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Full text of "The San Francisco directory for the year .."

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT 



MAIN LIBRARY 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 

|l|ll|!MlllllUI{lllll[ll{|{llllll 



3 1223 04590 4530 




24 
917.94 S227-2 



1950 



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY 



FORM 3427 



ADVERTISING DEPAKTMENT. 



in 




% 



^^#^^ 



^'^ 



mm 



.w^# ^1^^^ 



4> 




Cash Assets, - - $14,000,000. 

FIRE RISKS AT CURRENT RATES. 



I© OMist mi Wis 



%i fill 111 



DOING BUSINESS IN AMERICA. 



GEJ^E^AL JGEJ^TS, 
316 C^LIFORNI^ STREET. 



IV 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Pacific Mail Steamship Cq, 




NEW YORK LINE, VIA PANAMA. 



SteRmship?, Sidewheell HENRY CHAUNCEY, MONTANA AND 

3000 Tons. / CONSTITUTION. 

Iron Screws, I ACAPXJLCO, COLON, GRANADA, COLIMA, 

3000 Tons. ]■ CITY OF PANAMA. 

LcsTe New York every alternate Saturdiij-. Leave San Francisco every alt.- 
Wednesday, at 12 o'clock noon, calling at Acapulco only, both ways. 

Central American and Mexican IJine. 

Steamers, Screws, l HONDURAS, SALVADOR, WINCHESTER, 

Iron, 2000 Tons. / COSTA RICA. 

Sidcwheel. DAKOTA, ST. LOUIS, ANCON, ARIZONA. 

Leave San Francisco for Panama every alternate Thursday, at 12 o'clock noou,calli 

San Pedro, San Diego, Cape St. Lucas, ilazatlan, San Bias, Manzanillo, Acapulco, 

Angel, Salina Cruz, Tonala, San Benito, Chaniperico, Sececapa, Tecajote, San Jose de 

temala, Acajutla, La Libertad, La Union Amapala, Corinto, San Juan del Sur, Punta Ar 



i|;iate 



Port 
<Jun- 

■'inaa. 



China Line. 



steamers, Sidewheel, \ CHINA, COLORADO, GREAT REPUBLIC 

4500 Tons. J AND ALASKA. 

Iron Screws, \ CITY OF PEKING and CITY OF TOKIC 

5000 Tons. / VANCOUVER and VASCO DB GAMA ^diarterud.) 

(AIfo Five Iron Screw SteauiLTs, 4UiM Tons each, building.) 
Leave San Francisco on the 1st and loth of each month, at 12 o'clock noon, fjj- Song 
Kong via Yokohama, Japan. | 



Shanghae Branch. 

Steamers,- Sidewheel, 1 GOLDEN AGE, OREGONIAN, COSTA BICA 

2500 Tons. / AND NEVADA. 

Leave Yokohama for Shanghae, via the Inland Sea of Japan, calling at Hiogo ■■■ ' 
aeaki four times a month, and for Hakodate on the 1st of every month. 

Office in San Francisco, Cor. Sacramento and Leidesdorff Sr 



I 



Wliarr Corner of Brannan aii<l First 9»treets. 

JENNINGS S. COX, Ag> U, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO. 



CAPITAl. stock:, - $1,000,000. 



Established for the manufacture of Railroad and Merchant Iron. Every variety of 
Shafting, including all sizes of Stkamhoat Shafts. Cranks, Pistons, Conxkctin<i 
Rods, Etc. Car and Locomotivk Axles and Frames, and Hammkred Iron of 
every description and size. 

3 and 5 FRONT STREET, - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO, P. 0. Box 2032, will MYe immediate atteMion, 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOB SCRAP IRON. 

PRESIDE.N-T. WM. ALVORD, 

VICE-PRESIDEJ^T, - - - - l, s. BEXCELEY, 

SUPERLN-TEMDEJS'T, - - - - B. P. BRUJ^MER, 

SECRETARY, SAM'L. I C. SWEZET 



PACIFIC OIL AND L EAD WORKS. 

CAPITAL STOCK. - - $600,000. 



Established for the manufacture of Linseed, Castor and other Oils, and of White 
Lead, Zinc and other Paints. Works are now in operation, and prepared to furnish Oils 
of drst quality, and quantity sufficient for the supply of the Pacific Coast. Also, Oil 
Cakes and Meal in quantities required. 

Highest jirice paid for Flax Seed and Castor Beans, delivered at the Corapany's 
■Works, King Street, near Third. 

0FFICE--3 & 5 FRONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Orders addressed to "Pacific Oil and Lead Works," P. O. Box 1443, will have 
immediate attention. 

President, - - - - - JOHN BEXSLET, 

Vice-President, D. 0. MILLS, 

Manager, L. B. BEXCHLEY, 

Secretary, SAM'L I. C. SWEZEY. 



VI SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTOKY. 

Colorado Steam Navigation Co. 







Communication -with all the Ports of 

Via :— Mazatlan, La Paz, Guaymas, Magdalena 
Bay, Cape St. Lucas, and 

¥l]e C^olofcido f^ivef, 

Touching at La Paz and Ida y Vuelta. 

Regular Steamship Line to Mexican Ports, 
Sailing Every Twenty Days. 



i'MMIHf 4f llllgll lAf IS 



a 



THE FAVORITE STEAMERS 

2f ® "ir s s » ir^ ' 

Captain, .... William Metz^er. 



%M. a fl<a? ^ _a_ 'sap a 



Captain, - - - A. JV. McDonnough. 

Mazatlan. - - - Mexico, Mr. Kelton. 

La Paz, - - - Mexico, - - - - Mr VioBca 

FoTvuma ' ' ' ^""'°°' ^^ Wmard. 

i-ort Yuma, - - - Arizona, .... Tyr- !?;„,,„„ 

Mohave, - - - Arizona, - - - - Mr. Hooper. 
Fur Infonnatiun i elating to Passage, etc., apply to 

^ilOFRONT STREET. 

tW Reduced Rates of Fare, and go..d Accomodation for 

Cabin Passengeis. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Vll 



COMPANIA A VAPOR 



DEL 



^ «-♦-•-♦-» _ 

La Compania Tiendra Oomunicacion con los 
Puertos de Mejico y Arizona. 

PARA MAZATLAJV, LA PAZ, GUAYMAS, MAGDA- 
LEJVA BAY, CABO DE SAJV LUCAS, Y 

EL RIO COLORADO, 

TOCANDO A LA PAZ DE IDA Y YUELTA. 

Linea Regular para los Puertos de Mejico. Saldran 
cada 20 dias llevando carga a precios reducidos. 



CAPITAN, 



"WILLIAM METZGER. 



CAPITAN. 



A. N. McDONNOUGH. 



MAZATLAN, MEXICO, ---.... 

LA PAZ, MEXICO 

GUAYMAS, MEXICO. - 

FORT YUMA, ARIZONA, 

EHRENBERG, ARIZONA, 

MOHAVE, ARIZONA, - - 



Sr. K ELTON. 

" VIOSCA. 

'• WILLARD. 
" FINGAY. 
" FISHER. 
•• HOOPER. 



El pasage se ha reducido mucho, y hay la mayor oomodidad abordo para pasageros. 
Para informarse, tocando flete y pasage ocurrase a 

EDUARDO NORTON, 

610 Calle de Front. 



viii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



OREG^ON" 

Steamship Comp'y 




fBEJ^. HOLLAQAY, (President, = = San Francisco. 

WILLIAM J^OfRfRIS, Agent, = ^ ^ " 

J. (D. <BILES, Secretary, » = = (Portland, Oregon. 

DISPATCH STEAMERS TO THE FOLLOWING PLACES : 

PORTLAND, Oregon; 

SITKA, Alaska. 



rUiyjIi* Zillll MJIWK;l||f gj^, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. IX 



WELLS, FARGO & CO. 

Exchange, Banking 



^IsTTD I 



EXPRESS COMPANY. 

ORGANIZED, 1852. CAPITAL. $5,000,000. 



PRINCIPAL OFFICES: 

„. „. i . . - London. 

No. 61 King: Wm. Street, ■ _ p^^..^^ 

So. 33 Kiie dn Quatre Septenibre, - • ' ^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

No. 65 Broadw.iy, ■ ' ox_ T " S.in Fiaucisco. 

N. W. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets, - - ^^"^ iiaucisco. 



SXPKBSS LINES 

TO ALL PAKTS OF CALIFORNIA, NEVADA, UTAH, WYOMING, COLORADO, 
MoSaNA^ NEBRASKA, KANSAS, OREGON, WASHINGTON AND IDAHO 
TERRITORIES, BRITISH COLUMBIA, I^^^^^ CALIFORNIA AND MEX- 
ICAN PORTS, NEW YORK, ATLANTIC STATES, AND EUROPE. 

BILLS OF EXCHANGE AND TELEGRAPH TRANSPERS 

and ^^^^^^^^^'^''^^^ ^^^ Y„,k House, exchangeable for Circular 
Letters, payable in all parts of Europe. 



COLLECTIONS AND COMMISSIONS 

Of all Umas executed, and General Express B..inessa«end^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ 

United States, Europe and Canada. O'^'^'^f^f ' ^^^"'l' New York. Also 
"-^±tw'Y"S°tn^raS-Ov^^^^^^ 



LLOYD TEVIS, President. 

J. B. HAGGIN, Vice-President 

JAMES HERON, Secretary. 

H. S. KING, Treasvirer. 

J. J. VALENTINE, Gen'l Supt. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRKCTORY. 



TliE! 



Bank of California, 

SA-N FRANCISCO. 



W. C. RALSTON, .... President. 
THOMAS BROWN, - - - - Cashier. 

In New York, - - Agency of the Bank of California, 23 PINE STREET. 
In Boston, ...... TREMONT N.\TIONAL BANK. 

In London, ORIENTAL BANK CORPORATION. 



The ]iank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents 
at all the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 



.,,,.,,ra 



Hi if OllBIf ISSFll, 

Available for the purchase of Merchandise throughout the United States, Europe, 
India, China. Japan and Australia. 



EXCHANGE FOR SALE ON THE ATLANTIC CITIES. 

TyRAJW DIRECT ON 

LOJVD0.¥, LEIPSIC, 

^pfp/f' FRAmCFORT-OK-MAIJ{, 

'''unTFR^^^'"' MELBOURNE, 

H/urilln^' YOKOHAMA, 

iiiE?^?r' SEAJVGHAE, 

VlEJSTJfA, SYDJVEY. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XI 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limited 

(Incorporated under the Joint Stock Companies' Acts of 2862 and 2867—Oreat Britain), 

CAPITAL, ■ ~^ ~. 



■ " - $5,000,000, GOLD, 

Of which $3,000,000 is fully paid up. 



RESER VE FUJVn, 



$500,000, GOLD. 



HEAD OFFICE, 22 OLD BROAD STREET, - LONDON. 

FREDERICK RODEWALD, London, Chairman. 

E. H. GREEN, (late of Russell & Sturgis, Manila). London Deputy Chaimian. 
H. L, BISCHOFFSHEIM (of Bischoffsheim & Goldschmidt) , London. 
J. F. FLEMMICH of Fred. Huth & Co.», Loudon. 
JULIUS MAY late of San Francisco), Frankfort-on-the-Main. 
J. S. MORGAN of J. S. Morgan & CoJ, Loudon. 

JOHN PARROTT of the late firm of Parrokt Co., Bankers), San Francisco. 
ROBERT RYRIE (of Gladstone, Ewart & Co , London. 
BARON H. de STERN, of (Stern Brothers), London. 

RUDOLPH SULZBACH of Sulzbach BrothersU Frankfort-on-the-Main. 
Manager, - R. D. PEEBLES. Secretary, . ARTHUR SCRIVENER. 



Loudon Bankers— Bauk of England ; London Joint Stock Bank. 
San Francisco Branch, - 424 California Street- 



MILTON J* r.ATIIAM, PreHi<leiit. 
JAM£S 91, »iTB£ET£N. Manager. 



CAiTIII^O HIARTf ?V, AftA't 31auasror. 
U'IE.1.IA:9I 3IACKINT0!«U. Aceuiintant, 



This Hank is prepared to grant Letters of Crkdi r available in any part of the world ; to transact every description 
of UfVNKiNG AND EXCHANGE BUSINESS, and to negotiate California and other American Secuuities, 

ill Europe. 
San Francisco, Cal., January, 1875. MILTOIV S. LATH AM, President. 



AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS. 

The following are Agents and Corrrspon'oents. on any of whom, as also on the Head Office of the Bank, 
Letters of Ckedit will be granted, and Drafts drawn : 



L<nidon— London Joint Stock Bank; Bischoffsheim & 

(Joldschmidt ; Friihling & Goschen ; Fred Huth & 

Vxi.\ J. s. Mor]?au & Co.; Stpni Brothers; Imperial 

Hank, Limited. 
New York— Dicxel, Morgan &Co. 
Boston— Third National Bank. 
Pbil:idflphju-Drt-XL-1 & Co. 
Paris— Bisriinffsiieini. Gioidsclimidt & Co.; A.J. .Stern 

& t'o. ; iJrexel, llarjes & Co. 
Berlin- Deut.v.h.' Bank. 
Vienna— Si-hueller d; Co. 
Frankfort-on-the-Main— Gebruder Sulzbach; Bunk of 

Saxe .Mcwiiri^ell. 
Hamburg— John Berenberg, Gossler & Co. 
Dresden— Kobert Thode & Co. 
Konie— I'lowden, Cholmeley & Co. 
Amsterdam— La Banque de Credit et de D6pOt des 

I*ay.s-Bas. 
Antwerp— Nottebohin Brothers. 
Naples and Florence— Anglo-Itulian Bank. 
Genoa— Henry Dapples. 

Valparaiso and Lima— Fred. Huth, GrOning A Co. 
Chinaand Japan— Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, 

J^ondon and China; Comptoir d'liscompte de Paris; 

D*^nt>iche Bank. Hongkong <fe Shanghai ii'g Corp. 
Manila— HuHsell &. Sturgis. 
Klv-T ; 'ite— Mercantile Bank of the Klver Plate, 

L: ■:.-k.. 



Australia and New Zealand— Union Bank of .\us- 
tralia; Bank of New South Wales; Victoria, New 
South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tas- 
mania, New Zealand. 

Ireland— Provincial Bank of Ireland ; Armagh, Ath- 
loiie, Belfast, Ballina. Banbridge, Ballymena, Ban- 
don, Eallyslmnnon, Cork, Clnnmel, Coleraine. Cavan, 
Cootebill. Carriek on Suir,Carrick on shannon, Clog- 
been, Dungarvan. Dun^annon, Drogheda. Ennis- 
killeii, Enniscorthy. Ennis. Fermoy, (iahvay, Kil- 
kenny, Kilrusli, Limerirk, Loiidondeiry. Monaghan, 
Mallow, Newry, Nermgh, Newcaiitle (Co. Limerickt, 
Oiuagh, Parsonstown. siigo, Strabane, .Skibbereen. 
Tralee, Teinplemore, Wexford, Waterford, YougUal. 



Tike nnderinenlionedare Correspoitdei^ts 

of the Bauk : 

English Bank of Rio de Janeiro, Limited, Rio de 

Janeiro. 
Alzuyeta Brothers. Acapuico, Mexico. 
Southern Bank, New Orleans. 
Union National Bank, Chicago. 
Gilmore. Dutdap & Co., Cincinnati. 
Luctis Bank, St. Louis. 



xii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



Si\glo ■ C^klif of i\iki^ Sai\l^ 



(LIMITED.) 



London Oflace, . - - - 3 Angel Court. 
San Francisco Oflice, - 422 California Street. 

Authorized Capital Stock, - - $ 6,900,000 

Subscribed, ..--.. 3,000,000 
Paid in, --..-. 1,500,000 

Eemainder subject to call. 

DIRECTORS IN LONDON: 
Hon. HUGH McCULLOCH, REUBEN D. SASSOON, .JULIUS SINGTON. 

WM. F. SCHOLFIELD, ISAAC SELIGMAN, JOSEPH SEBAG. 

CORRESPONDENTS AND AGENTS: 

J. & W. SELIGMAN & CO., - - KEW TORK. 

SELKiMAN. HELLMAS & CO., NEW OELEAXS. 

MASSACHDSETTS NATIONAL BANK, BOSTON. 

SELIG.VAN FRERES & CIE, PARIS. 

SELKiMAN & STETTHEIMER, FRANKFORT 

GEBRIDER MEYER, BERLIN. 

CHINA AND JAPAN. 
HONGKONG AND SHANGHAE BANKING CORPORATION. 

EAST INDIES: 
CHARTERED MERCANTILE BANK OF INDIA, LONDON AND CHINA. 

AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND: 
BANK OF AUSTRALASIA AND BRANCHES. 

BILLS OP EXCHANGE, COMMERCIAL and TRAVELERS' LETTERS OF 
CREDIT .ssued on the most favorable terms, for use in the United States. British 
Possessions, boiith and Central America, Europe, China and Japan. 

MANAGERS IN SAN FRANCISCO: 

FREDERICK T. LOW - - . r^ r.- 

T^i.T.™„ „ - - - - Cashier. 

IQNATZ STEINHART. P. n. LILIENTHAL. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XUl 



THE Um OF BEITISH COLTOBU, 

INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER, 
Soutlieast Corner California and Sansom Streets. 

PAID UP CAPITAL, - - $1,490,000 

In 14,900 Shares, of $100 Each, 

WITH POWER TO INCREASE TO $10,000,000. 

London Office, 5 East India Avenue, Leadenhall Street 

T. W. L. MACKE\X, London (Late of the flrui of Turner & Co., China); 

DEPUTY CHAIRMAN, 

KOBEKT GILLESPIE, Esq., Director of the Bank of Montreal, Loudon. 

COURT OF DIRECTORS IN LONDON: 

James Anderson, Esq. (Messrs. Anderson Anderson & Co.); 

Eden Colville, Esq. (Director'of the Hudson's Bay G^mpany),^ 

H D Harrison, Esq. (Messrs. Falkner, B«ll & Co., San Franc.sco): 

Sir John KosK, Bart., K. C. M. G. (Messrs. Morton, Kose & Co., London). 

:Bi=t.-fi^ivro£3:E!s. 

PORTLAND, OREGON; VICTORIA AND CARIBOO, 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

.A.OE2SrTS I 

„ _ , Agency Banlc of Montreal. 

New York ^ .....Bank of Montreal. 

AuSfa tnTi^ letla^n^d^."":Bank of Australasia Commercial Bank- 
ing Company of Sydney. .a?<i Bank of New Zealand^ ^^^^ 1 . 

England National Provincial Bank of England, U&thl oi ±jivb v 

North and South Wales Bank. ^^^^ Company's Bank. 

Scotland " Bank of Ireland. 

Ireland 



''X°ha..e, aho, ,.ld on London, New York and Canada, and on Victoria, British Coioo^bia, and Po,»- 

'""trrrcU, credit, .ranted on Earope, China, Japan ^^^^ ^"'-"^ »^ ^^ ^-'-^• 
Discount approred Paper and make Advances on Collateral becuriUes. 
Collect Bills aud transact a (ieneral Banking Business. 

W. H. TILLINGHAST, Manager. 



XIV SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Incorporated in Genera, Switzerland, Jannarj 20th, 1873. 



HEAD OFFICE IN GENEVA. 



CAPIJAL, - - - f WQ MILLiOH miLkm 

SUBSCRIBED, 
ONE MILLION PAID UP. 



President, - - - HENRY HENTSCH. 

DIRECTORS 

FRANCIS BERTON, ROBERT WATT. 



SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH, 

SrccEssoRs TO Messes. HENTSCH & BERTOX, 
3 2-7 O I- -A. -K- S T H. E3 E: T . 



This Bank Is prepared to grant Letters of Credit on Europe, and to Transact every kind of 
Banking, Mercantile and Exchange Business, and to negotiate .\merican SecuritiesMn Europe. 

DEPOSITS RECEIVED. 

BILLS OF EXCHANG-E ON 

Now York. Berlin, Chiiii^ .l<..p„„j. 

Uiv.rpool. Fraukfort, SolotUur-T ' 

^air- '''•"'^.\ Luus..„ae. 

, "^ Zurich, Bnden 

Hordeaax, Si Gull L^ • ™ 

Bru.srli^' ^rn ' Fribourg, 

H.jmbur«r, M.'uchatel ''"Aa'rau 

L.acarno, Twr,!^ MeBdnsio, 

Florence. G^noa, Ko.aa. 



An ASSAY OFFICE is annexed to the Bank. A«av= of sold ,;i^» 
and sulphurets. Rc.turns in coin or bar., at the option of fhe depositor ' ''' '^"'"^ '"'' 

Advances made on bullion and ores. 

Dust and bullion can be forwarded from any part of the oA,.„t™ „ j . 
through Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks. country and returns made 

Consnl for Switzerland and Portugal, FRANCIS BERTOX. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XV 



THOS. H. SELBY & CO. 

Nos. 116 and 118 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, 






m,rf 1 

II 

tJ 



a 




CAST STEEL, 



Slioot Ooi3p>or, ZSinc, 







6br. of Howard and First Sts., San Francisco, 



OF 



SHEET LEAD, DROP SHOT, ETC, 



ALSO, PROPRIETORS OF THE 



SELBr LEAD AND SILVER SI\/IELTING WORKS, 






MAIN OFFICE, 116 and 118 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



Xvi SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



STEAMSHIP LINE. 

■*-t-^ 

For Coos Bay, Oregon, Crescent City, 

And Port Orford. 

steamer " EASTPORT," J. F. Whitney, Master. 
Steamer " EMPIRE," C. H. Butler, Master. 

MAKING WEEKLY TKIPS. \ 



For Fort Ross, Stewart's Point, Gualala, Point Arena, Cuffey's Cove, 
Novarro, Mendocino City, Caspar Creek and Big River, 

Steamer " MARY TAYLOR," J. Parker, Master. 

SAILS EVERY THREE DAYS. 

ID. ^^^JSJIDTL^H^, J^^GTCXt, 

Office, 106 DAVIS STREET, Near California, San Francisco. 



FREIGHT AND PASSAGE 



AT KEDTJCED MTES. 



South America Steamship Company, 



F-FLOl^ 



Panama to Valparaiso, 

OOKNEOTINQ WITH 

Steamers of Pacific Mail S. S. Co. 



Bennett & Page, Agents, 

304 DAVIS STREET, San Francisco. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, XVll 



PACIFIC CORDAGE CO 



This Company has constantly on hand a large assortment of 

"WHALE LINES, 

STEAM PACKING YARN, 



And are prepared to fill orders for 



I^OIPEl, 



Of all sizes and lengths. 



J The Works of the Corapanj' are so situated that its Fabrics can be 
shipped direct by Rail or Water to any part of the State 
when so desired by purchasers. 



J. D. FAB.T77ELL, Agent, 
lie fiio:n^t street, s. f. 



XVUl 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



ONION INSORANOE CO. 



OF SAN FRANCISCO. 



Ci^PITA.L, - - ^750,000, GOLD. 



IF^lr© a,nca. Jvrarme Ixisiaraiace. 



THE CALIFORNIA LLOYDS' 



ESTABLISHED IN 1861, 



g^HEH^* 



CASH CAPITAL, 
ASSETS EXCEED, 



S750,000, Gold. 
S1,000,000, Coin. 



Fair Rates, Prompt Settlement of Losses, Solid Security. 



SAN FRANCISCO, 

J. Mora Mom, Nicholas Luning, R. S. Floyd, 

Moaos Hellor, Charles liaum, Adam Oraiit, 

M. J. O'Connor, M. D, Sweeny, Charles Kohler, 

Daniel Meyor, Gustavo Touch ard, W. C. Ralston, 

Antoine Borol, Geo. G. Uiokox, A. Weill, 

Josonh Seller, J. II. Haird, Jas. Moffitt, 

I. Lawrence Pool, James Otis, Jabe/. Howes, 

N. G. Kittle, N. J. T. Dana, 

SACRAMENTO, 
Edward Cadwalader. L. A. Booth. 

MARYSV1I.I,E, 
L. Cunningham. 
NEW YORK, 
J. Q. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, 



John Parrott, 

J. lioum, 

Jos. Brandenstein, 

C. Ducommun, 

T. Lommen Meyer, 

T. E. Lindonberger, 

I. Steinhart. 



James Phelan. 



CHARLKS D. HAVEN, SecreUrj. 
QEOHOE T. BOHEN, Surveyor, 



GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. 
N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

JAS. D. BAILEY, General Agent 



i 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XIX 




THE PACIFIC IRON VV^ORKS 



:EST.A.:BL-jis:E3:ErD xixr XS30_ 

FMBBACING 

Foundry, Machine, Boiler, Forging and Smithing, 

Patte n and Wood Work Departments, Drawing and Library Rooms, Etc. 

G-EORG-E "W. FOG- 3, Superintendent- 
IKA P. KAXKIN. ^^______ ALBERT P. BRAYTON. 

These works have now been in succe.^.ful operation for the past twenty-four years. From a comparatively small 
ing patronage has each year demanded larger facilities, until our establishment 

npare f '" • < - ^ 



A nese WUI hs iiavt; iivjw utv-11 111 aui-^.i— ^-«»j' "t"-" """.. • — 1 J J 1 f T." 

beginning in the year 1850. its increasing patronage has each year demanded Larger facilities, 
inallitsappointments, will compare favorably with that of any similar one in the country. 

. m vkriety and extent, are ■unsurpa.-sed ; embracing the latest improvements m all classes of ma- 
to use on this coast. Our sever,,! departments are well equipped with skil ful workmen, ="d efficient 

.s to execute all orders entrusted to us promptly.and m ^e most workmaidike manner J^^^^^^^ 



appointrri' 
Our patterns, 
chinery, adapted 

fact,t\eTfo" doing woTraTalt;' for^mc'^Irnrg our7uppfcs"from' fir», hands, we are enabled to give our customers first, 
claim" hTne7a^t pr°ces frequently paid for inferior work. The most skillful designing and engineenng talent, apply, 
ing to the various branches of mechanical work, constantly at the service of our ;:"f»";=;f- „,,„„,h,„ rates- 

Orders for all cla-ses of Machinerv Casting, or Boiler work, promptly executed at the most reasonable rates. 

Particular attention given to Steamboat and Steamship Work. .Mining and Ho.stmg Machmery of the most 
approved construction. 

Aerency of the Celebrated Prall Steam Pump-the cheapest and best 

Power Pump in use. Engines and Boilers of superior construction constantly on hand. 

FIRST AND FREMONT STREETS, 

_ , _. . .. „ J SAN FBAXflSCO. 

Between HiMlon and Howard, 



XX SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Bank of British North America 

ESTABLISHED IN 18 36. 

I^fCORI'ORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER. 

PAID UP CAPITAL, ■ ^1,000,000. 

HEi^A^rD OFFICE!, 

CZiSMXlITT'S Z.A1TZ, Z.0ITD02T, England. 

San Francisco Agency, 



COMMERCIAL CREDITS ISSUED 

For use in Europe, China, .Tniian, the East Indies, South America and Australia ; also. 
Circular Letters of Credit for Travelers, available in all parts of the world. 

Demand and Time Bills of Exchange, payable in London and elsewhere, bought and 
sold at current rates; also Telegraph Transfers. 

Demand Drafts on Scotland and Ireland; also on Canada, British Columbia, and N«w 
York. Bills collected and other Banking business transacted. 

A. McKINLAY, 



A. McKINLAY, ) 

H. W. GLENN Y, J ^^^"*^- 



JAMES OTIS. W. A. MACONDRAY. 



F. Vr. MACONDRA-Y. 





macondray & co. 
m:ercha.nt©, 

AND IMPORTERS OF 

WA AHP &AWAW WM 

NO. 206 SANSOME STREET. 

SA.3Sr FK,uA.3SrC!ISCO. 



f 



Agents for the 'STang-Tz© Insurance 
Association, Shanghae, 



-A^KTID 



HONGKONG LINE OF SAILING PACKETS. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXI 



Wm. T. COLEMAN it CO. 

Commission and Siiipping- 

SAN FRAUCISCO AND 1TE"W YORIS. 



Receive Consignments from all quarters; 

Make Advances on Approved S'lipments; 

Fill Orders for Staple Goods in all Markets; 

Effect Marine and Fire Insurances— Local and Foreign; 
Buy and Sell and Charter Vessels for All Trades. 



ALL INTERESTS INTRUSTED TO OUR CARE WILL HAVE OUR MOST 
FAITHFUL AND WATCHFUL ATTENTION. 



315 CALIFORNIA ST., 

CASPARI, AMMON &, CO., 28 Brunswick Street, Liverpool. 

Ill 




& 





PURCHASERS OF WHEAT AND FLOUR. 

Make advances on WHEAT, and other produce consigned to their 

Liverpool House. 

SHIPPING AND FORAV^ARDING AGENTS. 

Agents for Thomas Marian's celebrated A No. 3 Ales; John Crossley'e 
Sons' Carpets ; "Wm. Malcomson & Co., Belfast. Ireland, for all kinds of 
Linens, Cottons, Damasks and Drills, Dunaee Bags of all sizes, Hessian 
Wool Bags and Twine. 

Issue Drafts and Letters of Credit on Liverjwol and London. 



xxii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

INCORPORATED JULY 2^, 1857. 

OFFICE, NO. 619 CLAY STREET, 

SAKT iriFLA.nsrOISOO. 



E. W. BURR, President ; CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier ; 

A. H. RUTHERFORD, Auditor; BENJ. O. DEVOE, Surveyor. 



E. W. BURR. WM. BOSWOKTH. J. W. CUDWORTH, J. M. SHOTWELL, 

BENJ. 0. DEVOE, R. J. TIFKANY. T. L. RUTHERFORD, E. F. NORTHAM. 

ISAAC HYDE, ANNIS MERRILL, U. L. KING, 



Deposits, $ll,S84,9i9. ReserTe WnM, $3i4»7iS 



DEPOSITS RECEIVED FROM TWO AND ONE-HALF DOLLARS UP TO ANY AMODNT^ 

Dividends declared semi-arnually — in January and July of each year. 



LOGAN & CO. 

No. 19 Montgomery Street, 107 and 109 Sutter St. 

IXPORTBBS AND DEALERS IN 

FANCY GOODS, 

BERLIN ZEPHYR WOOLS, 

EMBROIDERING FLOSS AND TWIST, 

And all other Articles for Needle Work, at Wholesale and Retail. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xxiii 



SAN FRANCISCO 

OFFICE, 532 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Corner of Webb, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Guarantee Capital & Reserve Fund, Paid iu, $225,705. i"o°o 
Amount Deposits, held, $6,597,967.iiJ. 

I^esident, JAMES De FREMBRY. 

Vice-President, ALBERT MILLER. 

DIRECTORS : 

C. ADOLPH LOW, CHARLES BAUM, 

GEORGE C. POTTER, WASHINGTON BARTLETT 

CHARLES PACE, DENIS J. OLIVER, 

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL. Sen. 

Cashier and Secretary, - - . . LOVELL WHITE 

Surveyor, - JOHN ARCHBALD. I Auditor, - THEODORE LOESSEL. 

Accountant, - J. A. LANGSTROTH. I Attorney, - HENRY C. CAMPBELL. 



McCain, flood & mcClure, 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 



Clothing, Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, 

HOSIERY, WHITE GOODS, BLANKETS, Etc. 

MB S at Pmm SwmEMWt> 

Between Front and Battery, SAN FRANCISCO. 



XXIV SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 



I3^3"OOE=t:POI=l..A.TBID 12tia .^.:E='FITTj, 1S39. 



OFFICE, N. E. COR. MONTGOMERY AND MARKET STS. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



The oI^6ots for which this Association is formed are, that by ita operations the depositors thereof may 

be enabled to find a 

Secure and Profitable Investment for Small Savings, 

And borrowers may have an opportunity of obtaioing from it the use of a moderate capital, on 
giving good and sufficient security for the use of the same. 

OmCEHS : 

Peksidekt. - - • - M. D. sweeny. I Treasieee, - . . EDWARD MARTIN. 
Vice-Pbksidest, - -CD. O'SULLIVAN. I Attornkt, ... RICHARD TOBIN. 

Any person can become a depositor of this Society on paying an entrance Fee of TWO DOLLARS, 

and subscribing to the by- Laws. 

«S- Deposits can be made of any sum from ONE DOLLAR to any amount, .aa 

LiOANS MADE ON SECURITY OP REAL ESTATE WITHIN THE CITY AND COUNTY. 



Land Mortgage Union 

534 California Street, Corner of Webb. 
GUARANTEE CAPITAL, - - - $250,000. 

Receives depoeits and* allows interest from day of deposit Depos- 
itors may transfer their funds at anytime to the share department and 
receive the benefit of a shareholder. No charge for pass book or en- 
trance fee to depositors. Open from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. and everv Sat- 
urday ftom 7 to 9 P. M. and every other Wednesday from 7 to 9 P. M 

J. H. FISH, President. 



SXRKCXOXtS 

A. UEMM 
THOS. K, HAYES, 

JOHN T. CARTER, Secretary. 



ASA HARKKR. c. MAIN. A. UEMME. Jon\ MORTOV 

JOHN M. JOHNSON. THOS. R. HAYES. J. H. FKU ' 



ADVEKTISIXG DEPARTMENT, XXV 



MASONIC 

GUARANTEED CAPITAL, - $150,000. 
Office, No. 6 POST ST., MASONIC TEMPLE. 



President, "WILLIAM H. CULVER. 

Vice-President, FRANCIS SMITH. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 

LEONIDAS E. PRATT, GEORGE ROBINS, JONATHAN KITTREDGE. 

WM. H. CULVER, FRANCIS SMITH, WM. T. GARRATT, 

CALEB S. HOBBS, JOHN F. SNOW, FRANK EASTMAN, 

CALVIN H. WETHERBEE, HIRAM T. GRAVES, PETER DEAN, 

JAMES SIMPSON. 

Secretary, HIRAM T. GRAVES. 

Attorney, - - - - - - L. E. PRATT. 

Office Hoars from 9 A. M. to 3 P. JI., daily. Extra Hours on Saturday, from 7 to 9 P. JI.. for reeoiving 
Deposits only. Loans mada on Real Estate and Collateral Securities at usual rates of interest. Certifi- 
cates of Deposit issued, transferable by indorsement. Remittances from the interior, through any of the 
usual channels, may be sent, the Bank not being accountable for their safe delivery. Th? sii^nature of 
the depositor should accompany his first deposit. A pass-book will be delivered to the agent by whom the 
deposit is made, or sent by mail if desired. Deposits received from One Dollar upwards. 

CcrtificafeH of Deposit ISHued. payable in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, and ttie Principal Cities 
of the Atlantic States and Cauadas ; also London, Paris, Hamburg, and all ttxe Principal Cities of Kurope. 



First Premiim awarded wlerever exMMted— Fair ol Meclianics' Institute, 1865-8— State Fair, 1868. 

ESTABLISHED, 1856. 



STEAM COTfiE MJD BfWt MiiiS. 
CHARLES BERNARD, 



MANUFACTURER AND DE.4LER IN 



FAMILY GHARTRES COFFEE, 

ALWAYS ON HAND, 

AND SPICES OF ALL KINDS, 

Also, SALERATUS, CARBONATE OP SODA, CREAM OF TARTAR, 

and BAEJNG POWDER. 

TiTo. TOT arxd "700 Sja-nMsoivr ST. 

Comer of Gold, between Jackson and Pacific StreeU, San Francisco, Cal. 



XXVI SAN FRANCISCO DIKECTORT. 



JOHN SKINKER, 

No. 108 BATTERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, 

.st)LE AGENT FOR THE PACIFIC COAST FOR 

DUPONT'S CANNON, MUSKET, 



Lake Superior and Pacific Fuse Company's 

NEVER-F-All_ING 



■Warranted. 



WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS GO'S 



^9 ^^kA9&£^WM^9 tm^^M.MXW9 

And Cartridges for same, as well as for. all other Rifles and Pistols of 
American Manufacture. 



E. G. DeCRANO. C. J. DUVAL. 



ASSAY OFFICE AND LABORATORY «^ 

412 Commercial St., San Francisco. 

Ores Worked by MUl Process or Otherwise. Ores Assayed. All kinds 
of Chemical Work Done. 



J. SEOUFE. L. H. SWEENEY. j. e. RUGGLES. 

SROUFE, SWEENEY & CO. 

And WHOLESALE DEALERS IN PROYISIONS, 

No. 406 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXVll 



FARWELL & CO., 



IMPOETERS AND DEALERS IN 



COAL, PIG IRON 

105 AND 107 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

BA.N FRiLNCISCO. 

W. H. FARWELL JNO. 0. HANSCOM. 



XXVUl SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



HELBING & STRAUS 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS I>f 



C R O C K E R Y 

Glass and China Ware, Cutlery, Lamps, 

SILVER-PLATED ^ BRITANNIA WARE, 

102 & 104 BATTERY STREET, 

CORNER OP PINE, SAN FRANCISCO. 



COFFEE AND SPICE MILLS 

625 ^ND 627 FRONT ST. 

The oldest Coffee and Spice Factory on the Pacific Coast. 
MANUFACTORY OF THE 

ORICIIVAL CHARTRES COFFEE, 

First iiitrodnccU Into this country in June, 1851, by G. Tenard. 

GENUINE MOCHA. COFFEE. 

ALL KINDS OF GREEN, ROASTED AND GROUND COFFEES. 

ALSO, SPICES AND CALIFORNIA MUSTARD. 



ADVERTISINQ DEPARTMENT. xxix 



HARRIS, DELL & CO. 







.A.C3-EIKJTS 



STAR ^ LINE, 

PACIFIC com PACKETS, 

To Portland, Oregon, Puget Sound, W. T. 

OFFICES: 

No. 88 Front Street, Portland, Oregon, 

No. 40 California Street, San Francisco. 



Transatlantic Fire Insurance Co. 

CAPITAL, - - $1,125,000. 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., Agents, 

304 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

G. W. CflESLET. E. J. Van Voorhies. J. Siebe. J. S. Joxes. 

G. W. CHESLEY & CO. 

' Importers and Wholesale Dealers in Pine 

WIMBi AM® MC|l©li» 

SOLE PROPRIETORS Or 

CUNDUEANGO BITTEES, 

414 Pront Street, San Francisco. 51 Front Street, Sacramentc 



XXX SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SULLIVAir, KELLY &. CO. 

(Successors to KELLY, WALSH & CO.) 
Importers and Wholesale Dealers in 

Paints, Oils, Glass, 

Etc., Etc. 

101, 103 and 105 Front Street, and 110 Pine Street, 



Sole Agents for tho Pacific Coast for the sale of Chance's 21 oz. and 26 oz. C. S. Glass. 
Also, Agents for the London and -Manchester Co's "White Plate Glass. 

JA\.ES K. KELLY. C. D. O. SULLIVAN. 



CORDA GE Manu factory 

Constantly on hand, a Large and Complete Assortment of 



// 



ma cm 




WHALE LINE, BALE ROPE, TARRED MANILA ROPE, 

ETC., M.\NUPACT0RED PROM 

PURE M:A.TsriLA. HEMP. 

OFFICE AT TUBBS & CO, 611 and 613 FRONT STREET. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xxxi 
/^ 1 



stock: coMPA.isrY. ^ 



Number of Shares, 3,000. $500 per Share. 



ISi-OORlP^OS^ikXSO ^^^I£. 3, £@@7. 



C. SPRECKELS, - President and Manager. 

D. SPRECKELS, - - Secretary. 



C. SPRECKELS, GEO. H. EGGERS, PETER SPRECKELS 

CLAUS MANGELS, F. HAGEMANN. 



SIO California Street. 



WOMS, S. W. COR. EIGHTH i BEANNAN STREETS 



This Beflnery, having recently trebled its capacity, is better prepared 
to supply the great demand for its various kinds of 

SUGARS AND SYRUPS 



xxxu 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTOEY. 



UNITED STATES AND FOREIGN 

SALAMANDER MTING CO. 

(Pacific Branch.) 

(Owning Patents issued September 14th, 1869 ; October 5th, 1869 ; October 4th, 1870 ; 

May 9th, 1871.) 



m 



'J\^'^M^^g 



^»a 



SOS I^OXJIFLTI^: STJFIEBT, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



This is the best non-conductor of heat in use. For coTering Steam Boilers, Pipes and Ho 
Blast Pipes, it has no equal. It has the highest endorsements for durability, lightness, 
elasticity, ease of application and all desirable qualities. It has been adopted by the sev- 
eral Departments of Government of the United States and is in general use in the Atlantic 
States. It eflt'cts a large saving of fuel, lasts as long as the iron on which it is applied, 
and is reasonable in cost. 

SEJVD FOB CIRCULAR. 



ALBANY BREWERY, 

SPHECKELS & CO., Proprietors. 










ca 



Bet Third and Fourth, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Thii EsUbliahmonthM been enlarged for the third time during the past season, and now poageeass 
lacilities unsurpassed by any competition for the production of 

SUPERIOR CREi^M A.LE, 

To supply the increasing demands of the public. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXUl 



NORTHERN ASSURANCE CO 

OF LONDON AND ABERDEEN. 



Subscribed Capital, ■ ■ - $10,000,000 
Accumulated Fuuds, • - ■ 6,750,000 

Animal Fire Premium, - ■ 1,180,000 

LOSSES PROMPTLY PAID IN U. S. GOLD COIN. 



"W. L. BOOKEH, - - - Agent, 

319 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

The Policies of this Company are not only guaranteed by the Capital, but also by the 
unlimited personal responsibility of nearly one thousand shareholders. 



ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 

B'©® Sit mMiiMwmmmEM. mmmmmwm 

Note is liereliy ma M arraigemeiits Have im entered lute lietweeii tie 
ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY 



-AND THE- 



Fmmm maiii g^iAMSHip 

FOR the forwarding of treasure to the Bank of England, and to the 
Bank of France, in Ilarre, by the steamships of the two companies 
bv means of through bills of lading, to be granted by the commanders of 
the Ships of the Pacific Mail .Steamship Company, for delivery to the 
^gent of the Roval Mail Steam I'acket Company, to be sent across the 
Isthmus, and embarked on the Ships of the K. M. S. P. Co- For particu- 
lars as to through rate of freight, apply to ths undersigned. .^=i«™i 

Arrangements can be made for the shipment of Gold and Silver t)res -^^^ ^___ 

from Aspinwall by the Company's Steamers on farorable Terms. 

The Steamships of the K. M. S. P. Co. leave Aspinwall for Plymouth, calling at St Thomas, on the 6th 
(Tth when there are 30 davs in the previous month,! and 22d of each month. ,,.,,. , ,, 

Passages, at reduced rates, can be secured on application to the undersigned, who will give any farther 
particulars that may be required about the Company's business. 

■W. Xj. .BOOI^E-E=l.. 




xxxiv SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



HENRY B. WILLIAMS. HENRY P. BLANCH^B. CHARLES B. MORGAI.. 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & GO. 



• • 



Shipping & Commission 

IKEEIRC HANTS, 

No. 218 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

SA.Isr FRANCISCO. 



IlBIi Mm MILL 

Corner Mission and Fremont Streets, 

SA¥ ERA¥GISGO. 



WM. M. GEEENWOOD, Proprietor. 



E. B. DBAN. DAVID WILLCOX. C. H. MERCHANT. 

E. B. DEAN & CO. 



4k 

BILLS OUT TO ORDER. 

OREGON PINE, SPRUCE AND CEDAR. 

MARSHFIELD IdlLLS, COOS BAY. 

CORNER CALIFORNIA AND DRUMM STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXXV 



SI 



CBiMEBCiAL mumi CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA. 
FIRE A.ND MA.RI]SrE. 



W. "W. DODGE, 
CLAUS SPRECKELS, 
SELDEN S. "WRIGHT, 
W. B. CUMMINGS, 
BARTLETT DOE, 
FRANK EASTMAN, 

H. S. CROCKER, 



C. W. KELLOGG, 
A. W. JEE, 
PETER DEAN, 
JOHN H. WISE, 
C. J. DEERIN6, 
LEVI STEVENS, 

SACBAMENTO : 
N. D. THAYER, 
D. H. HASKELL. 



JAMES GAMBLE, 
CHARLES MAIN, 
J. A. HOOPER, 
G. L. BRADLEY, 
JAMES PHELAN, 
JAMES LINFORTH. 



F. S. FREEMAN, 



OFFICE in SAN FRANCISCO, No. 228 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



CHAS. A. LATON, Secretary. 



C. W. KELLOGG, President. 



M. ULLMi^lSTN^ & CO. 

iMPOaTEBS AND DEALERS IN 

WOOLENS, SILKS AND TAILORS' TRIMMINGS, 

Nos. 626, 628 and 630 SACRAMENTO STREET, 
Bet. Montgomery and Kearny. 



JOHU KIRKPATRICK. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED "SIGNET" WHISKY. 

B. B. CUTTER. JS- B. GENTRY. 



:i 



IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

FIJSfM WIMB8 ^MB MQW&M8 

313 PINE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Sole Agents for the Celebrated Flint Stone Rye 



XXXVl 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



JAMES LINFORTH, JOHN BENSLEY, 

IiINFOBTH, ElMiOGI 

LMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 



L. B. BENCHLEY. 




AGRICULTURAL 



implements! 



AND 



MITJIT^O 



TOOLS. 




GENERAL AGENTS FOK 



POWELL TOOL GO'S 



AXES & EDGE TOOLS, 



BL^CK DIAMOND FILES 



SanMj Tool Go's Planes. 



Etc., Etc.. Etc. 



ITOS- 3 A 5 FKOITT STREET, 



NEAR MARKET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



OP=LI3E!I=».S I=«.ESFECTr'XJIjIj-S' S OI_iIC ITE X3 . 



BANDMANN, NIELill & CO* 

And Commercial Agents of the 

GIAITT PCWDER COMPAIT^, 

OFFICE, 210 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXVII 



400 and 402 BATTERY STREET, cor. GLA.Y, 

u UlilliXXuuX U iV liXJuIlljXliXiV X ijj 



AISTD DEALERS IN 



HIDES, TALLOW, PELTS, OIL, 

LEATHER OF ALL KINDS 

INCLUDING FRENCH, EASTERN, AND CALIFORNIA, 

Importers of Tanners' Tools and Materials; 
Also, Agents for Jas. S. Mason & Go's Blacking. 

Pay the Highest Cash Market Prices for Hides, Tallow and Pelts. 
MARK CONSIGNMENTS-A. C. N. & CO., SAN FRANCISCO. 



W. J. T. PALMER & CO. 

Cabinet Makers, 

"Warerooms, 323 California Street, 

Manufactory, 105 and 107 Mission Street, 

NEAR SPEAR, SAN FRANCISCO. 



XXXVlll 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



512 and 514 Washington Street, 



IMl'OKTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 



DRUGGISTS' GLASSWARE 

A.ND SUNDRIES- 

The Latest Styles of Glassware and Fixtures for Pirst-Class Drug Stores, 

with Glass Labels, Counter and Prescription Scales, Druggists' 

Sundries, Perfumery and Liquor Labels in good Variety. 

ASSAYERS' MAIERIALS AND CHEMICALS, 

Ilullion nnd Assay Balance!., Humid A?pay Apparatus, Cuppelling Furnaces. French and Sand Crucibles 
Uliun s Loleljrated Ulack Load Crucibles, and ovcrylhing required in an A=say Office. 

PHOTO a-pi.A.T=i3:io a-oo3DS. 

PASSE PARTOUTS AND CHEMICALS, 
Photographic Goods, Frames, Etc. 



222 Jackson Street, San Francisco, 

S AAV SMITHING 



r 



AGENT FOR 



-A 



V 



H. Disston <L Sons' 

tl .Mill krjd 

I Circular sawS. 



Butchers' Toole for Sale : Sheet Metals 
Cut to Pattern. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXIX 



it. 3gnafuis' Cnllrgf, 



841 Market Street, and 344 Jessie Street, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



This Institution, conducted by the Fathers of the Society of Jesus, was opened for the 
reception of Students on the 15th of October, 1855. On the 30th of April, 1859, it was incor- 
porated and empowered to confer degrees and academical honors in all the learned professions, 
and to exercise all the rights and privileges common to any other literary institution in the 

United States. 

THE DESIGN OF THIS INSTITUTION IS TO GIVE A THOROUGH 



IT IS ENTENDED FOR DAY SCHOLARS ONLY. 

The Course of Studies embraces the Greek, Latin and English Languages, Poetry, 
Rhetoric, Elocution, History, Geography, Arithmetic, Book-Keeping, Mathe- 
matics, Chemistry, lilental. Moral and Natural Philosophy. The study of 
the French and Spanish Languages, Vocal Music, Short-Hand and 
Practical Telegraphy are optional. 

Besides the Classical, there is a Prepakatoky and Elementart Department for the 
younger students. Its object is to qualify the pupil sfor the higher studies. 

This Institution, provided with a full staff of Professors, presents considerable advantages 
for the mental and moral training of the students. 

A Complete Philosopliical Apparatus 

HAS BEEN RECEIVED FROM PARIS. 

THE LABORATORY CONTAINS OVER TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY PURE 

CHEMICALS, AND ALL. THAT IS NECESSARY FOR THE MOST 

COMPLICATED MANIPULATIONS AND ANALYSIS. 

THE COLLEGE HAS, MOREOVER, A COMPLETE PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. 

The "St. Ignatius' College Band"; The " Iqnatian Literary Society" for 
exercise in debate; the " Philhistorian Debating Society " to promote the knowledge 
of History; and the " Loyola Scie>tific Academy " for the cultivation and promotion of 
the study of Natural Sciences, are established in the College for the improvement of the pupils 
and young gentlemen of good standing. 

ALOYSIUS MASNATA, S. J., President. 



Xl SANFRANCISCODIRECTORY. 



XET, UAVIS $c CO'S 

PIANOS, 

AND GEORGE WOODS & GO'S 

ORGANS, 

Are the Leading Instruments of the World. 

Pirst Fremium at State Fair, Sacramento City, 1874. 



^WM:. G. BA33GER, 

SOLE AGENT, 

13 SANSOM STREET. 



AGENTS FOR 

Fire and Life Insurance Companies^ 

Sfamp MlllA and all other Maohlner.r, Real EM(a(e, Hfiiijnff Stock, 9Koney Brokers, and 

JnerebaiidiHe Salebuien. 

SALE OF MINES A SPECIALTY, 

BRADLEY & RULOFSON'S BUILDING, 

429 Montgomery Street, - San Francisco. 



DURYEA'S SATIN GLOSS STARGH, 

AND 

Duryea's Improved Corn Starcli, 

Aro tho best in (ho world. Uso thorn once and you will use no other. 
DURYEA'S SATIN CLOSS STARCH. -It is the whitest; it is the purest; it is the strong- 
er; it .s tho most glossy; it is tho easiest to uso; it is tho best Starch; it is tho most economical. 

EfiKRTOX, ALLEX & CO. 
lOO Oallfomia St., Saxl r'ran.clsoo. 

»OI,E ^^-^^^^ ^«K T.... r„,r,C ,OAST. CHINA. JALAN. MKX.IO, tE:,THA., 
A.1IfcKIlA. ANO THE WKST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xli 





DIRECTED BY THE FATHERS OF THE SOCIETY OF JESUS. 

FOUNDED IN 1851. INCORPORATED IN 1855. 

WITH A FULL STAFF OF 

PROFESSORS AND TUTORS, 

AND A 

THOSOUGH SYSTEM OF INSTRUCTION 

IN 

LATIN, MATHEMATICS, HISTORY, 

GREI]K, NATURAL SCIENCES, GEOGRAPHY, 

ENGLISH, ARITHMETIC, USE OP THE GLOBES, 

MENTAL JPSILOSOJPHT, BOOK-KEEPINO, PENMANSH 

FRENCH, SPANISH, ITALIAN, GERMAN, 

TOOli All Ilif I'lJMlIf Ai MUilO 
AUD DRA-WllTC, 

DIVIDED niTO TWO EEGULAE COURSES : 
BESIDES A 

PREPA.II.A.TOIIY DEPAKTMENT. 



TEK,3S^CS: 



Board and Lodging, Tuition in either Classical or Commercial Department, Washing 
and Mending, Stationery, Medical Attendance and Medicines, Fuel, Baths, 

per week ?8 0" 

Total, per Session of ten months, §350— payable half-yearly in advance. 
N. B. — If more than two brothers enter the College, each additional one pays only $200 
per Session. 



For further information, or for Catalogue of the College, apply to Rev. A. Vaksi, 
President of Santa Clara College, Santa Clara County, or to St. Ignatius College, 841 
Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Xlii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



STENCIL PLATBS 

R M. TRU WORTHY, 



STEXCIL PLATES, when handsomolir eiecuted. present the cheapest and best mode of advertising 
that can be adopted. Thiri 13 the experience of all who use them. 

STENCIL PLATES OF EVERY PATTEKN cut at this establishment in a style unequaled by any 
other workmen in California. 

Morcbants and others are invited to call and examine specimens in proof of the above assertion. 

Orders from abroad, as well as those given in person, promptly executed and forwarded- Parties send- 
ing orders by lett<?r are particularly requested to write plawlt and give the exact space they wisa 

THE LKTTKRS TO orcUPY. 

By rinse application and superior execution of work during an experience of thirteen years, Mr. TRT7- 
WOKTHY has extended his business to its present proportions. His present facilities for rapid and 
tasteful execution of all work in hie line are far superior to those of any other in this State or in the Union. 

Having purchased all iho late .John Hall's Stencil Tools, Platen and Impressions, and everything per- 
taining to his business, I am prepared to furnish his customers with fac-simiies of his work. 

BRUSHES, INK AND MARKING POTS FOR SALE. 

REMEMBER THE PLACE, 

318 FRONT STREET, corner Commercial (Up Stairs,) San Francisco, California. 



J052T H. SIMS, 

MANUFACTURER OP 

IRON DOORS, SHUTTERS, 

WROUGHT IRON GIRDERS, 

Beam Aiclors aM Tie Bonis, MiMml Bant Tanlts M Safes, 

J All. "WORII, BRIDGE "WORK, 
Cast and Wrought Iron Cemetery, Stoop and Area Railings, 



AND ALL KINDS OF 



Agricultural, Plala aad Qmameatal Iroa Work, 

Between 'Washington and Jackson, below Front, SAN FRANCISCO. 

All orders for the interior. Oreeon and Xevada. also, Mon tana 
Idaho and \\ ashington Territories, attended to with promptness 
and dispatch, Mr. Sims appreciates the past liberal patronage 
of his friends, and trusts he ma.v continue to merit it in the 
future. For the inforraation of Strangers he would sav that he 
feels conHdent that his experience in his particular calling is 
surpassed b.v none on this coast, which his superior work, sent to 
almcwt every town in California, Oregon, Victoria and Stendwich 
Islands, and to he seen on some of the best buUdings in San 
Francisco, fully attests. 

N. B.-Mr. K. M. BURTON, of Portland, will make contracts 
for iron \\ ork m my name. 




ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



xliii 



GOODALL, NELSON & FERKl 



STEAMSHIP CO. 




^tekii\ef ^ kijd ;^kil Ye^^el^ 



RUNNING TO VICTORIA, (V. I.) 



TOM ALES, 

OLEMA, 

HALF MOON BAY, 

PIGEON POINT, 

SANTA CRUZ, 

SOQUEL, 

APTOS, 

SALINAS, 

CASTRO VILLE, 



■WATSONVILLE, 

PAJARO, 

MOSS LANDING!-, 

MONTERET, 

SAN SIMEON, 

CAYUCOS, 

SAN LUIS OBISPO, 

POINT SAL, 

GAVIOTA, 

ALSO, AGENTS FOR 



CARPENTERIA, 
SANTA BARBARA, 
MOOR'S LANDING, 
SAN BUENAVENTURA 
HUENEME, 
SAN PEDRO, 
(LOS ANGELES,) 
ANAHEIM and 
SAN DIEGO. 



m mm wizm aid mii witch, 

And for the supply of Spring Valley "Water for Shipping at the 
Wharves or in the Bay. 



CD I^ I5-1 I o E! 



Junction of Market and Sacramento Streets, Up-stairs, 



SAIT EPRA,ITCXSCO. 



xliv SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 




C A A S" £ T 



RETAZZ. CiiZlFST 

A N D 

WALL PAPER WAREHOUSE. 

We keep constantly on hand the largest assortment on the Pacific Coast of 

VELVET, BODY BRUSSELS, AXMINSTER, 

Tapestry Brussels, Belgique, Three-Ply Ingrain, 

DUTCH, HEMP & VENETIAN CARPETS, 
COTELINES, REPS, TERRY, DAMASK, PLUSH, 



And a full and well-selected Stock of 



CUHTAIUS & UPHOLSTEHY GOODS, 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, 



-ALSO,- 



"^ML PAPER AND DECORATIONS, 

OF THE NEWEST STYLES AND PATTERNS. 

Call and see us before purchasing elsewhere. We will endeavor to suit you, both as to 
quality and price. 

Uo not forget the Store, as it is the only Carpet Store on Clay Street. 

FRANK G. EDWARDS, 

628, 630, 632 and 634 CLAY STREET, 

AND 

s.A.isr rRA-jsrcisco- 



/. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xlv 



BOOK BINDER, 



-AND- 



BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER, 

No. 521 CLAY STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



H. SCHUSSLER, 

Mill C!Vli tmiMt% 

Consulting Engineer Spring Valley Water Works, 
OFFICE, 516 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

Zlesxdezxoo, SaV XSllis Street. 



:e3: E! isr i=L ■:?" ^AmiTE], 

Suceeitor to 

LEGAY & CO., 



^4ry ^sr? 4^** iss^ 



614 & 616 COMMERCIAL STREET. 



Xtvi SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



ATKINS MASSEY. N. TTCTNG. 



MASSEY & YUNG, 

UNDERTAKERS 




651 SA RAMENTO STREET, 

First House below Kearny, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Barstow's and other Metallic Caskets alMP^ays on hand. Everything in 
our line will be furnished on the most Liberal Terms. 



CLOTHIERS, MERCHANT TALORS 



AND DEALERS IN 



MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS, 

TRUNKS, TRATELING BAGS, VALISES, ETC. 
e08 MOigTGOlVIERT STREET, 

Ba«t Side, Korth of Clay. g^^, PRANCISCO. 



Our Merchant Tailoring Department is complete, and all orders from the Country will 
wceive prompt attention. Stylish and perfect fitting garments always guaranteed. 

Wm. Sherman & Co. 



ADVERTISINS DEPARTMENT. xlvii 



EKH1IS» FOB 



Machine Works, 

ANGELL, PALMER & CO., Proprietors, 

JVos. 247 to 259 First Street, - SAJV FEAJVCISCO. 



The Establishment is now Manufacturing 

ACttlHEBY MB CASTIWaS, 

Of all kinds, at lower rates than ever before. We can turn out work to better advantage 
and at less prices than any other shop on this Coast or elsewhere. 



FARMERS' AND MECHANICS' BANK 

OF SAVINGS, 

225 SANSOM ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



Guarantee Capital, - $150,000 

H. BUTTON, President. G. M- CONDEE, Cashier. 

N. C. FASSBTT, JAS. LAIDLEY, G. W. SWAN, 

1. E. DAVIS, ABNBR DOBLE, H. BUTTON, 

O. CLAYTON, B. H. FREEMAN, G. M. CONDEE. 



No charge for Entrance Fee or Bank Book. Deposits received in sums from One 
Dollar upwards. Dividends declared the first Monday in July and January. Loans made 
on Real Estate and Collateral Securities. 



xlviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTOKY, 



.A.- S. Hja.X^X-.I13IEII, 



Importer, Dealer and Manufacturer of 



IRON AND STEEL WIRE ROPE, 

AND WIRE OF ALL KINDS. 

ESTABLISHED, 1857. 

No. 113 and 115 PINE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Sole Proprietor of the 

PATENT EIMDLESS ROPEWAY 

(Wire Tramway) for transporting Ores, etc., over mountainous places. 



Agent for Pacific Wire and W. R. Manufacturing Company, of California, 

AND OF 

Eictiard Johnson & Nephew, Wire Manufacturers, of Manchester, England 



MIXING COMPARES, FEERYMEN, AXD SHIPMASTERS 

Are informed that M'ire Uopo can bo furnished them considerably under the cost of Hemp or Manila, of 
equal strength. Wire Uopo does not stretch or shrink by change of weather. It weighs 40 per cent. less 
than Hemp, is less than one-half the diameter; is easily spliced under all circumstances; is as pliable for 
equal strength; and is from four to live timos as durable as the bast Hemp or Manila llope. 

For Hoisting from Deep Mines, the economy of its application is immense. 

The Wire fiom which my Ropes are made is manufactured in San Francisco by the 
Paciflc Wire Maniifactiuinif Company, from the very best of Stock. 

NoTK.— STEEL WIRE ROPE weighs about sii-tenths of Iron Rope, or one-third of Hemp of equal 
strength. Its e.vlreme lightness saves largely in freight to remote places, audits great durability recom- 
monds it for hoisting purposes, etc. bee table ol comparatire weights, strength, and sizes of 



Slerl Wire Ro|>e. 


Iron n'lre Ro|ic. 


Benip Rope, 


Working 
load of each. 


Circumterence 


\\ t. pr. liio tl 


Circumference 


V, t. pr. 100 ft 


Circumference 


Wt. pr. 100 ft 


2 inch. 


UO lbs. 

100 •• 


2H inch. 


100 lbs. 
ISO ■' 


H^i inch. 


lOB lbs. 

284 " 


8,300 lbs. 
7,000 " 



ENDLESS WIRE ROPEWAY, 

(Wire Tramway) secured by numerous patents. 
By means of the Kopeway, ores, rock and other material can bo transported over mountainous and diffi 



five to fifty tons per hour according to capacity; and being carried upon posts ubive snow and other oh 
■IrucUons, can bo used when other modes of transportation would ba impossible . 

A. S. HALLIDIE, 113 and 116 Pine Street, San Francisco. 

Circulars sent on application. 



ABVERTISINQ DEPARTMENT. xHx 



NATHANIEL GRAY. H. M. GRAT. 

N. GRAY c£ CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

UNDERTAKERS, 

641 Sacramento Street, 

Corner of Webb, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

THE TRADE SUPPLIED WITH 

Coffins & Coffin Trimmings, Hearses & Hearse Plumes 

AND EVERY ARTICLE IN THE LINE, ON LIBERAL TERMS. 

Sole Agents for Barstow's Patent Metallic 

BURIAL OASES & CASKETS. 




BEALE STREET MILL. 



33- I>. H O Hi Ij .A. I>jr JD, 

CORNER BEALE AND MISSION STREETS, 
OfTloe, 304 Mission Street. SAN FRANCISCO. 



MOULDINGS. BRACKETS. FRAMES, SASH. BLINDS, DOORS AND ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS OF WOOD- WORK FINISH. 



MICHAEL B. MORAGHAN. HENRY LVNCH. 

MORAGHAN & LTXGH, 



DEALERS IN" 



iwrn^m^, ^Em^ekwrn 



And all kinds of SHELL FISH, 

STALL 68 CALIFORNIA MAKEET, - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

PUBLIO AND PRIVATE PARTIES, FAMILIES, HOTELS, SHIPPING, 
AND RESTAURANTS SUPPLIED. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



WATERJS^ORKS. 

Incorporated under Act of the Legislature, April 8, 1858. 



Divided into 80,000 Shares, of $100 Each. 



San Andres, Capacity 4,650,000,000 Gallons 

Pilarcitos, " 1,04-5,000,000 " 

LAKE HONDA, " 34.000,000 

COLLEGE HILL, " 14,000,000 

FRANCISCO STREET, *' 7,000,000 

RUSSIAN HILL, " 4,000.000 

BUCHANAN STREET, " 2,000,000 

BRANNAN STREET, " 500,000 



President, - - . . CHARLES WEBB HOWARD. 

Vice-PreBident, - - . . . CHARLES. E. McLANE, 

Secretary, ----._. E. M. MILES. 

TRUSTEES. 

OLIVER ELDRIDGE, CHAS. WEBB HOWARD, 

WM. NORRIS, D. J. STAPLES, 

GEO. W. GRANNISS, CHAS. E. McLANE. 
A. B. FORBES, 



OFFICE OF THE T770B.S:S, 



ADVEKTISING DEPARTMENT, 






Pli. 



pfc piy 



i^mi 



RETAIL DEALER IN THE 






1,^1 i 



3S^EEX=LSC:E3:.^TJ]VL X^II^BS, Etc 



PETER T. GANNON, 

Corners of Montgomery, Post and Market Streets, 



-SAN FRANCXSCO. 



EDWARD MARTIN. 



D. V. B. HENARIE. 




WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



WINES AND LPORS 

408 FRONT STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



GEO. HAYES & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



'Windo'w Caps, Dormer "Windows, Gutters, Finials, Pinnacles, 
Chimney Caps and Ventilators. 

ALL KINDS OF 

ioppngatei Irom Wurt lor Bnildlngs* 

Sol© r'2ror>rietoi-"s of 

Hayes' Patent Ventilating Skylights 

Hnghes' Patent Malt Kilns and Wash Tub Bottoms, Architectnral 
Stamped Zinc Work, &c. 

30 HARRIET STREET, - 



BETWEEN HOWARD AND FOLSOM, 
SIXTH AND SEVENTH. 



BEND FOE ILLTJSTKATED CATALOGUE AND PBICE LIST. 



lii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



:0. H. r"R.E3E31\(fl:.A.3>3' cfc OO. 



No8. 413 and 415 Mission Street, 



Adjoining Mechanics- Mill. 1 SaN FrANCISCO. 

Between hirst and Fremont Streets, J ' -' 

SCROLL SAA VIIvra A^ TD TURisriNa. 

MAHOGANT, BLACK WALNUT AND CEDAK FOR SALE. 

Constantly on hand and made to order, Stair Rails, Posts, Balusters, etc., etc. 



OAK LEATHER BELTING AND HOSE 

MA.SUFACirRED BY 

415 MARKET STREET, - - SAN ERAXCISCO. 

MINING HOSE. SUCTION HOSE, FIRE BUCKETS, FIRE HATS, MAIL BAGS, ETC 

AGEKCT OF THE SILSBY MANUFACTURING CO. 
Rotary Steam Fire E^Qgines and Patent Combination Hose. 



■WM. EHEEITPFOUT, 



IMPORTER AND RETAIL DEALER IN 



CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, 

AND UPHOLSTERY GOODS. 



THE FINEST QUAT.TTT OF 

(WHOLESALE.) 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. liii 



(Formerly of U. S. Mint. S. F.) 

ASSAYER & fflETALLl&ICAL CHEIIST, 

(OPPOSITE THE GLD U. S. MINT,) SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

PIONEER WOOLEN FACTORY 

LOCATED AT 

Black Foint, San Francisco, Cal. 

MANUFACTORY OF ALL CLASSES OF 

SUCH AS 

BLANKETS, CASSIMERES, TWEEDS, FLANNELS, OVERSHIRTS, 

TEAMSTERS' SHIRTS, FIREMEN'S SHIRTS, UNDERSHIRTS 

AND DRAWERS, SLUICE BLANKETS, &c. 

Depot and Oifice, - ■ - No. 115 Battery Street. 



MEEKER^ JAMKS & CO. 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

WAGON AND CARRIAGE MATERIALS, 

COR. CALIFORNIA & DAVIS STREETS, 

San iJ^raiacisco. 



liv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PACIFIC BARREL AND KEG FACTORY, 

Location on Brannan Street, bet. Seventh and Eighth, 

Office, 408 C ALIFORN IA STREET. 

HAVE ON HAND COOPERS' STOCK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

Antl are fully prepared to manafacture to order packages of all kiads acd sizes. 

FLINT, PEABODY & CO., Agents. 



N. P. LANGLAND, 
stair builder, 

WOOD TURNER 

SCROLL SAWYER. 

No. 485 Brannan Street, 

<KEAK,) 

SAN FHANCI8CO. 




CHAKLES CLA-i-TON. 



JOS. W. JORDAN. 



Commission Merchants 

IN GRAIN AND FLOUR 

AGENTS FOR THE "SANTA CLARA" FLOUR MILLS, 

Northeast Corner Front and Clay Streets, 



San Francisco. 



MANUFACTURER AND IMPORTER OF 

HARDWARE, MECHANICS^ TOOIii, 

MACHINE SCREWS, TWIST DRILLS, ETC. 

312 BUSH STREET, 

Between Moxtqomeby and Eeabnt, 

San F'ra.xiclsco. 




ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. ]v 



PARROTT & CO. 

IMPORTERS 



.ia>.3srxD 



n .ommission 4+1 erchants. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



RODGERS, MEYER & CO, 

212 BATTERY STREET, 



ROBERT RODGERS & CO. 



■ ■ 




■ ■ 



1 u liOMissioi fflfircims, 

GRAIN SHIPPERS. 



Dra^v Exchange on Europe. 



Ivi SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTOKT. 



:\d:.A.:E=i.iisrni] .^.nxriD i^ip^e. 



THE 



CALIFOHNIA INSITRANCE CO. 

OFFICE, NO. 318 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

ONE DOOR EAST FROM SANSOM. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



-»-♦ ^ *♦"»— 



CAPITAL PAID UP (IN GOLD) - - - $300,000 
ASSETS 450,000 

THE OLDEST OF ALL THE LOCALS. 



C. T. HOPKINS, Prest. H. B. TICHENOR, Vice-Prest. 

Z. CROWELL, Secretary. 



IMPERIAL FIRE 



- AND - 



Qtieei\ In^tifarice C5o^. 

OF LONDON AND LIVERPOOL. 

Losses paid here immediately on Adjustment, 
in U. S. Gold Coin. 

FalknerJBell&Co. 

No. 430 California St., 

AGENTS FOR CALIFORNIA. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ivii 

CUBER? <& COMFAXTTr, 

Book d Ornamental Printers, 

414 MARKET STREET, below Sansom, 

P. O. BOX 1819. SAN FRANCISCO. 



Ordert for every description of Printing gratefully received and promptly executed. 



aEO. M. ^^ooT> & CO. 

I^njgranm, mt mmim, lie mlm, Stencil pxiim, 

And Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in Stencil Tools and Stock, Key Check Dies, and Stock & Lyon's Head 
Seal Presses, Copper Plate Ink, Card Plates, St.-ncil Alphabetsand Figures, and a splendid assortment of superior hand 
plated Door Plates constantly on hand and for sale cheap, i2o Post Street, above the White House, San Francisco, Cal. 

TO ORDER. Cards elegantly Printed, Written and Engraved. Fine Stencil Name Plates cut in Roman, German 
Text, Old English: also engraved in Writing Style. Steel Name Stamps, Brass and Electrotype Stamps, Burning 
Brands, Raised Brass Work, etc., etc. 



PIONXSXZR PAPZSR IKEIImIi, 

TAYLORVILLE, MARIN COUNTY, CAL. 
S. P. TAYLOR & CO., - - - Proprietors. 

Also Agents Eagle Paper Mills. 

Manufacturers and Importers of all kinds of 

PRINTING, MANILA, HARDWARE AND STRAW 

PAPERS, PAPER BAGS, W NE, ETC. 

Paper Warehouse, No. 416 Clay Street, San Francisco. 

The Highest Price paid for Kags, Bope, Etc. 



CALIFORNIA I TALIAN PA STE COMPANY. 

FRUSSO & SPLIVALO, 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Macaroni, f eiicelli, Fancy Paste, Fariia, 

ETC., EXO, 

NOS. 704 and 706 SANSOM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Iviii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



KAliBTR,t-B:l' 



Fire Insurance 



COMFAXT7. 



SWISS LLOYD 





Kxmt Msmma 



MOREIS SPEYER & CO. 

General Agents, 

No. 13 Merchants' Exchange, 
425 GALZFOHITZA STB.SET. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



lix 



H. M. NEWHALL. 



J. 0. BLDKIDGE. 



a. PALACHE. 



^a i^va a 



[IWlllili ^ 







SALESROOM, 



FIRE-PROOF BRICK, 



309, 311 and 313 SANSOM STREET, 



MONDAY and THURSDAY— Catalogue Sale of Boots, Shoes, Clothing, 
Hard-ware, Fancy Goods, etc. 

■WEDNESDAY— Catalogue Sale of Dry Goods, Silks, Embroideries, 

French Goods, etc. 

Ca.s1i. .^L.cLT7-£t,zi.ces oxx AXexroIiemcAise for- Sa-le. 




Real Estate Agent, 

740 FOUHTH STREET. 



Qrovind to lease for a term of years, conveniently situated to the 

Southern and Central Pacific R. R. Depots, 

and also to the Wharves. 



Ix BAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SAVINGS ANDLOAN SOCIETY 

nffera-nti®® Cmpltolf $W%M§m 



IsTo. S2S O^lifonai^ Stz-oot 



JS^- Office Hours from 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. 

Exti-a houi-s on Saturdays from 7 to 8 p. m. , for receiving of deposits only. 
Loans made on Real Estate and other Collateral Securities, at current 
rates of interest. 

GEORGE LETTE, L. GOTTIG, 

SECBETARY. PRESIDENT. 



R G. MATHEWS. H. ALLEN MATHEW. 



Produce Commission Merchants, 

One door South of Commercial, SAN FRANCISCO. 



R. H. BENXKTT. HENRY PAGE. WILFRED PAGE. 

BENNETT & PAGE, 

Commission Mierehants, 

NO. 304 DAVIS STREET, 

P. O. Box 1206. SAN FRANCISCO. 

— «♦« 

Consignments of 'Wool and Grain respectfully solicited. Advances made 

thereon If required. 



ADVERTISINGDEPARTMENT. Ixi 



GEO. C. SHREVE & CO. 



iM:p='oi=i.TE!r=i.s oi^ 



AVATCHES. 

DIAMONDS, 

ETC., ETC!. 

110 Montgomery Street, 

Make a Specialty of the 

Gorham Manufacturing Company's 

tmUm MUmt Sttt* 




Particular attention is requested to the many attractive designs now 
being produced by this celebrated Company. With works projected 
on a scale unparalleled for magnitude in the world, together with the 
best talent for designing, the most skilled workmen, the best labor- 
saving machinery, and the immense amount of goods produced, they 
are enabled to offer the best made and most artistic articles at the 
lowest possible price. 

The standard of Silver used is British Sterling. 



Ixii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PUBLISHERS' AGENTS, 

413 WASHINGTON STREET, 

Opposite Post Office, SAJf FBAJYCISCO. 



Supply all the Eastern and European 

]V^ew^|)a|)ef^ ^ Petiodidkl^ 

AT THE LOWEST RATES, 

IN ADVANCE OF THOSE SUBSCRIBING DIRECT. 



Per Tear. 

Popular Science Monthly ?5 00 

Overland Monthly 4 00 

Harper's Magazine 4 00 

Atlantic Monthly 4 00 

Scribner's Monthly 4 00 

The Galaxy 4 OO 

Lippincott's Magazine 4 00 

Catholic World 5 00 

PhrenologicalJournal 3 00 

Appleton's Journal 5 00 

Chambers' Journal 4 00 

International Review 5 QQ 

North American Review 6 00 

St. Nicholas Magazine 3 00 

Godcy's Lady's Book 3 oO 

Leslie's Lady's Magazine 4 00 

Demorest's 4 qO 

Peterson's Magazine 2 50 

Eclectic Magazine 5 oO 

London Society g 00 

London Belgravian 6 00 

AH the Year Round "...'.'..... 5 00 

London Art Journal 12 00 

London Illustrated News 13 00 

London Graphic 13 oO 

London Dispatch 5 oO 



Per Tear. 

London Punch 8 00 

Harper's "Weekly 5 00 

Harper's Bazar 5 00 

Leslie's Pictorial 5 00 

Leslie's Chimney Corner 5 00 

New York Police Gazette 5 00 

New Y'ork Clipper 5 00 

New Y'ork Ledger 3 00 

New Y'ork Weekly 3 00 

New Y'ork Tribune 3 00 

New Y'ork Times 3 00 

New Y'ork Herald 3 00 

Scientific American 4 00 

Banner of Light 4 00 

New York Nation 5 00 

A. and N. Journal 6 00 

Wilkes' Spirit 6 00 

The four Reviews and Blackwood 16 00 

Weekly Sacramento Record-Union 5 00 

Weekly S. F. Bulletin 3 00 

Weekly S. F. Alta 5 00 

Weekly Examiner 4 00 

Weekly S. F. Chronicle 4 00 

Weekly S. F. Mining Press 4 00 

Weekly Commercial Herald 9 00 

" Rural Press 4 00 



^Complete Price Lists furnished Free on Application. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixiii 



BLAKE, ROBBINS & GO. 



IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 



Book, News, Writing, 

-A-KTIZ) 

WRAPPING PAPER; 

STRAW AND BINDERS' BOARDS, 

BLACK AND COLORED INKS. 

Agents for the Saratoga and Lick Mills Paper Mf 'g Co., Santa Clara Co., Cal. 

ALSO MANUFACTURERS OP 



'9 

Nos. 516 Sacramento and 519 Commercial Streets, 

Between Sansom and Montgomery, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



FRANCIS BLAKE, "t f 

JAMES MOFFITT, VSan Francisco. J 

CHAS. F. ROBBINS, J \ 

JAMES W. TOWNE, New York. I 



B. McQuillan, 

IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER OF 

WALNUT, ROSEWOOD AND GILT 

LOOKIISTG GLASSES, 

ENGKAYINGS, CHEOMOS, LITHOGRAPHS 

And Depot for CURRIER & IVES' PICTURES, 

WHOLESiLK AND EKTAIL, 

NOS. 209 AND 2il LEIDESDORFF STREET, 

AND NO. 529 COMMERCIAL STREET, 
Between Commercial and Sacramento, Montgomery and Sansom, San Francisco. 



Pictures, Diplomas and Business Cards Framed on the most reasonable 
terms. RBGILDINQ done in the best style. 



Ixiv 



BAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 




^Viv^tix^g^^^ 




% 



FRANK EASTMAN, 

Book, Cap^ and Fancy 

JOB PRINTER 



509 GImAY STREKT^ 

NEAR SANSOM, ^J^ Wm^M€m€@, 



Every style of work required by Merchants, Mechanics, Lawyers, In- 
surance Companies, Banks, etc., correctly, tastefully, speedily 
and elegantly executed at this long established House. 

The Proprietor has added every desirable improvement in 



That the business demands. 
Novelty and Originality of Design in the execution of 

IP Ilk wl $,tt%% |il iprii&i 

Will receive his prompt attention ; and ho hopes, by fair dealing and low prices, to suit 
all who may favor him with their patronage. 



ADVERTISING DEPAKTMENT. IxV 



SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

ITo. 408 CAZiZFORlTZA STHBBT, 
And 41 INDIA WHARF, - - BOSTON, MASS. 



MOERIS SPEYER & CO. 

No. 13 Merchants' Kxehange, 

425 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Draw on J\''ew York, London, Paris, Harrdturg, Bremen, 
Berlin, Frankfort, Vienna, 

.A.1SIT> OTIEIER, CITIES IJST EXJR,OI>E. 



J. A. LEDDEN. A. WHIPPLE. 

LEDDEN, WHIFFLE & GO. 



IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 






SA.3Sr FR.A.isrcisco, 



MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 

lD:R,1Zr C3-OOIDS, 

eoaisEa ©f s&hsom ana btoish steekts. 



Ixvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



LOUIS SLOSS. 



SIMON GREENEWALD. 



LEWIS GERSTLE. 



LOUIS SLOSS & CO. 

SnccessoTs to A. WASSERMAN & CO. 



II 








Nos. 310 and 312 SANSOM STREET, 




Liberal Cash Advances made on Shipments through us to our Houses 
in New York and London. 



SAVINGS BANK 



GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 



$300,000. 



President, 



F. D. Atherton, 
I. Friedlander, 

Sbcbetaby, 



OFFICERS. 

JOHN PAHROTT. | Vice-President, 

IDII=LEOTOR.S. 
James Otis, John Parrott, 

Adam Grant, John Morton, 

S. L. Jones. 
- T. F. BACON. I Attorney, - 



JEROME LINCOLN. 



Thomas Menzies, 
Jerome Lincoln, 

SIDNEY V. SMITH. 



ORDINARY AND TERM DEPOSITS RECEIVED. 



KT O C H .A. 1=1. G- E "F^OFL E IST T IR. .^ 3Sr O E! I^ E E . 



Loans made on Real Estate and other approved Securities. 
OflSce, No. 215 Sansom Street, between California and Pine. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixvii 



Laurel Hill Cemetery, 



(FORMERLY LONE MOUNTAIN,) 



OFFICE AT THE ENTRANCE OF THE CEMETERY, 



BUSH STREET AND CENTRAL AVENUE. 



TH.TJSTESEIS, 



W. C. Ralston, 
James Otis, 

C. C. Butler, 



A. J. Gunnison, N. Luning, 

N. Gray, H. M. Newhall, 

J. H. Redington, 



JAMES OTIS, President. 
W, C. RALSTON, Treasurer. 



C. C. BUTLER, SECRETARy. 
C. H. CROWELL, Acting Sup't. 



Ixviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



W®I«®H & ©@. 




Brittan's Building, 109 California Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

AGENTS MOODY'S SAW MILLS, BUBRABD INLET, B. O. 



ANDREW WELCH & CO. 

19 Tower Chambera, Liverpool, Eng. 



W^ELCH, RITHET & CO. 

, Victoria, British Columbia. 



ISAAC E. DAVIS. HENRY COWELL. 

DAVIS A COWELL, 

DE.^LERS IN 

SANTA CRUZ AND SACRAMENTO LIME, 

Cement, Plaster, Hair, Marble Dust, Fire Tile, 
COR. FRONT AND WASHINGTON STREETS, 



184.©. 



IS^S. 



PIONEER IRON WORKS, 

Nos. 225 and 227 BEALE STREET, 

Between Howard and Folsom, SAN FRANCISCO. 

CHARLES H. LEAVITT, 



M A.I«■xJ^■.a.c!'I•XJI».*3H.. 




WROUCHT IRON 

BUSSEY'S PATENT 

COMBINATION BURGLAR PROOF 

BANK VAULT 



steel Xjlzieca. ^sss 
BANK VAULTS, i 

BURGLAR, FIRE PROOF, 

AND SILVERWARE SAFES, 

PRISON CELLS, 

FIRE-PROOF 

3D o o :el s. 

Detachable Knobs, no Key. A large Assortment of Combination and Key Locks on 
band. Ijitost Improred Shears, Punches, Dies, etc., for Cold Iron Works. 

Constantly on hand a largo assortment of 

FIRE PROOF DOORS AND SHUTTERS. 



SAFE LOCKS, 

Uontainiog Millions of changes. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixix 



ALEX. ELDER. SAMUEL R. STEELE. THEODORE S. CRESSY. 

STEELE, ELDEH & CO. 

WHOLESALE 

COMMISSION 

DEALERS 

Califorxxia Dairy Produce, 
No. 204 Front Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



A. S. EOSENBAUM & CO. 

TOBA.CCO, ETC. 

And Sole Agents for the Celebrated Peach Cake Navy Tobacco, 
COR. californiAl and battery sts. 

s^^isr in:EH.^^isroisco. 

162 "WATER STREET, NEW YORK. 



The BLACK BIAli COAL Mil CO, 



AND THE 



6ELLIN6HAM BAY COAL COMPANY. 

Steam and House Coals by the Cargo, and to Ships 

and Dealers. 
Office ott Spear Street, at Riacoa Wharf. P. B. CORNWALL, Pres't. 



IXX SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



notice: tux: rz:iviovai«. 

^rRT^m MuBlB PtOFSSf 

105 KEARNY STREET, and 101 FIRST ST., 

San Francisco. Portland, Or. 

REMOVED FROM 623, 625 CLAY ST. 



PIANOS. 

Steiniray & Sons, 
Kranich & Bach, 
Gmld, Chnrch &; Co. 
Ha nes Bros. 
£rn8t Kaps Grands, 
Carl Roenisch Uprights, 
£rnst Rosenkranz Up'ts. 



ORGANS. 

The Bnrdett, 
Celeste, 
Combination, 
Orchestral & Domestic. 
The Shoninger, 
Gem Organs, in every 
style and size. 



INSTRUMENTS SOLD, PAYABLE IN INSTALLMENTS. 

THE LARGEST STOCK OF SHEET MUSIC AND MUSICAL 
MERCHANDISE WEST OF CHICAGO. 



GEORGE MORROW. AVILLIAM SCOTT. 

GEORGE MORROW & CO. 

CornixLission Miercliaiits, 

AND DEALERS IN 

HAT, GRAIN, GROUND FEED, ETC, 

39 CLAY STREET and 28 COMMERCIAL STREET, 

Between Drumm and East, SAN FRANCISCO. 



I 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory 

N. W. cor. Montgomer y and Merchan t Sts., San Francisco. 
WATCHES AND CHAINS. AMETHYST AND TOPAZ. BROOCHES. 

EAR-RINGS, SLEEVE BUTTONS AND RINGS. 
Diamond Setting. Knameliog and all kinds of Repairing done. Jewelry for Salo, Wholesale and ReUil. 



ADVERTISING DKPARTMENT. 



Ixxi 



IBWAEB liiiUI t m. 

Counting House, Bank and Insurance 

DIEEOT IMPORTEES OP 

P. Sb J. Arnold's Writing Fluid and Copying Ink, 

WHATMAN'S DEAWING AND WEITING PAPERS, 



JOSEPH GILLOTT & SONS' STEEL PENS, 

All of which will be offered in quantities to suit, at reasonable rates. 

No. 413 & 415 Sansom Street, corner of Commercial. 




STRAIGHT. 




IroD Stone Sewer Pip, 

drain; TILE, 
PLAIN FLOWER POTS, 

AND FIRE BRICK. 



TERRA COTTA VASES 

And FLO"WER POTS, 



TRAP. 



Garden Tile, Etc., Etc. 



AGENT, 

30 California Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Ixxii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



H. A. CRANE. W. H. BRIGHAM. R. A. SANFORD. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

DRUGS, MEDICINES, PHOPRIETARY ARTICLES, 
Druggists' Sundries, Perfumery, Etc., Etc. 

322, 324 and 326 FRONT STREET, 
Oorner or 013.37-. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



JOSEPU ROTH. - MRS. FRAXCOISE TEDEAU. 



Importers and WTiolesale Dealers in 

FINE WINES, LIQUORS 

Brandies and Whiskies, 



1 



SOLE AGENTS OF THE CELEBRATED BENEDICTINE. 
214= ^ND 316 PIISrE STREET, 

JBetween Sansotn and Battery, 
S -A. BO" r'H. -A. I^ O I S O O. 



ADVEBTISING DEPARTMENT, 



Ixxiii 



H. A. PLATE. 




Importers, Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in every description of 







, M^****XWXJ, *iltXX*«M*. XX«X*^MV»*W, 

WHIPS, LEATHER COLLARS, ETC. 

101 and 106 Front Street, Near Pine, 



San Francisco. 



JOHN M. JOHNSON. 



PEM. B. HORTON. 



Kirby's Santa Cruz Leather and Hill's Concord Harness. 



Ixxiv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTOKY. 



WM. SCHMOLZ, 







TH.-A.3SrSXTS, 



THEODOLITES, SOLAR COMPASSES, 



Y LEVELING INSTEUMENTS, 




COMPASSES, 

MOUNTAIN BAROMETERS, 



CHAINS, MERIDIAN TEANSITS, 

®mlll@a ®ala®©es8 

Etc. Etc. 



REPAIRS EXECUTED IN THE BEST MANNER. 



420 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. IxXV 

EXCELSIQ E MILL COMPANY. 



MNNtJFACTURER OF 



FRAMES, SASH, BLINDS, DOORS, & MOLDINGS, 

441 TO 445 BRANNAN STREET, 

Between Third and Foiirth, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Always on hand and made to order, all kinds of OUTSIDE AND INSIDE FINISH. 

Brackets and Scroll Sawing and Wood Turning in all their branches, done with dispatch. 



CHARLES MAYER, 

Importer and Manufacturer of the Latest Novelties of 

CLOAKS, SUITS, ETC. 

NO. 20. MONTGOMERY STREET, 

Opposite the Lick House, SAN FRANCISCO, 



LA FLOR D£ LA MARIPOSA, 



635 PACIFIC ST. ^|^HHP^ SAN FRANCISCO. 




AND LA FLOR DE LA CORONA 

CIGARITOS MANUFACTORY. 

Have constantly on hand a lot of YELLOW and WHITE paper Cigaritos of the best quality at the 

lowest rates. Cigaritos of La Viuda de Garcia. La Honrradez, Cabanas, Figaro, etc. 

Ordars from the interior promptly attended to. 



NEWBAUER & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

METROPO llTAM MATCHES 

Our Matches are Sure, and are "Warranted to withstand Dampness of 
every Climate, and be good for any length of time. 



FACTORY, POTRERO. 

OFFICE, No. 107 SANSOM STREET, Between PINE and BUSH, 



Ixxvi 



BAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



[FIRST ESTABLISHED SEPTEMBER, 1849.] 

The Pacific News Company 

SUCCESSORS TO 

J. W. SULLIVAN'S NEWS AGENCY. 



J. S. STZLL c& CO., Mazxagers, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Booksellers, Stationers, and General Subscrip- 
tion Agents for American and Foreign 
Books, Cheap Publications, News- 
papers and Periodicals. 



No. 1023^ MARKET STREET, 

Above Fifth Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 

We beg leave to call the attention of the friends of the two old Pioneer Establishments of the Pacific 
Coa^t, to the consolidation of these two old and popular News Agencies, and return thanks for the very 
liberal patronage bestowed on them for the past, twenty-six years. Having made very favorable arrange- 
ments with the Eastern publishers, we are now prepared to supply everything in our lino with promptness 
and dispatch. We deliver subscribers their papers and magazines to any part of the city, free of charge. 



NEWSPAPERS. 

Per Year. 

Appleton's Journal... J5.00 

Army and Navy Journal ti.uo 

Boston Weekly JoumaL 3.0O 

Boston Pilot _ 3.00 

Banner of Light - 4.0O 

Clipper, N. \. 5.00 

Chimney Corner- 5.00 

Days Doings _ 5.00 

Forest and Stream. 5.00 

Frank Leslie's Newspaper « 5.00 

" 111 /eitung... 5.00 

" " Lady's Jourl 5.00 

Harpers' Weekly .i.Oi) 

Harpers' Ba7sr 5.00 

Herald, N. Y 3.00 

Hearth and Home _ 4.00 

Irish American „.. 3.00 

Irish World „ 3.00 

Littell's Living Ag6..._ 8.00 

Ledger, N. Y 8.00 

New Sensation...- - 5.00 



Nation^N. Y 

N. Y. \ arieties 

Nat. IVilico (iaiette 

Police News, Illustrated... 

Saturday Night 

Scientific .\merican 

Scottish .American _., 

Tribune, N. \ 

Timos, N. Y 



ti.00 
.5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
3.00 
4.00 
4.00 
3.00 
3.00 



Per Year. 

World, N. y 3.00 

Wilkes' Spirit of Times- 6.00 

Weekly, N. Y 3.00 

FOREIGN. 

Art Journal _ 12.00 

Boys of England _ 3.1X1 

Bow Bells, 1 13 Nos.J 4.51) 

London Society 6.00 

World of Fashion .5.00 

Young Men of G. Britain 3.00 

Y. Lady's Journal (13 Nosi... 4.50 

London Illustrated News 14.00 

London Illustraied (iraphic 14.00 
London Illustrated Queen.... Itl.OO 

London Punch - 7.00 

London Public Opinion- 10.00 

Caliromia PubUcatlona. 

S. F. Weekly Alta California 5.00 

" " Bulletin .3.00 

" Daily Bulletin li.oo 

' " Chronicle 6.00 

'• Call 6.00 

Sacramento « eekly Union... 5.00 

S. F. M'oekly Examiner- 5.00 

" " Rolden Era 3..t0 

" " Monitor 5.00 

' " Cath.lTuardian 5.00 

Scientific Jt M in. Press.. 4.00 

" Courier de S. Francisco. 10.00 



Per Y'ear. 

S. F. News Letter - 7.00 

" Commercial Herald and 

Market Review 9.00 

Overland Monthly - 4.00 

Pacific Rural Press 4.0O 

Mazarine*. 

Atlantic Monthly — 4.00 

Aldine, The S.0O 

Boys of .America 2.00 

Ballou's ^lagazine '--00 

Budget of Fun comic) 2.00 

Blackwood's Magazine 4.00 

Do. with 4 Reviews I'.OO 

Comic Monthly ~. 2.00 

Demorest's Magazine 4.0O 

Eclectic Magazine 5.00 

Everv Saturday, Mo. Parts.- 5.00 

Frank Leslie's Magazine 4.00 

4.00 

3.00 
4.00 
6.00 
2.00 
2.00 
.5.00 
4.00 



j Galaxy Magazine... 

Godey's Lady's Book 

Harper's .Magazine...- 

Le Bon Ton (Fashions).... 

Nick Na.x icomici 

Peterson's Magazine 

Popular Science Monthly. 

Scribner's Monthly 

St. Nicholas Magazina 3.00 

Wild Uats _ 3.00 

Yankee Notions 2.00 



Any other Xew.spaper or Magazine not In this List will be Supplied to Order. 

JIEW TOSK $oo» $'y Oi;« 

CHARLES W. STILL, NO. 1024 MARKET STREET. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxvii 




Ixxviii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



W. & I. STEINHART & GO. 



Ina.p>ort©x"s of 



CLOTHING 



-A^isriD 



GENT'S FUHITISHIITG GOODS, 

XTos. 3 axxd 5 Battery Street, 
ORIENTAL BLOCK, SAN FRANCISCO. 



84 Thomas Street, >■ Iffeinr York. 



P 



SrF£3.^.]MC 



COFFEE AND SPICE MILLS, 



SBAZ.BXis zxr 



No. 212 SACEAMENTO STREET, 

BETWEEN FRONT AND DAVIS, 

SA.]Sr FRA-isrcisco. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxix 



^^ 



W 



(& CO. 






InajDoarters of 










W( 



4^f= 



Vi=i-. <t«'^ 



5^FlRFFWaBT 



^vk)^ 



^^^::^^ ^ _- v^,j^ ■;ri: 



<5s^^ ^ci»-::j 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Steele's Glycerine Lotion, Steele's Saponaceous Tooth 

Po-wrder, Steele's Extra Quality Cologne 

Water, and Steele's Grindelia 

liotion for the cure 

of Poison 

Oak. 



t^" J. G. Steele & Co. import directly from Eastern and 
European markets. 

— » »• 

J. G. STBSZiS (& CO. 



521 Montgomery Streetj 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Ixxx SAN FRANCISCO DIKECTORT. 



Importer and Dealer in all kinds of 

GAS FIXTURES 



.A-isrrD 



730 Montgoinery Street, 

NEAR JACKSON STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 



FANCY AND PLAIN WASH BASINS, 

Marble Slabs^' 

Silver-Plated Cocks^ 

Bath Tubsy Sheet Zinc^ 

Sheet Lead, Lead Pipe, 

dAlVAIEIB AID JLAII HOI PIPE, 

-£w.IjIj sizes. 

For Gas, Steam and Water, 

In lots to suit, together with Elhovrs, Tees, Return Bends, Stop Cocks, Plugs, Bushings, 
Nipples, etc.; Rubber Hose, Hose Bibbs, Hose Pipes, etc. 

CAST IRON PIPE, COPPER BOILERS, Etc. 

Gas and Steam Fitting and Plumbing in ail its Branches. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxi 



EiSI-FITTIiE PiNfAmOiS 



J. "^HALEXT, 

]VIercliaiit Tailor, 
oxsoo 



WE CUT MOHE OH LESS SPHIH& AS GESIHEQ. 



J. B. WOOSTER. 



C. P. HUBBELL. 



D. D. SHATTUCK. 



WOOSTEE, SHATTtJCK I CO. 
Commission Merchants, 

AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Provisions, Butter, Cheese, Lard, Hams, Bacon, 
317-323 FRONT STREET, 

Corner Commercial, SAN FRANCISCO. 

6 



Ixxxii 



SAN FKANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



-r. H. KING £ CO. 

(Successors to J. D. CASEBOLT & CO.) 

IMPORTEBS AND DEAI^ES Ef 

CARRIAGE AND WAGON MATERIALS, 



Carriage Hardware, 
Mail or Coacli Axles, 
Half Patent Axles, 
Concord Axles, 
Axle and Spring Clip, 
Carriage i Tire Bolts 
Fifth Wheels, 
Carriage Steps, 
Dash Frames, 
Felloe Plates, 
Whiffletree Bolts, 
Mhiffletree Plates, 
Carriage Springs, 




Hubs, 

Spokes, 

Bims, 

Felloes, 

Shafts, 

Poles, 

Whiffletrees, 

Xei-k lokes. 

Bows, 

Oak, 

Ash, 

Hickory, 

Whitenood, 



MALLEABLE IRON s CARRIAGES and WAGONS, 
Carriage Trimming Goods, 

ENAMELED LEATHERS, DUCK DRILLS AND RUBBER CLOTH, 

LINING AND TUFTING NAILS AND BUTTONS— ALL COLORS, 

SHELTON TACKS, CARRIAGE KNOBS, 

SEAMING CORDS, TWrNE, BUCKRAM, 

CARRIAGE LACES, FRINGES, TASSELS, CORDS AND CLOTHS, 

CARRIAGE MOUNTINGS— SILVER OR GOLD PLATED, 

POLE AND SHAFT TIPS, HUB BANDS, DOOR HANDLES. 



.A. Gr :E3 IDO^ T & s 




SARVEN 


PATENT 


WHEELS; 




WAGON, BUGGY 


AND PHAETON BODIES; 


CARRIAGE, STAGE AND 


BUGGY 


LAMPS. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixxxiii 



ARMES & DALLAM, 

MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OP 

WOOD AND WILLOW WAHE, 

Brooms, Brushes, Baskets, Pails, Tubs, Churns, 
Twines, Matches, Blacking, Clothes Wring- 
ers, Paper Bags, Feather Dusters, Sta- 
tionery, Fishing Tackle, Cordage, 
Coffee Mills, Washboards, Axe 
Handles, Etc., Etc. 



l#ifV 



215 and 217 SACRAMENTO ST,, 



Vaw a nm 



IMPOKTERS AND DEALERS IN 

STOVES, 

Iron Pipe^ Pumps, Zinc Wire, 

Tinners' Stock, Tools and Machines, House - Furnisliing Hardware, 

And Manufacturers of Tin, Sheet Iron and Copper 'Ware, 

NOS. 614, 616 and 618 BATTERY ST. 



Agents Richmond Stove Company, Norwich, Conn. 

Agents New Haven Copper Company. 



IxXXiv SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



HZSNRir winilimT: a go. 

S O UNT O ISA: J^ 




WINES and BRANDIES 



i 



S. E. corner Sacramento and Leidesdorff Streets, 



A.ND I^ UMF FA CTORY. 

A- J. SMITH, 

I^ Ij TJ 3V^ B E I?. , 

And Sole Proprietor and Manufacturer of the 

Celebrated Hudson Force Pumps, 

Atwood & Bodwell Windmill Brass Pumps, 

SMITH'S COPPER-LINED PUMPS, PLUMBERS' FORCE PUMPS. 

Special attention paid to Brewers', Distillers', Beer and Hot Liquor Pnnips, and 
»iue Tumps. Particular attention paid to AIR PUMPS, also to 

DIVERS' SUBMARINE PUMPS, 
ARTESIAN WELL PUMPS Made to Order. 

ALSO, PATENT WATER CLOSETS. 

XTo. 222 FREMOITT STREST, 

S-A-KT FPIAISXCISCO- 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxv 





DAVID STODDART, 

E 







114, 116, 118 and 120 BEALE STREET, 

CAMEHON'S STEAM PUMPS, 

ADAPTED TO EVERY POSSIBLE USE. 

PZCZIEHZITC'S 



EUGIHE EEaULATOHS. 

INJECTORS. 




\ 



Ixxxvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Mi li^^^^ii 




-^isrxD 



*J ^ ^ Pot 




ZONTAL FLUME, 

Patented April 1st, 1873. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Ortle Tirifi WATi WHEELS 



ipleriial ai( 



'li§ntal f lumeis 



ALSO, ALL KINDS OF 

MILL GEARING ESPECIALLY ADAPTED TO OUR WHEELS. 



PRICES GREATLY REDUCED AND COIVIPETITION DEFIED. 



F^OT=L S^Sk.TISF_^0TI01sr IT H^A-S KTO TnQTT A T ■ 



Having established ourselves in this city, wo will give our personal attention to our business, and 
thereby hope to give better satisfaction than we have been able to give heretofore through agents. We 
will also do a oommission business in 

MILLERS' AND MINERS' SUPPLIES. 

Our reputation as Milling Engineers is sufHcient guarantee of our ability to give entire satisfaction. 
We can furnish anything that our patrons may desire, on the shortest notice. Please remember that we 
give personal attention to our business. 

Address, or call on Leffel & Myers, 306 California St. 

s.A.]sr mA.3srcisco. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOQUB AND NEW PRICE LIST.-SENT FREE. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxvii 



Read, Brand & Co. 

SHIPPING 



-AND- 




ttmmgKii 






w 

<9^ 



fl 




L i: 



^^T^^^a 



Ellf, 



San Francis CO; Cal. 



GEOEGE CAMPBELL. 



E. D. HEATLEY. 



DICKSON. DE WOLF L CO. 



■ 



1 w lu 







410, 412 and 414 BATTERY STREET, 



CAMPBELL, HEATLEY & CO. 

11 GEORGE YARD, LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

SOI^ AGENTS OF THE CELEBRATED !: 

Viz.— A. A. A— CENTUKY-EUREKA-ORANSTON-Etc. 



Ixxxviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PHILADELPHIA 



» 




con. SECOXTD AITD FOZiSOM STRSSTS, 



I take the present opportunity of thanking my Friends and Customers for the liberal 

support heretofore extended to the 

PHILADELPHIA BREWERY, 

And notify them that I have added to my establishment 

ITew and Extensive Buildings, 

By which I hope, through the greatly increased facilities now possessed by me, 
to fUrnish, as usual, a 

mi ARTICIE DF m ALE Ai LAEES BESK, 

That shall not only equal that previously furnished by me, but convince them that I 
am determined to merit their continued patronage and support. 

JOHN WIELAND. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixxxix 



Importer and Dealer in all kinds of 

GAS FIXTURES 

335 PINE STREET, NEAR MONTGOMERY. 

M Pipe, all Sizesjor Gas, faler aid Sleain, 

IN LOTS TO SUIT, TOGETHER WITH 

ELBOWS, TEES, RETURN BENDS, STOP COCKS, PLUGS, 
BUSHINGS, NIPPLES, ETC, ETC. 



Buildings fitted up with Gas and Water Pipes. 

Rubber Hose, Hose Bibbs, Hose Pipes, etc Plumbers' Basins, etc., etc. 
Copper Boilers, Bath Tubs, etc. 



PREPAEING FOR IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION. 



REVISED AND CORRECTED TO DATE. 



^tfeet kr^el Syentie (Jtiide 

■F^CyFL XS'ZS; 

Containing a reliable Map of the City, and many items of valuable 

information, useful for strangers visiting the Metropolis. 

One Volume, 24mo. Price, 75 Cents. 

HENRY G. LANCLEY, Publisher. 



xc 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 



MANUPACTUKEK OP 

Hendy's Patent Concentrators 

Automatic Ore Feeders, Steam Engine Governors, 
and Circular Sa'w Mills. 

Agent for Blaisdcll k Go's Patent Drill Press, with quick return motion, and 

other First-Class Machinists' Tools. Dealer in New and Second- 

Hand Engines, Boilers, and Machinery of all kinds. 



NO. 32 FREMOXT STREET. 



REFERENCES: 



Eureka M. Co., Overman M. Co.. Virginia Clt.v, Nev.; Camp Ployd M. Co., Utah S. M. 

Co., Utah; Falk & Miner, Eureka; J. M. Brown, Holllster; Gazos Mill, Pesca- 

dero, Cal.; also, Bancroft A Co., Yolo Mills, the Union, Golden Gate 

and Fulton Iron Works, of this city. 





Sectional View of Hendy's Patent Ore Concentrator. 

Over six hundred now In use In the quartz mills on this coast. 



SASH, BLIND AND DOOR FACTORY 

No. 160 MkM eiEllT., 

S-A.3sr ra.A.l^3■cIsco. 

3>a"- "^JST. OOI_iE3 



ORDERS FOR WORK SOLICITED. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XCl 



El)¥©4^® 1@E BWillEii* 



A practical education is valuable to all. 
Heald's College educates thoroughly for busi- 
ness. It is universally acknowledged to be the 
Leading Commercial School of the Pacific. 
Its graduates are practical accountants and obtain 
lucrative positions. Its scholarships are good for 
tuition in the thirty-six Bryant & Stratton College^ 
located in all our principal cities. 



*wl BRYANT & STRATTON __ ' «^ 

^BUSINESS COLLEGE 

The M\M Institute of Business Traiiini npn tie Pacific Coast. 

Jig other Easiness College in the State can compare with the number of Stndents, 
size and elegance of Rooms, number and experience of Teachers, Course of Studies, 
or school discipline. Theory and Actual Business Practice are combined in 
such a manner as to obtain the advantages of both. The Student Buys, Sells, Ships, 
Barters, Consigns, Discounts, Insures, draws Checks, Xotes and Drafts, gives Leases, 
Deeds, etc.— in fact, goes through the entire routine of actual business. 

The School Eoom is elegantly fitted up with 
MERCHANDISING, JOBBING AND IMPORTING EMPORIUMS, GEN- 
ERAL AND NATIONAL BANKING OFFICES, COMMISSION, 
FORWARDING, REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE, 
EXPRESS AND POST OFFICES. 

A Ladies' Depaktment is in successful oper- %f-^y^l.^-'^^~~-^r^Ty^,^ — vp^ ^^ — ~^ 
ation, and all ladies wishing to fit **'™'':''''^' foglLD S S^. jijgSS /T^ 



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thoroughly for positions as clerks, Cash 
Copyists, Book-Keepers,or Telegraph Operators, 
will find the best facilities at 



BRJ^IN^CHES TAUGHT. 

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General Infokmation.— Sessions continue day and evening throughout the year. Stu- 
dents can commence at any time. Scholarships for full six months Business Course, $75, 
For full particulars, call at the College Office, 24 Post Street, or send for 




An eight-page paper published monthly by the College, and sent free of charge to any person 
addressing 

President Business College, San Francisco, Oal. 



Xcii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



FRANCIS & VALENTINE, 



THE LARGEST AND LEADING 




00k ^ |0b Iriiitas 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST, 

517 Clay and 514 Commercial Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



MAMMOTH POSTER ESTABLISHMENT. 



Resigns ^uhnished roK ^ngravings. 



PRINTING of Every Style and Description at 
Short Notice and Reasonable Prices. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



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WATERHOUSE & LESTER, 



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COACH, CARRIAGE AND WAGON MATERIALS, 

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CARRIAGE AND BU&GY BODIES. 



PATENT ^V\^HEELS. 



Nos. 122 and 124 Market St., and 19 and 21 California St. 

17, 19, and 21 SEVENTH STREET, BETWEEN I and J, 



121 and 123 FRONT STREET, - NEW YORK. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 




Ceo rrj 






The raamifscture of Pvimping Machinery has been oiir specialty for the past twenty- 
six year?. We are the Pioneer and largest manufacturers in this line on the Pacific Ccast, and 
we say, without the least fear of succ^s^ful contradiction, that for Beauty, Simplicity, 
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\V e have rwiived all the FIRST PREMIUMS awarded by the Mechanics' Insti- 
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FACTORY, CORNEE MARKET AND BEALE STS., S. F. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XCV 



W. I. f ISf Il'S FAf ill 

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The Simplicity and Perfection of these Machines is the result 
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ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULARS AND PRICE LISTS. 

Factory, Cor. MARKET AND BEALE STREETS, S. F. 



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XCVi BAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



.#^^^'SS '^«v 



GILROY CIGARS, 

MADE OF CALIFORNIA-GROWN TOBACCO. 
GS= ALSO, =^0 

SMOKING TOBACCO, 

ITnequaled for Delicacy and depth of Flavor by any Tobacco for Pipe 

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OmCK AZTD aa.X.B8SiOOMt. 

207 FROISTT STREET, 

SA-KT FS,.A.IsrCISCO. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 

For the Year commencing March, 1875, 

KMBRACINa A 

GENERAL DIRECTORY OF RESIDENTS 

A X D A 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY; 

A L6 » 

' DIRECTORY OF STREETS, PUBLIC OFFICES, ETC. 

AND A RELIABLE MAP OF THE CITY. 

TOQETHEB WITH 

"he Consolidation Act and its Amendments; Offloers of the Municipal QoTerninent, 
Societies, and other Organizations, and a great variety of Useful 
and Statistical Information. 

EXHIBITING AT A GLANCE 

THE PAST HISTORY AND PRESENT CONDITION OF THE CITY, 



SIXTEENTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. 



COMPILED BY 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, 

EDITOR OP "pacific COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY," "STATE REGISTER," AND "PACIFIC COAST ALMANAC." 



DEPOTS FOR THE SALE OF THIS WORK: 

Office of the Directory, No. 612 Clay Street, up stairs; A. Roman & Co., 11 Montgomery Street; 

ScMNER Whitney, 613 Clay Street ; A. L. Bancroft & Co., 721 Market Street ; White <fc Bacee, 

413 Washington Street, and W. E. Lqomis, S. E. corner Washington and Sansom streets. 

FJtICE, FIVE DOZJOASS, OOZB COZX. 



SAN FEANCISCO: 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, PUBLISHER, 613 CLAY STREET. 

Francis i, VALSirrraB, Couvkrcial Steau Presses, 517 Clay Street. 

1 a r s . 



PBEPAiUNG FOR IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION. 



SAN FRANCISCO ILLUSTRATED, 

SAN FRANCISCO AND ITS ENVIRONS; 



■ EXHIBITIKQ AT A GLAHCE 



What can be seen in and around the METROPOLIS of the PACIFIC, 

and Eoiu to See it, with References to the Earlij History 

of the City, Early Settlers, Public Buildings, etc. 

ILLUSTRATED WITH NUMEROUS ENGRAVINGS, MAPS, ETC., ETC. 



One Volume, 12 mo, 216 pages. Price, ONE DOLLAB. 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, Publislier. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-five. 

By HENRY G. LANGLEY, 

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington. 



A Few M.ore Sets only Remain on Hand. 

SAN FRAKCISCO DIRECTORY, 

FROM 1854 to 1874. 

Seventeen Volumes Octavo, the whole Forming 

A COMPLETE AND RELIABLE HISTORY OF THE 

CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

From its first settlement to the present time. 

I^or Seile, - - - I='rlce, S30.00- 



HENRY G. LANGLEY, Publisl\er, 






I>REFA.TORY. 



It is an accepted fact that a reliable Directory is a trustiA'ortliy indication of the growth and prosperity of a 
city, geiienUly, as well as the increase or decrease of its population. Comparing, then, the data of the past year's 
growth, as exhibited in the pages of the present volume, with that of the year 1S74, a verj- remarkable progress in 
the different departments of commercial wealth, and an increase of population will be observed, unpaa-alleled in 
former years of this city's history. 

The number of references contained in the present volume is 127,692, as follows : General Register, 87,192 (of 
which 77,206 are names of male residents) ; Business Director)-, 25,000 ; Appendix, 15,500. The number of names in 
1874 was 05,092; in 1875, 77,206; increase 12,114, or nearly twenty per cent. The popidation of the city is estimated 
at 230,132, a gain since March, 1874, of 29,432, or about fifteen per cent. At this rate the population in ISSO «-ill be 
462, S75. Estimating the population on the basis of the number of names in the present volume, 77,206, and assuming 
that each name represents three in the population, it would give 231,613 as the result. These figures may be regarded 
as a reasonable estimate when the fact is stated that this ratio is much less than generally accepted in Eastern 
cities. In Chicago it is three and one half, in St. Louis four and one half, and in New York five. These figures 
may answer for the locahties to which they refer, but for this city where so ma.ny peculiarities siuTouud the differ- 
ent elements which compose our population, they would be undoubtedly too high. The article on population, on 
page 56, contains valuable data on this subject to which attention is respectfully in\ited. 

The number of buildings erected during the year ending February 28, is 1,3S9, of which 71 are of brick, at a cost 
of $4,411,000, and 1,318 wood, §4,933,800; total, $9,344,800. If the amounts disbursed in unproving the water front 
and public streets and in beautifying our parks and private residences be added, the aggregate amount for improve- 
ments of all kinds for 1874-5, will exceed $10,000,000. In addition to several extensive blocks for business purposes 
completed during the year, an unusual number of elegant and commodious private residences have been erected 
Uiat greatly exceed in beauty and cost those of former years. The total number of buildings comprised within the 
ci^ limits is 23,700, of which 4,300 are brick. 

The expense of maintaining the Municipal Government for the year ending J\me 30, 1874, is $3,830,408, including 
the expenses of the Street Department. The Bonded Debt of the city, March 10, 1875, is $3,725,000, exclusive of the 
Montgomer>- Avenue Bonds, $1,500,000. 

The Introductory and General Re\iew present a diar}- of interesting local events of the year, brief notices of 
Schools, public and private, descriptions of Public Buildings, Hotels, Public Parks, and the operations of the dif- 
ferent Railroads and Steamship Lines, together with references to several other subjects worthy of special mention. 
Mid historical data of present interest, well calculated to make the book a valuable work of reference to future 
generations. But the most interesting features of this department are valuable contributions on the Population of 
the City; Meteorology and Climate of San Francisco from 1851 to 1875, by Henry Gibbons, M.D.; the Current 
History and Progress of the City ; a Re\iew of its Manufacturing interests, and operations of the Public Schools, 
1874^5, by Prof. E. Knowlton; Hospitals, pubhc and private, by Henry Gibbons, Jr. M.D.; and a statement of the 
50st and number of buildings erected during the past year and the aggregate number ^\^thin the city limits. 

The Appendix contains a variety of valuable information connected with the history of the city, and the Consoli- 
iation Act with the amendments thereto, to which are added a number of important laws adopted by the Legislature 
>f the State (Session 1873-4), including those regulating the Fire Department, abolishing the City Hall Commissioners, 
"egulating the levj-ing and collection of taxes, organizing a Board of Health, providing for public Water Works, the 
lew Senatorial and Assembly Districts, Compulsory School Law, etc. , each of which is arranged under its appropriate 
iiead, to which has been added an Analj-tical Index of the whole, which will facilitate reference thereto. There will 
)e also foimd in this departmeut of the work a large number of references to the different organizations in this citj*, 
imbracing lists of the Federal, State, and Municipal Officers, notices of local Societies and Associations, Churches, 
dihtarj- Organizations, Incorporations, etc. Attention is invited to a new and corrected Map of the City and County 
itf San Francisco, which for reUabihty and beauty of execution has never been equaled on this coast, and a revised 
iltreet Directory, including the new system of numbering the buildings, thoroughly revised, and carefully compared 
|rtth each street and locality named therein. 
I The present volume of The Sa>" Francisco Directory has been printed from new material, cast expressly for 
jhe purpose, by Miller & Richard, Edinburgh, and supplied through their agents in this city, Messrs. Read, Brand 
c Co. A simple glance through its pages is only necessary to direct attention to a style of tj-pe which for beauty 
nd sj-mmetr>' it would be difficult to excel- The arrangements for the future pubhcation of the work are on a 
cale conimensxirate with its important character. An extensive and well-appointed Composing Room has been 
,stablished, with abundant resources for the rapid execution and prompt publication of future issues. 

The compiler respectfully tenders his acknowledgments for many favors extended by the different pubhc 
Ifficers, and other gentlemen who have been applied to for information for the work. To his numerous friends 
|)r their hberal patronage, and to Messrs. Francis & Valentine by whom the tj-pographical department was exe- 
'irted, he would especially tender his thanks. The seventeenth volume of Thb Sa.\ Frascisco Directory will be 
[sued in March, 1876. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



I 



FAGB. 

ALPHABETICAL LISTS OF ADVERTISERS 5 and 8 

CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS 6 

FROC.KLSS OF THE CITY 9 

Ciirrtjnt History ^ 

Real Estate. KuiMlugs, etc ^^ 

New Buildings fur year 1874-1875 |^ 

Building Aspociatious, etc ^^ 

I*ubUc Buildings \^ 

Post-urticu and its operations, 1874 ^^ 

U. S. Mint and coinage, 1874 i' 

Cufitom House, Imports, etc 17 

T7. S. Marine Hospital 17 

Municipal Buildings la 

Street liailroads f'^ 

Steam Railroads *^ 

Steamship Lines *o 

Bay and River Steamers ^ 

Hotels and their Accommodations ^ 

Theaters 31 

Parks. Gardens, etc ^ 

Promenades and Drives ^ 

Improvements of Streets ^ 

Water Resources ^ 

Libraries ^' 

Public Sdiools ^° 

Colleges and Private Schools 45 

Hospitals ™ 

Associations. Benevolent and Protective 49 

Manufactures 50 

Insurance Companies 55 

Banks and Banking 55 

Savings and Loan Institutions 56 

FINANCES CITY AND COUNTY 56 

Fimded Debt. March, 1875 56 

Assessment and rates of Taxation 1870-1875 57 

Municipal Expenditures 1865-1874 57 

Annual Revenue 1865-1874 57 

POPULATION, 1S75 58 

METE( tlU>U H ;H ' AL OBSERVATIONS 58 

CHRONoLotaCAL HISTORY 61 

STREET liIKErroRY 64 

BUlLDlMiS, BLOCKS. HALLS, ETC 82 

Pul.'lic Buildings, Hails 82 

Blocks. Rows. Whajres 83 

Places of Amusement 83 

Prominent PlacuA 83 

KEY TO PUBLIC OFFICES 84 

Federal 84 

State 84 

City and County 84 

CITY ORDINANCE— Hack and Cab Fares 84 

NEWSPAPER AND PERIODICAL PRESS 85 

ADUiTIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC... 

REOISTKR OF NAMES 

BUSINESS DIUECTORY, TRADES, ETC 

CONS(-»LIDATH »N ACT 

Municipal Ek-ctions 8Sl 

Paid Fire Department 882 

Coroner and Duties 885 

Police Judges Court and Jurisdiction 890 

Presiding .Judge Police Court 891 

Harbor I'olice Regiilatious 891 

Increase of Police Force 892 

Amended School Law 892 

Finances Board E<luciition 895, 899 

Establishing Cosmopolitan Sdiools 899 

Compulsory School Law 9(11 

Amended Street Law 9L>2 

Vacating Streets and Market Places 912 

Drifting Sand on Improved Streets 912 

Legalizing Grades of Certain Streets 912 

Finance Committee 920 

RoadM an<i Highways, Improvement of 921 

Opeiiiug and Extending Streets 921 

Modifying Street Grades 922 

EsUbliwhirig Street Grades 924 

Changing (ini.les of Streets 924 

I'olice Contingent Fund 924 

Additional Powers Board SuperviBora and Salaries. 924 

Construction Channel Street Canal 925 

To establish .Vims Hovise and Hospital 926 

Alw»lishing City Hall Commissionera 926 

Organizing J uaticcs* Courts 928 

Autliiiriziiig HeK«iuna Supreme Court to be held in 
SatiFranuisc*, 929 



930 

, 931 

932 



CONSOLIDATION ACT (Continued). 

Establishing Municii>al Court 

Collection State and Municipal Licenses^. . 
Assessment and Collection 01 Taxes, 18/4. 

Providing for Building House of Correction y^J 

Management of Industrial School »** 

Authorizing Public Water Works. 9J0 

Quaruntiue Law and Board of Health y*J 

Analytical Index ™ 

mu:nicipal government ^ 

Board of Superriaors ^ 

Board of Education ^ 

City and County Officers ^ 

ELECTION DISTRICTS J« 

Congressional ™ 

Judicial ^ 

Senatorial and Assembly ^ 

City and County *^f, 

POLICE DEPARTMENT ^'AT^ii gm 

FIRE ALARM AND POLICE TELEGRAPH 95J 

FIRE DEPARTMENT ^* 

Officers and Organization ^% 

FEDERAL OFFICERS gj 

Custom House "0=2 

United States Treasury ^ 

United States Mint ^^ 

Surveyor-General *^ 

Post-office l^ 

STATE OFFICERS ll' 



. 87 
, 773 
, 873 



STATE APPOINTEES 

COURTS 

CHURCHES 

Baptist 

Congregational ^^ 

Episcopal ^ 

Evangelical Luthei^an ^ 

Hebrew ^ 

Methodist Jl 

Presbyterian ^ 

Roman Catholic ™J 

Swedenborgian ^; 

Unitarian ' 

XJniversalist ■ 

Mariners' 

Swedish Evangelical Union 

Second Advent Chrisliau 

Seventh Day Adventists ■ ■ 

Disciples of Christ 

Independent t^rman 

Re-organized Church of Latter Day Saints 

Christian Brethi-en 

Russian 

Spiritualist Union ™- 

Independent Spiritualists *i 



95S 



Lyceum for Mutual Cultmre 

Lyceum for Self Culture Xi 

ASSOCIATIONS AND SOCIETIES g 

Religious "^ 

Benevolent 2t 

Masonic Fraternity 2 

I. O. of Odd Fellows S 

Temperance S 

Protective x? 

Literary S 

Historical S 

Social ^ 

mLn\UiY ■■% 

NEWSPAPERS 85. « 

PERIODICALS SJ 

BANKS l\ 

LNCORPORATED COMPANIES »J 

INSURANCE COMPANIES « 

HOMESTEAD ASSOCIATIONS °] 

MINING COMPANIES f. 

TELEGRAPH LINES « 

RAILRi tADS ,«' 

OCEAN STEAMERS ]*^ 

STEAMBOATS 1^^ 

STAGES oj 

EXPRESSES » 

PACKETS, SAILING S^ 

CONSULS I- 

HOSPITALS 8] 

CEMETERIES 1^ 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT land 10( 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 

[Numerals refer to advertisements in front, and figures, unless othenme expressed, to the end of volume.] 



PAGE 

Etna Insurance Co., front 

cover 

Ubany Brewery xxxii 

Immuu, Caspar! & Co . . .sxi 

ijuos A: Davis 19 

Vngell. Palmer & Co xlvii 

inglo-Califomiau Bank . .xii 

ijTiies k Dallam Ixxxiii 

Badger W. G xl 

Baker & Hamilton 3 

Bandmann, Nielsen & Co. 

XXX vi 
Bank British Columbia . .xiii 

Bank British N. A xx 

Bank nf California x 

Barrett & Sherwood ii 

Bay Suijar Refinery 17 

Beadle Donald xvi 

Bellin?hani Bay Coal Co- Ixix 
Bennett k Pa^e . . .xvi and Is; 

Bernard Charles xxv 

Bert F- W., register of 

names 327 

Black Diamond Coal Co. Ixix 
Blake. Robbins & Co....lxiii 
Boardman George C. front 

cover 

Bonney O. Jr 9 

Booker W. L xxxiii 

Bosqui Edward& Co., reg- 
ister of names, side 

line, and Ixxi 

Bowen Bros., back of vol- 
ume and 16 

Brader Henry 28 

Brat'g Robert 5 

Eravermau i Levy, front 

cover 
Brittan. Holbrook k Co.. 

register of names 863 

Britton, Rey& Co., register 

of names 832 

Browell Jeremiah, 3, 18, 

and 26 

Brown William xxxviii 

Bumliam James W. k Co. .12 

Buswell A slv 

California Brass Foundry. .10 
Calif oruia Insurance Co . .Ivi 
California Italian Paste 

Co Ivii 

California Sugar Refinery 

xxxi 
Carvill Manufacturing Co. 13 

Chesley G. W. & Co fvi^ 

Chinese Insurance Co., 

register of names 395 

Clark N. &Co Ixii 

Claussenius George 27 

Clayton C. & Co liv 

Cole N. "W. &Co ic 

Coleman W. T. & Co xxi 

Colorado Steam Naviga- 
tion Co ■vi and vii 

Commercial Flour Mills. . .17 
Commercial Insurance Co. 

XXXV 

Consolidated Tobacco Co. 

xcvi 

Cook C.Mrs 25 

CookH. N m 

Cornwall P. B Ixix 

Corriveau Louis, register 

of names, bottom line 
Corville Emerson & Co., 
back cover and regis- 
ter of names 848 

Crane & Brigham Ixiii 

Cross & Co iii 

Cubery & Co Ivii 

Cummings W. H 24 

Curry F. 1 8 



PAGE. 

Davis & CoweU Ixviii 

Day Thomas 

front cover and Ixxxix 

De Crano & Duval xxvi 

Dean E. B. & Co xxxiv 

Dickson, De "Wolf & Co. 

Ixxxvii 

Dolliver & Brother 28 

Driscoll Cornelius E 26 

Eastman Frank Ixiv 

Easton John 27 

Edwards Frank G xliv 

Egerton Allen & Co xl 

Ehrenpfort William Iii 

Eitner Rudolf Ixxvii 

Empire Brewery, register 

of names 784 

Excelsior Mill Co Ixxv 

Falkner& Bell Ivi 

Farmers' and Mechanics' 

Bank of Savings xlvii 

Farwell & Co xxvii 

Firemans Fund Ins. Co., 

front cover 
Flavin Martin J. (I X L) 

back cover 
Flint, Peahody & Co. .Uv and 
Ixv 
Florence Sewing Machine 

bottom edge of volume 
Francis & Valentine, back 

of volume and xcii 

Freeman B. H. & Co Iii 

Fulton Foundry 16 

Gannon PeterT li 

Gardiner George D. & Co., 

register of names 482 

GarrattW. T 8 

German Sa\ ings and Loan 

Society Ix 

Giant Powder Co xxsvi 

GiUnan k Mellon 24 

Glasgow Iron and Metal 

Importing Co 6 

Goddard & Co xix 

Goodall. Nelson & Perkins 

S. S. Co xliii 

Goodhind Richard k Co. . .xl 
Grand Opera House, reg- 
ister of names 327 

Gray M Ixx 

GrayN. & Co xlix 

Greenwood W. M xxxiv 

Griffith A. J 21 

Grosh & Rutherford 17 

Halladie A. S xlviii 

Hamburg-Bremen Fire In- 
surance Co Iviii 

Hanscora & Co 

Harris. Dell & Co xxix 

Hayes George & Co li 

Heald's Business College, 
register of names 361, 

and adv. dept xci 

Helbing & Straus rsviii 

Hendy Joshua xc 

Heney William 11 

Heverin M., inside back cover 
Hibemia Savings and 

Loan Society xxiv 

Hicks D. & Co., register 

of names 778 

Hinckley & Co 16 

Holland D. D xlix 

Home Mutual Ins. Co., 

register of names.... 862 

and back of volume 

Houseworth Thomas & Co. .ii 

Rowland E. F back cover 

Hunt E.G. & Co 4 

Hyde&Chester 22 

Imperial Insurance Co Ivi 



PAGE. I 

India Eic^ Mill xxxiv j 

Invin R. B. & Co., regis- 
ter of names 395 

Jesse k Drew 21 

Johnson J. C. & Co 

Ixxiii and 7 
Johnson T. Eodgers, id- 
Bide back cover 

Kallenberg Theodore 20 

Keller Henry & Co., reg- 
ister of names 778 

Kelly Patrick back cover 

King T. H- & Co I xx xii 

Kirkpatrick, Cutter & Co. 

ssxv 

Knowles Geoi^e B 22 

Koehler k Ritter, reg. of 

names 482 

Kohler& Frohling.front cover 

Kuh Leopold liii 

Kuner A. 11 

Laird D. W., register of 

names top line. and. .Ixx 
Land Mortgage Union of 

California xxiv 

Langland N. P liv 

Langley H. G., reg. of 
names, page 863. and 
bottom line, and Ixxxix 

LarkiDs& Co 28 

Laurel Hill Cemetery.. Ixvii 

Lea^itt Charles H Ixviii 

Ledden, Whipple & Co. . .Ixv 

Leffel k Meyers Ixxxvi 

Leveque & Co 18 

Linforth, Kellogg& Co . xxxvi 

LlewelljTi Keese 15 

Locan & Co xxii 

London Assurance Cor- 
poration 

London and S. F. Bank xi 

Lorillard Insurance Co., 

reg. of names 395 

LowC. Adolpbe&Co 13 

Lyon k Co., register of 

names 784 

Macken James 10 

Macondray & Co xx 

Maguire's New Theater, 

register of names 474 

Mallon John. 9 

Manning A. W., register 

of names 394 

and back of volume 
Marcus George & Co — xxix 

Marden Ira & Co Isxviii 

Martell John 2 

Martin E. & Co li 

Martin P., reg. of names.. 483 
Masonic Savings k Loan 

Bank xxv 

Massey & Yung xlvi 

Mathews E . G. & Co Ix 

Mayer Charles Ixxv 

Mayer Joseph 22 

McAfee, Spiers & Co 5 

McCain, Flood & McClure 

XXI ii 

McMillan k Kester 2 

McNidty C. A 14 

McQuillan B liin 

Mfeker James & Co liii 

Meeker W. A. Ixiv 

MerriUP H 

Meyer Charles 19 

Miners' Foundry xlvii 

Moore H. H., register of 

names 326 and 1 

Moraghan k Lynch xlix 

Morelos A Ixxv 

Morgan & Co., reg, names 

bottom line, and 849 



PAGE. 

Morrow George & Co Ixx 

Muecke, Vietor & Co.. 

front CO' er 

Murphy, Grant k Co Ixv 

National Clock Co back 

cover 

National Hotel 3 

Newbauer&Co Ixrv 

Newhall H, M. & Co lii 

Nichols A. C. & Co xxxvii 

Northern Assurance Co. 

xxxiii 

O'Donnell Comehus 20 

Opera House (Maguire's], 
register of names — 475 

Oregon S, S. Co viii 

Otto Charles liv 

Pacific Barrel and Keg 

Factory. liv 

Pacific Cement Co. , reg. 

of names 483 

Pacific Cordage Co xvii 

Pacific File Works 11 

Pacific Iron Works xix 

Pacific Mail S, S. Co iv 

Pacific News Co Isxvi 

Pacific Oil k Lead Works. .T 

Pacific Rolling Mill Co v 

Pages J. F 20 

Palmer W. J. T. k Co. .xxxvii 

Parkin John 11 

Parrott & Co Iv 

Philadelphia Brewery. . . 

Ixxxviii 

Pioneer Paper Mill Ivii 

Plate A.J. & Co Ixiiii 

Price M 21 

Prinz John 21 

Prior J. K Uxx 

Prusso & Splivalo Ivii 

Queen Insurance Co Ivi 

Racouillat H & Co 7 

, Read, Brand k Co.. reg- 
ister of names, side 

line, and Ixxxvii 

Richards k Harrison 18 

Risdou I. k L. Works 6 

Roach John 12 

Rodgers, Meyer & Co Iv 

Rosenbaiim A. S. & Co.. Ixix 

Roth k Videau Ixxii 

Rothschild k Ehrenpfort. .14 
Royal Mail PacketCo. .xxxiii 

S. F. Boiler Works 8 

S. F. Cordage Manufac- 
tory XXI 

S. F. Gas Light Co 28 

S. F. Jewelry Manufact- 
uring Co., register of 
names top hue and.... Ixx 

9. F. Last Factory 18 

S. F. Pioneer Woolen 

Factory liii 

S. F. Savings TTnion. . . .xxiii 

Sanborn k Byrnes 15 

Santa Clara College xli 

Saul&Co 14 

Savage & Son 25 

Savings and Loan Society 

xxii 

SchillerF.C 2 

Schmolz William Ixiiv 

Schussler H xlv 

Security Savings Bank..lxvi 

Seiler & Schuler 3 

Selby Thomas H. & Co. . . 

Sellers James C 20 

Sherman Wm. i Co xlvi 

Sherwdoil Robert ii 

Short M 29 

Shreve George C. k Co. .edge 
of volume and page Ixi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PAGE. 

Sims John R xlii 

Skinker John xxvi 

Sloss Louis & Co bcvi 

Smith A- J li3Lriv 

Smith C. W. M 30 

Smith WiUiam 19 

SuuokO.iW 23 

South American S. S. Co . . xri 

Spauliiiug J. k Co 7 

Speyer Morris & Co liv 

and Iviii 

Spreckels i Co ixxii 

Spring Menzo 15 

Spring Valley W. Works. . . .1 
Sroufe, Sweeney & Co. . .nvi 

St. Ignatius C*>Uege ixxii 

Steele. KlUer i Co liix 

Steele James G. ^Co..lxxix 



PAOE. 

Steinhart W.kl.k Co. Ixxviii 

Stockman J. M 10 

Stoddard David Ixxxv 

Strahle Jacob & Co., reg. 

of names 779 

Straut i Hamilton 17 

Sullivan it Moorhead, reg. 

of names 785 

Sullivan, Kelly i Co xxx 

Swiss -American Bank. . ..xiv 
Swies-Lloyd and Marine 

Insurance Co ..Iviii 

Tay George H. &, Co. .Ixxiiii 

Taylor John & Co xxxviii 

Taylor S. P. & Co Ivii 

Tesmore Solomon 25 

Teubner & Hoffman 27 

TrAnsatianticFireIns.Coxiii 



PAGE. 

Truworthy Francis M — xix 

Tubbs & Co xn 

Tustin W. I., top edge of 
volume and iciv and xcv 

trUman M. iCo ixsv 

Union Insurance Co. ...xviii 
tr. S. & Foreign Salaman- 
der Felting Co iixii 

VanSchaack C. P. &Co., 
rt^Tsterof names top line 

Venard G xiviii 

Vulcan Iron Works 12 

Waterhouse i Lester xciii 

Week L. E. & Co 14 

Weed & KingweU 10 

WeichhartJ 9 

Welch & Co liviii 

Wells, Fargo & Co ii 



PAOB. 

Wells. RusselliCo 2S 

Wetherbee George M 6 

Whalen John . . . .Ixxxi and 23 

What Cheer Laundry 5 

White Bros 15 

White Henry. iIt 

White & Bauer Ixii 

Wieland John Ixxrvtii 

Williams, Blanchard&Co., 
niiv 

Williams H. F lis 

Winkle Henry & Co. . .Ixsxiv 

WoodG. M. &Co Ivii 

Wooster, Shattuck & Co., 

Ixxjri 

Wyman George D 24 

Yang-Tze Insurance As- 
sociation xz 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 



Afljn<ilers. 

McNtilty C. A. I Customs) . . U 

AKrlrnltnral Imprts. 

Baker k Hamilton 3 

Boiiuey O. Jr 9 

Linf orth. Kellogg &, Co. xxxvi 

Aninlganiafing Ma- 

Hendy Joahua ic 

Amiueuiente — Places 
of. 

Grand Opera House 327 

Maguires New Theater, 

register of names 474 

Opera House (Maguire's) 

register of names 475 

Ammonia. 

S. F. Gas Light Co 28 

Apothecaries. 

Steele James G. k Co. .luii 

Arlificial Limbs. 

Spring Menzo 15 

Arlists* .Ylaterlals. 

Bosqui Edward k Co. . . .Ixd 
Assayers. 

De Crano k Duval nvi 

Kuh Leopold. liU 

Aactloneers. 

Cummings W. H 24 

Newhall H. M. & Co Ui 

BankA. 

An^o-Califomian Bank, .xii 
Bank British Columbia . .liii 
Bank British North Am- 
erica XX 

Bank California x 

London and S. F. Bank. ..xi 

Swiss-American Bank liv 

Wells, Fargo & Co ix 

Banks- Sa Vines. 

Famiurs' and Mechanics' 

^ Bank Ixvif 

Gennao Savings and 

Loan Society li 

Hibcmia .Savings and 

lAtaa Socit'ty... xxiv 

Land Mnrt^gage Union 

and Savings Bank. . .niv 
Ma«4»nic Savings and 

Lttan Bank xxt 

San Fancisco Savings 

Union rxiii 

SftTlnga and Loan Sode- 

„ ty ixil 

Security Savings Baiik..lxTi 

Baths. 

Conivcau Louis, register 

of names — bottom line 
Sanitarium 26 



Billiard Table Mann- 
facturers. 

Strahle Jacob & Co.. reg- 
ister of names 779 

Bitters. 

McMillan k Kester 2 

Blacksmllhs. 

Larkins 4 Co 28 

Weichhart J 9 

Blank Book Manu- 
faclurers. 

Boaqui Edward&Co Ixri 

Hicks D. k Co., register 
of names 778 

Boiler Works. 

Angell. Palmer & Co ilvii 

Curry F.I 8 

Goddard & Co xii 

Hinckley & Co 16 

McAfee, Spiers &;Co 5 

Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works 6 

Book Binders. 

Bosqui Edward k Co., 
reg. of names side line, 

and Ixxi 

Buswell A. xlv 

Hicks D. k Co., register 
of names 778 

Books — Subscription 
Agents. 

Keller Henry & Co., reg- 
ister of names 778 

Booksellers. 

Moore H. H., register of 
names 326 and 1 

Boots and Shoes— Ke- 
tall. 

Flavin Martin J. {IXL) 

back cover 

Boot and Shoe Mann* 
faelurers. 

Kelly Patrick. back cover 

Brass Fonndrics. 

Garratt W. T 8 

Smith A. J liiiiv 

Weed & Kingwell 10 

Brewers. 

Lyon k Co., roister of 

names 794 

Spreckels & Co ixxU 

Wieland John luxviii 

Bridge Builders. 

Hallidie A. S xlviij 

Brokers - Commercial 

GoodhindB.&Co xl 



Cabinet Makers. 

Easton John 27 

Pahner W. J. T. & Co. mvii 

Carpet Beating. 

MerrillP 11 

Spaulding J. & Co 7 

Carpets. 

Bumham James W, & Co. 12 

Edwards Frank G xliv 

Ehrenpfort William Ui 

Carriage Depots. 

Carvill Manufactioring Co. 13 

Larkins k Co 2S 

Saul i Co 14 

Carriage Stock. 

King T H. & Co Ixixli 

Meeker, James & Co liii 

Strant & Hamilton 17 

Waterhouse & Lester . . .iciii 
White Bros 15 

Carvers —Ornamental. 

Schiller F. C 2 

Cement Pipe. 

Browell Jeremiah. 3, 18 

and 26 

aark N. & Co Ixsi 

Martin P. , reg. of names . . 483 

Cemetery. 

Laurel Hill livii 

Champagne. 

Muecke, Victor & Co 

front cover 

CbemUts. 

KuhL liii 

Steele J. G. & Co bodx 

Chnrn Manufacturers. 

Armes k Dallam iTrxji i 

Cigar itos. 

Morelos A. bciv 

Cigars and Tobacco. 

Consolidated Tobacco 

Co xcvi 

Gannon Peter T 11 

Rosenbaum A. S. & Co. .liii 

Civil Engineer. 

Schussler H ilv 

Clojiks and Suits. 

Mayer Charles lixv 

Sullivan k Moorhead,reg- 
ister of names 785 

Clocks. 

National Clock Co 

back cover 



Clothing. 

Flavin Martin J. (I X L) 

back cover 
McCain. Flood k Mc- 

Clure Txiij 

Sherman WiUiam & Co. -xlri 
Steinhart W.kl.k Co.lxxvlii 
Van Schaack C. P. k Co., 

roister of names top line 

Cloths. 

S. F. Pioneer Woolen 

Factory liii 

UUman M. & Co ttt v 

Coal. 

Bellingham Bay Co liii 

Black Diamond Co Ixix 

CofTee and Spices. 

Bernard Charles xiv 

Marden Ira k Co Ixiviii 

Venard G ixviii 

Coke. 

S. F. Gas Light Co 28 

Colleges. 

Heald's Business ici 

andregisterof names. 06I 

Santa Clara xli 

St. Ignatius xxxlx 

Commission Mer- 
chants. 

Ammon. Caspari & Co. . .ixi 
Bandmann, Nielsen & 

Co xxxvi 

Bennett & Page xriandlx 

Clayton C & Co liv 

Coleman W. T. 4 Co iii 

Dickson, De Wolf & Co., 

lusvii 

Egerton, Allen k Co il 

Flint, Peabody & Co liv 

andlxT 

Harris, Dell & Co Tvir 

Irwin Richard B. & Co.. 

register of names 395 

Ledden. Whipple k Co. . .liv 

Low C. Adolphe & Co 13 

Macondray K Co 11 

Mathews E. G. & Co Ix 

Nichols A. C. & Co xiivii 

Parrott & Co Iv 

Read. Brand k Co Ixxivii 

and reg. of names 

side line 

Rodgers. Meyer & Co Iv 

Speyer Morris k Co Ixv 

and Iviii 
Sroufe, Sweeney & Co. . .iivi 

Steele, Elder & Co ixix 

Welch & Co liviii 

Williams, Blanchard k 

Co xxxir 

Wooster, Shattuck & Co.. 

Ixxxi 
Confectioners. 
Rothschild k Ehrenpfort. .14 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 



PAGE. 

Conlraclors. 

Browell Jeremiah. 3, 18 and 26 
Hjde & Chester 22 

Coopers. 

I'aciiic Barrel and Keg 

Factory liv 

Coppcrsniitlis. 

Macken James 10 

Cordage, 

Hallidie A. S, (wire) xlviii 

Pacific Cordage Co siii 

San Francisco Cordage 
Manufactory ttt 

Cordials, etc. 

McMillan & Kester 2 

Crockery, 

Helbing & Straus xxriii 

Cutlers. 

Price Michael 21 

' Diamonds. 

Braverman & Levy, front 

cover 

Sherwood Robert ii 

Shreve George C. & Co.. 

edge of vol. and page bd 

Doors, Sash, etc. 

Cole N. W. & Co xc 

Excelsior Mill Co Ixsv 

Hulhind D. D xlix 

Wells, Russell & Co 22 

Drnggists, 

Crane & Erigham Imri j 

Steele James G. & Co. . .Ixxix 

Dry Goods. 

McCain, Flood & Mc- 

Clure Txii'i 

Muriihy. Grant & Co Ixv 

Embroideries, 

Locan &Co tyij 

Engravers. 

Eitner Rudolph Ixzvii 

Kuner A 11 

Pages Jules F 20 

WoodG. M. & Co Ivli 

Engravings. 

McQuillan B Isiii 

Expresses. 

Wells. Fargo & Co ix 

Fancy Goods. 

Flavin Martin J. (I X L) 

back cover 

Locan &Co xxii 

Van Schaack C. P. & Co., 

reg. of names top line 

Felting. 

T7. S. and Foreign Sala- 
mander Felting Co. xxxii 

File Manufacturers. 

Pacific FUe Works 11 

Fire Arms. 

Plate A. J. & Co iTriii 

Fisb. 

Griffith A. J 21 

Flags. 

Johnson T, Rodgera 

inside back cover 
Flour nUls. 

Grosh & Rutherford. 17 

Foundries. 

Anqell. Pakner & Co ilvii 

G.)adard&Co ill 

Hiinscom & Co 8 

HiriLtdey & Co 16 

Llewellyn Reese 15 

Vulcan iron Works 12 



PAGE. 

Furniture. 

Bumham James W. k Co. 12 

Easton John 27 

Pahuer W. J. T. & Co, , xxrvii 

Furnlture—Scliool . 

Palmer W. J. T. & Co. , xxxvii 
Gas Fixtures. 

Day Thomas, front cover 

and Isxxix 
Prior J. K IxTT 

Glass and Glass^vare, 

Taylor John k Co xxxviii 

Glass Stjiiners. 

Mallon John 9 

Groceries. 

Bowen Brothers 16 

and back of voliune 
Ledden, Whipple k Co. . .Ixv 
Richards k Harrison 18 

Gunsmitlis. 

Meyer Charles 19 

Plate A. J. & Co Ixxiii 

Uair Jewelry. 

Cook C.Mrs 25 

Hardvrare. 

Baker k Hamilton 3 

Glasgow I. and M. Im- 
porting Co 6 

Linf orth, Kellogg & Co . . 

XXXTJ 

Otto Charles liv 

Selby Thomas H. & Co. . . .xv 
Hardware— Saddlery. 

Johnson J. C. k Co Ixxiii 

and 7 
Harness, etc. 

Johnson J. C. &■ Co . . ^^nn^^ 

and? 
Hats and Caps. 

WTiite Henry xlv 

Hay and Grain. 

Morrow George kCo. Ixx 

Hides and Wool, 

Sloss Louis k Co Ixvi 

Hose and Belting. 

CookH. N m 

Hotels. 

National Hotel 3 

Instrument Depots, 

Houseworth Thomas & Co . . ii 

Roach John 12 

Schmolz William Lxxiv 

Insurance Agents, 
Boardman George C — 

front cover 

Booker W. L xxxiii 

Claussenius George 27 

Cross & Co iii 

Falkner, Bell & Co Ivi 

Irwiu Richard B. & Co. 

register of names 395 

Macondray & Co xx 

Marcus Geo. & Co xiix 

Speyer Morris & Co Ixv 

Insurance Co's, Eastern 

and Foreign. 
JEtnA (Hartford)- .front cover 
Chinese (limited, Hong- 
kong), reg- of names. .395 
Hamburg-Bremen Fire..lviii 
Imperial Fire (London) . . .Ivi 
London Assurance Cor- 
poration. iii 

Lorillard (New York), 

register of names 395 

Northern Assurance (Lon- 
don and Aberdeen). ixxiii 

Queen Fire (Liverpool) Ivi 

Swiss Lloyil Marine Iviii 

Transatlantic Fire (Ham- 
bui^) xxix 



PAGE. 

Yang-Tze (Shanghai) xx 

lusurauce Co's. Hmne. 

California Ivi 

Commercial Insurance Co., 

of CaUforuia xxxv 

Firemans Fxmd. . .front cover 
Home Mutual Ins. Co.. 

reg- of names 862 

Union xviii 

Iron and Steel. 

Glasgow Lron and Metal 

Imp. Co 6 

Selby Thomas H. & Co . . . . xv 

Iron Doors, etc. 

Hayes Geo. & Co li 

Leavitt Charles H Ixviii 

Sims John R xlii 

Jewelers. Man'fg. 
Braverman & Levy, .front 

cover 
Koehler k Ritter, reg. of 

names 4S2 

Laird D. W. . register of 

names, top line, and. .Ixx 
Gardiner George D. k 

Co.. reg. of names 432 

Sherwood Robert ii 

Slireve Geo, C. & Co Lxi 

and edge of volume 

Last Factories. 

S. F. Last Factory 18 

Laundries, 

What Cheer 5 

Leather Dealers. 

Johnson J. C. k Co 7 and Ixxiii 

Nichols A. C. & Co xxx\'ii 

O'Donnell Comehus 20 

WeckL. E. &Co 14 

Lime and Cement. 

Davis & Cowell Ixviii 

Lithographers. 

Britton, Rey k Co., register 
of names 832 

Locomotives. 

Risdon Iron and Locomo- 
tive Works 6 

Looking Glasses, etc. 

McQuillan B Ixiii 

Lumber Dealers. 

Dean E, B. k Co xxxiv 

Knowles George B 22 

Macaroni. Vermicelli, 

etc. 
California Italian Paste 

Co Ivii 

Machine Shops. 

Hendy Joshua xc 

Kallenberg Theodore 20 

Risdon Iron and Locomo- 
tive Works 6 

Machinery. 

Stoddard David Lxxxv 

Marble Yards. 
Heverin M . inside back cover 
Match xManufacturers. 

Newbauer k Co Ixxv 

Mill Furnishing. 

Leflfel & Myers Lxxxvi 

Millwrights, 

Amos & Daris 19 

Model Makers. 

Kallenberg Theodore 20 

Stockman J. M 10 

Musical Instruments, 

Badger W. G xl 

Gray M Ixx 

Native Wines. 

Kohler & Frohling. .front 

cover 



PAGE. 

Prinz John 21 

Winkle Henry k Co. . .Ixxxiv 
News Agents. 

Pacific News Co Ixivi 

White & Bauer Ixii 

Oil Works, 
Pacific Oil and Lead 

Works V 

Opticians. 

Houseworth Thomas k Co. il 

Roach John 12 

Organ Builder. 

Mayer Joseph 22 

Oysters. 

CorviUe Emerson k Co., 
back cover and reg- 
ister of names 843 

Manning Alfred W., reg. 

of names 394 and 

back of volume 

Moraghan & Lynch xlix 

Morgan k Co., register of 
names, bottom line, and 
849 

Tesmore Solomon 25 

Paints and OiLs. 

Sullivan, Kelly k Co xxx 

Painters. 

Oilman k Mellon 24 

Paper Dealers, 

Blake, Robbins & Co Ixiil 

Read, Brand & Co. . . .Ixxxvii 

and reg. of names side line 

Taylor S. P. & Co Ivii 

Patent Agency. 

Smith C.W.M 30 

Photographe rs . 

Houseworth Thomas & Co . . ii 
Howland B. F back cover 

Photo. Engravings, 

Houseworth Thomas & Co . .ii 
Plnmbers, etc. 

Day Thomas, front cover 

andlxxxix 

Prior J. K Ixxx 

Smith A. J Ixxxiv 

Smith William 19 

Snook G. & W 23 

Pottery. 

Clark N. & Co Ixxi 

Powder Dealers. 

