 

in the Havana lottery is drawn by residents of this 

city John Pardo and Braggio Stetta are arrested 

for opening a letter Bartley Freel is convicted of 

murder in the second degree for killing Edward 
Allen. 

April 25. The Odd Fellows celebrate their Fifty- 
first Anniversary by a picnic at Alameda Steam- 
ers Antelope and New World collide in the bay with 

trifling damage The Grangers Bank of California 

is organized. 

April 21). The ship James Cheston, stranded at 
South Beach, is rescued and towed to Hunter's Point 

A gas balloon from Woodward's Gardens, after 

reaching an altitude of two thousand feet, descends 
near the Small-Pox Hospital, the occupant narrowly 

escaping with his life Eugene Callahan is severely 

stabbed by a man named Feline The Provincial 

Council of the Roman Catholic Diocese of California 
is held at St. Mary's Cathedral. 

April 27. The wholesale liquor dealers organize to 
oppose the Local Option Law The French iron- 
clad Atalante, one of the most effective vessels in the 
French Navy, arrives from Peru. 

April 28. A fire at 507 Clay Street, destroying prop- 
erty to the amount of S8,000 The legal profession 

pass resolutions of condolence and respect for .Jabish 
Clement, a well-known member of the Bar, who died 

while on a visit to Oregon Frank L. Greeu, who 

was stabbed by Charles Johnson, dies. 

April 29. The Fifth Annual Session of the Califor- 
nia Woman's Suffrage Convention is held The col- 
ored population celebrate the anniversary of the 
ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment, at Horti- 
cultural Hall The City Hall Commissioners trans- 
fer the books, property, etc., of the new City Hall to 
the Board of Supervisors. 

April 30. Mrs. James Howden obtains a verdict of 

$3,000 against the S. F. Chronicle for libel The 

Stockton Guards arrive as the guests of the National 

Guard Abraham Solomon is fatally shot during 

an altercation with two of his comrades Bartley 

Freel is sentenced to eleven years' imprisonment for 
killing Edward Allen. 

May 1. The third annual picnic of the Masonic 

Board of Relief is held at Saucelito The steamship 

Vasco de Gama arrives, twenty-seven days from 
Hong Kong and seventeen days and eight hours from 
Yokohama, being the quickest trip on record. 

May 2. The St. Andrews Society held their an- 
nual picnic at Saucelito. 

May 3. W. S. Moss is fined for violating the pri- 
mary election law. 

May 4. A delegation of ladies visit the Board of 
Supervisors in session and present a petition on tem- 
perance reform Maguire's new and beautiful The- 
ater on Bush Street is opened to a crowded and 

delighted audience The British corvette Knedos 

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Oni' Public Schools.'' 

The San Francisco school year begins with July 
and ends with the following June. Hence the edu- 
cational record of the calendar year 1873 includes 
the last half of the school year 1872-3, and the first 
half of the school year 1873-4. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The present classification of the public schools of 
this city divides them into five kinds — Primary, 
Grammar, and High ; the Evening Schools, which 
are a kind of temporary and partial combination of 
Grammar and High School; and the Model School 
or Training School, which is really a kind of Sub- 
Normal and PracticeSchool combined. To these one 
may add the Teachers' Normal School, held upon 
Monday evening of each school week, in which 
teachers of any grade may pursue studies and receive 
instruction fitting them to pass examinations for 
higher grades of certificates. 



The thirty-five Primary Schools are all mixed; of 
the thirteen Grammar Schools seven are mixed.threo 
are for boys only, and three for girls alone; while the 
two High Schools provide one for each sex. The one 
Model bchool and the single Evening Normal School 
receive both sexes, while the Evening Schools are 
partly one sex and partly both. 

NUMBKR OF GRADES. 

The Primary Schools have four grades — the eighth, 
seventh, sixth, and fifth; the Orammar Schools four 
— the fourth, third, second, and first; and the High 
schools three grades — the junior, the middle, and the 
senior. 

In all the schools each grade may include, and 
generally does include, several classes of similar ad- 
vancement and nearly equal rank. 

TIME IN EACH GRADE. 

In every grade throughout the entire course, the 
studies are so arranged that pupils of average capac- 
ity and ordinary diligence can thoroughly and safely 
complete them in one year. Hence the Primar.v 
School course takes four years, the Grammar School 
four years, and the High School three years. Thus 
the entire public school course occupies eleven years. 
The regulations provide, however, that pupils of un- 
usual ability or extraordinary industry may be pro- 
moted more rapidly and complete the course pro- 
portionally sooner. Every year furnishes scores of 
instances of this, though it is generally true that the 
pupil who attempts three years' work in two years, 
loses more than he gains. 

AVERAGE AGE OF EACH GRADE. 

The age nominally required for entering the lowest 
Primary grade, the eighth, is six years. While some 
enter younger, many more come in older, so that the 
average age of eighth-grade pupils upon entrance is 
about six years and three quarters, showing that the 
number entering at seven or upwards, is decidedly 
greater than the numljer entering at six or under. 
To find the average age of any upper grade add one 
year for each grade. The raising of the average age 
in each of the upper Grammar grades, resulting from 
the coming in of older outside pupils, is nearly or 
ftjlly balanced by the more rapid promotions of the 
smarter pupils already mentioned, so that the aver- 
age age of any grade may be found with suflBcient 
accuracy by the method just stated. 



* By Prof. E. Knowlton, to whom we would again ex- 
press our thanks for courteous assistance.— Compiler. 



STUDIES OF EACH GRADE. 

EIGHTH GRADE. 

The little ones of the beginning Primary grade— 
the eighth— learn counting, the reading of printed 
and written numbers, and writing numbers to 101; 
Roman numerals in connection with their reading 
lessons, and the mental and written addition of small 
numbers. In reading and spelling they learn the 
more common, easy, and simple words from the 
teacher's speech, the charts, and the reading book; 
and the proper putting together of these words into 
common household, school-room, or play-ground sen- 
tences. In writing they learn the small letters and 
the simpler capitals. They also receive oral lessons 
upon the five senses — their names, organs, and uses; 
common objects from the objects themselves, from 
pictures, and from the teacher's description; conver- 
sational lessons upon common domestic animals and 
their uses, with instruction in the primary and sec- 
ondary colors, from colored objects and from colored 
diagrams upon charts. Besides these they learn to 
sing the musical scale, ascending and descending, 
both by the usual scale names and by other syllables; 
and four songs by note; and have physical exercises 
twice a day. 

To do all this they sit in school about three hours 
and a half each day, five days of each week, through 
forty-four weeks of the year, which is seven hun- 
dred and seventy hours a year, out of the four thou- 
sand three hundred and eighty hours during which 
they are supposed to be awake, allowing that they 
sleep half the time. Thus they are in school and at 
study less than one-fifth of their waking time. And 
it must be remembered that even this time is broken 
by from two to three daily recesses of fifteen minutes 
each, and a long intermission of from one hour to an 
hour and a quarter at noon, besides the five or ten min- 
utes, twice a day, spent in regular physical exercises 
in tne school room under the lead, or at least the 
guidance of the teacher. Thus the little ones are sel- 
dom, if ever, kept even approximately still in their 
seats more than a half hour at a time. In no city on 
the continent, or indeed in the world, are school 
children confined fewer hours or more frequently and 
thoughtfully relieved by careful ventilation and suit- 
able exorcise. The old cry, " The Murder of the In- 
nocents," which Col. Higginson and his zealous 
physiological associates used to be so fond of raising 
concerning the confinement of the Primary school 
children of Boston, can certainly find no reasonable 
pretext out here along the distant golden rim of their 
educational " hub." In fact one needs go but a very 
li*tle way in his observation of the condition and 
care of most of the homes from which these children 
come to have the conclusion forced upon him that 
they receive a far more physiological and healthful 
care in their public schools than in their private 
homos. That there are occasional exceptions no rea- 
sonable person can deny, but these spring from the 
negligence, disobedience, or incompetence of an oc- 
casional teacher, or the extreme carefulness of an 
exceptionally thoughtful and over-physiological pa- 
rent, which is still more rare than any habitually 
careless teacher. More parents indeed complain 
that the schools do not keep their children "out of 
the way " long enough than find any fault at their 
confining them so long. 

SEVENTH GRADE. 

Arithmetic. — Review work of eighth grade, and 
practice the addition and subtraction of small num- 
bers. Spell words picked from each reading lesson; 
write weekly from dictation one paragraph from the 
regular lessons of the week; once in two weeks copy 
one lesson from the open Reader, as an exercise in 



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spelling, punctuation, and capitals. Write small 
letters and capitals of the whole alphabet, on slates 
and blackboards, and use pens, ink, and paper in 
classes provided with desks, which unfortunately are 
not as numerous as necessary. Oral lessons upon 
colors and common plants, and conversations upon 
wild animals. In vocal music they review and con- 
tinue the practice of the scales, and learn four more 
songs from the First Music Reader, and frequently 
as many by rote. They also copy from the black- 
board upon their slates exercises in musical nota- 
tion, including notes and rests, long and short; staff, 
lines, spaces, and degrees, measures, bar, double bar, 
and the G clef. 

In this grade the hours of study, the frequency and 
duration of recesses, and the recurrence of physical 
exercises, are the same as in the preceding. In both 
those grades any one lesson seldom exceeds fifteen or 
twenty minutes. The importance of variety, the 
necessity of frequent change are fully recognized and 
prescribed by the Manual, if not always remembered 
and observed by unfaithful or otherwise incompetent 
teachers. 

SIXTH GEADE. 

Language. — Correcting common errors in daily 
speech; copying from the Reader lessons or parts 
of Lessons, to teach spelling, punctuation, and use of 
capitals ; practice in the use of capitals ; writing 
from memory short abstracts of easy reading lessons 
as a preparation for original composition; picking 
out and naming nouns, adjectives, and articles in 
the reading lessons; weekly dictation of paragraphs 
to be written; spelling of tabulated words at the 
head of each reading lesson; abbreviation of words 
often abreviated, as they occur in the Reader. 

Numbers. — Multiplication and division, using one 
figure for multiplier or divisor. Review work of 
preceding grade. 

Geography.— '^oniaiiVs Introduction, to Lesson 
twenty-mne. The whole to be read aloud in class; 
map questions studied and answered from open book 
under guidance of teacher ; the most important 
fourth to be memorized. 

Oral Lessons.— hines, angles, and plain figures 
from the charts; additional colors, from charts and 
objects; familiar talks on common articles of food 
and clothing. 

Vocal Music. — Ten minutes daily. Continue songs 
through Mason's First Music Reader, by rote, to 
prepare the pupils for learning the same by note. 
The first six sounds of the scale in the key of ft, 
written upon the staff, in the G clef. Practice daily 
from the first series of Mason's Musical Charts. 
Learn the meaning of the repeat, the slur, and the 
following musical abreviations : p, pp, /, ff, inf ; 
triple, quadruple, and sextuple time, and how to 
beat each. 

Time of study, recesses, intermissions, and physical 
exercises, as in previous 



FIFTH GRADE. 

iartfiTMaore.— Oral descriptions of simple objects 
and familiar incidents; reports, from memory, of 
oral lessons; correcting grammatical errors in daily 
speech; construction of easy sentences; naming three 
parts of speech from the reading lessons; written 
abstracts of easy reading lessons; changing simple 
poetry into common prose; and exercises in letter 
writing. Read first half of Mcfiuffey's Fourth 
Reader. Spell and define words in table at head of 
each lesson. Write weekly, from dictation, one or 
more paragraphs of some lesson previously read; 
copy from open book some reading lesson, to teach 
spelling, punctuation, use of capitals, and division 
into paragraphs. Willson's Primary Speller, to p. 
67. Abbreviations of words commonly abbreviated, 
as they occur in the Reader. 

iVwmbers.— Multiplication and division continued, 
inental and written combined. Easy lessons in frac- 
tions, common and decimal, and the tables of denom- 
inate numbers. 

G-Vor/rap/12/.— Complete the text book; Monteith's 
Introduction; read the whole from open book; mem- 
orize the most important fourth. 

Oral ift?«ons.— Animals from Willson's Chart, No. 
XVI; Plants, from No. XXII; Colors, from objects 
and charts; forms of Solids from box of models. 

Vocal Music. — Daily practice from music charts, 
and songs and exercises by note from First Music 
Reader. Sharps and flats, and their use. The 



Major Diatonic Scale, by its intervals. Mason's 
National Music Teacher, lessons 25-29, and 33. Time, 
at least ten minutes daily. 

For promotion, pupils should write, at dictation, 
whole, half, quarter, and eighth notes and their 
corresponding rests; the staff and the G clef, in its 
proper place on the staS'; also write, at dictation, 
upon the staff with the G clef, the notes representing 
the following sounds and pitches : g, a, b, c, d, e, f, 
g, a, b, c, d, e,f, g ; also, f sharp, / sharp, e sharp, 
b flat. 

This grade finishes the Primary School work. Pu- 
pils who successfully complete it receive certificates 
entitling them to a seat in any fourth-grade class in 
the city at the beginning of the next term. 
' Besides the studies already enumerated, about fifty 
special teachers in Drawing, French, and German 
have taught those studies for two years past, until 
January, 1874, when the Board of Education suddenly 
dismissed them, for reasons which appear elsewhere 
in this article. 

GRAMMAR GRADES. 
These form the second group of four grades in the 
ascending system of public teaching. They are pro- 
vided to teach the common branches of an English 
education to all who desire to learn. The studies of 
each grade are these: 

FOURTH GRADE. 

Language.— 'Syixa.Q all the parts of speech from 
the reading lessons. Learn number and case of 
nouns; comparison of adjectives; declension of pro- 
nouns, and conjugation of verb "to be" in the in- 
dicative mood. AVrite composition fortnightly; ab- 
stracts of reading lessons, transpositions, letters; 
descriptions of vacations, visits, excursions, picnics, 
or travels. 

Reading and Spelling. — Complete Fourth Reader; 
spell from Reader; learn English prefixes, and suf- 
fixes from word analysis. 

Geography. — Through United States, especially 
California and local or home geography. Read and 
study the whole with open book; memorize the most 
important fourth as previously assigned by teacher 
in each advance lesson. 

Arithmetic. — Addition, subtraction, and multipli- 
cation of common and decimal fractions with United 
States money. Particularlj' learn analysis of opera- 
tions; take mental arithmetic in connection with 
written, learning the same topic in both kinds at 
the same time. 

Writing.— 'P^y son, Dunton, and Scribner's system, 
as directed by the principal. 

J)ra!<'}».9.— Bartholomew's system, under direction 
of special instructor. 

Vocal Music. — Review work of fifth and sixth 
grades. AVrite scales of C, G, and F major upon 
staff with G clef, with proper signatures ; name 
pitches of sounds composing those scales in order; 
read and sing, by note, simple exercises and melo- 
dies in the keys of C, G, and F. Mason's Second 
Series of Charts and Second Music Reader. Time, 
ten minutes daily. Lessons by special teacher, one 
half hour weekly. 

THIRD GRADE. 

Language.— Correct daily errors in speech; write 
abstracts of lessons in reading and geography, re- 
ports of oral lessons, letters, transpositions, or para- 
phrases; conjugate verbs in indicative mood; parse 
and analyze easy sentences from Reader. 

Reading and Spelling.— First half of Fifth Read- 
er; spell and define important words from reading 
lessons. 

Word Analysis. — Learn common prefixes and suf- 
fixes, and define words formed with them. 

Geography.— Comp\QtQ the text-book, especially 
learning the geography of California and the Pacific 
Coast. Read the whole with open book; memorize 
not more than one fourth of the leading points as 
previously marked by teacher. 

Arithmetic. — Review work of preceding grades; 
division of common and decimal fractions; United 
States money; compound numbers and reduction, 
omitting obsolete tables; specially learn analysis of 
operations; mental in connection with written, learn- 
ing the same topic in both kinds at the same time. 

TVriting.—F. D. & S.'s system as directed by prin- 
cipal. 



FABNSWOBTH & CIiABE, Gen'l Fire and Marine Insurance Agency; office 230 Cal. Sfe 



I 



O p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbeta, 



GENERAL REVIEW, 



45 



Drawing. — Architectural (for boys), draw from ob- 
jects, doors, windows, tables, plans of rooms, etc., 
from actual measurement; half an hour weekly. For 
girls, as directed by the teacher of drawing. 

Vocal Music. — Major and relative minor scales, 
with major and minor intervals. Sing by note in the 
clef of C, G, D, A, B flat and B flat. Mason's sec- 
ond series of charts and second music reader. Ten 
minutes daily. One half hour weekly by special 
music teacher. 

SECOND GRADE. 

Language. — Correct daily errors in common speech, 
review conj ugation of verbs ; analyze and parse easier 
simple, complex and compound sentences from read- 
ing lessons; learn the coarse print of text-book; read 
aloud in class the important notes and exceptions; 
read rules of syntax, and correct examples of false 
syntax. Compositions fortnightly upon same topics 
as hereinafter specified for the First Grade. 

Reading and Spelling. — Complete the Fifth Kead- 
er. Write paragraphs dictated from the Keader at 
least once a week. Spell, both orally and in writing, 
the most important words of every lesson, to culti- 
vate the habit of observing the orthography of words. 

Word Analysis — Prefixes, suttixes and roots of 
words, illustrated by analysis and synthesis of com- 
posite words and by formation of sentences includ- 
ing words previously analyzed. 

Geography . — Part second of text-book, Califor- 
nia and !N evada. Teach the most important fourth 
of the map questions. In Descriptive Geography 
memorize only important facts. 

History.— Discovurias, colonial settlements, and 
wars, and the Revolution— in U. S. History. Read 
and discuss the whole in class, but memorize only 
leading facts. 

Arithmetic. — Common and decimal fractions; com- 
pound numbers and reduction, omitting duodecimals 
and obsolete tables. Review work of preceding 
grades, especially attending to explanation of prin- 
ciples and analysis of operations, particularly in 
fractions. Carry mental arithmetic along with writ- 
ten, teaching the same topic in both kinds at the 
same time. 

Writing. — P. D. & S.'s National System, and other 
exercises as directed by the principal. 

X>7-atOTVifl'.— Architectural drawing, linear drawing, 
plans and perspective (for boys). For girls, linear 
perspective as applied to drawing from objects, chairs, 
tables, rooms and buildings; landscape and flowers 
in pencil or crayon. One lesson of one hour, weekly. 

Vocal Music. — Review of lessons and exercises in 
first part of " Song Echo," singly and in concert. 
Chromatic scales and intervals. Simple exercises in 
the usual keys, at sight. Songs for two voices, so- 
prano and alto. Mason's Third Series of Charts and 
Third Reader. Time, ten minutes daily. Lessons 
by the special music teacher, half an hour weekly. 

FIRST GRADE. 

Language. — General review of text-book in Gram- 
mar. Systematical parsing and analysis of sentences 
from the reading lesson. Weekly compositions; ab- 
stracts of reading lessons, turning poetry to prose; 
abstracts of lessons in geography and history; reports 
of oral lessons, letter writing, and miscellaneous sub- 
jects. 

Word ^/ja^j/sw.— Prefixes, suffixes, and root words, 
illustrated by analysis and synthesis of composite 
words, and formation of sentences including words 
thus previously studied. 

Reading. — Complete Fifth Reader; road aloud 
from history and geography. 

Spelling. — Oral and written spelling of more im- 
portant words from reading lessons and from the reg- 
ular lessons in any of the text-books. Oral reports 
of oral lessons given by principal. 

Geography. —I'lirt I of text-book in physical ge- 
ography; Pacific Coast. Read the whole; learn im- 
portant points as designated by teacher 

.ffisiorj/.— Complete text^book. Outline review of 
Second Grade work. Constitution of the United States 
read with conversational lessons. 
_ ArithTnetic— Interest, simple and compound; par- 
tial payments by U. S. rule; commission and broker- 
age; stocks; profit and loss; discount and banking; 
ratio and proportion; square root; mensuration and 
the metric system. Review with special attention to 
the discussion of principles and the analysis of oper- 



ations. Take mental arithmetic with written, teach- 
ing the same topic in both kinds at the same time. 

Writing.— P. D. & S.'s National System, exercises 
as directed by the principal. 

Drarving.— For boys, architectural drawing; lin- 
ear drawing, plans and elevations of buildings. One 
lesson of one hour weekly, under special teacher. 

Vocal Music. — Review lessons and exercises in 
first part of text-book— Song Echo; take chromatic 
scales and intervals; sing in concert and singly; sim- 
ple exorcises in the usual keys, at sight. Two-part 
songs, for soprano and alto. Mason's Third Series 
of Charts and Third Music Reader. Time, ten min- 
utes daily. Regular lesson by special teacher half an 
hour weekly. 

AVERAGE AGE AND TIME IN SCHOOL. 

The average age of pupils in the Grammar grades 
is fourteen years. Excluding recesses and intermis- 
sions, they are in the school room and regularly en- 
gaged in their duties less than twenty-four hours a 
week. Their regular school time is from nine a.m. 
to three p.m., that is, six hours. Of this time the 
morning recess occupies fifteen minutes, from half- 
past ten to quarter to eleven ; the noon intermission 
one hour, from twelve to one, and the afternoon re- 
cess fifteen minutes, from two to quarter past two. 
Thus, the two recesses and the intermission occupy 
one hour and a half of the six hours prescribed by 
the State Law, leaving but four hours and a half of 
actual school each day. The number of school days 
in each week is five. Four hours and a half each day 
for five days gives twenty-two hours and one half as 
the total time actually spent in the school room at 
school work in each week by the girls and boys of the 
Grammar grades, and the same, or very nearly the 
same, is also true of the High Schools, whose pupils 
have an average age of seventeen years. 

In view of these facts it is idle, and worse than 
idle, to charge the PublicSchools with breaking down 
the health of their pupils by over-confinement and 
over-work. There is hardly one girl in a thousand, 
or a boy in ten thousand, who could not, and who can- 
not, regularly enter upon and thoroughly complete 
the entire Primary, Grammar, High, and Normal 
School courses ot public instruction as at present ar- 
ranged and conducted in this city, not only with posi- 
tive safety, but with actual physical improvement 
during the whole period, were it not for other and 
wholly outside influences, which none more fully un- 
derstand and more deeply regret than faithful teach- 
ers themselves, but which, unfortunately, they cannot 
control except in a very indirect manner and to an ex- 
tremely limited degree. 

COMPARATIVE HEALTH OF BOYS AND GIRLS. 

The boy's health seldom or never fails. His spon- 
taneous activity and irrepressible playfulness uncon- 
sciously impel him to the very out door exercises 
which become his physical salvation. Until twelve 
or thirteen, that is, up to the time which usually finds 
her in the fourth or the third grade, the girl runs, 
hops, skips, jumps, climbs, and romps nearly as much 
as the boy, though in difi'erent ways, and until that 
time she is absolutely almost, and relatively quite, 
the equal of the boy in physical health, and she 
might remain so but for the slavery of fashion. About 
that time, however, the fond but foolish mamma, and 
the proud but prudish papa, in unconscious slavery 
to social folly, deliberately commence the gradual 
killing of their girls. Their days of youthful, health- 
ful freedom suddenly begin to depart. They must no 
longer run races, play tag, drive hoop, jump rope, 
toss balls, swing on gates, scale fences, and dim b trees, 
because all that makes them " too much like a boy." 
So there their ways divide and thence their equality 
ceases. The boy, hand in hand with vigorous, shout- 
ing, out-door exercise, tanned by the sunshine and 
browned by the breezes, sweeps forward from 
strength to strength and enters with bounding pulse 
and throbbing health upon the worthier achieve- 
ment of robust and stalwart young manhood and the 
glorious physical freedom of masculine independ- 
ence — 

"A heritage, it seems to me, 
Worth belug inale to hold in fee." 

But the poor girl may no longpr run at the top of 
her speed, shout at the top of her voice, or play with 
all her might, lest she become a romp, a hoyden, or 
a Tom-boy. She must walk softly and slowly, speak 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIKECTORY, 1874-6, H. G. Langley, Pub'r, S. P. Price $5. 



Ii. W. KENNEDY, General Insurance Agent, Tire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



46 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



faintly and demurely, and curl down in a close room 
two hours a day to hateful practice upon the inevita- 
ble piano, whether she shows the least taste or abili- 
ty for piano music or not. Subject a boy to restric- 
tions, confinements, deprivations, and compulsions 
equal or equivalent to those which fashion enforces 
upon the average girl, and he would presently become 
far less able to maintain his rights than she is at pres- 
ent to advocate her own. 

This topic demands a thousand times the space 
which any brief article in a volume of this kind can 
properly afford. Dr. Clarke and others have already 
began that discussion and agitation which usually 
precedes long-needed reforms. 

THE USUAL END OF PUBLIC INSTEUCTIOH. 

With this grade the Grammar School work ends. 
All pupils who honorably complete it receive an en- 
graved certificate of graduation, which entitles them 
to enter either High School at the beginning of the 
next school year. 

To most pupils the graduation from the Grammar 
School becomes at once the hight of their scholarly 
ambition and the end of their formal i'ublic School 
education. 

PERCENTAGE WHO COMPLETE THE COUESE. 

To such an extent is this true, that of all who enter 
the High Schools hardly one in seven graduates from 
them; white the Grammar Schools graduate about 
one of every hve whom they receive, and the Priiua- 
ry Schools one of every three. That is, out of every 
one hundred and five who enter the lowest Primary 
grade about thiity-five creditably complete the tour 
years of primary study and enter the Grammar 
School; ot these thirty-live who enter the Grammar 
School, about seven regularly complete its lour years 
of study and enter either High School, and of these 
seven who enter the High School one will regularly 
complete its course and honorably graduate from it. 
Thus the Public School Department carries com- 
pletely through and honorably graduates from its 
highest grade only one of every one hundred and 
five, or less than one per cent, of those whom it re- 
ceives into its lowest Primary grade eleven years 
before. 

CAUSES OF PREMATURE WITHDRAWAL. 

Several causes combine to account for this. Even 
those parents who have least of, and care least for, 
education, wish their children to read, write, speil| 
add, subtract, multiply, and divide. Hence, all 
parents, with very rare exceptions, desire their chil- 
dren to complete the Primary School course certain- 
ly, and usually the Grammar School course as well, 
if the increase oi family expenses and the consequent 
neces.^ity of multiplying even the smallest possible 
sources of family income enable them to spare them 
long enough. iSut even if its attainment were possi- 
ble, hardly one parent in twenty as highly appre- 
ciates, or as strongly desires for his child an equal 
knowledge of the studies commonly terming the 
greater part of High School instruction. 

A still more common cause oi the increased pro- 
portional withdrawal of pupils from the higher 
grades— a reason so powerful, in fact, as to become 
almost uncontrollable— is the increased pecuniary 
value of the service of the child with every year of 
successive growth. Hence, every teacher of ten 
years' experience in all grades ot Public Schools, 
can testily that the relative number of withdrawals 
Irom this cause alone, after making due allowance 
for the efiects of other natural and unavoidable 
causes, continually increases with each higher grade. 

RliMEDY SUGGESTED. 

A partial preventive, at least, of this premature 
withdra.val and consequent failure to obtain the full 
benoht of the entire Public School course, would bo 
the addition of one year to the time now spent in the 
Grammar School. Such an additional year laith- 
lully devoted to a thorough and nnal review ot the 
more important branches now imperiectly taught 
and still more imperiectly learned during the last 
three years ot the present Grammar School course, 
would make the scholars doubly sure ot what they 
now very seldom thoroughly acquire, and enable 
them to add some very desirable, practical, and prof- 
itable studios which-lack of time now compels them 
to lorego. and which they seldom have any subse- 
quent opportunity to pursue. 



To a thorough drill in branches as indispensable 
as Commercial Geography, Business Arithmetic, with 
Business Penmanship, developed by daily practice 
in writing Business i'orms and practicing Business 
Correspondence, and including, of course. Practical 
Bookkeeping, they might add a fair knowledge of 
Phonography and of such practically valuable nat- 
ural sciences as Elementary Astronomy, Natural 
Philosophy, Chemistry, Geology, Mineralogv, Zoolo- 
gy. Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene, and especial- 
ly ot Botany, which, as presented in such recent 
works as that truly scientific and admirably simple 
one of Miss Youmans, is almost an education in it- 
self. T'he study of nature, in any of its departments, 
IS far better fitted to quicken mental lite, develop 
mental growth, and discipline mental power than 
any other that can possibly be assigned to young 
minds. 

Among the more obvious and immediate advantages 
of this additional year in the Grammar School would 
be: 

1st. The High and Normal Schools could propor- 
tionally extend and improve their courses, and this, 
in turn, would give us tar better qualified teachers, 
ihe present system sends into both those schools 
pupils so young in years, immature in mind, defi- 
cient in mental acquisition, lacking in intellectual 
discipline, and wanting in scholarly culture, that the 
almost unanimous testimony of experienced teachers 
IS, that they are compelled to lose nearly or quite the 
whole of the first year in doing over again, or, oftener 
indeed, in doing for the first time that elementary, 
preparatory work which should have been thoroughly 
done before the pupil was permitted to approach 
either a Normal or a High School. 

Keceiving pupils thoroughly and uniformly well 
qualified those higher schools could enter at once 
upon their own legitimate work, accomplish it better 
in quality and more completely in degree, and send 
tqrth their graduates with far broader culture, better 
discipline, and higher honor, than is now possible. 

^d. Our Colleges, Universities, and Professional 
Schools would, in turn, receive even more benefits 
and be able, in still higher degree, to accomplish 
what they should and would, but cannot for lacli of 
previous culture in their precipitate pupils. 

ad. And, chiedy:— many pupils who cannot pos- 
sibly accomplish, or even attempt, a full three years' 
course, beyond, or in addition to, that of the Grammar 
School, could and would gladly remain for the single 
additional year could it be made to include, as sug- 
gested above, such practical and essential studios as 
the average pupil most needs in later life. 

RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OK THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

_ The Grammar School is indisputably and emphat- 
ically the peoples' college. Nearly ten times as 
many succesfully complete its course and honorably 
graduate from it as from the High School, and nearly 
twenty times as many go partially through, but are 
compelled to withdraw within a year or two of gradua- 
tion. Hence it long since became, and to-day re- 
mains, the true popular University, to a far greater 
degree than any other institution for free popular 
education. Consequently, the inclusiveness of its 
scope, the excellence of its methods, the economy of 
Its management, and the completeness of its success 
are matters often times as much interest to the pop- 
ular mind and heart. This is clearly shown by the 
tact that not one citizen in one hundred denies the 
necessity or objects to the general scope and manage- 
ment of the Grammar Schools, while nearly ninety 
in a hundred decidedly doubt the necessity and 
questions the methods of a High School whose chief 
result seems to be to turn out perhaps ten graduates 
a year that are fit for admission to the University, 
ani produces this meager result with the minimum 
of economy and the maximum of expense. It we take 
proper care of the Piimary and Grammar Schools, 
the High Schools, Colleges, and Universities will 
taiie care of themselves. Hence it is fully in order, at 
least once a year, for those immediately charged 
with the management of Grammar Schools, long ex- 
perienced in such management, minutely acquainted 
with every detail, thorougtily conversant with their 
results, tamiliar with their excellencies, well know- 
ing and even sutfering trom their UoDciencies, to do 
what they can toward calling public attention to 
these public matters and ask a proper considera- 
tion of them. This the present writer.has partially 



a-ABNSWOBTH & CLAKK. Fire Ins. Agts. 230 Cal. St.. represent $4,000,000 of Capital. 



C. p. VAir SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 



GENERAL EEVIEW. 



47 



attempted but very imperfectly performed. Indeed 
when one considers tiie general public apathy and 
remembers how little practical, personal, and in- 
telligent interest even parents themselves appear 
to cherish, either in the schools themselves, or in 
those men and women who devote their lives to 
them, and how frequently a suggestion or a crit- 
icism from some practical educator who does know, 
calls forth only the public censure or even the 
personal enmity of impractical Directors who do 
not know, it will plainly appear what it really is, 
almost always a thankless, and often a dangerous 
task, to oti'er hints, criticisms, and suggestions tend- 
ing only to the improvement of that most vital 
public interest, which in Fourth of July orations, at 
least, and in political platforms, if nowhere else, is 
universally conceded to be the foundation and the 
palladium of American liberty. 

CUTTING OFF EXTRA STUDIES. 

The discontinuance of regular daily instruction in 
French, Uorman, Vocal Music, Drawing, and Pho- 
nography, having taken place since January 1, lh74, 
more properly belongs to the school history of the 
current year than to that of 1873. which, alone, this 
article attempts to relate. As, however, it quickly 
became, and has since remained, a matter of un- 
usual public interest, it may be proper to state that, 
early in January of this year, the new Board of Ed- 
ucation, the lirst elected from the city at large, with- 
out the slightest previous official announcement, or 
even intimation of such intention, giving opportunity 
for discussion, calling for testimony from principals, 
and other educators as to how the matter was work- 
ing, or taking any adequate pains whatever to ascer- 
tain the public will, suddenly abolished instruction 
in French or German from nearly four hundred class- 
es, and summarily dismissed about hlty ladies and 
gentlemen previously employed as teachers of those 
languages. 

ABRUPT DISCONTINUANCE. 

Whatever may be the diversity of public opinion 
as to the general desirability, propriety, necessity, or 
legality oi teaching modern languages in the free Pub- 
lic Schools 01 an Jinglish-speaking country, to the dis- 
proportionate extent to which they had unquestion- 
ably come to be taught in those of this city, public 
opinion was almost unanimous in condemning the re- 
markable precipitation and absoluteness which char- 
acterised the unexpected act. it looked very much 
as if a controlling majority of the new Board, unduly 
exalted by now accession to unwonted power, and tem- 
porarily overcome by an intirmity which has beset 
and oi'erset other minds almost equally great, in pre- 
vious epochs of the summary and spasmodic legisla- 
tion of this new State, had quite forgotten that the 
people had chosen them as their servants and not as 
their masters; and that, belore decreeing so radical 
and sweeping a change it might have been wise, to 
say nothiijg ot the modesty and courtesy of the act, to 
take some measures for learning the will ot the peo- 
ple who had made them what they were and whose 
will they wore bound to ascertain and execute. Even 
if the public will, or the will of a considerable ma- 
jority of the school-patroniiing public, had chosen 
the partial discontinuance, or the total abolition of 
free public instruction in French and Uerman, it 
would have been better to announce such proposed 
discontinuance or abolition at least three months in 
advance. 

it may be, however, that the new Directors, in the 
first flu.~h 01 their fresh-blown wisdom, concluded 
that, like some surgical operations, the sharper, se- 
verer, and more quickly over, the amputation of the 
study of the modern languages could be made, the 
better would be the patients' chances of recovery 
from the sudden shock, it is but simple justice to 
state, however, that this most precipitate step ever 
taken by any iioard of Education in this city, and 
the one which immediately worked so many and se- 
vere hardships, did not pass without the very strong 
opposition ui a highly respectable minority mainly 
composed of the lormer and more experienced mem- 
bers, and so considerable in numbers that an addition 
of two would have made them the controlling major- 
ity. And, also, to add that present symptoms indi- 
cate not only that, if the vote were to be taken again, 
it would bo wholly reversed, but that the Board con- 
templates an early restoration of instruction in 



French and German, to at least four of the leading 
Grammar Schools of the city. 

VOCAL MUSIC, DRAWING, AND PHONOGRAPHY. 

The instruction in Vocal Music and Drawing, 
which had been so successfully given for several 
years by generally well-qualilied teachers, was also 
discontinued early in January of this year. 

Since the commencement of this article the Board 
has reelected the best of the available Special Teach- 
ers in those branches and proposes to reestablish 
their respective departments. A similar fact is also 
true of Phonography, and, partially so, of French 
and German, as was anticipated. 

SHOULD FOREIGN LANGUAGES BE TAUGHT IN FREE PUB- 
LIC SCHOOLS, AND, IF SO, WHAT ? 

Pertinent to this matter of the sudden general ex- 
clusion and subsequent partial restoration of instruc- 
tion in modern languages, and, more especially bear- 
ing upon the general question whether they should 
bo taught at all in ourfree Public Schools, and, if so, 
what foreign language should be lirst introduced and 
to what extent, the following are a lew among the 
many facts and arguments claiming a fair hearing, 
and worthy of due consideration. 

1st. Of the native-born German and French speak- 
ing families for any considerable time resident in 
this city, or in America, hardly one in twenty uses 
its own native speech at the table, or generally, about 
the home. 

2d. Of those same families hardly one member in a 
hundred intends any permanent return to, or final 
residence in, his native land. 

ad. The German and French merchants and busi- 
ness men, with their bookkeepers, salesmen, and 
clerks, almost universally speak English, and habitu- 
ally use it in nine tenths of their business trans- 
actions. 

■1th. English is fast becoming, if it has not already 
become, the almost universal language of commerce, 
in all the leading marts and ports ol South America, 
Africa, india, China, and Japan. 

5th. For English speaking youth generally to learn 
German and irench, is going backward, againut the 
current of commerce, immigration, and general pro- 
gress, while for French and German speaking youth 
to learn English, is rowing themselves forward into 
the full strength of its onward sweeping tide. 

THE MOST NECESSARY FOREIGN LANGUAGE. 

6th. If the Public Schools otthis city especially at- 
tempt to teach any foreign modern language, it 
should be, first of all, the Spanish, which, in our in- 
evitable and fast-increasing relations with Mexico 
and South America, their present pupils are likely 
to find of far more immediate service and permanent 
value. An additional argument lor this, is the fact 
that the youth of Spanish speaking countries have 
very few, if any, general facilities lor learning Eng- 
lish, compared with the similar lacilities now quite 
generally extended to the youth of Germany and 
i'rance. Hence, while the F'rench and German 
youth can and do come to us on the ground of owr 
own common speech, we must quality our youth to 
approach the Mexican, the South American, and the 
Spaniard, on the ground, or through the medium of 
his common speech, if we expect profitable and satis- 
factory business, social, or political intercourse. 

A complete colloquial mastery of F rench and Ger- 
man, if such could be imparted to every one of our 
Public School pupils to-day, would never prove of 
one tenth the social and business advantage to them 
which ivould accrue from a similar acquisition of the 
Spanish. And, still farther, the Spanish presents 
less difficulty and consequently can be much more 
thoroughly learned and far more servicably used, in 
decidedly less time, than either the i rench or the 
German. (Much as certain parties may sneer at the 
suggestion, and scofi'at the suggestor, it is, neverthe- 
less, true that within the next twenty years an ordi- 
nary colloquial knowledge of the Chinese language 
will prove of far greater practical value to its fortu- 
nate possessor than an equal knowledge of all three 
of the other foreign languages already named.) As 
previously intimated these are but a few of the facts 
bearing upon this question, and any one of them 
might be much more strongly put, and, much farther 
expanded, did ability and opportunity permit. They 
may serve, however, as a contribution to that public 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY circulates throughout the Pacific Coast. 



KENNEDY'S INSUBANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, represents $12,000,000.' 



48 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



discussion and consideration, which will end in less 
attention to the far-off and comparatively valueless 
languages of trans -continental and trans -oceanic 
countries, and increased provision for the study of the 
native speech of millions living upon the same con- 
tinent with ourselves, and with whom we, and espe- 
cially our youth, must inevitably come into constant- 
ly closer and rapidly increasing business, social and 
political relations. 

THE HIGH SCHOOLS. 

There are two— the Boys' and the Girls'. 

The iioys' High School is established to afford 
boys who have graduated from the Grammar 
Schools, or who have gained an equivalent education 
elsewhere, an opportunity for a more liberal educa- 
tion, and to tit those who desire it for entering the 
University of California. 

The Girls' High School furnishes those girls who 
have regularly graduated from the Grammar Schools, 
or have received an equivalent education elsewhere, 
such higher culture as may prepare them for admis- 
sion to the University of Ualifornia; and qualify those 
who desire it for the profession of teaching. 

The regular course in each school occupies three 
years. The iSormal course consists of an additional 
year after the girl has duly completed the regular 
High School course. 

it will be noticed that the boy who may wish to fit 
himself for the profession of teaching finds no pro- 
vision made for him by the public schools of the city. 

There is a strong and rapidly-growing conviction 
that the lligh Schools of this city, as at present con- 
ducted, are by far the most expensive, and much the 
least profitable, of all the departments of public in- 
struction. Comparing the annual number of gradu- 
ates with the annual cost of conducting the two 
schools, will presently disclose one reason of this con- 
viction, even if it does not demonstrate the full truth 
of this assertion. 

In the organization, support, management, and 
improvement of public instruction, as far as provid- 
ed for in the ordinary Jr'rimary and Grammar Schools 
of both city and country, the people, through their 
agents, and, generally, in the choice of their agents, 
have done nearly, if not quite, as well as could have 
been expected; but in the organization and conduct 
of the High Schools and the University, they have 
fallen, and appear content to remain, very far short, 
not of any tine, impracticable theories, but ot the 
actual performance which was, and is, really attain- 
able under the circumstances. 

in partial proof or illustration of this, consider the 
following facts in the management of the High School 
Hepartment of this city: 

1st. it maintains two separate schools, two district 
buildings, two well-salaried principals, two numer- 
ous sets of duplicate teachers, two sets of apparatus, 
and two libraries, where one comprehensive school, 
one commodious building, owe competent principal, 
one set of thoroughly qualitiod teachers, one set of 
apparatus, and one library, could do the proper work 
and serve the special use of a High School, not mere- 
ly as well, but very decidedly better. 

2d. it may not be generally known that, within 
two years, the management of both High Schools 
has returned to the old, obsolete, i'rimary I>istrict, 
country-school plan of requiring every teacher to 
instruct his or her own class in all, or very nearly 
all, the branches which they pursue, in practical 
common sense and daily etticiency this plan is fully 
equal to what would be the case in the U. S. Armory 
if each individual workman were required to make 
all the parts of each gun with which he had anything 
to do. Jiverybody knows that every teacher, liKe 
every mechanic, has some specialty; some one thing 
which he naturally does with greater ease, etiiciency, 
and success, and that the best management is that 
wtiich assigns to each teacher those branches in 
which he is specially accomplished, and therefore 
can teach with the greatest economy of his own 
power, and, what is of far greater consequence, with 
far greater protit to the class. This sound principle, 
almost everywhere practically recognized, has been 
disregarded and is still ignored in the High Schools 
of this city by educational otficials, who sometimes 
seem to act as if very few principles in the science and 
art of successful teaching had been thoroughly tested 
and almost unanimously settled by the most ad- 
vanced educators of the world years before any of 



them began their costly experiments in this com- 
munity. 

This is not a theoretical question to be argued; it 
is an actual fact to be proved by experience and tes- 
timony; and even this proof need be brought only to 
those who, by reason of the life-long pressure of 
other and very different interests, have been so com- 
pletely engrossed that they have never found or 
taken the time necessary to adequately understand 
and judge this most vital subject. 

One of the strangest intellectual or social facts of 
the day is, that, while in all other public interests, or 
even departments of private business, we readily 
concede the superiority of the expert, defer to his 
opinion, and decide by his testimony, in the matter 
of education every man feels himself competent to 
pronounce the most decided j udgments even upon 
the most complicated points; and a peculiarly unfor- 
tunate feature of the case is, that those most notori- 
ously destitute of both education and experience are 
the most aggravatingly positive and self-assertive in 
the announcement of their most ridiculous opinions, 
and the precipitate enforcement of their most dam- 
aging plans. 

Each successive set of new and inexperienced 
School Directors appears too prone to act as if its 
predecessors had known next to nothing; and its first 
duty, in its full flush of new-felt power and uncon- 
scious ignorance, was to upset something to begin 
with, as if to prove beyond question how much more 
it knew in a week than its dull predecessors had 
been able to find out in two years. If the results of 
such precipitate and self-conceited action had not, 
too often, been so injurious as well as costly, it 
would be almost laughable to notice how almost 
uniformly the average Director knows such an im- 
mense deal more about the efficient management 
of the almost endlessly multiplied details of a large 
school department, charged with the public in- 
struction of thirty thousand children, during his first 
month of office, than he ever does again. And it is 
almost as entertaining, and vastly more satisfactory, 
to observe how uniformly he gradually settles into 
the final conviction that those same predecessors did 
know a little something alter all, and that the pub- 
lic good does not absolutely require him to signalize 
the commencement of his official career by suddenly 
upsetting as much as possible of what they had 
done. 

What the common sense of the people demand of 
our High Schools is this: 

ist. i'heir union into one centrally-located, con- 
veniently planned, commodiously-constructed build- 
ing, amply yet economically furnished, and finished 
within and withe ut with such solidity, simplicity, 
and appropriateness that the very sight of it should 
be a daily lesson in the highest school of true archi- 
tecture. 

i?'or the site, take a block, or the center of some 
block, at the junction of Oak and Webster streets, or 
within half a dozen blocks of that locality, in which- 
ever direction the best adapted or obtainable site 
may be found. Take a lot, one hundred and fifty by 
two hundred and fifty feet, in the center oi such a 
block, and have four avenues of approach from the 
center of each side of the inclosing block. This 
would give the necessary freedom from the noise of 
adjacent streets, which is so great to any schools 
placed upon or very near any main thoroughfare 
daily traversed by loaded wagons, heavy drays, and 
rattling cars. In such a building, let the recitation 
rooms, library, reference room, philosophical, chem- 
ical, and .istronomical apparatus, and teachers' 
rooms occupy the central part, and devote each wing 
to the study rooms of each of the separate classes or 
divisions; each sex by itself, or both together, as the 
authorities may determine. 

2d. into such a building bring both the present 
High Schools, and over the one grand, central, union 
High School thus created, place one experienced, 
accomplished educator, full of energy, enthusiasm, 
and, above all, of that personal magnetism which 
always distinguishes the true teacher; reduce the 
present number of classes, and, consequently, of 
teachers, fully one third, retain the best of those now 
employed, or get better, and diminish the annual 
cost of the entire High School instruction of this city 
by at least twenty tfiousand dollars a year, besides 
having it done in a much more uniform, thorough, 
and scholarly manner. 



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QENERAL REVIEW. 



49 



GAINS. 
MOKE PRACTICAL SUPERINTENDENCY. 

During the year, the regular biennial election 
placed theSuperintendency again in the hands of one 
of the most experienced practical teachers upon the 
Coasi, who was still further qualified for the office by 
two previous terms in the same capacity. Superin- 
tendent Denman signalized his return to office by 
procuring the immediate and much-needed disci- 
pline of several careless teachers who decidedly 
needed official admonition. With the aid of his able 
Deputy, Prof. Leggett, ho has already initiated 
more minute, practical, and helpful supervision of 
the methods of instruction throughout the different 
grades. 

The present Board of Education, which came into 
office December 1, 1S78, is the first elected under the 
new law, which provides for the choice of School 
Directors from the city at large, instead of one from 
each ward, as had previously been the case. As an 
almost necessary consequence, the personal character 
and general ability of its members are generally con- 
sidered a decided gain upon those of previous years 
last past. Their principal deficiencies are those 
which time and experience alone can remove, as two 
or three of their more prominent official acts have 
already partially demonstrated. 

NEEDS. 

The most important needs of the School Depart- 
ment, as specified in our issue of last year, remain 
substantially unchanged. As an agitation of nearly 
ten years has resulted in securing the choice of Di- 
rectors from the city at large, it is to be hoped that 
in less than as many years longer, the public mind 
may be brought to perceive not only the permissibil- 
ity and the propriety, but the absolute necessity of 
making it illegal to place any but educated citizens 
in charge of public educational interests. 

I. — FREE BOOKS. 

Many claim that the Public School is not, and can 
not be, really and wholly a/ree school until the State 
provides free books as well as free teachers, houses, 
furniture, stationery, and necessary apparatus ; in 
fact, that the very phrase "necessary apparatus," 
must, first of all, include the requisite school books, 
as an indispensable part of the apparatus necessary 
to successful study and auxiliary to profitable teach- 
ing. Without attempting a decision or even a dis- 
cussion which vrould be wholly gratuitous in a coun- 
try where each man generally insists on his inalien- 
able right to bring in his own verdict whether he has 
heard the evidence or not, and zealously forms and 
forces his own opinion whether he understands the 
matter or not, or even venturing upon any discus- 
sion, it is certainly pertinent and should be profita- 
ble to inquire what advantages have followed the 
free-book system in those cities which, by actual ex- 
periment, have taken the question out of the domain 
of theory, assertion, and argument, into that of act- 
ual performance, proof, and demonstration. 

Among these advantages, are : 

1st. The immediate saving of from one quarter to 
one third of the original cost of all school books. As 
is well known, the ordinary bookseller, buying in 
comparatively limited quantities, receives a discount 
of from twenty-five to thirty-three and one third per 
cent. The city or the State, buying in immensely 
larger quantities, could obtain even greater dis- 
count. 

In San Francisco alone, with its present number of 
public school children, the saving from this single 
source would amount to nearly forty thousand dol- 
lars (SiU.OUjj a year, or quite enough to build two 
excellent school houses annually, amply accommo- 
dating from eight hundred to one thousand of those 
pupils now inconveniently quartered in rented rooms, 
if the'parents and taxpayers choose to continue pay- 
ing this, and an even greater sum annually to the 
retail booksellers instead of saving it toward the 
payment of their other taxes, it is, of course, their 
own affair. And it may appear, and will appear, in 
this paper, if time and space permit, that in spite of 
the immediate loss to the retail bookseller which, it 
might at first seem, would result from the adoption 
of this plan, its carrying out would involve results 
which might partially if not wholly compensate him. 



This, however, is a question of universal public good 
rather than of the gain or loss of any small clique of 
men doing business solely for their own pecuniary 
profit. 

2d. With the provisions hereafter noted, it would 
save fully one half the wear and tear and loss of 
books, and thereby cause them to last at least twice 
as long. This would be equivalent to an annual cash 
saving of fifty per cent. 

Our Pubnc Schools have an average membership, 
upon the lowest calculation, of twenty-four thousand. 
Fully one half of these, probably a larger part, go 
homo to lunch and return, thus passing over the 
distance between the home and the school four times 
a day. Assuming that the average distance between 
the school and the home is only one quarter of a 
mile — which is below the fact — ten thousand children 
traveling this distance twice a day, and another ten 
thousand going over it four times a day, give us a 
distance of fifteen thousand miles a day, seventy-five 
thousand miles a week, throe hundred thousand 
miles a month, and three million three hundred 
thousand miles a year, over vphich those twenty 
thousand school children carry, drag, swing, tote, 
or lug their frequently-falling packets and bundles 
of poorly- bound school books; battering them by 
frequent collision and dropping, straining and break- 
ing them by over-strapping, and often losing them 
altogether. 

As the plan of furnishing free books, at public ex- 
pense, generally includes the provision or require- 
ment that, as public property, the books must not 
be taken from the school room, an additional and 
even greater saving would result from thus cutting 
off the wear and tear of frequent and generally care- 
less street transportation. 

Should any ask when and where the pupils can 
learn their lessons if not allowed to carry the text- 
books home, the answer is the simple and obvious 
one, "i« school." This can be effected in two ways: 
By devoting less time to recitation and more to in- 
struction and study. Nearly twice as much time is 
now consumed in recitation as needs be or would be 
if teachers, generally, knew how to conduct recita- 
tions in a business-like way, and pupils were proper- 
ly instructed how to study, prepare lessons, and make 
recitations. Also, by adding one hour to the present 
school time, and devoting this hour wholly to instruc- 
tion and study. As shown elsewhere, even with the 
proposed addition of one hour, the actual time spent 
in school work in the school room, exclusive of inter- 
mission, recesses, opening and closing exercises, etc., 
would still be but a small fraction over five hours. 
And of this time never more than an hour and a half 
at one time are the pupils kept continuously in their 
rooms, even in the highest grades, while in the lower 
grades, and especially in the primary classes, more 
frequent recesses, or times of physical exercise, make 
the longest continuous confinement even shorter. 

If any ask what the teacher would be doing while 
the class is studying, the answer is: She should be 
correcting papers, assisting more backward pupils, or 
hearing one division of the class recite while the 
other studies. 

od. Itwould also save the expenses of sachels, bags, 
knapsacks, book- holders, and straps, which, includ- 
ing their unavoidable wear and tear and frequent 
loss, make quite a considerable item every year, 
especially in a family having three or four school- 
gOing members. 

4th. It would improve the figure and gait or car- 
riage of the children. 

Any one who has observed the shuffling, hampered, 
drooping, round-shouldered, swinging, or rolling gait 
of the average book-laden pupils needs no proof of 
this. An obvious cause, or a cause which becomes 
obvious by the merest statement, is this: The child 
carries, we will say, but two pounds' weight of books, 
suspended or slung in a bag, sachel, or strap, so as to 
hang or dangle from six inches to a foot and a half 
below the hand, and constantly swinging against or 
hindering the free motion of the lower leg, ancle, or 
loot, or even hitting and scraping the ground. To 
say nothing of the droop in the upper extremities, 
how is a child to walk freely and gracefully with 
such a constant impediment. Little wonder that our 
dancing and drill-masters complain of the extreme 
difficulty of teaching the average boy or girl an up- 
right, easy, and graceful gait. And less wonder that 
parents complain of the frequent loss of many books 



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i 4 



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50 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



and the falling to pieces of many more. A book miist 
bo exceedingly well bound, indeed, to withstand the 
straining and banging of frequent transportation at 
the hands of an ordinary juvenile of the present day. 
Those fond of statistics may add one more fact: 
allowing that the average weight of school books 
carried back and forth at least twice a day— is two 
pounds only, and hundreds carry from four to five 
pounds — and that the average distance of the pupil's 
home from his school is but a quarter of a mile — and 
hundreds live a mile or more away— and also allow 
them to attend school upon an average two hundred 
days a year — and hundreds attend the whole two 
hundred and twenty days of the entire school year— 
and it follows immediately that our twenty thousand 
school children lug through the streets twenty tons 
of school books ten thousand miles a day, or four 
thousand tons two million miles a year. And this 
calculation, in all its elements, weight of books, dis- 
tance traveled, number of days, and number of 
children, is within and below the truth in every 
particular. The argument needs no aid from exag- 
geration. 

THE PLAN NOT NEW. 

This proposed plan of free books is by no means 
new. Larger American cities than ours adopted it 
from fifteen to twenty years ago, and the present 
writer merely borrowed the idea from them when he 
suggested it here nearly ten years since. 

ADVANTAGES OP THE SYSTEM. 

Its adoption, or fair trial, would involve the fol- 
lowing points: 

1st. Ihe fcitate or the city should furnish all neces- 
sary school books and stationery free of direct cost 
to the individual pupil or his parent. 

2d. ihe pupil should never take the books from 
the school room. 

ad. The pupil or his parent should immediately 
pay for all loss of, or damage to, books, resulting 
from his own negligence or abuse. 

Certainly no one could reasonably object to the 
system on the ground of cost, as the parent would 

Eay in increased taxes the wholesale cost of the 
ooks, while he would save in private family ex- 
penses, their retail cost, thus making a net gain of 
the ditlerence, which is commonly one fourth of the 
retail price, and, under the system of very large 
wholesale purchases, would become even more. 

THE CASE OF THE CHILDLESS TAX PATER. 

Of course, the objector would instantly bring up the 
case of the childless property owner, or the wealthy 
citizen and heavy tax payer whose children do not 
attend the I'ublic Schools. To him we answer at 
once that the general intelligence of a community 
directly increases its desirability as a place of resi- 
dence, and correspondingly enhances its value as a 
place of investment, and that the three great public 
fountains of general intelligence and popular enlight- 
enment are the school, the church, and the press, and 
that the church gains few intelligent voluntary mem- 
bers, and the press finds very few readers and fewer 
subscribers in communities wherein the school is not 
doing or has not done its work. 

VVliat would lands and houses be worth in a city or 
a country without schools ".' And which costs more, 
to pay tor the single item of public schools or to pay 
the extra taxes necessary for the efficient mainten- 
ance of reform schools, county jails, State prisons, 
State sheriffalty, county constabulary, and city po- 
lice, to say nothing of the immense cost of courts, the 
salaries of judges, and the fees of the vast army of 
lawyers, all of which are greatly increased, if not 
principally supported or primarily caused by the ig- 
norance of clients, criminals, and convicts. The ar- 
gument might lose no strength by including also the 
vast annual cost of hospitals, infirmaries, asylums, 
and alms houses, most of whose inmates find their 
way thither through causes which efficient popular in- 
struction, made compulsory upon all, would have very 
largely diminished, if not wholly removed or prevent- 
ed. With the kindest of feeling towards both law- 
yers and doctors, the student of true political economy 
cannot help seeing that they mainly live upon the ig- 
norance and vice of their clients and patients, and that 
in proportion as the three great teachers of mankind, 
the editor, the preacher, and the teacher, do their 
work thoroughly and universally the service of the 



doctor and the lawyer, at least in their present 
spheres, must continually grow less and less. Wheth- 
er true or not, it has been often said and oftener 
thought, that one great reason why compulsory edu- 
cation, and other educational reforms, encounter so 
many rebuffs and progress so slowly, is the apa- 
thy, indifference, and sometimes positive opposition 
which they meet at the hands of the lawyer members 
of various State Legislatures and prospective ofBce- 
seekers, who manipulate ward meetings, district pri- 
maries, and county conventions, whose ignorant mem- 
bers habitually cheat themselves with the self-com- 
plimentary delusion that they are having their own 
way and voting as they please, when the truth is that 
a few selfish politicians, compacted into a little clique 
or ring, have completely captured them and are lead- 
ing them whithersoever they will. However loudly 
these office-seekers and ring-makers may clamor for 
free schools and shout for universal popular educa- 
tion, they are the very things which atheartthey es- 
pecially dread and detest. Between them there is 
and must be that natural enmity which begets and 
nourishes a continual conflict. As the masses rise 
the demagogues fall. And this is true, not only in 
matters educational and political, but even more so 
in moral and religious interests. One or the other 
must go to the wall, and the people, having made up 
their minds which it shall be, are beginning to prac- 
tically understand that the free Common School is 
the grand source of mental enlightenment and civil 
enfranchisement, and to firmly resolve that neither 
political tyrants nor religious despots shall take it 
from them. * 

II. — MORE HOURS OP SCHOOL EVERT DAT. 

Fully aware of the strong oppositon which the 
merest hint of such a suggestion will almost certainly 
call forth from the majority of teachers, his experi- 
ence of nearly twenty years has fully convinced the 
writer that an addition of at least one hour to the 
present number of school hours each day, with prop- 
er accompanying provisions and regulations, would 
very greatly improye the quality of the regular school 
work in all the grades, and, at the same time, rather 
improve than injure the health of the pupils. He 
thinks so for the following reasons : 

1st. The present total daily time now devoted to 
actual school work, in the school room and under 
school regulations, including study time, recitation 
time, and all forms of regular school work, even in 
the Grammar and High Schools, is but four and one 
half hours a day. And, if we exclude the time usu- 
ally occupied by calling the roll, receiving reports, 
etc., it is still less than this. In fact, in the highest 
classes, and under the stricbest teachers, the most 
faithful pupil devotes hardly four hours a day to any- 
thing like earnest, absorbing, or really hard study. 
And even this small amount is not continuous; twice 
a day it is broken by recesses of fifteen minutes each, 
while at noon a solid hour of rest and recreation 
separates the morning work from that of the after- 
noon. Besides this, in accordance with a well-known 
law of both physical and mental effort, the variety 
of the work becomes in itself often equivalent to a 
full rest. 

Kequiring one hour more of school each day, with 
the accompanying proviso that the pupil should not 
ordinarily study at home, would involve or secure 
the following advantages: 

1st. Instead of costing the pupil more time it 
would actually cost him less. Home-study is almost 
universally necessarily broken by unavoidable in- 
terruptions. Few families are so commodiously 
housed that every boy or girl can have his or her 
own private or quiet little study room. Studying in 
the midst of younger children, almost constantly in- 
terrupted by surrounding domestic noises, and by the 
rattling conversation of heedless callers, the average 
pupil, with mind comparatively undisciplined in self- 
control, can hardly accomplish as much in two hours 
as he easily accomplishes in a single hour in the 
school room, where all the surroundings, as far as 
practicable, are made to favor successful study. 

2d. It would enable the teacher to train the pupils 
in right methods of study. In the acquisition of 
knowledge, the hoiv is often fully as important as the 
what. Many a pupil with brains enough in head, 
and time enough on hand, has failed simply through 
not knowing how to use both brain and time. Right 
methods of study enable even average pupils to ac- 



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GENERAL REVIEW. 



51 



complish amounts of real scholarly work previously 
thought well-nigh impossible. Teaching how to 
Study is, probably, the most neglected part of the 
teacher's work as at present conducted. 
_ 3d. It would tend to equalize the diverse condi- 
tions under which many pupils now study. Hun- 
dreds of boys and girls not only have no regular 
household helping to be done in and about the house, 
but they have parents who can, and often gladly do, 
help them in their lessons, not only by giving them 
quiet rooms for study, but by frequent personal aid 
in hard places. Other hundreds, of fully equal nat- 
ural ability, have hardly ten successive minutes of 
uninterrupted opportunity to study while out of the 
school. They must run upon dozens of errands and 
do scores of little household services, exacted by 
parents who cannot understand the conditions or 
requisites of an education which they never received. 
Every thoughtful teacher soon learns the vast differ- 
ence in real moral credit due to different pupils for a 
seemingly equal performance. One comes from a 
home full of helps ; the other from a home obstructed 
with nearly every conceivable hindi-ance. The most 
careful and conscientious marking cannot always 
justly discriminate between the good and ill-desert 
of pupils sitting side by side and making apparently 
equally good recitations. While no human power, at 
present, at least, can banish those great inequalities 
at home, it would seem an important and a fully 
practicable step toward justice for public authority 
to partially obviate them by providing increased 
time for study in school, where all can have an 
equally good chance to do equal work in equal time. 
This suggested extension of time is not intended to 
involve any increase either of the number of studies 
or of the time of recitation; simply to provide more 
time for study in school; that is, to come nearer to 
doing school work, in school time, on school prem- 
ises, in the midst of school influences and under uni- 
form school control, and thus send the scholar home 
free for home work in home time. If carried into 
execution, the total time spent in all recitations and 
studies each day would still be less than five hours, 
and this would be broken by an additional recess 
into such intervals that no pupil would ever be kept 
continuously in his seat a moment longer than at 
present. 

III.— SINGLE DESKS FOR ALL GRADES. 

Nearly all the Grammar grades have them already, 
but it seems not yet to be generally understood that 
the little ones of the Primary grades have even 
greater need of them. Almost the first necessity of 
such grades is that of frequent physical exercise, and 
the first necessity for free and profitable physical ex- 
ercise, after pure air and clear sunshine, at least, is 
convenient room. Double desks necessarily compel 
the occupants of two opposite seats to rise toward 
each other and to stand together in the same aisle. 
Such an arrangement crowds the pupils so that by no 
possibility, in any room of ordinary size, can more 
than half the pupils exercise freely at once. Single 
desks, having a separate aisle at the side of each 
row, give the occupant of each seat, his own exclu- 
sive space, in his own aisle, opposite his own desk 
and chair. 

2d. Single desks and chairs, by giving each pupil 
his own particular spot, and keeping him more near- 
ly in it, increases his distance from his neighbor's and 
thus diminish at once his opportunity and his conse- 
quent temptation to whisper or communicate in any 
other way. They thus become a material clause in 
the practical answer of the petition, " Lead us not 
into temptation," which some of the children, at 
least, are taught to offer, in the home, if not at 
school. 

3d. They tend to develop the ideas of exclusive 
proprietorship and consequent increased personal 
responsibility for cleanliness, neatness, etc., which 
every child feels for years before he understands the 
ponderous polysyllables which express them- Every 
experienced teacher knows that seating two pupils at 
the same desk divides the responsibility and dimin-, 
ishes the carefulness of each. If, as old " Agesilaus, 
King of Sparta," used to say, " children should be 
taught those things which they will practice when 
they come to be men and women," even the lowest 
Primary grade is not too early a time or place in 
which to oegin such teaching. 

Other matters would claim notice did time and 



space permit, but, aside from the needs specified last 
year, this of single desks and separate chairs is of 
such immediate and constant physical and mental 
importance, and involves so many direct conse- 
quences important to both pupils and teachers, that 
it can least afford to wait. 

CONCLUSION. 

The free Public School is the infallible pulse of 
true republican vitality. It is the unerring register 
of the past, the certain index of the present, and the 
sure prophecy of the future. Its relations to the na- 
tional life are closer, deeper, more infinite, and more 
vital than those of any or all other public inter- 
ests. It is the fountain of civil life, the source of po- 
litical health, the preserver of social stability, the 
precursor of broader civil liberty, and the harbinger 
of true religious freedom. 

" What think you of the Public School?" is the 
simple challenge by which freedom's watchful sen- 
tinels may most readily and certainly distinguish be- 
tween the friends and the foes of popular enlighten- 
ment, personal independence, and national freedom. 

More clearly than any other human utterance the 
Public School repeats the primal fiat of recorded time 
when the Divine command "Let light be," fii-st broke 
the long and lifeless reign of" chaos and old night." 
Social chaos and mental night hear the word and fly 
before it. 

Its foe is the friend of political slavery and the 
ally of religious despotism. No matter under what 
specious guise he may strive to cloak his deadly hos- 
tility, he is the nation's most dangerous foe. 

More important than railways, mere necessary 
than steamships, more essential than telegraphs, 
more vital, in short, than all forms of material pros- 
perity or shapes of physical progress, are the early 
organization, the careful and constant fostering, the 
liberal endowment, and the continual elevation of the 
Public School. It is, in fact, the mother and the 
nurse of all these. Greater than the printing press, 
the steam-engine, and the electric telegraphs were 
the minds which originated them and have brought 
them thus far toward perfection. And far greater 
than any score of even the greatest minds is that 
wide-spreading and all permeating popular educa- 
tion of which these minds were but unusual out- 
growths and culminations. The average hight of a 
continent depends not as much upon the loftiness of 
a few scattered dominating peaks rising here and 
there far above the surrounding country, but, rather, 
upon the general elevation of the broad central 
plateaus above which these great landmarks tower, 
and which support and sustain them. So with the 
average mental elevation of a nation; wo ti'uly 
measure it, not by the hights of intellectual culture 
reached by its few rare and almost solitary minds, 
but rather by the hight of knowledge to which 
sound education, underlying the whole social fabric, 
universally diffused and everywhere operative, has 
gradually uplifted the whole mass of the common 
people. 

General Statistics, June 30, 1873. 

Number of children under fifteen years of age 

(increase for the year,''- 2,149} 54,469 

Number of children between five and fifteen 

years of age (increase for the year) 2,740... 34,676 

Number of pupils enrolled in the Public 

Schools 24,154 

Average number belonging to the Public 

Schools 19,720 

Average daily attendance of pupils 18,530 

Number of School Houses: High, 2; Gram- 
mar, 12 ; Primary, 34. Total, 48 ; of 
which several are rented, at an annual 
expense of. $12,000 

Number of Teachers, 506 ; Classes, 412. 

Expenditures — 

Salaries of Teachers, 8446,587. 

Annual cost per pupil, not including 

building fund, $30.82, 
Annual cost for tuition, exclusively, 
S2.3.12. 

Total expenses of the Department, for the 

year ending June 30, 1873. $607,889 



=■•• The School Census for 1873 shows a gain of four per 
cent, for the year. For 1872 nearly twelve per cent. 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIKECTOKT contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



KENNEDY'S INSTJRaNCE AQENC-T. Fire. Marine, and Life. 411 California St. 



52 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



The following is a comparative statement of the I Bush Street Cosmopolitan Primary School (Lo« 
daily attendance at all the public schools from 1852 cation,southeastcorner of Bush and Stockton streets), 
to 1873, being a period of twenty-one years: 1852, 445; —Pupils registered, 84«; average attendance. 544 
1853, 703; 1>554, 1,011; 1855,1,484; l&5ii, 2,510; 1&57, 
2,15.5; 1858,2,521; 1*59,2,829; 1890,2,837; 18t)l, 3,377 
1802,3,794; 1863,4,389; 1804,5,470; 1805,6,718; 1800, 
8,131; 1807, 10,177; 1808, 11,871; 1809, 13,113; 1870, 
15,394; 1871 10,382; 1872, 17,588; 1873 18,530. 

Subjoined is a statement of the yearly expendi- 
tures of the department since 1852 to the present 
time; 1852, $23,125; 18.53, S35,040; 18.54, Sl.59,249; 1855, 
S130,.580 ; 1850, $125,004 ; 18-57, S92,9J55 ; 18.38, $104,808 ; 
18.59, $134,731; 1800, $1.50,407; 1801, $1.58,855; 1802, 
$l.S4,-507; 1803, $178,929 ; 1804, $228,411 ; 1805, $346,802 ; 
1800, $361,608 ; 1807, $507,822 ; 1808, $410,0.54 ; 1809, 
$397,842 ; 1870, $520,625 ; 1871, $705,116 ; 1872, $608,262 ; 
1873, $611,818. Total, twenty-two years, $6,211,.390. 



LOCATION OF SCHOOLS. 

Number of Pupils Enrolled and the Average At- 
tendance of School Month ending May 31, 1873. 
BoTS' High School (Location, east side of Powell 
Street, near Clay). — Pupils registered, 131 ; average 
attendance, 90. 

GiRLSi^HiGH School (Location, north side of Bush 
Street, between Hyde and Larkin). — Pupils regis- 
tered, 309 ; average attendance, 243. 

Lincoln Grammar School (Location, east side of 
Fifth Street, near Market). — Pupils registered, 1,113; 
average attendance, 818. 

Denman Grammar School (Location, northwest cor- 
ner of Bush and Taylor streets).— Pupils registered, 
941; average attendance, 696. 

RiNCON Grammar School (Location, Vassar Place, 
leading from Harrison Street, between Second and 
Thirdj.— Pupils registered, 579; av'ge attendance,411. 
Broadwat Grammar School (Location, north side 
of Broadway, between Powell and Mason streets).— 
Pupils registered, 554; average attendance, 35.5. 

South Cosmopolitan Grammar School (Location, 
north side of Post Street, between Dupont and Stock- 
ton).— Pupils registered, .568; average attendance, 400. 
Union Grammar School (Location, north side of 
Union Street, between Montgomery and Kearny).— 
Pupils registered, 523; average attendance, 400. 

Washington Grammar School (Location, south- 
west corner of Mason and Washington streets).- 
Pupils registered, .547; average attendance, 379. 

Spring Valley Grammar School (Location, south 
side of Broadway, between Larkin and Polk streets). 
— Pupils registered, 7.52; average attendance, 404. 

North Cosmopolitan Grammar School (Location, 
north" side of Filbert Street, between Jones and Tay- 
lor).— Pupils registered, 010; average attendance, 479. 
Hayes Valley Grammar School (Location, north 
side of McAllister Street, between Franklin and 
Gough). — Pupils registered, 1,044 ; average attend- 
ance, 781. 

Valencia Street Grammar School (Location, oast 
side of Valencia Street, between Twenty-second and 
Twenty-third).— Pupils registered, 901; average at- 
tendance, 008. 

Eighth Street Grammar School (Location, east 
side of Eighth Street, between Harrison and Bryant). 
— Pupils registered, 9.52; average attendance, 4.52. 

South San Francisco School (Location, South San 
Francisco, near Railroad Avenue). — Pupils register- 
ed, 408; average attendance, 202. 

Tehama Primary School (Location, south side of 
TehamaStreet, near First). —Pupils registered, 1,034; 
average attendance, 647. 

Mission Primary School (Location, west side of 
Mission Street, between Fifteenth and Sixteenth). — 
Pupils registered, 727; average attendance, 484. 

Lincoln Primary School (Location, southeast cor- 
ner of Market and Fifth streets).— Pupils registered, 
900; average attendance, 655. 

Fourth Street Primary School (Location, north- 
west corner of Fourth and Clara streets).— Pupils 
registered, 826; average attendance, 600. 

South Cosmopolitan Primary School (Location, 
north side of Post Street, between Bupont and Stock- 
ton).— Pupils registered, 1,060 ; average attendance. 
702. 



Taylor Street Cosmopolitan Primary School 
(Location, east side of Taylor Street, between Post 
and Geary).— Pupils registered, 587; average attend- 
ance, 39.5. 

Geary Street Primary School (Location, south 
side of Geary Street, between Stockton and Powell). — 
Pupils registered, 332; average attendance, 220. 

Greenwich Street Primary School (Location, 
south side of Greenwich Street, between Jones and 
Leavenworth.— Pupils registered, 8:38 ; average at- 
tendance, 512, 

Powell Street Primary School (Location, west 
side of Powell Street, between Jackson and VVashing- 
ton).— Pupils registered, 093; average attendance, 437. 

Union Primary School (Location, northwest cor- 
ner of Filbert and Kearny streets).— Pupils regis- 
tered, 030; average attendance, 888, 

Silver Street Primary School (Location, north 
side of Silver Street, between Second and Third). — 
Pupils registered, 1,022; average attendance, 618. 

Broadway Primary School (Location, north side 
of Broadway, between Montgomery and Sansom 
streets).— Pupils registered, 640; average attendance. 
389. 

Model School (Location, north side of Bush Street, 
between Hyde and Larkin). — Pupils registered, 374; 
average attendance, 279. 

Market Street Primary School (Location, south 
side of Market Street, between Fourth and Fifth).— 
Pupils registered, 1,084; average attendance, 036. 

Pine and Larkin Street Primary School (Loca- 
tion, southwest corner of Pine and Larkin streets).— 
Pupils registered, 730; average attendance, .502. 

Eighth Street Primary School (Location, east 
side of Eighth Street, between Harrison and Bryant). 
—Pupils registered, 1,222; average attendance, 085. 

Hayes Valley Primary School (Location, north 
side of Grove Street, between Franklin and Gough). 
— Pupils registered, 743; average attendancb, 407. 

Shotwell Street Primary School (Location, east 
side of Shotwell Street, betwe'en Twenty-second and 
Twenty-third).— Pupils registered, 913 ; average at- 
tendance, 570. 

Tyler and Jones Street Primary School (Loca- 
tion, north side of Tyler Street, near Jones). — Pupils 
registered, 435; average attendance, 324. 

Spring Valley Primary School (Location, south 
side Union Street, between Franklin and Gough). — 
Pupils registered, 374; average attendance, 109. 

Pine Street Primary School (Location, north side 
of Pine Street, between (Scott and i>evisadero). — 
Pupils registered, 142; average attendance, 91. 

Tyler Streei Primary School (Location, north 
side of Tyler Street, between Scott and Pierce). — 
Pupils registered, .^23; average attendance, 191. 

West End School (Location, near Six-mile House). 
— Pupils registered, 78; average attendance, 53. 

PoTRERo School (Location, southwest corner of 
Kentucky and Napa streetsj. — Pupils registered, 227; 
average attendance, 138. 

San Bruno School (Location, San Bruno Road, 
near Toll-gate).— Pupils registered, 221; average at- 
tendance, 116. 

Ocean House School (Location, near Ocean House). 
—Pupils registered, 39; average attendance, 22. 

Point Lobos School (Location, Point Lobos Road, 
near the Turf Housej. — Pupils registered, 55; average 
attendance, 31. 

Laguna lloNDA School.— Pupils registered, 79; av- 
erage attendance, 53. 

Fairmount School (Location, Fairmount Tract).— 
Pupils registered, 198; average attendance, 91. 

Evening Schools.— Pupils registered, 1,139; aver- 
age attendance, 630. 

Colored (School (Location, northwest corner of 
Taylor and Vallejo streets;.— Pupils registered, 87; 
average attendance, 41. 

Colored School (Location, Fifth Street, near Har- 
rison). — Pupils registered, 16; average attendance, 9. 



PARNSWOBTH & CLARK furnish Safe and Beliable Insurance against Fire. 



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GENERAL REVIEW, 



63 



Private Educational Institations. 

The total niimber of colleges and private schools in 
this city is nearly one hundred, of which twonty-one 
are under the control of the Catholic denomination. 
Many of these institutions are in a very flourishing 
condition, and the private schools will compare fav- 
orably with the public schools for thoroughness of 
instruction and excellence of discipline. 

From the report of the school census for 1873, it 
will be seen that the number of children between six 
and fifteen years of ago that have attended private 
schools for the year ending June 30, 1S7;^, was five 
thousand two hundred and eighty-five. The number 
attending public schools for the same period, twenty- 
four thousand one hundred and fifty-four. 

In addition to the attendance of the private schools, 
there are about thirteen hundred children under sis 
years of age at the different infant schools and benev- 
olent institutions, and about twelve hundred attend- 
ing the higher private schools and colleges. 

ST. IGNATItJS' COLLEGE. 

This well-known literary institution, located on 
Market Street, between Fourth and Fifth, which is 
conducted by the Fathers of the Society of Jesus, 
was first opened for the reception of students on the 
fifteenth day of October, 1855, and was incorporated 
under the law of the State on the thirtieth of April, 
185(1, and empowered to confer the usual degrees 
and academical honors. Since its commencement, 
this institution has been attended with the highest 
degree of prosperity and success. The course of 
instruction pursued is thorough, and comprises a 
complete classical, mathematical, and philosophical 
course of training, calculated to prepare the pupil 
for entering upon the study of any of the professions, 
or commencine any business vocation. The college 
is provided with an extensive laboratory, compris- 
ing all the necessary appliances for the assaying of 
metals and making chemical analysis, which is an 
important feature not generally found in institutions 
of this character. There is a telegraphic room, with 
an instrument in operation, where the business of 
operating is taught. The " Ignatian Literary So- 
ciety," for exercise in debate: the " Philhistorian 
Debating Society," to promote the knowledge of his- 
tory: the " Loyola Scientific Academy," for the cul- 
tivation and promotion of the study of natural sci- 
ences: a College Band and singing classes, are estab- 
lished in the college for the improvemoct of thepupils. 

The founders of this institution, foreseeing the 
rapid progress of the Queen City of the Pacific, pur- 
chased some years since ihe property upon which the 
magnificent college edifice has since been erected. 
This lot has a frontage of two hundred and seventy- 
five feet on Market, and the same on .Jessie Street, 
with a depth of three hundred and fifty feet. The 
present building — the cost of which, independent of 
the lot, was ?1H0,000— although one of the finest 
architectural ornaments of the city, is only a part 
of the extent contemplated. When the extensive 
additions are made, the entire structure will rival 
anything of the kind to be found in our portion of 
the country. The present building is admirably 
adapted to the purposes for which it was designed, 
being abundantly lighted and well ventilated in 
every portion ; the ceilings are lofty, and spacious 
halls run through the building. A large play 
ground is attached, with a commodious shelter from 
the rain, affording ample means for the physical 
exercise of the pupils. In fact, nothing has been 
neglected which is at all conducive to mental and 
physical training. The number of students in the 
college at present is over five hundred, under a staff 
of twenty-two professors and teachers. [See Adver- 
tisement, page xxxix.] 

SANTA CLARA COLLEGE, SANTA CLARA. 

This establishment is under the superintendence 
of the Fathers of the Society of Jesus, and is open to 
all who choose to avail themselves of its advantages. 
It is situated in the beautiful Valley of Santa Clara, 
80 celebrated for the mildness and salubrity of its cli- 
mate, and is about three miles distant from San Jos6 
and quite close to the Southern Pacific Railroad. 

The college was founded in 18.51. On the 2Sth of 
April, 1855, it was incorporated and empowered to 
confer degrees and academical honors, and to exer- 
cise all the rights and privileges common to any other 



literary institution in the United States. It has a 
full staff of professors, and presents advantages for 
the mental, physical, and moral training of the stu- 
dents unsurpassed in California. It possesses a com- 
plete philosophical apparatus, purposely made in 
Paris for Santa Clara College, and furnished with all 
necessary instruments for experiments in mechanics, 
hydraulics, pneumatics, caloric, electricity, magnet- 
ism, optics, acoustics, and surveying. New and im- 
portant additions are being made every year to keep 
pace with the progress of science. 

The chemical laboratory is provided with a full as- 
sortment of chemicals, a very good set of furnaces, 
and all that is necessary for the different kinds of 
chemical analysis. The museum of natural history 
comprises a valuable collection of mineralogy and 
geology; also three thousand specimens of shells and 
other natural curiosities. As an accessory to the sci- 
entific department, there is a photographic gallery, 
where the students who wish may learn photography 
in all its different branches. Practical lessons are 
given also on the electric telegraph. The college li- 
brary numbers about twelve thousand volumes. 
[See Advertisement, page xli.] 

HEALD'S BUSDJESS COLLEGE. 

The object of this school, as its name implies, is to 
educate for business. It is the leading commercial 
school of the Pacific Coast, and one of th-e largest, 
most complete, and most thorough institutions of the 
kind in the United States. During thejiast year, it 
has had in attendance over six hundred students, 
which is a considerable increase over preceding years. 
Among its pupils are the sons of many of our most 
prominent business men. The plan of operation 
adopted by this school is quite novel and interesting. 
Instead of a dry and tedious study of mere text books, 
acUcal practice in business aflfairs is so united to the 
theoretical study of accounts, penmanship, arithme- 
tic, etc., that the progress of the student becomes 
easy and rapid. The information thus acquired is also 
of the most practical nature, and ready for immediate 
use. In order to carry out the system of business 
training, the school room has been fitted up to repre- 
sent a miniature business world. There are in act- 
ive operation banks, jobbing, and iuiporting houses, 
insurance and real estate offices, commission houses, 
express offices, wholesale and retail merchandising 
houses, etc., etc. In all of these establishments an 
actual business is carried on by the student, who acts 
in turn as clerk, salesman, bookkeeper, cashier, 
agent, merchant, broker, and banker. In these vari- 
ous capacities he makes out all varieties of business 
and legal papers, and writes up notes, drafts, bills, 
statements of accounts, orders, receipts, invoices, ac- 
count sales, certificates, bills of lading, contracts, 
deeds, leases, bills of sale, articles of copartnership, 
etc. As a merchant, he buys, sells, ships, consigns, 
orders, barters, insures, and keeps a complete and 
systematic record of his business transactions. As a 
banker, he receives and pays outdeposits, makes col- 
lections, loans, discounts, buys and sells, exchanges, 
issues certificates of deposit, keeps the corporation 
books, issues and transfers stock, and enters up the 
results of all these transactions in the proper books. 
In fact, so thorough and practical is this system of 
instruction that the graduates of this school are fitted 
to pass directly from the school room to the counting 
room. 

This school is one of the Bryant and Stratton Col- 
leges, so long and favorably known in the Eastern 
States. The schools now number thirty-six, of the 
leading business colleges in the country, and are asso- 
ciated under the title of the "International Business 
College Association." This association meets annual- 
ly fo'r the discussion and advancement of the cause of 
commercial education. The scholarships of this col- 
lege are good for tuition in all the schools of the 
association. 

There is also connected with the college a telegraph 
institute, where young men and ladies are fitted for 
telegraphic operators. This department has been 
fitted up at a great expense, and is one of the most 
complete of the kind in the country. The office is 
supplied with a great variety of telegraphic instru- 
ments and electrical apparatus. A line of wire has 
been extended around the city for the practice of the 
students, and there are at present over twenty offices 
on the line, thus affording pupils an opportunity of 
writing with experienced operators. 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTORY circulates throughout the Pacific Coast. 



KENNEDY'S INSUBANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, represents $12,000,000. 



54 



SAN FKAN CISCO DIRECTOEY. 



Until recently, ladies have not been received into 
the college for tuition, but they are now admitted 
into all the school departments, and already about 
twenty-five ladies are availing themselves of this op- 
portunity for obtaining a practical education and 
learning telegraphy. We are told by the teachers 
that their progress has been very satisfactory in 
every case, thus demonstrating the fact that women 
can readily learn business. 

This school is now permanently located in what is 
known as the College Building, at No. 24 Post Street, 
between Montgomery and Kearny streets. This 
building was constructed over three years ago, and 
these apartments specially arranged for the college. 
The rooms are very fine for this purpose, and, we are 
told, are in every respect equal to those of the best 
schools of like nature in our largest Eastern cities. 
A visit to them during school hours will always prove 
interesting as well as instructive. 

The faculty of the college comprises the following 
well-known teachers and officers: E. P. Heald, 
President; F. C. Woodbury, Secretary; A. E. Castle 
and J. D. Elackman, Accounts and Penmanship; 
F. Seregni, Plain and Ornamental Writing; H. M. 
Stearns, Bookkeeping and English Studies; T. R. 
Southern, Mathematics and Penmanship; Miss C. 
Snell, Assistant Theoretical Department; 0. Brooks, 
Superintendent of the Telegraphic Department ; 
Mrs. A. M. Hatch, Phonography; W. P. Casey, Sur- 
veying and Navigation; A. P. DuBiof, Alexander El- 
gass, and C. ¥. Morel, Modern Languages ; and 
Lloyd Bald-win, Commercial Law. 

medical Colleges. 

There are two medical colleges in this city— the 
' Medical Department of the University of Cali- 
fornia," and the "Medical College of the Pacific." 
The latter was established in 1S58, and was, until 
1872, the "Medical Department of the University of 
the Pacific." It is now the " Medical Department 
of University College," and is situated on Stockton 
Street, near Geary. The former was established in 
18!i4 under a special charter, by Dr. H. H. Toland of 
this city, who has recently conveyed the entire prop- 
erty of the institution, including the college building, 
situated on the corner of Stockton and Francisco 
streets, to the University of California, under whose 
fostering care its operations will be hereafter con- 
ducted. Both have a very efficient corps of Profes- 
sors—the most eminent physicians in the State. The 
attendance upon these colleges is not large; yet from 
some cause, both are continued with good assurance 
of success. 

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY. 

Established by the druggists of San Francisco for 
the purpose of education in the branches pertaining 
to the practice of Pharmacy. Incorporated August 
V W.''^- . -Trustees: William T. Wenzell, President; 
J. Winchell Forbes, Secretary; J. G. Steele, Treas- 
urer; Jno. Calvert, Wm. Simpson, and W. E. May- 
hew, who are authorized to solicit subscriptions for 
the capital stock. 

The Faculty of the College will be composed of 
actual Pharmacists, and the practical as well as the 
theoretical portion of the science of Pharmacy will 
be thoroughly and experimentally demonstrated ; 
the overy-day counter manipulations sharing equal 
attention with the more abstruse details of the labo- 
ratory, as it is the aim of the management to qualify 
all who avail themselves of the advantages offered, 
to cope with any and every emergency that may 
arise in the transaction of the business of legiti- 
mate pharmaoy. The present course commenced on 
March 1, 1878, includes Materia Medica, Pharmacy, 
Chemistry, and Botany. 

BeneTOlent and Social Associations. 

San Francisco, as well as all California, can ever 
point with exultant satisfaction to the many well- 
endowed and well-organized asylums, orders, and 
associations for the refuge of the aged, infirm, and 
bL\lploss, and ibr the relief of want and suffering. 
Whatever the superficial observer may say, or the 
cynic write, of the heterogeneous, rough, and uncul- 
tivated adventurers, as they have called the pioneers 
of this coast, the institutions of benevolence, of learn- 
ing, and social order, are monuments of character 



tnat reply with undflSWetable Arguments to thought- 
less aspersions. Our people, seeking adventure and 
wealth, and a new field of enterprise, are still woTk- 
ers in every line that leads to the fulfillment of their 
hopes, and therefore may neglect the many elegant 
exhibitions of ostentatious wealth so attractive in 
older countries; but the innate nobility of character 
is more truly shown by the kindly care bestowed 
upon the unfortunate by Government and by indi- 
viduals ; to those in our midst, and to friends and 
fellow-countrymen of other lands. Here have gather- 
ed people of many different nations, each honorably 
emulating the other in the care for the sick and 
wounded and poor. To systematize and render most 
effective these objects, associations have been form- 
ed—some by the community in general, some by reli- 
gious sects; others by people of certain nationalities, 
by secret societies, trades, clubs, etc. ; those of gen- 
eral admittance being lilborally aided by appropria- 
tions from the State Treasury. 

To relieve suffering, assist the depressed, and bury 
the dead, have been the obiects of the benevolent 
societies formed. The good deeds accomplished anS 
the constant care and watchfulness exercised, have 
given to San Francisco a world-wide reputation, 
which IS richly deserved. Aside from the organized' 
societies, the popular benevolence is proven by the 
large sums often given for various objects at the call 
pt charity or sympathy. Millions of dollars bava 
beensent abroad when the good heart thought it was 
required to alleviate distress, either among our own 
people or those of foreign lands, and never is relief 
called in vain for any individual case of destitution 
found in our midst. Fortunately, cases of destitution 
arerare, and the provisions made by the law and by 
social organizations prevent any necessity for such 
distress as drives to importunate beggary. The 
liberality of Californians is proverbial; and when 
any great calamity befalls a distant people, the eyes 
of the world are at once turned toward San Fran- 
cisco— to the land of gold— for aid, and the countless 
thousands sent upon many different occasions are 
proof that they did not look in vain. 

This unequafed munificence of our citizens has 
been also manifested in their generous support of the 
many organizations for social and charitable purpo- 
ses. There are now one hundred such organizations 
in the city; and many of those are divided into lodges, 
groves, stamms, vereins, councils, posts, etc., making 
a total of two hundred and fifty, some having up- 
wards of a thousand members. These are of every 
class of reputable orders, and include those of every 
nationality that make up our population. From their 
number and strength, it would appear as though 
nearly all the people of San Francisco were members 
of one or other of these orders. Their wealth is 
shown in the possession of asylums, halls, hospitals, 
and schools, and the fine appearance members make 
on days of public celebration. 

As their name implies, the general object of the 
societies is benevolence, the assistance of unfortunate 
members, or their wives and children when in sick- 
ness, burying them when dead, or, if of foreign births 
aiding their return to their native land. But by no 
means do all limit their charities to their members. 
Several of these noble organizations are controlled 
by ladies whose care is for the orphan, the sick, and 
needy of all classes, and for the reclamation of the 
degraded of their own sex. Five asylums, generous 
homes for the tender orphans, are under their con- 
trol, and the excellent condition of the charge is 
evidence of the care bestowed. As early as 1851, the 
gentle bisters of Charity, as ever devoting their lives 
to the holy cause of doing good, founded the Roman 
Catholic Orphan Asylum on Market Street, and con- 
tinued it, with the addition of schools and further 
extensions, until 1873, when they removed to South 
San Francisco, whore they had erected a large and 
commodious edifice, suitable for the accommodation 
of eight hundred children. The Protestant Orphan 
Asylum was organized by prominent ladies of this 
city in 1851. In 1854, they erected a fine building of 
stone, to which additions have since been made, the 
whole at an expense of .fei),000, on the corner of La- 
guna and Haight streets. At this asylum are one 
hundred and sixty children, unfortunate in their 
orphanage, but most fortunate in having such a 
noble home and such parental care as the benevolent 
ladies have prepared for them. The Ladies' Protec- 
tion and Relief Society occupy an extensive and com- 



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GENERAL REVIEW. 



55 



modious teuUding, erected at an expense of S50,000, 
on the corner of Franklin and Post Streets, where 
they have over two hundred children under their 
care. A few years since, our Hebrew citizens organ- 
ized the Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum, and have 
adopted measures for the speedy erection of a build- 
ing that will meet the wants of that portion of our 
population. 

But the ladies' charity does not end here. The San 
Francisco Female Hospital; the Lying-in and Found- 
ling Asylum; the Magdalen Asylum; the St. Mary's 
Ladies' Society, and numerous others, attest tne 
scope of their ministering care. The kind attention 
and the liberal expenditure by the ladies of San 
Francisco, without distinction of nationality, race, 
or religion, are most honorable and praiseworthy, 
and every citizen of San Francisco is justly proud of 
their untiring exertions. . 

The broad field of labor of the San Francisco Be- 
nevolent Association has been well filled, the mem- 
bers exercising a generous guardianship over the 
(tistress and wants of the city. Neither membership 
in other societies, nor race or condition, forbid their 
action, but their compassion, like the cloak of char- 
ity, covers ail. Tbe "Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion occupies a noble position among the benevolent 
societies of San Francisco. Possessing a fine hall, 
with library, gymnasium, baths, etc, it is well 
enabled to extend the handof charity to all,_to guide 
the erring, and to give pleasure and instruction to its 
members and proteges. 

The Episcopal Church supports a great many 
charities, such as St. Luke's Hospital, on Bernal 
Heights, founded in 1872; the Church Union, founded 
in 1870; and the Church Home, also founded in 1870, 
all of which are liberally maintained, the receipts 
and expenditures amounting to several thousand 
dollars annually. 

The Ladies' Pastoral Aid Society is a recent or- 
ganization by the ladies of Trinity Church, having 
for its object the care and protection of the destitute 
and friendless within the bounds of Trinity Parish ; 
to find employment for those requiring it; to provide 
clothing and i^sistance for such as may bo in need ; 
to visit and comfort the sick ; to endeavor to bring 
to the church those who are neglectful of its services, 
particularly the poor and friendless classes; to gather 
children into the Sunday School, and to aid in pro- 
viding active and competent teachers ; to advance 
the interests of the Church of Christ, and to extend 
the privileges and blessings of the Gospel. 

The Union Missionary Society is organized for the 
purpose of visiting the sick and administering to the 
wants of the needy. They also propose to establish 
a sewing school for poor girls, and to extend such 
facilities as may be deemed advisable for their fu- 
ture well-being ; also a laundry, for the employment 
of women in need of work. 

Among other recent organizations are the Boys' 
and Girls' Aid Society, to better the condition and 
elevate the tastes of friendless and neglected boys ; 
the Little Sisters' Society, to take care of the young 
children of working women, thus allowing the moth- 
ers to perform a day's work: the Teachers' Mutual 
Aid Society; St. Patrick's Mutual Alliance of the 
U. S.; and the Netherlands Benevolent Society. 

The Little t-isters is a peculiar organization, aris- 
ing from the endeavor of a few children to hold a fair 
for the purpose of aiding a needy family; and finding 
their eifort a success, organized as a society to con- 
tinue the kind work. The society now has an Infant 
Shelter at 803 Bush Street, where, in pleasant and 
spacious rooms, they have fitted up an attractive 
nursery. ' 

The secret orders and societies are in great number 
and of high standing. The orders of Masons, Odd 
Fellows, Druids, Red Men, etc., are bodies of great 
wealth and usefulness, and fill an important place in 
the society of San Francisco. Several of these pos- 
sess stately edifices, have extensive libraries, main- 
tain banks, publish papers, and in various ways 
manifest their importance and perform their duties. 
Added to these are the Immigrant Aid Association, 
Prison Association, Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals, and numerous others, showing 
the broad field occupied. 

The benevolent societies, composed of people of 
foreign birth, for the object of aiding their fellow- 
countrymen, are numerous and etficient. The Eng- 
lish, Scotch, Welsh, and Irish have their organiza- 



tions, divided into several classes and divisions, all 
with a large number of members. The British Be- 
nevolent Society exercises a supervision over the 
wants of the subjects of that kingdom, relieving in 
the past year one thousand and nine persons, and 
expending $5,176. The Germans, French, Italians, 
Russians, Portuguese, Mexicans, Greeks, Scandina- 
vians, Sclavonians, Hebrews, and Chinesemaintain 
organizations for the same purpose, showing a be- 
nevolence of the highest character, and most wor- 
thily occupying their appropriate fields of usefulness. 
The German General Benevolent Society is a large 
and effective organization, having one thousand nine 
hundred and thirty-two members residing in the city 
and two hundred and fifty in the interior. This 
generous society maintains a hospital worthy of its 
high character, and which would be an honor to any 
city or state. 

The French Benevolent Society is an institution m 
keeping with the most noble of its class here, where 
the rank is of the highest grade. This society has 
one of the finest hospitals of the State. It is a spa- 
cious edifice of brick, with pleasant gardens and 
ornamented grounds surrounding it, making it a 
most desirable home to the invalid. Other national- 
ities maintain their hospitals and their homes, thus 
indicating the care taken of all and the unbounded 
benevolence of all classes and peoples who have 
made San Francisco their abiding place. 

It is difficult to form an estimate of the amount 
received as contributions and dues and expended by 
this vast array of benevolent associations. The Or- 
phan Asylums, the Odd Fellow, Masonic, Red Men, 
and Druid organizations, the tiorman, French, and 
Italian societies, etc., each disburse many thousands 
of dollars annually. But this is not all. Th« State 
generously steps in and lends a helping hand. The 
appropriations by the Legislature for benevolent pur- 
poses is about three quarters of a million dollars 
annually; chiefly, however, for the charities directly 
under State control, as the Insane Asylum, Deaf, 
Dumb, and Blind Asylum, and State Reformatory for 
Boys, and a large sum also goes to charitable institu- 
tions outside of this city. Among the appropriations 
of the last Legislature, are the following to the vari- 
ous Orphan Asylums of the State : San Francisco 
Protestant, $4,000 ; San Francisco Roman Catholic, 
$4,000; San Francisco Pacific Hebrew, P,000; Beys', 
San Rafael, $3,000; Protestant, Sacramento, 11.500; 
St. Joseph's, Sacramento, $1,500; Grass Valley (Cath- 
olic), $2,000; Pajaro (male), |1,500; Santa Barbara, 
$1,500; Sisters of Mercy, Los Angeles, $1,500; tTOod 
Templars, Vallejo, $1,000 ; St. Vincent, Petaluma, 
$1,000. To other societies as follows: San Francisco 
charities: Magdalen Asylum, $5,000; Female Hospi- 
tal, $ti,000; Ladies' Relief and Protection, $7,500 ; 
State Woman's Hospital, $4,000; Lying-in Hospital, 
$6,000; Protestant Episcopal Church Home, $1,000; 
Old Women's Home, Rincon Hill, and St. Luke's 
Society, $1,000; Howard Benevolent Society, Sacra- 
mento, $2,500, and $1,000 each to the Ladies' Benevo- 
lent societies in interior towns as follows: Stockton, 
Marysville, Napa, Placerville, Grass Valley, Val- 
lejo, Oakland, San Jose, Nevada City, and San 
Diego. 

To give a full account of all the associations for 
charitable and social objects would exceed the limits 
we could devote to the purpose, but would refer to 
the Appendix on pages ;t39-i;t5H inclusive, for a com- 
plete list of the diS'orent organizations, exhibiting in 
detail their operations during the past year and 
their present condition, to which attention is invited. 

AID UNION. 

This society was incorporated June 13, 1874, and 
has now one hundred and fifty-three members. The 
object of this society is to pay to its sick members 
$1.50 a day, and to the heirs of its members $500 for 
each membership a member holds. There are no 
assessments at the deaths of members, as the lives of 
the members are re-insured in the Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Company, the Union paying all pre- 
miums thereon, as long as they remain members. 
The benefit of this re-insurance is: 1. That only 
persons, who are at the application sound and healthy 
can join the Union and participate in the sick fund. 
2. That every member knows exactly how much he 
has to pay. ^ 3. That members do not lose their money 
if they eeas* to be members, as the policy of life in- 
surance will then become their property. 



PACIFIC- CO AST BUSINESS PIKECTOBY contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



Ii. W. KENIfEDY, General Insurance Agent, Fire, Marine, and Life. 411 California St. 



ta 



56 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Hospitals. 

The hospitals of San Francisco will compare favor- 
ably with those of other cities of its size and popula- 
tion. The public institutions are ample in accommo- 
dation and appointment, while those of private 
character are to be found in all parts of the city. 
The Germans and French have for years had fine 
hosjiital buildings, the one belongint' to the latter 
having recently received extensive additions. The 
Sisters of Mercy own a large structure on Rincon 
Hill, and the Italians have, within a few years, com- 
pleted a commodious building four miles from the 
business portion of the city. The special purpose of 
these hospitals is to provide for certain classes of our 
citizens, as the French, the German, the Italian, 
etc., but all who desire to avail themselves of their 
advantages are admitted upon payment of most rea- 
sonable fees. Besides the institutions enumerated 
above, there are several smaller ones which have 
been established through the munificence of our citi- 
zens, and whose names indicate their special uses. 
These are the State Woman's Hospital, the San 
Francisco Woman's Hospital, the Foundling Asylum 
and Lying-in Hospital, etc. 

For years the facilities offered by the city were en-^ 
tirely inadequate, and much feeling was from time to 
time occasioned in the efforts to obtain creditable 
hospital buildings for its poor. All such feeling has 
now disappeared in the satisfaction occasioned by 
the completion of a hospital, of which, at least, we 
have no cause to feel ashamed. Not only are the 
buildings and accommodations much more ample, 
but the location is far more suited to the purposes in 
view. The grounds are in the southern portion of 
the city, and comprise the two blocks bounded by 
Is evada. Sierra, and Nebraska streets and Potrero 
Avenue. They measure eight hundred and sixty-six 
feet by four hundred and eighty-one feet, or nearly 
ten acres. The location is somewhat elevated, at 
least sufficiently so to insure efficient drainage, and 
though not very accessible at present will, when the 
contemplated extension of the Sixth Street line out 
Potrero Avenue is completed, be but a short ride from 
Market Street, requiring no more time than was ne- 
cessary to reach the former hospital. The main build- 
ings face the west, the hospital entrance being on 
Potrero Avenue, which runs nearly north and south. 
An entirely different plan has been adopted to that 
usually in vogue. Several individual structures, 
most of them at considerable distance from each 
other, but connected by a long covered corridor, unite 
to form the hospital. With the exception of the 
kitchen and laundry, which are of brick, all of the 
buildings are of wood, with brick foundations. The 
individual structures are: The administrative and 
dinmg-hall buildings, each three stories high, situ- 
ated in the center of the block, opposite each other 
and on either side of the center of the covered corri- 
dor, which is five hundred and fifty-six feet long by 
eighteen feet wide, and runs lengthwise of the block; 
the kitchen and laundry, back of the dining rooms; 
the chapel, at the south end ofthe corridor; the gate 
house, stable, morgue, operating rooms, etc., scatter- 
ed about in various places, and lastly six long pavil- 
ions, each two stories high, and each designed to ac- 
conimodate sixty-four patients (with their nurses), 
thirty-two on a floor. It is designed eventually to 
have twelve pavilions, to be built in pairs, opposite 
each other, on either side of the long corridor and 
parallel to the main buildings; the first pairs, on 
either side, being a hundred feet from the main build- 
ings, the second pairs a hundred feet from the first, 
and the third a hundred feet from the second. Six 
pavilions are considered sufficient for present pur- 
poses. With the most generous allowance of space, 
they will contain three hundred and eightv-four pa- 
"ents. In an emergency at least a hundred more 
could be accommodated without serious overcrowd- 
JDg. Since moving into these new quarters in Sep. 
tember, 1872, the number of patients has largely in- 
creased, owing, partly, at least, to the greater com- 
lort attordod. The overage number of patients in 
the City and County Hospital for the year 1873, was 
throe hundred and fifty-seven, and during this period 
the total admissions numbered three thousand and 
seventy-four, and the deaths two hundred and fifty- 
eight. It may bo further mentioned that there are 
treated at the hospital from fifteen hundred to two 
thousand out-patients yearly. In 1873, nearly elev- 



en thousand prescriptions were put up for out-na- 

tients. 

The ofl5cers are : P.esident Physician, Dr. W, M. 
Lawlor ; Assistant Resident Physician, Dr. .J. W 
Keenoy- Visiting Surgeons, Drs. W. A. Douglass 
and H. H. loland ; Visiting Physicians, Drs. F. A. 
Holman and C. M. Bates. Besides these, the medi- 
cal staff IS composed of Dr. Martinaehe of the Uni- 
^^5!I.''-\?^,?'''K*'™'* ^^^ Drs, Gibbons and Barkan 
of the Medical College ofthe Pacific, whose services 
are rendered gratuitously. 

In 18^7, the Alms House, a large and substantial 
franje building, was constructed near Bake Honda, 
by the city. The need of such an establishment had 
become urgent, as the City and Countv Hospital was 
burdened with the permanently disabled and super- 
annuated, who had been accumulating for vears. 
Ihis building will accommodate five hundred per- 
sons, the average number present in 1873 being three 
hundred and twenty-four, and the total admissions 
for the year being three hundred and eighty-eight. 
In the hospital wards there is an average of seventy 
patients. Fifty deaths occurred in 1873. The ofiicera 
are a superintendent. Mr. M. J. Keating, and a resi- 
dent physician, Dr. S. R. Gerry. 

Besides the Hospital and Alms House, the city 
owns two frame buildings about half a mile from tho 
hospital, which were constructed at the time ofthe 
small-pox epidemic in 1868-9, and are capable of ac- 
commodating in the neighborhood of two hundred 
patients. One of the buildings is still reserved for 
small-pox cases, eighty-seven of which have been 
treated there during the year, with sixteen deaths: 
the other is used as a Chinese Hospital. In this last 
j were admitted thirty-four cases, mostly chronic, two 
I of them being cases of elephantiasis, or'leprosy. The 
patients were all under the professional care of Dr. 
L. P. Foster. 

