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Full text of "The San Francisco directory for the year .."




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C£Ni:RAL REFERENCE 



■« 

» u ' 

SAN FRANCISCO 


PUBLIC LIBRARY 


DEC ^^^70 


QAM Frt^^,"CISCO 


REFERENCE BOOK 


Not to be taken from the Library 



GENERAL REFERENCE 



GENERAL REFERENCE 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ill 



>" ^=^"«.^ 



CORPORATION 




Casb. Assets, - $14;,500,000. 

FIRE RISKS kJ CURRENT RATES. 



The Oldest and Wealthiest Fire Insurance Co. 

DOING BUSINESS IN AMEailOA. 



^mm aig 



aEJ^E(RAL AGEJ^TS, 



316 Ci^LIFORNlA. STREET. 



IV 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPAK^H 

WINTER ARRANGEMENT. 

NEW YORK & ASPINWALL PANAMA RAILROAD. 

San Francisco and Panama, Central Am2rican and Mexican Lines. 
TIME TABLE No. 3. 

steamers will depart and arrive with the greatest possible re?iilarity. On and after Januarv 1 , 1876, and unti' ^^'' 
further orders, the Steamers of the PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY will sail as follows, leaving tht m 
Ports herein specified upon the dates given, the Hgures representing the days of each month. 

Oeneral Oftioe, Pier 42- Korth River, 'Sew Vork. Oeiieral Office, Wliarf, corner Firat 
and Braiinan Streets. Sun Francisco. 



OUTWARD. 
NEWVOKK to ASPINWAl.il. 



NewYork and 
Aspinwall. 





15 


1 30 
1 9 


Arr. Aspinwall 


Leave .\spinwall, Panama Railroad 

Arr. Panama " " 


24 

24 


1 9 
1 9 


C5 i . S3 

Panama to San £ = g E«g 
FraneiHCo. gSg^ 1 §■5 = 


Panama and 
San Francisco 



Leave 

Panama... 

Puntarenas 

San Juan del Sur 

Corinto 

Amapala 

La Union 

La Libertad 

Acajulta 

San Jose de Gua- 
temala 

Champerico 

San Benito 

Satlna Cruz 

Port Angel 

Acapulco 

Manzanillo 

San Bias 

Mazatlan 

Cape St. Lucas... 
Arr. San Francisco 



9 


. 24 


24 


y 


27 


27 


13 


28 




14 


29 




15 


30 




15 


30 




16 


1 




17 


2 




18 


4 


29 


19 


5 
6 

7 
8 






9 


1 

9 



HOMEWARD. 

San Francisco to 

Panama. 



San Francisco 
and Panama. 



\<H\ 



SoS 
a u a 

o i> * 
aAi 



Leave 

San Francisco. ... 

Cape St. Lucas ... 

Mazatlan 

San Bias 

Manzanillo 

Acapulco 

Port .\ngel 

Salina Cruz 

San Benito 

Champerico 

San Jose de Gua- 
temala 

Acajulta 

La Libertad 

La Union 

Amapala 

Corinto 

San Juan del .Sur 

Puntarenas 

Arr, Panama 



Lv. Panama K. K.. 
Arr, Aspinwall " .. 



12 M. 


12 M. 




lot 


30t 




21 






22 






24J 


7 


24 
25 
26 
27 
29 




10 


30 

2 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 




12 


11 


30 


la • 


13 


30 1 


15 




30 I 


15 





Aspinwall &New York 

Lv. Aspinwall 

Arr, New York 



MOVEMENT OF STEAMERS AND CONNECTIONS,— Steam krs LE.WfNG Coix)x (Aspinwall). 

Eoyal Mail Steam Packet Company, for Southampton -6th, nth and 22d of each month, calling at Kingston, 
Jamaica, St. Thomas, Plymouth and Cherbouig, France. West India and Pacific Steamship Company, for Ltv- 
KKFODL— loth and 24ih of each month, direct. French Trans-Atlantique Company, for Sr. Nazaike— 1st of each 
month, calling at Savanilla, Puerto Cabello, La Gua.vra, Martinique and Guadaloupe. French Trans-Atlantique 
Conipatiy for Havkk and Bordeaux— 20th ofeach month, calling at Savanilla, Santa Martha, Kingston, (Jamaica) 
Santiago de Cuba, Port au Prince, Cape Haytien, San Juan de Puerto Rico, St. Thomas, Bordeaux and Havre, 
Hamburg and American Packet Company, for Hamburg— 2l8t of each month, calling at Port au Prince, Gonaires, 
Cape Hayti, St. Thomas, Plymouth and Havre. 

.STEAME KS LE.A VING PANAMA— Pacific Steam Navigation Company, for Callao, and Valparaiso- 1st, 
lOtli.lGtli. 2.1th and '-Tlh of every month. South American Steamship Company, for Callao and V.\lp.ar.\iso — 
9th and 21tli of each month, calling at intermediate ports. The Steamers leaving Panama ou the Ist and 16th, 
call at GUAYAQUIL and Payta ; those of the lOth and 25ih at Payta; and the Steamer of the 27th at Buenaven- 
tura, Tumaco, Esmaraldas, Manta, Ballenita. Guayaquil, Tumbes and Payta. 



STE.A.MERS LEAVING SAN FRANCISCO-fPacific Mail Steamship Company for Hong Kong— 1st of 
each month, at 12 o'clock, noon, connecting at Yokohama for Hiogo, Nagasaki and Shanghai. +Pacific Mail 




Northern Pacific Railroad at Tacoma for Poktland, Oregon,— at 12 o'clock, noon, i0th,2uth and 30th of each month, 
im' During the Coffee Season, e.xtra Cargo Steamers will be despatched to the Central American and Mexican'' 
Ports. E.\-tra Steamers will be despatched between Acapulco and San Bias to suit the requirements of trade. 



leaving l-ith, for Ports north of Acapulco. Note.— When the month has 31 days, the Steamer leaving San Fran-l, 
Cisco the. 'ifitli, will leave the i'orts of Call one day earlier than the time given above and arrive in Panama the 
Ulh. When the month has 31 days, the Steamer leaving Panama the •24th, will arrive at Acapulco the 30th, and 
San Francisco, the 8ih. 

Sidney Dillon, Pres't, N. Y.; H. J. Bullay, Sup't, N. Y. A. P. Bacon, Gen'l Agent, San Francisco. 
Gkoroe S. Scott, Vice-Pre.s't, N. Y. W. P. Tisdell, Gen'l Agent, Panama. E. T. Bacon, Pass. Agent, San Fran. 
Cisco. J. B. Houston, 2d Vice-Pres't, New York. N. Lennox, Agent, Acapulco. John Steuart, Freight Ag't. 
San Francisco. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO. 



CAPITAI- STOCK, - 1,000,000. 



Established for the manufacture, of Railroad and MERCHAyT Iron. Every variety of 
Shaftiko, including all sizes of Steamboat Shafts, Cranks, Pistons, Connecting 
Bods, Etc. Car and Locomotive Axles and Frames, and Hammered Iron of 
every description and size. 

3 and 5 FRONT STREET, - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

omere aililressed to PACIPIC ROLLING MILL CO.. P, 0. Box 2032, will Mve iimedlate altentiOD. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR SCRAP IROy^, 

PRESIDENT, - - - - - WM. ALVORB, 

VICE-PRESIDE.A'Z - - - L, B. BENCH LEY, 

SUPERIJfTE.MDEJ^T, • - - - B. P. BRLWJ^ER. 

SECRETARY, .... SAM'L I. C. SWEZEY. 



PACIFIC OIL AND LEAD WORKS. 



CAPITAL STOCK. - - $600,000. 



Established for the manufacture of Linseed, Castor and other Oils, and of White 
Lead, Zinc and other Paints. Works are now in operation, and prepared to furnish Oils 
of first quality, and quantity sufficient for the supply of the Pacilic Coast. Also, Oil 
Cakes and Meal in quantities required. 

Highest price paid for Flax Seed and Castor Beans, delivered at the Company's 
Works, King Street, near Third. 

0FFICE--3 &. 5 FRONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Orders addressed to "Pacific Oil and Lead Works," P. O. Box 1443, will have 
immediate attention. 

oz«z*xoz:xi.s : 

President, JOH\ BEXSLEY, 

Vice-President, .... D. 0. MILLS, 

Manager, L. B. BENCHLEY, 

Secretary, SAM'L I. C SWEZEY. 



VI 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



OREGON 




REGULAR STEAMERS TO PORTLAND, leaving San Francisco 'Weekly: 



#• L* BFMPMMJfMi 



9 



Connecting with Steamers to SITKA and PUGET SOUND, and O. and O. R. R. Co., 

and Oregon and O. R. R. Co., through Willamette, 

Umpqua and Eogue River Valleys, Oregon 

TICKETS TO ALL POfflS on lie 0. & C. R. R. sold 5 REDUCED RATES. 



SAILING DAYS :-Saturdays, at lO o'clock A. M. 



WILLIAM HOHHIS, 

.A. S; e xx t , 

210 BATTERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Vll 



GOOMLL, ILSilN k PEll 

STEAMSHIP CO. 




Running to Victoria, (V. I.) and Puget 
Sound Forts. 



HALF MOON BAY, 
PIGEON POINT, 
SANTA CRUZ, 
SOQUEL, 
APTOS, 
SALINAS, 
OASTROVILLE, 
■WATSONVILLE, 
POINT ARENA, 



PAJARO, 

MOSS LANDING, 

MONTEREY, 

SAN SIMEON, 

OAYUOOS, 

SAN LUIS OBISPO, 

POINT SAL, 

GAVIOTA, 

CARPENTERIA, 

CUPPY'S COVE, 



SANTA BARBARA, 

MOOR'S LANDING, 

SAN BUENAVENTURA, 

HUENEME, 

SANTA MONICA, 

SAN PEDRO, 

(LOS ANGELES), 

ANAHEIM, 

SAN DIEGO and 

MENDOCINO. 



TICKET OmCE, 

214 MONTGOMERY STREET. 

GENERAL OFFICE, 

Ho. lO market St., Up Stairs, 



Vlll SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



WELLS, FARBO & CO. 

Exchange, Banking 



^^isriD 



EXPRESS COMPANY. 



ORGANIZED, 1852. CAPITAL, $5,000,000. 



PRINCIPAL OFFICES : 
No. 61 King Wm. Street, - - - - - * - London 

No. 33 Roe dn Qnatre Septembre ------ Paris 

No. 65 Broadway, ....... jfew York 

N. W. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets, . . - San Francisco 



TO ALL PAKTS OF CALIFOKNIA, NEVADA, UTAH, MONTANA, OKEGON, 

WASHINGTON AND IDAHO TERRITOKIES, BRITISH, COLUMBIA 

LOWER CALIFORNEA, AND MEXICAN PORTS, NEW 

YORK, ATLANTIC STATES, AND EUROPE. 



BILLS OF EXCHANGE AND TELEGRAPH TRANSFERS 

On New York, Boston, and Montreal, payable in the principal cities of the United States 

and Canada. Also, Bills on London, Dublin, and Paris. Letters of Credit 

issued on our New York House, exchangeable for Circular 

Letters, payable in all parts of Europe. 



COLLECTIONS AND COIWBIWIISSBONS 

Of all kinds executed, and General Express Business attended to promptly in all parts of the 
United States, Europe, and Canada. Orders for Passage furnished from Queens- 
town, London, Liverpool, Hamburg, and Havre to New York. Also 
from New York to San Francisco — Overland or by Steamer. 

LLOYD TEVIS, President. JAMES HERON, Secretary. 

J. B. HAGGIN, Vice President. H. S. KING, Treasurer. 

J. J. VALENTINE, Qen'l Supt. 



J I 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



IX 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limited, 

[Incorporated under the joint Slock Companies' Acts of 1862 <^«^ 1867 — Great Britain.) 



Capital, - - - $5,000,000, gold, 

Of which $3;000,000 is fully paid up. 



HEAD OFFICE, 22 OLD BROAD STREET, - LONDON. 

FREDERICK RODEWALD, London, Chairman. 

E. H. GREEN, London, Deputy Chairman. 

HENRY ObSCHEN (of Fruhliug & Gbschen.) 

J. F. FLEAf VIICH (of Fred. Huth & Co.) London. 

JULIUS MAY (late of San Francisco.) Frankfort-on-the-Main. 

J. S. MORGAN (of J. S. Morgan & Co.) Loudon. 

JOHN PARROTT (of the late firm of Parrott & Co., Bankers) San Francisco. 

ROBERT RYRIE (of Gladstone, Ewart & Co.) London. 

BA.RON H. de STERN (of Stern Brothers) London. 

RUDOLPH SULZBACH, (of Snlzbach Brothers) Frankfort-on-the-Main. 



Manager, - R. D. PEEBLES- 



Secretary, - ARTHUR SCRIVENER. 



London Bankers— Bank of England ; London Joint Stock Bank. 
San Francisco Branch, - 424 California Street. 



MII,TON S. li.VrHAM. President. 
JAJflES M. STREETEN, Manager. 



CAMIIiO MARTIST, Ass't Manager. 
fVIl<I.IAIH iriACKIKTOSU, Accountant. 



This Bank is prepared to grant Letters of Credit available in any part of the world ; to transact every description 
of Banking and Exchange Business, and to negotiate California and 
OTHER American Securities in Europe. 
' San Francisco, Cal., January, 1876. MIliTON S. liATHABI, President. 



AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS. 

The following are Agents and Correspondents, on any of whom, as also on the Head Office of the Bank, 
Letters of Credit will be granted, and Drafts drawn : 

London— London Joint Stock Bank ; Friihling & Gos- 

ehen ; Fred. Hiith <fe Co.; J. S. Morgan & Co. 
New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. 
Boston— Third National Bank. 
Pliiladelphia— Drexel <fe Co. 
Chicago — Union National Bank. 
8t. Louis — Lucas Bank. 
Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. 
Birlin— Deutsche Bank. 
Vienna— .Schoeller & Co. 
Frankfort-on-the-Main— Gebriider Sulzbach ; Bank of 

Saxe Meiningen. 
Hamburg— John Berenburg, Gossler & Co. 
Dresden— Robert Thode & Co. 
Rome— Plowden, Cholmeley & Co. 
Amsterdam— La Banque de Credit et de DfipOt des 

Pa.vs-Bas. 
Antwerp— Nottebohnl Brothers. 
Naples and Florence— Anglo-Italian Bank. 
Genoa— Henry Dapples. 
Milan— .4. Conierio. 

Valparaiso and Lima— Fred. Huth, Griining <fe Co. 
China and Japan— Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, 

London and China; Comptoir d'Escompte de Paris. 

Deutsche Bank. Hongkong <fc Shanghai B'g Corp. 
River Plate— London and River Plate Bank, Limited. 



Australia and New Zealand— Union Bank of Australia; 
Bank of New South Wales; Victoria; New .South 
Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, New 
Zealand. 

Scotland— Union Bank of Scotland ; Glasgow, Aber- 
een. Alloa, Damfries. Dundee, Edinburgh, Greenock, 
Kilmarnock, Kirkcaldy, Leith, Paisley, Perth, 
Stirling, Stranraer. 

Ireland— Provincial Bank of Ireland ; Armagh, Ath- 
lone, Belfast, Ballina,Banbridge,Ballymena,Bandon, 
Ballyshannon, Cork, Cionmel, Coleraine, C'avan, 
Cootehill, Carrick on Suir, Carrick on Shannon, Clog- 
heen, Dungarvan, Dunsfannon, Drogheda, Enniskill- 
en, Enniscorthy, Ennis, Fermoy, Galway, Kilkennj', 
Kilrush, Limerick, Londonderry, Monaghan, Mallow, 
Newry, Nenagh, Newcastle (Co. Limerick,) Omagh, 
Parsontown, Sligo, Strabane, Skibbereen, Tralee, 
Templemore, Wexford, Waterford, Youghal. 



The undermentioned are Correspondents 
of tiie Bank. 

English Bank of Rio de Janeiro, Limited, Rio de 

Janeiro. 
Alzuyeta Brothers, Acapulco, Mexico. 
Southern Bank, New Orleans. 
Gillmore, Dunlap & Co., Cincinnati. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



The Nevada Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

Nevada Block, Corner Pine and Montgonfiery Streets. 



CAPITAL $5,000,000, GOLD, PAID IN. 



Presided, LOUIS McLANE. Vice-Presldeiit, J. C. FLOOD. Cashier, N. K. MASTEK 
Agency at Virginia, Nev. - - - GEO. A. KING, Agent. 



COREESPONDENTS : 



LONDON, Smith, Payne & Smiths, 
The Chartered Mercantile Bank 
of India, London and China. 

DUBLIN, The Bank of Ireland. 

PARIS, Eottinguer & Co. 

HAMBURG-, Hesse, Newman & Co., 
Altona. 



NEW YORK, Eugene Kelly & Co. 
BOSTON, The Second National Bank 

of Boston, 
CHICAGO, The Merchants' National 

Bank. 
NEW ORLEANS, State 'National 

Bank. 



^1 



The Bank opens Current Accounts ; grants Drafts on all 
principal places in the United States, Europe, Australia, China, and 
Japan ; makes telegraphic transfers of money ; negotiates and 
collects Bills of Exchange, etc.; issues Letters of Credit; under- 
takes the Purchase and Sale of Stocks and other Securities of the 
Pacific Coast States ; collects Dividends, etc.; and transacts every 
description of Banking business. 

The Bank has also great fiicilities for dealing in Bullion, and 
receives consignments for Refining purposes or treatment in the 
United States Mint. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XI 



THE 
(LIMITED.) 



Sri^lo-CJalifof i\ikri 8^1. 



London Office, - - - - 3 Angel Court. 
San Francisco Office, . - 422 California Street. 

Authorized Capital Stock, - - $6,000,000 

Subscribed, 3,000,000 

Paid in, 1,500,000 

Remainder subject to call. 
DIRECTORS IN LONDON : 

Hon. HUGH McCULLOCH, E. H. LUSHINGTON, JULIUS SINGTON. 

WM. F. SCHOLFIELD, ISAAC SELIGMAN, JOSEPH SEBAG. 

CORRESPONDENTS AND AGENTS: 

J. & W. SELIGMAN & CO., NEW YORK. 

SELIGMAN, HELLMAN & CO., NEW ORLEANS. 

MASSACHUSETTS NATIONAL BANK, BOSTON. 

SELIGMAN, FRERES & CIE, PARIS. 

SELIGMAN & STETIHEIMER, FRANKFORT. 

GEBRUDER MEYER, BERLIN. 

CHINA AND JAPAN: 

HONGKONG AND SHANGHAE BANKING COKPORATION. 

EAST INDIES: 

CHARTERED MERCANTILE BANK OF INDIA, LONDON AND CHINA. 

AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND: 

BANK OF AUSTRALASIA AND BRANCHES. 

BILLS OF EXCHANGE, COMMERCIAL and TRAVELERS' LETTERS OF 
CREDIT issued on the most favorable terms, for use in the United States, British Possessions, 
South and Central America, Europe, China, and Japan. 

MANAGERS IN SAN FRANCISCO: 

FREDERICK F. LO'W, IGNATZ STEINHART, 
P. N, LIL.IENTHAL, Cashier. 



XII SANFRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



THE BANK OF BBITISH COLUMBIA, 

INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER, 

Southeast Corner California and Sansom Streets. 



PAID UP CAPITAL, - - $1,514,500 

WITH POWEE TO INCREASE TO $10,000,000. 



London Ofidce, 5 East India Avenue, Leadenhall Street 



o lEi -^ I i=L ivE ^^ nsr . 
T. W. L. MACKEAN, London (Late of ths firm of Turner & Co., China); 

DEPUTY CHAIRMAN, 
ROBERT GILLESPIE, Esq., Director of the Bank of Montreal, London. 

COURT OF DIRECTORS IN LONDON: 

James Anderson, Esq. (Messrs. Anderson, Anderson & Co.); 

Edkn Culville, Esq. (Director of the Hudson's Bay Company); 

H. D. Harrison, Esq, (Messrs. Falkner, Bell & Co., San Francisco); 

Sir John Eose, Bart., K. C. M. G. (Messrs. Morton, Eose & Co., London). 



:BI=l..A.KrOX3:BS: 

PORTLAND, OREGON; VICTORIA AND CARIBOO, 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



-A. G- E 2SX T S = 



New York and Chicago Agency Bank of Montreal. 

Canada Bank of Montreal. 

Mexico and South America London Bank of Mexico & South America. 

China and Japan Oriental Bank Corporation and Chartered Bank of 

India, Australia, and China. 
Australia and Ne-w Zealand Bank of Australasia; Commercial Banking 

Company of Sydney, and Bank of New Zealand. 
England National Provincial Bank of England; Bank of Liverpool; 

North and South Wales Bank. 

Scotland British Linen Company's Bank. 

Ireland Bank of Ireland. 



Deposits received on Current Account, subject to Check, or on Special Deposit. 

Exchange sold in sums of £1 and upwards on the Agencies of the Bank of Ireland and British Linen 
Company. 

Exchange, also, sold on London, New York and Canada, and on Victoria, British Columbia, and Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Commercial Credits granted on Europe. China, Japan, South America, Australia and New Zealand. 

Discount approved Paper and make Advances on Collateral Securities. 

Collect Bills and transact a General Banking Business. 

W. H. TILLINGHAST, Manager. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Xlll 



Incorporated in Geneva, Switzerland, Jan. 20, 1873. 



HEAD OFFICE IN GENEVA. 



Capital, - Tt^o Million Dollars 

stj:bso:e\i:be ID , 



President, - - ZIBXTB.7 ZISITTSCZI. 
Francis Berton, Kolsert "Watt. 



San Francisco Branch, 

(Successors to MESSRS. HENTSCH & BERTON), 



This Bank is prepared to grant Letters of Credit on Europe, and to transact every kind 
of Banking, Mercantile, and Exchange Business, and to negotiate American Securities in 
Europe. 

DEPOSITS RECEIVED. 



rew York, 


Berlin, 


Cliaux-de-Fouds, 


Ijiverpool, 


Frankfort, 


Solothurn. 


liondon. 


Oeneva, 


liansanne. 


P»ris, 


Zurich, 


Baden, 


li.rons. 


Basel, 


Cliur, 


Bordeanx, 


St. Oall, 


ftiliaflrhansen. 


MarMeilles, 


IVinterthnr, 


Freibourgr, 


BruMsels, 


Bern, 


Iiucern, 


Hamburg, 


Meurchafel, 


Aarau, 


Bellinzona, 


liugano. 


Mendrlsio 


Iiocarno, 


Turin, 


Milan, 


Oloron, 


«iienoa. 


Bom a. 


Florence, 







AN ASSAY OFFICE is annexed to the Bank. Assays of gold, silver, quartz ores and 
sulphurets. Keturns made in coin or bars, at the option of the depositor. 

Advances made on bullion and ores. 

Dust and bullion can be forwarded from any part of the country, and returns made 
through Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks. 



Consul for Sn^itzerland and Portugal, FRANCIS BERTON. 



XIV 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 




OF SAN FRANCISCO. 



1 



OA.PITA.L, - - ®750,0OO, QOLD. 



Fire and Marine Insurance. 



THE CALIFOENIA LLOYDS^ 

ESTABLISHED IN 1861, 

Nos.416 and 418 CALIFORNIA STREET, 



CASH CAPITAL, 
ASSETS, Exceed 



$750,000, Cold. 
$1,000,000, Coin. 



FAIR RATES, PROMPT SETTLEMENT OF LOSSES, SOLID SECURITY. 



DIRECTORS : 



J. Mora Moss, 
Moses Heller, 
M. J. O'Connor, 
Daniel Meyer. 
Antoine Borel, 
Joseph Seller, 
I. Lawrence Pool, 
Edward Cadwalader, 
N. B. Stone, 



Nicholas Luning, 
Charles Baum, 
M. I). Sweeny, 
Gustave Touchard, 
Geo. C. Hickox, 
J. H. Baird, 
N. G. Kittle. 
L. A. Booth. 
Benjamin Brewster, 



R. S. Floyd, 
Adam Grnnt, 
Charles Kohler, 
N,.J. T.Dana, 
A. Weill, 
Jas. Moffitt, 
Jabez Howes, 
L. Cunningham. 



John Parrott, 

J. Baum, 

Jos. Brandensteiiii 

C. Ducommun, 

T. Lemmen Meyer, 

T. E. Lindenbergori 

I. Stein hart. 

J. G. Kittle, 

Bartlett Doe. 



GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Tice-President. 

CHARLES D. HAVEN, Secretary. 
GEORGE T. BOHEN, Sui-veyor. JAS. D. BAILEY, General Agent. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XV 



SPRING VALLEY 



Incorporated under Act of the Legislature, April 8, 1858. 



m m 



Divided into 80,000 Shares, of $100 each. 



San Andres, 
Pilarcitos, 
L ! ke Honda, 
College Hill, 
Francisco street, 
Russian Hill, 
Buchanan street, 
Brannan street, 





GALLONS. 


Elevate 
above higl 


on 
tide. 


icit 


y, 7,420,000,000, 


290 F 


^eet 


a 


6,690,000,000, 


450 


4( 


(( 


1,085,000,000, 


700 


(( 


(( 


34,000,000, 


376 


it 


a 


14,000,000, 


253 


ii 


« 


^ 7,000.000, 


150 


i( 


u 


4,000,000, 


300 


(( 


a 


2,000,000, 


200 


(( 


«c 


500,000, 


85 


(( 



OFI^ICERS: 



President, 

Vice-President, 

Secretary, 



CHARLES WEBB HOWARD. 

OLIVER ELDRIDGE. 

E. M. MILES. 



TRUSTEES : ' 



CHAS. WEBB HOWARD, 

■WM. NORRIS, 

GEO. W. GRANNISS, 

A. B. FORBES. 



OLIVER ELDRIDGE, 

J. D. PRY, 

O. W. BONYNGE, 



OFFICE OF THE WORKS: 



XVI SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Bank of British North America 

ESTABLISHED IN 1836. 

INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER. 

PAID UP CAPITAL, - £1,000,000 

CZ-SMSITT'S Z.AXTS, ZiOlTDOXT, England. 

San Francisco Agency, 



COMMERCIAL CREDITS [SSUED 

For use in Europe, China, Japan, the East Indies, South America, and Australia; also, 
Circular Letters of Credit for Travelers, available in all parts of the world. 

Demand and Time Bills of Exchange, payable in London and elsewhere, bought and 
sold at current rates ; also Telegraph Transfers. 

Demand Drafts on Scotland and Ireland ; also on Canada, British Columbia, and New 
York. Bills collected and other Banking business transacted. 

A. McKIXLAY, ) . 

H. W. GLENNY,) '^^®^*** 



W. A. MACONDRAY. F. W. MACONDRAY. 

MACONDRAY & CO. 







AND IMPORTERS OF 

No. 206 SANSOM STREET, 



Agents for the Yang-Tze Insurance Association, 
Shanghae, and North China Ins. Co., 

AND 

HONGKONG LINE of SAILING PACKETS. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XVII 



THE PACIFIC IRON WORKS. 




ZaStAlollslrec]. ixi. lOSO. 



EMBRACING 



Poundry, Machine, Boiler, Forging and Smithing, 

Pattern and Wood Work Departments, Drawing and Library Booms, Etc. 
GEORGE W. FOGG, Superintendent. 

IRA P. RANKIN. ___^.^^___ ALBERT P. BRAYTON. 

These works have now been in successful operation for the past twenty-five years. From a comparatively 
small beginning, in the year 1S50, its increasing patronage has each j'ear demanded larger facilities, until our es- 
tablishment, in all its appointments, will compare favorably with that of any similar one in the country. 

Our patterns, in variety and extent, are unsurpassed, embracincg the latest improvements in all classes of 
machinery, adapted to use on this coast. Our several departments are well equipped with skillful workmen, and 
efficient tools, enabling us to execute all orders entrusted to us promptly, and in the most workmanlike manner. 
With ample facilities for doing work, as also for procuring our Supplies" from first hands, we are enabled to give 
jur customers first-class machinery at prices frequently paid for inferior work. 'I'hemost sl<illful designing anden- 
jineering talent, applying to the various branches of mechanical work, constantly at the service of our customers. 

(irders for all classes of Machinery, Casting, or Boiler work, promptly executed at the most reasonable rates. 

Particular attention given to Steamboat and Steamship Work. Mining and Hoisting Machinery of the most 
ipproved construction. 

Agency Of the Celebrated PRALL STEAM PUMP, 

The cheapest and best Power Pu ^p in use. En'sines and Boilers of superior construction constantly on hand. 

FIRST AND FREMONT STREETS, 

between Mission and Howard, SAN FfiAKCISCO. 



Xviii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



GEO. C. SHREVE & CO. 



Im:porters of 



1 



AVATCHES, 



DIAMONDS, 



EiTO., BTO. 

no MOISTTGOMERY STREET, 

MAKE A SPECIALTY OF THE 

Gorham Manufacturing Go's 

STERLING SILVER WARE.' 



'I 



^ 



Particular attention is requested to the many attractive designs 
no-w being produced by this celebrated Company. With -works pro- 
jected on a scale unparalleled for magnitude in the world, together 
■with the best talent for designing, the most skilled -workmen, the best 
labor-saving machinery, and the immense amount of goods produced, 
tbey are enabled to offer the best made and most artistic articles at 
the lo\(rest possible prices. 

B®°The standard of Silver used is British .Sterling. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XIX 



HAMBURG-BREMEN 

Fire Insurance 



COMPANY. 



SWISS LLOYD 



COMPANY. 



MORRIS SPEYER & CO.,Gen'l Agents, 



BILLS OF EXCHANGE, LETTERS OF CREDIT, ETC., ETC, ON 
EASTERN AND EUROPEAN CITIES. 



No. 13 Merchants' Exchange, 
435 Ci^LIFORlSriA. STREET. 



XX 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



m. 



e CciK©A' 



Or 



® 



This Company has constantly on hand a large assortment of 

Manila and Tarred Cordage, 

Steam Packing JTarn^ 

SASH AND SPRING CORDS. ETC. 



And are prepared to fill orders for 



mo:^i^ 



Of all Sizes and Lengths. 



The Works of the Company are so situated that its fabrics can be shipped direct by Rail or 
Water to any part of the State when so desired by purchasers. 



E. K. HOWES & CO , Agents, 

118, 120 and 122 Front Street, S. F. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



SCOTTISH COilRCIILlORiCi 

Head Office, OLi^SGOTV'. 



1^ 
J 



Capital, - - Si 0,000,000 Gold. 

Assets of Company in the United States, - - $586,04:8. 



Total amount of Premiums received by the San Francisco Agency since 

establishment thereof. $240 000 

Amount of Losses paid by the San Francisco Agency 131,0o0 

I. W. HART and D. B. BLAIR, General Agents, 

321 California Street, S. F. 



it 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXI 



Parrott & Co. 



AND 



^*io>ij¥i^^io:K ilK^^c^S^X'J'^, 



306 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Ammon, Caspar! & Go. 

123 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

AKD 

CASPAEI, AMMON & CO. 

28 Bruusivick Street, Liverpool, England, 

Imprters anl CoMission Merchants, 

Shipping and Forwarding Agents, 

Make liberal advances on AVheat and other produce consigned to their Liverpool house and their corres- 
pondents abroad. AGENTS FOR THOMAS MARRIAN'S CELEBRATED ALES. Receive 
regular consignments of, and execute orders for Pig Iron, Scotch and English Coals, all kinds of Linens, 
Cottons, Damasks, and Drills, Dundee and Calcutta Grain Bags, Wool Bags, and Hessians. 



XXU SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

INCORPORATED JULY 23, iSrj. 

OFFICE, No. 619 CLAY STREET, 



OFFICERS : 

E. W. BURR, President; CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier; 

ELI B. BURR, Auditor; BENJ. O. DEVOE, Surveyor. 



JEtoa-rrtSL of X3±x*ec3'tox*fii : 

E. W. BURR, WM. BOSWORTH, J. W, CUDWORTH, J. M. SHOTWELL, 

BENJ. O. DEVOE, R. J. TIFFANY, T. L. RUTHERFORD, E. F. NORTHAM. 

ISAAC HYDE, ANNIS MERRILL, H. L. KING, 



l*«»^«f'i 



DEPOSITS RECEIVED FROM $2.50 HP TO ANT AMOnNT. 

DiTidends Declared Semi-Annually— In January and July of each Year. 



No. 19 Montgomery St. and 107 & 109 Sutter St. 



IJirPOBTJERS ANJ> DEAZEItS J2V 



FANCY GOODS, 

BERLIN ZEPHYR WOOLS, 



ibtl 



Embroidering Floss and Tv/ist, 

And all other articles for Needle- Work, at WHOLESALE and RETAIL. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXlll 



OFFICE, 532 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

Corner of Webb, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Guarantee Capital and Reserve Fund, Paid in, $236,7]7.ioo 
Amount Deposits held, $6,905,223.iS'o 



JAMES De PREMERY, President, ALBERT MILLER, Vice-President, 

C. ADOLPH LOW, CHARLES BAUM, 

GEORGE C. POTTER, "WASHINGTON BARTLETT, 

CHARLES PACE, DENIS J. OLIVER, 

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, Sen. 

Cashier and Secretary, . _ . LOVELL "WHITE. 

Survej-oi-,. - JOHN ARCHBALD. I Auditor, - THEODORE LOESSEL. 

Accountant, - J. A. LAXGSTROTH. | Attorney, - HENRY C. CAMPBELL. 



McCAIlT, FLOOD & MoCLURE., 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 

FOREIQN AND DOMESTIC 

DRY GOODS, 

Clothing, Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, 

HOSIERY, WHITE GOODS, BLANKETS, ETC. 



amM%p %sM&w, ^M3^ 1^ m^MMMm 
Bettveen Front and Battery, SAN FRANCISCO. 



-XXIV SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 



OFFfCE, N. E. COR. MONTGOMERY AND MARKET STREETS, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



The objects for which this Association is formed are, that by its operations the depositors thereof 

may be enabled to find a 

Secure and Profitable Investment for Small Savings, 

And borrovfers may have an opportunity of obtaining from it the use of a moderate capital, on 
giving good and sufficient security for the use of the same. 

Presidknt, - . - M. D. SVVERNY. I Trkasurer, - - EDWARD MARTIN. 

Vjce-Prksident, - -CD. O'SULLIVAlV. | Attornky, - - - RICHARD TOBIN. 

Any person can become a depositor of this Society on paving an entrance Fee of TWO DOLLARS, 

and subscribing to the By-Laws. 

B®"Deposits can be made of any sum from ONE DOLLAR to any amount. 

I<OANS lIADi: ON SECURITY OF REAIi ESTATE WITHIN THE CITY AND COUNTY. 



a. ^. wii<i<is>i^. 

Real Estate Agent, 



740 FOURTH STREET. 



Ground to lease for a term of years, conveniently situated to the 

Southern and Central Pacific R. R. Depots, 

and also to the -wharves. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXV 



The California Savings & Loan Society, 

512 California Street, San Francisco. 

(Next door to Wells, Fargo & Co.) 



GUaRANTEE CAPITAL^ 



$300,000. 



OFFICERS. 

DAVID FARQUHARSON President. 

CHARLES LUX Vice-President. 

JULIUS C. KEIS Treasurer. 

A. C. CUKBETT Surveyor. 

C. P. ROBINSON Attorney. 

D. B. CHISHOLM Secretary. 



DIRECTORS. 



James R. Kelly, 
David Farquharson, 
Chnrlos Lux, 
Julius C. Reis, 
Gustaye Reis, 

R. 



A. C. Corbett, 
6. Howard Thompson, 
P. J. White. 
R. G. Brown. 
John C. Roberts, 
Bunker. 



ORDISTARY nEPOSITS are received from $2.50 up to $15,000, and are practically on call. The last 
dividend on tlieni was s per cent. 

T«',HM I>e;P4»NIT.4 are received from $30 upward.s, and the last dividend on them was 9.60 per cent. The 
dividends are declared :ind payable in the beginning of Jannary and Jul.v of each year, and if not called for 
are immediately added to the principal, and are so compounded half yearly. 

There is no Charge Made for Entrance Fee or Pass Books. 

Loans made on good Improved Farms as well as on City Property. 

The fullest particulars may be obtained of the officers of the Bank, or any of the Directors, either in regard 
to Deposits 01 Loans, or of the undersigned stockholilers : 

James R. Kelly, of Sullivan, Kelly <fe Co.; P. J. White, Capitalist, and e.x-Sherififof San Francisco; John Kelly, 
Jr., Brooklyn Hotel ; Daniel Sheerin, of Larseneiir A Sheerin : Milton S. Lathan),of London and San Francisco 
Bank : Charles Lux, and Henry Miller, of Miller <fe Lux ; John C. Moody, Druggist ; J. H. O'Brien, Plumber and 
Gas-fitter ; John Bain, President of St. Andrews Society. 



First Premium aivarded wlierever exiiihitecl — Pair of Mechanics' Institute, 1S65-S — 

Statu Fair, 1868. 

:E3STF.^^IL«XSX3:£3X> 1356. 



CHARLES BERNARD, 

MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 

FAMILY CHARTRES COFFEE 



AL"WAYS ON HAND, 



» 



AND SPICES OF ALL KINDS, 



Also, SALBRATUS, CARBONATE OP SODA, CREAM OF TARTAR, 

and BAKING POWDER. 

IN'o. 707 eft? 700 SudLXg'SOAi: STF. 

Corner of Gold, between Jackson and Pacific Streets, San Francisco, Cal. 



XXVl 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



XTo. lOS BATTSK'7 ST., San Fraxxcisco, 



Sole Agent for the Pacific Coast for Dupont's 



Cannon, Musket, Blasting, Mining 



EAGLE SAFETY FUSE GO'S 

ITSVSH F^ZZiZlTC BKAXTDS OF FUSS, 

Viz: Triple Tape, Double Tape, Siugle Tape ; Cement 9fo. 3, Cement No. 1; Hemp, 
IrVater-pruof and Submarine. 



UnriTaled New 5Iodel 
standard, or Extra Fine and Extra Finisbed. 



mmwi 



Eeloadingr Tools for Cartridges, in sets and primers, per 1,000. Cartridges, central fire, for New Model, 

and rim fire for Old Model Winchester Arms, as well as fnr all other Rifles and 

Pistols, both central and rim fire. SALES BY THE CASE. 



RoDGERs, Meyer & Co. 

212 Battery Street, 

SJN FRANCISCO. 



Robert Rodgers & Co. 

LIVERPOOL, 

ShIPPIG and GoiilSSlON ifflCHUTS, 

DRAW EXCHANGE ON EUROPE. 



Sin 
Ida 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXVU 



A. S. HAIjLIDIK, 

Importer, Dealer and Manufacturer of 

Fancy Wire Goods, Netting, Screens, 

IRON AND STEEL WIRE ROPE, 

FOR MINING AND HOISTING PURPOSES, 
AND WIRE OF ALL KINDS. 

ESTABLISHED 1857. 

113 and 115 PINE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Sole Proprietor of the 

PATENT ENDLESS ROPEWAY 

(Wire Tramway) for transporting Ores, etc., over mountainous places. 



MINING COMPANIES, FERRYMEN, AND SHIPMASTERS 

Ire informed that Wire Rope can be furnished them coTisidorably under the cost of Hemp or Manilla, of equal 
trength. Wire Rope does not stretch or shrink by change of weather. It weighs -lO percent, less than Hemp, Is 
ess than one-half the diameter; is easily spliced under all circumstances; is as pliable for equal strength; and is 
rom fuur to five times as durable as the best Hemp or Manila Rope. 

For Hoisting from Desp Mines, the Econom7 of its Application is Immense. 

riie Wire from which my Ropes are made is manufactured in San Francisco, by the 
Pacific Wire Manufacturing Company, from the very best of Stocli. 

Note.— STEEL WIRE ROPE weighs about six-tenths of Iron Rope, or one-third of Hemp of equal strength. 
[ts extreme lightne.ss saves largely in freight to remote places, and its great durability recommeuds it for hoisting 
purposes, etc. See table of comparative weights, strength , and sizes of 



Steol Wire Rope. 


Iron %Vire Rope. 1 Hemp Rope. 


Working Load 
of each. 


Circumference W't. per 100 ft. 


Circumference 


W't. per 100 ft. Circumference 


W't. per 100 ft. 


2 inch. 60 lbs. 

2,''e '• 100 •' 


2'/2 inch. 


100 lbs. 8'4 inch. 

180 " 814 " 


166 lbs. 

284 '• 


.S,300 lbs. 
7,000 " 



ENDLESS ^VIRE ROPE 'WAY, 

("Wire Tramway) secured by numerous Patents. 

By means of the Ropevvay. ores, rock, and other material can be transported over mountainous and difficult 
places, where it would be impossible or exceedingly expensive to build a road, ft can deliver from five to fifty 
tons per hour, according to capacity; and being carried upon posts above snow and other obstructions, can be used 
when other modes of transportation would be impossible. 

A. S. HALLIDIE, 113 and 115 Fine Street. San Francisco. 

ClrcularH Sent on Application. 



XXVlll SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Ivdl^^P^IIsTJE ^^KTID I^II=l.Ei. 



THE 



CALIFORNIA INSURANCE COJ 

OFFICE, NO. 318 GAUFORNIA STREET, 

ONE DOOE EAST FROM SANSOM, SAN FRANCISCO, CALAOi 

■ ^ > ^ 

CAPITAL PAID UP (IN GOLD) - - - $300,000 
ASSETS 461,OOo|ioJ 

THE OLDEST OF ALL THE LOCALS. -^ 



C. T. HOPKINS, Prest. H. B. TICHENOR, Yice-Prest 

Z. CROWELL, Secretary. 



[i 



COFFEE AND SPICE MILLS 

6'26 A.ND 627 FRONT ST. 



The oldest Coffee and Spice Factory on the Pacific Coast. 
MANUFACTORY OF THE 

ORIGINAL CHARTRES COFFEE, 

First iatroduced into this country in June, 1851, by G. Tenard. 



10' 



OENUINE MOOHA. COFFEE. 



ALL KINDS OF GREEN, ROASTED, AND GROUND COFFEES. 

ALSO, SPICES AND CALIFORNIA MUSxARD. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXIX 



a. M. NEWHALL. J. 0. ELDRIDQE. Q. PALACHE. 







ts, 



FIRE-PROOF BRICK, 

309, 311 and 313 SANSOM STREET. 



MONDAY and THURSDAY— Catalogue Sale of Boots, Shoes, Clothing, 
Hardware, Fancy Goods, etc. 

WEDNESDAY— Catalogue Sale of Dry Goods, Silks, Embroideries, 

French Goods, etc. 

Oa.s1i jek.€3L\rskra3.o&Gt oxi. 3VEex'o]3.a<33.c3.ise foxr Settle. 



Transatlantic Fire Insurance Co. 

CAPITAL, ^ '__ $1,125,000. 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., Agents, 

504 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Wt>tnt^ r«ASO«)T ^ CO 




No. 40S CALIFORNIA ST., 

A.nd 41 INDIA WHARF, BOSTON, MASS. 



XXX SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



IMPERIAL FIRE 



AND 



i 



OF LONDON AND LIVERPOOL. 

Losses paid here immediately on Adjustment fe 
in U. S. Gold Coin. 



FALKNER, BELL & CO 

Ho- 430 GALIFORI\IIA STREET. 

AGENTS FOR CALIFORNIA. 



' 



SA.]sr FRAisrcisco 

CORDAGE MANUFACTORY 



Constantly on hand, a large and Complete Assortment of 

MANILA CORDAGE. 

Whale Line Eale Eope, Tarred Manila Eope, 

ETC., MANUFACTURED FROM 

PURE MANILA HEMP. 



i 



Office at TUBB3 & CO., 611 and 613 FRONT STREET, 

MANUFACTORY AT THE POTRERO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXX] 



^ STOCK COMPANY. ^ 



Number of Shares, 3,000. $500 per Share. 



INCORPORATED APRIL 3d, 1867. 



C. SPRECKELS, - President and Manager. 
D. SPRECKELS, - - - Secretary. 



IBocixrca. of a?2:*i;i.steejs: 

C. SPRECKELS, GEO. H. EGGERS, PETER SPRECKELS, 
HENRY HORSTMANN, JOHN D. SPRECKELS. 



Oo-m m er*oia>l .^s^xxts: 



'f^'^i .'M. KOI 1E1 IBP <@ Jir (^ ^ni] 



210 California Street. 



S. W. Corner EIGHTH and BRANNAN STREETS. 



This Refinery, having recently trebled its capacity, is better prepared 
to supply the great demand for its various kinds of 

SUGARS AND SYRUPS. 



XXXii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Of London and Aberdeen. 



Subscribed Capital, - - ■ $15,000,000 
Accumulated Funds, - • ■ 8,890,000 
Annual Fire Premium, - ■ ■ 1,565,000 

Losses Promptly Paid in U. S. Gold Coin. 



V7. li. BOOHEK, - - - Agent, 



I 



1 



Cc 
319 CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco. 



Royal Mail Steam Packet Company 



ii 



Notice is liereUy given mat arrangeients laye fieen entered into lieiween tlie 



AND THE 

Pacific Mail Steamsliip Cozxipany, 

For the forwarding of treasure to the Bank of England and to the 
Bank of France, in Havre, by the steamships of the two companies by means 
of throiigli bills of lading, to be granted by the commanders of the ships of 
the Pacific Mail Steamsliip Company, for delivery to the Agent of the 
Xioyal Mail Steam Packet Company, to be sent across the Isthmns, and 
embarked on the ships of the K. M. S. P. Co. For particulars as to through 
rate of freight, apply to the undersigned. 

Arrangements can be made for the shipment of Gold and Silver Ores 
from Aspinwall. by the Company's Steamers, on favorable terms. 

The Steamships of the H. M. S. P. Co. leave Aspinwall for Plymouth, calling at St. Thomas, on the 6th (7th, 
when there are :iO days in the previous month), and 22d of each month. 

Passages, at reduced rates, can be secured on application to the undersigned, who will give any further par- 
ticulars that may be required about the Company's business. 

'^. Zi. BOOHSK. 




ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXXlll 



H. A. CRANE. 



m 



'^E 



W. H. BRIGHAM. 

1 M M 



R. A. SANFORD. 



''^ 



WHOLESALE 



DRUGGISTS, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

DRUGS, MEDICINES, PROPRIETARY ARTICLES. 
Druggists' Sundries, Perfamery, Etc., Etc, 

322, 324 and 326 FRONT STREET, 



Oomer of GlSi-y, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



ALBANY BREWERY, 

SPBECHELS It CO., Froprietora 



ir> 










Between Third and Fourth, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

This Establishment has been enlarged for the third time, during the past season, and now possesses 
facilities unsurpassed by any competition for the production of 

SUPERIOR OREi^M ALE, 

To supply the increasing demands of the public. 



XXXIV SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



HENRY B. WILLIAMS. HENRT P, BLANCHARD. 

WILLIAMS, BLAHCHAUD & CO. 
Shipping & Commission 

MERCHANTS, 

No. 218 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

SA.lSr FHi^NOISOO. 



COR. MISSION & FREMONT STS.. ' 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



^VM. M. GREENVV^OOD, Prop'r. 




C. D. WHEAT, 

L Em m mu comni mi 

740 FOURTH STREET, S. F. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXXV 



The CoMiBRCiAL Ihsdraice Company, 

OF CALIFORNIA, 

FIRE AND MARINE. 



DIRECTORS. 



W. W. DODGE, of W, W. Dodge & Co.. Merchants. 
CLAUS SPRECKELS, President California Sugar 

Refinery. 
SELDEN S. WRIGHT, Judge County Court. 
W. B. CUMMINGS, of W. B. Curaraings & Co., Mer- 

chanis. 
BARTLETT DOE, of B. &J. S. Doe, Manufacturers. 
FRANK EASTMAN, Printer. 
C, W.KELLOGG.of Wilmerding.Kellogg & Co., Mer- 

chants. 
A. W. JEE, Merchant. 
PETER DEAN, Capitalist. 



JOHN H. WISE, of Christy & Wise, Merchants. 
C. y. DEERING, of Deering& Co., Merchants. 
LEVI STEVENS, of Stevens, Baker & Co., Mer- 
chants. 

A. J. POPE, of Pope & Talbot, Ship Owners, etc. 
CHARLES MAIN, of Main & Winchester, Mer- 
chants. 

B. G. CRANE, of Crane, Hastings & Co., Mer- 

chants. 
W. L. ELLIOTT, U. S. A. 
GEORGE L. BRADLEY, Capitalist. 



SACR-A-MEN-TO. 



H. S. CROCKER, of H. S. Crocker & Co., Merchants. 
N. D. THAYER, Capitalist. 



F. S. FREEMAN, of Woodland, Capitalist. 
D. H. HASKELL, C. P. R. R. 



Office in San Francisco, No. 228 California St. 

CBAS, A. ZATON, Secretary. C. W. KEIiIiOOG, President. 



M. TJLLMA.ISrN & CO. 

WOOLEN DRAPERS, 



Importers and Dealers in 



Woolens, Silks & Tailors' Trimmings 

J^os. 626, 628 and 630 SAC(RAMEJ^TO ST., 

Between Montgomery and Kearny. 



F. JOOST. 



F. HiNKE. 



B. JoOST. 

JOOST BROTHERS & CO., 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Hardware, Tools, Buildifpg Material, Etc. 

Nos. 37, 39 and 41 ELEVENTH STREET, Cor. Mission, S. F. 



Nails and Spikes, of Parker Mills, Warehan\j 

Constantly on. Hand. 
A LARGE SUPPLY OP TACKS IN STOCK. 



XXXVl SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



James Linfobth. John Benslet. L. B. Benchlet. 

LiNFORTH, Kellogg & Go. 



'1 
Importers and Jobbers of 



^^ AND 

AghicultuhaL Implements. 



GEJ^EfRAL AGEJ^TS FO(R 

NORWICH LOCK MANUFACTURING CO'S LOCKS, 
BLACK DIAMOND FILES, 

TUTTLE'S FORKS, HOES, AND RAKES, 
GARDEN CITY PLOWS, 

MYER'S EXCELSIOR GANG PLOWS, 
PITTS' THRESHERS, 

MANSFIELD ENGINES, 

WOOD'S EAGLE MOWERS, 

RUSSELL'S REAPERS, 

FISH BROS WAGONS. 

ISTos. 3 and 5 Front Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Oft.X>X3Zl.S Xl.X3S:E*X3CX'X*X7XjXjTr SOXjXOX'X'X3X>. 



G. W. Stbong. W. L. Stkong. 

STKOITC <& CO. 

METALLURMCAL WORKS, 

HO. 10 STEVENSON STREET, NEAR FIRST, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



We purchase high grade Gold and Silver Ores, Bullion, Etc. Ores worked and tests made with care ; also, Ore 
Assays of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Tin, Iron, Manganese, Cinnabar, Ni;kel, Etc. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXVll 



40O and 402 BATTERY STREET, cor. CLAY, 

uU lYXlYXXuiJXUiV lYXJbXiuXXXliV X U5 



AND DEALERS IN" 



HIDES, TALLOW, PELTS, OIL, 

LEATHER OF ALL KINDS, 

INCLUDING FRENCH, EASTERN, AND CALIFORNIA. 

Importers of Tanners' and Curriers' Tools and Materials. 
Agents for Tanneries; also, Agents for Jas. 8. Mason & Co's Blackiug. 

Pay the Highest Cash Market Prices for Hides, Tallow, and Pelts. 



W. J. T. PALMEE & CO. 

Warerooms, 

323 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Manufactory, - 1 05 and 1 07 Mission Street, 

NEAR SPEAR, - SAN PRANOISOO. 



XXXVlll SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



JiMi TilLii i @i. 

512 to 518 Washington Street, 

Impobters of and Dealbbs in 

DRUeGISTS' GLASSWARE 

^ND SUISTDIIIES. 

The Latest Styles of Glassware and Fixtures for First-Olass Drug 

Stores, -with Glass Labels? Counter and Prescription Scales, 

Druggists' Sundries, Perfumery and Liquor 

Labels in good Variety. 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS AND CHEMICALS, 

Bullion and Assay Balances, Humid Assay Apparatus, Cupelling Furnaces, French and 
Sand Crucibles, Dixon's Celebrated Black Lead Crucibles, 
and everything required in an Assay Office. 

We have the largest and most desirable stock of Goods in this line in the City, and are constantly replen- 
ishing with fresh Goods. All orders will have prompt and careful attention. 



JOSEPH ROTH. H. L. LEVY. 

snccirssoRs to 
ROTH & VIDEAU, 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in 

Fine Wines, Liquors, 

Brandies and Whiskies, 

Sole Agents of the Celebrated Benedictine. 

314 ^]srr> 316 PiisrE street, 

Between Sansom and Battery, 
S -^ SO* JF* XI. .£L X^ O I S O O . 



ant 
h 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXXIX 




841 Market Street, and 344- Jessie Street, 



This Institution, conducted by the Fathers of the Society of Jesus, was opened for the 
reception of Students on the 15th of October, 1855. On the 30th of April, 1859, it was in- 
corporated and empowered to confer degrees and academical honors in rU the learned profes- 
sions, and to exercise all the rights and privileges common to any other literary institution in 
the United States. 

THE DESIGN OF THIS INSTITUTION IS TO GIVE A THOKODGH 

English, Classical, Mathematical and Philosophical 



It is Intended for Day Sclxolars Only. 

The Course of Studies embraces the Greek, Latin, and English Languages, Poetry, 
Khetoric, Elocution, History, Geography, Arithmetic, Book-Keeping, Mathe- 
matics, Chemistry, Mental, Moral, and Natural Philosophy. The 
study of the French and Spanish Languages, Vo- 
cal Music, Short-Hand and Practical 
Telegraphy are optional. 

Besides the Classical, there is a Preparatory and Elementary Department for 
the younger students. Its object is to qualify the pupil for the higher studies. 

This Institution, provided with a full staff of Professors, presents considerable advantages 
for the mental and moral training of the students. 

A Complete Philosophical Apparatus 

HAS BEEN RECEIYED FROM PARIS. 

THE LABORATORY CONTAINS OVER T"WO HUNDRED AND FIFTY 
PURE CHEMICALS, AND ALL THAT IS NECESSARY 
FOR THE MOST COMPLICATED MANIPU- 
LATIONS AND ANALYSIS, 

THE COLLEGE HAS, MOREOVER, A COMPLETE PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATCS. 

The "St. Ignatius' College Band"; The "Ignatian Literary Society" for exercise in 
Rebate ; the " Philhistorian Debating Society" to promote the knowledge of Histoi-y ; 
and the " Loyola Scientific Academy" for the cultivation and promotion of the study of 
Natural Sciences, are established in the College for the improvement of the pupils and young 
gentlemen of good standing. 






xl SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 



mwmmtmm ©a^pltali) $M&^ 



i 



No. 526 CALIFOENIA STREET. 



J^" Office Hours from 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. 

Extra hours on Saturdays from 7 to 8 p. m. , for receiving- of deposits only. 
Loans made on Keal Estate and other Collateral Securities, at current 
rates of interest. 



GEORGE 


LETTE, 

SECKETARY. 




L. 


GOTTIG, 

PBESIDENT, 


lI^^]^Qllt 


of and 


oo» 




Manufacturers 





Above New City Hall, SAN FRANCISCO, 



market Street Cars pass the door. 



1 



D. D. HOLLAND. C. F. RUPPEL. 

HOLLAND & RUPPEL, 

fte^le Street Mlll» 

CORNER BEALE AND MISSION STREETS, 

Office, 304 Mission Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Mouldings, Brackets, Frames, Sash, Blinds, Doors, and all descriptions ofWood-work Finish. 



I 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



xli 



Ki/Vv 



1%^ 




^■1 



<- 4-^i 4^^ 4^i 



i 




I'a 
















DIRECTED BY THE FATHERS OF THE SOCIETY OF JESUS. 

FOUNDED IN 1851. INCOEPOEATED IN 1855 



"WITH A FULL STAFF OF 



PROFESSORS AND TUTORS, 

AND A 

THOROUaH SYSTEM OF INSTRUCTION 

IN 

LATIN, MATHEMATICS, HISTORY, 

GREEK, NATURAL SCIENCES, GEOGRAPHY, 

ENGLISH, ARITHMETIC, USE OF THE GLOBES, 

MENTAL rSILOSOPHT, BOOK-KEEPING, PENMANSHIP, 

FRENCH, SPANISH, ITALIAN, GERMAN, 

DIYIDiLD INTO TWO EEGULAE COUESES: 

^®I©®1 and ©@®m@i^©tml 

BESIDES A 

FB.EFAB.ATOXl'7 DSFiillTMSITT. 



TEI^]>wd:S_ 



Board and Lodging, Tuition in either Classical or Commercial Department, "Washing 
and Mending, Stationery, Medical Attendance and Medicines, Fuel, Baths, 

per week §8 00 

Total, per Session of ten months, §350 — payable half-yearly in advance. 
N. B. — If more than two brothers enter the College, each additional one pays only ?200 
per Session. 

For further information, or for Catalogue of the College, apply to Key. A. Varsi, 
President of Santa Clara College, Santa Clara County, or to St. Ignatius College, 841 
Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



xlii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



STENCIL PLATES 

CUT BY 

F. M. TRU^ATORTHY, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



t 



STENCIL PLATES, when handsomely executed, present the cheapest and best mode of advertising that can be 
aodpted. This is the experience of all who use them. 

STENCIL PLATES OF EVERY PATTERN cut at this establishmeut in a style unequaled by any other work, 
men in California. 

Merchants and others are invited to call and examine specimens in proof of the above assertion. 

Orders from abroad, as well as those given in person, promptly executed and forwarded. Parties sending orders by 
letter are particularly requested to write plainly and give the exact space they wish the letters to occupy. 

By close application and superior execution of work during an experience of thirteen years, Mr. TRUWORTHY 
has extended his business to its present proportions. His present facilities for rapid and tasteful execution of all work 
in his line are far superior to those of any other in this Sute or in the Union. 

Having purchased all the late John Hall's Stencil Tools, Plates, and Impressions, and everything pertaining to his 
business, I am prepared to furnish his customers with fac-similes of his work. 

BRUSHES, INK, AND MARKING POTS FOR SALE. 
REMEMBER THE PLACE, 

318 FRO^T STREET, corner Commercial, (Up Stairs,} San Francisco, California. 1= 



[ 




R 



123 and 125 BEALE STREET, San Francisco. 



k 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xHii 


W. & 1. STEINHART & CO. 

Iraapoi-tonrs of 

CT.O'l HTNG 

.A.3Sr ID 

* GEliTTS' FUHlTISHmG GOODS, 

ORIENTAL BLOCK, SAN FRANCISCO. 


84 Thomas Street, - Iffeiiir Tork. 


IRA IKEARDXSN «£ GO'S 

COFFEE AND SPICE MILLS, 



OS^X.BRS SIT 




£To. 212 SACB.AMEXTTO Stusbt, 



BET. FRONT AND DAVIS, 



\Mm wm.M.m^Em^&, 



xliv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



ELLIS READ, 



Shippin, 







m 








ITos. 310 and 312 CLAY STREET, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



GEOEGE CAMPBELL. 



E. D. HEATLEY. 



DICKSON, DE WOLF i. CO. 

410, 412 and 414 BATTERY STREET, San Francisco. 



1 



CAMPBELL, HEATLEY & CO. 

11 GEORGE YARD, LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 



SOLE AGENTS OF THE CELEBRATED 



mwwm 



i. 'jiL~~ Jioii m^ Jim, WW viof miw mw ^ ww jidm jm io 

Viz.— A. A. A.— CENTURY— EUREKA— OR A.NSTON— Etc 



mm 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xlv 



^ e s 1, 



a, ^■. _, ^ 



BOOK BINDER, 



AND 



BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER, 

No. 521 CLAY STEEET, 
San Francisco. 



H. SCHUSSLER, 

Hydraulic and Civil Engineer, 

Chief Engineer Spring Valley Water Works, 

OFFICE, - 516 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



Zlesicl.e33.ce, 227 X311isi Stxreet. 



maKTIt'S' XVHITJE3, 

Successor to 

LEGAY & CO., 



'i 



614 & 616 COMMERCIAL STREET. 



Xlvi SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



ATKINS MASSEY. N. YUNG. 



MASSEY & YUNG, 

UNDERTAKER^ 



651 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

First House below Kearny, 

San Francisco, Cal. 




I» 



Barstow's and other Metallic Caskets always on hand. Everything ir 
our line will be furnished on the most Liberal Terms. 



'WM. SBSRMAIT A CO. 

CLOTHIESS, HEBGHANT TAILORS 



AND DEALERS IN 



MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS, 

TRUNKS, TRAVELING BAGS, VALISES, ETC 

e08 IHOIVTGOniERY STREET, 

East Side, North of Clay, SAN FRANCISCO 



B^°Our Merchant Tailoring Department is complete, and all orders from the Country wil 
receive prompt attention. Stylish and perfect-fitting garments always guaranteed. 

Wm. Sherman & Cof 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xlvii 



\f) 



^^IsTJD 



Machine Works, 

ANGELL, PALMER & CO., Managers. 

JVos. 237 to 259 First Street, - SAJV FRAJVCISCO. 



This Establishment is now Manufacturing 

Of all kinds, at lower rates than ever before. We can turn out work to better advantage 
and at less prices than any other shop on this Coast or elsewhere. 



FARMERS' AND MECHANICS' BANK 

OF SAVINGS, 

225 SANSOM ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



Guarantee Capital, - $150,000. 

H. DUTTON, President. (J. M. CONDEE, Cashier. 

. E. DAVIS, J AS. LAIDLEY, G. W. SWAN, 

D. CLAYTON, ABNER DOBLE, H. BUTTON, 

1. H. FREEMAN, G. M. OONDEE. 

No charge for Entrance Fee or Bank Book. Deposits received in sums from One Dolla^ 
ipwards. Dividends declared the first Monday in July and January. Loans made on Rea^ 
istate and Collateral Securities. 



xlviii 



SAN TRAN CISCO DIRECTORY. 



^^i^^^^^''% 



il 



'^J 



FRANK XZASTIiflCAM, 

Book, Card and Fancy 

JOB PRINTER, 



NEAR SANSOM, 



Every style of "work required by Merchants, Mechanics, La"wyers, Insu- 
rance Companies, Banks, etc., correctly, tastefully, speedily 
and elegantly executed at this long-established 
House. The Proprietor has added every 
desirable improvement in 



su-»| 

I 




That the business demands. 
NOVELTY AND ORIGIN AlITY OF DESIGN IN THE EXECUTION OF 



1 



PLAIU AND FAITCY JOB PE,mTIUG 



Will receive his prompt attention ; and he hopes, by fair deal- 4 
ing and low prices, to suit all -who may favor 
him with their patronage. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xlix 



ATHANIEL GRAY. H. M. GRAY. 

N. GRAY «£ CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

UNDERTAKERS, 

641 Sacramento Street, 

orner of Webb, SAN FBANOISCO, CAL. 

THE TRADE SUPPLIED WITH 

ofdns & Cofiin Trimmings, Hearses & Hearse Plumes 

AND EVERY ARTICLE IN THE LINE, ON LIBERAL TERMS. 




Sole Agents for Barstow's Patent Metallic 

BURIAL CASES AND CASKETS. 



IMACHINE WORKS. 

210 and 212 BE ALE STBEET, 

ear Howard, SAN FRANCISCO. 

«-»« 

Manu.factu.rers of 
AND ALL KINDS OP 

Mill and Mining Machinery. 

Also make a Specialty of the Manxifacture of 

DETABLE HOISTING ENGINES FOR MINES AND DOCK PURPOSES, 

FOR ■WHICH THE 

FIRST PREIIVIIUM MEIDALi 

AS AWARDED AT THE MECHANICS' INSTITUTE FAIR FOR 1876* 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Vitrified Iron Stone Sewer Pipe 





—PROM— 

N. CLARK'S PACIFIC POTTERY, 

SACRAMENTO. 





Pipe of various Size, with Connections, T's, Elbows and Traps, 

AT YARD: 

225 MAIN ST. JOHN B. OWENS, Ageni 



Also Agent for 

BERGMAN BROTHER! 

SACRAMENTO 




OTTERI 



SACRAMENTO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 
ROCKINGHAM STONE, 
TELLOW WARE, 

TERRA COTTA VASE! 
RUSTIC GARDEN WORK, E 

SALESROOM: 

nSTo. 20 Oalifornia Street, near Drnmin, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



J. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



^MmMPm*» CIgdr $l9r#* 



Betail Dealer in the Finest Brands 



1\X£S3E3X1.1SCXZ.A.X73MC F*X]E>X:S, X2tc 



RETER T. OANNON, 

orners of Montgomery, Post and Market Streets, SAN FRANCISCO. 



DWARD MARTIN. 



D. V. B. HENARIE. 



^. Sll^]^1"Ilt ^ oo. 




WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



WINES AND LIQUORS. 

408 Front Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



SCIENTIFIC 



iiR FiDi^ 



No. 523 Kearny Street, Rooms Nos. 4 and 5, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 




Mrs. H. A. Moore would announce to ladies and 
gentlemen who desire the personal adornment of a 
fine suit of hair, that she has opened parlors for its 
express treatment. They are emphatically assured 
she possesses the skill to produce a full flowing crop 
of hair on all stages of baldness. A few treatments 
will convince the most skeptical this is no exaggera- 
tion. No mineral or damaging substances used. I 
have in my parlors photographs of well known citi- 
zens, exhibiting the contrast before and after treat- 
ment, which can be seen by those desiring it. No 
better evidence can be furnished. AVhen they are 
seen, doubt vanishes. 



Sr PREPARATIONS FORWARDED TO ALL PARTS OF THE COUNTRY, "^a 



]ii SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



3B- H. rrtESESHVL^a.!^ cfc CJO- 

Nos. 4 I 3 and 415 Mission Street, 

Adjoining Mechanics' Mill, 1 Q^N FrANCISCO. 

Between iirst and iremont btreets,) r J ^ 



SCROLL SA.TV^ IiSra AIS TD TURNi:^^G 

MAHOGANY, BLACK WALNUT AND CEDAR FOR SALE. 

Constantly on hand and made to order, Stair Rails, Posts, Balusters, etc., etc. 



^Al 



J. BLOOM. E. KOHNSTAMM. J. STKAUS. 

Straus, Kohnstamm & Cc 

Successors to HELBING & STRAUS, 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALEBS IN . 

CROOK.ERY'1 



CHINA AND GLASSWARE, CUTLERY, LAMPS, CHANDELIERS, 

SILVER-PLATED AND BRITANNIA WARE, 

LOOKING GLASSES, ETC. 

102 and 104 Battery Street, cor. Pine, SAN FRANCISO 



WM. EHRENPFORT, 

Carpet Warehouse 

14 THIRD STREET, NEAR MARKET. 



? 



IMPORTER AND RETAIL DEALER IN 



CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS 



AND 



LAJ 



fep 



■ I 



"Fixe X*izxest €^^ai&^±±fy of 



( WHOILiES-A-ILjE, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. JlU 

LEOPOLD KUH, 

jftheU. S. Mint, S. F.) 

tallBrffical Cleiiist 



(Formerly of the U. S. Mint, S. F.) 






No. 611 Commercial Street, 

-Above Montgomory,-'^:^ JSaN -FrANCISCO, CaL. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

lONEER WOOLEN FACTORY, 

LOCATED AT 

Black Point, San Francisco, Cal. 

MANUFACTORY OF ALL CLASSES OP 

SUCH AS 

LiANKETS, CASSIMERES, TWEEDS, FLANNELS, OVERSHIRTS, 
TEAMSTERS' SHIRTS, FIREMEN'S SHIRTS, UNDERSHIRTS 
AND DRAWERS, SLUICE BLANKETS, ETC. 

epot and Office, - - - No. 115 Battery Street, 



IKIGGKEIR^ JAMBS & GO« 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

kfAGON AND CARRIAGE MATERIALS 

COR. CALIFORNIA AND DAVIS STREETS, 



liv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PACIFIC BARREL AND KEG FACTORY 

liOCAXIOHr 03i BRANBTAN STREET, BET SEVENTH ANB EIOHTH, 

Office, 408 California Street. 



HAVE ON HAND 

COOPERS' STOCK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

And are fully prepared to manufacture to order packages of all kinds and sizes. 



IJ'IjIIMT, I»E3-A.^OI>"5r cf3 Oo., .ASG-n-ts 



N. p. LANGLAND. 



J, G. LEAC: 



LANGLAND & LEACH, 

STAIR BUILDERS 

SCROLL SAWYERS 

AND 

WOOD TURNERS 

ALSO 

Ua&nfaeturers and Sealers in 
STAIR RAILS, 

NEWEL POST! 
BALUSTERS, 
Etc. 
485 Brannan St., Betwee.™ and Fourth gy^i^ FRANCISCO 




o; XX ..^ fl. H. :E3 S O T7 T O , 

MANUFACTURER AND IMPORTER OF 

HARDWARE, MECHANICS' TOOLS 

MACHINE SCREWS, TWIST DRILLS, ETC. 

AGENT FOR THE 

AMERICAN SPIRAL SPRING 
BUTT HINGE. 




KTAfUSHED G]HAS.0iPTOV SvF 



|p^ 312 Bush St. 
312 BUSH ST., P^*TRusr»^rBro'clr°"l SAN FRANCISCC 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Iv 



I 



CIS & VALe 



The Largest and Leading 



t8 









it 



ill Pi 




AC 



ON THE PACIFIC COAST, 

517 Clay and 514 Commercial Street, 



SAJ^ F(RAJ^CISCO. 



'SI 




Poster EsTiBUSHMEMT. 



ENGRAVING AND DESIGNING. 



Designs Furnished for Engravings. 



fPmMTIJ^G OF EVEfRY STYLE AJ^iD (DESCRICP. 

riOJN AT SHOiRT NOTICE AJ^Ti fREAS- 

OJ^A<BLE (RiRICES. 



M 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



,mm,u ,^^ 



^ry 



'ri: 



m%mMWJk^'^^ I 




This Elevator is the SAFEST and OCCU-' 
pies less room than any other ever invented. 
It is worked by four small screws inside 
of brass or iron tubes. It can be made of Vi 
any shape or size, to suit any open space, such 
as light wells or the well-hole of any stairs, and 
nothing required or seen but the four tubes 
that enclose the screws for elevating or lower- 
ing the car. 



ill 



It can be worked by 



MANUAL, HORSE, orSTEAM POWER 



This arrangement is most admirably adapted 
for Private Dwellings as well as Hotels 
and Public Buildings. 

\ THE TWIN STAIRS 

iAre Self-Supporting, requiring no walls, partitions, or iron columns. They also pre- 
'vent obstruction on the stairs, as one is for ascending and the other for descending — 
taking up no more room than an ordinary flight of stairs— and are ornamental to 
'any building. They can be constructed of Wood or Iron. 

PATENTED MARCH 7tli, 1876. PATENT RIGHTS FOR SALE. 



SCIENTIFIC STAIR BUILDERS. 

Inventors of the 

Combination Safety Elevator, Twin Stairs & Light Shaft 

No. 2245 MISSION STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Y( 



DI 

imt 
[(rni! 
lift I' 
fited 
illon 
liftti 
licli 
Es 
ialbi 

kec; 



:ipi 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ivii 



S. P. TAYLOR Si CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

Printing, Manila and Straw Papers, Paper 
Bags, Twines, Etc. 

ID E F O T OF THE 



I 



nd aranufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in Stencil Tools and Stock, Key Check Dies, and Stock <fe Lyon's 
ead Seal Presses, Copper Plate Ink, Card Plates, Stencil Alphabets and Figures, and a splendid assortment of 
iperior hand plated Door Plates constantly on hand and for sale cheap. 

120 POST STREET, above the White House, San Francisco, Cal. 

TO ORDER. Cards elegantly Printed, Written, and Engraved. Fine Stencil Xame Plates cut in Roman, Ger- 
laii Text. Old English; also engraved in Writing .Style. Steel Name .Stamps, Brass and Electrotype Stamps, 
urning Brands, Raised Brass Work, etc., etc. 



GEO. M. ^V^OOD & CO. 





AND DEALERS 




IP . , 

YOlJ SHOITLiD BE CURED OR RELIEVED, 

WITHOUT IXCOXVEXIENCE OR RESTRICTION IN EXERCISE OR DIET. 

DR. ROWE, in order to arrive at the absolute certainty of the correctness of the peculiar course of treatment 
vented and adopted b3- him, devoted great attention to the mechanism of the structure involved in the course of 
ernia. so that he is now a.ssured, by a large experience, that it is in accordance with the principles of science, and 
ith the most universall}' acknowledged practice of artistic surgerv, and he asserts with confidence thus in- 
lired that it permanently relieves all cases.of reducible Hernia, without regard to the age of the patient or thedu- 
■tion of the injury, while it is wholly free from all the cruelty that has characterized the treatment of the malady 
ith tortuous Trusses from the earliest age to the present. day. He therefore invites the earnest attention of the 
Hicted and closest scrutiny of the profession. 

Experience shows that all tempered spring Trusses necessarily press upon and often disease parts of the body 
at before were in a perfectly healthy condition. Lumbago and other equally distressing ailments are not unfre- 
the outgrowth of such pressure, and in view of this fact, it becomes a miatter of decided consequence to avoid 
ce calamities, if possible. 

2i'o Persons Suffering with, or Troubled by Hernia, should be without them. 

1st.— There are no tempered springs to confine the body. 

2d.— The pressure can be raised from one ounce to forty pounds. 

Sd.— Pressure only where the bowel escapes. 

•1th.— Pressure up and back, therefore retaining the Hernia at all times. 

5th.— This instrument is worn with perfect ease while riding horseback. 

6th.— Rupture retained and the pressure the same while in any position. 

7th.— Its extreme lightnessand facility of adjustment give it a pVeference over any other now known to be in use. 

The Superiority of these instruments over the rigid Iron Hoops, which in former days were the only recourse 
the ruptured, admits of NO ARGUMENT. Consultations and Examinations Free. 

These Trusses sent to any part of the country by Express (Terms— C. O- D.) upon receipt of measure around 
ps, and statement whether single or double rupture. 

««=-The Perforated Frictional and Elastic Support Belts, the BEST in the world for the prevention 
id cure of Rheumatism, Lumbago, Spinal Disease, Weakness, etc., etc. 

p stairs. SAN FRANCISCO. 



Iviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 





THE HEALTH LIFT 



LIFTI]\G CURE 



REDUCED TO A SCIENCE 



A THOROUan GYMNASTIC SYSTEM FOR LADIES AND GENTLE- 
MEN. IN TEN MINUTES, ONCE A DAY, CUMULATIVE 
EXERCISE, POPULARLY KNCWN AS THE 

Health Lift or Lifting Cure. 

"Whilst improving the health will DOUBLE THE ACTUAL STRENGTH 
IN THREE MONTHS, Occupies only ten minutes each day ; furnishes £ 
safe and more valuable mode of PHYSICAL TRAINING than the Gymna 
slum. 

Is adapted to both LADIES and GENTLEMEN, requiring NO CHANGE 
OP DRESS ; does not fatigue nor exhaust, but by equalizing and improvini 
the CIRCULATION OF THE BLOOD, refreshes and invigorates, and it 
recommended by leading Physicians, to those suffering from want of ton* 
and vigor, or from dyspepsia and other forms of indigestion, or fron 
various diseases of the nervous system, or from the class of ailmentf 
caused by torpor or congestion of the liver. It is approved by the Medi 
cal Profession as the most efflcient, safe, and simple means of preventing 
diseases arising from sedentary habits. 



Exercise Parlors for Ladies and Gentlemen, 

415 MONTGOMERY ST., 

San Franeiseo. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



lix 



HENRY C. FULDA. 



SOL. FROHMAN. 



LAMARTINE R. FULDA, 



California Wine Cooperage. 

Nos. 30 to 40 SPEAR STREET, Near Market, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
FULDA BROS. & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS 

— OF — 

WINE, BEER, 

AND 

M©U©1 CASES, 

TANKS, ETC., 

WATER TANKS, 

SHIP TANKS, 

yiKEQAS STANDS 

— AND — 

MINING WORK 
Ji Specially. 



Proprietors. 




-A.11 "Worls. a-iia.ra.ziteeca.. 



FULDA'S PLANING MILL. 

36 to 40 SPEAR STREET, near Market, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 




SAWING, PLANING, TURNING, BAND AND SCROLL SAWING, 

SHAPING, AND ALL KINDS OF GENERAL MILL WORK, 

AT LOWEST RATES. 

Mouldings of all Descriptions constantly on hand, or "Worked to Order. 



Ix 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



I. f Willi 



wpm 



First PremiM linHills M Horse-Powers. 

The Simplicity and Perfection of these Machines is the result 
of 26 years' experience in California. 



These Machines are designed'for all pur- 
poses, such as pumping -water for irriga- 
tion, "Watering Stock. Chopping Feed, 
Churning, Sa-wing Wood, Running Machin- 
ery, for Manufacturing, Mechanical or other 
purposes. 




The ECLIPSE, for 1 Horse. 



Designed especially for the 
of Dairymen. 

CO 



use 




THE ECONOMVt FOR I OZ Z HORSES. " 



f^% 



OS 2 
«^ I 

^ i 

^-^ s 

^ .5 

a 

^^ 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULARS AND PRICE LIST. 

Factory, Cor. MARKET AND BEALE STREETS, S. F. 
"W. I- TTJSTIIISr- 




s3 

© 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixi 







0<w 

HH 



The manufacture of Pumping Machinery has been our specialty for the past twenty- 
six years. We are the Pioneer and largest manufacturers in this line on the Pacific Coast, 
and we say, without the least fear of successful contradiction, that for Beauty, Simplicity, 
Convenience, Durability and Economy, these Machines are unequaled. 

We have received all the FIRST PREMIUMS awarded by the Mechanics Insti- 
tute, in this city, in our line, for the past nine years, and every time previous, when we 
exhibited in competition with others, for which we h ave our Diplomas to show. 

IF. #. WWBWIM^ ^^Tm^TEM. 
Factory, Cor- Market and Beale Sts., S. F. 



e« 


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o 


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Ixii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



UNION MANUFACTORY 



O F 



BURIhL GASKETS AIHD COFFINS; 

Also, HUNT'S PATENT CASKET; 

Also, the Earstow Savage Metallic Burial Casket. 



b 



At the Extensire Buildings of the Old San Jose Depot, 

No. 1719 MARKET STREET, 
D. W. HUNT. SAN FRANCISCO. 



il 



ELLIS READ, 



AND 



^ 






<^X!(kr 




m 



^Svti^ 






No. 310 CLAY STREET, 

San Francisco, - - Gal, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixiil 



BLAKE, BOBBINS &. CO. 



IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 



Boot, Nofs, friti&£ asfl Hmm 
PAPER, 

Straw and Binders' Boardsi Black and Colored Inks. 



Agents for the Saratoga and Lick Mills Paper MPg Co., Santa Clara Co., Cal. 

ALSO MANUFACTURERS OF 

??A?f ^?cS4^5' 1 « ^ • f Nos. 516 Sacraiento M 519 Coinmerclal Streets, 

JAMES MOFFITT, ^San Francisco. 

pTTAC Y "RORRTN'S I I Between Sansom and Moutgomery, 

JAMES W. TOWNe', New York. ^ SAN FRANCISCO. 



B. M:cQTJILL^]Nr, 

IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER OF 

WALNUT, ROSEWOOD AND GILT 



Looking Glasses, Engravings, Chromos, Lithographs, 

And Depot lor CURRIEK & IVES' PICTURES, 

'Wbolesale and Retail. 



Nos. 20^ and ill Leidesdorff Street^ and No. 529 Commercial Street, 

Between Commercial and Sacramento, Montgomery and Sansom, 



Pictures, Diplomas and Business Cards Framed on the most reasonable 
terms. HEQILDING done in the best style. 



Ixiv 



SAN PRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 




THESE WATERS 

are received daily, fresh from the celebrated 

CONGRESS SPRINGS, 

Nine miles from Santa Clara, Cal. Highly 

recommended by physicians, for invalids and 

family use. By the free use of these Waters 

Yitality is Regaiued, 

The Blood Purified, 

Tlie Liyer Inyigorated, 

The Kidneys Strengthened, 

ITie Bowels Regulated, and 

The Entire System Built Up and 

Fortified Against Disease. 

The best evidence of the popularity of these Waters, is the large and increasing 
sales, for over Twelve Years, all over the Pacific Coast. 

PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS OFFICE AND DEPOT : 

162 New Montgomery Street, near Howard, San Francisco. 




Wines h^l Brandies 

. i 

O^W"N"JVTNTAGE. | 

S. E. COR. SACRAMENTO AND LEIDESDORFF STREETS^ 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixv 



PETER COOK. 



^ 



^^^ & Coo 



JOHN KANE. 



^ 



oo 



AND 



412 COMMERCIAL STREET, 

411 Clay Street, Sar\ Frai\cisco. 



M ®i "N 



MORRIS SPETER & CO. 

No. 13 Merchants' Exchange, 

425 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Draw on J^ew York, London, Paris, Samhurg^ Bremen, 
Berlin, Frankfort, Vienna, 

AND OTHER CITIES IN EUROPE. 



r. A. LEDDEN. A. WHIPPLE. 

LEDDEU, WHIPPLE & CO. 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in 

Groceries and Provisions, 

Setsa ZPi-eLZXcisco. 



Ixvi SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



LOUIS SLOSS. SIMON GREENEWALD. LEWIS GERSTLl 



LOUIS SLOSS & CO. 

Successors to A. WASSERMAN & CO. 



I 



iis, Ml, nz m mioi 

Nos. 310 and 312 SANSOM STREET, 



\ 



Liberal Cash Advances made on Shipments throngli us to our House 
in Ne-w York and London. 



J. ANTONIO SALAZAR, > f J, M. MONTEALEGRE, J 

RAFAEL GALLEGOS. | '( MANUEL MONTEALEGR 

MONTEALEGEE & CO. 



IMPORTERS 



M. 



-A.3SrXD 



MiOMMISSION 4f ) ERCHANTS 

230 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



U\ 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixvil 



\yX (FORMERLY LONE MOUNTAIN,) ^ 



Office at the Entrance of the Cemetery ^ 



Bush Street and Central Avenue. 



TRUSTEES: 

L J. GUNNISON, President, C. C. BUTLER, Secretary. 

N. TUNING, H. M. NEWHALL, N. GRAY, 

ROBERT ROGERS, SAMUEL COWLES, JAMES H. DEERING, 

OVELL WHITE, Treasurer, C. H. CROWELL, Acting Sup't. 



Ixviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



inrxsz-CH <£ go. 

Imprters, SUiim & Comiission Herclants 

Brittan's Building, 109 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



AGENTS MOODY'S SAW MILLS, BURRARD INLET, B. O. 



I' 



ANDREW 'WELCH & CO., 

19 Tower Chambers, Liverpool, Eng. 



W^ELCH, RITHET & CO, 

Victoria, British Columbia. 



ISAAC E. DAVIS. 



HENRY COWELI 



®^VIS ^ ©©"W^lili 



^ 






£a im 



» r 



\ 



Cement, Plaster, Hair, Marble Dust, Fire Tile, Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, Et( 
211 AND 213 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



1849. =^acB@° 1876. 



(' 



Pio>fi;i;i;Ii{o>f Woi^Kg 



225 and 227 Beale Street, bet. Howard and Folsom, San Francisco. 



CHARLES H. LEAVITT, 



m 



MANUFACTURER 



Steel Lined Bank 
VAULTS, 

Burglar, Fire Proof, 

and Silverware 

SAFES, 




PRISON CELLS, 
Fire Proof Doors, 

Detachable Knobs, no Key. A large assortment of ( 
Latest Improved Shears, Punches, Dies, 



Wrought Irob 
GIRDERS, Irt 

Bussey's Paten' 

Combination Burglar Proof I 

Bank Vault and Sd 
LOCKS, ' 

Containing Millions of ChBngB 



Combination and Key Locks on haQ 
etc., for Cold Iron Works. 
Constantly on hand a large assortment of FIRE PROOF DOORS AND SHUTT£]|||li 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



IXIX 



^%M P® Wpi,@, 




m^ 







0518 Sacramento St , cor. LeidesdorfF, S F-O 



av 



l|^' ,j) 4' I 4 ^ I *4 M -^ ;). 

NOTICES, 



CIBCULABS, ^ 





LABELS, 



mim CA&ss, 



^r^ ^ HAXDBILLSf 

POSIERS, EIC, 



>UL KINDS O' PRINTING AT THE LOWEST BATES.) 



A. S. ROSENBAUM & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF FINE HAVANA 



3^ 



i,. 



«®®©^ 






And Sole Agents for the celebrated Peach Cake Navy Tobacco. 

California and Battery Sis., SAN FRANCISCO. No. 162 Water Street. NEW YORK. 



IE BLACK DIAMOND GOAL MINING GO. 



AND 



THE BELLIN6HAM BAT GOAL COMPANY. 



steam and House Coals by the Cargo, and to Ships and Dealers. 
e« on Spear Street, at Rincon Wharf. P. B. CORJiWALL, Pres't. 



Ixx 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 




EXCELSIOR 



!or 



IMPROVED 




L! 



The opinion has become quite 
prevalent that Windmills are 
not to be relied upon, either to 
withstand violent storms, or to 
perform their work in very 
light winds. Such opi'iion is 
doubtless true, with regard to 
many of the Mills made in Cal- 
ifornia, and especially true with 
regard to most of those sent 
here from the East. It is, how- 
ever, an injustice towards the I 
few mechanics wlio have made 
wind-power a study and a spec- 
ialty for many years, to class I 
the productions of their labor 
witli those of the many who I 
pretend to be windmill makers, | 
but who Iiave comparative!}- lit- [ 
tie experience or practical |l| 
knowledge of tlie business. 

We were the inventors, more 
than ten years ago, of the single, 
cross-vane windmill. The de- 
mand for them gradually in- 
creased, until they have come 
into more general use than any 
other mills. Of course, other 
parties were induced tomakean 
imitation of them, and some to 
make use of its name, "JExcfl- 
*i«r."' A man isdesirousof pur- 
chasinga windmill, and starts in 
pursuit of the factory. Present- 
ly he seesasign, "Windmills," 
walks in and inquires, " Is thts 
the place where thej' make the 
Kxcel^iior WiiBdniil?*' The 
answer is, " Yes sir— O, yes, we 
make them," or words to that 
etTect,and the gentleman really 
thinks he is purcliasing an Kx- 
celsioi*. We have recently 
caused tlie name to be registered 
in the U. S. Patent office as our 
Tradk Makk, and hereby cau- 
tion all persons not to make un- 
lawful use of tlie same. 

Tlie Excelsior was awarded 
the iirst or cash premium at the 
Cal. State Agricultural Fair, in 
1872— the only time ever exhih- 
ued there. It has taken a larger 
number of premiums at the Me- 
^^r:zs=^^2'-^;=====^^K=='''°ZI=,^^^^SiilP<W3ii^ chanics' Institute Fairs, in San 

s? ~" — j«*!:: — ==''—"' ' •'^''''''^^^^^wMJW'W/fiM Francisco, than any other wind- 

We have of late made material improvements in their construction. They are adjustable and self-regulating' 
are very substantially built, and with reasonable care will last for twenty-five to thirt.v years. Revolving hori- 
zontaliy upon anti-friction balls, enables them to catch the slightest breezes, and the.y will run in lighter winds 
than any other mills, and violent storms very seldom injure them. They are always under perfect control, achild 
being able to operate them. 

The cut, engraved from a photograph, represents the style and appearance of the improved or forty-farf 
EXCELSIOR. ♦ ; 

They are made in twelve sizes, from twelve-foot to forty-foot diameter of wheel. A larger stock and assort- 
ment kept on hand than can be found in the State. Every mill fully guaranteed. 



IRI 



DO 



EXCELSIOR WINDMILL WORKS: 
211 & 213 Mission Street, San Francisco^ 

HAHRY H. BODWELL, Proprietor. 



i 



^ 



FiS 



m 



\ 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxi 



SWEEP 

' Horse -Po we r s, 

^Vrm PATENT 

DEAW-SPEIUa LEVEES. 

LITTO ilAHT, 

$140.00 

TRIPLE GEARS 

-AND- 

DOUBLE LEVERS, 

For Two Horses. 




EXCELSIOR, 

$100.00 

)OUBLE- GEARED, HEAVY, 

OK£ HORSE. 




P A.RMERS' 

$80.00 

SINGLE - GEARED, 

FOB OXE HORSE. 




zzc3x%.sx: z=>o'\7^x:ziL£t. 



These machines are complete in oirery detail, and 
possess every iraprovemont and advantage that can 
be combined in Sweep Horse-Poivers. They have 
an advantage over any other horse-powBr in this 
market, viz: our application of the patent rubber 
draw-spring, which prevents any breakage of the 
gears by any sudden start, or jumping, or fractious- 
ness of the horse ; and when used for pumping, 
materiBlly lessens the jerking motion on the lover, 
caused by the change of motion of the piston. 

AVe use external gears in those machines. They 
are universally used on all kinds of geared machinery 
where internal gears can be dispensed with, being 
more easily lubricated and cleaned, and less liable 
to break the periphery of the wheels. 

These Powers have dust-proof and self-oiling jour- 
nals; are simple, strong, durable and cheap. Having 
succeeded in making them much superior to those 
which have been imported from the East, we have 
virtually stopped their importation. 
_ We furnish with these powers when desired, any 
size of belt wheels, or style, or weight of balance 
wheels, combined with a moveable crank-pin for 
pumping, and counter-balance when needed. 

THE STOVER 

Self- Regulating 

WINDMILL, 

l8 the best Eastern Windmill 

ever introduced into 

this State. 



FOR SAEE BT 



Harry H. Bodwell. 




Harry H. BoflweU's 

WIND-MILL 




These Pumps were de- 
signed especially for Wind- 
mill work. 

They are superior to any 
pump of Eastern make, 
both in weight, strength, 
and inside finish. 

They are constructed in 
the simplest form of a lift 
and force pump, and are 
not liable to get out of 
order. 



All kinds of Pipingr. 
FittlngTH, etc.. fnrnished 
al lonest rates: also, 
liVater Tanhs ofall sizes. 




L 



Ixxii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



THOMAS PRICE, 

(Formerly of tie SAN FRANCISCO ASSAYING AND REFINING WORKS), 






No. 524 SACRAMENTO STREET, cor. Leidesdorff, 

wm mQ)W wwmwAWMW ®'@ m^ki ^ii^¥^ of the 

precious and useful metals and their ores, as well as complete 
or partial analysis of all Minerals, Salts, Waters or other sub- 
stances, that may be desired ; and hopes that his long residence 
and experience in his profession will entitle him to a reasonable 
portion of the business of his friends and the public generally. 



i 



I 



GEO. HAYES & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



WINDOW CAPS, DORMER WINDOWS, GUTTERS, FINIALS, PINNACLES, 
CHIMNEY CAPS AND VENTILATORS. 
ALL KINDS OF 

dofi^u^kted If Oil Wofk foi^ Suildir^^^. 



Ih 



SOLE PROPRIETORS OF 



HUGHES' PATENT MAXjT KILNS AND "WASH TUB BOTTOMS, 
ARCHITECTURAL STAMPED ZINC WORK, ETC. 



30 Hai^riet jSti^eet, 



II 



(Between Howard and Folsom 
Sixth and Seventh. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST. 



1 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxiii 



H. A. PLATE. 



WM. B. COTREL. 




►d 

t> 

l-H 

Q B 


td 

O 

o 
o 








c 

o 

CO 

o 



O 
o 

CO 



J. C. Johnson & Co. 

Importers, Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in every description of 

HARNESS 

SADDLERY, HARNESS HARDWARE, WHIPS, LEATHER COLLARS, ETC. 



104 and 106 Front St., near Kne, San Francisco. 



JOHN M. JOHNSON. 



PEM. B. HORTON. 



Elirby's Santa Cruz Leather and Hill's Concord Harness. 



Ixxiv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Mathematical Instrument Maker. 



01 




TH^A. POSITS, 

Y Leveling Instruments, 

Leveling Staves, 

Compasses, 

Mountain Barometers. 

DISTANCE RODS, 

leiMiii f miiiti, 

BULLION BALANCES, 

Etc., Etc. 
repaiks executed in the best manner. 

'W]\d:. s oih: m: oi_i2; , 

420 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



the 
frie 

a 

n 



FREITCH SAVmGS i LOA^ SOCIETY 

(La Societe Fran9aise d'espargnes at de prevoyance 
Mutuelle). 

Incorporated, February, 1, 1860, 



GIJSTAVE I>U!SSOI<, President. CA1HII.I.O 9EARTIN, Treasurer. 

OUST AVE SIAHE, Secretary and Muuaser. 



OFFICE:— 411 (BUSH STfREET, ABOVE KEA^RJ^Y, 



I 



I 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxv 



OLD ORIGINAL COL. W. H. BROWN. 




•^OERSONS notified to remove Nuisances will find it to their 
advantage to call on Col. W. H. Brown at once. 

W. H. BROWN, THE SANITARY MAN! 

Whom the citizens of San Francisco should employ to clean out 
their premises, and save the expense of burying themselves and their 
friends. An Ounce of Prevention is better than a Pound of 
Cure. Call and leave your orders, and save the city from the 
Cholera. 



OFFICE: 

3 MILLS PLACE, opp.Seir Centre Market. 



RFSIDEXCE: 

Cor. BAT STREET and MEIGGS WHAUF. 



SUCCESSORS XO 

f>.A.irxsxz dGr.A.jE<. lUL .A. 3S. mt. s ' xrnr X o rr, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CIGARS 

Of the Best VDELTA ABAJO HAVANA and DOMESTIC TOBACCO. 

635 PACIFIC STREET AND 1058 MASON STREET. 

Orders directed to A. MORELOS AGO. SAN FRANCISCO. 




NEWBAUER & CO. 



MANUFACTUEEES OP 



METROPO LITAN MATCHES 

Our Matches are Sxire, and are "Warranted to -withstand Dampness of 
every Climate, and be good for any length of time. 



Factory: POTRERO. 



Office : No. 206 BUSH STREET. 



Ixxvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



ummn khiikiy snoKs. 



PATENTED APRIL I, 1873. 



Mafle of Fire Clay witlioiit Brict or Morlar. No Decay to tlein. 

AWARDED THE FIRST PREMIUM AT THE INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION OF THE 
MECHANICS' INSTITUTE FAIR FOR 1875. 



No Decay, No Danger, No Repairing, No Dirt, No Trouble, Perfect Ven- 
tilation. Cheap, Light, Portable, Fire-Proof, Earthquake-Proof. 

SO UALVAIZED IRON OR BLOCK SHEET IRON USED IN THEIR CONSTRUCTION, 



1 

The inventor of these complete Chimney Stacks is satisfied that he is offering to the public something thatwil 
be appreciated by every householder. They are particularly well adapted for the ventilation and heating of 
Churches, School Houses, Theatres, and all kinds of public or private buildings. So universal is their application 
that they can be readily set on any fire-place, or outside of brick or frame buildings; in fact, they may be placed 
in any part of the house with perfect safet.v vvithout going to the foundation. Can also be applied to cooking 
stoves, ranges, blast furnaces, pottery kilns, etc. 

Thit improvement consists In constructing the chinme.v or stack of sections of fire-clay, earthenware, cement 
or artificial stone, and surrounding said chimney with a metallic tube larger than the chimney, in order to pro- 
vide the necessary ventilation for keeping the inner pipe cool, and for furnishing warm air to the rooms of the 
house. It also consists of a novel arrangement for binding the sections together in their upright position, and for 
fixing and protecting the joints where they meet. 

By constructing chimneys in the above manner, all trouble about burning or wearing out is entirely avoided. 
They can be transported readil.v to any part of the State, and put in place by any mechanic. Their adoption has 
been recommended by leading architects in Saa Francisco and throughout the State, and by Fire Insurance 
Companies generally. 

State and County Bights for Sale in every State and Territory, except California 
Apply by letter or in person to the patentee. 



J. B R O W E 
GOHTRAGTOR AND BUiLdBR^ 

442 JACKSON STREET, San Francisco, Cal. 



J. B. CHAPMAN. 



(Established in 1859.) 



JOHN BAUEK 



COITTIIACTOIIS FOU NIGHT WOUK. 

VAULTS, CESSPOOLS, SEWERS, YARDS, &c. CLEANED. 

SEWERS REPAIRED AND PROPERLY LAID. 

O I^ IT" I O E3, 313 XDXJr^OJSTT STP^EEIT, 

BETWEEN BUSH AND SUTTER, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxvn 










G^oodWoi'k. >Iodefktef^ri6e^. 



.— *^^ 

?^i^ 



^^.,.v-*-v--v.^ 






[629CLA7 3TB£ETi 

"Si 



Ixxviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



a, s. ^(DaatuD a m 



MANUPACTUEEES OF 



printing Inks, 



AND 



epaa^'^iyF^^ Jm&i 



iJ^^^® 



jj^o. 1^0 ;^j)fin^ ^^A^) Boston. 



TO BE PUBLISHED IN MAY, 1876. 



FIFTH EDITION, REVISED AND CORR ECTED TO DATE. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
IStf eet kr\(i A veqtie vJuide 

For I 876, 

Containing a reliable Map of the City, and many items of valuable 

information, useful for strangers visiting the Metropolis. 

One Volume, 24mo. Price One Dollar. 

HENRY G. LANCLEY, Publisher. 



i 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



I XXIX 




I^^]^J<^I^ 



-^nsriD 



>iYi^^^ 




HORIZONTAL FLUME, 

MANUFACTURERS OF patented April 1st, 1S73. 



DOeLETURfiiE WATER WHEELS, 

Spherical and Horizontal Flumes, 

ALSO, ALL KINDS OF 

miL GEARING ESPECIALLY ADAPTED TO OUR WHEELS. 



PRICES GREATLY REDUCED AND COMPETITION DEFIED. 



iFon. s^^Tisii^.^5k.OTioisr it it^^s nsro eqtj.a-Tj. 



Having established ourselves in this city, we will give our personal attention to our business, and thereby 
hope to give better satisfaction than we have been able to give heretofore through agents. We will also do a 
commission business in 

MZZiZiSKS' AlTD MZXTSRS' STTFFZiZSS. 

Our reputation as Milling Engineers is sufficient guarantee of our ability to give entire satisfaction. We 
can furnish anything that our patrons may desire, on the shortest notice. Please remember that we give personal 
attention to our business. 

ADDRESS OE CALL ON LEFFEL & MYERS, 306 CALIFORNIA ST. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATEDJCATALOGUE AND NEW PRICE LIST.-SENT FREE. 



IXXX SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



^WaterA/V^orks. 

Incorporated under Act of the Legislature^ April 8, 18^8. 

C!k|)itkl^ - - - $§,000^000 



Divided into 80,000 Shares of $100 each. 



RESERVOIRS: 



I 



r' A T T nivTC Elevation 

LrAl^l^ums. Above High Tide 



CRYSTAL SPRINGS, Upper Reservoir, - Capacity, 7,420,000,000, 290 Feet. 
SAN ANDRES, Reservoir, ■ " 6,690,000,000, 450 



MLARCITOS, 
LAKE HONDA, 
COLLEGE HILL, 
FRANCISCO STREET, 
RUSSIAN HILL, 
BUCHANAN STREET, 
BRANNAN STREET, 



" 1,085,000,000, 700 

« 34,000,000, 376 

" 14,000,000, 253 

" 7,000,000, 160 

" 4,000,000, 300 

" 2,000,000, 200 

500,000, 85 



Total Storage Capacity - 15,256,500,000. jl 



^rriGEKS: 

President, - - - - CHARLES "WEBB HO"WARD. 

Vice-President, ----- OLIVER ELDRIDQE. 
Secretary, - - - - - - E. M. MILES. 



a^KUSTKES: 

CHAS. "WEBB HOWARD. OLIVER ELDRIDQE. 

WM. NORRIS. J. D. PRY. 

GEO. W. GRANNISS. O. W. BONYNGE. 

A. B. FORBES. 



^Il 



^^y. 



TTICZ or THK ^^ K X S 



SIS OALIRORNIA STREETJlSi 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxi 



WATER HOUSE ^ LESTER, 

IMPORTERS OF 



HARD WOOD LU 




AND ALL KINDS OF 



COACH, CARRIAGE AND WAGON MATERIALS, 

Carriage and Wagon Axles and Springs, 




Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast for 



CLARK'S ADJUSTABLE 



Carriage Umbrella 



CAREIAeE AND £0661 BODIES. 



PA.TENT T\mH:E:LS. 



Nos. 122 and 124 Market St., and 19 and 21 California St., 



200 and 203 J Street, between Seventh and Eighth, 
SACRAMENTO. 



NEVA/ VORK OF=f=ICEr 

.21 and 123 FRONT STREET, - NEW YORK 



Ixxxii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

File '^) Tool Works 

No. 12 STEVENSON STREET, near FIRST. 



Neiu Files of every description. Old Files Re-cut, Vist Fitting, Alower and Reaper Sections^ 
Bars, etc., on hand and made to order at lowest prices. Job Grinding. 



IML. 



IESXj 



E3TE3n. IF'- 3VLjflL3>3" 




f eteriflary %\\im 



1 



All 



-AND— 



• Qof^e-:^l\oef. 



Nomwest cor. JONES aM TYLER streets, Sai Francisco. 



p] 



MANAGERS OF 

FaciSc Boiler, Slieel Iron ad Water Fije Worb 

Are fully prepared to do at shortest notice, and in the best workmanlike manner, all kinds of Boiler and 
Sheet Iron Work. High and Low Pressure Boilers built and repaired. We refer to Twenty Years' ex- 
perience in the above business as a guarantee that all orders for work will be faithfully executed. 

OfiBce and Works, 118 and 120 Fremont St., bet. Mission and Howard, San Francisco 

J. N. RISDON, formerly of Coffey & Risdon and Risdon Iron Works. 

CHAS. TOWER, formerly foreman of Coffey & Risdon and Risdon Boiler Works. 



c 



Fir 



!> 



uL 




.™n |n|[;y 



mil 



dL 




11® wtMxm s^m: 



Miffl 



tos. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



« 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixxxiii 



(trier nnd Dealer In all Iciiidn of 

GAS FIXTURES 

Mautel Clocks, Fine French Bronzes, and Plumbers' Ware. 



122 and 124 SUTT ER ST., nea r MONTGOMERY. 

All Sizes, for GAS, WATER and STEAM, in lots to suit ; together with 

ELBOWS, TEES, RETURN BENDS, STOP COCKS, PLUGS, 

BUSHINGS, NIPPLES, ETC., ETC. 



WE@®gM Is@m ftp© ^alTiL®l^©i» t@^ Wat©^^ st@e 

Buildings Fitted up with Gas and Water Pipes. Rubber Hose, Hose Bibbsy Hose 

Pipes, etc. Plumbers' Basins, etc., etc. Copper Boilers, Bath Tubs, etc. 
:e» Ij XT iwx 3B I x>ar <3- .a.j^ ly Gr.A.& :e« it t lavr ca-. 



GeorgeH.Tay& Co. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



STOVES, 

Tin Plate, Sheet Iron, Iron Pipe, 

PUMPS, ZINC WIRE, TINNERS' STOCK, TOOLS AND MACHINES, 
HOUSE-FURNISHING HARDWARE, AND MANUFACTUR- 
ERS OF TIN, SHEET IRON AND COPPER WARE. 



Vos. 614, 616 and 618 BATTERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

igents Richmond Stove Company, Norwich, Conn. 

Agents New Haven Copper Company. 



Ixxxiv 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



^ IIT 






^ _ 



I^HiTJIi^BEI?, 



f 




And Sole Proprietor and Manufacturer of the 

Celebrated Hudson Force Pumps, 

Atwood & Bodwell Windmill Brass Pumps. 

SMITH'S COPPEK-LINED PUMPS, PLUMBEKS' FORCE PUMPS. 

Special attention paid to Brewers', Distillers,' Beer and Hot Liqnor Pumps, and 
TVine Famps. Particular attention paid to AIR PUMPS, also to 

DIVERS' SUBMARINE PUMPS. 
ARTESIAN WELL PUMPS Made to Order. 




SPECIAL ATTENTION CALLED TO MY NEW TREBLE AND QUADRUPLE PUMPS, 

The Best Invention ever made in the line of Pumps. 

BRA.SS CASTINGS M ADE TO ORDER. 
222 and 22<b FKBMOITT STKSST. 



u 

11 

ml 

FC 

hi 

I 

II 






•t-ot 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxv 




AFTER ONE OP THE 

MOST THOROUaH TRIA-LS 

EVER HAD IN THE UNITED STATES, 

BETWEEN COMPETITORS OF BEST ESTABLISHED REPUTATION, 

In which, at great expense, the different Steam Pumps were tried under every test known to 

experts, the Examining Committee of the Tenth Industrial Fair of the 

Mechanics' Institute have awarded to us their 

G^OI_iXD Ivdl :H] ID ^^ I_i 

FOR BEST STEAM PUMPS ON EXHIBITION. 

"We are prepared to furnish PUMPS UNDER CONTRACT, guaranteeing 

their ability to perform any specific work for which Steam 

Pumps are adaptable, such as 

For Water Worm, Feeding Boilers, Raising Water froi Wells, Steamer and SMp Pnmps, Etc 

We would also call the attention of those interested, tf> our Direct Actin? Deep-Well Pumps for raising water 
from Any Deitlred Depth. Also to our Especial Construction of Pumps, For Hnndling: QnicksllTvr 
or heavy liquids. We claim that our Pumps are the bent ever made In Himpilcity of construction, economical 
use of power, (lurabllit.v and perfect adaptability for general uses, and we ask all persons interested to investi- 
gate our title to tbls claim. Salesrooms at our Machine Shop, 

114 and 116 BEALE STREET, San Francisco. 

W. C. WILCOX Sl CO., Proprietors. 



Ixxxvi 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



JOSSTJA SEITDY, 



MANUFACTURER OP 



Heady's Patent Concentrators, 

Automatic Ore Feeders, Steam Engine Governors, and 
Circular Saw Mills. 

Agent for Blaisdell & Co.'s Patent Drill Press, with quick return motion, and 

other First-Class Machinists' Tools. Dealer in New and Second- 

Hand Engines, Boilers, and Machinery of all kinds. 



No, 32 FUEMOJST STREET, 



REFERENCES 



Eureka M. Co., Overman M. Co., Virginia City, Nev.; Camp Floyd M. Co., Utah S. M, 
Co., Utah; J. M. Brown, Hollister; Gazos Mill, Pescadero, Cal.; also Bancroft 

& Co., Yolo Mills; Golden Gate and Fulton Iron Works of this city. g. 





Sectional View of Hendy's Patent Ore Concentrator. 

Over six hundred now in use in the quartz mills on this coast. 




I 



San Francisco. ^ 



J^o. 22 Mission St., 



Between 
Spear atid Stetiart, 



BOATS built to Order, and constantly on hand. All Orders promptly attended to. 



AGENT FOR CALIFORNIA FOR THK SALE OF 



HOLMES' PATENTED SELF-RIGHTING SURF AND LIFE-BOATS. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxvii 



PHILADELPHIA 




30K. SSCOXTD AITD FOZ.SOM STRSSTS, 



s.A.:sr :FE=L^^isroi£30o- 



I take the present opportunity of thanking my Friends and Customers for the liberal 
support heretofore extended to the 



HILADELPHIA Jl REAVER Y, 




And notify them that I have added to my establishment 



By which I hope, through the greatly increased facilities now possessed by me, 
to furnish, as usual, a 

Superior s^rticle of Imager oeer 

That shall not only equal that previously furnished by me, but convince them that I am 
determined to merit their continued patronage and support. 

JOSXT T^ZSZiAlTD. 



Ixxxviii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



# 



^''^..^^'''^ %>. 



44> 



(ffli A iroi''^ 



MADE OF CALIFORNIA-GROWN TOBACCO. 

1 

ALSO, 

SMOKING TOBACCO, 

Unequaled for Delicacy and depth of Flavor by any Tobacco for Pipe 

Smoking or Cigarette. 

Golden Thread Smoking Tobacco, 

ALSO, A GREAT VARIETY OF OTHER SMOKING TOBACCO 
MANUFACTUKED AND FOR SALE BY THE j 



Eifl 



OFFICE AND SALESROOM, 

207 FROXTT STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 

For the Year commencing April, 1876, 



EMBRACING A 



GENERAL DIRECTORY OF RESIDENTS 

AND A 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY; 

ALSO, 

A DIRECTORY OF STREETS, PUBLIC OFFICES, ETC. 

AND A RELIABLE MAP OF THE CITY. 

TOGETHER WITH 

The Consolidation Act and its Amendments, Officers of the Municipal Government, 

Societies and other Organizations, and a great variety of Useful 

and Statistical Information. 

EXHIBITING AT A GLANCE 

THE PAST HISTORY AND PRESENT CONDITION OF THE CITY. 



SEVENTEENTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. 



COMPILED BY 

HENRY a. LANGLEY, 

EDITOR OF "PACIFIC COAST BCSIXB8S DIRECTOET," "STATE REGISTER," A\D "PACIFIC COAST ALHANAC. 



DEPOTS FOR THE SALE OF THIS WORK: 

Office of thk Directory, No. 612 Clay Street, up stairs; A. Roman & Co., 11 Montgomery Street; 

Sdmnee Whitney, 618 Clay Street ; A. L. Bancroft & Co.. 721 Market Street ; San 

Francisco News Co., 413 Washington Street. 

PSICE, FIVE I>OLZA.IiS , G O m COIN. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

HENRY Q. LANQLEY, PUBLISHER, 613 CLAY STREET. 

Francis & Valentine, Commercial Steam Presses, 517 Clay Street. 
1876. 



PREPARING FOR IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION. 



SAN FRANCISCO ILLUSTRATED, 

J^ C3-XJI3DE IBOOKl 
SAN FRANCISCO AND ITS ENVIRONS; 



-EXHIBITING AT A GLANCE- 



What caiz he seen in and around the METROPOLIS of the PACIFIC, 

and How to See it, with References to the Early History 

of the City, Early Settlers, Public Buildings, etc. 



ILLUSTRATED WITH NUMEROUS ENGRAVINGS, MAPS, ETC., ETC. 



One Volume, l%no, 216 pages. Price, ONE DOLLAR. 



HENRY G. LANGLEY, Publisher. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-six, 
By HENRY G. LANGLEY, 
In the OfBce of the Librarian of Congress at Washington. 



A Few More jSets only Remain on Wand. 

SAN FRANCISC? DIRECTORY, 

ini={.oM: 1&34: to IST-S. 

Eighteen YoluTnes Octavo, the whole Forming 

A COMPLETE AND RELIABLE HISTORY OF THE 

CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

From its first settlement to the present time. 

I^or Se.lo, - - - I^z-lco, S3S.OO. 



HENRY G. LANGLEY, Publisher, 

61Q OI_i.^"2' Sa?£=l.E]ET- 



itiii 



ibil 
Hell 

ilSc( 



PREFATORY 



In presenting the Seventeenth Volume of the San Francisco Directory to the public, the compiler directs 
attention to the important and numerous evidences contained therein, of tlie continued prosperous growth of the 
City. A comparison of its advancement during the past twelve months, and its present condition, will show a 
greater degree of prosperity than that of any similar period of its history. 

The number of references contained in the present volume is one hundred and forty-five thousand two hundred 
and seventy, viz : Register of names, one hundred thousand two hundred and seventy (of which ninety thousand 
six hundred and thirty-three are names of resident males). Business Directory, twenty-seven thousand. Appendix, 
eighteen thousand. The number of names of male residents in 1874, is sixty-five thousand and ninety-two ; 1875, 
seventy-seven tliousan<f two hundred and six ; 1876, ninety thousand six hundred and thirty-three. Increase since 
March 1, 1875, thirteen thousand four hundred and twenty-seven, or nearly eighteen per cent. The population of 
this city is estimated, March 1, 1876, at two hundred and seventj'-two thousand three hundred and forty-five. 
March 1, 1875, two hundred and thirty thousand one hundred and thirty-two. A gain of forty-two thovisand two 
hundred and thirteen, or over eighteen per cent. At this rate the population in 1880 will be five hundred and 
twenty-eight thousand. Estimating the population on the basis of the number of names in the present volume — 
ninety thousand six hundred and thirty-three — and assuming that each name represents three in population, it 
would give two hundred and seventy-one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine as the result. In Chicago, three 
and one-half are taken as a basis ; in St. Louis, four, and in New York, five. These figures may answer for the 
localities to which they refer, but for this City, where so many peculiarities surround the different elements which 
compose our population, they would be undoubtedly too high. The article on population, on page 50, contains 
valuable data on this subject, to which attention is respectfully invited. 

The number of buildings erected during the year ending February 29, 1876, is one thousand eight htmdred and forty, 
of which forty-four are of brick, at an aggregate cost of ?512, 500,000. If the amounts disbursed in improving the 
water front and public streets and in beautifjing our parks and private residences be added, the aggregate amount 
for improvements of all kinds for 1875-6, will exceed $13,000,000. In addition to several extensive blocks for busi- 
ness purposes completed during the year, an unusual number of elegant and commodious private residences have 
been erected that greatly exceed in beauty and cost those of former years. The total number of buildings comprised 
within the city limits is twenty-five thousand five hundred, of which four thousand three hundred and fifty are brick. 

The expense of maintaining the Municipal Government for the year ending June 30, 1875, is §4,435,258, including 
the expenses of the Street Department. Tlie Bonded Debt of the city, March 10, 1875, is §3,732,500, exclusive of the 
Montgomerj' Avenue Bonds, §1,500,000. 

The Introductory and General Review present a diary of interesting local events of the year, brief notices of 
Schools, public and private, descriptions of Public Buildings, Hotels, Public Parks, and the operations of the dif- 
ferent Railroads and Steamship Lines, together with references to several other subjects worthy of special mention, 
and historical data of present interest, well calculated to make the book a valuable work of reference to future 
generations. But the most interesting features of this department are valuable contributions on the Population of 
the City; Meteorology and Climate of San Francisco from 1851 to 1876, by Henry Gibbons, M.D.; the Current 
Historj' and Progress of the City ; a Review of its Manufacturing interests, and operations of the Public Schools, 
1875-6; Hospitals, public and private, by Henry Gibbons, Jr. M.D.; and a statement of the cost and number of 
buildings erected during the past year and the aggregate number within the city limits. 

The Appendix contains a variety of valuable information connected with the history of the city, and the Consoli- 
dation Act with the amendments thereto, to which are added a number of important laws adopted by the Legislature 
of the State (Session 1875-6), including those organizing the City Criminal Court, providing and maintaining Public 
Water Works, establishing water rates, providing for the completion of the New City Hall, authorizing the widen- 
ing of Dupont Street, etc., each of which is arranged under its appropriate head, to which has been added an Ana- 
lytical Index of the whole, which will facilitate reference thereto. There will be also found in this department of 
the work a large number of references to the different organizations in this city, embracing lists of the Federal,, 
State, and Municipal Officers, notices of local Societies and Associations, Churches, Militarj' Organizations, Incorpor-. 
ations, etc. Attention is invited to a new and corrected Map of the City and County of San Francisco, which for 
reliability and beauty of execution has never been equaled on this coast, and a revised Street Directorj', including 
the new system of numbering the buildings, thoroughly revised, and carefully compared with each street and locality 
named therein. 

The present volume of The San Fr.4nci8co Directory has been printed from new material, cast expressly for 
the purpose, by Miller & Richard, Edinburgh, and supplied through their agent in this city, Mr. Ellis P^ead. A 
simple glance through its pages is only necessary to direct attention to a style of tj-pe which for beauty and sym- 
metry it would be difficult to excel. 

The compiler respectfully tenders his acknowledgments for many favors extended by the different public 
officers, and other gentlemen who have been applied to for information for the work. To his numerous friends 
for their liberal patronage, and to Messrs. Francis & Valentine by whom the typographical department was exe- 
cuted, he would especially tender his thanks. The eighteenth volume of Thk San Francisco Directory will be 
issued in March, 1877. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



ALPHABETICAL LISTS OF ADVERTISERS 5 and 8 

CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 6 

PROGRESS OF THE CITY 9 

Ciirreut History ■ ,° 

Real Estate < ' '•••• |Y 

Building Improvements - \\ 

New Buildings for year 187o-1876 1^ 

Building Asf-ociations, etc., l.i 

Improvement of Streets j* 

Public Building.s • i* 

tr. S. Mint and coinage, 1875 \\ 

Post-office and its operations, 1875 15 



Custom House. 



U. S. Marine Hospital ' 16 

Municipal Buildings ^ 

Street Railroads - • • ■ • • • ■ J° 

Steam Railroads. .... • ' |^ 

Steamship Lines ■ ^ 

Fei-ries and Ba.y Steamers • - ^ 

Hotels and their accommodations -.....- Jh 

Theaters '• • ^ 

Parks, Gardens, etc -• ^^ 

Promenades and Drives ' ^^ 

Water Supply. ^* 

Libraries ,• U • • i " " l-' " ' ' ' ' ' ' ' S 

Associations, Benevolent and Protective Jb 

Private Charities - * 

Public Schools - '• • ^' 

Colleges and Private Schools '■••■ w 

Health Department - jj 

Hospitals 2* 

Manufactures ' *g 

Ship Building • • • ' *° 

Banking and Finance '° 

Savings and Loan Institutions , < • ■ *o 

Insurance Companies. . ■■■■•■■■ ■■■ - *g 

FINANCES CITY AND COUNTY f 

Funded Debt, March, 1876 ;;,;A'-;;iJ ' Ta 

Assessment and Rates of Taxation 1870-1876 « 

Municipal Expenditures 1865-1875 50 

Annual Revenue 1865-1875 50 

POPULATION, 1876 'A-i4rV tV 

METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS 51 

CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY 5* 

STREET DIRECTORY • • 59 

BUILDINGS, BLOCKS, HALLS, ETC 77 

Public Buildings, HaUs •- d 

Blocks, Rows, Wharves '| 

Places of Amusement - '| 

Prominent Places '° 

KEY TO PUBLIC OFFICES 79 

Federal • 'g 

State J9 

Cityacd County '•• '^ 

CITY ORDINANCE— Hack and Cab Fares. 79 

ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC 80 

REGISTER OF NAMES „■ --ri,-^ ofi 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY, TRADES, ETC 863 

CONSOLIDATION ACT 973 

Mimicipal Elections • »°' 

Paid Fire Department 9»^ 

Coroner and Duties ^^ 

Police Judge's Court and Jurisdiction ayu 

Presiding Judge Police Court 991 

Establishing City Criminal Court 991 

Harbor Police Regulations 99^ 

Increase of Police Force ^9/ 

Amended School Law ■ • • • - 9M3 

JFlnances Board Education 99", iWi 

Establishing Cosmopolitan Schools lOOU 

Compulsory School Law ]-^f 

Amended Street Law ..IW6 

Conferring fm-ther Powers upon the Superintend- 
ent Public Streets 101" 

Vacating Streets and Market Places l^'i^ 

Drifting Sand on Improved Streets 101^ 

Legalizing Grades of Certain Streets lOlJ 

Cleaning Public Streets \^j^ 

Appropriations, authorizing jO^J 

Finance Committee • l^^-J 

Roads and Highways, Improvement of 1U^4 

Opening and Extending Streets 10^4 

Modifying Street Grades 10^5 

Changing Grades of Streets 10^° 

Police Contingent Fund v •;,• •,■ •■^" ' 

Additional Powers Board Supervisors and bala- 



CONSOLIDATION ACT (Continued). TkgS 

Establishing Water Rates -1031 

Establishing Municiial Court. |"^^ 

Providing for Completion of New City Hall lO^i 

Authorizing the widening of Dupont btreet ...... 1UA> 

Pre.servation and Improvement of Golden Gate 

Pj^j.Jj , , lUo». 

Collection State' and Municipal Licenses 1039 

Collector Licenses, Deputies and Salaries. WW 

Assessment and CoUeotion of Taxe^ 18/4 .1U4A 

Public Moneys retained by ex-Tax Collectors 104^ 

Establishing Alms House and Hospital i»^ 

Quarantine Law and Board o* Health j^*' 

Analytical Index \^.l 

MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT \^^ 

Board of Supervisors ' ' • -f^^f 

Board of Education , j^g* 

City and Ooimty Officers i"3| 

ELECTION DISTRICTS 10=° 

Congressional ' • • • - rj'2x 

Judicial ■■■■■*■ Jx?? 

Senatorial and Assembly • ■ ■ ■ - --{^ 

City and County 



EtDi 
EtD 






.1057 



POLICE DEPARTMENT • • • • • •- lOof 

FIRE ALARM AND POLICE TELEGRAPH 1059 

FIRE DEPARTMENT \>^ 

OtRcers and Organization i^o;' 

FIRE PATROL 1"°" 

FEDERAL OFFICERS 1"^| 

Custom House ^"°* 

United States Treasury i"°5 

United States Mint , |^°J 

Surveyor-General i"°2 

Post-oftice :}"°2 

STATE OFFICERS 1"°° 

STATE APPOINTEES.... 1"^^ 

COURTS 1"°° 

CHURCHES 1™; 

Baptist ' IJ™' 

Congregational • • ' :}V2? 

1072 
1073 

ion 

1075 
1077 
1079 
,1079 
.1079 
1079 



Episcopal. . 
Evangelical Lutheran.. 

Hebrew 

Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic 

Swedenborgian 

Unitarian ,....,.., 

Universalist 

Mariners'. 



Cal 



Oil 



Swedish Evangelical Union 10|0 

Second Advent Christian - 1^ 

Seventh Day Adventists ' lOgJ 

Disciples of Christ - 1"°" 

Independent German luo" 

Re-organized Church of Latter Day Samta 108U 

Christian Brethren 

Russian. ...gn 

Friends' Me.eting - j"™ 

Spiritualist Union i"™ 

Lyceum for Self Culture .•.-■••• 1"|^ 

ASSOCIATIONS AND SOCIETIES 1O80 

Religious |"S 

Benevolent \^ 

Masonic Fraternity • • • • • • !^ 



I. O. of Odd Fellows . 



Temperance • 

Protective. ■ ■■■ 

Literary. • • • 

Historical ■ 

Social 

MILITARY 

NEWSPAPERS 

PERIODICALS 

BANKS • 

INCORPORATED COMPANIES 

INSITK ANOE COMPANIES , 

HOMESTEAD ASSOCIATIONS 91 

MINING COMPANIES ~ j, 

'.'.'. 95? 
.111 



.vm 

.110! 
.110! 
.110( 
.110! 
. 94! 
. 94! 
. 86! 
. 91' 
91 



TELEtiUAPH LINES, 

RAILROADS 

OCEAN STEAMERS ;}" 



STEAMBOATS 

STAGES 

EXPRESSES 

PACKETS, SAILING 
CONSULS 



961 



Construction Channel Street Canal 



ProvTung and Maintaining Public Water Works.. 1028 | ADVERTISING 



HOSPITALS ,?{; 

DEPARTMENT i and HI 



1027 CEMETERIES 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 

[Numerals refer to advertisements in front, and figureo, unless otherwise expressed, to the end of volume.] 