Giant Powder Co xxxvi 

Skinker John xivi 

Printers, 

Bosqui Edward & Co.. re^. 
of names side line, and 

Ixxi 

Cubery & Co Ivii 

Eastman Frank liiv 

Francis k Valentine. .... 
back of volume, and xcii 
Printers' Material. 
Read, Brand & Co., reg- 
ister of names side 

line, and Ixxxvii 

Wetherbee George M 6 

Produce Commission, 

Bennett k Page Ix 

Clayton C. & Co liv 

Mathews E. G. & Co Ix 

Provisions. 
Ledden, Whipple k Co. ..Ixv 
Sroufe, Sweeney k Co. . .xxvi 

Steele, Elder & Co bux 

Wooster.Shattuck&Co. Lxxii 

Publisher. 

Langley Henry G., regis- 
ter of names, bottom line 
and 8r>3, and Ixxxix 
PuIverLtcrs. 
WymanG. D 24 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PAGE. 

Pumps. 

Smith A. J \sxmT 

Sto'ldart D bcxiv 

Real Kstatc Agents. 

WiUianis H. F Ux 

Retfalia. 

Johnson T. Rodgers .... 

inside back cover 

Sire >Ulls. 

India Rice Mill miv 

Kolling: HIU. 

Pacific RoUing Mill v 

Safes. 

Leavitt Charles H Ixviii 

Savings anil Loan So- 

flt'lICS. 

Farmers' and Mechanics' 

Bank xlvii 

German Savings and Loan 

Society ]x 

Hibemia Savings and 

Loan Society xxiv 

Land Mortgage Union 

and Sa%ings Bank. . . xiiv 
MasoDic Savings and 

Loan Bank xxv 

San Francisco Savings 

Union niii 

Savings and Loan Society, xiii 

Security Savings Bank. . .Ixvi 

Saw Makers. 

BonneyO. Jr 9 

Brown William mviii 

Saw Mills. 

Holland D. D xlis 

Wells. RusseU & Co 22 

Sewing Machines. 

Florence . . bottom edge of vol 
Ship Chandlers. 

Farwell k Co 3xvii 

Shipping and For- 
warding. 

Amnion, Caspar! k Co. . .sii 

Beadle D xsi. 

Coleman W. T. & Co xxi 

Flint, Peabody & Co liv 



PAGE. 

Goodall. Nelson & Per- 
kins iliii 

Harris, Dell & Co xiii 

Irwin Richard B. &. Co., 

register of names 395 

Low C. Adolphe & Co 13 

Macondray & Co n 

Parrott&Co Iv 

Williams, Blanchard & 
Co xixiv 

Shoe Findings. 

Dolliver & Brother 28 

Week L. E. &Co U 

Shot and Lead Pipe. 

S. F. Shot Tower xv 

Show Case Maimers. 

Teubner k Hofiman 27 

Silver Platers. 

MarteU John 2 

Stair Builders. 

Freeman B. H. & Co lii 

Jessed Drew 21 

LanglandN. P Uv 

Sanborn & Byrnes 15 

Starch Dealers. 

Egerton, Allen & Co xl 

Stationers. 
Bosqui Edward & Co., 
register of names 
side line, and lisi 

Steamship Lines. 

Colorado Steam Naviga- 
tion Co vi and vii 

Coos Bay. Oregon, Cres- 
cent City, and Port 

Oxford xvi 

Goodall, Nelson & Per- 
kins S. S. Co xliii 

Oregon S. S, Co viii 

Pacific Mail S. S. Co iv 

Royal Mail xxxiii 

South American S. S. Co . . xri 

Steering Wheels. 

Bragg Robert 5 

Stencil Cutters. 

Truworthy F. M ilii 

Wood G. AL & Co Ivii 



PAGE. 

stoves, etc. 

Brittan, Holbrook & Co., 

register of names 863 

Savage & Son 25 

Snook a &W 23 

Tay George H. & Co. .Ixxnu 
Sugar Refineries. 

Bay 17 

California xixi 

Tailors. 

Short ML 29 

Whalen J lyrri and 23 

Tanners. 

O'Donnell Cornelius 20 

Tin and Sheet Iron 
Workers. 
Brittan. Holbrook & Co., 

register of names 863 

Snook G. & W 23 

Tay Geo. H. & Co iTnriii 

Tobacco Growers. 
Consolidated Tobacco Co. 

icvi 
Tool Makers. 

WeichhartJ 9 

Turners. 

Heney William 11 

Wetherbee Geo. M 6 

Type Dealers. 
Read. Brand Si Co., reg. of 
names side line, and 

Ixxxvii 
Cmbrella— Adjust- 
able. 

Waterhouse & Lester xciii 

Fndertakers. 

Gray N. & Co ilii 

Massey & Yung slvi 

FphoLsterers. 
Bumham James W. & Co. .12 

Edwards Frank G iliv 

Ehrenpf ort William lii 

Varnishes. 

Sullivan. Kelly & Co xxx 

Watches and Jewelry. 
Bravei"man & Levy . . front 

cover 



PAGE. 

Gardiner Geoi^e D. & Co. , 

register of names 483 

Sherwood Robert ii 

Sbreve George C. & Co Ixi 

and edge of volume 
Water Closets. 

Smith A. J Ixxdv 

Smith William 19 

Water Pipe. 
Browell Jeremiah- 3, 18, and 26 

Clark N. & Co lixi 

Martin P., reg. of names. .483 
Mater Wheels. 

Leffel & Myers liuvi 

M^atcr Works. 

Spring Valley 1 

Whiteners. 

SeUersJ.C 20 

Willow Ware. 

Armes & Dallam Imiii 

Wind MiU Manufs. 

Hunt E.G. &Co »..".. 4 

Tustin W. I xciv aiii xcv 

Window ShadeL 
Burnliam James W. & Co . . 12 

Edwards Frank G iliv 

M'ines and Liquors. 

Brader Henry 28 

Chesiey G. W. & Co sxix 

Kirkpatrick, Cutter & Co. 

XXXT 

Martin E. k Co li 

McMillan & Kester 2 

Prinz.Tohn 21 

Racouiliat H. & Co 7 

Richards i; Harrison 18 

Roth & Videau Ixxii 

Winkle Henry &, Co. . .lirxiv 

Mire M'orkers. 
Hallidie A. S xlviii 

M'ooden Ware. 
Armes & Dallam Ixxxiii 

M'oolen Goods. 

trUmann & Co s^tr? 

Moolen MUls. 
San Francisco Pioneer. . . .liii 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BUSINESS CARDS. 



See Business Directory, pages 773-872. 



Allen Williiun R 810. 853 

Antiiiell T. M. S Co S52 

Armes Si Dallam 867. 871 

Auger B. E. 4 Co. ...792, 825 

838, 845 

Austin B. C 866 

Balch M. M 845 

Bandmann, Nielsen & Co. 

838,853 

Bartlett & Randolph 787 

Barton B. F.&Co 872 

Berry i Capp 787 

Blako, Kobbins & Co 849 

Bradstreet J. R 858 

Browell J 852 

BurkharatMai 852 

Bumham J W. 4 Co.... 791 

BurrC. C & Co 845, 861 

California Bed Comforter 

Factory 779 

California Cider Works.. 868 
Calif oniia .1 ewelry Co ... . 822 

Callaghan V 872 

Carson H. W 863 

Cook & 'frounson 791 

CorriUe £inersoa & Co. 

(3), 818 

Croskey & Floyd 825 

Cuddy 4 Hughes 854 

Cummincs W. H 838 

Daly* Hawkins 787 

Day Till imas 810, 853 

Du Rose i Banks 779 



Dunham, Carrigan & Co. .816 
Egerton, Allen & Co .. 841, 861 
Electrical Construction 
and Maintenance Co. 

779, 80i 870 

FarieonS. & Co 870 

Feigenbaum t Co. . . .791, 845 
867 

Fisher L. P 773.845 

Frankenthal & Co. . . .800, 872 
Frontier, Bellemere & Co. 

801,823 

Ghirardelli D 796 

Gilbert 4 Moore 809 

Goodyear Rubber Co.... 818 

Gray Mathias 844. 852 

Gray Samuel C 824, 865 

Greenebaum 4 Co 838 

Harrison ,lolin 832 

Harrison W. P 854 

Hartford Fire In.-!. Co 821 

Heald's Business College 

797,858 

Hecht Bros. & Co 782 

Heynemann 4 Co 791, 803 

Hobson McGilfillan 773 

Home Mutual Ins. Co 821 

Houseworth Thos- 4 Co. 

800, 805, 850 

HneterBros 4Co 775 

Hunt E.O 870 

Hutdiinson C. 4 Son 791 

Isaacs & Wilson 860 



Jenkins T. H 787 

KahathN. J 816,841 

Koehler 4 Ritter (2), 860 

Laird D. W 823 

Liliby S 859 

Linsley 4 Collins. 811, 854,855 
Locke 4 Montague.. 821, 863 

Lowrj- J. W 791 

Macdonald D. A. 4 Co.. 801 

McCurrie 4 Weber 845 

Mclntyre John B 782 

Meyers Adolph. 845 

SIills4 Leak 810 

MorganM 804 

Morrison John C. .Jr. 825 

Muir A. 4 Co 859 

MuUerC (2). 847 

M\UTihy, Grant S Co. .803. 811 

Murray E.E 823 

National Clock Co 795 

Neustadter Brothers 809 

Newton Bros. 4 Co 865 

Nichols A C. 4 Co 824 

Pacific Electro-Depositing 

Works 846.860 

Pacific Oil and Lead Works 

817 

Pacific Vinegar Works 869 

PagesJ.F 805 

Palmer W. J. T. 4 Co. . . .809 

Patch George W 862 

Pohlay 4 Koster 869 

PomroyS. S 839 



Preble& Co 868 

Price Press Co 853 

Putzman Fr 825 

Ransome EmestL 775, 863 

Remington Sewing Ma- 
chines 859 

RochicioUR-F 860 

Roman A. & Co 783, 861 

Roos Joseph 4 Co 806 

Rosseter4Sniith. 824 

Rud.jlfiCo 845 

Ruhl Brothers 792 

San Francisco Laundry.. 824 

Saul 4 Co 791 

Schmidt M. 4 Co 833 

Shreve George C. 4 Co. 

801, 822, 860, 869 
Showers, Jewell 4 Co.... 859 

Smith. Francis 4 Co 852 

Snook G. 4 W 863 

Steele James G. 4 Co . .792. 806 
832, MO, 867 

Strahle Jacob 4 Co 779 

Tay George H 4 Co 863 

Truworthy F. M 858, 862 

Tustin W. 1 870 

Watson 4 Co 800, 824, 867 

Weaver 4 Taylor. 818 

WcckL. E.4C0 824 

Weyl Brothers 795, 822 

White 4 Bauer 845 

Woodworth, Schell 4 Co . .852 
Wynne Brothers 774, 807 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY, 

1874-5. 



OTTIRIiElISrT msTOi^.'sr. 




In May, 1850, the City of San Francisco first entered 
upon its formal and legally-recognized existence as an 
Independent Municipality. The Counli/ of San Fran- 
cisco had been duly organized the month preceding. 
For upward of six years the two distinct govenunents 
contemporaneously maintained independent adminis- 
*rations within the same geogi-aphical limits. On the 
first day of July, 1856, the Consolidation Act, unify- 
ina the two under the name aud title of "The City 
and County of San Francisco," terminated the need- 
less and wasteful independence of each, and thence- 
forth identified their interests and history. Although 
but nineteen years have passed since the accomplish- 
ment of this consolidation, the city, in all material 
interests aud historic importance, is so incomparably 
the greater of the two civic existences then merged into 
one, that we may rightly— in fact, we must, necessar- 
ily — reckon from its independent birthday in determin- 
intr the age of the present municipaUty. Twenty-five years old, then, in Jlay of the present 
V«vr, is the exact, legal age of the Pacific Metroj.olis, and her quarter century of unexempled 
prosperity has most grandly culminated in this final, crowning year, whose history the best 
attempt can but most imperfectly narrate. , • , i. i _l 

Aeev of the City and County.— The total land area of the city and county is about forty- 
two square miles, or, more exactly, twenty-seven thousand acres. The total value of real estate, 
according to the Assessor's roll, for the current fiscal year, 18,4-o, is .>122,9d7,3^0, ihe 
SLvem^e value per acre upon this basis is .?4,o5i, with an upward tendency fuUy equalmg 
any previous known rate of advance. The value of improvements upon real estate, acconhng 
to the same authority, is estimated at 839,123,285. The valuation of personal property is 
1102,035,689. inclusive of money, which is given at only $4,369,593, a.i amount obviously 
ridiculously low, and probably falling seventy-five per cent below the truth. The total valu- 
ation is .^264,116,294, an estimate so low that tax payers have less cause for grumbtaig at any 
unusuaUy high rate of taxation. The rate of taxation, including btate city and county, 
amounted to a total of §2.09.9. [For Tables of Assessment and Rates of Taxation, Revenue, 
and Exijenditares, Funded Debt, etc., se<? page 56.] r i,i- „„,.;*■„+>,» 

PoprLmoN.-Universally recognized as the most mfaUible mdex of public prospenty, the 
statistics of population command the first place in public interest. March 1, 18/5, S'-'D^ran- 
cisco contained two hundred and thirty thousand inhabitants, an mcrease of nearly thirty 
thousand, or about fifteen per cent upon the population at the correspondmg date of 18;4 
[For a detailed and classified statement of the population, March 1, 18/5, see page 5S.J Ihe 



attractions which induced this unprecedented growth were neither evanescent nor "^isubstaii- 
tiah \\TiUe speculation of the fiercest kind enlivened the closing weeks of the year the pre- 
ponderating cLses of this most rapid increase, relatively,^which^the «ty has^Uio.^^^^ 
1S48-9, were agriculture, mming, and manutactunn. 



v3 

o 
o 



o 



3. 

€:♦■ 






Id 

o 

t?d 

o 

P' 
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o 



ci> 



ever the most substantial foundations 



A The 'permanent prosperity of any State or community. Indeed, it is afact well known in 



\i< diti' 



Kiiicicai economy luai. llic uiu^ica.^ m ^ji^^^^^^^^j •- — ^. -— . l- - i,:.-i, 

argely results from and therefore reliably indicates, that of the state or of the country of which 

^ -mains the industrial and commercial metropolis. Hence, the commercial capital becomes 

only the political economist's self-registering thermometer to record the actual agricultural 

manufacturing condition of to-day, but, in a sense equally true and fully as important 






Children's Hair Cut in the most Eeoherohe Manner at 113 Geary. 



San rranoisoo Jewelry Manufactory, L. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Meroliani 



10 SAN FRANCISCO DIBECTOEY. 



immediate future. So intimately interwoven and closely identified do they become tliat one 
finds it well-nigh impossible to write a separate history of either. 

In this sense, then, the record of San Francisco manifestly assumes a threefold, nay, even a 
tenfold, significance as largely indicating, if not actually constituting, not only that of the whole 
of California but of the entire Pacific Coast, from Central America even to Alaska. 

And, beyond all this, the fast-multiplying steam and sail lines, both domestic and foreign, 
already prosperously established or in immediate contemplation ; the already considerable, con- 
stantly-increasing and prospectively immense commercial interests ; and, in some cases, inter- 
national rehvtions between the United States and China, Japan, the Sandwich and South Sea 
[slands — not to mention South and Central America and the Mexican Coast — nearly all of which 
must inevitably center at or find transit through San Francisco, combine to enhance her present 
and especially her prospective importance to an almost immeasurable degree. 

Among other and nearer tributary sources of her wealth and power one may catalogue the 
subjugation of thousands of acres of previously wild land ; the reclamation of leagues of long- 
submerged marsh or tule ; the extension and development of scores of old mines, and the open- 
ing of hundreds of new ones; the founding of dozens of new towns; the erection of new coun- 
ties ; the extension of railways already existing, the completion of new ones, and the projection 
of others, with the establishment of new steamship and sailing lines, all of which act and react, 
directly and indirectly, as so many %agorously-throbbing arteries and strongly-pulsating veins, 
constantly expanding their one central heart, the grand fountain and the one intense focus of 
the swiftly-circulating financial flood which constitutes the commercial life of the whole vast 
community — the body politic, social, industrial, and ciril. 

BniLDiNo.s, Rents, Etc. — Necessarily and closely connected with, or immediately spring- 
ing from, this universally rapid increase of both transient and permanent population, akeady 
instanced, the resulting scarcity both of business buildings and of tenements, -nath the conse- 
quent advance of rents, stimulated budding in both tiese departments to an extent previously 
unknown. The location, number, size, style, character, and cost of some of the more note- 
worthy of these structures appear more in detail elsewhere in this article. 

Municipal Comp.a.ctness. — Under this head we rank the occupation and improvement 
of lots previously vacant of any budding, or cumbered by mere shells or shanties of the shab- 
biest construction or most transient duration. Many structures of this description, together 
with a few more substantial of the pioneer buildings, some antiquated by long use, and more 
grown insufficient by the increase of surrounding business, have given place to broad, substan- 
tial, and lofty fabrics, proof alike against fire, flood, or earthquake, at least as far as human skill 
and strength can make them so. Along and near California and Market streets, with some of the 
adjacent streets, this sul:>stantial improvement and solid compacting of the more prominent 
business quarters have become most noticeably apparent. Under improved methods of bind- 
mg, bracing, strapping, compactiog, and otherwise unifying large or lofty buildings, the seem- 
ing appreliensinn of earthquakes, which for several years rarelv allowed a block or a building 
t<5 nsu above the fourth story, has so far subsided, or so completely vanished, that five and even 
SIX stones have become increasingly conmion, while the new metropolitan leviathan, the Palace 
Hotel, startmg from two stories underground, lifts its huge and overshadoTv-ing bulk seven full 
stones above. This, however, as a general thing, may, possibly, result from the fact that the 
shrewd land owners, accidentally looking upward, have suddenly discovered that their titles 
extend farther m that direction than they had previously suspected, and that, under the stim- 
ulus of rapidly-mcreasmg values upon and near the surface of the earth, they are fast availing 
tbernselyes of their newly-discovered rights heavenward. Of one most encouraging consid- 
eration m connection with this they may rest absolutely certain, they will encounter far less 
competition in that direction. 

Territorial Expansion.— So closely connected with the last point as, in large measure to 
grow out of it, stands the fact of a marginal growth, or circumferential outpush, which, in 
rapulity, quality, extent, and value, also far outranks that of any equal preceding period. 

J he general occupation, with the uuusuaUy substantial and costly improvement of hun- 
dreds ot previously vacant lots, within, upon, and immediately beyond the suburbs, especiaUy 
along the southern and western margins of the city, have not only absolutely but relatively far 
surpassed those of any former year. ^ j j 

Among the most conclusive indications of the city's vitality, elasticity, and seemingly 
unJimited capability ot expansion, we may take the fact that the extreme boundary line of thSse 
portions built with any approach to city-like compactness, including the western and southern 
additious, but leaving out such a remote, though important, suburb as South San Francisco— 
almost a city in itself-is now fully seven and a half miles long, an increase of at least fifteen per 
cent over that of 18/3. At this rate of marginal expansion-and the chances are that the ratio 
of growth will increase rather than diminish— the city will double her present circumference in 
less than nve years. 

Bcal EaUite, Bnlldlnjt, Kte. 



Since the beginning of 1873, the upward tendency of real estate has steadily increased. In 
number, magnitude, and price, the aggregate sales and niling rates of 1874 far surpassed those 
of the previous year while during the opening quarter of the current year, both in the absolute 
number of sales and m the relative prices obtained, each month has witnessed a notable gain 



Earitan River Transplanted Oysters at MORGAN & CO.'S, 87 California Market. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Keamy, Estatlished 1852. 



PROGEESS OP THE CITY. 11 



upon the preceding. This very marked and constantly-progressive appreciation has character- 
ized not only sites for business building, but to an even greater degree has enhanced the values 
of choice suburban lots for private residences. 

"VVe present, herewith, a brief review of the real estate transactions in the City and County 
of San Francisco during the past year (1874), particularly noting a few of the heavier sales, 
ranging from §40,000 up, as shown by the valuable and reliable Real Estate Circular, published 
by Thomas Magee. January : Lot at the northwest corner of Pine and Leavenworth streets, 
one hundred and eighty-seven and one half feet by one hundred and thirty-seven and one half, 
sold to W. C. Ralston for §40,000 ; conveyance of lot, one hundred and three and one fourth 
feet by one hundred and thirty-seven and one half, at the northeast corner of Pine Street and 
Van Ness Avenue, §45,000 — total sales during the month, $1,082,118. February : East side of 
Sansom Street, lot with improvements, §43,500 ; three lots on the south side of Sacramento 
Street, between Sansom and Battery, with the tliree-story brick building, |150,000 — total sales 
for the month, §1,611,697. March : On the east side of Battery Street, south of Sacramento, 
lot forty-five and three fourths feet by one hundred and two and one half, with two two-story 
brick stores, granite fronts, $50,000 ; the gore lot, one hundred and twenty-nine and three fom-ths 
feet on Market Street, one hundred and ten on Post, eighteen and one fourth on Montgomery, 
and ninety-seven and one half feet deep, |300,000, which, as the lot contains but about sixty- 
nine thousand square feet, would be §43. 4S per square foot — one of the highest prices ever paid 
here for laud — total for the month, §1,975,616. April : North side of California Street, sixty- 
seven and one half feet west of Sansom, lot forty feet by eighty, with three-story and basement 
brick, .$150,000 ; two other large sales on California Street this mouth of §65,000 and §52,500 ; 
also lot on the north side of Howard Street, west of Seventh, fifty- vara, transferred — price put in 
deed, §85,000 — sales for the month, §1,697,551. May : In this month there were only two indi- 
vidual sales exceeding §40,000 ; one on the east side of Montgomery Street, lot twenty-five 
feet by eighty -seven and one half, with three-story brick, §52,000, and fractional parts of lots 
on Montgomery Street, §52,500 — total for the month, §1,165,.554. June: Southeast comer of 
California and Mason streets, one half of fifty-vara lot, .$45,000 ; lot northeast comer of Market, 
Sutter, and Sansom streets, \vith thi-ee-story brick, §130,000 ; northeast corner of Beale and 
Bryant streets, with one-story brick warehouse, §60,000 ; undivided half of the same, resold, 
§40,000 ; a §60,000 sale on Market Street, and one on Kearny Street of §45,000 — sales during 
the mouth, §1,588,867. July : The heaviest sale this mouth was lot on the north side of Bush 
Street, sixty-eight and three fourths feet by one hundred and thirty-seven and one half, with 
building, §155,000; there were also seven other important sales, ranging from $48,700 to 
$80,000— total for the month, $2,208,211. August : The most important sales in August were. 
South Beach blocks Nos. 23, 24 and 30, for §150,000 ; lot on the south side of Market Street, 
southwest of Sixth, twenty -five feet by ninet}', §130,000, and nine other sales in diflerent parts 
of the city averaging over §60,000 each — total for August, §3,074,193. September : The num- 
ber of sales, reaching .§40,000 this month, was only four. The heaviest of these was lot on the 
southeast corner of Montgomery and California streets, which sold for §410,000 — sales for the 
month, $1,775,397. October : Lot on the south side of California Street, and west side of San- 
som, §205,000; northwest corner of Post and Leavenworth streets, fifty-vara lot, §71,400; 
seven other heavy transactions this month, ranging from §41,000 to $70,000 — sales for the 
month, .$2,079,127. November: The heavy sales in November were ten, of which the most 
important was a $250,000 sale at the corner of Kearny and Post streets — total sales this month, 
$2,292,220. December: The twelve heaviest sales this month foot up §791,424; among these 
are, south side of Market Street, fifty feet by one hundred and seventy, through to Stevenson 
Street, with extra ten feet by seventy deep on Stevenson, .$115,000 ; southwest corner of Mar- 
ket and Fremont streets, fifty-vara, old sale, §135,000 — sales for the month, §3,343,352. 

Recapitulation— Januarv, §1,082,118; February, $1,611,697; March, $1,975,616 ; April, 
$1,697,551 ; May, §1,165,5"54; June, §1,588,867; July, §2,208,211 ; August, $3,074,193; Sep- 
tember, $1,775,397; October, $2,097,127; November, §2,292,220; December, $3,343,3.52— 
total, .§23,893,903. This grand total is nearly double that of either of the three years imme- 
diately preceding, which were— 1873, §12,383,752; 1872, §13,127,458; 1871, $12,717,792. The 
number of sales during the year was three thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, averag- 
ing §6,199.76 each, while in 1873, there were three thousand one hundred and thirty-four 
sales of .$3,951.42, against four thousand and sixteen sales averaging only .§3, 161.80 in 1871. 
The advance became more rapid and marked during the closing months of the year, when real 
estate, in the most favored localities, had increased in value from one hundred and fifty to two 
hundred per cent. From all the facts and figures which have been presented it is safe to say 
that there has been a general advance of at least sixty -five per cent. From present prospects, 
we can see no good reason to doubt that the sales of the present year will come well up to 
§40,000,000. The Mission sales show the greatest proportionate increase, amounting, in num- 
ber to three hundred and twenty-eight, and in value, §1,613,901. Next are the sales in the 
Western Addition, where, although the number of sales, two hundred and eighty-two, is 
smaller, the increase in value of §1,703,872 is greater by nearly §100,000. In the one Imndred- 
vara section of the city, although the number of sales exceeds that of 1873, by oidy eighty-six, 
yet the advance in value is §1,864,938. This large increase is o\ving, probably, more to the fact 
that the sales of this class were of larger properties, than to the positive increase in value. 



Snly Hairdressing Saloon appropriated Exclusively to use of Ladies at 113 Geary. 



D. ¥. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, Wholesale and Retail, cor. Merchant and Mont, ; 



a 



12 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Good property was never in more active demand or seized up with avidity when it is known 
that there is a possible chance of becoming the possessor. SeUers are more scarce than buyers, 
who stand ready to gobble up any good site that is put into the market at anything less than 
balloon prices. Sites for first-class residences, lying between California and Market, Stockton 
and Leavenworth streets, with a fuU depth of one hundred and thirty-seven and one half feet, 
readily command from .?2.50 to .?400 per front foot, and the tendency is still upward. Withm 
three or four years it will probably reach from $400 to S600 per foot. In the tract bounded by 
California. Polk, Taylor, .and Cough streets, land is also advancing and is now looking upward 
from $125 to $225 per front foot. 

The location of the cemeteries, directly in the line of the city's western growth, is a serious 
drawback upon the value of real estate "in that section, yet it is not unsafe to predict that, 
within the next decade, with the means of communication facilitated by the steam raOroad, which 
will run along Fulton and D streets, on the north side of the Golden Gate Park, to the ocean, 
full depth lots will command from $50 to $100 per front foot, and that m,any of our finest 
suburb,an residences will be found along either side of the park, from Stanyan Street to Forty- 
ninth Avenue. This naUroad will bring the park, with its picnics grounds and rapidly-increasing 
attractions, and the ocean beach, within easy access, and cause them to speedily become the 
most popular places of Sunday and holiday resort to a large class of our citizens who would 
gladly bestow upon such a route their grateful patronage. While there has been such marked 
activity and buoy.ancy in the central and western p.art of the city. South Beach firoperty has 
remained very nearly'at a stanil still, but few transactions having been recorded during the past 
four years, except the sale of some few lots for railroad purposes. This is not, however, a sure 
indication for the future. The continued prosperity of so large a portion of the city must 
eventually afl'ect the whole, and it is not at all improbable, but, on the contrary quite likely, 
that the present year -Kill witness adv.ances in South Beach, which, although not so marked as 
in some more highly-favored portions of the city, will stdl be very gratifjing to property 
owners in that section. During 1874 the Spring Valley Water Co. received one thousand one 
hundred and fifteen applications for new water communications to houses. A single application, 
in many instances, represented from two to ten or twelve houses, built together by one owner, 
as, for instance, applications from the Re<al Estates Associates, representing from six to twenty 
houses each. The number of new buildings and houses erected dui-ing the year, including the 
Palace Hotel, is one thousand three hundred and fifty -nine, and the work is still going on with 
undiminished vigor and rapidity. 

F.ivoRED L0CALITIE.S FOR Costly Resibbnces. — Every great city has its fashionable quarter 
wherein its wealthiest citizens delight to build palatial homes. New York has her Fifth 
Avenue ; Boston her Beacon HiU ; Chicago her Michig.an Avenue ; Cincinniiti her Clifty and 
Walnut Hill suburbs ; St. Louis her Lucas Place ; New Orleans her Garden District, and San 
Francisco her Highland Terraces. In nearness to business centers, ( ration above the cit5''s 
noise .and dust, clearness and coust.ancy of sunshine, and, above all, in breadth, grandeur, 
and beauty of the panoramic view comm.anded, San Francisco presents huncb-eds of building 
sites whose multiplied advantages no great American city can even approximate. Within half 
a dozen blocks of the very business heart of the city, hundreds of acres of high plateaus, sloping 
summits, and crowning crests of an extensive range of commanding hights present unequ.alea 
combinations of retirement without dist.ance — of country quiet witliin city bounds. 

Pal.\ce Mansion Sites. — Simidtaneously with the erection of the mammoth and magnificent 
Palace Hotel, several of California's and San Francisco's leading millionaires have commenced 
the erection of palati,al residences. The locality chosen includes the four blocks IjTng between 
Pine and Clay streets, on the south and north, and bounded by PoweU and Hyde streets, on 
the east and west, respectively. Within this district of some fifteen squares or blocks, stretch- 
ing along, upon, .and near the culminating ridges or high plateaus, comprising the most com- 
manding sites within the city limits, a group of mining monarchs, railway kings, and real-estate 
princes have purchased extensive and adjacent lots .and commenced the erection of palatial 
mansions, which will presently transform th.at quarter into the BelgraWa of San Francisco. 

Ex-Governor Leland Stiiiiford, President of the Central Pacific Railroad, has bought, and 
commenced building upon, the eastern hiilf of the block at the northwest junction of California 
■and Powell streets. This most sightly location comm.ands a prospect of such rare extent 
and varied beauty as to almost constitute an artistic education in itself alone. Certainly, the 
Governor will never be able to hang upon the walls of his parlor riews equ.aling those which its 
windows wUl constantly command. Of the utter indifference to cost which" they must have 
attained who contemplates building in such localities, one may infer from one or two items of the 
]>reparatory cost. The value of the ground alone, four hundred and twelve feet, .at .$200 a front 
foot, rises, of course, to $82,400, while the gnading necessary to suitably prepare the lot before 
it can receive even the first foundation stone, employed three hundred laborers for several weeks. 
Thus, this railway king will spend over $100,000 before beginning to lay the foundation. From 
such items one may readily estimate the cost of completing .and ifm-nisliiug the building itself. 

The west half of the same block, Mark Hopkins, one of the Directors of the same road and 
Treasurer of both that and the Southern Pacific, has bought. Upon this he proposes the 
erection of a modest little mansion whose ultimate cost will, probably, run as far into the 
hundred thousands as his gubeni.atorial neighbor does into the millions. 



MOKGAN & CO.'S Celebrated Saucelito Transplanted Oysters, 87 California Market 



p. VAN SCHAACK Si CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 7H, and 716 Kearny, Estatlislied 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 13 ^ 



Diagonally across that of the comer, at the junction of California and Taylor streets, Charles 
Crocker, another Central Pacific Director and President of the Southern Pacific Railroad, and 
a man of weight by whatever scale one may judge him, has purchased land whereon to found the 
last local habitation he wdl probably need. 

Ex-Governor Milton S. Latham, President of the London and San Francisco Bank, has also 
bought a large lot southerly of these, on which to build his winter or city residence, in addi- 
tion to his country seat, at Menlo Park, which cost considerably over a quarter of a million. 

Opposite Crocker's, Gen. Colton owns and occupies a "^^^lite House," far more elegant than 
the President's at Washington. Among the other millionaire neighbors of the billion.aire group 
which heads this poverty-stricken list, one may catalogue such names as those of Lloyd Tevis, 
Esq.; Jas. B. Haggin, Esq.; Senator J. P. Jones; Richard Tobin, Esq., and others. 

On the western slope of this extensive Highland Terrace, at the northwest junction of Pine 
and Leavenworth streets, the most widely known of all the younger and more enterprising 
capitalists of the Pacific slope, the President of the Bank of California, the principal owner and 
builder of the Palace Hotel, William C. Ralston, Esq. , has just completed his new city residence, 
whose notable architectural beauty, like that of his famous country seat at Belmont, is yet 
subordinated to the provision of a complete and perfect home. 

These names by no means exhaust the list of those who have chosen sites within or near this 
Highland Terrace District or upon some of its bordering slopes. Nor are all the fine residences 
of the city concentrated here. In the Western Addition ; along Van Ness Avenue ; at the 
Mission; on Rincon HiU, as well as in dther portions of the former, present, or prospective 
suburbs,' stand elegant homes of wealth, already long known or just approaching completion. 
The city has e\'idently fairly entered upon its second stage, that in which prominent merchants 
and capitalists, conscious that their feet already stand upon the westering slope of life, sensibly 
resolve to abate, if they do not wholly abandon, the exclusive pursuit of wealth and provide for 
themselves elegant homes while they have yet time to enjoy them. At this stage in the life of 
every city commences its true and permanent growth in architectural beauty and artistic attrac- 
tions, and upon this era San Francisco may safely congratulate herself that she has now fairly 

New Bnlldlngs for the Year ending Febmary 28, 18'3. 

The costly and palatial structures for both public and private purposes, already partially 
described or enumerated, by no means exhaust the list of notable new buildings erected during 
the year, or now in progress. Besides these several magnificent business blocks, or buildings, 
now" rapidly approaching completion, are daily adding grandeur and beauty to the architectural 
attractions of our leading business thoroughfares, or favorite avenues of residence. The first of 
these in size, style, and cost, worthily standing nearest the city's financial center, is the 

Safe Deposit Co.'s Building, on the southeast corner of Montgomery and Califorma 
streets. The land, alone, occupies one hundred and thirty-seven and a half feet on Montgomery, 
by sixty-eight and three quarters on California. Four lofty stories, above a high and airy base- 
ment, make up its imposing fronts. Iron below and Frearstone above, with all the combma- 
tions'and modifications which these admirable materials admit, together with the most mgemous 
and substantial auxiliaries which science and experience could construct or devise, give the 
structure a strength, a solidity, a unity, and a beauty far surpassing those of any busmess 
building of equal size yet erected upon this coast. If the utmost strength of iron, stone, and 
brick can make any building proof against earthquake as weU as fire, this building may claim 
those qualities in a most eminent degree. Obviously, the most notable feature of this magnih- 
cent building, especiaUy to the army of self-appointed inspectors who personally supermtended 
its construction from day to day, is the immense fire and burglar-proof vault, sixtj'-eight and 
three quarters feet by sixty, which occupies nearly one half the basement. In size, this is by 
far the largest in the world, while in strength it is simply enormous. In capacity it equals four 
thousand six hundred safes, or treasure boxes of the ordinary size, while its strength incompar- 
ably surpasses theirs. This mammoth depository, literally a complete iron and steel building 
in itself, is constructed of heavy iron beams and girders, covered with thick iron and steel 
plates. The construction is under charge of JNIessrs. Dieboid, Norris & Co., of Canton, Ohio. 
This vault alone wiU cost §200,000. Besides this, there will be a large number of smaller vaults 
and safes in the building constructed by or from the manufactories of Urban & McNeal, and 
the HaU Safe and Lock Co., of Cincinnati, Ohio. Cost of land and buildmg, S1,000,0<». 

Upon the northwest comer of Montgomery and Pine streets Messrs. Flood & Brien are 
erecting a large, four-story building with basement, to be occupied for stores, banking oflices. 
etc This frontage on Montgomery Street is one hundred and twenty-five feet ; that on Pme 
Street one hundred and thirty-seven and a half. The foundation is of stone ; the two fronts of 
the lower story of iron, and above this a happy blending of iron and brick form the three upper 
stories This edifice, when completed, will rank among the most valuable additions to our first- 
class business buildings, and wOl reflect great credit upon the architect, Mr. Tlavid Farquharson, 
as well as upon the buUder, Mr. John Cochran. The building will contam no dark rooms, bemg 
well Hghted on three sides from Montgomerj', Pine, and Summer streets, while the mner tiers ot 
rooms receive light from an inclosed court or square. The different floors will be reached by 
means of one of Hmckle's Patent Hydraulic Elevators, made by Phihp Hinkle, at his manu- 
factory on Mission Street, between Beale and Fremont. These elevators, from the simplicity of 



o 



The Best and most Cleanly Family Baths in the City are at 113 Geary. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



14 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



their constmction, combined with ease and security of manipulation, which .^ilmost debar the 
possibility of accident, are rapidly coming into favor, and are being introduced into nearly all 
the larger new buildings where an elevator is desired. Cost of land and building, §700,000. 

Another large four-story and basement brick building is being put up on the gore lot, 
bounded by Montgomery Avenue, Kearny, and Pacific streets. The ground dimensions are one 
hundred ,ind forty-two feet on Montgomery Avenue, thirty on Kearny Street, and one hundred 
and thirty-seven anil a half feet on Pacific. The building is owned by William Hood, of 
Siinoma, ami will be occupied, the upper part of it, as a hotel, for M'hich purpose it is already 
engaged by Mr. Homblower, formerly of the New Orleans Hotel, at Sacramento, at a monthly 
rental of from $1,200 to §1,300. The first floor is to be divided into stores, and tha basement 
reserved as a wine cellar, for the storage and sale of Sonoma wines. The building is being 
rapidly pushed forward, under the direction of Messrs. Portois & Taylor, and will probably be 
ready for occupation some time in June. Cost, about §120,000. 

Messrs. Terrill & Slayten have commenced the erection, for Messrs. Meyerstein & Lowen- 
berg, upon the southeast comer of Kearny and Post streets, of a four-story and basement brick, 
of which the basement is but just now completed. The probable cost of the building will be 
from §80,000 to §100,000. 

The Hammam, or new Turkish Bath Building, on the west side of Dnpont Street just north 
of Market. The lot belongs to Senator Jones of Nevada, from whom the enterprising builders 
of the Hamman have leased it for a term of ten years. The building is a perfect Hygienic Palace, 
exteriorly reproducing the outward peculiarities of the Turkish architecture, while its interior 
presents a most ingenious, artistic, and beautiful combination of the lighter, more airy, and more 




artists, who have been for nearly a year past engaged in sketching and painting the more notable 
scenery upon our coast. The ceQings are to be beautifully frescoed, and the wooden scroll work, 
of which a large quantity of the most elaborate description is used in the interior decoration, 
is to be finished with blue, gold, and silver. The architect of the building is Charles Geddes. 
Total cost of lot and building, about §150,000. 

Upon the southeast comer of California and Front streets, a large building, ninety-five feet 
by ninety-five, owned by Messrs. Shultz &. Van Bergen, is nearly completed. The building 
raises three fuU stories above a commodious basement, and in lieu of stairways will employ one 
of Henkle's Hydraulic Elevators. 

The north side of Sutter Street, between Montgomery and Keamy, has been greatly im- 
proved by the recent completion of a sightly and imposing four-story edifice. The basement 
and three lowers stories are intended for stores and offices, while the upper floor will probably 
be occupied as lodging rooms. The main building has a frontage on Sutter Street of one hun- 
dred and four feet four and one half inches, with a depth of one hundred and twenty-three and 
a half feet, mth a wing on Hanlie Place thirty-four feet by fifty-eight ; also four stories high 
with basement and sub-basement. In addition to the broad stairway leading up from the main 
entrance at No. 120 Sutter Street, the building is also to be supplied with the patent hydraulio 
elevator. The buddmgis owned by Mrs. Robert C. Johnson, was designed by William Patten 
architect, and erected by Robert Ewing, at a cost of about §160,000. 

Farther to the south, upon the southeast comer of Fifth and ilinna streets, James Devlin 
contractor and builder, is erectmg a §50,000-structure, upon the James Donohue estate The 
facades, seventy-hye feet upon Fifth Street, and eighty upon Minna, are of wood, while the 
south and west walls are brick, the whole resting upon a stone foundation, which also consti- 
tutes the basement waDs. The building is four stories high above the basement, and contains 
tour stores upon the first floor and fifty-four rooms above. 

These are but a few representative structures among the more notable buUdings now in pro- 
cess of construction. Upon neariy every street, especially the leading highways of trade or 
avenues of residence, new hotels, new factories, or new buildings of some discription meet the 
eye at almost every turn. They go up so fast that the most complete record of them made 
upon the evening of any one day would become incomplete before noon of the next. Even the 
bare catalogue of them would hU scores of pages while to attempt anything like an ordinary 

nTw Z?, r... ^^t^l-^ "iTu"'* '^ volume neariy, if not quite, as large as this entire wor^ 
v„»r „n!li„ v 1 ot'i^o^^" ?'""'^er Of buUeUngs erected and nearly completed during the 

ir^ nrjrii ^"""^f '/I7^;,f ±'^""° '^•""^ed and eighty-nine,* of which seventy-onf are 
«0 -J^ ^ ' nf ,1 '?' "^ f^:*\h^\ ^""^ tl^^t^e" ^^"<^^i are of wood, cost §4,933, 800 ; total, 
eK M^;^^^ the frame buildings three fourths are of one and two stories, the average cost 
Bud,! nf'.^n 1 j" 'l"^ ^^t'^-^te IS mcluded the Palace Hotel, Nevada Block, Safe Deposit C< 
Building, C.rand Uper.a House, and several others not entirely finished : with these excentions 
th^h^nires herem only include building enterprises commenced and fiiiled di^g t^e^ 



rsESsSSSSiSiSSSSE-^ 



MOE&AN & CO., 87 California Market, have their own Boats and Oyster Beds.! 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 70S, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Keamy, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 15 



Number of Bwldings. — The number of buildings in the city and county is estimated at 
twenty-three thousand seven huntlred, of which four thousand three hundred are of brick. The 
Federal Census of 1870 returns the number at twenty-two thousand two hundred and sixty-six. 

Homes for the People, BallAiug Associations, Efe. 

In this important department, also, the accomplishments of the past year, and the varied 
and increasing activities of the present, give token of a general and permanent prosperity far 
exceeding that of anj^ former period. Foremost of these — if indeed they are not doing a busi- 
ness so wholly of their own kind as to stand quite alone — rank the 

IlE.iL EsT.\TE Associates, or, as they might properly be called, the San Francisco House 
Manufacturing Co. Organized but two years since, for the purpose of bujdng land, building 
houses, and selling both — usually upon the installment plan — they have managed their enter- 
prise so acceptably to the great middle class, whom they chiefly seek to serve, that, although 
finishing neat and even elegant two-story houses at an average rate of one a day, the popular 
demand already outrans the supply, and apparentty "grows by what it feeds on." Judiciously 
selecting large lots in the choicest parts of the city, and quickly improving them witix neat, 
substantial, and comparatively inexpensive residences, they have done more to accommodate 
the public and to beautify the city than any similar organization ever formed within its limits. 
Commencing in March, 1S73, with that part of Mission Block, No. 22, which fronts on Ridley 
and Guerrero streets, they immediately built thirty-six houses, for sale on the installment plan. 
Every house was sold before completion ! Encouraged by this unexpectedly complete success, 
they buUt and sold eighty-four more houses before the close of the year, making a total of one 
hundred and twenty houses buUt and sold in the first ten months after commencing business. 
The next year, finding an increasing demand for somewhat larger and more expensive houses, 
they began at once to supply that, also. Early in June, 1874, they bought the half block, 
bounded by Howard and Capp streets, and lying between Seventeenth and Eighteenth. Six 
months later they had finished thereon forty-one houses, and sold every one ! Before these 
were fairly finished the company had bought the half block, bounded by Mission and Jessie 
streets, between Nineteenth and Twentieth, on which they immediately commenced the erec- 
tion of twenty-seven dwellings, ranging in price from $2,750 to $6,700, for all of which parties 
were waiting to enter before they were completed. In December, 1874, they bought, and imme- 
diately commenced building upon, the entire west front of Valencia Street, from Ridley to 
Quinn. And these were but a few items of their year's work, which proceeded with such 
rapidity, and in so many localities at once, that their aggregate number of houses built and 
sold by them in 1874, the first entire j'ear of their operation, was three hundred and sixteen, 
or more than one for every working day in the year. 'Wlule still improving at the Mission, 
they are also builiUng in the Western Addition — on Sutter, Sacramento, CaHfomia, Pine, Clay, 
Turk, Pierce, and Eddy streets, a class of buildings even finer than those with which they 
began at the Mission." Still "swinging round the circle." they have lately bought, and, of 
course, commenced buildiug upon, property at North Beach, on VaUejo Street, between Leav- 
enworth and Hyde. In January of the present year they finished and sold tliirty-three houses, 
in February thirty -one, and in the first ten days of March fourteen. Thus they open the cam- 
paign of 1875 by turning off considerably over a house a day. WTierever they buy they build ; 
and almost before they finish budding they have sold. The total number of houses which they 
had built up to March 10, 1875, was five hundred and fourteen — no inconsiderable town of 
itself. Of the whole number of new buildings erected in 1874, this company budt nearly one- 
fourth. The annual aggregate of their operations already exceeds a milhon and a half. In the 
entire history of the city no company has even remotely approximated this in the style and 
extent of its budding, or ever succeeded as well in supplying the great popular demand for 
beautiful and permanent homes. 

Homestead Associations. — While the general advance in the price and activity in the im- 
provement of real estate has been so marked duiing the year, the prosperity of the homestead 
associations, once so numerous and popular, has experienced a very decided diminution. The 
aggregate sales of lots by such associations during 1874 amounted to but §128,485, while the 
year before they rose to §458,831. Sales of outside lands, though slightly in excess of those of 
i873, are yet below the average of the three years preceding. 

FnbUc Bniidlnss. 

The New Mint stands upon the northwest comer of Mission and Fifth streets, fronting one 
hundred and sixty and one half feet on the former and two hundred and seventeen and one 
sixth feet on the latter. The building is two stories high, besides the basement. The parapet 
walls are fifty-six feet high ; the pediment seventy-five and the two chimneys each one hun- 
dred and forty-two feet. The form of the budding is a hollow parallelogram, one hundred and 
two and one half feet by forty-three and three quarters, paved with flagging. The foundation 
is of concrete, five feet deep, "laid in the most substantial manner. The basement walls are of 
the hardest sun-burned brick, three feet thick with a face of Rocklin granite one foot thick. 
The upper walls also of brick and of the same material, faced with blue-gray sandstone twelve 
inches thick. The floor girders are wronght-iron beams, twelve inches deep. The floors are 
arched with brick between the beams ; leveled above with concrete, then flagged. The wains- 



;^adies should tear in mind that the Best Lathing Appliances are at 113 Geary. 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merohar, 



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16 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTOET. 



cot, door, and window frames, shutters, columns, ornamental work and the back stairs, are all of 
iron. The broad, lofty front stairs on the Fifth Street front, are of Rocklin granite. The 
doors and ^raldow sashes, golden mahogany ; the counters and furniture of Honduras mahogany; 
the window -glass of French plate; door fittings of brass; the flat-link sash-weight chains are 
copper, and the roof covered with copper, tinned on both sides. Six solid fluted columns, mas- 
sive and lofty, give beauty and grandeur to the main entrance on Fifth Street. The style of 
architecture is the Doric. 

A particular description of the location and especial purpose of each room, with the peculiar 
elaborate machinery contained therein would All a volume. Much of the costly machinery is 
of the most massive description in its proportions and solidity, and finished -with the finest pos- 
sible mathematical nicety. As is not generally known, the San Francisco Mint is no longer a 
Branch Mint, even in name. Nearly two years since it was erected into the fuU dignity of an 
independent establishment. In fact, when one considers the magnitude of the business done 
within its walls, it would seem that in respect to this, and most important of aU particulars, 
all the other mints in the country might more properly be ranked as branches of this. Its coin- 
age of gold and sUvor during 1874, up to the first of December, was : Gold — Eight hundred and 
seventy-five thousand double eagles, worth ^17,500,000 : five thousand eagles, worth §50,000, and 
seven thousand half eagles, woi-th -SSo.OOO ; total, ^17,585,000. Silver — two miUion one hundred 
and thirty-three thousand trade dollars, worth §2,133,000; three hundred and forty-four thou- 
sand halves, worth 8172,000; three hundred and ninety-two thousand quarters, worth §98,000, 
and two hundred and forty thousand dimes, worth §24,000; total, §2,427,000 — thus making a 
grand total of over §20,000,000. 

The United States Appraiser's Building. — Upon the west half of the block, bounded by 
Washington, Sansom, Jackson, and Battery streets, commonly known as the Post-oflice Block, 
stands, or has begun to stand, the new United States Appraiser's Budding. Its length, ou .San- 
som Street, is two hundred and sixty-five feet and six inches ; its depth from west to east, along 
both Washington and Jackson streets, one hundred and twenty feet and six inches ; its hight 
JQ ! is to be thi'ee full stories above a lofty basement. The material is what is known among the 
•^ i builders of this coast as Napa stone, from the locality of its most abundant quarries. It appears 
to be a kind of metamorphic granite. Only the basement and the first floor are to be used as 
appraiser's stores; the two upper stories are intended for occupation by the United States 
courts. The basement, nine feet and three inches in the clear, is already completed or so nearly 
so that the first floor, or at least the foundation, is fully laid. The basement wall rests upon a 
bed of solid concrete, five feet %»-ide and as many deep. The material is broken rock firmly bedded 
in the best Rosendale cement. This was laid in courses about eight inches thick or deep, and 
each course was thoroughlj' tamped do^ra into the utmost obtainable solidity. The first floor 
consists of arches of brick turned between deep and strong iron beams. Ainong the closing 
acts of the last Congress was the passage of a bill appropriating §150,000 for the continuation 
^ I of work upon this building. The progress of this immense and valuable building has been 
" greatly delayed by the unexpected, yet almost imperative, necessity of changing the material 
of the outer waUs from pressed brick to stone, a very considerable modification of the original 
design. Gen. Samuel McCuUough, Superintendent of Construction of United States Buddings 
in t!alifomia, the same who completed the United States Mint for §50,000 within the appropri- 
ation therefor, has charge of this. Under his economical administration, masterly management, 
and watchful care, it bids fair to rank among the most faithfully and substantially-constructed 
Government buildings ever erected. 

The Post-office stiU occupies its old, insuflicient, and inconveniently-located quarters on 



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t> the eastern half of the block, boimded by Washington, Battery, and Jackson streets. Here it 
is horizontally Siindwiched between the basement and upper story, both of which the Custom 
House appropriates. The Postmaster, Gen. Coey, with his customary zeal and efficiency is still 
multiplying all possible conveniences for the accommodation of the two hundred and thirty 
^^ thousand people to whom his is by far the most important of all the Federal oflices. His small 
ea ; army of employes, already numbering some hun(b-ed and twenty, can hardly be recruited fast 
O I enough to equal the constantly -increasing demand upon their indispensable services. Between 
•^ I forty and fifty find ample employment in the in-door service ; upward of thirty are postal clerks 
fH I or stage agents, and nearly forty are employed in the distribution and collection of written and 
P4 I printed mail matter throughout the city. The multiplication of the iron postal boxes, placed 
^ I at convenient intervals within and to even beyond the corporate limits of the city, proves an 
^ I indispensable public convenience, and, in fact, an almost inestimable public benefit in sai-ing to 
g ! our citizens tlie thousands of daily journeys to the Post-oflice, which, under the foi-mer system, 
they were necessarily compelled to make several times a day. Yet, although the service of the 
carrier department is so frequent and eflicient, the two thousand three hundred post-oSice boxes 
still used, directly or indirectly, by upward of sixteeen thousand persons, show that a very 
considerable portion of our citizens stUl prefer their conveniences. The number of letters 
liisjiatched daily by the regular Overland Mail is between three and four thousand, while the 
State and Co.ast Mail is nearly five times as great. The mails to China and Japan carry six 
thousand letters a month; those to Australia, five thousand; to the West Coast of Central and 
South America, four thousand ; to the Sandwicn Islands, four thousand ; to British America and 
Alaska, two thousand. Thus, the grand aggregate of letters annually dispatched from the San 



F4 



Send your Orders from the Country for Eastern Transplanted Oysters to Morgan & C( 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 70S, 708, 710, 712, 7H, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 17 






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Francisco Post-office rises to between sei'en and eiyht million! These figures, the reader will 
reniember, make no account of the almost equallj' immense number of letters received ; nor of the 
huiulreds of tons of papers and other mailable matter which the successive relays of day and 
night forces of clerks annually handle. Among the more particular statistics of letters, may be 
specified the two hundred dead letters which form the daily average sent hence ; reidstered 
letters, nearly one hundred ; money orders, tifty-five ; of the latter, about seventy -five a°month, 
for sums averaging about S35 each, go to Germany. The value of stamps sold during 1874, was 
§350,000. Besides the making up and forwarding of the immense mails already described, the 
San Francisco office receives all the superfluous cash of the other Post-offices upon this coast, 
averaging over §20,000 a week. It also sends out to other offices about §10,000 a month, to 
enable them to cash postal-money orders drawn upon them. Gen. Coey's right-hand man is 
Assistant Postmaster William C. Dougherty, whose record of continuous service in the Depart- 
ment dates back to 1839. Of these thirty-six consecutive years he has spent the last twelve 
in responsible positions connected M-ith the office in this city. Gen. Coey's previous experience 
in the same capacity, his well-known energy and careful attention to details, with that rare 
tact which inclines him not only to gratify, but, as far as practicable, to anticipate every public 
want, combine to make him exceedingly efficient and popular. 

The Custom Hou.se. — It is a just matter of surprise to every intelligent commercial visitor, 
that the General Federal Government has provided no better building for the accommodation of 
the custom-house business of a port as important as that of San Francisco. Occupying the ' S* 
upper story of an old, stuccoed brick building, three blocks from the water front, insufficient in ' Q 
size, inconvenient in location, and inadequate in accommodation, the present buOtling is at once ' a 
a daUy reproach to the government whose name it bears, and an hourly provocation to the t & 
thousands of shipmasters and merchants who have dealiugs therein. A few of the more impor- i S 
tant statistics of the custom-house business may give the reader a partial idea of its importance. I o' 
During the yeir 1874, the total clearances of American vessels for domestic ports were four I ^ 
hundred and forty with a tonnage of three hundred and twenty thousand nine hundred and ^ 
sixty-six tons ; of foreign vessels for domestic ports, sixteen, with a tonnage of eleven thousand j § 
five hundred and three tons ; of American vessels for foreign ports thr-ee hundred and thirty, 2, 
with a tonnage of three hundred and ninety -foui; thousand three hundred and fifty-one tons ; ! ^ 
of foreign vessels for foreign ports, two hundred and ninety-four, with a tonnage of two hundred , t* 
and seventy thousand one hundred and twenty-five tons. Besides these, seven American ves- I «a 
sels with a total tonnage of two thousand tliree hundred and eighty-four, and one foreign ves- ' 't-M 
sel of two hundred and fifteen tons, cleared for whaling, and nineteen American vessels of one 
thousand one hundred and sixty-seven tons burden, cleared for fishing and sealing voyages. 
The total clearances from the port were one thousand one hundred and seven, with an aggre- 
gate tonnage of one million seven hundred and thirty-one tons. The whole number of arrivals 
in the same j'ear was four thousand two hundred and four, representing a gross tonnafe of one 
million five hundred and fifty-three thousand five hundred and fourteen. The excess over the 
corresponding items of 1873 was five humlred and fifty-seven in number, and two hundred and 
sixty thousand one hundred and sixteen tons. Total value of exports during the year, exclud- 
ing treasure, §-22,481,136. This was .§3,421,661 less than in 1873. 

The New United States M.yrine Hospitax. — The old brick building at Rincon Point, 
so long familiar as the most prominent landmark of that part of the city, having become dan- 
gerously unsafe through repeated shakings by earthquakes, as well as insufficient in accommo- 
dation, was justly condemned some four years since, and the erection of a new hospital soon 
after determined upon. Toward the consummation of this project. Congress appropriated 
$58,789.56 for the commencement of a suitable building ujjon Angel Island. The Govern- 
ment, however, subsequently refused to sanction the site first proposed, or, in fact, to allow 
the use of any portion of that island for such a purpose. Thereupon Gen. McCullough, Super- 
intendent of Construction of United States Buildings, and A. B. MuUett, then United States 
Architect, were instructed to select a new site. They finaUy decided upon the most desirable 
portion of the Presidio Reservation. A better site, in itself, or one better adapted by its 
natural advantages, would have been hard to be found. The situation is attractive in itself 
and pleasant in its surroundings. Neighboring hills protect it from the high WTnds and fogs, 
while its southerly exposure insures abundant sunshine. Another, and very considerable 
advantage is that it is but four miles from the city, from which it is readily reached by the 
Cliff House Road. The buildings, of which there are seven, have an easterly frontage. This 
di'\"ision of the acconrmodations constitute a very healthful peculiarity besides combining sev- 
eral obvious advantages. The surgeon's house is forty-four feet and four inches by forty-one 
feet and ten inches, with a piazza eight feet wide and twentj'-seven feet long. The wings are 
twenty-one feet and six inches by seventeen feet and four inches. It contains a parlor, dining 
room, bed room, bath room, pantry, and kitchen. The executive building, intended for the use 
of the officers of the institution, has a frontage of forty-six feet and four inches, and a depth of pu 
fifty-five feet and ten inches, vrith a piazza running around the first story. Upon the first floor t m 
are the reception room, office, library, dispensary, operating room, and bath room. The second ' S> 
story is to be used for sleeping rooms. The kitchen is a long, narrow building, twenty-five feet 
and four inches by one hundred and three feet and two inches, containing a dini ng room, 
kitchen, steward's and apothecary's dining room, nurses' and employes' dining room, pantries, 

The Best and most Cleanly Family Baths in the City are at 113 Geary. 

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■ San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, P. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



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~ Tl,» l»,in,lrv' inother long, narrow buililing of about the same dimensions as 

thrurhen tmta^ the uL^n roo^ men.tng room, wa.hh^ room, property room, and dead 
toL T^e^! Ss are construete,! without extravagant or useless ornamentation and are 
mcTels of simplicity and substantiality, reflecting great credit upon supermtendent, architect, 
and buihk^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^gj^^^ „f the Federal service, numbering 

severalscores in all al-eTot accommodatlcl in any goyemment building especially pro^.ded for 
them but occuuv rented offices in the most convenient locations avaUable. x. ■ «; 

S^VTE Bui"mm-roR Offices. -Although several state officials necessardy have their offices 
in tW^cHy the State has not yet provided\ny special budding for their accommoda ion. The 
Various CWnSssioners, Inspectors, and Agents, rent offices as convenient as possible to the 
resTectiveWious of their several occupations. Should the reader have any special desire to 
LnrwherethesTarehe can easily ascertain by referring to the proper place m the general 

'^"'MuNiciP-U, Buildings. -Of these the most important as the local capitol and seat of the 
municipal offices, is the City HalL In respect to this, her governmental building San Fian- 
dsc"1s just now in that transition state in which she partly has two, and completely has none. 

The Old City Hall, long famUiar to every resident for any considerable tune, occupies the 
southwest comer of the block bounded by W^hington, Montgomery Clay, and ^;^™y ^t'^^f'^ 
It is of brick, stuccoed. For inconvenience of arrangement and msufficiency of accommodation 
it stands pre-eminent. Several of the entrances are blind and roundabout and few if any of 
them, are broad or light enough. Many of the important offices are exceedmgly bad m them- 
selves, both with regSrd to their situation relatively to each other as well as for ready access by 
the general puWic. In addition to these objections, they are dl-bghted, and poorly ventilated. 

The New City H^ll.— This Municipal Elephant occupies, or has began to occupy, the site 
formerly known .as Yerba Buena Park, at the junction of Market Street and \an Ness Avenue. 
The irregularly, triangular lot, though centrally located, presented peculiar difficulties m the 
adoption of a suitable plan. The Commissioners, however, chose one whose remarkable blend- 
ing of aU possible forms make up a composite geometrical aggregate whose outlme, like the 
probable cost of the finished structure, is "one of those thmgs that no feUah can fand out 
Commenced in September, 1S71, in tliree years ond a haU the buildmg has not yet reached the 
second story, while the cost has ab-eady risen far alove the roof. The expense of grading and 
fencing the lot, excavating "about" two hundred and three thousand five hundred and forty- 
seven cubic yards of sand, and layiiig the concrete bed, was only $201,726.56. As the law 
authorizing the erection and conii^letion of the building limited its total cost to .?1, 500, 000, it 
will lie seen that it was found possible to spend one seventh of that entire and immense sum 
before even l.a>-ing a single stone of the foundation of the building proper. Among the inter- 
esting minor items, it is pleasant to know that the corner stone with its "dressings, cost but 
S736.42 ; much less, probably, than it costs many a citizen to "dress" his wife for the entire 
year. This is a mere bagatelle. A city of such immense wealth, and, above all, of such unlim- 
ited possibdities, could easily afford to "build the whole stracture of similar stones, especially 
if they could all lie had at a similarly low rate. Unless in the most unlikely event of a serious 
rise in the price of stone, it is prob.ably, speaking within bounds, to say that at the present rate 
of progress, and ratio of cost, the whole structure can be completed in ample time for the 
Second Ceutemiial celebration of the foundation of the city, and that, without reckless extrava- 
gance in sonxe departments, its cost need not exceed the comparatively trifling and insignih- 
cant aggregate of ten or a dozen bdlion of dollars, more or less. In a matter which so largely 
involves the credit of the city, and appeals so directly to the pride, and so deeply to the pocket, 
of every present and prospective citizen for the next four or ttve hundred years, it is to be hoped 
that no considerations of niggardly economy will prevent, or even deLay the worthy completion 
of the structure, or in any way embarrass the operations of the public-spirited and economical 
citizens having it in charge. In marked contrast with this stands the erection and cost of the 
New Mint, whose contractor actually performed the modern miracle of completing and deliver- 
ing it over to the Federal Government at a cost of some .?50,000 less than the original appro- 
priation. By a remarkable coincidence, the originally estimated cost of construction was the 
same for both buildings, that is, a million and a h.ilf of dollars. It is hardly necessary to 
remark, however, that the coincidence suddenly ends at that jjoint. 

The Jail, upon the north side of Broadway Street, between Keamy and Dupont, now 
quite convenient to the Old City HaU. If not removed untU the completion of the New City 
Hall it will probably occupy its present site at the arriv.al of the MUlemiium. As in most of 
the larger Arnerican cities petit larceny, misdemeanor, and vagrancy, mth assault and battery, 
or others of the minor offenses, constitute the causes for which fully five sixths of all com-icts 
find their way within its walls. Inclemency of weather and lack of food, wliich statistics have 
demonstrated to be so considerable an element in causing crime among the destitute poor of 
some of our northern and eastern American cities, become hardly appreciable in this land of 
equable temperature and abundant food. Reason upon total depravity as we may, the police 
and crimin.al records of large cities prove that many of the minor crimes, as well as quite an 
ajipreciable ratio of the graver offenses, primarily result from a famished stomach more than 
from a depraved heart or an uncultivated conscience. 



Send your Orders from the Country for Eastern Transplanted Oysters to Morgan & 



p. VAN SCHAACK <S: CO., 70S, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Established 1S62, 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 19 



The Industrial School.— This juvenile jail, the primary department of our municipal 
reformatory mstitutions, occupies a beautiful and Iiealtliful suburban location on the San Jose 
Road, betweu five and si.x miles southwest of the Oity Hall. Its dimensions, accommodations, 
and general condition remain unchanged since last year except by the addition of a larfre stable.' 
As a pleasing proof of the gradual progress of this institution we note the fact, as shown by 
successive reports, that the number of youth committed liy their parents for unmanacability, 
and, especially, the number of those recommitted, annually diminishes. In the distinctiveiy 
reformatory department its management continues that firm, quiet,, and thorouglily-efticient 
discipline which wayward youth most need, while the various industi-ial occupations, both out- 
doors and in, continue as varied and general as the public appropriation permits, constantly 
demonstrating, if demonstration were needed, the indispensable value of profitaUe industry in 
the reclamation of \'icious youth. 

The House of Correction.— Upon the same lot as the Industrial School Buildin", and 
about a hundred yards northeast of it, the New House of Correction is steadily rising. It has 
the general form of a hexagon, with projecting wings in front and at each adjoining side. The 
diameter of the main building is ninety-two feet ; tlie dimensions of each wing forty -four feet by 
one hundred and thirty-seven. The foundation and basement walls are of stone ; the remain- 
ing ^three stories of brick. The contract for its erection was awarded to Demiis Jordan, for 
.$12.3,000, gold coin, in September, 1874, and work immediately commenced. Messrs. Bugbee 
& Son, architects. 

The City and County Hospit.al is located in the southern part of the city, on a lot 
bounded by Nevada, Sierra, and Nebraska streets, and Potrero Avenue, and containing about 
ten acres. The main building faces the west, the entrance being on Potrero Avenuef which 
runs nearly north and south. AH the buildings are of wood with brick basements, except the 
kitchen and laundry which are wholly of brick. The different buihlings are : The administrative 
and dining haU buddings, each three stories high, situated in the center of the block opposite 
each other on either side of the covered corridor, ^vhich runs lengthwise of the premises ; the 
kitchen and launtlry, back of the dining rooms; the gate house, stable, morgue, operating rooms, 
etc., conveniently located in various places, and, lastly, six long pavilions, each two stories 
high, and designed to accommodate sixty -four patients with their nurses. These will contain, 
with the most generous allowance for space, three hundred and eighty-four patients, and are 
considered amply sufficient for present purposes. It is designed, eventually, to have twelve 
paWbons bmlt in pairs on either side of the corridor, and parallel mth the main buUdhig. The 
number of patients in the hospital, July 1, 1874, was three hundred and thirty-seven. In 
addition to those taken in, there are treated at the hospital some ten thousand or more out- 
patients annually. The number of prescriptions put up for this class alone, every year, ia over 
ten thousand. 

Alms House. — In 1867 the erection of such an institution became imperatively necessary 
in order to relieve the City and County Hospital of the permanently disabled and superan- 
nuated who had accumulated for years, and a large, substantial, and commodious wooden build- 
ing was erected for this purpose near Lake Honda. The house will accommodate five hundred 
persons, and up to the present time has proved amply sufficient to meet the pubUc want, the 
average daily number of inmates, during the past year, lia\'ing been less than four hundre<l. 
The expense of maintaining this noble, charitable institution, during the year 1874, as shown by 
the Auditor's Report, was S73,756.38. 

New School Houses. — Probably in no city in the Union is greater interest displayed in 
schools and institutions of learning th.an in San Francisco, and it must be a matter of gr.atifica- 
tion to every parent and friend of education to know that our School Department is exerting 
itself to the uttermost to keep even pace mth the steady and rapid growth of the city. To do 
t]i;.i additional permanent buildings for school purposes became necessary and the erection of 
ti'. c new school houses in different localities determined upon and commenced. One on Green- 
w'lrh Street, between Jones and Leavenworth, to accommodate the large number of pupils in 
tliat quarter who are now attending school in low, dark, and iU-ventilated rented rooms. 
Another on Mission, between Fifteenth and Sixteenth streets, and a third on Geary Street, 
upon a portion of Hamilton i^uare, which has been set apart for school pui-jjoses by the Board 
of Supervisors. As these burtlings are to be of the same size, and differ but little in constmc- 
tion and cost, one description will serve for all. The main building will be fifty-two feet two 
inches by seventy -nine feet seven inches, with two wings, each twelve feet ten inches by thirty- 
five feet. The basement story will be of brick, seven feet six inches high, above which will 
rise three stories of wood, each story to be budt separate, the two lower to be fourteen feet and 
the upper to be sixteen feet, from floor to floor. The top of the first floor to be six feet above 
the grade. They are to be well lighted and ventUated, and supplied with gas, water, and 
every convenience for the comfort of pupils and teachers. They are to be built by Thomas 
Noble & Co., and will cost, respectively, .'S29,500, S2S,000, and .¥26,500. Another and lai-ger 
building is to be erected on Eddy Street, between Polk Street and Van Ness Avenue, by M. E. 
Smith, at a cost of .?37,000. The main structure iviU be of the same dimension as those given 
above vrith two wings, thirty-eight by thirty-five feet each. This building will accommodate 
eighteen classes of sixty each, or one thousaml and eghty pupUs. There is, also, at the conerr 
of Noe and Temple streets, a smaller, four-class budding, just completed, for the accommoda- 



" Cleanliness is next to Godliness! " &o and Eathe at 113 Geary. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory. P. W. Laird, 613jJontgomery cor. Merchaa 



20 SAN FRANCISCO DIBECTOET. 



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tion of the large nuu.ber of families settling in the beautiful valley ^etween is oe Street and the 
« Mission Hills In a.Wition to these it is proposed to move the old Kmcon School House to the 
g ieTt,^ part of the lot facing on Perry Street, and erect, upon the remamder of the lot frontmg 
S on SU™r Street, a large buU'ling which will accommodate six hundred and sixty grammar and 

W , ^""rlauw^'oF Lnteknal Comjiuxicatios. -Under this head one may class the extension of 
old streets-and the opening of new ones; the adoption of new methods of pavmg, and the un 
provement of those alreatly in use; the gra.iing sewenng, ^-^^ paving of both old and nev, 
•rt streets; the grading, curbing, planking, paving, and lapng of crossmgs and sidewalks, with th. 
rt i extension of horse-car routes, and the completion, eqmpment, and operation of newlmes. 
** AMiile it is obviously impracticable to attempt an>-thmg more than the mere mention of most 

J3 1 of these, we subjoin the latest obtainable details of our Horse Railroads, as the most important 
public means of internal communication. 

Sipeet Railroads. 

If streets and avenues arc the city's arteries and veins, the horse car is the most vital cor 
puscle that circulates through them. Indeed, mthout the horee car the busmess and social cir- 
M culation in the outer portions, and especially tlie remote suburbs, would dimmish to positiv 
•o ' stagnation, if it did not wholly cease. But for the horse car the population would pack itseli 
° intS unhealthful density in and about all those quarters most devoted to manufacture, trade, and 
leading occupations, and large cities would presently sutler from a social or cmc '-congestion of 
the htart " It is hardly too much to say that the modem horse car is among the most mdis- 
pensable comUtions of modern metropobtan growth. It is to a city what steam-car and steam- 
ship Unes are to a State or a country. In these modem days of fashionable efleminacy and 
Habbv feebleness, which never walks when it can possibly nde, the horse car virtually faxes the 
ultim'ate limit of suburban growth. The easier, faster, cheaper, more frequent, and abundant 
are the means of transit from center to circumference, the more rapid wiU be the growth, and, 
at the same time, the better the sanitary condition of that city. 

From the wonderfully rapid growth of this city as already stated, one would immediately 
infer that, in respect to this, she enjoys unusual facilities even among the most progressive Amer- 
ican cities. Such is the fact. Few, if any, cities in the Union, of equal population, crowd their 
inhabitants as little. Everybody has room, and the principal cause of that most imusual fact, 
which contributes so directly and so largely to the unequaled healthiness of the city, is the con- 
venience and the cheapness with which laborers and the poorer classes generally can reach 
comparatively roomy and sunny suburban homes by means of plenty of horse cars and low fares. 
Eight companies, o-miiug and operating nearly forty-five miles of routes, about eighty nules 
of track, ranning two hundred and twenty cars, employing seven hundred men and seventeen 
hundred horses, perform this indispensable public service. The aggregate number of passen- 
gers carried over these roads during the year 1S74, exceeded twenty -seven miUion ; gross 
receipts, .$1,350,000. In accordance with usual custom we subjoin them in alphabetic order, 
for ob\-iou3 convenience of reference : 

The C'extr.vl R.ulro.vd Co. owns two main lines, both double track. One runs from the 
water front, on VaUejo Street near Front, to the junction of Eighth and Brannan streets— two 
miles and seven eighths ; the other, from Taylor Street, between Etldy and Turk, to the junc- 
tion of Post Street and Cemeteiy Avenue," Lone Mountain — two miles and a quarter. Total 
length of both lines, with sidings, five miles and one eighth. A branch track from the comer 
of Turk and FiUmore streets, through Turk, Devisadero and Fell streets, to the new Golden 
Gate Park — one nule — is in process of construction, and will be completed, stocked, and operated 
as soon as the Park becomes sufficiently attractive. The company had in 1874 twenty-four cars 
in regidar daily use, sixteen on the Citj' Front Line, and eight on the Lone Moimtain Line — all 
of the usual pattern, seating twenty -two passengers each. It has ninety employes upon its rolls, 
an<l owns and works tno hundred .and twenty horses. The conductors and drivers, one to 
each car, receive from $2. 50 to S2. "5 a day. In fare, the company ailheres to the obnoxious 
old rate of four tickets for a "quarter," and exacts ten cents for a single fare. Passengers who 
desire receive a transfer from either line to the other without extra expense. In 1874 this road 
carried an aggregate of about three million of passengers, making its gross earnings amount 
to §1'.K),000. 

The C'itt Railroad Co., commonly called " Woodward's," from the name of its principal, 
if not exclusive, owner, or " Mission Street," from the name of the street upon which most of 
its property lies, owns and operates one double track, main line — " The Mission Route " — from 
the comer of Second and Mission streets, straight along the latter to Twenty-sixth Street, a 
distance of three miles ; and one branch line — "The City Route " — mostly double track, from 
Woodward's Gardens, Mission Street, between Thirteenth .and Fourteenth, through Mission, 
Fifth, Market, iJupout, and Sutter streets, to the comer of Sutter and Sansom streets, about 
two and one quarter miles. This line is noted for ha\'ing first introduced the " bob-tail, " or light, 
one-horse car, seating but fourteen, ha^-iug no conductor, but requiring each passenger to deposit 
his own f.irc or ticket — which he obtains of the driver through a small brass gate swinging hori- 
zontally in the front door — in a patent receiver with glass front and back, and a tipping bottom 
from which, by pulling a strap, the driver shps or drops each fare or ticket as soon as depos- 



Largest and Best Selected Stock Eastern Oysters at l^organ & Co.'s, 87 Cal. Mark! 



I. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO, 705, 708, 710, 712, 7H, and 715 Kearny, Established 1852. 

PROGRESS OP THE CITY. 21 



ited, into a metal box below, which is unlocked and emptied of its contents once each round 
trij) by the secretary or his agent, as the car passes the depot or the otfice. This company owns 
forty cars, besides a number of large, opeu cars for summer excursions ; two hundred and 
twenty horses, and regularly employs thirty-five drivers, at $2.50 per day. It sells five tick- 
ets for twenty-five cents, charges but five cents a single fare, keeps its cars cleaner and better 
lighted, runs them oftener and faster, and, upon tlie whole, pleases the general pubhc better 
than any other line. During 1874 it carried about four million of passengers. 

The Clay Street Hill Railroad Co. is remarkaWe for combining steam and horse power 
in the traction of its cars. The exceeding steepness of the grade along the first seven blocks 
from its eastern terminus westward, in some parts exceeding one foot in eight, renders it 
wholly impracticable, if not quite impossible, for any ordinary span of horses to pull up any but 
the smallest cars and the lightest loads. In this juncture the ingenious and enterprising com- 
pany, encouraged by energetic citizens living upon the adjacent hights or o\vning adjacent 
property, became the pioneers in the employment of a steam engine acting upon an endless 
underground steel-wire cable, by which to draw loaded cars up the gi-ade swiftly, smoothly, and 
safely. At the top of the grade stands a stationary engine of thirty-five horse power. This 
operates heavy machinery, which steadily winds the mre cable at a uniform rate, in one direction, 
up one track and down the other. This rope cable is of the best steel wire, upward of three inches 
in circumference, about one mile and three eighths long, and weighs nearly five tons. The cars 
receive the motive power through tenders or dummies, coupled to them in front and provided 
with strong gripping-clamps or grippers which reach down through a narrow continuous slit or 
slot nearly under the center of the car, and firmly grip the cable which instantly communicates 
its motion to both tender and car. They stop by releasing their grip upon the running cable 
beneath and remain stationary, or avoid running doini hill by four strong brakes which, 
instead of acting directly upon the wheels as usual, present four long, fiat surfaces which, when 
pushed squarely down upon the track exert a friction which proves amply sufficient to hold 
them securely in place without the least sign of slipping under even the hea™st load. Judg- 
mg by the throngs of spectators and passengers for months after the opening of this road, it 
was for a long time an open question whether it was the greater mechanical curiosity or muni- 
cipal convenience. The steep gi-ade, up and down which the company employs steam power, 
extends from the inner or city end, at the corner of Clay and Kearny streets, to Leavenworth 
Street, a distance of seven blocks, or nearly three quarters of a mile ; thence to the outer or 
suljurban terminus, nearly two miles, the oars are drawn by horses in the usual manner. Among 
the minor conveniences of this line, the pulilic notice with pleasure that it was the first and, 
thus far, remains the only one which provides its cars with clocks, and keeps them, like the 
other equipments of the line, always in excellent running order and sharply ' ' on time. " Mechan- 
ically and financially, the road has proved a gratifying success to its ingenious and enterprising 
projectors and owners. This company also, as well as the Central, proposes to extend its line 
through Clay Street and First Avenue to the Golden Gate Park at as early a day as an obrious 
public demand shall justify the expense. The present working force is thirty-three men, 
twenty-two horses, and fourteen cars. Five tickets for a "quarter ; " single fares at same rate. 
During the whole period of its operation, since September, 1873, the road has carried nearly two 
million of passengers without accident of any kind. At present its daily travel averages about 
four thousand, and the consumption of coal, fifteen hundred pounds. As far as known it is the 
only road of the kind not only in the United States luit in the world. 

The Market Street Horse Railway Co.'s main line begdns in Market Street, near the 
water front, and runs along Market and Valencia streets to Twenty-sixth Street, nearly four miles, 
over a fine double track the whole distance. Its Hayes Valley branch runs from tlie junction 
of Market and Hayes streets, through Hayes, Laguna and five other streets, to the comer of 
O'Farrell and De\'isadero streets, nearly two mdes. Since August, 1874, the cars of this route 
have been rumiing as a separate line from the water-front terminus at the foot of Market Street, 
direct to the tenninus above named, thus avoiding the former inconvenience of changing cars at 
the Hayes Valley junction. Upon both lines the company now runs about thirty cars, employs 
ninety men, and o'wns two hundred and forty-five horses. It sells five tickets for twenty-five cents, 
pays "its conductors and drivers §2.50 a clay, and during 1874 received §163,912 for carrjang 
three million two hundred and twentv-six thousand four hundred and twenty passengers. Its 
cars are chiefly remarkable for unusual width and roominess, and, consequently, superior ventila- 
tion, -Hnth greater comfort, and usually make quick time. . 

TuE North Beach and Mission- Railroad Co. runs two main, double-track lines, having 
a general direction at right angles to each other and intersecting at the corner of Fourth and 
Folsom streets, where either transfers to the other without extra charge. The one commonly 
called the City Route, has its southern terminus on Fourth Street, corner of Townsend, at the 
offices of the Central, Southern Pacific, and California Pacific Railway companies, whence it 
extends through Fourth and Kearny and other important streets to the junction of Mason and 
Francisco streets. North Beach, a distance of two and seven eighths miles. Tlie other, more gene- 
rally known as the Mission Route, runs from the corner of Kearny and California streets, domi 
the'latter to and along Battery Street, through First and along Folsom to Twenty-sixth Street 
its southerly terminus, about "three miles and three quarters. Total length of both lines, all 
double track, six and five eighths miles. On both lines the company regularly runs between 



Children's Hair Cut in the most Eecherche Manner at 113 Geary, 



r. "W. Laird, San Traiioisoo Jewelry Manufactory, 513 Montgomery cor. Merchant.! 



SAN FRANCISCO DIEECTORT. 



tliirty anil forty cars, owns two hundred and fifty horses, employs a hundred and thirty men, 
pays'ita conductors and drivers S2.50 a day, sells five tickets for a "quarter," and charges no 
more in projiortion for a single ticket. During 1874 it transported five million passengers. 
Its gross receipts for the same period were about §2.51,453. 

The Omnibus R.\iluo.\I) Co., like several others, has its two routes, or main douhle-track 
lines. The first, or City Route, commonly called the North Beach and South Park Line, has its 
southern terminus at tlie" foot of Third Street, near the water front, whence it runs in a generally 
northerly direction along Third Street, through Howard, Second, Montgomery, or Sansom, 
.Tacksoui Stcjckton, and Powell streets to the junction of the latter with Bay Street, three miles 
in all. Going northerly the cars of this line run from Second to Wasliington streets through 
Montgomery, hut when returning, drive from Washing'tou to Second streets through Sansom, 
until noon. 1 luring the afternoon they reverse this arrangement, and in the evening tliey 
run through Montgomery Street only in both directions. Between Sansom or Montgomery 
and Stockton streets tlie ears go westerly up Jackson Street, over a grade so steep that the 
company employs twelve of its horses as extras, or tow -horses, to help the regular spans 
up this most difficult pitch attempted by any horse-line in the city. Returning, the cars 
make their easterly transit from Stockton to Montgomery Street, by going down Washing- 
ton Street. A branch line, single track, extends from Third Street, easterly, down Braunan 
Street to the Pacific Mail Steamship Co. 's Docks, conveying passengers to and from the main 
City Line without extra expense. The other main line of this company — the Mission Route — 
starts from Montgomery Street, between Jackson and Washington, and runs, over a double 
track, southerly, through Montgomery Street, along Mai'ket Street to Third, through Third 
Street to Howard, along which, westerly and then southerly, it finishes its course at the 
corner of Twenty-sixth Street, three and one half miles from its opposite terminus. Total 
length of both routes, six and one half miles ; of track, thirteen miles. On the Mission Line the 
company runs twelve cars. It has recently commenced running ten of the most elegant, best 
constructed, most tlioroughly ecpiii^ped, excellently lighted, convenient, and comfortable one- 
horse cars that the skiU and taste of that veteran car builder, John Stephenson, could construct, 
ami has ten more of the same pattern now on their way hither. /~3jnong several modern improve- 
ments in the new cars, the most notable, as the one likely to prove most generally accept.xble, 
especially to ladies without escorts, is the new arrangement of the check strap communicating 
with the driver's bell. Just inside the car it divides into two, one of which runs along the upper 
corner, on eacli side, from end to end. From these, at convenient intervals, short, connecting 
straps h;mg sufficiently low to be conveniently grasped and puUed without rising. Thus, a lady 
cm readily give the stopping signal without leaving her seat or asking any one to do it for her. 
Over the <-'ity Line the company runs from eighteen to twenty cars. On both lines it emjiloys — 
.as nearly as can be estunated in the .absence of official figures, which they appear strangely 
reluctant to give — about a hundred and thirty men and not far from thi'ee hundred horses. 
It pays its comluctors and drivers .f2. 50 a day, sells five tickets for twenty-five cents, .asks but 
half a dime for a single fare, and transfers patrons without extra expense from either line to 
the other, at the corner of Third and Howard streets, where the two main lines come nearest 
together. According to the Viest practicable estimate this company cai'rieil nearly five million 
passengers in 1874, and received therefrom gross earnings which closely approximated $250,000. 

ThePotrf.ho andBay View Railroad. — This line begins at the junction of Post and Mont- 
gomery streets, and runs somewhat westerly but mainly soutlierly, through Post, Dupont, Mar- 
ket, Fifth, Bluxome, Fourth, and Kentucky streets, and Railroad Avenue, to Thirty-fourth Av- 
enue, South San Francisco. By agreement with the Market Street Railway Co. , this line also 
runs its cars along Market Street to the corner of Sansom. Its total length slightly exceeds 
five miles, mostly single track. Fcu-ty-two men, fifty-seven horses, and fifteen ears make up 
the list of employes and the inventory of live .and rolling stock. Four fares on this line cost 
twenty-five cents ; a single f.are, five cents on the northern section, and ten cents on the south- 
ern, the road being operated in two sections connecting with e.aeh other at Townsend Street. 
The jiassenger who goes from either secticm to the other must pay another fare. The greater 
portion of tlie southerly section of this road runs over water, crossing Mission Bay and Islais 
Oeek by suljstantial and expensive bridges. As soon as the Southern Pacific Railroad Co. etiect 
the eontemidated change in the route of their i>reseut ti-unk line from Valencia Street to the 
.shore line of Mission Bay, the bay wUl be gradually filled in untd the present long, wooden bridges 
become bulkheads ahuig the new water front. Upon the completion of this plan the property 
interests and gener.al importance of the Potrero and South San Fr.ancisco vnil experience an 
immediate, very decided, and unquestionably permanent .appreciation. These localities appear 
destined, at no dist.aut day, to become great manufacturing and ship-building centers. 

Si'itkh Stuekt Raii.uoad.— The main trunk road, known as the City Route, begins at the 
junction of Broadway and Davis streets, on the city front, and runs thence tlirough Broadway, 
I'.attery, Sutter, ami Polk streets to the junction of the latter with Broadway .Street, a distance 
of two anil one third miles. One branch, the Larkiu Street Route, extends from the comer of 
Sutter and Larkin streets, through Larkiu, Ninth, and Mission streets to AVoodward's Gardens, 
over the track of tlio City Railroad w,lnch grants the use of so much of its track in return for 
the equivalent privilege of running the cars of its northern br.auch line over the Sutter Street 
track from Dupont to Sansom streets. The second branch, extends from the corner of Bush 



Get your Eastern Transplanted Oysters from MOEOAN & CO., 87 California Market 



C. p. VAN SCHAACE & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Established 1852. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 



23 



and Polk streets through Bush, Fillmore, and California streets, and Cemetery Avenue, and to 
the junction of the latter -n-ith Geary Street, a distance of one and seven eighths miles. This 
line, carrNang passengers direct to Lone Mountain and the neighboring cemeteries, is known a« 
the Lone" Mountain Branch. The main line and nearly aU of both branches are double-track 
roads. From the corner of Union and Laguna streets a third branch — the Presidio — rung -n-ith 
a siinJle track, through Union, Pierce, Greenwich, and Baker streets, three miles to Harbor Vie-w, 
on the Bay shore, near the Presidio. StiU a fourth branch, the Pacifio Street, runs along that 
street from the main line at Polk Street to Fillmore Street, a distance of eight blocks, or 
about one mile. The total length of the Sutter Street Road, including branches, is eight and 
one quarter miles. The company o-svns t-wo hundred horses and thirty oars. Several of the 
latter are mid-way in size between the usual doable and the modern single-horse car, owing 
to the frequency and extent of steep grades, of which this road has a larger proportion than 
any other in the city using hoi-ses exclusively. The smaller size of these cars enables theni, 
unusually hea\Tly loaded, to dispense with the extra tow horse, such as the Omnibus Company is 
regularly compelled to use in surmounting its Jackson Street grade with cars of the usual size 
and oarrj-ing ordinary loads. Among the newer ears it has one single-horse oar of a peculiarly 
novel pattern, known as the "balloon car," ha-i-ing an oval outline and a dome top, but chieily 
distimmished by the fact that the body of the ear turns at will upon the truck which 
remaiSs stationary, thus enabling the compmy not only to dispense with the turntable some- 
times employed, but relieving the driver from the necessity of unhitching his horses, driving 
them round and re-attaching them to the other end of the car. The company employs ninety 
men pays its conductors and drivers §2.50 a day, and is one of the three which stdl seU but 
four tickets for a "quarter," and charges ten cents for a smgle fare. The main bne and aU 
the branches, except the Presidio, exchange transfers -with each other. In 18/4 the company 
reports one miUion eight humlred and two thousand six hundred and thirty-nine passengers 
carried, and §125,000 gross receipts. 

Stejtm Railroads. 

SxEiM RAILROAD.S.— From the city's facilities for internal and suburban intercommunication 
the mind naturally passes next to her prorisions for rapid transit to points beyond the suburbs, 
and thence successively to aU those places within the State, upon the coast, or on the continent, 
-with which business demands rapid, sure, and frequent communication. 

Our city, now in the middle of its third decade, is yet in its infancy, or at most, just entering 
upon its eariy vouth. It is not yet too late to prepare for the immense and rapid growth 
which ine^tablv awaits us. Our first native-born generation has hardly yet attained its 
maioritv, and is but just beginning to make itself felt in the admimstration of public attairs 
Many of our founders yet survive with undiminished vigor and full of experience and counsel 
for the guidance of those who have ab-eady become their juvenUe partners m pubhc as weU as 
private business, and, in the course of nature, must presently succeed them m the management 
of pubUc affairs. It is onlv supreme selfishness which could cause these founders ot a city to 
refuse so to order their present plaus as to provide, as wisely and as broadly as possible, no* o^y 
for themselves and those who shall immeliately follow them, but for the whole vast future, 
however remote. Within ten years New York has discovered that she has ahnost irremediably 
lost nearly half a miUion of inhabitants and half a bUlion of wealth by failing to provide or hav- 
ing faded to begin to proride, twenty years ago, for ample means of frequent and rapid transit 
between the central business portions of the city and the remoter suburbs and outlymg tlistricts, 
which the erection of private residences or occupation by modest homes and tenement blocks 
would have speedily converted into additional and constantly-extending suburbs, i ifteen years 
ago business had crowded residence so far north that the pass.age between store or shop and 
home required two hours a day. Few could stand a greater loss of time _ than this, and from 



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populous by day and deserted at night. Previous to - , y , , - 

population and "wealth, that each successive census had become a fresh and welcome surprise 
to her citizens. At the rate of increase which had seemed to have become estabbshed, but 
twenty years more would ■^-" ^^" "-"-* -*" *-" """-'" "< inhabitants and two bdlion of 
wealth. But, in that same 

expansion as compared -with „.v,.^....-., ... 1 ., , , .. i- j.- 

with her unprecedented growth experienced a very sensible and as i* Proved, a oonhm ous 
diminution in ratio. Right across the Xorth River lay Jersey City and the whole of Hudson 
County as an almost limitless suburb surrounding it. New \ orkers began to discover that they 
could "there find or found homes at less original cost, and at a far less expense of time and 
money in the daily double transit. And they also found that they could reach the eastern and 
southern suburbs of Brooklyn quicker than the northern ones of their own city. The natura 
result foUowed. During the ten years from 1860 to 1870, Hudson Cmraty, ^ew Jersey, gained 
neariv four hundred per cent, in "population, while New York gained but eighty per cent, only 
one fi'fth as fast. Upon the publication of the census of 1870, New Y ork began to realize the 
immensity of her mistake. Her eyes suddenly opened to the fact that, had she built a double 






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Only Hairdressing Saloon appropriated Ezclusively to use of Ladies at 113 Geary. 



JEWELRY made to order and EEP AIRED ty D. ¥. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Merchant j 



24 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



track accommodation steam railway— or even two of them — from the vicinity of her business 
centers through her northerly suburbs out to the Harlem River and its vicinity, running ample 
sets of accommodation trains, some running through, at once, to Harlem and its adjoining 
suburbs, and others following and stopping at every second or third cross-street along the older 
and.nearer suburbs of the city proper, she might have kept the greater portion of this immense 
migratory population which nightly tiits to homes beyond her limits, besides retaining their 
stiU more immense increase of wealth almost wholly within her own municipal limits and 
regularly tributary to her own revenue. From the business centers of New York out to Harlem is 
about eight miles. In 18(i0 railways like those suggested could have been built for §500,000 
a mile, or a total cost, of course, of $4,000,000. The wisdom of that day decided to save the 
§4,000,000 and, in doing it, lost the miUion of inhabitants subsequently di-iven not only out 
of the city and county but even into the adjoining State, and carrying with them ten times 
the cost of the railroad. Besides this, and worse than this, the now enormously-increased 
cost, if not the absolute impossibility of obtaining the right of way through several miles of 
former suburlis which have since become almost as densely populated as, and at night even more 
so than, the old heart of the city, makes the city powerless to ever remedy that one gigantic blun- 
der, by any railways along the surface level. Almost the only approximate remedy — the only 
apparently practicable, and, at best, but a partial substitute for the broad, double-track accom- 
modation surface lines which might then have been built with such comparative ease and cheap- 
ness — appears to be the construction of elevated railways from the vicinity of the Battery, along 
both flanks of the city, out to the Harlem River. It is estimated that these could be properly 
built for 1300,000 a mile. 

The recent report of the American Society of Civil Engineers upon the feasibility of the dif- 
ferent plans recommended for rapid transit between the centers and the suburbs of New York, 
represents underground railways as so completely impracticable as to be wholly out of the ques- 
tion, and favoi's the construction of elevated raib-oads. The single experimental road of this 
kind, alreaily built along Greenwich Street, within two blocks of and parallel with the North 
River, has had a very perceptible effect in shortening the city, by bringing its extremes very 
sensibly nearer together, in point of time as well as in degree of comfort. The committee sug- 
gest three improvements : Additional braces to diminish vibration and increase securitj' ; a 
change to narrow gauge, and the replacing of its present iron rails by steel. The figures of the 
committee show that such roads camiot onlj' be made to meet all the wants of safe, convenient, 
and rapid transit, but to yield a fair return on the investment from the very outset. Their dis- 
cussions are still in progress ; local capitalists and wealthy citizens are subscribing their thou- 
sands ; repeated public meetings are exciting and increasing popular interest, and very consid- 
erable and immediate results bid fair to follow. Let us, of San Francisco, be wise in time. 

Outside Railkoads. — Owing to her peculiar^ peninsula position, San Francisco has but a 
single steam railroad — the Southern Pacific — starting within city limits and directly coimecting 
her with the outside world. All the others necessarily end their rails at the nearest convenient 
point upon the main land .across the Bay, whence they comiect with the city proper in the usual 
way, by swift and commodious steam ferry boats, landing their passengers at adjacent slips along 
the city's eastern or harbor front. Of these the western portion of the great Trans-continental 
Railroad necessarily claims the foremost place. 

Central Pacific. — The compilation of the official reports for any fiscal year necessarily 
involves so great an aggregate of computation, with such infinity of detail that it becomes well- 
nigh impossible, or at least, has thus far proved so, to reach the fuU report of certain and final 
results much before the middle of the year following. Mainly through the courtesy of Secretary 
Miller we present the latest obtainable statistics. The total length of track is one thousand four 
hundred and thirty-one miles. This aggregate comprises eight hundred and eighty-three miles 
of iiiain track, from San Francisco to Ogden ; one hundred and fifty-two miles of the Oregon 
di\-ision, from Roseville to Reading ; two hundred and seventeen miles of the Visalia division, 
from Lathrop to Sumner ; Oakland and Alameda branches twenty-one miles ; San Josti branch, 
from Niles, seventeen miles ; total length of sidings, one hundred and forty-one miles. The rolling 
stock comprises four thousand three humb-ed and seventy-one cars of all kinds, exclusive of 
engines. The floating stock, including bay and river steamers, ferry boats, and barges, numbers 
thirty different craft, with a total registered tonnage of fourteen thousand three hundred and 
seventeen tons, which would propably equal an aggregate carrjdng capacity of fully twenty 
thousand tons. During 1874 this railroad carried one million sixty-two thousand six hundred 
and fourteen tons of freight ; transported six hundred and twenty thousand two hundred and 
seventeen passengers ; employed, in all capacities, neai-ly one thousand persons, and paid for 
their services upward of .$1,000,000. The excess of passengers brought west over the number 
carried east, in_other words the gain to the population of the State on through passengers by rail 
for the year 1874, was thirty thousand one hundred and forty-one. As is generally understood, 
though not ahyays known by parties liraig at a distance, the Central Pacific RaOroad does not 
strictly lead directly into, or out of, San Francisco. The end of its rail — its western terminus 
proper— is on the head of the immense Oakhand Pier, whence its passengers and freight complete 
their long overlaml journey in steam ferry boats which quickly transport them across the 
remaining three miles of San Francisco Bay still necessary to be passed before they fairly land 
in the Pacific metropolis. 



Buy your Eastern Transplanted Oysters from first hand, Morgan & Co., 87 Cal. Market, i 



, p. VAN SCHAACE & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 7H, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OP THE CITY. 25 



SorTHERN Pacific. — This company was incorporated for the purpose of constructing and 
operatiiii: a railway from San Francisco to a point on the Colorado Eiver at or near Fort Mojave, 
au estimated distance of six hundred and twenty -nine miles, there to connect with the Atlantic 
and Pacific R.aUway or Thii-ty-fifth Parallel Route, with a branch ria Tehachepi Pass and I^os 
Anceles, to Fort Yuma, a distance of three hundred and fifty-three mUes, where it is to connect 
with the Texas Pacific Railway. The road is now completed and in operation from San Fr.ancisco 
to Tres Pinos. a distance of one hundred miles. Besides this a branch — called the Pajaro Branch 

commences at Camadero, eighty-two miles south of San Francisco, and runs thence by way 

of Pajaro, near Watsonville, to'Soledad, sixty miles. "Within the year a section of fifty miles on 
the Los Angeles division, running from San Fernandino to Spadra, has been completed. In 
December, 1874, the Los Angeles and San Pedro RaUroad, running from Los Angeles to 
WUminaton, twenty and a half miles was consolidated with the Southern Pacific, thus gi\-ing 
a total of three huncb-ed and five and five one-hundredths miles of this road now completed and 
in operation. The branch line from Florence Station to Anaheim, twenty-one miles, is in course 
of construction and nearly finished. The completion of this route, -n-ith its numerous and exten- 
sive connections, is of great importance to our State, as it will open up business not only with a 
large and fertile portion of Southern California, but with Arizona and Northern Mexico. Upon 
completing its connection -n-ith the Texas Pacific Railway it will furnish a short line from San 
Francisco, through Texas to New Orleans and the country bordering on the G ulf of Mexico. 
This -will connect the Southern Pacific States with the GuU States and the Southern Atlantic 
States, liy a more nearly aii--line route, and one which the snows of winter will never obstruct. 
This road is the only steam railway running directly into San Francisco, and actually landing 
its passengers fairly" within the city without the intervention of ferry boats. 

The C.u,lFOENl.i Pacific employs upon its cars and steamers and in and about its offices 
some three hundred men, whose annual wages aggregate S250,000. Among the more iniport.ant 
items of its annual business for 1874, one hundred and eight thousand three hundred and ten 
passengers brought, eighty-eight thousand five hundred and fifty-five carried, -srith forty-one 
thousand eight hundred "and' twenty-three tons of freight from San Francisco, and thirteen 
thousand eight hundred and sixty tons toward the city, constitute the chief. Its passenger and 
freight business is constantly increasing -svith that of aU the California railroads. The amount 
received in 1874 for the transportation of passengers, freight, mails, express matter, etc., was 
SI. 054, 066. 14. The total amount of freight carried was one hundred and ninety two thousand 
eight hundi-ed and three tons. , , ^\ -^ c 

The S.vx Fr.vncisco a>-d North Pacific, extending northerly across the bay thirty-tour 
miles to Donohue, and thence by raU up the beautiful Petaluma and Russian River valleys 
through Santa Rosa and Healdsbiirg to Cloverdale, fifty-four miles farther, is among the best-con- 
structed and best-managed roads directly connecting -svith the city. Besides its increase of 
passengers and freight naturally resulting from the fertility and steady gro-ni;h in population of 
the charming country which it "traverses, by also furnishing the quickest and pleasantest route 
to the Oeysers, it is constantlv recei%-ing an increased proportion of pleasure travel both of our 
own residents and of the visit'ing throng of tourists from abroad, whose patronage annuaUy con- 
stitutes a relatively larger factor in the prosperity of all main lines of public travel throughout 

California. c lo-- • ii. 

The North Pacific Coast Rail-way.— This road, formally opened January 5, Ibio, is the 
first narrow gauge, directly or closely connecting -irith San Francisco, which has yet been actually 
constructed. Startim' from deep w'ater at Saucehto on the northern shore of the bay, m Mann 
Countv, and but six miles from San Francisco, it runs northerly through the heavy redwood 
forests alternating -svith the rich grazing regions of that county, fifty-one miles to lomales the 
present temporary terminus ; whence it wiU run up the coast, crossmg Russian River about tour 
miles from its mouth ; thence, still northerly, keeping near the coast, tapping the more ha bit- 
able and beautiful seaward valleys of Sonoma County, to Gualala, crossmg the (,u.alala Kiyer 
in the town of the same name, occupying the extreme southwestern corner of Jlendocino County, 
and famous as the outlet of a very extensive and valuable lumber countrj-. Ihe route is 
admirably selected, the grades easy and safe, the work thoroughly performed the locomotives 
and cars "of the most approved patterns, the stations and piers convement and substantial, tlie 
connecting boats accommodate their passengers weU, and make frequent trips, while the pros- 
pects of the road indicate that this most important experiment of enterprismg capitalists will 
not only begin to oay from its very opening, but insure a constantly-increasing diralend. 

B\Y Shore Lixe.— Besides the roads already enumerated heavy capitahsts, who generally 
succeed in what they undertake, propose the construction of a new double track, street rad line, 
running southward from the city proper, across Mission Bay, along or near the Potrero water 
front, by .'^outh San Francisco and the Dry Dock at Hunter's Point, and thence skirting the Q 
west shore of the Bay, at lea.st to its southern extremity, fifty miles more or less. As not a .- 
spade full of earth has yet been lifted in the construction of this Ime, it cannot strictly claim j^ 
place among the events marking the actual progress achieved in 1874. Thus far it more prop- ^ 
erly ranks among the plans than the performances of that year. The obvious and increasing g 
need of such a road, however, together with the number, financial resources and executive abil- g- 
ity of the parties interested, and the preliminaries already settled upon, combme to encourage the i . 
i beUef that the present year will witness at least the beginning of this very important new railway. | 



Sp 



The most Artistic Work in Hairdressing is Performed at 113 Geary. 



D. "W. Laird, Manufaoturing Jeweler, Wholesale and Retail, cor. Merchant and Mont 



26 SAN FRANCISCO DIBECTOBT. 



Stramshlp Unes. 

Six regularly estalilished lines of ocean-going steamships now radiate from this port, north, 
south, and west. As the most important among these stands that company whose name and 
fame are second only to that of the State, with whose history it became so early coniaected, and 
in whose general and esjjecially whose commercial interests it has ever since maintained so 

imtiortant a part : , „ i j., • • ^i. u j. 

The Pacific Mail Steamship Co.— With a single exception— the Cunard— this is the oldest 
steam navigation company in existence. It is the largest company ever organized as distinctively 
American, and sailing under the stars and stripes. The wi-ecking, burning, and disablmg of 
some of its largest ships ; the stock-jobbing in Wall Street ; the opposition of rival lines upon 
the ocean and the coinjiletion of the Central Paciho Railroad ; the disclosure of the disburse- 
ment, by its .agents, of three quarters of a million of dollars in the effort to obtain from Congress 
an additional half million of annual subsidy ; and, finally, the refusal of the Post-office Depart- 
ment to pay the subsidy previously received, on account of the company's failure to come to 
time in the fulfillment of its contract in regard to the time of completing and placing in service 
some of its latest, largest, and finest ships ; aU these have combined to create in the public mind 
tlu-oughout the country an unusual combination of distrust and disgust, most damaging to the 
company. A change of management, and a change of base by remo^-ing its headquarters from 
New York to this city, thus locating in the midst of the merchants from whom its chief support 
has come, and, miint 'mine in the future, in a constantly-increasing degi-ee, would prove among 
the most certain and powerful means of restorinfj public confidence, and retrieving at once its 
reputation and its fortunes. A fleet of thirty hrst-class steamships of wood and iron, -n-ith an 
aggregate carrying capacity of nearly one hundred thousand tons, and constantly traversing 
regular routes whose total length nearly equals the circumference of the globe, present an array of 
naval statistics of which several hicdily respectable second-class nations might well lie proud. 
Among the latest additions to its fleet of iron steamsphips, the City of Peking and the C'ity 
of Tokio, in size, model, strength, and speed, surpass anything yet known in the merchant 
marine ser%'ice of the world. Iron propellers, four hundred and twenty-three feet long, forty- 
eight feet wide, haring a registered tonnage of five thousand five hundred ; passenger accommoda- 
tions for one hundred and fifty in the cabin and one thoiLsand five hundred in the steerage, are 
particulars which convey to any mind familiar with nautical matters some partial idea of the 
positive grandeur of these inonarchs of the seas. In perfeotness of proportion, beauty of model, 
and strength of construction, the shipliuilder's art has never surjiassed, probably never equaled, 
these ocean le\aathans, while in the mdispensable point of speed they easily rival that of the 
earlier railway trains. In fact, the terms of the contract require, and the builders — John 
Roach & Sons — bind themselves under a heavy forfeit, that the ships shall make fifteen miles 
an hour at sea. This would give them a daily speed of three hundred and sixty miles. At this 
rate the seven thousand-mile voyage from San Francisco to Hongkong will occcupy less than 
twenty days. Besides these ocean monarchs, the company have contracted ^yith the same 
builders for three more first-class, iron-screw ships for the great China Line, each of which is 
to be three hundred ami sixty-two feet long, with a can-ying capacity of eight hundred steer- 
age passengers and three thousand tons of freight. The builders contract that these ships shall 
be the fastest in the world, having an average speed of sixteen knots an hour. Two others, of 
a different class, are also to be added to the line. The five ships will cost over $4,000,000. 
The company runs four different lines. The oldest and best known is the New York and 
San Francisco Line, commonly called the Isthmus Route. Four side-wheel and five iron-screw 
boats, of over three thousand tons each, constitute this line ; a ship leaves New York every 
other Saturday and San Francisco alternate Wednesdays, at noon. Tlie only way port at 
which these ships regularly touch, is the Mexican port of Acapulco. Its Central American and 
Mexican Line comprises four iron screws, of two thousand tons each, and three side- wheelers. 
This line makes regular fortnightly trips between San Francisco and Panama, calling at some 
twenty Mexican and Central American way ports ; a ship leaves San Francisco at noon every 
other Thursday. The great Japan and China Line, which might properly be called the Americo- 
Asiatic, or great Central Trans-Pacific Line, embracing a larger arc of the earth's cii-cumference 
than any regularly established route has ever before attempted, is that upon which this great 
company seems now concentrating its chief attention, and stocking with the largest and finest 
ships ever known to the naval or merchant marine service of the world. It has four immense 
iron screws, some of tliem of over five thousand tons each, and four wooden side-wheelers of 
nearly cfjual size, and five iron screws of four thousand tons each now in process of construction. 
From this fleet of thirteen magnificent steamships, with an aggregate carrying capacity of 
seventy-five thousand tims, the company dispatches a ship from San Francisco at noon of 
every other Saturday, and one from Hongkong upon alternate Wednesdays. The company's 
fourth and last line is the Shanghae Branch immediately comieeting with the preceding. It 
comprises fcuir wooden side-wheelers of two thousand five hunclred tons each, one of which 
leaves Yokohama for Slianghae, by the way of the inland sea of Japan, and calling at Hiogo 
and Nagasaki, four times a month. The company's comiection with other lines than its own 
brandies, are as follows : At Hongkong with English and French steamers for the upper ports 
of India, and, by the way of the Suez Canal, with the Mediten-anean and Atlantic ports of 



MOR&AIT & CO., 87 Cal. Market, always have the Best Eastern Transplanted Oysters) 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



PROGRESS OE THE CITY. 27 



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southern and western Europe. The New York and S>an Francisco Line connects at Panama with 
the Pacific Steam Na^-igation Co.'s lines to all the important Pacific ports of South America. 
At AspinwaU it connects vnth the Royal Mail Steam Packet Co. , direct to Liverpool ; with the 
Hamburg- American Steam Packet Co., to Hamburg; -n-ith the Compagnie Generale Trans- 
Atlantique, to France. Within a year an additional line of the smaller ships of this company, 
wliich formerlv pUed between San Francisco and the chief ports of Southern California and 
Mexico, has become the projierty of the 

GooDALL. Xelson ANT) Perkins Steasishtp Co. which, with the youthful vitality and vigor 
of a new and strong finn, is fast taking its place among the foremost steamship companies of 
the Pacific Coast. This company o-rnis sixteen sea-going steamers, of which two are iron and 
eleven are propellers. In measurement, they range from two hunched to one thousand and 
three hundred tons, having an aggregate carrjHng capacity of upwards of ten thousand tons. 
The company employs most of thes'e ships, together with several smaller steamers, upon its main 
or Southern Coast Line, pljTng between San Francisco and San Diego, and touching at all the 
more important intermediate ports. It also runs a northern coast line to Victoria, which carries 
the English mails. It employs, directly and indirectly, about five hundred men ; has a monthly 
pay roll of nearly §30,000, and dispatches, upon an average, one ship every other day. As the 
eoiupanv, under'its present organization, or, at least, with its present Hst of ships and Knes, has 
been doing business considerablv less than a year it is yet premature to attempt any statement 
of annuallreight roll or passenger list. It is safe to say, however, that their aggregate of freight O 
exceeds that of any other line upon this coast. Inaugairated but ten years since, and then 
commencing with but a single small steamer, the imprecedentedly rapid, and yet always safe, 
growth of this company, sufliciently demonstrates the energy and sagacity of its owners and 
management. t, i j 

The Oregon Steajiship Co. dispatches a steaihship regularly every ten days to Portland, 
Oregon, where they connect -with steamers for Puget Sound and Alaska, as well as with the 
main railways of the more important part of Oregon. 

The Colorado Ste.uiship Co. — Two ocean steamships, four river steamers, and five barges, 
constitute the present fleet of this company. It dispatches a ship every twenty days for the 
Colorado River and the adjacent ports of the Jlexican Coast, as well as for the mtenor locabties 
Ij-ini' along the river, or using the river as the highway of their commerce. Their vessels range 
in size from one hundred and fiftv to one thousand tons, and have a total carrying capacity of 
five thousand tons. The four river steamers are stem-wheelers of the kind often denommated 
wheelbarrows. This line has six agencies ; employs about two hundred men ; can-ies the 
Mexican and Wells, Fargo & Co.'s mails, and does no inconsiderable portion of its business in 
transporting troops and supplies for the United States Government. The details of their 
passenger travel and freight transportation the company prefer to withold from publication. 

The ArsTHALiAN and Ajiekicax Steamship Co. nms six powerful, Clyde-buUt, iron-screw 
steamers from San Francisco to New South "Wales and New Zealand. These ships range m size 
from two thousand five hundred to three thousand five hundred tons. One of them leaves San 
Francisco on the fourth Saturday of each month, or as soon thereafter as the closed mails from 
Europe for Australia, arrive in San Francisco, ina the Overland Railroad, from New York. On 
both the outward and return voyages the ships of this line touch at Honolulu, Sandmch Islands, 
and Handavan, Fiji Islands. As eariy as practicable, the company mtends to double the 
frequency of their- present trips. The 0T(-nership of this company is nearly equally divided 
between EngUsh and American shareholders, thus making it an international company m the 
fullest sense of the term. . i v i- 

Before finally lea%-ing this topic of steamship lines, it seems not only strictly pertinent but 
also to be actually demanded by the present state of pubUc mterest upon both continents, to 
append a brief statement of some of the advantages of our great American Trans-Continental 
and Trans-Pacific links in the Xeic Highway Around the World. The ex-periences of neariy five 
years indicate that the established current of travel does not easily or quickly change its chan- 
nels. The simple fact of the opening of a new, shorter, quicker, cheaper, and m aU respects better, 
route than any previouslv known, seems to require considerable time to work itselt tairly into tne 
understanding or, at leist, the practical appreciation of the merchants and travelers who are 
likely to receive its greatest advantages. 

To passencers between England or eastern Europe and Japan and Chma, India, or Australia, 
the actual distance, by the way of the Suez Canal, is unquestionably less, but m the very 
important and usually decisive particulars, is surpassingly in favor of the American Route. 
For example : One who had never investigated the matter would hanUy believe what is never- 
theless the fact, that, although the distance from London to Yokohama is neariy the same by 
either route, the time of passage by the way of San Francisco is twenty daysaTvl the cr^t oj 
vassaqe one hundred dollars less. Other an.I very important considerations also favor the Amer- 
ican Overiand Route. Going by the way of Suez the traveler must change from one convey- 
ance to another at Brindisi, AlexancWa, Suez, Bombay, Calcutta, Point de GaUe, and Hongkong 
—no less than seven times.' By the American Route, he changes but twice ; once from steamship 
to cars, at New York, and again from ears to ship, at San Francisco. In the very important 
matter of comfort and convenience this is of itself almost a decisive consideration 

Again, and in respect to the often vital consideration of health, the Suez Route subjects 



idies should hear in mind that the Best Bathing Appliances are at 113 Geary. 



PINE WATCHES and JEWELRY for Sale by D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



28 



SAN FEANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



him to repeated and extreme changes of temperature in passing from one zone, or climate, to 
another. The American Route lies wholly in the temperate zone and through the most equable 
portions of it. More, again, and in respect to a matter of such exceeding importance that it 
may even become one of life or de,ath, the diflference is so greatly in favor of the American 
Route as to preclude any fair comparison. Besides this, the tourist, whose main object is sight- 
seeing, and even the commercial traveler, who does not geueraUy object to it, would hardly 
hesitate between a route which takes him through tliree thousand miles of the grandest and 
most beautiful scenery of a new and strange continent, and one which carries him across a narrow 
corner of Egypt and whirls him across a few huncb-ed miles of Central or Southern Hindostan, 
or. possibly, gives him a Hying glimpse of the tangled jungles of India. Wliether or not, however, 
the traveler possesses much of the artistic sense or the corresponding desire to gi-atify it, every 
particle of his physical being wiU luxuriate in the multiplied comforts of the RuUm.an Palace 
Cars, those first-class hotels on wheels which presently beguile the occupant into the belief that 
he has not left home at all but that, by some accommodating mystery, his home has started on 
his journey around the world, and is taking him along as a matter of course. For the benefit 
of the large class who prefer a tabular statement of distances, lines, and fares by the route from 
London by the way of Liverpool and America, or by the Suez Route from London by the way 
of Southampton, we subjoin the foUomug 

COMPARISON OF ROUTES. 





Via Suez Route. 






From 


Miles. 


Days. 


£ 




11,268 
10,518 

13,259 
11.999 
11.439 


.56 
53 
48 
«2 
57 
56 


103 




103 




93 








88 


Melbourne 


88 



Via American Route. 



Yokohama . 
Shaiiyliae. . 
Honj^fkong- . 
Auckland . . 

Sidney 

Melbourne . 



Miles. 


Days. 


11,382 


34 


13,032 


42 


13,002 


40 


12,290 


44 


13,220 


47 


13,780 


48 



72 
82 
82 
82 
82 
87 



We may now make the journey around the world in eighty-eight days, or less than three 
montlis ; though it is hardly supposable that any one, except upon the pressure of most urgent 
business, would consent to make such a journey without many stoppings-over for sight-seeing. 
Tile intermediate distances and times by this shortest of the great round-the-world routes, are 
as follows : 



From 



London to Liverpool 

Liverpool to New York 

New York to San Francisco. 
San Francisco t^i Y'okohama. 

Yokohama t^) Shan.^hae 

Shan^'hae to Hoiiyliong 

Hongkong to Calcutta 



Miles. 


D's. 


H's 


200 




5 


3,000 


10 




3,294 


6 


6 


4,764 


19 




1,200 


4 




870 


5 




3,500 


22 





From 



Calcutta to Bombay 

Bombay to Suez 

Suez to Alexandria (by rail) 

Alexandria to Brindisi or Venice . 
Brindisi to London (by rail) 



Totals. . 



Miles. D's. H's 



1,400 

3,600 

225 

8,50 

1,200 



24,103 



88 



Fare for the above route £195. In view of the foregoing table, it requires no very sanguine 
temperament to believe that the great American Route is diverting to itself the great current 
of circumterranean travel, nor is it too much to prophecy that this Trans-continental and Trans- 
oceanic Route around the world must speedUy become, and permanently remain, the great 
highway of the nations. 

Bay and River Steamers and Ferries. 

Oakland and Al.uieda Ferry. ^Large and swift steamers make fifty trips a day between 
San Francisco and the end of the railroad pier on the Oakland side, whence trains connect for 
Oakland and Alameda. Besides the boats of the regular raUroad line, wdiat is known as the 
"Creek Route," makes two trips each way daily, between this city and Oakland or Brooklyn. 

Behkeley Ferry. —Largely for the accommodation of the students of the University as 
well as for the service of the constantly-increasing residents and pleasure seekers. The Berkeley 
Ferry Co. runs one small steamer three times each way, daily, between San Francisco and 
Berkeley. 

Sauceltto Ferry.— This well-known route has become of additional importance during the 
year from the fact that Saucelito, long noted as one of the most popular places of summer 
resort, and the objective point of frequent picnics, has risen to additional and permanent 
importance dunng the present year, as the southerly Kami terminus of the North Pacific Coast 
Harrow-gauge Railroad, between S.an Francisco and Tomales. Four trips each way daily, with 
an cxtr.T, trip on Momlay morning and another on Saturday evening, make up the weekly serrice 
of one of the most iniiiortant ferries along the city front. 

TilK Mission Rock Ferry lu.akes hourlv trips between the foot of Third Street and Mission 
Hock, several liuiidrcd yards southeast of its city terminus. This locality, formerly nothing 
inore tliaii a solitary, barren rock, somewhat noted as a convenient and" favorable spot for 
harbor fishing, has become quite an important center of wharves and warehouses. 



MOEQAIT & CO., 87 California Market, deals in all kinds of Fresh Oysters. 



, p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 29 

MiscEliAyEOUS. — Besides the ferries already mentioned as making regular trips eaeli way 
daily, are others ruimiug to San Rafael, Antioch, New York, Martinez, Benicia, and VaUejo. 
To some of these places, these ferries, running once a day, furnish the only regular means of pub- 
lic conveyance ; to others they merely supplement the more important and regular Unes which 
take these places merely as way stations, on their passage to other and generally more important 

sections. 

notrls. Etc. 

Having learned something of the general facilities for reaching this city from all parts of the 
world, the traveler and business man, or the capitalist who contemplates a ^it to, or, it may be, a 
permanent residence in San Francisco, naturally desires, in the next place, information concern- 
iiu' her hotels. Long celebrated for the number and excellence of her accommodations for the 
traveling pubUc, or for that large class of residents whose tastes inclme them rather to hotel 
Uvuu' than to the maintenance of a private home establishment, the Pacific metropolis is 
now adding to her famous hotels a mammoth structure, which not only incomparably surpasses 
any hotel preWously known in San Francisco, but also upon the entire continent and, indeed, 
throughout the ci\-iiized world. 

There is probably no city on earth, not even the French capital itself, that presents as many 
and as great facilities for carrying on a sti-ictly fu-st-class hotel, as S;ui Francisco. The leading 
hotels of this city now m successful operation, are hardly surpassed and very rarely indeed even 
equaled, in their manifold excellencies, by those of any metropolitan city of the world. Vfe 
have in full abundance all those peculiar requisites that a hrst-class hotel needs, or that its 
guests could possibly desii-e. The climate, almost uniformly -mild; a temperature smgularly 
equable and agreeable ; markets abouudmg with the tmest of fish, flesh, and fowl— domestic and 
wild ; vegetables and fruits of both temperate and tropical climates, in a perfection and profusion 
which fairly astonish the newlv-arrived -s-isitor. If any city tliis side of Paris can justly lay 
claim to be called the Sybarite' 's Paradise, San Francisco may confidently present that claim. 
Excellent and ample, however, as our hotels have hitherto proved, the greatly-mcreased mtlux 
of 1 Jeasure-seeking and business risitors, not only from the eastern and southern portions of our 
own country, but from Europe and even Asia, made it plainly apparent more than a year since, 
that all the metropolitan hotels then existmg, numerous and ample as they were considered at 
the time of their erection, had already begun to prove very appreciably and mcreasingly 
uisufficient for the annually swelling throng of guests. Realizing this abeady existmg dehciency, 
and fuUy assured that each successive month would only -mtness its mcrease, on the tii;st 
of March, 1S74, Messrs. Ralston and Sharon, two of the hea%-iest capitalists and most public- 
spirited citizens who ever contributed to build up the fortunes of any metropoUs whUe success- 
fully accumulating their o^vn, commenced the erection of a mammoth hotel which has thus far 
been kno«-n by the most undemocratic name of the 

Pal ICE Hotel, and by the constant emploj-ment of a Hteral army of the most skilllul me- 
chanics to be obtained in this State, or imported from the East, they have steadily pushed the 
git'antic structure toward completion with a rapidity, and at the same time a substantiabty, 
unprecedented in the history of gi-eat building enterprises. OccupjTiig the southwest comer 
of Xew Montgomery and Market streets, this architectural monster rears its huge front tor 
two hundred and seventy-five feet along the south side of Market Street, from New Mont- 
gomery to Anna, and stretches its vast flank three huntlred and fifty feet along New Montgom- 
Iry and Anna streets to Jessie. It covers nmety-six thousand two himdred and hfty square 
feet or nearly two acres and a quarter. Its form is that of an immense hoDow quadrangle. 
Its main front and entrances are on New Montgomery Street. Commencmg two stories uuder- 
groimd, it i-ises seven full stories above, and through a considerable portion has eight, htoue, 
marble, iron, and brick are the chief materials. Of the latter, twenty-six million were used 
in Its construction. The lower story has a hight of twenty-tive feet in the clear, while the 
uppermost is fourteen. The walls and partitions are built of stone and brick, laid m cement, 
and everywhere made as neariy earthquake proof as possible by broad, iron bands ot such 
iuunense size as to require neariy three thousand tons for this purpose alone. Ihe buililmg 
incloses three inner courts, connecting 'B-ith the adjoining streets on either side, and with each 
other by broad, arched doorways through separate walls of massive masonry \\ ithin these 
courts large gardens and parterres of tropical plants and rare exotics roofed with glass beauti- 



fied with statuary and made delicious by the constant playing of sparkhng fountams, 
and delight the guests. Around these gardens, on a level with each story, broad galleries or 
arcades, brilliantly Hghted at night, ^^•ill afford most inriting promenades tor aU the transient 
guests or more permaSent residents of this truly palatial home In this latter particular, indeed, 
it will quite closely resemble the Palais Royal in Pans, and the Hote Iturbide m Mexico. 
Seven hundred and fifty-live suits of rooms and guest chambers besides mimense recei^on 
rooms, public and private pariors, dimng and breakfast halls, both pubhc and private, with 
spacious dining rooms for chUdren and servants, music pavihon and baU room, ladles dra«-mg 
rooms and parlors, three hundred and seventy-seven bath and toilet rooms, are a few of the 
more prom£ient statistics, from which the observant reader may mfer the rest, i-rom the 
lower or garden floor of the bazaar or promenade gallenes, rear entrances «t11 admit guests 
directly into the elegant stores which are to occupy the lower floors along Market and New 
Montgomery streets Each of these stores wiU have a show window facing upon the prome- 

None but the Best of Artists employed at Hairdressing Establishment, 113 Geary- 



si 
p* 

M 

>-t 

o 



> 

en 

<D 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merchai, 



30 SAN FRANCISCO DIKECTOBT. 



naile, along which, completely sheltered from the weather, lady guests may pass at pleasure, 
auil without t)ie necessity of covering, to and fi'om the various shops. Upon New Mont- 
gomery and Market streets there will be eighteen of these double-fronting or rearless stores. 
Among the additional statistics are sixteen thousand live humlred square feet of marble, 
twelve thousand square feet of slabs and tiling, six hundred and eighty-tive thousand lights of 
plate glass from England, and three thousand seven lumdred lights of French plate glass, of 
double thickness. While it is, of course, wholly impossible to begin to enumerate all the 
various details, we may mention the fact that the owners have contracted for four thousand 
locks and forty -eight thousand keys. These are to be made in San Francisco. The contract 
price of each lock, with its aecomjjanying keys, is $5, thus making the locks and keys alone 
cost the snug little sum of $20,000, in gold. The furniture, made by special contract in this 
city, of the finest and most diversiiied native woods, costs §500,000. The cost of the gi-ouud 
was .$1,000,000; of the builiUng, .ifl,750,000, which, with that of the furniture, as above, makes 
a total cost of §3,250,000. The lessee is that prince of hotel managers, Warren Leland, whom 
all the traveling world knows so weU that any attempt at description or compliment would be 
simply an intrusive imjiertinence. The building is to be completed and ojjened in July of this 
year. Its myriads of bay windows, diversifying the four immense fronts from top to bottom, par- 
partially relieve the indescribable massiveness which would otherwise characterize the builiimg, 
while its unique and beautiful exterior fuiish of pure white and gold at once delight the eye and 
justify its name. This superb edifice, surpassing aU the hotels of the world in grandeur, splen- 
dor, and completeness, must form for years not only the pride of this occidental metropolis, but 
the architectural crowu of the Pacific Coast. 

The Grand Hotel. — On the opposite side of New Montgomery Street, fiUing all the space 
between it and Second Street, stands a hotel which was, and, in the judgment of many, still is, 
more harmoniously proportioned architecturally, more finely designed and artistically finished, 
and, withal, more tastefully decorated than any in the city. Immediately upon its comiJetiou 
it became, and has since remained, the great favorite, both with transient visitors and perma- 
nent residents. In the opinion of many it combines, more completely than any other, the very 
desirable qualities of elegance, quietness, and homelike attractiveness. It occupies a lot three 
hundred and ten feet on New Montgomery Street, two hundred and seven on Market, and 
one humlred and sixty on Second. Including the Mansard roof, it is four stories high. It con- 
tains foiir hundred rooms, and can conveniently lodge and dine six hundred gnests. In construc- 
tion it is completely framed of heavy timber, bolted and strapped with thick iron bands and 
heavy anchors, which gives to it the utmost possible strength and solidity. Nervous people 
consider it more completely earthquake proof than any public house in the city. Its external 
decoration is elaborately ornate, which gives to the building a light and tasteful appearance, 
combined M'ith a kuid of au-y elegance, hi most marked contrast mth the ponderous and majes- 
tic Palace Hotel directly opposite. Its halls are unusually wide, aii-y, and cheerful ; its general 
arrangement exceedingly convenient, and its furniture, carpets, and general appointments rich, 
comfortable, and inviting. Tlie furniture was manufactured in Europe and the East expressly 
for this hotel, at a cost of §275,000. The general internal decorations of the house are simple, 
yet tasteful and elegant. The beautiful and cheerfully -lighted dining rooms seat three hundred 
guests at once. Inmiediately adjoining the mam dining room are commodious separate dining 
rooms for ehddren, nurses, and servants. The bath rooms, launtlries, kitchens, pantries, fire- 
places, etc are numerous and ample. In short, the architect and builders omitted no provision 
winch could add to the comfort and satisfaction of its gTiests. The monthly rental of the 
various suits of rooms varies from §150 to §500, -nath board. The daily charge for sin>de 
rooms and board is three dollars. The present lessees are G. S. Johnson & Co., and the favor- 
able estmiate unanimously placed upon their management by the guests of the house during 
the past four years is the best possible evidence of their abiUty to conduct so vast an estabUsh- 
ment. 

The Occidental Hotel, on the east side of Montgomery Street, occupies the whole 
block between Bush and Sutter streets, and half of that stretching from Montgomery to San- 
som. Ihis well-known hotel, alike large m its material dimensions and in the hold which it 
has upon the public estimation, stands as one of the most substantial m construction, conven- 
ient m .arrangement, and complete in appomtmeut, of the really first-class houses of the city. 
l< our full stories, besides a lower attic story ; aU the usual concHtions of a fairly-appointed, first- 
class hotel ; a large, beautifully-huished elevator, smoothly and swiftly run by hydraulic press- 
ui-c, IS amoii" its chief couvemences. As one of the most celebrated hotels upon the Pacific 
Slope, It needs less extended and minute description than those houses of more recent estab- 
lishment which have not such an immense ai-my of former guests and transient boarders, every 
one ot which becomes a travcluig advertisement of its many excellencies 

TnK CosiioroLiTAN stands upon the northeast corner of the same block as the Occidental. 
By later extensions its north front stretches along Bush Street, untU it joins that of the Occi- 
dental, the t«o forming one of the fmcst architectural fronts in the city. In exterior finish it 
IS somewhat niore ornate than its great neighbor, while withm, in point of general exceUence 
of arrangemeiit and richness, it is entitled to a conspicuous place in the front rank of the lead- 
ing iioteis ot the city. Prominent among its fellows is the 

Lick House, upon the west side of Montgomery Street. The eastern front occupies an 



MOE&AIT & CO., Wholesale Oyster Dealers, 87 California Market. 



I. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Established 1852. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 31 



eutire block, extending from Sutter to Post streets, \^^th a depth of from one hundred to two 
hundred feet. It is excellently finished, and luxuriously furnished throughout, while its 
caisine, as attested by its numerous guests and patrons, is not excelled by any institution of its 
kind, ^^^lile enjojTng such an enviable reputation for its creature comforts, it is justly and 
widely celebrated for its elegantly elaborated, highly ornate, and most artisticaUy-tiuished 
dinin'"' hall, which is the truest on this continent, and, it is said, is not surpassed by any in 
Europe. Among the many valuable and really beautiful results of the limner's art which 
adorn the walls are to be seen several most living and natural views of the wonderful Yosemite 
Valley, by eminent California artists. 

In point of numbers, size, and excellence of its hotels, San Francisco is not exceeded by any 
citj' in the Union, and very probably by none in the world. Aside from those already designated 
and partially described, may be mentioned the Kuss House on the west side of Montgomery 
Street, between Sutter and Pine ; the American Exchange, corner of Sansom and HaUeck 
streets ; the Brooklyn Hotel, on Bush Street, between Montgomery and Sansom ; the Inter- 
national Hotel, on Jackson Street ; the once-famous What Cheer House, on Sacramento Street, 
so long, well, and favorably knoini to all old Califomians, as the point of departure either to 
the ' ' States " or to the mines. These, with some sixty or seventy others, any one of which in 
its grade cannot be excelled, if equaled, in any city of the civilized world, go to make up the 
hotel accommodations of the city. 

Bo.iKDiNG AXD Lodging Houses. — As a supplement (if any were required) to the large list 
of hotels, there are in the city about eight hundred houses occupied wholly or in part as lodg- 
ing houses, or for the accommodation of both boarders and lodgers, in many of whieh, at less 
expense than in any other city in the United States, one may enjoy all the comforts of a 

home. 

Theaters. 

Worshipers at the Thespian Shrine have ample opportunity to indulge their passion here, 
as theaters and other places of amusement are numerous and weU patronized. The class of 
performances enacted at these houses, whether tragic, dramatic, comic, or tragi-comic, is gen- 
erally of a high order. Indeed, so fastidious are the San Francisco public in this respect, and 
theater patrons and newspaper critics so hard to please, that tlie manager who is so rash as to 
produce anything that is not fully up to the standard is sure to lose money by the operation, 
while the actor or actress who cannot stand solely upon his or her own merits, independent of 
newspaper puffs and printers' ink, cannot achieve a success. Nowhere in the world will an 
actor or an actress sooner lind his or her true level than in San Francisco. Some of the brightest 
ornaments of the American stage either made their dehid or took their first upward step upon 
the ladder of dramatic or theatrical fame before a California audience. 

The California Theater, located on the south side of Bush Street, between Kearny and 
Dupont, is the largest theater now in operation in the State. Its frontage on Bush Street is one 
hundred and sixty-five feet, -n-ith a depth of one hundred and thirty-seven and one half feet. The 
stage is seventy-two feet wide by seventy deep, and the auditorium sixty -two feet wide by seventy 
deep. The house wiU comfortably seat upward of eighteen hundred persons. The dress circle 
and parquet furnished -n-ith softly-cushioned, comfortable arm chairs ; the boxes luxurious m their 
upholstering and hangings; the mechanical appliances complete, and the scenery and drop 
curtains beautiful specimens of artistic skiU. The builtling was erected in 1869, at a cost of 
about .?12-5,000. Under the successful management of that king of the Pacific stage, John 
McCuUongh, who is also proprietor, the class of performances, the merit of the actors engaged, 
and the public patronage bestowed, it has become in aU respects the first-class theater of this 
city, and stands second to none on this continent. 

The Grand Opera HorsE.— After many vexatious delays and discouragements, this magni- 
ficent tempie of the drama, now budding on Mission Street, between Third and Fourth, is rapidly 
approaching completion. The front section of the edifice is already roofed m and the ia?ade is 
now being plastered. The intention, according to the original plan, designed by S. C. Bugbee 
& Son, was to make the Grand Opera House, in general convenience of plan and completeness 
of equipment, one of the finest in the United States. That this plan has been well carried out, 
few persons, after an adequate comparison of notes, will be inclined to question. The theater 
is owned by a joint-stock company of over five hundred shareholders, the most of whom are 
citizens of wealth and position. The capital stock is §300,000 ; the eutire cost of the building 
about .^ioO 000. The frontage on Mission Street is one hundred and ten feet, and the depth 
toward' Market Street two hundred and seventy-five feet. The structure, three stories high, 
is composed entirely of iron and brick, and is so constructed as to render it as nearly as possible 
both earthquake and fire proof— the roof of the auditorium resting, not upon the walls, but on 
timbers independent of the walls to which they are "tied." Between the auditorium and the 
'corridor there is also a thick wall of brick. The architecture is of the Romanesque and Italian 
styles in which hea-s-y omature has been carefuUy avoided, so that the entablature, together 
with the -n-indow cornices, is more chaste than elaborate. For ingress and egress the most ample 
provision has been made. The main entrace is twenty-five feet wade, and there are two side 
entrances each twelve feet wide at the extreme ends of the elevation. The pnncipal corridor is 
seventy-five feet in length, and of the same width as the door. Behind this is the vestibule or 
central hall, thirty -five by eighty-one feet, -nith a beautiful fountam m the center. The Uoonng 



Baths ! Baths ! ! Baths ! ! ! Go and Bathe at Central Baths, 113 Geary. 



JEWELEY made to order and EEPAIEED by D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



32 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



of Iwth the corridor and the vestibule is a mosaic of black and white majble. The aucUtonum 
is similar in plan and construction to that of the CaUfomia Theater, and hke that has a wide 
corridor whoUy encircling it. Three gaUeries rise above the orchestra circle. The lower of 
these, the dress circle, wUl seat over five hundred persons ; next is the family circle, which has 
about hve hundred and fifty seats, and the third or upper will accommodate about six hundred 
The orchestra circle and parquette will seat eight hundred and twenty, while the boxes will 
accommodate one hundred more, thus gi\-ing a total seating capacity of over two thousand hve 
hundred. All the seats are to be uphoUtered in an elegant and luxunous manner, and the 
gaUery fronts and other prominent features artisticaUy decorated. The stage is eighty-one feet 
deep by one hundred and six in width, including the wings. Only the latest and most approved 
stage machinery and effects will be used, and the most ample pro\-ision made for scene-shifting 
ai-rangements for the production of the spectacular drama. The ilrop curtam will be one of the 
handsomest ever designed or painted. The entire building will jdeld a monthly revenue of §3, 600 
per month. The theater portion is leased for 5^-2,000 per month, to Frederick "O . Bert, who, 
upon its completion, which is presumed will be about the first of next June, will inaugurate the 
house by a season of grand opera. 

Maguire's New Theater.— This, among the latest and most deservedly popular houses of 
public amusement, which bears the name of CaUfomia's veteran manager — almost the pioneer 
caterer for public entertainment — stands on Bush Street, on the south side. It occupies a lot 
one hundred and thirty-seven feet deep by sixty-eight feet front, and can accommodate one 
thousand six hundred spectators. About two years since, Mr. Thomas Maguire, its sole pro- 
prietor and manager, rebuilt and opened this theater, which is one of the most elegant and 
attractive places of amusement in the city. Here he rapitUy presents one class of performances 
after another in a variety and to an extent which includes the whole range of his managerial 
experience. All parts of the house have a clear view of the stage, while in acoustic properties 
it is surpassed by no theater on the coast. The auditorium has the usual divisions of dress 
circle, parquet, and balcony, to which the prices of admission are, respectively, SI and fifty 
cents. The company generally includes from forty to fifty actors of all grades of abUity. 

Opera House. — On the north side of Bush Street, opposite the new theater just described, 
stands this popular place of public recreation. Capable of seating one thousand two hundred 
people, it has proved through over two successful years that it knows how to send its guests 
home in the best of humor. Its interior, like that of the theater, is divided into di-ess circle, 
parquet, and family cii-cle, to which patrons are admitted at corresponding rates. The range 
of performances presented keeps pace with all the varieties of the public mood, and affords the 
most ample scope for the uttermost versatility of the actors who take part in them. In all 
capacities the Opera House employs from thirty to thu-ty-tive persons. 

1'koposed Jsew Theater. — Within the past few weeks responsible parties have secured 
a large lot, on the corner of Market and Powell streets, on which they propose commencing, 
with the least possible delay, the erection of another large, first-class theater. It will have a 
frontage of seventy -five feet, and a depth of one hundred and seventy-five. The proscenium 
will coml)ine the latest and most elegant improvements lately introduced into such theaters as 
the recently erected Boston Globe Theater, and the New Park and New Lyceum Theaters of 
New Yi >rk. In extent and safety the facilities for ingress and egi'ess are intended to far surpass 
any yet known in this eit}-. Two immense entrances, each twenty-five feet wide, one main 
entrance on Market Street, and another side entrance on Powell, connect with vestibules, halls, 
passage ways, aisles, and galleries so numerous and ample that the whole vast audience can 
safely witlidraw within five minutes. The veteran manager, Thomas Maguire, is now in the 
East, prosecuting arrangements for the immediate commencement of the work. 

AViL-soN-'s Palace Amphitheater occupies the southwest corner of New Montgomery and 
Mission streets. Originally erected during the closing months of 1S73 by John \\ilson, who 
; inaugurated it with a grand opening on the eighteenth of the ensuing January, it immeiliately 
presented a combination of equestrian talent which attracted paying houses for one hundred and 
eighty-three consecutive performances. The buUiling covers about one hundred and twenty -five 
feet on Mission Street, by one hundred and sixty feet on New Montgomery. Its interior presents 
a fine arena one hundred and twenty -five feet in circumference, surrounded by tier upon tier of 
circular seats, each suflicicutly higher than the one in front of it to give every occupant an 
unobstructed riew of those daring and skillful feats which so finely display the strength and 
agility of man, the grace of woman, and the intelligence of the horse. During the mterval 
between the equestrian seasons, Madame Anna Bishop and Frank Gilder gave a monster concert 
of patriotic selections, on the fourth of July, 1S74, to an audience of nearly three thousand. 
The pojiular love of the circus is even above the average in San Francisco. No where else in 
the world, probably, would the general taste more amply justify the Autocrat of the Breakfast 
Table in his well-knowni assertion that " the outside of a horse is good for the inside of a man." 

Working hard, earning money easily, and spending it freely, Californians and, especially, 
San Franciscans, furnish a more liberal support to a larger number of tirst-cLsss theaters and 
places of public amusement than any equal population on the continent. Though critical in 
taste they arc yet very ardent in their likings, and an actor who once has the good fortune to 
establisli a hold upon the afi'ections of our theater-going public, is sure of a generous support 
and may count upon the warmest welcome at each successive return. 



The place to get the Best Eastern Transplanted Oysters at MOEGAN & CO.'S. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Zearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 33 



Parks, Gardens, DrlTcs, Promenades, Etc. 

Our parks are three ; the Yerba Buena, Bnena Vista, and the Golden Gate. 

The Golden Gate Pakk. — The Grand Central Park of New York contains but seven hun- 
dred and seven acres, used as a park proper. The Golden Gate Park of San Francisco presents a 
surface of one thousand and forty-three acres. New York's great park was not actually com- 
menced until the fall of 1857, when the great commercial city of the Atlantic was well advanced 
in her third century. That of San Francisco was begun in the summer of 1871, before the great 
metropolis of the Pacific had fairly entered upon her second decade. In New York, during 
several years pending the proposed withdrawal of so many acres from purposes of building and 
commerce, the project called forth much heated and bitter discussion. This continued several 
years after the commencement of the park improvements. In respect to this particular, San 
Francisco presents an entire similarity. The original project, and especiaUy the subsequently 
chosen location of the Golden Gate Park, elicited an amount of public misrepresentation and 
ridicule never previously equaled and which has not yet fully subsided. In the primary matter 
of financial cost and pecuniary returns, it is yet quite too early to institute comparison. Two 
facts relating to this part of the history of the Central Park may possibly indicate the proba- 
bilities in regard to our own great park which has but just begun to be. The total cost of the 
great New York Park, for the first twenty years, including the land, was over §15,000,000. On 
the other side stands the great compensatory fact, which the opponents of such pubUc improve- 
ments usually ignore or deny, that the increase in the tax revenue in the three adjoining wards, 
in 1872 alone, was nearly $4,000,000 over and above what it would have been but for the open- 
ing of this great place of popular resort. Hence, laying aside all sanitary and artistic consid- 
erations, one can readily appreciate the truth of Mayor Kingslaud's remark, "The people of 
New York look upon their park as a great public blessing cheaply purchased. " Except in a 
few sordid souls the public opposition to the Central Park in New York has now whoUy sub- 
sided before the almost universal public conviction that the outlay upon the park is the most 
healthful and every way profitable public investment in the annat of the present, and espe- 
cially for future generations, that could have been made. 

The Golden Gate Park lies in the western, or possibly northwestern margin of the city. Its 
length, lying east and west, is about six times its width. From Fulton Street, its northern 
boundary, it extends southerly some eight blocks to Franklin Street, which bounds it in that 
direction. The eastern limit of the park proper is the west line of Stanj'an Street. From a 
little north of the center of this eastern end the entrance drive, or grand avenue of approach, 
with its bordering greenery, shrubbery, and meandering paths, occupjdng the full block between 
Oak and Fell streets, stretches eight blocks eastward to Baker Street. Westerly it extends to 
the shore of the Pacific, where its "Grand Drive," running nearly north and south, lies along 
the line of what would be Fiftieth Avenue, were it completed. It is fifty -six blocks long and 
nine blocks wide. The original surface was largely composed of small hiUs, sparsely covered 
^"ith low shrubs, with here and there a few stunted trees, and toward the ocean end hills and 
banks of wind-blovm sand. Much of it is nothing more than barren sand-doons. After careful 
study the most approved plans of covering, protecting, and fencing these sands by the culti- 
vation of such trees and shrubs as have been most convenient for that purpose in similar 
situations along the coasts of France and Holland have been adopted and tiieir successful 
adaptation and execution entered upon. The area of the park includes seven natural lakes or 
ponds. Avenues, rides, drives, and walks, eight miles in extent; groves, greens, and grottoes, 
arbors, terraces, mounds, and valleys, gardens, lawns, base-balls, and cricket grounds, embank- 
ments, cuts, tunnels, and bridges find place among the multiplied improvements and adorn- 
ments already completed or contemplated in the present, immediate, and ultimate plans. 
Among the indispensable preliminaries, a well yielding eighteen thousand gallons of water a 
day was sunk, nearly three mUes of water pipe, of which the larger part is four and one half 
iach wrought iron, has been laid. Besides these, the nursery, which was very early established, 
has already propagated over sixty thousand plants, of which upward of thirty thousand have 
been transplanted to different locations about the grounds. Already more than one thousand 
teams a day have driven over the broad, smooth roadway, while five hundred a day is quite a 
common average, and the increasingly large number of picnic parties, with the ecjuestrian and 
pedestrian visitors, begin to afford satisfactory demonstration that the benefits of the Golden 
Gate Park are no longer problematical or prospective. Total disbursements to December 31, 
1874, §375,000. 

The Commissioners, feeling the necessity of concentrating their resources on the principal 
park, have as yet paid but little attention to Buena Vista Park, which, however, will not be 
much longer neglected. The fine prospects of bay and city scenery which it presents will, 
together with its other natural advantages, make it a most popuhw resort. The small park 
around Mountain Lake, as an indispensable feature to the general plan, will also be improved 
before long, and Congress will also, almost certainly, grant the use of the most of the Presidio 
Military Reservation to the city for the purposes of a park. It wiU, therefore, be seen that 
San Francisco is in process of being liberoDy and well supplied with desirable places of out- 
door recreation. 

Woodw.vrd's Gardens. — Park, garden, pond, fountain, mnsenm, aqnarium, conservatory, 



The Best and most Cleanly Family Baths in the City are af 113 &eary. 

3 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 513 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



34 SAN FRANCISCO DIBECTORT. 



theater, circus, hippodrome, menagerie, skating rink, picnic ground, restaurant, and ererything 
in the world of out-door or in-door amusement, or the best possible combination of both, that 
can contribute to attract and delight the public, this all comprehensive and most popular resort 
is sure to provide. If any visitor can discover a deficiency he has only to make it kno^-n to 
the enterprising proprietor who is sure to supply it at the earliest possible moment. It is the 
universal verdict of all late visitors, that no citj' in America can show any place of pubhc resort 
which provides anything approaching the abundance and variety of means for public recreation 
which are here to be found. The immense pavilion is the largest and strongest permanent 
wooden building upon the coast. It has the form of a huge parallelogram, with the comers cut 
off, thus giiTng its ground outline the shape of a regular octagon. One hundred and fifty feet 
long by one hundred and thirty wide, and fifty feet high, with broad rows of strong seats running 
entirely around it, and massive galleries also encompassing its whole circumference, and accom- 
modates within its acre and a half of extent seven thousand spectators at once. In the center 
a solidly -laid, perfectly-fitted, and smoothly -planed floor, one hundred and ten feet long by 
ninety in width, furnishes as extensive a scope for skating as the most ambitious could desire. 
The new aquarium is most surprisingly delightful and wholly successful attempt at establish- 
ing permanent homes for the most rare and curious, as well as the most common and useful of 
the tinny tribes. Here also one may study at leisure the mysteries of trout hatching and raising 
from the egg to the fully-grown specimens of the largest and finest varieties, until the whole 
operation become as clear as the glass through which it appears. 

The City Gardens. — On the south side of Twelfth Street, stretching from Folsom to Harrison 
streets, and running half a block south. The groimds are finely laid out and ornamented with 
shade trees, shrubbery, arbors, etc. It has also a pavilion in which theatrical representations, 
balls, and various other popular entertainments follow each other as the successive tastes of its 
patrons demand. 

PcBLic SgtjAEES Airp Pakks. — Portsmouth Square, commonly known as the Plaza, on the 
west side of Kearny Street, extending from Clay to Washington streets and directly fronting the 
old CHty Hall, is the oldest, most celebrated, and best finished public square. 

Union Square, bounded bj' Post, Stockton, Geary, and Powell streets, and for several years 
occupied by the successive buildings for various Mechanics' Fairs, is now one of the most 
beautifully-improved and neatly-kept squares of the metropolis. 

Nearer the northerly or north central portion of the city, Washington Square, bounded by 
FUbert, Stockton, Union, and PoweU streets, supplies a sort of municipal lung for the denizens 
in that vicinity. 

Besides these, Columbia, Lobos, Alcatraz, Lafayette, Jefferson, Alta, Hamilton, and Alamo 
squares relieve their respective portions of the city from undue crowding and suggest to the 
neighboring residents the beautiful meadows of their earlier homes, or the arid deserts of Arabia, 
according as their grassy or sandy surfaces attest the attention or neglect of the City Fathers. 

PROMEN'.iDES. — Montgomery Street is our occidental Broadway. On either side rise some of 
the largest and finest retail business houses. Three of the leading hotels are here, and four 
others within less than half a block. During the forenoon business occupies its area almost 
exclusively. Near its intersection -n^iih California Street, ' ' the bulls and bears of Mammon's 
fierce zoology " frequently congregate in crowds so dense as to monopolize the side walks. 
Afternoons, fashion claims its place, and well-nigh crowds business, not exactly to the wall, 
but out upon the curbstone and occasionally into the gutter. 

From three to five P. M. the tide of Mammon ebbs and that of fashion swells in at fuU flood. 
Noble and queenly women alternate with their fair and frail sisters, forms of beauty and faces 
which range do^vnward from positive plainness to undisguisable ugliness, calicoes, silks, satins, 
velvets, broadcloths, beavers, and cassimeres, make up the motley throng, swaying, tiaOing, and 
jostling up and down the crowded thoroughfare. Many of the female faces are exceedingly fair, 
"as far as we can see," and the forms equally graceful, with the same qualification. Masculine 
faces, broad-browed, clear-eyed, firm-mouthed, or fully-bearded, irresistibly impress one with the 
dash, the ilrive, and the nerve which have tunneled the everlasting hUls, spanned the continent 
with rails, and bridged the Pacific with steamships ere yet the full flush of manhood has fairly 
settled upon them. Too many show the full, uncertain Hp, flushed cheek, and dewy eye that 
tell of excessive stimulants too frequently applied. Nowhere on earth is the temptation to drink 
as strong as here. Business is brisk, competition sharp, and the climate the most constantly 
stimulating anj-where to be found. Rivahrj' spurs them on every hand, and scores stand waiting 
to take their places the moment they step aside. So they drive till nature falters or weakens 
and calls for rest. But nature's rest they cannot or will not afford ; an artificial stimulant is 
quicker ; it is everjTrhere close at hand ; it seems to save time ; companions press ; everybody 
does it, and they follow the fashion. Business men die suddenly ; on the street to-da}-, to- 
morrow at L«ne Mountain. Heart disease, apoplexy, congestion of the lungs, disease of the 
kidneys, or lirer complaint, are the causes most generally assigned to that portion of the public 
which cannot afford even to stop long enough to inquire. The one great cause of all these 
causes few stop to ask, or dare to teU. 