In the fall of 1865 the San Francisco Health OflSce 
was established. Prior to this time no mortuary 
records had been preserved by the city. The creation 
ofthe office has resulted in unquestionable advantage 
leaving out of consideration the value of the statis- 
tics collected. A city Board of Health was created 
by the Legislature m 1870. It consists of the Mayor 
and four phvsicians, and has control over the Health 
Office and all the public charitable institutions of the 
city -and county. From a small beginning the Health 
Department has grown into a very important branch 
of the city government. It controls appointments 
involving an expense to the city of several thousand 
dollars a month, and has a general oversight of all 
sanitary affairs. 

. The German Hospital is built upon a lot fronting 
one hundred and thirty-seven and a half feet on 
Brannan Street (near Third Street) and extending 
back two hundred and seventy-five feet. The main 
building is of brick, three stories high, facing the 
northwest, and occupies all the frontage except 
what IS required for a wide carriage way. It was 
built in 18>3; a wing was added in ISriO, and a second 
wing in 18i59, so that the hospital can accommodate 
one hundred and thirty patients. The remaining 
portion of the grounds, equaling over ono half the 
area, is laid out with grass plats and walks, and 
planted with trees. There are but two wards in the 
hospital, each containing ton beds; the remaining 
rooms being designed for one or two patients only, 
ihe hospital is under the control of the German 
General Benevolent Society, which now numbers 
twenty-three hundred and forty members. The 
charges, which include medical attendance, are S2 
per day, with from -oOcts. to S1.50 extra for private 
rooms it they be desired. During the year 1873, the 
German Hospital received for treatment six hundred 
and fifty-two patients, the average number present 
being about sixty-five, There were sixtv-two deatha 
in the same period. The attending phvsicians are 
Brs. Loehr, Regensberger, Wilhelm, and Smith. 
Ihe resident physician is Dr. Carl W. Betzel. 

The French Hospital, or "Maison de Sante," is 
also under the charge of a society, the "J5ociet6 Fran- 
Oaise de Bienfajsaneo Mutuelle," organized in 1851, 
and now having a membership of three thousand 
two hundred. The building is a large two-story brick 
structure, occupying the center of a hundred-vara 
(two hundred and seventy-five by two hundred and 
seventy-five foot) lot on Bryant Street, between 
tifth and Sixth streets, the remaining grounds be- 
ing laid out in gardens and planted with trees. 



Pire Insurance at Tariff Rates; Losses promptly paid by FAJaNSWORTH & CLARK. 



I 



C. p. VAN SCSAACK & CO., 708, 71S, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



GENERAL REVIEW. 



57 



Orlginallv, the hospital completed in 1859 was but 
one story in hight. In 1889 a second Story was 
added, increasing the capacity to the accommodation 
of one hundred and seventy patients. In 1873, there 
were admitted to this hospital seven hundred and 
ninetv-three patients, the weekly average number 
present being sistv-four. During the year there 
were fiftv-two deaths. The charges are $2 per day 
for ward patients, S3 for those desiring private 
rooms. Drs. Pign6-Dupuytren and D'Oliveira are 
the visiting physicians, and Dr. E. Pruvost is the 
apothecary. , . , . ,, „, 

One of the finest of the private hospitals is the St. 
Mary's Hospital, under the care of the Sisters of 
Mercv. It was erected in 1861 on a hundrod-vara lot 
on the southwest corner of Bryant and First streets. 
The building is of brick, is four stories high, and 
measures seventy-five by one hundred and fifty feet 
on the ground. The design is, when occasion shall 
require, to add to it a wing, which will double its 
present capacity. No hospital in this city excels this 
in interior arrangement. The ceilings are high, the 
halls broad, the rooms capacious, the ventilation 
and general adaptability to the purposes intended 
excellent. There are but one or two large wards, 
the majority being intended to accommodate from 
six to twelve patients; besides these there are a 
number of private rooms. In the wards and rooms 
there are beds for one hundred and eight patients. 
During the year the wards are often full; the average 
number of patients for the year 1873 was about a 
hundred, and the total admission for the year num- 
bered eight hundred and forty - one. In the same 
period one hundred and seventeen deaths occurred. 
Patients in the general wards are charged SlO per 
week, those occupying private rooms S20. For sev- 
eral years Dr. L. C. Lane has been visiting surgeon. 
Dr. James Murphy is visiting physician. 

In 18(i8 the Italian Benevolent Society erected a 
hospital for the use of its members and others. Two 
blocks, bounded by Twenty-eighth, Twenty-ninth, 
Noe, and Castro streets— four miles from the City Hall 
—had been secured, and afford a most admirable site. 
The building faces the east. It is of brick, two stories 
in hight and contains beds for forty patients. A wing 
may be conveniently added should more room be 
required. During the first eleven months of 1872, 
there were admitted to this hospital two hundred 
and three patients, the average number present at 
any one time being over eighteen; and the number 
under treatment on the first of December, 1872, be- 
ing about ten. For various reasons, perhaps as 
much because of its great distance from the central 
portion of the city as from any other cause, this 
hospital was closed toward the latter part of 1873 ; 
when it will again be opened for patients is not 
known. 

In 1853 the Government caused to be erected at 
Rincon Point a very large four-story brick hospital, 
one of the finest buildings in the city at that time, 
and ever since, from its character and position, a 
prominent landmark. It was designed for eight hun- 
dred patients — sailors of the merchant and national 
marine — probably five times as many as were ever 
within its walls atone time. Until 1868 it continued to 
be used. In this year the severe earthquake further 
impaired a foundation already rendered insecure by 
extensive grading, which had left the hospital perch- 
ed upon a high embankment,, and it was vacated. 
Orders have been issued to dispose of the building 
for whatever its material may be worth, when it is 
expected another one will be erected in a different 
locality. After numerous removals and vicissitudes, 
the patients have at last secured a home in the build- 
ings formerly occupied as the asylum for the deaf, 
dumb, and blind, on the corner of Mission and Fif- 
teenth streets. The ground is ample, the buildings, 
two in number, and four stories high, of brick, and 
perhaps as suitable for a hospital as buildings con- 
verted to such purposes generally are. They are 
probably the best accommodations that could be se- 
cured without building, and are calculated to contain 
one hundred and twenty-five patients, though the 
average number in 1873 was but sixty-five. In this 
year there were admitted five hundred and thirty-five 
patients. During the same period eighteen deaths 
occurred. The hospital is under the professional 
charge of Dr. C. N. Ellinwood. It is altogether prob- 
able that within a short time suitable buildings will 
bo provided for this class of patients. Already a site 



has been selected in the neighborhood of Mountain 
Lake, in the Presidio Reservation, and plans have 
been drawn for appropriate buildings, including 
three pavilions, each one story in hight, to accom- 
modate thirty-two patients each. The structure is to 
be of wood. 

The writer of this article has visited all the hospi- 
tals above named, some of them frequently. Their 
internal arrangements are creditable to their au- 
thorities, convenient and comfortable to patients, 
and calculated to afford excellent facilities for the 
cure of disease. Nearly all, if not all, the establish- 
ments are provided with bathing apparatus, not only 
for common use, but for special application in treat- 
ment. Thus a patient may have warm, cold, show- 
er, steam, or medicated baths, at the option of his 
physician. The medical staff' of the different institu- 
tions is ample, and as will be seen, includes physi- 
cians of excellent standing in the profession. 

The larger hospitals have now been considered. 
There remain to be mentioned, a few smaller insti- 
tutions inaugurated for special objects. The build- 
ings which these occupy were not built for such 
purposes, but have all been converted from dwelling- 
houses. The State Woman's Hospital, corner of 
Twelfth and Howard streets, receives only those with 
diseases peculiar to women. All who are able are 
expected to pay ; but a limited number of those una- 
ble to do so, are received gratuitously. Eighteen 
patients can be accommodated, and in 1873 this num- 
ber was constantly on hand. There were admitted 
during the year ninety-three patients. In explana- 
tion of the small number admitted during the year, 
it may be mentioned that most of the cases require 
months, some as many as eight, of treatment, before 
a cure be effected. The hospital is under the charge 
of Dr. John Scott, assisted by Doctors Raymond and 
Chismore. 

On the corner of Clay Street and Prospect Place is 
the San Francisco Woman's Hospital, of which Dr. 
C. T. Deane is the physician. As the certificate of 
incorporation shows, this institution was established 
for the cure of sick females, and to provide them 
with a home, medical attendance, medicines, and 
proper care during such period of sickness. It is in 
fact a general hospital for females, who are received 
and treated gratuitouslj'. There were received here 
during the years 1872 and 1873 three hundred and 
seventj'-one patients. One hundred and sixty-four 
of these were admitted for various diseases. Two 
hundred and seven infants were born in the two 
years, a hundred and thirty-one of which were legit- 
imate. A little more than half of those admitted 
were non-residents. The Hospital, which contains 
thirty beds, had an average for the two years of from 
eighteen to twenty inmates. 

In 1868 the San Francisco Lying-in Hospital and 
Foundling Asylum was incorporated, for respectable 
married women or unprotected single women, and for 
the care and protection of such children as maj; be 
born in said hospital, and foundlings without distinc- 
tion of color. The special character of the institution 
will be seen at once ; it will be appreciated that it 
differs from all other charities, in receiving no cases 
of disease whatever. The hospital and asylum has 
been in successful operation for several years at 269 
Jessie Street, under the professional care of Dr. Ben- 
jamin F. Hardy. It provides a room for each preg- 
nant woman, of which it can accommodate twenty- 
one, besides providing room for the infants left in its 
charge. Arrangements are being perfected for ex- 
tensive additions, which will largely increase its use- 
fulness. In 1872 and 1873 a hundred and thirty-four 
women were admitted, who gave birth to a hundred 
and forty-one infants ; besides which ninety-four in- 
fants were deposited at the door, making two hun- 
dred and twenty-eight admissions. Sixty-one of the 
Infants were given away and adopted ; forty-seven 
were taken away by their mothers. 

A little more than two years ago the various Epis- 
copal churches, desiring to provide more fully for the 
sick and needy of their parishes, organized St. Luke's 
Hospital, and procured a building beyond the Mis- 
sion. Though designed for the poor of the Episcopal 
parishes, St. Luke's Hospital is not exclusive, but 
receives patients of all denominations, and is general 
in its character. It contains beds for twenty patients, 
fifteen of which are, on the average, occupied, and is 
visited professionally by Drs. W. A. Douglass and 
W. T. Bradbury. The managers are now raising 



PACITIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTORY, 1874-6. H. Q. Langley, Pub'r, S. F. Price $B. 



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BAN- FRANCISCO INSURANCE CO. (S'ire and Marine), offlce 411 CaUforntar 



58 



SAN FllANditSCO DIRECTORY. 



funds for the purchase of a lot upon which to erect a 
suitable building. 

.Ji 7i!'' a° ^^""^ ^^?^ exclusive of the Alms House 
and the Small-pps Hospital, the city, in its public 
and private chanties, offers accommodation for near- 
ly a thousand patients ; that during l,S78 nearly =ix 
thousand five hundred persons availed themselves of 
toeir advantages, of which over five hundred and 
litty died ; and that the average number of patients 
under treatment was over seven hundred. 



Cemeteries. 

There is, perhaps, no feature connected with a 
prominent city that occupies a greater degree of in- 
terest in the estimation of strangers and visitors 
than its cemeteries. One of the most attractive spots 
:2 *^he .■5'isitor to the great American Metropolis is 
the City of the Dead" at Greenwood. The peace- 
tul shades of Mount Auburn have a melancholy 
charm to those who make a pilgrimage to the great 
capital of the Bay State, and no one enters the City 
of Brotherly Love, without seeing the classic monu- 
ments tastefully laid out, beautifullv-adorned, and 
admirably-kept grounds at Laurel Hill. Other cities 
of lesser extent and fewer years exhibit equal taste 
and regard for the depositories of their dead. Spring 
•jro^e at Cincinnati, Mount Hope at Rochester, the 
Albany Cemetery, and numerous others, are exam- 
ples of taste in the selection of tho location and 
beauty of adorning and arrangement. In point of 
grandeur of locality, our own Laurel Hill and Cal- 
vary cemeteries, situated as they are in full view of 
that noblest of all monuments— the mighty ocean- 
are nowhere surpassed. There is a fitness and sub- 
hniity in their contiguity to the waves of the Pacific 
and the entrance to the Golden Gate, that never 
fails to impress every beholder. In the way of mon- 
uments erected to the memory of the departed by 
the hand of affection and regard, many may be found 
in the city cemeteries which are alike models of ar- 
tistic elegance and pure and refined taste. 
_ There are eight cemeteries in this city. The Mis- 
sion Burial Ground (no longer used as a place of in- 
terment), established in 1776; Laurel Hill (late Lone 
S^i'n"?,**,',"^ in 1854; Calvary in 1860; Masonic in 1864; 
Odd Fellows' in 1S65; Home of Peace in 1865; Sherrith 
Israel m 1865, and the City in 1873. The last is in- 
tended as a depository of the city's dead, and is 
situated at the termination of California Street. A 
new cemetary is proposed to be established in the 
vicinity of Lake Honda. A large plat of land has 
been set apart for the purpose, and the necessary 
improvements will be soon commenced to adapt it 
tor public use. 

Associations— Proteetlve, I.lterary, Etc. 

For a description of the different associations, the 
reader is referred to the Appendix, pages 956-965, in 
which will be found the oflicers and operations of 
each during the past year. The progress made by 
many of these associations reflects credit upon the 
members thereof, and is worthy of the liberality so 
generously extended in their support. 

IWannfaetiires. 

The annual review of the manufactures of San 
t rancisco shows a gradual advancement to the close 
observer; still the advancement is by no means such 
as the hopeful look for, nor such as the needs of the 
country demand, or in measure as the opportunity 
offers. A few years since, we noticed a forward 
movement along the whole line of local industries, 
giving promise to the hope that the consuming needs 
of the country would be supplied by the enterprise 
and labor, and to the profitof our own people. While 
success is believed to have followed nearly every 
branch of manufacture yet established in this city, 
and in many instances returning unexpected gains, 
the held is comparatively neglected for the more ex- 
citing adventure of mining speculation. This attract- 
ive held, made so by the great wealth acquired in 
the last few years by some of the principal minin" 
operators, has driven the capital of the country to 
that channel to the neglect of other enterprises. 

ihe enormous mineral and agricultural products 
of the country contributory to San Francisco, pour a 
constant stream of wealth into the city, now shown 
by the general prosperity and the rapid increase in 



building, and promising in tho future a revival of 
every industry. 

The abandance of the agricultural products de- 
mand all the tonfiag'e that can be induced to enter 
the port, thus inviting imports ftt exceedingly low 
rates which compete with and retard our local man* 
ufactares. This, too, aids the importer in his contest 
with the home producer— an opposition that has 
been fatal to many manufacturing enterprises, and 
one that requires constant exertion, unwavering en- 
ergy, and continued patience to overcome. Many 
articles of Eastern and Foreign manufacture have 
become favorites with consumers, and agencies of 
great profit to merchants have been established and 
these conditions are difficult to disturb. Thirty mil- 
lion dollars worth of raw material of California pro- 
duct IS exported annually, and forty million of 
treasure, which of course is returned "in imported 
g9ods. This immense commerce passes its profits to 
distant lands, giving to our own but a slight percent- 
age. It is evident that the field of manufacture is 
but partly occupied, and that the opportunity ig 
inviting. 

The pressing demands of the mining interest gave 
a stimulus to iron manufacture, and the many found- 
ries in the city, as well as throughout the country, 
are the consequences constituting a leading industry, 
borne of these are quite extensive establishments, 
and the work turned out will compare favorably 
with that of any country. The principal of these 
are, the Union, Miners' Fulton, Vulcan, ^tna, Pa- 
cific, Golden State, Phcenix, Pioneer, Portland, Cali- 
fornia, Eureka. Occidental, Colombia, Risdon Boiler 
Works, and the Pacific Rolling Mills. These are 
quite complete in all their appointments, and capa- 
ble of turning out from three to five million dollars' 
worth of work annually, employing about fifteen 
hundred men. Locomotives for several railroads 
have been made at the Union of fine finish and great 
power. The castings for the Stetefeldt Furnaces, 
are also produced here, as well as numerous other 
specialties. At the Golden State are made the cast- 
ings and iron work for quicksilver furnaces; and aa 
this branch of mining has recently been greatly ex- 
tended by new discoveries, the business of preparing 
furnaces promises to be large. At the Minors' a 
great deal of mining machinery is alwajs in course 
of construction, and the interesting experiments of 
naany inventors are often seen on trial. Specialties 
of manufacture and many new inventions are found 
at every establishment. 

The Pacific Saw Company rank amongst the iron 
workers, and constitute a very important and inter- 
esting portion. At this establishment on Fremont 
fetreet, are made the principal part of the saws used 
m the lumbering regions of the Pacific Coast. Hav- 
ing the Spaulding patent tooth, it maintains a mo- 
nopoly of circular saw manufacture and supplies a 
great and growing demand. But its operations are 
not confined to this class, as saws of every description 
are made from the tiny ivory cutter to' those of six 
or seven feet in diameter. Much of the machinery 
used is of the invention of Mr. N. W. Spaulding, and 
the style of manufacture in many respects is peculiar 
to this house. 

Of notable importance are the Selby Silver and 
Lead bmelting and Reduction Works, covering a vast 
expanse, and fitted with every appliance for conduct- 
ing these operations on a grand scale. They are the 
most extensive and complete in the Union, and are 
susceptible of being greatly enlarged. This estab- 
lishment IS most advantageously located at the very 
edge of deep water where the heaviest ships can load 
with facility and dispatch. The works are now capa- 
ble of consuming one thousand two hundred tons of 
lead and silver ore per month for refining, and one 
thousand tons per month for smelting and reduction. 
On several occasions, one thousand tons of pig lead 
per month have been landed in New York, and a 
regular monthly supply of from four hundred to five 
hundred tons is maintained for exportation to tho 
liast, besides the large quantities required for inte- 
rior and domestic consumption. The superiority of 
our lead is now universally admitted, while the qual- 
ity of the sheet lead, lead pipe, and shot turned out 
at the Shot lower— which is an auxiliary to the 
bmelting and Refining Works— is not equaled by the 
like fabrics of other places. Two sets of hands are 
employed, night and day, and number collectively 
overone hundred and thirty men, many of them hav- 



MEBIDEN FIRE INS. gO. OF CONN.; Assets over $300,000 ; FftrnswortH & Clark, Agts. 



f- C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712» 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Gooda. 



aENERAL REVIEW. 



59 



ing families which are comfortably and independent- 
ly Supported through the agency of this great indus- 
try. In addition to the lead obtained from the ores 
by these works, large quantities of gold and silver 
are also extracted. The chief goufce. of supply for 
these works, has been the ftrgentlfefoiis galena 
mines of Cerl'O (Jordo in Inyo County, whence has 
been derived during the past year some ton thousand 
tons of lead bullion. The silver-lead mines of Eure- 
ka, Battle Mountain, and other points in Nevada 
also send here a portion of their products. 

This, both in mining and reduction, is a rapidly 
growing interest, and as there is no limit to the sup- 
ply there is, practically, no limit to the market. In 
view of this, other works of a similar nature are pro- 
jected in various parts of the country, some Eastern 
cities making most strenuous exertions to secure a 
precedence of the business. In Alameda County 
are two load reduction works, whore it is contem- 
plated to so refine the metal as to fit it for the manu- 
facture of paint, of which many thousands of tons is 
used annually. Here again occurs one of the anoma- 
lies of our business, that while we produce everything 
that enters into the manufacture of white lead paint, 
we send it all to foreign countries whence we re-import 
it with the added costs of freight, manufacture, waste, 
interest, other profits, and customs duties. As this 
is so connected with mining, the prospect may not be 
obscured by the brilliancy of that interest, as in the 
case of other branches of industry. 

The Woolen Mills of San Francisco show a healthy 
condition, but not the progress it is generally thought 
the interest demands. The large profits in wool 
growing, and the many million pounds shipped East 
for sale, prove the adaptability of the country to its 
production, while the imports of woolen goods show 
the demand for fabrics of that material. Some of 
the products of our mills are of such a superior qual- 
ity as to be exported in large quantities, competing 
successfully with those of any country. The two 
mills, the Pioneer and the Mission and Pacific, show 
a slight advance over former years. The first, situ- 
ated at Black Point, is a factory of nineteen sets of 
carders, seven thousand eight hundred spindles, and 
sixty-seven broad looms. The building and machin- 
ery cost 1400,000, and the capital of the company is 
$450,000. Last year they used one million five hun- 
dred thousand poundsof wool, worth $300,000. They 
made five hundred thousand yards of cassimeres and 
two hundred and sixty thousand yards of blankets, 
etc. The total value of the manufacture was 1750,000. 
The amount spent in labor was 830,000, which gave 
employment to three hundred and fifty hands, in- 
cluding one hundred white men, twenty-five wo- 
men, twenty-five boys, and two hundred Chinese. 
The Mission and Pacific Mill takes first rank among 
the mills of the Pacific Coast; and proud of it as San 
Franciscans justly are, it appears insignificant when 
compared with some of the great mills of the Eastern 
States. The capacity of woolen mills is reckoned by 
numbers of sets of cards. The Mission and Pacific 
has twenty sets, and on the whole Pacific Coast are 
but eighty. In the State of Massachusetts are three 
thousand sets, a single mill at Lawrence having one 
hundred and twelve. Even the new State of Kansas 
exceeds California in its woolen manufactures, and 
little Rhode Island has one hundred mills and eight 
hundred sets of machinery. The Mission and Pacific, 
although having but twenty sets, claims a capacity 
of thirty-six sets, from the manner in which the mill 
is run. Added to these are seven thousand spindles 
and eightj'-seven broad looms. The value of goods 
manufactured in 1873 was $1,100,000 ; this year it will 
be 11,300,000, showing an advance of over eighteen 
per cent, in one j'ear. There was used altogether 
one million eifeht hundred thousand pounds of wool ; 
this year there will be used two million two hundred 
thousand pounds. Of the wool used last year, there 
were one million four hundred thousand pounds Cal- 
ifornian, three hundred thousand pounds Australian, 
and one hundred thousand pounds Oregon. Besides 
the wool there was also one hundred and fifty thou- 
sand pounds of cotton used, or about fifteen per cent, 
of the whole. The department for the manufacture 
of hosiery turns out about $200,000 worth a year, the 
rest of the manufacture being made up of cassimeres, 
tweeds, shawls, flannels, blankets, and every variety 
of woolen goods. Some of the goods appear to be 
equal in make and finish to anything imported or 
foreign, and many of the cassimeres and tweeds are 



of remarkable beauty. There are here constantly 
employed three hundred and eighty-seven white 
people and four hundred and fifty-six Chinese, Of 
the white people, eighty are men with families, 
eightyfire to one hundred boys, and the balance 
women and girls. The average pay-roll is from 
S18,000 to S21,000 per month. The white men employed 
earn, on an average, $2.50 per day ; the women from 
$30 to $40 per month, and the boys from S4 to $7 per 
week, averaging perhaps S5. The Chinese employed 
earn about $1 per day. The buildings of the factory 
on Fifteenth and Folsom streets, are seven hundred 
and ninety-three feet long by an average of fifty foet 
wide, and are two stories in hight. The hosiery 
department by itself is two hundred feet long, and 
two stories in hight. Besides these there are a dye- 
house and workshops and a large stone storehouse, 
one hundred and thirty feet long by fifty feet wide, 
two stories high, and capable of receiving two million 
pounds of wool. On arriving at the factory, the wool 
is first assorted and scoured. Then it is colored, 
picked, carded, spun, and afterward wove into cloth, 
blankets, etc. There are but two hundred and twenty 
thousand yards of cassimeres, tweeds, etc., made 
annually, which are worth from 95 cents to $1.00 per 
yard. Every week there is sent from this factory. 
East over the railroad, a car load of goods, worth 
from 125,000 to $30,000. They work largely for the 
Government. Their goods go everywhere over the 
coast, to Japan, China, and British Columbia. The 
capital of the company, which is a close corpora- 
tion, is $650,000. The mill occupies three blocks of 
land, which were bought at a nominal price, but 
which are now worth from $600,000 to $700,000. 
The buildings and machinery are worth, at least, 
$400,000. 

Our wooden fabrics are diversified and important, 
although for some of the materials employed we are 
dependent upon Eastern supplies. This is especially 
the ease in the manufacture of wagons, buggies, car- 
riages, and other articles requiring the use of hick- 
ory, white oak, and walnut. We are fairly furnished 
with saw-mills; sash, door, and blind factories; coop- 
erages; furniture manufacturers; billiard-table con- 
structors ; piano makers ; wooden ware and broom 
manufacturers; boat builders and other similar con- 
cerns, numbering one hundred and twenty-two, turn- 
ing out an aggregate annual value of millions of 
dollars of perfected articles. 

A. S. Hallidie is proprietor of the only wire and 
rope works on the coast. The establishment went 
into operation in 1857, and has met with a large 
measure of success, the demand being somewhat ur- 
gent and steady. This gentleman has recently in- 
vented a cheap and ready mode for the conveyance 
of ores to mill, by means of buckets or cars suspend- 
ed on wire ropes, which traverse mountainous ridges 
inaccessible to ordinary modes of transportation. 
The works are capable of supplying from twelve 
hundred to fourteen hundred tons of wire rope per 
annum, besides manufacturing largely in the way of 
screens, sieves, wire cloth, cables for suspension 
bridges, and other like articles. 

The San Francisco Cordage Factory was organized 
in 1856, and has now grown into large proportions. 
The rope-walk has an extreme length of one thousand 
eight hundred feet, and the spinning department 
occupies a building two hundred feet long by fifty 
feet in width. The products of the works exceed four 
million pounds of cordage annually. The success of 
this establishment has induced the erection of a sim- 
ilar one near Alameda, on a large scale, which is now 
in successful operation. 

Twelve tanneries supply the leather used in the 
city, with a considerable surplus for export. The 
products of leather constitute an encouraging feature 
in our manufactures. But a few years since, the 
boots, shoes, slippers, harness, saddles, etc., were 
almost entirely imported, the shoe and harness mak- 
ers exercising their trade mostly in repairing. Now 
these, in a great measure, are of home manufacture, 
and the wealth derived has so stimulated enterprise 
in that direction that we now rank shoemaking as 
one of the most prominent of our local industries. 
Devoted to this branch are several large establish- 
ments, employing from three hundred to six hun- 
dred persons in each, turning out from $3,000,000 to 
$4,000,000 worth of goods annually. In the large facto- 
ries, about half the employes are Chinese. These peo- 
ple quite monopolize the making of slippers, which 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY co»tai»9 Addresses of over 50,000 ISIercliaats. 



KENNEDY'S INBUKANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life. 411 California St. 



60 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Were formerly imported at considerable cost ; but the 
cheaper rates at which they are furnished have 
caused the iuiportation to cease. The success of the 
Chinese in this department has raised an envious 
cry of denunciation of cheap labor ; but as in this 
case they entered an unoccupied and neglected field, 
the act is more for congratulation than regret. 

Our harness makers now export their wares largely 
to the Eastern States, and orders are so extensive 
that it is impossible to meet the demand. This is 
not the rough and cheap work, but costly sots of from 
8300 to S500 a pair. By some it is averred that this 
would only be possible from the fact that harness 
and saddles are the work of State Prison convicts, 
and made at rates impossible to free labor. 

Great hopes have been entertained of the silk 
manufacture, but the progress is slow. At South San 
Francisco the California Silk Manufacturing Co. are 
operating successfully in the manufacture of sewing 
silk, twist, etc. This factory occupies a building of 
fifty feet front by one hundred and twenty-five in 
depth, and employs forty hands, chiefly women and 
young girls, who earn from ?3 to $15 per week. The 
Union Pacific Silk Manufacturing Co. organized 
about two years since, with a capital of SlOO.OOO, 
which has recently been increased to 1250,000. The 
works of this company are situated in Visitacion 
Valley, and are capable of turning out about Sti.OOO 
worth of goods weekly. The principal product has 
boon ribbons. 

The manufacture of cigars is rising to unusual im- 
portance. There are about one hundred and fifty 
establishments in this city, of which sixty-two are 
owned and superintended by Chinese, engaged in the 
business, employing about six thousand men and turn- 
ing out ten million cigars monthly, valued at from S30 
to S35 per thousand, or an annual product of about 
$4,000,000. The chief business is in the hands of 
American citizens, but the employes are almost ex- 
clusively Chinese, of whom many are young boys and 
girls. The work is usually done by the piece, the 
operators making from ^5 to 315 per week, working 
ten hours per diem. Without the Chinese there would 
be no available labor that would enable this branch of 
manufactures to attain the position it has. The to- 
bacco is principally Havana and Connecticut, and 
about two and a half million pounds are used annu- 
ally. The tobacco of California, cured by a new pro- 
cess, is said to be superior to all others, and the 
prospect bids fair for our supplying the world with 
the seductive weed. 

The Pacific Chemical Works, located at the corner 
of Mason and Francisco streets, are engaged chiefly 
in refining borax, but also manufacture nitrate of 
silver, spirits of niter, cyanide of potassium, absolute 
alcohol, mercurial ointments of all kinds, salts of 
zinc, salts of magnesia, and other chemical prepara- 
tions. Until recently the greater part of the borax 
used in this State, and nearly all used in the United 
States, was imported from foreign countries. For 
some years the products of Borax Lake, in Lake Co., 
furnished a partial supply, but that resource is now 
abandoned. East of the Sierra, in Esmeralda Co., 
Nevada, and in Inyo Co., California, are found vast 
deposits of borate of soda and borate of lime, from 
which the borax of commerce is extracted at the 
Pacific Chemical Works. The refining is by a pecu- 
liar process, kept secret by the company. From twen- 
ty to thirty men are employed. The manufacture of 
acids at the various chemical works is sufficient for 
the present demand. Few contemplate the value 
and importance of sulphuric acid, and how exten- 
sively it enters into various manufactures. It is used 
in making soda, soap, glass, paper, candles, refining 
naetals, preparing medicines, and in countless ways 
is valuable to mankind. In Europe some eight hun- 
dred thousand tons are made annually, chiefly of 
pyrites, for which six hundred and sixty thousand 
tons are required. As other manufactures are es- 
tablished this will advance, and fortunately the 
country will supply the material for any demand. 

browell's salamander chimney stacks. 
This important and valuable improvement for 
buildings, although but a short time before the pub- 
lie, has already received the hearty approval of a 
large number of architects and builders for durabili- 
ty and economy, and by insurance agents for absolute 
protection against fire. They are particularly well 
adapted for the ventilation and heating of churches. 



school houses, theaters, and all kinds of public or 
private buildings. So universal is their application, 
that they can be readily set on any fire place, or out- 
side of brick or frame buildings; in fact, they may be 
placed in any i)art of the house with perfect safety, 
without going to the foundation. They can also be ap- 
l)lied to cooking stoves, ranges, blast furnaces, pottery 
kilns, etc. The principal improvement in these stacks 
consists in constructing the chimney or stack of sec- 
tions of fire-claj', earthenware, cement, or artificial 
stone, and surrounding said chimney with a metallic 
tube larger than the chimney, in order to provide 
the necessary ventilation for keeping the inner pipe 
cool, and for furnishing warm air to the rooms of the 
house. _ It is claimed by the inventor, that these 
stacks insure a perfect draft, that they do not rust 
or wear out like iron or brick, and that they do 
not occupy one tenth the space required by the old 
style of chimneys. These advantages are entitled to 
the consideration of those interested in promoting 
any improvement that will add to the domestic com- 
fort of the people. 

Water Companies. 

SPRING VALLEY WATER WORKS. 

The original Spring Valley Water Company was 
incorporated in Juno, 1858, and in July, ISHl, the 
water from Islais Creek was introduced into the city 
by the company. 

The present organization is formed by a consolida- 
tion of the San Francisco City and Spring Valley 
Water Works companies. Date of incorporation, 
January, 18(35. 

The present works receive their supply from two 
sources — Lobos and Pillarcitos creeks. Lobos Creek 
is a stream of pure, fresh water, emptying into the 
bay near Point Lobos, which supplies two million 
five hundred thousand gallons daily. The distance 
of the stream from the Plaza is three and one half 
miles, in a direct line. The water is elevated by four 
double-acting pumps, with a capacity of four million 
of gallons, daily, propelled by two steam engines of 
two hundred and fifty horse-power each, to the dis- 
tributing reservoirs on the adjacent hills, the high- 
est being three hundred and eight feet above the city 
base, located at the corner of Hyde and Greenwich 
streets ; the second, which is situated immediately 
below, at the intersection of Hyde and Francisco 
streets, is one hundred and fifty feet above the city 
base. The capacity of the first is four million of gal- 
lons, and that of the lower, seven million. 

Pillarcitos Creek is situated east of the coast range 
of mountains, distant from San Francisco about fif- 
teen miles, in a southerly direction, and seven hun- 
dred feet above the level of the sea. 

A large dam has been constructed in the Pillarcitos 
Valley, which is ninety-two feet in hight and six 
hundred feet long, containing one thousand million 
of gallons, and is drawn from as required in the reser- 
voirs. From the east end of Tunnel No. l,the water 
is conducted by a flume five by two feet, into a filter 
and sand-box, in its passage through which it ii 
cleansed from vegetable matter and sediment ; it 
then enters Tunnel No. 2, where the water undergoes 
another purification, and after passing thrpugh thir- 
teen miles of thirty-inch wrought-iron pipe, and one 
mile of forty-inch flume, enters Tunnel No. 3, from 
whence Lake Honda and the city distributing reser- 
voirs are supplied. 

Lake Honda has a capacity of thirty-five million 
of gallons, and supplies the city by means of three 
miles of cast-iron mains to the reservoir on the cor- 
ner of Buchanan and Market streets, which contains 
two million of gallons, and is the main distributing 
reservoir, supplying two fifths of the cfty. 

The company has constructed a new reservoir, of 
fourteen million of gallons capacity, near Holly Park, 
called College Hill Reservoir, which is the main dis- 
tributing reservoir for the lower part of the city. 
There is also a large reservoir in San Andreas Val- 
ley, thirteen miles south of the city, containing four 
thousand six hundred and fifty million of gallons. 
The water level is four hundred and thirty feet above 
the city base, from which the city will have a never- 
failing supply of the pure element. 

The present amount of pipe laid down in the city 
proper is one hundred and forty miles. Capital 
stock of the company, §8,000,000, in eighty thousand 
shares of SlOO each. 



PABNSWOKTH & CLABK, Gen'l Fire and Marine Insurance Agency; office 230 Cal. St. 



O p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobber* 



ADDITIONAL ISSUES, CHANGES, REMOVALS, ETC., 

RECEIVED TOO LATE FOE. REGULAR INSERTION. 



Adams George W., clerk with C. L. Dingley, dwl 

Adams House 
ADAM.S, SPUIXGER & CO. ^A. M. Adams and A. 

C. Springer J , brass founders, lock manufactur- 
ers, and machinists, 2ij Fremont 
Agard George E., salesman with M. Rosenshine & 

Bro., dwl Wadsworth House 
Aitkin Eggert Mrs., clairvoyant, -313 O'Farrell 
Alden Fruit Preserving Co., office 402 Montgomery 

room 5 
ALEXANDER D. & CO., manufacturers cigars and 

importers tobacco, -120 Battery 
Altschul Charles M. (AlUchul, Simon & Co.), dwl 

oiy Eddy 
Alvarado J. C, attorney at law, office .330 Pine room 

•57, res Oakland 
Amerman Isaac A., clerk U. S. Assistant Treasurer, 

res Alameda Co. 
AJIO.S & DAVI.S fjohn T. Amos and M. S. Davis J , 

millwrights and draftsmen, 112 Beale 
Amy G. L., salesman with Hoffman & Co., dwl 708 

Leavenworth 
Anderfuren Charles, patternmaker with J. M. Stock- 
man, dwl 7.>i Mission 
Anderfuren William J., patternmaker with J. M. 

Stockman, dwl 7>5 Mission 
ANDERSON & RANDOLPH r James Anderson and 

William C. RandolphJ , watches, jewelry, dia- 
monds, etc., 101 Montgomery 
ANGEL MYRON, advertising agent and newspaper 

correspondent, office 411>^ California room 15, dwl 

1118 Howard 
ANGELL JAMES M., contractor and builder, dwl 

fili Mission 
Anthony Edward T. (McArthur, A. & Co.), dwl 124 

Oak 
An tiseir Thomas M. (Thomas M. Antisell d; Co.), res 

Oakland 
ANTLSELL THOMAS M. & CO., pianofortes and 

organs, till Washington 
Antisell \\ illiam C, clerk with Thomas M. Ajitisell 

& Co., res Oakland 
Atkinson Nathan, real estate, office -507 ilontgomery, 

dwl ~<i'-)}/2 Mission 
Aronson Siegismund, salesman with Shirek & Co., 

dwl li32 Broadway 
Armager Charles W'., policeman City Hall, dwl Ports- 
mouth House 
Arnold Otto, messenger London and San Francisco 

Bank, dwl *)y Powell 
Ash Robert, attorney at law and solicitor patents, 

office o>r2 Montgomery, room 13, dwl 114 Minna 
A=her A. B., policeman City Hall, dwl ti'J3 Bush 
Ashton Charles fBeveridge <t A.J, dwl 9 Hubbard 
Aulbach Adam, compositor, dwl Wi Post 
AUSTIN B. C, tin can and box manufacturer, 520 

Washington, res Oakland 
■ ansini Antonio, vegetable dealer, dwl 1816 Powell 

ers D. M. 'Ayers & Keith/ , dwl 208 Kearny 
-.vers Henry (VarnpbeU & A.j,^vi\ American Ex- 
change 
Ayers & Keith fD. M. Ayers and W. H. Keith) , 

clothiers, 303 Kearny 
AZPIROZ MANUEL LICENCIADO, consul for 

Mexico, office 100 California, dwl 23 South Park 

Babcock Annie Mrs., furnished rooms, 417 Kearny 
BACUN & CO. 'Jacob Bacon and .Tames E. Ager), 
book and jobprinters, NW cor Clay and Sansom 
Badenna Alexander, saloonkeeper, dwl 207 Post 
Bailey Samuel, clerk Evening Post, dwl Coso House 
Baker George F., attorney at law, office tiOo Mont- 
gomery rooms 3 and 4, dwl 574 Folsom 



Baker Samuel, bookkeeper with Stevens, Baker & 

Co. fand Nickerson <& Co.), dwl Tubbs' Hotel, 

East Oakland 
BALCH S. M. ii CO., wholesale provisions and dairy 

produce, 3<J7 Clay 
Balch Stephen M. rS. M. Balch & Co.), dwl 1-512 

Post 
Baldwin Albert S., physician and surgeon, office 218 

Stockton 
Baldwin Oliver T., clerk Forwarding Department 

Wells, Fargo k Co., dwl 1411 Pacific 
Ball Charles E., mining, dwl 110 Sutter 
Ballinger Frank J., reporter S. F. Chronicle, dwl 17 

(Gilbert 
Bamber John, with Horace Meader, 517 Davis, dwl 

1012 Montgomery 
Bandwin 0., waiter American Exchange 
Banks \Villiam, dwl 1421 Washington 
Banner Peter ^Banner Brothers) , dwl .30 Kearny 
Barclay Roderick, blacksmith and machinist with F. 

A. Huntington, dwl 73 Natoma 
Barkan Adolph, oculist and aurist, office and dwl .305 

Kearny 
Barman Jonas S., custom house inspector, dwl 410 

Sixth 
Barnes Charles, journalist, dwl 1206 Market 
BARNES W. H. L., attorney at law, office 426 Cali- 
fornia, dwl SW cor McAllister and Fillmore 
Barnum E. K., assistant light-housekeeper South 

Farallones 
Barrows Lottie Miss, teacher Vallejo St. Primary 

School, dwl -508 Ellis 
Barry James M., teamster, dwl Wadsworth House 
Bartlett William S., noteteller National Gold Bank 

and Trust Co., res Oakland 
Barton Robert, broker, dwl 1116 Bush 
Bass Thomas J. (T. J. Bass <& Co./ , dwl Fifteenth bet 

Market and Noe 
Batchelder T., captain brig Orient, office with A. 

M. Simpson k Bro., 44 Market 
BAVARIA BREWERY Frauenholz A Davison pro- 
prietors, 62iJ and 022 Vallejo 
Bay District Fair Grounds, bet First and Fifth avs, 

and Fulton and Point Lobos Road 
Bazan Ferdinand, physician and surgeon, office and 

dwl cor Twenty-first and Howard 
Beaver Nathan, bookkeeper with C. Klopstock & 

Co., dwl 714 Hayes 
Becker Kaspar, tannery, E 8 San Bruno Road nr 

Twenty-eighth 
Bee Joseph, policeman City Hall, dwl 8-35 Clay 
Beham James G., compositor Alta California, dwl 11 

Geary 
Behlow Charles J. (H. Liehes & Co.), dwl 4<j Twelfth 
Bell William A., solicitor Evening Post, dwl 15 Sut- 
ter 
Bellevue Mining Co. (Placer Co., Cal.), D. F. Verde- 

nal secretary, office VH California 
Bennett Charles D. (Nevuman & Bennett) , dwl i2H 

Powell 
Bennett George W. ( McArthur, Anthony <Sc Co.), 

dwl 526 Jessie 
Berberich August, butter, cheese, and eggs, 86 Cali- 
fornia Market, dwl Bootz Hotel 
Berry George W., teamster with Jason Springer, dwl 

22 Eleventh 
Berry John, hostler with John Wilson, dwl SW cor 

Mission and New Montgomery 
Beveridge Arthur B. (Beveridge & Ashton), dwl 728 

Bush 
BE^'EKIDGE & ASHTON (Arthur B. Beveridge 

and Charles Ashton) , eorsim\.ii\on agents cattle, 

and ranch property, SW cor Sansom and Jack 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTOBY, 1874-6, H. Q. Langley, Pub'r, S. P. Price $5. 



Ii. W. KENNEDY, General Insurance Agent, Eire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



62 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Bidlack B. A. nV. IT. Sparks <& Co.), dwl 12 Clem 
BiGELOW J. E., surveyor with Farnsworth & Clark, 

firo insurance agents, 2:W Cal, dwl 152 Perry 
EIGNE VINCENT, saloon, San Jos6 Depot, cor 

Market and Valencia 
Bingham Henry (Loivry, Menzies & Bingham) , dwl 

1SU8 Dupont 
Black Mary Mrs., furnished rooms, 15 Sutter 
Blackwell Enoch, trimmer with Charles Molter, dwl 

"J283^ Harrison 
Blackwell E. S., dwl 923>^ Harrison 
Blair David B. (Hart, B. & Co.), res Oakland 
BLAKE HENKY C, notary public and commission- 
er deeds, o^j Montgomery, dwl 987 Howard 
Blake \Villiam, stock broker, WS Saciamento (and 

W. & S. Blake), Avi\.'l-l'6i!onTth. \ 
Blakeley Charles, circus performer with John Wil- 
son, dwl Niagara House 
Blakeslee Charles A., policeman City Hall, dwl 37 

Second 
BLANKMAN HENRY G., real estate, office 215 San- 

som room 2, dwl Grand Hotel 
Blethen John H., chief wharfinger Board State Har- 
bor Commissioners, office Pacific St. Wharf, dwl 

1201) Market 
Blethen William, clerk, dwl 1206 Market 
BLUXUME it CO. (Isaac Bluxome) , coal, iron, and 

metals, 319 California 
Blynn Uyrns A., policeman City Hall, dwl 141 Silver 
Bloeh it Davidson (Isaac F. Block and James W. 

Davidson) , morocco leather manufacturers, 220 

Battery 
Blum Moses Jr. (Porter, Blum & Slessinger), dwl 

(J03 Eddy 
Blumenthal Adolph (Seeliasohn & Co.), dwl 299 

Clementina 
Boettcher Paul, salesman with August Ludorff, dwl 

710 Bush 
Bogart Robert D., journalist S. F. Chronicle, dwl 703 

Market 
Bogart \Villiam F., secretary Mahogany G. and S. 

Mining Co., dwl 1921 Sacramento 
Bohannan Edward, expressman, cor Dupont and 

Commercial, dwl 207 Post 
Bokee David M., mining secretary, office 212 Sansom, 

dwl 1015 Leavenworth 
Bondu A., dwl 71 Natoma 
BOKGEK CHRISTIAN, wood and coal, 11 and 13 

Taylor 
Borgstrom Jennie Mrs., milliner, 1132 Dupont 
Bouillet Joseph R., policeman City Hall, dwl 317 

Clementina 
Bouton Francis G. (Bouton & Bowlen), dwl 1227 

Washington 
Bouton & Bowlen Francis O. Bouton and Thomas 

H. Bowlen), livery stable, 1019 Stockton, and 

proprietors Occidental Hotel Coaches 
Bowers Alphonzo B., civil engineer, 409 Washington, 

dwl 013 Mission 
Bowlen Thomas H. (Bouton & B.), dwl 121 Mont 
Boyle John, laborer, dwl 707 F'ront 
Boynton Charles, operator AVestern Union Telegraph 

Co., dwl 15 Sutter 
Bozio <fe Leturc (O. Bozio & A. Leturc), liquors, etc., 

149 I'ourth 
Bozio 0. (Bozio & Leturc), dwl 132 Fourth 
Bradley AVilliam 0., policeman City Hall, dwl 1513 

Taylor 
Bradrick Isaac, policeman City Hall, dwl 113 Dora 
Bradstreet J.K., rubber molding and weather strips, 

314 Pine 
Bree John H. (T.'.omas W. Bree & Co.), dwl 542 

Mission 
Bree Thomas W. (Thomas W. Bree & Co.), dwl 542 

Mission 
Bree Thomas W. & Co. (John H. Bree), brassfoun- 

ders and finishers, 542Mission 
Brennan Joseph B., waiter with Bruno Triebe, dwl 

NW cor Bush and Mason 
Brett Edward P. (Brett & Morrotv), dwl 448 Minna 
Brett k Morrow (Edtvard P. Brett and J. B. Mor- 

roivi , draftsmen and engineers, 90834 Howard 
Brewster John A., civil engineer and surveyor, office 

005 Clay room 14, dwl 750 F'olsom 
Briggs Thomas, printer, dwl 300 Jessie 
Brigham C. A. (BHgham <Sc Hawes), dwl SW cor 

Ihird and King 
Brigham & Hawes (C. A. Brigham and Elisha 

i/au'esy , dealers paving stone, etc., NE cor Third 

and King 



Britton John A., clerk with Curry & Evans, dwl 13 
Grand Av 

Brooklyn, Fruit Vale & S. F. Express, Steere & Col- 
by, proprietors, office 319 Washington 

Brooks Samuel H. f Brooks <& LreJ , dwl 703 Leav 

Brooks & Lee f Samuel H. Brooks and Benjamin F. 
Lee) , stock brokers, office 4^15 Montgomery 

Broom James M., policeman City Hall, dwl 015 Sac- 
ramento 

Brower George W., printer, dwl 1027 Sutter 

Brown Edward M., compositor, dwl American Ex- 
change 

Brown Frederick T., policeman City Hall, dwl-646 
Howard 

Brown Luther, physician and surgeon, office 7 Mont- 
gomery Av room 15, res Oakland 

Browning George W., clerk with P. Douglas & Co., 
dwl 120; Market 

BRUCE DONALD, book and job printer, 535 and 
5:^7 Sacramento, dwl 1020 Larkin 

Bruguiere John G., secretary Pacific Borax Co., office 
021 Sansom 

Brune August, student Medical Department Univer- 
sity College, dwl 20734 Taylor 

Bryan Thomas (Bryan Bros.), dwl American Ex- 
change 

Buckbee Charles A., record clerk U. S. Mint, dwl 516 
Taylor 

Buckelew B. R. Mrs. (widow), dwl 735 Green 

BUFFINGTON JOHN M., mining secretary, office 
37 Merchants' Exchange, dwl 137 Silver 

Buffum A. C, physician, office and dwl 654 Mission 

Bugbee John S., attorney at law, office 7 Montgom- 
ery Block, dwl 14 Hawthorne 

BuUetti Ferdinand, painter with St. Denis & Ches- 
ney, dwl 041 Broadway 

BUKCKHARDT JOHN, vice-consul Denmark, Swe- 
den, and Norway, office NE cor Cal and San 

Burdick R. M. & Co., importers leaf tobacco, 120 Clay 

Burdick William L., policeman City Hall, dwl 119 
Perry 

Burke J. C. editor Pacific Odd Fellow, dwl 13 Powell 

Burke John, policeman City Hall, dwl 1 Martin's 
Block 

BURKE WILLIAM F., importer, manufacturer, 
and retail boots and shoes, 113 Sutter, dwl 1218 
Clay 

BURN HAM JAMES W. & CO. (John L. and Henry 
Eckley) , importers carpets, upholstery goods, etc., 
018 Market and 328 and 330 Pine 

Burr C. A., insurance agent, dwl 421 Fourth 

Burt Silas S., annealer Coiner's Department U. S. 
Mint, dwl S\V cor Geary and Powell 

Bush Hiram F., salesman with Johnston & Veasey, 
dwl 1318 Hyde 

Bush Norton, artist, studio 330 Pine room 41, dwl SW 
cor Sutter and Devisadero 

Butler Henry C, carpenter, dwl 10 Wetmore PI 

Butler Joseph J., salesman with Fechheimer, Good- 
kind & Co., dwl 10 AVetmore PI 

Butler Warren C, designer and engraver on wood, 
535 Clay, dwl 10 AVetmore PI 

Buttner William, policeman City Hall, dwl Guerrero 
bet Seventeenth and Eighteenth 

BYRNE GARRETT J. (Kerhy, Byrne & Co.), dwl 
Lick House 

CALIFORNIA CLUB, W. G. Holmes president, 

rooms 212 Sutter 
CALIFORNIA DAIRY PRODUCE DEPARTMENT 

OF THE GRANGES, JohnH. Hegler manager, 

412 and 414 Sansom 
CALIFORNIA HIDE AND LEATHER CO., E. W, 

Park president, T. J. Kennedy secretary, tannery 

W s San Jos6 Road nr Six-mile House, office 408 

Battery 
California Poultry Co., 0. A. Telle president, office 

003 Pine 
Callaghan, Lynch & Co. (Sherwood Callaghan and 

J- Lynch/ , stock brokers, office 110 Leidosdorff 
Callaghan Sherwood (Callaghan, Lynch & Co.), dwl 

324 Turk 
Camman Charles F., porter 14 Battery, dwl 029 Bush 
Campbell Frank (Campbell <& Ayers) ,Am\ American 

Exchange 
Campbell James, oysterman, dwl 15 Sutter 
CAMPBELL & AYERS7i<'m«A; Campbell a'^d HeU' 

ry Ayers) , wines and liquors, 324 Sansom 
Cannavan Josephine Mrs., clothing, furnishing goods, 

etc., 811 Kearny, dwl 703 Dupont 



SPBINQPIELD FIBE & MAR'E INS. CO.; Assets, $1,100,000; Farnsworth & Clark, Agts. 



O. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC. 



62a 



Cannavan Michael, auctioneer, 811 Kearny, dwl 703 
Dupont 

Cantel Henriette Mme., cleaner and mender laces, 
30(i Sutter, dwl 1040 Folsom 

Cantel Louis, dwl 1040 Folsom 

CANTIN <& EVERETT (Joseph P. Cantin and Au- 
gustus F. Everett/, stock brokers, 313 California 

Carpenter William H., veterinary surgeon and horse 
infirmary, M4 Mission, dwl 757 Mission 

CAKK WILLIAM B., contractor, office 84 Mont-, 
gomery Block, dwl N W cor Valencia and Twen- 
ty-tifth 

Carroll John F., wines and liquors, 409 California, 
dwl 430 Tehama 

Carsten Adolph, waiter with Bruno Triebe, dwl NE 
cor Bush and Dupont 

Carter E., specialty agent, office 080 Sacramento 

Carter Thomas S. (Kent >& CJ , dwl 14ol Minna 

Carver B. E. (Carver, Prushaw & Myers), dwl 428 
Greenwich 

CARVEK, I'KUSHAW & MYERS (B. F. Carver, A. 
W. Prushaw, and Charles iWi/ersA collecting and 
real-estate agents, office 002 Merchant room 

Cary Silas 1)., real estate, dwl 401 Van JMess Av 

CASSERLY EUGENE, attorney at law, office 318 
California third floor, dwl 832 O'Earrell 

Cederberg Gold M. Co. (El Dorado Co., Cal.); office 
212 Sansom 

Central Wool Depot, John H. McAlister proprietor, 
N s Townsond bet Fifth and Sixth 

Chamberlin James F., driver with William J. Her- 
ring, dwl 430 Bryant 

Chandler John A., secretary Board U. S. Inspectors 
of Steam Vessels, dwl 9 Fourth 

Chapman Samuel (Terrill & CJ, dwl 340 Bush 

Chase William F., bookkeeper with E. Cahill & Co., 
dwl 321 Sutter 

CHESLEY G. W. & CO. (R. J. Van Voorhies, Jere- 
miah S. Jones, and Charles KohnJ , importers 
and wholesale wines and liquors, 414 Front 

Christiansen Christian, coachman with Millen Grif- 
fith, 509 Harrison 

Churchill W. B., dwl American Exchange 

Clark Alvan K., bookkeeper with Thomas H. Selby 
& Co.'s warehouse, 33 Market, res Oakland 

CLARK CHARLES K., bookkeeper with J. L. Bar- 
ker and manager S. F. Percussion Match Co., of- 
fice 40« Market, res Oakland 

Clark James H., capitalist, office 238 Montgomery, 
dwl 1200 Market 

CLARK NATHAN, hairdressing saloon, 224 Mont- 
gomery, dwl Bernard 

Clark VV^illiam H., attorney at law, office 808 Mont- 
gomery room 10, dwl 704>2 Mission 

Clayes Charles ^Y., entry clerk C. H., dwl 313 Oak 

Clayes Henry G., compositor Alta California, dwl 21 
Powell 

Cleary Robert, collector, office 236 Montgomery, dwl 
41 Stanly PI 

Clough John W., blacksmith, 17 Stevenson, dwl 117 
Perry 

Cobb G. D., attorney at law, 636 Clay room 25, res 
Alameda 

Cofifey James Vincent, attorney at law, office 729 
Montgomery, and editor S. F. Examiner, dwl 
1105 Powell 

Cofran George, contractor, office 651 Clay 

COGGESHALL WILLIAM A., cigars and tobacco, 
33 Post, dwl 330 O'Farrell 

COGHLAN JOHN M., Assistant U. S. Attorney, 
office 0-8 U. S. Court Building, dwl Lick House 

COLBURN T, W., secretary Raymond & Ely and 
Meadow Valley Mining Co.'s, office 418 California 

COLE N. W. <fe CO. (Uriah SeagersJ, sash, blind, 
and door factory, 200 Main 

COLEMAN EVAN J., president Pacific Transfer 
Co., office 110 Sutter, dwl 7 South Park 

Colgan Michael, laborer American Exchange 

Collins Cornelius, builder, dwl 1234 Stockton 

Collins George S., clerk Occidental Billiard Room, 
dwl 15 Sutter 

Collins J. Y., machinist, dwl American Exchange 

COMMON SENSE, William N. Slocum editor, 236 
Montgomery 

CONARD W. D. & CO. (L. H. Van SchaickJ, gen- 
eral collectors, office 000 Montgomery room 22 
Congdon George, real-estate agent, 430 Montgomery, 

res Oakland 
ConnoU D., carpenter, dwl 207 Post 
Conner Elizabeth Mrs., furnished rooms, 405 Powell 



Conner John E., musician Bella Union Theater, dwl 

1705 Mason 
Connolly Michael, laundryman American Exchange 
CONSUL DENMARK, vice John Burckhardt, office 

NE cor California and Sansom 
CONSUL JAPAN, vice Takaki Samro, office 703 

Market 
CONSUL MEXICO, Licenciado Manuel Azpiroz, 

office 109 California rooms 23 and 24 
CONSUL SWEDEN AND NORWAY, vice John 

Burckhardt, office NEcor California and Sansom 
Cooper Thomas C, compositor, dwl 704 Sutter 
COOPER JAMES K., stationery and periodicals, 750 

Market, dwl 315 Geary 
CORBETT SAMUEL J., physician, office NE cor 

Stockton and Geary, dwl 2112 Pacific Av 
CORDER S. E. & CO. (.Sacramento), proprietors Sac- 
ramento Hide, Wool, and Tallow Co., 113 and 115 

Washington 
CORVILLE EMERSON & CO., wholesale oysters, 

and proprietors Saddle Bock Oyster House, 419 

Pine 
Cornell George, painter with B. L. Brandt, dwl 242 

Jessie 
Cosgrove John, dwl 1206 Market 
Costa Lorenzo, wholesale groceries and provisions, 

SW cor Sansom and Jackson 
Cotrel W. B. (A. J. Plate & Co. J, dwl N s Twenty- 
first bet Valencia and Guerrero 
Coubrough Henry Jr. (Hart, Blair & Co.), res Oak- 
land 
Cox Christopher C, policeman City Hall, dwl N W 

cor Montgomery and Jackson room 19 
COX HENRY D. D., secretary and manager Pacific 

Branch Republic Life Insurance Co. (Chicago), 

office 317 California, dwl 059 Howard 
Cox Matthew B., superintendent marine department 

Home Mutual Insurance Co., office 400 California 
Cox Myron S., clerk with Marcus C. Hawley & Co., 

dwl 410 Post 
Coy F'rank, real-estate agent, 430 Montgomery, res 

Alameda 
Craig Lee, general agent, office 240 Montgomery 

rooms 5 and 0, res Oakland 
CRAIG R. R. & J., hydraulic mining machines, 

office 240 Montgomery rooms 5 and 
Crandell 0., millwright, dwl American Exchange 
Crook John T., physician Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

of New York, office 204 Montgomery, dwl N W cor 

Kearny and Chestnut 
Crosett J ames F\ (Orosett & Co.), dwl 312 Sixth 
CROSETT & CO. (James F. Crosett), employment 

office, 600 Clay 
Cue Richard A., carriagemaker, dwl 529 Geary 
Cue William, copyist, 729 Montgomery, dwl NE cor 

Market and Eleventh 
Culver Charles G., clerk, dwl 213 Geary 
Cummings iVlichael F., editor Irish Nationalist, office 

409 Washington, dwl 13 Langton 
Curry Luke, groceries and liquors, 313 Seventh 
Curtis Julia A. Mrs., furnished rooms, 704 Sutter 
Curtis Tliomas, porter with M. Ehrman & Co., dwl 

529 Stevenson 
CUSHEON J. D., farmland, real estate, and business 

agent, office 230 Montgomery rooms 1 and 2 

D'Or Caesar, cook Grand Hotel, dwl S s McAllister 
bet Webster and F'illmore 

Daigneau Frank, hackdriver American Exchange 

Dall George A., clerk Melter's and Refiner's Depart- 
ment U. S. Mint, dwl 733 Broadway 

Darlington E. & Co., "Spiers & Pond," wines and liq- 
uors, 422 Sacramento 

Davidson James, woolgrader with J. H. McAlister, 
dwl NW cor Nineteenth and Shotwell 

Davies John M. & Co. (of New York), furnishing 
goods, 310 California 

Davis George A., dwl 1200 Market 

Davis Mary (widow), dwl SE cor Seventh and Bran 

Davis Solon H., salesman with S. M. Balch & Co., 
dwl 1014 Green 

DAVIS (THE) VERTICAL FEED SHUTTLE SEW- 
ING MACHINE, J. C. Warren agent, 118 Post 

Davis W. (Davis & Pickett J, dwl 217 Second 

Davis & Pickett (W. Davis and Charles Pickett), 
wholesale tobacco and cigars, 13034 Seventh 

Davison Thomas G. P., clerk, dyvl Branch House 

Davison William ( Frauenholz & D.) , dwl Prescott 
House 

Davy Henry, waiter with Leland Stanford, 711 Pine 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTORY circulates throughout the Pacific Coast. 



KENNEDY'S INStTKANCB AQENOY, Fire, Marine, and Life, represents $12,000,000. 



626 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Dawson George C. ^Holmes <fe D.J, dwl 8 William 
Day A. L., self-lighting lamp and gaa attachment, 410 

Kearny, dwl 218 Eddy 
Day Thomas S., office 732 Montgomery, dwl (iBO Har 
De Squires George, assistant adjuster Coiner's De- 
partment U. S. Mint, dwl 512 Folsom 
De Voy John C, merchant, dwl 3^^ Oak GroveAv 
Dean Peter, merchant, office 4W Clay, dwl 1000 Post 
Dehon T. M., merchant, dwl 712 Shotwoll 
DEXNY & STEVENSON f Joseph A. Denny and 
Robert StevensonI , stock brokers, office 23tt Mont 
Deuel Henry, carpenter, dwl 8 Clara Lane 
DEWEY CHARLES H. (M. M. Baldwin <& Co.), 

dwl Russ House 
Diedrich Gustave, upholsterer American Exchange 
Diercks Henry, carpenter, "J05 Jackson 
Dillon Edward, watchmaker with Tucker Jewelry 

Manufacturing Co., dwl 1715 Taylor 
DIXON CLEMENT, ale vaults, B Leidesdorff 
Dixson Jennie Miss, dwl 120ti Market 
Dockham Daniel S., peddler, dwl 1221 Pacific 
Dodge Jeremiah, advertising agent with John Wil- 
son, dwl 110 Minna 
Dohrman H. G. E,, fruit and vegetables, NW cor 

Howard and Fifth, dwl IStJ Fifth 
Donovan Mary Miss, shoetitter with Henry Har- 

bourne, dwl Park Hotel 
Doolan William, real estate, office 405>^ California, 

dwl 1010 Bush 
Dore Benjamin, book and jobprinter, 512 Sacramen- 
to, dwl S21 Greenwich 
DORE MAURICE & CO. (Henry A. Cobb), real- 
estate, general, and stock auctioneers, 326 Pine 
Doterer Frederick (Michael Qremenger & Co.) , dwl 

1103 Folsom 
DOAV JOHN BLAKE, butcher, 1123 Clay, dwl 1121 

Taylor 
Doxey William, lodgings, 26 Sixth 
Dreyfus B. k Co., wine growers, office .529 Clay 
Drum Thomas J., attorney at law, office 620 Wash- 
ington, dwl •514 Bush 
Duffy James ( Whittier, F. <fe Co.), dwl 537 Valencia 
Dugau Mark M., boots and shoes, NE cor Fourth and 

Minna, dwl 140 Perry 
Dunavent A. C, well sinker, 225 Seventh 

Durivie (widow,!, seamstress, dwl 837 Folsom 

Dury Wells, compositor Alta California, dwl 627 Cal 
Dutton William J., assistamt secretary Fireman's 

Fund Ins. Co., dwl 120ii Market 
Dwyer James R., agent Babcock Fire Extinguisher, 

dwl 120t) Market 
Dye William M., clerk Liverpool & London & Globe 

Ins Co., res Alameda 
Dyer C. S., manufacturer, dwl Grand Hotel 

Eaton Frederick W. (Eaton & Edioards), dwl 1418 
California 

EATON k EDWARDS (Frederick W. Eaton and 
William P. Edwards Jr.), counting house sta- 
tioners, 413 and 415 Sansom 

Edwards Justus H., salesman with Albert Mau & Co., 
dwl 4 Simpson PI 

Edwards William, paying teller Merchants' Exchange 
Bank, dwl 12U j Market 

Edwards William P. Jr. (Eaton & E.),dLVi\ 52 Te- 
hama 

Eberhardt Adolph, merchant, dwl 503 Greenwich 

Ehrlich Meyer (Ehrlich & Steinhart) , dwl 1.509 
Stockton 

EHRLICH & STEINHART (Meyer Ehrlich and 
Siginund Steinhart) , stock broKers, 413 Cal 

Einstein J acob f Einstein <fc SchubartJ , dwl 502 Bush 

Einstein & Schubart (Jacob Einstein and Elias 
Schubart), money brokers, 332 Montgomery 

Eisenbach Isaac P., salesman with Williaui Green & 
Co., dwl 210 Sutter 

Elliott Thomas W., physiciin, dwl 1016 Mission 

Ellis Samuel, blacksmith, 53 Beale 

Elmers Nicholas (Meyer & Co.}, dwl SW cor Green- 
wich and Powell 

Elvin Henry, clerk with John Hillebrandt, dwl SW 
cor Sixteenth and Folsom 

Emery Frank W., bookkeeper with J. C. Johnson & 
Co., dwl 15 Sutter 

Engelhardt Emil G. (Engelhardt & CbJ, 509 Kearny, 
dwl ISl'J Powell 

ENGLE VOLNEY, groceries and lictuors, NE cor 
O'Farrell and Powell 

Enterprise Consolidated G. Mining Co. (Calaveras, 
Cal.), office 236 Montgomery 



Epstein Henry (H. H. Noble & Co.), dwl .3-35 Eddy 
EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY (New 

York), William D. Garland general agent for 

California, office 426 California 
Esche Otto, bookkeeper with Anglo-Californian Bank 

(limited), dwl 621 Pine 
Euphrat Frederick, physician, office .3-31 Kearny room 

10, dwl 905 McAllister 
Eureka Artificial Stone Co., factory 5 Spear, office 207 

Sa^nsom 
EVANGEL (Baptist, weekly). Evangel Publishing 

Co. publishers, office 40;t Washington 
Evangelist The (monthly), Charles Montgomery pub- 
lisher, office 227 Second 

Fabens Herbert S., dwl 314 Post 

Fallon Thomas, clerk with Francois A. Rouleau, dwl 
1215 Union 

Farwell Franklin M., secretary Phelps Manufactur- 
ing Co., dwl 1510 Jones 

FARWELL & CO. (William H. Farwell and John 
O. Hansconi) , shipchandlers, 105 and 107 Cal 

FAY CALEB T., commission merchant, office 606 
Mont room 23, dwl S s Pine bet Hyde and Larkin 

Fell Caroline (widow), theatrical costumer, 204 Mont 

Fenren Mary Miss, waitress Woodrow House, 1206 

FERHEIROS A. & CO., manufacturers cigars, SW 
cor Clay and Davis 

Ferreiros Antonio (A. Ferreiros <& Co.), dwl 304 
Brannan 

Figel Samuel, merchant tailor, -333 Bush, dwl 105 Ma- 
son 

Findley Thomas, banker (Grass Valley, Cal.), office 
424 Montgomery, dwl 912 Bush 

Fink David, dressmaking and patterns, N s Six- 
teenth nr Valencia 

Finnegass Henry, deputy U. S. marshal, dwl 31 Wil- 
low Avenue 

Fish Harry, bookkeeper, dwl 896 Howard 

Fisher Charles C. (T. H. Holt <& Co.), dwl 1313 Lar- 
kin 

FISHER G. W. & CO., stock brokers, office 113 Leid 

Flagg Murray, dwl 1922 Taylor 

Foley Daniel B., clerk with McAfee, Spiers & Co., 
dwl 564 Minna 

Foley Edward T., clerk with A. L. Bancroft & Co., 
dwl 564 Minna 

Ford James P., clerk with Emerson Corville & Co., 
dwl 620 Washington 

FORD JEROME B , president Mendocino Lumber 
Co., office 34 California, res East Oakland 

Ford Thomas, blacksmith 110 First, dwl W s Steiner 
bet Ellis and Eddy 

Ford Nathaniel M. (Pendleton <& F.), dwl 1520 Fol- 
som 

Foster F. A., messenger Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 
American Exchange 

Frank Isidor, musician with John Wilson, dwl 926 
Jackson 

Frauenholz Philipp (Frauenholz & Davison) , dwl 
624 Vallejo 

FRAUExVHOLZ & DAVISON (Philipp Frauenholz 
<& William Davison), proprietors Bavaria Brew- 
ery, 620 and 622 Vallejo 

Frazee Vltruvius, architect, office 302 Montgomery, 
dwl 1107 Pine 

Freeman Joseph Rev., pastor First Baptist Church, 
dwl 809 Washington 

Freeman W. H., bartender with Martin & Horton, 
dwl 915 Jones 

French Benjamin F. (French & Shade), dwl 142 
Rose Av 

French M. B., merchant, dwl 1038 Mission 

French & Shade (Benjamin F. French and Corne- 
lius Shade), carpenters and builders, 2 Powell 

Friedman Joseph S., real-estate office, 607 Washing- 
ton, dwl SE cor Eddy and Taylor 

Frizzi Joseph, painter with St. Denis & Chesnoy, 
dwl 314 Pacific 

Fuller C. H., dentist, office and dwl lOJ Mont 

Gaffnet p. T., clerk with R. G. Dun & Co., dwl 13 

Sutter 
Gage J. W., captain bark Portland, office with A. M. 

Simpson & Bro., 44 Market 
Gale Alfred Y. (Tuttle <& O.J, dwl 421 Fourth 
Ganz Enoch S. (Oanz & Kelley) , dwl 310 Sutter 
Ganz & Kelley (Enoch S. Oanzand William J. Kel- 
ley J, real-estate agents, 607 Clay 



SFBINQFIELD INS. CO. paid Iiosses in full at Troy, Portland. CMcago, and Boston. 



C.'PrVAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC. 



62c 



Gardenier W. C, stock broker, ofiBee 330 Montgomery, 

dwl 1720 California 
GAKLAND WILLIAM D., general agent Equitable 
Life Assurance Society (New York), office 420 Cal 
Gazell Louis, fish, Washington Market, dwl 20 La- 
fayette Pi 

Geitner Leonhardt, blacksmith, 1 Front, dwl 7 Wil- 
liam 

Germon A. & Co., shingles and hard woods, 16 Spear 

Gethin Edward B., proprietor North Point Dock 
Bonded Warehouse, dwl 702 Sutter 

Gilbersoii Charles M. (Howland, Sullivan & Co.), 
res Salt Lake Citv 

Gilmore Charles, dwl 309 Powell 

Girvan ^Villiam, proprietor Union Mills, 24 Sacra- 
mento, dvvl Middle nr Pine 

GLOBE FIKE INSURANCE CO. (Chicago), E. E. 
Potter general agent, otBce 318 California 

Godoy .Jose F., State translator and attorney at law, 
otiico 1104 Merchant, dwl 333 Geary 

Goet/, Andrew, liquor mixer with E. A. Fargo & Co., 
dwl ti Bureham PI 

Goldman Morris, fancy goods, 1 Virginia Block NW 
cor Stockton and Pacific 

Goldstein E. L., merchant, office 529 Clay, res Wies- 
baden, Germany 

Goldstein William, agent E. L. Goldstein, office 529 
Clay, dwl 315 Tyler 

Gomez Antonio F., messenger U. S. N. Paymaster's 
Office, dwl 520 Sutter 

Gonnolla John, wines and liquors, 513 Commercial, 
dwl N s Broadway bet Dupont and Kearny 

GOODALL, NELSON & PERKINS, agents Coast 
Steamers, office junction Market and baeramento 

Goodhind Richard (Richard Goodhind tb OoJ, res 
Oakland 

GOODHIND RICHARD & CO., fire and life-insur- 
ance agents, 215 Sansom 

Gorey John, expressman, NE cor Clay and Sansom, 
dwl lis Perry 

Gosling James (Gosling & Williams) ,diw\ 435 Clem 

Gosling & Williams (James Gosling and John 8. 
Williams), architects, 712 Montgomery 

GRACE J. W. ifc CO. (James F. Chapman) , shipping 
and commission, 40 California 

Graham Estelle V., teacher San Bruno SchooL dwl 
B s P'jtrero Av nr Twenty-third 

Grant George, paying teller Anglo Californian Bank 
(limited), dwl 1721 Clay 

Green John L., clerk with B. S. Brooks, 6 Mont Av 

Green Joseph E., band leader Wilson's Palace Am- 
phitheater, dwl N \V cor New Mont and Mission 

Green William & Co. i Michael Phillips), gold and 
plated jewelry, 219 Pine 

Green William (William Green •& Co. ), &w\ 324 Ellis 

GreenebaumSigmund (Schmidt, G. & Co.), dwl 508 
Eddy 

Greenfield L. L., salesman with Levi Strauss & Co., 
dwl 120.) Market 

Gremenger Michael & Co. (Frederick Doterer), mar- 
ket, 1103 Folsom 

Grossetta Martin (Grossetta & Tripalo), dwl 803 
Union 

GROSSETTA & TRIPALO ( Martin Grosietta and 
Phihpp Tripalo I, proprietors Arizona Coffee Sa- 
loon, 027 Commercial 

Grotschel Benjamin, market, 621 Hyde, dwl SE cor 
Geary and Hyde 

Qruenberg Max, importer and jobber paints, oils, 
and glass, 425 Sacramento, dwl 615 Jones 

Gundelflnger Louis (Altschul, Simon & Co.), dwl 513 
Lady 

Qunn James 0. B., clerk C. P. R. R., dwl 2234 Fill- 
more 

Qurney A. L., Green Point Transportation and Dairy 
to., dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 

Hackktt P M., dentist, 504 Kearny, dwl SE cor Sev- 

_ , enteenth and Mission Av 

HAlUHr ANDREW J., watches, diamonds, jew- 
elry, etc., i:*; Montgomery, dwl 26)^ Kearny (see 

_. adv. page xcv) 

i* 1 o*^M,'^^^^S S., physician, office 652 Market. 

Hon n 1 ^ .^■■'^ ^^^ VVebster and Fillmore 

UalllidwardL., collector Home Mutual Insurance 
Co., ros Last Oakland 

|f»l\'-. dwl ;i0J Powell 

ilALL JOHN L. manufacturer and dealer doors, 
T' 1 ,"^'^*!i'/"!^ blinds, 11 and 13 California and 114 
and Ho Market, dwl Lick House 



Hall Treadle for Sewing Machines, Kent & Carter 

agents, 933 Market 
Hames R. H., hotel solicitor, dwl American Esch 
HAMILL JOHN (IIamill& Sivim I ,uot.a.ry imhMc, 

office 320 Mont, dwl N s Fulton nr Franklin 
HAMILL &S WIM (John Hamill and D. K. 8wim>, 

real-estate agents, 329 Montgomery 
Hammond D. P., clerk, dwl American Exchange 
Hanken John, musician, dwl 207 Post 
HANLY GEORGE T. & CO. (Washington Marion), 

teas, coffee, and spices, 922 Market 
Hansen Louis, saddler and harnessmaker, 311 Pine, 

dwl 609 Union 
Hanson & Moore (Stephen B. Hanson and David 

Moore), draymen, NE cor Pine and F'ront 
Hantzsch Charles, blacksmith, dwl 32 Jessie 
Hare Andrew J., wood and coal, 173 Railroad Av. 

South S. F. 
Harris J. k Co. (R. H. Monck and G. H. Wright), 

trunkmakers, NE cor Market and Kearny 
Harrahan James, porter American Exchange 
Harrison 0. H., pilot Benicia and Mare Island, office 

517 Front 
HART, BLAIR & CO. (J. W. Hart, DavidB. Blair, 
and Henry Coubrough .Jr.) , commission mer- 
chants and insurance agents, 319 California 
Hart J. W. (Hart, Blair & Co.), res Glasgow, Scot- 
land 
Harvey A. B. stock broker, dwl 652 Minna 
Hathaway Nathan, carpenter, dwl 110 O'Farrell 
Hatton G. G., carpenter, dwl 207 Post 
Hawes Elisha, president and secretary Pacific Gran- 
ite Co., NE cor Third and King (and Brigham 
& H.), dwl 411 Brannan 
Hawes Uliver, agent Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

(Hartford), office 317 California, res Oakland 
HAWKS NELSON C, manager Pacific Type Foun- 
dry, office 532 Clay 
HAWLEY, BOWEN &C0. (Charles J. Haivley and 

Charles R. Boweni, grocers, 215 and 217 Sutter 
Hay John McHardy, salesman with Zocchi & Gian- 

nini, dwl 608 FMlbert 
Healy John H., telegraph operator Cal. P. R. R., dwl 

635 California 
Heerdink John, tobacco manufacturer, 23 Seventh, 

dwl 39 Langton 
Hellman Henry J., collector, dwl 923 Folsom 
Henderson Abraham, dwl 508 McAllister 
Henderson David, dwl 1026 Larkin 
Henderson John ¥., salesman with Joseph Figel, dwl 

225 F^ourth 
Hendrickson George R., (Hendrickson <fe Waggon- 
er), dwl 658 Mission 
Hendrickson & Waggoner (George R. Hendrickson 
and George H. Waggoner), proprietors Novelty 
Wood Works, Mechanics' Mills, SW cor Mission 
and Fremont 
Hennig Louis, musician with John Wilson, dwl Ni- 
agara House 
Henry W. Warner (W. Warner Henry & Co.), dwl 

725 Pine 
Berber John (Herber & Mayer), dwl 745 Clay 
Herber & Mayer (John Herber and J. Mayer) ,h6eT 

and billiard saloon, 527 Kearny 
HerriehsonTheodor, cabinetmaker, dwl 24}4 Langton 
Hill Ephraim P., compositor Alta California, dwl 710 

Ellis 
Hesse Carl, merchant, dwl 207 Post 
Hill Francis H., mining, office 411>^ California room 

3, dvvl 1110 Leavenworth 
Hillert Frederick ( Portois dt: H.), dwl SW cor Moss 

and Folsom 
Hitchcock George B., salesman with H. S. Crocker & 

Co., dwl 1010 Powell 
HOAG J. C, commission merchant, 200 Davis, dwl 

303 Eddy 
Hoffmann Henry (Hoffmann & Taussig), dwl 311 

Sutter 
HOFFMANN & CRAVEN (Charles F. Hoffmann 
and Alfred Craven)), civil and topographical 
engineers, office 92 Montgomery Block 
Hoffmann & Taussig (Henry Hoffmann and Morris 

Taussig) , cigars and tobacco, 308 Sansom 
Holden James B., mercantile accountant, 633 Front, 

dwl 750 Howard 
Holland George, circus performer with John Wilson, 

dwl 632 Mission 
HOLMES W. G., president California Club, 212 Sutter 
Holmes William E. (Holmes <Sc Dawson) dwl 8 Wil- 
liam 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 1874-6. H. G. Langley. Pub'r, S. F. Price $5. 

4a 



SAN FKANCISOO INSUBANCE CO. (Fire and Marine), office 411 CaUfornia. 



QU 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Holmes & Dawson (William E. Holmes and Oeorge 
C. DaivsonJ, marble works, UK O'Farrell 

HOLT T. H. & CO. (Charles C. Fisher), real-estate 
agents, office 238 Montgomery 

HOLT ZEBA, real estate and mining agent, oflSco 330 
Pine room 44, dwl Occidental Hotel 

Holterman Henry H., groceries and liquors, 429 
Fourth 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE CO. (fire and ma- 
rine) John H. Redington president, Charles R. 
Story secretary, office 40tj California 

Honig Michael, furs, 34;:> Kearny, dwl 330 Minna 

Honigsberger Saul ( Honigsberger <& WendV, dwl 
622 Ellis 

Honigsberger & Wendt {Saul Honigsberger and 
Christian Wendt) , wines and liquors, 21lSansom 

Hosmer Hezokiah L. fPinney <& HJ , attorney at law, 
office 434 California second floor, dwl 1200 Leav- 
enworth 

HOWARD H. C, stock broker, 329 Montgomery, dwl 
200 Hyde 

Howard John B. (Howard <Sc Hunsaker), res Oak- 
land 

Howard & Hunsaker (Oscar F. Hunsaker, John B. 
Howard, and John W. Hunsaker) , attorneys at 
law, office t)20 Washington rooms 10 and H 

Howland Stephen W. (Hoivland, Sullivan & Co.), 
res Oakland 

HOWLAND, SULLIVAN & CO. (Stephen W. How- 
land, P. Ji. Sullivan, and C. M. Gilberson) , real 
estate and commission merchants, 338 Mont- 
gomery room 5 

HUUHES JOHN F., book and job printer, 606 Clay 

HUMPHREY P. H., physician and quarantine offi- 
cer Port San Francisco, office 24 and 25 Stevenson 
Building, dwl 403 Turk 

Hunsaker J ohn W. (Howard & H.) , attorney at law, 
office and dwl 620 Washington 

Hunsaker Oscar F. (Howard S: HJ , attorney at law, 
office 620 Washington, dwl 729 Pine 

Hunt Clarence M., collector with F'rank G. Edwards, 
dwl 25 Hawthorne 

Hunt David W., machinist with Edwin 0. Hunt, dwl 
25 Hawthorne 

HUNT EDWIN 0., patent windmill, horsepower, 
and pump manuf, 51 Beale, dwl 25 Hawthorne 

Hunter ife Shaekleford (William Hunter and T. T. 
Shackle/ord) , brick manufacturers, 402 Mont^ 
gomery 

HUSTED ALANSON, collector and money broker, 
712 Montgomery, dwl 423 Bush 

Hutchinson Joseph, dwl tiW cor How and Fifteenth 

HUTCHINSON MANN & SMITH (C. I. Hutchin- 
son, H. R. Mann, Andrew D. Smith, and George 
O. Smith Jr.) , insurance agents, 314 California 

Hyland Michael (Kennedy <& H.) , dwl 238 Sutter 

IHRIE GEORGE P., stock broker, office 539 Califor- 

nia, dwl Lick House 
Ingerson Hiram H., homeopathic physician, office 

and dwl 319 Geary 
Iowa Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), office 605 Clay 
Irwin Alexander C, clerk Auditor C. P. R. R., dwl 

1206 Market 

Jackson, Andrew R., civil engineer, dwlS s Twenty- 
first bet Capp and Mission 

Jacob Little Gold and Silver Mining Co. (Storey Co., 
Nevada), office 113 Leidesdorff 

Jacobs Samuel, bookkeeper with Julius Jacobs, dwl 
21 Ellis 

Jacobs & Wright (Charles Jacobs and William 
Wright) ,\a,m.iis, glassware, cigars, and tobacco, 
NE cor Broadway and Montgomery Av 

Jacobsen Iver, veterinary surgeon, dwl 15 Sutter 

Janes John F., fish, Washington Market, dwl Har- 
bor View, Presidio 

Janssen Diedrich, patternmaker with J. M. Stock- 
man, dwl 48 Ritoh 

Jeddie, J. C, locksmith with Adams, Springer & Co., 
dwl Pacific nr Montgomery 

Jenkins Leonard C, clerk, dwl 17 Hubbard 

JENSEN WILLIAM, proprietor St. Louis Hotel, 
11 and 13 Pacific 

Jewett Thomas M., clerk U. S. Attorney, dwl 528 
Green 

JOACHIMSEN HENRY L., attorney at law and 
presiding justice of the peace, office 804 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 608 Filbert 

Johns George (George Johns & Co.), dwl 5 Stock 



JOHNS GEORGE & CO. (Daniel McSweganJ, ad- 
vertising and publishing agents, N W cor Sacra- 
mento and Sansom 

Johnson George, baker, dwl 207 Post 

JOHNSON T. RODGERS, manufacturer regalia 
and military goods, 10 Montgomery Avenue and 
grand secretary Grand Lodge I. 0. 0. F., office 
325 Montgomery, dwl NW cor Grove and Polk 

Johnson ^Villiam C, clerk with H. Paulsen, dwl SW 
cor Turk and Taylor 

Johnston Baptiste, clerk with Baker & Hamilton 

Johnston Improved Still Co., L. L. Bullock manager, 
office 65 Merchants' Exchange 

Johnston Thomas J., pressman with Cubery & Co., 
dwl 814 Mission 

Jones Edgar F\, printer Alta California, dwl 310 
Stockton 

Jones Thomas, mining secretary, office 236 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 82 Natoma 

Jones W. J., dwl 320 O'Farrell 

Jordan Ernest B., accountant, office 113 Leidesdorff, 
dwl 1806 Taylor 

JORDAN MORRIS, jeweler and importer dia- 
monds, watches, etc., 7 Kearny, dwl 636 Green 

Kabath N. J. (Kabalh & Ladd) , dwl 308 Stockton 
KABATH & LADD (N. J. Kabath and George 8. 

Ladd) , importers mill and mining supplies and 

agency Lafiin & Rand Powder Co., office 109 Cal 
Kaiser John (Hildebrand & K.) , dwl 5 St. Charles PI 
Kane Charles C. (Kane, O'Leary & Co.), dwl 611 

Eddy 
Kane Michael (Kane, O'Leary & Co.), dwl 611 Eddy 
KANE, O'LEARY & CO. (Michael Kane,Charles C. 

Kane, and Fergus O'Leary), importers and 

wholesale wines and liquors, 607 and 609 Front 
KAVANAGH JOHN, merchant tailor, 15 New 

Montgomery 
Kearney Patrick (Murphy & Kearny) , dwl NW cor 

Pacific and Leavenworth 
Keeler Julius M. (J. M.Keeler & Co.;, dwl 816 Bush 
KEELER J. M. & CO-, commission merchants and 

agents for Eastern manufacturers, office 306 Cali- 
fornia 
Keightley William J., clerk with B. Nathan & Co., 

dwl 101 O'Farrell 
Keller Charles, druggist, 722 Montgomery, dwl SE 

cor Taylor and Eddy 
Kelley William J. (Kelley & Witlierspoon) , dwl 122 

Taylor 
Kelley & Witherspoon (William J. Kelley and 

James E. Witherspoom) , real-estate agents, 607 

Clay 
Kelly Peter, groceries and liquors, SE cor Fourth 

and Minna 
Kendall Adne E. (Kendall, Klinger & Co.), res 

Cleaveland, Ohio 
KENDALL, KLINGER & CO. (Adne E. Kendall 

and Beneville Klinger) , mattress manufacturers. 

Mechanics' Mills, cor Mission and Fremont 
KENNEDY FRANK, attorney at law, office 604 

Merchant, dwl 120o Market 
Kennedy Hugh (Kennedy & Hyland) , dwl 319 Clem 
Kennedy & Hyland (Hugh Kennedy and Michael 

Hyland) , horseshoers, 9 and 11 Webb 
Kennisson Asa, dairyman with Noble & Wohlers, 

dwl N VV cor Thirtieth and Old San Josg Road 
Kent Peter (Kent A Carter), dwl 933 Market 
Kent & Carter (Peter Kent and Thomas 8. Carter), 

sewing machines and agents Hall's Treadle, 933 

Market 
Kentey Augustus Reid, clerk C. P. R. R. Co., dwl 40>^ 

Geary 
Kerby Patrick, merchant, dwl Lick House 
KERRY, BYRNE & CO. (Garrett J. Byrne), dry 

goods, 7 Montgomery 
Kerrins Christopher, groceries and liquors, 1419 Fol 
Kershaw Marsdon, coal dealer, 17 Spear, dwl NE cor 

Liberty and Guerrero 
Kiehl Gottfried, bagmaker with Dakin & Libbey, 

dwl SW cor Clay and Drumm 
Kile Thomas, dwl American Exchange 
Kind Henry W., assistant register clerk Fifteenth 

District Court, dwl 1428 California 
King Charles H., cigarmaker, dwl 153 Octavia 
King George A., cigarmaker, dwl 153 Octavia 
King Sarah (widow), dwl 153 Octavia 
Kingsloy Omar, director Palace Amphitheater, dwl 

837 Miss 
Klatt Frederick (Kloppenburg & K.) , res Alameda 



^FABNSWOBTH & CIiABK, Qen'l Fire and Marine Insvirance Agency: office 230 Cal. St. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 7143 "Tid 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC. 



62e 



Klinger Beneville H. (Kendall, K. & Co.), dwi 44 

Clementina 
Kloppenbnrg Otto (Kloppenhurg & Klatt), dwl 510 

Franklin 
KLOPPENBURG & KLATT (Otto Kloppenhurg 

and Fcrdinayid Klatt J, Sa.n Francisco Cigar Box 

Factory, otBco 324 Clay, factory 132 and 134 Berry 
Klose Christian A., publisher Pacific, office NW cor 

Clay and Sansom, res Oakland 
Knowlton Edwin L., teacher, dwl 511 Jones 
Knox Charles H., driver with Edgar V. Thorn, 32 

California Market, dwl 414 Post 
Knox John F., foreman with J. H. McAlister, dwl 

315 Fifth 
Koehneke C. H. (Lee & KoehnckeJ, dwl 13 Selina PI 
Kohlman Charles, policeman City Hall, dwl 39 Oak 

Grove Av 
Kohn Charles (O. W. Chesley & Co.), dwl 1208 

Geary 
Kohn Naphtaly, clerk with G. W. Chesley & Co., dwl 

1208 Geary 
Kraft John, clerk, dwl 207 Post 
Kraker Anthony, billiardist, dwl 15 Sutter 
Kustel Guido, superintendent Pacific Reduction 

AVorks, office 210 Front, dwl 727 Harrison 
Kyle Thomas (Mead & K.), dwl 2 Geary PI 

L'HoTR Cynthia (widow), dwl 1509 Jones 
L'Hoto Eugene, merchant, dwl 1305 Mason 
L'Hote H. C, merchant, dwl 2015 Howard 
LA GRANDE LAUNDRY, Es Thirteenth bet How- 
ard and Folsom 
Labbe Pierre, drayman, 615 Front, dwl SW cor O'Far- 

rell and Octavia 
Lacy B. T. (Parke & L.I, dwl Russ House 
LAFLIN & RAND POWDER CO., Kabath & Ladd 

agents, office 109 California 
Laird B. Mrs. (widow), dressmaker, 113 Eddy 
Lake William B., advertising and purchasing agent, 

office 402 Kearny, dwl 1023 Hyde 
Lamarche A. (widow), dressmaker, 624 California 
Lane Margaret Mrs., dwl 1206 Market 
Lange Frederick W., groceries, SW cor Stockton and 

Greenwich 
Lansing Gerrit L., bookkeeper Auditor's Office C. P. 

R. R., dwl 2234 Fillmore 
Lansing Mary R. (widow), dwl 2234 Fillmore 
Larrimore & Co. (Richard Larrimore and B. B. 
Fuller) , real-estate and business agents, 7 Mont- 
gomery Av room 17 
Lasalle Edward B., topographical engineer and 

draftsman, dwl Nucleus House 
Lawless John, circus performer with John Wilson, 

dwl Niagara House 
Lawlor John M., hotel proprietor, dwl 127 Kearny 
Lawson M. C, captain schooner Sparrow, office with 

A. M. Simpson & Bro., 44 Market 
Le Breton A. J., attorney at law, office 609 Sacra- 
mento, dwl 327 Ellis 
Le Breton Edward, real estate, dwl S27 Ellis 
Le Breton E. J. , receiving teller National Gold Bank, 

dwl 327 Ellis 
LEARY ANDREW J., bookbinder and paper ruler, 

406 Sansom, dwl 610 Pine 
Lee Benjamin F. (Brooks & L.) , dwl 113 Taylor 
Lee Eugene, circus performer with John Wilson, 

dwl 133 Mission 
Lee Frank, circus performer with John Wilson, dwl 

224 Minna 
Lee James, circus performer with John Wilson, dwl 

Niagara House 
Lee John Brown (Lee & Koehneke) , dwl 429 Front 
Lee & Koehneke (John Brown Lee and C. H. 

Koehneke) , house and signpainters, 429 Front 
Lee William, ticket clerk P. M. S. S. Co., NW cor 

Sacramento and Loid, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
LEHN PHILIP P., hairdressing saloon, 606 Mer- 
chant, dwl 364 Clementina 
Leitch William H., drayman, 404 Battery, dwl 1312 

Hyde 
Leonard Emma C. Mrs., adjuster Coiner's Depart- 
ment U. S. Mint, dwl 4 Burcham PI 
Leonard John, cook Woodrow House, 1206 Market 
Leve Frank, restaurant, 3053^ Third 
Levy Abraham, merchant, dwl 215 Sixth 
Levy Louis, t>aperbox manufacturer, 311 Pine, dwl 

112 Elov'enth 
Levy JNIarcus, dry goods, 105 Sansom, dwl 153 Octavia 
Levy P. & Brother (Usher Levy), importers -and 
jobbers clothing, 22 Sansom 



Levy Usher rP. Levy & Brother) , dwl 419 Hayes 
LEWIS JOHN B., real estate, office 502 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 409 Bryant 
Liebes Solomon fof Liehes & Ettinger, Salt Lake 

City), office 301 Battery, dwl 44 Third 
LINDSEY JOSEPH H., collector, office 6 Court 

Block 636 Clay, dwl 1319 Sansom 
Linehan William B., reporter Alta California, dwl 

215 Perry 
Lissman Isaac, boots and shoes, 132 Kearny, dwl 632 

Geary 
Lloyd John, attorney at law, 4113^ California, res 

Fruit Vale. Alameda Co. 
Locke Louis, Chinese interpreter, dwl 1014 Wash 
LOCKHART & PORTER/(?eor£^e A. Lockhart and 

William H. Porter >, coffin manufacturers, 120 

Main, and undertakers, 29 Third 
LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSUR- 
ANCE CO. (Liverpool), Hart, Blair & Co. agents, 

319 California 
Long George S., porter with Richards & Harrison, 

dwl 1 Burcham PI 
Long Mary A. Mrs., furnished rooms, 719 Market 
Lovejoy William (Lovejoy <& Williams), dwl 1617 

Laguna 
LOW FREDERICK F., manager Anglo-Californian 

Bank (limited), office 412 California, dwl Grand 

Hotel 
Lucehesi Luigi, laborer with Daniel Giovannini, dwl 

814 Pacific 
Lutz Jacob, translator, dwl 257 Clementina 
Lynch John,. baker American Exchange 
Lyons Julius, short-hand reporter, office 605 Ciay, 

dwl S s Broadway bet Polk and Van Ness Av 

Mackie James Balfour, clerk with E. Cahill & Co., 
406 Montgomery 

Macnevin Henry P., dwl 519 Third 

Macy Henry C, architect, office 236 Montgomery, dwl 
1215 Mason 

Madden Jerome, clerk Land Office C. P. R. R. Co., dwl 
E s Capp bet Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth 

Madsen J., captain brig Arago, office with A. M. 
Simpson & Bro-, 44 Market 

Magagnos J. A., local agent and collector State In- 
vestment Insurance Co., office 409 California, dwl 
Arlington House 

MAGILL R. H., insurance agent, office 113 Liedes- 
dorff, res Alameda 

MAGILL & DENISON (Arthur E. Magill and 
Charles H. Denison) , general agents Phoenix In- 
surance Co. of Hartford, Home Insurance Co. of 
New York, and North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Co. of London and Edinburgh, office 
205 Sansom 

Maginnis Michael, boilermaker, dwl 34 Minna 

Mahogany G. and S. Mining Co. (Idaho), office 4113^ 
California room 4 

Mahony J. H., stock broker, office 418 Montgomery, 
dwl 920 Washington 

Mahony W. P., real estate, dwl American Exchange 

Maison Leon A. ( Mathieu & M.), dwl 1715 Stockton 

Malatesta Nino, real-estate agent, office 502 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 919 Stockton 

Mandlebaum Francis, wholesale wines and liquors, 
312 Sacramento, dwl 511 Van Ness Av 

MANHATTAN MARBLE CO. OF CALIFORNIA, 
office 212 Sansom 

Mann B. F., real estate, dwl American Exchange 

MANNING M. P., carrier S. F. Chronicle and Even- 
ing Post, dwl 1311 Pacific 

Manning M. E. Mrs., stationery and varieties, 1311 
Pacific 

Manrow J. P., real estate, office 430 Montgomery, 
dwl NE cor Chestnut and Larkin 

Marchand D. C, dwl 619 Eddy 

Marfies T., carpenter, dwl 207 Post 

Marks S. Mrs., milliner and millinery, 28 Third 

MARSH HENRY F., general agent eastern manu- 
facturers, 316 Pine, res San Rafael 

Martin Albert, paying teller with Tallant & Co., dwl 
1206 Market 

Martin Henry, steward Woodrow House, 1206 Mar- 
ket 

MARTIN P., president Pacific Cement Co., office 502 
Kearny, dwl 635 Union 

Mason Charles, salesman with John M. Davies & 
Co., dwl Nucleus House 

MASON FREDERICK, real estate, office 37 Mont- 
gomery Block, dwl Grand Hotel 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTOBY contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



KENNEDY'S INSUBANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



62/ 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Mason John E., civil engineer, office 37 Montgomery 

Block, dwl (rrand Hotel 
MASONIC SAVINGS AND LOAN BANK, William 
II. Culver president, H. T. Graves secretary, 6 
Post, Masonic Temple 
Mntthoy Henry, engineer, dwl 309 Powell 
Matbiou Alphonse ( Mathieu <& JV/awonA dwl Met- 

calf PI 
Mathieu & Maison (Alphonse Mathieu and Leon 

Maison), manufacturing jewelers, 434J-2 Pine 
Mayer August, clerk, dwl 871 Mission 
Mavson J. M., clerk, dwl 007 Bush 
McAUep William I., captain schooner Enterprise, 

office with A. M. Simpson & Bro., 44 Market 
McAUTHUR, ANTHOi^Y & CO. (John M. McAr- 
thur, E. T. Anthony, and George W. Bennett), 
leather dealers, 321 and 323 Sacramento 
McArthur .John M. (McArthur, Anthony & Co.), 

res Oakland 
McCann Michael, commission merchant, NE cor Bat- 
tery and Broadway, dwl W s Treat Av bet Twen- 
ty-first and Twenty-second 
McCaskell James, houseraiser, dwl 54 First 
McCaulloy John, barkeeper with John Gray, dwl 

.Wt Howard 
McCOMBE JOHN, collector and money broker, 430 

Cal, dwl NAV cor Twenty-second and Treat Av 
McCuUough Daniel, master mariner, dwl 41 Natoma 
McCrum Hugh (J. M. Goewey & Co.), dwl 1206 Mar- 
ket , , „ 
McCurrie Charles H. (McCurrie & TFebeW , dwl 811 

Leavenworth 
McCURRIE & WEBER (Charles H. McCurrie and 
Julius 'FP'^eher/', dealers sheet music and piano- 
fortes, 123 Post 
McDermott Michael, plumber, dwl 252 Clementina 
McDonald Alexander, captain brig Perpetua, office 

with A. M. vSimpson & Bro., 44 Market 
McDonald T., back, 703 Market, dwl 308 Folsom 
McDonald Timothy, express wagon, junction Market 

and Sacramento, dwl 1825 Sutter 
McDonnell Thomas, hackman, dwl 250 Tehama, rear 
McElroy Abraham J., caniagemaker with Pollard 

it Carvill Manufacturing Co., dwl (38 Minna 
McElroy Robert, agent James Phelan,office331 Mont- 

gouierv room 20, dwl ;,U7 Howard 
McEvov Michael, stonecutter, dwl 27 Anthony 
McEadden Samuel, hackman, 717 Market 
McGee John, expressman, 7 Third, dwl Bernal 

Heights 
McHenery George, expressman, SW cor Sutter and 

Kearny, dwl 1S15 Broadway 
Mclvel Peter, tailor with L. Morris & Son, dwl 533 

Mission tt i j i 

McKenna Thomas D., policeman City Hall, dwl 2ol3 

Mission 
McKenty Jackson, stock broker, office 413 California 
McLaren Daniel, notary public and commissioner 
deeds, 330 Mont, dwl SW cor Gough and Geary 

McLaughlin , dwl S s Jackson bet Devisadero 

and Broderick „ „ „ ^ ^ 

McMenomy J., hoseman Hose No. 2, S. F. F. D., Post 

nr Fillmore 
McNiel John, solicitor Morning Call, dwl 17 Willow 
Av ^ . , , 

McNear Christopher E.. ship broker, 302 Davis, dwl 

133^ Oak 
McRUER D. C, State harbor commissioner, office 

414 Montgomery, dwl 18 Laurel PI 
McSwegan Daniel (George Johns >& Co.A dwl Revere 

House 
Mead Daniel (ilead <& Kyle), dwl 608 Jones, rear 
Mead & Kyle (Daniel Mead and Thomas Kyle), 

draymen, 608 Jones, rear 
Meagher John F., deputy coroner, office 636 Clay, 

dwl 417 Kearny 
Mecartney Amos, real estate, office 533 Kearny room 

13, dwl 70!) Taylor 
MELCHER J. A. & SON (Eugene A. Melcher) ,gon- 
eral agents Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance 
Co., office -330 Kearny 
Melstedt Sarah Miss, adjuster Coiner's Department 

U. S. Mint 
Mendelsohn David (Beeb AM.), dwl 19 Ellis 
Merchants' Insurance Co. of Newark, N. J., Hamil- 
ton ASonnichsen agents, office NE cor California 
and Sansom 
MERRIFIELD & ROSENER (Edwin Merrifield 
and Levi Jiosener) , Star Brewery, SE cor Folsom 
and Eleventh, office and depot 521 Market 



Merwin P. J. (P. J. Merwin & Co./, -dwl 729 Treat Av 
Merwin J. P. & Co., commission produce, .325 Wash 
Metx Frederick, transferer with F, Korbel & Bros., 
dwl 207 Post 

Meyer C. G., assayer, dwl American Exchange 
MEYER CHARLES, gunmaker and dealer firearms, 
803 Montgomery 

MICHELSSEN, BROWN & CO. (Edward Michels- 
sen, Benjamin W. Bronni and Daniel HothJ, im- 
porters and dealers provisions, pork packers, etc., 
.308 and 310 Front 

Middleton Samuel P. (Olneys & M.),dwl 19 Ellis 

MILLER GEORGE W., hatter, 112 Montgomery, 
dwl 517 Pine 

Mills George E., mining engineer, office 240 Mont- 
gomery room 2 

Moffitt George, baggage master C. P. R. R., dwl 
American Exchange 

MONTGOMERY STREET REAL ESTATE CO., 
office 326 Pine 

MOODY .)OHN C, apothecary, 214 Kearny, dwl 
2109 Pine 

Moody W, dwl American Exchange 

Moore James, receiving teller First National Gold 
Bank dwl 803 Hyde 

Mooi^i Justin P., real estate and commission, office 
426 California, res Oakland 

Morgan Morgan P., attorney at law, office 430 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 1003 Pacific 

Morgenstern Albert, hairdressing saloon, 9 Second, 
dwl 504 Taylor 

Morrill Charles A., special agent U. S. Treasury De- 
partment, office Custom House third floor, dwl 
1024 Jackson 

Morse George T., captain schooner Bobolink, office 
with A. M. Simpson & Bro., 44 Market 

Mortimer Peter, porter American Exchange 

MORTON J. & CO. (Sargent S. Morton, and John 
Ruggles,', teamsters, office 302 California 

Morton Joshua B., carpenter and builder, 11 Webb, 
dwl 1509 Jackson 

Moylan Patrick, packer with R. A. Swain & Co., dwl 

5 s Stockton bet Clay and Washington 
Mulhern Daniel, waiter American Exchange 
MUNSELL JAMES Jr.. managing agent Mutual 

Benefit Life Insurance Co., office 224 Sansom SE 

cor California, dwl 12 Fifth Av 
Murphy Frank J., reporter, dwl 23 Kearny 
Murphy Nathaniel S., physician, office NW cor Geary 

and Dupont 
Murray Kate, waitress Woodrow House, 1206 Market 
Muzzey Enos B., drayman with James Forrest, dwl 

432 Fell 
Myers Charles (Carver, P. & M.) , dwl 515 Kearny 

Nahor a. H., miner, dwl American Exchange 
Nelson Horatio, circus performer with John Wilson, 

dwl 803 Montgomery 
Nelson John B.,card engraver with Geo. M. Wood 

6 Co. , dwl 120 Post 
Neumann Louis, collector with Julius Jacobs, dwl 

113 Sixth 

Newton, Philipps & Co., importers gents' furnishing 
and linen and white goods, 306 Sansom 

Nippert August, real-estate and employment office, 
116 Kearnv, dwl 715 Hayes 

NISBETH HUGO, editor and proprietor California 
Scandinav and general agent of the Scandinavian 
Agencv of the Inman Lino, office 326 Sansom, dwl 
1120 Stockton 

Noble H. H. (H. H. JVoble & Co.), dwl 19 Hawthorne 

NOBLE H. H. & CO. (Henry Epstein), stock brok- 
ers, 4-35 California 

Noggle Dorman L., dwl 1030 Jackson 

Nohl E. W., workman Coiner's Department U. S. Mint 

Nordlinger Isaac J., importer foreign fruits, etc., 310 
Front, dwl 502 Bush 

NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 
CO., J. A. Melcher & Son general agents, office 
339 Kearny „ ,.„ 

Norton George N., with R.G. Dun & Co., 320 Califor- 
nia, res East Oakland 

O'Hanlon Daniel, porter American Exchange 

O'Leary Fergus (Kane, O'Leary <& Co.^dwl Brook- 
lyn Hotel 

Oakland Quicksilver Mining Co. (Sonoma Co., Cal.), 
office 108 Leidesdorff _ , 

OCCIDENT (Presbyterian, weekly). Rev. S. Wood- 
bridge editor, office 434 California 



FABNSWORTH & CIiABK furnisli Safe and Eeliable Insurance against Fire. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Vaiises. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, KEMOVALS, ETC. 