PAGE 

Abbott House 23 

.iKtna Insurance Co., front 

cover 

.^Etna Iron Works 8 

Allxiuy Brewery xxxiii 

Aininon, Caspari Ji Co . . .xxi 

AiKliiraii C & Co 7 

Aiigell, I'olmer & Co. . . .xlvii 
Anglo-Californian Bank .^.xi 
Bank British Columbia . . .xii 

Bank Britisli N. A .xvi 

Barrett & .Slierwooil ii 

Bay Sugar Relinery 17 

Bt-ainish Percy, register 
of names, bottom line 
Bellinghaiu Bay Coal Co. Ixix 
Benjamin Henry A. & Co . Ixiv 

Bernard Charles xxv 

Berryman & Doyle, front 

, cover 
Bert F. W., reg. of names.. 944 
Bethesda Mineral Spring 
Water, register of 

names 370 

Black Diamond Coal Co. Ixix 
Blake Charles E., back cover 

Blake, Robbins & Co Ixiii 

Boardman George C, front 

cover 
Bodwell Harry H.Ixx and Ixxi 

Bonney O. Jr. 9 

Booker W. L xxxli 

Busqui ELlward& Co., reg- 
ister of names, side line 

Bntgg Robert 5 

Bravermau & Levy, front 

cover 
Britton, Rey & Co., register 

of names 928 

BroweU Jeremiah, Ixxvi 

and 26 

rowa W. H Ixxr 

Biyden & Hinckley 28 

B\irnham James W. & Co . . 12 

Burns John H 17 

Buswell A xlv 

California Brass Foundry. . 10 
California Insurance Co. 

xxvili 
California Savings and 

Loan Society xxv 

California Sugar Refinery 

xxxl 
California Wine Cooper- 

_e lix 

California Wire Works. . . .29 

Chapman & Co Ixxvi 

ClarkN 1 

Claussenius Oeorge 27 

Coe O. R. (Health Lift). .Iviii 
Commercial Insurance Co. 

XXXV 

Consolidated Tobacco Co. 

Ixxxvili 

Cornwall P. B Ixix 

Crane & Brigham xxxiii 

Cross ii Co iii 

Cumminirs W. H 24 

Curry F. 1 8 

Davis & Cowell Ixviii 

Day Thomas 

front cover and Ixxxlii 
Dickson, De Wolf & Co. 

xliv 

Dolliver & Brother 28 

Donald W. C. & Co. (Bos- 
ton) Ixxviii 

Driscoll Cornelius E U 

Eastman Frank xlviii 

Easton John 27 

Edwards Frank G 18 

Elireni)f ort WiUiam Iii 

Eitner R udolf Ixxvii 

Eureka Foundry 5 

Excelsior Mill Co 10 

Falkner, Bell & Co xxx 



PAGE 
Farmero' and Mechanics' 

Bank of Savings xlvii 

Fireman* Fxmd Ins. Co., 

front cover 
Flavin Martin J, (IX L) 

back cover 
Flint, Peabody & Co. 

xxix and liv 

Francis & Valentine back 

of vohirae and Iv 

Freeman B. H. & Co hi 

Frencli Savings and Loan 

Society Ixxiv 

Fulda Bros. & Co lix 

Fulton Foundry .lii 

Gannon Peter T , . . . . Ii 

Garratt W. T 8 

Gem>an Savings and Loan 

Society xl 

Gilman & Mellon 24 

Giovannini D 4 

Glasgow Iron and Metal 

Importing Co 6 

Goddard & Co xvii 

Goodall, Nelson & Perkins 

S. S. Co vii 

Gray N. & Co xlix 

Gray & Son Ivi 

Greenwood W. M. . . . . .xxxiv 

Griffith A. J 21 

Hall & Kelshaw 4 

Halladie A. S xxvii and 29 

Hamburg-Bremen Fire In- 
surance Co xiX 

Hammam Medicated and 
Turkish Batlis, regis- 

of names 371 

Hawkins & Cantrell xlix 

Hayes George & Co Ixxii 

Heald's Business College, 

register of names 392 

Health Lift Iviii 

Heerdink & Co xl 

Heudy Joshua Ixxxvi 

Heney William 11 

Heverin M., inside back cover 
Herrmann C., reg. names.. 870 
Hiberuia Savings and 

Loan Society xxiv 

Hicks D. & Co., register 
of names 871 and in- 
side back cover 

Hinckley & Co 16 

Holbrook, Merrill & Co., 

register of names 982 

Holland & Ruppel xl 

Home Mutual Ins. Co 13 

Hooper Henry 25 

Houseworth Thomas & 
Co. , register of names 963 

Hunt D. W Ixii 

Hunter James & Co 23 

Hyde & Cliester 22 

Imperial lusiu-ance Co. ..xxx 

India Rice Mill xxxiv 

Jesse JiDrew 21 

Jewell A. M. & Co 7 

Johnson J. C. & Co. . ..Ixxiii 
Joost Brothers & Co . . . .xxxv 

Kane & Cook Ixv 

Kelly Martin Ixxxii 

Kaovyies George B & Son. .22 
Kohler & Frohling. front cover 

Kuh Leopold liii 

Kuner A 11 

Laird D. W., register of 
names top line 

Langland 6i Leach hv 

Langley H. G., reg. of 
names, 963, 972, side 

line, and Ixxviii 

Larkins&Co 28 

Laurel Hill Cemetery .. Ixvii 
Lavery Joseph G., regis- 
ter of names 370 

Leavitt Charles H Ixviii 



PAGE 
Ledden, Whipple & Co. . .Ixv 

Leffel k Meyers Lxxix 

Leveijue & Potter 21 

Lindsey & Oesterreicher, 

reg. of names, side line 
Linforth, Kellogg & Co . Xxxvi 
Litton Springs Seltzer 

Water 24 

Locan & Co xxii 

Locke & Montague, reg- 
ister of names 962 

London Assurance Cor- 
poration iii 

London aU I S. F. Bank. . . .ix 
Loryea A. M., register of 

names 371 

Macken James 10 

Macondray & Co xvi 

Mallou John 9 

Mangan Peter F Ixxxii 

Marcun George & Co xxix 

Marden Ira & Co xllii 

Marder, Luse & Co., reg- 
ister of names 870 

Martell John 2 

Martin E. & Co Ii 

Martin P., reg. of names. .530 

Massey & Yung xlvi 

Mayer Joseph 22 

McAfee, Spiers & Co 5 

McCain, Flood & McClure 

xxiii 

McMillan & Kester 2 

McNulty C. A 14 

McQuillan B Ixiii 

Meeker James & Co liii 

Meeker W. A 10 

Meyer Charles 7 

Miller & Sievers 25 

Mills Robert Ixxxii 

Miners' Foundry .xlvii 

Montealegre & Co Ixvi 

Moore H. A. Mrs Ii 

Moore H. H., register of 

names 531 and 1 

Morelos A. & Co Ixxv 

Morgan & Co., register of 

names 945 

Muecke, Victor &. Co . . 

front CO- er 
Nevada Bank of San Fran- 
cisco X 

Newbauer&Co Ixxv 

Newhall H. M. & Co. . . .xxix 

Nichols A. C. & Co xxx vii 

North China Insiurance 

Co xvi 

Northern Assurance Co. 

Nutting Calvin & Son 19 

O'Donnell Cornelius 20 

Occidental Foundry 4 

Oregon S. S. Co vi 

Otto Charles liv 

Pacific Barrel and Keg 

Factory liv 

Pacific Cement Co., reg. 

of names 530 

Pacific Congress Springs 

Water Ixiv 

Pacific Cordage Co xx 

Pacific File Works 11 

Pacific Iron Works xvii 

Pacific Mail S. S. Co iv 

Pacific Oil & Lead Works, .v 

Pacific Rolling Mill Co v 

Pacific TjTje Foundry, reg- 
ister of names 870 

Pages J. F 20 

Palmer W. J. T. & Co . . xxxvii 

Parkin John 11 

Parrott & Co xxi 

PasqualeB 25 

Pendergast & Smith 8 

Philadelphia Brewery. . . 

Ixxxvii 



PACE 

Pioneer Iron Works, , . .Ixviii 

Pioneer Paper Mill Ivii 

Plate A. J. & Co Ixxiii 

Price M . . . , 15 

Price Thomas Ixxii 

Priuz John 21 

Progress Carriage Factory. 23 

tiueen Insurance Co xxx 

RansoroeEruest L. back cover 
Read Ellis, register of 
names, side lixie. and 

xliv and Ixii 

Risdou I. & L. Works 6 

Risdon & Tower Ixxxii 

Roach John 12 

Rodgers, Meyer & Co xxvi 

Rosenbavmi A. 3. & Co. .Ixix 

Roth & Levy xxxviii 

Rothschild & Ehrenpfort. .14 
Rowe Elastic Ti-uss Co. . .Ivii 
Royal Mail Packet Co. . .xxxii 

S. F. Boiler Works 8 

S. F. Cordage Manufac- 
tory xxx 

S. F. Gas Light Co 28 

8. F. Jeweh-y Manufact- 
uring Co., register of 
names top line 

S. F. Last Factory 21 

S, P. Pioneer Woolen 

Factory liii 

.S. F. Sarings Union xxiii 

S. F. Steam Pump Works, 

Ixxxv 
Sacramento Boiler Works. .4 

Sanborn & Byrnes 15 

Santa Clara College xli 

,Saul & Co 14 

Savings and Loan Society 

xxii 

SchillerC.F 2 

Schmidt M .& Co., regis- 
ter of names 971 

Schmolz William Ixxiv 

Schussler H xlv 

Scottish Commercial In- 
surance Co XX 

Sellers James C 20 

Sherman Wm. Jit Co xlvi 

Sherwood Robert ii 

Shreve George C. & Co. .edge 

of volume and xviii 

Sims John R xlii 

Skinker John xxvi 

Sloss Louis & Co Ixvi 

Smith A. J Ixxxiv 

Smith C. W. M., bottom 

edge of volume and 3 

Smith E.B.& Co 24 

.Smith William 19 

Smithsonian Medical In- 
stitute, register of 
names bottom line 

8nookG..&W 23 

Speyer Morris &. Co xix 

and Ixv 

Spreckels & Co xxxiii 

SpringMenzo 15 

Spring Valley W. Works, .xv 
and Ixxx 

St. Ignatius College xxxix 

Steele James G. & Co., 
register of names bot- 
tom line 

Steiger & Kerr 4 

Steinhart W. it I. & Co . . . xliii 
Straiis, Kohnstamm & 

Co Iii 

Straut & Hamilton 17 

Strong & Co ^^^Xl 

Swiss- American Bank xiii 

Swiss-Lloyd Marine In- 

svurance Co xix 

Taber, Hark-fcr & Co 20 

Taber I. W. & Oo Ii 

Tay George H. & Co. .Ixxxiii 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 



PAGE 

Taylor D. B. & Co. . .back 

cover and 30 

Taylor John & Co xxxviii 

Taylor S. P. & Co Ivii 

Tenthorey J. P. & Co 14 

Tesmore Solomon 25 

Teubner & Hoffman 27 

Thueuer & Martens 26 

Thompson Bros 5 

TransatlanticFirelnsCo. xxix 
Trumbull Robert J. back 

cover 
Truworthy Francis M. . . .xlii 



PAGE 

Tuhbs & Co .XXX 

Tustin W. I., top edge of 

volume and Ixand Ixi 

Ullman M. & Co xxxv 

Union Insurance Co xiv 

Upton John P Ixix 

VanSchaack C. P. &Co., 
register of names top line 

Venard G xxviii 

Vice Martin Ixxxvi 

Vulcan Iron Works 12 

Wade's Opera House, re- 
gister of names 944 



PAGE 

WaterhouBe & Lester. . .Ixxxi 

Weed &. Kingwell 10 

WeichhartJ 9 

Welch & Co Ixviii 

Wells, Fargo & Co viii 

Wells, Russell & Co 22 

Wetherbee George M 6 

What Cheer Laundrj', re- 
gister of names 870 

Wheat CD xxxiv 

Wheeler & Wilson Manuf. 

Co — back of vol. and 16 
White Bros 15 



PAGE 

White Henry xlv 

Wieland John Ixxxvii 

Wilcox W. C. & Co. . . .Ixxxv 
Williams, Blanchard&Co., 
xxxiv 

Williams H. F xxiv 

Winkle Henry & Co Ixiv 

Winter J. W., register of 
names side line 

Wood G. M. & Co Ivii 

Yang-Tze Insui-ance As- 
sociation xri 



Wtel 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 



Jherw 

jIhKK 



Dii 

telsi 



PAGE 

Adjnstcrs. 

McNulty C. A, (Customs) . .14 

Agricjultnral Impl'ts. 

Bonney O. Jr 9 

Linforth, Kellogg & Co. xxxvi 

Amiili^amaflng Ma- 

Hendy Joshua Ixxxvi 

Amnsemeuts — Places 
of. 

Wade's Opera House, re- 
gister of names 944 

Aiiinionia. 

S. F. Gas Light Co 28 

Apothecaries. 

Steele James G. & Co., re- 
gister of names bot- 
tom line 

Artificial Limbs. 

Spring Menzo IS 

Artificial Stone. 

Ransome Ernest L., back 

cover 
Assayers. 

Kuh Leopold liii 

Price Thomas Ixxii 

Strong & Co xxxvi 

Auctioneers. 

Cummings W. H 24 

NewhaU H. M. & Co. . . .Xxix 

Banks. 

Anglo-Californian Bank. . .xi 
Bank British Columbia. . .xii 
Bank British North Am- 
erica xvi 

London and S. F. Bank. ..ix 
Nevada Bank of San 

Francisco x 

Swiss- American Bank xiii 

Wells, Fargo & Co viii 

Banks— Savings. 

California Savings and 
Loan Society xxv 

Farmers' and Mechanics' 
Bank xlvii 

French Savings and Loan 
Society Ixxiv 

German Savings and 
Loan Society xl 

Hibemia Savings and 
Loan Society xxiv 

San Fancisco Savings 
Union xxiii 

Savings and Loan Socie- 
ty xxii 

Baths. 

Hammam Medicated and 
Tiirkish, Register of 
names 371 

Sanitarium 11 



PAGE I 

Bitters. 

McMillan & Kester 2 

Blacksmiths. 

Larkins&Co 28 

Weichhart J 9 

Blanli Book Mann- 

factnrcrs. 

Bosqui Edward & Co., 
reg. of names side 

line 
Hicks D. & Co., register 
of names. . . .871 and 

inside back cover 

Boat Bnlldcrs. 

Vice Martin Ixxxvi 

Boiler Works. 

Angell, Palmer & Co ... . xlvii 

Cmxy P. 1 8 

Goddard & Co xvii 

Hall & Kelshaw 4 

Hinckley & Co 16 

McAfee, Spiers & Co 5 

Risdon I. and L. Works 6 

Risdon & Tower Ixxxil 

Book Binders. 

Bosqui Edward & Co., 
reg. of names side line, 

BuBwell A xlv 

Hicks D. & Co., register 

of names 871 and 

inside back cover 

Booksellers. 

Moore H. H., register of 
names 531 and 1 

Boots and Shoes— Re- 
tail. 

Flavin Martin J. (IXL) 

back cover 

Brass Foundries. 

GarrattW. T 8 

Smith A. J Ixxxiv 

Weed & Kingwell 10 

Brewers. 

Spreckels & Co xxxiii 

Wieland John Ixxxvii 

Bridge Builders. 

Hallidie A. S.. . .xxvii and 29 

Cabinet Makers. 

Easton John 27 

Palmer W. J. T. & Co. xxxvii 

Carpets. 

Burnham James W. & Co. 12 

Edwards Frank G 18 

Ehrenpfort William lil 

Carriage Depots. 

Larkins & Co 28 



PAGE 

Progress Carriage Fac- 
tory 23 

Saul & Co 14 

Carriage Stock. 

Meeker, James & Co.' liii 

Straut & Hamilton 17 

Waterhouse & Lester. . .Ixxxi 
White Bros 15 

Carvers —Ornamental. 

Schiller C. F 2 

Cement Pipe. 

Browell Jeremiah Ixxvi 

Clark N 1 

Martin P., reg. of names. .530 

Cemetery. 

Laurel Hill Ixvii 

Champagne. 

Muecke, Vietor & Co 

front cover 

Chemists. 

KuhL liii 

Price Thomas Ixxii 

Steele J. G. & Co., reg. of 

names bottom line 

Strong & Co xxxvi 

Chimney Stacks. 

Browell J Ixxvi and 26 

Cigaritos. 

Morelos A. & Co Ixxv 

Cigars and Tobacco. 

Consolidated Tobacco 

Co Ixxxviii 

Gannon Peter T li 

Heerdink & Co xl 

Rosenbaum A. S. & Cclxix 

Civil Engineer. 

Schussler H xlv 

ClotMng. 

Flavin Martin J. (I X L) 

back cover 
McCain, Flood & Mc- 

Clure xxiii 

Sherman William & Co. .xlvi 
Steinhart W, & I. & Co. . .xUii 
VanSchaackC. P. &Co., _ 

register of names top line 

Cloths. 

S. F. Pioneer Woolen 

Factory liii 

Ullman M. & Co xxxv 

Coal. 

BelUngham Bay Co Ixix 

Berryman & Doyle,. front 

cover 
Black Diamond Co Ixix 



PAGElBljdei 

Coffee and Spices. 

Bernard Charles xxvl 

Marden Ira & Co xUii »' 

Venard G xxviiiPf" 

Coffin Manufacturers. 

HuntDW ixiij|[^ji| 

Coke 

S. F. Gas Light Co 28 

pnyt 
Colleges. 

Heald's Business, regist- 
er of names ' 

Santa Clara xli 

St. Ignatius xxx 

Commission Mer- 
chants. 

Ammon, Caspari & Co. . .xxl 
Dickson, De Wolf & Co. .xliv 
Flint, Peabody & Co — xxix ,^. 
Ledden, Whipple & Co. . .Ixv '* 

Macondray H Co xvi 

Montealegre & Co Ixvi . 

Newhall H. M. & Co. . . .xxi4" 
Nichols A. C.& Co. 

Parrott & Co xxiL 

Read Ellis, reg. of names * 

side line and xliv and Ixii 

Rodgers, Meyer & Co xxvi 

Speyer Morris & Co xi: 

and Ix' 

Welch & Co Ixviii 

Williams, Blanchard & 

Co, 



Confectioners. 

Rothschild & Ehrenpfort. .14 

Contractors. 

BroweU Jeremiah Ixrv! 

and 26 

Brown W.H 

Chapman & Co Ixxvi 

Hyde & Chester 2' 

Coopers. 

Cal. Wine Cooperage li 

Pacific Barrel and Keg 
Factory Uv 

Coppersmiths. 

Macken James iti 

Cordage. 

Hallidie A. S. (wire) 

and 

Pacific Cordage Co 

San Francisco Cordage 
Manufactory 



tei 



um 



Jill! 

kkli 



.xxx 



Cordials, etc. 

McMillan & Kester. . . . 

Cornices. 

Hayes George & Co — 
Hunter James & Co . . . 



lafln' 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 



PAUE 

Crockery. 

Straus, Kohustamiu & Co.lii 

Cutlers. 

EMceM 15 

I>enti.<«t.4. 

Jlake Charles E. .back cover 
iV inter J. W., register of 

names, side line 

Diamonds. 

Jraverman A: Levy, front 

cover 

herwood Robert ii 

ihreve George C. & Co. . 
edge of vol. and page xviii 

Doors, .SsLsh, etc. 

xcelsior Mill Co 10 

lolhiiid & Ruppel xl 

looper Henry O 25 

Veils, Kussell & Co 22 

Draymen. 

Jryden & Hinckley. 



28 

Druggi.sts. 

'rane & Brigham xxxiii 

teele James G. & Co. .reg. 

of names bottom line 

Dry Good.s. 

IcCain, Flood & Mc- 
Clure xxiii 

Elevators. 

ray & Son Ivi 

Embroideries. 

ocan &;Co xxii 



Engravers. 

itner Rudolph Ixxvii 

imer A 11 

ages Jules F 20 

'^oodG. M. & Co Ivii 

Engraving.s. 

cQuillan B Ixiii 

Expresses. 

'ells, Fargo & Co viii 

Fancy Goods. 

la\'iu Martin J. (I X L) 

back cover 

Dcan & Co xxii 

asquale B 25 

an Schaack C. P. & Co., 

reg. of names top line 

File Manufacturers. 

icific File Works 11 

F. File Works Ixxxii 

Fire Arms. 

ate A. J. & Co linriii 

Fish. 

riffithA. J 21 

Flags. 

isqualeB 25 

Florists. 

iller & Sievers . . . 



25 

Foundries. 

ageU, Palmer & Co xlvii 

jddard & Co xvii 

inckley & Co 16 

ndergast & Smith 8 

eiger & Kerr. . .'. 4 

ompson Brothers 5 

ilcan Lron Works 12 

Furnishing Goods— 
™^ Men's. 

samish Percy, register 

of names, bottom line 
ivin Martin J. (I X L), 

back cover 
Cain, Flood & McCIure 



PAOE 

Van Schaack C. P. & Co. 
register of names, top line 

Furniture. 

Bumham James W. & Co. 12 

Easton John 27 

Palmer W. J. T. & Co., xxxvii 

Furniture i^chool. 

Palmer W. J. T. & Co., xxxvii 

Ga.H Fixtures. 

Day Thomas, front cover 

and IxTxiii 

Glassware. 

Straus, Kohnstamm & Co. .lii 
Taylor John & Co. (drag- 
gists xxxviii 

Glass i^tainers. 

Mallon John 9 

IVIills Robert Ixxxii 

Groceries. 

Ledden, Wliipple & Co. . .Ixv 
Taber, Barker & Co 20 

Gunsmiths. 

Meyer Charles 7 

Plate A. J. & Co Ixxiii 

Hair Restoratives. 

Moore H. A. Mrs U 

Hardware. 

Glasgow I, and M. Im- 
porting Co 6 

Joost Brothe s & Co iixv 

Linforth, Kellogg & Co. . 

xxxvi 
Otto Charles liv 

Hardware— Sacldlery. 

Johnson J. C. & Co Irxiii 

Harness, etc. 

Johnson J. C. & Co lyxiii 

Hats and Caps. 

Herrmann C, reg. names. 870 
White Henry xlv 

Health Lift. 

Coe O. R Iviii 

Hides and Wool. 

Sloss Louis & Co Ixvi 

Horseshoers. 

Mangan Peter F luxii 

House Movers. 

Hyde & Chester 22 

Hygienic Institute. 

Smith Barlow J., reg. of 

names, bottom line 

Instrument Depots. 

Houseworth Thomas & 
Co.. register of names 963 

Roach John 12 

Schmolz WUliam Ixxiv 

Insurance Agents. 

Boardman George C 

front cover 

Booker W. L xxxii 

Cross & Co .iii 

Falkner, Bell & Co xxx 

Hart & Blair xx 

Macondray & Co xvi 

Marcus Geo. & Co xxix 

Speyer Morris & Co xix 

DLSurance Co's. Eastern 

and FureUjn. 
Mtna, (Hartford), .front cover 
Hamburg-Bremen Fire. ..xix 
Imperial Fire (London), .xxx 
London Assurance Cor- 
poration iii 

North China (Shanghai) . .xvi 
Northern Assurance (Lon- 
don and Aberdeen).. xxiii 
Queen Fire (Liverpool). . .xxx 



PAUE 

Scottish Commercial 

(Glasgow) XX 

Swiss Lloyd Marine xix 

Transatlantic Fire (Ham- 
burg) xxix 

Yang-Tze (Shanghai) xvi 

Insurance Co's. Home. 

California xxviii 

Commercial Insurance Co., 

of CaUfomia xxxv 

Firemans Fund. . .front cover 

Home Mutual Ins. Co 13 

Union xiv 

Iron and .Steel. 

Glasgow Iron and Metal 

Imp. Co 6 

Iron Doors, etc. 

Hayes Geo. & Co Ixxii 

Leavitt Charles H Lxviii 

Nutting Calvin & .Son 19 

Sims John R xlii 

Jewelers. Man'fg. 

Braverman & Levy . . front 

cover 
Laird D. W., register of 

names, top line 

Sherwood Robert ii 

Shreve Geo. C, 4c Co xrtii 

and edge of volume 

Last Factories. 

Leveque & Potter 21 

Laun<iries. 

What Cheer, register of 
names 870 

Leather Dealers. 

Johnson J. C. &Co Ixxiii 

Nichols A. C. it Co xxxvii 

O'Dounell Cornelius 20 

Lime and Cement. 

Davis & Cowell lxviii 

Lithographers. 

Britton, Rey & Co., register 
of names 928 

Schmidt M & Co., regis- 
of names 971 

Locomotives. 

Risdon L-on and Locomo- 
tive Works 6 

Looking Glasses, etc. 

McQuillan B Ixiii 

Lnniher Dealers. 

Knowles George B. & Son. .22 

Macaroni, Veiinicelli, 
etc. 

Tenthorey J.P.&Co 14 

Machine Works. 

Hawkins k. Cautrell xlix 

Hendy Joshua btxxvi 

Risdon Iron and Locomo- 
tive Works 6 

Marble Yards. 

Heveriu M . inside back cover 

Match Manufacturers. 

Newbauer & Co Ixxv 

Mill Furnishing. 

Leffel & Myers Ixxix 

Mineral Waters. 

Bethesda, reg. of names. .370 

Litton 24 

Pacific Congress bdv 

Native Wines. 

Kohler & Frohling. .front 

cover 

Prinz John 21 

Winkle Henry & Co Ixiv 

Oil Works. 

Pacific Oil and Lead 
Works V 



PAOK 

Opticians. 

Houseworth Thomas & 

Co., reg. of names 953 

Roach John 12 

Organ Builder. 

Mayer Joseph 22 

Oysters. 

Morgan & Co., register of 

names 945 

Tesmore Solomon 25 

Painters. 

Gilman & Mellon 24 

Paper Dealers. 

Blake. Robbins & Co Ixiii 

Read Ellis, reg. of names 

side line, and xliv and Ixii 
Taylor S. P. & Co Ivii 

Patent Agency. 

Smith C. W. M., bottom 

edge of volume and 3 

Photographers. 

Houseworth Thomas & 

Co., reg. of names 963 

Taber I. W. & Co ii 

Taylor D. B. & Co., back 

cover and 30 

Photo. Engravings. 

Houseworth Thomas & 

Co., reg. of names 963 

Taber LW.& Co ii 

Planing Mills. 

Excelsior MiU Co 10 

Fulda Bros. & Co Ux 

Holland & Ruppel xl 

Jewell A. M. &Co 7 

Wells, Russell & Co 22 

Plumbers, etc. 

Day Thomas, front cover 

and Ixxxiii 

Smith A. J Ixxxiv 

Smith William 19 

Snook G. &W 23 

Pottery. 

Clark N 1 

Powder Dealers. 

Skinker John xxvi 

Printers. 

Bosqui Edward & Co., reg. 

of names side line 

Eastman Frank xlviii 

Francis & Valentine Iv 

Kane & Cook Ixv 

Upton John P Ixix 

Printers' Material. 

Blake, Robbins & Co Ixiii 

Read Ellis, register of 
names side line, and 

xliv and Ixii 
Wetherbee George M 6 

Provisions. 

Ledden, Whipple & Co. . .Ixv 
Taber, Barker & Co 20 

Publisher. 

Langley Henry G.. regis- 
ter of names, 9L'3, 972, 

side line and 1 xxviii 

Pumps. 

JeweU A. M. & Co 7 

San Francisco Steam 

Pump Works Ixxxv 

Smith A.J Ixxxiv 

Real Estate Agents. 

Lindsey & Oesterreicher, 
reg. of names side lines 

Wheat CD xxxiv 

Williams H. F ixiv 

Regalia. 

Pasquale B 25 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



PAGE 

Ro.stiiiiraiit. 

Bums John H 17 

KU-v SiJlls. 

India Rice Mill xxxiv 

ICoIIiii? Mill. 

Pacific Rolling Mill v 

Safes. 

Leavitt Charles H IxTiii 

Savings an<] loan So> 

PBt'Iies. 
California Savings and 

Loan Society xxv 

Farmers' and Mechanics' 

Bank xlvii 

French Savings and Loan 

Society Ixxiv 

German Savings and Loan 

Society xl 

Hibernia Savings and 

Loan Society xxiv 

San Francisco Savings 

Union xxiii 

Savings and Loan Society.xxii 
Saw Makers. 

Bonney O. Jr 9 

Scetis, Trees, Ete. 
Trumbull Robert J. .back 

cover 
Sc^vins Machines. 
Wheeler & Wilson Mauu- 
factiu-ing Co., back of 

volume and 16 

Shipping; and For- 
warding. 
Ammon, Caspari & Co. . .sxi 

Claussenius George 27 

Flint, Peabody & Co. . . xxix 

Macondray & Co xvi 

Parrott &Co xxi 

Rorlgers, Meyer & Co xxvi 

Williams, Blanchard & 
Co xxxiv 



PAGE 

Shirts. 

Beamish Percy, register 

of names Ijottom line 
Shoe Findings. 

DoUiver & Brother 28 

SIlow t'ase Makers. 

Teubner & Hofiman 27 

Thuener & Martens 26 

Silver Platers. 

Martell John 2 

Stair Builders. 

Freeman B. H. & Co lii 

Gray & Son Ivi 

Jesse & Drew 21 

Langland & I,each liv 

Sanborn & Byrnes 15 

Steamship Lines. 
Goodall, Nelson & Per- 
kins S. S. Co vii 

Oregon S. S. Co vi 

Pacific Mail S. S. Co iv 

Royal Mail xxxii 

Steering Wheels. 

Bragg Robert 5 

Stenetl Cutters. 

Truworthy F. M xlii 

Wood G. M. & Co Ivii 

SJove.s, etc. 
Holbrook, Merrill & Co., 

register of names 962 

Locke & Montague, regis- 
ter of names 962 

Snook G.&W 23 

Tay George H. & Cc.lxxxiii 
Sugar Retincries. 

Bay 17 

California xxxi 

Tanners. 
O'Donnell Cornelius 20 



PAGE 

Tin and Sheet Iron 
Workers. 

Holbroolc, Merrill & Co., 

register of names 962 

Locke & Montague, reg- 
ister of names 962 

Snook G. &W 2.3 

Tay Geo. H. k Co Ixxxiii 

T«»bacco Growers. 
Consolidated Tobacco Co. 

Ixxxviii 
Tool Makers. 

Weichhart J 9 

Trjiss Manisfaeturers. 
Rowe Elastic Truss Co. . .Ivii 

Turners. 

Heney William 11 

Wetherbee Geo. M 6 

Tyi>e Dealers. 
Read Ellis, reg. of names 

side line, and xliv and Ixii 
Pacific Type Foundry, reg- 
ister of names S70 

Fmbrella— Adjustable 

Waterhouse & Lester. . .Ixxxi 

l'n«lert;ikers. 

Gray N. & Co xlix 

Massey & Yung xlvi 

Upholsterers. 
Burnham James W. & Co. .12 

Edwards Frank G 18 

Ehrenpfort William Ui 

Vases, Fountains, etc. 

Rausome E. L back cover 

Veterinary Surgeons. 

Mangan Peter F Ixxxii 

Watches and .Jewelry. 
Braverman & Levy, front covr 
Laird D. W., register of 

names top line 



PAGE 

Sherwood Robert ii 

Shreve George C. & Co. .xviii 
and edge of volume 
Water Closets. 

Smith A. .T Ixxxiv 

Smith William 19 

Water l*lpe. 

Browell Jeremiah Ixxvi 

Clark N 1 

Martin P., reg. of names. .530 
Water Wheels. 

Leffel & Myers Ixxix 

Water Works. 

Spring Valley . . .xv and Ixxx 

Whitenei-s. 

Sellers J. C 20 

Wind Mill Manufs. 

Bodwell Harry H ha 

and Ixxi 
Tustin W. I., top edge of 

volume and Ix and Ixj 

Window .Shades. 

Burnham James W. & Co . . IS 

Wines and Liquors. 

Anduran C. &, Co 

Martin E. & Co 1 

McMillan & Kester 

Prinz John 2! 

Roth & Levy xxxvii 

Winkle Henry & Co bdi 

Wire Workers. 

HaUidie A. S. . ..xxvii and 2 

Wood and I'oal. 

Giovannini D 

Woolen Cioods. 

Ullmann & Co xxr 

Woolen Mills. 
San Francisco Pioneer lii 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BUSINESS CARDS. 



SEE BUSINESS DIRECTORY, PAGES 863-971. 



Allen AVUliam R 904, 951 

Auger B. E. & Co. . . .881, 920 

935 

Austin B. C 966 

Bacon &Co 952 

Balch M. M 942 

Baker & Hamilton. . ..863, 911 
Bandmami, Nielsen & Co. 

935, 951 

Banner Bros 888 

Barker James L..911, 950, 951 
Barnard's Business College, 

890 

Bartlett & Randolph 879 

BendelB. &Co 933 

Bennett Wm. H. Mrs 965 

Ber.y & Capp 879 

Blake, Robbins & Co.... 946 

Blake T. A 898 

Bowers J. Milton 949 

Bradstreet J. R 956 

Browell J 950 

Buena Vista Vinicultural 

Society 942 

Burke F. H 865, 893 

Bruce D 952 

Burnham J. W. & Co. . . .883 

Burr C. C. & Co 942, 959 

California Bed Comforter 

Factory 869 

Callaghan D. & Co 971 

Carson & Ladd 967 

Cellarius, Brand & Wijbcken, 

920 

CookH. N 868, 870, 913 

Cook & Trounson 883 

Corville Emerson & Co. 

(3), 945 

Cronan W 9.56 

Croskey & Floyd 920 

Cummings W. H 935 

Curlett William 864 

Daly & Hawkins 879 

DayThomas 904, 951 



Denniston Edward G 958 

Dinkelspiel & Farjeon 969 

Dolliver&Bro 919 

Du Rose & Banks 869 

Duff J. M 879 

Duncan Geo. & Co. . ..865, 956 
Dunham, Carrigan & Co. .911 

Eells & Stanford 878 

Egerton, Allen & Co. .937, 960 

EisenT. A 864 

Electrical Construction 
and Maintenance Co. 

870, 897, 970 

FarweU&Co 957 

Florence Sevring Machine Co. 
957 
Frontier, Bellemere & Co. 

894, 917 

Gang Hermann 883 

GariboldiG. G 945 

Getleson & Landis 919 

Ghirardelli D 889 

Gibson & White 877 

Gilbert & Moore 903, 904 

GillerC. L 898 

Goldsmith W. E. & Son. .899 

Goodyear Rubber Co 913 

Gray Mathias 941, 950 

Gray Samuel C 919 

Greenebaum & Co 935 

Grover & Baker S. M. Co.. 957 

GuittardE. & Co 889 

Harrison .John 928 

Harrison W. P 952 

Harrison & Dickson (2), 

879, 971 
Hartford Fire Ins. Co. . . .916 
Hayes George & Co 917 

936, 956 
Heald's Business College 

890, 957 
Heynemaun & Co. . . .883, 897 

Hill John B 960 

Hodge John G. & Co 960 



Home Mutual Ins. Co 916 

Houseworth Thos. & Co. 

944 947 

Hueter Bros. & Co.865, 946, 967 

HmitE.O 969 

Kalleuberg Theodore . 932, 941 

Kirkpatrick & Gentry 920 

Kohler, Chase & Co. .942, 950 

Koehler & Ritter 958, 959 

Kiamer& Co 903 

Laird D. W 917 

Libby S 957 

Linsley & Collins. 905, 952,953 
Locke & Montague.. 916, 962 

Lo\vry J. W 884 

Macdonald D. A. & Co... 895 

Madison, Burke & Co 879 

Magee Thomas 879 

Main & Winchester. . 911, 969 

Mancusi G. Signor 965 

Marquis J 864 

Martin E. & Co 920 

Marwedel C. F 932 

McCurrie, AVeber k Co. . .942 

McNally & Hawkins (2) 904,951 

Methodist Book Depository, 

873 

Meyers Adolph 942 

Molony P 951 

Morgan E. M 898 

Muecke, Vietor & Co. 884, 935 

Muir A 958 

MuUerC (2), 944 

Nathan B. & Co 894 

National Clock Co 888 

Neustiidter Brothers 903 

Newton Bros. & Co 964 

Nichols A. C. &Co 919 

Owens John B 950 

Pacific Electro-Depositing 

Works 943,958 

Pacific Lamp and Reflec- 
tor Factory 918 

Pac. Oil and Lead Works . .944 



laial 



95 sill 




Pacific Saw Manufactur- 
ing Co 

Pacific Vinegar Works 96 

Palmer W. J. T. & Co.. "" 

Perey P 

Pioneer Carpet Beatinj 
Machine 

Pohley & Koster 

Price M 

Price Press Co 89i 

RansomeEmestL 86 

883. 8'a3.901,943,950(2).9( 

Rochicioli R. F 

Roos Joseph & Co 

Rosseter it Smith. 

Rudolf G. & Co 

Rulil Brothers 

San Francisco Plating W( 



Sanborn & Byraes 9 

Schmidt M. k Co.... 928, 9 

Sheldon & Graves 9 

Shi-eve George C. & Co. 
895, 917, 959, 

Shuck OscarT 

Steele James G. & Co . . 864, 8 
896, 900, 947, 

Steiger & Kerr sig. , 

Stockman J. M 941, 9j M 

TaberL W. &Co ....899, 91 jtH 

Tay George H. & Co « ; " 

Taylor S. P. & Co (2), 9) '«'1S\ 

Truworthy F. M 956, 8t lofp I 

Tustin W I .W^ 

U. S. & Foreign Salaman- 
der Felting Co 91 

Watson & Co 893, 919, 

Weaver, Taylor & Co 

Weichhart J 

Weil Brothers 

AVhat Cheer Laundrj' 9 

Woodworth, Schell & Co . .» 
Yale Lock Manufactiuring 

Co a 



if out 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 7H, and 716 Kearny, EstaT:lished 1852. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY 

18V5-76. 



C"c^I^I?-E3S^T msToi^ir. 




The City of San Francisco was incorporated in May, 
1850. In July, 1856, the City and County govern- 
ments were united, thus consoUdating two independent 
and expensive sets of governmental machinery. San 
Francisco's age, therefore, is twenty-six years, and the 
progi'ess made during those years is one of the marvels 
of the time. The area of the City and County is 
twenty-seven thousand acres. 

Debt a>"d Taxation. — The bonds and coupons out- 
standing at the close of the fiscal year, June, 1875, was 
83,749,547.80. In addition to this, there is a bonded 
debt of -SI, 500,000 for the opening of Montgomery 
Avenue, payable by the property specially benefitted. 
The assessed value of all propertj' in the city, after 
equalization, was §268,532,857 ; so that a tax of one 
and four-tenths per cent, would paj"- off the entire 
debt. Nearly all of the larger American cities would 
be enriched by following the example set bj'' the metro- 
polis of the Pacific Coast, and avoiding the useless burden of a heavy debt. The rate of 
taxation for the last fiscal year was S1.60| on each $100, of which the State received sixty and 
one-half cents, and the city and county the remainder. The valuation of real estate in the city 
is !? 127, 288, 645 ; of improvements, §42,668,665 ; of personal property, exclusive of money, 
§90,761,341 ; of money, §7,814,208. 

General Progress. — The last year has been signalized by the completion of the Palace Hotel, 
the Safe Deposit Company's building, the Nevada Block, several extensive rows of substantial 
brick buildings dedicated to commercial purposes, and many other structures of great beauty and 
value. The wealth drawn from the mines of California and Nevada has been freely invested, 
and the two-story buildings that had been in use for twenty years previously rapidly disap- 
peared to make room for the massive piles that mark the inauguration of a new era in California 
architecture. The extension to the west, crowding upon the burial places of the dead, and to 
the extreme south, has been rapid and steady. During the earlier part of the year building 
operations were progressing at a rate altogether unprecedented ; but a check was given by the 
financial disturbances, and the discontinuance of loans by the Savings Banks. The suspension 
of the Bank of California was not due to any prostration in trade or diminution in the products 
of our industries, and the business community has long since recovered from its effects. The 
Bank itself is transacting its usual business as if nothing had occurred, and, in the light of what 
has transpired, San Francisco may well boast that nowhere else in the commercial world could 
there have been a suspension of a vast financial institution attended with so little loss and incon- 
venience. The railroad system of the State has been rapidly expanding, bringing rich agricul- 
tural districts into closer communication with us, and equally benefitting both localities. A 
new line of steamships has been inaugurated, to bring to us the treasures of the Orient. Rela- 
tions with the wealthy Colonies of the South Sea, Victoria, and New Zealand, have been made 
more intimate by the establishment of steamship service, by an American company, with those 
wealthy provinces. 

Trade and Cojimerce. — During the last calendar year, four thousand three hundred and 
fifty vessels entered the Golden Gate, having a registered tonnage of one million five hundred 
and ninety thousand one hundred and forty-eight tons. The imports amounted to .§35,708,782 ; 
the exports to §35,765,637 ; exports of treasure, §42,911,048. The clearances numbered one 
thousand and sixty -nine, with a tonnage of one million eighty-one thousand two hundred and 
fifty -one tons. The number of passengers arriving by sea and by rail, was one hundred and 



CEELE'S Squirrel Poison is sold by all Druggists, Grocers, and General Dealers- 
2 



r. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant ?• 



10 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



seven thousand one hundred and twenty-one ; the number of departures, forty-three thousand 
and seventy-four ; lea\'ing a gain in population of sixty-four thousand and forty-seven. The 
sales of mining stocks aggregated eight million two hundred and eighty-seven thousand one 
hundred and seventy-seven shares, amounting to $220,222,890. 

Real Estate. 

The true condition of the people of a city is more closely determined by the record of its 
real estate transactions than by any other information within the reach of a compiler. Numerous 
heavy transfers show that our miners, merchants, and capitalists have been making unusual 
accumulations, and the \ast number of minor transfers is a sure indication that mechanics 
and laboring men are becoming the oMoiers of homesteads. It will be noted presently 
that the year 1875 was fruitful in real-estate transfers which were of the extreme classes. 
It was a good year for capitalists and speculators, and for those engaged in industrial 
pursuits. The connection is readily seen. It is likely that hundreds of men who found 
employmeni; in the erection of prominent commercial buildings, converted a portion of their 
earnings in the pitrchase of homestead property. The money disbursed to mechanics on the 
Palace Hotel or the Safe Deposit Company's building, has, to a large extent, reappeared in 
homesteads, and has thus doubly benefited the city. We compile our statements of the real- 
estate business from^ Magee's Real Estate Circular, which, from month to month, faitlifuUy 
reviews what has been done. 

Business of the Year. — There were four thousand five hundred and eight sales, amount- 
ing to .|35,SS9,374, an increase of six hundred and fifty-four sales, and .§11,995,475 in amoiint, 
for the year. These sales are classified as- follows : Ffty-varas, seven hundred and thirty, 
§10,451,519; hundred-raras, four hundred arnl twenty-seven, $7,343,670; city slip and water 
lots, seventy-seven, §2,268,620 ; South Beach,^five, $100,250 ; Potrero, two hundred and eighty- 
one, §1,013,776; Mission Addition, one thousand three hundred and eight, §5,960,929; 
Western Addition, one thousand one hundi-ed and twenty-five, §7,840,488 ; South San Fran- 
cisco, one hundred and twenty-nine, $156,600 ; Homestead Associations, forty-nine, §195,610 ; 
Outside Lands, two hundred and forty-seven, $630, 763 ; Tax and Skeleton Titles, one hmidred 
and fifty-six, $59,150. There were two thousand nine hundred and eighty-eight mortgages, 
amounting to $16,892,268 ; and one thoiisand eight hundred and ninety-four releases, amount- 
ing to §9,740,277. The increase in the number of mortgages for the year, is three hundi-ed and 
seventy-two, in amount, §19,564 ; the decrease in the number of releases was one hundi-ed and 
thirty-five, and the amomit of the decrease was §1,460,974. 

Summary by Months. — January: Number of sales, 500; amount, $3,724,840. Among 
the notable sales are the following : Northwest corner Front ami Commercial, sixty by sixty 
feet, §60,000 ; southwest comer Dupoiit and Post — one hundred and twenty feet on Dupont 
and ninety-seven and a half on Post, §100,000 ; north side California Street, sixty-two and a 
half feet east of INIontgomery, east twenty-five by sixty-eight and three-fourths, §85,000 ; 
south side of Pine Street, eighty-seven and a half feet east of Montgomery, east fifty by one 
hundred and thirty-seven aiid a half feet, §140,000. There were twelve sales of property, 
worth §50,000 or more. February : Number of sales, 414 ; amount, .§4,506,538. There is a 
decided increase in the value of sales in the Western Addition. Notable sales were as follows; 
Southeast corner Sansom and Halleck, east thirty-foiir by sixty-eight and a half feet, $85,000; 
east side of Montgomery, sixty-eight and a half feet south of Pine, south forty-six by fifty- 
seven and a half feet, $127,000 ; northwest corner Powell and Ellis, north foi-ty-four by ninety- 
three and a half feet, $53,000; northeast comer Washington and Davis, east seventy by one 
hundred and twenty feet, §45,000; southwest comer Cla,y and Sansom, west forty by one hun- 
dred and twenty feet, .§75,000; northwest cor Post and Stockton, one hmidred and thirty-seven 
and a half by one hundred and thii-ty-seven and a half feet, $95,000; southeast side of JNlarket, 
seventy-eight feet northeast of Sixth street, northeast ninety-eight and a half by one hundred 
and seventy, §180,000, bought by E. J. Baldwin. March : Number of sales, 520 ; amount, 
§4,264,397. Sales iu the Western Addition were greater than ever before recorded. The most 
notable transfer was of the property on the east side of ISIontgomery Street, seventy feet south 
of Pine, forty-four by sixty-seven and a half feet, for §138,000, or $3,036 per front foot, the 
Real Estate Associates being the buyers. The following important sales are also noted : south- 
east comer of Kearny and Sutter, south one hundred and twenty-two and a half feet to Ver 
Mehr Place, by ninety-seven and a half feet, §344, 500 ; southeast side Market Street, tlu"e» 
hundred eighty-one and a fourth feet, southwest of First, southwest thirty-one by one hum" "~ 
and fifty-five feet, §66,000. Undivided half interest south side of Brannan Street, two h 
dred and seventy-five east of second, east five hundred and fifty by five hundred and fifty fi 
$300,000. Ai)ril: Number of sales, 428; amount, .§3,726,545. There is noted a heavy faUi 
ofif in sales in the Western Addition, and in business properties. The most imjiortant sale 
of the property on the northeast comer of California and Montgomery, east sixty-two and' 
half by sixty-eight and a fourth feet, for §350,000. May : Number of sales, 382 ; amou: 
$4,078,465. Business property is in gi-eat demand, also the more valuable classes of reside; 
property. William C. Ralston transferred his half interest in the Palace Hotel to Mr. Sha: 
for $1,750,000. The lot south side of California Street, one hundred and three and two-thir( 



Smithsonian Medical Institute, 637 Cal., B. J. SMITH, M.D., Prof. Phrenology 



. p. VAIT SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 11 






feet, west of Battery, west forty by eighty-nine feet, sold for $125,000 ; the southwest comer 
of Pine and Sansom, one hundred thirty-seven and a half by one hundred thirty-seven and a 
half feet, sold for $300,000. June: Number of sales, 371; amount, $3,038,293. There was 
an incre;ise in the sales in tlie Mission Addition, and a decrease in the Western Addition, Init 
no sales specially notable, and the month was a comparatively dull one in contrast with jirevi- 
ous months, though a very lively one when compared \\dth the remaining months of the year. 
July: Number of sales, 344; amount, $1,958,382. A very large jiroportion of the purchasers 
were homestead investors. The heavier sales were as follows : Northeast corner Front and 
Commercial, north fifty-live by (me hundred feet, $90,000; Northeast corner Pine and Davis, 
one hundred and thirty-seven and a half by one hundred and thirty-seven and a half feet, 
$155,000; southeast side Market, two hundred feet northeast of Fourth Street, northeast 
twenty-five by one hundred feet, $55,000. August: Number of sales, 376; amount, $3,244,- i is" 
792. There was a general increase in sales of all descriptions of property. The heaviest sale 
of the month was that of the east corner of Market and Fourth streets, northeast one hundred 
and seventy-five by one hundred and seventy, to Stevenson Street, for .$375,000. The Bank of 
California suspended on the 2b'th of this month, and for some days prior the money market hail 
been in an unsettled condition. The indications during the first part of the month were ex- 
cellent. September: Number of sales, 264; amount, $1,459,917. The number of buyers of 
small properties is larger this month than it was before the panic. The crash in the stock j '~4 
market and the temporary loss of confidence in the banks, helped along sales of this descrip- 
tion. October: Number of sales, 315; amount, $1,645,614. Small buyers are becoming still 
more numerous. A tract of thirteen acres of overflowed land at South Beach, was sold to 
Charles Crocker for railroad uses, for $90,000. November: Number of sales, 259; amount, 
$1,582,001. Although there is a great scarcity of money, there is no break in real-estate 
values. The sales of residence property continue to be the most prominent feature. The fol- 
lowing heavy sales are noted : west side Front, one hundred and forty-seven and a half feet, 
south of Pine, south thirty-six and three-fourths by one hundred thirty-seven and a half feet, 
$70,000; south corner Market and First, southwest sixty by eighty feet, $100,000. Deceml)er: 
Number of sales, 335; amount, $2,659,590. The heaviest transaction was the sale of the 
Mission Woolen Mills for $785,000. The following are noted: west side of Sansom, thirty-five 
and a half feet north of Pine, north thirty-one by eighty-seven and a half, $70,000 ; northeast 
corner Market and Front streets, one hundred feet on Market and one hundred and thirteen on 
Front, $75,000. 

The Outlook for 1876. — During the first quarter of the year 1876 there have been 1023 j Ir* 
sales, amounting to $5,692,060. There were scarcely any speculative sales of expensive busi- 
ness property, the class of buyers of properties worth from $1,000 to $7,000 having become 
very numerous. The sales in the Mission Addition are taking the lead. The sav-ings banks 
ha\"ing resumed the loaning of money for building purposes, a healthy tone pervades the 
market, and it is probable that the sales for the year will be as large as in 1875, after deducting 
the heavy purchases made by hicky operators in mining stocks, and the heavy transfers which ^ 
immediately preceded and followed the panic. *^ 

Property Values. — Prices on Market Street, from Third to Sixth, have advanced from 
twenty-five to sixty per cent, during the year. The quantity of business property sold for 
$3,000 per front foot, or even more, is quite large. The choicest residence property in San 
Francisco is within the district bounded by California, Market, Powell, and Leavenworth 
streets, and is worth from $225 to .$400 per front foot, with a depth of 137^ feet. 

Residence Property. — The Western Addition has advanced in a more rapid ratio than any 
other section of the city, and prices have increased from twenty to thirty-five per cent., and 
now range from $60 to $100 per front foot. At the Mission there have been more transfers, 
but not a proportionate increase of prices — a circumstance really fortunate for that portion of 
San Francisco. The number of small buyers has been greater than during any year in the pre- 
vious history of San Francisco ; the people are becoming owners of their own homes, hence the 
almost unprecedented extension of the city, which will be observ^ed in our review of the build- 
ing improvements for the year. 

Building Improvements. 

The value of buildings which were completed during the year 1875 is greater than ever before 
in the history of San Francisco. A considerable number of very costly structures, including 
the Palace Hotel, were begun in 1874, or earlier. The nature of the improvements is in the 
highest degree satisfactory. While the most grand and costly buildings ever constructed in 
this part of the world have been rising, there have been multitudes of comfortable dwellings 
springing up, and not a few of our millionaires have provided themselves with palatial man- 
sions. The notable feature of the year has been the great change that has taken place in the 
very heart of the city. Structures that a few years ago would have been considered as some- 
thing remarkable are now becoming so numerous as to scarcely attract attention, aud the ven- 
erable buildings that had satisfied our business men for the last fifteen or twenty years have 
been disappearing with a rapidity that must be disheartening to those who have an affectioflkte 
regard for "old landmarks." 

During the latter part of the year the Palace Hotel was finished and opened for the recep- 



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JAMES G-. STEELE & CO. dispense Prescriptions from Pure Medicines. 



San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant P.^ 



12 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



tion of guests. This building has a frontage of three hundred and fifty feet on New Montgom- 
ery Street, two hundred and seventy- live feet on Market, three hundred and fifty on Annie, 
and two hundred and seventy-five on Jessie, covering an area of ninety-six thousand two hun- 
dred and fifty square feet, or a trifle more than two and one-fifth acres. There entered into the 
construction of this building thirty-one million bricks, fifty-six thousand barrels of lime and 
cement, ten million feet of lumber, and three thousand three himdred tons of iron. It is seven 
stories high, and is probably the grandest and most elegant hotel in the world. It is the property 
of Wm. Hharon, United States senator from Nevada. The land cost .^l, 000,000; the building 
about .12,000,000. The cost of the furniture is upwards of half a million dollars additional. A 
volume of veiy respectable dimensions might be filled with interesting information about this 
marvel, a city in its completeness. Nothing is wanting that wealth can command or that can 
be obtained from the resources of science and art. 

Next in importance is the building of the Safe Deposit Company, on the southeast comer of 
Montgomei-y and California streets, having a frontage of one hundred and thirty-seven and one 
half feet on Montgomery and six hundred and eighty- three feet on California Street. The value 
of the ground, building, and vaults is in the neighborhood of .$1,500,000. The great steel vault 
is twenty-seven feet -wide, thirty-two feet long, and twelve feet high ; it weighs eight hundred 
thousand pounds, and is the most complete work of the kind in the world. It contains four 
thousaixd six hundred safes, of various sizes, rented at prices ranging from $2 to $20 per month. 
The cost of all the safes and vaults was .$207,000. The security against fire and thieves is as 
nearly perfect as it can be made by human ingenuity. With every known appliance it is esti- 
mated that it would require three weeks to make an opening through one of the waUs of the 
great vault. Its top, bottom, and sides can be readily inspected. There is a thoroughly organ- 
ized patrol, and telegraphic connection vrith the police headquarters at the Citj^ Hall. 

The Nevada Block, owned by Flood & O'Brien, is on Montgomery Street, between Pine and 
Summer, having a frontage on Montgomery Street of one hundred and twenty-five feet. The 
principal story is occupied by the Nevada Bank and the First National Gold Banlc The build- 
ing has been erected in the most substantial and elegant manner, equally capable of resisting fire 
and earthquake, at a cost of about $500,000. 

Wade's Opera House, on Mission Street, near Third, is a brick and iron building, having a 
frontage of one hundred and ten feet, and a depth of two hundred and seventy-five feet, and 
M-ith the land and fixtures cost upwards of $500,000. There are three front entrances to the 
theatre, one of them twenty-four feet wide, and each of the others thirteen feet wide. The 
auditorium is eighty-four feet in diameter, and it is sixty-eight feet from the ceiling of the dome 
to the floor of the parquet. There are seats for two thousand five hundred persons, without 
crowding. The stage is eighty by one hundred feet in size, and the distance from floor to roof 
is ninety-six feet. It is one of the largest and most elaborately constructed in America, and 
there are few, if any, theatres this side of the Atlantic, more complete in all of their appoint- 
ments. 

E. J. Baldwin is finishing a building at the junction of Market, Powell, and Ellis streets, 
having a frontage of two hundred and seventy-five feet on Powell Street, two hundred and ten 
feet on Market, and one hundred and thirty-seven and one half feet on Ellis Street. It is six 
stories high, and the value of the property is estimated at $800,000. A portion of the struc- 
ture will be used as a hotel, having five hundred rooms. It contains a theatre, now open, hav- 
ing seats for one thousand seven hundred people. The auditorium is one hundred and twenty- 
five by seventy-five feet in size. From the floor of the parquet to the ceiling of the dome the 
distance is sixty -five feet. In fitting up the theater there has been a lavish expenditure of 
money, and in the furnishing of the hotel elegance and convenience, not the cost, will be the 
ruling considerations. 

William Hood has erected, at a cost of about $200,000, the Commercial Hotel, a four-story 
structure, at the junction of Montgomery Avenue, Kearny and Pacific streets. 

Some exceedingly valuable improvements have been made upon Market Street, notably by 
the Cunningham estate, near Second, and the imposing brick block of D. 0. Mills, near Third. 
At the coi-ner of Sutter and Kearny streets, Milton S. Latham is completing a magnificent brick 
and Frearstone structure, at an expense of $310,000, to be named Thurlow Block. The bonanza 
millionaires have thrown a boldness and energy in building operations that has resulted in a 
great change in the appearance of the business part of the city. Men whose fortunes have been 
of slower growth would have hesitated about taking what seemed to be such great risks, and 
would never have built such splendid structures as are now rendering the city famous. 

The high land on Russian HiU has become the favorite locality for the costly residences of 
San Francisco millionaires. Ex-Governor Leland Stanford, President of the Central Pacific 
Railroad Company, has erected, at the comer of California and Powell streets, the most costly 
and magnificent dwelling in San Francisco, at a probable expense of nearly a million dollars. 
Charles Crocker, a director in the same company, has for some time been engaged in the erection 
of a house as valuable as that of ex-Govemor Stanford, directly opposite the residence of Gen- 
eral Colton. 

The number of dwelling houses ranging in value from $10,000 to $40,000, is very large, and 
the number of buildings of more moderate cost, erected during the year, is unprecedented. 



BEAMISH'S— Importer Purnishing Goods, Nucleus Bldg, cor. Third and Market, 



3. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Zearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY, 



13 



New Biiildliigrs is;5-76. 

The number of buildings erecteil and completed during the year ending February 29, 1876, 
is eighteen hundred and forty.* Of this num])er, forty. four are of brick. Included in the 
latter are the Palace Hotel, Nevada Block, Safe Deposit Block, Wade's Opera House, and 
several other extensive improvements commenced previous to, but completed during the period 
named. Of the wooden buildings erected, four-fifths are of one and two stories, principally 
used for dwellings. The remaining fifth includes a number of elegant and costly private 
residences, the most prominent of which is the commodious mansion of Gov. Leland Stanford, 
erected at an expense of .$1,000,000. The aggregate expense of these improvements is estimated 
at $12,500,000, an amount exceeding that of any other year in the city's history. 

Number of Buildings. — The number of buildings in the city and county is estimated at 
twenty-five thousand five hundred, of which four thousand three hundred and fifty are of brick. 
The Federal Census of 1870 returns the aggregate number at twenty -two thousand two hundred 
and sixty-six. 

Operations of tbe Real Estate Assoelates. 

The Real Estate Associates is an institution of a very singular character. It has undertaken 
the herculean task of buildmg up the city of San Francisco, and the evidences are everywhere 
apparent that it is earnestly prosecuting this commendable work. The company was organized 
ten years ago, with a small capital of .$120,000, which has been increased from time to time, 
until now it has reached .$1,000,000, all paid up, Vjesides having a large surplus. Originally, its 
operations were confined to the buying and selling of unimproved lands. But about five years 
ago the prescience of Mr. HoUis, the President and Manager of the institution since its forma- 
tion, induced him to try the experiment of building homes and selling them, either for cash or 
a long credit (upon the installment plan). The project was so novel, and beset with so many 
adverse surroundings, that few but the projector entertained a hope of its success as a regular 
business enterprise. Now, however, the sentiment prevails, and it is universallj^ admitted, 
that the corporation of T. Pi. E. A., imder the judicious direction of its head executive, has 
done more permanent good for the city and citizens of San Francisco, than its most sanguine 
well-wisher could have expected. Of the fifteen hundred families who have been furnished 
with homes, it is safe to say not over one third could have ever hoped to have owned a home 
had it not been for the facilities offered by this association. Its operations are now of immense 
magnitude, and there is not anything too small or too large that does not come ■nathin its com- 
pass. Its customers embrace many of our wealthy citizens and merchants, while the tradesman 
and artisan extend their full share of patronage, as is e^'idenced by the fact that the range in 
prices for a house and lot has thus far been from -$2,700 to -$27,000. The company will build 
any kind of a house, insisting on one condition — that the house be built on its own land. 
Though constantly invited to erect dwellings on lots owned by others, the proposition is stead- 
ily refused. Last year the association sold over three huncb'ed houses, at an aggregate value of 
nearly $2,000,000. It is now building and selling at the rate of a house per day. In the con- 
struction department the company has from tliree hundred to four hundred mechanics constantly 
employed, whose weekly wages amount to between .$8,000 and 810,000. All work is done by 
day labor, except plumbing, the several contracts for which amount to -$10,000 monthly. Be- 
tween .$30,000 and $40,000 per month is expended for lumber, and the bill for mill work foots 
up $1.5,000 additional. Smaller items embrace 82,000 monthly for glassware, .$2,500 for paints 
and oils, and about $3,000 for hardware. The company is in a very prosperous condition, and 
is constantly making purchases of suitable tracts of land. The disbursements on account of 
land purchases range from -$100,000 to -$150,000 monthly, and when it is understood that this 
means cash, some idea may be formed of the mammoth business of this corporation. 

The Outlook for 1876. 

The more notable improvements near the business center of the city were largely the result 
of the develoi^ment of the great wealth of the Nevada mines, and the sudden acquirement of 
colossal fortunes. The 5'ield of buUion is undiminished, and it must continue to make itself 
felt in the erection of improvements, but we cannot expect such a sudden inauguration of great 
enterprises at the present time. Many substantial and expensive structures are rearing their 
walls, however ; and, with the disappearance of the last traces of the financial troubles last Fall, 
there has been a healthy re\aval, and the progress for 1876 promises to be greater than during 
any of the years preceding the bonanza developments. One of the more prominent structures 
now in course of erection is the new building of the San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board, 
on Pine Street. It is to be four stories high ; its frontage is to be seventy-seven and one half 
feet, and its depth one hundred and thirty-seven and one half feet. It will be unsurpassed for 
elegance and adajjtability to its intended purposes, and the matter of expense %vill be a second- 
ary consideration. There seems to be no diminution in the number of dwelling houses com- 



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* The returns of the Spring Valley Water Works for the year endin;? December 31, 187-5, show that one thousand 
five hundred and ei^'hty-eii^ht new taps were made, and it is estimated that the number of new buildings from which 
no orders were received, will more than overbalance the orders from old ones. — Compiler. 



JAMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 



D. "W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



14 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



mencecl from week to week. The sand hills in the Western Addition are rapidly clisappearing, 
and rows of comfortal)le houses are taking their places, while there is greater activity at the 
^lission than has been seen there for years before. 

Improvement of Streets. 

From July 1, 1856, to July 1, 1875, the City of San Francisco and its citizens hare expended 
812,754,759.72 for the grading, paving, and sewering of streets. The total length of sewers con- 
structed is 74. 37 miles. Sewers of an aggregate length of three hundretl and ninety-two thou- 
sand seven hundred and nine feet four inches, were built last year ; and the cost of street work 
for the year was .S603,492.32. The cost of sweeping the streets is .S5,620 per month, or .^67,440 
per annum, and the total cost of sweeping and repairs was .?158,927.71, paid from the Street 
Fund. The cost of tools, work in front of public property, and of repaving accepted streets, was 
.^129,084. 97 additional. The enormous amoimt of money expended by the city has by no means 
been used to the best advantage. The plan of sewerage was defective and it was reserved for 
the present local administration to take proper steps to secure plans (an appropriation of 
.slO,000 has been authorized for this pui-pose by the Legislature of the State at its last session) 
that will meet the present and prospective wants. The mistakes of the past have been followed 
with most disastrous results, and the costly experience of the last twenty years will doubt- 
less cause a more judicious expenditure of the people's money hereafter. The lighting of 
streets and repairing of street lamps cost !§273,501, thus making a total expense of $1,165,006 
for the improvement and care of the streets of San Francisco for the last fiscal year. 

Public Bnlldlnss. 

The New Mint stands upon the northwest comer of Mission and Fifth streets, fronting one 
hundred and sixty and one half feet on the former and two hundred and seventeen and one 
sixth feet on the latter. The building is two stories high, besides the basement. The parapet 
walls are fifty-six feet high ; the pediment seventy-five, and the two chimLueys each one hundi-ed 
and forty-two feet. The fonn of the building is a hollow parallelogram, one hundred and two 
and one half feet by forty-three and thi-ee quartei's, paved with flagging. The foundation is of 
concrete, five feet deep, laid in the most substantial manner. The basement walls are of the 
hardest sun-burned brick, three feet thick, with a face of Rocklin granite one foot thick. The. 
upper walls are also of brick and of the same material, faced with blue-gray sandstone twelve 
inches thick. The floor girders are wrought-iron beams, twelve inches deep. The floors are 
arched with brick between the beams ; leveled above with concrete, then flagged. The wains- 
cot, door, and window frames, shutters, columns, ornamental work, and the back stairs, are all 
of iron. The broad, lofty front stairs on the Fifth Street front, are of Rocklin granite. The 
doors and window sashes, golden mahogany; the counters and furniture of Honduras mahog- 
any ; the window glass of French plate ; door fittings of brass ; the flat-link sash-weight chains 
are copper, and the roof covered with copper, tinned on both sides. Six solid fluted columns, 
massive and lofty, give beauty and grandeur to the main entrance on Fifth Street. The style 
of architecture is the Doric. 

A particular description of the location and especial purpose of each room, with the peculiar 
elaborate machinery contained therein, would fiU a volume. Much of the costly machinery is 
of the most massive description in its proportions and solidity, and finished with the finest pos- 
sible mathematical nicety. As is not generally known, the San Francisco Mint is no longer a 
Branch Mint, even in name. Nearly two years since it was erected into the fuU dignity of an 
independent establishment. In fact, when one considers the magnitude of the business done 
within its waUs, it would seem that in respect to this, and most important of all particulars, 
aU the other mints in the country might more properly be ranked as branches of this. Its 
coinage of gold and silver during 1875, up to December 31, was : Gold — one million two hun- 
dred and thirty thousand double eagles, worth $24,600,000; nine thousand half eagles, worth 
.^5,000; eleven thousand six hundred quarter eagles, worth $29,000; total, .$24,674,000. 
Silver — four million four hundred and eighty-seven thousand trade dollars, worth $4,487,000 ; 
three million two hundred thousand half dollars, worth $1,600,000; six hundred and eighty 
thousand quarter dollars, worth $170,000; one million one hundred and fifty-five thousand 
twenty cent pieces, w-orth .$231,000; nine million and seventy thoiisand dimes, worth .$907,000; 
total, .$7,395,000; thus making the total coinage for the year, .$32,069,000. The total amount 
coined since the opening of a mint in 18-54, is: Gold, .$390,427,200 ; Silver, $19,175,400. The 
coinage for the quarter ending March 31, 1876, amounts to $9,007,500, an increase over the 
corresponding quarter of 1875 of .$2,489,500. 

During the year 1875, the refining department has been placed in operation. Its capacity 
is about one million ounces per month, an amount frequently insufiicient to meet the demands 
for its ser\aces. Charges for refining : three hundred parts gold and less, 2i cents ; three hun- 
dred and a half parts gold to six hundred thousand, 4 cents ; six hundred and a half p;irts gold 
to seven hundred and fifty thousand, 6 cents ; seven hundred and fifty and a half parts ^old 
and over, 8 cents. When necessary, outside establishments are employed to assist the L . S. 
Mint in its refining department. 

The United States Appraiser's Building. — Upon the west haU of the block bounded 



Smithsonian Medical and Hygienic Institute, 635 Cal., B.J. SMITH, M.D., Proptr. 



'4 . P. VAU SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, EstaTDlished 1861 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 



15 



by Washington, Sansom, Jackson, and Battery streets, commonly known as the Post-office 
Block, stands, or has begun to stand, the new United States Appraiser's Building. Its length, 
on Sansom Street, is two hundred and sixty-five feet and six inches ; its depth from west to 
east, along both Washington and Jackson streets, one hundred and twenty feet and six inches ; 
its height is to be three full stories above a lofty basement. The material is what is known 
among tlie builders of this coast as Xapa stone, from the locality of its most abundant quarries. 
It appears to be a kind of metamorphic granite. Only the basement and the first floor are to 
be used as appraiser's stores ; the two upper stories are intended for occupation by the United 
States courts. The basement, nine feet and three inches in the clear, and first and second 
stories, are already completed, or are so nearly so that the third floor is fully laid. The base- 
ment wall rests upon a bed of solid concrete, five feet wide and as many deep. The material 
is broken rock firmly bedded in the best Roseudale cement. This was laid in courses about 
eight inches thick or deep, and each course was thorouglily tamped down into the utmost 
obtainable solidity. The first floor consists of arches of brick turned between deep and strong 
iron beams. Among the closing acts of the last Congress was the passage of a bill appropri- 
ating 8150,000 for the continuation of work upon this building. The progress of this immense 
and valuable building has been greatly delayed by the unexpected, yet almost imperative, 
necessity of changing the material of the outer walls from stone to pressed brick with granite 
sills, a very considerable modification of the original design. Gen. Samuel McCullough, Super- 
intendent of Construction of United States Buildings in California, the same who completed 
the United States Mint for SoO,000 within the appropriation therefor, has charge of this. 
Under his economical administration, masterly management, and watchful care, it bids fair to 
rank among the most faithfully and substantially-constructed Government buildings ever 
erected. 

Xew U. S. Sub-Treasury. — A building is now being erected on the site of the old Mint, 
on Conunercial Street, of the same style of architecture as the U. S. Appraiser's Building, of 
pressed brick, with granite sills, at an estimated cost of §90,000, of which a small appropriation, 
§35,000, has already been made. It was the original intention to repair the old Mint, but on 
examining the building, it was found so defective, and that the cost of repairing it would have 
exceeded the cost of a new buUding, that it was finally determined to j)ull it doAvn and erect 
the new building, of which the basement is completed. 

The Post-office still occupies its old, insufficient, and inconveniently-located quarters on 
the eastern half of the block, bounded by Washington, Battery, and Jackson streets. Here it 
is horizontally sandwiched between the basement and upper story, both of which the Custom 
House appropriates. The Postmaster, Gen. Coey, with his customary zeal and efficiency is still 
multiplying all possible conveniences for the accommodation of the two hundred and thirty 
thousand people to whom his is by far the most important of all the Federal offices. His small 
army of employes, already numbering one hundred and twenty, can hardly be recruited fast 
enough to equal the constantly-increasing demand upon their indispensable ser\aces. Between 
forty and fifty find amjjle employment in the in-door service ; upward of thirty are postal clerks 
or stage agents, and forty-two are employed in the distribution and collection of written 
and printed mail matter throughout the city. The number of letters and postal cards deliv- 
ered during the year 1875 was four million seven hundred thousand ; collected, five million six 
hundred thousand. Newspapers delivered, one million two hundred thousand ; collected, eight 
hundred and twenty thousand. The muitiplication of the iron postal boxes, placed at conven- 
ient intervals within and to even beyond the corporate limits of the city, proves an indispensa- 
ble public convenience, and, in fact, an almost inestimable public benefit in saving to our citizens 
the thousands of daily journeys to the Post-office, wliich, under the former system, they were 
necessarily compelled to make several times a day. Yet, although the ser^^ce of the carrier 
department is so frequent and efficient, the two thousand three hundred post-office boxes still 
used, directly or indirectly, by upward of sixteen thousand persons, show that a very consid- 
erable portion of our citizens still prefer their conveniences. The number of letters dispatched 
daily by the regular Overland Mail is between three and four thousand, while the State and 
Coast Mail is nearly five times as great. The mails to China and Japan carry six thousand let- 
tei-s a month ; those to Australia, five thousand ; to the West Coast of Central and South 
America, four thousand ; to the Sandwich Islands, four thousand ; to British America and 
Alaska, two thousand. Thus, the grand aggregate of letters annually dispatched from the San 
Francisco Post-office rises to between seven and eiyht million ! These figures, the reader will 
remember, make no account of the almost equally immense number of letters received ; nor of 
the hundreds of tons of papers and other mailable matter which the successive relays of day 
and night forces of clerks annually handle. Among the more particular statistics of letters, 
may be specified the two hundred dead letters which form the daily average sent hence ; regis- 
tered letters, nearly one hundred ; money orders, one hundred and thirty per day; of the latter, 
about two hundred and twenty-five a month, for sums averaging about $35 each, go to Germany. 
The value of stamps sold during 1875 was §400,276. Besides the making up and forwarding of 
the immense mails already described, the San Francisco office receives all the surplus money 
order funds of the other Post-offices upon this coast, averaging over §30,000 a week. It also 
sends out to other offices about §10,000 a month, to enable them to cash postal money orders 
drawn upon them. Gen. Coey's right-hand man is Assistant Postmaster William C. Dougherty, 



JAMES G. STEELE & CO., mamifacturers of Steele's California Perfumea 



Jewelry Manufactory, "Wholesale and Retail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merclia 



16 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 



whose record of continuous service in the Department dates back to 1843. Of these thirty- three 
consecutive years he has spent the last twelve in responsible positions comiected with the office 
in this city. Gen. Coey's previous exi)erience in the same capacity, his well-known energy and 
careful attention to details, with that rare tact which inclines him not only to gratify, but, as 
far as practicable, to anticipate every public want, combine to make him exceedingly efficient 
and popular. 

The Custom House. — The Custom House has for many years been overcrowded, and there 
will be a great relief felt by employees, merchants, and shipmasters, when the removal of the 
Appraiser's quarters to a new building will leave the miich needed space. A few of its statistics 
for 1875 will convey a fail* idea of its importance, and of the volume of business transacted on the 
Pacific Coast. During the year 1875, the total clearances of American vessels for domestic jiorts 
were four hundred and seven, with a tonnage of three hundred and sixteen thousand two hundred 
and nine tons ; of foreign vessels for domestic ports, thirty-four, with a tonnage of thirty-three 
thousand six hundred and twenty ; of American vessels for foreign ports, three hundred and 
forty, with a tonnage of four hundred and twenty-six thousand seven hundred and eighty -four 
tons ; foreign vessels for foreign ports, two hundred and sixty-one, with a tonnage of two 
hundred and ninety-eight thousand seven hundred and ninety-three tons ; besides these twelve 
American vessels, with a total tonnage of four thousand six hundred and fifty-one tons, and 
two foreign vessels, with a tonnage of two hundred and fifty-one tons, cleared for whaling ; and 
thirteen American vessels, of nine hundred and forty -three tons burden, cleared for fishing and 
sealing voyages. The total number of arrivals, in the same year, was four thousand three 
hundred and fifty, representing a gross tomiage of one million five hundred and ninety thousand 
one hundred and forty-eight tons. 

The United States Marine Hospital — Is a very complete hospital establishment, built 
on the pavilion plan, and equipped with all the modern appliances which science and art have 
devised for the treatment of disease. To this hospital are admitted only persons employed on 
merchant vessels, and a tax is imposed by the Government upon the class of seamen benefitted 
by the hospital, which now nearly maintains it. The United States only pro^ddes in marine 
hospitals for all merchant seamen sick or disabled who may be restored to sea-going ability 
within a reasonable time ; but does not proA"ide for those crippled and permanently disabled for 
the seaman's vocation. This hospital is located at Mountain Lake, west of First Avenue, and 
is now reached by the north end of First Avenue. During this year, it is expected that 
California Street will be opened to a point near the hospital grounds. The Sutter Street 
line of cars, to the corner of California Street and Cemetery Avenue, is the public conveyance 
nearest to the hospital. The town office is at 715 Clay Street, corner of Kearny ; Dr. C. N. 
Ellinwood, Surgeon. 

The Army, Navy, etc. — The military and other offices of the Federal service, numbering 
several scores in all, are not accommodated in any government building especially provided for 
them, but occupy rented offices in the most convenient locations available. 

State Buildings or Offices. — Although several state officials necessarily have their offices 
in this city, the State has not yet provided any special building for their accommodation. The 
various Commissioners, Inspectors, and Agents, rent offices as convenient as possible to the 
respective locations of their several occupations. Should the reader have any special desii-e to 
know where these are he can easily ascertain by referring to the proper place in the general 
directory. 

Municipal Buildings. — Of these the most important as the local capitol and seat of the 
municipal offices, is the City Hall. In respect to this, her governmental building, San Fran- 
cisco is just now in that transition state in which she partly has two, and completely has none. 

The Old City Hall, long familiar to every resident for any considerable- time, occupies the 
southwest corner of the block bounded by Washington, Montgomery, Merchant, and Kearny 
streets. It is of brick, stuccoed. For inconvenience of arrangement and insufficiency of accom- 
modation it stands pre-emment. Several of the entrances are blind and roundabout, and few, 
if any of them, are broad or light enough. Many of the important offices are exceedingly bad 
in themselves, both with regard to their situation relatively to each other, as well as for ready 
access by the general public. In addition to these objections, they are ill-lighted, and poorly 
ventilated. 

New City Hall. — Occupies the site formerly known as Yerba Buena Park, at the junction of 
Market and Van Ness Avenue. Its construction was commenced in September, 1871, under 
an Act of the Legislature, approved April 4, 1870, upon an estimated expenditure for the 
entire building of .fl, 500, 000. The total expenditures under the operations of the Commission- 
ers, appointed under the Act before its repeal, March 30, 1874, was $1,400,000 ; since the latter 
date the control of its operations has been placed in charge of a Committee of Supervisors, 
with authority to close up the business of the old Board of Commissioners, to liquidate all 
unsettled claims, and to adopt the necessary measures to preserve and protect building, 
grounds, etc. That portion of the building loiOMai as the Hall of Records, is in an advanced 
state, and it is estimated that an additional sum of .$50,000, will entirelj'^ complete it. This 
building, in its construction, is most admirably adapted for the purposes for which it was 
designed ; it is fire - proof throughout, and is supplied with evwy facility for the rapid 
transaction of business and for the convenience of those engaged therein. The Legislature, at 



BEAMISH'S— Shirt manufacturer, Nucleus Building, corner Third and Markell 



f . VAN SCHAACK & CO., 70S, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 17 



its last session, passed an Act, approved April 3, 1876, axithorizing the Board of Supervisors, 
in the event that they deem it expedient, to continue the construction of the building, to levy 
and collect annually, commencing with the fiscal year 187(), and for the following four years, 
a tax on real and personal property of the city, 15 cents on each $100 of value, the money 
arising therefrom to be called the Js^ew City Hall Fund, out of which shall be paid all claims for 
labor, materials, etc. The Act creates the Mayor, Auditor, and City and County Attorney, a 
Board of Commissioners to carry on the work according to the original plan, each of whom is 
to receive a salary of §100 a month; they shall appoint a Superintendent, at a salary of $200 a 
month ; an Architect, $300 a month ; and a Secretary, $150 a month. 

The Jail, upon the north side of Broadway Street, between Kearny and Dupont, now 
quite convenient to the Old Citj^ Hall. As in most of the larger American cities, petit larceny, 
misdemeanor, and vagrancy, with assault and battery, or others of the minor offences, con- 
stitute the causes for which fully five sixths of all convicts find their way within its walls. 

The Industkial School. — This juvenile jail, the primary department of our municipal 
reformatory institutions, occiapies a lieautiful and healthful suburban location on the San Jose 
Road, betwen five and six miles southwest of the City Hall. Its dimensions, accommodations, 
and general condition remain unchanged since last year except by the addition of a large stable. 
As a pleasing proof of the gradual progress of this institution we note the fact, as shown by 
successive reports, that the number of youth committed by their parents for unmanagability, 
and, especially, the number of those recommitted, annually diminishes. In the distinctively 
reformatory department its management continues that firm, quiet, and thoroughly-etiicient 
discipline which waj^ward youth most need, while the various industrial occupations, both out- 
doors and in, continue as varied and general as the public appropriation permits, constantly 
demonstrating, if demonstration were needed, the indispensable value of profitable industry in 
the reclamation of \acious youth. According to the report of the Superintendent for the last fiscal 
year, there were two hundred and twenty-two inmates — one hundred and sixty-six boys and 
fifty-six girls. There were two hundred and twenty -five commitments to the institution during 
the year. The cost of maintaining the school was $42,401.19, and for maintaining girls at the 
Magdalen Asylum, .'j;9,036, or a total of $57,957.19, for the support of this department. 

The House of Correction. — Upon the same lot as the Industrial School Building, and 
about a huntb-ed yards northeast of it, the New House of Correction is situated. It has 
the general form of a hexagon, with projecting wings in front and at each adjoining side. The 
diameter of the main buikling is ninety-two feet ; the dimensions of each wing forty -four feet by 
one hmnlred and thirty-seven. The foundation and basement walls are of stone ; the remain- 
ing three stories of brick. The contract for its erection was awarded to Dennis Jordan, for 
$123,000, gold coin, in September, 1874. Messrs. Bugbee & Son, architects. On the first floor 
of the hexagonal building is the guards' room, ninety-two feet in diameter, commanding a view 
of every cell door in the two wings. There is a workshop, forty-four by one hundred and 
thirty-seven, in the northwest wing. There are two hundred cells, five by six feet on the floor, 
and eight feet high, to be occupied by one person only. The doors are of open iron work, and 
admit sutiicient air, it is claimed, although it seems to be an act of needless cruelty to confine 
an.y human being, no matter what his offence may be, in a cell containing only two hundred and 
forty culjic feet of air. As we close our compilations, the Supervisors are arranging for the 
organization and the immediate opening of this institution. 

The City and County Hospital is located in the southern part of the city, on a lot 
bounded by Nevada, Sierra, and Nebraska streets, and Potrero Avenue, and containing about 
ten acres. The main building faces the west, the entrance being on Potrero Avenue, which 
runs nearly north and south. All the buildings are of wood with brick basements, except the 
kitchen and laundry which are wholly of brick. The different buildings are : The administrative 
and dining hall buildings, each three stories high, situated in the center of the block opposite 
each other on either side of the covered corridor, which runs lengthwise of the premises ; the 
kitchen and laundry, back of the diniiig rooms ; the gate house, stable, morgue, operating rooms, 
etc., conveniently located in various places, and, lastly, six long pavilions, each two stories 
high, and designed to accommodate sixty -four patients with their nurses. These will contain, 
with the most generous allowance for space, three hundred and eighty-four patients, and are 
considered amply sufficient for present purposes. It is designed, eventually, to have twelve 
pavilions built in pairs on either side of the corridor, and parallel with the main building. 

Alms House. — In 1867 the erection of such an institution became imperatively necessary 
in order to relieve the City and County Hospital of the permanently disabled and superan- 
nuated who had accumulated for years, and a large, substantial, and commodious wooden build- 
ing was erected for this purpose near Lake Honda. The house will accorumodate five hundred 
persons, and up to the present time has proved amply sufficient to meet the public want, the 
average daUy number of inmates, during the past year, having been less than four hundi'ed. 

New School Houses. 

The Board of Supervisors have expended most of the funds derived from the sale of $200,- 
300 of bonds, in the erection of the following school buildings : 

Greenwich Street Primary. — This is situated on a fifty- vara lot on the south side of 



ru TAMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists, removed to ITo. 316 Kearny St. 



San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merohai 



18 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTOEY, 



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Greenwich Street, between Jones and Taylor streets. The building has a frontage of fifty-one ' 
and two thirds feet, and a depth of seventy-nine and seven twelfths feet. There are two ^nngs, 
thirteen by thirty-five feet, for halls of entrance. It is three stories high. There are accom- 
modations for seven hundred and twenty pupils. Contract price, $29,500. 

South Cosmopolitan Grammar School. — An eighteen class building has been erected on 
the fifty vara lot on the soiith side of Eddy Street, between Polk Street and Van Ness Avenue. 
Its dimensions are the same as those of the preceding building, and in addition there are two 
wings thirty-eight by thirty-five feet in size. It seats one thousand pupils and cost !i^37,000. 

Mission School. — The old Mission school house has been removed to the rear portion of 
the lot and thoroughly repaired. A twelve class building has been erected on Mission Street, 
with seats for twelve hundred grammar and primary pupils, at a cost of $28,000. 

Geary Street School. — A building, similar to the Greenwich Street Primary, has been \tm 
erected on a portion of Hamilton Square fronting upon Geary Street. There are accommoda- 
tions for seven hundred grammar pupils. Cost of building, $26,500. 

RiNCON School. — The old Pincon school building has been removed to the western portion 
of the lot on which it stood, raised one story, and made into a twelve class building, with room 
for seven hundred primary pupils. A new edifice has been erected in this lot, forty- eight by 
seventy-eight and one fourth feet in size, with two wings for halls of entrance, thii'teen by 
thirty-five feet in size. These two buddings will seat thirteen hundred pupils. The cost of jcr- 
repairing the old one was $3,990 ; of building the new one, $31,937. 

Lincoln Primary. — Upon a lot on Bryant Street, near Sixth, the Board of Education has 
erected an elegant twelve class edifice similar to the Rincon grammar building, with seats for 
seven hundred and twenty pupils. Contract price, $28,794. The lot cost $20,000. It is 
ninety by two hundred and seventy -five feet in size, and aff'ords ample room for the erection of 
another school house. 

Boys' High School. — This is a plain and substantial building on a fifty vara lot on the 
north side of Sutter Street, between Octavia and Gough. The building is fifty-one and seven ana 
twelfths by seventy-nine and one twelfth feet in size. The session rooms are all twenty -four 
and seven twelfths by thirty-three feet in dimension, and those upon the third story are con- 
nected by sliding doors, and can be thrown into one large hall for general exercises. Contract Ijob 
price, $37,400. 

Other School Houses and Enlargements. — Another story has been added to the Spring Lji 
Valley Grammar School, giving four more rooms. Cost, $11,525. 

A one story building has been erected at the corner of Noe and Temple streets, capable of 
accommodating two hundred and forty primary pupils, at a cost of $7,297.50. Lfep 

The buildings erected have cost $258,146, and wdl accomodate 6,700 pupils. ifflyl 

perat 

Street Railroads. poic 

icirc 
The population of San Francisco is scattered over a large area, and an abundance of fresh air jjjj, 

and sunshine is thus assured. To this fact, in no inconsiderable degree, the city is indebted for ^j], 
its low death rate. The consti'uction of street cars enables the toiling masses to reside in local- j, 
ities where the cost of land is small and where each may become the owner of the house that |, 
shelters him. This modern means of transportation is one of the greatest blessings of the times, 
and has been more potent than anything else in improving the health and purifying the morals 
of communities. But for our street railroads, the central part of the city would be densely 
populated, while its outskirts would remain almost uninliabited. What is now within the reach 
of everybody, would be a luxury, to be enjoyed only by the more opulent. 

The street railroads of San Francisco are of an aggregate length of forty-nine miles, and as 
most of the companies have double tracks over the principal part of their routes, there is not 
less than ninety miles of track in daily use. Exact information has been given us by some of X ■ 
the companies, but not by all of them. We find, however, that the total number of passengers 
carried during the year 1875, was about thirty mdlious ; that there are two hundred and fifty 
cars in use, one thousand seven hundred and twenty-nine horses owned by the companies, and 
six hundred and ten men employed. Six out of the eight companies are connected with the ^^^t 
ferry landing at the foot of Market Street. Their branches extend to every part of the city 
where there is a prospect of obtaining a fair amount of business, and in many cases extensions 
to unimproved localities have been secured by property-owners, and have thus induced popula- 
tion by rendering them accessible. 

The Central Railroad Co. owns two main lines, both double track. One runs from the 
water front, on Vallejo Street near Front, to the junction of Eighth and Brannan streets — two 
miles and seven eighths ; the other, from Taylor Street, between Eddy and Turk, to the junc- 
tion of Post Street and Cemetery Avenue, Lone Mountain — two miles and a quarter. There 
are also ferry cars running to the foot of Market Street, connecting with the company's other 
lines at the junction of Market and Sansom streets. Total length of both lines, with sidings, 
five miles and one eighth. A branch track from the corner of Turk and Fillmore streets, 
through Turk, Devisadero and Fell streets, to the new Golden Gate Park — one mile — is in 
process of construction, and will be completed, stocked, and operated as soon as the Park Ijecomes 
sufiiciently attractive. The company had in 1875 twenty-four cars in regular daily use, sixteen 



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kailri 



Smithsonian Medical Institute treats Hheumatic and Chronic Diseases, 635 Ca 



"^ . VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 711, and 716 Kearny, Estatlislied 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 19 



* a the City Front Line, and eight on the Lone Mountain Line — all of the usual pattern, seat- 
ig twenty-two passengers each. It has ninety employes upon its rolls, and owns and works 
.vo hundred and twenty horses. Tlie conductors and drivers, one to each car, receive 
■oiu .^'2.50 to §2. 75 a day. In fare, the company ailheres to the rate of four tickets 
ir a "quarter," and exacts ten cent.s for a single fare. Passengers who desire, receive a transfer 
■om either line to the other without extra expense. In 1875 this road carried an aggregate of 
bout tliree million five hundred thousand passengers, making its gross earnings amount to 
216,000. 

The City Railroad Co., commonly called " Woodward's," from the name of its principal, 
' not exclusive, owner, or " Mission Street," from the name of the street upon which most of 
£ property lies, owns and operates one double track, main line — " The Mission Route " — from 
ae corner of Steuart and Mission streets, straight along the latter to Twenty-sixth Street, a 
istance of three miles ; and one branch line — " The City Route" — mostly double track, from 
P^oodward's Gardens, Mission Street, between Thirteenth and Fourteenth, through Mission, 
ifth, Market, Dupont, and Sutter streets, to the Oakland Ferry. This line is noted 
)r ha\dng first introduced the "l)ob-tail," or light, one-horse car, seating but fourteen, 
aving no conductor, but requiring each passenger to deposit his o^vn fare or ticket — which 
e obtains of the driver through a small brass gate swinging horizontally in the front 
oor — in a patent receiver viith glass front and Vjack, and a tipping bottom from which, 
y pulling a strap, the driver slips or drops each fare or ticket as soon as deposited, 
ito a metal box below, which is unlocked and emptied of its contents once each round 
ip by the secretary or his agent, as the car passes the depot or the office. This company owns 
jrty cars, besides a number of large, open cars for summer excursions ; two hundred and 
(venty horses, and regularly employs thirty-five drivers, at §2. 50 per day. It sells four tick- 
ts for twenty-five cents, and charges ten cents a single fare, keeps its cars cleaner and better 
ghted, runs them oftener and faster, and, upon the whole, pleases the general public better 
ban any other line. During 1S75 it carried about four million of passengers. 

The Clay Street Hill Railroad Co. is remarkable for combining steam and horse power 
the traction of its cars. The exceeding steepness of the grade along the first seven 
locks from its eastern terminus westward, in some parts being one foot in six, renders it 
rholly impracticable, if not quite impossible, for any ordinary span of horses to pull np even 
i he smallest cars and the lightest loads. In this juncture the ingenious and enterprising com- 
an}^, encouraged by energetic citizens li^^ng upon the adjacent heights or o\^Tiing adjacent 
iropcrt}', became the pioneers in the emplojonent of a steam engine acting upon an endless 
.ndergrouud steel-wire cable, by which to draw loaded cars up the grade swiftly, smoothly, and 
afely. At the top of the grade stands a stationary engine of thirty-five horse power. This 
■perates hea^'y machinery, which steadily winds the ■wire cable at a uniform rate, in one direction, 
p one track and down the other. This rope cable is of the best steel wire, upward of three inches 
tt circumference, about one mile and three eighths long, and weighs nearly five tons. The cars 
eceive the motive power through tenders or dummies, coupled to them in front and provided 
pith strong gripping-clamps or grippers which reach down through a narrow continuous slit or 
lot nearly under the center of the car, and firmly grip the cable which instantly communicates 
ts motion to both tender and car. They stop by releasing their grip upon the running cable 
teneath and remain stationary, or avoid running down hill by four strong brakes which, 
nstead of acting directly upon the wheels as usual, present four long, flat surfaces which, when 
(ushed squarely down upon the track exert a friction which proves amply sufficient to hold 
hem securely in place without the least sign of slipping under even the heaviest load. Judg- 
ng by the throngs of spectators and passengers for months after the opening of this road, it 
ras for a long time an open question whether it was the greater mechanical curiosity or muni- 
ipal convenience. The steep grade, up and do-mi which the company employs steam i)ower, 
xtends from the inner or city end, at the comer of Clay and Kearny streets, to Leavenworth 
street, a distance of seven blocks, or nearly three qiiarters of a mile ; thence to the outer or 
uburban terminus, nearly two miles, the cars are drawn by horses in the usual manner. Among 
;he minor conveniences of this line, the public notice with pleasure^that it was the first and, 
hus far, remains the only one which pro"V"ides its cars with clocks, and keeps them, like the 
tther equipments of the line, always in excellent running order and sharply ' ' on time. " Mechan- 
cally and financially, the road has jiroved a gratifying success to its ingenious and enterprising 
)rojectors and owners. This company also, as well as the Central, proposes to extend its line 
hrough Claj^ Street and First Avenue to the Golden Gate Park at as early a day as an obvious 
public demand shall justify the expense. The present working force is thirty-three men, 
wenty-two horses, and fourteen cars. Five tickets for a " quarter ;" single fares at same rate. 
'• During the whole period of its operation, since September, 1873, the road has carried over three 
^ niUion two hundred and fifty thousand passengers without accident of any kind. At present 
ts daily travel averages about four thousand three hundred, and the consumption of coal, 
>! lixteen hundred poumls. A new steel rope was put in on December 12, 1875 ; the old rope 
'■< lad run two years and four months, traveled sixty-four thousand two hundred miles, and raised 
1 ive hundred and fortj-^-two thousand five hundred tons of dead weight three hundred and seven 
5 :eet high. As far as known it is the only road of the kind not only in the United States but 
n n the world. 



' In 



STEELE'S Glycerine Lotion cures Tan, Sunburn, Eruptions, etc. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Ilontgomery cor. Mercha: '■ ■ 



20 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



niai 
Mil Ik 



The Market Street Horse Railway Co. 's main line begins in Market Street, near th< "V 
water front, and runs along Market and Valencia streets to Twenty-sixth Street, nearly four miles "'' ' 
over a fine double track the whole distance. Its Hayes VaUey branch runs from the junctioi "' 
of Market and Hayes streets, through Hayes, Laguna, and five other streets, to the comer o J^ 
OTarrell and Devisadero streets, nearly two miles. Since August, 1874, the cars of this rout(*' 
have been running as a separate line from the water-front terminus at the foot of Market Street * 
direct to the terminus above named, thus avoiding the former inconvenience of changing cara a ^f 
the Hayes Valley junction. Upon both lines the company now runs about forty cars, employ; *^ ' 
one hundred and sixty men, and owns four hundred horses. It sells four tickets for twenty -fivi ' 
cents. Its cars are of unusual width and superior ventilation, and make quick time. ' 

The North Beach and Mission I1.4.ilroad Co. i-uns two main, double-track lines, ha^^nJ ^ 
a general direction at right angles to each other and intersecting at the comer of Fourth anf '^, 
Folsom streets, where either transfers to the other without extra charge. The one commoid^ ^ 
called the City Route, has its southern terminus on Fourth Street, corner of Townsend, at thi *™' 
offices of the Central, Southern Pacific, and California Pacific Railway companies, whence i ^^ 
extends through Fourth and Kearny and other important streets to the junction of Mason am ""■* 
Francisco streets, North Beach, a distance of two and seven eighths miles. The other, more gene ^^• 
rally known as the Mission Route, runs from the corner of Kearny and California streets, dow] ' "" 
the latter to and along Battery Street, through First and along Folsom to Twenty-sixth Street ■''*' 
its southerly terminus, about three miles and three quarters. Total length of both Unes, al '*'" 
double track, six and five eighths miles. On both lines the company regularly runs lietweei ^^, 
thirtj^ and forty cars, owns two hundred and fifty horses, emplo5^s a hundred and thirty men *^' 
pays its conductors and drivers .§2.50 a day, sells four tickets for a "quarter," and charge"''^' 
ten cents for a single ticket. During 1875 it transported five million passengers. Its gros "i" 
receipts for the same period were about .iti2ul,453. "'■ ' 

The Omnibus Railroad Co. , like several others, has its two routes, or main double-tracl i*" 
lines. The first, or City Route, commonly called the North Beach and South Park Line, has it f"'^ 
southern terminus at the foot of Third Street, near the water front, whence it runs in a generall; ^ 
northerly direction along Third Street, through Howard, Second, Montgomery, or Sansom ""W 
Jackson, Montgomery Avenue, Stockton, and Powell streets, to the junction of the latterwith Ba; '">* 
Street, three mUes in all. A branch line runs along Market Street, from its junction with Mont "*' 
gomery, to the Oakland Ferry. Going northerly the cars of this line run from Second to Wash ^i" 
ington streets through Montgomery, but when returning, drive from Washington to Second street i*^" 
through Sansom, until noon. During the afternoon they reverse this an-angement, and in tin ^'' 
evening they run through Montgomery Street only in both directions. Between Sansom or Mont i™ 
gomery and Stockton streets the cars go westerly up Jackson Street, over a grade so steep tha iy«* 
the company employs twelve of its horses as extras, or tow-horses, to help the regular spam <^^' 
up this most difficult pitch attempted by any horse-line in the city. Returning, the can ^ 
make their easterly transit from Stockton to Montgomery Street, by going down Washing '•'•a 
ton Street. A branch line, single track, extends from Third Street, easterly, down Brannai wl] 
Street to the Pacific Mad. Steamship Co. 's Docks, conveying passengers to and from the mail istinj 
City Line mthout extra expense. The other main line of this companj' — the Mission Route— mi 
starts from Montgomery Street, between Jackson and Washington, and runs, over a doubltHQi 
track, southerly, through Montgomery Street, along Market Street to Third, through Thin mi 
Street to Howard, along which, westerly and then southerly, it finishes its course at thi Hi,f 
corner of Twenty-sixth Street, three and one half miles from its opposite terminus. The com « « 
pany's ferry cars run between the stand in front of the Hibernia Bank and the Oakland am Buii 
other ferries — making close connection with the yellow and red cars, thus enabling passenger 
from the ferry, by means of transfers, to reach any point on the company's route for a siugl 
fare. The same facilities are afforded for going to the Ferries from any point on th 
company's routes. It has riinning thirty of the most elegant, best constructed, most thoroughly "o 
equipped, excellently lighted, convenient, and comfortable one-horse cars that the skill am *" 
taste of that veteran car budder, John Stephenson, could construct. Among several modern im '""i 
provements in the new cars, the most notable, as the one likely to prove most generally acceptable 
especially to ladies without escorts, is the new arrangement of the check strap communicatinj 
with the driver's bell. Just inside the car it divides into two, one of which runs along the uppe 
corner, on each side, from end to end. From these, at convenient intervals, short, connectinj 
straps hang sufficiently low to be conveniently gi'asped and pulled without rising. Thus, a ladj 
can readdy give the stopping signal without leaving her seat or asking any one to do it for her 
Over the City Line the companj^ runs from eighteen to twenty cars. On both lines it employs- 
as nearly as can be estimated in the absence of official figures, which they appear stran;.;el; 
reluctant to give — about a hiindred and thirty men, and not far from three hundred horsis 
It pays its conductors and drivers $2.50 a day, sells four tickets for twenty-five cents, charuv 
ten cents for a single fare, and transfers patrons without extra expense from either line ti 
the other, at the comer of Third and Howard streets, where the two main lines come nearesffcij 
together. 'l f'l 

The Potrero and Bay View Railroad. — This line begins at the junction of Post and Morfj P 
gomery streets, and runs somewhat westerly but mainly southerly, through Post, Dupont, Midi 
ket. Fifth, Bluxome, Fourth, and Kentucky streets, and Railroad Avenue, to Thirty-fourth Af 



% 



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BEAMISH'S— Nucleus Bldg, Third & Market, Shirts & Men's Furnishing Goo 



\ VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



PROGRESS OP THE CITY. 21 



lue, South San Francisco. Under a lease \\4tli the Market Street Railway Co. , this line also 
ins its cars along Market Street to the comer of Sansoni. Its total length slightly exceeds 
101 ^''^ miles, mostly single track. Forty-two men, one hundred and fifteen horses, and seventeen 
irs make up the list of employes and the inventory of live and rolUng stock. Four fares 
le entire distance on this line cost tMenty-five cents ; the same fare on the northern section, the 

vil being operated in two sections connecting with each other at Townsend Street. The greater 

rtion of the southerly section of this road runs over water, crossing Mission Bay and Islais 
reek hy sul)stantial and expensive bridges. As soon as the vSouthern Pacific Railroad Co. effect 
le contemplated chajige in the route of their present trunk line from Valencia Street to the 
lore line of Mission Bay, the bay will be gradually filled in until the present l<3ng, wooden bridges 
3Ct)me bulkheads along the new water front. Upon the completion of this plan the property 
terests and general importance of the Potrero and South San Francisco will experience an 
innediate, very decided, and unquestionably permanent appreciation. These localities appear 

stined, at no distant day, to become gi-eat manufacturing and ship-building centers. 

Sutter Street Railroad. — The main trunk road, known as the City Route, begins at the 
mction of Broadway and Davis streets, on the city front, and runs thence through Broadway, 
attery, Sutter, and Polk streets to the junction of the latter with Broadway Street, a distance 

two and one third miles. One branch, the Larkin Street Route, extends from the corner of 
utter and Larkin streets, through Larkin, Ninth, and Mission streets to Woodward's Gardens, 
:er the track of the City Railroad, which grants the use of so much of its track in return for 
le equivalent privilege of running the cars of its northern branch line over the Sutter »Street 
ack from Dupont to Sansom streets. The second branch extends from the corner of Bush 
id Polk streets through Bush, Fillmore, and California streets, and Cemetery Avenue, and to 
le junction of the latter with Geary Street, a distance of one and seven eighths miles. This 
lie, carrying passengers direct to Lone Mountain and the neighboring cemeteries, is 
iiown as the Lone Mountain Branch. Cars also now run direct to the Oakland Ferry, 
[arket Street W^iarf. The main line and nearly all of both branches are double-track 
ads. From the corner of Union and Laguna streets a third branch — the Presidio — runs with 
single track, through Union, Pierce, Greenwich, and Baker streets, three miles, to Harbor View, 
1 the Bay shore, near the Presidio. Still a fourth branch, the Pacific Street, runs along that 
reet from the main line at Polk Street to Fillmore Street, a distance of eight blocks, or 
si jout one mile. The total length of the Sutter Street Road, including branches, is eight and 
le quarter miles. The company owns two hundred horses and thirty cars. Several of the 
tter are midway in size between the usual double and the modern single-horse car, owing 

the frequency and extent of steep grades, of which this road has a larger proportion than 
ly other in the city usiug horses exclusively. The smaller size of these. cars enables them, 
iiusually heaAoly loaded, to dispense with the extra tow horse, such as the Omnibus Company is 
gularly compelled to use in surmounting its Jackson Street grade, with cars of the usual size 
id carrj-ing ordinaiy loads. Among the newer cars it has one single-horse car of a peculiarly 
)vel pattern, known as the "balloon car," having an oval outline and a dome top, but chiefly 
stinguished by the fact that the body of the car turns at will upon the truck, which 
imains stationary, thus enabling the company not only to dispense with the turntable some- 
mes employed, but relievmg the driver from the necessity of unhitching his horses, dri\"ing 
lem round and re-attaching them to the other end of the car. The company employs ninety 
en, pays its conductors and drivers ?j'2.oU a day, sells four tickets for a "quarter," and charges 
n cents for a single fare. The main line and all the branches, except the Presidio, exchange 
ansfers with each other. 



Steam Railroads. 



The Southern Pacific Railroad is the only one which reaches San Francisco by a continuous 
ue of rails. On account of its position, railroads from the north and the east must terminate 
pen the northern or eastern shores of the bay. But their actual termini are in this city, 
irough passengers never halting upon their journey until they reach the ferry landing in San 
rancisco, and freight cars never resting until they are brought to the depot here. 

Central Pacific. — Through the courtesy of Secretary Miller we are enabled to present 
following statistics for the j'ear 1875 : The total length of track is one thousand four 
andred and thirty-one miles. This comprises eight hundred and eighty-three miles of main 
ack, from San Francisco to Ogden ; one hundred and fifty -two miles of the Oregon division, 
om Roseville to Redding; two hundred and seventeen miles of the Visalia division, from 
athrop to Sumner ; Oakland and Alameda branches, twenty-one miles ; San Josii branch from 
iles, seventeen miles ; total length of sidings, one hundred and forty-one miles. The rolling 
ock comprises four thousand six hundred and twenty cars of aE kinds, and two hundred and 
iree engines. The floating stock comprises thirty different craft, including bay and river 
eamers, ferry boats and barges, vrith a registered tonnage of fourteen thousand three hun- 
red and seventeen, and an aggregate carrying capacity of more than twenty thousand tons. 
1 1875 the company transported one million one hundred and sixty-four thousand two hundred 
id thirty-nine tons of freight ; four million seven hundred and sixty-two thousand three hun- 
red and fourteen passengers ; employed, in all capacities, nearly five thousand persons, and 
iid for their services upwards of 114,000,000. The excess of west bound passengers over east 



"AMES &. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 



r. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchi?.' 



22 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



bound passengers, or the net gain in population by those coming by rail was forty-four thousaii' 
four hundred and ninety-seven. The rail terminus is at the end of the Oakland Pier, a strud 
lu-e extending two miles into the bay from its eastern shore. Passengers reach the city in fi; 
teen minutes time by the ferry boats. Freight cars are brought over on immense steamei 
specially constructed for that purjwse. The "Transit," jiist completed, has a carrj-ing capj 
city of one thousand live hundred tons, and has room for an ordinary train of freight ( 
passenger cars. This boat is three hundred and thirty-eight feet in length, seventy -five feet i 
width, and has engines of one thousand horse power. The transfer of a train of cars from on 
side of the bay to the other is made almost as quickly as if there were, a bridge and a cont 
nuous line of rails. 

Southern Pacific. — This company was incorporated for the purpose of constructing an 
operating a railway from San Francisco to a poiiit ou the Colorado River at or near Fort Mojav^ J, 
an estimated distance of six hundred and twenty -nine miles, there to connect with the Atlant 
and Pacific Railway or Thirty-fifth Parallel Route, with a branch ria Tehichipa Pass and Ia 
Angeles, to Fort Yuma, a distance of three hundred and fifty-three miles, where it is to connei 
with the Texas Pacific Railway. The road is now completed and in operation from San Francisc 
to Tres Pinos, a distance of one hundred miles. Besides this a branch — called the Pajaro Branc 
— commences at Carnadero, eighty-two miles south of San Francisco, and runs thence by wa 
of Pajaro, near Watsonville, to Soledad, sixty miles. Since our last issue a branch from Fli 
rence Station to Anaheim, twenty-one miles, has been completed and put in operation. S© 
tions of the road are also completed from Goshen to a considerable distance beyond Calient 
and from San Fernando to Seven Palms, within about a hundred miles fi'om the Colorado Rive 
The heavy work from Tehichipa to San Fernando is being rigorously prosecuted, and it is e: 
pected that the gap between these two points will be closed by July next, which will give a 
rail communication with Los Angeles and bring it within twenty-four hours' ride of this cit; 
There are now about five hundred miles of road completed, and at the present time but thn 
days and twenty hours are required to reach Ehrenberg ; five daj's and eight hours to reac 
Prescott ; and six and one quarter days to reach Tucson. The completion of this route, with i 
numerous and extensive connections, is of great importance to our State, as it will open up bus 
ness not only with a large and fertile portion of Southern California, but with Arizona ax 
Northern Mexico. Upon completing its comiection -with, the Texas Pacific Railway it wi 
furnish a short line from San Francisco, through Texas to New Orleans and the countr3'' bord 
ring on the Gulf of Mexico. This will connect the Southern Pacific States with the Gulf Stat< 
and the Southern Atlantic States, by a more nearly air-line route, and one which the snows • 
winter will never obsti'uct. 

The California Pacific employs upon its cars and steamers and in and about its offio 
some three hundred men, whose annual wages aggregate .$2.50,000. Among the more importai 
items of its annual biisiness for 1875, one hundred and eight thousand three hundi-ed and t< 
passengers brought, eightj^-eight thousand five hundred and fifty-five carried, with forty-oi 
thousand eight hundred and twenty-three tons of freight from San Francisco, and thirtet 
thousand eight hundred and sixty tons toward the city, constitute the chief. Its passenger ai 
freight business is constantly increasing with that of all the California railroads. The amom 
received in 1875 for the transportation of passengers, freight, mails, express matter, etc., w, 
considei'ably over .$1,500,000. 

The North Pacific Coast Railroad. — Almost simultaneously -with the beginning of tl 
year 1875, business was commenced on the North Pacific Railroad between Saucelito, S? 
Rafael, and Tomales, a distance of fifty-fiv^e miles from San Francisco. The road is a narroi 
gauge and has been a profitable investment. At Saucelito ferry comiection is made with Sj 
Francisco, distance seven miles. The route of this road is over a hilly country, and its cod 
truction has been quite expensive, costing without eqiiipment about .§15,000 per mile, or vri\ 
equipment $20,000 a mile. The gauge is three feet, and the usual narrow-gange rail, we. ' ' 
thirty-six pounds to the yard, is used. The country i:ienetrated is rich in resources, being qjl 
of the most prosperous dairying sections of the State, and, as it extends, will enter the redw<^l 
himber region, and give life to new interests. During the year 1875, one hundred and fifty ffl 
thousand six hundi-ed and thirty four passengers passed over this road for San Qufi 
tin and points beyond. The company employ eight locomotives, ten passenger, three mail ai 
one hundred and fifty-five freight cars. Length of road fifty-two and one-half miles. 

San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad. — The beautiful valleys of Petaluma ai 
Russian River now resound with the clamor of the rushing train bearing the products to mark 
from the well-tilled plains and vine-clad hills of Sonoma, and from the dense forests and ferti 
vales of Mendocino. The San Francisco and North Pacific has been completed to CloverdaJ 
in Sonoma County, making its entire lenglit fifty-six miles from Donahue, where it connec 
with steamer for San Francisco, a distance of thirty-four miles. There are employed six loc 
motives and seventj^-two passenger and freight cars. It is probable that this road ■will be « 
tended through Ukiah to Humboldt Bay on the north, and southerly through Marin County 
the harbor of Saucelito. In its present course it passes the towns of Petaluma, Santa Roe 
Windsor and Healdsburg, all, together with its termini, pleasant and thriving places. Tl 
country traversed is one of the most interesting and prosperous sections in the State. Yr 



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Smithsonian Medical Institute, 637 Cal, B. J. SMITH, M.D., Prof. Phrenolof 



. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 23 



Straiiislilp LincM 

Besides maintaimng close steamship connections with .all points of importance on the Pacific 
Coast, from Victoi-ia to Panama, San Francisco is connected with China and Japan by two reg 
uhir lines of steamers, and with New South Wales and New Zealand. Within the year the 
Occidental and Oriental Steamship (.'onipany has inaugurated a comjjeting line of steamers to 
China ami Japan. Steamers are on the way from New York, and one of the events of 1876 
will be the formation of a new steamshiij line to compete with the Pacific Mail Steamship Com- 
pany for the New York trade, by way of Panama. 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company. — With the single exception of the Cunard, this is the 
oldest steamship company in existence. Until a few years ago it was a close corporation, the 
stock V)eing owned by but few persons, who managed the business on legitimate principles 
^^'hile they accumulated enormous wealth, they pursued a general policy that was eminently 
fair towards the public, and calculated to develop the trade and commerce of the Pacific Coast 
with other parts of the world. Wlien the control of the company's affairs passed into the hands 
of Wall Street operators, its policy was governed in the interest of speculations, and there has 
been an almost continuous decline in its prosperity. It has divided the business between this 
port and China with a competing line, and upon the Panama route it is about to have a most 
formidable rival, and one that will have some very positive advantages. San Francisco is so 
largely dependent upon the proper management of the lines of steamers connecting it with 
other parts of the world, that her merchants and capitalists must inevitably take control of 
this business, if their interests are longer to be a foot ball for speculators in New York. Our 
railroads are managed by California men, and m favor of California interests ; and we do not 
think that the time is very far distant when the control of the carrying trade by water is cen 
tered in the Pacific metropolis. This company will certainly retrieve its waning fortunes by 
transferring its central office to this city, and making it a commercial instead of a stock gam- 
bling enterprise. It has a fleet of thirty first-class vessels, of wood and iroii, of an aggregate 
arrying capacity of about one hundred thousand tons. It owns and operates the following 
Lines : New York and Aspinwall, two thousand miles ; Panama and San Francisco, three thou- 
iid two hundred miles ; Panama and Acapulco, one thousand eight hundred miles ; Panama 
and Champerico, one thousand one hundred miles ; San Francisco and Hongkong, six thousand 
four hundred miles ; San Francisco and Tacoma, one thousand miles ; San Francisco and Aus 
tralia, eight thousand six hundred miles ; total length of routes, twenty-four thousand one hun- 
Ired miles, a distance very nearly equal to the circumference of the earth. During the last year 
the City of Pekin and City of Tokio were added to its fleet. Defects of construction have 
been remedied by extensive and costly additions, and these steamships are among the most 
staunch and elegant ever constructed. They are four hundred and twenty-three feet long, M'ith 
1 breadth of beam of forty-eight feet, and a registered tonnage of live thousand five hundred 
;ons each. The latest additions to its fleet are the steamships City of San Francisco, 
City of Panama, City of New York, City of Sydney, Australia, and Zelandia, first- 
-lass steamers, of an aggregate cost of more than .?4, 000, 000. The company runs five 
iifferent lines. The oldest and best known is the New York and San Francisco Line, 
jommonly called the Isthmus Route. Four side-wheel and five iron-screw boats, of 
)ver three thousand tons each, constitute this line; a ship leaves New York every other 
Saturday and San Francisco alternate Wednesdays, at noon. The only way port at which 
;hese ships regularly touch, is the Mexican port of Acapulco. Its Central American and 
VIexican Line comprises four iron screws, of two thousand tons each, and three side-wheelers. 
This line makes regular fortnightly trips between San Francisco and Panama, calling at some 
iwenty Mexican and Central American way ports ; a ship leaves San Francisco at noon every 
)ther Thursday. The great Japan and China Line, which might properly be called the Americo- 
(Vsiatic, or great Central Trans-Pacific Line, embracing a larger arc of the earth's circumference 
;han any regiilarly established route has ever before attempted, is that upon which this great 
!ompany has concentrated its chief attention. It has nine immense screw steamers, and ten 
ide- wheelers, of nearly equal dimensions. On the first day of each month (except when that 
isLy is Sunday, when the sailing day will be on the Saturday previous) a steamer is dispatched 
Tom San Francisco to Yokohama and Hongkong. Its fourth line is between San Francisco and 
Victoria and Tacoma. On the 10th and 25th of each month a first-class ii'on-screw steamer is 
lispatched for the above ports. Its fifth line is to the Sandwich Islands, New Zealand and 
Australia. Five first-class screw steamers, of three thousand five hundred tons each, are de 
;ailed for this service, and one of then* leaves San Francisco on or about the fourth Monday of 
jach month, or as soon as the British mails arrive from New York. The company's 
onnection with other lines than its own branches, are as follows : At Hongkong with 
English and French steamers for the upper ports of India, and, by the way of the Suez Canal, 
^th the Mediterranean and Atlantic ports of southern and western Europe. The New York 
md San Francisco Line connects at Panama with the Pacific Steam Navigation Co. 's lines to all 
;he impoi-tant Pacific ports of South America. At Aspinwall it connects with the Royal Mail 
steam Packet Co. , direct to Liverjjool ; with the Hamburg- American Steam Packet Co. , to 
Hamburg ; with the Compagnie Generale Trans- Atlantique, to France. Within the year the 
iTokohama and Shanghai branch has been sold to a Japanese company. A line of smaller steam- 



7AMES &. STEELE Si CO., Apothecaries, No. 316 Kearny Street. 



San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchai 



24 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



id 
rjt 



111 



ers between San Francisco and Southern California and Mexican ports, has been sold to the 
GoodaU, Nelson & Perkins Steamship Company. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. — One of the prominent enterprises of the year 
is the establishment of the line of British steamships between San Francisco and China and 
Japan. A steamer leaves San Francisco each month, from the Pacific Mail Dock. The vessels 
are of sui^erior construction, and in all respects first class. Though under a foreign Hag, they 
are mainly owned by American citizens, and the central office is in this city. 

GooDALL, Nelson and Perkins Steamship Co., with the youthful vitality and vigor of a 
new and strong corporation, is fast taking its place among the foremost steamship companies of 
the Pacific Coast. This company owns sixteen sea-going steamers, of which two are iron and 
eleven are propellers. In measurement, they range from two hundred to one thousand and 
three hundred tons, having an aggregate can-yiug capacity of upwards of ten thousand tons. 
The company employs most of these ships, together with several smaller steamers, upon its main 
or Southern Coast Line, plying between San Francisco and San Diego, and touching at all the 
more important intermediate ports. It employs, directly and indirectly, about five hundred 
men; has a monthly pay roll of nearly .f.30,000, and dispatches, upon an average, one ship every 
other day. As the company, under its present organization, or, at least, with its present list of 
ships and lines, has been doing business not much over a year, it is yet premature to attempt 
any statement of annual freight roll or passenger list. It is safe to say, however, that their 
aggregate of freight exceeds that of any other line upon this coast. Inaugurated but ten years 
since, and then commencing with but a single small steamer, the unprecedentedly rapid, and 
yet always safe, growth of this company, sufficiently demonstrates the energy and sagacity of 
its owners and management. 

The Colorado Steamship Co. — Two ocean steamships, four river steamers, and five bargea, 
constitute the present fleet of this company. It dispatches a ship every twenty days for the 
Colorado Eiver and the adjacent ports of the Mexican Coast, as well as for the interior localities 
lying along the river, or using the river as the highway of their commerce. Their vessels range 
in size from one hundred and fifty to one thousand tons, and have a total carrying capacity of 
five thousand tons. The four river steamers are stern-wheelers of the kind often denominated 
wheelbarrows. This line has six agencies ; employs about two hundred men ; carries the 
Mexican and Wells, Fargo & Co. 's mails, and does no inconsiderable portion of its business in 
transporting troops and supplies for the United States Government. The details of their 
passenger travel and freight transportation the company prefer to withold from publication. 

The Oregon Steamship Co. dispatches a steamship regularly every week to Portland, 
Oregon, where they connect Avith steamers for Puget Sound and Alaska, as well as with the 
main railways of the more important parts of Oregon, and Washington Territory. 

New Highway Around the World. 

Before finally leaving this topic of steamship lines, it seems not only strictly pertinent, but 
also to be actually demanded by the present state of public interest upon both continents, to 
append a brief statement of some of the advantages of our great American Trans-Continental 
and Trans-Pacific links in the New Hlcjhicay Around the World. The experiences of nearly five 
j'ears indicate that the established current of travel does not easily or quickly change its chaa 
nels. The simple fact of the opening of a new, shorter, quicker, cheaper, and in all respects better, 
route than any previously known, seems to require considerable time to work itself fairly into the 
understanding or, at least, the practical appreciation of the merchants and travelers who are 
likely to receive its greatest advantages. 

To passengers between England or eastern Europe and Japan and China, India, or Australia, 
the actual distance, by the way of the Suez Canal, is unquestionably less, but in the very 
important and usually decisive particulars, is surpassingly in favor of the American Route. 
For example : One who had never investigated the matter would hardly believe what is ncvel^ 
theless the fact, that, although the distance from London to Yokohama is nearly the same by 
either route, the time of passage by the way of San Francisco is twenty days and the cost ^ 
passage one hundred dollars less. Other and very important considerations also favor the Amer^ 
ican Overland Route. Going by the way of Suez the traveler must change from one convey- 
ance to another at Brindisi, Alexandria, Suez, Bombay, Calcutta, Point de Galle, and Hongkong 
— no less than seven times! By the American Route, he changes but twice ; oiice from steamship 
to cars, at New York, and again from cars to ship, at San Francisco. In the very importani 
matter of comfort and convenience this is of itself almosit a decisive consideration. 

Again, and in respect to the often vital consideration of health, the Suez Route subjects 
him to repeated and extreme changes of temperature in passing from one zone, or climate, tc 
another. The American Route lies wholly in the temperate zone and through the most equablt 
portions of it. More, again, and in respect to a matter of such exceeding importance that H 
may even become one of life or death, the difference is so greatly in favor of the America! 
Route as to preclude any fair comparison. Besides this, the tourist, whose main object is sight 
seeing, and even the commercial traveler, who does not genei'ally object to it, would hardlj 
hesitate between a route which takes him through three thousand miles of the gi-andest anc 
most beautiful scenery of a new and strange continent, and one which carries him across a narroT? 



T 

It 
11; 

ie(( 
itra 



■Ih 



h 



BEAMISH'S— Nucleus Bldg, Third & Market, Shirts & Men's Furnishing Good ^ 



PINE WATCHES and JEWELRY for Sale by D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 



25 



corner of Egypt and whirls him across a few hundred miles of Central or Southern Hindostan, 
or, possibly, gives him a flying glimpse of the tangled jungles of India. Whether or not, however, 
the traveler possesses much of tlie artistic sense or the corresponding desire to gratifj' it, every 
particle of his physical being will luxuriate in the multiplied comforts of the Pullman Palace 
t'iirs, those first-class hotels on wheels which presently beguile the occupant into the belief that 
he has not left home at all but tliat, l>y some accommodating mj'stery, his home has started on 
his journey around the world, and is taking him along as a matter of course. For the benefit 
of the large class who j)refer a tabular statement of distances, lines, and fares by the route from 
London by the way of Liverpool and America, or by the Suez Route from London by the way 
of Southampton, we subjoin the following 

COMPARISON OF ROUTES. 





Via Suez Route. 






From 


Miles. 


Days. 


& 




11,268 
lO.-'ilS 
9,048 
13,25U 
11,99!) 
11,439 


56 
5.3 

48 
62 
57 
56 


103 


Sha"-hai 


103 




93 




102 




88 


Melbounie 


88 



Via American Route. 



From 



Yokohama . 
Shanghai. . 
Hongkong . 
Auckland . . 

Sydney 

Jlelbourne . 



Mile.?. 


Days. 


11, .382 


34 


13,032 


42 


13,002 


40 


12,290 


44 


13,220 


47 


13,780 


48 



We may now make the journey around the world in eighty-eight days, or less than three 
months ; tliough it is hardly supposable that any one, except upon the pressure of most urgent 
business, would consent to make such a journey without many stoppings-over for sight-seeing. 
The intermediate distances and times by this shortest of the great 'round-the-world routes, are 
as follows : 



From 



London to Liverpool 

Liverpool to New York 

New York to San Francisco... 
San Francisco to Yokohama... 

Yokohama to Shanghai 

Shanghai to Hongkong 

Hongkong to Calcutta , 



Miles. 


D's. 


H's 


200 




5 


3,000 


10 




3,294 


6 


6 


4,764 


19 




1,200 


4 




870 







3,500 


22 





From 



Calcutta to Bombay 

Bombay to Suez 

Suez to Alexandria (by rail) 

Alexandria to Brindisi or Venice . . . 
Brindisi to London (by rail) 



Totals. 



Miles. D's. H's 



1,400 

3,600 

225 

850 

1,200 



24,103 



Fare for the above route £195. In view of the foregoing table, it requires no very sanguine 
temperament to believe that the great American Route is diverting to itself the great cuiTent 
of circumterranean travel, nor is it too much to prophecy that this Trans-continental and Trans- 
oceanic Route around the world must speedily become, and permanently remain, the great 
highway of the nations. 

Ferries and Bay Steamers. 
There are ferries running to all points of importance on either shore of the bay, and steamers 
for Yallejo, Stockton, and Sacramento, connecting at those places with lighter draft boats which 
run to the headwaters of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Nearly all these boats land 
at Market Street ^^^larf and the ailjoining slips. The various contracts for the construction of 
the ferry slips and the spacious building required, amounted to .f 91, 575, and there were many 
extra items of expense, so that the total cost is about .f 100,000. The building is larger than 
most of the Eastern railway depots, and contains spacious waiting rooms for passengers and 
baggage and freight rooms, besides the ticket offices requii'ed for the enormous business of the 
Central Pacific Railroad Company. Two of the slips are used by the passenger boats on the 
Oakland ferry, a third is used Ijy the freight boat on the same ferry, and the fourth is used by 
the vSan Quentin and San Rafael ferry boats, which connect with the North Pacific Coast rail 
road. At Market Street Wharf are the landing places of the river boats for Saci'amento and 
Stockton and the steamers of the California Pacific Railroad Company, which run to Vallejo. 
The centralization of this business is of immense advantage to the public, as it prevents mistakes 
and confusion. Any part of the city is accessible by rail ; the locality is central, and a more 
satisfactory arrangement could not have been made. 