Kearny Street, par.allel with Montgomery and but a single block above, or to the west of it, 
competes with its companion and rival, Montgomerj- Street, as a great avenue of business and 
pleasure. Though some single buildings along Montgomery Street may be finer, the average of 



MOEGAIT & CO., 87 California Market, have their own Boats and Oyster Beds. 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 18S2, 



PROGRESS OF THECITY. 35 

the newer business blocks and buildings of Kearny Street, in some portions of its extent, falls 
but little behind that of the great central and more celebrated avenue. 

California Street, at right angles with ihe two great thoroughfares mentioned above, and 
crossing them at right angles near their centers — the Wall Street of the Pacific— runs straiglit 
down from one of the highest summits within the city limits, to within two blocks of the water 
front, and there debouches into Market Street. Along the cro-miing hights of its upper por- 
tions several of our wealthiest citizens have planted their palatial residences, elsewhere noted, 
commanding most extensive %'iews of the city beneath, the bay, Oakland, Brooklyn, and the 
bouniling hills of the Coast Range, which slope up toward, and finally culminate in. Mount 
Diablo. Farther down, St. Mary's Cathedral, the Alta Building, and leading telegraph offices ; 
thence, fi-om Montgomery Street to Battery, the finest array of business blocks and banking 
buildings which the city presents. 

Market Street is the broad, dividing avenue which separates the older city from the newer, 
offers a rare architectural medley to the ej^e of the exploring artist. This great central high- 
way is the longest and widest of the city streets. Starting from the water front at the western 
margin of the bay, whence it slightly ascends through eight or nine blocks, it runs thence south- 
westerly, on a nearly level grade beyond the city limits. Its surface presents nearly every con- 
ceivable variety of natural conformation ingeniously vai-ied with artificial distortion. Plank, 
rubble. Macadam, cobble, Nicolson, gravel, stone foundation, deep sand, and, finally, undis- 
guised dirt, offer their successive and pleasing variety to the exploring eye. Stately blocks, 
grand hotels, massive stores, common tenements, and tumble-down shanties form its varied and 
picturesque boundary on either hand. AMien the high, summer winds sweep easterly down its 
broad avenue ladeued -nith clouds of flying sand from vacant lots along its either "margin, it 
sometimes becomes a decidedly open question whether some of the marginal lots really belong 
in the department of real estate, or should properly be entered in the catalogue of movable prop- 
erty. We have dwelt thus long upon this street, not only on account of its central position 
and superior dunensions, but because it is, in respect to many particulars, a representative street. 
Others are like it as far as they can be. Did length, width, and direction permit, they would 
resemble it still more closely. It is fast becoming the great business street of the city, and, 
spite of the roughness and crudeness necessarily attaching to most of the streets of a new and 
fast-growing city, it immistakably possesses aU the requisites of the future " Grand Avenue " of 
the Pacific metropolis. 

Dri^is. — The Cliff House Road stretches westerly from near the end of Bush Street to the 
Pacific Ocean beach. Originally a mere trail over the sand hUls, it has become the broadest, 
smoothest, hardest, and longest track in the State. If the visitor wishes an idea of California 
horseflesh and California turnouts, let him drive out this road almost any day. The roadway is a 
fine, smooth, hard surface, wide enough in places for twenty teams abreast, and is often nearly 
filled from side to side with the smooth rolling of friendly racing teams, from the natty single 
tiuggy to the elegant coach, or hack, and the stately four-in-hand. A million dollars' worth of 
legs and wheels flash by a man in a very short time on this fashionable drive, especially on a 
racing day. Along this road are two or three road-side inns, which, like the majority of Cal- 
ifornia inns, are chiefly drinking houses under another name. At the end of the road stands 
the CHff House, so named from its site, the nearly solid top of a precipitous, rocky bluff, or 
cliff, overlooking the Seal Rocks, a few hundred feet west; then the fifty-mile sweep of the 
Pacific Ocean horizon, broken only by the sharp, rocky points of the FaraUones, low down 
under the western sky, and clearly visible when fogs, and mists, and haze permit. South of 
the cliff the road winds down the bluff to and out upon the ocean beach, which differs from the 
weU-kno-ivn Eastern beach drives except that it is not as wide even at the lowest tides, and that 
the ocean view thence is far more seldom diversified with passing sails. The surf, however, is 
fair, and the beach usually good, so that brisk driving for two or three miles upon it seldom 
fails to put the oxygen into the lungs, the iodine into the blood, and the exhilaration into the 
spirits. Some two or three miles south of the Cliff House the road bends easterly, leaves the 
beach, and starts back to the city by another way, known as the Ocean House Road, which, 
like the former, takes its name from a public house, or hotel, near its seaward end. Ajjproach- 
ing the city by this route, one reaches a greater hight than by the Cliff House Road, and some 
two or three miles from the city centers enjoys a beautiful \'iew of the southern, western, and cen- 
tral city, the shipping, the bay, the opposite shore, the trailing cities and towns whose straggling 
houses gleam between the trees of Alameda and Contfa Costa counties, with their grassy foot hills, 
the whole view backed and bounded by the dominating peak of old Mount Diablo beyond. 
Coming in by this way one enters the city suburbs on the southwest, passing dii-ectly by the 
old Mission Dolores, with its famous old church, and makes his way back to the city centers by 
Market, Mission, Howard, or Folsom streets. 

Between the CUff House and the Ocean House roads, but nearer the latter, runs a third, 
known as the Central Ocean Drive. 

Over the Bay View Road Drive, from Market along Third or Fourth street to Long Bridge, 
across that to the Potrero, keep straight on through the Mission cut, over Islais Creek Bridge, 
thence through South San Fr ncisco, up the little rise from whose summit you may look down 
upon the little vaOey, a great bay of vegetable gardens, between which and the water, and on 
the north side of Bay View Race Track, stands the Bay View House. If one would readily 



CO 






" Cleanliness is next to CJodliness! " Go and Bathe at 113 Geary. 



D. W. Laird, San Pranoisoo Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant.' 






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36 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



understand why they used the phrase "Bay View" so frequently in naming localities hereabout, 
he has only to glance eastward fi-om any one of several points on his way out, to solve the 

^^Northerly from the city the only drive takes one to the Presidio and Fort Point, over a road 
not remarkable for excellence, and through suburbs not particularly attractive. 

From the city front the pleasautest and, probably, the only practicable drive, would be 
that upon the duck of a ferry boat. The best time for any or all of these drives is m the 
momin"— the earlier the better. Besides the greater purity, freshness, and clearness of the aur 
everywhere occompanying the morning hours, one then escapes the wmd and dust which, on 
nearly every afternoon" through more than half the year, constitute the chief drawback from the 
fuU enjoyment of out-door pleasure ne.ir the California coast. 

Iniprovenienl of Streets. 

Street P.4ving akb Clilu.-ing.— For the very considerable number who drive their own 
carriages, ride in hired vehicles or peramljulate the sidewalks and, in fact, for nearly all the 
inhabitants of the city who, Uving mthin its bounds, must daily look forth upon its streets, the 
construction and cleanliness of these d,-iily thoroughfares become matters of the highest interest ; 
while to the business man and, especially, to all tax-paying citizens, they constitute items of 
the most decided personal and pecuniary importance. As a general fact, the streets of San 
Francisco give little gi-ound for just pride to her citizens. We can spend more money on our 
streets, get less work for it, have it more shabbily done, repeat the operation more frequently, 
grumljle more, and do less by way of effectual and permanent remedy, than any constituency of 
equal number in the Union. It would seem that we have advanced nearly far enough in out- 
ward or material ci\-ilization to enable us at least to learn of sister cities, if we cannot or will 
not originate our own remedy. For nearly two years past the City of Philadelphia, through a 
committee of its council, has thoroughly examined the methods, results, and comparative cost of 
street construction and street cleaning in several prominent cities of Europe. The examination 
demonstrated — as any observant European traveler could have previously assured them that it 
would— that in respect to both these important particulars, Paris furnishes by far the best 
example. Every sojourner in that city knows that a highway out of repair seldom obstructs 
travel or offends the eye. And all wlio study the subject also know that this maximum of 
excellence in condition is regularly secured and constantly maintained at the minim um of 
expense. The whole city is dirided into sections, each ha%nng its own superintendent or con- 
tractor. ^^^len the police notice any want of repair they instantly report to the proper super- 
intendent, who as promptly attends to the matter. It involves no question of jurisdiction and is 
done without delay. It is unquestionably somebody's duty, and that somebody knows it, and he 
knows, too, that the Government knows both him and his duty. Under that system the con- 
tractor makes more money by doing his duty promptly and thoroughly than by delaying or 
slighting it. He knows that, too, and profits by it. The simple secret of all this is that the 
government of Paris has reduced this pa\-ing and cleansing of streets to plain, common-sense 
business principles, precisely as any business man of ordinary sagacity, charged with any similar 
business for hunself or another, would immediately do as a matter of course. It has so exactly 
learned the actual and necessary cost of keeping the streets in proper order, that it knows just 
what sum will pay each contractor for the faithful performance of his duty and leave him a fair 
margin of profit. It even knows the chemical composition and the agi'icultural or commercial 
value of the street refuse, and makes this an element in each contract. For example : The official 
figures of the Philadelijhia council committee's report show that Paris pays its scavengers 
S"J90,000 a year for cleaning its streets, and that the scavengers yo.y back to the city §120,000 
a year for the right to profit by selling the refuse. Thus the net cost to that immense city of 
haraig her streets thoroughly swept every day in the year, is but $170,000. As the population 
of Paris is, in round numbers, ten times that of San Francisco, the cost of keeping our streets 
in repair and of cleaning them, if we do as well, relatively, should be but §17,000 ! ! 
Instead of this it amounts to §315,000 a year, for a service hariUy one tenth as well done. But, 
beyond this, one should remember that even this immense sum pays for nothing but repau'ing 
and cleaning our streets. Besides this, the cost of new street work for the last fiscal year was 
SGG7,-t8S.40. And to both these snug little items, ab'eady amounting to nearly a round million 
of dollars in gold, we have yet to add the expenses of lighting, and the repairs incidental to. that 
operation, which amounted to a third item of §252,000, upward of a quarter of a million. Thus 
the streets of San Francisco, during the year 1874, cost the city the modest little amount of 
§1,234,488.40, gold coin of the United States, and they were not remarkably good streets at that. 

Wnter Kesonrces. 

The Spring Valley Water Works of San Francisco draw their supply mainly from the Lobos 
and Pdarcitos creeks. The first of these is a stream of pure, clear water, emptying into the outer 
bay near Point Lobos, and is capable of supplying two and one half million of gallons of water 
dc-iily. This stream is about three and one half miles from the City Hall. From this, four- 
double connecting pumps, driven by engines of five hundred-horse power and having a capacity 
of four million gallons a day, force water into the immense distributing reservoir three hundred 
and eight feet above the city base. This is located at the corner of Hyde and Greenwich streets. 



Send your Orders from the Country for Eastern Transplanted Oysters to Morgan & C 



i p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 7U, and 716 Zearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 37 



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It holds four million gallons. The second, at the comer of Hyde and Francisco streets, three ^ 

blocks north, and considerably lower, has a capacity of seven million gallons. The second §; 

original source of supply, PUarcitos Creek, traverses the higher ra%-ines of the eastern slope of the ^^ 

peninsular hills which constitute the di%-ide between the ocean and the bay, running north and ^ 

south through San Mateo County. In Pdarcitos VaUey, fifteen miles south of the city, and seven *g 

hundred feet above the sea level, the company has buUt an immense dam, six hunrlred feet long, ^ 

ninety-two feet high, and two hundred feet through at the base. This immense dam, forming a (J 

reservoir which contains one billion gallons, constitutes their great original source of supply. lu ^ 

San Antlreas Valley, two miles nearer the city, the company has another reservoir containing 53" 

six hundred and fifty million of gallons. This reservoir is four hundred and thirty feet above o' 

the city base. From these two sources, tunnels and flumes having a section of ten square feet S^* 

and amply pro\'ided with sand boxes and tilterers to cle,anse the water from vegetable matter g; 

and sediment, thirteen miles of fourteen -inch \iTought - iron pipe, and finally another mile of h** 

flume, passes through Tunnel, No. 3, into Lake Honda, four miles southwest of the City Hall. ' 

Here, in a little valley expressly pro%'ided by nature, the company has changed what was orig- ^ 

inally a lake into a large double reservoir of sloping- sided masonrj-, smoothly covered -n-ith ^ 

cement, and holding thirty-five million gallons. A central wall di\4des this in two, so that in W* 

the event of accident, either will suflice to supply the city while the other undergoes repairs. JJ" 

From Lake Honda, three miles of cast-iron mains conduct the water to the Distributing Eeser- I j, 

voir at the corner of Buchanan and Market streets, holding two million of gallons, and also to | j^ 

the CoUege Hill Reservoir of fourteen million gallons capacity, which immediately supply the ft 

city mains. The present amount of pipe now laid -ndthin the city proper is one hundred and ^ 

fifty-five miles. The capital stock of the company is .58,000,000, divided into eighty thousand : f^ 

shares of §100 each. ! ^ 

In accordance with the provisions of the Act of the Legislature, passed March .30. 1874, ^ g 

selected committees of the Board of Superiors, accompanied by competent engineers, have vis- . ^ 

ited several of the more promising localities within fifty miles of the city, whence the abun- 1 p 

dance of pure water, not only for the immediate future but for all possible demands of the "" 
remotest time, could be safely brought at reasonable expense. This investigation and explora- 
tion, though in successful progress, are yet incomplete, hence any present attempt at a partial 
report of them would be obviously premature. 

libraries. 

For a city as distinctively absorbed in business as San Francisco, ample provision has been 
made for the gratification of scientific research or literary taste. Chief among the many institu- 
tions provided for this purpose, stands the 

Mercantile Library, on the north side of Bush Street, between Montgomery and Sansom. 
The building has a frontage on Bush Street of sixty-eight feet nine inches, with a depth of one 
hundred and thirty-seven feet and six inches. It is three stories high, with basement and attic. 
The facade is of the modern Italian style, sixty-five feet to the top of the main cornice, and is 
surmounted by a mansard roof, with iron crestings. Upon the first floor is the library, contain- I g 
ing about forty thousand volumes, the reading room, reference library, ladies' reading room, 
parlor, and trustees' and janitors' room. On the second floor, the chess and smoking room, writing ^ 
room, museum, and store room for periodicals. The library room extends the full width of the I pj 
front of the building, and is fifty-four feet deep with a hiiht of twenty feet in the clear. A ' ^ 
tasteful, light, airy gallery, for the convenience of the librarian, is erected on two sides of the fj* 
room. The basement contains a lecture room, fifty-eight feet by seventy-four and twenty-four 
high ; supper room, ladies' and gentlemen's dressing rooms, waiting rooms, etc. The whole of the 
first story front is of iron, as also are aU the window dressings, coins, strings, and pilasters of 
the rest o"f the front. The interior finish is of kUn-cLried, white cedar, 'varnished ; the doors, stair 
finish, and book cases, of black walnut. In addition to the library is a large list of magazines j fel 
and periodicals, comprising one huntlred and sixteen magazines, twenty-three illustrated papers, , j, 
about the same number of foreign papers, some eighty-two Atlantic and one hundreil and thirty- I g 
four Pacific papers, .besides papers from the Sandw'ich Islands and Cape of Good Hope. The 
number of volumes taken from the library during 1874, was eighty-four thousand seven hundred 
and sixty-three. _ 

The Mechanics' lN.STrcTE is a fine, three-story brick building, ha^^ng a frontage of seventy- | ■= 
five feet on Post Street, south side, between Montgomery and Kearny. The building contains I ^ 
the Ubrarv, reading, and chess rooms, a lecture hall capable of seating five hundred persons, a | <§ 
smaller hall, and three stores. The library comprises nearly thirty thousand volumes, among ; g_ 
which are many rare and costly scientific and mechanical works. It is expectevl that this number 1 a 
will be increased in the coming August by the addilion of three thousand and three hundred' '^ 
volumes of the British Patent Pveports and Specifications donated to the Institute in Ajiril, 1874. [ ^ 
This win increase the library to consiilerably over thirty thousand volumes. The Institute is 1 
also one of the official depositories of the Patent Office Reports of the Department at Washing- | ^ 
ton. The Industrial Fairs of this society constitute a prominent and attractive feature of 1 ^ 
the instructive entertainments of the city. During the past few years they have been held - 
annually, and with such successful results that it is probable they will hereafter yearly de- 
light and instruct the general public. The ninth of these fairs was held last year, in the new 



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Children's Hair Cut in the most Eecherche Manner at 113 Geary, 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant., 



38 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Mechanics' Pa%-ilion, on Eighth Street, between Market and Mission. The entire building is 
two hundred feet wide by five hundred and fifty feet long. It has a grand central nave one 
hundred by four hundred and fifty feet, around which runs a spacious gallery fifty feet wide. 
It is a remarkably substantial, well-built, wooden structure, conveniently arranged and admira- 
bly adapted to the purpose for which it is designed. Cost. $110,000. The Tenth Industrial 
F.air will open on the seventeenth day of August, 1S75, and there is no doubt will prove a 
gi-eater success than any which have preceded. 

The Odd Fellows' Library occupies a commodious, excellently-arranged hall at No. 325 
Montgomery Street. The library contains twenty-si.x thousand, six himdred and fifty-seven 
volumes, in the various departments of literature, science, and art, and includes one of the 
most extensive collection of works on the early history of the Pacific Coast, as well as one of 
the most complete and valuable cabinets in the State. Organized, December 30, 1854. 

Sax FR.V.NCISCO Law Library. — In 1865, a society was formed for the purpose of organ- 
izing and maintaining a Law Library, and its success is demonstrated by the fact that it now 
has some fifteen thousand volumes of standard legal, biograjihical, historical, and miscellaneous 
works upon its shelves. The library derives its support from a monthly levy upon its mem- 
bers of .*2.50 ; it also derives a revenue of §2 from every case tried before the District Courts 
of the city. 

The Milit.a^ry Library' was organized in January, 1873, for the purpose of acquiring, pre- 
serving, and conducting a public library composed chiefly of books and periodicals of a military 
character. This institution derives its support from the sales of shares at §5 each. Members 
may use as many books at a time as they hold shares. There are no dues, but the trustees 
have power to call for $5 additional upon each share whenever they deem it necessary. 

In .addition to those alreaily mentioned several of the literary associations and club rooms are 
provided with large and well-selected libraries and conveniently-furnished reading rooms, libe- 
rally supplied with the leading publications of the day ; of these maj- be mentioned the California 
Pioneers, California Academy of Sciences, Young Men's Christian Association, San Francisco 
Verein, etc. , etc. For details of the different Literary Associations see Appendix, page 994. 

Onr Public Schools. 

In the various departments of public affairs the oflScial chronology of San Francisco is as de- 
cidedly trinitarian as the most orthodox could desire. Its cakiidar year, like that of all nom- 
inally cirilized and presumalily Christian cities, begins upon the first of January ; its school year 
upon the first of July, and its municipal year upon the first of December. Hence, the Direct- 
ory's year, coinciding with the regular calendar, begins with the last half of one school year 
and ends «ith the first half of the next. 

For convenience of correspondence or facility of comparison this is, obviously, one of the 
worst possible arrangements. LTntU remedied, however, he who attempts the record can only 
accept and act upon the troublesome fact, in accordance with the well-known and highly politic 
maxim, "When you >7i«.«/, you'd bctler." 

Gener.il Progre-ss. — During 1S74 the progress of the Public Schools, in numbers, organiza- 
tion, and general improvement, measurabl}' approximated the material progress of the city, and 
this, as every old resident or observant \"isitor knows, far surjiassed that of any previous year 
of her history. Never before have citizens gener.aOy manifested as marked an interest, and as 
willing a liberality in multiplying and impro^-ing all practicable facilities for the extension and 
elevation of popular education ; never before have the public pro\-ided as ample resources ; never 
before has the city undertaken the simultaneous erection of as many and as costly school builclhigs^ 
and at no former period, even in the educational historj' of this jjroverbiaUy liberal cit}-, have 
teachers received as high salaries. Especi.ally is this the case in regard to female assistants in 
Primarj- and Grammar Schools. Young girls, holders of the lowest-grade certificates, and with 
ru> previous experience in teaching, receive six hundred dollars a year for their crude appren- 
tice work in experimenting upon hajiless little ones while learning their business. This is the 
lowest salary paid, and of four hundred and seventy-five female teachers only twelve receive it. 
Seventeen others command six hundred and sixty dollars for their second year of apprentice- 
ship, while the great majority draw from the public treasury salaries ranging from eight hundred 
ami ten to two thouMindJ'our hundred dollars a year, in f/old. 

The areraije annual salary of the whole five hundred teachers now in the department, of 
whom nineteen tu-enlieths are fetnates, is over one thounand and thirty-three dollars in gold. As 
Superintendent Denman's last Annual Report truly says, the female ' ' assistants in our Primary 
and (irammar Schools receive nearly douhle the salaries paid to teachers in similar positions in 
most of the eastern cities." And this, too, where the necessary expenses of living are actually 
less, and very considerably less, than in any eastern city of equal size. This m.akes San Francisco 
the female teachers' pecuniary paradise, and sufficiently accounts for their increasingly large 
immigration hither from the less-favored East. The activity of the matrimonial market "has 
nothing whatever to do with it," and any such report is a "mean, masculine slander," originated 
by "those horrid men." 

Rented Rooms. — That the city did not enter a day too soon upon the erection of the new 
buildings already commenced, clearly appears from the fact that the Department has been renting, 
and still occupies, the larger part of, eighty rooms, in thirty-five diflferent buildings and parts of 



Get your Blue Point Transplanted Oysters from MOEGAIT & CO., California Market, 



!. P. VAN SCHAACE Si CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 7U, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PBOGBESSOFTHECITY. 39 



buildings, at an annual rental of nearly §19,000 — a sum quite sufficient to build and equip a new 
twelve-class primary school house every year. These eighty rooms accommodated four thousand 
two hundred and seventy-one pupils, or about one seventh of the total enrollment for the year. 

New Buildings. — The Board of Super\nsor3 has already entered upon the erection and 
equipment of live new school buildings, all of the most approved design, excellent material, and 
thorough workmanship, and containing an aggregate of seventy rooms. Though less in number, 
the superior size of these new rooms will enable them to accommodate a considerably larger 
number of pupils than the eighty old rented rooms. 

Le.vse of the Lincoln Lot. — The last Legislature authorized the Mayor, Auditor, and 
Treasurer of San Francisco to issue bonds to the amount of .?200,000, to constitute a Building 
Fund for the erection of urgently-needed school buildings. As a Sinking Fund for the redempition 
of these bonds, as well as to proride revenue for the pajTnent of interest thereon, the Legislature 
authorized the Board of Supervisors to lease, for twenty years, that portion of the Lincoln 
School lot, lying two hundred and seventy-five feet on Market Street by one hundred feet on 
Fifth Street. This centrally-located and already very valuable property was at once sub-divided 
into eleven lots, each twenty-five by one hundred feet ; all of which were promptly, profitably, and 
permanently leased. The income thus derived not only pays the interest upon the ?200,000 of 
bonds, but jnelds a surplus which, safely invested at no more than seven per cent, will amount 
to nearly •?400,000 at the expiration of the twenty years' lease. This sum ^rill not ordy redeem 
the bonds, but leave a balance of nearly §200, 000 for the erection of such additional school build- 
ings as the Department may then require. Thus, by temporarily surrendering the use of this 
valuable property to the rapidly -increasing business of this central section, the city not only 
gains the immediate and continued use of ample means for the acconmiodation of thousands of 
pupils in the mean time, but retains and eventually resumes the possession of property which, at 
the expiration of its twenty-year lease, can hardly fail to command at least .§1,000,000. 

Ratio of School Children. — In a total population of two hundred thousand seven hundred 
and seventy the number of youth under seventeen years old was sixty thousand five hundred 
and fifty-two ; that is about thirty per cent, or nearly one third, of all the inhabitants of the 
city. Of these, about thirty-five thousand, or considerably more than one half, were of the 
schoolable age ; that is, upward of six. As a matter of fact, however, when reckoning the 
number of youth actually attending the Public Schools, we must remember that the High 
Schools always, and the upper grades of the Grammar Schools quite generally, contain pupils 
more than seventeen years old ; while the Normal and Evening Schools are largely, if not 
mainly, composed of such. Hence it is safely within bounds to calculate that the whole number 
of youth of schoolable age in this city during the last school year, reckoned in round numbers, 
was nearly, if not quite, forty thousand. 

R.4.TI0 OF Enrollment.— Of these forty thousand youth the Public Schools, including the 
Evening Schools, enrolled twenty-nine thousand four hundred and forty-nine, or three fourths 
of all legaUy entitled to attend. Of the remaining ten thousand, the denominational, Sprivate, 
Kindergarten, and family schools probably enrolled fully one half. Hence, it cannot be far wrong 
to say that, with all the excellent facilities furnished by both public and private schools of all 
kinds, about one eighth of the schoolable youth of the city wholly failed to attend any school 
whatever. It is, obviously, upon these five thousand boys and girls now growing into unlawful 
and destructive ignorance that the new Compulsory Riucathm Law, when properly constructed 
and duly enforced, is expected to work its chief benefits, public and private. 

Average ENROLLiiENT. — The average number actually belonging was twenty thousand seven 
hundred and fifty. This fairly indicates, what every public school teacher of any considerable 
experience in San Francisco knows to be true, that, of the tot.al number enrolled in any year, 
nearly one third fail to attend regularly enough to retain membership for anj'thing more than 
an necessarily limited time. This very large percentage of irregular or desultory membership 
results from sickness, removal, incompetence, leaving school for work or trade, and sundry 
other minor causes. Of these, probably the fourth is the most generally operative in this 
money-getting metropolis. 

Average Attendance. — This was nineteen thousand three hundred and eighty-one, which, 
upon twenty thousand seven hundred and fifty, the average number belonging, gave a general 
percentage of attendance for the entire Department, of ninety-three and three tenths per cent. 
This was the lowest in nine years, though but one and one tenth per cent below that of 1873, 
which was the highest ever reached in the history of the Department, indicating a very high 
general average and a surprising uniformity. 

The two High Schools, with an average membership of five hundred and thirty-nine, rose 
to ninety-six per cent in attendance; the Grammar Schools having an average membership of 
four thousand seven hundred and ninety, reached ninety-five and three tenths per cent, while 
the Primaries, with an average membership of fourteen thousand six hundred and eighty-nine, 
attained ninety-two and five tenths per cent. Considering their vastly greater numbers, together 
with their far inferior average age, the little ones decidedly bore off the palm in this very import- 
ant matter of regular attendance. 

The average number of pitpils to a teacher in the High School was twenty-five and three 
tenths ; in the Grammar Schools, thirty and three tenths ; in the Primary Schools, forty-three 
and eight tenths ; in the entire Department, thirty-nine and nine tenths pliw. This average 



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Inly Hairdressing Saloon appropriated Exclusively to use of Ladies at 113 Geary. 



D. W. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, Wholesale and Eetail, oor. Merchant and Mont, 



40 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



li results from dividing the average attendance by the number of regular teachers, excluding, of 
g course, all special teachers not having constant charge of any one class. This low average 
M resulted largely from the inferior size of a considerable part of the rooms occupied, not only in 
§ • some of the older buildings belonging to the Department, but more especially in many of those 
M which it was compelled to rent. Doubtless the ambition of some principals whose salarj' was 
lO made to depend upon the numljer of classes they could contrive to maintain, and the unfortunate 
necessity of keeping up some classes chiefly to give emplojTnent to sundry impecunious and 
___ importunate teachers and silence their clamorous constituency, may have partially accounted 
r4 for no inconsiderable portion of these superfluous classes. The very judicious consolidation of 
classes early effected by the present administration, together with the completion and occupa- 
tion of the larger rooms in the new buildings, will very considerably increase the average num- 
"^ 1 ber of pupils taught by each teacher during the current year. 

.^T I Co.sT OF Instruction. — Including the salaries of teachers, janitors, carpenters, and other 
g employes of the Department, rents, fuel, lights (for evening schools), books, and supplies, the 
tao average annual cost of instructing each scholar, including all grades, was §'29. 76. In the Pri- 
<! mary Schools each pupil cost the city 819-20 ; in the Grammar Schools about §31.25, and in 
the High School, §79.80 ! These very high averages chiefly result from four causes : 1st. The 
extremely high salaries paid to Primary and Grammar assistants, as already noted. 2d. The 
unusually large amount spent for repairs and new furniture. 3d. The very small average 
number of pupils to a class in several of the Primary and Grammar Schools. 4th. The large 
amount consumed in paying for rented rooms. Upon the completion, equipment, and occupa- 
tion of the new buUdings, the second of these causes will become much smaller, while the third 
and fourth will be almost extinguished. 

Ratio of School Expenses. — Out of a total municipal expense of $3,197,808.30, for the 
year, the total expense of the School Department was 8689,022, or twenty-one and five tenths 
per cent of the whole. This was nearly two per cent higher than that of the preceding year 
and just three and five tenths per cent below that of 1871, when the ratio of expense for Public 
Schools was the highest ever known in the city. Considering the number directly connected 
with the several departments, this ratio of expense is, relatively, much less than that of either 
the Fire Department or Police. 

Rapid Gain lk Mejieership. — "The average number belonging to the Public Schools in 
August, 1874, was twenty-two thousand one hundred and ninety-five and five tenths, which 
was three thousand three hundred and thirty-six more than the membership in the previous 
December. The number of teachers employed, at the same time, was four hundred ancl eighty- 
two, which was sixty-three less than in the December preceding. " These two statements, from 
the Superintendent's last report (p. 39), require explanation to prevent thefr convej-ing wrong 
impressions. To compare August of one year with December of the preceding year might easily 
give a wrong idea, because the attendance in December, which is always the close of the first 
term, and just before the holidays, is much smaller than at any other time of the year, except 
in May, which is the close of the second term and the end of the school year — as June is the 
long vacation. On the other hand, August, coming as the second month of the school year, and 
sufficiently long after the opening of the year to enable all the grades to have received nearly or 
quite their full complement, is that one month of all the year in which the enrollment is com- 
monly the largest, or very nearly so. Hence, to compare the month of highest enrollment with 
the month ot lowest enroUment in the same school year, involves a fallacy which needs only the 
statement to become plainly apparent. Had the Superintendent compared the enroUmeiat in 
December, 1874, with that of August, 1874, the result would have indicated a very slight gain, 
if mdeed it had not shown an actual loss. Neither of these methods of comparison is the just 
one. The true way is to compare the enrollment in any month with the enrollment in the same 
month of the year before, and at the same time in the month. 'While there was a decided gain. 
It was by no means as great or as sudden as one might conclude who should read that statement 
without due information and reflection. 

TTie Xew Chssi/icntkm, which was practically a consolidation of nearly seventy classes and 
parts of classes into about half as many full ones, took place in July, and was one of the best 
steps toward increasing the efficiency of the Dep.artment, and introducing practical economy 
mto it, which any Superintendent and Board have ever taken. 

Cosmopolitan Parentage.— Among the curiosities, if not the actual incredibiUties, of the 
.School Census of 1874, appears the report that, of the sixty thousand five hundred and fifty-two 
children or youth reported, only twelve thousand two hundred and thirty, or about one fifth of 
the whole number, were children of parents who were both native bom. Forty thousand and 
fifty-six, or nearly two thirds of all, came of parents both of whom were of foreign birth, and 
five thousand nine hundred .-ind (ifty-six had one parent foreign borr In the face of such a 
fact no one can dispute the ckim of San Francisco to be pre-eminently the most cosmopolitan 
city of America. 

Nativity of the Children.— Although fathered and mothered from nearly all the civilized 
nations the children themselves are neariy all native bom. Of the whole sixty thousand five 
hundred and hfty-two, only two thousand two hundred and ninety-nine, or less than four per 
cent, were bom m foreign countries. 

Xox-Attkn DANCE. —The number of children and youth, of legal age, who were not attend- 



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MORGAN & CO.'S Celebrated Saucelito Transplanted Oysters, 87 California Market 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 7H, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 41 



ing school when the census was taken, was six thousand four hundred and eighty-eight The 
causes of this are, mainly, two: 1st. Many parents mil not subject their little ones to the 
neceSary confinement and drill of the school room through their earlier childhood and therefore 
keep them at home, or send them to Private or Kindergarten Schools, til eight or nine years 
old "d Hundreds of parents, under stress of poverty, reluctantly withdraw their boys and 
girls from school to avail themselves of their help at home or of their earnings m store ot shop 
The Sui>erintendent estimates the number of those who had no good cause for not attendmg 
school, at one thousand four hundred and eighty-eight. K^+wepn 

The Co7,ipul.sorv Educatimi Law, intended to " compel all the youth of the State between 
eight and fourteen years of age, to attend some school at least twelve consecutive weeks "f each 
year " has failed to become operative in San Francisco, because it omitted to provule foi Schoo 
Ma^hals, or some equivalent officials, to enforce its provisions. It is so 1-f y^^-^^^n that it 
will pro^e almost impossible for school officers to compel the attendance of chddren whose 
pa en^ts wish to keep them at home, or choose to let them roam the streets. The next LegisU 
ture should either perfect it by providing means for its enforcement, or repeal it altogetl ei. 

The" Hoodlum" Element". ^Though comparatively few m numbers is vicious and vigor- 
ous to a decTdedly dangerous degree. Educating themselves to the lowest and molest deWg 
themselves and de^n-adSig many of the Public School pupils with whom they come mto contact, 
he"rest?amt, and as fa? as po^ssible their reformation, are -"-f ^^-^^Sf^f^P^^.tr' 
claiming the earliest and most earnest attention of our educational and municipal authorities 

TTbentIl Negligence. -In most cases the negligence or incompetence of parents and 
miar(ians is chiefly and directly responsible for the vileness of these social pests. Upon th s 
^Lt the SuperTntTndent-s remarL deLrve the most careful reading am^ 

teachers and school oificers can do much toward checking the frightful tide of youthtul Ue- 
nra^tywMchTs sweeping over our city, wrecking so many noble youths, the fathers and mo h 
^rs must be mainly responsible for the welfare of their chUdren They are the first and -l>™el " 
amiointed instructors of youth ; other teachers are but assistants m the great work of education. 
TT^slVrrvisionsof^ any law which human ingenuity can devise wdl therefore be po^-er- 
i^ss, 3ess Sined by parental influence and sanctioned by a pubhc_ sentmient ahve to the 
imnortanoe of reclaiming and educating the wayward youth ot our city. 

importance o^reclainnng the pupils fttending aU the Public Schools, barely one fiftieth go to 
the ffigh Schoo'a ComparedUh the population of the city t^e average attendance records 
of thlHiah Schoo s show but ouc pupU for every three hundred and eighty-five and five tenths 
inhabitants This very smaU fract on, over one half of one per cent shows that while on the 
o^e hand the pubhc taste doubtless needs elevation, on the other hand the course of study and 
the general conduct of the High Schools need important modification if they are to become m 

^'^r::^lr^'Z'J:i^^^^f^er^ department of the University of CaUforuia, the 

5Hb4^rpS^^:rS:^^^r^;r^:n^^ 

they have for some time had in serious coi^templation decided maiority of the 

nominal. As a High School it is a very decided ^"^ces as a ^omal hchmU^^an eq y ^^^ 

questioned failure. This is not the fault of the ^achers but of the ^y^^em wm p 

t'o do the work of two separate and distinct departments, each rfp^^ ^>.^^ 

School, provided with regular Normal teachers of the ^If * °!*"j;f%fe GjrU' High and Nor- 



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The most Artistic Work in Hairdressing is Performed at 113 Geary. 



JTWELEY made to order and EEPAIEED by D. W. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Merchant 



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42 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



promotion at the close of the preceding year, which naturaUy resulted in promoting into nearly 
all the grades numliera of very poorly-prepared pupils. The unusuaUy and undeservedly high 
percentages obtamed at that examination were fuUy ofifset by the naturaUy lower ones reached 
under the more thorough examinations of May, 1874. Marking pupils liberaUy is a very cheap 
an, easy way to give one's school or one's class a seemingly high standard, and a correspond- 
ingly Ingh reputation for scholarship ; but the day of examination exposes all such devices and 
disastrously ends the transient delusion. The present course of study in the (irammar Schools 
IS in the main necessary, sensible, and practicable. Competent teachers and faithful learners 
can easily and thorougUy accomplish it in the time prescribed, and have ample marcdn for 
complete re\new. '^ ^-^^lu iui 

PRIM.4RY Schools.— The higher any structure is to rise toward Heaven, the deeper, the far- 
ther toward Heaven s antipode must the ^-ise builder fix its foundations. In things material 
no one questions this. We aU know and heed it. The magnificent Palace Hotel, now lifting 
its mammoth proportions seven stories above ground, started two stories below. Similarly the 
wise educator learns of the skillful architect that the higher and grander he is to rear his edu- 
cational fabric, culminating in and crowned by the college and^the nnivei^ity traink/the 

tZ" riiorT 'n' ''"' ""T TtH^'"'-^ completely musl he lay the Primary LhooHo^unda! 
tions. Iheoretically, we aU admit this : practicaUy, most forget it 

Uuring the year Superintendent Denman has msely occupied the greater part of the time 
rn?:rr 7°f'r'f'''i""""'^'"'"'° *" the condition Ld improvement of these fnnX! 
^uagfe^spSvi^^ He reports that "great progress has been made in teachin|^an. 

guage, especiaUy in the fifth and sixth grades. Correcting false sjmtax and sentence-mSkinff 
^ZVll""'^ considerable attention. In some of the sixth, and^yen in the seventSf 
classes, the compositions showed a better practical knowledge of the proper use of Ihe English 
language than many of the pupils of the grammar grades possess. " In penmanship also many 
of^t^ primary classes did exceedingly we^ As S whole^ the primary^eachers Sid exceuTnt 

Cb.'iMoponTANSciiooLS.-The summary abolition of the study of any language other than 
the English in all the schools of the Department excepting only the two High Sols provoked 
a popular displeasure and aroused a public opposition which resulted in aKath-e enactment 
re^iuiring the Board of Education to restore the study of the German and French lanCTagrS^ 

dustrill or Refom Ih^nr^nrse^'^^ "^V \^^l '"'' ^""'^ ^"^ ^™"'""'-^l *» I''- 

midway betwee™he S; Schod an f.^^^^f '"'i- ^ Fo^ such the city should provide a school 
place it in char °e of exper enoed^^^^^^^^ >h « ^'^"''i '° *''" '"^'«"*y "^ '*^ discipline, and 

insure the corr^tiveTml re ormatorv^ l^^''' T'^'"gy' ^''^' ^"'^ conscience to 

Enlightened humanitretneXnWlsfor^t^ , constitute the chief end of such a school, 

rightly-conducted schooTofthis^Se ^^ estabhshment of a properly-organized and 

„ t''-;rnrn;i^x,%7r!iH;g^:oZu\t^^^^^^^ *-'='>-• r*^""-g 

^ average monthly enrollment of one thousand and eW.n , ^'^^e'^ty-three pupils, having an 
^ shouhi say nightly, attendance of sirCdred and tw; an 7 "^T^ff ''"''^' °'"' P'^"'^'''?^ ^« 
^ Iportant facts of these extremely useful seool. Of fJ ? ^ *''"*''• ^""^"^^"^^ the im- 
B 1 one female. The results of tl e instn,, Hnn i p i i ''°*-^ J^*"''*''"' "'"ctcen were male and 

" ing, the notable process of large nZi:" "f ^^f^^T^^L^'' Mechanical and Industrial Draw- 



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larity with Commercial Arithmetic and Rn?W^»T V ^ ^'^^ m gaming practical famil- 

dation. Under the conti m«i ™,pervl"on o? W 1 ^"^^V-^^"* e«Pecial notice and commen- 
with improved general effidency have adHiH^;,^i ^f^'*^""' Esq., good order and discipline, 
and in 'fact thf indispensabL'pubUc ntes hT"^^ great practical utility! 

instruction. ^ necessity, ot these valuable auxihanes to our public 

thre^trch^rs^TnrhawJgTn tragetufatt?n"'f "*^ 'I'l'^T' '^■«"«-"* V-VUs, employing 
and one third to each te.alher, formfd the^ecord Irthe^I "k f-^ty-thr^e scholars, or f^ui^eeS 
|_Stre^Scho^^a^;erageda^ 

Set the Millbrae Transplanted^OystersfroiliOEGANTcoTsT^Cal^^ 



p. VAN SCHAAOK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 43 



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tuition of each pupil. This unsatisfactory showing principaUy resulted from the general unwill- 
iu.mess of the colored people to send their children to monochromatic schools. Ha^^ng obtamed 
equal rights in the elective franchise they claim equal pririleges in educational facilities, and 
are in a fair waj- to get them. .,„,., ,. . ,.1 j.i. ij. j. 

Labor Schools.— Under the auspices of the Mechanics' Deliberative Assembly, the attempt 
to encn-aft the teaching of various mechanical trades upon the regular mstniction of the Fublic 
Schools was quite %-igorously prosecuted for some months in the early part of the year ihe 
futility of any such attempt presently became so apparent that its advocates modihed their 
attempts into a well-digested plan for a School Ship or Floating Trcumng School, for which they 
have already obtained from the Navy Department the grant of the U. !5. ship Jamesto^vm with 
the appointment of Commander Glass to inaugurate and develop the enterprise, wiU ma 
few davs be placed in practical operation. The main idea is to receive lads and young men who 
would "else be committed to the Industrial School, and while teachmg them the essential 
branches of a sound, English education, also to train them for efficient ser^ce m the merchant 
marine or naval ser-sHce, as they may elect. . r 1, i 

Corporal Pi-vtshmen't.— The regulation respecting this very important portion of school 
disciplme requii-es each principal to include in his monthly report a statement of the nuniber of 
cases of corporal punishment, the age and sex of the pupil, and the cause therefor. Under 
this rule the report of eighteen thousand three hundred and sixty-seven cases of corporal pun- 
ishment came into the office, and even this immense number was considerably below the truth, 
as many teachers admitted that they recorded and reported only the more severe cases This 
ahnost incre.lible number largely resulted from that change in the rules -Kdiich empowered every 
assistant to personally administer corporal punishment at her own discretion, which wa^nearl> 
as great an error in some respects as it would be for tlie father of a large famdy to authorize 
the big brothers and sisters to whip the little ones whenever they thought best or felt like it 
Upon this point the Superintendent deserves quoting agam : " In order to protect the helpless 
and dependent children in our Public Schools from passionate and inexperienced teache^ I 
respectfully recommend the Board of Education to hmit the power to mflict corporal pumsh- 
ment to the principals of the schools. " , ■ , , ■ _i • 1 „* „„+ T>«,,.f;,,nblp 

The total abolition of corporal punishment, however desirable is certainly not yet pract^.^able, 
except by resort to suspension and expulsion from school ; and this camiot be done ythout 
sacriLing the very .youth whom we should save, and, at the same time, seriously endangering 
he peace^f society. ^^Tien we have succeeded in safely abohshmg capital punishnaen and the 
resort to all forms of force in deaUng with adult oifenders, we may enter more l^opefuUy upon 
the task of securing the necessary discipline among large bodies of often sadly neglected and 
occasionally positively ^-icious, youth without ever resortmg to physical f°'^'=f- , ^^?f"^,Xrin!r 
to be noted that these visionary humanitarians, with their beautiful ideas °f t^« , !^^^^^/ 
aneel latent in every youthful human soul," are generally old mauls or old bachelors— or par- 
:nr^thout"hd^en or, having chddren. lamentably deficient in home d-cipbne; or tethers 
whose own classes or schools exhibit a lack of order which at once condemn the t^^her and h^ __ 
testimony. To hundreds of the very youth who most need corrective ^^'f ^P'f f ' «„^,'^'°° ee^ S 
school would prove "capital" punishment mdeed, by turning t^^'" 1°°^^;?*°J^^ f,*!^^^^^^^^ g. 
unchecked by home or school influence, free to give themselves up to ^^Xfm^Z^ent or 
in following their own depraved dispositions into vice, crmiinality, and earlj ™P"^°X, 'blv 
possibly, capital execution itself . On theoretic boys and girls these fine theories ^o^^^^™^: 
but with the real youth of this time and place, the judicious admimstration of corporal punish 
ment, under due bounds and restraints, is indispensably necessary. ,, ^p, , ,. Opi,„„isfrom 

The foUowing is a comparative statement of the '^^dy attendance at all the Public School frem 
1852 to 1873, being a period of twenty-one years ^ 18o2 445 ; 18o3, ,03 ; 18o4 1011 I800 l,^i, 

lS,Sr,SS£aSS^.^ IS: If £; l£«3|: !S I3i; g 

S178 ^0 ■ 1804 i5228,411 ; 1865, §346,862 ; 1866, 8361,668 ; 1867, ^^O'-S^^! 1^6^.' ticfi /-V To 
S397:si2;' 1870, §.526,625; 1871, 8705,116; 1872, §668,262; 1873, 8611,818; 18/4, b68b,4.9. To- 
tal, twenty-three years, 86,897,869. 

LOCATION OF SCHOOLS. 

^-umber of Pupils Enrolled and the Averaye Attendance 0/ School Month, ending May 31, 1873. 

Boys' High School (Location, east side of PoweU Street, near Clayj.-Pupils registered, 240 ; 
"Ti^R^f High^SchoTl (Location, north side of Bush Street, between Hyde and Larkin).-Pu- 
pils registered, 416; average attendance, 339.1. , t^.,, ci t „„,, \f,rVotl Pnnils reir- 

Lincoln Grammar School (Location, east side of Fifth Street, near Market).-PupU3 reg 
istered, 1,116; average attendance, 864. f ■d„=i, „„,q Tavlnrotreptsl — Pncils 

Denmax Gramm.Si School (Location,northwe3t comer of Bush and Taylor streets), rupus 

registered, 897 ; average attendance, 690. ^ 1 

LadieTshould tear in mind that the Best Bathing Appliances are at 113 Geary. 



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PINE WATCHES and JEWELEY for Sale by D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



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44 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



EiNCON Grammar School (Location, Vassar Place, leading from Harrison Street, between 
Secouil and Third).— Pupils registered, 635; average attendance, 437. 

Broadway Grammar School (Location, north side of Broadway Street, between Powell and 
Mason).— Pupils registered, 605; average attendance, 425. 

South Cosmopolitan Gr.uiimar School (Location, north side of Bush Street, between Du- 
pont and Stockton).— Pupils registered, 707; average attendance, 521.6. 

U.NioN Grammar School (Location, north side of Union Street, between Montgomery and 
Kearny).— Pupils registered, 535 ; average attendance, 383. 

Washington Grammar School (Location, southwest corner of Mason and Washington 
streets).— Pupils registered, 5SI ; average attendance, 382.5. 

Spring Valley Grammar School (Location, south side of Broadway Street, between Lar- 
kin and Polk).— Pupils registered, 822; average attendance, 544.6. 

T -"^ '"'■''" t'os'ioPOLiT-ix Grammar School (Location, north side of Filbert Street, between 
Jones and iaylor).— Pupils registered, 632; average attendance, 467.1. 
<H I ,■ ^Y^,''^ Valley Grammar School (Location, north side of McAllister Street, between Frauk- 
*>. j Im and Gough).— Pupils registered, 1,198: average attendance, 752.8. 
" \ VALENCIA ^REET GRAMMAR ScHOOL (Location, east side of Valencia Street, between Twen- 
ty-second and Twenty-third).— Pupils registered, 1,016; average attendance, 700. 

JiiGUTH Street Gramm.« School (Location, east side of Eighth Street, between Harrison 
and Bryant).— Pupils registered, 944; average ateendance, 665.4. 

South S.in Fr.^nclsco School (Location, Fourteenth Avenue near L).— Pupils registered, 
410 ; average attendance, 267. ' r o < 

Tehama Primary School (Location, south side of Tehama Street, near First).— Pupils reg- 
istered, 1,181 ; a\-erage attendance, 651.9. ' F s 

Mission Primary School (Location, west side of Mission Street, between Fifteenth and Six- 
teenth).— Pupils registered, 881 ; average attendance, 538.9. 

Lincoln Primary School (Location, southeast comer of Market and Fifth streets).— Pupils 
registered, 1,122; average attendance, 647. ir"P"» 

Focrth Street Primary School (Location, northwest corner of Fourth and Clara streets). 
—Pupils registered, /50; average attendance 492 

and^SwWfnnf °p''"m^'' Primary School (Location, north side of Post Street, between Dupont 

and Stockton). -Pupils registered, 994 : average attendance, 690 

Stockton .iZZ '-'??"°f''"TAN Primary School (Location, southeast comer of Bush and 

Stockton streets).— Pupils registered, 736; average attendance, 459 8 

streeisT^" PntikT .^'5''^"7«"TAX Prim-ary School (Location, comer of Taylor and Post 

streets).- I'upils registered, 597; average attendance, 361 

and p';weilf™Pnyf''™-'f ^^o'^.n'' (^"'^^ti™. ^^tli side of Geary Street, between Stockton 
and foweU).— Pupils registered, 259; average attendance, 193 4 

Joncs3reavenl?r?M^T-'M'" S™00L (Location, south side of Greenwich Street, between 
p!.™, Q ^ '-"^"P",^' registered, 825; average attendance, 520.4. 

and Wa^hiLt,nf%wT-'''''-'^.^"°?^i^''"'*'°°' ^''^* ^"'« "^ P"^<^" Street, between Jackson 
and n ashington). — Pupds registered, 662 ; average attendance, 457. 

regiYtZl, '^^l'Z:::^:^^'^i^f^^ «''™- "^ ^^^^^ --J Kearny streets). -Pupils 
an^^.^-S3^-;S^— /^- ^X^d^^^^Over «--■ ^^ Second 
MoS:j^L^=^!!!^:-~ ^ea^^^ Street, between 

^^^'^^X'J^r^^:^^:^^ «--^ ^«'— «^^ -^ Leavenworth).- 

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andJ:^,:^,f;^-Lr;;^;-i^-^^^^ 

and^t-^:;;;^^^^:^,^^^!^^- r^ ^.^^ «- Stree, between Larkin 

jonl^::!^.:^^:L;:x'sr:;::^i;^Sni^*^r' ^°^ ^'^ ^ ^^- «*-«*> — 
^JpS^^'s^^:^ ^e:tS^:jf ^^ ^"^^^ ^*^-' ^«'— ^-^-^ 

De|2.^^^;!:':-^J:^- l^-'X^^f^nr^^ stree, between Seott and 
V^^^^^XlSS^rrZj^^ ^' ^'- «*-^. between Seott and 

MOEaAN & CO., 87 Califb^iaJIaSeUi^^rUheiro^;^^ 



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PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 45 



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West End School (Location, San Jo3(S Road, near Six-mile House). — Pupils registered, 84; 
average attendance, 64. 

PoTKEKO School (Location, southwest comer of Kentucky and Napa streets). — Pupils reg- 
istered, 237 ; average attendance, 144. 6. 

Sax Bruxo School (Location, Nebraska near Yolo). — Pupils registered, 341 ; average attend- 
ance, 210.5. 

Ocean House School (Location, San Miguel Road, near Ocean House Road). — Pupils regis- 
tered, 47; average attendance, 31.1. 

PorST LoBOS School (Location, Nineteenth Avenue, Point Lobos Road, near the Turf 
House). — Pupils registered, 53; average attendance, 22. 

Lagcna Hosda School (Location, Eighth Avenue, near K Avenue). — Pupils registered, 
67 ; average attendance, 50. 

Fatrmovn'T School (Location, Chenery Street, near Randall. — Pupils registered, 218; 
average attendance, 127.5. 

Evening Schools. — Pupils registered, 2,173; average attendance, 608. 

Vallejo Street Colored School (Location, northwest comer of Taylor and VaUejo 
streets). — Pupils registered, 65; average attendance, 35. 

Howard Street Colored School (Location, Howard Street, between Fourth and Fifth). 
— Pupils registered, 16: average attendance, 8. 

Noe and TE>rPLE Street Primarv School (Location, comer of Noe and Temple streets). 
— Pupils registered, 82 ; average attendance, 65. 



Collescs anil PriTate Setaools. 

St. iGXATirs' College. — This well-known literary institution, located on Market Street, 
between Fourth and Fifth, which is conducted by the Fathers of the Society of Jesus, was iirst 
opened for the reception of students on the fifteenth day of October, 1855, and was incorporated 
under the law of the State on the thirtieth of April, 1859, and empowered to confer the usual 
degrees and academical honors. Since its commencement, this institution has been attended 
with the highest degree of prosperity and success. The course of instraction pursued is thorough, 
and comprises a complete classical, mathematical, and philosophical course of training, calculated 
to prepare the pupil for entering upon the study of any of the professions, or commencing any 
business vocation. The college is provided with an extensive laboratory, comprising all the neces- 
sary appliances for the assaying of metals and making chemical analysis, which is an important 
feature not generally found in institutions of this character. There is a telegraphic room, with 
an instrument in operation, where the business of operating is taught. The " Ignatian Literary 
Society," for exercise in debate; the " PhiDiistorian Debating Society," to promote the knowl- 
edge of history; the "Loyola Scientific Academy," for the cultivation and promotion of the 
studv of natural sciences ; a College Band and singing classes are established in the college for 
the improvement of the pupils. The founders of this institution, foreseeing the rapid progress 
of the Queen City of the Pacific, purchased some years since the property upon which the 
magnificent college edifice has since been erected. This lot has a frontage of two hundred and 
seventy-five feet on Market and the same on Jessie Street, with a depth of three hundred and 
fifty feet. The present building— the cost of which, independent of the lot, was .S160,000 — 
although one of the finest architectural omaments of the city, is only a part of the extent con- 
templated. yVhen the extensive adtlitions are made, the entire structure will rival anj-thing of 
the kind to be found in our portion of the country. The present building is admirably adapted 
to the purposes for which it was designed, being abundantly lighted and well ventilated in 
every portion ; the ceilings are lofty, and sjracious halls mn through the building. A large play 
ground is attached, with a commodious shelter from the rain, afi'ording amjJe means for the 
physical exercise of the pupils. In fact, nothing has been neglected which is at all conducive 
to mental and physical training. The number of students in the college at present is over five 
hundred, under a stafli'of twenty-two professors and teachers.— [.SVe Advertisement, page xxxix.] 

Santa Clara College, Santa Clara.— This establishment is under the supermtendence - 
of the Fathers of the Society of Jesus, and is open to all who choose to avail themselves of its W 
advantages. It is situated in the beautiful Valley of Santa Clara, so celebrated for the mildness j, 
and salubrity of its climate, and is about three miles distant from San Jose and quite close to | P* 
the Southern Pacific Railroad. The college was founded in 1851. On the twenty-eighth of 
April, 1855, it was incorporated and empowered to confer degrees and academical honors, and 
to exercise all the rights and pri\-ileges common to any other literary institution m the Umted 
States. It has a full stalT of professors, and presents advantages for the mental, physical, ancl 
moral training of the students unsurpassed in California. It possesses a complete philosophical 
apparatus, purposely made in Paris for Santa Ckra College, and furnished with all necessary ci 
instraments for experiments in mechanics, hydraulics, pneumatics, caloric, electricity, magnetism, ° 
optics, acoustics, and surveying. New and important additions are being made every year to ^ 
keep pace with the progress of science. The chemical laboratory is pro\nded with a full assort- 
ment of chemicals, a very good set of furnaces, and all that is necessary for the different kinds 
of chemical analysis. The museum of natural history comprises a valuable collection of miner- 
alogy and geology ; also three thousand specimens of shells and other natural curiosities. As 
an accessory to the scientific department, there is a photographic gallery, where the students 



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Tone tut the Best of Artists employed at Hairdressing Establishment, 113 Geary. 
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Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D. "W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merohaai 



46 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



who wish may learn photography in all its different branches. Practical lessons are given also 
on the electric telegraph. The college library numbers about twelve thousand volumes. — [.^ee 
Advertisement, page xli.] 

Heald's BrsiNESs College.— This popular school is located at 24 Post Street, between Mont- 
gomery and Kearny. It is well known throughout the country as being the largest and one of 
the most thorough and complete commercial institutes in America. It has a total yearly attend- 
ance of about seven hundred and fifty pupils. Among these pupUs are found the sons of many 
of our most prominent business men. Students are also to be found here from every county in 
tlie State, from all the neighboring States and Territories, from British America, Mexico, Cen- 
tral America, and the Sandmch Islands. Heald's Business CoUege is connected with the Inter- 
national Business CoUege Association, which includes the leading commercial schools in the 
United States and Canada. There are thirty-six schools in the association, located in all of our 
leading commercial cities. These schools — formerly kno%\ii as the Bryant & Stratton Colleges — 
are popular among the business men of the whole country, and their graduates are numbered by 
thousands. The object of this school is principally to tit young men for business pursuits, yet 
its course of insti-uction is adapted to all professions and caUings. In addition to the course of 
commercial studies, instruction is given in aU the English branches ; in French, German, and 
Spanish ; in Telegraphy, Phonography, Higher Mathematics, etc. The plan of operation adopted 
is different from other schools on this coast. Actual practice in business affairs constitutes the 
main feature of the mercantile course. Instead of a dry and uninteresting study of mere theory, 
the pupil enters into business ^i-here he meets with the same transactions that he would in a real 
counting house or bank. He buys, sells, ships, consigns, and goes through all the routine of a 
merchant. He keeps his accounts with the bank, drawing his checks, discoimtiug his notes, 
and dealing in all kinds of business forms and papers. By this process the pupO readily becomes 
familiar not only with the proper forms of bookkeeping but also with aU the details of business. 
When ready to graduate he thus has a practical knowledge of the phases of merchandising, 
banking, railroading, commission, jobbing, importing, etc. The practicability of this method 
of instruction has been amply proved by the success of the numerous graduates of this school 
during the past twelve years. Its graduates are now to be found in most of the leading banks 
and mercantile houses of this city, and their serxaces are in good demand. Connected with the 
college is a telegraphic institute, located in the Mechanics' Institute Building, No. 27 Post 
Street. This department is under the immediate supervision of James Gamble, General Super- 
intendent of the Western Union Telegr.aph Co. , and is ably managed. It has been fitted up at 
great expense with all the instruments for teaching the art thoroughly, and is one of the most 
complete institutes of the kind in America. The graduates of this department find ready em- 
ployment, and succeed in gixang perfect satisfaction. Ladies are admitted mto all the depart- 
ments of the college, and their success both in the business and telegraphic departments has 
been most gTatifjang. They are quite generally availing themselves of the opportunity thus 
afforded for fitting themselves for useful and lucrative emplojTnent, and we regard it as a hopeful 
sign to see so many of them m the school. The College Faculty comprises the foUo-wong well- 
known officers and teachers : E. P. Heald, President and General Manager ; F. C. Woodbury, 
Secretary and Superintendent of Course of Instruction ; H. M. Stearns, Superintendent of 
Theory Department ; A. E. Castle, Superintendent of Practical Department ; T. K. Southern, 
Superintendent English Department; H. A. Frederick, A. B. Capp, and Miss Clara SneU, Book- 
keeping and Accounts ; F. Seregni, Penmanship ; Mrs. N. Heald, Department of Telegraphy ; 
Mrs. A. M. Hatch, Phonography ; W. P. Casey, Surveying and Mechanical Drawing ; Lloyd 
Baldwin, Mercantile Law ; A. P. Du Bief, French ; C. F. Morel, Spanish ; George Jebens, 
(ierman. 

Private Schools. — The number of private schools and colleges in San Francisco is about one 
hundred. In size and character these range throng hnearly every degree, from the little private, 
family or home school of half a dozen scholars, to the large flourishing college enroUing its pupils 
by hundreds. Of these the Catholics maintain about one fifth, while a considerable portion of 
the remainder either directly belong to or are managed in the especial interest of other religious 
denominations. The number of pupils attending private and church schools in June, 1874, as 
reported by the Census Marshals, was six thousand one hmidred and eighty-one. This was a 
fraction less tlian one tenth of the whole number of schoolable children" in the city. The 
increase in the number of such pupUs during 1874, was eight hundred and ninety-six, which 
was considerably greater, relatively, than was shown by the census and reports of pubHc school 
attendance. 

Hospitals. 

The hospitals of San Francisco wiU compare favorably with those of other cities of its size 
and population. The public institutions are ample in accommodation and appointment, while 
those of priv.ate character are to be found in aU parts of the city. The Germans and French 
have for years had fine hospital buildings. The Sisters of Mercy own a large structure on Rin- 
con HUI. The Italians have within a few years completed a commodious building, comer of 
Twenty-eighth and Noe streets, and the Episcopal societies are now erecting a hospital on 
the cottage plan, beyond the Mission. The special puqjose of these hospitals is to provide 
for ccrtam classes of our citizens, as the French, the German, the Italian, etc., but all who de- 
sire to avail themselves of their advantages are admitted upon payment of most reasonable 



Earitan River Transplanted Oysters at MORGAN & CO.'S, 87 California Market. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 47 



fees. Besides the institutions enumerated above, there are several smaller ones which have 
been established through the munificence of our citizens, and whose names indicate their special 
uses. These are the State Woman's Hospital, the San Francisco Woman's Hospital, the Foimd- 
ling Asylum and Lying-in Hospital, etc. 

Up to September, 1872, the City and County Hospital was located at North Beach, the 
main building ha^"ing been originally constructed for a school house ; the other two being tem- 
porary wooden structures. For years these had been inadequate for the increasing wants of 
the city, hence the completion of the commodious structure now in use was viewed with much 
satisfaction by those interested in the good name of our city. Not only are the buildings and 
accommodations in the new location much more ample than those foi-merly occupied, but the 
location itself is far better suited to the purposes in riew. The grounds are in the southern 
jiortion of the city, and comprise the two blocks, bounded by Nevada, Sierra, and Nebraska 
Streets and Potrero Avenue. They measure eight hundred and sixty-six feet by four hundred 
and eighty-one, or nearlj' ten acres. The location is somewhat elevated, at least sufficiently 
so to insure efficient drainage, and though not very accessible at present will, when the contem- 
jilated extension of the Sixth Street line out Potrero Avenue is completed, be but a short ride 
from Market Street, requiring no more time than was necessary to reach the former hospital. 
The main buildings face the west, the hospital entrance being on Potrero Avenue, which rung 
nearly north and south. An entirely difterent plan has been adopted to that usually in vogue ; 
several individual structures, most of them at considerable distance from each other, but con- 
nected by a long, covered corridor, unite to form the hospitah With the exception of the 
kitchen and laundry, which are of brick, all the buUdings are of wood, with brick foundations. 
The indiA*idual structures are : The administrative and dining-hall buildings, each three stories 
high, situated in the center of the block, opposite each other, and on either side of the center 
of the covered corridor, which is five hundred and fifty-six feet long by eighteen feet wide, and 
runs lengthwise of the block ; the kitchen and laundry, back of the dining rooms ; the chapel, 
at the south end of the corridor; the gate-house, stable, morgue, operating rooms, etc., scat- 
tered about in various places, and, lastly, six long pa\'ilions, each two stories high, and each 
designed to accommodate sixtj'-four patients (with their nurses), thirty -two on a floor. It is 
designed eventually to have twelve pavilions, to be built in pairs, opposite each other, on 
either side of the long corridor and paraDel to the main buildings ; the first pair, on either 
side, being a hundred feet from the main buildings, the second a hundred feet from the 
first, and the third a hundred feet from the second. Six pavilions are considered sufficient for 
present purposes. With the most generous allowance of space, they will contain three hun- 
dred and eighty-four patients. In an emergency at least a hundred more could be accommo- 
d.ited without serious overcrowding. Since moving into these new quarters in September, 1S7"2, 
the number of patients has largely increased owing, partly at least, to the greater comfort 
att'orded. The average number of patients in the City and County Hospital for the year 1874, 
was three hundred and seventy-seven, and during this period the total admissions numbered 
three thousand five hundred and forty-six, and the deaths three hundred and thirteen. It may 
lie further mentioned that there were treated in 1874, as estimated, about six thousand out- 
Ijatients, for whom were put up over twelve thousand prescriptions. Resident Physician, Dr. 
\\'. il. Lawlor ; Assistant Resident Physician, Dr. J. W. Keeney ; Visiting Surgeons, Drs. W. 
A. Douglass and H. H. Toland ; Visiting Physicians, Drs. F. A. Hobnan and C. M. Bates. 
Besides these, the medical staff is composed of Dr. Martinache, of the University of California, 
and Drs. Gibbons and Barkan, of the Medical College of the Pacific, whose ser\Tices are ren- 
dered gratuitously. 

In 1867, the Alms House, a large and substantial frame building, was constructed near Lake 
Honda, by the city. The need of such an establishment had become urgent, as the City and 
County Hospital was burdened with the permanently disabled and superarmuated, who had 
been accumulating for years. This building will accommodate five hundred persons, the average 
number present in 1874 being three hundred and thirty, and the total admissions for the year 
being four hundred and fifty-one. In the hospital wards there is an average of seventy-five 
patients. Thirty-nine deaths occurred in 1874 The officers are a Superintendent, Mr. M. J. 
Keating, and a Resident Physician, Dr. S. R. Gerry. 

Besides the Hospital and Alms House, the city owns three frame buildings about half a 
mUe from the hospital, which were constructed at the time of the small-pox epidemic in 1868-9, 
and are capable of accommodating in the neighborhood of two huntlred patients. One of the 
buddings is still reserved for small-pox cases, forty-two of which have been treated there dur- 
ing the year, with eight deaths. Another of the buildings is used as a Chinese Hospital In 
this last were admitted forty cases, mostly chronic, fourteen of whom died. The patients were 
under the professional care of Dr. L. P. Foster, the Resident Physician. 

In the fall of 1865 the San Francisco Health Office was established. Prior to this time no 
mortuary records had been preserved by the city. The creation of the office has resulted in 
unquestionable advantage, lea\Tng out of consideration the value of the statistics collected. 
A City Board of Health was created by the Legislature in 1870 ; it consists of the Slay or 
and four physicians, and has control over the Health Office and aE the public charitable insti- 
tutions of the city and county. From a small beginning the Health Department has gro-m) 
into a very important branch of the city government. It controls appointments invohing 



Baths ! Baths ! ! Baths ! ! ! (Jo and Bathe at Central Baths, 113 Geary. 



JEWELEY made to order and REPAIRED by D. ¥. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



48 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



an expense to the city of several thousand doDars a month, and has a general oversight of all 

sanitary affairs. ,,,,.,■ ^ j v i* 

The (lennan Hospital is built upon a lot fronting one hundred and thirty-seven and one half 
feet on Braimau Street (near Third Street) and extending back two hundred and seventy-five 
feet The main building is of brick, three stories high, facing the northwest, and occupies all 
the frontage except what is required for a wide carriageway. It was built in 1853 ; a wmg 
was added in 1860, and a second wing in 1869, so that the hospital can accommodate one hun- 
dred and tliirty patients. The remaining portion of the grounds, equaling over one half the 
area, is laid out with grass plats and walks, and planted with trees. There are but two wards 
in the hospital, each containing ten beds ; the remaining rooms being designed for one or two 
patients only. The hospital is under the control of the Gennan General Benevolent Society, 
which now numbers twenty-seven hundred and ninety-six members. The charges, which include 
medical attendance, are $2 per day, with from 50 cents to $1.50 extra for private rooms if they 
be desired. During the year 1874, the German Hospital received for treatment seven hundred 
and fifty-seven patients, the average number present being seventy-seven. There were forty- 
seven deaths in the same period. The attending physicians are Drs. F. Von Loehr, J. Regens- 
burger, A. Wdhekn, and F. W. Smith. 

The French Hospital, or " Maison de Sant^," is also under the chargeof a society, the " Sociiit^ 
Fran^aise de Bienfaisance MutueUe," organized in 1851, and now having a membership of three 
thousand. The budding is a large two-story brick structure, occupying the center of a hunilred- 
vara (two hundred and seventy-five by two himdred and seventy-five feet) lot on Bryant Street, 
between Fifth and Sixth streets, the remaining grounds being laid out in gardens and planted 
with trees. 

OriginaBy, the hospital completed in 1859 was but one story in hight. In 1869 a second 
story was added, increasing the capacity to the accommodation of one hundred and seventy pa- 
tients. In 1874 there were admitted to this hospital eight hundred and fifty patients, the 
weekly average number present being sixty -five. During the year there were sixty-one deaths. 
The charges are §2 per day for ward patients and §3 for those desiring private rooms. Drs. Pigne- 
Dupuytren and Hoffstetter are the Visiting Physicians, and Dr. E. Prevost is the Apothecary. 

One of the finest of the private hospitals is the St. Mary's Hospital, under the care of the 
Sisters of Mercy. It was erected in 1861 on a himdred-vara lot on the southwest corner of 
Bryant and First streets. The building is of brick, four stories high, and measures seventy- 
five feet by one hundred and fifty on the ground. The design is, when occasion shall require, 
to aild to it a wing, which wQl double its present capacity. No hospital in this city excels this 
in interior arrangement. The ceilings are high, the halls broad, the rooms capacious, the ven- 
tdation and general adaptability to the purposes intended excellent. There are but one or 
two large wards, the majority being intended to accommodate from six to twelve patients ; 
besides these there are a number of private rooms. In the wards and rooms there are beds for 
one hundred and eight patients. During the year the wards are often fulL The average number 
of patients for the year 1874 was about ninety, and the total admissions for the year numbered 
nine hundred and seventy-eight. In the same period one hundred and thirty deaths occurred. 
Patients in the general wards are charged $10 per week, those occupying private rooms $20. 
Dr. James Murphy is Visiting Surgeon ; Dr. J. D. MTiitney, Visiting Physician, and Dr. C. G. 
Kenyon, Resident Physician. 

In 1868 the Italian Benevolent Society erected a hospital for the use of its members and 
others. Two blocks, bounded by Twenty-eighth, Twenty -ninth, Noe, and Castro streets had 
lieen secured, and afi'ord a most admirable site. The building faces the east. It is of brick, 
two stories in hight and contains beds for forty patients. A wing may be conveniently added 
should more room be required. During the first eleven months of 1872 there were admitted 
to this hospital two hundred and three patients, the average number present at any one time 
being over eighteen ; and the number under treatment on the first of December, 1872, being 
about ten. For various reasons, perhaps as much because of its great distance from the central 
portion of the city as from any other cause, this hospital was closed toward the latter part of 
1873 ; when it \vill again he open for patients is not known. 

In 1853 the Government caused to be erected at Rincon Point a very large, four-story brick 
hospital, one of the finest buildings in the city at that time, and ever since, from its character 
and position, a prominent landmark. It was designed for eight hundred patients — sadors of 
the merchant and national marine — probably five time as many as were ever within its walls at 
one time. Until 1868 it continued to be used. In this year the severe earthquake further 
impaired a foundation already rendered insecure by extensive grading, which had left the 
hospital perched upon a liigh embankment, and it was vacated. After numerous removals and 
vicissitudes, the patients at last secured a home in the budding formerly occupied as the asylum 
for the deaf, dunil), and blind, on the comer of Mission and Fifteenth streets. The ground is 
ample, the buddings, two in number, are four stories high, of brick, and perhaps as suitable 
for a hospital as buddings converted to such purposes generally are. They are probably the 
}>cst accommodations that could be secured without budding, and are calculated to contain one 
hundred and twenty-five patients, though the average number in 1874 was but eighty-five. In 
this year there were admitted six hundred and sixteen patients. During the same period thirty 
deaths occurred. The hospital is under the professional charge of Dr. G. N. Ellinwood. 



HORGAK & CO. have Prince's Bay Transplanted Oysters always on hand. 



p. VAN SCHAACE & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, EstabHshed 1S62. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 49 



Over a vear since the Government decided to build a suitable Marine Hospital, a site on^ the 
Presidio Reservation near Mountain Lake, ha-i-ing been selected. The buildings are, in fact, 
almost completed and are expected to be ready for occupancy by May, 1875. They are con- 
structed entirely of wood, aud consist of an executive buUding two stories in hight, of two, 
long, one-story buildings, one on each side of the executive building, to be used for kitchen, 
pantry, laundry, store rooms, dead room, Hnen room, etc. ; and of three one-story wards radiating 
from the rear of the executive building like the ribs of a fan. The whole expense, including a 
separate residence for the surgeon, will be about §60,000. 

The writer of this article has visited all the hospitals above named, some of them frequently. 
Their internal arrangements are creditable to their authorities, convenient and comfortable to 
patients, and calculated to afford excellent facilities for the cure of disease. Nearly all, if not 
aU, the estabbshments are pro\'ided with bathing apparatus, not ordy for corumon use, but for 
special application in treatment. Thus a patient may have warm, cold, shower, steam, or med- 
icated baths, at the option of his physician. The medical staff of the different institutions is 
ample, and, as will be seen, includes physicians of excellent standing in the professioiu 

The larger hospitals have now been considered. There remain to be mentioned a few smaller 
institutions inaugurated for special objects. The buildings which these occupy were not built 
for such purposes, but have aU been converted from dweUing houses. The State Woman's 
Hospital, comer of Twelfth and Howard streets, receives only those -n-ith diseases peculiar to 
women. All who are able are expected to pay. Six beds are, however, devoted to non-paying 
patients, .?10 per week being charged in other cases. Originally the hospital accommodated 
eighteen patients. About a year since an addition was budt, increasing its capacity to thirty- 
one beds. In 1874 the average attendance was eighteen, and the total admissions numbered 
eighty. A hundred and ninety-eight out-patients were treated during the same period. In 
explanation of the small number admitted during the year, it may be mentioned that most of 
the cases require months, some as many as eight, of treatment, before a cure can be effectecL 
The hospital is under the charge of Dr. John Scott, assisted by Drs. George Chismore aod 
C. E. Blake. 

On the corner of Clay Street and Prospect Place is the San Francisco Woman's Hospital, of 
which Dr. 0. T. Deaue is the Physician. As the certificate of incorporation shows, this institu- 
tion was established for the cure of sick females, and to provide them mth a home, medical 
attendance, medicines, and proper care during such period of sickness. It is in fact a general 
hospital for females, who are received and treated gratuitously. There were receive<l here 
during 1874 one hundred and eighty-one patients, of whom a hundred were pregnant ; and there 
were born in the institution in this period one hundred and four infants. 'The hospital, which 
contains thirty beds, had an average for the year of about twenty inmates. 

In 1868 the San Francisco Lying-m Hospital and Foundling Asylum was incorporated, for 
respectable married women or unprotected single women who have previously borne a good 
moral character, and for the care and protection of such children as may be born in said hospital, 
and foundlings without distinction of coler. The special character of the institution will be 
seen at once ; it wiU be appreciated that it differs from all other charities in receiving no cases 
of disease whatever. The hospital and asylum has been in successful operation for several years 
at 269 Jessie Street, under the professional care of Dr. Benjamin F. Hardy. Within a short 
period another large dwelling, adjoining in the rear and fronting on Mission Street, has been 
rented, and the accommodations thus materially increased. The design is to provide a room 
for each pregnant female besides providing room for the foundlings left at the door. During 
1874 the hospital was generally fuU ; nearly a hundred infants were either bom in, or left to the 
care of, the institution. A number of these died, many were given away or adopted, and others 
were taken away by their mothers. 

A little more than three years ago the various Episcopal churches, desiring to provide more 
fully for the sick and needy of their parishes, organized St. Luke's Hospital, and procured a 
building beyond the Mission, which they adapted to hospital purposes and arranged to accom- 
modate" twenty patients. During 1874 sixty-five patients were received, the average attend- 
ance being fourteen. The patients are under the charge of Drs. W. A. Douglass and C. B. 
Hutchins. Some months since the managers purchased a lot containing two acres, on which 
they are now erecting a hospital on the cottage plan, which wUl be ready for occupancy by 
Apnl next, ^^^len fuUy completed it will contain beds for eighty patients, but at present^ the 
design is to provide for but thirty. Though designed more especially for the poor of the Epis- 
copal parishes, St. Luke's Hospital is not exclusive, but receives patients of all denominations, 
and is general in character. , . . . ■ 

It will be seen that exclusive of the Alms House and the Small-pox Hospital, the city, in its 
I'll'Iie and private charities, offers accommodation tor over a thousand patients ; that during 
l-7i over seven thousand persons availed themselves of their advantages, of which nearly eight 
hui^bred died ; and that the average number of patients under treatment was over seven hun- 
dred and fifty. 
1 AssocJatlons— Benevolent and Protective. 

I The operations of the different Associations, Benevolent, Protective, etc., are fuUy detailed 
in the Appendix, pages 972-994. During the past year several important charities have been 
e3tablished to assist those already in existence. The unequaled munificence of our citizens in 






The Best and most Cleanly Family Baths in the City are at 113 Geary. 



Ban Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



o 



^ 
g 



50 SAN FRANCISCO DIEECTORT. 



their generous support of the many organizations of a benevolent character in our roidst, as well 
as their prompt and characteristic responses to the many appeals for assistance from abroad, have 
given them a reputation that any community may -sreU be proud of. 

Hanorartiires. 

Manufacturing eventually becomes to a city what agriculture is to the country, its surest 
source of general prosperity and permanent wealth. In San Francisco especially, speculation 
and trade have usually proved so largely remunerative, and, consequently, so generally attract- 
ive, that manufacturing, with its relatively slow and small returns, has absorbed comparatively 
little capital. Within the past two years, however, a few capitalists of the heavier class, with a 
very considerable number of those controUing more moderate fortunes, have given increased 
attention to the establishment and encouragement of the more important manufactures at 
home. A brief review of the more prominent of these, including such statistical information 
as we can command, will sufficiently demonstrate to the reader the character, extent, and value 
of the most valuable of our home industries dming the past year. By the most valuable, we 
mean those which employ the greatest number of operatives, and the annual aggregate of whose 
transactions exceeds $100,000. For obvious convenience we present them in alphabetical order: 

Artificial Stone Works. — Of these, working imder different patents, and making both 
stone and marble, the city has four. They employ between eighty and ninety men, and turn 
out finished products to the value of §150,000 a year. 

BiLLlAKD Tables. — Six factories employ eighty men, make five hundred tables, worth 
.?220,000. There is probably as great a demand for billiard tables in San Francisco as in any 
other city of equal population in America. The players, both amateur and professional, will 
have the best, and are generally both able and 'williug to pay for them. 

Boots and Shoes. — This branch of industry is rapidly progressing, and fast displacing East- 
em-made goods, the importation of which, in comparison with the rapidly-increasing demand, is 
steadily decreasing. In style and quality California-made boots and shoes surpass anything we 
can obtain from the East, and our home-made goods now find a ready market in all the adjoin- 
ing and neighboring States and Territories, and were it not for the difference in currency we 
might successfully compete even with New England for the trade of the West. The support 
of this great local interest, the products of which are always trodden under foot, gives employ- 
ment to nearly four thousand hands, inclucUug all classes, male and female, Eastern and Cliinese 
workers, the value of whose productions amounts in the aggregate to very nearly, if not quite, 
$4,000,000. One of the largest firms in the city, that of Messrs. Buckingham &, Hecht, employed 
during 1874 three hundred and fifty white hands and two hundred and fifty Chinese, making a 
total of six hundred hands. The stock consumed by them was as follows : Sides of sole leather, 
thirty-seven thousand six hundred and eighty ; sides of wax upper, eleven thousand six hundred 
and forty ; sides of buff upper, fifteen thousand ; kip, six thousand ; domestic calfskin, eight 
thousand and four hundred ; imported calfskin, twelve thousand, from which was manufact- 
ured three hundred and seventy-five thousand pairs of boots and shoes, an increase of forty thou- 
sand on the previous year. A dozen such establishments as this could scarcely supply the 
local and country trade. 

Boxes. — Twenty- two companies and firms, making aU kinds of boxes, wooden, metallic, and 
paper ; plain, fancy, cigar, and treasure, employ three hundred and forty hands, whose annual 
work results in §1,200,000 worth of finished goods. 

Brass Foundrie.s. — Fourteen of these furnish employment to one hundred and seventy-five 
men and boys, and increase the aggregate annual value of manufactures of the city by §385,000. 

Breweries. — Lager Beer constitutes the principal brew of the city. The report of the 
brewers for 1874 shows a healthy increase of business. The number of barrels made was two 
huuilred and five thousand. There are in the city about forty breweries, which give employ- 
ment to three hundred and forty-two men. The total value of their annual production is 
§1,725,000. 

Brooms, Broom Handles, and Britshes. — The making of these indispensable domestic 
utensils forms the business of no less than thirteen separate factories, furnishes employment to 
one hundred and twenty men and boys, and results in the annual placing upon the market of 
over one million brooms and brushes, worth §210,000. 

CANDLE Factories. — In these days of gas and kerosene one would hardly believe that in 
the City of San Francisco alone over one hundred men tiud constant work in turning out one 
hundred and ten thousand boxes a year, worth upward of §300,000. When they reflect, 
however, that the constantly-increasing army of miners, in all the darkness of their underground 
work, unable to depend upon gas or kerosene, must rely wholly upon candles, they wUl quickly 
discover the source of a very great and annually-increasing consumption wliich makes such a 
"cereus" item in the annual account of the city's manufactures. 

Carriage, Car, and Wagon Factories. — Of these, including those of aU capacities, there 
are nearly fifty in the city. They range from the vast establishment of the Kimball Manufactur- 
ing Co. to the small shop employing but a single man. They employ four hundred and fifty 
men, turned out over twelve hundred wagons and carriages in 1874, and added over §600,000 to 
the total wealth of our manufactures. 

CHKM1CAL.S. — In a city and county iu which so much of assaying and other metallurgical 



Send your Orders from the Country for Eastern Transplanted Oysters to Morgan & Co 



p. VAIT SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 51 



work is constantly demanded, the production of chemicals is necessarily stimulated to an extent 
ahnost incredible to one who had not previously considered these unusual causes. Eicdit differ- 
ent chemical works employ forty-niae men. In the lack of the statistics necessary to give the 
annual value of their production, we give a few items of their consumption. Last year they 
used three thousand and four hundred tons of nitrate of soda, five hundred and fifty tons of 
sulphur, and eight hundred and twenty tons of sulphuric acid. 

Cigars .\:n-d Tobacco. — Siuce the successful raising and preparing of tobacco, by the CHdp 
process, has been practically demonstrated, the culture of this plant has attracted much atten- 
tion in this State, and there is no longer any doubt that this industry is destined to become of 
very great importance among the commercial and manufacturing interests of CaUfomia. The 
California tobacco, cured by this process, conunands a higher price than any other in the mar- 
ket. The New York Tobacco Leaf says that the first sales at Louisville, Kentucky, of Califor- 
nia tobacco, cured by the Gulp process, brought eighty per cent more than any other tobacco 
sold during that week, and from one hundred to one hundred and fifty per cent more than aver- 
age new leaf from other States. As Louis\'iUe is one of the centers of the tobacco interest iu 
the United States, the commercial rating of tobacco there would fix its character all over the 
country. Havana tobacco, of equally good quality as that grown upon the Island of Cuba, can 
be raised in many parts of the State, and produces abundantly, yielding two thousand jjounds 
to the acre, a greater bulk than is produced iu any of the southwestern States. The beautiful 
and fertOe valley of Santa Clara is taking the lead in this busiuess, and will probably become 
the great tobacco county of the State. In June, 1874, according to the Sacramento Record, 
Santa Clara had about four million plants set out ; Los Angeles about one million ; Santa Cruz, 
eight hundred thousand, and Lake County, three hundred thousand ; making a total of over six 
milUon, which, it is probable, has now nearly, if not quite, doubled. In selecting a site for a 
tobacco plantation, care should be taken that it is weU sheltered from prevailing win'ds, and 
that the soil is a soft, sandy loam, such as is most favorable to its gTowth. In regard to the 
cigar-making interest, it is no smoky \-iew of the subject that leads us to say that it is becom- 
iug by far the greatest of our local industries, giving emploj-ment to a larger number of people, 
and producing a greater value than almost any other. Nearly all our cigars are of home manu- 
facture, only about one thousand cases having been imported during the "last two years. Of the 
one hundred and fifteen cigar manufactories in the city, the heaviest is that of Lewis Brothers. 
The number of hands employed by them during 1874 was three hundred. They consumed 
three hundred and twenty thousand pomids of tobacco iu the manufacture of nine million 
cigars. The number of hands employed by all the manufactories is three thousand four hun- 
dred and eighty, and the aggregate number of cigars made, ninety-four milli on six hundred 
and fifty thousand, worth §40 per thousand, or §3,786,000. Taking into account the large 
number of smaller manufactories from which we have no returns or statistics, we may safely 
assume that the value of this industry, in the City of San Francisco, closely approximates 
§5,000,000. 

Clothing. — Tailors are abundant, and their work excellent ; j'et, notwithstanding this, the 
demand for ready-made work is great enough to furnish constant employment to one hundred 
and seventy-five men and women, and calls for the aggregate manufacture of g400,000 worth of 
clothing last year. 

Coffee, Spice, and Chocolate Mills number ten. They employ over one hundred men, 
roast and grind two million two hunilred and fifty thousand pounds of coftee, prepare one hun- 
dred thousand pounds of chocolate, gi-ind one hundred and seventy-five thousand pounds of 
apices, and add §540,000 to the amiual value of the city's productions. 

Cordage and Rope. — One would hartU}' expect that a city and State which have as little 
ship building could keep one hundred and twenty-five men and boj's, in three factories, con- 
stantly at work, and could consume three thousand tons of hemp and wire rope in a single 
year. The great amount of heavy hoisting done in the mines of California, and the adjoining 
States, occasions and accounts for almost the whole of this consumption. 

Distilleries. — The city furnishes no less than eleven. Thej' employ over two hundred 
men, make a miUion and a half gallons of liquor, worth upward of 81,500,000 a year. 

Flouring Mills. — Eight flouring mills, ■within the city limits, last year produced six hun- 
dred and sixty-five thousand barrels of flour ; seven thousand three hundred and twenty-five 
tons of feed barley ; seven hundred and thirtj'-five tons of hominy ; si.x hundred and tw'enty 
tons of oatmeal and groats, and two hundred and twenty tons of buckwheat and rye flour. 
The aggregate value of these was considerably above §4,500,000. The number of men employed 
was one hundred and seventy-three. 

FonNDRiEs and Iron Works. — This is another of the industries directly or indirectly 
deriving a large part of their support from the mines. There are now twenty-four in operation, 
employing twelve hundred men, and using eight thousand tons of pig iron a year, besides .about 
one tenth as much bar iron. The value of their manufactures aggregate about §5,000,000. Among 
the more prominent of these are the JEtna, California, Columbia, Fulton, Golden State, Miners', 
Pacific, Pacific Rolling Mills, Occidental, Union, and the Risdon Iron Works. For solidity, 
weight, strength, and finish, the work turned out at the iron works of San Francisco, esijecially 
during the last two or three years, will bear comparison with that of even the most celebrated 
foundries of the East. The Hope Iron Works, at the Potrero, of which W. W. Hanscom is 



" Cleanliness is nezt to CJodliness! " Qo and Bathe at 113 Oeary. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 513 Montgomery cor. Merchaat 



52 SAN FKANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



proprietor, makes a specialty of vertical Engines, both stationary and manne and particularly 
for steam yachts and pmpellers for special serrice. That the demand for specihc articles is such 
as to enable or warrant an establishment of this class in turning its entire attention to their 
manufacture, is a matter of much congi-atulation as denoting the healthy increase of this 
branch of industry; and not only that, but we may reasonably expect that the result will be 
the production of a superior cl.ass of manufactures. •.•.,, 

FURNITUKE —The increase in this in,anufacture daring the past few years has been abnost 
unprecedented, hav-ing increased more than fivefold, while in quality, style, and finish the pro- 
ducts of our factories cannot be surjxassed. There are ill the city some thirty estabbshments of 
different degrees, employing nearly five hundred men, and producmg an aggregate value of 

$1,250,000. , ^^ r I,- 11 rr 1 

FuKS.— These are only worn in this mild climate because they are fashionable, io supply 
this demand five factories or shojis are required, which^atibrds employment to from fifty to 
sixty hands in the manufacturing of furs to the value of .§300,000. 

Gl.a.ss Works.— The demand for glassware, such as is produced by the two factories here, 
continues good. The call for liottles for the -B-ine-growing interests of the State is steadily 
increasing, and is now nearly, if not quite, supplied by home manufacture, the large unporta- 
tious of former years from France and Germany hai-ing now almost entirely ceased. The glass 
works run two furnaces, thirteen pots, and employ about seventy-five men. The aggregate 
value of their wares is $225,000. 

Hats ahv C'ap.s.— The manufacture of hats and caps increases the value of our local pro- 
ducts .?420,000 annually, and employs in the nineteen estabbshments devoted to that purpose 
one hundred and fifteen men and women. 

Jewelry, for the adornment of man and womankind, employs nearly four hundred artisans 
in the production of an aggregate value of $1,225,000. The number of manufactories is forty- 

Lbad and Shot. — San Francisco is fast becoming one of the most important lead-refining 
centers of the world. During 1874 Selby's works at North Beach produced twelve thousand 
tons of refined lead, from the bullion of the Cerro Gordo mines, ten thousand tons of which 
was exported, while at the manufactory, at the comer of Howard and First streets, there was 
turned oU' enough lead pipe, sheet lead, and shot to supply all local demands and have a hand- 
some surplus for outside trade. The aggregate value produced by the two manufactories 
engaged in this industry is nearly SI, 750,000. 

Saw Manufactories. — "Saw up and saw down" has been the motto of the proprietors of 
the eight estabbshments engaged in this branch of manufacture, until their wares are gradually 
superseding all others. Located as they are in the near vicinity of the immense gro-n-th of 
lumlier- producing trees, the wants of the State and of the Coast are fuUy understood, and 
their s.aws for miUiug purjioses are withtiut rival either in size or in quality, while in the pro- 
duction of hand and other smaller saws for mechanical purposes, they successfully compete 
with those of the famed Disstou manufacture. There are now eight saw manufactories in this 
city, employing seventy-two men, consuming seventy-five tons of steel annually, and producing 
an aggregate value of nearly $200,000. 

S^Asn, Blinds, and Doors. — As a natural consequence the erection of so many buildings in 
the city during 1874 has had a stimulating efifect upon this branch of industry. In the eight 
factories devoted to this interest three hundred and fifty men have been employed in working 
up over seven miUion feet of lumber, which has added nearly $500,000 to the value of our local 
manufactures. 

Silverware, in its various departments, employs sixty-five men in the manufacture of 
1250,000 worth of plate and other articles of household ornament and convenience. 

Shirt Manufactories. — Although these manufactories present a good showing for the past 
^•ear, there is stdl room for a large increase. They number but eight, employ one hundred and 
forty-five hands, and make up amiually .§120,000 worth of shirts. 

.SHii'P.uiLDiNt;. — In this most important essential to our commercial interests California, 
although far advanced in many other industries, is yet very far in the background. ^^ ith our 
bays, whose deep, bold shores aflbrd some of the finest sites for ship yards to be found on the 
continent ; an inexhaustible supply of excellent timber suitable for such purposes, either in our 
owu forests or so near at hand and easily accessible that it may be procured at much less cost 
than timber of an inferior quality can be had ill the Atlantic shipbuilding States, we are yet 
dependent upon them, m>t only for those magnificent iron fioating palaces, but for all the wooden 
liottonia which are eug.aged iu the transportation of our immense exjiorting and importing inter- 
ests. \\'hile we have been sleejjing on from our birth to our majority, scarcely taking a step in 
this direction, and pajdng millions of dollars of freight money every year to Eastern and foreign 
shipowners, our younger sisters at the north, Oregon and Washington Territory, hardly out of 
their swaddling clothes, realizing the importance of this almost inestimable branch of industi'y 
and pillar of stability, have borne away the iialm. It is tnie we have buUt a few inland steam- 
ers and small coasting schooners, the largest of which is less than three hundred tons burden. 
During the year 1874 there were built at and launched from California yards twenty-five schoon- 
ers and seven stem-wheel and propeller steamers, having an aggregate tonnage of two thousand 
three hundred and ninety-two tons. The gi-eat steam ferry boat, Thoroughfare, of the Central 



Largest and Best Selected Stock Eastern Oysters at Morgan & Co.'s, 87 Cal. Marked 



;. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO, 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 63 



Pacific Railroad Co., is one of the largest pieces of marine architecture yet launched from 
California shores. She is two hundred and sixty feet on deck, thirty-eight feet beam, with a 
flat bottom. She once made the trip across the bay, carrying eighteen loaded freight cars, run- 
ning a distance of three and a half miles, in twenty-two minutes. The successful launching of 
the Western Shore from the shipyard of Simpson Bros. & Co. , at Coos Bay, Oregon, has dem- 
onstrated beyond a doubt that this interest can be made a great success upon this coast. The 
Western Shore is the largest vessel ever constructed upon the western shore of the continent. 
Her dimensions are : Length of keel, one hundred and eighty feet ; beam, forty -two feet ; mean 
depth of hold, twenty -two and one half feet. Tonnage, Custom House measurement, twelve 
hundred tons, or more than one half the entire tonnage of all the vessels built in California 
duruif the year. The cost of consti-uction was about 888,000, or 8fi6, 67 per ton. In the Atlantic 
States' the cost of similar vessels is from S90 to .§120 per ton. This difference in favor of the 
Pacific is a strong argument in favor of building our own vessels. Not only does the Pacific 
slope abound in most excellent timber for the construction of the hulls, but in the important 
auxiliary of spar timber, which cannot be equaled anywhere in the known world. It is pleas- 
ing' to note, however, that this significant branch of industry, the successful development of 
w&ch will result in a sa\-ing to our merchants and shippers the -513,000,000 of freight money 
now annually paid, an expense which is constantly increasing with the growth and prosperity 
of the State," has at last attracted much attention among our business men, and gained a promi- 
nence among our capitalists which promises speedy results. A project is already on foot among 
the capitalists of this city, looking to the establishment of a large shipbuilding industry upon 
the shores of our newly and dearly-acquired territory of Alaska. A petition has been pre- 
sented to the Senate asking for the passage of a law giring to the petitioners the right to cut 
timber from off a large tract of Government land on that coast for shiplrailding purposes. The 
laud desired borders on Hekow and Chatham straits and Prince Edward Sound, and abounds 
in the best quality of cedar, spruce, and pine timber. If successful in procuring the necessary 
legislation they propose incorporating immediately, and promise that %rithin two years they 
■niU buQd a ship of twelve hundred tous burden. Some of the advantages of this coast for 
shipbuilding may be briefly summed up as follows: 1st. The cost of good oak, hard pine, and 
other timber of the best quality, is at least forty per cent less than in the Eastern States. 2d. 
It is the opinion of many experts that the yellow fir- and Oregon pine make a vessel superior in _ _ 
aU respects to one built of Eastern w-ood, being admirably adapted for shipbuddmg purposes Ji 
in all the requirements of strength, durability, and for holding a fastening. ^Mien properly g" 
ventilated and salted, its lasting qualities have stood the test of fifteen or twenty years, in all " 
parts of vessels, sailing or steamers. 3d. The immense supply of magnificent spar timber, 
which for size, length, durabilitv, and strength, is unrivaled. We neglected to note in its 
proper place the organization at "Vallejo, in August, 187-i, of a shipbuihling company, with a 
capital stock of 8250,000. This company contemplates tlie construction of a ship of from one 
thousand to twelve hundred tons burden, to demonstrate the fact that if California can pro- 
duce the grain she can also budd the vessels for its transportation. 

Slippers. — The manufacture of slippers gives employment to some two hundred and fifty 
hands, mostly Chinese, and aggregates in value 8162, .500 a year. Number of factories, eighteen. 

Silk.— The Union Pacific Silk Manufacturmg Co., at their works in Visitacion Valley, are 
operating successfully in the manufacturing of sewing silk, ribbons, etc. Their works have a 
capacity of producing about 86,000 worth of goods weekly. 

So.VP Factories. —The soaps made by the twenty-three manufactories in this city are 
steadily increasing in favor, and gradually," but surely, decreasing the importation of Eastern 
and foreign goods. The number of boxes received from outside sources durmg 1874 was six- 
teen thousand and fifty-nine boxes less than in 1873, whUe the exports were six thousand six 
hundred and thirty-two boxes in excess of the preceding year. The twenty-three factories m 
San Francisco employ one huntUed and thirty-eight hands, and make annuaUy eight million 
two hundred and fifty thousand pounds of soap, valued at 8215,000. 

Tanneries. —The leather interest is in a most prosperous and steaddy-improving condition, 
an extra demand hai-ing sprung up for boot and shoe manufacturing purposes. The Califorma 
hides, under the present improved system of curing, are second only to those of Buenos Aj-res. 
The overland shipments of leather", during the first eleven months of last year, more than 
trebled those for the entire year of 1873, while the value of the sea exports showed a healthv 
increase. San Francisco has thirty-eight tanneries, empIo)^ng an aggrefflite of two hundred 
and thirty men, and consuming four thousand and eight hundred cords of bark amiuaUy, m the 
tanning of one hundred and eighteen thousand five huncUed and fifty hides, which produce 
leather of the value of 8945,000. ^ . ^ . c „ 

Tefn-ks and V.ILISES also form a prominent feature in the manufacturing interests of the 
city, giWng employment to over one hundred men, who make 8210,000 worth of trunks and 
valises annually. , .. 

Watch Making.— Although our age is confessedly fast, our country faster, and our city 
pr.ssibly fastest of all, even California and San Francisco have not yet become quite fast enough, 
n.ir <Town sufliciently independent to discard some thoroughly reliable standard time measurer. 
Conscious of this necessity, and quite too proud to depend for its supply upon the older manu- 
facturing centers of Europe or the East, several of our leading capitalists and more promment 



Children's Hair Cut in the most Eeoherche Manner at 113 Geary. 



D. "W. Laird, San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, 513 Montgomery cor. Merchant' 



54 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 

husiness men, toward the close of last year, united in such representations, assurances, and 
other more substantial inducements, to the managers and proprietors of the Cornell Watch Co. , 
then of Chicago, 111., as decided those gentlemen to remove their immense establishment, with 
all its vast efjuipment of complicated and expensive machinery, from the great metropolis of 
the lakes, to that of the Pacific Coast. Accordingly, having rented the large east wing of the 
immense building, known as Kimball's Carriage Factory, on the west side of Fourth Street, 
between Harrison and Brj'ant, they successfully transported thither their complete machinery 
and tliere established the "first watch factory, not only of San Francisco, but of Western North 
America. A quarter of a century ago, few, if any, watches were wholly manufactured in the 
United States, nor did the whole countrj' then contain anything at all approaching the dimen- 
sions or dignity of a watch factory proper. And neither in this country nor in any other had 
any one attempted the application of machinerj' to the manufacture of any except a few of the 
very simplest parts of a watch. Within that period, however, that mechanical genius of invent- 
ive industry which sets the American baby to contri\"ing improvements upon his own cradle, 
even before he is fairly out of it, ha\-ing improved or remodeled every known machine of the 
lieaWer description, and invented hundreds of new ones, begun to turn its attention to the 
making of watches, and especially to the constraction of the machines necessary to manufacture 
them more accurately, uniformly, and rapiiUy. The usual result speedily followed. Besides 
the numberless factories of lesser note, the country has now seven large and celebrated estab- 
lishments for the maniifacture of machine-made watches. These are the Waltham Co. at 
Waltham, Massachusetts ; the Howard Watch Co., Boston, Massachusetts ; the New York Co., 
Springfield, Massachusetts ; the United States Co., Marion, N. J. ; the Springfield Watch Co., 
Sja-ingfield, Illinois ; the National Watch Co., Elgin, Illinois; and the Cornell Watch Co. (late 
of Chicago, Illinois) now of this cit}-. With the machinery now in operation the factory occu- 
pies nearly one half of the buUding, and employs about one hundred hands, of whom one fourth 
are females. As soon as the remaining machinery arrives and the factory commences working 
to its full capacity it will occupy the whole building, give constant emplojTnent to four hundred 
operatives and turn out from seventy-five to one hundred watches a day, ranging in prices from 
ten, twenty to three hundred dollars each. As is well known the ingenious, accurate, and 
delicate machinery now employed in the manufacture of American watches produces even the 
minutest parts of their complicated machinery with an exactness, perfection, and uniformity far 
surp.assing the finest work of the largest experienced and most successful human hand. But 
liesides this, mathem.atical accuracy and uniform proportion, the machines have reduced the 
number of pieces or parts to less than one fifth. The old standard English fusee watch, made 
almost wholly by hand, had over seven hundred and fifty separate and different parts ; the mod- 
em American machine-made watch has less than one hundred and fifty. In the old-fashioned 
hand-made watch no part of any one watch had exactly the same size and shape of the corres- 
ponding part in another ; hence, in case of accident or necessary repair, no substitution or 
exchange of part for part could be made without perceptaMy aft'e"cting the rate of the watch. 
In the modem American watch, as made by the Cornell C^ii., with the possible exception of 
a few of the jeweled portions and pivots specially fitted to each watch, any one of the scores 
of separate pieces taken from one watch fits with p"erfect accuracy in the corresponding place in 
any other of the same grade. Thus, in the event of accident, anv piece lost, broken, or worn, can 
always be duplicated at the factory on receipt of the name of the part, and the number or kind 
of watch. Among the very great, if not the decisive, advantages which CaHfomia presents for 
the establishment of a mechanical enterprise, especially one involving as much iron and steel, 
is the very great and almost constant ihyness of the atmosphere. This alone wiU prove a very 
considerable element in the superior ease and consequently greater profit with which watches 
can be m.ade in San Francisco. The Comell Co. may reasonably expect not only to retain 
a large portion of its foi-mer custom east of the Rocky Mountains, but almost certainly, at no 
distant day, to supply the entire Pacific Coast market. Beyond this it may confidently count 
upon extending its trade to Mexico, Central and South America, Japan, China, and even India. 
As the jnoneer in this valuable and important branch of mechanical enterprise we cordiaUv 
welcome the Cornell Watch Co., and join with the city and the State in wishing it that annu- 
ally-mcreasing success which shall at once equal its own desert and our confident anticipa- 
tions. 

Wire and Wire Rope.— Of these the city has two factories. The first, more exclusively 
devoted to the making of wire, is the Pacific Wire Works, at No. 437 Brannan Street. It 
inakes wires for ropes, springs, brooms, bottles, etc., of material imported from England. Em- 
plojnng alxnit twenty men, it finished and delivered, in 1S74, nearly one hundred thousand 
pounds of wnrc, worth .?loO,000. Started less than four years since, it ab-eady commands most 
of the home trade. Tlie Wire-rope Factory at North Beach thus far remains the only one upon 
the coast. Remodeled, enlarged, and refitted during the year, it has now a capacity of nearly 
two thousand tons a year. These ropes are used for extra heavy hoisting in deep mines, for the 
standuig ngging of large ships, for traction on steep-grade street-car routes, as already noted, 
and in the patent Elevated Wire Tramway— if such a phrase aibnits of such an application. 
Some of these larger and longer ropes weigh from eight to nine tons. Besides these the estab- 
lishment h,-w successfully accomplished the manufacture of an aggregate length of upward of 
hfty miles of subm arine telegraph cable for various lines in the vicinity of Puget Sound and 



Get your Eastern Transplanted Oysters from MORGAN & CO., 87 California Market 



p. VAIT SCHAACS & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Keamy, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 



55 



Vancouver's Island. His entire success in these experiments encourages the proprietor in the 
co'ntiilent prediction that his establishment will, ere long, manufacture the mammoth Pacific 
Submarine Telegraph Cable, which will furnish the last and grandest link in the telegraphic 
circuit of the world, by connecting California with Japan and China. 

Wood and Willow Wakk.— The manufacture of this class of wares has kept steady pace 
with the rapid growth of the city, and the figures for 1874 show a large increase over any pre- 
ceding year, and amounts in the aggregate to $145,000, as the product of sixty-five hands 
employed in the two factories, which also employ steam to the amount of one hundred and 
twentj'-horse power. . . . „ , , • ,cro 

Woolen Mills.— The Pioneer Woolen MUls at Black Pomt, ongmaUy erected in 1858, were 
the first to attempt to create a local industry from the then, as now, rapidly-increasing wool 
clip of the State, which, up to 1859, the year in which the Pioneer MUls commenced runmng, 
had been shipped abroad to find a market. The success of the enterprise having received a 
practical demonstration, the Pioneer Mills were followed in 1861 by the Mission Woolen Mills, 
located on Folsom Sstreet, between Fifteenth and Sixteenth. These were followed at a later 
date by the Pacific Woolen Mills, also located on Folsom Street, between Eighteenth and 
Nineteenth, which have since become identical with the Mission Mills, the concern now being 
known as the Mission and Pacific Woolen MUls. The product of these mdls comprises broad- 
cloths tweeds, cassimeres, heavy army and navy blankets, shawls, cloakings, and flannels of 
superior quality and finish, and hosiery. The blankets manufactured at the Mission ^ oolen 
Mills have a world-wide reputation, and cannot be equaled upon this continent. These nulls 
employ in the aggregate nine hundred hands, in the production of two hundred thousand pairs 
blankets twelve hundred dozen pairs of flannel drawers, one thousand dozen hosiery, two hun- 
dred and five thousand yards of cloths and tweeds, and one million two hundred thousand yartls 
of flannels, from four million five hundred thousand and five hundred pounds of wool. The ap- 
proximate estimated value of these manufactures is SI, 300, 000. We have thus briefly noted the 
more prominent manufactures of San Francisco, the value of which, if sweUed by the large 
number of estabhshments of lesser note, gives us a grand aggregate of very nearly forty million 

of dollars. 

Insnrance Companies. 

FiEE Insurance.— The number of companies doing a Fire or Fire and Marine Insurance 
business in this State, February 15, 1875, was eighty. Of these seven were Calif orma compa- 
nies, fifty were companies of other States of the Union, thirteen of Great Bntam, four of Ixer- 
many, four of China, and two of Switzerland. <• i.. oi i 

Life Insurance.- At the last session of the Legislature the Insurance Laws of the State 
of California were amended by the enactment of certain provisions which had the effect to 
cause nearly aU the Life Insurance companies of other States, then having agencies m this, to 
suspend operations within its limits. Section 419 of the new CivU Code provides that any 
Insurance Co., whether of this or any other State, in order to become legaUy authorized to 
transact business in California, must have a paid-up capital equal to §200,000, at least and that 
this capital must always be maintained intact. This, with sundry other provisions, aU of wliicu 
had simply the effect to place all foreign companies upon precisely the same footmg as o"r own 
home companies, resulted in the withdrawal of their agencies from this State on the part of all 
the outside companies then doing business within it, except four, which are the only ones now 
authorized by law to issue policies of Life Insurance in Cabfomia. These are the National Lite 
Insurance Co. of the United States of America, Chicago, 111.; New England Mutual Lite 
Insurance Co., Boston, Mass.; Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co Mdwaukee, Wis.; 
Union Mutual Life Insurance Co., Maine. These, with the Pacific Mutual Life Insm-ance Co., 
of Sacramento, the only home company now doing Life Insurance business m tlie State, con- 
stitute the only five Life Insurance companies which can now legally issue new policies Jiesides 
these, seven companies of those formerly having agencies here, the .*;tna, of Harttoixl, Oonn. ; 
The Germania and the Manhattan, of New York; The Life Assurance of Ainerica, of St Louis, 
ilo.; the New Jersey Mutual, of Newark, N. J.; the Piedmont and Arhngton, of Richmond, 
Va., and The Widow and Orphans' Fund, of Nashville, Tenn.. are now legaUy authorized to 
collect renewal premiums only. „_, . . i, t ^ ,„^i- 

The aggregate business. Fire and Marine, for the year 1874, is as follows : Insurance ^mt- 
ten, S258lt4r359; premiums received, -54,448,033.02; losses paid, .§1,098,406.49; ratio of losses 
to premiums, 24.7. Of this amount the CaUfomia companies transacted the foUowj^g- /"i^"^" 
ance written §98,562,279.58; premiums received, ,S1,771 .548.86; losses paid, $541 217 33 ratio 
of losses to premiums, 30.55. The diminished ratio of losses paid to the amount of msurance 
written, and the amount of premiums received, shows a marked improvement m the business 
of property insurance in this State during the year 1874, as compared with that of the two 

preceding years. _ 

^ ^ ■' Bunks and Banking. 

No one ever saw a California bank note. Eastern visitors and newly-arrived residents 

remark, with surprise, the complete absence of notes issued by Califoniia banks Jhe 'State 

has no Banks of Issue. Her Constitution forbids them. The only establishments within her 

bmits which may issue notes for general circulation are the two national gold-note banks, the 

First National Gold Bank, and tie National Gold Bank and Trust Co., established by the 



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inly Hairdressing Saloon appropriated Ezolusively to use of Ladies at 113 Geary. 



JEWELRY made to order and EEPAIEED by D. ¥. Laird, 513 Mont. cor. Merchani 






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56 



SAN FKANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



aut)iority and operating under the regulations of the General Government. General Commer- 
cial Banks of Deposit, Loan, Discount, and General Financial Accommodation are suflBciently 
numerous and prosperous. The aggrepate of bank capital and deposits, December 31, 1874, was 
S.54,95.S,.337 (of which the two National Gold Banks had over $5,000,000), an increase of 
^,919,093 over the preceding year. Besides regular banks, the city has a considerable number 
of Land and Loan Associations or organizations which are really doing much of the legitimate 
work of banks without formally assuming the name. Of the financial sagacity which charac- 
terizes the general management of our leading banks one may gain a tolerably satisfactory idea 
from the di\adends paid by our leading local banks during 1874, which were as follows: Bank 
of California, $600,000; First National Gold Bank, $180,000; Merchant's Exchange Bank, $160,- 
000; National Gold Bank and Trust Co., $150,000; Pioneer Land and Loan Association, $13,- 
920. The total amount of paid-up working capital in the commercial banks of the city is about 
$17,500,000. A considerable portion of this finds employment in assisting the movement or 
transfer of the immense crops throughout the entire State, and in more or less close connection 
with the mining operations of our own and neighboring States and Territories. 

Savings Banes. — These are the true indices of the general pecuniary prosperity of the 
great masses. One may safely judge the monetary condition of the whole community from the 
records and returns of its institutions of savings. In these he may read the industry, economy, 
and sobriety of the great working classes, that immense "Third Estate," whose condition more 
surely than that of any other shows the true growth and the real status of the community. 
We subjoin a tabulated list of the condition of the San Francisco Savings Banks, as shown by 
their last semi-annual reports : 

SEMi-AN2inAL Statement of San Fraxcisco Savinos Institotions, Decehbeb 31, 1874. 



NAME. 



S.avings and Loan Society 

IJibernia Savings and Loan Society 

French Savinyw and Loan Society 

San Francisco Savings Union 

Tkld Fellows Savings Bank 

Farmers and Mechanics Bank of Savings. 

Gemian Savings and Loan Society 

Masonic Savings and Loan Banli 

Himibnldt Savings and Loan Bank 

Security Savings Bank 

California Savings and Loan Society 



Totals, January, 1875. . 
Totals, January, 1874. . 

Increase in one year. . . 



Number 
Depositors. 



9,877 
17,706 
6,600 
6,127 
7,649 

687 
6,990 
3,087 
1,648 
1,000 

687 



60,658 
61,807 



8,861 



Amount 
Deposits. 



$11,684,949 
13,647,636 
6,976,351 
6,697,968 
7,480,334 

655,896 
6,216,060 
1,360,466 

848,305 
1,482.019 

272,194 



866,021,177 
46,745,044 



88,276,133 



Gross 
Earnings. 



8668,932 
604,185 
280,739 
316,703 
326,941 
32,990 
231,643 
71,437 
37,784 
70,054 
16,843 



82,557,151 
2,266,224 



8290,927 



Reserve 
Fund. 



8354,756 
862,249 
182,776 
226,700 
126,666 

65,000 
135,600 
171,838 

67,424 
150,000 

63,000 



82,384,804 
2,091,055 



8293,749 




82,232,667 
81,949,610 



$282,967 



The average to each depositor, 1873, $902.25 ; in 1874, $907.07 gold, equal to $1,043 currency. 
This exceeds the average of the State of Rhode Island ($545), which, with the exception of San 
Francisco, is the highest known — nearly one hundred per cent. 

*'Uy and County Bonded Debt, IMarcta 10, 1815. 



18.58.... 
1802-03. 



1863.,.. 
1864.... 
1864.... 
1866.... 
1866-67. 
1867.... 
1870.... 
1870.... 
1871.... 

1872 

1873 

1873 

1874 

1874 

1874 

1874 

1874 



By the. 



City and County 

City and County for San Josd 

Railroad 

City and County for City Slip 
City and County for City Slip 

Central Pacific H. R. Co 

Western Pacific R. R. Co 

School Department 

Judgment 

School Department 

Park Improvement 

Hospital 

School Department 

Park Improvement 

Hospital 

Park Improvement 

House of Correction 

School Department 

Park Improvement 

City Hall. 



Payable 



1888 

1877-8 

1883 

1884 

1894 

1895 

1881 

1887 

1890 

1890 

1891 

1882 



1904 
1904 
1894 
1904 
1904 



Annual Interest. 



Pr.ct. 



Payable In. 



San Francisco. 



San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 
San 



Francisco . . 
Francisco ) 
Francisco f 
Francisco . . 
Francisco . . 
Francisco. . 
Francisco . . 
Francisco . . 
Francisco.. 
Francisco. . 
Francisco. . 
Francisco . . 
Francisco.. 
Francisco. . 
Francisco. . 
Francisco. . 
Francisco . . 
Francisco.. 



Totals. 



Annual 
Sinking Fund. 



About841,000 

About 26,000 
About 47,000 



About 20,000 
About 17,000 
About 16,000 



About 9,000 
About 10,000 



Bonds in 
Circulation 



8648,000 

108,000 
473,500 

11,000 
377,000 
250,000 
197,000 
246.000 
285,000 
1.50,000 
170,000 
100,000 

75,000 

40,000 
126,000 
150,000 
200,000 
125,000 

94,500 



8224,000 I 83,725,000 



Funded Debt, March 10, 1875, $3,725,000; Cash in Treasury (sinking funds), $251,200; 
Actual Debt, $3,473,800. March 1, 1875: Cash in Treasury (various funds), $1,297,848. 



Buy your Eastern Transplanted Oysters from first hand, Morgan & Co., 87 Cal. Market. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 



57 



Of the amount of City Hall Bonds, §750,000, authorized by the Legislature of 1873^, 
594,500 have been issued. 

The bonds issued for the opening and improvement of Montgomery Avenue, amountmg to 
$1,500,000, are not included in the above table; they are redeemable in thirty years, bear inter- 
est at the rate of six per cent per aimum, and for their payment the property directly benefited, 
valued at $60,000,000, is pledged. 

Assessment and Rates of Taxation from 18*0 to 1875.* 





Total 
Annual 
Rates. 


Pakticulab Class of Assessments. 


Total 


i'lSCAly yjSAKS. 


Real Estate. 


Improvements. 


Personal Property. 


Assessments. 


1869-70 


3 08 
2 84J 
2 97 
1 60 

1 60 

2 09.=„ 


69,776,603 
75,145,717 
76,124,661 
180,671,640 
180,871,138 
162,080,605 


In Real 
In Real 
In Real 
In Real 
37,182,680 
In Real 


t44,982,908 
31,246,169 
28,900,988 

108,011,617 
44,164,717 

102,035,689 


114,769,611 


1870-71 


106,391,876 






187'' 73 


1288,683,257 






1874-75 


264,116,294 



The value of the real and personal property of the City and County of San Francisco, October 
1874 was assessed as foUows : Real Estate, §122,338,369; Improvements, §39,943,685; Personal 
Property §105 590 592 ; Total, §267,872,646. The total value of the Real and Personal Property 
of the State of California, 1872-73, is §637,232,823. Total State tax levied, §3,175,480, of which 
San Francisco was assessed forty-five per cent. 

IHnnlcipal Expenditures from 1865 to 18;4.§ 



yEAES. 


Current Expenses 


1866-66 


$916,034 45 
939,285 05 
1,216,926 00 
1,937,925 41 
2,098,610 00 
2,417,110 00 
2,783,843 00 
2,826,670 98 
3,036,212 OO 




1867-68. 


1868-69 


lg69-70 


1370-71 


1S71 72 


1872 73 


1873-74 



Permanent Im- 
provements. 



S90,995 00 
188,073 75 
165,659 24 



Interest. 



8256,198 38 
213,353 06 
200,644 07 
373,060 83 
224,198 00 
226,462 00 
223,462 00 
232,985 65 
270,011 00 



Reduction of 
Debt. 



$154,055 00 
354,686 82 
206,457 76 
148,233 81 
361,625 00 
177,045 00 
65,461 00 
213,909 46 
124,685 00 



$19,097 47 
71,166 66 



$1,437, 
1,766, 
1,788, 
2,459, 
2,684, 
2,819, 
3,062, 
3,273 
3,430, 



,281 20 
,565 34 
,686 07 
,210 06 
,433 00 
,617 00 
,766 00 
,515 90 
,808 00 



Total expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1874, §3,430,808. This amount does not 
include the cost of repairing unaccepted streets, paid by owners of property, aggregatmg about 

$400,000. ., . ^. ^ c i.\,^ 

For the year ending June 30, 1874, the foUowmg amounts were paid for the support of the 
different departments of the Municipal Government : Salaries, City and County officers, )?408 301 ; 
Police, S<188,678 ; Fire (including Fire Alarm Telegraph and all other expenses connected Tnth the 
Department, §224,922; School, §686,480; Street Light, §229,040; Hospital, i,188,b96; Alms 
House, §73,756; redemption bonds and interest, §394,595. The number of salaned employes 
connected with the Municipal Government exceeds one thousand, who receive for salaries 
annually an aggregate of over one million one hundred thousand dollars. 

Annnal Revenne from 1865 to 1874.11 



YEARS. 



1865-66. . 
1866-67. . 
1867-68. , 
1868-60. . 
1869-70. , 
1870-71. . 
1871-72. 
1872-73. , 
1873-74. 



Taxes. 



State and Co. 
Licenses. 



$1,361,876 26 
1,482,476 31 
1,509,162 60 
1,786,129 43 
1,966,827 00 
1,936,902 00 
2,062,204 68 
1,814,669 00 
2,613,108 91 



$89,253 26 
93,901 50 
09,484 74 
100,454 60 
110,363 12 
106,167 00 
146,046 18 
190,443 00 
212,360 00 



Municipal 
Licenses. 



828,799 25 
31,762 80 
38.895 90 
52,560 50 
41,646 50 
40,067 00 
42,414 06 
65,522 00 
71,267 60 



Sale of 
Bonds. 



861,050 00 

126,965 38 

47,500 00 



Other Sources. 



883,420 30 
107,647 97 
271,263 78 
607,040 67 
752,365 93 
716,263 00 
812,683 04 
1,138,814 00 
915,824 77 



Total 



81,624,408 06 
1,841,753 96 
1,966,306 92 
2,446,185 29 
2,871,192 65 
2,798,389 OO 
3,063,346 88 
3,199,448 00 
3,712,551 28 



State. 



$944,812 35 

987,105 77 

1,095,586 71 

1,044,836 20 

1,049,506 09 

965,957 00 

947,399 83 

904,066 00 

1,127,076 94 



The total receipts for the year ending June 30, 1874, exclusive of the State tax, §1,127,676 94, 

"^^ThVspectJl Fee Fund for 1873-74 aggregated §148,467, of which the Eecorder returned 
§.32,654; the County Clerk, §41,621 ; the Sherifif, §24,871 ; the Tax Collector, §15,'^'^" — ' +'^» 
Clerk of the Justices' Court, §9,552. 



and the 



• For table of Assessments, etc., from 1850 to 1869, see San Fraxcisco Directort 18, 4, P^e 11. ,^„,io,, 

t Exclusive of Mortgages, which amounted in 1869-70 to near «16,pOO,000, now held t^ ^.f ?rrA„P^i!^''of the 
J The large increase i?the value of real and personal property, 1872-73, was occasioned by the operation of the 

^""I F.°?table of Municipal E.tpenditures from 1850 to 1865, see San Francibco Directorv 1868. P°«^. lO' „ ^„ .„ 
U For table of Revenue coUected in San Francisco from 1850 to 1865, see San Francibco Directors 1800, page 10. 



The most Artistic Work in Hairdressing is Performed at 113 Qeary. 



S. "W. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, Wholesale and Eetail, cor. Merchant and Mot . 



58 SAN FRANCISCO DIKECTOEY. 






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Popnlatlon of San Francisco, Marcb 1, 1875. 

The following estimate of the population of this city has been prepared from careful investi- 
gation made during the progress of the canvass for the present volume and other reliable data ; 
and in directing attention thereto, the compiler believes that the aggregate presented is a fair 
approximation to the actual number : 

AVhite Males over Iwenty-one 77*306 

White Females over eighteen (estimated) 44,000 

Whit* Males under twenty-one (estimated) 43,57''2 

White Females under eighteen (estimated) 37,H04 

White Males, names refused, and foreigners not taken in the canvass (estimated) 1,750 

Chinese, Male and Female ^ 19,000 

Colored, Male and Female 1,800 



Total permanent Population 225,132 

To which should be added a large element of our population known as "floating," which consists of: 
Ist. Transient boarders, etc., at hotels, boarding houses, etc. 2d. Soldiers at the fortifications in the 
harbor. 3d. Persons engaged navigating the bay, who claim this city as their residence. 4th. In- 
mates of Alms House, Hospitals, and other charitable institutions. County Jail, etc. 5th. A lar^ 
number of persons who have no permanent place of abode, together amounting to about 5,000 



Total Population, March 1, 1875 230,132 



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The estimate of the males over twenty-one in the above table is based upon the aggregate of 
names contained in the present voltmie, as follows : The number of references in the register of 
o i names is 87,192, of which 76,206 are male residents of this city. These figures are exclusive of 
»4 I numerous lists of names included in the Business Directory and the Appendix, containing the 
of I names of officers of societies, incorporations, etc. , not obtained in the regular canvass, estimated 
g I at 1,()00, making a total of 77,206. The two latter named departments of the Directory are 
ng I compiled from information collected just previous to the publication of the work, and include 
many names not to be found in the regular list. 

The number of females over eighteen is estimated at 44,CKX), upon the basis of the Federal 
Census of 1870. The number of females of all ages enumerated, as published in this city, 
amounts to 61,577, of which 23,261 are under fifteen years. According to the average of the 
I Census throughout the United States, about sixteen per cent of the number under fifteen 
fj I (3, "21) should be added thereto to represent the element between sixteen and eighteen, indu- 
es I sive, which would give an average as foUows : Under eighteen, 26,982; eighteen and over, 
^ , 34,.595. The difference between the last-named figures (34,595) and those included in the table 
g ; (44,000), amounting to 9,405, wiU not be considered an over-estimate for the increase since 
g j August, 1870. Estimated increase for the year eniUng February 28, 1875, 4,900. Of this num- 
«H ! ber, at least 2,000 have been contributed by the Eastern immigration alone. 

The estimates of males under twenty-one, and the females under eighteen, are based upon 
the returns published in the San Francisco Directory for 1874. According to the figures referred 
to the aggregate of these two elements was 73,978; or, males, 39,611 ; females, 34,367. Esti- 
matmg an mcrease of ten per cent for the past year, 7,398, would give as a total 81,376; or, 
males, 43,572 ; females, 37,804. 

The remainder of the data in our estimate explains itself, and to those who are acquainted 
with the different elements referred to therein, the figures relating thereto will not be con- 
sidered over-estimated. 

The aggregate of the present year (230,132), as compared with that of last year (200,700), 
exhibits a gam of 29,432, or about fifteen per cent, a much greater percentage of increase than 
has taken place for a similar period since 1850. 

The number of names enumerated in the register of the present volume (77,206) exliibits an 
increase over the number published in the San Francisco Directory for 1874 (65,092) of 12,114, 
or nearly nineteen per cent, a remarkable and unmistakable evidence of the rapid and prosper- 






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ous growth of the city. Assuming that each name published in a reliable birectory represents 
tliree persons, our population on this basis aggregates 231,618. 

Meteorological Obserratlong made at San Francisco, from NoTcmlier, 1850, to March, 1875. 

BY HKNRY OIBBONS, M.D. 

In the foUowing tables the reader will find, in a condensed form, the results of twenty-four 
years diligent observation of the climate of .San Francisco, with more particular reference to rain. 

llam has f.aUen in every month of the year. In July it has rained only in one year ; August 
has furmshed ram m four years; June in seven years; September in twelve years; October in 
sixteen years. Is o account is made of a more sprinkle, nor of the deposit of summer mist. The 
greatest quantity of mist which ever falls in twenty-four hours is about three hundredths of an 
""'^, 'f^ *'"» quantity 13 very rare. Near the ocean the mist is much more copious. 

The driest season was 1850-51 which gave only seven inches. Next to that was 1863-64, 
with eight and one half mchcs. The winter of 1867-68 gave the most rain-forty inches. The 
average is between twenty-one and twenty-two inches. 

The earliest setting in of the rainy season was October 8; the latest, January 12. An early 



MORGAN & CO., 87 Cal. Market, always have the Beet Eastern Transplanted Oysten 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Established 1862. 



METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS. 



59 



S" 



►1 
s> 

tt 

Ft* 
»f» 

Q 

p 

W 

!-■ 

o 



p* 

o 

•— ■ 

o 



beginning and an abundant supply are apt to go together, but there is no rule in this respect — 
the latest beginnings have been foDowed by an average supply. 

The average date of the beginning of the r.ainy season is Xovember 28 ; of the termination, 
April 1 0. March is as certain to bring rain in liberal amount as any other month. In one ye:ir 
out of every three there is no rain of importance after JIarch. The last showers of the season 
come, with remarkable uniformity, about the third week of May.' 

The middle of January is the average di\-idiug point of the rainy season. The mean quan- 
tity before .January 1 is about equal to the mean quantity after Januarj' 31. 

" December gives the greatest average quantity ; January is not far behind ; February, March, 
and November come next, and are nearly alike; then April, May, and October, in the order 
named. 

The greatest amount of rain in any one month was in January, 1862, when there fell the 
enormous quantity of eighteen inches. 

It is worthy of note that in the driest seasons there has been an abundant supply for agri- 
cultural purposes, had it been distributed evenlj'. Three inches in December, with one inch 
in each of the four following months, would answer all purposes. 

The rain table of San Francisco may be made the basis for estimating the fall in other parts 
of the State. The mountains of the north have from two to three times as much, and the 
southern section of the State about half as much, or even less in some localities. The valley of 
the Sacramento has nearly the same quantity as San Francisco ; that of the San Joaquin one 
fourth or one third less, the quantity diminishing southward. 

By reference to the tables showing the extremes of heat and cold, it appears that the coldest 
weather was in January, 18.54, when the mercury fell to 25°. At that time the mud in the 
streets was frozen solid, and the shallow ponds were covered with ice strong enough for boys to 
skate on. But such weather is extremely rare, though since that time the ground has been 
frozen several times so as not to thaw fully in the shade for a day or two. The coldest noonday 
embraced in the record was 37°. Often the entire winter passes by without bringing the ther- 
mometer so low as the freezing point. In 18.53 it fell at no time below 40°. 

The extreme of heat was on the tenth and eleventh of September, 1852, when the thermom- 
eter reached 97° and 98' on the two days, respectively. This, however, was entirely excep- 
tional, and might not occur again in half a century ; the air was dry as a sirocco, and caused 
the woodwork of houses to crackle and the plaster to break on the wooden walls. 

With the exception just noted, the hottest day on record was 93' on the sixth day of July, 
1867. In October, 1864, and in September, 1865, it reached 91', and in July, 1855, it reached 
90'. Thus it appears there were only six days in twenty-four years when the thermometer rose 
as high as 90°. 

The table of mean temperature shows that our summer does not come till the suirmier flionths 
have passed by. September is the warmest month in the year, and October next ; then i^omes 
August ; July, the hottest month elsewhere, is the fourth here, or links with June ; next come 
April and May ; then March and November ; then February, and, finally, January and Decem- 
ber, which are the only winter months, if indeed we have any weather that deserves the name 

of winter. lo-i; •* 

Twice the ground has been covered with snow. On the twenty-ninth of December, 18o6, it 
snowed very fast for several hours, and two or three inches gathered, but it melted before night. 
OA the twelfth of January, 1868, it snowed fast before day, so that two inches collected. But 
it disappeared before sunrise, so that few persons enjoyed the rare spectacle. 

The extraordinary evenness of the climate depends on the adjacent ocean, the water of which, 
flo-ning in a current from the north, is always at a temperature of about 52', summer and 
winter. The sea breeze of summer, which chdls the air at noonday, leaves no place for hot 
nights. There is not, on an average, one night in the year when it is warm enough to sit out 
of doors at midnight with comfort. 





B 



o 



B 

IS 
o 

3- 

ra 
I 



at 

Dl 

a> 

tl 
o 



Table I. 



-Shoiuing the Aniouni of Bain in each Month since 1S.50; and the Total Amount in each Bainy 
Season. HolE.— Each Column represents one Rainy Season, 



Month. 



.\ue:ust. 
S.vptember 
' 'ctober... 
November 
December. 



January... 
Ffhruary. 

March 

.\pril 

May 

Jnrie 

July 



.11 

i.o: 

.4 .1 
2.2! 0..3 
7.111.9 

1852 1853 

.6 4.1 

.1 1 " 

6.4 4.8 

.2 5.1 



Totals.. 13.2 33.5 23.0 



1354 1855: 1.856 18.57 



.1 

2.1.. 

4 1.2 

4 5.4 4.0 

i I 
1855 18.56 1857 

4.5 8.4 2.1 

4.6 .5 8.6 
4.3 1.6 1.6 
5.6 3.2 

2.2 .91 .1 
.1 



24.121.2 20.0 



1 I I 
1860 1861 13S2 186;) 



3.4i. 
.5. 5.4 

4.8 1.5 



1.01 l.l 

5.2 1.4 
2.5^ 3.1 

.3. 1.7 
2.0l 2.6 



1.2113.1 
6.1 



.1 2.5 
2.7 1. 



1863|1SM 
1.3 



19.8',l7.lll4.61.T8.0,15.2| 8.5 



i651» 



.1 .2 
.1 .1 
.6 3.1 

13.1 

1865'1S6C'1S6: 



21.3121.2132.0 



1867 1868 1869 



I .2 

.2; 2.34 

1.2 1.24 

4.3' 4.50 

1869 1870 

6.4 3.76 

4.0 4.51 

3.2 1.84 

2.2 1.49 

.1 



.04 
.13 

2.27 
13.40 

1872 



2..'M 
3.55 



6.50 
7.90 



I.24I 1.53 
2.C5 1.22 



21.620.08;i3.08.33.10 



18T2 18731S74 



.Ml 

.061 
2.90 
7.8O' 

1873 1874 

2I7! 5.33 
3. 401 2.49 

.74 3.56 

.37 

,40 



06 
2.75 
5.41 

;«) 

1S75 

7.13 
00 
,70 



17.68124.071.. 



1850.-NOV., 1.3; Dec., 1.1. I851.-Jan.,0.6; Feb., 0.4; March, 1.9; April, l.l; May, .7., Total.T.L 






p« 

.3 



Ladies should bear in mind that the Best Bathing Appliances are at 113 Geary. 



PIITE WATCHES and JEWELEY for Sale by D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



60 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Table II.— Date 0/ the First and Last Rains, and of the Beginning and Ending of each Rainy Season; 
also, the Amount of Rain which Fell before the End of the Year.and the Amount after the End of 
the Year, in each Season, since I80O. 



o 

o> 
a> 

•n 

O 

u 



1S.W-5I 

lS.il-.VJ 

1S5.'-.>I 

ISX'.-SI 

lv.(-.-..5 

ls,Vi-,ifi 

1S.-6-S7 

.>S 



<-'-t'^.. 



im;im;i. 
isi'.i-fi:;. 



First 
Rain. 



Last 
Rain. 



Rainy Season. 



Begins. Ends. 



Bef'e 
Jan 



Nov. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept 

Oct, 

Xov. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Sept 



10 Mav 
6 May 

2S May 

15 .\pfii 
4 Mav 

10 Mav 

10 Mar. 
6 Mav 

21 May 
9|May 
4IMav 
IMav 
5|May 

19lMay 



20Dec. 
lIDec. 
12 Nov. 
28!jan. 
2niDec. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Nov. 



.5:May 1 2.4 
19Mar. 3ll 10.5 

9lApriI 29; 18.0 
12lApill 2S| 3.8 
aiApril 17 
10 April 14' 
15JI.-.r. XH 
24 .\pril 7| 

4 April 10, 

glAprll 8 

OApril 5 
lO'April 14 
13 .-\pril 26 
uL^pril 4' 



After 
Dec. 



4.7 

7.7 
15.5 
19.4 
21.2 
14.6 
12.5 
10.9 
11.0 
10.2 

8.6 
23.1 
12.3 

4.1 



Year. 



First 
Rain. 



1864-65 Nov. 

1S6.5-66 Sept 

lS66-ff7 Nov. 

1367-6S Sept. 

1S6.S-69 Oct 

1869-70 Sept. 

1870-71 Nov. 

1871-72 Oct 

1872-73 Sept 

IS73-74 Oct 

1374-75 .Sept 

Mean 



Last 
Rain. 



May 
June 
May 
June 
May 
May 
May 
May 
.\prii 
June 



Rainy Season. 



Begins. Ends. 



19 Nov. 
■S Nov. 
17 Nov. 
23 Nov. 
19 Dec. 
19, Dec. 
28 1 Dec. 
31 Dec. 
21 Nov. 
221 Dec. 
Oct 



23 Mar. 4 
13 Mar. 31 

16 April 12 
19AprU 13 

17 Mar. 29 
7,April 11 
2iApril 17 

16 AprU 18 
28 Feb. 28 
3[May 7 



Nov. 28 April 10 



Befe 
Jan 



14.9 
4.0 
15.8 
15.9 
5.7 
8.1 
3.5 
15.8 
10.8 
11.4 
8.5 



8.0 



After 
Dec. 



6.4 
17.2 
16.4 
24.6 
15.9 
12.0 

9.3 
17.2 

6.8 
12.3 



Table ni.- 



-Maximum Quantity of Rain in tach Month, Minimum Quantity in each Month, ayid 
Average Quantity in each Month, since I80O. 



Ma.Timnm. 
Minimum. 
Mean 



18.1 
0.6 
4.8 



Mar. Ap'l. 



6.4 5.6 
0.0 0.0 
3.0 1.7 



May. June July. 



2.0 0. 
0.0 0.0 
.50 0.4 



Aug. I Sept. Oct 



0.2 I 1.0 
0.0 I «.0 
0.1 I .05 



3.4 

0.0 

.37 



13.4 
0.4 
5.0 



Table IY.— Mean Temperature of each Month since 18.50, deduced from Two Daily Observations, one at 
Sunrise, the other at Noon; also, the Mean Temperature of each Year, 



Month. 



Jauuiiry , 

Feijruarv.... 

Mun-n 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November.. 
December .. 

Mean .... 



, , . I I I I I I I I I 

1851 1852 1853 18.>l 1855 1856! 1857 1858 I859U860 1861 1362 1863 1864 1865 1866 1867 186S 186911870 1.371 1872 1873 1374 



50.8 

53.1.>) 

.52.9 

SUA 

.W.l 

60.4 

61.4 

61.2 

63.1 

.W.7 

53.5 

.50.3 



.0 48.2151 
.153.61.56, 
,9.54.1.59, 
3 59. 3.57. 
7.5C.S.57. 
9.53.5.i'l. 
3 61.361. 
,0 60.3i62. 
,7 60.562. 
,7(».7[fil. 

.58.0 52. 

1 53.S47. 



46..5'47, 
48.8 50. 
49.0'53. 



48.8 51.2 46.3 
8!53.7,51.4. 5:1.1 
4'.55.9|.55.9.52.0 
7l.55.9'.5S.8'-55.7|.53.6.5:l 
7 .Vi.2 .'i7.5|57.6 .57.2 .54 
9 o;*.l:6n,y|.'^s.7 61.557 
2.5!I.4 5!I.2)60.7:.5'.I.3C1 
51.5:1.6.59. 1161.9161. 162 



4:61.5 60.8|62.4 

6|57.6 60.6. 57.8 

9J53.3I.54.5M.0 

47.0.59.5 44.8 



6 S6.5 53.1,57. l|57.6|55.7;.57. 55.4 51. 855.1 55.4150.6 



61.4 62. 
59.7-56. 
.53.552. 
46.3,49.! 



6 57.7 52. 
7.5i'.9 5o. 

2 57.8 55. 

3 55.7 57. 
5 57.6 58. 
2 .58.2 58. 
7. 59.757. 
061.160. 
3 63.6 60. 
3 62.2.59. 
2 57.356. 
5 53.7 51. 



549.4 
9 51.0 
6 53.3 
9.55.5 
9 62. 01.58. 



3 61 
661.1 
6 60.0 
363.3 
658.7 
57.6 
47.2154 



051.246.9 
4 52.0151.9 
3 .50.5153. 
457.5i.55.3 
58.3 53.0 
60.21,58.0 
6 63.2o9.6 60. 
0:60.4 59.8.59. 



1'61.3.59.3 
0'5S.2i60.8 
6 56.7.57.2 
7.55.3.53.2 



.51.5 53. 
.51.0 .55. 

63.2 65, 
&4.2.54. 

55.3 57. 

56.5 00. 
58.0 59. 
59.5,59. 

61.4 60. 
61.2 62. 

56.6 53. 



6 64 
61 
."158 
4.55 
7151.01.51.7 51 



57.0 57.0:66.7|57.4|o7.ll56.156.9|.56.S|o4.6,5o.4 56.7,51.5 



55.5 47.1 
.50.049.1 
55.149.8 
M.S55.7 
55.158.0 
;59.0 
.57.5.57.9 
60.059.0 
.58.7 61.3 
.58.6 60.0 
.56.4 56.4 
19.049.6 



Tablk v.— Extremes of Heat in each Month since 1850 ; also, in each Year. 



Month. 



January 

February.... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

AuLTiist 

s..pt..mber.. 

Oitober 

November.. 
December... 



1851 18.52 1853 1&54 1855:1856 18.57 1868 18.59 1860 1861 1862 1863 1864 1866 1866 1867 1868 1869 187o|l87I 1872 1873 1874 



Year 84 98 I 88 87 90 | 85 



60 I 62 

61 : 58 
S2 ! 72 
79 76 
76 ! 76 
76 I 79 
78 1 86 
76 I 87 
76 84 
83 I 84 
69 I 70 
63 I 64 



69 



87 91 



63 



93 I 86 



Table Vl.— Extremes of Cold in each Month since 1850 ; also, in each Year. 



Month. |1851 1852 18.53 1854 185.5 1856 1867 1858 18.59:1860 1861 1862 186.1, 1864 1865 1866 1867 1868 1869 1870 1871 1872 1873 1874 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

.\ncn8t ' 50 

September. i SO 

October I 47 

November _ 41 

December. 36 



Year.., 



I 30 



33 
41 
44 

40 
44 
49 
SI 
50 53 
46 60 



35 40 25 29 33 31 27 



I 38 I 27 38 37 31 28 



41 i 45 30 

49 I 36 38 

46 ! 43 I 33 
40 41 1 43 

47 45 .50 
51 I 49 49 
51 I 50 I 50 
62 I 53 52 

48 , 62 1 48 
44 I 45 ! 61 
40 I 46 44 
31 1 32 .34 



32 34 31 I 32 I 



MOEQAN & CO., 87 California Market, deals in all kinds of Fresli Oysters. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF CURRENT EVENTS, 



FBOM MA¥ 6 TO DECEMBEK 31, ISM. 



Mat 6, 1S74. The twenty-fourth Annual Convention of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church, in the Diocese of Cali- 
fornia convenes at Trinity Church. 

May 7. Donald McKay and a delegation of the w arm 
Spring Indians arrive, en route to the Eastern States. 

May 8. The Knights of Pythias hold their Annual 
Picnic at Alameda. 

iliy y. During a fracas on Montgomery Avenue, Au- 
gust Plateau is mortally stabbed, and Patrick Kennedy is 
slightly cut in the back. . . .W. H. Homer is mortally shot 
by Charles Osboni. . . , . i. ,m, * 

May 10 H. C. Howerton commits suicide in the What 
Cheer House.... The residence of E. W. Linsley is de- 
stroyed by lire; loss, $6,000. .. .Memorial services com- 
memorative of the Kev. John L. Stephens are held in the 
First Congregational Church. 

Jlay 12. A meeting is held in aid of the sufferers by 
the late floods in Louisiana, and a committee of citizens 
appointed to devise means of relief ... .Annie Meehen 
drops dead in the City Prison .... Michael Murphy is found 
dead in his room. i, ^, i 

May 1.5 Darby Creighton is crushed to death by a 
hawser on board the steamer S. M. Whipple .... James 
Malvil, formerly a member of Col. Stevenson's Regiment, 

New York Volunteers, dies, aged flfty-five years The 

Synagogue of the Congregation Beth Israel, on Mission 
Street near Fifth, is consecrated. , 

May 10. How See, a Chinaman, is assassmated m the 
street bv Giacomo lioero. 

May 17. The Pacific Total Abstinence and Benevolent 
Society gives its first public entertainment at Grand Cen- 
tral Hall. . . , 

May 18. Frederick Noltemeyer commits suicide... >. 
Tlie Aimee Opera Troupe makes their first appearance at 
the California Theater Margaret Noonan is found sit- 
ting on a door step in an exhausted condition with her 
new-horn babe dead in her arms .... Lawrence Connelly 
drops dead. , . . , 

May 19. JosiS Ortiz dies suddenly at his residence on 
Hinckley Street. . 

May -20. Auguste Plateau dies in the County Hospital 
from" the effects of a wound received during a fracas on 
Montgomery Avenue.... Mrs. Victoria C. Woodhull and 
Miss Teuny Claflin arrive from the East. 

May 21. Henri Rochefort and several other noted 
French Communists who escaped with him from New 
Caledonia, arrive on the steamer Mikado. 

Jlay -22. Antoine Hunckler, convicted of manslaughter 
for the killing of hia mother, is sentenced to five years 
imprisonment. . ^, . . 
May 23. The Annual Picnic of the Caledonian Club is 
held at East Oakland. . . . Aug^stino Cuneo commits sui- 
cide . . . Kennedy, Sullivan, and Murphy, under arrest on 
the charge of the murder of Auguste Plateau, are dis- 
charged from custody George Glusmg drops dead in 

his store. . , ^ rm, * 

May 24. AliceL. Tennant commits suicide the An- 
nual Festival of the German General Benevolent Society 
is held at Woodward's Gardens .... Dr. John P. Roger?. " 
well-known pioneer physician dies suddenly, aged htty 
years. . . . A banquet is given by some of the French res- 
idents in honor of Paschal Orousset and Francis Jourde, 
who escaped with Henri Boohefort from New Caledonia 

A slight shock of earthquake is felt. 

May 25. A banquet is given by the Bntish Benevolent 
Society in honor of the fifty-eighth birthday of yueen 
Victoria The Mayor of New Orleans telegraphs to 
Mayor Otis for aid in behalf of the sufferers by the Louis- 
iana floods.... Captain Moore, of the steamship Mikado, 
is arrested for violating the State immigration laws. 

May 20. MaroeUina AmiU dies in a barber shop while 
being shaved. 



May 27. The noted bandit Tiburcio Vasquez arrives 
from Los Angeles en route to Monterey County for trial 

Samuel K. Palmer is found dead in his bed The 

first Annual Commencement exercises of the students of 
Sacred Heart College are held in the College Hall. 

May 28. George Dougherty drops dead on the street. 

May 29. Canon Charles Kiugsley, the well-known En- 
glish writer delivers his first lecture to a San Francisco 
audience A trotting match for 81,000 between Califor- 
nia Dexter and Mary Davis over the Agricultural Park 

Course results in the success of the latter Cyrus W. 

Field the well-known submarine telegraph projector ar- 
rives from the East with a view of developing his plans 
for 3i P&rCific c*lblc* 

May 30. Memorial Day is observed by public services 
in the burial grounds and the decoration of the soldiers' 

graves A picnic is held at Woodward's Gardens fur the 

benefit of the Louisiana sufferers .... A trotting match for 
S2,000, between Ella Lewis and May Howard over the -Vg- 
ricultural Park Course, results in the success of the former 
Hem-y Tietjen is drowned in the bay. 

May 31. Several persons are arrested for a violation of 

the law for the employment of women in saloons The 

Annual Shooting Festival of the National Rifle Club is 
held at Harbor View. „ „ „^ 

June 1. Col. James Coey succeeds N. B. Stone as 
Postmaster of San Francisco Mrs. Victoria C. Wood- 
hull lectures to a large audience at Piatt's Hall Geo. 

G. Webster, a well-knowii member of the S. F. Stock and 

Exchange Board, dies, aged fifty years Picnic under 

the auspices of the Teachers' Mutual Aid Society at Wood- 
ward's Gardens nets $3,000. , „ . i 
June 2. The first Annual Meeting of the Boys and 
Girls' Aid Society is held and a permanent organization 
effected Victoria Woodhull delivers her second lect- 
ure at Piatt's Hall The annual session of the Grand 

Grove of California United Ancient order of Druids held 

at Druids' Hall James Helm, proprietor of the trotting 

horse Sam Purdy, dies suddenly. 

June 3. James Lick's deed, dedicating all his projierty 
amounting to over 82,000,000, for public purposes, is placed 
on record . Maxcey, the room-mate of Caldwell, dies, 
without divulging the secret of the tragedy which resulted 
in the death of both. , n, . 

J mie 4. Lawrence McNulty commits suicide IM'enty- 

fifth anniversary banquet of the passengers of the steamer 
Panama, held at the Grand Hotel. 
June 6. Eleventh Annual Commencement exercises of 

St. Mary's College held at Piatt's Hall D'Alva Mosse 

commits suicide while laboring under painful affection of 
the brain ...The United States District Attorney com- 
mences suit against fifteen firms for violation of the U 
S. customs laws. , ,, , . , t ^-^ * 

June li. Annual Meeting of the Mechanics Institute 

"june 7. The Annual Celebration of the Festa Delia 
Statuto held by the Garibaldi Guard. . , „ . 

Junes. Charles Fechter makes a successful first ap- 
pearance at Maguire's New Theater. 

June 9 Ernest W. Wiley commits suicide. .. .John 
McDonald commits suicide. . . .The U. S. steamer Narra- 
gansett arrives from a surveying cruise .... ITie State 
Dental Association commences its fifth annual session. 
I June 10. While a party of Crusaders were praying m 
front of a saloon on Diiunm Street, near Pacific, the side- 
walk gave way and they were suddenly precipitated into 
the mud.... George S. Hull found dead in his bed.... 
The ■Tain steamer Ellen sinks at Hathaway's wharf. . . . 
^ Fire on Third Street, between Clementina and Howard; 
loss about 55,000. 

June 11. Judge James H. Hardy, a prominent mem- 
ber of the bar, dies suddenly. 



bJ 

•-J 
»> 

p- 

$!? 

O 

p 



lone but the Best of Artists employed at Hairdressing Establishment, 113 Geary. 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merohar 



62 



SAN FRANCISCO DIEECTORT. 



^ 



June 12. Edward Murphy attempts suicide. 

June 13. Albert Peterson is shut by Tliomas Winship 
....The Calaveras Keuuiou holds their secuud Annual 
Picnic at Badj^er's Park. 

June 14. Steamer Prince Alfred strikes on Duxbury 
Reef and j,'oe3 ashore at Tennessee Cove, a total loss. 

June 15. Petra Patino killed by a stone rolled down 

TeIej,Taph Hill Dr. Robert J. Kichardson assaulted b^' 

Thomas Koid with a sand bag. . . .George Easton, a steve- 
dore, dies from injuries sustained by a fall. 

June 16. James B. McElwain, a well-known broker, 
dies Charles De Young, of the San Francisco Chron- 
icle, has an affray with B. F. Napthaly, duinng which a 
boy is shot in the leg. 

June 20. Grand exhibition of horses at Agricultural 

Park for the benefit of the Louisiana sufferers Mary 

O'Neil is rmi over by a truck and killed. 

June 21. The fishing boat Alessandro capsizes hi the 
bay and two of the occupants drowned. 

June 22. The fair in aid of the Louisiana sufferers 
closes; the total receipts about §20,000. 

June 23. Walter W. Stone commits suicide. 

June 25. Monster Sabbath School Picnic at Wood- 
ward's Gardens, ten thousand children on the grounds. 

June 20. William L. Hoover, of Gilroy, commits sui- 
cide at the Occidental Hotel. 

July 1. Mrs. A. C. Kej-t and child are thrown from a 
buggy and severely injured. 

July 2. Charles C. Lindsay commits suicide. 

July 4. Independence Day is celebrated by a military 
and civic i)rocessiou, and a regatta by the Master Mari- 
ners' Association. 

July 5. Gurin Maynard, of San Mateo, is dashed 

against a tree by his horse and killed Rev. Dr. Julius 

Eckmau, pioneer Jewish minister and editor, dies after a 
short attack of paralysis. 

July 7. A banquet and torchlight procession by the 
Society of Pioneers in honor of James Lick. 

July 10. AIl.\'n & ^Vhite's, Schultz -St Von Bergen's, and 
R. G. Gelien's stores destroyed by fire. Loss $60,000. 

July 11. The steamer V^co de Gama arrives from 
Yokohama in sixteen days. L.Jacob Jacobson dies sud- 
denly while being taken to th\city prison. 