62g 



Ogden H. G. f Pacific Electro Depositing Works) , dwl 
43.5 Bryant 

OLNEY & CO. f James iV. and Charles C. OlneyJ, 
real-estate asents. office 310 Montgomery 

OLNEYS & MIDDLETON rjaines N. and Charles 
C. Olney ajid Samuel P. Middletonj ,re&\-esidXB 
auctioneers, 810 Montgomery 

Olsen Frederick, lanndryman American Exchange 

Osborn George W., real-estate agent, 430 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 1770 Howard 

OWENS, THOMAS J., raining secretary, office 215 
Sansom, dwl 1108 Bush 

PACIFIC BAPTIST AND EVANGEL, Evangel 

Publishing Co., office 409 Washington 
Pacific Borax Co., Jacques Trayes president, office 

621 Snnsom 
PACIFIC BRASS FOUNDRY, Adams, Springer & 

Co. iiruprietors, 20 Fremont 
PACIFIC CEMENT CO., P. Martin president, office 

502 Kearnv 
PACIFIC ELECTRO DEPOSITING WORKS (Geo. 

5. Ladd and IT. G. Ogden!, 134 Sutter 
PACIFIC GRANITE CO., Elisha Hawes president, 

6. Rausch superintendent, office NW cor Third 
and King 

Pacific Jute Co. (formerly California Jute Co.), office 
115 Battery 

Pacific Reduction Works, G. Kustel superintendent, 
office 210 Front 

PACIFIC TRANSFER CO., Evan J. Coleman pres- 
ident, office 110 Sutter 

PACIFIC TYPE FOUNDRY, Nelson C. Hawks man- 
ager, 532 Clay 

Page and Panaca S. M. Co. (Ely, Nev.), office 488 
California 

Palomera Eusebio, saddlemaker, dwl 18 Dupont Al- 
ley 

Parke L. C. (Parke & Lac^i), dwl Occidental Hotel 

PARKE & LACY (L. C. Parke and B. T. Lacy J, 
agents Burleigh Rock Drill Co., office 6 Leid 

Patterson Robert Rev., pastor First Presbyterian 
Church, res Oakland 

Patterson William, captain bark Melanchton, office 
with A. M. Simpson k, Bro., 44 Market 

PEART BENJAMIN, agent Alvinzallayward. office 
224 California, dwl SE cor Post and Leavenworth 

Pease Austin S., traveling agent with William Wood- 
ward k Co., dwl 554 Bryant 

Pendleton B. F. (Pendleton & Fordi, res Oakland 

Pendleton & Ford (B. F. Pendleton and N. M. 
FordJ, real-estate and business agents, 513 Mont 

Pennell J. A., captain bark Oregonian, office with A. 
M. Simpson & Bro., 44 Market 

PETTIGREW JAMES J., collector, office 236 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 611 Greenwich 

Pettit Joseph, agent for patent pruning shears, and 
furnished rooms, 215 Kearny 

Phelan James, capitalist, office 331 Montgomery 
room 20, dwl Lick House 

Philips Newton & Co., importers gent's furnishing 
and linen and white goods, 306 Sansom 

Phillips Michael (William Green & Co. and M. 
Phillips & Co., Honolulu I, dwl 324 Ellis 

Phillips Stephen H., attorney at law, office 426 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 528 Harrison 

Pickett Charles (Davis & P.), dwl 334 Bush 

Pico M. J. R., dwl 553 Tehama 

Pinkstone A. J., reporter S. F. Chronicle, dwl 836 
Market 

Pinney George M. (Pinney & HosmerJ , res Oakland 

Pinney & Hosmer (George M. Pinney and IT. L. 
Hosmer) , attorneys at law, office 434 California 

Pitt William J. C, carrier S. F. Chronicle, dwl (531) 
431 Tehama 

Piatt W. H. Rev., Rector Grace Church, dwl 100 
Stockton 

Pollard Aaron, real estate, dwl 514 Lombard 

Pollard Charles H., real estate, office 534 California, 
dwl 326 O'Farrell 

POPE HORACE E., dentist, 6 Montgomery, dwl 1412 
Mason 

Pope Samuel B., secretary Manhattan Marble Co., 
office 212 Sansom, res Alameda Co. 

PORTER ASA A., wines and liquors, 112 HaUeck, 
dwl 313 Geary 

POTTER E. E., general agent Globe Fire Ins. Co.. 
office 318 California, res Oakland 

POTTER G. A., agent enamelled, marbleized, and 
iron mantels, 1214 Market 



Pouzadoux L. & Co., upholsterers, NW cor Stockton 
and O'Farrell 

Powning James, dwl 200 Hyde 

Prushaw A. W. (Carver. P. >& Co.), dwl W s Guer- 
rero, nr Twenty-fourth 

Pulverman Moritz, optician, 1112 Market, dwl 121 
Sixth 

Radovich Lazarus (Radovich & UhrlandtJ, dwl 1719 

Pacific 
RADOVICH & UHRLANDT (L. Radovich and H. 

E. ZTrhlandt) . proprietors Wine House, 306 Kear 
Ranft Henrv, clerk with Francois A. Rouleau, dwl S 

W cor Greenwich and Larkin 
Rathbone George S., wharfinger and collector Folsom 

St. Wharf, dwl NW cor Stockton and Jackson 
Ravekes David (Whittier, Fuller & Co.), dwl 548 

Howard 
Reading E. M., stock broker, office 608 Montgomery, 

dwl 4 Rincon PI 
REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATES (The), Wm. Hollia 

president, office 304 Montgomery 
Regan Ellen Mrs., millinery, 25 Post 
REGENSBURGER ALFRED E., physician, office 

417 Bush, dwl 117 Taylor 
REID JOHN, merchant tailor, 907^ Market 
Reid Robert, machinist with Adams, Springer & Co., 

dwl 8 Minna 
Reinhart J. F.. bookkeeper with William Green & 

Co.. dwl 715 Eddy 
Rice Emmet E., mining, dwl 1110 Leavenworth 
Richardson Robert W., dry goods, 901 Stockton 
Robinson Edward R. (R. R. Swain & Co.), dwl '213 

Sutter 
ROBINSON MARY Miss, furnished rooms, 324 

Sutter 
Rockman Morris, physician and surgeon, office 22 

Kearny, dwl 723 Ellis 
Rohan Thomas, ship clerk, dwl 446 Minna 
Roth Daniel (Michelssen, Brown & Co.), dwl 717 

Turk 
Rubber Stamp Company, manufacturers printing 

wheels, etc.. 318 Front 
RUHL BROTHERS ( Adolphxis and Henry r-J, im- 
porters watches and jewelry, agents William 

Ruhl New York and G. H. Mumm & Co.'s 

Champagne, 522 Montgomery 
Ryer W. M., capitalist, office 3:30 Pine room 42, dwl 

Grand Hotel 
Ryer W. T. S., real-estate agent, office 330 Pine room 

42, dwl 912 Sutter 

SACRAMENTO HIDE, WOOL, AND TALLOW 
CO. (8. E. Corder & Co., Sacramento City) 
office 113 Washington 

Samoan Commercial and Land Company (Navigators 
Islands), office 106 Leidesdorff 

SAN^FRANCISCO CIGAR BOX MANUFACTORY. 
Kloppenburg & Klatt proprietors, factory 132 and 
134 Berrv, office 324 Clav 

SAN FRANCISCO MANUFACTURING CO. (John 
E. Bryant, Simon Strahan, J. A. Hunt, and J. 
Anderson) , general mill workers and manufact- 
urers house finish, cor Howard and Main 

Sargent Timothv, coal and wood, SW cor Powell and 
Sutter, dwl 1602 Taylor 

Scheerer Joseph, carpenter and builder, 512 Post, 

Schluter J. Henry, groceries and liquors, SE cor 
Howard and Second, dwl 112 Tehama 

Schmirer Emil, secretary Pacific Cement Co., office 
502 Kearny 

Schnoter Philip H., hairdresser, SW cor Fourth and 
Folsom, dwl 252 Clementina 

Schubart Elias (Einstein & S.J, dwl 742 Washington 

Schutz Julius, bookkeeper with Loupe & Haas, dwl 
1225 Bush 

Schwiering Emil (Sciviering <Sc Westall) , dwl 337 Te- 
hama 

SCHWIERING & WESTALL (Emil Schrviering 
and Joseph Westall I , dealers feathers and pillow 
manufactory, 704 Mission 

Scott Paul E., clerk Bank California, dwl 521 Post 

SCUDDER & FULLER (Frank V. Scudder and 
Arnold Fuller), notaries public and com mis 
sioners deeds, 611 Montgomery 

Se'eligsohn & Co. (Max Seeligsohn and Adolph 
Blumenthal), gent's furnishing goods, 704 Mar- 
ket 

Sharp William Jr., stationery and varieties, 236 
Montgomery, dwl 414 Union 



-PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTOBY circulates throughout the Paoifio Coast, 



EENNBDY'S IIfSITBAJ!]^C£ AGEIfCY. Fire, Marine, and Ijife, represents $12,000,000. 1 



62A 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Sherwood Samuel B., shipping and commission mer- 
chant. NW cor Front and Commercial room 5, 
dwl SW cor Montgomery and Pacific 

Shourds George W. & Co. f John A. Shourds) , de- 
signers and engravers on wood, 4lP<i California 

Simon Julius fAUschul. S. & CoJ, dwl ol3 Eddy 

Sinclair Archibald, stationery and varieties. Center 
Market cor Sutter and Dupont, dwl 925 Natoma 

Singleton Michael A., workman Coiner's Department 
U. S. Mint, dwl 422 Sutter 

Skidmore Charles W., clerk with Edward E. Eyre, 
dwl (lift Eddy 

Skidmore Susie E. Miss, teacher Market St. Primary 
School, dwl 619 Eddv 

Skidmore W. E. Mrs., dwl 619 Eddy 

Sloan William R., real-estate agent, 236 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 1203 Howard 

SLOCUM WILLIAM X., editor Common Sense, office 
and dwl 2oi) Montgomery 

Small Richard G., master mariner, dwl 29^2 Third 

Smedberg William R. Capt. U. S. A., clerk with C. 
Adol)>he Low & Co., dwl 1611 Larkin 

SMITH C. W. M., solicitor patents and patent law 
attorney, office 415 Montgomery, dwl 1719 Clay 

Smith George, molder with Adams, Springer & Co., 
dwl Chicago Hotel 

Smith Henry, musician, dwl 405 Green 

SOUTHWICK A. H. & CO. fH. F. Shepardson) , 
manufacturers windmills, 428 Sansom 

South worth Alden B.. dwl 621 Leavenworth 

SPARKS W. H. & CO. 'B. A, Bidlackj, real -estate 
agents, 240 Montgomery 

Spence A. S., wholesale dealer sewing-machine attach- 
ments, needles, etc., 933 Market 

Springer A.C. (Adams, Sprincipr & Co.) , dwl 308 Bush 

ST. LOUIS ART AND PHOTOGRAPHIC GAL- 
LERY (Theodore Miltz, John Swart, and Rich- 
ard SchadJ . 702 Market 

ST. LOUIS HOTEL, William Jensen proprietor, 11 
and 13 Pacific 

Stager R., locksmith with Adams, Springer & Co., 
dwl SW cor Third and Harrison 

Stahl X. F., attorney at law, office and dwl 606 Mont- 
gomery room 25 

Stearns R. E. C, secretary Board Regents University 
California, office 320 Sansom, dwl 15 Clementina 

Steinhart Sigmund (Ehrlich ct SteinhartJ , dwl 1509 
Stockton 

Steudeman Theodore, collector and general agent, 
off NW cor Mont and Cal room 13, dwl 331 Kear 

Stevens Charles W., real-estate agent, 236 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 737 Howard 

Stoakes B. F., helper Melter's and Refiner's Depart- 
ment U. S. Mint 

Stock Ernest C, reporter Morning Call and inter- 
preter German Police Court, dwl 609 Pine 

Stone Frank M., salesman with John M. Davies, & 
Co., dwl Nucleus House 

Striby William, teacher music, dwl 969 Howard 

Sullivan P. R. (Howland, 8. & CoJ, dwl Windsor 
House 

Susman Philip, secretary Pacific Jute Co., office 115 
Batterv, dwl 502 Bush 

SUTRO TUNNEL COMPANY, office 320 California 

SWAN BREWERY CO., (Frederick A. Elliott and 
Charles Wilmottl , brewers and bottlers ale and 
porter, SE cor Fifteenth and Dolores 

Sweeney George, machinist with Adams, Springer & 
Co.. dwl IS Fourth 

SWIFT JOHN F., attorney at law, office 430 Cal, 
dwl W s Valencia bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 

TAKAKI SAMRO, vice-consul of Japan, office 703 
Market 

Talbert T. A., real estate, office 308 Montgomery, dwl 
NW cor Pine and Kearny 

Ten Bosch Nicholas, commission merchant,, 109 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 1609 Van Ness Av 

Terrill William (Terrill & Chapman), dwl 340 Bush 

Terrill & Chapman (William Terrill and Samuel 
Chapman) , billiard saloon, 340 Bush 

Terry J. T., auction, commission, and business agen- 
cy, 504 Kearny 

Thompson James W., clerk with G. W. Chesley & 
Co., dwl 631 Sacramento 

Tiffany George (Tiffany & Co.), dwl 235 Kearny 

Tiffany & Co, (George Tiffany), watches and jewelry, 
2?5 Kearny 

Tillmann Frederick (Tillmann & Bendel), dwl 331 
Kearny 



TILLMANN & BENDEL (Frederick Tillmannand 
JTerman Bendel J , v!h6lesale groceries and pro- 
visions, 407 and 409 Clay 

Todd J. M., attorney at law, office 418 California, dwl 
NW cor Sixth and Minna 

Toplitz Robert L., bookkeeper with M. Brandenstein 
& Co., dwl 932 Broadway 

TORMEY & HAND (J. C. Tormey and John J. 
Jfartd', wholesale and retail liquors, 210 Sutter 

Towle J. Edward, architect, 302 Mont, dwl 426 Post 

Townsend AVilliam R., mining secretary, office 419 
California room 28, dwl 520 Capp "^ 

Tracy James P., bookkeeper, dwl 754 Mission 

Tripalo Philip (Grosaeita <& T.) , dwl 527 Commercial 

Turner Charles 0., merchandise broker, 202 Califor- 
nia, dwl SW cor Sacramento and Larkin 

Tyne E. D.. real-estate and business agent, 305 Kear- 
ny, dwl 410 Clementina 

Uhrlanpt H. E. (Radovich d: JJ.), dwl 413 Kearny 

Ullmer Moses, cigars and tobacco, 527 Montgomery, 
dwl 605 Clay 

Universal Self-Lighting Lamp and Gas Co., A. L. 
Day manager, 410 Kearny 

Ustick William L., mining secretary, office 438 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 127 Kearny 

Vas Schaick L. H., attorney at law (and W. D. Ca- 
nard & Co.) , office 606 Mont, dwl 6.50 Howard 

Vimont Joseph N., stock broker, office 5 Leidesdorff, 
dwl 213 Turk 

Wadsworth Benjamin C. (William R. Wadsworth 

& Son), dwl Windsor House 
Wadsworth William R. (William R. Wadsivorth <& 

Son), dwl Windsor House 
Wadsworth AVilliam R. & Son (Benjamin C. Wads- 

worth) , commercial brokers, 402 Front 
Waggoner George H. ( Hendricksen & Waggoner), 

dwl 1005 California 
Waller Leopold P. F., local agent Equitable Life 

Assurance Society, office 426 California, dwl 1329 

California 
Waterman & Katz, merchants (of Port Townsend, W. 

T.). office 529 Clay 
Watson James, general broker, office 213 Sansom, 

dwl 80i) Stockton 
Webfoot Mining Co., office 401 California room 4 
Weber Julius ( Mc Carrie & W.) , dwl 811 Leav 
Weeden .lohn H., lieutenant U. S. Engineers, office 

533 Kearny 
Weeks E. J., real estate, office 605 Clay, dwl 1825 

Powell 
Wendt Christian ( Honigsherger & W.), dwl 225 Post 
WENSINGER F. S., real estate, office 238 Montgom- 
ery, dwl Occidental Hotel 
WENZEL HERMAN, importer and manufacturer 

clocks, jewelry, watches, etc., 13 Montgomery 

Av, dwl 515 Jessie 
West Frank G., law clerk, dwl 1208 Folsom 
AVheat Charles D., real-estate agent, office 740 Fourth, 

dwl 8 Mason 
White Silas A., principal Valencia Street Grammar 

School, dwl N s Twentv-third nr Valencia 
WHITMAN S. P., real-estate and loan agent, office 

302 Montgomery, dwl 1223 Mission 
WHITTIER, FULLER k CO. (W. Frank Whittier. 

William P. Fuller, James Duffy, and David 

Ravekes), importers paints, oils, etc., and manu- 
facturers mirrors, SW cor Front and Pine 
WILLIAMS HENRY F. & CO., real-estate agents, 

office 740 Fourth 
Williams John S. (Gosling & W.), dwl 728 Vallejo 
Wilson A. B., molder with Adams, Springer & Co., 

dwl SW cor Fourth and Castro 
Wolf Elias, salesman with M. Wertheimer & Bro., 

dwl 502 Bush 
Worcester Joseph Rev., pastor New Jerusalem 

Church, Druids' Hall, dwl 814 California 
AVright Thomas H., collector, office 317 California 
Wronkow H. & Co., importers and dealers Yankee 

notions, etc., 219 Pine 

YOST DANIEL Z., private secretary to Leland 

Stanford, dwl 915 Eddy 
YOUNGER WILLIAM J., dentist, office 224 Post, 

res Oakland 

Zeehandelaar a., employment office and business 
agent, 715 Montgomery, dwl 313 Stockton 



ATIjAS ins. CO. OF HABTFOBD; Assets $325,000; Farnsworth & Clark, Agents. 



C. p. VAN SCHAAOK & CO,, 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearn^ Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



THE 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 

For the Year Commencing April 1st, 1874. 



H^^NoTiCE. — Names too late for regular insertion, removals, changes, etc., which have occurred dur- 
ing the printing of the work, will he found on the pages immediately preceding this. 

For List of Boarding Houses, Hotels, Lodgings, etc., see Business Directory, pp. 736, 776, and 793; for 
Packets— Sail and Steam, see pp. 809 and 826 ; for the location of the offices of the different Mining Com- 
panies, see Business Dieectort, p. 803. 



A.BBItE^IA.TIOI^S 



labv Above 

acct Accountant 

agt Agent 

assn Association 

[atty Attorney 

av Avenue 

ben Benevolent 

bldg...Buil(iing or Buildings 

bds Boards 

bet Between 

iblk. Block 

C. H Custom House 

elk Clerk 

col'd Colored 

com Commission 

cor Corner 

dept Department 

dwl Dwelling 

E East 

E.H.L.. Eight-Hour League 
forwd Forwarding 



IntEev.. Internal Revenue 

F. P Fort Point 

h House 

imp Importer 

lab Laborer 

manuf Manufacturer 

mecht Merchant 

Mis Dol Mission Dolores 

mkr Maker 

mkt Market 

N North 

nr Near 

off. Office 

opp Opposite 

pi Place 

P. M Pacific MaU 

P. O Post Office 

pro Protective 

prod Produce 

proptr Proprietor 

res Besides or Besidence 



R. R Railroad 

Rev Reverend 

rms Rooms 

S South 

s Side 

S. F. F. D S. F. Fire Dep 

stm..Steamer or Steamship 

Supt Superintendent 

Treas Treasurer 

wks Works 

W West 

STREETS. 

Bat Battery 

Bdwy Broadway 

Bran Brannan 

Cal California 

Clem Clementina 

Com Commercial 

Dup Dupont 

Fol Folsom 



Har Harrison 

How Howard 

Jack Jackson 

Kear Kearny 

Leav Leavenworth 

Leid Leidesdorff 

Lomb Lombard 

Merch Merchant 

Min Minna 

Miss Mission 

Mont Montgomery 

Pac Pacific 

Pow Powell 

Sac Sacramento 

San Sansom 

Sec Second 

Ship Shipley 

Stev Stevenson 

Steu Steuart 

Stock Stockton 

Wash Washington 



Aaron A. Henry, clerk, dwl 18 Sutter 

Aaron Amelia Miss, teacher Eighth St. Grammar 

School 
Aaron Hannah (widow), dwl 131^2 Perry 
Aaron J oseph, hairdressing saloon, 8OO34 Market, dwl 

131>^ Perry 
Aaron Moses, waiter. New York Bakery 
Aaron Simon, merchant, dwl 733 l^'olsom 
Abadie Emile, liquors, dwl 619 Vallejo 
j Abadie Eugene, carpetlayer, dwl 61U Vallejo 
, Abadie Maria Pene (widow), midwife, dwl 619 Vallejo 
Abbey and Twenty-sixth St. K. K. Assn, off 507 Mont- 
gomery 
Abbey Homestead Association, office 507 Montgomery 
Abbot, Downing & Co., manufacturers Concord car- 
riages. Concord, N. H., Hill & Eastman agents, 
411-415 Battery 
Abbot (ieorge (E. Orisar & Co.A NW cor Broadway 

and Sansom 
Abbot Thomas, stevedore with Menzies, Lowry & 

Bingham 
Abbott Anna F. B. Mrs., dressmaking, 1400 Polk 
Abbott Charles M., clerk with Newton Brothers & 

Co., dwl 611 Mason 
, Abbott Eliza A. (widow), dwl NW cor Mission and 
J Seventh 

J Abbott Henry, agent Michigan Central R. R., dwl 
I .^^'■^ Montgomery 

I Abbott Isaac C, seaman, dwl 405 Kearny 
I Abbott John, cook, dwl 12 Hunt 
Abbott John iM., lumberman, dwl 611 Mason 
I Abbott Joseph E., carpenter with D. A. Macdonald 
i & Co., dwl 413 Eourth 
Abbott Lucy (widow), dwl 2503 Sacramento 



Abbott Margaret (widow), boarding, NE cor Brannan 

and Ninth 
Abbott Moses A. Capt., dwl 2314 Washington 
Abbott Usborn, broker, office 304 San, dwl 939 How 
Abbott Samuel S., carpenter Woodward's Gardens, 

dwl NE cor Mission and Twenty-third 
Abbott Thomas (I'etersen & A.), dwl 115 Clark 
Abbott William, bookkeeper Methodist Book De- 
pository, dwl 815 Tyler 
Abbott William, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Abcock Albert P., feeder with Elliot <& Brother, dwl 

22 Turk 
Abel Alvah C, hassockmaker, dwl 1 Goodsell PI 
Abel Charles, laborer Pacific lioUing Mills, dwl Illi- 
nois bet Twentieth and Shasta, rear 
Abel Charles, master mariner, dwl 16U Steuart 
Abel E. B., carpenter with Savage ife Son, dwl 227 Sec 
Abel George A., clerk with W. A. Holcomb & Co., res 

Oakland Point 
Abel James, carpenter S. P. R. R. 
Abel Lewis 1 3Iarks & Co.), dwl 15 Taylor 
Abel Richard, seaman, dwl 160 Steuart 
Abell Edward Alexander, bookkeeper California 

Savings and Loan Societj', dwl 5 Vassar PI 
ABELL ALEXANDER G., grand secretary Grand 

Lodge E. and A. M., office Masonic Temple, dwl 

1027 Washington 
Abell Edward Alexander, bookkeeper California 

Savings and Loan Society, dwl 28 Hampton PI 
Abell Eroderick, baker with E. Behrmann, dwl 1218 

Powell 
ABEND POST (German daily and weekly), S. F. 

Abend Post Co. publishers and proprietors, office 

521 Clay 



•AOIFIO, COAST BUSINESS DIKEOTOEY contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



Ii. W. KEJfNEDY. General Iilsuranee Agent. Fire. Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



ABE 



64 



ADA 



Abercrombie Alexander K., clerk P. M. S. S. Co. dwl 

tjOO Bush ' 

Ajjernethy William A., carpenter, dwl 561 Minna 
Abie Thadeus, seaman, dwl 92 Steuart 
Aborn Edward S., physician, office and dwl 213 Geary 
Abraham Abraham, clothing, 400 Pacitic 
Abraham Adolph, tailor, dwl 1 Elizabeth 
Abraham (Jabriel, clothing, 33 and 3.3 Sec, dwl 4 Hyde 
Abraham Henry f Cohen d- A.J, dwl 248 Clementina 
Abraham Henry, hats and caps, 1012 Dupont, dwl 728 

Union 
Abraham John, packer 412 Battery, dwl 1128 (1188) 

Broadway 
Abraham Louis fM. Spiro & Co.), dwl 644 Sac 
Abraham Louis, clothing, 6 Clay, dwl 4.38 JSTatoma 
Abraham Marks, peddler, dwl 430 Green 
Abraham Philip, dry goods, 44 Sixth, dwl 9 Seventh 
Abraham Ihomas, seaman, dwl 10.5 Clark 
Abraham Wolf, peddler, dwl 247 Clementina 
Abrahams Henry, hatter, dwl 728 Union 
Abrahams Jacob, tinsmith with Louis Leiser, dwl 

248 Clementina 
Abrahams John L., laborer, dwl 6.5 Clementina 
Abrahams Jonas, bootmaker, dwl 128 Olive Av 
Abrahams Marks, peddler, dwl 248 Clementina 
Abrahamskey A., clerk, dwl Overland House 
Abrahamson Alexander, clothing, 429 Kearny, dwl 

820 Mission 
Abrahamson Gustave, with S. Bine, dwl 733 Geary 
Abrahamson Hermann, \f\ih. S. Bine, dwl 733 Geary 
Abrahamson Jacob, dwl 733 Geary 
Abrahamson Julius, merchant, dwl 733 Geary 
Abrahamson Peter, stoves and tinware, 4.39 Bush dwl 

1022 Hyde ' 

Abrahamson Rosa Miss, teacher German Bush St. 

Cosmopolitan school, dwl 733 Geary 
Abrahamson Samuel, gastitter with Charles Waters 

dwl Calitornia nr Polk 
Abramovieh John ( Abramovich <& Co.), dwll322Polk 
Abramovich in, Co. (John Abramovich and Theodore 

ISerovichj , fruits, 1122 Stockton 
Abrams Havid, clerk with Charles C. Keene, dwl S 

VV cor Van iNess Av and Tyler 
Abrams Edward C, trimmer with Edward Galpen & 

Co., dwl W s Poisom nr Seventeenth 
Abrams Henry (Abrams & Bro.J , dwl 786 Folsom 
Abrams John (Abrams & Carroll), dwl Lick House 
Abrams J ulius (Abrams & Bro.J, dsvi 785 Polsom 
Abrams Marcus, real estate, dwl 786 Polsom 
Abrams Samuel, real-estate office, 310 Monteomerv 
dwl 1.312 Pranklin h,^^^'-:/, 

Abrams Sarah, saleswoman 2-3 Kearny, dwl cor Tyler 

and Van i\ ess Av 
Abrams & Bro. (Henry and Julius Abrams), cigars 

and tobacco, .3iy Montgomery 

ABKAMS & CAKROLL (John Abrams and James 

M,. Carroll), importers and wholesale druggists, 

2Uj and 2US Battery ssi=i.=. 

Abramsky Charles, upholsterer with Goodwin & Co.. 

dwl 421 Bush 
Abramson Adolph, clerk with Louis Abraham, dwl 

2u Clay 
ABRAMSON EDWARD, druggist and apothecary, 

7o3 Clay, dwl 1217 Mason 
Abramson J acob, watchmaker with Hartwig Traube 
dwl 1217 Mason ' 

Abramson xVeils, mariner, dwl S s San Bruno Road 

nr Islais Creek 
Abrego Ysmael, salesman with Linforth, Kellogg & 

Co., dwl .3iy Polsom ^° 

Abury Emily (widow), clerk Surveyor-General's Of- 

nce, dwl 10.38 xMission 
ACADEMY BUlLDliNG, 330 Pine 
Academy of ^'otre Dame, E s Dolores bet Sixteenth 

and Seventeenth 
Academie Parisienne (French school), Mrs. L. Fors- 

ter principal, 012 Sutter 
Acclimatizing Society, office 6.32 Mi'^sion 
Aof}}^ i'^^' K- ^'''^ clergyman St. Ignatius' College 
Acesot Jacob, gardener Eaurel Hill Cemetery 
Anhfu'^'l:-'^'"'!"!''^ S. aVi/e & A.), dwl 1028 Larkin 
ipht . ^^ ''^^ ."" 'r^\^\- ^- l^ochicioli, dwl 8 Tyler 
Acntormann Charles, laborer with P. A. Hering N 

s 1 ost bet Lyon and Cemetery Av 
Acker Pannie Mrs., dressmaker, 203 Dupont 
Acker Mary Miss, cloakmaker with Fratinger&Noll, 

dwl .00.3 Howard 
ACKEHMAN BROTHERS (Hart 8., Isidore S., Isi- 
dore H., and Samuel /S.y, dollar store and whole- 
sale variety goods, 123 Kearny 



Ackerman Charles, dwl 734 Tehama 

^^^.S P*^^^"^ CLARLES L., attorney at law, office 

420 Calfornia, dwl 520 Eddy 
Ackerman David, butcher with Felix Uri, dwl 902 

Ackerman David G., jeweler with C. Meseth, dwl 710 
Howard 

Ackerman Edward, salesman with Hall & Lachman 
Qwl ILd Perry ' 

Ackerman Edward, varnisher with W. J. T. Palmer 
& Co., dwl 218 Minna 

Ackerman Hart &.( Ackerman Bros.), dwl 916 Sutter 

Ackerman Henry, jeweler with George Finck, dwl 
o20 Eddy 

Ackerman Hyman, clerk with Ackerman Bros., dwl 
916 Sutter 

Ackerman Isidore H. (Ackerman Bros.), dwl 916 
Sutter 

Ackerman Isidore S. (Ackerman Bros.), dwl 916 
Sutter 

Ackerman J. D., bookkeeper with John H. Hegler. 
dwl 314 Bush 

Ackerman Oliver B., cabinetmaker with J. P. Han- 
son, dwl 1.502 Stockton 

Ackerman Samuel S. (Ackerman Bros.), dwl 916 
Sutter 

Ackerman William, butcher, dwl SW cor Sacra- 
mento and Drumm 

Ackerman. See Akerman. 

Ackermann Charles, baker, dwl 631 Pacific 

Ackormann Claus, seaman, dwl 39 Pacihc 

Ackerson Charles, carpenter, dwl 215 Kearny 

AckMson John W. (Hanson, A. & Co.;, res Tacoma, 

Ackerson Mary C. (widow), dwl 176 Perry 
Ackland Edward T., porter 109 Pine, dwl 106 Hick- 
ory Av 
Ackley Benjamin F., bookkeeper Freight Depart- 
ment C. P. R. R., dwl 30 Stanly PI 
Ackley Ezra, carriagemaker with Kimball Manu- 

tactunng Co., res Alameda 
Ackley Helen M. (widow), dwl 33 Moss 
Acosta Antonia (widow), dressmaker, dwl E s Vir- 
ginia PI nr Broadway 
Acosta Miguel, carriagemaker with Pollard & Car- 

viU Manulacturing Co., dwl .308 Green 
Acton Martin J., express wagon, cor Fourth and 

Market, dwl 4 Sumner 
Acton Richard, harnessmaker with J. C. Johnson & 

Co., dwl 307 First 
Acton Robert, bootmaker with Einstein Bros. & Co. 

dwl .3.31 Howard 
Acuiia Isabelle (widow), dwl 615 Broadway, rear 
Adacks Henry, laborer, dwl New Alaska Hotel 
Adair George B., salesman with Pills bury, Webb & 

Co., dwl 29 Hawthorne 
ADAM THOMAS, liquor saloons, junction Market 
and Geary, and Old Corner, 516 Montgomery, 
cor Commercial, dwl .507 Gough 
Adami John, expressman, dwl 113 Virginia 
Adams A., shoemaker, dwl 2-35 Stevenson 
Adams A. J., broker, dwl 312 Sixth 
Adams A. L., carpenter, dwl Empire Hotel 
Adams Albert P., deputy U. S. Internal Revenue. 

dwl 2023^ Seventh 
Adams Alexander P., surveyor, dwl 543 Second 
Adams Altred, capitalist, dwl y05 Market 
A ifP^^r^^*!'®'^-,!'- I Hanson & A.), dwl 202}^ Seventh 
Ai>AMb A. M. (Adains, Springer <& Co.), brass 
founder, look manufacturer and machinist, 20 
iremont, dwl 119 Fifth 
Adams Anna (widow), dwl 525 Geary 
Adams Anthony, carpenter, dwl Heinz Hotel 
ADAAlS, BLliMNJ & CO. (William J. Adams and 
. , Peter Taylor) , lumber, Pier 17 Steuart 
Adams C. A. xVliss, teacher Broadway Grammar 

School, dwl 1910 Hyde 
Adams Charles, cook P. M. S. S. Mohongo 
Adams Charles, driver City R. R. Co., dwl NE cor 

Mission and fourteenth 
Adams Charles D., porter with 0. F. Willey & Co 

dwl .339 feecond 
Adams Christian (Krausgriff & A.), dwl 2 Vallejo 

Adams Cyrus (Cyrus Adains & Co.), dwl 526 Post 

Adams Cyrus &Co. ('-B/josi'mjY/jy, importers and job- 
bers leal tobacco, 419 and 421 Jackson 

Adams D. T., dwl 700 California 

Adams Edson, real estate, office 44 MontgomeryBloek. 
res Oakland 



Fire Insurance at Tariff Bates; Losses promptly paid by FABIfSWOKTH & CLARK. 



C. P.'VAM" SCSAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 718 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 



ADA 



65 



ADL 



Adams Emerson, butcher with Somers & Co., dwl539 

Second 
Adams Francis T., teamster with N. P. Ferine, dwl 

506 ijrannan 
Adams Frank, laborer with James McDovitt, dwlN 

W cor liattory and Green 
Adams Uoorge, barkeeper with Jacob Hildebrandt, 

dwl (ioU I'acilic 
Adams George, clerk with John W. Shehan, dwl 2 

Vallojo I'i 
Adams Georgro E., butcher with Somers & Co., dwl 

syj Second 
Adams George F., printer, dwl 15 Fifth Av 
Adams George G., barkeeper, dwl Overland House 
Adams George M., foreman rolling room Coiners' De- 
partment U. S. Mint, dwl Miy^ Grove 
Adams George P., clerk S. F. Post-office, dwl lOl-l 

Leavenworth 
Adams Grove (Adams d- Knight), dwl 920 Pine 
Adams Henry, brewer Broadway Brewery, dwl 10 

Polk Lane 
Adams Henry, miller, dwl 20 Jessie, rear 
Adams Henry Q., assistantj^weigher Custom House, 

dwl 2087 Pino 
Adams Herman, merchant tailor (Eureka, Nev.), dwl 

2o5 Kearny 
Adams Hill Con. M. Co. (Eureka, Nev.), William 

Traylor secretary, office 419 California 
Adams Horace E., collector, dwl 520 Kearny 
ADAMS HOUSE, John C. Beach proprietor, 537 Sac- 
ramento 
Adams Howard N., carpenter, dwl 27)-^ Fourth 
Adams Hugh, salesman with Paul E. Quillemin. dwl 

102 Eddy 
Adams J., dwl 37^ Dora 

Adams J., cooper, with Pae. Barrel and Keg Co. 
Adams Jacob (Specht & AJ , dwl 1(3 Scott PI 
Adams J ames, ex-sheritf, dwl !J02 Mission 
Adams James H., shoemaker, dwl lyi'j Hyde 
Adams James S. (Adams & Butler J, dwl 416 Larkin 
Adams J. M. Mrs., seamstress, dwl N s Francisco bet 

Mason and Taylor 
Adams John, boxmaker with Hobbs,Pomeroy & Co.. 

dwl 414 Post, rear 
Adams John, hairdresser with Joseph Lipman 
Adams John, waiter Lick House, dwl 3 Clara Lane 
Adams John, watchmaker, dwl 318 Pine 
ADAMS JOHi\ Q., attorney at law, office 604 Clay, 

dwl 1012 Taylor 
Adams John Q., clerk General Freight Office C. P. R. 

K., dwl 4oS Second 
Adams John Q., head postal clerk S. F. Post-office, 

dwl liuss House 
Adams John Quincy, helper with Moynihan & Ait- 
ken, dwl Kearny bet Pacific and Broadway 
Adams John S., clerk Freight Department C. P. R. 

K. Depot 
Adams Joseph, clerk, dwl cor Pennsylvania Av and 

Solano 
Adams Joseph W., manufacturer washing powder, 24 

Commercial, dwl 525 Pine 
Adams Josephine M. Miss, saleswoman Singer Man- 
ufacturing Co., dwl 1716 Turk 
ADAMS LA\VSOi\ S. (Adams, McNeill <& Co.,Sac- 

ramento City), office 405 Front, dwl S25 Bush 
Adams Mary Miss, typesetter California Type Found- 

ry, dwl Stockton nr Vallejo 
Adams Mary Mrs., housekeeper Empire Hotel 
Adams Mary Mrs., laundress, dwl lolS Powell, rear 
Adams N. B., advertising agent with Mark A. Miller. 

60S Market 
Adams Kelson, shipjoiner Shipjoiners' Jour. Assn. 

139 Post 
Adams Orson B., surgeon stm Constitution P. M. S. 

S. Co., dwl 11 Guerrero 
Adams Otis, steam-pumpmaker, Channel nr Fourth, 
. , dwl S s Eleventh Av bet K and O, South S. F. 
■***^i!^^,t»'"sper F., shipjoiner P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 15 
ritth Av 

A^o"'* 'i:^-i (dentist, dwl 1515 Leavenworth 

AHoI"** '}P<J"«y Mrs. (colored), nurse, dwl 11 Scott PI 

AH^^'^ i'"^"'^' teamster, dwl i\ s Bran nr Eighth 

7m d'!"'!* ^\l '"^'^ ^"^^ caps. 657 Washington, dwl 
/U.I MiutwoU 

! Adams Sumuoj, druggist, dwl 814 Bush 
Adams .^auu.el, machinist, dwl 516 Stevenson 
Aaams Nirah (widow), dressmaker, 10.S2 Kearny 
ilioli'* u' ■'}■>•• ^'■toMan wellborer, dwl 2221 Jackson 
4 ^ Ui ham, stevedore, dwl 331 Green 

Adams W lUiam H., barkeeper, dwl 80y Vallejo 



Adams William H., porter 205 Front, dwl W s Guer- 
rero bet Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth 
Adams William J. (Adams, Blinn <Se Co.), residence 

Fair Oaks, San Mateo Co. 
Adams William S., mate, dwl 127 Jackson 
Adams Zabdiel B., salesman with Main & Winchester, 

dwl W s Fillmore bet Ellis and Eddy 
ADAMS k BUTLEll (James S. Adam^ and Thomas 

J. Butler J , hay and grain, 53 Clay 
Adams & Knight (Grove Adams and William W- 
Knight), agents South S. F. Kelining Co., NW 
cor Seventh Av and M, office 314 Washington 
Adamson Kichard, salesman with Michols, Fried- 
lander k Co., dwl 260 Clara 
Adamson William, seaman steamer Kalorama, dwl 

26 Sacramento 
ADAMSON W. K. H., British Columbian immigra- 
tion agent and stock broker, office 315 California, 
dwl 206 Lombard 
Adcock Edwin, French polisher with L. & E. Eman- 
uel, dwl 45 Freelon 
Adcock John T., clerk with Knowland & Doe, dwl 

208 Second 
Adcock Robert, hostler, dwl Park Hotel 
Adcock William, porter with Hobart, Wood & Co., 

dwl 56 Tehama 
Addison George, dwl 1518 Broadway 
Addison John E. Gen., dwl 110 Sutter 
Addison William H., dwl 318 Pine 
Addoms Samuel K., salesman with Armes & Dallam, 

dwl cor Thirteenth Av and N, South S. F. 
Adogell James W. (colored), whitener, dwl 615 Grove 
Adels George, barkeeper with Madel k Tietjen, dwl 

NE cor Mission and Steuart 
Adelsdorfer Bertha Miss, seamstress with Isidore 

Lash, dwl 231 Sixth 
Adelsdorfer Eliza Miss, seamstress with Isidore Lash. 

dwl 231 Sixth 
Adelsdorfer Ernest (Ordenstein & Co.), dwl 1709 

Powell 
Adelsdorfer Isaac, peddler, dwl 231 Sixth 
Adelsdorfer Joseph, salesman with Frankenthal k 

Co., dwl 314 Seventh 
Adelsdorfer Zacharias, merchant, dwl 1709 Powell 
Adelston Bernard, glazier, dwl 510 Post 
Adoma William, calker, dwl 513 Howard, rear 
Aden MalehertK., captain schooner Hamlet, Market 

St. Wharf 
Ader J. Louis, laborer with P. Priet, dwl 777 Market 
Adickes Henry, maltster Albany Brewery, dwl 74 

Everett 
Adler A. A., salesman with W. & J. Steinhart & Co., 

dwl 1113 Post 
Adler Adolph, bookkeeper with Hart & Goodman, 

dwl Bootz Hotel 
Adler Alexander, clerk with Colman Bros., dwl 513 

Post 
Adler Bar, real estate, dwl 748 Howard 
Adler Bernard, tailor, dwl 357 Clementina 
Adler Charles, bookkeeper with Levi, Strauss k Co., 

dwl lOli* Sutter 
Adler Charles, salesman with Liebmann & Goldman. 

dwl 1619 Powell 
Adler Charles (W. & I. Steinhart & Co.), dwl 1113 

Post 
Adler Charles E., salesman llO Bush, dwl 1002 Van 

Ness Av 
Adler David, market, 419 Hayes 
Adler Harrj', silversmith with W. K. Vanderslice & 

Co., dwl 357 Clementina 
Adler Hermann, salesman with Schoenfeld, Cohen 

k Co., dwl 502 Bush 
Adler Jacob, boot and shoe dealer, officeSSO Kearny. 

dwl 502 Bush 
Adler John, stevedore with Menzies, Lowry & Bing- 
ham 
Adler Julius, solicitor with Union Ins. Co., dwl 513 

Post 
Adler Leopold (Schwerdt & A.), dwl 518 Stevenson 
Adler Louis, bootmaker, 3:>i East, dwl 160 Minna 
Adler Maurice, butcher, 302 Beale, dwl 115 Eleventh 
Adler Moses, merchant, dwl 1435 Pine 
Adler Moses, salesman with W. k J. Steinhart k Co 

dwl 1113 Post ' 

Adler Solomon, merchant, dwl 734 Geary 
Adler Solomon, clerk with Ackerman Bros., dwl 748 

Howard 
Adlington David M., carpenter, dwl 1125 Kearny 
Adlington Mary Mrs., dressmaker, 119 Silver 
Adlington Thomas L. (Hecox & A.J, dwl 119 Silver 



ifPACIPIO COAST BUSINESS DIKECTORY. 1874-6, H. G. Langley. Pub'r. S. P. Price 



^ 



$5. 



L. W. KENNEDY, General Insurance Agent, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



ADMINISTRATOR PUBLIC, office 3 and 4 Court 

Block ii;?(i Clay 
Admiral Nelson Tunnel and Mining Co.(Littlo Cotton- 
wood, Utah), Richard H. Sinton secretary, office 

5'iSt California 
Adoljih Joseph (colored), laborer 434 Pine, dwl 423 

Pine 
Adolphus Henry, physician, office 423 Washington, 

dwl 1!S08 Dupont 
Adrain William, merchant, dwl 629 California 
Adriatic Silver Mining Co. (Shell Creek, Nevada), 

office 408 California, room 14 
Adsit Elizabeth (widow), dwl 726 Sutter 
Aed/.art Andrew, laborer with William J. Cady 
Aorni George, cabinetmaker with W. J. T. Palmer & 

Co., dwl llfj John 
^TNA INSURANCE CO. of Hartford, Conn. (Fire), 

George C. Boardman manager, Henry Carlton Jr. 

agent, office 14 Merchants' Exchange 
^TNA IRON WORKS, Hanscom &, Co. proprietors, 

SE cor Eremont and Tehama 
J5tna Life Insurance Co. (Hartford, Conn.), M. P. 

Morse general manager, office 504 Kearny 
^tna Quicksilver Mining Co. (Napa Co., Cal.), Charles 

Langloy At Co. agents, SW cor Battery and Clay 
j3i!tna Tunnel Company (Utah), office 430 California 
Afflorbaeh Alice Miss, teacher piano, dwl 728 Broad- 
way, rear 
Afflorbaeh Christian H. Rev., pastor German Meth- 
odist Church, dwl 728 Broadway, rear 
Afflerbach Emma Miss, teacher piano, dwl 728 Broad- 
way, rear 
Afflox D., laborer La Grande Laundry 
Afripp Frederick, clerk with William Mentel, dwl N 

E cor Broadway and Vallejo 
AfFron Augustus, with Lewis Bros., dwl 8 Tyler 
Affron J. VV. (widow), dressmaker, dwl 8 Tyler _ 
Agama Joanna (widow), real estate, dwl 403 Union 
Agan James, marblocutter, dwl HI Ellis 
Agan Thomas, laborer Russ House 
AGARD, FOULKES & CO. (William B. Agard and 

Thot7ias FoulkcsJ, importers and commission 

merchants, 412 Front 
Agard George E., solicitor with M. Rosenshine <fe Co., 

dwl Continental Hotel 
Agard William A. T., clerk with Agard, Foulkes & 

Co., dwl 311 Green 
Agard William 13. (Agard, Foulkes <fe Co.), dwl 311 

Green 
Ageo Robert, fruit peddler, dwl S s Bernal Heights 

nr Islais Creek, Bernal Heights 
Agor James E. {Bacon & Company), dwl 26 Second 

Av nr Sixteenth 
Ager John E., bookkeeper Mutual Life Insurance 

Co. of N. Y., dwl 26 Second Av nr Sixteenth 
Agerman Frederick, gardener, dwl 421 Dupont 
Agilara Damasio, laborer with E. Regos 
Agincourt L. E., drayman with Cubery & Co., dwl 

714 Howard 
Agnew Eliza (widow), dwl 66 Minna 
Agnow Gilmore, compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 512 

Sixth 
Agnew John, livery-stablekeeper, dwl Valencia nr 

Ridley 
Agnew John, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Agnew John J., teamster with S. F. Gas Light Co., 

dwl 318 Jessie 
Agnew Patrick, calker Shipcalker's Ass'n, 713 Miss 
Agnow Richard, carpenter, dwl 55 Natoma 
Agnow Robert, miner, dwl 917 Battery 
Agnew Samuel, porter with J. Y. Wilson & Co., dwl 

SE cor Twentieth and Howard 
Agnew Thomas,city agent State Investment and Ins. 

Co., dwl 36 South Park 
Agnew Thos. H., compositor with Cuddy & Hughes, 

dwl 824 Kearny 
Agnew William, storekeeper P. M. S. S. Constitution 
Agnew William, teamster with S. F. Gas Light Co., 

dwl 318 J essie 
AGRICULTURAL PARK RACE COURSE, James 

R. Dickey proprietor. Point Lobos Av nr Twen- 
ty-fifth Av 
Aguayo Antonio, drover, dwl 754 Washington 
Aguayo Lisandro, clerk with Augustus D. Splivalo, 

dwl 754 Washington 
Aguilar Francisco J., hairdresser with H. L. Van- 

geistertield, dwl 1404>^ Dupont 
Aguirre Juan M., real estate, dwl 2 Dupont PI 
Aguirre Martin, salesman with Polack & Hartman, 

dwl 2 Dupont PI 



Aguirre Peter (Fernandez & A. J, dwl 2 Dupont PI 
Aguirre Ramon M. (Romero <& AJ, dwl 2 Dupont PI 
Aguirre Trinidad (widow), dwl 722 Broadway, rear 
Ah Chong (Chinese), merchant, E s Sullivan Alley 

nr Pacific 
Ah Ka (Chinese), tailor, 1008 Dupont 
Ah Quing (Chinese), cigar manufacturer, 309 Battery 
Ah Soo (Chinese), cigars, 734 Pacific 
Ahearn James, carpenter, dwl 115 Second 
Ahearn James, seaman, dwl United States Hotel 
Ahearn Peter, carpenter, dwl 115 Second 
Ahearn Robert, carpenter, dwl 115 Second 
Ahern David, oiler P. M. S. S. China 
Ahern James, groom with William F. Babcock, 11 

Essex 
Ahern James, teamster, dwl 372 Clementina 
Ahern John M., groceries and liquors, dwl NW cor 

Larkin and Ash Av 
Ahern M. A. Miss, teacher Eighth St. Primary 

School, dwl NW cor Larkin and Ash Av 
Ahern Mathew, bricklayer, dwl 649 Stevenson, rear 
Ahern Michael, bootmaker with S. W. Rosenstock 

& Co., dwl 23 Lilly Av 
Ahern Owen, tailor with George S. Reynolds, dwl 

274 Minna 
Ahern Patrick, laborer S. P. R. R. 
Ahern Patrick, tailor, dwl 1604 California 
Ahorn Thomas, helper Union Iron Works, dwl 58 

Jessie 
Ahern Timothy, helper Union Iron Works, dwl 58 

Jessie 
Ahern William, oysterman, dwl 536 Sacramento 
Aherne Jeremiah, teamster, dwl 265 Stevenson 
Aherne Patrick O., lamplighter S. F. Gas Light Co., 

dwl 727 Ellis 
Aherns George (Kuck & -^.^dwlNE cor Steiner 

and Greenwich 
Aheron John, laborer with William Kerr, 903 Battery 
Ahlbach J. (Conrad <& A.J, dwl SW cor Fifth and 

Harrison 
Ahlborn Charles fWeidenho/er <b AJ, dwl 429 Bush 
Ahlborn Emma F. (widow), dwl 245 Seventh 
Ahlborn Henry, expressman, cor Kearny and Post, 

dwl W s Fillmore bet Eddy and Ellis 
Ahlborn William, teamster with Stewart A Buckley 
Abler llippolyte, picture framer, dwl 621 Vallejo 
Ahlers Dietrick, captain sloop America, dwl cor Steu- 
art and Mission 
Ahlers Henry, laborer, dwl 160 Steuart 
Ahlers J. H. & Co. (F. Biscjwffj , groceries and liq.- 

uors, SW cor Powell and Vallejo 
Ahlers Johan D., agent with Bucking & Postel, NW 

cor Pacific and Tavlor 
Ahlers John H. (J. H. Ahlers i& Co.), dwl SW cor 

Powell and Vallejo 
Ahlers Richard, barkeeper with George Cantus, dwl 

SW cor O'Farrell and Stockton 
Ahlers William, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl cor 

Eighth and Brvant 
Ahlf Diederich, butcher, dwl Fifth Av nr M, South 

S. F. 
Ahren Hannah (widow), dwl 1313^ Perry 
Ahren Peter, laborer, dwl 549 Fourth 
Ahrens August, carpenter with Richardson & Hol- 
land, dwl 563 Howard 
Ahrens Charles F., cabinetmaker with Charles 

Klemm, dwl Fourth St. Hotel 
Ahrens Christian, watchmaker and jeweler, 843 Du- 
pont 
Ahrens Gertrude (widow), dwl 563 Howard 
Ahrens Henry (Jacob Nibhe& Co.), dwl 1406 Polk 
Ahrens Henry, clerk with Claus H. Wedemoyer, dwl 

SW cor Treat Av and Twenty-fourth 
Ahrens Jacob, clerk with John Von Hadelen, NW cor 

Powell and Green 
Ahrens Jacob Henry, liquor saloon, 218 Commercial, 

dwl S s Ellis nr Steiner 
Ahrens Nicholas, grocer, dwl 5 Vallejo PI 
Ahrnardt August ( Hildehrand <& A.), dwl 1602 Pow 
Ahumada Joseph M., real-estate agent, office and 

dvvl 631 Sacramento 
Aibischer Bruno, real estate, dwl 1337 Dupont 
Aibischer Joseph, dwl 1337 Dupont 
Aibischer Louis, printer, dwl 1337 Dupont 
Aibischer Mary, xMiss, schoolteacher, dwl 1337 Dup 
Aich Rudolph, gardener, dwl 1621 Sutter 
Aicher Franz, locksmith with John (}. lis, dwl 1618 

Stockton 
Aickley William, carpenter, dwl E s Utah bet Twen- 
ty-fourth and Twenty-fifth 



FABNSWOBTH & CIiABK, Gen'l Fire and Marine Insurance Agency: office 230 Cal. St< 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO.. 708, 712, 714, and 716 Keaxny Street, Furnishing Goods. 



AID 



67 



ALD 



AID UNION, J. A. Bauer president, William Girzi- 

kowsky secretary, office 417 Bush 
Aigeltingor Leopold, furrier with Adolph MuUer, 

dwl 10(59 Howard 
Aiken A, civil engineer Golden Gate Park 
Aiken Addie E. Miss, teacher Broadway Grammar 

School, dwl fiod Minna 
AIKEN CHARLES, attorney at law. office 34 Mont- 
gomery Block, dwl ti.« Minna 
Aiken James, laborer with Stand & Bro., dwl 303 Ma- 
son 
Aiken John, dwl 100 Ellis 
Aiken John, sailmaker, dwl 414 Jones 
Aiken Robert, shoemaker with I. M. Wentworth & 

Co., dwl W s Buchanan bet O'Farrell and Ellis 
Aiken William, civil engineer, dwl 905 Market 
AlIiEN WILLIAxM H., attorney at law, office 34 

Montgomery Block, dwl 6*3 Minna 
Aikin Martha (widow), dwl lOoo Eolsom 
Aikin Nathan J., physician, office and dwl 504 Kear 
Aikin. See Akin 
I Aime George, fisherman. Clay St. Wharf. 
Aimey Charles, engineer, dwl 531 Mission 
Ainsa James M., warehouse clerk Naval Office, Cus- 
tom House, dwl 305 Lombard 
Ainsley Frank, harnessmaker, dwl 4(JS Tehama 
Ainsley James, printer S. F. News Letter, dwl 24 

Sixth 
Ainsley John, boot and shoecutter U. W. C. Boot 

and Shoo Co., dwl 24 Sixth 
Ainsley Malinda W. (widow), dwl 325 Fourth 
Ainsley Thomas, express wagon, 222 Dupont 
Ainsley Thomas, furnished rooms, 24 Sixth 
Ainsworth Peter (Aiiisworth & AldisJ, dwl 529 Na- 

toma 
Ainsworth & Aldis f Peter Ainsworth and Edward 

Aldis) , slippermakers, 410 Market 
Aird Darling, blacksmith, with Deacon & Bulger, 

dwl 10 Zoo 
Aitchison Elizabeth Mrs., fancy goods. 111 Sixth 
Aitohison John, carpenter, dwl HI Sixth 
Aitchison Robert L. (Birdsall & ^.Adwl 223 Dupont 
Aitken Charles H., captain schooner Caroline Medau, 

dwl Broadway bet Polk and Van Ness Av 
Aitken Charles H., market, 5 Washington, dwl 228K 

O'Farroll ^ 

Aitken Charles H. Jr., student Heald's Business 

College 
Aitken James ( Moynihan & A.J, dwl 308 Seventh 
Aitken J ames, machinist S. F. P. Woolen Factory, 

dwl N W cor North Point and Larkin 
Aitken James C, boilormaker Union Iron Works, 

dwl 308 Seventh 
Aitken Jeannette (widow), dwl NW cor Capp and 

Twenty-fifth 
Aitken John, butcher with Rodman Sweet, dwl 563 

Mission 
Aitken K. S. Eggarts Mrs,, clairvoyant, dwl 22834 

O'Farrell 
Aitken Mary A. (widow), dwl 1511 Broadway 
Aitken Robert, house carpenter, dwl 115 Second 
Aitken Samuel, machinist Cal. Machine Works, dwl 

N W cor Capp and Twenty-fifth 
Aitken William, butcher with Charles H. Aitken, 

dwl 5 AV'ashington 
Aitkens Ernest (JE. H. Steel <& Co. 'Awl 352 Brannan 
Akerman Benjamin J., deputy L. S. marshal, dwl 

447 Howard 
Akers Henry, teamster with Peck & Co., dwl 309 

Austin 
Akers John, miner, dwl 22 Turk 
Aklong S. A., tailor, dwl E s Hampshire bet Twenty- 
second and Twenty-third 
Akniann William r >/e^er<JE,-^.;,dwlNWcor Drumm 

and Sacramento 
Alabama & Humboldt Con. M. Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), 
. , *\ • H- Watson secretary, office 302 Montgomery 
Alacran Mining Co. (Sinaloa, Mexico), office 003 Wash 
Aladdin Mining Co. (Ely, Nov.), office 110 Leidesdorff 
ALAMEDA FERRY, cor Davis and Pacific 
A amei Bernard, laborer, dwl 44 Jackson 
Alamo (iold and Silver Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nov.), 

office 434 California 

.''^■^ COAL CO., James T. Hoyt secretary, office 
A T ?^,Vlerchants' Exchange 
ALASKA CUxMMERClAL CO., John F. Miller pres- 

laent, E. Neumann secretary, office 310 Sansom 
Alaska Consolidated Mining Co. (Lyon Co., Nev.), 
, , t^oorge R. Spinney secretary, office 320 California 
Alaska Herald, A. A. Stickney editor, office 113 Leid 



Alatorre Theofilo, laborer, dwl 621 Vallejo 

Alban Edwin G., postal clerk S. F. Post-office, dwl 22 

Oak Grove Av 
Alban W. G., physician, dwl 22 Oak Grove At 
ALBANY BREWERY, Spreckels & Co. proprietors, 

71-75 Everett 
Albemarle House, Mrs. Collins and Mrs. E. A. Hod- 
son proprietors, 8 Mason 
Alberga George (colored), bootblack with Sand Bros., 

dwl Havens PI nr Washington 
Alberigi G. & Co. ^ Carlo Braga and Guiseppe Toni- 

erU^ wood and coal, 608 Broadway 
Alberigi Giovanni (O. Alberigi & Co.), dwl 608 Bdwy 
Alberline John, deckhand stm Pioneer, Jackson St. 

Wharf 
Albers Albert, ornamental painter with Field & Froi, 

dwl SW cor Minna and Second 
Albers Anton, foreman cigarmakers with Lewis 

Brothers, dwl 446 Minna 
Albers August, oysterman with George Mayes, dwl 

223 Jessie 
Albers Henry, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl Bry- 
ant Av bet Harrison and Bryant 
Albers J., truckman H. & L. No. 1 S. F. F. D., 22 

O'Farrell 
Albei-s Marcus, groceries and liquors, 335 Fourth, dwl 

223 Perry 
Albert Charles, longshoreman, dwl 1405 Stock, roar 
Albert Lewis, teamster. Pier 1 Steu, dwl 148 Tehama 
Albert Louis, waiter Lick House 
Alberti Frank, musician, dwl 105 Geary 
Alberti Jose, dwl 206 Brannan 
Albertson Albert, seaman, dwl 415 East 
ALBERTSON JOSEPH A., mining, office SOS Mont 

and physician, office and dwl 114 O'Farrell 
Albertson William, molder, dwl 1027 Market 
Albertson William T., machinehand with D. A. Mac- 

donald k Co,, dwl 1027 Market 
Albion & Noyo Mills, Macpherson & Wetherbee pro- 
prietors, office 30 Market 
Albion Louis, teamster, dwl W s Church nr Seven- 
teenth 
Albreeht — , merchant, dwl 132 Fourth 
Albrecht Andrew, milk ranch, W s San Jose Road 

opp St. Mary's College 
Albrecht August (Schroder & Albrecht J , dwl 738 

Minna 
Albrecht George, wagonmaker with Herman Lan- 

germann, dwl N s Twelth Av nr P 
Albrecht John, miner, dwl 933 Kearnv 
Albrecht John, tailor, 443 Bush, dwl 423 Bush 
Albrecht John B., clerk with Charles Duveneck, 

NW cor Seventeenth and Dolores 
Albrecht Joseph, wood and coal, 1515 and 1517 Mis- 
sion 
ALBRECHT RICHARD, bakery and confection- 
ery, 109 Taylor 
Albrecht Rudolph, clerk U. S. Coast Survey, dwl 768 

Bryant 
Albrecht William, merchant, dwl 15 Howard Court 
Albress Henry, laborer, dwl Bryant Av 
Albright Charles H., salesman with John Newman, 

dwl 445 Bush 
Albary John, laborer with California Butter Co. 
Alcayaga Jose, groceries, 524 Broadway 
Alcolo Andrew, laborer, dwi 3 Emmet PI 
Alden Abbie W. Miss, lodgings, 52 Second 
Alden Fruit Preserving Co., office 604 Merchant, 

room 8 
Alden John, carpenter, dwl 443 Shipley, rear 
Alden 0. W., driver with Murphy Brothers, dwl 331 

Jessie 
Alden Samuel B., policeman City Hall, dwl 4 Ber- 
nard 
Alder Gottlieb, steward Swiss Hotel, 627 Commercial 
Alderman Oscar, conductor N. B. and Mission ll. R., 

dwl 783 Market 
Aldis Edward {Ainsworth & A.), dwl 627 Stevenson 
Aldona August, dwl 1109 Kearny 
Aldred Michael J., boilermaker, dwl 144 Natoma 
Aldrich^Frederick, nurse Alms House, Mission Ocean 

House Road 
Aldrich George, oiler S. P. R. R., dwl 1929 Howard 
Aldrich Henry A., with Gibson & Worth, dwl 733 

Market 
Aldrich Louis A., attorney at law, office 59 Mer- 
chants' Exchange, dwl 1723 Clay 
Aldrich W. A., capitalist, office 621 Clay, dwl Grand 

Hotel 
Aldrich William B., laborer, dwl 310 Austin 



PACIFIC COAST BUSUSTESS DIBECTORT contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchant*, 



KENNEDY'S INSUBANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



Aldrich William H., clerk with J. C. Merrill & Co., 

• res Oakland 
Aldritlpo John, waiter AVhat Cheer House 
Aldiidge Kobert, tinsmith with S. F. Gas Light Co. 
Aleixo J. F., Portuguese P. and B. Association, 100 

California, room KJ 
ALEMAXY JOSEPH S., Most Rev. Archbishop of 

8an Francisco, dwl ()28 California • 
Alemon Pierre, carpenter, dwl Guillaume Tell Hotel 
Alers August, physician, office and dwl 722 Mont 
Alex Joseph F., liquor dealer, dwl i''<l (xreenwieh 
Alexander A., house and sign painter, dwl 428 

Broadway 
Alexander Adolf, tailor, 807 Market, dwl 404 Minna 
Alexander Annie (widow), dwl Twentieth Av nr K, 

South S. F. 
Alexander A. P., ship carpenter, dwl 418 Folsom 
ALEXANDER BARTON S. Gen., senior engineer 

and president Board Engineers, U. 8. A., Pacific 

coast, office 54^ Kearny, dwl 'oO South Park 
Alexander Ben, seaman, dwl 2ii Stenart 
Alexander Benjamin, porter 12 Battery, dwl 706 

Vallejo 
Alexander Bertha Mrs. (colored), hairdresser, 1407 

Ltupont 
Alexander C, cook, dwl Overland House 
Alexander C, portrait painter, studio and dwl 110 

Sutter 
Alexander Charles, clerk, dwl 437 Jessie 
Alexander Charles, cook, dwl 214 Ritch 
Alexander Charles M., clerk with A. G. Davis, dwl 

fjO.S Leavenworth 
Alexander Charles M., tinsmith, 811 Fifth, dwl 315 

Fifth 
ALEXANDER D. & CO., manufacturers cigars, 222 

and 224 Battery 
Alexander David CD. Alexander & Co. /*, dwl 570 M in 
Alexander David G., clerk with Cantin & Everett, 

dwl ltj7 Silver 
Alexander Edward C, compositor Morning Call, dwl 

2-58 Clara 
Alexander Edward L., special agent U. S. Post-office 

Dep., office tiOb Mont, room 22, dwl 405 Turk 
Alexander Eli, peddler, dwl 344 Fifth 
Alexander Elizabeth (widow), dry goods, W 8 Gough 

bet Grove and Fulton 
Alexander Elizabeth Mrs., fruits, 122 Seventh 
Alexander Flora Mrs., dwl tjl9y2 Minna 
Alexander George, cooper, dwl 122 Seventh 
Alexander George W. f Osborn <& A./ , dwl 209 Austin 
Alexander Gilbert, barkeeper, dwl Sullivan's Bldg 
Alexander Goodman, glazier, dwl 274 Jessie 
Alexander Harris, peddler, dwl 704 Yallejo 
Alexander Isaac, student Heald's Business College 
Alexander Isham, carpenter, dwl 1114 Market 
ALEXANDER J. & CO. f Jacob and Leo AshJ, im- 
porters and jobbers clothing, NW cor Battery 

and Bush 
Alexander Jacksot, whitener with Poland & Hatha- 
way, dwl 11 l-Cearny 
Alexander Jacob A., cigars and tobacco, 2 Clay, dwl 

53t)34 Howard 
Alexander James, locksmith with James D. David- 
son, dwl 2t>l Stevenson 
Alexander James, tailor, dwl 281 Stevenson 
Alexander James, wood dealer. Berry bet Third and 

Fourth, dwl 434 Sixth 
Alexander James B., shipjoiner, dwl 31 Fifth Av, rear 
Alexander James I., carpenter with D. A. Macdonald 

<k Co., dwl -504 Greenwich 
Alexander Jane (widow), dwl 9 Miles PI, rear 
Alexander John, laborer, dwl N s Folsom nr Main 
Alexander John, longshoreman with Oregon S. S. Co. 
Alexander Joseph fj. Alexander <& Co J, dwl 319 

Ellis 
Alexander Joseph D., melter S. F. Assaying and Re- 
fining Works, dwl lOlti Green 
Alexander Julius, hairdresser with Adam Grimm, 

dwl 21 Ellis 
Alexander Newton, student, dwl 819 Post 
Alexander Philip, ladies' trimmings, 34 Sixth 
Alexander Robert (W. G. Houston & Co.), dwl 525 

Fourth 
Alexander Robert, shipwright, dwl 167 Silver 
Alexander Rosa (widow;, dwl 627 Post 
Alexander Samuel, tailor, 706 Vallejo 
Alexander Samuel O. (8. O. Alexander & Co.), dwl 

ri3 O'FarreU 
Alexander Simon, hatter, llOOJ^ Dupont, dwl SW cor 

Pacific and Dupont 



Alexander S. 0. <fe Co. (Abram Marcus) , manufact- 
urers and importers clothing, 4 Battery 

Alexander Theodore, clothing, dwl 926 Jackson 

Alexander T. !{., dwl 711 California 

Alexander \\. F., express wagon, cor Clay and Dup 

Alexander William, dwl NW cor Post and Buchanan 

Alexander William, clerk with J. E. de la Montagnio, 
dwl 167 Silver 

Alexander \\'illiam, upholsterer, dwl Twentieth Av 
nr K, South S. F. 

Alexander William Rev., principal University Col- 
lege, dwl sill Post 

Alexander William F., painter, dwl SW cor Gough 
and Vallejo 

Alexander AVilliam H., commission merchant, 310 
Washington, dwl Coso House 

Alexander \\'illiam H. (colored), porter with Susan 
Twiggs, dwl 14U7 Dupont 

Alexander Y. (widow), dwl 18 Turk 

Alexis E. Mme., French laundry, 409 Sutter 

Alexson John, seaman, dwl 115 Clark 

Alferitz Peter f Delleiyiane & Co.), dwl 2007 Powell 

Alfs William, bookkeeper with Ehlers & Brand, dwl 
521 Pacific 

Alger James, engineer, dwl 813 Mission 

Alger James, optician with Christian Muller, dwl 
1010 Stockton 

Alhambra Building, 325 Bush 

Alhambra Hill M. Co. (Silverado, Nov.), Henry G. 
Langley secretary, office 612 Clay 

Alhambra Lodgings, Mrs. Owens proprietress, 319 
Bush 

ALHAMBRA THEATER. Thomas Maguire propri- 
etor, 325 Bush 

Alila Carlo, fisherman. Clay St. Wharf 

ALISO MlLLvSiLos Angeles), Deming,;Palmer & Co. 
proprietors, office 2(J2 and 204 Davis 

Alison Charles, machinist with Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works, dwl 1240 Howard 

Aljoe James, laborer 17 Front, dwl 813 Mission 

AUaart Herman, baker with Schroth k Westerfeld, 
dwl 228 Kearny 

Allan J ames G., seaman, dwl 48 Sacramento 

Allan John, stone seal engraver, 128 Kearny, dwl 1010 
Powell 

AUari Henry, boxmaker with Benjamin F. Gilman, 
dwl SW cor Haight and Buchanan 

Allari J oseph, preserved meats, 52 California Market, 
dwl 4 Virginia PI 

ALLARDT GEORGE F., civil engineer, office 715 
Clay, res Oakland 

Allbright John H., bookkeeper with H. K. Cummings 
& Co., dwl 102 1 Pacific 

ALLDACK JOSEPH, groceries and liquors, SW cor 
Bush and Devisadero 

Alle Albert, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 

AUeck Jos.'ph fConstantine d: A.J 1403 Stockton 

Allegheny GoldM.Co. (Sierra Co., Cal.), J. M. Buffing- 
ton secretary, office 37 Merchants' Exchange 

Allen Addison F., clerk with Wm. T. Garratt. dwl 
NW cor Natoma and Fremont 

Allen Albert, fireman S. P. R. R. Co., dwl junction 
Market and Valencia 

Allen Albert, heater Pacific Rolling Mill Co., dwl 
Potrero Point 

Allen Albert J., foreman Market St. Railway Co.'s 
Stables, dwl N s Sixteenth bet Valencia and Sec- 
ond Av 

Allen Alexander, night wn.ishman, dwl W s Sh^.twell 
bet Nineteenth and T\ ntieth 

Allen Alexander, waiter ■'.^.'ti Mont, dwl 18 Wash 

Allen Alexander, watchman S. i . P. Woolen Factory, 
dwl North Point bet Larkin and Polk 

Allen Alfred D., mining, dwl 5(J2 Franklin 

Allen Alonzo \V., patternmaker with Hanscom & 
Co., dwl 230 Third 

Allen Anna (widow), dwl 216 Third 

Allen Ansel S., liquor saloon, 724 Pacific 

Allen Anthony, harnessmaker with J. C. Johnson & 
Co., dwl 652 Market • 

Allen Asa, hairdresser, dwl E s Fillmore bet Sutter 
and Post 

Allen Benjamin, fancy goods, 240 Third 

Allen Bessie Miss, assistant matron Protestant Or- 
phan Asylum, W s Laguna bet Haight and W^aller 

Allen B. G. fWing & A.) . dwl 52;? Kearny 

Allen Charles, waiter with David Harrison, 745 Mar- 
ket 

ALLEN CHARLES C, bird-cagemaker, 437 Bran- 
nan, dwl 613 Mission 



PABNSWOSTH & CIiABK fvirnish Safe and Beliable Instirance against Fire. 



C. P- YA3H SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valises. 



Allen Charles E. (Egerton & AJ, res Fruit Vale, 

Alameda Co. 
Allen Charles E., actor, dwl 1107 Stockton 
Allen Charles E., cabinetmaker with Kragan & Co., 

dwl 21(i Third 
Allen Charles E., clerk, dwl 21 Second Av nr Six- 
teenth 
Allen Charles R., clerk with P. B. Cornwall, dwl 6G2 

Harrison 
Allen Christopher C, waiter New York Bakery, dwl 

9 Hunt 
Allen Daniel, dwl 32 Fourth 
Allen David, stonecutter, dwl E s Cemetery Av bet 

Post and Sutter 
Allen Declen, blacksmith, dwl 558 Stevenson 
Allen Edward, sawmaker with William Brown, dwl 

1207 Montgomery 
Allen E. N., artist, dwl 7(iS Harrison 
Allen Esther (widow), dwl 22-J Minna 
Allen Eugene A,, sawyer with B. & J. S. Doe, dwl 75 

Clementina 
Allen Frances (widow). Branch Bakery, N s Sixteenth 

bet Mission and Valencia 
Allen Franklin, cotfeo saloon, 720 Pacific 
Allen George, carpenter, dwl l'i% Rausch 
Allen George, butcher, dwl St. Nicholas Hotel 
Allen Hannah (widow), dwl 54 Jessie, roar 
Allen Henry F. (Alien & Leioi-sJ, dwl570 Harrison 
Allen Hugh, nurseryman and florist, SVV cor Buchan- 
an and McAllister 
Allen Isaac P., bookkeeper Bank California, dwl 

1028 Pine 
Allen Isaac S., secretary and general agent S. F. 

Benevolent Assn, office 10 Webb, dwl 1028 Pine 
Allen Isaac W., miner, dwl 421 Sansom 
Allen J ames, boilermaker, dwl 28 Minna 
Allen James, carriage painter with Kimball Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 558 Stevenson 
Allen James, chief engineer P. M. S. S. Nevada 
Allen James, longshoreman, dwl Hunter's Point 
Allen James, molder, dwl 7S Natoma 
Allen James, stableman, dwl N s Pacific Av bet Oc- 

tavia and Gough 
Allen James, stableman with Thomas Fitzgerald, dwl 

Howard Dot Twelfth and Thirteenth 
Allen Jame«, stableman with Augustus Starr 
Allen James A., engineer, dwl 18 Ridley 
Allen James C, captain schooner John McCuUough, 

dwl 4 Mission 
Allen James M., stockholder, dwl 82fi Greenwich 
Allen Jeremiah, boarding, 18 Washington 
Allen John, carpenter, dwl E s Jones bet Broadway 

and Vallejo 
Allen John, dealer musical instruments and leader 

Allen's band, 32ii Third 
Allen John, hardware and crockery, 1322 Stockton, 

dwl N W cor Fifteenth and First Av 
Allen John (colored), porter, dwl lOOci .Jackson 
Allen John, stevedore with Menzies, Lowry & Bing- 
ham, dwl 
Allen John, tailor with Henry Collin, dwl N s Broad- 
way bet Hyde and Larkin 
Allen John, teamster with George Bryden, dwl 208 

Second 
Allen John, teamster with Turner & Harvey, dwl 1203 

Montgomery 
Allen John, tinroofer, dwl 234 Fourth 
Allen John, waiter, dwl 304 Front 
Allen John G., clerk with Henry P. Bowie, dwl 215 

Tehama 
Allen John J., mining, dwl cor Franklin and Grove 
Allen John L., boatman, dwl 29 Oak Grove Av 
Allen John M., surveyor, dwl 2217 Jackson 
Allen John S. f Granville Lampman <£- Co.) , dwl 724 

Pacific 
Allen John W. (colored), messenger Savings and 

Loan Society 
Allen Laura E. (widow), dwl 814 Lombard 
Allen Lizzie S. (widow), dwl 547 Mission 
Allen Lorenzo D., principal \Vashington Grammar 

School, dwl N 6 Webster bot Fine and Bush 
Allen Lorenzo H., clam dealer, dwl Long Bridge foot 

of Fourth 
Allen Lucius H. (Allen & Lewis! ., dwl 570 Harrison 
Allen Lumber S., shipwright, 8 California, dwl 955 

Howard 
Allen Lyman B. (Ham <Ss AJ, dwl 61 Tehama 
Allen Mary (widow), dressmaker, 734 Howard 
Allen Mary Miss, dressmaker with Madame Leroy, 
dwl 44 Clementina 



Allen Michael, wines and liquors, NE cor Folsom 

and Hauseh, dwl 42!) Minna 
Allen Michael, pressman Evening Bulletin 
Allen Michael J., barkeeper, dwl 512 Commercial 
Allen M. W. & Co., SE cor Fourth and Silver 
Allen Nathaniel, laborer with Kimball Manufactur- 
ing Co. 
Allen Oliver P., bookkeeper Bank of California, dwl 

414 Ellis 
Allen Reece B., bookkeeper with A. S. Tredalo, dwl 

W s Mission bet Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Allen Robert (ion., chief quartermaster Military Div. 

Pacific, office 105 Stockton, dwl 1117 Stockton 
Allen Robert K, compositor Morning Call, dwl 808 

Leavenworth 
Allen Roe, livery stable, (il37 and 669 Market, dwl 667 

Market 
Allen Samuel, engineer with J. Y. Wilson & Co., dwl 

Buchanan nr Bay 
Allen Samuel G., salesman with Murphy, Grant & 

Co., dwl 1231 Union 
Allen S. K. (widow), dwl 26 Howard Court 
Allen S. L., truckman, 515 Market 
Allen Theodore H., stevedore, dwl 712 Greenwich 
Allen Thomas, bartender, dwl 505 Howard 
Allen Thomas, laborer, dwl 537 Sacramento 
Allen Thomas, pressman Evening Bulletin 
Allen Thomas J., delivery clerk, 507 Cal, dwl 223 

Minna 
Allen Thomas S., ship carpenter, dwl .350 Brannan 
Allen ^^ illiam, boilermaker, dwl N s Sixteenth bet 

Second Av and Guerrero 
Allen William, carpenter, dwl 613 Mission 
Allen M'illiam, carpenter with Charles Williams, dwl 

617 Mission 
Allen William, molder with Hinckley & Co., dwl 315 

Beale 
Allen A\'illiam, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Allen William, stevedore with Whitney & Freese 
Allen William, watchman Sutter St. R. R. Stables, 

dwl S s Pine bet Webster and Fillmore 
Allen William Jr., band sawyer with Kragfcn & Co., 

dwl 313 Beale 
Allen William A., stevedore, dwl 124 Bernard 
Allen William B., reporter Evening Post, dwl 1010 

Powell 
Allen William H., attorney at law, oflSce 712 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 206 Ellis 
Allen \Villiam H., miner, office 116 LeidesdorfiF, dwl 

12 Oak 
Allen \\^illiam H., salesman with Gabriel Abraham, 

dwl lll'o Minna 
Allen William K., clerk, dwl 807 Leavenworth, rear 
ALLEN WILLIAM R., plumber and gasfittor, 819 

Market, dwl Ellis bet Webster and O'FarroU 
Allen William T., barkeeper Clitf House, Point Lobos 

Av 
Allen William T., bookkeeper, dwl 230 Second 
Allen W. J. Jr., quartermaster P. M. S. S. Alaska 
Allen & Lewis r L. H. Allen and C. H. Lewis) , corii- 

mission merchants, office 202 California 
Allen. See Allyn, Allan, Alline, and AUyne 
Allendorff M. Mrs., ladies' nurse, dwl 134V^ Seventh 
Allene Henry, waiter with Basilo Constantine, dwl 

1010 Stockton 
Alley Henry L., dwl 737 Howard 
Alley W. H. & Co. (A. H. Davies) , wood and coal, 

910 Stockton 
Alley William, stevedore Riggers and S. U. Associa- 
tion, 42!t Pacific 
Alley \niliam >I. (W. H. Alley & Co.i, dwl N s 

Greenwich bet Montgomery and Sansom 
AUiaga Maria (widow), dwl 621 Vallejo 
Allingham Joseph, laborer, dwl 510^2 Mission 
Allione Francis, steward with Nicholas Castis, dwl 

1326 Stockton 
Alliot E., ladies' hairdresser, 3U Sutter 

Allison , dwl SA\^ cor Powell and .lackson 

Allison Charles, stevedore P. M. S. S. Co.,dwl cor 

Folsom and Bealo 
Allison David E. ( D. E. Allison <Sc Co.), dwl 117 Oak 
.•V.LLISON I). E. it CO., fruit and produce commis- 
sion, 30J and 311 Washington 
Allison Frank, cook, dwl r,2:) Valencia 
AllisDn Frank J., salesman with Braverman & Levy, 

dwl 528 Pine 
Allison Oscar, jewelry-case manuf, dwl 537 Sac 
Allison Ranch Mining Co. (Grass Valley, Cal.), B. B. 

Minor secretary, office 411>i California 
Allison Robert, sheep dealer, dwl 1240 Folsom 



PACIPIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOBY, 1874-6, will be pubHshed September, 1874. 



KENNEDY'S INSURANCE AGENCY, Fire, Maxine, and Life, represents $12,000,000, 



Allison Thomas R., bookkeeper with Pacific Ice Co., 

dwl 71« Battery 

Allison. See Alison 

Allkiro Samuel H., assistant storekeeper Vallejo 
Bonded AVarehouso, dwl 122 Geary 

Allman George, inspector Custom House, dwl 143 
Third 

Allman Miles, driver Sutter St. R. R. 

Allsoits Meinaird, boot and shoemaker, 2005 Folsom 

Allverdan John, porter Hotel Rhein, 909 Kearny 

Allwood Henry, woodcarver with Bryant & Strahan, 
dwl ME cor Lombard and Hyde 

Allyne John W. (AUyne & White), dwl NW cor 
Goughand Green 

ALLYiSiE A WHITE (John W. Allyn^ and WilUara 
H. White), importers and jobbers oils, lamps, 
etc., 121-125 California, and proprietors Pacific 
Oil and Kerosene Works, cor Chestnut and Taylor 

Almada Frank, seaman, dwl W s Sansom nr Green 

ALMADA GKEGOKIO, merchant,dwl 21 South Park 

Almeida Manuel, liquor saloon, (i54 Pacific 

Almon Andrew, clerk with Peterson & Abbott, dwl 
115 Clark 

Almon David, dwl 127 Gilbert 

Almond Mathew H.. engineer, dwl 50(5 Fourth 

ALMS HOUSE CITY AND COUNTY, San Miguel 
or Mission Ocean House Road 43^2 miles from City 
Hall 

Almun George, bookkeeper, dwl 143 Third 

Almy Giles M., bookkeeper with J. Everding k Co., 
dwl 100!t Mission 

Almy Moses B., salesman with Wilmerding & Kel- 
logg, dwl 313 O'Farrell 

Almyghram Charles, baker International Hotel, 530 
Jackson 

Aloise of the Cross, principal of Academy of Notre 
Dame, dwl E s Dolores bet Sixteenth and Seven- 
teenth 

Alonso Jos6 fDietz, Beriz & Co.) , dwl 112 Virginia 

Alonzy Charles, cook Maison Doree, dwl 221 Minna 

Alpen H. (widow), dwl 1525 Dupont 

Alpen Herman, marine adjuster, ofBce 305 East, dwl 
1525 Dupont 

ALPEKS CHARLES, manager Potrero Co., SE cor 
Fifth Av and N, South S. F. and leader Metropol- 
itan Band, office 22.S Bush, dwl l(i23 Powell, roar 

Alpers John, leader Germania Band, office and dwl 
228 Bush 

Alpha Con. M. Co. (Gold Hill, Nov.), William Willis 
secretary, office 419 California 

Alphonse V., carpenter, dwl (521 Vallejo 

Alphonse Jean B., lithographer with Abraham 
Waldstein, dwl 348 Ritch 

Alpine Gold Mining Co. (Amador Co., Cal.), office 438 
California 

Alpine James, seaman, dwl 2(5 Steuart 

Alps Silver Mining Co. (Ely, Nov.), office 42t Mont 

Alsemoros John, hardwareclerk, dwl 13U7 Broadway 

Alsen Allrcd, seaman stm Monterey 

Alsonz Jacob, shoemaker, 915 Post, dwl 1610 Post 

Alsgood Frederick (AUgood <fc Mentz), dwl 323 Te- 
hama 

ALSGOOD & MENTZ (Frederick Alsgood and 
Frederick ilfe/itz/', liquor saloon, NW cor Clay 
and Drumm 

Alsop John A., umbrella and parasolmaker, 346 Bush, 
dwl 8 Virginia PI 

Alston Frederick, laborer with George B. Knowles, 
dwl 4<i Sacramento 

Alt Charles, shoemaker, dwl 608 Vallejo 

ALTA CALIFORNIA (daily and wgeklyj, Frederick 
MacCrellish <fe Co. proprietors, office 529 Cal 

ALTA CALIFORNIA ALMANAC (annual), Fred- 
erick MacCrellish & Co. proprietors, office 529 Cal 

ALTA CALIFORNIA BUILDING, 529 California 

Alta Lodgings, Ralston <fc Cottrell proprietors, 536 
Sacramento 

Alta S. M. Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), W. H. AVatson sec- 
retary, office 302 Montgomery 

Alta Water Co., office 808 Montgomery 

Altemus John, bakery, Ws Folsom nrTwentj'-Second 

Altemus William E., auctioneer with Greenebaum & 
Co., dwl (525 Stevenson 

Altenborg Peter F., merchant, dwl 528 Kearny 

Altenberg Rosalie Mrs., cloaks and millinery, 528 
Kearny 

Altenburg Ernest, bookkeeper with A. S. Rosenbaum 
& Co., dwl 822 Greenwich 

Althof Bros. (Theodore and Ernest) ,B&y Oyster Sa- 
loon, 620 Market 



Althof Ernest (Althof Bros.), dwl 864 Mission 
Althof Hermann (Althof drBahlsJ, dwl 864 Mission 
Althof Theodore (Althof Bros.), dwl !S'Mi% Jessie 
ALTHOF & BAHLS (Hermann Althof and John 
F. W. Bahlgi , bookbinders and blank-book man- 
ufacturers, 423 Clay 
Althoff John, painter, dwl Heinz Hotel 
Altinger George, cabinetmaker with L. & E. Eman- 
uel, dwl Cushman nr Clay 
Altman Charles, adjuster with Wheeler & Wilson 

S. M. Co., dwl 409 Post 
Altman Emma Miss, seamstress, dwl 1505 Dupont 
Altman Lewis, baker, dwl 1505 Dupont 
Altman Teresa (widow), dwl 1505 Dupont 
Altman Tobias, tailor, awl 428 Green 
Altmann Jacob, tailor, 773 Market, dwl 858 Howard 
Altmark Louis, porter with Rosenthal, Feder & Co., 

dwl 259 Stevenson 
Altmayer Aaron ( Einstein Bros, d- Co./*, dwl 115 Eddy 
Altmayer Abraham (Einstein Bros. & Co.) , dwl 334 

Eddy 
Alton Francis C, confectioner with Dexter & Co., 

dwl 904 Jackson 
Altona Gravel M. Co. (Grass Valley, Cal.), David 
Wilder secretary, office 28 Merchants' Exchange 
Altpeter Charles, cabinetmaker, dwl 801 Van Ness 

Av 
Altpeter George, cellarman with A. Michaelaen & 

Co., 2a5 First 
Altridge Arthur, shoemaker, dwl 211 Perry 
Altruter William, waiter, 824 Kearny 
Altschul Charles M. (Altschul, Simon & Co.), dwl 

Occidental Hotel 
Altschul Leopold ( May field cfc Co-V, dwl 748 Howard 
Altschul Ludwig ( Altschtd & Hildebrandt) ,di-w\Wyi 

Powell 
Altschul & Hildebrandt (Ludtvig Altschul and Wil- 
liam. C. Hildebrandt) , importers wines and liq- 
uors, 809 Montgomery 
Altschul, Simon & Co. (Charles M. Altschul, Juli%is 
Simon, and Louis Gundelfinger) , fancy dry 
goods, 25 Kearny 
Altshuler Levi, dry goods, 518 Sixteenth 
Altube Bernardo, cattle dealer, dwl 1414 Kearny, rear 
Altube Pedro (Louis Peres <t- Co./ , dwl 9 Dikeman PI 
Altvater David, packer National Flour Mills, dwl 

428 Chestnut, roar 
Altvater Frank, porter with A. J. Plate, dwl Bootz 

Hotel 
Altvater Frederick, market, SW cor Van Ness Av 

and Oak, dwl 12 Twelfth 
Altvater Mary (widow), dwl 12 Twelfth 
AJvarado Beet Sugar Co., office 314 California 
Alvarado Frederico, real-estate agent, office 708 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 316 Pine 
Alvarado, J. C, attorney at law, office 408 California, 

res Oakland 
Alvarado Victor, laborer with Leon R. Myers & Co., 

dwl l.)18 Filbert 
Alvarando Doboloris (widow), dwl 5 Prospect PI 
Alvarez Antonio, tinsmith, dwl 1606 Mason 
Alvarez Tiburcia Mrs., dressmaker, dwl KiOO Mason 
Alvero Antonio, waiter stm Ajax, Oregon S. S. Co. 
Alvors Peter, miller Potrero Distillery Co., dwl Penn- 
sylvania Av bet Yolo and Nevada 
Alverson Stephen H., blacksmith with Kimball 

Manufacturing Co., dwl 409 Brannan 
Alves Frederick, dwl Western House 
ALyEY CHARLES AV., stoves and tinware, 911 

Kearny, dwl 1813 Stockton 
Alvin Henry, laborer, dwl 2 California, rear 
Alvord Frank, cari^enter, dwl 1037 Folsom 
Alvord Henry, route agent S. F. Post-office 
Alvord Mary J. Mrs., toys and candies, 1037 Folsom 
ALVORD WILLIAM, president Pacific Rolling Mill 
Co. and park commissioner, office 3 Front, dwl 
•5(54 Folsom 
Alvs John, seaman stm Amelia 
Alzamora J., stevedore P. M. S. S. Co. 
AMADOR CANAL AND MINING CO., Frank M. 
Brown secretary, office 64 Merchants' Exchange 
Amador Co. (Chinese), manufacturers cigars, ;-i39 Bush 
Amador (Original) Mining Co. (Amador Co., Cal.), 

office 31() California 
Amador Trinidad, shoecutter with Einstein, Bros. & 

Co., dwl 25 Fella PI 
Amador Tunnel and Mining Co. (Ely, Nev.), Louis 
Kaplan secretary, office 27 Merchants' Exchange 
Amarante A. Mattes, farmer, dwl SW cor Drumm 
and Oregon 



ATLAS INS. CO. OF HARTFORD ; Assets $325,000 ; Farnsworth & Clark, Agents. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



AMA 



71 



AND 



Amark Frederick, with H. H. McCloUan & Co., dwl 

901 Post , ^ . ^ 

Amat Gustave, pantryman with Fran?ois Lacoste, 

dwl 310 Dupont . „ r.. s 

AMAZON INSURANCE CO. (Cincinnati, 0., Fire), 

Hutchinson, Mann & Smith general agents, office 

314 California 

Ambler Benjamin, druggist with Charles Langley & 

Co., dwl 719 Clementina . 

Ambrogi Michael, produce peddler, dwl 1 William 
Ambrose .Tames f James Ambrose it Cb-^dwl N s 

Fulton nr Laguna 
Ambrose James & Co. (Patrick Murphy), poultry 

and game, 40 Occidental Market 
Ambrus Joseph, steward with Hardy & Horkenham, 
dwll8 Oregon ..,,,• t t, 

Ambsey Peter, stevedore with Menzies, Lowry & 

Bingham _ 

Amg Paul rReiffd: A.J, dwl 412 Dupont 
Amedee Pierre, porter, dwl 409 Post 
Amelia S. M. Co., L. Kaplan secretary, office 27 Mer- 
chants' Exchange 
Amend Charles, clerk with J. WinckelhofF, SE cor 

Powell and Greenwich 
Amende Charles H., porter with George W. Clark, 

dwl cor Eleventh and Howard 
Amendt Emile, carpenter and builder, 731 Pacific 
AMERICAN CLOCK CO., Henry Molineux agent, 

5'20 Market and 17 and 19 Sutter 
American Eagle Lodgings, Joseph Reed proprietor, 

321) Sansom „„^ ^ -„ ,, 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL, Bryan Brothers 

proprietors, 319-325 Sansom 
American Fire Insurance Co. (Philadelphia), Jona- 
than Hunt manager, office 313 California 
American Flag Mill and Mining Co. (Pioche, Nov.), 
George R. Spinney secretary, office 320 California 
American Flat Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nevada), office 

434 California , „ „ ,r. • 

American Henry A. Mrs. (widow), dwl 1010 jMission 
American Ice Co., W. H. Watson secretary, office 302 

Montgomery 
American Lloyds f Register 8 hipping J , Amos Noyes 

agent, office 406 California 
American Panel Machine Co. (The), George A. Tread- 
well agent, office 531 California . 
American Protestant Association, hall 713 Mission 
American Quicksilver Co. (Lake Co., Cal.), office 316 

California ^ _, , t, -a 

American Russian Commercial Ice Co. (now Paciiic 

Ice Co.), SE cor Battery and Broadway 
American Steamship Line, J. R. Erringer Jr. agent, 

office 238 Montgomery . 

American Sunday School Union Depository, A. Ro- 
man & Co. agents, 11 Montgomery 
American Tract Society, Pacitic Agency, depository 

757 Market 
Amerigo Mary (widow), dwl 905 Market 

Ames , music teacher, dwl 613 Mission 

Ames Albert, seaman, dwl 9 Washington 

Ames Albert N.,carriagepainter with Pollard & Car- 

vill Manufacturing Co., dwl 613 Mission 
Ames Benjamin F., teamster with Davis & Cowell, 

dwl -541 Stevenson , „ „ ^ ,„ 

Ames F. F., storekeeper P. M. S. S. Great Republic 
Ames Fisher, attorney at law, office 13 City Hall, 
third floor, and clerk City and County Attorney, 
dwl 722 Turk „ „ , 

Ames Francis, painter with Chas. H. Sykes & Co., 

dwl Mission St. House 
Ames Frank M., salesman with 0. Lawton & Co., 

dwl 218 Shotwell 
Ames George H., ship clerk, dwl 2 Vernon PI 
Ames Harmon, carpenter, dwl 18 Ellis _ 

Ames H. M. Jr., bookkeeper with Christian Schrei- 

bor & Co., dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Ames John, seaman, dwl 421 East 
AMES JOHN W., president European and Oregon 

Land Co., office 200 Sansom, dwl 1307 Taylor 
Ames L. E. Mrs., boarding, dwl 220 Turk 
Ames Martha Mrs., teacher Valencia St. Grammar 

School, dwl 211 Seventh 
Ames Mary E., ladies' nurse, dwl S s Twentieth nr 

Guerrero , ^ 

Ames Oscar H., painter, dwl S s Twentieth nr Guer- 

Ames Pelham W., secretary Sutro Tunnel Co., office 

321 California, dwl 1312 Taylor 
Amette Jean B. (Amette & BlondeauJ, dwl 2o7 bte- 



Amette & Blondeau rjean R. Amette and Bene 

BlondeauJ, hairdressers, 3053^ Third 
Amgott Simon, fancy goods, 918 Dupont 
Amhoff A., milkman, dwl Clara Av nr Alms House 

Road 
Amidon George W., ladies' underwear, 830 Market, 

dwl 15 Stockton, rear 
Amilon Charles L., laundryman S. F. Laundry, NW 

cor Turk and Fillmore 
AMMERUP G., paints and oils, 1126 Market, dwl 

921 Market 
Ammon Frederick, porter 8 Brenham PI 
Ammons D. B., laborer, dwl 3;i3 Bush 
Amor Edward, bookkeeper, dwl 31 Jessie 
Amore CatoUo, laborer with Patrizio Marsicano, dwl 

223 Drumm 
Amos Fred. R., with Balch, Howe & Co., dwl 309 

Broadway r, ^^ -r^ i^ 

Amos George W., driver Engine No. 4, S. F. F. D., 

dwl 111 Natoma _ „ , 

Amos John, silversmith with W. K. Vandershce & 
Co.,dwl 136 Sutter . , „ ,, t, t. 

Amos John Mrs., dressmaker with Mrs. Mary Rob- 
ertson , , ,„ , ^ 
Amos John T. rAmos & Davis J, dwl 1506 Leav 
Amos J. T., physician, dwl 1024 Polsom 
Amos Mary C. Miss, seamstress with Edmond C. 

Kennedy, dwl 111 Natoma 
Amos Zacharias, millwright, dwl 536 Ellis 
AMOS & DAVIS fjohn T. Amos and M.S.Davis), 

millwrights and draftsmen, 213 Mission 
Amsbory Calvin, dwl 34 Tehama 
Amsterdam Marine Board of Underwriters, James 

De Fremery agent, office 710 Sansom 
Amundsen August, upholsterer with Edmond C. 

Kennedy, dwl 2759 Harrison 
Amy Gustavo L., salesman with Hoffman & Co., dwl 
607 Sutter 

Anartosio , fisherman. Clay St. Wharf. 

Anastasio Peter, dwl 1318 Dupont 

Ancelin Arthur, machinist, dwl 3 Washoe PI 

Anderau Joseph, preserved meats, etc., 27 California 

Market 
Anderfuren John, tailor, 7.5-5 Mission 
Andermach Florence, taxidermist with Ferdinand 

Gruber, dwl Central PI 
Andersen Christian, porter Iwith Ferdinand Conra- 

des, dwl 51 Stevenson 
Andersen N. M., tanner, dwl 721 Brannan 

Anderson , shipbuilder, dwl 270 First 

Anderson A. B. Mrs., teacher Lincoln Grammar 

Anderson Abraham, cabinetmaker, dwl S s Fifteenth 

nr Noe 
Anderson Abraham, laborer, dwl 536 Sacramento 
Anderson Albert, salesman 730 Market, dwl 235 

O'Farrell 
Anderson Andrew (D. C. Fox & Co. J, dwl 512 Stev 
Anderson Andrew, brassfinisher with Wm. T. Gar- 

ratt, dwl Pacific Hotel . , , , 

Anderson Andrew, deckhand stm a. M. Whipple, dwl 

531 Jackson ^, , 

Anderson Andrew, fireman C. P. R. R. stm Thorough- 
Anderson Andrew, junk, 327 East, dwl 125 Sac 
Anderson Andrew, laborer, dwl 115 F'irst 
Anderson Andrew, laborer Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl 

Potrero Point 
Anderson Andrew, lictuor saloon and boarding, 2o0 

Spear 
Anderson Andrew, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Anderson Andrew, tailor, dwl 1119 Leavenworth 
Anderson August, seaman, dwl 415 East 
Anderson Augustus, pressman, dwl 3 Hardie PI 
Anderson C, fireman steamtug Rescue 
Anderson C. A. Mrs., teacher Lincoln Grammar 

School, dwl 29 Webster . . 

Anderson C. D. & Co. (John CwneoA commission mer- 
chants, 209 Washington 
Anderson Charles, captain schooner War Eagle, dwl 

18 Frederick 
Anderson Charles, collector, dwl 916 Vallejo 
Anderson Charles, domestic, 427 Sutter 
Anderson Charles, longshoreman, dwl 82 Clementina 
Anderson Charles, miner, dwl 1422 Pacific 
Anderson Charles (colored), porter 17 Front, dwl 533 

Vallejo 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 28 Sacramento 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 29 Frederick, rear 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORIT circulates throughout the Pacific Coast. 



Ii. W. KENNEDY, General Insurance Agent, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



Anderson Charles, stevedore with Whitney & Freese, 

d\v\ NE cor Howard and Spear 
ANDEUSOX CHARLES A.. Harris' Sample Rooms, 

■431! California, dwl 2*) Minna 
Ander=on Charles C, messenger C. P. R. R., dwl 621 

California 
Anderson Charles D. CC. D. Anderson & Co.), dwl 

815 Washington 
Anderson Charles E., special policeman, dwl 9 Perry 
Anderson Christian, clerk, dwl 227 Second 
Anderson Christian, engineer stm Emma, res Ala- 
meda 
Anderson Christian, laborer Merchants' Dry Dock 

Company's Wharf, dwl 13S Union, rear 
Anderson, Clark & Morgans (WiWam B. Anderson, 
Walter <'1ark, and Charles H. Morgans/ , car- 

riagemakers, 418 Third 
Anderson Claude, clerk U. S. Army Headiuarters, 

105 Stockton,- dwl A-2?, Bush 
Anderson D. E., tailor, dwl 520 Taylor 
Anderson Deborah (widow), seamstress, dwl 15 Fred- 
erick 
Anderson Edward, tailor with Gabriel Abraham, dwl 

707 Howard 
Anderson Edward J., naval architect, dwl 652 How- 
ard 
Anderson Erik, cabinetmaker with L. &E. Emanuel, 

dwl 818 Mission 
Anderson Erik, cabinetmaker with Kragen <fe Co., 

dwl 210 First 
Anderson Erick N., tailor with Purdy <fe Litchfield, 

dwl 320 Dupont 
Anderson Eva Miss, teacher Market St. Primary 

School, dwl 811 Harrison 
Anderson Evard, seaman, dwl 2'i Sacramento 
Anderson F., cabinetmaker with Kragen & Co., dwl 

:!4fi Third 
Anderson F. E. (widow), furnished rooms, 25 Second 
Anderson Flora Miss, dressmaker, dwl 841 Clay 
Anderson Frances Mrs., furnished rooms, 323 Sutter 
Anderson Frank, seaman, dwl 2t Sacramento 
Anderson Frank H., bookkeeper, dwl 311 Harrison 
Anderson Frank P., dwl 012 Pacific 
Anderson Frederick, cabinetmaker with L. & E. 

Emanuel, dwl E s San Bruno Road nr Twenty- 
ninth 
Anderson Frederick, framemaker with Snow & Roos, 

dwl iSf W cor Hyde and Green 
Anderson Frederick, seaman with AlaskaCommercial 

Co., dwl2jSteuart 
Anderson George, carpenter, dwl 321 Oak 
Anderson George, cook with A. E. Swain, dwl 636 

Market 
Anderson George, seaman, dwl 45 Sacramento 
Anderson George, master schooner Osceola, dwl 3173^ 

Tehama 
Anderson George A., night inspector Custom House, 

dwl 103 Perry 
Anderson Hans, blacksmith with Charles Oester, dwl 

4t) Jessie 
Anderson Harold, whitener with G. A. Kaiser & Co., 

dwl Preseott House 
Anderson Harry, seaman, dwl 82 Steuart 
Anderson Hector, laborer with F. N. Woods & Co., 

dwl 306 Green, rear 
Anderson Henry, carpenter with Cal. Mills, dwl Gol- 
den Gate Hotel 
Anderson Henry, inventor patents, dwl 521 Jessie 
Anderson Henry, porter with John O'Connor, dwl N 

E cor Pacific Av and Octavia 
Anderson Henry A., pressman with Abraham Wald- 

stein, dwl 3 Hardie PI 
Anderson Henry C, oysters, 4-5 Washington Market, 

dwl !I15 Greenwich 
Anderson Henry W., woodcarver, dwl W s Mission 

nr Twenty-fifth 
Anderson Holger, laborer C. P. R. R. Depot 
Anderson Isaac, porter with E. Martin & Co., res 

Oakland 
Anderson J., carpenter, dwl Overland House 
Anderson James (Anderson & Randolph), dwl 169 

Minna 
Anderson James, carriagemaker, dwl N s Twentieth 

nr Howard 
Anderson James, laborer, dwl Fort Point 
Anderson James, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anderson James H., bookkeeper with Heywood & 

Harmon, dwl 2 Essex PI 
Anderson James H., boxmaker with Hobbs, Pome- 

roy & Co., dwl 15 Second 



Anderson James W., brakesman Market St Depot 

S. P. R. R., dwl l(i9 Minna 
Anderson James W. Jr., jeweler with Wenzel, Roths- 
child & Hadenfeldt, dwl 169 Minna 
Anderson Jane (widow), dressmaker, dwl 434 Green- 
wich 
Anderson John, captain schooner Nathalie, dwl 18 

Freolon 
Anderson John, carpenter Excelsior Mills, dwl 126 

Welsh 
Anderson John, cook Russ House, dwl 110 .Tackson 
Anderson John, cabinetmaker with Pacific U. AV, 

Furniture Manufacturing Co., dwl 1 Seventh 
Anderson John, broker, cor Solano and De Haro 
Anderson John, dyer Mission Woolen Mills, dwl S s 

Sixteenth bet Folsom and Harrison 
Anderson John, laundryman with Solomon May, dwl 

1142 Folsom 
Anderson John, proprietor Ocean House. 108 Clark 
Anderson John, restaurant, 783 Market, dwl 836 Mar- 
ket 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 12 Washington 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 13 Pacific 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 36 Sacramento 
Anderson John, seaman,- dwl 44 Steuart 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 103 Sacramento 
Andereon John, seaman, dwl 106 .Jackson 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 415 East 
Anderson John, seaman stm Monterey 
Anderson .John, stevedore with Blnck Diamond Coal 

Co., dwl cor Clementina and Second 
Anderson John, tailor, dwl 415 Powell, rear 
Anderson John, upholsterer with John C. Bell, dwl 

6 Moulton PI 
Anderson John, with James Glasgow, dwl Ocean 

House Road nr Ocean View House 
Anderson John Jr., captain schooner Ino, dwl 2631 

Howard 
Anderson John Mrs. (^widow), dwl 920 McAllister 
Anderson John James, teamster with Alvis Brandt, 

dwl 1013 Van Xess Av 
Anderson .John X., captain sloop Louise de Merritt, 

dwl 21 Commercial 
Anderson .Josei)h, laborer, dwl 838 Minna 
Anderson Joseph, stevedore with M'hitney & Freese 
Anderson Joseph D., books and stationery, 120 Fourth 
Anderson Julius, cigars and tobacco, 30j Kearny, dwl 

381 Kearny 
Anderson J.W., principal Fairmount School, dwl44V^ 

Sixth 
Anderson L. Mrs., spiritualist artist, dwl -36 Geary 
Anderson Lars, seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Anderson Louis, porter Wells Fargo & Co., dwl 152 

Minna 
Anderson Louis, stevedore with Whitney &. Freese 
Anderson ^Margaret, dressmaker, divl 15 Second 
Anderson Maria (widowi, dwl 118 O'Farrell 
Anderson Marshall, bookseller, dwl 29 Turk 
Anderson Mary (widow), dwl li Moulton PI 
Anderson Mary (widow), dwl W s Sansom nr Union 
Anderson Mathew A., teacher music, dwl 15 Guerrero 
Anderson Matilda Miss, chambermaid Grand Hotel 
Anderson N., cabinetmaker with Kragen & Co., dwl 

26 First 
Anderson Nels (Nelson & A.), dwl 10 Oak Grove Av 
Anderson Nels, seaman, dwl 415 East 
Anderson Nelson, hostler with Theodore H. Allen, 

712 Greenwich 
Anderson Oliver, foreman with Fencke & Co., dwl 546 

Seventh 
Anderson P. Mrs., milliner with Miss Maria Stacom, 

dwl 924 Folsom 
Anderson Peter (Anderson & Irving J, dxy\ 513 Taylor 
Anderson Peter, cabinetmaker with Pacific U. W. 