Oakland and Alameda Ferry.— The travel on the Oakland ferry averages about ten 
thousand on week days and very nearly twenty thousand on Sundays. The Central Pacific 
Railroad Company reports the following statistics of travel for 1875: round trips, five hundred 
and ninety-five thousand one hundred and seventy-five ; single trips, one million eight hundred 
and two thousand one hundred ami ninety; commutation trips, one million six hundred and 
hirty thousand nine hundred and forty-five ; total, four millions twenty-eight thousand three 
undred and ten. Commutation tickets entitle the holders to one round trip per day, for ^, 
nth, and are sold for three dollars each ; single tickets are sold for fifteen. cents. The land- 
upon the Oakland side is at the end of the long railroad wharf, about three and one half 
.63 from the ilarket Street sltps. The steamers are unsurpassed for elegance, and are nin at 
:gh speed. The larger, the Oakland, has been added to the route during the year. The 



ilLE'S Squirrel Poison is sold by all Druggists, Grocers, and G-eneral Dealers. 



JEWELRY made to order and EEPAIEED by L. W. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Merchaa 



26 SAN FRANCISCO DIEECTOEY. 



extreme dimensiona of this boat are as follows: length, two hundred and eighty-two feet; 
breadth of beam, seventj'^-two feet. The main saloon is one hundred and thirty-six feet, its 
width, twenty-eight feet. In the earlier parts of the tlay there are half -hourly trips, the first 
boat leaving San Francisco at 6:10 a.m. and the second at 7 a.m., after which there are half 
hourly trips until 10 A.M., then hourly trips until 3 p.m., after which there are half hourly ti'ips 
till 7 P.M., when the trips are at longer intervals, the last boat leaving San Francisco at 
11:45 P.M. The company has recently reconstructed the steamer Capital, of over one thousand 
and six hundred tons tonnage, and at an early day she will be placed on the Creek Route to 
Oakland. 

Saucelito Ferry. — The landing of the Saucelito Ferry is at the foot of Da^ns Street. Five 
round trips per day are made. The boats connect on certain trips with the trains of the North 
Pacific Coast Railroad Company. 

Berkeley Ferry. — Four trips per day are made to the Berkeley landing, which is connected 
by a stage line with the University grounds. 

Miscellaneous. — Besides the ferries already mentioned as making regular trips each way 
daily, are others running to San Rafael, Antioch, New York, Martinez, Benicia, and Yallejo. 
To some of these places, these ferries, running once a day, furnish the only regular means of 
public conveyance ; to others they merely supplement the more important and regular lines 
which take these jjlaces merely as way stations, on their passage to other and generally more 
important sections. 

Hotels. Etc. ' 

Ha\4ng learned something of the general facilities for reaching this city from all parts of the 
world, the traveler and business man, or the capitalist who contemplates a \'isit to, or, it may be, a 
permanent residence in San Francisco, naturally desires, in the next place, information concern- 
ing her hotels. Long celebrated for the number and excellence of her accommodations for the 
traveling public, or for that large class of residents whose tastes incline them rather to hotel 
living than to the maintenance of a private home establishment, the Pacific metropolis has 
recently added to her famous hotels a mammoth structure, which not oidy incomparably sur- 
passes any hotel previously known in San Francisco, but also upon the entire continent and, 
indeed, thi'oughout the civilized world. 

There is probably no city on earth, not even the French capital itself, that presents as many 
and as great facilities for carrying on a stiictly first-class hotel, as San Francisco. The leading 
hotels of this city now in successful operation, are hardly sui-passed and verj' rarely indeed even 
equaled, in their manifold excellencies, by those of any metropolitan city of the world. We 
have in full abundance all those peculiar requisites that a first-class hotel needs, or that its 
guests could possibly desire. The cliniate, almost uniformly mild ; a temperature singularly 
equable and agreeable ; markets abounding with the finest of fish, flesh, and fowl — domestic and 
wild ; vegetables and fruits of both temperate and tropical climates, in a perfection and profusion 
which fairly astonish the newly-arrived \4sitor. If any city this side of Paris can justly lay 
claim to be called the Sybarite's Paradise, San Francisco may confidently present that claim. 
Excellent and ample, however, as our hotels have hitherto proved, the greatly-increased influx 
of pleasure-seeking and business visitors, not only from the eastern and southern portions of our 
o^Ti country, but from Europe and even Asia, made it plainly apparent a few years since, 
that all the metropolitan hotels then existing, numerous and ample as they were considered at 
the time of their erection, had already begun to prove very appreciably and increasingly 
insufficient for the ennuall}' swelling thi-ong of guests. Realizing this already existing deficiency,' 
and full}' assured that each successive month would only witness its increase, on the first 
of March, 1874, Messrs. Ralston and Sharon, two of the heaviest capitalists and most public- 
sjiirited citizens who ever contributed to build up the fortunes of any metropolis while successi 
fully accumulating their own, commenced the erection of a mammoth hotel, which has been 
named the 

Palace Hotel, and by the constant employment of a literal army of the most skillful me- 
chanics to be obtained in this State, or imported from the East, they have steadily pushed the 
gigantic structure toward completion with a rapidity, and at the same time a substantiality, 
unprecedented in the liistory of great building enterprises. Occupying the southwest comer 
of New Montgomery and Market streets, this architectural monster rears its huge front for, 
two hundred and seventy-five feet along the south side of Market Street, from 2^^^^- Mont4 
gomery to Anna, and stretches its vast flank three hundred and fifty feet along New Montgom4 
ery and Anna streets to Jessie. It covers ninety-six thousand two hundred and fifty square 
feet, or nearly two acres and a quarter. Its form is that of an immense hollow quadrangle. 
Its main front and entrances are on New Montgomery Street. Commencing two stories imder- 
ground, it rises seven full stories above, and through a considerable portion has eight. Stone, 
marble, iron, and brick are the chief materials. Of the latter, twenty-six million were used 
in its construction. The lower story has a liight of twenty-five feet in the clear, while the 
uppermost is fourteen. The walls and partitions are built of stone and brick, laid in cement, 
and everywhere made as nearly earthquake proof as possible by broad, iron bands of such, 
immense size as to require nearly three thousand tons for thi« purpose alone. The building 
incloses three inner courts, connecting with the adjoining streets on either side, and with each 



1 



Smithsonian Medical Institute, 637 Cal., B. J. SMITH, M.D., Prof. Phrenology 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 27 



other by broad, arched doorways through separate walls of massive masonry. Within these 
courts large gardens and parterres of tropical plants and rare exotics, roofed with glass, beauti- 
fied with statuary and made delicious by the constant playing of sjjarkling fountains, will charm 
and delight the guests. Around these gardens, on a level with each story, broad galleries or 
arcades, brilliantly lighted at night, \vi]l afford most inviting promenades for all the transient 
guests or more permanent residents of this truly j)alatial home. In this latter particular, indeed, 
it quite closely resembles the Palais Royal in Paris, and the Hotel Iturbide in Mexico. 
Seven hundred and fifty-five suits of rooms and guest chambers, besides immense reception 
rooms, public and private parlors, dining and breakfast halls, both public and private, with 
spacious dining rooms for children and servants, music pavilion and ball room, ladies' drawing 
rooms and parlors, three hundred and seventy-seven bath and toilet rooms, are a few of the 
more prominent statistics, from which the observant reader may infer the rest. From the 
lower or garden floor of the bazaar or promenade galleries, rear entrances admit guests 
directly into the elegant stores which are to occupy the lower floors along Market and New 
Montgomery streets. Each of these stores has a show window facing ui)on the promenade, 
along which, completely sheltered from the weather, lady guests may pass at pleasure 
and without the necessity of covering, to and from the various shops. Upon New Mont- 
gomery and Market streets there are eighteen of these double-fronting or rearless stores. 
Among the additional statistics are sixteen thousand five hundred square feet of marble, 
twelve thousand square feet of slabs and tiling, six hundred and eighty-five thousand lights of 
plate glass from England, and three thousand seven hundred lights of French plate glass, of 
double thickness. The furniture, made by special contract in this city, of the finest and most 
diversified native woods, costs §500,000. The cost of the ground was $1,000,000; of the build- 
ing, 81,750,000, which, with that of the furniture, as above, makes a total cost of $3,250,000. 
The lessee is that prince of hotel managers, Warren Leland, whom all the traveling world knows 
so well that any attempt at descrijjtion or compliment would be simply an intrusive imperti- 
nence. Its myriads of bay -ndndows, diversifying the four immense fronts from top to bottom, 
partially relieve the indescribable massiveness which would otherwise characterize the building, 
while its unique and beautiful exterior finish of pure white and gold at once delight the eye and 
justify its name.. This superb edifice, surpassing aU the hotels of the world in grandeur, splen- 
dor, and completeness, must form for years not only the pride of this occidental metropolis, but 
the architectural crown of the Pacific Coast. 

BALD\^^N's Hotel. — E. J. Baldwin is building a hotel at the junction of Market, Powell, 
and Ellis streets, which will not be surpassed for strength, elegance, and comfort. The struc- 
ture has a frontage of two hundred and seventy-five feet on Powell Street, two hundred and ten 
on Market Street, and one hundred and thirty-seven and one half feet on Ellis Street. It is to 
cost, with the theater forming part of it, $800,000. It is six stories high, with dormitories. 
There are five towers, well proportioned, one of which is one hundred and fifty feet high. The 
exterior of the building will be finished in a highly ornamental manner. There are six hundred 
apartments, and the general arrangement is such that there must be plenty of fresh air and sun- 
light in every part of the hotel. Elevators for passengers and baggage connect the ditFerent 
floors. On the roof are four water tanks, of an aggregate capacity of forty thousand gallons, 
and there is a liberal supply of hose, so that the danger from fire is reduced to a minimnm. 
The walls are so constructed that there is less to be feared from a heavy earthquake than if the 
structure were of wood. The hotel will be kept in the best possible style, and will be une- 
qualled by any in America, perhaps in the world. John A. Remer is architect, and Alexander 
McAbee superintendent of building operations — the work being done by the day. 

The Grand Hotel. — On the opposite side of New Montgomery Sti-eet, filling all the space 
between it and Second Street, stands a hotel which was, and, in the judgment of many, still is, 
more harmoniously proportioned architecturally, more finely designed and artistically finished, 
and, withal, more tastefully decorated than any in the city. Immediately upon its completion 
it became, and has since remained, the great favorite, both with transient ^^sitors a»d jjerma- 
nent residents. In the opinion of many it combines, more completely than any other, the very 
desirable qualities of elegance, quietness, and homelike attractiveness. It occupies a lot three 
hundred and ten feet on New Montgomery Street, two hundred and seven on Market, and 
one hundred and sixty on Second. Including the Mansard roof, it is four stories high. It con- 
tains four hundred rooms, and can conveniently lodge and dine six hundred guests. In ct^nstruc- 
tion it is completely framed of hea^'y timber, bolted and strapped with thick iron bands and 
heavy anchors, which gives to it the utmost possible strength and solidity. Nervous people 
consider it more completely earthquake proof than any public house in the city. Its external 
decoration is elaborately ornate, which gives to the building a light and tasteful appearance, 
combined with a kind of airy elegance, in most marked contrast ^ath the ponderous and majes- 
tic Palace Hotel directly opposite. Its halls are unusually wide, airy, and cheerful ; its general 
arrangement exceedingly convenient, and its furniture, carpets, and general appointments rich, 
comfortable, and in\'iting. The furniture was manufactured in Europe and the East expressly 
for tliis hotel, at a cost of $275,000. The general internal decorations of the house are simple, 
yet tasteful and elegant. The beautiful and cheerfvdly-lighted dining rooms seat three hundred 
guests at once. Immediately adjoining the main dining room are commodious separate dining 
rooms for children, nurses, and servants. The bath rooms, laundries, kitchens, pantries, fire- 



s'. 



TAMES &. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 



JEWELRY made to order and BEPAIHED by D. W. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Merchant 



28 SAN FEANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



places, etc. , are numerous and ample. In short, the architect and builders omitted no provision 
which could atld to the comfort and satisfaction of its guests. The montlily rental of the 
various suits of rooms varies from $150 to $500, "wath board. The daily charge for single 
rooms and board is three dollars. The present lessees are G. S. Jolmson & Co. , and the favor- 
able estimate unanimously placed upon their management by the guests of the house during 
the past four years is the best possible evidence of their ability to conduct so vast an establish- 
ment. 

The Occidental Hotel, on the east side of Montgomery Street, occupies the whole 
block between Bush and Sutter streets, and half of that stretching from Montgomery to San- 
son!. This well-knowTi hotel, alike large in its material dimensions and in the hold which it 
has upon the public estimation, stands as one of the most substantial in construction, conven- 
ient in arrangement, and complete in appointment, of the really first-class houses of the city. 
Four full stories, besides a lower attic story ; all the usual conditions of a fairly-appointed, first- 
class hotel ; a large, beautifully-finished elevator, smoothly and swiftly run by hydraulic press- 
ure, is among its chief conveniences. As one of the most celebrated hotels upon the Pacific 
Slope, it needs less extended and minute description than those houses of more recent estab- 
lishment which have not such an immense army of former guests and transient boarders, every 
one of which becomes a traveling advertisement of its many excellencies. 

The Cosmopolitan stands upon the northeast corner of the same block as the Occidental. 
By later extensions its north front stretches along Bush Street, until it joins that of the Occi- 
dental, the two forming one of the finest architectural fronts in the city. In exterior finish it 
is somewhat more ornate than its great neighbor, while within, in point of general excellence 
of arrangement and richness, it is entitled to a conspicuous place in the front rank of the lead- 
ing hotels of the city. Prominent among its fellows is the 

Lick House, uj)on the west side of Montgomery Street. The eastern front occupies an 
entire block, extending from vSutter to Post streets, with a depth of from one hundred to two 
hundred feet. It is excellently finished, and luxuriously furnished throughout, while its 
cuisine, as attested by its numerous guests and patrons, is not excelled by any institution of its 
kind. "While enjoying such an enviable reputation for its creature comforts, it is justly and 
widely celebrated for its elegantly elaborated, highly ornate, and most artistically-finished 
dining hall, which is the finest on this continent, and, it is said, is not surpassed by any in 
Europe. Among the many valuable and reaUy beautiful results of the limner's art which 
adorn the walls are to be seen several most living and natural views of the wonderful Yosemite 
Vallej% by eminent California artists. 

The Commercial Hotel was completed and occupied near the close of the year. It was 
built by AVilliam Hood, of Sonoma, at a cost of about $200,000, and is located at the junction 
of Montgomery Avenue, Kearny, and Pacific streets. It is of a triangular shape, having a 
frontage of one hundred and forty-eight feet on the avenue, one huncb-ed and thirty-eight feet 
on Pacific, and thirty- five feet on Kearny street. It is first class in its appointments, and prop- 
erly takes rank among the prominent hotels of San Francisco. Hornblower & Saxe, the former 
for many years landlord of the Orleans Hotel at Sacramento, have charge of the Commercial 
Hotel, and their reputation and full knowledge of this intricate business are a satisfactory guar- 
antee of its excellence. 

In point of numbers, size, and excellence of its hotels, San Francisco is not exceeded by any 
city in the Union, and very probably by none in the world. Aside from those already designated 
and partially described, may be mentioned the Russ House oii the west side of Montgomery 
Street, between Sutter and Pine ; the American Exchange, corner of Sansom and Halleck 
streets ; the Brooklyn Hotel, on Bush Street, between Montgomery and Sansom ; the Inter- 
national Hotel, on Jackson Street ; the once-famous What Cheer House, on Sacramento Street, 
so long, well, and favorably known to all old Californians, as the point of departure either to 
the "States " or to the mines. These, with some sixty or seventy others, any one of which in 
its grade cannot be excelled, if equaled, in any city of the civilized world, go to make up the 
hotel accommodations of the city. 

Boarding and Lodging Houses. — As a supplement (if any were required) to the large list 
of hotels, there are in the city about one thousand two hundred, occupied whoUy or in part as 
boarding and lodging houses, or for the accommodation of both boarders and lodgers, in many 
of which, at less expense than in any other city in the United States, one may enjoy all 
the comforts of a home. 

Tliciiters. 

Worshippers at the Thespian shrine have ample opportunity to indulge their passion here, 
as theaters and other places of amusement are numerous and well patronized. The class of 
performances enacted at these houses, whether tragic, dramatic, comic, or ti-agi-comic, is gen- 
erally of a high order. Indeed, so fastidious are the San Francisco piiblic in this respect, and 
theater patrons and newspaper critics so hard to please, that tlie manager who is so rash as to 
produce anything that is not fully up to the standard is sure to lose money by the operation, 
while the actor or actress who camiot stand solely upon his or her own merits, independent of 
newspaper puffs and printers' ink, camiot achieve a success. Nowhere in the world will an 
actor or an actress sooner find his or her true level than in San Francisco. Some of the brightest 



BEAMISH'S— Nucleus Building, corner of Third and Market streets. 



*a p. VAIT SCHAACK & CO., 705. 708, 710, 712, 714. and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 29 



ornaments of the American stage eitlier made their dehut or took their first upwartl step upon 
the laiUler of dramatic or theatrical fame before a California audience. 

The California Theatek, located on the south side of Bush Street, between Kearny and 
Dupont, is one of the largest theaters now in operation in the State. Its frontage on Bush Street 
is one hundred and sixty-five feet, with a deptli of one hundred and thirty-seven and one half feet. 
The stage is seventy-two feet wide Ijv seventy deep, and the auditorium sixtj'-two feet wide by 
seventy deep. The house wnll comfortably seat upward of eighteen hundred persons. The 
dress circle and parquet furnished with softly-cushioned, comfortable arm chairs ; the boxes 
luxurious in their upholstering and hangings; the mechanical appliances complete, and the 
scenery anjl drop curtains beautiful specimens of artistic skill. The building was erected in 
18()9, at a cost of about §!l'2.>,000. Under the successful management of that king of the 
Pacific stage, John McCullough, who is also proprietor, the class of performances, the merit 
of the actors engaged, and the public patronage bestowed, it has become in all respects one of 
the first-class theaters of this city, and stands second to none on this continent. 

Wade's Opera HorsE, on Mission Street, between Third and Fourth streets, opened its 
doors on Monday, January 17, 1876, and is one of the most magnificent theatres in the United 
States. The auditorium is similar in plan and construction to that of Niblo's Garden in New 
York, and like that has a wide corridor wholly encircling it. The lighting and acoustic arrange- 
ments are equal to any jjublic jjlace of amusement in the world, and far surpass many both in 
Europe and America. The frontage on Mission Street is one hundred and ten feet, and the 
depth toward Market Street two hundred and seventy-five feet. The structure, three stories 
high, is composed entirely of iron and brick, and is so constracted as t6 render it as nearly as 

Eossible both earthquake and fire proof — the roof of the auditorium resting, not upon the walls, 
ut on timbers independent of the walls, to which they are "tied." Between the auditorium 
and the corridor there is also a thick wall of brick. The architecture is of the Romanesque and 
Italian styles, in which heavy ornature has been carefully avoided, so that the entablature, 
together with the ■«andow cornices, is more chaste than elaborate. Fcft- ingress and egress the 
most ample pro\-ision has been made. The main entrance is twenty-five feet wide, and there 
are two side entrances each twelve feet wide, at the extreme ends of the elevation. The princi- 
pal corridor is seventy-five feet in length, and of the same width as the door. Behind this is 
the vestibule or central hall, thirty-five by eighty-one feet, mth a beautiful fountain in the 
center. The flooring of both the corridor and the vestibule is a mosaic of black and white 
marble. Three galleries rise above the orchestra circle. The lower of these, the dress circle, 
will seat over five hundred persons ; next is the family circle, which has about five hundred and 
fiftj' seats, and the third or upper will accommodate about six hundred. The orchestra circle 
and parquette will seat eight hundred and twenty, while the boxes will accommodate one 
hundred more, thus gi\'ing a total seating capacity of over two thousand five hundred. All the 
seats are ujjholstered in an elegant and luxurious manner, and the gallerj' fronts and other 
prominent features artistically decorated. The stage is eighty-one feet deep by one hundred 
and six in width, including the \\-ings. Only the latest and most approved stage machinery and 
efifects are used, and the most ample provision made for scene-shifting arrangements for the 
production of the spectacular drama. The theater is owned hy a joint-stock company of over 
five hundred shareholders, the most of whom are citizens of wealth and position. The lessee 
and manager- is Mr. Frederick W. Bert, with an executive force consisting of Mr. James J. 
Bartlett, stage manager ; Mr. William Voegtlin, scenic artist ; Mr. Dohrman, conductor of the 
orchestra ; Mr. Rogers, treasurer ; Mr. E. G. Bert Jr. , box bookkeeper ; Mr. Abrams, master 
machinist; Mr. Greenlock, property master; Mr. Laury, costumer; and Mr. Howard Morri- 
son, gas engineer. The Theater is principally devoted to spectacular plays and opera, produced 
in the most elaborate and perfect manner. 

Baldwin's Opera House. — Baldwin's Opera House constitutes part of the hotel building 
at the junction of Market and Powell vStreets, mentioned elsewhere. The hotel portion is 
incomplete, but the theater has been finished and thrown open to the public, under the auspices 
of Thomas Maguire, who has for so many years catered to the San Francisco public in a most 
acceptable manner. Mr. Baldwin has not been sparing of money in the fitting up of this 
theater, and it is one of the most elegant in the United States. It has seats for one thousand 
seven hundred persons, and, when the standing room is occupied, two thousand five hundred 
persons can command an unobstructed view of the stage. The auditorium is sixty-five by 
seventy-five feet in size ; dei)th of stage forty-five feet ; height of the dome from the parquet, 
sixty-five feet. Thft gas jets are all lighted by electricity, and there has been every known 
precaution against fire and accident. Particular attention has been given to ventilation, which 
is thoroughly secured, and -s^dthout the usual xmpleasant accompaniment of a disagreeable 
draft. The embellishments are most expensive and elaborate, and though the theater is not 
the largest in the citj*^, it is sect)nd to none of them. 

Magcire's New Theater. — This, among the latest and most deservedly popular houses of 
public amusement, which bears the name of California's veteran manager — almost the pioneer 
caterer for public entertainment — stands on Bush Street, on the south side. It occuj^ies a lot 
one hundred and thirty-seven feet deep by sixty-eight feet front, and can accommodate one 
thousand six hundred spectators. About two years since, Mr. Thomas Maguire, its sole pro- 
irietor and manager, rebuilt and opened this theater, which is one of the most elegant and 



i^B JAMES &. STEELE & CO., manufacturers of Steele's California Perfumes. 



PINE WATCHES and JEWELRY for Sale by D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



30 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



attractive places of amusement in the city. Here he rapidly presents one class of performances 
after another in a variety and to an extent which includes the whole range of his managerial 
experience. AU parts of the house have a clear -view of the stage, while in acoustic properties 
it is surpassed by no theater on the coast. The auditorium has the usual divisions of dress 
circle, parquet, and balcony, to which the prices of admission are, respectively, §1 and fifty 
cents. The company generally includes from forty to fifty actors of all grades of ability. 

Oper.\ House. — On the north side of Bush Street, opposite the new theater just described, 
stands this popular place of public recreation. Capable of seating one thousand two hundred 
people, it has proved through over two successful years that it knows how to send its guests 
home in the best of humor. Its interior, like that of the theater, is divided into dress circle, 
parquet, and family circle, to which patrons are admitted at corresponding rates. The range 
of performances presented keeps pace with all the varieties of the public mood, and aifords the 
most ample scope for the uttermost versatility of the actors who take part in them. In aU 
capacities the Opera House employs from thirty to thirty-five persons. 

Wilson's Amphitheater occupies the southwest comer of New Montgomery and 
Mission streets. Originally erected during the closing months of 1873 by John Wilson, who 
inaugurated it with a grand opening on the eighteenth of the ensuing January, it immediately 
presented a combination of equestrian talent which attracted paying houses for one hundred and 
eighty-three consecutive performances. The building covers about one hundred and twenty -five 
feet on Mission Street, by one hundred and sixty feet on New Montgomery. Devoted to eques- 
trian and variety entertainments. 

Bella Union Theater is located on Kearny Street, between Washington and Jackson, an 
extensive and conveniently arranged theater, under the management of Samuel Tetlow ; a well 
established and successful place of enterainment, where the best class of minstrel and variety 
entertainments are presented every evening. 

In addition to the regular theaters, there are several halls and concert-saloons devoted to 
musical and variety entertainments, the most prominent of which are Piatt's New Music Hall, 
Pacific Hall, Union Hall, and the Mechanics' Pavilion. 

Working hard, earning money easily, and spending it freely, Califomians and, especially 
San Franciscans, furnish a more liberal support to a larger number of first-class theaters and 
places of public" amusement than any equal population on the continent. Though critical in 
taste they are yet very ardent in their likings, and an actor who once has the good fortune to 
establish a hold upon the affections of our theater-going public, is sure of a generous support 
and may count upon the warmest welcome at each successive return. 

Parks, Gardens, Drives, Promenades, Etc. 

Our parks are three ; the Yerba Buena, Buena Vista, and the Golden Gate. 

Golden Gate Park. — It is as important for a large city to maintain a public park as it is 
to have a city hall and school houses. There must be a place where the rich and the poor can 
equally fiiid seclusion from turmoil and confusion; where, to some extent, the scenery and 
quiet of the couutrj^ can be reproduced within the limits of a city. Golden Gate Park lies in 
the western, or possibly northwestern margin of the city. Its length, Ijdng east and west, is 
about six times its width. From Fulton Street, its northern- boundary, it extends southerly 
some eight blocks to Franklin Street, which bounds it in that direction. The eastern limit of 
the park proper is the west line of Stanyan Street. From a little north of the center of this 
eastern end the entrance drive, or grand avenue of approach, with its bordering greenery, 
shrubbery, and meandering paths, occupying the fuU block between Oak and Fell streets, 
stretches eight blocks eastward to Baker Street. Westerly it extends to the shore of the 
Pacific, where its "Grand Drive," running nearly north and south, lies along the line of what 
would be Fiftieth Avenue, were it completed. It is fifty-six blocks long and nine blocks -wide. 
The original surface was largely composed of small hills, sparsely covered with low shrubs, 
with here and there a few stunted trees, and toward the ocean end hills and banks of wind- 
blown sand. Much of it is nothing more than barren sand-doons. After careful study the 
most approved plans of covering, protecting, and fencing these sands by the cultivation of 
such trees and shi'ubs as have been most convenient for that purpose in similar situations 
along the coasts of France and Holland have been adopted and their successful adaptation 
and execution entered upon. The area of the park includes seven natural lakes or ponds. 
Avenues, rides, drives, and walks ; groves, greens, and grottoes, arbors, terraces, mounds, and 
valleys, gardens, lawns, base-balls, and cricket grounds, embankments, cuts, tunnels, and 
bridges find place among the multiplied improvements and adornments already completed or 
contemplated in the present, immediate, and ultimate plans. Since the establishment of the 
Park very great results have been accomplished by an outlay of money not extravagant, and 
by the zealous and intelligent efforts of the gentlemen composing the Board of Commissioners — 
E. L. Sullivan, Presi lent, William Alvord and Louis McLane. Their biennial report to the 
Legislature presented at the close of the year 1875, together with the report of the engineers, 
gives a satisfactory exhibit. The Park is approached by an avenue two hundred and seventy- 
five feet wide and three quarters of a mile long. The Park is three miles long by about half a 
mile wide, and its area is about one thousand acres. The reports we mention are for the 



Smithsonian Medical and Hygienic Institute, 635 Cal., B. 7. SMITH, M.D., p7?opt 



; ). P. VAIT 5CHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 31 



biennial period ending November 30fch, 1875. At the commencement of the period just 
expired there had been received from all sources the sum of $216,603.3(), of which $207,399.98 
liad been exiiended, leaving a cash balance of $9,20.3.38. Since tliat time the receijjts have 
been as follows: From the sale of l)onds, .?229,()fi2.50; from sale of Lupin seed, $799.7fi; from 
Police Court fines, §375; from Pound fees, §252; from hire of tools, $13; making a total since 
their last report of §231,102.2(5; with balance on hand at that date— .?9, 203. 38— $240, 305. G4. 

The amount expended during the past two years is $205,877.69, leaving a cash balance on 
liand of $34,527.95. Since its t)rganization the Board of Park Commissioners has disbursed 
.$,389,566.35, all of which is represented by actual work performed on the grounds in its charge, 
and for the purchase of mnterial and merchandise employed in the work. For the future 
maintenance of the Park the Legislature of the State, 1876, authorized the Board of Super- 
visors to appropriate $15,000, and to levy an annual assessment upon the taxable property 
of the City and County, of one and one half per cent, upon each one hundred dollars valuation. 

The amount actually expended upon the Parks also includes the expense of fencing the 
Buena Vista and Mountain Lake Parks, and making large plantations on the former reserva- 
tion, so that deducting the expense of the preliminary topographical survey of Golden Gate 
Park, and the amount of the items of expense upon the other two reservations, the cost of 
improvement and maintenance of the Park, as seen by ordinary visitors, has been, during the 
past four and a half years, since the work commenced, about $379,814.35. Of this, about 
$72,000 is chargeable to maintenance; and about .$10,000 invested in work-horses, rolling-stock, 
heavy imjjlements, tools, office furniture, instruments, and other needful incidentals, in good 
order for future use ; so that the total cost of improving Golden Gate Park and Avenue, includ- 
ing all plans therefor, superintendence of the work and reclamation of the sands, is, to date 
hereof, $297,814.35. 

The statement relating to visitors shows that one hundred and thirty thousand eight hun- 
dred and eighty-eight vehicles and four hundred and forty-four thousand six hundred and 
eighteen persons entered the Park during the year ending November 30, 1874, and one hundred 
and tifty-seven thousand and ninety-one vehicles and five hundred and sixteen thousand one 
Imudred and seventy persons in the year ending November 30, 1875. During the first men- 
tioned year fourteen million one hundred and twenty-three thousand six hundred and forty-one 
callous of water were used on the grounds ; during the latter year, thirteen million eight hun- 
dred and ninety-seven thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine gallons. 

The length of roadway constructed is twenty-five thousand eight hundred and eighty-two 
feet, representing an area of one million six hundred thousand eight hundred and thirty square 
feet. 

About ten thousand linear feet of walks have been graded and macadamized in the Park, of 
which somewhat less than half is fully surfaced, while the remainder requires only a thin layer 
of screened rock for their completion. There are ten thousand seven hundred linear feet of 
walk graded, ready for macadamizing, in the avenue. This, with the ten thousand six hundred 
feet macadamized in the Park, and about two thousand five hundred feet more now under con- 
struction, makes twentj'^-eight thousand eight hundred linear feet, or somewhat over four miles 
of walk, which may be placed in serviceable condition at a reasonable expense during the pres- 
ent year. 

The length of drains laid is £is follows : Rock drain, two thousand eight hundred and thirty 
feet ; wooden drain, eight by ten inches, five thousand nine hundred and ninety-eight feet ; 
drain tile, two-inch, three hundred and ninety-six feet ; iron-stone drain-pipe, three to seven- 
inch, one thousand three hundred and sixteen feet ; total length, ten thousand five hundred and 
forty feet. 

Following is a statement of trees and shrubs planted in grounds : Purchased and planted in 
the avenue and Eastern portion of the Golden Gate Park in the Spring of 1872, six thousand 
six hundred and thirty ; raised in the nursery and planted on the same grounds since that date, 
forty-one thousand nine hundred and forty-nine ; raised and planted on western or sand district 
of Golden Gate Park during the seasons of 1873-75, seventeen thousand eight hundred and 
four ; ditto on Buena Vista Park during same period, six thousand three hundred and thirty- 
seven. Total trees and shrubs planted out, seventy -two thousand seven hundred and twenty ; 
to be planted during season of 1875-76, twenty thousand; total planted out with present appro- 
priation, ninety-two thousand seven hundred and twenty. In addition to the above there are 
probably thirteen thousand to fifteen thousand young plants, for planting in subsequent seasons, 
in the nursery. 

The reservation known as the Great Highway is the key to all the work of permanent recla- 
mation of the downs. It comprises a strip of land along the ocean beach, extending south from 
the Cliff House bluff about two and seven-eighths miles, varying in width*from two hundred to 
four hundred feet, accord ng to the curvature of the shore line. On it the sands are thrown by 
the ocean waves and carried inland, a continuous fresh supply to the drift. The manner in 
which this is being reclaimed, and a further drift of sand prevented, is thus described : 

Along a line on the Highway reservation, lying parallel to and one hundred feet west of its 

item boundary from its intersection with a prolongation of the northern boundary of Golden 
rate Park, south, for a mile in length, across the face of the Western end of the Park Reserva- 
on, and for half a mile south of it a brush fence has been built. Redwood posts, four by four 



JAMES &. STEELE & CO. dispense Prescriptions from Pure Medicines. 



0. p. VAN SCHAACK «S: CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 186! 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 



inches and fourteen feet long, were set three feet in the sand, at intervals of twelve feet ; to 
which, on the leeward side, two rails of one by six jjine fencing lumber were loosely fastened, 
originally near the ground and about two feet apart. 

Against tliese rails on the outside a thin wall f)f brush was laid, which, nmking an eddy in 
the winds, causes the advancing sands to heap up about the fence, a steep bank on the leeward 
face, sloping away gently towards the beach. As the surface becomes higher, the rails are 
raised and more brush applied ; the down being now about nine feet in height, and the drift of 
the sand eflectually restrained from advancing more than eighteen feet within the line of fence. 
As the present fence posts become covered, another row will be set parallel to them and about 
fifty feet further towards the water, where the same process of checking the sands will be gone 
through with, until the hillock becomes high and w^de enough to improve as the proposed 
elevated drive, along which will be planted suitable trees ; the outer slope of the embankment 
being planted wdth sea-beach grass and its imier face covered ^vith shrubbery. In the course 
of time, the grass arresting further drift, and growing through it, the slope of the beach will 
become too great for lodgment of more sand, and the advance will be checked. The drive on 
the summit of the do^^^l wiU supply the place of that on the beach, commanding a fine view of 
the ocean and the inland improvements ; and the proposed lower road at the foot of the down 
on its inner line, will furnish a grand promenade, nearly three miles long, level and straight, 
entirely protected from the winds. 

The engineer considers it demonstrated that the shifting sands may be thoroughly reclaimed 
and covered -svith vegetation, without resorting to such expensive expedients as had at first 
been anticipated. 

The Commissioners, feeling the necessity of concentrating their resources on the principal 
park, have as yet paid but little attention to Bueua Vista Park, which, however, will not be 
much longer neglected. The fine prospectc of bay and city scenery which it presents will, 
together ^Hth its other natural advantages, make it a most popular resort. The small park 
around Mountain Lake, as an indispensable feature to the general plan, will also be improved 
before long, and Congress wiE also, almost certainly, grant the use of the most of the Presidio 
Military Reservation to the city for the purposes of a park. It wiU, therefore, be seen that 
San Francisco is in process of being liberally and well supplied with desirable places of out- 
door recreation. 

Pioneer Park. — In the early part of the present year, a few enterprising citizens conceived 
the idea of preserving in its original condition the crest of Telegraph Hdl, one of the most 
prominent and interesting landmarks of the city, and for that purpose contributed a fund 
sulficient for the pxirchase of several fifty vara lots, including the above site. It is proposed to 
dedicate the plat for the purposes of a public jiark, and to carry into efi'ect this object the Leg- 
islature, at its last session, passed an act authorizing the Board of Supervisors to appropriate 
five thousand dollars to be expended in the erection of fences and beautifying the grounds, 
provided the fee of the land is conveyed to the City and County of San Francisco. 

Woodward's Gardens. — Park, garden, pond, fountain, museum, aquarium, consers'atory, 
theater, circus, hippodrome, menagerie, skating rink, picnic ground, restaurant, and everything 
in the world of out-door or in-door amusement, or the best possible combination of both, that 
can contribute to attract and delight the public, this all comprehensive and most popular resort 
is sure to provide. If any visitor can discover a deficiency he has only to make it known to 
the enterprising proprietor who is sure to supplj' it at the earliest possible moment. It is the 
universal verdict of all late \4sitors, that no city in America can show anj^ place of public resort 
which provides anything approaching the abundance and variety of means for pul)lic recreation 
which are here to be found. The immense pavilion' is the largest and strongest permanent 
wooden building upon the coast. It has the form of a huge parallelogram, with the corners cut 
off, thus giving its ground outline the shape of a regular octagon. One hundred and fifty feet 
long by one hundred and thirty wide, and fifty feet high, with broad rows of strong seats running 
entirely around it, and massive galleries also encompassing its whole curcumference, and accom- 
modates within its acre and a half of extent seven thousand spectators at once. In the center 
a solidly-laid, perfectly-fitted, and smoothly-planed floor, one hundred and ten feet long by 
ninety in width, furnishes as extensive a scope for skating as the most ambitious could desire. 
The new aquarium is most surprisingly delightful and wholly successful attempt at establish- 
ing permanent_ homes for the most rare and curious, as well as the most common and useful of 
the finny tribes. Here also one may study at leisure the mysteries of trout hatching and raising 
from the egg to the fuUy-growTi specimens of the largest and finest varieties, until the whole 
oi^eration V)ecome as clear as the glass throiigh which it appears. 

The City Garden.s. — On the south side of Twelfth Street, stretching from Folsomto Harrison 
streets, and running tialf a block south. The gi-ounds are finely laid out and ornamented with, 
shade trees, shrubbery, arbors, etc. It has also a pavilion in which theatrical representations, 
balls, and various otlier popular entertainments follow each other as the successive tastes of its 
patrons demand. 

Public Squares and Parks. — Portsmouth Sqiiare, commoidy known as the Plaza, on th«' 
west side of Kearny Street, extending from Clay to Washington streets and directly fronting the 
old City Hall, is the oldest, most celebrated, and best finished public square. 

Union Square, bounded by Post, Stockton, Geary, and Powell streets, and for several years 



BEAMISH'S— Shirt manufacturer, Nucleus Building, corner Third and Market 



35 P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 33 



occupied by tlie successive buildings for various Mechanics' Fairs, is now one of the most 
beautifully-improved and neatly-kept squares of the metropolis. 

Nearer the northerly or north central portion of the city, Washington Square, bounded by 
Filbert, Stockton, Union, and Powell streets, supplies a sort of municipal lung for the denizens 
in that vicinity. 

Besides these, Columbia, Lobos, Alcatraz, Lafayette, Jefferson, Alta, Hamilton, and Alamo 
squares relieve tlieir resjjective jxtrtions of the citj' from undue crowding and suggest to the 
neighboring residents the beautiful meadows of their earlier homes, or the arid deserts of Arabia, 
acconling as their grassy or sandy surfaces attest the attention or neglect of tlie City Fathers. 
Liberal appropriations were authorized by the Legislature, at its session of 1876, for the im- 
provement of several of the public squares hitherto neglected by our city authorities. 

Promenades. — Montgomery Street is our occidental Broadway. On either side rise some of 
the largest and finest retail business houses. Tlu-ee of the leading hotels are here, and four 
others within less than half a block. During the forenoon business occiipies its area almost 
exclusively. Near its intersection Maih California Street, "the bulls and bears of Mammon's 
fierce zoology " frequently congregate in crowds so dense as to monopolize the side walks. 
Afternoons, fashion claims its place, and well-nigh crowds business, not exactly to the wall, 
but out ui3on the curbstone <and occasionally into the gutter. 

From tliree to five p. M. the tide of Mammon ebbs and that of fashion swells in at full flood. 
Noble and queenly women alternate with their fair and frail sisters, forms of beauty and faces 
which range downward from positive plaimiess to undisguisable ugliness, calicoes, silks, satins, 
velvets, broadcloths, beavers, and eassimeres, make up the motley throng, swaying, trailing, and 
jostling up and down the crowded thoroughfare. Many of the female faces are exceedingly fair, 
"as far as we can see," and the forms equally graceful, with the same qualification. Masculine 
faces, broad-browed, clear-eyed, firm-mouthed, or fullj'-bearded, irresistibly impress one Avith the 
dash, the drive, and the nerve which have tunneled the everlastiiig hills, spanned the continent 
with rails, and bridged the Pacific with steamships ere yet the full flush of manhood has fairly 
settled upon them. Too many show the full, uncertain lip, flushed cheek, and dewy eye that 
tell of excessive stimulants too frequently applied. Nowhere on earth is the temptation to drink 
as strong as here. Business is brisk, competition sharp, and the climate the most constantly 
stimulating anywhere to be found. Rivalry spurs them on every hand, and scores stand waiting 
to take their places the moment they step aside. vSo they drive till nature falters or weakens 
and calls for rest. But nature's rest they cannot or will not afford ; an artificial stimulant is 
quicker; it is ever j^-here close at hand ; it seems to save time ; companions press ; everybody 
does it, and they follow the fashion. Business men die suddenly ; on the street to-day, to- 
morrow at Lone Mountain. Heart disease, aj^oplexy, congestion of the lungs, disease of the 
kidnej's, or liver complaint, are the causes most generally assigned to that portion of the public 
which cannot afford even to stop long enough to inquire. The one great cause of all these 
causes few stop to ask, or dare to tell. 

Kearny Street, parallel with Montgomery and but a single block above, or to the west of it, 
competes with its companion and rival, Montgomery Street, as a great avenue of business and 
pleasure. Though some single buildings along Montgomery Street may be finer, the average of 
the newer business blocks and buildings of Kearny Street, in some portions of its extent, falls 
but little behind that of the great central and more celebrated avenue. 

California Street, at right angles with the two gi-eat thoroughfares mentioned above, and 
crossing them at right angles near their centers — the Wall Street of the Pacific — runs straight 
down from one of the highest summits within the city limits, to -nathin tM'o blocks of the water 
front, and there debouches into Market Street. Alon^ the crowning bights of its upper por- 
tions several of our wealthiest citizens have i>lanted their palatial residences, elsewhere noted, 
commanding most extensive A-iews of the city beneath, the bay, Oakland, Brooklyn, and the 
bounding hills of the Coast Range, which slope up toward, and finally culminate in, Mount 
Diablo. Farther down, St. Mary's Cathedral, the Safe Deposit Block, and leading telegraph 
offices; thence, from Montgomery Street to Battery, the finest array of business blocks and 
banking buildings which the city presents. 

Market Street is the broad, diA-iding avenue which separates the older city from the newer, 
offers a rare architectural medley to the eye of the exploring artist. This great central high- 
way is the longest and widest of the city streets. Starting from the water front at the western 
margin of the bay, whence it slightly ascends through eight or nine blocks, it runs thence south- 
westerly, on a nearly level grade beyond the city limits. Its surface presents nearly every con- 
ceivable variety of natural conformation ingeniously varied with artificial distortion. Plank, 
rubble. Macadam, cobble, Nicolson, gravel, stone foundation, deep sand, and, finally, undis- 
guised dirt, offer their successive and pleasing variety to the exidoring Sye. Stately blocks, 
grand hotels, massive stores, common tenements, and tumble-down shanties form its varied and 
picturesque boundary on either hand. ^^Tien the high, summer winds sweep easterly dowm its 
i'road avenue ladened vrith clouds of flying sand from vacant lots along its either margin, it 
sometimes becomes a decidedly open question whether some of the marginal lots really belong 
in the department of real estate, or should properly be entered in the catalogue of movable prop- 
erty. We have dwelt thus long upon this street, not only on account of its central position 
and superior dimensions, but because it is, in respect to many particulars, a representative street. 



STEELE'S Glycerine Lotion cures Tan, Sunburn, Eruptions, etc. 



I'lNE WATCHES and JEWELRY for Sale ty D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery 



34 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Others are like it as far as they can be. Did length, width, and direction permit, they would 
resemble it still more closely. It is fast becoming the great business street of the city, and, 
spite of the roughness and crudeness necessarily attaching to most of the streets of a new and 
fast-growing city, it unmistakably possesses all the requisites of the future "Grand Avenue" of 
the Pacific metropolis. 

Dupont Street. Authority has been given to the Board of Supervisors, by act of the Leg- 
islature, 1876, to widen this street from Market to Filbert, an improvement earnestly desired j 
by those li\ang in the district affected thereby. 

Dri\t:s. — The ClifiF House Road stretches westerly from near the end of Bush Street to the 
Pacific Ocean beach. Originally a mere trail over the sand hills, it has become the broadest, 
smoothest, hardest, and longest track in the State. If the visitor wishes an idea of California 
horseflesh and California turnouts, let him drive out this road almost any day. The roadway is a 
fine, smooth, hard surface, wide enough in places for twenty teams abreast, and is often nearly 
filled from side to side with the smooth rolling of friendly racing teams, from the natty single 
buggy to the elegant coach, or hack, and the stately four-in-hand. A million dollars' worth of 
legs and wheels flash by a man in a very short time on this fashionable drive, especially on a 
racing day. Along this road are two or three road-side inns, which, like the majority of Cal- 
ifornia inns, are chiefly drinking houses under another name. At the end of the road stands 
the Cliff House, so named from its site, the nearly solid top of a precipitous, rocky bluff, or 
cliff, overlooking the Seal Rocks, a few hundred feet west ; then the fifty-mile sweep of the 
Pacific Ocean horizon, broken only by the sharp, rocky points of the ^^rallones, low down 
under the western sky, and clearly ^^sible when fogs, and mists, and haze permit. South of 
the cliff the road winds down the bluff to and out upon the ocean beach, which differs from the 
well-known Eastern beach drives except that it is not as wide even at the lowest tides, and that 
the ocean view thence is far more seldom diversified with passing sails. The surf, however, is 
fair, and the beach usually good, so that brisk driving for two or three miles ujion it seldom 
fails to put the oxygen into the lungs, the iodine into the blood, and the exhilaration into the 
spirits. Some two or three miles south of the Cliff House the road bends easterly, leaves the 
beach, and starts back to the city by another way, known as the Ocean House Road, which, 
like the former, takes its name from a public house, or hotel, near its seaward end. Approach- 
ing the city by this route, one reaches a greater hight than by the Cliff House Road, and some 
two or three miles from the city centers enjoys a beautifulAaew of the southern, western, and cen- 
tral city, the shipping, the bay, the opposite shore, the trailing cities and towns whose straggling 
houses gleam between the trees of Alameda and Contra Costa counties, with their grassy foot hills, 
the whole view backed and bounded by the dominating peak of old Mount Diablo beyond. 
Coming in by this way one enters the city suburbs on the southwest, passing directly by the 
old Mission Dolores, with its famous old church, and makes his way back to the city centers by 
Market, Mission, Howard, or Folsom streets. 

The "drives" of the Golden Gate Park, over four miles in length, present the most attrac- 
tive advantages, constantly revealing to the eye a series of the most beautiful views of the sur- 
rounding country and the Pacific Ocean. 

Between the Cliff House and the Ocean House roads, but nearer the latter, runs a third, 
known as the Central Ocean Drive. 

Over the Bay View Road Drive, from Market along Third or Fourth street to Long Bridge, 
across that to the Potrero, keep straight on through the Mission cut, over Islais Creek Bridge, 
thence tlirough South San Fr ncisbo, up the little rise from whose summit you may look do\\Ti 
upon the little valley, a great bay of vegetable gardens, between which and the water, and on 
the north side of Bay View Race Track, stands the Bay View House. If one would readily 
understand why they used the phrase "Bay View" so frequently in naming localities hereabout, 
he has only to glance eastward from any one of several points on his way out, to solve the 
problem. 

Northerly from the city the only drive takes one to the Presidio and Fort Point, over a road 
not remarkable for excellence, and through suburbs not particularly attractive. 

From the city front the pleasantest and, probably, the only practicable drive, would be 
that upon the deck of a ferry boat. The best time for any or all of these drives is in thM 
morning — the earlier the better. Besides the greater purity, freshness, and clearness of .the ai« 
everywhere occompanying the morning hours, one then escapes the wind and dust which, OBt^ 
nearly every afternoon through more than half the j'ear, constitute the chief drawback from the 
full enjoyment of out-door pleasure near the California coast. 

Water Supply. 

The water supplied to the city comes almost entirely from the works of the Spring Valley 
Water Company. Several large buildings derive a sufficient supply from artesian wells. At 
the U. S. Mint, Palace Hotel, Baldwin's Hotel, and a few other places, there are such wells. 
At a depth of one hundred and twenty feet a bed of gravel is found, through which runs a 
stream of clear, fresh, and cold water. It is of prime importance, however, tliat water should 
be distributed under a heavy pressure ; and if it were possible to sink a well on every block, 
property holders would still prefer to procure water from pipes cormected with a fountain head 
far above the general level of this city. 



HYGIENIC BOARDINa at Smithsonian Medical Institute of Dr. SMITH, 635 Ca 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGUESSOPTHECITY. 35 



The Spring Valley Water Works draw their principal supply from the Peninsula, where 
they control the watershed of thirty-nine square miles, which supplies the three storage reser- 
yoirs, namely : the Pilarcitos reservoir, San Andres reservoir, and the Crystal Springs reservoir, 
all being located at a sufficiently high altitude to supply all parts of the city. The three reser- 
voirs together have a storage capacity of over 15,000,000,000 gallons, which can and will be in- 
creased to 40,000,000,000 gallons by building the lower Crystal Springs dam. The aggregate 
capacity of the reservoirs of the Company is 15,256,500,000 gallons. 

The water from these reservoirs is delivered by means of two 30-inch plate-iron pipes, into 
the Lake Honda Reservoir, and the College Hill Reservoir respectively — the former holds 
thirty -four million gallons and the latter foui-teen million gallons ; these two reservoirs again 
feed the water to the five smaller distributing reservoirs in San Francisco, viz. : Market Street, 
Russian Hill, Francisco Street, Clay Street, and Brannan Street reservoirs; all these seven 
reservoirs, together holding in the vicinity of sixty million gallons. 

The water from these distributing reservoirs is furnished to the inhabitants of San Fran- 
cisco, through a system of cast-iron pipes laid in the streets, seven hundred and eighty thousand 
feet, or nearly one hundred and fifty miles, in length, varying in diameter from twenty-two- 
inch to four-inch. 

The Company also owns the Lobos Creek property, which, by means of its aqueduct, a 
pumping apparatus furnishes two million gallons per day. 

The daily supply is at present in the neighborhood of twelve million gallons. In order to 
meet the increasing Want of the city in the future, the Company has acquired the right to 
bring into their present works, the water furnished by sixty additional square miles of water- 
shed, comprising the larger coast streajns south of Spanishtown. 

The Legislature of 1873-74 authorized the Board of Supervisors to come and examine the 
sources of water supply and to jmrchase or condemn such as might be selected. In accordance 
with law, T. R. Scowden was elected Water Engineer, and instructed to make an examination 
of the rivers, lakes, and water-sheds, which could be rendered available. After a series of ex- 
tended surveys, he submitted a report containing the required information. He recommended 
the purchase of the water- sheds of Calaveras Valley, located partly in Alameda County and 
partly in Calaveras County. The Spring Valley Water Company subsequently purchased the 
Calaveras property, and the Sui^ervisors decided to negotiate for the ijurchase of the property 
owned by that Company. The price asked for the real estate and franchises at Calaveras Creek 
was one million dollars, and for the other property, $14,500,000. The Supervisors declined to 
make the purchase, and for the time being the city's effort to become owner of a system of 
water works came to an end. Many propositions were submitted and a vast amount of inter- 
esting information was placed in possession of the public. The Legislature of 1875-76 has 
passed an Act for the appointment of Commissioners to regulate water rates, under which 
selections have been made, and also a law authorizing the city to purchase or erect water 
works. (See pages 1028 and 1031. ) 

To show the many separate sources from which San Francisco can be supplied with water, 
we give a brief statement of those described by Mr. Scowden, premising that the supply on the 
peninsula seems adequate for the wants of a city much larger than San Francisco is likely to 
become during the present generation. The water shed of the Calaveras Creek has an area of 
139. 48 square miles, and the estimated daily supply is seventy-nine million six hundred and ninety- 
two thousand six hundred gallons. A dam one hundred ^feet high would be needed, and the 
route of the conduit to San Francisco would be around the head of the bay, by way of Alviso, 
a distance of .45.48 miles. Total cost, $10,655,052. 

The Blue Lakes are in Alpine County, at the summit of the Sierras. A daily supply of one 
hundred million of gallons can be obtained, at a cost of $25,581,414. Length of route, 217.06. 
Clear Lake is in the central part of Lake County, 127.23 miles distant. The source of supply 
is "practically inexhaustible," being far beyond the wants of a population of one million peo- 
ple. Cost of the scheme, .$22,014,641.22. 

Mr. Scowden also gave exhaustive descriptions of the resoiirces of the Spring Valley Water 
Company, and of the Lagu^ja Merced and Pescadero Creek, the former being within six miles 
of the City Hall, and this taking its rise in the Santa Cruz Mountains. It can thus be seen 
that San Francisco will never suffer such embarassments as have been encountered by many large 
cities in obtaining an abundance of pure water. The sources from which she can obtain it are 
uany, and the cost will be trifling when contrasted with what has elsewhere been paid for facil- 
ities far more restricted than those within our reach. 

lilbrarles. 

Mercantile Library, on the north side of Bush Street, between Montgomery and Sansom. 
The building has a frontage on Bush Street of sixty-eight feet nine inches, with a depth of one 
I iiindred and thirty-seven feet and six inches. It is three stories high, with basement and attic. 
The fa9ade is of the modem Italian style, sixty-five feet to the top of the main cornice, and is 
surmounted by a mansard roof, with iron crestings. Upon the first floor is the library, contain- 
ing about forty thousand volumes, the reading room, reference library, ladies' reading room, 
parlor, and trustees' room. On the second floor, the chess and smoking room, writing room , 



AlIES Q. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 



D. "W. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, Wholesale and Eetail, cor. Merchant and Mc U 



36 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



museum, and store room for periodicals. The library room extends the full width of the 
front of the building, and is fifty-four feet deep, -nath a height of twenty feet in the clear. A 
tasteful, light, airy gallery, for the convenience of the librarian, is erected on two sides of the 
room. The basement contains a lecture room, fifty-eight feet by seventy-four and twenty-fo^ir 
high ; supper room, ladies' and gentlemen's dressing rooms, waiting rooms, etc. The whole of the 
first story front is of iron, as also are all the ^vindow dressings, coins, strings, and pilasters of 
the rest of the front. The interior finish is of kiln-dried, white cedar, varnished ; the doors, stair 
finish, anil book cases, of black walnut. In addition to the library is a large list of magazines 
and periotlicals, comprising one hundred and sixteen magazines, twenty-three illustrated paiiers, 
about the same number of foreign papers, some eighty-two Atlantic and one hundred and thirty- 
four Pacific papers, besides papers from the Sandwich Islands and Cape of Good Hope. The 
number of volumes taken from the library during 1875, was eighty thousand one hundred. 

The Mechanics' Institute is a fine, three-story brick building, having a frontage of seventy^ 
five feet on Post Street, south side, between Montgomery and Kearny. The l)uilding contains 
the library, reading, and chess rooms, a lecture hall capable of seating five hundred persons, a 
smaller hall, and three stores. The library comprises nearly thirty-five thousand volumes, 
among which are many rare and costly scientific and mechanical works, and this number is now 
increased by the addition of three thousand and three hundred volumes of the British Patent 
Reijorts and Specifications, donated to the Institute. This has increased the library to con 
siderably over thirty-five thousand volumes. The Institute is also one of the official depositories 
of tlie Patent Office P^eports of the Department at Washington. The Industrial Fairs of this 
society constitute a prominent and attractive feature of the instructive entertainments of the 
city. During the past few years they have been held annually, and with such successful 
results that it is probable they will hereafter yearly delight and instruct the general public. 
The tenth of these fairs was held last year, in the new Mechanics' Pavilion, on Eighth Street, 
between Market and Mission. The entire building is two hundred feet wide by five hundred 
and fifty feet long. It has a grand central nave one hundred by four hundred and fifty feet, 
around which runs a spacious gallery fifty feet wide. It is a remarkably substantial, well- 
built, wooden structure, conveniently arranged and admirably adapted to the purpose for 
which it is designed. Cost, $110,000. The Eleventh Industrial Fair will open on the eighth 
day of August, 1876, and there is no doubt it will prove a greater success than any which have 
preceded. 

The Odd Fellows' Library occupies a commodious and excellently-arranged hall, at No. 
325 Montgomery Street. The library contains over twenty-nine thousand volumes, in the 
various departments of literature, science, and art, and includes one of the most extensive 
collection of works on the early history of the Pacific Coast, as well as one of the most com- 
plete and valuable cabinets in the State. Organized, December 30, 1854. 

San Francisco Law Library. — In 1865, a society was formed for the purjjose of organ- 
izing and maintaining a Law Library, and its success is demonstrated by the fact that it now 
has some fifteen thousand volumes of standard legal, biographical, historical, and miscellaneous 
works upon its shelves. The library derives its support fi-om a monthly levy upon its mem- 
bers of $2. 50 ; it also derives a revenue of $1 from every case tried before the District Courts 
of the city. 

The Military Library was organized in January, 1873, for the purpose of acquiring, pre- 
serving, and conducting a public library composed chiefly of books and periodicals of a military 1^ 
character. This institution derives its support from the sales of shares at .$5 each. Members'*, 
may use as many books at a time as they hold shares. There are no dues, but the trustees ,f. 
have power to call for $5 additional upon each share whenever they deem it necessary. ^ 

League Nationals Library was organized in August, 1871, under the aiispices of the 1 
League Nationale Francais. The library contains over five thousand volumes, contributed by 
members and their friends. Any person, acceiitable to the Board of Trustees, can have access 
to the reading-room by paying a monthly fee of $1.50. 

The San Francisco Verein have a well selected German library of fifteen thousand 
volumes, at their elegant rooms opened during the last year, and furnished and decorated at a 
cost of about .$75,000. The Academy of Sciences, the Young Men's Christian Association, the 
California Pioneers, and many literary clubs and associations, also have reading rooms and 
libraries. 

Associations— Benevolent an«l Protective. 

The operations of the different Associations, Benevolent, Protective, etc. , are fully detailed 
in the Appendix, pages 1082-1109. During the past year several important charities have been 
established to assist those already in existence. The unequaled munificence of our citizens in 
their generous support of the many organizations of a benevolent character in our midst, as well 
as their prompt and characteristic responses to the many appeals for assistance from abroad, have 
given them a reputation that any community may well be proud of. 

Private Charities. 

The liberality of the people of San Francisco is well shown by the number and character of 
the many benevolent institutions they sustain. The cosmopolitan character of our population 






BEAMISH'S— Importer Furnishing Goods, Nucleus Bldg, cor. Third and Mark« 



?. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 



37 






is proven by the existence of hospitals for Germans, French, and Italians. St. Mary's Hospital, 
uniler the care of the Sistei's of Mercy, is one of the best in the city. St. Luke's Hosi)ital, 
maintained by the Episcopal churches, is continually increasing the sphere of its usefulness. 
Tho Frotostant, Catholic, and Hebrew orphan asylums are each well endowed and generously 
sustained in their good work. The San Francisco Benevolent Association disburses over f 1,500 
per month, and aflbrds a vast amount of relief to the destitute. The association is able to give 
food and clothing to all who really deserve it, and to provide some kind of employment for 
such as are able to work, so that almsgiving upon the street is not only unnecessary but an 
actual encouragement to mendicants. The Ladies' Protection and Relief Society takes care of 
two hundred friendless little girls, and secures places for them in Christian families where they 
can receive suitable attention and instruction. The California State Women's Hospital, the 
San Francisco Female Hospital, and scores of other noble charities, are doing an amount of good 
beyond the possibility of estimating. Elsewhere in this work will be found in detail a statement 
of the affairs of these institutions. 

Onr PnliUc Scbool.s. 

The first English school was organized in San Francisco, in April, 1847, with about thirty 
pupils. It was taught by a Mr. Marston, who is, therefore, the pioneer California school- 
master. Late in the same year the citizens organized a public school and erected a building on 
the southwest comer of Portsmoiith Square. In April, 1849, the Common Council established 
a public school, and John C. Pelton and wife were emploj'^ed as teachers. The city has always 
been liberal in its support of the common schools, and to-day San Francisco is in this respect 
one of the foremost among American cities. 

We give below the more interesting statistics for the last school year, and for convenience 
of comparison we also give the figures for the entire State as reported to the State Board of 
Education : 



San Francisco. 



The State. 



Number of white bojs between five and seventeen years of age 

Number of white girls between five and seventeen years of age 

Number of negro children between five and seventeen years of age 

Total census children between five and seventeen years of age 

Number of children under five j-cars of age 

Number of children between five and seventeen years of age who have attended 

public school at any time during the year 

Number of children between five and seventeen years of age who have attended 

private schools at any time during the year 

Native born, native parents 

Native born, one parent foreign 

Native born, both parents foreign 

Foreign bom 

Whole number enrolled 

Average number belonging 

Average daily attendance 

Percentage of attendance on average- number belonging 

Number of male teachers 

Number of female teachers 

Average monthly pay of male teachers 

Average monthly pay of female teachers 

Cash received from State apportionment 

Cash received from county taxes 

Total receipts from all sources 

Amount paid for teachers' salaries 

Rent, repairs, fuel, and contingent expenses ,. . 

Total current expenses 

Amount paid for sites, buildings, and furniture 

Total cxi>enditures 

Total vahie of school property 



20,243 
20,61.5 
163 
41,021 
23,024 

26,211 

6,094 

13,319 

6,282 

42,886 

2,413 

32,075 

22,151 

20,830 

94.03 

61 

446 

$165.20 

78.60 

$288,836.75 

391,654.30 

986,425.75 

519,138.72 

147,778.10 

669,386.14 

134,221.22 

803,607.36 

2,239,600.00 



85,763 

83,620 

1,067 

171,563 

78,050 

116,896 

15,021 

125,119 

26,962 

93,776 

6,444 

130,930 

86,637 

78,027 

90.06 

1,033 

1,660 

$•84.93 

68.01 

$1,210,808.49 

1,115,530.06 

3,390,359.30 

1,810,479.62 

381,800.62 

2,236,961.98 

421,279.36 

2,658,241.34 

5,068,678.30 



According to the report for September, 1875, the annual amount paid for salaries would be 
$545,070, and the average annual salary of each teacher would be $1,021.13. The average 
annual cost for the tuition of each pupil belonging is .?29. 82. The percentage of the total 
expenditures of this city, for educational purposes, is 15.9. 

Study of the Foreigx L.a.nguages.^ — In September, 1875, there were one thousand four 
hundred and twenty seven pupils studying French; two thousand eight hundred and fifty-one 
studying German ; one hundred and eleven studying Latin ; and forty studying Greek. There 
are thirteen teachers of German and nine teachers of French. 

Evening Schools. — There are eight hundred and ninety-one pupils at the evening schools, 
wenty-three teachers being employed for their instruction. 

Progress during the Year. — During the school year ending June 30, 1875, the increase in 
the number of children under seventeen years of age was four thousand seven hundred and 
eighty, and the increase in the number enrolled was one thousand two hundred and sixteen. 

JAMES G. STEELE & CO., Apothecaries, No. 316 Kearny Street. 



D. W. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, Wholesale and Retail, cor. Merchant and Mo l'' 



38 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



1 

1 
! 

W; 

I • 

Itei 



The proceeds of the sale of bonds, to the amount of §200,000 have been expended in the erection 
of substantial and commodious school houses, which have afforded accommodations for the 
four thousand two hunilred and seventy-one pupils who had previously been taught in rented 
rooms, which were often dark, damp, and unhealthy. The eight new school houses erected 
during that period can seat nearly six thousand pupils. 

CosMOPOLiTAX SCHOOL.S. — The summary a]K)lition of the study of any language other than 
the English in all the schools of the Department excepting only the two High Schools, provoked 
a popular displeasure, and aroused a public opposition which resulted in a legislative enactment 
requiring the Board of Education to restore the study of the German and French languages in 
at least two Grammar and two Primary Schools. Ha\T[ng become fully satisfied of the unex- 
pected strength and extent of the popular demand for free public instruction in these two lan- 
guages, the Board liberally went beyond the mere letter of the law, and, in September, 1875, had 
introduced the study of the French and German into four Grammar Schools, and five Primary. 
The present regulation requires no pupil to study any other, and alloics him to study but one 
other language than the English. In September, 1875, the number of pupils studying French 
was one thousand four hundred and twenty-seven, while those studjdng German numbered two 
thousand eight hundred and fifty-one. To instruct these the Board employs thirteen teachers of 
German, and nine teachers of French. As now conducted these schools are giving general sat- 
isfaction, and becoming increasmgly popular. 

Evening Schools. — Five Evening Schools, employing twenty-three teachers, continuing 
through nine months, enrolling two thousand one hundred and seventy-three pupils, having an 
average monthly enrollment of eight hundred and twenty-seven and three tenths, and an average 
daily, or, perhaps we should say nightly, attendance of six hundred and eighty six and three 
tenths, summarize the important facts of these extremely useful schools. Of twenty classes, 
nineteen were male and one female. The rcRnlts of the instruction in Bookkeeping, in Mechan- 
ical and Industrial Drawing, the notable progi-ess of large numbers of young foreign'ers in learn- 
ing to read, write, and speak Engbsh, together with the general progress of all the pupils in 
gaining practical familiarity w4th Commercial Arithmetic and Business Forms, merit especial 
notice and commendation. Under the continued supervision of W. A. Robertson, Esq. , good 
order and discipline, with improved general efficiency, have additionally demonstrated the great 
practical utility, and in fact the indispensable pubbc necessity, of these valuable auxiliaries 
to our public instruction. 

Colored Schools. — Two colored schools, enrolling ninety-eight difi"erent pupils, employing 
three teachers, and having an average daily attendance of but forty-nine scholars, or sixteen 
and one third to each teacher, formed the record of these schools for the year. 

The following is a comparative statement of the daily attendance at all the Public Schools from 
1852 to 1875, being a period of twenty-four years : 1852, 445 ; 1853, 703; 1854, 1,011 ; 1855, 1,484; 
1856, 2,516; 1857, 2,155; 1858, 2,521 ; 1859, 2,829; 1860, 2,837; 1861, 3,377; 1862, 3,794; 1863, 
4,389; 1864, 5,470; 1865, 6,718; 1866, 8,131; 1867, 10,177; 1868, 11,871 ; 1869, 13,113; 1870, 
15,394; 1871, 16,382; 1872, 17,588; 1873, 18,530; 1874, 19,432; 1875, 21,014. 

Subjoined is a statement of the yearly expeucUtures of the Department since 1852 to the pres- 
ent time: 1852, .§23,125; 18.53, .§35,040; 1854, §159,249; 185.5, §136,580; 18.56, §125,064; 1857, 
i=;92,955 ; 18.58, §104,808; 1859, §134,731; 1860, §156,407; 1861, §158,855; 1862, §134,567; 1863, 
§178,929; 1864, §228,411; 1865, .§346,862; 1866, .§361,668; 1867, .§507,822; 1868, §415,839; 1869, 
.§400,842; 1870, .§526,625; 1871, §705,116; 1872, §668,262; 1873, $611,818; 1874, §689,022; 1875, 
§707,445.36. Total, twenty-four years, §7,610,043.36 {m 

LOCATION OF SCHOOLS. fl 

Number af PupiU Enrolled and the Average Attendance of School 3Ionth, ending May 31, 1875. 

Boys' High School (Location, north side Slitter Street, between Gough and Octavia).— Pu- 
pils registered, 238 ; average attendance, 177.99. 

GiHLs' High School (Location, north side of Bush Street, between Hyde and Larkin). — Pu- 
pils registered, 458 ; average attendance, 377.8. ^ 

Lincoln Grammar School (Location, east side of Fifth Street, near Market). — Pupils r<H 
istei-ed, 1,385; average attendance, 1,062.59. '^ 

Denman Grammar School (Location, northwest comer of Bush and Taylor streets). — Pupils 
registered, 971; average attendance, 814. 

RiNCON Grammar School (Location, Vassar Place, leading from Harrison Street, between 
Second and Third). — Pupils registered, 732; average attendance, 455. 

Broadway Grammar School (Location, north side of Broadw^ay Street, between Powell and 
Mason). — Pupils registered, 606; average attendance, 474.34. 

South Cosmopolitan Grammar School (Location, north side of Bush Street, between Du- 
pont and Stockton). — Pupils registered, 700; average attendance, 561. 

Union Gramm.\r School (Location, north side of Union Street, between Montgomery and 
Kearny). — Pupils registered, 633 ; average attendance, 439. 

Washington Grammar School (Location, southwest comer of Mason and Washington 
streets). — Pupils registered, 711 ; average attendance, 511.1. 

Spring Valley Grammar School (Location, south side of Broadway Street, between Lar- 
kin and Polk). — PuijUs registered, 710; average attendance, 528. 



SMITHSONIAN BATHS, Electro, Russian, Turkish, Medical, and Toilet, 635 Ca 



p. VAIT SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 7U, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OP THE CITY. 39 



North Cosmopolitan Grammar School (Location, north side of Filbert Street, between 
Jones and Taylor). — Pupils registered, 778; average attendance, 537.5. 

Hayes Valley Grammar School (Location, north side of McAllister Street, between Frank- 
lin and Gough). — Pupils registered, 1,438; average attendance, 947. 

Valencia Street Grammar School (Location, east side of Valencia Street, between Twen- 
ty-second and Twenty-third). — Pupils registered, 1,223; average attendance, 919.62. 

Eighth Street Grammar School (Location, east side of Eighth Street, between Harrison 
and Bryant). — Pupils registered, 1,304; average attendance, 898.76. 

South San Francisco School (Location, Fourteenth Avenue near L). — Pupils registered, 
404; average attendance, 271. 

Tehama Primary School (Location, south side of Tehama Street, near First). — Pupils reg- 
istered, 1,127 ; average attendance, 6947. 

Mission Primary School (Location, west side of Mission Street, between Fifteenth and Six- 
teenth). — Pupils registered, 877; average attendance, 606. 

Lincoln Primary School (Location, Bryant, near Sixth). — Pupils registered, 1,039; average 
attendance, 656. 

Fourth Street Primary School (Location, northwest corner of Fourth and Clara streets). 
Pupils registered, 641 ; average attendance, 518. 

South Cosmopolitan Primary School (Location, south side Eddy, between Polk and Van 
Ness Avenue). — Pupils registered, 884 ; average attendance, 755. 

Bush Street Cosmopolitan Primary School (Location, southeast comer of Bush and 
Stockton streets). — Pupils registered, 688; average attendance, 335.58. 

Taylor Street Cosmopolitan Primary School (Location, corner of Taylor and Post 
streets). — Pupils registered, 510; average attendance, 450. 

Greenwich Street Primary School (Location, south side of Greenwich Street, between 
Jones and Taylor). — Pupils registered, 793; average attendance, 528. 

Powell Street Primary School (Location, west side of Powell Street, between Jackson 
and Washington). — Pupils registered, 633; average attendance, 472. 

L^NioN Primary School (Location, northwest corner of Filbert and Kearny streets). — Pupils 
registered, 604 ; average attendance, 420. 5. 

Silver Street Primary* School (Location, north side of Silver Street, between Second 
and Third). — Pupils registered, 1,023; average attendance, 678.5. 

Broadway Street Primary' School (Location, north side of Broadway Street, between 
Montgomery and Sansom). — Pupils registered, 656; average attendance, 419. 

Model School (Location, south side of Geary Street, between Jones and Leavenworth). — 
Pupils registered, 641; average attendance, 576. 

Market Street Primary School (Location, south side of Market Street, between Fourth 
and Fifth). — Pupils registered, 1,299; average attendance, 805. 

Pine and Larkin Street Primary School (Location, southwest comer of Pine and Larkin 
streets). ^Pupils registered, 909 ; average attendance, 558. 

Eighth Street Primary' School (Location, east side of Eighth Street, between Harrison 
and Bryant). — Pupils registered, 732; average attendance, 438. 

Hayes Valley Prijlary School- (Location, north side of Grove Street, between Larkin 
and Polk). — Pupils registered, 692; average attendance, 458.7. 

Shotwell Street Prisiary School (Location, east side of Shotwell Street, between Twen- 
ty-second and Twenty-third). — Pupils registered, 695; average attendance, 493.9. 

Tyler and Jones Street Primary School (Location, north side of Tyler Street, near 
Jones). — Pupils registered, 296; average attendance, 272. 

Spring Valley Primary School (Location, south side of Union Street, between Franklin 
and Gough). — Pupils registered, 480; average attendance, 299.12. 

Pine Street Primary School (Location, north side of Pine Street, between Scott and 
Devisadero). — Pupils registered, 223; average attendance, 134.2. 

Tyler Street Primary School (Location, north side of Tyler Street, between Scott and 
Pierce). — Pupils registered, 385; average attendance, 267. 

New Primary' School (Location, north side Jackson, between Webster and Fillmore). 

We.'^t End School (Location, San Jose Road, near Six-mile House). — Pupils registered, 85; 
average attendance, 50. 

PoTRERo School (Location, southwest comer of Kentucky and Napa streets). — Pupils reg- 
istered, 257; average attendance, 156.4. 

San Bruno School (Location, Nebraska near Yolo). — Pupils registered, 416 ; average attend- 
ance, 196.1. 

Ocean House School (Location, San Miguel Road, near Ocean House Road). — Pupils regis- 
tered, 52 ; average attendance, 35. 8. 

Point Lobos School (Location, Nineteenth Avenue, Point Lobos Road, near the Turf 
House). — PupUs registered, 40 ; average attendance, 24. 3. 

■ Laguna Honda School (Location, Eighth Avenue, near K Avenue). — Pupils registered, 
'85; average attendance, 54. 

Fairmount School (Location, Chenery Street, near Randall. — Pupils registered, 189; 
average attendance, 1 14. 3. 



JAMES G-. STEELE & CO., Chemists, removed to ITo. 316 Heamy St. 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Eetail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merchai ^ 



40 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Evening Schools.— Pupils registered, 2,678; average attendance, 1301. 

A^'allejo Street Colored School (Location, northwest comer of Taylor and Vallejo 
streets). — Pupils registered, 76; average attendance, 39. 

Howard Street Colored School (Location, Howard Street, between Fourth and Fifth). 
— Pupils registered, 21 ; average attendance, 10.4. 

NoE AND Temple Street Primary School (Location, comer of Noe and Temple streets.) 
— Pupils registered, 58 ; average attendance, -. 

Geary Street Primary School (Location, Geary, between Pierce and Scott). 



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Collescs and Private Schools. 

St. Ignatius' College. — This well-known literary institution, located on Market Street, 
between Fourth and Fifth, which is conducted by the Fathers of the Society of Jesus, was first ' 
opened for the reception of students on the fifteenth day of October, 1855, and was incorporated 
under the law of the State on the thirtieth of April, 1859, and empowered to confer the usual 
degrees and academical honors. Since its commencement, this institution has been attended 
with the highest degi-ee of prosperity and success. The course of instruction pursued is thorough, 
and comprises a complete classical, mathematical, and philosophical course of training, calculated 
to prepare the pupil for entering upon the study of any of the professions, or commencing any 
business vocation. The college is provided with an extensive laboratory, comprising all the neces- 
sary appliances for the assaying of metals and making chemical analysis, which is an important 
feature not generally found in institutions of this character. There is a telegraphic room, with 
an instrument in operation, where the business of operating is taught. The " Ignatian Literary 
Society," for exercise in debate; the " Philhistorian Debating Society," to promote the knowl- 
edge of history; the "Loyola Scientific Academy," for the cultivation and promotion of the 
study of natural sciences ; a College Band and singing classes are established in the college for 
the improvement of the pupils. The founders of this institution, foreseeing the rapid progress 
of the Queen City of the Pacific, purchased some years since the property upon which the 
magnificent college edifice has since been erected. This lot has a frontage of two hundred and 
seventy-five feet on Market and the same on Jessie Street, with a depth of three hundred and 
fifty feet. The present building is only a part of the extent contemplated, "\^^^en the exten- 
sive additions are made, the entire structixre will rival anything of the kind to be found in our 
portion of the country. The present building is admirably adajited to the purposes for which 
it was designed, being abundantly lighted and well ventilated in every portion ; the ceilings are 
lofty, and spacious halls run through the building. A large play ground is attached, with a 
commodious shelter from the rain, affording amjjle means for the physical exercise of the 
pupils. In fact, nothing has been neglected which is at all conducive to mental and physical ™ 
training. The number of students in the college at present is over five hundred, under a staff 
of twenty -four professors and teachers. — [See Advertisement, page xxxix.] 

S.vnta Clara College, Santa Clara. — This establishment is under the superintendence 
of the Fathers of the Society of Jesus, and is open to all who choose to avail themselves of its 
advantages. It is situated in the beautiful Valley of Santa Clara, so celebrated for the mildness 
and saluljrity of its climate, and is about three miles di^ant from San Jose and quite close to 
the Southern Pacific Railroad. The college was founded in 1851. On the twenty-eighth of 
April, 1855, it was incorporated and empowered to confer degrees and academical honors, and 
to exercise all the rights and privileges common to any other literary institution in the United fii 
States. It has a full staff' of professors, and presents advantages for the mental, physical, and 
moral training of the students unsurpassed in California. It possesses a complete philosophical 
ajjparatus, purposely made in Paris for Santa Clara College, and furnished with all necessary 
instruments for experiments in mechanics, hydraulics, pneumatics, caloric, electricity, magnetism, 
optics, acoustics, and surveying. New and important additions are being made every year to 
keep pace with the progress of science. The chemical laboratory is pro^^ded with a full assort 
ment of chemicals, a very good set of furnaces, and all that is necessary for the different kinds 
of chemical analysis. The museum of natural history comprises a valuable collection of miner' 
alogy and geology ; also three thousand specimens of shells and other natural curiosities. As 
an accessory to the scientific department, there is a photographic gallery, where the students 
who wish may learn jjliotography in all its different branches. Practical lessons are given also 
on the electric telegraph. The college library numbers about twelve thousand volumes. — [iS'e* 
Advertisement, page xli.] 

Heald's Business College. — -This popular school is located at 24 Post Street, between Mont 
gomery and Kearny. It is well kno-wTi throughout the country as being the largest and one of 
the most thorough and complete commercial institutes in America. It has a total yearly attend- 
ance of about seven hundred and fifty pupils. Among these pupils are found the sons of many 
of our most prominent business men. Students are also to be found here from every county in 
the State, from ."'1 the neighboring States and Territories, from British America, Mexico, Cen- 
tral America, and the Sandwich Islands. Heald's Business College is connected Avith the Inters 
national Business College Association, which includes the leading commercial scliools in tht 
United States and Canada. There are thirty-six schools in the association, located in all of oui 
leading commercial cities. These schools — formerly known as the Bryant & Stratton Colleges— 



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BEAMISH'S— Nucleus Bldg, Third & Market, Shirts & Men's Pumishing Gooc I] 



p. VAIT SCHAACK & CO^ 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 41 

are popular among the business men of the whole country, and their graduates are numbered by- 
thousands. The object of this school is principally to tit young men for business pursuits, yet 
its course of instruction is adapted to all jirofessions an<l callings. In addition to tKe course of 
commercial studies, instruction is given in all the Englisli Ijranches ; in French, German, and 
Spanish ; in Telegraphy, Phonography, Higher Mathematics, etc. The plan of operation adopted 
is different from other schools on this coast. Actual practice in business affairs constitutes the 
main feature of the mercantile course. Instead of a dry and uninteresting study of mere theory, 
the pupil enters into business where he meets with the same transactions that he would in a real 
counting house or bank. He buys, sells, ships, consigns, and goes through all the routine of a 
merchant. He keeps his accounts wth the bank, drawing his checks, discounting his notes, 
and dealing in all kinds of business forms and papers. By this process the pupil readily becomes 
familiar not only witluthe proper forms of bookkeeping but also with all the details of lousiness. 
When ready to graduate he thus has a practical knowledge of the phases of merchandising, 
banking, railroading, commission, jobbing, importing, etc. The practicability of this method 
of instruction has been amply proved l)y the success of the numerous graduates of this school 
airing the past twelve years. Its graduates are now to be found in most of the leading banks 
1 1 mercantile houses of this citj% and their services are in good demand. The telegraphic 
iiiotitute, under the immediate super\nsion of James Gamble, General Superintendent of the 
Western Union Telegraph Co., is ably managed. It has been fitted up at great expense 
with all the instruments for teaching the art thoroughly, and is one of the most complete 
institutes of the kind in America. The graduates of this department find ready employment, 
and succeed in giving perfect satisfaction. Ladies are admitted into all the departments of the 
college, and their success both in the business and telegraphic departments has been most 
gratif j-ing. They are quite generally availing themselves of the opportunity thus afforded for 
fitting themselves for useful and lucrative emplojinent, and we regard it as a hopeful sign to 
see so many of them in the school. The College Faculty comprises the following well-known 
officers and teachers : E. P. Heald, President and General Manager; F. C. Woodbury, Secre- 
tary and Superintendent of Course of Instruction ; A. B. Capp, Superintendent of Theory 
Department ; H. M. Steams, Superintendent of Practical Department ; T. R. Southern, Super- 
intendent English Department; W. H. H. Valentine, A. B. Capp, and Miss Clara SneU, Book- 
keeping and Accounts ; F. Seregni, Penmanship ; ^Mrs. X. Heald, Department of Telegraphy ; 
Mrs. A. M. Hatch, Phonography ; A. Vander Nailen, Survejdng and Mechanical Drawing ; 
Lloyd Baldwin, Mercantile Law ; A. P. Du Bief, French ; C. F. Morel, Spanish ; George 
Jebens, German. 

Private Schools. — The number of private schools and colleges in San Francisco is about one 
hundred and ten. In size and character these range through nearly every degree, from the little 
private, family or home school of half a dozen scholars, to the large flourishing college enrolling 
its pupils bj' hundreds. Of these the Catholics maintain about one fifth, while a considerable 
portion of the remainder either directly belong to or are managed in the especial interest of 
other religious denominations. The number of ptipils attending private and church schools in 
June, 1875, as reported by the Census Marshals, was six thousand and ninety -four. 

Health Department. 

The excellent and comprehensive report of Henry Gibbons, Jr. M. D. , Health Officer for the 
last fiscal year, makes an exceedingly favorable showing for San Francisco, its death rate being 
less than in any other large American city. This rate was 18.1 per thousand. Among the 
Chinese it was 23.8, and among all others, 17.5. The total number of decedents was four 
thousand one hundred and sixty-three. With the single exception of Philadelphia, San Fran- 
cisco suffers less than any other American city of note from ZjTnotic diseases, a class of diseases 
largely prevented by good sewerage and drainage, pure air, and wholesome food. 

The work of the Health Department has been carried on -with zeal and intelligence, and its 
value is very great, though habitually underrated by the public. The careful compilation of 
mortuary statistics leads to the discovery of the true cause of many diseases, and points to the 
proper remedy. A reduction of the death rate, however slight, is a matter of large pecuniary 
importance to a community. It has been estimated, that there are thirty-four cases of sickness 
to each death, and that the average duration of each case is twenty days. In any event the 
expenses of sickness are large, and in the case of male adults there is the additional loss of 
time, the equivalent of money. Every death, on this basis, is virtually the loss of about two 
years of the time of an individual, so that it is a measure of wise economy to deal liberally 
with a department of the municipal government that is capable of accomplishing such grand 
results. 

Hospitals. 

The hospitals of San Francisco will compare favorably with those of other cities of its size 
and population. The public institutions are ample in accommodation and appointment, while 
those of private character are to be found in all parts of the city. The Germans and French 
have for years had fine hospital buildings. The Sisters of Mercy own a large structure on Rin- 
con Hill. The Italians have within a few years complete<l a conamodious building, comer of 
Twenty-eighth and Noe streets, and the Episcopal societies have also erected a hospital on 
, the cottage plan, beyond the Mission. The special purpose of these hospitals is to provide 



JEELE'S Squirrel Poison is sold by all Druggists, Grocers, and General Dealerp- 
4 



r. "W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant V 



42 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



for certain classes of our citizens, as the French, the German, the Italian, etc. , but all who de- 
sire to avail themselves of their a<lvantages are admitted upon payment of most reasonable 
fees. Besides the institutions enumerated above, there are several smaller ones which have 
been established through the munificence of our citizens, and whose names indicate their special 
uses. These are the State Woman's Hospital, the San Francisco Female Hospital, the Found- 
ling Asylum and Lying-in Hospital, etc. 

Up to September, 1872, the City and County Hospital was located at North Beach, the 
main building having been originally constructed for a school house ; the other two being tem- 
porary wooden structures. For years these had been inadequate for the increasing wants of 
the city, hence the completion of the commodious structure now in use was viewed with much 
satisfaction by those interested in the good name of our city. Not only are the buildings and 
accommodations in the new location much more ample than those formerly occupied, but the 
location itself is far better suited to the purposes in view. The grounds are in the southern 
portion of the city, and comprise the two blocks, bounded by Nevada, Sierra, and Nebraska 
Streets and Potrero Avenue. They measure eight hundred and sixty-six feet by four hundred 
and eighty-one, or nearly ten acres. The location is somewhat elevated, at least sufficiently 
so to insure efficient drainage, and though not very accessible at present wiU, when the contem- 
plated extension of the Sixth Street line out Potrero Avenue is completed, be but a short ride 
from Market Street, requiring no more time than was necessary to reach the former hospital. 
The main buildings face the west, the hospital entrance being on Potrero Avenue, which rxms 
nearly north and soiith. An entirely different plan has been adopted to that usually in vogue ; 
several individual structures, most of them at considerable distance from each . other, but con- 
nected by a long, covered corridor, unite to form the hospital. With the excejition of the 
kitchen and laundry, which are of brick, all the buildings are of wood, with brick foundations. 
The individual structures are: The administxative and dining-haU buildings, each three stories 
high, situated in the center of the block, ojjposite each other, and on either side of the center 
of the covered con-idor, which is five hundred and lifty-six feet long by eighteen feet vsdde, and 
runs lengthwise of the block ; the kitchen and laundry, back of the dining rooms ; the chapel, 
at the south end of the corridor ; the gate-house, stable, morgue, operating rooms, etc. , scat- 
tered about in various places, and, lastly, six long pavilions, each two stories high, and each 
designed to accommodate sixty-four patients (with their nurses), thirty-two on a floor. It is 
designed eventually to have twelve pavilions, to be built in pairs, opposite each other, on 
either side of the long corridor and parallel to the main buildings ; the first pair, on either 
side, being a hundred feet from the main buildings, the second a hundred feet from the 
first, and the third a hundred feet from the second. Six pavilions were considered sufficient for 
all purposes in 1872. With the most generous allowance of space, they accommodated three hun- 
dred and eighty-four patients. In an emergency at least a hundred more could be accommo- 
dated without serious overcrowding. Since moving into these new quarters in September, 1872, 
the number of patients has largely increased owing, partly at least, to the greater comfort 
afforded, until the hospital has become again overcrowded. To obviate this an additional ■«dng 
was ordered some months since and is now ready for occujjancy. The average number of 
patients in the City and County Hospital for the year 1875, was three hundred and ninety-four, 
and during this period the total admissions numbered three thousand nine hundred and fifty-one, 
aiad the deaths three hundred and seventy-two. It may be further mentioned that there were 
treated in 1875, several thousand outpatients, for whom were put up over fourteen thousand 
prescriptions. Resident Physician, Dr. E. H. Bryan ; Assistant Resident Physician, Dr. J. W. 
Keeney ; Visiting Surgeons, Drs. W. A. Douglass and H. H. Toland ; Visiting Physicians, 
Drs. F. A. Holman and C. M. Bates. Besides these, the medical staff is composed of Dr. 
Martinache, of the University of California, and Drs. Gibbons and Barkan, of the Medical 
College of the Pacific, whose services are rendered gratuitously. 

In 1867, the Alms House, a large and substantial frame building, was constructed near Lake 
Honda, by the city. The need of such an establishment had become urgent, as the City and 
County Hospital was burdened with the permanently disabled and superannuated, who had 
been accumulating for years. This building wiU accommodate five hundred persons, the average 
number present in 1875 being three hundred and thirty, and the total admissions for the year 
being four hundred and fifty-six. In the hospital wards there is an average of seventy-five 
patients, and in the house wards about an equal number. Sixty deaths occurred in 1875. The 
officers are a Superintendent, Mr. M. J. Keating, and a Resident Physician, Dr. S. R. Gerry. 

Besides the Hospital and Alms House, the city omtis three frame buildings about half a 
mile from the hospital, which were constructed at the time of the small-pox epidemic in 1868-9, 
and are capable of accommodating in the neighborhood of two hundred patients. One of the 
buildings is still reserved for small-pox cases, eight of which have been admitted there dur- 
ing the year, with one death. Another of the buildings is used as a Chinese Hospital. In 
this last were admitted fifty cases, mostly chronic, making with the twenty-nine remaining 
from the year before, seventy-nine cases of which twenty-four died. The patients were under 
the professional care of Dr. L. P. Foster, the Resident Physician. 

In the fall of 1865 the San Francisco Health Office was established. Prior to this time no 
mortuary records had been preserved by the city. The creation of the office has resulted in 
unquestionable advantage, leaving out of consideration the value of the statistics collected. 



Smithsonian Medical Institute, 637 Cal., B. J. SMITH, M.D., Prof. Phrenology. 



I p. VAN SCHAACZ & CO., 705, 70S. 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearnj, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 



43 



A City Board of Health was created by the Legislature in 1870 ; it consists of the Mayor 
and four physicians, and has control over the Health Office and all the public charitable insti- 
tutions of the city and county. From a small beginning the Health Department has grown 
into a very important branch of the city government. It controls appointments invcjlving 
an exi>ense to the city of several thousand dollars a month, and has a general oversight of all 
sanitary aifairs. 

The German Hospital is built upon a lot fronting one hundred and thirty-seven and one half 
feet on Braiman Street (near Third Street) and extending back two hundred and seventy-five 
feet. The main building is of brick, three stories high, facing the northwest, and occujjies all 
the frontage except what is required for a wide carriageway. It was built in 1853 ; a wing 
was addeil in 1860, and a second one in 1869, so that the hospital can acconuuodate one hun- 
dred and thirty patients. The remaining portion of the grounds, equaling over one half the 
area, is laid out with grass plats and walks, and planted \^-ith trees. There are but two wards 
in the hospital, each containing ten beds ; the remaining rooms being designed for one or two 
patients only. The hospital is under the control of the German General Benevolent Society, 
which now numbers over three thousand city members. The charges, which include 
medical attendance, are ^'2 per day, with from 50 cents to $1.50 extra for private rooms if they 
be desired. During the year 1875, the German Hospital received for treatment six hundred 
and eighty-two patients, the average number present being seventy-two. There were fifty- 
one deaths in the same period. The attending physicians are Drs. F. Von Loehr, J. Regens- 
burger, A. Willielm, and W. F. Smith. 

The French Hospital, or " Maison de Sante," is also under the chargeof a society, the " Socit^te 
Fran9aise de Bienfaisance Mutuelle," organized in 1851, and now having a membership of three 
thousand. The building is a large two-story brick structure, occupj^ng the center of a hundred- 
vara (two hundred and seventy-tive feet by two hundred and seventy-five) lot on Bryant Street, 
between Fifth and Sixth streets, the remaining grounds being laid out in gardens and planted with 
trees. Originally, the hospital completed in 1859 was but one story in Eight. In 1869 a second 
story was abided, increasing the capacity to the accommodation of one hxxndred and seventy pa- 
tients. In 1875 there were admitted to this hospital eight hundred and forty-one patients, the 
weekly average number present being eighty-five. During the year there were seventy-eight 
deaths. The charges are .§2 per day for ward patients and S3 for those desiring private rooms. 
Drs. Brigham and Hoffstetter are the Visiting Physicians, and Dr. E. Prevost is the apothecary. 

One of the finest of the private hospitals is the St. Mary's Hospital, under the care of the 
Sisters of Mercy. It was erected in 1861 on a hundred-vara lot on the southwest comer of 
Bryant and First streets. The building is of brick, four stories high, and measures seventy- 
five feet by one hundred and fifty on the ground. The design is, when occasion shall require, 
to add to it a wing, which wiU double its present capacity. No hospital in this city excels this 
in interior arrangement. The ceilings are high, the haUs broad, the rooms capacious, the ven- 
tilation and general adaptabibty to the purposes intended excellent. There are but one or 
two large wards, the majority bemg intended to accommodate from six to twelve patients; 
besides these there are a number of private rooms. In the wards and rooms there are beds for 
one hundred and eight patients. During the year the wards are often full. The average number 
of patients for the year 1875 was about ninety, and the total admissions for the year numbered 
eleven hundred and fourteen. In the same period one hundred and forty deaths occurred. 
Patients in the general wards are charged §10 per week, those occupying private rooms $20. 
Dr. James Muqjhy is Visiting Surgeon; Dr. J. D. Whitney, Visiting Physician, and Dr. C. G. 
Kenyon, Resident Physician. 

In 1868 the Italian Benevolent Society erected a hospital for the use of its members and 
others. Two blocks, bounded by Twenty-eighth, Twenty-ninth, Noe, and Castro streets had 
been secured, and afiford a most admirable site. The building faces the east. It is of brick, 
two stories in hight and contains beds for forty patients. A wing may be conveniently added 
should more room be required. During the first eleven months of 1872 there were acbnitted 
to this hospital two hundred and three patients, the average number present at anj' one time 
being over eighteen ; and the number under treatment on the first of December, 1872, being 
about ten. For various reasons, perhaps as much because of its great distance from the central 
portion of the city as from any other cause, this hospital was closed toward the latter pai-t of 
1873 ; when it will again be open for patients is not known. 

In 1853 the Government caused to be erected at Rincon Point a very large, four-story brick 
hospital, one of the finest buildings in the city at that time, and ever since, from its character 
and position, a prominent landmark. It was designed for eight hundred patients — sailors of 
the merchant and national marine — probably five time as many as were ever within its walls at 
one time. Until 1868 it continued to be used. In this year the severe earthquake further 
impaired a foundation already rendered insecure by extensive grading, which had left the 
hospital perched upon a high embankment, and it was vacated. After numerous removals and 
vicissitudes, the patients at last secured a home in the building formerly occupied as the asylum 
for the deaf, dumb, and blind, on the comer of Mission and Fifteenth streets. The buildings, 
two in number, were four stories high, of brick, and perhaps as suitable for a hospital as 
buildings converted to such purposes generally are. They were probably the best accommo- 



JAMES Qc. STEELE & CO. dispense Prescriptions from Pure Medicines. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 513 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



44 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



dations that could be secured without building, and were calculated to contain one hundred 
and twenty-five jjatients, though the average number in 1874 was but eighty-five. 

Over two years since the Government decided to build a suitable Marine Hospital, a site on 
the Presidio Reservation near Mountain Lake, having been selected. The buildings were com- 
pleted and occupied in May, 1875. They are constructed entirely of wood, and consist of an 
executive building two stories in hight, of two, long, one-story buildings, one on each side of 
the executive building, to be used for kitchen, pantry, laundry, store rooms, dead room, linen 
room, etc. ; and of three one-story wards radiating from the rear of the executive building like 
the ribs of a fan. The whole expense, including a separate residence for the surgeon, was aljout 
S60,000. The number of patients admitted here dm-ing 1875 was one thousand, of whom thirty- 
five died. The average number under treatment was eighty-three. The hospital is under the 
care of Dr. C. N. EUinwood, Superintendent. 

The writer of this article has %-isited all the hospitals above named, some of them frequently. 
Their internal an-angements are creditable to theii- authorities, convenient and comfortable to 
patients, and calculated to afford excellent facilities for the cure of disease. Nearly all, if not 
all, the establislmients are provided with bathing apparatus, not only for common use, but for 
special application in treatment. Thus a patient may have wann, cold, shower, steam, or med- 
icated baths, at the option of his physician. The medical staff of the different in- 
stitutions is ample, and, as will be seen, includes physicians of excellent standing in the 
profession. 

The larger hospitals have now been considered. There remain to be mentioned a few smaller 
institutions inaugurated for special objects. The buildings which these occupy were not built 
for such purposes, but have all been converted from dwelling houses. The State Woman's 
Hospital, corner of Twelfth and Howard streets, receives only those with diseases peculiar to 
women. All who are able are expected to pay. Six beds are, however, devoted to non-paying 
patients, $10 per week being charged in other cases. Originally the hospital accommodated 
eighteen patients. About tM^o years since an addition was built, increasing its capacity to thirty- 
one beds. In 1875 the average attendance was eighteen, and the total admissions numbered 
fifty -nine. Three hundred and ninety out-patients were treated during the same period. In 
explanation of the small number admitted during the year, it may be mentioned that most of 
the cases require months, some as many as eight, of treatment, before a cure can Vje effected. 
The hospital is under the charge of Dr. John Scott, assisted by Drs. George Chismore and 
C. E. Blake. 

On the comer of Clay Street and Prospect Place is the San Francisco Female Hospital, of 
which Dr. C. T. Deane is the Physician, and Dr. W. H. Mays Assistant Physician. As the 
certificate of incorporation shows, this institution was established for the cure of sick females, 
and to provide them Avith a home, medical attendance, medicines, and proper care during such 
period of sickness. It is in fact a general hospital for females, who are received and treated 
gratuitously. There were received here during 1875 one hundred and seventy-three patients, 
of whom over a hundred were pregnant ; and there were born in the institution in this period 
one hundred and eight infants, of whom sixty were boys. The hospital, which contains thirty 
beds, had an average for the year of about eighteen inmates. 

In 1868 the San Francisco Ljnng-in Hospital and Foundling Asylum was incorporated, for 
respectaVjle married women or unprotected single women who have previously borne a good 
moral character, and for the care and protection of such children as may be born in said hospital, 
and foundlings, without distinction of color. The special character of the institution will be 
seen at once ; it ■will be appreciated that it differs from all other charities in receiving no cases 
of disease whatever. The hospital and asylum has been in successful operation for several yfiars 
at 269 Jessie Street, under the professional care of Dr. Benjamin F. Hardy. Within a short 
period another large dwelling, adjoining in the rear and fronting on Mission Sti-eet, has been 
rented, and the accommodations thus materially increased. The design is to provide a room 
for each pregnant female besides proNading room for the foundlings left at the door. During 
1875 the hospital was generally fuU ; about a hundred and fifty infants were either bom in, or 
left to the care of, the institution. A number of these died, many were given away or adopted, 
and others were taken away by their mothers. 

A little more than four years ago the various Episcopal churches, desiring to provide more 
fully for the sick and needy of their parishes, organized St. Luke's Hospital, and procured a 
building beyond the Mission, which they adapted to hospital piirposes and arranged to accom- 
modate twenty patients. In 1874 the managers purchased a lot containing two acres on Va- 
lencia Street, near Twenty-eighth. On this they erected a well appointed hospital on the cot- 
tage plan, which was occupied early in the foUowing year, "\^^len fully completed it will con- 
tain beds for eighty patients, but at present the design is to pro\-ide for but thii-ty. Though 
designed more especially for the poor of the Episcopal parishes, St. Liike's Hospital is not 
exclusive, but receives patients of all denominations, and is general in character. 

It will be seen that the city, in its public and private charities, offers accommodation for 
nearly eighteen hundred patients ; that during 1875 over eight thousand persons availed them- 
selves of their advantages, of which nearly eight hundred died ; and that the average number 
of patients under treatment was eight hundred. 



BEAMISH'S— Importer Furnishing Goods, Nncleus Bldg, cor. Third and Marb, 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Zeamy, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 



45 



Mniiura«'lnr€8. ~ 

The following exhibit of the manufacturing industries of San Francisco is from the latest 
attainable data : 

Amalgamating Pan Manufactory, 1. — Men employed, twelve; pans made, one huudrerl 
and fifty; horse power of steam engine, six ; value of manufactures, $30,000. 

Stone Manufactories, 3. — Men employed, fifty-one; value of manufactures, $137,000. 

Axle (jRKASe Manufactories, 3. — Men employed, twenty; resin consumed yearly, barrels, 
two thousaml five hundred and fifty ; butter consumed yearlj% pounds, seventeen thousand ; tallow 
consumed yearly, pounds, ten thousand four hundred ; aggregate value of manufactures, .$91, 600. 

Barrel Manufactories, 5. — Men employed, two hundred and fifteen; barrels, half -barrels, 
and kegs made annually, two hundred and forty-seven thousand two hundred and fifty; horse 
power of steam engines, forty-eight ; barrels made by sugar refineries, seventy-live thousand ; 
syrup kegs made by tub and pail factories, sixty-five thousand. 

Bed-spring Manufactories, o. — Men employed, twenty-two; copper wire used, tons, five 
hundred and twenty; aggregate value of manufactui-es, .i?141,000. 

Bedstead Manufactories, 5. — Men employed, seven hundred and twenty -five; lumber 
consumed annually, feet, four million seven hundred thousand ; aggregate value of manufac- 
tures, 8025,000. 

Bellows M.anufactories, 2. — Men employed, eleven; bellows manufactured, one thousand 
five hundred; aggi^egate value of manufactures, .?27,000. 

Bedding Manufactories, 6. — Persons employed, sixty-four; aggregate value of manufac- 
tures, .?925,000. 

Billiard Table Manufactories, 6. — Men employed, ninety-five; billiai-d tables manu- 
factured, one thousand four hundred and ten; aggregate value of manufactures, $156,000. 

Boots and Shoes. — This branch of industry is rapidly progressing, and fast displacing East- 
ern-made goods, the importation of which, in comparison with the rapidly-increasing demand, is 
steadily decreasing. In style and quality California-made boots and shoes surpass anything we 
can obtain from the East, and our liome-made goods now find a ready market in all the adjoin- 
ing and neighboring States and Territories, and were it not for the diiference in currency we 
might successfully compete even M'ith Xew England for the trade of the West. The sujjpoi-t 
of this great local interest, the products of which are always trodden under foot, gives employ- 
ment to nearly four thousand hands, including all classes, male and female, white and Chinese 
workers, the value of whose productions amounts in the aggregate to very nearly, if not quite, 
$4,000,000. One of the largest firms in the city, that of Messrs. Buckingham & Hecht, employed 
during 1875 four hundred white hands and two hundred Chinese, making a total of six hunclred 
hands, who manufactured three hundred and seventy-five thousand pairs of boots and shoes. 
Number of manufactories twenty. Men and women emploj'ed, two thousand. Aggregate 
value of manufactories .$2,793,000. In addition to the larger establishments, there are four 
hundred and fifty persons, many of whom employ extra hands, engaged in the manufacture of 
boots and shoes on a smaller scale. 

Borax Works, 2. — Men employed, one hundred and ten ; value of manufactures, $620,000. 

Box Manufactories, 10. — Men employed, three hundred and seventy-tM- o ; horse power of 
steam engines, three hundred and seventy-five; aggregate value of manufactures, $980,000. 

Brass Foundries, 11. — Men employed, tvvo hundred and seventy -three ; aggregate value of 
manufactures, $1,055,000. 

Breweries, 40. — Men employed, three hundred and sixty -five; beer made annually, barrels, 
two hundred and sixty-seven thousand; aggregate value of manufactures, .$2,000,000. 

Broom and Broom Handle Manufactories, 10. — Men employed, one hundred and sev- 
enty-four ; brooms made annually, dozens, one hundred thousand ; aggregate value of manu- 
factures, $200,000. 

Brush Manufactories, 3. — Men employed, thirty-seven ; value of manufactures, $50,000. 

Candle Manufactories, 2. — Men employed, one hundred and ten ; candles manufactured, 
boxes, one hundred and fifty thousand ; aggregate value of manufactures, .$425,000. 

Clothing Manufactories, 8. — Men and women employed, four hundred and twenty- two ; 
aggregate value of manufactures, .$732,000. 

Cigar Manufactories, 175, — Men employed, six thousand five hundred, of which five 
thousand five hundred are Chinese ; cigars made annually, one hundred and ten millions ; value 
$4,400,000; average, .$40 per thousani The factory of the Consolidated Tobacco Company is 
located at Gilroy, and is the largest and best appointed of any in the United States, with 
the exception of factory at Key West, Florida. During the busy season of 1875, they employed 
seven hundred hands, and their pay rolls amounted to $30,000 per month. At San Felipe, 
where the tobacco is grown for cigar purposes, they have nine two-story curing houses, each 
forty by one hundred feet, the temperature of which is kept under perfect control by means of 
one of Baker's largest Air Blowers, run by a twenty horse power engine. The plantation is 
laid out in two acre plats with gravelled roads between each plat, to prevent dust, each side 
of the roads being lined A\'ith shade and fruit trees. Amount of tobacco raised in 1875 was esti- 
estimated at seven hundred and fifty thousand pounds. The shipments of this company during 
the present month, April, 1876, will amount to two and a half millions of cigars, and twenty-five 

ritAHES &. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 



r. "W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



46 SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



thousand pounds of smoking tobacco. The tobacco used in manufacturing cigars is all raised from 
imported Havana seed, and they expect to raise this season five million plants. The manufacture 
of cigars in San Francisco has become one of the leading industries. Nearly all of the tobacco 
used jn the manufacture of this large quantity of cigars is imported from the East, the better 
class coming from Havana. 

Chemical Works, 5. — Men employed, fifty; nitrate of soda used, tons, seven hundred and 
tw^ity ; sulphur used, tons, five hundred and fifty ; sulphuric and nitric acid used, tons, nine 
hundred and thirty ; sulphate of copper made, tons, five hundred ; value of products, .$425,000. 

Carriage and Wa(;on Manufac'ix>rie.s. — Men employed, four hundred; carriages, wag- 
ons, etc. , made annually, two thousand one hundred and seventeen ; railroad cars made annually, 
one hundred and eighty ; horse-power of steam engines, one hundred and ninety ; aggregate 
value of manufactures, §837,000. 

Coffee and Spice Mills, 10. — Men employed, 104; coffee ground and roasted annually, 
pounds, two million nine hundred and thirty thousand ; chocolate made annually, pounds, three 
hundred thousand ; spices ground annually, pounds,' seven hundred and eighty-four thousand ; 
horse power of steam engines, seventy; aggi'egate value of manufactures, .'§1,102,000. 

CordaCxE and Rope Manufactories, 3. — Men employed, one hundred and sixty-five; hemp 
and wire rope manufactured, tons, five thousand live hundred ; horse power of steam engines, 
two hundred and eighty; aggregate value of manufactures, .$975,000. 

Distilleries, 6. — Men employed, one hundred ; proof gallons of liquor made, one million 
five hundred and ninety-four thousand nine hundred and sixty-two ; value, -SI, 647, 000. 

Dry Docks (Floating), 2. — Capacity of docks, tons, two thousand six hundred; men em- 
ployed, fifteen. 

Dry Dock (Stone), 1. — Length of excavation in solid rock, feet, four hundred and fifty; 
width at top, feet, one hundred and twenty , depth, feet, thirty ; width at entrance, feet, 
ninety ; capacity of length, feet, four hundred and twenty-five ; capacity of drawing, feet, 
twenty-two ; capacity of pumps for clearing per hour, cubic feet, three hundred and twenty- 
tive thousand three hundred and sixty-eight ; tubular boilers of four-inch tubes, four ; dimen- 
sions of each boiler, diameter, inches, twenty-five; dimensions of each boiler, length, feet, 
sixteen ; fire surface of boilers, square feet, three thousand eight hundred ; men employed, ten ; 
total cost of work, !^675,000. 

Flouring Mills, 8. — Men employed, one hundred and thirtj'^- eight ; flour made annually, 
barrels, four hundred and forty-six thousand ; hominy made annually, tons, five hundred and 
eighty ; buckwheat and rye flour, tons, six hundred and eighty-five ; oatmeal and groats, tons, 
one thousand three hundred and fifty ; oatmeal and farina, tons, two thousand five hundred and 
thirty ; feed barley, tons, four thousand five hundred ; pearl barley, tons, five hundred ; cracked 
wheat, tons, two hundred ; split peas, tons, one hundred ; run of stones, fifty ; horse power of 
steam engines, one thousand one hundred and seventy-two. 

Foundries and Iron Works, 16. — Men employed, one thousand two hundretl and thirty ; 
pig iron used annually, tons, thirteen thousand seven hundred and fifty ; bar iron used annu- 
ally, tons, three thousand eight hundred and thirty -four ; rivets used annually, tons, ninety- 
four ; horse power of steam engines, six hundred and nine. 

Fur Manufactories, 5. — Men and women employed, forty-five ; aggregate value of manu- 
factures, $245,000. 

Furniture Manufactories, 20. — Men employed, five hundred and seven; lumber used 
annually, feet, eleven million two hundred thousand ; value of manufactures, §1,636,000. 

Glass Works, 2. — Men employed, one hundred and sixty-seven ; furnaces, three ; pots, 
seventeen ; aggregate value of manufactures, §270,000. 

GLASS-CurriNG Works, 2. — Men employed, eleven ; value of manufactures, $32,000. 

Gas Meter Manufactory, 1. — Men employed, four; value of manufactures, $15,000. 

Glove Manufactories, 3. — Men and women employed, one hundred ; aggregate value of 
manufactures, $130,000. 

Glue Manufactory, 1. — Men employed, forty ; glue made, tons, three hundred and sixty ; 
neatsfoot oil, gallons, four thousand ; curled hair, pounds, eighteen thousand ; aggregate value 
of manufactures, $325,000. 

Hat and Cap Manufactories, 15. — Men and women employed, one hundred and twenty- 
five ; aggregate value of manufactures, $328,000. 

Hose and Belting MANUFAtrroRiES, .3. — Men employed, twenty-seven; hose made annu- 
ally, feet, seven thousand ; belting made amiually, feet, one hundred and twelve thousand ; 
aggregate value of manufactures, $114,000. 

Jewelry Manufactories, 30. — Men employed, three hundred and twenty-three; aggre- 
gate value of manufactures, $827,000. 

Lead and Shot Works, 2. — Men employed, ninety; lead made, tons, ten thousand ; shot 
made, tons, five hundred ; aggregate value of manufactures, $1,000,000. 

La.st MANUFA(rroRiES, 2, — Men employed, foui-teen ; horse power of steam engines, ten; 
lasts manufactured, twenty-five thousand ; aggregate value of manufactures, $20,000. 

Maccaroni AND VERMICELLI MANUFACTORIES, 3. — Men employed, thirty; maccaroni and 
pastry made, boxes, eighty-seven thousand ; maccaroni wheat used, sacks, nine thousand five 
hundred ; horse power of steam engines, fifty-two ; aggregate value of manufactures, $120,000. 



Smithsonian Medical and Hygienic Institute, 635 Cal., B. J. SMITH, M.D., Froptz 



:. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 47 



Match Factories, 6. — Men employed, eighty-seven ; matches made amiually, gross, two 
hundred and fifty thousand ; aggregate value of manufactures, $260,000. 

Malt Hoit.sRS, 5. — Men employetl, thirty-five ; grain malted annually, tons, twelve thou- 
sand ; aggregate value of product, .i?300,000. 

Oakum Manufactory, 1. — Men employed, 10; bales made annually, five thousand; ag- 
gregate value of manufactures, .?25,000. 

I'icKLK AND Fruit PrksErving Works, 4 — Men employed, nine hundred and fifty-three ; 
fruits and meats put up, dozens, one hundred and eighty-five thousand ; pickles put up, kegs, 
forty-five thousand ; aggregate value, .$850,000. 

Powder Works, 2. — Men entployed, fifty-eight; horse power of steam engines, sixteen; 
powder made annually, pounds, nine hundred and eighty thousand ; aggregate value of manu- 
factures, .S5G8,000. 

Rolling Mills, 1. — Men employed, three hundred ; horse power of steam engines, four 
hundred ; cast iron used, tons, one thousand ; scrap iron used, tons, ten thousand ; coal con- 
sumed, tons, eight thousand ; aggregate value of products, .$750,000. 

Saw Manufactories, 1. — Men employed, thirty; horse power of steam engine, twenty- 
five ; steel used annually, tons, thirty-six; aggregate value of manufactures, .$00,000. 

Silk Manufactories, 2. — Men and women employed, one hundred and twenty ; aggregate 
value of manufactures, $300,000. 

Sash, Blind and Door Factories, 10. — Men employed, five hundred and two; horse power 
of steam engines, four hundred and fifty-five ; lumber consumed annually, twelve millions one 
hundred and ninety thousand feet; aggregate value of manufactures, $2,500,000. 

Silverware Manufactories, 4. — Men employed, eighty-eight; aggregate value of manu- 
factures, $252,000. 

SniRT Manufactories, 8. — Men and women employed, seven hundred and forty-three; ag- 
gregate value of manufactures, $798,000. 

Soap P\\.ctories, 17. — Men employed, one hundred and fifty-two; soap made annually, eight 
million five hundred and sixty thousand pounds; aggregate value of manufactures, .$513,000. 

Tanneries, 33. — Men emploj^ed, two hundred and forty-four; horsepower of steam engines, 
one hundred and sixty-one ; bark used annually, seven thousand nine hundred cords ; hides 
used, of all kinds, two hundred and seventeen thousand ; value of mamifactures, $985,000. 

Tool Manufactories, 6. — Men employed, forty-three; value of manufactures, $210,500. 

Trunk and Valise Manufactories, 6. — Men employed, one hundred and sixteen; aggre- 
gate value of manufactures, $240,000. 

Type Foundries, 2. — Men and women employed, fifty-three; valueof manufactures, $55,000. 

"W^indmill Manufactories, 4. — Men employed, twenty-nine; windmills made aiuiually, 
three hundred and thirty; aggregate value of manufactures, $57,000. 

Wire and Wire Kope. — The Wire-rope Factory, corner of Vallejo and Sansom streets, thus 
far remains the only one upon this coast. Remodeled, enlarged, and refitted, it has now a capac- 
ity of nearly two thousand tons a year. The ropes manufactured at these works are used for extra 
heavy hoisting in deep mines, for the standing rigging of large ships, for traction on steep-grade 
street-car routes, and in the patent Elevated Wire Tramway — if such a phrase admits of such an 
application. Some of these larger and longer ropes weigh from eight to nine tons. Besides these 
the establishment has successfully accomplished the manufacture of an aggregate length of 
upward of fifty miles of submarine telegi-aph cable for various lines in the vicinity of Puget 
Sound and Vancouver's Island. The entire success of these experiments encourages the pro- 
prietor in the confident prediction that his establishment will, ere long, manufacture the 
mammoth Pacific Submarine Telegraph Cable, which will furnish the last and grandest link 
in the telegraphic circuit of the world, by connecting California with Japan and China. The 
steel rope in use by the Clay Street Hill Railroad, seven thousand feet in length, was made at 
these Works. Number of men employed, fifty. The California Wire Works has been recently 
added, by purchase, to these Works, A. S. Hallidie, proprietor. 

Wood and W^illowware Manufactories, 2. — Men employed, seventy; horse-power and 
steam engines, one hundred and fifty; aggregate value of manufactures, $220,000. 

Wood Pre-SERVING Works, 1. — Men employed, thirty; horse-power of steam engine, twen- 
ty-eight ; value of lumber used amiually, $90,000 ; increase in value by preserving, .$50,000. 

Woolen Mills, 2. — Men and women employed, nine hunda'ed ; number of power looms, one 
hundred and six ; card sets, forty-eight ; frames for knitting underwear, twenty ; frames for 
knitting hosiery, fifty; spindles, thirteen thousand; blankets made annually, pairs, one hundred 
and fifty-five thousand ; flamiel drawers and xxnderwear, dozens, eighteen thousand ; hosiery, 
dozens, sixteen thousand ; cloths and tweeds, yards, eight hundred and fifty thousand ; flannel 
made, yards, nine hundred thousand ; wool used, pounds, three millions one hundred and fifty 
thousand ; aggregate value of manufactures, .$2,200,000. The Pioneer Woolen Mills at Black 
Point, originally erected in 1858, were the first to attempt to create a local industry from the 
then, as now, rapidly-increasing wool clip of the State, which, up to 1859, the year in which 
the Pioneer Mills commenced running, had been shipped abroad to find a market. The 
success of the enterprise having received a practical demonstration, the Pioneer Mills were 
followed in 1861 by the Mission Woolen Mills, located on Folsom Street, between Fif- 
teenth and Sixteenth. These were followed at a later date by the Pacific W^oolen Mills, 



JAMES Qe. STEELE & CO., manufacturers of Steele's California Perfumes. 



J'ewelr7 Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D. "W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merchant 



48 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



also located on Folsom Street, between Eighteenth and Nineteenth, which have since been con- 
solidated with the Mission Woolen Mills, The product of these mills comprises broad cloths, 
tweeds, cassinieres, heavy anny and nax'y blankets, shawls, cloakings, and tiamiels, of superior 
quality and finish, and hosiery. The blankets manufactured at the Mission Woolen Mills 
have a world-wide reputation, and cannot be equaled upon this continent. These mills 
employ in the aggi-egate nine hundretl hands, in the production of two hundred thousand pairs 
blankets, twelve hundred dozen pairs of flannel drawers, one thousand dozen hosiery, two hun- 
dred and five thousaml yards of cloths and tweeds, and one million two hundred thousand yards 
of flamiels, from four million five hundred thousand and five hundred pounds of wool. The ap- 
proximate estimated value of these manufactures is $1,750,000. We have thus briefly noted the 
more prominent manufactures of San Francisco, the value of which, if swelled by the large 
number of establishments of lesser note, gives us a grand aggregate of very nearly $40,000,000. 

Watch Manufactories, 1. — Men employed, one hundred and forty; number of watches 
made annually, fifteen thousand; value of watches made .|14@$150. 

Yeast Powder Works, 3. — Men employed, sixteen; yeast powders made, gross, four 
thousand ; cream of tartar made, pounds, one hundred and forty thousand ; soda made, pounds, 
four hundred and ten thousand; aggregate value of manufactures, $110,000. 

According to the foregoing statistics, there are eighteen thousand and thirty persons em- 
ployed in productive industries. There are continually springing into existence small establish- 
ments emjilojang a few persons, and it is obvious that the most thorough enumeration that can 
be made will fall considerably short of the tinitli. There is scarcely an article known to com- 
merce that is not manufactured in San Francisco. The restless energy of her people prompts 
them to the boldest experiments, and every few months it is demonstrated that some enterprise 
that had been experimental, has become a permanent success. 

Sbjp Building. 

During the year 1875 there were sixty vessels built at various ports on the Pacific Coast, of 
an aggregate toimage of nine thousand and seventy tons, costing §1,200,000, or f 132. 30 per ton. 
One bark, the first ever built on this bay, nine steamers, nine schooners, one brig, and two 
sloops, were constructed at ship yards in this city. It is demonstrated that the cost is as small 
here as at Coos Bay or Puget Sound, . where the timber is grown, and the business is developing 
rapidly and steadily. 

Banking and Finance. 

The di\'idends paid by local corporations during the year 1875, were .f26,785,200. The 
calamities attendant upon the suspension of a great banking house like the Bank of California, 
were happily averted, and what might have caused almost universal bankruptcy was attended 
with scarcely a single notable failure. The dividends paid during the year are summarized as 
follows : Seven comnfercial banks, $1,383,000 ; twelve savings banks, $4,754,300 ; Wells, Fargo 
& Co. 's Express, $400,000; Central Pacific Railroad, $2,160,000; gas and water companies, 
$1,532,000; insurance companies, $371,000; street railroad companies, $77,500; powder com- 
panies, $228,000; coal companies, $157,500; raining companies, $15,460,600; miscellaneous 
companies, $261,300; total, $26,785,200. For the year 1874 similar disbursements amounted 
to $20,303,700. The shipments of treasure amounted to $42,911,048. A Clearing House, simi- 
lar to the one for many years in successful operation in New York city, M^as established in 
March last, and its workings so far have greatly facilitated the business of the diff'erent institu- 
tions included in its organization. 

Savings Banks. — The condition of the indiistrial classes is best shown by the statistics of 
our savings banks. The following figures are condensed from the reports for the six months 
ending December 31,. 1875 : 

Semi-Annual Statement of San Francisco Savinqb Institutions, December 31, 1874. 



NAME. 



Number 


Amount 


Gross 


Amount 


Depositors. 


Deposits. 


Earnings. 


DiWdend. 


10,940 


$11,644,097 


§654,097 


§547,952 


. 17,151 


12,900,369 


624,470 


513,577 


6,&50 


5,637,385 


305,904 


281,285 


6,512 


6,905,224 


356,059 


323,533 


7,985 


7,121,900 


355,404 


301,836 


C55 


507,466 


27,070 


19,686 


6,660 


6,069,560 


294,118 


253,777 


3,662 


1,045,976 


64,114 


56,083 


4,136 


1,499,676 


82,088 


70,118 


1,904 


966,591 


49,462 


35,490 


995 


1,516,798 


86,970 


68,149 


911 


304,241 


23,387 


19,284 


2,307 


76,643 


13,177 


8,000 


461 


141, 6S2 


20,246 


9,268 


71,129 


§56,728,160 


§2,956,566 


§2,508,038 


60,658 


55,021,177 


2,557,151 


2,232,567 


10,471 


$1,706,983 


§399,415 


§275,471 



Savings and Loan Society 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

French Savings and Loan Society 

J^'an Francisco Savings Union 

Odd Fellows Savings Bank 

Farmers and Mechanics Bank of Savings 

German Savings and Loan Society 

Pioneer Land and Loan Association 

Masonic Savings and Loan Bank 

Humboldt Savings and Loan Society 

Security Savings Bank 

California Savings and Loan Society.... 

Dime Savings Bank 

Western Savings and Trust Company 

Totals, January, 1876 

Totals, January-, 1875 

Increase in one vear 



BEAMISH'S— Shirt manufacturer, Nucleus Building, corner Third and Markel 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY, 



49 



During the term ending June 30, 1875, there was an increase of some four million dollars in 
the amount of deposits ; but the suspension of the Bank of California, August 2(5, caused a run 
on the savings l)ank.s, not serious, on account of the rule requiring thirty days' notice before 
withdraM'al. The high rates of interest that prevailed during the stringency, diverted money 
from these banks, and the temporary check upon building operations greatly diminished the 
esxrnings of artisans. It is a remarkable circumstance, that about one-fourth of the entire 
population of San Francisco are depositors. Their average deposits are $798. 

Iiisnriiiicc. • 

On January 1, 1876, there were eighty-one fire and marine insurance companies trans- 
acting business in California, and four life insurance companies carrying on a general 
business. In addition, seven life insurance companies were collecting renewal premiums. 
Policies of fire and marine insurance to the amount of $293,118,385.79 were written during 
the year; the premiums received were $5,018,348.62; and the losses jjaid, $1,772,579.36. 
The gross amount of risks in force, December 31, 1875, was $199, 687; 09 1.60 ; those of the seven 
California companies being $74,742,181, or about thirty-seven and a half per cent, of the whole. 
The paid up cash capital of the California companies is $20,500,000. 

City and County Bonded Debt, March I, 1876. 



18,58.... 
1862-63. 



1863... 
1804... 
1864... 
1865... 
1866-67 
1867... 
1870. . . 
1872... 
1872... 
1872.. . . 
1873... 
1873... 
1874... 
1874... 
1874... 
1875... 
1874... 



By the. 



Ci y and County 

City and County for San Jos6 

Railroad 

City and County for City Slip. . 
City and County for City Slip. . 

Central Pacific R. R. Co 

Western Pacific R. R. Co 

School Department 

Judsjnient 

School Department 

Park Improvement 

Hospital 

School Department 

Park Improvement 

Hospital 

Park Improvement 

House of Correction 

School Department 

Park Improvement 

City Hall 



Payable 



1877-: 
1883 

1884 
1894 
1895 
1881 
1887 
1890 
1897 
1891 
1882 
1897 
1893 
1904 
1894 
1894 
1904 
1904 



Annual Inteeest. 



Payable in. 