July 12. The buildmgs of trh» Morocco Manufacturing 
Co. and George Griffin's tannerV entirely destroyed by 
fire, and adjoining buildings (Vmaged. Total loss, 

$20,000 William Schubert diessiilfldenly in his chair at 

the Hansa Hotel. 

July 18. Capt. Camman drops dead. 

July 19. H. G. Horner, an esteemed citizen and Secre- 
tary of the Commercial Insurance Company, is drowned. 

July 23. Suit couuuenced against William M. Lent to 
recover $20,000 on account of the diamond fraud. 

July 24. William B. Bourn commit-s suicide. 

July 25. The pas engers by the Pharsalia, in 1849, cel- 
ebrate the anniversary of their arrival by a banquet 

Rusael Card commits suicide. 

July 26. Ball.ion race from Woodward's Gardens. 

Jxdy 27. Expeditions of observiuice of the Transit of 

Venus sail on the Alaska Charles L. Tippett, a noted 

theatrical manager, dies. 

July 20. James Ramsey is killed by a mob at Mont- 
gomery Queen's Circus W. Scott commits suicide. 

July 30. Adolph Strecker, a promi?ient marksman, 
leaves overland t<i attend the shooting festival at Balti- 
more Patrick McCann dies from the effects of a kick. 

July 31. I^cnic at Woodward's Gardens of Chinese 
Sunday scholars Edward Coulter drops dead Me- 
chanics' Institute Pavilion formally accepted by the 
Board of Managers. 

August 4. J. W. Stow, an esteemed citizen and treas- 
urer of the San Francisco Benevolent Association, and 
president of the Gilroy Consohdated Tobacco Co., dies, 

ikftcr a hngcring illness Margaret Bishop dies at the 

County Hospital under circumstances of a suspicious nat- 
ure. 

August 5. Christopher QitcoWch is discovered dead in 

his room with a dirk buried deep in the skull Chas. 

Edwards, a notorious ruffian, escapes on the Oakland 
boat from Sheriff Mt.rsc, of Alameda County. . . .Rudolph 
Hirsch jumps thmugh a second-story window and dies 
from the injuries received. 

August Q. Michael Reese sues the California Pacific 
RaUruad for $7,0(K),000. . . . Williiuu McGee, from Virginia 
City, dies suddenly at the city prisf.n. 

August 11. William Alexander Lightfoot, of the tug 
Joscjih KajTuond, found drowned near the Ocean Side 
House. 

August 13. Mrs. A. B. Reed dies from the effect of a 



cut across the arm severing the arteries, inflicted hy her- 
self. 

August 15. John West found dead in his bed. 

August 17. James Lick records a new deed to protect 
the interests of the Academy of Sciences and Califumia 

Piuneers Albert Calcut commits suicide John A. 

McGljnin, superintendent of the Central Railroad, an old 
and eateemed citizen, dies, after a short illness. 

August is. Ninth Industrial Exhibition of the Me- 
chanics" Institute is opened to the public with consid- 
erable ceremony and display. 

August 24. Johtr^'hite disembowels himself with a 
raa^ir, then jumps out of the window, and dies three 
hours after. 

August 25. Investigation into the License Collector's 
office is commenced. 

August 29. Professor George Davidson and party 
leave for Nagasaki to observe the Transit of Venus. 

August 30. Exu-eka Hair Manufactory is destroj'ed by 
fire. Loss §20,000. . . .C. D. Anderson commits suicide. 

September 2. U. S. ship Tuscarora arrives from a 
soimding expedition. 

Sept. 3. Gen. John E. Addison commits suicide from 
fear of another attack of gout. 

Sept. 4. A. Strecker, the king shot of America, re- 
turns and is received with militarj' honors. 

Sept. 6. A man, named Fred. Clark, fatally stabbed. 

Sept. 9. The Pioneers celebrate the Quarter Centen- 
nial by military display and exercises at Woodward's Gar- 
dens, etc. 

Sept. 10. George Yelverton dies from the effects of 

wounds received while defending himself from attack 

The Pioneers take an excursion round the bay in the 
steamer Great Republic. 

Sept. 13. A boy, named David Cellar, run over by a 
street car, and killed. 

Sept. 15. Thomas Brown, at one time a salesman with 
Treadwell & Co., commits suicide. 

Sept. 16. Tlie Sixty-fourih Anniversary of the Inde- 
pendence of Mexico celebrated at Union Hall Fran- 

ciscc Proporata makes an unsuccessful attempt to commit 
suicide. 

Sept. 17. Herman Apel commits suicide. 

Sept. 20. Charles Wiggins accidentally' shoote himself. 

Sept. 21. George Keller commits suicide The ob- 
servance of the Day of Atonement is reUgiousIy kept by 
all the Israelites. 

Sept. 26. B. W. Vogelsdorff, a broker, commits suicide 

at the Grand Central Hotel, Oakland An explosion oc- 

ciu-s at the Bay View Distillery, attended with fatal in- 
juries to one of the workmen. 

Sept. 27. During a quarrel between two hoodlums at 
the comer of Third and Everett streets, John Murphy 

shoots John Caldwell fatally Samuel F. Blasdell, an 

old pioneer, commits suicide. 

Sept. 28. Three deputy assessors, Newton Morgan, A. 
Eckstein, and Joseph Cjisey, arrested for extensive poll-tax 
forgeries. 

Sept. 29. liouis Laurico attempts to gain possession of 
6600 from Angelina Martinez, and in her resistance he 
stabs her seven times. 

Sept. 30. Margaret O'Connor receives fatal injvu-ies by 
being thrown off a balcony by Thomas Nolan .... The body 
of John L. Stephens, the missionarj', arrives from Mex- 
ico, for interment in the city. 

October 1. Sarah R, Yt>akum makes an unsuccessful 

attempt to assassinate Dr. C. F. Buckley Phihp Barnes 

attemi>ts suicide ; wound fatal. 

Oct. 3. The Ninth Industrial Exhibition closes. 

Oct. 4. An aged woman named Annie Rice, found 
dead in her room in an advanced state of decomposition 
— The Bohemian Club gives a banquet to Randolph 
Rogers, the renowned American Sculi)tor. 

Oct. 6. Smith S. Studley is very badly crushed by a 
car of the Central Line. 

Oct. 7. John Nassar commits suicide by hanging him- 
self. 

Oct. 8. John M. Eckfeldt, melter and refiner, U. S. 
Mint, commits suicide at his residence at Oakland. 

Oct. 10. Thomas B. Masey commits suicide Claus 

F. Ehlers commits suicide in Oakland, by shooting him- 
self. 

Oct. H. James Orem dropped dead while on duty at 
Woodward's Gardens. 

Oct. 12. An old man named Murray is found dead 

A. L. Butenop found dead in his room. 

Oct. 13. Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge 

or Fi-ee Masons commences Joseph Gruet Buisley dies 

from the effects of a balloon accident. 



\^ . MOEGAN & CO,, Wholesale Oyster Dealers, 87 California Market. 



. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Keamy, EstabHshed 1852. 



CHEONOLOGICAL HISTORY. 



63 



Oct. 14. John Fogarty stabbed to death by a man 
named Sterling, on the steamer Amador. 

Oct. 15. Tlie Pioneers of 1S50 meet at Crusaders' Hall, 
,io orgajiize a society. 

Oct. 16. Coroner Rice is indicted for neglect of duty. 

Oct. 17. John ^\Tiitmore, mate of the bark E. H. 
King^man, kills P. Doran, a stevedore. 

Oct. 18. T\venty-first Anniversary' of the Young Men's 
Christian Association C. J. Selmer commit-s suicide. 

Oct. 19. Failure of E. E. Morgans Sons, for $335,000. 

Oct. 20. The remains of Maj. Harry Larkyns, killed at 
Napa by E. J. Muybridge, are buried in the Masonic 
Cemetery", with very imposing ceremonies. 

Oct. 23. W. C. iMiitehouse drops dead in a Chinese 
brothel. 

Oct. 25. During a row among hoodlums, James Bums 
is fataUy wounded in the abdomen. 

Oct. 26. Zenas Coffin, a well-known citizen, dies sud- 
denly. 

Oct. 31. Henry Wilhousen commits suicide .... Isaac 
Berry, a colored man, murders his father. 

November 1. — George C. Max^-ell is drowned while 
bathing in the bay near the Sue-mile House. 

Nov. 2. Frank Jobite found dead in his bed. 

Nov. 4. Henrj* VideJ^u, a prominent citizen, dies sud- 
denly of apoplexy. 

Nov. 5. The New U. S. Mint is formally transferred to 
Gen. O. H. La Grange, the superintendent, with befitting 
ceremonies Joseph McArdle, mate of the ship Un- 
daunted, is fined $250 and sentenced to two years" impris- 
onment in the State Prison, for cruelly treating his men. 

Nov. S. Edward Maguire shoots and kills his wife, 

while under the influence of liquor The ship Three 

Brothers returns, having made the trip to Ha\Te, from 
thence to New York, and to San Francisco, in three hmi- 
dred and eighty days. 

Nov. 11. The Central Pacific R. R. Co.'s steamer Sac- 
ramento is burned at the wharf. Loss §20,000. 

Nov. 14. Great nmuing race for $25,000 takes place at 
Golden Gate Park, between Katie Pease, Thad. Stevens, 
Hei.ry. Joe Daniels, Alpha, Hock Hocking, and Hard- 
wotid ; Katie Pease wins in two straight heats. Time, 
7.43i and 7.36i ; over twenty thousand persons were pres- 
ent. 

Nov. 17. A part of James Lick's property is sold at 
auction, at Piatt's Hall, in accordance with his instruc- 
tions, for different bequests, and realizes the simi of 
$l,95y,925. 

Nov. 18. George N. Murray discovers the body of his 
little son in a well. He had been missing three days. 

Nov. 21. laaac Beard dies from the effects of a stab 
in the back, received during a quarrel. 

X'.'V. 22. Peter Connolly is stabbed by James Lj-nch ; 
one wound in the abdomen considered fatal. 

Nov. 20. Thanksgiving Day is appropriately observed 
. . . .William Hendrick is found dead in bed, at the Mor- 
ton House. 

Nov. 27. Coroner Rice is removed from office, and the 
decree filed with the County Clerk. 

Ni'v. 23. Great trotting race, between Occident and 
Fullerton, takes place at the Bay District Fair Grounds. 
"L'ident wins the race in three straight heats. Time, 
•2.10, 2.25, and 2.20^. 

Nov. 29. King Kalakaua, of the Hawaiian Kingdom, 
arrives, and is received with considerable display by the 
civic and militan,^ authorities. . . . A woman named Mary 
Gates, drops dead at the residence of Thomas McArdle, 
where she was visiting. 

Nov. 30. Yoshida Kiyonari, Yice-Minister of Finance, 

for Japan, arrives en loute to Washington J. E. Pad- 

dijck, in a fit of drmikenness, attempts to assassinate Pat> 

rick H. Harrington The Twelfth Anniversary' of St 

Andrew's Society is celebrated at Piatt's Hall. 

December 1. Reunion of passengers by the steamer 
Oregon, which arrived December 1, 1S49, being the Twen- 
ty-fifth Anniversan.", is held at the Maison Dore6. 
" Dec. 2. King Kalakaua and staff take a trip round the 
Bay, visiting Alcatraz and Mare Islands. 

Dec. 3. A young man, named George McCulIy, is gar- 
roted and n.'bbed of some coin and a certificate of de- 
p- 'sit. One of the garroters is arrested, and while in the 
cell attempts to cut his throat. 

Dec. 4. Grand Re\iew of the Second Infantry is held 
in the Mechanics' PanUon, in honor of King Kalakaua 
...A man, named Robert Howe, found drowned off 
Hathaway's Wharf. . . .Louis WiUiams commits suicide. 

Dec. 5. King Kalakaua and party, leave en route for 
Washington, escorted by Col. Wherry, Lieut. Whiting, 
and Lieut.-CoL Hubbard. 



Dec. 6. Patrick Gilleran is accidentally shot, while 
pulling a loaded shot gun from a wagon, and dies almost 
immediately. 

Dec. 7. Robert Bruce Creighton is fined ?300, for as- 
saulting Thomas Newcomb, local editor of the San Fran- 
cisco Call F. W. Cushing, time clerk in the Naval Con- 
struction Department at Mare Island, brought here for 

investigation on a charge of falsifying the pay roll 

Frank Cxirley fatally stabbed by a notorious "hoodlum 
named McEvoy. 

Dec. 8. A Roman wrestling match takes place at 
Piatt's Hall, between Professor Miller and Mons. Bauer, 
which results in the latter's favor The Board of Man- 
agers of the Ninth Industrial Fair close up their ac- 
counts, showing a deficiency of $48,923.05 on their re- 
ceipts, but with a building to their credit" that cost 
$110,000. . . .James Mackey, the driver of the Hospital am- 
bulance, is thrown from his seat and instantly killed. . . . 
Dr. Swan is elected Coroner, and takes the oath of office. 

Dec. 10. Henrj- Jones is fined $500 for dealing faro 

James McNamara is found in his bed, at the Central Ho- 
tel, with five knife wounds on his person .... Charles 
Smith shoots himself fatally while examining a pistol. 

Dec. 11. Jerry Coghlan stabs his wife Samuel Don- 
aldson is found dead in his bed Frederick Gebhardt 

dies suddenly, the result of continued intemperancd.- 

Dec. 12. John Clark dies from injuries received by a 
pulley falling on his head. . . . Jabez Williams, seaman on 
the ship China, falls from a stage and is drowned Dur- 
ing a row on Mission Street, H. G. Wright draws his pis- 
tol and shoots WiUiam F. Patchell M. A. McLoughlin, 

during a row with a stranger, on Mission Street, stabs 
him with a knife. - . .John Brophy dies from the inhaling 
of no.xious gases while cleaning out a cesspool. 

Dec. 13. A business difficulty occurring between Chris- 
tian Wendt and E. Hardenburg, the former cuts the lat- 
ter across the throat with a sharp instrument. 

Dec. 15. Two men, named Fallon and St. Clair, attack 
a number of policemen ; Fallon wounds officer Gillespie 

John Bangs, a sailor on the bark Oakland, falls from 

the maintopsail yardarm and is killed W. Hepworth 

Dixon delivers a lecture at Piatt's Hall, on the German 
Empire. 

Dec. 16. James McNamara, who was stabbed so mys- 
teriously on the 10th, dies at the County Hospital.... 
John Murphy, an employed of the railroad, falls between 
the cars of a freight train, and dies two hours afterwards 

A man, named Gallagher, is foimd dead in his bed .... 

A man, named McEnemy, dies at the County Hospital 
from the effects of a stab mysteriously inflicted on the 
ninth inst. 

Dec. 17- Two men, named Furlong and Smith, meet in 
a saloon on Keamy Street, and exchange shots; both are 
wounded. 

Dec IS. Capt. McDonald's band of trained Indians 
gives an exhibition at La Grande Armorj". 

Dec. 19. Samuel J. Perkins, an old man over seventy 
years of age, drops dead at the Union Box Factory. 

Dec. 20. The late Capt. J. D. Cusheon is buried with 

military- honors, in the Odd Fellows' Cemeterj' Peter 

Tasse is fatally stabbed ; supposed to have been done by 
a Chinaman. 

Dec. 21. John Sullivan, a child five years old, is 
crushed by a lumber pile falling on him, on Market Street, 

near Steuart, and dies in an hour John Brums fomid 

drowned in the Bay. 

Dec. 22. Professor Mulder Fabbri. for many years con- 
nected with the musical profession, dies, aged fifty-two 
years. 

Dec. 23. A branch of the Order of Ancient Foresters, 

is established— the first on the Coast P. Lawless is 

found dead in his room M. G. Cobb, an attorney, is 

shot by Mrs. Annie Smj-the ; the womid is not dangerous. 

Dec' 24. Edward Alfeck shoots at T. E. Stevens and 
misses him... .A young man, known as Bob, a seaman 
On board the Three Brothers, falls overlxjard, and is 

drowned W. H. Leahy is found dead in his cell at the 

City Prison Capt. Robert Haley, who has been con- 
nected with the steamship Unes on this coast for twenty- 
five years, dies. 

Dec. 25. Christmas Day is observed by an almost total 
suspension of business, and by religious services in the 

different churches Bernard Lulop, a grain speculator, 

commits suicide The race between Katie Pease, 

Blanche Hull, and Nell Flaherty, won by the first-named 
Charles Reese commits suicide. 

Dec 30. Dr. John F. Morse, an old and esteemed cit- 
izen, and an influential member of the Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, dies. 



Satlis ! Baths ! ! Baths ! ! ! Qo and Bathe at Central Baths, 113 Qear7. 



JEWELRY made to order and EEPAIEED ty D. W. Laird, 513 Montgomery. 



PUBLIC STREETS, AVENUES, SQUARES, PLACES, 



OF THE CONSOLIDATED 



CITY OF SAN PRANOISOO,* 

IN ACCOKDANCE WITH THE OFFICIAL MAPS, 1868, 1870 AND 1872 



Explanatory.— The Ordinance for re-numbering the buUdings of thi3 city provides that 'Market Street shaU 
he thp starting point for the numbers of all buildings fronting on the streets runmng therefrom in a northerly 
ilJiv.'Unii ami also for those running therefrom in a southeasterly du-ection. The streets laid down m the ofhcial 
iiiai. n|- the citv as forming the water front thereof shall be the startmg point for numbers on all streets ruu»ing 
w.stvilv and southwesterly therefrom, except upon such streets running westerly commencing from Market 
streut, iuid upon all such streets. Market Street slmll be the starting point for numbers. On all streets the num- 
bers on the right hand side, startmg from the point of beginning, are even numbers, and on the left hand side, odd 
numbers One hundred numbers, or as many thereof as may be necessary, shaU be allotted tp each block bounded 
hv prinripal streets; numbers 100. 200 and SOU being respectively the numbers for commencing the blocks distant 
oil.-, twf. and three streets from the starting point on the side designated foreven numbers, and numbers lol, 201 and 
■.m ill similar niauner for the opposite side of the street, throughout its extent ; so that the initial fagure ot the 
luiiuher nUu-ed on a building at any street-crossing shall indicate the number of main streets such street-crossing 
is from the starting pohit. Not less than twenty feet iu frontage of all vacant lots of ground shall be allowed lor 
each number. On all cross or intermediate streets the numbering shaU commence where said streets begin, and 
shidl conform to the plan specified in this Order." . ^ ^ ■ ^., » ■ ^ +■ 

Bv tills new decimal svstem of numbering buildings, the exact locationof any number is readUy ascertained, tor 
example, if von want to find G24 Montgomery, it is on the east side of the block extending from Clay to Washing- 
ton, which is the seventh from Market— Commercial and Merchant being private streets. Again: t>2o Clay is 
above the eighth block from the water front, which is the one extending from Dupont to Stockton. It must be 
borne in mind that one hundred numbers are allowed on each block between principal streets. ^ -,- ^, z 

Several of the principal streets have been erroneously numbered. Bryant. Greenwich, Lombard and \ allejo 
each varv one hundred from the official map, which has been strictly adhered to ui the compilation of the present 
Street lnVectory. In every instance where an incorrect number has been used, the correct one has been included 
ill the canvass. To prevent cunfusiun tlu' wrong number has been added and enclosed in a parenthesis, thus U706). 
'lb.- following streets are but partijillv opened, and each dilfer materially from the plan originally laid out, viz: 
Ucineutiua, Ecker, Jessie, Minna, Natoma, Uitch, Shipley, Stevenson and Tehama. . , t, ■. 

The principal streets southeast of Market, aud running parallel to Fifth, have been, by an Ordinance ot me city, 
changed, and thev are to be designated hereafter numerically, as follows: Simmons to be Sixth, Harris as Seventh, 
Price as Eiglith. Johnston as Ninth, and so on as far as such parallel streets continue. . . t ^ 

The ttrriiory lying west of Laurel Hill and Udd Fellows' Cemetery, and generally known as the Outside Lands, 
hasbcuii recently surveyed, and isdosignated on the new official City aud County Map as avenues and streets. Those 
runnhig north and south are named respectively from Fu-st to Forty-nmth avenues, and those running east and 
west, from First Avenue to the Ocean, and parallel with Point Lobos Avenue, A to W streets. There are a lew 
a\enues and streets outside of the boundaries of the foregoing, the names of which will be found included m the 
Street Directory. , ^ » ,, tt j 

Reference w frequently made in the Register of Names to the following, and which are located as follows: Hoad- 
lev"s Addition, situated we'st of Pierce and between Ueary and Washingtou; Horner's Addition, south and near the 
Jli.ssioii linlores; Western Addition, west of Laikhi; San Miguel Ranch, southwest and near the Mission Dolores; 
lkrn;d Jiei-hts(B. H.), southof Twentv-sixth Street, between San Bruno and Sau Jose roads; and University 
Mound Tract i.U. M. T.), west of Sau Bruno Road, live miles from the Oily HaU. See, also. Prominent Places, 
page 8;i. 

{a) End or beginning of a street, (b) Not opened, (c) Fractional Blocks, one hundred numbers allowed ior first 

two blocks, (d) Fronting the bay. {e) Street ends. { ) Streetdoes not cross. B. H., Bernal Heights. U. M. T., 

University Mound Tract. S. S. F., South San Francisco. ' " -■ •- ■■ "- - - 

street could not be ascertained. 



A blank is used where the number at the crossing of a 



A4la, or Wells Conrl, 

opens Ss (yil) Lombard 
bet Stockton and Dupont 

Afin Court, NsO'Farrell 
bft Leavenworth and 
Hyde 

Ail»m. N and S s Eve, bet 
San Bruno Uoad and Cal- 
ifornia Avenue, B. 1£. 

AdninH, N s Tyler bet 
Scott and Devi^dero N 
to Turk 

Adolikicic Place, W s 

(.'il?) Taylor bet Post and 
Ueary 

Adele, from Tslais Creek 
bet CUiace andStringham 
S tu Hecker 

Adele Place, N s (S24) 
Jackson bet Stockton 
and Powell 



Adier, (see Dupont Alley) 

Adona Place, N s (1106) 

Washington bet Mason 
and Taylor 

AsneN I^ane, N s (530) 
Vallejo bet Dupont and 
Stockton 

Alabama, from Mission 
Creek bet Columbia and 
Harrison S to Serpentine 
Avenue 

Alameda, from the bay 
bet Channel and El Do- 
rado W to Harrison 

Alamo Square, bet 

Hayes, Steiner, Pulton 
aud Scott 

Alcalraz Square, bet 

Jefferson. FrankUn .North 
Point and Gough 



Allen, W s Hyde bet Un- 
ion and Filbert 

Allen, from Cortland Av- 
enue S to Crescent Av- 
enue S a B. H. 

Alleys Court., N s 
Oreenwich bet Sansom 
and Montgomery 

Almcra, N s Clay bet 
Leavenworth and Hyde 

Alta, (now Twenty-first) 
\V s Potrero Avenue bet 
Twentieth and Twenty- 
second W to Douglas ■ 

Alta Place, Ws Sansom 
bet Union and Filbert 

Alta Plaxa, bet Clay, 
Steiner, Jackson and Scott 

Amazon, F s County 
Road 5,'tj miles from City 
Hall 



Amherst, S s Silver Av- 
enue bet Princeton and 
Yale. U. M. T, 

Anderson, from Califor- 
nia Avenue S to Cort- 
land Avenue, B. H. 

Ankeny Place, Es (518) 
Powell bet Bush and 
Sutter 

Anna, or Anna Iiane, 

N s (14) Eddy bet Powell 
and Mason N to Ellis 

Annie, S 8 (667) Market 
bet New Montgomery 
and Third SE to Mission 

Anthony, N s (670) Mis- 
siou bet First and Sec- 
ond 

Antonio, Ws(411\ Jones 
bet O'Farrell and Ellis 



* The streets of the district known asSouth San Francisco, extending from the Buv of San Francisco west to the 
San Bruno Road, and from Tulare Street south to the county line, laid out as follows, viz.: Those runiung ui a 
northwesterly tUredlon known as avenues, from one to thirty-eight, and those southwesterly distinguished as 
streets from A to 8, respectively, are not included ; also, the streets on the water front, laid out by the 'llde Land 
Com mission ere, extendhig from China Basin on the north to India Basin on the south. 



The place to get the Best Eastern Transplanted Oysters at MOE&AIT & CO.'S. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Zeamy, Established 1862. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



65 



Arkansas, from the bay 
bet Connecticut and Wis- 
consin S lo Tulare 

Arlington, from San 
Jos^ Road m* Charles S 
W to Mateo 

Army. W s Old San Jos6 
Road bet Twenty-sixth 
aiid Twenty-seventh 

A»b Avenue. W s Van 
Xess Avenue bet Mc- 
Allister and Fulton 

Asbburtou Place, Tor 
Lincoln Avenue* E s (,208i 
Dupout bet Sutter and 
Post 

Asbbnry, N s Waller bet 
Masonic Avenue and 
Clayton N to Fuller 

Asbland Place. N s 
Mission bet Potter and 
Eleventh 

Aubnrn. Ns (10141Jack- 
son bet Taylor and Ma- 
son N to Pacific 

Angrast Alley. N s (TIS) 
Green bet Powell and 
Mason N to Union 

AoNtin. Ws Larkin bet 
Bush and Pine 

Xorth. Street. South Side. 

2 Larkin l 

100 Polk 101 

200 Van Ness Av 201 

Azf ec. XE s Coso Avenue 
bet Cherubusco and Bue- 
na Vista, B. H. 

Bacbe. S s Crescent Av- 
enue bet Porter and Lau- 
rel Avenue S s B. H. 

Bacon, W s San Bruno 
Koad bet Burrow and 
^^'ayland, U. M. T. 

Bagrlej Place. N s (U) 
OFarrell bet Dupont and 
Stockton 

Baker. N s Haight bet 
Eroderick and Lyon N 
to the bay 

Bafcer ATCnne. E s 
Railroad Avenue E to Is- 
lais Creek 

Balance. N s f412) Jack- 
son bet Montgomery and 
Sansoni 

Baldwin Conrt. N s 

(40S 1 Folsom bet First and 
Fremont 

Banks, from California 
Avenue S to Cortland Av- 
enue, B. H. 

Bannani Place, K s 
(510'i Green bet Dupont 
and Stockton N to Union 

Bartlett. S s Twentieth 

bet Valencia and Mission 

S to Serpentine Avenue 

tVfst. Str>'^t. East Side. 

- Twentieth I 

I'K) Twenty-first 101 

2iW Twenty-second 201 

300 Twenty-third 301 

¥<0 Twemv-fourth 401 

■^3 Tweuty-hfth 501 

(>"<J Twenty-sixth 601 

' ' ■ Serpentine Avenue {€) 

Bartletf. S s Thirtieth 
bt't Warren and Merced 
!? to Laidley 

Bartlett Alley, Ns(&l2) 
Jackson bet Kearny and 
Dupont 

Bartol, X a (340) Broad- 
way bet Montsomery and 
Sansom N to Vallejo 

Battery. N s Market bet 
Sansom and Front N to 

the bay 
Efi^t. Street WeH Side. 
2 Market and Bush 1 
100 Pine 101 



20O 


California 


201 


1!12 


Richmond 








Halleck 


213 


■Ml 


S;icramento 


301 


:ii4 


Commercial 


315 


■XHI 


Clav 


401 


41li 


Merchant 


417 


5UII 


Washington 


601 


oil! 


Oregon 


. 


m\ 


Jackson 


601 


7(K1 


Paciflc 


701 


Till 


Chambers 





Sill 


Broadway 


801 





FUnt Alley 


819 


MKI 


Vallejo 


901 


\<m 


Green 


1001 




Commerce 




lino 


X'nion 


1101 


VM) 


Filbert 


1201 


i.m 


Greermich 


1301 


i.e> 


Lombard 


le) 


Bay.Ws Kearnv bet Fran- 


cisco and North Point W 


to Presidio Reservation 



Xorth. Street. South Side. 

2 Kearny 1 

100 Dupont 101 

Midwav East 

300 Stockton 201 

Midway West 

300 Powell 301 

400 Mason 401 

500 Tavlor 501 

600 Jones 601 

Montgomery Av 

700 Leavenworth 701 

800 Hvde 801 

900 Larkin 901 

1000 Polk 1001 

1100 VanJ^'essAvenuellOl 

1200 Franklin 1201 

1300 Gough 1301 

1400 O-'tavia 1401 

1500 L;iguna 1501 

1600 Buchanan 1601 

1700 Webster 1701 

1800 Fillmore 1801 

1900 Steiner 1901 

2000 Pierce 2001 

2100 Scott 2101 

2200 DevLsadero 2201 

2300 Broderick 2301 

2400 Baker 2401 

Bay Avennc. Ss Bryant 
bet First and Second 

Bay Tiew Place, X s 

Union bet Leavenworth 

and Jones 

Beach, W s Powell bet 

North Point and Jefferson 

W to Presidio Reservation 

North. Street. South Siiie. 

2 Powell 1 

100 Mason 101 

200 Tavlor 301 

300 Jones 301 

400 Leavenworth 401 

Montgomery At 

500 Hvde 501 

600 Larkin 601 

700 Polk 701 

sm Van Xess Avenae 801 

900 Franklin 901 

1000 Gough lOOl 

1100 Octavia 1101 

1200 Laguna 1201 

i;i00 Buchanan 1301 

1400 Webster 1401 

1500 Fillmore 1501 

1600 Steiner 1601 

1700 Pierce 1701 

1800 Scott 1801 

1900 Devisadero 1901 

2000 Broderick 2001 

2100 Baker 2101 

Beacon, from Castro SE 
to Bemis, thence W to 
Castro 

Beale, S s Market bet 
Main and Fremont SE to 
the bay 

Southvest. Street. Nbrthecut 
2 3farkel 1 

Vlscher Place 

100 Mission 101 

Bertha 

200 Howard 201 

300 Folsom 301 



Beale Place 

400 Harrison 401 

oOO Bryant 501 

(c) Brannan (e) 

Beale Place. E s Beale 
bet Folsom and Harrison 
E to Main 

BeaTcr, W s Noe bet Fif- 
teenth and Sixteenth 

Bedford Place, N s 

(.SOtt) Jackson bet Powell 
and Stockton 

Beidcntan. N s Ellis bet 
Scott and Devisadero 

Belden. N s (342) Bush 
bet Kearny and Mont- 
gomery X to Pine 

Bellair Place, N s C-24) 

Chestnut bet Dupont and 
Stockton X to Francisco 

Belle vac. S s Elizabeth 
nr Ellen S to Thirtieth 

Bellcme Arenue, S s 

Greenwich bet Stockton 
and Dupont S to Filbert 

Bemis. from Beacon SE 
to Fairmouut, thence SW 
to Castro 

Benton Avenae:, W s 

Laurel Avenue nr Cres- 
cent Avenue, B, H. 

Berlin. S s Silver Av bet 
Girard and Gorttingea 

Bernadotte. from Isiais 
Creek K to Sixth Avenue 

Bernal, E of San Bruno 
Road from Vermont to 
Marengo 

Bern'al. S s Serpentine 
Avenue Sto Precita Av 

Bernard. W s {1535) Tay- 
lor bet Broadway and Pa- 
cific W to Leavenworth 

North. Street South Suie. 

2 Tavlor 1 

100 Jones ' 101 

(e> Leavenworth («) 

Berry, E s (312) Dupont 

bet Bush and Sutter 

Berry, W s Second bet 

Chnnnel and King SW to 

Eighth 

NorthicesL Street. Sotttheast 

2 Second 1 

100 Third 101 

Madden ■ 

Haggin ■ 

200 Forrth 201 

300 Fifth 301 

400 Sixth 401 

500 St^venth 501 

(6) Eighth (e) 

Bertha. W s Beale bet 

Mission and Howard 
BcMole, or Hodses, N 
sVallejo bet Montgomery 
and Sansom 
Billings Place, N s 
Vallejo bet Dupont and 
Stockton 
Birch Ayenne. W s Polk 

bet Grove and Fulton 
Blackstone Place, Ns 

Lombard nr Larkin 
Blossom, W s Valencia 
bet Ridley and Four- 
teenth W to Guerrero 

Blnxome, E s SUth bet 

Brannan and Townsend 
Blnxoine East, W s 

First bet Brannan and 

Townsend 
Boardman Place, N s 

Brannan bet Sixth and 

Seventh 
Bone Alley, or Qreen 

Place, N B (326) Green 

bet Montgomery and 

Kearny 



Boston Place. Es<32!)) 
First bet Folsom and 
Harrison 

Bonrbin Place. S s 

Ellis bet Steiner and 

Pierce 
Bourn. S s Kossuth bet 

Chace and Freelon S to 

Hecker 
Bondoin, S s Silver Av- 
enue bet Hamilton and 

Dartmouth, U. M. T. 
Bower Place, S s (529> 

G reen bet Dupon t and 

Stockton 
Bowie Areune. E s 

Eleventh bet Howard 

and Folsom 
Bosnian Place, S s 

Bryant nr First 
Boy<^, N s Point Lobos 

Avenue bet Cook and 

Williamson N to Laurel 

Hill Cemetery 
Boyd. E and W s Ches- 

ley bet Harrison and Brj*- 

ant 

Bradford, from Cort- 
land Avenue, X to Cah- 
fornia Avenue, B. H. 

Brady. S s Market bet 
Potter and Valencia SE 
to Mission 

Brady Place, E s Lar- 
kin bet Union and Green 

Brannan. W s Beale bet 
Bryant and Townsend 
SW to Ninth 

Northwest.Street.Southeast. 

2 Beale 1 

100 Fremont 101 

200 First 201 

300 Second 301 

Stanford 311 

Park Lane 

l"hompson Place 371 

400 Third 401 

416 Eitch 417 

430 Zoe ■ 

500 Fourth 501 

600 Fifth 601 

700 Sixth 701 

Clinton 

Geneva 

Boardman Place 

Brannan Place 

Gilbert 

800 Seventh 801 

900 Eighth 901 

1000 Ninth 1001 

Brannan Place, S s 
Brannan bet Sixth and 
Seventh 

Brenham Place, X s 
(750; Clay bet Kearny and 
Dupont N to Washington 

Breivster. from Hope S 
W to California Avenue 
B. H. 

Brid«-e. S s (1213) Broad- 
way bet Leavenworth 
and Hyde 

Bright, nr San Miguel 
Station 

Broad, W s Old San Jos6 
Road nr San Miguel Sta- 
tion 

Broadway, W s Davis 
bet Pacific and Vallejo 
W to Presidio Reserva- 
tion 

yorth. Street, South Siile 

2 Davla 1 

100 Front 101 

200 Battery 201 

300 .Sansom 301 

Ohio 321 

340 Bartol ■ 

400 Montgomery 401 

500 Kearny 501 

520 Pinkney Place 

Montgomery Av i 

600 Dupont 601 
610 Duncan Court 



O 

*s 
o 

CD 



The Best and most Cleanly Family Baths in the City are sit 113 Geary. 

5 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



66 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORT. 



o 

m 

D2 

lO 
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fio 



o 
o 

A3 

o 

n 

o 



f4 
O 
ft 

n 

•*» 

o 

J* 

I 

o 

•— • 

•tJ 



<D 

Ft 



ca 



o 
o 



o 



■ma Stockton 

— Virginia Place 
" Morey Alley 

Powell 
Scott Place 
900 Mason 

Salmon 

1000 Taylor 

Sweet 

Florence 

Jones 

Leavenworth 

Morse Place 

Bri<ige 

Hyde 

I^rkin 

Maxwell 

Polt 



900 



lino 

1200 



13<10 
1400 



l.TlB 

1600 



701 1 

709 1 

801 I 
817 
SOI 
921 
1001 



llOl 

1201 
1205 
1213 
1301 
UOl 

1501 



Van Ness Avenue IfiOl 



1900 
2000 
2100 

2200 



1700 Franklin 1701 

laOO Gough ISOl 

Octavia 1901 

I-a^na 2001 

Buchanan 2101 

Webster 2201 

2»iO Fillmore 2:»1 

2400 Steiner 2401 

2.i00 Pierce MOl 

2600 Scott 2601 

2700 Devisadero 2701 

2S00 Broderick 2»1 

£100 Baker 2901 

Broderich. Ns Waller 
bet Baker and Deviaa- 
dero N to the bay 
Broderick Avenne, S 
s Market bet Eleventh 
and Potter 
Broofc, E s Dolores nr 
Thirtieth E to San Jos€ 
Road 
Brookl.rn Plare, S s 
(.S-X'li Sacramento bet 
Stockton and Dupont 
Brooks, N s (732) Market 
bet Kearny and Dupont 
>' to Geary 
Brodnan, W s Valencia 
bet Fonrteenth and Rid- 
ley 
Brown, f now Twelfth) S 8 
Mission bet Eleventh and 
Thirteenth SE to Har 
Brown Alle?*, N s Mc- 
Allister bet Hyde and 
Larkin 
Br.ran Place, N s (206) 

Bush bet San and Mont 
Br.TanI, W s Spear bet 
Harrison and Brannan 
S\V to Eleventh. iThe 
buildings in this street 
are Incorrectly number- 
ed! 
Northtre4t.Stre€t.SotUheast~ 



Spear 

Main 

Beale 

Fremont 

First 
418 Rincon Place 
442 Stanly Place 
50© Second 

— Centre 
eoo Third 
I*) Ritch 

— Zoe 
Fourth 
Fifth 

Fifth Avenne 
Oak Avenue 
Park Avenue 
Sixth 
Clinton 
Garden 
Jones Place 
CiUbert 
Seventh 
Downey 
White Place 
Decatur 
Eighth 
Bryant Avenue 

lan Ninth 
1300 Tenth 
(«} Eleventh 
Bryant Avenae, 



100 

mo 

300 
400 



80O 



900 



1000 



1100 



1101 

1201 
1301 

flatc 
Florida) from Mission 



Creek bet York and Co- 
lumbia S to Serpentine 
Avenue 

Bryant Avenne. N s 
Brvant bet Eighth and 
Ninth 

Buchanan, N s Ridley 
bet Laguna and Webster 
N to the bay 

Eatt. Street. Wat Side. 

2 Ridley 1 

100 Kate 101 

200 Waller 201 

300 Haight 301 

400 Page 401 

Lilly Avenne 

500 Oak 501 

Hickory Avenne 

600 Fell 601 

Linden Avenne 

700 Hayes 701 

Ivv Avenne 

800 Grove 801 

Birch Avenue 

900 Fulton 901 

Ash Avenue 

lOOO McAllister 1001 

Locust Avenne 

1100 Tyler 1101 

1200 Turk 1201 

130O Eddy 1301 

14C0 Ellis 1401 

1500 OFarrcll 1501 

1600 C^ary 1601 

17C0 Post 1701 

ISOO Sutter 1801 

1900 Bush L901 

2000 Pine 2001 

2100 California 2ioi 

2200 Sacramento ZJnl 

2;)00 aay 2301 

2400 Washington 2401 

2500 Jackson 2501 

2600 Pacific 2601 

270O Broadway 2701 

2M) VaUeJo 2501 

2900 Green 2901 

3000 Union 3001 

3100 Filbert 3101 

3200 Greenwich 3201 

3300 Lombard 3301 

3400 Chestnut »401 

Lobos Square 
3600 Bay 3601 

roo North Point 3701 

3S0O Beach 3M1 

3900 Jefferson 3901 

4000 Tonquin 4001 

vc) Lewis (e) 

Bnena V*»ta,from Cort- 
land Avenue NE to Coso 
Avenue, B. H. 
Bnena Tista Park, bet 
Napa, Shasta, Vermont 
and Utah 
Bnena ViKta Place, 
(now Prospect Place i, N s 
California bet Stockton 
and Powell 
Bnenaventnra, N s 
California bet Kearny 
and Dupont 
Bnrchani Place, W s 
(101) Leavenworth bet Ty- 
ler and Turk 
Barsroyne Place, S s 
(1307) Pacific bet Hyde 
and Leavenworth 
Burrilt, Ss!603iBushbet 
Powell and Stockton 

Burrow, W s San Bruno 
Road bet Henry and Ba- 
con, C. M. T. 
Burton, E of San Bruno 
Road, 4 miles from City 
UaU 
BuHb, Junction Market 
and Battery bet Pine and 
Sutter W to Laurel Hill 
Cemetery 
North. SIrrel. SoUlh Side. 
2 Market 1 

100 Battery 101 

200 Sansom 201 

206 Brvan Place 

300 Montgomery 301 



306 Russ Alley 

Trinity 

342 Belden 

400 Kearny 

406 Morse 

Clara Lane 

MaryLane 

50O Dupont 

518 Chiitham Place 

600 Stockton 

Burritt 

610 Monroe 

Chelsea Place 

700 Powell 

800 Mason 

900 Taylor 

1000 Jones 

1100 Leavenworth 

1200 Hvde 

1300 Larkin 

1400 Polk 



407 
423 
501 

601 
603 

615 
701 
801 
901 
1001 
1101 
1201 
1301 
1401 



ISOO 
1900 
2000 
2100 
2200 
2300 

240O 
250O 
2600 
2700 
2300 
2900 
30OO 



Franklin 

Gough 

Octavia 

Laguna 

Buchanan 

Webster 

Middle 

Fillmore 

Steiner 

Pierce 

Scott 

Devisadero 

Broderick 

Baker 



ISOl 
1101 
3001 
2101 
2201 
2301 

2401 
2301 
2601 
2701 
2801 
2901 
3001 



1500 Van Ness Avenne 1501 



160O Franklin 


1601 


1700 Gough 


1701 


1800 Octavia 


ISOl 


1900 Laguna 


1901 


2000 Buchanan 


2001 


210O Webster 


2101 


2200 Fillmore 


2201 


2300 Steiner 


2301 


2400 Pierce 


2401 


2500 Scott 


2501 


2600 Devisadero 


2601 


2700 Broderick 


2701 


2S00 Baker 


2801 


2ii00 Lvon 


2901 


(e) Lott 


(e) 


Bnller. from 


California 


Avenue S to Cortland Av- 


enue, B. H. 





Butte, from the bay bet 

Solano and Napa W to 

Harrison 
Byinerton, W s Webster 

bet Ellis and O'Farrell W 

to Steiner 

Bj rne. from Islais Creek 
SE to Baker Avenue 

Byron, from Montcalm S 
to Hope, B. H. 

Cabot, from California 
Avenue bet Samoset and 
Star SE to Franconia Av- 
enue. B. H. 

Cadcll Alley, N s C50S) 
Union bet Stock and Dup 

Cadwallader, E of San 

Bruno Road 4 miles from 

City HaU 

Calhoun, N s Green bet 

Sansom andMontgomery 

California, junction of 

Market and Drumm bet 

Sacramento and Pine W 

to City Cemetery 

North. Street. South .Side. 

2 Market and Drnmm 1 

100 Davis 101 

2(0 Front 201 

300 Battery 301 

400 Sansom 401 

424 Leidesdorff 421 

50O Montgomery 601 

Spring 531 

5.32 Webb - — 
600 Kearny 601 
612 Wallace Place 

St. Mary Place 625 

- Quincv 6.57 
700 Dupont 701 

716 Selina Place 

800 Stockton 801 

Ellick Lane 

S12 Pratt Court 

820 Prospt-ct Place ■ 

8-32 Stiles Court 

900 Powell 901 

920 Gustavtis 

1000 Mason 1001 

1016 Cushman 

1100 Taylor 1101 

1200 Jones 1201 

IW) Leavenworth 1301 
1400 Hvde 1401 

1.500 Larkin 1.501 

1600 Polk 1601 

1700 Van Ness Avenne 1701 



Calirornia Avenne, E 

of San Jos^ Road and W 
of San Bruno Road, B. H. 

Cambridge, S s Silver 
Avenue bet Yale and Ox- 
ford, U.M.T. 

Camtlle Place, N s 

Washington bet Jones 
and Taylor 

Camp, E s Guerrero bet 
Sixteenth and Seven- 
teenth 

Capitol, W of Old San 

Jose Road nr San Miguel 

Station 

Capp, S s Fifteenth bet 

Howard and Mission S to 

Serpentine Avenue 

Wejt. ,'ilreel. East Side. 

2 Fifteenth 1 

100 Sixteenth 101 

20O Seventeenth 201 

300 Eighteenth 301 

400 Nineteenth 401 

.500 Twentieth 501 

60O Twentv-flrst 601 

70O Twentv-second 701 

800 Twentv-third 801 

900 Twentv-fourth 901 

1000 Twentv-fifth lOOl 

1100 Twenty-sixth UOl 

Card Alley, W s (1413) 

Stockton bet Vallejo and 

Green 

Carl, W s Clavton nr 

Frederick W to First Av 

Carlos PIa4^, S s (219) 
O'Farreli bet Mason and 
Powell 

Carolina, from the Imy 
bet Wisconsin and De- 
Haro S to Tulare 

Caroline, N s Lombard 
bet Jones and Leaven- 
worth 

Caroline, S s (1011) Fol- 
som bet Sixth and Sev- 
enth 

Caroline Place, E s 
(1218) Powell bet Jackson 
and Pacific 

Carr Place, S s Chestnut 
bet Taylor and Mason 

Carver, from California 
Avenue S to Powhattan. 
B. H. 

Caoe, W s San Bmno Road 
4 miles from City HaU 

Castro, S s Ridley bet 
Diamond and Noe 

Cedar, N s (212i Clay bet 
Davis and Front N to 
Washington 

Cedar Alley, W s Do- 
lores bet Sixteenth and 
Seventeenth 

Cedar Avenne, Ws I^ar- 
kin bet Post and Geary 

Cemetery Avenue (see 
Central Avenue) 

Center, (now Sixteenth) 
from the bay W to Castro 

Central, nr San Miguel 
Station 

Central Avenne, N s 
Geary bet Lvon and Wal- 
nut N to Presidio Reser- 
vation 



MOEQAIT & CO., 87 California Market, have their own Boats and Oyster Beds. 



C. p. VAIT SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 7H, and 715 Kearny, Established 1852. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



67 



Cenlrnl Plaee, S s (515) 

Pitie bet Dupont and 

Kearny 
Central Road, from 

McAllister SW to Ocean 

View House 
Centre. S s {5331 Bryant 

bet Second and Third SE 

to South Park 
Chaee, from Islais Creek 

S to Ilecker 
Ctiamber^i, W s (619) 

Davis bet Pacific and 

Broadway W to Battery 
Chambers Place, N s 

Greenwich bet Powell 

and Masou N to Lombard 

Channel, W s Third bet 

Berry and Hooper SW to 

Eighth 
Channel, Ws San Bruno 

Eoad 4 miles from City 

Hall 

Ciiapnltepec.from Cort- 
land Avenue NE to Coso 
Avenue, B. H. 

Charit.T, from Cadwalla- 
der NW to Islais Creek 

Charles, N s Tyler bet 
Leavexiworth and Hyde 

Charles. S of Pairmount 
from San Josfi Koad NW 
to Chenery 

Charles Place, N s (570) 
Har bet First and Second 

Chase, N s Point Lobos 
Avenue bet Williamson 
and Merrifield Nto Lam-el 
Hill Cemetery 

Chatliain Place, N s 
(51H 1 Bush bet Dupont and 
Stockton 

ChaKanoogra. SsTwen- 

ty-first bet Dolores and 
Church 

Chelsea Place, S s (615) 
Bush bet Stockton and 
Powell 

Chenery, S s Thirtieth S 
to Randal thence SW to 
Castro 

Cherry. N s California nr 
Maple N to Presidio Res- 
ervation 

Cheriabnseo. from Cort- 
land Avenue NE to Coso 
Avenue, B. H. 

Chesley, S s Harrison bet 
Seventh and Eighth 

CheRtnut, W s Sansom 
bet FrancLsco and Lom- 
bard W to Presidio Reser- 
vation 

JSroTt?i. Street. South Side. 

2 Sansom 1 

(c) Montgomery (c) 

Webster 

100 Kearny 101 

200 Dupont 201 

224 Bellair Place 

300 Stockton 301 

Chestnut Alley 

400 Powell 401 

500 Mason 501 

Newell 

Montgomery Av 

600 Taylor 601 

700 Jones 701 

800 Leavenwortli 801 

900 Hvde '01 

1000 Larkin 1001 

1100 Polk 1101 

12iX) Van Ness Avenue I20i 

1300 Franklin 1301 

1400 Gongh 1401 

1500 Octavia 1501 

1600 I,aguna 1601 

1700 Buchanan 1701 

1800 Webster 1801 

1J»00 Fillmore 1901 

2000 Steiner 2001 

2100 Pierce 2101 

220f) Scott 2201 

2300 Devisadero 2301 



2400 Broderick 2401 

2500 Baker 2501 

Chestnut Alley, N s 

Chestnut bet Powell and 

Stockton 
Chnrch, S s Ridley bet 

Dolores and Sanchez S to 

Thirtieth 
Chnrch Kjane, W s Do- 
lores bet Sixteenth and 

Seventeenth 
Church Place,W 3(1709) 

Dupont bet Lombard and 

Greenwich 

City Hall Avenne, N s 

Market opp Eighth NW 
to Park Avenue 
Clairville Place, S s 

(535) Uni(iu bet Dupont 

and Stockton 
Clara or Clary, WsRitch 

bet Folsom and Harrison 

W to Sixth 
Clara ATcnue, N s 

Eighteenth nr Douglass 

Clara Avenue or Clo- 
ver Avenue, nrLaguna 
de la Merced 

Clara I.<ane, N s (204i 

Sutter bet Kearny and 
Dupont N to Bush 
Clarice or Clarence 

Place. N s Townseud 
bet Second and Third 

Clark, W s (409) Drumm 
bet Jackson and Pacific 
W to Front 

Clary or Clara,WsRitch 
bet Folsom and Harrison 
W to Sixth 

Clay, W s East bet Wash- 
ington and Commercial 
W to First Avenue 



Nor 


h. Street. South 


Side. 


2 


Bast 


1 


ino 


Drumm 


101 


200 


Davis 


201 


213 


f'ertar 





300 


Front 


301 


400 


Battery 


401 


500 


Sansom 


601 





I.eidesiiorfr 


527 


600 


Montgomery 


601 


700 


Kearny 


701 


760 


Brenham Place 





800 


Dupont 


801 


814 


Waverly Place 


813 


828 


Spofford 





900 


Stockton 


901 


916 


Clay Avenue 








Prospect Place 


917 


1000 


Powell 


1001 





Tay 


1015 


1016 


Wetmore Place 




1100 


Ma-son 


1101 





Yerba Bueaa 


1115 


1200 


Taylor 


1201 


1300 


Jones 


1301 




Priest 







Reed 





1400 


Leavenworth 


1401 


laOO 


Hyde 


1501 




Torrens Court 





1600 


Larkin 


1601 


1700 


Polk 


1701 


1800 


Van Ness Avenue 1801 


liim 


Franklin 


1901 


2000 


Goufih 


2001 


2100 


Octavia 


2101 


2200 


Laguna 


2201 


2300 


Buchanaa 


2:j01 


2400 


Webster 


WOl 


2500 


Fillmore 


2501 


2600 


Steiner 


2601 


2700 


Pierce 


2701 


2800 


Scott 


2801 


2900 


Devisadero 


2901 


300O 


Broderick 


3001 


3100 


Baker 


3101 



Clay Avenue, Ns (916) 
Clay bet Stockton and 
PoweU 

Clajton, N s Waller bet 
Ashbury and Cole N to 
Fulton 



Clcaveland, Ws Colum- 
bia Square bet Folsom 
and Harrison 

Clements W s First Ave- 
nue bet Point Lobos Ave- 
nue and California W to 
City Cemetery 
Clement Place. S s 
Green bet Dupont and 
Stockton 
Clementina. W s (248) 
First bet Fol and Tehama 
Northwest. Street. Southeast 
2 First 1 

ih) Second (b) 

{f>} Tbird (b) 

300 Fourth 301 

400 Fifth 401 

(&) Sixth (6) 

(ft) Seventh (ft) 

700 Eighth 701 

(&) Ninth (&) 

Clinton, S s Bryant bet 
SLxth and Seventh 

CI i|>pcr, W s Old San Jos? 
Road bet Twenty-fifth 
and Twenty-sixth W to 
Douglass 

Clover Avenue or Cla- 
ra Avenue, nrLaguna 
de la Merced 

Codanan Place, Ss(1007) 

Wiisbington bet Powell 
and Mason 

Cohn Place, Ss Jackson 
bet Leavenworth and 
Hyde 

Cole. N s Haight bet Clay- 
ton and Shrader N to Fiil- 
ton 

College, S s Silver Ave- 
nue bet Dartmouth and 
University, U. M. T. 

Collegre Place, N s 

Hayes bet Larkin and 
Polk 

Collins, Ns Point Lobos 
Avenue bet Wood and 
Ferrie N to Laurel Hill 
Cemetery 

Columbia, W s Guerrero 
bet Nineteenth aud 
Twentieth W to Noe 

Columbia, from Mission 
Creek hrt I'.ryant Avenue 
and Alabama S to Ser- 
pentine Avenue 

Columbia, S s (1019) Fol- 
som bet Sixth and Sev- 
enth SE to Harrison 

Columbia Place, S s 

Precita Avenue S to Cali- 
fornia Avenue, B. H. 
Columbia S(|uare, bet 

Folsom, Harrison, Colum- 
bia and Sherman 
Colusa, from the bay bet 
Yuba and Marin W to 
Vermont 
Commerce, E s Battery 

bet Union and Green 
Commercial, W s East 
bet Clay and Sacramento 
W to Dupont 
North. Street. South Side. 
2 East i 

100 Drumm 101 

200 Davis 201 

300 Front 301 

400 Battery 401 

500 Sansom 501 

624 Leidesdorflr 525 

600 Montgomery 601 

700 Kearny 701 

(e) Dupont (c) 

Conffdon, nr Junction 
San Bruno Road and SU- 
ver Avenue 
Connecticut, from the 
bay bet Missouri and Ar- 
kansas S to 'rulare 



Cook, N 8 Point Lobos 
Avenue bet Ferrie and 
Boyce N to Laurel Hill 
Cemetery 

Cooper Alley, S s (623) 
Jackson bet Kearny and 
Dupont 

Corbett. (now Seven- 
teenth) W s Harrison bet 
Sixteenth and Eighte'nth 
W to Douglass 

Cortez, from California 
Avenue bet Montcalm 
and Samoset E to Fran- 
conia Avenue 

Cortland Avenuc.from 
San Jos6 Road near Thir- 
tieth E to San Bruno 
Road 

Coso Avenue, from 

North Avenue NW to 
California Avenue, B. H. 

Cotta£;e Place, E s f614) 
Jones bet Geary and Post 

County Road or San 
Jose R«»ad. from ter- 
mination of Mission SW 
to County Line 

CreeU Italic Ws Folsom 
bet Thirteenth aud Four- 
teenth 

Crescent Avenue, from 
San Josg Road nr St. Ma- 
ry's College E to San 
Bruno Road 

Crook, NsTownsend bet 
Third and Fourth 

CuNhman. Ns (1016) Cali- 
fornia bet Mason andTay- 
lor N to Sacramento 

Custom House Place, 
N s (412) Washington bet 
Sansom and Battery N 
to Jackson 

I>ale, (nowTwentv-nbitb) 
W s San Jos6 Road bet 
Twenty-eighth and Thir- 
tieth 

Dale Place, S s Tyler 
bet Leavenworth aud 
Hyde 
Dame, S s Thirtieth bet 
Chenery and Whitney S 
to Randal 
Dartmouth, S s Silver 
Avenue bet Bowdoin and 
College, U. M. T. 
Davi»i, N s Market bet 
Drumm and Front N to 
the bay 
East. Street. West Side. 

2 Market and Pine 1 
100 California 101 

William Place 100 

200 Sacramento 201 

214 Commercial 216 

:J00 Clav 301 

(6) Merchant (bi 

400 Wiishington 401 

410 Oregon 417 

500 Jackson &0I 

514 Clark 51;: 

600 Pacific 601 

(d) Chambers 619 
{(/) Broadway 701 

(e) Vallejo {e) 
Dan'Mon Place. Es Ma- 
son bet Sacramento aud 
Clay 

Day, W s San Jos6 Roatl 
h?t Twenty-ninth and 
Thirtieth 

Day, E s Dolores bet Sev- 
enteenth and Eighteenth 

De Boom, E a (5:i3) Sec- 
ond bet Bryan t and Bran- 
nan 

De Ilaro, from Mission 
Cret'k bet Caroline luid 
Rhode Island S to Tulare 

DC Kalb. from Cortland 
Avenue S to Crescent Av- 
enue S s B. H. 



" Cleanliness is nezt to G'odliness ! " C^o and Bathe at 113 Geary. 



D. W. Laird, San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant ■; 



68 



SAN FBANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Ile^-aJor, 8 s Bryant bet 

Seventh and Eighth 
Defaliir. S s Crescent 

Avenue W of Porter S a 

B. H. 
Delnwnre, S s Solano bet 

Ma'isarhusetta and Mary- 

hmd 
Delannre Court, N s 

Sutter bet Powell and Ma- 
son 
I>c>l|;ardo, E side Hyde 

bet Green and Union 

I>on4 Place, Xs Jackson 

bet Stockton and Powell 
I>eTi«a<loro, N s Ridley 

bet Broderiek and Scott 

N to the bay 
Oevrees. E of San Bruno 

Jtoad 4 miles from (.'ity 

Hall 
Dewey, SsKhigbetThird 

and Fourth S to Berry 

Dexter, S s Howard bet 

Mnin and Spear 
Dianionil, S s Sixteenth 

bet Castro and DougULSS 
DickerHon, EsSan Bru- 
no Road 3K miles from 

City Hull 
Dikoman Place. W s 

(tllT'^Iason betO'Farrell 

and Ellis 
D(»ek. W s Front bet Fil- 

iKTt and Union 
Dodse. s sTurk betHyde 

and Larkiu 

D oil NO 11 Alley, (see 

Keyes Alley) 
DoloreN, S s Market bet 

Church and Guerrero 
Dora. S s (1113) Folsom 

bet Seventh and Eighth 
Dore Alley. S s Jackson 

bet Powell and Mason 
Dorland K.ane.. W s 

Dolores bet Seventeenth 

and Eighteenth 
DoncIaH Place. Es 

Beale bet Folsom and 

Harrison 

DoutrlaNN, Ss Sixteenth 

\V of IMamond 
I>ow Place, W s Second 

bet Folsom and Harrison 
Do%vney, Ss Bryant bet 

Seventh and Eighth 
Druinni, Ns Market bet 

l»Hvis and East iV to the 

bay 
EasL Street West Side. 
2 Market and Cal 1 



100 


Sarrnmemo 


101 


im 


rimimercial 


115 


■jm 


Clay 


201 


•iI4 


Mf-rrhant 


(W 


ajo 


Washington 
Ori'Kori 


301 


4(l() 


Jurkson 


401 





Clark 


400 


(e) 


I'aciflc 


M 



Orur.T I,ane, W s (SOBl 
SeviMith bet Folsom aiid 
Harrison 

I>r> or Jnnodon, "W a 

<ll.l San J., SI- Hoad but 
'rwrtit\' -ninth and Thir- 
tlc'lli \V to Ui'llvvue 
Dnane. W s Jones bet 
Chestnut and Lotubard 

Dunbar Court, rear of 

city Hall 
Dnnrnii, W s Old San 

JosC Hoad bet Twenty- 
Rrvrnth and Twenty- 
ilflith 

Diincnn C'onrt, K 8(010) 

llroadway bet Dupont 
and Stockton 



2 
100 
110 
200 
20S 



300 
312 

400 
500 

60O 

700 
714 
SOO 
900 

1000 

1100 
112(1 
121.10 



1300 
1400 
1500 
1.500 
KiOO 
1013 
1700 

ISOO 
liJOO 

2000 
2100 
2200 

ic) 



213 
219 
301 

313 
401 
SOI 
505 
601 

701 
(b) 
801 
901 
S)23 
1001 
1021 
1101 

1201 



1301 
1401 
1501 

1601 

1701 
1709 
1801 
liJOl 

2001 
2101 
2201 

(e) 



Dnnn Alley. E S (1106) 
Kearny bet Broadway 
and Vallejo 
Dn|>on(. N s Slarket bet 
Stockton and Kearny N 
to the bay 
East. Street. WeM Side. 
Mkt and O'Farrell 1 
Geary 101 

^lorton 111 

i-ost 201 

Lincoln Avenue 
Stockton Place 
Mills Place 
Sutter 
Berrv 

Harlan Place 
Bush 
Pine 

Virginia Alley 
California 
Bupont Place 
Sacramento 
Commercial 
Clay 

Washington 
Hall Court 
Jackson 
Sullivan Alley 
Pai-iflc 

Dupont Alley 
Broadway 
Montgomery Av 
Hinckley 
Vallejo 
Green 
I'nion 

Nobili Alley 
Filbert 
Gerke Alley 
Greenwich 
Church Place 
Lombard 
Chestnut 
Pfeitter 
Francisco 
Bay 

:Nr)rth Point 
Beach 

Dii|>ont Alley, K s (1126) 
Dupont bet Pacific and 
Broadway 
Dupont Place, W s Du- 
pont bet Sacramento and 
California 
Dnisrht. W s San Bruno 
Hoad bet Woolsey and 
Olmstead, U. M. T. 
Eaerle. (now Nineteenth) 
W s Harrison bet Eight- 
eenth and Twentieth W 
to Douglass 
East, from Folsom N to 

Paciiio fronting the bay 
Emt. Street. West Shir, 
ill) Folsora 1 

(rf) Howard 101 

(<l) Mission 201 

(d) Market 301 

(((1 Clay 401 

(rf) Merchant 
(rf) AVashington 501 

((ii Jackson 601 

(et Pacific (e) 

Krker. S s (527) Market 

bet First and Second 
Edd.r, junction Market 
and Powell bet EllLs and 
Turk W to Calvary Cem- 
etery 
Xorth. Street. South Side. 
2 Jfarket and Powell 1 

14 Anna I,ane 

— Kildv Place 27 

100 Mason 101 

200 Tavlor 201 

300 Jones 301 

400 Leavenworth 401 
500 Hyde 501 

600 Larkin 601 

700 I'nlk 701 

Roo Van Ness Avenue 801 
900 Franklin 901 

1000 (iough 1001 

1100 Ocluvia 1101 

1200 Laguna 1201 

1300 liurhanan i:«)i 

1400 Webster 1401 



1500 Fillmore 1501 

1600 Steiner 1601 

1700 Pierce 1701 

Farren Avenue 

1800 Scott 1801 

ISKK) DevLsadero 1901 

20O0 Broderick 2001 

(e) St. Joseph's Av (e) 

Edilr Place. S s (271 Ed- 
dy bet Powell and Mason 
Ednard. N s Bush bet 

Larkiu and Hyde 
EiKlKeciifti. (late Fal- 
con i AV s Harrison bet 
Seventeenth and Nine- 
teenth W to Douglass 
Eislith. (late Price) S s 
Market bet Seventh and 
Ninth SE to Townsend 
Sont!iwe:^t..'^rect.Xortiicast 
2 Market 1 

Stevenson 
Jessie 
100 Mission 101 

114 Miiiiia 115 

Natoma 

200 Howard 201 

Noonan Avenue 205 

Tehama (6) 

Clementina 

300 Folsom 301 
Shipley . 

Heron 

400 Harrison 401 

500 Brvant 501 

600 Brannan 601 

tel Townsend (c) 

£1 Dorado, from the bay 
bet Alameda and Six- 
teenth W to Harrison 

Elet-entb. Gate Wood) S 
s Market bet Tenth and 
Twelfth SE to Mission 
Creek 

Southwest. Street. Northecu^t 



Market 
Mis-sion 
Howard 
Bowie Avenue 

Fnlsnm 

Harrison 

Bryant 



1 
101 

201 

301 

401 

Cf) 



Elir.a. N s Union bet Tay- 
lor and Jones 

Eliza Place. N s Wash- 
ington bet Taylor and 
Jones 

Ellzabetli. W s Noe bet 

Twentv-third and Twen- 
ty-fourth 
Elk. from Cadwallader N 
to Islais Creek 

Ellen, (now Thirteenth) 
SE s Mission bet Twelfth 
and Fourteenth 

Ellen. N s Harrison bet 
Seventh and Eighth 

Ellen. S s EUzabeth bet 
Dougl.'tss and Bellevue S 
to Thirtieth 

Ellick Alley, I^ s (722) 
Pacific bet Dupont and 
Stockton 

Elliek I.ane. N s Cali- 
fornia bet Stockton and 
Powell 
ElliH, junction Market 
and Stockton bet O'Far- 
rell and Eddy W to Cal- 
vary Cemetery 
North. Street. Sotith Side. 
2 Market and Stock 1 
100 PoweU 101 

Anna Lane 111 

•200 Mason 201 

300 Tavlor 301 

400 Jones 401 

500 Leavenworth 601 

600 Hvde 601 

700 I,arkin 701 

son Polk 801 

900 Van Ness Avenue 901 
1000 Franklin 1001 



1100 Gough 1101 

1200 Octavia 1201 

1300 Laguna 1301 

1400 Buchanan 1401 

Hollis 

1.500 Webster 1.501 

1600 Fillmore 1601 

1700 Steiner 1701 

Bourbin Place 

1800 Pierce 1801 

Farren Avenue 

1900 Scntt 1901 
Beideman 

2000 Dcvisartero 2001 

2100 Broderick 2101 

(e: St Joseph's Av (e) 

Ellswortll. from Califor- 
nia Avenue S to Cortland 
Avenue, B. H. 

Elm Avenue. W' s Lar- 
kin bet Turk and Tyler 

Emma. E s (.508) Stockton 
bet Pine and Bush 

Eniuia. E of San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City 
Hall 

Eniiua Place..SsChest- 
nut bet Stockton and Pow 

Emmet Place. Ws(709) 
Stockton bet California 
and Sacramento 

Erie Place. W s Howard 
bet Thirteenth and Four- 
teenth W to Mission 

Esmeralda Avenue. 
from North Avenue NW 
to CaUfornia Avenue, B. 
Heights 

Essex, S s (.543) Folsom bet 
First and Second SE to 
Harrison 

Esse.v Place. W s Esses 
bet Folsom and Harrison 

Estefania. junction of 
Hecker and .Stringham S 
W to Islais Creek 

Eugenie, N s Point Lobos 
Aveime bet Josephine 
and Wood N to Laurel 
Hill Cemetery 

Eureka. S s Seventeen th 
bet Douglass and Dia- 
mond 

E ve. W' s San Bmno Eoad 
W to California Av. B. H. 

Everett. W s (i:») Third 
bet Mission and Howard 
W' to Fourth 

Ener Place, W s (1011) 
Mason bet Sac and Clay 

Fair Avenue, W s Cali- 
fornia Avenue "W to San 
JosC Road 

Fair Oaks, S s Twenty- 
first bet Guerrero and Do- 
lores 

Fairmont, S of Randall 
from San Jos6 Road W to 
Bemis 

Faitli. from California 
Avenue NW to Brewster, 
B. H. 

Falcon. (nowEighteenth) 
W s Harrison bet Seven- 
teenth and Nineteenth W 
to Douglass 

Falcon Place, E s Tay- 
lor bet Bdwy and Vallejo 

Farren Avenue* N s 
Edd V bet Pierce and Scott 
N to Ellis 

Fell, junction Marketand 
Polk bet Hayes and Oak 
W lO Stanyan 

Korth. Street. Soxilh Side. 
2 Market and Polk 1 
lOO Van Ness Avenue 101 
200 Frauklin 201 

300 Gough 301 

40u Octavia 401 

500 Laguna 501 

600 Buchanan 601 

700 Webster 701 



Send your Orders from the Country for Eastern Transplanted Oysters to Morgan & Co, 



:. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



69 



800 Fillmore 801 

WO stelner 901 

inno Pierce lOOi 

1100 Scott 1101 

1200 Derisadero 1201 

1300 Broderick 1301 

1-100 Baker 1401 

Fella Place. E s (G16) 
Powell bet Bush and Pine 

Fern Avenne. W s Lar- 
kin bet Bush and vSutter 

Ferrie, N s Point Lobos 
Avenue bet Collins and 
Oook N to Laurel Hill 
Cemetery 

Fifteenth, nate Sparks) 
\V s Harrison bet Four- 
teenth and Sixteenth W 
to Castro 

Fiflb, S s Market bet 

Fourth and Sixth SE to 

the bay 

Southwest, Street, Northeast 

2 Market 1 

14 Stevenson (6) 

(b) Jessie 33 

100 Mission 101 

106 Minna 107 

124 Xaroma 125 

200 Howard 201 

210 Tehama 211 

226 Clenientiaa 227 

300 Folsom 301 

316 Shipley 317 

323 Clara, or Clary 329 

400 Harrison 401 

Perry 

500 Brvant 60! 

GOO Brannan 601 

700 Townsend 701 

King 

SOO Berry 801 
C'hannel 

Hooper 

Irwin 

HubbeU 

South 

Flflb Avenne. S s f9131 
Harrison bet Fifth and 
Sixth SE to Bryant 

Fig:?, (now Twenty-sev- 
enth) W s Guerrero bet 
Tvventv-sixth and Twen- 
ty-eighth 

Filbert. W s Front bet 

Greenwich and Union W 

to Presidio Keservation 

North. Street. South Sidf. 

2 Front 1 

100 Battery 101 

200 Sansom 201 

300 Montgomery 301 

400 Kearnv 401 

Filbert Place 407 

Varenne 417 

Grand Place 427 

500 Dupont 601 
504 Medau Place 

Jasper Place 515 

600 Stockton 601 

700 Powell 701 

Montgomery Av 

706 Gaven 

724 Scotland 

800 Mason 801 

SOO Taylor 901 

Roach Alley 

1000 Jones 1001 

1100 Leavenworth 1101 

Kandall Place 

1200 Hvde 1201 

1300 Larkln i:»l 

1400 Polk 1401 

1500 Van Ness Avenue 1501 

1600 Franklin 1601 

1700 Gough 1701 

1800 OcUivia 1801 

1900 Laguna 1001 

21100 Buchanan 2001 

2100 Webster 2101 

2200 Fillmore 2201 

2300 Steiner 2301 

2400 Pierce 2401 

2500 Scott 2501 

2600 Devisadero 2601 

2700 Broderick 2701 

2800 Baker 2S01 



Filbert Place. X s(406) 

Union bet Kearny and 
Dupont N to Filbert 



Fil Imore, N s Ridley bet 


Webster and Steiner 


Nto 


the bay 




East 


Street West Side. 


2 


RiiUey 


1 


100 


Kate 


101 




Germania 





200 


Waller 


201 


SOO 


Haight 


301 


400 


Page 


401 


500 


Oak 


601 


600 


Fell 


601 


700 


Hayes 


701 


800 


Grove 


801 


»00 


Fulton 


901 


1000 


McAllister 


lOOl 


1100 


Tyler 


1101 


1200 


Turk 


1201 


1300 


Eddy 


1301 


1400 


Ellis 
Byington 


1401 


1500 


O'FarreU 


1.501 


1600 


Geary 


1601 


1700 


Post 


1701 


ISOO 


Sutter 


1801 


1900 


Bush 
Wildey 


1901 


2000 


Pine 


2001 


2100 


California 


2101 


220(] 


Sacramento 


2201 


230O 


Clay 


2301 


2400 


M'ashington 


2401 


2.500 


Jackson 


2501 


2600 


Pacific 


2601 


2700 


Broadway 


2701 


2>«X) 


Vallejo 


2801 


2900 


Green 


2'«1 


3000 


Union 


300! 


3100 


Filbert 


3101 





Pixlej' Place 




3200 


Greenwich 
Moulton 


3201 


3300 


Lombard 


3301 


3400 


Chestnut 


3401 


3500 


Francisco 


3-501 


3600 


Bay 


3601 


3700 


North Point 


3701 


3.S00 


Beach 


asoi 


SIOO 


Jefferson 


3901 


4000 


Tonquin 


4001 


i.e) 


Lewis 


W 


First, S s Market bet Fre- 


mont and Second SE to 


the bay 




Sotithvesf. Street. Northeast 


2 


Market 


1 


22 


•Stevenson 





46 


Jessie 





.56 


Lick AUey 





100 


Mission 


101 


US 


Minna 





146 


Xatoma 







Melius 




200 


Howard 


201 


220 


Tehama 







Tehama Place 


223 


24S 


Clementina 





300 


Folsom 


301 


318 


Guy Place 








Boston Place 


320 


350 


Laurel Place 





400 


Harri.son 
Goodsell Place 


401 


500 


Bryant 


501 


520 


Frederick 





600 


Brannan 


601 


(e) 


Townsend 


lel 



First Avenne. N s J nr 

Golden Gate Park N to 
Presidio Keservation 

First Avenue, N" s Six- 
teenth bet Mission and 
Valencia 

Flint Alle.v, W s (819) 
Battery bet Broadway 
and Vallejo 

Florence. N 8 Broadwa.v 
bet Taylor and Jones N 
to Vallejo 

Florenee.BernalHeights 

Flori«la. now Bryant. 4.V- 
enue i.f roni Mis.sion Creek 
bet York and Columbia S 
to Serpentine Avenue 



Folarer. S s Ellis bet Web- 
ster and Fillmore 
Folsont, W s East bet 
Howard and Harrison 
SW to Fourteenth thence 
S 
Northipest. Street. Southeast 
2 East 1 

fc) Steuart (c) 

100 Spe.ir 101 

200 Main 201 

300 Beale 301 

Zoe Place 315 

400 Fremont 401 
408 Baldwin Court 

Grant Place 40^ 

600 First 501 

Ecker (6 

Essex 543 

600 Second -, 601 

Hawthorne 633 

Hampton Place 649 

700 Third 701 

Ritch 717 

Havwood 761 

800 Foiirth 801 

Miller Place 827 

900 Fifth 901 

Willow 92.1 

1000 SLxfh 1001 

Caroline 1011 

1016 Harriet 

Columbia 1019 

1028 Russ 

Sherman 1039 

1043 Moss 

1100 Seventh 1101 

Dora 1113 

1114 T^angton 

Harrison Avenue 1127 

1130 Rausch 

Folsom Avenue 1145 

1200 Eighth 1201 

l:)00 Uihth 1301 

1400 Tenth 1401 

.Juniper 1417 

1500 Eleventh 1501 

Neva-la 

1000 Twelfth 1601 

1700 Thirteenth 1701 

Creek Lnne 

1800 Fonrtei nth 1801 

1900 Fifteenth 1901 

20CIO Sixteenth 2001 

2100 Seventeenth 2101 

3200 Eighteenth 2201 

2.300 Nineteenth 2*)! 

2400 Twentieth 2401 

2500 Twentv-first 2.501 

2600 Twenlv-second 2601 
2700 TvveutV-third 2701 
2S00 Twentv-fnurth 2801 
2900 Twentv-fifth 2ti01 
3000 IVenty-sixth 3001 
Folsom Avenue. S s 
( 11451 Folsom bet Seventh 
and Eighth 
Fort Place, S s Pacific 

bet Hyde and l.arkin 
Fourteenth date Tracy 1, 
W s Harrison bet Thir- 
teenth and Fifteenth W 
to Castro 
Fourth. S s Market bet 
Third and Fifth SE to the 
bay 
Southwest. Street. Korlhr.aei 
- -- ■ 1 

21 
31 
101 
117 
l,3:i 
201 
219 
243 
301 
317 
3C! 
401 
417 
431 
601 
52! 
6:17 
601 
701 



Market 

(6) Stevenson 

30 Jessie 

lOO ilission 

110 Minna 

Everett 

200 Howard 

218 Tehama 

242 Clementina 

.300 FoLsom 

316 Louisa 

332 Clary 

400 Harrison 

416 Perry 

Silver 

500 Bryant 

Welch 

Freelon 

600 Brannan 

700 Townsend 

King 

800 Berry 
Channel 



Francisco. W s Mont- 
gnmer.v bet Chestnut and 
Bay \V to Presidio Reser- 
vation 

North. Street. South Side. 
2 Montgomery 1 

Webster 

tc) Kearnv fcl 

100 Dnpont 101 

Midway East 

Bellair Place 

200 Stockton 201 

Midway West 

300 Powell 301 

400 Mason 401 

500 Taylor 501 

Montgomery Av 
600 Jones 601 

700 Leavenwortll 701 
800 Hvde 801 

900 Larkin 901 

1000 Polk 1001 

1100 \im Ness Avenue 1101 



1200 Franklin 

130O Gough 

1400 Octavia 

1.500 Laguna 

1600 Buchanan 

1700 Webster 

1800 Fillmore 

1900 Steiner 

3™xi Pierce 

2100 Scott 

2200 Devisadero 

2:!i)0 Broderick 

2100 Baker 



1201 

1.301 
1401 
1501 
1601 
1701 
ISO! 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
3101 



301 
401 



501 



Franconia Avenue. 

from Hope SW to Cali- 
fornia Avenue, B. H. 

Frank Place. W s Ma- 
son bet California and 
Pine 

Franklin. N s Slarket 
bet Gough and Van Ness 
Avenue N to the bay 

East. Street. IlVsi Side. 
3 Market and Page 1 
Lilv Avenue 
lOO Oak 101 

Hickory Avenue 
200 Fell 201 

Linden Avenue 
300 Hayes 

Ivv Avenue 
400 Grove 

Birch Avenue 
600 Fulton 

Ash Avenue 
600 McAllister 

Locust Avenue 
700 Tyler 

Elm Avenue 
800 Tuik 

I>aurel Avenue 
900 Eddy 

Willow Avenue 
1000 Ellis 

Olive Avenue 
1100 O'FarreU 

Mvrtle Avenue 
1200 Geary 

Cedar Avenue 
1300 Post 

Walnut Avenue 
1100 Sutter 

Fern Avenue 
1.500 Bush 
1600 Pine 
1700 t.'alifornia 
1800 Sacramento 
19(H) Clay 
2000 Witshington 
2UI0 Jackson 
2200 Pacific 
2300 Broadway 
2400 Vallejo 
2-51 «) Green 
2600 Union 
2700 Filbert 
2S00 Greenwich 
2900 Ixjmbard 
3000 Chestnut 
.31110 Francisco 
:a>0 Bav 
33(X) North Point 
3400 Beach 
3.500 Jefferson 
3600 Tonquin 
(e) Lewis 



601 t:, 



HI 

o 
HI 

o 

$ 



o 



3. 
tt 

O 

ra 
o 

I3* 



o 



701 

801 



901 

1001 

1101 

1301 

1301 

1401 

l.iOl 
1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
340! 
2.501 
2601 
2701 
2S01 
2901 
3001 
3101 
3201 
3301 
3401 
3.501 
3601 



W 
o 

e> 

p* 
bJ 
»> 

p- 
{«> 

o 

p 

> 

t* 
ta 
CO 

o 

a 

I— ■ 

-^ 



CMldren's Hair Cut in the most Eeoherche Manner at 113 Geary. 



San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 513 Montgomery cor. Merchant.) 



70 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Fmnklln Parle, bet 

Sixtft'iilh, Santa Tiara. 

Haiiipjihire and Bryant 

A^'eiiUi' 
Frortcrirfc.WsAshbury 

Tir WnllcT W to First Av 
Frerterirlt.W s (520) First 

bt't Urannan and Bryaut 

Frooloii. W s Zoe bet 

Uraniian and AVelsh 

Freelon. bet Bnunie and 
Orsenius from Byrne W to 
.Salome 

Fremont, Ss Market bet 

First and Beale SE to the 

bay 

Southwest. Street. Northeast 

'Z Market 1 

100 Mission 101 

M.lliis 

■:00 JIuward 201 

Limoiii Place 24;{ 

HOD Folsom 301 

-100 Harrison 401 

500 Bryant 501 

>.e) Brannan (*:) 

Fremont Conrt or 
C'la.v Avenue, Ns(916) 
Clay bet Powell and 
Stockton 



Fri 


edman Place 


K s 


(lalO) Lark-in bet Pacific 


an 


d Broadway 




Front, N s Marke 


het 


Battery and Davis 


N t/l 


the bay 




East 


Ktrcet. West 


.Side. 


2 


Warlict 


1 


1(10 


Pine 


101 


aKi 


California 


2in 


— 


Richmond 


■211 


:;(i(i 


Sacramento 


Mil 


:(!!< 


Commercial 


;ii7 


4(KI 


Clay 


4111 


41« 


Merchant 


(c) 


WIU 


Washington 


601 


.1111 


Oreffon 





film 


JaclcsoQ 


(ail 


1114 


Clark 


— 


7IH1 


Pacific 


7111 


'Vl 


Chambers 


713 


ma 


Broadway 


SOI 


'.m 


Vallejo 


9111 


nil 


Green 


lOOl 


(rfl 


Comraerce 




(rf> 


Union 


1101 


('(1 


Dock 




(rfi 


Kilhert 


12111 


(«) 


Greenwich 


Ifl 



Fulton. W B I^arkin het 

McAllister and Grove W 
tu suiiiyan 
North, .street. South .'^{fU. 

2 J,arkin 1 

im Pulk 101 
200 \'aii Ness Avenue 201 

:«)0 Franklin .-^l 

400 (Jongh -101 

5O0 Octavia 501 

<5o(i Lii^una fiOl 

71)0 Buchanan 701 

KitO Wehster 801 

'>io Fillmore !)0l 

KHiO st.iiier lOOl 

1100 PiiTce HOI 

1200 Scott 1201 

i:<00 Devisadero l-tOl 

I4IH) llroderick 1401 

irm Buker l-soi 

ItiOO Lyuil IGOl 

Clnlnen, N s Green bet 
.Saiisoin and Battery N to 
Union 

Onlinto, N a Sitteenth 
bet iiiicrrero and Dolores 

Var4l«-ii, H s Harrison bet 

Sixth and Seventh SE to 

Itryant 
Onrtlner Alle:*. NsUI-) 

Post bet Dupont and 

Kearny 
0»ren, W s San Bruno 

Hoad 4 miles from City 

Hall 



CiateH. from Cortland Av- 
enue S to Crescent Ave- 
nue, B. H. 

Oaren. N s (70ff) Filbert 
bet Powell and Mason N 
to Greenwich 

Gear.v, junction Market 
and Kearnv bet Post and 
O'Farrell W to Central 
Avenue 

Nm-th. Street. South Side. 
2 Market and Kearny 1 

Brooks 25 

100 Dupont 101 
200 Stockton 201 
300 Powell 301 
-iOO Mason 401 
411 Metcalfe Place 

Martha Place 417 

500 Taylor 501 

Gearv Place 511 

512 William 515 

600 Jones 601 

700 Leavenworth 701 

soo Hvrle 801 

900 l.iirkin 90\ 

1000 Polk 1001 

1100 Van Ness Av 1101 

12(W Franklin 1201 

l.tOO Gnu^h 1"X>1 

1400 Octavia 14ril 

1500 Laguna l^iil 

IfiOO Buchanan ]'>0l 

1700 AVebster 1701 

isoo Fillmore isol 

1900 Steiner 1901 

2000 Pierce 2001 

2100 Scott 2101 

2200 Devisadero 2201 

2;}00 Broderick 2301 

St. Joseph's Av 

2400 Baker 2401 

2500 Lyon 2501 

Central Avenue 

Oeary Plaee. S s (511) 

Geary bet Taylor and 

Jones 

Geneva. S s Brannan bet 
Sixth and Seventh 

Georffia, S s Solano bet 
Louisiana and Michigan 

Oerke Alley. Esil6I8) 

Dupont bet Greenwich 
a[id Filbert 

Oerniania, "W s Web- 
ster bet Kate and Waller 
W to Fillmore 

<jerlruilifi. from Hecker 
SW to Islais Creek 

<«lbb. W s Maiden Lane 
bet Jackson and Wash- 
ington 

Ciib^tou. E s Larkin bet 
ITiiion and Green 

Oilbert. S s Brvant bet 
Sixth and Seventh SE to 
Tow use ad 

tillmore, Es Kentucky 
nr Shasta 

4;irar€l, S s Silver Av- 
enue bet San Bruno Road 
and Berlin 

C-Ien Park Avenue, S 

W s (26) Twelfth bet Mis- 
sion and Howard 

C> I en wood Plaee. S s 

Howard hft Twelfth and 
Thirteenth 

Olover, Es Leavenworth 

bet Bdwy and Vallejo 
tio4leuK. E s Mission nr 
Thirtieth E to Califor- 
nia Avenue 
CJocl.v. W s Btission nr 
Twt-nty-eishth 

Ooeftini^eH, S s Silver 
Avenue bet Berlin and 
Williams 

Oold, W s (705) Sansom 
bet Jackson and Pacific 
W to Montgomery 



Oolclen Oale Park, W 

of Stanyan bet D and H 
streets W to Pacific 
Ocean 
Ool<1man Plaee, E s 

Mission bet Sbcteenth 
aud Seventeenth 
Oood Cliildren. S s 

Lombard bet Kearny aud 
Dupont 
Coodsell Plaee, E s 

First bet Harrison and 
Bryant 
Gordon. N s Harrison 

bet EiEThth and Ninth 
Cionj^li. N s Market bet 
Franklin and Octavia N 
to the bay 
East. Street. West Side. 
2 MktandHaij^ht 1 
Rrtse Avenue 
100 Page 101 

Lillv Avenue 
200 Oak 201 

Hickory Avenue 
300 Ft' II 301 

Linden Avenue 
400 Hayes 401 

Ivv Avenue 
500 Grove 501 

Birch Avenue 
600 Fulton 601 

Ash Avenue 
700 McAllister 701 

Locust Avenue 
800 Tyler 801 

Elm Avenue 
900 Turk 901 

Laurel Avenue 
1000 Eddy 1001 

Willow Avenue 
1100 EHis 1101 

Olive Avenue 
1200 O'Farrell 1201 

Mvrtle Avenue 
1300 Geary 1301 

Cedar Avenue 
1400 Post 1401 

Walnut Avenue 
1500 Sutter 1501 

Fern Avenue 
IfiOO Bush 1601 

1700 Pine 1701 

I'^OO California 1801 

liKKl Sacramento 1901 

201(0 Clav 2001 

2100 Washington 2I0I 

2200 Jackson 2201 

2:too Pacific 2301 

2400 Broadway 2401 

2500 Vallejo 2501 

2600 Green 26111 

2700 Fnion 2701 

2^00 Filbert 2801 

2*100 Greenwicli 2901 

:i000 Lombard 3001 

3100 Chestnut 3101 

3200 Francisco 3201 

3300 Bay 3301 

3400 North Point 3401 

3500 Beach 3501 

.%00 Jelferson 3601 

3700 Tonquin 3701 

ie) Lewis (e) 

Oralinm Place, N s 

(5^18) Green bet Stockton 
and Dupont 
Grand Avenne, S s 

Mission bet Niuth and 
Tenth 

Grand Place. S s (427) 

Filbert bet Dupont and 
Kearny 

Grant, (see Pierce) 
Grant Avenne, (see 
Grand Avennej 

Grant Plaee. S s (409) 
Folsom bet First and 
Fremont 

Graftan, W b Stanyan 

nr Sullivan 

Green, W s Front bet 
Vallejo and Union W to 
Presidio Reservation 

North. Strea. South Side. 
2 Front 1 



100 


Battery 


101 




Gaines 




200 


Sansom 
Calhoun 


201 


300 


Montgomery 


301 


3ir, 


Vincent 





326 


Bone Alley 








Reed Place 


331 


400 


Kearny 


401 


406 


.Sonera Place 


. 


420 


Lafayette Place 





.TOO 


Dupont 


501 


510 


Bannam Place 





522 


Union Place 








Bower Place 


529 


538 


Graham Place 
Montgomery Av 




600 


Stockton 


601 


700 


Powell 


701 


718 


August Alley 





800 


Mason 


801 


9O0 


Taylor 


901 


1000 


Jones 


1001 


1100 


Leavenworth 


1101 




New ( irleans Av 







Hamlin 





1200 


Hyde 


1201 


1300 


I.arkin 


1301 


1400 


Polk 


1401 


1.^00 


Van Ness Av 


l.Tlll 


1600 


Franklin 


1601 


1700 


Gough 


1701 


1300 


Octcivia 


1801 


19O0 


Laguna 


1901 


2000 


Buchanan 


2001 


2100 


Webster 


2101 


2200 


Fillmore 


2201 


2300 


Steiner 


2301 


2400 


Pierce 


2401 


i.iOO 


Scott 


2.501 


2600 


Devisadero 


2601 


2700 


Broderick 


2701 


MOO 


Baker 


2S01 



Green Conrt, N s How- 
ard bet Steuart aud 
Spear 
Green Plaee or Bone 
Alle.v, N s Green bet 
Mont and Kearuy 



Orrennicli, W s Front 


bet Filbert and Lombard 


W 


to Presidio Reserva- 


tion. [The buildings in 


this street are incorrectly 


numbered.] 




North. Street. Scmth Side. 




Front 


1 


(cl 


Battery 


(<■) 


100 


.Sansom 


101 




Pringie Court 





200 


Montgomery 


201 


300 


Kearny 


301 


330 


Telegraph Place 





40O 


Dupont 


401 





Kramer Place 


403 





Bellevue Avenue 




500 


Stockton 


501 


600 


Powell 


601 





Gaven 


60:i 




Chambers Place 








Scotland 
Montgomery Av 


621 


700 


Mason 


701 


706 


Hartman 





716 


Jansen 





800 


Taylor 


801 




Roach Alley 


807 


900 


Jones 


901 


1000 


Leavenworth 


1001 





Randall Place 




1100 


Hyde 


1101 


1200 


Larkin 


1201 


i:too 


Polk 


1301 


1400 


Van Ness Av 


1401 


1.^00 


Franklin 


1.501 


1600 


Gough 


1601 


1700 


Octavia 


1701 


18O0 


Laguna 


1801 


1!I00 


Buchanan 


1901 


20O0 


\\'ebster 


2001 


2100 


Fillmore 


2101 


2200 


Steiner 


2201 


2300 


Pierce 


2301 


2400 


Scott 


2401 


2500 


Devisadero 


2501 


2600 


Broderick 


2601 


2700 


Baker 


2701 



GrlHar, W s Octavia bet 
Union and Filbert W to 
Laguna 



&et your Blue Point Transplanted Oysters from MORGAN & CO., California Market. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Eearny, Established 1862. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



71 



Cirove, W s Larkin bet 
Fulton and Hayes W to 
Stan van 
yo7-th. Street. South Side. 
2 Lark in 1 

100 Polk 101 

200 Van Ness Avenue 201 
300 Franklin 301 

400 Gough 401 

500 Octavia 501 

600 Lagana 601 

700 Buchanan 701 

800 Webster 801 

900 Fillmore 901 

1000 Steiner 1001 

Alamo Square 
1200 Scott 1201 

laoo Bevisadero IMl 

1400 Broderick 1401 

1500 Baktrr 1501 

llXH.1 Lyon 1601 

drove, (now Thirtieth^ 
"W* s San Jos€ Road S of 
T^-enty-ninth 

Guerrero. S s Market 
bet Valencia and Dolores 
S to Old San Jos^ Road 

OunniNon Aienae, S 

s Precita Place S to Pros- 
pect Place 
Casfarns. N s i'920) Cali- 
fornia bet Powell and Ma- 
son X to Sacramento 
Gu.v Place. W s (318) 
ilrst bet Folsom and Har- 
rison 
Hagrgin, S s King bet 
Third and Fourtli S to 
Berry 
Uaigrht, jnnction Market 
and Gough bet Page and 
Waller W to Stanyan 
Xof-th. Street. South Side. 
2 Market 1 

100 Octavia 101 

200 Lagnna 201 

300 Buchanan 301 

400 Webster 401 

500 FUimore 501 

600 Steiner 601 

700 Pierce 701 

800 Scott 801 

900 Bevlsadero 901 

1000 Broderick 1001 

1100 Baker 1101 

Hale, W s San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City 
Hall 
Hall Alley, Ss VaUeJo 
bet Montgomery and 
Sansom 
Hall Conrf, W s (923) 
Dupont bet Washington 
and Jackson 
Hall Place, S s Jackson 
b't Leavenworth and 
Hyde 
Halleek, E s Buchanan 

nr Lombard 
Halleck, W s (213) Bat- 
tery bet Sacramento and 
California W to Leides- 
dorff 
Hamilton, S s Silver Av 
bet Holvoke and Bow- 
doin, U. M. T. 

Haniilfon Sfinare. bet 

O'Farrell, Post, Steiner 
and Scott 
Hamlin. N s Green bet 
Leavenworth and Hyde 

Hamlin Place, EsLar- 
kin bet Broadway and 
VaQejo 

Hammond, S s Town- 
send bet Second andThird 

HampHbire. from Mis- 
sion Creek bet Potrero 
Avenue and York S to 
Serpentine Avenue 

Hampton Court, N s 
( mo* Harrison bet Second 
and Third 



Hampton Place, S s 

(649) Folsom bet Second 
and Third 
Hancock, W 8 Dolores 
bet Falcon and Eagle 

Hardie Place, E s i^I8) 

Kearnv bet Bush and 
Sutter 
Harlan Place, W 3(313) 
Dup bet Bush and Sutter 

Harriet, S s (10131 How- 
ard bet Sixth and Seventh 
SE to Folsom 

Harriet, (now Second 
Avenuei N s Sixteenth 
bet Valencia and Guer- 
rero 

Harris, (now Seventh) S 
s ^Market bet Sixth and 
Eighth SE to the bay 

Harrison. W s Steuart 
bet Folsom and Bryant 
SW to Fourteenth thence 
S to Serpentine Avenue 

Xorthtcest. Slr-eet. Southeast 

2 Steuart 1 

100 Spear 101 

Johnson Place 

200 Main 201 

300 Beale 301 

400 Fremont 401 

5O0 First 501 

538 Essex 

Rincon Place 551 

Stanly Place 557 

570 Charles Place ■ 

600 Secona 601 

Vassar Place 613 

630 Hawthorne 

670 Hampton Court 

700 Third 701 

720 Ritch (ft) 

SOO Fourth 801 

900 Fifth 901 

Fifth Avenue 913 

Oak Avenue 963 

Park Avenue 969 

1000 Sccth 1001 

Garden 

Columbia 

Sherman 

1100 Seventh HOI 

Dora 

Chesley 

Hay ward 

Mariposa Avenue 

1200 Eighth 1201 

1300 Ninth 1301 

1400 Tenth 1401 

1600 Eleventh 1501 

Nevarla 

1600 Twelfth 

Channel 1601 

1700 Fourteenth 

Alameda 1721 

1800 Fifteenth 

EI Dorado 1821 

1900 Sixteenth 1901 

Santa Clara 1921 

2000 Seventeenth 

Mariposa 2021 

2100 Eighteenth 

Solano 2121 

2200 Nineteenth 

Butte 2221 

2300 Twentieth 2301 

2400 Twenty-first 2401 

2.5110 Twentv-second 2501 

2600 Twentv-third 2601 

2700 Twentv-fourth 2701 

2800 TwentV-fifth 2S01 

2900 Twenty-sixth 2901 

(e) Serpentine Ave (e) 
Harrison Avenue. S s 

Ui-7iFoLsom bet Seventh 

and Eighth 
Harr.v. from Laidley SW 

to Beacon 
Harr^F Place, E s Lagu" 

na bet Filbert and Green- 
wich 
Hartrord,8 s Eighteenth 

bet Noe and Castro S to 

Twentieth 
Harlman, N s (706) 

Greenwich bet Mason and 

Taylor 



Harvard. S s Silver Av- 
enue W of Oxford 

Harvrood Place, (now 
Grand Place) S s Filbert 
bet Dupont and Kearny 

Havens, W s Leaven- 
worth bet Filbert and 
Union 

Havens Place. S s (907) 

Washington bet Stockton 
and Powell 

Hawes, S s Folsom bet 

Tenth and Eleventh 
Hawthorne, S s (633) 
Folsom bet Second and 
Third SE to Harrison 
Hayes, junction Market 
and Larkin bet Grove and 
Fell W to Stanyan 
iVoT-m. Strert. South Side. 
2 Market and Larkin 1 

College Place 

100 Polk 101 

200 Van Xess Avenue 201 
300 Franklin 301 

400 Gough 401 

500 Octavia 501 

600 Laguna 601 

700 Buchanan 701 

800 Webster 801 

900 Fillmore 901 

Steiner 1001 

Pierce HOI 

1200 Scott 1201 

1300 Devisadero 1301 

1400 Broderick 1401 

1500 Baker 1501 

1600 Lyon 1601 

Ha>'es Alley, (see Keyes 

Alleyi 
Hayward. S s Harrison 

bet Seventh and Eighth 
Haywood, Ss (761) Fol- 
som betThird and Fourth 
Heath, from Cortland 

Avenue S to San Brano 

Road 
Hecher.from IslaisCreek 

W to Bernal 
Helen. S s California bet 

Leavenworth and Hyde 
Henrietta, from San 

Jose Road nr Thirtieth S 

E to North Avenue, B.H. 
Henry, N s Lombard bet 

Hyde and Larkin 

Henry. W s Noe bet Four- 
teenth and Fifteenth 

Henry, W s San Bruno 
Road bet SilUman and 
Burrow, U. M. T. 

Herin^cr, E of San Bru- 
no Road 4 miles from 
City Hall 

Hermann, E of San Bru- 
no Road 4 miles from 
City Hall 

Hermann, S s Market 
bet Brady and Ridley E 
to Mission 

Heron, E s Eighth bet 
Folsom and Harrison 

Heyn Place, S s Clay 
bet Hyde and Leav 

Hickory Avenue* W s 

Van Nfss Avenue bet 
Oak and Fell 

Hifn^i"" Place, (see 
Keyes Alley) 

Highland Terrace, N 
s California bet Jones and 
Leavenworth 

Hill. W 8 Sanchez bet 
Twenty-first and Twen- 
ty-second W to Castro 

Himmelmann Place. 

N s (1024) Pacific bet Ma- 
son and Taylor 
Hinckley, Ws Montgom- 
ery bet Broadway and 
Vallejo W to Dupont 



Hodf^es or Be stole 
Place, N s Vallejo bet 
Montgomery and San- 
som 

Hodgres Court, W s 
Spear bet Market and 
Mission 

Hodgson Alley, N s 
Six teen thbet Mission and 
First Avenue 

HofT Avenue, S s Six- 
teenth bet Mission and 
Valencia 

Hollis, N s Ellis bet Bu- 
chanan and Webster 

Holly Park, SW s Ber- 
na! Heights nr San Jos6 
Road 

Holyoke, S s Silver Av- 
enue bet WiUianis and 
Hamilton.U. M. T. 

Hooper, from the bay bet 
Channel and Irwin SW 
to Seventh 

Hope, from California 
Avenue NW to Franco- 
nla Avenue. B. H. 

Horner, (now Twenty- 
third 1 Ws Bryant Avenue 
bet Twentv-second and 
Twenty -fourth W to 
Douglass 

HouNton, W s Taylor bet 
Chestnut and Francisco 

Howard, W s East bet 
Mission and Folsom SW 
to Twelfth thence S to 
Serpentine Avenue 

NorthwrM. Street. Southeast 

2 East 1 

(c) Steuart (c) 

Green Court 



100 


Spear 


101 


200 


Main 


201 


300 


Beale 


301 


40O 


Fremont 


401 


500 


First 


501 


600 


Second 


601 




New Montgom'ry 





Hubbard 


63:j 


700 


Third 


701 


800 


Fourth 


801 


8U 


Howard Court 





900 


Fifth 


901 




Mary 





1000 


Sixth 


1001 




Harriet 


1013 





RUS3 


1041 





Moss 


10511 


1100 


Seventh 


1101 




Langton 


lUl 





Rausch 


1127 





Sumner 


X159 


13)0 


Eighth 


1201 


1300 


Ninth 


1301 




Washington Av 







Grand Avenue 





1400 


Tenth 


1401 


1500 


Eleventh 


1501 




Lafavette 





IfiOO 


Txvelfth 


1601 


1700 


Thirteenth 


1701 





Creek Lane 
Eric Place 





ISOO 


Fourteenth 


1801 


1900 


Fifteenth 


1!I01 


2000 


SLxteenth 


2001 


2100 


Seventeenth 


2101 


2-200 


Eighteenth 


2201 


2:iOO 


Nineteenth 


2:!01 


2400 


Twentieth 


2401 


2500 


Twenty-arst 


2-iOl 


2800 


Twenty-second 


2>S11 


2700 


Twenty-third 


2701 


2S0O 


Twentv-fourth 


2SIH 


2900 


Twenty-fifth 


2rNti 


3000 


Twenty-sLsth 


3001 


(e) 


Serpeutiue Av 


le 


Ho 


H-ard ronrl. N 


s(8141 


H 


-)Ward bet Fourth and 


Fifth 





Hnhbard, s s (6331 How- 
ard bet Second and Third 

Ilubbell, W s Fourth bet 
Irwin and South SW to 
Seventh 



aly Hairdressing Saloon appropriated Ezolusivelj to use of Ladies at 113 Qearj. 



D. W. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, Wholesale and Eetail, cor. Merchant and Mont 



72 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



IfndtHon. Junction Four- 
teenth Avenue and Cud- 
wallader NW to Salome 

HiidNon, S s CliEinnel bet 
e^ourth and Fifth S to 
South 

lliiiiibolflf ,from the bay 

bot Sierra antl Nevada w 

to Bryant Avenue 
Hunt, Ks (U5) Third bet 

Howard and Sherwood 

Place 
Hunter. "NV s San Bruno 

Poad -i miles from City 

Hall 
lI.Tde, N s McAllister bet 

Larkin and Leavenworth 

N to the bay 
Sast. Street. West Side. 



2 


McAllister 


1 


mil 


Tyler 


101 


2(10 


Turk 


201 


3IK1 


Efldy 


301 


4IKI 


Ellis 


401 


Sim 


O'Farrell 


601 


em 


(ieary 


601 


:m 


Post 


701 


will 


Slitter 


801 


will 


Bush 


901 


IIKKI 


Piue 


1001 


11(111 


CiUifornia 


1101 


VM> 


Sacramento 


1201 


laiHi 


Clay 


1301 


HIXI 


Washington 


1101 


ISIKl 


JacksOQ 


1501 


IHIKI 


Pacific 


1601 


IIIIK) 


Lvnch 





umi 


Broatlway 


1701 


18(111 


Vallejo 


1801 


lllllll 


Green 


1901 





Russell 




aiixi 


Union 


2001 


— 


Allen 




21(111 


Filbert 


2101 


■J2I1I1 


Greenwich 


2201 


2:ilKI 


Lombard 


2301 


■J4(K) 


Chestnut 


2101 


2.1(1(1 


Francisco 


2501 


2(l(l() 


Bay 


2(>01 


■zym 


North Point 


2701 


2S(I(1 


Beach 


2801 


(e) 


Jefferson 


(c) 



Hyde Place, W s (203) 

nyde between Eddy and 
Turk 
IllinoiN, from the bay 
bet Michigan and Ken- 
tucky 

Indiana, from the bay 
bet Iowa and Minnesota 
S to Tulare 

lon-a, from the bay bet 
Indiana and Pennsylva- 
nia S to Tulare 

Irwin, from the bay bet 
Hooper and Hubbell S\V 
to Seventh 
Iiialtrl. from Wolfe SE 

to Shakspear, B. H. 
It.t Avenue. W s Van 
Ness Avenue bet Hayes 
ami Grove 
Jaelih4»ii, W 8 East bet 
WasliiiiKton and Pacific 
W to First Avenue 
North. Slreet. South Side. 
2 East 1 

(c) Drumm (c) 

100 Duvls 101 

200 Front 201 

300 Battery 301 

Custom House PI 313 

■100 Saiisora 401 
412 Balance 

• — Jones Alley 431 

500 Montgomery 501 

Montgomery Av 

600 Kearny 601 

Cooper Alley 623 

Washlngt«n Alley 633 

612 Bnrtlett Alley 

700 liupont 701 

San Luis Alley 711 

720 Sullivan AUey 

Ross 723 

600 Stockton 801 



806 

814 

824 
900 
1000 

1014 
1100 
1200 
1300 



1400 

1500 

iiioo 

1700 
ISOO 
1900 
2000 
2100 
2200 
2300 
2100 
2500 
2600 
2700 
2S00 
2900 
3O0O 



Bedford Place 

Virginia 

Stone 

Adele Place 

Powell 

Mason 

Vernon Place 

Auburn 

Taylor 

Jones 

Leavenworth 

Hall Place 

Wall Place 

Hyde 

Larkin 

Polk 

Van Ness Av 

Franklin 

Gough 

Octavia 

Laguna 

Buchanan 

Webster 

Fillmore 

Steiner 

Pierce 

Scott 

Devisadero 

Broderick 

Baker 



813 
819 

901 
1001 
1007 

lim 
1201 
1301 



1401 
1501 
UlOl 
1701 
ISO! 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2801 
2901 
3001 



Jaekfion Park, bet San- 
ta Clara, Mariposa, Ar- 
kansas and Carolina 

JackKOn Place, E s 

(11121 Montgomery bet 
Vallejo and Green 

Jacobi, N s California 
bet Leavenworth and 
Hyde 

Jane Place, N s (90S) 
Pine bet Miison and 1 ay- 
lor 

JanNcn, N s (716) Green- 
wich bet Mason and Tay- 
lor N to Lombard 



Ja»|ier Place. Nsl51fi) 


Union bet Dnpont 


and 


Stockton N to Filbert 


,Ien 


erson, W s Powell 


be 


Beach and Tonquin 


VV 


to Presidio Keserva- 


tion 




North, Slreet. South 


Side. 


(d) 


PoweU 


1 


(lit 


Mason 


1(11 


Ul) 


Taylor 


2111 


(rtl 


Jones 


3(11 


ird 


Leavenworth 


401 


(rtl 


Hvde 


,501 


(rtl 


Larkin 


601 


70(1 


Polk 


701 


8(1(1 


Van Ness Av 


801 


9(HI 


Franklin 


901 


KKHl 


Gongh 


1001 


IKKI 


Octavia 


1101 


12(X1 


Laguna 


1201 


i:i(l(l 


Buchanaa 


1301 


11110 


Webster 


1101 


15IHI 


l*111raore 


1.501 


16110 


Steiner 


11101 


17110 


Pierce 


1701 


ISIIII 


Scott 


ISOl 


imio 


Devisadero 


1901 


2011(1 


Broderick 


2001 


2100 


Baker 


2101 



JefTprson ATenne, E s 

Laurel Avenue nr Cort- 
land Avenue E to San 
Bruno Road 
JeirorMoii Square, bet 

Tyler, Gough, Eddy and 
Laguna 

Jersey, W s Guerrero 
bet IVenty-fourth and 
Twenty-fifth \V to Doug- 
lass 

JenHie. Ws (46) First bet 
Market and Mission. [The 
buildiTigs in this street 
bet Seventh and Eighth 
are incorrectly number- 
ed.] 

Northivest, Street. SotUheast 
2 First 1 

Anthony 
100 Second 101 

New Montgomery 



lfi2 Annie 

(6) Third 

300 Fnurth 

(6) Fifth 

5lX) Sixth 

6tl0 Seventh 
Eighth 



800 Ninth 



161 

(6) 
301 
(6) 
501 
601 
701 
801 



Je«e<i, W s Fourth bet 
Towiisend and King W 
to Fifth 

John. W s (1211) Powell 
bet Pacific and Jackson 
W to Mason 

Jofan. (now Twenty-sec- 
ond) W s Potrero Avenue 
bet T\ventv-first and 
Twenty-third Wto Doug- 
lass 

Jolinsou Place, S s 
Harrison bet Main and 
Spear 

JolinNlon, (now Ninth) 
S s Market SE to Mission 
Creek 

Joiee, N s (710) Pine bet 

Stockton and Powell N 

to California 

JoneN, N s Market bet 

Leaveinvurth and Taylor 

N to the bay 

Fa,st. Street. West Side. 

2 Mkt and McAllister 1 

100 Tyler 101 

200 Turk 201 

McDermott Place 215 



301) 


Eddy 


301 


40(1 


Ellta 


401 





Antonio 


411 


412 


Steveloe 





.5(H) 


O'FarreU 


501 


6(KI 


Geary 


601 


614 


Cottage Place 





Vim 


Post 


701 


7(14 


Lewis Place 





80(1 


Sutter 


801 


806 


White Place 





IKKI 


Bush 


901 


iimii 


Pine 


1001 


lllHl 


California 


1101 


12IH) 


Sacramento 


I2in 




Pleasaut 


— 


13IKI 


Clay 


1301 


14U0 


Washington 


1401 


1,1(1(1 


Jackson 


1,5111 


KKHl 


Pacific 


1601 


16(18 


Bernard 


1607 


1700 


Broadway 


1701 


1.8(10 


A allejo 


1801 


1900 


Green 
Lincoln 


1901 


2IK1II 


Union 


2001 


21(H1 


Filbert 


'.',101 




Valparaiso 






Greenwich 


2201 


illHI 


Lombard 


•.«oi 





Duane 




2400 


Chestnut 


2401 


2500 


Francisco 
Montgomery Av 


2501 


2(i0() 


Bav 


2601 


2VIH) 


North Potat 


2701 


2.SU0 


Beach 


2801 


W) 


Jefferson 


(e) 



Jone^ Alley, N s (532) 

Washington bet Sansom 
and Montgomery N to 
Jackson 

Joiie»i Place. N s Bryant 
bet Sixth and Seventh 

JTonepliiiie, N s Point Lo- 
bo8 Avenue het Central 
Avenue and Eugenie N 
to Laurel Hill Cemetery 

Joseikh's Terrace, E s 
Stockton bet Lombard 
and chestnut 

Joy, from California Ave- 
nue NWto Brewster, E.H. 

Julia, S s Minna bet Sev- 
enth and Eighth 

Julia Court, N s (28) 
O'FarreU bet Dupont and 
Stockton 

JalluH, N s (222)Lombard 
bet Kearny and Dupont 



Junction or Dry, W s 

San Jos6 Road bet Twen- 
ty-ninth and Thirtieth W 
to Bellevue 

Juniper, Ss (1417^ Folsom 
bet Tenth and Eleventh 

Kan.«a»). from Mi'jsion 
Creek bet Rhode Island 
and Vermont S to Tulare 

Hate, S s Bryant bet Sev- 
enth and Eighth 

Hate. junctiimMarket and 
Laguna W to Steiner 

Hearny, N s Market bet 
Montgomery and Dupont 
N to the bay 

East. Street. West Side. 
Market and Geary 1 






Morton 


19 


IIKI 


Post 


1111 


IIB 


Ver Mehr 





200 


Sutter 


201 


21S 


Hardie Place 




300 


Bush 


3(n 


1IHI 


Pine 


401 


414 


Summer 





50(1 


California 


.5(11 


6(«1 


Sacramento 


6(11 


6.32 


Commercial 


1127 


700 


Clav 


7(11 


720 


Merchant 




»(H) 


Washington 


.801 


900 


Jackson 
Montgomery Av 


901 


KHIO 


Pacific 


KHIl 


lOlH 


St. Charles 





IKKl 


Broadway 


11111 


1106 


Dunn Alley 





112(1 


Hinckley 


1 121 


1200 


Vallejo 


1201 





St. Charles Place 


1215 


13(HI 


Green 


1301 


IKHI 


I'nion 


1401 


l.ilHI 


Filbert 


1.501 


16(HI 


Greenwich 


1601 


ITIHI 


Lombard 


17(11 


1S(H) 


Chestnut 


IKIll 


Irtl 


Francisco 


llHIl 


frfl 


Bav 


2(HI1 


(e) 


North Point 


(e) 



Hensinj-fton Place, W 

g Howard bet Nineteenth 
and Twentieth 
Hent. W s (1809) Mason 

bet Filbert and Union 
Kentucky, from the bay 
bet Illinois and Tennessee 
S to Tulare 
Keyes Alley, (OOfi) N s 
Pacilic bet Mason and 
Powell 
Ulniball, N 6(1406) Sac- 
ramento het Leaven- 
worth and Hyde 
Kins:. W s Second bet 
Townsend and Berry SW 
to Eighth 
Northwest. Street. Southeast 
2 Si-cond 1 

100 Third 101 

Madden 
Haggin 
200 Fourth 201 

300 Fifth 301 

400 Sixth 401 

600 Seventh 501 

(e) Eighth (e) 

Hiujff* Ns Silver Avenue 
bet Holyoke and Hamil- 
ton 

HiHling Place, N s 
Fourteenth bet Folsom 
and Harrison 

KoHoiuKko. from Cort- 
land Avenue S toCrescent 
Avenue, B. H. 

HosKutli, E s Railroad 
Avenue E to Chace 

Hranier Place, S s(403) 
Greenwich bet Dupont 
and Stockton 

liafayette. S s Mission 
bet Eleventh and Twelfth 
S to Howard 



MORGAN & CO.'S Celebrated Saucelito Transplanted Oysters, 87 California Market. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Established 1862. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



73 



ILafarelle Place, 


N s 


(41'0i Cretan het Kearny 


and Dnpimt N to Union 


lafajette Square 


• bet 


Sacramento, Gougll, 


Wasliington and Laguna 


liafTima. N s Market bet 


Octaviu and Buchanan X 


to the hay 




East. SIreet. West Side. 


2 Market and Kate 


1 


100 Waller 


101 


200 Haight 


201 


Kose Avenue 




300 Page 


301 


Lillv Avenue 




400 Oak 


401 


Hickory Avenue 




5C0 Fell 


501 


Linden Avenue 




600 Hayes 


601 


Ivv Avenue 




700 Grove 


vol 


Birch Avenue 




800 Fulton 


801 


Ash Avenue 




900 McAllister 


901 


Locust Avenue 




1000 Tyler 


lOOl 


1100 Turk 


1101 


12«l Eddy 


1201 


Willow Avenue 




1.300 F>llis 


1301 


Olive Avenue 




1400 O'Farrell 


1401 


Mvrtle Avenue 




1500 Geary 


1501 


Cedar Avenue 




li»0 Post 


1601 


Walnut Avenue 




1700 Sutter 


ITOl 


Fern Avenue 




l.-(0 Bush 


1801 


l:»XI Pine 


1901 


2im California 


2001 


■:\(>0 Sacramento 


2101 


^■JiK) Clay 


2201 


■J^^iK) Washington 


2:»1 


241)0 Jackson 


2401 


i!.S(.nt Pacific 


2501 


2f^M:) Broadway 


2601 


JTi^i VaUejo 


2701 


'.-'xt Green 


2801 


:'"«:• t'nion 


2901 


3UO0 Filbert 


3001 


Harry Place 





;]'» Greenwich 


3101 


ijiK) Lombard 


3201 


-iN) Chestnut 


3301 


I'lO Francisco 


S401 


.."1^1 Bay 


i501 


i^wi NorthPoint 


3601 


:;:'») Beach 


37U1 


■ •-'() JefTerson 


3<01 


:m)*) Tonquin 


3901 


,fj Lewis 


(e 



1301 
1401 
1501 
1601 
1701 
ISOl 
1901 



1300 Pine 

1400 California 

1500 Sacramento 

1600 Clay 

1700 Washington 

ISOO Jackson 

1900 Pacific 

1910 Friedman Place 

2000 Broadway 20O1 

2100 VaUejo 2101 

2200 Green 2201 

Brady Place 

230O rnion Z^iOI 

2400 Filbert 2401 

2500 Greenwicll 2501 

2600 Lombard 2601 

2700 Chestnut 2701 

2800 Francisco 2S01 

2900 Bav 2901 

3000 North Point 3001 

3100 Beach 3101 

(d) Jeflferson 3201 

(e) Tonquin (e) 
l.asikie, N s Mission bet 

Eighth and Ninth 

l,atliaiH Place, W s 

Mason bet Ellis and O'- 
Farrell 

I^aura Place, S s (335) 
Pine bet Montgomery 
and Sansoni 

lianrel. N s California 
bet Locust and Walnut N 
to Presidio Reservation 

liaurel Avenue. W s 
Larkin bet Turk and Ed- 
dy 

I^aurel Avenue, from 
Cortland Av S to Benton 
Aveime, B. H. 

I.anrel Place, W s (350) 
First bet Folsom and Har 

I^eavcnwortli, N s Mc- 
Allister bet Jones and 
HvdeNtothebay. [Sev- 
eral buildings in the vicin- 
ity of Broadway are in- 
correctly numbered.] 

East. Street. West Side. 



L.aidle.v, from Tliirtieth 
SE to Fairmount thence 
SW to Castro 
Langton. S s (1111) How- 
ard bet Seventh and 
Eighth 
Larkin, N s Market bet 
Polk and Hyde N to the 
bay 
East. Street. West Side. 
2 Market and Hayes 1 
100 Grove 101 

:iJO Fulton 201 

300 McAUister 301 

Locust Avenue 

*» Tyler 401 

Elm Avenue 

500 Turk 501 

- Laurel Avenue 

600 Eddy 601 

- Willow Avenue 
Ellis 701 
Olive Avenue 

SOO O'Farrell 801 

Mvrtle Avenue 

SOO Geary 901 

Cedar Avenue 

1000 Post 1001 

Walnut Avenue 

IKiO Sutler 1101 

Fern Avenue 

]2(in Bvish 1201 

i;.« ^"orrath Place - — 

Austin 



7(X1 



2 Mc.\lllster 


1 


100 Tj-ler 


101 


Burcham Place 




200 Turk 


201 


300 Eddy 


301 


400 Ellis 


401 


500 O'Farrell 


501 


600 Geary 


601 


700 Post 


701 


ROO Sutter 


801 


900 Bush 


901 


10(10 Pine 


1001 


1010 Pan tam 





1100 California 


1101 


1200 S;iCramento 


1201 


1300 Clay 


1301 


1400 Washington 


1401 


1,500 Jackson 


1601 


1600 Pacific 


1601 


Lynch 


1609 


1614 Bernard 





1700 Broadway 


1701 


Glover 





1800 VaUejo 


1801 


1900 Green 


1901 


Lincoln 





2000 Union 


2001 


Havens 




2100 Filbert 


2101 


2200 Greenwich 


2201 


2;«K) Lombard 


2301 


2400 Chestnut 


2401 


1500 Francisco 


2501 


2600 Bay 


2601 


2700 North Point 


2701 


Montgomery Av 


KOO Beach 


2S01 


(e) JeJferson 


(e) 


l<ee. from Cortland Ave- 


nue i^ to San Bruno Koad 


S s B. H. 




I^eldcHflorfr, N s 


Pine 


bet Mont and feansom N 


to Clay 




East. Street West Side. 


(6) Pine 


(6) 


lOO California 


101 


HaUeck 






200 Sacramento 201 

212 Commercial 213 

(e) Clay (e) 

l^ena Place, E s Illinois 
bet Shasta and Napa 

IjCOnore, E s San Bruno 
Poad 4 miles from City 
HaU 

l,eroj- Place, S s (1319) 
Sacramento bet Jones 
and Leavenworth 

liCstracIc Place, N s 

(632) Pacific bet Kearny 
and Dupont 

I>cn'i8, W s Polk bet Ton- 
quin and the bay W to 
Presidio Reservation 

L.ewis, from Bemis W to 
Castro 

l/cnis Place, W s (60.5) 
Taylor bet Sutter and 
Po'st W to Jones 

tiberly, N s Townsend 
bet Ritch and Crook 

Iiitocrty, W s Valencia 
bet Twentieth and 'I^ven- 
ty-flrst W to Castro 

I,icU Alley. W s (.56) 

First bet Mission and Jes- 
sie 

r-ich Place. N s (121 Post 
bet Mont and Kearny N 
to Sutter 

Ijllly Avenue, Ns 
Franklin bet Page and 
Oak W to Buchanan 

I,inia, N s Filbert bet 
Leavenworth and Hyde 

Ijineoln, (see Buchanan) 

Liincoln, from North Av- 
enue E to Prentiss, B. H. 

r.incoln, Ws Taylor bet 
Union and Green W to 
Leavenworth 

Ijincoln Avenue, E s 

(208 1 Dupont bet Post and 
Sutter 

Iiincoln Place, Es(243l 
Fremontbet Howard and 
Folsom 

Ijincoln Place, E s 

Hyde bet Union and Fil- 
bert 
X,inclen Avenue, W s 

Van Ness Avenue bet 
Hayes and FeU W to 
We'bster 

Xorth. Street. South Side. 
2 Van Ness Avenue 1 
ino Franklin 101 

200 Gough 201 

300 Octavla 301 

400 Laguna 401 

500 Buchanan 501 

{e) Webster (e) 

liObos Square, bet La- 
guna, Bay, Webster and 
Chesthut 
K.OCUBI, Ns California bet 
Spruce and Laurel N to 
Presidio Reservation 

l^ocn)4t Avenue, W s 

Larkin betMcAUlster and 
Tyler 
I,oinbard, W s Battery 
bet Chestnut and Green- 
wich W to Presidio Res- 
ervation. !The buildings 
in this street are incor- 
rectly numbered.] 
North. Street. South Side. 
2 Battery 1 

(c) Sansoni (c) 

lOO Montgomery 101 

Webster 

200 Kcarnv 201 

Good Ohildrea 

222 Julius 



300 Dupont 

Ada 

400 Stockton 

Lombard Place 

500 Powell 

Chambers Place 

600 Mason 

Hartman 

608 Newell 

Montgomery Av 

Jan sen 

Taylor 

Jones 

Leavenworth 

Hyde 

Larkin 

Polk 



700 
800 
900 
10(10 
1100 
1200 



613 
701 
801 
901 
1(101 
1101 
1-201 



l:«lO Van Ness Avenue 1301 



1400 Franklin 
1500 Gough 



OctaWa 

Laguna 

Buchanan 

Webster 

Fillmore 

Steiner 

Pierce 

2300 Scott 

2400 Devisadero 

2,500 Broderick 

2600 Baker 



1600 
1700 
1800 
1900 
2000 
2100 
2200 



1401 
1.501 
1601 
1701 
ISO I 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2.501 
2601 



I,ombar<l Place. S s 

(4071 Lombard bet Stock- 
ton and Powell 

I,ott. N s Waller bet Lyon 
and Masonic Avenue N 
to Turk 

liouina, Es (317) Fourth 
bet Folsom and Harrison 

l,oui»iiana, S s Solano 
bet Maryland and Geor- 
gia 

I,uc]c, W s Orleans 'W to 
Bernal 

I.ncy, S s Waller bet Ma- 
sonic Avenue and Ash- 
bury 

K.nndy Iiane, from Vir- 
ginia Avenue NE to Coso 
Avenue, B. H, 

Lvncli, W s (1609) Leaven- 
worth bet Pacific and 
Broadway 

I,:i on, N s Haight bet Ba- 
ker and Lott N to Presi- 
dio Reservation 

l,:t-on»i, from California 
Avenue S to Cortland 
Avenue, B. H. 

I,>Bell Place, Ss (1311) 
Sacramento bet Jones 
and Leavenworth 



M, W s Sanchez bet Twen- 
ty-second and Twenty- 
third W to Diamond 

Macedonia, S s Callfor- 
nia Avenue S to Cortez, 
B. H. 

Sladden, S s Townsend 
bet Thu-d and Fourth S 
to Berry 

MaUlen tanc, S s (521) 
Jackson bet Montgomery 
and Kearny 

maiden tane, N s (622) 
VaUejo bet PoweU and 
Stockton 

Main, S s Market bet 
Spear and Beale SE to 
the bay 

Smdhwesl. Street. Northeast 
2 Market 1 

Meeks Place 

Main Street Place 



Mission 

Howard 

Folsom 

Rincon Court 

Harrison 

Bryant 



10! 
201 
301 

401 

(«) 



HI 
o 

v: 

o 
o 



09 

o 



u 



o 

m 



$!• 

Id 

•-■• 
o 

n 

n 

P* 
W 

p> 

o 

p 

if 

CD 
g- 

m 
ca 

a 



MainSlreet Place.Es 

Main bet Market and 
Mission 



The most Artistic Work in Hairdressing is Performed at 113 Geary. 



JEWELEY made to order and EEPAIEED by D. "W. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Merchant, 



74 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Sffalvina Place "W" a 

(1017 1 Mason bet Clay and 
I^acramento 
9l3t|ile, N s California bet 
Clu'rry and Sprnce N to 
Presidio lleservation 

HarenBO. SE of San 

Bninn Jload 4 miles from 
City Hall 

Rlarf^arot, N s Mission 
bet Eisbtb and Ninth 
(closed by Act of Legisla- 
ture 1872-3) 

Marjfarel Place, N s 
,l:»i' \'alI.-Jo bet Dupont 
anil Krarny 

Mai'sarc* Place, N s 

(141 Turk bet Mason and 

Taylor 
Marfrar.T, S s M bet San- 

cbez and Noe S to Clipper 
9laria or Mary, E and 

W s Chesley bet Harrison 

and Bryant 
]tlui*in, from the bay bet 

C'niusa and Tulare W to 
■ Vermont 
l*Iarl|iONa. from the bav 

bel Santa Clara and Sola- 
no W t" Harrison 
;TI:iri|i4>ha Avcnnc Ns 

Harrison bet Seventh and 

Eit-hth 

Slarhct, junction Sacra- 
mento and East S\V to 
SL'ssion Dolores-' 
N. W. mreet. S. E. Street. 
2 East 1 East 

(c) Steuart (c) Sleuart 
ino Drumm ini Spiar 
200 Davis 201 Main 

300 Front 301 Beale 

400 Battery 401 Fremont 
500 Sansora 501 First 

529 Ecker 
600 Montg'y 601 Second 
617 N. Mont 
687 Annie 
TOO Kearny 701 Third 

T:i2Hni,ik3 

win iiii|i,,Mt 801 Fourth 
wiosiijcktun iioi Fifth 
1000 Powell 1001 Sixth 
llOO Mason 1101 Seventh 
1200 Taylor 1201 Eighth 
l;i(in Jones l:((ll Ninth 
l-KKl l.i-av'th 11(11 'IVnth 
1-.IIII Hyde ir.iil Kli.y'nth 
liKKl l.arkin KiOl I'olter 
171KI Polk 1701 Brady 

isuo \-anNAv 1801 Valencia 

1(10(1 Franklin 

2(((i((Uuugh 2001 Quer'ero 

210(1 Octiivia 

.'200 Laeinia 2201 Dolores 

2:«Ki B\ieha'n 

2l(i((Clinreh 2401 Church 
■J")(io Sanchez 2f>01 Sanchez 
2(l((([Noe 2601 Noe 

2700Ciustro 2701 Castro 

Martha Place, S s (417) 

Geary bet Mason and 

'I'aylor 
Mar.T, S s (921) Mission bet 

Fifth and Sixth SB to 

Howard 
9Iar,T or Iflaria, E and 

\V s Chesley bet Bryant 

and Harrison 

Mary I.anc, 8 b (423) 
Bush bet Kearny and 
Dnpont 

I)Iar>laiid, a a Solano 
bet Delaware and Louisi- 
ana 

Maxon, N s Market bet 
Powell and 'I'aylor N to 
the bay 



'■■'The want of uniformity 
in the nunib.TS of Market 
Stri'et IS occasioned l.v the 
diirerence In llie frontaKo 
of tile hloi-ks on the north 
anri south sides of thestreet 



East 


. Street. West Side. 


2 


Market and Turk 1 


100 


Eddy 


101 


200 


Ellis 


201 





Latham Place 







Dikeman Place 


217 


300 


O'FarreU 


301 


400 


Geary 


401 





Oak 


409 


500 


Post 


601 


eon 


Sutter 


601 


700 


Bush 


701 


800 


Pine 


801 


soo 


California 


901 


1000 


Sacramento 


1001 


— 


Ewer Place 


1011 


— 


Malviua Place 


1017 


1100 


Clay 


1101 





Matthew Place 


1107 


1110 


Sheppard 





I'-'OO 


Washington 


1201 


1300 


Jackson 


1301 


1314 


John 





1400 


Pacilic 


1401 


1500 


Broadway 


1501 


1(»0 


Vallejo 


1601 


1700 


Green 


1701 


1716 


Winter Lane 




1800 


t'nion 


1801 





Kent 


1809 


1900 


Filbert 


1901 





Valparaiso 


1911 


20OO 


Greenwich 
Montgomery Av 


2001 


2100 


Lombard 


2101 


2200 


Chestnut 


2201 




Water 




2300 


Francisco 
Vandewater 


2301 


2400 


Bay 


2401 


2.100 


North Pomt 


2501 


2600 


Beach 


2601 


(e) 


Jefferson 


(el 



ItlaKonic Avenne. N s 

Waller bet Lott and Ash- 
bury N to Point Lobos 
Avenue 
9Xa»iNac*liu«4etl«, S s So- 
noma E of Delaware 

9Ia**»iaMoit, from Cortez 
SE to Franconia Avenue, 
B. H. 

9Iateo, W.of Miguel from 
San Jos6 Bead N\V to 
Cbeuery 

mattliew Place, W s 

(llf>7) Mason bet Clay and 
Washington 
Maxwell, N s Broadway 
bet Larkin and Polk N to 
Vallejo 

May Flower, E s Hose- 
crans bet California Av- 
enue andPowhattan,B.H. 
9leAlliNler, junction 
Market and Jones W to 
Masonic Avenue 
Nm-th. Street Ji^nth Side. 
2 Market and Jones 1 
lOU licaven worth 101 

2U0 Hyde 201 

:ioo Larkin 301 

■100 Polk 401 

500 Van Ness Avenue 501 
600 Franlvlm 601 

700 Goiigli . 701 

800 Octavia 801 

MOO Lagnna 901 

1000 Buelianan lOOI 

1100 Webster IIOI 

1200 Fillmore 1201 

i:iOO Steiner i:ioi 

HiH) Pierce l-IOi 

ir>oo Scott 1501 

1600 Devisadero 1601 

1700 Broderick 1701 

isoo Baker 1801 

isioo Lvou 1001 

2000 Lott 2001 

{c) Masonic Avenue (e) 

Meriellan, from Califor- 
nia Avenue s to Cortland 
Avenue, B. H. 

nieCorinIek, S s (1421) 
Pacific bet Hyde and Lar- 
kin 



])fleI>eriuott Place, W 

s (215) Jones betTurk and 
Eddy 

SleXynren I^ane, W s 

Polsom bet Thirteenth 
and Fourteenth 

]9Ieaehain Place, S s 

Post bet Hyde and Larkin 

Clears, N s Point Lobos 
Avenne bet Merrifleld 
and First Avenue N to 
Laurel Hill Cemetery 

Meflan Place. N 3 ('501) 

Filbert bet Dupont and 
Stockton 
Meelis Place, W s Main 
bet Market and Mission 

9felluN, Ws Fremont bet 
Mission and Howard 

9f el Tina PI ace, (see 
Malvina) 

Merced. S a Thirtieth 8 
to Laidley 

Mercer, from Cortland 
Avenue S to Crescent Av- 
enue, B. H. 

Mcrelianl, W s East bet 
Clay and Washington W 
to Kearny 

N'orth. Street. South Side. 

2 East 1 

(6) Drumm (6i 

(b) Davis (b) 

300 Front 301 

400 Battery 401 

500 Sansora 501 

600 Mont^'omery 601 

G2S Dunbar Court 

(e) Kearny (e) 

Merrifield, N s Point 
Lobos Avenue bet Chase 
and Mears N to Laurel 
Hill Cemetery 

Merrill, N s Silver Ave- 
nne bet WUUams and 
Goettiugen 

Merrill, W s Jones bet 
Vallejo and Green W to 
Leavenworth 

MetcairPlace. W s La- 

guna bet Post and Sutter 
MelealBe Place, N s 

Geary bet Mason and 
Taylor 

Mieltifran, S s Solano bet 
Georgia and lUiuois 

Midfllle, N s Pine bet 
Webster and Fillmore N 
to California 

Midway £a!at^ Ns Fran- 
cisco bet Dupont and 
Stockton N to Bay 

MidwayfVesl. Ns Fran- 
cisco bet Stockton and 
Powell N to Bay 

Mig;*iel, from Bemis nr 
Fairraouu t SE to San Jos6 
Koad 

MilcN Court, N s (832) 

California bet Stockton 
and Powell 
MilcA Place, N s (928^ 

Sacramento bet Stockton 
and Powell 

Miller Place, S s (S27) 

PViIsora bet Fourth and 
Fifth 

MIIIh Place, W s (219) 

Dupont bet Post and Sut- 
ter 

Minna. Wsfllfi) Firstbet 
Mission and Natoma 

2^orthwest. Street. Soxttheas, 

2 First 1 I 

100 Second 101 I 

New Montgomery | 



200 


Third 


201 


Mill 


Fourth 


301 


400 


Fifth 


401 


500 


SLxth 


SOI 


600 


Seventh 
Julia 


601 


700 


Eighth 


701 


(W 


Ninth 


(b) 



Minna Mace, WsBeale 

bet Mission and Howard 

Minne»ola,from thebay 
bet Tennessee and In- 
diana S to Tulare 

91innie, S s Waller bet 
Ashbury and Clayton 

Mission, W s East bet 
Market and Howard SW 
to Twelfth thence S to 
County Koad 

Northxcest. Street. Southeast 

2 East 1 

(c) Steuart (c) 

100 Spear 101 

200 Main 201 

300 Beale 301 

400 Fremont 401 

600 First 501 

Ecker 

Sullivan Alley 537 

570 Anthony 

600 Second 601 

New Montgomery 

(»50 Annie 

700 Third 701 

800 Fourth 801 

900 Filth 901 

Mary 921 

1000 Sixth 1001 

1100 Seventh 1101 

1200 Eighth 1201 

Laskie 

1300 Ninth 1301 

Washington Av 

Grand Avenue 

1400 Tenth 1401 

1500 Eleventh 1501 

Lafayette 

1600 Potter 

Twelfth 1601 

Brady 

Hermann 

Thirteenth 1701 

1700 Ridley 

Erie Place 

1800 Fourteenth 1801 

lilOO Fifteenth 1901 

2000 SLxteenth 2001 

Goldman Place 

2100 Seventeenth 2101 

2200 Eighteenth 2201 

■2300 Nineteenth 2301 

2400 Twentieth 2401 

2500 Tvventv-flrst 2501 

2600 Twenty-second 2601 
2700 Twenty-third 2701 
2.800 Twenty-fourth 2S01 
21K10 Twentv-Hfth 2W1 

3000 Twenty-sixth 3001 
Mission and Ocean 
Bcaoli Road, from 
junction Markel and Se\-- 
enteenth SW to Ocean 
View House 
Mission Avenne. S s 
Seventeenth bet Valen- 
cia and Guerrero 

Mission Plaza, NW s 

Mission bet Potter and 
Kidley 
Mississippi, from the 
bay bet Pennsvlvania 
and Texas S to Tulare 

Mlssonri, from the bay 
bet Texas and Connecti- 
cut S to Tulare 

Monroe, N s (610) Bush 
bet Stockton and Powell 
N to Pine 

Montcalm from Cali- 
fornia Avenue bet Wolfe 
and Cortez E to Isabel, 
B. H. 

MonfeKnnia, from Coso 
Avenue E to Folsom, 
B. H. 



Get the Millbrae Transplanted Oysters from MOEGAIT & CO., 87 California Market. 



. VAN SCHAACE & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



75 



3Ion1$comer.v, N s Mar- 
ket bet Kearuy and San- 
som N to the bay 

East. Street. We^t Side. 
2 Market and Post 1 



100 


Sutter 


101 


aio 


Bush 


201 


300 


Pine 


301 


— 


Summer 


319 


400 


(.'atifornia 


401 


500 


Sacramento 


501 


51S 


Commercial 


513 


GOO 


Clay 


601 


622 


Merchant 


6i:i 


700 


Washington 


701 


(e) 


Montgomery Av 




800 


Jackson 


801 


806 


GoM 





.900 


Pacific 


901 




MontgomeryCourtgio 


1000 


Broadway 


1001 




Hinckley 




1100 


^'aIlejo 


1101 


1112 


Jackson Place 





120O 


Green 


1201 





Moulton Place 




1300 


I'uion 


1301 





Montgomery PI 


1311 


1314 


Alui Place 


1315 


1400 


Filbert 


1401 


1600 


Greenwich 


1501 


1600 


Lombard 


1601 


(61 


Chestnut 


1701 


(C.I 


Francisco 


(e) 


9Tont$;onieryATenae. 


from XW cor Montgom- 


er. 


- and Washington NW 


to the bay 




Northeast. Street. Southwest 


2 


Mont and Wash 


1 





Maiden Lane 




100 


Jackson 
Kearny 


101 


200 


Pacific 


201 





Dupont Alley 




300 


Broadway 
Dupont 


301 


400 


Vallejo 
Stockton 


401 


500 


Green 


501 


600 


Union 
Powell 


601 


700 


Filbert 


701 


800 


Greenwich 
Mason 


801 


900 


Lombard 


901 


1000 


Chestnut 
Taylor 


1001 


1100 


Francisco 
Jones 


1101 


1200 


Bav 


1201 


1300 


North Point 
Leavenworth 


1301 


1400 


Beach 


1401 



9Ionl|fOiner.T Court-, 

W s (915) Monlsomery 
bet Pacific and Broadway 

Market bet Second and 
Third SE to Howard 

SouthjvFst. Street. Northeast 

2 Market 1 

— Stevenson 15 

30 Jessie 29 

100 Mission 101 

Minna 

Natonia 

(e) Howard (e) 

Sfontgomery Place, 

W s il^Ul) Montgomery 
bet Union and Filbert 

Moore, N s Union bet 

Hyde and Larkin 
Moore Place, {see Tor- 

rens Court,* 
Morel Place, Ns (1420) 

Pacific bet Larkin and 

Hyde 
iMorey Alley, N s (730) 

Broadway bet Stockton 

and Powell 
MorHC, N s (406) Bush bet 

Kearny and Dupont N 

to Pine 



Tlorse Place, S s i.l20oj 
Broadway bet Hyde and 
Leavenworth 

Tlorton, ilate St Mark's 
Place) W s (19) Kearny 
bet Post and Geary \V" to 
Stockton 

Mora, S s (1059) Howard 
bet Sixth and Seventh 
SE to Folsoni 

SIool Ion, W s Buchanan 
bet Greenwich and Lom- 
bard W to Steiner 

Moalton Place, "W s 

Montgomery bet Union 
and Green 

HlonlCrie, from Cortland 
Avenue S to Crescent 
Avenue, B. H. 

Myrtle Atchdc, W s 

Larkin bet O'Farrelland 
Geary 

Napa, (now Twentieth) 
from the bav bet Butte 
and Shasta W to Doug- 
lass 

Tiapoleon, from Orleans 
E to Biggs 

Xatoma, W s (14fi) First 
bet Howard and Mission 

North west. Street. Southeast 

2 First 1 

100 Second 101 

Kew Montgomery 
(6) Third (b) 

ib) Fourth (&) 

400 Fifth 401 

500 SLxth 501 

600 Seventh 601 

700 Eighth 701 

(6) Ninth (6) 

Navy, TnowTwenty-sLxth) 
W s Brvant Avenue bet 
Twenty-fifth and Twen- 
ty-seventh W to Doug- 
lass 

Bfebraska. from Mission 
Creek bet Vermont and 
Utah S to Yuba 

Necropolis ATenne, 

Ws Dolores bet .Sixteenth 
and Seventeenth 

Nevada, from the bay 
bet Humboldt and Sono- 
ma W to Potrero Av 

Nevada, S s Folsom bet 
Eleventh and Twelfths 
E to Harrison 

Neiv Anthony, N s 
Mission bet First and 
Second 

New Montg-omery, S s 
Market bet Second and 
Third SE to Howard 

Swithtvest. Street. Northeast 

2 Market 1 

Stevenson 15 

30 Jessie 29 

100 Mission 101 
Minna 
Natoma 

(e) Howard (c) 

New Orleans Avenae, 

N s Green bet Hyde and 
Leavenworth 

New Pacific, N s Mission 
bet Eighth and Ninth 

Newell, Jif 8 (6aS) Lom- 
bard bet Mason and 
Chestnut 

Newball, Ws Stockton 
bet Lombard and Chest- 
nut 

Nineteenth, (lateKagie) 
W s Harrison bet Eight- 
eenth and Twentieth W 
to Douglass 



Ninth, Oate Johnston) S 
s Market bet Tenth and 
Eleventh SE to Mission 
Creek 

South west StreeLNortheast. 



— 


Market 

Stevenson 

Jessie 


1 


100 


Mission 

Minna 

Natoma 


101 


200 


Howard 
Tehama 
Clementina 


201 


300 


Folsom 


301 


400 


Harrison 


401 


soo 


Brvant 


501 


600 


Brannan 


601 



Nobili Alley, E s (1506) 
Dupont bet Union and 
Filbert 

Noble Alley, (now Reed 
Place) S s (331) Green bet 
Montgomery and Kearny 

Noble Place, W s (236) 

Third bet Tehama and 
Folsom 

Noe, S s Ridley bet Castro 
and Sanchez 

Noonan Alley, Ss Val- 
lejo bet Stockton and 
PoweU 

Noonan Avenne, E s 

Eighth bet Howard and 
Folsom 

Norman, from Orleans E 
to Rhode Island nr Is- 
lais Creek 

North Avenue, from 
Coso Avenue SW to Hol- 
ly Park, B. H. 

North Parh I^ane, W 

s Second bet Bryant and 
Brannau 
North Point, W s Kear- 
ny bet Beach and Bay W 
to Presidio Reservation 
North. Street South Side. 
2 Kearny 1 

(c) Dupont (c) 

100 Stockton 101 

200 PoweU 201 

300 Mason 301 

400 Taylor 401 

500 Jones 501 

Montgomery Av 
600 Leavenworth 601 

700 Hvde 701 

800 Larkin 801 

900 Polk 901 

1000 Van Ness Avenue 1001 
1100 Franklin 1101 

laX) Gough 1201 

1300 Octavia 13U1 

1400 Laguna 1401 

1500 Buchanan 1501 

1600 "SVebster 1601 

1700 Fillmore 1701 

1800 Steiner 1801 

1900 Pierce 1^1 

2000 Scott 2001 

2100 Devisadero 2101 

2200 Broderick 2:^01 

2300 Baker 2301 

Norwich, W s Folsom 
bet Montezuma and Pros- 
pect Avenue, B. H. 

Nye, from Cadwallader N 
to Islais Creek 

O'C'onncIl Place, N s 
V;ilIeJo bet Powell and 
Mason 

O'Farrell, junction Mar- 
ket and Dupont bet Geary 
and Ellis W to Calvary 
Cemetery 

North. Street. South Side. 
2 Market and Dupont 1 

14 Bagley Place 

28 Julia Court 

100 Stockton 101 



200 


PoweU 


201 




Carlos Place 


219 


2ii 


O'FarreU AUey 





300 


Mason 


;«ii 




Raphael Place 


— 


4IHI 


Taylor 


401 


4;o 


William 





SIH) 


Jones 


501 


600 


Leavenworth 
Ada Court 


601 


7IH1 


Hvde 


701 


SIKl 


Ivarkin 


Kill 


90(1 


Polk 


901 


vm 


Van Ness Avenue 1001 


iim 


Franklin 


not 


1200 


Gough 


1201 


y.m 


Octavia 


1301 


I4(HI 


Laguna 


1491 


l.MIII 


Bnchanan 


1501 


iiinii 


Webster 


1601 


1700 


Fillmore 


1701 


ISIKI 


Steiner 


ISOl 


IWKI 


Pierce 


1901 


:>iBi« 


Scott 


2001 


2100 


Devisadero 


2101 


221 Kl 


Broderick 


22U1 


le) 


St. Joseph's Av 


^e) 



O'Farrell Alley, N s 

(22'>i O'Farrell bet PoweU 
and Mason 

Oalt. junction Market and 
Van Ness Avenue bet 
Fell and Page W to Stan- 
yan 
North. Street. South Side. 
2 Mkt & Van Ness Av 1 
100 Franklin 101 

200 Gough 201 

300 Octavia 3M1 

400 Laguna 4ni 

500 Buchanan 601 

600 Webster 6(U 

700 Fillmore 701 

800 Steiner 801 

900 Pierce 901 

10(.K) Scott 1001 

noo Devisadero 1101 

V2f)0 Broderick 1201 

1300 Baker i:i01 

Oak, W s i409) Mason bet 
Geary and Post W to Tay- 
lor 
Oak or Oak Cirove A v- 
enne. S s {Oo:J) Harrison 
bet Hfth and Sixth SE to 
Bryant 
Ocean Honse and 
Beach Road, from 
Point Lobos Road S and 
E to Ocean View House 

Ocean Ilonse Koad, 

(Central) from McAllister 
SW to Ocean View House 

Ocean Houne Road, 
I Mission ) from Mission 
Dolores SW to Ocean 
View House 

Ocean House Road, 
(old' from San Josfi Road 
nr Industrial School W to 
Ocean View House 

Octavia. N s Market bet 

Gough and Laguna N to 

the Bay 

East Street West Side. 

2 Market and Waller 1 

100 Haight 101 

Rose Avenue 
200 Page 201 

Lillv Avenue 
300 Oak" 301 

Hickory Avenue 
400 Fell 401 

Linden Avenue 
500 Hayes 501 

Ivv Avenue 
600 Grove 601 

Birch Avenue 
700 Fulton 701 

Ash Avenue 
800 McAllister 801 

Locust Avenue 
900 Tvler 901 

Jefferson Square 

UOO Eddy HOI 

Willow Avenue 



adies should bear in mind that the Best Bathing Appliances are at 113 Geary. 



FINE "WATCHES and JEWELET for Sale by D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery 



76 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTOR T. 



Ellis 120: 
Olive Avenue 

O'Farrell 1301 
Myrtle Avenue 

tieary 1401 
Cedar Avenne 

Post 1501 
Walnut Avenue 

Slitter 1601 
Fnrn Avenue 

Bush 1701 

Pine 1801 

California 1001 

Saoramento 2001 
Lafayette Square 

Washington 2201 

Jackson 2.101 

Pacific 2401 

Broadway 2501 

Valli'jo mil 

Green 2701 

I'nion 2^01 

Filbert 2!)01 

Greenwich 3001 

Lombard 3101 

Chestnut 3201 

Francisco 3301 

Bay 3401 

North Point 3501 

Beach 3B01 

Jr-fferson 3701 

Tonijuln 3801 

Lewis (c) 



1200 

1300 

1400 

1500 

1600 

1700 
180O 
inoo 
2000 

2200 
2303 
2100 
2500 
2li00 
2700 
2m 
21100 
:»oo 

3100 
320O 
3300 
^00 
3500 
3600 
3700 
SSOO 
(e. 

Ohio. X s (1181 Pacific bet 

MonteomeryandSansom 
X to Broadway 

Old ITivkory, E s Lau- 
rel Avenue nr Crescent 
Avenue E to San Bruno 
Road 

OI<l San Jose Road, 
from junction Valencia 
and Twenty-second SW 
to County Line 

OIiTe Avenne, W s Lar- 

Icin bet Ellis and O'Far- 
reU 

OlniMtead, WsSan Bru- 
no Koad S of Dwnght, U. 
M. T. 

Olner Place, X s King 

bet Second and Third 
Oneida Place, S s '827) 

Sacramento bet Stockton 
and Dupont 

Oreeon, w s East bet 

\\ ashington and Jackson 

W to Battery 

.Vort/i. Street. SoutA Side. 

2 East 1 

100 Drumm 101 

200 Davis 201 

(6) Front (6) 

(e; Battery (e) 

Orleann. from Kansas S 
to Islais Creek 

Or»enia«, from Byrne S 

to Salome 

Oxford. S s Silver Ave- 
nue bet Cambridge and 
Harvard, U. M. T. 
PaciJic, W s East bet 
Jackson and Broadway 
W to First Avenue 
-Voj-rt. street. South SUU. 
2 East 1 

Cc^ Driimm fc) 

100 r>a\-l8 101 

200 Front 201 

3i«) Battery 301 

40O Sansom 401 

11H iihio 

500 Montgomery floi 
600 Kearny 601 

Montgomery Av 
632 I.estrade Place 

r.arllett Alley 841 

7<N) Impont 701 
706 PaciHc Alley 

- siiiiivan Alley 719 

722 ElllckAUey 

«00 Stockton 801 
808 Virginia Place 

Virginia 815 



SflO 


Powell 


901 


•106 


Keyes Place 





Kl 


Scott Place 





KKKl 


Mason 


1001 


1016 


Salmon 


. 





Auburn 


1(117 


1024 


Himmelmatm PI 


11(10 


Taylor 


1101 


1200 


Jones 


1201 


i:«»i 


Leavenworth 


i:«il 





Burgoyne Place 


1307 


I4(»l 


Hyde 


1401 


UXl 


Morel Place 








Mccormick 


1421 


I.t(KI 


Larkin 


l.Slll 


Mm] 


Polk 


1601 


1700 


Van Xess Avenue 1701 


IKIHI 


FrankUn 


m\ 


IWkl 


Gough 


1901 


2(»KI 


Octavia 


2001 


21(W 


I^guna 


2101 


2200 


Buchanan 


22111 


2.-JK) 


Webster 


2301 


'.;4(«) 


Fillmore 


2401 


2500 


Steiner 


2501 


211(10 


Pierce 


2601 


■ro" 


Scott 


2701 


•',S(10 


Devisadero 


2S01 


?!ino 


Erode rick 


2'toi 


3O0O 


Baker 


3001 



Pacific Alley, N s (706) 
Pacific bet Dupont and 
Stockton 

Pacific Avenne— That 
part of Pacific Street ex- 
tending from Larkin to 
First Avenue, the num- 
bers continue, however, 
in regular order from the 
commencement of Pacific 
Street 

Page, junction Franklin 
anrl Market bet Haight 
and Oak W to Stanyan 

North. Street. South Side. 