Furniture Manufacturing Co., dwl 1 Seventh 
Anderson Peter, cooper with Norton & Kelly, dwl S 

s Minna bet Third and Fourth 
ANDERSON PETER (colored), editor and proprietor 
Pacific Appeal, ofiice 511 Sansom, dwl 1302 Powell 
Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 108 Sacramento 
Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 119 Jackson 
Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 250 Spear 
Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 415 East 
Anderson Pierre A., with EberhardtA Lachman.dwl 

924 Folsom 
Anderson R., patternmaker with Hinckley & Co. 
Anderson Richard, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anderson Robert, seaman, dwl 117 Drumm 






S'ire Insurance at Tariff Kates ; Losses promptly paid by TAENSWORTH & CLAEK. 



C. p. VAN SCHAAOK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 




Anderson Samuel, driver with Benhardt Kramer, 

dwl 1137 Folsom . , t. t^ „ ^ , 

Anderson Samuel S., salesman with P. Kelly, dwl 

Hansa Hotel „ , ,, 

Anderson Simon r Anderson d-BroJ, dwl 1814 Mason 

ANDERSON THOMAS, Seattle Coal Agency 118 and 

120 Market, and president Mutual Provident 

Assn ^and Anderson & Bra.), dwl 410 Eddy 

Anderson Thomas, stevedore with Menzies, Lowry & 

Co. 
Anderson Thomas W. bookkeeper with Thomas An- 
derson, dwl 920 McAllister 
Anderson Thomas W., butcher with J. Y. "Wilson & 

Co., dwl Buchanan nr Bay 
Anderson Tufve, miller Carmen Island Salt Works, 

dwl 42 Ecker 
Anderson Walter B., special policeman, dwl 502 Stock 
Anderson William, engineer S. F. Cordage Manufact- 
ory, dwl Indiana nr Sierra 
Anderson William, molder with Palmer, Knox & Co., 

dwl 84 Louisa 
Anderson William, purser stm Kalorama, dwl 718 

Howard 
Anderson William, seaman schr Express, 24 Market 
Anderson William, teamster Golden Age Flouring 

Mills 
Ander.'on William B. f Anderson, Clark & Morgans) , 

dwl 120 Fourth 
Anderson William B., bookkeeper with H. B. Tiche- 

nor & Co., dwl 2(531 Howard 
Anderson William C, laborer, dwl 555 Mission 
Anderson M'illiam H., calker, dwl 311 Harrison 
Anderson William H., bootblack, 406 Pine, dwl Vir- 
ginia Block 
Anderson William R. (colored), boarding and lodg- 
ing, 7 Broadway 
Anderson William R., laborer, dwl 45 Everett 
Anderson AVilliam R., driver with Yates & Co., dwl 

7 Bagley PI, rear 
Anderson William S., bookkeeper with I. W. Ray- 
mond, dwl 20 Haight 
Anderson & Bro. f Simon and Thomas Anderson), 

wood and coal, 737 .Jackson 
Anderson & Irving (P'^ter Anderson and Soviuel 
J?-m)!f/.', gents' furnishing goods, 219 Montgomery 
ANDERSON & RANDOLPH ( James Anderson and 
William C. Randolph I, watches, jewelry, dia- 
monds, etc., 112 Montgomery 
Andes Louis, waiter with George Becker, dwl SW 

cor Fourth and Berry 
Andes Silver Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), oflSce 507 

Montgomery 
Andlauer Joseph V., upholsterer with Henry Luch- 

singer & Co., dwl 409 Third 
Andlor Jacob, carpenter, dwl 409 Third 
Andornetti Celeste, compositor La Voce del Popolo, 

dwl 18^;, Lafayette PI 
Andornetti G. B., woodcarver with Louis Chilardi, 

dwl oOa Sansom 
Andornetti Julia (widow), ladies' nurse, dwl 18>^ La- 
fayette PI . 
Andrade Antonia Miss, dressmaker, dwl E s V irgin- 

ia nr .Jackson 
Andrade Antonio, cigarmaker, 324 Clay, dwl 1319 Dup 
Andrade Cipriano, first assistant engineer U. S. Navy, 

dwl Government House 
Andrade Eustaquia (widow), dwl E s Virginia nr Jack 
Andrade Evaristo, compositor Courrier de San Fran- 
cisco, dwl 9 Auburn 
Andrade Guillermo (Gaxiola & A.), dwl 611 Folsom 
Andrade Rises Miss, dressmaker, dwl E s Virginia 

nr Jackson 
Andrade William Jr., clerk with Hoffman & Co., dwl 

611 Folsom 
Andre Aley, seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Andre Anthony A., porter S. F. Assaying and Refin- 
ing Works dwl 7 Harriet 
Andre Emile, butcher with Baraty & Coutolenc, dwl 

NE cor Hinckley and Dupont 
Andre William, laborer, dwl 418 Drumm^ 
Andrea Dominico, laborer Maison Doree, dwl 1129 

Dupont 
Andrea Philip, cook with Roccp Beban, dwl Broad- 
way nr Kearny 
ANDREI ADOLFO, physician, office 621 Clay, dwl 

317 First ^ ., 

Andres Christian, band leader and musician Califor- 
nia Theater, dwl 345 Jessie 
Andresen Bros. (Christian and John G. A carnage- 
makers and blacksmiths, 607 Battery 



Andresen Christian (Andresen Bros.), res Oak 

land 
Andresen Henry, laborer, dwl Manhatten House 
Andresen John G. (Andresen Bros.) , res Oakland 
Andresen Peter, foreman Pacific U. W. Furniture M. 

Co., dwl SE cor Market and Seventh 
Andresen Peter, cutter with Wright & Harmon, dwl 

639 California 
Andreson John, planer Pacific U. W. Furniture M. 

Andreson Paul, baker with Hemme & Reuter, dwl 

122 Morton „, . , , , 

Andrew Carrie E. Miss, hairdresser, 2ol Third, dwl 

1604 Pacific Av 
Andrew Charles H., boxmaker S. F. Cooperative 

Box Factory, dwl 912 Bryant 
Andrew Elizabeth (widow), dwl 1604 Pacific _ 
Andrew George B. F., carpenter, dwl 1224 Union 
Andrew John, bookkeeper Front St. Warehouse, res 

Oakland , -.^.t^- i. 

Andrew John, waiter Constitution Hotel, .w liirst 

Andrews Abraham, importer and retail dealer 
watches, diamonds, jewelry, etc., 221 Montgom- 
ery, dwl lllV^ Minna T^ , 1 , 

Andrews Alexander, laborer Golden Gate Park, dwl 
N s Point Lobos Av nr First Av . „ , , 

Andrews Amador, messenger A¥ells, Fargo & Co., dwl 
433 Geary 

Andrews Amasa B., merchandise accountant Custom 
House, dwl 433 Geary . . 

Andrews Charles N., woodturner with Christian 
Schreiber & Co., dwl 841 Mission 

Andrews C. M., conductor Market St. Railway, dwl 
529 Valencia 

Andrews Edwin 0. (Andrews & Fancher), dwl 280 
Kearny 

Andrews Ellen (widow), dwl 1208 Pacific 

Andrews Frank, salesman with Wright & Harmon, 
dwl 433 Geary , -r^ . nr i 

Andrews Frederick J., laborer with D. A. Macdon- 
ald k Co., dwl Treat Av bet Twenty-second and 
Twenty-third » t>- t. 

Andrews George, housepainter with Frost & Rich- 
ards, dwl 315 Harrison 

Andrews George, seaman, dwl 421 East 

Andrews George, stevedore with Menzies, Lowry & 
Bingham, res Oakland 

Andrews Hannah (widow), furnished rooms, 13 and 
15 Second and 589 Market 

Andrews Harrv, business manager Woodward's Gar- 
dens, dwl E s Bartlett bet Twenty-third and Twen- 

Andrews Henry H., captain stm Princess, dwl 926 

Stockton 
Andrews Jacob (Kelly & A.), dwl Brooklyn Hotel 
Andrews James, painter, dwl 412 Pine 
Andrews James, painter with John F. Kennedy, dwl 

Park Hotel 
Andrews J. C, dwl 411 Sansom 
Andrews Jeremiah, laborer new U. S. Appraiser's 

Building 
Andrews John, dwl 707 Green 
Andrews John, laborer, dwl W s Potrero Av nr 

Twentv-third 
Andrews John, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Andrews John, watchman, dwl 15 Second 
Andrews Jonathan, boatman, dwl 504 Davis 
Andrews Oliver, hog butcher, Fifth Av, dwl Sixth 

Av nr L, South S. F. 
Andrews Orson A., dwl NWcor Pacific and Fillmore 
Andrews Peter, clerk, dwl 13 Geary 
Andrews Peter, seaman, dwl 13 Washington 
Andrews Richard, seaman, dwl 896 Front 
Andrews Richard, stevedore with Menzies, Lowry & 

Bingham, dwl 31 Alta PI ^ . „ ,. _^ 

Andrews Robert, machinist with F. A. Huntington, 

dwl 1005 Jones 
Andrews Susan (widow), dwl 515 Minna 
Andrews Thomas, assistant scene painter Califorma 

Theater, dwl 1208 Pacific 
Andrews Thomas J., maltster, dwl 436 Brannan 
Andrews T. U., carpenter, dwl 355 Jessie 
Andrews AV. B., clerk stm Julia 
Andrews William, conductor Market St. Railway, 

dwl W s Dolores bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Andrews William Otis, dwl 22 First Av 
Andrews & Fancher (E. O. Andrews and Charles H. 

Fancher Jr.! , butter, cheese, eggs, etc., 23 Occi- 
dental Market 
Andres Jos6, coalpasser P. M. S. S. Constitution 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOBT, 1874-6, H. Q. Langley, Pub'r, S. F. Price I 



KENKTEDY'S INSUBAITCE AGEJTCY. Fire. Marine, and Life. 411 California St. 



AND 



74 



APE 



ANDROS MILTON, attorney at law, room 18 U. S. 

Court Building, iw\ 523 Turk 
Andross Porter H., assistant abstract clerk Custom 

House, dwl 28 O'Parrell 
Andross Moses C, dwl 10 Liberty 
Andross Winfiold S., watchman U. S. Mint, dwl 10 

Liberty 

''^"'Ia'^Jt?^.^^* ^-^ butcher with Newman & Strubl, 
704 Battery 

Andrzejowski J William, letter carrier S. F. Post- 
office, dwl 702 Bush 

I Arn"^T° iS^D -^l/-'^; Bacouillat & Co.) , dwl 738 Pac 
AJN(jt;L MYRON, advertising agent and newspaper 

correspondent, office 432 Montgomery, room 11 

dwl 1118 Howard 
Angela M. Mrs., dwl SW cor Dupont and Pacific 
Angeh David B., fisherman, Clay St. Wharf 
Angehs August, tinsmith, dwl 3V< Zoe 
Angehs Theodore, teacher music^ dwl 1623 Pow, rear 
Angohus Diederich, driver Albany Brewery, dwl 756 

Howard 
Angell Andrew J., miner, dwl St. Charles PI 
Angell Horace B. (Angell, Palmer <& Co.), dwl 11 

Clementina 
ANGELL, JONATHAN W., apothecary, NW cor 
. ^^'^IT"* and Folsom, dwl 7 Vassar PI 
ANGELL, PALMER & CO. (Horace B. Angell and 

kk'^nL ^9^'^^^'' ' proprietors Miners' Foundry, 

/•>7-/47 rirst 

Angell W. C, physician, office and dwl 506 Folsom 

Angelo Angel, fishdealer, dwl 436 Union 

'*-°^-,°n<?r Charles A., newspaper correspondent, dwl 

1225 Mission 
Angelo Giovanni, express wagon, NW cor Sansom 

and Washington, dwl 1426 Pacific 
Angelo James, gardener, dwl S s Market nr Dolores 
Angelo Maria (widow), dwl 615 Broadway, rear 
Angelo Petri, baker with D. CarafiFa & Co., dwl 1309 

Dupont 
Angelo R. (R Angelo & Co.), dwl Visitacion Valley 
Angelo R. & Co.. gardeners, Visitacion Valley 
Angelo Raymo, clerk, dwl 1007 Union 
Angerer Charles, shoemaker, 1118 Folsom 
Angerhardt Anna A. (widow), liquor saloon, NE cor 

bteuart and Howard 
Angermnnn Adolph T., gardener, dwl 1521 Bush 
Angerstein Charles, laborer, dwl 1223 Stockton 
Angeyine James, market, SW cor Clementina and 

Eighth 
Angle Armatus, clerk with William Vale & Co., dwl 

210o .Jones 
Anglin Patrick, laborer, dwl E s Bryant bet Twen- 
ty-fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Anglin Thomas, porter with California Furniture 

Alannfactunng Co., dwl 721 Minna 
Anglin William, porter with Louis Eppinger, dwl 14 

Harlan PI 
ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK (limited), R. G. 
feneath and Ignatz Steinhart managers, office 412 
California 
Anglum Francis, laborer Pacific Rolling Mill, dwl 

Potrero Point 
Angus William 0., weaver S. F. P. Woolen Factory 

dwl North Point bet Larkin and Post 
Anie Frederick; varnisher with California Furniture 
. ^^Manufacturing Co., dwl 371 Jessie 
ANIMALS' FRIEND (monthly), S. F. Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals publishers, 
office 614 Merchant 
Ankle George, market, W s Railway Av bet Four- 
teenth and Fifteenth avs. South S. F. 
^°°-.x7-P,'°''''"^°" ^- M- Co. (Ely, Nevada), John R. 

Wildo secretary, office 23 Merchants' Exchange 
Annis Abraham, tailor, 208 Sutter, dwl 1 Quincy PI 
Annis Samuel, teamster, SW cor Drumm and Wash- 
ington, dwl 1319 Sansom, rear 
Annis Samuel J., carpenter with J. Wetmore Dunne, 

dwl 143 Fourth 
Annis William R., porter, dwl 327 Bryant 
Ansbro Thomas, private detective, dwl 623 Union 
Ansburg B. & Co. (Adam Jack, Jr.), market, NE 

cor Montgomery and Broadway 
Ansbnrg Barruck (B. Ansburg i& Co.), dwl NE cor 
Montgomery and Broadway 

?l™o?","'. messenger U. S. Army Headquarters, 

lOo btockton 
Anshel Levi, tailor, 204 Commercial 
Ansighoni Henry, real estate, dwl 523 Pine 

"^^ .^z,?.",^'^''''*"''' driver with Boudin & Gleizea, dwl 
43b Green, rear 



Anson Henry G., laborer C. P. R. R. Depot, dwl 413 

x* ourtn 
Anson Patrick F., painter with Wason & Morris, dwl 

bharp PI nr Union 
Anson Richard, painter, dwl 009 Geary 
ANSONIA CLOCK CO., Haviland & Co. agents, a35 

Pine ' 

Anspacher Abraham, real estate, dwl 1820 Market 
Anstett Anton, brewer Lafayette Brewery, dwl 725 

Green 
Anstett Armand (Anstett & Grogan) , dwl 725 Green, 
rear ' 

Anstett & Grogan (Arinand Anstett and Tlwmas 

Grogan), proprs Lafayette Brewery, 725 Green 
Anstide Gustav, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Antey Joseph, gasfitter, dwl 1135 Folsom 
Anthes Frederick, musician, dwl 6 Harlan PI 
Anthes John, musician, dwl 208 Tyler 
Anthes John A., clerk, dwl 208 Tyler 
Anthes Louis, clerk with Morris Speyer & Co., dwl 

Sophia Terrace nr Pine 
Anthes Peter (Anthes & Fleischman) , Awl Sophia 

Terrace nr Pine 
ANTHES & FLEISCHMAN (Peter Anthes and 
Charles N. Fleischman), hairdressing saloon. 
31o Kearny 
Anthonison Henry, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery, dwl" 

1428 Pacific, rear 
Anthony A. G., physician, dwl 704 Howard , 

Anthony Edward T. (E. T. Anthony & Co.), dwl 124 

Oak 
Anthony Emma (widow), seamstress, 915K Folsom 
Anthony E. T. & Co., repackers merchandise, 321 and 

323 Sacramento 
Anthony George W., real estate, off and dwl 417 Bush' 
Anthony Henry (Anthony & MaassJ, dwl 417 Sutter 
Anthony Henry, peddler, dwl 769 Brvant 
Anthony Henry, shoemaker, dwl 51 Natoma 
Anthony James M., engineer, dwl 615 Commercial 
Anthony Joseph, painter, dwl 100 Natoma 
Anthony Peter, shoemaker with John Youngclause, 

dwl 335 Sutter 
Anthony Richard M., bookkeeper with William Sher- 
man & Co., dwl 115 Kearny 
Anthony Sarah (widow), dwl 5 Haight 
Anthony William T., with E. T. Anthony & Co., dwl 

517 Pine 
Anthony & Maass (Henry Anthony and Christian 
MaassJ , groceries and liquors, N W cor Berry and 
Clara Lane 
Anthony's Hall, 417 Bush 
Anthy Andrew, laborer, dwl 227 Second 
Antilles Mining Co., office 106 Leidesdorff 
Antoine John, deckhand stm Contra Costa, Vallejo 

St. Wharf 
Antoine Michael, deckhand stm Clinton, Vallego St.' 
Wharf ) 

Anton Joseph, dairyman, dwl W s Old San Jose Road 

bet Twenty-ninth and Thirtieth 
Anton Joseph, cabinetmaker with Herman Grantz, 

dwl 640 Mission 
Antone Frank, stevedore P. M. S. S. Co., dwl De Boom 

nr Second 
Antone .Joseph, mate stm Sacramento 
Antoni Ferdinand, baker with J. Auger, dwl 911 Pac 
Antonia Clara Mme., clairvoyant physician and me- 
dium, office and dwl 20 Geary 
Antonio Louis J., cartman, dwl 9 Gaven, rear 
Antonio Manuel, steward Oakland Ferry boats 
Antonio Martinotti, waiter, dwl St. Gottard Hotel 
Antonio Mike, seaman stm Oriflamme, Oregon S. S. 

Co. 
Antonio Pedrotta, tinsmith with Simeon Mistre, dwl' 

St. Gottard Hotel 
Antonioli Casimiro, waiter 605 Washington, dwl cor 

Commercial and Liedesdorff 
Antony H. A., cutler with Will & Finck, dwl 522 Fil- 
bert 
Antrou Peter (Sweetser & Co.), dwl 800 Pacific 
Antunovich Florio, coffee saloon, 403 East, dwl 712 

Green 
Antunovich Nicholas, coffee stand, SW cor East and 

Commercial, dwl 8 Sacramento 
Antz Henry, market, NW cor Larkin and Geary 
Anzell Mary (widow), dwl 634 Vallejo 
Anzenhofer Louis, farmer, Old Ocean House Road nr 

Industrial School 
Aoustin Joachim, laborer with Joseph Morand, dwl 

738 Pacific 
Apel John, architect, dwl 701 Stockton 



MEBIDEN PIBE INS. CO. OF COWN.j Assets over $300,000 ; Farnsworth & Clark, Agts. 



p. VAN SOHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 



APE 



75 



AKM 



Apel's BuildiriK. 410 Kearny , t% ui j i 

Apels Charles blacksmith with Nelson & Doble, dwl 

SW cor First and Stovonson 
Aper jorome, dwl 81!) Montgomery 
Apollo Hall, 8()8 Pacific . -n m^ 

APOTHECAEIES' HALL, Benjamin B. Thayer 
manager, SE cor New Montgomery and Market, 
Grand Hotel , ^-rr .i • 

Appel Frank, baker with Henry Blum, dwl 3 Vallojo 

PI 
App<?l Samuel, dwl 12(i Hayes 
Appel Simon, tailor, 872 Folsom 
Appel Theodore, cigars and tobacco, junction Market 

and Ellis, dwl iiOii Howard 
Appell John C, cabinetmaker with John B. Luch- 

singer & Son, dwl SW cor Main and Mission 
Appianis Henry, clerk with John 0. Eohrs, dwl SW 

cor Mission and Eleventh 
Appiarius William, driver with Sol Wangenheim, 

dwl 502 Filbert ^ , ^ „ . 

Apple Jacob, bookkeeper with John G. Hodge & 

Co.. dwl oiili Minna 
Apple Phillip, liquor saloon, 826 and 828 Sacramento 
Apple Sarah Mrs., fancy goods, 20-1 Kearny, dwl 506 

Minna 
Apple Wolf, merchant, 204 Kearny, dwl 566 Minna 
Appleby William, European Nursery, NW cor Mis- 
sion and Twenty-first 
Applegarth Edward, capitalist, office 302 Montgom- 
ery, res Oakland 
Applegarth William, real estate, office 302 Montgom- 
ery, res Oakland 
Applegate J. Henry Jr., bookkeeper with J. H. Car- 
many & Co., dwl 204 Lombard 
Applegate John J., bookkeeper with Standard Soap 

Co^ dwl 2:^ Stockton 
APPLEGATE JOSIAH H., attorney at law, office 729 

Montgomery, dwl Grand Hotel 
Appleton Abraham, shoemaker, dwl 144 Shipley 
Appleton Morritz, blacksmith, dwl 28 First 
Appleton Thomas .Jr., superintendent Mission and 
Pac. Woolen Mills, office 517 and 519 Market, dwl 
128 Sixteenth 
Apps William J., furnished rooms, 720 Market 
Apted Walter, clerk, dwl 1403 Stockton 
Aquadro Gernino, cabinetmaker with W. J. T. Pal- 
mer & Co., dwl 505 Vallejo 
Aquale Germane, machinist, dwl St. Gottard Hotel 
Aqui G., express wagon, cor Washington and Davis 
Arago & Co. (Chinese), cigars, 767 Clay 
Aralich George, fisherman. Clay St. Wharf 
Arallno Manuel, dwl 438 Green, rear 
A rand Margaret Miss, lodgings, 719 Clay 
Arand Pierre, dwl 71!> Clay 
Arata Bartolemo, liquor saloon, 5 Clay 
Arata Francisco, boarding, 14 Union PI 
Arata Giovanni, gardener, dwl Mission Ocean House 

Road nr old road 
Arata Louis, fruits, dwl 425 Filbert 
Arata Nicolo, bootmaker, 648 Clay 
Arata Peter, laborer with D. Ghirardelh, dwl 13 

tJnion PI TT , • 

Arata Serafino, vegetable dealer, dwl 736 Vallejo, 

rear 
Arata Stephen, bootblack, 515 Cal, dwl 8 Scott PI 
Arbes Charles, furrier with H. Liebes & Co., dwl 225 
O'Farrell , ^ , ^ t., 

Arbogast Frederick, upholsterer with Frank G. lid- 
wards, dwl y02 Clay 
Arbuckle Henrv, groceries and liquors, NE cor Six- 
teenth and Howard, dwl 2009 Mission 
Arcade Cigar Co. (Chinese), cigar manufacturers, 646 

Pacific 
Arcaro Joseph, dwl 1121 Kearny 
Archano Cachina, gardener San Pedro Banch 
ARCHBALD JOHN, surveyor S. F. Savings Union, 

office .>^2 California, dwl 1312 Powell 
Archer Catherine (widow), laundress, dwl 18 Louisa 
Archer William, machinist Philadelphia Brewery, 

dwl 415 Fifth 
Archibald Charles, molder, dwl 44 Clementina 
Archibald James W., molder Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works, dwl 44 Clementina 
Archibald Jesse G., teamster SW cor Shasta and 

Michigan, dwl 297 Clementina 
Archibald J. P., hostler Sutter St. R. R., dwl NE cor 

Polk and Austin 
Archibald Prescott L., assistant superintendent Cen- 
tral R. R., dwl 5 Mason 
Archibald William, molder, dwl 5-36 Mission 



Arcolla Andrew, bootblack, dwl 5 Emmet Pl 
Arcolo Louis, laborer, dwl W s Midway nr Francisco, 

rear 
Arcularius George^ millwright, dwl 124 Fifth 
Ardery Agnes Miss, dressmaker with Sullivan & 

Moorhead, dwl 26^-^ Kearny 
Ardery James 11., salesman with H. K. Cummings & 

Co., dwl 569 Howard 
Argchiga Vicente, physician, dwl 1123 Stockton 
Arellano Tgnacio, bathman, dwl 1321 Kearny 
Arend Pierre, furnished rooms, 719 Clay 
Arendt Charles, shoemaker, 504 Green 
Arendt Edward D., upholsterer, dwl 1(J9 Silver 
Arestino Charles, milkman with Peter Palassen, dwl 

N W cor Fillmore and Francisco 
Arey Charles, captain ship Coquimbo, office Pier 1 

Steuart , ,„„„,,. 

Arey Robert B., master mariner, dwl .366 Minna 
Arey T. R., captain bark Christopher Mitchell, office 

Pier 1 Steuart . , -r , tt n , .,, 

Arey Walter W., bookkeeper with Jacob Underbill 

& Co., dwl 1516 Franklin ^ ,,,,„. t. , 

Arfort John B., wagonmaker, 218 Post, dwl 504 iul- 

Argall John f California Machine Works), Ami 323 

Argentes Loon, cook Cosmopolitan Hotel 

Argenti Tullio. marble worker with Bianchi & Cuneo, 

dwl W s Mission nr Twenty-sixth 
ARGENTINE REPUBLIC CONSUL, Charles Baum, 

office 510 Battery 
Ariani Santo, liquor saloon, 32 Clay „ „ , , , 
Ariaz Benancio, janitor London and S. F. Bank, dwl 

21 Telegraph PI 
Arimis B., laundry, 824 Pacific 
Arizona S. M. Co. (Humboldt Co., Nevada), William 

Willis secretary, office 419 California , ^ ^ 
Arizona & Utah M. Co. (Gold Hill, Nevada), Joseph 

Maguire secretary, office 419 California 
Ario Manuel, salesman with G. Venard, dwl 31 John 
Arlando Ignacius, bootblack with Adam Grimm 
Arling Isaac, laborer C. P. R. R. Depot, dwl 234 Ritch 
Arlington House, Mrs. E. M. Gillan proprietress, 127 

Armager Charles W., steward Hose No. 4, S. F. F. D., 

1802 Stockton „ , 

Armand C. Mdme., teacher French, dwl 1120 Stockton 
Armand Pierre, laborer with Alfred Sorbier, dwl 1013 

Dupont , , „ TT • 

A.rmanino Francisco, laborer, dwl ol7 Union 
Armann Edward (Gallaqher & A.J, dwl 72 Everett 
Armbruster Daniel, carbuilder S. P. R. R., dwl Six- 
teenth nr Second Av ^ .^ . T 1 

Armbruster Julius, engraver with California J ewelry 

Co. 
Armbruster AVilliam, watchmaker with Ambrose 

Golly 
Armer Lizzie Miss, dwl 1104 Pine 
Armer Max (Kullman it- A.), dwl 631 O'Farrell 
Armer Thomas, cook, 520 California, dwl 9 Ewer PI 
Armes C. William (Armes & Dallam), res Oakland 
Armes George W. (Armes & Dallam), res Oakland 
ARMES & DALLAM (C. W- and G. W. Armes and 
Richard B. Z)aito»n', importers wood and willow 
ware and manufacturers brooms, 215 and 21J Sac- 
ramento, and manufacturers tubs and pails, 22 
and 24 California 
Armington Edward J., printer, dwl 1017 Clay 
Armington Edward R., tailor with Thomas G. Kim- 
ball, dwl 1017 Clay ^ , , tt 
Armitage Joseph, painter, dwl Overland House 
Armon Edward, hairdresser, dwl 72 Everett 
Armon Isidore, professor music, dwl 47 Clementina 
Armor Robert, tinsmith, dwl 5 Washoe PI 
Armory Block, NW cor New Montgomery and How 
Armory Hall, 134 Fourth 
Armory Hall Building. 502 Montgomery 
Armour Henry, machinist Risdon Iron and Locomo- 
tive Works, dwl 227 Second , , -„r 
Arms Moses, night inspector Custom House, dwl 565 

Howard 
Arms Richard D., clerk, dwl 137 Montgomery 

Armstrong -, warehouseman, dwl Clarendon House 

Armstrong A. P., dwl Golden (iate Hotel 
Armstrong Bart. H., painter, dwl 8 Brenham PI 
Armstrong Charles H., wood and coal, 49 Everett 
Armstrong Christopher, clerk with Michael Connell, 

dwl NW cor Folsom and Harriet 
Armstrong David, commission merchant, dwl 522 
O'Farrell, rear 



PACIFIC OOA0T BUSINESS DIBECTOEY contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



KENNEDY'S INSURANCE AGENCY", Fire, Marine, and Life, represents $12,000,000, 



Armstrong David, lace goods , embroideries, j ewelry, 
etc., 5'W Market, dwl 142 Fourth 

Armstrons Dennis, clerk with Kohn & Goldsmith, 
dn-l 7 Morse 

Armstrong Edward J., collector Washington St. 
Wharf, dwl 8 Hardie PI 

Armstrong Edward J. S., clerk with B. S. Brooks, 
dwl 424 Sansom 

Armstrong Frank, minor, dwl E s Clinton nr Bran 

Armstrong Frank, porter with Meeker James & Co., 
dwl 522!4 O'Farrell 

Armstrong George, laborer, dwl 122 Tyler 

Armstrong George J., bootturner ivith Buckingham 
& Hecht^ cor Valencia and Market 

Armstrong Henry, painter, dwl 420 Stevenson 

Armstrong I. L. G., student Heald's Business College 

Armstrong James (Marks & AJ, dwl 640 Sixth 

Armstrong James, engineer City Paving Co. 

Armstrong James, laborer Marks's Brewery, dwl 240 
Sixth 

Armstrong J. D., dwl 613 Mission 

Armstrong Joanna (widow's dwl cor Chapultepec and 
Henrietta, Bernal Heights 

Armstrong John (Oeorge Egc/leston & Co.), dwl 113 
Oregon 

Armstrong John, cooper with Sol Wangenheim & 
Co., dwl 40!i Sutter 

Armstrong John, laborer, dwl .300 Folsom 

Armstrong John, laborer with Bryant & Strahan, 
dwl 2» First 

Armstrong John, musician, dwl 460 Sixth 

Armstrong John Jr., editor The Sun, office and dwl 
olO Washington 

Armstrong John L., stockbroker, office 330 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 440 Hayes 

Armstrong John S. (Armstrong & Con^ier/', dwl 905 
Post 

Armstrong K. Mrs., upholsteress with CaL Furniture 
Manufacturing Co., dwl 532 O'Farrell, rear 

Armstrong Marietta Mrs., furnished rooms, 118 Post 

Armstrong Martin, laborer, dwl 22 Harriet 

Armstrong Matilda Mrs., fancy goods, 1417 Dupont. 

Armstrong Robert, dwl 438 Green 

Armstrong Rudolph, cooper 508 Front, dwl 1417 Du- 
pont 

Armstrong Samuel C, salesman 309 Montgomery, dwl 
.564 Bryant 

Armstrong Samuel P., teamster with A. Brokaw, dwl 
1535 Mission 

Armstrong Truman B., tinsmith with Brittan, Hol- 
brook k Co., dwl 33 John 

Armstrong William, compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 
217 Minna 

Armstrong William, grainer, dwl S s Eighteenth bet 
Mission and Capp 

Armstrong William, horsedealer, dwl 632 Market 

Armstrong William, seaman, dwl 106 Jackson 

Armstrong William Jr., grainer, dwl S s Eighteenth 
bet Mission and Capp 

Armstrong \V^itliam H., clerk U. S. Army Headquar- 
ters, 105 Stockton, dwl 729 McAllister 

Armstrong AVilliam H., watchman P. M. S. S. China 

Armstrong k Conner (John S. A)-nislrong and Jo- 
seph Conner J , wood and coal, 915 Post 

Arnaud Paul, upholsterer, dwl 431 Sutter 

Arnaud Peter, boxmaker with Pac. Box Manufactur- 
ing Co., dwl N 8 Willow bet Miss and Valencia 

Arnbergor Frank, musician, dwl ViOo Montgomery 

Arndt E., carbuilder S. P. K. R. 

Arndt William, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl Bry- 
ant bet Dora and Eighth 

Arneto Carlo, fisherman. Clay St. Wharf 

Arneson Soren, laborer, dwl 1824 Powell 

Arnest John M., photographer with Bradley & Ru- 
lofson, dwl 725 California 

Arnheim Abraham, porter 221 Sansom, dwl 323 Pac 

Arnheim Gustav S., clerk, dwl 8 Steuart 

Arnheim Julius (Arnheim & SonJ , dwl NW cor 
Mission and Ninth 

Arnheim Sol, clothing, -323 Pacific 

Arnheim Samuel S., cigars and stationery, 8 Steuart 
(and Arnheim <& Son), dwl NW cor Mission and 
Ninth 

Arnh'-im William S., clerk, dwl 8 Steuart 

Arnheim & Son (Julius S. and Samuel S. AmheimJ, 
druggists, NW cor Mission and Ninth 

Arnmer Eugene, professor languages, dwl SW cor 
Buchanan and Pine 

Arnold Ames, teamster, cor Spear and Market, dwl 
E s Fair Oaks nr Twenty-third 



Arnold Augustus D., sawyer with Pacific Box Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 511 Howard 
Arnold Austin, bookkeeper with Marcus C. Hawley 

& Co., dwl 42') Geary 
Arnold Benjamin E., wholesale butcher, M nr Third, 

Butchertown, dwl 2122 Howard 
Arnold Benjamin T., clerk with Loupe & Haas, dwl 

215 Kearny 
Arnold Caspar, manufacturer hats, .50 Stevenson 
Arnold Cyrus, hostler Homestead House, Point Lobos 

Av 
Arnold Eldrid^e F., books, stationery, and optical 

goods, 427 Kearny, dwl 822 Filbert 
Arnold Ferdinand D., butcher, dwl Ws Valencia nr 

Twenty-third 
Arnold Frank W., cooperage, 708 Front, dwl 519 

Octavia 
Arnold Frederick R., butcher, dwl 1314 Kearny 
Arnold George C, teacher German Urban Academy, 

dwl 701 Geary 
Arnold George E., cigars and tobacco, 2-36 Montgom- 
ery and 312 Kearny, dwl 961) Howard 
Arnold George H., clerk Occidental Hotel 
Arnold George W., conductor N. B. and Mission R. 

R., dwl 224 Fourth 
Arnold Isaac S., laborer, dwl 346 Ritch 
Arnold J., dwl 10 St. Charles PI 
Arnold J. A., actor Maguire's Opera House, dwl 5 

Stockton 
Arnold .John, laborer Calvary Cemetery, dwl NE 

cor Ellis and Broderiok 
Arnold John Mrs. (widow), dwl W s Valencia nr 

Twenty-third 
Arnold John Chesley, clerk Buckley's Varieties, 

dwl 719 Clay 
Arnold John F., janitor Knights of Pythias Hall, 

dwl 1503 Leavenworth 
Arnold Joseph, sawyer with HoUihan & Augustine, 

dwl 274 Clementina 
Arnold Louis, clerk with William P. Brown, dwl 742 

Vallejo 
Arnold Marcus P., conductor Clay St. Hill R. R., dwl 

1-503 Leavenworth 
Arnold Mathew, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 

82 Natoma 
Arnold Noah S. (N. S. Arnold tfc Co.;, dwl 918 Capp 
ARNOLD N. S. & CO., hardware commission mer- 
chants and manufacturers' agents, 312 California 
Arnold Oscar, butcher, dwl 1.503 Franklin 
Arnold Otto, messenger London and S. F. Bank, dwl 

324 Turk 
Arnold Rufus, teamster with Sedgley & Davis, dwl 

S s Twentieth bet Treat Av and Harrison 
Arnold Thomas, actor Bella Union Theater, dwl 820 

Washington 
Arnold Thomas C, salesman with HechtBros. & Co., 

dwl 607 Pine 
Arnold T. J., engineer Board State Harbor Commis- 
sioners, office 414 Montgomery, res Oakland 
Arnold William, laborer, dwl N s Delgardo PI nr 

Hyde 
Arnold William, laborer, dwl NW cor Geary and 

Cemetery Av 
Arnold William H., dwl 439 Minna 
Arnot Charles, dwl 636 Pacific, rear 
ARxXOT NATHANIEL D., manager Vulcan Iron 

Works, 135 and 137 Fremont, dwl 1514 Pine 
Arnot Nathaniel D. Jr., secretary Central R. R., 

office 116 Taylor, dwl 1514 Pine 
Arnott Henry, coal dealer, dwl 6.57 Howard 
Arnott Henry, tireman, dwl 636 Commercial 
Arns Moses, waiter New York Bakery, dwl 733 

Folsom 
Arnson Soren, packer with Edward C. Storah, dwl 

NE cor Powell and Greenwich 
Arnstein Eugene (Stein, Simon & OoJ, dwl .331 Kear 
Arnstein Ludwig, bookkeeper with Stein, Simon & 

Co., dwl -507 Lombard 
ARON JOSEPH, president Sutro Tunnel Co., office 

321 California i^and Weil & Co.), dwl SE cor Sut- 
ter and Van Ness Av 
Arons Henry, clerk with R. Wichelhausen, dwl 18 

Sutter 
Aronson Abraham, cigars and tobacco, 242 Sixth 
Aronson Arnold, shoecutter with Einstein Bros. & 

Co., dwl 3 Monroe 
Aronson George, pawnbroker, 110 Kearny, dwl 307 

Eddy 
Aronson Julius, clerk with Schoenholz & Bro. 
Aronson S., student Heald's Business College 



FABNSWOBTH & CIiABK, Gen'l Eire and Marine Insurance Agency; office 230 Cal. St. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



ARO 



77 



ASS 



Aronson Siegmund, peddler, dwl 8 Monroe 

Aronson Sigismund, salesman with Shirek & Co., dwl 
7 O'Farrell 

ARONSTEIN ADOLF, physician, office 29 Kearny, 
dwl r>:M Jones 

Aros Albert, manufacturer cigarette cases, dwl 305 
Mason 

Arpor Albert D., carpenter with California Mills, 
dwl 551) Bryant 

Arper George W., machinehand with Field & Frei, 
dwl 559 Bryant 

Arper Thomas, millwright with F. Korbel & Broth- 
ers, dwl 559 Bryant 

Arpor Walter, sawyer with Field & Frei, dwl 559 
Bryant 

Arps Herman, cabinetmaker with Herman Grantz, 
dwl Brnnnan bet Sixth and Seventh 

Arralla Nolverts, vaquoro with Miller & Lux 

Arrambide J. B., dwl 038 Geary 

Arrington M. L. Mrs., dwl 12 Hampton PI 

Arrington Nicholas T., bookkeeper with Newton 
Brothers & Co., dwl l.'>0!» Mason 

Arriola Edward, photographer, dwl 14 Auburn 

Arriola Eli/.abeth (widow), dwl 14 Auburn 

Arriola Margarito, vaquero City Pound, dwl E s Val- 
Icjo I'l nr Vallejo 

Arrive Pierre, florist, dwl S s Fifteenth nr Guerrero 

Arronge Eugene, laborer with Schetzel & Weyer, 
dwl 712 Pacific 

Arrowsmith David B., local agent New York Life 
Insurance Co., 42(i Montgomery, dwl ISOti Taylor 

Arrowsmith Henry, clerk with Rodgers, Caspari & 
Co., res Oakland 

Arrowsmith John, laborer, dwl 5 Zoe PI 

Arsen Lemaitre, public gardens, Greenwich nr 
Gough 

ART ASSOCIATION, San Francisco, Benjamin P. 
Avery secretary, J. Ross Martin assistant secre- 
tary, rooms 313 Pine 

Arthur A. J., marbleworker with John Daniel & 
Co., dwl 50 Natoma 

Arthur Edwin M,, paying teller Banking Depart- 
ment Wells, Fargo & Co., res Oakland 

Arthur George, hairdresser with George Nicholas, 
dwl 37 Sacramento 

Arthur George N. tJ. D. Arthur & SonJ, res Oak- 
land 

Arthur J. D. & Son fOeorge iV. Arthur), farm and 
express wagons, SW cor California and Davis 

Arthur John D. (J. D. Arthur & Son) , res Oakland 

Arthur William S., baker and confectioner, 931 Fol- 
som, dwl 140 Second 

Artigues E. & Co. ijean and Louis Artigues), 
butchers, 14 San Francisco Market 

Artigues Emile (E. Artigues & Co.), dwl Fifth Av 
bet Railroad Av and N, South S. F. 

Artigues Jean (E. Artigues & Co.y.dwl Fifth Av bet 
Railroad Av and N, South S. F. 

Artigues Louis (E. Artigues A' Co.), dwl Fifth Av 
bet Railroad Av and N, South S. F. 

Arzaga Agustin P., compositor with Felipe Fierro, 
dwl 1519 Dupont 

Arzberger Martin, painter, dwl 1614 Bush 

Asal A., cane-chairworkor, 10 Brooks 

Asberry F. H., steamtitter U. S. Mint, dwl 969 How- 
ard 

Ascheim, Jacob M., dwl 137 Montgomery 

Aschoim S. J., clothier, dwl 915 Stockton 

Ascheim S. M., dwl 137 Montgomery 

Aseret Jacob, gardener, dwl 437 Fulton 

Ash Charles, drayman, dwl 28 (18^) Bluxome 

Ash Gregory, porter with John E. Richards, dwl 236 
Natoma 

Ash Herman, salesman with J. Alexander & Co., 
dwl 700 Ellis 

Ash Kate Miss, with Marks & Levinsky.dwl 117 Na- 
toma 

Ash Jacob fj. Alexander it Co.), res New York 

Ash Leo fJ. Alexander <& Co.), dwl 700 Ellis 

Ash Louis, upholsterer with John Hoey, dwl 516 Va- 
lencia 

Ash Mary (widow), dwl 117 Natoma 

Ash Peter, laborer, dwl 551 Minna, rear 

Ash Robert, attorney at law, dwl 414 Minna 

Ash Thomas P., shorthand reporter S. V. Stock and 
Exchange Board, dwl 433 Natoma 

Ash William, capmaker with W. Fleischer, dwl 9 
Jackson 

ASHBURNER WILLIAM, mining engineer, office 
240 Montgomery, dwl 1014 Pine 



ASHBURY MONROE, auditor city and county, office 

3 City Hall first floor, dwl 204 Montgomery 
Ashby Mark T., mining, dwl 514 Greenwich 
Ashcom James E., register clerk Fourth District 

Court, dwl 8.50 Market 
Ashcroft Henry, waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Ashcroft William, captain stoamtug Neptune, dwl 

1208 Jackson 
Ashdown Archibald, clerk with Porter, Donaldson 

&Co. 
Ashe Caroline L. (widow), dwl 540 Second 
Ashe Mathow, barkeeper 23ti Mont, dwl 445 Minna 
Asher A. F., clothing, 408 Fourth 
Asher Jeanetto, actress, dwl Overland House 
Asher Morris, millinery, 530 Kearny, dwl 257 Stev 
Asher Samuel, express wagon, cor Sac and Kearny 
Ashor Samuel, merchant, dwl 17 Scott PI 
Asher Samuel, oil clothing, factory 325 Davis, dwl 

225 Clay 
Ashorson Emil, bookkeeper Hebrew Observer, dwl 

432 Clementina 
Ashley Annie (widow), dwl 712 Bush 
Ashley Delos R., student, dwl 712 Bush 
Ashley P. L., porter 22() Bush, dwl 712 Bush 
Ashley Sydney J., master mason, dwl 2025 Pacific Av 
Ashley Samuel P. Y., painter, dwl v'Oij Pacific Av 
Ashley W. H., clerk, dwl 224 Kearny 
Ashley W. II. Mis., dressmaker, 224 Kearny 
Ashman Richard T., engineer, dwl cor Sierra and In- 
diana 
Ashmann William, clerk with Frederick Mohrmann, 

SW cor Broadway and Kearny 
Ashmead Gustavus S. fAshmcad & Kellum) , dwl 

SE cor Mariposa and Columbia 
Ashmead, K., engineer with Wells, Russell & Co., 

dwl .'21 Mission 
Ashmead k Kellum (Gustavus 8. Ashmead and 

Charles T. Kellum) , caipenters and builders, 5 

Beale 
Ashmoro William, waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel 
ASHTUN CHARLES, real- estate agent, office 621 

Sansom, dwl 9 Hubbard 
Ashton Charles S., clerk S. F. Stock and Exchange 

Board, dwl 10 Lilly Av 
Ashton Frank, clerk with Charles Ashton, dwl 4 

Hubbard 
Ashton George, dwl SWcor Shotwell and Fifteenth 
Ashton Susan (widow), dwl 19 Lilly Av 
Ashton W. H., prompter California Theater 
Ashton William C, salesman with Ronton, Smith <& 

Co., dwl.522)'2 Howard 
Ashworth Charles, dwl 238 Clara 
Ask Edward, waiter Lick House 
Askerman Claus, laborer National Flour Mills 
Askham Charles M., conductor Central R. R., dwl 

b34 Harriot 
Asmus John, laborer National Flour Mills, dwl 724 

O'Farrell 
Asmussen Nicholas, clerk with James Alexander, 

dwl Berry bet Third and Fourth 
Asmussen Wilhelra, groceries and liquors, NW cor 

Bryant and Eighth 
Asmussen ^Vill^am A., groceries and liquors, NW cor 

Eighth and Harrison 
Aspel William, calkor, dwl 315 Fremont 
Aspen J., carpenter, dwl NE cor Polk and Austin 
Aspen John, deckhand stm El Capitan, Oakland 

Ferry 
Asphalt Paving Co. of California, office 63 Mer- 
chants' Exchange 
Asphaltum Mastic Roofing Co., office 652 Market 
Aspinel William, printer, dwl 32 Minna 
Asiiril William, calker Shipcalkers' Assn, 713 Miss 
Assalino Nicholas, tailor with Wright & Harmon, 

dwl Twenty-sixth bet Harrison and Folsom 
Assanger A. (widow), dwl 12 Berry 
Assayer State, Louis Falkenau, office 421 Mont 
Asselin John, carpenter California Mill, dwl .563 Miss 
ASSESSOR CITY AND COUNTY, office 22 City 

Hall, first floor 
Assing & Co. (Chinese), merchants, 809 Sac, rear 
Assion Henry, tailor, dwl 1 Morey Alley 
Assion Joseph, merchant tailor, 205 Montgomery, 

dwl 348 Third 
ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT U. S. MAIL 

SERVICE, office tiOiJ Montgomery 
Assmann Adolph f Assmann it Neuhert), dwl Hamp- 
shire bet El Dorado and Alameda 
Assmann Otto, clerk 10 California Market, dwl 

Hampshire bet El Dorado and Alameda 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBOTOBY, 1874-6, wiU be published September, 1874. 



Ii. W. EENI^EDT, General Insurance Agent, Fire, Marine, and Iiife, 411 California St. 



Assmann & Neubort f Adolph Assmann and Rudolph 
NeubertI , butter, choese, eggs, etc., 10 California 
Market 

Aston John, expressman, cor Pacific and Davis 

Aston Daniel, painter with William Leo, dwl NW 
cor Twenty-fourth and Church 

Aston Sarah JE. (widow), dwl 401 Jessie 

ASTOK BLOCK, (i-U Saoramonto 

ASTKEDO ANTHONY, Astredo's Exchange, 635 
Washington, dwl t>14 Vallojo 

Astrom Kmil, seaman, dwl otj Sacramento 

Asztalos Samuel, cabinetmaker Pacific U. W. Furni- 
ture M. Co. 

At Lee Samuel Yorke, editor Pacific Odd Fellow, 
office room 18, 7 Montgomery Av, dwl 37 Second 

ATCUiNSON B. M. (B. M. Atchinson d: Co J, res 
East Oakland 

ATCHINSON B. M. & CO. (B. M. Atchinson and 
E. L. CuttenJ, butter, cheese, eggs, etc., 6, 7, 38, 
and '6d Occidental Market 

Athoarn Charles O. (Athearn <& Co.), dwl 909 McAl- 
lister 

Athoarn Charles M., milkman, dwl 1313 Larkin 

Athearn Christian, milkman, dwl 1313 Larkin 

Athearh Joseph H. (Athearn «fc Co.), dwl 17 Second 
Av 

Athearn William, clerk Forwarding Dep. Wells, 
Fargo & Co., dwl 1707 Leavenworth 

ATHEAKN & CO. (Charles G. and Joseph H. 
Athearn) , groceries, provisions, and ship stores, 
8 Clay 

ATHEN7EUM BUILDING, SE cor Mont and Cal 

Atherton Faxon D., capitalist, office 705 Sansom, res 
Fair Oaks, San Mateo Co. 

Atherton Faxon D. J r. , clerk London and S. F. Bank, 
dwl 31ij Turk 

Athy Dominick, butcher, dwl 510 Market 

Atkins A. B., with Henry B. Atkins, dwl 525 O'Farrell 

Atkins Charles, porter with F. B. Taylor k Co., dwl 
1:^17 Powell 

Atkins David, dummyman Clay St. Hill R. R., dwl 
S\V cor Broadway and Hyde 

Atkins Henry B., groceries and liquors and real- 
estate agent, SE cor O'Farrell and Jones 

Atkins James, laborer Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl Il- 
linois bet Twentieth and Shasta 

Atkins Joseph, pipefitter P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 111 Sil- 
ver 

Atkins Robert, laborer, dwl 318 Davis 

Atkins Robert, shipcarpenter, dwl 132 First 

Atkins Robert C. (Orr & A.), dwl 008 Geary 

Atkins W., clerk, dwl 525 Geary 

Atkins William, fireman S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 
Potrero 

Atkinson David, manager Russ House Laundry, Russ 
Alley, dwl 314 Bush 

Atkinson Francis, fireman Engine No. 6, S. F. F. D., 
dwl 100 Shipley 

Atkinson Frederick, pressman with John H. Car- 
many & Co., dwl 3d5 Minna 

Atkinson George, carpenter with William Kerr, dwl 
5;:i5>^ Minna 

Atkinson George F., turner with W. B. Bradbury, 
dwl 520 Folsom 

Atkinson James, laborer with Pac. Rolling Mills, 
dwl Potr«ro Point 

Atkinson James, Market Exchange Saloon, 538 Mar- 
ket, dvvl 41 Tehama 

Atkinson J. B. (£,. Atkinson <& Co.), res Philadel- 
phia, Penn. 

Atkinson Joseph H., patent agent, dwl 1032 Bdwy 

ATKINSON L. & CO. (XJS. ^/A-iwwn;, manufactur- 
ers and importers shirts and collars, 310 Cal 

Atkinson Lewis (L,. Atkinson <k Co.y, dwl Lick House 

Atkiuson N athan, real estate, office 305 Montgomery, 
dwl 7uli)2 Mission 

Atkinson Lose H. (widow), dwl 365 Minna 

Atkinson Thomas, gardener, W s San Jose Road nr 
Six-mile House 

Atkinson Thomas, real estate, dwl 24 Howard, rear 

Atkinson Thomas T., bookkeeper with Lyon & Co., 
dwl 112 Hyde 

Atkinson William, laborer, dwl 833 Geary 

Atkinson William, sailmaker with John S. Blakis- 
ton, dwl Clay 

Atlantic and Pac. Consolidated G. M. Co. (El Dorado 
Co., Cal.), A. Noel, office 419 California 

Atlantic and Pac. Insurance Co. (Chicago, 111.), Fire, 
Hutchinson, Mann & Smith general agents, office 
314 Calilbrnia 



ATLANTIC AND PAC. TELEGRAPH CO. (Cen- 
tral Pacific Division), Leland Stanford president, 
F. L. Vandenbergh superintendent, T. W. Hub- 
bard secretary, office 507 California ; branches 
Grand Hotel, Lick House, Cosmopolitan, SE cor 
Sacramento and Front, cor Fourth and Townsend, 
P. M. S. S. Co.'s Wharf, San Jos6 Depot, and Oak- 
land Ferry Wharf 

Atlantic Giant Powder Co. (New York), office 003 
Washington 

Atlantic House, Michael McDonnell proprietor, 212 
Pacific 

Atlantic Straw Works, Lorenzo Lapham proprietor, 
132 Fourth 

ATLAS FIRE INSURANCE CO. (Hartford, Conn.). 
Farnsworth &. Clark agents, office 230 California 

Atlas Henry, baker P. M. S. S. Montana 

Atlas Insurance Co. (New Orleans, La.), Fire and 
Marine, Hutchinson, Mann & Smith general 
agents, office -Ul California 

Atterbury Alexander, bookkeeper with James N. 
McCune, dwl 304 Seventeenth 

Atterbury James A., carpenter, dwl 12^^ Harriet 

Attinger Fredrick, tailor, dwl 3 Cushman 

Attinger Gottleib, shoemaker, dwl 31 Morton 

Attinger John, tailor, dwl 31 Morton 

Attridge Arthur, shoemaker with Einstein Bros, <& 
Co., dwl 211 Perry 

Attridge Edward, porter, dwl 1010 Filbert 

Attridge J ames, laborer Front St. Warehouse, NE 
cor Broadway and Montgomery 

Attridge Thomas, laborer, dwl 75i( Mission 

Attridge Thomas, porter Cowell's Warehouse, dwl 
1307 Broadway 

ATTWOOD MELVILLE, consulting mining engi- 
neer, dwl 722 Bush 

Atwater Minnie Miss, shoefitter with Buckingham & 
Hocht, cor Lilly Av and Laguna 

Atwill Edward, butcher with Mowatt & Wood, dwl 
944 Howard 

Atwill Joseph F. (Atwill ife Co.), res Oakland 

Atwill Samuel, cook, dwl 22 Minna 

ATWILL & CO. ( Joseph F. Atwill), Western Min- 
ing Agency, office 2i0 Montgomery 

Atwood Caroline L. Mrs., teacher Girls' High School, 
dwl 1511 Clay 

Atwood Ephraim A. (Atwood >& Bodwell) ,Ayi\ 1511 
Clay 

ATWOOD GEORGE A., groceries and liquors, SW 
cor Twenty-second and Folsom, dwl E s Shotwell 
bet Twenty-second and Twenty-third 

Atwood George E., teamster with William H. Nich- 
olls, dwl S\V cor Drumm and Sacramento 

Atwood George W., expressman, Steuart nr Mar- 
ket, dwl N s Ellis bet Webster and Fillmore 

Atwood William S., bookkeeper, 117 Battery, dwl 629 
Post 

ATWOOD & BODWELL (Ephriam A. Atwood and 
Harry H. BodwellJ, Excelsior windmill, pump, 
horsepower, and tank manufacturers, 211 and 213 
Mission 

Aubert Albert, pork butcher, 10 San Francisco Mar- 
ket, dwl 3 Graham PI 

Aubert James M., physician, office 235 Kearny 

Aubert Paul L., jeweler, dwl 620 I'ulton 

Aubert P. L., jeweler with Cal. Jewelry Co., dwl 1314 
O'FferroU 

Aubonnet August, lodgings, 109 Dupont 

Aubrey Bernard, dwl California Hotel 

Aubrey Charles A., tinsmith with G. & W. Snook, 
dwl 4513 i Tehama 

Aubrey Francis 0., cabinetmaker, E s Mission nr 
Twenty-second, dwl NE cor Chattanooga and 
Twenty-third 

Aubrey Mary (widow), dwl 4 Bannam PI 

Aubrey William, carpenter, dwl 75 Clementina 

Auburn Gold Mining Co. (Placer Co., California), 
office 414 California 

Aud Joseph, printer with Kane & Cook, dwl 100 
McAllister 

Audifi'red Alphonse, with Hyppolite Audiffred, dwl 
224 Austin 

Audiffred Hyppolite, wood and charcoal, Mission St. 
Wharf, dwl 224 Austin 

AUDITOK CITY AND COUNTY, office 3 City Hall, 
first floor 

Auerbach Leopold, merchant (Montana Ter.), dwl 
516 O'Farrell 

Auerbach Charles M., bookkeeper with Levi Strauss 
& Co., dwl 711 O'Farrell 



MISSISSIPPI VAIiIiSY F. & M. INS. CO.; Assets $600,000; Farnsworth & Clark, Agts. 



O. p. VATT SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 



AUE 



79 



AYE 



Auerbach Louis, cigars and tobacco. What Cheer 

House, divl 340 Turk 
Auerbach Louis, cigars and tobaoco, 309 East 
4.uger E. Eugene ,'B. E. Auger & Co.) , dwl 826 How 
AUGEK ii. E. ik Co., importers and commission mer- 
chants, 40i) Battery 
Augor Jean, bakery, 911 Pacific 
Auger Lambert, mathematical- instrumentmaker 

with John C. Sack, dwl 05 Jessie 
Augonetto Erank, milkranch, NW cor Fillmore and 

Francisco 
Augsburger Frank, carpenter, dwl 909 Kearny 
Augsburgh Fred ( Faicceit & A.) , dwl 03 Minna 
Aug:;st Alexander, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
August Henry, porter Eagle Warehouse, N W cor Pine 

and Davis 
August Mary (widow), dressmaker, dwl 634 Vallejo 
Augustine Henry, laundryman, dwl 915 Stockton 
Augustine H. W. (Hollihan & Augustine), dwl 124 

Tyler 
Augustine J., laborer Golden Gate Sugar Refinery, 

dwl t>E cor Turk and Park 
Augustine Morris, bookkeeper, 22 Battery, dwl 23 

Kearny 
Augustus Joseph, painter, dwl 703 Davis 
Aulbach Adam, compositor Evening Post, dwl 822 

Powell 
Auld George M., fireman S. P. R. R. 
Auld James, salesman with David Porter, dwl 32334 

Fifth 
Auleaf Lewis, gardener with Stefano Garosine, dwl 

E s Guerrero nr Sixteenth 
Ault Joseph, harness cleaner with Roe Allen, dwl 

178 Stevenson 
Ault Martha M. Mrs., adjuster Coiner's Department 

U. S. Mint, dwl 905 Market 
Ault Mathias 0., miller with F. D. Conro & Son, dwl 

51 Third 
Auman Frederick, liquor saloon, 8 Waverly PI, dwl 

508 Broadway 
Aumond Albert, miner, dwl Overland House 
Aumond Harry, cook with Louis Mayer, dwl 15 How- 
ard Court 
Auradou Leon, game, poultry, etc., 507 Merchant, 

dwl 520 Merchant 
Aureguy Luis, carpenter, dwl 1024 Kearny 
Aurignac Marcelin, florist stand, 3 Montgomery, dwl 

9 Trinity 
Aurora Co. (Chinese), cigars, 206 Dupont 
Auroiize Marius, hairdressing saloon, 647 Pacific, dwl 

1114 Stockton 
AUSTIN ALEXANDER, tax collector City and 

County, office 1 City Hall, first floor, dwl Lick 

House 
Austin Alvah C, engineer Pneumatic Gas Co., dwl 

405 Powell 
AUSTIN B. C, tin-can and box manufacturer, 419 

Battery, res Oakland 
Austin Charles, barkeeper with James Gallaudet, 

dwl Long Bridge foot Fourth 
Austin David S., captain P. M. S. S. Nevada, dwl 23 

Oak Grove Av 
Austin Emmet, bookkeeper with Littlefield, Webb & 

Co., dwl 770 Howard 
Austin F. A., machinist, dwl 966 Folsom 
Austin George B., wines and liquors, 023 Sacramento, 

dwl 031 Sacramento 
Austin Henry, dentist, office and dwl 634 Washington 
Austin Isaac, assistant engineer P. M. S. S. Nevada 
Austin Jean B., laborer, dwl 519 Union 
Austin John, engineer, dwl 331 Minna 
Austin .John, expressman, dwl 3 Broadway 
Austin Joseph, dwl 030 Commercial 
Austin Joseph, draj'man with Kirkpatrick & McCue, 

dwl 717 Natoma 
Austin Joseph, port warden, office 525 Front, dwl 

Lick House 
Austin Louise Miss, milliner with Mrs. M. Selig, dwl 

225 Kearny 
Austin Marcus E., agent patent window curtains, 639 

Kearny, res East Oakland 
Austin Mathew A., master bark Shooting Star, office 

cor Folsom and Spear 
Austin Minnie F. Miss, associate principal Clarke 

Institute, 2;« O'Farrell 
Austin Thomas, carpenter, dwl 423 Bush 
Austin Thomas A., groceries and liquors, 356 Jessie, 

dwl 'joo Folsom 
Austin William W., news editor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 

Overland House 



Auston Joseph B., salesman with 0. Lawton & Co., 

dwl 1030 Howard 
AUSTRALASIAN AND AMERICAN MAIL S. S. 

CO., J. C. Merrill k Co. agents, office 204 Cal 
AUSTRIAN JiENEVOLENT SOCIETY, rooms 71 

New Montgomerj' 
AUSTRO HUNGARIAN EMPIRE CONSUL. Gott- 
lieb A. E. Muoeke, office room 8, 109 California 
Autagne George A., paper hanger, dwl N s Bying- 

ton bet U'iarrell and Ellis 
Autey William, waiter Excelsior Restaurant, 544 

First 
Auvray Frank, teamster with Vermeil & Wellington, 

dwl SE cor Fourth and Berry 
Avaloz Manuela (widow), dwl 8^*^ Pacific 
Ave Frederick, seaman, dwl 132 Steuart 
Avel Rachel Miss, dressmaker, dwl 1015 Pacific 
Avella Malhous, seaman, dwl 116 Jackson 
Avellor Josa M., miner, dwl 110 Jackson 
Avenue House, John G. Genet proprietor, 807 and 

819 Kearny 
AVERILL CHEMICAL PAINT CO., Healy & Jew- 
ell agents, NW cor Fourth and Townsend 
Averill Jackson L., bookkeeper with H. M. Black, 

dwl 923>^ Harrison 
Averill W., truckman, 525 Front 
Averill William, shipjoiner, dwl 333 Bush 
Avery Adeline Mrs., water and magnetic physician, 

dwl 212 Sutter 
Avery Bean A., fruit and vegetables, dwl 1911 Polk 
AVERY BENJAMIN P., editor Overland Monthly, 
secretary S. F. Art Association and State Centen- 
nial Committee, office 021 Clay, room 8, dwl 600 
Bush 
Avery Clark, carpenter, dwl 1009 Clay 
Avery Charles H., seaman, dwl 214 Chestnut 
Avery David \\'., machinist RisJon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works, dwl 513 Howard 
Avery Dean R., produce, 41 and 42 Washington Mar- 
ket, dwl 1911 Polk 
Avery E. O., student Heald's Business College 
Avery Eunice H. (widow), variety store, cor Iowa 

and Solano 
Avery Francis, president Pacific Borax Co., office 210 

Battery, dwl 422 Second 
Avery Joseph, carpenter, dtvl 1609 Clay 
Avery Judson, salesman with Brown & McDonald, 

dwl 5043^ Howard 
Avery Mary (widowj, dwl 25 Jessie, rear 
Avery Nellie Miss, dressmaker, dwl 203 Third 
Avery Ross, carpenter, dwl SE cor Capitol and Broad 

nr San Miguel Station 
Avery S. Miss, teacher Rincon School, dwl cor Iowa 

and Solano, Potrero 
Avery William, billiardman with Pearson & Holmes 
Avila Joseph, wagonmaker, dwl 8 St. Charles PI 
Avila Mariano, agent Rio Colorado Company, dwl 

1015 Pacitic 
Avisseau Louis, carpenter, dwl 621 ValleJo 
Avon John, shipcarpenter, dwl 13 Tehama, rear 
Avy Eugene, wholesale butcher. Fifth Av, South S. 
F., office 15 Montgomery Block, dwl Lombard bet 
Stockton and Dupont 
Axel^ William, manutacturer ginger beer, NW cor 

Francisco and Midway 
Axt Ludwig, shoemaker, dwl 936 Howard 
Axtell William, compositor Golden Era, dwl 1026 

Montgomery 
Axthelm Herman, pastor German Methodist Church, 

dwl 804 Folsom 
Axtmann Ferdinand, butcher, dwl 238 Sutter 
Axtmann Herman, cabinetmaker with California 

Furniture Manufacturing Co., dwl 238 Sutter 
Ayer Joseph T., carpenter and builder, dwl 2408 Fol 
AYER W'ASHINGTON, physician and surgeon, office 

410 Kearny, dwl 428 Post 
Ayers David M. (Ayers <& Keith), dwl 778 Mission 
Ayers Grosvenor P., bookkeeper with Osgood & Stet- 
son, dwl 524 Geary 
Ayers Henry (Pike <t AJ, dwl NE cor Haight and 

Gough 
Ayers Humphey, earriagesmith with Albert Folsom, 

dwl SW cor Bartlett and Twenty-sixth 
Ayers Ira Jr., bookkeeper with George F. Bragg & 

Co.. dwl 1030 Jackson 
Ayers John C, policeman, dwl 28 Clara 
Ayers Mary, housekeeper with Alpheus Bull, NE 

cor Leavenworth and Francisco 
Ayers Robert, machinist with F. A. Huntington, dwl 
Jackson Park, Potrero 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTOKY circulates throughout the Pacific Coast. 



KENNEDY'S INStJBANCE AGENCY. Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



fa 



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o 

id 

H 

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OS 

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BAG 



Ayers William, shipcalker, dwl N s Twelfth Av bet 

JS[ and 1", tiouth (S. F. 
Ayers & Keith f David M. Ayers and William H. 

KeithJ , clothing and gents' furnishLng goods, a03 

Kearny 
Ayers. See Eayers and Ayres 
Ayhens Apoline, laundry, 'Z'il Hitch 
Aylward J ohn (Holland, Moorci&CoJ, res San Jose 
Aylward Michael, machinist with Angell, Palmer & 

Co., dwl ol Minna 
AYliES, UOPE A; CO. (George O. Davis, John G. 

Ayres, and George W. Cope;, stock and exchange 

brokers, office oUo California 
Ayres Emma (.widow), dwl 4U7 iSutter 
Ayres Henry, tinsmith, dwl 1027 Market 
Ayres James, blacksmith with i'ogarty & Meyer, 

dwl 2o2 J essie 
Ayres James, lumberman with Jason Springer, dwl 

cor Mission and Twenty-fourth 
Ayres J. Irving, mining superintendent, dwl 2521 

Mission 
Ayres J ohn Mrs. (widow), dwl Carolina nr Santa 

Clara 
AyvQS John G. (Ayres, Cope & Co.), dwl -131 Geary 
Ayres William 0., physician, office and dwl 215 Geary 
Ayres. See Ayers and Eayrs 
Azeveda Fernando, seaman, dwl SW cor Drumm and 

Oregon 
Azevedo J. D., physician, office and dwl Virginia Blk 
AZPiKOZ, MAiNUEL LICENCIADO, consul for 

Mexico, office 408 California, dwl 23 South Park 

B. 

Baagoe Christian, chop house. Battery, dwl 323 Bdwy 
Baas Charles, saloonkeeper, dwl S21 Vallejo 
Babbott Hahna (widow), dwl 102 William 
Babbitt John li., clerk with Sroufe, SvTeeney & Co., 

dwl W s Tennessee nr Butte 
Babbitt Leon, brasstinisher with Weed & Kingwell, 

dwl 51J Shipley 
Babcock B. E., insurance agent, dwl 1134 McAllister 
BABCOCK EIKE EXTliNGUiSHER, Walter B. 

Murdock agent, office 312 California 
Babcock George (Babcock & Gould), dwl 9 Sec Av 
Babcock George A., clerk with S. W. Kosenstock & 

Co., dwl 530 Howard 
Babcock John, clerk Custom House, dwl 28 Geary 
BABCOClv MAiNUFACTUKlNG CO. (Chicago), 
Kichard K. irvyin &, Co. agents, office 200 Sansom 
Babcock Silas B., stevedore P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 3 

Howard Court 
Babcock Warren, calker with T. Bigley & Co., dwl 

13 Spear 
Babcock William, clerk with Parrott & Co., dwl 11 

Essex 
BABCUCIv WILLIAM F., president Spring Valley 
Water Works Co. (and Parrott & Co.), office 306 
California, dwl 11 Essex 
BABCOCK &. GUULD (George Babcock and Henry 
GouldJ , produce commission and S. F\ F'eed 
Mills, 114 Sacramento and 113 Commercial 
BABCOX JEFFERSON T., chief coiner U. S. Mint, 
office blO Commercial, dwl Kevere House, cor Mis- 
sion and Fourth 
Babeecu Viotorine iVIatta, fisherman. Clay St. Wharf 
Babidge George, clerk, dwl Coso House 
Babington H. M., cook Alms House, Mission Ocean 

House Road 
Babb Charles, reporters. F. Chronicle, dwl 204 Mont 
Babson Edward (C. L. Taylor & Co.), res Boston 
Babylon George, stevedore P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 10 

Langton 
BACA P. & CO. (Andres Calderon and Frederick 
A. McDougall), wholesale butchers. Fifth Av 
nr Railroad Av, South S. F., office 535 Clay 
Baca Pablo (P. Baca cfc Co.), dwl 535 Clay 
iiaca Paul, woolgrower, dwl 8 Russ 
Baccala Louis, cook with Jules E. Sorbier, dwl 745 

day 
Baccoi Pietro, operatic artist, dwl 835 Clay 
iiaccla Louis, cook, dwl 745 Clay 

''^'wi'^nh?.^- manufacturer with Libby & Swett, 
awl 1018 Powell 

Baccus Richard T., butcher with Louis Kosenberg, 
dwi 517 Geary *' 

Bace Sarah N. (widow, colored) dwl 1511 Mason 

A V ,^'','°^' bookkeeper with Ferdinand Scherr. 
dwl 18 Langton ' 



Bach Frederick W., bookkeeper 12 Battery, dwl 735 

Green 
Bach Henry, porter Lick House 
Bach Hermann, clerk 317 Sacramento, dwl 17 John 
Bach Isaac, salesman with Henry Hanziger 
Bach John, laborer Golden Gate Park 
BACH JOHN, manager United Anaheim Wine 
Growers' Assn, office 321 Mont, and guns and 
sporting materials, 28 Geary, dwl 508 Taylor 
Bach William, stairbuilder, dwl 415 Brannan 
Bacholder Frank J., clerk with American Clock Co., 

dwl 1111 Pacific 
Bacheldor John W., assistant weigher Custom House, 

dwl 1103 Kearny 
Bachelder J. W., pressman with Cubery & Co., dwl 

1145 Howard 
Bachelder Thomas F., attorney at law, office 607 

Kearny, dwl 1028 Jackson 
Bachelor William, tailor, dwl 3 Clara Lane 
Bacher Frank A., clerk with Hirsch & Ruef, dwlll60 

Folsom 
Bachert August, salesman with B. Nathan & Co., dwl 

702 Vallejo 
Bachert Max, artist with Bradley & Rulofson, dwl 

Grand Hotel 
BACHMAN BROTHERS (Herman S., Nathan 8., 
and David S.), importers and jobbers dry goods, 
10 and 12 Battery 
Bachman David, merchant, dwl 215 Kearny 
Bachman David S. (Bachman Brothers), dwl 1109 

Van Ness Av 
Bachman Herman S. (Bachman Bros.), res New 

York 
Bachman Leopold S., salesman with Bachman Broa., 

dwl 1109 Van Ness Av 
Bachman Nathan S. (Bachman Bros.), dwl 1109 Van 

Ness Av 
Bachman Simon (Esherg & B.) dwl 9 Mason 
Bachmann Frederick, laborer, dwl 17 Downey 
Bachrach Martin, teamster with Marks & Arm- 

strong, dwl How bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Bacieh Thomas, cook with A. Rodovich, 5 Steuart 

Bacigalupi , fisherman. Clay St. Wharf 

Bacigalupi Antonio (Louis Wiegand d; Co.), dwl N s 

Sixteenth bet Valencia and Mission 
Bacigalupi Carl, cartman, dwl 19 Lafayette PI 
Bacigalupi F"., stillman Bay View Distillery, dwl 

Sixteenth Av nr 1, South S. F\ 
Bacigalupi Guisseppe (Sanguinetti & B.) , dwl 222 

pupont 
Bacigalupi John, boots and shoes, 1404 Dupont 
Bacigalupi Joseph, woodcarver with Bryant & 

Strahan, dwl 1805 Mason 
Bacigalupi Luigi. gardener, dwl Union bet Polk and 

Van Ness Av 
Bacigalupi Louis (Bacigalupi & Co.), dwl 10 Lafay- 
ette PI 
Bacigalupi Napoleon, vegetable dealer, dwl 12 Union 

PI 
Bacigalupi Peter, clerk with David A. Jennings, dwl 

1805 Mason 
Bacigalupi Polo, painter, dwl 433 Green, rear 
Bacigalupi Stephen, marblecutter with Stephen 

Campodonico, dwl 1805 Mason 
Bacigalupi T. D., native wines, 1419 Dupont 
Bacigalupi &. Co. (Louis Bacigalupi and Dominico 

iSanguineti) , liquor saloon, 1402 Dupont 
Backe F'rank, upholsterer with Mountain & Raye, 

dwl 5 Latham PI 
Backert A. G., clerk with Feldbusch & Co., dwl 411 

Sansom 
Backes Michael, waiter with Schroth & Westerfeld, 

dwl 228 Kearny 
Backett F'roderick A. (colored), painter with John 
E. (iarton. dwl 8 Wnshinp-fnn 



E. Garton, dwl 8 Washington , 

Backhaus Henry F., bookbinder with Althof & 

Bahls, dwl 320 Broadway 
Backus Charles, captain Caroline Medau, office 303 

East, dwl 1919 Mason 
Backus George, machinist, dwl 1018 Powell 
Backus John, dwl 1018 Powell 

Backus Oscar J. (George H. Tay <fc Co.), res Oakland 
Backus P. M., secretary Contra Costa Steam Naviga- 
tion Co., dwl 725 California 
Backus Samuel W. (S. W- Backus & Co.A dwll520 

Mason 
BACKUS S. W. & CO., forwarding and commission 

merchants and agents Regular Line Oregon 

Packets, office 203 Front 
Backus Theodore, clerk, dwl 1919 Mason 



BPBINQFIELD FIRE & MAK'E INS. CO.; Assets, $1,100,000; Farnsworth & Clark, Agts. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708. 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St.. Importers and Jobbers. 



BAG 



81 



BAI 



Bacon Emily Eleanor Miss, milliner with Miss Maria 

A. Stacom, dvvl 217 Third _ 
Bacon Gaston E., clerk with Painter & Calvert, awl 

5 Quincy PI . . , i. tvt t> j 

Bacon George H., assistant superintendent iN. ±5. and 

Mission 11. K.,dwl 11.5;^Folsoiu . ,, , . 
Bacon George W., proprietor Commercial Lodgings, 

IJlo Commercial 
BACON HENRY D., real estate, ofiBce 30t> Sansom, 

res Oakland , , r tt o o i. 

Bacon Horace, deputy U. S. marshal, 5 U. b. Court 

Building, dwl 54 Third 
BACOi^ JACOB (Bacon <& CoJ,Tes Oakland 
Bacon James, foreman Miners' Foundry, dwl 78 

Natoma , , „, r. i. 

Bacon James, seaman, dwl 10b bacramento 
Bacon John W., painter and paperhanger with Gibb 

Sl Co., dwl Columbia Hotel 
Bacon Joseph, painter, dwl VV's Mission bet Fifteenth 

and Sixteenth, rear ■, tt ■, 

Bacon Joseph S., agent Boston Board Underwriters, 

office 1U.J Front, dwl do}^ Kearny 
Bacon xMaria M. (widow), dwl o Uuincy Fl 
Bacon Mill and Mining Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), office 

414 California , ^ . , ^^ , t. tt c 
Bacon P. B., traptender Coiner's Department U. b. 

Mint, dwl 224trMission ., „ • t> i 

Bacon Truman F., secretary Security bavings Bank, 

office 304 Sansom, res Oakland 
Bacon William, hostler Omnibus R. R., dwl 258 

Clementina, rear 
BACON & CO. (Jacob Bacon, B. E. C. Stearns, and 

James E. AgerJ, book and jobprmters, ISl VV cor 

Sansom and Clay . , ^ , j t .,ou 

Bacquie Henry (Henry Bacquie & Co.), dwl 72b 

BACOUrE° HENRY & CO. (Aime il/assow; , liquor 
saloon, N W cor Stockton and Broadway 

Badaracho Antonio (Antonio Badaracho & Co. J, 
dwl NE cor Green and Graham Fl 

Badaracho Antonio & Co. ( George De Martini) , coal 
and wood, 151o Stockton .^, . 

Badaracco Bernardino, marble polisher with An- 
drew Paltenghi, dwl 12 Union PI 

Bade Henry, cabinetmaker with Gilbert & Moore, 
dwl 415 Brannan . 

BADENHOP HENRY F,, groceries and liquors, bE 
cor Harrison and Twenty-fourth 

Badger Henry, laborer Potrero Tannery, dwl Mis- 
souri nr jMariposa 

Badger James, express wagon, cor Clay and Kearny, 
dwl 22 Langton ,, „ , t^ . c 

BA1>GEK VVibLiAM Q., agent Hallett, Davis & 
Co.'s pianos and George AV oods k Co.'s parlor and 
vestry organs, and general commission merchant, 
7 and 13 Sansom, dwl 1307 Taylor „ -r , . 

Badgley William, tailor with Augustus C. imbrie, 
dwl 115 Geary ■ tt ^ i 

Badinier Louis, physician, dwl California Hotel 

Badlam Alexander Jr., real-estate agent, office 418 
Montgomery, dwl 708 California . „ „ , , 

Badt A. L., bookkeeper with P. Berwin & Bro., dwl 
927 Sutter , , .,„„ ,_ , 

Badt Morris (Badt & Colin, Elko), dwl 307 lurk 

Baeeker George, miller, bds German Hotel 

Baehr William (William Baehr & Co. J dwl 1708 
Sacramento „ , . . , 

BAEHR WILLIAM & CO., manufacturing jewelers, 
t)4y Sacramento 

Baer John, dwl 713 Broadway , , „_ ^ ., 

Baethge Henry, teacher music, dwl 627 Commercial 

Baettgo Peter, livery stables, 4 Front 

BaffiUi Giovanni B., gentlemen's nurse, dwl 112o Dup 

Bagala Louis, restaurant, N W cor Stockton and Post 

Baggo Theodore / C. Jos. King of Wm. & Co. J, res 
Oakland „ nr i ^ 

Baggott Elizabeth Mrs., dressmaker, 748 Market 

Baggs Alexander, dwl 240 Taylor 

Baggs Isaac, attorney at law, office 712 Montgomery, 
dwl 24U Taylor ^^„^ _ . 

Bagianovich Ambrozio, laborer, dwl N W cor Wash- 
ington and Davis „ zi ,.-. 

Bagley David T., mining secretary, office 401 Califor- 
nia, dwl 38 Twelith . , ^ „. o 

Bagley Honora Miss, dressmaker with Sullivan & 
Morehead, dwl 54j Mission 

Bagley John W., dwl 299 Clementina 

Bagley Perkins H., conductor N. B. and Mission R. 
R.,dwllO O'Farrell ^ , 

Bagley Peter, laborer, dwl United States Hotel 



Bagley Townsend, attorney at law, office 637 Kearny, 
dwl 45 Everett , , „„, t^ , 

Bagley William P., plasterer, dwl 931 Folsom 

Baglin John, teacher, dwl 35(j Jessie 

Bagman Jacob, milkman, Presidio 

Bagnasco Polycarp, photographic printer with Carle- 
ton E. AVatkins, dwl 13b7 Dupont 

Bahlmann Henry, clerk Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 
2231 Howard , , „„, _^. . 

Bahls John F- W. (AUhof&B.), dwl 864 Mission 

Bahman Adolph, jeweler with California Jewelry 
Co., dwl 25ij Stevenson . , rr 

Bahr William A., bootmaker with Frederick Kee- 
per, dwl 508 Greenwich ^ ., ^ , o,< TT M • 

Bahrs Andrew, keeper County Jail, dwl 814 vallojo 

Baicke Henry, porter 413 Bush, dwl Stevenson bet 
Third and Fourth o,,^ t> j 

Baiker L., groceries and liquors, SE cor Russ and 

Bail Paul, tailor with Frank Elwell, dwl 614 Califor- 
nia, rear ^, , . •»«■• 
Bailcup Antoine, saloon, dwl N s Sixteenth bet Mis- 
sion and Valencia, rear 
Bailey Alexander H., carpenter, dwl 309 Fell 
Bailey A. i\l., pastor Kentucky St. M. E. Church, 
dwl South S.F. ,, , - 
Bailey Amos J., mining, office 305 Mongomery. dwl 

Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Bailey Ryron, carpenter, dwl 428 Seventh 
Bailey Charles, clerk, dwl 333 Bush „ , , , 

Bailey Charles A., carpenter with D. A. Macdonald 

&" Co., dwl ItiO Perry 
Bailey Charles P., clerk S. F. Post-office, dwl room 

15 Mercantile Library Building 
Bailey David, carpenter, dwl 309 Fell , , -.t 

Bailey Edward, driver Sutter St. R. R., dwl JN s 
California opp Main . . -n ^■ 

Bailey Fannie Miss, shademaker California Rustic 

Shade Factory, dwl 522 Turk 
Bailey Frank, liquor saloon, 10 Washington 
Bailey Frank, printer with Bradley & Rulofson, dwl 

1005^ Mission 
Bailoy F'ranklin, carpenter, dwl 428 Seventh 
Bailey Frederick, miner, dwl 10 Geary 
Bailey George (George Bailey & Co.), dwl 533 Com 
Bailey George, porter with F'. B. Taylor & Co., dwl 

182(3 Bush „^.„. 

Bailey George & Co. (Alfred Clark and William 
McLean/, proprietors Railroad Lodgings, 531 
and 533 Commercial 
Bailey G. L., driver Central R. R. 
Bailey Henry, barrel dealer, dwl 1013 Howard 
Bailey Henry, hairspinnor, dwl Solano nr Wisconsin 
Bailey Henry, painter with J ohn Brewster, dwl 549>2 

Tehama 
Bailey James, helper Risdon Iron and Locomotive 

Works, dwl 158 First, rear 
Bailoy James D., general agent Union Insurance 

Co., dvvl 227 Geary 
Bailoy John, cook, dwl 636 Commercial 
Bailey John, cook, dwl N W cor Pow and Frftncisco 
Bailey John, driver Sutter St. R. R. 
Bailey John (colored), laborer, dwl 1227 Clay 
Bailey John, laborer with John P. Hawkins 
Bailey John, painter, dwl 522 Turk, rear 
Bailey John, teamster, dwl 34 Hayes 
Bailey Joseph H., books and crockery, 1513 Stock- 
ton, dwl 830 Union 
BAILEY LEWIS H., proprietor Portsmouth House, 

N W cor Clay and Rrenham PI 
Bailey Lewis H. Jr., machinist with F. A. Hunting- 
ton, dwl 15 Ellis 
Bailey Orrin, upholsterer, dwl 1423 Kearny 
Bailey Patrick, barrel dealer, dwl 719 Brannan 
Bailey Richard (Jioot ct J5./, res Oakland 
Bailey Robert, salesman with Percy Beamish, dwl 
20^^ Kearny „ „ . „ , , , 

Bailey R. S., liquor saloon stm El Capitan, Oakland 

Ferry, dwl S s Geary bet Powell and Mason 
Bailey S. M. (widow), dwl 757 Howard 
Bailey Thomas (James Hartley & Co.), dwl E s 

Howard bet Eleventh and Twelfth 
Bailey Thomas T., boarding, 421 Drumm 
Bailoy Vesta C.Mrs., dwl 801 Vallejo 
Bailey William, machinist with F. A. Huntington, 

dwl 25 De Boom . 

Bailey William, whitener, cor Third and Mission 
Bailey AVilliam Jr., porter with Thomas W. McCol- 

liam & Co., res Oakland 
Bailey William G., dwl 719 California 



g 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOBY, 1874-6, H. G. Langley, Pub'r, S. F. Price 
6 



L. 'W. KENNEDY, General Insurance Agent, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



Baillio Alexander, bootmaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 2(J1 Octavia 
Baillio Emilia P. (widow), furnished rooms, 415 Stock- 
ton 
Baillio George B., conductor S. P. R. E., dwl 335 Geary 
Baillie-r Camilo, hostler, dwl W s San Jos6 Road nr 

Six-mile House 
Baillv Achille (BaiUy Bros.), dwl 514 Filbert 
Bailly Arthur (Bailhj Bros J , dwl 514 Filbert 
Bailly Brother? (Arthur and AchilleJ, pork and 

sau.=ages, 71 Calilbrnia Market 
Bailly Glaudine (widow), dwl 514 Filbert 
Bailly Jules, with Bailly Bros., dwl 514 Filbert 
Bailly Leon, with Bailly Bros., dwl 514 Filbert 
Baily Alexander S., plasterer, dwl 54 First 
Baily Charles E., barkeeper with John Stratman, 

dwl 171 Minna 
Baily E. Franklin, clerk with 0. Lawton & Co., dwl 

54 First 
Baily ^V'asbington C, plasterer, dwl 54 First 
Baily William J., proprietor Isthmus House, SI First 
Baily Wilson S., plasterer, dwl 54 First 
Bain Alexander, longshoreman, dwl 425 Greenwich 
Bain James S., engineer, dwl ^ s Twenty-fifth bet 

Xoe and Castro 
Bain John, blacksmith, dwl 31 Perry 
Bain bridge Arnop, policeman City Hall, dwl 1222 

Kearny 
Bainbridge Sarah (widow), dwl 14 Turk 
Baine Katie M. Mjss, adjuster Coiner's Dept. U. S. 

Mint, dwl 127 Kearny 
Baines Thomas F., liquor saloon, 1022 Market 
Bainey Michael, laborer, dwl (5 Geneva 
Bainstan Morris C, dealer furniture, dwl 1104 Taylor 
BAlKi) AXDKEN^'^, agent Pacific Mutual Insurance 

Co. of New York (Marinei, and The lire Associa- 
tion of Philadelphia, office Slii Cal., res Oakland 
Baird James M., printer with C. A. Murdock & Co., 

dwl 1115 Clay 
Baird John U., president California Powder Works, 

office S14 California, dwl Pacific Club 
Baird Samuel H., miner, dwl 1115 Clay 
Baisson Clement, laundry, 780 Folsom 
Bakarcich Samuel, coffee saloon, 024 Kearny, dwlSW 

cor Clay and Prospect PI 
Baker Abby W. Miss, dwl 632 Market 
Baker A. E. A. Mrs., boarding, 'J2:j Market 
Baker A. J., expressman, 73 I'ourth 
Baker A. L., operator Western Union Telegraph Co., 

dwl 1022 Larkin 
Baker Albert, mason, dwl 904 Filbert 
Baker Alfred !>., porter with Rouse & Laws, dwl 728 

Vallejo 
Baker Alfred W., assistant abstract clerk Custom 

House, dwl 753 Clay 
Baker Andrew, lampmaker, dwl 15 Second 
Baker Ann Miss, dwl 032 Market 
Baker Carmen (widow), dwl 1208 Kearny 
Baker Caspar, tannery, E s San Bruno Road nr Twen- 
ty-eighth 
Baker Charles, express wagon, NW cor Market and 

Taylor, dwl 284 Minna 
Baker Charles, cooper, dwl 90 Stevenson 
Baker Charles A., waiter with Russell & Forrest, dwl 

09 Everett 
Baker Charles E., porter with Loupe & Haas, dwl 20 

Vaxk Av 
Baker Colin C. (Stevens, B. <& Co.), res Providence, 

R,l. 
Baker Conrad, assayer S. F. Assaying and Refining 

Works, dwl 527 Tehama 
Baker David, dwl 92ij Market 
Baker Eliiabeth Miss, milliner, dwl 37 Second 
Baker Emma (widowj, seamstress, dwl 1118^2 Folsom 
Baker Eugene J., teamster, dwl 704 Harrison 
Baker E. P. Rev., pastor Third Congregational 

Church, dwl 422 Minna 
Baker Francis, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Baker Frank, saddler with Main & Winchester, dwl 

131 Second 
Baker Frederick, seaman, dwl 19 Commercial 
Baker Frederick, waterman P. M. S. S. Nevada 
Baker Fred. W., clerk with Baker & Hamilton, dwl 

823 California 
Baker (ieorge, drayman, dwl 236 Perry 
Baker George, millhand Eisen Bros., dwl 16 Stev 
Baker George H., laborer, dwl Ocean House Flat nr 

Ocean View House 
BAKEll GEORGE H., lithographer and artist, 408 

California, dwl 1312 Larkin, rear 



Baker George L., melter S. F. Assaying and Refining 

Works, dwl 'M Seventh 
Baker George W., carpenter, dwl Oil Geary, rear 
Baker H. B., workman Assayer's Department U. S. 

Mint, dwl 759 Market 
Baker Helen, furnished rooms, 255 Stevenson 
Baker Henry, dwl 27 Oak Grove Av 
Baker Isaac Mrs. (widow), dwl 413 Tehama 
Baker Isaiah, U. S. boarding officer, Vallojo St. 

Wharf, dwl 1304 PaciBc 
Baker Isaiah Lincoln, clerk with Ruling & Co., dwl 

209 Kearny 
Baker James, seaman, dwl 103 Sacramento 
Baker James E., printer with Matthias Gray, dwl 

711 Howard 
Baker John, reporter, dwl 154 Tehama 
Baker John, seaman, dwl 39 Pacific 
Baker John, watchman P. M. S. S. Mohongo 
Baker John B., stockbroker, office 424 Montgomery, 

dwl 1723 Sacramento 
Baker John C, seaman, dwl 35 Pacific 
Baker John C, wharfsweeper with State Harbor 

Commission 
Baker John E., hackman, cor Bush and Montgomery, 

dwl West End Hotel 
Baker John G., manager California Butter Co., office 

405 Sansom, res Oakland 
Baker John IL, salesman with Feldbusch & Co., dwl 

515 Stockton 
Baker Joseph ( Baker & Barry ) , dwl NE cor Eighth 

and Minna 
Baker Joseph H., policeman, dwl 409 Green 
Baker Josiah Q., clerk Eureka Warehouse, dwl 925 

Vallejo 
Baker Judah Jr. (Stevens, B. & Co.), dwl 327 First 
Baker L. B., bookkeeper with M. S. Nile, dwl 10 

O'Farrell 
Baker L. C. (widow), dwl 513 Taylor 
Baker Lewis F., produce commission, 402 Davis, dwl 

N s Vallejo bet Fillmore and Steiner 
Baker Lewis F. Jr., clerk with Lewis F. Baker, dwl 

N s Vallejo bet Fillmore and Steiner 
Baker Livingston L. (Baker & Hamilton) , dwl Oc- 
cidental Hotel 
Baker Louis, baker with Adam Winkle, dwl SE cor 

Vallejo and Battery 
Baker Luca (John Pendo & Co.), dwl 723 Davis 
Baker Lucy A. (widow), dwl 1090 Union 
Baker Marcus, U. S. Coast Survey Office, dwl 314 

Bush 
Baker Marv Ann (widow), dwl 1618 Stockton, rear 
Baker Mill & M. Co. (Plumas Co., Cal.), Frank Swift 

secretary, oflice 419 California 
Bakor Orrin, foreman machinist with George H. Tay 

& Co., res Oakland 
Baker Osoorn F., liquor saloon, 825 Montgomery 
Baker Oscar, saloonkeeper, dwl 821 Vallejo 
Baker Peter, laborer, dwl 522 Filbert 
Baker Robert B., machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 

1220 Pine 
Baker Samuel, salesman with A. Andrews, dwl SE 

cor Fourth and Jessie 
Baker Samuel, salesman with Gibson & Preston, dwl 

1422 Geary 
Baker Samuel, bookkeeper with Stevens, Baker <& 

Co. (and JS'ickerson d: Co.l , dwl 4 Essex 
Baker Samuel D. (Baker & Studeman) ,Avi\ 547 Mis- 
sion 
BAKER SANFORD C, compositor with Bynon & 

Co., dwl 227 Second 
Baker Schiller, porter with G. W. Chesley & Co., dwl 

414 Front 
Baker Terry J., hostler, dwl 1125 Mission 
Baker Thomas J., builder, dwl 737 Market 
Baker William, bakery, NE cor Clay and Mason 
Baker William, carpenter, dwl 411 Clementina 
Baker \Villiam F., vocalist Maguire's Opera House, 

dwl 225 Bush 
Baker & Barry (Joseph Baker and David Barry), 

market, NE cor Eighth and Minna 
BAKER Ji HAMILTON ( Livingston L. Baker and 

Bobert M. Hamilton), importers and jobbers 

agricultural implements, machines, hardware, 

etc., KV19 Front and 9-15 J St, Sacramento City 
Baker & Studeman (S. D. Baker and F. F. Stude- 

inan) , collectors, office 338 Montgomery 
Bakker John R. (Fitter <fc B.J, dwl SW cor Jackson 

and East 
Bakker Reiger, restaurant, 104 Steuart 
Bakofsky Carl, dwl 1131 Harrison 



FABNSWOBTH & CL AB£, Qen'l Fire and Marine Insurance Agency ; office 230 Cal. St. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Furnishing Goods. 



Balanesi Giuseppe f Giuseppe Chelini & Co.), dwl 
420 Pacific 

Balcoar E. J. Mme. (widow), hair rejuvenator, dwl 
511 Pine 

Balch Alfred, machinist, dwl 314 Bush 

Balch A. H., chemist with Angell, Palmer & Co., dwl 
.:!14 Bush 

Balch F. K., fourth officer P. M. S. S. Colima 

BALCH HORACE M., organ builder and musical- 
instrument repairer, office 4H2 Kearny, dwl 014 
Tavlor 

BALCil, HOWE & CO. f Stephen M. Balch and 
George L. Howe) , wholesale provisions and dairy 
produce, 319 Clay 

Balch btephon M. (Balch, Hoive & Co.), dwl 1512 
Post 

Balchon Engerborg Mrs. (widow), dwl W s Pringle'a 
Court 

Balcom Charles F., mining, office 426 Montgomery, 
divl 1021 Washington 

Balcome Lydia (widow), seamstress Ladies' Protec- 
tion and lielief Society Home, SE cor Geary and 
Franklin 

Baldeck Ignatz, bootmaker with J. B. Monnin, dwl 
S22 Pacific 

Baldes f^eferena, dwl 433 Green, rear 

Baldridge .John E., stock broker, office 443 California, 
dwl 1010 Leavenworth 

Baldridge John H. (Ferguson Gray & B., colored), 
dwl 28 Stone 

Baldridge Michael, stockbroker, office 443 California, 
dwl lOlti Leavenworth 

Baldwin , architect, dwl Relay House 

Baldwin Abel B., compositor Examiner, dwl Bigelow 
House 

Baldwin Albert S., physician and surgeon, office 208 
Kearny 

Baldwin Alexander R., capitalist, office 401 Califor- 
nia, dwl Grand Hotel 

Baldwin Alfred \V., shoe manufacturer, dwl 418 Min 

Baldwin Amos B., driver with Eugene Moifat & Co., 
dwl S s Thirteenth Av bot N and P, South S. F. 

Baldwin Barry (Fassett, McCaulley & Co.), res 
Pacheco 

Baldwin B. B., student Heald's Business College 

Baldwin Charles G., clerk with J. J. O'Brien, dwl 18 
Ellis 

Baldwin Charles H. (C. Adolphe Low cfc Co.), and 
cai)tain U. S. N., dwl 928 Bush 

Baldwin Charles M., watchman with Kimball Manu- 
tacturing Co., dwl :<5 Moss 

Baldwin Edward S. (Fassett, McCaulley & Co.), dwl 
ij-JO Sutter 

Baldwin E. F., real estate, dwl 107 Hayes 

Baldwin Elbert D., draftsman with Wright & San- 
ders, dwl Lick House 

BALDWIN ELI AS J., capitalist, office 513 Califor- 
nia, dwl 410 Geary 

Baldwin Henry, express wagon, cor Fifth and Clem- 
entina, dwl oOvl Seventh • 

Baldwin Henry G., cabinetmaker with Christian 
Schreiber & Co., dwl 114 Hayes 

BALL WIN HiRAM S., physician, office 612 Clay, 
dwl i:i25 Geary 

Baldwin H. K., merchant, dwl Grand Hotel 

Baldwin James \V., cabinetmaker with Christian 
Schreiber & Co., dwl 114 Hayes 

Baldwin J oremiah, distiller, dwl E s Columbia nr 
-Nineteenth 

Baldwin John Mrs., seamstress, dwl 314 Bush 

Baldwin Luiio Mrs., artist, 115 Kearny 

Baldwin Marcus M., dwl IStOO Broadway 

BALDWIN LLOYD, attorney at law, officeGOe Mont- 
gomery, rooms IV and 18, dwl til3 Pine 

Baldwin Mamie Miss, teacher Union Primary School, 
dwl 2.5 Hawthorne 

Baldwin Marcus M. (M. M. Baldivin & Co.), dwl 
L'UO Broadway 

BALDWIN M. M, & CO. (Charles H. Dewey), im- 
porters and manufacturers jewelry, etc., 433 Mont 

Baldwin Nellie S., teacher Union Grammar School, 
dwl %'} Hawthorne 

Baldwin Oliver T., clerk Forwarding Dept. Wells, 
Fargo k. Co., dwl 1110 Pacific 

Baldwin Orville D. (W. Warner Henry & Co.), dwl 
355 Eleventh 

Baldwin Sidney F., student at law with John B. Fel- 
ton, res Oakland 

Baldwin Sidney M., carpenter. Noble PI nr Third 

Baldwin Starr, variety store, 603 Davis, dwl 424 San 



Baldwin T. J., calker Shipcalkers' Assn, 713 Mission 

Baldwin William, dwl Holden House 

Baldwin William, foreman with Hancock & Kelso, 
dwl 414 Bealo 

Baldwin William, lieutenant revenue cutter Wyan- 
da, dwl 1108 Clay 

Baldwin William H., shipcarpenter, dwl 7 Liberty 

Bale James, dwl Coso House 

Balenger Andrew, laborer Superintendent Public 
Streets 

Balletti Pida, fruitdealer, dwl W s Burgoyne PI nr 
Pacific 

Balfe M. J., barkeeper Occidental Bar, dwl Occi- 
dental Hotel 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO. (Robert Balfour and 
Alexander Guthrie) , commission merchants and 
general agents British and Foreign Marine in- 
surance Co., office .iiOS Sansom 

Balfour James, second mate stm Newbern, dwl 310J>^ 
Ititch 

Balfour Robert (Balfour, Guthrie & Co.), res San 
Rafael 

Balfrey William, shoemaker, dwl 558 Bryant 

Balk Stephen S., clerk, dwl W s Priest bot Washing- 
ton and Clay 

Balk Stephen S. .Jr., clerk with Ancel C. Robison, 
dwl 1325 Washington 

Balke William, boarding, SW cor Battery and Green 

Balker Charles, tailor, ssi Fifth 

Ball Albert, physician, office and dwl 11 Second and 
58v) Market 

Ball A. Everett (Sawyer & B.) , attorney at law, of- 
fice 502 Montgomery, res Alemoda 

Ball Charles, laborer, dwl W s Mission bet Twenty- 
fourth and Twentj'-fifth 

Ball Charles, porter 205 Front, dwl 712 Tehama 

Ball Charles A., driver Sutter St. R. R., dwl 3 Austin 

Ball Charles K., blacksmith, dwl 1830 Bush 

Ball Charles S., harnessmaker with Augustus Till- 
man, dwl 613 Gough 

Ball Charles T., waiter U. S. Restaurant, dwl 614 Miss 

Ball David B. Jr., shoemaker with Buckingham & 
Hecht, dwl 78 Natoma 

Ball David IL, bookbinder, dwl N s Mariposa bet 
Pennsylvania Av and Mississippi 

Ball George, seaman, dwl 132 Steuart 

Ball George, stevedore with Whitney & Freese 

Ball George, U. S. A. Medical Dept., dwl 942 Howard 

BallGoorge A., bookkeeper with Adams, Blinn Ac Co., 
dwl ;i34 O'Farrell 

Ball Horace W., clerk with Charles A. Grow, dwl 
1611 Howard 

Ball Joel, dentist, office 314 Bush, dwl 1210 Union 

Ball John S., machinist, dwl 613 Gough 

Ball John T., bookkeeper, dwl 1830 Bush 

Ball Mark, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 

Ball M. S. Mrs., dwl 15.5 New Montgomery 

Ball N. H., driver Sutter St. R. R. 

Ball R. D., paver Superintendent Public Streets 

Ball R. D., shii>wright Shipwrights' Journeymen 
Association, 71 New Montgomery 

BALL ROBEuT C, architect, office 49 Merchants' 
Exchange, res Oakland 

Ball Thomas, shipjoiner, dwl 1830 Bush 

Ball Thomas A., otlice Republic Life Insurance Co., 
res Oakland 

Ballantine Robert, clerk with W. J. T. Palmer & Co., 
dwl 3 Central PI 

Ballard Duane (Ballard &HallJ,dvr\ 1006 Bush 

Ballard E. P., clerk, dwl Overland House 

Ballard George, signpainter, 108 Sutter, dwl 179 Min 

Ballard George, tinsmith and bathmaker, 539 Mer- 
chant, dwl 424 Sansom 

Ballard John (W. H. Martin & Co.), dwl 722 Cal 

Ballard Josei>h H., shipping, dwl 706 California 

BALLARD Is. HALL (Duane Ballard and Isaac 
R. Halll , commission merchants, 106 Davis 

Ballon William 0., longshoreman, dwl ii\Y cor 
Franklin and Lilly Av 

Ballenborg Nathan, band leader, office 623 Clay, dwl 
711 California 

Ballentine Sarah (widow), dwl NW cor Jessie and 
Ninth 

Bailey Edward J., clerk with Forbes Brothers, dwl 
415 Hyde 

Ballhaus Frederick, dairyman, dwl 2209 Leav 

Ballheimer Charles, porter with Levi Strauss & Co., 
dwl 12 St. Mary 

Balli Angelo, hostler with Novella & Pitto, dwl 427 
Jackson 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTORY contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchant*. 