San Francisco . 

San Francisco . 
San Francisco ' 
San Francisco ; 
San Francisco . 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco . 
San Francisco . 
San Francisco . 
San Francisco . 
San Francisco . 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco . 
San Francisco . 
San Francisco . 
San Francisco . 
San Francisco . 



Totals . 



Annual 
Sinking Fmid. 



About 841,000 

About 36,000 

About 48,000 

About 20,000 

About 13,000 

About 21,000 

About 17,000 

About 15,000 



About 10,500 
About 10,500 



2,500 



$234,500 



Bonds in 
Circulation 



§542,000 

105,000 
424,500 
11,000 
377,000 
250,000 
197,000 
246,000 
285,000 
150,000 
170,000 
100,000 
75,000 
40,000 
125,000 
1.50,000 
200,000 
125,000 
160,000 



S3,732,.500 



Funded Debt, March 1, 1876, $3,732,500; Cash in Treasury (sinking funds), $314,221; 
Actual Debt, $3,418,279. March 1, 1876: Cash in Treasury (various funds), $994,398. 

Of the amount of City Hall Bonds, $750,000, authorized by the Legislature of 1873^, 
$160,000 have been issued. The balance, .$590,000, will be disposed of in May next. 

The bonds issued for the opening and improvement of Montgomery Avenue, amounting to 
$1,500,000, are not included in the table of funded debt; they are redeemable in thirty years, 
bear interest at the rate of six per cent per annum, and for their payment the property directly 
benefited, valued at $60,000,000, is pledged. 

Assessment and Kates of Taxation from 1870 to 187C.* 



FISCAL YEARS. 


Total 
Annual 
Rates. 


Particular Class of Assessments. 


Total 

Annual 

Assessments. 


Real Estate. 


Improvements. 


Personal Property. 


1869-70 


3 08 
2 84J- 
2 97 
1 50 

1 60 

2 09 1^0 
1 60J 


69,776,603 
75,145,717 
76,124,551 
180,571,640 
130,871,138 
162,080,605 
169,957,310 


In Real 
In Real 
In Real 
In Real 
37,182,680 
In Real 
In Real 


144,982,908 
31,246,159 
28,900,988 

108,011,617 
44,154,717 

101,763,267 
98,575,549 


114,759,511 
106,391,876 
105,025,539 
♦,288,583,257 
212,208,535 
264,229,444 
268,532,859 


1870-71 


1871-72 


1872-73 


1873-74 


1874-75 


1875-76 


The value of the real and personal property of the City and County of San Francisco, for the 
year ending June 30, 1876, was assessed as follows : Real Estate, $127,288,645; Improvements, 


* For table of Assessments, etc., from 1850 to 1869, see San Francisco Directory 1874, page 11. 
t Exclusive of Mortgages, which amounted in 1869-70 to near .§16,000,000, now held to be exempt from taxation. 
i The large increase in the value of real and personal property, 1872-73, was occasioned by the operation of the 
New Code. 



JAMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists, removed to No. 316 Kearny St. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchan 



50 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



,<H2,668,6(>5; Personal Property, exclusive of money $99,761,341; money 87,814,208; Total, 
$268,532,859. The total value of the Ileal and Personal Property of the State of Calif orjiia, for 
the year 1875-76, is $618,083,315. Total State tax levied, $3,739,094, of which San Francisco 
was assessed $1,627,925, or forty-five per cent. 

Municipal Expenditures Trom 1865 to 1875.* 



YEARS. 


Current Expenses 

it 


1865-66 


§916,934 45 
939,285 05 
1,215,925 00 
1,937,925 41 
2,098,610 00 
2,417,110 00 
2,783,843 00 
2,826,670 98 
3,036,212 00 
3,925,194 00 


1866-67 


1867-68 


1863-69 


1869-70 


1870-71 


1871-72 


1872-73 


1873-74 


1874-75 



Permanent Im- 
provements. 



§90,995 90 
188,073 75 
165,559 24 



Interest. 



$2.56,198 38 
213,353 06 
200,644 07 
373,050 83 
224,198 00 
225,462 00 
223,462 00 
232,935 55 
270,011 00 
302,456 00 



Reduction of 
Debt. 



§164,055 00 
354,686 82 
206,457 76 
148,233 81 
361,625 00 
177,045 00 
55,461 00 
213,909 46 
124,585 00 
207,608 00 



§19,097 47 
71,166 66 



§1,437, 
1,766 
1,788, 
2,4.59 
2,684, 
2,819, 
3,062, 
3,273 
3,430, 
4,435, 



281 20 
565 34 
586 07 
210 05 
433 00 
617 00 
766 00 
515 99 
«08 00 
268 00 



Total expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1875, $4,435,258. This amount does not 
include the co§t of repairing unaccepted streets, paid by owners of property, aggregating about 
$500,000. 

For the year ending June 30, 1875, the following amounts were paid for the support of the 
different departments of the Municipal Government : Salaries, City and County officers, $425,941; 
Police, .$231,233 ; Fire (including Fire Alarm Telegraph and all other expenses comiected with the 
Department), $230,755; School, $700,148 ; Street Lights, $273,502; Hospital, $91,579; Alms 
House, $57,621 ; redemption bonds and interest, $207,608. The number of salaried employes 
connected with the Municipal Government exceeds eleven hundred, who receive for salaries 
annually an aggregate of over one million two hundred thousand dollars. 

Annual Revenue n*oni 18G5 to 1875. t 



186.5-66. 
1866-67. 
1867-68. 
1868-69. 
1869-70. 
1870-71. 
1871-72. 
1872-73. 
1873-74. 
1S74-75. 



§1,361, 
1,482, 
1,509, 
1,786, 
1,966, 
1,935, 
2,062, 
1,814, 
2,513, 
3,.340, 



876 26 
476 31 
162 50 
129 43 
827 00 
902 00 
204 58 
669 00 
108 91 
870 00 



State and Co. 
Licenses. 



§89,253 25 
93,901 50 
99,484 74 
100,454 69 
110,353 12 
106,157 00 
146,045 18 
190,443 00 
212,.350 00 
272,943 00 



Municipal 
Licenses. 



§28,799 
31,762 
38,895 
52,660 
41,646 
40,067 
42,414 
55,.522 
71,267 
76,414 



Sale of 
Bonds. 



§61,0.50 00 
125,965 38 
47,500 00 



Other Sources. 



§83,429 30 
107,647 97 
271,263 78 
507,040 67 
752,365 93 
716,263 00 
812,683 04 

1,138,814 00 
915,824 77 

1,088,385 00 



§1,624, 
1,841, 
1,966, 
2,446, 
2,871, 
2,798; 
3,063, 
3,199, 
3,712, 
4,778, 



408 06 
753 96 
306 92 
185 29 
192 55 
389 00 
346 85 
448 00 
551 28 
612 00 



State. 



§944,812 

987,105 

1,095,586 

1,044,835 

1,049,.505 

965,957 

947,399 

904,065 

1,127,676 

1,289,349 



The total receipts for the year ending June 30, 1875, exclusive of the State tax, $1,289,349, 

was $4,778,612. 

The Special Fee Fund for 1874^75 aggregated $194,564, of which the Eecorder returned 
$44,408; the County Clerk, $48,563; the Sheriff, $35,748; the Tax Collector, $18,999, and the 
Clerk of the Justices' Court, $12,359. The amount received from poll taxes was $76,149. 

Population of San Francisco March 1, 1876. 

In directing attention to the following estimate of the population of this city, the compiler 
begs to state that the data upon which it is based has been obtained principally from informa- 
tion obtained during the canvass for the present volume and the returns of the School Census 
for 1875. The aggregate derived therefrom is believed to be a fair approximation to the actual 
niimber : 

White Males over twenty-one 90,6.t3 

White Females over eighteen (estimated) 49,380 

White Males under twenty-one (estimated) ."iO.IOS 

White Females under eighteen (estimated) 4;t,474 

White Males, names refused, and foreigners not taken in the canvass (estimated) 3,0410 

Chinese, Male and Female 30,<M)0 

Colored, Male and Female 1,850 



Total permanent Population 

To which should be added a large element of our population known as "floating," which consists of: 
l.st. Transient boarders, etc., at hotels, boarding houses, etc. 2d. Soldiers at the fortifications in the 
harbor. 3d. Persons engaged navigating the bay, who claim this city as their i-esidence. 4th. In- 
mates of Alms House, Hospitals, and other charitable institutions. County Jail, etc. 5th. A large 
number of persons who have no permanent place of abode, together amoiuiting to about 



367,345 



5,000 



Total Population, March 1, 1876 ; 273,»45 



* For table of Municipal Expenditures from 1850 to 1865, gp.c San Francisco Directory 1866, jjage 10. 

t For table of Revenue collected in San Francisco from 1850 to 1865, .fee S.\n Francisco Directory 1866, page 10. 



Smithsonian Medical Institute treats Hheumatic and Chronic Diseases, 635 Ca] 



p. VAU SCHAACK & CO., 706, 768, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



PROGRESS OF THE CITY. 51 



The estimate of the males over twenty-one in the preceding table is based upon the aggregate cf 
names contained in the present volume, as follows: The number of references in the register of 
names is U)0,270, of which 80.533 are male residents of this city. These figures are exclusive of 
numerous lists of names included in the Business Directory and the Appendix, containing the 
names of officers of societies, incorporations, etc., not obtained in the regular canvass, estimated 
at l.IOO, making a total of 90,(533. The two latter named departments of the Directory are 
compiled fnmi information collected just previous to the publication df the work, and include 
many names not to be found in the regular list. 

The number of females over eighteen is estimated at 49,280, upon the basis of the Federal 
Census of 1870. The number of females of all ages enumerated, as published in this city, 
amounts to (il,577, of which ■23,'2()1 are under fifteen years. According to the average of the 
Census throughout the United States, about sixteen per cent of the number under fifteen 
(3,721) should he added thereto to represent the element between sixteen and eighteen, inclu- 
sive, which would give an average as follows: Under eighteen, 2G,982 ; eighteen and over, 
34,5!)o, as the number of Jnly, 1870. The difference between the last-named figures (34,595) 
and those included in the table (49,280), amounting tft 14,685, will not be considered an over- 
estimate for the increase since August, 1870. Estimated increase for the year ending February 
28, 1875, 4,900; for the year ending February 28, 1876, 5,280. Of this number, at least 2,500, 
it is estimated, have l)een contriljuted by the Eastern immigration alone. 

The estimates of males under twenty-one, and the females under eighteen, are based upon 
the returns published in the San Francisco Directory for 1875. According to the figures referred 
to the aggregate of these two elements was 81,376; or, males, 43,572; females, 37,804. Esti- 
mating an increase of fifteen Y>er cent for the past year, 12,206, would give as a total 93,582; 
or, males, 50,108; females, 43,474. 

The estimate of the number of Chinese, thirty thousand (of which one thousand are women, 
and one thousand one hundred children), is based upon the judgment of reliable authorities 
who are familiar with that element of our population. According to the U. S. census, 1870, 
there were twelve thousand and eighteen Chinese of all ages residing in this city, of whom it 
was estimated that seven thousand were engaged in the ditt'erent departments of laljor. At the 
present date reliable data place the number, including domestics, at eighteen thousand, which, 
if correct, fully warrants the figures in the above table. The number of Chinese conducting 
business in this City, on their own account, including laundrymen, is nine hundred and fifty. 
One hundred and seventy-five estal>lishments, of which eighty-eight are owned by Chinese, are 
engaged in the manufacturing of cigars. The number of Chinese employed therein is over five 
thousand five hundred. The returns of the six Chinese Companies in San Francisco show that 
there are in the United States one hundred and eighty-seven thousand three hundred Chinese, 
of which sixty thousand are in the State of California. 

The remainder of the data in our estimate explains itself, and to those who are acquainted 
with the different elements referred to therein, the figures relating thereto will not be con- 
sidered over-estimated. 

The aggregate of the present year (272,345), as compared with that of last year (230,132), 
exhibits a gain of 42,213, or about eighteen per cent, a much greater percentage of increase than 
has taken place for a similar period since 1850, 

The number of names enumerated in the register of the present volume (90,633) exhibits an 
increase over the number published in the San Francisco Directory for 1875 (77,206) of 13,427, 
or nearly eighteen per cent, a gratifying and unmistakable evidence of the rapid and prosper- 
ous growth of the city. Assuming that each name published in a reliable Directory represents 
three persons, our population on this basis aggregates 271,899. 

Meteorological Observations made at San Francisco, fl-om November, 1850, to June, IS75. 

BY IlKNRY GIBBONS, M.D. 

In the following tables the reader will find, in a condensed form, the results of twenty-six 
years' diligent observation of the climate of San Francisco, with more particular reference to rain. 

Rain has fallen in every month of the year. In July it has rained only in one year ; August 
has furnished rain in four years ; June in eight years ; September in twelve years ; October in 
sixteen years. No account is made of a mere sprinkle, nor of the deposit of summer mist. The 
greatest quantity of mist which ever falls in twenty-four hours is about three hundredths of an 
inch. But this quantity is very rare. Near the ocean the mist is much more copious. 

The driest season was 1850-51, which gave only seven inches. Next to that was 1863-64, 
with eight and one half inches. The winter of 1867-68 gave the most rain — forty inches. The 
average is between twenty-one and twenty-two inches. 

The earliest setting in of the rainy season was October 8 ; the latest, January 12. An early 
beginning and an abundant supply are apt to go together, but there is no rule in this respect^ 
the latest beginnings have been followed by an average supply. 

The average date of the beginning of the rainy season is November 28 ; of the termination, 
April 10. March is as certain to bring rain in liberal amount as any other month. In one year 
out of every three there is no rain of importance after March. The last showers of the season 
come, with remarkable uniformity, about the third week of May. 



;ai 



STEELE'S Glycerine Lotion oures Tan, Sunburn, Eruptions, etc. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 513 Montgomery cor. Merchan' 



52 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



The middle of January is the average dividing point of the rainy season. The mean quan- 
tity before January 1 is about equal to the mean quantity after January 31. 

December gives the greatest average quantity ; January is not far behind ; February, March, 
and November come next, and are nearly alike; then April, May, and October, in the order 
named. 

The greatest amount of rain in any one month was in January, 1862, when there fell the 
enormous quantity of eighteen inches. 

The most extraordinary summer rain was in June, 1875, when 1.11 inches fell during a 
southerly storm which lasted several days. That this was an anomaly is made apparent by the 
fact that in the three summer months during twenty-six j^ears the whole quantity of rain, col- 
lectively, deducting this, was only 1.9 inches. 

It is worthy of note that in the driest seasons there has been an abundant supply for agri- 
cultural purposes, had it been distributed evenly. Three inches in December, with one inch 
in each of the four following months, would answer all purposes. 

The rain table of San Francisco may be made the basis for estimating the fall in other parts 
of the State. The mountains of the north have from two to tliree times as much, and the 
southern section of the State about half as much, or even less in some localities. The valley of 
the Sacramento has nearly the same quantity as San Francisco ; that of the San Joaquin one 
fourth or one third less, the quantity diminishing southward. 

By reference to the tables showing the extremes of heat and cold, it appears that the coldest 
weather was in January, 1854, when the mercury fell to 25°. At that time the mud in the 
streets was frozen solid , and the shallow ponds were covered with ice strong- enough for boys to 
skate on. But such weather is extremely rare, though since that time the ground has been 
frozen several times so as not to thaw fully in the shade for a day or two. The coldest noonday 
embraced in the record was 37". Often the entire mnter passes by without bringing the ther- 
mometer so low as the freezing point. In 1853 it fell at no time below 40°. 

The extreme of heat was on the tenth and eleventh of September, 1852, when the thermom- 
eter reached 97° and 98° on the two days, respectively. This, however, was entirely excep- 
tional, and might not occur again in half a century ; the air was dry as a sirocco, and caused 
the woodwork of houses to crackle and the plaster to break on the wooden walls. 

With the exception just noted, the hottest day on record was 93° on the sixth day of July, 
1867. In October, 1864, and in September, 1865, it reached 91°, and in July, 1855, it reached 
90°. Thus it appears there were only six days in twenty-four years when the thermometer rose 
as high as 90°. 

The table of mean temperature shows that our summer does not come till the siimmer months 
have passed by. September is the warmest month in the year, and October next ; then comes 
August ; July, the hottest month elsewhere, is the fourth here, or links with June ; next come 
April and May ; then March and November ; then February, and, finally, January and Decem- 
ber, which are the only winter months, if indeed we have any weather that deserves the name 
of winter. 

Twice the ground has been covered with snow. On the twenty-ninth of December, 1856, it 
snowed very fast for several hours, and two or tliree inches gathered, but it melted before night. 
On the twelfth of January, 1868, it snowed fast before day, so that two inches collected. But 
it disappeared before sunrise, so that few persons enjoyed the rare spectacle. 

The extraordinary evenness of the climate depends on the adjacent ocean, the water of which, 
flo^ving in a current from the north, is always at a temperature of about 52°, summer and 
winter. The sea breeze of summer, which chills the air at noonday, leaves no place for hot 
nights. There is not, on an average, one night in the year when it is warm enough to sit out 
of doors at midnight with comfort. 

a?.A.:BijDE I. 

SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF BAIN IN EACH MONTH SINCE 1850; AND THE TOTAL AMOUNT IN EACH RAINY SEASON. 
NOTE— EACH COLUMN REPRESENTS ONE RAINY SEASON. 



M;onth[i852 


1853 


1854 


1855 


18561857 


1858!l859 

1 


1860 


1861 


1862 


1863 


1864 


18651866 


1867 


1868 


1869 


1870 


1871 


1872 


1873 


1874 


1875 


Awiust. 

Sfpt 

October 

Nov 

Dec'b'r. 














.1 

'3A 
.5 

4.8 








.1 

"!i 

2.7 


'".2 

'2.5 
1.7 


.2 
.1 
.1 

7.6 
6.9 




















.00 


.8 
5.3 
11.9 


'!i 

1.4 
2.1 


'2;i 

.4 
.4 


i'.i 

5.4 


.1 

.5 
2.9 
4.0 


■■."9 
3.0 
4.2 


'SA 
1.5 


.1 

.9 
.2 

4.8 


.... 

3.8 

6.1 


.2 

.1 

3.1 

.6 


"2:7 
13.1 


.1 

.6 
3.1 
12.1 


'.2 
1.2 
4.3 


.2 
2.34 
1.24 
4.50 


.06 

■■;49 

3.04 


.04 

.13 

2.27 

13.40 


.04 

.06 

2.90 

7.80 


■■;56 

1.25 
9.59 


.06 
2.75 
5.41 

.30 


.00 

.00 

7.12 

3.42 


Janii'y. 

Feb 

March . 
April... 

May 

June.... 


1853 

4.1 
1.2 
4.8 
5.1 
.3 
.... 


1854 

4.3 
8.4 
3.2 
3.3 
.1 
.1 


1855 

4.5 
4.6 
4.3 
5.6 
2.2 


1856 

8.4 

.5 

1.6 

3.2 

.9 


1857,1858 


1859 

1.0 
5.2 
2.5 
.3 
2.0 


1860 

1.1 
1.4 
3.1 

1.7 
2.6 


1861 

1.2 

2.8 

3.4 

.3 

.7 

.2 


1862 

18.1 

6.1 

1.7 

1.1 

.9 

.2 


18G3 

3.3 
3.3 
2.4 
2.9 
.4 


1864 

1.3 

'i!4 
.9 
.5 


1865 

3.9 
.8 
.6 
.7 
.4 


1866 

11.0 
1.5 
2.6 

.1 
1.8 

.2 


18S7 

6.6 
6.2 
2.2 
1.1 
.1 


1868 

9.6 
6.2 
6.4 
2.2 

'".2 


1869 

6.4 
4.0 
3.2 
2.2 

.1 


1870 


1871 

2.34 
3.55 
1.24 
2.05 
.31 


1872 


1873 

2.27 

3.40 

.74 

.37 


1874 


1875 


1876 


2.1 
8.6 
1.6 

"!i 
•1 


4.4 
1.3 
3.9 
1.1 
.1 
.1 


3.76 
4.53 
1.84 
1.49 
.36 


6.50 
7.90 
1.53 
1.22 


5.33 

2.49 

3.56 

.89 

.40 


7.13 
.00 

1.20 
.05 
.17 

1.11 


7.07 
4.24 
4.7 




.3 




















































Totals. 


33.5 


23.0 


24.1 


21.2 20.0 


19.0 


19.8 


17.1 


14.6 


38.0 


15.2 8.5 


21.321.232.040.5 


21.6 


20.08 


13.08 


33.10 


17.58 


24.0718.18 





1850— Nov., 1.3; Dec, 1,1. 1851-.Ian., 0.(5; Feb., 0.4; March, 1.9; April, 1.1; May, .7; June, .0; July, .0; Total, 7.1; 
Aug., .1; Sept., 1.0; Oct., .2; Nov., 2.2; Dec. 7.1. 1852.-Jan., .6; Feb., .1; March, 6.4; April, .2; May, .3; June, .0; 
July, .0; Total 18.2. 



BEAMISH'S— Nucleus Bldg, Third & Market, Shirts Si Men's Furnishing (Joodj 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 711, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS. 



53 



T.ATBX.E II. 

DATK or THE FIRST AND LAST RATNS. AND OF THF, BEGINNING AND ^NDINO OF EACH KAINY SEASON; ALSO, THE 
AMOUNT OF KAIN WHICH FELL BEFOKE THE END OF THE YEAR, AND THE AMOUNT AFTER THE END OF 
THE YEAR, IN EACH SEASON, SINCE 1850. 



First 
Rain. 



Last 
Rain. 



Rainy Season. 



Begins. Ends. 



Befe After 
Jan. I Dec. 



1850-51.., 
1851-52.., 
1S52-53. . , 
lS.=.3-54. . , 
1854-55.., 
1855-56. . 
\6oi'i-o7 . . . 
lSr)7-58.. 
1858-59... 
lS,->9-60.., 

is^;o-6i.. 

18J1-62.., 
1802-63.., 
18153-64. . , 



Nov. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Sept. 



10 May 
6 May 

28 May 

15 April 
4 May 

10 May 

lO'Mar. 
6 May 

21 .May 
9 May 
4May 
l,May 
5iMay 

19 May 



20 Dec. 


5 May 


V 


2.4 


17 Dec. 


19 March 


31 


1(1.5 


12 Nov. 


9 April 


29 


18.0 


28 Jan. 


12 April 


28 


3.6 


20 Dec. 


31 April 


17; 


2.9 


25 Nov. 


10 April 


I4I 


6.6 


31 Nov. 


15 March 


31 


7.5 


21 Nov. 


24 April 


7! 


8.1 


22 Dec. 


4 April 


10; 


8.8 


22 Nov. 


9lApril 


81 


6.9 


22 Dec. 


6IApril 


.1 


6.0 


12 Nov. 


lOl April 


14 


9.9 


19iDec. 

irp^ov. 


ISApril 


26' 


2.9 


11 April 


*l 


4.4 



4.7 

7.7 
15.5 
19.4 
21.2 
14.6 
12.5 
10.9 
11.0 
10.2 

8.6 
28.1 
12.3 

4.1 



Year. 



First 
Rain. 



Last 
Rain. 



Rainy Season. 



Begins. Ends. 



Befe' After 
I Jan. Dec. 



1864-65. . 
1865-66.. 
1866-67.. 
1867-«8. . 
18(»-69. . 
1869-70. . 
1870-71.. 
1871-72.. 
1872-73.. 
1873-74.. 
1874-75.. 
1875-76. . 

Mean. 



Nov. 
Sept. 
Not. 
Sept, 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Oct. 



15 May 
24 June 

3 May 
14 .Tune 

IMay 
IMay 

4 May 
27 May 
17 April 

6 June 
3 June 
26 



19 Nov. 
8 Nov. 
17 Nov. 
23 Nov. 
19 Dec. 
19 Dec. 
28 Dec. 
31 Dec. 

21 Nov. 

22 Dec. 
16 Oct. 

Nov. 



23 March 4 14.9 

13 March 31 4.0 

16 April 12 15.8 
19 April 13 15. y 

17 March 29 5.7 
7 April 11 8.1 



2 April 
16 April 
28 Feb. 

3 May 



17 3.5 

18 15.8 
28 10.8 

7l 11.4 



SMarch 28i 8.5 
1 1 10.5 



Nov. 26AprU 9| 8.6 



6.4 
17.2 
16.4 
24.6 
15.9 
12.0 

9.3 
17.2 

6.8 
12.3 

9.7 



T ATRXiE III. 

MAXIMUM QU.^IfTITY OF RAIN IN EACH MONTH, MINIMUM QUANTITY IN EACH MONTH, AND AVERAOE 

IN E.\CH MONTH, SINCE 1850. 





Jan. 

18.1 
0.6 
4.8 


Feb. Mar. April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. Dec. 


Majrimum 


8.6 6.4 1 5.6 
0.0 0.6 0.0 
3.41 2.95 1.5 


2.0 

0.0 

.6 


1.11 
0.0 
0.09 


0.3 
0.0 
0.01 


0.2 
0.0 
0.02 


1.0 

0.0 

.09 


3.4 

0.0 
.4 


7.6 13.4 
0.1 0.4 


Mean 


2.65 5.26 



t.a_bijE i-y. 

MEAN TEMPERATURE OF EACH MONTH SINCE 1850. DEDUCED FROM TTVO DAILY 0BSERV.\TI0NS, ONE AT SUNRISE, 
THE OTHER .\T NOOS ; ALSO, THE ME.\N TEMPER.iTURE OF EACH YE.\R. 



Month. !l8511852'l853jl854 1S55 1856 1857 1858:1859 1860 1861 ' 1862: 1863 1864 1865il866^1867 1868,1869 1870 1 1871 1 1872 1873 1874 1875 



January., i^. 3 50 
Februaru. 51.153 

Marrh 53.852 

April... . 

May 

Jiin,' 

Jul II 

Amniat.. 

Octuber... 

.Vr) I'c HI 6f r 50 . 3 53 

December. 51.3 50 



'57.0 55 
58.860 
57.9 61 
,63.2 61 
■61.6 63 
.61.958 



852.048. 
154.153. 
9 55.9 5-1. 
4 58.3 59. 
160.7,56. 
4 61.9158, 
4 60.3161, 
260.0160, 
l;62.7i60 
,762.7i60 
,5,57.058 
,8'52.1153 



6 57.7 52, 
7l£0.9 55, 
2i57.8 55, 
3 55.7 57 
5i57.6 58 
2'58.2 58 

7 59.7 57 
0|61.160 
3163.6 60 
3j62.2 59 
2'57.3 56 
5153.7:51 



5 49.4 49.0'51 
9 51.0 53.4 52 

6 53.3 54.3,50 
9 55.5 58.4 57 

9 62.0158. 058 



3,61.282.0 
6 61.159.6 
660.0:59.0 
3 63.3162.1 

6,58.7162.0 
0'57.656.6 
0147.254.7 



2 45.9 51. 
51.9151. 
5 53.5157. 
5 55.3156. 

3 58.0l58. 
2 58.0J60. 
2 59.6 60. 

4 59.8 59. 
3,59.3160, 
2 60.8,60, 
7 57.2 56, 
353.2150 



2 52.5 51. 
2 53.5|51, 

4 51.5]53, 

5 54.8154, 
5 58.4'55, 
58.4156, 
2 62.4:58, 
6164.3159 
061.5161 
5 58.0:61 
4 55.4 56 
751.054 



553.355 
55.0 50 
2 55.6 55 
2 54.5 .54 

3157.6:55 
5l60.0!56 
0:59.7157 

5 59.8160 
460.0)58 
2 62.2 58 

6 58.0!56 

7 51.3 49 



5 47.148.3 
49.149.9 
149.8 51.8 
855.752.8 
158.0 57.0 



2 59.0 
5 57.9 
59.5 
7 61.3 
6,60.0 
4 56.4:56.9 
.0149.651.0 



59.0 
58.2 
58.4 
59.4 
61.9 



3fean...,56.6:56.5l58.i:57.157.6 55.7 57.0|55.4 54.8l55.l|55.4|55.5J57.5 57.0,56.7|57.4 57.l|56.1|56.9[56.8o4.6j55.4 55.7,54.5j55.4 



T-A-IBIiE "V. 

EXTREMES OF HE.VT IN EACH MONTH SINCE 1850 ; ALSO, IN EACH TEAR. 



Month. !l85l!l852 1853 1854 1855ll856 1857 1858185911860 18611862 1863 1864 1865 186611867 1868 18691870 187l|l8721873 1874 1875 



January.. 
February. 

' March 

April 

May 

June. 

July 

A ugtist... 

September 

Octuber. 

Not^ember 

December. 



Year.. 



72 60 1 67 
72 70 I 68 

"" 80 ! 74 
69 ! 81 
69 1 75 



87 90 85 



83 73 

88 88 
83 , 79 
72 , 73 
60 1 59 



65 I 62 
65 74 
70 75 
80 83 
85 73 
85 I 74 
82 1 82 
80 
87 



60 
61 

82 
79 

76 
76 
78 
86 I 76 
76 



83 87 87 91 91 88 93 



61 


61 


58 


70 


64 


68 


69 


65 


70 


88 


85 


75 


79 


87 


86 



91 78 



EXTREMES OF COLD IN EACH MONTH SINCE 1850; .A.LSO, IN EACH YEAR. 



Month. 1851 1852 1853 1854 1855 1856 1857 1858 1859 1860 1861 1852 1863 1864 18S5 1866 1867 1868 1869 1870 1871 1872 1873 1874 1875 



January.. 
February. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August.... 

September 

October. 

November 

December. 



41 25 

42 38 
41 I 38 



33 33 32 

41 1 40 31 
44 41 : 41 
40 40 ! 44 
44 43 I 43 

49 ; 46 50 
51 48 I 50 
53 49 : 50 

50 I 51 ! 50 

51 41 I 45 

42 I 40 I 31 
29 1 35 34 



30 1 30 
30 ! 34 
36 ' 35 
38 ; 34 
40 ' 39 
44 , 45 

48 48 

49 48 
44 43 
36 38 
34 36 
27 32 



39 , 35 
32 ! 35 



29 40 

34 38 

37 44 
36 , 43 

38 i 44 I 
49 1 50 

,in en 



38 1 35 i 38 

43 ! 38 I 42 

44 I 36 j 42 
40 I 40 45 



47 



46 I 43 
•49 49 
50 49 



37 1 .32 

37 31 

38 38 
42 42 
47 I 44 

45 



45 1 30 
36 38 
43 33 
41 45 



Year.. 



40 25 29 33 31 



27 30 31 23 



29 38 38 27 38 



28 32 



32 30 33 



:is JAMES &. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 



D. W. Laird, San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF CURRENT EVENTS, 



FKOM JAXUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, Ig:5. 



Jan. 1, 1875. The commencement of the new year cel- 
ebrated by the usual social festivities. .. .Robert Farley 
dies of wounds inflicted by F. J. Hayes in a bar-room 
fljfht. 

Jan. 2. A. Mc F. Davis elected President Board of Ed- 
ucation .... Death of Dr. Fourgeaud, a distinguished 
member of the Academy of Sciences. 

Jan. 3. Funeral of Dr. John F. Morse, attended by 
10,000 persons. . . .Arnold Smith, an old man, tonnenteJ 
by hoodlums, fires a gun at them and kills Joseph Demas, 
an innocent boy who chanced to be passing. 

Jan. 4. James H. Fulton, first mate of the ship Sonn- 
tag, convicted in the United States Circuit Court, for cru- 
elty to seamen. 

Jan. .5. The ' ' Week of Prayer," b}' Protestant Churches, 
inaugurated by services at Calvarj' Church .... Temper- 
ance Reform party effect a permanent organization. Post- 
master Janjes Coey c,)nimis.sioned as Brigadier-General 
of the California State Militia. 

Jan. 6. Finance Committee of Board of Supervisors 
discover fraudulent charges in the assessment rolls. 
.... Great excitement in the stock market, and large ad- 
vance in prices. 

Jan. 7. Inauguration of the Northern Pacific CoaSt 
Railroad, from San Francisco to Tomales, via Saucelito. 
... .Tlie Pacific Mail Steamship Co. withdraw from the 
coast-trade and sell their steamers to Goodall, Nelson & 
Perkins. . . .Richard Owens shot and killed by James H. 
Burke, in a drunken quarrel .... Steamer Yosemite col- 
lides in the fog with the bark Nicholas Thayer, and her 
passengers reach San Francisco in the small boats. . . .The 
shrinkage in stock values to-day is .S17, 000,000. 

Jan. S. Death of T. L. Johns, a well known California 
literateur. 

Jan. 9. Steamer Donahue launched .... Interesting col- 
lection of Aleutian mummies received at warehouse of 
the Alaska Commercial Co.... A %3,000 burglary at the 
residence of Milton S. Latham. 

Jan. 12. Charles B. Redman commits suicide in a 
house of ill-fame. . . . J. P. Hoge elected President of the 
San Francisco Bar Association . . . . W. F. Babcock elected 
President of the Chamber of Commerce. 

Jan. 15. William White arrested, on a requisition 
from Massachusetts, for assault with a dea 'ly weapon. 

Jan. 16. Joseph Casey, the poll-tax receipt forjjer, re- 
leased on §25,000 bail. 

Jan. 17. The cargo of the coal ship Respigadero takes 
fire and she is scuttled off the foot Third Street. 

Jan. 18. Suit began by the Attorney-General to re- 
cover §100,000 from ex-Harbor Commissioner J. J. Marks 
and his sureties, for alleged peculations while in office. 

Jan. 19. Paul Zecchi and a man by the name of Ives 
fight a duel near the Ocean House, .and Zecchi tries to 
kill himself.... A two-story frame dwelling house on 
California Street, blown down by the gale. 

Jan. 20. Destructive conflagration on Steuart Street, 
and loss of hay, gi"ain, and buildings, valued at §40,000 
The City and County Attorney decides that the Su- 
pervisors have no power to expend money for the main- 
tenance of a training ship. 

Jan. 21. The State Central Committee of the Inde- 
pendent party meet and detennine to nominate tickets 
for the State and every county. 

Jan. 22. Business men hold a meeting at the Chamber 
of Commerce to take steps to relieve the sufferers by the 
flood at Marysvillo; §15,000 obtained from various sour- 
ces. . . .The Gootlall, Nelson & Perkins Steamship Compa- 
ny incorporated. 

Jan. 23. John Griffin wantonly shot in the back by 
hoodlums. . . .The police make a raid and cajiture seven- 
teen gamblers. .. .James Lick revokes all previous wills 
and codicils made by him. 



Jan. 25. Robert Moulaton commits suicide by cutting 
his throat. 

Jan. 20. Another severe gale, causing much damage to 
ship])ing in the bay. The schooner Star of the Union 
Wrecked at Green Street Dock .... Joseph Casey, convicted 
of forging poll tax receipts Kalakaua, king of the Ha- 
waiian Islands, arrives from Wasliington, on his wa^' 
home. 

Jan. 27. The steamer City of Pekin arrives from New 
York. .. .Fourth anniversary exercises of the Methodist 
Chinese Mission. 

Jan. 28. George Treat's stud of horses sold at public 
auction . . . . G. G. McKune, attempts to commit suicide by 
cutting his throat .... The capital stock of the Consoli- 
i dated Virginia and California Mining Companies, each in- 
creased to fifty-four million dollars. 

Jan. 29. Newton Morgan, found guilty of forging poll- 
tax receipts. . . .Patrick Gowan, a Third street hoodlum, 
shoots at John Perrin without any provocation. 

Jan. 30. A sailor known as " Dutch Charley," is 
kicked to death by Antonio Hidalgo, at Hunter's Point 
Dry Dock. 

Jan. 31. Admirers of Tom Paine celebrate his birth- 
day .... The bark Bront«s parts her cable and drifts upon 
the rocks at Fort Point. 

Feb. 1. Delegations from temperance societies wait 
upon King Kalakaua. .. .John Boyce, while intoxicated, 
walks off Broadway Street Wharf and is drowned. . . .Ten 
thousand persons visit the steamer Citj' of Pekin. 

Feb. 2. King Kalakaua embarks on the U. S. man-of- 
war Pensacola, to return to his kingdom .... Gen. Coey 
assumes command of the National Guard, as Brigadier- 
General .... Seventh annual session of the Grand Lodge 
of the Knights of Pythias begins. . . .The Board of Edu- 
cation decide that the reading of the Lord's Prayer in 
the schools is partisan and sectarian. 

Feb. 4. Newton Morgan, poll-tax receipt forger, is 
convicted on another indictment. .. .Samuel Hopkins, a 
laborer, drops dead while at work. 

Feb. 5. Levi Rosener's removal from the office of 
Assessor by decree of the Nineteenth District Court, for 
neglect of dutj'. .. .Chinese commence their New Year 
festivities. . . . A faro dealer is fined §500, and various ^is- 
itors to his place .§40 each .... German bondholders file a 
complaint against the California Pacific Railroad Co., and 
ask tor the appointment of new trustees to execute their 
trusts. 

Feb. 6. A thief throws a brick through a window of 
the Dime Savings Bank, secures §1,000 in greenbacks, and 
effects his escape. 

Feb. 7. Meeting for the purpose of establishing a 
Catholic Hall and Library Association ; §45,000 sub- 
scribed towards the project. 

Feb. S. Alexander Badlam elected Assessor by the 
Board of Supervisors. . . .The Supervisors decide that the 
chai-ges of misconduct against Supervisor Menzies are 
without foundation. .. .Grand carnival by the Italian 
Benevolent Association. .. .T. P. Burns found dead iii 
his bed. 

Feb. 10. J. W. Hart, arrested for forgery, is dis- 
charged, he having been mistaken for the real offender. 
.... Funds raised for Kansas and Nebraska sufferers from 
the grasshopper plague. 

Feb. 11. P. Roberts and W. C. Urban have a murder- 
ous affray. 

Feb. 12. Special ofllcer Charles Miller, stabbed with 

a carving knife by Mrs. Clara Smith Church of the 

Advent reopened. 

Feb. 13. A. A. Louderback held to appear before the 
grand Jury for an alleged attempt to coiTupt one of the 
grand jurors in the Rosener case .... Newton Morgan, 
forger, sentenced to fifteen years imprisonment 



Smithsonian Medical Institute, 637 Cal, B. J. SMITH, M.D., Prof. Phrenologj 



3. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Established 1862. 



CHRONOLOGICAL EVENTS. 



55 



" Katie Pease" wins the race for five Iialf-mile heats, at 
the Bay District Traclc. 

Feb. 14. Delegates from Irish societies select O'Con- 
nel French as orat<.>r for St. Patricia's Lhiy. .. .Immense 
meeting' of Protestants at the Tabernacle express their 
inilignation at outrages ujMn Christian missionaries at 
Acapulco. 

Feb. 15. Official report that the s\ihscripttona for 
Kansis and Nebraska suflferers amount to s 8,000. 

Feb. IG. The Grangers' Business Association organ- 
ized. . . .Banquet to A. Is. Hallidic, President of the Me- 
chanic's Institute, by its trustees. . . .Arrangements com- 
pleted for a ririe-shtK>ting match between the Sumner 
Light Guard and a New York company'. 

Feb. 17. Mass meeting of Grangers and Temperance 
men, for the purpose of taking political action. .. .Two 
Sicilians, convicted of counterfeiting, sentenced to pay 
a fine of !?l,tK)0 e<ich, and imprisonment for six years. 

Feb. 18. The Sujiervisors engaged in investigating the 
affairs of the Tax Collector's office. 

Feb. IS). Au;,'ust Hemme gives $30,000 to the Central 
Tabcrnat^le Rev. E. P. Hanmiond, the evangelist, ar- 
rives. 

Feb. 20. Joseph Casey, poll-tax forger, sentenced to 
eleven years' imprisonment. . . . A committee and five hun- 
dred persons assemble and make arrangements for the 
Hammond revival meetings. .. .Steamship City of Pekin 
departs on her first voyage to China .... Annual meeting 
of the Pacific Coa.st Turner societies. 

Feb. '21. Immense meeting of Catholics to protest 
a^inst the expulsion of Sisters of Charity from Mexico. 

Feb. 22. General suspension of business ami observ- 
ance of Washington's Birthday. . . .Members of the Acade- 
my of Sciences make their annual visit to the State Uni- 
versity. 

Feb. 23. Mrs. James Baker suddenly dies while riding 
in a hack. 

Feb. 24. Shooting scrape between Henry Blumenthal 
and Thomas Wagner. . . .Governor Booth is.sues a compli- 
mentary order relative to the drill of the Second Brigade 
at the Pre-sidio on the 22d inst. 

Feb. 25. Marland R. Magee shoots himself through 
the heart at the American Exchange Hotel .... Great in- 
terest manifested in llie Hammond revival meetings. 

Feb. 20. Judge Wheeler decides that the city nuist pay 
the salary of the commander of the training shi|j . . . . Bune- 
jorgen J. Broderson commits suicide at the Swiss Hotel. 

Feb. 27. John Kelley shot and killed by Joseph F. 
Weiiie in self-defence. 

Feb. 23. James R. Kendall, a distinguished musician 
at the California Theater, drops dead in the music room. 

March 1. Suiiervisors order an investigation of License 
Collector Buckleys office .... Seven hmidred Cambrians 
celebrate St. David's Day. 

March 2. The " UndenvTiter'a Fire Patrol of San 
Francisco" is organized. . . .Orders received by the agent 
of the Pacific Mail Steamship Co. to dispatch only one 
steamer per month to China and Japan. 

March 3. Revival among Catholics, under the preach- 
ing of the Paulist Father Elliott. .. .The Tabernacle and 
Columbia .Square Baptist churches miite, under the name 
of the Metroix)litan Baptist Church, and choose Rev. 1. S. 
Kalloch as jjastor. 

March 4. F'urious affray among Chinamen, with 
knives. 

March 5. Captain Charles Avery commits suicide at 
the Oriental Hotel. 

March 6. Wrestling match for $2,500, won by Louis 
Bauer over Leopold Vanderveckeu. 

March 7. Intense religious excitement ; the churches 
and public halls are filled with large congregations. 

JIarch 8. The Commercial Bank is organized, with a 
capital of ;>6,000,000. 

March 9. Mrs. M. Bonnet endeavors to kill Kate Crow- 
ley, prompted by jealousy. 

March 10. Steamship City of Tokio arrives from New 
York.... Mrs. Minnie Boyce commits suicide by taking 
moq)hine. .. .Michael Casey, mate of the steamer Ama- 
dor, shot by poll-tax collector M. A. Wilson. 

March 11. Rifle match between Col. J. McComb, Col. 
G. W. Granniss, and Colonel A. Wason. At 500 yards 
won by Col. Granniss, and at 200 yards by Col. Wason. 

March 12. The members of the San Francisco Stock 
Exchange give $8,345 for the Nebraska sufferers. 

March 13. Thomas Brady, a Custom House watchman, 
commits suicide. . . .G. W. Stone found dead in his room 

Isaac E. Record, jailor at the Comitj- Jail, convicted 

of brutality to a prisoner. . . .Capt. S. E. Oakley, of the 
steamer Express, commits suicide by taking laudanum. 



March 14. The California Bible Society celebrates 
their quarter-centennial anniversary. 

March 15. The Emmet Guard arrive from Virginia 
City, on a visit. 

jiarch 17. St. Patrick's D{iy celebrated by a military 
and civic procession, and literary exerci.ses. 

March 18. Thomas Cuahine drowned while bathing off 
Hunter's Point. .. .The Internationalist-s celebrate their 
anniversary. 

March 111. William Gately, 14 years old, knocks down 
a countrjman and robs him. 

March 20. The Emmet Guard, of Virginia City, and 
San Francisco Sharpshooters, have a match, resulting in 
favor of the latter. .. .Oliver C. Reed found dead in his 
room .... Caleb M. Sickler found dead in his room. 

March 22. Large donations sent to the Nebraska suf- 
ferers Destructive fire at the Alhambra Buililing. 

March 24. William Cooper commits suicide by drown- 
ing. 

JIarch 26. The dead bod}' of Jule Mialon found floating 
in the Bay off North Beach. 

March '27. James Lick revokes his deed of trust exe- 
cuted in July, 1874, which conveyed all of his projierty 
for benevolent purposes. 

March 29. Oavid F. McCarthy, late clerk of the Police 
Court, found to have been a defaulter for about .*20,000. 

March 31. The Spiritualists celebrate their twenty- 
seventh anniversarj'. 

April 1. C. A. Peterson found dead in his nxim, from 
the effects of charcoal fumes .... Passengers by the steam- 
er Or^on, in 1849, hold a reunion. 

April 2. Rosenthal's great picture " Elaine," cut from 
its frame and stolen. 

April 4. G. A. Fisher commits suicide at the Coso 
House .... Five thousand Iri.^h-Americans form a proces- 
sion and participate in a demonstration in honor of the 
memory of the late John Mitchell. . . .The lost " Elaine, " 
is fo\ind, and six thieves arrested .... University Mound 
College Building, worth .$40,000, dc.'^troj-ed by fire. 

April 6. D. K. Meek commits suicide by taking laud- 
anum. 

April 7. Explosion of giant powder at Harrison Street 
WTiarf, causing the loss of four lives and the destruction 
of Hathaway's Warehouse, and other buildings, by fire 
. . . .Public reception of Senator Sargent, by the military 
and the mayor. . . . J. J. Daly commits suicide by poison- 
ing. 

April 8. Mrs. H. Anderson found drowned on the 
beach at the Potrero. 

April 9. The State Controller brings suits against va- 
rious banks to em'orce the collection of moneys belonging 
to e.scheated estates. . . .Veterans of the "California Hun- 
dred" celebrate the tenth anniversaiy of Lee's surrender. 

April 10. Victor O'Neill attempts self-destruction by 
cutting his throat. 

April 11. Continued excitement on religion ; the 
churches and public halls are thronged, and there are 
three meetings in the open air. 

April 12. Military parade and banquet to General 
Crook. 

April 13. Frederick Brandenberger found buried un- 
der a pile of lumber, where he had been imprisoned for a 
week; he dies shortly af terwards . . . . J. J. Valentine, of 
Wells, Fargo & Co., reports that the donations sent from 
the Pacific Coast to the Kansas and Nebraska sufferers 

amount to $37,000 California State Medical Society of 

Homeopaths convenes .... Miller and Vanderveckcn have 
a wTestling match for $2,000, which is won by the former. 

April 14. George Albert commits suicide by shooting 
himself. 

April 16. Revivalist Hammond holds his farewell 
meeting. 

April 17. David J. Fogarty, in a fit of temporary in- 
sanity, stabs and kills his infant daughter. 

April 19. City Engineer Scowden presents his rejwrton 
the question of water supply, and recommends the Cala- 
veras Creek scheme. 

April 20. Colored people celebrate the fifth anniversary 
of the ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment. 

April 21. Suit commences in the U. S. Circuit Court 
to compel the Central Pacific Railroad Co. to pay to the 
Government $1,836,000— five per cent, of its earnings. . . . 
Antonia Fox found dead in her room, asphyxiated. 

April 22. William Bell thrown frfim his wagon on the 
Ocean House Road and killed .... State Rifle Association 
organized. 

April 23. Eckstein, indicted for forging poll-tax re- 
ceipts, is acquitted. 

April 24. Six hundred jiassengers arrive from the 



:?; TAMES &. STEELE & CO., Apothecaries, No. 316 Hearny Street. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Mont^^omery cor. Hercliant 



56 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



East, having- been snow-bound for a week on the Union 
Pacific R. R. 

Ai)ril 25. Laura Pteiffer shoots lier father-in-law, in 
the CI iur.se of a fight... A dead bodj' found in the bay 

identified a.s that of John yuinlan Frederick Eltze 

found dead in lii.s bed. 

April 20. Odd Fellows celebrate the fifty-sixth anni- 
vei'.sary of their Order. . . .Second trial of J. J. Marks, for 
embezzlement, begins .... Water rights to Lake Tahoe 
and the lllue Lakes offered to the city for thirteen and 
twelve million dollars respectively. 

April 27. Banquet to Governor Pacheco and staff. 

April 28. E.v-Harbor Commissioner Marks again con- 
victed of embezzlement. 

April 29. Hannah Smj-the, who shot Gen. M. G. Cobb 
a few months previously, acquitted on the ground of in- 
sanity. 

April 30. Meeting of stock dealers for the organization 
of a new Board of Brokers. . . .Thomas Bunyan commits 
suicide by taking laudanum. . . .The Grand Jury censures 
the police for not suppressing gambling houses. 

Maj- 1. Publication of startling charges pf bribery 
and corruption in the office of Assessor, under Bosener 
.... John Reynolds found asphyxiated in his room. 

May 2. Frank M. Stamp commits suicide by hanging. 

May 3. Five additional propositions made to supply 
the city with water. 

May 5. Death of S. F. Butterworth Annual meet- 
ing of the Episcopal Board of Missions. 

Majf 6. Dead body of Timothy O'Neil found floating 
in the bay. . . .Second annual meeting of the State Tem- 
perance Alliance. 

May 7. Caleb M. Williams found dead in his room 

E. P. McCarthy brings suit to oust Supervisor Menzies 
from office. 

Maj' 8. Noonday Rock blown up by nitro-glycerine. 

May 9. Destructive fire at corner of Fourth and Berry 
streets; loss ^75,000. 

May 10. Meeting of the Grand Encampment I. O. O. F. 
. . . .Death of C. J. Brenham, mayor of San Francisco in 
1852. . . .A dead body found floating in the bay, identi- 
fied as that of Mrs. Henry Evans. 

May 11. Trotting race between Defiance and Abe 
Edgington for ^10,000, won by the latter. 

May 13. William C. Ralston sells to William Sharon 
his half interest in the Palace Hotel for .?1, 750,000. 

May 14. Benjamin Anderson commits suicide by cut- 
ting his throat Second annual re-union of the Har- 
vard Club. 

May 15. James Lick prepares a new deed of trust, 
leading most of his benefactions unchanged. .. .William 
C. Ladd drownied while bathing. 

May 10. Hannah Hoee found dead in her bed. 

May 17. The Water Committee of the Board of Super- 
visors endorse the Calaveras Creek scheme. 

May 18. John P. Fishbeck found dead in a cellar un- 
der the California Market, where he had hung himself 
.... Pilot boat J. C. Cousins wrecked on the Cliff House 
beach. . . .Charles Gallighan dies of stabs inflicted by Wil- 
liam Foster. 

May 19. Public reception to Senator Booth. 

May 20. Jabez Roberts dies of stabs inflicted by Wil- 
liam Davis. 

May 22. Death of General Alfred Reddington, at the 
Grand Hotel. . . .John J. Marks, ex-Harbor Commissioner, 
sentenced to seven years' imprisonment for official mal- 
feasance. 

May 23. Hill Beachy, a noted pioneer, dies of paralysis. 

May 24. A woman attempts to kill Col. W. H. L. 
Barnes .... The Fire Insurance Patrol begin active duty 
The British Benevolent Society celebrate Queen Vic- 
toria's birthday. 

May 25. Col. F. W. Sims commits suicide by taking 
morphine. 

May 20. George Kugler falls into a cellar and is killed. 

May 28. E. A. Minoch commits suicide by poisoning. 

Bauer and Miller have a Roman wrestling match, 

which the immense audience declare to be a swindle. . . . 
Chinese purchase the First Baptist Church Building for 
a lodging house. 

May 29. Grand Army of the Republic observe the 
usual services of Memorial Day. . . .Curran, one of the 
"Elaine" thieves, sentenced to eight years' imprison- 
ment. .. .William A. Addison found dead in his room, 
from an apoplectic fit. 

May 30. Charles A. Angelo found dead in his bed. . . . 
Tliomas Carroll shot and killed by James Sullivan in a 
saloon fight. .. .Thomas Fay assaults his father with a 
dagger. . . .Frank Melville stabbed and killed by one White. 



May 31. Theodore Stroeh dies of wounds inflicted upon 
himself with suicidal intent a month previously. 

June 1. The wife of John Buchanan found starved to 
death by her husband. .. .Application of J. J. Marks to 
be released on bail denied by the Supreme Court.... 
Grand Grove of Druids begin their annual session. 

June 2. John Skeehan killed by the caving of the 
bank of a sewer trench. . . .Arrival of the German frigate 
Arcona. 

June 3. Tread well & Co. suspend business, with lia- 
bilities amounting to half a million dollars. 

June 4. John Lynch falls down stairs and is killed. . . . 
Passengers by the steamer Panama, in 1849, hold a re- 
union. 

June 5. The Pacific Stock Exchange formally opened. 

June 6. Andrea Sagale found dead in his bed. 

June 7. Incorporation of the California Rifle Associa- 
tion. . . .The Supervisors pass to print an order to nego- 
tiate for the purchase of the works of the Spring Valley 
Water Co., without the Calaveras water-sheds .... G. 
Behrens commits suicide with the fumes of charcoal. 

Jmie 8. Sixth annual session of the State Dental As- 
sociation. 

June 9. Death of ex-Mayor Thomas H. Selby. 

June 10. T. W. Donahue found dead in his bed .... 
Henry Lavino commits suicide by shooting. 

June 13. Shooting match between a team from the 
Sumner Guard and the National Guard, results in a vic- 
tory for the former. 

June 14. A committee of the Board of Supervisors re- 
port that the defalcation of Ex-police Court Clerk McCar- 
thy amounts to §25,000. . . .The Supervisors pass the or- 
der to negotiate for the purchase of the property of the 
Spring Valley Water Company. 

June 15. The Summer exhibition of the San Francisco 
Art Association begins. 

June 16. Mrs. John W. Wilcox dies while a surgeon is 
administering chloroform. 

June 17. Celebration of the centennial anniversary of 
the battle of Bunker Hill .... Laying of the corner stone 
of the Improved Order of Red Men's Hall .... Henry Swan 
commits suicide by poisoning. .. .Ship Cham plain runs 
upon the North Farralone and is a total loss.... A. P. 
Bergstedt conunits suicide by shooting. 

June 18. The National Guard celebrates its nineteenth 

anniversary Slight earthquake shock at 3 o'clock, 

A. M. 

June 19. Formal opening of the U. S. Marine Hos- 
pital. 

June 20. John Miller, secretaiy of the Contract and 
Finance Company, in custody for extensive frauds. 

June 22. Fire on Broadway; loss, §10,000. . . .Fire on 
Lombard Street; loss, §20,000. 

June 23. U. S. frigate Benecia runs ashore at Point Pi- 
nol .... News received of the subsidizing of the Pacific 
Mail Steamship Company to carry mails to New South 
Wales and New Zealand. 

June 25. The city brings suit to forfeit the franchise 
of the City Gas Company. 

June 26. Shooting match between the team of the 
Sumner Guard of San Francisco and a New York team, 
resulting in a victory for the fomier. 

June '57. Stephen Hunt drowned while bathing. 

June 29. Arrival of steamer Oceanic from Hong Kong, 

the first of the Occidental and Oriental line Henry 

Conrad commits suicide by hanging. 

June 30. The Democi-atic State Convention nominates 
William Irwin for Governor. .. .William E. Lovett nomi- 
nated for Governor by the Temperance Reform Conven- 
tion .... Large meeting of French residents to raise funds 
for the relief of sufferers by floods in France .... Willie 
Schueler run over by a truck and killed. 

July 1. John F. Swift nominated as Independent can- 
didate for Congress from the First District .... Patrick 
Linehan blown from the mouth of a cannon and killed, 
while firing a salute .... John Sullivan found dead in his 
bed. 

July 4. Sermons approriate to Independence Day 
preached in nearly all of the churches. 

July 5. Celebration of Independence Day by military 
and civic societies, and by literary exercises. . . . J. W. C. 
Brand attempts to kill Polly Boon, and commits suicide 
by shooting. . . .Robert White commits suicide by cutting 
his throat. . . .The dead body of Frederick Schluckebeir 
found hanging to a tree near the Presidio. 

July 6. William A. Piper nominated for Congressman 
from "the First District, by the Democratic Convention. 

July 7. Incorporation of the National Telegraph Co., 
with a capital of !J25,000,000. . . .James Lick elected Presi- 



BEAMISH'S— Nucleus Bldg, Third & Market, Shirts & Men's Furnishing (jood fjj 



PINE WATCHES and JEWELRY f:r Sale by L. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



CHRONOLOGICAL EVENTS. 



57 



dent of the California Pioneers. .. .The Territorial Pio- 
neurs oelebrate the twenty-ninth anniversary of the rais- 
in};-(if the American Ha;,' in California. 

July 8, Miin^:aret Culleii found dead In her room. 

July 9. T. S. Shai>cott coniraita suicide. 

July 10. The dead body of Jauies Shomian found 
floating: in the Hay. 

July 11. Anno\nicenient of the granting of a contract 
with the Pacific Mail ijteumship Co. to run a line of 
steamers to Vancouver Island. 

July 12. Failure of Abram Block, for .'S'iOO.OOO 

Michael Coverly dies of injuries recoivod in a sparring 
match. 

July 14, Constant Ceillet found dead in his room. 

July Ih. The Chemical Works, at South Sun Francisco, 
destroyed by fire ; loss, >s25,0O0. 

July 17. Death of W. C U'Artois, who was picked up 
on the street in an insensible condition. 

July 18. Death of Captain James S. Houseman, for 
manj- years Harbor Master. 

July 21. The Commercial Bank opened. 

July 22, French residents send .§7,800 to the sufferers 
by the Hoods in France. 

Jul)' 24. Honry Kutzhoni commits suicide by drown- 
ing. . ..James P, Treadwell brings suit to restrain the 
Spring Valley Water Co. from consummating the pur- 
chase of the Caln\'cras water sheds Kegatta of the San 

Francisco Yacht Club ; prises won by the Gazelle, Freda, 
and Virgin. 

.luly 20. City Engineer Scowden tenders his resigna- 
tion, to take effect August 1st, 

July 28. Charles Kuchel arrested for embezzling 
$6,000. 

July 29. Catliolic citizens celebrate the twenty-fifth 
anniversary of the transfer of Archbishop Alemany to 

this diocese H. Frank found dead in his room', by 

strangulation. . . . Death of Joseph Kaslzky, aged 101 years. 

July 30. The Water Commissioners report that it will 
cost sl.S.oOO.OOO to purchase the property of the Spring 
Valley Co., and the Calaveras watersheds, and the Super- 
visors decide against making the purchase. 

August ]. Kev. J>r. Guard preaches his inaugural ser- 
mon as pastor of the Howard Street Methodist Church. 

August 2. Death of Wilii.am Kelley from injuries re- 
ceived by a fall from a carriage. 

August 3. Republicans hold a primary to select dele- 
.gates to a municipal convention .... People's Nominating 
Committee announce their ticket.. ..The property of tire 
Southei-n Pacific Railroad Co. is mortgaged for ••140,000,000. 

August .5. Former members of the New York Seventh 
Regiment hold a reunion. .. .Death of L. B.Wert, run 
over by a street car a few days previously. 

August 0. O'Connell Centennial Celebration by Irish- 
Americans. . . .Walter D. Shaw drowned. 

August 7. H. T. Brander drownied \\hile bathing. 

August 8, The seats of the amphitheater at Wood- 
ward's Garden break down and many persons are 
wounded. 

August 9, Ira P. Rankin nominated by the Repub- 
licans for Congressman from the first district. .. .The 
Super\isors pass an order prohibiting the presence of 
women in liquor saloons at night. 

August 10. J. Williamson dies from the careless use 
of poison. 

August 12. Arrest of John Miller alias Woodruff, the 
defaulting secretary of the Western Development Com- 
pany. ...The Democratic Convention nominates A. J. 
Brj'ant for Maj'or. 

Aug<istl4. Anthony Kraker ftnd John Deery play a 
billiard match for .'?l,o6o, which is won by the former. 

August 15. " The dead body of W. A. De Laski found 
floating in the bay, . . .The comer stone of the Spanish- 
American Catholic Church is laid. .. .Germans hold a 
grand celebration of the unveiling of the Herman statue. 

August 10. John McMahon and William Farrell have a 
WTeslling match for $1,000, which is won by the former. 

Augu.st 17. The bark Milan is destroyed by fire while 
at anchor on the bay. . . .The tenth annual exhibition of 
the .Mechanics' Institute begins. 

August 19. Charles Hanson shot and fatally wounded 
by James McVey, 

August 20. A child by the name of H. G. Saddler falls 
from a gate and is killed .... Henry B. King drops dead. 

August 21. Ten thousand jieople visit the Mechanics' 
Fair, 
from a gate and is killed .... Henry B. King drops dead. 

August 22, David T. O'Neil shot and killed by William 
J. Taylor. . . .Edward Sheridan, fourteen years old, stabs 
and kills Thomas Crowlev . . , .D. Lankman dies of wounds 



inflicted with a beer glass, hurled at him by Ellen Lon- 
daine. 

August 23. General Sheridan arrives from the East and 
is received with militarj' honors. . . . Carlo Cuneo commits 
suicide by poisoning. 

August 24. Arrival of the ship New York from Liver- 
pool, with twenty-four of the crew down with the scurvy. 

August 2[>. Great decline in the value of mining stocks. 
. . , .Charles McKee found dead in his bed. 

August 26. Suspension of the Bank of California and of 
the National Gold Bank and Trust Company. Indefinite 
adjournment of the Stock Boards. Runs on all of the 
banks. 

August 27. The Merchants Exchange Bank suspends 
payment. William C. Ralston resigns the Presidency of 
the Bank of California, makes a transfer of all of his 
property to William Sharon, and is drowned at North 
Beach, a few hours afterward, while bathing. 

August 28. Runs on the banks tease. The Stock Boards 
and many other public bodies hold special meetings, and 
pass resolutions to the memory of William C. lialston. 

August 20. Nearly all of the clergymen preach sermons 
relating to the exciting events of the past three dsys. 

August 30. Fifty thousand persons attentl the funeral 
of the late William C. Ralston .... Mary Ellen Dempsy 
killed by the burning of her clothing. 

August 31. On account of the financial disorders Gen- 
eral Thompson countermands the order for a grand 
brigade review September 9th. 

Sept. 1. Election for State and municipal officers, and 
a general suspension of business. ., .Anthony Cummins 
found dead from a blow inflicted by his wife with a billet 
of wood. 

Sept. 2. The Merchants' Exchange Bank resumes 
business. 

Sept. 8. A coroner's jury returns a verdict to the 
effect that the drowning of the late William C. Ralston 
was accidental. 

Sept, 4, The Oakland Ferry landings transferred to 
the fooj of Market street. 

Sept, 6. The training ship Portsmouth opened for the 
reception of pupils .... The Superxisors pass resolutions 
eulogizing the late W. C. Ralston. 

Sept. 7. Report of the absconding of George M. Pin- 
ney, clerk of the U. S. Naval Paymaster, to escape pun- 
ishment for extensive frauds. 

Sept. 8. Mass meeting of 20,000 persons pass resolu- 
tions eulogizing the late W. C. Ralston, and denouncing 
journals that had been opposed to him. 

Sept. 9. Formal dedication of the Lotta drinking 
fountain, at the corner of Kearny and Market Streets. . . . 
The TeiTitorial Pioneers celebrate the Twenty-fifth Anni- 
versarj' of the admission of California into the Union. 

Sept. 10. The Safe Deposit Co. commence business. . . . 
The dead body of Nicholas Brettreaschen found floating 
in the Bay. 

Sept. 11. George Bittenbender shot and killed by his 
brother Edward, , . .William Lane is drowned. 

Sept, 12, The dead body of Christopher Seeper is 
found in a cellar, where he had shot himself. 

Sept. 13, Nathan M, Simonton falls from a carpenter's 
stage and is killed .... The Board of Supervisors publicly 
thank A. Block, a retiring member, for his past services 
.... Ezekiel Bullock commits suicide at his wife's grave, 

Sept. 14. R. S. Floyd, F, D, Atherton, Sr,, B, D, 
Murphy, John H. Lick, and John Nightingale, appointetl 
trustees under James Lick's revised deed, conveying his 
property for public puqjoses. , . , Veterans of the Mexican 
war celebrate the Twenty-eighth Anniversary of the cap- 
ture of the City of Mexico. 

Sept. 15, The Annual Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church begins. 

Sept, 16. The Ladies' Protection and Relief Society 
celebrate their Twenty-second Anniversary. 

Sept. 18. Police officer Waite shoots and kills Patrick 
Coffee, a fleeing prisoner. 

Sept. 19. Rudolph Michelson commits suicide. 

Sept, 22. Guiseppi Galli stabbed and killed by Mary 
Soretto. 

Sept, 23. John Lee falls from a carpenter's stage and 

is killed James Lick presents to the California 

Pioneers a lot worth 8200,000. 

Sept. 24. James Lick presents to the Academy of 
Sciences a valuable building site on Market Street. . . . 
Margaret Conlin found drowned in Mission Creek.... 
Mary Ann Whalen, run over and killed by a hor.-^e car. 

Sept. 25. Formal organization of the '' Svndicate of 
the Bank of California," and election of William Sharon 
as President. 



'd TEELE'S Squirrel Poison is sold by all Druggists, Grocers, and General Dealers, 

5 



JEWELRY made to order and REPAIRED by D. "W. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Mercliai 



58 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Sept. 26. Anthony TroUope, the novelist, arrives from 
Australia. 

Sept. 27. Meeting of former residents of Texas to raise 
funds for the sufferers by the inundation of Galveston. 

Sept. 28. G. W. Mitchell, a laborer on the Palace Ho- 
tel, lalls from a scaffold and is killed. 

Sept. 29. Flood & O'Brien purchase the Selby Shot 
Tower and Snieltinjf Works. 

Sept 30. Serffeant William Lee, of the Montgomery 
Guard, accidentallj- shot and killed at target practice. 

Oct. 1. Peter Cleary, a teamster, killed by the, falling 
of a block of marble .... Veterans of the New York Seventh 
Regiment effect a permanent organization. 

Oct. 2. The Bank of California resumes business, amid 
great demonstrations of joy by the public. 

Oct. 3. William Saalburg dies of injuries inflicted by 
a wild bull. 

Oct. 4. The San Francisco and Pacific Stock Exchanges 
are reopened for the transaction of business. . . .The 5fe- 
vada Bank of San Francisco is opened, with a capital of 
$5,000,000. 

Oct. a. The new Board of Directors of the Bank of 
California organize and elect D. 0. Mills President. 

Oct. 7. A. K. Potter kills his wife, and commits sui- 
cide. . . .Charles Miller commits suicide by poisoning. . . . 
Ernestine Lewinski found dead in his bed. . . .John Sulli- 
van found dead in his bed. 

Oct. y. John Steed falls from a carpenter's stage and 
is killed .... Close of the tenth exhibition of the Mechan- 
ics' Institute, after a successful run of forty-seven days. 
.... Margaret Cook accidentally drowiied in the Bay. 

Oct. 10. Rev. Asa Fisk installed as pastor of the How- 
ard Presbjiierian Church. 

Oct. 12. Reception to General Sheridan by veterans of 
the California Battalion. 

Oct. 13. The Masonic Grand Lodge lays the comer 
stone of the First Baptist Church. 

Oct. 14. Banquet to General Sheridan by prominent 
citizens. . . .Slight eaithquake shock. 

Oct. 16. "Alexander" wins the three-mile heat, and 
$1,000 at the Bay District race track. 

Oct. 17. Italians celebrate the anniversary of the discov- 
ery of America by Columbus .... Dead body of Frederick 
Maher found lying in a back yard. 

Oct. IS. H. F. Maass commits suicide. 

Oct. I'J. Addie Ayres run over and killed by a street 
car. ..." Bradley" wins the purse of §2,500, at the Baj' 
District race track. 

Oct. 20. The special judicial election passes off quietly, 
17,042 votes being polled. 

Oct. 22. Shooting tournament of the California Rifle 
Association begins. 

Oct. 2.3. Capt. Burns, of the Sumner Guard, wins the 
first prize at the shooting tournament . . . .Thomas Peck- 
ham dies of stabs inflicted by James Drunigo. 

Oct. 2(j. Panic in stocks on account of the great fire at 
Virginia City. 

Oct. 27. Andrew Lamatre conunits suicide. 

Oct. 28. Organization of a relief committee to secure 
aid for the sutterers by the Virginia City fire. 

Oct. 20. Run on the National Gold Bank and Trust 
Company. .. .Death of James Otis, Mayor of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Oct. 31. Michael T. Reddy drowned while bathing. 

Nov. 1. The National Gold Bank and Trust Company 
suspend business. 

Nov. 2. Daniel Spring commits suicide by drowning. 

Nov. 4. The supervisors elect Dr. George Hewston 
Mayor. 

Nov. 5. Jean Gardere commits s\iicide by poisoning 
. . . .The directors of the Gold Bank and Trust Company 
resolve to wind up its affairs. 

Nov. 6. San Fi-ancisco's donations for the relief of Vir- 
ginia City amount to S00,750. 

Nov. 7. Death of B. F. Sherwood, a prominent stock- 
broker. 

Nov. 8. News received of the loss of the steamer Pa- 
cific with two hundred passengers, at Cape Flattery. . . . 
The dead body of Patrick (^uinn found floating in the bay. 

Nov. 9. General prevalence of the epizootic, in a mild 
form, is noted. 

Nov. 10. The Pacific Mail Steamship Company dis- 
jutch their first steamer on the Australian route. 

Nov. 12. James McUougall dies from injuries inflicted 
by garroters, six weeks previously. 

Nov. 13. The i!i30,000 running race of the Pacific 
Jockey Club is postponed on account of bad weather. 

Nov. 15. Dedication of the Boys' High School. 

Nov. 16. Sudden death of Ex-Harbor Commissioner 



Jasper O'Farrell D. W. C. Thompson tenders his resig- 
nation as Major-General of the National Guard of Cali- 
fornia. 

Nov. 17. Edward Sheridan, aged fifteen years, con- 
victed of manslaughter. 

Nov. 19. Grand carnival at the Mechanics' Institute 
Pavilion. 

Nov. 20. Caleb T. Fay hrings suit to oust Tax Col- 
lector Austin, for alleged neglect of duty The dead 

body of Louis Cheley found on the beach. 

Nov. 21. Edward" Keller dies of wounds inflicted upon 
himself with suicidal intent. 

Nov. 23. Bernard Nielson, found drowned in the Baj-. 

Nov. 24. The Pacific Jockey Club postpone the .$30,- 
000 running race until Christmas, and declare the p<>ol3 
off.... Tenth annual meeting of the California Prison 
Commission. 

Nov. 25. Observance of Thanksgiving Day by religious 
services in the churc'nes, and by social festivities. 

Nov. 28. David Manning found dead in his bed 

Margaret A. Brady found dead in her bed. 

Nov. 29. Margaret Stenson falls from a balconv and is 
killed. 

Nov. 30. The St. Andrews Society holds its thirteenth 
annual banquet. . . .Frederick Sommernlle falls into the 
baj' and is drowned. 

Dec. 1. A large number of Custom House employes 
discharged, in conformity with an order from Washing- 
ton. 

Dec. 2. The Bank of California reincorporates. 

Dec. 3. Eight Supervisors fined S50 each for contempt 
of court in disobeying an injunction. . . .S. H. Harrington 
decoj's a broker's clerk to his room in the Palace Hotel, 
with .$3,750, and attempts to rob and murder him. 

Dec. 4. 'The Attorney-General begins proceedings to 
cancel the patent giving to the Central and Southern Pa- 
cific Railroad Companies sixty acres of land in Mission 
Bay. . . . J.«H. Biggs, a tailor, found dead in his shop. . . . 
Paul Volnej' commits suicide by shooting. 

Dec. 6. The newiy elected Supervisors take their seats 
and Mayor Bryant delivers his inaugural address. . . .Brig- 
adier-General John McComb assumes command of the 
Second Brigade, N. G. C. 

Dec. 8. Maiy Johnson found asphjTciated in her room 
. . . .John Kane, dies of bums caused by the upsetting of 
a kerosene lamp. 

Deo. 9. The dead body of Jules Perin, foimd on the 
beach near the Ocean House. 

Dee. 10. James O'Malley falls from a plasterer's scaf- 
fold and is killed. 

Dec. 11. Henry Kaiser, falls from a balcony and is 
killed .... George Doherty, stabbed and killed by Thomas 
Mitchel. . . . "Defiance" wins the trotting race at the Bay 
District track for $1,000. 

Dec. 12. Charles G. Mej'er found drowned in the Bay. 

Dec. 14. Trotting race at the Baj' District track, for 
$1,000, won by "Van Voorhies" .... A Japanese war steamer 
arrives. 

Dec. 15. Rev. Dr. Cunningham resigns the pastorate 
of the Tabernacle Presb.vterian Church .... Bankers hold 
a meeting and determine to establish a Clearing House. 

Dec. 17. Asa P. Perrj^ commits suicide by shooting. 

Dec. 18. President Hallidie reports that the profits 
from the late fair of the Mechanics' Institute were $33,- 
830. 29.... E. Remer commits suicide by poisoning.. . . 
Death of Gen. C. H. Morgan, at Alcatraz. 

Dee. 20. The Pacific Jockey Club decides that the S30,- 
000 race shall come off February 22d, 1876 Tlie Super- 
visors elect Noah Flood Prosecuting Attorney for the 
Police Court. 

Dec. 22. Death of Major Richard Roman, formerly 
State Treasurer. .. .Marines from the Japanese frigate 
bury a dead comrade at Lone Mountiiin. 

Dec. 24. William Holtz run over by a car and killed. 

.... Suspension of the Commercial Bank Ellen Losse 

kicked to death by her husband. 

Dec. 25. Christmas is observed with the customary 
festivities. . . .The Turn Verein hold inaugural exercises 

at their new hall The dead body of William McGregor 

found floating in the bay. 

Dec. 20. The Spanish-American Catholic Church is 
dedicated. 

Dec. 28. Philip FuUman dies of wounds inflicted 
upon himself with suicidal intent. 

Dec. 29. Launch of the bark Paciflc Slope, 824 tons, 
built at the Potrero. 

Dec. 30. Mayor Bryant issues a proclamation recom- 
mending a celebration at the opening of the centennial 
year. . . .Aaron M. Tuck found dead in his house. 



fa 



UM 



In 



Wl(r 



Smithsonian Medical Institute, 637 Cal., B. J. SMITH, M.D., Prof. Phrenologj 



p. VAN SOHAAOK & 00., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



PUBLIC STREETS, AVENUES, SQUARES, PLACES, 



OF THE CONSOLIDATED 



CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO,* 

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE OFFICIAL MAPS, 1868, 1870, AND 1872. 



Explanatory.— The Ordinance for re-numbering the buildings of this city provides that "Market Street shall be the 
starting point for the numbers of all buildings fronting on the streets running therefrom in a northerly duection and also 
for those running therefrom in a southeasterly direction. The streets laid down in the official map of the city as forming 
the water front thereof shall be the starting point for numbers on all streets running westerly and southwesterly there- 
from, except upon such streets running westerly commencing from Market Street, and upon all such streets. Market Street 
shall he the starting point for numbers. On all streets the numbers on the right hand side, starting from the point of 
beginning, are even numliers, and on the left hand side, odd numbers. One hundred numbers, or as many thereof as may 
be necessary, shall he allotted to each block bounded by principal streets ; numbers 100, 200, and 300 being respectively the 
nunibere for commencing the blocks distant one, two, and three streets from the starting point on the side designated for 
even numbers, and numbers 101, 201, and 3U1, in similar manner for the opposite side of the street, throughout its extent ; 
so that the initial figure of the number placed on a building at any street-crossing shall indicate the number of main 
streets such street-crossing is from the starting point. Not less than twenty feet in frontage of all vacant lots of ground 
shall be allowed for each number. On all cross or intermediate streets the numbering shall commence where said streets 
begin, and shall conform to the plan specified in this Order.' 

By this new decimal system of niunbering buildings, the exact location of any number is readily ascertained; for 
example, if you want to find 624 Montgomery, it re on the east side of the block extenduig from Clay to Washington, which 
is the seventh from Market— Commercial and Merchant being private streets. Again : 825 Clay is above the eighth block 
from the water front, which is the one extending from Dupont to Stockton. It must be borne in mind that one hundi-ed 
nmubers are allowed on eacli block between principal streets. 

Several of the principal streets have been erroneously numbered. Bryant, Greenmch, Lombard, and Vallejo each vary 
one hundred from the official map, which has been strictly adhered to in the compilation of the present Street Directory. 
In every instance where an incorrect number has been used, the correct one has been included in the canvass. To prevent 
confusion the wrong number ha& been added and enclosed in a parenthesis, thus (1706). The following streets are but 
partially opened, and each differ materially from the plan originally laid out, viz : Clementina, Ecker, Jessie, Minna, 
Natoma, Ritch, Shipley, Stevenson, and Tehama. 

The principal streets southeast of Market, and running parallel to Fifth, have been, by an Ordinance of the city, 
changed, and they are to be designated hereafter numerically, as follows : Simmons to be Sixth, Harris as Seventh, Price 
as Eighth, Johnston as Ninth, and so on as far as such parallel streets continue. 

The territory lying west of Laurel Hill and Odd Fellows' cemeteries, and generally known as the Outside Lands, has 
been recently surveyed, and is designated on the new official City and County Map as avenues and streets. Those running 
north and south are named respectively from First to Forty-ninth avenues, and those lunning east and west, from First 
Avenue to the Ocean, and parallel with Point Lobos Avenue, A to W streets. There are a few avenues and streets out- 
side of the boimdaries of the foregoing, the names of which will be found included in the Street Directory. 

Reference is frequently made in the Register of Names to the following, and which are located as follows : Hoadley's 
Addition, situated west of Pierce and between Geary and Washington ; Horner's Addition, south and near the Mission 
Dolores ; Western Addition, west of Larkin ; San Miguel Raneh,southwestand near the Mission Dolores : Bemal Heights 
|B. H.K south of Twenty-sixth Street, between San Bruno and San Jose roads ; and University Mound Tract (U. M. T.), 
west of .San Bruno Road, five miles from the City Hall. See, also. Prominent Places, page 83, 

Ui) End or beginning of a .street. (6) Not opened, (c) Fractional blocks, one hundred numbers allowed for first two 

blocks, (rf) Fronting the bay. (e) .Street ends. ( ) Street does not cross. B. H., Bemal Heights. U. M. T., University 

Mound Tract. S. S. F., South San Francisco. A blank is used where the number at the crossuig of a street could not be 
ascertained. 



Ada. or Wells ronrt, 

opens S s (311) Lombard 
bet Stockton and Dupont 

Ada ronrt, N s O'Farrell 
bet Leavenworth and Hyde 

Adam, N and S s Eve bet 
San Bruno Road and Cali- 
fornia Avenue, B. H. 

Adams, Ns Tyler bet Scott 
and Devisadero N to Turk 

Adelaide Plate, Ws (517) 
Taylor bet Post and Geary 

Adele, from Islais Creek bet 

Chace and Stringham S to 

Hecker 
Adele Place, N s (824) 

Jackson bet Stockton and 

Powell 
i^lAdler {see Dupont Alley) 



Adona Place, N s (1106) 
Washington bet Mason and 
Taylor 

Agnes Lane, N s (530) Val- 
lejo bet Dupont and Stock- 
ton 

Alabama, from Mission 
Creek bet Columbia and 
Harrison S to Serpentine 
Avenue 

Alameda, from the bay bet 
Channel and El Dorado W 
to Harrison 

Alamo S»iHare,betHayes, 
Steiner, Fulton, and Scott 

Alealrax Square, bet 

Jefferson, Franklin, North 
Point, and Gough 
Alemany, N s Seven- 
teenth bet Dolores and 
Church 



Alger Place, E s First bet 
Harrison and Bryant 

Allen, W s Hyde bet Union 
and Filbert 

Allen, from Cortland Av- 
enue S to Crescent Avenue, 
S s B. H. 

Alleys t'ourl, N s Green- 
wich bet Sansom and Mont- 
gomery 

Alinera, Ns Clay bet Leav- 
enworth and Hyde 

Alfcl (now Twenty-first), W s 
Potrero Avenue bet 'fwen- 
tieth and Twenty-second W 
to Douglass 

Alta Place, W s Sansom 
bet Union and Filbert 

Alta Plaza, bet Clay, Stei- 
ner, Jackson, and Scott 



Amazon, E s County Road 
5^ miles from City Hall 

Amlier.st, S s Silver Avenue 
bet Princeton and Yale, U. 
M. T. 

Anderson, from California 
Avenue S to Cortland Av- 
enue, B. H. 

Ankney Place, E s (518) 
Powell bet Bush and Sutter 

Anna, or Anna Lane, N 
s (14) Eddy bet Powell and 
Mason N to Ellis 

Annie, S s (667) Market bet 
New Montgomery and 
Third SE to Mission 

Anthony, N s (570) Mission 
bet First and Second 

Antonio, W s (411) Jones 
bet O'Farrell and Ellis 



* The streets of the district known as South San Francisco, extending from the Bay of San Francisco west to the San 
Bruno Road, and from Tulare Street south to the county line, laid out as follows, viz : Those running in a northwesterly 
iirection known as avenues, from one to thirty-eight, and those southwesterly distinguished as streets from A to S, 
respectively, are not included ; also the streets on the water front, laid out by the Tide Land Commissioners, extending 
from China Basin on the north to India Basin on the south. 



<I> 



;:? AMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 



JEWELRY made to order and UEPAIHED ly B. "W. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Merchan 



60 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



ArkansiiM, from the bay 
bet Connecticut and Wis- 
consin S to Tulare 

Arlington, from San Jose 
Road nr Charles SW to 
Mateo 

Army, W s Old San Jos6 
Road l)et Twenty-sixth and 
Twenty-seventh 

Asli Avciinc, W s Van 
' Ness Avcniie bet McAllis- 
ter and Fulton 

Aslil>iirt<»ii Place, or 
Linrolii Avenue, E s 
(2081 Dupont bet Sutter and 
Post 

Ashbiiry, N s Waller bet 
Masonic Avenue and Clay- 
ton N to Fuller 

Aslllaiul Place, N s Mis- 
sion bet Potter and Elev- 
enth 

Allluim, Ns (1014) Jackson 
bet Taylor and Mason N to 
Pacific 

AllKlI!^t Alley, N s (718) 
Green bet Powell and Ma- 
son N to Union 

Anstlii, W s Larkin bet 
Bush and Pine 

North. Street. Sowth side. 
2 Larkin 1 

100 Polk 101 

200 Van Ness Avenue 201 

^Iztec, NE s Coso Avenue 
bet Cherubusco and Buena 
Vista, B. H. 

Baclie, S s Crescent Avenue 
bet Porter and Laiurel Av- 
enue, S s B. H. 

Bacon, W a San Bruno 
Road bet Burrow and Way- 
land, IT. M. T. 

Ifctgley Place, N s (14) O'- 
FarreU bet Dupont and 
Stockton 

Baker, N s Haight bet 
Broderick and Lyon N to 
the bay 

Baker Avenue, E s Rail- 
road Avenue E to Islais 
Creek 

Balance. N s (412) Jackson 
bet Montgomery and San- 
son! 

Baldwin Conrf , N s (408) 
Folsom bet First and Fre- 
mont 

Banks, from California Av- 
enue S to CVjrtland Avenue, 
B. H. 

Bannaiii Plac«, N s (510) 

Green bet Dupont and 

Stockton N to Union 
Bartlett, Ss Twentieth bet 

Valencia and Mission S to 

Serpentine Avenue 
West. Street. East side. 

2 Twentieth 1 

100 Twenty first 101 

200 Twenty-second 201 

300 Twenty-thirtl 301 

400 Twenty-fourth 401 

500 Twenty-fifth 501 

600 Twenty-sixth 601 

(f) Serpentine Avenue (t) 
Bartlett, S s Thirtieth bet 

AVaiTen and Merced S to 

Laidley 
Bartlett Alley, N s (642) 

Jackson bet Kearny and 

Dupon t 
Kiirtol, N s (340) Broadway 

bet Montgomery and San- 

som N to VaUejo 
Bllttery, N a Market bet 

Sansom and Front N to the 

bay 
East. Street. West side. 

2 Market and Bush 1 



100 


Pine 


XOl 


200 


California 


201 


212 


Riclimoud 








Halleck 


213 


300 


Sacramento 


301 


314 


Commercial 


315 


400 


Clay 


401 


416 


Merchant 


417 


500 


Washington 


501 


512 


Oregon 


-^-- 


600 


Jackson 


601 


700 


Pacific 


701 


710 


Chambers 





800 


Broadway 


801 





Flint Alley 


819 


900 


VaUejo 


901 


1000 


Green 


1001 




Commerce 





1100 


Union 


1101 


1200 


Filbert 


1201 


1300 


Greenwich 


1301 


(f) 


Lombard 


(e) 


Bay 


, W s Kearny bet Fran- 


Cisco and North Point W to 


Presidio Reservation 




North. Street. South 


side. 


2 


Kearny 


1 


100 


Dupont 


101 





Midway East 




200 


Stockton 
Midway West 


201 


300 


PoweU 


301 


400 


Mason 


401 


500 


Taylor 


501 


600 


Jones 
Montgomery Av 


601 


700' 


Leavenworth 


701 


800 


Hyde 


801 


900 


Larkin 


901 


1000 


Polk 


1001 


1100 


Van Ness Avenue 1101 


1200 


Frank Uu 


1201 


1300 


Gough 


1301 


1400 


Octavia 


1401 


1500 


Laguna 


1501 


1600 


Buchanan 


1601 


1700 


Webster 


1701 


1800 


Filhnore 


1801 


1900 


Steiner 


1901 


2000 


Pierce 


2001 


2100 


Soott 


2101 


2200 


Devisadero 


2201 


2300 


Broderick 


2301 


2400 


Baker 


2401 


Bay 


Avenne. S s Bryant 


bet First and Second 




Bay View Place, Ni Un- 


ion 


bet Leavenworth and 


Jones 




Beacll. W g Powell 


bet 


North Point and Jefferson 


W to Presidio Reservation 


North. Street. SenUh 


side. 


2 


PoweU 


1 


100 


Mason 


101 


200 


Taylor 


201 


300 


Jones 


301 


400 


Leaveuworth 
Montgomery Av 


.401 


500 


Hyde 


601 


600 


Larkin 


601 


700 


Polk 


701 


800 


Van Ness Avenus 


801 


900 


Franklin 


901 


1000 


Gough 


1001 


1100 


Octavia 


1101 


1200 


Lagnna 


1201 


1300 


Buchanan 


1301 


1400 


Webster 


1401 


1500 


Fillmore 


1501 


16CI0 


Steiner 


1601 


1700 


Pierce 


1701 


1800 


Scott 


1801 


1900 


Devisadero 


1901 


2000 


Broderick 


2001 


2100 


Baker 


2101 


Beacon, from Castro SE to 


Bemis thence W to Castro 


Beale. S s Market bet Main 


and Fremont SE to th 


ebay 


Sonthwe.1t. Street. Northeast. 


2 


Market 
Vischer Place 


1 


100 


Mission 


101 




Bei-tha 




200 


Howard 


loi 



300 Foldom 301 

Beale Place 

400 Harrison 401 

600 Bryant 501 

\e) Brannan (e) 

Beale Place, E s Beale bet 
Folsom and Harrison E to 
Main 
Beaver, W s Noe bet Fif- 
teenth and Sixteenth 
Be4iror«I Place, N a (806) 
Jackson bet PoweU and 
vStockton 

Beideiuan, N s ElUs bet 
Scott and Devisadero 

Belden, N e (342) Bush bet 
Kearny and Montgomery N 
to Pine 

Bellair Place, N s (224) 
Chestnut bet Dupont and 
Stockton N to Francisco 

Belle vue, Ss EUzabethnr 
EUen S to Thutieth 

Bellevue Avenne, S s 

Greenwich bet Stockton 

and Dupont S to Filbert 
BeMii8, from Beacon SE to 

Fairmoimt thence SW to 

(/astro 
Benton Avenne, W s 

Laurel Avenue m* Crescent 

Avenue, B. H. 
Berlin, S s Silver Avenue 

bet Girard and Goettingen 
Bernadotte, from Islais 

Creek E to Sixth Avenue 
BernaKE of San Bruno 

Road ftom. Vermont to 

Mjirengo 
Bernal, Ss Serpentine Av- 

env\e S to Precita Avenue 
Bernard, W s (1535) Taylor 

bet Broadway and Pacific 

W to Leavenworth 
North. Street. South side. 

2 Taylor 1 

100 Jones 101 

(c) Leavenworth («) 

Berry, E s (312) Dupont bet 

Bush and Sutter 
Berry, W s Second bet 

Channel and King SW to 

Eighth 
Northwest. Street. Southeast. 
2 Second 1 

100 Third 101 

Madden 

Haggin 

200 Fom-th 201 

300 Filth 301 

4O0 Sixth 401 

500 Seventh 501 

(f) Eighth (e) 

Bertha, W s Beale bet Mis- 
sion and Howard 

Bestole, or Hodges, N s 

VaUejo' bet Montgomery 
and Sansom 
BiUiugA Place, N s Val- 
lejo bet Dupont aiul Stock- 
ton 

Bircli Avenne. W a Polk 
bet Grove ami Fulton 

Blacki^tone' Place, N s 

Louibard m Larkin 

Blossom, W s Valencia bet 
Ridley and Fourteentli W 
to Guerrero 

Bluxouie, E s Sixth bet 
Brannan and Townseud 

Blnvoine East, W s First 
bet Brannan and Towusend 

Boardntan, N s Brannan 
bet Sixth and Serenth 

Bone Alley, or Green 
I'lace, N s (326) Green bet 
Montgomery and Kearny 



Boston Place, E a (329) 
First bet Folsom and Har- 
riison 

Bourltin Place, S r EUis 
bet Steiner and Pierce 

Bourn, S e Kossuth bet 
Chace and Freelon S to 
Hecker 

Bowdoin, S s Silver Av- 
enue bet Ham Iton and 
Dartmouth, U. M. T. 

Bower Plac*, S s (529) 
Green between Dupont and 
Stockton 

Bowie Avenne. Eg Elev- 
enth bet Howard and Fol- 
som 

BoMles Place, NW s 

Howard bet Twelfth and 
Thirteenth 

Bowman Place, S s Bry- 
ant nr First 

Boyce, N s Point Lobos 
Avenue bet Cook and Wil- 
liamson N to Laurel Hill 
Cemetery 

Boyd, E and WsChesley 
bet Harrison and Bryant 

Bradford, from Cortland 
Avenue N to California Av- 
enue, B. H. 

Brady* S » Market bet Pot- 
ter and Valencia SE to 
Mission 

Brady Place, E s Larkin 
bet Union and Green 

Brannan, W s Eeale bet 
Bryant and Townsend SW 
to Ninth 

NorthireM. Street. Southeast. 

2 Beale 1 

100 Fremont 101 

200 First 201 

Japan 

300 Second 301 

Stanford 311 

Park Lane 

Thompson Place 371 

400 Third 401 

416 Kitch 417 

430 Zoe ■ 

500 Fourth 501 

600 Fifth 601 

700 Sixth 701 

Clinton 

Geneva 

BoardmaB 

Brannan Place 

Gilbert 

800 Seventh 801 

900 Eighth 901 

1000 Ninth 1001 

Brannan Place. S sBran- 

nan bet Sixth and Seventh 

Brenliaiii Place, N s (750) 
Clay bet Kearny and Du- 
pont N to Warfiington 

BrewMer, from Hope SW 
to California Avenue, B.H. 

Bridges s (1213) Broadway 
bet Leavenworth and Hyde 

Bright, nr Sau INliguel Sta- 
tion 

Br4»ad. W t Old San Jos6 
Road nr San Miguel Station 

Broadway, W s Davis bet 
Pacific and VaUejo W to 
Presidio Reservation 



Nortk. Street 

2 Davis 

100 Front 

200 Battery 

300 Sanson! 
Ohio 

340 Bartol 

400 Montgomery 

500 Kearny 

520 Pinkney Place 
Mmitgomery Av 

600 Dupont 

610 Duncan Court 



South aide. 
1 
101 
201 
301 
321 

401 
501 



Ir; 



Irri 



BEAMISH'S— Nucleus Building, corner of Third and Market streets. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705. 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



SAN FKAN CISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



61 



700 


Stockton 


701 





Virgiuia Place 


709 


'130 


Morey Alley 





H(M) 


Powell 


801 


- — 


Scdtt Place 


817 


900 


^lason 


901 





Salmon 


921 


1000 


Taylor 
Sweet 


1001 




Florence 





U(K» 


Jones 


1101 


1»M) 


Leavenworth 


1201 





Morse Place 


1205 





Bridge 


1213 


1300 


Hy.le 


13l)1 


140O 


Larkin 
Maxwell 


1401 


ir>(K) 


Polk 


1501 


11)00 


Van Ness Avenue 1601 


IVOO 


Franklin 


1701 


18!)l) 


(Jo'gh 


1801 


lyoo 


Octavia 


1901 


'20U0 


Layuna 


2001 


UllH) 


Buchanan 


2101 


ii-iOO 


Welister 


" 2201 


2300 


liillmore 


2301 


2401) 


Steiner 


2401 


2500 


Pierce 


2501 


2H00 


Scott 


2601 


2700 


Devisadero 


2701 


MK) 


Broderick 


2801 


2900 


Baker 


2901 



BrtMlerirk, XsWallerhet 
Baker and Devisadero N to 
the bay 

Broderirk Avenne, S s 

Market bet Eleventh and 
Potter 
Brook, E s Dolores nr Thir- 
tieth £ to San Jose Road 

Brooklyn Place, Ss (833) 

Sacramento bet Stockton 

and Dupont 
Brooks. Ns (732) Market 

bet Kearny and Dupont N 

to Geary 

Bro.«naii, Ws Valenciabet 
Fourteenth and Ridley 

Brown (now Twelfth), S s 
Mission bet Eleventh and 
Thirteenth SE to Harrison 

Brown Alley, If s McAl- 
lister bet Hyde and Larkin 

Bryan Place, N s (206) 
Bush betSansom and Mont- 
gomery 

Bryant. Ws Spear bet Har- 
rison and Brannan SWto 
Eleventh. [The buUdings 
on this street are incorrect- 
ly numbered] 

Northwest. Street. Soutlieast. 



Spear 
100 Main 
200 Beale 
300 Fremont 
400 First 
418 Rincon Place 
442 Stanley Place 
500 Second 

Centre 

600 Third 

(6) Ritch 

Zoe 

700 Fourth 
800 Fifth 

Fifth Avenue 
Oak Avenue 
Park Avenue 
900 Sixth 

Clinton 

Garden 
Jones Place 

Gilbert 

1000 Seventh 

Downey 
WTiite Place 
Decatur 
1100 Eighth 

Erjant Avenue 
1200 Ninth 
■dlSOO Tenth 
(c) Eleventh 



1 
101 
201 
301 
401 
419 
443 
501 
533 
601 
615 
635 
701 
801 



1201 
1301 



Bryant A venue (late Flor- 
ida), from Mission Creek bet 

York and Columbia S to 
Seri>entine Avenue 
Bryant Avenue, NsBry- 
ant bet lOighth and Ninth 
Buciiannn. hot N s Ridley 

Laguna and Webster N to 
the bay 
Emt. Street. West ti4e. 
2 Ridley 

100 Kate 10 
200 Waller 

300 Haight 30 

400 Page 40 

Lilly Avenue 

500 Oak 50: 

Hickory Avenue 

600 Fell 60; 

Linden Avenue 

700 Hayes 70: 

Ivy Avenue 

800 Grove 80! 

Birch Avenue 

900 Fulton 90: 

Ash Avenue 

1000 McAllister 100! 

Locust Avenue 

1100 Tyler 110: 

1200 Tiu-k 120 

1300 Eddy 130 

1400 Ellis 140: 

1500 O'Farrell 150: 

IfiOO Geary 160: 

1700 Post 170: 

1800 Slitter 180: 

1900 Bush 190 

2000 Pine 200: 

2100 California 210: 

2200 Sacramento 220: 

2300 Clay . 230: 

2400 Washington 240: 

2500 Jackson 250: 

2600 Pacific 260: 

2700 Broadway 270: 

2800 Vallejo 280: 

2900 Green 290: 

3000 Union 300: 

3100 Filbert 310: 

3200 Greenwich 320: 

3300 Lombard 330 

3400 Chestnut 340: 

Lobos Square 

3600 Bay 360: 

3700 NorthPoint 370: 

3800 Beach 380: 

3900 Jefferson 390: 

4000 Tonquin 400: 

[e) Lewis {e] 

Bnena Vista, from Cort- 
land Avenue NE to Coso 
Avenue, B. H. 

Bnena Vista Park, bet 

Napa, Shasta, Vermont, 
and Utah 

Buena Vista Place (now 
Prospect Place), N s Cali- 
fornia bet Stockton and 
PowcU 

Bnena ventnra, Ns Cali- 
fornia bet Kearny and Du- 
pont 

Bn rcliani Place, W s (101) 
Leavenworth bet Tyler and 
Turk 

Bni*soyne Place, S s (1307) 
Pacific bet Hyde and Leav- 
enworth 

Burritt. S s (603) Bush bet 
Powell and Stockton 

Bnrrovv, W s San Bruno 
Road bet Henry and Bacon, 
U. M. T. 

Burton, E of San Bruno 
Roail 4 miles from City Hall 

BlLslt. junction Market and 
Battery bet Pine and Sut- 
ter W to Laiu-el HiU Cem- 
etery 

North. Street. South sirle. 
2 Market 1 
100 Battery 101 
200 Sansom 201 
206 Bryan Place 



300 Montgomery 

306 Russ Alley 

Trinity 

342 Belden 

400 Kearny 

406 _Morse 

'('laraLane 

Mary Lane 

500 Dupont 

518 Chatham Place 

600 Stockton 

Burritt 

610 Monroe 

Chelsea Place 

700 Powell 

800 Mason 

900 Taylor 

1000 Jones 

1100 Leavenworth 

1200 Hyde 

1300 Larkin 

1400 Polk 



407 
423 
501 

601 
603 

615 
701 
801 
901 
1001 
1101 
1201 
1301 
1401 

1500 Van Ness Avenue 1501 
1600 Franklin 1601 

1700 Gough 1701 

1800 Octavia 1801 

1900 Lag\uia 1901 

2000 Buchanan 2001 

2100 Webster 2101 

2200 Fillmore 2201 

2300 Steiner 2301 

2400 Pierce 2401 

2500 Scott 2501 

2600 Devisadero 2601 

2700 Broderick 2701 

2S00 Baker 2801 

2900 Lyon 2901 

(e) Central Avenue (e) 

Bjitler, from California Av- 
enue S to Cortland Avenue, 
B. H. 

Bntte, from the bay bet So- 
lano and Napa W to Harri- 
son 

Byiiiston,Ws Webster bet 
Ellis and O'Farrell W to 
Steiner 

Byrne, from Islais Creek S 
E to Baker Avemie 

Byron, from Montcalm S 
to Hope, B. H. 

C'akot, from California Av- 
enue bet Samoset and Star 
SE to Franconia Avenue, 
B. H. 

ra«(ell Alley, N s (508) 
Union bet Stockton and 
Dupont 

C'advvallader, E of San 

Bruno Road 4 miles from 
City Hall 
C'allionn, N s Green bet 

Sarisom and Montgomery 

California, jimction Mar- 
ket and Drumm bet Sacra- 
mento and Pine W to City 
Cemetery 

North. Street. South side. 
2 Market and Drumm 1 



100 


Davis 


101 


2011 


Front 


201 


3(H) 


Battery 


301 


40(1 


Sansom 


401 


424 


Leidesdorff 


421 


500 


Montgomery 


501 





Spring 


531 


532 


Webb 





600 


Kearny 


601 


612 


Wallace Place 








St. Mary's Place 


625 





Quincy 


637 


700 


Dupont 


vol 


yiK 


Selina Place 





800 


Stockton 
Ellick Lane 


801 


812 


Pratt court 





820 


Prospect Place 





H32 


Miles Court 





90() 


Powell 


901 


920 


Gustavus 





lOIMI 


Mason 


1(H)1 


1016 


Cushman 


. 


1100 


Taylor 


1101 


12(H) 


Jones 


1201 


1300 


Lea^ enworth 


1301 



1400 
1500 
1000 
1700 
1800 
1900 
2000 
2100 
2200 
2300 

2400 
2500 
2600 
2700 
2800 
2900 
3000 



Helen 

Hyde 1401 

Larkin 1501 

Polk 1601 
Van Ness Avenue 1701 

Franklin 1801 

Gough 1901 

Octavia 2001 

Laguna 2101 

Buchanan 2201 

Wel)ster 2301 
Middle 

FUhnore 2401 

Steiner 2501 

Pierce 2601 

Scott 2701 

Devisadero 2801 

Broderick 2901 

Baker 3001 



t'alifornia Avenue, E 

of San Jos(5 Road and W 
of San Bruno Road, B. H. 

Cambridge, Ss Silver Av- 
enue bet Yale and Oxford, 
U. M. T. 

Canillle Place, Ns Wash- 
ington bet Jones and Tay- 
lor 

Camp, E s Guerrero bet Six- 
teenth and Seventeenth 

Capitol, W of Old San Jose 
Road nr San Miguel Station 

Capp, S s Fifteenth bet 
Howard and Mission S to 
Serpentine Avenue 

West. Street. East side. 
2 Fifteenth 1 

100 Sixteenth 101 

200 Seventeenth 201 

300 Eighteenth 301 

400 Nineteenth 401 

500 Twentieth 501 

600 Twenty-first 601 

700 Twenty-second 701 
800 Twenty-third 801 

900 Twenty-fourth 901 

1000 Twenty-fifth 1001 

1100 Twenty-sixth 1101 

Card Alley, W s (1413) 
Stockton bet Vallejo and 
Green 

Carl, W s Clayton nr Fred- 
erick W to First Avenue 

Carlos Place, S s (219) O'- 
Farrell bet Mason and Pow- 
ell 

Carolina, from the bay bet 
Wisconsin and De Haro S 
to Tulare 

Caroline, N s Lombard bet 
Jones and Leavenworth 

Caroline, Ss (1011) Folsom 
bet Sixth and Seventh 

Caroline Place, Es (1218) 
PoweU bet Jackson and Pa- 
cific 

Carr Place, S s Chestnut 
bet Taylor and Mason 

Carver, from California 
Avenue S to Powhattan, 
B. H. 

Case, W s San Bruno Road 
4 miles frma City Hall 

Castro, S s Ridley bet Dia- 
mond and Noe 

Cedar, N s (212) Clay bet 
Davis and Front N to 
Washington 

Cedar Alley, W s Dolores 
bet Sixteenth and Seven- 
teenth 

Cedar Avenue, W s Lar- 
kin bet Post and Geary 

Cemetery Avenue {see 
Central Avenue) 

Center (now Sixteenth), 
from *he bay W to Castro 

Cen tral, nr San Miguel Sta- 
tion 



JAMES G-. STEELE & CO., manufacturers of Steele's California Perfumes. 



PINE WATCHES and JEWELRY for Sale by L. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



62 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 



Central Avenne, N s 

Geary l>et Lyon and wal- 
nut N to Presidio Reserva- 
tion 
Central Place, S b (515) 
Pine bet Duiwnt and Kear- 
ny 
Central Road, from Mc- 
Allister SW to Ocean View 
House 
Centre, S s (533) Bryant bet 
Second and Third SE to 
South Park 
Chaee, from Islais Creek S 

to Hecker 
Chambers. W s (619) Davis 
bet Pacific and Broadway 
■\V to Buttery 
Chambers Place, N s 
Greenwich bet Powell and 
Mason N to Lombard 
Channel, W s Third bet 
Berrj- and Hooper SW to 
Eighth 
Channel, W s San Bruno 
Roai I i miles from City Hall 
CUai>nlte|»ec. from Cort- 
land Avenue NE to Coso 
Avenue, B. H. 
Charity, from CadwaUader 

NW to" Islais Creek 
Ciiarles, N s Tj'ler bet 

Leavenworth and Hyde 
Charles, S of Fairmount 
from San Jose Road NW to 
Chenery 
Charles Place, N s (570) 
Harrison bet First and Sec- 
ond 
Chase, N s Point Lobos Av- 
enue bet Williamson and 
Merrifield N to Laurel Hill 
Cemetery 
Chatham Place, Ns(518) 
Bush bet Dupont and 
Stockton 
Chattanooga, S s Twenty- 
first betDolores and Church 
Chelsea Place, S s (615) 
Bush Vjet Stockton and 
Powell 
CheneiT, S s Thirtieth S 
to Randal thence SW to 
Castro 
Cherry, N s California nr 
Maple N to Presidio Reser- 
vation 
Cherilbnsco, from Cort- 
land Avenue NE to Coso 
Avenue, B. H. 
Chesley, S s Harrison bet 

Seventh and Eighth 
Chestnnt, W s Sansom bet 
Francisco and Lombard W 
to Presidio Reservation 
North. Street. South side. 



1900 Fillmore 

2000 Steiner 

2100 Pierce 

2200 Scott 

2300 Devisadero 

2400 Broderick 

2500 Baker 



1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 



2 


Sansom 


1 


(c) 


Montgomery 
Webster 


(c) 


ino 


Kearny 


101 


200 


Dm>ont 


aoi 


224 


Bellair Place 





300 


Stockton 


301 




Chestnut Alley 





400 


Powell 


401 


500 


Mason 
Newell 
Montgomery Av 


SOI 


fi(K» 


Taylor 


601 


700 


Jones 


701 


ROO 


Leavenworth 


801 


900 


Hyde 


901 


1000 


Larkin 


1001 


1100 


Polk 


1101 


11^00 


Van Ness Avenue 


1201 


I.SOO 


Franklin 


1301 


14*10 


Gough 


1401 


l.iOO 


Octavia 


1501 


1600 


Laguna 


1601 


1700 


Buchanan 


1701 


1800 


Webster 


1801 



Chestnut Alley, N s 

Chestnut bet Powell and 
Stockton 
Church, S 8 RifUey bet 
Dolores and Sanchez S to 
Thirtieth 
Church Lane, W s Dolo- 
res bet Sixteenth and Sev- 
enteenth 
Church Place, Ws (1709) 
Dupont bet Lombard and 
Greenwich 
CItv Hall Avenue, N s 
Market opp Eighth NW to 
Park Avenue 
Clalrville Place, S s (535) 
Union bet Dupont and 
Stockton 
Clara, or Clary ,W s Ritch 
bet Folsom and Harrison 
W to Sixth 
Clara Avenue, N s Eight- 
eenth nr Douglass 
Clara Avenue, or Clo- 
ver Avenue, nr laguna 
de la Merced 
Clara Lane, N s (204) Sut- 
ter bet Kearny and Dupont 
N to Bush 
Clarence, or Clarice 
Place, N s Townsend bet 
Second and Third 
Clark, W s (409) Drumm 
bet Jackson and Pacific W 
to Front 
Clarv, or Clara, W s Ritch 
bet Folsom and Harrison W 
to Sixth 
Clay, W s East bet Wash- 
ington and Commercial W 
to First Avenue 
North. Street. South side. 
2 East 1 

100 Drumm 101 

200 Davis 201 

212 Cedar 

300 Front 301 

400 Battery 401 

500 Sansom 501 

Leidesdorfif 527 

600 Montgomery 601 

700 Kearny 701 

750 Brenham Place . 

800 Dupont 801 

814 Waverly Place 813 

828 Spofford 

900 Stockton 901 
916 Clay Avenue 

Prospect Place 917 

1000 Powell 1001 

Tay 1015 

1016 Wetmore Place 

1100 Mason 1101 

Verba Buena 1115 

1200 Taylor 1201 

1300 Jones 1301 

Priest 

Reed 

1400 Leavenworth 1401 

1500 Hyde 1501 

Torrens Court 

1600 Larkin 1001 

1700 Polk 1701 

1800 Van Ness Avenue 1801 



1900 Frankhn 

2000 Crough 

2100 OctaWa 

2200 Lagima 

2300 Buchanan 

2400 Webster 

2500 Fillmore 

2600 Steiner 

2700 Pierce 

2800 Scott 

2900 Derisadero 

3000 Broderick 

3100 Baker 



1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2801 
2901 
3001 
3101 



Clay Avenue, N b (916) 
Clay bet Stockton and Pow- 
ell 

Clayton, N s Waller bet 
As'hbury and Cole N to Ful- 
ton 

Cleaveland,W s Columbia 
Square bet Folsom and 
Harrison 

Clement, W s First Avenne 
bet Point Lobos Avenue 
and California W to City 
Cemetery 

Clement Place, S s Green 
bet Dupont and Stockton 

Clementina. W s (248) 
First bet Folsom and Te- 
hama 
No7-thwest. Street. SoxOhmst. 

2 First 1 

(b) Second (6) 

(b) Third (&) 

300 Fourth 301 

400 Fifth 401 

(6) Sixth (b) 

(}i) Seventh (6) 

700 Eighth 701 

(6) Ninth (6) 

Clinton, S s Bryant bet 

Sixth and Seventh 

Oipper, W s Old San Jose 
Road bet Twenty-fifth and 
Twenty-sixth W to Doug- 
lass 

Clover Avenne, or Cla- 
ra Avenue, m Laguna 
de la Merced 

Codnian Place. S s (1007) 
Washington bet Powell and 
Mason 

Colin Place, S s Jackson 
bet Leavenworth and Hyde 

Cole, N s Haight bet Clay- 
ton and Shrader N to Ful- 
ton 

College, S s Silver Avenue 
bet Dartmouth and Uni- 
versity, U. M, T. 

College Place, N s Hayes 
bet Larkin and Polk 

Collins, N s Point Lobos 
Avenue bet Wood and Fer- 
rie N to Laurel Hill Ceme- 
tery 

Colton. NE s Brady bet 
Market and Mission 

Columbia. W s Guerrero 
bet Nineteenth and Twen- 
tieth W to Noe 

Columbia, from Mission 
Creek bet Bryant Avenue 
and Alabama S to Serpen- 
tine Avenue 

Columbia, S s (1019) Fol- 
som bet Sixth and Seventh 
SE to Harrison 

Columbia Place, SsPre- 
cita Avenue S to California 
Avenue, B. H. 

Columbia Place, W s 

Boanbnan nr Brarmau 

Columbia Square, bet 

Folsom, HaiTison, Colum- 
bia, and Sherman 
Colusa, from the bay bet 
Yuba and Marin W to Ver- 
mont 
Coniinerce. E s Battery 

bet Union and Green 

Conimercial, W s East 

bet Clay and Sacramento W 

to Dupont 

North. Street. South side. 

2 East 1 

100 Drumm 101 

200 Daris 201 

300 Front 301 

400 Battery 401 

500 Sansom 501 



524 Leidesdorfl 525 

600 Montgomery 601 

700 Kearny 701 

(e) Dupont (e) 

CoUKdon, nr junction San 
Bruno Road and Silver Av- 
enue 
Con nect i cu t . from the bay 
bet Missouri and Arkansas 
S to Tulare 
C4»ok, N 8 Point Lobos Av- 
enue bet Ferrie and Boyce 
N to Laiuel Hill Cemetery 

Cooper Alley, S s (623) 
Jackson bet Keamy and 
Dupont 
Corbett (now Seventeenth), 
W s Harrison bet Sixteenth 
and Eighteenth W to Doug- 
lass 
Cortez, from California Av- 
enuSbet Montcalm and Sa- 
moset E to Franconia Av- 
enue 
Cortland Avenne, from 
San Jose Road nr Thirtieth 
E to San Bruno Road 
Coso Avenne. from North 
Avenue NW to CaUfomia 
Avenue, B. H. 
Cottage Place, E s (614) 

Jones bet Geary and Post 
County Road, or San 
Jose Road, from teraii- 
nation of Mission SW to 
County Line 
Creek Lane. W s Folsom 
bet Thirteenth and Four- 
teenth 
Crescent Avenue, from 
San Jose Road nr St. Mary's 
College E to San Bruno 
Road 
Crocker. NW s Mission 

bet Brady and Hermann 
Crook, N s Townsend bet 

Third and Fom-th 
Cushman, N s (1016) Cali- 
fornia bet Mason and Tay- 
lor N to Sacramento 
Cnst4>ni House Place, N 
s (412) Washington bet San- 
som and Battery N to Jack- 
son 
Dale (nowTwenty-ninth),W 
s San Jose Road liet Twen- 
ty-eighth and Thirtieth 
Dale Place, S s Tjier bet 

Leavenworth and Hyde 
Dame, S s Tliivtieth bet 
Chenery and Whitney S to 
Randal 
Dartmouth, S s Silver Av- 
enue bet Bowdoia and Col- 
lege, U. M. T. 

Davis, N 8 Market bet 
Drumm and Front N to the 

bay 
East. Street. West side. 

2 Market and Pine 1 

100 California 101 

William Place 109 

200 Sacramento 201 

214 Commercial 215 

300 Clay 301 

(b) Merchant |h) 

400 Washington 401 

410 Oregon 411 

500 Jackson 501 

514 Clark 513 

600 Pacific 601 

(d) Chambers 619 

(d) Broadway 701 

{e) VaUejo («) 

Dawson Place, E sMason 
bet Sacramento and Clay 

Day, W s San Jose Road bet 
Twenty-ninth and Thirti- 
eth 



Smithsonian Medioal and Hygienic Institute, 635 Cal., B. J. SMITH, M,D„ Propt 



p. VAU SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 711, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



63 



Day, K s Dolores bet Seven- 
tueiith and Eighteenth 

De B<>oiii, E s (533) Second 
bet Bryant and Brauuan 

Di* Blaro, from Mission 
(^reek bet Caroline and 
lUiode Island S to Tulare 

no Kalb, from Cortland 
Avenue S to Crescent Av- 
enue, S s B. H. 

Docaliir, S R Brj'ant bet 
Seventh and Eighth 

Dorallir, S s Crescent Av- 
enue Wof Porter. .SsB. H. 

I»elawar«>, S s Solano bet 
Massachusetts and Mary- 
laud 

Itcla^varcCoiirt, N sSut- 

ter bet Powell and Mason 
lU'lKardo, K s Hyde bet 

(.ireeu and Union 
I>4>iit Place, N 8 Jackson 

bet Stockton and Powell 
D«'visa«Iero,NsRidleybet 

liroileiick and Scott N to 

the bay 
Devrpi's, E of San Bruno 

Road 4 miles from City Hall 
Dl'wey, S s King bet Third 

and Fourth S to Berry 
I^exItT, S s Howard bet 

Main and Spear 
Itianiond, S s Sixteenth 

hot Castro and Douglass 
DirUerson, E s San Bruno 

Road 3i miles from City 

HaU 

Dikciiiaii Place, W s (217) 

Mason bet O'Farrell and 
Ellis 

Dock, W s Front bet Filbert 

and Union 
DiHlse, S s Turk bet Hyde 

an(l Larkin 
Dotlson Alley {see Keyes 

Alley) 
Doliu-es, S 8 Market bet 

Church and Guerrero 
Dora. R s (1113) Folsom bet 

Seventh and Eighth 

Done Alley, S s Jackson 
bet Powell and Mason 

norland Lane, W s Dolo- 
res bet Seventeenth and 
Eighteenth 

noii?]a.s Place, E s Beale 
bet Folsom and Harrison 

Doiislass, S s Sixteenth W 

of Diamond 
Dow Place, W s Second 

bet Folsom and Harrison 
no>yney, S s Bryant bet 

Seventh and Eighth 
Driiuini, N s Market bet 

Davis and East N to the 

bay 



EiKst. Street. 



West side. 



Market and Cal 1 

100 Sacramento 101 

116 Commercial 115 

200 Clay 201 

214 Merchant (6) 

300 Washington 301 

Oregon 
400 Jackson 401 

Clark 409 

(c) Pacific (<•) 

Dvnry Lane, W s (306) Sev- 
enth bet Folsom and Har- 
rison 
Dry, or Junction, W s 
Old San Jose Road bet 
Twenty-ninth and Thirti- 
eth W to BeUevue 
Dnane, W s Jones bet 
Chestnut and Lombard 



Dnnbar <'onrt, rear of 

City Hall 

Duncan, W s Old San Jose 
Road l)et Twenty-seventh 
and Twenty-eighth 

Duncan <'ourl, N s (610) 

Broailway bet Dupont and 

Stockton 
Dunn illcy, E 8 (1106) 

Kearny bet Broadway and 

Vallejo 

Dliitont, N 8 Market bet 
Stockton and Kearny N to 
the bay 

East. Street. West sid^•. 

2 Mkt and O'Farrell 1 

100 Geary 101 

110 Morton 111 

200 Post 201 

208 Lincoln Avenue - — 

Stockton Place 213 

Mills Place 219 

300 Sutter 301 

312 Berry 

Harlan Place 313 

400 Bush 401 

500 Pine 501 

Virginia Alley 505 

600 California 601 

Dupont Place 

700 Sacniuiento 701 

714 Ccinuuercial (6) 

SOO Clay 801 

900 Washington 901 

Hall Court 923 

1000 Jackson 1001 

Sullivan Alley 1021 

1100 Pacific 1101 

1126 Dupont Alley 

1200 Broadway 1201 

Montgomery Av 

Hinckley 

1300 Vallejo 1301 

1400 Green 1401 

1500 Union 1501 

1506 Nobili Alley 

1600 Filbert 1601 

1618 Gerke Alley 

1700 Greenwich 1701 

Church Place 1709 

1800 Lombard 1801 

1900 Chestnut 1901 

Pfeiffer 

2000 Francisco 2001 

2100 Bay 2101 

2200 North Point 2201 

(f) Beach (e) 

Dupont Alley. E s (1126) 
Dupont bet Pacific and 
Broadway 
Dntiont Place, W s Du- 
pont bet Sacramento and 
California 

Dwiglit, W s San Bruno 
Road bet Woolsey and 01m- 
stead, U. M. T. 
Easlc (now Nineteenth), W 
s Harrison bet Eighteenth 
and Twentieth W to Doug- 
lass 
Ea.st, from Folsom N to Pa- 
cific fronting the bay 
East. Street. West side. 

(<il Folsom 1 

(d) Howard 101 

id) Mission 201 

id) Market 301 

id) Clay 401 

(d) Merchant 
id) Washington 501 

{(l) Jackson 601 

(f) Pacific (e) 

Ecker, S s (527) Market bet 

First and Second 
Eddy, junction Market and 
Powell bet Ellis and Turk 
W to Calvary Cemetery 
North. Street. South side. 
2 Market and Powell 1 
14 Anna Lane 

Eddy Place 27 

100 Mason 101 

200 Taylor 201 

300 Jones 301 



400 Leavenworth 401 

500 Hyde 501 

600 Larkin 601 

700 Polk 701 

800 Van Ness Avenue 801 

900 Franklin 901 

1000 Gough 1001 

1100 Octavia 1101 

1200 Lnguna 1201 

1300 Buchanan 1301 

1400 Webster 1401 

1500 Fillmore 1501 

1600 Steiner 1601 

1700 Pierce 1701 

Farren Avenue 

1800 Scott 1801 

1900 Devisadero 1901 

2000 Broderick 2001 

((■) St. Joseph's Av (t) 

E«ldy Place, S s (27) Eddy 
bet Powell and Mason 

Edward, N s Bush bet Lar- 
kin and Hyde 

Eisiitccntli (late Falcon), 
W s Harrison bet Seven- 
teenth and Nineteenth W 
to Douglass 

EiKlltb (late Price), S s Mar- 
ket bet Seventh and Ninth 
SE 

Southicest. Street. Northeast. 
2 Market 1 

Stevenson 

100 Mission 101 

114 Minna 115 

Natoma 

200 Howard 201 

Noonan Avenue 205 

Tehama (6) 

Clementina ' 

300 Folsom 301 
Shipley 

Heron 

400 Harrison 401 

500 Bryant 501 

600 Brannan 601 
Townsend 

El Diirado, from the bay 

bet Alameda and Sixteenth 

W to Harrison 

Eleventh (late Wood), S s 

Market bet Tenth and 

Twelfth SE to Mission 

Creek 

Southtrest. Street. Northeast. 

2 Market 1 

100 Mission 101 

200 Howard 201 

Bowie Avenue 

Henrietta Square 

300 Folsom 301 

400 Harrison 401 

(e) Bryant (e) 

Eliza, N s Union bet Taylor 
and Jones 

Eliza Place, N s Washing- 
ton bet Taylor and Jones 

Elizaltetb, W s Noe bet 
Twenty-third and Twenty- 
fourth 

Elk, from Cadwallader N to 
Islais Creek 

Ellen (now Thirteenth), SE 
s Mission bet Twelfth and 
Fourteenth 

Ellen, N s Harrison bet 
Se enth and Eighth 

Ellen, S s Elizabeth bet 
Douglass and BeUevue S to 
Thirtieth 

Ellick Alley, N s (722) Pa- 
cific bet Dupont and Stock- 
ton 

Ellick Liine, N s Califor- 
nia bet Stockton and Pow- 
eU 

Ellis, junction Market and 
Stockton bet O'Farrell and 
Eddy W to Calvary Ceme- 
tery 



North. Street. South side. 
2 Markt and Stockton 1 



100 


Powell 


101 





Anna Lane 


111 


200 


Mason 


201 


3(M) 


Taylor 


.301 


400 


Jones 


401 


500 


Leavenworth 


.501 


6(HI 


Hyde 


601 


7(M) 


Larkin 


701 


«(H) 


Polk 


801 


9(H) 


Van Ness Avenue 


901 


KHHI 


Franklin 


1001 


1100 


Gough 


1101 


1200 


( (ctavia 


1201 


13(M) 


Laguna 


KWl 


1400 


Buchanan 


1401 




Hollis 





1500 


Webster 


\m\ 


ItiOO 


Fillmore 


1601 


1700 


Steiner 


1701 





Bourbin Place 




IHOO 


Pierce 


1801 





Farren Avenue 




1900 


Scott 
Biedeman 


1901 


2000 


Devisadero 


2001 


211H) 


Broderick 


2101 


(«■) 


St. Joseph's Av 


(e) 


EllSMorlll, from Califor- 


nia 


Avenue S to Cortland 


Avenue, B. H. 





Elm Avenue, W s Larkin 
bet Turk and Tyler 

Emma, E s (508) Stockton 
bet Pine and Bush 

Emma, E of San Bruno 

Road 4 miles from City 
HaU 

Emma Place, S s Chest- 
nut bet Stockton and Pow- 
ell 

Emmelt Place, W s (709) 
Stockton bet California and 
Sacramento 

Erie Place, W s Howard 
bet Thirteenth and Four- 
teenth W to Mission 

E»«meralda Avenue, fmi 

North Avenue NW to Cali- 
fornia Avenue, B. H. 
Essex, S s (543) Folsom bet 
First and Second SE to 
Harrison 

E.ssex Place, W s Essex 

bet Folsom and Harrison 
Estefania, junction Heck- 

er and Stringham SW to 

Islais Creek 
Eugenie, N s Point Lobos 

Avenue bet Josephine and 

Wood N to Laurel HiU 

Cemetery 
Eureka, S s Seventeenth 

bet Douglass and Diamond 
Eve, W s San Bruno Road 

W to California Avenue, 

B. H. 

Everett, Ws (138) ITiird bet 
Mission and Howard W to 
Fourth 

Ewer Place, W s (1011) 
Mason bet Sacramento and 
Clay 

Fair Avenue, W s Califor- 
nia Avenue W to San Jose 
Road 

Fair Oaks, S s Twenty-first 
bet Guerrero and Dolores 

FairuKuit, S of Randal 
from San Jose Road W to 
Bemis 

Faitb, from California Av- 
enue NW to Brewster. B. H. 

Falcon (now Eighteenth), 
W s Harrison bet Seven- 
teenth and Nineteenth W 
to Douglass 

Falcon Place, E s Taylor 
bet Broadway and VaUejo 



JAMES G-. STEELE & CO. dispense Prescriptions from Pure Medioines. 