2 Market andFranklin 1 

100 Goueh 101 

200 Octavia 201 

300 Liiguna 301 

400 Buchanan 401 

500 Webster 501 

600 Fillmore 601 

700 Steiner 701 

800 Pierce 801 

900 Scott 901 

1000 Devisadero lOol 

1100 Broderick 1101 

1200 Baker 1201 

Palmer, from junction 
Chenery and Miguel to 
Bartlett 

Palmer Alley, Ws(809) 
Kearny bet Jackson and 
Washington 

Pantani. E s (1010) I^av- 
emvorth bet Pine and Cal- 
ifornia 

P a r Ic, (now Twenty- 
fourthl W s Potrero Av- 
enue bet Twenty-third 
and Twenty-fifth W to 
Douglass 

Park Avenue, S s McAl- 
lister bet Jones and Leav- 
enworth SW to Larldn 

Park Avenne, S s <969) 
Harrison bet Fifth and 
SLvth SE to Bryant 

Park Avenne, inclosing 
Holly Park SW s Bernal 
Heights 

Park I,ane, S s South 
Park bet Second and 
Third S to Townsend 

Park Place. E s (313) 
Second bet Folsom and 
Harrison 

Parker Avenne, N 8 
Pulton nr Shrader N to 
Point Lobos Avenue 

PalferMon, E s Bernal 
Heights bet .San Bruno 
Road and Bernal 



Paul, S s Crescent Ave- 
nue nr San Bruno Road 

Pearl, S 8 Market bet Va- 
lencia and Guerrero S to 
Ridley 

Pennj«;«lvanla Ave- 
nue, from the bay bet 
Iowa and Mississippi S to 
Tulare 

Perine, W s Steiner bet 
California and Sacramen- 
to W to Pierce 

Pcrrr, W s Vassar Place 
bet Harrison and Bryant 
W to Fifth 

Sorthu-esL Street. Southeast 

2 Vassar Place 1 

100 Third 101 

200 Fourth 201 

(«) Fifth («) 

Pefalnnia Avenne, 

from Point Lobos Avenue 
nr Toll Gate 

PrcilTer, W s Dupont bet 
Francisco and Chestnut 
W to Stockton 

Pierce, N s Waller bet 
.Steiner and Scott N to the 
bay 

East. Street. West Side. 

2 Waller 1 

100 Haight 101 

200 Page 201 

300 Oak 301 

400 Fell 401 

500 Hayes 501 

Alanio Square 

700 Fulton 701 

800 McAllister 801 

900 Tvler 901 

1000 Turk 1001 

1100 Eddy 1101 

1200 EUU 1201 

1300 O'Farrell 1.301 

1400 Qeary 1401 

Hamilton Square 

1.500 Post 1501 

1600 Sutter 1601 

1700 Bush 1701 

ISOO Pine 1801 

1900 California 1901 

Perine 

2000 Sacramento 2001 

2100 Clay 2101 

Alia Plaza 

2.300 Jackson 2.301 

2400 Pacific SlOl 

2.500 Broadway i501 

26(0 Vallejo 2601 

2700 Green 2701 

2800 Union KOI 

2900 Filbert 2901 

3000 Greenwich 3001 

3100 Lombard 3101 

3200 Chestnut 3201 

3;i00 Francisco 3.'«)1 

3400 Bav JJOI 

aiOO North Point 3601 

3600 Beach 3601 

3700 Jefferson 3701 

SSOO Tonquin 3801 

(e) Lewis {e) 

Pierce Bow, S s Union 

bet .Stockton and Dupont 

Pike or M^avcrly 

Place, N s (SlOi Sacra- 
mento bet Stockton and 
Dupont N to Washington 

Pinckner Place, X s 

(.52111 Broadway bet Kear- 
ny and DnpolJt N to Val- 
lejo 

Pine, junction Market and 

Davis bet California and 

Bush W to Laurel Hill 

Cemetery 

North. Street. South Side. 

2 Market and Davis 1 

100 Front 101 

200 Battery 201 

300 Sansom 301 

Laura Place 3.35 

400 Montgomery 401 



— 


Russ -Alley 


407 





Belden 


4.-» 


500 


Kearny 


.501 





Morse 


505 





Central Place 


515 


520 


St. Mary Place 




5.32 


Quincy 


"W7 


600 


Dupont 


601 


700 


Stockton 


701 


710 


Joice 






Monroe 


"tk 


SflO 


Powell 


801 


900 


Mason 


901 


908 


Jane Place 




1000 


Taylor 


lOOl 


1100 


Jones 


1101 


1200 


Leavenworth 


1201 


1300 


Hyde 


1301 


1400 


Larkin 


1401 


1.500 


Polk 


1.501 


1600 


Van Ness Avenue ifiOl 


1700 


Franklin 


1701 


ISOO 


Gough 


1801 


1900 


Octavia 


1901 


2000 


Laguna 


2001 


2100 


Buchanan 


2101 


2200 


Webster 


2201 




Middle 




2100 


Fillmore 


21101 


2400 


Steiner 


2401 


2.500 


Pierce 


2.501 


2600 


Scott 


ft,... , 


2700 


De^'isade^o 


2- 


MOO 


Broderick 


2- 


2900 


Baker 


2. 


3000 


Lvon 


suoi 


(e) 


Lett 


(f) 


Pinkbam Place 


Ws 


Eighth bet Howard and 


Folsom 




Pixlc.v Place, W 


i Fill- 


more bet Filbert 


and 


Greenwich W to Steiner 


Plea.«ant, 'late Rilevl W 


si 


1151 Taylor bet Sacra- 


mento and Clay 


VV to 


Jones 




PocaliontaK, X s 


Cali- 


fornia Avenue nr Lyons 


K to North Avenue, 


B.H. 


Point I^oboH Avenne 


or 


Toll Road, 


from 


termination of Geary W 


to the ocean 




Polk, N s Market bet Lar- 


kui andVan Ness Avenue 


N to the bay 




Sast 


. Street. West Side. 


2 


Market and Fell 


I 


100 


Hayes 


101 


200 


Grove 


■201 


300 


Fulton 


301 


400 


McAllister 
Locust Avenue 


401 


500 


Tyler 

Elm Avenue 


601 


600 


Turk 

Laurel Avenue 


601 


700 


Eddy 

Willow Avenue 


701 


800 


EUis 

Olive Avenue 


801 


900 


O'Farrell 
Myrtle Avenue 


901 


1000 


Gearv 

Cedar Avenne 


1001 


1100 


Post 

Walnut Avenue 


1101 


1200 


Sutter 

Fern Avenue 


1201 


1300 


Bush 
Austin 


1301 


1400 


Pine 


1401 


1.500 


California 


1.501 


1600 


.Sacramento 


1601 


ITOO 


Clay 


1701 


1800 


Washington 


ISOl 


11100 


Jackson 


1901 


2000 


Pacific 


2001 


2100 


Broadway 


2101 


2200 


Vallejo 


2»1 


2300 


Green 


2301 


24(X) 


Union 


2401 


i500 


Filbert 


2.501 


2600 


Greenwich 


2601 


2700 


Lombard 


2701 


2800 


Chestnut 


2S01 


2900 


Francisco 


2W1 


3000 


Bay 


3001 



MOE&AN & CO., 87 California Market, Import their own Stock from New York. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



SAN FEANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



77 



1100 Xorth Point 3101 

GOO Beach 3201 

\3O0 JefTerson 3301 

{it) Tonquin 3401 

le ) I-^ewis Ce) 

Polk r,ane, E s (1232) 

Stockton bet Broadway 

aad I*acific 
Pollard Place. N s 

(4201 Vallejo bet Kearny 

and Dupont 
Porier. S s Crescent Av- 
enue bet Decatur and 

Baclie 
Port««inonth S<|iiare, 

bet Wasliington, Kearny, 

Clay and Brenham Place 
Post, junction Marketand 

Montiicomery bet Sutter 

and (ieary W to Laurel 

Hill Cemetery 
yorffi. 'S'ti-eet. iSoiith Side. 
2 Market and Mont 1 

12 Li<!k Place 

100 Kearny 101 

112 Cardner Alley — 
200 Dupont 201 

300 Stockton 301 

,400 Powell 401 

'500 Mason 501 

600 Tavlor 601 

■ — William 617 

'700 Jones 701 

800 Leavenworth, 801 

900 Hyde 901 

— I\reachain Place 
000 Larkin 1001 

^100 Polk 1101 

200 Van Ness Avenue 1201 
1300 Franklin 1301 

[400 Gough 1401 

1 500 O Tavia 1501 

f600 I,a?una 1601 

700 Buchanan 1701 

SOO Webster 1801 

900 Fillmore 1901 

000 steiner 2001 

100 Kerce 2101 

300 Scott 2201 

3f*n Devisadero 2301 

400 Broderick: 2401 

500 Baker 2501 

600 Lvon 2601 

{€) Central Avenue (e) 

Post Office Place, N s 

Washington bet Sansom 
and Battery 

Potrei'O ATenue, from 
Mission Creek bet Utah 
and Hampshire S to Ser- 
pentine Avenue 

Potter, S s Market bet 
Eleventh and Brady SE 
to ilission 

Powell, Ns Market bet 
Stockton and Mason N to 
the bay 

?ast. Street JVest Side. 

2 Market and Eddy 1 

100 El lis 101 

200 O'FarreU 201 

SOO Geary 301 

100 Post 401 

500 Sutter 501 

518 Ankeny Place 

BOO Bush 601 

B16 Fella Place 

700 Pine 701 

300 California 801 

900 Sacramento 901 

000 Clay 1001 

100 Washington llOl 

200 Jackson 1201 

— John 1211 

218 Carohne Place 

300 Pacific 1301 

400 Broadway 1401 

500 Vallejo 1501 

600 Green 1601 

700 Union 1701 

Montgomery Av 

BOO Filbert 1801 

900 Greenwich 1901 

000 Lombard 2001 

XOO Cbestnut 2101 

20O Francisco 2201 

— Vandewater 



2300 Bay 2301 

2400 North Point 2401 

(,(/) Beach 2501 

(c) Jefferson te) 

Powell Avenue, W s 

CuUfornia Avenue W to 
San Jos6 Road 
Powliattan, from North 
Avenue E to Winslow, 
B. H. 

Prs»tt Coort, N s (812) 
California bet Stockton 
and Powell 

Precita ATcnae, from 
San Josfi Boadnr Twen- 
ty-seventh E to San Bru- 
no Road 

Prentiss,from California 
Aveiuie S to Cortland Av- 
enue, B. H. 

Presidio Road, froiu 
Larkin nr Pacific to the 
Presidio 

Pretcli, E of San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City 
HaU 

Price, (now Eighth) S s 
Market bet Seventh and 
Ninth SE to Townseud 

Pr iei«t, N s Clay bet Jones 
and Leavenworth N to 
Washington 

Princeton, S s Silver 
Avenue bet University 
and Amherst, U. M. T. 

Pringle Conrt, N s 

Greenwich bet Montgom- 
ery and Sanson! 
Prospect A venne.from 

Cortland Avenue NE to 
Coso Avenue, Bernal 

Heights 

Prosi»ect. Place, N s 

(S20) California bet Stock- 
ton and Powell N to Clay 

Pulaski, from Cortland 
Avenue s to Crescent Av- 
enue, B. H, 

Putnam, from Cortland 
Avenue S to Crescent Av- 
enue, B. H. 

Putziuau, E of San Bru- 
no Road 4 miles from 
City Hall 

Quinc.v, Ns (532) Pine bet 
Dupont and Kearny N to 

California 

Quincy Place, S s (527) 

Pine bet Kearny and Du- 
pont 
Quinn, W s Valencia bet 
Ridley and Fourteenth 
W to Guerrero 

Qninn Place, E s Val- 
encia bet Fourteenth and 
Ridley 

Bailroa<l Avenue, E s 

Dolores bet Seventeenth 

and Eighteenth 

Railroad Avenue, 

from Kentucky SW to 
Bay View Park 

Railroad Avenue, 

from Islais Creek SW to 
Silver Avenue 

Railway, Es Dolores bet 
Seventeenth and Eight- 
eenth 

Randal, W s San Jos6 
Road nr Thirtieth W to 
Palmer 

Randall Place, S s 
Greenwich bet Hyde and 
Leavenworth 

Randolph, nr San Mi- 
guel Station 



Raphael Place, N s 

O'FarreU bet Mason and 
Taylor 
Rau»«ch, S s (1127) How- 
ard bet Seventh and 
Eighth 

Reed, N s Clay bet Jones 
and Leavenworth N to 
Washington 

Reed. (late Noble) Place 

S s (331 ) Green bet Kearny 
and Montgomery 

Rhode Island, from 
Mission Creek bet Della- 
ro and Kansas S to Tu- 
lare 

Richmond, W s (211) 
Front bet Sacramento 
and California 

Richards, W s San Bru- 
no Road 4 niilesfrom City 
HaU 

Ridley, W s Mission bet 
Hermann and Fourteenth 

KlSSS, from Napoleon S 
to Schneider 

Riley, (now Pleasant) Ws 
(1115) Taylor bet Sacra- 
jnento and Clay W to 
Jones 

Rincon Court, WsMain 
bet Folsom and Harrison 

Rincou Place, S s (551) 

Harrison bet First and 
Second 

Ringold, W s Eighth bet 
Folsom and Harrison W 

to Ninth 

Ritcli, Ss (717) Folsom bet 

Third and Fourth SE to 

Townseud 

Southwest. Street. liortheast 

2 Folsom 1 

(&j Harrison (&J 

200 Bryant 201 

300 Brunnaa 301 

(,ej Townsend (fi) 

Ritter, S s Harrison bet 
Seventh and Eighth 

Roach Alley, Ns FUbert 
bei Taylor and Jones N 
to Greenwich 

Robbins Place, N s 

Union bet Kearny and 
Dupont 

Rondel Avenue, (or 

Piacej S s Sixteenth bet 

Valencia and ALission S to 
Seventeenth 

Rose, S s Chenery nr Cas- 
tro 

Rose, S s Crescent Ave- 
nue S to Case 

Rose Avenue, NW s 

Market bet Haight and 
Page 
Rosecrans, from Cah- 
fornia S to Powhattan, 
B. H. 

RosM, Ns (828) Washing- 
ton bet SLOckton aud Du- 
pont 

Rowland Alley, S a 

Broatlway bet Montgom- 
ery and Kearny 

Ruger, E of San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City 
Hall 

Rush, S s (1041) Howard 
bet Sixth and Seventh 

Russ Alley, N s Bush bet 
Montgomery andKearny 

Russell, W s Hyde bet 

Union and Green 



Saerantento, junction 
Market and East bet Clay 
and California W to First 
Avenue 



North. Street. South 


Side. 


2 


Market and Eas: 


1 


100 


Drumru 


101 


200 


Davis 


201 


300 


Front 


301 


■!00 


Battery 


401 


500 


Sansom 


501 




I.eidesclorff 


62S 


600 


Montgomery 


601 





Webb 


621) 


700 


Kearny 


701 


800 


Dnpont 


801 


810 


Waverly Place 
Oneida Place 








827 





Brooklyn Place 


HXi 


900 


Stoclcton 


mi 


924 


Prospect Place 


923 


928 


Miles Place 





1000 


Powell 


ICKIl 





Gustavus 


101 :i 


1014 


Tay 





1100 


Mason 


1101 


1114 


Yerba Buena 








Cushman 


1115 


1200 


Taylor 


1201 


i:»o 


Jones 


1301 




I.ysett Place 


1311 


1.320 


Leroy Place 


1319 


1400 


Leavenworth 


1401 


1406 


KimbaU 





l.iOO 


Hyde 


15fll 


ISfK) 


Larl;in 


101 tl 


17CW 


Polk 


1701 


1800 


Van Ness Avenue ISOI 


1900 


Franklin 


1901 


2000 


Gough 


2001 


2100 


Octavia 


2101 


2200 


Laguna 


2201 


2300 


Buchanan 


2301 


2400 


Webster 


2401 


2500 


Fillmore 


2501 


2600 


Steiner 


2001 


2700 


Pierce 


2701 


2300 


Scott 


2801 


2900 


Devisadero 


2001 


3000 


Broderick 


3001 


3100 


Baker 


3101 



Sadowa, W s Old San 

Jose Road nr San Miguel 
Station 
Salinas Avenue, W s 

RaiiroadAven ue bet Thir- 
ty-third anUThirtyfuurth 
avenues W to San Bruno 
Road 
Salmon, N s (10161 Pa- 
cihc bet Mason and Tay- 
lor N to Broadway 

Salmon Place, E s Lar- 
kin bet Broadway and 
Vallejo 

Salmon Place, N s 

Green bet Mason and 
Taj-lor 

Salome, from Islais 
Creek NE to Baker Av 

Samoftet, from California 
Avenue bet Cortez and 
Cabot SE to Frauconia 
Avenue, B. H. 

San Rruno Road, 
from termination of Po- 
trero Avenue S to the 
County Dine 

San JORC Avenne, S s 

Twentj'-second bet Va- 
lencia and Guerrero S to 
Thirtieth 

San Jo^e Road, or 
Count. y Roail. from 

termination Mission SW 
to County Line 

San l.nls Alley, S s 

(711) Jackson bet Dupont 
and Stockton 

San TMigruel Station, 

San Jos6 Road 5 miles 
from City Hall 

Sanchez, S s Ridley bet 
Church and Noe 



le tut the Best of Artists employed at Hairdressing EstabUshment, 113 Geary. 

I 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D. "W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merchai 



78 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTOKT. 



SniiMOin, N 8 Market bet 


Montgomery and Battery 


N 


to the bay 




Sast 


Street WesI Side. 


2 


Market and Sutter 1 


100 


UusU 


101 


200 


I'ine 


201 


300 


California 


301 


312 


Ihilleck 


313 


400 


Sacramento 


401 


41fi 


(.'ommercial 


417 


SOO 


Clay 


601 


V6H 


Merchant 


515 


l«00 


Washington 


601 


700 


Jackson 


701 




Hold 


705 


SOO 


I'acifle 


801 


flOO 


Broadway 


901 


IIHIO 


Vallcjo 


10(11 


UOO 


Green 


1101 


120O 


Union 


1201 




Alta Place 




i:»o 


rUbert 


1301 


UOO 


Greenwich 


1401 




Lombard 


1501 


Chestnut 


(e) 



Sniifn Clara, from the 
buy bet .Sixteenth and 
Mariposa W to Harrison 

Solinoifler, from Islais 
Creek E to Seventh Av 

Scliii>ler, from Cortland 
Avenut; w to Crescent Av- 
enue, B. II. 

Scotland, N a (724) Fil- 
bert bet Powell and Ma- 
son N to Greenwich 

Scott, N 8 Eidley bet 
I'ierce and Devisadero N 
tu the bay 

Emt. Street. West Side. 

2 Ridley I 

100 WuUer 101 

200 Haight 201 

300 Page 301 

^00 Oat 401 

500 Fell 501 

000 Haves 601 

7110 Grove 701 

81)0 Fulton 801 

yiM) McAllister 90i 

1000 'Ivler 1001 

IKXI Turk 1101 

12(10 Eddy 1201 

i;joo Ellis 1301 

l-ino O'Farrell 1401 

1500 Geary 1501 

ifiOO I'ost 1601 

1700 Sutter 1701 

IHOO liush 1801 

l:i«0 Pine UtOl 

2t)00 t;uUfornia 2001 

2100 Sacramento 2li)t 

2200 Clav 2201 

2;i00 Washington 2:101 

2-l(H} Jiu-kson 2401 

2500 I'ucific 2501 

2(i00 IJriiadway 2001 

2700 Vallejo 2701 

2S00 Green 2801 

2'.m Union 21)01 

:«K)0 FUbert 3001 

3100 Greenwich 3101 

3200 Lombard 3201 

3300 Chestnut 3301 

3100 Francisco 3401 

3500 Bay asoi 

aJOO North Point 3(i01 

3700 Heach 3701 

3K0O Jcffertton 38(11 

3900 TonfjuLll 31)01 

(c) Lewis (c) 

HvotU from North Ave- 
nue. Stu Cortland Avenue, 
li. U. 

Scolt Avennc, from Sil- 
ver Avenue SE to Unll- 
roiul Avenue, S. S. F. 

Scott Plac«, N 8 (922) 
Pacilic bet Powell and 
Madon N to Broadway 

Second, 8 s Markc't bet 
First and Third SE to the 
buy 

Southwest Street. Northeast. 
2 Market 1 , 



20 Stevenson 21 

2fi Jessie (b) 

100 Mission lOi 

118 Minna 117 

138 Natoma 137 

200 Howard 201 

218 Tehama 219 

(&) Clementina 233 

300 Folsom 301 

Park Place 313 

326 Vernon Place 

400 Harrison 401 

423 Silver • 

500 Brvant 501 

516 S.juth Park ■ 

DeBoom 533 

600 Braiuian 601 

700 Townsend 701 

(t:) Berry (ej 

Second A venne, S s Six- 
teenth bet Valencia and 
Guerrero S to Seven- 
teenth 

Selina Place, N s (716) 
California bet Stockton 
and Bupont 

Serpentine Avenue, 
from Mission nr Twenty- 
sixth E to San Bruno 
Road 

Seventeenth, (late Cor- 
bett) W s Harrison bet 
SbtteenthandEighteenth 
\V to Douglass 

Seventh, (late Harris) S 
s Market bet Sixth and 
Eighth SE to the bay 

Southwest. Street. Northeast. 

2 Market 1 

12 Stevenson 11 

38 Jessie 

100 Mission 101 
Minna 
Natoma 

21)0 Howard 201 

300 Folsom 301 

306 Drury Lane 

Cleaveland 

400 Harrison 401 

500 Brvant 501 

600 Branuan 601 

700 Townsend 701 

King 
800 Berry 801 

Channel 

Hooper 901 

Irwin 

HubbeU 1001 

South 

Seymour Avenue, N s 

Tyler bet Scott and De- 
visadero N to Turk 

ShakHpeare, from Isa- 
bel S to Hope, B. H. 

Sharp Place, S s Union 
bet Leavenworth and 
Hyde 

Shasta, from the bay bet 
Sierra and Napa W to Po- 
trero Avenue 

Sheitpard Place, E s 

(1110) Mason bet Clay and 
Washintfton 

Sheridan, E s Tenth bet 
Folsom and Harrison 

Sherman, Ss(1039) Fol- 
som bet Sixth and Sev- 
enth 

Sherman, S a Ellis bet 
Webster and Fillmore 

Sherman, S 3 Seven- 
teenth bet Castro and 
Diamond 8 to Twenty- 
second 

Shemood Place, E s 

(131) Third bet Howard 
and Minna 
Shiple.v, E s (313) Sixth 
bet Folsom and Harrison 

Shotwell, S 8 Fourteenth 
bet Howard and Folsom 
S to Serpentine Avenue I 



West. Street. East Side. 

2 Fourteenth 1 

100 Fifteenth 101 

200 Sixteenth 201 

300 Seventeenth 301 

400 Eighteenth 401 

500 Nineteenth 501 

600 Twentieth 601 

700 Twenty-first 701 

800 Twentv-second 801 

900 T\veiitv-tbird 901 

1000 Twentv-f"urth 3001 

1100 TWentV-iifth 1101 

1200 Twenty-sixth 1201 

(e) Serpentine Avenue te) 

Shrader, N s \\'aller bet 
Cole and Stanyan N to 
Fulton 

SicKclf from California 
Avenue S to Cortlaud Av- 
enue, B. H. 

Sierra, from the bay bet 
Snastaand Humboldt W 
to Potrero Avenue 

Silliman. W s San Bru- 
no Road bet Silver Ave- 
nue and Henry, U. M. T. 

Silver, W s (428) Second 
bet Harrison and Bryant 
\V to Fourth 

Northwest. Street. Sottthsast. 

2 Second 1 

100 Third 101 

(e) Fourth (e) 

Silver Avenue, from 
San Bruno Road 4 miles 
from City Hall W to Har- 
vard and E to Eighteen th 
Avenue 

SiminonN, (now Sixth) S 
s Market bet Fifth and 
Seventh SE to the bay 

Simpson Place, W s 

1,416) First bet Harrison 
and Bryant 

Sixteenth, Gate Center) 
from the bay W to Castro 

Sixth, (late Simmons) S s 
Market bet Fifth and Sev- 
enth SE to the bay 

Southioest. Street. Northeast. 

2 Market 1 

16 Stevenson 17 

28 Jessie 29 

100 Mission 101 

112 Minna 113 

(6) Natoma IS 

200 Howard 201 

(.6) Tehama 211 

(b) Clementina 227 

300 Folsom 301 

{b) Shipley 313 

Clara 320 

400 Harrison 401 

500 Bryant 501 

600 Braiman 601 

700 Townsend 701 

King 

800 Berry 801 

Chaimel 

900 Hooper 901 

Irwin 

1000 Hubbell 1001 
South 

Solano, from the bay bet 

Mariposa and Butte W to 

Harrison 
Sonoma, from the bay 

bet Nevada and Yolo W 

to Potrero Avenue 
Sonoma or Sonora 

Place, N s (406) Green 

bet Kearny and Dupont 
Sophie Terrace, N s 

I'ine bet Dupont and 

Stockton 
South, WsKentuckvnr 

Hubbell SW to Center 
South Avenue, from 

Crescent Avenue NE to 

Holly Park, B. H. 



South Parh, W s (516) 
Second bet Bryant ana 
Brannan W to Third 

South Park Avenue. 

S s Brannan bet Second 
and Third 

SparkA, (now Fifteenth) 
W s Harrison bet Four- 
teenth and Sixteenth W 
to Castro 
Spear. S b Market bet l 
Steiiart and Main SE to ' 
the bay 
Northwest. Street.Southeast. 
2 Market 1 

Hodges Court 

100 Mission 101 

200 Howard 20I 

300 Folsom 301 

400 Harrison 401 

(e) Bryant (e) 

SpoflTord, N 8 (828) Clay 
bet Waverly Place and 
Stockton N to Washing- 
ton 

Spr ins, S s (531) California 
bet Kearny and Montr 
gomery 

Spruce, N sCaliforniabet , 

Maple and Locust N to 

Presidio Reservation * 
St. CharlcM, E s (1018) 

Kearny bet Pacific ana 

Broadway 
St. Charles Place, W 8 

(1215) Kearny bet VaUeJo 

and Green 
St. James Alley, E s 

Mason bet Post and Sutter 

St. Josephs Avenue, 

N s Turk bet Broderick ; 
and Baker N to Geary 1 

St. 9Iark Place, (now ] 
Morton) W s (19) Kearny 
bet Post and Geary W to 
Stockton 

St. Mar.v, N s (520) Pine 
bet Dupont and Kearny 
N to California 

St. Vincent or Vincent, 

N s (316) Green bet Mon-t 
gomery and Kearny N to 
Union 

StaudiNh, from Califor- 
nia Av S to Powhattan, 
B. H. 

Stanford, S s (311) Bran- 
nan bet Second and Third 
SE to Towusend 

Stan 1 y Court, E s Stanly 
Place bet Harrison and 
Bryant 

Stanly Place, S s (557) 
Harrison bet First and 
Second SE to Bryant 

Stanyan, S s Fulton W 

of Shrader 

Star, from California Ave- 
nueSE to Francouia Ave- 
nue, B. H. 

Steiner, N s Ridley bet 
Fillmore and Pierce N to 
the bay 

East Street West Side. 

2 Ridley 1 

100 Kate 

200 WiiUcT 201 

300 Haight 301 

400 Page 401 

500 Oak 501 

600 Fell 601 

700 Haves 701 

800 (Jrove 801 

900 Fulton 901 

1000 McAllister looi 

1100 Tvler 1101 

1200 Turk 1201 

i;»0 Eddy 1301 

1400 Ellis 1401 



Earitaa River Transplanted Oysters at MORGAN & CO.'S, 87 California Market, 



J. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, EstabUshed 1862. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



79 



1500 
1600 
17(10 
ISOO 
1900 

2000 
211X1 
2:100 
2310 
2-100 
2500 
2600 
2700 
2800 
2900 
3000 
310O 

3200 

330O 
3400 
3500 
361X1 
3700 
3S00 
3900 
4000 
Ifj 



Evington 

OFarreU 

Ciliary 

Post 

.Sutter 

Bush 

Wikley 

Pine 

California 

Sacramento 

Clay 

M'as^hington 

Jjwkson 

Pacitic 

Broadway 

Vallejo 

Greeu 

Union 

Filbert 

Pixley Place 

Greenwich 

MOUltOD 

Lombard 

Chestnut 

Francisco 

Bay 

Jvorth Point 

Beach 

Jetferson 

Tonquin 

Lewis 



1501 
1601 
1701 
ISOl 
1901 

2001 
2101 
2201 
2;«1 
2101 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2S01 
2901 
3001 
3101 

3201 

3301 
3401 
3801 
3601 
3701 
3S01 
3901 
4001 
teJ 



Stenart. S s Market bet 
East and Spear SE to tlie 
bay 

Southu'c^L Street. Northeast 
2 Marljet I 

100 Mission 101 

200 Howard 201 

300 Folsom 301 

{,€) Harrison (e) 

SteTeloe, E s (412) Jones 
bet O'Farrell and Ellis 

Sfe^enfiOii, W s(22)First 
bet Market and Mission 

Northu'€.^t. Street. Southeast 

2 First 1 

100 Second 101 

^6) New Montgomery 16) 

200 Third 201 

1,6) Fourth (6) 

400 Fifth 401 

500 Sixth 501 

600 Seventh 601 

700 Eighth 701 

(.6) Kinth ^b} 



Stoi 


rkton, N s Market 


bet Dupont and Powell 


N to the bay 




East 


.Street. West Side. 


2 


Market and Ellis 1 


KXI 


O'Farrell 


li.l 


200 


Geary 


201 


212 


Morton 





3(K) 


Post 


;«)1 


3(iS 


Stockton Place 




400 


Sutter 


401 


.VK) 


Bush 


,501 


.51 W 


Emma 




6IKI 


Pine 


601 


-IKI 


California 


701 





Emmett Place 


709 


soil 


Sacramento 


801 


MX) 


Clay 


901 


1000 


Washington 


1001 


1100 


Jac-kson 


1101 


1-JiKJ 


Pacific 


r.'jii 


12.12 


Polk Lane 




l:-;in 


Broadway 


1301 


I-wo 


Vallejo 


1401 





Card Alley 


1413 




Montgomery At 





l.iOO 
IftXj 
171X1 



Green 

Cnion 

Filbert 

Cireen%\ich 

Lombard 

Chestnut 

PfeilTer 

Francisco 

Bay 

North Point 

Beach 



1501 
1601 
1701 
1»01 
1901 
2001 

2101 

2201 

2301 

(f) 



Slockton Place, (or 

Alley) W 8 (2131 Dupont 
bet Sutter and Post VV to 
Stockton 



Slone, N s (918) Washing, 
ton bet Stockton and 
Powell N to Jackson 

Striiishaxu, from Islais 
Creek W of Adele S to 
Hecker 

Sullivan, E and W a 
Stanyan bet Grattan and 
Ciirl 

SalllTan. from Cortland 
Avenue S to Crescent 
Avenue, B. H. 

SnIIivan Alley, NsCKO) 
Jackson bet Dupont and 
Stockton N to Pacific 

Snllivan Alley,Ssi537) 
Mission bet First and Sec- 
ond 

SnlliTan Alley, W s 
(1021 1 Dupont bet Jackson 
and Pa<'ific 

Snnimer, W s (319) Mont- 
gomery bet California 
and Pine W to Kearny 

Sniuner, S s California 
Avenue bet Rosecraus 
and Prentiss S to Pow- 
hattan 

Suxuner, S s (1159) How- 
ard bet Seventh and 
Eighth 

Salter, junction Market 
and Sansom bet Bush and 
Post W to Laurel Will 
Cemetery 

Xorth. Street. South Side. 

2 Market and Sansom 1 

100 Montgomery 101 

106 Trinity 

Lick Place 111 

200 Kearny 201 

204 Clara Lane 

300 Dupont 301 

400 Stockton 401 

500 Powell 501 

Delaware Court 

600 Mason 601 

700 Tavlor 701 

800 Jones 801 

900 Leavenworth 901 

1000 Hvde 1001 

1100 Larkin 1101 

120O Polk 1201 



140O FrankMn 

1500 Gough 

1600 Octavia 

1700 Laguna 

1800 Buchanan 

1900 Webster 

2000 FUlmore 

210O steiner 

2200 Pierce 

2300 Scott 

-400 Devisadero 

2o00 Broderick 

2600 Baker 

2700 Lyon 



1401 
1501 
1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 



(e) Central Avenue (e) 

Snan, from Bernal SW 

to junction Marengo and 

Bernal 
Sweeney, W S.San Bruno 

P.oad 4 miles from City 

HaU 
Sweet, N s Broadway bet 

Taylor and Jones N to 

Vallejo 

Tay, Ns(1014)Sacramento 
bet Powell and Mason N 
to Clay 

Taylor, N s Market bet 
Mason andJonesNtothe 
ba.i' 



East 


. Street. West Side. 


2 


Market and Tyler 1 


1110 


Turk 101 


200 


Eddy 201 


:«Hi 


Ellis 301 


41K1 


O'FarreU 401 


,500 


Geary 501 


HH 


Oak 


516 


Taylor Place 



Adelaide Place 

600 Post 

I.ewis Place 

700 vSiitter 

800 Bush 

900 Pine 

908 VUla Place 

1000 California 

UOO Sacramento 

Pleasant 

1200 Clav 

1300 \S a^hington 

1400 Jackson 

IbOO Pacific 

Bernard 

1600 Broadway 

1700 Vallejo 

1800 Green 

Lincoln 

1900 Vnion 

2000 Filbert 

2012 Valparaiso 

2100 Greenwich 

2200 Lombard 

Montgomery Av 

2300 Che.stnut 
"Water 

Houston 

2400 Francisco 

V an de water 

2500 Bay 

2600 NorthPoint 

2700 Beach 

tc) Jefferson 



517 
601 
605 

701 
801 
901 

1001 
1101 
1115 
1201 
1301 
1401 
15tH 
1535 
1601 
1701 
1801 

1901 
2001 

2101 
2201 



2401 



2501 
2601 

2701 
i.e} 

Taylor Place, Es(516) 
Taylor bet Geary and 
Post 

Tehama. "W s (220) First 
bet Clementina and How- 
ard 

JS'orth ire^^t. Street.Southeast. 

2 First 1 

100 .Second 101 

200 Third 201 

300 Fourth 301 

400 Fifth 401 

ib) Sixth (ft) 

<b) Seventh (bi 

700 Eighth 701 

ib) Kinth (6) 

Tehama, Ss Montezuma 
S to Prospect Place, B. 
H. 

Tehama Plaee, E s 

l223) First bet Folsom and 
Howard 

Teles^aph Place, N s 

(330) Greenwich bet Du- 
pont and Kearny 

Temple, (now Twenty- 
fifth) W s Potrero Ave- 
nue bet Twenty-fourth 
and Twenty -sixth 

Tennesfice, from the bay 
bet Kentucky and Min- 
nesota S to Tulare 

Tenth, (late Thorne) S s 
Market bet Ninth and 
Eleventh SE to Mission 
Creek 

Southwest Street. Northeast. 

2 Market 1 

100 Mission 101 

200 Howard 201 

300 Folsom 301 

400 Harrison 401 

500 Bryant 501 

Terrace View, S s Fran- 
cisco bet Kearny and Du- 
pont 

Tevis, S s King bet Third 
and Fourth S to Berry 

Texas, from the bay bet 
Mississippi and Missouri S 
to Tulare 

Third. S s Market bet 
Second and Fourth SE to 
the bay 

^ytithwest.Strcet,Noriheait. 

2 Market 1 

20 Stevenson 19 

{&) Jessie 37 

100 Mission 101 



Minna 

Sherwood Place 

Everett 

Hunt 

Howard 

Tehama 

Noble Place 

Clementina 

Folsom 

Verona Place 

Harrison 

Perry 

SUver 

Bryant 

South Park 

Bran nan 

Townsend 

King 

Berry 

Channel 



Thirteeiilh, Hate Ellen) 
SE s Mission bet Twelfth 
and Fourteenth 

South. Street. North Side. 

2 Mission 1 

100 Howard 101 

200 Folsom 201 

Thirtieth. Oate Grove) 
W s San Jos6 Road S of 
Twenty-ninth 

Thompson Avenue or 

Place, S s (,371 1 Brannan 
bet Second and Third 

Thorne, {now Tenth) Ss 
Market bet Ninth and 
Eleventh SE to Mission 
Creek 

Tiffany Avenue, (now 
Valencia) from junction 
Valencia and Twenty- 
sixth SW to Twenty- 
ninth 

Tilford, W s Fifth bet 
Bryant and Brannan 

Tomasa. from California 
Avenue SE to California 
Avenue, B. H. 

Tonqnin, W s Larktn bet 
Lewis and Jetiersou W to 
Presidio Keservation 

Torrcns Court, N s 

Claj* bet Hyde and Lar- 
kin 
Tonchard Alley, S s 

Pine bet Jones and Leav- 
enworth 



To^-n»iencl, W 


s First bet 


Brannan and King SW to 


Eighth 




Sorthmsl. Street. Southeast 


2 First 


1 


100 Second 


101 


Stanford 




Hammond 




200 Thu-d 


201 


Rilch 





Liberty 





Madden 




Haggin 




Crook 





300 Fourth 


301 


•100 Fifth 


401 


500 SLxth 


501 


600 Seventh 


601 


Eighth 





Tracy, (now Fourteenth) 
W s Harrison bet Thir- 
teenth and Fifteenth \V 
to Castro 

Treat Avenue, S b 
Twentieth bet Folsom 
and Harrison S to Ser- 
pentine Avenue 

Trinity, N s (106) Sutter 
bet Montgomery and 
Kearny N to Bush 

Trinity Court, W s 

Trinity bet Bush and Sut- 
ter 
Trnett, W s Mason bet 
Washington and Clay 



.. Zs.i'hs ! Baths ! ! Baths ! ! ! Qo and Bathe at Central Baths, 113 Qearj. 



JEWELEY made to order and EEPAIEED by D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



80 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Tulare, from tbe bay S 
ofMariu \V to Connecti- 
cut 

Turk, junction Marltet 
ami .'\Ijuson bet Tj'ier and 
Kddy W to Masonic Av 

Norlh. SIreel. South Side. 

2 Market and Mason 1 

14 Marijaret Place 

KK) Tavlor 101 

2!J0 Jones 201 

300 Leavenworth 301 

400 Hyde 401 

Dodge 

WX) I,aikin 501 

ll(«l I'olk 601 

TOO Van Ness Avenue 701 

Si») Franklin 801 

:hh) (JdOKh ;«)i 

IKIO Orii.via 1001 

IIUO X^aBuna 1101 

1200 lioehanan 1201 

1:«10 Webster l'»l 

Hiio Hllmore 1401 

1.100 Stelner 1501 

1600 Pierce 1601 

17IK) Scott 1701 

1S(K> Devisadero 1801 

19U0 Hrodcrlck 1901 

St. Joseph's Av 

2000 Baker 2001 

Lvon 2101 

Lott 2201 

(«) Masonic Avenue (e) 

T»»rini>. (laleBrown)SE 
s Mis-sion bet Eleventh 
anil Thirteenth SE to 
Harrison 
Soulhwfut. Street. Xartheast 
2 Mis.sion 1 

26 Glen Park Ave 

100 Howard 101 

200 Folsom 201 

ve) Harrison (e) 

Twenliefh. (late Napa) 
from the bay bet Butte 
and .Shasta W to Doug- 
la-ss 

Twcniy-eighlli (late 
Valet W s Guerrero bet 
Twenty - seventh and 
T\veiit.v-uinth 

Twi'nt.T-Hflto.aateTem- 

plel W s Potrero Avemie 
bet Twenty -fourth and 
Twenty-sixth W to Doug- 
lass 
T»enty-flr!i», Hate Alta) 
W s Potrero Aveime bet 
Twentieth and Twenty- 
second W to Douglass 

Twenf.v • fourth, (late 
Park i W s Potrero Ave- 
nue bet Twenty-third and 
Twenty-afth W to Doug- 
lass 

Twenly - ninth, (late 
Dale) W s San Jos6 Road 
bet Twenty-eighth and 
Thirtieth 

Twonf ,r • ftecond, (late 
Johni W s Potrero Ave- 
nue bet Twenty-first and 
IVenty-thh-d w to Doug- 
lass 

Tnrnt.v-Keventh, (late 
FiiiKi W s Guerrero bet 
Twenty-sixth and Twen- 
ty-eig!uh W to Douglass 

Tn-«>nty-Mixth, date Na- 
vy) W s BrvanI Avenue 
bet Twenty - fifth and 
l\venty -seventh W to 
Dcmglass 

Twrnl.r - third, (late 
Horner I \V s Potrero Av- 
enue het Twentv-second 
and Tw.nty-fourth W to 
Doiiglut^ 

Tyirr, Junction Market 
and Tavlor bet McAllis- 
ter an(l Turk W to Ma- 
sonic Avenue 



Jforth. Street. South .Vde. 

2 Market and Taylor 1 

100 Jones 101 

200 Leavenworth 201 

Dale 

Charles 

300 Hvde 301 

400 Larklu 401 

500 Polk 601 

600 Van Ness Avenue 601 

700 Franklin 701 

800 Gough 801 

900 Octavia 901 

1000 Laguna 1001 

lioii Buchanan 1101 

1200 Webster 1201 

1300 FUlmore 1301 

1400 .Steiner 1401 

1.500 Pierce 1-501 

IfiOO Scott 1601 

1700 Devisadero 1701 

IMl Broderick 1801 

ls»iO Baker 1*1 

2000 Lvon 2001 

2100 Lott 2101 

(c) Masonic Avenue («) 

T.tson Place. S s (919) 
Washington bet Stockton 
and Powell 

Union, W s Front bet 
Filbert and Green W to 
Presidio Reservation 

Xorth. Street. South Side. 



2 Front 
100 Battery 

Gaines 

200 Sansom 

Calhonn 

300 Montgomery 

- Vincent 
400 Kearnv 

406 Filbert Place 

- Sonoma Place 

Lafayette Place 

42) A'arenne 

500 Dupont 

508 Cadell Alley 

Ban nam Place 

618 Ja.iper Place 

- rnion Place 
ClairviUe Place 
Stockton 
Montgomery Av 
Powell 
-August Alley 
Ma.son 

900 Tavlor 
1000 Jones 

Bay View Place 
Leavenworth 

.Sharp Place 

1200 Hvde 
vm Larkin 
1100 Polk 



600 

700 
800 



1100 



523 
515 
601 

701 
717 
801 
901 
1001 

1101 

1201 
1301 
UOl 
1.500 Van Ness Avenue 1501 
1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2.301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2501 



1600 Franklin 

1700 Gough 

1800 Octavia 

1900 Laguna 

2000 Buchanan 

2100 Webster 

2200 Fillmore 

2.300 Sterner 

2400 Pierce 

2.500 Scott 

2600 Devisadero 

270O Broderick 

2S00 Baker 

Union Alley, from 

Union Place 
Union Avenue, E s 

I^aurel Aveime E to San 

Bruno Road S s B. H. 
Union Court, (now Ver 

Mehr) E s (116) Kearny 

bet Sutter and Post 
Union Plare. N s (522) 

Green bet Dupont and 

Stockton N to Union 
Union Squaro, bet 

Stockton, Powell, Geary 

and Post 
University, S s Silver 

Avenue bet College and 

Princeton, U. M. T. 
Utah, from Mission Creek 

bet Nebraska and Potrero 

Avenue S to Yolo 



Tale, (now Twenty- 
eighth ) W s Guerrero bet 
Twenty - seventh and 
Twenty-ninth 

Talencia, Ss Market bet 
Mi.ssion and Guerrero S 
to Twenty-ninth 

Vallejo, W s Davis bet 
Green and Broadway W 
to Presidio Reservation. 
[The buildings in this 
street are incorrectly 
numbered.] 



Sorth. Street. South Side. 


9 


Davis 


1 


(.CI 


Front 


(c) 


100 


Battery 


101 


200 


Sansom 


201 




Bestole 


. 





Bartol 




300 


Montgomery 


301 


400 


Kearny 


401 


420 


Pollard Place 







Pinckney Place 


423 


430 


Margaret Place 





500 


Dupont 
Montgomery Av 


501 





Vallejo Place 


621 


530 


Agnes Lane 





eno 


Stockton 


601 


62; 


Maiden Lane 








Morev Alley 


627 


700 


Powell 


701 


716 


Washoe Place 





7.36 


O'Connell Place 





800 


Mason 


801 





Vallejo Court 




900 


Taylor 


901 




Sw'eet 







Florence 




1000 


Jones 


1001 


1100 


Leavenworth 


1101 


1200 


Hyde 


1201 




White 





1300 


Larkin 


1301 





Miixwell 




1400 


Polk 


1401 


1500 


Van Ness Avenue 1501 


1600 


Franklin 


1601 


1700 


Gough 


1701 


ISOO 


Octavia 


1801 


1900 


Laguna 


1901 


2000 


Buchanan 


2001 


2100 


Webster 


2101 


2200 


Fillmore 


2201 


2:100 


Steiner 


2*1 


2400 


Pierce 


2401 


2.500 


Scott 


2.501 


2600 


Devisadero 


2601 


2700 


Broderick 


2701 


2800 


Baker 


2801 



Tallcjo Court, S s Val- 
lejo bet Mason and Taylor 

Vallejo riaoe, S s (521) 

Vallejo ,bet Dupont and 
Stockton 
Valley, Ws Old San Jos6 
Road bet Twenty-eight 
and Twenty-ninth 

Valparaiso. W s (1911) 
Mason bet Filbert and 
Greenwich 

Van Ness ATenne, N s 

Market bet Franklin and 
Polk N to the bay 

East. Street. West Side. 
2 Market and Oak 1 

Hickory Avenue 

100 FeU 101 

Linden Avenue 

200 Hayes 201 

Ivv Avenue 
300 Grove 301 

Birch Avenue 
400 Fulton 401 

Ash Avenue 

500 McAllister 501 

Locust Avenue 
600 Tyler 601 

Elm Avenue 
700 Turk 701 

Laurel Avenue 
800 Eddy 801 

Willow Avenue 
900 Ellis 901 

Olive Avenue 



1000 O'Farrell 1001 

Mvrtle Avenue 

HOC Geary 1101 

Cedar Avenue 

1200 Post 1201 

Walnut Avenue 

1300 Sutter 1301 

Fern Avenue 

1400 Bush 1401 

Austin 

1500 Pine 1501 

1600 California 1601 

1700 Sacramento 1701 

ISOO Clay 1801 

i;>00 Washington 1901 

2000 Jackson 2001 

2100 Pacific 2101 

2200 Broadway 2201 

2S00 Vallejo 2^01 

2400 Green 2401 

2500 Union 2501 

2600 Filbert 2601 

2700 Greenwich 2701 

2S00 Lombard 2S01 

2y00 Chestnut 2901 

3000 Francisco 3001 

3100 Bay 3101 

3200 North Point 3201 

3300 Beach 3301 

3400 Jefferson 3401 

3500 Tonquin 3301 

ie) Lewis (e) 
Vanden ater, W s Pow- 
ell bet Francisco and Bay 
W to Taylor 

Varenue, N s (420) Vnion 
bet Kearny and Dupont 

Va»sar Place, S s f613) 
Harrison bet Second and 
Thurd 

Ver Alelir. E s ^ 116) Kear- 
ny bet Post and Sutter 

Vermont, from Mission 
Creek bet Kansas and Ne- 
braska S to Tulare 

Vernon I»lace, Ws(326) 
Second bet Folsom and 
Harrison W'to Hawthorne 

Vernon I»Iaee,EsHyde 

bet Union and Green 

Veruon Place. S s (1007) 

Jackson bet Mason and 

Taylor 
Verona Place, E s (337) 

Third bet Folsom. and 

Harrison 

VieksburiT, S s Twenty- 
tirst bet Church and San- 
chez S to Twenty-hfth 

Villa Place. E s Taylor 
bet l*ine and California 

Vincent or St. Vin- 
cent, N s 1,3161 Green bet 
Montgomery andKearny 
N to Union 

Virginia. N s 1 914) Wash- 
ington bet citookton and 
Powell N to Pacilic 

Vir&rinia Alle;*, W s 

1.505) Dupont bet Pine and 
California 

Virginia ATenne.from 

California Avenue SE to 
Cherubuseo, B. H. 

Virsiuia Place, N s 

(80li) Pa4_'itic bet Stockton 
and Powtll N to Broad- 
way 
Viseher Placc,EsBeale 
bet Market and Mission 

Voisrt, E of San Bruno 
Road, 4 miles from City 
Hall 

Vorratli Place, E 8 

(12(^,1 Larkui be t Bush and 
Pine 
Vultnre— ;see Columbia) 

Wall Place. N s Jackson 
bet Leavenworth and 
Hyde 



MOEGAIT & CO, have Prince's Bay Transplanted Oysters always on hand. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Eearny, Established 1852. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



81 



fl'allace Place, N sf612) 

Ciilifornia bet Kearny 
and Dupout 

Waller, junction Market 
and Octavia W to Lyon 

Walnnt, N s Cal.fornia 
bet Laurel and Lott X to 
Presidio Reservation 

Walnut Avenue. W s 
Larkin bet Post and Sut- 
ter W to Polk 

Ward, from Cortland Av- 
enue S to Crescent Ave- 
nue. B. H. 

Warren, .S s Thirtieth bet 
Whitney and Bartlett S 
to Palmer 

Wasbingrton, W s East 
bet Jackson and Clay W 
to First Avenue 

North. Street. South Side. 
2 East 1 

100 Drumm 101 

200 Daris 201 

Cedar 217 

300 Front GOl 

Battery 401 



400 



412 Custom House PI - 
500 Sansom 
532 Jones Alley 
600 Montgomery 

Montgomery Av 

Ilunhar Court 

Kearny 

Brenham Place 
744 Washington Alley- 



501 



700 



800 Dupont 

: Waverlv Place 

' SpoSbrd 

I 828 Ross 

900 Stockton 

— Havens Place 
914 Virginia 

1 913 Stone 

1 TASon Place 

.000 Powell 

— Codman Place 

— Wetmore Place 
100 Mason 
106 Adona Place 
200 Taylor 
300 Jones 

Priest 

Reed 

400 Leavenworth 

"" Hyde 

SOO Larkin 

KIO Polk 



641 
701 

727 

801 
811 
823 

901 
907 



919 
1001 
1005 
1017 
1101 

1201 
1301 
1319 
1.326 
1401 
1501 
1601 
1701 
SOO Van Ness Avenue 1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2S01 
2901 
3001 
3101 



900 Franklin 
JOG Gough 
LoO Octavia 
iOO Laguna 
no Buchanan 
mo Webster 
iOO Fillmore 
WO Steiner 
Pierce 
IOO Scott 
IOO Devisadero 
IOO Broderick 
100 Baker 
rasliii]E:<on Alley, N 
B (744) Washijigton bet 
Dupont and Kearny 



Waslilng^lon Avenue, 

8 s Mission bet Ninth and 
Tenth 

^Vashington Avenue, 

S s Precita Avenue bet 
Folsom and Columbia 
Place, B. H. 

WaKhinston Square, 

bet .Stockton, Filbert, 
Powell and Union 

Washoe Plaoe. Ns(71Gl 

Vallejo bet Powell and 
Mason 

Water, W s Mason bet 
Francisco and Chestnut 
W to Taylor 

Waverly Place, N s 

(810J Sacramento bet Du- 
pont and Stockton N to 
Washington 

Wayland, W s San Bru- 
no Road bet Bacon aud 
Wolsey, U. M. T. 

Wa.vne, S s Cortland Av- 
enue bet Gates and Kos- 
ciusko 

Webb, N s (532) California 
bet Montgomery and 
Kearny N to Sacramento 

Webb Place, W s Mason 
bet Union and Green 

W^ebster, N s Kate bet 
Buchanan and Fillmore 
N to the bay 



East. Street. Wot Side 


2 


Kate 


1 





Germania 




KKI 


Waller 


ini 


200 


Haight 


201 


300 


Page 


3(11 


411(1 


Oak 


4(11 




Hickory Avenue 


600 


Fell 

Linden Avenue 


501 


Situ 


Hayes 


Rfll 


7(KI 


Grove 


701 


8(K) 


Fulton 


801 


9IK) 


McAllister 


901 


10(K) 


Tyler 


1(101 


110(1 


Turk 


11(11 


1200 


Eddy 


I20I 


l.OKI 


Ellis 


1301 


140(1 


O'FarreU 


1401 


l.WO 


Geary 


1.501 


16(1(1 


Post 


1601 


17(K1 


Sutter 


1701 


1S(HI 


Bush 


1801 





Wildey 




I9(KI 


Pine 


1901 


20(1(1 


California 


2001 


21110 


Sacramento 


2101 


221H1 


Clav 


2201 


iiOO 


Washington 


2MI1 


24IHI 


Jackson 


2401 


2,1(10 


Pacific 


2.501 


20.10 


Broadway 


2601 


am 


Vallejo 


2701 


2.SIK1 


Green 


2801 


:m\ 


Union 


2901 


3000 


FUbert 


3001 



3100 Greenwich 3101 

3-2(;iO Lombard 3-201 

3:f00 Chestnut 3301 

3400 Francisco 3-101 

3500 Bay 3,W1 

3fiiX) North Point STiOi 

3700 Beach 3701 

3.S00 Jefferson 3801 

3900 Tonquin 3901 

(_e) Lewis (e) 

Webster. N s Lombard 
bet Kearny and Montr 
gomery N to Francisco 
Weldon, S s Crescent 
Avenue nr San Bruno 
Boad 
Wells ATenne* W s Do- 
lores bet Fifteenth and 
Sixteenth 
Wells Conrt or Ada, S 
s Lombard bet Dupont 
and Stockton 
Welsb, W s Zee bet Bry- 
ant and iJranuaii W to 
Fourth 
West Arenae. from San 
Jos6 Koad near Cortland 
Avenue.SE to Holly Park 
n>st £ud Alley, N s 
Green bet Hyde and Lar- 
kin K to L'niou 
Tl'etinore Pla.ce, N s 
1.1016; Clay bet Powell and 
Mason K to Washington 

Wbite, N s Vallejo bet 

Hyde and Larkin 
Wbile Place, Ss Bryant 

bet Seventh and Jiighth 

White Plaoe, E s (806) 

Jones bet Bush and butr 
ter 

Whitney, S s Thirtieth 
bet Dame and Warren s 
to Palmer 

TVbitney, Ns Sixteenth 
bet Howard and Mission 

Wilde.T, W s Webster bet 
Bush and Pine W to Stei- 
ner 

W^illard. N s Grattan nr 
Stan van N to Golden 
Gate Park 

William, Ns (420) O'Far- 
reU bet Jones and Taylor 
N to Post 

East. Street. West Side. 

2 O'FarreU 1 

100 Geary 101 

(e) Post (e) 

William Place, W b 

(10i3j Davis bet California 
and Sacramento 

Wllliamitt, Ss Silver Av- 
enue bet Goettingen and 
Holyoke, U. M. T. 

Williaiuson, Ns Point 
Lobos Avenue bet Boyce 
and Chase N to Laurel 
Hill Cemetery 



n'illon-. S s (929) Folsom 
bet Fifth and SLxth 

Willow, Es Valenciabet 
Seventeenth and Eight- 
eenth 

Willow Arenne, W s 

Larkin bet Ellis and Eddy 

Winans Alley. E s 

Eighth bet Howard and 
Tehama 

Winkle, E of San Bruno 
Boad 4 miles from City 
HaU 

Winslow, from Califor- 
nia Avenue S to Powhat- 
tan,B. H. 

Winter I.ane, E s (1716) 
Mason bet Union and 
Green 

Wisconsin, from the 
bay bet Arkansas and 
CaroUna S to Tulare 

Wolfe, from California 
Avenue E to Isabel, B.H. 

Wolsey, W s San Bruno 
Boad bet Wavland and 
Dwight, U. M. T. 

Wood, (now Eleventh"! S 
s Market bet Tenth and 
Twelfth SE to Mission 
Creek 

Wood, N s X-'oint Lobos 
Avenue bet Eugenie and 
Collins N to Laurel Hill 
Cemetery 

W^ool, from North Ave- 
nue S to Uortland Avenue 
B. H. 

Worden, N a Francisco 
bet Stockton aud Powell 

Yale, s 3 Silver Avenue 
bet Amherst and Cam- 
bridge, U. M. T. 

Xerba Buena,N s(1114) 
Sacramento bet Mason 
and Taylor N to Clay 

Volo, from the bay bet 
Sonoma and Yuba W to 
Potrero Avenue 

Yorli, from Mission Creek 
bet Hampshire and Bry- 
ant Avenue S to Serpen- 
tine Avenue 

Ynba, from the bay bet 
Yolo and Coiusa W to 
Nebraska 

Zini, from Napoleon S to 
Schneider 

Zoe, S s Bryant bet Third 
and Foui th SE to Bran 

Zoe Place, S s (315) Fol- 
som bet Fremont and 
Beale 



iPiEsip^isass'o iF®5a sssMiiiiDaA'ii'Ji jpwsaiaoAsssss",. 



FOURTH EDITION; REVISED AND CORRECTED TO DATE. 



IAN FRANCISCO STREET AND AVENUE GUIDE 

FOR. IST'S; 

Dntaining a reliable Map of the City, and many items of valuable information, use- 
ful for strangers visiting the Metropolis. One Volume, 24mo. Price, 75 Cents. 

HENRY O. LANGLET, Publisher. 






The Best and most Cleanly Family Baths in the City are at 113 Qeary. 
6 



San Pranoisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



o 
n 



BUILDINGS, BLOCKS, ROWS, WHARVES, ETC. 



PrBLIC BnLDI>«S. 

Alms House, San Mi^el or Mission Ocean House Road, 

41^ miles from City Hall 
City Hall, E s Keamy bet Merchant and Washington 
City Hall (New), junction Market and Larkin 
Countv Hospital, E s Potrero Av bet Twenty-second and 

Tw-entv-third 
County Hospital (snmll pox), S s San Bruno Road nr Ser- 
pentine Av 
County Jail, N s Broadway bet Keamy and Dupont 
Custoni House, NIV cor Washington and Battery 
Hall of Records, SE cor Keamy and Washington 
Industrial School. Old San Jos6 Koad, 5 miles from City Hall 
Post-office, NW cor Washington and Battery 
United States Appraiser's Store, SW cor Battery and Jack 
United States Appraiser's Store (New), E s Sansom bet 

Washington and Jackson 
United States Marine Hospital (New), Mountain Lake nr 

Presidio 
United States Mint (New), KW cor Mission and Fifth 
United States Mint (Old), 610 Commercial 

BFILDIXGS. 

Academy, N s Kne bet Montgomery and Sansom 
Alhambra, 325 Bush 
Alta California, 520 California 
Armon.' Hall, NE cor Montgomery and Sacramento 
Kancrotfs, 721-725 Market 
Bank California, NW cor California and Sansom 
Bella Union, W s Keamy nr Washington 
Beniis', G2G California 
Bradbun,', 52 Second 
Brittan's', SW cor California and Davis 
Capital, NW cor Keamy and Pine 

Central Pacific R. R. Co.'s, NE cor Fourth and Townsend 
Change House (Stevenson's), SW cor Montgomery and Cal 
Cochituate, 213 and 215 Sansom 
Cogswell's, SE cor Front and Clark 
College. 24 Post 
Colton's, 220 Third 

Commercial, N'W cor Pine and Battery 
Croak's, SE cor Mission and Third 
Davidson's, NW cor Montgomery and Commercial 
Dexter's, 417 Keamy 

Donohoe, Kelly & Co.'s, SE cor Montgomerj' and Sac 
Dooly's, N\V cor Sansom and Sutter 
Duncan's, 411^ California 

Exempt Fire Company, W s Brenham PI opp Plaza 
P'xpress, NE cor California and Montgomery 
Firemans Fund Insiirance Co.'s, SW cor Cal and Sansom 
Frank's, W s Brenham PI opp Plaza 
Franklin, 406-410 California 
Friedlander's, NE cor California and Sansom 
Fun ken stein's, NE cor Market and Sansom 
German Sa\ings and Loan Society's, 626 California 
Government House. NW cor Wa^ngt^n and Sansom 
Hayward's. 415-123 California 

Hibeniia SaWngs and Loan Society, NE cor Mont and Mkt 
Howard's, 521 and 523 Montgomery 
Johnson's, N s Sutter bet Montgomery and Kearny 
Levisnn Brothers', 134 Sutter 

London and San Francisco Bank, NW cor Cal and liCid 
Masonic Temple, NW cor Montgomery and Post 
Maxwell's, SW cor Keamy and Sutter 
MajTiard's, NW cor California and Battery 
McCreer>''8, NE and SE comers Montgomery and Pine 
MechaJiics" Institute, 27 Post 

Mechanics' PavilUun (Nyw), E s Eighth bet Mkt and Miss 
ilercantile Librar>-, 216 Bush 
I Merchants' Exchange, S s California bet Mont and San 
Murphy, Grant & Co.'s, NE cor Sansom and Btish 



Naglee's, SW cor Montgomery and Merchant 
Niantic, NW cor Clay and Sansom 
Odd Fellows', 323-327 Montgomery 
Pacific Bank, NW cor Sansom and Pine 
Parrotf s, NW cor Sacramento and Montgomery 
Phcenix, SW-eer Sansom and Jackson 
Pioneers', 803 Montgomery 
Reese's, 716-722 Washington 

Safe Deposit Co.'s, &E cor Montgomery and California 
San Francisco Gas Co.'s, First, Howard, and Natoma 
San Francisco Savings Union, NE cor Cal and Webb 
Sather's, NE cor Montgomery and Commercial 
Sa\ings and Loan Society's, 617-^21 Clay 
Sherman's, NE cor Montgomery and Clay 
St. ilark's, SW cor Keamy and Morton 
Stevenson's (now Change House). SW cor Mont and Cal 
Sullivan's, SW cor Dupont and Pacific 
Taliant & Co.'s, NE cor California and Battery 
The Howard, NT\* cor Stockton and O'Farrell 
Tucker's, NW cor MontgomerT,' and Sutter 
Union Insurance Co.'s, 416 and 41S California 
United States Court, NE cor Battery and Washington 
Webb's, 37 Second 

Well's, SW cor Montgomery and Clay 
West End Studio, NW cor Broadway and Larkin 
White House, NW cor Keamy and Post 
Whiting's, SE cor Sansom and Pine 
Young Men's Christian Association, 232 Sutter bet Keamy 
and Dupont 



HAI.I1S. 

American Protestant Association, 713 Mission 

Anthony's, 417 Bush 

Apollo, S08 Pacific 

Armorj', 134 Fourth 

Barra's, 118 First 

Central, cor Bush and Polk 

Charter Oak, 771 Market 

Corinthian, 31 Post 

Covenant, 105 Post 

Crusader, 1159 Mission 

Dashaway, 139 Post 

Druids", 413 Sutter 

Eureka Turn Verein, E s Powell bet California and Pine 

Good Templars', 747 Market 

Grand Amiy of the Republic, 71 New Montgomery 

Grand Central, SE cor Sixth and Market 

Hare's, Tenth Av, South S. F. 

Hiberaia, 246 Third 

Hoag*s, SW cor Sutter and Powell 

Horticultural, W s Stockton bet Post and Sutter 

Independent Order Red Men's, 510 Bush 

Irish American, 816 and SIS Howard 

Irish Confederation, 751 Market 

James', SE cor Fifth and Shipley 

Kessing^s, cor Tweuty-fii-st and Howard 

Masonic "Temple, NW cor Montgomery and Post 

Mayberry's, E s Mission bet Twentieth and Tn'enty-first 

Mechanics', SW cor First and Stevenson 

Mechanics' Institute, 27 Post 

Mercantile Library's, 216 Bush 

National, 320 Post 

Oak Oate Charter Oak), 771 Market 

Odd Fellows', 323-327 Montgomer>' 

Pacific, N s Bush bet Keamy and Dupont 

Philharmonic, NE ci>r Stockton and Jackson 

Pixley, NE cor Pacific and Polk 

Piatt's Music, 216 Montgomery 

Riggers' and Stevedores', 429 Pacific 

St. Cj-prian's, NW cor Jackson and Virginia 

Tammany, cor Folsom and Eighth 

Terpsichorean, N s Pacific nr Stockton 



Largest and Best Selected Stock Eastern Oysters at Morgan & Co.'s, 87 Cal. Marked 



p. VAN SCHAACZ & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 7H, and 715 Kearny, Established 1862. 



HALLS, BLOCKS, ROWS, WHARVES, ETC. 



83 



Turn Verein, N s O'Farrell bet Mason and Taylor 

Turn Verein (Old), N s Bush bet Stockton and Powell 

Vnion, S s Howard bet Third and Fourth 

Veteran's, 51(j Bryant 

Washington, 35-39 Eddy 

Young ilen'a Christian Association, 232 Sutter 

BLOCKS. 

Armory, NW cor New Montgomery and Howard 

Aslor, 625-633 Sacramento 

Eelden's, SW cor Bush and Montgomery 

Broadway, NW cor Broadway and Kearny 

California, SE cor California and Batten,- 

Center, S s Sixteenth bet Folsom and Shotwell 

Court, C36 Clay and 041 Merchant 

Custom House. SE cor Sansom and Sacramento 

Front Street, E s Front from Clay to Washington 

Harpending, S s Market bet First and Second 

Howard's, 627 Third 

Lick House, W s Montgomery from Post to Sutter 

Martin's, S s Market bet Seventh and Eighth 

Metropolitan, 8-14 Montgomery' Av 

Montgomery, E s Montgomerj- from Merchant to Wash 

Nevada, NW cor Montgomery- and Pine 

O'Donnell's, NE corVallejo and Dupont 

Oriental, SW cor Bush and Batterj' 

Park's, SE cor Valencia and Sixteenth 

Reese's, W s Batter)'^ bet Pine and California 

Russ House, W s Montgomery from Bush to Pine 

Safe Deposit, SE cor C^ifomia and Montgomery 

Shiels', junction Market and Post 

Union, NE cor Market and Kearny 

Virginia, N'W cor Stockton and Pacific 

Washington, 1-17 Montgomery Av 

Yankee, SW cor Front and Pine 



KOMS. 

Matnard's SE cor Pine and Battery 
South Park, Third bet Bryant and Brannan 
Tittel's, W s Clara Lane nr Sutt«r 
Trainor's, SE cor Kearny and Sutt«r 



WHAK^XS. 

Beale Street, foot Beale 

Broadway, foot Broadway 

Central Pacific R. R., foot Second 

Clay Street, foot Clay 

Commercial Street, foot Commercial 

CoweU's, extends from Battery bet Union and Filbert 

Dewey's, foot Third 

Dn.- Dock Co.'s, Hunter's Point 

East Street, from Market to Folsom 

Fillmore Street, foot Fillmore 

Fi >l-nm Street, foot Folsom 

Fr-'iit Street, cor Front and Vallejo 

i.rocnwich Dock, contiimation Battery 

Hi.thaway's, cor Spear and Bryant 

H irrison Street, foot Harrison 

H> l.bs', E s Long Bridge foot Fourth 

HMward Street, foot Howard 

India Dock, foot Battery 

Jackson Street, foot Jackson 

Larue's, East bet Market and Mission 

Lumbard Dock, continuation Lombard Street from San- 
som to Battery 

Main Street, foot Main 

Murket Street, foot Market 

Meiggs', from Francisco bet Pow and Mason, North Beach 

Merchants' Dry Dock Co.'s, cor Kearny and Bay 

Mission Street, foot Mission 

Montgomery and Francisco Street, foot Francisco 

N'Tth Point Dock, continuation Sansom from Lombard to 
Chestnut 

Oakland Fern.-, cor Davis and Pacific 

Oriental, foot First 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co.'s, Brannan and First 

Pacific Rolling Mills Co.'s, Potrero Point 

Pacific Street, foot Pacific 

Rincon, foot Steuart 

RiiKon Point, Spear bet Folsom and Harrison 

San Francisco Gas Co.'s Wliarf, foot Second 

Steamboat, Long Bridge 

Tiiird Street, foot Tliird 

\";dlejo Street, foot Vallejo 

\N" i^hington Street, foot Washington 



PLACES OF AMISEMENT, 

Bella Union Theater, 803 and 805 Kearny 
California Theater, N s B\ish bet Kearny and Dupont 
Chinese Theater (New), 023 Jackson 
Chinese Theater (Old), 818 Jackson 
City Gardens, S s Folsom bet Twelfth and Thirteenth 
German Theater (California), N s Bush bet Kear and Dup 
Maguire's New Theater, 325 Bush 
Maguire's Opera House, 318 Bush 
Pacific Museum of ^Vnatomy. 320 Montgomery 
Palace Amphitheater, SW cor Mission and New Mont 
San Francisco Recreation Grounds, cor Folsom and Twen- 
ty-fifth 
Wade's Opera House N s Mission bet Third and Fourth 
Woodward's Gardens, N s Mission bet Thirteenth and 
Fourteenth 



PROMIXEXT PLACES. 

Agricultural Fair Race Grounds, entrance cor Seventh 

Av and Fulton 
Alcatraces Island, 2 miles NW Telegraph Hill 
Angel Island, 5 miles from City Hall 
Bay View, nr Hunter's Point 5 miles S City Hall 
Bemal Heights, S of Sen^entine Av bet San Jos^ and San 

Bruno roads 
Black Point, junction Van Ness Av and Bay Shore 
Buena Vista Park, S of Haight bet Broderick and Lott 
Clark's Point, foot Broadway 
Cliff House, 04 miles W City Hall 
Dn.- Dock (California), Hunter's Point 
Faimiomit, \V s San Jose Road nr Thirtieth 
Farallones Islands, 29 miles from City Hall 
Fort Point nr the Golden Gate 4 miles W City Hall 
Garratt's Point, ^ mileSW Hunter's Point 
Golden Gate, miles W City Hall 
Golden Gate Driving Park, Point Lobos Avenue 5 miles 

from City HaU 
(Solden Gate Park, W of Stanyan bet D and H to Ocean, 

entrance Baker bet Oak and Fell 
Hayes Valley, N of Market and W of Larkin 
Hoiladay Heights, bet Clay. Wash, Gough, and Octavia 
Holly Park, SW s Bemal Heights nr San Jos6 Road 
Homestead. Point Lobos Avenue 5 miles from City Hall 
Hunter's Point, 5 miles SE City Hall 
Islais Creek Bridge, from the termination of Kentucky to 

Railroad Av 
Kensington, Howard nr Twenty-first 
Lagoon, Gough bet Lombard and Francisco 
Lagima de la Merced, 7i miles SW City HaU nr Ocean 

View House 
Lake Honda, i miles SW City HaU 
Lake^ille, nr Laguna de la Merced 
Lime Point, opposite Fort Point 

Lone Mountain, S of Point Lobos Avenue nrToU Gate 
Long Bridge, from foot Fourth to Potrero Nuevo 
Mission Creek, from Harrison and Nineteenth SE to the 

Bav 
Mission Dolores, 2^ mUes SW aty Hall 
Mountain Lake, 4 miles W City Hall bet Point Lobos and 

Presidio roads 
Mountain Lake Park, 4 miles W City HaU bet Point Lobos 

and Presidio roads 
North Beach, foot Powell W to Black Point 
North Point, foot Francisco 
Ocean View House, Ocean House Road, 7 mUes SW City 

Hall 
Ocean Side House, Beach Road 8 miles SW City Hall 
Ocean View Riding and Driving Park, Ocean House Road 

7 miles SW Citv HaU 
Pacific Heights, CaHfomia to Broadway bet Van Ness Av 

and Fillmore 
Point Lobos, Gi miles W City HaU 
Point San Quentin, Potrero Nuevo 
Potrero Heights, Potrero Nuevo nr Bay Shore 
Potrero Nuevo, 2\ miles S City Hall 
Presidio. 3 miles W City HaU 
Rincon Point, foot Harrison 
Russian Hill, Taylor bet Broadway and Green 
San Jr.se or Black Point, June Van Ness Av and Bay Shore 
Seal Rock, 6^ miles W City Hall 
Sjiring Valley, nr and S Lagoon 
Steamboat Point, foot Second 

Telegraph Hill, Montgomerj' from Broadway N to the Bay 
Tucker\-ilie. from Buchanan to Webster and Wash to Pac 
Visitacion Valley, nrthe Bay and San Mateo County Line 
Yerta Buena or Goat Island, 2 milts XE City HaU 



Children's Hair Cut in the most Recherche Manner at 113 Geary. 



JEWELEY made to order and EEPAIEED by D. W. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Merchant 



81 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



KEY TO PUBLIC OFFICES. 



FEDERAL. 

AoKNT Special, Treasury Department, Costom House third 

floor 

Army, Military Division of the Pacific, Commandant, As- 
sistant Adjutant-General, Assistant Inspector-Gene- 
nil. Chief C^uartermaster, Depot f Quartermaster, Chief 
Commissary Subsistence, Chief Paymaster. Medical 
Purveyor, Engineer Officer, Attending: Surg-eon, Med- 
ical Storekeeper, MV cor Stockton and O'Farrell 

Anny, Department of California, Commandant. Assistant 
Adjutant-General, Chief Quartermaster, Chief Com- 
missary- Subsistence, Chief Paymaster, Medical Direc- 
tor and Attending Surgeon, Judge Advocate, Military 
Storekeeper, NW cor Stockton and O'Farrell. Mili- 
tary Storekeeper in charge clothing depot, Verba Bu- 
ena Island 

Army, Engineers, Senior Engineers, 533 Kearny, Fortifi- 
cations Harbor S. F., 533 Kearny; Light-house, 105 
Stockton 

Army, Recruiting Rendezvous, 313 Kearny 

Army, Depots and Warehouses, NW cor Stockton and 
O'Farrell and Verba Buena Island 

Bankruptcy, Registers District California, 636 Clay and 24 
V. S. Court Building 

Board of Commissioners on Irrigation, 533 Eeamy 

Centennial Commissioner for California, 714 Shotwell 

Coast Survey, Western Coast Division, 214 Stockton 

Courts, United States Court Building, Circuit, rooms 2 
and 3 ; Herk, 1 ; District, 9 ; Clerk, 14 ; District At- 
torney, 6; Marshal, 5 ; Commissioners. 1 and 14 

Customs Port San Francisco, Collector, Naval Officer, and 
Sur\eyor, NW cor Washington and Battery ; Ap- 
praiser's Store, SW cor Battery and Jackson ; Inspec- 
tor Drugs, SW cor Jackson and Batterj' ; Baxge Offi- 
cer, foot Front ; DrajTuan, SW cor Jac^on and Bat 

Inspector Boilers, 11 IT. S. Court Building 

Inspector Hulls, U U. S. Court Building 

Internal Revenue. Agent, 419 California ; Collector; Gau- 
gers, 321 Battery ; Supenisor. 419 California 

Land Office. Register and Receiver, 506 Jackson 

Light-house. Twelfth District, 204 Montgomery 

Marine Hospital, NE cor Fifteenth and Mission 

Marine Hospital, Pacific Coast, Superintending Surgeon, 
715 Clay 

Mint Superintendent, NW cor Fifth and Mission ; Assay- 
er, Coiner, Melter and Refiner, NW cor Fifth and Mis- 
sion ; Treasurer, 4i5S Montgomery 

Na\-al Rendezvous, 504 Washington 

Na\y Paj-mastcr, 434 California 

Pension Agent Army and Na\y, 321 Washington 

Post-office, Postmaster, NW cor Washington and Battery ; 
Assistant Superintendent Railway Mail Service, 606 
Slontgomen- ; Special Agent. 6i36 Montgomery 

Secret Service Division, 5 U. S. Court Building 

Shipping Commissioner, NE cor Front and Jackson 

Signal Service, 42 Merchants' Exchange 

Supervising Inspector Steamboats, 11 U. S. Court Bldg 

Surveyor-General California, 306 Pine 

Treasurer Assistant, 428 Montgomery 

STATE. 

AssAVER State, 421 Montgomery 
i.sh Commissioners. 401 California 

Iarb<>r Conunissioners, 440 Jackson 

nmiigration Commissioner, 302 Davis 

n.-;pector Gas Meters, 531 Mission 

nsurance Ctjmmissioner, 401 California 

Wlut Examiners, 34 Merchants' Excbangn 

"ilou. offices U. S. Court Bmlding 

urt Wardens. 525 Front 
Tide Land Commissioners, 715 Clay 
Vacdne Agent, 235 Kearny 

COUXTY AXD CITT. 

AssBSSoa County, City Hall 22 first floor 
Attorney and Counselor, Citj' Hall 13 third floor 
Attorney District, 8 Montgomery Avenue 
AtU>nieV Police, City Hall 17 first floor 
Auditor County, (ily Hall 3 first floor 
Board Education. City Hall 22 second floor 
Board Equalization, City Hall 3 second floor 



Board Health, Mayor's Office aty Hall 

Board Revenue Fund Commissioners, Mayor's Office City 

HaU 
Board Supervisors Clerk of, City Hall 4 second floor 
Oerk County, City Hall 18 first floor 
Coroner County, 036 Clay room 11 
Fire Alarm and Police Telegraph, Brenham PI 
Fire Department Commissioners, 23 Kearny 
Fire Department Corporation Yard, N s Sacramento bet 

East and Drumm 
Fire Department Engineers, 23 Kearny 
Fire Marshal, City Hall IS third floor 
Funded Debt Commissioners 1855, Mayor's Office, City Hall 
Grand Jury Rooms, City Hall 21 third floor 
Great Register, City Hall 16 second floor 
Harbor Master, SW cor Vallejo and Davia 
Harbor Police, E s Davis nr Pacific 
Health Officer. 124 Geary 

Hospital, E 8 Potrero Av bet Twenty-second and Twenty- 
third 
Industrial School Department, Board Supervisors, office 

City Hall 4 second floor 
Jail, N s Broadway bet Kearny and Dupont 
Judge County Court, chambers 504 Kearny 
Judge Fifteenth District Court, chambers 8 Mont Avenue 
Judge Fourth District Coxut, chambers 29 Montgomery 

Block 
Judge Municipal Criminal Court, chambere 729 Montgom- 
ery 
Judge Nineteenth District Court, chambers 417 Kearny 
Judge Police Court, chambers City HaU second floor 
Judge Probate Court, chambers City Hall second floor 
Judge Third District Court, chambers 27 Post 
Judge Twelfth District Court, chambers 502 Montgomery 
Justices of the Peace, 804 and 806 Montgomery 
License Collector County, City Hall 7 second floor 
Marine Board, 302 Davis 
Market Inspector, 124 Geary 
Mayor City and County. City Hall first floor 
Park Commissioners, 302 Montgomery 
Physician City and County, office County Hospital 
Police Chief, City Hall, 9 and 11 first floor 
Police Commissioners, City Hall 11 first floor 
Pound Keeper, N s Pine bet Steiner and Pierce 
Public Administrator, 636 Clay room 3 
Quarantine Officer, 124 Geary 
Recorder Coimty, SE cor Washington and Kearny 
Sheriff County, City Hall S first floor 
Station House, City Hall basement 
Superintendent Common Schools, City Hall 22 second 

floor 
Superintendent Streets, basement City Hall cor Merchant 

and Dunbar Court 
Surveyor Coimty, 629 Washington 

Tax Collector County, City Hall cor Merchant 1 first floor 
Tl-easurer County, City Hall 3 first fioor 



CITY ORDIXAXC'E, XO. 285. 

HACKS AXD CABS — RATES OK FARR. 

A Hack for 1 person not exceeding 1 mile $1 50 

A Hack for 2 or more persons, not exceeding 1 mile 2 50 

Each additional mile for each passenger 50 

A Cab for 1 person not exceeding 1 mile 1 00 

A Cab for 2 or more persons, not exceeding 1 mile. . 1 50 

Eiach passenger for each additional mile 25 

A Cab for 2 persons, when engaged by the hour, to 
be computed for the time occupied in going and 
returning, including detention for the first hour 1 50 

Each subsequent hour so used 1 00 

A Hack for 4 or less persons, when engaged by the 
hour, to be computed for the time occupied in 
going and returning, including detention for the 

first hour 3 00 

Each subsequent hour so used 2 00 

No extra charge to any passenger shall be made for the 
ordinary amount of baggage. 

Sac. 5 OF Order 43. — " From the landing of any steam- 
boat to any p>int east of the west line of Mason Street, 
and north of the south line of Brannan Street east of 
Third Street, shall in all cases be estimated not to exceed 
one mile." 



Buy your Eastern Transplanted Oysters from first hand, Morgan Sn Co., 87 CaL Market. 



. p. VAN SCHAACE & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 7U, and 716 Zeamy, Estatlished 1862. 



NEWSPAPER AND PERIODICAL PRESS. 



, F. Hess & 
, F. Hess & 



ABEND POST (daily and weekly), S. F. Abend Post Co., 

535 California 
ALASKA HERALD, A. A. Stickney, 113 Leidesdorff 
ALTA CALIFORNIA (daily and weekly), Frederick Mac- 

Crellish & Co., 529 Calitoniia 
ANIMAL'S FKIEND (monthly), S. F. Society Prevention 

of Cruelty to Animals, ofBce 614 Merchant 
CALIFORNIA CHINA MAIL, Frederick Marriott, 607 

Merchant _ , , ^^.„ 

CALIFORNIA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, John Hill 

ajjent, 761 Market 
CALIFORNIA CHRONIK (German weekly), 

Co., 524 California 
CALIFORNIA DEMOKRAT (German daily), 

Co., 524 California 
CALIFORNIA FARMER (weekly), "Warren & Co., 320 Clay 
CALIFORNIA GRANGER (weekly), G. W. Henning, 416 

Market _ , . , , , ^ 

CALIFORNIA HORTICULTURIST (monthly), John H. 

Cannany & Co., 409 Washington „ „ . „„ 

CALIFORNIA JOURNAL AND SONTAOS GAST 

(weekly), Wentzel, Huefner & Co., 603 Washrngton 
CALIFORNIA MAIL BAG (monthly), Frederick Marriott, 

607 Merchant 
CALIFORNIA REPORTER (weekly). Bacon & Co., 508 

CALIFORNIA SKANDINAV, Hugo Nisbeth, 326 Sansom 
CALIFORNIA STAATS ZEITTNG (German weekly), F. 

Hess & Co., 524 California 
CHINA NEWS (weekly), Bogardus & Gordon, 632 Merch 
COAST REVIEW (insurance monthly), John G. Edwards, 

113 Leidcsdoi-ff , ,,,,,. 

COMMERCIAL FREIGHT CIRCULAR (monthly), John 
H. Carmany & Co., 409 Washington ,„„„, 

COMMERCIAL HERALD AND MARKET REVIEW 

(weekly), John H. Carmany & Co., 409 Washrngton 
COMMON "SENSE (weekly), W. N. Slocum, 236 Mont 
COURRIER DE SAN FRANCISCO (daily, weekly, and 

steamer), E. Dei bee, 636 Clay 
CRAFTSMAN THE (monthly), C. W. Crocker, 616 Bush 
DANSKE AMERIKANER (Scandinavian weekly), Iversen 

& Freese, 326 Sansom 
DIAL (semi-monthly). Dial Publishing Cfl., 409 Wash 
EL TECKOLOTE (Spanish daily), Sepulveda, Amola & 

Plmentel, 625 Merchant 
ELEVATOR (weekly), Philip A. Bell, 616 Battery 
EVANGELIST (Christian Church), C. Montgomery, 227 
Second , j ^ \ 

EVENING BULLETIN (evening, weekly, overland, etc.), 

S. F. Bulletin Co., 622 Montgomery 
EVENING POST (daily and weekly). Evening Post Pub- 
lishing Co. , 600 Montgomery 
EXAMINER (daily and weekly), Wilham S. Moss & Co., 

533 Washington „ „ , 

FIGARO (dramatic daily), John P. Bogardus, 532 Merch 
GOLDEN DAWN (monthly), Dora Darmoore, 532 Clay 
GOLDEN ERA (weekly), Thomas J. Foard, 605 Clay 
GUIDE (tri-weekly), Vandall & Voigt, 521 Clay 
HEALD-S COLLEGE JOURNAL (monthly), 24 Post 
HEBREW (weekly). Philo Jacoby, 612 Commercial 
HEBREW OBSERVER (weekly), W. Saalburg. 502 Mont 
HUMORIST (German weekly). Max Burckhardt, 523 

Keamv „ , , „ 

ILLUSTRATED PRESS (monthly), S. F. Journal of Com- 
merce Publication Co., 414 Clay 
IRISH NEWS (semi-monthly), Jeffrey Nunan, 432 Mont 
JOLLY GIANT (weekly), George Thistleton, 423 Wash 
LA SOf;iEDAD (semi-weekly), Frederico Epson, 621 San 
LA VOICE DEL POPOLO (Italian weekly), G. B. Cevas- 

co, 603 Washington , , > „ 

LA VOZ DEL NUEVO MUNDO (Spanish bi-weekly), Fe- 
lippe Fierro, 1022 Dupont 



m 
P" 

•-i 



LE PETIT JOURNAL (French weekly), Georges Franc- 
fort, 603 Washington 

LEAVES FOR FREE RELIGIOUS LIFE (German 
monthly), Friedrich Schueneniann-Pott, 602 Wash 

LIVING WAY (reUgious monthly), S. D. Shnonds, 409 
Washington 

MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS, Dewey & Co., 224 
Sansom , , , , 

MONITOR AND GUAEDLAN (Catholic weekly), Lyons 
& Barry, 622 Clay „ „ „ ,„„ 

MORNING CALL (daily), San Francisco CaU Co., 623 
Montgomery , „ :, ,«„ 

MUSICAL REVIEW (monthly), Sherman & Hyde, 139 

NEW AGE'(weekly), New Age Publishing Co., 420 Kearny 
OCCIDENT (Presbyterian weekly). Rev. Sylvester Wood- 
bridge, 434 California , „ ,„„ 
OVERLAND MONTHLY, John H. Carmany & Co., 409 

Washington 
PACIFIC (weekly), C. A. Klose, 603 Clay 
PACIFIC APPEAL (weekly), Peter Anderson, 611 San 
PACIFIC BAPTIST AND EVANGEL, Evangel Pubhsh- 

ing Co., 409 Washington ,. , , ^ u 

PACIFIC CHURCHMAN (Episcopal monthly), Cubery 

& CO., 414 Market . ,,.,,«. v «. r. 

PACIFIC COAST PULPIT (semi-monthly), Cubery a Co., 

414 Market „ „ , _ 

PACIFIC GROCER (monthly), Penoyer, HoIIaway & Co., 

409 Washington , , , t ,. n 

PACIFIC LAW REPORTER (daily and weekly), John P. 

Bogardus, 532 Merchant ,„,,„^,.-, 

PACIFIC MEDICAL AND SURGICAL JOURNAL 

(monthly), Drs. Henry Gibbons and Henry Gibbons 

Jr., 26 Montgomery „ „ „ .„„ 

PACIFIC METHODIST (weekly), W. B. Parsons, 409 

Washington ,. „ „ _„, 

PACIFIC ODD FELLOW (weekly), William HaUey, 631 

California , , , ^ .. ^ noA 

PACIFIC RURAL PRESS (weekly), Dewey & Co., 224 

PACIFIC°°STATES INDUSTRIAL GUIDE (monthly), 
Dewey & Co., 224 Sansom , 

PACIFIC YOUTH (monthlv), John F. Davis, 612 Sac 

PEOPLE'S VOICE, I. S, Nathan, 622 Clay ^ ^ , . 

RAILROAD GAZETTEER (monthly), H. S. Crocker & 
Co. , 401 Sansom ^ „ 

REAL ESTATE CIRCULAR (monthly), Thomas Magee, 
310 Montgomery , , , „ i r. „ i, 

REAL ESTATE REPORTER (weekly). Bacon & Co. pub- 
lishers, 608 Clay »,,, < t t> ti 

RESOURCES OF CALIFORNIA (monthly) J P. IL 
Wentworth & Co., NE cor Sacramento and LeidesdorS 

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE (daily and weekly), 
Charles De Young & Co., 606 Montgomery 

SAN FRANCISCO JOURNAL OF COMMERCE (month- 

SAN FRANCISCO MARKET REVIEW (weekly), John 

H Carmanv & Co., 409 Washington 
SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 

ADVERTISER (weekly), F. Marriott, 607 Merchant 
SPIRIT OF THE TIMES (weekly). Chase & Boruck, 621 

STATISTICIAN (monthly), Louis P. McCarthy, 423 Wash 
STOCK REPORT (daily and weekly), Wheeler & Co., bOS 
Sacramento _ ,„« «, ^ 

TEMPERANCE ROLL CALL, A. A. Bynon, 409 Wash- 
ington „ 
VOICE OF ISRAEL, I. S. Nathan, 622 Clay 
WESTERN LANCET (monthly). Western Lancet Pub- 
lishing Co. , 414 Market 
WINE DEALERS' GAZETTE (monthly). Wine Dealers 
Gazette Publishing Co., 606 Montgomery 



t« 
P' 

u 
§-• 

CO 

o 

I—. 

o 

o 












tl 






O 



OnlyHairdressing Saloon appropriated Ezolusively to use of Ladies at 113 Geary. 

I 6* 



L. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 513 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, CHANGES, REMOVALS, ETC, 

KECEIVED TOO LATE FOE EEGULAfi INSERTION. 



AlHSLBT James E., compositor, dwl 24 Sixth 

Aldrich W. A., capitalist, office 200 Sansom, dwl 1019 Pine 

Alhanibra Quicksilver Mining Co. (Sonoma), office 22 Mer- 

clianta' Exchange 
Allen Bessy Miss, assistant matron Protestant Orphan 

Aaylum, dwl W s Laglina bet Haight and Waller 
Allen William H., attorney at law, office C07 Washington, 

dwl 20U Ellis 
Alpers Charles {Alper$, Eoster »fr Co.), dwl SW cor Grove 

and Buchanan 
Alpers, Roster & Co. (Charles Alpers and Joseph Eoster), 

real-estate and business agents, 306 Montgomery 
American Consolidated Gold and Silver Mining Co. (Storey 

Co., Nev.), Joseph F. Atwill secretary, office 240 Mont 
Amgott Simon (Lasker i A.), dwl NW cor Stockton and 

Vallejo 
AMOS * DAVIS (John T. Ainos and ilUo S. Davis), 

millwrights and draftsmen, 112 Beale 
Anderson Albino, watchmaker, dwl 91G Stockton 
Anderson John, real estate, dwl cor Solano and Delaware 
Anderson William, salesman Singer Sewing Machine Co., 

dwl 13 O'Farrell 
Anthony John A., freight agent Central Pacific E. R., NE 

cor Fourth and Townsend, dwl 153 Octavia 
Armstrong David, salesman L. Schwartz, dwl 522 O'Far- 
rell, rear 
Arreola Margareto, deputy poundkeeper, dwl cor Mont- 
gomery Av and Vallejo 
Arrowsmith Augustus T., civil engineer, dwl Occidental 

Hotel 
Arzaga Joai, compositor C. A. Murdock & Co., 632 Clay 
Ascroft Alice Mme., modiste, 1223 Bush 
Ascroft Henry, clerk Pacific Mail S. S. Co., dwl 1223 Bush 
Atkinson George, deputy county assessor, dwl 213 Capp 
Atkinson James (Atkimun d- Ncuiands), dwl 41 Tehama 
Atkinson & Ncwiands {Janus Atkiiuion and William 

Xewlands), liquor saloon, 538 Market 
Atlantic Fire and Marine Ins. Co. (Pro^idence, R. I.), 

Famsworth & Clark agents, 420 California 
Atlantic Giant Powder Co. (New York), office 40 California 
Audinot Frani;ois, laborer, dwl 438 Broadway 
Axtell William F., compositor Golden Era, dwl 26 Minna 

Baolet D. J., chief steward Pacific Mail S. S. City of 

Peking 
Bailey Henrj-, lahorer, dwl E s Minnesota nr Butte 
Bailey Henry (Bassarl J: B.). dwl 128 O'Farrell 
Baker Eugene K. (Sharkey 4 B.), dwl 764 Harrison 
Baldridge M., stockbroker, 432 Montgomerj', dwl 1016 

Leavenworth 
B.tLnMI.\ ELI.IS J., president Commercial Bank, 

office 421 California, dwl 410 Geary 
Balfry John, bootmaker S. W. Rosenstock & Co., dwl 233 

Jessie 
Rallance Thomas, bootmaker S. W. Rosenstock & Co., dwl 

Battery nr Green 
ICA\'KM T. <.'., capitalist, office 634 Califoniia, dw! 724 

California 
Barber William (Doyle, B. i- Scripture), attorney at law 

olfiee 323 California, res San Rafael * ' 

Barbour Frederick A., cari>cnter Cameron & Hull, dwl 

1024 Pacific 
Bardwcll J. L. & Co., bagmakcrs, 105 Clay 
Barker J. H., capitalist, dwl Morton House 
Barrett .Matthew, deputy county assessor, dwl 30 Geaiy 
Barrilis Diego Count, consul of Italy, office SW cor Front 

and Jackson 
Barry E. L., deputy county assessor, dwl 311 Pine 
Bassart Ch.arle3 E. (Bansarl .!■ Bailey), dvl 12 Oak Grove 

Av 



Bassart & Bailey (Charles E. Bassart and Henry Bailey), 

wood and coal, 12S O'Farrell 
BAI'ER KMILH: (White <t B.), dwl Geary bet Fillmore 

and Steiner 
Bauman George (Plantz d- B.), dwl 1601 Dupont 
Beal William B., liquor saloon, NW cor Kearny and Sac- 
ramento, dwl 523 Kearny 
Beale St. Warehouse, William Giselman proprietor, cor 

Beale and Bryant 
Beales John T. (BealeS <!• Martin), dwl 1004 Hyde 
Beales & Martin (John T. Beales and John Martin), 

stockbrokers, 331 Montgomery 
Beaver Nathan, bookkeeper C. Klopstock & Co., dwl 309 

Third 
Beck F. W., clerk Southern Pac. R. R., dwl 304 Third 
Beck Henry, boot and shoemaker, 1108 Market, dwl 618 

Jessie 
Beers Hiram W., rector Trinity Church 
BEN.VET HENRY 'VT., druggist, 21 Third 
Bennett G. L., newsagent and usher California Theater, 

dwl 613* Stockton 
Bennette Harre E., compositor S. F. Directory, dwl Third 

bet Folsom and Harrison 
Benzcn Heurj-, clerk John Brommer, dwl NE cor Bryant 

and Si.\th 
Bernhardt Charles (Bernhardt i: Pavlsman), dwl 519 Pac 
Bernhardt & Paulsman (Charles Bernhardt and Henry 

Panlsman), wood and coal, SW cor Fourth and 

Brannan 
Berolzhime Jonas, dwl 922 Geary 
BEKRl' A CAPP (Fulton G. Berry and Charles S. 

Capp), real-estate and home agents, 418 Montgomery 
Bertrand George, caneworker, dwl 636 Commercial 
Beyersdorff Edward (Beyersdorffd- Oross), dwl 145 Silver 
Beyersdorft & Gross (Edieard Beyersdorff and John 

Gross), liquor saloon, 627 Washington 
Binder Charies C, clerk John J. Thelen, dwl 995 Market 
Birkmaier George L. (Kohler, Chase i Co.), dwl Windsor 

House 
Biziou Louis, wines and liquors, 1415 Dupont, dwl 14 

Sullivan's Building 
Blair David B. (Hart, Blair i- Co.), res Oakland 
Blake P. H., deputy county assessor, dwl NE cor Ferrie 

and Point Lobos Av 
Blankaert Victor J., wines and liquors, 634 Sacramento 
Blauvelt Edgar W., dwl 519 Pine 
Blochman E., fire and marine insurance agent, office 407 

Sansom, dwl 420 O'Farrell 
Bluhnie K., reporter Danske Amerikaner, dwl 317 Minna 
Boero Joseph, vegetable peddler, dwl W s Sixteenth bet 

Guerrero and Dolores 

Boumos (widow), dwl 438 Broadway 

Bowen J. Jespard, butcher, dwi 31 Anthony 

Boyle John T., secreUn' Eureka Lamp Co., dwl 1830 Bush 

Boysen Julius, hatter, 614 Merchant 

Boyson Thomas, physician, office and dwl 14 Geary 

Brand Ernest (Cellarius. B. a.- Woebcken), dwl Ss Folsom 

bet Si.\th and Seventh 
Brandon William & Co. (A. M. S. Carpenter), real-estate 

agents. 432 Montgomery 
Brannan Tliomas, shoemaker S. W. Rosenstock & Co., dwl 

Church PI 
BREC'KE\R(DGE R. «. <t CO. (William Etchells), 

wood and coal, SW cor Sutter and Powell 
Breckenridge Robert G. (R. G. Breckenridge it Co.), res 

Vallejo 
Breiling Frank, market, 12.1 Third, dwl 229} Minna 
Brette Justus A., dealer hides, etc., 365 Grove 
BRITISH AMERirA ASSI RANCE CO., Richard 

B. Irwin & Co. agents, office 200 Sansom 



Get your Eastern Transplanted Oysters from MOE&AIT & CO., 87 California Market. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC. 



86a 



Brodersen Christ, seaman, dwl 160 Clara 

BrowTi Charles, restaurant, 405 Pacific, dwl 702 Pacific 

BRO>V\ EUM'ARn, manager French Insurance Cor- 

porati'm (Pacific Department), office 310 California, 

dwl 110 Taylor 
Brown George A. (Brown S: Hayden), dwl 621 Pine 
Brown & Hayden (George A. Bromn and B. F. Hayden), 

liquor saloon, 621 Washington 

Bryon Mrs., furnished rooms, 21 Turk 

Biuuni Geor^'e W., liquor saloon, SW cor Montgomery 

and Merchant, dwl 621 Larkin 
Bumell Jules, tinsmith George H. Tay & Co., dwl 31 

Hinckley 
Burnett M., dwl 31 Hincklgy 
Bums A. J. Mrs., dwl 20 Montgomery 
Bush John, butcher T. Loewenstein & Co., dwl 240 Pacific 
Bustamante Rosa (widow), tailoress, dwl 723 Vallejo 
BVSMXLl ALEXANDER, bookbinder, paperruler, 

and blankbook manufacturer, 521 Clay, dwl 1005 

Union 
Byrne Garrett J. (Byrne, Landers & Byrne), dwl 2524 

Bush 
Byrne, Landers & Byrne (Garrett J. Byme^ David Lan- 
ders, and Michael Byrne), dry goods, 7 Montgomery 
Byrne Michael (Byrne, Landers A Byrne), dwl 923 Pacific 

Cahill John, grocbries and liquors, 654 Miss, dwl 1608 Hyde 
Cairns John, accountant, dwl 1238 Howard 
CALIFORMA BED rOi>IFORTER FACTORY, 

Du Rose & Banks proprietors, 9 Sutter 
California Fruit Drier, Spaulding & Bro. proprietors, 31 

Beale 
Callahan Edward, stockfitter S. W. Rosenstock & Co., dwl 

2 Jasper PI 
Callahan William Jr. , shoemaker S. W. Rosenstock & Co. , 

dwl 1 Jasper PI 
Callan & Nenn {Thomas CaUanand James Kevin), liquor 

saloon, SE cor Montgomery and Merchant 
Callen Samuel, carpenter, dwl Cincinnati House,Valencia 

nr Sixteenth 
Campbell James (Stephenson d- Co.), dwl 128 Fifth 
Capler Alfred, barkeeper 716 Montgomerj' 
Carolan James (Carolan, Hooker tfc Cory), res Sacra- 
mento City 
Carolan, Hooker & Co. (James Carolan, John A . Hooker, 
and Isaac H. Cory), importers and jobbers hardware, 
iron, etc., 117 and 119 California 
Carolina Francisca Miss, seamstress, dwl 43S Broadway 
Carpenter A. M. S. (William Brandon d- Co.), res Oakland 
Carter John, workman U. S. Mint, dwl 327^ Bryant 
Case George A., dentist, 212 Kearny, dwl 924 Pine 
Casper John, carpenter Jerry Robinson, dwl 22 Turk 
Caulfield Michael, bootmaker S. W. Rosenstock & Co., 

dwl 155 Minna 
CELLARIIIS, BRAXD A WOEBrKEN (CTiaWes Cel- 
larin-s, Ernest Brand, and Wilhelm M'oebcken), whole- 
sale wines and liquors, 611 Sansom 
Cellarius Charles (Cellarins, Brand <i: Woebeke7i), dwl 821 

Bush 
Central Belmont Silver Mining Co. (Nye Co., Nev.), Da- 
vid Wilder secretary, office 28 Merchants' Exchange 
Chanev W, H., professor astrology, dwl 122 First Av 
Chaplin Samuel D., clerk Whittier, Fuller & Co., dwl 1007 

California 
Chase A. Mrs., seamstress, dwl 438 Broadway 
Cherokee Flat Blue Gravel Mining Co., O. H. Bogart sec- 
retary, office 402 Montgomery 
Child & Maguire (Edwin F. Child and George E. Ma- 

guire), stockbrokers, 433 California 
Christy & Wise (John H. Wise and Thomas Denigan), 

wool commission merchants, 607 Front 
Clark Charles C, boottreer S. W. Rosenstock & Co., dwl 

73 Natoma 
Clark Daniel, seaman, dwl Sanders' Hotel 
Clark William H., attorney at law, office 808 Montgomery, 

dwl 704.V Mission 
CLARKE'S POINT WAREHOFSE, J. F. Haycock 

i-V Co. proprietors, NW cor Front and Broadway 
Cla^Mn Adelbert B., wines and liquors, wholesale and re- 
tail, 119 Sutter, dwl Chattanooga bet Twenty-first 
and Twenty-second 
Cluyburgh Simon (Poly, Heilhron & Co.), dwl 27 Sixth 
Cla^tiin Jennie Miss, dwl 523 Kearny 

Cleinencia , gardener, dwl 438 Broadway 

Cobb A. J. Mme., clairvoyant physician, 118 Post 
Cuchrane J. P., deputy county assessor, dwl 603 Bush 
Cochrane & Dean (EdiciJi 0. Cochrane and Charle8\0. 

D- an), dentists, NE cor Kearny and Post 
CofTee John T., observationist, dwl 362 Jessie 



Coffin Walter, drajTnan, dwl 751 Market 

Cohen Paul, hatter, dwl 47 Minna 

Cole George N. (Showers, Jewell tfc C), res Stockton 

COLEMAN JOHN W. €., secretarj Mexican G. & S. 
M. Co., office 419 California room 28, dwl 935 Sutter 

Coli Alessio & Co. (Alesftio Coli OJid Alfonso Quilici), 
wood, coal, and charcoal, 907 Washington 

Colton Alric O., attorney at law, office 52 Montgomery 
Block, dwl SW cor Webster and O'Farrell 

Colton Franklin D., attorney at law, office 52 Montgomery 
Block, dwl SWcor Webster and O'Farrell 

COMMERCIAL BANK, E. J. Baldwin president, Seth 
Pinkham cashier, 421 California 

Conners John (Murphy d- C.), res Oakland 

Constant , butcher, dwl 438 Broadway 

CONSUL HONDURAS, William V. WeUs, office SW 
cor Sutter and Hyde 

Convis Charles E., real estate, dwl 1104 Sacramento 

Conway John (Purinton & Co.), dwl 915 Jackson 

Cook Charles W., dwl 1903 Stockt<:.n 

Cook I. & Co. (Joseph Corin), trunk manufacturers, fac- 
tory 30 and 32 California, salesrooms NW cor Slont- 
gomerj* and Sutter and 411 Kearny 

Coons John T. W. (J. T. W. Coons *£; Co.), dwl 749 Minna 

Cook Albert O. , leather belting and hosemaker Horatio 
N. Cook, dwl 235 Kearny 

Cook A. O. Mrs., hair jeweliy and flower preserving, 235 
Kearny 

Cook A. S., broker, dwl 224 Post 

Cook Isaac (/. Cook d: Co.), dwl 212 Sutter 

COOK JAMES D., architect, office 509 Kearny, dwl E 
s Thirteenth nr Mission 

Corbridge William F. , clerk Auditor's Office Southern Pac. 
R. R., dwl 522 Jones 

Corin Joseph (/. Cook tfc Co.), dwl Russ House 

CORVILLE <£ HOLDER (E-merson Corville and 
Thomas Holder), oyster saloon, 336 Kearny 

Cory Isaac H. (Carolan, Hooker tt Co.), dwl 316 Oak 

Cosgrove Patrick, solicitor Thomas Chandler, dwl 1 Fran- 
cisco 

Coubrough Henry Jr. (Hart, Blair & Co.), and agent 
London and Lancashire Fire Ins. Co. and Scottish 
Commercial Ins. Co. , office 318 California, dwl 318 Turk 

Cox James W., commission merchant, wool, hides, leath- 
er, and blacking, NW cor Front and Green 

Craig William H., dwl SE cor Twenty-fourth and Ala- 
bama 

Crawford William, manufacturer bed and sofa springs 
73 New Montgomery, dwl 413 Folsom 

Crist A. B. , agent stm Amelia Broadway Wharf, dwl Cos- 
mopolitan Hotel 

Crone Peter, agent Osbom's Patent Seal Presses, office and 
dwl 331 Mmna 

CYosby S. J. Mrs., human hair, 1106 Market 

CtDDY «lfe Ht'f^HES (John Cuddy and Edward C. 
Hitghes), book and jobprinters, 511 Sansom 

Cumraings W. J., dwl 523 Kearny 

Cummings & Sons (Williavi, William Jr., and Louis), 
watchmakers and jewelers, 327 Kearny 

Curtiss Charles S., bookkeeper Walter E. Dean, dwl 22 
Twelfth 

CFRRl' FRANCIS I., propnetor S. F. Boiler Works, 
123 and 125 Beale, dwl N s Page bet Buchanan and 
Laguna 

Cutter B. B. (Kirkpatrick, Cutter 6: Co.), dwl 930 Market 

Dalet Charles H. (Vaughn d- D.), dwl 926 Market 

Daly Patrick J., produce commission, 325 Washington, 

dwl W s Valencia bet Thirteenth and Fourteenth 
DALY A HAWKINS (James Daly and Michael Haw- 
kins), real-estate agents and money brokers, office 
220 Montgomerj' 
Dam George W. (Dam d- Myers), res Oakland 
Dam & Myers (George W. Dam and Louis W. Myers), 

real-estate agents, office 626 Montgomery 
Daniels W. E., clerk Brown & Hayden. dwl 1907 Stockton 
Dannenberg Joseph, patent braiding, 125 Sansom room 24, 

dwl 195 Hyde 
Davis George E., homeopathic physician, office 108 Stock- 
ton, dwl 1118 Sacramento 
Davis Horace (Horace Davis i- Co.), dwl 1521 California 
Dawson George, barkeeper, 716 Mont, dwl 646 Mission 
Dean Charles O. (Cochrane d; D.), dwl NW cor Jones and 

Chestnut 
Dean George, merchant, office 323 Front, dwl 427 Bush 
Dean T. B. (Dean d: Sutherland), dwl Russ House 
Dean & Sutherland (Thomas R. Dean and John Suther- 
land), wholesale butchers. First Av nr Kentucky, 
South S. F., office 53:^ Kearny 



adies should bear in mind that the Best Bathing Appliances are at 113 Geary. 



D. ¥. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, "Wholesale and Retail, cor. Merchant and Moni 



866 



SAN FRANCISCO DIEECTORT. 



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Deane C. T., physician, office SE cor Montgomery and 

Sutter, dwl 1V21 liush 
DEEKING JAMES H., wholesale boots and shoes, 

2S and 30 Sansom, and supervisor Sixth Ward, dwl 

819 California 
Deniren Henr^', tailor, dwl 438 Broadway 
DENHAK JAMES, superintendent Conunon Schools 

City and County, office 22 City Hall second floor, dwl 

318 Turk 
Dennigan James, clerk Banner Bros., dwl 142 Natoma 

Deuill , cook, dwl 438 Broadway , 

DEM'EV * fO., publishers Pacific States Industrial 

Guide, 224 Sansom 
Dockendiirff Oeorge, real-estate agent, office 606 Sacra- 
mento, dwl 726 Laguna . , „.- 
Doherty WiUiam K., physician, office 649 Clay, dwl 933 

Sutter , . _ 

Donohoe Michael, shoemaker S. W. Rosenstock & Co., 

dwl 420 Broadway 
DOULAND UEi\RY S., street contractor, office and 

dwl cor Dolores and Borland 
Dorr L. L., physician, office 33 Kearny 
Doud Philo, fanner, office 511 Bush 
DOYLE. BAKBER A S«'RIPTirKE (John T. Doyle, 

WiUiam Barber, and Ilenry D. Scripture), attor- 
neys at law, office 323 California 
Doyle John T. (Doyle, Barber & Scripture), res Menlo 

Park and 1032 Pine 
Doyle Nellie Miss, shoefltter, S. W. Rosenstock & Co., dwl 

' 49 Clementina 
DriscoU Dennis J., salesman L. Schwartz, dwl 454 Minna 
Duhem Auguste N., florist Miller & Sieyers, dwl 1224 

Bush 
Dunn Frank, steward 716 Montgomery, dwl 1102 Mont 

Ebbets George A., deputy county assessor, dwl cor Btish 
and Stockton 

Eells Rufus S., dwl E s ShotweU bet Nineteenth and 
Twentieth 

Egan Thomas, bootcrimper S. W. Rosenstock & Co., dwl 
305 First 

Eldredge K, C, president S. F. Cigar Box Co., office 132 
Berry, dwl 809 Jackson 

Elliott Frederick, advertising agent, office 411i California 
room 15 

Emerson A. J. , porter, 716 Montgomery 

ENGELRRECHT UERM.AN. importer, jobber, and 
manufacturer cigars and tobacco, 312-14 Front, dwl 
334 O'Farrell 

Engert A. F. C, salesman Haas Brothers, dwl 1120 Stock- 
ton 

Enos John S. (Enox ifc Whalen), dwl W s Chenery bet 
Thirtieth and Randall 

ENOS A WHALEN (John S. Enos aiid John H.Wha- 
len), attorneys at law, office 040 Clay 

Epes Ellery, real estate, office 420 Montgomery room 8, 
res .\Iameda 

Equitable Fire and Marine Ins. Co. (Providence, R. I.), 
Farnsworth & Clark, agents, 426 California 

Esten John, homeopathic physician, office 108 Stockton, 
dwl 228 McAllister 

Etcholls William (R. Q. Breckenridge cfc Co.), dwl 121 
Seventh 

Europa Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), office 419 Cali- 
fornia room 27 

Eveleth Fr.ank, butcher Charles H. Hazelton, dwl NW cor 
Gough and Pacific 

Excelsior Quicksilver Mining Co. (Sonoma), office 22 Mer- 
chants' Exchange 

Falls Stephen D., salesman Schafer & Co., dwl Russ 

House 
Farnum John E., attorney at law, office 622 Clay, res 

Oakland 
Favre Franijois (Favre & Jaujoti), dwl 539 Vallejo 
Favre & Jaujou (Frani^oii Favre and Eitgene Jaujou), 

importers wines, liquors, etc., 430 and 432 Jackson 
Ferguson William A., blacksmith, dwl New Railroad 

House 
Fernald William H., books and stationery, 1106 Market 
Fetter Benjamin M. (Ilxuiselman A Cu.), dwl 1824 flush 
Finnerty John Jr., shoemaker S. W. Rosenstock k Co., 

dwl 53 Shipley 
Fitzgerald Cecilia Miss, whipper S. W. Rosenstock & Co., 

dwl Mission nr Second 
Fitzpatrick John, bootmakers. W. Rosenstock & Co., dwl 

29 Minna 
FLOOB NOAH F., attorney at law, office and dwl 622 

Clay and 625 Merchant rooms 3 and 4 



Fogarty Thomas, laborer, dwl 551 Twentieth 

Folger Shubael M., custodian U. S. Marine Hospital Rin- 

con Point, dwl 180 Valencia nr Twenty-fourth 
Folsom George T., general accountant Office Southern 
Pac. R. R., NE cor Fourth and Townsend room 34, 
dwl 718 California ^ , „ . 

Foran Thomas, driver with Kelly & Swanton, dwl Occi- 
dental House 
Foss Oscar, photographic stock, 612 Washington 
Fonts Clarence L., draftsman, dwl 1023 Powell 
Fonts Daniel L., merchant, dwl 1023 Powell 
Fouts Maria Mrs., milliner, 1006 Stockton, dwl 1023 Pow 
Fox H. A. , deputy county assessor, dwl 355 Clementina 
Fraueiiholz Phillip (Fraiienholz J; Co.), dwl 135 Chestnut 
Frauenholz & Co. (Phillip Frauenholz and John F. 
Schicrhold), proprietors Bavaria Brewery, Montgom- 
ery Av bet Vallejo and Green 
FRENCH INSURANCE CORPORATION (Fire), Ed- 
ward Brown agent, office 310 California 
Fromberg A., auctioneer, 607 California, dwl 45 Freelon 
Fuller A. L. (A. L. * M. J. Fuller), res San Leandro 
FULLER A. I. A M. J., real-estate agents, 432 Mont 
Fuller M. J. (A. L. dt- M. J. Fuller), dwl 613 Stockton 

Gaoe Henry T., attorney at law, office 59 Merchants' Ex- 
change 
Gale Alfred Y. (Woods it G.), dwl 421 Fourth 
Cans P. (WaUher A G.), dwl 14 Natoma 
Gansevoort James, salesman Kimball Manuf. Co., dwl 423 

Second 
Gardiner George D. (George D. Gardiner & Co.), dwl 919 

Post 
GARDINER GEORGE D. A CO., (John R. Gardi- 
er), importers and manufacturers watches, jewelry, 
diamonds, etc. , 302 Montgomery 
Gardiner John R. (George D. Gardiner A Co.), dwl NW 

cor California and Jones 
Garlick James O., porter Brittan, Holbrook & Co., dwl 

1016 Taylor 
Gavan Michael J., dry goods, 154 Third, dwl 433 Natoma 
Gentry R. B. (Kirkpatrick, Cutter <(• Co.), dwl 817 Post 
Giann'ini Henry G. (Giannini it Marchi), dwl 2 Vernon 

PI nr Jackson 
Giannini & Marchi (Henry G. Giannini and John Mar- 
ch i), fruits and vegeubles, 529 Merchant 
GIANT POWDER CO., office secretary and treasu- 
rer 40 California 
Gibbon John, chairshaper S. F. Manufacturing Co., dwl 

520 Mission 
Gibson George R, physician, office National Surgical 

Institute, 319 Bush 
Gilmore Charles M., paying teller London and San Fran- 
cisco Bank, dwl Cliff House Road 
Giselman William, agent S. Clinton Hastings and propn- 
etor Beale St. Warehouse, office 2 Court Block, dwl 
Russ House 
Goemer George & Co. (John Nielso^l), emploj-ment office, 

523 Kearny 
Gofl Charles P., attorney at law, office 622 Clay and 625 

Merchant rooms 3 and 4 
GOLLT J. B. A CO. (Leon Golly), publishers, book- 
sellers, and importers, 31 Kearny 
Golly Leon (J. B. Golly i- Co.), dwl 620 Filbert 
GOOBHIND RICHARD A CO., commission mer- 
chants, general agents, and money brokers, office 429 
Montgomery 
Gordon Emily Miss, fruits and spices, 1061 Market 
Gouldin Thomas, hairdresser and teacher phonography, 

350 Fourth 
Grace Daniel, laborer, dwl cor Mission and Twentieth 
Green James, nurse, dwl NW cor Kearny and Sacramento 
Green John, wagonmaker and blacksmith, 100 Washing- 
ton, dwl 1003 Pacific 
Green's Line Sonoma Packets, Joseph Henrj' agent, La- 
rue's Wharf 
GREY Cl'RIL V. (Grey .t Brandon), dwl 1304 Post 
Grierson James, lithographer Britton, Rey & Co. , res Oak- 
land 
Griffin Arick M., carpenter, dwl S s Sixteenth nr Capp 
Gruenberg Max (Max Gruenherg i- Co.), dwl 1914 Sutter 

Haas Charles H., dwl 850 Market 
Habermehl Frederick, dressmaker, 2013 Mission 
Hadlock WiUiam, groceries, NE cor Twentieth and Gu- 
errero 
Hahn Joseph (Sfessinger ,t B.). dwl 90 Fair Oaks 
Hais Francis J., housepainter and kalsominer, 271 St«v 
HALE, PAGE A CO. (William E. IJale and JamfS 
11. Page), stockbrokers, office 14 Merchants' Exchange 



MOR&AIT & CO., 87 Cal. Market, always have the Best Eastern Transplanted Oyster 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Eearny, Established 1862. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC. 



86c 



Hall C. P., deputy comity assessor, dwl S24 Howard 
HaJl J. P.. deputy county assessor, dwl 1048 Folsom 
Hallidav D. & W.'. subscription a^nts, 142^^ Fourth 
Hallidav Da^id {D. ,i: W. HaliidauX dwl 142* Fourth 
Halhday William (D. tt W. Halliday), dwl 142^ Fourth 
Halpin Laurence, seaman, dwl 2*5 Steuart 
Hanlon Daniel, inspector Custom House, dwl S s Twenty- 
sixth bet Mission and Bartlett 
Hannan Joseph, stovemounter J. De La Montanj-a, dwl 

532 Howard 
HJlN'SCOM W, M'., proprietor Hope Iron Works, SE 
cor Miunesi.>ta and Santa Clara, Potrero, office 105 
Caliioniia, dwl 612 O'Farrell 
Hardy Frank, with Pacific Coast Collection Agency, office 

606 Montgomery room 22 
Harenburg EUwanlL. (Harenburg d: HoUwe^s), dwl XW 

cor Seventeenth and Church 
Harenburg^ & HoUwe^ (Edirard L. Harenbtirg and John 
HolUr-easX groceries and liquors, X^' cor Seventeenth 
and Church 
Harmstead Joseph B.. machinist, dwl 2225 Howard 
Hartmann Frederick E., bookkeeper Gleeson & Fell, dwl 

2609 Clav 
Hauser Conrad (Hildebrand 6: B.\ dwl 23 Jansen 
Hawkins J. M., gold and silver plater, 629 Washington 
Harden Benjamin F. (Brotm & H.), dwl 410 Kearny 
Hayes George {George Hayes dr Co.\ res Xew York 
Hayes George i Co., galvanized iron workers, 30 Harriet 
Heftl Balthazar, shipping agent for Mexican and Central 

American ports, office 504 R-itter\-, dwl 627 Com 
Held George (Held dt Kiefer), dwl 163 Tehama 
Held Simon, importer miliinery and straw goods, 412 Mar- 
ket, res New York 
Held & Kiefer (G'^orc/e Held and John Ki^fer), hairdress- 

ing and bathing' saloon, Grand Hotel, New Mont 
Henderson Da\id R., watchmaker and jeweler. 626 Clay 
Henry C. A., coal dealer, office 424 Mont, dwl 629 Geary 
Herr James J., stockbroker, office 417 California, res Oak- 
land 
HEM SO.\ KORERT, superintendent Union Gas Ma- 
chine Co., office 434 Montgomery, dwl 1612 Turk 
Hildebrand i: Hauser {Conrad Hildehrand and Conrad 

Hausir). junkdealers, 31S Francisco 
Hildebrandt George W., private school, 753 Mission 
Hilton W. H., deputy coimty assessor, dwl 602 Stockton 
Hinkle I. M.. physician, office National Siugical Insti- 
tute, 319 Bush 
Hirsch Joseph, dwl 11 Dikeman PI 
Hobe A. A. , deputy coimty assessor, dwl 602 Capp 
Hoeber Eugene G., printer Joseph Winterbum & Co., dwl 

1772 Folsom 
Hoeber Henry, measurer vessels and inspector Custom 

House, dwl 1772 Folsom 
Hoeber William A., printer John F. Brown, dwl 1772 Fol 
Hofleng Frederick, watchmaker and jeweler, clocks, etc, 

754 Market, dwl 119 OTarreU 
Holbrook Charles B., phvsician, office 926 Market 
Holder Thomas {CorvxUe d- H.). dwl 91S Larkin 
Holler Hennan {VoUbracht, H. d- Co.\ res Alameda 
Hollwegs John {Harenburg i- H.), dwl NW cor Seven- 
teenth and Church 
HOOPER F, P. A J. A,, wholesale lumber dealers 
and proprietors Trinidad Mills, office Pier 2t Steuart 
HOIVARD H, C, stockbroker, office 411^ California 

room 1, dwl 1928 Sutter 
Hort Charles D. {Morison^ Hutchinson <t Co.), dwl Russ 

House 
Hu^'hes James G. (Vimont, H. <Jt Co.), res Oakland 
Hughes William G. , cabinetmaker August Jungblut & Co. , 

dwl 31S Seventh 
Hume George W. {Vimont, Huqhe^ & Co.), res Oakland 
Hurlburt E. B., pastor First Baptist Church, dwl 224 Post 
Husselman Samuel B. {Husselman tt- Co.), dwl 16 Garden 
Hussehnan & Co. (Samuel B. Hu^s^lman, Benjamin M. 
Fetter, and W. S. Reytwids), California Land Agency, 
526 Keamv 
Hutchins C. B., phvsician, office and dwl S43 Slission 
Hutchins-^n Gardner S. (^Morison, H. <fc Co.), res Brook- 
Ij-n, N. Y. 

Irwi>- Robert, driver N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 113 

Welsh 
ITALY, Count Diego Barrilis consul, office SW cor Front 

and Jackson 

Jacksos Marcus A., bookkeeper Edward F. Hall & Co., 

dwl 42.^1 Natoma 
Jacobus JuU.^n El., clerk Hart & Goodman, dwl 115 Olive Av 
Jacobus Rebecca (widow), dwl 115 Ohve Av 



Jansen Romberg, watchmaker, 321 Kearny, dwl 347 Grove 
Jaujou Eugene (Favre <t J.), dwl 609 Greenwich 
Jewell Orla H. (Showers, JeiteU 6: Co.), dwl S Hubbard 
Johnson R. P., deputy county assessor, dwl NW cor Sec- 
ond and Folsom 
Jones John W., dry goods, 4 Third, dwl S56 Folsom 
Jordan George L. , as istant roister clerk Probate Court, 
dwl 1522 Broadway 

KAHX L. A H. A CO., importers watches and jew- 
elry, 112 Reamy 
Kalloch I. S. Rev., pastor Metropolitan Baptist Chiu-ch, 

dwl 1619 WasKin^on 
REWEDT EDMOXD €., importer carpets, oilcloths, 

etc., 729 Market, dwl Occidental Hotel 
KEXVEDY li. W., secretary Commercial Bank, office 

421 California, res Oakland 
Kennev George G., plumbing, gas, and steam fitting, 234 

Sutter, dWl 1703 Octaria 
Kent D. if- , clerk California Immigrant Union, dwl 208 

Eddv 
Kiefer John (Held d- K.), dwl 310 Sutter 
Kinney G. W. , mining secretary, 531 California room 2, 

dwl Overland House 
Knight Nehemiah R., clerk B. P. Flint & Co., res Oakland 
Kuowlton l>avid M., accountant and phonc^rapher, dwl 

700 Shotwell 
Knox John F., wool depot, storage, and grading, N 8 

Townsend bet Fifth and Sixth, dwl 323| Fifth 
Kollmver liN illiam A. , gilder and picture-framemaker, 419 

Pine, dwl 610 Powell 
Kull Theodore E. {Thomajt <t Co.\ dwl 1604 Post 
K.lXIiHA\ «& .IRMER (Louis Kunman, ifax Amv- 

er. and Xathan 3fayer), manufacturers cigars and 

dealers tobacco, 306 and 303 Sacramento 

Lauar Fire Insurance Co. (New York), Mayer & Belden 

agents, 313 California 
Leaw & Bro. (Charles Jf. and Laehman A.), cigars and 

tobacco, 509 Montgomerv and 301 Kearny 
Lewiston Silver Mining Co. "(Silver City, Nev.), office 113 

Leidesdorff 
Liebermann J. L, commission agent, dwl 614 Sutter 
Lindley & Co., merchants (Sacramento), office 405 Front 
Lindsay Thomas, manufacturing jeweler, 614 Merchant 
Lohrmann John (Lohrmann d- Simmer), dwl 75 Oregon 
Lohrmann & Siemer (Joh n Loh t ma nn a nd Derrick Sie- 

mcr), California Pickle Factory, 413 Drumm 
Lowell John F., accountant, office 330 Pine room 61 
Lucas, Gesner & Co. (John Lucas. J. William Lucas, and 

Conrad Gesner), plaster of Paris manufacturers, 215 

and 217 Main 

MacBeth Alexander, merchant tailor, 633 Washington 

dwl S24 Howard 
Macdonald A. C. (Titfanu d- Jf.), dwl 207 Kearny 
Maier Charles, boots and shoes, S34 and S36 Kearny, dwl 

1221 Keamv 
Main Alexander F., bookkeper Vimont, Hughes & Co., 

res Oakland 
Marcinkowski Joseph, merchant tailor, 7 Montgomery 

Av room 20 
Maritime Insurance Co. (Liverpool), Falkner, Bell & Co. 

agents, 430 California 
Martin John {Beales d- M.), dwl 600 Bush 
Maver Nathan (KuUman d- Armer\ dwl 922 Geaiy 
McElroy James G.. physician, dwl 1250 Mission 
McGettigan Patrick, shoemaker, 604 Mission 
McGraw' William, clerk Grand Opera House, dw! 29 Sec 
McKennev Henrv M., dwl 122 First Av 
McLaughlin E. Mrs., ladies' and gents' furnishing goods, 

1012 Stockton 
McLaughlin Joseph, dwl 1012 Stock-ton 
McLeod Donald W., agent American Tract Society, office 

757 Market, dwl 2 Vernon PI nr Second 
Meek Daniel K., bookkeeper James Munsell Jr., dwl 704 

Howard 
Meeker Dand (ifeeker, James d- Co.), dwl 1913 Sac 
Merchant's Insurance Co. (Pro\idence, R. I.), Famsworth 

^t Clark airents, 426 California 
HERRIFIELD A UOSE.SE& (Ed mn Merrijield and 

Levi Rcsener), Star Brewery. SE cor Eleventh and 

Folsom, depot 125 and 127 California 
Messinger Joseph (Mesnnger d- Hahn), dwl 214 Sansom 
Messinger & Hahn (Jc^iieph ^fe>^in{Jer and Joseph Hahn), 

manufacturing jewelers, SOS Market 
HE\I(A\ tOLD AXD SILVER MFSrVC €0. 

(Store v Co., Nev.). John W. C. Coleman Secretary, 

office 419 California room 28 



The most Artistic Work in Hairdressing is Performed at 113 Geary. 



FINE WATCHES and JEWELRY for Sal© by D. W. Laird. 613 Montgomery. 



SQd 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Milton Mining and Water Co., Henry Pichoir secretary, 
office 40 California 

Monahan Henry, bookkeeper Henrj- W. Bradley, dwi 217 
Elm Av 

MONSON B. H. & CO., printing, engraving, bookbinding, 
and lithographing, 50G Commercial 

Moore J. Murray, homeopathic physician, office 410 
Kearny, dwl 534 Bush 

Morey H. E. Mrs., clairvoyant, 212 Post 

Morison, Hutchinson & Co. {Thomas H. Morison, Gard- 
ner S. IIutcMiujion, Henry D. Pierce, and Charles 
/>. Hoyt), importers and manufacturers Star Brand 
Shirts, drawers, etc., 112 Bush 

Morison Thomas H. {Morison, Hutchinson (fc Co.), res 
Norwalk, Conn. 

Morse Elijah {Morse & Taylor), dwl 641 Mission 

Morse & Taylor {£-7//a/i Morse and WUlMin M. Taylor), 
housenn)vers, 041 Mission 

Morton Harn,-, operator Fire Alarm and Police Telegraph, 
Brenham PI 

Mott Julius H., business manager Musical Review Sher- 
man & Hyde, dwl 14 Perry 

Mott N. A. C. Mrs,. clair\'oyant, dwl 14 Perry 

Muri)hy Joseph, boileniiaker, dwl 53 Natoma 

Myers Louis W. {Dam tfc M.), dwl 1935 Broadway 

Nevin James (Callan tt jV.), dwl NW cor Montgomery 

and Vallejo 
XLM' A<;E (literary weekly), New Age Publishing Co. 

prnprietors, office 420 Kearny 
New Jersey Mutual Life Ins. Co. (Newark), James R. 

Garniss agent, 425 California 
New Orleans Ins. Co. (New Orleans), Andrew Baird agent, 

310 California 
Newport Fire and Marine Insvuunce Co. (Providence, 

H. I.), Famsworth & Clark agents, 426 California 
Nolan James, stevedore, dwl 335 Beale 
Northwestern Mutual Life Ins. Co. (Milwaukee, Wis.), J. 

A. Melcher & Son agents, 127 Kearny 
Nortj^tn Harry J., printer and correspondent, dwl 812 

Stockton 

O'IkOIIERTY GEORGE, stenographic reporter, dwl 
14 Eddy 

PACIFIC STATES IKDVSTRIAL GVIDE, Dewey 
& Co. publishers, 224 Sansom 

Paulsman Henn' (Bernhardt d- P.), dwl 322 Ritch 

Phillips & Cassady (S. P. Phillips and Allen Cassady), 
liqu'^r sali'on, NE cor Berrj' and Haggin 

PK'lIOlie 1IE\RV. secretary Giant Powder Co., At- 
lantic Giant Powder Co., and Milton Mining and 
Water Co., office 40 California, dwl 127 Montgomery 

Piedmont and Arlington Life Ins. Co. (Richmoud, Va"), 
John R. Stockman agent, 503 California 

Pierce Henry D. {Morison, Hutchinson iD Co.), dwl Occi- 
dental Hotel 

PINKHAM SETH, cashier Commercial Bank, office 
421 California, res Oakland 

Piatt William H., rector Grace Episcopal Church, SE cor 
Stockton and California 

Poindexter R. W., clerk James H. Latham & Co., dwl 208 
Eddy 

Purep Louis, watchmaker and jeweler, 230 Montgomery, 
dwl 1 Park Av 

Provost A. L.. physician, office and dwl (834) 894 Sutter 

Pre vost Joseph R., phvsician. office and dwl 894 Sutter 

PIEITCIIAUU MK'IEAEL G., acting consul for Mex- 
ico, office 100 Califonii;i room 24, dwl 902 Jackson 

Providence Washington Insurance Co. (Providence, R. I.), 
Famsworth & Clark agents, 426 California 

Purdy Fay H. {Purdy, Van Brunt X- Aobbiits), dwl 127 
Kearny 

PliRDV, VAN BRir.\T «t ROBBINS (Fay H. Pur- 
dy, Ocorqc- B. Van Brunt, and Edniuiui liohbins), 
stockbrokers, 405 Califoniia 

Purinton LTiarles P. (Purinton .f- Co.), dwl 915 Jackson 

Purint^m &Co. {Charles P. Purinton and JohnC&tiway), 
real-estate agents, 434 Montgomery 

Reoan Ellen Mrs., milliner, 1008 Market 

Reid William T., president Boys' High School, dwl 606 

Folsom 
Richardt Ferdinand, artist, dwl 1706 Leavenworth 
Richt€r Max, physician, office 112 Kearny 
Rittore Antoine, fish, 6 Clay St. Market, dwl 815 Vallejo, 

rear 
RORINSON ROBERT A., deputy superintendent 

streets, dwl 212 Post 



Rockman Morris, physician, office 519 Sacramento 

Ross Charles L., dwr413 Bush 

Rountree William S., clerk A. Roman & Co., dwl 1256 Cal 

Roux Mrs., embroidering and stamping, 128 Fourth 

Rowell Joseph Rev., pastor Mariners' Church, dwl 1416 
Sacramento 

San Francisco Brush Factory, Richard W. Simpson pro- 
prietor, 835 Harrison 
Sarles W. H., deputy countj' assessor, dwl 1205 Taylor 
Schierhold John F. (Frauenholz A- Co.), res Alameda 
Schleiden Joseph F. (Schlciden it School), dwl 511 Filbert 
Schleiden & School (Joseph F. Schleiden and Fra7ik W. 
F. School), commission merchants and agents Mexi- 
can and South American Line Packets, 504 Battery 
School Frank W. F. (Schleiden <i- S.), dwl cor Hickory 

Av and Buchanan 
Schottler Joseph F., real -estate agent, 724J Market, dwl 

342 Tehama 
Seaman ^Vrnon, Pacific Coast agency Type Writer, 9 

Montgomeiy, dwl 330 Sutter 
Silvey Robert, line repairer Fire Alarm and Police Tele- 
graph, Brenham PI 
Smith C. C., deputy county assessor, dwl 2100 Hvde 
Sontag Julian (Talb'A it- Co.), dwl 629 Washington 

Spears Mrs., fin-nished rooms, 681 Mission 

Squire Lovell, commission merchant, office 402 Front, dwl 

923 Washington 
Standard Soap Co. {Richard P. Thomas), office 204-208 

Sacramento 
Stanlev Charles A., engineer stm Tulare, dwl 027 Third 
Stephens Charles J. {Sutherland tt S.), dwl 600 Fourth 
Stevenson T. B., deputy county assessor, dwl 743 Pine 
Sutherland Farmer Sutherland (Sutherland tt Stephens), 

dw] 23 Hawthorne 
Sl'TBIEKLAN'D A" !^TEPUE%» {Sutherland Fantwr 
Sutherlami and Charles J. Stephens), stockbrokers, 
408 California 
Sweetser F. D., deputy county assessor, dwl 37 Second 
Swift George, office 9 Montgomery, res Oroville 

Talbot Charles (Talbot tt Co.), dwl NE cor Jackson and 

Larkin 
Talbot & Co. (Charles Talbot and Julian Sontag), 

Grangers' Foreign- American Emploj-ment Office, 629 

Washington 
Tifltanv Oscar F. (Tiffanvti: Macdonald), dwl 207 Kearny 
TIFEAXY A MACDONAJLU (Oscar F. Tiffany and 

A. C. J/acrfo?i-aid), real-estate and advertising agents, 

207 Kearny 
Todd John M., raining stocks, office 108 Leidesdorff 
Tracy William N., carpenter, dwl 1434 Pine 
Tucker George H. {Geor.je Hayes tfc Co.), dwl Cosmopoli- 
tan Hotel 
Tweedale T. S., janitor Mechanics' Pavilion, dwl NW cor 

Mission and Eighth 

UiDAL Ramon, veterinarv surgeon. 723 Vallejo 

UXOKR^VIEBTERS* FIRE PATROL OF SAX 
FRAX4'ISCO, E. D. Famsworth president, Charles 
R. Sttirj' secretary, headquarters SW cor Stevenson 
and Ecker 

FNIOX GAS MACHINE CO., Robert Hewson, super- 
intendent, office 434 Montgomery' 

Urquhart J. S., superintendent Fire Alarm and Police Tel- 
graph, office Brenham PI 

Verdenal John M., attorney at law, office 418 California 
room 3 

VIMOXT, HFGnES *!; CO. (Joseph N. Vimont, 
James G. Hiujbes, and George W. Hume), stockbro- 
kers, 426 Montgomery 

Vimont Joseph N. {Viuu>nt, Huohesd-Co.),dw\ 213 Turk 

Von Ronn, Hencke & Htgler (U'lV^Vim Von Bonn, Hcrr- 
inan and William Hcnck<\ and John H. Hegler), 
dairj' produce and provisions, 414 Clay 

Ward L. P.., deputy county assessor, dwl 331 Kearny 

Warren John, office 808 Montgo^nery 

Waters Charles, plumber and gasfitter, 10 O'Farrell - 

Weld Samuel, clerk, dwl 118 Sacramento 

'MJLLEV O. F. A rO, (Charles J. WUley), importers, 
manufacturers, and dealers carriages and wagons, 
427 Montgomery 

Wilson J. D., phj-sician, office and dwl 2200 Pine 

Winter Daniel, pictures, moldings, and frames, 211 Kear- 
ny, dwl 109 Taylor 

Woebcken Williani(Ct7/flrrJ'ws, Brand ib W.), res Alameda 

Wolff Sigmund, deputy county assessor, dwl 325 O'Farrell 



MOEGAN & CO., 87 California Market, deals in all kinds of Fresh Oysters. 



3. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, EstatUshed 1852. 



THE 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTOR!^ 



For the Year Commencing March 1, 1875. 



r 



S^ XoTicE. —JTam^-s too late for regular insertion, removals, changes, etc., which have occurred during the printi^ig 
of the icork. tcill he found on the pages immediatelii preceding this. 

For List of Boarding Houses. Motels, Lodgings, etc., see Busr>T:ss Directory, pp. 780. SIS. and 833; for Packets 
—Sail and Steam, see pp. &i8 and 862; for the Location of the Offices of the different Mining Companies, see Business 
DlKECTORY, p. 842. 



ABBRETIATIOXS. 



abv Above 

agt Agent 

assu Association 

av Avenue 

bIrig,..BuUcUiig- or BuildinRs 

bds Boards 

bet Bet^'een 

C. H Custom House 

col'd „ Colored 

com Commission 

cor Corner 

dept Department 

dwl Dwelling 

E East 

Int.Rev.. Internal Revenue 

h House 

imp Importer 



manuf Manufacturer 

mcbt Merchant 

Mis DoL Mission Dolores 

N North 

nr Near 

opp Opposite 

pi Place 

p. M Pacitic Mail 

P. O Post Office 

proptr Proprietor ■ 

res Resides or Residence ' 

K. R Railroad ' 

Rev Reverend 

r ms Rooms ' 

S South I 

s Side I 

S. F. F. D S. F. Fire Dep * 



stm,.Steamer or Steamship 

Supt Superintendent 

W West 

STREETS. 

Bat .-...Battery 

Bdwy Broadway 

Eran Brannan 

Cal California 

Clem. Clementina 

Com Commercial 

Dup Dupont 

Fol Foisom 

Har _ HarrLson 

How Howard 

Jacic. _ Jackson 

Keai'.„ Kearny 



Leav Leavenworth 

Leid Leidesdorflf 

Lomb Lombard 

Merch Merchant 

Mtn Mipua 

Miss Mission 

Mont Montgomery 

Pac Pacific 

Pow Powell 

Sac Sacramento 

San Sansom 

Sec Second 

Ship Shipley 

Stev Stevenson 

Steu Steuart 

Stock. Stockton 

Wash Washington 



Aabel Martin, Scandinavian Soc, 71 New Montgomery 
Aabet Joseph, laborer, dwl cor Rhode Island and Sixteenth 
Aalbertsburg Theodore, clerk I. T. Milliken, dwl 863 Miss 
Aar-ai A. Miss, teacher Eighth St. Grammar School, dwl 

131 i Perrj' 
Aanm A. H., salesman Davis Bros., dwl 26 Stockton 
Aaron Charles, mineralogist, dwl 314 Bush 
Aaron David, stamping and pinking, dwl 931 Sacramento 
Aaron Hannah (widow), dwl 131i Perry 
Aarun Joseph, hairdresser 534 Third, dwl 30 Garden 
Aaron Robert B., master mariner, dwl 810 Foisom 
Aaron Simon, merchant, dwl 733 Foisom 
Aarc^nson Anna (widow), toys and fancy articles, W s Sixth 

nr Minna 
Aaronsnn David, dwl 463 Jessie 

Abadie Emile, porter Denaveaux & Maison, dwl 705 Green 
Abadie Felice Mme., dressmaker, dwl 633 California 
Abadie Jean, tobacco factorj', 9 Polk Lane 
Ahadie Josej)h, baker, dwl ^33 California 
Al'ulie Joseph, waiter, dwl 636 Pacific 
Aladie Louis, butcher D. Sier. dwl S19 Broadway 
At.hey and Twenty-sLxth St. R. R. Assn, F. E. Luty sec- 
retary, office 507 Montgomer}' 
Abbey Homestead Association, F. E. Luty secretary, oflSce 

507 Montgomery' 
Abbey Sarah Miss, teacher, dwl 571 Bryant 
Abbev T., stoker stm Senator, dwl 533 Sacramento 
ABBOT, I>OW\I\G CO., manufacturers Concord 

carriages, Concord, N. H., Thomas S. Eastman a^ent, 

411-415 Battery 
Abb. 't George (E. Grisar & Co.), NW cor Townsend and 

Fifth 
Abb'^tt A. F., carpenter Palace Hotel 
Abb<:itt Annie (widow), boarding, 1406 Pine 



Abbott Charles H., agent, dwl 13 Eddy 

Abbott Charles M., clerk Newton Brothers & Co., dwl 611 

Mason 
Abbott Frank, cook 112 Kearny 

Abbott George, express wagon, cor Steuart and Market 
Abbott George F., carpenter Palace Hotel, dwl 452 Bart- 

lett 
Abbot Henry, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Abbott John M., lumberman, dwl Oil Mason 
Abbott Joseph E., machinehaud D. A. Macdonald & Co., 

dwl 413 Fourth 
Abbott Margaret E. (widow), lodgings, 80 Clementina 
Abbott Moses A. , inspector Custom House, dwl iS14 Wash 
Abbott Osbom, broker, olfice 304 Sansom, dwl 939 How 
Abbott Samuel S. , carpenter, dwl E s Mission nr Twenty- 
third 
Abbott Thomas, teamster, dwl S 8 Thirty-fifth Av nr L, 

South S. F. 
Abbott William, bookkeeper Methodist Book Depositoiy, 

dwl 815 Trier 
Abbott William, seaman, dwl 54 Sacramento 
Abel Alvah C, hassoekmaker, dwl 18 Oak Grove Av 
Abel Charles, master mariner, dwl IGO Steuart 
Abel E. B., carperrtec. dwl 227 Second 
Abel George A., clerk Wi A. Holcomb & Co., res Oakland 

Point \ 

Abel Ir\in L., solicitor, dwl 115 Webster 
Abel Lewis, clerk Marks & Co., dwl 15 Taylor 
Abel Richard, master mariner, dwl 214 Steuart 
Abel Robert F., seaman, dwl 210 Steaart 
Abelardo Jos6 (colored), seaman, dwl 7 Broadway 
ABELL ALEXAXDER G., grand secretarj- Grand 

Lodge F. and A M., office Masonic Temple, dwl 1027 

Washington 



The Best and most Cleanly Family Baths in the City are at 113 Geary. 



JEWELEY made to order and EEPAIEED by D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



88 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Abell I. L., journalist Evening Post, dwl W B Twenty- 
sixth nr Market 
ABELS S. Em attorney at law, office 628 Montgomery 

room 37. dwl S15 Union 
ABE.N'D POST (German daily and weekly) S. F. Abend 

Post Co. publi:>hers and proprietors, office 535 Cal 
Abercronibie Alaj^gie Sliss, capmaker Wolf Fleischer, dwl 

Railroad House cor Pacific and Sansom 
Aborn Edward S., oculist and aurist, office and dwl NE 

cor Post and Kearny 
Abraham Abraham, clothing-, 400 Pacific 
Abraliani Adolph, tailor, dwl 1 Elizabeth 
Abraham Gabriel, clothing and merchant tailor, 33 and 

35 Second, dwl 4 Hyde 
Abraham Henry, hats "and caps, 1012 Dupont, dwl 728 

Union 
Abraham Joseph, second-hand clothing, 721 Sansom 
Abraham Louis (3r. Spiro <!.- Co.), dwl 644 Sacramento 
Abraham Marks, hairdresser Simon Abraham, dwl SW 

cor Minna and Ninth 
Abraham Nathan, salesman Philip Abraham, dwl 9 Seventh 
Abraham Oie, tjcandinavian Soc, 71 New Montg-omery 
Abraham Philip, diy goods, 44 Sixth, dwl 9 Seventh 
Abraham Rebecca Miss, saleswoman with Philip Abra- 
ham, dwl 9 Seventh 
Abraham Simon, hairdresser, 860 Howard, dwl 721 San- 
som 
Abraham Wolf, expressman, dwl 247 Clementina 
Abrahams Ida Miss, seamstress I. Lash, 312 Sixth 
Abrahams Isaac, cluthing, 433 Pacific 
Abrahams Jacob, tinsmith Louis Leiser, dwl 248 Clem 
Abrahams Juim (colored), waiter Bohemian Club, dwl 

ltj06 Hyde 
Abrahams Jonas (Schnitzer d- A.), dwl 128 Olive Av 
Abrahams Luuis, clothing, 6 Clay, dwl 438 Natoma 
Abrahams Marks, peddler, dwl 248 Clementina 
Abrahams. See Abrams 

Abrahamson Abraham, seaman, dwl 18 Washington 
Abrahamson Alexander, clothing, 429 Keaniy, dwl 820 Miss 
Abrahamson Gustave, salesman David Mag^nes, dwl 733 

Geary 
Abrahamson Herman, salesman Schoenholz & Bros., dwl 

733 Geary 
Abrahamson Jacob, dwl 733 Geary 
Abrahamson Jacob, watchmaker Henry Zacharias, dwl 

1217 Mason 
Abrahamson Julius, clerk Becker & Jacoby, dwl 733 

Geary 
Abrahamson Niels, laborer, dwl E s San Bruno Road nr 

Thirty-fifth 
Abrahamson Peter, stoves and tinware, 919 Market, dwl 

1022 Hyde 
Abrahamson Solomon, seaman, dwl 20 Folsom 
Abram Robert, shipjoiner William Robinson, dwl 613 

Gough 
Abramovich Daniel (John i Daniel Abramovich), dwl 

1322 Polk 
Abramovich John (John tfc Da7iiel Abramovich), dwl 

1322 Pnlk 
Abramuvich John & Daniel, fruits and cigara, 1322 Polk 
Abrams Adolph, hairdresser Eugene Boisse, dwl 728 

Union 
Abrams Baron D., salesman Charles Kalisky, dwl SW cor 

Tyler and Van Ness Av 
Abrams David, market, S s Tyler nr Van Ness Av, dwl S 

W cor Tyler and Van Ness Av 
Abrams Edward C, trunkmaker, dwl 2032 Folsom 
Abrams Henry, printer, dwl 786 Folsom 
Abrams John (Abrams <£-■ Carroll), dwl Lick House 
Abrams Julius, hairdresser, dwl 786 Folsom 
Abrams Rachel (^idow), dwl 7S6 Folsom 
Abrams Samuel, real estate, office 310 Munt, dwl 507 Lomb 
Abrams Sarah H. Miss, clerk Altschul, Simon & Co., dwl 

SW cor Tj'ler and Van Ness Av 
Abrams Waverly, salesman Da^is Bros., dwl 23 Stockton 
ABRAMS A CARROLL (John AOraiiis and James 
A'. Carroll), importers and wholesale druggists, 206 
and 208 Battery 
Abramsky Charles, upholsterer Goodwin & Co., dwl Phil- 
adelphia House 
Abramson Adulph, clerk Louis Abrahams, dwl 1 Clay 
Abramson Edward, druggist and apothecary, 753 Clay 
Abrego Ysma«l, salesman Linforth, Kellogg & Co., dwl 

519 Folsom 
Academie Parisienne (French school), Mme. L. Forster 

principal, 912 Sutter 
ACADE.UY BUILDING, 330 Pine 
Academy of Notre Dame, E s Dolores bet Sixteenth and 
Seventeenth I 



ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, NW cor Cal and Dupont 

Acclimatizing Society, office 630 Howard 

Accolti Michael Rev., clergjTnan St. Igniatius College, dwl 

841 Market 
Aceset Jacob, gardener Laurel Hill Cemetery, dwl 616 

Octavia 
Aceues Alexander, shoemaker S. W. Rosenstock & Co., 

dwl 171 Clara 
Ach Eugenie Miss, dressmaker, dwl 516 Bush 
Acheson Thomas S. (Nye & A.), dwl 111 Taylor 
Achille Lompieur, dwl cor Mason and Pacific 
Achim August, brickmaker B. Bonnet, dwl cor T^a-enty- 

fomth and Sanchez 
Ackemoth Joseph L., blacksmith William A Mowry, dwl 

16 Washington Av 
Acker Frances, dressmaker, 213 Dupont 
Ackerman Arthur, clerk D. N. & E. Walter & Co., dwl 115 

Perrj' 
Ackei-man Brothers (Samiiel S., Hart S., Isidore 5., and 

Isidore H. Ackennan, and David Hauser), imports 

ers fancy goods, crockerj-, and general varieties, 209 

Sutter and 123 Kearny 
Ackerman Charles B., carpenter Palace Hotel, dwl 734 

Tehama 
ACKERMAN CHARLES L., attorney at law, office 

420 California, dwl 520 Eddy 
Ackerman Da\id. butcher Felix Uri, dwl 902 Clay 
Ackerman David G., conductor N. B. and Mission R. R. 
Ackerman David G., jeweler, dwl W s Stevenson bet 

Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
Ackerman Edward, salesman Hall & Lachman, dwl 115 

Perry 
Ackerman Hart S. (Ackerman Bros.), dwl 916 Sutter 
Ackerman Henry, cook, dwl 204 Steuart 
Ackerman Henry, jeweler George Finck, dwl 520 Eddy 
Ackerman Herman, conuuission merchant, dwl 202 Tyler 
Ackerman Hermann, master schr Johanuas, dwl 212 Steu 
Ackerman H\Tnan S., cashier Ackerman Bros., dwl 193 

Hyde 
Ackerman Isidore H. (Ackerm<in Bros.), dwl 916 Sutter 
Ackerman Isidore S. (Ackerman Bros.), dwl 916 Sutter 
Ackerman John D. , bookkeeper 414 Sansom, dwl 768 How 
Ackerman O. B., carpenter Palace Hotel, dwl 17 Auburn 
Ackeiman Samuel S. (Ackerman Bros.), dwl 916 Sutter 
Ackerman. See Akerman 
Ackersen Jacob, seaman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Ackerson Charles H., carpenter, dwl 215 Kearny 
Ackerson James, lather Palace Hotel 
Ackerson John W. (Hanso7i, A. d; Co.), res Tacoma, 

Washington Territory 
Ackerson L. Mrs., dwl 215 Jones 
Ackland Edward T., porter McCain, Flood & McClxire, 

dwl 106 Hickory Av 
Ackley Helen M. (\vidow), dwl 33 Mos8 
Ackley M. Mrs., dwl 14 Turk 
Ackner Christ, propertyman Bella Union Theater, dwl 411 

Sansom 
Ackrovd James, woolgrader Thomas Bailey & Co., dwl 

541 Foiuth 
Acocks George, butcher Pacific Mail S. S. Vasco de Gama 
Acors A. G. (widow), dwl 509 O'Farrell 
Acosta Donato, laborer, dwl 517 Vallejo 
Acton George, driver Charles H. Aitken, dwl 5 Wash 
Acton Martin, expressman, cor Fourth and Market, dwl 

340^ Shipley 
Acton Richard! hamessmaker J. C. Johnson & Co., dwl 

814 Mission 
Acton Thomas, gardener, dwl 1 Shipley 
Adair George B., {Pilsbury, A. d- Co.), dwl 764 Bryant 
Adair W. B., clerk filaj. George H. MendeU, dwl 515 Bush 
Adam (Jeorge, porter stm Mohongo 
Adam Michael, boots and shoes, dwl 247 Minna 
Adam Puttkimp, baker Frederick Kelterer, dwl cor Mi&- 

sion and Eugenia 
Adam Thomas (Adam & Kibbe), dwi 507 Gough 
ADAM A KIBBE (Thov\<ts A dam and Millard Kibbe), 
liquor saloons. Old Corner 516 Montg'omery cor Com- 
mercial, and junction Market, Geary, and Kearny 
Adami John, express wagon, cor Kearny and California, 

dwl 117 Virginia 
Adamich John, barkeeper 405 Pacific, dwl 409 Pacific 

Adams , searcher of deeds, dwl SE cor Green and 

Franklin 

Adams Mrs., dwl 719 Market 

Adams A., carpenter Palace Hotel 
Adams Adolph, waiter Lick House 
Adams Albert F. ('ifaTWon d- A.), and deputy collector 

U. S., internal revenue, dwl 202J Seventh 
Adams Alexander P. , surveyor, dwl 643 Second 



The place to get the Best Eastern Transplanted Oysters at MOEGAN & CO.'S. 