KENNEDY'S INSUEANCE AGENCY, Eire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 




Ballinger Andrew, laborer, dwl 19% Gilbert 
Ballinger F., printer, dwl Overland House 
Ballingor Jessie Miss, ladies' nurse, dvrl 821 Green 
Ballinger John J., painter, glazier, etc., NE cor Van 

Ness Ay and Market 
Ballinyer Patrick L., upholsterer with John C. Bell, 

dwl 17 Gilbert 
Ballinger Thomas R., upholsterer with John C. Bell, 

dwl 17 Gilbert 
Ballinger William G., conductor Sutter St. K. R., dwl 

1208 Larkin 
Ballou E. C. Mrs., furnished rooms, 716 Howard 
Ballou George, stevedore, dwl lvt5>2 Clara 
Ballon Nelson S., carpenter, dwl SW cor Thirteenth 

and Mission 
Lallow Charles, sawyer with Hobbs, Pomeroy &. Co., 

dwl 24oJ4 Stevenson 
Balm William, barkeeper, dwl 52S Kearny 
Balny Alex, clerk with Madame A. Roger, dwl W s 

Buchanan nr McAllister 
Baloun Joseph, merchant tailor, 613 Washington, dwl 

80: 1 Mason 
Balser Charles, market, SE cor Bryant and Eighth 
Balset v., butcher with M. Selig & Co., dwl First Av 

nr Kentucky, South S. F. 
Balthazard Leander (Heitdersoa & B.J, dwl NE cor 

Mission and Twenty-fourth 
Baltic Consolidated Mining Co. (Gold Hill, Nevada), 

office 507 Montgomery 
Baltic Silver M. Co. (Ely, Nevada), office 506 Mont 
Baltimore Consolidated Mining Co. (Gold Hill, Ne- 
vada), I). T. Bagley secretary, office 401 Cal 
Baltz Elizabeth (widow), dressmaker, dwl 838 Vallejo 
Balz Adolph, clerk U. S. Army Headquarters, 105 

Stockton, dwl 708 Market 
Balz John, hairdresser with Magazini&Lippert, dwl 

14 Stockton 
Balz Valentine, butcher, dwl Tenth Av nr Railroad 

Av, South S. F. 
Balzarini Carlo, waiter with Natale Giamboni, dwl 

.51H Clay 
Balzer Ferdinand, bookkeeper with A. Pfister & Co., 

dwl 531 Turk 
Balzer Henry f Henry Balzer <fc CoJ, dwl .531 Turk 
Balzer Henry, mattressmaker, dwl Twenty-first Av 

nr Railroad Av, South S. F. 
BALZEK HENRY Sc CO., importers, shipping, and 
commission merchant", and agents Hamburg Am- 
erican Packet Co., West India Line, 122 Cal 
Bambart Daniel f Watson A B.J, dwl 610 Howard 
Bamber John, expressman, dwl 1012 Montgomery 
BAMBER & CO.'S EXPRESS, A. D. W hitnoy man- 
ager, office SW cor Davis and Jackson 
Bamtield J. F., calker Shipcalkers' Assn. 713 Miss 
Bammonlez E. (widow), seamstress, dwl Metropolitan 

Hotel 
Banahan Alice Miss, dwl 113 Perry 
Banahan Patrick, hostler, dwl 113 Porry 
Banchero Giovanni, laborer, dwl 517 Union 
BANCROFT A. L. & CO. (Hubert H. Bancroft), 
publishers, importing booksellers, and stationers, 
printers, bookbinders, lithographers, engravers, 
etc., 721 Market 
BANCROFT ALBERT L. M. L.Bancroft & Co.), 

dwl N\V' cor Franklin and Pine 
Bancroft C. A., Bricklayers' Pro. Assn, 234 Sutter 
Bancroft Charles E., clerk with A. L. Bancroft & Co., 

dwl 'j;ii Howard 
Bancroft E. A., builder, dwl .515 Bush 
BANCROFT HUBERT H. (A. L. Bancroft S: Co.), 

dwl SW cor California and Franklin 
Bancroft Lyle, engineer and machinist, dwl G05 Pine 
Bancroft N. L., machinist, dwl 615 Stockton 
Bancroft William B., clerk with A. L. Bancroft & 

Co., dwl SW cor California and Franklin 
Bancroft William H., merchant, dwl :«4 Bush 
BANCROFT'S BUILDING, 723 Market 
Band Charles, baker with Eisert <fe Becker, 24 Third 
Band John i Lauriston & Band , dwl 31 Alta PI 
Bandenstal Vouzens, baker with E. A. Engelberg, 

dwl 416 Kearny 
Bandoreta Mill and Mining Co. (Mariposa, Cal.), of- 
fice 408 California, room 14 
Bandholdt Frederick, farmer, dwl 736 Minna 
Bandmann Julius (Bandmann, JVielsen di Co.), dwl 

ol4 Lombard 
BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO. (Jidius Band- 
mann and H. Nielsen), importers and commis- 
sion merchants and general agents Giant Powder 
Co., 210 I rout 



Bandy Aaron N., bookkeeper with Larzalere, With- 

am & Wightman, dwl 5 South Park 
Bacdy James, cook with Robert Mayers, dwl SW cor 

Pine and Dupont 
Bandy William H., carriagepainter, dwl 421 Folsom 
Banerman John, patternmaker, dwl 40 Minna 
Ban.Tt David, shoemaker, N s Sixteenth nr Mission 
Lanes Crowell, boxmaker with G. W. Swan & Co. 
Bangle Edward, paints, oils, glass, and paperhanging, 

426 Sansom, res East Oakland 
Bangs Edward, superintendent Mission Bay Ware- 
house, drtl 131 Dora 
Bangs Frank, clerk Home Mutuallnsurance Co.,dwl 

30 McAllister 
Banistor Frederick, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Bank John W. (colored!, cook, dwl Virginia Block 
Bankard Wctor J., barkeeper with Adam Smith, 

dwl 618 California 
Bankark Hubert, mining, dwl 26 Geary 
BANK EXCHANGE, George F. Parker proprietor, 

SE cor Montgomerv and Washington 
BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, Wm. H. Tilling- 

hast manager, SE cor California and Sansom 
BANK OF BRITISH NORTH AMERICA, McKin- 
lay & Finnie agents, NE cor California and San 
BANK OF CALIFORNIA, W. C. Ralston president, 
Thomas Brown cashier, office NW cor California 
and Sansom 
BANK OF CALIFORNIA BUILDING, NW cor 

California and Sansom 
BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, N. P. Cole president, 

Horatio McPherson secretary, 215 Sansom 
Bankom Alexander, waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Banks Caroline (widow), seamstress, dwl 607J^ Minna 
Banks Charles W., bookkeeper Wells, Fargo & Co., 

res Oakland 
Banks Cyrus (colored), messenger Subsistence Dept. 

U. S. A., dwl 621 Ellis 
Banks Edward, foreman with Isaac Friedlander, dwl 

131 Dora 
Banks Eiias, barkeeper, dwl 266 First 
Banks H. D., flagman S. P. R. R., Berry nr Fourth 
Banks James (colored), porter 342 Montgomery, dwl 

Oil Washington 
Banks James, seaman, dwl 318 Davis 
Banks Jam'es 0., clerk, dwl 25 Second 
Banks John, dwl 18 Tehama 
Banks John, cigars, 9;i7 Market, dwl 995 Market 
Banks Robert \V'., dwl Coso House 
BANKS THOMAS C, exchange broker, office 14 

Merchants' Exchange, dwl 724 California 
Banks William (Mac Beth <t- B.J, dwl 1421 Wash 
Bankson Alexander, waiter, divl 543 Howard 
Bankson John, oysterman with Solomon Tosmore, 

dwl 408 Broadway 
Bannahan Lizzie Mi-s, dressmaker, dwl 207 Minna 
Bannan Bridget (widow), dwl 1422 Jackson 
Bannan Hugh, laborer, dwl 214 Prospect PI 
Bannan John, boatman, Meiggs' Wharf, dwl 82 

Francisco 
Bannan Maggie Miss, teacher North Cosmopolitan 

Grammar School, dwl 1422 Jackson 
Bannan P., dwl 616 Kearny 
Bannan Patrick, engineer with Joseph Sedgley, dwl 

cor Solano and Columbia 
BANNER BROS. (Peter and. Samuel), importers 
and manufacturers clothing and gents' furnishing 
goods. 204 and 206 Sansom 
Banner Peter (Banner Bros.), dwl 629 Clay 
Banner Samuel (Banner Bros.), res New York 
Bannerman John, sawyer with W. B. Bradbury, dwl 

40 Minna 
Bannerot Eugene, machinist, dwl 232 Jessie 
Bannett Harris, boarding and lodging, 2*5 Kearny 
Bannett Lewis, jeweler with Edwards & Tuckey, 

dwl 235 Kearny 
Bannick C, salesman with W. Haker & Hinz, dwl 

517 Mission 
Banning F. M. Mrs., teacher Shotwell St. Primary 

School 
Banning George, dwl 15 Second 
Banning John, dwl 1223 Folsom 
Bannister Alfred, accountant London andS. F. Bank, 

dwl 1)J0:J Van Ness Av 
Bannister D. E., freight clerk P. M. S. S., Alaska 
Bannister George W., boxmaker with Benjamin F. 

Gilman, dwl 425 Fremont 
Bannister .John, shipwright Shipwights' Journey- 
men Association, 71 New Montgomery 
Bannister Joseph, porter, dwl 425 Fremont 



FABNSWOBTH & CLABK furnish Safe and EeUable Insurance against Fire. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valises. 



Bannon Charles, oysteruian with Alfred W. Man- 
ning 

Rannon John, laborer, dwl N s Glovor nr Lpav 

Bannon Michael, saloon and lodgings, 720 Third 

Bannon Phillip, night watchman Occidental Iron 
Works, dwl N s Tehama nr Eighth 

Bannon Thomas, tanner; dwl E s Mission nr Twenty- 
ninth 

Bansch August, laborer with Rossbaeh & Hyatt, dwl 
Fern Av bet Polk and Van Xess Av 

Bansch Maria Mrs., midwife, dwl IV> Xatoma 

Bansell Thomas, seaman, dwl 2o0 Spear 

Bant Joseph, butcher with Hermann Hertz, dwl 111 
Seventh 

Banz.John, laborer, dwl 421! Clementina 

Ban/, .John, shoemaker, dwl 21 Fulton 

Baourqiiel Emile, dwl 11 Virginia 

Bapiiler John, market, SE cor L)upont and Filbert 

Baptis John H., manufacturer gold pens, 328 Bush, 
dwl 112 I Clay 

Baptist Chinese Mission, Rev. John Francis mis- 
sionary, 82rt Washington 

Baptist Kobert F. (colorad), porter 33 Kearny, dwl 
Havens PI nr Washington 

Baptiste Antonia V., dijckhand stm Alameda, dwl 
S W cor Drumm and Oregon 

Baptiste Frank, fisherman, dvvl 213 Broadway 

Baptists Joseph, barkeeper, dwl SWcor Drumm and 
Oregon 

Baquire Elenore (widow), dwl 1019 Powell 

Bar Association of San F'rancisco, rooms i)34 Sac 

Barabino Carlo, packer with Cutting & Co., dwl 5 
Filbert PI 

Barabino James, packer with Cutting & Co., dwl 5 
Filbert PI 

Barada Louis, traveler with G. W. Chesley & Co., 
dwl iU Front 

Baraille John, blacksmith, dwl Ns Bush bet Brod- 
erick and L>evisadero 

Baranton Edward, confectioner, dwl 721 Pacific 

Baraton Joseph, coachman with H. A. Depierris 

Barratti , upholsterer, dwl 721 Pacific 

Baraty Frangois (fjarrau & B.J , dwl 2J1 Stevenson 

Baraty J. M. (Baraly & CoutolencJ, dwl 442 Green 

Baraty & Coutolenc fj. M, Baraty and Disrael 
CoutolencJ , pork dealers, 121!) Dupont 

Barbagelato Giovenale, vocalist, dwl 827 Vallejo, rear 

Barbara Angelo, waiter Lick House 

Barbara Stephen, marble cutter with J. & A. Morris, 
dvvl cor Fourth and Folsom 

Barbaro Joseph, oyster dealer, dwl 114 Prospect PI 

Barbary Paul, clerk 303 Fourth 

Barbaste Antoine, laundry, 838 Clay 

Barbat John, phvsician, apothecary, and chemist, 
810 Pacific 

Barbe Jean, proprietor Laurel Hill Nursery, NW 
cor Bush and Baker 

Barbee John, money and exchange broker, oOli Mont- 
gomery, dwl lOl.O Union 

Barber A. Mme, dressmaker, 614 California 

Barber Alfred, painter with John Brewster, dwl 776 
Folsom 

Barber Enos W. (Lawton & Co.), dwl 22 Turk 

Barber George A., upholsterer with J. A. Shaber & 
Co., dwl 707 Mission 

Barber James B., porter with Wilmerding k Kellog, 
dvvl 132( Pacific 

Barber John A. (colored), bricklayer and plasterer, 
dwl (58) 2i Bernard 

Barber John N., bookkeeper Charter Oak Life In- 
surance Co., dvvl 531 California 

Barber Mary (widow), boarding, 513 Taylor 

Barber Kobert, tailor, dwl 60SJ Powell 

Barber Thomas A., master mariner, dwl 1222 Pa- 
cific 

Barber William (Doyle&B.) , attorney at law, office 
323 California, res San Rafael 

Barber William M., blacksmith, dwl W s Capp nr 
Twentv-fifth 

Barber Z. T., driver Potrero and B. V. R. R. 

Barbery Frank, waiter, dwl 428 Broadway 

Barbetta Frederick, fisherman, Clay St. Wharf 

Barbey J. L., clerk Western Union Telegraph Co., 
res San Rafael 

Barbie Jane Mme, school teacher, dwl 650 Minna 

Barbier Armand, special policeman, dwl 431 Minna 

Barbier Paul L. ('i}arMer<fc .Barj-e^^y, dwl cor Minna 
and Julia 

BARBIER & BARRETT (I>aul L. Barbier and 
Edward J. Barrett) . liquor saloon, s^'OS Market 



Barbiere AdCle, saleswoman with F'rank Midon, dwl 

6 St. Mary PI 
Barbina Charles, bottlewasher, dwl 5 Filbert PI 
Barbour Freeman, merchant, dwl S s Twenty-third 

nr Bartlett 
Barcellos Jose, proprietor Luzitania House, SW cor 

Drumm and Oregon 
Barchi C. Rev., clergyman St. Ignatius College, 841 

Market 
Barchus J. H. .clerk with Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 

34) Clementina 
BAECKHAUSExV JULIUS, agent German General 

Benevolent Society, oflice 732 Washington, dwl E 

s Franklin bet Turk and Tyler 
Barckhausen -Julius Jr., clerk with Bandmann, 

Nielsen & Co., dwl SVV cor Franklin and Elm Av 
Barckhausen Otto, bookkeeper with Schafer & Co., 

dwl E s Franklin bet Turk and Tyler 
Barday Alexander (colored), seaman, dwl 5 Bdwy 
Barclay David, junk, 202 Dupont, dwl 784 Folsom 
Barclay James, dwl 1226 Folsom 
Barclay .John,.iunk, 202 Dupont, dwl 781 Folsom 
Barclay Mary Mrs., dwl 405 Clementina, rear 
Barclay Robert H., carriagemaker with Kimball 

Manufapturing Co., dwl 62H Bush 
Barclay Roderick, machinist, dwl 73 Natoma 
Barden Patrick, carpenter, dwl N s Eleventh Av nr 

P, South S. F. 
Bardonhagen Henry i'A. Warnecke <& Co.), dwl 101 

Sacramento 
Bardenwerper Charles P., messenger German Sav- 
ings and Loan Society, dwl 9 Stockton PI 
Bardet Alexander, ship clerk, dwl 9 Pinckney 
Bardet G., cabinetmaker with Alphonse Boisnet, dwl 

491 Brannan 
Bardies Phillip, butcher with Philip Seibel, 35 Geary 
BardwoU Charles W., machine sawyer with Christian 

Schreiber & Co., dwl 50) Market 
BardwoU J. L. & Co. (William McKenzie) , bag- 
makers, 105 Clay 
Bard well .John L. (J. L. Bardtvell&Co.J ,6.^1 Frank's 

Building, Brenham PI 
Bare Augustus, furrier, dwl 362^'^ Clementina 
Bare Edward, furrier with Lachman & Sternfels, dwl 

3i)2''o Clementina 
Bare Michael, furrier, dwl 3623^ Clementina 
Baroari Joseph, laborer with .Joseph Fluishmann 
Bareau Pedro, dwl cor Xoe and Fifteenth 
Bareillos J., milkranch, SE cor Greenwich and Oc- 

tavia 
Bareilles John, cook with P. B. Berges & Co., 77D 

Market 
Bareillos Peter, laborer with Armand Rebut, dwl 

N \V cor Greenwich and Octavia 
Bareilles Thomas, milkman, dwl SE cor Greenwich 

and Octavia 
Barentsen Louis, seamnn, dwl 127 Jackson 
Baretta Louis, cook, dwl 73 Tehama 
Baretta Pietro, fisherman, dwl SW cor Dup and Pac 
Barg Peter A., molder Jackson Foundry, dwl 535 

Howard, rear 
Bargen Henry, liquor merchant, dwl 404 Eddy 

Bargevin ■, dwl 235 Stevenson 

Bargin Patrick, cook with Flynne & Co., dwl 1140 

Mission 
Bargon Martin, tailor, 12 Berry 
Bargone James, driver with D. Ghirardolli, dwl 2218 

Mason 
Bargone Leonardo, porter with Pascal, Dubedat & 

Co., dwl 2218 Mason 
Bargstream George G., compositor with J. H. Car- 
many it Co., dwl cor Second and Minna 
Bariehievich John, restaurant, NE cor Fourth and 

Berry 
Baries Adolphe, butcher, dwl 634 Vallejo 
Baries Teresa (widow), dwl 634 Vallejo 
Barille Artemise Mrs., housekeeper, dvvl 8 Maiden 

Lane 
Bark A. William, vocalist, dwl 1024 Montgomery 
Barkan Adolph, physician, oculist, and aurist, office 

and dwl 722 Montgomery 
Barkeloo John, real estate, dvvl 1114 Post 
Barker Augustus, bricklayer, dwl W s San Jos6 Road 

nr Six-mile House 
Barker B. F., carpenter, dwl 5 Spring 
Barker Edward S., clerk with E. T. Tarbot, dwl 4 

Central PI 
Barker Erastus H., miner, dwl 6 Tay 
Barker Frank, carpenter, dwl N s Sixteenth Av bet 

P and Q, South S. F. 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS PIBECTOBY, 1874-6, will be pubUshed September, 1874. 



KENNEDY'S INSURANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, represents $12,000,000. 



Barker Frank, driver N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 302 

Fourth 
Barker Frank, waiter, 417 Front, dwl iV/i Folsom 
Barker Frederick, real-estate agent, dwl 20 Lilly Av 
Barker (jeorgo L., painter, dwl 102 Powell 
Barker Henry Jj., brickmaker, dwl 30!> Capp 
Barker Henry N., trnnkmakor with 11. Behrendt & 

Co., dwl W s Summer bet Folsom and Harrison 
Barker Isaac, brickmaker, dwl 809 Capp 
Barker Jacob, trunkmaker with H. Behrendt & Co., 

dwl 1<)5 Silver 
BARKER JAMES L., wholesale hardware and com- 
mission merchant, -408 Market, res Oakland 
Barker Joseph, policeman Citv Hall, dwl 40) Green 
Barker Joshua, bookkeeper with Lohman, Coghill & 

Co., res Oakland 
Barker Stephen, deputy superintendent streets, dwl 

W s Valencia bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Barker Thomas, dwl 10 Heron 
Barker Timothy L. (Well man, Peck <& Co.;, dwl 24 

Hawthorne 
Barker William, seaman stm Constantine, Clay St. 

Wharf 
Barket Thomas, baker, dwl 81 Stevenson 
Barkhaus Diederich (F. W. <fc D. Barkhaus), dwllO 

Turk 
Barkhaus Frederick W. (F. W. & D. BarkhausJ , dwl 

lfX»4 Sutter 
BABKHAUS F. W. &. D., books and stationery, 535 

Kearny 
Barkle Hiohard, mining engineer, dwl 902 Mont 
Barkley A. J. Mrs., lodgings, flO Kearny 
Barkley Andrew J., printer, dwl lOl'i I'ine 
Barkley George T. N., bookkeeper with Pool & Har- 
ris, SE cor Union and Leavenworth 
Barkley James, stockbroker, dwl 1010 Pine 
Barkley William, capitalist, dwl SE cor Union and 

Leavenworth 
Barkley William H., stockbroker, 418 California, dwl 

SE cor Union and Leavenworth 
Barlage Henry, cabinetmaker, dwl 3 Cnshman 
Barlage Henry Jr.. conductor 2?. B. and Mission R. 

K., dwl 3 Cushman 
BARLl A. & CO. {Giovanni CuneoJ, merchant tai- 
lors, 609 Clay 
Barli Alexander I'A. Barli & Co.) , dwl 1312 Kearny 
Barlow Carrie Miss, teacher Washington Grammar 

School, dwl 1)09 Clay 
Barlow Charles (R. G. Dun & Co.) , res New York 
Barlow Edward W., clerk with Thomas Houseworth 

& Co., dwl 20 Montgomery 
Barlow .John, machinist with Pacific Iron Works, 

dwl 730 Folsom 
Barlow Maggie Mrs., weaver Mission Woolen Mills, 

dwl cor Sixteenth and Howard 
Barlow Michael, laborer Golden Gate Park, dwl 200 

Clementina 
Barlovif W., teamster with R. & J. Morton, dwl 1 

Latham PI 
Barlow William, clerk, dwl 19 Tehama 
Barman Jonas, real estate, dwl 943 Folsom 
Barman Jonas S., merchant, dwl 410 Sixth 
Barnard Asa W., cooper with Simon P. Connors, dwl 

37 Jackson 
Barnard Edward, special policeman, dwl 651 Mar- 
ket 
Barnard F. & Co. f Henry VoormanJ , coal depot, N 

E cor Battery and Vallojo and 213 Jackson 
Barnard Frank fF. Barnard & Co.), dwl 418 Eddy 
Barnard George, teamster with Thomas H. Selby & 

Co., dwl -531 Linden 
BARNARD ISAAC I)., real estate and general busi- 
ness agent, office 224 Mont, dwl 912 Vallojo 
Barnard Moses, cooper, dwl 122o}^ Folsom 
Barnard Thomas G., contractor and builder, dwl 32 

Riucon PI 
Barnard William L., San Rafael Express, office 719 

Davis 
Barndon Henry, pantryman stm Constantine, Clay 

St, Wharf 
Earner William, clerk with Henry Knoche, dwl 423 

Third 
Barnes Benjamin J., laborer with W. G. Fookes, dwl 

554 Stevenson 
Barnes Charles A., plasterer, dwl SW oor Howard 

and Twenty-fourth 
Barnes Charles E., postal clerk S. F. Post-office 
Barnes E. B. Miss, teacher drawing public schools, 

dwl H28 O'Farrell 
Barnes E. D., capitalist, dwl Grand Hotel 



Barnes George, coalpasser stm Newborn, Front St. 
Wharf 

BARNES GEORGE ED., editor, office 6 Loidesdorff, 
dwl 1203 Market 

Barnes George H., carpenter, dwl 1135 Folsom 

Barnes Henry L., carpenter; dwl 1208 Folsom 

Barnes James, nailmaker, dwl N s Green nr Larkin 

Barnes Joseph, modelmaker, 052 Market, dwl 30 Post 

Barnes Joseph, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 

Barnes J^obert L. C, pressman Chronicle Pressroom, 
dwl 747 Market 

Barnes Thomas, carpenter, dwl 1311 Pacific 

BARNES W. H. L., attorney at law, office 438 Cali- 
fornia, dwl SW cor McAllister and Fillmore 

Barnes William, carpenter, N s Ellis bet Scott and 
Devisadero 

Barnes William D., teamster, cor Davis and Jack- 
son, dwl 720 Pacific, roar 

Barnes William R., carpenter, dwl E s Treat Av nr 
Twenty-first 

Barnett Edward, mariner, dwl Berry bet Third and 
Fourth 

Barnett Henry, seaman, dwl 896 Front 

Barnett Isaac, glazier, dwl 918 Folsom 

Barnett Joseph (Barnett <& Davis) , dwl 463 Clem 

Barnett Marks, salesman with Abraham Selig, dwl 
403 Clementina 

Barnett Morris S., grain commission, 210 Davis, dwl 
19 Turk 

Barnett Thomas, dwl 32 Rincon PI 

Barnett Wolfe, clockmaker, dwl 538 Green 

Barnett k Davis f Joseph Barnett and David Davis), 
crockery, 39 Fourth 

Barney Alfred S., deputy U.S. shipping commission- 
er, dwl 1612 Washington 

Barney Benjamin A., with William B. Hooper & Co., 
dwl 817 Van Ness Av 

Barney James M. f William B. Hooper & Co.), res 
Yuma, A. T. 

Barney Sophia A. Mrs., dwl -32 Sixth 

Barnhart Christian, laborer with Glasgow Iron and 
Metal Importing Co., dwl 18 Frederick 

Barnhart Daniel, auctioneer, dwl 610 Howard 

Barnhart George, porter Buss House 

Barnhisel Ellen M., lodgings, 147 Third 

Barnhisel E. II., carrier Alta California, .529 Cal 

Barnhisel S. Henry, salesman with Toklas, Hahn & 
Brown, dwl 147 Third 

Barnhofi" , dwl 326 Sansom 

Barnhouse Thomas, sawyer with Richardson & Hol- 
land, dwl 55 Natoma 

Baron Abraham, tailor, 31 Pacific 

Baron August, laborer with P. Priat, dwl 367 Tehama 

Baron Botrand, blacksmith with J. Dupuy & Co., 528 
Broadway 

Baron Henry, hairdresser with Samuel Brodek, dwl 
13 Geary 

Baron John, dwl 15 Second 

Baron .John (J. Dupuy & Co.;, dwl 528 Broadway 

Baron Samuel, butcher with Samuel S. Rosenberg 

Baron Vicforino (widow), lodgings, 823 Montgomery 

Baron William, hairdresser with Henry Woorz, dwl 
32 Pacific 

Baron William, housomover, dwl E s Mission nr 
Thirtieth 

Baroiii Peter, dwl 1318 Dupont 

Baronia Anton, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery 

Barotea;! Alfred, machinist, dwl cor Bdwy and Kear 

Barotini Louis, porter with G. W^. Chesley k Co., dwl 
cor Pine and Fillmore 

Barque D., capitalist, dwl 1609 Powell 

Barr C. Mrs., dwl 335 Geary 

Barr Daniel, carpenter, dwl 1131}-^ Folsom 

Barr Daniel, laborer S. F. (ias Light Co. 

Barr Hannah K. (widow), dwl 318 Oak 

Barr H. D., salesman 225 Kearny 

Barr Jacob, butcher with C. Korr & Co., dwl Seventh 
Av nr M, South S. F. 

Barr .John, machinist with S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 
N s Twentieth nr Valencia 

Barr John, sijaman, dwl 21IS Steuart 

BARR JOHN D., umbrella and parasol manufac- 
turer. 323 Bush, dwl 226 Jessie 

Barr M. Mrs., dwl 946 Howard 

Barr Neil, foreman with Savage & Son, dwl SE cor 
Twenty-third and Harrison 

Barr Platte, clerk Market St. Depot S. P. R. R. 

Barr Rose (widow), dwl 30 Clarence PI 

Barr Sarah A. Miss, teacher Girls' High School, dwl 
916 Washington 



OKIENT FIBE INS. CO. OF HARTFOED; Assets $700,000; Farnswortli & Clark, Agts. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



Barr William H., boatman, Vallejo St. Wharf, dwl 

N s Bay bet Leavenworth and llydo 
Barra August, laborer, dwl 'iii'l Natoma 
BARK A EZEKIEL I., tobacco and liquors, 118 First 
Barra John, mixer Pacilic Glass Works, dwl 18 Eree- 

lon 
Barra's Hall, NW cor First and Minna 
Barraoo Andrew, butter and egg dealer, dwl 3T Turk 
Barraillac Charles, baskotmakor, dwl 3 MeachamFl 
Barrallao Camillo, carpenter, dwl TJOj Kearny 
Barraque John fP. Castagnet & Co.), UHij Pacific^ 
Barrassino John, milkranch, cor Douglass and Sev- 
enteenth 
Barraud Louis, dwl 533 Kearny 
Barraud I'hilippe, cook with J. Leclerc, dwl N s 

Washington bet Kearny and Dupont 
Barren Samuel, stockbroker, 422 Mont, dwl GOO Bush 
Barren -J oseph, dwl (iOii Stockton 
Barron Michael, carpenter California Mills, dwl Mis- 
sion bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Barrett Alfred, jeweler and watchmaker, 13 Second, 

dwl 236 Seventh 
Barrett Charles A. (Barrett & Moody J, dwl 217 Te- 
hama 
Barrett Charles H., dwl 737 Howard 
Barrett Charles P., cutter with Purdy & Litchfield, 

dwl IJ2 Natoma 
Barrett Cornelius, laborer, dwl 727 Clementina 
Barrett Edmund, laborer, dwl 500 Minna 
Barrett Edward, butcher with Smith <k Piercy, dwl 

10;) Shipley 
Barrett Edward, laborer, dwl 24 Clementina 
Barrett Edward, painter with Wason & Morris, dwl 

What Cheer liouse . 

Barrett Edward, shoemaker with William D. Joiner, 

dwl lo Stevenson 
Barrett Edward J. (Barhicr & BJ, dwl 70i3 Com 
Barrett Edward J., expressman, SW cor Howard and 
Second, dwl 227 Second ^ ^, ^^ . 

Barrett Francis A., carpenter with E. K._ Howes in 

Co., dwl Seventeenth Av nr J, South S. F. 
Barrett George, hostler St. Lawrence Stable, dwl -123 

Barrett George, maltster with Mason & Co., dwl S s 

Chestnut bet Mason and Taylor 
Barrett Hannah (widow), housekeeper, dwl 517 Stev 
Barrett James, ex-supervisor, dwl 318 Clementina 
Barrett James, farmer, dwl 337 Jessie 
Barrett James, painter, dwl 112 Dora 
Barrett James, wood and coal. Seventeenth nr 

Church, dwl 541 Seventeenth 
Barrett John, bookkeper with John O'Kane, dwl 

782 Harrison ^ 

Barrett John, expressman, dwl 227 Second 
Barrett John, housemover, dwl Kansas nr Nevada 
Barrett John, laborer, dwl 1810 Larkin 
Barrett John, miller with Doming, Palmer & Co., 

dwl Pacific bet ^Montgomery and Kearny 
Barrett Maggie Miss, seamstress Mission Woolen 

Mills, dwl Kansas bet Sierra and Nevada 
Barrett Mary (widow), quilter, dwl 40 Natoma 
Barrett Mary T. (widow), saleswoman with Horence 

S. M. Co., dwl !J05 Bush ^ ^_ ^ ,.^,^ 

Barrett Michael, driver with James L. King, dwl 342 

Kitch ^ , 

Barrett Michael, laborer Golden Gate Park 
Barrett Patrick, carrier Call and Bulletin, dwl obS 

Natoma j , „, 

Barrett Patrick, clerk with Kennedy & Durr, dwl 24 

Clementina ,„ , , , ,^, , 

Barrett Robert, laborer S. F. Glass Works, dwl 122>^ 

Barrett William, driver with McNally & Blattner, 

dwl Russ House 
Barrett AVilliam, farmer, W s San Jose Road nr bix- 

luilo House 
Barrett William, laborer, dwl S s Laurel Av bet v an 

Ness Av and Franklin 
Barrett William F., molder, with Savage k Son, 

dwl 310 Folsom 
Barrett William G., cashier S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 

lOiJO Pine 
Barrett William H., carpenter with D. A. McDonald 

k. Co., dwl Dora nr Bryant 
Barrett & Moody (C. A. Barrett and J. H. Moody), 

market, 219 Second 
BARRETT & SHERWOOD (Robert Sherwood suc- 
cessor) , importers and dealers watches, diamonds, 

jewelry, etc., 517 Montgomery 
Barrie David, driver Sutter St. R. R. 



Barringer Benj amin, fruits, NE cor Powell and Green, 

dwl 1211 Powell 
Barringer Elizabeth Mrs., agent Curtis' Models, 54 

Fourth 
Barringer Peter, joiner, dwl 54 Fourth 
Barringer William, carpenter and builder, Long 

Bridge foot of Fourth 
Barrington George (Werner <& BJ, dwl 1714 Van 

Ness Av 
Barrington John, clerk S. F. Post-office, dwl 557 

Natoma 
Barrington Mary Miss, dressmaker with Elizabeth 

Lawrence, dwl 314 Green 
Barrington William B., storekeeper with Dickson, 

De Wolf & Co., dwl 314 Green 
Barris Clermont C, bookkeeper with L. Barris, dwl 

302 Montgomery 
Barris (ieorge. In borer Golden Gate Park 
BARRIS LA VERNE, broker, office 302 Montgomery, 

dwl NW cor Eighteenth and Howard 
Barriss Adolphe, butcher with Alphonso Geantit, 

dwl ()15 Vallejo 
Barroilhet Henry (Belloc FreresI, and consul for 
Chili, office 524 Montgomery, dwl 003 Sutter 

Barron , dwl Olii Kearny 

Barron Cornelius J., painter and paperhanger, 815 

Market 
Barron Edward, capitalist, office 403 Montgomery, 

dwl 510 Powell 
Barron James, framemaker with M. D. Nile, dwl SE 

cor Powell and Pacific 
Barron James, miner, dwl 021 California 
Barron John, painter, dvvl 2 Francisco 
Barron Louis billiard saloon, 14 Washington 
Barron Michael I)., dwl 511 Octavia 
Barron Richard, captain stm Emma, res Alameda 
Barron Thomas, dwl 15 Second 
Barron William, groceries and liquors, SW cor Clay 

and Powell 
Barron William, shipjoiner,521 East, dwl S s Califor- 
nia bet Webster and Fillmore 
BARKON & CO. (Thomas Bell), commission mer- 
chants, 305 Sansom 
Barrow William, dwl 14 Eddy 
Barrows Daniel F., painter, dwl 129 Second 
Barrows Robert, shipping clerk California Cracker 

Co., dwl 924 Stockton 
Barrows William IL, attorney at law, office 70 Mont- 
gomery lilock, dwl 10;» Leavenworth 
Barrows William R., shipjoiner, Shipjoiners' Jour. 

Association, 139 Post 
Barruth Ernst, groceries and liquors, SW cor Post 

and Larkin 
Barry Andrew, laborer, dwl S s O'Farrell betSteiner 

and Pierce 
Barry Ann Miss, housekeeper, dwl 1714 Leavenworth 
Barry Augustus W., driver Market St. Railway, dwl 

5i0}4 Valencia 
Barry B. V., conductor Sutter St. R. R., dwl 1130 

Market 
Barry Catherine (widow), dwl 110 William 
Barry Catherine, housekeeper, dwl 1112 Jackson 
Barry Charles, driver Sutter St. R. R., dwl 7 Austin 
Barry Charles, hackman, dwl 743 Broadway 
Barry Charles, teamster, dwl 28 First 
BARRY CHARLES E., searcher records, office 619 

Montgomery, dwl 1022 Jackson 
Barry Daniel, clerk S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl S s 

Eleventh Av nr Railroad Av, South S. F. 
Barry David (Baker & BJ, dwl 18 Washington Av 
Barry Douglas, shipcarpouter, dwl 12 Clementina 
Barry Edward, carriagomaker, dwl 24 Ridley 
Barry Edward, carpenter, dwl St. Nicholas Hotel 
Barry Edward, clerk White House, dwl 112 O'Farrell 
Barry Edward, laborer Union Iron Works, dwl 507 

Mission 
Barry Edward, milkranch, S s Cortland Av nr Islais 

Creek, Bernal Heights 
Barry Edward, real-estate agent, office 415 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 2010 Pacific Av 
Barry Emma H. (widow), dwl 023 Pacific 
Barry F. P., student Heald's Business College ^ 
Barry Isaac (colored), bootblack with Stephen G. 

Brown 
Barry J., yardman Occidental Hotel 
Barry James (Hartnett & BJ, dwl Golden Eagle 

Hotel 
Barry James, barkeeper with Robert Pinner, 35 Pac 
Barry James, clerk Risdon Iron and Locomotive 
Works, dwl Folsom bet Main and Spear 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTORY circulates througliout the Pacific Coast, 



Ij. "W. KENNEDY, General Insurance Agent, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



Barry James, coachman Brooklyn Hotel 

Barry James, foreman with Nelson & Doble, dwl 211 

Taylor 
Barry James, laborer, dwl 412 Post, rear 
Barrj' James, teamster, dwl 4>1 Jessie 
Barry James F., machinohand viith Richardson & 

Holland, dwl 21 Fulton 
Barry James H., compositor with SpauldingJt Barto, 

dwl 1-iOii Jackson 
Barry James J., receivins clerk new City Hall, dwl 

llli/j; Fifth 
Barry John, baker with Robert Stein, 230 Fifth 
Barry John, bootmaker with Buckingham & Hecht, 

dwl 4 ) Seventeenth 
Barry John, coachman with William F. Babcock, 

dwl 32o Folsom 
Barry John, expressman cor Kearny and Bush, dwl 

OiJO Minna 
Barry John, laborer, dwl 22 Freelon 
Barry John, laborer with Hancock & Kelso, dwl 414 

Bealo 
Barry John, laboijer with Hinckley & Co. 
Barry John, molter, dwl 2-523 Sacramento 
Barry John, painter, dwl oiil Clementina 
Barry John, porter 102 Battery, dwl Bdwy nr Dup 
Barry John, seaman, dwl 112 Pacific 
Barry John, shoemaker with Buckingham & Hecht, 

dwl .S47 Mission 
Barry John, tailor, dwl fi Trinitv, rear 
Barry John, watchman U. S. Mint, dwl 102 Fourth 
Barry John H., cooper with Frank W. Arnold, dwl 

3o Valparaiso 
Barry John H., clerk Western Union Telegraph Co., 

dwl 211 Taylor 
Barry John S., dwl 02^ Pacific 
Barry John T. (Lyons <£• £./, dwl 1526 Geary 
Barry Mark J., collector with James Lintott & Co., 

dwl 200 Stockton 
Barry Martin, tailor with John O'Donnell, dwl 1914 

Bush 
Barry Mary (widow), dwl 35 Valparaiso 
Barry Mary (widow), dwl SW cor Bay and Kearny 
Barry Mary Miss, laundress, dwl Emmet PI nr Stock 
Barry Matthew, peddler, dwl W s San Bruno Road 

nr Golden City House 
Barry M. E. Miss, teacher Eighth St. Grammar 

School, dwl 211 Taylor 
Barry Michael^ bootmaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl bW cor Fifteenth and "\'alencia 
Barry Alichael, carpenter with W. B. Bradbury, dwl 

70S Howard 
Barry Michael, laborer Golden Gate Park 
Barry Michael, laborer Union Iron Works, dwl 214 

First 
Barry Michael, upholsterer with Goodwin & Co., dwl 

214 Minna 
Barry Michael, woolsorter S. F. P. Woolen Factory, 

dwl 2217 Mason 
Barry Michael J., fruitstand, SW cor Sacramento 

and Sansom, dwl SE cor Pine and Dupont 
Barry Nellie Miss, seamstress, dwl SW cor Bay and 

Kearny 
Barry Owen, laborer Golden Gate Park, dwl SE cor 

Octavia and McAllister 
Barry Owen, tinsmith with S. F. Gas Light Co. 
Barry Patrick, boilermaker S. F. Boiler Works, dwl 

110 William 
Barry Patrick, fireman Spring Valley Water Works, 

dwl oo9 Natoma 
Barry Patrick, groceries and liquors, 235 Jessie, dwl 

274 Jessie 
Barry Patrick, laborer with Michelssen & Brown, 

dwl Sixteenth nr Potrero Av 
Barry Patrick, laborer Freight Depot S. P. R. R. 
Barry Patrick, policeman City Hall, dwl S s Ash Av 

bet Octavia and Laguna 
Barry Patrick, porter Oakland Ferry AVharf, dwl S 

s Pacific bet Drumm and Davis 
Barry Patrick 0., clerk with Charles E. Barry, dwl 

904 Jackson 
Barry Richard, hostler with McCord & Malone, dwl 

840 Market 
Barry Richard, laborer S. F. and Pae. Sugar Co., 

dwl 2i;0 Clara 
Barry P.lchard, picture-framemaker, 222 Sansom, dwl 

427 Stevenson 
Barry Richard, sailmaker with William C. Woods, 

dwl 18 Washington Av 
Barry Robert, commercial agent, dwl 21 Prospect 



Barry Robert, ropemakor, dwl S s Sixteenth nr 

Guerrero 
Barry Robert, tailor, dwl 6 Trinity, rear 
Barry Sarah D. Miss, teacher, dwl i:Mii Jackson 
Barry Sarah .1. (widow), dwl 130!J Jackson 
Barry T., calker with Savage &Son, dwl 1517 Sac 
Barry T., steerage steward stm Ajax, Oregon S. S. 

Co. 
Barry Theodore A. (Barry & Patten), dwl 700 Geary 
Barry Thomas, barkeeper, dwl NW cor Geary and 

Cemetery Av 
Barry Thomas, shoemaker, dwl 2 Eddy PI 
Barry Thomas T., salesman with Keane, O'Connor & 

Co., dwl Morton House 
Barry W. Mrs., dressmaker, dwl ()6 Natoma 
Barry William, actor California Theater, dwl SW 

cor Washington and Dupont 
Barry William, carpenter, dwl 708 Mission 
Barry William, hackdriver with James Tomkinson, 

dwl HO Natoma 
Barry William, laborer S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl cor 

Sierra and Louisiana 
Barry William, shipcarpenter, dwl 21 Rausch 
Barry William, trackman Omnibus R. R., dwl 630 

Jessie 
Barry William Mrs., furnished rooms, 200 Stockton 
Barry AVilliam J., clerk, dwl &5 Valparaiso 
Barry William McG., sui^evor, dwl 200 Stockton 
BARRY & PATTE^^ (Theodore A. Barry and 
Benjamin A. Patten), wines and liquors, 413 
Montgomery 
Barry see Barrie 

Barse William, calker, Shipcalkers' Assn, 713 Miss 
Barsilies Thomas, milkman, Presidio 
Barsotti Virgilio, vegetables, dwl 1002 Pacific 
Barstiano A., peddler, dwl 533 Vallejo 
Barstow Alfred, assistant superintendent U. S. Rail- 
way Mail Service, otfice 600 Montgomery, room 
22, res San Jos6 
Barstow David P., attorney at law, office 515 Califor- 
nia, res Oakland 
Barstow George (Barstow, Stetson <& JTouohtonJ, 

dwl 927 Pine 
BARSTOW, STETSON & HOUGHTON (Georffe 
Barstorv, Edward Gray Stetson, and R. E. 
Houghton) , attorneys at law, 315 California 
Barstow William, dwl room 42 U. S. Court Building 
Barstrom (ieorge, printer, dwl 115 Second 
Bart Adolph, cook, dwl 611 Pacific 
Bartalo Jose, fisherman. Clay St. Wharf 
Bartels Conrad, musician, dwl 417 Union 
Bartels George, driver, dwl New Alaska Hotel 
Bartels Henry, job wagon, cor Com and Front 
Bartels Peter Henry, liquor saloon and billiards, 539 

Jackson 
Bartels Richard, barkeeper with Nicholas Wiebalk, 

dwl SW cor Bush and Polk 
Bartels ^Villiam, job wagon, cor Com and Front 
Bartet Anna Madame, teacher French, dwl 715 Green 
Bartot Jean BaiJtiste, dwl 715 Green 
Barth Charles, cigars, 813 Montgomei-y 
Barth Charles H., bookkeeper with J. A. Folger & 

Co., dwl 540 Post 
Barth Charles H., clerk U. S. Army Headquarters, 

105 Stockton, dwl 2237 .Jackson 
Barth Isidor, laborer with F. Joost & Co., dwl 520 

Green 
Barth Joseph, varnisher with Jacob Strahle & Co., 

dwl 217 Dupont 
Barth Philip, clerk with I. Glazier & Co., dwl 1208 

Geary 
Barthe Pierre G., mannfacturer corks, 703 Cal, rear 
Barthew Antonia (widow), dwl Cedar Av bet Polk 

and Larkin 
Bartholme John, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery 
Bartholomew Henry G., expressman, SE cor Front 

and Pine, dwl E s Devisadero bet Sac and Clay 
Barthrop Edward (Casey <£• BJ, dwl SW cor Leav- 
enworth and Geary 
Bartles George, confectioner with William Schmits, 

dwl 910 jNIontgomery 
Bartlett Benjamin L., dwl 617 Mason 
Bartlett Charles G., watchmaker with M. M. Bald- 
win k Co., dwl 331 Montgomerj' 
Bartlett Charles H., paperhanger, dwl 120 Perry 
Bartlett Columbus (Bartlett & Pratt), dwl 1131 Ellis 
Bartlett Earl, attorney at law, oflfice 35 Montgomery 
Block, dwl S s Point Lobos Av nr Sixteenth Av 
Bartlett Edwin E., machinist with Deacon & Bulger, 
dwl 37 Tehama 



Insuraoice effected, Losses adjusted, and promptly paid by FARNSWOBTH & OL/ VK K. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers 




Bartlett Erastus, dwl 606 Folsom 

Bartlott Harry B., driver Contra Costa Laundry, dwl 

210') Jonf'S 
Bartlett J. (Bartlett & Wilcox), ros Brooklyn 
Bartlett James H., carpenter, dwl "OS Tehama 
Bartlett J. D., painter, dwl N s Eighteenth nr Do- 
lores 
Bartlett Job C, drayman, dwl 122 Eddy 
Bartlett Nathaniel, packer Golden Gate Flouring 

Mill?, dwl 1024 Montgomery 
Bartlett Robert B., porter with Macondray & Co., 

dwl ■:^X% Moss 
Bartlett Plfnv (Hallett, B. & Dnlton), res Oakland 
Bartlett Washington (Bartlett & Randolph), dwl 

S')0 Market 
BARTLETT WILLIAM C, Bulletin editorial 

rooms, 517 Clav, res Oakland 
Bartlett William H., noteteller National Gold Bank 

and Trust Co.. res Oakland 
BARTLETT & PRATT (Columbus Bartlett and 
Leonidas Pratt), attorneys fit law, office <i*i Sac 
BARTLETT & RANDOLPH 'Washington Bartlett 
and Daniel L. Randolph) , real-estate and money 
brokers, office 12 Montgomery 
Bartlett & Wilcox (J. Bartlett and David Wilcoxl, 
asents Hardy Coal Mine, office NW cor Califor- 
nia and Drumm 
Bartlottson Edwin, dwl 305 Minna 
Bartley Frank, boilermaker, dwl 125 Dora 
Bartley Georse, ropemaker S. F. Cordage Manufac- 
tory, dwl Michigan nr Humboldt 
Bartling William (Bartling & KirnhalV , res Your- 

teenth bet Castro and Brush, Oakland 
BARTLING <fe KIMBALL ( William Bartling and 
Henry Kimball), bookbinders and blank-book 
manufacturers, 505 Clay 
Bartmann Anton J., carpenter, dwl 818 Filbert 
Bartmann Ferdinand, carpenter with D. A. Macdon- 

akl k Co., dwl 522 Filbert, rear 
Bartmann John B., millwright, dwl 333 Bush 
Bartmann John C, music teacher, dwl 729 Grove 
Bartnett T., porter Occidental Hotel 
Barto Harrison (Spaulding & BJ, dwl E 3 Reed nr 

Clay 
Barto Mary (widow), dwl 2 Caroline PI 
Bartolani Pietro, tobacco and cigars, 611 Sansom 
Bartolasa Joseph, glazier, dwl 1-113 Dupont 
Bartoli N., express wagon, cor Pacific and Sansom 
Bartolomy G., dairyman, dwl Ws Old San Jose Road 

bot Twentv-ninth and Thirtieth 
Barton Alfred, brassfinisher with Wm. T. Garratt, 

dwl 32 Natoma 
Barton Benjamin ¥. (B. F. Barton & Co.), res Ala- 
meda „ , 
BARTON B. F. & CO., proprietors Pioneer Salt 

Mills, 213 Sacramento 
Barton Charles C, salesman with Conroy & O'Connor, 

dwl 1( Langton 
Barton Frank, student Heald's Business College 
Barton George, engineer, dwl 418 Brannan 
Barton H. H., civil engineer, dwl Grand Hotel 
Barton Hugh, stonecutter new City Hall, dwl 333 Mis 
Barton James, bootmaker, 81!) Battery 
Barton James, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Barton James, seaman, dwl 105 Clark 
BARTON JOHN, president Union Pacific Salt Co., 

office 218 Sacramento, res Alameda 
Barton Joshua H., superintendent Boarding! Dept. 

San Quontin, dwl 181 Jessie 
Barton Polly (widow), dwl '500 Eddy 
Barton P. W., clerk Fireman's Fund Insurance Co., 

res Alameda 
BARTON ROBERT, mining expert, office 435 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 1116 Bush 
Barton Robert, stockbroker, dwl 810 Leavenworth 
Barton Thomas, actor Bella Union Theater 
Barton Thomas S., clerk with N. B. Edgerly & Co., 

dwl 75'.t Clay 
Barton Willard T., clerk Union Pac. Salt Co., res 

Oakland 
Barton William, carver, dwl NE cor Lomb and Hyde 
Barton William, longshoreman, dwl 2103 Stockton 
Barton William, painter, dwl 1232 Union 
Barton M'illiam, sawyer with Bryant & Strahan, dwl 

1415 Pacific ^ , 

Barton William H.; stockbroker, dwl 242b Buchan- 
an 
Baruch Isaac, merchant, Healdsburg,dwl 108 Seventh 
Baruch Moses, salesman with Ackerman Bros., dwl 
1522 Powell 



Baruch Pauline (widow), midwi''e, dwl 252 Minna 

Barut Raymond, market, 1402 Stockton 

Baruth Ernst, groceries and liquors, SW cor Larkin 

and Post 
Baruth William, groceries and liquors, dwl N\y cor 

Hvde and Sutter , , „„ w 

Barv Gustav, furrier with Isidor Shirpser, dwl 362Ji 

Clementina 
Barville Edward, dwl 636 Pacific, rear 
Barwell Charles, waiter with John Reagan, dwl 605 

Stockton 
Barwos Alexander, barkeeper Park Hotel 
Barz August (Barz & Suhll, dwl 342 Seventh 
Barz James, lumber stevedore with Whitney & 

Freese 
Barz k Suhl (August Barz and Christopher F. Suhl) , 

wagonmakers and blacksmiths, 114 Drumm 
Basch Arthur, salesman with Theo. Liebormann & 

Co., dwl 724 Bush . ,. , 

Basch Hugo, hairdresser with Anton J. Pacheco, dwl 

Overland House 
Bascholt Charles, tailor, dwl 427 Greenwich 
Bascom John, bootblack 308 Bush, dwl Hinckley nr 

Kearny ■„ ^ .i, , , 

Bascom Lewis S., clerk with William F. Smith, dwl 

313 Bush . ^ ,^ , ^. 

Bascom Rav, pressman with Francis & Valentine, 

dwl 16 Ritch 
Bascombe A. Miss, dressmaker, dwl 32 Tyler 
Baselli Regina (widow'i, dwl 535 Green 
Rasford Jacob K., capitalist, dwl 017 Geary 
Basford W. L., telegraph operator Market St. Depot 

S. P. R. R., dwl 017 Geary , ^ ^ 

Bash Hevman, tailor 202 Bush, dwl 43lV^ Clementina 
Bash Julius, boot and shoemaker, dwl 26i) vStevonson 
Basham Frederick, plastermodeler, dwl 1008 Post 
Bashwell F. N., fireman S. P. R. R. . 

Basile Thomas H., cook, dwl 636 Commercial 
Baskervillo John S., sawyer with L. & E. Emanuel, 

dwl 5'>1 Sixth ^. ^ 

Baskerville Richard D., hairdresser, oOl Sixth 
Baskeville J. A., student Heald's Business College 
Basler George A., painter, 675 Market, dwl 29 Pearl 
Bass Harry, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Bass Thomas J. (T.J. Bass & Co.^ dwl 526 O'Farrell 
BASS T. J. & CO., paints, oils, varnishes, and glass, 

70n Market 
Bassalla William, painter, dwl 625 Valle.io 
Bassart Charles, master mariner, dwl 1016 Pacific 
Basse Thomas, merchant, office 526 California, res 

Bremen, Germany 
Bassett A. C, assistant supt and general freight agent 

S. P. R. R.., dwl !l0!j Market 
Bassett Alonzo, stonecutter with Frank Williams, res 

Oakland ci ci ^ 

Bassett C, second officer stm Pelican, Oregon b. b. Co. 
Bassett Charles F. (Charles F. Bassett & Co.), dwl 

W s Mission opp Twelfth 
BASSETT CHARLES F. & CO, produce commission 

merchants, 219 Washington 
Bassett Daniel M.. assistant engineer P. M. S. S. 

Alaska, dwl 58 Clementina 
BASSETT FRANK W., Kremlin Saloon, 236 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 114 Eleventh 
Bassett H. C, usher California Theater 
Bassett James M., editor, dwl 121 Fifth 
BASSETT JOSEPH, wholesale flour and gram, 221 

and 223 Clay, res Fruit Vale, Alameda Co. 
Bassett Louis, watchman stm Oriflamme, Oregon S. 

S Co 
Bassett Martin L., patent hoists, dwl N W cor Church 

and Jersey 
Bassett Nathaniel, doorkeeper California Theater, 

dwl 114 Eleventh ^ 

Bassett Robert, clerk S. F. Directory Office, res East 

Oakland 
Bassett William H., liquor saloon, 22 Second, dwl 114 

Eleventh 
Bassey Louis, helper Portland Iron Works 
Bassignano Peter F., coachman with 0. C. Pratt, 26 

Laurel PI , /, , 

Bassillio Joseph, engineer with Black Diamond Coal 

Co., dwl SW cor Green and Sansom 
Bassini Bernardo, meterman with S. F. Gas Light 

Co., dwl 1327 California 
Bassity James, plasterer, dwl 113 Jones 
Bastain Philip, clerk, dwl 17 Jansen 
Bastheim Joseph (Einstein Bros. & Co.), dwl 828 

O'Farrell 
Bastian Jacob (Mesmer <& B.J, dwl 398 Pacific 



PACITIC COAST BUSINESS PIEECTOBY, X874-6, H. Q, Langley, Pub'r, S. P. Price I 



KENNEDY'S INSUBANCE AGENCY. Fire, Marine, and Life. 411 California St. 



Bastian John, gardener with C. Spreckels, SE cor 

Sixteenth and Howard 
Baston Abner F., teamster with Miller <fe Hall, dwi 

1021) McAllister 
Baston Joseph G., porter with WaterhouseA Lester, 

dwl 102') McAllister 
Basye T. H., cellerman New York Bakery, dwl 636 

Commercial 
Batalle Albert, waiter with Deutsch & Co., dwl 433 

Broadway 
Batavin P., hair manuf, 1002 Stockton, dwl 813 Stock 
Batchelder Hiram, carrier Alta California, dwl 528 

Pine 
Batchelder John R., carpenter with William L. Bov- 

yer, dwl 613 Grove 
Batchelder Levi L., stevedore, dwl 1026 Clay 
Batchelder William H., hnusemnver, dwl 114 Austin 
Batchelor David F.. dwl ITOii Webster 
BATCHELOR EDWARD P., attorney at law, office 

7 Montgomery Block, and prosecuting attorney 

Police Court, dwl Si05 Market 
Bateman Ezra, carpenter, dwl 115 Second 
BATEMAX HEXRY C, importer books, stationery, 

and church articles, 203 Kearny, dwl 43 Tehama 
Bateman Isaac, mining, office 116 Leid, dwl 555 Har- 
rison 
Bateman James, bootmaker, dwl 121 Davis 
Bateman John, seaman, dwl 20 Commercial 
Bateman Michael C, contractor, dwl S s Pacific Av 

bet Gough and Octavia 
Bates Alfred, teacher, dwl 1001 Powell 
Bates A?her B. Mr?, (widowi. dwl 70') Bush 
Batp= Catherine i widow*, dwl 7i)4 Harrison, rear 
BATES CICERO M., physician, office 137 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 206 Powell 
Bates Daniel S., night inspector Custom House, dwl 

6313^ Minna 
Bates Dudley C, cashier with Edward F. Hall & Co., 

dwl 1705 Octavia 
Bates Edward K., bootmaker with I. M. Wentworth 

& Co., dwl 1124 Market 
Bates Eugene J., assistant bookkeeper with Crane & 

Brigham, dwl 764 Harrison 
Bates Felix J. W., millwright with Edwin 0. Hunt, 

dwl SW cor Bush and Pierce 
Bates George, principal Universitv School, NE cor 

Post and Powell, dwl 1001 Poivell 
Bates John, gardener, dwl S s Fell nr Laguna 
Bates .lohn, master mariner, dwl 423 East 
BATES JOSEPH C, attorney at law, office 434 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 1717 Webster 
Bates Joseph H., assistant engineer C. P. R. R., dwl 

325^^; Geary 
Bates Morris S., cashier Williams, Blanchard & Co., 

dwl 705 Bush 
Bates Paul, blacksmith, dwl 210 First 
Bates Samuel P., oakum manufacturer, dwl 6 Powell 
Bates William H., dwl 211 Stevenson 
Bathall (leorge, waiter stm Prince Alfred 
Bathslo William Tcolored), porter with John Stahle, 

dwl SO!' Pacific 
Batsere John, cook Union Club, dwl 1116 Bryant 
Batt .lacob, glass, crockery ware, and groceries, 109 

Sixth 
Battams William, salesman with Locke & Montague, 

dwl Occidental Hotel 
Batten George, rollermaker with Morrill & Co., dwl 

509 Commercial 
Batten H. E., butcher, 11 Union Market, dwl 746 

Howard 
Batten Sansom /'Batten & Mullen) ,Avi\ S 3 California 

bet Broderiek and Baker. 
Batten & Mullen f Sansom Batten and Michael Mul- 
len) , stonecutters, X s Geary nr Cemetery A v 
Battersby James, watchmaker and jeweler, 13 Third, 

dwl 709 Mission 
Battersby R., mining engineer, office 542 Market 
Battersby William X., clerk, dwl 280 Brannan 
Battery Street U. S. Bonded Warehouse, George C. 

Bode proprietor, XW cor Battery and Filbert 
BATTEUX DAXIEL, wines and Uquors, 34 Kearny, 

dwl 345 Jessie 
Battis Otis J. f.T. J. Vasconcellos d: Co.), dwl 1705 

Leavenworth 
Battiste Joseph, cook Grand Hotel 
Battles James, waiter stm Amelia 
Battles Luke, steward stm Amelia, dwl 10 Haggin 
Battu Ilippolyte, painter with St. Dennis & Chesney, 

dwl 731 O'Farrell 
Battu Z. (widow), dwl 731 O'Farrell 



Batturs Edward T., bookkeeper with Frank G. Ed- 
wards, dwl 521 Leavenworth 

Battv William J., hackman, XW cor Kearny and 
Bush 

Batzer H. J., mattressmaker with Cal. Furniture 
Manufacturing Co., dwl South S. F. 

Batzki William, upholsterer, dwl 337 Bush 

Batzner .John P., baker, dwl 722 Harrison 

Bauch Xicholas J., divl 033 Kearny 

Bauch Peter G., custom-house broker, 500 Battery, 
dwl 719 Union 

Bauchamp Julia Mrs., dwl 2430 Sacramento 

Bauck .John Henry, capitalist, dwl Prescott House 

Baud Frank, brass and zinc foundry, 522 Fulton 

Bauer Abraham ( Bauer, Tobriner <& Co.) , dwlll02 
Pine 

Bauer Brothers f Moses and Samuel), fancy dry 
goods, 410 Kearny 

Bauer Charles (Bauer & Kittelberger) , dwl 1143 
Mission 

Bauer Charles, laborer with Ruhland Bros., dwl 
Central Road nr Golden Gate Park 

Bauer Charles, policeman City Hall, dwl llj^ Lang- 
ton 

Bauer Charles G. ( Muller & BJ, dwl Halleek nr 
Lombard 

BAUER EMILE (White & BJ, dwl 2109 Jones 

Bauer Emile E., wines and liquors, 1042 Folsom, dwl 
IO55V2 Folsom 

Bauer George, liquor saloon and boarding, 27 Dupont 

Bauer Henry, maltster Pioneer Malt House, dwl 2110 
Stockton 

Bauer Henry H., upholsterer with John C. Bell, dwl 
1511 California 

Bauer Herman, gilder with Snow <fc Roos, dwl Thir- 
tieth nr Castro 

Bauer Jacob, baker with Hemme <fe Reutor, dwl 223 
Fifth 

Bauer John, cooper, dwl Palm House 

Bauer John, farmer, dwl 113 Virginia 

Bauer John, liquor saloon, 2 Front, dwl E s Fillmore 
nr Waller 

Bauer John, tinsmith, dwl 13 Pacific 

Bauer John A., farmer, dwl Presidio Road nr Lyon 

BAUER JOHX A., manufacturing chemist and 
druggist, 101 Post, dwl 620 Greenwich 

Bauer John C, farmer, dwl Presidio Road nr Lyon 

Bauer Moses (Bauer Brothers/ , dwl 1102 Pine 

Bauer Otto, restaurant, dwl 535 California 

Bauer Peter, blacksmith, dwl 1321^4 Stockton 

Bauer Samuel (Bauer Brothers J . dwl 1102 Pine 

Bauer Simon, porter with Kaindlor & Co., dwl 409 
Dupont 

BAUER, TOBRIXER & CO. (Abraham Bauer and 
Mattheiv Tobriner) , fancy goods, laces, and em- 
broideries, 537 ^larket 

Bauer Wenz.el, baker, dwl 19 Morton 

Bauer William, baker with Martin Kunstle, 776 Fol 

BAUER k KITTELBERGER tCfiarlos Bauer and 
Charles Kittelberger J , wines and liquors, SE cor 
Commercial and Kearny 

Baugh Theodore E., real estate, dwl 2022 Bush 

Baulanger Pierre, clerk with Lenormand Bros., dwl 
SW cor Dupont and Pino 

Baulsir Ximrod R. C. Hanson & Co.), dwl 1332 Wash 

BAUM CHARLES, custom-house broker and consul 
Argentine Republic, office 510 Battery, dwl 1705 
Powell 

Baum David A., clerk Liverpool & London k Globe 
Ins. Co.. dwl 18 Prospect PI 

Baum Gustave, furniture and carpets, 740 Washing- 
ton and 709 Pacidc, dwl 1112 Leavenworth 

Baum Hans C., wire ropemaker with A. S. Hallidie, 
dwl Oriental Hotel 

BAUM J. k CO. I (Henry and Morris &7<r(er', im- 
porters and manufacturers clothing, 218 and 220 
Sansom 

Baum John T., manufacturer and dealer office fur- 
niture, 605 California, dwl 607 Stockton 

Baum Julius (J. Baum & Co.) , dwl 1111 Van Xess At 

Baum Mary (widow), divl 23^^ Silver 

Baum Simon /Simon Baum & Co.) , dwl 303 Turk 

BAUM SIMOX & CO. fSolomon Cohn), importers 
and jobbers men's furnishing goods, 217 and 219 
Pine 

Baum William, barkeeper with John Ipswitch, dwl 
216 Second 

Bauman Charles, tailor, 1108 Stockton 

Bauman Emma Miss, milliner with Miss Joanna 
Desmond, dwl SW cor Third and Brannan 



SPBINGFIEIiD FIBE AND MAEINE INS. CO., of Mass., always Just, always Prompt. 



C. p. VAM" SCHAACK & CO.. 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 



Banman George fPlanz <t- BJ, dwl 52f) Natoma 

Bauman Joseph, locksmith, 510 Broadway 

Banman Louis, dwl 818 Folsom 

Bauman Marv Miss, retoucher with Thomas House- 
worth fi Co., dwl 818 Folsom 

Bauman W. G., clerk, dwl Overland House 

Bauniann Henry, porter with Jacob Joachim, dwl 
120 Prospect PI 

Baumann .Tames, laborer with E. T. Anthony & Co., 
dwl 600 Vallejo 

Baumann -John, musician, dwl 29 Morton 

Baumann Sigmnnd, bookkeeper with Levi Strauss & 
Co., dwl 502 Bush 

Baumbr-varer James Mrs., teacher piano-forte, dwl 
407 O'Farrell 

Baumber!?er James M., bookkeeper witt Breeze & 
Loufrhran, dwl 407 O'Farrell 

Baume S. H., dwl 15'! Third 

Baumeister Bernhard H.. hairdresser with Anthes <fe 
Floischinan, dwl 08;^ Kearny 

Baumeister Frederick, hairdresser, dwl 1524 Stock 

Baumeistor Henry, porter with William A. Hughes, 
dwl What Cheer House 

Baumeister Hormnn, dwl 3 Clara Lane 

Baumeister John, laborer with E. T. Anthony & Co. 

Baumeister John A. (Baumeister <fc Co.), dwl 1038 
Howard 

Baumeister Joseph, upholsterer, dwl 708 Filbert 

BAUMEISTER k CO. (John A. Baumeister and 
John C Beckler I ^\if\noT and billiard saloon, N 
W cor Bush and Kearny 

Baumgardner E. M. Mrs., teacher Denman School, 
dwl 1024 Bush 

Bauragardner S. J., commission agent California 
Cracker Co., dwl 1024 Bush 

Baumgarten Anton ( M. Ullmann & Co.), dwl 742 
Washington 

Baumgarten Carl ( M. Ullmann & Co.) . res Hungary 

Baumgarten Joseph, cashier with M. Ullman & Co., 
dwl 742 Washington 

Baumgarten Solomon, secondhand clothing, 740 Pae 

Baumgartner Peter, brewer Philadelphia Brewery, 
dwl 232 vSecond 

Baumgartner Valentine (Heerdink <fc Co.) , dwl 614 
Natoma 

Baumle Frederick, market, 522 Sixth 

Baumle Mary Miss, saleswoman 828 Market, dwl 522 
Sixth 

Baurhyto Isaac, assistant engineer stm Newborn, dwl 
315 First 

Baurhvto Isabella (widow), dwl 431 Natoma 

Bauschor H., tailor, dwl 12 Berry 

Bausher Jay D., office 405 Front, room 12, res Oak- 
land 

BAUSMAN WILLIAM, editor Morning Call, office 
517 Clay, dwl 552 Minna 

Bauteu F., tailor with John H. Tobin, dwl St. Mary 
PI 

Bauten Nicholas J. (Nicholas T. Bauten ds Co.), dwl 
228 Brannan 

Bauten Nicholas J. & Co. (William Muehe) , grocer- 
ies and liquors, 228 Brannan 

Bautz Leon, bottler with John N. Gardes, dwl 1112 
Kearny 

BAUX F. A., real estate, office 29 Merchants' Ex- 
change, res Oakland 

Baux John B., merchant, office 29 Merchants' Ex- 
change, res Oakland 

Bavaria Brewerv, Jacob Gundlach & Co. proprietors, 
020 and 022 Vallejo 

Bavons Henry, master mariner, dwl 5 Garden 

Bavorly John A., clerk with Diss & Co., dwl 404 Fol 

Baw Charles, baker with Jacob Schneider, dwl 115 
Oiik 

Bawdoii , capitalist, dwl 320 Jessie 

Bawl Horace W., clerk Auditor's Office C. P. E. R., 
dwl 1011 Howard 

Baxter Charles E. A., clerk with J. C. Merrill & Co., 
dwl 322 Turk 

Baxter Edward H.. salesman with Crane<fe Brigham, 
dwl llO.i Howard 

Baxter Hall W., cashier with Crane & Brigham, dwl 
S s Elli'i bet Fillmore and Steiner 

Baxter J., hosoman Hose No. 3, S. F. F. D., Twenty- 
second nr Folsom 

Baxter James, engineer, dwl 518 Bryant, rear 

Baxter .James E.. fruitdealer, dwl 12 Brooks 

Baxter John T., butcher, dwl N s Sixteenth bet Sec- 
ond Av and Guerrero 

Baxter Joseph P., special policeman, dwl 2 Jasper PI 



Baxter L. L. Mrs. (widow), dwl 1100 Howard 
Baxter Mat, tanner with Cornelius O'Donnell, dwl 11 

Geneva 
Baxter Patrick, laborer, dwl 144 Dora 
Baxter Thomas, helper with McAfee, Spiers <fe Co., 

dwl 144 Dora 
Baxter W. H., State secretary Farmers' Granges, of- 
fice 320 Caiilbrnia, third floor 
Baxter William S., clerk S. P. Assaying and Refining 

Works, dwl 425 Geary 
Bay Brewery, Weyand & Kasche proprietors, 612 and 

616 Seventh 
Bav Citv Soda Water Co., 87 and 80 Stevenson 
BAY DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIA- 
TION, A. D. Carpenter secretary, office room 10, 

605 Clav 
BAY DISTRICT HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, 

F. A. Miller secretary, office and reading-room 

622 Clay 
Bay Park Homestead Association, office 328 Mont 
Bav Salt Co., A. Giorgiani agent, 421 Washington 
BAY SUGAR REFINERY, Herman Meese presi- 
dent, Peter Meyer secretary, SW cor Battery 

and Union 
Bay View Distillery, Cushing & Co. proprietors, cor 

Nineteenth Av and H, South S. F., office and 

salesroom 313 and 315 Battery 
Bay View Homestead Association, I. T. Millikon 

secretary, office 302 Montgomery 
Bay View Nursery, Alfred Brocq proprietor, cor 

Twenty-first Av and J, South S. F., depot 619 

Sacramento 
Bay View Refinery, Louis Franconi proprietor, office 

and salesroom NW cor Batterv and Commercial 
BAY WAREHOUSE, John Melville manager, W s 

Sansom bet Greenwich and Lombard 
Baye Florencia ('widow), dressmaker, dwl 621 Vallejo 
Bayer Charles, baker with Leonhard Hilport, dwl 

1223 Stockton 
Bayer Jacob, liquor saloon, 6 Jackson 
Bayer J. F., clerk, dwl Overland House 
Bayer John, laborer, dwl Manhattan House 
liavor Joseph, roofer, dwl 246 Tehama 
Bayer Otto, cook with Schroth & Westerfeld, dwl 228 

Kearnv 
Bayle John (Borel d- B.J, dwl Fifth Av, South S. F. 
Bayle Patrick, stevedore with Whitney & Freese 
Bayless Charles, compositor with Spaulding & Barto, 

dwl 8 (ieneva 
Bayless Joseph, draftsman with DeWey & Co., dwl 8 

Geneva 
Bayless Lion, dravman, dwl 617 Hayes 
Bavless William H., architect, dwl 8 Geneva 
BAYLEY CHARLES A., Bayley's Sample Rooms, 

659 Clav, dwl 1214 Powell 
Bayley Charles H., clerk, dwl 1214 PoweH 
Bayley George, porter, dwl 1826 Bush 
Bayley George B., bookkeeper Bank California, res 

Oakland 
Bayley Menell F., photographer, 34 Third, dwl Mis- 
sissippi nr Mariposa 
Bayley Nathan J. (W. i^. <& N.J. Bayley), dwl 8 

Pleasant 
Bayley Thomas, butcher with Charles H. Aitken, dwl 

S s Drumm bot Oregon and .Jackson 
BAYLEY W. F. & N. J., photographic galleries, 

526 Montgomery and 1102 Stockton 
Bayley Wilbur F. (W. F. <& N. J. Bayley), dwl 1405 

Taylor 
Baylor William, clerk, dwl 154 Shipley, rear 
Bayly Charles A., apothecary, SE cor Sixth and Hoyv 
Bayly Pauline (widow), physician, dwl 103 Tehama 
Bayly. See Bailey and Baily. 

Bayma Joseph Rev., professor mathematics St. Igna- 
tius College, 841 Market 
Bayreuthor Gustav, tailor, dwl 774 Mission 
Bays Henry, ship carpenter, dwl 8 Liberty 
Bays John, street contractor, dwl 1600 Webster 
Bazan Ferdinand, physician and surgeon, office and 

dwl SE cor Howard and Twenty-first 
Baziadoly Auguste G.. porter 62i> California 
Bazin Louisa Mrs., private school, dwl 1625 Mission 
Bazin T. Miss, dressmaker, 71ii Clay 
Bazin Victor, tailor, dwl 1625 Mission 
Bazzurro Frank (O. Breda & Co.), dwl 506 Clay 
Bea Joseph, oysterman. Long Bridge foot of Fourth 
Beach A. C, barkeeper with George Green, Dunbar 

Alley, rear City Hall 
Beach Carrie A. (widow), dwl SW cor Howard and 

Eighteenth 



FACII'IC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTOBT contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



EENNEDY'S INSTTRANCE AGENCY. Fire. Marine, and Life, represents $12,000,000. 



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Boach Charles J., carpenter, dwl 120^4 Turk 
BEACH CHILION, books and stationery, 5 Mont- 
gomery, dwl Grand Hotel 
Bear-h Edward P., sbof-maker, dwl fiOO Howard 
Beach George H. salesman with Mayrisch Brothers 

Si Co., 1142^ Market 
Beach Henry H.. accountant with Wellman, Peck & 

Co., dwl 117 Sixth 
Beach H<^nr.v Martin, clerk City and County Auditor, 

dwl 120!i Tavlor 
Beach Horace cashier U. S. Mint, dwl ,534 Bush 
Beach .lobn, dwl 528 Stevenson 

BEACH JOHN C, proprietor Adams House, r>37Sac 
Beach John H., porter with Simon H. Tyler, dwl 

rrescott House 
Beach Joseph G.. ceiling decorator, 607 California, 

dwl Coso House 
Beach Thomas P., mining secretary, office 41134 Cali- 
fornia, dwl lOfi O'Farrell 
Beach Zylpha (widow), dwl 1824 Jackson 
Beach i- Paxson (iold and Silver Mining Co. (Storey 

Co., Aev.i, office .707 Montgomery 
Beacham Frederick, salesman with E. Supple, dwl 

W) Jiarket 
Beaehner James, laborer Pacific Commercial Co.. 

dwl Columbia Hotel 
Beachy Hill, capitalist, office 434 California, dwl 3.39 

Kearny 
BEADLE DONALD, shipping and commission mer- 
chant. lOi) Davis, dwl H23 Third 
Beahan Edward, track cleaner Market St Eailway. 

dwl Bernal Heights 
Beahan John, butcher with Grady & Whearty, dwl 

E s Dolores nr Sixteenth 
Beahen Thomas, laborer with Pacific Rolling Mill 

Co., dwl Potrero Point 
Beakley A., chairseater, 221 Dupont 
Beal Augustus, porter P. M. S. S. Alaska 
Beal Nathaniel, furniture and bedding, 774 Howard 
Beal Samuel, mattress manufacturer, 575 Mission 
d«-l 40 Silver ' 

^eal William B., liquor saloon and cigars and tobacco, 
A W cor Sacramento and Kearny, dwl Powell nr 
Broadway 

Beale , upholsterer, dwl 746 Howard 

Eeale Fletcher, molder Union Iron Works, dwl .552 
Mission 

Beale Bichard.marbleworker with Michael Heverin, 

dwl 414 Folsom 
Beale St. Sawing and Planing Mill, Richardson & 
T> , o. ^,^J proprietors, NW cor Beale and Mission 
Beale St. \\ arehouse, P. Ryan & Co. proprietors, cor 

Beale and Brvant 
Beale St. Wharf, foot Beale 
Beale Yl illiam, rigger, dwl 414 Folsom, rear 
Jjeale U illiam, saloon, dwl 1316 Powell 
Beale William A., miner, dwl 22 Perry 
Beales John T., furnishing, dwl 1004 Hyde 
Beals Abraham, dwl .533 Commercial 
Beals C.iroline R. Mrs., teacher Girls' High School, 

awl 1204 Leavenworth 
Beals Charles Channing Jr., pressman with John H. 

Carraany & Co., dwl 1506 Tavlor 
Beals Charles W., clerk with Carlos White, dwl 1506 

laylor 
BEAL^ H. CHANNING, editor Commercial Herald 

?-■)? ^^'^^'''^* Review, office 409 Washington, dwl 

1)0t laylor 
Beals John P., printer and engraver with Matthias 

Gray, dwl 743 Broadway 
Beals Manuel, laborer, dwl E s Stev nr Nineteenth 
Beals M. R., laborer ^Market St. Railway, dwl N s 

JNiijeteenth bet Mission and Valencia 
Beam Jjel M., cook with Donovan & O'Donnell, dwl 

31 Hunt 
Beam Peter G., general agent Erie R. R., office 140 

Montgomery, dwl Lick House 
Beaman 0., hatter with C. J. Collins 
Beamish -— -, cook, dwl .533 Commercial 
Beamish George, whipmaker with J. C. Johnson & 

Co.. dwl 106 Front 

Beamish John, bootmaker with George Burkhardt, 
awl 728 Grove 

BEAMISH PERCY, gents' furnishing goods. Nucleus 
■R<.o f^i'^''?^ ^^^ Market and 1 Third, dwl 1128 Pine 
Bean Charles T., calker, dwl 1011 Broadway 
Bean D. T., carpenter, dwl Park Hotel 
Bean Ernst cabinetmaker with Herman Grantz, dwl 

Berry St. House, cor Third and Berry 
Bean irancis, stockdealer, dwl 1233 Mission 



Bean George W., mate brig Josephine, dwl 1011 Bdwy 
Bean James, shipwright Shipwrights' Jour. Assn 71 

^New Montgomery 
Bean John, cook with Allen Freeman, dwl 2-37 Minna 
Bean Joseph W., carpenter California Mills, dwl 102 

Jones 
Bean Moses T. master mariner, dwl 1011 Broadway 
Bean Redmond, stevedore with Whitney & Freese. 

dwl ■>«! Howard 

^®^?,1^^*,"'^™' teamster with Davis & Cowell. dwl 
21*1 Clara 

^®^?^.*,°?a7?°'"^''' secretary Board of Education, dwl 
312% Minna 

Beanston Peter, carriagosraith with Pollard .t Carvill 
Manufacturing Co., dwl W s Hollis bet Ellis and 
O larrell 
Bear River Blue Gravel Mining Co. (Placer Co., Cal.). 

office 42'i Montgomery 
Beard Elizabeth Miss, dressmaker, dwl 240 Towns- 
end 
Beard George, dwl 522 Howard 
Beard George, stevedore, dwl N s Greenwich bet 

Montgomery and Sansom 
Beard Isaac, blacksmith, dwl 2J0 Townsend 
Beard John, boilermaker, dwl 240 Townsend 
Beard Joseph R., mining secretary, office 331 Mont- 
gomery, dwl Revere House 
Beard Sarah (widow), dwl 240 Townsend 
Beardsley Cyrus, carpenter, dwl 436 Union 
Beardsley George, with Pac. Barrel and Keg Co. 
Beardsley Irving W., butcher, dwl 114 Haves 
Beardsley .lames, engineer with Pacific Commercial 

Co., dwl H.54 Minna 
Beardsley John H., office 8 Court Block, dwl 921 Pow 
Beardsley S. A., purser P. M. S. S. Nevada 
Beardsley Sophia (widow), dwl 316 O'Farrell 
Bearner Herman, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Bearney Henry, blacksmith, dwlS s San Bruno Road 

nr Islais Creek 
Bearwald George, driver New York Brewery, dwl 115 

Dora 
Bearwald Jacob, printer with Edward Bosqui & Co., 

dwl 115 Dora 
Beasley Thomas R., waiter with W. R. Mathews & 

Co., dwl 617 Mission 
Beasley William, stovepolisher with George H. Tay 

& Co., dwl 9.50 Bryant 
Beates John, cook, dwl 519 Mission 
Beath John M., ice manufacturer, dwl 40^^ Geary 
Beathio William, waiter, dwl 4 Central Pf 
Beaton Angus, shipcarpenter, dwl 164 V^ Clara 
Beaton John J., shipwright Shipwrights' Jour. Assn, 

71 New Montgomery 
Beaton Peter, shipcarpenter, dwl .515 Howard 
Beattie David, tailor with Mac Both & Banks, dwl 

New Franklin House 
Beaty C. C, painter with Elijah H. Gadsby.dwl Ger- 
man Hotel 
Beatty H. J., waiter Homestead House, Point Lobos 

Av 
Beatty James riTare <t BJ, dwl Tenth Av nr Rail- 
road Av, South S. F. 
Beatty John, gardener Industrial School 
Beatty John, merchant, dwl 35 Eleventh 
Beatty L., carpenter, dwl What Cheer House 
Beatty L. Z. (widow), furnished rooms, 230 Third 
Beatty Patrick, laborer, dwl 529 Stevenson 
Beatty Patrick, mattressmaker with California Man- 

ufacturing Co., dwl 531 O'Farrell 
Beatty Samuel, bootmaker with Einstein, Bros. & 

Co., dwl 343 Jessie 
Beatty Samuel G., attorney at law, dwl .315 Jones 
Beatty \\ illiam, porter with Charles Haacke, dwl i 

Central PI 
Beatty William J., hack. Plaza 
Beauchamp Adam, clerk 838 Market, dwl Windsor 

House 
Beauchamp George W., clerk, dwl Russ House 
Beauchamp L. 0., framemaker with M. D. Nile, dwl 

S^V cor Pacific and Dupont 
Beauchemin Hypolite, miner, dwl 2 Vincent 
Beaugh John, dwl 326 Sansom 

Beaujardin TheodoreG., teacher music, dwl 823 Bdwy 
Beauman C, dwl 1023 Kearny 
Beaumont Arthur, engraver with J. W. Tucker & 

Co., dwl Wadsworth House 
Beaumont Charles A., liquor saloon, 1021 Kearny 
Beaunicant Joseph, carver, dwl 583 Market 
Beauregard Napoleon, machinist Pacific Rolling 
Mills, dwl cor Georgia and Sierra 



PABNSWOETH & CLABK, Gen'l Tire and Marine Insurance Agency; office 230 Cal. St 



i 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



Beauxis John, baker with John Muilher & Co., dwl 

Nubili Alley 
Bea^^er George W., capitalist, office 414 California, 

dwl 150S Taylor 
Beavor Samuel E., curroncytoUer Bank California, 

dwl 80 Post 
Beaverly John laborer, 404 FoLsom 
Beban Koeco, chop house, SE cor Broadway and 

Dupont, dwl i'ilH Kearny 
Bebee William, patternmaker, dwl 568 Howard 
Bee Bartholemy, real estate, dwl 1407 Stockton 
Bech Court, architect, dwl &Ai I'acitic 
Bechor GL-orgo, proprietor Metropolitan Hotel, 1330 

Stockton 
Bochor Henry, cook Buss House, dwl S s Ash Av bet 

Laguna and Buchanan 
Bechoror Charles F. (Bccherer <& PomeroyJ, dwl 048 

Sacramento 
BECHEKEK & POMEROY (Charles F. Bechcrer 

and O. P. Pomeroy ) , employment and collection, 

olhco lUS Sacramento 
Bechlor Joseph H., miller with Deming, Palmer & 

Co,, dwl 111) Sacramento 
Bechtel Max, bookkeeper, dwl N s Twenty-third nr 

Mission 
Beck Adolphus G., accountant and teacher book- 
keeping, 482 Montgomery 
Bock Andrew, seaman, dwl 1 Clay 
Beck Anton H., musician, dwl 80'J Union 
Beck August, speculator, dwl ti08 Greenwich 
Beck Bernard, laborer, dwl 407 Pacific 
Beck C. ifc Co., market, cor Hayes and Laguna 
Beck Charles fC. Beck <t CoJ , dwl *»!> Hayes 
Beck Charles, laborer S. ¥. P. Woolen Factory, dwl 

SW cor Francisco and Larkin 
Beck Christ, laborer, dwl 112 Polk 
Beck Christian, laborer with Peterson &. Co., dwl N 

W cor Mission and Tenth 
Beck Curtis, assistant foreman New U. S. Apprais- 

sers' Building 
Beck David L., merchandise broker, office 405 Front, 

room 5, dwl 18 Stanly PI 
Beck David L. Jr., clerk with Jones & Co., dwl 18 

Stanley PI 
Beck Eugene B. {Jones <& Co.), dwl 38 Stanly PI 
Beck F., dwl tilO Kearny 
Beck F. E., bookkeeper Howe Machine Co., dwl 13 

Powell 
Beck Frederick C. H., compositor Alta California, 

dwl 13 J Seventh 
Beck George, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 533 

Mission 
Beck Hans, captain schooner Alviso, Market St. 

Wharf 
Bock Hans S., plasterer and whitener, 302 Sutter, dwl 

1127 Harrison 
Bock Henry ( D telle &BJ, dwl 518 Jessie 
Beck Henry, currier with Samuel Bloom, dwl E s 

Bryant bet Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Bock Henry, tanner, dwl San Bruno Koad nr Twenty- 
eighth 
Bock Jacob, mason, dwl N s Seventeenth nr Church 
Bock James G., painter with M. J. Donovan, dwl 351 

Jessie 
Beck John, driver Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 232 Sec 
Beck John E., shoocuttor with Orin Jones 
Beck John L., cartman, 8 Brooks 
Beck Ludwig, clerk Trans-Atlantic Insurance Co. of 

Hamburg, 31t) Sansom, res Alameda 
Beck Mary Miss, seamstress Mission Woolen Mills, 

dwl Seventeenth nr Church 
Beck Mary L. (widow), dwl 134 Folsom, rear 
Beck Nathaniel A., tannery, E s Folsom nr Eight- 
eenth 
Beck Nelson, blacksmith Risdon Iron and Locomo- 
tive Works, dwl 8 Lick 
Beck Nicholas, special policeman, dwl 156 Steuart 
Beck llqbocca (widow), dwl Virginia Block 
Beck Walter A., clerk with Becherer & Pomeroy, 

dwl ti48 Sacramento 
Beck \V'illiam, cook stm Kalorama, Washington St. 

Wharf 
Beck William (colored), tinsmith with John Sumner, 

dwl S s Howard bet Spear and Steuart 
Beckedorif G. H. Christian, porter with L. k E. Wert- 

heimer, dwl o6 Russ 
Becker Albert, machinist U. S. Mint, dwl 902 Fil- 
bert 
BECKER B. ADOLPH, capitalist, office 418 Kearny, 

dwl 808 California 



Becker Brothers (I>iedrich and Charles H.i, gro- 
ceries and liquors, SE cor Leavenworth and Sut- 
ter, and SE cor Larkin and Turk 

Becker Casper, carriage-trimmer with McArron & 
Sophey, dwl SW cor Buchanan and Ivy Av 

Becker Charles H. f Becker Bros. J, dwl SE cor Turk 
and Larkin 

Becker Charles II., machine operator with Bucking- 
ham <fc Hecht, dwl 528 Linden Av 

Becker Christian, baker, iiNS Folsom 

Becker Diedrich (Becker Bi-os. J , dwl NW cor Cali- 
fornia and Leavenworth 

Beckor Frank, i)orter with Weil, Cahn & Co., dwl 
Pacific nr Jones 

Becker Frederich W., cigars and tobacco, 705 Davis 

Becker Frederick W., market, 1117 Mission, dwl 115 
Leavenworth 

Becker George J., liciuor saloon and restaurant, SW 
cor Fourth and Berry 

Beckor Gustavo, porter, 221 Cal, dwl 414 Tehama 

Becker Hannah iwidowi, dwl 528 Linden Av 

Becker Henry (Becker & Jacoby i , dwl 348 Third 

Becker Hermann, cook, 520 California, dwl 1005 Pow- 
ell 

Becker Jacob, Becker's Exchange, SE cor Bush and 
Cemetery Av 

Becker Jacob, miner, dwl till Pacific 

Becker James, seaman, dwl 252 Spear 

Becker John H. (Kahrs & BJ, dwl SE cor Sutter 
and Taylor 

Becker Joseph, crockery, .SW cor Dupont and Sutter 

Becker Joseph, sawyer with Pacific Box Manufactur- 
ing Co., dwl 17 Hinckley 

Becker Jost, special policeman, dwl Hinckley PI 

Becker J. W., dtcl 313 G ary, rear 

Becker Louis, carpenter with D. A. Macdonald & 
Co., dwl 183 Tehama 

Beckor Louis, baker with William Hessler, dwl SW 
cor Dupont and Pacific 

Becker Louis, shipping clerk S. F. Glass Works, dwl 
12434 Welsh 

BECKER MARTIN H. W., groceries and liquors, 
NE cor Fourth and Jessie 

Becker Michael, bakery, 24i) Sutter 

BECKER M. RUDOLPH E., capitalist, dwl 808 
California 

Beckor Nellie Miss, dressmaker with Lesser Les- 
zynsky, dwl 124 W'elsh 

Becker Nicholas, porter, 408 Clay, dwl NE cor Gough 
and O'Farrell 

BECKER OTTO F., proprietor Prescott House, OaS 
Kearny 

Becker Peter (Eisert & BJ, dwl 210 Stevenson 

Becker Peter, bootmaker with Rhode &. Peck, dwl 
523 Vallojo 

Becker William, groceries and liquors, N W cor Spear 
and Mission 

Becker & Jacoby (Henry Becker and Julius Jaco- 
by J , dry goods, H02 Third 

Becker William, bakery, 1033 Clay 

Beckerman John Capt., dwl 032 Market 

Beckers Dennis, turner, dwl SE cor Miss and Steuart 

Beckers Vinei, turner with Seaborn & Heney, dwl 
NE cor Mission and Steuart 

Becket Solomon, cook, dwl 30 Everett 

Beckett Andrew, stevedore with Mcnzies, Lowry & 
Bingham 

Beckett Henry, expressman, dwl S W cor Battery and 
Vallejo 

Beckhard Frank, tinsmith with John Lacy 

BeckhotI' Fritz, seaman, dwl 30 Pacific 

Beckhusan Henry G., clerk with Christian Meie- 
dierks, N W cor Post and Powell 

Beckler John C. (Baumeister i& CoJ, dwl 252 Te- 
hama 

Beckmann Claus, clerk Meyers' Hotel, 814 Mont 

Beckmann Frederick, cabinetmaker with VV. J. T. 
Palmer & Co., dwl 420 Grove 

Beckmann Henry, groceries and liquors, SW cor 
Capp and Nineteenth 

Beckmann Henry, teamster with U. S. Drayman, 
SW cor Battery and Jackson 

Beckmann Jacob, cabinetmaker with Teubner & 
Hoffman 

Beckmann John, groceries and liquors, NE cor 
Geary and William, dwl 020 Post 

Beckmann John N. (Beckmann <fe BroJ, dwl NE 
Mission and Fourteenth 

Beckmann Peter W. (Beckmann & BroJ, dwl NE 
Mission and Fourteenth 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIKECTOEY, 1874-6, will be published September, 1874. 



Ii. W. KENNEDY, General Insurance Agent, Fire, Marine, and Iiife, 411 California St. 



Beckmann Wilhelm (Beckmann & OUen),di-w\ SE 
cor \'ullejo and Dupont 

Beckmann ts. Bro. (John N. and Peter WJ, gro- 
ceries and liquors, SE cor Miss and Fourteenth 

Beckmann ct Otcen f Wilhelm Beckmann and Peter 
OttenJ, groceries and liqiuors, 6E cor Vallejo and 
iJupont 

Beckwith Elliott S., boatbuildor with Joseph Gil- 
man, dwl 5i2 Commercial 

Beckwith G. and S. M. Co. (Ely, Nevada), W. H. 
Watson secretary, otBee o02 Montgomery 

Beckwith (jeorge, boatbuilder with Samuel L. Beck- 
witii, dwl 106 Hayes 

Beclvwith James, porter with Wells, Fargo & Co., 
dwl ayi Montgomery 

Beckwith John W., policeman City Ilall, dwl 565 Te- 
hama 

BecKwith Mary (widow), dwl 700 Stockton 

Beckwith riamuel L., boatbuilder, Clark bet Drumm 
and i>avis, dwl lUo Hayes 

Becratt Almerin T., blacksmith with J. P. Locke & 
Co., dwl 102 Dora 

Bec?ey Joseph A., clerk, dwl 918 Jackson 

Bedell Charles E., laundryman S. ¥. Laundry, NW 
cor Turk and Fillmore 

Bedell Laniel C, barkeeper with Blackburn & Fal- 
lon, dwl t)8t) Commercial 

Bedell William, engineer Kisdon Iron Works, dwl 
E s Mission Av nr Seventeenth 

Bedford J ohn, mate stm Salinas, W^ash. St. Wharf 

Bee A. W. Mrs., adjuster Coiner's Department U. S. 
Mint, dwl yO!) Market 

Bee Camille T., tailor, 1028 Dupont 

Bee Emile, tailor, dwl 1413 Dupont 

Bee Frank, gunsmith with J. F. Bekeart, -340 Third 

Boe Theodore C, assayer Selby's Smelting Works, 
dwl lOzS Dupont 

Beebe Charles H., shipcarpenter, dwl Mechanics' 
House 

Beebe Joseph J., compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl S5 
Second 

Beebe Kobert, patternmaker Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works, dwl 510 Howard 

Beebe William S., foreman with Cutting & Co., dwl 
y Burcham PI 

Beecher Albert, finisher S. P. Last Factory, dwl NE 
cor Mission and i'ourth 

Beecher Andrew, dwl Columbia Hotel 

Beeching iiobort, genei-al agent California Prison 
Commission, office i>02 Mont, dwl 1010 Taylor 

Beecrolt John T., mechanic, dwl SW cor Utah and 
JNevada 

Beegan John, laborer, dwl 30 (28) Bluxome, rear 

Beegan John, salesman with F'ratinger <k Noll, 10 
Montgomery 

Beegan kato, chambermaid Occidental Hotel 

Beegan Louisa, chambermaid Occid^-ntal Hotel 

Beegoe Christian, coffee and chop house, 70:j Battery, 
dwl .',2-j Broadway 

Beehan J. C., printer, dwl Overland House 

BEEHIVE BLILDINU, NE cor Wash and Dupont 

Beokmau Charles W'., seaman, dwl 125 Sacramento 

Beeler Jacob, teamster, dwl S s Greenwich bet Scott 
and Fierce 

Beoman M. (widow), teacher music, dwl 1003 Pacific 

Beeman William, dwl 7iiO Geary 

Beer Frank, saloon, SE cor Mission and Fourth, dwl 
27.'5 Stevenson 

Beer Gottleib, bookkeeper with Weil & Co., dwl 1024 
Lark in 

Beer Henry, watchman, dwl .334 Third, rear 

Beermann Henry, cooper Pacific Distillery and Re- 
fining Co., dwl cor Filbert and Fillmore 

Boonuaun Louis, cook with H. F. Williams, dwl 
Long Bridge foot of Fourth 

Beers H. M. (Beers <Sc MaynardJ, dwl 319 Bush 

BEEKS JOHN B., dentist, oltiee 230 Kearny, dwl 437 
Tyler 

Beers iV Maynard fH. M. Beers and D. D. May- 
nard' , manufacturers, wholesale and retail boots 
and shoes, 236 Kearny 

Beesey Henry, seaman P. M. S. S. Orizaba 

Beoson F'red'k P., drayman 40U Front, dwl 418 Austin 

Boeson W., drayman 400 Front, dwl N s Austin bet 
Gough and Octavia 

Beevau Isaac, express wagon, NW cor Jackson and 
Dupont, dwl N W cor Taylor and Francisco 

Beez August, baker, dwl Alaska Hotel 

Beez Frederick, boots and shoes, 315 Bush, dwl 708 
Pine 



Beggs Harry, bookkeeper with S. F. Gas Light Co., 

dwl 847 Howard 
Beggs James, engineer with S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 

b47 Howard 
Beggs William, tinsmith with S. F. Gas Light Co., 

dwl 122 William 
Begley John, laborer, dwl 316 Beale. rear 
Begley Michael, milkman, dwl Ws Sherman nr Sev- 
enteenth 
Begoul Adolphus, painter, dwl cor California Av and 

Montcalm, Bernal Heights 
Begreist Godfrey, cabinetmaker with LPlum, Bell & 

Co., dwl Prescott House 
Begue Bertrand, market, 1320 Dupont, dwl 1323 Dup 
Begue Liidau J., dwl 924 Dupont 
Begue Mary Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 1323 Dupont 
Beguelin Henry, machinist with Joshua Hendy, dwl 

4 Russell 
Behan George, jeweler, dwl 907 Bush 
Behan James, housepainter, dwl NW cor Columbia 

and Twenty-third 
Behan James G., iirinter, dwl Overland House 
Beherns V\ illiam, master mariner, dwl E s Pierce bet 

Eddy and Ellis 
Behler William {Charles F. Waffner & Co. J, res 

Lakeville, Sonoma Co. 
Behlow Charles J. (H. Liebes & Co.), dwl 810 Filbert 
Behlow Emil, furcutter, dwl 810 Filbert 
Behlow William, upholsterer with Plum, Bell &Co., 

dwl 416 O'Farrell 
Behman Henry, cooper, dwl N s Filbert bet Fillmore 

and Steiner 
Behn Gotleib, cooper with Lawrence Felvey, dwl 626 

Geary 
Behn Walter B., salesman with Taylor & Bendel, dwl 

032 Broadway 
Behnemann Henry (Behnemann & Co./*, dwl SWcor 

Taylor and O'Farrell 
BEHNEMANN it CO. (Henry Behnemann and 

Martin Joost) , groceries and liquors, S W cor Tay- 
lor and O'i arrell 
Behnke .J ohn, cabinetmaker with Field <fe Frei, dwl 

325 Sixth 
Behr Herman H., physician, office 652 Market, dwl 

NW cor Fifth and Bryant 
Behr Otto, porter with Henry Brickwedel & Co., dwl 

Cook nr I'oint Lobos Av 
Behre Frederick, laborer, dwl SE cor Larkin and 

Turk 
Behre iiobort L., clerk with Doyle & Barber, dwl E s 

Larkin nr Turk 
Behre. See Berr 
Behrondt H. Ai Co. (Michael Long) , trunkmakers, 

TowDsend bet Third and Fourth, salesroom 513 

Market 
Behrendt Herman (H. Behrendt <fc Co.), dwl 1432 

Pino 
Behrendt John, trader, dwl 32 Geary 
Behrens Charles, clerk with Henry Lange, SW cor 

Mission and Tvventy-third 
Behrens Dioderich, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl 

037 Bryant 
Behrens George H. (Chapman & Co.), dwl 333 Sixth 
Behrens Gottlieb, cabinetmaker with Field & Frei, 

dwl Vallejo Place 
Behrens H. (3. F\, physician, ofiice 215 Kearny, res 

Oakland 
BEHiiENS JAMESjimporter wines and commission 

merchant, office 508 Battery, res Saucelito 
Behrens John, bootmaker with Frederick Leez, dwl 

42 Everett 
Behrens John, seaman, dwl 9 Washington 
Behrens John F. ( Bohling <& B.) ,6.\s\ NE cor Twen- 
ty-fourth and Potroro Av 
Behrens John J. (Behrens <& Kaiifmann) , dwl NE 

cor Clara and i ifth 
Behrens Joseph, brewer, dwl 1609 Mason 
Behrens Richard, carpenter, dwl 15 Harlan PI 
Behrens \V illiam, third officer P. M. S. S. Mohongo 
Behrens & Kaufmann John J. Behrens and Freder- 
ick Kauf^nann} , groceries and liquors, iSE cor 

Clara and Fifth 
Behrens. <S'ee Berrins 
Bchri Frederick, foreman with E. Guittard & Co., 

dwl SE cor Larkin and Turk 
Bohring Louisa (widowj, midwife, 107 Welsh 
Behringer Christopher, trunkmakor with D. S. Mar- 
tin ii, Co., dwl SW cor Eighteenth and Mission 
Behrmann Frantz E., carpenter, dwl 115 Morton 
Behrmann Fredrick, German Bakery, 1218 Powell 



PAKNS'WORTH & CLABK, Fire Ins. Agts, 230 CaL St., represent $4,000,000 of CapitaL 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK: & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 



Behrmann Henry J., cabinetmaker, dwl 824 Har 
Behrmann Louis, barkeeper with Ueo. C. W. Heuer, 

SE cor Stouart and Howard * 
Behrmann Mary Mrs., uiidwii'o, dwl 824 Harrison 
Behrns Charles, clerk with B. Nathan & Co., dwl 8 

U'i'"arrell 
Behrns Henry, seaman with Jerome B. Piper, Com- 
mercial St. AVhart 
Beicke Louis, blacksmith, dwl 344 Shipley bet Sev- 
enth and Eighth 
Beighle Ueorgo W'., salesman with Schlueter & Vol- 

l)erg, dwl 658 iS^atoma 
Beilles John, hairdresser vvith Frank Lacua 
Beimmers Edward, tanner with Park & Kennedy, 

dwl W s San Jose Koad nr Six-mile House 
Bein William, machinist, dwl 12 Blusome, rear 
Beirne Michael, wiredrawer with Pacific Wire Man- 
ufacturing Co., dwl 8 King 
BEIKXE PATRICK, proprietor Empire Hotel, 311 

and oi:j Pacific 
Beisel Jacob, proprietor Potrero Tannery, cor Missis- 
sippi and Santa Clara, dwl Missouri nr Mari- 
posa 
Beiso Antonia, stockbroker, dwl 7.54 Washington 
Beitler Frank, paperhanger, dwl 216 Stockton 
Beitling Phillippine (widow), dwl 417 Grove 
Beizel D. C, i)ainter, dwl 228 Bush 
Beizel Frederick, painter, dwl 228 Bush 
Bekeart Julius F., hardware and gunsmith, 346 Third 
Bolando P. & Co. f Joseph DapelloJ, wood and coal, 

1210 Powell 
Belando Peter {P. Belando & Co.), dwl 1210 Powell 
Belasco Abraham, trader, dwl 174 Clara 
Belau Hugo, clerk oOi Montgomery, dwl 1340 Kearny 
Belau Otto, clerk with Greenebaum & Co., dwl 1317 

Kearny 
Belaux Louis, Louis, foreman with Prosper May, dwl 

WJ Pine 
Belbeck Henry T., carpenter with John Cook, dwl 

VV hat Cheer House 
Belcher Frederick P., drayman, SW cor Market and 

!• remont, res Oakland 
Belcher Phillip, jobber, dwl NW cor Shasta and 

Michigan 
Belcher itubert H., drayman with Frederick P. Bel- 
cher, dwl 1015 Union 
BELCHEK S. M. CO. (Gold Hill, Nov.), H. C. Kibbe 

Secretary, office 419 California 
Belcour Jules, chancellor of consulat General de 

France, dwl ill Franklin 
BELDEN BLOCK, SW cor Montgomery and Bush 
Beldeu Edwin S., otficial reporter Fourth District 

Court, office tjo7 Kearny, res Oakland 
Belden F. C. (F. C. Beldeu A Co.;, divl 514 Bush 
Belden F. C. k Co. ( George Shonberg ) , metallurgists, 

215 Fit St 
Belden George H., insurance, dwl 607 Sutter 
Belden Henry K. (Mayer & B.J , dwl 607 Sutter 
Betden Joseph ^\^. bookkeeper Odd Fellows' Savings 

Bank, dwl 1020 Geary 
Belden J osiah, capitalist, oflSce 523 Mont, res San Jos6 
Beldeu M. S., dwl 417 Post 
Belden Tabitha (widow), dwl 1513 Stockton 
Belduke Emma, saleswoman 7y0 Market, dwl 9 Fourth 
Bekluke Frances xMrs., furnished rooms, 783 Market 
Belduke Joseph, carriagemaker, 110 Oregon, dwl 783 

Market 
Bele ttenna Robert, carpenter, dwl 613 Mission 
Belender Charles, cabinetmaker, dwl SW cor Bu- 
chanan and Oak 
BELGIUM CONSUL, Emil Grisar, office NW cor 

Sansom and Broadway 
Belgrave Richard B., receiver N. B. and Mission R. 