C. p. VAIT SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, EstabHshed ISC I 



64 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Fni'reii Avenue, N s E''- 

dy bet Pierce and Scott N 

to Ellis 

Fell, junction Market and 

Polk bet Uayes and Oak W 

to Stauyan 

Noilh. Street. South side. 

2 Market and Polk 1 

100 Van Ness Avenue 101 

230 Franklin 201 

300 Gough 301 

400 Octavia 401 

500 Laguna 501 

600 Buchanan 601 

700 Webster 701 

800 Fillmore 801 

900 Steiuer 901 

1000 Pierce 1001 

1100 Scott 1101 

12J0 Devisadero 1201 

1310 Broderick 1301 

1400 Baker 1401 

FcUsi riiu-e. Es (616) Pow- 
ell bet Bush and Pine 

Fern Aveiinc, W s Larkin 

bet Bush and Sutter 

Fcrrie, N s Point LobosAr- 

enue tiet OoUijis and Cook 

N to Laurel Hill Cemetery 

Fineenth (late Sparks), W 

S Harrison b.t Fourteenth 

and Sixteenth W to Castro 

Firtll , S s Market bet Fomih 

and Sixth SE to the bay 
S(juth}re.st. Street. Northeast. 
2 Market 1 

14 Stevenson (6) 

(b) Jessie 33 

100 Mission ICl 

106 Minna 107 

124 Natoma 125 

200 Howard 201 

210 Tehama 211 

226 Clementina 227 

300 Folsom 3J1 

316 Shipley 317 

328 Clara, or Clary 329 

400 Harrison 401 

Perry 

500 Bryant 501 

600 Brannan 601 

700 Townsend 701 

King 
800 Beiry 801 

Channel 

Hooper 

Irwin 
Hubbell 
South 
Fifth Avenue, S s (913) 
Harrison bet Fifth and 
Sixth SE to Bryant 
Figs (now Twenty-seventh), 
W s Guerrero bet Twenty- 
sixth and Twenty-eighth 

Filbert, AV s Front bet 
Greenwich and Union W to 
Presidio Reservation 

North. Street. Sotith side. 



500 
504 

600 
700 

706 
724 
800 



1000 
1100 



Front 
Battery 
Sansom 
Montgomery 
Kearny 
Filbert Place 
Vaieune 
Grand Place 
Dupont 
Medau Place 
Jasper Place 
Stockton 
Powell 

Montgomery At 
Gaven 
Scotland 
Mason 
900 Taylor 

Roach AUoy 

Jones 

Leavenworth 

Randall Place 

Hyde 

Larkin 

Polk 



1200 
1300 
1490 
1500 



1 
101 
201 
301 
401 
407 
417 
427 
501 

515 
601 

701 



801 
901 

1001 
1101 

1201 
1301 
1401 



1600 Franklin 

1700 Gough 

1800 Octavia 

1900 Laguna 

2000 Buchanan 

2100 Webster 

2200 Fillmore 

2300 Steiner 

2400 Pierce 

2500 Scott 

2600 Devisadero 

2700 Broderick 

2800 Baker 

Filbert Place, N s (406) 
Union bet Kearny and Du- 
pont N to Filbert 

Fillmore, N s Ridley bet 

Webster and Steiner N to 
the bay 

East. Street. 
2 Ridley 

100 Kate 

Gemiania 

200 Waller 

300 Haight 

400 Page 

500 Oak 

600 Fell 

700 Hayes 

800 Grove 

900 Fulton 
1000 McAUister 
1100 Tyler 
1200 Turk 
1300 Eddy 
1400 EUis 

Byington 
1500 OFarrell 
1600 Geary 
1700 Post 
18)0 Sutter 
1900 Bush 

WiWey 
2000 Pine 
2100 California 
2200 Sacj-amento 
2300 Clay 
2400 AVashington 
2500 Jackson 
2600 Pacific 
2700 Broadway 
2800 Vallejo 
2900 Green 
3000 Union 
3100 Filbert 

Pixley Place 

3200 Greenwich 

Moulton 
3300 Lombai-d 
3400 Chestnut 
3500 Francisco 
3600 Bay 
3700 NorthPoint 
3800 Beach 
3900 Jefferson 
4000 Tonquin 
Lewis 



1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2801 



West side. 

1 

101 

201 
301 
401 
501 
601 
701 
801 
901 
1001 
1101 
1201 
1301 
1401 

1501 
1601 
1701 
18J1 
1901 

2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2801 
2901 
3001 
3101 



3201 



(e) 



Van Ness Aveiiue 1501 



First, S s Market bet Fre- 
mont and Second SE to the 
bay 
Soitthn^est. Street. Noi'theast. 
2 Market 1 

22 Stevenson ■ 

46 Jessie 

56 Lick Alley 
100 Mission 
118 Minna 
146 Natoma 

Melius 

200 Howard 
220 Tehama 

Tehama Place 

248 Clementina 
300 Folsora 
318 Guy Place 

Boston Place 

350 Laurel Place 
400 Harrison 

Goodsell Place 

— — Alger Place 

500 Bryant 

520 Frederick 

600 Brannan. 601 

(f) Townsend {e) 

First Avenue, N s J nr 
Golden Gate Park N to Pre- 
sidio Reservation 



101 



201 

223 



301 
329 



401 



501 



First Avenue, N s Six- 
teenth bet Mission and Va- 
lencia 

Flint Alley, W s (819) Bat- 
tery bet Broadway and Val- 
lejo 

Floreuee, N b Broadway 
bet Taylor and Jones N to 
Vallejo 

Florence, Bemal Heights 

Florida (now Bryant Av- 
enue), from Mission Creek 
bet York and Columbia S 
to Serpentine Avenue 

Folger, S s EUis bet WeV 

ster and Fillmore 
Folsoni, W s East bet How- 
ard and Harrison SW to 
Fomteenth thence S 
Northiuest. Street. Southeast. 
2 East 1 

(c) Steuart (c) 

100 Spear 101 

200 Main 201 

300 Beale 391 

Zoe Place . 315 

400 Fi-emont 401 
408 Baldwin Court 

Grant Place 409 

500 First 501 

Ecker (ti) 

Essex 543 

600 Second 601 

Hawthorne 6'3 

Hampton Place 649 

700 Thii-d 701 

Ritch 717 

Hay^vood 761 

800 Fourth 801 

MiUer Place 827 

900 Fifth 901 

AVillow 929 

1000 Sixth 1001 

Caroline 1011 

1016 Han-iet 

Columbia 1019 

1028 Euss ■ 

Sherman 1039 

1042 Moss 

1100 Seventh 1101 

Dora 1113 

1114 Langton 

Harrison Avenue 1127 

1130 Rausch 

Folsom Avenue 1145 

120O Eighth 1201 

1300 Ninth 1301 

1400 Tenth 1401 

Juniper 1417 

1500 Eleventh 1501 

Nevada 

1600 Twelfth 1601 

1700 Thirteenth 1701 

•Creek Lane — r- 

1800 Fourteenth 1801 

1900 Fifteenth 1901 

2000 Sixteenth 2001 

2100 Seventeenth 2101 

2200 Eighteenth 2201 

2300 Nineteenth 2301 

2400 Twentieth 2401 

2500 Twenty-first 2501 

2o00 Twenty-second 2601 
2700 Twenty-third 2701 

2800 Twenty-fourth 2801 
2900 Twenty-fifth 2901 

3000 Twenty-sixth 3001 

Folsoni Avenue, S s(1145) 
Folsom bet Seventh and 
Eighth 
Fort I'lace, S s Pacific bet 

Hyde and Larkin 
Fourteenth (late Tracy), 
W s Hani son bet Thir- 
teenth and Fifteenth W to 
Castro 
Fourth, 8 s Market bet 
Third and Fifth SE to the 
bay 
Southwest. Street. Northeast. 
2 Market 1 

{h) Stevenspn 21 

30 Jessie 31 

100 Mission 101 

116 Minna 117 






Everett 
Howard 


133 


200 


201 


218 


Tehama 


219 


242 


Clementina 


243 


300 


Folsom 


301 


316 


Louisa 


317 


3:« 


Chra . 


333 


4i)() 


Harrison 


401 


416 


Perry 


417 





Silver 


431 


500 


Bryant 


501 





Welch 


523 





Freelon 


537 


6(K( 


Brannan 


601 


700 


Townsend 
King 


701 


800 


Berry 
Channel 


801 



Francise«», W s Montgom- 
ery bet Chestnut and Bay 
W to Presidio Reservation 

North. Street. South side. 



2 


Montgomery 
Webster 


1 


(0 


Kearny 


('•) 


1(X) 


Dupont 


101 




Midway East 








Bellair Place 




200 


Stockton 
Midway West 


201 


300 


PoweU 


301 


4(MI 


Mason 


401 


500 


Taj'lor 
Montgomery Av 


501 


601) 


Jones 


601 


700 


Leavenworth 


701 


800 


Hyde 


801 


900 


Larkin 


901 


1000 


Polk 


1001 


lino 


Van Ness Avenue 1101 


1200 


Franklin 


1201 


130O 


Gough 


1301 


1400 


Octavia 


1401 


1500 


Laguna 


1501 


1600 


Buchanan 


1601 


17{M) 


Webster 


1701 


IKOO 


Fillmore 


181)1 


190f) 


Steiner 


1901 


2000 


Pierce 


2001 


2100 


Scott 


2101 


2200 


Devisadero 


2201 


2300 


Broderick 


2301 


2400 


Baker 


iS401 



Franconta Avenue, frm 

Hope SW to California Av- 
enue, B. H. 
Frank Place, W s Mason 
bet California and Pine 

Franklin, N s Market bet 
Gough and Van Ness Av- 
enue N to the bay 
East. Street. West side. 

2 Market and Page 1 
Lilly Avenue 
100 Oak 101 

Hickoiy Avenue 
200 Fell 201 

Linden Avenue 
300 Hayes 301 

Ivy Avenue 
400 Grove 401 

Birch Avenue 
500 Fulton 501 

Ash Avenue 
600 McAllister 601 

Locust Avenue 
700 Tyler 701 

Elm Avenue 
800 Turk 801 

Laiu-el Avenue 
900 Eddy 901 

Willow Avenue 
1000 Ellis 1001 

Olive Avenue 
1100 OFarrell 1101 

MjTtle Avenue 
1200 Geary 1201 

Cedar Avenue 
1300 Post 1301 

Walnut Avenue 
1400 Sutter 1401 

Fern Avenue 
1500 Bush 1501 

1600 Pine 1001 

1700 California 1701 

ISOO Sacramento 1801 



BEAMISH'S— Shirt yaanufacturer, Nucleus Building, corner Third and Market 



'. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 7H, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



65 



1900 Clay 

2000 Washington 

2100 Jackson 
I'acific 
Kroadway 
Vallejo 
Green 
Union 
Filbert 
Cfreenwich 
I/onibar<l 
Chestiiut 
Francisco 
Bay 

North Point 
Beach 
Jefferson 

3f>m Tomiuiu 
(«) Lewi 



22(10 
23'M 
2J00 
SfKlO 

2;oo 

2700 
2SII0 
2SK10 
3000 
3100 
3200 
3300 
3«X» 
3501) 



1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2801 
2901 
3001 
3101 
3201 
3301 
3401 
3501 
3601 
(<;) 

Franklin Park, bet Six- 
teenth, 8anta Clara, Hamp- 
shire, and Bryant Avenue 
rro«l«'i*l«'k, W s Ashbury 
nr Waller W to First Av- 
enue 
Fr«Ml«'rlrk. W s (520) First 

bet Brannan and Bryant 
Froclon, W s Zoe bet Bran- 
nan and Welsh 
Fre«'Ion, bet Bourne and 
Orsenius from Byrne S to 
Salome 

Frein<int, S s Market bet 
First and Beale SE to the 
bay 

Strut liiri'st. Street. Northeast. 



100 



Market 

Mission 

Melius 

Howard 

Lincoln Place 

Folsom 

Harrison 

Brj'ant 

Brannan 



300 
400 
500 
(f) 

Fremont t'onrt, orC'lay 
Avonne, N s (91fi) Clay 
bet Powell and Stockton 

Frirduian riaee, E s 

(1910) Larkin bet Pacific 
and Broadway 

Front, N s Market bet Bat- 
tery and Davis N to the bay 

Ea.it. Street. West side 

2 Market 1 

100 Pine 101 

200 California 201 

Riclimond 211 

3M Sacramento 301 

318 Commercial 317 

400 Clay 401 

416 Merchant (c) 

500 Washington 501 

510 Oregon 

600 Jackson 601 

614 Clark 

TOO Pacific 701 

712 Chambers 713 

800 Broadway 801 

900 Vallejo 901 

id) Green 1001 

id) Commerce 

id) Vnion 1101 

((/) Dock 

(d) Filbert 1201 

(() Greenwich (e) 

Fulton, WsLarkinbetMc 
Al lister and Grove W to 
Stanyan >, 

North. Street. South side. 
2 Larkin 1 

100 Polk 101 

20O Van Ness Avenue 201 
300 Franklin 301 

400 (Jough 401 

500 Octavia 501 

600 Laguna 601 

700 B\ichanan 701 

800 Webster 801 

900 Fillmore 901 

100.1 Steiner 1001 

1100 Pierce 1101 

1200 Scott 1201 



1300 Devisadero 1301 

1400 Broderick 1401 

1.500 Baker 1501 

1600 Lyon 1601 

tiinines, N 8 Green bet San- 
son! and Battery N to Un- 
ion 

4;allnt4», Ns Sixteenth bet 

Guerrcn) and Dolores 
<iiar«l4-n, S s Harrison bet 

Sixth and Seventh SE to 

Bryant 
<iar4lrn Avenue, E s 

Broderick bet fieary and 

Post 

<iarilner Alley, N s (112) 
Post bet Dupont and Kear- 
ny 

tin ren, W s San Bruno Road 
4 miles from City Hall 

Gates, from Cortland Av- 
enue S to Crescent Avenue, 
B. H. 

tiaven, N s (706) Filbert bet 
Powell and Mason N to 
Greeunich 

Cieary, junction Marketand 
Kearny bet Post and OFar- 
rell W to Central Avenue 

North. Street. South side. 
2 Market and Kearny 1 

Brooks 25 

100 Dupont 101 
200 Stock-ton 201 
300 Powell 301 
400 Mason 401 
416 Metcalfe Place 

Martha Place 417 

500 Taylor 501 

Geary Place 511 

512 William 515 

600 Jones 601 

700 Leavenworth 701 

800 Hyde 801 

900 Larkin 901 

1000 Polk 1001 

1100 Van Ness Avenue 1101 

1200 FrankUu 1201 

1300 Gough 1301 

1400 Octavia 1401 

1500 Laguna 1501 

1600 Buchanan 1601 

1700 Webster 1701 

1800 Fillmore 1801 

1900 Steiner 1901 

2000 Pierce 20O1 

2100 Scott 2101 

2200 Devisadero 2201 

2300 Broderick 2301 

St. Joseph's Avenue 

2400 Baker 2401 

2500 Lyon 9501 

Central Avenue - — 

Geary Plaee, S s (511) 
Geary bet Taylor and Jones 

Geneva, S s Brannan bet 
Sixth and Seventh 

Georjsia, S s Solano bet 
Louisiana and Michigan 

Gerke Alley, E s (1618) 

Dupont bet Greenwich and 

Filbert 
Gerniania, W s Webster 

bet Kate and Waller W to 

FUIraore 

Gertrndis, from HeckerS 
W to Islais Creek 

Gibl>, W s Montgomery Av- 
enue bet Washington and 
Jackson 

Gihsou, E s Larkin bet Un- 
ion and Green 

Gilbert, S s Bryant bet 
Sixth and Seventh SE to 
Townsend 

Gilniore, E s Kentucky nr 

Shasta 

Girard, S s Silver Avenue 
bet San Bruno Road and 
Berlin 1 



Glen Park Avenue, SW 

s (20) Twelfth bet Mission 
and Howard 

GleuMootl Plaee, S s 

Howard bet Twelfth and 
Thirteenth 

Glower, E s Leavenworth 
bet Broadway and Vallejo 

Godeus, K s Mission nr 
Thirtieth E to California 
Avenue 

Gody , W s Mission nr Twen- 
ty-eighth 

Goeltinsen, S s Silver Av- 
enue bet Berlin and Wil- 
liams 

Gold, W s (705) Sansom bet 
Jackson and Pacific W to 
Montgomery 

Golden Gate Park, W of 

Stanyan bet D and H streets 
W to Pacific Ocean 

Goldman Plaee, E s Mis- 
sion bet Sixteenth and Sev- 
enteenth 

G«»od Children, Ss Lom- 
bard bet Kearny and Du- 
pont 

Goodsell Plaee, E s First 

bet Harrison and Brj-ant 
Go:'d<»n, Ns Harrison bet 

Eighth and Ninth 

Gouifli, N s Market bet 

Franklin and Octavia N to 

the bay 

East. Street. West side. 

2 Market and Haight 1 

Rose Avenue 

100 Page 101 

Lilly Avenue 

200 Oak 201 

Hickory Avenue 

300 Fell 301 

Linden Avenue 

400 Hayes 401 

Ivy Avenue 

500 Grove 501 

Birch Avenue 

600, Fultcn 601 

Ash Avenue 

700 McAUister 701 

Locust Avenue 

800 Tyler 801 

Elm Avenue 

900 Tm-k 901 

Laurel Avenue 

1000 Eddy 1001 

Willow Avenue 

1100 EUis 1101 

Olive Avenue 

1200 OFarrell 1201 

MjTtle Avenue 

1300 Geary 1301 

Cedar Avenue 

1400 Post 1401 

Walnut Avenue 

1500 Sutter 1501 

Fern Avenue 

1600 Bush 1601 

1700 Pine 1701 

18110 California 1801 

1900 Sacramento 1901 

2000 Clay 2001 

2100 Washington 2101 

2200 Jackson 2201 

2300 Pacific 2301 

2400 Broadway 2401 

2500 Vallejo 2501 

2600 Green 2601. 

2700 Union 2701 

2800 FUbert 2801 

2900 Greenwich 2901 

3000 Lombard 3001 

3100 Chestnut 3101 

3200 Francisco 3201 

3300 Bay 3301 

3400 NorthPoint 3401 

3500 Beach 3501 

3600 Jefferson 3601 

3700 Tonciuin 3701 

(e) Lewis {e) 

Graham Plaee, N s (538) 
Green bet Stockton and 
Dupont 



<>rand Avenue, S h Mis- 
sion bet Ninth and Tenth 

Grand Plaee, S s (4271 Fil- 
bert bet Dupont and Kear- 
ny 

Grant [see Pierce) 

Grant Avenue {see Grand 
Avenue) 

Grant Plaee, Sa (409) Fol- 
som bet First and Fremont 

Graltan, W g Stanyan nr 
Sullivan 

Green, W s Front bet Val- 
lejo an<l Union W to Presi- 
dio Reservation 

North. Street. South side. 



2 


Front 


1 


100 


Battery 
Gaines 


101 


200 


San.som 
Calhoun 


201 


300 


Montgomery 


301 


316 


Vincent 





326 


Bone Alley 








Reed Place 


331 


400 


Keai-ny 


401 


406 


Sonora Place ' 





420 


Lafayette Place 





500 


Dupont 


501 


510 


Bannam Place 





522 


Union Place 








Bower Place 


529 


538 


Graham Place 
Montgomery Av 




600 


Stockton 


601 


700 


Powell 


701 


718 


August Alley 





800 


Mason 


801 


900 


Taylor 


901 


1000 


Jones 


1001 


1100 


Leavenworth 


1101 




New Orleans Av 







Hamlin 





1200 


Hyde 


1201 


1300 


Larkin 


1301 


1400 


Polk 


1401 


1500 


Van Ness Avenue 


1501 


1600 


Franklin 


ICOl 


1700 


Gough 


1701 


1800 


Octavia 


ISOl 


1900 


Laguna 


1901 


2000 


Buchanan 


2001 


2100 


Webster 


2101 


2200 


Fillmore 


2201 


2300 


Ste ner 


2301 


2400 


Pierce 


2401 


2500 


Scott 


2501 


2600 


Devisadero 


2601 


2700 


Broderick 


2701 


2800 


Baker 


2801 



Green Court, N s Howard 

bet Steuart and Spear 
Green Plaee, or Bone 

Alley, N s Green bet 
Montgomery and Kearny 

Greenwich, W s Front bet 
Filbert and Lombard W to 
Presidio Reservation. [The 
buildings on this street are 
incorrectly numbered) 

North. Street. South side. 



2 


Front 


1 


ic) 


Battery 


(<■) 


100 


Sansom 
Pringle Court 


101 


200 


Montgomery 


201 


300 


Kearny 


301 


330 


Telegraph Place 





400 


Dupont 


4<J1 





Kramer Place 


403 





Belle^Tie Avenue 




500 


Stockton 


501 


6(K) 


Powell 


601 





Gaven 


603 




Chambers Place 








Scotland 


621 




Montgomery Av 




7(H) 


Mason 


701 


706 


Hartman 





716 


Jansen 





m) 


Taylor 


801 





Roach Alley 


807 


900 


Jones 


901 


1000 


Leavenworth 
Randall Place 


1001 



STEELE'S Glycerine Lotion cures Tan, Sunburn, Eruptions, etc. 



PINE WATCHES and JEWELEY for Sale ty D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



66 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



o 



1100 


Hyde 


vMm 


Larkin 


i3f)n 


Polk 


1400 


Van Ness Avenue 


1500 


Franklin 


IfiOl 


Gough 


1700 


Octavia 


1800 


Lagnna 


1900 


Buchanan 


m)o 


Webster 


2100 


Fillmore 


MOO 


Steiner 


?:m) 


Pierce 


94m 


Scott 


^nOO 


Devisadero 


flIiOO 


Broderick 


2700 


Baker 



1101 
1201 
1301 
1401 
1501 

imi 

1701 
1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 

Oi'isar, W s Octavia bet 
Union and Filbert W to 
Laguna 

tirovo, Ws Larkin bet Ful- 
ton and Hayes W to Stan- 
yan 

North. Street. South side. 

2 Larkin 1 

100 Polk 101 

200 Van Ness Avenue 201 

300 Franklin 301 

400 Gough 401 

500 Octavia 501 

600 Lagnna 601 

700 Buchanan 701 

800 Webster 801 

900 Fillmore 901 

1000 Steiner 1001 

Alamo Square 

1200 Scott 1201 

1300 Devisadero 1301 

1400 Broderick 1401 

1500 Baker ' 1501 

1600 Lyon 1601 

Crovo (now Thirtieth), W s 
San Jose Road s of Twen- 
ty-ninth 

(Hievrero, S s Market bet 
Valencia and Dolores S to 
Old San Jose Road 

(iieiinSKon Avenue, S s 

Precita Place s to Prospect 
Place 

CHStavns, N s (920) Cali- 
fornia bet Powell and Ma- 
son N to Sacramento 

Guy Place, W s (318) First 
bet Folsom and Harrison 

Haif.Kiii, S s King bet Third 

and Fourth S to Berry 

HaiKSit, junction Market 

and Gough bet Page and 

Waller W to Stanyan 

North. Street. South side. 

2 Market 1 

100 (Jctavia 101 

200 Laguna 201 

300 Buchanan 301 

400 Webster 401 

500 Fillmore 501 

600 Steiner 601 

700 Pierce 701 

800 Scott 801 

900 Devisadero 901 

1000 Broderick 1001 

1100 Baker 1101 

Ilale, W s San Bruno Road 
4 miles from City Hall 

Hall Alley, S s Vallejobet 
Montgomery and Sansom 

Hull Coui't, W s 1923) Du- 
pont bet Washington and 
Jackson 

Hall Flaee, S s Jackson 
bet Leavenworth and Hyde 

Hal leek, E s Buchanan nr 
Lombard 

Halleek, W s (213) Battery 
bet Sacramento and Cali- 
fornia W to Leidesdorff 

Hamilton, S s Silver Av- 
enue bet Holyoke and Bow- 
doin, U. M. T. 



Hamilton ^(|nai'<'< ^^^ 

O'Farrell. Post, Steiner, 
and Scott 
Hamlin, N s Green bet 
Leavenworth and Hyde 

Hanil an Plaee, E s Larkin 
bet Broadway and Vallejo 

Hammond, SsTownsend 
bet Second and Third 

Hampshire, from Mission 
Creek bet Potrero Avenue 
and York S to Serpentine 
Avenue 

Hamitton Court, Ns (670) 
Harrison bet Second and 
Thurd 

Hampton Place, S s(649) 
Folsom bet Second and 
Third 

Hancoeli, W s Dolores bet 
Eighteenth and Nineteenth 

Hai-die Place, E s (218) 
Kearny bet Bush and Sut- 
ter 

Harlan Place, W s (313) 
Dupont bet Bush and Sut- 
ter 

Harriet, S s (1013) Howard 
bet Sixth and Seventh SE 
to Folsom 

Harriet (now Second Av- 
enue), N s Sixteenth bet 
Valencia and Guerrero 

Harris (now Seventh), S s 
Market bet Sixth and 
Eighth SE to the bay 

Harrison, W s Steuart bet 
Folsom and Bryant SW to 
Foui-teenth thence S to Ser- 
pentine Avenue 

Northn-cst. Street. Southeast 



2500 Twenty-second 

2600 Twenty-third 

2700 Twenty-fourth 

2800 Twenty-fifth 

2900 Twenty-sixth 



2501 
2601 
2701 
2801 
2901 



Steuart 

Spear 

Johnson Place 

Main 

Beale 

Fremont 

First 

Essex 

Rincon Place 

Stanly Place 

Charles Place 

Second 

Vassar Place 
-_- Hawthorne 
670 Hampton Court 
700 Third 

Bitch 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Fifth Avenue 

Oak Avenue 

Park Avenue 

Sixth 

Garden 

Columbia 

Sherman 

Seventh 

Dora 

Chesley 

Hayward 

Mariposa Avenue 

1200 Eighth 
1300 Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh 

Nevada 

Twelfth 

Channel 
1700 Fourteenth 

Alameda 

Fifteenth 
El Dorado 
Sixteenth 
Santa Clara 
Seventeenth 

Mariposa 

2100 Eighteenth 

Solano 

2200 Nineteenth 

Butte 

2300 Twentieth 
2400 Twenty-first 



2 
100 

200 
300 
400 
500 
538 



570 
600 



630 



720 
800 
900 



1000 



1100 



1400 
1500 



1600 



1800 
1900 



2000 



701 
(f*) 
801 
901 
913 
953 
969 
1001 



1201 
1301 
1401 
1501 



1821 
1901 
1921 



2221 
2301 
2401 



Serpentine Avenue (f) 

Harrison Avenne, S s 

(1127) Folsom bet Seventh 
and Eighth 

HaiTy, from Laidley SWto 
iieacon 

Harry Place, E s Laguna 
bet Filbert and Greenwich 

Hartford, S s Eighteenth 
bet Noe and Castro S to 
Twentieth 

Ha rtman, N s (706) Green- 
wich bet Mason and Taylor 

Harvard, S s Silver Av- 
enue W of Oxford 

Harwood Place, (now 
Grand Place) S s Filbert 
bet Dupont and Kearny 

Havens, W s Leavenworth 
bet Filbert and Union 

Havens Place, S s (907) 
Washington bet Stockton 
and Powell 

Hiiwes, S s Folsom bet 
Tenth and Eleventh 

HawtlBorne, S s (633) Fol- 
som bet Second and Third 
SE to Harrison 

Mayes, junction Market and 
Larkin bet Grove and Fell 
W to Stanyan 

North. Street. South Side. 
2 Market and Larkin 1 

College Place 

100 Polk 101 

200 Van Ness 'Avenue 201 



300 Franklin 301 

400 Gough 401 

500 Octavia 501 

fiOO Laguna , 601 

700 Buchanan 701 

800 Webster 801 

900 Fillmore 901 

Steiner 1001 

Pierce HOI 

1200 Scott 1201 

1300 Devisadero 1301 

1400 Broderick 1401 

1500 Baker 1501 

1600 Lyon 1601 

IBaves Alley, (see Keyes 

Alley) 

Hayward, S s Harrison bet 
Seventh and Eighth 

Haywood, S s (761) Fol- 
som bet Third and Fourth 

Heatll, from Cortland Av- 
enue S to San Bruno Road 

HecUei', from Islais Creek 
W to Bernal 

Helen, S s California bet 
Leavenworth and Hyde 

Henderson Avenne, S s 
Point Lobos Av bet John- 
son Av and First Av 

Henrietta, from San Jose 
Road nr Thirteenth SE to 
North Avenue, B.H. 

Henrietta Sflinare, E s 
Eleventh bet Howaird and 
Folsom 

Henry, N s Lombard bet 
Hyde and Larkin 

Henry, W s San Bninx) 
Road bet SilUman and Bur- 
row, U. M. T. 

Henry, W s Noe bet Four- 
teenth and Fifteenth 

Herlnger, E of San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City Hall 

Hermann, E of San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City Hall 



Hermann, S s Market bet 
Brady and Ridley E to Mis- 
sion 

Heron, E s Eighth bet Fol- 
som and Harrison 

Heyn Pliice, S s Clay bet 
Hyde and Leavenworth 

Hickory Aveime, W s 
Van Ness Avenue bet Oak 
and Fell 

HiscKins Place (see Keyes 
Alley) 

Highland Terrace, N s 
California bet Jones and 
Leavenworth 

Hill , W s Sanchez bet Twen- 
ty-first and Twenty-second 
W to Castro 

Hiutmelmann Place, N 
s (1024) Pacific bet Mason 
and Tas'lor 

Hincklpy, W s Montgom- 
ery bet Broadway and Val- 
lejo W to Dupont 

Hodges, or Bestole 
Place, N s Vallejo bet 
Montgomery and Sansom 

Hodges t'onrt, Ws Spear 
bet Market and Mission 

Hodgson Alley, N s Six- 
teenth betMission and First 
Avenue 

noflrAvenne,SsSixteenth 
bet Mission and Valencia 

Hollas, N s Ellis bet Bu- 
chanan and Webster 

Holly Park, SW s Bernal 
Heights nr San Jose Road 

Holyoke, Ss Silver Avenue 
bet Williams and Hamil- 
ton, U. M. T. 

Hooper, from the bay bet 
Channel and Irwin SW to 
Seventh 

Hope, from California Av- 
enue NWto Franconia Av- 
enue, B. H. 

Horner (now Twenty- 
third), W s Bryant Avenue 
bet Twenty-second and 
Twenty-fourth W to Doug- 
lass 

Honston, W s Taylor bet 
Chestnut and Francisco 

Howard, W s East bet Mis- 
sion and Folsom SW to 
Twelfth thence S to Ser- 
pentine Avenue 

Northwest. Street. Southeast 



9. 


East 


1 


Ir] 


Steuart 


(cl 




Green Court 





100 


Spear 


101 


200 


Main 


201 


,300 


Beale 


3U1 


400 


Fremont 


401 


.500 


Fitst 


501 


V, fiOO 


Second 


601 




New Montgomery 








Hubbai-d 


633 


700 


Third 


701 


800 


Fourth 


801 


814 


Howard Court 





900 


Fifth 
Mary 


901 


1000 


Sixth 


lOUl 




Harriett 


1013 





Russ 


1041 





Moss 


1059 


1100 


Seventh 


1101 





Langton 


1111 


, 


Rausch 


1127 





Sumner 


1159 


1200 


Eighth 


1201 


1300 


Ninth 


13U1 




Washington Av 







Grand Avenue 





1400 


Tenth 


1401 


1500 


Eleventh 
Lafayette 


1501 



HY&IENIC BOAEDIN(j at Smithsonian Ueiiosl Institute of Dr. SMITH, 635 



. p. VAIT SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, EstaWisIied 1862. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



67 



1600 Twelfth 1601 

Bowles Place 

1700 Thirtoentli 1701 

Creek Lane 

Erie Place 

ISJO Konrteeuth 1801 

19^>0 Fifteenth 1901 

2000 Sixteenth 2001 

2100 Seventeenth 2101 

2200 Eij,'hteenth 2201 

2*10 Nineteenth 2301 

24'W Twentieth 2401 

200O Twenty-lirst 2501 

L''>00 Twenty-second 2601 

2700 Twenty-third 2701 

231)0 Twenty-fourth 2801 

2.100 T\venty-fifth 29J1 

3000 Twenty-sixth 3001 

((■) Serpentine Avenue (c) 

H<Mvar«I Cnnrt, Ns(814) 
Howard bet Fourth and 
Fifth 

Hiilibard, S s (633) Howard 
bet Second and Third 

Hiibbell, W s Fourth bet 
Irwin and South SW to 
Seventh 

IIll«ls<»II, junction Four- 
teenth Avenue and Cad- 
walliider NW to Salome 

Hu«ls4»n, S s Channel bet 
Fourth and Fifth S to South 

Hiiliibulilt, from the bay 
bet Sierra and Nevada W 
to Bryant Avenue 

III! lit. E s (145) Third bet 
Howard and Sherwood 
Place 

Ililiiter, W s San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City Hall 

Hyde, N b McAllister bet 
Larkin and Leavenworth N 
to the bay 
Eiist. Street. West side. 

2 McAllister 1 

100 Tvler 101 

200 Tiu-k 201 

300 Eddy 301 

400 EUis 401 

500 OFarrell 501 

600 Geary 601 

700 Post 701 

60>i Sutter 801 

900 Bush 901 

1000 Pine 1001 

mX) California 1101 

12iX) Sacramento 1201 

13.tO Clay 1301 

1400 Washington 1401 

15O0 Jackson 1501 

1600 Pacific 1601 

1606 Lynch 

1700 Broadway 1701 

ISOO Vallejo 1801 

1900 Green 1901 

Russell 

2000 Union 2001 

Allen 

2100 Filbert 2101 

22j0 Greenwich 2201 

2300 Lombard 2301 

- 1 W Chestnut 2431 

i"") Francisco 2501 

2 '0 Bay 2601 

2;ijO North Point 2701 

2800 Beach 2801 

((■) Jefferson (f) 

Hyde Place, Ws (203) Hyde 
bet Eddy and Turk 

Illinois, from the bay bet 
Michigan and Kentucky 

Indiana, from the bay bet 
Iowa and Minnesota S to 
Tulare 

Iowa, from the bay bet In- 
diana and Pennsylvania S 
to Tulare 

Irwin, from the bay bet 
Hooneraud HubbellSWto 
Seventh 



South side. 
1 
(c) 
101 
201 
301 
313 
401 

431 
501 

601 
623 



iHaliel, from Wolfe SE to 

Shakspear, B. H. 
Ivy .lveinie,W8 VanNess 

Avenue bet Hayes and 
Grove 

Jarksoii, W 's East bet 
Wiishington and Pacific W 
to First Avenue 
North. Stnrt 
2 E.ist 
(<•) Drumm 
lOO Davis 
200 Front 
300 Battery 

Custom House PI 

400 Sansoni 
412 Balance 

Jones Alley 

500 Montgomery 

Montgomery Av 

600 Kearny 

Cooper Alley 

Wasliington Alley 633 

642 Bartlett AUey 

700 Dupont 

San Luis Alley 

720 Sullivan AUey 

Ross 

800 Stockton 

806 Bedford Place 

814 Virginia 

Stone 

824 Adele Place 

900 Powell 

1000 Mason 

Vernon 

1014 Auburn 

1100 Taylor 

1200 Jones 

1300 Leavenworth 

Hall Place 

Wall Place 

1400 Hyde 1401 

1500 Larkin 1501 

1600 Polk 1601 

1700 Van Ness Avenue 1701 



701 
711 

723 
801 

813 
819 

901 
1001 
1007 

1101 
1201 
1301 



1800 Franklin 

1900 Goiigh 

2000 Octavia 

2100 Laguna 

2200 Buchanan 

2300 Webster 

2400 FUlmore 

2500 Steiner 

2800 Pierce 

2700 Scott 

2800 Devisadero 

2900 Broderick 

30OO Baker 



1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 
2301 
2701 
2801 
2901 
3001 



Jarkson Park, bet Santa 
Clara, Mariposa, Arkansas, 
and Carolina 

Jarkson Place, E s (1112) 
Montgomery bet Vallejo 
and Gieen 

Jacobi, N s California bet 
Leavenworth and Hyde 

.lane Place, N s (908) Pine 
bet Mason and Taylor 

JaiL<>en,N s (716) Greenwich 
bet Mason and Taylor N to 
Lombard 

.lapan, Ns Townsend bet 

First and Second N to 

Brannan 

Ja.<<]>cr Place, N s (518) 

Union bet Dupont and 

Stockton N to Filbert 

Jeirers«»n, W s PoweU bet 

Beach and Tonquin W to 

Presidio Reservation 

North. Street. South side. 

(rf) Powell 1 

id) Mason 101 

(rf) Taylor 201 

id) Jones 301 

((/) Leavenworth 401 

id) Hyde 501 

id) Larkin 601 

700 Polk 701 

800 Van Ness Avenue 801 

900 Franklin 901 

1000 fk)ugh 1001 

1100 Octavia 1101 

12D0 Laguna 1201 



1300 
1400 
1500 
1600 
1700 
1800 
19:H) 
2fH)0 
2100 



Buchanan 

Webster 

Fillmore 

Steiner 

Pierce 

Scfitt 

Devisadero 

Brokerick 

Baker 



1301 
1401 
1501 
1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 



JelTerMoii Avenne, E s 

Laurel Avenue ui Cortland 
Avenue E to San Bruno 
Road 

JeflTerson Ktinare, bet 

Tyler, Gough, Eddy, and 
Lagmia 

Jersey, W s Guerrero bet 
Twenty-fourth and Twen- 
ty -fifth W to Douglass 

Jessie, W g (46) First bet 
Market and Mission. (The 
buildings on this street bet 
Seventh and Eighth are in- 
correctly numbered] 

Northire.'it. Street. Southeast. 
2 First 1 

Anthony 
100 Second 101 

New Montgomery 
162 Annie 161 

ih) Third (6) 

300 fourth 301 

{b) Fifth (6) 

500 Sixth 501 

600 Seventh 601 

700 Eighth 701 

800 Ninth 801 

Jewett, W s Fourth bet 
Townsend and King W to 
Fifth 
John, W s (1211) PoweU bet 
Pacific and Jackson W to 
Mason 
J4»iin (now Twenty-second), 
W s Potrero Avenue bet 
Twenty-first and Twenty- 
third W to Douglass 
Johnson Avenne, S s 
Point Lobos Av bet Parker 
Av and Henderson Av 
Johnson Place, S s Har- 
rison bet Main and Spear 
Johnston (now Ninth), Ss 
Market SE to Mission Creek 
Joice. N s (710) Pine bet 
Stockton and PoweU N to 
California 
Jones, N s Market bet 
Leavenworth and Taylor 
N to the bay 
Eaxt. Street. West side. 

2 Mkt and McAllister 1 
100 Tyler 101 

200 Turk 201 

McDermott Place 215 



300 Eddy 

400 EUis 
Antonio 

412 Steveloe 

500 OFarreU 

600 Geary 

614 Cottage Place 

700 Post 

704 Lewis Place 

800 Sutter 

806 ■White Place 

900 Bush 

1000 Pine 

1100 California 

1200 Sacramento 

Pleasant 

1300 Clay 

1400 Washington 

1500 Jackson 

1600 Pacific 

1608 Bernard 

1700 Broadway 

1800 Vallejo 

1900 Green 

Lincoln 

2000 Union 

2100 Filbert 

Valparaiso 



301 
401 
411 

501 
601 



801 

901 
1001 
1101 
1201 

1301 
1401 
1501 
1601 
1607 
1701 
1801 
1901 

2001 
2101 



2200 Greenwich 2201 

2300 Lombard 2301 

Duane 

2400 Chestnut 2401 

2500 Francisco 2501 

Montgomery Av 

2600 Bay 2601 

2700 North Point 2701 

2800 Beach 2801 

((f) Jefferson {e) 

Jones Alley, N s (532) 
Washington bet Sansom 
and Montgomery N to 
J ackson 

Jones Place, N s Bryant 
bet Sixth and Seventh 

Josephine, N s Point Lo- 
bos Avenue bet Central Av- 
enue and Eugenie N to Lau- 
rel Hill Cemetery 

Joseph's Ternice, E s 

Stockton bet Lombard and 
Chestnut 

Joy, from CaUfomia Ave- 
nue NW to Brewster, B.H. 

Jnlla, S 8 Minna bet Sev- 
enth and Eighth 

Julia C'oHl-t, N s (28) O'- 
Farrell bet Dupont and 

Stockton 

Julius, N s (222) Lombard 
bet Kearny and Dupont 

•Innction, or Dry, W s 

San J ose Road bet Twenty- 
ninth and Thirtieth W to 
Bellevue 
Jnniper, S s (1417) Folsom 

bet Tenth and Eleventh 
Kaiisas,f rom Mission Creek 
bet Rhode Island and Ver- 
mont S to Tulare 
Kate, S s Brjant bet Sev- 
enth and Eighth 
Kate, junction Market and 

Laguna W to Steiner 
Kearny, N s Market be 
Montgomery and Dupon 
N to the bay 
East. Street. West side 

2 Market and Geary 

Morton 19 

100 Post 10 

116 VerMehr 

200 Sutter 20: 

218 Hardie Place 
300 Bush 30 

400 Pine 40! 

414 Sumner 
500 California 50: 

600 Sacramento 60 

632 Commercial 62' 

700 Clay 70: 

720 Merchant — 

800 Washington 80 

900 Jackson 90 

Montgomery Av 
1000 Pacific lOO: 

1013 St. Charles 
1100 Broadway llO: 

1106 Dunn AUey 
1120 Hiucklev 112 

1200 VaUejo 120: 

St. Charles Place 1215 



130: 
140: 

150: 
i6o: 
i7o: 

180 
190 

20o: 

North Point [e] 

Kensington Place, W s 

Howard bet Nineteenth 

and Twentieth 
Kent, W s (1809) Mason bet 

Filbert and Union 
Keiitneky, from the bay 

bet Illinois and Tennessee 

a to Tulare 



1300 Green 

1400 Union 

1500 Filbert 

1600 Greenwich 

1700 Lombard 

1800 Chestnut 

{d) Francisco 

id) Bay 

(e) " 



t-« 
n 



JAMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 315 Kearny Street. 



D. W. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, Wholesale and Eetail. cor. Merchant and Mont ^. 



68 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



M 









G> 

M 

CO 

o 



PI 
n 



Keyes Alley. N s (90G) Pa- 
cific bet Mason anil Powell 
Killllnill, N s (1406) Sacra- 
mento het Leavenworth 
and Hyile 
KinSt W S' Second bet 
Townseud and Berry SW 
to Eighth 
Northwc.it. Street. Southeast. 
2 Second 1 

100 Third 101 

Madden 
Haggin 
200 Fourth 201 

300 Fifth 301 

400 Sixth 401 

500 Seventh 501 

(e) Eiglith (<■) 

Kins, N s Silver Avenue bet 
Holyolfc and Hamilton 

Kisling Place, N s Four- 
teenth bet Folsom and Har- 



Koscoiisko, from Cortland 
Avenue S to Crescent Av- 
enue, B. H. 

Kossiltll. E s Railroad Av- 
enue E to Ohace 

Kramer Place, S s (403) 
Greenwich betDupont and 
Stockton 

Lafayette, S s Mission bet 
Eleventh and Twelfth S to 
Howard 

LafayeUe Place, N s (420) 
Green bet Kearny and Du- 
pont N to Union 

Lafayette Sriiiare, bet 

Sacramento, Gough, Wash- 
ington, and Laguua 

Lagliiia, N s Market bet 
Octavia and Buchanan N 
to the bay 
East. Street. West side. 

2 Market and Kate 1 

100 Waller 101 

200 Haight 201 

Rose Avenue 

300 Page 301 

Lilly Avenue 

400 Oak 401 

Hickory Avenue 

500 Fell 501 

Linden Avenue 

600 Hayes 601 

Ivy Avenue 

700 Grove 701 

Birch Avenue 

800 Fulton 801 

Ash Avenue 

900 McAllister 901 

Locust Avenue 

1000 Tyler 1001 

1100 Turk • 1101 

1200 Eddy 1201 

Willow Avenue 

1300 Ellis 1301 

Olive Avenue 

1400 OTarrell 1401 

Myi-tle Avenue 

150O Geary 1501 

Cedar Avenue 

1600 Post 1601 

Walnut Avenue 

1700 Sutter 1701 

Fern Avenue 

1800 Bush 1801 

1900 Pine 1901 

2000 California 2001 

2100 Sacramento 2101 

2200 Clay 2201 

2300 Washington 2301 

2400 Jackson 2401 

2500 Pacific 2501 

2600 Broadway 2601 

2700 Vallejo 2701 

2800 Green 2801 

2900 TTnion 2901 

3000 Fill)ert 3001 

Harry Place 

3100 Greenwich 3101 

3200 Lombard 3201 



3300 Chestnut 3301 

3400 Francisco 3401 

3500 Bay 3501 

3S00 NorthPoint 3601 

3700 Beach 3701 

3300 Jeflferson 3801 

3900 Tonquin 3901 

(c) Lewis ((') 

Laidley, from Tliirtieth SE 
to Fairuiount thence SW to 
Castro 

Lanslon, Ss(llll) Howard 
bet Seventh and Eighth 

Lnrkin, N s Market bet 
Polk and Hyde N to the 

bay 
East. Street. West side. 

2 Market and Hayes 1 
100 Grove 101 

200 Fulton 201 

300 McAllister 301 

Locust Avenue 

400 Tyler 401 

Elm Avenue 

500 Tiurk 501 

Laurel Avenue 

600 Eddy 601 

Willow Avenue 

700 Ellis 701 

Olive Avenue 

800 O'Farrell 801 

Myrtle Avenue 

900 Geary 901 

Cedar Avenue ' 

1000 Post 

Walnut Avenue 

1100 Sutter 

Fern Avenue 

1200 Bush 

1206 Vorrath Place 

Austin 

1300 Pine 

1400 California 

1500 Sscramento 

1600 Clay 

1700 Washington 

1800 Jackson 

1900 Pacific 

1910 Friedman Place 

2000 Broadway 

2100 Vallejo 

2200 Green 

Brady Place 
2300 Union 
2400 Filbert 
2500 Greenwich 
2600 Lombard 
2700 Chestnut 
2800 Francisco 
2300 Bay 
3000 North Point 
3100 Beach 

(d) Jefferson 

(e") Tonfjuin 



1001 
1101 



1201 



1301 
1401 
1501 
1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 

2001 
2101 
2201 

2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2801 
2901 
3001 
3101 
3201 
(e) 



Lai^kic, N s Mission bet 
Eighth and Ninth 

Latliaill Place, W s Ma- 
son bet Ellis and O'Farrell 

Lanra Place, S s (335) Pine 
bet Montgomery and San- 
som 

Laurel, N s California bet 
Locust and Walnut N to 
Presidio Reservation 

Laurel Aveuue, W sLar- 
kin bet Turk and Eddy 

Laurel Avenue, from 
Cortland Aventie S to Ben- 
ton Avenue, B. H, 

Laurel J'lace, W s (350) 
First bet Folsom and Har- 
rison 

Leavenwortli, Ns McAl- 
lister bet .Tones and Hyde 
N to the Bay. |Sc eral 
buildings in the vicinity of 
Broadway are incorrectly 
numbered] 

East. Street. West side. 

2 McAllister 1 

100 Tyler 101 

■ Burcham Place 

200 Turk 201 



300 Eddy 301 

400 Ellis 401 

500 OFarrell 501 

600 Geary ' 601 

700 Post 701 

800 Suttei; 801 

900 Bush 901 

1000 Pine 1001 

1010 Pantam 

1100 California 1101 

1200 Sacramento 1201 

1310 Clay 1301 

1400 Washington 1401 

1500 Jackson 1501 

1600 Pacific 1601 

Lynch 1609 

1614 Bernard 

1700 Broadway 1701 

Glover ■ 

1800 Vallejo 1801 

1900 Green 1901 

Lincoln 

2000 Union 2001 

Havens 

2100 Filbert 2101 

2200 Greenwich 2201 

2300 Lombard 2301 

2400 Chestmit 2401 

2500 Francisco 2501 

2600 Bay 2601 

2700 NorthPoint 2701 

Montgomery Av 

2800 Beach 2801 

(e) Jefferson (e) 
Lee, from Cortland Avenue 
S to San Bruno Road, S s 
B. H. 
Lcirtcsrtovir, N s Pine bet 
Montgomery and Sansom 
N to Clay 
East. Street. West side, 

{b) Pine ib) 

100 California 101 

Halleck 

200 Sacramento 201 

212 Commercial 213 

(e) Clay («) 

Lena Place, E s Illinois bet 

Shasta and Napa 

Leonore, E s San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City Hall 

Leroy Place, S s (1319) Sac- 
ramento bet Jones and 
Leavenworth 

Lestrade Place, N s (6321 
Pacific bet Kearny and Du- 
pont 

Lewis, W s Polk bet Ton- 
quin and the bay Wto Pre- 
sidio Reservation 

LovBS, from Bemis W to 
Castro 

Lewis Place, W s (605) Tay- 
lor bet Sutter and Post W 
to Jones 

Liberty, N s Townsend bet 
Ritch and Crook 

Liberty, W s Valencia bet 
Twentieth and Twenty-fii'st 
W to Castro 

Lick Alley, W s (56) First 
bet Mission and Jessie 

Lick Place, N s (12) Post 
bet Montgomery and Kear- 
ny N to S\itt6r 

Lida Place, N s Sixteenth 
bet Valencia and Mission 

Lilly Avenue, N s Frank- 
lin bet Page and Oak W to 
Buchanan 

Lima, N s Filbert bet Leav- 
enworth and Hyde 

Lincoln (sip Buchanan) 

Lincoln, from North Av- 
enue E to Prentiss, B. H. 

Lincoln. W s Taylor bet 
Union and Green W to 
Leavenworth 



Li ncoln A ven ue, E s (208) 
Dupont bet I'ost and Sutter 

Linc«»ln Place. E s (243) 
Fremont bet Howard and 
Folsom 

Lincoln Place, E s Hyde 

bet Union and Filbert 

Linden Avenne.Ws Van 

Ness Avenue bet Hayes and 

Fell W to Webster 

North. Street. South side. 

2 Van Ness Avenue 1 

100 Franklin 101 

200 Gough 201 

300 Octavia 301 

400 Laguna 401 

500 Buchanan 501 

(e) Webster (e) 

Loltos Siinare, betLagu- 
guna, Bay, Webster, and 
Chestnut 

Locust. N s California bet 
Spruce and Laurel N to 
Presidio Resen'ation 

Locust Aveuue, W s Lar- 
kiu bet McAllister and Ty- 
ler 

Lombard. W s Battery 
bet Chestnut and Green- 
wich W to Presidio Reser- 
vation. [The build ngs on 
this street are incorrectly 
numbered] • 

North. Street. South side. 

2 Battery 1 

(c) Sansom M 

100 Montgomery 101 

Webster — - 

200 Kearny 201 

Good Children 

222 Julius 

300 Dupont 301 

Ada 311 

400 Stockton 401 

Lombard Place 407 

500 Powell 501 

Chambers Place 

600 Mason 601 

Hartman 605 

608 Newell 

Montgomery Av 

Jansen 613 

700 Taylor 701 

800 Jones 801 

900 Leavenworth 901 

1000 Hyde 1001 

1100 Larkin HOI 

1200 Polk 1201 

1300 Van Ness Avenue 1301 

1400 Franklin 1401 

1500 Gough 1501 

1600 Octavia 1601 

1700 Lagrma 1701 

1800 Buchanan 1801 

1900 Webster 1901 

2000 Fillmore 2001 

2100 Steiner 2101 

2200 Pierce 2201 

2300 Scott 2301 

2400 Devisadero 2401 

2500 Broderick 2501 

2600 Baker 2601 

Lombard Place, S s (407) 
Lombard bet Stockton and 
Powell 

Lott, N s Waller bet Lyon 
and Masonic Avenue N to 
Turk 

Louisa, E s (317) Foiui;h 
bet Folsom and Harrison 

Louisiana, S s Solano bet 
Maryland and Georgia 

Luck, W s Orleans W to 
Bernal 

Lucy, S s Waller bet Ma- 
sonic Avenue and Ashbury 

Liindy Lane, from Virgi 
nia Avenue NE to Coso Av- 
enue, B. H. 



BEAMISH'S— Importer Purnishing Goods, Nucleus Bldg, co-r. Third and Markel 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO.-, 70S, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 71S Kearny, Established 1862. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



69 



Lynrli, W b (1609) Leaven- 
wo.th bet Tacilic and 
Broadway 

L)'4tn, N s Haiglit bet Baker 
and Lott N t<) Prt-aiiUo Re- 
servation 

Lyons, frinii ('alifomia Av- 

euue iS to Cortlaud Avenue, 

B. H. 
Lyhvtt IMuro, S 8 (1311) 

Sac aiueiito bet Jones aud 

Leiivenworth 

M, W 8 Siinchoz bet Twenty- 
secoud aud T >venty-third W 
to Diamond 

.Miic*r<l<>llia, S s California 
Avenue S to Oortez, B. H. 
I 

MiKhU'II, Ss Townoend bet \ 
Tliird and Fourth S to | 
Berry ; 

Maiilon Ia\ih\ N s (622) i 
V'allejo bet Powell and 
Stockton 

.Main, S a Market bet Spear { 

aud Beale HE to the bay 
Southicent. Street. Nvrtheait. 
2 Ma ket 1 

Meeks Place 

Main Street Place 

100 Mission 101 

200 H..ward 201 

300 Folsum 301 

Rincon Court 

400 Harrison 401 

(c) Bryant (e) 

Main Street Place, £ b 

Main bet Market and Mis- 
sion 

Mai Vina Fince, W 8(1017) 
Mason bet Clay and Sacra- 
mento 

IManision Honsc Court, 

(see Dupont Place) 

Maple, N B California bet 
CheiTy and Spruce, N to 
Presidio Reservation 

Marenso, SE of San Bnmo 
Road 4 miles from City Hall 

Mar^iret, N s Mission bet 
Eighth and Ninth (closed 
by Act of Legislature 1872- 
73) 

Margaret Place, N s (430) 
\'aUejo bet Dupont and 
Kearny 

Mancaret Place, N s (14) 
Turk bet Mason and Taylor 

Marjtary, S s M bet San- 
chez and Noo S to Clipper 

Maria, or Mary, E andW 

s Cbesley bet Harrison and 

Bryant 
Marin, from the bay bet 

Colusa aud Tulare W to 

Vermont 
Mari|M»Ka, from the bay 

bet Santa Clara and Solano 

W to Harrison 

Mariposa Avenne, N a 

Harrison bot Seventh and 
Eighth I 

Market, junction Sacra- 
mento and East SW to 
Mission Dolores' I 

* Tlie want of imifofmity ] 
in the numbers of Market , 
Street is occasioned by the ' 
difference in the frontage of 
the blocks on the north and j 
south sides of the street. 
A', ir Stri-et. S.E. Street. 
2 East 1 East 

•) Steuart (c) Steuart 



600 Sansom SOI 

eOOMontg'ry 601 
617 
667 
701 



TOO Kearny 

732 Brookn 

800 Dupont 8 11 
900 Stockton 9J1 
lOOJ Powell 1001 
1100 Mason 11(11 
\'2M Taylor 1201 
1300 Jones 1301 
1400 Leavn'th 14J1 
1500 Hyde 1601 
1600 Larkin 1601 
17(10 Polk 1701 

18)0 VauNAvlSOl 

I'.tOO Franklin 

20(K1 Coiigli 2001 

2100 iJctavia 

22JO Lrvguiia 2231 
2*0 Hucbaiin — 
2400 Ohurcli 2401 
2500 Sancliez 2501 
2600 Xoe 2601 

2700 Castro 2701 



First 

Ecker 

Second 

N.Monfy 

Annie 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

Eifihth 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh 

Potter 

Brady 

Valencia 

Ouerrero 

Dolores 

Chiurch 
Sanchez 
Noe 
Castro 



100 Drumm 
200 Davis 
300 Front 
400 Battery 



101 Spear 
201 Main 
301 Beale 
401 Fremont 



Martliii Place, S b (417) 
Geary bet Mason and Tay- 
lor 

Mary, S s (921) MisBion bet 
Ktth and Sixth SE to How- 
ard 

Mary, or Maria, E andW 
s Chesley bet Bryant and 
Hariisou 

Mary Lane, S s (423) Bush 
bet Kearny and Dupont • 

Maryland, S s Solano bet 
Delaware and Louisiana 

Ma80U>X 8 Market bet Pow- 
ell and Taylor N to the bay 
East. Strnl. iVeM side. 
2 Market and Turk 1 
lOO Eddy 101 
aOO Ellis 201 
• Latliam Place 

Dikenian Place 217 

300 OFnrrell 301 

400 Gear>- 401 

Oak 40J 

800 Post 601 

600 Sutter 601 

700 Bush 701 

800 Pine 801 

900 California 901 

1000 Sacramento 1001 

Ewer Place 1011 

Mai Vina Place 1017 

1100 Clay 1101 

Matthew Place 1107 

1110 Sheppard 

1200 Wasiiington 1201 

1300 Jackson 1301 

1314 John ■ 

1400 Pacific 1401 

1500 Broadway 1501 

1600 Vallejo 1601 

1700 Green 1701 

1716 Winter Lane - — 

1800 Union 1801 

Kent 1809 

1900 Filbert 1901 

Valpa aiso 1911 

2000 Greenwich 2001 

Montgomery Av 
2100 Lombard 2101 

2200 Chestnut i201 

Water 

2300 Francisco 2301 

Vandewater 

2400 Bay 2401 

2500 North Point 2501 

2600 Beach 2601 

(c) Jefferson (e 

Masonic Avenne, N b 

Waller bet Lott and Ash- 
bury X to Point Lobos Av- 
enue 

MasssichnKcttti, S s Sono- 
ma E of Delaware 

Massasoit, from Cortez, S 
E to Franconla Avenue, B. 
H. 



Mnteo, W of Miguel from 
San Jose Road NW to 
Cherry 

Muttlievv Place.Ws (1107) 
Mason bet Clay aud Wash- 
ington 

Ala.VMell, N ■ Broadway 
bet LarKin and Polk N to 
VaUejo 
Mjiy Fl«»vver, E s Rose- 
craus bet Calif orniaAvenuo 
and Powhattan, B. H. 
McAlIiNter, jimction Mar- 
ket and J ones W to Mason- 
ic Avenue 
North. Street, Smith aide, 
2 Market and Jones 1 
100 Leavenworth 101 

200 Hyde 201 

300 Larkin 301 

400 Volk 401 

500 Van Ness Avenue 501 
600 Franklin 601 

700 Gough 701 

800 Uctavia 801 

900 Laguna 901 

1000 Buchanan 1001 

1100 Webster 1101 

1200 Fillmore 1201 

1300 Steiner 1301 

1400 Pierce 1401 

loOO Scott 1501 

too Devisadero 1601 

1700 Broderick 1701 

1800 Baker 1801 

1900 Lyon 1901 

2000 Lott 2001 

(e) Alasonic Avenue (i) 

.Mcl'lellan, from Califor- 
nia Avenue S to Cortland 
Avenue, B. H. 

McC'orniick. Ss (1421) Pa- 
cific bet Hyde and Larkin 

McDermott Place, W s 

(215) Jones bet Turk and 
Eddy 

McLjiren Litne, W s Fol- 
som bet 'Ibirteenth and 
Fourteenth 

Meachani Place, S « Post 
bet Hyde and Larjjin 

Mears, N s Point Loboil Av- 
enue bet Merrifield and 
First Avenue N to Laurel 
Hill Cemetery 

Medan Place, N s (504) 
Filbert bet Dupont and 
Stock on 

Meeks Place, W g Main 

bet Market and Mission 

Mellns, W g Fremont bet 
Mission and Howard 

Melvina Place {see Mal- 
vina) 

Merced, S s Thirtieth 8 to 

Laidley 

Mercer, from Cortland Av- 
enue S to Crescent Avenue, 
B. H. 

Merchant, W g East bet 

Clay aud Washington W to 

Kearny 

jVorfA. Street. South side. 

2 East 1 

(&) Drumm (6) 

{b) Davis (i) 

300 Front 301 

400 Battery 401 

500 Sansom 601 

000 Montgomery 601 

628 Dunbar Court 

(f) Kearny («•) 

Merrifield, N s Point Lo- 
bos Avenue bet Chase and 
Mears N to Laurel Hill 
Cemetery 

Merrill, Ns Silver Avenue 
bet Williamson and Goet- 
tingen 



Merrill, Wg Jones bot Val- 
lejo and Green W to Leav- 
enworth 

MerriniaC. E n Tonnessee 
nr South E to the Hay 

Metcair Place, Wk Lacu- 
na bet Post and Sutter 

Metra 1 fe I'lacCf X s Geary 
bftt Masou and Taylor 

.Micllitfan. S s Solano bet 
Georgia and Illinois 

Mid<lle, X B Pine Ut Web- 
8t<;r and Fillmore X to 
California 
Midway East, N s Fran- 
cisco bet DuiMjnt aud Stock- 
ton N to the bay 
MidM ay West, N » Fran- 
cisco l)et Stockton and Pow- 
ell a to tho bay 
Micnel, from Beinis near 
Fairmount SE to San Jose 
Road 
MileM t'onrl, N a (832) Cal- 
ifornia bet Stockton and 
Powell 
Miles Place, N s (928) Sac- 
ramento bet Stockton and 
Powell 
Miller Place. S s (827) Fol- 

som bet Fourth and Fifth 
Mills Place, W s (219) Du- 
pont bet Post and Sutter 
Minna, W s (118) First bet 

Mission and Xatoma 
Nor-thirist. Street. Suitthea^t. 
2 First 1 

100 Second 101 

New Montgomery 
200 Third 201 

300 Fourth 301 

400 Fifth 401 

5O0 Sixth 501 

600 Seventh 601 

■— Julia 

700 Eighth 701 

(b) Ninth (!>) 

Minna Place, W s Beale 
bet Mission and Howard 

Minnesota, from the bay 
bet Tennessee and Indiana 
S to Tulare 

Minnie, Ss Waller bet Ash- 
bury and Clayton 

Mission, W«Ea»t bet Mar- 
ket and Howard SW to 
Twelfth thence S to County 
Road 

Northtnest. Street. Southeast. 



2 


East 


1 


(r) 


Steuart 


M 


100 


Spear 


101 


200 


Main 


201 


3(H) 


Beale 


301 


4(H) 


Fremont 


401 


500 


First 


,501 




Ecker 


,. 


— ~ 


Sullivan Alley 


537 


570 


Anthony 


,« — 


600 


Second 

New Montgomery 


601 


H.'V) 


Annie 





700 


Third 


701 


800 


Foi'rth 


801 


9!K) 


Fifth 


901 





Mary 


921 


lOOO 


Sixth 


1001 


1100 


Seventh 
Mission Alley 


1101 


1200 


Eighth 


1201 




Laskie 





1300 


Ninth 


1.301 




Washington Avenue 





Granil Avenue 




\m) 


Tenth 


1401 


I5IK) 


Eleventh 


l.V)1 





Lafayette 




1000 


Potter 








Twelfth 


1601 




Brady 







Crocker 







Hermann 






JAMES G. STEELE & CO., Apothecaries, No. 316 Kearny Street. 



D. W. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, Wholesale and Retail, cor. Merchant and Men 



70 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



1700 

1800 
1900 
2000 

2100 

2200 
2300 
2400 
2500 
2600 
2700 
2800 
2900 
3'JOO 



Thirteenth 

RiiUey 

Erie Place 

Fourteenth 

Fifteenth 

Sixteenth 

GoMnian Place 

Seventeenth 

Eighteenth 

Nineteenth 

Twentieth 

Twenty-first 

Twenty-second 

Tw'enty-third 

Twenty-fourth 

Tweiity-filth 

Twenty-sixth 



1701 



1801 
1901 

2001 

2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2801 
2aoi 

3001 



Pi 



Vi 

m 



Ft 



V2 

1=: 



o 
cr> 

CO 

pC 

W 

W 
o 
n 

PI 
p^ 
p? 

El 
za 
PI 
o 

PI 
ca 
PI 



601 



701 
801 



901 
1001 



1101 



Mission Alley, NW a 

Mission bet Seventh and 
Eighth N to Jessie 

Mission and Orc.in 
Beat-ii gCoad, from junc- 
tion of Market and Seven- 
teenth S\V to Ocean View 
House 

Mission Avenue. S a Sev- 
enteenth bet Valencia and 
GueiTero 

Mission I*l.i7-a, NWs Mis- 
sion bet Potter and Ridley 

Mississippi, from the bay 
bet Pennsylvania and Texas 
S to Tulare 

Missouri, from the bay bet 
Texas and Connecticut S to 
Tulare 

Monr(»e. N s (610) Bush bet 
Stockton and Powell N to 
Pine 

Montcalm, from Califor- 
nia Avenue bet Wolfe and 
Cortez E to Isabel, B. H. 

Monteznnia, from Coso 
Avemie E to Folsom, B. H. 

Montsomery, Na Market 
bet Kearny and Sansom N 
to the bay 

East. Street. West side. 

2 Market and Post 1 
100 Sutter 101 

200 Bush 201 

300 Pme 301 

Sumner 319 

400 California 401 

500 Sacramento 501 

518 Commercial 513 

600 Clay 601 

622 Merchant 613 

700 Washington 701 

(f) Montgomery At 

800 Jackson 801 

806 Gold 

900 Pacific 901 

• Montgomery Court 915 

1000 Broadway 1001 

■ Hinckley 

1100 Vallejo 1101 

1112 Jackson Place 

1200 Green 1201 

Moulton Place 

1300 Union 1301 

■ Montgomery Place 1311 

1314 Alta Place 1315 

1400 Filbert 1401 

1500 Greenwich 1501 

1600 Lomljard 1601 

(h) CJhestnut 1701 

(t) Francisco (e) 

Montsoniery Avenue, 

from NW cor Montgomer>' 
and Wasliington NW to the 
bay 
Northeast. Street. Southwest. 
2 Mont and Wash 1 

Gibb 

100 Jackson 101 

Kearny 
200 Pacific 201 

Dupont Alley 

300 Broadway 301 

Dupont 
400 Vallejo 401 

Stockton 
500 Green 501 



600 Union 
Powell 
700 Filbert 
800 Greenwich 

Maaon 
900 Lombard 
1000 Chestnut 

Taylor 
1100 Francisco 

Jones 
1200 Bay 1201 

1300 North Point 1301 

Leavenworth 
1400 Beach 1401 

Monlgoniery Court, W 

a (915) Montgomery bet Pa- 
cific and Broadway 

Montgomery Place, AV s 

(13111 Montgomery bet Un- 
ion and Filbert 

Moore, N a Union bet Hyde 

and Larkin 
Moore Place (we Torrens 

Court) 
Morel Place, N s (1420) 

Pacific bet Larkin and Hyde 

Morev Alley, N s (730) 
Broadway bet Stockton and 
Powell 

Morse, N s (406) Bush b^t 
Kearny and Dupont N to 
Pine 

Morse Place, S s (1205) 
Broadway bet Hyde and 
Leavenworth 

Morton (late St. Mark's 
Place), Ws (19) Kearny bet 
Post and Geary W to Stock- 
ton 

Moss, S s (1059) Howard bet 
Sixth and Seventh SE to 
Folsom 



Moulton, W a Buchanan 
bet Greenwich and Lom- 
bard W to Steiner 
Moulton Place, Ws Mont- 
gomery bet Union and 
Green 
Mojiltrie, from Cortland 
Avenue to Crescent Av- 
enue, B. H. 
Myrtle Avenue, W a Lar- 
kin bet O'Farrell and Geary 
Na|>a (now Twentieth), from 
the bay bet Butte and Shas- 
ta W to Douglass 
Xapolei>n, from Orleans E 

to Riggs 
>'atoma, Ws (146) First bet 

Howard and Minna 
Northwest. Street. Sotttheast. 
2 First 1 

100 Second 101 

New Montgomery 
(b) Third (b) 

(b) Fourth (b) 

400 Fifth 401 

500 Sixth 501 

600 Seventh 601 

700 Eighth 701 

(b) Ninth (b) 

Navy now (Twenty-sixth), W 
s Bryant Avenue bet Twen- 
ty-filth and Twenty-seventh 
W to Douglass 
SfebrasUa, from Mission 
Creek bet Vermont and 
Utah S to Yuba 
Xccropolis Avenue, W s 
Dolores bet Sixteenth and 
Seventeenth 
lS'eva«Ia, from the bay bet 
Humboldt and Sonoma W 
to Potrero Avenue 
\eva«Ia, S s Folsom bet 
Eleventh and Twelfth SE 
to Harrison 
New Anthony, N g Mia- 
aion bet First and Second 



>e>v Montgomery. S b 

Market bet Second and 
Third SE to Howard 
Southire.'st. Street. Northeast. 
2 Market 1 

Stevenson 15 

30 Jessie 29 

1(XJ Mission 101 

Minna 
Natoma 
(p) Howard (e) 

Xew Orleans Avenue, 
N s Green bet Hyde and 
Leavenworth 
Xew Pacific, N s Mission 

bet Eighth and Ninth 
Xewell, N s (608) Lombard 

bet Mason and Chestnut 
Xewliall, W 8 Stockton bet 

Lombard and Chestnut 
Xineteenth (late Eagle),W 
s Harrison bet Eighteenth 
and Twentieth W to Doug- 
lass 
Xinth (late Johnston), S a 
Market bet Eighth and 
Tenth SE to Mission Creek 
Soi'thvest. Street. Northeast. 
2 Market 1 

Stevenson 

Jessie 

100 Mission 

Minna 

Natoma 

200 Howard 

Tehama 

Clementina 

300 F.dsom 
400 Harrison 
500 Bryant 
600 Brannan 

Xobili Alley, E a (1506) 
Dupont bet Union and Fil- 
bert 

XoWe Alley (no-w Reed 
Place), S a (331) Green bet 
Montgomery and Kearny 

Xoble Place, W a (236) 
Third bet Tehama and Fol- 
som 

Xoe, S a Ridley bet Castro 
and Sanchez 



101 



201 



301 
401 
501 
601 



2000 Scott 2001 

2100 Deviaatlero 2101 

2200 Broderick 2201 

2300 Baker 23(Jl 

Xorwicii, W a Folsom bet 
Montezuma and Prospect 
Avenue, B. H. 

Xye, from Cadwallader N to 
Islais Creek 

O'Connell Place, Na Val- 
lejo bet Powell and Mason 

O'Farrell, junction Market 
and Dupont bet Geary and 
Ellis W to Calvary Ceme- 
tery 
North. Street. South side. 
2 Market and Dupont 1 

14 Bagley Place 

2S Julia Court 
lOJ Stockton 
200 Powell 

Carlos Place 

228 O'Farrell AUey 
300 Mason 

Raphael Place 
400 Taylor 
420 William 
5o0 Jones 
600 Leavenworth 

Ada Court 

Hyde 

Larkin 

Polk 



700 
800 
900 
1000 
1100 
1200 
1300 
1400 
1500 
1600 
1700 
1800 
1900 
2000 
2100 
2200 
(e) 



Van Ness Avenue 1001 



Franklin 

Gough 

O eta via 

Lagmia 

Buchanan 

Webster 

Fillmore 

Steiner 

Pierce 

Scott 

Devieadero 

Broderick 

St. Joseph's Av 



1101 
1201 
1301 
1401 
1501 
1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 
20U1 
2101 
2201 
(t) 



Xoonan Alley, S a Vallejo 

bet Stockton and Powell 
Xoonan Avenne, E s 

Eighth bet Howard and 
Folsom 
Xorman, from Orleans E 
to Rhode Island nr Islais 
Creek 
Xortli yivenue, from Coso 
Avenue SW to Holly Park, 
B. H. 
Xortli Park Lane, W a 
Second bet Bryant and 
Brannan 
Xortli Point. W s Kearny 
bet Beach and Bay W to 
Presidio Reservation 
North. Street. South side. 
2 Kearny 

((•) Dupont (c) 

100 Stockton 101 

200 Powell 201 

300 Mason 301 

400 Taylor 401 

500 Jones 501 

Montgomery Av 
600 Leavenworth 601 

700 Hyde 701 

800 Larkin 801 

J05 Polk 901 

1000 Van Ness Avenue 1001 



1100 Franklin 

1200 Gough 

1300 Octavia 

1400 Laguna 

1500 Buchanan 

1600 AVebster 

1700 Fillmore 

1800 Steiner 

1900 Pierce 



1101 
1201 
1301 
1401 
1501 
1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 



O'Farrell Alley, N s (228) 
O'Farrell bet Powell and 
Mason 

Oak, jxmction Market and 
Van Ness Avenue bet Fell 
and Page AV to Stanyan 

North. Street. 'South side. 

2 Mkt and Van Ness Av 1 

iOO Franklin 101 

200 Gough 201 

300 Octavia 301 

400 Laguna 401 

500 Buchanan 501 

600 Webster 601 

700 Filhnore 701 

800 Steiner 801 

901 Pierce 901 

1000 Scott 1001 

1100 Devisadero 1101 

1200 Broderick 1201 

1300 Baker 1301 

Oak, W s (409) Mason bet 
Geary and Post W to Tay- 
lor 

Oak, or Oak Grove Av- 
enue, S s (953) Harrison 
bet Fifth and Sixth SE to 
Brjant 

Ocean House an«l 
i;4'a«'h Road, frm Point 
Lobos Road S and E to 
Ocean View House 

Ocean House Road (Cen- 
tral), from McAllister SW 
to Ocean View House 

Ocean House Road (Mis- 
sion), from Mission Dolores 
SAV to Ocean View House 

Ocean House Road (old), 
from San Jose Road nr In- 
dustrial School AV to Ocean 
View House 



II' 



SMITHSONIAN BATHS, Electro, Russian, Turkish, Medical, and Toilet, 635 Ca 



p. VAU SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



71 



Ortavia, N 8 Market bet 
Guiii,'h and Laguna N to 
the bay 



East 


Street. West side. 


2 


Miirket and Waller 1 


100 


HuiKht . 
• Rose Avenue 


101 


200 


I'aae 

Lilly Avenue 


201 


300 


Oak 

Hickory Avenue 


301 


400 


Fell 

Linden Avenue 


401 


500 


Haj'es 

Ivy Avenue 


601 


600 


(J rove 

Birch Avenue 


601 


700 


Fulton 
Ash Avenue 


701 


800 


McAllister 
Locust Avenue 


801 


900 


Tyler 

Jefferson Square 


901 


1100 


Kd.ly 

Willow Avenue 


1101 


laoo 


Ellis 

Ulive Avenue 


1201 


1300 


OFarrell 
Myrtle Avenue 


1301 


14U0 


Cieary 

Cedar Avenue 


1401 


1500 


Post 

Walnut Avenue 


1501 


1600 


Sutter 
Feru Avenue 


1601 


17(K) 


Bush 


1701 


1800 


I'ine 


1801 


1900 


California 


1901 


20J0 


.Sacramento 
Lafayette Square 


2001 


2'JOU 


■Washington 


2201 


23U0 


Jackson 


231)1 


24(K) 


Pacilic 


2401 


2500 


Broadway 


2o()l 


2600 


Vallejo 


2601 


2(00 


Green 


2/01 


aW)(( 


t'uion 


2Hi)l 


29(K) 


Filbert 


2901 


3000 


Greenwich 


3001 


31(HI 


Lombard 


3101 


3200 


Chestnut 


3201 


331)0 


Francisco 


;«oi 


34o;» 


Bay 


:«()] 


3500 


Xorth Point 


3501 


3600 


Beach 


3o(i] 


37(H) 


Jefferson 


3701 


3800 


Tonquin 


3801 


(e) 


Lewis 


(e) 



Ohio, X s (418) Pacific bet 
Montgomery and Sansom 
N t6 Broadway 

Old Hickory, £ 8 Laurel 

Avenue nr Crescent Ave- 
nue K to San Bruno Road 

Old Sail Jose Koad, 

from junction Valencia and 
Twenty-second SWto Coun- 
ty Line 

Olive Avenue, W s Lar- 
kin bet Ellis and O'Farrell 

Olnistead, Ws San Bruno 
Koad S of Dwight, U. M. T. 

Oliiey Place, N s King 
bet Second and Third 

Oneida Place, S s (827) 
Sacramento bet Stockton 
and Dupont 

Oregon, W a East bet 
Washington and Jackson 
W to Battery 

North. Street. 
2 East 
100 Drumm 
200 Davis 
ib) Front 
(e) Battery 



South Side. 

1 

101 

201 

M 



Orleans, from Kansas Sto 
Islais Creek 



Orseuiii.s, from Byrne Sto 
Salome 



Oxl'«»rd, S s Silver Avenue 
bet Cambridge and Harv- 
ard. IT. M. T. 

Pacific, Ws East bet Jack- 
son ami Broadway W to 
First Avenue 



North. Street. South Side. 


2 


East 


1 


(c) 


Dnirani 


101 


100 


I>avi3 


200 


Front 


201 


300 


Battery 


301 


400 


Sansom 


401 


413 


(Jhi.) 


. 


500 


Montgomery 


501 


600 


Kearny 
Montgomery Av 


601 


632 


Lestrade Place 








Bartlett Alley 


641 


700 


Dupont 


701 


706 


PaciHc Alley 








Sullivan Alley 


719 


722 


EUick Alley 





800 


Stockton 


801 


806 


Virginia Place 







Virginia 


lis 


900 


Powell 


901 


906 


Keyes Place 




922 


Scott Place 





1000 


Mason 


1001 


1016 


Salmon 








Auljurn 


1017 


1024 


Himmelmann PI 




1100 


Taylor 


1101 


1200 


Jones 


1201 


1300 


Leavenworth 


1301 





Burgoyue Place 


1307 


1400 


Hyde 


1401 


1420 


Morel Place 








McCormick 


1421 


1500 


Larkiu 


1501 


1600 


Polk 


1601 


1700 


Van Ness Avenue 1701 


1800 


Franklin 


1801 


1900 


Gough 


1901 


2000 


Octavia 


2001 


2100 


Laguna 


2101 


2200 


Buchanan 


2201 


2300 


Webster 


2301 


2400 


Fillmore 


2401 


2500 


Steiner 


2501 


2600 


Pierce 


2601 


2700 


Scott 


2701 


2800 


Devisadero 


2801 


2900 


Broderick 


2901 


3000 


Baker 


3001 



Pacific Alley, N s (706) 
Pacific bet Dupont and 
Stockton 

Pacific Avenue — That 
part of Pacilic Street ex- 
tending from Larkin to 
First Avenue ; the, num- 
bers continue, however, in 
regular order from the 
commencement of Pacific 
Street 

Page, junction Franklin 
and Market bet Haight 
and Oak W to Stanyan 

North. Street. South Side. 
2 Market and Franklin 1 



100 


Gough 


101 


200 


Octavia 


201 


300 


Laguna 


301 


400 


Buchanan 


401 


500 


Webster 


501 


600 


Fillmore 


601 


700 


Steiner 


701 


800 


Pierce 


801 


900 


Scott 


901 


1000 


Devisadero 


1001 


1100 


Broderick 


1101 


1200 


Baker 


1201 



Park, (now Twenty-fourth) 
W 8 Potrero Avenue bot 
Twenty-third and Twenty- 
fifth W to Douglass 

Park Aveiine, S a McAl- 
lister bet Jones and Leav- 
enworth SW to Larkin 

Park Avenue. Ss (969) 
Harrison bet Fifth and 
Sixth SE to Bryant 

Park Avenue, inclosing 
Holly Park SWs Bernal 
Heights 

Park Lane, S s South 
I'ark bet Second and Third 
S to Townsend 

i'ark Place, Ea (313) Sec- 
ond bet Folsom and Har- 
rison 

Pai'ker Avenue, N a 

Fulton nr Shrader N to 
Point Loboa Avenue 

i'alterson, E s Bernal 
Heights bet San Bruno 
Road and Bernal 

Paul, Ss Crescent Avenue 
nr San Bruno Road 

Pearl, S s Market bet Va- 
lencia and Guerrero S to 
RicUey 

Pennsyl vania Avenue, 

from the bay bet Iowa and 
Mississippi S to Tulare 

Perine, W s Steiner bet 
California and Sacramento 
W to Pierce 

Perry, W s Vassar Place 
bet Harrison and Bryant 
W to Fifth 

Northwest. Street. Southeast. 

2 Vassar Place 1 

100 Third 101 

200 Fourth 201 

(e) Fifth (f) 

Petaluuia Avenue, 

from Point Lobos Avenue 
in: Toll Gate 

Pfeiflfer, W s Dupont bet 
Francisco and Chestnut W 
to Stockton 

Pierce, N s Waller bet 

Steiner and Scott N to the 
bay 



Palmer, from junction 
Cheneiy and Miguel to 
Bartlett 

Palmer Alley, Ws (809) 
Kearny bet Jackson and 
Washington 

Panlani, Es (1010) Leav- 
enworth bet Pine and Cal- 
ifornia 



Mast Street 

2 • Waller 

100 Haight 

200 Page 

300 Oak 

400 FeU 

500 Hayes 

Alamo Square 

700 Fulton 

800 McAllister 

900 Tvler 

1000 Turk 

1100 Eddy 

1200 Elhs 

1300 OFarreU 

1400 Geary 

Hamilton Square 

1500 Post 

1600 Sutter 

1700 Bush 

1800 Pine 

1900 California 

Perine 

2000 Sacramento 

2100 Clay 

Alta Plaza 

2300 Jackson 

2400 Pacific 

2500 Broadway 

2600 Vallejo 

2700 Green 

2800 Union 

2900 Filbert 

3000 Greenwich 



West Side. 
1 
101 
201 
301 
401 
501 

701 
801 
901 
1001 
1101 
1201 
1301 
1401 



1501 
1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 

2001 
2101 

2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2801 
2901 
3001 



3100 


Lombard 


3101 


32(X) 


Chestnut 


3201 


3300 


Francisco 


3301 


3400 


Bay 


3401 


3500 


North Point 


3501 


3600 


Beach 


3601 


3/00 


J efferaon 


3701 


3800 


Tonquin 


3801 


('■) 


Lewis 


(e) 



Pierce Ko^v, S a Union 
bet Stockton and Dupont 

Pike or Waverly "Plaice, 

N s (810) Sacramento bet 
Stockton and Dupont N to 
Washington 

Pinckney Place, N s 

(520) Broadway bet Kearny 
and Dupont N to Vallejo 

Pine, junction Market and 
Davis bet California and 
Bush W to Laurel Hill 
Cemetery 

North. Street. South Side. 



2 

100 
200 
300 



Market and Davis 

Front 

Battery 

Sansom 

Laura Place 

Montgomery 

Russ Alley 

Belden 

Kearny 

Morse 

Central Place 

St. Mai-y Place 

Quincy 

Dupont 

Stockton 

Joice 

Monroe 

Powell 

Mason 

Jane Place 

Taylor 

Jones 

Leavenworth 

Hyde 

Larkin 

Polk 



1 
101 
201 
301 
335 
401 
407 
435 
501 
505 
515 

527 
601 

701 

725 
801 
901 

1001 
1101 
1201 
1301 
1401 
1501 



Van Ness Avenue 1601 



520 
532 
600 
700 
710 

800 

900 

908 
1000 
1100 
1200 
1300 
1400 
1500 
1600 
1700 
1800 
1900 
2000 
2100 
2200 

2300 
2400 
2500 
2600 
2700 
2800 
2900 
3000 
ie) 

Pinkliam Place, W s 

Eighth bet Howard and 
Folsom 

Plxley Place, W s Fill- 
more bet Fdbert and 
Greenwich W to Steiner 

Pleasant, (late RUey) W 
s (1115) Taylor bet Sacra- 
mento and Clay W to Jones 

Pocalic»nta8. N s Califor- 
nia Avenue nr Lyon N to 
North Avenue, B. H. 

Point I/Obos Avenue or 
'roll Koa«l, from termi- 
nation of Geary W to the 
ocean 

Polk, N s Market bet Lar- 
kin and Van Ness Avenue 
N to the bay 

East. Street. West Side. 

2 Market and FeU 1 

100 Hayes 101 

200 Grove 201 



Franklin 

Gough 

Octavia 

Laguna 

Buchanan 

Webster 

Middle 

Fillmore 

Steiner 

Pierce 

Scott 

Devisadero 

Broderick 

Baker 

Lyon 

Central Avenue 



1701 
1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 

2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2801 
2901 
3001 
ie) 



JAMES Q. STEELE & CO., Chemists, removed to No. 316 Kearnj St. 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Hetail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merchar 



72 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



o 



O 

,43 



o 
o 
o 

O 



ti-f 
o 

ta 

<D 

ta 
ta 
o 

<1 



o 

o 
o 

f4 

H 
PI 

ca 
coi 

n 
ca 

t« 
ca 
<J 
o 
(3 

o 
n 

1^ 

l-H 

o 

Pi 

1^ 

t^ 



300 Fulton 
400 McAllister 

locust Avenue 
500 Tyler 

Elm Avenue 
600 Turk 

Laurel Avenue 
700 i;d.ly 

Willow Avcnuo 
800 Ellis 

Olive Avenue 
900 O'Fiirrell 

Myrtle Avenue __,„, k,,^, 

1000 Geary 1001 "^"f 

Cellar Avenue , ,,^ 

1100 Foft 1101 100 

Walnut Avenue 2J0 

1200 Sutter 1201 300 

Fern Avenue 4J0 

1300 Bush 1301 50O 

Austin 51= 

1400 Pin« 1401 600 

1500 California 1501 616 

1600 Sacramento 1601 700 

1700 Clay I'^^l 800 

1800 Washington 1801 900 

19110 Jackson 1901 1000 

2000 Pacific 2001 UOO 

2100 Broadway 2101 1200 

2200 Vallejo 2201 

2-»00 Green 2301 1218 

2400 Union 2401 ISOO 

2500 Filbert 2501 1400 

2600 Greenwich 2601 1500 

2 TOO Lombard 2701 1600 

2300 Chestnut 2801 1700 

2J00 Francisco 2901 

3000 Bay 3001 ISOO 

3100 North Pohit 3101 1900 

3200 Beach 3201 2000 

3330 Jefferson 3301 2100 

[d) Tonquin 3401 2200 

(i) Lewis . . 

2300 

PolU Lane, E s (1232) 2400 

Stockton bet Broadway ^^^) 

and Pacific (e) 

Pollarrt Place, N a (420) 
Vallejo bet Kearny and 
Dupont 

Porter, S S Crescent Av- 
enue bet Decatur and 
Bache 

Porlsitiouth Sfliiare, 

bet Washington, Kearuy, 
Clay and Brenharo Place 

Post, junction Market and 
Montgomery bet Sutter 
and Gear}' W to Laurel 
Hill Cemetery 
North. St ret t. South Side. 
2 Market and Mont 1 
12 Lick Place • — - 

100 Kearny 101 

112 Gardner Alley 

200 Duponf 201 

390 Stockton 301 

400 Powell 401 

500 Mason 501 

600 Taylor 601 

. William 617 

700 Jones 701 

800 Leavenworth 801 

900 Hyde 901 

Meacham Place 

Larkin 1001 

Polk 1101 



I Potrero Avenue, from 
Mission Creek bet Utah 
and Hampshire S to Ser- 
pentine Avenue 

Potter, S 8 Market bet 
Eleventh and Brady SE 
to Mission 

P»>veII, N « Market bet 

Stockton and Mason N to 
the bay 



Street. West Side 
Market and Eddy 1 
Ellis 
OFarrell 
OeaiT 
Post 
Sutter 

Ankeuy Place 
Bu8h 

Fella Place 
Pine 

(Jalitomia 
Sacramento 
Clay 

Washington 
Jackson 
John 

Caroline Place 
Pacific 
Broadway 
VaUejo 
Green 
Union 

Montgomery Av 
Filbert 
Greenwich 
Lombard 
Chestnut 
Franciflco 
Vandewater 
Bay 

North Point 
Beach 
Jefferson 



101 
201 
301 
401 
501 

601 

701 

801 
feOl 
1001 
1101 
1201 
1211 

1301 
1401 
1501 
1601 
1701 

1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 

2301 

2401 

2501 

ie) 



1000 
1100 
1200 
1300 
1400 
1500 
1600 
1700 
1800 
1900 
2000 
2100 
2200 
2300 



Van Ness Avenue 1201 



Franklm 1301 

Gough 1401 

Octa.ia 1501 

Laguna 1601 

Bucli:inan 1701 

Webster 1801 

Fillmore 1901 

Steiner 2001 

Pierce 2101 

Scott 2201 

. Devisadero 2301 

2*00 Broderick 2401 

2500 Baker 2501 

20O0 Lyon 2601 

(<■) Central Avenue (t) 

Post OIBce Plaee. N s 

Washington bet Sansom 
and Battery 



Powell Avenue. Wb Cal- 
lifomia Avenue W to San 

Jose Road 

Povvliattan, from North 
Avenue E to Winslow, B. 
H, 

Pratt Court. N s (812) Cal- 
ifornia bet Stockton and 
Powell 

Precita Avenue, from 
San Jose Road nr Twenty 
seventh E to San Bruno 
Road 

Prentiss, from California 
Avenue S to Cortland Av- 
enue, B. H. 

Presidio Roa<t. from Lar- 
kin nr Pacific to the Pre- 
sidio 

Pretell, E of San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City HaU 

Price, (now Eighth) S s 
Market bet Seventh and 
Ninth SE to Townsend 

Priest, N s Clay bet Jones 
and Leavenworth N to 
Washington 

Princeton, S s Silver Av- 
enue bet University and 
Amherst, U. M. T. 

Prinsle Court, N g Green- 
wich bet Montgomery and 
Sansom 

Prospect Avenue, from 
Cortland Avenue NE to 
CIoso Avenue, Bernal 
Heights 

Prospect Place, N s (820) 
Cali f ornia bet Stockton and 
Powell N to Clay 



Pulaski, from Cortland 
1 Avenue 8 to Orescent Av- 
enue. B. H. 

Putnam, from Cortland 
Avenue S to Crescent Av- 
enue, B. H. 

Piitxinan, E of San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City 
Hall 

Uuincy, N s (532) Pine bet 
Dupont and Kearny N to 
California 

Quincy Place, S s (527) 
Pine bet Kearny and Du- 
pont 

<)ninn, W s Valencia bet 
KiUley and Fourteenth W 
to Guerrero 

Quinn Place,E 8 Valen- 
cia bet Fourteenth and Kid- 
ley 

Knilroart Avenue, E s 

Dolores bet Seventeenth 
and Eighteenth • 

Railroad Avenue, from 
Kentucky SW to iiay View 
Park 

Railroad Avenue, from 
Islais Oreek SW to Silver 
Avenue 

Railway, E s Dolores bet 
Seventeenth and Eight- 
eenth 

Randal, Ws San Jose Road 
nr TUinieth W to Palmer 

Randall Place, S a Green- 
wich bet Hyde and Leav- 
enworth 

Randolph, nr San Miguel 

Station 

Raphael Place, N s 

OFarrell bet Mason and 
Taylor 

Ransch, S s (1127) Howard 
bet Seventh and Eighth 



K' 



Sontku-est. Street. Northeast. 

2 Folaom 1 

(b) Harrison {'A 

aOO Bryant 2)1 

300 Brannan 301 

(.) Townsend (t) 

Ritter, S s Hanison bet 
Seventh and Eighth 

Roach Alley, N s Filbert 
bet Taylor and Jones N to 
Greenwich 

Robl>insPlace,K8Union 

bet Kearny and Dupont 

Ron«lel Avenue (or Place) 
8 B Sixteenth bet Valencia 
and Mission S to Seven- 
teenth 

Rose, S s Chenery nr Castro 

9 
Rose, S B Crescent Avenue 
8 to Case 

Rose Avenue, NW » Mar- 
ket bet Haigbt and Page 

Rosecrans, from Califor- 
nia S to Powhattan, B.H. 

Ross, N s (82S) Washington 
bet Stockton and Dupont 

Rowland Alley, S s 

Broadway bet Montgomery 
and Kearny 

Rnger, E of San Bruno 
Eoad 4 miles from City 
HaU 

Russ, S B (1041) Howard bet 
Sixth and Seventh 

Russ Alley, N 9 Bush bet 
Montgomery and Kearny 

Russell, W 8 Hyde bet 
Union and Green 

Sacramento, junction 
Market and East bet Clay 
and California W to First 
Avenue \k 



Reed. N a Clay bet Jones 
and Leavenworth N to 
Washington 

Reed (late Noble) Place, 
S s (3311 Green bet Keainy 
and Montgomery 

RlKHle Island, from Mis- 
sion Creek bet DeHaro and 
Kansas S to Tulare 

Ki«iiniond,WH(211) Front 
bet Sacramento and Cali- 
fornia 

Richards, W b San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City 
HaU 

Ridley, W s Mission bet 
Heniiann and Fourteenth 

Rigas, from Napoleon S to 
Schneider 

Riley (now Pleasant), W s 
(1115) Taylor bet Sacra- 
mento and Clay W to Jones 

Rincon Court. W s Main 
bet Folsom and Harrison 

Rincon Place, S s (551) 
HaiTison bet First and Sec- 
ond 

RinK(»ld, W s Eighth bet 
Folsom and Harrieon W to 
Nhith 

Ritch, S s (717) Folsom bet 
Third and Fourth SE to 
Townsend 



Nm-th. Street. South Side. 
2 Market and East 1 

100 Drumm 101 

200 Davis 201 

300 Front 301 

400 Battery 40l 

500 Sansom oOl 

522 Leidesdorff 525 

600 Montgomery 601 

-— Webb C29 

700 Kearny "Ol 

800 Dupont S91 

810 Waverly Place 

Oneida Place 827 

Brooklyn Place S33 

900 Stockton 901 

924 Prospect Place 923 

928 Miles Place 

1000 Powell 1001 

Gustavus 1013 

1014 Tay — - 

1100 Mason HOI 

1114 Verba Buena — ; 

Cushman Hlf 

1200 Taylor 1201 

1300 Jones 1301 

— - Ljsett Place 1311! 

1320 Leroy Place 131;. 

1400 Leavenworth 1401 - 

1403 KimbaU — - ' 

1500 Hyde 150 • 

1600 Larkin It-Ol I 

1700 Polk 17011 
1800 Van Ness Avenue 1^0] . 

1900 Franklm 1901 1 

2000 Gough 2^101 1 

2100 Octavia 2101 1 

2200 Laguna 220! I 

2300 Buchanan 230 ; 

2400 Webster -'40. ; 

2500 Fillaiore 2a0: 

2600 Steiner 2t>0i 

2700 Pierce 270! 

2S00 Scott 280. 



BEAMISH'S— Nucleus Bldg, Third & Market, Shirts & Men's Furnishing Goo 



p. VAIT SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. f 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



73 



2900 


Derisadero 


2901 


31)00 


Broilerick 


3001 


3100 


Baker 


3101 



Silflowa, Ws Old San Jose 
Road nr San Miguel Sta- 
tion 

Salinas Avenue, W s 

Railroad Avenue bet Thir- 
ty-third and Thirty-fourth 
avenues W to San Bruno 
Road 

Salmon. N s (1016) Pacific 
bet Maaon and Taylor N to 
Broadway 

Salmon Place, E s Lar- 
kin bet Broadway and Val- 
lejo 

Salmon Place, N s Green 
bet Mason and Taylor 

Salome, from Islais Creek 
NE to Baker Avenue 

Saiuoset, from California 
Avenue bet Cortez and 
Cabot SB to Franconia 
Avenue B. H. 

San Brnno Road, from 
termination of Potrero 
Avenue S to the County 
Line 

San Jose Avenue. S s 

Twenty-second bet Valen- 
cia and Guerrero S to Thir- 
tieth 

San .lose Road, or 
I'onnty Road, from 

termination Mission S\V 
to County Line 

San Lnis Alley. S s (711) 
Jackson bet Dupont and 
Stockton 

San Miguel Station, 

San Jose Road 5 miles 
from City HaU 

Sanctaez, S s Ridley bet 
Church and Jfoe 

San»ioni, X s Market bet 
Montgomery and Battery 
N to the Bay 

East. Street. West Sidt. 
2 Market and Sutter 1 



100 


Bush 


1 


2U0 


Pine 


201 


'MO 


California 


301 


■iU 


HaUeck 


313 


400 


Sacramento 


401 


416 


Commercial 


417 


500 


Clay 


601 


514 


Merchant 


515 


600 


Washington 


601 


VOO 


Jackson 


701 


. 


Gold 


705 


800 


Pacific 


801 


900 


Broadway 


901 


1000 


Vallejo 


1001 


11(K» 


Green 


1101 


laoo 


Union 
Alta Place 


1201 


i3'J0 


Filbert 


1301 


1400 


Greenwich 


1401 


Id) 


Lombard 


1501 


M 


Chestnut 


ie) 



Santa Clara, from the 
bay bet Sixteenth and 
Mariposa W to Harrison 

Santa Rosa Avenue, E s 

Henderson Avenue bet 
Point Lobos Avenue and 
B, E to Masonic Avenue 

Sclieerer Place, W s 

Mason bet Post and Sut- 
ter 

Schneider, from Islais 
Creek E to Seventh Av- 



Schnyler, from Cortland 
Avenue S to Crescent Av- 
enue, B. H. 

Scotland, Ns (724| FUbert 
between Powell and Ma- 
sou N to Greenwich 

Scott, N s Ridley bet Pierce 
and Devisadero N to the 
bay 



East. 
2 

100 

200 

300 

400 

500 

600 

700 

800 

900 

1000 

1100 

1200 

1300 

1400 

1500 

1600 

1700 

1800 

1900 

2000 

2100 

2200 

2300 

2400 

2500 

2600 

2700 

2800 

2900 

3000 

3100 

3200 

3300 

3400 

3500 

3600 

3700 

3800 

3900 

(e) 



Scott, from North Avenue 
S to Cortland Avenue, 
B. H. 

Scott Avenue, from Sil- 
ver Avenue SE to Rail- 
road Avenue, South S. F. 

Scott Place, N s (922) Pa- 
cific bet Powell and Mason 

Second, S s Market bet 
First and Third SE to 
the bay 

SouthweM. Street. Northeast. 



. street. West Side. 


Ridley 


1 


Waller 


101 


Haight 


201 


Page 


301 


Oak 


401 


Fell 


501 


Hayes 


601 


Grove 


701 


Fulton 


801 


McAllister 


901 


Tyler 


1001 


Turk 


1101 


Eddy 


1201 


Ellis 


1301 


OFarreU 


1401 


Geary 


1501 


Post 


1601 


Sutter 


1701 


Bush 


1801 


Pine 


1901 


California 


2001 


Sacramento 


2101 


Clay 


2201 


Washington 


2301 


Jackson 


2401 


Pacific 


2501 


Broadway 


2601 


Vallejo 


2701 


Green 


2801 


Union 


2901 


Filbert 


3001 


Greenwich 


3101 


Lombard 


3201 


Chestnut 


3301 


Francisco 


3401 


Bay 


3501 


North Point 


3601 


Beach 


3701 


Jefferson 


3801 


Tonquin 


3901 


Lewis 


ie) 



2 


Market 


1 


20 


Stevenson 


21 


26 


Jessie 


(b) 


100 


Mission 


101 


lis 


Minna 


117 


i;<K 


Natoma 


137 


2110 


Howard 


201 


218 


"Tehama 


219 


(M 


Clementina 


233 


300 


Folsom 


301 





Park Place 


313 


32fi 


Vernon Place 




4<K) 


Harrison 


401 


428 


Silver 





.501» 


Bryant 


501 


516 


South Park 





. 


DeBoom 


533 


m) 


Brannan 


601 


700 


Townsend 


701 


(e) 


Berry 


(«) 



Serpentine Avenue. 

from Mission nr Twenty- 
sixth E to San Bruno Road 

Seventeentb, (late Cor- 
bett) W 8 Harrison bet 
Sixteenth and Eighteenth 
W to Douglass 

Seventh, (late Harris) S 
8 Market bet Sixth and 
Eighth SE to the bay 

Southwest. Street. Northeast. 



Second Avenue, S s Six- 
teenth bet Valencia and 
Guerrero S to Seventeenth 

SeUna Place, N s (716) 
California bet Stockton 
and Dupont 



2 


Market 


1 


12 


Stevenson 


11 


38 


Jessie 




100 


Mission 

Minua 

Natoma 


101 


200 


Howard 


201 


300 


Folsom 


301 


306 


Drury Lane 
Cleaveland 




400 


Harrison 


401 


500 


Bryant 


501 


600 


Brannan 


601 


700 


Towsend 
King 


701 


800 


Berry 
Channel 


801 





Hooper 


901 





Irwin 







HubbeU 


1001 





South 





Sej'mour Avenue, N s 

Tyler bet Scott ana Devi- 
sadero N to Tiurk 

Shakspeare, from Isabel 
S to Hope, B. H. 

Sharp Place, S s Union 
bet Leavenworth and 
Hyde 

Shasta, from the bay bet 
Sierra and Napa W to Po- 
trero Avenue 

Sheppard Place, E s 

(lllu) Mason bet Clay and 
Washington 

Sheridan, E s Tenth bet 
Folsom and Harrison 

Sherman, S s (1039) Fol- 
som bet Sixth and Seventh 

Sherman, S s EUis bet 
Webster and Fillmore 

Sherman, S s Seventeenth 
bet Castro and Diamond 
S to Twenty-second 

Sherwood Place, E s 

(131) Third bet Howard 
and Minna 

Shipley, E s (313) Sixth 
bet Folsom and Harrison 

Shotwell, S s Fourteenth 
bet Howard and Folsom S 
to Serpentine Avenue 



Wes 


. Street. East Side. 


2 


Fourteenth 


1 


100 


Fifteenth 


101 


200 


Sixteenth 


201 


300 


Seventeenth 


301 


400 


Eighteenth 


401 


500 


Nineteenth 


501 


600 


Twentieth 


601 


700 


Twenty-first 


701 


800 


Twenty-second 


801 


900 


Twenty-third 


901 


1000 


Twenty-fourth 


1001 


1100 


Twenty-fifth 


1101 


1200 


Twenty-sixth 


1201 



(e) Serpentine Avenue (c) 

Shrader, N s Waller bet 
Cole and Stanyan N to 
Fulton 

Slegel, from California Av- 
enue S to Cortland Av- 
enue, B. H. 



Sierra, from the bay bet 
Shasta and Humboldt W 
to Potrero Avenue 

SiUlman, W s San Bruno 
Road bet Silver Avenue 
and Henry, U. M. T. 

Silver. Ws (428) Second 
bet Harrison and Bryant 
W to Fourth 

Northwest. Street. Southeast. 

2 Second 1 

100 Third 101 

(<■) Fourth (e) 

Silver Avenue, from San 
Bruno Road 4 miles from 
City Hall W to Harvard 
and E to Eighteenth Av- 
enue 

Simmons, (now Sixth) S s 
Market bet Fifth and Sev- 
enth SE to the bay 

Simpson Place, W s (416) 
First bet Harrison and 
Bryant 

Sixteenth, (late Center) 
from the bay W to Castro 

Sixth, (late Simmons) Ss 
Market bet Filth and Sev- 
enth SE to the bay 

Southwest. Street. Northeast. 



2 


Market 


1 


16 


Stevenson 


17 


28 


Jessie 


29 


100 


Mission 


101 


112 


Minna 


113 


(ft) 


Natoma 


125 


200 


Howard 


201 


m 


Tehama 


211 


w 


Clementina 


227 


300 


Folsom 


301 


W 


Shipley 


313 




Clara 


329 


400 


Harrison 


401 


500 


Bryant 


501 


600 


Brannan 


601 


VOO 


Townsend 
King 


701 


800 


Berry 
Channel 


801 


900 


Hooper 
Irwin 


901 


1000 


HubbeU 
South 


1001 



Solano, from the bay bet 
Mariposa and Butte W to 
Harrison 

Sonoma, from the bay bet 
Nevada and Yolo W to Po- 
trero Avenue 

Sonoma or Sonora 

Place, Ns (406) Ureen 
bet Kearny and Dupont 

Sophie Terrace, Ns 

Pine bet Dupont and 
Stockton 

South, Ws Kentucky nr 
HubbeU SW to Center 

South Avenue , from 
Crescent Avenue NE to 
Holly Park, B. H. 

South Park, W s (516) 
Second bet Bryant and 
Brannan W to Third 

South Park Alley, E s 

(537) Thiid bet South Park 
and Brannan 

South Park Avenue, S 

8 Brannan bet Second and 
Third 

Sparks (now Fifteenth),. W 
8 Han ison bet Fourteenth 
and Sixteenth W to Castro 

Spear, S s Market bet Steu- 
art and Main SE to the bay 



•' !EELE'S Squirrel Poison is sold "by all Druggists, Grocers, and General Dealers- 
* 6 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and MercHant 



(4 



^ 
^ 



74 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Northwest. Street. Southeast. 

2 Market 1 

Hodges Court 

100 Mission 101 

200 Howaid 201 

300 Folsom 301 

400 Harrison 401 

(c) Bryant (c) 

SiiofTord, N s (828) Clay 
bet Waverly Place and 
Stockton N to Washington 

Spring, S 8 (531) California 
bet Kearny and Montgom- 
ery 

Spruce, N s California bet 
Maple and Locust N to 
Presidio Reservation 

St. Ciiarlcs, E s (1018) 
Kearny bet Pacific and 
Broadway 

St. Charles Place, W s 

(1215) Kearny bet Vallejo 
and Green 

St. .lames Alley, E s Ma- 
son bet Post and Sutter 

St. Joseph's Avenue, N 

s Turk bet Broderick and 
Baker N to Geary 

St. Mark Place (now Mor- 
ton), W s (ly) Kearny bet 
Geary and Post W to Stock- 
ton 

St. Mary, N s (520) Pine bet 
Uupont and Kearny N to 
California 

St. Vincent, or Vincent, 

N s (316) Green bet Mont- 
gomery and Kearny N to 
Union 

Standish, from California 
Av S to Powhattan, B. H. 

Stiinford, S s (311) Bran- 
nan bet Second and Third 
SE to Townsend 

Stanly Court, E s Stanly 
Place bet Harrison and 
Bryant 

Stanly Place, S s (557) 
Harrison bet First and Sec- 
ond SE to Bryant 

Stauyan, S s Fulton W of 
Shrader 

Ststr, from California Ave- 
nue SE to Franconia Ave- 
nue, B. H. 

Steiner, N s Ridley bet 
Fillmore and Pierce N to 
the bay 



2600 
2700 
2800 

2aoo 

3000 
3100 

3200 

3300 
3400 
3500 
3(i00 
3700 
3800 
3900 
4000 
ie) 



Pacific 

Broatlway 

Vallejo 

Green 

Union 

Filbert 

Pixley Place 

Greenwich 

Moulton 

Lombard 

Chestnut 

Francisco 

Bay 

North Point 

Beach 

Jefferson 

Tonquin 

Lewis 



2601 
2701 
2801 
2901 
3001 
3101 

3201 

3301 
3401 
3501 
3601 
3701 
3801 
3901 
4001 
(e) 



Steuart, S s Market bet 
East and Spear SE to the 
bay 

Southwest. Street. Northeast. 



2 

100 

200 

300 

(e) 



Market 
Mission 
Howard 
Folsom 
Harrison 



Mast. 
2 
100 
200 
300 
400 
500 
600 
700 
800 
900 
1000 
1100 
1200 
1300 
1400 

1500 
1600 
1700 
1800 
1900 

2000 
2100 
2200 
2300 
2400 
2500 



Street. 
Ridley 
Kate 
Waller 
Haight 
Page 
Oak 
FeU 
Hayes 
Grove 
Fulton 
McAllister 
Tyler 
Turk 
Eddy 
Ellis 
Byington 
OFarreU 
Geary 
Post 
Sutter 
Bush 
Wildey 
Pine 

California 
Sacramento 
Clay 

Washington 
Jackson 



West Side. 
1 

201 
301 
401 
501 
601 
701 
801 
901 
1001 
1101 
1201 
1301 
1401 

1501 
1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 

2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 



Steveloe, E s (412) Jones 
bet OFarrell and Ellis 

Stevenson, W s (22) First 
bet Market and Mission 

Northwest. Street. Southeast. 

2 First 1 

100 Second 101 

(b) New Montgomery (b) 

200 Third 201 

(b) Foiurth (M 

400 Fifth 401 

500 Sixth 501 

600 Seventh 601 

700 Eighth 701 

(6) Ninth (6) 

Stevenson Avenue, E s 

Valencia bet Brady and 
Hermann 

Stockton, N s Market bet 
Dupont and Powell N to 
the bay 



East. Street. West , 

2 Market and Ellis 

100 O'FarreU 

200 Geary 

212 Morton 

300 Post 

308 Stockton Place 

400 Sutter 

500 Bush 

508 Emma 

600 Pine 

700 California 

Emmet Place 

800 Sacramento 

900 Clay 

1000 Washington 

1100 Jackson 

1200 Pacific 

1232 Polk Lane 

1300 Broadway 

1400 VaUejo 

Card Alley 

Montgomery Av 

1500 Green 

1600 Union 

1700 Filbert 

1800 Greenwich 

1900 Lombard 

2000 Chestnut 

Pfeiffer 

Francisco 

2200 Bay 

2300 North Point 

Beach 



StrlnKham, from Islais 
Creek W of Adele S to 
Hecker 

Sullivan. E and W s 

Stanyan bet Grattan and 

Carl 

Sullivan, from Cortland 

Avenue S to Crescent Ave- 
nue, B. H. 

Sullivan Alley, N ^(720) 
Jackson bet Dupont and 
Stockton N to Pacific 

Sullivan Alley, 8 s (537) 
Mission bet First and Sec- 
ond 

Sullivan Alley, W s 

(1U21) Dupont bet Jackson 
and Pacific 

Summer, W s (319) Mont- 
gomery bet California and 
Pine W to Kearny 

Sumner, S s California 
Avenue bet Rosecrans and 
Prentiss S to Powhattan 

Sumner, S s (1159) How-, 
ard bet Seventh and Eighth 

Sutter, junction Market 
and Sansom bet Bush and 
Post W to Laurel HiU 
Cemetery 

North. Street. South Side. 
2 Market and Sansom 1 






Adelaide Place 


617 


fiflfl 


Post 


6U1 





Lewis Place 


605 


7(K) 


Sutter 


701 


800 


Bush 


801 


9(Ht 


Pine 


901 


908 


ViUa Place 




KKK) 


California 


1001 


1100 


Sacramento 


1101 





Pleasant 


1115 


12(K) 


Clay 


1201 


i;«)o 


Washington 


1301 


14<KI 


Jackson 


1401 


mn) 


Pacific 


1501 




Bernard 


15;« 


1600 


Broadway 


1601 


1700 


VaUejo 


IVOl 


18110 


Green 


lUOl 





Lincoln 




19(H) 


Union 


1901 


2000 


Filbert 


2001 


2012 


Valparaao 





2100 


Greenwich 


2101 


2200 


Lombard 
Montgomery Av 


2201 



2301 



2100 



401 
501 

60i 
701 
709 
801 
901 
1001 
1101 
1201 

1301 
1401 
1413 

1501 
1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 
2001 

2101 
2201 
2301 
(e) 



600 



101 

111 

201 

301 
401 
501 

601 
701 
801 
901 
1001 
1101 
l1201 

1300 Van Ness Avenue 1301 
1401 
1501 
1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 



100 Montgomery 

106 Trinity 

— Lick Place 

200 Kearny 

204 Clara Lane 

300 Dupont 

400 Stockton 

500 PoweU 

Delaware Court 
Mason 

700 Taylor 

800 Jones 

900 Leavenworth 

1000 Hyde 

1100 Larkin 

1200 Polk 



ie) 

Stockton Place, (or Al- 
ley) W 8 (213) Dupont bet 
Sutter and Post W to Stock- 
ton 

Stone, N B (918) Washing- 
ton bet Stockton and 
Powell N to Jackson 



1400 Franklin 

1500 Gough 

1600 Octavia 

1700 Lagima 

1800 Buchanan 

1900 Webster 

2000 FUlmore 

2100 Steiner 

2200 Pierce 

2300 Scott 

2400 Devisadero 

2500 Broderick 

2600 Baker 

2700 Lyon 

[ej Central Avenue (e) 

Swan, from Bernal SW to 
junction Marengo and Ber- 
nal 

S^veeney, W s San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City 
HaU 

Sweet, N 8 Broadway bet 
Taylor and Jones N to 
Vallejo 

Tay, N s (1014) Sacramento 
bet PoweU and Mason N 
to Clay 

Taylor, N s Market bet 
Masou and Jones N to the 
bay 



2401 

2501 

2601 

2701 

{e) 



East 
2 
100 Turk 



Street. West Side. 
Market and Tyler 1 



200 Eddy 

300 EUis 

40O OFarreU 

500 Geary 

504 Oak 

516 Taylor PI 



2300 Chestnut 
Water 

Houston 

2400 Francisco 

Vandewater 
2500 Bay 
2600 North Point 
2700 Beach 

(f) Jefferson 
Taylor Place, E s (516) 
Taylor bet Geary and Post 
Tehama, W s (220) First 
bet Clementina and How- 
ard 
Northwest. Street. Soutluast. 
2 FuTBt 1 

100 Second 101 

200 Third 201 

300 Fourth 301 

400 Fifth 401 

(b) Sixth (b) 

(b) Seventh (b) 

700 Eighth 701 

(b) Ninth (b) 

Tehama, S 8 Montezuma 
S to Prospect Place, B. H. 

Tehama Place, E s (223) 
First bet Folsom and How- 
ard 

Telegraph Pliice, N s 

(330) Greenwich bet Dupont 
and Kearny 

Temple, (now Twenty- 
fiith) W s Potrero Avenue 
bet Twenty-fourth and 
Twenty-sixth 
Tenjiessee, from the bay 
bet Kentucky and Minne- 
sota S to Tulare 
Tenth, (late Thome) S s 
Market bet Ninth and 
Eleventh SE to Misaion 
Creek 
Southwest, Street. Northeast. 
2 Market 1 

100 Mission 101 

200 Howard 201 

300 Folsom 301 

400 Harrison 401 

500 Bryant 501 

Terrace View, S s Fran- 
cisco bet Kearny and Du- 
pont 
Tcvis, S s King bet Third 
and Fourth S to Berry 

Texas, from the bay bet 
Mississippi and Missouri S 
to Tulare 

Third, S s Market bet 

Second and Fourth SE to 

the bay 

Smithwest. Street. Northtast. 

2 Market 1 

20 Stevenson 19 

(b) Jessie 37 

100 Mission 101 

118 Minna 117 

Sherwood Place 131 



Smithsonian Medical Institute, 637 Cal., B. J. SMITH, M.S., Prof. Phrenology. 



3. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Zeamy, Established 1862. 



SAN FRANCISCO STREET DIRECTORY. 



75 



138 Everett 

Hunt 143 

200 Howard 201 

224 Tehama 223 

236 Noble Place 

(f>) Clementina 247 

300 FolBoni 301 

Verona Placo 337 

400 Harrison 401 

418 PeriT 417 

436 Silver 435 

500 Bryant 501 

South Park 519 

South Park Alley 537 

600 Brannan 601 

700 Townsend 701 

King 

800 Berry 801 
Channel 

Tliirtei'nth Gate Ellen), 
SK 8 Mission bet Twelfth 
anil Foiirteeuth 

SojUh. Street. North Side. 
2 Mission 1 

100 Howard 101 

200 Folsom 201 

Thirtieth (late GroTe), W 
8 San Jose Road S of 
Twenty-ninth 

Tiiwiupson. Avenne or 
Pluce, S 8 (371) Brannan 
bet Second and Third 

Thome (now Tenth), S s 
Market bet Ninth and Ele- 
venth SE to Mission Creek 

TiflTany Avenue (now 
Valencia), from junction 
Valencia and Twenty-sixth 
SW to Twenty-ninth 

Tllden, W s Noe bet Fif- 
teenth and Sixteenth 

Tilford, W s Fifth bet 
Bryant and Brannan 

Toniasa, from California 
Avenue SE to California 
Avenue, B. H. 

Tonqnln, W s Larkin bet 
Lewis and Jefferson W to 
Presidio Reservation 

Torrens Court, N s Clay 
bet Hyde and Larkin 

Toiiohsird Alley, S s Pine 
bet Jones and Leavenworth 



Townsend, W 


9 First bet 


Brannan and King SW to 


Eighth 




Northwest. Street. 


Southeast. 


2 First 


1 


Japan 




100 Second 


101 


Stanford 




Hammond 




200 Third 


201 


Ritch 




Liberty 





Madden 




Haggln 




Crook 





300 Fourth 


301 


400 Fifth 


401 


500 Sixth 


501 


600 Seventh 


601 


Eighth 





Tracy (now Fourteenth), W 
s Harrison bet Thirteenth 
and Fifteenth W to Castro 

Treat Avenue, S s Twen- 
tieth bet Folsom and Har- 
rison 8 to Serpentine Av- 
enue 

Trinity, N s (106) Sutter 
bet Montgomery and Kear- 
ny N to Bush 

Trinity Conrt, W s Trin- 
ity bet Bush and Sutter 

Trnett, W s Mason bet 
Washington and Clay 

Tulare, from the bay S of 
Marin W to Connecticut 



Turk, Junction Market and 
Mason 1 et Tyler and Eddy 
W to Masonic Avenue 

North. Street. South Side. 

2 Market and Mason 1 

14 Margaret Place 

100 Taylor 101 

200 Jones 201 

300 Leavenworth 301 

400 Hyde 401 

Dodge 

500 Larkin 501 

600 Polk 601 

700 Van Ness Avenue 701 

800 Franklin 801 

900 Clougli 901 

1000 Octavia 1001 

1100 Laguua 1101 

1200 Buchanan UOl 

1300 Webster 1301 

1400 Fillmore 1401 

1500 Steiner 1501 

1600 Pierce 1601 

1700 Scott 1701 

1800 Dfvisadero 1801 

1900 Broderick 1901 

St. Joseph's Av — — 

2000 Baker 2001 

Lyon 2101 

Lott 2201 

(e) Masonic Avenue (e) 

Tweinil (late Brown), SE 
8 Mission bet Eleventh and 
Thirteenth SE to Harrison 

Southwest. Street. Northeast. 
2 Mission 1 

26 Glen Park Avenue 

100 Howard 101 

200 Folsom 201 

(e) Harrison (e) 

Twentieth (late Napa), 
from the bay bet Butte and 
Shasta W to Douglass 

Twenty-eighth (late 
Vale), W s Guerrero bet 
Twenty-seventh and Twen- 
ty-ninth 

Twenty-filth (late Tem- 
ple), W s Potrero Avenue 
bet Twenty - fourth and 
Twenty-sixth W to Doug- 
lass 

Twenty-flrst (late Alta), 
W s Potrero Avenue bet 
Twentieth and Twenty-sec- 
ond W to Douglass 

Twenty-fourth (late 
Park), W s Potrero Ave- 
nue bet Twenty-third and 
Twenty-fifth W to Douglass 

Twenty-ninth(lateDale), 
W s San Jose Road bet 
Twenty-eighth and Thir- 
tieth 

Twenty-second (late 
John), W s Potrero Ave- 
nue bet Twenty-first and 
Twenty-third W to Doug- 



Twenty - seventh (late 
Figg), W s Guerrero bet 
Twenty-sixth and Twenty- 
eighth W to Douglass 

Twenty-sixth (late Na- 
vy), W 8 Bryant Avenue 
bet Twenty-fifth and Twen- 
ty-seventh W to Douglass 

Twenty third (late Horn- 
er), W 3 Potrero Avenue 
bet Twenty - second and 
Twenty-fourth W to Doug- 



Tyler, jimction Market and 
Taylor bet McAllister and 
Turk W to Masonic Avenue 

North. Street. South Side. 

2 Market and Taylor 1 

100 Jones 101 



300 

400 

500 

600 

700 

800 

900 

1000 

1100 

1200 

1300 

1400 

1500 

1600 

1700 

1800 

1900 

2000 

2100 

(<•) 



Leavenworth 

Dale 

Charles 

Hyde 

Larkin 

Polk 



Van Ness Avenue 601 



Franklin 

(iough 

Octavia 

Laguna 

Buchanan 

Webster 

Fillmore 

Steiner 

Pierce 

Scott 

Devisadero 

Broderick 

Baker 

Lyon 

Lott 

Masonic Avenue 



701 
801 
901 
1001 
1101 
1201 
1301 
1401 
1501 
1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 



Tyson Place, Ss (919) 
Washington bet Stockton 
and PoweU 

Union, Ws Front bet Fil- 
bert and Green W to Pre- 
sidio Reservation 

North. Street. South Sidt. 



2 Front 

100 Battery 

— - Gaines 

200 Sansom 

Calhoun 

300 Montgomery 

Vincent 

400 Kearny 

406 Filbert Place 

Sonoma Place 

Lafayette Place 

420 Varenne 

500 Dupont 

508 Cadell Alley 

Bannam Place 

518 Jasper Place 

LTnion Place 

Clairville Place 

600 Stockton 



301 
323 
401 

407 
419 



523 
535 
601 



Montgomery Avenue 



700 Powell 

August Alley 

800 Mason 

900 Taylor 

1000 Jones 

Bay View Place 

llOO Leavenworth 

Sharp Place 

1200 Hyde 

1300 Larkin 

1400 Polk 



701 
717 
801 
901 
1001 

1101 

1201 
1301 
1401 



1500 Van Ness Avenue 1501 



1600 Franklin 

1700 Gough 

1800 Octavia 

1900 Laguna 

2000 Buchanan 

2100 Webster 

2200 Fillmore 

2300 Steiner 

2400 Pierce 

2500 Scott 

2600 Devisadero 

2700 Broderick 

2800 Baker 



1601 
1701 
1801 
1901 
2001 
2101 
2201 
2301 
2401 
2501 
2601 
2701 
2801 



I'nlon Alley, from Union 
Place 

I'nlon Avenne, E s Lau- 
rel Avenue E to San Bnmo 
Road S s B. H. 

Union Court, (now Ver 
Mehr) E s (116) Kearny bet 
Sutter and Post 

Union Place, N s (522) 
Green bet Dupont and 
Stockton N to Union 

Union $^()iuare, bet Stock- 
ton, Powell, Geary and 
Post 

University, S s Silver Av- 
enue bet College and 
Princeton, U. M. T. 

Utah, from Mission Creek 
bet Nebraska and Potre- 
ro Avenue S to Yolo 



I'nle, (now Twenty-eighth) 
W s Gvierrero Iwt Twenty- 
seventh and Twenty-ninth 

Talencia, S b Market bet 
Mission and Guerrero S to 
Twenty-ninth 

Vallejo, W s Davis bet 
(;reen and Broadway W to 
Presidio Reservation. (The 
buildings in this street are 
incorrectly numbered.] 

North. Street. South Side. 



2 


Davis 


1 


(0 


Front 


(c) 


100 


Battery 


101 


200 


Sansom 


201 




Bestole 







Bartol 




300 


Montgomery 


301 


400 


Kearny 


401 


420 


Pollard Place 








Pinckney Place 


423 


430 


Margaret Place 





500 


Dupont 
Montgomery Av 


501 





Vallejo Place 


521 


530 


Agnes Lane 





600 


Stockton 


601 


622 


Maiden Lane 







Morey AUey 


627 


700 


Powell 


701 


716 


Washoe Place 





736 


O'Connell Place 





800 


Mason 


801 





Vallejo Court 




900 


Taylor 


901 





Sweet 







Florence 




1000 


Jones 


1001 


1100 


Leavenworth 


1101 


1200 


Hyde 


1201 




White 





1300 


Larkin 


1301 





Maxwell 




1400 


Polk 


1401 


1500 


Van Ness Avenue 1501 


1600 


Franklin 


1601 


1700 


Gough 


1701 


1800 


Octavia 


1801 


1900 


Laguna 


1901 


2000 


Buchanan 


2001 


^100 


Webster 


2101 


2200 


Fillmore 


2201 


2300 


Steiner 


2301 


2400 


Pierce 


2401 


2500 


Scott 


2501 


2600 


Devisadero 


2601 


2700 


Broderick 


2701 


2800 


Baker 


2801 



Vallejo Court, S s Val- 
lejo bet Mason and Taylor 

Vallejo Place, S s (521) 

Vallejo bet Dupont and 

Stockton 
Valley, W s Old San Jos6 

Road bet Twenty-eighth 

and Twenty-ninth 

Valparaiso, W s (1911) 
Mason bet Filbert and 
Greenwich 

Van .Vess Avenue, N s 

Market bet Franklin and 
Polk N to the bay 
East. Street. West Side. 