I p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 70S, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



mi 
* I 






Adams Alfred, hairdresser, NW cor O'Farrell and Devisa- 

dero 
Adams A. M. (A. iV. Adams <t Co.), dwl361 First 
Adams A. M. & Co. (Richard Staler a7id J. C. Geddei)^ 

locksmiths, 220 Fremont 
Adams Angeline Miss, dwl 912 Jackson 
Adams Anthony, carpenter, dwl 203 Post 
Adams B.. s&iman. dwl 20 Steuart 
ADAll!^, dlW A I'i^* ( William J. AdaTUS and Peter 

TauUr). lumber. Pier 17 Steuart 
Adams Charles, laborer, dwl 725 Brannan 
Adams Charles, master mariner, dwl cor Penngj'lvania 

and Solano 
Adams Charles, porter Babcock & Gould, 114 Sacramento 
Adams Charles D., clerk, dwl N s Market bet Lagima and 

Buchanan 
Adams Christian, gTjnsmith, locksmith, and bellhanger, 

508 Commercial, dwl 14 Jansen 
Adams Clara A. Miss, teacher Broadway Grammar School, 

dwl 1010 Hyde 
Adams Conrad, laborer Jackson Iron Foimdry, dwl 638 

Green 
Adams C. W., carpenter Palace Hotel 
Adams Cjtus (Cyrus Adfims <£; Co.), dwl 526 Post 
Adams Cynis & Co. (Enos Smith), importers and jobbers 

leaf tobacco, 419 and 421 Jackson 
Adams D. T., capitalist, dwl 700 California 
ADA^S EDSOV, real estate, office 44 Montgomery 

Bl'Ck. res Oakland 
Adams E. Evans Miss, dressmaker, dwl 710 Sutter 
Adams Edward, dwl 107 Chambers 
Adams Ehza (widow), dwl 12 Second Av 
Adams Emerson, market, 4 Pearly dwl N s Market bet 

Lagiina and Buchanan 
Adams F. , laborer Palace Hotel 

Adams Felix, paint«r Koble & Gallag'her, dwl 25 Pollard PI 
Adams Frank, conductor Potrero and B. V. R. R. 
Adams Frank, driver N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 21 

Louisa 
Adams Frank, stevedore, dwl Green bet Battery and San 
Adams Frank H., clerk McCain, Flood &, McClure, res 

Oakland 
Adams Frederick H. , attorney at law, office 606 Montgom- 
ery, dwl 52 Second 
Adams Ge':)rg:e, clerk J. W. Shehan. dwl 14 Jansen 
Adams George, machinist Pacific Rolling Mills 
Adams George M., foreman cutting room U. S. Mint, dwl 

347)^ Grove 
Adams George P., clerk S. F. Post-office, dwl 704 Powell 
Adams George R.. dwl 1533 Sutter 
Adams Grove (Hale d: A.), dwl 920 Pine 
Adams II. A., carpenter City R. R. 
Adams Hein-y, brewer Broadway Brewery, dwl 10 Polk 

Lane 
Adams Henry, upholsterer Grand Hotel 
Adams H. G., mason Palace Hotel 
Adams H. H., carjienter Palace Hotel 
Adams Hill Consolidated ilining Co. (Eureka, Nev.), office 

408 California room 4 
Adams Horace E., collector, dwl 520 Kearny 
Adams Hkusc. John C. Beach proprietor, 537 Sacramento 
Adams Howard N., cai-penter, dwl 27A Fom-th 
Adams Hugh, proprietor Hubbard House, 139 Fourth 
Adams J., carpenter, dwl 207 Second 
Adams Jacob, laborer Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl E s Illi- 
nois bet Napa and Shasta, rear 
Adams Jacob, proprietor Broadway Brewer>', 637 Broad- 
way, dwl 6 Scott PI 
Adams Jacob F. , carpenter Wlssinger & Payson, dwl 616 

Lombard 
Adams James, capitalist, dwl 962 Mission 
Adams James D.. lieutenant II. S. Coast Survsy stm 

Hassler, office 214 Stockton 
lAdams James H., dwl 1910 Hyde 
lAdams James S. (Adams dt Butler), dwl 416 Larkin 
Adams J. B., bootblack stand, 602 Market, dwl 636 Com 
Adams Joel, laborer New City Hall, dwl 725 Brannan 
Adams John, boxmaker Hobbs, Pomeroy & Co., dwl 414 

Post, rear 
Adams John, dra^Tnan National Flour Mills, dwl 615 

Hyde 

Adams John, waiter Lick House 
Adams John L., laborer Spring Yalley Water "W. Co. 
ADAMS .fOHX Q., attorney at law, office 604 Clay, 

dwl 1012 Taylor 
Adams John Q- , clerk General Freight Office Central Pa- 
cific R. R., dwl 24 Hawthorne 
Adams John Q., head postal clerk S. F. Post-office, dwl 

1027 Market 



Adams John S., clerk, dwl 545 Minna 

Adams Joseph, painter Noble & Gallagher, dwl 25 Pol- 
lard PI 

Adams Joseph A (]!^orton <L- Adatns), dwl 327 Larkin 

Adams Joseph W., soap and washing powdermakcr, 24 
Commercial, dwl 6 Central PI 

Adams Josephine M. Sliss, saleswoman Singer Manufact- 
uring Co., dwl 1716 Turk 

Adams J. P., bootblack stand, cor Kearny and Ver Mehr, 
dwl 509 Broadway 

Adams Lawson S. (of Admns, McNeill tt Co., Sacra- 
mento City), office 405 Front, dwl 825 Bush 

Adams Lewis, mason Palace Hotel 

Adams Nelson, shipcarpenter,, dwl 718 Howard 

Adams Nelson B., solicitor M. A. Sliller, dwl 32 Russ 

Adams Otis, steam pumpmaker, dwl S s Eleventh Av bet 
N and O, South S. F. 

Adams P. D. Miss, dressmaker, dwl 710 Sutter 

Adams Prosper F., carpenter Pacific Mail S. S. Co., dwl 
15 Fifth Av 

Adams Q. L., dentist, dwl 1515 Leavenworth 

Adams Rhoda (widow, colored), dwl 11 Scott PI 

Adams Richard, teamster, dwl N s Brannan bet Seventh 
and Eighth 

Adams Samuel, druggist, dwl 1533 Sutter 

Adams Samuel, seaman, dwl 140 Folsom 

Adams Samuel, shipearpenter Middlemas & Boole 

Adams Samuel B., watchman, dwl SW cor New Montgom- 
ery and Mission 

Adams Samuel J., dwl 516 Stevenson 

Adams Silas L., artesian wellborer, dwl 2207 Fillmore 

Adams William, dw! 14 De Boom 

Adams WiUiam, clerk Philips, Taber & Co., dwl 207 Kear 

Adams William, deckhand tug State Harbor Commis- 
sioners 

Adams William, gasfitter Bush & Milne 

Adams William, plasterer Palace Hotel, dwl 114 Jessie 

Adams William, printer, dwl 519 Pacific 

Adams William, stevedore, dwl 331 Green 

Adams William H., compositor Evening Bulletin, dwl 629 
Clay 

Adams M'illiam H., porter French, Gilman & Co., dwl W 
s Guen-ero bet Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth 

Adams William J. (Adaim, Blinn tD Co.), res Fair Oaks 
San Mateo Co. 

Adams William S., seaman, dwl 664 Howard 

Adams Zebdiel B., salesman Main & Winchester, dwl W s 
Fillmore bet Ellis and Eddy 

ADAlfiS A' BCTLEU (Jam<!S S. Adams and Thomas 
J. Butler), hay and grain, 53 Clay 

Adamson Andrew, seaman, dwl 2G Steuart 

Adamson David, machinist Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 
39 Stanford 

Adamson James, machinist Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 
39 Stanford 

Adamson Richard, salesman Michels, Friedlander & Co. , 
dwl 260 Clara 

Adamson W. H. R., bookkeeper Woods & Freeboni, dwl 
206 Lombard 

Adamy Abondio, cook 623 Commercial 

Adcoek Edwin, polisher L. & E. Emanuel, dwl 826 Folsom 

Adcock John T., clerk Knowland & Doe, dwl 208 Sec 

Adcoek Kate Mrs,, milliner W. J. Butler, dwl 826 Folsom 

Adcock Robert, stevedore, dwl 141 Clara 

Adcock Wiliam, porter Hobart, Wood & Co., dwl 56 Te- 
hama 

Addison S. L. Mrs., furnished rooms, 787 Mission 

Addoms Samuel K., salesman, dwl S s Thirteenth Av nr 
N, South S. F. 

Adelsberger Charles F.. cooper Hogan & Co., dwl 409 Pac 

Adelsdorffer Bertha Miss, seamstress I. Lash, 312 Sixth 

Adelsdorffer Eliza Miss, seamstress I. Lash. 312 Sixth 

Adelsdorfer Ernest (Ordcmtcin tfc Co.), dwl 1713 Powell 

Adelsdorfer Isaac, dwl 312 Sixth 

Adelsdorfer Joseph, merchant, office WN cor Battery and 
Califtimia, dwl 505 Van Ness Av 

Adelsdorfer Zacharia^, merchant, dwl 1713 Powell 

Adelstein Bernard, peddler, dwl 510 Post 

Adema William, helper Melter and Refiner's Department 
U. S. Mint, dwl 513 Howard, rear 

Ader William, cabinetmaker Field & Frei, dwl IS Morton 

Adkins Henry, real-estate airent, dwl 433 O'Farrell 

Adler Aaron A., salesman W. & I. Steinhart & Co. , dwl 
1113 Post 

Adler Abram, stevedore Menzies & Bmgham 

Adler Alexander, clerk Colman Bros., dwl 513 Post 

Adler Barnard, real estate, dwl 74S Howard 

Adler Bernard, tailor, 637 Tliird 

Adler Charles (W. X- /. Steiahart & Co.), dwl 1113 Post 



iiCIPIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTOEY, 1875-7, H. G. Langley, Publisher, S. 
7 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchan' 




Adler Charles, bookkeeper Sigmund Steinhart, dwl 1019 

Sutter 
Adler Charles, upholsterer Goodwin & Co., dwl 333 Bush 
Adler Charles E., salesman Fechheimer, Goodkind & Co., 

dwl 427 Bush 
Adler Da\id, bookkeeper M. Selig & Co., dwl 115 Eleventh 
Adler David, market, 419 Hayes 
Adter Elkan, baker}', 80G Larkin 
Adler Henr>*, machinist, dwl 037 Third 
Adler John, seaman, dwl 26 Steiiart 
Adler Julius, solicitor Union lusurance Co., dwl 513 Poet 
Adler Leopold (Sclnocrdt cfc A.), dwl 51S Stevenson 
Adler Leopold, dwl 637 Gean' 

Adler Lewis (Henry WiJikle d: Co.), dwl 339 Eddy 
Adler Lewis, bootmaker, 331 East, dwl 322 Green 
Adler Maurice, butcher, 302 Beale, dwl 115 Eleventh 
Adler Morris L., clerk, dwl 1114 Market 
Adler Muses, salesman W. & I. Steinhart & Co., dwl 1113 

Post 
Adler Robert, bootcutter Einstein Br.>8. & Co., dwl 115 

Eleventh 
Adler Solomon, dwl 734 Geary 

Adler Sulomon, clerk Ackerman Bros., dwl 748 Howard 
Adlin,^on Thomas L., liquor saloon, 524 Fourth 
.IWMIMSTRATOK Pl'BUC, office 3 and 4 Court 

Bl'.>ek Oi6 Clay 
Admiral Nelson Tunnel and Mining Co. (Little Cotton- 
wood, Utah), office 539 Califomia 
Adolphus Henr>-, physician, dwl 524 Filbert 
Adot Thomiis, shipcarpenter, dwl 15 Tehama, rear 
Adrian Adolph, barber, dwl 1437 Jlission 
Adrian George, hairdresser Louis L. Schoen,dwl22L*wiaPl 
Adrain William, merchant, dwl 629 California 
Adsit Elizabeth (widow), dwl 726 Sutter 
Aeile Charles (Aeils d: Sckulz), dwl Post nr Mason 
Aeils & Schulz (Charles Aeils and Frcdi'rick Schulz), 

liouor saloon, SW cor Keaniy and Commercial 
jETXA INSrKAXCE €0. of HarUord, Conn. (Fire), 

George C. Boardman manager, Henry Carlton Jr. 

agent, utfice 14 Merchants' Exchange 
iETXA IRON M'ORKS, Hanscom & Co. proprietors, 

SE cor Fremont and Tehama 
^tna Life Insurance Co. (Hartford, Conn.), Charles W. 

Daunals manager, office 504 Kearny 
Afbilay Antoine. dwl 2 Ridley 

AiHerbach Alice Miss, teacher music, dwl 728 Bdwy, rear 
Afflerbach Christian H. , pastor German Methodist Church, 

dwl 72S Broadway, rear 
Afflerbach Edmund, clerk Mathias Gray, dwl 72S Broad- 
way, rear 
Affrou Augustus B., salesman, dwl S Tj'ler 
A_ffron J. W. (widow), dressmaking. 8 T>-ler 
Afleck Addie Mrs., furnished nxmis, 12S Tyler 
Agurd. Foulkes i: Co. (Williaui D. Ajard and Thomas 

Fotdkes), importers and commission merchants, 38 

and 40 Califomia 
Agard George E. , salesman M. Rosenshine & Brother, dwl 

Wadsworth House 
Agard John A., clerk Agard, Foulkes & Co., dwl 311 

Green 
Agard WilHam A. T. , clerk Agard, Foulkes & Co. , dwl Sll 

Green 
Agard William B. (Aaard, Foulkes d- Co.), dwl 311 Green 
Agee Robert P. , wooddealer, dwl S 3 Bemal Heights nr 

Islais Creek 
Ager James E. (Bacon tt Co.), dwl 2C Second Av nr Seven- 
teenth 
Ager John E., bookkeeper Mutual Life Insurance Co. of 

New York, dwl 26 Second Av nr Seventeenth 
Agncw Gilmore, printer, dwl 512 Sixth 
Agnew John, dwl cor Ridley and Valencia 
Agnew John J., foreman S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 3C1 

Jessie 
Agnew Patrick, sbipcalker, dwl Na Lilly Av bet Octavia 

and Laguna 
Agnew R'ibert, laborer, dwl 917 Battery 
Agnew Samuel, porter Wilson, Merrj' & Co., SE cor 

Eighteenth and Mission 
Agnew Thumas. city agent State Investment and Ins. Co. , 

dwl 36 South Park 
Agnew Thomaa H., compositor Cuddy & Hughes, dwl 824 

Kearny 
Agnev William, teamster S. F. Gae Light C!o., dwl 6 

Tjler 
Agra Mountain Tmmel & M. Co. , A, D. Carpenter secre- 
tary, office 605 Clay 
Agrati Glulio, theatrical agent, dwl 440 Green 
Agricultural Fair Race Grounds, entrance cor Seventh Av 

and Fill ton 



Agrill John, liquor saloon, dwl 405 Kearny 

Aguale Felipe, laborer, dwl W s Railroad Av nr Fifth Av, 

South S. F. 
Aguayo Ant«3nio, cattle dealer, dwl 932 Clay 
Aguilar Francisco J., barber H. L. Van Geisterfield, dwl 

437 Green 
Aguilar James, cook Pacific Mail S. S. Salvador 
Aguilar Jos6 M., wagonmaker Joseph Belduke, dwl 1313 

Dupont 
Aguirre Juan M., real estate, dwl 2 Gardner Alley 
Aguirre Martin, clerk S. Lone, dwl 2 Gardner Alley 
Aguirre Peter (Fernandez i: A.), dwl 1 Gardner Alley 
Aguirre R. Michael, real estate, dwl 2 Dupont PI 
Aguirre Ramon M. (Romero ,!■ A.), dwl 1 Gardner Alley 
Aguirre Simon, barber, dwl 1023 Kearny 
Ah Ki (Chinese), messenger office Pacific Mail S. S. Co. 
Ah Kim (Chinese), rice, 760 Clay 

Ah Sam (Chinese), expressman, SE cor Dupont and Jack 
Aharen EUen (widow), dwl 414 Post, rear 
Aheam Daniel, deckhand stm Alice E. Garratt, Commer- 
cial St. "WTiarf 
Aheam John, deckhand stm Alice E. Garratt, Commer- 
cial St. \\'harf. 
Aheam Mary Miss, dressmaker, dwl 213i^ Tehama 
Aheam Michael, laborer R-^man Cathohc Orphan Asylum, 

South S. F. 
Aheam Thomas, blacksmith, dwl IS First 
Ahef Deitrich, butcher, dwl Sixth Av bet L and M, South 

S. F. 
Ahem Arthur, carpenter, dwl 372 Clementina 
Ahern Bat, laborer, dwl 372 Clementina 
Ahem David, oiler P. M. S. S. China 
Ahem Fannie Miss, saleswoman Mrs. M, A. Butler, dwl 

318 Clementina 
Ahem James, laborer, dwl 372 Clementina 
Ahem John, coachman James Irwin, NE cor Eleventh and 

Folsom 
Aliem M. A. Miss, teacher Eighth St. Primary Schoolj 

dwl W s Larkin nr SIcAllister 
Ahem Martin C^Aeni 0; Co.)^ dwl NW cor Jackson and 

Montgomery 
Ahem Mary («idow), dwl 563 Stevenson, rear 
Ahem Michael, bootmaker, dwl N s Ellis bet Pierce and 

Scott 
Ahem Morton (Ahern tfc Co;), dwl NE cor Washington 

and Montgomery' 
Ahem Patrick, carrier Monitor, dwl 622 Clay 
Ahem Patrick, laborer, dwl 372 Clementina 
Ahem Patrick, tailor, dwl 1604 California 
Ahem Peter, carpenter, dwl 310 Jessie 
Ahem Timothy, blacksmith, dwl 58 Jessie 
Ahem William, carpenter, dwl 372 Clementina 
Ahem William, laborer, dwl Shasta bet Hiinois and Mich- 
igan 
Ahem & Co. (Morton Ahern) ^txmt and commission mer- 
chants, 208 Washington 
Aherae John M., groceries and liquors, NW cor Larkin 

and Ash Av 
Aheme P., driver Market St. R. R. 
Aheme Patrick O., lamplighter S. F. Ga8 Light Co., dwl 

727 ElUs 
Ahgru L. , dwl 123 Jackson 

Ahlars Henr)*, waiter Joseph Le\vi9, dwl 150 Steuart 
AHLBACH JACOB, stoves, tinware, plumbing, and 

gasfitting, 207 Fourth, dwl 41 Clara 
Ahlbach Peter, carpenter Ernest Bean, dwl 134 Fourth 
Ahlbom Charles, proprietor Hansa Hotel, 429 Bush 
Ahlbom Minna F. (widow), seamstress, dwl 245 Seventh 
Ahlbom William, teamster, dwl 5 Mason 
Ahlers George, barkeeper Madel & Tietjen, dwl NE cor 

Howard and Spear 
Ahlers Henn', jeweler, dwl 640 Howard 
Ahlers J. H,* & Co. (Frederick BUchoff)^ groceries and 

liquors, SW cor Powell and Vallejo 
Ahlers John D., with Bucking & Postel, dwl N'W cor Pa- 
cific and Taylor 
Ahlers John H. (J. B. Ahlers tt- Co.), dwl 1423 PoweU 
Ahlers Richard, barkeeper Salvia P. Collins, dwl 933 

Kearnv 
Ahlers William, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl Decatur 

nr Brjant 
Ahlerson Hans, seaman, dwl 10 Berry 
Ahlert Frederick, machinist, dwl SE cor Ivy Av and Tan 

Ness Av 
Ahllam August, pantrj-man Hename & Reuter, dwl 431 

Dupont 
Ahlstrom Albert, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Ahlstrom Charles, editor California Skandinav, office 326 
Sansom, dwl 523 Pine 



MOEGAN k CO., 87 California Market, have their own Boats and Oyster Beds. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 70S, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



AHL 



91 



ALB 



Ahlstrora P. F., seaman, dwl 6"27 Bush 
Ahmaim Heun,', laborer, dwl G~.5 Clementina 
Ahnert August (Ahnert X- Davix), dwl 1602 Powell 
Ahnert & Da\is f^ Mi/iw( Ahnert and William Davis), 

junk dealers, 715 Sansom 
Ahpei Carl, cashier DaWd Samuels, dwl 714 McAllister 
Ahpel Henrv (A. W. Jmti A- Co.), dwl 11 Carlos PI 
Ahren Henry, clerk P. N. Butt & Co., dwl NE cor Hyde 

and Broadway 
Ahrenber;^'-er Fr.,' musician, dwl 1305 Slontg-omerj' 
Ahrens Albert, master mariner, dwl 7 M'ashington 
Ahreiis Charles F., carpenter, dwl 512 Fourth 
Ahrens CTiristian, watchmaker and jeweler, S43 Dupont 
Ahrens Claus, waiter J. H. Tietjen, dwl 415 Brannan 
Ahrens George (Kuck <t Ahrem), dwl NAV cor Green- 
wich and Steiner 
Ahrens George, capitalist, dwl 843 Dupont 
Ahrens Gertrude (widow), seamstress, dwl 563 How, rear 
Ahrens Henr>% butcher, dwl 520 Broadway 
Ahrens Hcnn,', cook, dwl 39 Jackson 
Ahrens Heiirj-, cooper Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl Sixteenth 

nr Folsom 
Ahrens Henry, groceries and liquors, SE cor Union and 

Dupont 
Ahrens Henry (Jacob Xibbe cC- Co.), dwl 111 Austin 
Ahrens Jacob, clerk B. & M. Joost, dwl SW cor Twenty- 
third and Valencia 
Ahrens Jacob Henry, liquor saloon, 21S Commercial, dwl 

1421 Mason 
Ahrens Nicholas (Ahrens <L- Tamm), dwl 149 Post 
i Ahrens i: Tamm (Nicholas Ahrens and William Tainin), 

groceries and liquors, SE cor Dupont and Post 
i Ahrens. See Arens 
Ahumada Joseph M., real-estate agent, office and dwl 

631 Sacramento 
Aibischer Bruno, real estate, dwl 1337 Dupont 
Aibischer Joseph, dwl 1337 Dupont 
Aibischer Man,' Miss, teacher, dwl 1337 Dupont 
Aicher Frank, locksmith Jackson Iron Foundrj', dwl 1618 

Stockt-jn 
AID I'XIOX, F. W. Bruggemann manager, office 33 

Kearny 

Aigeltinger Leopold, furrier, 1069 Howard 
Aiken Addie E. Miss, teacher Broadway Grammar School, 

dwl 1221 Washington 
Aiken Andrew, stevedore, dwl S s Greenwich bet Mont- 

gomerj- and Sansom 
Aiken A. S.. jeweler, office and dwl 608 Market 
AIKE\ CHAKLES, attorney at law. office 34 Mont- 
gomery Block, dwl \z2\ Washington 
Aiken James, teamster William Kerr, dwl N s Vallejo bet 

Batten,- and Sansom 
Aiken John, sailmaker, dwl 414 Jones 
Aiken John P., letter carrier S. F. Post-office, dwl 1221 

Washington 
Aiken K. S. Eggert, clairvoyant, office and dwl 313 

O'Farrell 
Aiken Robert, shoemaker, dwl S b Ellis bet Laguna and 

Buchanan 
AIKE>' WILLIAM H,, attorney at law, office 34 Mont- 

gonierj- Block, dwl 1221 Washington 
Aikiu Maggie Miss, dressmaker, dwl 59 Shipley 
Aikin Martha (widow), dwl 59 Shipley 
Aikin Martha S. Miss, dressmaker, dwl 59 Shipley 
Aime Joseph, fisherman, dwl 49 Clay 
Aimes Robert, farmer, dwl 509 Bush 
Aine Henrj' E., contractor, dwl 1517 Dupont 
Ainsa James M., warehouse clerk Naval Office, Custom 

House, dwl 305 Lombard 
Ainsbery Margret (widow), dwl 248 Perry 
Ainsberj- Martin, laborer, dwi 24S Perry 
Ainsley "Francis, blacksmith, dwl 431 Pine 
^nsley Francis, collarmaker Main & Winchester, dwl 553 

Mission 
Kinsley James, printer, dwl 24 Sixth 
Unslev John, bootcutter U. W. C. Boot and Shoe Co., 

dwl 24 Sixth 
\.iii^l'?y if. W. Mrs., dwl 758 Harrison 
Viii-lev Thomas, laborer U. S. Appraiser's Building, dwl 

Ui Sixth 
\iri-li y William, painter John F. Kennedy, dwl 1135 Fol 
\!r,-',v.irth A. G., broker, 415 Montgomer>% res Oakland 
Vir I Ijarling, blacksmith Pacific Rolling Mills 
Viri James, blacksmith Pacific Iron Works, dwl 8 Zoe 
Viri.:-;,- John, laborer, dwl 230 O'Farrell 
i.iti_liison A. L. (colored), pantrj-man stm Julia, Broadway 

Wliarf 
i^itchison Matilda Mme., fortune teller, 223 Dupont 
titken Charies H., market, 5 Wash, dwl 228J O'Farrell 



Aitken Fred., merchant, dwl 117 Stockton 
Aitken J., student Heald's Business College 
Aitken James (Monnihan J- A.), dwl 308 Seventh 
Aitken James, machinist S. F. P. Woolen Factory, dwl E 

s Larkin bet Beach and Jefferson 
Aitken James C, machinist Tait k Hainque, dwl 308 

Seventh 
Aitken Jeiinnette (widow), dwl NW cor Capp and Twenty- 
fifth 
Aitken Man,- A. (widow), dwl 1513 Broadway 
Aitken Robert, mining, office 402 Montgomen,' room 7, 

dwl 36 Geary 
Aitken Samuel, machinist Birch, Argall & Co., dwl NW 

cor Capp and Twenty -fifth 
Aitkens A. Ernest (Cocks A- A.), dwl 308 Green 
Alton James, bricklayer, dwl 909 Kearny 
Alton John, bricklayer, dwl 909 Kearny 
Akerly George S., hairdresser Jacob Jacobs, dwl 915 Mont 
Akennan Benjamin J., United States deputy marshal, 

dwl 34 Fourth 
Akers Christopher, baker, dwl 428 Broadway 
Akers Henry, drajanan Peck & Co., dwl 132 Feni Av 
Akerstrom J. G., Scandinavian Soc, 71 New Mont 
Akmann William (Meyer d- A.), dwl 29 Drumm 
Alabama and Humboldt Con. M. Co. (Storej* Co., Nev.), 

office 302 Montgomery room 5 
Alacran Mining Co., L. L. Robinson president, office 603 

Washington 
Alameda Ferry, cor Davis and Pacific 
Alameda Frank, seaman, dwl W s Sansom bet Green and 

Union 
Alamo Gold and Silver Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), 

office 434 California 
Alarie Edward N., cook Philip Donoho, dwi California 

Hot€l 
Alaska Cigar Companv (Chinese), 31 Pacific 
ALASKA C'OMMEitfl'IAt CO., John F. Miller pres- 
ident, E. Neumann secretary, office 310 Sansom 
Alaska Consolidated Mining Co., George R. Spinney sec- 
retary-, office 320 California 
ALASK.l HERALD, A. A. Stickney editor, office 113 

Leidesdorff 
Alatorre Presiliano, laborer Diez, Bertz & Co., 
Alban Edwin G., head postal clerk S. F. Post-office, dwi 

22 Oak Grove Av 
Alban William G., phvsician, dwi 22 Oak Grove Av 
Alban W. J., conductor Potrero and B. V. R. R., dwl 829 

Folsom 
ALBAW BREWERY, Spreckels & Co. proprietors, 

71-75 Everett 
Albemarle House, Mrs. Mary F. Collins proprietress, S 

Mason 
Alberg Frank, teamster Rider, Somers & Co., dwi 24 Mar- 
ket 
Alberga George B., bootblack Sand Bros., dwi C Havens 

PI 
Albers Adeline (widow), dwi 249 Minna 
Albers Anton, foreman Liebes Bros. & Co., dwi 446 Minna 
Albers August, oj-sterman George Mayes, dwi 223 Jessie 
Albers Henry, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwi Bryant 

Av nr Bni'ant 
Albers Jacnb, plumber and tinsmith, dwl 41 Clara 
Albert John, extraman H. & L. No. 1 S. F. F. D., dwi 22 

O'Farrell 
Albers Marcus, groceries and liquors, 335 Fourth, dwl 223 

Perry 
Albcrson James, machinist, dwi 27 Minna 
Albert George, liquor saloon, N'AV cor Beale and Mission 
Albert John S. H., molder Hanscom & Co., dwi 519 Miss 
Albert Lewis (Ltwis d- Co.), dwi 148 Tehama 
Albert Peter, cook, dwi Sansom bet Vallejo and Green 
Alberti Frank, musician, dwi 105 Geary 
Albertin Julie Mme. ( Le Stiiechal d- A.), dwi 427 Third 
Alberts Henrj', trunkmaker, dwi SW cor Si.xteenth and 

^"alencia 
Alberts Lewis, porter Lick House 

Albertson Joseph A., physician, office and dwi 109 O'Far- 
rell 
Albertson Samuel, seaman, dwi SW cor East and Merch 
Albertson William T., machinehand D. A. McDonald & 

Co., dwi 547 Mission 
Albion River Mills (Mtndocino Co.), Macpherson & Weth- 
erbee proprietors, office 36 Market 

Albrecht , dwi 209 Leidesdorff 

Albrecht A. (Gerrrqe Goerner it- Co.), dwl 318 Pine 
Albrecht August {Albrecht d: Ropers), dwi 510 Kearny 
Albrecht August (Schroder d- A.), dwl 43(; Jackson 
ALBRECHT I\ & 1'0„ ( PaulTrommUtzJ .vih'A^i^XQ 
and retail liquors and cigar manufacturers, 127 Second 



LCIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY Contains Addresses 60,000 Merchants. 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant, 



ALB 



92 



ALH 



Albrecht Frederick {F. Albrecht d: Co.^ dwl 42S Fell 
Albrecht Genrge, bhicksinith, SE cor Railroad and Fif- 
teenth avs, dwl Sixteenth Av bet M and N, South S. F. 
Albrecht James, can-iagemaker Plath & Kitzmuller, dwl 

i-lS ShotwcII 
Albreeht John, tailor, 528 Bush 
Albrecht JohJi B., clerk Charles Duveneck & Co., dwl NW 

cor Seventeenth and Dolnres 
Albrecht Joseph, brewer, dwl 42S Shotwell 
Albrecht Jcsephine Miss, dwl t>35 Clay 
\Ibrecht Richard, bakery and confcctionerj-, 109 Taylor 
Albrecht Rudolph, draftsman U. S. Coast Survey, 214 

Stockton 
Albrecht & Ropers (A n(;ust A Ihreck t a nd Johann Ropers ), 

dairy produc'j, SO Califoniia Market 
Albri^' Juhn, laborer, dwl W s Old San Jos6 Road opp St. 

Mary's CoUeye 
Albrij^'ht Charles, drus-ffist, dwl 613 Pine 
Albright C^barles H., salesman Ne\\-man & Bennett, dwl 

(;i3 Pine 
Albright Fredrick, ciganuaker, dwl 15S Clani 
Albri^'ht Geor^'C, blacksmith, dwl Ns SLKteeuth Av nr 

Railroad Av, South S. F. 
Albrif^'ht John H., bookkeeper Christian Schreiber & Co., 

dwl 545 Minna 
Alcasabar F., waiter Pacifie Mail S. S. Costa Rica 
Aleavaga Jos6, grroceries, 524 Rroadway 
Alden Fruit Preserving Co., otfice 426 Montgomery 
Alden G. S., painter, dwl 241 Minna 
Alden Samuel B., policeman City Hall, dwl 4 Bernard 
Alden Thomas H., longshoreman, dwl Portsniuuth House 
Alder S., printer, dwl 241 Minna 
Aldennan Henry, dwl 1 Liberty 
Alderman Oscar, dwl 2(i Stockton 
Aldei-sbach Charles, laborer, dwl BeiTj- St. House 
Alderson Frank, printer, dwl 037;V Fulsom 
Alderson H. E., pianotuner Sherman & Hyde, 139 Kearny 
Aldrcil ilichael J., boilemiaker, dwl 144 Natoma 
Aldred Robert, laborer, dwl 2l> Jessie, rear 
Aldrich Bvron Rev., pastor Fifth Baptist Church, dwl 

2C14 Folsom 
Aldrich Carrie Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 409 Minna 
Aldrich Cathrine (widow), dwl 719 Howard 
Aldi-ieh Frederick, mu"8e Almshouse, Mission and Ocean 

House Road 
Aldrich George A., fireman Southern Pac. R. R., cor 

Fourth and Towiisend 
Aldrich Henry A., upholsterer, dwl NE cor Serpentine 

Av and Mission 
Aldrich Louis, attorney at law, office 330 Pine room 53, 

dwl 1733 Claj- 
Aldrich Marion, dwl 1143 Howard 
Aldrich W. A., capitalist, office 200 Sansoni, dwl Grand 

Hntel 
Aldridge Albert, car|jenter Palace Hotel, dwl 325t Bush 
Alilridge John, waiter W. J. Cady, dwl 025 Sacramento 
AUiridge Robert, street mainnian S. F. Gas Light Co. 
Alega Nicholas, pantr>Tnan stm Orizaba 
Aleman Bernardo, fisherman, dwl S Sacramento 
Alemany Joseph S., Most Rev. Archbishop of San Frtin- 

cisco, dwl (i2^ CiiUfornia 
Alers August, Turkieili and Russian baths and physician, 

ofHce and dwl 722 M<>ntgomer>- 
Alesio Carl, drajinan, 907 M'lushington 
Alex Joseph F. (Cim'^tantine .t- A.), dwl 535 Union 
Alexander Adt)lf, tailor, 807 Market, dwl 404 Minna 
Alexander AUred, dwl 31G Third 
Alexander Andrew, plasterer, dwl 113 Prospect PI 
Alexander Ann Mrs., cmploMuent, office 650 Mission 
Alexander Annie (widow), d«l Twentieth Av m- K, South 

S. F. 
Alexander A. P., Ship^\Tights' Jour. Assn, 71 New Mont 
Alexander Barton S. Gen., senior engineer and president 
Board Engineers U. S. A. Pacific Coast, office 633 
Kearny, dwl 30 South Park 
Alexander" Benjanun, jmrter Kline & Co., dwl 706 Vallejo 
Alexander Benjamin, seaman, dw! 26 Steuart 
Alexander Bertha Mrs. (colored), hairdresser, 1407 Dui^ 
Alexander B. L, carpenter, dwl 510 Pacific 
Alexander C, i>ortrait jxiinter, studio and dwl 110 Sutter 
Alexander Charles, cigiirs and tobaeeo, 957 Market, dwl 

500 Jessie 
Alexander Charles, cook Constitution Hotel, 563 First 
Alexander Charles M., clerk Da\is Bros., dwl 24 O'Farrell 
Alexander Charles M., tinsmith, 315 Fifth 
Ale.\ander D. & Co., mainifaeturers cigars, 222 Battery 
Alexander David (1). Ah'xnnder d: Co.), dwl 1047 Har 
Alexander David G. , clerk Cnntin & Everett, dwl 2022 Pine 
Alexander E., cai>tain stm Monterey, Market St. Wharf. 



Alexander Edward L., special agent U. S. Post-office De- 
partment, office 006 Moutgomen,', dwl 405 Turk 
Alexander Edwin C, compositor Morning Call, dwl ICS 

Silver 
Alexander Eli. peddler, dwl 344 Fifth 
Alexander Elizabeth (\\idow), dry goods, W 9 Gough bet 

Fulton and Grove 
Alexander F., millhand Pac. Barrel and Keg Fvictory 
Alexander G., cook Lick House 
Alexander George, cooper, dwl 122 Seventh 
Alexander George W. (Oi^borti A- A.), dwl 209 Austin 
Alexander Goodman, glazier, dwl 142 Shipley 
Alexander Hugh Byron, assayer Riehn, Hemme &Co., 

dwl 1013 Washington 
Alexander Isham E., carpenter and builder, 38 Morton, 

dwl 605 Pine 
Alexander Jacob A., cigars, 2 Clay, dwl 2513 Clay 
Alexander James, laborer, dwl 120^ Turk, rear 
Alexander James, locksmith James D. Davidson, dwl 2S1 

Stevenson 
Alexander James, painter, dwl 8 Oimmercial 
Alexander James, tailor, dwl 2S1 Stevenson 
Alexander James, wooddealer. Berry between Third and 

Fomth, dwl 434 Sixth 
Alexai\der James B. , foreman Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s dock, 

dwl 40 Stanly PI 
Alexander Jane (widow), dressmaker, dwl 75 Jessie 
Alexander John, laborer, dwl N s Folsom nr Main 
Alexander Joseph, capitalist, office 121 Sansom, dwl 614 

Sutter 
Alexander Joseph D., melter S. F. Assaying and Refining 

Works, dwl 1016 Green 
Alexander Julius, hairdresser, dwl 419 Minna 
Alexander Louis L., secretaiy Manhattan ilarble Co., 13 

Fi-emont, res Oakland 
Alexander Manuel, shoemaker, dwl 123J Shipley 
Alexander Blarquis, dwl 123J Shipley 
Alexander Otto, clerk, dwl 1047 Harrison 
Alexander Philip, fancy goods, 34 Sixth 
Alexander Rachel Miss, music teacher, dwl 344 Fifth 
Ale-Bander R. P., carpenter Palace Hotel 
Alexander R. 1.. salesman 607 Clay, dwl 520i Sutter 
Alexander Richard, clerk, dwl 1047 Harrison 
Alexander Robert., shipciiri>enter, dwl 2022 Pine 
Alexander Ruth, molder, dwl 220 First 
Alexander Samuel, tailor, 706 Vallejo 
Alexander Simon, hats and caps, llOO^Dupont, dwl Sulli- 
van's Building 
Alexander S. O. (S, 0. Alexander & Co.), dwl 125 O'Far- 
rell 
Alexander S. O. & Co. (Ahravi Marciis), manuiactorers 

and importei's clothing, 4 Battery 
Alexander Tlieodore, salesman 020 Kearny, dwl 926 Jack 
Alexander Thomas, cook John George, dwl 222 Minna 
Alexander Thomas, hairdresser George Held, dwl 421 

Bush 
Alexander W., lithographic artist A. L. Bancroft & Co. , 

dwl 1010 Green 
Alexander W. H. & Co., produce commission, 414 Sansom 
Alexander William, clerk Joseph E. De La Montaguie, 

dwl 2022 Pine 
Alexander WUliam H. (W. U. Alexander A Co.), dwl 

768 Howard 
Alexander William H. (colored), porter Cohuan Brothers, 

dwl 1407 Dupunt 
Alexander Y. (widow), dwl IS Turk 
Alexandru Antoine, fishemian, Hay St. Wharf 
Alexis E. Mme., laundrj-, 409 Sutter 
Alexis Frank, gardener, dwl 115 Francisco 
Alferitz Peter (Ddlepiane. .C- Co.), dwl 2007 Powell 
Alfers Peter, millhand Deming,Palmer&Co., dwl 333 Bush 
Alford Aniasa, lumber surveyor, office Simpson Bros. & 

Co. Steuart and Howard, dwl 47 Mimia 
Alford Charles, drajTuan. dwl i:JS Fi>isi>ni, rear 
Alforder David, miller, dwl 428 Chostnxit, rear 
Alfred Alfred, carpenter, dwl 103 Natoma 
Alfred Charies. packer J. A. Folger & Co., dwl 14^ Mason 
Alfred John E., baker, dwl 31 Hinckley 
AUs William (Brand, Naber A Co.), dwl 519 Pacific 
Algao James C, bootmaker Gilbert Priugle, dwl Minna 

bet Sixth and Seventh 
Algeo James, machinist Baker & Hamilton, dwl 543 

Tehama 
Alger Elizabeth H. (widow), teacher music, dwl 428 Hayes 
Alger Florons, carver, dwl 565 Mission 
Alger James, optician Christian Muller, dwl 6 Mont 
Algiers Delia Miss, dwl 512 Fi'anklin 
Algren John, carpenter, dwl SIO Jessie 
Alhambra Building, 325 Bush 



Send your Orders from the Country for Eastern Transplanted Oysters to Morgan & C 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Established 1852. 



Alhambra Hill M. Co. (Silverado, Nev.), Henrj' G. Lang- 

lej secretary, otfice 012 Clay 
Alhatiibra Lody^inj.'S, Mi-s. Owens proprietress, 319 Bush 
Alio Enrece, restaurant, dwl 715 Vallejo 
Alissnn Frank, dwl o32 Pacific 
Allan Janies. millhand Pac. Barrel aiid Keg Factory, dwl 

:i'26 Seventh 
Allan James, paperhangcr Wm. B. Peters, dwl 014 Xlont 
Allan John, stone seal en^-raver, 123 Kearny, dwl 1010 

Powell 
Allan Robert J., mUlhand Pac Barrel and Keg Factor}-, 

dwl 3ii(i Seventh 
Allan William, dwl 119i Bernard 
Allar Paul, wringer Occidental Laundry 
AllartU Georsre F., civil eng-ineer, otfice 101 McAllister, 

dwl SU Hyde 
Allardt William, laborer, dwl 364 Natoma 
Allari Heniy, trunkmaker, dwl SW cor Haight and 

Buchanan 
Allan Joseph, preserved meats, 52 California Market, dwl 

4 Virginia PI 
Alldack Joseph, groceries and liquors, SW cor De\isadero 

and Bush 
Alleghany Silver M. Co., J. M. BuflBngton secretary, office 

37 Merchants' Exchange 
Alleis Charles, with Frederick Kelterer, dwl cor Mission 

and Eugenia 
Allemand Constantine. laborer Pourcho & 'Wittmann 
Allen A. Miss, dressmaker, dwl Itio Silver 
Allen A. P., clerk Wni. T. Garratt, dwl NW cor Fremont 

and Natoma 
Alien Albert, fireman Southern Pac. R, R., dwl 8 Powell 
Allen Albert J., foreman Mai-ket St. R. R. Stables, dwl 

Sixteenth bet Valencia and Second At 
Allen Albert W., heater" Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl E 8 

Louisiana near Shasta 
Allen Alexander, laborer Jeremiah E. Allen, dwl IS Wash 
Allen Alexander, watchman S. F. P. Woolen Factory 
jVllen Alexander, weaver, dwl W s Shotwell bet Nine- 
teenth and Twentieth 
Allen Alfred, bricklayer, dwl 10 Clementina 
Allen Alonzo W., patternmaker Hanscom & Co., dwl 73 

Natt.mia 
Allen Andrew, stevedore Menzies & Bingham 
Allen Anna (widow), dwl 21U Third 
Allen Annie Miss, seamstress ilission and Pac. Woolen 

Mills, dwl W s Shotwell bet Xineteenth and T^veutieth 
Allen Ansel S., liquor saloon, 724 Pacific 
Allen Anthony F., hamessmaker J. C". Johnson & Co., 

dwl 400 Bryant 
Allen .\sa, hairdresser, NE cor Ellis and De\isadero, dwl 

E s Filhnore bet Post and Sutter 
Allen Benjamin, fancy goods, 240 Third 
Allen B. G. (Wi)i^ d- A.), dwl 523 Kearny 
Alien C. C, waiter Vizina & Co.. dwl 20S Jessie 
Allen C. E., carpenter Palace Hotel. 
Allen Charles, cabinet-maker, dwl 21G Third 
Allen Charles, laborer D. A. MacDonald & Co., dwl 210 

Third 
Allen Charles, laborer Palace Hotel, dwl 97 Stevenson 
Allen Charles, salesman, dwl 44S Minna 
Allen Cliarles C, bird-cagemaker, 437 Branuan, dwl 013 

Missi^»n 
Allen Charles E. (Egertwx, A. <!• Co.), res Fruit Vale, 

Alameda Co. 
Allen Charles E., actor, dwl 400 Post 
Allen Charles R., dwl 315 Fult^jn 
Allen Charles R, , cashier Black Diamond Coal Mining Co. , 

dwl 522 Sutter 
Allen Consolidated Minmg Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), F. Swift 

secretary, I'tlice 410 California 
Allen David," stonecutter Da\id Moore, dwl l-TW^ cor Cali- 

loruia and Central Av 
Allen Da%id H., salesman Crane, Hastings & Co., dwl 1412 

Sacramento 
Allen Declan, blacksmith, dwl 55S Stevenson 
Allen Edward O. H., medical student, dwl SOS Leav, rear 
Allen Fanny (widow), bakery, X 8 SLxteenth bet Mission 

and V;i"lencta 
Allen F. R., dwl 424 Sansom 

Allen Frederick, printer Charles W. Gordon, dwl 815 Mont 
Allen Frederick M., porter John P. Gennett, dwl ^19 

Kearny 
Allen CJeorge, carpenter Palace Hotel 
Allen George, porter J. L. Barker 
Allen George, stevedore, dwl 5 Drumm 
Allen George A., pilot stm Pioneer, Jackson St. ^"harf 
Allen George W.. chief steward P. M. S. S. Salvador 
Allen Henrj- F. (Allen tt Lewis), dwl 570 Harrison 



Allen Henry H., mining, dwl 514 Stockton 

Allen Hugh, uurservman and florist, dwl W s Buchanan 

bet Fulton and McAllister 
Allen Isaac, compositor New Age, dwl 329 Third 
Allen Isaac P., clerk Bank of C^ifornia, res I'ubbs' Hotel, 

Oakland 
ALLE\ IS.4.4r S., secretary and general agent S. F. 

Benevolent Association, otfice 10 Webb, dwl 1028 Pine 
Allen J. A. Mi-s., dwl 704 Folsom 
Allen James, barkeeper, dwl 4 Eddy PI 
Allen James, Boilennakers' Assn, SIS Howard 
Allen James, carriagepainter, 55S Stevenson 
Allen James, chief engineer Pacific Mail S. S. Co., dwl 18 

Ridley 
Allen James, coalpasser P. M. S. S. Constitution 
Allen James, expresswagon, cor Stockton and Pacific 
Allen James, laborer, dwl 191S Pacific Av 
Allen James, laburer, dwl Eighth Av ur C, South S. F. 
Allen James, laborer Philip Morshead, dwl 850 Howard 
Allen James, molder, dwl 7S Katoma 
Allen James, plasterer, bds cor Sierra and Louisiana 
Allen James, seaman stm Ajax Oregon S. S. Co. 
Allen James, stairbuilder, dwl 320 Seventh 
Allen James, tailor, dwl 239 Minna, rear 
Allen James M., atM-rney at law, office 402 Montgomerj-, 

dwl 031 Sacramento 
Allen James M.. real estate, dwl 125 Francisco 
Alien Jeremiah E., liquor saloon, boarding and lodging, 

IS Washington 
Allen J. F., waiter What Cheer House 
Allen J. H., tinsmith with H. G. Fiske 
Allen John, dentist, bds G15 Hyde 
Allen John, dra^^nan, dwl 1207 Montgomerj' 
Allen John, drajnuan George Biyden. dwl 20S Second 
Allen John, groceries and liquors, 1711 Jones 
Allen John, hamessmaker Mead & Son, dwl 741 Market 
Allen John, hardware and crockery, 1322 Stockton, dwl 

First Av bet Fourteenth and Fiiteeuth 
Allen John, laborer, dwl 558 Stevenson 
AUen John, leader Allen's Band, and musical instniments 

329 Third 
Allen John, liquor saloon, 720 Pacific 
AUen John, molder with Francis 1. Curry 
Allen John, saddler, dwl 741 Market 
Allen John, tanner, dwl 1315 Broadway 
Allen John G.. clerk Henry P. Bowie, dwl 519 Third 
Allen John AV., porter Savings and Loan Society 
Alien J. R., dwl 424 Sansom 
Allen Lewis, seaman, dwl 29 Oak Grove Av 
Allen Lorenzo D., principal Washington Grammar School 

'and Allen d: PrwrJ, dwl W s Webster bet Bush 

and Pine 
Allen Loi-enzo H., clamdealer, 105 California Market, dwl 

Long Bridge foot Fourth 
Allen Louisa Mrs., cloakmaker C. Mayer, dwl 129 Third 
Allen Lucius H. (AUen d: Lttri^), dwl 570 Harrison 
Allen Limiber S., shipwright, 16 Drumm 
Allen M., laborer, dwl 333 bash 
Allen Martin, laborer Hanscom & Co. 
Allen Mary Mrs., dressmaker, 734 Howard 
Allen Michael, hodairrier Palace Hotel 
Allen Michael, wines and liquors, XE cor Folsom and 

Rausch, dwl 33S Shiplev 
Allen Myles, laborer Pahner, Knox & Co., dwl 511 Miss 
Allen O. A., driver City R- R. 
Allen Oliver P., bookkeeper Bank of California, dwl 414 

Ellis 
Allen Oscar, driver Omnibus R. B.. dwl 443 Mmna 
Allen Parthenia Miss, dressmaker, dwl 448 Minna 
Allen P. C, lumberdcalcr, dwl 704 Fulsom 
Alien Peleg, asphaltum roofer, dwl 104 Jessie 
Allen Peter, weighing clerk Thomas Bailey &. Co., dwi 

110 o'Farrell 
Allen Peter, with John Schwegerle & Co.. dwl 446 Bran 
Allen Reese B. . bookkeeper Tlionias Downing, dwi 2654 Fol 
\llen Richard, hostler Phihp .Morshead, dwi 850 Howard 
Alien Robert Gen., chief quartermaster Military Division 

Pacific, office 105 St.->ckton, dwi 1117 Stockton 
Allen Robert E., corai>ositor Morning Call, dwi 808 Leav 
ILLKN leOK, livery stable, 007-609 Market, dwl 669 

Market ' 

Allen Samuel, engineer Wilson, Merry & Co., dwl cor 

Buchanan and Bay 
Allen Siimuel, liver>- stable, 610 Mission, dwl 207 Post 
Allen Samuel G. , salesman Muri>hy, Grant & Co. , dwi 1207 

Union 
Allen Samuel J., clerk HLxon k Curtis, dwi 708 Hayes 
Allen Sheldon T., ent-ineer, dwi 203 Third 
Allen S. M., teamster, 515 Market 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOET Circulates throughout Pacific Coast. 



JEWELRY made to order and EEPAIEED by D. "W. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Merchai, 




Allen Susan (widow), dwl 26 Howard Court 

Allen Theodore H. (Allen it- Yunn;}), dwl 712 Greenwich 

Allen Thoniiuj, coalpasser stm Montana, Folsuin St. 

\\liarf 
Allen Thunias, polisher Michael Heverin, dwl 214 Bdwy 
Allen Thunias, telej^aph operator, dwl 223 Minaa 
Allen Thomas S., shipcarjienter, dwl 208 Eighteenth 
Allen Thomas W., gasfitter Thomas Day, dwl 224 Fourth 
Allen Velnia Miss, teacher music, dwl 128 T\ier 
Allen ^y. G., freight elerk Pacific Mail S. S. Orizaba 
Allen W. H., cartman, cor Stockton and Clay 
Allen William, boilennaker, dwl '20 Minna 
Allen William, bnckmaker, dwl NW cor Gearr and Cen- 
tral Av 
Allen William, carpenter, dwl 448 Minna 
Allen William, carpenter Palace Hotel, dwl 102 Minna 
Allen William, molder, dwl 37 Minna 
Allen William, niulder Hinckley & Co., dwl 315 Beale 
Allen William, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Allen William, watchman Sutter St. R. R., dwl 2211 Pine 
Allen William B., clerk Real Estate Associates, dwl 1010 

Powell 
Allen William F., barkeeper Clifi House, Point Lobos Av 
Allen William H., attorney at law, ottice 712 Montgomery, 

dwl 200 Ellis 
Allen William H., millwright and mining, office 419 Cali- 
fornia room 7, dwl 12 Oak 
Allen William H., salesman, dwl Brookl^ni Hotel 
Allen William H., salesman Gabriel Abraham, dwl 111^ 

Minna 
ALLEX M'lrtlAM R., plumber and gasfitter, 819 

Market, dwl i 10 Dolores 
Allen William R., real estate, dwl S08 Leavenworth, rear 
Allen William T., long'shoreman, dwl Greens Court 
Allen W. T..geneial agent Indianopolis. Bloomingti;>n, and 
W'estern R. R., office 214 Montgomejy, dwl 8 Powell 
Allen & Lewis (L. H. Allen and C. H. Lewis), comniis- 

sion merchants, office 202 California 
Allen & Prior /Lorenzo D. Allen and Philip PHor J, real- 
estate agents and coUectiirs, 434 Mnntgomerj' 
Allen & Young (Theodore II. Allen and Thomas l'ou7ig), 

steycdores, office SW cor Battery and Willejo 
Allenberg Charles, mining, office 433 California, dwl 309 

Hyde 
AUender Mai-garet (widow), nurse, dwl 134 Seventh 
Allett Benjamin, plasterer Palace Hotel 
Alley James, mason Palace Hotel 
Alley obed P., dwl 1102 Scott 

A Ilcy S. S. , cmipositor 518 Sacramento, dwl 209 Leidesdorff 
.\lky Wiiliam. mason Palace Hotel 
Alley William H., cr.al and wood, 90S Stockton, dwl cor 

Greenwich and Pringle C'lurt 
Allingham William, blacksmith, dwl 625 Minna 
Allington W. W., laborer, dwl 212 Broadway 
^Ulione Frank (Allioju; and Stathopolin ), "dwl 3 Hardie 

PI 
Allione & Stathopolis (Frank Allione and E. Stathopo- 

lis), oyster saloon, S7 and 88 Centre Market. 
Alliott Emanuel, ladies' hairdresser, 311 Sutter 
AUirol A., barber, 841^ Clay 

AUis Harry, shipearpenter, dwl NE cor Battery and Filbert 
Allis P. S., detective, dwl SW cor Bush and Steiijer 

Allison , shipcari>enter, dwl cor Sierra and Louisiana 

Allison David E. (£). E. Allmon d- Co.), dwl 117 Oak 
Allison D. E. .fe Co., fruit and produce commission, 309 

and 311 Washington 
Allison D. W., clerk Braverman & Levy, dwl Russ House 
Alhson E. C, chief musician Fourth U. 8. Artillery, Pre- 
sidio Barracks 
Alli.si.m Elizabeth Mrs., dwl 1 Highland Terrace 
Allison Frank F., mining stocks,' dwl 111 Taylor 
Allison Frank J., salesman Braverman & Le\y, dwl 523 

Pine 
Allison Frederick, confectioner Henrv H. Tiedeman, dwl 

120 Taylor 
Alli-^un J., student Heald's Business College 
Allis.in James, dwl 115 Second 

Allison James, hostler Philip Morshead, dwl 850 Howard 
Allison Joseph, helper S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 250^ Jessie 
Allison P., carpenter stm Saucelito^. Davis St. Wharf 
Allison Robert, shecpdealer, dwl 1240 Folsom 
Allison Thoniiis R., buokkeci>cr Pac. Ice Co.. dwl 718 Bat 
Allkire Sanmel H., assistant storekeeper Broadway Bond- 
ed Warehouse, dwl 1515 Stockton 
Allinan George, inspector Custom House, dwl 127 Kearnv 
Alliiiini Julm H., with Treadwell & Co., dwl 127 Kearny ' 
Allman Miles, track repairer Sutter St. R. R. 
Allman Thomas H., watchman U. S. Appraiser's Building, 
dwl 130 Turk 



Allman William, teamster fililton P. Sessions, dwl 1219 

Ft-'lsom 
Allmeyer M., extraman H. & L.'Co. No. 3 S. F. F. D. 
Alloways Heurj', pattenimaker Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works, dwl 3 Mmna 
Allseits Meinrad. bootmaker, 2005 Folsom, dwl SW cor 

Folaom and Sixteenth 
Allston Frederick, teamster George B. Knowlea & Co., 

dwl SE cor Main and Mission 
Allwood Harrj', carver, dwl NE cor Hyde and Lombard 
Allyn Charles, compositor New Age, dwl 227 Second 
Allyn Ji'hn, mining stocks, dwl 7o3 Larkin 
Ailyne John W. (Allyne d: White), dwl NW cor Gough 

and Green 
ALLViVE A' M'lllTE (John W. Ailyne and William 

II. White), importers and jobbers oils, lamps, etc., 

112 and 114 Front, and proprietors Pacific Oil and 

Kerosene W'orks, cor Chestnut and Taylor 
Almada Gregorio, capitalist, office 320 Sansora, dwl 21 

South Park 
Almborg Andrew, laborer, dwl 21 Clara 
Almborg H. Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 21 Clara 
Almon David, dealer barrels, 127 Gilbert 
ALMS HOUSE CITY AXD 40i:.\TV, San Miguel or 

Mission r)cean House Road, 4^ miles from City Hall 

Almy , dwl 930 Market 

Almy Mary (widow), dwl 205 Powell 

Alonso Jose (Diez, BcrU & Co.), dwl 112 Virginia 

Alpen Herman, master mariner, dwl 1419 Masou 

Alpen Max, clerk P. B. Keimedy, dwl 40 Geary 

Alper John, barkeeper John C. Reich, dwl 308 Pacific 

AJLVEIES i'llAKLES. oil works. Fourth Av nr Railroad 

Av, South S. F., and leader Metropolitan Band, office 

228 Bush, dwl SW cor Grove and Buchanan 
Alpers Charles W., musician, dwl 1623 Powell, rear 
Alpei-s Frederick, teamster Robt. K. Pattridge, dwl 121 

Spear 
Alpers J<:>hn, leader Germania Band, office 228 Bush, dwl 

717 Green 
Alpers Peter, miller, dwl 333 Bush 
Ali'ha Cons. M. Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), William Willis 

secretarj-, office 419 California room 17 
Alphonse May, pantr^Tuan Lick House 
Alphouze Johu B., lithographer Abraham Waldstein, dwl 

348 Ritch 
Alpine Gold Mill and Mining Co. (Amador Co. Cal.), office 

433 California 
Alpine James, seainan, dwl 26 Stewart 
Alps Silver Mining Co. (Ely, Nev.), office 331 Montgomery 

room 28 
Alroth Henry, laborer, dwl 512 Fourth 
Alrutz John, bookkeeper, dwl 2509 Clay 
Alsenz Jacob, shoemaker, 915 Post, dwl 1610 Post 
Alsgood Frederick, with Francis Wilker, NW cor Folsom 

and Eighth 
Alsop John S., umbrella and parasolmaker, 333 Bush, 

dwl 8 \"irginia PI 
Alsop William. H., painter, dwl 231 First 
Alsted August, plumber, dwl 1824 Powell 
Alsting Frederick, dwl 129 Second 
Alt Bernard, clerk Daniel Donovan, dwl 60S Vallejo 
Alt Christoph, shoemaker, 60S Vallejo 
Alt Giusei>]>e. laborer, dwl 13 Union PI, rear 
ALTA i'ALIFOR^'Li (daily aud weekly). Frederick 

MacCrellish .!t Co. i)roprietors. office 529 California 
ALTA C'ALIFOKXIA ALMAXAC (annual). Frede- 
rick MacCrelli-.h A, Co. proprietors, office 529 Cal 
ALTA C'ALIF4»U\1A ISriLlllXU, 529 California 
Alta Lodgings, Ralstoii & Cottrell proprietors, 536 Sac 
Alta Silver Mining Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), office 302 Mont- 
gomery room 5 
Altemus John, bakerj". W a Folsom bet Twenty-first and 

Twenty-second 
Altemus William E., auctioneer Greenebaum & Co., dwl 

715 Ellis 
Altenberg Peter F., merchant, dwl 523 Kearny 
Altenberg Rosalia Mrs., cloaks and millinerj-. 523 Kearny 
Altenburg Charles, cook Schroth &i Westerfeld, dwl 228 

Kearny 
Altenburg Earnest, bookkeeper A. S. Rosenbamn & Co., 

dwl 822 Greenwich 
Altendorf Jules, sawgrinder Pacific Saw Manufacturing 

Co.. dwl 302 Union 
Altfield Abel, peddler, dwl 929 Mission 
Altlicld Amelia Miss, dressmaker, dwl 929 Mission 
Althen Adoiph, baker Joseph Bock, dwl 30 Sixth 
Althof Bros. (Theodore and Ernest J, Bay Oyster Saloon, 

620 Market 
Althof Ernest (Althof Bros J, dwl 864 Mission 



Get your Blue Point Transplanted Oysters from MOEGAN & CO., California Haxfeel 



j. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



ALT 



95 



AME 



Althof Hermann fAHhof i- BahlsJ , -res O^klHind 
Althof Theodore i Althvf Bros. I , dwl 636^ Jessie 
Althof & Bahls (Hermann Althof and John F. W. 
Bahls ' , b<x>kbinders and blank book manufs, 423 Clay 
Althuson John, clerk John Rohde, dwl SW cor Clay and 

Tavlor 
■Altman Charles, sewing-machine agent and repairer sew- 
ing machines, 14 Turk 
Altman Emma, machine operator E. Detrick & Co., dwl 

514 Stevenson 
Altman L., lather Palace Hotel 
Altman Tobias, tailor, dwl 428 Green 
Altmann Jacob, tailor, SoS Howard 
Altmann Teresa (widow), dwl 514 Stevenson, rear 
Altmark Louis, salesman Rosenthal, Feder & Co., dwl 515 

Eddv 
Altmaver Aaron f Einstein Bros, i- Co.. I, dwl 115 Eddy 
Altma'ver Abraham lEiniit-ein Bros. A Co./, dwl 334 Eddy 
Alton Frank C, clerk Dexter S Co., dwl 904 Jackson 
Alton Louis, carpenter, dwl ;i03 Post 
Altona Gravel Mining- Co. (Grass Valley, Cal.), David 

Wilder secretary, office 28 Merchants' Exchange 
Altpeter Charles, dwl 220 Oak 
Altpeter George, brewer Philadelphia Brewer}-, dwl 232 

Second 
Altridge Robert, miner, dwl 616 PaciBc 
Altsohul Charles il. fAttschvl, Simon & Co.), dwl 703 

Market 
Altschul Leopold (Maviield <k Co.), dwl 748 Howard 
Altschul Ludwig fAltschiid- HildebrandtJ .dwl 335 Geary 
Altschul, Simon & Co. (Charles M. AltschiU and Julius 

Simon J, fancy goods, toys, and varieties, 25 Kearny 
Altschul & Hildeb'randt f Lu'dmn Altichul and William C. 
Hildebrandt.1, importers wines and Uquors, 809 Mont- 
gomery . 
Altshuler L., fancy dry goods, 618 SLxteenth bet Mission 

and Valencia 
Altube Bernardo, ranchero, dwl 1414 Kearny, rear 
Altube Pedro, dwl 23 Oak Grove Av 
AJtvater David, assistant engineer National Flour Mills, 

dwl 42S Chestnut 
Altvater Francis, port«r 610 Sacramento, dwl 9 WOliam 
Altvater Frederick, market, cor Van Ness Av and Oak, 
dwl 6 Page „ ^ „, 

Alvarado Alberto, printer FeUpe Fierro, dwl 8 Pollard PI 
Ali-arado Frederico, real-estate agent, 708 Montgomery, 

dwl Lick House 
Alvarado Salt Works (Alameda Co. Cal.), Getz Bros. & Co. 

agents, office 513 Front 
Alvarez Antonio, tinsmith Brittan, Holbrook & Co., dwl 

1606 Mason 
Alvarez Antonio, waiter stm Los Angeles, Market St. 

Wharf „ 

Alvarez Cavetano (Cobo, Ygual <t Co.), dwl 907 Clay 
Alvarez Frank Q., miner, dwl 828 Broadway 
Alvarez Rafael H., clerk, dwl 523 Filbert 
Alvarez Raimondo, bricklayer, dwl 021 Pacific, rear 
Alvarez Salomon, dressmaker, dwl 621 Pacific, rear 
AlveUng Henry, carpenter, dwl 312 Tehama 
Alverson Alexander, cook Allen Freeman, dwl 631 East 
Alverson D. W. , machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 27 Mm 
Alverson Stephen H., blacksmith Kimball Manufacturing 

Co.. dwl 139 SUver 
Alvey Charles W., stoves and tinware, 911 Kearny, dwl 

1813 Stockton 
Alvies Joseph, seaman, dwl 64 Sacramento 
Alvin Matilda Mme., fortuneteller, 137 Third 
Alvin Robert J., seaman, dwl 35 Pacific 
Alviso A., waiter stm Ajax, Oregon S. S. Co. 
Alvord A. , with Kimball Manufacturing Co. 
Alvord Frank, cari>enter, dwl 759^ Howard 
Alvord Henrj , route agent S. F. Post-office, dwl Govern- 
ment Htiuse 
Alvord Henr}-, trunkmaker A. Haas & Co., dwl cor Six- 
teenth aiid Valencia 
Alvord Marv J, Mrs., confectionery and bakery, 759i How 
Alvord Jam'c-s H., merchant, dwl 930 Union 
AITORD Mim.t.'M, president Pacific BoUmg Mill 
Co. and Park Commissioner, office 3 Front, dwl 664 
Folsom 
Alwood Harry, carver S. F. Manufacturing Co., dwl NE 

cor L<>mbard and Hyde 
Alzanlora Charles, barkeeper, dwl 339 Eddy 
Amador Canal and M. O:.. (Amador Co., Cal.), J.W. Clark 

secretary, office 418 California third floor 
Amador Consolidated S. M. Co. (Lander Co., Nev.), office 

37 Merchants' Exchange 
Amador IVinidad, shoemaker, dwl W s Guerrero bet Blos- 
som and t^uinn 



Amador Tunnel and M. Co. (Ely, Nev.), Louis Kaplan sec- 

retan-, office 27 Merchants' Exchange 
Amark Frederick, mth H. H. McClellan & Co., dwl 901 

Post 
Amas John, bricklayer, dwl 403 Broadway 
Amat Gustave, pantr>Tnan Francois Lacoste 
Amavou Emile, laundrvman, dwl 721 Pacific 
.\mazon Con. M. Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), office 330 Pine 
Amazon Insurance Co. (Cincinnati, 0. , Fire), Hutchin- 
son, Mann & Smith agents. 314 California 
Ambler Benjamin, druggist Charles Langley & Co., dwl 

719 Clementina 
Ambler Samuel, hostler William McCafferty, dwl 17 Kid- 
ley 
Ambrose Edward, waiter Union Club 
Ambrose James, p<;>ultryand game, 78 and 79 Centre Mar- 
ket, dwl 533 Fulton 
Ambrose Natali. dwl 3 William 
Ambrose Thomas, sheepfarmer, dwl IS Verona PI 
Ambum Eliss, pantryman J. Reagan, dwl cor Kearny 

and Montgomery Av 
Ame Paul, restaimint, 412 Dupont 

Amedee Camille, hairdresser J. E. Voisenet, dwl 409 Post 
Amedee Pierre, porter B. Davidson & Co., dwl 409 Post 
Amelan J., laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s \«iarf, foot of 

Second 
Amelung Julius C, salesman Henry Brader, dwl 232 Post 
Amende" Charles, porter, dwl 333 Bush 
Amende Charles H., clerk, dwl 69 Minna 
Amendt Emil, carpenter, 731 Pacific, dwl 1208 Kearny 
American Central Insurance Co. of St. Louis (Fire), Ham- 
ilton & Sonnichsen agents, 221 Sansom 
ASIEKIt'AX CLOCK CO., Henry Molineux agent, 620 

Market and 17 and 19 Sutter 
American Elizabeth A. (widow), dwl 5 Verona PI 
American Exchange Hotel, Bryan Bros, proprietors, 319- 
325 Sansom 



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American Fire Insurance Company of Philadelphia, office 

313 California 
American Flag Mill and Mining Co. (Ely, Nev.), George 

R. Spinnev secretary, office 320 California 
American Flat Mining "Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), office 331 

Montgomery- room 20 
American Flat South Mming Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), office 

401 California room 1 
American Ice Co. , Chauncey B. Land president, Dudley C. 

Bates secretan', office 410 California 
American Laundrj-, H. T. Kiedel and George L. Moyer 

proprietors, office 316 Bush 
American Lloyds (Register Shipping), Amos Noyes i^ent, 

office 318 California 
American Mills Reducing Works, Bergin & Benn proprie- 
tors, office and works W s Fourth nr Berrj- 
American Protestant Association Hall. 713 Mission 
American Russian Commercial Co., J. Mora Moss presi- 
dent, office 718 Battery , 
American Sunday School Union, American Tract Society 

ageut, depository 757 Market 
ASIERIC.4\ Tn.4CT SOCIETT. Pacific Agency, 

Donald \V. McLeod depositarj-, office 757 Market 
Americo Joseph, fisherman. Clay St. \Miarf 
Americus Club, rooms 701 Howard 
Amerige Marv (n-idow), dwl Windsor House 
IMEU-tltS I. A., superintendent Railway MaU Ser- 
rice Eighth Division, office 606 Mont, res San Leandro 
Ames Albert N., carriagepainter Carvill Manufacturing 

Co., dwl 013 Mission „ ^ ,=., o. 

Ames Benjamin F., te-amster Davis & Cowell, dwl 541 Ste- 
venson, rear „ 
Ames E. A. Mrs., ladies' nurse, dwl E 8 Chattanooga nr 

Twentv-second 
Ames Edward, longshoreman, dwl 425 Drunim 
Ames Fisher, attorney at law, office 17 City Hall thud 

floor, dwl '2624 Sacramento 
Ames Frank, painter, dwl 548 Mission ,,„„„» 

Ames Frank M., salesman O. Lawton &Co.,dwl 218 Shot- 
well 
Ames Frederick, salesman, dwl 349 Jessie 
Ames George, third assistant engineer P. M. S. S. Arizona 
Ames George H., ship's clerk, dwl 2 Vernon PI 
Ames H. M. Jr., salesman R. F. Osbom & Co., dwl Cos- 
mopolitan Hotel 
\mes John, mate stm C. M. Small, Com. St. WTiarf 
4.MES .IOH\ W. (Household Furnishing Co.), dwl 

1307 Taylor _ , 

Ames L. E. Mrs., private boarding, 220 Turk 
Ames L. R. , driver Potrero and B. V. R. K. 
Ames Martha Miss, teacher Valencia St. Grammar School, 
dwl 211 Seventh 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOEY, 1875-7, Published March, 75, Price $5. 



D. "W. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, Wholesale and Retail, oor. Merchant and Mont 1 




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Ames Oscar H., carpenter WUIiam Dregger, dwl 113 

Chattanooga 
AMES 1'EIIIjI!»I W„ secretary Sutro Tunnel Co., 
office 320 C'alitoniia (and Household Fmnishing Co.), 
dwl 1312 Taylor 
Ames Robert, dwl 103 Hayes 

Ames Robert C, machinist, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Ames W. F., lather Palace Hotel 
Aiiicsta Laro, fishennan, Clay St. Wharf 
Amey Charles H., engineer'Kimball ilanufacturing Co., 

dwl 428 Clementina 
Amgutt Simon, furnishing goods, 91S Dupont 
Amietz N., carpenter Palace Hotel 
Amilon Charles, laundryman S. F. Lamidry, NW cor Turk 

and Fillmore 
Amiraux Peter, mining engineer, office 330 Pine room 48 
Ammerup G., paints, oils, and paper hangings, 112G Mar- 
ket 
Amnion Bernhard Von (A7mnon, Caspari <t Co.), res 

Llakland 
AIJ.^SOJ.. fASPARI A Ca. (Bernhard Ton Ammrm, 
0(f'^ Canjxtri, and Harold UnkkrnctiS), commission 
and shipping merchants, 315 California 
Ammon Frederick, porter S. P. Morse, dwl S Brenham PI 
Animoud Frank, fniits, 725 Davis, dwl cor Com and Davis 
Annuonn John, maltster Lyon & Co., 150 Jessie 
Amnions John, garduer, dwl 115 Second ' 
.\nK.nt C, bootmaker, dwl 475 Jessie 
Auiore Catello, laborer with I'atricio Marsieano, dwl S 8 

Commercial nr Dnimm 
Amos Frederick R., dwl 809 Broadway 
Amos George W., miUvnight Amos & Davis, dwl 107 

Tehama 
Amos John, mason Palace Hotel 
Amos John, silversmith \V. K. Vandorslice & Co., dwl 205 

Second 
Amos John T. (Amos <t Daris), dwl 1506 Leavenworth} 
Amos John T. Mrs., dressmaker Mrs. Mary Robertson, 

dwl 205 Second 
Amos Joseph A. (colored), porter Gray, Ferguson & Bald- 

dridge, res Oakland 
Anios Juan, carpenter, dwl 23 Turk, rear 
Amos Roliert C. (Edward C. Fitts A Cn.), dwl 303 Jessie 
Amos Zachariah, tannery, dwl 734 Guerrero 
Amos & Davis (John T. Amus aud ililo S. Dams), mill- 
wrights and draftsmen, 112 Beale 
Amoskcag Manufacturing Conijianv Steam Fire Engines, 

Weaver & Taylor agents, 501 Market 
Anirine Henry, tailor Hennann Wise, dwl 815 Mont 
Anistead Philiii, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Amsterdam Marine Board of UnderHTiters, James De- 

Fremeiy agent, office 710 Sansom 
Amstutz Henry L. (Gra/i: A.), dwl 331 Kearny 
Ainundsen August, upholsterer E. C. Kennedy, dwl 2769 

Harrison 
Amy Gustave L., salesman Hoffman & Co., dwl 70S Leav 
Amy Osair M., broker, dwl 1409 Stockton 
Anoelin Arthur, machinist, dwl 3 Washoe PI 
.Vncell William, cook Motgomeiy Hotel, 229 Second 
.\neiier Henry, seaman, dwl 20 Steuart 

Anchor , student Heald's Business College, dwl 609 

Bush 
Ancient J. 0. K. S. E. Hall, 751 Market 
Andoppo Panye, hoga-auch, SuUivan nr Cresent Av S s 

Bcnial Heights 
Anderau Joseph (Joseph A ndcrau d- Co.), dwl 1517 Leav- 
enworth 
Anderau Joseph & Co. (Mrs. Theresa Stcrnitzky), pre- 

sei-ved me;vts. 27 California Market 
Anderfuren Charles, patternmaker John M. Stockman,dwl 

755 Mission 
Anderfuren W. J., patternmaker John M. Stockman, dwl 

75.T Mission 
Anderlund Hei-man, carpenter, dwl 5.'!B Howard, rear 
Auderon Isaac, longshoreman, dwl 545 Mission 
Andersen Albert, clerk Palmer Bros., dwl 235 O'Farrell 
Andersen August, seaman, dwl SW cor East and Merch 
Andei-sen Christian, steward Montgomery Hotel, 229 

Second 
Andersen John, seaman, dwl 114 Jackson 
Andersen John, seiinian, dwl 631 East 
Andersen John, seaman, dwl SW oor East and Merchant 
Andersen John, tailor, dwl 4 Centr.al PI 
Andersen Mathias, liquor saloon, 411 Drumm 
Andersen Peter, milker, dwl 705 Front 
Andersen Peter, seaman, dwl SW cor East and Merchant 
-A.iidcrsen Robert, draftsman Hinckley & Co., dwl NE 

cor Twenty-fourth and Shotwell 
Anderson A,, carpenter C. E. Bowman, dwl 729 Bdwj' 



Anderson A. B. Mrs., teacher Lincoln Grammar School, 

dwl 547 Mission 
Anderson Abraham, cabinetmaker, dwd S s Fifteenth bet 

Market and Noe 
Anderson A. J., master mariner, dwl 9 Spear 
Anderson Alexander, carpenter, dwl 411 Pacific 
Anderson Alexander, seaman, dwl 140 Folsom 
Anderson Alexander, stevedore Menzies & Bingham 
Anderson Alexander, tinsmith George H. Tay & Co. 
Anderson Alfred, cook stm Sonoma, dwl 9 Washington 
Anderson Alfred, culTier Anton Krieg, dwl junction San 

Bruno Road and Potrero Av 
Anderson Andrew fD. C. Fox & Co.), dwl C30^ Minna 
Anderson Andrew, liquor saloon, 250 Spear 
Anderson Andl'ew, liquor saloon. Long Bridge nr Ken- 
tucky 
Anderson Andrew, master mariner, dwl W s Capp bet 

Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Anderson Andrew, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Anderson Andrew, Shipwrights' Jour. Assn, New Mont 
Anderson Andrew, shoemaker Edward Main, dwl 43 

Sixth 
Anderson Andrew, tailor, dwl 5 August Alle.v 
Anderson Amie Miss, dressmaker, dwl 605 Muina 
Anderson Ant^n, seaman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Anderson A. P., carpenter, dwl 349 Sixth 
Anderson .(\rchie, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anderson August, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
An.lerson B., carriag-emaker, dwl 836 Market 
Anderson Eenuard (Eraxttz i: A.I, dwl 5 Drumm 
Anderson C, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co's Wliarf 
Anderson C. A., mason Palace Hotel 
Anderson C. A. Mrs., teacher Lincoln Grammar School. 

dwl 29 Tmk 
Anderson Charles, cook, dwl 536 Sacramento 
Anderson Charles, laborer, dwl 402 Union 
Anderson Charles, laborer, dwl 636 Sacramento 
Anderson Charles, milker William Hall, Yisitacion Valley 

bet San JosiS and San Bruno roads 
Anderson Charles, miner, dwl 411 Sansom 
Anderson Charles (colored), porter Baker & Hamilton, 

res Oakland 
Anderson Cliarles, seaman, dwl 20 Commercial 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 26 Steuai* 
Andereon Charles, seaman, dwl 27 Frederick 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anilcrson Charles, seaman, 140 Folsom 
Anderson Charles, stevedore A. C. Freese 
Anderson Charles A., Hams' Sample Rooms, 432 Cal- 
ifornia, dwl 266 Minna 
Anderson Charles E., special policeman, dwl 103 Perry 
Anderson Charles P., seaman, dwd 26 Steuart 
Anderson Christian, laborer Merchants' Dry Dock, dwl 

NW cor Union and Keaniy 
Andei-son Claude, clerk U. S. Army Headquai-ters, 105 

Stockton, dwl 421 Bush 
Anderson Deborah (widow), dwd 15 Frederick 
Anderson Daniel, saloonkeeper, dwl 47 Second 
Anderson David, seaman, dwl 50 Natoma 
Anderson Edward, bootfltter Pfeiffer cSi Rotenkolber, dwl 

110 Taylor, rear 
Anderson Edward, seaman, dwl 64 Sacramento 
Anderson Edward, tailor, dwl 8 Willow 
Anderson Edward J., carpenter. Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s 

Wharf, dwl 652 Howard 
Anderson Erick, cabinetmaker, dwl 777 HiuTison 
Anderson Erick, cabinetmaker Cal. Fumitm-e Manufact- 
uring Co., dwl 520 Stockton 
Anderson Erick, tailor, 1514 Stock, dwl 3 Bannam PI 
Anderson E. S. Miss, teacher Market St. Primary School, 

dwl 311 Harrison 
Anderson F., cxtraman H. and L. No. 2 S. F. F. D., dwl 627 

Bro.adway 
Anderson F., Miss, dressmaker, 763 Clay 
Anderson F. Rev. (colored), clergyman, dwd 11 Scott PI 
Anderson Frank, bookkeeper, dwl 311 Harrison 
Anderson Frank, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Anderson Frank, teamster Hancock & Kelso, dwl 414 

Beale 
Anderson Frank 0., cabinetmaker H. Grantz. dwl 777 Har 
Anderson Frank P., special policeman, dwl 912 Pacific 
Anderson Frederick, cabinetmaker L. & E. Emanuel, dwl 

E 8 San Bruno Road nr Thirtieth 
Anderson Frederick, framemaker Joseph Roos & Co., dwl 

1901 Hyde 
Anderson Frederick, seaman, dwl W s Taylor bet Chestnut 

and Fi'ancisco 
Anderson George, driver John Bamber, res Oakland 
Anderson George, laborer, dwl 545 Mission 



M0RGA1T& CO.'S Celebrated Sauoelito Transplanted Oysters, 87 California Market. ' \ 



C. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



ANB 



97 



AISTD 



A-.i.r^,ni (;-,.iv-e, Sca,ndina\ian Soc. 71 New Montgomery 
_o, seaman, dwl 323 Main 
.ue A., night inspector Custom House, dwl 

AndersLin Citiorge L., second lieutenant Fourth U. S. Ar- 

tillen,-. Black Point 
Anderson George W.. boilermaker, dwl 574 Minna 
Anderson Gustav, longshoreman, dwl 140 Folsom 
Anderson Gustave, wat-chmaker Christian Ahrens, dwl 

816 PoweU 
Anderson H., laborer Pacific Rolling Mills 
Anderson Harold, whitener G. A. Kaiser & Co., dwl 314 

Union, rear 
Anderson Heurj', blacksmith Charles Oester, dwl 43 Jessie, 

rear 
Anderson Henry (colored), cook stm Julia, Bdwy Wharf 
Anderson Henry, laborer, dwl 705 Front 
Anderson Heiny, mate seh. Ada May, dwl 5 Wash 
Anderson Ilenrj", seaman, dwl 16 Washington 
Anderson Henry, tailor, dwl 439 Bush 
Anderson Henry C. /'A?ideyS''n <t- Marshall J, and oyster 

dealer, 45 Washington Market, dwl 915 Greenwich 
Anderson Holwer, carpenter, dwl Willows Hot«l, SW cor 

Mission and Eighteenth 
Anderson Horatio, cabmetmaker, dwl 520 Stockton 
Anderson Isaac, porter E. Martin & Co., res Brooklyn, 

Alameda 
Andei-son Isaac M., mining, dwl 737 Harrison 
Anderson Jacob H. V., clerk Hej-wood & Harmon, res 

Oakland 
Anderson James (And^'y-scn d> Randolph), dwl 305 Jones 
Anderson James, bo:- m iker, dwl 32 Everett, rear 
Anderson James, clerk S. I. Smith, dwl cor Harrison and 

Twenty-fourth 
Anderson James, liquor saloon, 207 Main 
Anderson James, longshoreman, dwl 536 Sacramento 
Anderson James, salesman Sherman & Hjde, dwl 783 

Market 
Anderson James, sawyer Hobbs, Pomeroy & Co., dwl 32 

Everett 
Anderson James C, pinionmaker Cornell Watch Co. 
Anderson James H., bookkeeper Hepvood & Harmon, 

res Oakland 
Anderson James W.. jeweler Wenzel, RothschUd & Ha- 

denfeldt, dwl 305 Jones 
Anderson Jane (widow), dressmaker, dwl 434 Greenwich 
Anderson J. C, conductor N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 

339 Tehama 
Anderson J. F., acting local elder African M. E. Zion 

Church, Stockton bet Clay and Sacramento 
Anderson J. M., bookseller, dwl 29 Turk 
Anderson Joel, seaman, dwl IS Washington 
Anderson John (S. F. Manxtfacturing Co.), dwl 212 

Seventh 
Anderson John, Scandinavian Soc, 71 New Montgomery 
Anderson Jthn, blacksmith Palace Hotel 
Anderson John, boatman, dwl IS Freelon 
Anderson John, bricklaj'er, dwl 530 Mission 
Anderson John, broker,' dwl cor Solano and Delaware 
Anderson John, captain schr Ino, office 42 Market, dwl 

2631 Howard 
Anderson John, coalpasser stm William Taber, Market 

St. ^Miarf 
Anderson John, cooper, dwl 5 Dmmm 
Anderson John, folder Occidental Laundry 
Anderson John, laborer Merchants' Dry Dock, dwl cor 

Green and Callioun 
Anderson John, laborer Wilson, Merry & Co., dwl cor 

Buchanan and Bay 
Anderson John, machinist, dwl 1116 Mission 
Anderson J-jhn, miner, dwl 511 Jlission 
Anderson John, plasterer Palace Hotel, dwl 112 Bush 
Anderson John, proprietor Ocean House, 103 Clark 
Anderson John, restaurant, 836 Slarket 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 21 Conmiercial 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 140 Folsom 
Anderson John, seaman Colorado S. N. Co.'s stm Mon- 
tana, Folsom St. ^Taarf 
Anderson John, seaman stm Salinas, Wash. St. AVharf 
Anderson John, shipcarjienter, dwl 41G Francisco 
Anderson John, sfiecial pohceman, dwl 8 Washington 
Anderson John, stevedore Black Diamond Coal Co., dwl 

S2 Clementina 
Anderson John, tailor, dwl 1 St. Marj- PI, rear 
Anderson John, tailor, dwl 434 Vallejo, rear 
Anderson John C, machinist Cornell Watch Co. 
Anderson John James, coachman James McM. Shatter, 
951 Chestnut 



Anderson John K., laborer, dwl S s Sixteenth bet Folsom 

and Hamson 
Anderson John P. , laborer, dwl 53 Minna 
Anderson John W., private Normal School, 33 Kearny, 
and ^ice-prulclpal Union Grammar School, dwl 547 
Mission 
Anderson Joseph, laborer Golden Gate Park, dwl Twen- 
ty-sixth bet Valencia and Mission 
Andei-son Joseph, Laborer Magdalen Asylum, E s Potrero 

Av nr T\venty-first 
Anderson Joseph, stevedore A. C. Freese 
Anderson Joseph D., books and stationery, 120 Fouith, 

dwl 802 Ho\\'ard 
Anderson Julius (Julius Anderson X* Co.), dwl 627 Cal 
Anderson Juhus & Co., gents' furnishing goods, 328 Kear 
Anderson Knight, carpenter, dwl HZQ Market 
Anderson Lars, laimdr,", 1313 Jackson 
Anderson Lars, seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Anderson Lars, seaman, dwl 47 Sacramento 
Anderson Lewis, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Anderson Lewis, seaman, dwl 54 Sacramento 
Anderson Louis, porter Wells Fargo & Co., dwl 152 Minna 
Anderson Louis, stevedore ■^ith A. C. Freese 
Anderson M. (\ridow), boarding, IIS O'Farrell 
Anderson Magdelene (■nidow), dwl 32 Frederick 
Anderson Mary (\\idow), dwl 6 Moulton PI 
Anderson Marj- (widow), dwl 1114 Kearny 
Anderson Marj' (widow), dwl W s Sansom bet Green and 

Union 
Anderson Mary Ann Mrs., laundress, dwl 11 Pinckney PI 
Anderson Matilda Miss, chambermaid Grand Hotel 
Anderson Matthew, dwl 15 Guerrero 
Anderson Nels, boatman, dwl 4 Francisco 
Anderson Nels, master mariner, dwl 10 Oak Grove Av 
Anderson N. P., fireman stm Reform, Jackson St. TAhari 
Anderson Oliver, driver, dwl 548 Seventh 
Anderson P. C, laborer Palace Hotel 
Anderson Pet Mrs., spirit artist, dwl 206 Kearny 
Anderson Peter (Anderson 6: Irviiuj), dwl 513 Taylor 
Anderson Peter, clerk N. & P. Bruns, dwl NW cor Third 

and Berry 
Anderson Peter, cooper Kelly & Norton, dwl 707i Mission 
AXOEKSOX PETER (colored), editor and proprietor 

Pacific Appeal, office 511 Sansom, dwl 1302 Powell 
Anderson Peter, laborer, dwl 6 Minna 
Anderson Peter, laborer Israel Richards, dwl W s Jones 

bet Francisco and Bay 
Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 103 Sacramento 
Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 250 Spear 
Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 1226 Kearny 
Anderson Peter A., carpenter, dwl 924 Folsom 
Anderson Peter G., carpenter, dwl 735 Brannan 
Anderson Robert, clerk, dwl Portsmouth House 
Anderson S., watchman Grand Hotel 
Anderson Samuel S., agent Samuel Dunbar & Co. (Phila- 
delphia), boots and shoes, 543 Market, dwl NE cor 
Fourth and ilinna 
Anderson Sevenn, conductor N. B. and Mission R. R., 

dwl 339 Tehama 
Anderson Simon (Anderson d- Bro.), res Oakland 
Anderson Stephen, deckhand stm Reform, Jackson St. 

"UTaarf 
Anderson Theodore, dwl 44 Jessie 
Anderson Theodore, cook 11 Sixth, dwl 635 Stevenson 
Anderson Theodore, seaman, dwl 10 Jackson 
Anderson Theodore, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Anderson Thomas, dealer coal US and 120 Market, and 
president Mutual Provident Association (and Ander- 
son ct- Ero.), dwl 410 Eddy 
Anderson Thomas, fireman stm Thoroughfare, Second St. 

Anderson Thomas, Shipwrights' Jour. Assn, a New 

Montgomerj" , , 

Anderson Tliomas W., bookkeeper Thomas Anderson, 

dwl S s Oak bet Buchanan and Webster 
Anderson T. K., brakeman Southern Pac. R. R., cor 

Fourth and Townsend 
Anderson Tufve, miller Carmen Island Salt Works, dw 1 42 

Ecker 
Anderson Tunis, laborer, dwl 8 Anthony 
Anderson T. Walter, clerk Frank Barnard & Co., dwl SE 

cor Oak and Webster 
Anderson W., cabinetmaker Pac. Furniture M. Co. 
Anderson Walter B., special policeman, dwl 502 Stockton 
Anderson William, calker Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s ^^'harf, 

dwl 311 Harrison 
Anderson WUham, driver Yates & Co., dwl 9 Bagley PI, 

rear 
Anderson William, engineer, dwl 34 Lomsa 



sif "ACIPIC COAST BUSINESS LIRECTOEY, 1875-7, H. G. Langley, Putlisher, S. P. 



San Tranoisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merohanl 



Anderson William, engineer S. F. Cordage Factory, dwl 

Indiana nr Sierra 
Anderson William, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anderson William, Shipwrights' Jour. Assn, 71 New 

Montgomery 
Anderson William, teamster Kom & McCarthy, dwl 620 
Linden Av 

molder, dwl 34 Louisa 
bookkeeper H. B. Tichenor & Co., 



Anderson William Jr. 

Anderson AVilliam B., 

dwl 2L531 H.nvard 

Anderson William H. 



woodcarver, dwl W s Mission bet 

Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Anderson William R. (colored), boarding, 7 Broadway 
Anderson William S., accountant Ben. Holladay & Son, 

210 Battery, dwl Twenty-fourth bet Howard and Fol 
Anderson & Bro. (Simon a nd Thomas A nderso-n), dealers 

coal, lis and 120 Market 
Anderson & Irvmg (Peter Anderson and SaimiellrviTig), 

gents' furnishing goods, 219 Montgomery 
Anderson & Marshall (Henry C. Artderson and Joseph S. 

Marshall), oyster saloon, 91 and 93 Centre Market 
ANOEKSON A RA^iDOLrU (Javies A7id€rson and 

Williain C. Randolph), watches, jewelry, diamonds, 

etc., 101 and 103 Montgomen,'' 
Andes Louis, waiter, SW cor Fourth and Berry 
Andes Silver Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), office 507 

Mi:)ntgomery 
Andgretge Stephen, sausagemaker with Fred. Katz 
Andiauer Jacques, carpenter, dwl 409 Third 
Andlauer Joseph V., upholsterer Henry Luchsinger & Co., 

dwl -109 Third 
Andlauer Josephine Miss, dressmaker Mrs. Dolores Den- 

echaud, dwl 409 Third 
Andlauer Mar\' Miss, dressmaker Mrs. Dolores Denech- 

aud, dwl 409 Third 
And'imetti Celeste, compositor La Voce del Popolo, dwl 

ISJ Lafayette PI 
Andornetti Julia (widow), dwl ISJ Lafayette PI 
AnUrade Evaristo, compositor Courrier de San Francisco 
Andradc Guillermo (Gaxiola A- A . ), dwl 611 Folsom 
Andr^ Alexander A., porter S. F. Assaying and Refining 

Works, dwl 7 Harriet 
Andreas J. G., machinist Kisdon Iron and Locomotive 

Works, dwl 209 Minna 
Andreazzi Giacomo, merchant, dwl 215 Broadway 
Andree Rudolph, fruits and vegetables, 12 Grand Central 

Market, dwl 311 Clementina 
A^DUEI ADOLFO. physician, office 621 Clay 
Andres Christian, band leader and musician California 

Theater, dwl 345 Jessie 
Andres Hear}-, seaman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Andres Marj' M. Miss, dwl S24 Mission 
Andresen Brothers (Christian and John G.), carriag©- 

makers and blacksmiths, G07 Battery 
Andresen Christian (Andre^m Bros.), res Oakland 
Andresen John G. (Andresen Bros.), res Oakland 
Andresen Peter, cutter Wright & Harmon, dwl G39 Cal 
Andrew Carrie E. Miss, hairdresser 251 Third, dwl 1604 

Pacific Av 
Andrew Charles, driver John A. Shepston, dwl San Bruno 

Road nr Golden City House 
Andrew George B. T., carpenter, dwl 1224 Union 
Andrew R. , lather Palace Hotel 

Andrews , dwl 209 Leidesdorff 

Andrews , printer, dwl 532 Commercial 

Andrews A. Miss, dwl 516 Pacific 

Andrews Abraham, importer and retail dealer watches, 

diamonds, jewelry, etc., 221 Mont dwl 111^ Minna 
Andrews Alexander, laborer, dwl W s Williamson nr 

Point Loboa Av 
Andrews Alexander, waterman Golden Gate Park 
Andrews Alfred, barkeeper, dwl SW cor Clay and Stock 
Andrews Amador, messenger Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 

2107 California 
Andrews Ainasa B., inspector Custom House, dwl 2520 Sac 
Andrews Andrew, liquor saloon, W 8 Kentucky nr Six- 
teenth 
Andrews Anne, lodgings, 536 Market 
Andrews C. N., workman Ed^^in Falkingham, dwl 841 

Mission 
Andrews Ellen (widow), dwl 120S Pacific 
Andrews Ellen (widow), dressmaker, dwl 1604 Pacific Av 
Andrews E. 0. (B. 0. Andrews tt Co.), dwl 230 Kearny 
Andrews E. 0. & Co., butter, eggs, and cheese, 24 Centre 

Market 
Andrews Francis M. (widow), dwl 11 Yerba Buena 
Andrews Frank, carpenter, dwl 364 Minna 
Andrews Frank J., machinehand D. A. Macdonald & Co., 

dwl Treat Av bet Twenty-second and Twentj'-third 



Andrews Frank P., machinist Cornell Watch Co., dwl 

767 Harrison 
Andrews George, painter Frost & Richards, dwl 313 Har 
Andrews George, painter Palace Hotel 
Andrews George S., clerk Forwarding Department Wells, 

Fargo & Co., dwl 2107 California 
Andrews Harn,', busuiess manager Woodward's Gardens, 

dwl E s Bartlett bet Twenty -third and Twenty-fourth 
Andrews J., waiter stm Pacific 
Andrews James, clerk, dwl 209 Minna 
Andrews James, painter, dwl 20 Clementina 
Andrews J. B., clerk stm Julia, Broadway Wharf 
Andrews John, dwl 424 Sansom 
Andrews John, bookkeeper Front St. Warehouse, res 

Oakland 
Andrews Jonathan, solicitor, dwl 504 Da\is 
Andrews J. P., delivery clerk A. M. Simpson & Brother, 

Howard St. VTh&rf 
Andrews J. W., dwl 414 Pacific 
Andrews Kirk, laborer Standard Soap Co., dwl E s Mission 

Creek bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Andrews M. M., bootmaker E. H. Dunbar, dwl cor Stock- 
ton and Sacramento 
Andrews Ohver, hogranch, cor Fifth Av and K, dwl Sixth 

Av nr L, South S. F. 
Andrews Otis C, drajnuan, dwl 614^ Minna 
Andrews Peter, clerk, dwl 3 Hardie PI 
Andrews Richard, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Andrews Richard, stevedore Menzies & Bingham, dwl 81 

Alta 
Andrews Robert S., machinist Golden Gate Foundry, dwl 

416 Austin 
Andrews R. W., bookkeeper Palmer, Knox & Co., dwl 

416 Austin 
Andrews Susan Mrs., shoefitter Maj-nard & Jones, dwl 

1435J- Mission 
Andrews T. H., carpenter Palace Hotel 
Andrews Thomas, lumber stevedore, dwl 20 Clementina 
Andrews Thomas, sceuic artist California Theater, dwl 

1208 Pacific 
Andrews T. J., maltster, dwl 406 Brannan 
Andrews T. W., carpenter Palace Hotel 
Andrews Washburne R., carpenter, dwl 536i Howard 
Andrews William, conductor Market St. Railway 
Andro Pierre, liquor saloon, 704 Pac 
Andros A. A., conductor Potrero and B. V. R. R. 
Andros James, poultry and game, dwl N s Birch Av bet 

Laguna and Octa\ia 
AXBROi^ MUTOK, attorney at law, office U. S. Court 

Bldg room IS, dwl NAV cor Van Ness Av and Grove 
Andros Washburn, carpenter S. F. Manufacturing Co., 

dwl 536J Folsom 
Andross Porter H. , assistant abstract clerk Custom House, 

dwl 2S O'Farrell 
Andross W. S., clerk S. F. Post-office, dwl 23 OTarrell 
Anduran Charles (H. Racouillat Jc Co.), dwl 738 Pacific 
Andrzejow^ski J. W., letter carrier S. F. Post-office, dwl 

702 Bush 
Anets P., deckhand stm Amelia, Broadway ^\Tiarf 
Angel Andrew J., broker, dwl St. Charles'Pl nr Kearny 
ANGEL IHYROX, advertising agent and newspaper 

correspondent, office 411^ California room 15, dwl 

1118 Howard 
Angel Philip, Cooper's Union No. 1, 417 Bush 
Angeles August, tinsmith, dwl 26 I^usch, rear 
Angelheart George, cooper, dwl 427J Green 
Angelheart M. (Foht .t A.), dwl 427^ Green 
Angelis Wilhelmina (widow), dwl 1023 Powell, rear 
Angelius Diedrich, driver Albany Brewerj-, dwl 756 How- 
ard 

Angell Horace E. (Angell, Palmer tfc Co.). dwl 11 Clem 
Angell Jonathan W. , apothecarj', NW cor First and Fol- 
som. dwl 415 Brj'ant 
AAGELL, PALMER A €0. (Horace B. Angell and 

Cyrus Palmer) proprietors Mmers' Foundry, 237- 

247 First 
Angell W. C, physician, office and dwl 506 Folsom 
Angelo Charles Aubrey, newspaper correspondent, dwl 

920 Sutter 
Angelo D. G., fisherman, dwl foot Clay 
Angeto Giavanoni, clerk 50G Clay, dwl 1404 Clay 
Angelo Ginher, vegetable dealer, Colombo Market 
Angelo Sarah (widow), dwl SW cor Eighth and Tehama 
Angerer Charles, bootmaker, 1118 Folsom 
Angerstein Charles, laborer Curtis Tobey, dwl 163 Minnft 
Angle M. B., druggist's clerk, dwi 246 Third 
Anglin John, laborer, dwi King St. House 
Anglin Patrick, laborer. dwi^E s Bryant bet Twenty- 
fourth and Twenty-fifth 



Get the Millbrae Transplanted Oysters from MOE&AIT & CO., 87 California Market. 



p. VAN SCHAACE & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Establislied 1852. 




Anglin Rebecca, milliner Mrs. Mary Shear, dwl 227 

Second 
Anglin Thomas, packer California Funiitiu-e Manufact^ 

uring Co., dwl 721 Minna 
AXGLO-C.4llTORM.\X BAXK Oimited), Frederick 
F. Low and Ijrnatz Steinhart maua^ra, office 422 
California 
Auglum Francis, laborer Pacific EoUing Mills, dwl Sierra 

bet Georgia and Michigan 
Angonett Frank, teamster, dwl N s Filbert bet Buch- 
anan and Webster 
Anicott Frederick, carpenter, dwl 421 Pine 
Anie Frederick, polisher California Furniture Manufact- 
uring Co., dwl 371 Jessie 
AXIM.II/S' FRIEND (monthly), S. F. Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals publishers, office 
614 Merchant 
Anjele George, papercarrier, dwl SE cor Twenty-first 

Av and K, South S. F. 
Ankel Bernard, hats, caps, and gents' furnishing goods, 

933 Folsom 
Ankele George, market, W s Railway Av bet Fourteenth 

and Fifteenth avs. South S. F. 
Anker Ibnsina, student Heald's Business College, dwl 

609 Bush 
Ankle Abraham, expressman, SE cor Union and Stock- 
ton, dwl 15 Jansen 
Ankner Chris, propertjTnan Bella Union Theater, dwl 

Government House 
Anne P.O., carpenter Palace Hotel 
Annie Belcher Quicksilver Mining Co. (Sonoma Co. Cal.), 

office 37 Merchants' E.tchange 
Annie George, fisherman, dwl foot Clay 
Annis Ahram, tailor, 215 Dupont, dwl 227 Pacific 
Annis C, clerk H. F. Marsh, dwl 1319 Sansom 
Annis Caroline widow), dwl 327 Brj-ant 
Aimis James, carpenter, dwl 94S Howard 
Annis Samuel, stevedore, dwl 1319 Sansom, rear 
Annis William R., porter, dwl 327 Brj'ant 
Ano E., waiter, dwl 6313 Commercial 
Ano Louis, waiter Schneller & Beyer, dwl 1146 Market 

Ansbro Mrs. (widow), dwl 107 Fifth 

Ansburg Barruck (B. Aiisbiirq <t Co.), dwl 313 Green 
Ansburg B. & Co. (Adam Jack; ./r.^, market, NE cor 

Montgomery and Broadway 
Anschel Leri, tailor.v204 Commercial 
Anschel Samuel, peddler, dwl 29 Minna 
Ansell Sarah (widow), dwl 728 Vallejo 
Anselm Otto, messenger U. S. Army Headquarters, 105 

SUickton, dwl 18 Garden 
Anselme Jacquemond, dwl 117 Virginia 
.Ansiglioni Henrv, dwl .523 Pine, rear 
Anslein Arthur, laborer City Iron Works, dwl 3 Washoe 

PI 
Alison James, master mariner, dwl 425 Green 
Anson Patrick, painter Wason & Morris, dwl 909 Geary 
Anson Patrick F., painter Wason & Morris, dwl Sharp PI 

nr Union 
Anson Richard, painter, dwl 909 (3eary 
Anspacher Abraham, real estate, dwl 1S20 Market 
Anstett Antoine, brewer Lafayette Brewerj', dwl 725 

Green, rear 

Anstett Amiand (Anstett i- Grogan), dwl 725 Green, rear 

Anstett & Grogan (Arviand Aiutctt and Thomas Gro- 

gan), proptrs Lafavette Brewerj-. 725 and 727 Green 

Anstey Charies T., clerk Balfour, Guthrie & Co., dwl 228 

Shotwell 
Anthes Charles, barber, dwl 618 Pine 
Anthes Frederick, bakerr, 510 Fourth, dwl 6 Harlan PI 
Anthes John, musician, dwl 2 Potter 
Anthes John A., clerk Henrj- B. Shaw, dwl 2 Potter 
Anthes Louis, clerk, dwl Sophie Terrace nr Pine 
Anthes Peter (Anthes A FUischman), dwl W 3 Sophie 

Terrace nr Pine 
Anthes i Fleischman (Peter Anthes and C:harlesA. 

Fieischman). bairdressing saloon, 315 Kearny 
Anthonison Henry, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery, dwl 24 

Telegraph PI 
Anthony E. T., cut-bottom stock (leather), 323 Sacra- 
mento (and B. T. A nthony A Co.). dwl 124 Oak 
Anthony E. T. & Co., repackers merchandise, 321-323 Sac 
Anthonv Ferdinand, bookbinder Bartling k Kimball, dwl 

974'Folsom 
Anthony Florence M. Miss, teacher music, dwl 11 Haight 
Anthonv Frank L.. clerk, dwl 11 Haight 
Anthonv Frank M. , produce dealer, dwl 11 Haight 
Anthony Franklin, tanner, dwl 672 Folsom 
Anthony George W., real estate, office 417 Bush, dwl 730 
Hayes 



Anthony Harrj-, shoemaker, dwl 297 Clementina 
Anthony Henrj- (Anthony ,1: Maass), dwl 6 Clara Lane 
Anthony Heiirj-, cutler Will & Fiuek, dwl cor Kearny and 

Union 
Anthony Henr>-, peddler, dwl 769 Bryant 
Anthony James, assistant engineer Pacific Mail S. S. Alaska 
Anthony John, boilermaker. dwl 504 Howard 
Anthony Joseph, painter John F. Kennedy, dwl 104 

Natoma 
Anthony Milo J., carpenter Palace Hotel, dwl 226 Sutter 
Anthony Richard M., bookkeeper and manager William 

Sherman & Co. , dwl 115 Kearny 
Anthony Sarah (widow), dwl 11 Haight 
Anthony Walter N., clerk George W. Chapin, dwl 11 

Haight 
Anthony William T., with E. T. Anthony & Oj., dwl 517 

Pine 
Anthony & Maass (Henry Anthony and Christian 
Maas.):), groceries and liquors, NiV cor Berry and 
Clara Lane 
Anthony's Hall, 417 Bush 

Antila Abraham, longshoreman, dwl 16 Washington 
Antila Gustafi, seaman, dwl 16 Washington 
Antisell Piano Co., 640 Washington 
Antisell Thomas M. (Thomas H. Antisell it Co.), dwl 216 

Fair Oaks 
ASTISEIL THOJJAS M. A CO., pianos and organs, 

640 Washington 
Antisell William C, with Thomas M. Antisell & Co., 640 

Washington 
Antoine A., butcher, dwl cor First Av and Kentucky, 

South S. F. 
Anton (jlerster. carpenter Golden Gate Park 
Antone August, cigarmaker John Lemke, dwl 18 Clem 
Antone John, deckhand stm Amador. Broadway ^NTiarf 
Antonelli Peter, gardener, E s Railroad Av Bay View, 

South S. F. 
Antonia Clara Mme., clairvoyant and phj-sician, office 

and dwi 134^ Post 
Antonio Barba, fisherman, dwl foot Clay 
Antonio John, cook stm John L. Stephens, Oregon S. S. 

Co. 
Antonio John, deckhand stm Julia, Broadway Wharf 
Antonio Thomas, laborer, dwl San Jose Av bet Twentj-- 

ninth and Thirtieth 
Antonioli Casirairo, waiter, dwl 209 Leidesdorff 
Antony August, laborer, dwl 2118 Powell 
Antrim Amos V., blacksmith Jonathan Kittredge, dwl 236 

Sutter 
Antrou Pierre, laborer, dwl SW cor Mont Av and Vallejo 
Anttmovich A. fisherman. Clay St. ^Vharf 
Antunovich Florio (Antmtovich <i- Rossett), dwl 712 

Green 
Antunortch Luza, laborer Milloglav & Sopa 
Antunovich Nicholas, coffee saloon, SW cor East and Com- 
mercial, dwl 1311i Sacramento 
Ant\mo^ich & Rossell (Florio Antunovich and John 

Mossell). coffee saloon, 403 East 
Antz E. Z., clerk, dwl 318 Pine 
Antz Hemy, market, XW cor Larkin and Geary 
Anzel Marie (widow), dwl 634 Vallejo 
Anzenhofer Louis, farmer, E s Ocean House Road J mile 

SW Industrial School 
Apel John, architect, office 610 Sac, dwl 701 Stockton 
Apel's Building, 410 Kearny 
Apgar G. M,, carpenter Pac FtuTiiture M. Co. 

Stockton 
Apogast Frederick Edwards, dwl 902 Clay 
Apollo Hall, 808 Pacific , „ , . 

Apothecaries' Hall. SE cor New Montgomery and Market, 

Benjamin B. Thayer manager 
Appel Herman, uphoisterer, dwl 807 Kearny 
Appel Samuel, secondhand furniture, 22,5-227 Fifth 
Appel Simon (Simon Appel ,(.- Co.), dwi 5 Willow 
Appel Simon & Co. (Elias Levi), secondhand furmture, 

872 Folsom 
Appel Theodore, cigars and tobacco, junction Market and 

Ellis, dwl 1118 Howard 
Appeld Morris, mechanic, dwl 639 Mission 
Appell John C, cabinetmaker Kragen & Co., dwl SW cor 

Mission and Main 
Appiarius Franz W., salesman Sol. Wagenheim&Co.,dwi 
504 Filbert , , .„ 

Appiarius Henry, barkeeper F. William Kamps, dwl 40 

California 
Apple Henry, upholsterer Philip Stem, dwl 218 Sixth 
Apple J., porter stm William Taber, Market St. Wharf 
Apple Jacob, bookkeeper John Q. Hodge & Co., dwl 566 
Minna 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOEY Contains Addresses 50,000 Merchants. 



PINE WATCHES and JEWELRY for Sale ty D. W. Laird, 513 Montgomery. 



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Ai>ple S.. extniman U. & L. Co. No. 3 S. F. F. 

Aj'ple Sarah Mrs., dn- groods. 2S Sixth 

Api'le Wulf, merchant, dwi 5C6 Minna 

Ai'i'leby Albert, shoemaker, dwI 127 Morton, rear 

A]']>Iebv AVilliam, proprietor European Nursery, NW cor 

Mission and T\vent?--first 
Applc^'-.xrth Edw-ard, capitalist, office 302 Montgomery 
I ro<fm 31 , res Oakland 
Apple^tirth William, real estate, office 302 Montgtjmerj- 
j room 31, res Oakland 
Applc^te J. Henrr Jr., reporter with J. H. Carmany & 

Co.. dwI 1119 Gearv 
APPLKftATE JOSI.1H H., attorney at law, office 729 
I Mnntp^mer>% dwl Grand Hotel 
I Appleton Abraham, i;>eddler, dwl 942 Harrison 
Appleton Thomas Jr., superintendent Mission and Pac. 
Wo<3len Mills, office 517 and 519 Market, dwl N s 
Twenty-third bet Capp and Mission 
Appleton VTeUin^ton, dwl 516 Sutter 
Aptel AValter, boatman Wainier & Raiser, dwl Meiffes 

Wliarf • -* 

Aquafi Esperidiona Mrs., dressmaker, 539 Vallejo 
Arabet James, laborer, dwl 14 Ohio 
Ara^o & Co. (Chinese), cigar manufacturers, 767 Clay 
AniTano Ignatius, bootblack Adam Grimm 
Araml Margaret Miss, furnished rooms, 719 Clay 
Arand Peter, dwl 719 Clay 
Arata Bartolemo. liquor saloon, 5 Clay 
Arata Benjamin, lab^-rer, dwl 5 Gaven 
Amta Da^id, vegetable dealer, dwl IS Ohio 
AKATA F. A CO. (Dojnenico BrVjtwni), feed store, 

020 liF'jadway 
Arata Francisco (F. Arata a.- Co.), dwl 521 Greenwich 
Arata Fr^res (Giambatuta and Giovanni), vegetables 
32 Colombo Market, dwl Sunny Vale Ranch Mission 
Ocean House Road 
Arata Giambatista CArafa Frtres), dwl Sunny Vale 

Ranch, Mission Ocean House Road 
Arata Gi'^vanni (Arfita Frtsrts), dwl Smmy Vale Ranch, 

Mission Ocean House R<:Tad 
Arata John, cartman, dwl 6 Gaven 
Araia La^\Tence, vegetable peddler, dwl 425 Filbert 
Arata Louis, laborer, dwl 423 Filbert 
Arata Louis J., vegetables and fruits, dwl E s Gaven bet 

Filbert and Greenwich 
Arata Nicola, seaman, dwl Lafavette PI 
Arata Pietro. laborer D. Ghirarxlelli, dwl 13 Union PI 
Arbeck A.. laJvirer, dwl 11 Pacific 
Arhers Ant'<n. cigannaker. dwl 440 Minna 
Arbes Charles, furrier H. Liebes & Co., dwl 317 Bush 
Arbogast Fred., upholsterer Fnuik G. Edwards, dwl 902 

aay 
Arbondin Henry, machinist City Ironworks, dwl 4 Gra- 
ham PI 
Arbondin Herman, tobacconist, dwl SE cor Taylor and 

Vallejn 
Arbuckle Henry, groceries, NE cor Sixteenth and How- 
ard, dwl Mission near Sixteenth 
Arcade Hnuse, L. I>. Ingoldsbv proprietor, 930 Market 
ARI'SIBALD .lOini. sunevor S. F. Savings Union, 

nffice 532 California, dwl 1312 Powell 
Archer Ann (widow), dwl 111 Pr^>spect PI 
Archer Catharine (witJow). dwl IS Louisa 
Archer Charles, machinist William T. Garratt, dwl 415 

Fifth 
Archer Luke, lumberman, dwl 127 Jackson 
Archer William, macWnist Philadelphia Brewerj-, dwl 415 

Fifth 
Archibald James W., machinist, dwl 254 Clementina 
Archibald Jesse, teamster, dwl 297 Clementina 
Archibald Prescott L., assistant suiierintendent Central 

R. R.,dwl 5 Mason 
Archibald W. F., operator Western Union Tel^raph Co., 

dwl S3S Mission 
Archibald William, molder, dwl 53C Mission 
Arder> Agnes Miss, dressmaker Sullivan & Moorhead,dwl 

2tJi Kearny 
.Arder>- J. A., salesman H. K- Cummings &. Co., dwl 155 

Tehama 
Aregan Lars, dwl 123 Jackson 
Arellano Ignacio, barber, dwl 11 Morey Alley 
Arend G., seaman, dwl 104 Steuart 
Arendt Edward, car upholsterer Southern Pac. R. R., dwl 

lt;7 Silver 
Arendt William, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl NW 

cor Br^'ant and Eighth 
Arensberg H., physician, otflce and dwl 30 Kearny 
Arent Dai.id, blacksmith, dwl 10 Zoe, rear 
Arents Albert, metallur^st, dwl 1410 Califoraia 



Arey James A., driver John Bamber. res Oakland 

Arev Robert B., first officer stm William Taber, Market 

St. ^\'harf 
Arey Walter W., bookkeeper Linforth, Kellogg & Co., dwl 

1516 Franklin 
Arfort Jean B., carriage and wagomnaker, 218 Post, dw] 

504 Fulton 
Argan John (Birch, Argall d- Co.), dwl 323 Fifth 
Argenti T. W., varieties, W s Mission bet Twenty-fiftl. 

and Twentv-sixth 
ARGENTINE REPrBLK*, Charles Bamn consul, 

office 510 Battery 
Argo Manuel, driver G. Vemard, dwl 440 Greenwich 
Arguello -\lfred O., law student with S. L. Johnson, dwl 

318 Pine 
Aria Risetto, ropemaker. dwl Duncan Court ur Bdwy 
Ariani Santo (Scalmanini ^ Co.), dwl 14 Washingt'jQ 
Arias Gertrude Miss, dressmaker, dwl 343 Jessie 
Ariaz Benancio, janitor London and S. F. Bank, dwl 21 

Telegraph PI 
Arigrinj Napeleone, fresco painter, dwl N s Green bet 

Dupont and St<>ckton 
Ariola Jlargarit-f. deputy poundkeeper, dwl SW cor Mont- 
gomery Av and Vallejo 
Aris~Anielia E. Miss, dwl 1203 Howard 
Aristide Gustav, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Aritta Andrew, with John J. Hardy, dwl 570 l^nion 
Ariv6, P., real estate and florist, dwl Galinto nr Fifteenth 
Arizona Silver Mining Co. (Humboldt Co., Nev.), office 

419 California room 17 
Arizona and Utah Mining Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), Joseph 

Maguire secretary-, office 419 California 
Arjo Miguel, j^ddler, dwl 31 John 
Arl Joseph, waiter H. Hoesch, dwl 719 Clay 
Arlett Benjamin, mason Palace Hotel 
Arling Isaac, laborer Central Pacific R. R., dwl 346 Ritch 
Arlington Da\id M., carpenter, dwl 1125 Kearny 
Arlington House, 3Irs. E. M. Gillan proprietress, 127 

Kearny 
Arlington William rRoss d- Arlington}, dwl 612 Taylor 
Arlington W illiun, minstrel Maguire's Opera House 
Armager Charles W., policeman City Hall, dwl S12 Stock 
Arman Edward, hairdresser, dwl 72 Everett 
Armand Adolphe, laundryman Mrs. Angeline Digean, dwl 

6 Polk Lane 
Armand Lautand, tailor, 327 Pine 
Armanin Frank, shoemaker Louis Deferrari, dwl Union, 

bet Dupont and Stockton 
Armann Edward (Gallanher d: A.), dwl 72 Everett 
Armaurd P., boxmaker Pacific Box Factory, dwl o Willow 

bet Mission and Valencia 
Armbruster Adolph, clerk, dwl 10 Junipsr 
Armbruster Daniel, carpenter Southern Pac. R. R., dwl 

11 Hickory 
Armbruster Henry, raachinis* Risdon Iron and Locomo- 
tive Works, d'wl Second nr F^.lsom 
Armbruster JuUus, engraver California Jewelrv Co., dwl 

312 Chestnut 
Armer Herman, traveling agent Knllman & Armer, dwl 

1230 Bush 
Armer Lizzie Miss, furnished rooms, 522 Stwkton 
Armer Max (Kxaiman .t- A.), dwl 631 OTarrell 
Armer R-^bert. tinsmith H. G. Fiske, dwl NU' cor Hvde 

and Pacific 
Armer Thomas, cook Saulmann & Lauenstein, dwl 520 

California 
Armes C. William (Ami'^s A: Dallam), res Oakland 
Amie-^ George W. (Annen A- Dallam), res Oakland 
AR.nES A- DALLAM (C. W. and G. W. ArmeJi and 
Richard B. Dallam), importers wood and willow 
ware and manufacturers brooms, tubs, and pails, 215 
and 217 Sacramento, manufactory- 22 and 24 California 
Armington Edward J., compositor A. L. Bancroft & Co., 

dwl 1017 Hay 
Armington Edward R., tailor Wright & Harmon, dwl 

1017 Clay 
Armington George H., salesman C. Otto & Co., dwl 2S1 

Minna 
Armitage George, saihnaker Harding & Braunn, dwl 414 

Union 
Armitage John, plasterer, dwl SW cor Sixth and Howard 
Armitage Jo5ej>h, painter F. A. Rutherford 
Armon George, cook Lick House 

Armonat Carl, restaurant Wilson's Amphitheater, 637Mis3 
Arraonino P., vegetables. 75 Colombo Market 
Armor WDliam, barkeeper Flanigan & Kennelly, dwl N'W 

cor Pacific and Front 
Armory Hall, 134 Fourth 
Armorj- Hall Building, NE cor Montgomery and Sac 



MOEGAN & CO., 87 California Market, Import their own Stock from New York. 



I. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Estatlisliea 1862. 




Arms M"ses, jioliceman City Hall, dwl cor Grceu and 

Mi»nt;r<)nierv Av 
Armst Julin. photo'jrapher Bradley & Rulofson, dwl 726 

Califoi-nia 
Armstroni; Amelia Miss, dwl 2220 Broadway 
Amistroiigf Anna Miss, shoefitter Einstein Bros. & Co., 

dwl 7S2 Howard 
Armstronj? Caroline A., vestmaker, dwl 415 Powell 
Annstronf;: Catherine Sirs., upholsteress California Fiirni- 

tm-e Manufacturing Co., dwl 522 O'Fai-rell 
Ami^troH^^ (_'lKir]es, asphaltum worker N. P. Perine 
ArnistroHLC Charles, seaman stm Kaloraiua, Market St. 

Wharf 
Armstroii!,' Christopher, clerk Michael Connell, dwl NW 

cor Harriet and Folsom 
Armstrong Christopher, sign painter, dwl 1810 Polk 
Armstrong Daniel, clerk John McKillip Si. Co., dwl 13 

Grand Av 
Armstrong David, com mcht, dwl 522 O'Fan-ell, rear 
Annstrong Dennis, salesman Lazarus Schwartz, dwl 609J 

Jlinna 
Armstrong Edward J. M., clerk Benjamin S. Brooks, dwl 

1003 Powell 
Armstrong Edward J., collector, dwl 2313 Howard 
Armstrong Fannie Miss, dressmaker Sullivan & Moor- 
head, dwl 549 Mission 
Anustrong Frank T., porter Meeker, James & Co., dwl 

622 O'Farrell, rear 
.\rmstrong George, shoefitter Buckingham & Hecht, dwl 

S s Waller bet Webster and Fillmore 
Armstrong Henrj-, clerk, dwl 112G Market 
Armstrong .lames, barkeeper John K. Armstrong, dwl 

NE cor Third and Townsend 
Annstrong James, brewer and bottler ale, SW cor Folsom 

and Fourteenth, dwl 240 Sixth 
Armstrong James, gardener, dwl E s Harrison nr Twenty- 
fourth 
Armstrong James, shoemaker, dwl 415 Powell 
Ai-mstrong Jennie Miss, dwl 2220 Broadway 
Armstrong Joanna (widow), dwl cor Chapultepec and 

Henrietta, Bernal Heights 
Armstrong John, engineer, dwl 1023 Hyde 
Armstrong John, laborer, dwl 1100 Folsom 
Armstrong John, laborer, dwl Tyler bet Jones and Taylor 
Armstrong John, laborer Risdon Iron and Locomotive 

Works, dwl 809 Folsom 
Armstrong John, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Annstrong John, tailor, dwl IGO Minna 
Armstrong John G., cooper Bernard F. Stromberg, dwl 

409 Sutter 
Armstrong John H., vamisher L. & E. Emanuel, dwl 460 

Sixth 
Armstrong John K., liquor saloon, NE cor Third and 

Townsend, dwl 417 Tehama 
Armstrong John L., stockbroker, 434 Montgomery dwl 

440 Hayes 
Armstrong Joseph, carpenter Palace Hotel 
Armstrong Matilda Mrs., dressmaker, 1417 Dupont 
Armstrong Michael, laborer, dwl Tyler bet Jones and 

Taylor 
Ai-mstrong Robert, clerk, dwl 736 Vallejo 
Annstrong Rudolph, cooper, dwl 1417 Dupont 
Armstrong Samuel C, salesman George W. Miller, dwl 

604 Bryant 
Armstrong Samuel P., teamster, dwl 31 Lafayette 
Armstrong Thomas, student Heald's Business College 
Armstrong Ti-uman B., turner Brittan, Holbrook & Co., 

dwl 3.'i John 
Armstrong WilUam, compositor S. F. Clu-onicle, dwl 1137 

Armstrong William, grainer, dwl S s Eighteenth bet Capp 

and Mission 
Armstrong William H., clerk Medical Director's OfBce U. 

S. A., 106 Stockton, dwl 942 Howard 
Annstrong William H., waterman Pacific Mail S. S. China 
Annstrong W. W.,bookkeeper John C. Winans, dwl 1001 

Sutter 
Amaad Albert, barkeeper Mrs. J. Sajous, dwl 12 Wdlow 

Av 
Amberger Frank, musician, dwl 1306 Montgomery 
Arnesen Ivan, cook, dwl SW cor East and Merchant 
Amcson Soren, laborer, dwl 90B Filbert 
Ame<t John, photographer, dwl 725 Califonua 
Amhdt William, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl NW 

cor Eighth and Brj'ant 
Amheim Abe, clerk Isaac & Gross, dwl 323 Pacific 
Aniheim Gustavnis, jeweler, dwl 8 Steu.art 
Arnheim Hennan. clerk S. S. Amheim, S Steuart 
Arnhcim JuHus S., druggist, NE cor Ninth and Mission 



AUi\IIKl.n SAJIIIEL .S„ cigars and stationery, S, 

Steuart 
Aniheim Sol. clothing, 323 Pacific 
Aridieim William S,, jeweler, dwl 8 Steuart 
Arnnim Alice (widow), liquor saloon, Potrero Av nr El 

Doi-ado 
Arnof Gus. , jeweler R. W. Jackson, dwl 8 Steuart 
Ai-nold Adam, butcher, dwl S s Eleventh Av bet N andP 

South S. F. 
Arnold Amanda Mrs., millinery and fancy goods, 1400 

Polk 
Arnold Ames, teamster, cor Market and Spear, dwl E s 

Fair O.aks nr Twenty-third 
Arnold Anna (widow), dwl 934 Folsom 
Arnold Augustus B., sa^h and blindmaker, dwl 511 How 
Ai-nold Austin, bookkeeper Marcus C. Hawley & Co., dwl 

429 Geary 
Arnold A. W., jjainter and grainer, dwl 315 Minna 
Arnold Benjamin E., wholesale butcher, NW cor Fourth 

Av and M, South S. F., dwl 2217 Howard 
Arnold Charles, liiborer, dwl 317 Francisco 
Arnold Elbridge F., optician and stationer, 427 Kearny 

dwl 822 Filbert 
Arnold Elizabeth Miss, dressmaker, dwl E 3 Fair Oaks 

nr Twenty-third 
Arnold F. D'. letter carrier S. F. Post-offlce, dwl S s 

Twentieth bet Guerrero and Valencia 
Arnold Francis W., cooperage, 70S Front, dwl 519 Octa\ia 
Arnold George, cabinetmaker Kimball Manufacturing Co. 
Arnold George, laborer, dwl cor Twentieth and Potrero Av 
Arnold George C. , teacher German, Urban Academy, dwl 

701 Geai-y 
Arnold George W., plumber, dwl cor Twentieth and Po- 
trero Av 
Arnold O. H. , clerk Occidental Hotel 
Arnold Joe. New Mission Market, Mission nr Thirtieth 
Arnold John, machinehand D. A. Macdonald & Co. 
Arnold John i^lrs., dwl S s Twentieth nr Guerrero 
Arnold John C, business manager Buckley's Varieties, 

dwl 719 Clay 
Arnold John F., conductor Clay St. Hill R. B., dwl 1603 

Leavenworth 
Aniold JosiS, waiter, dwl 719 Clay 

Arnold Joseph, coal and wood, 8'26 Third, dwl 274 Clem 
Arnold Lewds, financial secretary Longshoremens' Be- 
nevolent Assn, dwl 3 Clay 
Arnold Louis, gr.icer, dwl 1600 Powell 
Arnold Marcus P. , lettercarrier S. F. Post-office, dwl 1503 

Leavenworth 
Arnold Matthew, machinist Union Iron Works 
Aniold Noah S. (iV. S. Arnold X- Co.). dwl 918 Capp 
Arnold N. S. & Co. , hardware commission merchants and 

ma:nufacturers' agents, 312 California 
Arnold Otto, messenger London and San Francisco Bank, 

dwl 309 Powell 
Arnold Patrick, salesman J. J. O'Brien & Co., dwl 634 

Bnsh , , ^ 

Arnold Rufus W., teamster Sedgley & Davis, dwl Es 

Shntwell bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Arnold Thomas C, salesman Hecht Bros. & Co., dwl 101 

Grove . . 

Arnold T. J. , engineer Board State Harbor Commissioners, 

office 440 Jackson, res Oakland 
Arnold William, laborer, dwl N s Delgardo PI nr Hyde 
Arnold William H., cook U. S. Marine Hospital 
Aniold William H., salesman, dwl 936 Howard 
Aniold U. K., bookkeeper Greenebaum Bros., dwl 1017 

ARNOT N.4THAME1 B.. manager Vulcan Iron 

Works, 136 and la7 Fremont, dwl 1614 Pine 
jIKKOT NATHlMIEl, »., Jr.. secretary Central R. 

R. Co., office 118 Taylor, dwl 2.510 Clay 
Amott Henry, extniman Engine No. 1 S. F. F. D., dwl 

419 Pacific 
Amott John, dwl 537 Sacramento 
Amott Thomas, expressman, dwl 411 Sixth 
AmsburgCharies,market,corBroadwayand Montgomery, 

dwl 313 Green „, „ „ » 

Amson John, Shipwright 8 Join-. Assn, 71 New Mont 
\Tnstoin Eu"'ene fSlein, Simr/ii it- Co. J, dwl 332 Eddy 
Arnstein Ludwig, bookkeeper St«in, Simon & Co., dwl 

332 Eddy 
Amstein Max, dwl 828 Greenwich 
Amtz F. , carpenter Palace Hotel 
Aronsolm Sigmund, peddler, dwl 3 Monroe 
Aronson Abraham, furniture, 1320 Stockton, dwl 'Jessie 

bet Fifth and Sixth 
Aronson Arnold, shoecutter, dwl 3 Monroe 
Aronson George, pawnbroker, 110 Keamy, dwl 307 Eddy 



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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOEY Circulates throughout Pacific Coast. 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D, W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merchant. 



Aronson Julius, drj'-goods clerk, dwi 500 Jessie 
Aronson Leon, salesman Brow-n Bros. & Co., dwl 824 O'- 

Farrell 
Aronson Nuthan, clerk Joseph Bock, dwl 30 Sixth 
Aronson Siegismund, clerk Shirek & Co.. dwl 932 Bdwy 
Aronstein Adolph, physician, office 29 Kearay, dwl 620 

Jones 
Arp Jockum, laborer, dwl 30 Washington 
Arper Albert D.. millhand California Mills, dwl 2132 How 
Arper Thomas, millwright F. Korbel & Bros., dwl 2132 
H 11 ward 
; Arper Walter, sash and blindraaker, dwl 2132 Howard 
Arps Heniiun, cabinetmaker Field & Frei, dwl 573 Bryant 
I Arrambide J. B., live-stock dealer, dwl 759 Harrison 
I Arrata Paoli. peddler, dwl 3 Margaret PI nr Vallejo 
Arrata Serapheno, peddler, dwl 736 Vallejo, rear 
Arrate LewTs, marble polisher J. & C. Morris, dwl 784 

Fulsom 
Arrechea Augustine, dwl lOlS Stockton 
Arrelano Manuel, laborer, dwl 12 Pollard PI 
Arreras Jesus (widow), dwl 723 Broadway 
Arret Hans H., Scandinavian Soc, 71 New Montgomery 
Arriestopher Arriest, miner, dwl 127 Jackson 
Arrigoni Napoleone, fresco painter, dwl 9 Union PI, rear 
Arrington Maria L. (widow), dwl (>i3 Folsom 
Arrington Nicholas T., bookkeeper Newton Bros. & Co., 

dwl 1309 Mason 
Arringt^sn William Bailey, clerk Pacific Mail S. S. Co.*s 

office, dwl 643 Folsom 
Arriola Edward f Septtlveda, A. it Piinentel), dwl 14 

Auburn 
Arriola Isabella (wHdow), dwl 14 Auburn 
Arrisseau Louis, carpenter, dwl SW cor Montgomery Av 

and Vallejo 
Arronge Eugene, dyer, dwl 615 Pacific 
Arrowsmith Dand" B., general agent, office 426 Mont- 

gomeiT. dwl 1107 Pine 
Arrowsmith Henry, clerk Ammon, Caspari & Co., res 

Oakland 
Arrowsmith John, laborer, dwl 7 Tehama 
Arrowsmith Joseph, salesman Treadwell & Co., dwl 16 

Lafayette 
Arsberrj- Joseph, telegraph operator, dwl 572 Folsom 
AKT ASSOIXITION, San Francisco. Robert C. Rog- 
ers secretary-, J. Ross Martin assistant secretary-, 
rooms 313 Pine 
Arteche Frank, laborer George W. Swan &Co., dwl 27 

Commercial 
Arth George, musician, dwl 742 Folsom 
Arthur Charles S. . hamessmaker Can-ille Manufacturing 

Co. , dwl 330 Brannan 
Arthur Eva (widow), dwl 330 Brannan 
Arthur George N. (J. D. Arthur .t- Smi), res Oakland 
Arthur John (J. J). Arthur d: Son), res Oakland 
Arthur J. D. & Son (Genr<je N, Arthxir), farm and ex- 
press wagons, SW cor California and Da\is 
Arthur William S., baker and confectioner, 259 Third 
^Vrthut Edwin M., paying teller AVells, Fargo & Co., res 

Oakland 
Artigues E. &. Co. (Jean and Lmiis Artigiies}, butch- 
ers. 14 San Francisco Market and S s Fifth Av nr 
Railroad Av, South S. F. 
Artigues Emile (E. Artigves tfc CoJ, dwl Fifth Av bet 

Railroad Av and N., feouth S. F. 
Artigues Jean /"£. Artitjues <.(■ Co.;, dwl Rfth Av bet 

Railroad Av and N., South S. F. 
Artigues Louis fK Artianes d- CoJ, dwl Fifth Av bet 

Railroad Av and N., South S. F. 
Artt David W., carpenter, dwl Fifth Av bet A and B, 

South S. F. 
Arzbergcr Martin, housepainter, dwl 1614 Bush 
Asal Adolf, brush manufacturer, dwl 3 Noble PI 
AsbesU>s Felting and Paint Co., Merrell & Hook agents, 

office 314 Tow-nsend 
Asbury Frank, dwl 123 T>ier 
Asby John, tailor Adolph Young, dwl 153 Third 
Asch B., hairdresser F. A. Regner, dwl 415 Clementina 
Asch William, eapeutt«r Wolf Fleischer, dwl 415 Clem 
Ascheck Henrj-, marbleworker John Daniel & Co., dwl 

Golden Gate Hotel 
Aachen Ernst, clerk Henry Nolt«, dwl SW cor Dupout 

and Bush 
Aschcr A. F., clothing, 408 Fourth 
Ascher H. R., musician S. F. Musical Pro. Assn, 545 Cal 
Aschmann William, clerk Nicholas Wiebalk, dwl SW cor 

Bush and Polk 
Aschmann William, longshoreman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Ascott John, seaman, dwl 23S Steuart ! 

Ascroft Alice Mnie., milliner, 110 Geary | 



Ascroft Henry, watchman Pacific Mail S. S. Co., dwl 110 

Geary 
Ash Brothers fLeo and Jacob), importers and jobbers 

clotliing, NW cor Battery and Bush 
Ash C. L. (\vidow), dwl 540 Second 
Ash, David, horseshoe nailmaker John W. Clough, dwl 

518 Mission 
Ash Harriet (widow), nurse, dwl 413 Fourth 
Ash Herman, salesman Ash Bros., dwl 700 Ellis 
Ash Jacob (Aiyh Brothers), res New York 
Ash Leo (Anh Brotht-rs), dwl 700 Ellis 
Ash Mary Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 117 Natoma 
Ash Pet«r, laborer Ri^don I. and L. Works, dwl 551 Min 
Ash Robert, attorney at law, dwl 1010 Mission 
Ash Simon, clerk Henrj" Meininger, dwl 215 Clementina 
Ash Thomas P., shorthand reporter, dwl SE cor Eddy 

and Steiner 
Ash William, tailor, dwl 415 Clementina 
Ash. See Ashe 
Ashboum Alexander (colored), manufacturer California 

Cocoanut Pulverizing Co., 738 Howard 
AshbiuTier William, mining engineer, office 240 Mont- 

gomen", dwl 1014 Pine 
ASUBt'Kl' MOiXKOE, auditor city and county, office 

3 City Hall first fioor, dwl 204 Montgomery' 
Ashby Mark T. , mining, office 402 Front room 8, dwl 516 

Greenwich 
Ashby Wilson, mining, office 402 Frqnt 
Ashcom James E. , register clerk Fourth District Court, 

dwl 1104 Market 
Ashcroft William, captain stm Macpherson, dwl 1203 Jack 
Ashe Oregon,', porter John E. Richards, dwl 114 Tehama 
Ashe Matthew, barkeeper John E. Richards, dwl Mis- 
sion nr Thirtieth 
Asher Alexander B., policeman City Hall, dwl 603 Bush 
Asher Charles L., compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 44 

Third 
Asher Edward, dwl 555 Natoma 
Asher Henrj', merchant, dwl 212 Sutter 
Asher Samuel, oil clothing, factory 325 Davis, dwl 225 

Clay 
Asherson Emil, bookkeeper Hebrew Observer, dwl 432 

Clementina 
Ashim George, clerk, dwl 44 Third 
Ashim S., merchant, dwl 44 Third 

Ashley Delos R., messenger and clerk Naval Office Cus- 
tom House, dwl 712 Bush 
Ashley Delos R. (mdow), dwl 712 Bush 
Ashley W. H., clerk Firemaus Fxmd Insurance Co., dwl 

224 Kearny 
Ashley W. H. filrs., dressmaker, 224 Kearny 
Ashman Charles, machinist Risdon L and L. Works, dwl 

54 First 
Ashman Richard T., engineer Wells, Russell & Co., dwl 

cor Sierra and Indiana 
Ashruan William, stevedore A. C. Freese 
Ashmead Gusta\^is S. (Ashmead <i- EellumJ, dwl Mari- 
posa bet Florida and York 
Aslimead & Kellum (Gustavus S. Ashmead and Charles 

T. KelhiMil, carpenters and builders, 5 Beale 
Ashmore William, storekeeper Cosmspolitan Hotel 
Ashton A., dwl 828 California 
Ashton Charles (Beveridqe S: A.), dwl 9 Hubbard 
A6ht<:m Charies S., clerk S. F. Stock and Exchange Board, 

dwl E s Fillmore bet Union and Green 
Ashton Frank, clerk, dwl 9 Hubbard 
Ashton H.. quartennaster Pacific Mail S. S. Montana 
Ashton William, stevedore A. C. Freese 
Ashton M'illiam C, salesman Renton, Holmes & Co., dwl 

408 Brj-ant 
Ashworth Thomas, dwl 806 McAllister 
Askham Charles M., steward Pacific Mail S. S. Co., dwl 

310 Ritch 
Askwith William C, steward stm William Taber, Market 

St. Wharf 
Asmas Ehse Miss, dressmaker M. Vaslin, dwl Pacific bet 

Hyde and Larkin 
Asmus John, farmer, E s San Jos6 Road nr Five-mile 

House 
Asmus John, porter Grosh & Rutherford, dwl 724 O'Farrell 
Asmussen Wilhehii, groceries, liquors, and boarding, NAV 

cor Brj'ant and Eighth 
AspeirWilliam, calker, dwl 315 Fremont 
AssaJino Nicholas, tailor Wright & Harmon, dwl T\venty- 

seventh bet Folsom and Harrison, Bemal Heights 
Assalino Salvatora, co4:.k, dwl T%venty-seventh bet Folsom 

and Harrison, Bemal Heights 
Assanger Elizabeth Mrs., dwl 3 Man' Lane 
Assanger Henrietta (widow), dwl 3 Mar>' Lane 



Karitan Eiver Transplanted Oysters at MOEGAIT & CO/S, 87 California Market, 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Assayer State, Louis Falkenau, otfice 421 Montgomery 
Asseiin Benjamin, travelina: ajj:ent. dwl 31 Glen Park Av 
Asseiin Charles, carpenter Kimball Manuf. Co., dwl W 3 

Hampshire bet Twenty- second and Twenty-third 
Asseiin John, millhand California Mills, dwl 5<j3 Mission 
Asseiin Susan (widow), dwl W s Hampshire bet T^venty- 

second and Twentv-third 
ASSESSOR fITY Ai\0 <'OF\TT, office 22 City HaU 

first iioov 
Assion Henr>-, tailor, dwl l\ Morey Alley 
Assion Joseph, merchant tailor, 205 Montgomerj', dwl 34S 

Third 
ASStSTAN'T SITERIN'TEXDENT RAILWAY 

MAIL SERVaCE, office (iOti Montgomery 
Assmann Adolph (Asamatui d- XeubertJ, dwl Hampshire 

bet El Donido and Alameda 
Assmann Frederick, dwl Hampshire bet El Dorado and Al- 
ameda 
Assmann Otto, cabinetmaker, dwl 612 Pine 
Assmann & 'SeubeTt( Adolph Assmann and Rudolph jVew- 

bert), butter, cheese, eggs, etc., 10 California Market 
Astemian L., baker>% 13 Pearl 

Asteruch M., milliner Mrs. M. Seliff, dwl 529 Greenwich 
Asten Ferdinand O., masquerade costumer, 655 Wash 
AstenJuhn, expressman, cor Pacific and Davis, dwl 3 

Brt:>adway 
Astou James, gasfitter, dwl 401 Jessie 
Aston Sarah E. (wido\v), dwl 461 Jessie 
Astor Block, 631 Sacramento 
ASTREDO AXTHOXY, Astredo's Exchange, 635 

Washington, dwl 914 Vallejo 
Asztalos Samuel, cabinetmaker, dwl 529 Greenwich 
Atchinson B. M. fB. M. Atchiii^on tt CoJ, res East Oak- 
land 
Atchinson B. M. & Co. f Edward L. CuttenJ , butter, e^:s, 

and cheese, 16 and 28 Centre Market 
Atchinson John, carpenter William B. Bradbury, dwl 452 

Sixth 
Atheam Charles G. (Athearn & Co.), dwl 913 McAllister 
Atheam Charles M., milkman, dwl 1313 Larkin 
Athearn Joseph H. {Atheam 6: Co.) , dwl 17 Second Av 
Atheam William, clerk Forwarding Department Wells, 

Fargo & Co., dwl 1707 Leavenworth 
ATHEARN A CO. (Charles G. aiid Joseph H. 