R., dwl 40i Taylor 
Belhomme Francis, copper and tinsmith, 619 Vallejo 
Belin Anna, dressmaker, 810 Washington 
Bolinge F. A. A., physician, dwl 938 Mission 
Beli/. Leonardo, tinsmith with Locke & Montague, 

dwl 9 Union PI 
Belknap David T. (Winans ct B.) , attorney at law, 

office 604 Merchant, dwl 504 Powell 
BELL ALEXANDER D., editor Evening Post, dwl 

1102 Taylor 
Bell Amory F., clerk with John C. Bell, dwl 2309 Sac- 
ramento 
Bell Charl.'s, laborer, dwl 116 Pacific 
Bell Charles, steward Hose No. 1, S. F. F. D., dwl 

112 J ackson 
Bell Charles E., shipwright Shipwrights' Journey- 
men Association, 71 i^e!\v Montgomery 



Bell Charles H., hostler with Thomas Fitzgerald, dwl 

3 Lafayette 
Bell Charles Henry, porter with Smithson & Ward, 

dwl 315 Fifth 
Bell Conrad, laborer, dwl 5 Card Alley 
Bell Daniel P., entry clerk with Tobin, Davisson & 

Co., dwl SE cor Fulton and Octuvia 
Bell David, machinist, dwl St. Nicholas Hotel 
Bell David, tailor with F. Wilton, dwl 509 Bush 
Bell David B., fishmonger Grand Central Market, 

dwl 502 Stevenson 
Bell Ellen (widow, colored), ladies' nurse, dwl 1011 

Pacific 
Bell Emma D. Miss, dwl 451 Tehama 
Bell Frank, student Heald's Business College 
Bell F. Vinton, clerk with W. H. L. Barnes, dwl 19 

Ellis 
Bell G. B., hostler with John B. Carabbio, dwl 1121 

Mission 
Bell George, seaman stm Pelican, Oregon S. S. Co. 
Bell George H. (Bell & Co.), dwl 639 Kearny 
Bell George H. Jr., clerk with Boll & Co., dwl 639 

Kearny 
Bell George R., scenic artist California Theater, dwl 

5 s Pleasant nr Jones 

Bell George VV^ (colored), clerk, dwl 1011 Pacific 
Bell Henry, gardener, dwl 3 Lafayette 
Bell Henry, gasfitter, dwl 546 Seventh 
Bell Henry, laborer IJ. S. Mint, dwl 524 Turk 
Bell Henry S., waiter Occidental Hotel, dwl 565 Stev- 
enson 
Bell H. H. (widow), dressmaker, dwl 419 Eddy 
Bell Jacob, fireman P. M. S. S. Nevada 
Bell James, dry goods, 932 Market, dwl 747 Howard 
Bell James, tailor with Holland Bros., dwl 42o Bush 
Bell James H. (colored), hairdresser, 829 Folsom 
Bell Jennie N. Miss, teacher Eighth St. Primary 

School, dwl cor Guerrero and Seventeenth 
Bell John (Plum, B. <& Co.), dwl Occidental Hotel 
Bell John, shipjoiner Shipjoiners' Jour. Assn, 139 

Post 
Bell John B., hairdresser with George Held, dwl 171 

Minna 
Bell J ohn C, carpets, upholstery, and furniture ware- 
rooms, 524 Market and 21 Sutter, dwl 502 Green- 
wich 
Bell John C. Jr., salesman with John C. Bell, dwl 

502 Greenwich 
Bell John D., conductor N. B. and Mission R. R., 

dwl 325 Tehama 
Bell John P., attorney at law, office 21 Court Block, 

636 Clay, dwl 138 Seventh 
Bell John W., clerk Forwarding Dopt. Wells, Fargo 

6 Co., dwl 5US Third 

Bell Joseph F., bootmaker, dwl 16 Ohio 

Bell L. (J. M. Keeler & Co.), res New York 

Boll Maria \V (widow), dwl 514 Stockton 

Bell Otto, motalroofer with Henry G. Fiske, dwl 305 

Mason 
Bell Peter, housepainter, dwl 649 Minna 
Bell Peter, tinsmith with Code, Elfelt & Co., dwl SE 

cor Fulton and Octavia 
BELL PHILIP A. (colored), editor and proprietor 

Elevator, office and dwl 616 Battery 
Bell Robert, laundrvman Occidental Laundry 
Bell Robert, upholsterer, 1810 Powell 
Bell Robert, U. S. district officer Custom House, dwl 

1246 Howard 
Bell Samuel, shipcarpenter, dwl Greenwich bet Polk 

and Van Ness Av 
Bell Samuel L., machinohand with W. B. Bradbury, 

dwl 10 Tehama 
BELL THOMAS, commission merchant (and Barron 

& r'o.y,dwl 1107 Bush 
Bell Thomas, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Bell Thomas H., captain, dwl 607 Powell 
Bell Thomas J., porter with M. Heller & Bros., dwl 

10 Garden 
Bell Thomas S., stevedore with Whitney & Freese, 

dwl SW cor Gilbert and Bryant 
Boll William, dwl 423 Bush 
Bell William, barkeeper with Owen Gaffney, dwl 1002 

Taylor 
Bell William, compositor Morning Call, dwl N s 

Green bet Leavenworth and Hyde 
Bell William, engineer Union Iron Works, dwl E s 

Montgomery Det Filbert and Greenwich 
Bell AVilliam, heater, dwl Sierra nr Michigan 
Bell William, shipcarpenter, dwl Greenwich bet Polk 

and Van Ness Av 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOBY circulates throughout the Pacific Coast. 



KENNEDY'S INSUBANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



Bell William, shipcarpenter, dwl cor Minnesota and 

Butto 
Bell William, stevedore, dwl 25 Welsh 
Bell \Villiam, stonecutter JSfew City Hall, dwl cor 

Baker and Bash 
Bell \\ illiam H., dwl 514 Valencia 
Bell William H., stationery and toys, 4 Sixth, dwl 519 

Stevenson 
Bell William M., salesman with Cutting & Co., dwl 

V6l jN atoma 
BELL k CU. (Oeorge H. Bell), books, stationery, 

and periodicals, ^li'd Kearny 
BELLA UiN-LUiM THEATEti, Samuel Tetlow pro- 
prietor, M'-i and 81)5 Kearny 
Bellanger Oamille, real estate, dwl Lafayette Hotel 
Bellay i^'rancis, artist with Benjamin E. Howland, 

dwl liiUo I'owoU 
Belle Allen M. Co. (Sierra Co., Cal.), oflfice 30G Mont 
Bellemere Adolph (Levy S: B.J, dw) 111 Powell 
Bellemere Anna B. (widow), housekeeper, dwl 1103 

Mission 
Bellemere Augustus (Frontier & BJ, dwl 226 Sutter 
Bellenger E., hreman stm Sacramento 
Bellerly John, porter F. M. S. S. Colima 
Bellermanu Emil, bookkeeper Bavaria Brewery, res 

Oakland 
Belleville Juliet, papercarrier, dwl 720 Vallejo 
Bellevue xMining Co. (Placer Co., Californiaj, office 

4o» Calitoruia 
Bellew Henry J., tanner with Augustus Onen, dwl S 

s Twonty-niiith nr Old San J o»e Koad 
Bellew James, upholsterer with Goodwin & Co., dwl 

17 Ohio 
Bellew John, dwl 409 Sansom 
Bellew John, boarding, IS Ohio 
Bellew Thomas, porter with J. W. Davidson & Co., 

dwl 2'.ij Minna 
Bellew Vincent, peddler, dwl 642 Jessie, rear 
Bellingall Peter Vv., deputy surveyor Port of San 

i<rancisco, res Oakland 
BELLlAUliAM BAY COAL CO., P. B. Cornwall 

president, E s Spear bet Eolsom and Harrison 
Bellingham iiobert, shoemaker with M. Uuerin, dwl 

ll:iS (llSSj Broadway 
Bellire Josephine O. (widow), dwl 22 Stockton PI 
Bellis A. 11., bookkeeper, dwloJl Montgomery 
Bellislo Erancis >J., master carbuilder tt. P. H. B., dwl 

Vv' s Bryant bet I'wenty-lourth and Twenty-tifth 

Belli/ia , musician, dwl \.V£i Hupont 

Bellman Oliver P., painter, dwl I02o Kearny 
Bellman Vincent, ropemaker S. E. Cordage Manu- 
factory, dwl I'ennessee nr Sierra 
Bellmar Erederick, teamster, dwl 723 Natoma, rear 
Bellmor J. 11. C, restaurant, SW cor Eirst and Stev 
Bello Bruno, waitr stm Oridamme O. S. S. Co. 
Belloc Benjamin (Belloc F re res J , res Paris 
BELLOC r itriiPiES (Benjaiaia and Irene Belloc, 

Henry Barroilhet, and Ouslave DussolJ,ha.nk- 

ers and agents (General Trans-Atlantic Co. (Paris, 

7o Kuo du Courcelles), office 524 Montgomery 
Belloc llippolyte, clerk with Belloc i'rores, dwl 13 

Stockton 
Belloc Irene (Belloc FreresJ, res Paris 
Bellows Edward St. John, bookkeeper U. S. Assist- 
ant Treasurer's Office, dwl 10 i>e Boom 
Bellsted J ohn, assistant engineer Cal. Sugar Refinery, 

dwl \V" s Hecatur bet lirannan and iiryant 
Bellville Eli, broommaKcr with Gillespie it Zan, dwl 

45u JS' atoma 
Belmont Ida, dwl 15 Second 
Belmont Mining Co. (i>ly6 Co., Nov.), 0. H. Bogart 

secretary, office 41134 California 
Belru Michael, tailor, dwl 1317 Kearny 
Belson P. E. 
Belt Alfred M., clerk with Charles Clayton & Co., 

dwl 1008 Bush 
Belt Thomas VV., bookkeeper Brooklyn Hotel 
Belton Emile, cook Maison i)oree,dwl 117 Natoma 
Beltun Phillip M., clerk S. E. and Pacific Sugar Co., 

dwl cor bighth aud Shipley 
Belton \V illiam, canvasser Howe Machine Co., dwl 

12J Third 
Belucy \V illiam, harnessoleaner with Charles Dryer, 

dwl 624 I'acific 
Bemis Charles C, U. S. supervising inspector steam 

vessels, office 11 U. S. Court Building, dwl 44!J 

Bryant 
Bemus James, magazinekeeper California Powder 

Works, dwl Harbor View 
Benam John, oysterman, dwl 506 Market 



Benard Auguste F., liquor saloon, NE cor Fifth and 
Howard 

Benard John, dwl 15 Oak Grove Av, rear 

Benat Joseph, boxmaker with Pacific Box Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 111 Virginia 

Benavides All redo, tinsmith with Locke & Montague, 
dwl 1516 Powell, rear 

Benavides Antonio, cigarmaker,dwl 1516 Powell, rear 

Benavides Joseijh, tinsmith with Locke &Mo;jtaguo, 
dwl lolo Poivell, rear 

BEXCHLEY LEONIDAS B. ( Linforth, Kellogg & 
CoJ , and manager Pacific h.olling Mill Co., 
otiice 3 Front, dwl lOliJ California 

Bendegard George M., master mariner, dwl SE cor 
Mission and Steuart 

Bendel Hermann (Taylor & BJ, res Germany 

Bender Charles, importer and dealer leather and 
shoefindings, li;2 Sutter 

Bender Charles, pantryman International Hotel 

Bender Edward, minor, dwl 611 Pacific 

Bender Eli/.abeth (widow), dwl 755 Mission, rear 

Bender llattie Miss, seamstress with JohnD. Barr, 
dwl 40 Clarence PI 

Bender Jacob A., bricklayer New City Hall, dwl 1215 
Clay 

Bender Josiah P., bricklayer, dwl 40 Clarence PI 

Bender Thomas L., bricklayer New City Hall, dwl 
I%15 Clay 

Bender William, waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel 

Bender William A., clerk 2o0 Cal, dwl 1215 Clay 

Bendit Abraham, hairdresser with Abe Schwetzer, 
dwl jS s Sixtoanth betAIission and Valencia 

Bendit Bennie hairdresser with Edward W'redo, dwl 
1216 Pacific 

Bendit Herman IL, salesman with Samuel Bendit, 
dwl 747 Market 

Bendit Isaac, peddler, dwl 160 Shipley 

Bendit Morris, express wagon, NE cor Montgomery 
and California, dwl S\V cor Post and Gough 

Bendit Samuel, furniture and bedding, 747 Market 

BEiNDT WILLIAM, proprietor Minerva House, 123 
Jackson 

Benecke Bros. ( Diederieh and John), groceries and 
liquors, o'M Broadway 

Benecke Diederieh ( Benecke Bros.) , diwl^ylQ Bdwy 

Benecke John (Benecke Bros. J , dwl 520 Broadway 

Benedict Charles, musician, dwl ul3 Mission 

Benedict Charles V., clerk 71iJ Market, dwl 737 How 

Benedict Courtland S. (Benedict tt Co./, dwl W s 
Valencia bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 

Benedict E. L., manager Weaver k Taylor, dwl Nu- 
cleus House 

Benedict Jacob, refiner S. E. Assaying and Refining 
Works, dwl W s Castro bet Fifteenth aud Six- 
teenth 

Benedict Sophia Miss, artist, dwl 725 California 

Benedict k Co. (C. IS. Benedict/ , gents' furnishing 
goods, 3 Second 

Bonieldt Conrad, seaman, dwl 9 Crook 

Benham Calhoun, attorney at law, office 1 Montgom- 
ery Block, dwl 420 First 

Benham James, broker, dwl 26 Turk 

Benham John A., mining operator, office 24 Mer- 
chants' Exchange, dwl 26 Turk 

Benham Patrick, hostler Tattersall's Livery Stable, 
524 Third, dwl 113 Perry 

Benhan Henry, hostler with Roe Allen, dwl 164 Jes-( 
sio 

Benhayon Jacob, salesman with Livingston k Co. 

Benheim Josio Miss, milliner, dwl 744 Eolsom 

Benheim Rosa Miss, dvvT744 lolsom 

BEN ICl A CEMliAT CO., (Solano Co.), office 534 Cal- 
ifornia 

Boning George F., liquor dealer, dwl 1417 Ma^on 

Benites J ulius, bootblack with Adolph Strecker, dwl 
16 St. Charles 

Benitz, W. 0., student Heald's Business College 

Benjamin Abraham F., stockbroker, office loO Cali- 
fornia, dwl l.)55 Post 

Benjamin Alexander, carriagetrimmer with Henry 
M. Black, dwl 1355 Post 

Benjamin Alfred it., bookkeeper, dwl 737 Harrison 

Benjamin Charles, barber stm Arizona, dwl lOU Sil- 
ver 
• Kienjamin Charles, jarinter with Swett & Bumm -»- 

Benjamin Charles E., bookkeeper with Gile, Hayes 
<t Co.,dwl21yShotwell 

Benjamin Edward C, clerk, dwl 215 Kearny 

Benjamin Fannie Miss, teacher Pine and Larkin St. 
Primary School, dwl 32 J essie 



BPBINGFIELD INS. CO. paid Losses in full at Troy, Portland, Chicago, and Boston. 



C.'P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 



Benjamin G. B., broommaker Cal. Broom Factory, 

dwl 117 Dramm 
Benjamin II. A., real estate, divl Russ House 
Benjamin Isidor, waiter S2tj Market, dwl cor Vallejo 

and Battery 
Benjamin Jacob, ex-public administrator, office 430 

Cali.oinia, dwl 13.55 Post 
Benjamin M. O. Mrs., dwl 7-j7 Harrison 
Begjamin Moses U. fSloss & B.J, dwl 1355 Post 
Benjamin U. C, storekeeper P. M. S. S. Colorado 
Benjamin Thadeus S., clerk with Jacob Benjamin, 

dwl l-i5.) Post 
Berijamin William K., produce dealer, dwl 32 Jessie 
Benkelmann Adam, liquor saloon, cor Railroad Av 

and Ninth, dwl N s Fii'teenth bet P and Q, tjouth 

S. F. 
Benken .John, porter 411 AVashington, dwl SW cor 

Broadivay and Kearny 
Benn George, laborer with James Dunn, dwl 121 

Bernard 
Benn .J ames, driver Hibernia Brewery, dwl 1131} Fol 
Benn John B. physician, office 23 Kearny, dwl lOOy 

Howard 
Benn 'ihomas, maltster Hibernia Brewery, dwl 209 

Eighth 
Benneman John, conductor, dwl 24*3 Stevenson 
Benuor !• elix, cigarmaker, dwl ij Jasper PI, rear 
Benner Frt-dericK M., melter Melter and iieliner's 

Department U. S. Mint, res Oakland 
Benner (>eorge L., carpenter with ^Villcutt & Rowe, 

dwl -"24 Beale 
Bennet Charles A., druggist with Henry W. Bennet, 

dwl luls Washington 
BENNET lIEXllY W., druggist, 21 Third 
Bennett Albert, painter with J. E. W. Coleman, dwl 

91)2 Folsom 
Bennett AltVcd /'Bennett & Co. J, dwl 074 Folsom 
Bennett Alfred, carpenter with D. A. Macdonald & 

Co., r<'s (lakland 
Bennett Anthony J., carriage painter with Mills & 

Evans, dwl 510>^ Mission 
Bennett Brothers /'George and John R.J, butter, 

chouse, and eggs, 35 and 3o Calitornia Market 
Bennett Charles D., teacher Heald's College, dwl 127 

Kearny 
Bennett E. D., clerk with Charles Mayer, dwl Folsom 

nr Twenticith 
Bennett Edward, gasfitter, dwl (53ij Commercial 
Bennett Edwin ri., foreman with McCord & Malone, 

dwl lb riutter 
Bennett E. S., driver Central R. R., dwl Bryant bet 

Seventh and Eighth 
Bennett J: rederick, liciuor saloon, 230 Brannan 
Bennett Frederick, Kiggers' and .S. U. Assn, 429 Pac 
Bennett George f Bennett Bros. J , dwl 231 Stevenson 
Bennett George, bootblack with Herman Hauser, dwl 

2-5 Morton 
Bennett George, carpenter, dwl 903 Pacific, rear 
Bennett G -orge, clerk, dwl H~i)}'i Mission 
Bennett George, laborer U. S. Mint, dwl 21 Sixth 
Bennett George, laborer with F. D. Conro & Son, dwl 

717 Battery 
Bennett (ieorge, painter with Donovan & Hayes, dwl 

NE cor Clay and Davis 
Bennett George, seaman, dwl 9 Washington 
Bennett George, waiter, dwl 524 Howard 
Bennett George W., clerk with Levi, Strauss & Co., 

dwl 1132 Market 
Bennett George W., shoecutter with Orin Jones, dwl 

•52 J Jessie 
Bennett G. L., news agent, dwl 013% Stockton 
Bennett Henrietta, teacher music, dwl 452 Sixth 
Bennett Henry f Bennett cfc Co. J, dwl 452 Sixth 
Bennett Henry, janitor Industrial School 
Bennett Henry C., dwl llUi Mason 
Bennett Henry M., operator Atlantic and Pacific Tele- 
graph Co., dwl 3;J1 Montgomery 
Bennett tierbert W., teacher music, dwl 1215 Polk 
Bennett James, carpenter, dwl 5i33 Mission 
Bennett James C. (Bennett it Co./', dwl E s Iowa bet 

Mariposa and Solano 
Bennett John K. (Bennett Bros.), dwl 231 Stevenson 
Bennett Joseph, cook, dwl 524 Mission 
Bennett M., carpenter, dwl 245 Second 
Bennett Mary ( widowj,dwl W s Folsom nr Twentieth 
Bennett Mary (widow), laundry, 5.55 Bryant 
Bennett Mary E. Miss, teacher Valencia St. Gram- 
mar School, dwl Folsom nr Nineteenth 
Bennett Michael, bootmaker, 520 Bat, res Oakland 
Bennett Morri-, laborer, dwl lOOj Bush 



BENNETT NATHANIEL, attorney at law, office 

rooms 8 and !•, tj05 Clay, dwl S31 Howard 
Bennett Peter, fishdealer, dwl 428 Green 
Bennett Robert U. (Bennett tt Page J , res Oakland 
Bennett .Samuel, real estate, dwl 2017 Mission 
Bennett Samuel, state-prison guard, dwl 133o Pacific 
Bennett Samuel Jr., bookkeeper with Getz Brothers 

<k Co., dwl 2017 Mission 
Bennett Sophia S. (widow), dwl 515 Stockton 
Bennett S. S., bookkeeper with Roland G. Brown, 

dwl 19 Ellis 
Bennett Susan (widow), dressmaker, dwl NW cor 

Mission and Ninth 
Bennett Thomas, painter, dwl 303 Davis 
Bennett Thomas, physician, office 17 Post, dwl 716 

Pino 
Bennett William (Fragley & B.J, dwl4(>234 Minna 
Bennett William, bookkeeper, dwl 51ti Filbert 
Bennett William,'lirst assistant engineer P. M. S. S. 

Japan 
Bennett William, physician, dwl 452 Sixth 
Bennett William, plumber and gas titter, dwl 1015 

Clay 
Bennett William, poolkeeper Lick House Billiard 

Saloon, dwl 'ilSJ^ Stockton 
Bennett di Co. (Henry and Alfred Bennett) , painters 

and whiteners, 608 Market 
BENNETT i CO. (James C. Bennett/', proprietors 

Pacific Glass Works, cor Iowa and Mariposa, 

office 514 Washington 
BENNETT & I'AGE f Robert H. Bennett, Henry 

Pafje,and IFt7/redPa£^e;, commission merchants, 

mi Davis 
Bennick Frederick, salesman 730 Market, dwl 517 

Mission 
Benoit Amedee J., compositor with Francis & Val- 
entine, dwl 420 .Jackson 
Benrimo Joseph, stockbroker, dwl 015 Kearny 
Bense \Villiam, cook 610 California, dwl 103 First 
Bensen Conrad, groceries and liquors, SW cor Polk 

and Broadway 
Bensen Henry ( H. Bremei- <£■ Co.J, dwl 770 Bryant 
Bensinger Daniel, bakery, SE cor Twentieth and 

Howard 
BENSLEY JOHN (Lin/orth, Kellogg <t Co.J, and 

president Pacific Oil and Lead \\ orks Co., office 

3 Front, dwl7oS Post 
Benson Annie E. Miss, teacher Fourth St. Primary 

School, dwl d22 Sixth 
Benson Andrew, longshoreman, dwl W s Sansom bet 

Filbert and Greenwich, rear 
Benson Benjamin F. M., bookkeeper California 

Mills, dwl 700 California 
Benson Edward, laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

dwl Harrison bet Seventh and Eighth 
Benson Elizabeth J. (widow), ladies' nurse, dwl 372 

Clementina 
Benson Franklin R., clerk Odd Fellow's Savings 

Bank, dwl (322 Sixth 
Benson George, timber agent with C. P. R. R., dwl 28 

Jessie 
Benson Henry, seaman, dwl .32 Steuart 
Benson Henry C. Kev., editor California Christian 

Advocate, olhca 711 Mission, res Santa Clara 
BENSON JAMES, secretary Odd Fellows' Savings 

Bank, office 325 Montgomery, dwl o20 Sixth 
Benson James A., teamster, cor Clay and Drumm, 

dwl 1 Dodge 
Benson John, real estate, office 116 Leidosdorff, dwl 

803 Stockton 
Benson Lucy (widow), dwl 411 Powell 
Benson Simon J., captain schooner Undaunted, office 

305 East, dwl 14 Vincent 
Benson Thomas A., porter with Banner Bros., dwl 

27 Hunt 
Benson William, bootmaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 34'J Grove 
Benson William, seaman, dwl 10c3 Jackson 
Bent Edward F., clerk with I. Friedlander, dwl 1014 

Bush 
Bent John T., salesman with F. De Long, dwl 51.5 Fol- 
som 
Bent William, waiter P. M. S. S. Montana, dwl 547 

First 
Benter Charles, watchman, dwl 1 Chestnut Alley 
Bentfield Conrad B., captain schr Prosperous, dwl 9 

Crook 
Bentham Ann (widow), dwl Mariposa nr Nebraska 
Bentham Henry, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 

76i> Harrison 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 1874-6, H. G. Langley, Pub'r, S. F. Price $5 

7 



Ii. W. KEUJf EDY. General Insurance Agent. Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 CaUfornia St. 



& 
m 
O 

1^ 



BEN 



98 



BER 



Bentiek Henrj', fireman California Sugar Kefinery, 

dwl Eighth and Brannan 
Bentley Calvin, framemaker with Bernard McQuil- 
lan, dwl of) Everett 
Bentley Edwin, professor anatomy and pathology, 
Jledical Uept. University College, office Army 
Head 1 natters, 105 Stockton 
Bentley Horace (colored), porter Post-office, dwl 1006 

Jackson 
Bentley James, bootmaker with George Rick 
Bentley »> illiam R., with New York Life Insurance 
; Co., 42'j ^Montgomery, dwl 201 Turk 
[ Benton Byron \X., cabinetmaker with Christian 
I behreiber & Co., dwl Columbia Hotel, 741 Market 
I Benton Charles, salesman with T. J. Bass & Co 
I -D ^"■^ Howard bet Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth ' 
j -denton Elizabeth Miss, music teacher, dwl 14 La- 
! fayette 

' Benton H., dwl Columbia Hotel 
Benton Lizzie Miss, dressmaking, dwl 616 Grove 
I Bentz Jacob, dwl 2215 Fillmore 
Bentzen Christian, sailmaker, dwl 9 Washington 
Lontzen Edward, laborer, dwl S s Boyd near Chesley 
Benz John, laborer National Flour Mills 
Benz John C, laborer with John H. Kessing, dwl 

'•M Broadway 
Benzing Carl, carrier Evening Post and California 

l»emokrat, dwl 80 j Greenwich 
Benzon Albert J., bookkeeper with J. Everding & 
Co., dwl Preseott House 

cao^'Ti*" I'jederick (Hermann, Harms d- CoJ, dwl 
62-3 Pacific 
Bepler Alexander, laborer with Bryant & Strahan, 

dwl o48 .^hipley 
Beppler John, cartman, dwl 1528 Dupont 
Beraldo Frank, fisherman, dwl 14 Washington 
beran Emanuel, shoemaker, dwl 1608 Powell 
iierard Achille, laundryman with Jules Bouvet. res 

Contra Costa 
Berard Edward, compositor Courrier de San Fran- 

Cisco, dwl 712 Vallejo 
Beraud Fortune, dwl 5 Miller PI 
Beraut Andrew, baker, dwl Palm House 
Beraut Felix, baker, dwl Palm House 
Berbench August (Geary & BJ, dwl Bootz Hotel 
BfiTboTi^y,icho\&i, clerk with Domingo Mersich,dwl 

;Uo Clay 
^^""f P-'.o^T?°*PJ'^'^®r with S. W. Rosenstock k Co., 

dwl (43 Paeinc 
Berel Jacob, secondhand clothing, 743 Pacific 
lieremans John B., express wagon, S W cor Front and 

Jackson, dwl 2>1 Perry 
Beresford John, steward Russ House 
lieretta John machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 13 

oherwood PI 
Beretta William, collector, dwl 414 Green 
iierg Adolph, receiving clerk Custom House, dwl 14 

Jtlaigtit 
Berg A. T., painter, dwl 21 Stevenson, rear 
Berg August, clerk, dwl ;!1 Eleventh 
iierg Carl, physician and surgeon, office and dwl 904 

Kearny 
Berg Charles, blacksmith with J. Herman Schintz, 

ciwi bsi Jjush 
Berg Christian, seaman with Jerome B. Piper Com- 
mercial St. Wharf 

Padfi^" ®*®^®*^'''''' Riggers' and S. U. Assn, 429 
Berg Ferdinande (Mayer & BJ, dwl 4-56 Clementina 
Berg George, barkeeper with Henry Reiter, dwl 518 

.Stockton 
Berg John, seaman, dwl 822 Bush 
Berg John A clerk with Eric J. Swordstream, dwl 

-> *V cor Fourth and Harrison 
Berg Julius, bootmaker with John Utschig, dwl 16 

Jonn 
^'''■g-^alph, hairdresser with George Nicholas, dwl 
oi Sacramento 

ll\ •)! Ekvent\" ^^^'' ^'^^^'^ ^""^'^'■^ ^''^''°^' 
Berge Erick 0., groceries and liquors, NE cor Green 
and Calhoun, dwl 2 Calhoun 

teeSth '^^''^'"' ^'''^°''^''' ^"^^ E s Second Av nr Six- 
Bergen Charles, gunsmith, dwl 34 Ellis 

f 'fo?at^;v\^j.^riSnJ°''^ ^'''^^^°' ^^'''''' 
Bergen John, laborer C. P. R. R Depot 



^^''§^1 p''"'?f'?' soapboiler with Standard Soap Co.. 

teenth ^ ^^^'^"^ ^^®°^ ^'^^ Fourteenth and llfl 

Bergen. See Bergin 

Bergenduhn Daniel, seaman, dwl 9 AVashington 

?it°i r.-^. r^'^rp^"''-' ''■^^'*^' ^^artin's Restaurant, 
dwl 621 California ' 

Berger Gabriel, collector, office 402 Montgomery, and 
lllIFra^nkr'''^''^ Savings and Loan Society, dwl 

Berger George, clerk with Edward Cohn & Co., dwl 
614 Lombard 

Berger Julius (Edward Cohn & CoJ, dwl 225 Mont- 
gomery iivj*j<- 

Rprf.r \^^v^^ ^■,y^}^'\^ Geo. Thistleton, dwl 54 First 
Berger M ilham, driver, dwl 131 Second 

TJ?i9l",''li"*^?^'"'- t^'^^li^' Jl^^rench and music, 
dwl 1211 Powell 

Bergerot John, French private school, 1211 Powell 

iiergorot J ohn A., gardener, dwl cor Sixteenth and 

Rhode Island 
i?.''s??TA'^^'®°o' gardener Mountain Lake 
BERGE.>5 P. k CO. (A.Drayeur and D. Cazeaux), 

proprietors Miners' Restaurant, 529 and 531 Com- 

mercial and 769 Market 

Po^st^^*''^ Bernard (P. Berges & CoJ, dwl 411 
Berges Pierre, farmer. Mountain Lake 
Bergevin Peter, laborer, dwl 274 Brannan 
IJergez Jean, waiter with Pourcho & Witmann, dwl 

b21 Union , '^ • •■ 

BERGGREN AUGUSTUS, money broker, office 336 

Montgomery, dwl 1111 Stockton 
Rerghauer Hermann, steward Preseott House. 933 

Kearny ' 

Bergh^auser^ Frederick, clerk with Frederick Iken. 

Berghauser John, capitalist, dwl 1600 Taylor 
Berghauser Margaret Mrs., dwl 1709 Hvde 
Berghofer Conrad, butcher, dwl 542 Folsom 
Bergholte \\ illiam, tailor, 5 Morton 
Bergin J ames J., merchant, dwl 1528 Powell 
Bergin Michael, attorney at law, office 79 xMontgom- 

ery Block, dwl 743 Pine ""^som 

Bergin Patrick, waiter City Restaurant, dwl 1140 

Mission 
Bergin Thomas L ^Jic^^/w^ers & BJ, attorney at 

law, office o28 Calitornia, dwl Russ House 
Bergin. See Bergen » 

Bergini Casimire, helper with Guiseppe Masone 
Rerglund Hans, carpenter with Oregon S. S. Co., dwl 

38 Perry 

•^^^Sl^J'J^T.^^^'^,', shoemaker with Nolan Bros., dwl 
2i2 O'iarrell 

Bergmann Abraham, confectioner, dwl 1107 Pacific 
iiergmann Alexander, captain schooner Lolita, dwl 

Coso House 
Bergmann Gustav, seaman, dwl 132 Steuart 
Bergmann Jacob (Frankenihal & CoJ, dwl 318 Sut- 

Bergmann Jacob, milkranch, dwl NE cor Pierce and 

r iibert 
Bergmann Samuel, butcher with J. T. Wilson k Co.. 

awl .»o Kearny 
Bergner Alfred J„ sign and ornamental painter, 230 

jMission, dwl 232 Fremont 
Bergner Charles F., clerk, dwl 228 Mission 
Bergner Louis, dwl 421 Dupont 
Bergo^ld Charles V. (Bergold & Springer), dwl 608 

BergoldA Springer (Charles V. Bergold and Sam- 
uel h. fI»-^rlger), proprietors Philadelphia Res- 
taurant, 408 Pine 

Bergorvich — -, upholsterer, dwl 3 Clara Lane 

Bergrow Charles, captain schooner Ida Jane, Market 
bt. \V harf 

Bergschicker William, brewer with Gluck & Hansen, 
dwl ^E cor i ulton and Webster 

BergsonOle carpenter and builder, 508 Montgomery, 
awl 318 I ulton 

Bergst Louis, hairdresser, dwl W s Miller PI nr Fol 

Rergstein Louis, dry-goods dealer, dwl 1328 Polk 

Rergstrom B., seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 

Bergstrom John, organ - builder, NE cor Twenty- 
tourth and Mission, dwl W s Lundy Lane nr Es- 
meralda, Bernel Heights 

Bering John P., salesman with J. M. Eckfeldt &Co.. 
and secretary Pacific Wire and Wire Rope Man- 
ulacturing Co., dwl 417 Francisco 

Beringer William (Cook & BJ, res San JosS 



FABNSWOBTH & CLAEK, Gen'l Fire and Marine Insurance Agency; om<,J^3Q^^,^. 



<C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Furnishing Goods. 



Berk Maurice G., cigars and tobacco, 332 Montgom- 

ory, dwl 8 Harriet 
Berkeley Villa Association, William Stuart secretary, 

office 113 Lcidosdortf 
Berker, A. B., gardener, dwl 421 Dupont 
Berkley M., fireman Coiner's Department U. S. Mint, 

dwl (ill) California 
Berkowitz Meyer, cloaks, mantillas, etc., 521 Kearny, 

dwl 00*) Minna 
Borlack Maurice, bookkeeper with Gabriel Abra- 
ham, dwl 4 Hyde 
Berlin Charles, carpenter, dwl "North German Hotel, 

3:) Jackson 
Berlin Henry, traveling agent, dwl 1430 California 
Berlin William, stovodoro with Whitney & Freese, 

NW cor Franklin and Lilly 
Berliner Abraham, merchant tailor, 107 Geary, dwl 

r.iV.2 Rausoh, rear 
Berliner Herman A. (Diamant B. & Co. J, dwl 32t3 

Minna 
Berling Carl, clerk, dwl 611 Pacific 
Berling .Tohn, machinist with Joseph Bien 
Berling Max, waiter, dwl Chicago Hotel 
Berman Otto, clerk 214 Kearny, dwl 27) Stevenson 
Bermodo .Jule, laundryman Occidental Laundry 
Bermingham Edmund R., clerk County Recorder 

fand Doherty ct- B.) , dwl 14 Harriot 
Bermingham Edward, compositor Evening Bulletin, 

dwl U)\ Kearny 
Bermingham John, finisher with Cornolius O'Don- 

nell, dwl cor Erannan and Clinton 
Bermingham John, shipping and forwarding, office 

with John Kosenfeld, dwl Russ House 
Bermingham Thomas, capitalist, dwl New Franklin 

House 
Bermingham Thomas I., harnessmakor, 315 Battery, 

dwl i)08 Jackson 
Bermingham. <S'ee Burmingham 
Bernado Joseph, fisherman, dwl 502 Davis 
Bernal Geronima R. D. (widow), real estate, dwl SE 

cor Church and Seventeentli 
Bernan Florence, expressman, cor Broadway and 

Davis, dwl 149 Shipley 
Bernard August, clerk with Joseph Bros., dwl 2214 

Sixteenth 
Bernard Abraham, broker, dwl 781 Folsom 
Bernard Bernard, upholsterer with Plum, Bell & Co., 

dwl 313 Clementina 
BERNARD CHARLES, coffee and spice manufac- 
turer, 707 Sansom, dwl 312 Oak 
Bernard Charles A., house and sign painter, 629 Mer- 
chant, dwl Kill Clay 
Bernard Emer, cooper, dwl 415 Broadway^ 
Bernard Emile, cigarmaker with Lepold Kutnor, dwl 

52:) Pacific 
Bernard Francis, carpenter, 122 Washington, dwl 

1S18 Larkin 
Bernard Hennessey, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Bernard Henry, nurse St. Mary's Hospital 
Bernard Isaac, varieties and upholstery, N s Six- 
teenth bet Mission and Valencia 
Bernard J. A., clerk with C. P. Van Schaack & Co., 

dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Bernard J. Frank, porter with A. B. Elfelt & Co., 

dwl 323 Sutter 
Bernard Jean B., cook, dwl 1123 Dupont 
Bernard .Johanna (widow), dwl 6143^ Natoma 
Bernard John, dwl 616 Kearny 

Bernard John, dwl San Bruno Road nr Twenty-eighth 
Bernard John L., blacksmith with Carl Hinz, dwl 

6i43<^ Natoma 
Bernard Julius, furniture and carpets, 1120 Stockton 
Bernard Leon, hairdresser, 818 Stockton 
Bernard Mary (widow), dwl 262 Tehama 
Bernard Michael D., porter 216 Battery, dwl il323 

Montgomery 
Bernard Minnie Miss, shoefitter with Buckingham 

& Hecht, dwl ()14 Natoma 
BernarJProsser, laundryman with Celostine Bong- 
let, awl 529 Hayes 
Bernard R., clerk with F. De Long, dwlSE cor Union 

and Jones 
Bernard Robert, capitalist, dwl Overland House 
Bernard Robert, painter, 412 Clay, dwl i)33 California 
Bernard Samuel, seaman P. M. S. S. Mohongo 
Bernard Ulric, driver with William J. Davis, 2;3J^ 

Second 
Bernard Walter, barkeeper with William B. Beal, 

dwl 52 Second 
Bernardo , fisherman, Clay St. Wharf 



Bernardaschi Bernard ( Bernardaschi <& OianniniJ , 

dwl W s San Bruno Road nr Barrows Av 
Bernardaschi & Giannini ^Bernard Bernardaschi 
and Gaetano GianyiiaiJ , milkranch, W s San 
Bruno Road nr Burrows Av 
Bernardi Maurigo, cook, dwl 1118 Kearny 
Bcrnata Pierre, farmer, dwl Gxiillaume Tell Hotel 
Berndt Carl, captain sloop Whipple, dwl 440 Green 
Berndt Joseph, laborer California Dry Dock, dwl 

Hunter's Point nr Dry Dock 
Berner Frederick, cutter with Calisher & Jacobs, 

dwl 787 Folsom 
Bernerd .John, captain schooner John Frederick, of- 
fice 305 East 
Bernes Benjamin J. (Foolces & BJ , dwl 450 Stev 
Berncy .Julius, brassflnisher with Wm. T. Garratt, 

dwl Hinckley 
Bernez Julie, machinist, dwl St. Gottard Hotel 
Bernhamer Harry, restaurantkoeper, dwl S s Hayes 

bet Buchanan and Webster 
Bernhard Beruhard fStahleS: B.J, dwl 215 Prospect 

PI 
Bernhard Samuel H. (Ellis, Bernhard cfe Co.A dwl 

550 Jessie 
Bernhardt Charles, clerk Continental Hotel 
Bernheimer Francis, laborer, dwl N s Fell bet Web- 
ster and Fillmore 
BERNIS BUILDING, 624 and62fl California 
BERNIS G., proprietor California House, 626 Cal 
Bernius Frederick, special policeman, dwl cor Bealo 

and Bryant 
Bernot John, dyer, dwl 5 Quincy PI 
Bernstein Abraham, fruits, 528 Third 
Bernstein B., cigarmaker, 64 First 
Bernstein David, tailor, 77sJ Folsom 
Bernstein Elias, furniture, 313 and 315 Third 
Bernstein George, oyster saloon, 50 and 51 California 
Market, and flower depot lOJ California Market, 
dwl 253 Minna 
Bernstein Henry, dwl 936 Howard 
Bernstein Johanna, dressmaker with Charles Mayer, 

dwl 440 Tehama 
Bernstein Joseph, gents' furnishing goods, 824 Mar- 
ket, dwl 11!) O'Farrell 
Bernstein Joseph, peddler, dwl 144 Shipley 
Bernstein Julius, salesman with Pollock &IIartman, 

dwl 335 Jessie 
Bern.stein Julius C, clerk with M. C. Bernstein, dwl 

705 Harrison 
Bernstein L., salesman with W. Hunt <fe Co., dwl 335 

Jessie 
Bernstein Louis, clerk with Joseph Bernstein, 824 

Market 
Bernstein Morris C, furniture and bedding, 517 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 1101 Taylor 
Bernstein Solomon, dwl 405 Post 
Berntson Anders, captain sloop Thomas Brown, dwl 

cor Sansom and Alta 
Beronio G., proprietor Roma Hotel, 215 Broadway 
Beronio Peter, cook with Flynne & Co., dwl 20 Vallejo 
Berot B., gardener French Hospital, S s Bryant bet 

Fifth and Sixth 
Berrich Frank, cabinetmaker, dwl Stanford House 
Berrett Moses A., peddler, dwl 1505 Powell 
Berring Rudolph, steward 6 Leidesdorfi', bds Swiss 

Hotel 
Berroa Andres, musician, dwl 1220 Stockton, rear 
Berroa Cleofas Mrs., Spanish needlework, dwl 1220 

Stockton, rear 
Berroa Espiridion, hairdresser, dwl 1220 Stock, rear 
Berroa Margarita (JJ., seamstress, dwl 1220 Stock, rear 
BERRY ALBERT, proprietor National Flour Mills, 

SW cor Battery and Pacific, res Oakland 
Berry August, seaman, dwl 2 i Steuart 
Berry Charles, seaman, dwl 176 Jessie 
Berry D., deckhand stm Cora 
Berry David, fruiter, dwl 205 Folsom 
Berry Edwin W., foreman Spirit of the Times, dwl 1 

Jackson PI 
Berry Enoch, machinehand with Richardson & Hol- 
land, dwl 1226 Folsom 
Berry Fulton G. (Berry ifc Capp), dwl 2212 Howard 
Berry George W., drayman, dwl 22 Eleventh 
Berry Gideon M., bookkeeper Sheriff's Ofiice, dwl 603 

Polk 
Berry Isaac (col'd), waiter dwl 2 Virginia PI 
Berry James, seaman, dwl 23 Vallejo 
Berry James, longshoreman, dvvl 23 Natoma 
Berry James, shipcarpenter, dwl 211 Frederick, rear 
Berry James F., turner, dwl 2 Washington Av 



PACIFIC COAST BUSIITESS DIRECTOBT contains Addresses of over 50,000 MerohantB. 



KENNEDY'S INSUBANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life. 411 CaUfornia St. 




Berry John (Orisivold Jc B.), dwl 2-') Silver 

Berrj' John, foreman with Daniel Sweeney, dwl 948 

Howard 
Berry John D., carpenter, 1258 Bush 
Berry John J., clerk Ueneral Freight Office C. P. 11. 

R., dwl 322 Jones 
Berry Leivis (col'd), whitewashor, dwl 2 Virginia PI 
Berry Lueretia S. (widow), dwl 141'.i Taylor 
Berry llichard, laborer, divl Empire Hotel 
Berry Richard, 2d assistant engineer stm Montana. 

Front St. ^V'harf 
Berry Richard Mrs. (widow), dwl 127 Kearny 
Berry St. House, Ferdinand Stoetzer proprietor. Ber- 
ry bat Third and Fourth 
Berry Thomas, carpenter California Mills, dwl Es 

Jessie bet Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
Berry Thomas, driver Market St. Railway, dwl N s 

Sixteenth nr Second Av 
Berry Thomas H., operator Atlantic and Pacific Tel- 

egraiih Co., dwl 3 Hampton PI 
Berry William, cook P. M. S. S. Colima 
Berry William, printer, dwl 112 Shipley 
Berry William L., compositor Spirit of the Times, 

res Oakland 
Berry William M. 0. fTreadwell & Co.^ res Oakland 
BERRY & CAPP f Fulton G. Berry and Charles S. 
Capp), real estate and house agts, office 418 Mont 

Berryman -, dwl 31 Second 

Berryman Fred, clerk, dwl 704 Powell 

Berryman Frederick M., elk with Berryman & Doyle, 

dwl 130 Tyler 
Berryman Henry B. (Berryman d- Doyle), dwl 1107 

Stockton 
Berryman Robert, farmer, dwl 31 Second 
Berryman & Doyle (Henry B. Berrymai and James 
R. Doyle), coal and pig iron, 413 and 41') Pacific, 
wholesale 420 East bet Pacific and Jackson 
Bersell Terrence, laborer with Ueorgo T. Bromley & 

Co. 
Bersellier John, painter with St. Denis & Chesney 
Bersner Herman, suaman, dwl 12 Washington 
Berson A. &. Son fGustave Berson), carpets and up- 
holsterers, 710-714 Washington 
Berson Adolph (A. Berson d- iSon), dwl 828 "Wash 
Berson ti. Mrs., laundry, 82S Washington 
Berson (xustavo (A. Berson d- Son), dwl 828 Wash 
Berstein Herman, tailor, it07 Bryant 
Bert BeTnsLrd( Henry Schroder it CoJ, res Bordeaux, 

France 
Bert Edward G., theatrical manager, dwl 545 Minna 
Bert Frederick W., theatrical manager, dwl W s 

Shotwell nr Twenty-first 
Bert. See Burt 
Berteling Louis A., optician with Thomas House- 

worth & Co., dwl 423 Hyde 
Bertels Albert, cabinetmaker with Christian Schrei- 

ber & Co., dwl 415 Perry 
Bertelsen (Jeorge, clerk, dwl 995 Market 
Bertelsen Martin, seaman, dwl 2i3 Steuart 
Bertelsen Otto, drayman, dwlE s Buchanan bet Post 

and Geary 
Bertelsen A., clerk with Jacob Lindeman, NW cor 

Vallejo and Pollard PI 
Berter Attillo, laborer 135 Sansom, dwl cor Sacra- 
mento and Stockton 
Berter Formosa, cook 135 Sansom, dwl cor Sacramen- 
to and Stockton 
Berter Samuel, cook 135 Sansom, dwl cor Sacramento 

and Stockton 
Bertormd Lacazette, laundryman with Celestine 

Bonglet, dwl 529 Hayes 
Bertha Albert, liquors, dwl 28 Everett 
Bertha Julius, clerk, dwl 28 Everett 
Berthaut John, cabinetmaker with Julias Eolland, 

dwl Guillaume Tell House 
Bertheau C, clerk with Henry Balzer & Co., dwl 122 

California 
Berthelot Charles, porter 421 Front, dwl 608 Minna 
Berthold Louis (Berthold d- Grantz), dwl 420 Green 
Lerthold & Grantz (Louis Berthold and Adolph 

Grantz), market, 20i) Broadway 
Berti Carlo, restaurant, 810 Clay 
Berti Giocondo, vegetable dealer, dwl 1004 Pacific 
Berti Giuseppe, confectioner with Jules Perrin, dwl 

738 \Vashington 
Berlin Alexandre, dyeing and scouring, 147 Third. 

/pi Clay, and 521 Fil bert, dwl 147 Third 
Rortin Leon, laborer with G. Venard, dwl 639 Bdwy 
Rertini Ulderico, framemaker with Louis Ghilardi, 
dwl 551 Stevenson 



Bertlett Joseph L., blacksmith with Hanscom & Co., 

dwl New Franklin House 
Bertody Charles, physician and surgeon, dwl 1005 

Stockton 
Bortolacci Sebastian, agent with MarioUi & Pagan- 

ini, dwl 518 Vallejo 
Bertoluce John, expressman, NW cor Washington 

and Davis 
Berton Flavien, cook with P. Priet, dwl W s Dupont 

bet fine and Bush 
BERTON FRANCIS, manager. Swiss Amorican 
Bank and consul for Portugal and Switzerland, 
office .j27 Clay, dwl 11 South Fark 
Bertram Fritz (Bertram & Vorlmann), dwl NWcor 

Steuart and Howard 
BERTRAM THOMAS, stoves and tinware, 982 and 

984 bolsom, dwl 7 Garden 
Bertram k Vortmann (Fritz Bertram and Henry 
I ortmann), liquor saloon, NW cor Steuart and 
Howard 
Bertrand Alfred, barkeeper with Eugene Colin, dwl 

/O.J Commercial 
Bertrand Andrew, furrier, 501 Koarny 
Bertrand Denis, laborer Maison Doree, dwl 639 Pa- 
cific 
Bertrand Joseph, beer saloon, dwl 73'i Vallejo, rear 
Bertrand Lewis (colored i, seaman, dwl 7 Broadway 
Bertrand R. (widow), dwl 21 Clarence PI 
Bertrand Victor, laborer Maison Doree, dwl 1114 

Stockton 
Bertsou Chris, shoemaker, dwl 609 Seventh 
Bortz J. (Dietz, B. d" Co.), dwl 2215 Fillmore 
Berwick James, laborer C. P. R. R. Depot 
Berwiek Thomas, sailmaker, dwl 1127 Clay 
Berwick W. D., miner, dwl 033 Kearny 
Berwick ^\'illiam B., laborer C. P. R. R. Depot, dwl 

348 Pitch 
Berwin JMoritz (B. Berwin it Bra.), res New York 
Berwin P. & Bro. ( Moritz Berwin), importers and 

jobbers hats and caps, lOj Battery 
Berwin iMncus (P. Berwin & Bro.), dwl 1320 Tyler 
Berz Baptiste, laundryman, dwl 5 Miller PI 
Berzzlo Frank, bartender, dwl 421 San«om 
Besamayer William, laborer California Sugar Re- 
finery, dwl 1131 Harrison 
Besby Henry J., barkeeper with Samuel Gardner & 

Co., dwl N s Ivy bet Franklin and Gough 
Bescheinen William, watchmaker with George C. 

Shreve k Co., dwl 832 Broadway 
Bescheinen Wilhelmine Miss, housekeeper, dwl 832 

Broadway 
Beschormann Adolf, upholsterer with Schlueter & 

V olberg, dwl 328 Mason 
Beschormann Charles F., mail clerk California Demo- 

krat, dwl 30 N a to ma 
Besecke William (Joseph Wagener & Co.), dwl 1512 

Stockton 
Besi Bernard, laborer, dwl cor Sixteenth and Rhode 

Island 
Besnard Augustine Mme., dressmaker with Mdme 

E. Leroy, 121 Sutter 
Besse Jesse 0., salesman with Kaindler k Co.. dwl 

1224 Bush 
Bessemer H. L., chemist and perfumer, 14 Mary 
Bessey R. W. Mrs., seamstress, dwl 042 Howard 
Bosson Felix, fruits, dwl 17 Union PI " 
Besson Gustav G., waiter Gailhard Hotel, dwl 522 

Pine 
Bessor Ellen (widow), proprietor Roxbury House, 318 

Pacific 
Bessor Joseph, clerk with Ellen Bessor, dwl 318 Pac 
Best Charles, furniture polisher, dwl 137 Tehama 
Best Charles, stableman with Charles Metzler, dwl 6 

Scotland 
Best D. A., assistant cook stm Constantine, Clay St. 

W harf 
Best James, shipwright Shipwrights' Jour. Assn, 71 

New Montgomery 
Best John (Johnson & B.), dwl 1717 (1817) Leav 
Best John, painter, dwl 56 Tehama 
Best John T., clerk U. S. Army Headquarters, 105 

fetockton, dwl 31'.t Fremont 
Best William, stairbuilder with B. H. Freeman k 

Co., dwl 516 Leavenworth 
Best and Belcher M. Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), AVilliam 

Willis secretary, office 410 California 
Bester Ferdinand, blacksmith with Edmund Saul 
Bester John H., liquor saloon, 923 Kearny, dwl 631 

Vallejo 
Besterfield Oscar, laundryman, dwl 205 Clementina 



PABNSWOKTH & CLABK furnish Safe and Beliable Insurance against Fire. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valise8 




Besthorn Christopher, toolmakor with John Weich- 

hart, dwl 1)21 Mission , , , ttx u- 

Besthorn Herrmann, bootmaker with AdolphUtscnig, 

dwl 2o Morton 
Besthorn Hermann E., restaurantkeeper, d-.vl 021 Miss 
Bestor Henry T., architect, otfico 04ij Market, dwl b s 

Clay nr Scott 
Besttchar Chris, musician, dwl 418 Powell 
Betaiix Louis, winsdealer, dwl fiO ) Pine 
Beteloty Piotro, laborer Bay Sugar Kofinery 
Betgf>r Charles, ioweler with California Jewelry Co. 
Betger Edward, shoemaker, 740Vallejo, dwl Vii) Green 
Betho Hermann, professor music, dwl 410 Kearny 
Bethol Thomas \V., watchman public buildings, dwl 

BETHESDA^MINER AL SPRING WATER of Wau- 
kesha, Wis., Dunbar & Hendry agents, 230 Sutter 
and i3i Montgomery ,- , t^, a^ 

Bethje William, captain schooner Ida Florence, office 

305 East, dwl 42 Steuart 
Bethu John, painter with St. Denis & Chesney 
Betkowski Peter, expressman, cor Montgomery and 
Bush, d'vl 23 Silver , ^ ^ t, ■, , - -ir • 

Betscho Charles, iroworker with J. G. lis, dwl o Mai- 
den Lane 
Bettan J ose, fisherman. Clay St. W harf 
Betteles Emile, jobber, dwl S s Caroline PI nr Powell 
Bettie David, tailor, dvl Xew Franklin House 
Bettis Otis J., stoves and tinware, dwl 170o Leav 
Bettman Moses, Chemical Olive Soap \\ orks, S s 
Brannan nr Eighth, office 311 Commercial, dwl 
508 Eddy ^ „ ^ , , 

Bctts Charles, truckman Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl 
cor Ninth and Brannan ,o,.i/t7i 

Belts John M., physician, 128 Kearny, dwl 844)4 lol 
Belts Poter M., vice-president Belts bpring Co., 

office 218 Fremont, dwl 1523 Mission . 

BETTS SPRING CO., William M. Belts president, 
Peter M. Betts vice-president, Edwin h retwell 
secretary, office 218 Fremont a ■ n 

Betts William, springmaker with Betts Spring Co., 

dwl 152 ; Mission _ „ - ^ a: 

Betts William M., president Betts Spring Co., office 

218 Fremont, res Oakland . 

Betzel Charles W., resident physician German Hos- 
pital, 427 Brannan _ , , ..„ r^,•n 
Botzel Isidor, bookkeeper 25 Battery, dwl o37 O'lar- 

Betzel Louis f Betzel <& Cohn) , dwl 537 O'Farroll 
BETZEL & COHN (Louis Betzel and Loui^ M. 

Cohn), manufacturers boys' clothing, lO'J bansom 
Botzer August, baker, dwl till Pacific 
Beuehc'l Ernst, ieweler, dwl 727 Broadway, rear 
Beuch.'l J ohan G., tailor, dwl 727 Broadway, rear 
Beuchler Julius J., laundryman with bolomon x\lay, 

dwl 781 Stevenson ^ , _„„ „ .„ 

Beugue Joseph ( Canagnahere & B.^dwl 7-.o Pacifac^ 
Beumer Kasper, with Lyon Lipsick, Old ban Jose 

Road nr Miguel „. 

Beutlor Frank B., shademaker with George W. 

Clark, dwl Stockton nr Post . 

Beutlor John B., musician, dwl 732 Mission 
Bevan Benjamin, clerk with William Craig, dwl 9Uo 

Dupont 
Bevan James, waiter, dwl 8 Bernard , om, i 

Bevell Richard M., purser stm China, dwl 29 Park 

Av 
Beven John, coalpasser stm Montana, Front St. 

Wharf 
Beveridga Arthur B. (Beveridge & Co.), dwl 728 

Beveridge Horatio, with Falkner, Bell & Co.. dwl 

li>20 Washington . , , 

BEVERIDGE A CO. (Arthur B. Beveridge) , com- 
mission agent sheep, cattle, and ranch property, 
SW cor Jackson and Sansom 
Beverly Ruth N., ladies' nurse, dwl 334 Iremont 
Beverly Walter, waiter Grand HotSl . ^ ,,. . 
Beverson Carsten, groceries and li luors, o/O Mission 
Boverson Christopher, driver with J. C. Pennie Jr., 
dwl 728 Lombard j i n-i 

Beverson H., teamster with George Mayor, dwl Gil- 
bert bet Sixth and Seventh 
Beverson Martin, clerk with Carsten Boverson, dwl 

570 Mission , , _ , tt 

Bevilege Joseph, barkeeper, dwl 722 Harrison 
Bevins John, laborer, dwl Serpentine Av nr \ork 
Bevins William M., printer, dwl ft s Tyler bet J< ill- 
more and Webster 
Bewell James, laborer with George T. Bromley & Co 



Bewley Clifton L., clerk 323 Mont, dwl 628 Sutter 

Bewley William J., clerk, dwl 13 Selina PI 

Beyer Adolph, baker with A. E. bwain, dwl 227 btev- 

Beyer Louis, hairdresser with John Lehritter, dwl 
t)25 Vallejo . . 

Beyer Louis H., bookkeeper, dwl ()2o Vallejo 

Beyer Robert W., drayman with James xM. Curtis, 
dwl 1028 McAllister 

Beyer William, barkeeper with Cunningham & Dow- 

Boyerle John Ernest, coppersmith with John G. Us, 

dwl 700 Broadway . 

Beverle Joseph, shipwright Shipwrights' Journey- 

'men Association, 71 New Montgomery 
Beyersdorf, John, engineer, dwl 1403 Stockton 
Bevorsdorf Louis (Safferhill & B.J , dwl oSo Cal . 
Beymer E., president Horticultural Hall Associa- 
tion, dwl cor Nineteenth and Folsom 
Bevnon William, seaman, dwl 2) Steuart . 

Bez'/ini Daniele, cook with Natale Giamboni, dwl 

Biagi Domenico (Biaqi& Galli) , dwl 923 Wash 
BiAGI .t GALLI (Domenico Biagi and Alplwnso 
OalUJ, fruit and produce commission, olti and 
518 Sansom 
Bia-'ina Perda, expressman, dwl 2 Cadell Alley 
Biambo Paul, fisherman, dwl NW cor Union and 

Kearny ^ „t . i i c- 

Bianchi Albert, helper Union Iron Works, dwl ban- 
som St. Hotel ^ .,,-,• TT i 1 
Bianchi Angelo, laborer, dwl Garibaldi Hotel 
Biaiichi Carlo (Bianchi & CuneoJ , res Italy 
Bianchi Eugenie, teacher vocal music and operatic 

artist, iJ21 Calitornia 
Bianchi Guisoppi Battista, pastry cook with Natale 

Giamboni, dwl 510 Clay , „ ^ ., r 

Bianchi Joseph B., carpenter, dwl 8 Polk Lane 
Bianchi Pietro, carpenter, dwlO Union PI 
Bianchi Pietro, laborer, dwl Garibaldi Hotel 
Bianchi & Cuneo (Carlo Bianchi and Augustmo 

C'M/ieo,', marble works, 820 Market 
Bianchini Amadeo, laborer with California Italian 
Paste Co., dwl 8 Margaret PI , j , ow 

Bianchini Frank (Bianchini & ColonnaJ , dvfl bW 

cor Sansom and Pacific 
Bianchini & Colonna ( Frank Bianchini and Augus- 
tus Colonna/, proprietors Hotel d'ltalia, b W cor 
Sansom and Pacific , o n n t 

Biarnos Amaarv, laundryman, dwl 8 1 oik liane 
Biarnes Josephine Mrs., laundress, dwl buUivan 

Bibb Dandridge H., invoice clerk with Treadwell & 

Co., dwl 411 Fourth 
Bibb 11. H., clerk, dwl 411 Fourth ,,.„_, 
Bibbins Tracy L. (Bibbins <!• C'o.y, dwl loO/ Lear 
Bibbins A; Co. (T. L. Bibbins), real estate, office 402 

Kearny „ t.^. . , ^ m i 

Bibcau A. J., blacksmith, E s Mission bet Twenty- 
eighth and Twenty-ninth ,^, , xTT J 
Bibend xMary (widow), dwl W s Twelfth bet Howard 

and Folsom , ^ , t^ ,, -,nr>i 

Biber Adam, foreman with John Bollman, olO Bdwy 
Biber Madame, dressmaUing, Ol.i Stockton 
Bichard Charl-.s N., clerk, dwl 3*) First 
Bichard Martin, shipwright bhipwrights' Journey- 
men Association, 71 New Montgomery 
BICHARD NICHOLAS, coal yard, It) and 18 How- 
ard, dwl 3)5 First , tt • , * 
Bickel Madeline (widow), dwl 25 Haight 
Bickerstaff J *nathan, dwl 017 Pacific 
Bicke>' .James, clerk, dwl 251 Stevenson 
Bidden Philip W., stoekraiser, dwl 830 Howard 
Biddlo Andrew, clerk with Henry Arbuckle, dwl 299 
Sixteenth . , _j_ ., „ 
Biddle Frederick W., bookkeeper with Betanett & 

Page, dwl 107 Sansom 
Biddlo Philip, capitalist, dwl 403 Minna 
Biddolph James, machinist with Palmer, Knox & 

Co., dwl f)19 Mission ,„„-,-,„. 

Bidlack W. W., physician, dwl 20 Ellis ^ .. ^. , 
Bidleman Enoch G., bookkeeper wiih E. Martin & 

Co., dwl 828 California , , „,„ w u 

Bidleman Joseph, stock broker, dwl 910 "ash 
Bidleman ■William A., clerk with E. Martin & Co., 

dwl W s Ninth bet Folsom and Harrison 
Bie John, baker with Frederick Hellwig, dwl 110/ 

Dupont , . . ,, X r T 

Biecke Luis, blacksmith with Mangeot <fe Lacaze, 
dwl N s Shipley bet Seventh and Eighth 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTOBY, 1874-6, wiU be published September, 1874. 



KENNEDY'S INSURANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, represents $12,000,000. 



Biedenbach August, beor saloon, NE cor Third and 

Mission, dwl 28t> Minna 
Biederman Erolinda (widow), dwl 1211 Bush 
Biederman Louis, cook with Peter Jorgonsen, dwl 

oilO Clementina 
Biohl llormann, seaman, dwl 127 Jackson 
Bielawski Casimir, draftsman U. S. Surveyor-Gen- 
eral, dwl 212 Stevenson 
Bi 'ler A., tailor, dwl Quincy _ 

Bieler Zacharias, teamster Pacific Distillery and Re- 
fining Co., dwl Greenwich bet Pierce and Scott 
Bielski Max fMaz Bielski & CoJ, dwl 927 Jackson 
Bielski Max & Co. {Joseph JacobyJ, butter, cheese, 

eggs, etc.. 29 Occidental Market 
BIEN JOSEPH, machinist and locksmith, 311 Bat- 
tery, dwl 305 Tyler 
Biene John, laborer California Sugar Refinery, dwl 

cor Brannan and Eighth 
Bienonfold Elias, ladies' and gents' furnishing goods, 

1229 Stockton, dwl 12:ii Stockton 
Bierbrauer Carl, tinner with Sol NV^angenheim & Co., 

dwl 122 Davis 
Bierbrauer John, cabinetmaker with Kragen & Co., 

dwl 2 Vall.-jo PI 
Bierce Albert G., swoopcellar Melter's and Refiner's 

Department U. S. Mint, res Oakland 
Biers Charles H., cabinetmaker with Field & Frei, 

dwl 262 Clementina 
Bierschwale Charles, cabinetmaker, 731 Mission 
Bicsta Federico, teacher French and Italian, dwl 331 

Montgomery 
Bigelow C. P., bricklayer Bricklayer Pro. Assn, 234 

Sutter 
Bigelow Edwin, bricklayer New City Hall 
Bigelow Francis H., printer Bulletin Office, dwl 315 

Ritch 
Bigelow George H., agent State Investment Insurance 

Co., dwl 7)7 Harrison 
BIGELOW HENRY H., general manager Home 

Mutual Ins. Co., office 433 California, dwl 108 First 

Av bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Bigelow House, Sarah T. Comstock proprietress, 720 

Sansom 
Bigelow John F., with Cross & Co., dwl 619 Pine 
Bigelow Jonathan B., special agent Homo Mutual 

Ins. Co., office 433 California, dwl 152 Perry 
Bigelow Lewis, driver City R. R., dwl W s Mission 

bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Bigelow Winsor D., merchant, dwl 844 Valencia 
Bigger Alexander, cabinetmaker with John C. Boll, 

dwl 227 Post 
Bigger Alexander, steward P. M. S. S. Arizona, dwl 

6\V cor Nineteenth and Stevenson 
Bigger William, teamster, dwl 240 iVIinna 
Biggers Jennie B. (widow), dwl 1127 Filbert 
Biggi William, dwl 80i Montgomery 
Biggins Patrick, cardriver, dwl 202 Sixth 
Biggs Abel R., salesman with A. M. Oilman, dwl 014 

Jones 
Biggs Edward, portor 228 Bush 
Biggs Ellon (widow), groceries, 122 AYilliam 
Biggs Henry C, clerk with McHenry, Moulton & Co., 

dwl (J14 Jones 
Biggs Jesse E., carpenter with D. A. Macdonald & 

Co., dwl 7iJ2 Mission 
Biggs John E., Flime House, E s San Bruno Road nr 

Twenty-se\'enth 
Biggs Thomas, teacher Shotwell St. Primary School, 

dwl 423 Bush 
Biggs William, millwright, dwl 932 Harrison 
Biggy John, express wagon, NWcor Market and Ellis, 

dwl -i Latham PI 
Biggy Terrenco, hostler N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 

N s O'Farrell bet Brodoriek and Dovisadero 
BIGLEY BliOIilERS (Daniel and OeorgeJ, gro- 
ceries, NE cor Clay and Davis 
Bigley Daniel i Bigley Bros.), dwl 203 Eleventh 
Bigley George (Bigley Bros.), dwl 808 O'Farrell 
Bigley John, commission merchant, office NE cor 

Clay and Davis, dwl 707 Larkin 
BIGLEY' T. & CO., shipwrights, calkers, and spar- 
makers, 13 and 15 Spear 
Bigley Thomas (T. Bigley & Co.), dwl 832 Mission 
Eigne Vincent, saloon San Jose Depot 
Bigwood George, blacksmith, dwl W s Columbia nr 

Twenty-fifth 
Bigwood J. (Newsham & B.J, King bet Second and 

Third 
Bihler William (Charles F. Wagner & Co.), res 

Lakeville 



Bilay Anthony, assistant bookkeeper with Eberhardt 

i& Laohman, dwl 4 Kidley 
Bilfinger G., carrier Guide, dwl 1334 Dupont 
Bilfinger Mary (widow), dwl 1334 Dupont 
Bilhac Louis, dwl 901 Kearny 
BilickeGustavus, capitalist, dwl 828 Geary 
Bill Conrad, upholsterer with Henry Luchsinger & 

Co., dwl Card Alley bot Valleio and Green 
Bill George, butcher vvith Louis Zeh, dwl 1413 Koar 
Bill Jacob, laborer with F. Reinle, dwl Vallejo nr 

Mason 
Bill Margaret (widow), dwl 427 Union 
Bill Philip, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery, dwl 13 Va- 

ronno 
Bill Philip, real estate, dwl 29 Ritch 
Bill Robert, seaman, dwl 115 Clark 
Billin William, plumber, dwl Bartol nr Broadway 
Billing Peter, dwl ^'irginia Av bet Twenty-eighth 

and Twenty-ninth 
Billinghurst Ray, hostler 921 Sutter 
Billings David R. (JD. H. Billiiujs & Co.), dwl 227 

Eighth 
Billings D. R. k Co. ( John Boltomley J , giocoTi&s and 

liquors, 1311 Stockton 
Billings Edward P., messenger Bank of San Francis- 
co, dwl 529 Sacramento 
Billings George E., salesman with A. Roman & Co., 

dwl 809 Hyde 
Billis James, grocer, dwl 726 Howard 
Billis James Mrs., hairdresser, 72) Howard 
Bills Frederick J., clerk with John Taylor & Co., res 

Oakland 
Bills John L., watchman C. P. R. R. Depot, dwl 1110 

Harrison 
Bilty Theodore G., salesman, dwl 1321 Powell 
Biltz F. R., musician, dwl 535 Kearny 
Binckley Homer, painter, dwl 741 Market 
Binder George J., bookkeeper with Ballard & Hall, 

res Oakland 
Bine Solomon, fancy goods, 12 Second, dwl 323 Eddy 
Bineaud Loon, hairdressing saloon, 818 Stockton 
Binet Frank, laborer with Noonan & McGrath, dwl 

912 Kearny 
Bingenheimer Christopher, cooper 110 Davis, dwl 908 

Geary 
Bingham Henry ( Menzies, Loivry <& B.J, dwl 308 

Lombard 
Bingham Joseph, butcher Constitution Hotel, 547 

First 
Bingham L. Mrs., chambermaid Overland House 
Bingham William T., clerk, dwl N s Pine bet Web- 
ster and Fillmore 
Binn Walter C, miller, dwl 8 Verona PI 
Binswangor Lewi?, gents' furnishing goods, 513 Kear 
Birbe Henry C, clerk with E. & C. Suiith, dwl cor 

Kentucky and Sixth Av, South S. F. 
Birce Frank IL, salesman with Pope & Talbot, Third 

St. Wharf, dwl 22 De Boom 
Birch Henry, longshoreman, dwl NW cor Front and 

Pacific 
Birch Samuel, gardener, dwl E s Castro nr Seven- 
teenth 
Birch Thomas J., bookkeeper Examiner, dwl 1324 

Broadway 
Birch William (Kennedy ct B.I, dwl 945 Folsom 
Birch William, dwl 913 Sacramento 
Birch William A., student Hoald's Business College 
Birch \Villiam H. (California Machine Works), dwl 

500 Folsom 
Bird Albert, lamplighter S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 911 

Sacramento 
Bird Allan, C. P. R. R., dwl 13 O'Farrell 
Bird Anna S. (widow), dwl 171(5 Leavenworth 
Bird Henry, harnossmaker with Main & Winchester, 

dwl 20 Park Av 
Bird James, molder with Peter Phillips, dwl 227 Sec 
Bird J. W., bricklayer Bricklayers' Protective Assn, 

234 Sutter 
Bird Lawrence, bricklayer, dwl 1009 California 
Bird Lizzie (widow), dressmaker, 255 Beale 
Bird Marion T., stonemason, dwl 759 Clay 
Bird Mary (widow), dwl 545 JMission, rear 
Bird Michael, weigher and hosoman Engine No. 1, 

S. F. F. D., dwl 153 Tehama 
Bird Nelson J., physician, office 230 Kearny, dwl 531 

Jessie 
Bird Patrick, expressman, cor Kearny and Geary, 

dwl 514 O'Farrell 
Bird RobertS.,jeweler with Henry A. Callender, dwl 

1313 Pacific 



ATLAS INS. CO. OF HABTFOBD; Assets $325,000; Farnsworth & Clark, Agents. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708. 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



BIR 



103 



BLA 



Bird Thomas, draftsman, ofiTice and dwl 432 Mont- 
gomery, room 11 
Bird Thomas, fireman stm Julia 
Bird Thomas, painter with Noble & Gallagher, dwl 

7 AVetiuore PI 
Bird William, molder, dwl 100 Minna 
Bird William, tailor, dwl 7 Wetiuoro PI 
Birdsall Charles, barkeeper with George Birdsall, 

dwl 72:) Harrison 
Birdsall Elias Rev., rector St. John's Episcopal 

Church, dwl W s Dolores nr Twontioth 
Birdsall (xeorge, liquor saloon, 52u Third, dwl 729 

Harrison 
Birdsall George J., liquor saloon, 129 Clay, dwl 141 

Perry 
Birdsall, George W., special policeman, Bay View 

Race Track , , ^. 

Birdsall John, engineer Norths-ways, dwl cor Sierra 

and Louisiana „, ,. , . 

Birdsall John M. fBirdsell ct Aitchison) , 1222 Market 
Birdsall R. Miss, teacher Shotwell St. PrimarySchool, 

dwl 121S Powell , , , „ 

Birdsall William, driver Central R. Pw, dwl 029 

Birdsall Wyatt, engineer P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 018 Pine 
Birdsall Zepheniah, wagonmaster Wells, Fargo & 

Co., dwl '.■20 Clay 
Birdsall & Aitchison (John M. Birdsall and Robert 

L. Aitchison), furniture repairers, 1222 Market 
Birdsley Ironv VV., butcher, dwl 114 Hayes 
Birgo James J., dentist, office and dwl 410 Kearny 
Birgen John, laborer, dwl SW cor Sixteenth and liar 
Birgevin Nelson L., clerk with John Renz, dwl 235 

Stevenson , , ^t . tt 

Birgham i A. E. Guiaard* Co. J, dwl Nucleus House 
Birhoff Samuel (Schoenlwlz & BroJ, dwl 110 Sixth 
Birling John, locksmith, dwl 10(j William 
Birnio Robert, interpreter with Drake & Rix, dwl 

7o7 Howard , , , a ,-i ^-n■^ 

Biron Hyman, physician, office and dwl 10 Central PI 
Birrell .Andrew, real estate, dwl 1223 Mason 
Birrell George, machinist with Deacon k Bulger, dwl 

1223 Mason 
Birrell. See Burrell , t j , ,<,a 

Birtles Henry, clerk with George E. Arnold, dwl 4b0 

Birtt Leopold, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl 1131 

Harrison 
Bisagno Rartolomeo (Bisagno £>-os./', res Chiavari, 

Italy , . 

Bisagno Brothers (Louis and BartolomeoJ , impor- 
ters and jobbers hardware, etc., 420 Battery 
Bisagno Louis (Bisagno Bros. J, dwl !»24 Pacific 
Bisazza Frank, cook with Jacob Cusich, 501 Dupont 
BischofF Diedrich (Carstensen & B.J, dwl bW cor 

Geary and Jones 
Bischolf Frederick (J. H. Ahlers tfe Co.;, dwl SW cor 

PowoU and Vallojo •, tt ,. i 

Bisgreon William, night watchman Grand Hotel 
BishofF Herrmann, porter with Ehmann & Leisen, 

dwl 22.8 Bush t , r. 

Bishop B. F., engraver with California Jewelry Co. 
BISHOP D. M, & CO. (Eugene TFie.'/a/id/', publish- 
ers S. F. Semi-Annual Trades Guide and Cali- 
fornia Directory, office 521 Clay , , -- , 
Bishop Duncan M. (D.M. Bishop & Co.), dwl /o4 

Washington ,,,. , . 

Bishop Edgar (Bishop & Co.), dwl 513 Webster 
Bishop Ephraiui B., inventor dredging machine, office 
312 California, dwl S s Miss bet Now Mont and bee 
Bishop Frank, brassfinisher with Electrical C. and 

M. Co., dwl 32.'.>^ Bush 
Bishop Gurdon, miner, dwl 5 Florence 
Bishop Henry, driver 518 Kearny, dwl N \V cor Lar- 

kin and McAllister , , .-on ht- 

Bishop Henry, liquor saloon, 2 Clay, dwl 539 Minna 
Bishop Henry, machinist, dwl 907 Bush 
Bishop H. 0., stairbuilder with Sanborn & Byrnes, 

dwl 23!'i Minna . 

Bishop Homer (colored), cook, 304 Third 
Bishop James H., carpenter, dwl 1017 Clay 
Bishop James W., sawyer with Benjamin i. Gilman, 

dwl 32 Ellis 
Bishop J. N., clerk, dwl 423 Bush 
Bishop John, molder, dwl 28 Minna 
Bishop John, teamster, dwl What Cheer House 
Bishop John N., blacksmith with Nelson & Doblo, 

dwl 907 Bush . , ^, , - - 

Bishop Mary Miss, dressmaker with Charles Mayer, 
dwl 514 Minna 



Bishop Oliver H., drayman with Bryden & Co., dwl 
453 Tehama „^,, ^ _ , 

Bishop Ransom B., furnished rooms, 32-% Bush 

Bishop Richard, stonecutter, dwl 421 Vallejo 

Bishop Stephen, dwl 221 Austin 

BISHOP THOMAS B., attorney at law, office 522 
Montgomery, dwl 530 Second 

Bishop William A., teamster, dwl 42i Fifth 

BISHOP & CO. ( Edgar Bishop, A. S. Peterson, and 
L. W. Palmer), groceries, 710 Market and 17 

BISSe'lL JAMES L., inspector of gas meters, office 

and dwl 531 Mission , ,, „ , . ivr i 
Bissell William, laborer with McCord & Malone 
Bissen Joseph, bottler with Marks <fc Armstrong, dwl 

cor Sixteenth and Howard 
Bissot Andrew, stonecutter, dwl 1027 Sutter 
Bissett H. N., shipwright Shipwrights' Jour. Assn, 

71 New Montgomery . , .r • ot « 

Bissinger Adolph, bookkeeper with Louis bloss Be 

Co., dwl NE cor O'FarroU and Polk 
Bistrup William, tailor, 25 Hunt 
Bisvik Ofamio, restaurant, dwl 738 Vall^o 
Biter John, bookkeeper with M. & C. Mangels, dwl 

S s Waller bet Fillmore and Steiner 
Biter Willard, druggist with C. W. Bruns, dwl 49 

Bither George W., physician, office and dwl 631 Sac- 
ramento , , n , T> IT 

Bittenbender G. W., medical student, dwl Brooklyn 

Bitter Hermine Mrs., confectionery and laundry, 308 

Post 
Bitter Johanna (widow), dwl 306 Post 
Bitters Julius, glassblower Pacific Glass Works, dwl 

cor Mariposa and Minnesota 
Bittersen William, cook, dwl 710 Kearny 
Bitty Joseph, driver with John Marshall, dwl L s 

White nr Vallejo 
Biven E. (widow), dwl 305 Lombard 
Bixby John, teamster with J. & P. N. Hanna, dwl 
421 Folsom , ■^,. ^ ^ . 

Bixby Llewellyn (B. P. Flint & Co. and Flint, B. & 

Co.), res San Juan South 
Bixby. See Byxbeo 
Bizzett James, mariner, dwl 02 First 
Bjarnsen Niels Daniel, express wagon, BE cor Dupont 

and Sacramento o, .mi.-j 

Bjerromark Charles, wines and liquors, 314 ihira 
Bjoerke F., mattressmaker, dwl 423 Bush 
Bjorkman August (BjorkmanSc Wilkinson), dwl 310 

Front 
Bjorkman & Wilkinson (August Bjorkman and P. 
C. Wilkinson), draymen, office 310 and 312 tront 
Blach Charles, physician, office 514 Kearny, dwl 631 

Post 
Blacho Jean, poultry, dwl '>27 Vallejo _ 
Black Adam, bootmaker, dwl 1209 Mission 
Black Alexamlor H., student, dwl S s bacramonto bet 

Polk and Devi^adoro , ^ m i 

Black Amanda F. Mrs., furnished rooms Astor Block, 

((31 Sacramento 
Black Ann (widow), dwl 707 Stockton 
Black B. (widow), dwl 102 Eddy 
Black Bear Quartz Mining Co. (Klamath Co.. Cal.), 
William L. Oliver secretary, office 310 California 
Black Daniel R., printer with Frank Eastman, dwl 

310 Bealo 
BLACK DIAMOND COAL MINING CO., P. B. 
Cornwall president, Rincon Point AVharf E s 
Spear between Folsom and Harrison 
Black Edwin (Black & Hunt), dwl 8 Second Av nr 

Sixteenth 
Black George, bricklayer, dwl 527 Filbert 
Black George, patcrnmaker, dwl S. F. Hotel 
Black George Mrs. (widow), dwl IDO.t Eddy 
Black Hawk M. Co. (Utah), office 30ii Montgomery 
Black ilenrv, laborer, dwl 1522 Pacific Av 
BLACK HENRY M., carriagemaker, 1120 and 1122 

Market, dwl 14 Russ 
Black Howard, cutter with Noustadter Bros., dwl 43 

Second 
Black James, dwl 271-^ Fourth 

Black James J., upholsterer, dwl W s Eleventh nr 

Harrison , ^ . / 

Black John, laborer, dwl Alabama bet Solano and 

Marir)osa , , „, 

Black John, laborer Broadway Bonded Warehouse, 

dwl 22 Turk 
Black John, watchman P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 327 Beale 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY circulates throughout the Pacific Coast. 



L. W. KENNEDY, General Insurance Agent, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



BLA 



104 



BLA 



Black John W., collector with Thomas H. Selby & 

Co., dwl(!32FeII 
Black Joseph, blacksmith, Bay View nr Railroad 

Av, dwlf);)8 Howard 
Black Mountain Coal Mining Co. (Santa Cruz Co., 

Cal.), office 402 Montgomerv, room 23 
Black Patrick W., clerk-iJ. S. New Mint, dwl 2 Har- 
riot 
Black Peter R.. shipcarpenter. dwl 116 Natoma 
Black Robert, bartender, dwl N s Silver Av nr San 

Bruno Road 
Black liobert M., gents' furnishing goods, 209 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 1100 Van Ness Av 
Black William, marblocutter with Leon R. Myers & 

Co., dwl 421) Fulton 
Black William, laborer Fort Point 
Black William K., carpenter, dwl G63 Howard 
Black William W., livery stable, 1025 Market, dwl 

1054 Howard 
Black & Hunt (Edwin Black and Charles E. Hifit), 
house painters, SW cor Sixteenth and Kondel PI 
Blackbourn .John, engineer and overseer Fort Point 
Blackburn .James, stocks, dwl 312 Sixth 
Blackburn L. F. ( Blackburn & Fallon) , dwl Cosmo- 
politan Hotel 
Blackburn & Fallon fL. F. Blackburn and 31. Fal- 
lon), Alhambra Saloon, 32! Bush 
Blacklodge Robert, with Rodgers, Caspari & Co., dwl 

UOfi Pino 
Blackman Abraham, dwl 33 O'Farrell 
Blackman Cassius H., salesman with AYilmerding & 
liellogg, dwl E s Hoff Av bet Sixteenth and Sev- 
enteenth 
Blackman Henry, cook with McKay & Sim, dwl 1127 

Folsom 
Blackman .T. D., teacher Heald's Business College, 

dwl !)25 Jones 
Blackman Morris, tinsmith and plumber, 10^ Hayes 
Blackman Sarah H. Mrs., teacher, dwl W.) Hayes 
Blackman W. H., barkeeper, dwl 1127 Folsom 
Blaekmar Ransom C, clerk 71ii Market, dwl 32 

Fourth 
Blackwell Enoch, trimmer with Charles Molter, dwl 

339 Minna 
Blackwell Horatio S., tinsmith with Thomas Ber- 
tram, dwl 71!> California 
Blackwood Charles H., waiter Russ House 
BLACIvWOOD WILLIAM, real estate, office 109 
California, room 13, dwl NWcor Bryant and Oak 
Grove Av 
Blaeken Charles, laborer S. F. & Pae. Sugar Refinery, 

diyl 959 Bryant 
Blaikie Andrew, draftsman Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works, dwl 2413 Buchanan 
Blaikie James L.,real estate, 507 Montgomery, dwl 7 

Pratt PI 
Blaikie Richard, shipjoiner, dwl S s Sutter bet Web- 
ster and Fillmore 
Blaikie Richard T.. shipjoiner with D. A. Macdonald 

& Co., dwl 153 Third 
Blaikie Sarah Mrs., dwl S s Sutter bet Webster and 

Jilmore 
Blaine Rodman P., bookkeeper, dwl 1301 Leav 

Blair , ui)holstorer, dwl .533 Commercial 

Blair Archibald, civil engineer, dwl 315 Fulton 
Blair Chauncoy S., patternmaker with Palmer, Knox 

& Co., dwl 1304 Lark in 
Blair Frank B., messenger Coiner's Department U. 

S. Mint, dwl lOlS Montgomery 
Blair tieorge W., teamster with Blair & Chase, dwl 

20 Page 
Blair Henry, cabinetmaker, dwl 411 Pacific 
Blair James, oiler P. M. S. S. Colima 
Blair James A. W., boottreer with Einstein Bros. & 

Co., dwl 228 Oak 
Blf ir James C, soapmaker, dwl 8 Zoe, rear 
Blair John G., seaman with Alaska Commercial Co., 

dwl Broadway Hotel 
Blair Lafayette, boots and shoes, 9 Kearny, dwl 319 

Bush 
Blair Matthew {Blnir& Chase), dwl 224 Capp 
Blair Robert, machinist California Machine Works, 

awl 8 /oe, rear 
Blair Samuel, master mariner, dwl 47 Tehama 
^r-?'"fe\*^'^" (widow), furnished rooms, 1018 Mont 
iilair Thomas M., seargent at arms S. F. Stock and 
Lxchange Board, and agent Pacific Hall, dwl 518 
Bush 
Blair William, capenter. dwl 514 Howard 
islair William, painter, dwl 8 Zoo, rear 



Blair & Chase (Matthew Blair and William W. 
Chase I, hay and grain market, opposite S. P. R. 
R. Depot 
Blaise Charles H., clerk Letter Department Wells, 

Fargo k Co.,^dwl 737 Market 
Blake Alexander, clerk with A. M. Simpson Bro. & 

Co., dwl 324 Folsom 
Blake Charles, boxmaker with Hobbs & Gillmore, 

dwl 32 Natoma 
Blake Chas. E. Sr., dentist, dwl 34 Tyler 
Blake Charles E., physician, office 17 Post dwl 34 

Tyler 
Blake Charles F., physician, office and dwl 507 Hayes 
Blake Charles T., contractor, dwl 4 Vernon PI 
Blake C. N., carpenter, dwl 342 Shipley nr Seventh 
Blake Edwin, teamster with George Bryden, dwl 25 

Folsom Av 
Blake Elizabeth (widow), dwl 121 Shipley 
BLAKE FRANCIS /Blake, Rabbins & Co.), res 

Oakland 
Blake Francis, laborer, dwl 12 Broadway 
Blake Frank, tinsmith with S. F. Gas Light Co. 
Blake George (colored), cook, 634 Sacramento, dwl 

820 Jackson 
Blake George M., bookkeeper with Alvinza Hay- 
ward, dwl 11241-2 Folsom 
Blake George W., bookkeeper .321 Montgomery, dwl 

528 Pine 
Blake Greenleaf C., teamster NW cor Sansom and 

Jackson, dwl 113 Franklin 
Blake Henry, whitener, 5 Brooks, rear 
Blake Henry C, notary public and commissioner 

deeds, office 418 Montgomery, dwl 937 Howard 
Blake Henry H. fff. H. Blake & Co.), dwl 810 Leav 
BLAKE H. H. & CO., managers Continental Life 

Insurance Co. of New York, office 302 Mont 
Blake James (Morgan cfc BJ, divl 1002 Montgomery 
Blake James, laborer, dwl 142 Clara 
Blake James, laborer with California Butter Co. 
Blake James, physician, dwl 42 i Sutter 
Blake James W., medical student, dwl 3 Marlha PI 
Blake John, blacksmith Omnibus R. R., dwl 231 

Clara 
Blake John, blacksmith with Nelson k Doble, dwl 

122 Shipley 
Blake John, boot and shoemaker, 974 Folsom 
Bliiko John, carpenter, dwl 27 Fifth Av, rear 
Blake John, harnossmakor, 315 Battery, dwl 108 First 
Blake John, liijuor saloon, 106 First 
Blake John, tailor, 413 Sutter, dwl 332 Sutter 
Blake John (i., bricklayer, dwl 121V2 Gilbert 
Blake John J., salesman with William A. H. God- 
frey, dwl 671 Harrison 
Blake John R. (colored), calker, dwl 914 Pacific 
Blake Julia (widow), dwl 538 Natoma 
Blake Maggie R. (widow), dwl 404 Post 
Blake Mary B. (widow), dwl 2 Leroy PI 
Blake Maurice B., attorney at law, office 729 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 513 Jones 
BLAKE MAURICE C, judge Municipal Criminal 
Court, chambers rooms 16 and 17, 72 1 Montgomery, 
dwl N s Dorland bet Church and Sanchez 
Blake Michael, blacksmith Omnibus R. R., dwl 231 

Clara 
Blake Michael, stableman, dwl 423 Bush 
Blake Philip Henry, real -estate agent, office 306 
Montgomery, dwl cor Ferrie and Point Lobos Av 
BLAKE, ROBBINS k CO. (Francis Blake, Charles 

F. Bobbins, James Mo ffiU, and James W. TowneJ, 
importers and jobbers book, news, writing, and 
wrapping paper, 516 Sacramento and 51'J Com 

Blake S. ( W. & fi. Blake), dwl 228 Fourth 

Blake S. B., commission merchant, dwl 1205 Taylor 

Blake Sumner C, stationery and photographs, ffl7 

Montgomery, dwl 1422 California 
Blake Theodore A. (Ooodyear & B.), dwl 216 Bush 
Blake W. k S., feather cleaners and dyers, 228 Fourth 
Blake Walter, painter, dwl 788 Harrison 
Blake William, stevedore with Whitney AFreese 
Blake William, stockbroker, office 306 Montgomery 

(and W. & S. Blake), dwl 228 Fourth 
Blake William H. (colored), hairdresser with Isaac 

G. Cary, dwl (58) 26 Bernard 
Blakeley Francis, carpenter, dwl 109 Powell 
Blakely Calvin, sash and blindmaker Excelsior Mills, 

dwl W s Brewster, Bernal Heights 
Blakely Edward, fireman with S. F. Gas Light Co.. 

dwl 510 Tehama 
Blakely J. M. (widow), dwl 15 Ellis 
I Blakely John, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 



Fire Insurance at Tariff Rates ; Losses promptly paid by FARNSWORTH & CLARK. 



C. p. VAN" SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers 



Blakely John E., chemist with S. F. Gas Co., dwl 22 

Rausch 
Blakenoy, Thomas .J., dwl Lick House 
Blakev John, pressman Evening Bulletin, dwl 502 

Vallejo 
Blakie Andrew, draftsman Eisdon Iron Works, dwl 

2418 Buchanan 
BLAKISTON JOHN S., sailmaker, 6 and 8 Clay, 

dwl ()0}<; vSeeond 
Blakistnn Robert, sailmaker with John S. Blakiston, 

dwl ()0^.' Second 
Blakloy .John, laborer, dwl lf>^ Minna 
Blanc Alexander, real estate, dwl 117 Dora 
Blanc Amedio, cnriier Guide, dwl 7'!8 Washington 
Blanc Henry, polisher with Chas. Roche 
Blanc Paul, barkeeper with Martin Faure,dwl(i30Pac 
Blanc Stewart, boot and shoemaker, 705 Battery, dwl 

117 Dora 
Blanch Rernnrd, carriagebuilder, dwl 450 Minna 
Blanehard Candice fwidow), dwl 7^1 Natoraa 
Blanehard David f Blanehard i& Haber tin J , dwl 621}^ 

Minna 
Blanehard Frank, coachman with Wm. C. Talbot, 

17 ;0 Jackson 
Blanehard Frank G., hackdriver, dwl 1014 Polk 
BLAXCriABD FRANK H., real estate and notary 

public, oflfico 2:^8 Montsomerv, dwl (iOO Polk 
Blanehard, Henry P. f Williams, B. & Co.), office 218 

California, dwl Grand Hotel 
Blanehard J. P. (widow), boarding, dwl 14 Turk 
Blanehard .Tules, hardware and bed and sofa springs, 

44 Fo'irth, dwl '2'-<&4, Jessie 
Blanehard Lett, messenger Custom House, res Oak- 
land 
Blanchnrd Mareellns, dwl 73 Natoma 
Blanehard M. C, laborer with A. 0. Green 
Blanehard Phineas V., milkranch, cor Old San Josg 

Road and Twenty-sixth 
Blanehard William E., brakeman S. P. R. R., dwl 

30:l Jessie 
BLANCHARD & HABERLIN (David Blanehard 

a')d James Haherlin), liquor saloon, junction 

IMarket and S|itter 
Blanche Euphemia, teacher drawing, wax flowers, 

etc., dwl 8'-15 Howard 
Blanchet Andrew, tailor, dwl 539 Vallejo 
Blanchette Loui^, boot and shoe manufacturer, 42 

Sixth, dwl 520 Sixth 
Blanehfleld Edward J., butcher with Gloason & 

Brother, dwl 519 Bush 
Blanchlield .Tames, laborer, dwl 38 Baldwin Court 
Blanckaert Victor J., barkeeper with Adam Smith, 

dwl <118Calirornia 
Blanckenburg Francis, clerk with Carl Zeile, dwl 528 

Paeitic 
Blanckenburg Theodore, bookkeeper with E. K. 

Howes & Co., dwl IfiOO Taylor 
Blanco Theresa (widow), dwl (J21 Vallejo 
Blaneon Paul, porter with Taylor & Bendel, dwl 522 

Broadway 
Blanding John G., attorney at law, office 606 Mont- 
gomery, rooms 5 and 6, dwl 609 Pine 
Blanding William, attorney at law, office 507 Mont- 
gomery, res Oakland 
Blaney Ambrose, architect and builder, dwl 812 Stock 
Blaney Anna (widow), dwl 129 Folsom, rear 
Blaney Charles, assistant engineer P. M. S. S. Mo- 

hongo 
Blaney E. W., attorney at law, dwl .507 Ellis 
Blaney .James (Comvay & B.l , dwl 263 Jessie 
Blaney John, painter, dwl 507 Ellis 
Blaney John Henry, bookkeeper with Sullivan, Kelly 

& Co., dwl 530 Jessie 
Blaney Oregon, telegraph operator, dwl 812 Stockton 
Blangy Samuel F., potmaker S. F. Glass Works, dwl 

31)2 Brannan 
Blank Anne Mrs., wot nurse, dwl 1419 Powell 
Blank Charles C, baker Eclipse Bakery, dwl 1907 Cal 
Blank .Tacob, machinist with Pacific Rolling Mill Co., 

dwl 628 Howard 
Blank Louis, clerk 519 Kearny, dwl 1216 Powell 
Blank Maurice, real estate, dwl 293 Clementina 
Blanken Henry, proprietor Six-mile House, San Bru- 
no Road 
Blanken Jacob, fireman S. F. P. Woolen Factory, dwl 

cor Polk and North Point 
Blanken Martin, dwl Six-mile House, San Bruno 

Road 
Blankenhorn Charles, butcher with C. Kerr & Co., 

dwl First Av nr Kentucky, South S. F. 



BLANKENHORN FREDERICK, Germania Brew- 
ery, NW cor Mason and Broadway 

Blankman Henry G., real estate, office 205 Sansom, 
room 2, dwl Grand Hotel 

Blankstein Henry N., salesman with David Samuels, 
dwl 11 Ellis 

Blant Samuel, butcher with Bernard McDormott, 
dwl SW cor Bnsh and Polk 

Blasdell Elizabeth F. (widow), dwl 1413 Larkin 

iBIasdell Oorge E., sackmaker with Horace Davis & 
Co., dwl 54 Third 

Blasdell Samuel F., liquidating clerk Custom House, 
dwl 314 Post 

Blasdell. See Blaisdf 11. 

Blaser Adele Mi-^s. dwl 1231 Stockton 

Blaser Rafael, cloakmaker, 10 i Geary 

Blass John C, clerk with C. V. Gillespie, dwl 59 Clem 

Blass Mever (of Bush, B. & Son), office 12 Bush, dwl 
435 Fifth 

Blass Michael, steward with Emil A. Engelberg, dwl 
IS Ellis 

Blasse Edward, clerk with Hermann Toelken, dwl 
NE cor Second and Tehama 

Blas/.kower Marks, clerk with Edward Cohn & Co., 
dwl 337 Clementina 

Blasz.kower Paulina (widow), dwl 337 Clementina 

Blatchlev A. Dr., mining engineer with Angell, 
Palmer k Co., dwl 1013 Stockton 

Blath Fritz, shoemaker with William Fisher, dwl 
Sutter Sit. House 

Blath Siegminid, bookkeeper Patent Brick Co., dwl 
20f! Tvler^ 

Blatten Henry, locksmith, dwl 312 Tehama 

Blattner John J.,"cDntractor, dwl 425 Third 

Blattner Nicholas ( McNally ifc J5.Adwl 80 Everett 

Blattner William J., clerk with Croskey & Whan, 
dwU25 Third 

Bl^si-Edward, metal roofer with Conlin & Roberts, 
- dwl 222 Minna 

Blauvelt Richard D. Jr., depujy recorder City and 
County, dwl 10:! Post /^ 

Blaz. Edward, clerk with H. Toelken, dwl 82 Natoma 

Bledden R., painter, dwl 655 AVashington 

Bledsoe Madison E., barkeeper with Benjamin De 
AVitt, dwl 29 Third 

Bledt Ludwig, shoemaker with Richard Pahl, 73 
Fourth 

Blonnerhassett John, bootmaker, 305 Fourth 

Blennerbassett Richard, shoemaker, dwl 538 How- 
ard, rear 

Blesi Sebastian, shoecutter with I. M. Wentworth & 
Co., dwl 223 Fell 

Blessing Frederick, janitor Pacific Hall, dwl Phila- 
delphia House 

Blethen Charles A., carpenter with Samuel Beal, 
dwl What Cheer House 

Blethen Clement P., shipbuilder, dwl 1117 Geary 

Blethen E. Miss, teacher Tyler St. Cosmopolitan Pri- 
mary School, dwl Windsor House 

Blethen E. 0., clerk with Brittan, Holbrook & Co., 
dwl Windsor House 

Blethen John H., chief wharfinger Board State Har- 
bor Commissioners, office Pacific St. Wharf, dwl 
905 Market 

Bley Abraham, clothing, .54 Third, dwl 1011 Mission 

Bliely Joseph, hairdresser with Joseph F. Campbell, 
dwl St. Nicholas Hotel 

Bliff"ens Thomas V., wharfinger Front St. Wharf, dwl 
1919 Polk 

Blinn Charles H., clerk Forwarding Department 
AVells, Fargo & Co., dwl 331 Fell 

Blinn Cyrus A., carpenter, dwl 141 Silver 

Blinn Helen B. (widow), dwl 542 Second 

Blinn AV. J., shipwright Shipwright's Journeymen 
Association, 71 New Montgomery 

BlinoU John, printer, dwl 112 A^alparaiso 

Bliss George D., butcher, dwl 15'i7 Pacific Av 

Bliss John, cigar manufacturer, 717 Sansom 

Bliss Theodore, stevedore with Monzies, Lowry & 
Bingham, res Oakland 

Blitz Caroline Mrs., dwl 227 Geary 

Bliven Albert P., captain ship Grace Darling, office 
Pier 17 Steuart 

Blivin Samuel N., field-note clerk U. S. Surveyor- 
General, dwl 630 Post 

Bloch Abraham B., clothing and furnishing goods, 
1107 Dupont, dwl 2106 Mason 

Bloch C, dwl 331 Kearny 

Bloch Daniel, merchant, dwl .530 Ellis 

Bloch Isaac F. (Bloch & Davidson), dwl 820 Larkin 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTOBY, 1874-6, H. G. Langley, Pub'r, S. F. Price i 



KENNEDY'S INSUBANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



Bloch Jacob, express wagon, SE cor Sansom and 
Sacramento, dw) 027 Broadway 

Bloch John, dry goods, 2 and 3 Virginia Block, dwl 
1)15 Groen 

Bloch Loon, cashier with John Bloch, dwl 015 Groen 

Bloch William, boots and shoes, 1032 Dupont, dwl 
1028 Dupont 

Bloch & Davidson {Isaac F. Bloch and James W. 
Davidson J , morocco leather manufacturers, fac- 
tory S s Brannan bet Seventh and Eighth, office 
303 Battery 

Blochman Abraham (Blochman & Cerf), dwl 898 
O'Farrell 

Blochman Abraham, merchant, dwl 1018 Stockton 

Blochman E. Mrs., millinery, 30 Kearny, dwl 420 
O'Farrell 

Blochman Emanuel, dwl 420 O'Farrell 

Blochman Lazar, bookkeeper with Abraham Yehl, 
dwl 420 O'Farrell 

Blochman & Cerf (Abraham Blochman and Moise 
Cerf J , commission merchants, office 21 Battery 

BLOCK ABKAM (of A. Block & Co., and Block 
& Furth, San Juan) , office 115 Battery, and pres- 
ident Odd Fellows' Savings Bank, office 325 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 208 Jones 

Block Bernard, bookkeeper with L Glazier & Co., 
dwl 809 Leavenworth 

Block Bertha Miss, teacher Broadway Grammar 
School, dwl 015 Green 

Block E. D., dry-goods dealer, dwl 515 Geary 

Block Israel, clerk with Lewis & Lissner, dwl 18 Ma- 
son 

Block James N., secretary S. F. P. Woolen Factory, 
office 115 Battery, dwl 208 Jones 

Block John, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery, dwl cor 
Sansom and Union 

Block John, tailor, 003 Kearny, dwl 321 Mason 

Block Marcus, clerk with M. A. Wolfe, dwl 324 Ma- 
son 

Block Robert, foreman dredger Winnemucca, dwl 
1105 Powell 

Block & Co. (Abram Block), merchants, office 115 
Battery 

Blockhaus Frederick, clerk with Mathias Wilkins, 
NE cor Chestnut and Mason 

Blodes Theodore (Blodes & Hoivard), dwl 1239 Fol- 
som, rear 

Blodes & Howard (Theodore Blodes and Oeorge 
Howard) , hairdressers, 050 Market 

Blodgett Edwin A., clerk with Brittan, Holbrook & 
Co., dwl 411 Natoma 

Blogg Henry, shoemaker with D. W. Emerson & Co., 
dwl 25!) Minna 

Blohm August, clerk with Louis A. Sage & Co., dwl 
^V' s Alabama nr Twenty-fourth 

Blohm Frederick, driver with Henry Loewenhayn 

Blohm John, porter 322 Clay, dwl 218 Pacific 

Blohm Peter (Blohm <& Oerken) , dwl NE cor Mission 
and Beale 

Blohm & Gerken (Peter Blohm and Claus GerkenJ, 
groceries and liquors, NE cor Mission and Beale 
and SE cor Mission and F'ourth 

Blohme Hermann, groceries and liquors, NE cor Sec- 
ond and Tehama (and Grotheer & Blohme 
Bros.) , dwl 70 Tehama 

Blohme John (Grotheer & Blohme Bros.), dwl NW 
cor Sutter and Polk 

Blohn Louis H. F., book agent, dwl 533 Commercial 

Blomo Henry, cook with John H. Schutt 

Blomgvist Olof, watchmaker with George C. Shreve & 
Co., dwl 1111 Leavenworth 

Blondeau Rene ( Ametie >& B. J , 305>^ Third 

Blondoau Zacharias, cooper and bottler, dwl 834 Val- 
lejo 

Blondell Thomas, drayman 325 Front, dwl 600 Fulton 

Blondin John, shipcarpenter, dwl 1514 Dupont 

BLOOD J. H., attorney at law, notary public, and 
commissioner of deeds, office 23 and 24 Montgom- 
ery Block, dwl N s Seventeenth bet Guerrero and 
Second Av 

Blood Levi L., executor estate Edward Kennedy, dwl 
025 Green 

Blood Mary L. Mrs., assistant seamstress Industrial 
School 

Blood M. L. Mrs., dwl 422 Sutter 

Blood William, sailmaker, dwl 1403 Stockton 

Bloom Abraham, cook, dwl 1123 Dupont 

Bloom Charles, cooper, dwl NW cor Sixth and Bry- 
ant 

Bloom David (L. Dinkelspiel & Co.), dwl 44 Third 



Bloom Elisa Mrs., seamstress White House, dwl 581 

Jones 
Bloom Emily, seamstress White House, dwl 531 Jones 
Bloom H., tanner with Wolf Bloom, dwl E s Folsom 

nr Nineteenth 
Bloom Isaac, peddler, dwl 4 Oregon 
Bloom Joseph (L. Dinkelspiel <& Co.), res Healds- 

burg 
Bloom Samuel, woolpuller and sheepskin tannery, E 

s Folsom nr Nineteenth, dwl NW cor Howard 

and Sixteenth 
Bloom Wolf, woolpuller and sheepskin tannery, E s 

Folsom oet Eighteenth and Nineteenth, dwl 25 

Harriot 
Bloom & Cohn, merchants (Healdsburg, Cal.), oflSce 

111 Battery 
Bloomer F. W., rubbor-typemaker, 311 Pine, dwl 

South S. F. 
Bloomer Hiram G., nursery, W s Railroad At nr 

Tenth Av, South S. F. 
Bloomer John G., operator Fire Alarm and Police 

Telegraph, Brenhara PI, dwl 1810 Dupont 
Bloomer Theodore H., clerk with Richard B. Irwin, 

dwl W s Railroad Av nr Tenth, South S. F. 
Bloomfleld George W., operator Atlantic and Pacific 

Telegraph, office Lick House, dwl Lick House 
Bloomfleld Homer, engineer Pneumatic Gas Co., dwl 

Occidental Hotel 
Bloomfleld Mary G. (widow), dwl 214 Francisco 
Bloor George W., printer, dwl 10 Prospect PI 
Bios Joseph A., express wagon, cor California and 

Battery, dwl NE cor Capp and Nineteenth 
Bloschke William, clerk with John Feohan, dwl NW 

cor First and Natoma 
Blossett Samuel, bootuiaker with Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl N s Linden Av nr Van Ness Av 
Blossom Rock M. Co. (Utah), Robert Stevenson sec- 
retary, office 305 Montgomery 
Blot Henry F. B., collector S. F. Chronicle, dwl 1013 

Washington 
Blow Walter W., bookkeeper with Haggin & Tevis, 

411}< California, res Oakland 
Bloxhem Charles, carpenter, dwl 229 First 
Blucher George, laborer Paeiflc Distillery and Re- 
fining Co., dwl cor Pierce and Chestnut 
Blue Anchor, John L. Schroeder proprietor, 7 and 9 

Washington 
Blue Robert, mate stm Constantino, Clay St. Wharf, 

dwl 1210 Larkin, rear 
Blues William, laborer C. P. R. R. Depot 
Bliiher Henry, clerk with John Brueckner, dwl 906 

Stockton 
Bluit, Michael, buggyman with Pacific Rolling Mill 

Co., dwl Potrero Point 
Blum Adolph, clerk with Ad. Lewis & Co., dwl 702 

Ellis 
Blum Emilie Miss, milliner with Caroline Jordan, 

dwl 1521 Powell 
Blum H., capitalist, dwl 900 Market 
Blum Henry, bakery, 1817 Powell 
Blum Henry, butcher with J. Schweitzer & Co.,'.dwl 

E s Van Ness Av bet Bush and Sutter 
Blum Isidor, furniture broker, office 310 Pine, dwl 

425 Geary 
Blum .Jacob (of Jacob Blum, Dixon, Solano Co.), 

office 117 Battery, dwl 009 Eddy 
Blum Jacob, merchant, dwl 593 Ellis 
Blum Jacques, salesman with Samuel Caro, dwl 322 

Hayes 
Blum John (Porter, B., & Slessinger), dwl 607 Eddy 
Blum John, calkor Shipcalkers' Association 
Blum John, shooting gallery, 824 Sac, dwl 421 Dup 
Blum Leon (J. Schweitzer & Co.) , dwl E s Van Ness 

Av bet Bush and Sutter 
Blum Louis, sackbuyor with Horace Davis & Co., dwl 

922^^ Folsom 
Blum Marcus M., musician, 229 Montgomery, dwl 

1204 Sutter 
Blum Moses, merchant (Vacaville), oflice 117 Battery, 

dwl 003 Eddy 
Blum Patrick, laborer, dwl 310 Austin 
Blum Solomon, liquor dealer, dwl S s Fifteenth nr 

Guerrero 
Blum William, steward, dwl 11 Hinckley 
Blumberg Julius P., commission merchant, 306 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 14353-^ Mission 
Blume Charles, laborer, dwl 33 Rausch 
Blume Frank, mattressmaker with Henry Frank, 

dwl 22 Scott PI 
Blume Henry, bootmaker, 649 Merchant 



MEBIDEN PIRE INS. CO. OF CONN.; Assets over $300,000 ; Farnsworth & Clark, Agta. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708. 712." 714, and 716 Kearny Street. Fancy Goods. 