2 Market and Oak 

Hickory Avenue 

100 Fell 

Linden Avenue 

200 Hayes 

Ivy Avenue 
300 Grove 

Birch Avenue 
400 Fulton 

Ash Avenue 

500 McAllister 

Locust Avenue 
600 Tyler 

Elm Avenue 
700 Turk 

Laurel Avenue 
800 Eddy 

Willow Avenue 
900 Ellis 

Olive Avenue 
1000 O'Farrell 



401 



701 



JAMES &. STEELE & CO. dispense Prescriptions from Pure Medicines. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



76 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 





Myrtle Avenue 




1100 


Geary 


1101 




Cedar Avenue 




1200 


Post 


1201 




Walnut Avenue 




1300 


Sutter 
Fern Avenue 


1301 


1400 


Bush 
Auatin 


1401 


15(M) 


Pine 


1501 


1600 


California 


1601 


17(H) 


Sacramento 


1701 


180O 


Clay 


1801 


1900 


Washington 


1901 


W)IM> 


Jackson 


2001 


?100 


Pacific 


2101 


22(H) 


Broadway 


2201 


2«H) 


Vallejo 


2301 


•«(K) 


Green 


2401 


2sno 


Union 


2501 


«ii(H1 


Filbert 


2601 


2700 


Greenwich 


2701 


2RO0 


Lombard 


2801 


29(H) 


Chestnut 


2901 


31)(I0 


Francisco 


3001 


3100 


Bay 


3101 


■A'>m 


North Point 


3201 


3300 


Beach 


3301 


3400 


Jefferson 


3401 


3500 


Tonquin 


3501 


(e) 


Lewis 


(e) 



VaiMlcwater. W s Powell 
bet Francisco and Bay W 
to Taylor 

Varciinc, N s (420) Union 
bet Kearny and Dupont 

Vas8Hr Place, .S s (613) 
Harrison bet Second and 
Third 

Vep Mchr, E s (116) Kear- 
ny bet Post and Sutter 

Vermont, from Mission 
Creek bet Kansas and Ne- 
braska S to Tulare 

Vernon Place, W s (326) 
Second bet Folsom and 
Harrison W to Hawthorne 

Vernon Place, E s Hyde 
bet Union and Green 

Vernon Place, ■ S s (1007) 
Jaclison bet Mason and 
Taylor 

Verona Place, E s (337) 
Third bet Folsom and 
Harrison 

Vicksbiirg, S s Twenty- 
first bet Church and San- 
chez S to Twenty-fifth 

Villa Place, E s Taylor 
bet Pine and California 

Vincent or St.. Vincent, 

N s (316) Green bet Mont- 
gomery and Kearny N to 
Union 

Vlrsinla, N s (914) Wash- 
ington bet Stockton and 
Powell N to Pacific 

Virginia Alley, W s 
(505) Dupont bet Pine and 
California 

Virginia Avenne, from 
California Avenue SE to 
Cherubusco, B. H. 

Virginia Place, N s (806) 
Pacific bet Stockton and 
Powell N to Broadway 

Vischer Place, E a Beale 
bet Market and Mission 

Voiglit, E of San Bruno 

Road, 4 miles from City 

Hall 
Vorrath Place, E s (1206) 

Larkin bet Bush and Pine 
Vulture— (see Columbia) 
Wall Place, Ns Jackson 

bet Leavenworth and Hyde 
Wallace Place, N s (612) 

California bet Keamy and 

Dupont 



Waller, jiinction Market 
and Octavia W to Lyon 

Walnnt, N s California 
bet Laurel and Lott N to 
Presidio Reservation 

Wailnut Avenue, W s 

Larkin bet Post and Sut- 
. ter W to Polk 

Ward, from Cortland Av- 
enue S to Crescent Ave- 
nue, B. H. 

Warren, S s Thirtieth bet 
Whitney and Bartlett S to 
Palmer 



Washington, W s 


East 


bet Jackson and Clay W 


to First Avenue 




North. Street. South Side. 


2 


East 


1 


100 


Drumm 


• 101 


200 


Davis 


201 





Cedar 


217 


300 


Front 


301 


400 


Battery 


401 


412 


Custom House PI 


- — 


500 


Sansom 


501 


532 


Jones Alley 


. 


600 


Montgomery 
Montgomery Av 


601 





Dunbar Court 


641 


700 


Keamy 


701 





Brenham Place 


727 


744 


Washington Alley 


800 


Dupont 


801 





Waverly Place 


811 





Spofford . 


823 


828 


Ross 





900 


Stockton 


901 





Havens Place 


907 


914 


Virginia 


— — 


918 


Stone 








Tyson Place 


919 


1000 


Powell 


1001 





Codman Place 


1005 





Wetmore Place 


1017 


1100 


Mason 


1101 


1106 


Adona Place 





1200 


Taylor 


1201 


1300 


Jones 


1301 





Priest 


1319 





Reed 


1325 


1400 


Leavenworth 


1401 


1500 


Hyde 


1501 


1600 


Larkin 


1601 


1700 


Polk 


1701 


1800 


Van Ness Avenue 1801 


1900 


Franklin 


1901 


2000 


Gough 


2001 


2100 


Octavia 


2101 


2200 


Laguna 


2201 


2300 


Buchanan 


2301 


2400 


Webster 


2401 


2500 


Fillmore 


2501 


2600 


Steiner 


2601 


2700 


Pierce 


2701 


2800 


Scott 


2801 


2900 


Devisadero 


2901 


3000 


Broderick 


3001 


3100 


Baker 


3101 



Washington Alley, N 

s (744) Washington bet Du- 
pont and Kearny 

Washington Avenue, 

S s Mission bet Ninth and 
Tenth 

Washington Avenue, 

S s Precita Avenue bet 
Folsom and Columbia 
Place, B. H. 

Washington Sauare, 
bet Stockton, Filbert, Pow- 
ell and Union 

Wasiioe Place, N s (716) 
Vallejo bet Powell and 
Mason 

Water, W s Mason bet 
Francisco and Chestnut W 
to Taylor 

Waverly Place, N s (810) 
Sacramento bet Dupont 
and Stockton N to Wash- 
ington 



Wayland, W s San Bruno 
Road bet Bacon and Wol- 
sey, U. M. T. 

Wayne, S s Cortland Av- 
enue bet Gates and Kos- 
ciusko 

Webl», N s (532) California 
bet Montgomery and Kear- 
ny N to Sacramento 

Webb Place, W g Mason 
bet Union and Green 

Webster, N s Kate bet 
Buchanan and Filhnore N 
to the bay 

East. Street. West Side. 
2 Kate 1 

Germania 

100 Waller W 

200 Haight 20! 

300 Page 30: 

400 Oak 40: 

Hickory Avenue 

500 Fell 50' 

Linden Avenue 

600 Hayes 60: 

700 Grove 70: 

800 Fulton 

900 McAllister 90: 

1000 Tyler lOO: 

1100 Turk llO: 

1200 Eddy 120: 

1300 Ellis 130: 

1400 O'Farrell 140: 

1500 Geary 150: 

1600 Post 160: 

1700 Sutter 170 

1800 Bush 180 

Wildey 

1900 Pine 190: 
2000 California 200: 
2100 Sacramento 210: 
2200 Clay 220: 
2300 Washington 230: 
2400 Jackson 240: 
2500 Pacific 250: 
2600 Broadway 260: 
2700 Vallejo 270: 
2800 Green 280: 
2900 Union 290: 
3000 Filbert 300 
3100 Greenwich 310: 
3200 Lombard 320 
3300 Chestnut 330: 
3400 Francisco 340 
3500 Bay 350: 
3600 NorthPoint 360 
3700 Beach 370 
3800 Jeffersom 380 
3900 Tonquin 390: 
(f) Lewis (f) 
Webster, N s Lombard 
bet Kearny and Montgom- 
ery N to Francisco 
Weldon, S s Crescent Av- 
enue nr San Bruno Road 

Wells Avenue, Ws Do- 
lores bet Fifteenth and 
Sixteenth 

Wells Court or Ada, S s 

Lombard bet Dupont and 
Stockton 

Welsh, W s Zoe bet Bry- 
ant and Brannan W to 
Fourth 

West Avenue, from San 
Jose Road near Cortland 
Avenue, SE to Holly Park 

West End Alley, N s 
Green bet Hyde and Lar- 
kin N to Union 

West Mission, from Mis- 
sion nr Twelfth SW to 
Mission nr Thirteenth 

Wetmore Place, N s 

(1016) Clay bet PoweU and 
Mason N to Washington 

White, N s Vallejo bet 
Hyde and Larkin 

White Place, S s Bryant 
bet Seventh and Eighth 

White Place, Es (806) 
Jones bet Bush and Sutter 



Whitney, S s Thirtieth 
bet Dame and Warren S 
to Palmer 

Whitney, N e Sixteenth 
bet Howard and Mission 

Wlldey, W 8 Webster bet 
Bush and Pine W to Stei- 
ner 

Willard, N 8 Grattan nr 
Stanyan N to Golden Gate 
Park 

William, N 8 (420) O'Far- 
rell bet Jones and Taylor 
N to Post 

East. Street. West Side. 

2 O'Farrell 1 

100 Geary 101 

(e) Post (e) 

William Place, Ws (109) 
Davis bet California and 
Sacramento 

Williams, S s Silver Av- 
enue bet Goettingen and 
Holyoke, U. M. T. 

Williamson, N s Point 
Lobos Avenue bet Boyce 
and Chase N to Laurel 
Hill Cemetery 

Willow, S s (929) Folsom 
bet Fifth and Sixth 

Willo^v, E s Valencia bet 
Seventeenth and Eight- 
eenth 

Willow Avenue, W s 
Larkin bet Ellis and Eddy 

Wlnans Alley, E s Eighth 
bet Howard and Tehama 

Winkle, E of San Bruno 
Road 4 miles from City 
Hall 

Wlnslo>v, from California 

Avenue S to Powhattan, 

B. H. 
Winter Lane, E s (1716) 

Mason bet Union and 

Green 
Wisconsin, from the bay 

bet Arkansas and Carolina 

S to Tulare 
Wolfe, from California 

Avenue E to Isabel, B. H. 
Wolsey, W s San Bruno 

Road bet Wayland and 

Dwight, U. M. T. 

Wood (now Eleventh), S s 
Market bet Tenth and 
Twelfth SE to Mission 
Creek > 

Wood, N 8 Point Lobos 
Avenue bet Eugenie and 
Collins N to Laurel Hill 
Cemetery 

Wool, from North Avenue 
S to Cortland Avenue,B.H. 

Worden, N g* Francisco 
bet Stockton and PoweU 

Yale. S s Silver Avenue 
bet Amherst and Cam- 
bridge, U. M. T. 

Verba Buena, N s (1114) 
Sacramento bet Mason and 
Taylor N to Clay 

Yolo, from the bay bet So- 
noma and Yuba W to Po- 
trero Avenue 

York, from Mission Creek 
bet Hampshire and Bryant 
Avenue S to Serpentine 
Avenue 

Yuba, from the bay bet 
Yolo and Colusa W to Ne- 
braska 

Ziui, from Napoleon S to 
Schneider 

Zoe, S s Bryant bet Third 
and Fourth SE to Brannan 

Zoe Place, S s (315) Fol- 
som bet Fremont and Beale 



BEAMISH'S— Importer rurnishing Goods, Nucleus Bldg, cor. Third and Market 



C. p. VAN SOHAAOK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Koamy, Established 1852. 



BUILDINGS, BLOCKS, ROWS, WHARVES, ETC. 



PiritLIC ttlllLDINGS. 

Alms House, San Miguel or Mission Ocean Houso Road, 

ik miles from City Hall 
City Hall, E s Kearny bet Merchant and Washington 
City Hall (New), junction Market and Larkin 
County Hospital, E s Potrero Av bet Twenty-second and 

Twenty-third 
County Hospital (small pox), S s San Bruno Road nr Ser- 
pentine Av 
County Jail, N s Broadway bet Kearny and Dupont 
Custom House, NVV cor Washington and Battery 
Hall of Records, SE cor Kearny and Washington 
Industrial School, Old San Jose Koad, 5 miles from City Hall 
Post-office, NW cor Washington and Battery 
United States Apjiraiser's Store, SW cor Battery and Jack 
United States Appraiser's Store (New), E s Sansom bet 

Washington and Jackson 
United States Marine Hospital, Mountain Lake nr Presidio 
United States Mint, NW cor Mission and Fifth 
United States Treasury, 610 Commercial 

BUILDINGS. 

Academy, N s Pine bet Montgomery and Sansom 

Alhambra, 325 Bush 

Alta California, 529 California 

Armory Hall, NE cor Montgomery and Sacramento 

Bancroft's, 721-725 Market 

Bank California, NW cor California and Sansom 

Bella Union, W s Kearny nr Washington 

Bernis', 626 California 

Bradbury, 52 Second 

Brittan's, SW cor California and Davis 

Capital, NW cor Kearny and Pine 

Central Pacific R. R. Co.'s, NE cor Fourth and To^vnsend 

Change House (Stevenson's), SW cor Montgomery and Cal 

Cochituate, 213 and 215 Sansom 

Cogswell's, SE cor Front and Clark 

College, 24 Post 

Colton's, 220 Tliird 

Commercial, NW cor Pine and Battery 

Crook's, SE cor Mission and Third 

Cunningham's, SS cor Market and Second 

Davidson's, NW cor Montgomery and Commercial 

Dexter's, 417 Kearny 

Donohoe, Kelly & Co.'s, SE cor Montgomery and Sa« 

Dooly's, NW cor Sansom and Sutter 

Duncan's, 411^ California 

Exempt Fire Company, W s Brenham PI opp Plaza 

Express, NE cor California and Montgomery 

Firemans Fund Insurance Co.'s, SW cor Cal and Sansom 

Frank's, W s Brenham PI opp Plaza 

Franklin, 406-410 California 

FViedlander's, NE cor California and Sansom 

Funkenstein's, NE cor Market and Sansom 

German Savings and Loan Society's, 526 California 

Government House, NW cor Washington and Sansom 

Hayward's, 415-423 California 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, NE cor Mont and Mkt 

Howard's, 521 and 523 Montgomery 

Johnson's, N s Sutter bet Montgomery and Kearny 

Levison Brothers', 134 Sutter 

London and San Francisco Bank, NW cor Cal and Leid 

Masonic Temple, NW cor Montgomery and Post 

Maxwell's, SW cor Kearny and Sutter 

Maynard's, NW cor California and Battery 

McCreery's, NE and SE corners Montgomery and Pine 

Mechanics' Institute, 27 Post 

Mechanics' Pavillion, E s Eighth bet Mkt and Mission 

Mercantile Library, 216 Bush 

Merchants' Exchange, S s California bet Mont and San 

Murphy, Grant & Co.'s, NE cor Sansom and Bush 

Naglee's, SW cor Montgomery and Merchant 



Niantic, NW cor Clay and Sansom 
Nucleus, SE cor Market and Third 
Odd Fellows', 323-327 Montgomery 
Pacific Bank, NW cor Sansom and Pine 
Pacific Exchange Building, 314 Montgomery 
Parrott's, NW cor Sacramento and Montgomery 
Phoenix, SW cor Sansom and Jackson 
Pioneers', 808 Jfontgomery 
Reese's, 716-722 Washington 

Safe Deposit Co.'s, SE cor Montgomeiy and California 
San Francisco Gas Co.'s, First, Howard, and Natoma 
San Francisco Savings Union, NE cor Cal and Webb 
Sather's, NE cor Montgomery and Commercial 
Savings and Loan Society's, 617-621 Clay 
Sherman's, NE cor Montgomery and Clay 
St. Mark's, SW cor Kearny and Morton 
Stevenson's (now Change House), SW cor Mont and Cal 
Sullivan's, SW cor Dupont and Pacific 
Tallant & Co.'s, NE cor California and Battery 
The Howard, NW cor Stockton and O'Farrell 
Tucker's, NW cor Montgomery and Sutter 
Union Insurance Co.'s, 416 and 418 California 
United States Court, NE cor Battery and Washington 
Webb's, 37 Second 

Well's, SW cor Montgomery and Clay 
West End Studio, NW cor Broadway and Larkin 
White House, NW cor Kearny and Post 
Whiting's, SE cor Sansom aud Pine 
Young Men's Christian Association, 232 Sutter bet Ke am j 
and Dupont 



HALLS. 

Americax Protestant Association, 713 Mission 

Anthony's, 417 Bush 

Apollo, 808 Pacific 

Armory, 134 Fowth 

Barra's, 118 First 

Central, cor Bush and Polk 

Charter Oak, 771 Market 

Corinthian, 31 Post 

Covenant, 105 Post 

Crusader, 1159 Mission 

Dashaway, 139 Post 

Druids', 413 Sutter 

Grand Army of the Republic, 71 New Montgomery 

Grand Central, SE cor Sixth and Market 

Hare's, Tenth Av, South S. F. 

Hibernia, 246 Third 

Hoag's, SW cor Sutter and Powell 

Horticultural, W s Stockton bet Post and Sutter 

Improved Order Red Men's, 320 Post 

Independent Order Red Men's, 510 Bush 

Irish American, 816 and 818 Howard 

Irish Confederation, 751 Market 

James', SE cor Fifth and Shipley 

Kessing's, cor Twenty-first and Howard 

Lafayette, 730 Montgomery 

Masonic Temple, NW cor Montgomery and Post 

Mayberry's, E s Mission bet Twentieth and Twenty-first 

Mechanics', SW cor First and Stevenson 

Mechanics' Institute, 27 Post 

Mercantile Library's, 216 Bush 

Natio'nal Armory, 324 Pi)8t 

Odd Fellows', 3'23-327 Montgomery 

Pacific, N s Bush bet Kearny and Dupont 

Philharmonic, NE cor Stockton and Jackson 

Pixley, NE cor Pacific and Polk 

Piatt's Music, 216 Montgomery 

Riggers' and Stevedores', 429 Pacific 

Scollay's, 1524 Stockton 

St. Cyprian's, NW cor Jackson and Virginia 

Tammany, cor Folsom and Eighth 



t?4 
n 



J* 

CO 
K-* 

o 

I— • 
o 

3 












tl 






C3 



W 



TAMES Qt. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Hearny Street. 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



78 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Terpsichorean, N s Pacific nr Stockton 
Turn Verein (Kureka), E s Powell bet California and Pine 
Turn Verein (Old), N s Bush bet Stockton and Powell 
Turn Verein (San Francisco), S s Turk bet Leavenworth 

and Hyde 
Union, S s Howard bet Third and Fourth 
Veteran's, 516 Brj'ant 
Washington, 35-39 Eddy 
Young Men's Christian "Association, 232 Sutter 

BLOCKS. 

Armory, NW cor New Montgomery and Howard 

Astor, 625-033 Sacramento 

Helden's, SAV cor Bush and Montgomery 

Broadway, NW cor Broadway and Keamy 

California, SE cor California and Battery 

Center, S s Sixteenth bet Folsom and Shotwell 

Commercial, SE cor California and Front 

Court, 636 Clay and 641 Jlerchant 

Cunningham's, SE cor Market and Second 

tMstom House, SE cor Sansom and Sacramento 

Front Street, E s Front from Clay to Washington 

Harpending, S s Market bet First and Second 

Howards, 627 Third 

Lick House, VV s Montgomery from Post to Sutter 

Martin's, S s Market bet Seventh and Eighth 

Metropolitan, &-14 Montgomery Av 

Montgomery, E s Montgomerj' from Merchant to Wash 

Nevada, NW cor Montgomerj- and Pine 

U'Donnell's, NE cor Vallejo and Dupont 

Oriental, SAV cor Bush and Battery 

Park's, SE cor Valencia and Sixteenth 

Reese's, W s Battery bet Pine and California 

Russ House, W s Montgomery from Bush to Pine 

Safe Deposit, SE cor California and Montgomery 

Shiels', junction Market and Post 

Thurlow, E s Keamy bet Sutter and Ver Mehr PI 

Union, NE cor Marl<et and Kearny 

Virginia, NW cor Stockton and Pacific 

Washington, 1-17 Montgomery Av 

Yankee, SW cor Front and Pine 



KOWS. 

Matnard's SE cor Pine and Battery 
South Park, Tliird bet Brjant and Brannaa 
Tittel's, W s Clara Lane nr Sutter 



>VHARVES. 

Beale Street, foot Beale 

Broadway, foot Broadway 

Central Pacific E,. R., foot Second 

Clay Street, foot Clay 

Cowell's, extends from Battery bet Union and Filbert 

Dewey's, foot Third 

Dry Dock Co.'s, Hunter's Point 

East Street, from Market to Folsom 

Fillmore Street, foot Fillmore 

Folsom Street, foot Folsom 

Front Street, cor Front and Vallejo 

Greenwich Dock, continuation Battery 

Hathaway's, cor Spear and Bryant 

Harrison Street, foot Harrison 

Hobbs', E s Long Bridge foot Fourth 

Howard Street, foot Howard 

India Dock, foot Battery 

Jackson Street, foot Jackson 

Larue's, East bet Market and Mission 

Lombard Dock, continuation Lombard Street from San- 
som to Battery 

Main Street, foot Main 

Market Street, foot Market 

Meiggs', from Francisco bet Pow and Mason, North Beach 

Merchants' Dr^' Dock Co.'s, cor Keamy and Bay 

Mission Street, foot Mission 

Montgomery and Francisco Street, foot Francisco 

North Point Dock, continuation Sansom from Lombard to 
Chestnut 

Oakland Ftrry, East bet Market and Clay 

Oriental, foot First 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co.'s, Brannan and First 

Pacific Rolling Mills Co.'s, Potrero Point 

Pacific Street, foot Pacific 

Rincon, foot Steuart 

Rincon Point, Spear bet Folsom and Harrison 

San FYancisco Gas Co.'s Wharf, foot Second 

Steamboat, Long Bridge 

Third Street, foot Tliird 



Vallejo Street, foot Vallejo 
Washington Street, foot Washington 



PLACES OF ANi:SEME5fT. 

Baldwin's Academy of Music, N s Market nr Powell 
Bella Union Theater, 803 and 805 Keamy 
California Theater, N s Bush bet Keaniy and Dupont 
Chinese Theater (New), 623 Jackson 
Chinese Theater (Old), 618 Jackson 
City Gardens, S s Folsom bet Twelfth and Thirteenth 
German Theater (California), N s Bush bet Kear and Dup 
Maguire's New Theater, 325 Bush 
Maguire's Opera House, 318 Bush 
Pacific Museum of Anatomy, Hardie PI nr Keamy 
Palace Amphitheater, SW' cor Mission and New Mont 
San Francisco Recreation Grounds, cor Folsom and Twen- 
ty-fifth 
Wade's Opera House, N S Mission bet Third and Fourth 
Woodward's Gardens, N s Mission bet Thirteenth and 
Fourteenth 



PROMINENT PLACES. 

Alcatraces Island, 2 miles NW Telegraph Hill 

Angel Island, 5 miles from City Hall 

Bay District Fair Race Grounds, entrance cor Seventh 

Av and Fulton 
Bay View, nr Hunter's Point, 5 miles S City Hall 
Bernal Heights, S of Serpentine Av bet San Jose and San 

Bnmo roads 
Black Point, junction Van Ness Av and Bay Shore 
Buena Vista Park, S of Haight bet Broderick and Lott 
Clark's Point, foot Broadway 
Cliff House, 6^ miles W City Hall 
Dry Dock (California), Hunter's Point .^ 

Fairmount, W s San Jos6 Road nr Thirtieth 
Farallones Islands, 29 miles from City Hall 
Fort Point nr the Golden Gate 4 miles W City Hall 
GaiTatt's Point, i mile SW Hunter's Point 
Golden Gate, 6 miles W City Hall 
Golden Gate Driving Park, Point Lobos Avenue 5 miles 

from City Hall 
Golden Gate Park, W of Stanyan bet D and H to Ocean, 

entrance Baker bet Oak and Fell 
Hayes Valley, N of Market and W of Larkin 
Hoiladay Heights, bet Clay, Wash, Gough, and Octavia 
Holly Park, SW^ s Bemal Heights nr San Jos6 Road 
Homestead, Point Lobos Avenue 5 miles from City Hall 
Hunter's Point, 5 miles SE City Hall 
Islais Creek Bridge, from the termination of Kentucky to 

Railroad Av 
Kensington, Howard nr Twenty-first 
Lagoon, Gough bet Lombard and Francisco 
Laguna de la Merced, 7i miles SW City Hall nr Ocean 

View House 
Lake Honda, 4 miles SW City Hall 
Lakeville, nr Laguna de la Merced 
Lime Point, opposite Fort Point 

Lone Mountain, S of Point Lobos Avenue nr Toll Gate 
Long Bridge, from foot Fourth to Potrero Nuevo 
Mission Creek, from Harrison and Nineteenth SE to the 

Bay 
Mission Dolores, 2\ miles SW City Hall 
Mountain Lake, 4 miles W City Hall bet Point Lobos and 

Presidio roads 
Mountain Lake Park, 4 miles W City Hall bet Point Lobos 

and Presidio roads 
North Beach, foot Powell W to Black Point 
North Point, foot Francifco 

Ocean A'iew House.Ocean House Road, 7 miles SWCity Hall 
Ocean Side House, Beach Road 8 miles SW City Hall 
Ocean View Riding and Driving Park, Ocean House Road 

7 miles SW City Hall 
Pacific Heights, California to Broadway bet Van Ness At 

and Fillmore 
Point Lobos, 6i miles W City Hall 
Point San Quentin, Potrero Nuevo 
Potrero Heights, Potrero Nuevo nr Bay Shore 
Potrero Nuevo, 2A miles S City Hall 
Presidio. 3 miles W City Hall 
Rincon Point, foot Harrison 
Russian Hill, Taylor bet Broadway and Green 
San ,hii-6 or Black Point, junc A'an Ness Av and Bay Shore 
Seal Rcc , 6^ miles VV City Hall 
Sjiring Valley, nr and S Lagoon 

Telegraph Hill, Montgomery from Broadway N to the Bay 
Tuckerville, from Buchanan to Webster and Wash to Pac 
Visitacion Valley, nrthe Bay and San Mateo County Line 
Yerba Buena or Goat Island, 2 miles NE City Hall 



Smithsonian Medical and Hygienic Institute, 635 Cal., B. J. SMITH, M.D., Propt 



3. P. VAIT SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



KEY TO PUBLIC OFFICES. 



79 



KIETT TO I^TJBXiIO OIF-IFICES. 



FEDER.4L. 

AOBNT Special, Treasury Department, Custom House third 
floor 

Army, Military Division of the Pacific, Commandant, As- 
sistant Adjutant-General, Assistant Ins|)9ctor-Gene- 
ral. Chief Quartermaster, Depot Quartenuaster, Chief 
Commissary Subsistence, Chief Paymaster, Medical 
Purveyor, Engineer Officer, Attendiiif; Surf,'eon, Med- 
ical Storekeeper, NW cor Stocl<ton and ( )'Farrell 

Army, Department of California, Commandant, Assistant 
Adjutant-General, Cliief Quartermaster, Chief Com- 
missarj' Subsistence, Chief I'aymaster, Medical Direc- 
tor and Attendine: Surgeon, Judge Advocate, Military 
Storelieeper, NW cor Stockton and O'Farrell 

Army, Engineers, Senior Engineer, 533 Kearny, Fortifi- 
cations Harbor S. F., 533 Kearny; Light-house, 120 
Sutter Street 

Army, Depots and Warehouses, NW cor Stockton and 
O'Farrell and Verba Bucna Island 

Bankruptcy, Registers District California, 636 Clay and 24 
U. S. Court Building 

Board of Commissioners on Irrigation, 533 Kearny 

Centennial Commissioner for California, Mechanics' Insti- 
tute, 91 Post 

Coast Survey, Western Coast Division, 214 Stockton 

Courts, United States Court Building, Circuit, rooms 2 
and 3 ; Clerk, 1 ; District, 9 ; Clerk, 14 ; District At- 
torney, 6 ; Marshal, 5 ; Commissioners, 1 and 14 

Customs Port San Francisco, Collector, Naval Officer, and 
Surveyor, NW cor Washington and Battery ; Ap- 
praiser's Store, SW cor Battery and Jackson ; Inspec- 
tor Drugs, SW cor Jackson and Battery ; Boarding 
Officers, foot Front ; Drayman, SW cor Jackson and 
Battery 

Inspector Boilers, -ll U. S. Court Building 

Inspector Hulls, 11 U. S. Court Building 

Internal Revenue, Supervisor, 123 California ; Collector, 
U, S. Court Building ; Agent, 123 California ; Gaugers, 
U. S. Court Building 

Land Office, Register and Receiver, 506 Jackson 

Light-house, Twelfth District, 204 Montgomery 

Marine Hospital, Mountain Lake nr presidio 

Marine Hospital, Pacific Coast, Superintending Surgeon, 
715 Clay 

Mint Superintendent, NW cor Fifth and Mission ; Assay- 
er. Coiner, Melter and Refiner, NW cor Fifth and Mis- 
sion ; Treasurer, 428 Montgomery 

Naval Rendezvous, 504 Washington 

Na\y Pay Office, 434 California 

Pension Agent Array and Navy, 321 Washington 

Post-office, Postmaster, NW cor Washington and Battery ; 
Assistant Superintendent Railway Mail Service, 606 
Montgomery ; Special Agent, 606 Montgomery 

Secret Service Division, 5 U. S. Court Building 

Shipping Commissioner, NE cor Front and Jackson 

Signal Ser\T«;e, 42 Merchants' Exchange 

Supervising Inspector Steam Vessels, 11 U. S. Court Bldg 

Surveyor-General California, 306 Pine 

Treasurer Assistant, 428 Montgomery 



STATE. 
AssAYER State, 421 Montgomery 
Fish Commissioners, 401 California 
Harbor Commissioners, 440 Jackson 
Immigration Conunissioner, 330 Montgomery 
Inspector Gas Meters, 531 Mission 
Insurance Commissioner, 401 California 
Pilot Commissioners, 44 Merchants' Exchange 
Pilots, offices U. S. Court Building 
Port Wardens, 525 Front 

Supreme Court, 640 Clay, Judge's chambers 640 Clay 
Vaccine Agent, 235 Kearnj' 

CITY AND COUNTY. 

Assessor County, City Hall 22 first floor 

Attorney and Counselor, City Hall 13 third floor 

Attorney District, 8 Montgomery Avenue 

Attorney Police, City Hall 17 first floor 

Auditor' County, City Hall 3 first floor 

Board City Hail Commissioners, Mayor's office, City Hall 

Board Dupont Street Commissioners, SW cor Kearny and 

and Clay 
Board Education, City Hall 22 second floor 
Board Equalization, City Hall 3 second floor 



Board Health, Mayor's Office City Hall 

Board Revenue Fund Commissioners, Mayor's Office City 

Hall 
Board Sui>ervisoi-s Clerk of. City Hall 4 second floor 
Board Water Commissioners, City Hall, 4 second floor 
Clerk County, City Hall 18 first floor 
Coroner County, 636 Clay room 11 

Court Third District, 27 Post, Judge's chambers 27 Post 
Court Fourth District, 8 Montgomery Avenue, Judge's 
chambers 29 Montgomery Block 

Court Twelfth District, City Hall second floor, Judge's 
chambers 45 Montgomery Block 

Court Fifteenth District, 8 Montgomery Avenue third 
floor. Judge's chambers 8 Montgomery Av third floor 

Court Nineteenth District, 417 Kearny, Judge's chambers 
417 Kearny 

Court County, City Hall second floor, Judge's chambers 
504 Kearny 

Court Probate, City Hall second floor. Judge's chambers 
City Hall second floor 

Court Municipal Criminal, 729 Montgomery, Judge's cham- 
bers 729 Montgomery 

Court City Criminal, City" Hall second floor. Judge's cham- 
bers 

Court Police, City Hall first floor. Judge's chambers City 
Hall second floor 

Court Justices, 804 and 806 Montgomery 

Fire Alarm and Police Telegraph, Brenham PI 

Fire Department Commissioners, 23 Kearny 

Fire Department Corporation Yard, N s Sacramento bet 
East and Drumm 

Fire Department Engineers, 23 Kearny 

Fire Marshal, City Hall 18 third floor 

Grand Jury Rooms, City Hall 21 third floor 

Great Register, City Hall 16 second floor 

Harbor Police, E s Davis nr Pacific 

Health Officer, 124 Geary 

Hospital, E s Potrero Av bet Twenty-second and Twenty- 
third 

Industrial School Department, Board Supervisors, office 
City Hall 4 second floor 

Jail, N s Broadway bet Kearny and Dupont 

License Collector County, City Hall 7 second floor 

Market Inspector, 124 Gearj- 

Mayor City and County, City Hall first floor 

Park Commissioners, 302 Montgomery 

Physician City and County, office County Hospital 

Police Chief, City Hall, 9 and 11 first floor 

Police Commissioners, City Hall 11 first floor 

Pound Keeper, N s Pine bet Steiner and Pierce 

Public Administrator, 636 Clay room 3 

Quarantine Officer, 124 Geary 

Recorder County, SE cor Washington and Kearny 

Sheriff County, City Hall 8 first floor 

Station House, City Hall basement 

Superintendent Common Schools, City Hall 22 second 
floor 

Superintendent Streets, basement City Hall cor Merchant 
and Dunbar Court 

Surveyor County, 629 Washington 

Tax Collector County, City Hall cor Merchant 1 first floor 

Treasurer County, City Hall 3 first floor 



CITY ORDINANCE. 

HACKS AND CABS — RATES OK FARE. 

A Hack for 1 person not exceeding 1 mile $1 50 

A Hack for 2 or more persons, not exceeding 1 mile 2 50 

Each additional mile for each passenger 50 

A Cab for 1 person not exceeding 1 mile 1 00 

A Cab for 2 or more persons, not exceeding 1 mile. . 1 50 

Each passenger for each additional mile 25 

A Cab for 2 persons, when engaged by the hour, to 
be computed for the time occupied in going and 
returning, including detention, for the first hour 1 60 

Each subsequent hour so used 1 00 

A Hack for 4 or less persons, when engaged by the 
hour, to be computed for the time occupied in 
going and returning, including detention, for the 

first hour 3 00 

Each subsequent hour so used 2 CO 

No extra charge shall be made for the ordinary amount 
of baggage. 

Penalty not less than ^ nor more than $10 for each 
offence. 






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JAMES Qt. STEELE & CO., manufacturers of Steele's California Perfumes. 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant ,; 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, CHANGES, REMOVALS, ETC. 

RECEIVED TOO LATE FOR REGULAR INSERTION. 



Adams William H., advertising department Evening Bul- 
letin, dwl 132 Sixth 
Adamson Emeline Mrs., furnished rooms, 645 Clay 
.lEnger Julius {^-Eivier d- Obi), dwl 13 Pacific 
Mnger & Ohl (Julnts ^Unaer and Andreas Ohl), proptrs 

St. Louis Hotel, 11 and 13 Pacific 
Ahem Richard Henrj', housepainter, dwl 279 Minna 
Ahlboni Henry, expressman, NE cor Dupont and Post, 

dwl S s Fell bet Steiner and Pierce 
Aiken Addie E. Miss, teacher Broadway Grammar School, 

dwl 7 Pearl 
AIKE.\ CHARLES, attorney at law, office 34 Mont- 
gomery Block, dwl 7 Pearl 
Aiken John P., clerk Post-office, dwl 7 Pearl 
AIKEX WILUAM II.. attorney at law, office 34 Mont- 
gomery Block, dwl 7 Pearl 
Alatorre Teophilo, manufacturing jeweler, 1519 Stockton 
ALBERTSOX JOSEPH A., physician, office and dwl 

109 O'Farrell 
Allen R. A. , collector Harrison and Bryant St. wharves 
Allison Charles, wharfinger Second and Berry St. wharves 
Alpine Gold and Silver Mining Co., office 419 Cal room 28 
Alta Soap Co. (late Falkinburgh <t Co., William A. Eng- 
wer and John W. Thunnan), manufs soaps, Oregon 
bet Washington and Jackson 
Altschul Ludwig, wholesale liquors, 809 Montgomer>', dwl 

929 Larkin 
AMERICAN DISTRICT TELEGRAPH, office 222 

Sansom 
American Steamship Co., J. R. Erringer Jr. agent, office 

518 Clay 
A3IES H. K., manager Howe Machine Co., office 873 

Market, dwl W s Powell bet Post and Sutter 
Anderson Albert {Edsberg lO A.), dwl 1002 Market 
Anderson David C., actor, dwl 600 Bush 
A\«ELL JOXATHAX \S'., apothecary, NWcor First 

and Folsom, dwl 415 Brj'ant 
Anson Henrj' S., real estate, dwl 609 Post 
Armer Max {Kullman tt A.), dwl 1424 Bush 
Armstrong James, proprietor Eagle Brewerj', SW cor 

Folsom and Fourteenth 
Armstrong John L., stockbroker, office 421 California, 

dwl 200 Hyde 
Askey A., wharfinger Francisco St. Wharf 
ASSMA\Sf ADOLPH, fancy groceries, and manufac- 
turer caviar, 32 California Market, dwl E s Jersey bet 
El Dorado and Alabama 
Avan John, policeman City Hall, dwl 13 Tehama 
Avj- Eugene, woolgrower and wholesale sheep dealer, of- 
fice 320 Sansom room 2, dwl 310 Lombard 
AYRES JOH\ G., office 324 CaUfomia 
Babsox Seth, architect, office 320 Cal, dwl 132 McAllister 
Badger Mill and Mining Co. (Lander Co., Nev.), O. H. 

Spencer secretarj', office 408 California room 13 
Badger Thomas, pilot commissioner, office 44 Merchants' 

Exchange 
Baker Edward P. Rev., pastor Third Congregational 

Church, dwl 1909 Jessie 
Baker I. M. (BalcerJ; Smith), NW cor Eddy and Mason 
Baker Joseph (Sharkey iL- B.), dwl 22 Grove Av 
Baker & Smith (/. M. Baker and P. C. Smith), groceries 

and liquors, NW cor Eddy and Mason 
BAL<'H HOR.iCE >I., nrganbuilder and musical in- 
strument repairer, 432 Kearny, dwl 614 Taylor 
BALI»WI\'S ACADE.nY OF ItlliSIC, Thomas 

Maguire proprietor, junction Market and Powell 
Banning Henry, laborer, dwl NW cor Geary and Lyon 
Bargogliotti Paolo, fruits, 145 Post 
Bark A. William, vocalist, dwl 812 California 
Barnard L D. (Scymmir d- Co.), dwl Russ House 
Barnes Charles E. , mechanical engineer and draftsman, 
and agent for organ blowers, 609 Miss, dwl 120 Jones 



Barnes E. T., city agent California Ins. Co., dwl 007 Bush 

Barrows Robert, secretary California Cracker Co., office 
320 Sansom, dwl 327 j" Filbert 

Barss James E., real-estate agent, 230 Kearny room 10 

BARTO!* B. F. d: CO., proprietora Pioneer Salt 
Mills, 213 Sacramento 

Barton T. J., physician, office and dwl 14 Eddy 

Bauer John G., cabinetmaker Walcolm Ss, Schomberg, 
dwl 512 Fovuth 

B.4Y DISTRICT F.IIR GROUND ASSOCIATION, 
Thomas W. Hinchraan secretary, office 317 Mont 

Beach H^nry Martin (Beach <t Parker), res Oakland 

BEACH «6 PARKER (H. M. Beach and Frederick 
Parker), real-estate and commissionbrokers, 608 
Market 

Beardsley Paul F., stockbroker, office 328 Montgomery 
room 8, dwl 821 Bush 

Bee Frank, dwl 706 California 

Belden Joseph W., bookkeeper Merchants* Exchange 
Bank, dwl 1020 Geary 

BELL, GULLIXSOX A CO. (John Bell and Henry 
A. Gullixsion), carpets, oil cloths, etc., 653 Market 

Bell John (Bell, Gullixson & Co.), dwl Occidental Hotel 

Bell William H. (Bell d- Oaklet/), dwl 137 Montgomery 

BELL •» ClILLEX (W. H. Bell and Thomas Cxdlen), 
booksellers and stationers, 639 Kearny 

Bell & Oakley (William H. Bell and A. D. Oakley), 
rubber printing stamps, 137 Montgomery room 6 

Bellemere Adolph, wholesale and retail wines and liquors, 
7 Stockton, dwl 111 PoweU 

Belloc Hypolite (Ir. Belloc), dwl 325 O'Farrell 

BELLOC IR. (Iren4e Belloc, Henry BarroUhet, Hy- 
polite Belloc, ayid Germain de Montaiizan), bankers, 
and agents General Ti-ans-Atlantic Co. (Paris, 78 Rue 
de Courcelles), office 524 Montgomery 

Belloc Irenee (Ir. Belloc), res Paris 

Belmar A., chop house, 704 Mission 

Bensick William (M. Hagyerty <t Co.), dwl N s Tehama 
bet Second and Third 

BEN'TLEY WILLIA.M DARLEY, vice-consul Brazil, 
office 309 California, res Oakland 

Benton C. L., bookkeeper Union Coal Co., dwl 927J Post 

Beretta G., moneybroker and conveyancer, o^ce 518 Clay 

Berger M. L. Rev., pastor Westminster Presb>'terian 
Church, dwl McAllister nr Steiner 

Bergez Jean (Liebschiitz tfc B.), dwl 631 Union 

Berliner Isydor A. (Kaskell d- B.), dwl 353 Third 

Berner William, groceries NE cor Natoma and Ninth 

Berry George, dwl 10 Eleventh 

BERRY, WOLFSKILL *i CO. (Fulton G. Berry, 
Edward Wolfskill, and Amos Boberts), stock- 
brokers, office 324 Montgomery 

BERRYMAX A HOYIjE (Henry B. Berniman), coal 
and pig iron, and agents Wellington Colliery, B. C, 
office Bulkhead bet Pacific and Jacksoi-St. wharves 

Bessor Margaret Miss, proprietress Roxbury House, 318 
Pacific 

Bestier Frederick, shoemaker E. Eiesendahl, dwl 337 
Keamj' 

Bethel Thomas W., policeman City Hall, dwl 13 Fifth Av 
nr Harrison 

Bettelheim A. S. Rev. Dr., minister Congregation Ohabai 
Shalorae, dwl 1006 Post 

Bine Leon (Bine d- Georges), dwl 418 Sutter 

Bine & Georges (ieoji Bine and Hippolyte Georges), mer- 
chant tailors, 113 Sutter 

Bird Sanmel M., commission merchant, office 309 Cali- 
fornia, res Oakland 

Bisagno Guiseppe (L. Brignardello .t Co.), dwl 924 Pac 

Bishop W. D. Rev., Missionaiy Mariner's ( hurch 

Bissell George R., teacher Boys' High School, res 
Alameda 



BEAMISH'S— Shirt manufacturer. Nucleus Building, corner Third and Markei 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 70S, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC. 



81 



Blade Arthur, salesman C. Herrmann, 402 Kearny 
Blair Aupistus W. , attorney at law, office 304 California, 

dwi S\V cor Howard and Twenty-fifth 
BLAKE CHARLES E. Sr., dentist, office and dwl 

123 Powell 
Blakslce Charles A., policeman City Hall, dwl TGS How 
Blanchard H. T. Mrs., clerk U. S. Survcvor-Oeneral's Office 
BLAM>l.\(i ^VILLIAM, State harbor commissioner, 

office 440 Jackson, dwl 1606 Howard 
Blankcnhorii Gottlioh, proptr Germania Brewery, NW 

cor Mason and Broadway 
Blattner Nicholas (AfcXaUi/ <i; B.), dwl Mont nr Vallejo 
Block Amelia I. Miss, teacher music, dwl llOS Powell 
Bloom Josie M. Miss, saleswoman Palmer Bros., dwl 208 

O'Farrell 
Blow Alfred W. (Blow Bros.), res Oakland 
Blow Brothers (Walter W., Robert, and Alfred W.), 

stockbrokers, office 439 California 
Blow Robert (Blow Bros.), res Oakland 
Blow Walter W. (Blow Bros.), res Oakland 
Blunt William G. (Bhint ct- Chapninn), dwl 1100 Taylor 
Blunt & Chapman (William O. Blunt and Henry Chap- 
man), taxidermists and naturalists, (V2(i California 
BOAKI» OF CITV HALL t'0.>IMl!»8I0.'VERS, 

Mayor's office City Hall 
BOAKI> OF I»|;p6\T iiiTREET COMMISSION- 
ERS, office "l.") Clav, room 12 
BOARI» OF W.ATER COH.MISSIONERS, office 4 

City Hall, second fioor 

Bockniann R. W. , bakerv, cor Mason and Greenwich 

BOmVELL H.ARRY'H., Excelsior Windmill, pump, 

horsepower, and tank manuf, 211 and 213 Mission, 

dwl E s Bartlett bet Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth 

Boice Nathaniel, wharfinger Market St. Wharf, dwl 218 

Seventh 
Bolander Catherine (widow), dwl 736 Market 
Bolorio Joseph, dwl 15 Washington 
Boquet John Jules, real estate, dwl 1305 Dupont 
Boradt Henry (Lynch, B. & Colburt), dwl SE cor Mission 

and Tenth 
Borger J. W., collector Main St. Wharf 
Borgstrom Jennie Mrs., dressmaking, 122 Mont Av 
Bortfeld Ernest (Ilnnnen d- B.), dwl 20 Boardman 
Bosqui Edward (Edward Bosqui tk Co.), dwl 814 Lomb 
Bosworth H. M., teacher music, dwl 127 Kearny 
Bowen Asa M., collector Washington St. Wharf, dwl 1804 

Mason 
BOWERS J. MILTON, physician, ofTice and dwl 632 

Market 
BOniE HENRY P., attorney at law, office 318 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 1016 Bush 
Boyce Henry F., clerk G. F. H. Wilkins, dwl SW cor 

Turk and Pierce 
Bradford Wallace, salesman Charles M. Plum & Co., dwl 

2123 California 
BRAI»FORn WILLIAM B., agent A. Booth & Co.'s 

Salmon, office 318 Front, res San Rafael 
Bradley George L., office 521 Front, dwl 820 Sutter 
BRAl'tSTREET J. R., rubber molding, 609 Mission, 

dwl 1224 Mission 
Braham George, supt Pac. Hebrew Orphan Asylum and 

Home Society, dwl 1517 Mason 
Branigan Matthew (Ringrose & B.), dwl 43 Minna 
Brauer W. A., teacher music, dwl 126 Turk 
BRE€K ALLEN »t CO. (William C. iTcwji), man- 
agers Commercial Bureau of California, office 528 Cal 
Bremer Ernest, collector Vallejo St. Wharf 
Brennan John (Kennedy & B.), dwl 2206 Steiner 
Breslauer Louis, dealer wool and hides, dwl 418 Sutter 
Breslin La\vrence B. Rev., assistant Pastor St. Francis 

Church, dwl 519 Green 
Brickwedel C. H. Jr. & Co. (Hitgo Fugel), proprietors 
Ancon Hotel and Restaurant, SE cor Pac and Drumm 
BRICKWEUEL H. & CO. (Henry Schroder), im- 
porters wines and liquors, 208 and 210 Front 
Brignardello L. & Co. (GuLseppe Bisarino], macaroni and 

vermicelli factory, 815 Sansom, office 420 Battery 
Brignardello Luigi (L. Brignardello ib Co.), dwl 1406i 

Dupont 
Brodhead W. H., stockbroker, office 331 Mont, room 7 
Brooke Charles (Swan it B.) dwl 2327 Howard 
Brooks Daniel S., dwl 608 Market 
Broughton Napoleon L. , capitalist, dwl Lick House 
Brown John W., draftsman G. L. Pierce, dwl 1006 Sutter 
Browne G. R. A., collector Jackson St. Wharf 
Bruce Herbert E. (Kennison & Co.), dwl W s San Bruno 

Road, nr Twenty-ninth 
Brunil Simon (Shoenbcrq & B.), dwl 413 Jones 
Bruns Hermann (Taylor d- B.), dwl 125 Seventh 



Bruns Rudolph, clerk Taylor & Bruns, dwl SE cor Twen- 
ty-first and Valencia 
BRYAN THOMAS, proprietor American Exchange 

Hotel, 319 and 325 Sansom 
Bryan William, real estate, dwl American .Exchange 

Hotel 
Buchn Christian, maltster Pioneer Malt House 
Buckley E. J., actor Baldwin's Academy of Music 
Bugbee John S., dwl SW cor Guerrero and Eighteenth 
Buhr & Bandy (Benjamin F. Bulir and Aaron N: Ban- 
dy), commission fruit and vegetables, NE cor Front 
and Washington 
Burckes Warren H., books, stationery, and fancy goods, 

1124 Market, dwl 108 Turk 
BLRKE FR.4NCIS H., asphaltumroofer and con- 
tractor, office 501 Montgomery, dwl 714 Leavenworth 
Burke William F., messenger San Francisco Clearing 

House, 211 Sansom, dwl 1213 Clay 
BURNS A.4RON M., State harbor commissioner, 

office 440 Jackson, res Oakland 
BURR C. C. <K <'0. (Mary Hxidson), successors to 
H. C. Hudson & Co., manufacturers mustard, spices, 
etc., factory foot Stockton, office 116 Front 
BURT J. <iiIIS, general purchasing agent, office 116 

Front, dwl 528 Pine 
Bj'ram Edward, policeman City Hall, dwl 711 Greenwich 
BY.YBEE JOHN F., manuf redwood lumber and 
agent Ru.ssian River (Duncan's) Mills, and stm Alex. 
Du!ican, office 18 Market 
Caduc & Valin (Philip Cadue and William, H. De Valin), 
agents Hydrocarbonized Brick Pavement Co., office 
513 Montgomery 
Cahill John (CahillA Currie), dwl 2110 Larkin 
CAHILL ** CirRRIE (John Cahill and Frank P. 

Currie), liquor saloon, 125 Post 
Caleb George (Stout cfc C), dwl 562 Stevenson 
California Rifle Association, office 328 Mont room 21 
CALIFORNIA TOOL WORKS, John Weichhart 

pro|irietor, 143 and 145 Beale 
CALIFORNIA VITRIFIED SEWER PIPE 
WORKS, Gladding, Mc-Bean & Co. proprietors, 
office 213 Market 
Callaghan T. Rev. , pastor St. Bridget's Church, dwl SW 

cor Broadway and Van Ness Av 
Callahan Dennis J., liverj- stable, 844 How, dwl 425 Sixth 
Callahan James, watchman Hibernia Savings and Loan 

Socdwl 229 Third 
Calnan John, harnessmaker, 506J Howard 
Campbell J. B., captain U. S. A., dwl Presidio 
Cannon Frank, laborer, dwl Polk Lane nr Stockton 
Canteri Luigi, tailor Joseph Vicci, dwl 637 Pacific 
Cappelman Christian, groceries and liquors, 719 Pacific 
Cargill Andrew H., stockbroker, office Pacific Exchange 

Building, 314 Montgomery 
Carl Hennann, with Louis Wilkie, dwl 242 Sutter 
Carlsen Lauritz Rev., pastor Our Saviour's Scandinavian 

Evangelical Lutheran Church, dwl 335 Bryant 
CARMEN ISL.4ND SALT WORKS, salesroom and 

office 223 Sacramento 
Carothers John, barkeeper, dwl 6 St. Mary 
Carr Matthew D., compositor, dwl 1016 Pine 
Carr William T., dwl 533i Stevenson 
Carter George E., broker, office 238 Mont, dwl 11 Kearny 
Cashin John, president People's Ice Co., dwl Cosmopoli- 
tan Hotel 
Cast Steel Shoe and Die Co., William R. Townsend, sec- 
retary, office 59 Nevada Block 
CASTilLHIIN FREDERICK .1., attorney at law, office 

607 Kearny, dwl 1606 Leavenworth 
Castro Jesus, expressman, NW cor Vallejo and Dupont, 

dwl W s Powell bet Pacific and Broadway 
Cathcart James F. , actor Baldwm's Academy of Music 
Central Belmont Silver Mining Co. (Belmont, Nev.), of- 
fice 328 Montgomery room 22 
Cerac Theodore, porter Alexandre Levy, dwl 836 Vallejo 
CERF EM.4NIJEL, expressman, NW cor Mission and 

Third, dwl 19 Bernard 
Chadboume F. S. (F. S. Chadbourne & Co.), dwl NW 

cor Bush and Leavenworth 
Chadbourne F. S. & Co., furniture and bedding, 727 

Market 
Chadbourne Thomas J. , ship bread and cracker bakery, 

1412 Dupont, office 214 Sacramento 
Chamberlin C. Rev., pastor St. Paul's M. E. Church 

South, dwl 802 Shotwell 
Chamblin John, wharfinger Main St. Wharf 
Champlin John L., real-estate agent, dwl NE cor Twen- 

tv-fourth and Howard 
Chapman Henry (Blunt <t C), dwl 530 Pine 



TAMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists, removed to No. 316 Kearny St. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchan' i\ 



82 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Chapman James, wharfinger Battery St. Wharf 
CHAPMAK Itl'Sl^DLL, real-estate and general busi- 
ness agent, 224 Montgomery, res San Rafael 
Church Isaac S., dwl 2727 California 
CITV €KIini.\'AL <'OliilT, City Hall, second floor 
€ITV IR«.\ WORKS, Low&Chartrey proptrs,2G and 

28 Fremont 
Clancy Owen H., groceries and liquors, SE cor Sixteenth 

and Second Av 
CLAKK (iEOROE >V., importer paper hangings, win- 
dow shades, etc., 645 Market, dwl 720 Union 
Clarke C. J., dwl 908 Jackson 
Clarke George E. {Clarke <C- Co.), res Reveille, Nev. 
Clarke k Co. (George E. Clarice and James B. Malholm), 

milling, office 331 Montgonier\' room 7 
Cleary Michael (C. E. itcCiuker <t- Co.), res Oakland 
demons Sarah G. Mrs. , teacher music, dwl 711 Taylor 
Clever Christina Mrs., confectioner*', etc., 912 Market 
Clingan David, wharfinger, Howard St. Wharf 
Clinton George, policeman City Hall, dwl 1006^ Wash 
Cochran Robert N., dwl 813 Howard 
Code Philip D. (Code, El/elt it Co.), dwl 2136 Howard 
Coffey Joseph F., clerk prosecuting attorney Police 

Court, dwl W s Dolores nr Twenty-second 
Coffin Flora, forewoman D. Hicks & Co. , dwl 5 Verona PI 
Cogan Patrick, laborer, dwl N s Sierra nr Louisiana 
I'OOHLA^" JOII.\ M., U. S. district attorney, office 

U. S. Court Building, dwl 1714 Hyde 
Cohanc John, hostler Market St. R. R., dwl 617 Hayes 
Cohen Henry S., books and stationerj-, 2202 Sixteenth 
Cohen Samuel Harrj', printer Francis & Valentine, dwl 

2202 Sixteenth nr Mission 
Cohrn Edward, policeman City Hall, dwl 426 Chestnut 
Colburt John (Lynch, Boradt d: Co.), dwl SE cor Mission 

and Tenth 
Cole Hattie Miss, actress Baldwin's Academy of Music 
C'OLLI.VS JO.SEPH €., real-estate office". 318 Kearny 
Combination Gold and Silver Mining Co. (Inyo Co., Cal.), 

David Wilder secretarv, office 328 Mont room 22 
CO>IMER<IAL BITREAU OF CALIFORMA, Al 

len Breck & Co., managers, office 528 California 
Conkling Silas, collector Green St. Wharf 
CONSOLinATED IMPERIAL MINING CO., 
(Gold Hill, Nev.), W. E. Dean secretary, office 419 Cal 
Cooke Francis H., coachman, dwl 710 Broadway 
COXSJ'L BRAZIL, William Darley Bentley, office 309 

California 
Corbaz F., teacher music, dwl 14 Russ 
Coursen G. A. , stockbroker, office 430 Cal, dwl 1006 Fulton 
Cox A. A., salesman James E. Gordon, dwl 235 O'Farrell 
Cox R. H., actor Baldwin's Academy of Music 
Craig John (Mallady X- C), dwl 25 Valencia 
CR.AIG JOSEPH (Edwards <t- C), attorney at law, 

office 37 Merchants' Exchange, dwl 1916 Sutter 
Craig William, wholesale wines and liquors, NW cor Mar- 
ket and Ellis, dwl 21 Powell 
Crisolio John, vegetables, 620 Broadway, dwl 1229 Dupont 
Crowninshield Jacob, clerk Board Commissioners Dupont 

Street, dwl 18 Prospect PI 
Cullen Thomas (Bell & Cullea), dwl 1132 Market 
Culverwell Richard S., mining secretary, office 320 San- 

som room 5, dwl 9 Glen Park Av 
Cunningham Stephen J. (Purman ib C), dwl 707 Hyde 
I'l'RLETT WILLI.AM, architect, office 330 Pine room 

61, dwl 509 Franklin 
Currie Frank P. (Cahill <fc Currie), dwl 1037J Folsom 
Curtis John W., secretarj' The Pearson & Curtis To- 
bacco Co., office 309-317 Clay 
Dachet Louis, barkeeper Leonhardt Breidenstein, dwl 

333 Vandewater 
Damm C. D., cabinetmaker Walcolm & Schomberg, dwl 

423 Bush 
DAMEL JOII^' ^ CO., Co-operative Marble Works, 

421 Pine 
DANNEKBERG AM.ALIE Mrs., children's goods, 24 

Montgomery, dwl 614 Sutter 
Darling Abram (Morris <fc D.), dwl 2310 Mission 
Darneal H-rvey, secretarj' The General Land Agency of 

California, 405 California, dwl 732 Hayes 
Davis G., dwl 23 Powell 
Daj' James M., dwl 850 Market 
De Fragua Antrmio Maria, watchman stm New World, 

Market St. Wharf, dwl 116 Jackson 
Dearborn Theodore H., agent Kansas City, St. Jo. & 
Council Bluffs, and St. Louis, Kansas City and North- 
em Railways, office 3 New Mo'it, dwl Grand Hotel 
Dell Charles L.' (Matthews ct D.), dwl 139 Fourth 
Denison Charles H., insurance agent, office 38 California, 
res Alameda 



Desmond Cornelius, hatter, 6 New Montgomery, Palace 

Hotel, dwl 1008 Mission 
Detje N., musician, dwl 74 Grove Av 
Dillon Bernard F., groceries and liquors, NW cor Taj'lor 

and Tyler and SE cor Sixth and Shipley, dwl 161 

Shipley 
DIETZ A. C. «& <'0., importers and wholesale dealers 

oils, paints, varnishes, and lamps, 224 Front 
Dickinson O. Jr., mining, office 331 Montgomerj- room 10, 

dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Dillon Charles H., deputy license collector, dwl 1819 Hyde 
Doane & Reed (Joshua G. Doane and Charles E. H. 

Reed), hay, wood, and coal, cor Tyler and Webster 
Docking Joel, brickmason, dwl 638 Vallejo 
Dodd N. M. H. J. (widow), dwl 9 Sherman PI 
Dodge, Russ & Co., merchants (Ferndale, Humboldt Co., 

Cal.), office 209 Davis 
Dold Charles (Kittelberger <t- D.), dwl NE cor Fourth and 

Everett 
Donnolly Thomas C, dwl 1611 Mason 
Donovan James, painter, 117 Davis, dwl 1516 Post 
Donzelle A. J., collector Market St. Wharf 
Dow Dwight S., commercial night school, 641 and 643 

Market, Nucleus Block, dwl 911 Laguna 
Doyle William, fireman U. S. Mint, dwl 221 Second 
Dowen Albert P., lumberman, dwl 14^ Ritch 
I>ll ROSE FR.ANK, manuf bed comforters, 9 Sutter, 

dwl 1402 Hyde 
Dufficy Peter (Enrujht i; D.), dwl 25 Ridley 
Dudgeon Edwin, contractor, 206 Montgomery 
Dunbar James W. (Dunbar A Ilixson), dwl 917 Guerrero 
Dunbar & Hixson (James W. Dunbar aiuL Edi'ard T. 

Hixson), produce commission, 206 Washington 
Duncan A. & Co. (Duncan's Mills, Sonoma Co.), office 18 

Market 
DlfXCAX GEORGE A' CO. (George Duncan and 

Jam's Currie), asphaltum and masticroofers, office 

652 Market 
Dunlevj' Andrew J., policeman City Hall, dwl 933^ Folsom 
East Yellow Jacket Mixing Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), P. B. 

Turner secretarj-, office 320 Sansom 
EASTO\' A. S. A CO., real-estate and land agents, 

office 32 Merchants' Exchange 
Easton Asahel S. (A. S. Easton & Co.), dwl 26 Haight 
Ecoles W. E., clerk W. M. Searby, dwl Concordia Hotel 
Echeverria Francisco P., physician, office and dwl 1107 

Stockton 
Eddy William T., teamster Lewis & Co., dwl 411 Fourth 
Edeiman Charles, assistant storekeeper Custom House, 

dwl 26 Sixth 
Edsberg Edward (Edsberq <t Anderson), dwl W s Devisa- 

dero bet Eddj' and Ellis 
Edsberg & Anderson (Edward Edsberg and Albert An- 
derson), drj' goods, 1002 Market 

Edwards , master bark Oregonian, Howard St. Wharf 

Edwards E. D. (Edwards d- Craig), dwl 27 Turk 
EDWARDS «S CRAIG (E. D. Edwards and Joseph 

Craij), attorneys at law, office 37 Merchants* Ex- 
change 
Elbe C. B. (Oft & E.), dwl 1216 Market 
ELLIOT CH.ARLES, city superintendent Spring Val- 
ley Water Works, dwl fe'W cor Folsom and First 
Ellis Samuel, blacksmith, 53 Beale, dwl 1511 Jackson 
Empire Steam Coffee and Spice Mills, Camiie & Co. proptrs, 

SE cor Eleventh and Harrison, office 318 Front 
Engwer William A. (Alta Soap Co.), dwl 826 Union 
Erringer John R. Jr., railroad and steamship agent, ofiBce 

518 Clay, dwl 206 Chestnut 
EUREKA STONE MANUFACTURING CO., Mai 

colm Macdonald superintendent, factorj'535 Brannan, 

office 567 Market 
Fais Henry L., diaraondsetter, 311 Pine room 9, dwl 

554 Tehama 
Falk Morris, dwl 444 Clementina 

Falk Philip, mining, office 432 California, dwl 541 Turk 
Farnfield Charles P., clerk Union Insurance Co., dwl 

Commercial Hotel 
FARXS WORTH A CL.ARK (EliasD. Farnstrorthand 

Zerah P. Clark), agents fire insurance, office 209 San 
Famum John E., exchange teller Merchant's Exchange 

Bank, res Oakland 
Faulkner George H., bookkeeper, dwl 423 Sutter 
Faull John A. (Wilson, Merry <t- Co.), dwl 1209 Sutter 
FERRAL ROBERT, Judge City Criminal Court, cham- 
bers Citj' Hall 
Ferrero Mateo, boot and shoemaker, 629^ Union 
Field George D., deputy license collector, res Oakland 
Fifield Daniel, fireman Southern Pac. R. R., dwl NE cor 

Sixteenth and Howard 



Smithsonian Medical Institute treats Eheumatic and Chronic Diseases, 635 Cal 



^ p. VAN SCHAACZ & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 7U, and 716 Kearny, EstabHshed 1862. 



ADDITIONAL NAMES, REMOVALS, ETC, 



83 



Fischer Nicolas, native wines, 851 Market 
Fitch J. B. (Fitch ,»• Vpal), dwl 330} Bush 
Fitch & Veal (J. B. Fitch and John T. Veat), wines 

and liquors, 338 Bush 
Fitsclicu John, sawyer Charles Thistlewaite, dwl 482 

Bryant 
Fltzhuurli William M., deputv license collector, dwl 423 

Kddy 

Flynn Andrew, liquor dealer, dwl 511 Octavia 
Fopiana A., hootblackinpr, 853 Market, dwl N s Union bet 

Stockton and Powell 
FOSTKK S. A Vn. (A. F. Soott), wholesale and job- 

binjj grocers, 3() California 
Fouse William P., collector Pacific St. Wharf 
Fox Charles J., barkee))er James Rvie, dwl 777 Market 
Fox H. B.. dentist, office and dwl 1018 Market 
F^nce William, clerk D. H. Tvving: &, Co., dwl 111 Fourth 
FKAIN'K KKOS. tV' <'0. (Fredirick A. and George P. 

Frank, and Fuller <C- Williams, Madison, Wis.), 

ajn-icultural implements, and agents W. A. Wood 

Mowini; and Reaping Machine Co., 34!) Market 
Freaner John A., office 300 Califomia, dwl 810 Mission 
Frederichs Richard, expressman, NW cor Sansom and 

Bush, dwl 415 FVancisco 
Frisius Frederick A., clerk coiner's department U. S. 

Mint, tlwl NE cor Hyde and Green 
Furman William Harrison (Furnian <k Cunningham), 

dwl 835 Harrison 
Furman & Cunningham (WiVh'flun Harrison Furman and 

S. J. Cnn7iinf)ham), real-estate and business agents, 

331 Kearny room 3 
Gadsby Elijah H., house and signpalnter, 505 Mission, 

dwl G55 Seventeenth 
GALLA<aill-:K Hl'fiH P. Rev., pastor St. Joseph's 

Church, dwl W s Tenth bet Howard and Folsom 
Granatin L. C, collector Francisco St. Wharf 
Garcia E. R., teacher music, dwl 1024 Stockton 
Gar.liner Thomas {Hooktr & G.), 426 Montgomery 
Gardner James H., Custom House broker, office Custom 

House, res Saucelito 
Gardner Samuel, whai-flnger Washington St. Wharf 
GAItlROLDI G. G., frescopainter, studio and office, 

861 Market 
Gasque Henrv F. (Gasqvc <£• Ricchers and Riechers & 

a.), dwl SW cor Hyde and O'Farrell 
Ganthier Eugene (Gauthier tfc Schmitt), dwl 306 Green 
Gauthier & Schmitt (Eugene Ganthier and Joseph 

Schmitt), stockbrokers, 238 Montgomeiy 
Gauthorne Charles A. , photographer D. B. Taylor & Co. 
General Land Agency of California (The), Charles Vinzent 

president, Hervey Darneal secretan,-, office 405 Cal 
Georges Hippolyte (Bine <t G.), dwl 730 Bush 
Gibbs Charles Erwin, attorney at law and court commis- 
sioner Twelfth District Court, office 402 Montgomerj', 

dwl 2215 Steiner 
GIBSON WESTOX, merchandisebroker, office 402 

Front, dwl 005 Pine 
GIOVANMXI KAMEL, wood and coal, 816 Pacific 
GL.\»l»I>l'G, McBEAN •&- CO. (Charles Gladding, 

P. McG. McBean, and George Chainhers), proptrs 

Cal. Vitrified Sewer Pipe Works, office 213 Market 
Glass Henry, U. S. N. commander training ship James- 
town, d'wl 220 Turk 
Good Harry C, dwl 611 Taylor 
Goodall James E., deputy license collector, dwl American 

Exchange 
Goodman A. & Co. (Marcus Goodman), liquor saloon, 406 

Montgomery 

Goodman Abraham (.4. Goodman <t Co.), dwl 328 Minna 
Goodman Marcus (A. Goodman J: Co.), dwl 328 Minna 
GOKDOX J.4MES F... importer and dealer hardware, 

349 Market, dwl 318 First 
Gough Charles H., deputv license collector city and county 
Gould A. S. , dwl 429 Geary 

Gould Charles A. (Murdoch, G. & Co.), dwl 108 Ellis 
Giiwan Mai-garet (widow), dwl 1316 Kearny, rear 
GKA\GEKS* BrSIXES8 ASSOriATION, Thomas J. 

Brooke manager, 106 Davis 
GRANT A. N., hay and grain, 1141 Market, dwl 463 

Stevenson 

Grant John, carpenter and builder, 1149 Market 
GRAY A SON (Samuel Gray), stairbuilders, 2245 Mis- 
sion, rear 
Green John C, salesman Household Furnishing Co., dwl 

617 Post 
Green William H., liquor saloon, 997 Market, dwl 613 

Bush 
Green & Seller (Louis Green and David Sei7er), clothing, 

689 Market 



Greene & Co. (Clay M. Greene and Harry A . Greene), 

stockbrokers, 324i Montgomery 
GREEN WOOI> l^'iLLIAM M., proptr India Rice 

Mill, E s Fremont nr Mission, dwl Grand Hotel 
Grosh Samuel, miller, dwl 220 Seventh 
Guild Albert H., collector Commercial Bureau of Cali- 
fornia, dwl 237 Second 
GIIITTARI> E. A. <'0. ( V. Rey), Eureka Coffee and 

Spice Mills, 515 and 517 Commercial 
OuUixson Henry A. (Bell, GuUixson Jk Co.), dwl 1408 

Leavenworth 
Habelmann Theodore, teacher music, dwl 614 Bush 
Haendel Isador, boots and shoes, 132 Third, dwl 339 

Minna 
Haggerty Patrick S., policeman, dwl 914 J Natoma 
Halen A. W. Vd (Skinner it- //.), res Oakland 
Hall George (Leiris i(r Co.), dwl 825 Harrison 
Hall James H. (Ifall d- Murrai/), dwl N s Twenty-second 

bet Howard and Shotwell 
Hall James V. (Hall & Kelshaw), dwl 614 Market 
Hall John Chase, attorney at law, office 240 Mont room 16 
Hal! Robert (Howe <fc //.), dwl 825 Twentieth 
Hall S. P. & C. P., attorneys at law, office 240 Mont- 
gomery room 16 
HALL JSi KELSHAW (James V. Hall and Joseph 

Kehhau'), proptrs Sacramento Boiler Works, 37 

Fremont 
HALL A MURRAY (James II. Hall and G. JV. M%ir- 

ray). Milkmen's New Depot Liquor Saloon, 937 Market 
Hamer Henrv C. , locksmith and bellhanger, 44 Geary, 

dwl 315 Ellis 
Hansen J., ci'.rars and tobacco, 1266 Market 
Harker Asa (Taber, Harker ifc Co.), dwl SW cor Octavia 

and Pine 
HAKLEY CH.IRLES & CO. (George Barley), barrel 

and junk dealers, 116 and 118 Davis 
Harmon George W., policeman City Hall, dwl 8 Brenham 

PI 
HARMON SAMIFEL H., lumber, Pier 13 Steuart, dwl 

6 Essex PI 
Harold James, policeman City Hall, dwl 819 Montgomerj^ 
Harrington James J., clerk D. H. Twing & Co., dwl 419 

Stockton 
Hartmann Emil A., jeweler, 16 Third, dwl 63 Thirteenth 
Hathaway John D., stockbroker, office 419 Califomia room 

17, dwl S s Liberty nr Valencia 
Haub Philip (Wagner d: H.), dwl 3 Sonoma PI 
Hausman S. & Co. (Loxiis Hausmann), importers and 

manufs lookingglasses, moldings, etc., 647 Market 
HA'WKINS A CANTRELL (William Hawkins and 

Thomas G. Cantrcll), machine works, 210 and 212 

Beale 
Heald I. A., machinist Moreau & Co., 514 Commercial, 

dwl 334 Bush 
Heckey Thomas, collector Battery St. Wharf 
Heinze Louis, fancv glassblower, 626 Cal, dwl 16 Garden 
Henarie D. V. B. (E. Martin & Co.), dwl 904 Taylor 
Hencken Martin, liquor dealer, dwl 633 Minna 
Hennessy Dennis, tailor, 506 Howard, dwl 923i Folsom 
HENRIUIIES »AYII», stockbroker, office Pacific Ex- 
change Building, 314 Montgomery, dwl 331 Kearny 
HERMANN LIICIEN, mining secretary, office 220 San- 
som, dwl 299 Hyde 
Hermannshon L., liquor saloon, 1061 Market 
Herrick S. W., assistant engineer U. S. Mint, res Oakland 
Herring William J., Overland Freight and Transfer Ex- 
press, office 228 Montgomery, dwl 532 Mission 
Herrmann C, hats and caps, 402 Kearny, dwl 1003 Powell 
Hesthal August, proptr Eureka Glove Factory, 2618 Bush 
Heywood Frank, lumber dealer, dwl 100 Sixth 
Heywood Zimri B., lumber dealer, dwl 1533 Polk 
HINCHMAN THOMAS W ., secretary Bay District 

Fair Ground Assn, office 317 Mont, dwl 1124 Pine 
Hinckley E. G. , wholesale flax and cotton twines, 324 

Clay, dwl 118 Post 
Hirshfeld N. H., moneybroker, office 634 Montgomery, 

dwl 12 Langton 
Hixson E. T. (Dunbar <i- H.), dwl 206 Washington 
Hixson J. M., treasurer The General Land Agency of 

Califomia, 405 Cal, dwl SW cor McAllister and Scott 
Hixson Walter D., bookkeeper, dwl SW cor McAllister 

and Scott 
Hodge Frank, collection agent Bell, Byrne & Co., 606 

Montgomery room 15, dwl 759 Market 
Hoffmann John, liquor saloon, 1057 Market 
Hogan John A., deputv license collector city and county 
HOHL>VEG FREi»ERI<'K, apothecary and chemist, 

NE cor Polk and Jackson, dwl NE cor Hyde and 

Green 



;!i 



STEELE'S Glycerine Lotion cures Tan, Sunburn, Eruptions, etc. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Hontgcmery cor. Merchj 



84 



SAN FRANCISCO BIRECTORY. 



Kenny & Sheahan (John Kenny and Maurice Sheahan) 

merchant tailors, 691 Market 
Kentuck Mining Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), William R. Town 

send secretarN', otfice 59 Nevada Block 
Keystone No. 1 and 2 Gold and Silver Mining Co. (Arizona) 

William R. Townsend secretary, office .59 Nevada Blocl 
Kilboume W. L., stockbroker, California Stock Exchang 
King Leonidas A., dentist, office and dwl 619 Kearny 
King W. A., wharfinger Mission St. Wharf 
Kittelberger Charles {Kittelberger A- Bold), dwl 409 Dup 
Kittelberger & Bold {Cliades Kittelberger and Charle 

Bold), wines and liquors, SE cor Kearny and Com 
Knox George T., stockbroker, office lOSJ Leidesdorff, dw 

NW cor Guerrero and Eighteenth 
Koebelin Lorenz, clerk, dwl 21 RondelJ PI 
K.OKni,V,KARlTTER(GotthardKoehler and Charle 

A. Hitter), manufacturers jewelrj' and silver ware, 2' 
Post 

Kraemer Julius (John W. Schaeffer & Co.), '321 Sac 
Kreger William, carpenter and builder, 108 Davis 
KIIHL, STEEL A HIC'KOX (H. George Kuhl, Thoina 

Steel, and Albert A. Hickcx), stockbrokers, office 40 

California 
KYLE .lAMES, liquor saloon, 620 Market, dwl 60. 

Jones 
La Grange Burke, memorandum clerk U. S. Mint, dw 

409 Stevenson 
La Malfa J. F. & Co. (M. Levinson), advertising special 

ties, 417 Clay 
La Pique Eli, tailor Dennis Hennessy, dwl 68 Tehama 
Lande Raphael, conductor L^. S. Mint, dwl 833 Howard 
LAXD.SKKRCER I. Jt CO. (Arpad Unra-yzthy, Ed 

ward Vollmer, S. Epstein, and Louig Grosff), manuf 

champagne, dealers wines, brandies, and soleproptr 

IXL Bitters, 414 Market and 10 and 12 Jones Alley 
Lardner Henry F., commissioner Alabama claims, offic 

U. S. Court Building room 23 
LARZELERE, WITHAM A WIOHTMAX (WiWan 

B. Larzelere, WiUiam L. Witham, and John Wight 
wa>i Jr.), produce commission merchants, SW co 
Clay and Davis 

Laton B. B., mining supt, office 228 Cal, dwl 271.5 Missioi 
LATO.V riI.4KLE§ A., secretary Commercial Insur 

ance Co. of Cal., and agent Fire Assn of Philadel 

phia, office 228 California, dwl Lick House 
Laven James A., superintendent supplies Central Pac. R 

R. stms, office 30 Sacramento, dwl 923j Harrison 
LAVERY J. G. A CO., agents Bethesda Minera 

Spring Water, 107 Stockton 
Law Matthew S., policeman City Hall, dwl 36 Perrj' 
LAWTOX EDGAR M.. secretary California Stock anc 

Exchange Board, res Alameda 
LEE BRI'CE B., State Harbor Commissioner, offict 

440 Jackson, dwl 714 Seventeenth 
Lee John, wool dealer, 320 Sansom, dwl 2219 Taylor 
Lee Roland (Lee <t- Winstanley), dwl 636 Clay 
Lee & Winstanley (Roland Lee and Clement Winstan 

ley), architects, 636 Clay room 23 
Lennan Jacob, policeman City Hall, dwl 308 Union 
Levinson M. (J. F. La Malfa J- Co.), 417 Clay 
Levy J. H., clerk Mrs. S. H. Lichtenstein, dwl 510 Kearny 
Lewis Albert (Lewis ifc Co.), dwl 825 Harrison 
Lewis Charles E., saloonkeeper, dwl 355 Minna 
Lewkowitz Jacob, monevbroker, NE cor Kearny and Mar 

ket, dwl Ss Turk nr'Hyde 
Leydecker William, liquors, SE cor Pacific and Drunim 
Lichtenstein S. H. Mrs., moneybroker, 540 Keamv, dw 

1044 Howard 
Life Association of America (St. Louis, Missouri), Isaa< 

W. Tener secretary', office 316 Montgomerj' 
LINDSLEY' A CHI'RCH (Addison A. Lmdsley anc 

Setimotir H. Church), importers and dealers foreigr 

and domestic coals, yard cor Main and Folsom, offic* 

238 Montgomerj' 
Lissak A. H. Jr., stockbroker, office 108.V Leidesdorflt, dw! 

116 Turk 
Lissak Louis S., stockbroker, office 108} Leidesdorff, dw! 

Lick House 
Logan James, Astralian Beer Hall, 738 Howard 
Logan Matthew J., produce commission, 222 Clay 
Longhead J., painter, 31.5 Stockton, dwl 713i Bu'^h 
MACPHER.SOX A WETHEUBEE (Alexander A. 

Macpherson and Henry W'etherbee), lumber dealers, 

and proptrs Noj'o and Albion River Mills, office 36 

Market 
Maldonado Charles, engineer, dwl 528 Vallejo 
Mallady Willliam Jalmes (Mallady <0 Craig), dwl 837 Miss 
Mallad}' & Craig (iViliiam James Mallady and John 

Craig), undertakers, 703 Mission 



Holler T., liquors, 1036 Market 

Hook Benjamin F. (Hook <fc Jaqucs), dwl 1115 Clay 

Hook & Jaques (Benjamin F. Hook and James B. 
Jaqiiex), coffee saloon, 304 Market 

HOOPER C. .4. A <'0. (George W. Hooper), lumber 
dealers, foot Fourth cor Channel 

HOPPiS A SOXS (Charles, Charles E., George H.,and 
Frank W. Hopps), house, sign, and ornamental 
painters, 332 Pine 

HOI SEIIOLB Fl RMSHI.XG CO. THE (John W. 
Ames and Pelham W. Ames), wooden, tin, and 
metal household wares, 22 Post 

Hudson James H., cigars and tobacco, SE cor Kearny 
and Bush, dwl 5 Annie 

Hughes Ignatius, clerk James H. Hudson, dwl 335 J Lin- 
den Av 

Hutrhes Mary (widow), dwl 17 Fourth 

HIGHER W.ILTOX G.. stockbroker, office Pacific 
Exchange Building. 314 Montgomery 

Humbourg August, cabinetmaker Walcolm & Schomberg, 
dwl 124 First Av 

Humphreys Thomas, plumber, gas and steamfltter, 609 
Mission, dwl 116^ Ninth 

HIIXT EOWIX O".. Challenge, Union, Pioneer, and 
Adjustable Wind Mills, 37 Fremont, dwl 1721 Market 

Hunter William T., deputy license collector 

Hunter & Shackleford (H'(7?i«m //wnifr and Thomas J. 
Shacklcford), brick manufacturers, office 124 Geary 

Husselman Samuel B. (Hu-sselman i- Nolte), dwl 1823 
Bush 

H1JSSEL.U.4N A XOLTE (Samuel B. Husselman and 
Henry Nolle), Callfoniia land and real-estate agents, 
526 Kearny 

HLSSEY .lAMES L., stockbroker, office 331 Kearny 
rooms 3 and 4, res San Rafael 

Hutchinson Anna Miss, teacher music, dwl 535 Turk 

IXFAXTS* SHELTER, Mrs. J. S. Spear president, Miss 
E. Humister matron, 512 Minna 

Ingersoll Rock Drill, J. !B. Rej-nolds agent, office 320 San- 
som room 4 

I.\M.1\ .JERRY, wines and liquors, SE cor Fifth and 
Market, dwl Brooklyn Hotel 

Interior Press Association, T. Glancy agent, office 328 
Montgomery room 24 

Irazoque !FranQois, liquor saloon, 500 Pacific, dwl 814 Sac 

ISAACS, GROSS A CO. (Morris J. Isaacs, Herman 
Gross, and Solomon J. Nathan), importers and man- 
ufacturers clothing and furnishing goods, 533 Market 

JACKSON JOHN P., agent John P. Jones, office Nev- 
ada Block, 309 Montgomerj' room 61, dwl 720 Sutter 

Jackson John W., watchmaker H. Hyman & Co., dwl 863 J 
Market 

Jacoby Julius H., clerk Louis Schwartz, dwl 1110 Stock 

Jaques James B. (Hook Jk Jaques), dwl 526 Filbert 

Jaques James J., sewer and drain pipes, office 304 Mar- 
ket, dwl 1826 Eddy 

Jehu Nathaniel L., policeman City Hall, dwl 275 Jessie 

Johnson A. S., painter, dwl 1617 Polk 

JOHXSOX A VO.(Giisfavus S. Johnson, William P. 
Ridgeway, and Charles J. Spaulding), proprietors 
Grand Hotel, SE cor Market and New Montgomerv 

JOHXSTOXE niLLlAM, book and jobprinter, 414 
Market, dwl Howard nr Twentv-sixth 

JOXES .lOlIX P., capitalist, office Nevada Block 309 
Montgomery room 61 

Jones Winfield S., secretary Security Savings Bank, office 
215 Sansom, dwl 1120 Washington 

Judge Thomas, fruits and vesetables, 502 Third 

K.ILLEXBEKG THEOBORE, machinist and model- 
maker, 32 Fremont, dwl 27 Anthony 

Kannaven James, keeper Sherifif 's Office, dwl 111 Virginia 

Kansas City St. Joseph & Council Bluffs R. R. Co., T. H. 
Dearborn agent, 3 New Montgomeiy 

Kauce ttank H., watchman U. S. Mint, dwl 217 Tehama 

Keeney Charles C., surgeon and Medical Director U. S. A., 
office 105 Stockton, dwl 562 Folsom 

Keil Frederick C. ( Von der Lieth X- K.), dwl SW cor Sixth 
and Folsom 

Kelleher John, porter Sheriff's Office, dwl W s Buchanan 
bet Ellis and O'Farrell 

Kelley George W. (Kelley <t Pollock), dwl Conunercial 
Hotel 

Kelley George W. (Kelley (t Pollock), res Oakland 

Kelley & Pollock (George W. Kelley and James C. Pol- 
lock), stockbrokers, office 316 Montgomerj' 

Kelshaw Joseph (Hall <t K.), dwl SE cor Hampshire and 
Santa Clara 

Kenny John, wholesale wines and liquors, 605 Front, dwl 
W 8 Nebraska nr Yolo 



BEAMISH'S— Nucleus Bldg, Third & Market, SMrts & Men's Furnishing Qooc 



larsdcn Ixtuisu Miss, coiup>usitor Bonnard & Daly, dwl 

~ t4i Howard 
lAItiSH HKXKY v., agent Eastern manufacturers, 

doiiliT dye stuffs, chemicals, etc., 310 Clav, res San 

Kufacl 

farsliall James M., jjoliccnian Citv Hall, dwl 12^ Langton 
larshall Scth & Co. (William T.' Wiclamir), sU.ckhrok- 

ei-s, Pacific Kxchanjje Huilding, 314 Montgomery 
tarston J. S., niglitwntchnian U. S. Mint, res Oakland 
lartlia Bessie Mining Co., J. W. Coppage socretar\', office 

3;i0 Pine 
lATTIIEWj* HKXni', vice-president and cashier 

Western Savings and Trust Co., office 415 California, 

dwl 317 Mason 
IA1'LI»I\ Hit; II, stockbroker, office 316 Montgomery, 

dwl Grand Hotel 
J IcAdani Owen (McAdam A: Webber), 134 Third 
" IcAdam & W'chher (Oireti McAdamaiid Henry Webber), 

Ixiots and shoes, 134 Third 
IcCafferty Neil, livorj' stable, 213 Pine, dwl 325 Sansom 
, [cCarthy Miles, collector Union St. Wharf 
M [cCo 



?. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



rmack Daniel, longshoreman, dwl S s Broadway bet 
iliison and Taylor 



m icGehen Hugh, collector Howard St. Wharf 
IcGowan P. H. {Stock Report Publishing Co.), dwl 



*[, 



- . 608 

Sacramento 

[cOrew William H., attorney at law, office 72 Mont- 
gomery Block, dwl 1S07 Jessie 
[cKenzie .John W., collector and private agent, office 607 

Kearny, dwl 22 Fell 
[cMenomy James W., deputy license collector city and 
p, county 

J [cNamara Thomas, attorney at law, 636 Clay room 10, 
dwl 971 Van Ness Av 
cNeil James, messenger Security Savings Bank, dwl 

2211 Van Ness Av 
eoson J. C. , collector Oakland Ferry Wharf 
ieeker Henry H., ookkeeper Sanderson &, Horn, dwl 
;' 2401 Buchanan 

', [efret Xavier, pantrjinan Boutinoti & Bulland, 536 
Merchant 
ellon Edward, porter James Kyle, dwl 624 Commercial 
ulody Joseph, policeman City Hall, dwl 7-50 Howard 
cndclson Solomon, money and exchangebroker, 634 
Market (and Mendelson Brothers, i'okohania), dwl 
34 Turk 
lEKCKK ROBERT .1., real-estate agent, office 426 

Montgomerj-, dwl Morton House 
^erriam George B., blacksmith C. H. Leavitt, dwl 245 
Minna 

4escth Charles, jeweler, 137 Mont, dwl 923 Union 
etzner Catherine (widow), dwl 202 Fifth 
etzner Charles, jeweler, dwl 202 Fifth 
eyers Fannie Jliss, teacher music, Uwl 907 McAllister 
lillcr James A. (i[Hler it Stauf), res Oakland 
liller & Sta,ui (James A. Miller and Werner Stauf), 

stockbrokers, 302 Sansom 
ills & Leak (Philo Mills d: Mon Leak), importers and 

wholesale dealers gloves, 202 Bush 
[ineral Park Mill Co., William R. Townsend secretary, 

olfice 59 Nevada Block 
ix L. W., .stockbroker, California Stock Exchange, dwl 

427 Sutter 

[onroe E. B. (JD. B. Taylor Ji: Co.), res Oakland 
[ontJiuzan Germain de (/r. Belloc), res Paris 
IO.\TR.iLK4;KE«l: <'0. (Jose Maria Montealegre Jr., 
Marniel Montealegre, J. Antonio Salazar, and Ra- 
fael Gallegos), importers and commission merchants, 
, . 230 Cfalifornia 
''* tonumental Mining Co. (Gold HiU Nev.), William R. 
Townsend secretary, office 59 Nevada Block 

* [core Emmett S., night watchman U. S. Mint, dwl E s 
f Mission nr Tenth 

'" [oran & McBride (Patrick Moran and Dennis McBride), 

jiroduce commission, 218 Washington 
"flOKE, KKVXOLD.S «f! CO. (Samuel More and Frank 

II. Reynolds), wholesale liquors, 212 California 
(org-an E. W., liquor saloon, 9 Hardie PI 
[urdoch, Gould & Co. (Walter B. M%irdoch and Charles 

A . Gould), niiningbrokers, 419 California 
[urdoch Walter B. (Murdoch, Gould it Co.), 419 Cal 
luybridge Edward J., architectural and engineering 

photographer, 618 Clay 
[yer Abraham, watches and jewelry, 1014 Market, dwl 

206 Tyler 
[yers Edward, attorney at law, office 312 California, dwl 

1037 Post 

* Fash Joseph, stockbroker, office 320 Sansom room 5, dwl 
1104 Market 






.^1 



NEILIi M'lLLIAM N., merchant, office 309 California 

room 11 
Newman William, stationery and varieties, 914 Market, 

dwl (il3 Ellis 
Ni.igara Gold and Silver Mining Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), 
William K. Townsend secretarj', office 59 Nevada Block 
Nice Thomas D. , night watchman U. S. Mint, dwl 22 Fifth 
Nicholls E. Imugene Miss, teacher music, dwl 509 Powell 
Nichols Warren, teacher music, dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
NK'IIOL.SOX H. H., Centennial Flavoring Extracts, 

1051 Market 
Nolan W. H. & Co., importers and manufacturers boots 

and shoes, 506 Market 
Nolte Henry (Hxisseiman d- N.), res Oakland 
KORTII^V ESTER. \ 4'0.>iMER('IAL CO., William 

M. Helman secretary, office 309 California, room 14 
Nuttall J. Robert, note department London and San 

Francisco Bank, dwl 1603 Taylor 
Nuttall Robert Kennedy, physician, office 417 Kearny, 

dwl 1003 Taylor 
Nye John W. , real-estate agent, office 238 Montgomery, 

dwl 1015 Scott 
O'Neili. T. J., collector Mission St. Wharf 
O'Reilly P. S., deputy license collector, dwl 361 Seven- 
teenth 
Oakley A. D. (Bell <t O.), dwl 137 Montgomery 
Ohl Andreas (Enger <fc O.), dwl St. Louis Hotel, 11 Pac 
Orr W. M., proprietor Golden Gate Blacking Factory, 

143 Minna 
OWE>IS .lOHN^ B., agent Pacific and Sacramento Pot- 
teries (Sacramento), office and depot 20 California, 
dwl 1810 Fillmore 
PACIFIC EXCIIANCE BriLMXG, 314 Montgomery 
Pacific Glove Works, H. Shoenberg & Co., proprietors, 

511 Market 
Pacific Sulphur Co. , E. J. Fraser president, John H. Ware 

Jr. secretary, office 305 Kearny 
Parker Frederick (Beach <!• P.), dwl S s Clipper bet Dia- 
mond and Castro 
PajTie John Captain, dwl 306 Francisco 
Pearson Charles E., president The Pearson & Curtis To- 
bacco Company, office .309-317 Clay, dwl 1406 How 
Pearson Charles T., capitalist, office 808 Montgomery, 

dwl Windsor House 
PEAR80N * CIRTIS TOBACCO CO., Charies E. 
Pearson president, John W. Curtis secretary, manufs 
and importers cigars and tobacco, 309-317 Clay 
Pechner Marcus S., hairdressing saloon, 777 Market, dwl 

834 Mission 
PEOPLE'S ICE CO., office 312 Mission 
Perkins George C. (Goodall, Nelson it P.), dwl 2216 How 
Perry Grattan, private secretary John P. Jones, 61 Nev- 
ada Block, dwl 811 O'Farreil 
Phelan Joseph J., collector Broadwaj' St. Wharf 
Phil. Sheridan Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), William R. 

Townsend secretary, office 59 Nevada Block 
Philip Franklin, chief clerk Na\y Pay Office, 434 Cal 
Pierce William, wharfinger Front, and Union St. wharves 
Pilcher William J. (Pilcher it Strong), res Oakland 
Pilcher & Strong (William J. Pilcher and A'. R. Strong), 

real-estate agents, 121 Montgomery 
Platz Brothers (Edward and Joseph), metalroofers, 

stoves and tinware, 119 Third 
Platz Edward (Platz Brothers), dwl 163 Tehama 
Platz Joseph (Platz Brothers), dwl 163 Tehama 
Pollock James C. (Kelley tt P.), dwl 574 Folsora 
PO.\B» EI>WARI> B., capitalist, office 212 California, 

dwl 1221 California 
POND .lAMES L., mining, office 330 Pine, room 28, 

dwl Nucleus House 
Potter Henry N. (D. B. Taylor & Co.), res Oakland 
Prather J. N., traveling agent The General Land Agency 

of California, 405 California 
Pritchard .James A., mining, office 59 Nevada Block, dwl 

602 Geary 
PROVOST DANIEL R., manager California Vinegar 

Works, and commission merchant, office 223 Sac 
Quicksilver Co. (New Almaden), office .305 Sansom 
RAY W. S. A CO. (William B. Anderson), cabooses, 
office and cooking stoves etc., 12 and 14 Market and 
9 and 11 Sacramento 
Rea A., stockbroker, Cal. Stock Exchange, dwl 824 How 
Rea C. T. , stockbroker, California Stock Exchange 
Read Charles E. H. (Doane d- R.), cor Tyler and Webster 
Read John F., wharfinger Vallejo St. Wharf 
Red Star Steamship Co., J. R. Erringer Jr., agent, office 

518 Clay 
Reichert Theodore, mineral clerk U. S. Surveyor-General's 
Office, dwl 602 Third 



,^'AMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 ICearny Street. 



r. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merely 



86 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY. 



Reimann Henrv A. (Soher .1- R.), dwl 2629 Harrison 
Reutter Paul, barkeeper, dwl 1102 Montgomery 
Reynolds Frank B. (More, B. <fc Co.), dwl 1113 Bush 
Reynolds J. B., agent Ingersoll Rock Drill, office 320 

Sansom room 4 
Richard Sophie T. Mrs. , teacher music, dwl 1706 Leav 
Richardson Thomas, lumber commission, office 18 Market, 

res East Oakland 
Ridgewav William P, (Jnbmon & Co.), Grand Hotel 
KIEUKLL <;|iSTA1E. manufacturer vinegar, 102 

Drumm, dwl 1021 Sacramento 
Riggs George S., dwl 719 California 
Rising Star S. M. Co., John W. Coppage secretary, office 

380 Pine 
Rixford Emmet H., attorney at law, office 528 California, 

dwl 0-26 Oak 
KO<;ER.S F4>KD H., stockbroker, office 334 Pine, dwl 

1533 Sutter 
Rollins John B., gunsmith, machinist, and sawfller, 1061 

Market, dwl 606 Mission 
Rooney Max, liquor saloon, 805 Market 
Rosenheim Eugenie Miss, teacher music, dwl 103 Eleventh 
Roxburv House, Miss Maigaret Bessor proprietress, 318 

Pacific 
Sam G. W., cigars and tobacco, 1136 Market 
Sander Louis, dwl 312 Post 
SAXTA MOXK'A LAXD CO. (Los Angeles Co., Cal.), 

office 521 Montgomery 
S.AI'L A t'O. (Edmund Saul), carriage manufactory, 

67 and 69 Stevenson 
Schmitt Joseph (Gauthier it S.), dwl 735 Union 
Scholl Charles, cabinetmaker Walcolm & Schombeig, dwl 

109 Chattanooga 
Schomberg William (Walcolm <t- S.), dwl 109 Chattanooga 
Schuchardt Carl W., watchmaker and jeweler, 44 Geary, 

dwl 957 Market 
Schuldheis John G., clockmaker American Clock Co., dwl 

315 Stockton 
Schwartz Lazarus, dry goods, 134 Sixth, dwl 536 Ellis 
Seaton George M. (S. A. Stobie <t Co.), res Oakland 
SEYMOIK S. H. A €0. (Simon H. Seymour and I. 

D. Barnard), proprietors Russ House, W s Mont- 
gomery from Bush to Pine 
SHAEFFEK .1. W. & CO. {John W. Shaeffer, Julius 

Ooetz and Julius Kraemer). manufacturers cigars 

and dealers tobacco, 323 Sacramento 
Sharp Young Richard, physician, office 536 Sacramento 
Sherburne J. B., dwl Folsom nr Third 
Shoenberg Henry (Shoenberij ct Bruml), dwl 507J Hyde 
Shoenberg & BTum\(Henry Shoenberg andSimonBruml), 

proptr Pacific Glove Works, 511 Market 
Simon L., cabinetmaker, 1149 Market 
Simon U. & Sons(Gw.s<ay F. and Sainuel Jr.), import- 
ers hats and caps, 117 and 119 Sansom 
Smith P. C. (Baker it- S.), NW cor Eddy and Mason 
S.UITH W. .lAY, president Cal. Stock Exchange Board, 

dwl SOJt Pine 
Soher Lewis (Soher tfe Reimann), dwl 1225 Bush 
Soher & Reimann (Lewi.t Soher and Henry A. Reimann), 

regalia, military goods, and trimmings, 427 Mont 
Solver Henry, toys, books, and stationery, 218 Sixth 
South Jefferson Mill and Mining Co., Frederick Madge 

secretary, office 64 Merchants' Exchange 
Spaulding Charles J. (Johniton it Co.), Grand Hotel 
St. Louis, Kansas City and Northern Railway Co., T. H. 

Dearborn agent, 3 New Montgomery 
Stacom Maria R. Miss, French millineiy, SW cor New 

Montgomery and Market, dwl 907 Jones 
Stanyan Charles H., real estate, dwl 2006 Bush 
Stender J. Mrs., teacher music, dwl 26 Rausch 
Stewart J. Miss, colorist D. B. Taylor & Co., 415 Mont 
Stirling John F., mining secretary, office 330 Pine room 

28, dwl 1220 Market 
Stobie S. A. (S. A. Stobie it Co.), dwl 418 Powell 
Stobie S. A. & Co. (George M. Seaton), apothecaries, 413 

Kearnv 
Strong N. R. (Pilch^ir <t S.), dwl 1245 Mission 
Stuart James, messenger St. Mary's Hospital 
Sullivan Patrick R., steward training ship Jamestown 
Simmer Gold and Silver Mining Co. (Kern Co., Cal.), 

William R. Townsend secretary, office 59 Nevada 

Block 
Surprise Valley Mill and Water Co. (Panamint, Inyo Co., 

Cal.), William R. Townsend secretary, office 59 Nevada 

Block 
Sweeny John F., secretary Pac. Ice Co., dwl 601 Fell 
TAnER. HARKEK »t CO. (Jacob S. Taber and Asa 

Marker), wholesale grocers, 108 and 110 California 
Taber Jacob S. (Taber, Harker & Co.), res Oakland 



ii 



trs 



111 



3ljH 



Tague Michael, fireman S. S. John L. Stevens, Folsom Si 

Wharf 
Taylor David W. (Taylor d.- Bruns), dwl 411 O'Farrell 
TAYLOR D. B. •& CO. (H. N. Potter and E. B. Man 

roc), photographers, 415 Montgomery 
Taylor Dwight B. (D. B. Taylor it Co.), res Alameda 
Taylor George W., wharfinger Harrison and Bryant Sti 

wharves 
Taylor & Bruns (David W. Taylor and Herman Brum), 

Custom-House brokers, office Custom House 
Tener Isaac W., secretary Life .Association of America. 

office 316 Montgomery, dwl 16 De Boom 
Tennent Thomas, chronometer, watch, and mathematical 

instnimentmaker, IS Market, dwl 1513 Jackson 
TENTIIOREY J. P. A VO. (Ppul H. Trolliee^, 

maccaroni and vermicelli factorj', 558 Mission 
Tern,' George W. (Terry X- Valentine), dwl 915 Stocktor |^,' 
Terry & Valentine (George W. Terry and John ValW\ 

tine), foreign and domestic fruits, 220 Washington 
Thompson Isaac H., with Pac. Ice Co., dwl 435 Eddy 
Thurman John W. (Alta Soap Co.), res Oakland- 
TIBBEY HEX'RY S., notary public and commissionei 

deeds, office 600 Montgomery, and secretary Board 

Commissioners Dupont Street, office 715 Clay room 

12, dwl 527 Green 
Tischer Carl, liquor saloon, 1 Front, dwl 14 Eighth 
Tischler George, toys, books, and stationery, 1006 Mar- 
ket, dwl 1004 Market 
Tobin Richard C, stockbroker, office Pacific Exchangi L.. txirt 

Building, 314 Montgomery ■' 

Tojetti Edouard, artist, dwl 1218 Mission 
Tojetti Vergilia, artist, dwl 121S Mission 
TOWNSEXD WILLI.AM R., mining secretary, oi 

Nevada Block, 309 Mont room 59, dwl 1028 Pine 
True S. E. Miss, teacher music, dwl Hoff Av bet Sixteei 

and Seventeenth 
Tugawa R. Z., wholesale and retail Japanese goods, Ull 

Market 
Vaccari Charles M., bacon, hams, and lard, 12 and U 

Union Market 
Vagts D. H., wines and liquors, SW cor Annie and Ste^ 

venson, dwl Tehama nr Second 
Van Amringe John, bookkeeper Owens, Moore & Co., Tti^ 

Oakland 
.Van Norden Robert T. , real-estate agent, office 607 MonVjcfi 

gomery, dwl 1819 Sacramento 
Van Vleck Durbin, designer and engraver on wood, 6(R 

Montgomery room 44, dwl 600 Bush 
Veal John T. (Fitch it V.), dwl 336^ Bush 
YERDEVAL .IOH\~ M., attorney at law, office 

Montgomery-, dwl 1525 Sutter 
VICE M.ARTJ.V, boat builder, 32 Mission, dwl 156 Mini 
Vinzent Charles, president The General Land Agency 

California, office 405 California, res Oakland 
Walcolm George (Walcolm it Schomberg), A^'\ S sCoI 

bia bet Guerrero and Dolores 
WALCOLM »t SCHOMBERG (George Walcolm and 

William Schomberg), furniture and upholstery, KM 

and 103 Stockton 
Wall J. S., vice-president The General Land Agency d 

California, office 405 California, res Oakland 
Walsh Thomas, merchant, office 309 California room 11 
Ware .John H. Jr., secretary Pacific Sulphur Co., offli 

305 Kearny 
Webber Henry (McAdam <t W.), 134 Third 
Webster & Prather (Lemuel J. Webster and John 

Prather), stockbrokers, 328 Montgomery room 1 
Wenzel Hermann, clocks, watches, jew-elry, etc., 3Sj 

Kearny, dwl 515 Jessie 
TYH.AN W. W., manufacturer Non-Explosive Diamonl 

Gas Fluid, and dealer lamps, etc., 1244 Market 
Wheeler Edward J., deputy coroner city and countg^ 

office 636 Clay room 11, dwl 915 Bush 
White Thomas H'., workman U. S. Mint, dwl 23 StocktOB 
WHITE WILSOX, merchandisebroker, office 204 Calj 
Widow and Orphan Fund Life Insurance Co., Daniel 

McLaren agent, office 238 Montgomery 
WILL.4RD GEORGE H.. stockbroker, office Pacific 

Exchange Building, 314 Montgomery 
Williams Brothers (Henry L. and Chester), leather and 

findings, 25 New Montgomery 
Williams Chester (Willia7/is Brothers), dwl 10 Monroe 
Williams Henry L. (Williams Brothers), dwl 10 Monroe 
Wilson Israel C., porter William Willis, 309 Montgomery* 

dwl 831 Greenwich 
WINTER A WIXTER (James W. and Washingtott 

Winter), dentists, 208 Kearny 
Young William A., photographer D. B. Taylor & Co. 415 

Montgomery 



ill 
offia 

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.1 ! 



U;.. 






;,-r 1 

ij.-al' 
is; J, 
ksJ. 
toaL 

iirun i 
iyie. 
iUe: 
Alulie 
AUie 



Abt«f 

4, 



Smithsonian Medical Institute, 637 Cal., B. J. SMITH, M.D., Prof. Phrenolog^i 

J 



?. VAN SOHAAOK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 710 Kearny, EstaiUshod 1862. 



^GENERAL REFERENCE 



THE 



SAN FRANCISCO DIRECTORY 

FOR THE YEAR COMMENCING APRIL 1, 1876. 



SS" Notice. — Names too late for regular insertion, removals, changes, etc., tchich h<tve occurred during tJie printing 
' the work, will be found on the pages immediatelii preceding this. 

For List of Boarding Houses, Hotels, Lodgings, etc., see Business Directory, pp. 871, 913, and 929; for Packets 
Sail and Steam, see pp, 945 and %1 ; for the Location of the Offices of the different Mining Companies, see Business 
•tRBCTOKY, . p. 939. 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



Assoolation 

k* Avenue 

tidg Building 

et between 

or corner 

ept department 

wl dwelling 

East 

nt. Rev. . .Internal Revenue 

aanuf manufacturer 

i North 



ir near 

>p opposite 

I Place 



proptr proprietor 

res resides or residence 

R. R Railroad 

Rev .Reverend 

S South 

S. f] F.'i)] ! i'.'s.'r.Firebept 

S. S steamship 

stm steamer 

supt superintendent 

W West 

STREETS. 

Bat Battery 



Bdwy Broadway 

Bran Brannan 

Cal California 

Clem Clementina 

Com Commercial 

Dup Dupont 

Fol Folsom 

Har Harrison 

How Howard 

Jack Jackson 

Kear Kearny 

Leav Leavenworth 

Leid Leidesdorff 

Lomb Lombard 



Merch Merchant 

Min Minna 

Miss Mission 

Mont Montgomery 

Pac Pacific 

Pow Powell 

fr'as Sacramento 

San Sansom 

Sec Second 

Ship Shipley 

Stev Stevenson 

Steu Steuart 

Stock Stockton 

Wash Washington 



iABBL Martin, Scandinavian Soc., 71 New Montgomery 
^aron A. Miss, teacher Eighth St. Grammar School, dwl 

131J Perrj' 

Aaron A. H., salesman Davis & Co., dwl 26 Stockton 
Aaron David, stamping and pinking', 850 Washington, dwl 

927 Washingfton 
Aaron David Mrs., dressmaker, 841 Wash, dwl 927 Wash 
Aaron J., cabinetmaker, dwl 352 Third 
Aaron Joseph, hairdressing saloon, 534 Third 
Aaron Louis, porter Simond Held, dwl 854 Folsom 
Aaron Morris, tailor, dwl 533j Fourth 
Aaron Simon, merchatil, dwl 854 Folsom 
Abadie Adolph, clerk, dwl 915 Pacific 
Abadie Emile, porter Denaveaux k Maison 
Abadie Felicie Mme., dressmaker, 614 Bush 
Abadie Louis (Abadie ct Fos), dwl 1510 Dupont 
Abadie & Fos {Louis Abadie and John i'og), market, 

1320 Dupont 
Abbes Frank, painter, dwl 1318^ Pacific 
Abbey Homestead Association, F. E. Luty secretary, 

office 507 Montgomerj- 
Abbey Isadora (widow), dwl 5 Pollard Place 
Abbey John, carpenter, dwl 28 Clay 
Abbot, Downing 4: Co., manufacturers Concord carriages, 

Concord, N. H., Thomas S. Eastman agent, 413 and 

415 Battery 
Abbot George \E. Grisar is Co.), dwl Pacific b«t Ootavia 

and Laguna 
Abbot William, seaman, dwl 104 Steuart 
Abbotsford House, XW cor Larkin and Broadway 
.Abbotsford Michael B., dwl NW cor Broadway and Larkin 
Abbott Annie (widow), dressmaker, 1406 Pine 
Abbott C. H., dwl 14 Eddy 
AbbottCharles M. , clerk Newton Bros. & Co. , dwl 611 Mason 



Abbott C. S. {Curtis A. A Co.), res Salinas City 

Abbott David, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.^ Wharf 

Abbott Frank, cook, dwl 251j Clementina 

Abbott Frank H. (i>'. B. Fuller X- Co.), dwl 257 Tehama 

Abbott George, dwl 117 Bernard 

Abbott George, broker, dwl 221 Capp 

Abbott George, pantryman 519 Clay, dwl 420 Jackson 

Abbott George F., builder, dwl 019 Capp 

Abbott Hannibal H., salesman S. L. Mastick & Co., dwl 

1823 Turk 
Abbott James, dwl 304 Third 
Abbott John, dwl 225 Bush 
Abbott John F., dwl 822 Folsom 
Abbott John M., painter, dwl 611 Mason 
Abbott Joseph, dwl 315 Eddy 

Abbott Lewis H., printer Cubery& Co., dwl 1828 Cal, rear 
Abbott Margaret (widow), furnished rooms, 80 Clem 
Abbott Moses A., inspector Custom House, dwl 2314 

Washington 
Abbott O. J. (Ctirtis, A. & Co.), dwl 708 Hayes 
Abbott Osboni, moneybroker, office 319 California, dwl 

939 Howard 
Abbott Samuel C, carpenter Woodward's Gardens, dwl 

28 Erie 
Abbott Thomas, clerk John H. Heins, dwl 28 Clay 
Abbott Thomas G., blanketcleaner, dwl S s Thirty-fifth 

Av nr L, Bay View 
Abbott William, bookkeeper Methodist Book Depository, 

dwl 811i Tyler 
Abbott William, clerk, dwl 1825 Turk 
Abbott William, seaman, dwl 54 Sacramento 
Abbow John, dwl 17 Fourth 

Abeille Marius, cook Joseph Barron, 606 Stockton 
Abel Christian H., hassockmaker, dwl 18 Oak Grove Av 



TAMES &. STEELE & CO., Apothecaries, No. 316 Kearny Street. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, L. W. Laird, 513 Montsomory cor. Mercliai 




Abel Geor^'e A., clerk W. A. Holcomb &, Co., res Oakland 

Abel John, machinist, dwl 227 Second 

Abel L. & Co. {Jusepli Marks), auctioneers, 004 California 

Abel Louis (L. Abvl i Co.), dwl 452 Tehama 

Abele Gustav, cook Weiss & Batteux, dwl 14 Harlan 

Abeling Christian, laborer, dwl 561 Minna 

Abclino Tet'oda, saddler Main & Winchester, dwl 3 Val- 

lejo Court 
ABELL ALEXANDER G., grand secretar}' Grand 

Lodge F. & A. M., office Masonic Temple, dwl 1027 

Washington 
Abell Irvine, clerk, dwl 115 Webster 
Abell Irving L., journalist, dwl Ks Shotwell nr Twentieth 
ABEL!!! S. E., attorney at law, office 52 Montgomery 

block, dwl S15 Union 
ABEND POST (German daily and weekly), S. F. 

Abend Post Publishing Co., publishers and proprie- 
tors, office 535 California 
Aber W. E., carpenter E.xcelsior Mills 
Abercrombie James, dwl NE cor Pacific and Sansom 
Abercrombie Maj,'g-ie J., capmaker Wolf Fleischer, dwl 

NE cor Pacific and Sansom 
Aberly Fritz, cook John Nussen, dwl 1324 Stockton 
Abfelielder Charles, tailor, dwl 442^ Clementina 
Able Albert F., driver United Anaheim Wine Growers' 

Assn, dwl 1100^ Stockton 
Able Richard, mariner, dwl 212 Steuart 
Abies Herman, machinehand California Cigar Box Co., 

dwl 12 Boardman PI 
Abline Benjamin, saloonkeeper, dwl 912 Clay 
Aborn Edward S., physician, office and dwl NE cor Post 

and Kearny 
Abraham Abraham, clothing, 400 Pacific 
Abraham Adolf, tailor, dwl 1 Elizabeth 
Abraham Adolph, barber, dwl 728 Union 
Abraham Christian, clerk Henry Meyer, dwl 'SW cor 

Hayes and Market 
Abraham G. , laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 
Abraham Henry, hats and caps, 1012 JJupont, dwl 728 

Union 
Abraham Herman, fruits, SW cor Fourth and Tehama, 

dwl 248 Clementina 
Abraham Isaac, clerk Weil & Woodleaf, dwl 214 Sansom 
Abraham Jacob, conductor N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 

829 Folsom 
Abraham Jacob, machinist, dwl 349 Fourth 
Abraham Joseph, clothing, 721 Sansom 
Abraham Marks, hairdresser W. Morgenstern, dwl 721 

Sansom 
Abraham Myer, tailor, 704 Sacramento 
Abraham Nathan (P. Abraham cO Son), dwl 9 Seventh 
Abraham P. & Hon (Nathan Abraham), fancy drj' goods, 

44 Sixth 
Abraham Philip (P. Abraham <t Son), dwl 9 Seventh 
Abraham Reuben, laborer West Coast Furniture Co., 

dwl 721 Harrison 
Abraham Si|pon, hairdressing saloon, 860 Howard, dwl 

721 Sansom 
Abraham Thomas, broker, dwl 1612 Turk 
Abrahams John, steward Bohemian Club, dwl 1606 Hyde 
Abrahams Louis {Abrahams it Spiro), dwl 644 Sac 
Abrahams Louis, clothing, 6 Clay, dwl 438 Natoma 
Abrahams Marks, junkdealer, dwl 248 Clementina 
Abrahams Richard, warehouseman West Coast Furniture 

Co., dwl 620 Fourth 
Abrahams Samuel, porter Stewart & Buckley, dwl 336 

Broadway 
Abrahams & Spiro (Lni^is A brahams and Morris Spiro), 

pawnbrokers, 1136 Dupont 
Abrahams. See Abrams 
Abrahamsick M. Alton, Tailors' Protective Union, NW cor 

Kearny and Morton 
Abrahamson Alexander, clothing, 429 Kearny, dwl 820 

Mission 
Abrahamson Gustav, salesman Stolz Brothers, dwl 733 

Geary 
Abrahamson Herman, clerk Emanuel Mansbach, dwl 733 

Geary 
AbrahamSon Jacob, clerk David Magnes, dwl 733 Geary 
Abrahamson Jacob, watchmaker Hartwig Traube, dwl 

1217 Mason 
Abrahamson Nelson, teamster Black Diamond Coal Co., 

dwl 411 Sixth 
Abrahamson Ole, Scandinavian Soc, 71 New Mont 
Abrahamson Peter, stoves and tinware, 939 Market, dwl 

1022 Hyde 
Abrahamson Rosa Miss, teacher German South Cosmo- 
politan Primary School, dwl 733 Geary 
Abrahamson S., cigardealer, dwl 522 Dupont 



Abram Isaac, clothier, 433 Pacific 

Abram John, locomotive engineer, dwl W s Capp nr 

Twentith 
Abram Robert, shipjoiner, dwl 613 Gough 
Abram Thomas, printer, dwl 613 Gough 
Abramovich Bros. (John aiid Daniel), fruits, candies, 

and tobacco, 1322 Polk 
Abramovich Daniel (Abramovich Bros.), dwl 1322 Polk 
Abramovich John (Abramovich Bros.), dwl 1322 Polk 
Abrams Baron D., clerk Charles Kalisky, dwl SW cor 

Tyler and Van Ness Av 
Abraiiis David, merchant, dwl SW cor Van Ness Av and 

Tyler 
Abrams Edward C, carriagetrimmer A. Haas & Co., dwl 

2032 Folsom 
Abrams Henry (Levin <S: Abrams), dwl 786 Folsom 
Abrams Joel, butcHer, dwl W s Thirteenth Av nr P.South 

S. F. 
Abrams John (.4 drams ct Carroll), dwl 112 Kearny 
Abrams John, tinsmith Joseph Mayer, dwl 248 Clemen- 
tina 
Abrams Jonas, groceries, liquors, and crockery, 800 Lar- 

kin, dwl 128 Olive Av 
Abrams Julius, hairdresser, dwl 786 Folsom 
Abrams Leon, salesman Stolz Brothers, dwl 128 Olive Av 
Abrams Samuel, real estate, office 310 Montgomerj', dwl 

507 Lombard 
Abrams Waverly, clerk Davis Bros., dwl 23 Stockton 
Abrams William, glazier, dwl 247 Clementina 
ABRAMS A CARROLL (Jotin Abrams and James E. 

Carroll), importers and wholesale druggists, 206 and 

208 Battery 
Abramson Adolph, clerk Ephraim Frank, dwl 904 Kear 
Abramson Edward (>46ra);i»f)7i <1: Bacon), dwl 1217 Mason 
Abramson & Bacon (Edward Abramson and Gaston E. 

Bacon), drugs and medicines, 717 Clay 
Abrego Ysmael, salesman Linforth, Kellogg & Co., dwl 

519 Folsom 
Acaberrj' James, carpenter, dwl 928 Mission 
Academic Parisienne (French school), Mme. L. Forster, 

principal, 912 Sutter 
ACADEMY BLILDING, 330 Pine 
Academy of Notre Dame, E s Dolores bet Sixteenth and 

Seventeenth 
ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, SW cor Cal and Dupont 
Accidental Consolidated Gold and Silver Mining Co. 

(Storey Co. Nev.), Charles W. Lamar secretary, office 

339 Kearny room 4 
Acclimatizing Society, S. AV. Hoyt secretary, office NE 

cor Mission and First 
Accolti Michael Rev., clergjTnan St. Ignatius College, 

dwl 841 Market 
Aceves Alexander, shoemaker, dwl 27 John 
Achers Frank, cook John H. Heins, dwl 28 Clay 
Achers George, seaman, dwl 16 Washington 
Acheson Thomas S. (Nye * A.) dwl 1035 Post 
Achin August, laborer Ame & Branger, dwl 1315 Kearny 
Achom Woodburj', porter Marcus C. Hawley & Co., dwl 3 

White PI nr Jones 
Achurra Ignacia, dressmaker, dwl 526 Vallejo 
Acker Christian, baker Hirshfeld & Frey, dwl 911 Larkin 
Acker V. Mrs. , dressmaker, 317 Sutter 
Acker Valentine, dwl 317 Sutter 
Ackerman Brothers (Samuel S., Hart S., Isidores., and 

Isidore II. Ackerman and David Uavser), import- 
ers fancy goods, crockerj- and general varieties, 209 

Sutter and 123 Kearny 
Ackerman Caroline (widow), dwl 520 Eddy 
Ackerman Charles, seaman, dwl 12 Washington 
ACKERMA.V CILiRLES L., attorney-at law, office 

420 California room 6, dwl 520 Eddy 
Ackerman David, butcher Felix Uri, dwl 902 Clay 
Ackerman Edward, salesman Hall & Lachman, dwl 1309 

Larkin 
Ackerman Hart S. (Ackerman Brothers), res New York 
Ackerman Henry, jeweler George Finck, dwl 520 Eddy 
Ackerman Hyman S., cashier Ackerman Brothers, dwl 

193 Hyde 
Ackerman Isidore H. (Ackerman Brothers), dwl 910 

O'Farrell 
Ackerman Isidore S. (AcJcerman Brothers), dwl 910 O'Far- 
rell 
Ackerman J., dwl 614 Keamj' 
Ackerman Jacob, driver Clay St. Hill R. R. Co., dwl 1822 

Jackson 
Ackennan Jennie, chambermaid Palace Hotel 
Ackerman John, seaman stm Salinas, dwl 16 Washington ' 
Ackerman Oliver B., carpenter, dwl E s Fillmore bet Union 

and Green 



I 



BEAMISH'S— Nucleus Bldg, Third & Market, Shirts & Men's Purnishing Qoods. 



!. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Estatlished 1862. 



Ackerman Samuel S. (Ackerman Drothcrg), dwl 910 

O'Farrell 
Ackennan. See Akerman 
Ackermann A. , hutchef , dwl 719 Clay 
Ackennaun Charliw, baker, dwl 631 I'acific 
AckeriDaim llorman, seaman, dwl 45 Sacramento 
Ackermann John H., professor dancing, dwl 024 Pacific 
Ackcrson Charles H., aruhitect and builder, office 215 

Kearny 
Ackerson John W, {Hanson A., <fc Co.), res Tacoma, 

Washlnjj'ton Territory 
Ackerson Lucinda (widow\ dwl 1627 Sutter 
Ackerson Mary C. (widow), dressmaker, dwl 1*25 Geary 
Ackcrson William E., line repairer fire ahvrin and police 

telegraph, Brenham I'l 
Ackland Edward T., i)orter McCain, Flood & McClure, 

dwl 106 Hickory Av 
Ackman Charles, dwl 743 Tehama 
Acors A. G. Mrs. (wido-.v), boarding, 316 O'Farrell 
Acosta Donato, laborer, dwl 924 Sacramento 
Acrat Jacob, j^ardener Laurel Hill Cemetery 
Act Lee (Cliinese), butcher, 747 SacranKiuto 
Acton George Jr., driver Charles H. Aitkcn, dwl 5 Wash 
Acton George Sen., butcher, dwl 5 Wasliingtim 
Acton Joseph, nnvchinist William T. Garratt, dwl 752 Fol 
Acton Martin J., expressman, SE cor Market and Fourth, 

dwl 340J Shipley 
Acton Richard, harnessmaker J. C. Johnson & Co., dwi 

N s M nr San Jos6 Av 
Acton Robert, bootmaker Buckingham & Hecht, dwl 551 

Howard 
Acuila Spiririona (widow), dressmaker, dwl 539 Vallejo 
Adacicich John, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Most 
Adair George B., merchant, dwl 34 Oak Grove Av 
Adair J. , barkeeper W. B. Cooper, dwl 763i Mission 
Adair Robert G. , dwl 62 South Park 
Adair William B., clerk Major George 11. Mendell, dwl 

575 Minna 
Adam Frank, driver ^N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 21 

Louisa 
Adam George, carrier S. F. Chronicle, dwl ns7 Pacific 
Adam John, carpenter California Mills 
Adam John, driver B, Badovich, dwl 131 Chesnut 
Adam Robert, baker^ dwl E s Dupont bet GreeR and 

Unioji 
Adam Thomas {Adam .t Kibbe\ dwl 507 Cough 
Adam W. Mrs., dressmaker. 308 Post 
ADA.tf A Ii.inBK.{Thomas Adam and Millard Kibbe), 

liquor saloons. Old Comer 516 Montgomery cor 

Coniuiercial, and junction Market. Geary and Kear 
Adaniena Felix, painter Giovanni B. Defeirari, d'wl 5 Pol- 
lard PI 
Adamena Joseph, painter, dwi 5 Pollard PI 
Adaniena Mary (widow), dwl 5 Pollard PI 
Adami John, expressNvagon, cor Stockton' and Jackson, 

dwl 1204 Powell 
Adami Lorenxo, laborer F. W. Haubrich, 623 Commerciai 
Adami Luigi, Mason, dwl 19 Lafayette PI 

Adams , attorney at law, dwl 741 Howard 

Adams Mrs., dwl 719 Market 

Adams — - Mrs., seamstress, dwl 31 Eddy 
Adams A. A. Miss., actress Maguire's New Tlveater 
Adams A. L., carpenter, dwl Central Pacific Hotel 
Adams Albert F. {Hanson it ^.), and deputy colloctorU. 