Athearn), groceries, provisions, and ship stores, 8 

Clay 
Atherton E. A., architect, ofifice 330 Pine room 47 
Atherton Faxon D., capitalist, office 705 Sansom, res Fair 

Oaks, San Mateo Co. 
Atherton Faxton D. Jr. , clerk F. D. Atherton, res Fair 

Oaks, San Mateo Co. 
Atherton Henry, metal roofer Wilham Cronan 
Atherton John, laborer, dwl 23 Minna 
Atherton N. H., tinsmith H. G. Fiske, dwl 614 Kearny 
Atherton William, laborer S. F. Manufacturing Co. 
Athey Andrew, laborer Spring V'alley Water W. Co., dwl 

227 Second 
Athey James, machinist, dwl 617 Minna 
Alhey John, carpenter, dwl 522 Folsora 
Athoy A. , laborer Spring Valley Water W. Co. 
Atken Charles H., with Boilermaker Assn, 818 Howard 
Atkins A, B., grocer Henry B. Atkins, dwl SE cor O'Far- 

rell and Jones 
Atkins Benjamin F. (Cord, Otten d: Co.), dwl 8 Com 
Atkins David, dummyman Clay St. Hill R. R. 
Atkins Ebenezer, porter F. B. Taylor & Co. 
ATKLN'S HENRY B., gr<x;eries, liquors, and real- 
estate agent, bS cor O'Frrrell and Jones 
Atkins Joseph, pipefitter Pacific Mail S. S. Co. 'a WTiarf 
Atkins L., laborer Palace Hotel 
Atkins Robert C. (Orr tfc Atkim), dwl 60S Geary 
Atkins. See Aitkens 
Atkinson A., laborer Palace Hotel 
Atkinson Alexander, clerk, dwl 111 Taylor 
Atkinson C. Elwood, basketmaker William B. Bradbury, 

dwl Twenty-fourth bet Mission and Bartlett 
Atkinson Francis, boilermaker, dwl 221 Linden Av 
Atkinson Francis, fireman Engine No. 6 S. F. F. D.,dwl 

311 Sixth 
Atkinson George, dwl 622 Grove 
Atkinson George, wheelwright, dwl 535J Minna 
Atkinson George F., woodturner William B. Bradbury, 

dwl 520 Fulsom 
Atkinson James, laborer Pac. Rolling Mills, dwl Shasta nr 

Georgia 
Atkinson James, wholesale and retail winee and liquors, 

538 Market, dwl 41 Tehama 
Atkinson Joseph H., dwl 1032 Broadway 
Atkinson L. (L, Atkinson ct CoJ, dwl 22 Sansom 



ATKINSON E, A CO., shirt and collar manufacturers, 

22 Sansom 
Atkinson Laura (widow), canvasser, dwl 113 Perry 
Atkinson Nathan, real estate, office 507 Montgomery, dwl 

W s Gough nr Tjier 
Atkinson Rttbert, laborer, dwl 31S Davis 
Atkinson Rrise H. (widow), dwl 365 Minna 
Atkinson Thomas, dwl Old San Jos6 Road nr Industrial 

School 
Atkinson Thomas, real estate, dwl 26 Howard, rear 
Atkinst.'n Thos. E., bookkeeper 410 Sansom, dwl Twenty- 
fourth nr Mission 
Atkinson Thomas T., bookkeeper Lyon & Co., dwl 112 

Hyde 
Atkinson William, sailmaker, dwl 6 Clay 
Atlantic and Pacific Consolidated Gold Mining Co. (El 

Dorado Co., Cal.), office 419 Calif urnia room 5 
Atlantic and Pacffic Quicksilver Mining Co. (Lake Co., 

Cal.), office 331 Montgomen' room 14 
ATL-INTIC AND PACIFIC TELEGRAPH CO. 
(Central Pacific Division^, Lelaud Stanford president, 
Richard P. Hammond general manager, F. L. Van- 
denbergh superintendent, J. G. Bloomer city manager, 
office 507 California ; branches Grand Hotel, Lick 
House, SE cor Sac and Front, cor Fourth and To\m- 
send, Oakland Ferrj' Wharf, and Broadway "Wharf 
Atlantic Giant Powder Co. (New York), office 603 Wash 
Atlantic Straw Works, Forrest & Co. proptrs, 132 Fourth 
Atlas Insurance Co. (Fii-e), of Hartford, Hutchinson, 

Mann & Smith agents, 31-4 California 
Atterbun,- Alexander, bookkeei>er James N. McCune, dwl 

304 Seventeenth 
Atterbur,- James N., contractor and builder, dwl 923 Miss 
Atterburj' John P., contractor and builder, dwl 92S Miss 
Attinger Gottleib, bootmaker Frank Muller,dwl 31 Morton 
Attinger Gustav, shoemaker, dwl 31 Morton 
Attridge Arthur, shoemaker Einstein Bros. & Co., dwl 

W s Noe bet Market and Fifteenth 
Attridge Edward, porter, dwl 1010 Filbert 
Attridge James, laborer Front St. Warehouse, dwl NE 

cor Broadway and Montgomery 
Attridge Thomas, porter Cowell's Warehouse, dwl 1307 

Broadway 
Attwood Melville, consulting mining engineer, dwl 722 

Bush 
Atwill Edward, salesman Mowatt & Co. , dwl 210 Minna 
Atwill Joseph F. (AticUl i- Co.), res Oakland 
Atwill & Co. tJoi<eph F. Aticilljy Western Mining Agency, 

office 240 Montgomery 
Atwood Caroline L. Mrs., assistant Girls* High School, 

dwl 1511 Clay 
Atwood E. C, clerk, dwl 636 Commercial 
Atwood Ephraim H. fAticood d; Bodwdl) , dwl 1511 Clay 
Atwood Ernest, laborer Angell, Palmer & Co., dwl 636 

Commercial 
Atwood George A., groceries and liquors, SW cor Folsom 
and Twenty-second, dwl E s Shotwell bet Twenty- 
second and Twenty -third 
Atwood George E. (Nichols & AJ, dwl SW cor Drumm 

and Sacramento 
Atwood William T., bookkeeper Porter, Blimi & Slessin- 

ger, dwl 629 Post 
Atwood & Bodwell (Ephraim Atwood and Barry E. 
Bodwcilly Excelsior Windmill, pump and horsepower 
and tank manufacturers, 211 and 213 Mission 
Atzeroth Frederick, bricklayer, dwl 415 Francisco 
Auban Vittoria Madame, laundress Felecite Cleman, dwl 

Broadway, bet Dupont and Kearny 
Aubert Albert, hams, bacon, etc., 10 San Francisco and 55 

Centre markets, dwl 3 Graham PI 
Aubert James M., physician, office and dwl 504 Kearny 
Aubert Joseph, dwl 532 Pacific 
Aubert Joseph P., jeweler, dwl 620 Fulton 
Aubert Paul L., jeweler California Jewelrj' Co., dwl 1314 

O'Farrell 
Aubery John, seaman, dwj 140 Folsom 
Aubin Adolphiue Mrs., ironer B. Sarthon, dwl 907 Sac 
Auboimet August, proprietor Europe Hotel, 107 Dupont 
Aubrey Bernard, real estate, dwl 209 Montgomer>- Av 
Aubrey CTiarles, tinner G. in W. Snook, dwl 451^ Tehama 
Aubrey Francis O., carpenter Southern Pac. R. R., dwl NE 

cor Twentv-third and Chattanooga 
Aubriere Peter, clerk Herbeman & Fonroche, dwl 209 

Montgomen' Av 
Auburn Gold Mining Co. (Placer Co., Cal.), office 414 Cal- 
ifornia 
Auberj- Emily Mrs., clerk U. S. Surveyor General, dwl 

415 Post 
Aud B. Mrs., dwl 100 McAllister 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEEOTOKI, 1875-7, Published March, 75, Price $5. 
I 



JEWELEY made to order and EEPAIRED by D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



Audiffrcil Aljihonse, driver Hy])olite Audiffred, dwl 224 

Austin 
Audiffred Hj-polite, wood and charcoal, Mission St. Wharf, 

dwl 224 Austin 
All>!TOK fITY AXB> COr.\TY, office 3 City HaU 

first tioL.r 
Ainller llornian, cariienter Snow & May, dwl 535 Howard 
Audmare Emanuel, laundry, 314 Sutler 
Audniaro Eniil.laundiynian Enianuel Audmare, 314 Sutter 
Auerbach Charles M., bookkeeper Levi Strauss '& Co., dwl 

711 OTarreU 
Auerbach Julius J., physician, office cor Powell and 

Broadway, dwl 1306 Powell 
Auorb.'iL'h Leopold, merchant (Montana Ter.), dwl 516 

OTan-uU 
Auerbach Lewis, cijjar dealer, dwl 340 Turk 
Auerbach Louis, cigars and tobacco, 309 East, dwl 14 Har- 
riet 
Au;^e Lewis, carpenter, dwl W s Miller PI 
AI'CI'^K B. E. cV <'0., importers and commission mer- 

th;ints. -tWHjiattery 
Auger B. Eugene (B. E. Aiuj&r <{; Co.), dwl S20 Howard 
Auger Flora Mrs., milliner, dwl 1416 Powell 
Auger -luim, baker, dwl 1416 Powell 
Auger Lambert, instrument maker, 203 Montgomery, dwl 

64 Natoma, rear 
Augerstcin Fredcrich, musician, dwl 163 Minna 
Augsburger Frank, carpenter, dwl 909 Kearny 
Augsburgh Frederick (Fawcett ii: A.), dwl 6*3 Minna 
August Hein;3', porter Nathan R. Lowell, NW cor Pine 

and Da\*is 
August John, laborer Henry F. Williams, dwl Long 

Bridge foot Fourth 
August Samuel, laborer Pac. Rolling Mills 
Augusta Kindergarten Select School, 534 Turk 
Augustine M., bookkeeper Roseubaum & Friedman, dwl 

23 Kearny 
Augustine Morris, bookkeeper, dwl 23 Keamy 
Augustiny Harmes, clerk Solomon Meyer, dwl 32 Willow 

Av 
Augusto Miguel, cook, dwl SW cor Dnimm and Oregon 
Augusto Robert, barber Manuel J. Silva, dwl 707 Brannan 
Augustus Fi-ank, varnisher Ki-ageu & Co., dwl 549 Mission 
Augustus Josejth, painter, dwl 703 Davis 
Auibach Adam, compositor, dwl 20i Keamy 
Auld Junies, salesman David Pointer, dwl 531 Clay 
Ault Henry, brakeman Southern Pac. R. R., cor Fourth 

and Townsend 
Ault Jo^dih P., hostler William Miner, dwl 197 Stevenson 
Ault Martha M., adjuster Coinei-'s Dejiartment U. S. Mint, 

dwl 329 O'Farrell 
Auman Frederick ,','1 uman & Tletjen), dwl 508 Broadway 
Auman i; Tictjen (Frederick Auman and Henry Tiet- 

jen ', liquor saloon, 90S Kearny 
Auradou A. L. (Auradoit d- Tf/rtellJ, dwl 520 Merchant 
Aurad(.u Leon, game, poultry, etc., 507 Merchant, dwl 

520 Merchant 
Aui-adou iS: Tortell (A. L. Auradou and William Tor- 
tell ly game, poultrj', etc.. 507 Merchant 
Aurende Charles H., porter George W. Clark 
Aurick i_'harles, seaman, dwl SW"cor East and Merchant 
Aurignac Marccllin, florist, dwl 31 Hinckley 
Aurora Co. (Chinese), cigannakers, 206 Dupont 
Aurouze .Marius, hairdressiug saloon, 647 Pacific, dwl 1114 

Stoukton 
Ausman Otto, varnisher John A. Shaber & Co., dwl 612 

Phie 
Austenuiller Clmrlea, barkeeper Schramm & Schnabel 
Ali$Tlx\ ALEXANDER, tax collector City and Coun- 
ty, t'tticc 1 City Hall first floor, dwl 11 Keamy 
Austin Alfred, mason Palace Hotel 
Austin Arnold, bookkeeper Marcus C. Hawley & Co., dwl 

429 (Jtjary 
Austin Arthur C, clerk Linforth, Kellogg & Co., dwl 516 

Fol,<.,m 
AtSTIX B. <'., tin can and box manufacturer, 520 

Washington, res West Oakland 
Austin diaries, barkeeper, dwl Long Bridge foot Fourth 
Austin l>a\id S., captain Pacific Mail S. S. Constitution, 

office NW cor 8aciumenU» and Leidesd(>rff 
Austin Edward, fireman Central Pacific R. K., dwl 6G4 

Howard 
Austin Fi-ank, waiter stm John L. Stephens, Oregon S. S. 

Co. 
Austin Henry, dentist, office and dwl 634 Washington 
Austin Isaac, second iissistivnt engineer Pacific Mail S. S. 

Constitution, dwl Quincy House 
Austin .lacob, carpenter Palace Hotel 
Austin John i MaUon tO A.i, dwl 1805 Mason 



Austin John, expressman, cor Pacific and Davis, dwl 3 

Broadway 
Austin John, gasfitter Palace Hotel 
Austin John, drajnnan, 604 Front, dwl 717 Natoma 
Axistin Joseph, port warden, office 525 Front, dwl Lick 

House 
Austin Joseph B., salesman 0. Lawton & Co., dwl 2524 

Clay 
Austin M. A., master mariner, dwl 2136 Howard 
Austin Marcus E., agent patent window curtains, 630 

Keamy, res East Oakland 
Austin M. F. Miss, associate principal Clarke Institute 

dwl 22S Capp 
Austin Sampson, packer O. Lawton & Co., dwl 223 Clara 
Austin Thomas, carpenter Charles Williams, dwl 423 Bush 
Austin Thomas A., clerk U. S. Custom House, dwl 96G 

Folsom 
Australasian Steam Navigation Co., J. C. Merrill & Co. 

agents, office 204 California 
Austrian Uene\olent Society, 155 New Montgomery' 
Air!^l'RO-lir\<;AKI AN EltBFIRE, Gottlieb A. E. 

Muecke consul, office 109 California room 8 
Autajne George, French laundiy, 2213 Pine 
Autey William H., waiter, 232 First 
Auvray Frank, teamster Vermeil & Wellington, dwl SE 

cor Fourth and Beny 
Auxilby Samuel, steward Pacific JIail S. S. Constitution, 
Auzinger Wolfgang, butcher Miller & Lux, dwl First Av 

nr Kentucky, South S. F. 
Avenue House, John P. Genet proprietor. 819 Keamy 
Averill Etta Miss, dressmaker, dwl 263 Third 
Averill J. L., bookkeeper H. M. Black & Co., dwl 923J 

Harrison 
Averill Mark R., dwl 44i Sixth 
Averill Wilham, shipjoiner Pacific Mail S. S. Co., dwl 333 

Beale 
Averill Wilson, teamster, cor Sac and Davis, dwl 564A^ How 
Avery Adeline (widow). Homeopathic physician, office and 

dwl 933 Bush 
Avery C. H. , master mariner, dwl S W cor Washington 

and Dnmun 
Avery Clark, carpenter, dwl 1609 Clay 
Aveiy David W., dwl 212 Post 

Avery Dean R. (D. R. Avery ct Co.), dwl 1911 Polk 
Avery D. R. & Co. (Judson ^uery;, fruits and vegeta- 
bles, 18 and 19 Centre Market 
Avery D. W., machinist Kimball Manufacturing Co., dwl 

202 Second 
Averj^ Edwaj'd N., cook, dwl 132 Turk 
Averj- Ellen (\yidow), dwl 838 Mission 
AAery Eunice (widow), variety store, cor Iowa and Solano 
Avery Francis, president Pacific Borax Co., office 621 

Sansoni, dwl 422 Second 
Averj' George H., master mariner, dwl 439 Minna 
Avery James 0., compositor A. L. Bancroft it Co., dwl 

cor Iowa and Solano 
Avery Jasper W., carpenter, dwl 1609 Clay 
Avery Judson (D. R. Avery A- Co.j, dwl 1911 Polk 
Avery Robert J., blockinaker R. C. Hanson & Co., dwl 54 

Third 
Avery Ross, carpenter, dwl Lizzie nr Mission 
Avery S. Miss, teacher Rincon School, dwl cor Iowa and 

Solano 
Avery Samuel, waiter John Anderson, dwl 783 Market 
Avery Samuel C, druggist, dwl 247 Minna 
A\ilez Dolores, dressmaker, 160S Powell 
Avissau M. Mme., dwl 1513 Stockton 
Avon John, shipcarpenter, dwl 15 Tehama, rear 
Avonsino Antonio, vegetables, dwl 728 Lombard 
Avonsino Joseph, vegetables, dwl 728 Lombard 
A\Toy Mrs. (widow), dwl 815 Pacific 
A\y Eugene, woolgrower, office 509 Sac, dwl 310 Lomb 
Axford William, ironmolder, dwl 17 Sherwood PI 
Axt Ludvrig, bootmaker, 936 Howard 
Axtell William, ginger beer manufacturer, dwl 1 Midway 
Axthelm John, wheelwTight John W, Farren, dwl 560 

Stevenson 
Axtmann Ferdinand, butcher Leopold M. Fabrj-, dwl NE 

cor Grove and Lagiuia 
Axtmann Herman, cabinetmaker California Fumiture 

Manufacturing Co., dwl 232 Minna 
Axtmann Leopold, baker Bertha Josephson, dwl 500 

Hayes 
Aj'amad Francis, hairdresser A. Dissat, dwl Stevenson 

bet Third and Fourth 
Ayer C. E., milkman, dwl 1142^ Market 
Ayer J. R., painter, dwl 504 Thiixi 
Ayer J. Y., dwl 2408 Folsom 
Ayer M. J., Shipwrights' Jour. Assn, 71 New Mont 



MOEGAIT & CO. have Prince's Bay Transplanted Oysters always on hand. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 70S, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 




Ayer Washington, physician and surgeon, office 410 

Kearny, dwl Russ House 
Ayers David M.. salesman Charles Dahlman, dwl E s Fill- 
more bft Post and Sutter 
Ayers Edw:trd A., dwl 414 Pacific 
Ayers Elijah, farmer, dwl 414 Pacific 
Avers Frederick, bricklayer, dwl 787 Mission,* rear 
Avers Grosvener P., bookkeeper Osgood & Stetson, dwl 

524 Geary 
Ayers Heur>- (Pike <t ^ J, dwl NE cor Haight and Gough 
Ayei*s Humphrey, carriagesmith Albert Folsom, dwl 920 

Dolores 
Ayers I. C. Mrs. (\\idow), dwl Carolina bet Mariposa and 

Santa Clara 
Ayers Ira Jr., with George F. Bragg & Co., dwl 1030 Jack 
Ayers John, housepainter John \V. ^\'hitaker 
Ayei-9 John E., policeman City Hall, dwl 2Si Clara 
Ayers Olivia Miss, saleswoman, dwl Carolina bet Mariposa 

and Santa Clara 
Avers Robert, machinist F. A. Huntington, dwl Carolma 

bet Mariposa and Santa Clara 
Ayers William, shipcalker, dwl N s Twelfth Av bet O and 

P, SmuHi S. F. 
A^Tes William, tea dealer, dwl 1303 Broadway 
Ayers William Mrs., teacher music, dwl 1303 Broadway 
Ayers William H., carpenter, dwl Santa Clara nr Carolina 
Aylward John, machinist Angell, Palmer & Co., dwl 37 

Minna 
Aylward Michael, stevedore, dwl 54 Minna 
A\Tes Emma (widow), dwl G15 Taylor 
AjTes George, laborer Charles L. Tilden, dwl Potrero 
AjTes Henry L., tinsmith Brittan, Holbrook & Co., dwl 

1027 Market 
Ayres James, lumberman Jason Springer, dwl 248 Minna 
AjTes J. Ining {Ayres <£■ HopthisJ, dwl 555^ Minna 
Ayres John O., capitalist, office 42tiMont, dwl 431 Geary 
Ayres Joseph, silver plater, dwl N s Lincoln bet Jones 

and Tavlor 
Ayres Joseph J., carpenter and builder, dwl 606 Green- 

mch 
Ayres Samuel, printer, dwl 260 Minna 
Ayers i: Hopkins fJ. Irving Ayres and Letmtel B. Hop- 

kinsj, real-estate and business agents, 531 California 

AjTie , seaman, dwl 127 Keamy 

Azeredo J. F., ph%"sician, office and dwl 1015 Stockton 
AZPIKOZ .^lAXrEL, Mexican lawj-er and consul for 

Mexico, office 109 California room 24, dwl 43 South 

Park 
Aztec Company, Marden & M^Tick proprietors, office 212 

Sacramento 



Baack Frank H., compositor Cubery & Co., dwl 426 Cal 
Baagoe Christian, restam-ant, 703 Batterj-, dwl 921 Green- 
wich 
Baas Charles, saloonkeeper, dwl 156 Shipley 
Baaser Ferdinand, laborer, dwl N s Thirteenth Av nr P, 

South S. F. 
Babb Charles, reporter S. F. Chronicle, dwl 204 Mont 
Babbington Daniel, carpenter, dwl 614 Mission 
Babbitt John H., clerk Sroufe Sweeney & Co., dwl 1422J 

Washington 
Babcock Alexander, dwl 14 Eddy 
Babcock Annie Mrs., furnished rooma, 417 Keamy 
Babcock Geoi-ge {Babcock <t Gould/, dwl 9 Second Av 
Bab--..ck Geui-ge A., printer, Spaulding & Baito, dwl 1422 

California 
Babcock John, clerk, dwl 224 O'Farrell 
5abcuck Lj G., c-arpenter Palace Hotel, dwl 50 Natoma 
Babcock William, clerk Parrott & Co., dwl 11 Essex 
BABCOCK "»VILLIA.>I F. (Parrott tt CoJ, office 306 

California, dwl 11 Essex 
Babcock in Qovdd ; George Babcock and Henrxi Gould) , pro- 
duce commission and proprietors Oakland City Flour- 
ing Mills, office 114 Sacramento and 113 Commercial 
Babcox J. S., assistant weigher Coiner's Department U. 

S. Mint, dwl 14 Eddv 
BABC«.V .IEFFERSO\ T., cWef coiner U. S. Mint, 

office N"AV cur Fifth and Mission, dwl 926 Market 
T"'^ :t A. J., dwl 217 Green 

'W Edward fC. L. Taylor d: CoJ, res Boston, Mass. 
Ion George, engineer, dwl 159 Clara 
L...::.x P. & Co. (Andrew Calderon, Frederick A. McDou- 
■ralt, and Joseph EstremJ, wholesale butchers, Ss 
Fifth Av nr Railroad Av, South S. F., office 535 Clay 
Baca Pablo fP. Baca <t- CoJ, dwl 8 Russ 
Bciccala Louis i Bocken <£.* Bj, dwl 745 Clay 



Bacchus H. F., bookbinder A. L. Bancroft & Co., dwl 10 

John 
Baccus George, porter B. Nathan & Co., dwl 1018 Powell 
Bacons John B., physician, dwl 1018 Powell 
Baccus Richard T. f Baccus tL- Bosenhcrgj^ dwl 16 William 
Baccus & Rosenburg (R. T. Baccus and Louis Rosen- 
berg j , market, SW cor O'Farrell and Mason 
Baccus. S'.'e Backus 

Bach Adolph, tailor, 1202 Market, dwl 816 Pacific 
Bach Andrew, laborer, dwl 1 Clay 

Bach Charles, bookkeeper Ferdinand Scherr, dwl IS Lang- 
ton 
Bach Charles, tailor, dwl 835 Broadway 
Bach F. W., bookkeeper Kline i: Co., dwl 735 Green 
Bach Henn'. gilder, dwl 432 Vallejo, rear 
Bach J., lauudrj-man Folsom Laundrj', S s Sixteenth nr 

Valencia 
Bach John, manager United Anaheim Winegrowers' Assn, 

office 321 Montgomen,', dwl 50S Taylor 
Bachelder Frank J., salesman American Clock Co., dwl 

1111 Pacific 
Bachelder Horace, clerk Angell, Palmer & Co., dwl N s 

Palmer nr WTiitney 
Bachelder James W., weigher, dwl ^( s Palmer nr Wliit- 

ney 
Bachelder John W,, assistant weigher, dwl 1106 Keamy 
Bachelder Sarah {\\'idow), dwl N s Palmer nr >\liitney 
Bachelder T. F., attorney at law, office 607 Keamy, res 

Suiiol, Alameda Co. 
Bachelder. See Batchelder 

Bachert August, salesman B. Nathan & Co., dwl 331 Kear 
Bachicolo Louis, cartman, dwl 71S Greenwich 
Bachman Brothers (Herman S., Nathan 5., Leopold 5., 

and David Sjy importers and jobbers dr>- goods, 10 

and 12 Battery 
Bachman Da\'id S. (Bachman BrosJ, dwl 1107 Van Ness 

Av 
Bachman Edwin, dwl 502 Bush 

Bachman Herman S. (Bachman BrosJ, res New York 
Bachman Jacob, milkman, N s Filbert bet Steiner and 

Pierce 
Bachman John, maltster Washington Brewer}', dwl 725 

Lombard 
Bachman Leopold S. {Bachmnn Bros.), dwl 317 Powell 
Bachman Nathan S. (Bachman BrosJ, dwl 1109 Van 

Ness Av 
Bachman Simon (E^berg d- BJ, dwl 9 Mason 
Bachrach Martin, ale and porter, dwl 1S19 Powell 
Baci Steven, marblecutter J. & F. Kesseler, dwl 1S05 

Mason 
Bacigalupi Carl, cartman, dwl 19 Lafayette PI 
Bacigalupi Carlo, bootblack, 1 Bnan PI, dwl 13 Pollard 

PI 
Bacigalupi Frank, stiUman Oriental Refinery, dwl S s 

Sixteenth Av m- 1. South S. F. 
Bacigalupi Giobato, gardener, dwl bet San Bruno Road 

and Railroad Av, Bay View 
Bacigalupi Giovanni, bootblack, 652 Market, dwl 1117^ 

Kearnv 
Bacigalupi" Guisseppe, helper Melter and Refiner^s eD- 

partmcnt U. S. Mint, dwl 524 Filbert 
Bacigalupi John, boots and shoes, 1404 Dupont 
Bacigalupi John, laborer, dwl 1506 Dupont, rear 
Bacigalupi Joseph, bootblack, 652 Market, dwl 1U7J 

Keamy 
Bacigalupi Joseph, woodcarver S. F. Manufacturing Co., 

dwl 1805 Mason 
Bacigalupi Louis (Bacigalupi & CoJy dwl NW cor 

Union and Bannam PI 
Bacigalupi Luigi, sweeper Colombo Market, dwi N s 

Green^vich bet Mason ajid Powell 
Bacigalupi Paolao, blacksmith, dwl 1I17J Keamy 
Bacigalupi Paolo, painter G. B. Deferrari, dwl 14 Pol- 
lard PI 
Bacigalupi Peter, clerk Da\nd A. Jennings, dwl ISOa 

Mason 
Baeii^lupi Stephen, marblecutter, dwl 1805 Mason 
Bacigalupi T. D., native winas, 1419^ Dupont 
Bacii-'alupi & Co. (Louis Bacigalupi and Domenico 

San>jui)ietiJ, Uquor saloon, 1402 Dupont 
Backe Frank, upholsterer Mountain & Raye, dwl 5 La- 
tham PI 
Backrath James, heater Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl SE cor 

Shasta and Illiuois 
Backstadt William, hamessmaker Main & Winchester, 

dwl 438 Bran'nan 
Backstron A. O., painter F. A. Rutherford, dwl 270 First 
Backus Charles, master Caroline Medau, dwl 220 Fran- 
cisco 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIHECTOEY Circulates throughout Pacific Coast. 



San Prancisoo Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchani 




Backus H. F., bookbinder, dwl 10 John 

Backus Oscar J. fGtorge H. Tay tt CoJ, rea Newark, 

N. J. 
Backus P. M., bookkeeper, dwl 725 California 
Backus Samuel W. /S. W. Backus X- CoJ, dwl 1520 

Mason 
BAC'KI'S S. W. «!t t'O. (Geor-je S. Fife), forward- 
ing and coniniissiou merchants and agents Regular 

Lme Oregon Packets, 200 Front 
Backus Theodore, clerk, dwl 220 Francisco 
Backus. See Baccus 

Bacome William, hostler, dwl 25S Clementina, rear 
Bacou Adaline A. Mrs., dwl 717 Eddy 
Bacon Bridget (widow), dwl N s Washington bet Hyde 

and Larkin 
Bacon C. B., miner, dwl 206 Kearny 
Bacon Charles, miner, dwl 227 Second 
Bacon Charles R., superintendent Cornell Watch Co., 

dwl 921 O'Farrell 
Bacon Dean, carpenter New U. S. Marine Hospital, 

Movmtain Lake 
Bacon Ellen Miss, milliner Mrs. E. Thomas, dwl 359 

Minna 
Bacon Gaston E., clerk Painter & Calvert, dwl 5 Quincy 

PI 
Bacon George H., assistant superintendent N. B. and 

Mission R. R., dwl 73(5^ Clementina 
Bacon George W., proprietor Commercial Lodgings, 615 

Commercial 
BAC'0\ HE>BT D», real estate, ofSce 305 Sansom, 

res Oakland 
Bacon Henry J., clerk Bank of San Francisco, dwl 1429 

Howard 
Bacon Hiram Mrs., dwl SW cor Pacific Av and Gough 
Bacun Horace, United States deputy marshal, dwl 54 

Third 
Bacon Jacob (Bacon S: CoJ, dwl 513 Eddy 
Bacon James, laborer Angell, Palmer it Co., dwl 78 

Natoma 
Bacon John, painter, dwl 359 Minna 
Bacon John B. , Bacon d- StackpoleJ, dwl 740 Minna 
Bacon Joseph H., clerk, dwl 1429 Howard 
Bacon Joseph S. , agent Boston Board Underwriters, office 

405 Front, dwl 20^ Kearny 
Bacon Louis, teamster 1. F. E^ton, dwl SW cor Berry and 

Third 
Bacon Maria B. (widow), dwl 5 Quincy PI 
Bacon Mill and Mining Co. (Gold Hill, Nov.), Edward 

May secretary, office 419 California room 3 
Bacon P\'am B., helper Melter aiid Refiner's Department 

U. S. Mint, dw! 730 Sixteenth 
Baeon S. E. (widow), dwl 1429 Howard 
BAt'0\ TBl'MA> F., seeretarj' Security Savings Bank, 

office 215 Sansom, res Oakland 
Bacon WUliam, hostler Omnibus R. R., dwl 25S Clementina 
BAC'O^i «& CO. (Jacob Bacon and James E. AgerJ, 

book and jobpriuters, iiiVt"^ cor Clay and Sansom 
Bacon & Stackiwle {J. B. Bacon and T. W. StackpoleJ, 

liquor saloon, 121 Post 
Bacquie Henr\' f Henry Bacquie tt CoJ, dwl 700 Bdwv 
BAC'Qt'lE UEXBY A CO. (Aitne Masf^onJ, whole- 
sale and retail wines and liquors, 1301 Stockton 
Badaracco Antonio fAnt^tnio Badaracco «t CoJ, dwi 1516 

Stockton 
Badaracco Antoiuo & Co. f George De Martini) , coal and 

wood, 1510 Stockton 
Badaracco Giovanni, niuier, dwl 215 Broadway 
Bade Henrj^ cabinetmaker Gilbert k Moore, dwi 415 Bran 
Bade Joseph, cook Voss & Fruhling, dwl 615 Pacific 
Badenhop H. F., groceries and liquors, SE cor Harrison 

and Twenty-fourth 

Bader , master mariner, dwl 310 Stockton 

Bader George, insurance agent, dwl 21S Stockton 

Bader William, hairdresser John Pilling, dwl E s Davis 

bet Clay and Washington 
Badger Charles, ironworker, dwi 5 Maiden Lane 
Badger G. , hairdresser, dwi 533 Sacramento 
Badger George H., clerk Buyer, Reich & Co., dwl 607 Na- 

toma 
Badger James, expressman, SE cor Fifth and Market, dwi 

22 Langton 
Badger Joseph B., commission agent, dwi 607 Natoma 
Badger Mill and Mining Co. (Lander Co.,, Nev.), office 402 

Montgomery room 1 
Badger Oliver, canvasser, dwi 255 Tehama 
B.UM;CB MILLIAn G., agent Hallett, Davis & Co.'s 
pianos and Gef^rge Wi.H>d i; Co.'s parlor and vestr.' 
organs, and general commission merchant, 7 and 13 
Sansom, dwl 1307 Taylor 



Badger W. K., bookkeejwr T. E. Lindenberger, dwl 1012 

Pine 
Badgley E. F., salesman A. Andrews, dwl R\iss House 
Badgley William, tailor A. C. Imbrie, dwl 115 Geary 
Badiraco Sandro, bootblack, 61S Montgomery 
Badlam Alexander Jr.. real estate agent and mining sec- 

retar>', office 41S Montgomen.-, dwl 708 California 
Badman John, teacher, dw 1 350 Jessie 
Badoual Jules, laundrj-man John Chauvel, dwl 1434 Dup 
Badrie Edward, expressman Lick House 
Badt Alexander L., bookkeeper P. Berwin & Bro., dwl 

417 Hyde 
Badt Morris, merchant, dwl 307 Turk 
Baecker Geor^'e, miller, dwi 18 First 
Baehland Gustav, tailor A. & W. Raphael, dwl 134 Fourth 
Baehr John M., liquor saloon, 507 Commercial, dwi cor 

Mason and Greenwich 
Baehr William / WUliam Baehr d: Co.), dwl 1703 Sac 
BAEHIt WII,LIA3I A CO., manufacturing jewelers, 

649 Sacramento 
Baekley Peter, laborer Pacific Furniture Co., 
Baer Jacob, teamster, dwi N s Twelfth Av nr N, South 

S. F. 
Baethge Henry, professor music, dwl 509 Leavenworth 
Bagala Louis, ovsterman Emerson Corville ifc Co. , dwl 6 

Oak 
Baganz William, cellarman Vigina & Co., dwi 312 Tehama 
Bagge Theodore F. (C. Jas. King of Wm. d: CoJ, res 

Oakland 
Bagge WUliam, laborer C. Jas. King of Wm. & Co. 
Bagia Carlos, laborer, dwi 420 Broadway, rear 
Bagiano\ich Ambrozio, laborer, dwi 200 Washington 
Bailer Louis, dwi 6 Oak 
Baglev Da\id T., mining secretary, office 401 California, 

dwl 38 T\velfth 
Bagley James, laborer, dwl 221 Folsom, rear 
Baglev James, surveyor, dwi 310 Beale, rear 
Bagley John, quarrjTiian, dwl 316 Beale, rear 
Bagley John Jr. , plumber and gasfitter, dwi 310 Beale, rear 
Bagley John W., clerk U. S. Custom House, dwi 948 How- 
ard 
Bagley Perkins H., conductor Potrero and B. V. R. R., 

dwl 10 O'Farrell 
Bagley Peter, longshoreman, dwi 270 Brannan 
Bagley Sarah Mrs., dressmaker, 948 Howard 
Bagley Thomas, stevedore ilenzies & Bingham 
Bagley Townsend, attorney at law, office 637 Keamy, dwl 

45 Everett 
Bagley W. P., plasterer Palace Hotel, dwl 11^ Garden 
Baglin Hugh, laborer Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works, 

dw 1 St. Nicholas Hotel 
Bagman Jacob, milkman, Presidio 
Bagnall Joseph, longshoreman, dwl 20 Washington 
Bagnasco Polycarp, phottigraphic printer cSrleton E. 

Watkins, dwi 1337 Dupont 
Bagot Frederick, clerk D. M. Bishop & Co., dwl N s 

Greenw ich bet Montgomery and Sansom 
Bahart George, butcher S. F. Packing and Pro\ision Co., 

dwi 814 Montgomery 
Bahen Morris, laborer Palace Hotel 
Bahen Patrick, laborer Palace Hotel 
Bahlmann Henry, clerk Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 2231 

Howard 
Bahls John F. W. fAlthof 6: BJ, res Oakland 
Bahmaun Adolph ( Bcrjannoff S; Bj, dwl 146 Stevenson 
Bahr John, driver Lewis Hentrich, dwl 1012 Leav 
Bahr John M., saloonkeeper, dwi 5 Hartman Alley 
Bahr Paul, storekeeper Pacific Mail S. S. Arizona 
Bahr William A., shoemaker, dwi ISl/J^ Powell 
Bahrenfuss Henrj-, carpenter, dwl 505 Filbert, rear 
Bahrenger John, "dwi 621 Pine 
Balirs Andrew, keeper County Jail, dwl 814 Vallejo 
Bahrs Deidrich, seaman, dwi 119 Jackson 
Bahrs Herman, draraian, dwl 1624 Dupont 
Bahrs John, expressman, cor Sixth and Howard 
Bahrt Henry L.. carpenter, dwi 127 Jackson 
Bahrt Martin, farmer, dwi W s Castro, bet Fifteenth and 

Sixteenth 
Bail Paul, tailor Frank Elwell, dwl 614 California 

Bailev (colored), dwi E s Minnesota nr Butte 

Bailey Alexander H, dwi 309 Fell 

Bailey Amos J., mining, dwi Cosmopolitan Hotel 

Bailey Ann (widow), dwi 233 Jessie 

Bailey Anna (widow), dwi 1423 Keamy 

BaUey Charles, clerk John Martin, dwi 427 Bush 

Bailey Charles A., carpenter D. A. Macdonald & Co., dwl 

9 Perr)' nr Second 
Bailey Charles E., driver Hamilton & Robertson, dwl 
845 Harrison 



Send your Orders from the Country for Eastern Transplanted Oysters to Morgan & C( 



, p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Biiiley Charles P., clerk S. F. Post-office, dwl Mercantile 

Libran- Building room 15 
Bailey Da\id, earjienter, dwl SOD Fell 
Bailey Edwurd, bookkeeper John Martm, dwl 427 Bush 
Bailey Edward, driver Sutter St. R. R., dwl 1009 Cal 
Bailey Frank, photographic printer Bradley & Rulofson, 

dwl lOOo^^ Mission 
Bailey Frederick P., mill superintendent, dwl 110 Fourth 
Bailey George (George Bailey d- Co. J, dwl 533 Com 
Bailey George & Co. (Alfred Clark and William J/c- 

X^an,', proprietors Railroad Lodgings, 53X and 533 

Commercial 
Bailey Henn,', barreldealer, dwl 1013 Howard 
B:iiley Henry, painter John Brewster, dwl 21 Valparaiso 
Bailey Isaac L., capitalist, dwl 911 Harrison 
Bailey James (Wrt'jkt d* B.J, dwl Montgomerj' Av bet 

Jones and Taylor 
Bailev James, foreman laborer Risdon I. and L. Works, 

dwl 130 First 
Bailey James D., general agent Union Insurance Co., dwl 

■213 Gearj- 
Bailey John, cabinetmaker Pacific Furniture Manuf. Co. 
Baile}- John, laborer Allione & StathopoUs, dwl XW cor 

Natoma and Second 
Bailev John (colored), waiter Commodore J. H. Spotts, 

dwl 19 South Park 
Bailey John R. (colored), dwl 1227 Clay 
Bailey Joseph H., books and crockerr, 1513 Stockton, 

dwl S30 Union 
Bailey Leon, laborer Jackson Iron Foundry 
Bailey L. H. Jr., machinist F. A. Huntington, dwl 365 

Minna 
BAILEY LOns H., proprietor Portsmouth House, 

NW cor Cla3' and Brenham PI 
Bailey Nathan J., butcher, dwl 1109 Jones 
Bailey Orrin, upholsterer James W. Bimiham & Co., dwl 

1423 Kearny 
Bailey Patrick, dealer barrels, dwl 719 Brannan 
B;iiley Patrick, waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel, dwl 607 Linden 
Bailey Richard {Root d; B./, res Oakland 
Bailey Robert, salesman J. J. O'Brien & Co., dwlS43 Miss 
Bailey R. S., liquor saloon El Capitan, dwl 334 Bush 
Bailey S. M. (widow), furnished rooms, 757 Howard 
Bailey Sylvanus, waterproof clothingmaker, NE cor Fol- 

som and INventv-second 
Bailey Thomas {Thomas Bailey <t Co.), dwl 1535 How 
Bailey Thomas & Co., proprietors Pacific Wool Depot, SE 

cor Fifth and King 
Bailey William, machinist, dwl 25 De Boom 
Bailey William A., plasterer Palace Hotel, dwl 81 Natoma 
Bailey William L, clerk Thomas W. McCollam k Co., res 

Oakland 
Baillet Desiri, laborer, dwl 8 Vallejo 
Baillie George B., conductor Southern Pac. R. R.,dwl 335 

Gean.- 
Baillie Emilv P. (widow), furnished rooms, dwl 1415 Stock 
Bailiv Achilie (Bailly Bros. I, dwl 514 Filbert 
Bailly .\rthur fBaiU]/ Brosj , dwl 514 Filbert 
Bailly Brothers i A rtimr and Achilie), pork andsausa^s, 

71 California Market 
Bailly Glaudine (widow), dwl 514 Filbert 
Bailly Jules, with Bailiv Bros., dwl 514 Filbert 
Bailly Leon, tinsmith J. G. lis, dwl 514 Filbert 
Ballon Charles, oiler Pacific Mail S. S. Arizona 
Baily A., laborer, dwl Berry St. House 
Baily Alexander S., plasterer, dwl 54 First 
Baily AnsoUa, boarding, 2 Dupont PI 
Baily Charles, hostler, dwl 333 Bush 
Baily E. Franklin, clerk 0. Lawton & Co., dwl 54 First 
Baily John, teamster Horace Davis i, Co. , dwl 23 Grand Av 
Bail}' Michael, farmer, dwl 38 First 
Baily Washington I., plasterer, dwl 54 First 
Baily William J., proprietor Istlnnus House, 54 First 
Baily Wilson S., plasterer, dwl 510 Linden 
Bain Alexander, stevedore, dwl 425 Greenwich 
Bain James, seaman, dwi 119 Jackson 
Bain John, dwl 31 Perrj- 
Bain Philip, seaman, dwi G09 Jackson 
Bainbridge Amop, policeman City Hall, dwl 1322 Kearny 
Bainbridge Joseph, salesman Henry Brader, dwi 214 Miss 
Bainbridge Robert, agent, dwi 214 Mission 
Bainbridge S. H. Mrs., dwi 930 Market 
Baine F., carpenter, dwi 217 Stevenson 
Baine Katie M. Miss, adjuster Coiner's Department U. S. 

Mint, dwi X27 Keamv 
BA1NE.S THOMAS f"., wines and liquors, 1022 Market 
Baird A. M., conductor Central Pac. R. R., dwi 504 Sixth 
BAIRD A\DREn% agent Pac. Mutual Ins. Co. of New- 
York (Marine), office 310 California, res East Oakland 



Baird E. L. K., clerk Locke & Montague, dwl 1509 Stock- 
ton 
Baird James, cigars and tobacco, 213 Montgomer}-, dwl 1115 

Clay 
Baird James M., printer, dwi 1115 Clay 
Baird John E., solicitor, dwl 824 Keariiy 
Baird John H., president California Powder Works, office 

314 California, dwi Pacific Club 
Baird Matthew, boatman, dwi 244 Beale 
Baird Samuel H., dwi 1115 Clay 
Baird William, master mariner, dwi 112 Pacific 
Bairn John, laborer Chemical Paint Co.. dwl 2 Crook 
Baizley Stephen, farmer, dwi Mariposa nr Minnesota 
Bajer Jacob, laborer, dwi 421 Dupont 
Bak Henry, physician, oSice 229 Kearny, dwi 321 Hyde 
Bakeman Henry, with Pac. Refining and Distilling Co., 

dwi N s Moulton bet Fillmore and Steiner 
Baker Abijah, farmer, dwi 440 Second 
Baker A. G., seaman, dwi 20 Steuart 
Baker A. G., teamster Max Englander, dwi 718 Turk 
Baker A. L., operator Western Union Telegraph Co., dwl 

522 California 
Baker Albert, clerk Frederick Morlock, dwi 1608 Cal 
Baker Albert, laborer, dwi 002 Filbert 
Baker Alfred D. , porter Rouse k Laws, dwl 1307 Stockton 
Baker Alfred W., assistant abstract clerk Custom Hou'se, 

dwi 759 Clay 
Baker Andrew, dwl 209 Leidesdorff 
Baker Anna Mrs., furnished rooms. 13 Harlan PI 
Baker Ant4:>ny, cook Pacific Mail S. S. Constitution 
Baker Avis D. Miss, milliner, dwi 109 Montg'omery 
Baker B., laborer, dwi Berr\' St. House 
Baker B. L., clerk, dwi ()3() Green 
Baker C, dwi (314 Kearny 
Baker Charles ^Schnihhe <f.- Bj, dwi 303 Mason 
Baker Charles, cabinetmaker John B. Luchsinger & Son, 

dwi XW cor Seventh and Natoma 
Baker Charles, cooper, dwl 23 Natoma 
Baker Charles, waiter, dwi 777 Mission 
Baker Charles E.. clerk Haas Bros., dwi 20 Park Av 
Baker Christian, bakery, 7S8 Folsom 
Baker Colin C. (SUnrm, B. tt: Co.) , res Providence, R. I. 
Baker Conrad, assayer S. F. Assajing and Refining 

Works, dwi 527 Tehama 
Baker David, dwl 926 Market 
Baker Edward E. , hatpresser Pac. Straw Works, dw! 210 

Stockton 
Baker Edward L., upholsterer Fletcher & Day, dwl 16 

Howard Court 
Baker Edward P. Rev., pastor Third Congregational 

Church, dwl 422 Minna 
Baker Emma Mrs., dwi lllSi Folsom 
Baker E. S., clerk Edgar J. Bowen, dwl 1621 Webster 
Baker Eugene J., teamster, dwi 764 Harrison 
Baker F., gasfitter C. H. Storabs & Co. 
Baker Frank, clerk, dwi 812 Powell 
Baker Frank, haniessmaker Main & Winchester, dwl 131 

Second 
Baker Fred W., salesman Baker & Hamilton, dwl 431 

Second 
Baker Gfeorge, laborer Eisen Bros., dwi 18 First 
Baker Grcorge, waiter, dwi 13 Harlan PI 
Baker George F., attornev at law, office 606 Montgomerj-, 

dwl 725 Pine 
Baker George H., lithographer and artist, 103 Montgom- 

en,', dwi 1312 Larkin, rear 
Baker' Gteorge L., melter S. F. Assaying and Refining 

Works, dwi 504 Seventh 
Baker H. B., workman Assayer's Department U. S. Mint, 

res Oakland 
Baker Henn,-, dwi 27 Oak Grove Av 
Baker Henry, clerk William Baker, dwi NE cor Clay and 

Mason 
Baker Henr.', fouadayman Savage k Son 
Baker Henry, plumber, dwi C14 Missiun 
Baker Henr^- Mrs. (widow), dwi 1209 Kearny 
Baker Hernian, confectioner Pacific Restaurant, dwl 8 

Lafavette PI 
Baker Isaiah, dwi 1304 Pacific 
Baker J. A., dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Baker J. Arthur, oiler Pacific Mail S. S. Vasco de Gama 
Baker James, seaman, dwi Portland Hotel, Sacramento 

nr Dnuum 
Baker James, seaman, dwi XW cor Harrison and Spear 
Baker James, seaman schooner Susie, Beale St. ^liTiarf 
Baker James, miller, dwi 54 Sacramento 
Baker John, carpenter, dwi 822 Post, rear 
Baker John, hackman, dwi West End Hotel 
Baker John, laborer H. G. Fiskc, dwi What Cheer House 



ACinC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOEY, 1875-7, Published March, '75, Price $5. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 




Baker John, night Watchman Pacific Mail S. S. Wliarf, 
dwl 20 Stanford 

Baker John, tinsmith, dwl 249 Minna 

Baker John A., farmer, dwl W s Lobos Creek nr Ceme- 
tary Reservation 

Baker John B., stockbroker, office 424 Montgomery, dwl 
1(j20 Sacramento 

Baker John C, sweeper Battery St. WTiarf, dwl 1110 Eat 

Baker John G., clerk Track Department Central Pacific 
R. R. dwl 1-2 Ellis 

Baker John H., trimkmaker, dwl 515 Stockton 

Baker Joseph (Barry <L- Co,i, dwl 1207 Mission 

Baker Joseph, laborer Palace Hotel 

Baker Josep h H., policeman City Hall, dwl 1306 Keaniy 

Baker Josiah Q., clerk Eureka Warehouse, dwl 925 
Vallejo 

Baker Judah Jr. (Stevens, B. tt CoJ, dwl 327 Fii-st 

Baker J. W., captain ship Germania, office Bellingham 
Bav Coal Co. 

Baker Kindred, chiropodist, dwl 611 Geary, rear 

Baker L. B., bookkeeper M. D. Nile, dwl 10 O'Farrell 

Baker L. F. Jr., imi)ortcr card board, paper, etc., 410 
and 412 Sansom, dwl N s Vallejo bet Fillmore and 
Stein er 

Baker Lincoln, salesman L. Lebenbaum & Co., dwl 729 
California 

Baker Livingston L. (Baker cD Hamilton), dwl Occi- 
dental Hotel 

Baker Lizzie Miss, milliner Miss Maggie Fitzgerald, dwl 
SW cox Stockton and Jackson 

Baker Louis, blacksmith, dwl IS First 

Baker Louis F., produce commission, 402 Davis, dwl N s 
Vallejo bet Fillmore and St^^iner 

Baker Lucy A. (widow), dwl 1090 Union 

Baker Mary (widow), dwl 317 Beale 

Baker Mary («idow), dwl 740 Folsom 

Baker Mai^- F. Mrs., dwl 413 Tehama 

Baker Maurice, tillerman H. & L. Co. No. 3 S. F. F. D., 
dwl SE cor Jessie and Fourth 

Baker Michael, bakery, SW cor Union and Sonora PI 

Baker Michael, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 

Baker Mill and Mining Co. (PImnas Co., Cal.), Frank 
S\vift secretary, otfice 419 California 

Baker Osboni F., liqnor saloon, S25 Montgomery 

Baker Patrick, laborer, dwl 311 Pacific 

Baker Robert B., machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 515 
Minna 

Baker Samuel (Bralich X- CoJ, dwl S s Clay bet Stockton 
and Powell 

Baker Samuel (Nicfcerson iL- CoJ, and, bookkeeper Stev- 
ens, Baker & Co., dwl 16 Guy PI 

Baker Samuel, laborer, dwl 209 Leldesdorff 

Baker Samuel, salesman A. Andrews, dwl SE cor Fourth 
and Jessie 

Baker Samuel, salesman Gibson & Preston, dwl 1422 
Geary 

BAHEOC SANDFOKD C, printer Cubery & Co., dwl 
17 Langton 

Baker Sarah (widow), dwl SE cor Jessie and Fourth 

Baker S. B., salesman 708 Kearny, dwl 609 Pine 

Baker Schuyler, porter G. W. Chesley & Co., dwl 127 Va- 
lencia 

Baker Thomas, Bricklayers' Pro. Union, 232 Sutler 

Baker T. J. Mrs., dressmaker, 229 Post 

Baker W. H., seaman, dwl *.i6 Steuart 

Baker William, bakeiy, NE cor Clay and Mason 

Baker William, carpenter U. S. Marine Hospital, dwl N 8 
T\venty-second bet Valencia and Bartlett 

Baker Williani, gasfitter Bush & Mihie, dwl 411 Sansom 

Baker William, shij^carpentcr, dwl 741 Market 

Baker William, tinsmith H. G. Fiske, dwl 411 Sansom 

BAKKK A HAMILTON (Livingston L. Baker and 
Hobert 3f. llainHton) , importers and jobbers agri- 
cultural implements, machines, hardware, etc., 13-19 
Front and 9-15 J, Sacramento City 

Bakkei- John R. (Fitter J; BJ, dwl SW cor Jackson and 
East 

Bakker Keyer, restaurant, 104 Steuart 

Bakl (Hiver, watchman International Hotel 

Bakofsky Carl, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl 1131 
Harrison 

Balanesi Angelo, market, 314 Montgomery Av, dwl NE 
cor Broadway and Montgomer)' Av 

Balanesi Francois, hustler Guiseppe Chelini & Co., dwl 420 
Pacific 

Balanesi Guiseppe fOniseppc Chelini X- CoJ, dwl 420 Pac 

Balbi Louis, dwl 621 Pacific, rear 

Balcear E. J. Mrae. (widow), hair rejuvenator, 532 Bush 

Balch Alfred, reporter, dwl 1010 Montgomery 



Balch Horace M., organ builder and musical-instnuueut 
repairer, office 432 Kearny, dwl 614 Taylor 

Balch Nellie Miss, bookf older D. Hicks & Co. , dwl 259 Jessie 

Balch Stephen M. (Balch d.- DunlapJ, dwl 1512 Post 

Balch & Duiilap (Stephen M. Balch and John DiuilapJ, 
general auctioneers and com merchants, 132 Fourth 

Balck William, quartermaster Pacific Mail S. S. Constitu- 
tion 

Balconi Charles F., mining, office 330 Pine room 19, dwl 
1021 Washington 

Balcon Lydia E. Miss, seamstress Ladies Protection and 
Relief Society Home, NE cor Geary and Franklin 

Baldo D., fisherman, Clay St. Wharf 

Baldridge John E., stockbroker, office 404 Montgomery, 
dwl 1016 Leavenworth 

Balrid':re John H. (Fcryimm, &ray & BJ, dwl 2S Stone 

Baldridge John H., bookkeeper Michael Baldridge, dwl 
1016 Leavenworth 

Baldridge Michael, stockbroker, office 404 Montgomery, 
dwl 1016 Leavenworth 

Baldwin , conductor Central R. R., dwl 44^ Sixth 

Baldwin Albert S., physician, office and dwl 21S Stockton 

Baldwin Alexander R., capitalist, office llli Leidesdorff, 
dwl 1104 Post 

Baldwin Alfred, shoemaker, dwl 418 Minna 

Baldwin Amos B., butcher E. & H, Motfat, dwl S s Thu- 
t«enth Av nr N, South S. F. 

Baldwin C. F. , stairbuilder Sanborn & BjTnes, dwl 820 Fol- 
som 

Baldwin Charles H., office 208 California 

Baldwin Charles M., watchman Kimball Manuf. Co., dwl 
514 Sixth 

Baldwin Edward S., dwl 620 Sutter 

ISALWWIX ELIAS J., president California Invest- 
ment and Trust Co., office 513 Cal, dwl 4lU Geaiy 

Baldwin Elihu F., real estate, dwl 107 Hayes 

Baldwin Ephraim, miner, dwl 209 Leidesdorff 

Baldwin George E., lettercarrier S. F. Post-office, dwl 
Ewer PI 

Baldwin Henrv, vnne merchant, dwl 309 Seventh 

BALOWlxV UnCAM S,, physician, office 012 Clay, dwl 
y25 Geary 

Baldwin J. A., chemist, office 605 Clay, dwl 2 Vernon PI 

Baldwin James, carpenter, dwl 109 Geary 

Baldwin James W., cabinetmaker Weir & Graj-, dwl 44i 
Sixth 

Baldwin Jennie (mdow), dressmaker, dwl 221 Mason 

Baldwin Jeremiah, distiller, dwl E s Florida bet Eighteenth 
and Nineteenth 

Baldwin John Mi's., dressmaker, dwl 314 Bush 

Baldwin Josiah A., dwl 25 Hawthorne 

Baldwin Leon McL., dwl 16 Oak 

Baldwin Lizzie Mrs., portraitpainter, studio and dwl 115 
Keaniy 

Baldwin Lloyd, attorney at law, office 606 Montgomerj', 
dwl 732 Geary 

Baldwin Mary H. Mrs., dwl 309 Seventh 

Baldwin Nellie S. Miss, teacher Union Grammar School, 
dwl 1409 Bush 

Bald\\in Oliver T., freight clerk Pacific MaUS. S. Co., dwl 
1411 Pacific 

Baldwin Orville D. (W. Wai-^ier Henry X- CoJ, dwl 355 
Eleventh 

Baldwin Sidney F., law student John B. Felton, res Oak- 
land 

Baldwin Simeon, carpenter, 1 Noble PI 

Baldwin Starr, varieties, 603 Davis, dwl 424 Sansom 

Baldwin Stephen, carpenter, dwl 44^ Sixth 

Baldwin Thomas, carpenter, dwl 267 Minna 

Baldwin WilUam, foreman Hancock & Kelso, dwl 414 
Beale 

Baldwin William, dwl 824 Valencia 

Baldwin William H., shipcarpenter, dwl 7 Liberty 

Balemar W., cabinetmaker Pac Furniture M. Co. 

Balfe M. J., barkeeper Cliarles Wilson, Occidental Hotel 

BAXFOIIR, (;IITI1KIE A CO. {Uobert Balfour and 
Alexander y)(?/iri('y,c<.>mmission merchants and gen- 
eral agents British and Foreign Marme Insurance Co., 
office 230 California 

Balfour James, first officer ship Lookout, dwl 310J Ritch 

Balfour John, machinist Risdon L and L. Works, dwl Bry- 
ant nr Fom'th 

Balfour Robert (Balfmir, Guthrie. tO CoJ, dwl 1018 Geary 

Balgc Hemy A., carver S. F. Manufacturing Co., dwl St. 
Nicholas Hotel 

Balk Amelia Miss, whipbraider, dwl 1820 Hyde 

Balk Fred., seaman, dwl 1505 Dupont 

Balk Stephen S. Jr., clerk Ancel C. Robison, dwl 1820 
Hyde 



Largest and Best Selected Stock Eastern Oysters at Morgan & Co/s, 87 Cal. Marke 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Ball A. Everett ^Saintcr A- BalL\, a.toniey at law, office 

502 Montgomery, res Alameda ' 

Rill C'kules, cook 548 Clay 
Ball Oiarles. laborer, dwi \V s Mission bet Twentj'-fourth 

and Tneutv-flfth 
Ball Cliarles, porter French, Oilman & Co., dwl 712 Te- 
hama 
Ball Charles S., saddler, dwl 515} Franklin 
Ball David H., bookbinder, dwl N s Mariposa bet Penn- 
sylvania and Mississippi 
Ball Frank, whit«ner Frederick A. Jennin^, res Oakland 
Ball Georf.'e, stevedore G. H. Wiitney, dwl 132 Steuart 
Ball George A., bookkeeper Adams, Blinn & Co., dwl 730 

Gearv 
Ball Henr\- W.. porter Schroder & Weston, dwl 410 Bdwy 
Ball Horace \V., clerk M. P. and M. Dep. Central Pacific 

R. R., res Oakland Point 
Ball J. E., furnished rooms. 54 Third 
Ball Joel, dentist, dwl 1210 Union 
Ball John, waiter Windsor House 
Ball John S. , machinist, dwl 515} Franklin 
Ball Joseph, carjienter, 703 Howard 
Ball Mark, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Ball Martha S. Mrs., artist, dwl 155 New Mont room 9 
Ball X. -A., driver Sutter St. R. R., dwl 3 Austin 
Ball Randolph D., shipcarpenter, dwl 1415 Bush 
Ball R. D.. paver Superintendent Public Streets 
Ball Robert C, architect, office 49 Merchants' Exchange, 

res Oakland 
Ball Samuel, sailmaker, dwl 5 Jackson 
Ball Samuel, stevedore G. H. ^^^litney 
Ball S. D.. carpenter, dwl 1212 Clay 
Ball Thomas A., insurance agent, 410 J California, res 

Oakland 
Ball William, Grocer, dwl 741 Market 
Ball W. T., dwl 9-1 Montgomery Block 
Ballan Anna S., janitress U. S. Mint, dwl 4 Chatham PI 
Ballan B. C. Mrs., dressmaker, 240 Thu-d 
Ballantine Robert, clerk W. J. T. Palmer & Co., dwl 519 

Bush 
Ballard Duane f Ballard J: Ualll, dwl 1416 Gearj' 
Ballard Georf^e, carpenter Palace Hotel 
Ballard George, signpainter John W. Cherrj-, dwl 179 Min 
Ballard George, tinsmith and bathmaker, 215 Second, dwl 

424 Sansom 
Ballard John ,'ir. H. Martin <£■ Co.', dwl 713 Ellis 
Ballard Josei.h H., shipping merchant, dwl 708 Sutter 
BALIAKB A II.4LL (Duaiu Ballard and Isaac R. 

Hall J, commission merchants, 100 Davis 
Ballena Malta, fishennan. dwl foot Clay 
Ballenberg Nathan, bandleader, office 623 Clay, dwl 711 

California 
Ballentine Henry, Shipwrights' Jour. Assn, 71 New Mont- 
gomery' 
Ballentine Sarah (widow), dwl NW cor Jessie and Ninth 
Bailey Edward J., shipping clerk Forbes Bros., dwl 17 

Rincon Court 
Ballhaus Frederick, dairyman, dwl 2209 Leavenworth 
Ballhaus Louisa (widow), dwl 112 Valparaiso 
Ballheimer Cliarles, porter Leri Strauss & Co., dwl 112 

Austin 
Ballinger Andrew, laborer Thomas Bailey & Co., dwl 19} 

Gilbert 
Ballinger Frank J., reporter S. F. Chronicle, dwl 1107 

Montu'omer^' 
B.U,LI>CE!C' JOIIV .1., paints, oils, and glass, NE 

cor Van Ness Av an(f Market 
Ballinger Patrick B. , upholsterer John C. Bell, dwl 17 

Gilbert 
BaUinger T. Richard, upholsterer John C. Bell, dwl 17 

Gilbert 
BaUinger WUliam G., conductor Sutter St. B. R., dwl 1208 

Larkin 
Ballinger. See Ballenger 
Ballou Charles, machinist, dwl 737 Howard 
Ballou George, dwl l,5iJi Clara 
Balluu J. F., plasterer Palace Hotel 
Ballou Nelson S., carpenter, dwl Thirtieth nr San JosiS Av 
Ballou Thomas, clerk, dwl 227 Minna 
Baloun Joseph fBalnun <L- Stouda j ,dv.-l 615 Washington 
BAlOtX A STOrD.4 (Joseph Baloun aiid A. M. 

Stoudai , merchant tailors, 613 Washington 

Hallow (widow), dwl 4 Wetmore PI 

Ballshain William H.,barkeepcr Cliff House, Pt. LobosAv 
Ballvnt^Te Frank, second officer stm Constantine 
Balser C'harles, butcher, dwl 21 Kate 
Balser John, pipemaker Francis Smith & Co., dwl NWcor 

Vallejo and Montgomerj* 
Baltams Betsy (widow), dwl 611 Mason 



Balten George, printer's roUermaker William Newell dwi | 
209 Leidcsdorff 

Baltage Herman, cigarmaker, dwl 317 Bush 

Balthazar Hugo, bookkeeper, 536 Sacramento 

Balthazard Leander ' Henderiton <t BalthazardJ , dwl NE 
cor Mission and Twenty -fourth 

Balthrop Lewis W., carpenter, dwi cor Utah and Twenty- 
fourth 

Baltic Consolidated Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), office 
507 Montgomery 

Baltimore Consolidated Mining Co. (Storey Co. , Cal.), office 
401 California, room 1 

Balz Adolph, dwl 251 Stevenson 

Balz Valentine, buteher M. Selig & Co., dwl South S. F. 

Ealz.arini Carlo, waiter N. Giamboni & Co., 519 Clay 

Ealzer Ferdinand, bookkeeper M. Waterman & Co., dwl 
531 T\irk 

Balzer Henry .Uenry Balzcr .{• Co.l, dwl B31 Turk 

EiALZEK HEXK'i' «!k t'O., imptirters and commission 
merchants, agents Hamburg American Packet Co., 
Svea Fire Ins. Co. (Gothenburg), and Switzerland Ma- 
rine Ins. Co. (Zurich), office 213 Sansom 

Balzer Henri- J., mattressmaker Cal. Furniture M. Co., 
dwi S s Beriy nr Foiuih 

Balzer. See B.alser 

BA.WBEK JOHX. proprietor Oakland and S. F. Ex- 
press, office 501 Da^is, dwi WVl Montgomery 

Baniber Joseph J. , grocer, 945 Folsom, dwi 35 Langton 

Bamber William, nutstand, SE cor Bush and Kearny, 
dwi 5 Selina PI 

Bamberg B. L. , dwi 209 Montgomery- Av 

Bames John, teamster Pacific Rollmg Mill, dwl cor Ken- 
tucky and Butte 

Bamlield'John F., calker Ship Calkers' Assn, 713 Mission 

Bamfield M. , laborer Palace Hotel 

Bamford Mary (widow), dressmaker, dwl 13 Metcalf PI 

Bammann H.' H., teamster Horace Davis & Co., dwl 2 
Washingt'in Av 

B,anahan Henry, laborer, dwi 173 Clara 

Banan Hugh, laborer, dwi 214 Prospect PI 

Banbur;*- 'Thomas, laborer Southern Pac. R. R., dwl cor 
Sierra and Louisiana 

BAXt'ROFT A. 1. A CO. (Huhert II. BanrrnftJ, 
publishers and importing booksellers, and stati ners. 
printers, bi:)okbinders, lithographers, engravers, etc., 
721 Market 

Bancroft Albert L. fA. L. Bancroft & Co.), dwl NW cor 
Franklin and Pine 

Bancroft Charles E., salesman A. L. Bancroft & Co., dwl 
320 O'Farrell 

Bancroft Eugene, captain Fotuih U. S. Artillery, dwl 
Presidio Barracks 

Bancroft George, with Union Gas Co., dwl Windsor House 

Bancroft Hubert H. .1. L. Bancroft A- Co.), res Oakland 

Bancroft N. L. , clerk Treadwell & Co. , dwi Windsor House 

Bancrtift W. H.. messenger A. L. Bancroft & Co., dwi 204 
Slontgomerv 

Rancrnit William B.. manager printing and Uthographing 
department, dwl 32S O'Farrell 

Bancroft William H.. physician (Magnetic), office and dwl 
204 Montgomerv 

BA>'«'KOFTft' Bi'ItDI\«. 723 Market 

Band John /Lauristun ,i- B.j. dwi 1014 Montgomery 

Band Joseph fWessa <t- B.). dwl N s Fulton nr Octavia 

Bandereto Mill and Mining Co. (Mariposa, CaL), office 408 
California room 14 

Bande\ in Oliver, waiter American Exchange 

Bandfond'John, seaman, dwl 12:i Jackson 

Bandhi>!dt Fred H., fanner, res 736 Minna 

Ban Imann Julius (Bamhnann, Xicben d: Co.), dwl 514 
Lorn'oard 

BIMUBA-VX, XIEISEX A «'©. f Julius Bandmann 
and H Sielfenj, importers and commission mer- 
chants and general agents Giant Powder Co. , 210 Front 

Bandv Aaron N., dwl 5 South Park 

Bandy William H., carriagepamter, dwi 421 Folsom 

Bane'B., dwi 741 Market 

Bane Charles, student, dwi 113 Stockton 

Banfield Everett C, attorney at law, office 40 U. S. Court 
Building, dwi 191S Sacramento 

Bang George A., machinist Hinckley & Co., dwl 506 
Powell 

Bangs A., laborer, dwi 636 Commercial 

Ban"s Edward, superintendent Mission Bay Warehouse, 
dwl 131 Dora 

Bangs Frank H., clerk Home Mutual Insurance Co., dwl 
30 McAllister 

Bangs Job, carpenter, dwi 241 Minna 

Banhan Patrick, hostler City Stables, dwl 113 Perry 



<5 



•PACIFIC COAST BUSIITESS LIEECTOEY, 1875-7, H. &. Langley, Publisher, S. P. 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



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llaniivj;er Frank, fireman stin Aniailnr. Bntadway WTiarf 
BAXK or UiCl'D'ISli t'OLUMKIA, William H. Til- 

Iini,'liast manay^cr, 8E cor California ami Sansom 
nAMK Oa- BieniSBI XOKTH AMEKMA. Archi- 
bald MoKinlay and Henry W. Glenny agents, 219-221 

Sanson! 
BAKK OF <'ALirOItMA, AV. C. Ralston president, 

Thomas Jiruwn cashier, otfiee K\V cor California and 

Sansom 
ICAMi OF «'AMFOUMA BtlLDEVO, NW cor Cal- 

iforni;i. and Sansnm 
BA\K4HI' SAN r»eAX<'ISCO, N. P. Cole president, 

Horatio MLl'liursi^n cashier, 436 California 
Banker John, driver Omnibus R. R., dwl SE cor Third 

and Howard 
Hanker J. W,, patternmaker Palmer, Knox & Co., dwl 

City Hotel 
Bankin William, seaman, dwl 123 Jackson 
Hank-; Charles W., bookkeeiwr Wells, Fargo & Co., res 

(takland 
Banks Kli, barkeeper, dwl 732 Harrison 
['.Link-; <;eorge S., proprietor Pacific Stable, 709 Jones 
i;;inks Harry D., bookkeei>er, dwl 52.'>i Howard 
Banks .Tames, l:iborer, dwl 3 Hodges PI 
Banks James, laborer, dwl 31S Davis 
lianks James C, clerk, dwl 55 Second 
Banks John (colored), barber Charles H. Shaftner, dwl 911 

Washington 
Banks John, cigars and tobacco, 997 Market, dwl 995 

Market 
Banks Lizzie May Miss, teacher Spring Valley Grammar 

School, dwl 1419 W'ashington 
BANKS T. C*., capitalist, office 14 Merchants' Ex- 

chan'j:e. dwl 724 California 
Banks William fDu Hose & BJ, dwl 1419 Wash 
Banks William Oscar, draftsman S. C. Bugbee & Son, dwl 

1419 Washington 
Bankson Alet, waiter Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Bankson Eric, laundryman. dwl 107 Mhina 
Bankson James, miner, dwl 636 Commercial 
Bankson John (' \Vn ters d' B, i , dwl 32 Tehama 
Bann James, teamster Hibernia Brewery, dwl 731 Clem 
Bann James Mrs., milliner, dwl 735 Clementina 
Bann Thomas, teamster Hibernia Brewery, dwl 731 Clem- 
entina 
Bannahan Alice Miss, boarding, 113 Perry 
Bannun Bridget (widow), dwl 1422 Jackson 
Bannan Frank, clerk, dwl 617 Natoma 
Bannan John, boatman, dwl 82 Francisco 
Bannan M. Miss, teacher Union Primary School, dwl 1422 

Jackson 
Bannan Patrick, engineer Joseph Sedgley, dwl Solano bet 

Florida and York 
Bannatjnie James, clerk Balfour, Guthrie & Co., res 

Oakland 
BAWKB BBOTIIKRS f Pet, t and Samuel ),im\i(yvi- 

ers and manufacturers ckUhing and gents' furnishing 

goods, 204 and 206 Sansom 
Banner Peter fBannrr Brosj, dwl 305 Kearny 
lianner Ilaphael, fancy goods, 1059 Folsom 
Banner Samuel (Banner Bma.), res New York 
liannennan John T., laborer William B. Bradbury, dwl 9 

Guerrero 
Bannett Harris, boarding, 235 Kearny 
Bannett Louis, jeweler, dwl 235 Kearny 
Bannick Christian, salesman John H.Heitmann, dwl 15 

Geary 
Bannick Johannes F., clerk W. Haker & Hinz, dwl 517 

Mission 
Bannin John, laborer Pac. Rolling Mills 
Banning F. M. Mrs., teacher Shotwell St. Primarji- School, 

dwl 1223^ Folsom 
Banning Henry, laborer Palace Hotel 
Baiming John, laborer Townsend St. Depot Central 

Pacific R. R. 
Banning Philip, night worker, dwl 17 White PI 
Jiaiinister Alfred fStarr .(• CoJ, dwl 309 Powell 
]Jannistcr George W., sashmaker Haskell Jc Bode, dwl 

42.5 Fremont 
Bannister J. C, upholsterer William J. Heney & Co., dwl 

127 Keaniy 
Bannister John, boatbuilder, dwl 804 Third 
Bamiister Joseph, watchman Armes & Dallam, dwl 425 

Fremont 
Bannon Jane Miss, furnished rooms, 110 Fourth 
liannon John, broker, dwl 1223i Folsom 
Bamion John, laborer St. Mari''s College 
Bannon John, laborer Kittle & Co., dwr24 Glover 
Bannon Margaret Mrs., lodgings, 823 Montgomery 



Bannon Michael, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co., dwl NW 

cor Third and King 
Bannon P., wine dealer, dwl 823 Montgomerj' 
Bannon Phillip, seaman Colorado S. N. Co.'s stm New- 

bern, Folsom St. Wharf 
Banny A., clerk Mme. A. Roger, dwl W s Buchanan nr 

McAllister 
Bansch Maria Mrs., midwnfe, dwl 141 Minna 
Banse Frederick, carpenter, dwl 624 Pacific 
Banson Alexander, cok, dwl 19 Commercial 
Baptis John H., gold-pen manufacturer, 328 Bush, dwl 

541 Foui-th 
Baptist Robert F. (colored), waiter, dwl B Havens PI m* 

Washington 
Baptiste Antonio R. , deckhand stm Alameda, dwl SW cor 

Drumm and Oregon 
Baptiste Jean, butcher, dwl S20 Folsom 
Baptiste Jean A., lithographer A. Waldatein, dwl 34S 

Ritch 
Baptiste Joseph, barkeeper Jos6 Barcellos, dwl Luzitania 

Hotel 
Baptiste Joseph, cook Grand Hotel 
Baptiste Juan, butcher M. Selig & Co., dwl cor First Av 

and Kentucky, South S. F. 
Baque Dominique, dwl 1609 Powell 
Bar A., merchant, dwl 44 Third 

Barabino Carlo, packer Cutting & Co., dwl 5 Filbert PI 
Baracco James, stevedore A. C. Freese 
Baracco Lesira, laborer, dwl 13 Union PI, rear 
Baraco Vincent, salesman, dwl 529 Tehama 
Barada Laurent, traveling agent G. W. Chesley & Co., 

dwl 412 Green 
Baragat Baptiste, laborer Jules Disdier, dwl 721 Pacific 
Baraille John, blacksmith, N s Geary bet Scott and Devis- 

adero, dwl W s Devisadero bet Post and Geaiy 
Barassina John, milkman, Presidio 
Barattini Lawrence, porter G. W. Chesley & Co., dwl 1610 

Bush 
Baraty Francis fCarrau cO BJ^ dwl 241 Stevenson 
Earaty George, student Heald's Business College 
Baraty John M. (Baraty ct CoutvlencJ, dwl 303 Montgom- 
ery Av 
Baraty & Coutolenc (John M. Baraty and Desire Coxito- 

Icncj, pork dealers, 303 Montgomery Av 
Baraud Philip, cook Louis Donardieu, dwl 1S04 Taylor 
Barbagelat^ Giovenate, vocalist, dwl S27 Vallejo, rear 
Barbaste Antoine, laundrj-, 838 Clay 
Bai'bat John, physician, apothecary, and chemist, 910 Pac 
Barbe Jean, nurseiy, N s Bush bet Baker and Lyon 
Barbech John, cook Antoine Vasalovich, dwl 9 Dupont 
Barbee John, manufacturer upholsterers' materials, dwl 

1090 Union 
Barber Elizabeth (widow), dwl 1625 W'ebster 
Barber Enos W. (LaivUm <ir Co.), dwl 22 Turk 
Barber George, upholsterer, dwl 525 Post 
Barljer Gideon M., carpenter, dwl 305 Minna 
Barber Henry D. (Barber d: KeserJ, dwl 305 Minna 
Barber James B., poxter Wilmerding & Kellogg, dwl Guer- 
rero bet Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth 
Barber John (colored), brickmason, dwl 53 Bernard 
Barber John N., insurance broker, office 531 California 

room 4, dwl 700 California 
Barber M., tailor, dwl 423 Bush 
Barber M. E. (widow), dwl 513 Taylor 
Barber Robert L. (liiMeif ,(■ Bj, dwl 506 Bush 
Berber S., farmer, dwl 261 Jessie 
Barber Ste])heu, marblecutter J. & A. Morris, dwl 303 

Fourth 
Barber Thomas A., master mariner, dwl 1222 Pacific 
Barber William ( Doyle .[• B.J, attorney at law, office 323 

California, res San Rafael 
Barber William M., blacksmith, dwl W s Capp bet Twen- 
ty-fifth and Twenty-sixth 
Barber ZacharyT., with James E. Mitchell & Co., dwl 

SE cor Buchanan and McAllister 
Barber & Kescr (Henry D. Barber and Frederick IT. 

Keser), hairdressing saloon, 683 Mission 
Barberi Frank, waiter Jacob Stork & Co., dwl 428 Bdw)' 
Barbero John, actor, dwl 1016 Stockton 
Barbetta Frederick, fishennan, dwl 49 Clay 
Barbie John, manufacturer upholsters' "materials, dwl 

1090 Union 
Barbier Armand, special policeman, dwl 107 Fifth 
Barhior Eugenie, teacher French, dwl 650 Minna 
Barbier Gabriel (Woodtkrop d- BJ, dwl 508 Battery 
Barbier Paul, barkeeper, dwl 107 Dupont 
Barbier Paul L. (Barbier tO Barrett J, dwl 107 Dupont 
Barbier & Barrett (Paul L. Barbier and Edward J. 

Barrett J, liquor saloon, 903 Market 



Get your Eastern Transplanted Oysters from MOR&AN & CO., 87 California Market 



p. VAN SCHAACZ & CO., 705, 70S, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Barbiere G., cabinetmaker L. & E. Emanuel, dwl 2oA Zoe 
Barbieri Guiseppe, captain schooner Marj' Ann, dwl 621 

Pacific 
Barbour F. A., carpenter Cameron & Hull, dwl 1107 

Keaniy 
Barbour Freeman, drugsrist, SW cor Mission and Twenty- 
second, dwl S s Twenty-third bet Mission and Va- 
lencia 
Barca Joseph, vesretable peddler, dwl W s Burgoyne PI 
B-IUC'ELLOS JOSE, proprietor Luzitania Hotel, SW 

cor Drumm and Orei^on 
Barchi Cesar Rev., clerg^Tiian St. Ignatius College, dwl 

841 Market 
Barchus John H., clerk Forwarding Department Wells, 

Fargo & Co., dwl 806 Webster 
Barciller Annie Mrs., ironer B. Sarthon, dwl 907 Sac 
Barclay Bros, f John and DacidJ, junkdealers, -i^Z Dup 
Barclay Da\id / Barclay Bros J , dwl 7S4 Fulsom 
BarclaV Harn', tinsmith, dwl 815 Montgomery 
Barclay Henry, upholsterer H. J. M. Troutt, dwl S s 

Clara bet Fifth and Sixth 
Barclay John f Barclay Bros. J, dwl 7S4 Folsom 
Barclay Robert, baker, dwl 405 Folsom 
BarclaV Robert H., woodworker Kiniball Mauuf. Co., dwl 

629 Bush 
BarclaV Roderick, machinist F. A. Huntington, dwl 108 

Powell 
Barclay. See Barkley 

Bardeau Pierre, tailor FeUce Ohio, dwl 209 Mont Av 
Barden John, carpenter Pacific Hotel 
Harden G., stairbuilder B. H. Freeman & Co. 
Bardenhagen Henry fA. Warnecke it Co./, dwl 101 Sac 
BarUenwerper Charles P., messenger German Savings 

and Loan Societ.v, dwl 9 Stockton PI 
Bardet Alexander, ship's clerk, dwl 9 Pinckney PI 
Bardet Constance (\vidow). milliner, 1108 Dupont 
Bardwell Charles W., machinehand Christian Schreiber 

i- &!., dwl 605 Market 
Bardwell J. L. & Co. (William lIcKenrieJ, bagmakere, 

105 Clay 
Bardwell John L. fj. L. Bardwell <!; Co.J, dwl 8 Bren- 

hamPl 
Bare Edward, furrier Lachman & Stemfels, dwl 362i 

Clementina 
Bare Gustave. furrier I. Shirpser, dwl 362} Clementina 
Bare Jlichael, furrier, dwl 3621 Clementina 
Bareau Philip, cook L. Donnadieu, dwl cor Stockton and 

Pacific 
Barela Maria Miss, milliner, dwl Duncan Court nr Bdwy 
Baresel William, bricklayer, dwl 207 Pacific 
Baretta Pietro, fisherman, dwl 04 Sullivan's Building 
Bargones James, laborer D. Ghirardelli, dwl 713 Green- 
wich 
Bargones Leonardo, porter Pascal, Dubedat & Co., dwl 

221 S Mason 
Bargstream George G., compositor John H. Carmany 

& Co., dwl 115 Second 
Bargstream H., watchman stm Los Angeles, Market St. 

nilarf 
Barhydt Edward C, boilemiaker Moj-nihan & Aitken, 

dwl 767 Howard 
Barichievich John, liquor saloon, 131 Fifth, dwl S4S 

Minna 
Barichie\ich Martin, barkeeper John Barichievich, dwl 

348 Minna 
Barikansky J., carpenter, dwl 411 Pacific 
Barila Martin, laborer Diez, Bertz & Co. 
Earilari Camillo, carpenter, dwl 427 Fdbert 
Bardies Emile, driver F. Larroche, dwl cor Sixth Av and 

M, South S. F. 
Barios .Alphonse, dwl 209 Montgomery Av 
Barjuin Martin, tailor A. Barli 
Bark A. William, v.iicalist, dwl 1024 Montgomery 
Bark Henrv, laborer Freight Depot Southern Pac. R. K., 
cor Fifth and TowTisend, dwl cor Sierra and Louisiana 
Barkan Adolph, physician, oculist, and aurist, office and 

dwl 13 Guy PI 
Barkeloo John, real estate, dwl 1114 Post 
Barker .August, marblecutter J. & F. F. Kesseler, dwl 1019 

Powell 
Barker Charles J., pastrj- cook, dwl ^Vhat Cheer House 
Barker E. B. (widow), dwl 14 Stanly PI 
Barker Edward, bricklayer, dwl 814 Sansoni 
Barker Frank, carpente'r, dwl N 8 Sixteenth Av bet P 

and Q, South S. F. 
Barker Frederick, dwl 14 Stanly PI 

Barker Frederick, officer Pacific Mail S. S. Co., dwl 54 Sac 
Barker Grace H. (widow), dwl 1421 Folsom 
Barker H., painter, dwl 102 Eddy 



Barker Henrv" L., brickmaker, dwl 309 Capp 

Barker Heiu"y L. , carpenter Winsinger & Pa.vson, dwl 1609 

California 
Barker Henry X., trunkmaker H. Behrendt & Co., dwl W 
s Summer bet Folsom and Harrison, S s Bernal 
Heights 
Barker Hosea (Barker it Barmtm), dwl 102 Eddy 
Barker Jacob, tnuikmaker H. Behrendt & Co., dwl 165 

Silver 
Barker James L., wholesale hardware and commission 

merchant, 408 Market, res Oakland 
Barker John P., lumberdrj-er, dwl 15 Glen Park Av 
Barker Joshua, bookkeeper Lohmau, Coghill & Rotm- 

tree, res Oakland 
Barker Marv A. (widow), dwl W s Cushman nr Sac 
Barker Martha H., (widow), dwl S s Post bet Scott and 

De\isadero 
Barker Owen, shoemaker, dwl '236 Sutter 
Barker Stephen, bookkeeper, dwl 814 Valencia 
Barker Thomas, laborer, dwl 3 Boyd 
Barker Timothy L. fWellman, Peck ti- Co.), res Oakland 
Barker WiUiani J., dwl 835 Clay 
Barker W^ilham M., plumber Bush & Milne, dwl 7 Yerba 

Buena 
Barker k Bamum (Rosea Barker and Ezra B. Bar- 

numj , housepainters, 124 Fourth 
Barkhaus Diederich (F. W. <t D. BarkhausJ, dwl 10 

Turk 
Barkhaus Frederick W. (F. W.&B. BarkhausJ, dwilOOi 

Sutter 
Barkhaus F. W. &, D., books and stationer)', 535 Kearny 
Barkhausen Otto A., bookkeeper Schafer & Co., dwl 

Franklin bet Turk and Tyler 
Barklage WiUiam (Barklajc A Co.), dwl 1223 Mont 
Barkl^e & Co. (William Barklage and Jacob Melle), 
bowling and billiard saloon, SE cor Jackson ahd Kearny 
Barkley Andrew J., dwl 1016 Pine 
Barkley George T. N., bookkeeper Pool & Harris, dwl SE 

cor Union and Leavenworth 
Barklev Margaret Mrs., dwl 114 Oak 
Barkley William, dwl SE cor Union and Leavenworth 
Barkley William H., dwl SE cor Union and Leavenworth 
BarkleV. See Barclay 
Barkm'an Gustav, stevedore G. H. Whitney 
Barlage Henr}', cabinetmaker California Furniture Co., 

dwl 3 Cushman 
Barlage Henry Jr., porter Henry T. Hobnes & Co., dwl 3 

Cushman 
Barlage William, jeweler Herman J. Brand, dwl 3 Cush- 
man 
Bariav B., driver City R. B. 
Barlert George, carriagemaker, dwl 629 Bush 
Barletti S., expresswagon, 4 Pacific 
Barli Alexander, tailor, 609 CTay, dwl 1312 Kearny 
Barling Richards., clerk Central Pacific B. R. Freight 

Office, dwl 61S Fourth 
Barlow Caroline Mrs., teacher, dwl 911 Bush 
Barlow Carrie Miss, teacher Washington Grammar School, 

dwl 909 Clay 
Barlow Charles (B. O. Dtin * Co.;, res New \ork 
Barlow G., laborer U. S. Marine Hospital 
Barlow John, laborer Palace Hotel 
Barlow John, machinist, dwl 732 Folsom 
Barlow Maggie Miss, weaver Mission and Pac. «oolcn 

Mills, dwl 125 Fifteenth 
Barlow Michael, laborer, dwl 260 Clementina, rear 
Barlow Richard, laborer, dwl SW cor Clay and Jones 
Barlow Sarah (widow), fruits, 1003 Folsom 
Barlow Warren, teamster, dwl Park Hotel 
Barlow W. W., bookkeeper, dwl 71 Tehama 
Barman Charles, clerk Altschul i: HUdebiandt, dwl 943 

Folsom 
Barman Jonas S.. dwl 410 Sixth 
Barmuson C, seaman, dwl 123 Jackson 
Barmwater Henrv, seaman, dwl 250 Spear 
Barnane Florence, teamster, dwl Clara bet Fifth and 

Sixth 
Barnard Edward, special policeman, dwl 20 Ellis 
Barnard F. &. Co. (Henry Voorman) , coal, 213 Jackson 
Barnard Frank (F. Barnard .t Co.J, dwl 418 Eddy 
Barnard George, teamster T. H. Selby & Co., dwl 531 

Linden -Av 
BIBN.4RD I. D., real-estate and general business 

agent, 224 Montgomery, dwl 912 Vallcjo 
Barnard John, expressman, dwl 536 Sacramento 
Barnard John, seaman, dwl 13 Oak Grove Av, rear 
Barnard John, t^xJmaker, dwl 614 Natoma 
Barnard Louis, plasterer, dwl 1137 Pacific 
Barnard Matthew, shi fcniaker, dwl 5'28 Stevenson 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTORY Contains Addresses 60,000 Merchants. 



JEWELRY made to order and EEPAIEED by D. W. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Merchant 




Baraanl Jloses S., cooper, dwl 1226^ FL.lsom 
Barnard Thomas G., contractor, dwl 32 Rincon PI 
Barnard William L., ])roprietor Barnard's Express, office 

719 Davis, res San Rafael 
Earner Williajii, clerk Henry Knoche, dwl 423 Third 
Barnes A. (widow), dwl 33y Eddy 
Banies Annie M. Mrs., dwl 339 Eddy 
Banies Benjamin J., laborer, dwl 554 Stevenson 
Barnes Charles A., plasterer, dwl SW cor Howard and 

Twenty -fourth 
Barnes Charles N., inventor, dwl 1224 Mission 
Barnes D. H., third otficer Pacific Mail S. S. Great Re- 
public 
Eanies E. B. Miss, assistant teacher Drawing Public 

School Department, dwl 600 Bush 
Barnes E. D., capitalist, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Banies Edward, waiter, dwl 312^ Tehama 
Barnes George, dwl 205 Second 

Banies Gcortfe. steward 1. Friedlander, dwl 438 Bryant 
BAIO'ES iiEORGE ED., editor, office GOO Montgom- 
ery' room 40, dwl 1200 Market 
Barnes Henry J., carpenter, dwl 1153 Howard 
Barnes James, nailmaker, dwl 132G Green 
Barnes Joseph, modelmaker, 652 Market, dwl 25 Geary 
Bai'nes Jlonroe, watchmaker National Clock Co., dwl 430 

Stevenson 
Barnes Robert L. C, dwl Sll Stockton 
BAICNEI^ "^V. n. I,., attorney at law, office 426 Cali- 
fornia, dwl SW eor McAllister and Fillmore 
Barnes William, carpenter, dwl N s Ellis bet Scott and 

De\'isadero 
Banies William R., carpenter, dwl Treat Av bet Twenty- 

fir^t and Twenty-Second 
Barnes W. P., dwl 032 Market 
Banies W. T., laborer City R. R.. dwl 529 Valencia 
Baniett Absalom J., draftsman J. P. Gajiior 
Barnett Barbara (widow), dwl 810 Union 
Barnett David, hamessmaker Charles H Mead, dwl E s 

Davis bet Washinyton and Clay 
Barnett David, tailor, 625 Sacramento, dwl 251 Perry 
Barnett Edward J., expressman SW cor Second and How- 
ard, dwl 227 Second 
Baniett Jolm, laborer, dwl 7 Lick 
Barnett John J., sailmaker and cxtraman Engine No. 7 

S. F. F. D., dwl Engine House cor Second Av and 

Sixteenth 
Baniett Joseph, crockeiy and glassware, 39 and 79 Fourth, 

dwl :J72 Jessie 
Baniett Joseph P., club rooms, dwl 28 Geary 
Barnett Morris S., grain commission, 210 Davis, dwl 1114 

Market 
Barnett Samuel, draftsman, dwl 207 Second 
Barnett S. S., carpenter, dwl 128 Turk 
Barney Alfred S., dcjiutv U. S. shipping commissioner, 

dwl 2109 Van Ness Av 
Barney Aurelius, di-essmaker Mrs. Marj' Robei-tson, dwl 

32 Second 
Barney Benjamin A., with William B. Hooper & Co., dwl 

S17 Van Ness Av 
Barney B. Griffin, Deputy U. S. Shipping Commissioner, 

office P. M. S. S. Co.'s Dock, dwl 2209 Jackson 
Banicy E. S., broker, dwl 318 Pine 
Barney James M. { Willidtn B. Hooper i- Co. ) , res Ymna, 

A. T. 
Baniey Morgan L., lumber dealer, dwl 1324 Polk 
Barney S. A. Mrs., dwl 32 Sixth 
Banihart Christian, laborer, dwl 22 Garden 
Banibart Daniel (Wntmn d- BJ, dwl 1021^ Market 
Barnhisel E. R., carrier Alta California 
Banibisel S. Henry, salesman Toklas, Hahn & Brown, dwl 

147 Third 
Banihouse Theodore, machinehaud Daniel D. Holland, 

dwl 34 Tehama 
Bams Dcidrich, refiner Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl W s 

Potrero Av bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Bamum Augusta (widow), dwl 1620 Washington 
Barnum E. K., assistant lighthousekeeper. South Faral- 

lonc Islands 
Barnum Ezra B. (Barker it BJ, dwl Columbia Hotel 
Barnum Henrj-, editor Rural Press, dwl 1520 Broadway 
Barnum J., dwl 414 Pacitic 
Barnum William, lab'n-or To^\^l8end St. Depot Central 

Pac. R. R., dwl 708 Brannan, rear 
Bamum William 0., clerk Dewey & Co., dwl 1520 Bd^y 
Barocchi Maurizio, vegetables, 62 Colombo Market 
Baron Abraham, tailor, 31 Pacific 
Baron Edouard, porter 330 Pine 
Baron John {Baron J- DvpwjJ, dwl 628 Broadway 
Baron S. , lather Palace Hotel 



Baron William, housemover, dwl E s Misssion nr Thirtieth 
Baron & Dupuy {John Baron and John DupxiyJ, black- 
smiths, 528 Broadway 
Baroni Peter, expressman, Colombo Market 
Baronia Anton, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery 
Bannuiuaire E. (widow), dwl 1019 Powell 
Barque Heiin,% liquor saloon, NE cor Stockton and Bdwy 
Barr Charles,' liquor merchant, dwl 335 Geary 
Barr Daniel, carpenter, dwl 31 Hunt 
BaiT F. D., hairdresser, dwl 516 Pacific 
Barr Hannah K. (widow), dwl N s Oak bet Lagima and 

Octavia 
Barr Harry, agent, dwl 1212 Clay 
Ban- Henry (colored), laborer, dwl 520 Broadway 
Barr James, heater Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl cor Sierra 

and Michigan 
Barr John, dwl 424 Sansom 
Ban' John D., umbrella and parasol manufacturer, 323 

Bush, dwl 912 i'ost 
Barr Mary Mrs. , dressmaker, dwl N s Twentieth nr Va- 
lencia 
Barr Neil, molder Hinckley & Co., dwl SE cor Twent}'- 

third and Harrison 
Barr Robert, mason Palace Hotel 
Barr Sara A. Miss, assistant Girls* High School, dwl 916 

Washington 
Barr William, carpenter Palace Hotel, dwl 102 First 
Barr William H., mariner, dwl S s Bay bet Hyde and Leav 
BaiTa Ezekiel I., liquor saJoon and cigars, 118 First, dwl 4 

Minna 
Barra Miguel, cook, dwl 1119 Kearny 
Barra's Hall, NW cor First and Mimia 
Bari-acco Andrew, poultry dealer, dwl 33 Turk 
Ban-aellac Charles, basketniaker, dwl 3 Meacham PI 
Barrailet Felicien, laborer F. Laroche 
Ban-anowski Hem*y, cook, dwl 4 Selina PI 
Barraque John (Daunet dj B.), dwl 708 Commercial 
Barras Adolph, butcher D Sier, dwl 419 Vallejo 
Bari-aud Louts, dwl 533 Keaniy 
Barre Augustus, laborer, dwl 362 Natoma 
Barre lean, dwl 715 Stockton, rear 
Ban-eis Adolph, butcher Fred. Katz, dwl 624 Vallejo 
Barrell Edward, clerk Cashier's Department Wells, Fargo, 

& Co., dwl 600 Bush 
Barrell Samuel, stockbroker 422 Mont., dwl 600 Bush 
Barrellis John, cook P. B. Berges & Co., dwl 769 Market 
Ban-ere Louis, draymau 316 Sacramento, dwl 817 Howard 
Barrett Alfred, jeweler and, watchmaker, 13 Second, dwl 

234 Seventh 
Ban*ett Annie Miss, dressmaker Mrs. Francisco Smith, 

dwl 129 Sixth 
Ban-ett Charles P., cutter Purdv & Litchfield, res Oakland 
Barrett Charles R. (Phelps t(- BJ, dwl 215 Minna 
BaiTett Cornelius, laborer, dwl 104 Polk 
Barrett Cornelius, laborer, dwl 732 Natoma 
Barrett Dominique, upholsterer Goodwin & Co., res Oak- 
land 
Barrett Edmond, laborer, dwl 609 Minna 
Barrett Edward, farmer, dwl Old Sau Jos^ Road nr In- 
dustrial School 
Barrett Edward, laborer, dwl 24 Clementina 
Barrett Edward, laborer John Cochran, dwl 609 Minna 
Barrett Edward, painter Wason &, Morris, 38 California 
Barrett Edward, waiter Lick House 
Barrett Edward F. , butcher John D. Piercy, dwl W a 

Miller PI nr Folsom, rear 
Barrett Edward J., (Barbier A BJ, dwl 349 Minna 
Barrett Edward J., expressman, dwl 227 Second 
Barrett Edward M., baker, dwl 108 First 
Barrett Francis A., carpenter E. K. Howes & Co., dwl Ss 

Seventeenth Av nr J, South S. F. 
BaiTctt. George, maltster Mason's Brewery, dwl 529 Chest- 
nut 
Barrett Haimah (widow), dwl W s Miller PI nr Folsom 
liarrett Haiuuih (widow), dwl 515i Stevenson 
Barrett James, fanner, dwl 337 Jessie 
Barrett James, gardener Laurel Hill Cemetery 
Barrett James, painter, dwl 112 Dora 
Barrett James, wood and coal, N s Seventeenth bet Do- 
lores and Church 
Barrett James Fisher, steward, dwl 117 Drunun 
Barrett James L., machinist, dwl 719 Market 
Barrett J. C, Bricklayers* Pro. Union, 232 Sutter 
Ban-ett John, bookkeeper John O'Kane, dwl 782 Har 
Barrett John, carrier Examiner 

Barrett John, laborer Southern Pac. R. R., dwl W s Kan- 
sas nr Nevada 
Barrett John, lithographic printer G. H. Baker, dwl 318 
Clementina 



Buy your Eastern Transplanted Oysters from first hand, Morgan & Co., 87 Cal. Market. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Established 1852. 




Barrett John, machinist Pacific Mall S. S. Co.'s ^NTiarf, 

dwi 10 Berry 

Barrett John, miller Demino, Palmer & Co., dwl 54 Sac 
Barrett John, st<:>necutt€r Michael Heverin, dwl 16 Crook 
Barrett Mary Mrs., seamstress, dwl 202 Second 
Barrett Marv T. (widow), saleswomau Florence Sewing 

Machine Co., dwl 905 Bush 
Barrett Matthew (Barrett <t Cazn^au), dwl 11 Geary 
Barrett Michael, coachman Fashion Stables, dwl 342 

Kitch 
Rirrett Michael, laborer, dwl 112 Polk 
Barrett Michael, shipcarpent«r, dwl 33 Clementina 
Barrett Moses, peddler, dwl 1.^05 Powell 
Barrett P., carpenter Palace Hotel 

Barrett Patrick, salesman Kennedy & Durr. dwl 24 Clem 
Barrett Patrick N., carrier Evening Bulletin, dwl 363 

Natf-^ma 
Barrett Paul, carpenter, dwl 506 Market 
Barrett Richard F., framemaker S. Hausman & Co., dwl 

427 Stevenson 
Barrett Robert, soapmaker Richard Brown, dwl 122 J 

Gilbert 
Barrett Thomas, carpenter, dwl 785 Mission 
Barrett Thomas, laborer, dwl 111 Jessie 
Barrett William, bricklayer, dwl 311 Jessie 
Barrett William, driver' Lenhart &; Brady, dwl 35 Sutter 
Barrett William, hackdriver Reardon i; Hinckley, dwl 293 

Clementina 
Barrett William, laborer, dwl S s Laurel Av bet Van Ness 

Av and Franklin 
Barrett William, teamster George Morrow & Co., dwl 31 

Commercial 
Barrett William F., molder St«iger & Kerr, dwl 316 Fol- 

som 
Barrett William G., cashier S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 1000 

Pine 
Barrett William H., carpenter D. A. Macdonald & Co., 

dwl 23 Muss 
Barrett & Cazneau fMatthcic Barrett ayid Thomas L. 

CozufanJ , liquor saloon, 38 Gear\' 
BARKETT A SHERWOOO, jewelers {Robert Sher- 

irood successor J , importers and dealers watches, 

diamonds, jewelry', etc., 517 Mont;:romerj' 
Barretta Louis, upholsterer, dwl 223 Minna 
Barretta Peter, fisbenuan, dwl foot Clay 
EarriL'hovich John, saloonkeeper, dwl 438 Minna 
Barrie Da-\id H., driver Sutter St. R. R.. dwl 1320 Polk 
Ean-ilis Die^o Count, Italian consul, ofBce 704 Washing- 

t-tn, res Oakland 
Barringer Elizabeth Mrs., agent Curtis' Models, 54 Fourth 
Barringer Jacob, fruitdealer, SE cor Powell and John, 

dwl 1211 Powell 
Barringer William, carpenter and builder, Hitch nr Berrj', 

dwl King St. House 
Rarrington Geoi^e F., dwl 1706 Sacramento 
Harrington John, clerk S. F. Post-office, dwl 557 Natoma 
Harrington John, laborer G. Jas. King of Wm. & Co., dwl 

521 Sacramento 
Earrington William, porter Dickson, De Wolf & Co. 
Barrintos Martin, printer, dwl Virginia Block SE cor 

Stockton and Pacific 
Barris Clermont C, bookkeeper Laveme Barns, dwl 302 

ilontgomery 
Barris Hiram IK, butcher, dwl 92S Post, rear 
BARKIS L.\VER\E, broker, office 302 Montgomery 

room 30, dwl 1609 Van Ness Av 
Barrisnn Michael, laborer, dwl S s Ellis bet Gough and 

Octa\"ia 
B.IRKOILHET HE\R1' fBcUoc Frt^rc^ J, ^nd consxil 

for Chili, office 524 Montgomeri", dwl Grand Hotel 
Barron Barney, pantr^Tnan 542 Clay 
Barron Cornelius, barkeeper Wilham SulUvan, dwl 733 

Howard 
Barron Cornelius J., house and sign painter, and paper- 

hani^er, &lo Market 
Barron Edward, capitalist, office 406 Montgomery, dwl 435 

Geary 
Barron Henry, barber Jacob Davis, dwl 45 Third 
Barron James, cabinetmaker, dwl 2 Caroline PI 
Barron James, captain stm Hope, Commercial St. Wharf 
Barron James, framemaker McEachran & Parkinson, 437 

Brannan 
Barron James, mining, dwl 147 Third 
Barron John, carpenter Palace Hotel, dwl 522 Folsom 
Barron John, painter, dwl 1 Francisco 
Barron Joseph, capitalist, dwl 606 Stockton 
Barron Louis, cook Frank Caffiere, dwl 1112 Turk 
Barron Michael, carpenter California Mills, dwl E B Mis- 

siftn between Nineteenth and Twentieth 



contractor, dwl SW cor Gean' 



Barron Slichacl D, 
Broderick 

Barron Richard, captain stm Emma, Commercial St. 
Wharf 

Barron Ten-ence, laborer, dwl 214 Broadway 

Barron William, groceries and liquors, SW cor Clav and 
Powell 

Barron Willi.am, hairdresser Abraham Lewis, dwl 31 Pacific 

Barron William, Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl cor Sierra and 
Louisiana 

Barron William R., shipjoiner, dwl E s Middle bet Pine 
and California nr Rllmore 

BARRO\ A I'O.. office 305 Sansom 

Barrow Samuel M. f Curtis d: Co.), dwl Morton House 

BaiTow S. W., cigars and tobacco, dwl 533 Sacramento 

Barrows Daniel F., housepainter William Lee, dwl 129 
Second 

Barrows Edward C, pressman A. L. Bancroft & Co., dwl 
1123 Bush 

Barrows H. M., student Heald's Business Collie 

Barrows James O., actor, dwl 129 Second 

Barro^^-s John fWakejield d- Co. I, dwl 315 Hyde 

Barrows Lotta M. Miss, teacher Vallejo St. Colored School, 
dwl 1123 Bush 

Barrows Peleg, bookkeeper Thomas Barrows, res Oakland 

Barrows Robert, superintendent Califoniia Broom Fact- 
or.-, dwl 237^ Filbert 

Barrows Thomas, general agent Victor Serving Machine, 
121S Market, res Oakland 

Barrows William H., attorney at law, office 76 Montgom- 
ery- Block, dwl 109 Leavenworth 

Barry A., driver City R. R. 

Barry Aaron, boxmaker George W. Swan & Co., dwl 14 
Boiu-bon 

Bam- Alfred, third officer Pacific Mail S. S. Great Repub- 
lic 

Bam- Bartholomew, deckhand stm El Capitan, Oakland 
Ferr>-, dwl 339 Clementina 

Barn- Bridget, laundress, dwl 33 Everett 

BarrV Catherine (widow), dwl 110 William 

Barr'v Charles. clra\nuan George Brj-den. dwl 360 Natoma 

BARRY <'H.1RLES E.. searcher records, office 619 
Montgomery, dwl 150S Jones bet Pacific and Jackson 

Barry Daniel, cokeman S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl S s Elev- 
enth Av bet N and O, South S. F. 

Barry Daniel, rigger Palace Hotel 

P>arr^- Da-\id (Bacru A- Co. I, dwl 10 Washington Av 

Barrj- Da\id, deckhand stm El Capitan, Oakland Ferry 

Earr^- Da^is, peddler, dwl 211 Folsom 

Earrr Dennis, laborer Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 102 
First 

Bam' Edward, carriagemaker, dwl 24 Ridley 

Barr\- Edward, laborer, dwl 567 Mission 

Barrj- Edward, milkranch, S 8 Cortland Av nr Islais 
Creek S s Bemal Heights 

Bam- Edward, real-estate agent, office 415 Montgomerj', 
dwl 2010 Pacific Av 

Earr>- Eliza Miss, machine operator Stillivan & Moorhead, 
liwl Bush bet Buchanan and Lagmia 

Barn- Ella Miss, teacher St. Mar\-'s School, NE cor Dupont 
and California, dwl 923 Pacific 

Bam- Ellen Mrs., shirtmaker, dwl 708 Howard 

Barrj^ Emma H. (widow), dwl 923 Pacific 

Barrj- Francis, boilermaker Francis L Curry 

Barr^- Frederick, stevedore Menzies & Bingham 

Barn- Frederick J., laborer, dwl IS Ohio 

Barry George, machinist, dwl 28 Natoma 

Barry H. E. Mrs., lodgings, 14 Eddy 

Barr^' James (Hartnett & B.J, dwl 402 Broadway 

Barry James, foreman Nelson & Doble, dwl 211 Taylor 

Bany James, laborer, dwi 412 Folsom, rear 

Baiii- James, laborer, dwl 412 Post, rear 

Bany James, machinehand Daniel D. Holland, dwi Lizzie 
nr Thirtieth 

Bam- James, milker Matthew Barry, dwl Sweeny W s 
San Bruno Road nr G<:>lden City House 

Barri' James, quartermaster Pacific Mail S. S. Grenada, 
dwl 529 Fourth 

Earrj- James, stevedore A. C. Freese 

Barrj- James H., compositor Spaulding & Barto, dwi 1306 
Jackson 

Barrj- James J., receiving clerk New City Hall, dwi lllj 
Fifth 

Berry J. L. (Gilrnan & B.\ dwl 302 Montgomery 

BarrS' John, baker Robert Stein, dwl 238 Fifth 

Barry John, bnissmolder Greenberg & Co., dwi S 8 Fran- 
cisco nr Bay 

Barry John, clerk, dwl 64 Natoma 

Barry John, coachman WilliaiQ_F. Babcock, dwl 325 Fol 



'ACinC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 1875-7, H. &. Langley, PubUshsr, S. F. 
I 



D. ¥. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, Wholesale and Retail, cor. Merchant and Mod 




Barn- John, criraper, dwl N s Seventeenth nr Church 

Barry John, driver John Haley, dwl 737 Broadway 

Barry John, expressman, cor Bush and Kearny 

Barry John, gusfitter Bush & Milne, 

BarrV John, laborer, dwl 52S Broadway 

Barr\- John, laborer Construction Department U. S. Mint, 

dwl 102 Fourth 
Barry John, laborer Henry F. Williams, dwl Long Bridge 
foot Fourth 

Bam- John, laborer Hinckley & Co., dwl 2521 Sacramento 

Bany John, laborer S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl cor Sierra 
and Louisiana 

Barr>' John, longrshoreman, dwl IS Freelon 

Earn.- John, packer Helbing & Straus, dwl 6 Glover 

Barr>- John, painter, dwl Sdl Clementina 

Barn,' John, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 

Barry John, shoemaker, dwl Seventeenth bet Church and 
Dolores 

Bam- John H., dehvery clerk Western Union Telegraph 
Co., dwl 211 Taylor 

Barr>' John H., driver John Haley, Plaza, dwl 35 Valpa- 
raiso 

Barrj- John T. {Lyons <k BJ, dwl 1526 Geary 

BarrV Julia (widow), dwl 613 Greenwich 

Barry Kate Mrs., dwl 120 Seventh 

Barr?- M. Sirs., dressmaker Sullivan & Moorhead, dwl 
iiush nr Buchanan 

Barry Martin, tailor, dwl N 3 Bush bet Buchanan and 
Lagnna 

Barrj- Mary (widow), dwl 35 Talparaiso 

Barn' Man- Miss, laundress, dwl S s Emmet PI 

Barry Matthew, milkranch. dwl Sweeny W s Sao Bruno 
Road nr Golden City House 

Bam' M. C. Miss, teacher Eighth St. Granunar School, 
dwl 211 Taylor 

Bam- Michael, bootmaker, dwl W s Chenery nr San Jos6 
Road 

Barry Slichael, cabinetmaker, dwl N s Post bet Broderick 
and Baker 

Barrj- Michael, carpenter William B. Bradbury, dwl 708 
Howard 

Barr>' Michael, cook, dwl 54 Jessie 

Barrj- Michael, laborer Palace Hotel 

Barn, Michael, miner, dwl 511 Mission 

Barry Michael, tailor Austin Fitzgerald, dwl 164 Jessie 

Barn- Michael J., fruitstand, SW cor Sansom and Sacra- 
mento, dwl 419 Bush 

Barn- ilichael L., woolsorterS. F. P. Woolen Factory 

Barr\- Owen, laborer Palace Hotel, dw E s Octavia nr Mc- 
Allister 

Barn," Patrick, baggagemaster. dwl 339 CHementina 

Barn- Patrick, boUermaker Francis I. Curry, dwl 110 Wil- 
liam 

Bam- Patrick, extraman Engine No. 3, S F. F. D., dwl 
isis California 

Barry Patrick, grocer, dwl 274 Jessie 

Barn' Patrick, hostler William E. Bridge, dwl 164 Jessie 

Barry Patrick, laborer Palace Hotel 

BarrV Patrick, laborer Southern Pacific R. R., dwl 529 
Fourth 

Barry Patrick, watchman Michelssen, Brown & 0>., dwl 
Sbrteenth nr Potrero 

Barrj' Patrick, plumber Bush & Milne, dwl 1317 Sac 

Barry Patrick, policeman City Hall, dwl S s Ash Av bet 
Lagtma and Octa\ia 

Barr>- Patrick, seaman, dwl 510 Daria 

Barn,- Patrick, watchman Oakland Ferry Wharf, dwl 339 
Clementina 

Barr>- Patrick Jr., laborer, dwl 511 Mission 

Barry Patrick Sr., laborer, dwl 511 Mission 

Barn.- Patrick O., clerk Charles E. Barry, dwl 904 Jack 

Barrj' Richard, laborer, dwl 239 Perry 

Barn- Richard, laborer, dwl S s Eleventh Avbet N and O, 
South S. F. 

Barry Richard, laborer Weed & Kingwell, dwl 260 Clara 

Earn,- Richard, miner, dwl 511 Mission 

Barry Richard, paperhanger, dwl 10 Anthony 

Barry Richard, sailmaker William Wood, dwl IS Wash- 
ington Av 

Barry Robert, ropemaker, dwl S s Sixteenth nr Dolores 

Barrj- Robert, tailor, dwl 6 Trinity, rear 

Bany' Robert, traveling agent, dwl 21 Prospect PI 

Barry Sarah (widow), dwl 130G Jackson 

Barn,' Teresa (widow), dwl 3 Park PI 

liarrj' Theodore ^V. f Barry tt Patten), dwl 709 Geary 

Barry Thomas, bootmaker, dwl 2 Eddy PI 

Barry Thomas, clerk, dwi 207 Powell 

Barr>' Thomas, laborer Palace Hotel 

Barry Thomas, merchant, dwl Russ House 



Barrv Thomas, steward stm. Ajax, Oregon S. S. Co. 
Barrj- ThomM T., salesman Keane, O'Connor & Co., dwl 

Powell bet Gear>' and O'Farrell 
Barry Thomas F., tutor University of California, dwl 35 

Valparaiso 
Bam- William, blacksmith, dw! 513 Howard 
BarrV William, broker, dwl 719 Market 
Barrj- WiUiara, carpenter Omnibus R. R., dwl 766 Mission, 

rear 
Barry WiUiam, hackdriver, dwl 1S07 Powell 
Barri- WiUiam, laborer Machinery Department U. S. Mint 
Barn- William, laborer William T. Garratt, dwl 513 How 
Bany William, miner, dwl 511 Mission 
Barn- Wilham, trackman Omnibus R. R., dwl 630 Jessie 
Barry William, wheelwright Ennis & McNeill, dwl 21 

Rausch 
Barrj- William J., dwl 35 Valparaiso 
Barry- William Mrs., furnished rooms, 200 Stockton 
BanV' William McG., suneyor, dwl 200 Stockton 
Barn- A: Co. (David Barry and Joseph Baker j , morktl, 

i207 Mission 
BARRY A PATTEX (Theodore A. Barry and Benja- 

inin A. Patten) , wines and liquors, 413 Mont 
Bar santi Attlio, laborer F. Giovannini. dw! 438 Bdwy 
Barsilis D. consul Itaha, office and dwl 702 Washington 
Barsotti Virgilia, peddler, dwl 1002 Pacific 
Barstow Alfred, attorney at law, office 330 Pine room 50, 

dwl 17 South Park 
Barstow Da^id P., attorney at law, office 35 MerchantaT 

Exchange, res Oakland 
Barstow George /Barstow, Stetson 6: Houghton), attor- 
ney at law, dwl 927 Pine 
Barstow Henn-, seaman, dwl SW cor East and Merchant 
BARSTOn,' STETSOX A HOrtiHTOX (George 

Barntoic, Edward Gray Sletmn, and B. E. Hough- 
ton), attorneys at law, office 315 California 
Barteaux A., blacksmith Kimball Manuf. Co., dwl cor 

Vallejo and Montgomen,- 
Bartelomeo Barbaieri, dwl 303 Fourth 
Bartels Conrad, musician, dwl 417 Union 
Bartels Eochem, waiter, dwl 67 Water 
Barrels George, confectioner William Schmlts, dwl 916 

Montgomerj' 
Bartels Hermann, barkeeper John Hartler, dwl NW cor 

Dupont and Gean' 
Bartels John, dwl 220 Pacific 
Bartels John, laborer, dwl 67 Water 
Bartels Max, teacher music, dwl 815 CHay 
Bartels Peter Henrj', liquor saloon and billiards, 539 Jack- 
son 
BARTELS RICHARD, groceries and liquors, NW cor 

Bush and Jones 
Barter Augusta B. (widow), electro-physician, office and 

dwl 406 Post 
Bartes Phihp, driver 1 (lay St. Market, dwl 735 O'Fanell 
Barth C. H., bookkeeper McCain, Flood & McClure, dwl 

405 Powell 
Barth Charles, bootmaker, dwl 16 St. Mary, rear 
Barth Charles H., clerk, dwl 2237 Jackson 
Barth Ernst F., butcher William F. Witzemann, dwl 7 

Washington 
Barth Isador, filer Jackson Iron Foundrv, dwl 520 Green 
Barth Philip, clerk I. Glazier & Co., dwl 906 Market 
Barthalmy James, miner, dwl 814 Montgomery 
Barthen Antonia (widow), dwl Cedar Av bet Polk and 

Larkin 
Barthev Albert, waiter, dwl 411 Green 
Barthoif T. WalOron, engineer Bush & Milne, dwl 212 

Second 
Bartholoma John, groceries and liquors. 1413 Stockton 
Bartholomew Henry G., expressman, SE cor Pine and 

Front, dwl E s De\isadero bet Sacramento and Clay 
Bartholow Eugene, clerk Central Pacific R. R. Freight 

Office, dwl 746 Howard 
Barthrup Edward (Casey (L- BJ, dwl 317 Hayes 
Bartleson Edward A., waiter Delmonico's Restaurant, 

dwl 509 Howard 
Bartlett A. W. M. Mrs., physician, office and dwl 29 

O'Farrell 
Bartlett Charles H., special policeman, City Hall 
Bartlett Columbus (Bartlett <L- Pratt), dwl 1131 Ellis 
Bartlett Earl, attorney at law, office 35 Montgomery 

Block, dwl S 8 Point Lobos Av nr Sixteenth Av 
Bartlett Henry, dwl 313 Kearny 
Bartlett Henrj- E., driver Contra Costa Laimdry, dwl 1106 

Kearny 
Bartlett James, carpenter, dwl 306 Tehama 
Bartlett Jared A., shipcarpenter, dwl 312 Beale 
Bartlett J. H., carpenter Palace Hotel 



MORGAN & CO., 87 CaL Market, always have the Best Eastern Transplanted Oyste: 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



Bartlett J. L., blacksmith machine shop Southern Pacific 

R. U. , cor Sixteenth and Harrison 
Bartlett J. M., clerk R. G. Dun & Co., dwl 737 Howard 
Bartlett Job C, diuyman, cor First and Natoma, dwl 122 

Etldy 
Bartlett Nathaniel, flonrpacker F. D. Conro & Son, dwl 

1024 Montgomery 
Bartlett riiuy (Hallftt, B. A Daltmil, res Oakland Point 
Bartlett Robert, hostler 3. & R, Smith, dwl 344 Brannan 
Bartlett Robert B., porter Macondray & Co., dwl 33^ Moss 
Bartlett Washington (Bartlett d; Randolph), dwl 1104 

Market 
Bartlett William, cook Windsor House 
BAHETLKTT M'lLLIAM C, Bulletin editorial rooms, 

517 CI;iy, res Oakalnd 
Bartlett William S., noteteller National Gold Bank and 

Trust Co., res Oakland 
Bartlett W. P., compositor A. L. Bancroft & Co., dwl 29 

O'Farrell 
BAItTLETT A PRATT iColumlm^ Bartlett and 

L'.'iinidas E. Pratt), attorneys at law. office 636 Sac 
BAKTJLKTT A" RAXDOLPIfi {Watihington Bartlett 
and Daniel L. Randolph/, real-estate and money- 
brokers, office 12 Montgomery 
Bartley Frank, boilennaker, dwl 125 Dora 
Bartley George, boilermaker, dwl 125 Dora 
Bartley George, laborer Pac. Rolling Mills, dwl E 9 Illinois 

bet Napa and Shasta 
Bartling William fBartlhig d- KimballJ, res Fourteenth 

bet Castro and Brush, Oakland 
Bartling & Kimball fWilliam Bartling and Henrif Kim- 
ball) , bookbinders and blank book manufs, 505 Clay 
Bartlow William (colored), bootblack Stable & Bernhard, 

dwl Pacific bet Dupont and Kearny 
Bartly Maninn, laborer Potrero and B. V. R. R. 
Bartmann Antone, carpenter, dwl 2219 Powell 
Bartmann Charles, laborer, dwl SW cor Shasta and Mich- 
igan 
Bartmann Ferdinand, carpenter, dwl 522 Filbert, rear 
Bartmann John (Phelan <i- BJ , dwl IIS Berry 
Bartmann John C, teacher music, dwl 729 Grove 
Bartnett Thomas, porter Occidental Hotel, dwl 334 Third, 

rear 
Baniicklow George R., carpenter, dwl 1037^ Folsoni 
Banilcklow George R. Mrs., dressmaker, dwll037A^ Folsom 
Barto Harrison i Spauldlng & B.J , dwl E s Reed nr Clay 
Barto Mary Mrs., housekeeper, dwl 3 Caroline PI 
Bartola S., fisherman. Clay St. Wharf 
Bartolasa Joseph, glazier, dwl 1413 Dupont 
Bartolomeo Periano, cook, 723 Sansom 

BLirtun , stevedore Menzies & Bingham 

Barton Alfred, brassfinisher William T. Garratt, dwl 105 

Montgomerj' Block 
B;n-tnn Benjamin F. (B, F. Barton & CoJ^ res Alameda 
I'.nlnn B. F. & Co., proptrs Pioneer Salt Mills, 213 Sac 
I. utt.n Charles C, salesman, dwl 128 Clara 
J'.iiton Frederick, foundrjnnan, dwl 740 Harrison 
liLi.rt^n George, dwl 418 Brannan 
liLLrtijn C^orge, dwl W s Missicm bet Twenty-fourth and 

Twenty-fifth 
E:irtun George, stairbuilder Dillon & Drew 
Iiurtuu Hiram Jr., student Heald's Business College 
Bitrtiin James, boot and shoemaker, 819 Battery 
B:irton James, pipemaker Francis, Smith Sl Co., dwl 281 

Minna 
Barton John, manager Union Pacific Salt Co., 218 Sacra- 
mento, res Alameda 
Burton Patrick, butcher, dwl N 3 Eleventh Av nr Q, South 

S. F. 
Iiurtcn Phineas W., clerk Firemana Fund Insurance Co., 

res Alameda 
I'iLrtuu Richard, watchmaker Cornell Watch Co., dwl 348 

Fourth 
BAfiCTO\ ICOBFRT, mining engineer, office 422 Mont- 

gonier\-. dwl 111^0 Bush 
Barton S. M. fS. M. Barton 6: Co.), dwl 615 Post 
Barton S. M. iS: Co., moneybrokers. 2.38 Montgomery' 
Burton Thomas, actor Bella Union Tlieater, dwl 812 Jack 
Burton Thomas S., clerk N. B. Edgerly k Co., dwl 759 Clay 
Lurtun Willard T., clerk Union Pacific Salt Co., dwl 620 

iiUis 
Barton William, dwl 1040^ Howard 
Barton William, painter, dwl 1232 Union 
Bartun William, sawjer S. F. Manufacturing Co., dwl 1415 

Pacific 
Barton William, stevedore, dwl W a Stockton bet Fran- 
cisco and Bay 
Bartun William H., stockbroker and reporter Evening 
Post, dwl 2428 Buchanan 



Eartram John, bookkeeper Stange & Hink, dwl 112 Polk 

Barts John, tailor, 522 Pine 

Baruch Moses, bookkeeper J. Eisenberg, dwl 1522 Powell 

Bai-uch Pauline Mrs., midwife, dwl 252 Minna 

Baruch Simon, salesman S. Leszynsky & Bros., dwl 371 

Jessie 
Barut Raymond, market, 1402 Stockton 
Baruth William, groceries and liquors, KW cor H^'de and 

Sutter 
Barwell Charles, waiter 605 Commercial 
Brfrwes Alexander, barkeeper Park Hotel 
Barz August ( Barz (ic Suhl', dwl 257 Perry 
Barz & Suhl {Aitgust Barz and Chri^itian F. Suhl), 
blacksmiths and wagonmakers, NE cor Drunun and 
Commercial 
Basaine Felix, machinist, dwl 421 Dupont 
Basalt Co., office 216 Bush 
Basch Abraham fBasch ifc Co.), dwl 518 Pacific 
Basch Henry, hairdresser with Jacob Burger, dwl 320 

Dupont 
Basch Samuel fBasch d; Co J, dwl 518 Pacific 
Basch & Co. {Samuel Ba-'ich, Abraham Basch, and Fe- 
lix Kior), tailors, 1202 Market 
Bascom Absolem, cai-penter, d\\l 207 Second 
Bascom Decious, foreman Wesley Dig^ns, dwl N s Sutter 

bet Devisadero and Broderick 
Bascom Lewis S., clerk Mark L. McDonald, dwl 109 

O'Farrell 
Bascom M. M., tinsmith H. G. Fiske, dwl 207 Second 
Baseombe Annie Miss, dressmaker, dwl 32 Tyler 
Bascon Jean, butcher Borel & Baylc, dwl Fifth Av bet L 

and M, South S. F. 
Basey David, carpenter, dwl 22 Turk 
Basford Jacob K., capitahst, dwl 917 Geary 
Basford W. L., druggist, SE cor Bush and Fillmore 
Bash Heyman, tailor, 2 Bryan PI, dwl 359A Tehama 
Basilisco Luigi, barkeeper Louis Rismondo, dwl 629 Davis 
Bashford Edward, musician, dwl 227 Second 
Basker\'ine Aurelia, glovemaker Pacific Glove Works, dwl 

30 Silver 
Baskerville James, gardener, dwl S s Geary bet Devisa- 
dero and Broderick 
Baskerville John, machinehand L. & E. Emanuel, dwl 591 

Sixth 
BaskerWlle Richard D., hairdresser, dwl 591 Sixth 
Easier George A., painter, dwl 29 Pearl 
Basney John H., machinist Cornell Watch Co., dwl 841 

Harrison 
Basque Henrj', sugar dealer, dwl 700 Broadway 
Basquill John, carpenter Palace Hotel, dwl 846 Market 
Bass Addie Miss, dwl 433 Jessie 
Bass Julia Miss, teacher music, dwl 433 Jessie 
Bass Thomas J. (T. J. Bass «t Co.;, dwl S s Fifteenth 

between Market and Noe 
BAS^ T, J. A, CO., paints, oils, varnish, and glass, 

26 Geary 
Bass William, calker, dwl 625 Vallejo 
Bassalla Giovanni, painter with G. B. Deferrari, dwl 625 

Vallejo 
Bassart Charles E., wood and coal, 128 O'Farrell, dwl 12 

Oak Grove Av 
Bassart Peter, poultry dealer, dwl 12 Oak Grove Av 
Basse Thomas, merchant, office 526 California, res Bremen, 

Germany 
Bassen Joseph, driver Enterprise Brewery, dwl 2019 Fol 
Bassett A. C., general freight agent and assistant super- 
intendent Southern Pac. R. R., NE cor Fourth and 
Townsend room 45, dwl 906 Market 
Bassett C. F. &l Co., produce commission merchants, 219 

Washington 
Bassett Charles F. (C. F. Bassett d: Co.), dwl W s Mis- 
sion opp Twelfth 
Bassett Charies W., clerk, dwl 221 Second 
Bassett Daniel M., assistant engineer Pacific Mail S. S. 

Alaska, dwl 58 Clementina 
Bassett Frank W., barkeeper, dwl 114 Eleventh 
Bassett Harrj' C, carrier Figaro, res Oakland 
Bassett James, laborer Palace Hotel 
Bassett John, watchman Mission Rock Dock, dwl 3 

Townsend 
BASSETT JIOSEPn, produce commission, 221 Clay, 

res Fruit Vale, Alameda Co. 
Bassett Martin L., mechanic, dwl NW cor Church and 

Jersey 
Bassett Nathaniel, dwl 114 Eleventh 
Bassett Robert, clerk S. F. Directory Office, res East Oak- 
land 
Bassett William H., dwl 114 Eleventh 
Bassi Guiseppe, dwl 620 Post 



ACIPIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOEY Contains Addresses 60,000 Merchants. 



PINE WATCHES and JEWELRY for Sale Tjy D. W. Laird, 513 Montgomery. 



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Bassi L., boilermaker with Fnincis I. Curry I 

Bassignano Peter, express wag'on, NE cor Montgomery and 

Sacramento, dwl 5-20 Seventh 
BassiUio Jo'^eph, engineer Black Diamond Coal Co., dwl 

SE cor Union and Calhoun 
Bassini Beniardo, metennau S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 1327 

California 
Bassity James E., plasterer, dwl 113 Jones 
Bastheim Joseph (Eimtcin Bros. <t- Co.), dwl 82S O'Far- 

rell 
Basthorn Herman, bootmaker A. Utschig, dwl 25 Morton 
Busfian Jacob (Mesmer i{- BJ, dwl 398 Pacific 
Bastile F., waiter stni Ajax, Oregon S. S. Co., 
Bastin Florence, fanner, dwl 411 Pacific 
Bastin H. JI., dwl Russ House 
Bast-m Freeman A., expressman Kohler, Chase & Co., dwl 

1020 McAllister 
Baston Joseph G., clerk Waterhouse & Lester, dwl 1209 

Cnay 
Batavia John, dwl 737 Howard 
Bat,avia Patrick, hairdresser, dwl 419 Fourth 
Batchel Thomas, mth A. Redowich, NW cor Folsom and 

Steuart 
Bat^helder David F., farmer, dwl W s Lobos Creek nr 

Cemeterj' Resei-vation 
Batchelder Henrj', eashmaker Excelsior Mills, dwl 25 
. Warren 

VBatchelder Hiram, carrier Alta and Bulletin, dwl 930 Clay 
Batchelder James, laborer L Friedlander's Mission Bay 
/ Warehouse, dwl Fairmont Tract 
Batchelder John R., carpenter W. L. Bovj'er, dwl 613 
V Grove 

BJitchelder Le\'i L., stevedore, dM-1 1026 Clay 
IlatdioMer T.. captain brig- Orient, ofiice 44 Market 
But .iKlder William H., housemover. dwl 114 Austin 
I6AT<-HKt«R EI^>VARD P., attoniey at law, office 

7 Mitntg'imery Block, and prosecuting attorney Police 

Court, dwl Windsor House 
Bat<'he]or Henr\-, butcher Werner & Lincoln, dwl SW cor 

Clay and Polk 
Batchelor N., carpenter, dwl SE cor Bush and Polk 
Bateman Henry C, bookseller, dwl 43 Tehama 
Bateman Isaac C, mining, office 419 California room 7, 

dwl 5.'i5 Harrison 
Bateman James, bootmaker Patrick Kenney, 
Bateman Joshua, longshoreman, dwl Columbia Hotel 
Bateman Michael C, real estate, dwl NW cor Paciffic Av 

and Gough 
Bateman William, cabinetmaker Pac. Furniture M. Co. , 

dwl 725 Harrison 
Bateman William A., liven' stable, 353 Tehama 
Batenick Anthon, cook Miller & Hacker, dwl 421 Fourth 
Batersby Frederick, wheelwritrht, dwl S Minna 
Bates Alfred, teacher University College, dwl 1404 Van 

Ness Av 
Bates Asher B. (widow), dwl 705 Bush 
Bates Catherine (widow), dwl 7(54 Harrison, rear 
Bates Carrie Miss, teacher LTniversity College, dwl 1404 

Van Ness Av 
Bates Charles, teamster George Meyer, dwl 1142 Mission 
Bates Cicero M., physician, office 137 Montgomery, and 

professor clinical medicine University California, dwl 

20G Powell 
Bates C. P., dentist Henr>' Da\-is, dwl 749 Folsom 
Bates Daniel S., night inspector Custom House, dwl 231 

Stevenson 
Bates Dudley C, with S. B. Boswell & Co., dwl 1705 Oo- 

t-avia 
Bates Edward K., bootmaker Thomas Mxu-phy, dwl 1124 

Market 
Bates Elizabeth (widow), dwl 1404 Van Ness Av 
Bates Eugene J., shipping clerk Crane & Brigham, dwl 

704 Harrison 

Bates Felix J W., millwright, dwl SW cor Bush and Pierce 

Bates George, clerk, dwl 411 Pacific 

Bates George, principal University College, SE cor Stock- 
ton and Geary, dwl 1404 Van Ness Av 

Bates George, teamster H. N. Tribou, dwl 431 Fulton 

Bates James, coalpasser Pacific Mail S. S. Orizaba 

Bates James, dwl 403 Broadway 

Bates James, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 

Bates J. C, carpenter Palace Hotel 

Bates John, master schr Ximrod, office 5 Spear 

Bates John S., gardener, dwl 52(J Oak 

BATE.S JOSKPII <'., attorney at law, office 434 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 2520 Clav 

Bates K. E. (widow), dwl 622 Fourth 

Bates Morris S., cashier William Blanchard & Co., dwl 

705 Bush 



Bates Morris Upham, commercial editor Evening Post, 

dwl 700 Post 
Bates Samuel, master mariner, dwl 6 Powell 
Bates William, street contractor, dwl S 8 Twenty-second 

nr San Jos6 Av 
Bates William H., carpenter, dwl 211 Stevenson 
Bateson James H., tailor, dwl 7 Clementina 
Batey John, painter, dwl 429 Francisco 
Batias Inocencio, seaman Pacific Mail S. S. Winchester 
Batisse Emanuel, captain stm Clara Crow, dwl 16 Ohio 
Batista Garibaldi Jan, laborer Bay Sugar Refinerj- 
Batister John, seaman, dwl 119 Jackson 
Bator Tliomas, seaman stm Los Angeles, Market St. 

WTiarf 
Batsere John, cook Fran^-ois Lacoste, dwl 1116 Bryant 
Batt Jacob, tailor, dwl G23 Minna 
Battaile Albert P., waiter, 614 Clay 
Battanis William, salesman Locke & Montague, dwl Oc- 
cidental Hotel 
Battel Alexander, seaman, dwl 117 Drumm 
Batten Sampson, stonecutter, dwl S s California bet 

Broderick and Baker 
Batten Samuel f Batten tt Mullen), dwl California bet 

Broderick and Decker 
Batten & Mullen f Samuel Batten and Michael Mullen), 

stonecutters, N s Geary nr Central Av 
Battersby F., blacksmith John Higgins, dwl 8 Minna 
Battersby J., mining expert, dwl 533 Sacramento 
Battersby James, watchmaker, 13 Third, dwl 709 Mission 
Battersby Robert, mining engineer, office 640 Clay, dwl 

Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Battery St. Bonded Warehouse, George C. Bode pro- 
prietor, cor Batten' and Filbert 
B4.TTEI'X WAXDEL, vrinQS and liquors, 34 Kearny, 

dwl 41Si Sixth 
Batteux Frederick W., artist, studio and dwl 105 Mont 
Battin James, seaman, dwl 43S Steuart 
Batting William, coalpasser stm William Taber, Market 

St. "Rliarf 
Battle Joseph, tailor, dwl 410 Broadway 
Battles John Jr., proprietor King St. House, S 8 King nr 

Third 
Battolone Mazzeti, milkman, N s Greenwich bet Pierce 

and Steiner 
Battu Hippolyte Jr., painter, dwl 731 O'Farrell 
Battu Zoe (widow), dwl 731 O'Farrell 
Batturs Edward T., manager Frank G. Edwards, dwl 521 

Leavenwdrth 
Battv William J., coupe Plaza 

Batziier Philip, laborer John A. Hefner, dwl 722 Har 
Bauch Peter O., custom-house broker, 500 Battery, dwl 

719 Union 
Baucher Henry, bookkeeper Folsom Laundry, S s Six- 
teenth nr Valencia 
Baud Fnmk. brassfinisher, 522 Fidton 
Bauer Abi-aham (Baxir d- Tohrincr), res Paris 
Bauer Adolj^h, clerk, dwl 339 Jessie 
Bauer Adolphe, fringemaker, dwl 1007 Natoma 
Bauer Alex. . ranchhand John Schaeter, Mission and Ocean 

Beach Road 
Bauer Brothers /"Jfoses and Sa7rtWcZ;, fancy drj' goods, 

410 Kearny 
Bauer C. A., miner, dwl 110 Sutter 
Bauer Catharine (wdow), ladies' nurse, dwl 109 Dora, 

rear 
Bauer Charles A., saloonkeeper, dwl 1143 Misrsion 
Bauer Charies H. F., policeman City Hall, dwl 717 Clem 
Bauer Conrad, molder Joseph Schmadel, dwl SW cor 

Fremont and Howard 
BA|:EK E^lllE (White X- B.), dwl 2100 Jones 
Bau6r Emile E., wines and liquors. 1042 Folsom (and 

Bauer 1- Bcncger), dwl 10.'S5^ Folsom 
Bauer Francis, shipping master, 10 Clay 
Bauer Frank, laborer Stand & Bro., dwl W^illiam Tell 

Hotel 
Bauer lYederick C, druggist John A. Bauer, dwl 716 

Broadway 
Bauer G. A., 'sewing-machine agent, dwl 506 Market 
BAITER 4;E0K0E, proprietor Hayes Valley House, 

114 Hayes 
Bauer Heiiirich, farmhand Louis Anzeuhofer, E s Ocean 

House Road nr Industrial School 
Bauer Henry, dwl 220 Pacnfic 

Bauer Henrj', upholsterer John C. Bell, dwl 1511 Cal 
Bauer Hernian, gilder Snow & May, dwl cor Castro and 

Thirtieth 
Bauer Jacob, clerk 12 S. F. Market 

Bauer John (Chapman d-Bj,dv:\ Es Fillmore nr Waller 
Bauer John, farmer Francisco McAeel, dwl 1927 Howard 



MOEGAN & CO., 87 California Market, deals in all kinds of Fresh Oysters. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 70S, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



IS.il'ER JOIIX A., manufacturing chemist and drug- 
gist, 101 Post, dwl 71(J Broadway 
Bautrr John F., milkman, Bay View, South S. F. 

Bauer Jnsei)h, car]ienter, dwl 15 Gilbert 

Bauer Karl, milktr iiuhland Bros., dwl N s Central Road 

nr Uuldc-n Gate Park 
Bauer Leopold, expressman, SEcorVallejo and Stockton, 

dwl NE cor Hyde and Union 
Bauer Louis, clerk, dwl 870 Folsom 

Bauer Louis X., clerk, dwl NW cor Natoma and Twelfth 
Bauer Moses (Baufr BrothersJ, dwl 1102 Pine 
Bauer Peter, blacksmith, dwl 1321i Stockton 
Bauer Samuel (Baner Brothersj , dwl lloi Pine 
Bauer Simon fKuppenheim <i- BJ, dwl 4 St. Mary PI 
Bauer William, caudymaker Pellet & Falu-bach, dwl 271 

Stevenson 
Bauer William, usher California Theater 
Bauer & Keineger (Emile E. Bauer and Charles Rein- 

eijcrj, stoves and tinware, 1056 Folsom 
Bauer & Tobriner /Abraham Bauer and Matthew To- 

briner), fancy goods, laces, and emboideries,547 Market 
Bauerle John, carpenter, dwl 732 Union 
Baugh Anna (widow), dwl 2020 Sacramento 
Baiigh Frederick, machinist, dwl 274 Jessie 
Baugh Theodore E., real estate, dwl 25 South Park 
Baultius Biurell K., carpenter, dwl 1423 Hyde 
Baul William, butcher Herman Schneider, dwl 18 Morton 
Baulsir Nnin^.id {Hanson d- B.J, dwl 1332 Washington 
BAa.'^lI tHASlLSiS {Charles Baum and Charles Ed- 
word ilcisc', custom-house brokers, 510 Battery 
BAI'M 4.'l9.iALES, consul Argentine Republic, office 

510 Batteiy, dwl 1705 Powell 
Eaum David A., clerk Liverpool and London and Globe 

Insurance Co., dwl 615 Bush 
Eaum Gustave, furniture, 740 Wash, dwl 1112 Leavenworth 
Baum Hyman, dwl 1112 Leavenwurth 
BAI'M J, tt CO. {Henry and Morris Shricr J, importers 

and manufacturers clothing, 21S and 220 Sansom 
Eaum Juhn T., cabinetmaker, dwl U07 Stockton 
Baum Julius {J. Baum 6: CuJ, dwl 1111 Van Ness Av 
Baum Philip, dwl 1112 Leavenworth 
Bauni Simon {Simon Baum cfc Co J, dwl 303A Turk 
BAIMI SHMOA' Jfe CO. (Solomo^n CohnJ , importers and 

jobbers men's furnishing goods, 217 and 219 Pine 
Bauman Charles, tailor, dwl 1108 Stockton 
Bauman George {Flanz iL- BaunuinJ, dwl 531 Natoma 
Bauman Henry, barkeeper, 630 Sac, dwl 5i Monroe 
Bauman Lewis, tailor, dwl SIS Folsom 
Bauman Louis, tailor Plaiiz & Bauman, dwl 531 Natoma 
Baimian Mary Miss, photog-raph finisher Houseworth & 

Co., dwl SIS Folsom 
Baumann Bertha, fortuneteller, NW cor Montgomery Av 

and Filbert 
Bamuann Henry, saloon, NW cor Mont Av and Filbert 
Baumann H. H., real-estate agent, otfice 502 Montgomery, 

dwl 007 Clay 
Baumann John, musician, dwl 707 McAllister 
Bamnann Sigmund, bookkeeper, Levi Strauss & Co., dwl 

502 Bush 
Baumann WiUiam, machinist Walkmgton & Wagner, dwl 

213 Dupont 
Baumard Henry, tinsmith, dwl 721 Pacific 
Baiunberger Eliza Mrs., teacher music, dwl W 8 Octavia 

bet Oak and Fell 
Baumberger James M., bookkeeper Breeze & Loughran, 

dwl W s Octavia bet Oak and Fell 
Baumeister Amiie Miss, dwl 510 Pacific 
Baunieister Bernard, law student, dwl 13 Verona PI 
Baumeister Heniy, laundr^inan S. F. Laundry, NW cor 

Turk and Fillmore 
Baumeister John {Baumeister cfc Heinz), dwl 1036 How- 
ard, rear 
Bamucister Joseph, sashmaker William B. Bradbury, dwl 

1^219 Powell 
Baumeister A: Heinz (John BauTneuster and Philip 

Heinz J, liquors, 113 Sbcth 
Baumgardner K. M. ilrs., vice-principal Deninan Gram- 
mar School, dwl 1024 Bush 
Baumgardner Jacob, milker William Hall, dwl Visitacion 

\'alley Road bet San Jose and San Bruno roads 
Baumgardner S. J., clerk, dwl 1024 Bush 
BaumgartenCarl/'JA £7;i)/wn7iX- Co.;, res Pesth, Hungary 
Baumgarten Jenny Mrs., second-hand clothing, 732 Pac 
Baunigarten Joseph, cashier M. Ullmann iS: Co., dwl 742 

Washington 
L.r.iiiigarten Solomon, clerk Mrs. J. Bamngarten, dwl 732 

Pacific 
Baunigartner Peter, laborer F. Fortmann & Co., dwl 267 

Tehama 



Baumgartuer V. & Co. f Valentine BauingartnerJ , tobacco 

factory, 23 Seventh 
Baunigartner Valentine {V. Baumtjartner tfc Co.), dwl 

614 Natoma 
Baup Jean Maire, butcher Dengler & Blum, dwl Railroad 

Av nr Second Av, South S. F. 
Baurhyte Isabella (widow), dwl 431 Natoma 
Baurhyte Isaac, engineer stm Pacific 
Bausher Jay D., salesman Eugelbrecht & Levy, dwl Cos- 
mopolitan Hotel 
BA8 S.^iAX WILLIAM, editor Morning Call, office 517 

CLu", dwl 552 .Minna 
Bauten Frank, tiiilor, dwl 2 St. Mary 
Bauten Nicholas J. { N icholas J Bauten & Co.;, dwl 228 

Branuau 
Bauten Nicholas J. &Co. (William Muche) ,^ocQviQsa.xid. 

liquors, 228 Braunan 
Bauth James, clerk, dwl 320 Sansom 
Baux F. A., real estate, office 29 Merchants' Exchange, res 

Oakland 
Baux J. B., real estate, office 29 Merchants' Exchange, res 

Oakland 
Bauz Joseph, cabinetmaker, dwl cor Oak and Octavia 
Bavaria Brewery, Frauenholz & Davison proprietors, 

Montgomery Av bet Vallejo and Green 
Baxter C. G., shoejuaker, dwl 234 Oak 
Baxter Charles, clerk, dwl 322 Turk 
Baxter Charles T., shoefitter Buckingham & Heeht, dwl 

709 Jones 
Baxter Edward H., salesman Crane & Brigham, dwl 1109 

Howard 
Baxter Frank C, operator Edouart & Cobb, dwl 830 Miss 
Baxter Hall W., cashier Crane & Brigham, dwl S s EUis 

bet Fillmore and Steiner 
Baxter Hem-y, laborer, dwl 209 Leidesdorff 
Baxter James, engineer, dwl 34 Louisa 
Baxter James, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Baxter John, painter John J. Cooney, dwl 79 Everett 
Baxter Joseph P., special policeman, dwl 2 Jasper PI 
Baxter L. L. (widow), dwl 1109 Howard 
Baxter Mathew, tanner Cornelius O'Donuell, dwl 11 

Geneva 
Baxter Patrick, laborer, dwl 17 Harrison Av 
Baxter William, saddler, dwl 438 Brannan 
Baxter WiUiam H., secretary Cal. Fanners' Mutual Fire 

Ins. Assn, office Leidesdorff, res Napa 
Baxter William S., clerk S. F. Assaying and Refining 

Works, res Oakland 
Bay City Soda Water Co., F. R. Wilson secretary, 87 and 

89 Stevenson 
Bay Brewery, Weyand & Kasche proprietors, 612 and 616 

Seventh 
BAY a>l!^TKICT FAIR GKOtIND ASSOCLlTIOiV, 

office 411^ California room 3 
Bay John, baker Jacob Schneider, dwl 115 Oak 
Bay Salt Co., A. Giorgiani agent, 421 Washmgton 
BAY Slj>>AK REl-'li^lEUV, Herman Meese president, 

Peter Meyer secretary, SW cor Battery and Union 
BAY VIKW OISTILLEUY, Andrew A. Louderback 

pruptr, cor Nineteenth Av and H, South S. F., office t 

and salesroom 313 and 315 Battery 
Bay View Homestead Association, I. T. Milliken secretary, 

office 302 Montgomery 
Bay View Nursery, Alfred Brocq proprietor, NE cor 

Twenty-first Av and J, South S. F. 
BAY W.iKEBaOrSE, John Melville proprietor, W s 

Sansom bet Lombard and Greenwich 
Bayard George G., watchman Pacific Mail S. S. Colorado 
Bayard Jose O., barkeeper, dwl 814 Sacramento 
Bayer Jacob, liquor saloon, Jackson 
Bayer Joseph, metal roofer Conlm & Roberts, dwl 017 

Stevenson 
Bayer William, sugar refiner, dwl 32 Rausch 
Bayle John {Borel d: Bj, dwl Fifth Av bet L and M, 

South S. F. 
Bayless Charles, printer B. Dore & Co., dwl 8 Geneva 
Bayless Joseph A., draftsman Dewey & Co., dwl 8 Geneva 
Bayless William H., architect, dwl 8 Geneva 
BAYLEY CHARLES A., Bayle/s Sample Rooms, G59 

Clay, dwl 1214 Powell 
Bayley George B., note clerk Bank of California, res Oak- 
land 
BayJey Nathan J. fW. F. tfc iV. J. Bayley), dwl 8 Pleasant 
Bayley Pauline Mrs., physician, dwl 103 Tehama 
Bayley Thomas, hoarding, 73 Oregon 
Bayley W. F. i: N. J., photogi-aphic gallery, 526 Mont 
Bayley Wilbur F. ( W. F. a; N. J. Bayley J , dwl 1200 Bdwy 
Bayly Charles A., apothecary-, SE cor Howard and Sixth 
Bayly George, dwl 1002 Pacific Av 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIHECTOEY Circulates throughout Pacific Coast 



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Baj-ma Joseph Rev., professor mathematics, St. Ignatius 

" College, dwl S41 Jlarket 
Bayreuther Amelia (widow), dwl 253 Stevenson 
Bayreuther Clara B. Miss, dwl 253 Stevenson 
Ba*\Teuther Gustave, tinner, dwl 253 Stevenson 
Bayrouseutor Eckenzo. dwl 833 Geary 
Bays John, street contractor, dwl N s Bush bet Fillmore 

and Steiner 
Bazadioly August, with Charles Tenc^, dwl 626 Cal 
Bazan Ferdinand, physician, office and dwl SE cor How- 
ard and Twenty-tirst 
Bazier T. Miss, dressmaker, dwl 655 Washington 
Bazin Louise Madam, Children's Home, 1633 Mission 
Biizin Victor, tailor, dwl 1633 Missiun 
Bazzini Marco, laborer Jubn C. Poetz, dwl cor Sacramento 

and Dupunt 
Bazzm-o Francisco, restaurant and oyst-er saloon, 105 Pac 
Beahan Edward, trackcleaner Market St. R. R., S s Ber- 

nal Heights nr I^lais CYeek 
Beahan John, butcher, dwl E s Dolores nr Sixteenth 
Beaheu Thomas, laborer Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl cor Si- 
erra and Louisiana 
Beach Andrew C, clerk George Green, Dunbar Alley 
Beach August B., blacksmith, dwl S3 Stevenson 
Beach Carrie A. (\Wdow), dwl SW cor Howard and Eight- 
eenth 
Beach Chilion, books and stationery, 5 Montgomerj', dwl 

Grand Hotel 
Beach C. \V., with Califoniia Chemical Pamt Co-, dwl S s 

Twenty-second bet Folsora and Shotwell 
Beach Elizabeth Mrs., weaver Mission and Pac. Woolen 

Mills, dwl Sizteenth bet Mission and Howard 
Beach George H., salesman Mavrisch Bros. & Co., dwl 18 

Taylor 
Beach Henrv H., accountant Wellman, Peck & Co., dwl 

228 Turk 
Beach Henn' Martin, clerk City and County Auditor, dwl 

1209 Taylor 
Beach Horace, cashier U. S. Mint, office NW cor Fifth and 

Mission, dwl 534 Bush 
Beach John, porter Simon H. Tjier, dwl 1106 Mason 
Beach John C. proprietor Adams House, 537 Sacramento 
Beach Joseph, t«amster Richard PenT, dwl cor Polk and 

Bush 
Beach Joseph G., ceiling decorator, 627 California, dwl 

ISll Stockton 
Beach Robert, truckman, dwl SE cor Bush and Polk 
Beach Thomas P. . mining secretary', office 424 Montgomery 
Beach Tyler, president California Chemical Paint Co., of- 
fice 308 Tuwnsend. res San Jose 
Beach & Paxon Gold and Silver Mining Co. (Storey Co., 

Nev.), office 507 Montgomery' 
Beach. See Beech 

Beachy Hill, capitalist, dwl 1007 Sutter 
BEAULE DONALD* shipping and commission mer- 
chant and agent steamers Empire and Eastport for 
Cooa Bay, and stm Man," Taylor for Point Arenas, 
office 106 Davis, dwl NW cor Fultiin and Lagima 
Beagan John, laborer, dwl 22 Bluxome 
Beajena Frolindo. liquor saloon, San Josti Road nr St. 

Mary's College 
Beakley John S., physician, office and dwl 532 Geary 
Beal Da\id, conductor, dwl 30 Freelon 
Beal Nathaniel, funiiture and bedding, 772 and 774 How 
Beal Samuel, manufacturer of mattresses, 675 Mission, 

dwl 2526 Clay 
Beal William, laborer E. Fanning, dwl 320 Chestnut 
Boal William B. (Beal .(• Cu. \ dwl 417 Keamy 
Beal William L., mattressniakcr Samuel Beal, dwl 2526 

Clay 
Beal Williani T. fJ^fian *t BJ, dwl 217 Third 
Beal & Co. }WiUiam B. Beal and H. DopsonJ, liquor 

saloon, NW cor Sacramento and Keamy 
Beale J., mason Palace Hotel 
Beale John, machinist, dwl y74 Harrison, rear 
Beale John, machinist Walkingt<»n dt Wagner, dwl 414 

Ft '1 sum 
Beale Richard F., marblecutter J. & A. Morris, dwl 974 

Harrison, rear 
BEALE ST. SAMIXO AND PLAXIXG MILL, 
Daniel D. Hulland proprietor, NW cor Beale and 
Mission 
Beale St. Warehouse, Patrick Ryan & Co. proprietors, 

NE cor Beale and BnTint 
Beale St. Wliarf. foot Beale 
Beale Thomas Mrs. (widow), dwl N s Chestnut bet Taylor 

and Jones 
Beale William, laborer Palace Hotel 
Beale WilUam, rigger, dwl 074 Harrison, rear 



Beales John T., stockbroker, 712 Montgomerj*. dwl 1004 

Hyde 
Beales Moses H., carpenter, dwl 3 William 
Beall Samuel W., observer Signal Service V. S. A., office 

and dwl 42 Merchants" Exchange 
Beals Caroline R. Mrs., assistant Girls' High School, dwl 

1204 Leavenworth 
Beals Charles W., pressman John H. Carmany & Co., dwl 

2101 California 
Beals E. C, furrier Lachman & Stemfels, dwl 2101 Cal 
BEALS H. t'llAWIXG, editor Commercial Herald 
and Market Review, office 409 Washuigton, dwl 2101 
California 
Beals John P., printer and engraver Mathias Gray, res 

Alameda 
Bealke William, boarding, SW cor Battery and Green 
Beam Charles, laborer Vlznia & Co., dwl 209 Leidesdorff 
Beam Joel M., cook, dwl 826 Green, rear 
Beam John, butcher, dwl E s Dolores nr Sixteenth 
Beam Peter G., agent Michigan Central R. R., office 240 

MontgonierTi-, dwl Lick House 
Beam Peter M., contractor, dwl 532 Chestnut 
BEAM I*. C;,, general agent Michigan Central and Great 
Western R. R,, office 140 Mont, dwl Lick House 
Bearaan Margaret (widow), dwl 1003 Pacific 
Beaman Orlando, hatter Charles J. Collins, 321 Mont 
Beaman. See Beeman 
Beamish Abraham, laborer, dwl 714 Grove 
Beamish Jubn, bootmaker George Burkhardt, dwl 714 

Grove 
Beamish John, laborer 647 Commercial, dwl Railroad 

Lodging House 
Beamish Percy, importer and manufacturer clothing, 
shirts, and furnishing goods, 691 and 693 Market, dwl 
2130 Howard 
Bean Annie Mrs., furnished rooms, 1110 Market 
Bean Charles, Ship Calkers' Assn, 713 Mission 
Bean Daniel, porter National Hotel 

Bean David, drajTnan Albert Man & Co, , dwl 232 Stevenson 
Bean Edwin F., 'salesman James H. Deering, dwi 30 Kear 
Bean Ernst, carpenter, 233 Fourth, dwl 533 Bn.'ant 
Bean George W., sailmaker Harding & Braun, dwl 1011 

Broadway 
Bean James, engineer Jonathan Kittredge, dwl N side 

T\venty-fifth bet Noe and Castro 
Bean James, Shipwrights' Jour. Assn, 71 New Mont 
Bean John, plasterer Palace Hotel 
Bean John D., cook Alexander Williams, dwl 239 Miima, 

rear 
Bean Joseph, hairdresser Henry I. Jacobs, dwl 130 Fourth 
Bean Joseph W., shipjoiner California Mills, dwl 146 

Second 
Bean Moses T., master mariner, dwl 1011 Broadway 
Bean Redmond, stevedore A. C. Freese 
Bean Simon, master mariner, office 10 Clay 
Bean William, clerk, dwl 1110 Market 
Bean WilUam, truckman, dwi 35 Park Av 
Bean. See Bien 
Beanston George, secretary Board of Education, dwl 13 

Verba Buena 
Beanston Peter, carriagesmith JohnB. Morrison, dwl W s 

Hullis bet Ellis and O'Farrell 
Bear Edwin, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 54 First 
Bear Jacob, butcher L. Poly & Co., dwl S s Twelfth Av nr 

Railroad Av, South S. F. 
Bear S., moneybroker, 140 Montgomery, dwl 1215 Polk 
Beard Geoi^'e, stevedore Menzies &. Bingham, dwl N s 

Greenwich bet Montgomery- and Sansom 
Beard Henn, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Beard John, boilermaker McAfee, Spiers & Co., dwi 240 

Towiisend 
Beard Joseph R., mining secretary, office 331 Montgom- 

en.' room 12, dwi 704 Howard 
Beard Mathew, fireman stm WilUam Taber, Market St. 