BLU 



107 



BOC 



Blumel Lebracht, tailor, dwl E s Columbia nr Twen- 
ty-fourth J 1 1 , -.- 
Blumeubeig Jacob H., real estate, office and dwl lis 

SanFom 
Blumenberg Julius J., dwl 22o Bush 
Blumenberg's Building, SW cor Pine and Sansom 
Blumentbal Edward M., shoemaker, dwl 207 Minna 
Blumenthal Henry, butcher, Clay St. Market, dwl 

1.305 Mason 
Blumenthal Henry M., dwl 5 Caroline 
Blumenthal Julius, dry goods, 214 i'hird, dwl 12 Hyde 
Blumer Jacob Jr., compositor Alta California, dwl ti27 
California . , t , ^-,^111 

Blundell Henry, sailmaker with John Guilford, dwl 

Blundell J. Mrs., furnished rooms, 700 Broadway 
Blundell James, restaurant, lo03K Stockton, dwl m 

Broadway . , ^t » ^ 

Blunt AmvC. Miss, seamstress with Norcross & Co., 

dwl 1160 Taylor . , ^. , . ^ , n a ^ 
Blunt John P., clerk with Einstein Bros. & Co., dwl 

1100 Taylor , „ ^ 

Blunt Phineas U., assistant storekeeper Custom 

House, dwl 1100 Taylor 
Blunt William G., surveyor, dwl 1100 Taylor 
Blutt Micheal, laborer Pacific Boiling Mills, dwl 

Louisiana nr Twentieth ,,,„„-rr 

BLUXOME ISAAC iBluxome & Co.), dwl 1103 Van 

Ness Av , re J 

Bluxome Joseph, physician and surgeon, omce and 
dwl 30<i Stockton 

Bluxome Sarah, dwl 1103 Van Ness Av 

BLUXOME & CO. (Isaac Bluxome), coal, iron, and 
metals, 204 and 20ii Sansom 

Bly Lander A., machinehand Excelsior Mills, dwl 
811 Mason ^ , 

Blv Nannv S. (widow), dwl 808 Bush 

BlVthe Harrv, capitalist, dwl 109 O'Farrell 

Blvthe Henrs-, lumber dealer, dwl 2olo Sacramento 

Blythe Henrv Jr., salesman with Starbird & Gold- 
stone, dwl S s Sac bet Fillmore and Steiner 

Blythe John, calker, Shipcalkers' Assn, 713 Mission 

Blvthe Mary (widow), dwl 503 Folsom 

Blythe T H., dwl 159 Third 

Blythe William J., musician, dwl 283 Stevenson 

B'nai B'rith Library Association, 10) Post 

Boaken Henrv, laborer Pacific Distillery and Ketin- 
ing Co., dwl cor Filbert and Fillmore . 

BOALT JOHN H., attorney at law and president 
Stetefeldt Furnace Co., office 410 Montgomery, 
res Oakland 

Boalt. See Boldt, Bolt , , . ,;r- • a 

Boam P., musician, dwl Sixteenth bet Mission and 
Valeileia , . , „„ _. ,, 

Boam Philip B., watchmaker and jeweler, 38 bixtli, 
dwl 521 Stevenson .^^ , . 

BOARD OF BROKERS (old), William Burling pres- 
ident, Franklin Lawton secretary, rooms 411/^ 
California , ,„ ^ -r o -t 

BOARD OF BROKERS (new), T. J. L. Smiley pres- 
ident, W. W. Lawton secretary, rooms 423 tali- 

BOARD OF*COMMISSTOXERS CITY HALL, office 
cor McAllister and Leavenworth t^t^ot. 

BOARD OF COMMISSIOXEKS FUNDED DEBT 
1855, office 2 City Hall, first floor „„„ t^t^, 

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS S. F. FIRE DE- 
PARTMENT, office 23 Kearny -TBT^rnA 

BOA.RD OF COMMISSIONERS U. S. A. IRRIGA- 
TION, office 5:« Kearny 

BOARD OF EDUCATION, 22 City Hall, second floor 

BOARD OF EDUCATION, committee rooms lb City 

BOARD i'fIxGINEERS IMPROVEMENT SAN 

ANTONIO HARBOR, office 5:« Kearny 
BOAIU) OF ENGINEERS U. S. A. Pacific Coast, 

BOARD OF Equalization, office 3 city Haii, 

Bo1rI)"oF FisH COMMISSIONERS, office 401 Cal- 
ifornia ^ 
BOARD OF HEALTH, office 124 Gearv 
BOARD OF PHARMACY, rooms 728 Montgomery 
BOARD OF PILOT EXAMINERS, office 34 Mer- 

BOARi) OT^POLICE COMMISSIONERS, room 11. 

CitrHaU, first floor ^ ^ ,,. ^ , 

BOARD OF PORT WARDENS, office 52o Front 
BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS, office City Hall, sec- 
ond floor 



BOARD OF REGENTS UNIVERSITY OF CALI- 
FORNIA, office 320 Sansom . m , 

BOARD OF RELIEF !Masonic\ Masonic Temple 

BOARD OF REVENUE FUND COMMLSsION- 
ERS, office 2 City Hall, first floor „^„^^ ^^,, 

BOARD OF SAILOR BOARDING-HOLSE COM- 
MISSIONERS (Marine Boardi, office 302 Davis 

BOARDOF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS, 
office 414 Montgomery „„„.,„,, , 

BOARD OP SUPERVISORS, 3 City Hall, second 

BOAflD OF SUPERVISORS, Clerk of, office 4 City 
BOAllDOF TID E-LAND COMMISSIONERS, office 

BOARD ^"^UNDERWRITERS, AMSTERDAM, 
James de Fremery agent, office 710 sansom^ 

BOARD UNDERWRITERS, BORDEAUX, Henry , 
Schroder & Co. agents, office SW cor Battery • 
and Washington , „ -r. t I 

Board Underwriters, Boston, Joseph S. Bacon agent, i 
office 405 Front „ „ ^. 

BOARD UNDERWRITER.S, BREMEN, C.F. Me- 
bius agent, office 307 Sacramento 

BOARD UNDERWRITERS, FRENCH, Belloc 
Freres agents, office 524 Montgomery 

BOARD UNDERWRITERS, HAMBURG, Hell- 
man Brothers & Co. agents, office SW cor Front 

BOARD UxNDER WRITERS, LONDON LLOYDS, 
Falkner, Bell & Co. agents, office 4.30 California 

BOARD UNDERWRITERS, NEW YORK, A. T. 
Fletcher agent, office 318 California 

BOARD UNDERWRITERS, PHILADELPHIA, 
A. T. Fletcher agent, office 318 California 

BOARD UNDERWRITERS, S. F. FIRE, Charles 
D. Haven secretary, office lit} California 

BOARD UNDERWRITERS. S. F. MARINE, C. T. 
Hookins secretarv, office 318 California 

BOARDING-MASTERS' ASSOCIATION, Casey & 
Chute agents, office lilO Front 

BOARDMAN GEORGE C, manager ^tna Insur- 
ance Co., office 14 Merchants' Exchange, dwl 
Grand Hotel , . j , j i ,010 

Boardman John H., coffee and spice dealer, dwl 1210 

Boardman Joseph, real estate, dwl NW cor Brannan 
and Boardman PI , .,. ^ ^ 

Boardman Patrick R., seaman, dwl 41o East 

Boarman Louis, waiter Grand Hotel 

Boarman Marv (widow), dwl 2318 Howard 

Boas Judah, stockbroker, office 420 Montgomery, 
room 4, dwl .555>^ Minna ,, „ ttt 1 

Bobet Adolph L., brassfinisher Kmgwell & W eed, 
dwl 59 Shipley 

Bobier John, gardener, dwl NE cor Twenty-seventh 
and Sanchez 

Bobiez J., dwl 1318 Dupont 

Bobos Antonio, chop house, NE cor Battery and Fil- 
bert ^ ^ . 

BobstCvrusE., dwl 72o California , , ,™, 

Boccardo Luigi, baker with B. Ratto & Co., dwl 427 

Boccia Angelo, barkeeper with Angelo Bona, dwl 

310 Kearny 
Bocelli Lazaro, laborer, dwl Garibaldi Hotel 
Boch Rudolph, dwl 421 Sixth 
Bochau William, pilot stm Oriflamme, Oregon b. b. 

Co. 
Bocher George, salesman with Frederick Klotz, dwl 

1G20 Stockton „ ^ ^ , <v,o 

Bock F., porter with Feigenbaam & Co., dwl 228 

Bush _ , 

Bock II., engineer Yolo Mills, dwl 228 Bush 
Bock James, tailor, dwl ;t7 Natoma 
Bock John, sugar refiner, dwl II42V2 Market , , _ . 
Bock John, tailor with C. C. Hastings & Co., dwl <4o 

745 Howard , „„ „. ,, 

Bock Joseph .De??!W^ct- £. A dwl 30 Sixth 
Bocken Henry, restaurant, 045 W ashmgton, dwl fell 

Union, rear . . t,* c-- 1. x 

Bocker John, basketmaker with Henry; bieburst, 

dwl 037 Broadway ^ . ^ ^^^ ,, « 

Bockmann D. H., porter with D. N. & E. Walter & 

Co., dwl 219 Tehama ^ , o^, t, t, 

Bockmann l^rederick, porter 414 Clay, dwl 3o7 Kush 
Bockner William, porkpacker with S. F. Packing 

and Provision Co., dwl 7 Varenne 
Bocqueraz Antoine fSJiea, Bocqueraz & McKee), 

dwl (32t) California 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



KENNEDY'S INSUKANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, represents $12,000,000. 



Boda Louis, carbuildor S. P. R. R. 

Roflo Aflolrih W. (HaslfPll &TIJ, dwl 518 Rrannan 

Bodo CharloM II. III. Bode & Co.), NW cor Fourth 

and Townsend 
Bodo Eid'i fIT. Bode <fc Co J, dwl NWcor Fourth and 

BODE GEOKGE C, proprietor Battory St. U. S. 

liondod Warohonso, NW cor Battory and Filbert, 

divl 1210 ('alifornia 
Bodo II. <fc Co. (Charles TT. and Eide Bodel ,Uq\ioTS 

and cigars, NW cor Fourth and 'I'ownscnd 
Bodo llonry I'll. Bode <t- Co. J, dwl I'J liliixoino 
Bode llonry, waiter, dwl United States Holol 
Bodo Lewis, confectioner with Dexter Si Co. 
Bodo Ijouis, wagonmakor, dwl 18 Eleventh 
Bode William, barkeeper with .John Gingg, dwl|0 

(Jninev 
Bodo William, sash and blindrnaker, dwl •'JIS Brasi 
Bi'id 'cker liOnis, niiisieian, dwl 102 Ureen 
r>;idi'cker Mina (widow), dwl 102 Green 
Biidecker Wilholm, musician, dwl 402 Green 
Boden .lohn F., court-room clerk Fourth District 

(!ourt, dwl f>24 Filbert 
Boden .lohn II. (John FT. Boden <t' Co.), dwl S s 

Chestnut hot .Jones and Leavenworth 
Boden .John JI. & Co. (Jidius Quinchard) , CMSiovi- 

houso brokers, 50) Battery 
Boden P. (widow), dwl 705 (jroenwich 
Bodfi«h AV. II., attorney at law, office (il2 Clay, dwl 

257 Clara 
Bodfish H. S., master mariner, dwl 257 Clara 
Bodjon A. & Son (John BodienJ, upholsterers, 902 

i'Vilsom 
Bodien Adolph (A. Bodien & SonJ, dwl 0()2 Folsom 
Bodien .John ''A. Bodien & SonJ, dwl 01(2 Folsom 
Bodl<in Eli/a Miss, dressmaker, 218 Second 
Lodlvin Sariih Miss, dressmaker, 2)8 Second 
Bodkin Thomas, plasterer, dwl 110 Shipley 
Bodson Theodore, blacksmith with Alexander Bour- 
geois, dwl 029 Vallejo 
Bodw >11 .losetih, shoetnakor, dwl 417 Bush 
BODWELL llABl'.Y II. (Ativood & BodiveUJ , (lw\ 

E s Bartl.itt bot Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Bodwell .Joseph B., bootmaker, dwl i:il8 Bnpont 
Boo Dotlef, cabinetmaker Pacific U. W. Furniture M. 

Co. 
Boeck Christian, cook with Schepor & Ivomayor, dwl 

10 Nat(uiia 
I3ooel<e Adolidi, silversmith with Koehlor & Bitter, 

dwl Sl'{, Stevenson 
Boeckman (loorgo, porter with H. P. Wakoloo, dwl 

8:i7 Bush 
Boockman .Johan 0., miner, dwl lOIOV;^ Mason 
Boege Henry, driver with Rossbach & Hyatt, dwl 

I'M Fern Av 
Boogel Charles, silversmith with Schultz & Fischer, 

dwl 818 Stevenson 
Boehm .Jacob, waiter, dwl 1113 Dupont 
Boohmo Frederick L., musician, dwl SE cor^Stockton 

and Pacific 
Boehme. AVr? Bohm 
Boejzo B., teamster with T. H. Solby & Co., dwl SW 

cor Powell and Vallejo 
Boell Edward A., sash and blindmaker with B. & 

J. S. Poo, dwl 315 Fifth 
Boeokmann Dotrick IL, porter, dwl 219 Tehama 
Boerif^ke F. E. ( Boericke & Tafrl) ,Yon Philadrdphia 
BOERICKE WILLIAM, manager Homeopathic 

I'harmacv, 234 Sutter, dwl 13 Monroe 
BOERICKE & TAFEL (F. JS. Boericke, and A. J. 

Ta/ei/', proprietors Homeopathic Pharmacy, 234 

Sutter 
Boorn Charles, expressman, cor Clay and East 
Boero (ierolmo, cook, dwl 5 .Jasper PI 
Boes Mi(!haol, teamster, dwl !t4il Folsom 
Boose Diodorich, painter, dwl NW cor Dupont and 

Pacific 
BrESCII EMILE, lamp manufacturer, NE corMont- 

gcuuory and Jackson, dwl NW cor Jackson and 

Montgomery 
BOESE HENRY J., Golden Gate Market, SE cor 

Davis and Clark, dwl 2110 Mason 
Bootteher Deidrioh, clerk with Henry Gerht, N W cor 

Fifth and Folsom 
Boettcher Raul, salesman 221 Kearny, dwl 209 Minna 
Boot/,el George, hostler with Philip Morshead, dwl 848 

Howard 
Bofor William (William Bo/er <& Co.), res Germany 
Bofer William & Co. (Adolph MarquardJ , imiiOTters 

and retail hardware, BlO Sacramento 



Bofingor Jacob, silverplator, dwl 1(118 Powell 
Bogan Charles, commission merchant, dwl W a Wall 

PI nr .lackson 
Bogan Charles, tanner with Bloch & Davidson, dwl 

(322 Sixth 
Bogan John, salesman, dwl N s Green bet Hyde and 

Lark in 
Bogan Phillip TL, longshoreman, dwl De Boom bot 

Kirst and Second 
BOGARDUS JOHN P., publisher and proprietor 

Figaro and Pacific Law Betiorter. office .5.32 Mer- 
chant, dwl N s Delgardo Rl nr Hyde 
Bogardiis AVilliam, engineer Engine No. 9, S. F. F. D., 

320 Main 
Bogart Charles, carriage painter, dwl 96'! Mission 
Pogart .1. C, captain P. M. S. S. Gipsey, dwl 15 Stock 
Bogart .John M., stock broker, office nil's California, 

res Oakland 
Bogart Joseph N., with Boobar & Richardson, dwl 

315 Third 
BOGART ORLANDO IL, cashier Pacific Bank and 

airent R. H. McDonald, dwl r.(21 Sacramento 
Bogart William F., clerk with Richard B. Noyos, dwl 

1021 Sacramento 
Bogasch Eugene, clerk with John Schneider, dwl 6 

St. Charles PI 
Bogel C. H., groceries and litiuors, SWeor Washing- 
ton and VVaverly I'l 
Bogel Theodore, merchant, office 203 Battery 
Boger F. Edward, driver with llemmo & Reuter, dwl 

29 Kearny 
Bogert William G., jeweler with Charles Lemme, 

dwl Alhambra Building 
Bogert William T. (Bogert & Caldwell), dwl 513 

Montgouiery 
Bogert k Caldwell (William T. Bogert and Theodore 

C. Cnldwdl) , managers Marsh Truss Co., 513 

Montgomery 
Boggan (Jw(>n, groceries and liquors, NE cor Bush 

and Buchanan 
Bogle .Joseph S., boafbuildor with Samuel L. Bock- 

with, dwl 524 Sixth 
Bogle William, framomakor with Sanborn, Vail & 

Co., dwl SW cor Ohio and Broadway 
Bogle \V'illiam 11., special policeman, dwl (510 Powell 
Bogler Frederick, truckman with Levi Strauss &Co., 

dwl 110 Taylor 
Bogler Mary (widow), dwl 110 Taylor 
Bognor Bernard, engraver with Larson & Wilson, 

dwl 519 Geary 
Bogner Charles, tailor, 11 Sutter, dwl 519 Geary 
Bogner Charles .Jr., watchmaker, dwl 519 (Joary 
Boguo Bernard, laborer with Palmer, Knox & Co., 

dwl 13 Sherwood 1*1 
Bogue Felix, clerk with John G. Kelly, dwl 305 

Seventh 
Boguo Hugh, helper with Savage & Son, dwl St. 

Nicholas Hotel 
Bogue Michael, milkranch, Presidio 
Bogy William, laborer Masonic Cemetery, dwl Cem- 
etery Av nr Rest 
Bohan .James, gardener, dwl 20 Oak Grove Av 
Bohan Patrick, barkeeper 52 i Mission, dwl 2 Chelsea 
Bohan Thomas, hostler with William McCatforty, 

dwl E s Mission bet Twi-ntieth and Twenty-first 
Bohannan Anne (widow), dwl 118ii Harrison 
Bohannan .John !<]., compositor Monitor 
Bohannen Edward, expressman, cor Dup and Com 
BOHEMIAN CLUB, rooms 031 Sacramento cor Webb 
Bohen Benjamin F., policeman City Hall, dwl 1425 

Pine 
Bohen GeorgoT.,survoyor Union Ins. Co.,dwl (517 Pine 
Bohen James, miner, dwl Empire Hotel 
Bohen John, laborer, dwl 521 Shotwoll, roar 
B6hen Matthew, fireman S. F. and Pac. Sugar Co., 

dwl 42(1 Shipley 
Bohen Michael, miner, dwl Empire Hotel 
Bohen Miles, laborer S. F. and Pac. Sugar Co., dwl 

420 Shiiiley 
Bohen Patrick, saloon, dwl 3 Chesloy 
Bohen Timothy, laborer Laborers' Pro. Ben. Assn, 

818 Howard 
Bohen William, laborer with James Hartley & Co., 

dwl 520 Mission 
Bohlo William, seaman, dwl 9 Washington 
Bohlor James, longshoreman, dwl 24 Howard, rear 
Bohling C, clerk with Becker Bros., SE cor Turk and 

Lark in 
Bohling Henry (Bohlina & Behrens), dwl NE cor 

Twenty-fourth and Potrero Av 



PABNSWORTH & CLARK, Gen'l Fire and Marine Insurance Agency; office 230 Cal, St. 



P ¥1 



MANUKACrUREKS OF 



Jewelry and Silver Ware, 




Also. DIAMOND. ENAMELED AND OUARTZ JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER. 



ITo. 620 H/LKB-CHAXTT STKSST, 



Between Keainy and MontgonuMy, 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



HOM<EOPATHIC 




PHARMACEUTISTS AND PUBLISHERS. 



BOBRIGKE; d^ TAFSD^ 

234 Sutter St., Young Men's Christian Association Bldg., San Francisco. 



MEDICINE CASES for Physicians and Families. This is the only estab- 
lishment on the Pacific Coast exclusively devoted to Homoeopathy. 



*108 



ELLIS READ 

SHIPPING 



-AND — 






iiiiibiifii Miiilii 



/\I0. 304 GAL/FOR/H/A STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



THOIS/TA^S DAY, 



Importer and Dealvr in all kinds of 



GAS FIXTURES 

335 PINE STREET, NEAR MONTGOMERY. 



Iron PlR all Sizes, for easJateraniSteaiD, 

IN LOTS TO SUIT, TOGETHER WITH 

ELBOWS, TEES, RETURN BENDS, STOP COCKS, PLUGS, 
BUSHINGS, NIPPLES, ETC., ETC. 



Wi^mgM It^a ftp© ©alTaml^jei^ t@E WiLt©^» ©t©« 

Buildings fitted up with Gas and Water Pipes. 

Rubber Hose, Hose Bibbs, Hose Pipes, etc. Plumbers' Basins, etc., etc. 
Copper Boilers, Bath Tubs, etc. 

*100 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Glassware and Toys. 



Bohling & Behrens (Henry Bohling and John F- 
BehrensI , groceries and liquors, NE cor Potrero 
Av and Twenty-fourth 

Bohlmann llormann.clork with Ebbinghausen&Co., 
dwl SE cor Third and Howard 

Bohm John, porter with Ureenebaum & Bro., dwl 
714 Geary 

Bohm VV. & Co., manufacturing jewelers, 61ii Moreh 

Bohm William (\V. Bohm cfe Co.l, dwl VV s Valencia 
bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Bohm William, shipwright. Shipwrights' Journey- 
men Assn, 71 New Montgomery 

Bohm. See Boehme 

Bohn Andrew, conductor Central R. R., dwl 803 Bry- 

Bohn Daniel, lauudryman, dwl S s Vandowatar nr 

Powell 
Bohn Hoin, carpenter, dwl 39 Jackson , o„r 

Bohn Henry, foreman Pioneer Warehouse, dwl bW 

cor Battery and Filbert 
Bohn John, stoves and tinware, 112 bovonth 
Bohn John Jr., tinsmith with John Bohn, dwl 112 

Seventh 
Bohn L., tailor, dwl 1123 Dupont 
Bohn Mary A. (widow), dwl S s Vandewater nr Pow 
Bohrdon John, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl 122 

Bohs Henry, groceries and lictuors, NW cor Seventh 

and Minna , t-. i t 

Boice Charles J)e S., collector Fireman's luind in- 
surance Co., dwl 53o Natoma 
Boic.3. *'ee Boyce ,^-,^r,^ .^ 

Boido Dominico, boots and shoes, IVMy^ Stockton 
Boio George, llourpacker with Horace Davis & Co., 

dwl 12 Lewis 
Boigt Minna (widow), furnished rooms, :;>04 Minna 
Boillon Angole, carpenter, dwl u45 Bioadway, roar 
Boiro Louis, clerk with Michel Levy, dwl Ij Morey 

Alley, rear 
Boiso Gerston, captain sloop Challenge, Market St. 
Wharf 

rilirvTitsQ onTiinotmnkBr 4!)1 Urannar, 

Stock- 



Boisnet Alphonse, cabinetmaker, 491 Brannan^ 
Boisse Eugene, hairdresser, 52u Com, dwl lb05 S 



ton 



Boisse Gaston, shipbuilder, dwl 1805 Stockton 
Boisseau Emil (Boisseau& Son) , dwl 1 Chelsea PI 
Boisseau Gabriel, hairdressing saloon, 738 Pacific, 

dwl Bush bat Stockton and Powell 
Boisseau Jean (Boisseau tfc Son), dwl 1 Chelsea PI 
Boisseau & Son (Jean and Emil Boisseau), hoot and 

shoemakers, 324 Dupont 
Boissjiior Edouard, bookkeeper with St. Denis & 

Chosney, dwl 327>4 Chestnut 
Boisson Francis, butter, cheese and eggs 43 and 44 

Washington ^Market, dwl White Hoaso Hotel 
Bok William, carpenter, dwl 824 Harrison 
Bokee David M., secretary Manhattan Marble Co. of 

Cal., office 319 Pine, dwl 1015 Leavenworth 
Bokee Vernon M., bookkeeper, dwl 715 Lush 
Bolado Joa'juin, real estate, office 535 Clay, dwl 528 

Sutter 
Bolan James, carriage driver, dwl 19 Everett 
Bolan John, waiter American Exchange 
Bolan Lewis, stevedore P. M. S. S. Co. 
Bolan Martin, paver, dwl 5 Lick 
Bolan M. J., physician, office 235 Kearny 
Boland Bridget (widow), dwl 109 Shipley 
Boland Edward, bookkeeper with Bluxomo & Co., 

dwl 109 Shipley , , . t .i 

Boland James (Stieger & B.J, dwl 211) Leavenworth 
Boland John, butcher, dwl SE cor O'rarrell and 

Taylor 
Boland Lawrence, coachman, dwl 214 Broadway 
Boland Michael C, harnessmakor with J ohn O'Kane, 

dwl S s Twentieth bet Dolores and Church 
Boland R. J. (Donnicliff& B.), dwl 322 Sixth 
Boland Robert, barkeeper, dwl 322 Sixth 
Boland William H., assistant weigher Custom House, 

dwl 24 Minna 
Bolandor C. (widow), furnished rooms, 738 Market 
Bolander F., silversmith, dwl 219 First 
Bolander Henry N., State superintendent public in- 
struction, dwl 1231 Mission 
Bolasca Antonio, watchman P. M. S. S. Arizona 
Boldemann Adolph, cook, dwl 132 Olive Av 
Bolden J. B., butcher, dwl 428 Broadway 
Boldt John, with W. A. Church, dwl d3i Commercial 
Bole Constant, brickmaker, dwl 82J Broadway, roar 
Bole James, bookkeeper with Forbes Bros., dwl 225 

Second 



Bole John, driver City R. R., dwl NW cor Mission 
and Sixteenth . 

Bole John, groceries and liauors, SW cor Mission and 
Seventh , » ^^ ,1 

Bole John, teamster with William Lund & Co., dwl 
909 Battery, rear 

Bole William, boarding and lodging, 22a Second 

Boloy Susan, boarding, 54 Third 

Bolger John, boilermaker, dwl 44b Clementina, 

Bolgor John, plasterer, dwl 335 Shipley bet Seventh 

and Eighth 
Bolger Solomon, teamster, dwl 22 Folsom Av 
Bolgor Thomas, bookkeeper with McNally &. Haw- 
kins, dwl 945 Howard 
Bolin George, bricklayer, Bricklayers' Protective 

Association, 234 Sutter 
Boling George, plasterer, dwl 519 Bush 
Bolis Nicholas, seaman, dwl 13 Washington 
Bolivor Patrick, slater, dwl 553 Mission 
BOLIVIA CONSUL, F. Herrera, otlice331 Mont 
BoUaudor Ericson, silversmith; dwl 219 First 
Bolle Henry, wine merchant (Solano Co.), dwl 323 
Clementina ^ , , i,i- ^ 

Bolle Nelson, tailor with L. Morris & Son, dwl Mont- 
gomery Hotel . , X Tr 
Bollenhagen Henry, barkeeper with Jamos Vance, 
dwl 4:iO Jackson , , , ,n^. 
Boiler Frederick J. (F. J. Boiler <fc Co.), dwll824 

Stockton , , _„ 

Boiler F. J. & Co. (Victor Schmid) , market, SE cor 

Stockton and Lombard 
BoUes Frederick, captain stm Ajax, dwl 421 Har 
Bo lies. See Bowles , , ,„ 

BoUier Paul, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl 12 

Welsh 
Bolliger Jacob, barkeeper with John J. Streuli, dwl 

414 Dupont 
Bollin John, moldcr, dwl 152 First 
Boiling George K., musician, dwl 948 Howard, roar 
Bollinger Edward, clerk with S. Mosgrove & Co., dwl 

SJ4 Folsom „ ,, , 

Bollinger John C, collector, office oOa Montgomery, 

res Oakland 
Bollinger Joseph, barkeeper, dwl 208 Seventh, rear 
Bollinger Nicholas, market, 411 East, dwl 322 Broad- 
way, rear . , t 
Bollinger Richard, blacksmith with Daniel J. 
Shield, d.vl 321 Greon , ,r,,r t^ .i 
Bollinger William, millhand, dwl NW cor Fourth 

and Mission , 

Bollman John, Russian ciganto manufacturer, olO 

Broadway, dwl 515 O'Farrell 
Bollor Frederick J., market, 1230 Dupont, dwl cor 

Lombard and Stockton 
Bolsghero August, cook, dwll021 Clay , , ^t-t. 

Bolster Thomas, driver with Lyon & Co., dwl JNE 

cor F'ranklin and Linden Av 
Bolte Henry, molder with Adolph Hanke, dwl cor 

Main and Harrison 
Bolte Mary (widow), liixuor saloon, 1014 Kearny 
Bolte Peter, boarding, 32 Kausch , . . 

Bolte William L., salesman with Sol Wangenheim & 

Co., dwl 1018 Market 
Bolter Frank, agent S. F. Chronicle, dwl 748 Howard 
Boltmann Henry, cartman, dwl N s Maria nr Chos- 

ley 
Bolton Edward, storekeeper Union Club, 403 Mont 
BOLTON JAMES R.,capitalist, office 818 Merchant, 

dwl NW cor Greenwich and Jones 
Bolton John H., bookkeeper with Miller & Lux, dwl 

821 Third 
Bolton JohnS., machinist, dwl 029 Folsom 
Bolton Robert (colored), waiter, dwl lo Pinckney 
Bolton Thomas, haokman, dwl 121 Montgomery 
Bolts John (Keeleu •& B.) , dwl Sixth bet Howard 

anil Mission 
Boltz Albert R., restaurant, 250 Fourth 
Bolz Valentine, butcher with M. Selig k Co. 
Boman Charles E., carpenter, 1 Powell, dwl Bay 

Bomaster James, cabinetmaker with W. J. T. Palmer 

& Co., dwl 708 Filbert ^^ t t^ 

Bomfield Samuel, captain schooner N. L. Drew, 

Market St. Wharf 
Bona Angolo, Squarza's punches, wines, and liquors, 

120 Leidesdorff, dwl 310 Kearny 
Bona Gabriel, barkeeper, dwl 310 Kearny 
Bonach Bernard, restaurantkeeper,dwl 43 Second 
Bonach Mary E. Mrs., furnished rooms, 43 Second 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTOBY, 1874-6, will be published September. 1874. 



Ii. W. gEjru-EDlT. General Insurance Agent. Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



BON" 



110 



BOO 



Bonacina Angelo, woodcarver with Field & Frei 

dwl 25}'2 Zoo ' 

Bonac-ina Joseph, foreman with L. & E. Emanuel 

uH'l rj:^ Brannan, rear ' 

Bonacina Joseph Jr., bookkeeper with Bryant & 

btrahan, dwl 24 Calilbrnia 
Bona! Jean, shoemaker, dwl 034 Vallejo 
Boiialdi ti. B. (Pardini, Jones <t BJ, dwl 621>< 

Union 
Bonavia Nicola, fresco painter, dwl 572 Folsom 

Bond , laborer, dwl 533 Commercial . 

bond (xuadalupe (widow), dwl 533 Green 

Bond Harry, confectioner, dwl 251 Stevenson 

Bond bamuel D., hats and caps, 59 Second, and hair- 

dresser with Heider d Co., dwl 950 Mission 
iiondor Lotus, farmer, dwl 13 Pacific 
•Gondii P., laborer French Hospital, S s Bryant bet 

iitth and Sixth 
Bonds Dora Miss, shirtmaker, dwl 1220 Powell 
Boner David, upholsterer, varnisher, etc., 1102 Ma- 
son 
Boner Eliza (widow), dwl 721 Broadway 
Bunerand John, baker with Good k Tschurr, dwl 1230 

Dupont 
Bone?teel Charles A., salesman with John G. Hodge 

k Co., dwl 718 California 
Bonestel Charles D., with Carloton E. AVatkins, dwl 

oo/ Calitornia 
Bonestell John T. (California Jewelry Co.), dwl 60S 

Slitter 
BONESTELL LOUIS H., manager John G. Hodge 

k Co., dwl bOa Sutter 
Bonotti Guiseppe, cutlerygrinder, dwl 6 Polk Lane 
Lonfiglio Iv leollo, baker with B. Ratto & Co., dwl 4''7 

i aeific 
Bongert John M., cartman, dwl 623 Broadway 
Bonglet Celestine, Hayes Park Laundry, 525-529 

Hayes 
Bonham George D., carpenter, dwl 636 Commercial 
Lonitaca Sarah Miss, teacher, dwl 14 Hampton PI 
liomtacio Giheri (Bonifacio <j& Peirano), dwl 1015 

Clay 
Bonifacio & Peirano (Gilieri Bonifacio and Gocomo 
Peirano J, flints and confectionery, NE cor Wa«h- 
iiigton and Stockton 
Bonifield James T., stevedore, dwl 332 Main 
lionig Henry, miner, bds German Hotel 
lionig Herman, miner, bds German Hotel 
l^onis Marcellin, butcher, NW cor Dap and Morton 
Jionis 1 lerre D., veterinary surgeon, 214 Stevenson 
iionn 1<. W. Albert, gilder with Snow & Boos, dwl 111 

(jreary 
Bonn Henry, bookkeeper with Lang & Co., dwl 5 Mor- 
■ ton 

Bonna John, marblepolisher with J. & A.Morris, 

dwl Vallejo bet Kearny and Montgomery 
Lonnard August, cleaner with Alexandre Bertin, dwl 

iS W cor Dupont and Vallejo 
Bonnard Eureka A. Miss, teacher Spring Valley 

Grammar School, dwl 1409 Jackson 
Honnard Francis A. (Bonnard <& Daly), dwl 1409 

Jackson 
Bonnard Marriane Miss, teacher Geary St. Cosmo- 
politan School, dwl 1409 Jackson 
Bonnard i Daly (Francis A. Bonnard and Bernard 

U. Daly), book and job printers, ti29 Wash 
Bonimrdel Hippolyte, tailor, dwl 1022 Dupont 
iionnelondGastave J., bookkeeper French Mutual 

Benevolent Society, dwl 335 Minna 
Bonncll Allison C, cashier S. F. Bulletin Co.. dwl W 

s Capp nr Twenty-fifth 
Bonnell Edwin, payingteller Savings and Loan So- 

ciety, dwl 709 Tavlor 
Bonnoll Henry, clerk with Franfois A. Eouleau, dwl 

W s Capp nr Twenty-fifth 
Bonnell John T., salesman with William H. Cum- 

mmgs, dwl 12 Willow Av 
Bonnell Kate Miss, teacher Larkin St. Primary 

behool, dwl W s Capp nr Twentv-fitth 
^n^n",^7;r'- 7-"^*°^ -^^^'^ ^oxMQ, dv^l 3 Clara Lane 
^onner Christian, pianotuner, dwl 811 Stockton 
Jionner Henry, dairyman with John A. Roy. dwl W 

s ban Bruno Road nr Thirteenth 

and E41i''^' P°'^'=<'™'^°' <i«'l ^^' ^ Webster bet Eddy 
Bonner John, engineer S. P. R. R. Co., dwl E s Ala- 

bama bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Bonner Rosa (widow), dwl 1114 Post 

"""Te^t'h^rij^iiolrd^" '• ^- ^- ^- ^°- ^^^ ''-Si- 



BONNET B., contractor asphaltum work and brick- 
maker, office 402 xMontgomery, room 3. dwl 7 
(Vashington Av 
Bonnet Elio, foreman with B. Bonnet, dwl NW cor 

iwent3'-third and Sanchez 
BONNET L. Mme., ladies' hairdresser, 25 Post 
lionnet Lawrence, laborer with G. Venard, dwl 62.5 

r ront 
Bonnet Paul, hairdealer, 25 Post 
Bonnetti Vincent, laborer, dwl 8 Polk Lane 
Bonney Charles, carpenter, divl 907 Larkin 
Rpi\Pvirx^''''^r°,°r^^^°^^''' ^"■^'^ 1205 Stockton 
liUxNAEi ULPHA Jr., manufacturer woodworking 
machinery, band saws, etc., 221 Mission, dwl NE 
cor btevenson and Twentieth 
Bonnifield J. T., stevedore and hosoman Engine No. 
T^^ ' '^' '^- *• D-. •'520 Main 
^*^^,-^i^ GEORGE (George C. Shreve & Co.), dwl 

31034 Stockton 
Bonny Joseph, porter with Geo. C. Johnson & Co., 

dwl 24 < Stevenson 
Bons George, butcher, dwl 611 Pacific 
Bonsai Edivard C, chief clerk Subsistence Depart- 

ment U. S. A., dwl 1623 Sacramento 
Bonstel j\ illis T., salesman with John G. Hodge & 

Co., dwl ;04 Pine 
Bonynge Charles W., stock broker, office 402 Mont- 

gomery, room 4, dwl 816 Sutter 
Bontan J. L., shipwright Shipwrights' Journeymen 

Association, 71 New Montgomery 
Boobar Elijah C. (Boobar & Richardson), dwl 554 

l^olsom 
Boobar James, piledriver with Boobar & Richard- 
son, dwl 554 Folsom 
Boobar k Richardson (E. C. Boobar and W. L. Rich- 
ardson), piledriver and wharf building, NW cor 
Steuart and Howard 
Boobarg Gustav, steward, S31 East 
Loockmeyer Otto W ., seaman, dwl 9 Washington 
Roohan Patrick, hostler, dwl Fulton bet Steiner and 

Pierce 
Booker Frederick, seaman stm Newbern, Front St. 

\v harf 
Booker George E., clerk Spring Valley Water W. Co., 

dwl 04 Tehama 
Booker H. E. (widow), fancy goods and trimmings, 14 

Second, dwl 04 Tehama 
BOOKER W. LANE, H. B. M. consul California, 
Uregon, and U ashington Territory, office 319 Cal- 
ilornia, dwl Union Club 
Bookstavor Charles H., clerk, dwl 734 Tehama 
Rookstaver Henry, driver with George Kaiser & 

Co. 
Bookstaver Mary J. (widow), dwl 734 Tehama 
Bookstaver Walter, salesman 537 Kearny 
Bool N., miner, dwl 227 Second 

Boole Frank A., bookkeeper with Flint, Peabody & 
Co., dwl W s Diamond bet Twenty -first and 
iwenty-second 
Boole George, shipbuilder, dwl W s Diamond nr 

iwenty-first 
Boole William A. ( Middlemas & B.), dwl SW cor 

i air Oaks and Twentv-tourth 
Boom John (colored), cook with John T. Callender, 

dwl o Broadwav 
Boom William, truckman H. and L. No. 2, S. F. F. 

D., 627 Broadway 
Boomsma Albert, saloon, 1029 Kearny 
^^^^^c. Charles E., plumber with George Milne, dwl 

828 Union, rear 
Boone John L. (Deivey & Co.), dwl S s Twentieth bet 

Guercero and Dolores 
Boop John D., watchman U. S. Mint, dwl 104 Sixth 
Booream Margaret Mrs., dwl 133 Perry 
Boos George, brewer with Kleinclaus, Fauss & Co.. 

dwl SE cor jN ineteenth and Mission 
Booth Adam (Adam Boolh & Co.;, dwl 1713 Mason 
Booth Adam & Co. (Rufas Keyserj, produce commis- 
sion, 125 Davis 
Booth Albert I., machinist, dwl 743 Pine 
Booth Andrew G., attorney at law, office 604 Mer- 
chant, dwl 558 Minna 
Booth A. T. machinist with California Jewelry Co., 

dwl b27 Caliiornia 
Booth Charles H., shipwright Shipwrights' Journey- 

nien Association, 71 New Montgomery 
Booth Charles S., machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 

11 iehama 
Booth David, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 11 
iehama 



MISSISSIPpY^^Il.i^ p. & M. INS. CO.; Assets ^50^000 ; Parnsworth & Clark. AgtB. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 



Booth David C, oiler with Loroy T. Hutchinson, dwl 

N s Twenty-second nr Treat Av 
Booth (.Tcorge A. (Gunnison & B.) , attorney at law, 

office IJ04 Merchant, dwl 558 Minna 
BOOTH HENKY J., president Western Savings and 

Trust Co. (and H. J. Booth & Co.), office 213 

Sansom, dwl 501 Harrison 
BOOTH H. .J. & CO. (George W. Prescotiand Irving 

M. Scott ', proprietors Union Iron Works, NE cor 

Mission and First 
Booth Hosoa, dairyman with N. Simonds, dwl NW 

cor Twenty-fourth and Vermont 
Booth James, blacksmith with A. Muir & Co., dwl 

Manhattan House 
Booth James, spinner S. F. P. Woolen Factory, dwl 

SW cor Larkin and Beach 
Booth .John, dwl 612 Stockton 
Booth Jonathan, spinner S. F. P. Woolen Factory, 

dwl SW cor Larkin and Beach 
Booth Lucius A., commission merchant, 402 Front, 

res Oakland 
BOOTH NEWTON (W. W. Dodge d- Co J, res Sacra- 
mento City 
Booth llobert, tanner with Christian Hellwig, dwl 

cor Serpentine Av and Columbia 
Booth S., oyster dealer, dwl Morton House 
Booth Samuel, laborer Custom House, dwl 512 Shot- 
well 
Booth William, dwl 42 Tehama 
Booth William H., with AVilliam B. Hooper & Co., 

dwl llo Stockton 
Boothby Adolph, restaurant, 42 Steuart 
Boothby August, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery, dwl 

232 (jrreen 
Boothbv David N., clerk with A. L. Bancroft & Co., 

dwl .507 Ellis 
Boothby Ezekiel, drayman with Roth & Vidoau, 

dwl 287 Oak 
Boothby William L., dwl 507 Ellis 
Bootz Adam, proprietor Bootz Hotel, 435 Pine 
Bootz Adam J., with Adam Bootz, dwl 435 Pino 
Bootz Andrew (colored), dwl 5 Broadway 
Boque Michael, milkman, dwl NE cor Union and 

Webster 
Boquist Charles V., miner, dwl W s Shotwell nr 

Twenty-first 
Borbeck John, cigars, N s Montgomery Av nr Kear- 
ny, dwl 503 Pacific 
Barboa Jesus, artificial flowermaker, dwl 12 Auburn 
Borchalt John H., carpenter, dwl 1200 Green 
Borehardt Herman, salesman with Aekerman Bros., 

dwl 5513-2 Natoma 
Borchors August, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery, dwl 

31 AltaPl 
Borchers J. C, physician, office and dwl 540 Wash 
BOKCHEKS JOHN H., groceries and linuors, 5;32 

First 
Borchers William, carpenter, dwl 26 Oak Grove Av, 

rear 
Borchers William, master mariner, dwl 4 Eincon PI 
Bordage Jeanty, porter, dwl 1413 Dupont 
Borde Emeilie Mrs., laundry, 808 Stockton 
Borde Frederick, expressman, cor Sacramento and 

Montgomery, dwl 101(3 Powell 
Borde Julian, bootcrimpor, SlOJo Stevenson 
BORDEAUX BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS, 

Henry Schroder & Co. agents, SW cor Battery 

and AV'ashington 
Bordeaux Victor, dwl 28 Hunt 
Borden Catherine Mrs., confectionery, 911 Folsom 
Borden H. R., patternmaker with Hinckley & Co., 

dwl tiU!) Third 
Borden Michael, boilermaker with P. M. S. S. Co., 

dwl Oil Folsom 
Bordenwall Jenny (widow), doctress, dwl 535 Green 
Bordes J can Louis, machinist with Jean Ortet, 223 

Leidesdorff 
Bordinavc John, baker with Messner & Bastian.dwl 

3!'8 Pacific 
Bordinavo Joseph, butcher with Paul Husson, dwl 

cor Fifth and Railroad Av, South S. F. 
Bordinavo Pierre, baker, dwl 03(5 Pacific 
Bordner Henry, dwl Heinz's Hotel 
Bordner Jacob, carpenter Russ House 
Bordner Thomas, shoemaker with John O'Sullivan, 

dwl SW cor Dupont and Post 
Bordt Henry A., clerk with D. H. Wulzen, dwl NE 

cor Ninth and Folsom 
Bordt John, clerk with Herman Siedonburg, NW 

cor Kearny and Green 



Bordt William, clerk with Christopher Hack, dwl 

NE cor Sacramento and M^averly PI 
BORDWELL GEORGE, architect, office 515 Califor- 
nia, dwl 3 Froelon 
Bardwcll George A., draftsman with J. P. Gaynor, 

dwl 3 Freelon 
Bordwell Walcott H. (Bordwell & Mailer J , dwl 530 

Bryant 
BORDWELL & MALTER (Walcott IT. Bordivell 

and George II. Mailer), mechanical engineers 

and millwrights, office 515 California 
Borel Alfred (Alfred. Borel & Co.), res Switzerland 
BOREL ALFRED & CO. ( Antoine Borel) , bankers, 

NW cor Montgomery and Clay 
Borel Antoine ( Alfred Borel & C'o.y, and vice-consul 

for Switzerland, dwl 02't Pine 
Borel Francis A., wholesale butcher, Fifth Av nr 

Kentucky, office 15 Montgomery Block (and Bo- 
rel & BayleJ , dwl S s Santa Clara nr Hampshire 
Borel Leon, cook with Poureho & Witmanu, dwl 530 

Washington 
Borel & Bayle (Francis A. Borel and John Bayle), 

tripe, preserved meats, etc., 83 California Market 
Borella Angelo, with E. Brunior, dwl 531 Vallejo 
Borg Charles, waiter with Carlo i5erti,dwl 132 Pacific 
Borgart J., truckman H. and L. No. 1, S. F. F. D., 22 

U'FarroU 
Borger Louis, express wagon, NE cor Battery and 

Washington, dwl 515 Bryant 
Borger Christian, wood and coal, 11 and 13 Taylor 
Borges John M., seaman, dwl SW cor Drumm and 

Oregon 
Borgstrom Jennie, milliner, 1118 Dupont 
Boi-gstrom Minnie Mrs., milliner, (il4 Broadway 
Borgstrom Peter, tailor with George L. Reynolds, dwl 

014 Broadway 
Boris Lambert, clothing and furnishing goods, 1127 

Dupont 
Borker Solomon, agent, dwl 331 Montgomery 
Borkbiui Henry, regimental tailor, 30 Geary 
Borland James, driver with Donnelly & Tuito, dwl 

228 First 
Borland Samuel H., barkeeper with James Buckley, 

dwl 705 Howard 
Borland Samuel H. Mrs., dressmaking, 765 Howard 
Borle Gustavus, carpenter, dwl 545 Jessie 
Borlo Louis (James Connelly & Co.), dwl 547 Jessie 
Borman Fred., clerk with Frederick Lankenau, NE 

cor Powell and Ellis 
Borman .Joseph, milker with E. W. Klevesahl, dwl 

cor Chestnut and Scott 
Borman William, crackerbaker, dwl 21 Anna 
Bormann Albert, butcher with C. Junker, dwl 128 

Oak 
Bormann Ferdinand, butcher, dwl 1413 Dupont 
Boruiemason John, cleaner with Alexandre Bertin, 

dwl 701 Clay 
Born Charles, chiropodist, .535 Geary 
Born Phillip, collector, dwl 23 Morton 
Borne Jacob, laborer German Hospital, 427 Brannan 
Bornemann Ferdinand H., bookkeeper with M'ilmer- 

ding ct Kellogg, dwl !)5 Fifteenth 
Bornemann Francis (J., cashier U. S. Assistant Treas- 
urer's Office, dwl S s Thirteenth bet F'ol and How 
Bornemann Hartwig, artjst, dwl 913 Clay 
Borner Adolph, porter Swiss Hotel, 027 Commercial 
Borner Christian, pianomaker with Benjamin Curtaz 
Bornett Antonio, baker with Giovanni Malatesta, 

dwl 1313 Dupont 
Born hold Bendix (Bornhold & Kohnke) , dwl 274 

Jessie 
Bornhold & Kohnke (Bendix Bornhold and Fritz 

Kohnke > , oyster and chop house, 518 Battery 
Bornhoret Hermann, cabinetmaker Pacific U. W. 

F'urniture M. Co. 
Borns Mary Miss, shoefitter vrith Buckingham & 

Hecht, dwl 214 Ritch 
Bernstein Bt-rtha Miss, teacher Market St. Primary 

School, dwl 821 Post 
Bernstein Bros. & Co. (Julius and Max Bornstein 

and Herman lioman) , gents' furnishing goods, 

822 Market and 108 Fourth 
Bornstein Herman, peddler, dwl 414 Tehama 
Bornstein Julius (Bornstein Bros, cfe Co.), dwl 12 

Hyde 
Bornstein Louis (Bon^stein & Vickers), dwl 801 Stock 
Bornstein Max (Bornstein Bros. <& Co.), dwl 12 Hyde 
Bornstein & Vickers (Louis Bornstein, and John L. 

Vickers) , restaurant, 801 Stockton 
Borntrager D., miner, dwl 933 Kearny 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOBY circulates throughout the Pacific Coast. 



KENNEDY'S INSURANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



Borren K., upholsterer, dwl 2>) Clementina 

Boriilo Antonia (widow), dwl 1824 Powell 

Boiruiaun John C, groceries and liquors, SW cor 
i^ighth and Howard 

Borronieo Augustine, boots and shoes, 420 Pacific 

Borrowe \V., clerk P. M. S. S. Co. 

Borsch Nicholas, conductor N. B. and Mission R. K., 
dwl Miller PI 

Bortea Margaret (widow), dwl 30 Lewis PI 

Bortteld Ernest, president Pacilic U.W. Furniture M. 
Co., dwl 24J4 Garden 

Borthwick Charles, bookkeeper with Pacific Saw 
JMaiiUlacturing Co., dwl 1218 Kearny 

Borth.vick Kobert, porter with Wellinan, Peck & Co., 
dwl 008 rihipley bet Seventh and Eighth 

Boruck Marcus L). f Chase it £j , dwl 714 O'Farrell 

Bosch llyman, tailor, dwl 8O0 Montgomery 

Boschen Nicholas, groceries and liiiuors, NE cor 
iitth and Minna 

Boschke Albert, civil engineer, dwl Cottage PI nr 
Taylor 

Bose Johanna (widow), dwl 8:53 Vallojo 

Bose John, tringemaker with William Englander, 
dwl E s Nebraska nr El Dorado 

Boslield ,.dwl 622 Filbert 

Boslar John, butcher, dwl i> Howard Court 

Bosq Komainu, laundry, dwl 1023 Sutter, rear 

Bosq Sylvan, laundryman with John Chauvel, 1005 
iVlarket 

Bosquet Andrew, porter with A. P. Hotaling & Co., 
dwl lli^'2 John 

Bosquet Eluiso (widow), dressmaker, 1028 Kearny 

BUSQUI EDWAlii) {Edward liosgui & Co. and R. 
J. Bush & Co.) , dwl 814 Lombard 

BOSQL' i EI) \V AK1> Jf CO., printers, stationers, book- 
binders, and engravers, SE cor Clay and Leid 

Boss Albert \V'., carpenter, dwl NW cor Broadway 
and Kearny 

Boss (jeorge, teamster, dwl 404 Capp 

Boss Henry, cabinetmaker with (i. Ueffinger & Co., 
dwl 21 Garden 

Boss J acob, machinist with Louis Chely, dwl 24 Gar- 
den 

Boss Mary M. (widow), dwl 715 Broadway 

Bossity Josephine Miss, fursewer with Lachman & 
Sttrnt'els. dwl 2)7 Minna 

Bost John W. iBost <k Jenkins) , res Oakland 

BOST ii JENlviNS (John W. Bost and Timothy F. 
Jenkins) , real-estate agents, otHce 331 Mont 

Bostick Horace M., clerk with George I. Ivos, dwl 
701 Stockton 

BOSTUN BUAKD UNDERWRITERS, Joseph S. Ba- 
con agent, office 405 Front 

BOSTON CRACKER BAKERY, Judson H. Clark 
proprietor, 3i Geary 

Boston Furniture Store, Henry Luchsinger & Co. pro- 
prietors, 735 Market 

Boston House, John F. Hinrichs proprietor, 119 Jack 

Boston House, Miss Mary Cerrigan proprietress, 759- 
701 Mission 

Boston indexical Soap Co., Henry F. Marsh agent, 
200 Sansom 

Boston Joseph (Oray, Jones & Co.), res Santa Cruz 

BOSTON MASTIC KOOFING, N. P. Ferine proprie- 
tor, office 038 Market 

Boston Mary W. (widow), dwl 120 Turk, rear 

BOSTON RUBBER SHOE CO., Hecht Bros. & Co. 
agents, lOo Sansom 

Bostrom Peter, mariner, dwl 120 Clara 

Bostwick John H., farmer, dwl 818 Lombard 

Bostwick Sarah (widow), lodgings, 3 Hardie PI 

Boswell Frederick, barkeeper with James Irvine 

Boswell S. B. (Edivard F. Hall & Co.;, dwl 1103 Bush 

Boswick Robert (colored), jobber, W 3 Ellick Alley 
nr Pacitic 

Bosworth C. W., cook, dwl What Cheer House 

Bosworth George F., compositor Examiner, dwl 1024 
Montgomery 

Bosworth Henry M., organist and teacher music, 
office 13J Ivearny, dwl :i Stockton 

BOSWORTH WILLIAM, mining, office 432 Mont- 
gomery room 5, dwl 125 Ellis 

Botcher Albert, groceries and liquors, NW cor Bu- 
chanan and McAllister 

Both i\. W'., cooper with Cutting & Co., dwl 2223^ 
Kitch 

Bothe Sojjhia, midwife, dwl 247 Stevenson 

Bothin Henry E., dwliiOj Van Ness Av 

Bothmann Frederick, expressman, dwl 2 Brannan 
PI 



Bottazini Louis A., pressman with Spaulding & Bar- 
to, dwl 825 Jackson 
Bottelmi Alwern, porter, dwl New Alaska Hotel 
Bottger John, groceries and liquors, SE cor Seven- 
teenth and Mission 
Bottiger Christian, musician, dwl 418 Powell 
Bottner John, ca:i)enti--r Caliibrnia !Mills,dwi 1 Welsh 
Botto Joseph, fisherman, dwl 425 Filbert 
Bottomloy Charles, driver Central R. R., dwl 2406 

Post 
Bottomley James, porter with Babcock & Gould, dwl 

510 Sixteenth 
Bottomley John (D. R. Billings & Co.), dwl SE cor 

Montgomery and Vallejo 
Bottron Ferdinand, cabinetmaker, dwl 8 August 

Alley 
Botts Charles T., attorney at law, office (JO Merchants' 

Exchange, res Oakland 
Bouar Jacob, baker, dwl 223 Fifth 
Bouchard George, compositor Courrier de San Fran- 
cisco, dwl ylH Clay 
Bouche t^aul, butcher, dwl 1123 Dupont 
Boucher Charles, laborer, dwl 112 Beale, rear 
Boucher Eugene, merchant tailor, 537 Sacramento, 

d.vl 8ll'2 Montgomery 
Boucher Henry, boilermaker with McAfee, Spiers & 

Co., dwl 1 Bertha 
Boucher James, porter 117 Battery 
Boucher Thomas, boilermaker with McAfee, Spiers 

& Co., dwl 1 Beilha 
Boucherd Samuel, cabinetmaker with John C. Bell, 

dwl 7J4 Langton 
Bouchet Julius, chocolate manufacturer with E. Guit- 

tard k Co. 
Bouchier James, shoemaker, dwl 550 Stevenson 
Bouchon B., gardener with P. Berges, Mountain Lake 
Boudar Jacques, laundryman with John Chouvel, 

dwl 1005 Market 
Boudin Isidore (Boudin& GleizesJ, dwl 43(5 Green, 

rear 
Boudin Louis, upholsterer with James W. Burnham & 

Co., dwl W s Mission bet Twenty-third and Twen- 
ty-fourth 
Boudin ic Glcizes f Isidore Boudin and Benjamin 

Gleizes', bakery. 43v) tlreen, rear 
Boudon Alcide, laundry, 2111 Mason 
Boue H., nurse French Hospital, S s Bryant bet Fifth 

and Sixth 
Boue Henry, bookkeeper, dwl 720 Vallejo 
Boue Henry Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 720 Vallejo 
Boueholz Gustav, blacksmith with Barz k. Suhl, dwl 

1418 Powell 
BouSe Ernest, with J. W. Davidson & Co., dwl 803 

Montgomery 
Bougrand M., dwl 1318 Dupont 
Bougraud Louis, laundryman with Claud Chatelaine, 

dwl 534 Vallejo 
Boukofsky E., merchant, dwl 923 Howard 
Boulais Joseph, shoemaker with Charles Palmer, 

dwl 130 Jessie 
Boulanger Mariner C, coal and charcoal, ll'i3 How 
Boulanger Pierre, real estate, dwl o2i California 
Bould'.n Steiihen S., carpenter, dwl Vermont bet 

Butte and Napa 
Boulin Pierre, carpenter, dwl 517 Filbert 
Boullet Joseph, teacher music, dwl 317 Clementina 
Boullet Olivia (widow), dwl 317 Clementina 
Boulogne Edward, artist, dwl 823 Montgomery 
Boulon Etienne, real estate, dwl 013 Union, rear 
Boulon S., dwl 3 Berry 
Boulot L., cook Occidental Hotel 
Bounop Henry, sea baths, SW cor Beach and Hyde 
Bourchardt Herman, clerk with Ackerman Brothers, 

dwl 0)1)2 Natoma 
Bourdeaux Emily Mme., dyer, 46 Second 
Bourdon Pierre, vegetable dealer, dwl W s Virginia, 

rear, nr Pacific 
Bourgeois Alexandre, carriage factory, 630 Broadway 
Bourgeois Louis, steward, dwl 1328 California 
Bourgoin Adel (widow), dwl SW cor Octavia and 

O'Farrell 
Bourgoin Adolph, jeweler, 1120 Dupont 
Bourguignon Ernest P., shoemaker with Orin Jones, 

dwl 1034 Kearny 
Bourjade Cheri P., liquor merchant, 1528 Dupont cor 

Filbert 
Bourjade Jules, salesman with G. D. Mariani, dwl 

E s Filbert nr Dupont 
BOURN WILLIAM B., capitalist, office 401 Califor- 
nia, dwl 1105 Taylor ^ 



BPBINGFIELD FIBE & MAK'E INS. CO. ; Assets, $1,100,000 ; Farnsworth & Clark, Agts. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny St., Importers and Jobbers. 



BOURNE ELISHA W., secretary Merchants' Mu- 
tual Marine Insurance Co., office iO J California, 
dwH28 Bryant 
Bourne Frederick, dwi 1117 Montgomery 
Courne John B., member Cal. Stock Exchange Board, 

dwl 2107 Jones 
Bourne Richard A., shoemaker, 025 Merchant third 

floor, dwl 42! Stevenson 
Bourquin Charles, dentist, 802 Washington 
Boursur Edouard, butcher Lick House, dwl UOo Stock 
Bousfield E. li., assayor with assay office Swiss Amer- 
ican Rank, dwl N s Eilbort bet Stock and Row 
Bousquet A. M. (widow), dyer and scourer, 217 Fourth 
Boutard Charles, laundry, 528 Hayes 
Boutell Alexander A., importer tobacco and cigars, 

office 2UUCalitornia 
Boutes James E., barkeeper with Coon & O'Reilly, 

dwl 11U7 Montgomery 
Boutinon All'red, baker, dwl 021 Vallcdo 
Boutinon Simon (Boutinoii <t BuUand) , dwl 530 

Merchant 
Boutinon & Rutland (Simon Boutinon and Benoit 

BullandJ , restaurant, 580 Merchant 
Bouton Daniel i Bouton A SonJ , dwl 11^7 Wash 
Bouton Francis U. (Bouton ct Son/ , dwl 1227 Wash 
Bouton ife Son (Daniel and Francis G. Bouton) , liv- 
ery stable, 1010 Stockton, and proprietors Occi- 
dental Hotel Coaches 
Bouvet J ulos, French laundry, 710 Vallejo 
Boiiwman Bernard, dwl i Harriet 
Rovee Claud, carpenter, dwl 43 Second 
Bovee James S., dwl 1214 Union 
Bovee William H., real estate, oflBce 238 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 1007 Powell 
Bovee William R., inspector Custom House, dwl 739 

Green 
Bovee William R., steward U. S. Restaurant, dwl 

515 Sacramento 
ROVU GARRIEL, wholesale wines and liquors, 1300 

Dupont 
Bovyer ^Villiam L., carpenter and builder, SE cor 

Commercial and Loidesdorff, dwl 40S Austin 
Bow Joseph, dwl 7o0 Eolsom 
Row Margaret (widow), laundress, dwl S s Tyler nr 

Buchanan 
Bowcher James (Wood & B.J, dwl 705 Hyde 
Bowden Anna (widow), dwl E s Mission bet Twenty- 
first and Twenty-second 
Bowden Bridget (widow), dwl 312 Folsom, rear 
Rowden John, laborer, dwl 2 Liberty 
Rowdon Joseph, carrier Alta California, 529 Cal 
Rowdon Nelson, shoemaker with Joseph Lavigne, 

dwl 229 Third 
Rowden Samuel H. N., master mariner, dwl 148 Sil- 
ver 
Rowden William, painter, dwl 1113 Filbert 
Rowdish Melville S., salesman with Charles A. Haw- 
ley i& Co., dwl 2) Twellth 
Bowen A. G. W., accountant, dwl 725 California 
Bowen Agnes, chambermaid Nucleus House 
Bowen Albert (Bowen tfc NeivmanJ , dwl cor Kearny 

and Union 
Bowen Albert H., merchant, dwl 1310 Pacific 
Bowen Archibald J., stevedore, dwl NE cor Mont- 
gomery and Alta PI 
BOAVEN BROS, i Pardon M. and Charles E. Bowen) , 
wholesale and retail groceries, provisions, etc., 
428, 430, and 432 Pine, and 408 Eleventh (Uak- 
landi 
Bowen Catherine (widow), dwl 44 Louisa 
BOWEN CHARLES E. (Bowen Bros.), dwl 1139 

Sutter 
Bowen Charles R. (Hawley, B. & Co.), dwl 429 Sixth 
Bowen L>., laundryman Occidental Hotel 
Bowea Daniel, printer, dwl 39 Everett 
Bowen Daniel, shipcarpenter. dwl 540 Folsom 
Bowen Dennis, hostler with N. Gray & Co., dwl 442 

Jessie 
BOWEN, DODS & CO. (J. B. Boiven, T. W. Bowen, 
and James X)ocisy, pork packers and butchers, 941 
i'olsom 
Bowen E. C, foreman pressroom Coiner's Depart- 
ment U. S. Mint, dwl ^'allejo nr Leavenworth 
Bowen Edgar J., seedsman, 804-808 Sansom, dwl 1711 

Webster 
Bowen Edward, laborer, dwl 819 Kearny 
Bowen Elizabeth, dwl 803 Montgomery 
Bowen Frances R. (widow), dwl 25 Russ 
Bowen Franklin, miner, dwl 403 Broadway 
Bowen George, carpenter, dwl 808 Pacific 



Bowen George H., miller with Horace Davis & Co., 

dwl E s Devisadero bet Turk and Eddy 
Bowen James, driver N. R. and Mission R. R. 
Rowen James, laborer, dwl 455 Clementina 
Rowen James R. (Bowen, Dods & Co.) , dwl 944 Fol 
Rowen Johannah (widow), dwl 30 Everett 
Rowen John, brassfinioher, dwl Virginia Rlock 
Rowen John, coachman with Poter Spreckels, E s 

Thirteenth bet Howard and Mission 
Rowen John, laborer New City Hall, dwl 81 Everett 
Rowen John, laborer with Main & Winchester, dwl 

Shotwell bet iSineteenth and Twentieth 
Bowen John L., tinsmith with Osgood & Stetson, dwl 

129 Bernard 
Bowen Joseph, papercarrier, dwl 1107 Filbert 
Jiowen Kate, chambermaid Occidental Hotel 
Bowen Lydia (widow), dwl 121 Bernard 
Bowen Maria, chambermaid Occidental Hotel 
Bowen ^lichael, laborer, dwl 211 Folsom, rear 
Bowen Michiiol, hiborer, dwl 915 Market 
Bowen Milton A., liquor dealer, dwl 2219 Leav 
BOWEN PARDON M. (Bowea Bros.), dwl 1139 

Sutter 
Rowen Reuben W., bookbinder with Bartling& Kim- 
ball, dwl o7>^ Langton 
Bowen Rosina (widow), dwl 15053^ Franklin 
Bowen R. P. (widow), dwl 821 and 823 California 
Rowen Samuel W., clerk with Dalton & Gray, res 

Oakland 
Bowen Thomas (Boiven & Slocum) , dwl 1106 Sac 
Rowen Thomas W. (Bowen, Dods & Co.), dwl SE cor 

Twellth and Folsom 
Rowen \Villiam Jr., painter, dwl 1113 Filbert 
Bowen k Newman (Albert Boivea and Philip New- 
man), butchers, 1 Metropolitan Market 
BOWEN & SLOCUM (Thomas Bowen and Lot Dean 
Slocum), Excelsior Livery Stable, 021-925 Sutter 
Rowens Mary (widow, colored), dwl 1510 Mason 
Bowens Thomas S., clerk with J. Mcllwain & Bro., 

dwl 28 Everett 
Rower Frank, laborer with Staud & Bro., dwl Ni- 
agara House 
Bower George, miner, dwl 246 Tehama 
Rovver John, cooper with Mason & Co., dwl Palm 

House 
Bowering George, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Rowers Caroline (widow), dwl 10 Frederick 
Rowers Catherine (widow), dwl 11 Natoma 
Rowers Ronjamin D., expressman, cor Market and 

Post, dwl E s Steiner bet Geary and O'Farrell 
Rowers Henry, maltster, dwl 522 Filbert, rear 
Rowers Jacob, shipwright Shipwrights' Journey- 
men Association, 71 iNew Montgomery 
Rowers John i'., agent Kittredgo's Safes, 212 Sansom, 

dwl 1005 Jones 
Rowers M. Co. (Gold Hill, Nov.), W. H. Watson sec- 
retary, office 302 Montgomery 
Bowers S. T., bricklayer Bricklayers' Protective As- 
sociation, 2;i4 Sutter 
Bowers T. R., expressman, cor Market and Post 
Rowers Thomas, waiter King St. House, Berry bet 

Third and Fourth 
Bowery Con. Mill and M. Co, (Ely, Nov.), Charles E. 

Elliot secretary, office 419 California 
Rowes Caroline A., dressmaker, dwl 0195^ Minna 
Rowes John M., weigher Clay St. Wharf, dwl 019J^ 

Minna 
Bowie A. J., physician, office 022 Clay, and president 
faculty Medical Department University College, 
dwl 1010 Rush 
Rowio Augustus J. Jr., mining engineer, office 302 

Calilornia, dwl 438 Rryant 
ROWIE HE.NKY P., attorney at law, office 318 Cal- 
ifornia third floor, dwl 1010 Bush 
Bowie Wallace A., dealer paper and paper bags, dwl 

717 Howard 
Bowl George, clerk U. S. Army Headquarters, 105 

Stockton, dwl 912 Howard 
Bowlan James, hackdriver, dwl 19 Everett 
Rowland Frank, dwl 405 Kearny 
Rowlen Mary, chambermaid Occidental Hotel 
Rowlen Thomas H,, foreman with Ronton &, Son, Oc- 
cidental Hotel Coaches 
Bowles George R., carpenter with Henry Darrow, 

203>^ Post 
Bowles James, books and stationery, SE cor Leides- 

dorif and Com, dwl NVV cor Clay and Stockton 
Bowles John, driver City R. R., dwl Railroad House 
Bowles Richard, laborer Union Iron Works, dwl 41 
Minna 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIBECTORY, 1874-6, H. G. Langley, Pub'r, S. F. Price $5. 



Ii. "W. KENNEDY, General Insurance Agent, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



Bowles Thomas, laborer with G. B. Dougherty, dwl 

SE cor Bay and Jones 
Bowles. See Bolles 
Bowloy Frederick S., engineer S. P. R. R., dwl 1427 

Howard 
Bowley Henry L., bookkeeper with Grego & Bowley, 

dwl 428 Bryant 
Bowley Samuel C. (Crego & BJ , dwl 423 Bryant 
Bowlin James, bricklayer, dwl 225 Perry, rear 
Bowlin Thomas, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Bowman Amos, topographical and mining engineer, 

dwl 17 Rondel PI 
Bowman Arthur W., real-estate agent, office 523 

Montgomery, res Oakland 
Bowman Charles, clerk C. P. R. R., dwl 716 Front 
Bowman E. B. (widow, colored), dwl 513 Broadway 
Bowman Eliza Miss, saleswoman 730 Market 
Bowman Frank, stovomounter with Brittan, Hol- 

brook & Co., dwl 825 Harrison 
Bowman Frank E., boxmaker S. F. Cooperative Box 

Factory, dwl 410 Capp 
Bowman Horace W.,molder California Mills, dwl410 

Capp 
Bowman James, clerk special agent Post-office De- 
partment, dwl 714 Broadway 
Bowman James F., journalist, dwl 1005 Clay 
Bowman Joel K., money broker, dwl 158 Tehama 
Bowman John, cook, dwl 015 Commercial 
Bowman John, engineer, dwl 39 Clementina 
Bowman John S. (Liebes &B.), dwl S)04 Leav 
Bowman Joseph, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Bowman Joseph E., conductor N. B. and Mission R. 

R., dwl 30;.)>^ Clementina 
Bowman Michael (Lachman <& BJ, dwl 945 Mission 
Bowman P. E. (widow), dwl 1808 Taylor, rear 
Bowman Peter, laborer, dwl SW cor Laguna and Fil- 
bert 
Bowman Samuel, driver Market St. Railway, dwl 

SVV cor Laguna and Grove 
Bowman William, boottreer with Einstein Bros. & 

Co., dwl SE corOctavia and Page 
Bowmiin William, tobacconist, dwl 907 Clay 
Bowman. See Boman 
Bown Frederick, dwl 12 Page 
Bowne Emma (widow), dwl 107 Powell 
Bowne William S. f Wright & B.J, dwl 1510 Sac 
Bownes George, expressman, NW cor Market and 

Fourth, dwl cor Butte and Tennessee 
Bowrey T. E., miner, dwl Overland House 
Bowse E. F. Miss, teacher Shotwell St. Primary 

School, dwl cor Twenty-fourth and Alabama 
Box James, carpenter, dwl E s Dame nr Randall 
Boyee Charles, dwl Gl« Kearny 
Boyce Charles, reai-ostato agent, dwl 132 Fourth 
Boyee Charles, waiter 783 Market 
Boyce Edward, teamster, dwl Park Hotel 
Boyce Ella Miss, tailoress with Timothy Canty, dwl 

550 Tehama 
Boyce Frank S., with Boyce Brothers, dwl 22 John 
Boyce Henry D., wireworker with Charles C. Alkan, 

dwl 1055;!.^ Folsom 
Boyce James, deckhand stm Julia 
Boyce James E., street -ear advertisers, NW cor 

Washington and Sansom, dwl 710 Hyde 
Boyce John, dwl Golden Eagle Hotel 
Boyce John, fireman S. F. and Pac. Sugar Co., dwl S 

s Nevada bet Folsom and Harrison 
Boyce John, laborer with William Kerr, dwl 909 

Battery, rear 
Boyce Nathaniel, dwl 924 Mission 
Boyee Samuel, with Thomas Boyce, 25 Merchants' 

Exchange 
Boyee S. B., salesman with J. W. Davidson & Co., 

dwl 22o Sutter 
Boyee S. G., dwl 124 Fifth 
Boyee Thomas, advertising agent, office 25 Merchants' 

Exchang ', dwl 52'j Bryant 
Boj'ce Worden J., carpenter, dwl 720 Lombard 
Boyce. See Boiee 

Boyd Alexander fBoyd & Davis), dwl 500 Sutter 
Boyd G. A., musician Alhambra Theater 
Boyd Colin M., register clerk Third District Court, 

dwl 553 Howard 
Boyd David, sawyer California Mills, dwl 1710 Leav 
Boyd Edward T., plumber and gasfitter, 840 Clay, 

dwl 8 Cushman 
Boyd Frank, pilot, office U.S. Court Building, dwl 

W s Pringle Court 
Boyd George W., capt. bark Vidette, off Pier 1 Steu- 
art, dwl S s Columbia bet Dolores and Guerrero 



Boyd Henry C, speculator, dwl 2012 Pacific Av 
Boyd James, boatman Vallejo St. Wharf, dwl SW 

cor Montgomery and Union 
Boyd James, longshoreman, dwl 1820 Stockton 
Boyd James, machinist, dwl 159 Silver 
Boyd James, stonecutter with Frank Williams, dwl 

1404 Hyde 
Boyd James II,, groceries and liquors, cor Bryant 

and Stanly PI and NE cor Cal and Larkin 
Boyd James T. (Crane & BJ, attorney at law, office 

()29 Kearny, dwl 703 Market 
Boyd J. E., bookkeeper with T. H. King & Co., dwl 

Columbia bet Guerrero and Dolores 
Boyd John, dwl 15 Fifth Av 

Boyd John, clerk with James H. Boyd, dwl cor Bry- 
ant and Stanly PI 
Boyd John, seaman, dwl 2<i Steuart 
Boyd John D.,dwl 127 Montgomery 
Boyd John F., mining engineer, office 419 California, 

dwl 127 Montgomery 
Boyd Joseph, tinsmith, dwl 1257 Montgomery 
Boyd Joseph C, miner, dwl 810 Webster 
Boyd Julia L., Miss, dwl 1022 McAllister 
Boyd Mary, chambermaid American Exchange 
Boyd Molly Mrs., glovemaker Pacific Glove Works, 

dwl 212 Second 
Boyd Nathaniel (Cornyn & BJ, dwl 214 First 
Boyd Oliver, hatter, dwl NE cor Sac and Front 
Boyd Oliver D., deputy assessor city and county, dwl 

212 Chestnut 
Boyd Samuel, hostler with James R. Travers, 1625 

Powell 
Boyd Theodore C, clerk with Edward E. Eyre, dwl 

1517 Larkin 
Boyd Thomas H., photographer with G. D. Morse, 

dwl 480 San Jose Av nr Twenty-sixth 
Boyd Thomas W., machinist with Hanscom & Co., 

dwl 628 Geary 
Boyd V7illiam, cook with John Reagan, d(vl Bay nr 

Dupont 
Boyd William, seaman P. M. S. S. Mohongo 
Boyd William, stevedore P. M. S. S. Co., dwl Pacific 

nr Sansom 
Boyd William A., brewer, dwl 525 Folsom 
BOYD & DAVIS (Alexander Boyd and J. Z. 
Davis), capitalists, office 420 Montgomery room 2 
Boyde Augustus M., laborer with George T. Broomley 

& Co. 
Boye Otto, policeman City Hall, dwl NE cor Mason 

and Filbert 
Boyenval Armarrd, foreman with L Landsberger & 

Co., dwl 1303 Dupont 
Boyer Louis W., with Imperial Fire Insurance Co.. 

dwl 1412 Pine 
Boj'or Urbain, laborer with G. Venard, dwl Rock 

House 
Boyer William, lamplighter with S. F. Gas Light Co., 

dwl 34 Russ, rear 
Boyes Charles, upholsterer with Samuel Beal, dwl 

German Hotel 
Boyes James, night clerk Branch House, 424 Sansom 
Boyhan John, carriage trimmer with Pollard & Car- 

ville Manufacturing Co., dwl 445>-2 Natoma 
Boyhan Patrick, carriage trimmer with Pollard & 

Carville Manufacturing Co., dwl 11 Jessie 
Boylan Bernard, workman with I. Landsberger <& 

Co., dwl 8 Auburn PI 
Boylan Bridget (widow), dwl 419 Clementina 
Boylan James, laborer, dwl 711 Ash Av 
Boylan James, tinsmith with S. F. Gas Light Co. 
Boyle Alexander, second officer stm Oriflamme Ore- 
gon S. S. Co. 
Boyle Ann Mrs., fursewer with H. Liebes & Co., dwl 

cor Fourth and Folsom 
Boyle Barney, laborer Selby's Smelting Works, dwl 

1615 California 
Boyle Charles, carriagemaker with John W. Lowry. 

dwl 1830 Bush 
Boyle Charles, teamster with Hancock & Kelso, dwl 

414 Beale 
Boyle Delia, cook with Andrew J. Pope, 614 Folsom 
Boyle Edward, porter with Eggers & Co., dwl 432 

Tehama 
Boyle Elizabeth Mrs., proprietress Irving House, 568 

Mission 
Boyle Frank, carpenter, dwl 1318 Pacific 
Boyle George, seaman, dwl 156 Minna 
Boyle George S., dentist, office 135 Kearny, dwl 1821 

Stockton 
Boyle Hannah (widow), dwl 1821 Stockton 



FARNSWOETH & CLABK, Gen'l Fire and Marine Insurajice Agency; office 230 Cal. St. 



■€. p. VAN" SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street. Furnishing Goods 




Boyle Harry, soaman, dwl 103 Sacramento 
BOYLE HENRY, mining secretary, office 331 Mont- 
gomery, res San Rafael 
Boyle Hugh C. M., bookkeeper, dwl 605 Pine 
Boyle James, bricklayer Bricklayers' Pro. Assn, 234 

Boyle James, hostler N. B. and Mission R.R.,dwl233>^ 

Boyle James, laborer, dwl E s Capp bet Twenty- 
fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Boylo James, laborer Golden Gate Park 
Boyle James, pantryman stm Prince Alfred 
Boyle James, plasterer, dwl 423 Bush 
Boyle .!ohn, dwl 21!) Pacific 
Boyle John, dwl Park Hotel 
Boyle John, collector, office 304 Montgomery, dwl S s 

Hayes Ibet Steiner and Pierce 
Bovle John, laborer, dwl !»7 Stevenson 
Boyle John, laborer with Hancock & Kelso, dwl 414 

Beale 
Boyle John, shipping agent, dwl 909 Jackson 
Boyle John C, gaslitter with G. & W. Snook, dwl 

7 Morse 
Boyle John J., druggist with A. McBoyle & Co., dwl 

\\ s Ohio bet Broadway and Vallejo 
Boyle John J., clerk with G. H. Mitchell & Co., dwl 

1 Quincy PI 
Boyle John T., clerk with Doming, Palmer k Co., 

dwl 1830 Bush 
Boyle Lawrence, sawyer, dwl 127 Market 
Boyle Louisa (widow), dwl 1524 Stockton 
Boyle M., liquor saloon, 420 Pacific 
Boyle Mary (widow), dwl 10 Vallejo Court 
Boyle Mary, compositor Womans' Publishing Co., 

dwl 40;( (Greenwich, rear 
Boyle Michael, baker Eclipse Bakery, dwl 1413 Dup 
Boyle Michael, heater with Pacific Rolling Mill Co., 

dwl Potrero Point 
Boyle Michael, laborer, dwl 234 Fremont 
Boyle JS'eil, teamster with Arthur M. Ebbets, dwl 
t)2l3^ Minna , ^^^ 

Boyle Owen, conductor Market St. Railway, dwl NE 

cor Lagiina and Grove 
Boyle Patrick, carpenter, dwl W s Ohio bet Broad- 
way and Vallejo 
Boyle Patrick, longshoreman, dwl 22 Minna 
Boyle Peter, fireman S.F. Gas Light Co., dwl Geor- 
gia bet Shasta and Sierra 
Boyle Peter, laborer, dwl S s Market bet Valencia 

and Brady 
Boyle Peter, stevedore P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 533 Mis 
Boyle Peter T., proprietor New York House, 219 and 
221 Pacific . , -n 1. . 

Boyle Robert, ornamental glasspainter with Robert 

Mills, dwl 5'J8 Mission 
Boyle Sarah J. Miss, teacher Hayes Valley Primary 

School, dwl Bush bet Laguna and Octa.via 
Boyle Thomas, drayman with California Cracker Co., 

dwl 203 Sacramento 
Boyle Thomas, shipjoiner Shipjoiners' Journeymen 

Association, 139 Post 
Boyle Timothy, longshoreman, dwl 583 Bryant 
Boyle William, cutter with Porter, Blum & Slessm- 

ger, dwl 1015 California 
Boyle William, framemaker with Sanborn, Vail & 

Co., dwl SW cor Broadway and Ohio 
Boyle William, milkman, d\vl N s Twenty-third nr 
Noe _^ 

Boylen Burnett, porter, dwl 8 Auburn 
Boylen Charles, fruits, 142() Stockton 
Boyling Thomas, captain bark Isaac Jeanos, office 

Pier 17 Stouart, dwl 511 Stevenson 
Boyne George, mailclerk Alta California, dwl -92 5>^ 

Washington 
Boyne Joseph, laborer, dwl 3 Codman PI 
Boyne Thomas, boarding, 45 Vallejo 
Boynton Charles E., carriagemaker with Kimball 
Manufacturing Co., dwl N s Eddy bet Seott and 
Pierce 
Boynton Hugh, speculator, dwl 472 Jessie 
Boynton Lamour A., receiving teller U. S. Treasurer's 

Office, dwl 543 Minna 
Boynton Underbill, mining agent, office 402 Mont- 
gomery room 3 ,, , a- 
Boysen Charles M., hatter with Konrad Meussdoriier, 

dwl 1225 Kearny 
Boysen Constance (widow), trimmer with Le Gay & 

Co., dwl 313 Mason 
Boysen Frederick, seaman with Jerome B. Piper, 
Commercial St. Wharf 



Bovsen Hans, captain schooner Maria H. Nelson, 

" dwl N W cor Francisco and Dupont 
Boysen Julius, hatter, 514 Pine 
Boysen Martin, teamster with J. D. Arthur & Son, 

dwl 430 Fell „ ^ „. 

Boysen Peter S., teamster with Higgms & Collins, 

dwl 12 Tehama Court 
Boyston John S. (Fritz & BJ , dwl 114 Natoma 
Boze Henry, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl cor Bry- 
ant and Eighth 
Bozman J. E., solicitor with Kenny & Co., dwl 409 

Minna 
Bozzano Pasquale, marblepolisher with .J. & A. Mor- 
ris, dwl Paul nr San Bruno Road 
Bozzo Emanuolo iBozzo& G'ior'onnoniA dwl 737 Val- 
lejo 
Bozzo &Giovonnoni (Martin Oiovonnoninnd Eman- 
uelo Bozzo), wood and coal, SE cor Vallejo and 
Powell 
Braasch William, carpenter, dwl S s Willow Av bet 

Laguna and Buchanan 
Brach George A., manufacturing and retail confec- 
tioner, 522 Kearny 
Brach John A., confectioner with George A. Brach, 

dwl 522 Kearny 
Bracken George, clerk with C. E. McCusker & Co., 

dwl 225 Sixth 
Bracken John, proprietor Five-mile House, San 

Bruno Road 
Bracken Lawrence, laborer, dwl 430 Seventh 
Bracker John, music and drawing teacher, dwl 539 

Minna 
Brackett Charles, canvasser, dwl 117 Perry 
Brackett Edward, blacksmith with John Kleogh, 

dwl 117 Perry 
Brackett Henry II., salesman with Conroy, O'Connor 

& Co., dwl Russ House 
Brackett Joseph G., miller, dwl 1136 Union 
Brackett Walter, sacksewer, dwl 546 Mission 
Brackett \Villiam L., butcher, dwl 412 Taylor 
Bracktle Ambrose, boots and shoes, 31 Geary, dwl 

3213^ O'Farrell 
Braconnier Louis, upholsterer, 027^ Union 
Bradbury Alfred W., bookkeeper, dwl 1511 Clay 
Bradbury Amos P. Capt., dwl 827 Greenwich 
Bradbury Frederick M., clerk with J. W. Davidson 

& Co., dwl 801 Leavenworth 
Bradbury Nathaniel F., carpenter, dwl 1511 Bu- 
chanan 
Bradbury Vesta E. Miss, teacher Larkin St. Primary 

School, dwl 1511 Clay 
BRADBURY WILLIAM B., sash, door, blind, and 
molding manufacturer. Mechanics' Mills Build- 
ing, SW cor Mission and Fremont, dwl 1416 
Bush 
Bradbury William J., merchant, dwl 1021 Bush 
Bradbury William T., physician, office 542 Market, 

and school director, dwl 2525 Howard 
Bradljury's Building, 52 Second 
Braddock William, carriagepainter with Peter Wit- 

bock & Son, res Alameda 
Bradpn Thomas, contractor, dwl W s Pierce bet Eddy 

and Turk 
Brader Anna (widow), dwl 740 Broadway 
Brader Christiau, with Henry Brader, dwl 740 Bdwy 
Brader Henry, wholesale liquors, 621 Sansom, dwl 738 

Broadway 
Bradlield Peter, liquor dealer, dwl 323 Broadway 
Bradfield Richard, miller with F. D. Couro & Son, 

dwl Coso House 
Bradford C. H., capitalist, dwl Grand Hotel 
Bradford Edwin J., steamfitter, dwl 130.S Powell 
Bradford George, painter, dwl 115 Second 
Bradford George B., real-estate agent, dwl 65 Tehama 
Bradford George L., dwl 65 Tehama 
Bradford Gershom, assistant U. S. Coast Survey, office 

214 Stockton, dwl 83'.t Mission 
Bradford Joseph F., clerk, dwl 26 Sixth 
Bradford P. F., mining, office 426 Montgomery, dwl 

822 Powell 
Bradford Rebecca (widow), dwl NE cor Howard and 

Fifteenth 
Bradford Thomas, conductor N. B. and Mission R. 

R., dwl 297 Clementina 
Bradford Wallace, salesman with Plum, Bell & Co., 

dwl 1 Winter Lane 
Bradford Woodbury, foreman Monitor, dwl 1 Winter 

Lane 
Bradloe Frank K., conductor Market St. Railway, 
dwl 5163^ Valencia 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIKECTOBY contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



KENIJ-EDY'S IJVTSUKANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, 411 California St. 



Bradleo Stephen H. Jr., butcher with George A. 

Ka.ibo, (Iwl 1145 Folsom 
Bradley Anson S., driver City R. R., dwl 77 Fifteenth 
Bradley Arthur, soaiuan, dwl 8 Commercial 
Bradley Rennet T., wharfinger Washington St. Wharf, 

dwl 1421 Bush 
Bradley Bernard, housepaintcr, dwl 1222 Eddy 
Bradley Catherine Miss, dressmaker with Mrs. Mary 

Robertson, dwl 158 Silver 
Bradley Charles, stevedore, dwl 249 Perry, roar 
Bradley C. W., conductor Clay St. Hill 11. R., dwl 

1413 Clay 
Bradley Daniel, laborer, dwl 105 Tehama 
Bradley Eliza (widow), lodgings, 5 Stockton 
Bradley Ella Miss, milliner, dwl mi Minna 
Bradley E. P. Mrs., teacher Uenman School, dwl CIO 

Mason 
Bradley (Jcorge L., merchant, dwl 820 Sutter 
Bradley 11. A. elerk Towsond St. Yard S. P. R. R. 
BlIADLEl HENRY W., importer photographic and 
ambrotype material, ()18and020 Clay (and Brad- 
ley A- JlulofsonJ, dwl llo Taylor 
Bradley James, teamster with Milton P. Sessions, 

dwl 121',i Folsom 
Bradley John, hostler with Clayburgh & Branden- 

stein, dwl 160 Jessie 
Bradley John, stevedore with Menzies, Lowry & 

Bingham 
Bradley John, waiter Russ House 
Bradley John A., clerk with J. J. O'Brien, dwl 1524 

J ackson 
Bradley John J., driver Hose No. 5, S. F. F. D., dwl 

5 Oak 
Bradley John T., mining stocks, dwl 740 Pine 
Bradley Joseph, cooper, dwl S s Eighteenth bet Noe 

and Sanchez 
Bradley J. Thomas (colored), seaman, dwl 5 Bdwy 
Bradley Mary Miss, seamstress Mission Woolen Mills, 

dwl Dolores bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Bradley M. J. (widow), furnished rooms, 20) Fourth 
Bradley M. J. Miss, teacher elocution, dwl 127 Kear 
Bradley P., musician, dwl 4:52 Kearny 
Bradley Peter, merchant, dwl 303 Jessie 
Bradley Richard, captain schooner Dreadnought. 

office 22 and 24 Market 
Bradley Robert, laborer, dwl SE cor Polk and Pacific 
Bradlej' Samuel, patternmaker City Iron Works, dwl 

120 Seventh 
Bradley Sarah Mrs., seamstress, dwl 352 Jessie 
Bradley Theodore, principal Boys' High School, dwl 

blO Mason 
Bradley Thomas, hostler Dexter Stables, dwl cor Sec- 
ond and Market 
Bradley W. G., driver Market St. Railway, dwl W s 

V aleneia bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Bradley William, hostler with David Stewart, dwl 

134 Seventh 
Bradley M'illiam, porter, dwl 352 Jessie 
Bradley William, teamster with Elliot & Bro., dwl 

iN s Eighteenth nr Mission 
Bradley William, teamster with J. Y. Wilson & Co., 

dwl Buchanan nr Bay 
Bradley William P., clerk Bamber & Co. 's Express, 

dwl 335 Broadway 
Bradley William 0., letter carrier S. F. Post-office, 

dwl 1513 Tavlor 
BRADLEY & RULOFSON f Henry W. Bradley and 
William H. Bulofson), Photographic Art Gal- 
lery 421) Montgomery cor Sacramento 
±iradrick Isaac, express wagon, cor Front and Wash- 
ington, dwl 113 Dora 

Bradshaw , collector, dwl 322 Minna 

Lradshaw - — (widow), dwl NE cor Pow and Wash 
bradshaw (.eorge H., bookkeeper with Walter Turn- 

bull k Co., dwl 708 Leavenworth 
Bradshaw H. B., clerk with Nelson & Doble, 13 and 

lo h remont 
Bradshaw Hugh A., student Heald's Business College 
Bradshaw Michael, blacksmith with Philip Mors- 
head, dwl 2120 Mission 

o-^^^'^^ ^- ^- Co., Louis Kaplan secretary, office 
^'Merchants' Exchange 
Bradshaw Samuel C, clerk, dwl 708 Leavenworth 
iiradshaw lurrell T., merchant, office and dwl 606 
■or, i'lontgomery room 25 

BRADSTREET J. M. & SON, improved mercantile 
agency. New York, James R. Pickens superin- 
tondent, office 230 California 
Rradt John A., carpenter, dwl 20 Anna 
liradt John M., carpenter, dwl 424 Stevenson 



Brady Adolph, clerk with H. Friedlander & Co., dwl 

10 Sixth 
Brady Ann Mrs., dressmaker, 914 Folsom 
Brady Benjamin, general merchandise, 311 Commer- 
cial, dwl 1318 Broadway 
Brady B. F., clerk stm New World, dwl 1103 Clay 
Brady Daniel, fruits and vegetables. 111 Fifth 
Brady Edward, d'wl 533 Commercial 
Brady Edward, engineer Lick House, dwllSlK Dora 
Brady Edward M., watchman Lick House 
Brady Edward R., clerk Treasurer's Office C. P. R. 

R., dwl 132 Turk 
Brady Ellen Mrs., dwl 42 Jessie 
Brady E. Owen, bricklayer, dwl 914 Folsom 
Brady Felix, with S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 152 First 
Brady Irancis, hostler, dwl 515 Pino 
Brady Francis, laborer, dwl S s Liberty bet Guerrero 

and Valencia 
Brady Frank, shipwright Shipwrights' Journeymen 

Association^ 71 New Montgomery 
Brady George K., captain U. S. A. Provost Marshal's 

Othce, 313 Kearny, dwl 000 Bush 
Brady H. Mrs., tailoross, 522 Sixth 
Brady Henry J., attorney at law, office NE cor Mont- 
gomery and Jackson, dwl 5 Laskie 
Brady Hugh, weigher, dwl 022 Brannan 
Brady J. <k J., oyster saloon, 31 Occidental Market 
Brady James (J. H. Bedington & Co.J, dwl SW cor 

Kearny and Union 
Brady James (J. &J. Brady), dwl 9 Sumner 
Brady James, dwl 10.53 Mission 

Brady James, laborer, dwl S s Greenwich bet Mont- 
gomery and Sansom 
Brady James, letter carrier S. F. Post-office, dwl 1018 

Montgomery 
Brady James F., solicitor State Investment Insur- 
ance Co., dwl 2007 Mission 
Brady James G., compositor with H. S. Crocker & 

Co., dwl W s Hyde bet Green and Union 
Brady James W., clerk with Whittier, Fuller & Co., 

dwl 1 Vincent 
Brady John (J. dt J. Brady), dwl 853 Harrison 
Brady John, blacksmith, dwl 1010 Ma»on 
Brady John, boilermaker Risdon Iron and Locomo- 

tive Works, dwl 349 Tahama, rear 
Brady John, bookkeeper with M. Tranor, dwl 320 

Minna 
Brady John, carpenter, dwl 725 Ellis 
Brady John, cartman Superintendent Public Streets 
Brady John, fireman P. M. S. S. Constitution 
Brady John, flagman C. P. R. R. Depot, King nr 

Fourth 
Brady John, laborer, dwl 1 St. Charles PI 
Brady John, waiter with John Reagan 
Brady John J., porter with T. H. Hatch & Co., dwl 

/17 Tehama 
Brady John J., speculator, dwl 608 Third 
Brady John R., watchman with Lyon & Co., dwl 160 

Jessie 
Brady John T., salesman with Charles Langley & 
Co., dwl 720 California s. ya., 

Brady M., laborer Superintendent Public Streets 
Brady Margaret A., lioLuor saloon, junction Market 

and \ aloncia 
Brady Martin, laborer, dwl 1410 Kearny 
Brady Martin, tanner with Cornelius O'Donnell, dwl 

SE cor Brannan and Sixth 
Brady Matthew, laborer, dwl 140 Eighth 
Brady Matthew, second assistant engineer S. F F 

D., dwl 1214 Stockton 
Brady Matthew, steward, dwl 351 Grove 
Brady Michael, blacksmith, dwl 1010 Mason 
Brady Michael, foreman with Mickelsson & Brown 
dwl Seventh Av nr M, South S. F\ ' 

-^^^i^J^^'''^'^^*^^' laborer S. F. and Pae. Sugar Co., dwl 

NE cor Eighth and Heron 
Brady Michael, longshoreman with Oregon S. S. Co. 
dwl cor Mission and Spear ' 

Brady Michael, stonecutter, dwl 1816 Powell 
Brady Michael T., miner, dwl 522 Sixth 
Brady Nicholas, porter Wells Fargo & Co., dwl 416 

Stevenson 
Brady Owen (Lenhart & BJ, dwl 304 Mason 
Brady Owen, laborer, dwl junction Market and 

Guerrero 
Brady P., coalpasser P. M. S. S. Montana 
Brady Patrick f Brady & Co.), dwl E s Devisadero 

bet Geary and O'Farrell 
Brady Patrick, hotelkeeper, dwl 28 O'Farrell, rear 
Brady Patrick, laborer, dwl E s Kate nr Bryant 



PAENSWORTH & CLAUK furnish Safe and Reliable Insurance against FireT 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Trunks and Valises. 



Brady Patrick, laborer Golden Gate Park, dwl W s 

Lyon bet Post and Geary 
Bradv Patrick, tinsmith, dwl 21 Garden 
BllADY P. F., La Grande Exchange, 010 Market and 

11* Post, dwl (i25 Bush 
Brady Philii>, blacksmith Risdon Iron and Locomo- 
tive Works, dwl 9 Cleveland 
Brady Philip, eartman, dwl Vi Gilbert, rear 
Bradv Philiii, foundryman, dwl 17 Minna 
Brady Philip, hoseman Kngino No. 10, S. F. F. D., 

dwl N s Bryant nr Fourth 
Brady Philip, laborer with \V^esley Diggins, N s Sut- 
ter bet Devisadero and Broderick 
Brady Philip, picture framemakor with 8. & G. Gump, 

dwl S s Liberty bet Guerrero and Valencia 
Brady Philip, seaman, dwl S s Do Boom bet First 

and Second 
Brady P. W., assistant County Surveyor's Office, dwl 

517 Bryant 
Brady liichard, drayman, J3l Jackson, dwl itlil Har 
Brady Thomas (Flnniyan & B.' , dwl 27.! Jessie 
Brady Thomas, bricklayer U. S. Mint, dwl 853 Clem 
Brady Thomas, fireman P. M. S. S. Nevada 
Brady Thomas, liquors, dwl 278 Jessie 
Brady Thomas, teamster with Jacob Browning 
Brady Thomas, stableman, dwl S s California bet 

Webster and Fillmore 
Brady Thomas H. f Brady & Co.), dwl E s Devis- 

adoro bet Geary and U'Farrell 
Brady William, helper Kisdon Iron and Locomotive 

Works, dwl 17 Minna 
Brady William, longshoreman, dwl 625 Davis 
Brady William J., foreman boilershop Risdon Iron 

and Locomotive Works, dwl 34 Rauseh 
Brady & Co. (Thomas H. Brady and Patrick Brady } , 
hairdressers and dealers human hair, 940 Market 
Braog lUchard I Bracg & Frank) , dwl 510 Jones 
BRAEG & FRANK (Richard Braeg, E. M. Frank, 
and Albert Ballemand' , importers and whole- 
sale wines and liquors, S\V cor Cal and Front 
Braeslin Patrick, brassfinisher, dwl 135 Tehama 
Brafort Edward A., porter with Agard, Foulkes & 

Co., dwl 780 Montgomery 
Braga Carlo (G. Albcrigi & Co.) , res Sebastopol 
Braga F. .J. M., Portuguese P. and B. Association, 109 

California room Pi 
Bragg Frank, machinist S. P. R. R., dwl 322 Main 
Bragg Goorge F. (George F. Bragg <& Co.), divl Lick 

llouso 
BRAGG GEORGE F. & CO., importing and commis- 
sion merchants and agents Usivego Starch Co. , 
office IPJ Front 
Bragg George H., jeweler with Edward Heriughi, dwl 

17 Fourth 
Bragg James, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Bragg J. C, jeweler, dwl 109 Geary 
Bragg Mary J. Miss, principal Mission St. Primary 

School, dwl 822 Main 
BRAGG ROBERT, manufacturer steering wheels, 

and school director, 822 Main 
Bragg Robert Jr., shipjoiner, dwl 822 Main 
Braggeman Frederick, dwl 1809 Stockton 
Brahany James, peddler, dwl 1139 Harrison 
Brahany Thomas, domestic, dwl 415 Powell 
Brain Samuel, carpenter, dwl 288 Sutter 
Brainard Henry C., machinist with Howe Machine 

Co.. dwl 419 O'Farrell 
Brainard Richard (Carroll, B. & Co.A dwl 1412 How 
Brakanwagen Henry, cabinetmaker, dwl 432 Vallejo, 

roar 
Braloy George A., fruit, 501 Davis, dwlSPi Davis 
Bralich Frederick, coffee saloon, 024 Kearny, dwl S 

\V cor Clay and Prospect PI 
Braly Margaret .J. (widow), dwl 1208 Howard 
Bramall (ioorge, secretary Grand Division Sons Tem- 
perance, office 432 Kearny, dwl 1808 Taylor 
Braman Jason J., physician, office and dwl W s 

Franklin nr Hayes 
Braman L. B., teacher Valencia St. Grammar School 
Bramhall Cornelius, dwl 015 Kddy 
Bramstedt John H. (Claus H. Koocks & Co.), dwl 

SW cor Steuart and Folsom 
BramwoU Aaron, groceries and liquors, NW cor Un- 
ion and Sansom, dwl SW cor Union and Sansom 
Branberg Charles B., seaman, dwl 132 Steuart 
Branch George, sawmaker with Pacific Saw Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 17 Bernard 
BRANCH HOUSE, L. J. Ewell proprietor, 424 San 
Branch Martha B. Mrs. (widow), boarding, SW cor 
Mission and Spear 



Branch Mint G. and S. M. Co. (Nevada Co., Cal.), J. 
M. Buffington secy, office 87 Merchants' E.xchange 

BfvANCH OVERLAND HOUSE, J. E. Slinkey pro- 
prietor, 519 Sacramento 

Branch William, baker, dwl S s Bernard bet Taylor 
and Jones 

Branch William, sawmaker with Pacific Saw Manu- 
facturing Co., dwl 17 Bernard 

Brand Aristide (A. E. Sabatie lii Co.), res Alameda 

Brand Carolina (widow), dwl 2! Park Av 

Brand Ernest, bookkeeper Humboldt Savings and 
Loan Society (and Brand & Ryhiner), dwl 5 
Martin's Block S s Market nr Eighth 

Brand Etenneu, brassfinisher with Frank Baud, dwl 
S s Ash Av bet Octavia and Laguna 

Brand Henry, compositor S. F. Abend Post, dwl 039 
California 

Brand Henry, varnishor, dwl 580 Sacramento 

BRAND HERMAN, manufacturer cigars and im- 
porter loaf tobacco, 804 Bat, dwl 50o Franklin 

Brand Herman J., manufacturingjeweler, 134 Sutter, 
dwl 728 Bush 

Brand James W. C., clerk Commercial Union Insur- 
ance Co., dwl 1917 Polk 

Brand John G. (Montgomery Baths Co.), dwl 423 
Broadway 

Brand Loonhardt (Ehlers <& B.) , dwl 428 Broadway 

Brand Locion, bookkeeper with A. E. Sabatie k Co., 
res Alameda 

Brand & Kyhiner (Ernest Brand and Adolph Ry- 
hiner) , cigars and tobacco. Grand Hotel 

Brandeniann Charles, shipcarpenter, dvvl 108 Freolon 

Brandenberg (Jliver C. \\'., laborer with B. H. Free- 
man & Co., dwl Hillinan's Temperance House 

Brandenstein Gustav II. F. A., cutter with Einstein 
Bros, i Co., dwl 4 St. JIary 

Brandenstein Herman (Clayburgh «£• B.), dwl 112 
Post 

Brandenstein Herman H., bookkeeper with Hecht 
Bros. & Co., dwl 505 Powell 

Brandenstein Joseph (A. 8. Rosenbaum <fc Co.), dwl 
r.'l Eddy 

BRANDENSTEIN M. & CO. (Lazard Godchaux), 
wholesale butchers, cattle, and sheep d3aler3. 
First Av, South S. F., otlico 529 Clay 

Brandenstein Meyer (31. Brandenstein <& Co.), dwl 
709 O'Farrell 

Brandor Herman T., waiter with John S.Brander, 
dwl 225 Clav 

BRANDBR JOHN S., liquor saloon, 225 Clay, dwl 
407 Filbert 

Brandhofer Michael, tailor with Pierre Dreydomi, 
dwl cor Cal Av and Coso Av, Bernal Heights 

Brando Peter, miner, dwl S s Point I..obos Av nr 
Filth Av 

Brandon Henry, pantryman stm Constantine, Clay 
St. Wharf 

Brandon .Joseph R. (Grey & B.J, attorney at law, 
office 004 Merchant, dwl E s Bartlett ur Twenty- 
sixth 

Brandon Michael, carriage driver with J. & R. Smith, 
dwl 79 Clementina 

Brandon Patrick, special policeman, dwl 28 Clarence 
PI 

Brandon W. M. ^Brandon & Ror/ers), dwl 38 Eddy 

BRANDON & ROGERS (W. M. Brandon and Jacob 
}]'. Rogers! , real-estate agents, 5 55 California 

Brandow Henry W., tinsmith with Thomas Bertram, 
dw! 279 Minna 

Brandstotter George, bootmaker, 1504 Stockton 

Brandstetter Joseph (Jacob Klein & Co./', dwl 631 
Pacific 

Brandt A. Mrs., teacher German Bush St. Cosmopol- 
itan School, dwl 5 Market 

Brandt Adolph (Hein & B.),Av{\ SE cor Battery and 
Filbert 

BRANDT ALOIS, proprietor California Hide Depot, 
11 and 13 Broadway, dwl 101! Van Ness Av 

Brandt Alonzo, boilermaker, dwl NW cor Capp and 
Twenty-fifth 

Brandt August \V^., cook, dwl 11 Freelon, rear 

BRANDT, B. L., house and signpainter, 213 Pine, 
dwl Nucleus House 

Brandt Charles, porter 423Fiont, dwl NE cor Second 
and Clementina 

BRANDT ERIC A., groceries and liquors, 131 Third, 
dwl 048 Howard 

Brandt Frank, dwl 3 Clara Lane 

Brandt Frederick (John P. Olsen & Co.), dwl 3 
Grand PI 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 1874-6, wiH be published September, 1874. 