S. Internal Revenue, dwl 1238 Mission 
Adams Alexander, laborer A. M. Simpson & Bro., dwl 1 

Howard 
Adams Alexander, laborer A. M- Sampson & Brother, 

dwl 1 Howard 
Adams Alexander P., surveyor, dwl 543 Second 
Adams A. M. & Ca, locksmiths, 220 Fremont 
Adams Amos, secretary State Grange P. of H., office NE 

cor California and Davis, res Oakland 
ADAMS AMOS C, attorney at la\r, office 40 Montgom- 

erj- Block, dwl 413 Octavia 
Adams Andrew, laborer New City Hall, dwl 545 Mission 
Adams Andrew M, {A, M. Adams (C Co.), dwl 361 First 
Adams Angeline Miss, sewing machine operator Levi 

Strauss & Co., dwl 914 Jackson 
Adams Anthony, carpenter, dwl SW cor Dupontand Post 
Adams Arthur, ivoodcarver, dwl 79 Everett 
Adams C, driver City R. R, 
Adams Charles, carpenter, dwl 110 Minna 
Adams Charles, master mariner, dwl SW cor Pennsyl- 
vania Av and Solano 
Adams Charles D., porter 0. F. Willey & Co., dwl Ni 

Market bet Laguna and Buchanan 
Adams Clara A. Miss, teacher Broadway Grammar School, 

dwl 1910 Hyde 



Adams Christian, gunsmijh, locksmith, and bellhanger, 

508 Connnercial, dwl 2 Vallejo PI 
Adam.s Conrad, laborer Pro. Benev. Assn., 818 Howard 
Adanis<;yrus {Cynm Adanus <t Co.), dwl 1527 Sutter 
Al>/i.MS Cl'UIIS «t t'«. {Jinos Smith), Importers and 

jobbers leaf tobacco, 419 and 421 Jackson 
Adams 1). T. , capitalist,. dwl 700 California 
AI>.4MS EltSOlV, real estate office, 44 Montgomery 

Block, res Oakland 
Adams Edward, dwl 23 Powell 
Adains Enicrson, market, 4 Pearl, dwl N s Market bet 

Laguna and Buchanan 
Adams F., \;lcrk, dwl 8 Mason 
Adams Frank, longshoreman Charles E. Haseltine, dwl 

N 8 Green bet Battei-y a'nd fSanscxn 
Adams Frederick H. ( Van Shaick (<• A .), attorney at law, 

office 606 Montgomery, dwl 42 Hawthorne 
Adams George, clerk John W. Shehan, dwl 2 Vallejo PI 
Adams (jleorge, laborer Pac. Rolling Mills, dwl N s Shaata 

nr Illinois 
Adams George, seaman, dwi 20 Commercial i 
Adams George M., foreman cuttii^g room U. S. Mint, dwl 

347i Grove 
Adams George P., night clerk Post-office, dwl 206 Keaniy 
Adams George R,, clerk Louis Sk»ss & Co., dwl 1833 Sutter 
Adams George W., dwl 527 Sacramento 
Adams Grove, mining, office 406 Mont, dwi 920 Pine 
Adams Henry, brewer Broadway Brewery, dwl 10 Polk 

Lane 
Adams Henry, seaman, dwl 117 Dmmm 
A-dams Henry, upholsterer Grand Hotel 
Adams Henry B., giinsmith Liddle A Kaeding, dwl SO 

Park Av 
Adamis Henry Q.. clerk Wm. Boswortli, dwl 2510 Gongh 
Adams Herman, tailor, 341 Bush, dwl 235 Kearny 
Adams H. H., carpenter, dwl 107 Twenty-sixth nr Miss 
Adams Hill Consolidated Mining Co. (Eureka Co., Nev.), 

W. W. Traylor secretary, office 309 Mont room 37 
Adams Horace E.. collector, 4*5 Kearny 
AOAMS HO«iSE, >fohn C, Beach proprietor, 537 Sao 
Adams Howard N., carpenter Omnibus R. R, Co., dwl 82S 

Mission 
Adams Isaac, hairdresser Obenauer & Wagner, dwl 235 

Kearny 
Avlams Jacob, proprietor Broadway Brewery, 637 Broad- 
way, dwl 6 Scott PI 
Adams James {Adam.s dc Butler) dwl 416 Larkin 
Adams James, dwl 402 Larkin 

Adams JaVnes, cattle driver, dwl RaUroad Av, South S. F. 
Adams Jam«s li., dwl 1910 Hyde 
Adams Jane (widow), dwl 15 Fifth Av 
Adams .J, B., bootblack, 602 Market 
Adams J. Dexter, lieutenant stm Hassler, U. S. Coast 

Survey, 214 Stockton 
Adams Joel, laborer, dwl 17 Gilbert 
Adams John, dwl 614 Kearny j^ 

Adams John, baker Jacob Lutz, dwl 1218 Pacific 
Adams John, boxmaker Hobbs, Pomerov & Co., dwl 414 

Post 
Adams John, cabinetmaker, dwl 18 First 
Adams John, carpenter, dwl 233 Third 
Adams John, laborer, dwl 29 Oak Grove Av 
Adams John, master barge San Mateo, dwl Long Bridge 
Adams John, teamster George Meyer, dwl 515 Hyde 
Adams John, waiter Lick House 
Adams John A. {Norton tt A.), dwl 327 Larkin 
Adams John S., freight clerk stm Montana, dwl 547 Min 
Adams John Q., attorney at law, office 641 Washington, 

dwl 1028 Vallejo 
Adams John Q., clerk Merchants' Exchange Bank, dwl 

106 Post 
Adams Joseph, bookkeeper, dwl SW cor Pennsylvania 

Av and Solano 
Adams Joseph, hostler, dwl 327 Larkin 
Adams Joseph, painter Noble & Gallagher, dwl 25 Pol- 
lard PI 
Adams Joseph L., laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl SW 

cor Brannan and Eighth 
Adams Joseph W., manager Banner Soap Co., dwl 514 

Pine 
Adams Josephine M. Miss, saleswoman Singer Sewing- 

Machine Co, dwl 1718 Turk 
Adams J. Z., clerk, dwl Overland House 
Adams K. F. (widow), dwl 729 California 
Adams Laura E., chambermaid Palace Hotel 
Adams Lawson S. {of Adams, McNeill d; Co., Sacramento 

City), office 405 Front, dwl 825 Bush 
Adams Lorenzo D., laborer D. A. Macdonald & Co., dwl 

238 Steuart 



AMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchan^ 



Adams Slay Miss, student Heald's Telegraph Institute, 

dwl 321 Green 
Adams N., Ship and Steamboat Jour. Assn, 139 Post, dwl 
Adams N. A., Mrs. (widow), dwl 2506 Sacramento 
Adams Nelson B., solicitor M. A. Miller & Co., dwl 82 

Russ 
Adams Oswald, pkmiber W. S. Ray, dwl 611 Howard 
Adams Otis, steam pumpmaker, dwl S s Eleventh Av nr 

P, South S. F. 
AdKnis Patrick, deckhand stm Louise, Clay St. Wharl 
Adams Q. L., dentist, dwl 1515 Leavenworth 
Adams R. H., salesman J. C. Meussdorffer & Bro., re» 

Oakland 
Adams ' Richard L., teamster Michelssen, Brown & Co., 

dwl cor Eiffhth and Brannan 
Adams R. M., hat manufacturer, 631 Merchant, dwl 931 

Shotwell 
Adams Robert, carpenter, dwl 870 Folsom 
Adams Samuel, druggist, dwl 1S33 Sutter 
Adams Samuel, shipcarpenter Boole & Webster, Pier 7 

Steuart 
Adams Samuel J., machinist, dwl 51G Stevenson 
Adams Thomas J., clerk, dwl 12 Ellia 
Adams W., dwl 636 Comjnercial 

Adams William, clerk Phillips, Taber is Co., dwl 127 Kear 
Adams William, shoemaker, dwl 28 Clay 
Adams William A., stevedore, dwl 331 Green 
Adams William H., advertising departrnent Evening Bul- 
letin, dwl 629 Clay 
Adams William Henry, porter Hahn & Roche, dwl Guer- 
rero bet Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth 
Adams William J. {Adams <Sc Taylor), res Fair Oaks, 

San Mateo Co. 
Adams William S., painter Cal. Furniture Manuf. Co., 

dwl 572 Folsom 
Adams Winslow, carpenter, dwl 1016 Market 
Adams Zebdiel B., salesman Mam & Winchester, dwl W i 

Fillmore bet Eddy and Ellis 
Adams & Butler (James Adams and Thoma$ J. Butler), 

hay and gJ'ain, 42 and 44 Clay 
ADAJ»IS «& TAYLOR (WillUnn J. Adams and Peter 

Taylor), proprietors South Point Warehouse, Berry 

bet Third and Fourth, and lumber, Pier 17 Steuart 
Adaiais & Westlake Manuf. Co., Walter M. Rockville 

agent, office 109 California room 9 
AdamSu See Addoms 
Adamsciu Andrew, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Adamson Felix E., yardman John Smith, dwl 435 Pine 
Adamson Godfrey, laborer Occidental Laundry, SE cor 

FiiCbert and Octavia 
Adamson H. H., dwl 957 Market 
Adanisoa James, machinist Pv.isdon I. and L. Works, dwl 

Liberty bet Guerrero and Dolores 
Adamson Richard, salesman WjTine, Lowth & Co., dwl 

3 Natoma 
Adamson Wmiam, seaman, dwl 409 Pacific 
Adamson W. R. H., cashier Woods & Freeborn, dwl NE 

cor Leavenworth and Greenwich 
Adar John L. (A dar tb Bicrge), dwl 736 Pacific 
Adar & Biergie {John L. Adar and Joseph Bierge), pro- 
prietors Lafayette Hotel, 736 Pacific 
Adcock Edwin, polisher James W. Burnham & Co., dwl 

440 Second 
Adcock Jolm T., clerk Knowland & Doe, dwl 208 Second 
Adcock Robert, laborer A. M. Simpson & Brother, Beale 

St. Wharf 
Adcock Thomas, shipcarpenter, dwl 13 Tehama, rear 
Adcock William, dwl 208 Second 
Adcock William, porter Hobart, Wood & Co., dwl 56 

Tehama 
Adderly O., shoemaker Everett H. Dunbar, dwl 1220 

Market 
Addington Frank, saddler, dwl N s Sixteenth bet Second 

Av and Guerrero 

Addison Mrs., janitress Union Primary School 

Addison Anna, dressmaker, dwl 329 Filbert 

Addison Oliver, Coopers' Union, 417 Bush 

Addison Sarah L., dwl 7S7 Mission 

Addoms Samuel K., salesman Robinson, Fowler & Co., 

dwl SW cor Thirteenth Av and N, South S. F. 
Adelsberger Charles F., cooper Hogan & Co., dwl 409 Pac 
Adelsdorfcr Ernest (Ordenntein cfc Co.), dwl 1605 Gough 
ADKLSDOKFEK ISAAC, dwl 312 Sixth 
Adelsdorfer Joseph, salesman Frankenthal & Co., dwl 

505 Van Ness Av 
Adelsdorfer Zacharias, merchant, dwl 1605 Gough 
Adelstein Bernard, junkdealer, dwl 510 Post 
Adema William, helper melter and refiner's department 

U. S. Mint, dwl 6 Tehama 



Aden Rammer, captain schooner Anna Aden, Pacific St. 
Wharf 

Aden Solomon, clothing, 818 Montgomery 

Aderton T., saddler Market St. R. R. 

Adler Aaron, dwl 1113 Post 

Adler Adolph, bookkeeper Hart & Goodman, dwl 228 
Bush 

Adler Albert, clerk Wenzel, Rothschild & Hadenfeldt, 
dwl 912 Howard 

Adler Alexander, bookkeeper Ordenstein & Co., dwl 513 
Post 

Adler Barnard, real estate, dwl 748 Howard 

Adler Bernard, tailor, 637 Third 

Adler Charles {W. <t /. Stcinhart & Co.), dwl 1113 Post 

Adler Charles, bookkeeper, dwl 1019 Sutter 

Adler Charles E., salesman Fechheimer, Goodklnd & Co., 
dwl 427 Bush 

Adler David, bookkeeper M. Selig, dwl 115 Elev«ith 

Adler David, market, 419 Hayes 

Adler Elkan, dwl 514i Fell 

Adler George, painter, dwl 1128 Folsom 

Adler Hermann, bookkeeper Simon Held dwl 502 Bush 

Adler Jacob, clerk M, UUmann & Co., dwl 513 Post 

Adler John, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s ^Vhart 

Adler John, saloonkeeper, dwl 1128 Folsom 

Adler Julius, local agent Union Ins. Co., dwl 513 Post 

Adler Leopold, shoemaker, dwl 637 Geary 

Adler Leopold W. {Uhl Jk A.), dwl 518 Stevenson 

Adler Louis, boots and shoes, 333 East, dwl 322 Green 

Adler Louis, shoemaker I. M. Wentworth & Co., dwl 115 
Eleventh 

Adler Morris, market, 302 Beale, dwl 115 Eleventh 

Adler Moses, dwl 1113 Post 

Adler Peter, carriagemaker, dwl 521 Green 

Adler, Solomon, dwl 729 Geary 

Adlington I)a\dd N., carpenter, dwl 1125 Kearny 

ADMINISTRATOR PUBLIC, office 3 and 4 Court 
Block, 636 Clay 

Adrian Manuel, journalist, dwl 702 Vallejo 

Adrian Adrien, dyer F. C. Hagerup & Co., dwl 148 Third 

Adrian Frank K., butcher Henrj' A. Zeiss, dwl 1103 Fol 

Adriana Cora Miss, premier dansense Wade's Opera House, 
dwl Warschauer House 

Adsit Amiie (widow), dwl 726 Sutter 

ADVANCE SILVER MININCi CO. (Alpine Co., Cal.), 
Bartlett Lingley secretary, office 309 Cal., room 16 

Aehms Herman, carpenter, dwl 18 Ellis 

Aeils Charles, porter Hardie & Fredericks, dwl cor Bush 
and Jones 

Aelben Lewis, agent Cal. Brick Co., office 309 Montgom- 
ery, dwl Church bet Sixteenth and Seventeenth 

Aemi George, cabinetmaker W. J. T. Palmer & Co., dwl 
627 Commercial 

Aeschlimann John H., coachman Daniel J. Cook, 1117 
Pine 

JETHiA INSrRANCE CO. of Hartford, Conn, (fire), 
George C. Boardman manager, Henry Carlton Jr. 
agent, office 311 California 

jETNA iron ^VORKS, Pendergast & Smith proprie- 
tors, E s Fremont bet Howard and Folsom 

iETNA LIFE INSLRANCE CO. (Hartford, Conn.), 
Charles W. Dannals manager, office 504 Kearny 

Afelde Joseph, porter John Harrold, dwl 918 Larkin 

Afflerbach Alice Miss, music teacher, dwl 728 Broadway 

Afflerbach Christian H., pastor Broadway German Metho- 
dist Church, dwl 728 Broadway 

Afflerbach Edmund, clerk John J. Pfister, dwl 728 Bdwy 

Afflerbach Emma Miss, music teacher, dwl 728 Broadway 

Afflick , dwl 632 Market 

Afflick , driver Sutter St. R. R. 

Affranchino Angel Rev., clergjTnan St. Ignatius College, 
dwl 841 Market 

Agama Juana A. (widow), dwl 403 Union 

Agard George E., salesman M. Rosenshine & Bro., 'dwl SE 
cor Mason and Jackson 

Agard William B., merchant, dwl 311 Green 

Agarri Ascension, laborer, dwl 15 Bannam PI, rear 

Agate William, merchant, dwl 411 Sansom 

Agee Robert, peddler, dwl SE cor Alabama and Twenty 
second 

Agcr James E. (Bacon <i- Co.), dwl E s Capp bet Twenty- 
fifth and Twenty-sixth 

Ager John E., bookkeeper Mutual Life Insurance Co. Ol 
New York, dwl 24 Second Av nr Seventeenth 

Agers John, dwl 1226 Pacific 

Ages C. , dwl 614 Kearny 

Agger Peter, seaman, dwl 409 Pacific 

Agnew A., lumberman C. A. Hooper & Co 

Agnew Gilmore, compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 512 Sixtl 



Iher 



Hen 
fa 



Hem 



tttrji 



PRANCIS & VALENTINE. Commercial Printing House, 517 Clay Street, S. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 




Agnew James, teamster, dwl 28 Clay 

A^'iiew James €, Jwl 304 Third 

A|,'iiew John, stableman, dwl E s Valencia nr Ridley 

AgTiew John J., foreman teamster S. F. Gas Light Co., 

dwl 14'J Perrj' 
A^ew Patrick, shipcarpenter, dwl N s Lily Av bet La- 

gTina and Octavia 
Acrnew Robert, cari'ienter, dwl 91" Batten,' 
Ajjnew Samuel, porter Wilson, Merry & Co., dwl N s Do- 
lores nr Twenty-ninth 
Agnew Thomas, city agent State Investment and Insur- 
ance Co., otfice 218 San, dwl 1001 Capp c<5r Twenty-fifth 
Agnew Tliomas, compositor Cuddy & Hughes, dwl 824 

Kearny 
Agnew William, teamster S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl cor 

Fifth and Tehama 
Agrati Giulio, theatrical agent,' dwl Gailhard's Hotel 
Agrerre Trinida (widow), dwl 722 Broadway 
Agrippina Insurance Co. (marine, Cologne), Henry Bal- 

zer A: Co. agents, office 213 Sansom 
Agual Patrick, calker L. S. Allen, 16 Drumm 
Agnern* Eladea (widow), d^'l 1332 Dupont, rear 
Aguilar Francisco J., hairdresser Creamer &, Deckelman, 

dwl 313 Green 
Aguilar Jacques, dwl GIO Stevenson 
Ay:uilar Rosa Mrs., dwl 208 Drumm 
Aguirre Albert, laborer George Ellich, dwl 156 Steuart 
Aguirre Helena Miss, seamstress Joseph Sheyer, dwl 17 

Green 
Aguirre Juan M., real estate, dwl 2 Gardner Alley 
Aguirre Martin Joseph, clerk Ramon M. Aguirre, dwl 2 

Gardner Alley 
Aguirre Peter A., hatter, 329 Kearny, dwl 2 Gardner 
AGTIRKE RAMO.V .M., nioneybroker and cigars and 

tobacco, 5iX» Kearny, dwl 2 Gardner Alley 
Ah Foo (Chinese), restaurant, 808 Dupont 
Ah Fors (Chinese), shirtmaker, 811 Clay 
Ah Fung (Chinese), phj^sician, office 215 Bush 
Ah Hem (Chinese), rice, 760 Clay 
Ah Hip (Chinese), tailor, 725 Pacific 
Ah Sing (Chinese), barber, 706 Jackson 
Ah Sing (Chinese), cigars, 729 Davis 
Ah Sun (Chinese), clerk London and San Francisco Bank, 

dwl 10 Brenham PI 
Ah Tem (Chinese), merchant, 623 Jackson 
Ah Why (Chinese), cigar manufacturer, 1235 Dupont 
Ah Yuen (Chinese), candy, 650 Jackson 
Ahbeck Xelson, blacksmith, dwl 520 Mission 
Ahbin D., dwl 547 Mission 
Ahearn Ann (widow), dwl 15J Boardman, rear 
Ahearn Jeremiah, foreman Dennis Jordan, dwl 265 Stev 
Alieam Mary Jliss, dwl 213J Tehama 
Ahearn Patrick, lamplighter S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 727 

Ellis 

Ahearn Thomas, helper Union Iron Works, dwl What 
•*■ Cheer House 

Ahern Ann (widow), dwl 605 Xatoma 

Ahem Arthur, carpenter, dwl 1060 Howard 

Ahern B., laborer, dwl 610 Stevenson 

Ahem Bartholomew, laborer C. P. R. R., dwl 1060 How 

Ahern Daniel, laborer Laiu-el Hill Cemeterj-, dwl W s 

Baker bet Gear>' and Post 
Ahem Daniel, piledriver, dwl 336 Brj-ant 
Ahern James, coachman N. G. Kittle, 903 Sutter 
Ahem James, teamster Samuel S. Reinstein, dwl 1060 

Howard 
Ahern John M., grocer, dwl NW cor Larkin and Ash Av 
Ahern M. A. Miss, teacher Eighth St. Primary School, 

dwl cor Larkin and McAllister 
Ahern Martin (A hern tt Co.), dwl NW cor Jackson and 
^ Montgomery 

Ahem Mary Miss, dressmaker, dwl 605 Xatoma 
Ahern Maurice, laborer Laurel Hill Cemetery, dwl W s 
^ Baker bet Post and Gearj' 
Ahem Michael, bootmaker S. W. Rosenstock & Co., dwl 

W s Ellis bet Pierce and Scott 
Ahem Michael, driver Market St. R. R., dwl SW cor Six- 
teenth and Rondel PI 
Ahem Michael, laborer, dwl llj Freelon, rear 
Ahem Morton (Ahern <t Co.), dwl NE cor Washington 

and Montgomery 
Ahem Owen, Tailors' Protective Union, SW cor Keamy 

and Morton 

Ahem Patrick, driver Market St. R. R., dwl 529 Valencia 
Ahem Patrick, deckhand stm Louise, dwl 1060 Howard 
Ahem Patrick, tailor, dwl 1604 Cal 
Ahem Thomas, foundryman, dwl IS First 
Aiera Timothy, blacksmith Union Iron Works, dwl 58 
•111 Jessie 



Ahern William, dwl 536 Sacramento 

Ahem William, car|>enter, dwl 1060 Howard 

Ahern William, laborer, dwl 424 Broadway 

Ahem & Co. (Martin and Murttni Ahern), fruits and 

commission merchants, 208 Washington 
AIILIC.41'11 JACOB, stijves, tinware, plumbing and 

gasfitting, 207 Fourth, dwl 41 Clara 
Ahlbom Charles, proprietor Hansa Hotel, 429 Bush 
Ahlbom Henry, expressman, dwl S 3 Fell bet Pierce and 

Stelner 
Ahlbom Louis, dwl cor Seventeenth and Church 
Ahlbom Minna F. (widow), seamstress, dwl 33 Jessie nr 

Seventh 
Ahlbom William, laborer, dwl 5 Mason, rear 
Ahlers George (Sturken <t A.), dwl 229 Spear 
Ahlers Henry, jeweler Bujannoff & Babmann, dwl 18 

Turk 
Ahlers Henrj", stevedorq, dwl 160 Steuart 
Ahlers Hennan, waiter John G. Druhe, dwl junction 

Market and California 
Ahlers John D., clerk Bucking & Postel, dwl NW cor 

Taylor and Pacific 
Ahlers William, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl SW cor 

Eighth and Bi-annan 
Ahlert Frederick (Alhert dt Son), dwl S s Post nr Scott 
Ahlert George J. (Ahlert <!• Son), dwl S s Post nr Scott 
Ahlert & Son (Frederick and George J. Ahlert), fancy 

goods, S s Post nr Scott 
Ahll Richard, hog ranch, dwl W s Sixth Av nr M, South 

S. F. 
Ahlgrren C, baker BrookljTi Hotel, dwl 8 Harlan PI 
Ahlgren John, carpenter, dwl 816 Jessie 
Ahlgren S., seaman, dwl 123 Jackson 
Ahlstedt G., laborer, dwl 430 Dmmm 
Ahlstrom Charles, organist Scandinavian M. E. Church, 

dwl 117 Perry 
Ahnert August, junk, 614 Green, dwl 1514 Powell 
Ahpel Carl, bookkeeper D. Samuels, dwl 714 Mc.\llister 
Ahpel Henrv (Henry Ahpcl Ji- Co.), dwl 11 Carlos PI 
AHPEL UKMCY A CO., fruit and produce 209 Wash- 
ington 
Ahreus Charles, carpenter Charles Klemm, dwl 352 

Third 
Aljrens Christian, jeweler and watchmaker, 843 Dupont 
Aln-ens Claus, barkeeper Asa L. Waugaman, dwl 415 

Brannan 
Ahrens DIedrich (Ahrens dk Brother), dwl SW cor Mis- 
sion and Main 
Ahrens Frank, seaman, d*l 37 Pacific 
Ahrens George (Ahrens <t Brother), dwl SW cor Mission 

and Main 
Ahrens George, clerk Christian Ahrens, dwl S43 Dupont 
Ahrens Henry (Ahrens <i: Windt), dwl NE cor Hj'de'and 

Broadway 
Ahrens Henry (Henry Ahrens it Co.), dwl 111 Austin 
Ahrens Henrj- & Co. (William D. Koch and Henry Tiet- 

jen), proprietors Chicago Brewery, 1420-142S Pine 
Ahrens Henry Mrs., dwl 520 Broadway 
Ahrens Jacob, clerk Charles Mues, dwl NE cor Pacific 

and Front 
Ahrens Jaeob H., liquor saloon 218 Commercial, dwl 1421 

Mason 
Ahrens Rodolph, with D. H. Hillen, dwl NW cor Pine 

and Larkin 
Ahrens & Brother (Diedrich and George), wines and 

liquors, SW cor Mission and Main 
Ahrens & Windt (Henry Ahrens and A. H. Windt), gro- 
ceries and liquors, NE cor Hyde and Broadway 
Ahrens. See Arens 
Ahronsen Julius, salesman Buyer, Reich & Co., dwl Sixth 

near Market 
Ahson Abraham, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 
Ahumada Joseph M., real-estate agent, office and dwl 631 

Sacramento 
Aibischer Brano, real-estate, dwl 1337 Dupont 
Aibischer Joseph, dwl 1337 Dupont 
Aibischer Louis, artist, dwl 1337 Dupont 
Aibischer Mary Miss, teacher South S. F. Grammar 

School, dwl 1337 Dupont 
Aich Rudolph, gardener, dwl 1621 Sutter 
Aicher Frank, locksmith John G. lis, dwl 1618 Stockton 
Aicher Olga Miss, seamstress, dwl 1618 Stockton 
AID I XIOX, F. W. BrUggeman, manager, office 320 

Sansom 
Aigeltinger Leopold, furrier, 1069 Howard 
Aiken .\ddie E. Miss, teacher Broadway Grammar School, 

dwl 1102 Tavlor 
Aiken Adeline W. Mrs., dwl 1102 Taylor 
Aiken C. H., laborer Pacific Liverj- Stable, 709 Jones 



iS 



JAMES G. STEELE & CO. dispense Prescriptions from Pure Medicines. 



Jewelry Manufactory, "Wholesale and Retail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Mercha: 



AIKE\ CHARLES, attorney at law, office 34 Mont- 
gomery Block, clwl 1102 Taylor 

Aikens Jaiiies, bookkeeper, dwl 707J Mission 

Aiken James, teamster William Kerr, dwl 909 Bat, rear 

Ailceu John, sailmaker, dwl 708 Jones 

Aiken John P., clerk Post-office, dwl 1102 Taylor 

Aiken Mary Miss, school teacher, dwl 14 Eddy 

Aiken Michael, dwl 208 Third 

Aiken Robert, bootmaker I. JI. Wentworth & Co., dwl S 
s Ellis bet Laguna and Buchanan 

Aiken Robert, broker, dwl Nucleus House 

Aiken Robert, deckhand stm Julia, Broadway Wharf 

Aiken Thomas, agent, dwl G20 Brannan 

Aiken William E, barkeeper stm James M. Donahue, 
Green St. Wharf 

AIKE.\ MBLIilAM II., attorney at law, office 34 Mont- 
gomery Block, dwl 1102 Taylor 

Ainsa James M., warehouse clerk Naval Office, Custom 
House, dwl 1906 Eddy 

Ainsley Francis, coUarmaker Main & Winchester 

Ainsley James Edward, compositor San Francisco News 
Letter, dwl 24 Sixth 

Ainsley John, bootcutter U. W. C. Boot and Shoe Co., 
dwl 24 Sixth 

Ainsley M., dwl 636 Commercial 

Ainsley Mary W. (widow), dwl 758 Harrison 

Ainsley Tliomas, dwl 24 Sixth 

Ainsworth Charles, mariner, dwl 19 Minna 

Ainsworth Frederick, laborer A. F. Spear & Co., 218 
Drumm 

Ainsworth John, dwl 225 Bush 

Ainto John, porter Oakland Ferry Steamers, dwl 115 
Geary 

Aird Darling, blacksmith William Deacon, dwl 10 Zoe 

Aird David, carpenter, dwl 7 Lafayette PI 

Airey George F., butcher, dwl 73 Tehama 

Aitchison John, carpenter, dwl 11 Cleveland 

Aitchison Mathilda Jilme. (colored), fortune teller, dwl 
223 Dupont 

Aitken Charles H., market, 5 Washington, dwl 208 Ellis 

Aitken Eggert Mrs., clairvoyant, dwl 208 Ellis 

Aitken James {Moynihan Js A.), dwl 308 Seventh 

Aitken James C, boilermaker Portland Boiler Works, 
dwl 266 Clementina, rear 

Aitken Jane Mrs., furnished rooms, 618 California 

Aitken John R. {Aitken cfc Bender), dwl 530 Turk 

Aitken Robert, carpenter, dwl 115 Second 

Aitken S. Mrs. (widow), dwl NW cor Capp and Twenty- 
fifth 

Aitken Samuel, machinist California Machine Works, 
dwl NW cor Capp and Twenty-fifth 

Aitken William, coachman Peter Donahue, NE cor Bry- 
ant and Second 

Aitken & Bender {John JR. Aitken and Thomas L. Ben- 
der), market, 543 Turk 

Aitkens Ernest, shipping master, dwl 308 Green 

Akerberg Nelson R. , blacksmith John Higgins, dwl 430 
Drumm 

Akerman Benjamin J., deputy marshal, dwl 113 Ellis 

Akeroyd James, woolgrader. Pacific Wool Depot, dwl 624 
Fourth 

Akers Hem-y, laborer James W. Cox & Co., dwl 132 Feni 
Av 

Aklon Samuel A. , tailor, dwl E s Hampshire bet Twenty- 
second and Twenty-third 

Akmann AVilliam {Meyer J; A.) dwl 101 Sacramento 

Akron Charles, chop house, 13 Washington 

Alabama and Humboldt Consolidated Mining Co. (Storey 
Co., Nev.), William H. Watson secretary, office 302 
Montgomcrj' 

Alabama Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), Frank Swift sec- 
retary, office 419 California 

Alacran Mining Co. (Mexico), L. L. Robinson president, 
office 320 Sansom, room 23 

Alahoe Peter, seaman, dwl 212 Green 

Alameda Express, Alfred W. Lind proptr, office 18 Clay 

Alameda Ferrj', foot Market 

Alameda Frank, Austrian Benev. Soc., 71 New Mont 

Alameda Mining Company, Lyttleton Price secretary, 
office 606 Montgomery 

Alameda Real Estate Associates, James E. Damon man- 
ager, office 607 Montgomery 

Alami Bernard, fisherman, dwl 8 Sacramento 

Alarme Louis, hairdresser Leon Bineaud, dwl N s Pacflc 
bet Kearny and Dupont 

Alaska Coal Co. (Alaska Ter.) James T. Hoyt secretary, 
office 63 Merchants' Exchange 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL CO., John F. Miller presi- 
dent, Emanuel Neumann secretary, office 310 Sansom 



ALA.SKA IIERALU, A. A. Stickney editor and pro 

prietor, office 113 Liedesdorff 
Alatorre Daniel, cigarmaker Diez, Bertz & Co. 
Alatorre Dionicia (widow), dwl 1121 Kearny 
Alatorre Presiliaiio, cigarmaker Diez, Bertz & Co., dwl 

912 Jackson 
Alatorre Theophilo, jeweler, 912 Jackson 
Alatorre William, barber Espiridion Berroa, dwl 504 Val- 

lejo 
Alavia Peter, cook Cosmo Franciscovich, dwl 6 Fourth 
Alban Edward G., head pr^stal clerk U. S. Railway Mail 

Service, dwl 1753 Howard 
Alban William Greene {A. C. Wightman <t Co.), dwl 1753 

Howard 
Albano A. C, dwl 810 Mission 
ALBANY BREWERY, Spreckels & Co. proprietors, 

71-75 Everett 
Alberg Frank, driver Vermeil & Wellington, dwl cor 

Fourth and Berry 
Alberger George, porter, dwl 8 Tyson PI 
Alberigi D., laborer Battista Papera, dwl 90S Stockton 
Albermarle House, Mrs. Mary F. Collins proprietress, 8 

Mason 
Albers A. , carrier S. F. Chronicle, dwl 224 Fourth 
Albers Albert, ornamental painter Andrew Frei, dwl 455 

Bryant 
Albers Anton, foreman Denicke Bros., dwl 1118 Jackson 
Albers Henry, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl SW cor 

Brannan and Eighth 
Albers John H., bookkeeper Conlin & Roberts, dwl 22 

O'Farrell 
Albers John Henry, oysterman George Mayes, res Ala- 
meda 
Albers Marcus, groceries and liquors, NE cor Fourth and 

Clara 
Albert Allen, gilder M. D. Nile, dwl 625 Bush 
Albert Edward, Branch Bakery, 219 Sixth 
Albert Henry, dentist, dwl 304 Tliird 
Albert Henry, waiter Phil Donoho, dwl 1105 Powell 
Albert H. M., stairbuilder, 407 Brannan 
Albert Honestus, teacher stairbuilding, 413 Brannan 
Albert J., laborer C. A. Hooper & Co. 
Albert Jerkin, tinsmith dwl 41 Clara 
Albert Lewis {Lewis <t Co.), dwl 148 Tehama 
Albert! Frank, professor music, dwl 105 Gearj' 
Albert! Pada, bootmaker Joaquin J. Silva, dwl 41S Drumm 
Alberts Albert, painter, dwl 455 Bryant 
Albei'ts Henry, seaman, dwl 430 Drumm 
Albertson Alexander, seaman, dwl cor Anderson and 

Lyon, Bemal Hights 
Albertson Joseph A., homeopathic ph3'sic!an, office and 

dwl 109 O'Farrell 
Albertson William J. , real estate, dwl 304 Third 
Albertson William T., machinehand S. S. Culverwell, 

dwl 615 Turk 
Albion River Mills (Mendocino Co.), Macpherson & 

Wetherbee proprietors, office 36 Market 
Albrecht August {Schroder d- A.), res West Oakland 
Albreoht Frederick, boilermaker. Pacific Rolling Mills 
Albrecht Frederick, cigar manufacturer, SW cor Second 

and Mission, dwl 66 Shipley 
Albrecht George, blacksmith, cor Fifteenth and Railroad 

Avs, dwl Sixteenth Av nr N, South S. F. 
Albreoht J., dwl 432 Broadway 
Albrecht James, butcher Rosenberg & Co., dwl 428 Shot- 
well 
Albrecht John, laborer Ruhland Bros., NW cor Fell and 

Stanj"an 
Albrecht John, tailor, 528 Bush 
Albrecht John B., groceries and liquors, NW cor Church 

and Twentj'-fourth 
Albrecht Joseph, clerk Joseph M. Shotwell, dwl 425 

Shotwell 
Albrecht Richard, bakery and confection erj', 109 Taylor 
Albrecht Rudolph, architect, dwl 768 Brj'ant 
Albrecht Valentine, laborer Ruhland Bros., dwl N 8 Can 

tral road nr Golden Gate Park 
Albright Alexander, billiard-tablemaker Jacob Strahh 

& Co. , dwl 317 Bush 
Albright Charles H., salesman A. M. Oilman, dwl 61! 

Pine 
Albright. See AUbright 

!i-Album Louis, teamster, dwl W s Church nr Seventeenth 
Alcayaga Josf5, g'roceries, 524 Broadway 
Alcortage Edward, broommaker Gillespie, Zan & Co. 

res Oakland 
Aldas Augustine, laborer, dwl 12 Varenne 
Alden C. D. Miss, artist, dwl 538 Ellis 
Alden Fruit Preserving Co., office 426 Jlontgomery 



Hi!) 



PEANCIS & VALENTINE, Printers, 517 Clay and 510-516 Commercial St., S til 



p. VAIT SCHAACK & CO., 70G, 708, 710, 712, 711, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Alden James A., clerk, dwl 34 Eddy 
Alden John, carpenter, dwl 214i Sixth 
Alden Sumuel li., jwrter Frank G. Edwards, dwl 4 Ber- 
nard 
Alderman Oscar, policeman. City Hall, dwl 20 Stockton 
Aldcrson David N. , dwl 24 O'Farrell 
Aldred Michael J., foreman McAfee, Spiers & Co., dwl 

144 Natoma 
Aldrich Hyron Rev., clergiTiian, dwl E s Folsom bet 

Twenty-second and Twenty-third 
Aldrich Ennna L., physician, office and dwl 759 Market 
Aldrich Frederick, nurse, Alms House 
Aldrich George A., fireman Southern Pac. R. R. Co. 
Aldrich John, laborer H. Kelling & Co., dwl 038 Com 
Aldrich L. B. Mrs., teacher Shotwell St. Primary School 
Aldrich Louis, attorney at law, office 330 Pine room 53, 

dwl 1723 Clay 
Aldrich Theodore, dwl 1425 Dupont 
Aldrich W. A., capitalist, office 200 Sansom, dwl 612 Jones 
Aldrich William I>., laborer, dwl S s California nr Bu- 
chanan 
Aldridge Albert, carpenter Baldwin's Hotel 
Aldridf^e Catherine (widow), dwl 71!) Howard 
Aldridf,''e John, steward, dwl 21 Stockton 
Aldridg'e Marion, barkeeper, dwl 524 Howard 
Aldridjre Robert, laborer S. F. Gas Lijjht Co., dwl 29 Jes- 
sie, rear 
Aleniany Josei)h S. Most Rev., Archbishop of San Fran- 
cisco, dul 628 California 
Alers Aug'ust, Turkish and Russian baths and physician, 

office 722 Montgomery, dwl 718 Montgomery 
Ale.\ Isabella Miss, dressmaker Mrs. P. M. Willard, dwl 

635 Union 
Alex Joseph (Coiutantine <!• A.), dwl 535 Union 

Alexander , dwl 014 Kearny 

Alexander , contractor, dwl 7 Mason 

Alexander , lumberman C. A. Hooper & Co. 

Alexander A. (widow), dwl cor K and Twenty-first, South 

S. F. 
Alexander Adolph, tailor, 807 Market, dwl 404 Minna 
Alexander Barton S. General, senior engineer and presi- 
dent Board Engineers U. S. A. Pacific Coast, office 
533 Kearny, dwl Palace Hotel 
Alexander B. 1)., dwl 414 Pacific 

Alexander Benjamin, porter Kline & Co., dwl 706 Vallejo 
Alexander Bertha Mrs, hairdresser, 1407 Duiwnt 
Alexander Charles, cigars and tobacco, 957 Market, dwl 

500 Jessie 
Alexander Charles, cook Constitution Hotel, 547 First 
Alexander Charles M., tinsmith, 311 Fifth 
Alexander U. k Co., manufacturers cigars, 222 Battery 
Alexander David (D. Alexander <i- Co.), dwl 1047 Har 
Alexander David G. , clerk Cantin &. Everett, dwl 2022 Pine 
Alexander D. H., dwl 226 Second 
Alexander E., barber, dwl 419 Minna 
Alexander Edward L. , special agent U. S. Post-office De- 
partment, office GOO Montgomeri', dwl 405 Turk 
Alexander Edwin C, com]X)sitor, dwl 168 Silver 
Alexander Eli, peddler, dwl 344 Fifth 
Alexander Elizabeth (widow), dwl E s Gough bet Grove 

and Fulton 
Alexander Emanuel, shoemaker, dwl W s Natoma bet 

Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Alexander Esther Miss, dwl 639 Vallejo 
Alexander K.zekiel, captain stm Monterey, office 10 Market 
Alexander Flora (widow), furnished rooms, 519 Jones 
Alexander George, mate stm Monterey, Pacific St. Wharf 
Alexander George W. (Oxborn ti- A.}, dwl 209 Austin 
Alexander George W., miner, dwl 114 Mason 
Alexander Goodman, glazier, dwl 1027 Harrison 
Alexander H. , laborer, dwl 509 Washington 
Alexander Harry, salesman W. Cohen & Co., dwl 1402 

Powell 
Alexander H. B., civil engineer Pacific Bridge Company, 

office 606 Montgomery, dwl 708 Pine 
Alexander Isaac, boot and shoemaker, 209J^ Pacific 
Alexander J., capitalist, dwl 418 Sutter 
Alexander Jackson (Carletoii ct Co.), dwl 120 Seventh 
Alexander Jacob A., cigars and tobacco, 2 Clay, dwl 2513 

Clay 
Alexander James, dwl Commercial Hotel 
Alexander Jumes {Perrett it Co.), dwl 122 Seventh 
Alexander James, clerk, dwl 1411 Pacific 
Alexander James, tailor, dwl 281 Stevenson 
Alexander James, wholesale wood, 9 Berry, dwl 434 Sixth 
Alexander John, merchant, office 121 Sansom, dwl cor 

Tyler and Turk 
Alexander John, stevedore Oregon S. S. Co., dwl NW cor 
Main and Folsom 



Alexander John R. P., conductor Central R. R., dwl 1046 

Folsom 
Alexander Joseph, clerk Godchaux Brothers & C(j., dwl 

617 Green 
Alexander Joseph, laborer, dwl 6 Zoo 
Alexander Joseph Dolby, melter Pacific Refinery and 

Bullion Exchange, dwl 1016 Green 
Alexander Julius, hairdresser Adam Grimm, dwl 415 Min 
Alexander Laura, dressmaker, dwl 7 Miles PI 
Alexander Louis, painter, dwl W s Capj) in- Twenty-fifth 
Alexander Mark, cutter Levinsky Bros., dwl W s Natoma 

bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Alexander Orlando, mining, office 309 California room 17, 

dwl 148 Sixth 
Alexander Philip, fancy dry goods, SW cor Twenty-second 

and Mission 
Alexander Rachel, teacher fancy work, dwl 344 Fifth 
Alexander Robert, calker L. S. Allen, dwl 2022 Pine 
Alexander Robert, mariner, dwl SE cor Bryant and Board- 
man PI 
Alexander Samuel, tailor, dwl 706 Vallejo 
Alexander Samuel O. (S. 0. Alexander <!; Co.), dwl 125 

O'Farrell 
Alexander Siegfried, clerk Bomstein Bros., dwl .S13 Jessie 
Alexander Simon, second hand clothing, 1402 Powell 
ALE.VA^tDEK S. O. <£ CO. (Abram Marcus), manu- 
facturers and importers clothing, 4 Batterj' 
Alexander T. H., office SE cor California and Montgomerj- 

room 19, dwl Lick House 
Alexander Theodore, salesman 620 Kearny, dwl 926 Jack 
Alexander Thomas H., office 328 Mont, dwl Lick House 
Alexander Wallace, clerk U. S. Shipping Commissioner, 

dwl 1016 Green 
Alexander William, clerk Joseph E. de la Montagnie, dwl 

2022 Pine 
Alexander William, upholsterer, dwl cor K and Twenty- 
first Av, South S. F. 
Alexander William A., laborer, dwl 741 Market 
Alexander William F., painter, dwl SW cor Gough and 

Vallejo 
Alexander William H., compositor J. H. Carmany & Co., 

dwl 421 Fourth 
Alexander William H, porter Colman Brothers, dwl 1407 

Dupont 
Alexander Y. (widow), dwl 18 Turk 
Alexis Gold Mining Co. (Calaveras Co., Cal.), H. R. West 

secretary, office 240 Montgomery 
Alexson M., Tailors' Pro. Union, SW cor Kearny and 

Morton 
Alfen Elizabeth Mrs., dwl 3 Vernon PI nr Jackson 
Alferitz Peter {Dcllepiane ct Co.), dwl 620 Green 
Alford Charles, packer Ira Marden, dwl 9 Mason 
Alford Joseph A., molder Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 

722 Harrison 
Alfred Alfred, carpenter, dwl 11 Minna 
Alfred Charles, laborer, dwl 2107 Stockton 
Alfs John {Clans <L- A.), dwl 204 Steuart 
Alfs William {Brand, Nabcr d: Co.), dwl 408 Gough 
Alfs William, dwl 52 Pacific 

Alfuse Frederick, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steu- 
art 
Algao James C, shoemaker Gilbert Pringle Sr., dwl 

607j Minna 
Algar Francis, carpenter, dwl 701 McAllister 
Algar Hiram, carpenter, dwl 306 L'^nion 
Algar Reuben, blacksmith Saul & Co., dwl 609 Folsom 
Alge J., carpenter, Wade's Opera House 
Alger James, optician, dwl 12 O'Farrell 
Algerne August, laborer Palace Hotel 
Algier John, carpenter, dwl Sacramento Hotel 
Algore Thomas, carpenter, dwl 16 Taylor, rear 
Alhambi-a Building, 325 Bush 
Alhambra Hill M. Co. (Silverado, Nev.), Henry G. Langley 

secretarjf, office 612 Clay 
Alhambra House, 319 Bush 
Alhambra Mining Co. (Lyon Co., Nev.), Richard Wegener 

secretary, office 414 California 
Alhambra Quicksilver M. Co., office 320 Sansom room 19 
ALI.SO .IIILLS (Los Angeles), Deming, Palmer & Co. 

proprietors, office 202 and 204 Davis 
All Nations Hotel, Frank J. Bertrand proprietor, 432 

Broadway 
Allan Alexander, carpenter, dwl 1028 Market 
Allan John, builder, dwl 1 Glover 
Allan John, stone seal engraver, 408 Bush 
Allan. See Allen 
Allardt George F., civil engineer, office 715 Clay, dwl 1719 

Sacramento 
AUardyce Alexander Rev., clergyman, dwl 2204 Pine 



S ITEELE'S Squirrel Poison is sold by all Druggists, Grocers, and General Dealers. 



"D. "W. Laird, San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 




Allari Henry, boxmaker Benjamin F. Oilman, dwl SW cor 

Haight and Webster 
Allari Joseph, preserved meats, 53 and 54 California Market, 

dwl 29 Morton 
AUavia Peter, Austrian Benevolent Soc. , 71 New Mont 
Allbri^ht John H., bookkeeper Charles Field & Co., dwl 

508 Fell 
Allbright. See Albright 

Alldack Antonio, Austrian Benevolent Soc., 71 New Mont 
Alldack Joseph, groceries and liquors, SW cor Devisadero 

and Bush 
AUee Daniel, surveyor, dwl 245 Stevenson 
Allegria Gil Y., laborer Louis Sloss & Co., dwl cor Van 

Ness Av and Green 
Alleman Bernard, Austrian Benevolent Soc, 71 New 

Montgonierj' 

Allen , dwl 856 Mission 

Allen Addison F. , clerk 'William T. Garratt, dwl NE cor 

Natoma and FVemont 
Allen Albert, fireman Southern Pac. R. R. 
Allen Albert J., foreman stables Market St. R. R., dwl 

N s Sixteenth nr Second Av 
Allen Albert W^, heater Pac. Rolling Mills, dwl Es 

Louisiana nr Shasta 
Allen Alexander, dwl 51G Sbotwell 

Allen Alexander, watchman S. F. Pioneer Woolen Fac- 
tory, Black Point 
Allen Alonzo W., patternmaker Pacific Iron Works, dwl 

78 Natoma 
Allen Ansel S., liquor saloon, 724 Pacific 
Allen Asa, hair dresser, S s Geaiy nr Devisadero, dwl E s 

Fillmore bet Post and Sutter 
Allen Averv T. , clerk William M. Windsor, dwl 605 Pine 
Allen Bennett G. (Wing tt A.), dwl 1711 Eddy 
Allen C, dwl 863i Market 
Allen C. C, bird cage and wire stand manufacturer, 437 

Brannan 
Allen Charles, carpenter, dwl 404 Bryant 
Allen Charles, laborer D. A. Macdonald & Co. 
Allen Charles, laborer H. F. Williams, dwl Long Bridge 
Allen Charles, printer, dwl 525j Howard 
Allen Charles E. , dwl 22 Minna 
ALLE\ C'lI.iRLEl^ E., president Standard Soap Co., 

office 203 Sacramento (and Egerton, A. <i: Co.), res 

Fruit Vale, Alameda Co. 
Allen Charles E., sawyer, dwl 216 Third 
Allen Charles R., cashier Black Diamond Coal Co., dwl 

905 Market 
Allen Consolidated Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), Frank 

Swift secretary, office 419 California 
Allen D., salesman W. T. Garratt & Co., dwl 572 Folsom 
Allen Daniel B., cabinetmaker, dwl 223 Perrj' 
Allen David, stonecutter David Moore, dwl 1032 Market 
Allen Da\-id H., salesman Crane, Hastings & Co., dwl 1412 

Sacramento 
Allen Declen, blacksmith, dwl NE cor Rausch & Folsom 
A len E. A., dwl 75 Clementina 
Allen Edgar L., bookkeeper F. P. & J. A. Hooper, dwl 

905 Market 
Allen Edward, seaman, dwl 137 Beale 
Allen Edward, surgeon Pacific Mail S. S. Constitution 
Allen Edward I., dwl 45 South Park 
Allen Elizabeth Miss, assistant matron Protestant Or- 
phan Asylum, W s Lagnna bet Haight and Waller 
Allen Ella Mrs., dwl 519 O'Farrell 
Allen Ellen (widow), dwl 23J Zoe 
Allen Esther (widow), dwl 223 Minna 
Allen Eugene, clerk SW cor Third and Howard 
Allen F., dwl 102 Eddy 
Allen Francis, hamessmaker James H. Wilson, dwl 400 

Bryant 
Allen Francis, bakery, 326 Sixteenth 
Allen Frank, dwl 22 Turk 
Allen Frank, clerk, dwl 605 Pine 

Allen P'rank, seaman stm Orizaba, Broadway St. Wharf 
Allen Frank F. (Allen ik Pilkey), dwl 720 Pacific 
Allen Frederick, carpenter brig Sea Waif, Howard St. 

Wharf 
Allen George, seaman sloop Gazelle, Washington St. 

Wharf 
Allen George, teamster, dwl 16 Taylor 
Allen George A. , captain stm Jennie Gawne, Washington 

St. Wharf 
Allen George S., bookkeeper N. S. Arnold & Co., res 

Oakland 
Allen George W., packer J. A. Folger & Co., dwl SW cor 

Fillmore and Post 
Allen Georgiana, chambermaid Palace Hotel 
Allen H., laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 



Albert Henry, hairdresser John H. Hitchings, dwl Bush 

bet Baker and Lyon 
Allen Henry F., clerk Allen & Lewis, dwl 570 Harrison 
Allen Henry H., mining, office 419 California, room 7, 

dwl 514 Stockton 
Allen Hugh, nurserjTnan and florist, W s Buchanan bet 

McAllister and Fulton 
Allen L P., local policeman, dwl 711 California 
Allen Isaac, compositor Stock Exchange, dwl 329 Third 
Allen Isaac P., exchange clerk Bank of California, dwl 

129 Page 
AILEX ISAAC S., secretary and general agent S. F. 

Benevolent Assn, oflSce 10 Webb, dwl 1028 Pine 
Allen James, dwl 713 Howard 
Allen James, dwl 305 Tyler 
Allen James, boilemiaker, dwl 207 Second 
Allen James, engineer Pacific Mail S. S. Co., dwl 18 Ridley 
Allen James, expressman, cor Stockton and Pacific, dwl 

1918 Pacific Av 
Allen James, laborer, dwl 509 Washington 
Allen James, laborer, dwl C nr Eighth Av, South S. F. 
Allen James, machinehand Pac. Barrel and Keg Factory 
Allen James, painter, dwl NE cor Rausch and Folsom 
Allen James, seaman, dwl 20 Washington 
Allen James, stableman Norton & Adams, dwl 433 Turk 
Allen James, stave cutter Pacific Barrel and Keg Factory, 

dwl 123 Park Av 
Allen James, teamster Horace N. Tribou, Pier 17 Steuart 
Allen James A. (Sceman <l- A.), dwl 732 Howard 
Allen James K., laborer New City Hall, dwl 22 Turk 
Allen James M., attorney at law, office 309 Montgomery 

room 12, dwl 1030 Jackson 
Allen Jane Miss, laundress Henry A. Henderson, dwl 

1618 Stockton, rear 
AUen Jeremiah E., liquor saloon, boarding and lodging, 

18 Washington 
Allen John, dwl 35 Clementina 
Allen John, dwl 621 California 
Allen John, dwl NW cor Bush and Stockton 
Allen John, carpenter, dwl 709 Tehama 
Allen John, carpenter, dwl W s Bryant Av bet Harrison 

and Bryant 
Allen John, g^roceries and liquors, NE cor Rausch and 

Folsom 
Allen John, hardware and crockery, 1322 Stockton, dwl 

First Av bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Allen John, hamessmaker Mead & Son, dwl 549 Stev 
Allen John, laborer, dwl 234 Fourth 
Allen John, leader Allen's Band, and musical instru- 
ments, 329 Third 
Allen John, plumber McNally & Hawkins 
AUen John, porter Wilmerdlng, Kellogg & Co., dwl 208 

Second 
Allen John, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Allen John, stableman Central R. R. 
Allen John, teamster, dwl 1207 Montgomery 
Allen John, teamster George Brjden, dwl 208 Second 
Allen John, tailor, dwl 1315 Hyde 
Allen John G. , clerk Eugene Casserly, dwl 533 Post 
Allen John L. , master mariner, dwl 29 Oak Grove Av 
Allen John P., laborer A. M. Simpson & Brother, 1 How- 
ard 
Allen John W. , porter and messenger Savings and Loan 

Society, dwl 719 Clay 
Allen Joseph, paper-barrelmaker Pac. Barrel and Keg 

Factor^-, dwl 611 Seventh 
Allen J. T.", laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s WTiarf 
Allen LawTence, patternmaker, dwl 78 Natoma 
Allen Lewis, laborer S. F. Pioneer Woolen Factor}', dwl 

cor Powell and Francisco 
Allen L. H., clamdealer, 105 California Market, dwl Long 

Bridge nr Toll Gate 
Allen L. M., watchman Pacific Mail S. S. Granada 
Allen Lorenzo D., teacher, dwl 1819 Webster 
Allen Lucius H. (Allen <t- Lewis), dwl 570 Harrison 
Allen Lumber S., shipwright and builder, 16 Drumm 
Allen Mary (widow), dressmaker, 734 Howard 
Allen Michael, grocer, dwl 338 Shipley 
Allen Miles, laborer Palmer, Knox & Co., dwl 511 Minna 
Allen N. F., driver Omnibus R. R. Co. . 
Allen Oliver P., bookkeeper Bank California, dwl 308 

Eighteenth 
Allen P., laborer R. P. Kelly, dwl foot Fourth, Long 

Bridge 
Allen P. C, asphaltumroofer, dwl 164 Jessie 
Allen Reese B., bookkeeper, dwl 2654 Folsom 
Allen Richard, hostler Philip Morshead, dwl 848 Howard 
Allen Richard N., dwl 23i Zoe 
Allen Robert, boxmaker, dwl 231 Second 



PEAITCIS & VALENTINE, Printers, 517 Clay and 510-516 Commercial St., S. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Allen Robert General, chief quartermaster Military Divi- 
sion Pacific, office 105 Stockton, dw 1 Lick House 

Allen Robert J., pai>er-barrelmaker Pacific Barrel and 
Key: Factory, dwl 123 Park Av 

ALLE.\' KOK, projirietor Nucleus Liverj' and Sale 
Stable, 1S5 and 187 Stevenson 

Allen Samuel, enarineer Wilson, Merry & Co., dwl cor 
Buchanan and Bay 

Allen Samuel J. , clerk, dwl 70S Hayes 

Allen S. G., salesman Murphy, Grant & Co., dwl SE cor 
First and Folsom 

Allen Shelden, butcher, dwl 33 Oak Grove Av 

Allen S. K. (widow), dwl 26 Howard Court 

Allen S. M., c.ipitalist, dwl .51.5 Market 

Allen T., gasfitter Wade's Opera House 

Allen T. H., waiter Pacific Mail S. S. Montana 

Allen Theodore H. (Allen <{• i'oun/}), dwl 712 Greenwich 

Allen Thomas, polisher John Daniel & Co., dwl 406 Bdwy 

Allen Thomas C, painter Baldwin's New Theater 

Allen Thomas J., telegraph operator Pacific Mail S. S. 
Co., dwl 223 Minna 

Allen Tliomas K., dwl 54 First 

Allen Thom;vs S., shipcarpenter L. S. Allen, dwl 208 
Ei;;hteenth 

Allen Villa Miss, dwl 130 Tyler 

Allen W., laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 

Allen W. A. , storekeeper Pacific Mail S. S. Granada 

Allen W. H., salesman, dwl Brookl^ii Hotel 

Allen William, carpenter, dwl 404 Bryant 

Allen William, carpenter and builder, 524 Third 

Allen William, clerk .John T. Beales, dwl 206 Ellis 

Allen William, engineer, dwl 319 Green 

Allen William, liquor saloon, 539 Jackson 

Allen William, local policeman, dwl Polknr Bush 

Allen William, moUler, dwl 315 Beale 

Allen William, turner William Heney, res Oakland 

Allen William, seaman, dwl NE cor Howard and Steuart 

Allen William, waiter Palace Hotel 

Allen William, watchman Sutter St. R. R, dwl 2213 Pine 

Allen William Jr., saw^'er Francis J. Graoier, dwl 315 
Beale 

Allen William B., clerk Real Estate Associates, dwl 1010 
Powell 

Allen William F., barkeeper Cliff House, Point Lobos Av 

ALLE\ WILLIAM H. {White <fc A.), office 419 Cali- 
fornia room 7, dwl 12 Oak 

Allen William H., attomej' at law, office 607 Washington, 
dwl 206 Ellis 

Allen William H., salesman Eagleson & Co., dwl llli 
Minna 

ALLE.N' M'lLLIAM R., plumber and gasfitter, 819 
Market, dwl 910 Dolores 

Allen William T., laborer, dwl 26 Howard 

Allen W. T., purser stm Julia, dwl 119 Turk 

Allen & Lewis {Lucius H. Allen and C. H. Leiois), com- 
mission merchants, office 202 California 

Allen & Pilkey {Frank F. Allen and Robert Pilkey), 
liquor saloon, 720 Pacific 

ALLE^r A YOrXG (Theodore H. Allen and Thomas 
Young), stevedores, S21 Battery 

Allen. See Allan 

Allenberg Charles, mining secretary, office 438 California, 
dwl 309 Hyde 

Allenberg L., bookkeeper Schweitzer, Sachs & Co., dwl 
309 Hyde 

Allese H., laborer George H. Whitnev, 114 Steuart 

Allese T. , laborer George H. Whitney 114 Steuart 

Alley Obed F., dwl 1102 Scott 

Alley Philip, laborer, dwl 460 Tehama 

Alley William Henry (A I le tut: DonaZd«on), dwl Ns Green- 
wich bet Sansom and Montgomery 

Alley & Donaldson (It'iHifrm H. Alley and John Donald- 
son), liqui>r saloon, 717 Davis 

Allmgham William, machinist Alcatraz Island, dwl 1007 
Folsom 

Allione Frank (Sfathopolis <t- A.) 88 Centre Market 

AUione Henry, clerk Stathopolis & Allione, dwl 715 Vallejo 

Alliot Emanuel, hairdresser, 311 Sutter 

Allirol A., hairdresser, 841 Clay 

Allison , shipcarpenter, dwl 606 Third 

Allison C. , clerk, dwl 219 Ma.son 

Allison Charles, machinist Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 
1038 Folsom 

ALLISOX l»AVID E., fruit and produce commission, 
309 and 311 Washington, dwl 117 Oak 

Allison Frank J., salesman Bravenuan & Le^y, dwl 528 
Pine 

Allison H. J., seaman, dwl NE cor Berry and Madden 

Allison James, carpenter, dwl 2652 Folsom 



Allison J H., dwl 417 Bush 
Allison John, dwl 191 Hyde 
Allison John, fireman O. & O. S. S. Oceanic 
Allison John, teamster Isadore F. Eaton, dwl 724 Shot- 
well 
Allison Joseph, machinist S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 141 

Second 
Allison Ranch Franklin M. Co. (Nevada Co., Cal.), T. M. 

O'Connor secretan,-, office 505 Front 
Allison Richard, laborer Torrens & Enricht, 1520 Clay 
Alli.son Thomas, laborer Pacific Mail .S. S. Co.'s \Miarf 
Allison Thomas R., bookkeeper Pacific Ice Co., dwl 713 

Battery 
Allison W., machinist Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 1110 

Montgomery 
Allison William M., operator Western Union Telegraph 

Co., dwl 870i Mission 
Allkire Samuel H., bookkeeper, dwl 1515 Stockton 
AUman David (Gallardo <t- A.), dwl E s Dorr bet Bran- 
nan and Bryant 
AUman George, inspector Custom House, dwl 143 Third 
AUman John H. , clerk, dwl 127 Keaniy 
AUman Miles, trackrepairer Sutter St. R. R., dwl E b 

Larkin bet Bush and Pine 
AUmaver A., fireman Hook and Ladder Co. No. 3 S. F. 

F.' D. 
AUmaver Michael, extraman Hook and Ladder Co. No. 3 

S.F. F. D. 
AUseits Meinrad, bootmaker, 2005 Folsom, dwl SW cor 

Sixteenth and Folsom 
Allwood Henry (Parker tfc Allwood), dwl 14 Frederick 
Allwood James, deckhand stm Julia, Market St. Wharf 
Allwood Joseph, deckhand stm Julia, Market St. WTiarf 
AUjTi John, real estate, dwl 701 Post 
AUyne John W. (Allyne tfc White), dwl NW cor Green 

and Gough 
ALLYNE »1- WHITE (John W. Allyne & William 

H. White), importers and jobbers oils, lamps, etc., 

112 and 114 Front, and proprietors Pacific Kerosene 

Works, cor Chestnut and Taylor 
Almada Gregorio, dwl 21 South Park 
Almaden Consolidated Quicksilver Mining Co. (San Luis 

Obispo Co., Cal.), William J. Forde secretary, office 

38 Merchants* Exchange 
Almanzi Carmelita*(widow), dwl 508 Broadway 
Almbau Joseph, musician, dwl 526 Vallejo 
Almeda Frank, seaman, dwl 1109 Sansom 
Almon John, dwl 1041 Mission 
ALMS HOl'SE CITY AND COUNTY, Mission Ocean 

House Roatl, ik miles from City Hall 
Almy Maiy (widow), furnished rooms, 110 O'Farrell 
Alnwick Charles, seaman, dwl 415 East 
Aloncle Julian, boxmaker Hobbs, Pomeroy & Co., dwl 

127 Second 
Alonso Jos6 (Diez, Bertz <t Co.), dwl 112 Virginia 
Alpen Henry, laborer, dwl 155 Shipley 
Alpen Herman, master mariner, office 4 Mission, dwl 

1419 Mason 

Alpers Mrs., midwife, dwl 717 Green 

ALPERS CH.4RLES (Alpers <t Mowrv and Potrero 

Co.), and leader Metropolitan Band, office 607 Kearny, 

dwl NW cor Buchanan and Ivy Av 
Alpers Charles W., musician, office 228 Bush, dwl 1623 

Powell, rear 
Alpers John, leader Germania Band, office 228 Bush, dwl 

717 Green 
Alpers Peter, miller Deming, Palmer & Co. , dwl Niagara 

House 
ALPERS A MOWRl', {Charles Alpers and George 

Motvry), real-estate agents, office 607 Kearny 
Alpha Consolidated Silver Mining Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), 

William WiUis secretary, office 309 Montgomerj' 

room 29 
Alphonso Joseph, cabinetmaker Charles Field & Co., dwl 

415 Drumm 
Alpine A., dwl 334 Eddy 

Alps Silver Mining Co. (Ely, Nev.), O. D. Squire secre- 
tary, office 331 Montgomerv room 28 
Alsberg Samuel, clerk Thomas Tennent, dwl 1602 Powell 
Alsenz Jacob, shoemaker, 521 Hyde, dwl 1610 Post 
Alsey Daniel, accountant, dwl 811 Stockton 
Alsgood Frederick, cook A. E. Pfuhl, dwl 419 Drumm 
Alsin Jacob, master barge Dolly Varden, dwl Long Bridge 
Alsing Frederick, dwl 129 Second 
Alsop James R., bookkeeper Meeker, James & Co., dwl 

1001 Powell 
Alsop John S., manufacturer umbrellas and parasols, 407 

Bush, dwl 8 Virginia Alley 
Alsop William H., painter, dwl 231 First 



JAMES Or. STEELE & CO., manufacturers of Steele's California Perfumes. 



San Francisco Jewelry Mamifactcry, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchani ;." 



Alstrom Frederick, teamster George B. Knowles & Co., 

dwl SE cor Main and Mission 
Alsum Edward, waiter Pacific Mail S. S. Colima 
Alt Bernard, clerk Daniel Donovan, dwl 608 Vallejo 
Alt Christopher, shoemaker, 608 Vallejo 
ALT A CALII'^OK.MA (daily and weekly), Frederick 

MacCrellish & Cn, proprietors, office 529 California 
ALTA C'AIBFOKMA ALMANAC (annual), Frede- 
rick MacCrellish & Co. proprietors, office 529 Cal 
ALTA CALIFOKXIA BiriLDIXO, 529 California 
Alta Consolidated Mining- Co. (Mohave Co., Arizona), E. 

W. Reynolds secretarii-, office 419 California room 7 
Alta Lodgings, Ralston & Cottrell proprietors, 536 Sac 
Alta Silver Mining Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), William H. 

Watson secretary, office 302 Montgomery 
Altamirano Joseph, waiter Oregon S. S. Co., dwl N s 

Virginia PI nr Dupont 
Altemus John, bakery, W s Folsom nr Twenty-second 
Altemus William E., auctioneer Greenebaum & Co., dwl 

715 Ellis 
Altenbach F. , Tailors' Protective Union, SW cor Kearny 

and Morton 
Altenberg Peter F., merchant, dwl 528 Keaniy 
Altenberg Rosalie Mrs., cloaks and millinery, 528 Kearny 
Altenburg Charles, cook Schroth & Westerfeld, 228 Kear 
Altenburg Ernest, bookkeeper A. S. Rosenbaum & Co., 

dwl S22 Greenwich 
Altendorf J., sawgrinder Pacific Saw Manufacturing Co., 

dwl 168 Clara 
Althof Bros. {Theodore and Ernest), Bay Oyster Saloon, 

626 Market 
Althof Ernest (Althof Bros.), dwl 864 Mission 
Althof Herman (Althof ti- Bahls), res Oakland 
Althof Theodore (Althof Bros.) dwl 536^ Jessie 
Althof & Bahls (Herman Althof and J. F. W. Bahls), 

bookbinders and paper rulers, 411 Clay and 412 Com 
Althouse John, barkeeper, dwl 12 William 
Altmann Jacob, tailor, 303 Washington, dwl 65Sj Mission 
Altmann Sigmund L., fruits and candies, 3 Sixth 
Altmark Louis, salesman Rosenthal, Feder & Co., dwl 515 

Eddy 
Altmayer Aaron (Einstein Bros. <& Co.), dwl 115 Eddy 
Altmayer Abraham (Einstein Bros. & Co.), dwl 334 Eddy 
Alton Frank, salesman Dexter & Co., dwl 1528 Powell 
Alton Louis, lather, dwl SW cor Diipont and Post 
Altona Gravel Mining Co. (Grass Valley, Cal.), David 

Wilder secretary, office 28 Merchants' Exchange 
Altoona Quicksilver Mining Co. (Trinity Co., Cal.), 

Charles Allenberg secretary, office 438 California 
Altpeter Charles, dwl 226 Oak 
Altpeter Geerge, engineer S. F. Stock Brewery, dwl 2118 

Powell 
Altrueter William, waiter International Hotel, 824 Kear 
Altschul Charles M., dwl 703 Market 
Altschul Leopold (Mayfield d: Co.), dwl 748 Howard 
Altschul Ludwig (Altschul & Hildebrandt), dwl 929 

Larkin 
Altschul & Hildebrandt (Ludicig Altschul and William 

C. Hildebrandt), importers wines and liquors, 809 

Montgomery 
Altshuler Levi, trimmings and drj' goods, S s Sixteenth 

bet Rondel PI and Hoff Av 
Altube Bernard, cattle dealer, dwl 1414 Kearny, rear 
Altube Pedro (i/. Peres cfc Co.), dwl 23 Oak Grove Av 
Alturas Gold Mill and Mining Co. (Idaho), R. H. Brown 

secretarj', office 402 Montgomery room 2 
Altvater Francis, porter 510 Sacramento, dwl 15 Rausch 
Altvater Philip, plasterer, dwl 262 Octavia 
Alumbaugh William, dwl 22 Verona PI 
Alva Miguel, dwl 1114 Stockton 

Alvarado Albert, jirinter Felipe Fierro, dwl 8 Pollard PI 
Alvarado Frederico, real estate, office 70S Montgomery, 

dwl 310 Pine 
Alvarado George, dwl 8 Margaret PI 
Alvarado Juan C, attorney at law, office 330 Pine room 46 
Alvarado Pascuala Senora, dwl 5 Prospect PI 
Alvarado Salt Works (Alameda Co., Cal.), Getz Brothers 

& Co. agents, office 221 Front 
Alvarado Victor, laborer F. Korbel & Bros., dwl 8 Green 
Alvarez Antonia, tinsmith Holbrook, Merrill & Co., dwl 

1606 Mason 
Alvarez Atanasio, importer and manufacturer cigars, 621 

Sansom 
Alvarez Cayetano (Garcia d: A.), dwl 706 Green 
Alvarez Charles, blacksmith, dwl 536 Vallejo 
Alvarez Jacinta (widow), dwl 2 Pollard PI 
Alvarez Jesus, dwl 1600 Mason 
Alvarez Juan, cigarmaker Joseph Perazzo, dwl Ss Vallejo 

bet Kearny and Dupont 



Alverson D. W., machinist, dwl 1012 Polk 

Alverson Stephen H., refiner Pacific Refinery and Bullion 
Exchange, dwl 1402 Leavenworth 

Alverson William, conductor Sutter St. R. R., dwl 1304 
Polk 

Alverson William, mason new U. S. Appraiser's Building, 
dwl 1402 Leavenworth 

Alves Fred, miner, dwl 32 Fourth 

Alvey Bridget Mrs., stoves and tinware, 535 Pacific, dwl 
1813 Stockton 

Alvey Charles W., agent Mrs. B. Alvey, dwl 1813 Stock 

Alvin Daniel, coachman John Sullivan, 1037 Mission 

Alvin Louisa Mrs., dwl 137 Third 

Alvin Matilda Mrs., clairvoyant, 137 Third 

Alvis John, seaman stm Mohongo, Broadwaj- St. Wliarf 

Alviso Dairj', office W s Main nr Harrison 

Alviso Joseph B., porter U. S. Mint, dwl 340 Seventh 

Alvord Franli, bakerj', 759j Howard 

Alvord Henrjr, route agent U. S. Railway Mail Service, 
dwl 504 Washington 

Alvord James H., clerk land office Southern Pac. and 
Central Pacific R. R., NE cor Fourth and Townseud, 
dwl Morton House 

Alvord Thomas, barkeeper, dwl 23 Powell 

AL>"ORI» WILLIAM, president Pacific Rolling Mill 
Co., office 3 Front, and vice-president Bank of Califor- 
nia, office NW cor California and Sansom, and S. F. 
Park Commissioner, dwl 564 Folsom 

Alvrer Frederick, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steu 

Ahveins George, cabinetmaker P. Liesenfeld, dwl 649 
Folsom 

Alzer Merritt L., carpenter, dwl 107 Twenty-sixthnrMiss 

Alzyamora J. A., laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wharf 

Amador Canal and Mining Co. (Amador Co., Cal.), Joseph 
W. Clark secretary, office 418 California third floor 

Amador Trinidad, solecutter, dwl SW cor Quinn and 
Guerrero 

Amador Tmmel and Mining Co. (Ely Co., Nev.), Louis 
Kaplan secretary, office 27 Merchants' Exchange 

Amann Frank, dwl S s Polk Lane nr Stockton 

Amarie , cook, dwl 1031 Dupont 

Am ark Frederick, cigars and tobacco, 518 Battery, dwl N s 
Twenty-second nr Valencia 

Amazon Consolidated Mining Co. (Lyon Co., Nev.), Rob- 
ert P. Hosmer secretary, office 330 Pine room 21 

Amazon Insurance Co. (fire, Cinciimati, O.), D. J. West 
Co. agents, office 319 California 

Ambler Benjamin, clerk Charles Langley & Co., dwl 719 
Clementina 

Ambler Samuel, dwl 19 Ridley 

Ambold Charles, dwl 909 Kearny 

Ambrose C. E., dwl 109 O'Farrell 

Ambrose Daniel, with J. Ambrose & Co., dwl Latham PI 

Ambrose David (Ambrose d: Horse), dwl NE cor Second 
and Minna 

Ambrose J. & Co., poultry and game, 78 and 79 Centre 
Market 

Ambrose James (J. Ambrose ct Co.), dwl N s Birch Av bet 
Octavia and Laguna 

Ambrose Joseph, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Mont 

Ambrose Thomas, sheep raiser, dwl 18 Verona PI 

AMBROSE «K MORSE (David Ambrose and Stephen 
H. Morse), proprietors Second St. House, NE cor 
Second and Minna 

Ambrunn Frederick, cornicemaker Geo. Hayes & Co., dwl 
563 Linden Av 

Ame Frederick, varnisher Cal. FiUTiiture Manuf. Co., dwl 
371 Jessie 

Ame Paul (Ame & Branger), dwl 412 Dupont 

Ame & Branger (Paul Ame and John Branger), restau- 
rant, 412 Dupont 

Amedee Camille, agent Louis J. Renault, dwl 409 Post 

Amadee Pierre, porter B. Da\idson & Co., dwl 409 Post 

Amelan Joseph E., coalpasser Pacific Mail S. S. Colima 

Amelung Julius C., salesman James Pyle & Co., dwl 29 
Randall PI 

Amend Charles W., clerk Charles H. Mentz, dwl 1125 Dup 

Amende Charles H. , porter George W. Clark, dwl 09 Min 

Amendt , bookkeeper, dwl 246 Tehama 

Amendt Emil, carpenter, dwl 1031 Dupont 

Amendt George, bookkeeper William Bloch, dwl 733 Pine 

Amere Catello, laborer Patricio Marsicano, dwl Commer- 
cial nr Drumm 

American Baptist Publication Society, J. C. Baker dis- 
trict secretary, office 320 Sansom room 20 

American Central Fire Insurance Co. of St. Louis, Ham- 
ilton & Sonnichsen agents, office 221 Sansom 

AMERM'AN CLOCK «'«►., Henry Molineux agent, 
520 Market and 17 and 19 Sutter 



PEANCIS & VALENTINE. Printers, Designers, and Engravers, 517 Clay St., S.I 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



American Commercial A^ncy, W. C. Quinby president, 

W. H. Murr.ij- secretary, office 414 Clay 
American Consiolidated Gold & Silver Mining Co. (Storey 

Co., Nov.), .lo.-iciili F. Atwill secretary, office 240 Mont 
AMEKI4 A\ IIISTKKT TELK<;KAi>ll. oftice417Cal 
A.MKRK'A.X K\<'IIA\<iE HOTEL, iJryan Brothers 

proprietors, .'Ui,)-32.5 Sansoni 
Americ-an Fire Insnranoe Co. of Philadelphia, Jonathan 

Hunt agent, office 313 California 
American Flag Mill and Mining Co. (Pioche, Xev.), 

George R. Si)inney secretarj-, office 320 California 
American Flat Mining Co. (Storey Co., Xev.), Charles A. 

Sankey secretary, office 331 Montgomery roonj 20 
American Flat South Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), 

Charles A. Sankey secretary, office 331 ilont room 20 
American Inlaid Wood Co., Weaver, Taylor & Co. agents, 

office 501 Market 
American Ice Co., Chauncey B. Land president, Dudley C. 

Bates secretary, office 309 California 
American Laiuidry, H. F. Riedel prt)prietor, office 316 

Bush 
American Lloyds (Register Shipping), Amos Noyes agent, 

office 313 California 
American Protestant Association, hall 713 Mission 
American Russian Commercial Co., J. Mora Moss presi- 
dent, office 718 Battel^- 
American Samson, physician, office and dwl 1503 Mission 
American Sewing Machine Co., C. D. Lucas agent, 10 Fifth 
American Steamship Co., J. R. Erringer Jr. agent, office 

23S Jlontgomerv 
AMEKK'AN SI VdAY SCHOOL I'MOX DEPOSI- 

TOKY, Rev. Frederic E. Shearer agent, 757 Market 
A.MEKI(-A\ TKAfT SOCIETY, Rev. Frederic E. 

Shearer secretary, office 757 Market 
Americus Club, rooms 701 Howard 
Anieriire Mary (widow), dwl 905 Market 
A-HER.W.lV I. A., superintendent U. S. Railway Mail 

Service, Eighth Division, office 606 Montgomerj", res 

San Leandro 
Ames B. Adams, dwl 703 Market 
Ames Benjamin F., teamster Davis & Cowell, dwl 541 

Stevenson, rear 
Ames Fanny Miss, dressmaker Da^id Edwards, dwl 132 

Fourth 
Ames Fisher, attorney at law, office 17 City Hall third 

floor, and school director, dwl 2624 Sacramento 
Ames F. M., salesman O. Lawton & Co., dwl Grand Hotel 
Ames Frank, painter Charles H. Sykes & Co., dwl 548 

Mission 
Ames Frank, tinsmith Alexander Porteous, dwl 1314 Dup 
Ames Frederick F., salesman James W. Buniham & Co., 

dwl 712 Howard 
Ames George H., shipping clerk, dwl 124 O'Farrell 
Ames George S., second assistant engineer Pacific Mail 

S. S. Constitution 
Ames H. K., manager Howe Machine Co., office 113 Post, 

dwl W s Powell t)et Post and Sutter 
Ames H. M. Jr. {Gifford S: A.), dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
AMES JOH.V "W. {Household Furnishitig Co.), NE 

cor Kearny and Ver Mehr, dwl NAV cor Jackson and 

Octavia 
Ames ilartha Miss, teacher Valencia Grammar School, 

dwl 21 S Eddy 
Ames M. E. Mrs., ladies' nurse, dwl 213 Chattanooga 
Ames Oscar H., carpenter, dwl 213 Chattanooga 
A.IIES PELHAn W., secretarj' Sutro Tunnel Co., 

office 320 California (and Hoxisehold Furnishing Co.), 

dwl 1312 Taylor 
Ametor Frank, porter Howes & Pitts, dwl 504 Sansom 
Aniilla Elizabeth, dwl S s Union bet Sansom and Battery 
Amiutte Frederick, carpenter, dwl 423 Bush 
Ammann A. {Knotty r .i: A.), dwl 23 Everett 
Amnierup G., paints, oils, and paperhangings, 1126 Market 
Amiiuin Benibard Von (A mmon, Caspari d- Co.), dwl 913 

Tvler 
A3I.WO.\, CASPARI Jt CO. (Bernhard Von Amman, 

Otto Campari, and Harold Holdernes-^), commission 

and shipping merchants, 123 California 
Ammon Frederick, porter S. P. Morse, dwl 8 Brenham PI 
Ammon John, maltster Lyon & Co., dwl 416 Chestnut 
Ammon John, pantryman Leonard J. F. Schnutenhaus, 

134 Fourth 
Ammon. See Amann 
Amo Cigar Company (Chinese), 304 Market 
Amos Frederick R., salesman Hej-wood & Hendley, dwl 

1007A Minna 
Amos Getirge W., teamster, dwl 107 Tehama 
Amos Jane Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 205 Second 
Amos John, bricklayer, dwl 408 Broadway 



Amo< John, silversmith W. K. Vanderslice k Co., dwl 136 

Sutter 
Amos .lohn T. (Amnsd- Davii), dwl 1506 Leavenworth 
Amos Zacharias, millwright, dwl 34 Twelfth 
A.110S A- OAVLS (John T. Amos and ifilo S. DavU), 

millwrights and draughtsmen, 110 and 112 Beale 
Amoskeag Jlanufacturing Co. , steam fire engines, Weaver, 

TayloV & Co. agents, 501 Market 
Amrine Henrj-, tailor H. Wise, dwl 116 Shipley 
Amsbary Sue"(widow), dwl 202 Sixth 
Amsterdam Marine Board of Underwriters, James de 

Fremery agent, office 710 Sansom 
Amstutz Henry L. (Graf <t- A.), dwl 331 Kearny 
Amundsen .\ugust, upholsterer EdmondC. Kennedy, dwl 

2759 Harrison 
Amy Charles, gasfitter Baldwin's Hotel 
Amy Gustave L., salesman Hoffman & Co., dwl 708 Leav 
Amy C)scar M., broker, dwl 1409 Stockton 
Anagiiostopolus Athanasius, barkeeper Samuel Martino- 

vich & Co., dwl 8 Sacramento 
Ancelin Arthur, machinist, dwl 3 Washoe PI 
Ancell William, steward Delmonico Restaurant, dwl 227 

Second 
Ancient J. 0. K. S. B. Hall, 751 Market 
Anci jna A. D. Miss. , teacher Eighth St. Grammar School, 

dwl 511 Franklin 
Ancker Henry, seaman , dwl 2G Steuart 
Ancker Ibusina, waiter Philadelphia House, 423 Bush 
Andel Frederick, maltster Pioneer Malt House, dwl E s 

Stockton iir Francisco 
Aiiderfuren Charles, patternmaker, dwl 208 Nineteenth 
Anderfuren John, tailor, dwl 208 Nineteenth 
Aiiderfuren William J., foreman John M. Stockman, dwl 

20S Nineteenth 
Andersen Albert, clerk Samuel Henderson, dwl 521 Gearj' 
Andersen Andrew, hogranch, cor Fifth Av and L, South 

S. F. 
Andersen Fritz, carpenter, dwl 624 Pacific 
Andersen G. A., night inspector Custom House, dwl 103 

Perry 
Andersen Hans, cartman, dwl 506 Sixth 
Andersen Hans, mariner, dwl 28 Clay 
Andersen Henrj', puncher Pacific Rolling Mills 
Andersen James, laBorer Andrew Andersen, dwl cor Fifth 

Av and L, South S. F. 
Andersen Lars, laundry, 1313 Jackson 
Andersen Nelson, blacksmith John Higgins, dwl 113 Jack 
Andersen Paul (Andemcn <t Bereiuttn), dwl W s San 

Jose Road nr Six-mile House 
Andersen Peter, bootmaker George Burkhardt, dwl 214 

Mission 
Andersen P. N., cooper, dwl 39 Jackson 
Andersen William, master schr Ehina, dwl 39 Jackson 
Andersen & Berensten {Emanuel Berensten and Paul 

A ndersen), dairj-men, W s San Jos6 Road, near Six- 
mile House 
Andersen. See Andresen 
Anderson , carpenter, dwl N s Market bet Fifteenth 

and Sixteenth 

Anderson , collector William T. Garwood 

Anderson A., dwl 636 Commercial 

Anderson A., laborer A. F. Spear & Co., 218 Drumm 

Anderson Aaron, carpenter Charles E. Boman, dwl 604 

Franklin 
Anderson A. B. Mrs., teacher Lincoln Grammar School, 

dwl 32 Fourth 
Anderson Abraham, cabinetmaker, dwl S s Fifteenth bet 

Market and Noe 
Anderson A. F., tailor P. Motzenbecker, dwl 230 Keamy 
Anderson Alexander, boot and shoemaker, 136 Seventh, 

dwl 619 Natoma 
Anderson Alexander H., laundry, 614 Ellis 
Anderson Alfred, seamafl, dwl 1517 Dujiont 
Anderson Alfred, seaman schooner Caroline Z., Washing- 
ton St. Wharf 
Anderson Anders, laborer, dwl 103 Sacramento 
Anderson Anderson, shoemaker Peter Kehoe, dwl 43 

Jessie 
Anderson Andrew, cooper Reuben Norton, dwl 15 How 
Anderson Andrew, deckhand stm Reform, Jackson St. 

Wharf 
Anderson Andrew, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steu 
Anderson Andrew, Hquor saloon, W s Kentucky nr Six- 
teenth 
Anderson Andrew, liquor saloon, 1025 Keamy 
Anderson Andrew, mariner, dwl 111 Jackson 
Anderson Andrew, master mariner, office 305 East, dwl 

126 Capp 
Anderson Andrew, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 



JAMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchai 




Anderson Andrew, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 

Anderson Andrew, stevedore, dwl junction California and 

Market 
Anderson Andrew, tailor, dwl 8 Aui^st Alley- 
Anderson Andrew, wines and liquors, 250 Spear 
Anderson Andrew P., packer Martenstein & Deming, dwl 

1715 Jones 
Anderson Anthony, shipwright, dwl E s South Park Av 

nr Brannan 
Anderson Anton, boatman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Anderson Antono, painter, dwl 608 Franklin 
Anderson A. P. (widow), dwl 32 Frederick, rear 
Anderson A. P., fireman stm Reform, Jackson St. Wharf 
Anderson Aty C. (Anderson & Co.), dwl SE cor Brady 

and Stevenson 
Anderson August, laborer Torrens & Enricht, 1520 Clay- 
Anderson August, longshoreman, dwl 140 Folsom 
Anderson August, watchmaker, dwl 737 Green 
Anderson Bernhard, seaman, dwl 415 East 
Anderson Benjamin F., waiter Palace Hotel 
Anderson C. , dwl G14 Kearny 
Anderson C, helper Excelsior Mills, dwl Lombard bet 

Kearny and Montgomery 
Anderson C., laborer A. F. Spear & Co., 218 Drumm 
Anderson C, driver City R. R. 
Anderson C. , laborer What Cheer House 
Anderson C. A. Mrs., teacher Lincoln Grammar School, 

dwl 29 Turk 
Anderson Carl, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl NW cor 

Eighth and Bryant 
Anderson Carl, seaman, dwl 16 Washington 
Anderson C. B., quartermaster Pacific Mail S. S. China 
Anderson Charles, dwl 804 Washington 
Anderson Charles, captain schr Montana, dwl 27 Frederick 
Anderson Charles, carpenter, dwl 1141 Folsom 
Anderson Charles, dairyman William Hall, dwl Visitacion 

Valley nr San Bruno Road 
Anderson Charles, expressman, cor Mission and Steuart 
Anderson Charles, laborer Cal. Sugar Refiner}', dwl NE 

cor Bryant and Bryant Av 
Anderson Charles, sailmaker William H. Burton 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 19 Frederick 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 20 Washington 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 45 Sacramento 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 110 Berry 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 100 Jackson 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Anderson Charles, seaman, dwl 430 Drumm 
Anderson Cliarles, seaman, dwl 531 East 
Anderson Charles, stevedore, dwl 14 Stanford 
Anderson Charles, tailor, dwl 8 August Alley 
Anderson Charles, tajiner Albert B. Patrick, dwl SW 

cor Nineteenth and Folsom 
Anderson Charles A., carpenter, dwl 1143 Folsom 
Anderson Charles A. , Harris' Sample Rooms, 432 Califor- 
nia, dwl 266 Miima 
Anderson Charles E., local policeman, dwl 9 Perry 
Anderson Charles G., engineer, dwl 244 Green 
Anderson Christopher, mariner, dwl 21 Pacific 
Anderson C. W., paperhanger, dwl 230 Third 
Anderson Daniel, paperhanger, dwl 568 Howard 
Anderson David C., actor Wade's Opera House, dwl Grand 

Hotel 
Anderson Deborah (widow), dwl 15 Frederick 
Anderson Dennis, foreman stable James Craig, dwl C4 

Minna 
Anderson Edward, bootfitter Frederick Pfeiffer, dwl 110 

Taylor 
Anderson Egbert, seaman, dwl 22 Washington 
Anderson E. J., draughtsman, dwl 657 Howard 
Anderson Emanuel, carpenter, dwl 1141 Folsom 
Anderson Erich, cabinetmaker Cal. Furniture Manuf. 

Co., dwl 1721 Jessie 
Anderson Ericlv M. , tailor Joseph Kolble, dwl 1 St. Mary PI 
Anderson Ernest, tailor, dwl S Willow 
Anderson E. S. Miss, teacher Lincoln Primary School, 

dwl 311 Harrison 
Anderson F. A., Tailors' Protective Union, SW cor Kear- 
ny and Morton 
Anderson Flora Miss, dressmaker, 603 Jackson 
Anderson F. P., second mate stm Alexander, dwl 12 Sac 
Anderson FVances (widow), dwl 323 Sutter 
Anderson Francis, teamster Hancock & Kelso, dwl 534 

First 
Anderson Frank, seaman, dwl N~\V cor Third and Berry 
Anderson Frank P. , local policeman dwl 829 Pacific 
Anderson Frederick, cabinetmaker, dwl E s San Bruno 

Road nr Thirtieth 



Anderson Frederick, clerk F. N. Woods & Co., dwl 1113 

Pacific 
Anderson Frederick, framemaker Joseph Rocs & Co., dwl 

1901 Hyde 
Anderson Frederick, shoemaker, dwl 531 East 
Anderson George, dwl 304 Third 
Anderson George Mrs., dwl 323j Dupont 
Anderson George, carpenter, dwl 302 Eighteenth 
Anderson George, carpenter, dwl 2206 Powell 
Anderson George, driver Whitney & Co.'a Express, re» 

Oakland 
Anderson George, laborer, dwl 19 Crook 
Anderson George, longshoreman, dwl 225 Second 
Anderson Gustave, seaman, dwl 16 Washington 
Anderson Gustave, seaman, dwl 28 Clay 
Anderson Gustave, seaman, dwl 421 Drumm 
Anderson H., blacksmith, dwl 804 Third 
Anderson H., machinist Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl N s Si- 
erra nr Louisiana 
Anderson H. Miss, furnished rooms, 331 Third 
Anderson H. Mrs., milliner, 128 Geary 
Anderson Hans, farmer, dwl NE cor Wash and Drnmm 
Anderson Hans A., ship carpenter Central Pacific R. R. 

Co., res Oakland 
Anderson Harold, whitener G. A. Kaiser & Co., dwl 314 

Union, rear 
Anderson Harry, clerk, dwl 573 Bryant 
Anderson Hauck, locksmith, dwl 43 Jessie 
Anderson H. B., fruits, SE cor Turk and Taylor 
Anderson Henry, dwl 720 Laguna 
Anderson Henry {Robinson, Fowler <fc Co.), res South 

Vallejo 
Anderson Henry, agent Cal. Transportation Co., dwl 10 

Oak Grove Av 
Anderson Henry, cabinetmaker, dwl 426 Shipley 
Anderson Henry, carpenter Excelsior MUl Co., dwl 242 

Townsend 
Anderson Henry, cook Alms House 
Anderson Henry, bookkeeper, dwl 758 Harrison 
Anderson Henry, cook stm Julia, Broadway St. Wharf 
Anderson Henry, engineer, dwl 534 Tehama 
Anderson Henry, laborer L. Terkelson & Bro., dwl Bry- 
ant nr Seventh 
Anderson Henry, student Barnard's Business College 
Anderson Henry, vamisher G. Ueffinger & Co., dwl 137 

Brannan 
Anderson Henry C. {Anderson & Marshall), dwl 915 

Greenwich 
Anderson Henry J. , dwl 762 Howard 
Anderson Henry W., stevedore, dwl NE cor Fourth and 

Berry 
Anderson Herman, laborer, dwl 545 Mission 
Anderson Herod, plasterer, dwl 14 Vincent 
Anderson H. K., captain brig Josephine, Washing- 
ton St. Wliarf 
Anderson Hugh, photographer William Shew, dwl 1726 

Eddy 
Anderson Isaac, porter E. Martin & Co., res East Oakland 
Anderson Isaac M., mining, dwl 737 Harrison 
Anderson J., carpenter Market St. R. R. 
Anderson J., laborer Patent Brick Co. 
Anderson J. A., waiter Palace Hotel, dwl 1018 Powell 
Anderson Jacob H. V., clerk Hej^vood & Harmon, dwl 

817 Capp 
Anderson James {Anderson i: Randolph), dwl 305 Jones 
Anderson James, dwl 128 Second 
Anderson James, dwl 406 Broadway 
Anderson James, helper Hobbs, Pomeroy & Co., dwl 30 

Everett, rear 
Anderson James, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wharf 
Anderson James, lumberman C. A. Hooper & Co. 
Anderson James, plumber, dwl 34 Louisa 
Anderson James, nurse City and County Hospital 
Anderson James A., bootfitter, dwl 434 Greenwich 
Anderson James H., bookkeeper Heywood & Harmon, 

dwl 817 Capp 
Anderson Jane (widow), dwl 434 Greenwich 
Anderson Jane Mrs., dressmaker, 119 Seventh 
Anderson J. E., dwl 572 Folsom 
Anderson Jerome A. , physician and surgeon, office and 

dwl 1118^ Folsom 
Anderson J. C. , Tailors' Protective Union, SW cor Kear- 
ny and Morton 
Anderson Job, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 
Anderson John, dwl 176 Perry 
Anderson John, dwl 1040 Howard 
Anderson John, dwl 1412 Powell 

Anderson John {S. F. Manufacturing Co.), dwl 208J 
Seventh 



PEAITCIS (S; VALENTIITE, Printers, Designers, and Engravers, 517 Clay St., S 



. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO, 706, 703, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



\nderson John (Sioaiison ,<• A.), dwl lOS Fell 
Aiulersoii John, captain schr Ino, <l\vl 'Jd.'U Howard 
Anderson John, ciirpcnter, dwl 100 Jackson 
Anderson John, carpenter, dwl 1714 DuiKint, rear 
Anderson John, carjienter Charles Peterson, dwl 117 

Clark 
Anderson John, clerk, dwl 34 Louisa 
Anderson John, hostler J. H. Miller & Co., dwl N 3 Clark 

hct Davis and Druinm 
Anderson John, lahorer, dwl 4 Miller PI 
Anderson John, laborer, dwl 4;W Drumm 
Anderson John, laborer, dwl r)45 Mission 
Anderson John, local ]>oIicenian, dwl 8 VVashinRton 
Anderson John, master mariner, dwl 4 Henrietta Square 
Anderson John, mate stm Reform, Jackson St. Wharf 
Anderson John, mate stm Washington, Jackson St. 

Wharf 
Anderson John, miner, dwl 231 Second 
Anderson John, proprietor Market Street Restaurant, 

783 Market, dwl 103 Grove 
Anderson John, quartermaster Pacific Mail S. S. Costa 

Rica 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl NE cor W"ash and Drumm 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 1 Market 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 5 Francisco 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 35 Pacific 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 45 Sacramento 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 73 Oreg:on 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 103 Sacramento 
Ai\derson John, seaman, dwl 132 Steuart 
Anderson John, seaman, dwl 643 Third 
Anderson John, tailor, 'dwl 1 St. Marj", rear 
Anderson John, tailor, dwl 3 Raphael Place 
AndcSrson John, tailor, dwl 7 August Alley 
Anderson John, tailor, dwl 1111 Kearn.y, rear 
Anderson John Jr., captain schr Leo, dwl 2G31 Howard 
Anderson John Mrs. (widow), dwl SE cor Solano and 

DeHaro 
Anderson John Mrs., proprietress Ocean House, 103 Clark 
Anderson John C. (Anderson <t Co.), dwl SE cor Brady 

and Stevenson 
Anderson John F. Rev. , acting local elder First A. M. E. 

Zion Church, dwl 11 Scott Place 
Anderson John G., seaman, dwl 415 East 
Anderson John H., clerk Leahy Bros., dwl 318 Fifth 
Anderson John M., Omnibus R. R., dwl 29 Turk 
Anderson John W., principal Spring Valley Grammar 

School, dwl 32 Fourth 
Anderson Joseph, gardener, W s San Jos6 road nr county 

line 
Anderson Joseph, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 
Anderson Joseph, local policeman Magdalen Asylum 
Andereon .Joseph, seaman, dwl 29 Pacific 
Anderson Joseph D., stationery and schoolbooks, 120 

F(jnrth 
Anderson Julius, salesman Adc'ph Neuberg, dwl 4 

Henrietta Square 
Anderson L., coalpasser stm Orizaba, Market St. Wharf 
Anderson Lars F., bootmaker, 530 East 
Anderson Louis, laborer, dwl NE cor Alta PI and Calhoun 
Ander.son Louis, Lumbermen's Pro. Union, 71 New Mont- 
gomery 
Anderson Louis, porter Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl Salmon 

nr Broadway 
Anderson L. Pet Mrs. , spirit medium, office and dwl 325J 

Bush 
Anderson Lud\vig, Tailors' Pro. Union, SW cor Kearny 

and Morton 
Anderson M., captain schr Mary E. Anderson, Beale St. 

Wharf 
Anderson Mamson, cigamiaker, dwl 2 California, rear 
Anderson Margaret A. (widow), dwl 57 Second 
Anderson Margaret T. Mrs., housekeeper Phenix House, 

SE cor Market and Fourth 
Anderson Martha, waitress Palace Hotel 
Anderson Marj- (widow), dwl C Hinckley 
Anderson Mary (widow), dwl N s Sansom bet Green and 

Union 
Anderson Mary (widow), dwl 306 Green, rear 
Anderson Mary Miss, sewing-machine operator Levi 

Strauss & Co., dwl 450 Minna 
Anderson Mathias {Anderson d- Fredericks), dwl 38 Jack 
Anderson Matilda, chambermaid Grand Hotel 
Anderson Matthew A., teacher music, dwl 15 Guerrero 
Anderson M. E., Tailors' Pro. Union, SW cor Kearny and 

Morton 
Anderson N., barber N. F. Williams, dwl 119 Seventh 
Anderson Nels, boatman, Market St. Wharf 



Anderson Nels, janitor Sanders' Hall 

Anderson Nels, secretary and treasurer California Trans- 
portation Co., office Jaclcson St. Wharf, dwl 10 Oak 
Grove Av 

Anderson N. P., laborer, dwl 430 Drumm 

An<lerson N. Y., seaman, dwl 132 Steuart 

Anderson Oliver, tanner, dwl 7 Kate 

Anderson Olof, seaman schr Kitturah, Washington St. 
Wharf 

Anderson Olof, stairbuilder Frank McLaughlin, dwl 007 
Folsom 

Anderson O. P., seaman, dwl 430 Drumm 

Anderson Oscar, porter Charles C. Perkins & Co., dwl 
cor Filmore and Pacific Av 

Anderson Otto, seaman, dwl 8 Jackson 

Anderson P., mate Black Diamond Coal Co.'s steam tug 
Rabboni 

Anderson P. A., seaman, dwl 415 East 

Anderson Patrick, carpenter, dwl 313 Ritch 

Anderson P. D., watchman, dwl Coso House 

Anderson Perry, lumberman C. A. Hooper & Co. 

Anderson Peter, barkeeper stm Sonoma, Front Street 
Wharf 

Anderson Peter, coojjer Reuben Norton, dwl 79 Jessie 

ANDEKSON PETER, editor and projirietor Pacific 
Ai^i^eal, office 511 Sansora, dwl 15J- Pinckney PI 

Anderson Peter, laborer, dwl 103 Sacramento 

Anderson Peter, laborer, dwl 1908 Powell, rear 

Anderson Peter, laborer Frederick White, dwl W s Mason 
bet Francisco and Vandewater 

Anderson Peter, painter, dwl 409 Stevenson 

Anderson Peter, painter, dwl 541 Fourth 

Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 2 Washington 

Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 25 Commercial 

Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 100 Jackson 

Anderson Peter, seaman, dwl 415 East 

Anderson Peter, waiter Seegers & Kettles, dwl 519 Pac 

Anderson Peter N., laborer Lohmann & Siemer, dwl 1890 
Powell 

Anderson Peter W. (Anderson & Irvin(j), dwl 513 Taylor 

Anderson Phar A., carpenter, dwl 128 Geary 

Anderson Philip, boatman, dwl NE cor Berry and Mad- 
den 

Anderson Philip, stonecutter McVicker & Roche, dwl 110 
Berry 

Anderson Philip, vamisher Andrew Frei, dwl 36 Silver 

Anderson P. P., carver Herman Grans, dwl 327 Fourth 

Anderson R. , draftsman Hinckley & Co. 

Anderson Richard K., carpenter, dwl 1246 Folsom 

Anderson Robert, bricklayer, dwl 362 Third 

Anderson Robert, carpenter, dwl 815 Montgomery 

Anderson S. A., seaman, dwl 415 East 

Anderson Samuel S., salesman Maynard & Jones, dwl 22 
Everett 

Anderson Severin (N. C. Nelson & Co.), dwl 27 Second 

Anderson Severin, conductor N. B. and Mission R. R. 

Anderson Simon (Anderson it- Bro.), res Oakland 

Anderson Stephen, deckhand stm Mohongo, Broadway 
St. Wharf 

Anderson Stephen, musician, dwl 117 Drumm 

Anderson Theodore, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 

Anderson Thomas, dwl 204 Ellis 

Anderson Thomas, carpenter, dwl 322 Tliird 

Anderson Thomas, carpenter, dwl 1023 Kearny 

Anderson Thomas, cartman Storm & Co., dwl Berrj' bet 
Third and Fourth 

Anderson Thomas, dealer coal, 118 and 120 Market, presi- 
dent Mut. Prov. Assn (and Anderson <k Bro.), dwl 
410 Eddy 

Anderson Thomas, engineer, dwl 21 Sixth 

Anderson Thomas, second engineer stm Oakland, Oak- 
land Ferry 

Anderson Thomas Walter, bookkeeper F. Barnard & Co., 
dwl 527 Oak 

Anderson Tiifve, miller Carman Island Salt Works, dwl 8 
Anthony 

Anderson V. G., Tailors' Pro. Union, SW cor Kearny and 
Morton 

Anderson Walter, hostler Black Diamond Coal Co., dwl 
330 Spear 

Anderson Walter B., special policeman, dwl 502 Stockton 

Anderson William, dwl 611^ Minna 

Anderson William (Doyle d: A.), dwl 64 Minna 

Anderson William, bakery, 643 Third 

Anderson William, boxmaker Cook Brothers, dwl 28i 
Perry 

Anderson William, calker, dwl 311 Harrison 

Anderson William, clerk Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 S. 
F. F. D. 



STEELE'S Glycerine Lotion cures Tan, Sunburn, Eruptions, etc. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchan I 




Anderson William, engineer S. F. Cordage Factory, dwi 

\V 8 Indiana nr Sierra 
Anderson William, hostler John F. Willson, 126 Ellis 
Anderson William, longshoreman, dwl SW cor Main and 

Folsom 
Anderson William, miner, dwl Olympic Lodgings 
Anderson William, molder Palmer, Knox & Co., dwl 34 

Natoma 
Anderson William, planer Pacific Box Factory, dwl 1618 

Folsom 
Anderson William, seaman, dwl 10 Jackson 
Anderson William, seaman, dwl 16 Washington 
Anderson William, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Anderson William, seaman, dwl 430 Drumm 
Anderson William, seaman schr ChamiJion, Jackson St. 

Wharf 
Anderson William Jr., molder, dwl 34 Louisa 
Anderson William B., bookkeeper H. B. Tichenor & Co., 

dwl 2631 Howard 
Anderson William B., carpenter, dwl 1246 Folsom 
Anderson William R., boarding, 7 Broadway 
Anderson William S., accountant, dwl N s Twentieth nr 

Folsom 
Anderson William W., barber Marcus S. Pechner, dwl 119 

Seventh 
Anderson & Co. (John C. Anderson & Afy G. Anderson), 

groceries, SE cor Brady and Stevenson 
Anderson & Bro. (Siwon and Thomas Anderson), dealers 

coal, 118 and 120 Market 
Anderson & Fredericks (Mathias Anderson andAndrexo 

Fredericks), liquor saloon, 26 Washington 
Anderson & Irving {Peter W. Anderson and Samtiel 

Irvine/), gents' furnishing goods, 219 Montgomery 
Anderson & Marshall (Henry C. Anderson and Joseph S. 

Marshall), oyster and chop hbuse, 91-93 Centre 

Market 
A5ri>ERSOX & RAXDOIPH (James Anderson and 

William C. Iiandol2)h), watches, jewelry, diamonds, 

etc., 101 and 103 Montgomery 
Anderson. See Andresen 
Andes Louis, waiter George J. Becker, SW cor Fourth 

and Berry 
Andes Silver Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), Michael 

Landers secretary, office 309 Montgomery room 2 
Andlauer Jacques, carpenter, dwl 409 Third, rear 
Andlauer Joseph V., upholsterer, dwl 409 Third, rear 
Andlund Herman, carpenter, dwl 535 Howard, rear 
Andornetti Celeste, compositor La Voce del Popolo, dwl 

ISJ Lafayette PI 
Andornetti Joseph, hackdriver, dwl 18i Lafayette PI 
Andornetti Julia (widow), ladies' niu-se, dwl ISJ La- 
fayette PI 
Andrade Anastacia, dressmaker, dwl 1119 Kearny 
Andrade Antonia Miss, dressmaker, dwl 1119 Kearny 
Andrade Antonio, laborer, dwl 514 Green 
Andrade Everisto, printer, dwl 434 Union 
Andrade Guillermo, merchant, dwl 656 Folsom 
Andrade Joaquin Dutra, dwl 1308 Montgomery 
Andrade Pictoriano, shoemaker Faustino Dabolis, dwl 

514 Green 
Andrade Zeferino, shoemaker Faustino Dabolis, dwl 428 

Green 
Andrazzio Louis, cook Pacific Mail S. S. Granada 
Andre I., barber, dwl 5 Tyson PI 
Andrea Dominico, laborer Leon Dingeon & Co., dwl cor 

Berry and Clara Lane 
Andrea Julian, shipsmith, dwl NE cor Fourth and Berry 
Andrea Henry, watchmaker, dwl 742 Harrison 
Andrean Joseph, pork and Swiss sausage, 51 Centre Mar- 
ket, dwl 1517 Leavenworth 
ANDREI AOOLFO, phj'sician, office 621 Clay 
Andrei Rudolph, carpenter Excelsior Mill, dwl 1117 Fol 
Andres Christian, bandleader and musician California 

Theater, dwl 345 Jessie 
Andres John P., foreman A. M. Simpson & Brother, dwl 

331 Fourth 
Andres Mary Miss, matron San Francisco Lying-in Hospi- 
tal and Foundling Asylum, 762 Mission 
Andresen Bros. (Christian and John G.), blacksmiths and 

wagonmakcrs, 607 Battery 
Andresen Christian (Andresen Bros.), res Oakland 
Andresen Henry, fireman, dwl 413 Vallejo 
Andresen Jasper, longshoreman, dwl 1 Vallejo 
Andresen John G. (Andresen Bros.), res Oakland 
Andresen John H E., machinehand Pacific U. W. Fumi- 

niture Manuf. Co., dwl 8 Geneva 
Andresen Paul E., baker Schroth & Westerfeld, dwl 228 

Kearny 
Andresen Peter, mate schr Lolita, dwl 39 Jackson 



Andrew Carrie E. Miss, dealer human hair, 251 Third 
Andrew Gabriel, dwl 515 Union 
Andrew George B. T., builder, dwl 1224 Union 
Andrew Hannah Miss, Branch Bakery, 1332 Pacific 
Andrew John, bookkeeper J. F. Haycock & Co., dwl 803 

Hyde . 
Andrew Samuel, laborer, dwl 509 \\ashington 
Andrews Abraham, importer and retail dealer watches, 

diamonds, jewelry, etc., 221 Mont, dwl 922 Gearj- 
Andrews A. H., dwl 729 California 
Andrews Alexander, laborer, dwl N s Point Lobos Av nr 

Odd Fellows' Cemetery 
Andrews Alexander, waterman Golden Gate Park 
Andrews Alfred, waiter John Vitaich 
Andrews Amasa B. , inspector Custom House, res Alameda 
Andrews C, dwl 636 Commercial 
Andrews Charles, dairyman John B. Shepston, dwl San 

Bruno Road nr Golden City House 
Andrews Charles, lumberman C. A. Hooper & Co., dwl 

137^ Perrj' 
Andrews Charles, steward Bachelor Club, 630 Commercial 
Andrews Charles, woodturner, dwl 841 Mission 
Andrews Charles J. , seaman , dwl 10 Commercial 
Andrews Charles N., turner Charles Field & Co., dwl 619 

Third 
Andrews D., lumberman C. A. Hooper & Co. 
Andrews Edwin O. (E. 0. Ayidreros dt Co.), dwl 230 Kear 
Andrews Ellen (widow), dwl 120S Pacific 
Andrews E. O. & Co. , dairy produce, 24 Centre Market 
Andrews F., carpenter A. M. Jewell & Co., dwl 461 Bran- 
nan 
Andrews Fanny (widow), dwl 11 Yerba Buena 
Andrews Frank, baker, dwl 311 Seventh 
Andrews Frank, watchmaker, dwl 754 Folsom 
Andrews Frank J. , carpenter D. A. Macdonald & Co. 
Andrews 6., machinist Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 209 

Minna 
Andrews George, painter Frost & Richards, dwl 313 Har- 
rison 
Andrews George, shoemaker Everett H. Dunbar, dwl 20 

Page 
Andrews George S., expressman, dwl 2107 California 
Andrews H. Mrs., furnished rooms, 536 Market 
Andrews H., laborer Patent Brick Co. 
ANDREWS 1I.\RR\', manager Woodward's Gardens, 

dwl E s Eartlett bet Twenty-third and Twenty -fourth 
Andrews Henry, laborer C. A. Hooper & Co. 
Andrews H. H", captain stm Petaluma, Davis St. Wharf, 

res Saucelito 
Andrews J. , dwl 737 Howard 
Andrews J., dwl 636 Commercial 

Andrews J., laborer Patent Brick Co., dwl 17 J Natoma 
Andrews Jacob (Kelly cfc Andrews), dwl Brooklyn Hotel 
Andrews James, carpenter, dwl 36 Welsh 
Andrews James, carpenter Cal. Cigar Box Co., dwl 2013 

Mission 
Andrews James, painter Frost & Richards, dwl 20 Clem 
Andrews James, stonecutter McVicker & Roche, dwl 720 

Third 
Andrews James R., clerk, dwl 90S Valencia 
Andrews James S., lithographer, dwl 209 Ritch 
Andrews J. D. Mrs., dwl Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Andrews Jerry, fireman Spring Valley Water W. Co., dwl 

429 Francisco 
Andrews J. N., painter, dwl 915 Clay 
Andrews John, dwl 224 Minna 
Andrews John (Andretcs if- Spero), dwl 331 East 
Andrews John, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
Andrews Oliver, hog ranch, cor Fifth Av and K, dwl W 8 

Sixth Av bet L and M, South S. F. 
Andrews Peter, dwl 251 Clara 

Andrews Peter, boxmaker Cook Brothers, dwl 18 Stev 
Andrews Peter, boxmaker S. F. Cooperative Box Factory, 

dwl 137 Ritch 
Andrews Reuben C, local policeman, dwl 516 Brannan 
Andrews Richard, stevedore, dwl 31 Alta PI 
Andrews Robert W., machinist, dwl 1217 Washington 
Andrews S., oiler Oregon S. S. Co.'s stm Ajax, Folsom St. 

Wharf 
Andrews Thomas, laborer A. M. Simpson & Brother, 1 

Howard 
Andrews Thomas, longshoreman, dwl 20 Clementina 
Andrews Thomas, scenic artist California Theater, dwl 

1208 Pacific 
Andrews Thomas, stagecarpenter Maguire's Opera House, 

dwl 319 Bush 
Andrews Thomas J., miner, dwl 1435 J Mission 
Andrews T. J., maltster, 436 Brannan 
Andrews W., cabinetmaker, 543 Howard 



PEANCIS & VALENTIITE. Commercial Printing House, 517 Clay Street, S. P 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Andrews W., master mariner, dwl Overland House 
Andrews Washburn R., cari)entcr S. F. Manuf. Co., dwl 

547 Mission 
Andrews William, dwl W s Dolores nr Sixteenth 
Andrews William, jprdener Collio & Stewart, dwl N 8 

Post bet liroderick and Baker 
Andrews William, messenj^er Kol>ert Flenniken, 724 Mont 
Andrews William H., dwl 501) Leavenworth 
Andrews & Spero (John Andrews and Manuel Spero), 

ciijars and tobacco, 331 East 
Andro Jose, teamster, dwl 8 Scott PI 
A.MtKOS MILTO.X, attomev at law, office 18 U. S. 

Court BUlir, <lwl 301 Van Ness Av 
Andross Porter H., dwl 28 O'Farrell 
Andross W. S., night clerk Post-otlice, dwl 206 Kearny 
Andrus (nam/; refitxed), clerk Tallant & Co., 200 Battery 
Andnis T. W., physician, office and dwl 11 Powell 
Andrzejowski J. W., butcher John Robl, dwl 431 Pine 
Andrzejowskl J. W., letter carrier Post-office, dwl 702 

Bush 
AM>I'KA\ C. A VO. (Charles Carpy), importers and 

jobbers foreijjn and California wines and liquors, 515 

and 517 Sacramento 
Anduran Charles (C. Andura7i it Co.), dwl 733 Pacific 
AXCiEL .1IYKO.\. advertising agent and newspaper 

correspondent, office 411J California room 4, dwl 1118 

Howard 
Angel Philip, Coopers' Union, 417 Bush 
Anirelis August, tinsmith, dwl id Rausch, rear 
Aiigelis Theodore, music teacher, dwl 11»23 Powell, rear 
Anircliiis Diedrich, driver Spreckels i*c Co., dwl 750 How 
Angell Andrew J., broker, dwl 1215 Keariiv, rear 
Angell Horace B. (Aiijcll, Palmer a- C".), dwl 11 Clem 
AngfcU James M., carpenter Henry J. McLerie, dwl 613 

Mission 
Angell John, carpenter, dwl 509 Washington 
Angell Jonathan W. , apothecar)-, X W cor First and Fol- 

soni, dwl 415 Bryant 
A\«ELL, PAL."ttER & CO. (Horace B. Angell and 

Cyrus Paliiicr), proptrs Miners' Foundry, 237-251 

First 
Angell R., pantryman stm Empire 
Angell William C, physician, office and dwl 506 Folsom 
Angelo Esther, dwl 704 Howard 
Angelo Ginheo, vegetable dealer Colombo Market 
Angelo Giovannoni, bootmaker Eugene Pardini, dwl N s 

Union bet Dupont and Stockton 
Angelci Mollie, dw! 704 Howard 
Angell) Peter, marbleworker Charles Bianchi, dwl 314 

Pacific 
Angelo Tasso, florist, dwl 5 Margaret PI near Vallejo 
Auger v., tanner Main St Winchester, dwl 730 Fourth 
Angerstein Charles, laborer Curtis Tobey, dwl 1406^ Dup 
Angier Aiine H. Mrs., private school, dwl 734 Post 

Anglade , baker Alphonse Guenin, dwl 639 Bdwy 

Anglade Jean, laborer Megilligan <Si Clark, W s Old San 

J 03(5 Road nr Industral School 
Anglade John (Palassuu <k ^.), dwl NW cor Fillmore 

and FVancisco 
Anglin John, laborer, dwl 632 Brannan 
Anglin M., cabinetmaker Kragen & Co., dwl 557 Folsom 
Anglin Patrick, laborer, dwl E s Bryant bet Twenty- 
fourth and 'Twenty-fifth 
Anglin Thomas, porter Cal. Furniture Manuf. Co., dwl 

721 Minna 
Anglin William, barkeeper, dwl 14 Harlan PI 
A.\«LO-CALIFOB.MA>i BA>K (limited), Frederick 

F. Low and Ignatz Steinhart managers, otfice 422 Cal- 
ifornia 
Angonett Clara A. Miss, laundress Frank Angonett, dwl 

715 Stockton 
Angonett Frank, French laundrj-, 715 Stockton 
Angonett Martha Miss, laundress Frank Angonett, dwl 

715 Stockton 
Angonett Mary O. Miss, laundress Frank Angonett, dwl 

715 Stockton 
Angostora John, milkman Thomas Barcilles, dwl cor La- 

guna and Bay 

Angot , barkeeper, dwl 1031 Dupont 

Angot A. , dwl 1120 Stockton 

Angot Julius (if arc it A.), dwl 705 Pacific 

Angott Simon, dwl 708 Vallejo 

Angulo Marciana, tailoress, dwl 634 Vallejo 

Angulo Petra, tailoress, dwl 634 Vallejo 

Angus Daniel, deckhand stm C. M. Small, Front St. 

Wharf 
Angus O. , waiter stm Empire 
Angus John, jeweler, dwl 561 Mission 
Ankel Bernard, capmaker, dwl 565 Minna 



Ankele Geoiye, baker, dwl Sixth Av nr Dry Dock, 

Hunter's Point, South S. F. 
Ankele llenrj-, clerk Morris Jordan, dwl 613 Pine 
Ankener Chris, propcrtyman New Lyceum Theater, dwl 

819 Kearny 
Ankjon Andros, seaman, dw^l 21 Pacific 
Annis C, porter Whittier, Fuller & Co., dwl 1319 Sansom, 

rear 
Annis Caroline (widow), dwl 327 Bryant 
Annis S. James, cariieuter William Kreger, dwl 403J 

Natoma 
Ansbro James, hackman, dwl SW cor Dupont and Post 
Ansburg B. & Co. (Adam Jack Jr.), market, NE cor 

Montgomery and Broadway 
Ansburg Barucli (B. Ansburg i Co.), dwl IS Union PI 
Anschel Levi, tailor, 204 Commercial 
Anschel Samuel, fancy goods and trimmings, 200 Sixth 
Anseca Elizabeth, buttonhole maker, dwl W s Dupont 

bet Union and Filbert 
Anselm Arthur, cabinetmaker, dwl 18 Garden 
Ansley Barcilai, furcman William Kerr, dwl 903 Batterj' 
Ansley Washington, cooper S. T. Hubbell & Co., dwl NE 

cor Jackson and Dnmim 
Ansolabeher Jean, dwl 2 Gardner 
Anson Asmus, carpenter, dwl 4S Riteh 
Anson Henry S., dwl slO Mission 
Anson P. F. , housepainter Wason & Morris 
Anson Richard, painter, dwl 909 Geary 
Anspacher Abel, dry-goods dealer, dwl 1820 Market 
Ansteinson Mathias, dwl 438 Broadway 
Anstett Antoine, brewer Lafayette Brewery, dwl 725 

Green, rear 
Anstett Armand (A/istett <t Grogari), dwl 7'25 Green, rear 
Austin, SaOrog^n (Armand An.?tctt and Thomas Gro- 

gan), proptrs Lafayette Brewery, 725 and 727 Green 
Anstcv Charles T., clerk Balfour, Guthrie & Co., dwl 228 

Shotwell 
Anthes Frederick, bakerj', 510 Fourth 
Anthes John, musician, dwl 2 Potter 
Anthes John A. , clerk Henrj- B. Shaw, dwl 2 Potter 
Anthes Louis N. , clerk Stoutenborough & Hall, dwl So- 
phie Terrace nr Pine 
Anthes 'P&t&r (Anthes it Fleischman), AviX Sophie Ter- 
race nr Pine 
Anthes William F., clerk Carlos F. Glein, dwl 2 Potter 
Anthes & Fleischman (Pefer Anthes and Charles X. 

t'leischman), hairdressing saloon, 315 Kearny 
Anthonisen H., laborer Baj- Sugar Refinery 
Anthony A. J., miner, dwl 114 Mason 
Anthony Carrie, milliner, dwl Brj'ant St. House 
Anthony E. T., leather and cut bottom stock 416 Market, 

(and E. T. Anthonxj it Co.), dwl 124 Oak 
Anthony E. T. & Co. (A. T. Green), re-packers merchan- 
dise, 407 and 409 Commercial 
Anthonj' Ferdinand, bookbinder Bartling and Kimball, 

dwl 912 Natoma 
Anthony Florence M. Miss, teacher music, dwl 11 Haight 
Anthony Frank, clerk, dwl 11 Haight 
Anthony Frederick, laborer, dwl 619 Pacific 
Anthony George L., engineer F. B. Schoenstein, dwl 11 

Haight 
Anthony George W., real-estate, office 417 Bush, dwl 44J 

Sixth 
Anthony Henrj- (Anthony tt Maass), dwl 6 Clara 
Anthony Henry, ragdealer, dwl 1423 Hyde 
Anthony Henry, shoemaker, dwl 299J Clementina 
Anthony James, capitalist, office 606 Montgomery, dwl 513 

Van Ness Av 
Anthony James M., oiler Pacific Mail S. S. City of San 

Francisco 
Anthony Jerome, clerk, dwl 31 Eddy 
Anthonj' John, dwl 210S Mason 
Anthony John, boilennaker, dwl 537 Sacramento 
Anthony John A., freight agent, dwl 153 Octa\ia 
Anthony Richard M. , bookkeeper William Sherman & Co., 

dwl 115 Kearny 
Anthony Robert, waiter Pacific Mail S. S. Costa Rica 
Anthony Sarah (widow), dwl 11 Haight 
Anthony Walter M., clerk Frank L. Kreider, dwl 11 

Haight 
Anthony William, miner, dwl 56 Clara 
Anthony William T., salesman E. T. Anthony, res Oak- 
land 
Anthony & Maass (Henry A nthony and Christ oph Maass), 

groceries and liquors, NW cor Berry and Clara Lane 
A-MHOXVS II ALL, 417 Bush 
Antich Antonio, waiter Cosmo IVancisco\ich, dwl 6 

Fourth 
Antich Vincent, cook, dwl 6 Vallejo PI 



JAMES &. STEELE «S; CO., Chemists, removed to No. 315 Kearny St. 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchan '. 



Antippo Antoine, hogranch, dwl S 8 Crescent Av, Islais 

Creek, Bornal Heights 
Antisell P., buxniaker Cal. Cigar Box Co., dwl Potrero 
Antisell Thouias M. (Thomas M. Antisell Jc Co.), dwl 210 

Fair Oaks 
A.\TI8ELL THOMAS M. <ft CO., pianos and organs, 

8U5 Market 
Antisell William C, bookkeeper Thomas M." Antisell & 

Co. , dwl 865 JIarket 
Antoine Louis, laborer, dwl 1257 Montgomery 

Anton , waiter, dwl 50!) Washington 

Anton Arthur, seaman, dwl 123 Jackson 

Anton August, eigarmaker, dwl 33 Natoma 

Anton Frank, deckhand stm Los Angeles, Pacific St. Wharf 

Anton Henry, machinist Will & Finck, dwl E s Stockton 

bet Lombard and Greenwich 
Antou John, deckhand stm Amador, Broadway St. Wharf 
Anton Thomas, laborer John Schaefer & Sons, Misaion 

and Ocean Beach Road nr Mountain Spring House 
Antonelii David, image manufacturer, 433 Green 
AXTOXI.l CLAKA Mine., clairvoyant, 134J Post 
Antonio Bctino, confectioner Palace Hotel 
Antrim Amos Y. , dwl 238 Jessie 
Antron Peter, silk weaver, dwl 1211 Powell 
Antunovich Bianci, fisherman, dwl 6 Merchant 
Antunovich YXorio {Antunovich <i; Rossell), dwl 712 Green 
Antunovich Nicholas, coffee saloon, S\V cor East and 

Commercial, dwl 1311^ Sacramento 
Antunovich & Rossell (Florio Antunovich and John lios- 

sell), coffee saloon, 403 East 
Antz Henry, market, N\V cor Larkin and Geary 
Antz Joseph, carpenter, dwl SW cor Dupont and Post 
Anzar Anatalio, dwl 120 Bernard 
Anzenhofer Louis, farmer E s Ocean House Road, J mile 

SW Industrial School 
Anzenhof er R. , farmer, E s Ocean House Road, \ mile SW 

Industrial School 
Anzoli Anselmo, milker Carl Solari, W b Clara Av nr 

Nineteenth 
Aoyon Edward, lodgings, 600 Vallejo 
Apel Carl, bookkeeper D. Samuels 
Ajiel Charles, miner, dwl Olympic Lodgings 
Apel John, architect, office 610 Sacramento, dwl 701 Stock 
Apel's Building, 410 Kearny 

Apell Peter, calker Pacific Mail S. S. Co., dwl 7^ Garden 
Apelt Charles, shirtmaker, dwl 605 Greenwich 
Apgard Richard, policeman City Hall 
Apothecaries' Hall, SE cor New Montgomery and Market 

Grand Hotel, Benjamin B. Thayer chemist, Wil- 
liam J. Brj'an druggist 
Apparill George, shoemaker, dwl 333 Bush 
Appel Antonio, w alter What Cheer House 
Appel Arthur, seaman, dwl 123 Jackson 
Appel Herman, upholsterer, dwl 1023 Kearny 
Appel Philip, liquor saloon, 826 Sacramento 
Appel Samuel, dwl 527 Tehama bet Fifth and Sixth 
Appel Samuel, extraman Hook and Ladder Co. No. 3 S. 