"VMiarf 
Beard Thomas K., dwi 439 Minna 
Beardsley Cj-rus, carpenter, dwi 436 Union 
Beardsley Frank, plumber and gasfitter, dwi IS Minna 
Beardsley George F., lather Palace Hotel, dwl SW cor 

Seventh and Brannan 
Beardsley Harrison, painter, dwi 207 Minna 
Beardsley Ining W., butcher Meyer Rosenberg, dwl 114 

Hayes 
Beardsley James, engineer and foreman Pacific Commer- 
cial Co., dwl 654 Minna 
Beardslev John H., accountant, office 6 Court Block 636 

Clay, dwi 910 Taylor 
Beardsley S. A., purser Pacific MaU S. S. Colima 
Beardsley Samuel A., rancher, dwi 220 Stockton 



MOEGAN & CO., Wholesale Oyster Dealers, 87 California Market. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Eeamy, Established 1852. 



Beardsley Sophie (widow), dwl 316 O'Farrell 

Bearmau T., cabinetmaker Kimball Manuf. Co., 

Beursing James, seaman, dwl 39 Jackson 

Bearwald Jacob, printer Edward Bosqui & Co., dwl 917 
Tehama 

Beanvald Marks, cutter Joseph Lucier, dwl 719 Tehama 

Bearward , dwl 328 Jessie 

Beasan Louis, painter, dwl 112 Polk 

Beaslej' Edward S., schoolteacher Advent Church, dwl 
4:^0 Brjaut 

Beasley Georg-e, bricklayer Palace Hotel, dwl 517 Mission 

Beasley John, cook Morton House 

Beasley J. P. , fireman stm C. M. Small, Commercial St. 
WHiarf 

Beasley Lewis, molder Union Iron Works 

Beasley Philip S., salesman Anthony J. Griffith, dwl 917 
Jones 

Beasley William, stove polisher, dwl 950 Bryant 

Beasey William, painter Hugh F. McCabe, dwl 137 Third 

Beath John M. (Martin it- JS.J, dwl 35(j Tehama 

Beathjjfe John, musician, dwl 509 Leavenworth 

Beaton Angus, shipcarpenter Pacific ilail S. S. Co.'s 
Wharf, dwl ItyU Clara 

Beaton John, shipcarpenter Middlemas & Boole 

Beaton Neil, carpenter, dwl 530 Folsom 

Beaton Pet«r, shipcarpenter, dwl 530 Folsom 

Beats , stevedore Menzies & Bingham 

Beattie David, tailor Alexander MacBeth, dwl 219 Minna 

Beattie James, laborer, dwl 520 Mission 

Beattie John W., conductor Market St. R. R., dwl 8 Fol- 
som Av 

Beattie William, cook Charles Haacke, dwl 4 Central PI 

Beatty Cliristopher, driver City R. R., dwl 31 Eleventh 

Beatty Da\id, carpenter, dwl 22 Turk 

Beatty James, clerk Murphy, Grant & Co. , dwl 31 Eleventh 

Beattv James, teamster, dwl N s Tenth Av nr Railroad 
Av, South S. F. 

Beatty J. J., painter E. H. Gadsby, dwl IS First 

Beatty John, cabinetmaker S. F. Manufacturing Co., dwl 
31 Eleventh 

Beatty John, gardener Industrial School 

Beatty Patrick, mattressmaker California Furniture Man- 
ufacturing Co., dwl 529^ O'Farrell 

Beatty Samuel, shoemaker Einstein Bros. & Co., dwl 343 



Beatty Samuel G., real estate, dwl 313 Jones 

Beatty W. A., lather Palace Hotel 

Beatty William J., hackdriver Plaza, dwl 436 Bush 

Beauchamp Frederick, salesman Solomon Bine, dwl 

W^indsor House 
Beauchamp L. O., printer, dwl 38 Sullivan's Building 
Beauhamais Mrs., embroider}', dwl 1200 Stockton 
Beaujardin Theodore G., music academy, 823 Broadway 
Beauman Horace, machinist, dwl 5G3 Minna 
Beauregard N., rollturaer Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl 425 

Fourth 
Beaver George W., capitalist, office 414 California, dwl N 

E cor Washington and Taylor 
Beaver Henn-, laborer, dwl 9 Ritch, rear 
Beaver Nathan, bookkeeper C. Klopstock & Co., dwl 327i 

Third 
Beaver Samuel E. currencyteller Bank California, dwl 

605 California 
Beaverly John A., clerk Louis Hartter, dwl 729 Folsom 
Beaxchi Prolo, dair^Tnan, dwl 510 Pacific 
Beban.Rocco, restaurant, SE cor Broadway and Dupont, 

dwl 1313 Kearny 
Bebbens Henry, cook, dwl cor First Av and Kentucky, 

South S. F. 
Bee Eartholemy, capitalist, dwl 1407 Stockton 
Becard Philoxcine, basketmaker Victor Navlet, dwl 723 

Sansom 
Bececk Charles D. (Bececk <£; PapovichJ, dwl 650 Sac 
Bececk & Papovich (Charles D. Bececk and Lucas Papo- 

vichj , chophouse, 650 Sacramento 
Bech August, blacksmith Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 

80 Stevenson 
Becher Gustave, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl Decatur 

nr Erj'ant 
Becher Henry, cook, dwl S b Ash Av bet Buchanan and 

Laguna 
Becherer A. Miss, teacher music, dwl 811 Union 
Becherer Charles F., map and chart mounter, office 622 

Clay 
Bechler Joseph H., miller Deming, Palmer & Co., dwl 116 

Sacramento 
Bechtel ilax, bookkeeper O. Fauss & Co., dwl 219 Geary 
Beck Adolphus G., accountant and teacher bookkeeping, 

432 Montgomery 



Beck Anthony H., musician Magiiire's New Theater, dwl 

809 Union 
Beck August, dwl 608 Greemvich 
Beck AugTOSt, gun and locksmith, 510 Broadway 
Beck Charles, laborers. F. P. Woolen Factory, dwl SWcor 

Francisco and Larkin 
Beck Charles, upholsterer with Henry Luchsinger & Co. , 

dwl 347 Tehama 
Beck David L., merchandise broker, office 405 Front, dwl 

18 Stanly PI 
Beck David L. Jr., clerk Jones & Co., dwl 18 Stanly PI 
Beck Edward, agent Howe S. M. Co., dwl 10 Powell 
Beck Eugene B. (Joms if- Co.), dwl 34 Rincon PI 
Beck Frederick, butcher P. Ne-ATuan, dwl 21 Carolina 
Beck Frederick E., bookkeeper Howe S. M. Co., dwl 10 

Powell 
Beck George, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 533 Miaa 
Beck George, miner, dwl 619 Pacific 
Beck Gottlob, gold and silver plater, 335 Third 
Beck Hans S. , whitening and plastering, 20S Sutter, dwl 

1127 Harrison 
Beck Henry (Dietle 6: BJ, dwl 518 Jessie 
Beck Henry, tanner Samuel Bloom, dwl cor Twenty-third 

and Alabama 
Beck Henrj', tanner S. F. Tannerj', dwl Twenty-eighth Av 

nr P, South S. F. 
Beck Jacob, bricklayer, dwl E s Church nr Seventeenth 
Beck James G., painter, dwl 351 Jessie 
Beck John, blacksmith, dwl NE cor Twenty-third and 

Alabama 
Beck John, driver Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 243 Second 
Beck John, laborer, dwl 15 Harrison Av 
Beck John, tanner, dwl Twenty-eighth Av nr P, South 

S. F. 
Beck John, woodturner Kitnball Manuf. Co., dwl 007 Stock 
Beck John G., laborer, dwl 23 Rijicou PI 
Beck Ludwig, surveyor Svea Fire Insurance Co., 213 

Sansom, dwl 228 Oak 
Beck Mary, dwl Virginia Block SE cor Stockton and Pac 
Beck Marj' Louisa (widow), dwl 134 Folsom, rear 
Beck Nathaniel A., currier, E s Folsom bet Seventeenth 

and Eighteenth 
Beck Nelson, blacksmith Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 15 

Harrison Av 
Beck Nicholas, special policeman, dwl 156 Steuart 
Beck Robert, porter MortoTi House 
Beck Samuel, carriagemaker, dwl 949 Harrison 
Beck S. F., laborer, dwl SW cor Washington and Drumm 
Beck S. P., laborer, dwl SW cor Washington and Drumm 
Beck Thomas, plasterer, dwl 113 Jones 
Beck Wallace, clerk Freight Auditor's Office, Central Pa- 
cific R. R., dwl 304 Third 
Beck Walter A., clerk James M. Shav, dwl 619 Sacramento 
Beck Walter F., clerk J. C. Merrill & Co., dwl 18 Stanly PI 
iJeck William, clerk U. S. Surveyor- General, dwl 304 Third 
Beck William, milkman, 409 Tehama 
Beck William, shoemaker Kohler & Maier, dwl Kearny 

bet Vallejo and Broadway 
Beck William, tinsmith Thomas Bertram, dwl 134 Folsom, 

rear 
Beckedorff G. H. C, dwl 38 Russ 

Becker , hamessmaker, dwl 131 Second 

Becker A. L., with S. F. Glass Works, dwl 124i Welch 
Becker Albert, laborer U. S. Appraiser's Building, dwl 

902 Filbert 
Becker Anna (widow), dwl 528 Linden Av 
Becker August, waiter Nucleus House 
BEi'KER B. AUOLril, capitalist, office 418 Kearny, 

dwl 81)8 California 
Becker Brothers (Diedrich and Charles H.), groceries 

and liquors, SE cor Leavenworth and Sutter and SE 

cor Larkin and Turk 
Becker C, driver City R. R. 
Becker Caspar, earn age trimmer McArron & Sophey, dwl 

cor Ivy Av and Buchanan 
Becker Csisper, tamiery, E s San Bruno Road nr Twenty- 
eighth 
Becker Charles, clerk Amandus Reeckmann, dwl NE cor 

Folsom and Beale 
Becker Charles, tailor Asmus Stoldt, cor Washington and 

Drumm 
Becker Charles H. {Becker Brothers) ^ dwl SE cor Larkin 

and Turk 
Becker Charles J. (C. Hartman <t- CoJ, dwl N a Post nr 

Mast'ii 
Becker Diedrich (Becker BrothersJ^ dwl NW cor Cali- 
fornia and Leavenworth 
Becker Frank, porter Weil, Cahn & Co., dwl Pac nr Jones 
Becker Frederick W., dwl 115 Seventh 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 1875-7, Published March, 75, Price $5. 



JEWELRY made to order and EEPAIEED ty D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 




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Becker Frederick W., cigars and tobacco, 705 Da™ 
Becker Ueur;,'e, carpenter, dwl 203 Post 
Becker George F., dwl 610 Mason 

Becker George J., cook Mrs. H. Denham, dwl 13 Harlan PI 

Becker George J., restaurant and liquor saloon, SW cor 

Fourth and Berry . . , , .„ 

Becker Gustave, porter Louis Taussig & Co., dwl 142 

Rose .\v 
Becker Henry (Becker A Jacoby), dwl 915 Howard 
Becker Henry, laborer Jacob Beisel & Co., dwl Miaaouri 

nr Mariposa 
Becker Hermann, confectioner Saulmann & Lauenstem, 

dwl s Lafayette PI 
Becker .lolin. harnessmaker, dwl 131 Second 
Becker John H. (Kahrs J; li.i, dwl 923 Sutter 
Becker Joseph, crockery and glassware, 227 Dupont 
Becker Just, special policeman, dwl Hinckley PI 
Becker J. W. (Becker A- Fischer J, dwl 313 Geary, rear 
Becker Lew-Is E., bookkeeper, dwl 12■^^ Welsh 
Becker Louis, baker William Hessler, dwl 30 Sullivan 3 

Building 
Becker Lucas, barkeeper, SW cor Fourth and BeiTy 
Becker Martin H., groceries and liquors, NE cor Jessie 

a]id Fourth 
Becker M. Kudolph E., dwl 808 Califoniia , , . , 

Becker Nicholas, porter 408 Clay, dwl S s Myrtle At bet 

Franklin and Gough 
BEC'kUIl OTTO F., proprietor Prescott House, 933 

Kearny 
Becker Peter (Eisert i- BJ, dwl 216 Stevenson 
Becker Peter, bootmaker Rohde & Peek, dwl 520 ^ allejo 
Becker Richard, grocer, dwl 1300 Camornia 
Becker Samuel, clerk M. Pulverman, dwl 525 Vallejo 
Becker William, baker, 103U Clay 
Becker WilUam, groceries and liquors, NW cor Spear and 

Mission 
Becker William, hairdresser T. Blodes, dwl 4 Clay Av 
Becker William, willow-worker, SE cor Keaniy and Post, 

d\sl 230 Stevenson 
Becker & Fischer (J. W. Becker and George Fischer J, 

beer saloon, 1134 Market 
Becker S: Jacoby (Uenry Becker and JuUm Jacoby), 

Ary goods, 302 Third 
Beckerton C. A., stevedore, dwl 129 Jackson 
Becket Solomon (colored), whitener, SE cor Dupont and 

Gearv, dwl 20 Scott PI 
Beckett Henry, teamster, dwl SW cor Battery and Vallejo 
Becliliusen Heray, clerk Henry Von-ath, dwl NE cor 

O'Farrell and William 
Beckler John C. (Beckler >t DaUs) , dwl 262 Tehama 
Beckler & Daiss (John C. Beckler and Edmund DaissJ, 

liquor saloon, NW cor Kearny and Bush 
Beckmann Bros. (John N. and I'eter W.I, groceries and 

liquors, NE cor Fourteenth and Mission 
Beckniann Andrew, seaman sloop Bonita, dwl SW cor 

East and .Merchant 
Beckmann Charles, delivery clerk E. V. Hathaway, dw-1 

235 Ritch nr Brannan 
Beckmann Claus, bookkeeper 69 California Market, dwl 

933 Post 
Beckmann Frederick, carpenter, 420 Grove 
Beckmann Frederick (Beckmann i: Meyers), dwl Fifth 

Av 
Beckmann H., laborer PaciSc Distilling and Refining Co. 
Beckniann John, butcher, dwl Sixth Av nr K, South 

S. F. 
Beckniium John, groceries and liquors, NE cor Gearj'and 

William, dwl 714 Geary 
Beckmann John, stevedore, dwl 5 Drtimm 
Beckmann John N. (Beckmann Bros.), dwl NE cor 

Fourt.centh and Mission 
Beckmann Peter W. (Beckmann Bros.), dwl NE cor 

Fourteenth and Mission 
Beckmann Wilhehu (Beckmann <fc 0((e)»A dwl SE cor 

Vallejo and Dupont 
Beckmann & Movers /Frederick Beckmann and Charles 

Menem', market, S s McAllister nr Franklin 
Beckmanim ii Gtt«n (Wilhclm Beclcmann and Peter 
Otten), groceries and liquol-s, SE cor Vallejo and Dup 
Becknor Wilham, porkpacker Washington Market, dwl 

420 Union 
Bcckwith Amos, carpenter, dwl SW cor Turk and Hyde 
Beckwith Elliott S., boatbuilder George A. Gihuan, dwl 

532 Commercial 
Beckwith George, tinsmith William Cronan 
Beckwith Gold and Silver Mining Co. (Ely, Nev.), office 

302 Montgomery room 6 
Beckwith James B., driver Wells, Fai-go & Co., dwl 273 
Jessie 



Beckwith John W., policeman City Hall, dwl 565 Tehama 
Beckwith Seth L., boatbuilder, N s Clark bet Davis and 

Urumm, dwl 106 Hayes ,„ , , , 

Becraft Almerin T., machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 

1U2 Dora 
Becraft Hem-y L., machinist, dwl 102 Dora 
Becsey Joseph A., French and Spanish uiterpreter, Po- 
lice Court, dwl 722 California 
Eedburv James M., plasterer, dwl 630i Minna 
Bedell John, dwl 420 Second 
Bedell Willkam, machinist, dwl 11 Mission Av 
Bedln Bartholomew, clerk Theodore Truelson, dwl SE 

cor Sacramento and Leavenworth 
Bedorf Ferdinand, laborer, dwl W s San Jos(S Road nr 

St. JIary's College ^ „ „ 

Bee A. W. Mrs., adjuster Coiners Department U. S. 

Mint, dwl 900 Market 
Bee CamiUe T., tailor, 1028 Dupont 
Bee Emil, tailor, dwl 1413 Dupont . 

Bee Frederick A., manager Olympia Radway and Mimng 

Co., office 419 California room 17, dwl 021 Leav 
Bee Joseph, policeman Uty Hall, dwl 921 Powell 
Bee Theodore, assayer Selby"s Smelting Works, dwl 1028 

Eeebe Charles H., carpenter Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s 

\\liarf . , , , ,^ 

Beebe Joseph J., compositor S. F. Chromcle, dwl 65 

Second , , o 

Beebe William S., warehouseman Cuttmg s. Co., dwl i 

Burcham PI 
Beebee O. W. (widow), dwl 1898 Broadway 
Beebee Wallace, hairdresser George Howard, dwl 133i 

Clara 
Beech Zilfiha (widow), dressmaker, dwl 1324 Jackson 
Beecher Albert, turner, dwl 772 Mission 
Beecher D. A., lastmaker Leveque & Co., dwl 772 Mission 
Beecher George, woodturner, dwl 2'20 Ritch 
Beecher HeniT, cook Russ House 
Beeching Robert, general agent Cal. Prison Commission, 

office 302 Montgomery, dw-1 1016 Taylor 
Eeecroft John T., surveyor, dwl cor Utah and Nevada 
Beegan John, salesman Fratinger & Noll 
Beehive Building, NE cor Washington and Dupont 
Beehler Edward, fringemaker, dwl 610 California 
Beekman C. W., lodgings, SE cor Sacramento and Davis 
Beel P. S., engraver Frontiere, Bellemere & Co., res Oak- 

Beele'r Jacob, laborer William Watts, dwl S 8 Vallejo nr 

Kearny 
Beeman Thomas, bricklayer, dw-1 Columbia Hotel 
Beeman William, engineer, dwl 730 Geary 
Beeman. See Beaman 
Beer Frederick, porter, dwl 414 Larkin 
Beenuann H., cooper Pac. Distilling and Eefining Co. 
Beei-mann Louis, cook Robert P. Kelley, dwl Long Bndge 

foot Fourth 
Beers Barrett, dentist, office and dwl 230 Kearny 
Beers diaries H., cabinetmaker, dwl 262 Clementina, rear 
Beeson Frederick P., drayman, 409 Front, dwl 907 Larkm 
Beet Robert (colored), longshoreman, dw-1 N s Broadway 

bet Sansom and Battei-y 
Beevan Isaac, porter Jonas Sclioenfeld, dwl 10 'White 
Beez Fi-ederick, bootmaker 315 Bush, dwl 70S Pine 
Beggs Ellen (widow), grocery, 122 William 
Beggs James, gas engineer S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 847 

Howard 
Beggs William, tinsmith S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 122 

William 
Begley John, teamster Hancock & Kelso, dwl 306 Beale, 

rear 
Begner Herman, dwl 12 Washington 
Begot Louis, butcher M. Bonas, dwl cor Virginia PI and 

Begue Bidau Josephine (widow), furnished rooms, 924 

Dupont 
Begue Joseph, butcher, dwl 663 First 
Beguelin Hciu-y, machinist Theodore Kallenberg, dwl S 

Russell ,, , , 

Beguhl A. F. (E. Vonahn and A. F. Beyuhl), dwl cor 

Twentv-fitth and Folsom 
Beh.an A. (widow), dwl 139 Shipley 
Behan Eilward, brushmaker S. F. Brush Factory 
Behan Edward, mason Palace Hotel 
Behan F., tannerv N s Fifteenth bet Guerrero and Dolores 
Behan Francis, brushmaker S. F. Brush Factor>- 
Behan James, housepainter, dwl Twenty-third bet Ala- 
bama and Columbia 
Behan James G., compositor, dwl 139 Shipley 
Behan Maurice, proptr Union St. Livery Stable, 726 Umon 



Tbe place to get the Best Eastern Transplanted Oysters at MOEGAN & CO.'S. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1362. 




Behan Patrick, hostler, 726 Union 

Beheren H., seaman, dwl 9 Washington 

Behlow Charles J. (U. Liebef <i: CoJ, dwl 40 Twelfth 

Behlow Eniile, furrier H. Licbes & Co., dwl 40 Twelfth 

Behlow "William, foreman upholsterers Charles M. Plum & 

Co.,dwU16 0"Fan-ell 
Helm Walter, salesman 409 Clay, dwl 632 Broadway 
Behnemann Albert, grocer, dwl SW cor O'Farrell and 

Taylor 
Behnemann Henn,' f Bek7i£infinn <t CoJ, dwl SW cor 

O'Farrell and Taylor 
Behnemann & Co. (Uenry Behnemann and Martin 

Joost, , groceries and liquors, SW cor O'Farrell and 

Taylor 
Behnke Charles, seaman, dwl 170i Silver 
Behnke Frederick, laborer, dwl 937 Brjant 
Behnke John, laborer Pacific Distilling and Reflnuig Co., 

dwl SW cor Keaniy and Broadway 
Benke John, cabinetmaker Kloppeuburg & Klatt, dwl 325 

Sixth 
Behr A. M., polisher Gilbert & Sloore, dwl 542 Folsom 
Behr Herman, physician, dwl NW cor Fifth and Brjant 
Behr Otto, porter Henry Brickwedel &; Co., dwl Cook nr 

Point Lobos Av 
Behr William, barkeeper Henry Huber, dwl 423 Bush 
Di^hre Frederick, foreman E. Guittard & Co., dwl SE cor 

Larkin and Turk 
Ii?hre Robert L., clerk Doyle & Barber, dwl SE cor Larkin 

and Turk 
r.:-liremfuss Theodore, with H. G. Fiske 
Behren John, seaman, dwl 9 Washington 
Et-liren WiUiani, master mariner, dwl 212 Grove 
Behrend M.. dwl 44 Third 

Bt-hrends Aug:ust, machinist, dwl 924 Stockton 
Dthrendt H. Jc Co. f Michael Long J , tmnkraakers, Ns 

Townsend bet Third and Fourth, salesroom 513 Mar- 
ket. 
i;._-hrendt Herman (H. Bchrendt & Co.}, dwl 805 Ellis 
I'--hreudt M'Uliam, boots and shoes, 58 Third, dwl 1050 

Howard 
P<I]reng-er Henn', brassfinisher Electrical Con. & M. Co., 

dwl 621 Pine 
] :. ii rens Adrian G. , clerk Treadwell & Co. , dwl 43S Ha.ves 
1 hrens Bros. (John and Fred'.'rwk', groceries and 

liquors, SW cor Dupont and Stockton PI 
r.jhrens CHiarles, clerk Jlohrman & Co., dwl SW cor Kear- 
ny and Broadway 
K.-lirens Diedrich, carpenter, dwl 550 Tehama 
l>chrens Diedrich, laborer Oil. Sugur Kefinerj', dwl Po- 

trero Av nr Sbcteenth 
Lk'hrens Frederick f Bchrens Bros. ) , dwl SW cor Dupont 

and St* icktf.n PI 
Belirens Frederick, groceries and liquors, NW cor Twenty- 
fourth and Howard, dwl 911 Capp 
Behrens Harry, seaman Jerome B. Piper, dwl 423 East 
IX-hrens Henrj' C, physician, dwl 43S Hayes 
l>.-hrens James, importer wines and commission mer- 
chant, office 504 Battery, res Saucelit> 
LHi-hrens Johann G. cabinetmaker Field & Frei, dwl N s 

Green nr Dupont 
Eehrens John (Bchrens Bros.), dwl SW cor Dupont and 

Stockton PI 
E^'hrens John, bootmaker F. Beez, dwl 42 Everett 
r-.'irens Juhn F. fBohliiiy .t BehremJ , dwl NE cor 

Twenty-fourth and Potrero Av 
r. hrens Joseph, cellemian Lyon & Co 
I "lirens William, second officer Pacific Mail S. S. Granada 
K.-hring William, raachinist Union Iron Works 
lAliringer Christ, trunkmaker D. S. Martm & Co., dwl 

W s Br>ant bet Twenty-fourth and Twenty -fifth 
E_'hrmann Frederick, bakerj^ 1'21S Powell 
Bchmiann Henn% cabuietmaker, dwl S24 Harrison 
Behrmann Joachim H., cabinetmaker, dwl S24 Harrison 
B.'hrmann Louis, barkeeper Geo. C. W. Heuer, SE cor 

Howard and Steuart 
ivhrmanB Marj- Mrs., midwife, dwl 824 Harrison 
l.'.'.ihnvald George, peddler, dwl 721 Tehama 
l^icke L., blacksmith, dwl cor Folsom and Twenty-second 
Beighle Ge-irge W., salesman Schlueter & Volberg, dwl 

1018 Hyde 
I'vil J. S. Mrs., furnished rooms, 313 Kearny 

lies John, hairdresser Frank Lacua, dwl 713 Broadway 

laeler August, heli>er MojTiihan & Aitken 

n William, machinist, dwl 12*^ Bluxome 

ue John. laborer C'al. Sugar Refiner>', dwl NE cor 

Eighth and Brannan 

nert David, bootmaker, N s Sixteenth bet Valencia 
: and Mission 

Beirman Otto, dyer, dwl 275 Stevenson 



Beime Martin, wiredrawer Pacific Wire Manufact\u-i»g 

Co., dwl King St. House 
Beirne Patrick fJieirne tt Glynn}, dwl 313 Pacific 
Beirne & Gl}-nn {Patrick Beirne and Michael J. Glynn), 

proprietors Empire Hctel, 311 and 313 Pacific 
Beise! Jacob & Co. (M. X. CV.'^^, proprietors Protrero 

Tannery, cor Mississippi and Santa Clara 
Bekeart Charles A., blacksmith Zina H. Cuimingham, dwl 

346 Tliird 
Bekeart Fmnk C, with Freeman & Wrin, dwl 346 Tliird 
Bekeart Julius F., hardware and gunsmith, 346 Tliird 
Beken John, seaman, dwl 415 Clementina, rear 
Belan Otto, clerk Greenebaum & Co., dwl 1317 Kearny 
Belando Pietro, wood and coal, 1210 Pow, dwl 120S Pow 
Belasco Abraham, trader, dwl 174 Clara 
Belasco D., actor Maguire's New Theater, dwl 331 Fourth 
Belau Michael, tailor, dwl 131S Kearny 
Belbeck Henry T., carpenter, dwl ^\^lat Clieer House 
Belcher Frederick P., drajTnan, office SW cor Market and 

Fremont, res Oakland 
Belcher Phillip, laborer, dwl Michigan nr Sliasta 
Belcher Robert H., drajTnan Frederick P. Belcher, dwl 

1015 Union 
BEL<'HER SITVEK MIM\G CO. (Gold Hill, Nev.), 

H. C. Kibbe secrctar>^ office 419 California 
Belchman Thomas, tinsmith, dwl 31* Garden 
Belcner William, picture-frame polisher M. D. Nile, dwl 

1924 Mason 
Eelcour Jules, chancellor of Consulat-Geueral de France, 

dwl 111 Franklin 
Belden C. A., teller Merchants* Exchange Bank, dwl 72S 

Bush 
Belden Charles, mason Palace Hotel 
Belden Edward, broker, dwl 514 Bush 
Belden Edward, cigars and tobacco, 520 Sac, res Oakland 
Belden Edwin S., official reporter Fourth District Court, 

office 637 Kearny, res Oakland 
Belden Henry K. {Mayer tt Co.}, res East Oakland 
Belden Joseph W., bookkeeper National Gold Bank and 

Trust Co., dwl 1020 Geaiy 
Belden Josiah. capitalist, office 200 Sansom, res San Jose 
Belden M. S. (widow), dwl 510 Mason 
Belden Truman, shipcarpenter Nichols & Weaver, dwl 

Fourth Av nr J, South S. F. 
Belduke Emma Miss, clerk Palmer Bros., dwl 783 Market 
Belduke Frances Mrs., furnished rooms, 7S3 Market and 

9 Fourth 
Belduke Joseph, wagonmaker, 110 Oregon, dwl 783 Mar- 
ket 
Beley Henr>-, hair manufacturer, dwl Missouri bet Mar- 

ij)Osa and Santa Clara 
Belfrage Gustave, salesman dry goods, dwl 537J- Stev 
Belgrave R. B., receiver N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 226 

Sutter 
Belhner Louis, roofer, dwl 22 Louisa 
Belhomme Francois, tinsmith, 1602 Stockton 
Beliczia Domenico, musician, dwl 1123 Dupont 
Belinge F. A. A., phvsician, dwl 938 Mission 
Belitzer J., clerk Edward Cohn & Co., dwl 225 Mont 
Belknap David P. f Wina ns d: B.J, attorney at law, office 

604 Merchant, dwl 502 Powell 
BELIi ALEXANDER D., editor Evening Post, res 

Saucelito, Marin Co. 
Bell Amor\- F., with John C. Bell, dwl 2609 Sacramento 
Bell Augustus, porter, dwl 2 St. Charles PI 
BELL. BYKXE A CO. fJohn P. Bell, P. W. Byrne, 

and W. L. Cowan}, law and collection, office 006 

Montgomery' 
Bell Cliarles, laborer Palace Hotel 
Bell Charles, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 

Bell Charles, steward Hose No. 1 S. F. F. D.,dwl 112 Jack 
Bell Charles, waiter, dwl 447 Natoma 
Bell Charles E., Shipwrights' Jour. Assn, 71 New Mont 
Bell Charles T. , agent Journal of Conmaerce and Rural 

Press, 414 Clay 
Bell Charles Henry, porter WiUiam Ward & Co., dwl 419 

Clementina 
Bell Charies P., clerk S. F. Post-office, dwl 216 Bush 
Bell Daniel P., clerk Tobin, Da^isson & Co., dwl SE cor 

Oota\ia and Fulton 
Bell Da\id, blacksmith, dwl 217 Second 
Bell Da^id, machinist McAfee, Spiers & Co., dwl 44 Clem 
Bell David, taik.r, dwl 415 Powell 
Bell Dand B., fishmonger, 29 Grand Central Market, dwl 

502 Stevenson 
Bell Edward, carpenter, dwl 7S5 Mission 
Bell Ellen (widow, colored), nurse, dwl 1011 Pacific 
Bell F. Vinton, clerk W. H. L. Barnes, dwl 725 Harrison 
Bell George H. {Bell d- Co. J, dwi 639 Keaniy 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOEY Circulates throughout Paoifio Coast. 



San Prancisoo Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 




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Bell George H. Jr., clerk Bell & Co., dwl 639 Kearny 
Bell George R., scenic artist Bella Union Theater, dwl 33 

Pleasant 
Bell George W. (colored), porter Mark L. McDonald, dwl 

1011 Pacific 
Bell Henry, gardener, dwl 1G22 Mission 
Bell Henry, gasfitter Bush & Milne, dwl 54G Seventh 
bell Henry, laborer U. S. Appraiser's Building, dwl 524 

Turk 
Bell Henry, shooting gallery, 821 Kearny, dwl 814 San 
Bell Henry, waiter Brooklju Hotel 
Bell Heni^' h., messenger Custom House, dwl 524 Turk, 

rear 
Bell Henr>' S., waiter, dwl 551 Howard, rear 
Bell H. H. Mrs., dwl 920 Market 
Bell James, deckhand tug Ellen. Fourth St. WTiarf 
Bell James, dry goods, 932 Market, dwl 747 Howard 
Bell James, tailor, 415 Powell 
Bell James H. (colored), barber Pacific Mail S. S. Colima, 

dwl S33 Clay 
Bell James H. Mrs. (colored), hairdresser, S33 Clay 
Bell John, carpenter, dwl 530 Pacific 
Bell John, gasfitter Palace Hotel, dwl 11 Leroy PI 
Bell John, office 121 Montgomery room 1, dwl Occidental 

Hotel 
Bell John B., attorney at law, office 21 Court Block 636 

Clay, dwl 2213 Steiner 
Bell John B., barber George Held, dwl 244 Clementina 
Bell John C, carijets, upholsterj', and furniture ware- 
rooms, 524 Market and 21 Sutter, dwl 502 Green^\ich 
Bell Jolm P. (BcU, Byrne <{■ Co.i, attorney at law, office 

(30U Montgomery', dwl 2213 Steiner 
Bell John R., groom Palace Amphitheater 
Bell John W., clerk Forwarding Department Wells, Fargo 

& Co., dwl 508 Third 
Bell Joseph F., bootmaker, 4 Market, dwl 16 Ohio 
Bell M.. calker, dwl cor Polk and Greenwich 
Bell Mary Mrs., dwl 309 Austin, rear 
Bell N. H., student, dwl Greenwich bet Polk and Van 
Neas Av I 

Bell Otto, foreman tinsmith H. G. Fiske, dwl 7 Dikeman 

PI 
Bell Peter, housepainter, dwl N s Willow Av bet Van 

Ness Av and Franklin 
Bell Peter, tmsmith, dwl SE cor Octavia and Fulton 
Bell Philip A. (colored), editor and proprietor Elevator, of- 
fice and dwl 610 Batteiy 
Bell Philip, laborer, dwl 13 Varenne 
Bell Robert, folder Occidental Laundr3' 
Bell Robert, merchant (Reno, Nev.), dwl 1246 Howard 
Bell Robert, U. S. district officer Custom House, dwl 1246 

Howard 
Bell Robert, upholsterer, 410 Hayes 
Bell Samuel, carjjcnter Palace Hotel 
Bell Samuel L., foreman sash and blindmaker D. A. Mac- 

dunald & Co., dwl 15 Clara 
BEIiL THOMAS, conmiission merchant, office 305 San- 

som. dwl 1107 Bush 
Bell Thomas, hostler Clayburgh & Brandenstein, dwl 365 

Harrison 
Bell Thumas, laborer Southern Pac. R. R., dwl cor Sierra 

and Louisiana 
Bell Thomas, poi-ter M. Heller & Bros., dwl 27 Raiiach 
Bell Thomas, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Btll Tliomas, stevedore, dwl 3 Gilbert 
Bell Thomas H., captain, dwl 607 Powell 
Bell Thomas H., hostler, dwl 304 Towiisend 
Bell Thomas J., porter, dwl 9 Garden 
Bell W. H., stationerv, blank books, etc., 4 Sixth 
Bell William, dwl S35 Clay 
Bell William, bricklayer, dwl 403 Broadway 
Bell William, conductor N. B. and Mission R. R. 
Bell William, engineer Union Iron Works, dwl NE cor 

Filbert and Montgomery 
Bell William, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wlmrf 
Bell William, laundrjTiian Folsom Laundry, Ss Sixteenth 

nr Valencia 
Bell William, mason Palace Hotel 
Bell William, paiitr>inan Pacific Mail S. S. Costa Rica 
ikil Witliani, pcddkr, dwl cor Sacramento and Davis 
Bell William, shipciirpentcr, dwl cor Butte and Jliimesota 
Bell William, shi pear pen ter, dwl Greenwich bet Polk and 

Van Ness Av 
Bell William, stevedore, dwl 30 Welsh, rear 
Bell William, waiter stm William Taber,MarketSt.Wliarf 
Bell William H., general agent Pacific Mutual Beneficial 

Assn, office 20 Montgomery Block, dwl 514 Valencia 
Bell William M., city agent Cutting & Co., dvvl 137 Na- 
toma 



Bell & Co. (George H. Bell), books, stationery, and peri- 
odicals, 639 Kearny 
Bellay Francis, artist John H. Fetus, dwl 718 Greenwich 
Bella' Union Theater, Samuel Tetlow proprietor, 803 and 

805 Kearny 
Bellander Charles, vamisher, dwl S s Oak bet Buchanan 

and Webster 
Belle Da\id, taUor F. Wilton, dwl 415 Powell 
Belle Thomas, stevedore A. G. Freese 
Bellemere Adolphe (Levy ct Bj, dwl 111 Powell 
Bellemere Augustus {Frontier, B. d: Co.), dwl 427 Bush 
Bellermann Emil, bookkeeper Merchants' Exchange Bank, 

res Oakland 
Bellet August, cook Leon Dingeon & Co., dwl NW cor 

Broadway and Kearny 
Bellevue Mining Co. (Placer Co., CaL), D. F. Verdenal 

secretary, office 409 California 
Bellew James, upholsterer Goodmn & Co., dwl 18 Ohio 
Bellew J. H., upholsterer, dwl 225 Green 
Bellew John, boarding, IS Ohio 

Belli Angiulino, hostler Novella & Pitto, dwl 427 Jackson 
Belli John, vegetable dealer, San Pedro Ranch 
Bellingall Charles, foreman Hawley, Bowen & Co., dwl 

737 Howard 
Bellingall Peter W. , deputy surveyor Port of San Francis- 
co, res Oakland 
BELJLI\(;HAi1l BAY €OAL €0., P. B. Cornwall 

president, office E s Spear bet Folsom and Harrison 
Bellingham Harry, shoemaker, dwl IISS Broadway 
Bellingham John, shoemaker, dwl 1188 Broadway 
Bellingham Robert, shoemaker M.Guerin.dwl 1188 Bdwy 
Bellis£ Francis N.,maatercarbuilder Southern Pac. R.R., 
dwl W s Bn-ant bet Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Bellinski Abraham, peddler, dwl 178 Clara 
Bellinski Simon, tailor, dwl 178 Clara 
Bellman Vincent, laborer S. F. Cordage Factory, dwl 

Tennessee nr Sierra 
Bellman William, painter, dwl 1023 Kearny 
Bellmer Frederick, teamster Mausshardt & Hoelscher, dwl 

723 Natuma 
Bellmer John H. C, restaurant, SW cor P'u^t and Stev- 
enson, dwl 59 Stevenson 
Bello A'^incent, fruit, dwl 642 Jessie 
Belloc Benjamin ( Belloc Frercs), res Paris 
BELLO€ FRERES (Benjamin and Irerie Belloc, 
Henry Barroilhety andGustave Ditssol) , bankers and 
agents General Trans- Atlantic Co. (Paris, 73 Rue de 
Courcelles), office 524 Montgoraeiy 
Belloc Irene (Belloc Fri^res), res Paris 
Belloc Jean, butcher, dwl SW cor Dupont and Broadway 
Belloo Peter, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 

Bellow Tliomas, porter J. W. Davidson & Co. , dwl 225 Min 
Bellows Carlos D., tinsmith Joseph J. Vasconcellos, dwl 

730 Natoma 
Bellows E. St. John, bookkeeper U. S. Assistant Treasu- 
rer, dwl Windsor House 
Bellows Joseph, painter, dwl 1024 Stockton 
Bellsted John, engineer CaL Sugar Refinery, dwl 11 De- 
catur 
Belmont Mining Co. (Belmont, Nev.), office 402 Montgom- 
ery room 1 
Belmonte Joseph, mason Palace Hotel 
Eelmonte M. Miss, clairvoyant, 38 Rausch 
Belmore Barbara (widow), dwl 1163 Mission 
Belmore Louis, actor, dwl 129 Third 
Belo Andrew, seaman, dwl 140 Folsom 
Belshaw A., miner, dwl 109 Montgomery 
Belt Alfred M., clerk Charies Cla,non & Co., dwl 1008 Bush 
Belton Philip M., clerk, dwl 408 Shipley 
Belton, William, machinist Howe Machine Co., dwl 759 

Market 
Bcltrau Jos6, fisherman Clay St. Wharf 
Beltz Conrad, laborer, dwl E s San Bnmo Road nr Twen- 
ty-sixth 
Belue Calixte, clerk Lenormand Bros., dwl SW cor Pine 

and Dupont 
Belue Camille, clerk Lenormand Bros., dwl SW cor Pine 

and Dupont 
Belville Eli, broommaker Gillespie, Zan & Co., dwl S B 

Mission nr Fifth 
Belz John, hairdresser, Charles K. Zimmer 
Belzner William, gilder M. D. Nile, dwl 1924 Mason 
Beman Louis, carpenter Gray &. Marcher, dwl 618 Cal 
Bembower Phillip, carpenter, dwl 423 Bush 
Bemerer August, cutler Will & Finck, dwl Bush bet Pow- 
ell and Mason 
Bemis Almira, dwl NW cor Second and Folsom 
Bemis Charles C, U. S. supervising inspector steam ves- 
sels, office 11 U. S. Court Building, dwl 449 Bryant 



MOR&AN & CO., 87 California Market, have their own Boats and Oyster Beds. 



, p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 71C Kearny, Established 1852. 



Benard Augruste F., liquor saloon, NE cor Fifth and How 
Benbow David. paint€r Thomas Dowiiing, dwl 415^^ Clem 
Benchel John, taik-r, dwl 727 Broadway, rear 
BE.XCIILEY LEO\IDA$ B. fLinfurth, Kellonq & 
C(/. /.and manager Pacific Rolling Mill Co., office 3 
Front, dwl lOlOCulifumia 
Benchlev William, hostler James Graham, dwl 907 Larkin 
Bend Charles, buker Eisert Oc Becker, 24 Third 
BE>D£L B. A CO. 'il^nnj P. Duffy), Empire Match 

Fact^jrv, SE cor Eleventh and Har, office 520 Front 
Bendel Befnhard fB. Bendel J: Co..', dwl 142i Fourth 
Bendel Hermami /Tillman it- B.', res Oakland 
Bendelsham Charles, waterman, dwl 1112 Folsom 
Benden Haity, seaman, dwl 260 Minna 

Bender ,'dwl G03 Pine 

Bender Charles, importer and dealer leather and shoe 

findings. 42 Gean', dwl 40A Geary 
Bender Edward, engineer, 742 Washington 
Bender Jacob A., bricklayer, dwl 1215 Clay 
Bender Joseph, baker Eclipse Bakery, dwl 1414 Dupont 
Bender Josepn D. Jr., hamessmaker Patrick W. Lahaney, 

dwl 623 Third 
Bender Josiah P., bricklayer, dwl 623 Third 
Bender MoUie Miss, shoefitter Einst«in Bros. & Co., dwl 

229 Jessie 
Bender William, waiter, dwl G50 Mission 
Bender William A., clerk R. G. Dun & Co., dwl 1215 Clay 
Beudit Abraham, barber, dwl E s Valencia bet Fifteeath 

and Sixteenth 
Bendit Herman, fire marshal police, dwl 747 Market 
Bendit Morris, expressman, NE cor California and Mont- 
gomery, dwl S s Post bet Gough and Octavia 
Bendit Samuel, furniture and bedding, 757 Market 
BendLxen Charles, laborer E. E. Meyer, dwl San Miguel 

Ranch near Laguua Honda 
Bendt Isaac, peddler, dwl 4o3 Tehama 
Bendt William, proprietor Minen'a House, 123 Jackson 
Benecke Dietrich, groceries and liquors, 520 Broadway 
Benecke John D. O. fBeiwcke d: M angels J , dwl SW cor 

Clav and Mason 
Benecke A: ilangels 'John D. 0. Bpjiecke and EaJis M. 
C. Ma ageU; , groceries and liquors, SW cor Clay and 
Mason 
Benedetti Louis, carman, dwl 512 Green 
Eenedetti T., fisherman, Clay St. AMiarf 
Benedict Charles V., bookkeeper Excelsior Mills, dwl 737 

Howard 
Benedict Cornelius, medical student, dwl 274 Minna 
Benedict Courtland S. i Benedict ii- Co./, dwl Ws Valencia 

bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Benedict E. L.. salesman Weaver & Taylor, dwl 200 Powell 
Benedict Jacob, refiner S. F. Assa>ing and Refining 

Works, dwl N s Beaver bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
Benedict S. S. Miss, retoucher, studio 23 Kearny, dwl 725 

California 
Benedict &. Co. cC. S. Pe/wdic^;, gents' furnishing goods, 

3 Second 
Benehan H., hostler Fashion Stables, dwl 173 Clara 
Beneken John, porter Pacific Distilling and Refining Co., 

411 Washington 
Beneler Julius, laundryman Lick House 
Benevides Antonio, foreman A. Ramon, dwl cor Union 

and Powell 
Benfeld Conrad, master mariner, dwl 9 Crook 
Bengam Baptist, ranchman, dwl San Gottardo Hotel 
Benham A. M., salesman Sherman i: Hyde, res Seminary 

Park, Alameda Co. 
Benham Calhoun, attorney at law, office 1 Montgomerj' 

Block, dwl 420 First 
Benham John A., mining, dwl 26 Turk 
Benham Joseph H., liquor saloon, 827 Folsom 
Benhayon Jacob, salesman Li\ing^n &. Co., dwl 44 Third 
Benicia Cement Co., office 502 Kearny 
Bening George F., dwl 1114 Webster 
Benington A. W., dwl 1 Central PI 

Benites Julius, bootblack, 002 Kearny, dwl 16 St. Charles PI 
Benjamin Abraham F., stockbroker, 430 California, dwl 

1355 Post 
Benjamin Alexander, butcher, dwl 286 Stevenson 
Benjamin C, weaver, dwl 2009 Folsom 
Benjamin Charles E., salesman Crane, Hastings & Co., 

dwl 219 Sholwell 
Benjamin Charlotte (widow), furnished rooms, 749 Market 
Benjamin Edward C, clerk Crane, Hastings & Co., dwl 

215 Kearny 
Benjamin E. R., clerk, dwl Morton House 
Benjamin Frederick, mining, dwl 737 Harrison 
Benjamin Grovenor B., broommaker California Broom 
Factory, dwl 27i Fourth 



Benjamin Henry A. f Henry A. Benjamin tfc Co. J, dwl 

Russ House 
BE\J.4J»I1>' HE\RY A. «& CO., Pacific Congress 

Springs Depot, 162 New Mont4,'omery 
Benjamin Jacob, ex-public administrator, office 430 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 1355 Post 
Benjamin Lucien, jobber, dwl 1316 Powell 
Benjamin M. H., stockbroker, office 430 Cal, dwl 1355 Post 
Benjamin Mill and Mining Co. (Lyon Co., Nev.), office 401 

California room 7 
Benjamin Moses F., collector, 430 Cal, dwi 1355 Post 
Benjamin Thaddeus f Benjamin <i- Strasser) , dwl 27 Fourth 
Benjamin William K., special policeman, dwl 32 Jessie 
Benjamin &, Strasser f Thaddeus, Benjamin, and Leopold 
StrastierJ , poultr>' and game, 74 and 75 Centre Market 
Benkelmann Adam, liquor saloon, NE cor Railroad and 
Ninth avs, dwl N s Fifteenth Av bet P and Q, South 
S. F. 
Benn Geoi^, driver James Dunn, dwl 121 Bernard 
Benn Harr.-, cigarmaker Emma Sneider, dwl 44 Third 
Benn John E., physician, office 23 Kearny, dwl 1109 Post 
Benn John S. ,' Berjin d- B.J, dwl 25 Crook 
Bennan Michael T., Bricklayers' Pro. Assn, 232 Sutter 
BenndorfE Gustav, mattressmaker Henrj- Frank, dwl 64 

Everett 
Benner Felix, cigarmaker F. Korbel & Bros., dwl 9 Zoe, 

rear 
Benner Frederick, shoemaker, dwl SE cor Folsom and 

Fomth 
Benner Frederick M., deposit melter U. S. Mint, res Oak- 
land 
Benner George L. , shipcarpenter, dwl 324 Beale 
Benner Henr\-, longshoreman, dwl 323 Broadway 
Benner Maria Mrs., fruits and vegetables, 323 Broadway 
Bennerscheidt Bruno, brassfinisher M. Dobrzensky, dwl 

123 O'FaiTell 
Bennet Andrew, poultry dealer, dwl 16 Pinckney PI 
Bennet Cliarles A., druggist Henrj' W. Bennet, dwl 1018 

Washington 
Bennet Henr>- W., druggist, 21 Tliird 
Bennett A. E., caqienter D. A. Macdonald & Co., res Oak- 
land 
Bennett Alfred, painter, dwl 974 Folsom | 

Bennett A. M-, sawjer Christian Schreiber & Co., dwl 505 ! 
Sutter I 

Bennett Anthony A., carriagepainter, dwl 510 Mission 
Bennett Brother^ f George and John BJ, butter, cheese, 

and eggs, 35 and 36 California Market 
Bennett (Siarles, dwl 215 Kearny 
Beimett Charles, molder, dwl 520 Mission 
Bennett Cliarles D. (Xcwman d: Bennett), dwl 701 Post 
Bennett Charles H., molder Union Iron Works 
Bennett Daniel, clerk Roland G. Brown 
Bennett Edward, bricklayer Palace Hotel, dwl 726 Mission 
Bennet Edward D., student Heald's Business College, dwl 

W s Folsom bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Bennett Frederick, liquor saloon, NVr' cor Brannan and 

Rincou PI 
Bennett George, flourpacker F. D. Conro & Son, dv.i 719 

Battery 
Bennett George, laborer Palace Hotel 
Bennett George, painter Wilson & Moulton, dwl NW cor 

Clay and Davis 
Bennett George, porter 309 Clay (and Bennett Bros.), 

dwl 231 Stevenson 
Bennett George, seaman, dwl 9 Washington 
Bennett George W., stockkeeper Levi Strauss & Co., dwl 

12STurk 
Bennett Hanr E., compositor, dwl 13 Verona PI 
Bennett Heniietta Mrs., teacher music, 452 Sixth 
Bennett Henr^-, clerk Edwards & Loane, dwl NE cor Turk 

and Leavenworth 
Bennett Henry M., operator Atlantic and Pac. Telegraph 

Co., dwl326Gearj- 
Bennett Herbert W., professor music, dwl 908 Clay 
Bennett H. L. (widow), dwl 39^ Moss 
Bennett I., saddler, dwl 4 C^ay Av 
Bennett James, bookkeeper, dwl 516 Filbert 
Bennett James, cari>enter, dwl 502 Mission 
Bennett James, pipemaker Francis Smith & Co., dwl 507 

Mission 
Bennett John, carpenter Larseneur & Sheerin, dwl 136 

Nattjnia 
Bennett John, stevedore, dwl nr San Bruno Road, opp Bay 

View 
Bennett John R. (Bennett Bros.), dwl 546^ Natoma, rear 
Bennett Joseph, cook, dwl 54 Sacramento 
Bennett Joseph (colored), steward, dwl 2k Vernon PI nr 
I Jackson 



^ 
^ 



> 

Ot3 



o 

a 



PACIPIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTOEI, 1875-7, Published March, '75, Price $5. 



D. "W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 




Bennett Louis, jeweler Bujannoff & Babmann 

Bennett Maria h. Miss, miitmu St. Luke's Hnspital, Lundy 
Lane bet Emerald and Virijinia avs. Benial Heights 

Bennett Mary (widow), dwl W s Folsom bet Nineteenth 
and Twentieth 

Bennett Mary E. Miss, teacher Valencia St. Grammar 
Sehool, dwl W s Folsom bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Bennett Man,' H. (widow), laundry, 555 Bryant 

Bennett Maurice, laborer, dwl I'iOG Bush 

BE\XET'2' X.ITHAMEL, attorney at law, office 7'2 and 
7;) Montgomery Block, dwl 1*218 Howard 

Bennett Peter, fishmonger, Clay St. Market, dwl 433 Green , 

Bennett Robert, seaman, dwl 20 De Boom 

Bennett Robert, seaman, dwl 140 Folsom 

Bennett Robert IL (Bennttt A- Page), res Oakland 

Bennett Samuel, guard State Prison, dwl 133G Pacific 

Bennett Sojihia S. (widow), dwl 515 Stockton 

Bennett S. S., bookkeeper Roland G. Broun, dwl 19 Ellis 

Bennett Stephen, laborer JohuMahlstedt, 223 Drunmi 

Bennett Susan Mrs., dressmaker, S7 Ninth 

Bennett Tliomas, cook Nicholas Buya, dwl NW cor Pacific 
and Davis 

BENXKXT XnOMAS, physician, office 620 Market, 
dwl 710 Pine 

Bennett T. W.. mason Palace Hotel 

Bennett \V. H., druggist, dwl 51(3 V Valencia 

Bennett William, barkeeper TeiTill & Chapman, dwl 613J 
Stockton 

Bennett William, bottler Edward C. Slorah, dwl 523 Te- 
hama 

Bennett William, first assistant engineer Pacific Mail S. 
S. Co.. dwl 317 Bn.'ant 

Bennett William, laborer, dwl 2011 Mission 

Bennett William. maL-hinist, dwl 507 Mission 

BeiuKrtt William. ]iliy^ieian, office and dwl, 452 Sixth 

Bennett William, jihunber Palace Hotel, dwl 1015 Clay 

Bennett William H., pressman Mahon, Thomas & Co., 
dwl 555 Bryant 

Bennett William S.. brakeman Passenger Depot Southern 
Pac. R. R., cor Fourth and Townsend 

BE\i\ETT «!t I'AliE (Robert H. Bennett, Henry 
Pafjf, and Wilfred Page', commissiLin merchants 
and agents South American Steamship Co., 304 Davis 

Benningham Thomas, dwl 321 Pacific 

Benningham Thomas Jr., saddler, dwl 321 Pacific 

Bennink Adrian W., printer H. S. Crocker & Co., dwl 517 
Pine 

Benoit Amedee J., printer, dwl 420 Jackson 

Benoit Celine Mme., corsets and ladies' underwear, C31 
Sacramento 

Benrimo Joseph, stockbpker, dwl 615 Kearny 

Benrod Eugene, raachimst, dwl 232 Jessie 

Bensch William J., carriage painter Walter Welsh, dwl 
1520 Dupont 

Bensen Conrad, groceries and liquors, SW cor Polk and 
Broad n*ay 

Bensen Henry fU. Bremer <£: Co J, dwl 770 Brj-ant 

Bcnset Michael, i>acker San Francisco Packing and Pro- 
vision Co., dwl SIO Montgomerj' 

Bensing John, shoemaker, dwl SOO Greenwich 

Bensinger D., baker stm Ajax Oregon S. S. Co. 

ICENSLEY JOflIX (LinJ'orih, A't-^iof/y' dr Co.;, and pres- 
ident Pacific Oil and Lead Works Co., office 3 Front, 
dwl 73S Post 

Bensley William, quartermaster Pacific Mail S. S. Ancon, 
dwl 32 Steuart 

Benson , physician, dwl 100 Stockton 

Benson A., laborer Palace Hotel 

Benson Andrew, stevedore, dwl Filbert nr Sansora 

Benson Annie E. Miss, teacher Fourth St. Primary 
School, dwl 2710 Howard 

Benson Anton, laborer, dwl 351 First 

Benson Benjamin C, captain stm Relief, dwl 1330 Bdwy 

Benson Benjamin F. M., bookkeeper Bowen Brotliers, 
dwl 70LI California 

Benson Charles, salesman Moses A. Wolfe, dwl 9 Dike- 
man PI 

Benson Charles, waiter Leonard J. F. Schnutenhaus, dwl 
134 Fourth 

Benson Elizabeth J. (widow), ladies' nurse, dwl 372 Clem 

Benson Emanuel, laborer, dwl Eighteenth Av nr F, South 
S. F. 

Benson Franklin R., clerk Odd Fellows' Savings Bank, 
dwl 2710 Howard 

Benson (icorge, dwl 2S Jessie nr Seventh 

Benson Henry, seaman, dwl 20 Steuart 
Benson Henry C. Rev., editor California Christian Advo- 
cate, office 701 Market, res Santa Clara 

Benson J. A,, merchant, dwl Russ House 



BEXSON JAMES, secretary Odd Fellows' Savings 

Bank, office 325 Slontgomery, dwl 2710 Howard 
Benson James A., teamster J. Morton & Co., dwl 111 Wil- 
liam 
Benson James E. R., printer D. M. Bishop & Co., dwl 2710 

Howard 
Benson John, real estate, dwl S03 Stockton 
Benson John, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Benson Lucy (widow), dwl 411 Powell 
Benson N., boilermakcr Francis I. Curry, dwl 113 Jackson 
Benson Olof, seaman Colorado S. N. Co. stm Montana, 

Folsom St. \\liarf 
Benson P., waiter Brooklyn Hotel 
Benson Samuel H., boilermaker Moynihan & Aitkin, dwl 

loi^ Clinton 
Benson Simon J., master mariner, dwl 14 Vincent 
Benson Thomas, seaman, dwl 250 Spear 
Benson Thomas A., porter Banner Bros., dwl 27 Hunt 
Benson W. B., civil engineer, dwl 14 Eddy 
Benson William R., crimper U. W. C. Boot and Shoe Co., 
dwl 29i Rauseh 

Bent , clerk, dwl 127 Kearny 

Bent Edward F., clerk I. Fi-iedlander, dwl 207 Sutter 
Bent James Robert, clerk Louis A. Zinns, dwl 427 Stev 
Bent John T., clerk Mission Rock Dock, dwl 515 Folsom 
Bent Siliis E., carriagemaker Carville Manuf. Co., dwl 741 

Market 
Benter Charles, watchman Mission and Pac. Woolen Mills, 

dwl 1 Chestnut Alley 
Benter Mary (widow), dwl 1 Chestnut Alley 
Bentham Henry, machinist Union Iron Works 
Benthock Henry, fireman Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl NE 

cor Eighth and Brannan 
Bentiz Antonio, waiter stm Los Angeles, Market St. Wharf 
Bentley B., brakeman Southern Pac. R. R. Co., cor Fovuth 

and To\nisend 
Bentley Cliarles, longshoreman, dwi 625 Davis 
Bentley Charles, seaman Pacific Mail S. S. California 
Bentley Edwin, professor anatomy and pathologj- Medi- 
cal Department University College, and physician, of- 
fice and dwl 310 Stockton 
Bentley George, special policeman, dwl Potrero 
Bentley Horace N. (colored), messenger S. F. Post-office, 

dwl 410 Union 
Bentley James, shoemaker Patrick Tracy, dwl 24 Third 
Bentley John A., brickmolder Herman Heigler, dwl cor 

Seventeenth and Sanchez 
Bentley Timothy, shoemaker, dwl 39 Ecker, rear 
Benton Byron W., cabinetmaker Christian Sclireiber & 

Co., dwl S2S Washington 
Benton Han*v, clerk Henry Schwartz, dwl 72S Folsom 
Benton Joseph A. Rev. D.D., editor Pacific, 508 Clay, res 

Oakland 
Benton N., dwl 209 Liedesdorff 
Bentson Alexander, cook, dwl 10 Commercial 
Bentzen Edouart, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl Kate nr 

Brjant 
Bentzen Henry, clerk Dierk Gefken, dwl 923 Bryant 
Benz John, marketman, dwl 203 Octa\'ia 
Benz John C, fishmonger J. K. Kessing, dwl 713 Bdwy 
Benzecroi Abram, clerk J. Fleissner, dwl cor Stockton and 

Pacific 
Benzing J., carrier Cal. Democrat, dwl S06 Greenwich 
Benzon August F., bookkeeper J. Everding & Co., dwl 

720 California 
Beoda Dolores Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 1319 Dupont 
Bepler Alexander, caqjenter, dwl 74 Bernard 
Bepler H. laborer, S. F. Manuf. Co., dwl 348 Shipley 
Beppler John, market, SE cor Dupont and Filbert 
Bera Antonia (widow), dwl 314 Fifth 
Beraldo Frank, fisherman, dwl 10 Washington 
Beran Emanuel, shoemaker, dwl IOCS Powell 
Bei-an John, clerk Freight Department Southern Pac. R. 

R., dwl 529 Fourth 
Berbest Jean, sausagemaker, dwl SW cor Dup and Bdwj- 
Bcrehem Anthony, miller, dwl 311 Pacific 
Bercherer John, painter, dwl 361 Miima 
Berchke Julius, baker, dwl 80^ Stevenson, rear 
Eerdan George, carpenter, dwl 116 Silver 
Beregi Louis, dwl 835 Clay 

Berell Martin, with Erasmus Spurgeon, dwl 552 Bryant 
Berenger Christiiui. trunkmaker D. S. Martin & Co., dwl 

W s Brj-ant bet Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Berenslon Andrew, seaman, dwl N 9 Alta bet Montgom- 
ery' and Sansom 
Bercsford John, marketman Russ House 
Bercsfurd J. D., lather Palace Hotel, dwl 115 Second 
Beretta John, machinist Union Iron Works 
Beretta William, collector, 430 Jackson, dwl 414 Green 



Send your Orders from the Country for Eastern Transplanted Oysters to Morgan & Co 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 70S, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1352. 



Berg Adolph. assistant warehouse and ^\ithdrawal clerk 
Ctistcm House, dwl 14 Haijrht 

Berg Alexander, waiter S. F. Bar Association, dwl cor 
Clay and Stockton 

Beiv Anthony, painter G. Ammerup, dwl 21 Stevenson 

Berg- A. P., dwl 12 Washington 

Berg Carl, physician, offiL-e and dwl G18 California 

Berg Carl J., seaman, dwl SW cor East and Merchant 

Ber^ diaries, blacksmith J. Herman Schintz, dwl 521i 
Stevenson 

Berg Charles A., cabinetmaker, dwl S s Twenty-sixth bet 
Valencia and Bartlett 

Berg Christian, seaman Jerome B. Piper, 331 East 

Berg Edward, waiter G23 Commercial, dwl 525 Pine 

Berg Emil, salesman, dwl 137^ Perry 

Berg herdmande (3fauer .L- B.,\ dwl 456 Clementina 

Berg John, liquor saloon Thalia Verein Club, 204 Mont- 
gomerj', dwl 23i- Stevenson 

Berg John, rigger, dwl IS Minna 

Berg John Aug., clerk P. A. Swansy, dwl NW cor Ritch 
and Clara 

Berg Julius, bootmaker C. Dietle, dwl 2G6 Stevenson 

Berg Peter, molder Jackson Iron Foundry, dwl 1016 Pac 

Berg R.. laborer Palace Hot«l 

Berg William, lather Palace Hotel 

Berge Erick O., groceries and liquors, NE cor Green and 
Calhoun 

Berge R.. turner Cameron & Hull 

Bergen T. Adrian, clerk A. Galli & Co., dwl 20 Prospect 
PI 

Bergen William, cook, dwl N s Faimiount nr Pahner 

Bergendahl Daniel, seaman, dwl 7 Washingtuu 

Bergeot Alexander, steward Cliff House, Point Lobos Av, 
dwl 31 Hinckley 

Berger Bernard, wagonmaker H. Casebolt & Co. 

Berger Bienvenu, cheesemaker. dwl 721 Pacific 

Berger Christian, clerk C. L. Steylaars, dwl NE cor Du- 
pont and Montgomery Av 

Berger Gabriel, collector* office 402 Mont, and siu^eyor 
French Sa\ings and Loan Society, dv.i 119 Franklin 

Berger George, clerk 627 Clay, dwl Swiss Hot«l 

Berger Henry-, housejainter, dwl 433 Hayes 

Berger Hermann, dwl 1121 Montgomery 

Berger Jacob, gardener, dwl Fifteenth bet Xoe and Castro 

Berger Julius /Edward Cohn d; Co.), dwl 514 Bush 

Berger Louis, clerk Charles W. Fox, dwl 303 Eddy 

Berger Otto. bookkee:>er, dwl 333 O'Farrell 

Berger R. , seaman tugboat Rabboni 

Eergerot Jean, private school, 1211 Powell 

Bergerot John A., real estate, dwl cor Sixteenth and 
Rhode Island 

Eerges Jean, waiter Poiu"cho & Wittmann, dwl 621 Union 

Herges Louis, waiter, dwl 621 Union 

Berges P., vegetables, 20 Colombo Market 

Berges P. B. & Co. fA. Drayeur and D. Cazeaux), pro- 
prietors Miners' Restaurant, 529 and 531 Commercial 
and 769 Market 

Berges Peter Bernard fP. B. Ber'jcs <!: Co. J, dwl 411 Post 

Berges Pierre, barber, dwl 621 L'nion 

Bergevin Nelson, salesman, dwl 235 Stevenson 

Ber<re\in Peter, stcvc-di^re A. C. Freese 

BEK4;GRE\ AI iilSTlS, moneybroker, 406 Mont- 
gomery-, dwl 1111 St'ickton 

Berggren Herrman, dwl 1111 Stockton 

Bei-gh Erasmus, laborer Hinckley & Co., dwl IS Minna 

Berghauser Frederick, clerk Frederick Ikeu, dwl 1600 
Taylor 

Berghauser Joseph, dwl 1000 Tavlor 

Berghauser Philip, clerk, dwl 1600 Taylor 

Berghofer Conrad, butcher, dwl M2 Folsom 

Bergier Adolph, silversmith Schulz ic Fischer, dwl SlJ 
Stevenson 

Bergin Gustavus, porkpacker Louis Hentrich, dwl 1011 
Leavenworth 

Bei^n James J., dwl 152G Powell 

Bei^n John, laborer Townsend St. Depot Central Pacific 
R. R., dwl Sixteenth bet Folsom and Harrison 

Bergin Mary (widow), (Berjin <t Benn), dwl SE cor 
Powell and Green 

Bei^n Michael, attorney at law, office 79 Montgomerj- 
Block, dwl 743 Pine 

Bergin P., driver City R. R. 

Berlin Patrick C, cook 542 Clay, dwl 1140 Mission 

Bergin Thomas I. rMcAllUters dr Bjy attorney at law, 
office 52S California 

Bergin William, foreman Standard Soap Co., dwl E s Mis- 
sion Creek bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 

Bergin & Benn ,'Manf Beryin and John S. BennJ, pro- 
prietors American Mills, W s Fourth nr Berrj- 



Rerglimd Hans, shipcai-penter Oregon S. S. Co., dwl 3S 

Perry 
Berglund Nicholas, shoemaker Nolan Bros., dwl 232 

OTarrell 
Berglund Nils, Scaudma\ian Soc, 71 New Montgomerj' 
Bergmann Abraham, confectioner, 200 Washington, dwl 

102 Bernard 
Bergmann Alexander, mariner, dwl W s Devisadero bet 

Geary and O'Farrell 
Bergmann Henry, shoemaker Liebegott & Thijmler, dwl 

25 ilorton 
Bergmann Jacob f Frankenthal <t Co.), dwl 31S Sutter 
Bergmann Samuel, butcher Wilson, Merry & Co., dwl 331 

Kearny 
Bergmann William, laborer, dwl Second Av bet Sixteenth 

and Seventeenth 
Bergnei J., Alfred, sign and ornamental painter, 219 Mis- 
sion, dwl 232 Fremont 
Bergold Charles Y. . propt r FYancouia House, E s San Bruno 

Road nr Twenty-eighth 
Bergscliicker William, brewer, dwl 317 Francisco 
1£EK(*$0\ OLE, carpenterand builder, 537 Sacramento, 

dwl 312 Fulton 
Bergstedt A. P., bootmaker F. Beez, dwl 337 Bush 
Bergstein Louis, dry goods. 132S Polk 
Berg>trom John, organ builder, NE cor T^venty-fou^th 

and Mission, dwl W s Lundy Lane nr EsmeraJda Av , 

Bemal Heights 
Berillat Frank, butcher, dwl 738 Washington 
Bering John P., salesman J. M. Eckfeldt&Co.,andsecre- 

tan." Pac. Wire and Wire Rope Manufacturing Co., dwl 

417 Francisco 
Beriot Pasquale, waiter, dwl 3 Margaret PI nr Vallejo 
Berk ilaurice G., dwl 3 Harriet 
Berkeley Ferry and Raih-oad Co., William Stuart secre- 

tan-. office 113 Leidcsdorff 
BEKKELEY 1 1\B> A^DTOWX EMrKOVEMEXT 

AS^iKI.VTIOX, S. X. Penwell secretary, office 624 

Montgomery 
Berkeley Villa Association, William Stuart secretary', 

office 113 Leidesdorff 
Berkley Joseph, laborer Palace Hotel, dwl 609 Post 
Berkley Michael, fireman Coiner's Department U. S. Mint, 

dwl 1323 Sacramento 
Berkowitz Mever, merchant, dwl 556 Minna 
Berkowitz R. Mrs., cloaks, mantillas, etc., 1008 Stockton, 

dwl b'^(y Minna 
Berlack Maurice, bookkeeper Gabriel Abraham, dwl 4 

Hyde 
Berlaman J., chief engineer Avith Goodall, Nelson & Per- 
kins, dwl 915 Montgomery- 
Berlenz Joseph, waiter, dwl 433 Broadway 
Berli Samuel, gardener Theresa Scho, dwl San Miguel 

Station 
Berlin Augustus, mcssman stm Pelican, Oregon S. S. Co. 
Berlin Henry, traveling agent, dwl 1430 California 
Berlin Ludwig, seaman, dwl lli> Jackson 
Berlin Max, waiter, dwl 213 Stevenson 
Berlin William, stevedore A. C. Freese, dwl NW cor 

Franklin and Lillv Av 
Berliner Herman A. Diamant, B. d- Co.), dwl 326 Minna 
Berliner Isador, furniture, NE cor Third and Harrison 
Berliner Sarah (widow), dwl 19i Rausch 
Berling John, machinist Charles H. Leavitt, dwl 14 Wil- 
liam 
Berling Joseph, laborer Saulnmnn & Lauenstein, dwl 

Broadwav bet Montgomen- and Keaniy 
Berling Richard, baker Frederick Helhng, dwl 110 Dup 
Bermann Otto, eanvassir, dwl SOI Folsom 
Bemiaster H., carpenter U. S. Marine Hospital 
Bermel Celine Mrs., French and English School, 33 South 

Park 
Bermel John G., dwl 33 South Park 
Bermier Marie (widow), lodgings, 8 Polk Lane 
Bermingham Edward, compositor Daily Examiner, dwl 

730 Market 
Bermingham Edward R,, clerk Cotmty Recorder, dwl 245 

Tehama 
Bermingham James, dwl 212 Post 
Bcnningham John, ship]ting and forwarding, office John 

Rosenield, dwl Russ House 
Bermingham Margaret (widow), dwl 125 Clinton 
Bermin;i:ham Margaret (widow), dwl W s Ash Av bet 

Larkin and Polk 
Bemdngham Thomas I., hamessmaker W. F. Dorrance, 

dwl 321 Pacific 
Bema Frederick, collector, office 430 Jackson, dwl 2210 Pow 
Bemnl Geronima (widow), dwl SE cor Seventeenth and 

Church 



?ACIPIC'C0AST~BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 1875-7, H. &. Langley, Publisher, S. P. 



JEWELEY made to order and EEPAIEED by D. W. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Merchant 



BEE. 



126 



BER 



Beman Florence, expresswagon , cor Broadway and Davis 

Bernan John, laborer, dwi 552 Mission 

Bernard Alexander, cook Ocean View House, dwl S\V cor 

Montyumery Av and ^■allejo 
Bernard Alfred, waiter stm Los Angeles, Market St. 

Wharf 
Bernard Ann (widow), dwl E s Webster bet Ellis and 

O'Farrell 
Bernard Aubrey, waiter L. Donnadieu, dwl cor Pacific 

and New Montg-omery 
Bernard August, clerk Joseph Bros., dwl 2214 Sixteenth 
Bernard Barney,' expressman, dwl 149 Shipley 
Bernard Bernard, upholsterer, 318 Polk, dwl 1310 Larkin 
Bernard B. F., clerk A. B. Elfelt & Co., dwl 323 Sutter 
BEK\AKD CHARLES, cofEee and spice manufacturer, 

707 Sansom, dwl 312 Oak 
Beniard Charles A., house and signpainter, 629 Merchant 

dwl Kill Clay 
Bernard Francis, carpenter and builder, 122 Washington, 

dwl 1318 Larkin 
Bernard Frank, laborer, dwl 512 Fourth 
Bernard George, baker D. R. Brower, dwl NE cor Stock- 
ton and Vallejo 
Beniard Guillemio, cook, dwl Visitacion Valley bet San 

Jose Road and San Bruno Road 
Beniard H., hairdresser, dwl 537 Stevenson 
Bernard Isaac, varieties, N s SLxteenth bet Mission and 

Valencia 
Beniard James, grainer, dwl 24 Howard Court 
Bernard Jane Mrs., dwl 7S1 Folsom 
Bernard John, lodgings, 5 Druuim 
Bernard John, niachineliand I). A. Macdonald & Co. 
Bernard Juan, longshoreman, dwl 418 Drumm 
Beniard Julius, furniture and cari>ets, 1120 Stockton 
Bernard Mary (widow), dwl 202 Tehama 
Bernard Michael D., porter Main & Winchester, dwl 1323 

Montgomery 
Bernard Robert, clerk Fleishman, Sichel & Co., dwl SE 

cor Union and Jones 
Bernard Uhlrich, baker William J. Davis, dwl 23^ Second 
Eernaza Fi'ancisco, fisherman, dwl foot of Clay 
Bemdt Carl, seaman, dwl 530 Green 
Benidt Joseph, laborer, dwl Fifth Av nr B, South S. F. 
Berndt Louis, tailor, Iti St. Maiy 
Berne Jean, waiter, dwl Tay nr Sacramento 
Bernede Joseph, laundryman, dwl 31 Hinckley 
Berner Frederick, dwl 432 Broadway 
Berner Frederick, shoecutter Calisher & Jacobs, dwl 787 

Folsom 
Berner Jnhn, laborer, dwl SW cor Shasta and Michigan 
Bcrneri Annie Miss, dwl 1015 Washington 
Bernert John, messenger Quartermaster's Department U. 

S. A., 105 Stockton 
Bemhanier Harry, restaurant, 21 Sutter, dwl 25S Stev 
Benihard Bemhard fStahle d: BernhardJ, dwl 215 Pros- 
pect PI 
Benihard George J., dwl 314 Oak 
P-LTiihard Samuel H. (Ellis d: BJ, dwl 550 Jessie 
Bernluird Sarah Mrs., dwl (iOO Jones 
Bernhardt Charles, clerk Continental Hotel 
Bcrnieri John, clerk Bi-izzolara & Co., dwl 24 Wetniore PI 
Beniis Building, 024 and 620 California 
Bernius Frederick, special policeman, dwl cor Beale and 

Bryant 
Bemon John, laborer Boutinon & Eulland 

Bernstein , salesman, dwl 305 Keaniy 

Bernstein Abram, fruits and confectionerj', 523 Third 
Bernstein Abraham, oystcnuan George Benistein, dwl 

253 Minna 
Benistein Adolph, salesman, dwl 1114 Market 
Bernstein David, tailor, dwl 779 Folsom 
Bernstein Ellas, furniture, 313 and 315 Third 
Bernstein Fanny (widow), dwl 779 Folsom 
Bernstein George, oyster saloon, 50 and 51 California 

Market, dwl 2.'>3 Minna 
Bernstein Henry, auction commission merchant, dwl 915 

Howard 
Bernstein Hermann, tailor, 907 Br3'ant 
Bernstein Isaac, oystennan George Bernstein, dwl 253 

Minna 
Benistein Joseph, clothing and gents' furnishing goods, 

824 Market, dwl 119 OTarrell 
Bernstein Julius C, clerk M. C. Benistein, dwl 705 Har 
Benistein Louis, clerk Jacob A. Alexander, dwl 6 John 
Bernstein Louis, clerk Joseph Bernstein, dwl 119 O'Far- 

reU 
Bernstein Morris C, furniture and bedding, 517 Califor- 
nia, dwl 1104 Taylor 
Bernstein Solomon, expressman, dwl 246 Beale, rear 



Bernstein Solomon, fancy goods, 3S Fourth, dwl 405 Post 
Bernzott M. P., dwl 816 Montgomerj* 
Bero Jub, waiter Emerson Corville & Co., dwl cor Mont- 
gomery Av and Pacific 
Beronio G.. proprietor Roma Hotel, 215 Broadway 
Berot B.. gardener French Hospital, S s Bryant bet Fifth 

and Sixth 
Berou F., baker, dwl 641 Broadway 
Berracca S., laborer Hobbs, Pomeroy & Co., dwl IS Pac 
Berretto John, machinist, dwl 19 Sherwood PI 
BeiTich Fnuik, carpenter, 629i Union, dwl 375 Jessie 
Berrill Thomas, caqienter Palace Hotel 
Berring Rudolph, barkeeper J. Casimer, dwl SW cor Ma- 
son and Clay 
Berrogi John, waiter Sciaccaluga & Limberte, dwl 835 

Clay 
Berrj' A. A., miner, dwl WTiat Cheer House 
Berry Albert, capitalist, office 402 Front, res Oakland 
Berry Augustus, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Berry Charles, Bricklayers' Pro. Assn. 232 Sutter 
Bern,' David, grocer, dwl 710 California 
Berry Douglas J., Girpenter, dwl 12 Clementina 
Berry Edwin W., foreman Spirit of the Times, dwl 1319 

Montgomerj' 
Berrj- Enoch, machlnehand Daniel D. Holland, dwl 1131 

Folsom 
Berry Fulton G. {Berry S.- Capp;, dwl 2212 Howard 
Berry George, painter, dwl 371 Brftnnan 
Berr^' George C, woolgrower. dwl 600 Bush 
Berrj' George W., teamster Jason Springer, dwl 10 

Eleventh 
Berry G. H., painter Pacific Furniture Mauuf. Co. 
Berri' Gideon M., bookkeeper Sheriffs OtRce, dwl 427 

t>'ler 
Ecrrj' Isaac, cigars and tobacco, dwl 130 Eighth 
Berr}- James, machinist Union Iron Works 
Berry' James. shipwTight, dwl 20 Frederick, rear 
Berry J. E., carpenter Palace Hotel, dwl 110 Minna 
Berry John fGriswold & B./, dwl 23 Welsh 
Berry John, carpenter Daniel Sweeney, dwl 414 Tehama 
Berry John, carriage painter, dwl 23 W'elsh 
Berry John, printer, dwl 719 Market 
Berrv John, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Berrj- John, shoemaker Howe & Harris, dwl 227 Second 
Berry John E., merchant, dwl 741 Market 
Berry John J., clerk General Freight Office Central Pa- 
cific R. R., dwl 1237 Folsom ■ 
Berrj- Jonas, seaman, dwl 212 Steuart, rear 
Beny Julia Mr^., dwl 263 Third 
Berry J. W. Mrs., lodgings. 109 Montgomerj- 
Berry L., laborer Southern Pac. R. R-, dwl cor Sierra and 

Louisiana 
Berrj- Michael, cellarman, dwl Eagle Hotel 
Berry Moretz. longshoreman, dwl 204 Steuart 
Een^- Richard, engineer stm Montana, Folsom St. Wharf 
Berry Richard, laborer, dwl 260^ Clara 
Bern- Street House. Ferdinand Stoetzer proprietor, Berry 

bet Tliird and Fourth 
Berry Street Wharf, S s Berrj' bet Third and Fourth 
Bern,- Thomas, carpenter California Mills, dwl 1723 Jessie 
Berrv Thomas, driver Market St. R. R. 
Berrv Thomas H. , operator Atlantic and Pacific Telegraph 

Co., dwl E s Capp bet Twenty-fifth and Twenty-Sixth 
Berry Washington L., assayer, dwl 305 Minna 
Berrj' WUliam D., compositor Spirit of the Times, dwl 

NW cor Kearny and Broadway 
Berrj' William F., delivery- clerk Atlantic and Pacific Tele- 

grajih Co., dwl 305 Minna 
Berry WiUiam L., compositor Spirit of the Times, res 

West Oakland 
Berry W. O. M. (Treadwell ,0 CoJ, res Oakland 
Berry & Capp f Fulton G. Berry and Charles S. Capp), 

real-estate and house agents, 418 Montgomerj- 
Eerrunger Frank, fireman stm Amador, Broadway "SMiarf 
Berrjinan Frederick M., cashier Eerrjnnan & Doyle, dwl 

835 Mission 
Eerrj-man Henrj' B. (Berrijinan ,k Doyle) y dwl "Windsor 

House 
Berrnnan John, dwl NE cor Montgomerj' and Pacific 
BerrJTuan & Doyle (Henry B. Bcrryman and Mrs. 

Louisa Diii/leJ , coal and pig iron, and agents Welling- 
ton Colliery, Nanainio, B. C, otfice bulkhead bet 

Pacific and Jackson St. wharves 
Bersaghini Antonio /■Marsili *£r Co.', dwl 320 Broadway 
Bei-son A. {A. Bcrson i(- Son), chvl 828 Washington 
Berson A. & Son iGiistave BersonJ , carpets and oilcloths, 

710-714 Washington 
Berson A. Mnie.. laundry, 828 Washington 
Bersth Gottlieb, brewer Jacob Nibbe & Co., dwl 1420 Pine 



Get your Blue Point Transplanted Oysters from MOE&AN & CO., California Marke* 



{. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 70S, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 




Bert A. Miss, dressmaker, dwl E s Shotwell bet Twenty- 
first and Twentv-second 
Bert Bernard (Henry Schroder & Co.), res Bordeaux, 

Frtince 
Bert E. G., theatrical manager, dwl W s Treat Av bet 

Ti\ent,v-first and Twenty-second 
Bert Edward G. , clerk Geortte A. Atwood, dwl Shotwell 

bet Twentieth and T^venty■flrst 
BERT FKEOERirK W .. lessee and manager Grand 
Opera House N s Mission bet Third and Fourth, dwl 
W s Shotwell bet Twenty-first and Twenty-second 
Berta Formosa, cook John C. Poetz, dwl cor Sacramento 

and Dupont 
Berta Guiseppe, waiter N. Giamboui & Co., dwl 639 Pacific 
Berta Samuel, cook John C. Poetz, dwl cor Sacramento 

and Dupont 
Bertala Peter, tinsmith, dwl 630 Green 
Bertard A., dwl 816 Dupont 
Berteling Louis A., optician Thomas Houseworth & Co., 

dwl SW cor Larkin and Green 
Bertelsen A. , student Heald's Business College 
Bertelsen Martin, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Bertelsen Otto, drajTuan, cor Front and Commercial, dwl 

E s Buchanan bet Post and Geary 
Bertelson Adolph, clerk Jacob Mehrteus, dwl 520 Vallejo 
Bertelson Christian, seaman, dwl 19 Welsh 
Berten Angelo, laborer, dwl Visitacion Valley bet San 

Jos6 Road and San Bruno Road 
Bertest Lona, cook Philip Donoho, dwl Montgomerj' nr 

Vallejo 
Bertheau C, clerk Henry Balzer & Co., dwl NW cor 

Washington and Powell 

Berthelot Charles, porter, dwl 6 Martin's Block, S s Mar- 
ket nr Seventh 
Berthier Louis, machinist, dwl 738 Washington 
Berthold Louis iBerthold * Orantz/, dwl 329 Broadway 
Berthold & Grantz f Louis Berthold and Adolph Grantz), 

market, 206 Broadway 
Berthrop Edu-ard, butcher, dwl 317 Hayes 
Bertin Alexander, dyeing and scouring, 147 Third, 334 

Bush, and ,'i21 Filbert, dwl 147 Third 
Bertin Leon, packer J. A. Folger&Co., dwl 639 Broadway 
Bertini Raphael, framemaker Louis Ghilardi, dwl 723 

Sansom 
Bertini Ulderigo (L. lAitched £ Co. J, dwl 723 Sansom 
Bertley Burnett, stonecutter, dwl cor Eighteenth and Do- 

i'^res 
Bertody Charles, physician and surgeon, dwl and office 

1005 Stockton 
Bertolacci Sebastiano, agent Sebastopol Charcoal, dwl 518 

Vallejo 
Bertolo Geronimo, tinsmith, dwl 518 Vallejo 
Bertols Albert, cabinetmaker Christian Schreider & Co., 

dwl NE cor Main and Folsom 
Bcrtoluce John, expressman NW cor Wa.sh and Davis 
Berton Flavien, cook E. Marehand, dwl 29 Minna 
BERTON FRAXC'IS, manager Swiss-American Bank 
and consul for Portugal and Switzerland, office 627 
Clay, dwl 11 South Park 
Berton Joseph, dwl 77 Clementina 
Bertoni Charles, waiter Leon Dingeon & Co., dwl NW or 

Sansom and Pacific - 

Bertram Dennis, oysterman Lick House 
BERTR.4IH THOMAS, stoves and tinware, 982 and 

984 Folsom, dwl 31i Garden 
Bertrand Alfred, barkeeper, dwl 209 Montgomery Av 
Bertrand Andrew, fuiTier, 501 Kearny 
Bertrand George, caneworker George A. La Rose, dwl 324 

Commercial 
Bertrand Hippolyte, cook, dwl 506 Union 
Bertrand John, cook, dwl 432 Broadway 
Bertrand Joseph, waiter American Exchange 
Bertrand Joseph (Bertrand d- Mauser), dwl 432 BdwT 
Bertrand Josefine Miss.witb Louis Lengfeld, dwl 738 Vallejo 
Bertrand Rosina (widow), seamstress, dwl 864 Folsom 
Bertrand John, brickmolder Herman Heigler, dwl cor 

Seventeenth and Sanchez 
Bertrand & Mauser (Joseph Bertrand and Albrecht Mau- 
mt), proprietors All-Nations Hotel, 432 and434Bdwy 
Bertrandis Alphonse, carpenter, dwl 675 Brjant 
Bertrandis Edward, carpenter, dwl 575 Brj-ant 
Bertrandt Denis, ovsterman, dwl 4 Tay 
Bertz Jacob iDiez',B. A Co.l, dwl 2215 Fillmore 
Berude Gustav, seaman, dwl 41 Jackson 
Berville Edouard, laborer, dwl 636 Pacific 
Berwanger Martin, cook Henn' Bokmann, dwl 616 Cal 
Berwick James, laborer Central Pacific R. R., dwl 848 

Ritch 
Berwick Joseph, laborer, dwl 130} Shipley 



Berwick Maggie, dressmaker, dwl 130J Shipley 

Berwick Thomaa O. , sailmaker Harding & Brann, dwl 1127 

Clay 
Ber^vick William B., laborer Townsend St. Depot, Central 

Pacific R. B., dwl 348} Ritch 
Berwin Moritz (P. Berwin tfc BroJ, res New York 
Berwin P. & Bro. (Moritz Berwin/ y importers and job- 
bers hats and caps, 106 B.attery 
Benvin Pineus (P. Berwin * BroJ, dwl 1320 Tyler 
Berz Peter, ironmolder, dwl 1016 Pacific 
Berzer Gabriel, collector, dwl 119 Franklin 
Besan»;on Eugene, bootmaker with F. X. Kast, dwl 11 

Mar\' Lane 
Besby Henrj' J., saloon keeper, dwl 314 Ivy Av 
Bescheinen Henry, watchmaker with Charles H. Dewey, 

dwl 832 Broadway 
Bescheinem William, watchmaker, dwl 832 Broadway 
Beschormann Adolph, upholsterer with Schlueter & Vol- 

berg, dwl 328 Mason 
Beschormann Augustus, dwl 328 Mason 
Beschormann Charles F., clerk California Democrat, dwl 

312 Post 
Beschormann Otto, upholsterer John A. Shaber & Co. , dwl 

328 Mason 
Besecke William (Joseph Warjiwr i- Co.), dwl 1512 Stock 
Besse Joseph O., clerk with Kaindler& Co., dwl 1407 Bush 
Besse Samuel H., dwl W s Buchanan bet Bush and Sutter 
Besssemer Henrv L. , chemist and perfumer, 14 Mary 
Bessenger Patrick, teamster Morris Williams, dwl 432} 

Fell 
Besser Joseph (McDonald & B.I, dwl 318 Pacific 
Bessey Rose Mrs., children's clothing, dwl 638 Howard 
Bessi 'Louis, boilermaker. dwl 47 Clementina 
Bessou Auguste, cook, dwl 6*26 Vallejo 
Besson Felix (widow), sewing, dwl 17 Union PI 
Besson Gustave, carrier Courrier de San Francisco, dwl 522 

Pine 
Bessonet George, mason Palace Hotel 
Bessy Patrick, barkeeper, dwi 243 Stevenson 
Best and Belcher Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), William 

Willis secretary, office 4«« California room 17 ,, 
Best Charles, brewer, dwl 725 Green, rear 
Best David A. (colored), steward, dwl E s Front nr Bdwj- 
Best James, Shipwrights' Jour. Assn, 71 New Montgomery 
Best John (Johnsm * B.), dwl 1717 (1817) Leavenworth 
Best John T., clerk U. S. Anny Headquarters, 106 Stock- 
ton, dwi 319 Fremont 
Best Robert, farmer, dwl 239 Minna 
Best William, shipcarpenter, dwl cor Sierra and Louisiana 
Best William, stairbuilder, dwl 516 Leavenworth 
Besta John H., liquor saloon, 913 Kearny, dwl 631 Vallejo 
Besthorn Christopher, toohnaker John Weichart, dwl 18 

First 
Besthorn George (Mahlstedt& B.;, dwl SE corO Farrell 

and Leavenworth 
Beston Frank, clerk, dwl 227 Second 
Bestnn John, carpenter Maguire's New Tlieater 
Bestor Henr>' T. , architect, office 652 Market, dwl S s Clay 

near Scott 
Betaux Eugene L., winedealer, dwl 706 Pine 
Betaux Louis, foreman Prosper May, dwl 700 Pine 
Betche August, cooper F. Schillu & Son, dwl 5 Maiden 

Lane bet Stockton and Powell 
Betoold Jacob, butcher, dwl N s First Av nr Kentucky, 

South S. F. 
Betebema Robert, carpenter, dwl 613 Mission 
Beteloty Pietro, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery 
Betger Charles, jeweler California Jewelry Co. 

Betger Edward, bootmaker, 740 Vallejo and 710 Powell, 

dwi 736 Green 
Bethel George, waiter Pacific Mail S. S. Ancon 
Bethel Samuel, surveyor, dwl 322 Third , , ,„ 

Bethel Thomas W., watchman Public Buildings, dwl 13 
Fifth Av , , , „. ^ 

Bethje William, master sch Ida Florence, dwl 42 Steuart 
Betkowski John, baker ivith G. Melsing, dwl NE cor Pow- 
ell and Vallejo 
Betkowski Peter, express wagon, cor Montgomery and 

Bush, dwl 23 Silver 
Betserie John, cook, dwl 1116 Erj-ant j , ,, , 

Bettencourt Caisar A. (Bettencourt db MartinJ, dwl 514 

Stockton 
Bettencourt & Martin (Ctfsar A. Bettencourt and Man- 
uel Martin I , hairdressers, 20 Clay 
Bettig Conrad, baker Hemme & Reuter, dwl 29 Kearny 
Bettis 0. J., blacksmith, 1434 Jackson, dwl 1803 Larkin 
Bettman Moses, Chemical Olive Soap Works, S s Braiman 
nr Eighth, office 311 Commercial, dwi 508 Eddy 



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■PACiriC COAST BUSINESS DIEECTOEY Contains Addresses 60,000 Merchants. 



D. W. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, "Wholesale and Retail, cor. Merchant and Men 



Betts James, longshoreman, dwl 111 Jessie 

Belts John M. , physician, office 128 Kearny, dwl 24 O'Far- 

rell 
Belts Peter M.. vice-president Betts Spring Co., office 218 

and t?L*0 Frenmnt. dwl 1523 Mission 
Betts Hnlurt, ^;MiakT W. F. Dorrance, dwl 812 California 
BKTTS Sl*iei\4; CO., William M. Belts president, Peter 

M. Betts vice-president, Edwin Fretwell secretary', 

office 218 and 220 Fremont 
Bells W. A., purser stm San Joaquin, Jackson St. Wharf 
Betts William, springuiaker Betts Spring Co., dwl 409 

Minna 
Belts William M., president Betts Spring Co., office 218 

Frenmnl, res Oakland 
Buty Ohristiiin. barkeeper, dwl 337 Bush 
Bctz Jiilm, machinist Union Works 
Bctzel Chas. W., resident physician German Hospital, 427 

Brannau 
Betzel Isidor, hookkeeper I. Cook & Brother, dwl 537 

O'FaiTell 
Betzel Louis (Betzel lO Cohn), dwl 537 O'Farrell 
Betzel & Cohn (Louifi Betzel and Louis 31. Co/in), manu- 
facturers boys' clothing, 109 Sansom 
Eetzke Charles, ironworker Jackson Iron Foundry, dwl 5 

Maiden Lane 
Betziild Charles, seaman, dwl 204 Steuart 
EcLichlein Charles, brewer Frauenholz & Danson, dwl 

Monlgomery Av betVallejo and Green 
Beucler J. Mrs., ladies nurse, dwl 30 Bernard, rear 
Beudel Abraliam, barber, Valencia bet Fifteenth and Six- 
teenth 
Beutlor Emelia (widow), dwl 114 Ridley 
Leutler Frank B., shademaker George W. Clark, dwl 

StocktoTi nr Post 
Bevan Benjamin, clerk William Craig, 905 Dupont 
Bevan Charles, plasterer Palace Hotel, dwl 25 Morton 
Bevan Emanuel, shoemalcer, dwl 1G08 Powell 
Bevan James, waiter 548 Clay, dwl 8 Bernard 
Bevan Jt.thn, oiler stm Montana, Folsom St. ^Nliarf 
Bevan Washington J., mining, dwl 805 Mission 
Bevans Isaac, compositor Spaulding &l Barto, dwl 1111 

Mason 
Bevell H., machinist helper Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wharf 
Bevell Margaret (widow), dwl 29 Park Av 
Beven T. E., student Heald's Business College 
Beveridge Arthur B. (Beveridgc tfc AsktonJ, dwl 809 

Stockton 
Beveridge Horatio, clerk Falkner, Bell & Co., dwl 1620 

Wasliin'.fton 
Be\-cri<iLrc -loscph, waiter, dwl 10 Clara 
Btli* 1':UBBM;K a ASIITON (Arthur B. Bevendge and 

Cfinrlcs A><liton), commission merchants, SW cor 

Jackson and Sansom 
Beverlcigh Co. (Chinese), cigar manufactixrer8,409 Pacific 
Beverly John, gn ccries, dwl 729 Folsom 
Beverly R. M. (widow), nurse, dwl 324 Fremont 
Beverly Walter, bellman Grand Hotel 
Beverson Carsten. groceries and liquors, 570 Mission 
Beversen Martin, clerk Carsten Bevcrsen, dwl 670 Mission 
Bevins William M., printer, dwl 1205 l^'ler 
Bewley Clifton L., bookkeeper, Gedge & Thayer, dwl 628 

Suiter 
Bewley William J., clerk, dwl 210 Minna 
Beyer C. Joseph, Shipwrights' Jour. Assn. 71 New Mont 
Beyer Edv/ard, baker A. E. Swain, dwl U Minna 
Beyer Emma Miss, embroidery, dwl 625 Vallejo 
Beyer Louis, hairdresser, dwl 625 Vallejo 
Beyer Marietta Mrs., lodgings, 625 Vallejo 
Beyer Olto fShncller tt- Bi-ycrl, dwl 1146 Market 
Beyer Robert W., teamster, 221 California, dwl 1023 McAl- 
lister 
Beyer William, cabinetmaker Goodwin & Co., dwl 30 Rilch 
Beyer Soren A., Scandinavian Soe., dwl 721 New Mont 
Buyerle John E., coppersmith Jackson Iron Foundry, 

dwl 700 Broadway 
Beyersdorf Louis (Sdfferhill it- BJ, 200 Van Ness Av 
Bcyiiun L>avid, laborer Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl W s 

Michigan nr Sierra 
Bcynon William, seaman, dwl 27 Steuart 
Bezonu Milo, laborer Giononi Isalo, dwl San Jos6 Road nr 

St. Man.''8 College 
Bezzini Daniel, cook N. Giamboni & Co., 519 Clay 
Biagini Casslmero, helper Guiseppe Massone, dwl 131 

Vallejo 
Biagini Giacomo, blacksmith Guiseppe Massone, dwl 311 

Vallejo 
Biancalana Girolamo, framemaker Louis Ghilardi, dwl 22 

Second 
Bianehi A., tailor, dwl 1337 Dupont 



Bianchi Alberto, dwl 723 Sansom 

Bianehi Antonio, laborer, dwl 10 Union PI 

Bianchi B. Guiseppe, cook, N. Giamboni & Co. 519 Clay 

Bianchi Carlo, marble works, 829 JIarket, dwl 26 Mission 

Bianchi Eugcnio, teacher vocal music and operatic artist, 

426 Kearny, dwl 621 California 
Bianchi G. B., cari^enter and billiard maker, 813 Mont 
Bianchi Guiseppe, laborer California Italian Paste Co., dwl 

cor Montgomery Av and Vallejo 
Bianchi Lazaro, cook Francisco Bazzuro, dwl 10 Union PI 
Bianclii Pietro, carpenter, dwl 9 Union PI 
Bianchini Amadeo, laborer California Italian Paste Co., 

dwl 5 Margaret PI 
Biarnes Josephine Mrs., laundress Mrs. Angeline Digean, 

dwl NE cor Dupont and Pacific 
Bibb Daniel H.. dwl 717 Howard 
Bibb Gei^rge. dwl 717 Howard 

Bibber Charles, carpenter Cal. Pacific R. R. steamers 
Bibibcr Van, carpenter, dwi 270 First 
Bibbins Tracy L. (Bihbins .t Co. and V. M. Peyton it 

Co.), dwl 1507 Leavenworth 
Bibbins & Co. (Tracy L. Bibbins and Valentine M. Pey- 
ton^, real estate, office 402 Kearny 
Bibby James, driver Central R. R., dwl Brannan nr 

Seventh 
Bibeau Isaac, blacksmith, dwl Mission bet Twent)'-eighth 

and Twenty-ninth 
Bibend Ferdinand, florist, dwl W s San Bruno Road nr 

Twenty-ninth 
Bibend Mary (widow), dwl W s Twelfth bet Howard and 

Folsom 
Eiber Madam, dressmaker, lOllA^ Stockton 
Bibergall Jacob, peddler, dwl 508 Broadwaj' 
Richard Charles N., clerk Nicholas Bichard, dwl 365 First 
BI('IIAKB» ^K'UOLAS, coalyard, 10 and IS Howard, 

dwl 365 First 
Bickel Miuieline C. (widow), dwl 26 Haight 
Eickford Chauncy A., cook, dwl S s Tuwnseud bet Sev- 
enth and Eighth 
Bickmore George, carpenter, dwl 63 Clementina, rear 
Bieknell F.. cutter D. W. Emerson, dwl 5 Everett 
Bicuste Peter, cook Almshouse, Mission and Ocean House 

Road 
Biddle Frederick W., bookkeeper Bennett & Page, dwl 

225 Bush 
Biddle Philip, capitalist, dwl 652 Mission 
Biddlecomb Joshua, mariner, dwl 741 Market 
Biddolph James, machinist Palmer, Knox & Co., dwl 619 

Mission 
Biddulph E., dwl 424 Sansom 
Biddy Tliomas, machinist Risdon, I. and L. Works, dwl 

Broadway nr Montgomery 
Bidlack Benjamin A., druggist, dwl 1024 Stockton 
Bidlack William Wallace, physician, office and dwl 919 

Stockton 
Eidleman Enoch G., bookkeeper E. Martin & Co., res Oak- 
land 
Bidleman William A., clerk E. Martin & Co., dwl Ws 

Ninth bet Folsom and Harrison 
Eiedenbach August, beer saloon, NE cor Mission and 

Third, dwl 236 Minna 
Eiederman Erolinda (widow), dwl 1211 Bush 
Eiedernian, Louis, cook 11 Sixth, dwl 360 Clementina 
BiedeiTiian Richard, upholsterer William J. Heuey & Co., 

dwl 113 Perry 
Bieler Adolph, tailor, 6 Quincy 
Bieler Mary E., saleswoman Pauline Locher, dwl SW cor 

Larkin and Green 
Bielawski Cassimir, draftsman U. S. Surveyor-General, 

dwl 242 Stevenson 
Bielenberg Peter H., clerk Henry Lange, dwl 346 Town- 
send 
Bielenberg W., tanner, dwl Columbia Hotel 
Biclski Max fJacoby ct- B.J, dwl 927 Jackson 
Bien Joseph, machinist and locksmith, 311 Batterj', dwl 

305 Tyler 
Bienenfield Elias, ladies' and gents* fiirnishing goods, 1229 

Stockton, dwl 1231 Stockton 
Bierbon W., jeweler, dwl 924 Folsom 
Bierbi-auer Carl, tinsmith Sol. Wangenheim & Co., dwl 

123 Sacramento 
Bierbrauer John, Ciibinetmaker, dwl 1133i^ Harrison 
Biercc iVlbert S., sweepccllar Melter and Refiner's De- 

imrlment U. S. Mint, res Oakland 
Bieriioff Sanmel (Schoenholz d- BruthcrJ, dwl 110 Sixth 
Biennann August, baker Balthaser Stumpf, dwl 226 Pac 
Bicrmann Edward, miner, dwl 741 Market 
Biennann Henry O., cooper Pacific Distillingand Refining 

Co., dwl N s Filbert bet Fillmore and Steiner 



MORGAIT & CO.'S Celebrated Saucelito Transplanted Oysters, 87 California Market. 



C. p. VAU SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Eearny, Established 1862. 



Bienie M. T., niredrawer, dwl 3 King 

Biers Charles H., cabinetmaker L. & E. Emanuel, dwl 262 

CIcmtiitina 
Biersdiw-ale Charles, cabinetmaker, 731 Mission 
Biescr Charles, barkeei)er John Gingg, dwl 2 Qulncy PI 
Biesta Frederico, clerk Italian Consul and teacher lang- 
uages, dwl 331 Montgomerj' 
Biesterfeld Osc-.ir, laundr>man,*dwl 1520 Stockton 
Biesterfeldt Dittmer, waiter New Atlantic Hotel 
Bifield William, loundrjTuan Savage &; Son, dwl SW cor 

First and Mission 
Bigalow J., mokler Francis I. Curry 
Bigranel F., dentist T. H. Ferg^ison, dwl 224 Kearny 

Eiyelow , sewing-machine agent, dwl 542 Br^'ant 

Big:elow C. P., Bricklayers' Pro. Union, 232 Sutter 
Bigelow Daniel, engineer Pac. Furniture il. Co., dwl 154 

Dora 
Bij^elow Francis H., printer Bulletin Oflfice, dwl 315 Ritch 
Bigelow George H. , agent State Investment and Insurance 

Co., res Oakland 
Bigelow H. B. (Holcamb Bros. & Co.), res New Haven, 

Conn. 
Bigel'Av H. I)., seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
BI«;£LO>V HE\RY H., general manager Home Mu- 
tual Insurance Co., 400 California, res Oakland 
Bigelow John, Bricklayers' Pro. Union, 232 Sutter 
Bigelow John, miner, dwl 424 Sansom 
Bigelow John F., with Cross & Co., dwl 619 Pine 
Bigelow Jonathan E. , city agent State Investment and In- 
surance Co., dwl 152 Perry 
Bigelow L. C, capitalist, dwl Grand Hotel 
Bigelow Loms, driver City R. R,, dwl W s Minna bet 

Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Bigelow Susan H. Mrs., dwl 1 Hampton Coiut 
Bigelow Windsor, merchant (Silver City, Idaho), dwl 844 

Valencia 
Bigger A., steward Pacific Mail S. S. Costa Rica 
Bigger Alexander, cabinetmaker William J. Heney & Co., 

" dwl 227 Post 
Bigger William, teamster, dwl 326 Tehama, rear 
Biggers Jennie B. (widow), adjuster Coiner's Department 

U. S. Mint, dwl 1224 Mission 
Biggins James, teamster J. McDevitt, dwl S s Vallejo nr 

Sansom 
Biggins Patrick, driver Omnibus R. R., dwl 202 SLxth 
Biggins William. laborer Palace Hotel 
Biggorino Joseph, workman Bavaria Brewery, dwl Mont- 
gomery- Av bet Vallejo and Green 
Biggs Abel R., broker and commission, office McHenry, 

Moulton & Co., 427 Front, dwl 409 Ellis 
Biggs Ham' C. , salesman McHenrv, Moulton & Co. , dwl 

409 Ellis 
Biggs Jesse D., carpenter S. F. Manuf. Co., dwl 114 Ridley 
Biggs John E., Flume House, Es San Bnmo Road ux 

Twentv- seventh 
Biggs Robert, hostler Charles F. Dryer, dwl 624 Pacific 
Biggs William, sa\\-yer Pacific Furniture M. Co., dwl 949 

Harrison 
Biggy John, expressman, 900 Market, dwl N s Ash Av bet 

La^runa and Buchanan 
Biggy Terrence, hostler N. B. & Mission R. R. 
Bigler Jacob, laborer, dwl Hinckley nr Vallejo 
BItiLEY BKOTUERS (Daniel and George J, groGers, 

XE cor Clay and Da\is 
Bigley Daniel (Bigley Bros.), dwl 203 Eleventh 
Biu'ley George fBigley Brosj, dwl 1011 Washington 
Bigley John, dwl 707 Larkin 
Bigley John, bricklayer, dwl 423 Bush 
Bigley M., molder, dwl W s Sherman nr Seventeenth 
Bigley T. s Co., shipwrights, calkers, and spamiakers, 13 

and 15 Spear 
Bigley Theodore, bookkeeper T. Bigley & Co., dwl 832 

Mission 
Bigley Thomas fT. Bigley d- Co.J, dwl 832 Mission 
Bignami Frank, vnth S. F. Manufacturing Co., res Oakland 
Bigne Vincent, saloon and restaurant. Southern Pac. R, R. 

Deix.t 
Bignell Freeman, shoemaker, dwl 5 Everett 
Bignotti Giacomo, vegetables, 44 Colombo Market 
Bigsley Harrj', laborer, dwl Humboldt House 
Big\V'Xid George, blacksmith, dwl W s Columbia bet 

Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth 
BigTi\ood J. fyeictfham d: BJ, W s King bet Second and 

Third 
Bihler William (Charles F. Wagner <£- Co.), res Lakeville 
Bilay A. F., salesman S. Lachman k, Co. 
BUfinger Gustave, carrier Guide, dwl 1334 Dupont 
Bilfinger Marie (widow), dressmaker, 1334 Dupont 
Bilicke Gustave, capitalist, dwl S24 Gean,- 



Bill Conrad, upholsterer Henry Luchsinger & Co., dwl 7 

Card Alley 
Bill Conrad, waiter Prescott House 
Bill Jacob, butcher, dwl 512 Linden Av 
Bill Philip, laborer, dwl 13 Varenne PI 
Bill Philip, real estate, dwl 29 Ritch 

Billamy , machinist Union Iron Works 

Billiard Alphonse, carpenter, dwl 1334 Dupont 
Billing Peter, teamster, dwl Virginia Av bet Twenty- 
eighth and T\venty-ninth 
Billinghurst Ray, hostler Thomas Kelley, dwl SE cor 

Gean" and Leavenworth 
Billings Da\id R. (D. U. Billings & Co.V, dwl 522 Filbert 
Billings D. R. & Co. fCAnr/t^sZ^tcey.groceriesand liquors, 

1311 Stockton 
Billings Edward P., porter Bank of San Francisco, dwl 

436 California 
Billings George E., saleonan A. Roman & Co., dwl 809 

Hyde 
Billings H. A., dwl 156 Third 
Billis Helen Louisa Mrs., dwl 325 Fovtrth 
Billon John, fruit dealer, dwl 615 Commercial 
Bilson Robert, laborer, dwl 127 Jackson 
Bilty Theodore G., dwl 1321 Powell 
Bimmerle Moritz, baker Theo. WolUtz, dwl 1425 Dupont 
Bimrick Charles, laborer, dwl 234 First 
Biucaud Leon, hairdresser, 818 Stockton 
Binder Charles Albert, finisher, dwl S14 Mo'^tgomery 
Binder George J., bookkeeper Ballard & Hall, dwl 1424 

Gearj' 
Binder Jacob, carpenter, dwl 631 Broadway 
Bine Leon, bookkeeper Solomon Bine, dwl 323 Edtly 
Bine Solomon, fancy g^oods, 12 Second, dwl 323 Eddy 
Binet Amable, cook John H. C. Bellmer 
Eingenheimer Christopher, cooper, 110 Davis, dwl 5 Clem 
Bingham Dora (widow), dwl 32 Ellis 
Bingham Henrv' (Menzi^s d: B.J, dwl 1808 Dupont 
Bingham J. F., clerk, dwl 1912 Bush 
Binkenshaw Joseph, carpenter Palace Hotel 
Binney Henn', deckhand stm Pioneer, dwl 26 Steuart 
Binny Stuart' B. , dwl 702 Sutter 

Binseuhoefer David, baker Martin Kimstle, dwl 776 Fol 
Binswanger L., gents' funiishing goods, 513 Kearny 
Birbe Henn,- C, clerk E. & C. Smith, dwl cor Sixth Av 

and Kentuckv, South S. F. 
Birce Frank H.. salesman Pope & Talbot, dwl 330 B^-ant 
Birch Alexander, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Birch, Argall & Co. (Wm. H. Birch and John Argall), 

proprietors California Machine Works, 119 Beale 
Birch Charles, longshoreman, dwl 202 Pacific 
Birch Henrj-, foreman Chase & Wolf, dwl SE cor Pacific 

and Fri_mt 
Birch Patrick, expressman San Jos6 E- R. Depot, dwl 111 

Clementina 
Birch Samuel, gardener, dwl W s Castro nr Seventeenth 
Birch Thomas J., bookkeeper Examiner Office, dwl NE 

cor Greenwich and Dupont 
Birch William, benchhaud Daniel D. Holland, dwl 945 Fol 
Birch William A., bookkeeper H. H. Noble & Co., dwl913 

Sacramento 
Birch William H. f Birch, Argall <t Co.), dwl 2405 Clay 
Birchfield Catharine A. (widow), dwi 505 Bush 
Bird A. E., lamplighter S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl cor Sac- 
ramento and Stockton 
Bird Albert, laborer, dwi 911 Sacramento 
Bird Autone, painter, dwi 23 Stevenson, rear 
Bird Catharine (widow), dwl 367 Natoma 
Bird Dennis, laborer, dwl 21 Miima 
Bird Edward, molder, dwl 551 Folsom 
Bird Ellen Miss, domestic S. H. D\vineUe, dwi 225 Leav 
Bird George, electrician, dwi 8 St. Mary 
Bird George F., actor, dwi 7 Dikeman PI 
Bird G. W.. cook sch Fannie A. Hyde, dwi 2 Caroline PI 
Bird Henr\' C, hamessmaker Main & Winchester, dwl 

203 Post 
Bird James, molder LTnion Iron Works 
Bird LawTence, bricklayer, dwi 1609 California 
Bird Mary (widow), dwl 65 Stevenson, rear 
Bird M. F., stonemason, dwi 759 Clay 
Bird Michael, extraman Engine No. 1 S. F. F. D., dwl 1 

Auburn 
Bird Nelson J., physician, office 230 Keamy, dwi 531 Jessie 
Bird Patrick, gasfitter Bush &: Milne, dwl 367 Natoma 
Bird Patrick, expressman, cor Gearj' and Keamy, dwl 514 

O'FarreU 
Bird Peter, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Bird Richard, laborer, dwi 36 Welsh, rear 
Bird Robert, watehmaker and jeweler, 1313 Pacific 
Bird Thomas, blacksmith, dwl (JO First 



PACIFIC COAST BUSIITESS DIEECTOEY, 1875-7, H. G. Langley, Putlisher, S. P. 



San Francisco Jewelry Mamifaotory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



Bird Tliomas, painter Noble & Gallat,^her 

Bird William, molder City Iron Works, dwl 11 Folsom Av 

Bird William, tailor, dwl 178 Stevenson 

Bird Wilson, clerk, dwl 502 Stockton 

Blrde Lizzie Mrs. (widow), dressmaker, 255 Beale 

Birdner Jacob, builder, dwl Russ House 

Birdsall Aaron, tinsmith, dwl W s Lagfuna bet Hayes and 

Grove 
Birdsall Carrie Miss, actress California Theater, dwl 618 

Pine 
Birdsall Charles, clerk Brown & Sniffen, dwl 729 Harrison 
Birdsall Da\-id A., mining agents dwl W s Laguna bet 

Hayes and Grove 
Birdsall Elias Rev., rector St. John's Episcopal Church, dwl 

704 Dolores 
Birdsall Elizabeth (widow), dwl 729 Harrison 
Birdsall George, liquor saloon. 129 Clay, dwl 141 Perry 
Birdsall George W., special policeman, City Hail 
Birdsall Jacob, tinsmith H. G. Fiske 
P.ird)^all John, upholsterer H. W. Fortune, dwl 223 Sutter 
BirdsLilI R. B. Miss, teacher Eighth St. Primary School, 

dwl 526 Tehama 
Birdsall William, butcher William Van Housen, dwl 742 

Market 
Birdsall William, driver N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 629 

Minna 
Birdsall Wyatt, engineer Pacific Mail S. S. Orizaba, dwl 

618 Piiie 
Birdsall Zephaniah, wagomnaster Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 

810 Green 
Birge James J., dentist, office and dwl 410 Kearny 
Birgham A. (E. Gxdttard .t- Co.), res Alameda 
Birgmann Henry, shoemaker Llbegott Thiunler, dwl 25 

Mott 

Birk , dwl 36 Geary 

Birkmere George L., salesman Kohler, Chase & Co., dwl 

Windsor House 
Birling John, locksmith, dwl 16 William, rear 
Birnbaum H. B., bookkeeper Charles P. Lolor, 81 Mer- 
chants' Exchange 
Birnic Ri-bert, interpreter Drake & Rix, dwl 737 Howard 
ItnCKELL AKUICEW, real estate, dwl 1223 Mason 
Birrcll George, machinist Pacific Wire Manufacturing Co., 

dwl 1223 Mason 
Birth Henry, sashmaker Haskell & Bode, dwl 1131 Har 
Bisagno Joseph, clerk Antonio Daneri, dwl 924 Pacific 
Bisagno Louis, real estate, dwl 924 Pacific 
Bisazza Frank, cook Smith & Hranovelli, dwl Dupont bet 

Francisco and Bay 
Bishee D. W. F. (Benjamin Willia)ns d: Cojj dwl 14 

O'Farrell 
Bisbee Edward, billposter, dwl 111 Virginia 
Bischel Henry, carpenter, dwl 245 Seventh 
Bischoff Diedrich (Carstensen it BJ, dwl SW cor Geary 

and Jones 
Bischoff Frederick fj. H". -4 ftZcrs it Co. A dwl 1423 Pow 
BlSC'IIOrr lALENTIXE, hairdresser, 42il Broadway 
Bischmann Matthias, tobacconist, dwl 20 Clara 
Bishop Amy (widow), dwl 1017 Clay 
Bishop D. M. &. Co. (Eugene Weigand and Henry M. 

McKenney) , pubUshers New City Directory, office 521 

Clay 
Bishop Duncan M. (D. M. Bishop <fc Co. arid Bishop tfc 

WicgandJ, dwl 742 Washington 
Bishop Edgar (Bishop <t Co J, dwl 513 Webster 
Bishop Ephraim, merchant, dwl 726 Shotwell 
Bishop Fi-ank, brassfiuiaher Electrical Con. & M. Co., dwl 

325^ Bush 
Bishop Gabriel, machinehand California Mills, dwl NW 

cor Berry and Fourth 
Bishop George, seaman, dwl 119 Jackson 
Bishop Godfrey, assistant engineer Pacific Mail S. S. 

Vasco de Gama 
Bishop Henry, clerk Henry Bnmj^s, dwl NE cor Brannan 

and Zoe 
Bishoi> Henry, driver 518 Kearny, dwl NW cor Larkin 

and McAllister 
Bishoj) Henry, jeweler, dwl 613 Pine 
Bishop Henr}', liquor saloon, 2 Clay, dwl 539 Minna 
Bishnp Henry, miner, dwl 614 Kearny 
Bish(i|i Henry N., carpenter William Lo\vrj', dwl 23 Fell 
Bishop H. 0., stairbuilder Sanborn & BjTnes, dwl 23^ 

Minna 
Bishop James H., carpenter Albert A. Snyder, dwl NW 

cor Clay and Tay 
Bishop James W., sawyer B. F. Gilman, dwl 513 Howard 
Bishop Mary, dressmaker Sullivan & Moorhead, dwl 23 

Foil 
Bishop N. C, carpenter Palace Hotel 



Bishop Oliver H., porter Spruance, Stanley & Co. , rea 

Brookl3'"n, Alameda Co. 
Bishop Peter, master bark Constitution, office N. Bich- 

ard, 18 and 20 Howard 
Bishop Ransom B., furnished rooms, 325i Bush 
Bishop Richard, stonecutter, dwl 421 Vallejo 
Bishop Thomas B. C Bishop <i- Fijield>, dwl 536 Second 
Bishop Walter, clerk, dwl S s Fell bet Polk and Van 

Ness Av 
Bishop William, carpenter, dwl 23^ Minna 
Bishop William, driver Schussler & LHlma 
Bishop William, laborer William A. Cliurch, dwl 636 Com 
Bishop W'illiani, mason Palace Hotel 
Bishop William A., dra\Tnan, dwl 4"21 Fifth 
Bishop W^illiam H., bricklayer, dwl 56S Mission 
Bishop William H., plasterer, dwl 957 Harrison 
Bishop &, Co. {Edgar Bishop, A. S. Peterson, and L. W. 

Pahneri, groceries, 716 Market and 17 Geary 
BISHOP •» FIFIELD (Thomas B. Bishop a7id Wil- 
liam H. Fifield) , attorneys at law, office 522 Mout 
Bishop & Wiegaud (Duncan M. Bishop, and Eugene 

Wiegand/, publishers S. F. Semi-Annual Trades 

Guide, 521 Clay 
Bisniark F. . dwl Windsor House 
Bismark Silver Mining Co. (Humboldt Co., Nev.), office 

401 California room 7 
Bison Fichel, baker Simon Stiefvater, dwl NE cor Six- 
teenth and Galinto 
Bissell James L., inspector gas meters, office and dwl 531 

Mission 
Bissell M. Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 413 Fourth 
Bissell William A., assistant freight agent Central Pacific 

R. R., dwl Windsor House 
Bissett Andrew, stonecutter, dwl 1027 Sutter 
Bissett E. F., student Heald's Business College 
Bissett Henry N., shipcarpenter, dwl 130 T>'ler 
Bissett H. n! Mrs., boarding, 130 Tyler 
Bissett William, seaman, dwl 303 First 
Bissinger Adolph, bookkeeper Louis Sloss & Co., dwl 206 

Kearny 
Bistelle John, brickmaker B. Bonnet, dwl cor Twenty- 
fourth and Sanchez 
Bistrup William, tailor, dwl 562 Stevenson 
Bitcoske John, baker, dwl 738 Vallejo. rear 
Biter John, bookkeeper M. & C. Mangels, dwl S s Waller 

bet Folsom and Steiner 
Hither Amanda Mrs. , f m-nished rooms, Astor Block 631 Sac 
Bither George W,, physician, office and dwl 631 Sac 
Bitte Manuel, laborer, dwl 5 \Miite 
Bittenbender George W., student Medical Department 

University of California, dwl Brookl>TX Hotel 
Bitterman Charles, market, W s Folsom bet Twenty-first 

and T\venty-second 
Bitters Julius, glassblower Pacific Glass Works, dwl cor 

Mariposa and Minnesota 
Bitters Louis, glassblower Pacific Glass Works, dwl cor 

Minnesota and Mariposa 
Bbcby John, driver F. L. Such & Co., dwl NW cor Twen- 

tv-fourth and Douglas 
BLxby LlewelljTi (£. P. Flint tfc Co. and Flint, B. & Co.), 

res San Juan 
Bixby William, mine inspector, dwl 720 Mission 
Bizion Louis, saloon, 1023 Dupont. dwl 14 Sullivan Bldg 
Bizziui Giovanni, waiter, dwl 641 Broadway 
Bizordi Carlos, waiter, 723 Sansom 
Bjerke Hans, Scandinavian Soc, 71 New Montgomery 
Bjorkland Andrew, upholsterer WiUiam H. Cxunmings, 

dwl 7 Carlos Place 
Bjorknian August (Bjorhman d- Wilkinson), dwl 569i 

Minna 
Bjorkman Carl, architect, dwl 720 Folsom 
Bjorkman Ellen (widow), dwl 28 Ritch, rear 
Bjorkman Kab Miss, waiter Mrs. M. T. Thompson, dwl 

534 Bush 
Bjorkman Richard, plumber and gasfitter, dwl 2S Ritch 
Bjorkman & Wilkinson (August BJork-man and PhUetus 

C. Willcitison), drajTnen, 110 Cal 
Bjornlund Mich. M., Scandinavian Soc, 71 New Mont 
Blach Charles, physician, office 514 Kearny, dwl 631 Post 
Blachree Frank D., salesman N. Skerrett, dwl 257 St«v 
Black Adam, bootmaker, dwl 1209 Mission 
Black Adam, engineer, dwl 126 Turk 
Black Alexander, clerk A. M. Simpson & Bro., dwl 318 

Folsom 
Black Ann (widow), dwl 707 Stockton 
Black Asa, carpenter, dwl 241 Minna 
Black Asa F., dwl 741 Market 
Black Bear Quartz M. Co. (Klamath Co., Cal.), office 310 

California 



Get the Millbrae Transplanted Oysters from MOEGAN & CO., 87 California Mark( 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Zeamy, EstabHshed 1862. 



Black Charles Mrs., upholsteress Cal. Furniture llanul. 

C".. dwl Bernal Heig:hts 
BL-ICK DlAMOXn COAL MIXI>« CO., P. B. 

Cornwall president, office Rincon Point Wharf, E 8 
S|.>ear bet Folsoni and Harrison 
Black I>aniel, cler^Muan, dwl G07 Polk 
Black Daniel, printer, dwl 318 Beale 
Black Daniel, salesman J. McGuire, dwl 14 Anthony 
Black Edwin H.. painter. 514 Sixteenth, dwl N s Campnr 

Second Avenue 
Black George, bricklayer, dwl 527 Filbert 
Black George Mrs. (m'dow). dwl 1906 Eddy nr Devisadero 
Black Georire W.. cutter Neustadter Bros., dwl 632 Miss 
Black H.. bed and sofa spring manufacturer. 63 New 

Montgomen'. dwl Mission bet First and Second 
Black Hawk Coal Mining Co., olHce 520 Montgomery 
Black Henrv, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Bl.ick HenrV M. (H. J/. Black .(■ Co.), dwl 14 Russ 
Black H. m! & Co. , carriagemakers, 1120 and 1122 Mar- 
ket 
Black Howard, cutter Neustadter Bros., dwl 632 Mission 
Black J., carpenter, dwl 241 Minna 
Black .1., clerk, dwl 153 Third 
Black James, delivery- clerk Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wharf, 

dwl 413 Brannan 
Black Joaquin, mason, dwl 259 Jessie 
Black John, blacksmith Lawton & Co., dwl 227 Fourth 
Black John, laborer, dwl 38 Tehama 
Black John, laborer, dwl 536 Sacrament^) 
Black John, shipcarpenter, dwl 27 Minna 
Black John, spinner Mission and Pac. Woolen Mills, dwl 

Alabama bet Solano and Mariposa 
Black John, watchman, dwl 327 Beale 
Black John, watchman Broadway Bonded Warehouse, dwl 

63 Minna 
Bbck John W., boilermaker Moynihan & Aitken, dwl 28 

MiJina 
Black John W., collector Thomas H. Selby & Co., dwl 632 

Fell 
Black Joseph, blacksmith, dwl 663 Howard 
Black Lizzie, chambermaid Occidental Hotel 
Black Louise Mrs., dwl 307 Sutter 
Black Peter R.. shipjoiner S. Libby. dwl 116 Natoma 
Black Patrick W., watchman V. S. Mint, dwl 2 Harriet 
Black Robert, driver N. B. and Mission R. R. 
Black Robert M., gent's furnishing goo-is, 209 Montgom- 

erv. dwl 1100 Van Xess Av 
Blaek William, hackdriver, dwl 203 Ritth 
Black William, laborer Fort Point, dwl S s Sacramento 

bet I>e\isadero and Broderick 
Black William, marble works, 92 Stevenson, dwl IJ Russ 
Black William K. , carpenter, dwl 663 Howard 
Black William W.. liquor saloon, SW cor Seventh and 

Mission, dwl 10,54 Howard 
Blackall Alice, tailoress John Huber, dwl 22i Welsh 
Blackall Catherine B., tailoress John Huber, dwl 18 Free- 
Ion 
Blackburn Allen H., clerk \^^lite Bros., dwl 147 Third 
Blackburn Charles, salesman Meeker, James & Co., SE 

cor California and Davis 
BlackbiuTi Isaac, subscription agent A. L. Bancroft & Co., 

dwl 24 O'Farrell 
Blackburn L. F. (Blackburn i- Fallon), dwl Cosmopolitan 

Hotel 
Blackburn E. A. , dwl 404 Broadway 
BlackbiuTi i Fallon (L. F. Blackburn and 3f. Fallon), 

Alhambra .Saloon. 323 Bush 
Blackenburg Theodore, bookkeeper E. K. Howes & Co., 

dwl .502 Franklin 
Blackledge Robert, clerk Rodgers, Meyer & Co., dwl 228 

Shot%vell 
Blackman Cassius H., salesman Wilmerding, Kellogg & 

Co., dwl 104 Mason 
Blackman George, teacher, dwl 605 Pine 
Blackman Henrv, cook Edward Conollcy, dwl 1127 Folsom 
Blackman Morris J., tinsmith and plumber, 109 Hayes 
Blackman W. H., barkeeper, dwl 1127 Folsom 
Blackmar Ransom C, clerk Bishop i Co., dwl 534 Gear}- 
Elackwell Edward S., clerk W. B. CTuff & Co., dwl 9234 

Harrison 
Blackwell Enoch, carriagetrimmer Carv-ill Manuf. Co., 

dwl 923i Harrison 
Blackwell Horatio S., tinsmith George H. Tay & Co., dwl 

1003 Powell 
Blackwell James, longshoreman, dwl ^^'hat Cheer House 
Blackwell John, cook, dwl 50 Everett 
Blackwood Charles H., waiter Russ House 
Blackwood William, clerk National Clock Co., dwl NWcor 
Bryant and Oak Grove Av 



Blackwood William, real estate, office 109 California room 

13, dwl XW cor Brvant and Oak Grove Av 
Blade George H., porter. 924 Dupont 
Bladt Ludwig, shoemaker Richard Pahl, dwl Fair Oaks nr 

Twentv-second 
Blaikie Andrew, draftsman Rlsdon I. and L. Works, dwl 

2413 Buchanan 
Blaikie James F., plumber with Bush & Milne, dwl 7 

Pratt Court 
Blaikie James L., real estate, office 507 Montgomery, dwl 

7 Pratt Court 
Blaikie Richard T., carpenter D. A. Macdonald & Co., dwl 

429 Turk 
Blaine Rodman P., dwl SW cor Clay and Jones, r«ar 
Blainsdell Joshua, cook, dwl 50 Everett 
Blair Archibald, civil engineer, dwl 315 Fulton 
Blair Augustine W. . attome.v at law, office 607 Washing- 
ton, dwl SW cor Howard and Twenty-foxuth 
Blair Chauncy S.. patternmaker Palmer, Knox & Co., 

dwl 1304 Larkin 
Blair David B., office 416 Sacramento, res Oakland 
Blair Edward, friugemaker William Englander, dwl 616 

California 
Blair Edward, waiter Cliff House, Point Lobos Av 
Blair Frank, pressman Coiner's Department U. S. Mint, 

dwi 006 Montgomery 
Blair Heiu^', shaperhand Kragen & Co., dwl 766 Howard 
Blair James A. W., boot and shoemaker Einstein Bros. 

& Co., dwl 320 Fell 
Blair James C, soapmaker dwl 8 Zoe, rear 
Blair John B., cabinetmaker William H. Ctunmings, dwl 

533 Conunercial 
Blair Matthew (Blair i- Chase), dwl 224 Capp 
Blair Robert, machinist Birch, Argall & Co., dwl 8 Zoe, 

rear 
Blair Samuel, master mariner, dwl 47 Tehama 
BLAIR THOMAS M., sergeant-at-arms S. F. Stock & 
Exchange Board and agent Pacific Hall, dwl 518 Bush 
Blair William, painter, dwf 8 Zoe. rear 
Blair William, upholsterer, dni .533 Commercial 
Blair William .A.. J., shoemaker Einstein, Bros. & Co., 

dwl 320 Fell 
Blair & Chase (Matthew Blair and Winiam W. Chase), 

hay and grain, 1912 Market 
Blaisdell Jav P. , bootmaker Joseph Lucier, dwl 286 Stev 
Blaisdenn Elizabeth (widow), dwl 1417 Larkin 
Blake A., plasterer Palace Hotel, dwl ,536 Sacramento 
Blake Arthur, dwl E s Howard bet Twentieth and Twen- 
ty-first 
Blake Charles E., physician, office and dwl 406 Hayes 
Blake Charles E. Sen., dentist, office and dwi 1231 Turk 
Blake Charles M. Rev., teacher, dwl 331 Gear}- 
Blake C. M., carpenter, dwl 425 Shipley 
Blake C. T., collector Howard St. Wharf, dwl 619 Bush 
Blake Edward, salesman, dwi 206 Tjier 
Blake Elizabeth (widow), dwl 121 Shipley 
BLAKK FKAXCIS (Blake, Eobbim i Co.), res Oak- 
land 
Blake Francis J. (widow, colored), dwl 914 Pacific 
Blake George, clerk, dwl 310 Tliird 
Blake George M., bookkeeper .Alvinza Haywaid, dwl 1124J 

Folsom 
Blake George Washington, salesman Fisher & Co., dwl 

316 Third ^ , , 

Blake Greenleaf A., drayman NW corSansom and Jack- 
son, dwl 112 Fell 
Blake Henrv C. notary public and commissioner deeds, 

office 333 >Iontgomerv, dwl 204 Wetmorc PI 
Blake Henrv H. (H. H. Blake i- Co.). dwl 810 Leav 
BL.4KE li. H. «S CO., managers Continental Life In- 
surance Co. of New York, office 302 Montgomery 
Blake J., seaman stm -\jax Oregon S. S. Co. 
Blake James, laborer, dwl 142 Clara 
Blake James, phj-sician, office and dwl 426 Sutter 
Blake James, sailmaker, dwl 34 Steuart 
Blake James Williaoi, physician and surgeon, dwl 1636 

Blake J."H., captain schooner Dashing Wave, Pier 6 Steu 

Blake J. K., tuner Kohler, Chase & Co. 

Blake John, boots and shoes, 974 Folsom 

Blake John, carpenter, dwl -zl Fifth Av 

Blake John, harnessmaker W. F. Dorrance, dwl 106 First 

Blake John, liquor saloon and boarding, 106 First 

Blake J.ihn, locksmith Nelson & Doble. dwl 121 Shipley 

Blake John, tailor, 332 Sutter, dwl 330 Sutter 

Blake J'lhn J., bricklayer, dwl 69 Minna 

Blake John J., clerk W. A. H. Godfrey, dwl 754 Turk 

Blake Joseph, contractor, Oakland, dwl 4 Vernon PI 

Blake J. W., capitalist, dwl 429 Bush 



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PACinC COAST BUSINESS DIHECTOEY Contains Addresses 60,000 Merchants. 



PINE WATCHES and JEWELRY for Sale b7 D. W. Laird, 513 Montgomery, 



.1 




Blake LawTence, laborer Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl cor 

Sierra and Louisiana 
Blake M. A. (widow), dressmaker, dwl IIS Post 
Blake Ma^e R. (widow), dressmaker, dwl 404 Post 
Blake Man- Miss, dressmaker Mrs. Francisca Smith, dwl 

121 Shiplev 
Blake Man- L. f^ndow), dwl 12 Leroy PI 
BLAKE "MAI'RM'E B., attorney at law, office T29 
Munt, dwl 82r> Seventeenth bet Mission and Valencia 
BLAKE MAIKM'E C, judge Mmiicipal Crimmal 
CViurt, chambers 720 Mont^'omery rooms 16 and 17, 
dwl 325 Seventeenth bet Mission and Valencia 
Blake Patrick, serviceman S. F. Gas Light Co. 
Blake Philip H., real estate, dwl N s Point Lobos Av bet 

Collins and Ferrie 
BLAKE, UOBBIXS A CO. (Francis Blake, Charles F. 
EubbinSy James Moj}itt, and James TT. Towrw), im- 
porters and jobbers book, news, \\Titing, and wrap- 
ping paper, 516 Sacramento and 519 Commercial 
Blake Simmer C., etationerj- and photographs, 617 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 1422 California 
Blake Theodore A. (Goodyear <£• B.) dwl 216 Bush 
Blake Walter W., painter F. A. Rutherford, dwl S13 Har- 
rison 
Blake AVilliam, painter F. A. Rutherford, dwl 529 Second 
Blake William, stevedore A. C. Freese 
Blake William H. (Cary tt: B.), dwl 928 Washington 
Blake Wilson, miller, dwl ^^'hat Cheer Hovise 
Blakeley Alexander, printer, dwl 422 Seventh 
Blakeley C. F. Mrs., lodgings, 206 Kearny 
Blakeley Francis, carpenter, dwl 109 Powell 
Blakely Alexander, compositor Stock Report, dwl 422 

Seventh 
Blakely Calvin, sashmaker Excelsior Mills, dwl W s Brew 

ster nr San Bruno Road. Bemal Heights 
Blakelv Edward, ammonia works S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 

22' Rondel PI 
Blakely John, fireman S. F. Gaslight Co., dwl 163 Minna 
Blakeni'.'re Ed«in. gilder, dwl 223 Francisco 
Blakeney T. J. (Jo-sei'h Bo'>s d- Co.), dwl Lick House 
Blakeslee C. C, druggist, dwl Russ House 
Blakeslee S. V. Rev., editor Pacific, 508 CHay, res Oakland 
Blakey John, pressman Evening Bulletin, dwl 512 Vallejo 
Blakiyt<tn John S., sailmaker, U and S Clay, dwl 149 Pern," 
Blakiston Robert, sailmaker John S. Blakiston, dwl 149 

Perry 
Blakley Absalom, caneworker, 221 Dupont 
Blakslee Charles A., policeman City Hall, dwl 755 Har 
Blanc Alexander, real estate, dwl 117 Dora 
Blanc Aniedee. carrier Guide, dwl 107 Montgomery Block 
Blanc Hcun-, marblecutter Charles Roche, dwl 1 Washoe 

PI 
Blanc Paul, liquor saloon. 637 Pacific 
Blanc Pompelom, laundrnnan Van Ness Avenue Laun- 
dry, W s Dolores, ur Fifteenth 
Blanc Stewart, boot and shoemaker, 705 Batter>-, dwl 117 

Dora 
Blanch Bernard, coach and hearsemaker, S20 Folsom, dwl 

314 Third 
Blanchar J. D., president Cal. Farmers' Mutual Fire Ins. 

Assn. office Leid, dwl 425 Kearny and res Napa 
Blanchard Da\id (Blaiichard and Ilabcrlin), dwl G2J 

Minna 
Blanchard Edward, drayman Peck & Co., dwl 1505 Pine 
Blanchard Frank G., hackdriver Thomas H. Bowleu, dwl 

1914 Polk 
Blanchard George A., deputy attorney -general of Cal., 

office 040 Clay, res Sacranient<i 
Blanchard H., physician, office and dwl 649 Broadway 
Blanchard Henrj- P. (Williams, B. d: Co.\ dwl 737 Ellis 
Blanchard H. T. Mrs., adjuster U. S. Mint, dwl First Av 

bet Mission and Valencia 
Blanchard James, carpenter Joshua B. Morton 
Blanchard Jules, hardware and manufacturer bed and 

sofa springs, 44 Fourth, dwl 236J- Jessie 
Blanchard Kibby, clerk Central Pacific R. R. Freight 

(.itfice 
Blanchard Leopold, machinist City Iron W'orks, dwl 236J 

Jessie 
Blanchard Lott, messenger Custom House, dwl 22 First 

Av nr Fifteenth 
Blanchard Mar>* J. Mrs., dressmaker Mrs. B. Hoadley, 

dwl 1505 Pine 
Blanchard Phineas V., milkranch, cor San Jos6 Av and 

IV cnty -sixth 
Blanchard & Habcrlin (David Blanchard and James 
Uaberlin), litjuor saloon, junction Market and Sutter 
Blanche Edwin, dwl 209 Leidesdorff 
Blanchet Heiuy, tailor, 539 Vallejo 



Blanchette Louis, shoemaker Stephens & Dugau, dwl 10 

M...SS 
Blanchfield Edward, butcher Gleason & Bro., dwl 519 Bush 
Blanchfield James, laborer, dwl 3S Baldwin Court 
Blanchfield Thomas, groceries and liquors, SE cor Gougb 

and Fell 
Blanck Charles, fisherman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Blanck John, fisherman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Blanck Peter, fisherman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Blanckaert Victor J., barkeeper Adam Smith, dwl 634 Sac 
Blanckardt Theodore A., dwl 8 Brenham PI 
Blanckenburg Francis, druggist vnth H. W. Schmidt & 

Brother, dwl 542 Kearny 
Blanckenburg Frederick, vamisher Goodvrin & Co., dwl 

519 Pacific 
Blanckenburg Theodore, bookkeeper E. K. Howes & Co., 

120 Front 
Blanding J. Gord-^n, attorney at law, office 507 llontgom- 

en-, dwl 1606 Howard 
BLA\DL\<; WILLIA.M, attorney at law, office 507 

Montgomery-, dwl 160G Howard 
Blaner Herbert, porter Lampe Bros. 

Blaney , lather, dwl 115 Second 

Blaney Annie (wiilow). dwl 127 Folsom 

Blanev Edward W. , att-<^mey at law, office 23 Court Block 

636 Clay, dwl 507 Ellis 
Blaney James, tinsmith and metermaker S. F. Gas Light 

Co. 
Blaney James E. (Comeay tt B.\ dwl 223 Jessie 
Blaney John, housepainter, dwl 507 Ellis 
Blaney John Henrj', bookkeeper Hibemia Savings and 

Loan Societv. dwl 530 Jessie 
Blangy Samuel," glassblower S. F. Glass Works, dwl 302 

Branuan 
Blank Charles C, foreman Eclipse Bakers-, dwl 1S06 Hyde 
Blank Jacob, machinist Pac. Rollmg Mills, dwl cor Twen- 
tieth and lUmois 
Blank Louis, watchmaker Samuel Simmons, dwl 1216 Pow 
Blank Morris, dwl 293 Clementina 

Blankart Otto, salesman Ackerman Bros., dwl 303 Hayes 
Blanken Henry, proprietor Six-mile House, San Bruno 

Road 
Blanken Martin, dwl Six-mile House San Bruno Road 
Blanken Nicholas (Mohnnan tt Co.), dwl SW cor Kearny 

and Broadway 
Blankenhom Charles, butcher Barney Horn, dwl N s 

First Av nr Kentucky, South S. F. 
Blankenhom Gotlieb, liquor saloon, NW cor Mason,and 

Broadway 
Blanker Jacob, fireman S. F. P. Woolen Factory, dwl 

North Point nr Larkin 
Blankman Henn- G., real estate, dwl Grand Hotel 
Blanks B. H. (widow), dwl 16 De Boom 
Blankstein Henrj' N., superintendent Da\id Samuels, dwl 

122 O'FarreU 
Blantiere Alonzo, shoemaker, dwl 37 Lafayette 
Blantiere Elanthiere, shoemaker, dwl 37 Lafayette 
Blasdell George E., bagmaker F. D. Conro & Son, dwl 54 

Third 
Blasdell John, shoemaker, dwl 286 Stevenson 
BlasdeU L. B., jeweler, dwl 504 Howard 
Blase Charles, trunkmaker, 636 Market, dwi Cottage PI 

nr Tavlor 
Blaser Christopher H., trunkmaker, dwl 267 Third 
Blaser Raphael, dress and cloakmaker, 32 Gear}- 
Blasgen H. , cigarmaker Jolm Lemke, dwl Golden Gate 

Hotel 
Blass John C, clerk C. V. Gillespie, dwl 53 Natoma 
Blass Meyer, office 12 Bush, dwl 435 Fifth 
Blasse Edward, clerk Herman Toelkcn, dwl 547 Mission 
Blaszkower Marks, clerk Edwai-d Cohn & Co., dwl 337 

Clementina 
Blaszkower Pauline (widow\ dwl 337 Clementina 
Blat L., waiter, dwl California Hotel 
Blath Adolph, tanner, dwl NE cor Brannan and Eighth 
Blath Siegmund, bookkeeper Patent Brick Co.,' dwl 200 

T>ier 
Blatt Neil, laborer, dwl 414 Pacific 
Blaltner John J., contractor, dwl 425 Tliird 
Elattner Nicholas (McXally d- B.), dwl SO Everett 
Blaltner William J., clerk, dwl 425 Third 
Blalz Edward, metalroofer Conlin & Roberts, dwl 275 

Stevenson 
Blatz Joseph, metalroofer Conlin & Roberts, 749 Mission 
Blautin Paul, waiter (P. Vlantin it Brv.), dwl 717 Dam 
Blauvelt G.. gasfitter Palace Hotel 
Blauvelt Richard D. Jr., deputy county recorder, dwl 

110 OFarrell 
Blauvelt William E., clerk 0. V. Gillespie, dwl 519 Pine 



MOEGAN & CO., 87 California Market, Import their own Stock fron ITew York. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, EstabHshed 1862. 



Blcakley John, with S. F. Gas Light Co.,d\vl 135 Tehama 
, Blether William, chicken ranch, car Solano and York 

■ lileddin William, painter, dwl 15 Second 

Bleg' Peter P., Scandina^^an Soc, 71 New Montgomerj' 
, Blemencic Jacob, laborer Cal. Sujjar Refinerj', dwl 1110 
Br\-atit 
Blemierhassett John, shoemaker, 305. Fourth 
BJenuerhassett Richard, bootmaker Perr>' Veitch, dwl 22 
Clara 
I Bless Michael, ■n'aiter Emil A. Engelberg;, dwl Ellis bet 

Powell and ilason 
' Blessing- Frederick, janitor Pacific Hall, N s Bush bet 
Kearny and Dupont 
Blessin^-tiin A. J., merchant, dwl 63G Commercial 
Blethen C'harl^ A., carpenter Samuel Beal, dwl 575 Miss 
Blethen Eug-ene O., salesman Erittan, Holbrook & Co., 

dwl 120(5 Mai-ket 
Blethen James H. Capt., chief wharfinger Board State 
Harbor Commissioners, office Pacific St. Wharf, dwl 
1200 Market 
Blethen James H. Jr.. dwl 1206 Market 
Blethen J. W., clerk Freight Office Central Pacific R. R. 
, Bley Abraham, clothing, dwl 1011 Mission 
Bk-\iiian Edward, upholsterer Frank G. Edwards, dwl 4 

" Vallejo PI 
Bliely Joseph, barber Plante & Fleischhauer, dwl 214 First 
I Blies Michael, steward, dwl lOS Turk, rear 
i Biififen John, watchman stra Alice E. Garratt, Commercial 
1 St. Wh-ATf 

! Bliffens T. V., wharfinger Front St. \\Tiarf, dwl 1919 Polk 

■ Blinn C. A., conductor Central Pacific R. R.,dwl 645 Stev 
Bliim Charles A., clerk, dwl l.''v27 Post 

, Blinn Cyrus A., i>oUceman City Hall, dwl 645 Stevenson 
! Blinn Frederick G., dwl 542 Second 
Blinn Helen B. (\\idow), dwl 542 Second 
Bliss Duane A. Mrs., dwl 912 Pine 
Bliss George D., live-stock dealer, Long Bridge, dwl 1597 

Pacific Av 
Bliss Theodore, stevedore Menzies & Bingham 
Blitz Caroline Mrs., dwl 227 Gear}- 
Bliven Albert P., master ship Grace Darling, office pier 17 

Steuart 
Bliven Samuel N., clerk U. S. Surveyor-General, dwl 1112 

Hyde 
Bliwice H., tailor W. Harris, dwl 411 Sansom 
Bloc Edward, cook International Hotel 
Bloch Abraham B., clothing, 1107 Dupont, dwl 2106 Mason 
Bloch Benihard, clerk Abraham B. Bloch, dwl 2100 Mason 
Bloch Constantin, dentist J. A. W. Lmidborg, dwl 9 Essex 
Bloch Isaac, cardseller, dwl SW cor Mont Av and Vallejo 
Bloch Isaac F. (Bloch A Davidson), dwl 820 Larkin 
Bloch Jacob, expressman, SE cor Sacramento and San- 
som, dwl 1717 Mason 
Bloch John, dry goods, 2 and 3 Virgfinia Block, dwl 615 

Green 
Bloch John, tailor, 603 Kearny, dwl 324 Mason 
BI'x;h Joseph {Zeehaiidelaar tt Co.), dwl 620 Fourth 
Bloch Leon, clerk John Bloch, dwl 615 Green 
Bloch William, boots and shoes, 1032 Dupont 
Bloch &; Davidson (Isaac F. Bloch andJarncs W. David- 
son), morocco manufactory', S s Brannan bet Seventh 
and Eighth, office 405 Sansom 
Blochman Abraham (Bb,chinan 6: Cerf), dwl S36 O'Farrell 
Blochman E. Mrs., millinery, 206 Kearny, dwl 420 O'Far- 
rell 
Blochman Lazar, salesman Cobliner Bros., dwl 420 O'Far- 

reU 
Blochman &. Cerf (A. BlochnKin and M. Cerf), mer- 
chants, office 407 Sansom 
>B10<'K AKRA.n {</ A. Block tt Co. and Block it 
Furtk, San Juan), office 115 Battery, president Odd 
Fellows' Savings Bank, office 325 Montgomerj', and 
pui>ervisur Eighth Ward, dwl 208 Jones 
};] . k Andreas, Scandinavian Soc, 71 New Montgomery 
bl .;k D., merchant (Virginia City, Nev.), office 22 Bat^ 

terj-, dwl 530 Ellis 
DI ik Emanuel D., dry-goods dealer, dwl 515 Geary 
b]Mi.k Henr\", dentist, dwl 9 Essex 
Bl' ick Henn-, hostler Hugh McGIinn, dwl 126 Fourth 
Bl<><_k Israel, cigars and tobacco, 228 Sutter, dwl 523 Stev 
BIuL-k Jacob, waiter 527 Commercial, dwl 411 Sansom 
blovk James, dwl 502 Bush 

Bl'.ck James X., secretary S. F. P. Woolen Factor}', office 
115 Battery, dwl 208 Jones 
I J. J., merchant, dwl 16 Sutter 
John, laborer Bay Sugar Refiner^', dwl E 8 Sansom 
el Union and Green 
I;, k Marcus, salesman J. Blumenthal, dwl 324 Mason 
J;l i k Ruben, foreman Steam Dredger, dwl 1105 Powell 



Block Samuel, butcher Louis Rosenberg, dwl SE cor 

Gearj- and William 
Blockhaus Frederick, clerk Bemhard Tienken, dwl 814 

Jackson 
Blockman J. D., teacher St. Marj-'s College, dwl Fair Av 

nr Old San Jose Road, Bemal Heights 
Blodes Theodore, hairdresser, 3 Post, dwl 1239 Folsom 
Blodgett Edwin A., clerk Brittan, Holbrook & Co., dwl 

411 Natoma 
Blogg-, Henry, shoemaker, dwl 723 Clementina 
Blohin August, driver Henrj- A. Benjamin & Co., dwl 1222 

Eddy 
Blohm Frederick, expressman, dwl Seventh nr Mission 
Blohm John, shii^calker, dwl 426 Vallejo, rear 
Blohm Peter (Blohm tt Gerkcn), dwl NE cor Mission and 

Beale 
Blohm & Gerken (PeUr Blohm and Claris Gerken)^ grocer- 
ies, NE cor Mission and Beale 
Blohme Bros. (Ilennann and Jvh n\ griweries and liquors, 
NE cor Sec and Tehama and NW cor Sutter and Polk 
Blohme Hermann (Blohme Bro.^.\ dwl 76 Tehama 
Blohme John (Bloh me Bro.-a.), dwl NW cor Sutter and Polk 
Blomqvist Olof, watchmaker George C. Shreve &, Co., dwl 

1111 Leavenworth 
Blond Louis, waiter Boutinon & Eulland 
Blondeau Zacharias, bottler, dwl S I^tt Court 
Blondell Tliomas, expressman, 325 Front, dwl 606 Fulton 
Blondin John, shipcari>enter, dwl 1514 Dupont 
Blood H. S.. dwl Morton House 

BLOO&> J. II., attorney at law, notary public, and com- 
missioner of deeds, olfice 23 and 24 Montg'omery 
Block, dwl N s Seventeenth bet Guerrero and Sec Av 
Blood John N., dwl Russ House 

Blood Joseph, barkeeper August Piaggio, dwl 1622 Stock 
Blood Levi L.. executor estate Edward Kennedy, office N 

s Gold nr Sansom, dwl 131 Montgomerj' 
Blood William, sailmaker William Wood, dwl lOlS Mont 
Bloom Da\id (L. DinkeU-piel A Co.), dwl 535^ O'Farrell 
Bloom Eliza Mrs., machine operator C. Mayer, dwl cor 

Geary and Jones 
Bloom Isaac, broomi^eddler, dwl 2 Oregon 
Bloom JosefJi (L. Dinkdspi^l X- Co.), dwl 614 Sutter 
Bloom Samuel, woolijuller and sheepskin tannen,',