KENNEDY'S INSURANCE AGENCY, Fire, Marine, and Life, represents $12,000,000. 



Brandt Frederick, clerk with William Henckon, dwl 

417 Third 
Brandt Frit/- H. D., liquor saloon, NE cor Kearny 

and St. Charles I'l, divl NE cor Pacitic and Koar 
Brandt (!eorfro E.,sailmaker, dwl 110 Virginia 
Brandt Herman J., jeweler, divl 72S Bush 
Brandt I. B. L., attorney at law, office 430 California, 

dwl Nucleus House 
Brandt Jacob, foreman with Ordenstoin & Co. 
Brandt John (Postel <& B.I, dwl 223 Perry 
Brandt L. (Brandt <k Wulzea) , res Oakland 
Brandt Lewis, seaman, dwl 23 Vallojo 
Brandt Louis, bookkeeper 8 Battery, dwl Nucleus 

House 
Brandt Maurice, salesman with Colman Bros., dwl 

■112 Paeiiic 
BRANDT 1 >TTO, groceries and liquors, 1038 Market, 

dwi 10 Sixth 
Brandt Thomas, seaman, dwl 103 Sacramento 
Brandt & Wulzen ( L^ Brandt and A. H. Wulzen) , 

upholstorers, 110 Sixth 
Branger Jean B., cook with Reiflf & Ame, dwl 900 

Powell 
Brangon Richard M. (T. H. Hatch & Co.), dwl 1300 

Pine 
Brank^ Jamos W., patternmaker Risdon Iron and 

Locouiotivo Works, dwl 113 Grove 
Brann F. K., clerk Hartford Firo Insurance Co., dwl 

333 J essie 
Brann Robert C. (Harding & B.J , dwl 333 Jessie 
Brannagan Patrick, confectionery, dwl 1105 Pino 
Brannan A. L. Mrs., dwl 317 First 
Brannan Andrew, dwl 718 Market 
Brannan Aus;ust, stevedore with Menzies, Lowry, 

and Bingham 
Brannun Charles, watchmaker, dwl 31 Hunt 
Brannan J., Mrs., dwl 110 Natoma 
Brannan James, gardener, dwl 4(i Louisa 
Brannan James, foreman Spring Valley Water 

Works 
Brannan James, hostler with Brush &, Mayhow 
Brannan James, laborer, dwl 17J1 Leavenworth 
Brannan James, laborer with G. B. Dougherty, dwl 

SE cor Bay and Jones 
Brannan James, mattressmaker with Cal. Furniture 

Manuliicturing Co., dwlS s CI ly nr Broderick 
Brannan James, tinsmith, divl 527 Howard 
Brannan James E., clerk 1-3 Kearny, divl 30) Tehama 
Brannan James N., jeweler, dwl 1002 Minna 
Brannan Jesse, carpenter, dwl 114 Minna 
Brannan John, forgeman with Pacitic Rolling Mill 

Co., dwl Potrero Point 
Brannan John, laborer, dwl 119 Shipley 
Brannan John, laborer Superintendent Public 

Streets 
Brannan John, laborer with Wesley Biggins, N s 

Sutter bet Dovisadoro and Broderick 
Brannan John, seaman, dwl 32 Stouart 
Brannan John, teamster, dwl 1111 Kearny 
Branann John, waiter stm Montana, Front St. 

Wharf 
Brannan John C, milkman, dwl SE cor Pierce and 

Filbert 
Brannan Lawrence, blacksmith, dwl 211 Second 
Brannan Martin, laborer, dwl lOOl Battery 
Brannan Martin, porter, dwl 5 Lafayette PI 
Brannan Martin, superintendent with Savage & Son, 

dwl 10:;4 Mission 
Brannan Michael, laborer Brooklyn Hotel 
Brannan M. T., bricklayer Bricklayers' Protective 

Association, 234 Sutter 
Brannan Patrick, blacksmith, dwl 4")2 Clementina 
Brannan Patrick, expressman, dwl 108 Froelou 
Brannan S. A. L. Jr., dwl 317 First 
BRANNAN SAMUEL, real estate, office 420 Mont- 

gomorv, room 1 third floor, dwl 920 Clay 
Brannan Thomas, dwl 32 Rauseh 
Brannan Thomas, bootmaker with S. W. Rosonstock 

it Co., dwl 2 )5 J essie 
Brannan Thomas, laborer, dwl 34 Uarrist 
Brannan Thomas, laborer C. P. R. R. Depot 
Brannan Thomas, shoemaker with Buckingham & 

Ilecht, divl 2> Howard Court 
Brannan Timothy, coachman with John 0. Earl, dwl 

;>28Folsom 
Brannan Timothy, laborer, dwl 527 Howard 
Brannan T. T., expressman, cor Kearny and Bush 
Brannan ^Villiam, longshoreman, dwl 315 Brvant,rear 
Brannanbcrg Charles, with Whitney & Freose, dwl 

SE cor Mission and Stouart 



Brannorhorst George, cook, dwl 909 Kearny 
Branning August, stevedore with Whitney & Freese 
Branseheid William, with Gabriel Weber, dwl 820 

Pacific • • 

Branseheid William H., collector with George H. 

Tay & Co., dwl 820 Pacific 
Branson Henry, dwl .589 Market 
Branson Ware, sailmaker with John S. Blakiston, 

dwl P'ilO Pacitic Av 
Brant John H., drayman^eor Davis and Sacramento, 

dwl 32!t Eddy 
Brant Louis, boot and shoemaker, 412 Pacific 
Brantigan Henry, weaver S. F. P. Woolen Factory, 

dwl NW cor North Point and Larkin 
Brarens Henry, milkman, dwl Fairmount Home- 
stead 
Bras Henry, clerk with Louis Von Harten, NW cor 

Brannan and Sixth 
Bra.scho G. H., clerk with Charles Haacke, dwl 617 

Stevenson 
Brasche William, carpenter with Richardson & Hol- 
land, dwl cor Buchanan and Willow Av 
Brask Charles (Charles Brask <fci?ro. A dwl 42 Jack 
Brask Charles & Bro. (John Brask) ,\i(i\xox saloon, 

113 Jackson 
Brask Christian F., porter U. S. Coast Survey 
Brask John (Charles Brask & Bro.) , dwl 100 Jack 
Braslin M. H., carpenter, dwl 41 Clementina 
Brassahan Patrick, teamster, dwl 1029 Sutter 
Brattles John Jr., proprietor King St. House, King 

bet Third and Fourth 
Brauor Albert, mariner, dwl New Alaska Hotel 
Brauor Alois (Frederick Hess & Co./', dwl 722 Union 
Brauer Christopher H., dwl .533 Bush 
Braum Andrew, blacksmith, dwl 333 Bush 
Braum Charles, fisherman. Clay St. Wharf 
Braun Adolpho W^, tailor, 025 Merchant third floor, 

dwl 1822 Stockton 
Braun Augustus F. H., machinist with Joseph Bien, 

dwl 1 Ewer PI 
Braun Charles J., teacher music, dwl 141 Minna 
Brann C. H. F., cashier with B. Davidson k Co., res 

Oakland 
Brann Emile, jeweler with Frontier ABellemerej res 

Oakland 
Braun John, quartermaster P. M. S. S. Colima 
Braunschwoiger Herman, clerk with Claus H. Schlu- 

ter, dwl NW cor Fourth and Berry 
Braverman Louis ( Bravermaii & Z/euyV, dwl 322 Ma- 
son 
BRAVERMAN & LEVY (Louis Braverman and 
Jb/i/i ieoj/^ importers and retail watches, jew- 
elry, diamonds, silverware, etc., 119 Montgomery 
Brawloy D., dwl 305 Minna 

Brawley John, waiter Branch House, 424 Sansom 
Brawley Patrick, peddler, dwl 242 Bealo 

Bray -, master mariner, dwl S7 Second 

Bray Ann Mrs. (widow), groceries and lijuors, 546 

Mission 
Brav Bessie Miss, teacher, dwl 22 Lafayette 
BRAY BROTHERS (Watson A. Bray ), Q.omm\?.sion 
merchants and agents Alviso Flour Mills, 22j Clay 
Bray Dennis, dwl 227 Minna 
Bray Henry T., carpenter, dwl 22 Lafayette 
Bray Isaiah, whitenor, dwl 31 Second 
Bray John, accountant, dwl 502 Taylor 
Bray Thomas, laborer with Pacific Paving Co. 
Bray W'arren L., whitenor with James C. Sellers, dwl 

31 Second 
Bray Watson A. (Bray Bros.) , res Fruit Vale, Ala- 
meda Co. 
Bray William, clog dancer Bella Union Theater 
Bravshaw Robert, weaver, dwl i»27 Greenwich 
BRAYTON ALBERT P. (Goddard& Co.), res 11G7 

Jackson St., Oakland 
Brazel Patrick, porter with Whittier, Fuller & Co., 

dwl 27H Clara 
Bra/.il William, laborer, dwl 610 Post, rear 
Breach Poti.>r, fireman, dwl 8 St. Charles PI 
Brearley Minnie M. Mrs., furnished rooms, 645 Clay 
Breck Fraicins, cook, dwl 1337 Dupont 
Breck Robert C, clerk, dwl 850 Market 
BRECK SAMUEL Mu., adjutant-general Depart- 
ment California, office 105 Stockton, dwl 627 Third 
Breckbcdol Catharine (widow), dwl Ss Post bet Lyon 

and Baker 
Breckinridge John 0., clerk with W. H. L. Barnes, 

dwl 331 Montgomery 
Brockwoldt John F., dwl Park Hotel 
Bredat Ernest, bookkeeper, dwl 1022 Dupont 



OBIENT FIKE INS. CO. OF HARTFORD ; Assets $700,000 ; Farnswortli & Clark, Agts. 



O. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714. and 716 Kearny Street, Paper and Envelopes. 



BRE 



119 



BRE 



Bredenback John, farmer, dwl Now Alaska Hotel 
Bredenbadl Leopo'ld, laborer,dwl 520 areen^ach rear 
Bredhoff Henry f Bredhoff & SiihUng I , dwl W)8 Fow 
Bredhoff & s/hling (Henry Bredhoff and Herman 

ij. Suhling) , liquor saloon, 423 Kast, 
Rree J. Mrs., furnished rooms, 542 Mission 
Bree John H.,brassfinisher,dvyl .542 Mission 
Bree Thomas W., actor Bella Union Theater, dwl 542 

Breed'Ecfward A., bookkeeper with Kimball Mantt- 

fapturins' Co., dwl 8 Brenham PI , , .,,0 

Breede August" porter with Wolters & Page, dwl 348 

Bre?S"Andrew, porter Sanders' Hotel, S^Y cor Bat- 

Bre^^/L^nfel^Saker with Pag Fleur, 

^rlZ ?oZ"cC^?:' it^ffas^h^^KXd'L'^^ ^ 
Breen John, hosUer with McCord & Malone, dwl 12 

Breen Mathew, laborer, dwl 603 Minna 

Breen Michael J., carrier Evening Bulletin, dwl 431 

Brem NelUe Miss, hairdresser, 30^>2 Jhird 

Breen Patrick, laundryman Occidental Hotel, dwl 

BrefL'ietM, paperhanger with George W. Clark, dwl 

Breen^Thomal machinist, dwl SW cor Market and 

Brera i:hnothy, laborer, dwl 97 Stevenson 

BreeS Timothy, PO^^^'" ^^"*\P/ -n^V^AVhrrf " 
Breen William, hackman, Vallejo St. Wharf 
Breeze^ Charles K. (Breeze cfe Loughran) , dwl 718 

BreSe James H., inspector Custom House, dwl 87 

Brefz^'e j"?seph C. salesman with Snow & Roos, dwl 
720 Lomijard , ,„,or^,T7 n * 

Breeze Thomas, merchant, dwl 718 O'Fari^ll 

BREEZE k LOUGHRAN^ (Charles K. Breeze and 
Thomas Laughran, , produce and provision mer- 
chants, SW cor Washington and Uavis 

Breid francis, machinist with Sefrin & Schober, dwl 

Brei^dfnba°ch Frank, dyer, dwl 1322 Kearny 
Broidenstein Leonhkrdt, manufacturer jewelry, box- 
es, etc., 328 Bush, dwll209 Kearny 
Breidonstein Louis, liquor saloon and bowling alley, 

Breig^John'JcT^. Beiners & Co.), Eureka Soda 

Works dwl 415 Brannan ., ^ ,,. 

Breiling Frank ( Dengler & B.J, dwl 22y>^,Minna 
BREILING JACOB, Franklin xMarket, 9b.j and 957 

Breimang° Jacob, cabinetmaker with Kragon & Co.. 

dwl Hitch nr Brannan 4r,pir,e 

Brein Owen, horseshoer ^y^th I^^e Wells^ dwl 41o line 
Breitonbacll Joseph, dyeing ^i^^d sco.mng '-.4 \M 
Breitfold Peter, liriuor saloon, N s Montgomeiy Av 

nr Kearny, dwl Broadway nr Ohio 
BrefthaAipt Felix, brewer Broadway Brewery, dwl 

637 Broadway 
■Rrokle Fritz lodgings, 19 Morton 
Brekle F^eTeSbf eW Golden City Brewery, dwl 

BREKLE^GOTTLIEB. proprietor Golden City Brew- 

BreU&haHes'l'lls^Jrman LongBridge^^^^^^ 
BREMEN BOARD OF UNDERWlUiEKb, b. i^. 

Mcbius agent, office 307 Sacmmonto 
Bremen Thomas, seaman P. M. b. t% (^0., awi j 

BremSi^William L Mrs. (wjdow)^ dwl 600 Shotwell 
Bromor Christian, blacksmith, dwl 228 BusH 
Bremer H & Co. '(Henry BenseaJ ,groceries,licinoTS, 

and market, NW cor Bryant and b xth 
Bremer Henry (H. Bremer ifc Co. J, dwl 770 Bryant 
BreSor Henry, chemist, dwl 632 Broadsyay 
BreSer Ilermann Jr., hatter with Charles J. Collins, 

Bremel Hy man, merchant, office 421 Sacramento, dwl 

Bremei5off carpenter with Christian Schreiber & 

Broiler tlS'lrivt' with Ernest Hoger, dwl 1319 

BremeTjoseph (Bremer ^^.^.'-ff ';/ V^^a''dwl"u5 
Bremer William, driver with Lyon & Co., awi i« 
Jessie 



H 
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Bremer William, shipwright Shipwrights' Jour. As 

sociation, 71 New Montgomery Jw13ll 

Bremer William H. (Bremer & Brother), dwl 311 

BREiMER°& BROTHER (^fPPhandWUUamHJ 

manufacturers cigars and importers loat tobacco, 

310 Sacramento , , ^ Mnnl- 

Brenan Paul M., physician office and dwl 127 Mont 

Brenckmann Frederick (8chunemaii & Co.), dwl ZJ 

Brenhvilliam, coatmaker with Gabriel Abraham, 

dwl 854 Folsom 
Brenek Louis, dwl 10 White PI ' „, j^i aw por 

Brenham Charles J., office 320 Sansom, dwl SW cor 

Sixteenth and Howard „ „ 

Brenham J. H., porter with Hoffman & Co. 
Brenham Patrick, longshoreman with Oregon b. b. 

Co., dwl SW cor Main and Harrison 
Brenly Michael, dwl Park Hotel 
Brennan Anna, dressmaker, 114o Eols9m 
Brennan Charles T., salesman, dwl Windsor House 
Brennan Ellon (widow), dwl lb William 
Bronnan J., driver Omnibus U.K. 
Brennan J., shoemaker, 4 Trinity, dwl 317 Bush 
Brennan James, clerk, dwl 407 Fourth 
Bronnan James, clerk with Patrick Hartigan, awi 

NW cor First and Howard . 

Brennan James, laborer, dwl 4o2 Jessie 
Brennan James, laborer St. Mary's Hospital 
Brennan James, liquor saloon, dwl f -^ «ea ^ 
Brennan James F., saloon, dwl 320 Lombard 
Brennan John (Kennedy, O'Neill & B.) , dwl ZM 

Bronnan 'j'ohn, laborer, dwl 320 Vallejo 

Bronnan John, laborer with H. F. Williams, awi 

Long Bridge foot of Fourth ^ „ , , 

Brennan John, stevedore, dwl 12 Hovyard „ , ^ , 
Brennan John' J., special pohcoman Lincoln School 
Bronnan Laurence, helper P. M. b. b. Co., awi « 

Brennan'Martin, porter with Neustadter Bros., dwl 

Brenn'fn' fartinV. (Brennan <fe Byrne), dwl 301 

BreSnin Mary Mrs., dwl Santa Clara nr Nebraska 
Brennan Michael, laborer, dwl I^ing^?/- House 
Bronnan Michael T., bricklayer, dwl 211 Claia 
Brennan Owen M., barkeeper with GarrottH. Hop 

per, dwl N s Market bet Ivearny and Dupont 
Brennan Patrick, expressman, dwl 2(1 ^ara 
Brennan Patrick', laborer, dwl Main nr Harri on 
Bronnan Patrick F., glassblpwerb. 1. Glass WorKS. 

dwl cor Mariposa and Mississippi 
Brennan Patrfck J., gilder with F. H. Rosenbaum & 

BreSJa^pliSck1':"^esman 329 Montgomery, dwl 

Brennai"Ri"hai-d P. Rov., secretary St. Mary's Ca- 

BreS:^rh?misl.?SriXk Alta California, dwl 

RB PNNAjf THOMAS W., Old California Exchange, 
^^NEctr Kearny and Clay, dwl 931 Howard 

S=n?uffi'r&" dettiUtft^Samuel 

BreS^lf ^ ^^fStln J. ^^-^^^^^.^^ 
L Byrne), tanners, cor York and iwonty-sixtli, 

Brennemf Louis,"c'lork. dwl 518 Greenwich 
Brenner Charles M., teacher^music, dwl 10>^ Lang 

Brenner L., fish, 18 Occidental Market, dwl «21 Larkin 
Brenner William H., groceries and liduors, NW cor 

Pacific and Jonos 
Bronnerman C, waiter stm New ^\ orld 
Brenning Augustus G., laborer, dwl_313 Eighth 
Brenning John, minor, dwl <)17 iJavis j 1 ex? 

Brent James, teamster with Lane & Pullen, dwl S^i 

cor Fillmore and Turk 
Brentnall John Mrs., dwl 27 Hunt 
Brereton James, collector S. F. Gas Co., dwl 640 Sec 
Brereton R. M., business manager San Joaquin and 

King's ilivor Canal and Irrigation Co., office 418 

California, dwl Lick House 
Bresland H., shipjoiner Shipjoinors' Joarneymen 

Association, 13:t Post 
Breslauer Flora Mrs., saleswoman with Lesser Les- 

zynsky. dwl 310 Kearny 
Breslauer Henry, merchant, dwl ISOb Pine 



J essie ^ ^ — — 7_ 

^^^^^^^^;^^-^^^^^^^^^5^^^^^iii^^^iYci^ tHroughout tHe Pacific Coast. 



W. EEJflf EDY. General Insurance Agent. Fire. Marine, and Life. 411 California St. 



BRE 



120 



BRI 



fa 



o 



Breslauer Lipman f Breslauenk Levy ) , dwl 813 Val- 

lejo 
Breslauer Theodore, clerk with Kohn & Goldsmith, 

dwl olO Kearny 
Breslauer k Levy (Lipman Breslauer and Nathan 

Levji), hides and wool, 222 California 
Breslerl)., hostler, dwl 3 Clara Lane 
Breslin Kate, dressmaker, 919 Montgomery 
Breslin Daniel, laborer S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 70 

lehama, rear 
Breslin Jane, chambermaid Occidental Hotel 
Broslm John, liquor saloon, 217 Bealo 
Breslin John, stone mason, dwl 1017 Mason 
Breshn Patrick, brassfinisher with Weed & Kins- 
well, dwl 135 Tehama 
Breslin Patrick, hostler Cliff House, Point LobosAv 
Jireslin ihomas, laborer, Superintendent Public 

i>treots 
Breslin William, fireman S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 3 

Verona PI 
Bresnahan Cornelius, hack driver, dwl 247 Second 
Bresnahan Stephen, laborer, dwl 518 Natoma 
Bresnahan Thomas, laborer, dwl King St. House 
Lrosse Louis, chief cook with Deutsch & Co., dwl 211 

Jillis 
Bresson Joseph, tobacco factory, SE cor Taylor and 

vallejo 
Bretschneider Friedrich, brewer Bavaria Brewery 

dwl(J20 Vallejo 
Brett George teamster with Fleming k Stetson 
iirettejohn Charles, machinist Cal. Machine Works, 
dwl L s Columbia bet Twentj'-second and Twenty- 
third 
Bretton M. C. Mrs., copyist, dwl Overland House 
Urener Hermann /P. Garms d- C'o.J, dwl NWeor 

Vallejo and Dupont 
Breuer Jacob, cabinetmaker with Herman Grantz, 

dwl 93 i Howard 
Breuer John, carpenter, dwl 214 Broadway 
i<D°T'?^Vr 'V?TT,-v™°'"chant tailor, 824 Pacific 
hKtljlL EDMOND, consulat general of France 

oflice 431) Jackson 
Breutigen — -, with S. F. P. Woolen Mills, dwl NW 

cor North l^int and Larkin 
^'■^Tr^r^.^,?- i^^oreal de Mrs., teacher French, dwl 

lOO^j Washington 
Brevans P. Henry, collector, dwl lOOiJ Washington 
Brevert Alfred (colored), nurse, dwl 32 Everett 
Lrew iNathamel, shipwright, dwl 748 Harrison 
J^rower A. W., teacher of music, dwl 12i Turk 
Brewer George AV., broker, dwl S s Twentieth nr 

Guerrero 
Brewer Herman, grocer, dwl New Alaska Hotel 
^D^T^'iT^'r^T?'^?''' carpenter, dwl 20 Everett 
iiKh\\ ER JOHN H., attorney at law, office M Mer- 

chants' Exchange, res Oakland 
Lrewer W illiam, special policeman, dwl 204 Mont 
Brewster B., carbuilder S. P. K. R. 

R[™^T^'i'^'^TV">??iV^-' V- S- internal revenue gauger 
BKEW.srER JOHN, painter and glazier, 529 Kearny. 

dwl b s Post bet Buchanan and Laguna 
4irewster .John A., civil engineer and surveyor, dwl 

7ob Folsom 
^rewster Mary Mrs., lodgings, 223 Kearnv 
BREWSTER ROLLA E?, 4ning, office 312 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 81(i Powell 
Brewster William, rigger, dwl 334 Seventh 
growton James G., barkeeper, dwl 1029 Clay 
lirewton John C, inspector lamps S. F. Gas Light 

Co., dwlSW cor Sacramento and Stockton 
Breyfogle Hannah (widow), dwl 740 Ellis 
^rian James, dwl 016 Kearny 

Brian Pierre, carpenter, dwl Guillaume Tell Hotel 
Jinan 1 lomas, drayman, cor Brannan and Gilbert 

,o M^^°^^' barkeeper with Ernst F. Kohler, dwl 

42) Davis 
Brice James, blacksmith P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 740 

Guerrero 

T^r!!;?''V"? '^''t'^" ¥■' physician, office and dwl 3(30 Bran 
Foisom ^^'''^'""^ ^itb ^^ilton S- Latham, 638 
Brickoll John, real estate, dwl 602 Filbert 
PrJrk^J'f f''.?™'J'' ?"°^ ^- M- S. S. Constitution 
Rvvl"'H ;^r°^°\^;"i'^' -'^'^ Polk, cl^l « Tyler 
Brickett Mary Mrs., fruits, () Tyler 
^nck ayers' Protective Association. 234 Sutter 
Jirickloy J ames, carpenter and builder, dwl 729 Clem- 
entina 

'X'nVn\'n"d wlK'^^'-^"'^ ^ ^"^^^^^ '^''^ ^- 



^""on°?;/°'^°'.?*l^^'^^° ^ith Richard H. Folli3,dwl 
(29 Clementina ,va"» 

Brickloy Peter, fruit peddler, dwl E s Ninth near 
Harrison 

Brickley William, waiter Lick House, dwl 120 Ship- 
ley, rear 

Brieluis Thomas (colored), cook with Charles A. An- 
derson, dwl 13 Virginia 

Brickwedol Charles H., proprietor Constitution Hotel, 
•>47-oo3 t irst 

Brickwodel Charles W. Jr., storekeeper P. M. S. S 
_ China 

Brickwedel Henry (Henry Brickwedel & Co.), dwl 
ol2 1rankhn ' 

BRICKWEDEL HENRY & CO. ( Martin Hencken) , 
importers and jobbers wines and liquors, 208 and 
2iU r ront 

Brickwedel Henry M., clerk Constitution Hotel, &47 
First ' 

Brickwedel Jacob, liquor saloon, 52 First 

Drickwedel Rebecca (widow), dwl 415 Linden Av 

lirifloen Charles, seaman, dwl 45 Sacramento 

iirideson JVilham, expressman with Wangonheim, 
. Sternheim k Co., dwl 1')17 California 

Bridewell Richard, architect, dwl 1003 Pacific 

Bridge Charles T., bookkeeper with A. Hayward, 
dwl 230 Kearny 

Bridge .John, machinist with Pacific Rolling Mill Co.. 
_ dwl 434 Brannan 

Bridge Matthew, mason and builder, dwl 1717 Lar- 
kin 

^"'Jl?o''',^°™^-^' assistant engineer Lick House, dwl 

121-:! Broadway, roar 
BRIDGE WILLIAM E., proprietor St. Lawrence 
Livery and Sale Stable, 212 Sutter, dwl 208 Sutter 
Bridges II. W., clerk, dwl 317 Fremont 
Bridges M. C. Mrs., dwl 317 Fremont 
Bridsres R. E., bookkeeper with Linforth Kellogg & 

Co., dwl 317 Fremont 
Bridgowood George \\ ., machinist with Hawkins & 

Cantrell, dwl 324 Main 
Bridgewood Joseph, engineer, dwl 324 Main 
Lridgewood Samuel, engineer, dwl 324 Main 
Bridgewood Samuel Jr., clork Banking Department 

. AV'ells, Fargo k Co., dwl 324 Main 
Lndgman John, soapmaker with Lucy & Donnelly 

. dwl E s Brannan bet Eighth and Ninth 
Jiridgman John W., drayman, 410 Front, dwl 122 

Olive Av 
Briodenbach August, painter, dwl 28:3 Minna 
Briel August, butcher, dwl S s Fifteenth Av bet 

and R, South S. F. 
Brien John, hostler with Bay City Soda Water Co., 
dwl 29 Anthony ' 

Brion P., laundryman Occidental Hotel 
Lrion Patrick, teamster with R. & J. Morton 
Brierty James M., blacksmith, dwl N s Cortland Av 

nr Mission 
Brigaerts Girard J., sawyer, dwl S s Ellis bet Steiner 

and Pierce 
Brigaerts Joseph, boxmaker with Benjamin F. Gil- 

. maji, dwl E s Bourbin PI bet Eddy and Ellis 
Briggans P., driver Omnibus R. R. 
Lriggs Albert, merchant, dwl 828 Broadway 
Briggs Albert D., clerk with Bowon Bros., dwl 515 

Stockton 
Briggs Alfred W., packer with J. A. Folger k Co., 

dwl 1409 California 
Briggs Charles C, shipcarpenter, dwl 1 Martha PI 
liriggs Edgar, tide-land commissioner, office SW cor 

. Kearny and Clay, dwl 33 Erie PI 
Briggs Edward K., woodcarver, dwl 2<) Geary 
Jiiiggs Gustavus, proprietor Germania Gardens, S s 

_ Lne bet Howard and Mission 
Briggs G. J. (Briggs <& Meiners) , dwl 110 Sutter 
Jiriggs Henry, waiter, dwl 14 Harlan PI 
Briggs James, laborer with Isaac Richards "W a 

Jones bet Francisco and Bay 
Briggs James N., molder, dwl 508 Folsom 
Briggs Joseph David ( Briggs & Toppw^^, wines and 

. liquors, 138 Sutter, dwl 30 Post 
Briggs Luoy (widow), dwl 24 Silver 
Briggs Margaret (widow), dwl 140:i California 
iiriggs 0. W Rev., furnished rooms, 137 Montgom- 

ery, res Alameda 
Briggs William C., gold and silver engraver, 620 

Merchant, dwl 105 Vallejo 
Briggs AV'ilUam R., broker, office 225 Bush, dwl 2720 

Mission 
Briggs William W., waiter P. M. S. S. Mohongo 



Insurance effected. Losses adjusted, and promptly paid by FABNSWOKTH & Ql^A^. 



Briggs & Meiners ,'G. J. Srir/gs and R. Meiners) , 
wines and liqviors, 110 Sntter , ^^ t 

Bri-Tf Topping (Joseph D. ^^iSO^.^nd Charles 
WimamToppingJ, llot Scotch baloon S3^. Bush 

Brigham Calvin 0. fC. O. Bnyham & Co J, ros Oak 



BRIGHAM CHABLES B., surgeon and physician, 

office 70S Market, dwl Grand Hotel 
BBTOIiVm Q. O. & CO., (Calvin O. Brigham and 

John C. Hooper), provision commission mer- 

Brigtam Wli'^m H. (Crane & Brigham) , res New 

Bri^hTjohn, laborer, dwl 231 Pacific 
Bright John, teamster, dwl 1' Ohio 
Briiht Robert, real estate, dwl f 9 Pacific 
Bri'man Andrew J., driver, dwl olb Oetavia , 

Bril^ardcllo Giacomo, i'^P^^.l^K.I^f ^J^" ^f/^j^^J.? 
Main and marble sawmill, oo Main (ana Jiiig \ 
nardeuT Macchiavello & Co., and Stempel- 
™rn??i ifc Co.', dwl 708 Stockton ^ , t^ ,. 

Bri"nardeilo (fioVanni B., foreman with Cal. Italian 

BriISe2-:/ihL'hifrwXr with Mrs C. M. Chap- 

Bri^"ardelToLuii,'labo?er 421 Battery, dwl Kearny 

%et Filbert and Union t n * TO rai- 

BRIGNARPELLO, MACCHIAVELLO & CO. rwi- 

acomoBrignnrdello, John Pmssoand Ccesar R. 

S'a?o', manufactarors vermicelli, maccaroni, 

forim f>tp 704 and 70o Sansom 
Bri|nXGiovan%uit stand, f^ Stockton 
Brill Frank, upholsterer with J. A. bnaoer & ^o., 

BrilfHenr? wttchman Windsor House, dwl 111 

Briu?i'^^on .Samuel, teamster Pier 2% Steuart, dwl 516 

Brin'c^t^Salvo, Produce, dwl WsPotrero Av bet 

Twentv-second and Twenty-thim j , ui/ 

Brinck Henry, waiter with Good & Tschurr, dwl 14>^ 

Brinckmann Frederick, clerk with D. C. Von Staden, 

SW cor Mission and bteuart , „., „ •«„ 
Brinckmann Henry, WacHl>"itl^V,f,7l ''24 Pacific 
Brind Cal-b, foreman with Rohman k HirscWeW 

^'a/id 5)-»!ri ct- Co.A dwl 1(5 Fourth 
Brind &VtVc«?.!,Bn-»d^confecticmers,lbr^ 
Brind William, clerk Freight Depot_te. P. R. R. 
Brindeau Adrion, shoemaker, dwl 1 ^ irginia 
Brinlle William, stonecutter, dwl IS Pmckney 
Sdleson Pete^, laborer dwl ^\ alnut nr Randolph, 

San Miguel Station 
Brink Henry, waiter dwl 14>^ ^^f i','^, a/ \Tason 
Brink Jennie xMiss. dressmaker, dwl 14H Mason 
Brink Marcellus M., batter with Le Gay & Co., dwl 

BrinkS^vId, cabinetmaker with Kragen & Co., 

dwlMon "omerv bet Vallej o and Broadway 
Tirindv Hu"h Market Exchange Saloon, Summer, 
rear Odd Fellows' Hall, dwl 257 Clementina, rear 
Briodv John J.,gasfitter and hoseman Engine .No. 

5 S. F. F. D., dwl 3 Pratt Court 
Briody Margaret (widow), dwl ^/o" f.°°i"y ^ 
Brion Frederick, saloonkeeper, dwl 1123 f^Pont ^^ 
' Brisac Felilclerk Liverpool & London & Globe In- 
surance Co., dwl 4 Burritt 
Brisachor Leopold, minor, dwl '9;^ Hycle 
Brisk Julius, furnishing goods, .,2^^2 ihird 
Brkcn Patrick, watchman. dwH^est End Hotel 
Brisset Arthur, clerk with Justinian Caire, dwl 932 

BriskllTndrew S. (colored), stovefitter with David 

W. Buggies, dwl 109 Silver 
Bristol Henry C, cooper, dwl 120 Tehama 
Bristol Levi E., cardriver Sutter St. R. R., dwl 103 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSUR- 
ANCE CO., Balfour, Guthrie & Co. general 

BRn^fiH'tENEvllTNT SOCIETY OF CALI- 
FORNIA, rooms 730 Montgomery 

BRITISH COLUMBIAN I^^^^^^^MIi^ll. ' 

W R. H. Adamson agent, 31o California 
BRITISH CONSULATE, W. Lane Booker consul, 

office 319 California , ,„ ™ t^t , ^^„ 
Britt James, plumber with W W Walmsley 
Britt John, housemover dwl 2o \\ hite PI 
Britt John, laborer, dwl ^lOo Battery 
Britt William, stevedore P. M. b. fc. oo 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK J^CO£70S^712^n4,^ndnaKe«;n^^ 

BRO 

T^RTTTAN^HOLBROOK & CO. ^iV. J. Brittan, 

iSKJoRt-ifiiteHrx,'?.™™ * 0... 

Britton Patrick, laborer, dwl E s uaruora 
PRUTTON &\eY ^Joseph Britton, J.. LRey and 
^ mnnj .lrf«.werMithographers, 529 Commer- 

RRfTwTs^EUILWNG, 589 Market ^ ^ ^ 

l?iz™ a Louis, wood and coal ^^l^B^Weta^o e p1 

TiHy7olard& Roccaf agitata), av!l 24 \v etmore ri 

Brirfolala Nfcholas, with Louis Brizzolara, dwl 24 

Brizl!a™a&Co. (Louis ^ri^^'-^ ^^,;^^''- 

catagliafal, wood and coal, lOlo \V ^^°i"^;°° ^^1 

Broad B. W., engineer S. F. Gas Light Oo., awi 

Georgia bet Shasta and Sierra 
Broad Charles, brewer, d^I 1222 Bush 
Broad Charles E.,grainer. dwl oo8 Jessie 
Broad Edward, plumber with G. & >> • bnooK, uwi 

PPOAT)WAY-BL0CK, NWcor Bdwy and Kearny 
BROADWAY BOND'eD WAREHOUSE, Edwin 
TV,rifortli nroprietor, SW cor Battery and Bdwy 
BR(?\DWAY BREwte Specht & Adams pro- 

nriptors (i37 Broadway . ^, ,i 

BROADWAY HOTEL, Donohue & Slattery proprie- 
tors, 212 Broadway 
Broadwav Wharf, foot Broadway , , -p, ^. ^^ 

Broctoe Peter, laborer 110 Sutter, dwl Dupont nr 

BrocJ^°^°SecUre with Menzies, Lowry & Bing- 

Brock Cecelia Mrs,, dresscutter. 304 Third 

Brock Samuel, teamster with Micah Doane, dwl 2112 

Brofk Theodore, second steward P. M. S. S. Nevada 
Brocka-o John F., clerk with Frangois A. Rouleau 
Brockfrofi- Brothers (Charles and WilUamJ , grocer- 
ies lid Ikinors, NW cor Bryant and Twenty- 

Brockhoff Charles (Brockhoff Bros.), dwl NW cor 
Brvant and Twenty-fourth 

Brockhoff William Brockhoff Bros.), dwl NW cor 
Brvant and Twentv-fourth , . 4. „/• 

Brock^ebank Manuel T., minin^g and real estate, of- 
fice 328 Montgomery, dwl 32o>o Bush 

Brockman Catherine (widow), dwl 2/3 Minna 

Brockman Charles, conductor Central R. R., dwl 111 

Brockman"charles, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Brockman Herman, laborer Superintendent Public 

Brockman John, clerk Freight Depot S. P. R. R. 
Brockman S. Mrs., dwl Overland House 
Rrockmann Henrv, liquor saloon, 1007 Battery 
Brocn Alfred, proprietor Bay View Nursery, cor 
Twent?y-first Av and J, South S. F.. office and dwl 

Bro?/uUrMrs!:florist and depot Bay View Nur- 

sery. 619 Sacramento 
Brod Mary J. (widow), 57o Bryant 



H 

!^ 
CQ 

a 

o 
t^ 

o 
o 



o 

o 

I 

o 
o 

I 



BrodiMary J. iwiaow;,o/j£.i>a... 
Brodeck Henry H., photographer with H. VV. 
Vaughn, dwl 232 Sixth i„„„T,a.. mo 

Brodek Samuel, hairdresser, cupper, and leecher, 602 

Brode? Patricklcltr? F?eight Depot S. P. R. R.. dwl 
18 Welsh . 



isriu wiiuaui, sLcvcuvio J. . ^.^. .-■ .^- ^ , ,_ . — 

^IciFIO^COAST BUSINESS PIEECTORT, 1874-6. H. G. Langley. Pu^'r, S. F. Price i 



KENNEDY^S IX SUBAI^Cg^Gg^cY^Pire^arine. and Life. 411 CaUfomia St. 



BRO 



122 



c? 

CO 

O 

n 

Q 
K 

1^ 



Brodenek James, hostler with Charles Kellett, W s 

iMission bet Twenty-soeond and Tiventv-third 
Brodenek James tinsmith with Freemai & Wiin 
Tir-J"^^- "T \Fair Av bet Mission and California Av 
Brodenek Jeremiah, hostler, dwl 288 Sutt-r 
Brodenek Johanna (widow), dwl 978 Harrison, rear 
Broderiek John (Fmnciscovich & B.J,A^v\ 409 xMain 
Brodenek John bqi ermaker with Mo'ynihan & Ait- 

l^en, dwl 3 bhendan 
Brodenek John, laborer, dwl N s Birch nr Van Ness 

Broderiek John E porter with William J. Heney & 

Co., dwl llGarden 
Broderiek Mary Miss, dressmaker, dwl 322 Jessie 
Broderiek Michael, longshoreman dwl Empire Hotel 
Brodenek Pa nek. coachman Occidental Hotel, dwl 

^ s Liberty bet Guerrero and Dolores 
Brodenek Patrick, hostler Market St. Railway, dwl 
T. A ? H'^'r^^'^ ^"^ between Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Brodenek Thomas, waiter Buss House, dwl HTNa- 

Brodorick T. J., boots and shoes, 54 Third, dwl 549 
Howard ' 

Rrn^^r!^^ W-^'"' I'^^orer, dwl 214 Broadway 

dwl 9 Garden ™' ^^^^^^^^ "'^''^ Boland G. Brown, 

Broderiek. See Brodrick 

Brodorsen B. merchant, dwl 627 Commercial 

dwf lyciara""' ^'°'*^' "^'^^ ^- I^emmen Meyer. 

Brodhun Charles tailor, 614 California, rear 

T^rnli; ^P®^^'^^^"'^' lodgings, 49 Clementina 

FHlmore' *''^'^*'^' ^^^^ ^ « ^^^^ bet Webster and 

Brodie Frank, patternmaker, dwl 513 Howard 

Co /^'i|'/p-''°'?i°.'S?,<;'^'"i^-t ^'^^^ Hinckley & 
Pv.^- 't '' ®^^'°® ^^^ Fillmore and Webster 

Pnn,'Jf"'''ti'?-' patternmaker Risdon Iron and Lo- 

W™b4er ' ' ^'^'"' ^"^ Fillmore and 

^"""Howard"' ^°'*^^ ""^"'"^ ^- ^- Po^t-office, dwl 511 

Brodie John, tinsmith with George H. Tav & Co., dwl 

Rrnf;^ I'-^^'^t bet Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth 

^'^1 'x^,?-"^l ?•- counseUor, office 407 California 

dwl ^^1 cor Stockton and Broadway ^ "^""^^^^^ 
Brodigan Margaret Miss, dwl 718 Broadway 

B 1 ^ , "rT'=°'' l^r-^ant and and Brvant Av 

Brodt^Tohn n?"'".'' ^^^''; (widow), dwl 823 Bush 
iirodt John, carpenter, dwl 424 Stevenson 

nr™ali^ornfa''' ^'''^°''' ^^ ^°^^' ^^^ ^ ^^""^^ ^""""t 
Brodwolf Michael, tailor with George Brodwolf, 135 

! ^^°lfont?omery'^^'^ "^'^^ Ernest Essmann, dwl 1024 
Brogan Charles C, dwl 328 Brannan 

I ^Vi^^'^ S^iphael, real estate, dwl 1416 Broadway 
Prnfr q/'^T'^' ^^'^r Central R. R.,dwl 66 Everett 
Brogan Stephen, dwl 213< Stanford '"^^'^^ r^vereu 

firihw'!l^ip''VTrr^>,*^ ^- S- Appraiser's 
j miiiding. dwl Central Hotel 

' BR(vfA'n^"inl°1\?\'^'^i^'i'^«t Howard and Folsom 
i .V ;^ --^BRAM, hay and grain general commis- 
' Brol «w ???'''^-'»ant, lo3o Mission, dwl 1516 Mission 
ililsi^n ' ^ ^^ ^- B^ol^a'^- dwl 1516 

Rr?b3 V"^""^ \ fDuff& S.A dwl 615 Turk 
Biokaw Lena (widow), dwl 507 feush 
iirokenwager^Henry, carpenter California Mills, dwl 

^'"son^^V'u-t barkeeper with Louis Matick, Jack- 

son ^t. \\ harf 

iirombsrger &imon (Rosenthal, Feder d- Co. and 8. 
BromLv FT^^''/;,^'^-,^r'«''"«''' dwl 44 Third 

^'''i'n^e?} l^„'i^^gET.,eontracto\o^^^^ 



BRO 



|^SS^;fpfte?;S;^|-^ffi-g^Battery 

MifsijL^^'"'^''"' ''^^'^ ""''^ Caftie^Bros.. dwl 865 

BRaMtllM\'-fsH?^^'^?,^l4 ^1 '^Og Jackson 

offle^ 30 ( Afn^t ^ ^^^^ ^^ commissioner deeds, 
omca 6i.) Montgomery, dwl 1023 Green 



Bromley W^illiam P., captain C. P. R. R. Co 's steam- 
ers, dwl 1221 Clay steam 

Bromm Harry, seaman, dwl 422 Drumm 

wf Poft^' ' '^'■"^^''^ ^^^^ -^^^^^ ^- Bauer, dwl 

^'"°thh-d''n^r'!Sn'^^^'"^^^ * ^°-'' ^""^ ^ ' Twenty- 

^^plVl^i^'^'^^f ^' ^'■'^°"'«« a°d liquors. SB cor 
i^ranklin and Haves • ^^ v-ui 

anTBnvSi't ^-^'■'"'""^'' * Cb.;, dwl NE cor Sixth 

^'"°Sill-mi^°\r"{''p" ^ro^^^^er and Lorenzo Jessen), 
milkmen, U s Park Av nr Bryant 
513'Ellis^"''^ adjuster with R. H. Magill, dwl 

Bronbecker Jacob A., teamster, dwl E s Alabama 

nr Seventeenth 
Bronor Antonio cook St. Gottard Hotel 

pll Pefej.^^^llfe^^^J^'-'^ -<i ^"b-t 
''"&Vo!:i:J?^%iVi^e5r'^^^^^'^ ^^^^ Falkenstein 
^'°MlrcS°' ^''^°''''' "^'^^ "^°^° "^''^y -^ Bros., 524 
Bronsdon Phineas, railroad contractor, dwl 17 Moss 
''"Xry^,^dTl\%S4^^°'-^^^''''^^ ^^^ ^^--^- 
Rrn^w ° fi" T°l™'T?*T mariner, dwl 55 Second 
Bronworth John D., longshoreman, dwl 303 Davis 
Bronzan John coffee and liquor 'saloon, XW cor 
Davis and Oregon 

°Ovs?er '^''nr' ^ajifornia Market Restaurant and 
Uyster baloon 7 Summer, dwl 218 Fourth 
grooker George, bootmaker with Charles J Robert* 
Brookes Samuel M artist, studio 611 Clav, dwl K 
Rr Ji •* Avnr California Av, Bernal Heights 

''"Sir?,'^i;\^y-&Tv^°' ^°'^^^^°' ''' ^^^-'- 

"'"t/Tio^ri^?;- ''^- ""' ^"^^""^^ ^^''^^*^^^' ''ffi- 

BROOKLYN LIFE IXS. CO., A. J. Bryant & Co 
general agents, office 409 California ^ "' "^ '^o- 
Batt°rv'^°°^''*' ^*^^'^'a°d, Alameda Co.), office 417 

Brooks^ Albert M.. clerk S. F. Post-office, dwl 7KHar- 

^'°dwliyi Bk?"*^*^"^'^"" ^- ^- ^- ^^°°1^° Factory, 
Brooks^ August, collector Pacific St. Wharf, dwl 333 

^^ s2?=n ^^i^^l.W S--' ^«°^°«y at law, office 224 
feansom, dwl 631 Harrison 

Rrn^bf Birdseye, laundryman Occidenfal Laundry 

dwl ?]7^0ak *^'™°'°'''" ^^'li Lumber S. Allen. 

'^^^^■^^A^^W ^OLCOTT, consul of Japan 

office /03 Market cor Third, dwl Grand Hotel 
Rrnnt' If """"i (^^'^' '^-^■'^ dwl 1117 WasMng ton 
Brook F r^R^' ttl'^"-apli repairer, dwl .»i Com 
Uiooks L. L. B., attorney at law. office and dwl 405 

Brooks^Elisha, teacher Urban Academy, dwl 1725 
1^ Brooks Frank, porter with Hobart Wood & Co., dwl 
Brooks Frederick A., watchman Grand Hotel 

llfci'Sina''""'' ^^l'^°°i«o Restaurant, dwl 
""■"anl &oe& ^ ' ^""^°" ">'' Seventeenth 

■^^°^t^i ?-°^^' e-^pressman, cor Mission and Third, 
awi /!)/ riryant ' 

Brooks Henry, miller, dwl .546 Mission 
Rr^nk^ u "'■-'" ^1^ '' ^l°- ^- ^«y -^ C-o.A dwl 3:3.3 Eddy 

^'°Seve?teen';h^- ''"^ ««tate. dwl W s Guerrero nr 
Brooks James, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Rrooks James, captain stm Princess, Meiggs' Wharf 
Brooks James, conductor X. B. and Aliss ohR R 
Brooks James, notary public, office 3lu Montgomery 
dwl cor Kearny and Pacific "^ uigomery, 

-1? vf-" ■•' ™'^'®^ with Horace Davis & Co., dwl 
.>lb Mission ' 

BROOKS JOHN L., merchant tailor, 710 Mont 
Brooks Joseph rc Jas.mna of Wm. & Co.;, dwl N 
\V cor Market and Franklin 



SPRINGFIELD FIBE AND^IAEINE IKts rn ^f tut ; ■ 

AJ.^^ m.a^j.j>jE INS. CO., of Mass., always Just, always Prompt. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO.. 708, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny Street, Fancy Goods. 




Brooks Josopli H., tinsmith with Caleb M. Sicklor, 

dwl <i2') Bay 
Brooks Margaret (widow), dwl SO Stono 
Brooks jNIaria Mrs., dwl 72ii Valle.io 
Brooks Mary (widow, colored), dwl 831 Vallojo, rear 
Brooks M. J. Mrs., nurse, dwl '-li'Z Howard 
Brooks Orion, superintondont Tolograpliio Institute. 

Heald's Business College, 27 I'ost, dwl iJoii4 

Minna , . ^ , . 

Brooks Patrick, hostler, dwl S s Point Lobos Av nr 

Twenty-fourth Av . 

Brooks Pelotia F. Mrs., dwlll7 Third ^ ^ 

Brooks lUchard, laborer, Maine Lodsings, OK) Koar 
Brooks Kobort C, distiller with Abraham T. Van 

Winkle, dwl Es Old San Jose lloadnr Industrial 

School ^ ^ , . Tir 11 

Brooks Samuel E., clork Letter Department Wells, 

Fargo & Co., dwl Bornal Heights 
Brooks Stephen S., real estate, office 420 Kearny, dwl 

801 Bush . , , „„ TT ■ 

Brooks Thaddeus R., civil engineer, dwl 721 ilarrison 
Brooks Thomas H., bookkeeper with Inost Ac iriod- 

landor, dwl 829 Mission i.^ j , 

Brooks Timothy, seaman schooner Dreadnought, awl 

24 ^Market ^ „ 

Brooks William, brakeman S. P. K. U. ,„_,„_ 
Brooks William, clerk Townsend St. 1 ards S. P. 11.. K. 
Brooks William, clork with Kimball Manufacturing 

Co., dwl ij;{I Harrison 
Brooks William, laborer, dwl 28^ Freelon 
Brooks William, seaman, dwl 10 Commercial 
Brooks AVilliam, spectdator, dwl 2008 Powell 
Brooks William H., janitor S. F. Produce Exchange, 

dwr208 Druium .. „ c ivr 

Brooks William M., shoemaker with Boers & May- 

nard, dwl Trinity, roar 
Broom Jamos M., clork, dwl Overland House 
Broom Samuel, longshoreman, dwl 24.i Spear, rear 
Brophy John, druggist, dwl Railroad House 
Brophy Michael, hostler Suttor St. K. R., dwl lo88 

Brophy Patrick, hostler with Josiah H. Swain, dwl 

United States Hotel 
Brosius Frederick, barkeeper, dwl 9 John 
Brosnahan Bartholomew, cardriver, dwl E 3 Minna 

hot Fourteenth and Fiftponth r rr- i 

Brosnahan Stephen, toauister with Haste « KirK, 

dwl 548 Tehama . „ 

Brosnan Hanna Miss, hairdresser with Mrs. Wm. H. 

Ringgold, dwU Haggin a- a t ^ra 

Brosnan John D., porter 111 Leidesdorff, dwl IM 

Tehama ,. „ _. , . 

Brosnan John T., plumber with McNally & Hawkins, 

dwl 1 Haggin 
Brosnan Michael, laborer, dwll Haggin 
Bross George fBross & Co.A dwl Pratt Courtnr tal 
Bross Jacob {Brass & Co.J, dwl 19 Diipont 
Bross k Co. (George and Jacob Bross and Michael 

nUtesJ, Metropolitan Bath and hairdrcssing sa- 
loon, 2o0 Bush _^ , i. ■ , c! I, 1 
Brossurd Frank, night watchman Industrial bchool 
Brosso Mmo, teacher of dress cutting, 34 ihirii 
Brothers Michael, coachman, dwl 11 Adelaide Pi 
Brothorton Lillio E. Miss, teacher Hayes Valley 

Primary School, dwl 1509 Broadway 
Brothorton Robert,carpontor with Charles E. iildon, 

dwlL309 Broadway ,, ^ . i. j 4. 

Brotherton Thomas W. Rev. M.D., superintendent 

St. Luke's Hospital, office 414 Market, dwl lo20 

Brougham John (Brouaham & Goldberg J, dwl 312 

tJreon , , ,- 

Brougham & Goldberg {John Brougham and Max 

Goldberf/!, hairdressing saloon, ii:;i Kearny 
Broughton J^ai>oloon L., speculator, dwl 102i) Bush 
Browdy John, baker, dwl Metropolitan Hotel 
BROWELL JEREMIAH, pipe manufacturer and 

contractor, 412 Jackson, dwl 217 Lombard 
BrowellJoromiah S., clork, dwl 217 Lombard 
Brower Andrew J., saloonkeeper, dwl olO tureen 
Brower Benjamin, coachman, dwl 1 Burritt 
Brower Daniel R., bakery, 1400 Stockton 
Brower Eli/.a Miss, weaver Mission Woolen Mills, 

dwl 4:i2 Seventh . „, , r. ui- i,- 

Brower George H., compositor Woman's Publishing 

Co., dwl 405 Hyde 
Brower Mary Mrs. (widow), dwl 81 Natoma 
Brower Robert, house and signpaintor, 417 Drumm 
Browly John C, waiter, dwl E s Fair Oaks nr 

Twenty-third 



Brown , carpenter, dwl 1028 Market 

Brown , driver, dwl .Wi Jessie 



Brown Aaron, teacher Hebrew, dwl 2<)7% Stevenson 
Brown A.. B., carpenter California MiU, dwl 22 Russ 
Brown A. B.. collector Spring Valley Water W. Co., 

res San Loandro 
Brown Abraham, dwl 1014 Stockton _ 
Brown Abraham, mason, dwl 220 Third 
Brown Abraham B. (colored), barber, dwl 1104 Pac 
Brown Adam, tailor, dwl 1822 Stockton 
Brown Adolph, tobacco and cigars, 824 Kearny, dwl 

710 Kearny 
Brown Albert, mariner, dwl G Kramer PI 
Brown Alexander, clork, dwl 250i) Webster 
Brown Alexander B., lumber dealer, dwl 219 Ritch 
Brown Alfred, framomakor Pacific Straw Works, dwl 

814 Sansom ^ ., 

Brown Alfred F., cutter with Henry Steil 
Brown Alonzo F., Indian beads, fancy goods, etc., 321 

Pine, dwl 1825 Bush ^ , , ^^ 

Brown Alonzo Fitch, with Edgar 0. Brown, dwl Russ 

House -I , r.r. 01 

Brown Andrew, captain schooner Mose, dwl 22 Stan- 
ford T>r CI O /-I 

Brown Andrew, tinsmith P. M. S. S. Co. 

Brown Annie (widow), dressmaker, dwl 40 Clara 

Brown Anton, laborer, dwl 5.ii) Sacramento 

Brown Antonio, tailor, 105 Jackson , , „,„ 

Brown Archibald, tinsmith P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 218 

Third ,, , ,. ^ 

Brown Arthur, compositor with Pacific Methodist 
Brown August, cook with John Stumpf, First Av nr 

Kentucky, South S. F. 
Brown Augustus, tailor, 329 Vallejo 
Brown Barbara Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 707 Vallejo 
Brown B. B., painter, dwl Overland House 
Brown Benjamin, dwl 508 Jones 
Brown Benjamin,baker Boston Cracker Bakery, dwl 
Heinz Hotel j , r.r. 

Brown Benjamin W. (Michelssen <& B), dwl oil 

Bryant , , , 

BROWN BRAINARD G., teacher phonography 

and phonographic reporter, dwl 419 Hyde 
BROWN BROTHERS & CO. (Morris and Lewis 
Brown, and Baehr SheidemanJ , agents Oregon 
City Woolen Manufacturing Co., 24 and 26 ban 
Brown Brown, carpenter, dwl 23 Ritch 
Brown Catharine (widow), dwl 124 Hayes 
Brown Catherine (widow), dwl SE cor Mission and 

Sixteenth 
Brown Catharine E. (widow), dwl 5b4 Stevenson 
Brown Cecil, clerk with E. V. Joice, (i Merchants' Ex- 
change, res East Oakland 
Brown C. H., upholsterer with Cal. Furniture Manu- 
facturing Co. , , ^^,„ ^ , 
Brown Charles (Johnson & B.J, dwl NW cor Jack- 
son and Jones 
Brown Charles, dwl 1023 Kearny 
Brown Charles, carpenter, dwl 25 Rausch, rear 
Brown Charles, clerk with I. Friedlander, dwl 322 

Fremont , -,,Tr 

Brown Charles, cook with A. C. Swain, dwl feW cor 

Fifth and Folsom 
Brown Charles, drayman with Jonathan Kittredge, 

dwl 110 Ellis 
Brown Charles, fisherman, dwl 1 Market _ 

Brown Charles, gasfltter U. S. Mint, dwl 21(5 Third 
Brown Charles, porter Western Union Telegraph Co., 

dwl 522 California ,,. ^ , 

Brown Charles, real estate, dwl \V s Dolores bet 

Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Brown Charles, restaurant, dwl 100 Jackson 
Brown Charles, restaurant, dwl 1010 Stockton 
Brown Charles, salesman with John H. Kossing, dwl 

5 Market 
Brown Charles, seaman, dwl 20 Sacramento 
Brown Charles, seaman, dwl 131 Spear 
Brown Charles, seaman, dwl 250 Spear 
Brown Charles, stoves and tinware, 724 Market, dwl 

335 O'Farrell 
Brown Charles, teamster, dwl 801 Vallejo 
Brown Charles A., collector with Charter Oak Life 

Insurance Co., dwl 7. Bay 
Brown Charles A., seaman, dwl 740 Front 
Brown Charles E., baggagemaster Market Street 

Depots. P. R. R., dwl83(j Market 
Brown Charles F. (Swain & BJ, dwl 66 Clementina 
Brown Charles F., student Heald's Business College 
Brown Charles H., stableman with James S. Dyer, 
1975 Union 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY contains Addresses of over 50,000 Merchants. 



KENNEDY'S INSUBANCE AGENCY, Fire Marine «.^ t -^ 
'^■^' -"ire, marine, and Li fe, represents $12,000,000. 



BRO 



124 



^™d°l^^^'!ihipfey^''^'"®''°'^° cor Sixth and Folsom, 
'"''Ad^^ib^i^'''^^''' "'^"^ ^°^- Millar, dwl 



BRO 



^''d"l n"; Pern'"' '''''''''"^ "'"'^ commission agent, 

^'TaS dVS'jtir^'^^^^^^*'^^""-- '^More- 

Rrn^," n'*""- 'I' r°H: '^'^^ ■53'^ Sacramento 

J^rown J)aniel, teacher naFi-ation, dvvl li2H}4 Jessie 

^'Til^Tinth" ^'"""^^^'P^^ ^ith N. Gray & Co., dwl 

^^°S?.^rdfv,^kt|irSrcf ^ '^^^ Washi^^foS^d 
Brown Denton D., civil engineer, dwl 130 Eleventh 
BllOWvTr)r°i'l^T''"^,"' '^''^ ISlOMonfgomerv 

Grand H*d^i^ ^^ ''''' ''''^''' ^^^ ^'^ Clay, dwl 
Brown Edmund, oiler P. M. S. S. Alaska 
Brown Edward, clerk, dwl 125 sAcramento 
Brown Edward, clerk Freight Depot S. PR R 
Brown Edward, cook stm Pelican Oregon S. S Co 

"nTcook""^''"^^'^''^'"' ^^^ ^^ ^ Point LobosAy 
Brown Edward, merchant, dwl 1145 Mission 
Brown^ Edward, seaman, dwl W s Columbia nr Twen- 

f "FaMo'r^S Jd.^!fol K^d^'^'^-*--* ^^^ells, 
%"lMar]°et''°^'°'''''' "^"^ ^- ^- Bancroft & Co., 

^'Trnion'"'' ^■' ^"''^"' ^^°^''° Methodist, dwl 529 

Brown Edwin W special policeman, dwl 1629 Mission 
Brown E. J. (widow) , dwl 52;J Union ^vii„sion 

m Market ''" ^°''° ^'^'""^ Machine Co., dwl 

''"F^a^Kl.VrTi^lT' '^°'°"^^^' ^""^ ^^-'^-'l ^'^^ 
Brown Elizabeth Mrs' dwl 720 Folsom 
Brown EM. (widow), dwl 409 Minna 
Brown Ellis, merchant, office lOS Battery 

1017 Padflf ' ^'^^'"^"^^''^ ^itii John Thomas, dwl 
Brown Emma (widow), dwl 217 O'Farrell 

Tim^'rv^^-^^/'^' teacher South Cosmopolitan 
rnTSnkfin°°'' ^^' ^"^^'^ '^^* ^^° ^ess Av 
Pr^3° ^^^'^i- Mrs., furnished room^, dwl 719 Cal 
m5 S?oSn'°'"''°'"°' EveninrBulletin, dwl 
RrZ° i^'^j*?" H-, telegraph operator, dwl 1629 Mis 
Co.,'d;fT7a'ssif'^™"° ^^'"^ Henry ^fnkle& 
Brown Frances (widow), dwl 9 Union PI 
^1°"^^ Frank expressman, dwll2i) Harrison 
Brown Frank M.,seeretary Amador Canal and Min- 
ing Co., office 03 Merchants' Exchange, dwl N W 
cor Twenty-second and Mission s , uwi j.> w 

Brown Frn^nki^- ^^''T'* '^' *'™:^e«A dwl 509 Bryant 
i^rown 1 ranklin merchant, dwl 9 John 

^^°roa.xrfflr nTf'iS" '''' '*^"^'-' -^ 

"d;;i![7^ttSor''^*''" ""^ »-^-baum & Co., 

Pvn^!^ Frederick, restaurant, 10 Steuart 

t nn/^°'',"'A°^/-^''°oks and stationery, 158 Sec 

Rrn^ '^i?°^''5'' ^•^^ n^a Costa Laundry, dwl 53 Natoma 

Howlrd'""" ^••'^"^''" Omnibus R. R., dwlSd 

^'°K6 Jessie"^^"'" ""'^^ ^°^'"°*'^ "^ Westerfeld, dwl 
irPnfeSi:^ffiv^^fll^^ 

I i |o?ie: s^-pwit\^L^-r— - 

f °s7ho?rifv!'l4»a^.!or^^^^^ ^"^"^^ «— " 

°Nat'^ma^°' ''^"''" ""'^^ ^^^^ ^^^agan, dwl 311 

^^MiS^-' "'^^'' Shipcalkers' Association, 



^'Te"t&f ifn-i^n^d^^C^^ll^'h-'^^^--. '-' ^-'^"^ 
thias Gray, dwl 1715 Loavonworth 

^""eSo^cJijy^ ^^- ''^- ^- ^«"--^^' "'ho^-aph- 
^'■"valKjo'House"''^ California Machine Works, dwl 

^'°rc^':^iTi'l:;i^i ni^g^aiSii^^ ^'■"'-- ^'^'^-^ 

Pv^"'" Hannah B. (widoty), dwl 734 Vallejo 

VrZ^ 9^"''' P'^P"" Scandinavian Home, 105 Clark 

Lrown Harry, seaman, dwl 127 Jackson 

i^rown Harry, seaman stm Newbern, Front St Wharf 

Brown Harvey S., land a^ent C P R P Pn V^ 

^,„NE cor Fourth>ndTownsend, res Oakland °'^'°' 

Prown p'°'-'^' f '^'■'^ V!^ ^"^'"^ Minn, dw 5I? Sac 
Blown Henry, driver Central R. R., dVl 113 Marv 
Brown Henry, fireman P. M. S. S. (jolima ^ 

Brown Henry, liquor saloon, 1013 Kearny 
Brown Henry, milker with Douglas E. Knight dwl 
I cor Greenwich and Scott tvni^nt, awl 

thrown Henry, musician, dwl 436 Union 
Urown Henry, salesman with G. H. Mitchell & Co 

dwl SE cor Webster and Fell ^"^^'^o'' ^ ^o- 
Prn3" genry, special policeman, dwl foot Oregon 

s Pr&At-n::'^!*'^" %'^'°'"'' Industry, IwlN 
SI rpcita Av nr Howai'd 

Brown Henry C. fSrotvn A Wilson;, dwl 52 Second 

"°dwl i?" Cjar-r''^""'''"''"' '"' ^°^^'*i and Sixth,- 
Brown Horace, foundryman, dwl Relay House 
l-'-o.MTrn V^{^:i 1,-''^ '^ «---"i Sun- 
pZn f^kfe^^mfn^^d^f ^l^^,^S- ^^^ ^^^^h 
Sixth"^° S., cook Horticultural Hall, dwl 420Ji 

Brown Hyman/o/ P. Brown & Bro., Marysville) 
manuf boys' clothing, 125 Sansom, dwl 17 Hyde 

Blown Ireson a, contractor, dwl 730 Guerrero 

G?ovf 4y (Brown & Brown), dwl 35 Oak 

Brown J., engineer stm Julia 

Jirown J., waiter, divl 206 Fourth 

Brown J. A., porter 316 Washington, dwl 1235 Union 

Brown James, baker Grand Hot^l ° 

^n^i Ar'"P^'' barkeeper with Julius Ludroff, SW 
cor Mission and Spear ' 

Brown James, drayman, dwl 4 Hunt 

brown James, laborer, dwl 908 Vallejo 

l^ui'^'lP' ™attressmaker with California Fur 
nituro Manufacturing Co., dwl 7 Verona PI 

RroJ^n t'^"^' 'colored), physician, dwl 10 Scotland 

Jjrown James, printer, dwl 930 Clay 

Brown James, salesman dwl 803 Montgomery ' 

Brown James, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 

brown James, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 

W'harf'^^^' ^'^^^^^ ^'™ Constantino, Clay St. 

Brown James, teamster, dwl NW cor Bat and Green 

ant nrTayfor '''"'''''"^° '"'^ ^™°*' ^^^ ^' ^^^^^ " 
Brown James C., hairdresser, 1146 Folsom 
Brown James E., coalpasser P. M. S. S. Colima 
°Cali'for'i!^l carpenter California Mills, dwl 628 

^'7,^1 Ss?ta '^^S^ '^-'^-' -52^ Tbird. 

"dwnO™5'Farrell "'^''^^ """^ '^- ^^ ^^'^"°" "^ ^o.. 
Brown James P lather, dwl 7 Stevenson 
brown .James ^V., furniture, dwl 81 Fourth 
brown Jane (widow, colored), cook, dwl 1405 Stock- 

^'°Pot'riro Av*^"' ^^^''''^'^"b, N s Twenty-fourth nr 
^'°Co "^' ■^■' <^biof engineer stm Pelican Oregon S. S. 

Brown' "t" p" f^T^ ^}}^ ^^ ^riedlander, res Oakland 
UrZ^ T ^- (colored), messenger Custom House 
Brown Jesse, engineer, dwl 51(1 Vallejo 

"Comme'reiaf ■' '^''^ ""'^^ ^'''^^ ^''^^^' "^^I ^36 



PABNSWOBTF^^I.lBi:^en'n,ir;^^J^Iarine^^-3ur^^ 



230 Oal. St. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708. 712, 714, ar^^716^earny^treet^_Glassw^^ 



BRO 



125 



BRO 



Brown Jesse E., driver with H. H. Edmund, dwl 

yiSK Hayes 
Brown J ohn, dwl 13 Baldwin Court . 
Brown John, barkeeper with Louis Eppmger, dwl lo 

Brown John, calker Shipcalkers' Assn, 713 Mission 

Brown John, deckhand steamtag Rescue 

Brown John, fireman, dwl 319 Vallojo 

Brown John, foundryman, dwl 11 ireelon 

Brown John, hnrseshoer, dwl 13 Aatoma 

Brown John, laborer, dwl 418 Drumm 

Brown John, lab Pacifto Rolling Mill, Potroro Point 

Brown John, laborer with llanscom Ai Co., dwl 8 

Frederick , r,^^ o . 

Brown John, liquor saloon, 82/ fcacramento . 
Brown John, longshoreman, dwl b\V cor \ allejo and 

Brown°John, millhand with Eisen Bros., dwl 16 Stev 
Brown John, nurse U. S. Marine Hospital 
Brown John, quartermaster P. M. b. b. Arizona 
Brown John 2d, salesman with George A. Meigs, dwl 

53 Clementina , , .„ c ^ 

Brown John, seaman, dwl -18 Sacramento 
Brown John, seaman stm Donald, \V ashington bt. 

Wharf 
Brown John, stevedore with Black Diamond Coal 

Co., dwl Sansom bot Broadway and \ allejo 
Brown John A., watchman b. h. Post-office, dwl 421 

Natoma „ , , , ,-omi,- j 

Brown John B. fErown <& B.J, dwl lo3 Third 
Brown John B., engineer S. P. R. R., dwl Alabama 
nr Sixteenth , 

' Brown John C, mate Oakland Ferry boats 
Brown John F., book and job printer, oA Commer- 
cial dwl 423^4 Greenwich 
Brown John H., clerk with Ellis Read, 304 Cal 
Brown John H., shipcarpenter, dwl oOh Howard 
Brown John M., seaman, dwl 127 Jackson 
Brown John 0., messenger U. &. Army Headquar- 
ters, 105 Stockton, dwl 707 \ allejo 
Brown John K., captain stm Alameda, Oakland 

Ferry, ros Petaluma 
Brown John William, capitalist, office 424 Montgom- 
ery, dwl S\V cor Pine and Powell 
Brown Joseph, dwl 023 Bush . t -d <•*■ t. 

Brown Joseph, compositor with A. L. Banerott & 

Co., dwl 714 Howard 
Brown Joseph, laborer, dwl b Broadway 
Brown Joseph, laborer S. F. P. U oolen Factory, dwl 
Polk bet Lombard and Chestnut ^^ , , , , , 
Brown Joseph, waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel, dwl 4 

Natoma 
Brown J. S. (widow), dwl 25 Ellis , „, „ . 
Brown Julia B. Miss, teacher Fourth St. Primary 
School, dwl 800 Mission , ^ , , , t -^v 

Brown J. William (J. W. Brown & Co.), dwl Lick 

Brown J. W. & Co., stock brokers, office 338 Mont 
Brown Kate Miss, dwl 15 Second 
Brown L. Mrs., saleswoman with Erasmus w. 
Haines, dwl 719 Market «- ri i- 

Brown Lawrence M., attorney at law, omce 6cio Cali- 
fornia, dwl 710 Market , ^ , . 
Brown Le#is fBron'ii Brothers <& Co. and Toklas 

iJa/iMct^.;, dwlS24 0'Farrell i 

BrownL.H., dwl 120 0' Farrell pt • 

Brown Lizzie, glovemaker with bhoenberg & Levm- 

sky, dwl jN \V cor Brannan and Clinton 
Brown L. L., salesman with Keane, O'Connor & Co., 

dwl 714 Howard 
Brown Louis, expressman, dwl Miller PI 
Brown Luther, phvsician, office and dwl /02 Wash 
Brown L. Walter, clerk 513 California, dwl o24 Post 
Brown Malcolm, compositor Evening Bulletin, dwl 

850 Market 
Brown Margaret (widow), dwl 42 Sacramento 
Brown Margaret (widow), dwl 1029 Mission 
Brown Maria (widow, colored), ladies' nurse, dwl 

1328 Pacific ^^ , , ^ 

Brown Mark, laborer, dwl SW cor Vallejo and ban 
Brown Mary (widow), dwl Ashbarton PI 
Brown Mary (widow), dwl N s Dorland nr Guerrero 
Brown Mary (widow, colored), dwl 3 Gerke Alley 
Brown Mary Miss, liquor saloon, 704 Pacific 
Brown Marv A. Miss, shoafitter with S. W. Rosen- 
stock & Co., dwl 710 Clinton 
Brown Matthew, laborer with James McDevitt, W s 

Sansom bet Broadway and Vallejo 
Brown xM. F. (Coelho & B.J, dwl 240>^ Fifth 
Brown Michael, dwl 3u7 Eighth 



•tJ 



CO 

a 

SI 

> 

o 

p 
O 

W 

g 



Brown Michael, driver with D. E. Boot & Co., dwl 
174 Jessie a-w„. 

Brown Michael, teamster, dwl lo8 bilver 

BrowS Mkhael J., clerk with C. P. Van Schaack & 
Co., dwl 1414 Dupont ,, ,^ , .„ „ „..,= na. 

Brown Michael J., helper Melter's and Refiner's De- 
partment U. S. Mint, dwl 025 Bush 

Brown Morris t Brown Brothers & Co.), dwl 8221 

Brown Mosos (colored), laborer, dwl 1813 Stock, rear 
Brown Moses P., harnessmaker with Main & Win 

Chester, dwl 1825 Bush ., „ „ ,„, -vr „ 

Brown M. T., student University College, dwl N s 

Turk bet Mason and Jones 
Brown Napoleon, barkeeper, dwl 1032 Clay . 
Brown Nathan, importer and jobber clothing, lUS 

Battery, dwl 927 Bryant ,.,.., at- „ 

Brown Nellie Miss, dressmaker, dwl .3-^1 Minna 
Brewn Nellie 0., dressmaker, dwl 224 Second 
Brown Newman A., physician, dwl 702 Brannan, rear 
Brown Nicholas, laborer, d.vl 3 Lick 
Brown Nicholas, laborer, dwl 1428 btockton, rear 
Brown Oscar, waiter Alta Lodgings, o3o bacramento 
Brown P., carrier S. F. Chronicle, dwl Potrero Avnr 

Seventeenth 
Brown Page, clerk, dwl 907 butter 
Brown Peter, captain sloop Julia, office ^Oo i.ast 
Brown Peter, deckhand stm Express, Commercial bt. 

Brown Peter, housemover, dwl 1100 Powell 

Brown Peter, machinist CaUfornia 1 heater, dwl Old 

Bush , , 

Brown Peter, molder, dwl 11 Jansen ^,-r,.„^^ 

Brown Peter, sailmaker Clothing Depot Military 
Division Pacific, 107 Stockton, dwl (24 Lombard 
Brown Peter, seaman, dwl 250 Spear 
Brown Peter, seaman P. M. S. S. Gipsey 
Brown Philip, longshoreman, dwl N s Filbert bet 

Montgomery and Sansom 
Brown K., seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Brown R. A., dwl 010 Kearny -r, ., t 

Brown Raphael, bookkeeper with Brown Brothers a, 

Co., dwl 824 O'Farrell ,,.,7 i. 

Brown Reuben W., foreman with Michelssen & 

Brown, dwl Railroad Av nr t ifth Av, South b. H: . 
Brown Richard, dwl 010 Kearny , , . _, 
Brown Richard, asphaltum roofer, dwl 2.^4 Stevenson 
Brown Richard, capitalist, ofl-215 ban, dwl 818 Green 
Brown Richard, clerk with Fleet 1. Strother, 328 

Montgomery, dwl 23 Anthony ^ , , , „, • „^ 
Brown Richard, collector, dwl S s Turk bet Sterner 

and Pierce , , ^ • i_ j 

Brown Richard, real estate, dwl cor Greenwich and 

Devisadero -«.t ,. , a 

Brown Richard, soap manufactory, cor Nebraska and 

Alameda , a tt a 

Brown Richard, stevedore Riggers' and b. U. Asso- 
ciation, 423 Pacific , , . , , „^^ r, -c 
Brown Richard A. (colored), jobbing dwl 7o0 Pacific 
Brown Richard T., bookkeeper, dwl 31/ iittb 
Brown Robert, cook stm Antelope, dwl lo2 Silver 
Brown Robert, salesman with Keane, O'Conn-or &. 

Co., dwl 15 Powell , , -rrr «, V. 

Brown Robert T., whitener, dwl W s Alabama nr 

Twenty-fourth ^ t> 1 o .„ 

BROWN ROLAND G., agent Grover & Baker Sew- 

iu" Machine Co., 110 Montgomery, dwl (Oo Post 
Brown Rolla, carpenter, dwl Fella PI 
Brown Rose (widow), dwl 110 Shipley 
Brown Rufus N.. dry-goods dealer, dwl 2322 Wash 
Brown Rutherford H., mining secretary, office 402 

Montgomery room 2, dwl tjlo Eddy 
Brown S., cook, dwl 533 Commercial 
Brown Sadie Miss, saleslady with H. W. Vaughn, dwl 

304 Third 
Brown Samuel, dwl 411 Sansom 
Blown Samuel, longshoreman, dwl 12 Tehama 11 
Brown Samuel, local policeman Hathaway VV hart. 

dwl 20 Stanford „,,,-„• n n 

Brown Samuel, student Heald's Businsss College 
Brown Samuel E., foreman with Frederick Marriott, 

dwl 325 Clementina ..,. m t t> p n„ 

Brown Samuel H., salesman with T. J. Bass & Co., 

dwl 7 Verona PI . . , „ ^ o i, i j 1 qq- 

Brown S. L. Miss, principal Potrero School, dwl 660 

Jessie , -r^ ■., o f^ x 

Brown S. R., water tender P. M. S. S. Japan 
Brown Stephen G., hairdressing saloon, 202 Fourth 
Brown Susan Mrs., dwl ^28 Washington 
Brown S.William, waiter, dwlSE cor Stone and Jack 



^ 



"Pacific coast business DIRECTOKY, 1874-6rv^ be published September. 1874. 



I.. W. KENNEBT. Oen»g^g,ugn;^A;eg;^I^;e^M;;^^ ,„ C»lif„„,a S.. 




Brown Sylvesior B., drayman with James A. Brown 
d wl S Cushman nr Saorftmento i^rown, 

Brown Iheodoro, dwl 1024 Diipont 

°F{?dS''°'^''"' ^°"" ^V-oodward's Gardens, dwl 6 

^^%VJr^o'^J-A^'-''''^r^ B'-^^k California, office 

A \\ cor Cahtornia and Sansom, dwl !I07 Sutter 
Brown Thomas, calkor, dwl S s Six een h nr Hoff Ay 
Brown Thomas, laborer, dwl 1 Jasper PI 
Lrown Ihomas, laborer, dwl 778 Harrison 

^™Fs1aiife|',&h^^s/^/^ ^ ^ ^^-^^«-*^ Ay nr 

te fc; !irr&^i;n°irMlri? '^'--^ 

iirown ihomas, salesman, dwl 935 Sutter 
l.rown -Thomas, selector with Wangonheim Stern- 
heim & Co., dwl cor Fourteenth Ay and^. South 

|''''dwl?iXrri:'oT'' ^"'°^'"^° ^"^*°" Ho"«e, 
^'^Kf'di^^^f^^fnfr^'lf "^^'^^^^^ ^'-^"^--^ Mar- 
Brown '^,^u°'^''^^' V"«"- P- M. S. S. Mohongo 
Brown ihomas A., photographic art gallery fiOa 
Kearny, dwl 312 Eighth K'^iery, ouj 

T^r^!I° m'^T^^ ?^' teamster. Golden Gate Park 

Brown I M. (widow), dwl 708 Folsom 

Brown W., dwl 010 Kearny 

J^rown W cook stm Santa Cruz, Wash. St Wharf 

Rrn!™ w" ^^^°^*° ^"*'^ ^'ax Oregon SS Co 

"""d^^HO^a'al^r^^ "^''^ B.ittan.Holbro'^ol^Co., 

Brown William, dwl 503 O'Farrell 

'"'ZlVJt^J^.f^.r''' ""''^ I^"^^^<fc Topping, 
f "p?oSSJftlf^[h''°°*'^^«'^ -"^ C^-1- 

Br2:Sll'£S:^^"^^;^!:Jil!^?-'^'^l-,Hpuse 



:-C^I^:^^l=^^^«^=^^Sj«lll|Bro^^elfl!i^^ 



Clinton, rear 

l^ro.vn \V illiam, drayman with Gibson & Co 
Brown JVi ham, fireman stm Prince Alfred 

Erown V;^'''''' ''^i'™''"'-^ dealer?dwl 1215 Folsom 
Zl 51X h"' ^°sema° Hose i\o. 1, S. F? R^ 
ciwi 0)6 Howard > •^- j.. j.. if., 

Brown William, laborer, dwl 3 Broadway 

Brown Wil ham, sawmaker, 222 Jack dwl Si 9 Cr..^ 

^'rZi! !{'?:?• If-^--' dwl 2. S?eukrt"' ''' ^'^^° 



Brown William Patrick, policeman City Hall dwl S 

Bro^li|fLt^=:Ct[^^¥Iha!a 
''"d^/lii'^riff---'- -'^ Bryan^^sTrahan. 

''™dwl"22'layior'" ^*"''^°* "^^'^ »-^ -^ Brandon, 

^'lssodaUon''7TMe\f^r'^\'P^"^^^^'J°"''^°ymen 
^asociauon, 71 i\ew Montgomery 

t^'eenlh " ^^^ ^^ ^''''""' '^ «>.A dwl 732 Six- 

BROWi\ W. S. & CO., eommission merchants and 

^"S^ot^;,TarSiy^-hird^^°"'^ ""'^ •^«'^'^^- 
Caliibrnfa Slarker • ^''^^^^^''l'^^' «*«•' '3^' and 31 

''"Z;*Sift,';^ri^Sa^nf'-''"''^«'^^^^^^«'^'^-/- 

Ti^vi^^"''*"/^'^"'"^ ^' ^'•«"'« ««rf William H. 
WdsonJ, asphaltum rooiers. (J14 Mission 
Browne Car D., artist, dwl (J:i5 Howard 
Browne Christopher K., clerk Fireman's Fund Insur- 
anco Co., dwl 1013 Washington '^ " "^ "°" ^^^"1^ 

Monttomer';'"'' ""^ ^'°''^' ^^^"^^°°' ^^^^ ^03 
^'°Fol'om'^''' *^" '''^"°'" '^^°°°' S^ «°^ Eighth and 
''^:;:^lfoet, ^e^faktt-™*' ^^^^ «^ Montgom- 
^"cTant^^l^la'^ngtri {!f^^S"pT' ^^^^ '' ""'^ 
"^"^^^^^il^^^^ "^'^^^ <'1-J^ Third 

^"s?ott!'te4s?(' '"^ «" c-"-'^ A- -d 

Co'dwl^w^-"','/''-^^?**''" Union Telegraph 
.r,-'u} ^}^ '^2^ I^eyisadero and Post 



'04 Powell 



O 

o 

H 

o 

p 

P 



p '"'" . miam, seaman, dwl SdH Front 
^ ;^e^Si-!'^«^^ri. Journey- 
Brown William, steyedore P. M.S^ s! Ca, dwl 441 

Brown William, tinsmith, dwl ^lIiGroye 
Provn W^r A- (colored), calker, dwl 10 Virginia 
Brown )^ i ham A., engineer, dwl 507 Ei4th 

'^"d.^l^l^ltektt "'^'^^^"^^^ ^^'^'^''' ^*- -^ Co.. 

^^XiSfcSw^si^r--*^^^-^-. 

f "en,^^d;ii^!v'^ato^ia\\^!'El^^* ^^'^ J"'^" ^^- F- 

■°^oS!r ''••''"■' ^''^ ^- N.Choynski, dwl 

^'"irr K''"" "• ^^'■'''^'^ * ^ci)ona;d;,res Eure- 

''''?e^:; S'^'.i?fll"^','=^°V'^'''°^ ^^^-'^^--k and 
Wharf ^' ^ ^^' *^'^^ JFrancisco nr Meiggs' 

'^''ca.Bt'^Sssir"'^"^" ^^'^ P^'^iS" Transfer 

IjrSpi&J^^tel^^is^^jI^ Mission 

^ Fo\,ndr'y:dwlfeoClLy''^°*^''"^ ^^"'"'''•"i^ Typo 
^ I^al^^^iiT'^'^' ^^^ "'^--•^^^ Valle- 



r;„„ 11 I -"'^'^•' luinisuea rooms, 704 Powel 

Brownell James A., salesman, dwl 704 Powell 

Browning August fBroivningd- HeberJ dwl Vp ^nr 

Jacksonand Leayenworth ^'"""^' '^^^ iNE cor 

°dwl°5:|^l^o°w^n^^- ''''^ ^"'^ P- ^'^^^^'^ & Co 
""'Ti^n^^^d MciSf ^"""^ ^^""'•'^'^l SWcor Lar- 
''"ra'r"k!„'rdX'Al&*^^'"^^«'^*'d-lS^^«or 
^'°Fols"om^^'^^'''°'' ''''""^ '^^°«°' 541 Clay, dwl 771 

Rrn," 'l^'"^^ HeberJ, gun and locksmiths tr>3 Wash 
R IrDeS"'' "^ ^'""^'^^ Bepartment C. P. 
Brownlee J ames, lab Superintendent Public Street-? 
Brownlee James S., dwl E s Diamond nr Nineteenth 
Brownndge Robert, helper P. M. S. s! Co. dwl 2TO 

Brownridge William, employe P. M. S. S. Co., dwl 270 
Brownrigg John W., carpenter, dwl 800 Third 
Brownstein George fE. G'o.^.v/./jTco. A dlyl 1017 

Brownstone Isaac /o/Z. Broionstone & Brother San- 
lOO^Lal-kif '^"^^'''""■^^^A office 427 i>ont,'^dwl 

RrM^'^''71'■ Effingor, teamster, dwl 502 Fourth 
w u"m.^^??^']del•, dwl Bootz Hotel 
BRUCE BUxN ALB book and job winter 535 and 537 
Ay"nrvalenc1f "^ ''' «eyenteenth and Mission 
Hrn^« H*"""^' ^?aman, d,yl 32 Steuart 

Bruce HerK^Vf 'r^"?"-" ^'^^ ^^'^^"^y & F'eese 
fhrl N u ^pl ^^/.'■y.man with xVoble & Wohlers 
clwl iN \\' cor Thirtieth and Old San Jose Ron rl 
Bruce James H., master mariner f]wli9i« it i 
Bruce John, carpenter, dwl nlissTon ' "^^''^'^^ 
Bruce John, calker, dwl 50 Clementina 

Jonei"'' '"'''''■^' ^''^ ^'"^'^ «• ^'^dsby, dwl 522 
Rrnf ■1^°'"}°^ )^-'i bootmaker, dwl 636 Commercial 
"^"c^^fSmtfa^i^.^^^^^^ 

"co.l'iS'o'ak'rnf''^^'' ^^*^ Balfour, Guthrie & 
Bruce \V;ashington, shoemaker, dwl 359 Brannan 
Hri'i'n^ W- ■'''"' '^°''''' d^vl 636 Commercial 
Bruce \Villiam, seaman, dwl 48 S acramento 

St., represent $4,000,000 of Coital, 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 708, 712, 714^and^l6Kearn,^St^^^ 



BRU 



127 



BRU 



Bruce William, wellsinker, dwl N s Jersey bet Noe 

Brucho^r^Adam M., harnossmaker with Main & Win- 
chester, dwl 25 Morton _ «, „„j A^^ KF 

Bruck Alexander A., physician, office and dwlJNii. 
cor Powell and Broadway 

Bruck Oswald, shoemaker, dw loOb Franklin 

Bruck Sidonia Miss, teacher German, Bush bt. Los 
monolitan School, res Oakland 

Bruck William, porter Nucleus House 

Bruder John 0., laborer with Weed & Kingwell, dwl 

Bru?ck'wimamfclerk Boericke & Tafol res Oakland 

Brueckner John, German news agent, othco h2,6 Mor- 

phant dwl 10 St. Charles Fl ^^ „„„ 

Brueigo kermann, barkeeper Prescott House, 933 

BruSrTohn, foreman with Funcke &Co., dwl 11 Oak 

BruerXoVold, cartman, dwl 1914 Mason 
Bruf-eman Henry, asphaltum roofer, dwl 31 Langton 
Brillgeraann Frederick W., dwl W s Capp nr Twen- 

BrUggomann Henry fStallviann & B.) , dwl 505 Union 
Bruggomann Henry Jr., ivory turner with J. G. H. 

Mover, dwl 505 Union , , o a tj„+„i 

Bruguiere Emil, with Sathor & Co., dwl Grand Hotel 
Kns Hans Vv., groceries and liquors, NW cor 

Green and Latayette 11 ,,„/-, „:„i, v„+ 
Bruhns Henry, longshoreman, dwl S s Greenwich bet 

Sansom and Montgomery 
Bruiaer A., broker, dwl'iOlb Powell j mo 

Br«;o3 John, clerk with John H. Schluter, dwl 112 

Bru'nlrTohn, blacksmith with Thomas D. Lamer, 

dwl Valencia nr Sixteenth 
BBTIM\G1M JOHN W., attorney at law, office 36 

and :V7 Montgomery Block, dwl Itilo Mason 
Brumell R., real estate, dwl 209 Geary ,p, 

Brumfield Vvilliam H., attorney at law, office 012 Clay, 

dwl 415 Capp 
Bruml Simon, clerk, dwl bOa Taylor 
BruSloy Chester R., sexton, dwl 13 O'Farrell 
BmSley Maggie J. kiss, teacher Lincoln Grammar 

School, dwl 13 O'Farrell 
Brumm Carl, blacksmith, dwl .909 Kearny 
Brummer C. A., carrier Morning Call 
Brummer Clars, laborer Union Brewery, 23b Clern 
Brummer John, brewer Union Brewery, o2b Clam 
Brun John (Camoxcs & £J, dwl 71o Lombard 
Brun Louis, cook xMaison Doree, drlj^^V'dwf Mis- 
Brundago C. G-, bridgetender C. P. R. R-, dwl Mis 

sion Bay Bridge 
Brune A., cigar manufacturer, / 17 Sansom 
Bruno August (colored), seaman, dwl o Broadway 
Brune Henry, clerk witL J. H. A. i olkers k Bro., dwl 

BRUN BR B. P., superintendent Pacific Rolling 
Mills, dwl Lick House , 

Bruner John, saddles and harness, 428 Pacific, dwl 

Brunei J. S°,*lriJk\Iyer Bricklayers' Protective As- 
sociation, 234 Sutter „„ T-. i. 1 IC-l 

BrumTr William H., physician, office 23 Post, dwl 6o4 

Brunes Co'Srad, machinist California Sugar Refinery . 

dwl Bryant bet Twenty-third and iWr^'^^r ^li 
Brunet Eugene, jeweler with Edwards k Tuckey, dwl 

1337 Dupont ^ , ,^ , 

Brunet John, cook with Joseph Morand 
Brunier Eugene, bottle depot, 113o Dupont, dwl lo28 

BruS°Christopher, miller with Eisen Bros., dwl 16 

Bruning wTlfiam, liquor saloon, 2 California, dwl 537 

Bruning^Louis, laborer California Sugar Refinery, 

BRUNINGSm!"* CO. (Henry F. Michaelis J , gro- 
"""^ciiies and liquors, SW cor i'^i'-d and Mission 
Brunin^s Martin { M. Brumngs & Co.), dwl-Ol MisS 
Bru^esConrad, laborer Calilorma Sugar Kehnery, 

dwl Eighth nr Brannan 
Brunjes Liedrich, groceries and liquors, W s San 

Jos6 Road nr Five-milo House r,,.„„„„„ 

Brunies Henrv, groceries and liquors, 430 Brannan 
BruDJes Jacob, clerk with John G. Maass, SE cor 

Howard and Main ^ , „ , „ t> •„<■ t « 

Brunjes xMartin, hostler Seal Rock House, Point Lo- 

bos 



CO 

d 
o 

O 
p 

o 

> 

o 

b 



Brunn Jacob Jr., bookkeeper with Anselmo Romano, 

dwl40!t Folsom . , „ . 

Brunn John, seaman, .<lfl2o Sacramento 
i^rnnn T () iiackor w th Kohlor, Chase & Co. 
lnneVdol^hus^eacher music, dwl 1410 Sto^^^^^^^^^ 
Brunner Jacob A., cigars and tobacco, 022 Kearny, 

Brunne/Louisl^^stationery and varieties, 321 Hayes, 

dwl N s Fulton nr Franklin Tr„„vr.^ 

Bruno Joseph, cook with Rocco Beban, dwl Kearny 

Bruno Nicholas, fruits, etc., 407 Broadway 
Bruno Salisad, barber, dwl 1421)4 Dupont 
Brunor J ohn, dwl 933 Kearny 
Brunette Louis, tailor, dwl A A^Kust^Alley 
RRUNS CHRISTIEN, physician, office and dwl 240 

Bruns Conrad, laborer, dwl W s Bryant bet Twenty- 
third and Twenty-tourth r,,„or,f 
Bruns Conrad, master mariner, dwl bob Bryant 

Bnms Com-ad, teamster with Nicholas Bruns, dwl 

BRUNS 'c.'^V., chemist and apothecary, NE cor 
Sutter and Dupont a/,i,,-f>- 

Bruns Diederich, barkeeper with Charles A. Schro 
der,N\V cor Powell and Vandewator -, 

Bruns Diedrich, proprietor Golden Eagle Hotel, 11- 

Bruns^ Frederick, president S. F. Stock Brewery 
(Frederick Bruns ct Bro., and Bruns & bteim 

Bruns^Frederick fe^B^o. (George Bruns), groceries 
and liquors., SE cor Mission and toixteenth 

Bruns George (Frederick Bruns <& Bro.) , dwl SE cor 
Mission and Sixteenth .,_,„, i „„ ii 

Bruns Henry, barkeeper with F. Schumacher, 44 

BrunsTenry, cabinetmaker Pacific U. W. Furniture 

M. Co., dwl li)2 Tehama 
BRUNS HENRY, groceries and liquors, bVV cor 

Brunr^renrf mUk?"nch, SW cor Thirteenth and Old 

Bruns"He*i-mann, st.-e bookkeeper Custom House, 

BrunrHermiM"! widow), dressmaker, 770 Howard 
Bruns John, clerk with Henry Bruns, SW cor bpear 

and Folsom , , ^,. ., , ti *„i 

Bruns John, tanner, dwl New Alaska Hotel 
Biuns John D., cabinetmaker with L. &B. Emanuel, 

BrunrJulius!'harnessmaker with John O'Kane 
BRUNS NICHOLAS, groceries and li'l^ors, 017 

Davis, and coal, OW Davis (and N. and P.Bruns) , 

dwl SE cor Guerrero and Camp „„, ^^^ 

BRUNS N. k P., groceries and liquors, N W cor 

Third and Berry , , , p-, rru-^-A 

Rrims Peter ( N. cO P. Bruns), dwl 6ol ihirci 
B unsi1?eimke ( Frederick Bruns ««f,^^fg-g 

Steimke), groceries and liquers, N \V cor Eaay 

Brunson Harry, metalroofer, dwl 811 Market 
Brunson Martin, salesman, dwl 518 Greenwich 
Brunt NVilliam, pipemaker Kisdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works, dwl 38 Jessie . 
Brunt William N., butcher, dwl 2bl9 Mission 
Bruntsch Carl Christian, with John H. Boden & Co.. 

Brunnin Sebastian. milkrancTi, Filbert bet Webster 

and Bay , r,-. o 

Brusco Francesco, cook 512 bansom 

Brush , waiter, dwl 515 Pine rr i„,. 

Brush Albert, groceries and liquors, NB cor iyler 

and Larkin. dwl E s Steiner bet Eddy and El is 
Brush Charles W., vice-president butro Tunnel Co., 

office 321 California, dwl Grand Hotel . 
Brush Creek G. and S. M. Co., ottico 32b Davis 
Brush E. H., laborer with William Kerr, 903 Battery 
Brush George A., grainor, 62'J Merchant 
Brush Reuben G. (Brush & Mayheiv), dwl 1410 Bush 
BRUSH k MAYHEW (Reuben <J. Brush and J. A. 
May hew) .auctioneers and commission mercbanis 
and proprietors California Tattersalls, N s Hal- 
leok bet Sansom and Battery 
Brusher Joseph, laborer, dwl i» Pinckney 
Brusom Luigi, fisherman, dwl 38 iMorchant 
Brust Peter, merchant, dwl 18 Howard Court 
Bruton James G., liquor saloon, 53o Jackson, dwl 

102'.i Clay , , ,- T,, 4 

Brutscher Adam, saddler, dwl 2o Morton 



> 



il^IFIO COAST BUSINESS DIKECTOBY cir^ates throughout the Pacific Coast. 



^^^^^^i:i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^CY^T;ire^M^ and Life, 411 California St. 



BRU 



128 



BUG 



Bruan John C, seaman, dwl North Germnn TTr^fni Rr,.o^?\^-n- i.'"?'^''"^«''y 

p.,.!^i-kf- '_ ' ° ° '''*'''• '''^^d^/l^l'Tn,;;''^"^'^'^-^--"^ David Conrad, 



oy Jackson 

^''"MnrL;'^°^f^.;,-''f?'''''''"^°' S^ cor Fourth and 
lUaiket, awl oU/ Hayes 

I mPv"? V °plf, i'nh^S^'-. '0|'&'°^«. 630 Mission 
\ Jiat ^^^y^^^^^^iJ^'ip'^^m and Thomas J, pro- 
! pnetors Ameriean Exchange, 3iy-32.5 Sansom 
isryan Charles (colored), hairdresser, dwl 13 Virginia 

Bryan Douglass C, clerk Health Office, dwl 1111 Clav 

Bryan E., packer 17 Front, dwl E s Shotwell bet 

Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth "'lo^vetl Det 

Bryan Edwin H., collector, office 523 Kearny, dwll.530 

Bryan E. H., physician, office and dwl 224 Kearny 
Bryan Emma Miss, music teacher, dwl 19 Buss 

^^^•f'alli^fi;Tl57^iint''^^^-^ ^'^ ^"--^^ 

Bryan James E., clerk, dwl Russ House 

Bryan John i\I stoves and tinware, 130 Third 

Bryan Mark H. carpenter, dwl KiuS Bush 

Bryan P., stevedore P. M. rf. S. Co 

Bryan P 0., carpenter, dwl 5^2 Stevenson 

Biyan Ihomas f Bryan Brothers), dwl (J19 fiearv 

''change'''"' '^''^^"^ ^'■^.^•^' d^l Ame&V- 
^'^dw/lJliul^-' ^'^°'^'^«"^P<'r 'vith Richard O'xXeill, 
^""'jessie""^'" ^•' '*'"^'°^ ^'^"fi^ College, dwl 240 



dwl Russ House 

'dwlsWpa'cific''- ^''''''^^' P^^^^"^"' °ffi°« and 
Bryant & Cook (Daniel S. Bryant and Daniel S 

Hl^yAAl ^ blKAHAN fjohn £). Bryant and Si- 
^Vf!}^trahanJ,wooA^^vsnng and turning 30 and 
62, Cahiornia and 2I« Steuart ' 

''^fol';'^/-^''^'^'!'' '-'^'"^'-'-e^" J- Bryant and J. 8. Tav- 
lor), importers sates and locks, 312 California 
Bryant 6'ee Briant and Bryan ^autornia 

Bryars Mary Miss, hairdresser, 711 Folsom^ 
Bryars Annie Mrs. (widow), dwl loll Stockton 
Bryars Annie Miss, hairdresser, loll StocktoS 

'tmbard'" "^ ^ ^^'^^^^^eton, B.T^'^^j^U 308 

^''dwl ]lu!>l5nDi'^^''''''' ""'^^ ^^- ^^- ^°*^°« ^ Co., 
^""^dwuf Pa!Sv ■' '^''^^' ^"'^ tinware, 203 Seeond, 
^■"'llinna "^''"'^'^^'^'^^ ""^^^ Hinckley & Co., dwl 216 
Kk'Y5nx"^,"viiT¥f^^:/"^°is^ed rooms, 718 Market 
pil-Ln^i" ^^ ^U"^- Y- ^^^^'^ <i^J3.J,dwl &2 Howard 
Marker'' ''''°^''' "^^''''"° *=**' ^^'^^rf, dwri04 
^'^dwl llMinna ^^^^^'''^aker S. F. Boiler Works, 

'^SSS^^^^^ '■ ^^eor,eH.Tay^CoJ,r.. I ^^A^^^^]:^^^^,^,, ,,/, 

^"^ InV^H^v^r^^dfugii^f ^a"*']^?^-- ^^^^ -' Third Buch^Ja^cXs^SLe 521 Front 

Merc&in'd'^ffi iome'iy^^^^^^ 

^^ ^/-^art a> CoJ, dwl 12ufHoward WMiam J. ^"^hanan E. 1., engineer, dwl 455 Minna 

BRYAN WILLIAM J & CO Tnoth^.o • atw guchanan James, painter, dwl 1104 Foisom 

Second and Howard and Vrd HoTeY'''^^^'^°^ ^"'fcard"^"' '^'^^'''''- ^^^' ^^^ cor ^nes and 

Bryan Wpltord, carpenter, dwl 31 An«H^ Rn.^f^f li, ,. . , -.. „ .. 



<3 
OS 

O 

pq 
n 

1^ 



■Rr,-o., n" i." 1 ""•""'J auu urana llote 
Br3an Woltord, carpenter, dwl 31 Austin 
Bryan. See Bryant and Briant 
Bryans Edward, hardware, dwl E s Shofwnii h<>f 
Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth '"^o'^'ell bet 

^'i^'(^o.toLf I'o^clllS/--^^ ^-"-^l- I'if^ 
Jirj-ant Alexander, dwl 73j Sixteenth 

'"''^itE^^'^'^''^'^^^' offi- 541 Clay, 

BryaTt-iftt J''i:,^Vl'^tl£S^- ^'^l «'^ S^^^ 
Bryant B. B., dwl <J2 First 

''m H^Sn^- ^'''•^- (^"^°-)> *-°I^- -usic, dwl 

Br^;^"^ K?ii?f ^^^^^^^i^ '- Oakland 



Buchanan John, cook, dwl 528 Pacific 

°Co.':Z/.^l"H^^rard ""'' ^^''^'^°' ^^^^^'^ & 

"""'ueLZfofl HowaTd™"^''" ^"^ ^^ ^ ^- E'^^^' 
Buchanan John W' sawyer with Pacific Box Manu- 

laotunng Co., dwl 422 Tehama -uanu- 

T^n^ho°''° Joseph, collector, dwl 511 Shotwell 
Buchanan Joseph Y., druggist with Peter A 

Kearny, 6j9 Clay, dwl 214 j^owell 
Buchanan Sarah A. (widow), dwl 511 Shotwell 
Buchanan \Villiam A., clerk U. S. Army Headauar- 

ters, lOo Stockton, dwl 22o ShotweU ^'^'^'^'I'^ar 
Buchanan William G., shoemaker, dwl 20 Lafayette 

Market''™'' ^' ^'^•' '^^^ ^^^'^"^^ College?^ 
Buchart Ueorge, shipwright Shipwrights' Journey 

men Association, 71 New xMontgomery ^"''^''y 



Bryan Edmund co lee or b7ooU- U^'t P/¥'^°d men Association, 71 N ew Montgomery ""'"'^^^ 

dwl822sXr Brooklyn Life Ins. Co., BucharMathias, foreman California Hry Dock dwl 

Bryant Ueorge, cutter with Beers & Mavn„.^ .„!« m^^.:^^- "^..^I'^J^^^y ^99^ . „ .. ' 



iiryant Ueorge cutter with Beers & Maynard dwl S 
E cor Lombard and Dupont ^-""^^ara, awl b 

, BRIANT jImFS^'f""'''" i ^'"■^' ^^1 191' P^lk 

v>Ti • ;; 7 I VT ,', crockery, lamps, etc., 10 and 

' Bryant Jam'efK ^^^^^ "1'°° bet Gough and beta, ia 
1