F. F. D. 
Appel Simon, furniture 872 Folsom, dwl 525 Tehama bet 

Fifth and Sixth 
Appel Theodore, cigars and tobacco, junction Market and 

Ellis, dwl Ills Howard 
Appel William, furniture dealer, S72 Fol, dwl 525 Tehama 
Api^ell John C, cabinetmaker Kragen & Co., dwl SW cor 

Mission and Main 
Appenzeller T., tailor, dwl William Tell House 
Appiarius Henry, barkeeper F. William Kamps, dwl NE 

cor California and Davis 
Appiarius William, driver, dwl 504 Filbert 
Apple Jacob, bookkeeper John G. Hodge & Co., dwl 1239 

Mission 
Apple John, cigars and tobacco, dwl 255 Minna 
Apple Isidor, woodcarver Sanborn, Vail & Co., dwl 1239 

Mission 
Apple Sarah Mrs., dry-goods, 28 Sixth 
Apple Wolf, merchant, dwl 1239 Mission 
Applebee Orville, hostler, dwl 701 McAllister 
AI'PLKBY M'lLLIA.U, proptr European Nursery, 

NW cor Mission and Twenty -first 
Applegarth William, real estate, office 302 Montgomery 

room 30, res Oakland 
APPLEtJATK J. HENKY JR., reporter John H. 

Carmany & Co., dwl 1119 Geary 
Applegate Josiah H., attorney at law, office 729 Mont- 

gomerj', dwl Grand Hotel 
Appleton Abraham, junk peddler, dwl 20 Dora 
Appleton George, mariner, dwl 105 Clark 
Appleton Thomas, salesman Mission Woolen Mills, dwl 

N s Twenty-third bet Mission and Capp 



Appo Georgina A., ladies' hairdresser, dwl 6 Thompson 

Av 
Appo Junius B., porter stm Mohongo, dwl 6 Thompson 

Av 
Apponyi Charles E. (Hochholzer & A.), dwl 1522 Post 
App Henry, porter Campi & Co., dwl 115 Oak 
Appy Hattie J. (widow), dwl 204 Sutter 
Apted Walter, boatman, Meigg's Wharf 
A(iuay Charlotte Miss, dwl 9 Sonora PI 
Arago Co. (Chinese), cigar manufacturers, 767 Clay 
Aralla Volverto, vaquero Miller & Lux 
Arata Andrea {Arata ifc Gueuaso), dwl 364 Third 
Arata Andrea, fruit and vegetables, 519 Fourth 
Arata Annie Miss, dressmaker Feliciana Arata, dwl 

Margaret PI nr Vallejo 
Arata Bartolomeo, dwl S s Cadell Alley nr Union 
Arata David, vegetable dealer, dwl 18 Ohio 
Arata F. & Co. {Domenico Brignoni), feed-store, 620 

Broadway 
Arata Feliciana Miss, dressmaker, 533 Vallejo 
Arata Francjisco {F. Arata ifc Co.), dwl 519 Greenwich 
Arata Freres (Qiannhatiista and Giovanni), vegetables, 

Colombo Market, Garden, Sunnyvale Ranch, W s 

Mission Ocean House Road 
Arata Giambatista (Arata Freres), dwl Sumiy vale Ranch, 

W s Mission Ocean House Road 
Arata Giovanni (Arata Freres), dwl Simny vale Ranch, 

W s Mission Ocean House Road 
Arata Giovanni, vegetable dealer, dwl 6 Gaven 
Arata Juanita (widow), dwl 6 Hinckley 
Arata Louis, laborer, dwl 423 Filbert 
Arata Louis, marbleworker Charles Bianchi, dwl 7 Gaven 
Arata Louis, vegetable dealer, dwl 2 Margaret PI 
Arata Louis A., vegetable dealer, dwl 533 Vallejo 
Arata Louise Miss, dressmaker Feliciana Arata, dwl Mar- 
garet PI nr Vallejo 
Arata Nicolo, seaman, dwl 12 Union PI, rear 
Arata Paolo, laborer California Italian Paste Co., dwl 

7 Gaven 
Arata Paul, peddler, dwl Margaret PI nr Vallejo 
Arata Pietro, laborer D. Ghirardelli, dwl 13 Union PI 
Arata S., peddler, dwl 736 Vallejo, rear 
Arata & Gueuaso (A)ulrca Arata and Andrea Gueuaio), 

fruits and vegetables, 304 Third 
Arbes Charles, furrier H. Liebes «& Co., dwl William Tell 

House 
Arbogast Frederick, upholsterer Frank G. Edwards, dwl 

cor Washington and Stockton 
Arbondin George, laborer, dwl 4 Graham PI 
Arbondin H., tobacconist, SE cor Taylor and Vallejo 
Arbondin Henry, machinist City Iron Works, dwl 4 

Graham PI 
Arborelli Antonio, upholsterer Jas. W. Bumham & Co., 

dwl 105 Prospect PI 
Arbuckle Henry (Arbuekle <i- Moidton), dwl 2007 Mission 
ARBIX'KLE «S MOHLTOX (Heiiry ArhucMe and 

Jonathan B. MouUon), groceries and liquors, NE 

cor Sixteenth and Howard 
Arbuste August, waiter Stanford Hotel 
Arcade House, Adolph Hartman proprietor, 45 Sac 
Arcade House, L. D. Ingoldsbv proprietor, 930 Market 
ARCIIBALD .TOH.V, survevor S. F. Savings Union, 

office 532 California, dwl 1312 Powell 
Archer Ann (widow), lodgings. 111 Prospect PI 
Archer Charles, machinist William T. Garratt, dwl 415 

Fifth 
Archer H. R., actor Bella Union Theater, dwl 1722 Leav 
Archer James H., student Heald's Business College 
Arclier John, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Archer Mary (widow), dwl 18 Louisa 
Archer Sue Miss, dwl 1205 Polk 
Archer William, machinist Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 415 

Fifth 
Archer William, laborer, dwl 815 Harrison 
Archibald A. W., conductor Central R. R., dwl 331 Tyler 
Ai-chibald James, molder Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 254 

Clementina 
Archibald Jane (widow), dwl 297 Clementina 
Archibald Jane A. Miss, dressmaker, dwl 327 Fell 
Archibald John, stonecutter, dwl 254 Jessie 
Archibald M. Miss, dressmaker Mrs. E. M. Haggett, dwl 

327 Fell 
Archibald Prescott L., assistant superintendent Central 

R. R., dwl S s Locust Av bet McAllister and Tyler 
ARnilKALU TUOMAS, liquor and billiard saloon, 

1 Valencia 
Archibald William, molder Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 

cor First and Mission 
Archibald. See Archbald 



PEANCIS & VALENTIITE, Printers, Designers, and Engravers, 517 Clay St., S.I| 

1 



;J1 P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706. 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Arderj', Agrnes Miss, dwl 26 J Kearny 

Ardery James A., clerk H, K. Cummiiigs & Co., dwl 202 

Sixth 
Arduiii Edward, cook Joseph Barron, 000 Stockton 
Arechiga v., physician, oftice and dwl 702 Vallejo 
Areeret Annie, dressmaker, dwl 610 Octayia 
Areeret Jacuh, gardener, dwl Olti Octavia 
Arenberj.'er F., musician, dwl 1305 Montyfomery 
Arend Peter (llenckes it- A.), dwl 719 Clay 
Arensberjf Herman, physician, oftice aiul dwl 303 Third 
Arents Albert, metiillur^'ist, dwl 1420 California 
Ares Guadalnpa (widow), dwl 3 Mai-jiraret PI 
Arey C. C, captain ship Co<iuimbo, office Pier 1 Steuart 
Arey Rutjert 15., first mate stm Ale:kauder, dwl South 

Park Hi>use, Third 
Arey Walter, cashier Linforth, Kellogg & Co., dwl 1516 

Franklin 
Arfort Jean B., Qarriage and wagonmaker, 218 Post, dwl 

623 Geary 
Arjrall John (Biroh. A. <t Co.), dwl 220 Third 
Argenti Tullio, marblcworker Charles Bian^i, dwl We 

Mission nr Twenty-fiith 
AKtiC.VTI.XBKEPi'BLir, Charles Baum consul, oflSoe 

510 Battery 
Argues Clement, physician, dwl 1234 Stockton 
Argues Francisca Miss, dwl 1234 Stockton 
Ariani Santo (Scalmanini <t Co.), dwl SE cor Drumm aJ>d 

East 
Arias Benancio, janitor London and San Francisco Bank 

(limited), dwl S45 Dupont 
Ariola Louis, laborer, dwl 1318 Dupont 
Ariola Michael, laborer, dwl 6 Vallejo PI 
Aris Gertrude Miss, dressmaker, dwl 343 Jessie 
Aristide Gustaf, seaman, dwl 20 St«uart 
Arizona Silver Mining Co. (Humboldt Co., Nev.), William 

Willis secretary, office 30!) Montgomery room 29 
Arjo Miguel, peddler, dwl 440 Greenwich 
Arl Joseph, steward, dwl 024 Fourth 
Arlar Martin, waiter Schneller & Beyer, dwl 13 Taylor 
Arling Isaac, laborer Central Pacific R. R. Co., dwl 234 

Kitch 
Arlington Andrew, hamessmaker, dwl W s De\-isadero bet 

Sutter and Bush 
Arlington House, Comwell & Wyman proprietors, 127 

Kearny and 207 Sutter 
Ami;iger Charles W., policeman City Hall, dwl 731 Clay 
Armand August, clerk Henrj- Bacquie, dwl 1513 Dupont 
Armand Frank, peddler, dwl 305 Da\is 
Armand Frank, saddler, dwl SW cor Montgomery Av and 

Vallejo 
Armand John, waiter International Hotel, 824 Kearny 
Armand L., tailor, 307 Pine 

Armand Lecoq, cook with Louis Donnadieu, dwl Califor- 
nia Hotel 
Armand Perrie, limiberman C. A. Hooper & Co., dwl Tay- 
lor bet Post and Geary 
Armann Edward (Gallagher <t- A.), dwl 624'V\^ashington 
Amiath Philip, laborer A. M. Simpson & Brother, 1 How 
Armberger F., musician Wade's Opera House 
Armbnister Adolph, liquor saloon, 314 Hayes 
Armbruster Daniel, cabinetmaker West Coast Furniture 

Co. , dwl 11 Hickory Av 
Armbruster Julius, engrayer Levison Bros. , dwl 134 Sutter 
Armbruster William, watchmaker and jeweler, 209 Mont 

Armer , dwl Olympic Lodgings 

Armer Hennan, traveling agent Kullman & Armer, dwl 

1303^ Polk 
Armer Lizzie Miss, ftimished rooms, 522 Stockton 
Armer Max (Kullnmn <t- A.), dwl 631 O'FarreU 
Armer Robert, tinsmith, dwl 5 Washoe PI 
Armer. See Armour 
Amies C. Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 137 Mont 
Armes Charles W. {Amies <i- Dallam), res Oakland 
Amies George W. {Arm^s it Dallam), res Oakland 
AK.>IK!!> <t DALLAM (C. W. and G. W. Armes and 

Richard B. Dallarn), importers wood and willow 

ware, manufacturers brooms, tubs, and pails, and 

agents F. N. Davis & Co.'s building paper, 215 and 

217 Sacramento, manufactorj- 22 and 24 California 
Armington Edward J., printer A. L. Bancroft & Co., dwl 

1017 Clay 
Armingt<^in Edward R., tailor Wright & Harmon, dwl 

1017 aay 
Armington George H., salesman Dunham, Carrigan & Co., 

dwl 462 Jessie 
Armitage George F. J., sailmaker Harding & Braim, dwl 

1003 McAllister 
Armitage John, sailmaker, dwl lOOS McAllister 
I Armitage Joseph, apothecarj-, 512 Kearny, dwl 724 Post 



Armon George, cook Lick House 

Armon Thomas, carpenter, dwl Twelfth Av nr P, South 

S. F. 
Amionino Pietro, vegetables, Colombo Market 
Armont Jacob, seaman brig Sea Waif, Howard St. 

Wliarf 
Armory Hall, 134 Fourth 

Annory Ifall Building, NE cor Montgomerj' and Sac 
Armour H., machinist Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl Mont- 
gomery Hotel 
Arms Clayton, sawyer D. A. Macdonald & Co., dwl 238 

Steuart 
Arms Moses, policeman City Hall, 430 Montgomerj' Av 
Armstcad John W., waiter Palace Hotel, dwl 928 Wash 
Armstrem Ch., lalwrer George H. \\'hitney, 114 Steuart 

Armstrong , engraver, dwl 1038 Howard 

Annstrong A. , dwl 106 Mason 

Armstrong B. Frank, salesman J. W. ShaefTer It, Co., dwl 

Morton House 
Armstrong C. , scenic artist Wade's Opera House 
Armstrong Charles, cooper Rudolph Armstrong, dwl 22 

Hampshire 
Armstrouif Charles, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steu 
Armstrong Charles, seaman, dwl 7 Broadway 
Armstrong Charles, seaman, dwl 132 Steuart 
Armstrong Christopher, clerk Michael Connell, dwl 36 

Harriet 
Armstrong Daniel, clerk, dwl 13 Grand Av 
Armstrong Daniel, printer Russell & McKenney, dwl 13 

Grand Av 
Armstrong David, commission merchant, dwl 522 O'Far- 
reU, rear 
Annstrong Dennis, dwl 609} Minna 
Armstrong E., clerk, dwl Overland House 
Armstrong Edward I., real estate, dwl 2313 Howard 
Armstrong Francis F., porter Meeker, James & Co., dwl 

522 O'FarreU, rear 
Armstrong George, dwl 3 Simpson PI 
Armstrong George, bootfitter Buckingham & Heclit, dwl 

N s Thirtieth bet Church and Sanchez 
Armstrong George, clerk Jason Springer, res Oakland 
Armstrong George, teamster, dwl 410 Larkin 
Armstrong Henry, painter, dwl 107 Valencia 
Armstrong H. S., machinist, dwl 1032 Market 
Armstrong H. T., carpenter, dwl 437 Jessie 
Armstrong James, dwl 417 Powell 
Armstrong James, dwl 735 Harrison 
Armstrong James, dwl 867 Market 
Armstrong James {Armstrong cO Taylor), dwl Ws Fol- 

som bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Armstrong James, bootmaker, dwl 415 Powell 
Armstrong James, laborer, dwl E s Harrison nr Alabama 
Armstrong James, miner, dwl 506 Davis 
Armstrong James P., engineer, dwl NE cor Third and 

Townsend 
Armstrong Joanna (widow), dwl cor Cherobusco and Hen- 

rieta, Berual Heights 
Armstrong John, barkeeper John Brask, dwl 426 Drumm 
Armstrong John, hostler George Eggleton & Co., dwl 115 

Oregon • 

Armstrong John, laborer, dwl 262 Eighth 
Armstrong John, laborer Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 25 

Nevada 
Armstrong John, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Armstrong John, tailor, dwl 109 Minna 
Armstrong John G., cooper, 104 Commercial, dwl 1009 

Vallejo 
Armstrong John H., polisher, dwl 460 Sixth 
Armstrong John K., liquor saloon, NE cor Third and 

Townsend, dwl 722 Shotwell 
Armstrong John L., stockbroker, office 238 Montgomery, 

dwl 2uO Hyde 
Armstrong Joseph, laborer William H. Brown, dwl 5 Bay 
Armstrong Kate Miss, copyist County Clerk's Office 
Armstrong Kate Mrs., upholsteress Cal. Furniture Manuf. 

Co., dwl 522 O'FarreU 
Armstrong Martin, cigars, 529J East, dwl 1007 Folsom 
Armstrong Martin, laborer, dwl 1100 Folsom 
Armstrong P., laborer A. F. Spear & Co., 218 Drumm 
Armstrong Robert, seaman, dwl 127 Jackson 
Armstrong Robert, cashier M. J. Fla%in, dwl 417 Powell 
Armstrong Rudolph, cooper 72 Oregon, dwl 22 Hamp- 
shire 
Armstrong Samuel, teamster A. Brokaw, dwl 14 Lafayette 
Armstrong Samuel C, salesman George W. MUler, dwl 

564 Bryant 
Armstrong" Samuel P., dwl 1232 Pacific 
Armstrong Sarah Mrs., dwl 65 Shipley 
Armstrong T., dwl Commercial Hotel 



JAMES &. STEELE & CO., Apothecaries, No. 316 Kearny Street. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant I! 



Armstrong Thomas, wines and liquors, dwl 834 Fijlsom 

ArnistronK Truman B., tinsmith Holbrook, Merrill & Co., 
dwl 921 Jackson 

Armstrong T. S., clerk Louis Hartter, dwl 227 Second 

Armstrong William, compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 1137 
Pacific 

Armstrong William, grainer 6C4 Howard, dwl S s Eigh- 
teenth bet Mission and Capp 

Armstrong William H., clerk medical director Depart- 
ment California U. S. A., dwl 1015 Howard 

Armstrong William II., mariner Pacific Mail S. S. China 

Aniistrong W. W., bookkeeper John C. Winans, dwl 1001 
Sutter 

Armstrong & Taylor (James Armstrong and John L. 
Taylor), proprietors Eagle Brewerj", SW cor Folsom 
and Fourteenth 

Amaud Albert, clerk Mrs. J. Sajous, dwl 729 Clay 

Arr.aud Matilda, dres.sraaker, dwl 16 St. Mary 

Aniaud Paul, plasterer, 324 Dupont 

Arnaud Paul, upholster, dwl Iti St. Marj* 

Aniaud Pierre, carjienter Racouillat & Gilmore, dwl Wil- 
low nr ^'alencia 

Arnberger Frank, musician, dwl 1305 Montgomery 

Arndt George, dwl 432 Broadwaj* 

Amdt William, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl NW cor 
Eighth and Erj-ant 

Ame Henry, cook Nicholas Castis, dwl 238 Jessie 

Arnesen Ivan, dwl 415 East 

Arneson Soren, packer Edward C. Slorah, dwl 906 Filbert 

Amess S., laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wharf 

Arnest John M., operator Bradley & Rulofson, res Oak- 
land 

Arnett August, dwl 1514 Powell 

Arnett Henry, steward Hose No. 5, S. F. F. D. 

Amheim Gustave S., jeweler, 8 Steuart 

Amheim Herman S., clerk Samuel S. Arnheim, 8 Steuart 

Amheim Julius S., drugs and medicines, 24 Steuart 

Arnheim Samuel S. , cigars and stationerj-, S Steuart 

Arnheim William S., jeweler, S Steuart 

Amhold Hugo, salesman Lilienthal &, Co., dwl 527 Turk 

Arnold , collector, dwl 719 Clay 

Arnold , hatter, dwl 317 Sutter 

Arnold A. Mrs., milliner, 1400 Polk 

Arnold Ames, teamster, cor Market and Spear, dwl E s 
Fair Oaks nr Twenty-third 

Arnold Augustus G., sawj-er D. A. Macdonald & Co., dwl 
516 Howard 

Arnold Austin, clerk Marcus C. Hawley & Co., dwl 429 
Geary 

Arnold Benjamin E., wholesale butcher, cor Fourth Av 
and M, South S. F., dwl N s Twentj'-third nr Guer- 
rero 

Arnold C. H., printer H. S. Crocker & Co., dwl 402 Larkin 

Arnold Catherine (widow), dwlE s San Jos6 Road nr Five- 
mile House 

Arnold Charles, clerk, dwl 102 Eddy 

Arnold Charles, cook, dwl 317 Francisco 

Arnold Charles W., bookkeeper Newark Land Assn. dwl 
1114 Market 

Arnold Edward H., driver Riley & Vest, dwl SE cor 
Brumm and Oregon 

Arnold Elbridge F., optician, cutlery and stationery, 427 
Kearny, dwl 822 Filbert 

Arnold Elizabeth Miss, seamstress, dwl E s San Jose 
Road nr Five-mile House 

Arnold Ferdinand, lettercanier Post-oflBce, dwl Twen- 
tieth nr Guerrero 

Arnold Francis W., cooperage, 712 Front, dwl 519 0ctavia 

Arnold George, dwl 14U0 Polk 

Arnold George C, teacher languages and mathematics, 
dwl 701 Geary 

Aniold George H., clerk Occidental Hotel 

Arnold Gottlieb, market, W s -Mission nr Tliirtieth 

Arnold Johanna, dwl 10 St. Charles PI 

Arnold John, business manager Palace Varieties, 25 Gearj' 

Arnold John F., conductor Clay St. Hill R. R., dwl 1503 
Leavenworth 

Arnold Joseph, wood and coal, 333 Third, dwl 362 Third 

Arnold Louis, dwl 742 Vallejo 

Arnold Marcus P., lettercarrier Post-office, dwl 1503 Leav 

Arnold Mathew, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 82 
Natoma 

Arnold Noah S. (JV. S. Arnold d- Co.), dwl 1306 Pine 

ARNOLD N. S. A CO., hardware commission mer- 
chants and manufacturers' agents, 310 California 

Arnold Otto, laborer, Lafayette Brewery, dwl 725 Green 

Arnold Otto, messenger London and San Francisco Bank, 
dwl 315 Powell 

AnioId 1 hilip, seaman, dwl 31 Pacific 



Arnold P. B., carpenter Market St. R. R., dwl 909 Kearny 

Aniold P. B,, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wharf 

jVniold Rufus, teamster Sedgley & Davis, dwl S s Nine- 
teenth nr Folsom 

Arnold Saunders, poultrj', Central Market, dwl 625 Post 

Arnold T., barkeeper, dwl 536 Market 

Arnold Thomas, blacksmith, dwl 519 Bush 

Arnold Thomas, clerk, dwl 2115 Market 

Arnold Thomas C, salesman Hccht Bros. & Co., dwl 101 
Grove 

Arnold T. J., engineer Board State Harbor Commission- 
ers, office 440 Jackson, res Oakland 

Arnold U. K., bookkeeper Greenebaimi Brothers, dwl 
1017 Polk 

Arnold W. , clerk, dwl Overland House 

Arnold William, laborer Eureka Warehouse, dwl 418 L'nion 

Arnold William, oiler stm Ancon, Broadway St. Wharf 

Arnold William A., carpenter, dwl 1310 Larkin 

Arnold William B., laborer, dwl Delgardo PI nr Hyde 

Arnold William H., salesman Albert J. Friel, dwl 402 
Larkin 

Arnold William T., printer John H. Peters, dwl 402 Larkin 

Arnolda Victor, cook St. Gottard Hotel, dwl 627 Bdwy 

Arnont Hannah (widow), dwl Paul Av nr Mission, Bemal 
Heights 

ARXOT XATHAXIEl D., manager Vulcan Iron 
Works, 135 and 137 Fremont, dwl 1514 Pine 

Arnot Nathaniel D. Jr., secretarj' Central R. R. Co., dwl 
2510 Clay 

Arnott Thomas, expressman, cor Fourth and Howard, 
dwl 103 Fifteenth 

Arnott William, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinerj", dwl SW cor 
Eighth and Brannan 

Amoudts Constant, manufacturer French artificial flow- 
ers and leaves, 4 Hartman PI 

Amsburg Charles, butcher, dwl IS Union PI 

Arnson John, shipcarpenter, dwl 331 Brannan 

Arnstein Eugene (Stein, Simon it Co.), dwl 332 Eddy 

Arnst^in Harriet (widow), dwl 132 Eighth 

Amstein Ludwig, bookkeeper Stein, Simon & Co., dwl 
208 Eddy 

Amstein M., cigarmaker, dwl 417 Brannan 

Arnthe George, kitchenhand Palace Hotel 

Arntz Frederick, carpenter, dwl 2o6j Jessie 

Amtz Henry, porter Nathan R. Lowell, NW cor Pine and 
Da\-is 

Arocoa Joseph, fruit peddler, dwl 521 Green 

Arodwirth L. C., superintendent stables N. B. and Mission 
R. R., dwl 956 Folsom 

Arondel Carrie (widow), real estate, dwl 620 Washington 

Aronsohn Sigmund, dwl 3 Monroe 

Aronson Abraham, furniture, 1326 Stockton, dwl 463 
Jessie 

Aronson David, dwl 463 Jessie 

Aronson G. & Co. (Adulph P. Craner), pawnbrokers, 
110 Keamy 

Aronson George (G. Aronson <fc Co.), dwl 307 Eddy 

Aronson I. , dwl 215 Sixth 

Aronson J., clerk, dwl 957 Market 

Aronson Leon, salesman Bowen Bros. & Co., dwl 824 
O'Farrell 

ARONSTEIX ADOLPH, physician, office 29 Keamy, 
dwl 520 Jones 

Arp Joacim, teamster William O'Brien 

Arpa Antonio, cook, dwl 10 Union PI 

Arper Albert A. D., machinist, dwl 2132 Howard 

Arjier George, carpenter California ilills, dwl 2132 How 

Arjjer Thomas, machinist, F. Korbel & Bros., dwl 2132 
Howard 

Arper Walter, machinist, dwl 2132 Howard 

Arjis Hennan, cabinetmaker Weir «Ss Greenwood, dwl 10 
Liberty 

Arques C. , dwl 1018 Stockton 

Arquest Charles, carpenter, dwl 272 Brannan 

Arranbide J. B., stockraiser, dwl 759 Harrison 

Arrandt Leonard, dwl 719 Clay 

Arria Anasetta, surcinglemaker, 2 Duncan Court 

Arrillaga Santiago, teacher music, dwl 129 Third 

Arrington William B., clerk forwarding department 
Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 043 Folsom 

Arrington Maria L. Mrs., dwl 043 Folsom 

Arrington Nicholas T., bookkeeper Newton Bros. & Co., 
dwl 044 Seventeenth 

Arrive Pierre, florist, W s Galinto bet Fifteenth and Six- 
teenth 

Arronge Eugene, dyer Alexander Bertin, dwl 521 Filbert 

Arrow John, laborer, dwl 20 Sacrainento 

Arrowsmith Augustus T., civil engineer, office 432 Mont- 
gomery room 9, dwl 461 Natoma 



PRANCIS (S; VALENTINE. Printers, 517 Clay and 510-516 Commercial St.. S. 



J. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Keamy, EstalDlished 1862. 



Arrowsmith David B., general agent, office 420 Mont- 
gomery, dwi <03 Market 

Arriiwsniitli Henry, clerk Ammon, Caspar! & Co., res 
Oakland 

Arrowsmith John, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wharf 

Arrowsmith Jos«ph, salesman Treadwell & Co., dwl Ws 
Twelfth l>et Mission and Howard 

Arroyo Jaiiuario E. (,/. Trejos .t Co.), dwl 11 Second Av 

Arsalino Nicolas, tailor Wright & Harmon, dwl Twenty- 
seventh bet Folsom and Harrison 

AKT .4SSOCI.4TIO.\, San Francisco, Samuel Purdy 
secreUiry, Julin K. Martin assistant secretary, rooms 
.•JIS I'ine 

Arth Jacob, brewer Wsuinenmacher & Kronenberg, dwl 
NE cor FYanklin and McAllister 

Arthur Mrs., dwl 763 Mission 

Arthur Charles, cjirriagetrimmer Carvill Manuf. Co 

Arthur E. M., paving teller Nevada liank of S. F., did 
cor Twelfth and e^stro, Oakland 

Arthur George F. , hairdresser, dwl 709 Folsom 

Arthur George N. (J. D. Arthur .fr Son), res Oakland 

Arthur J. D. & Son (iieorge X. Arthur), farm and ex- 
press wagons, SW cor California and bavis 

Arthur John D. {J. D. Arthur <t Son), res Oakland 

Arthur William S., baker and confectioner, 259 Third 

Arthus Pierre, dwl 634 Pacific 

Artigues E. & Co. (Jean and Louis Artigues), butchers, 
14 t>an Francisco Market and S s Fifth Av nr Railroad 
-Vv. South S. F. 

Artigues Einile (£. Artigues <t- Co.), dwl S 8 Fifth Av bet 
Railroad Av and N, South S. F. 

Artigues Jean (JS. Artigues <fc Co.), dwl S s Fifth Av bet 
Railroad Av and N, South S. F. 

Artigues Louis (E. Artigues ifc Co.), dwl S s Fifth Av bet 
Railroad Av and N, South S. F. 

Artman R., teamster J. Morton & Co. 

Artzberger Martin, painter, dwl 119 Park Av 

Arzaga Josd, compositor C. A. Murdock & Co., 532 Clay 

Asal Adolpb, carrier Abend Post, dwl 3 Noble PI 

Asbestos Felting and Paint Co., Isaac L. Merrill agent, 
office 314 Townsend 

Asbridge Tliomas, third engineer S. S. Gaelic 

Asbury Frank, gasfitter, dwl 1105 Powell 

Asch Benjamin, with William Landgrebe, dwl 415 Clem 

Asch Juli)is, cooper, dwl 870 Folsom 

Asoheck Henry F. , polisher John Daniel & Co. ,dwl 429 Pine 

Aschen Ernest {Ueinetnann & Aschen), dwl NW cor Bush 
and Octavia 

Ascherson Emilie Mrs. , dwl 432 Clementina 

Ascot John, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 

Ascroft Alice (widow), dwl 600 Jones 

Ascroft Henry, clerk, dwl 000 Jones 

ASH BICOTHEKS {Leo and Jacob), importers and 
jobbers clothing, NW cor Battery and Bush 

Ash v., lumberman C. A. Hooper & Ca, dwl Mechanics' 
House, Berry nr Fourth 

Ash Herrman, salesman Ash Bros., dwl 1355 Post 

Ash Isidore, furrier, 338 Kearny, dwl 1046 Folsom 

Ash Jacob (^4 s/i Brothers), res New York 

Ash Leo (Ash Brothers), dwl 1355 Post 

Ash Mary Mrs., dwl 117 Natoma 

Ash Peter, machinist Risdou I. and L. Works, dwl 551 
Mission, rear 

Ash Regina Miss, dwl 1316 Geary 

A,SH KOBEKT, attorney at law, oflSce 605 Clay, dwl 
1010 Mission 

Ash Thomas P., phonographic reporter, dwl 1812 Dupont 

Ash W., lumberman C. A. Hooper cS: Co., dwl Mechanics' 
House, Berry nr Fourth 

Ash William, dwl 415 Clementina 

Ash. See Asch and Ashe 

Ashburner William, mining engineer, office 240 Montgom- 
ery-, dwl 1014 Pine 

Ashbun- F. H., gasfitter, dwl 1105 PoweU 

ASHBLRY 3fO.\KOE, ex-auditor city and county, 
dwl 204 Montgomery 

\8hby Elijah W., attorney at law, dwl .533 Kearny 

Ashby E. P., seaman schr Alonzo, Jackson St. Wharf 

&8hby Mark T., mining office, 402 Front room 8, res 
Berkeley 

Aahcom Jarnes 'E., deputy clerk Supreme Court of Cali- 
fornia, office 640 Clay, dwl 1104 Market 

&8hcr<:>ft Robert, machinist Risdon I. and h. Works, dwl 
532 Mission 

Aahcroft Samuel, plasterer, dwl 719 Howard 

(Uhcroft William, captain U. S. stm McPherson, dwl 1208 

kshdown Archibald, bookkeeper, S. de Greayer & Co. 
iBhe C. L. (widow), dwl 823 Post 



Ashe Gregory, porter John E. Richards, dwl 546 Bryant 

Ashe Matthew, barkeejier, dwl E s Mission nr Lizzie 

Ashell .\nnie (widow), dwl 1015 Stockton 

Asher A. F., clothing, 408 Fourth 

Asher Alexander B., policeman City Hall, dwl 10 Willow 

Av nr Larkin 
Asher Charles L., compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 44 

Third 
Asher Coleman, dwl 161 Fourth 
Asher Edward, waiter Russ House, dwl 555 Natoma 
Asher Frank, dwl Olympic Lodgings -. _ , — 

Asher Henry, dwl 212 Sutter j ' ■■- ' 

Asher James, laborer, dwl NE cor Battery and Green 
Asher Sanuiel, oilclothing, factory <iB Davis, dwl 325 Clay 
Ashcrson F;mil, bookkeeper Hebrew Observer, dwl 432 

Clementina 
Ashley Delos R. (widow), dwl 712 Bush 
Ashley Delos R,, clerk, dwl 712 Bush 
Ashley J., pantryman Brooklyn Hotel 
Ashlev P. L., porter Cal. Furniture Manul. Co., dwl 712 

Bush 
Ashley Ward H., clerk, dwl 120 Sutter 
Ashley W. H. Mrs., dressmaking, 120 Sutter rooms 47 and 

48 
Ashman Charles, machinist, dwl 54 First 
Ashman Richard T. , machinist, dwl cor Sierra and Indiana 
Ashmead Gustavus S., dwl SE cor Mariposa and Florida 
Ashmer William, lumberman, Pier 12 Steuart 
Ashmore W. E., assistant storekeeper Cosmopolitan 

Hotel, dwl 119* O'Farrell 
ASHTOX CHAKLES, real-estate agent, office 120 Sut- 
ter, dwl 9 Hubbard 
Ashton Charles S., stock-list reporter S. F. Stock and 
E.xchange Board, dwl E s Fillmore bet Union and 
Green 
Ashton Harry, barkeeper Georg<e D. Hodges, dwl 44 

Steuart 
Ashton J., dwl 31 Turk 
Ashton John, clerk, dwl 11 Stockton 
Ashton John, e.\]3ressnia)i, dwl 3 Vallejo 
Ashton Lydia Mrs., dwl SW cor Shotwell and Fifteenth 
Ashton William C, salesman Renton, Holmes & Co., dwl 

408 Bryant 
Ashurst C^orge C, proprietor New Idria House, cor Sac- 
ramento and Leidesdorff 
Ashworth Tliomas, capitalist, dwl 806 McAllister 
Askall G. H., seaman, dwl 1110 Battery 
Askem Charles, conductor Central R. R. Co., dwl 214^ 

Sixth 
Asklen George, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 
Asmus John, farmer, E s San Jos6 Road nr Industrial 

School 
Asmus John, laborer National Flour Mills, dwl 1597 Turk 
Asmussen Wilhelm, groceries and liquors and boarding, 

NW cor Bryant and Eighth 
Asmussen William A., groceries and liquors, 1192 Harri- 
son, dwl 1191 Harrison 
Aspel William, calker Jliddlemas & Boole, dwl 106 Steuart 
Aspenlaub Adam, tanner George Dietsch, dwl cor Serpen- 
tine Av and Howard 
Aspinwali Peter, seaman O. & O. S. S. Gaelic 
Aspriel William, Shipcalker's Assn, 118 First 
Assalino Louis R., painter, dwl 820 Folsom 
Assayer State, Louis Falkenau, office 421 Montgomery 
Assei Perra, cook Hartnett & Barry, dwl 406 Broadway 
Asselin John, carpenter California Mills, dwl 503 Mission 
Assessment Guide, Byers & Parker publishers and pro- 
prietors, otfice 306 California 
A.SSE!«SOR flTY A.\D t'OlI\TY, office 22 City Hall 

first floor 
Assion Henrj-, tailor, dwl 1 Morey Alley 
Assion J. Miss, dwl 348 Third 

Assion Joseph {Assion <£• Uabermacher), dwl S4S Third 
Assion & Habemiacher (Joseph Assion and Ferdinattd 

Habeniuicher), merchant tailors, 205 Mont'j:oniery 
ASSI.STANT SI PEKIJfTEXDEXT RAIIiWAY 

.1IAIL SERVICE, office 606 Montgomerj' 
Assmann Adolph (^■l*.s))('77i?i de Bold), dwl E a Jersey bet 

El Dorado and Alameda 
ASSMANW A I»OLl» (.Adolph Assmann and Charles 
Dold), fancy groceries, and manufacturers caviar, 
32 California Market 
Asten Ferdinand O., masquerade costimia'.lSGearj', and 

liquor dealer, 3 Dupont 
Asten G., laborer C. A. Hooper & Co. 
Asten John, expressman Oakland Ferry, dwl 3 Broadway 
Asten N., laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 
Aster George, bookbinder Radius & Roesler, dwl 1212 
Clay 



'AMES G-. STEELE &> CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 



JEWELRY made to order and IIEPAIIIED by D. W. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Mercliant. 



Aston Daniel, painter William Lee, 416 Sacramento 

Astim James Sirs., dwl 461 Jessie 

Astur Block, 631 Sacramento cor Webb 

A8TKKDO AXTIIOW, Astredo's Exchange, 635 Wash- 

insfton, dwl !>14 Vallejo 
Astroff Lewis, master mariner, dwl 139 Shipley 
Afztalos Mary Hiss, milliner, dwl 529 Greenwich 
Asztalos Samuel, cabinetmaker Pacific (J. W. Fumitxu-e 

M. Co., dwl 529 Greenwich 
Ataj^da A,, dv/1 3 Vallejo Court 
Atcheson John, carpenter Henry J. McLerie, dwl 11 

Cleveland 
Atchiiison B. SL (B. M. A tckinson tfc Co.), res East C»akland 
ATt'lllXSOX B. iM. A CO. {Edioard L. Cutten), dairy 

produce aaid provisions, 16 and 17 Centre Market 
Atchinson Charles, dwl 191 Hyde 
Atchinson Henry S. , kiborer, "dwl 22 Turk 
Atchinson T., dwl 314 Bush 
Atheam Charles, dwl 1313 Market 
Athearu Charles G. {AUiearn <t Co.\ dwl 813 Lagmia 
Atheam Charles M., milkman, dwl 1313 Larkin 
Atheam Frank, dwl 1707 Leaveoworth 
Atheam Joseijh H. {Atheam lO Co.), dwl 17 Second Av 
Athearn WilUam, clerk forwarding department Wells, 

Fargo & Co., dwl 1707 Leavewworth 
ATHEARX •£ <:0. {Charles G. and Jos. H, Atheam), 

groceries, provisions, and ship stores, 6 Steuart 
Atherton Faxton D., capitalist, office 705 Sansom, res 

Fair Oaks, San Mateo Co. 
Athey Charles, plumber John Bohn, res Oakland 
A this John, second mate schr Lovet Peacock, d*l 32 Steu 

Atkins , dwl 808 Mission 

Atkins Alanson B,, clerk Henry B. Atkins, dwl 2 Rose Av 
Atkins David, dummyman CUy St. Hill R. R. Co., dwl 

Broadway nr Leavenworth 
Atkms Ebenezer, porter Newton Bros. Si Co., dwl 621 Cal 
ATMJNS HEXJtY B., groceries and liquors, and real- 
estate agent, SE cor O'Farrell and Jones, dwl 2 
Rose Av 
AtkiDS James, dwl 36 Geary 
Atkins Philip, laborer Patent Brick Co, 
Atkins Robert, painter, dwl 123 Silver 
Atkins Robert C. {Orr d^A.), dwl 608 Geary 
Atkins Robert St. L., canvassing agent, dwl 313 Davis 

Atkinson , teacher dancing. Mission nr Eighth 

Atkuison Conrad, carpenter Eckf eldt & Co. , dwl 526 Pine 
Atkinson David, proprietor California Lavmdry, Russ Al- 
ley, dwl cor Church and Elizabeth 
Atkinson Francis, fireman Engine No. 6 S. F. F, D., dwl 

12 Caroline 
Atkinson Frank F., painter, dwl 26 Willow Av, rear 
Atkinson Frederick, boatinaji, dwl 110 Berrj' 
Atkinson George, carpenter Wrilliam Kerr, dwl 535J Minna 
Atkmson George, clerk General Freight Office Central Pa- 
cific R. R., NE cor Fourth and Townsend, dwl 213 Capp 
Atkinson George, mine owner, dwl West End Hotel, Bren- 

hamPl 
Atkinson George F., wood tnmer, 213 Mission, dwl 32 Te- 
hama 
Atkinson H. , carpenter Geo. W. Swan & Co. 
ATKIXSOX JA9l£,}i {Atkimon J: ^ewlajids),and in> 
porter wines and liquors, 1021 Market, dwl 41 Tehama 
Atkinson Joseph B. {L. Atkinson it Co.), res Philadelphia 
Atkinson Joseph H., dwl 1032 Broadway 
Atkinson L., clerk, dwl 633 O'FarreU 
ATKIX80X L. A ^:0. {Joseph B. Atkinson), shirtajad 

collar manufacturers, 22 Sansom 
Atkinson Lewis {L. Atkinson ct Co.), dwl 22 Sansom 
ATKI.VSOX, LI'ON A <'0. {Thoma» T. Atkinson and 

Jr. H. Lyon) stockbrokers, 405j Cal 
Atkinson Nathan, real-estate office, 507 Montgomerj',dwl 

807 Tj'ler 
Atkinson Rose H. (widow), dwl 371 Minna 
Atkinson Thomas, dwl W s Church bet Twenty-third and 

Twenty-fourth 
Atkinson Thomas, real estate, dwl Green Court 
Atkinson Tliomas E., bookkeeper George D. Gardiner & 

Co., dwl SE cor Shotwcll and Twenty-second 
Atkinson Thomas T. {Atkinson, Lyon <t Co.), dwl 112 

Hyde 
Atkinson William, laborer, dwl 833 Geary 
Atkinson William, printer, dwl 836 Market 
Atkinson William, sailmaker John S. Blakiston 
Atkinson William H., painter California Chemical Paint 

Co., dwl 652 Howard 
Atkinson W. J., surgeon O. & O. S. S. Belgic 
Atkinson & Newlands {James A tkinson and William T. 
Newlandx), wholesale and retail w ines and liquors, 
538 Market 



ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC TELEC;R.4J»1I CO. 

(Central Pacific Di\ision), Leland Stanford president, 
Richard P. Hammond general manager, F. L. Van- 
denburgh suijerintendent, J. G. Bloomer citj' mana- 
ger, office 507 California, branches Grand Hotel, Lick 
House, Palace Hotel, SE cor Front and Sacramento, 
NE cor Front and Broadway, Oakland Ferry Wharf, 
and cor Fourth and Townsend 

Atlantic Giant Powder Co., Henry Pichoir secretary, ofiBce 
40 California 

Atlantic House, Michael McDonell proprietor, 20 Sac 

Atlantic Straw Works, Forrest & Co. proprietors, 132 
Fourth 

Atlas Insurance Co. (fire) of Hartford, Hutchinson, Mann 
& Smith agents, 314 California 

Atterbury Andrew, laborer North Beach Cement Pipe 
Works, dwl 419 Francisco 

Atterbury Alexander, bookkeeper James N. McCune, dwl 
304 Seventeenth 

Attinger Frederick, tailor, 24 Dupont 

Attinger Gottlieb, boot and shoemaker, 117 Leidesdorff, 
dwl 31 Morton 

Attinger John, tailor, dwl 365 Minna 

Attridge Arthur, foreman Einstein Bros. & Co., dwl W s 
Noe bet Market and Fifteenth 

Attridge Edward, porter, dwl 1010 Filbert 

Attridge James, laborer J. F. Haycock & Co., dwl 414 
Broadway 

Attridge Thomas,porter CoweirsWarehouse,dwll307Bdwy 

Attridge Thomas, special policeman, dwl What Cheer 
House 

ATTWOOD niEIiTIELE, consulting and mining engi- 
neer, dwl 722 Bush 

Attwood William, seaman, dwl 430 Drumm 

Atwell Edward E., butcher George E. Mowatt, dwl 210 
Minna 

Atwill Joseph F. {Aticill <t Co.), res Oakland 

ATWILL A CO. {Joseph F. Atwill and H. R. West), 
Western Mining Agency, office 240 Montgomerj' 

Atwood Caroline L. Mrs., teacher Girls' High School, dwl 
1511 Clay 

Atwood Charles E., shoemaker Marks & Feder, dwl 648 
Mission 

ATWOOD EPHRAI9I A. {Atwood <Sc Bodwell), dwl 
1511 Clay 

Atwood Emest, machinist, dwl 742 Minna 

Atwoc3d Frederick W., clerk J. Morton & Co., dwl 761 
Mission 

Atwood George, ticket clerk Wade's Opera House 

Atwood George A., merchant, dwl 725 Treat Av 

Atwood George E. {Nichols <i: A.), dwl SW cor Sacra- 
mento and Drumm 

Atwood George W., teamster, dwl N s Ellis bet Webster 
and Fillmore 

Atwood Henry, clerk, dwl 214 Tj'ler 

Atwood J. K., mining, dwl 115 Eddy 

Atwood Mathew, miner, dwl 107 Turk 

Atwood WilUam, mate sloojj Mystery, Beale St. Wharf 

Atwood William T. , assistant secretary Pacific Stock Ex- 
change, dw'l 532 Geary 

ATWOOD A BODWELL {Ephraim A. Atwood and 
Harry H. Bodwell), Excelsior Windmill, pump, 
horse-power, and tank manufacturers, 211 and 213 
Mission 

Aubert Albert, hams, bacon, etc, 10 S. F. Market, dwl 3 
Graham PI 

Aubert Felix {Aubert it Chesneau), dwl 532 Pacific 

Aubert James M., physician, office and dwl 504 Kearny 

Aubert Joseph P., jeweler, dwl 620 Fiilton 

Aubert Paul L., jeweler Levison Bros., dwl 1314 O'Farrell 

Aubert & Chesneau {Felix Aubert and Einile Clies- 
neaii), restaurant, 707 Pacific 

Aubonnet August, proprietor Europe Hotel, 109 Dupont 

Aubrey Bernard, dwl 210 Montgomery Av 

Aubrey Charles, electrotyper Painter & Co., dwl cor] 
Twenty-third and Chattanooga f 

Aubrey Charles A., tinner G. &. W. Snook, Pine, dwl 1328 
California, rear 

Aubrey Francis O., carpenter, dwl E s Chattanooga nr 
Twenty-third 

Auburn Alice Miss, tailoress Adolph Morris, dwl 133 Dora 

Auburn Gold Mining Co. (Placer Co., Cal.), office 414 Cal 

Auclair Francis, cabinetmaker. 308i Tehama, dwl 12 Hunt 

Auclair Frederick, billiard-tablemaker Jacob Strahle &, Co., 
dwl 12 Hunt 

Auclair Mary Miss, fancy work, dwl 12 Hunt 

Aude Barbara A. Mrs., dwl 1007 Market 

Audemart Manuel, porter Henry Schroder & Co., and 
laundry, 314 Sutter 



FRANCIS & VALENTINE, Printers, Designers, and Engravers, 517 Clay St., S. 



C. p. VAIT SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Auder William, carpenter, dwl 020 Pine 
Audiffred Hypolite, wholesale and retail wood and char- 
coal, 3 Mission, dwl 1823 Bush 
AIDITOK OITl A.M» COI XTY, office 3 City Hall 

first floor 
Audley John, salesman, dwl 613 Pine 
Auerbach Alfred, fringemaker William Englander, dwl 

14 Harriet 
Auerbach Charles M., bookkeeper Levi Strauss & Co., 

dwl 711 OTarrell 
Auerbach Julius J., phj-sician, office and dwl BIOJ Stock 
Auerbach L. & Co. (Simon L. Goldberg), cigars and to- 
bacco, 309 East 
Auerbach Leopold, merchant (Montana Territory), dwl 

516 OTarreU 
Auerbach Louis (L. A turbach <t Co.), dwl 14 Harriet 
Auerbach Louis, office 571 Market, dwl 340 Turk 
Aufrecht Gustav, photographer I. W. Taber & Co., dwl 

430 Geary 
Aufric-htig Morris, manuf jewelrj', 233 Si.\th 
Aug T., tanner Samuel Bloom, dwl E s Folsom nr 

Eighteenth 
Augee Louis, carpenter, dwl SW cor Mission and Twenty- 
third 
Auirer B. E. (B. E. Auger J: Co.), dwl 826 Howard 
Al'OER B. E. «£ CO., importers and commission 
merchants and agents Buena Vista Vinecultural Soc., 
40<j Batterj' 
Auger Flora Mrs., milliner, 121 Stockton 
Aui,'er John, bakery, 911 Pacific, dwl 121 Stockton 
Auger Lambert, optician John C. Sack, dwl 64 Natoma 
Aughterson George, barkeeper Robert Lewellra, dwl 14 

Clara 
Augsburger Frank, dwl 909 Kearny 
Augsburger Frederick {Faucett it'Co.), dwl 63 Minna 
Augsburger John, carpenter, dwl 730 Vallejo 
Augur L. (A. T. Sherwood tt Co.), dwl 17 Tjier 

August (widow), laundress, dwl 132S Stockton 

August Charles, waiter 620 Fourth, dwl Stanford Hotel 
August John, laborer, dwl 23 Stevenson, rear 
August Josephine (widow), dressmaker, 634 Vallejo 
August L., waiter California Restaurant, dwl 614 Mont 
August Samuel, laborer Pacific Rolling Mills 
August Vobbe, waiter California Restaurant, dwl 22 

Montgomerj' 
Augustine Emma Miss, dwl 206 Powell 
Augustine Morris, bookkeeper Rosenbaum & Friedman, 

dwl 23 Kearny 
Augustine William, cabinetmaker, dwl 420 Brannan 
Augiistine Jean, cook Palace Hotel, dwl 627 Broadway 
Augustiny John (Saggau d: A.), Awl SE cor Turk and 

Polk 
Augustus Frank, vamisher Kragen « Co., dwl 327 Beale 
Augustus Joseph, painter, dwl 703 Davis 
Aulbach Adam, printer, dwl 511 O'Farrell 
Auld James, salesman David Porter, dwl 2210 Pine 
Auld John, saddler, dwl 214 Perrj' 
Ault H. W., conductor Southern Pac. R. R. 
Ault Joseph P., hostler Berry & Gillman, dwl 107 Stev 
Ault Martha M. Miss, adjuster coiner's department U. S. 

Mint, dwl 905 Market 
Ault Mathias, miller, dwl 111 Leavenworth 
Auman Frederick (.4 « ma /i X- Tutjen), dwl 508 Bdwy 
Aune Peter, carpenter, dwl 231 Minna 
Auradou A. Leon (JLuradoH it Tortcll), dwl 520 Merchant 
Auradou & Tortell(.A. L. Auradoiumd WilliainTortell), 

dealers game and poultry, 507 Merchant 
Auregey Miguel, carpenter, dwl 1022 Kearny, rear 
Aurick Charles, seaman schr Anne Hermene, Bulkhead 

bet Washington and Jackson 
Aurora Co. (Chinese), cigar manufacturers, 206 Dupont 
Aurouze Marius, hairdressing saloon, 647 Pacific, dwl 

1114 Stockton 
Aiigcomb E. S., oysterman Solomon Tesmore, dwl 614 

Kearny 
Auselman Joseph, restaurant, 308 Montgomery Av 
Ausensen Andrew, seaman, dwl 106 Jackson 
Ausman Otto, vamisher John A. Shaber & Co., dwl 254 

Tehama 
AustermUUer Charles, cook Schramm & Schnabel 
AISTI> ALEXANDER {J. M. Walker d: Co.), dwl 

Occidental Hotel 
Austin Aimie Miss, dressmaker, dwl 331 Minna 
Austin Arnold, bookkeeper Marcus C. Hawley & Co., dwl 

429 Geary 
Austin .^jthiir C, clerk Linforth, Kellogg & Co., res 

Oakland 
ArSTi;* B. €., tin can and box manufacturer, 522 
Washington, dwl 1520 Tavlor 



Austin C, dwl 863J Market 

Austin C, laborer New City Hall, dwl 545 Mission 
Austin Charles, tinroofer W. G. Fisk, dwl 715 Howard 
Austin David S., master mariner Pacific Mail S. S. Co., 

dwl 713 Bush 
Austin Emmet, bookkeeper S. L. Mastick & Co., dwl 108 

Ellis 
Austin Frank B., editor New Age, office 420 Kearny, dwl 

Grand Hotel 
Austin Han-ey, dentist, office and dwl 634 Washington 
Austin H. E., dwl 108 Taylor 
Austin Isaac, engineer, dwl 227 Main 
Austin James, mining, dwl 1142J^ Market 
Austin John, carpenter, dwl 212 Linden Av 
Austin Joseph (C. S. Crittenden ct Co.), dwl Lick House 
Austin Joseph, drajTuan, 60S Front, dwl 717 Natoma 
Austin Joseph B., dwl 2524 Clay 
Axistin Marcus E., real-estate agent, office 639 Kearny, 

res East Oakland 
Austin Matthew A., master mariner, dwl 2136 Howard 
Austin Minnie F. Miss, principal Clarke Institute, SE cor 

O'Farrell and Mason, dwl 228 Capp 
Austin R., seaman, dwl 123 Jackson 
Austin Robert N., laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s WTiarf 
Austin Sampson, packer O. La a ton & Co., dwl 1614 Post 
Austin Tliomas, carpenter, dwl 423 Bush 
Austin Thomas A., machinist .<Etna Iron Works, dwl 966 

Folsom 
Austin William, trimmer Bradley &, Rulofson, dwL966 

Folsom 
Austin William W., sub-editor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 570 

Minna 
Al^TRALI.4.\ STEAM >AVI«ATIOX CO., J. C. 

Merrill i Co., agents, office 204 California 
Austrian Mutual Benevolent Societv, rooms 71 New Mont 
AIJ«»TRO-UL'.VCi.lRIA\ E.nPIRE, Gottlieb A. E. 

Muecke consul, office 109 California room 8 
Autajne George, laundryman, dwl W s Scott bet O'Far- 
rell and Gearj- 
Autey William H., waiter, dwl 533 Commercial 
Autson John, miller, dwl 313 Brj-ant 
Auvraj- Frank, teamster Vermeil & Wellingtoii, dwl cor 

Fovuth and Berry 
Auxilby Samuel, second steward Pacific Mail S. S. City 

of Pekin 
Avan John, policeman City Hall, dwl 13 Tehama, rear 
Ave Frank, laborer Pacific Distilling and Refining Co., 

SW cor Chestnut and Pierce 
Avens John, Ship Calkers' Assn, 118 First 
Avenue Charles, cook, dwl 616 Broadway 
Avenue House, Leon Peiper proprietor, 819 Kearny 
Averell Wilson, teamster, cor Sacramento and Davis, dwl 

504J Howard 
Averill Etta Miss, dwl 9 O'Farrell 
Averill R., jeweler, dwl Russ House 
Averj' Adeline Mme., physician, office and dwl 204 Sutter 
Avery Clark, carpenter, dwl 1609 Clay 
Aven' Daniel W. (A very i- Goetze), dwl 166 Clara 
Aven,' Dean R. (i>. It. A very dt Co.), dwl 1911 Polk 
Avery D. R. & Co., fruit and vegetables, 18 and 19 Cen- 

Avery D. W., blacksmith Kimball Manuf. Co., dwl 212 

Post 
Avery E. C. , laborer Frear Stone Co 
Averj' Elihu, master mariner, dwl E s Minnesota bet 

Mariposa and Solano 
Aver}' E. M. (widow), dwl 238 Taylor 
Averj' Eunice H. (widow), dwl NW cor Iowa and Solano 
Avery Francis, secretary Saucelito Land and Feny Co., 

office NE cor Sansom and Halleck, dwl 1509 Wash 
Averj' Frederick, fourth engineer 0. &, O. S. S. Gaelic 
Avery G. H. Mrs., dwl 439 Minna 
Averj' Jasper W., carpenter, dwl 1609 Clay 
Avery John, molder Ray & Morrill, dwl 134 Fourth 
Avery Judson, with D. "R. Avery & Co., dwl Minnesota 

bet Solano and Mariposa 
Averj' Maria Miss, dwl 281 Minna 
Averj- Robert J., block and pumpmaker R. C. Hanson & 

Co., dwl 1145 Mission 
Avery Ross, carpenter, dwl Lizzie nr Mission 
Avery S. Miss, teacher I'^incon Grammar School, dwl cor 

Iowa and Solano 
Averj' William, seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 
Averj' & Goetze (Daniel W. Avery and John Goetze), 

proprietors Rotunda Hall, 234 Steuart 
A\'ila Zenobia Mrs., dwl 720 VaUejo 
Avison Christien, master mariner, dwl 110 Park Av 
Avisseau Louis, carpenter, dwl SW cor Montgomery Av 

and Vallejo 



tl 



JAMES &. STEELE & CO. dispense Prescriptions from Pure Medicines. 



FINE WATCHES and JEWELRY for Sale by D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



A\'y Eusrene, woolgrower and wholesale sheepdealer, of- 
fice 402 Front, room 3, dwl 310 Lombard 

Axel William, groceries and liquors, E s Castro bet 
Eighteenth and Nineteenth 

Axlord William, iron molder, dwl 17 Sher\vood PI 

Axt Ludwig, boot and shoemaker, 93fi Howard 

Axtell George \V., painter John A. Donovan «Sc Co., dwl 
513 Minna 

Axtell Mark, dwl 315 Eddy 

Axtell William, compositor Benj. F. Sterett, dwl 26 Min 

Axthelm Hermann W., wagonmaker John W. Farren, 
dwl 318J Fulton, rear 

Axtman Leopold, bakery, 500 Ha}-e3 

Ayala Manuel B. M., physician, office 919 Clay, dwl 702 
Pacific 

Ayer C. E. , milk and dairy produce, office 35 Eddy, dwl 
547 Mimia 

Ayer James, lumberman, dwl 25 Clinton, rear 

Ayer Joseph T., contractor and builder, dwl 2408Folsom 

Ayer Maggie, tailoress Wright & Harmon, dwl 30 Clinton 

Ayer Parrish L., carpenter, dwl 219 Hajes 

Ayer Washington, physician, office 410 Kearny, dwl 428 
Post 

Ayer. See Ejtb 

Ayers Frederick, bricklayer, dwl 1226 Folsom, rear 

Ayers Grosvenor P., salesman Osgood & Stetson, dwl 524 
Geary 

Ayers Henry, liquor saloon, 236 Montgomery, dwl 406 Cal 

Ayers Humphrey, foreman Albert Folsom, dwl 920 Do- 
lores 

Ayers Ira Jr., with George F. Bragg & Co. and secretary 
Sterling Mining Co., dwl 427 Sutter 

Ayers John C, policeman City Hall, dwl 959J Mission 

Ayers John C. Mrs. (widow), dwl E s Carolina nr Jackson 
Park 

Ayers John W., real estate, dwl 2716 Howard 

Ayers Joseph, clerk, dwl 16 Mason 

Aj'ers Mar3', tailoress Wright & Harmon, dwl 15J Clinton 

Ayers Robert E., machinist Globe Iron Works, dwl Caro- 
lina bet Mariposa and Santa Clara 

Ayers William, calker, dwl Twelfth Av nr P, South S. F. 

Ayers William H., carpenter, dwl E s Carolina ur Jack- 
son Park 

Ayieo Phillip, dwl N s Tenth Av nr Railroad Av, South 
S. F. 

Aylward John, machinist Miners' Foundry, dwl 37 Minna 

Aylward Michael, machinist Miners' Foundry, dwl 37 Min 

AjTe William, dwl 921 Jackson 

Ayres Charles, carpenter, dwl 327 Filbert 

Ayres Charles W. , plasterer, dwl 705 Howard 

AjTes Consolidated Silver Mining Co. (Ormsby Co.,Nev.), 
William A. M. Van Bokkelen secretary, office 320 
Sansom room 21 

AjTes Emma (widow), dwl 615 Taylor 

Avres Frederick, clerk, dwl 331J Eddy 

Ayres James, lumberman Jason Springer, dwl 13 Ritch 

AYKES JOHX C, broker, office 307 Montgomery, dwl 
Palace Hotel 

AjTes Joshua Irving, mining, office 320 Sansom room 21, 
dwl 525 Natoma 

AjTes William, dwl 1303 Broadway 

AjTes William Mrs., teacher music, dwl 1303 Broadway 

Ayres Winnie Mrs., dwl 428 Third 

AjTes & Hopkins Silver Mining Co. (Ormsby Co., Nev.), 
William A. il. Van Bokkelen secretary, office 320 
Sansom room 21 

Aztec Pinole Co., Ira Marden proprietor, office 212 S»e 



Baaoi Christian, dwl 1921^ Mason 

Baap J. M., butcher, dwl W Railroad Avnr Sixth, South 
S. F. 

Baaser Ferdinand, distiller, dwl E s Thirteenth Av nr P, 
South S. F. 

Baasleman Heinrich, mariner, dwl 28 Clay 

Babbitt A. Mrs., spiritual medium, 417 Kearny room 86 

Babbitt Andrew M., carpenter, dwl 417 Kearny 

Babbitt John, teamster Pac. Rolling Mills, dwl W ■ Ten- 
nessee nr Solano 

Babbitt Solomon, dwl 1108 Clay 

Babcock Annie Mrs., furnished rooms, 417 Kearny 

Bahcock Benjamin, dwl 8 Mason 

Babcock George {Babcock <fc Gould), res Oakland 

Babcock George A., compositor Spaulding & Barto, dwl 
1328 Polk 

Babcock John, dwl 18 Stockton 



Babcock L., laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'b Wharf 
Babcock Warren, calker Boole & Webster, dwl 26 Scott PI 
Babcock William (Parrott <t Cu.), dwl 11 Essex 
Babcock \Villiam, clerk, dwl 56 Tehama 
B.iltC'OCK MILH.OI F. (Parrott <t- Co.), office 806 

California, dwl 11 Egsex 
Babcock & Gould (George Babcock and Henry Gould), 
commission merchants and proprietors Oakland City 
Flour Mills, office 209 Davis 
Babco.x Jefferson T., dwl 110 Taylor 
Babcox J. S., clerk coiners' department U. S. Mint, dwl 

1012 Mission 
Babe Edward, seaman, dwl 1011 Battery 
Babin Landry C, collector Norbert Landry, dwl 319 Union 
Babson Edward (C. L. Taylor ct Co.), res Boston, Mass. 
Babson Seth, architect, office 37 Merchants' Exchange, 

dwl 132 McAllister 
Baby Martin, laborer, dwl 518 Mission 
Babylon George P., boUermaker McAfee, Spiers & Co. , dwl 

154 Clara 
Baca Pablo (Baca <fc Castarios), dwl 8 Russ 
BACA «.t CASTAXOS (Pablo Baca and Bartolo Cat- 
tanoi:), wholesale sheep butchers, S s Fifth Av nr 
Railroad Av, South S. F., office 535 Clay 
Bacarcich Samuel, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Mont 
Baccala Louis (Bocken & B.), dwl 630 Sacramento 
Bacconi V., laborer Musto Bros. 
Biiccus Benjamin, gasfitter, dwl 442 Greenwich 
Bacous George A., machinist, dwl 442 Greenwich 
Baccus John B., dwl 442 Greenwich 
BACCUS RICHARD T., market SW cor O'FarreU 

and Mason, dwl 528 O'FarreU 
Baccus. See Backus 

Bacfe Antonio, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Montgomery 
Bach Charles, bookkeeper Ferdinand Scherr, dwl 1583 Fol 
Bach F. , cabinetmaker S. F. Manufacturing Co. 
Bach Frederick W. , bookkeeper Kline & Co. , dwl 735 Green 
Bach Henry, porter Lick House 
Bach Herman, bookkeeper, dwl 802 Stockton 
Bach John, manager United Anaheim Wine Grower*' 

Assn, office 321 Montgomerj", dwl 2022 Mission 
Bachelder Frank J., salesman American Clock Co., dwl 

1111 Pacific 
Bachelder Hemy, carpenter, dwl 116 Ninth 
Bachelder Horace, clerk Angell, Palmer & Co., dwl N i 

Palmer nr Whitney 
Bachelder James W., weigher Mission Bay Warehou»e, 

dwl N s Palmer nr Whitnej' 
Bachelder John W. , attornej' at law, dwl 1106 Kearny 
Bachelder Sarah (widow), dwl N s Palmer nr Whitney 
Bachelder T. F., attorney at law, office 622 Clay, dwl 307 

Lombard 
Bachelder. See Batchelder 
BACHELOR CLUB, rooms 630 Commercial 
Bacher George, carpenter, dwl SW cor Dupont and Post 
Bachert August, salesman B. Nathan & Co., dwl 130 Sutter 
Bachle Charles T., carj^enter Henry J. McLeri, dwl cor 

Broadway and Montgomery 
Bachle Leopold, brewer, O. Fauss & Co., dwl SE cor Mii- 

sion and Nineteenth 
Bachmau Brothers (Herman S., Nathan S., Leopold S., 
and David S.), importers and jobbers dry goodi, 10 
and 12 Battery 
Bachman Charles, salesman A. L. Bancroft * Co., dwl 721 

Market 
Bachman David S. (Bachman Bro$.), dwl 1107 Van New 

Av 
Bachman Edwin, clerk Bachman Bros., dwl 502 Buih 
Bachman Ernst, capitalist, dwl 838 McAllister 
Bachman Felix, dwl 618 Larkin 
Bachman Frederick, dwl 144 Perry 
Bachrach M. , dwl 156 Powell 

Bachstein Frank, miner, dwl SW cor Dupont and Poit 
Bachman Herman S. (Bachman Bros.), res New York 
Bachman K. (widow), dwl K nr Sixth Av, South S. F. 
Bachman Leopold S. (Bachman Bros.), dwl 619 Leav 
Bachman Nathan S. (Bachman Bros.), dwl 1109 Van Nes8 

Av 
Bachman Simon (Esberg, B. tt Co.), dwl 9 Mason 
Bacibio Imenez, wheelwright Jesus E. Lopez, dwl 530 Mii- 

sion 
Bacigalupi Antonio, vegetable dealer, dwl 628 Broadway 
Bacigalupi Carlo, cartman, dwl 19 Lafayette PI 
Bacigalupi Domenico, wine-cellar, 1419 Dupont 
Bacigalupi Frank, dwl Sixteenth Av nr I, South S. P. 
Bacigalupi Frank (Casassa, B. J: Corcelia), dwl SE cor 

Hayes and Baker 
Bacigalupi Gitano, helper melter and refiner's depart- 
ment U. S. Mint, dwl 524 Filbert 



PEANCIS & VALENTINE. Commercial Printing House, 517 Clay Street, S. F. 



0. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Bacigralupi Giambati, laborer Pac. Barrel and Keg Fac- 
tory, dwl U Union PI 
Baciffalupi Giovanni, bootblack, dwl 1117i Kearny 
Baciiralupi Giovanni, boots and shoes, 1404 Dupont 
BarifT.iliip" -lanies, laborer, dwl r^H Filbert 
Bacitjaliipi John, ve^'etable dealer, dwl 628 Broadway 
Bacijralupi Joseph, sawyer Pac. Barrel & Keg Factory 
Baciiraiujii Joseph, woodcarver S. F. Mai\ufacturin|; Co., 

dwl ISO.T Mason 
Bacipilupi Louis, dwl NW cor Union and Brannan PI 
B.ici(ralnpi Louis, fishonnan, dwl 1'2 Union PI 
Bacii.'ulupi Paolo, bootblack, dwl 1117} Kearny 
Baciiralu])! Paolo, painter Giovanni B. Deferarri, dwl H 

PolLard PI 
Bacigaluiii Peter, clerk David A. Jenninirs, dwl 1805 Mason 
Bacicrahipi Stephen, marblecutter J. & F. Kesseler, dwl 

ISO.-) Mason 
Backe Francis, upholsterer Schlueter A Volberg, dwl 110 

Seventh 
Backer Frank A., cloaks and suits, 402 Kearny 
Backer John, basketmaker, dwl 027 liroadway 
Backer W., seaman, dwl NE cor Berry and Madden 
Backes Cliristian, porter Jacob G. Gundlach, 115 Leid- 

esdorff 
Backland Charles, seaman, dwl 20 Washington 

Backman , dwl SW cor Dupont and Broadway 

Baokman F., freight clerk S. S. Kalorama, 10 Market 
Backman Jacob, cabinetmaker Edward H. Linforth & 

Co. , dwl 98 Stevenson 
Backrath James, machinist Pac. Rollins' Mills 
Backrath Robert, fruits and vegetables, dwl E s Fifteenth 

AvnrS, South S. F. 
Backstadt William, harnessmaker Main & Winchester, dwl 

154 Clara 
Backus Benjamin, gasfitter Charles J. Reiley, dwl 10 

John 
Backus Charles, master mariner, dwl 220 Francis, rear 
Backus Henry F., bookbinder A. L. Bancroft &, Co., dwl 

10 John 
Backus Jlichael, waiter Miners' Restaurant, 719 Market, 

dwl 313 Dupont 
Backus Peter, dwl 314 Clay 
Backus P. N., dwl 725 California 
BACKUS S.IMI'EL W., commission merchant, ofHce 

44 Market, dwl 1520 Mason 
Backus. See Baccus 

BAC'OX ALONZO P., general agent Pacific Mail S. S. 
Co., office wharf cor First and Bran, dwl 510 Franklin 
Bacon Augustus, miner, 1016 Market 
Bacon B., hostler Omnibus R. R. Co., dwl 258 Clementina 
Bacon Bridget, dwl 1520 Washington, rear 
Bacon Charles A. , miner, dwl 206 Kearny 
B.4CO.\ rH.lKLES R., superintendent Cal. Watch 

Co., office 120 Sutter, res Berkeley 
Bacon Edward T., ticket agent Pacific Mail S. S. Co., of- 
fice wharf cor First and Brannan, dwl 510 Franklin 
Bacon Francis W., cashier Stat« Investment and Insur- 
ance Co., dwl 822 Sutter 
Bacon Gaston E. (A branuon <t- Bacnn), dwl 5 Quincj PI 
Bacon George A., local policeman, dwl 736 J Clementina 
Bacon George A. , assistant superintendent N. B. and Mis- 
sion R. R., dwl 300 Fourth 
Bacon George W., proprietor Commercial Lodgings, 615 

Commercial 
BA<'0.\' HENRY D., real estate, office 305 Sansom, res 

Oakland 
Bacon Henry J., clerk Bank of San Francisco, dwl 18 J 

Russ 
Bacon Horace, U. S. deputy marshal, dwl 1145 Mission 
B.iro\ JACOB {Bacon A- Company), dwl 108 Valencia 
Bacon James, foreman casting cleaner Miners' Foundry, 

dwl 78 Natoma 
Bacon John, capitalist, dwl 510 Mason 
Bacon John B., liquor saloon, Morton House 121 Post, 

dwl 740 Minna 
Bacon John P., bookkeeper E. E. EjTe, dwl 510 Mason 
Bacon Joseph S., agent Boston Board Underwriters, of- 
fice 405 Front, dwl 26^ Kearny 
Bacon Mill and Mining Co. (Gold Hill, Nev.), Edward 

May secretary, office 419 California room 28 
Bacon Nellie, Miss, saleswoman, dwl 211 Eddy 
Bacon Pvam B. , helper melter and refiner's department 

U. S". Mint, dwl 730 Sixteenth 
Bacon Sarah E. (widow), dwl ISJ Russ 
Bacon Snowden, insurance, dwl 26^ Keamy 
Bacon Thomas, shipjoiner, dwl 54 First 
Bacon Truman, physician, dwl 534 Montgomery Av 
Bacon William, stableman Omnibus R. R. Co., dwl 258 
Clementina, rear 



B.4<'0:V «fi <'«MI'.41«Y (Jacob Bacon a7id Jaine» E. 
Aqer), book and jobprinters, NE cor Clay and Sansom 

Bacquie Dominick, dwl 1609 Powell 

Bacquie Henry, wines and liquors, NW cor Stockton and 
Broadway, dwl 700 Broadway 

Badaracco Antonia, wood and coal, 1518 Stockton, dwl 
538 Green, rear 

Badaracco David, bootblack, SE cor Merchant and Mont- 
gomery, dwl Stockton bet Green and Union 

Badaraus S. B., student Barnard's Business College 

Bade Henry, cabinetmaker Gilbert i Moore, dwl 1415 
Brannan 

Bade Joseph, dwl 523 Tehama bet Fifth and Sixth 

Badel Antonio, Austrian Benevolent Soc, 71 New Mont- 
gomery 

Badelier Dolores Miss, seamstress, dwl 915 Pacific 

BAUEMIOP n. F., office SE cor Harrison and Twen- 
tv-fourth, res San Mateo 

Badef Albert (Jf. Oradwohl d- Co.), dwl 627 Commercial 

Bader Caroline Mrs., dwl SE cor Market and Fifth 

Bader John, salesman G. Mitchler, dwl N i Minna nr 
Sixth 

Bades Philip, butcher Philip H. Seibel, dwl SE cor O'Far- 
rel and Larkin 

Badger A. J., bellman Palace Hotel 

Badger Consolidated Mining Co. (Elko Co., Nev.), Wil- 
liam R. Townsend secretary', office 330 Pine room 4 

Badger Ella F. Miss, dwl 605 P'ine 

Badger George, salesman Buyer, Reich & Co., dwl 607 
Pine 

Badger James, expressman, SE cor Fifth and Market, 
dwl 23i Langton 

BADGER WILLIAM G., agent Hallet, Davis & Co.'s 
pianos and George Woods k Co.'s parlor and vestry 
organs, and sole agent Brownsville Woolen Mills Co., 
and general commission merchant, 7 and 13 Sansom, 
res Fruit Vale 

Badger W. K. , bookkeeper Thomas E. Lindenberger, dwl 
1012 Pine 

Badger's Central Park (Oakland), office NE cor Kearny 
and Bush 

Badgley E. L. , salesman Abraham Andrews, dwl Russ 
House 

Badgley William, taUor Augustus C. Imbrie, dwl 6 Clara 
Lane 

Badgley William H., dwl 231 Second 

B.ADLAM ALEXANDER, assessor City and County, 
office 22 City Hall first Hoor, dwl 708 California 

Badlam Ezra B., dwl 1012 Clay 

Badner Christian, cooper, dwl 28 Clay 

Badt Alexander L., bookkeeper T. Berwin & Brother, 
dwl 1305 Gough 

Badt Morris {Badt i: Cohn, Humboldt Mills, Nev.), 
office 106 Battery, dwl 307 Turk 

Baehr J. M., wines and liquors, 414 Sansom, dwl 5 Hart- 
man's Allev 

Baehr William "(ITiVa'a??! Baehr <!■ Co.), dwl 1708 Sac 

BAEHR, WILLIAM A CO., manufacturing jewel- 
ers, 649 Sacramento 

Back (widow ), dwl 735 Green 

Back Frederick, bookkeeper, dwl 735 Green 

Baek Stephen, plumber and gasfitter, dwl 2013 Hyde 

Baer Edwin, machinist, dwl 54 First 

Baer Emile {Bacr <t Schar.i:ch), dwl 736 Montgomery 

Baer & Scharsch {Emile Baer and Joseph Scharsch), res- 
taurant, 736 Montgomery 

Baethge Henry, professor music, dwl 338 Tm-k 

Bagala Louis, teamster, dwl 223 Fifth 

Baganz John, waiter D. Wolf 

Bagge Frank, machinist Pac. Rolling Mills 

Bagge Theodore F. (C. James King of Wm. <fe Co.), res 
Oakland 

Baggs , dwl 14 Geary 

Baggs Frank C, machinist Pac. Rolling Mills, dwl NW 
cor Georgia and Shasta 

Baggs James, machinist Pac. Iron Works, dwl NW cor 
Scott and Tvler 

Bagley A. D. (w-idow), dwl 7 Glen Part Av 

Bagley Charles, dwl 737 Howard 

Bagley David T., dwl 38 Twelfth 

Bagley F., mining, dwl 26 Eddy 

Bagley Hudson, teamster, dwl 32 Rausch 

Bagley Patrick, hostler Fashion Stables, dwl 315J Jessie 

Bagley Thomas, marblecutter Leon R. Myers & Co., dwl 
97 Stevenson 

Bagley Townsend, attorney at law, office 637 Keamy, dwl 
45 Everett 

Bagley William N., die sinker and seal engraver, dwl 45 
Everett 



STEELE'S Squirrel Poison is sold by all Druggists, Grocers, and General Dealers. 



JEWELEY made to order and HEPAIRED by D. "W. Laird, 613 Mont. cor. Merchaf 



Bagley William P., plasterer, dwl Ns Ivy Av bet Van 

Ness Av and I'olk 
Bafrnian Jacob, milkman, Presidio, dwl Filbert bet Pierce 

and Steiner 
Batrnal John, teacher, dwl 356 Jessie 
Raj^iial Joseph, steward stm Emma, Washington St. Wharf 
Bagiiasco P., photographer Carleton F. Watkins, dwl 1337 

Duijont 
Bagot Frederick, clerk D. M. Bishop & Co., dwl 1031 

Market 
Bagutti A., painter Noble & Gallagher, dwl 627 Bflwy 
Bagguti C, pantrj'man St. Gottard Hotel, 627 Broadway 
EagguttI Lesondro, painter, dwl 631 Broadway 
Bahler William, bookkeeper, dwl 8 Louisa 
Bahling John, engineer, dwl 16 William 
Bahlniann Henry, clerk Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 2231 

Howard 
Bahls J. F. W. {Althofik B.),res Oakland 
Bahmann Adolph (Bujantioff <£• B.), dwl 146 Stevenson 
Bahmer Charlotte (widow), dwl 4 Cheslej' 
Bahr William A., boots and shoes, 116 Sixth 
Bahrs Andrew, jailor Comity Jail, dwl 814 Vallejo 
Bahis John (JiumeUch tt £.), dwl 25 Ritch 
LJahrt M. (Mawjoin <i- B.), dwl 1701 Market 
Bail Adulph, waiter Concordia Club, dwl 614 Cal, rear 
Bail Paul, tailor Frank Elwell, dwl 614 California, rear 
Bailey Alexander S., plasterer, dwl 524 Linden Av 
Bailey Angelo, expressman NW cor Sansom and Wash- 
ington, dwl N s Broadway bet Mont and Sansom 
Bailey Ann (widow), dwl 233 Jessie 
Bailey Anna M. (widow), dwl 1423 Kearny 
Bailey A. P., photographer Joseph W. King, dwl 638 

Market 
Bailey Augustus, machinist, dwl 1006 Kearny 
Bailey Charles, clerk, dwl 427 Bush 
Bailey Charles, stableman John Martin, dwl 408 Bush 
Bailev Charles A., carpenter D. A. Macdonald & Co., dwl 

327i Third 
Bailey Charles A., secretarj' Standard Soap Co., office 208 

Sacramento, res Oakland 
Bailey Edward, dwl 1016 Taylor 
Bailey Edward, driver Sutter St. R. R., dwl 1304 Polk 
Bailey Edward J., clerk, dwl S Hampton PI 
Bailey Frank F., dairj' produce, 4 Union Market, dwl 1005 J 

Mission 
Bailey Frederick, painter, dwl 708 Commercial 
Bailey Frederick P., miner, dwl 110 Fourth 
Bailey George (Bailey <i- McLean), dwl 533 Commercial 
Bailey George, drug clerk, dwl 127 Kearny 
Bailey George W., laborer Charles Sutton Jr., dwl Ns 

Twenty-second nr Folsom 
Bailey George W., machinist, dwl 516 Folsom 
Bailey Henry, barrel dealer, dwl 1013 Howard 
Bailey Henry, painter, dwl 808 Union 
Bailey Henry, wood and coal, 128 O'Farrell, dwl 808 Union 
Bailey Henry A., clerk British Benevolent Society, dwl 

636 Commercial 
Bailey Isaac L., carriagemaker, dwl 911 Harrison 
Bailey James, fishennan, dwl 2005 Dupont, rear 
Bailey James S., fomidrjinan Risdonl. and L. Works, dwl 

17 Dora 
Bailey James D., general agent Union Insurance Co., 416 

California, dwl Grand Hotel 
Bailey John, dwl 1227 Clay 
Bailey John, painter, dwl 522 Turk, rear 
Bailej- John, teamster, dwl 640 Jessie, rear 
Bailey Joseph H., stationary and hardware, 1513 Stockton, 

dwl 830 Union 
Bailey Joshua, engineer Charles Sutton Jr., dwl Twenty- 
second bet Treat Av and Folsom 
Bailey Katie Mrs. (widow), dwl 339 Tehama 
Bailey Lewis H., dwl 213 First 
Bailey Lewis H. Jr., general machine work, ".15 First, 

dwl 317 Eddy 
Bailey Nathan J., butcher Joseph Simon, dwl 461 Clem 
Bailey 0. E., dwl 524 Geary 
Bailej^ Orrin, upholsterer James W. Biirnham & Co., dwl 

1423 Kearn3' 
Bailey Patrick, barrel dealer, dwl 719 Brannan 
Bailey Peter, dwl 613 Bush 
Bailey Richard, grocer, dwl 930 Market 
Bailey Richard, waiter Palace Hotel 
Bailey Robert S., liquor saloon El Capitan, dwl 1619 Bush 
Bailey Sarah M. (widow), dwl 757 Howard 
Bailey Shepard D., house reno\ator, dwl 502 Broadway 
Bailey Sylvanus, mate schr American Girl, Main St. Wharf 
Bailey Thomas {Thomas Bailey d; Co.), dwl 1535 Howard 
Bailey Thomas & Co., proprietors Pacific Wool Depot, SE 
cor Fifth and King 



Bailey Thomas T., barkeeper, dwl 635 Ellis 

Bailey T. W., guager U. S. internal revenue, res Oakland 

Bailey William, machinist, dwl 25 De Boom 

Bailey William I., porter Thomas W. McCollam, res Oak- 
land 

Bailey & McLean {George Bailey and Williain McLean) 
proprietors Railroad Lodging House, 533 Commercial 

Bailie Thomas, stevedore, dwl 31 De Boom 

Baillie Emily P. (widow), dwl 918 Bush 

Baillie George B., brakeman Southern Pac. R. R., dwl 335 
Geary 

Bailly Achille (Bailly Brothers), dwl 514 Filbert 

Bailly Arthur {Bailly Brothers), dwl 614 Filbert 

Bailly Brothers (A rthur a?id Achille), pork and sausages, 
71 California Market 

Baily Alexander H. Jr., carpenter, dwl 309 Fell 

Baily Alexander H. Sr., carpenter, dwl 309 Fell 

Baily Charles, hostler, dwl 333 Bush 

Baily Charles P., mailing clerk Post-office, dwl Mercantile 
Library Building 

Baily Da\-id, carpenter, dwl 309 Fell 

Baily E. Franklin, clerk H. Lawton & Co., dwl 54 First 

Bail}' John, lumberman, dwl 127 Jackson 

Baily William I., proprietor Isthmus House, 54 First 

Eaily William J., dwl 54 First 

Baily W. S., plasterer, dwl 510 Linden Av 

Bain Mrs., dwl 127 Kearny 

Bain Alexander, laborer Torrens & Enricht, 1520 Clay 

Bain Alexander, longshoreman, dwl 425 Greenwich 

Bain James S. , engineer Phoenix Iron Works, dwl Twenty- 
fifth bet Noe and Castro 

Bain John, blacksmith, dwl 31 Perry 

Bainbridge Arnop, policeman City Hall, dwl 1414 Kearny 

Bainbridge Thomas, cooper, dwl 28 Clay 

Baines Daniel H., quartermaster Pacific Mail S. S. Colima 

Baines Frank, seaman, dwl 132 Steuart 

Baines Tliomas F., dwl cor Jones and McAllister 

Baines William, dwl 203 Turk 

Baird A. M., conductor Central R. R., dwl cor FiUmore 
and Eddy 

BAIRD AX»REW, broker, office 304 California, dwl 
Union Club 

Baird E. K., clerk Locke & Montague, dwl N. W. cor 
Broadway and Stockton 

Baird Henry, printer, dwl 633 California 

Baird James M., compositor C. A. Murdock & Co., dwl 
1018 Clay 

Baird John H., dwl Paciffc Club 

Baird S. H., carrier Guide, dwl 210 Montgomery Av 

Bajer John, dwl 421 Dupont 

Bak Henry, physician, office 26 Mont, dwl 821 Hyde 

Baker , dwl 408 Bryant 

Baker , (widow), dwl 1618 Stockton, rear 

Baker Adam, hostler R. R. Swain & Co. , dwl 115 Natoma 

Baker A. J., laborer A. F. Spear & Co., 218 Drumm 

Baker Albert, laborer, dwl 902 Filbert 

Baker Alexander, laborer, dwl 409 Washington 

Baker Alfred D., porter James A. Pendergast, dwl 1307 
Stockton 

Baker Alfred W., assistant abstract clerk Custom House, 
dwl 742 Washington 

Baker Amos, dwl Olympic Lodging House 

Baker Andrew F., dwl 327 First 

Baker Benjamin, clerk, dwl 517 O'Farrell 

Baker Benjamin F. (TT. C. Wilcox & Co.) res Alameda 

Baker C, conductor Market St. R. R. 

Baker Carlman (widow), dwl 420 Vallejo 

Baker Casjsar, tannerj', E s San Bruno Road nr Twenty- 
eighth 

Baker C. H., laborer, dwl 18 First 

Baker diaries, dwl 505 Green 

Baker Charles, barkeeper John Quinn, dwl 536 Natoma 

Baker Charles, cooper, dwl 513 Vallejo 

Baker Charles, waiter 519 Clay, dwl 75 Fourth 

Baker Charles E., shipping clerk Haas Brothers, dwl 20 
Park Av 

Baker Christian, laborer Charles Goodall, dwl SE cor Mc- 
Allister & Pierce 

Baker Colin C. {Stevens, B. dk Co.), res Providence R. I. 

Baker Conrad, assayer Pac. Refinerj' and Bullion Ex- 
change, res Oakland 

Baker Creshan, bakery, 988 Folsom 

Baker David, dwl 719 Market 

Baker Edward, dwl Commercial Hotel 

Baker Edward P. Rev., dwl 1909 Jessie 

Baker Emily ]\Iiss, actress Maguire's Theater 

Baker Emma Mrs., ladies' nurse, dwl 1118i Folsom 

Baker E. S., dwl 22 Geary 

Baker Eugene I., teamster, dwl 22 Oak Grove Av 



PEANCIS & VALENTINE, Printers, Designers, and Engravers, 517 Clay St., S. P 



0. p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, EstaTDlished 1852. 



Baker Frank M., compositor A. L. Bancroft & Co., dwl 

769 Market 
Baker G., dwl 513 Ellia 
Baker Georife, miller, dwl 18 First 
Baker George, molder Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 740 

Folsoni 
Baker George, painter, dwl 1225 Market 
Baker George, teamster Max F.nglander, dwl 713 Turk 
Baker (ieorgc, waiter Palace Hotel 
BAKEK <;K0K<;K ¥,, attorney at law, office and dwl 

502 Moiitgomerj' 
Baker George H., lithographer and artist, 103 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 1415 Polk 
Baker GcoVgc L., meltcr Pacific Refinery and Bullion 

Exchange, dwl 504 Seventh 
Baker George W., i)cddler, dwl fill Natoma 
Baker II. H., transfer clerk U. S. Mint, res Oakland 
Baker Henry, dwl 27 Oak Grove Av 
Baker Henry, lalxircr California Brick Co. 
Baker Henry G. physician, dwl 111 Austin 
Baker Herman, cook, dwl 1707 Market 
Baker H. F., clerk Francois A. Rouleau, dwl 812 Stock 
Baker Horace, accountant, dwl 147 Hunt 
Baker Isaac Mrs., furnished rooms, 19 Tehama 
Raker Isaiah {Freeman d- />.), dwl 1304 Pacific 
Baker Jacob, clerk, dwl 32 Ellis 
Baker James, laborer California Brick Co., dwl NW cor 

Townisend and Third 
Baker James W., bookkeeper Egerton, Allen & Co., res 

East Oakland 
Baker J. C. Rev., district secretary American Baptist 

Publication Society, office 320 Sansom room 20, res 

Oakland 
Baker J. G., captain U. S. Navy, dwl 126 Fifth 
Baker J. Henry, assistant superintendent Boys' and 

Girls' Aid Society, home 68 Clementina 
Baker John, basketmaker John Caslin, dwl 313 Folsom 
Bakdr John, engineer's storekeeper O. & O. S. S. Gaelic 
Baker John, harnessmaker, dwl 131 Second 
Baker John, watchman stm Senator, Broadway St. \Miarf 
Baker John, watchman Pacific Mail S. S. Co., dwl 408 

Bryant 
BAKER JOHN B., stockbroker, office 311 Mont- 

gomerj- , Nevada block, dwl 1626 Sacramento 
Baker John C, sweeper Battery St. Wharf, dwl 1110 Bat 
Baker John H., carpenter, dwl 131 O'Farrell 
Baker John W. H., {Bryant <t JB.), dwl S s Folsom bet 

Third and Fourth 
Baker Joseph {David Barry tt Co.), dwl 1207 Mission 
Baker Joseph H., policeman City Hall, dwl 1306 Kearny 
Baker Judah Jr. {Stevem B. it Co.), dwl 327 First 
Baker Katie Miss, dwl 211 Eddy 
Baker L. B. , f ramemaker, dwl 16 Hampton PI 
Baker L. E. Mrs., dwl 312 Jessie 
BAKEK LIVi;VGSTOBi L. {Baker <t HamiltorC), dwl 

Palace Hotel 
Baker Louis F., produce commission merchant, 113 Wash- 
ington, dwl NW cor Fillmore and Vallejo 
Baker Louis F. Jr. , clerk Dalton & Gray, dwl N ■ Vallejo 

bet Fillmore and Steiner 
Baker Mary (widow), dwl 740 Folsom 
Baker Mary Miss, dressmaker Mrs. D. A. Finn, dwl 1214 

Stockton 
Baker Mary F. Mrs., lodgings, 413 Tehama 
Baker Mill and Mining Co. (Plumas Co., Cal.), Frank 

Swift secretarv, office 419 California 
Baker Morris, clerk, dwl 211 Eddy 
Baker Morris M., clerk Hook and Ladder Co. No. 3 

S. F. F. D. 
Baker M. S., framemaker, dwl 16 Hampton PI 
Baker N., miner, dwl 18 Turk 
Baker Orrin S., attorney at law, office 526 Montgomery, 

dwl 31 Eddy 
Baker Osborn F., liquor saloon, 825 Montgomery 
Baker Oscar F., dwl 29 Second 
Baker Otto J., cabinetmaker, dwl 24 Garden 
Baker Patrick, laborer, dwl 510 Mission 
Baker Peter {Hineg <t B.), dwl 25 Moss 
Baker P. F. , tinsmith, dwl 1405 Pacific 
Baker Robert B. , machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 515 

Minna 
Baker Robert, master mariner, dwl 1304 Pacific 
Baker Samuel, dwl 908 Clay 
Baker Samuel {Nickerson A- Co.), dwl 16 Guy PI 
Baker Samuel, salesman Abraham Andrews, dwl 211 Eddy 
Baker Samuel, salesman Gibson & Preston, dwl 1208J Turk 
BAKER S.iNFORD €., foreman Cubery & Co., dwl 

17 Langton 
Baker Sarah (widow), dwl 211 Eddy 



Baker Schuyler, clerk G. W. Clieslcy & Co. , dwl 2503 Cal 
Baker S. P., clerk C. P. Van Schaack i^i Co., dwl 021 Pine 
Baker Thomas, deckhand S. S. Los Angeles, Broadway St. 

Wharf 
Baker Thomas L., dwl SW cor Tyler and Hyde 
Baker T. W. Jr., salesman Baker & Hamilton, dwl 431 

Second 
Baker William, dwl 17 Fourth 
Baker William, dwl 414 Pacific 
Baker William, amalgamator, dwl N s Twenty-second nr 

Valencia 
Baker William, painter Cal. Chemical Paint Co., 308 

Townseiid 
Baker William, willow\\'are, 624 Market, dwl 79 Fourth 
BAKER »1- IIANILTO.\ {Livinpstrm L. Baker and 
liohert M. Hamilton), importers and jobbers agri- 
cultural implements, machines, hardware, etc., 13-19 
Front and 9-15 J, Sacramento City 
Bakker John R. (Fitter it Bakkcr), dwl SW cor Jackson 

and East 
Bakker Rej'er E. , proprietor Steuart Street House, 104 

Steuart 
Bakofsky Charles, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl 11 

Kate 
Balance Consolidated Gold and Silver Mining Co. (San 
Bernardino Co., Cal.), Louis Kaplan secretary, office 
27 Merchants' Exchange 
Balanesi Angelo (^4. Balaneni tfc Co.), dwl 115 Clark 
Balanesi Guiseppe, dwl 1107 Kearny 
Balanesi & Co. {Rafael Orsi), boarding and lodging, 115 

Clark 
Balarino Emile, chop house, 350 Third 
Balbi Louis, agent, dwl 621 Pacific 
Balcear E. J. (widow), hair renovator, 532 Bush 
Balch Horace M., organ builder aTid musical Instrument 

repairer, 432 Keaniy, dwl 614 Taylor 
Balch Stephen M. {Balch <t Co.), dwl 206 Nineteenth 
BALCH »t: CO., dairj' produce and provisions, 9 and 

44 Centre Market, cor Dupont and Sutter 
Balcom Charles F., stockbroker, office 330 Pine room 19, 

dwl 1719 Webster 
Balcom Lydia E. Mrs. seamstress Ladies' Protection and 

Relief Society, NE cor Gearj' and Franklin 
Bald Herman, shipping clerk Bay Sugar Refinery 
Baldassare Brusa, marbleworker Charles Bianchi, dwl 741 

Market 
Baldissone John, laborer D. Ghirardelli, dwl 215 Bdwy 
Baldochi Lorenzo, laborer, dwl 115 Clark 
Baldolopi Guiseppe, laborer, dwl 115 Clark 
Baldridge John E., dwl 1812 Pine 
Baldridge Michael, stockbroker, office 24 Halleck, dwl 

1812 Pine 
Baldwin Addison S., office 328 Montgomery room 17, dwl 

Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Baldwin Albert F. , upholsterer, dwl 710 Sutter 
BALD'Wi:^ ALBERT S., physician and surgeon, of- 
fice and dwl 218 Stockton 
Baldwin Alexander R., capitalist, office 111 J Leidesdorff, 

dwl 1104 Post 
Baldwin Alfred, waiter Zingseno & Nibbe, dwl 861 Miss 
Baldwin Alfred W., shoe manufacturer, dwl 418 Minna 
Baldwin Charles, general agent, dwl 309 Seventh 
Baldwin Charles, painter, dwl 568 Mission 
Baldwin Charles F., stairbuilder Sanborn & Byrnes, dwl 

547 Mission 
Baldwin Charles H. (C. Adolphe Low <Ss Co.), res New 

York 
Baldwin Charles H., butcher, dwl 24 Turk 
Baldwin Charles M., watchman West Coast Furniture Co., 

dwl 437 Fifth 
Baldwin Daniel P., patternmaker, dwl 317 Union 
Baldwin David, dwl 533 Commercial 
BALI»WI.\ ELIAS J., president Pacific Stock Ex- 
change, office 513 California, dwl NW cor Pine and 
Leavenworth 
Baldwin Elihu F. , dwl 107 Hayes 
Baldwin Elizabeth, artist, dwi 91 Ninth 
Baldwin Frederick A., salesman B. L. Solomon & Sons, 

dwl 710 Sutter 
Baldwin George E. , lettercarrier Post-office, dwl 525 Post 
BALDWIN' HIRA9I S., physician, office 612 Clay, dwl 

925 Geary 
Baldwin J., dwl 636 Commercial 
Baldwin J., laborer California Brick Co. 
Baldwin James, clerk, dwi 31 Second 
Baldwin Josiah A., dwl 27 First Av 
Baldwin Lemuel, conductor N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 

530 Pine 
Bald\vin L. J., conductor Market St. R. R. 



JAMES G. STEELE & CO., manufacturers of Steele's California Perfumes. 



PINE WATCHES and JEWELRY for Sale by D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery. 



Baldwin Llnyd, attorney at law, office 606 Montgomery 
room 17 "and 18, dwr327 Larkin 

Baldwin L. McL., dwl Grand Hotel 

Baldwin Mary V. Mrs., dwl 408 Geary 

Baldwin N. s". Miss, teacher Union Grammar School, dwl 
140!) Bush 

Baldwin Oliver T., clerk, dwl 1411 Pacific Av 

Baldwin Orville, carrier Evening Post 

Baldwin Orville D., restaurant, 519 Clay, (and W. War- 
ner, Henry tfc Co.), dwl 618J Filbert 

Baldwin R. (widow), dwl W s Thirteenth Av nr P, South 
S. V. 

Baldwin Richard, dwl 408 Geary 

Baldwin Richard, domestic General Bums, dwl 8 Dupont 

Baldwin Sidney L., student at law John B. Felton, res 
Oakland 

Baldwin Starr, varieties, 603 Davis, dwl 424 Sansom 

Baldwin VV. H., physician, dwl Russ House 

Baldwin William, foreman Hancock & Kelso, dwl 534 First 

Baldwin William H., shipcarpenter, dwl 7 Liberty 

BALDWIN'S HOTEL, E. J. Baldwin proprietor, junc- 
tion Market, Powell, and Ellis 

Baldy Charles, laborer Charles Sutton Jr., dwl N s Twen- 
ty-second nr Folsom 

Balecki Joseph, cooper Michelssen, Brown & Co., dwl 1176 
Hari'ison 

Bales W. D., driver City R. R. 

BALFOCK, CillXHBIE A CO. (Robert Balfoxir, Al- 
exander Guthrie and Robert B. Forman), commis- 
sion merchants, 230 California 

Balfour James, seaman, dwl 310 Ritch 

Balfour Robert {Balfour, Guthrie d: Co.), dwl 1418 Cal 

Balfour Thomas, bakery, 212 O'Farrell 

Balge Henry A., carver L. & E. Emanuel, dwl New Wash- 
ington Hotel, Fourth 

Balk Frederick, master mariner, dwl 1505 Dupont 

Balk Stephen, plumber and gasfitter, dwl 2013 Hyde 

Balke AVilliam, boarding, SW cor Battery and Green 

Ball A. Everett (Saioyer cfc Ball), attorney at law, office 
and dwl 502 Montgomery 

Ball Charles, carpenter, dwl 2840 Mission nr Twenty-fifth 

Ball Charles, porter Hahn & Hoche, dwl 712 Tehama 

Ball Charles S. , harnessmaker, dwl 1030 McAllister 

Ball David H., bookbinder, dwl 352 First 

Ball E. A., shampooerHammam Turkish Baths, 11 Dupont 

Ball E. J., mining agent, dwl Russ House 

Ball Elizabeth Mrs., dwl N s Mariposa nr Pennsylvania 
Av 

Ball Frederick, porter, dwl 350 Brannan 

Ball F. M. , carpenter, dwl 516 Pacific 

Ball Gardiner (Ball dc Julian), dwl 980 Market 

Ball George, lumberman, dwl 132 Steuart 

Ball George A., bookkeeper Adams & Taylor, dwl 1206 
Market 

Ball Henrj' P., bookkeeper L. & M. Sachs & Co., dwl 763 
Harrison 

Ball H. W., clerk auditor's office C. P. R. R., NE cor 
Fourth and Townsend, res West Oakland 

Ball James, miner, dwl 21 Turk 

Ball Joel (A. C. Wightvmn d- Co.), dwl 1210 Union 

Ball John, waiter American Exchange Hotel 

Ball John S., machinist, dwl 1030 McAllister 

Ball Martin, physician, dwl 11 Oak Grove Av 

Ball M. S. Mrs. , artist, dwl 155 New Montgomery room 9 

Ball N., dwl 3 Austin 

Ball Randolph A. , shipcarpenter, dwl 1505 Pine 

Ball R. D., paver superintendent streets 

Ball Richard, dwl 417 Kearny 

BALL ROBERT €., architect, office 49 Merchants' 
Exchange, res Oakland 

Ball Thomas, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 

Ball William, dwl 417 Kearny 

Ball William C, clerk, dwl 536 Tehama 

Ball W. T., dwl 94 Montgomery Block 

Ball & Julian (Gardiner Ball and George N. Julian), 
Occidental Wood Depot, N s Townsend bet Fifth and 
Sixth 

Ballantine Andrew, seaman, dwl 720 Tliird 

Ballard Duane (Ballard <t Uall), dwl 1416 Geary 

Ballard George, bathmaker, 215 Second, dwl 424 Sansom 

Ballard George, sign painter Wasou & Morris, dwl 179 
Minna 

Ballard John (W. IT. Martin <fc Co.), dwl 713 Ellis 

Ballard Joseph H., dwl 710 Sutter 

Ballard L. A. Mrs., homeopathic physician, office and dwl 
102 Stockton 

Ballard Sanford E., bookkeeper Hugh Craig, res Oakland 

BALLAR1» Jt HALL (Duane Ballard and Isaac R. 
Hall), commission merchants, office 320 Sansom 



Ballenberg Nathan, bandleader, office 105 Kearny, dwl 
711 California 

Ballenger William G., dwl 27 Perry 

Ballentine Sarah, dwl NW cor Jessie and Ninth 

Balleous Joseph, sexton St. Mary's Cathedral 

Bailer Edward, clerk, dwl 214 Turk 

Bailey Edward J., clerk Forbes Bros., dwl 700 Broadway 

Ballhaus Frederick, miner, dwl 2209 Leavenworth 

Ballheimer Charles, porter Levi Strauss & Co., dwl 112 
Austin 

Ballheimer John, butcher, dwl 616 California 

Bailiff Joseph, teamster Marshall Doane, dwl 27 Liberty 

Balling' Ed. Hadderson, carpenter, dwl 909 Kearny 

Balling Francis A., woodturner Pac. U. W. Furniture M. 
Co. , dwl 725 Brannan 

Balling John, cabinetmaker, dwl 870 Folsom 

Ballinger Andrew, laborer, dwl 19J Filbert 

Ballinger Frank J., journalist S. F. Chronicle, dwl 2123 
Mason 

Ballinger John J. (John J. Ballinger ic Co.), dwl NE 
cor Van Ness Av and Market 

BALLINGER JOHN' J. A CO., paints and oils, NE 
cor Van Ness Av and Market 

Ballinger Patrick R., woolgrader, dwl 17 Gilbert 

Ballinger Saul, peddler, dwl 525 Mission 

Ballinger Thomas, laborer, dwl 254j Clara 

Ballinger Thomas Richard, upholsterer, dwl 17 Gilbert 

Ballinger William, dwl 1308^ Polk 

Ballinger. See Ballenger 

Ballonger Frank, hairdressing saloon 1019 Market, dwl 
552^ Clara 

Balmer Andrew, dwl 513 Howard 

Balny A. G. , importer fancy feathers, 608 Market, dwl 907 
Buchanan 

Baloun Joseph (Baloun & Stouda), dwl 615 Washington 

BALOLX tt STOIIBA (Joseph Baloun and A. M. 
Stoxida), merchant tailors, 613 Washington 

Balser Charles, butcher, dwl W s Fifteenth Av nr Second, 
South S. F. 

Balser John, shuttermaker Francis Smith & Co., dwl 
1103 Montgomery 

Balthazard Leander (Henderson cfc B.), dwl NE cor Mis- 
sion and Twenty-fourth 

Balthrop Frederick, dairjonan, dwl 2209 Leavenworth 

Balthrop Lewis W., carpenter, dwl S 8 Twent}'-fourth 
bet Utah and Nebraska 

Baltic Consolidated Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), Theo- 
dore C. Kihbe secretary, office 419 California room 23 

Baltimore Consolidated Mining Co. (Storey Co., Nev.), 
Charles A. Sankey secretary, office 331 Mont room 20 

Baltz Elizabeth, widow, dwl 838 Vallejo 

Baluastro Ferfeto, Spanish breadmaker, 25 Hinckley 

Balz Adolph, tanner George Dietsch, dwl cor Ser- 
pentine Av and Howard 

Balz Valentine, butcher Moses Selig, dwl Seventh Av nr 
N, South S. F. 

Balzer Hem-y (Henry Balzer & Co.), dwl 537 Turk 

Balzer Henry, upholsterer, dwl Twenty-second Av, South 
S. F. 

BALZER HENRY «&' CO., importers and commission 
merchants, agents Hamburg American Packet Co., 
Svea Fire Ins. Co. (Gothenburg), and Switzerland 
Marine Ins. Co. (Zurich), office 213 Sansom 

Balzer. See Balser 

Balzerine C, steward N. Giamboni & Co., 614 Clay 

Bamber , lumberman C. N. Hooper & Co. 

Bamber John, Whitney & Co.'s Express, dwl 1012 Mont 

Bamber Joseph J., teamster Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl NE 
cor Hyde and Lombard 

Bamber Levy E., dwl Codman's PI 

Bamber William, clerk Whitney & Co.'s Express, dwl 1012 
Montgomery 

Bamberger Solomon S., clerk Herman E. Leszynsky, dwl 
1404 Polk 

Bamfield John, Ship Calkers' Assn, 118 First 

Bamman Frederick, clerk William A. Asmussen, dwl NW 
cor Eighth and Bryant 

Bamman Herman, expressman, junction Cal and Market 

Bamondes Jos6 Cayetano, engineer, dwl 506 Union 

Banahan Anne (widow), dwl 111 Periy 

Banahan Henry, hostler Fashion SUibles, dwl 173 Clara 

BAN<'ROFT A. L. & CO. (Hubert H. Bancroft), pub- 
lishers and importing booksellers and stationers, 
printers, bookbinders, lithographers, engravers, etc., 
721 Market 

BANCROFT ALBERT L. (A. L. Bancroft Ji Co.), 
dwl NW cor Franklin and Pine 

Bancroft Charles E., salesman A. L. Bancroft & Co., dwl 
8G8 Mission 



FRANCIS Si VALENTINE, Printers, Designers, and Engravers, 517 Clay St., S.P 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 




Bancroft K. A., bricklayer, dwl IG HarUvii PI, rear 

Bancroft Eiis,'ene A., captain Foui-tli U. S. Artillerj', dwl 
lYesidiii Barracks 

Bancroft Goorge II., salesman, dwl 41U Turk 

BA>f<'KOrT III'BEUT U. {A. L. Bancroft & Co.), 
Ill Market 

Bancroft L. J. Mrs., dwl 411^ Turk 

Bancroft Williani Blancliard, manager printing and litho- 
graphing A. L. Bancroft & Co., dwl 10:i2 Sacramento 

Bancroft William H., butcher, dwl 10 Garden 

BA\4'KOFT'8 BI'ILDI>'(;, 723 Market 

Band Harry F., insurance agent, office 204 Montgomery, 
dwl 2908 Folsonj 

Band John, saloon, dwl 1014 Montgomery 

Band J.iscph (M'essaS- B.), dwl 524* Linden 

Banderetii Mill and Mining Co. (Mariposa Co., Cal.), 
office 408 California, room 14 

Bandholdt Frederick, farmer, dwl 730 Minna 

Bandmann Julius (Bandmann, Xiehen it Co.), dwl 514 
Lombard 

BA\I>.MAIV'\, \IELSEN <K CO. (Julim Bandmann 
and II. Nielsen), importers and commission merch- 
ants and general agents Giant Powder Co., 210 Front 

Bandwin Oliver, waiter American Exchange Hotel 

Bandy Aaron N., entry clerk Drake & Emerson, dw 5 
South Park 

Bandy William H., musician, dwl 421 Folsom 

Bane Charles, carpenter, dwl 5 Stockton 

Bane Edw ard, dwl 204 Ellis 

Bane Frank, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Montgomerj' 

Bane Kate Mrs., adjuster coiner's department U. S. 
Mint, dwl 127 Harrison 

Bane Mark, laborer, dwl 762 Brannan, rear 

Banebank James, seaman, dwl 28 Clay 

Bangheart John, conductor Central R. R., dwl cor Fill- 
more and Eddy 

Bangs Edward, storekeeper Mission Bay Warehouse, dwl 
131 Dora 

Bangs Frank H., clerk Home Mutual Insurance Co., dwl 
SO JIcAl lister 

Bangs George A. , machinist Cal. Machine Works, dwl 
14 Geary 

Banich Joseph, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Mont 

Banich Simon, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Mont 

BANK EX<'II.4Nf.lE, Brown & Perkins proprietors, 
SE Cor Montgomery and Washington 

Bank Herman, cabinetmaker with Tlieodore Erden, dwl 
E s San Bruno Koad rir Thirtieth 

Bank Julia Miss, dressmaker, dwl 520 Vallejo 

BANK OF BRITISH COLI'MBIA, William H. Til- 
linghast manager, SE cor California and Sansom 

BA.Mi OF BRITISH NORTH AMERICA, Archi- 
bald McKinley and Henry W. Glenny agents, 219 and 
221 Sansom 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, D. O. Mills president, 
Thomas Brow-n cashier, NW cor California and San 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA BFILDING, NW cor Cal- 
ifornia and Sansom 

BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. N. P. Cole president, 
Horatio McPherson cashier, 436 California 

Banke Albert, laborer, dwl 46 Ritch 

Banker Abraham, helper Calvin Nutting & Son, dwl 70 
Tehama 

Banker and Depositor (monthly), office 113 Leidesdorfif 

Banker Isaac W., patternmaker Palmer, Knox & Co., dwl 
28 First 

Banks Addie Miss, seamstress, dwl 506 Howard 

Banks Charles W., bookkeeper bank Wells, Fargo & Co., 
dwl 591 Ellis 

Banks Cjtus, porter James W. Bumham & Co., dwl 786 
Harrison 

Banks Elias, laborer, dwl 48 Louisa 

Banks George S., proptr Pacific Livery Stable, 709 Jones 

Banks H. B., dwl 927 Howard 

Banks Hugh, laborer, dwl E s Sierra nr Louisiana 

Banks Isaac, patternmaker, dwl 28 First 

Banks James, furnished rooms, 318 Davis 

Banks James, molder Union Iron Works 

Banks James, porter, dwl 911 Washington 

Banks James O., clerk, dwl 118 Post 

Banks John, cigars and tobacco, 997 Market 

Banks John, housepainter, 619 California 

Banks John E., clerk, dwl 108 Powell 

Banks Joseph, tanner, dwl W s San Bnmo Road nr 
Twenty-third 

Banks .Joseph, waiter Palace Hotel 

Banks Lizzie Mary, Miss, teacher Spring Valley Grammar 

School, dwl 1419 Washington 
Banks Robert, watchman Code, Elfelt & Co., dwl 326 San 



BANKS T. C, capitalist, office 534 California, dwl 724 

California 
Banks William (Dm Rone tt Banks), dwl 1419 Washington 
Banks William, engineer Joshua Hendy, res Oakland 
Batdcs William Oscar, draftsman S. E. Bugbee & Son, dwl 

1419 Washington 
Bankson Eric, laundryman, dwl 107 Minna 
Bankson Joseph R. , liquor saloon, 208 First 
Bainnan Andrew, dwl 515 Eddy 
Bannian Bridget (widow) dwl 1422 Jackson 
Bannan Francis, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wharf, 

dwl 617 Natoma 
Bannan Frank, shipping clerk, dwl 617 Natoma 
Bannan Hugh, laborer, dwl 214 Prospect PI 
Bannan, John, laborer, dwl N s Francisco bet Dupont 

and Kearny 
Bannan Patrick, engineer Sedgley & Davis, dwl Solano 

bet Florida and York 
Bannan. See Bannon 
Bannatyne James, clerk Balfour, Guthrie & Co., dwl 501 

Second 
Bannell James S., bookkeeper Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 

1616 California 
BANNER BROTHERS (Peter and SaimieV), import- 
ers and manufacturers clothing and gents' furnishing 

goods, 204 and 206 Sansom 
Banner James, laborer A. M. Simpson & Brother, Beale 

St. Wharf 
Banner Peter (Banner Brothers), dwl 305 Kearny 
Banner Raphael, fancy goods, 1056 Folsom 
Banner Samuel (Banner Brothers), res New York 
BANNER SOAP COMPANY, John Barton proprie- 
tor, office 218 Sacramento, works 24 Commercial 
Bannerman John, bandsawyer William B. Bradbury, dwl 

9 Guerrero 
Bannerol Eugene A., machinist Garcin, & Son, dwl 2141 

Mission 
Bannett Harris, private boarding, 235 Kearny 
Bannett Louis, jeweler David W. Laird, dwl 235 Kearny 
Bannick Christopher, salesman Stange & Hink, dwl 24 

Minna 
Bannick Johannes F., clerk W. Haker & Hinz, dwl 537 

Mission 
Banning F. A. Mrs., teacher Shotwell St. Primary School, 

dwl 1223^ Folsom 
Banning George, stevedore, dwl 26 De Boom 
Banning John, blacksmith, dwl 1223j Folsom 
Banning John, laborer Central Pacific R. R., dwl 9 J 

Freelon 
Banning Philip, laborer Occidental Foundry, dwl 17 

White PI 
Banning Robert F., watchman Pacific Mail S. S. City of 

Pekin 
Banning William, watchman Occidental Foundry 
Bannister Alfred {Starr & Co.), dwl 937 Sutter 
Bannister Alfred, draftsman U. S. Surveyor General's 

office, res Oakland 
Bannister Frederick, seaman schr Amelia Martin, Green 

St. Wharf 
Bannister G., seaman, dwl 104 Steuart 
Bannister George W. , machinehand Stockton & Edwards, 

dwl 425 Fremont 
Bannister John, upholsterer, dwl SW cor Fifth and Minna 
Bannister Joseph, upholsterer, dwl 425 Fremont 
Bannister Thomas, laborer A. M. Simpson & Brother, 

Beale St. Wharf 
Bannister William, boarding and lodging, 29 Pacific 
Bannon Charles, bellboy Grand Hotel 
Bannon Charles, cook Alfred W. Manning, dwl 525 Pine 
Bannon Ellen Miss, dwl 630 Mission 
Bannon John, laborer, dwl 26 Glover 
Bannon M. Miss, teacher Union Primary School, dwl 

1422 Jackson 
Bansch Maria Mrs., midwife, dwl 141 Minna 
Bansan Thomas, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 
Bantzel Frank, compositor Abend Post, dwl 6 Kate 
Banyard James, carpenter, dwl 29J Fifth Av 
Banz Joseph, cabinetmaker Andrew Frei, dwl 111 Park 

Av 
Baptis John H., manufacturer gold pens, 328 Bush, dwl 

Hyde PI nr Eddy 
Baptiste Anthony V., bookkeeper Lisbon House, dwl 46 

Jackson 
Baptiste Antonio, deckhand stmr Oakland, Oakland Ferry 
Baptiste John, barber Geo. D. Held, dwl 163 Tehama 
Baptiste John P., ranchman, dwl 9 Union PI, rear 
Baptiste Juan, vaquero M. Selig & Co. 
Baptiste Leon, cook Philip Donoho, dwl 163 Tehama 
Barabino Carlo, bottlewasher Cutting & Co., dwl 5 Union 



JAMES (j. STEELE Si CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 



D. "W. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, Wholesale and Retail, cor. Merchant and Mc 



Barabino James, packer Cutting Packing Co., dwl 5 Fil- 
bert PI 
Baracca James, Lumbermen's Pro. Union 
Barada Laurent, salesman G. W. Chesley & Co., dwl 462 

Tehama 
Barafras Leonus, civil engineer, dwl 1009 Powell 
Baraille John, carriagemaker, WS Montgomerj' Av bet 

Filbert and Greenwich, dwl SW cor Powell and Bay 
Barajas Kita Miss, dwl 1020 Kearny 
Barandou Ernest A., confectioner Peter Job, dwl 226 Pac 
Barange Guissepe, laborer Palace Hotel 
Baranowski Henry, barkeeper with Conrad Hilderbrand, 

dwl ,501 Dupont 
Barassina John, milkranch, N s Francisco bet Scott and 

Devisadero 
Baraty Francis {Carrau <t B.), dwl 241 Stevenson 
Baraty George E., clerk John Saulnier & Co., dwl 241 

Ste\'enson 
Baraty John M. {Baraty & Covtolenc), dwl 303 Mont Av 
Baraty & Coutolenc {John M. Baraty and Desire Couto- 

lenc), porkdealers, 303 Montgomery Av 
Barbagelato Giovenato, fruits, SW cor Ellis and Mason, 

dwl 827 Vallejo, rear 
Barbagelato J, musician dwl 417 Filbert 
Barbarry Frank, waiter Campi's Restaurant, dwl 721 

Broadway 
Barbaste Antoine, dwl 838 Clay 
Barbaste Marie Mrs., laundr}', 838 Clay 
Barbat John, physician, apothecarj- and chemist, 910 Pac 
Barbe Jean, Laurel Hill Nursery, NW cor Baker and Bush 
Barbe Pierre, butcher John Bayle, dwl Fifth Av nr M, 

South S. F. 
Barbee John, money and exchange broker, office 512 

Montgomer}', dwl 1019 Union 
Barbee John, tailor, dwl 29 Tui-k 
Barber Adolph, dwl 635 Ellis 
Barber Andrew, musician, dwl 419 Fourth 
Barber Charles, hostler Central R. R. Co., dwl 122i Gil- 
bert, rear 
Barber Eli, gasfitter William R. Allen, dwl 1128 Folsom 
Barber Elizabeth (widow), dwl 1625 Webster 
Barber Enos W. {Lawton cfc Co.), dwl 22 Turk 
Barber Frank, dwl 27 Turk 
Barber Frank, bootblack, W s Brooks nr Market 
Barber George A., upholsterer 210 Stev, dwl 242 Stev 
Barber George K., bricklayer, dwl 536 Mission 
Barber Henry D. {Barber 'd: Keser), dwl 460 Jessie 
Barber James, fireman Pacific Mail S. S. Colima 
Barber James B., porter Wilmerding, Kellogg & Co., dwl 

W s Guerrero nr Twenty-eighth 
Barber John A., bricklaj'er, dwl 58 Bernard 
Barber John N. , insurance broker, office and dwl 531 Cal- 
ifornia room 4 
Barber Peter, waiter Palace Hotel, dwl 122 Geary 
Barber Robert L., tailor, 411 Pine 
Barber Thomas A., master mariner, dwl 1222 Pacific 
Barber William {Doyle, B. tt Scripture), attorney at law, 

office 323 California, res San Rafael 
Barber William M. Mrs. (widow), dwl W s Capp nr Twen- 
ty-fifth 
Barber Zacharias, teamster James E. Mitchell & Co., dwl 

1011 Eleventh 
Barber & Keser {Henry D. Barber and Frederick Ee»er), 

hairdressing saloon, 683 Mission 
Barbett Solomon, dwl 408 Clay 
Barbetta Frederick, fisherman, dwl 49 Clay 
Barbetta Nicholas J., marblecutter Andrea Paltenghi, 

dwl 49 Clay 
Barbich John, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Montgomerj^ 
Barbier Armand, local policeman, dwl 947 Howard 
Barbier Madame, dresscutter and fitter, dwl 618 Cal 
Barbier Eugenie S. A. (widow), teacher French, dwl 650 

Minna 
Barbier F. , steward N. Giamboni & Co. , 614 Clay 
Barbier Gabriel, liquor saloon, 1122 Dupont 
Barbier J., painter St. Denis & Chesney, dwl 702 Vallejo 
Barbier Paul L. {Barbier tfc Barrett), dwl 650 Minna 
Barbier & Barrett {Paxil L. Barbier and Edward J. Bar- 
rett), wines and liquors, 905 Market 
Barbieri Gitano, cabinetmaker L. & E. Emanuel, dwl 14 

Bluxome 
Barbontin Ynes, seamstress Mrs Josepha Labome, dwl 

720 Vallejo 
Barbosa Ignacio, dwl 8 Maiden Lane nr Vallejo 
Barbour A. E., clerk captain stm Hassler U. S. Coast 

Survey, 214 Stockton 
Barbour ciitus, attorney at law, dwl 605 Pine 
BAIM'ELL08 J08E, proprietor Luzitania Hotel, 415 
Drumm 





U 

nil! 

irti: 

life 
fl 

Fr 



Barcelo Vincent, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Mont 
Barcelona Consolidated Mining Co. (Nye Co., Nev.), Harrj kj"; 

C. Olmstead secretary-, office 409 California 
Barch Frank, driver Emanuel Steiner, Eighteenth Av ni 

F, South S. F. 
Barchi Cesar Rev., clergjTnan St. Ignatius College, dw) 

841 Market 
Barchus John H., clerk forwarding department Wells 

Fargo & Co., dwl 806 Webster 
Barclay Alexander, cook, dwl 5 Broadway 
Barclay Bros. {John and David), clock and furniture re- 
pairers, 509 Bush 
Barclay David {Barclay Bros.), dwl 784 Folsom 
Barclay Frank, boilermaker McAfee, Spiers &Co., dwl 12f 

Dora 
Barclay James, dwl 11 A'^erona PI 
Barclay John {Barclay Bros.), dwl 784 Folsom 
Barclay Julius, dwl 745 Clay 
Barclav Roderick S., machinist F. A. Huntington, dw 

108 Powell 
Barclay R. S. Mrs. , furnished rooms, 108 Powell 
Barclay. See Barkley 
Barco Anthony, cigars and tobacco, 124 Fourth, dwl lOi 

Powell 
Bard S. S., miner, dwl 226 Turk 
Barden G. , stairbuilder B. H. Freeman & Co. 
Barden John, waiter Palace Hotel, dwl 60 Annie 
Bardenhagen Henry {Wamecke & B.), dwl SW cor Sacr» 

mento and Drumm 
Barden werper Charles P., messenger German Savings anc 

Loan Society, dwl 9 Stockton PI 
Bardet Alexander, dwl 9 Piiickney PI 
Bardet Constance (widow), milliner, 1108 Dupont 
Bardet Isidore, locksmith John G. Us, dwl cor Mont^: 

gomery and Jackson 
Bardini Louis, wagonmaker Massone & Lacaze 
Bardon Louis, laborer Philadelphia House, 423 Bush 
Bardon Patrick, carpenter, dwl N s Eleventh Av bet Ifc 

and Q, South S. F. 
Bardthordt Marx, laborer S. F. Stock Brewery, dwl 211(|l^es 

Powell 
Bardwell Charles W. , turner Charles Field & Co. 
Bardwell John L., dwl 8 Brenham PI 
Bare Edward, furrier Lachman & Sternfels, dwl 362i Clem 
Bare Solomon, furrier Lachman & Sternfels, dwl 362J Cleit 
Bareilles Thomas, milkranch, corOctavia and Lombard 
Baretta John, machinist, dwl 19 Sherwood PI 
Barettini Lorenzo, porter G. W. Cheslev & Co., dwl lOK 

Bush 
Baretv M., upholsterer James W. Bumham & Co., dwl If 

Post 
Bargen John, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery, dwl 1017 Bat 
Bargion William P., clerk American District Telegraph, 

dwl 737 Howard 
Bargon Martin, tailor Alexander Barli, dwl 3 Mary Lane 
Bargones James, driver D. Ghirardella, dwl 718 Com- 
mercial, rear 
Bargones Leonardo, porter Pascal, Dubedat & Co., dwl 

2218 Mason 
Bargstream George G., printer headquarters Military 

Division Pacific, dwl 208J Seventh 
Baric Louis, waiter Hunt's Hotel, dwl 7 Montgomery Av 
Barichievich John, restaurant and liquors, SE cor Nato-|ttl( 

ma and Fifth, dwl 348 Minna 
Barichievich Martin, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Mont 
Bark A. William, vocalist. Wade's Opera House 
Barkan Adolph, physician, oculist and aurist, office 305 

Kearny 
Barkeloo John, dwl 1114 Post 

Barker , dwl 737 Howard 

Barker Mrs., dwl 17 Fourth 

Barker Annie M. Miss, dwl 1424 Pacific 

Barker Frank, carpenter, dwl N s Sixteenth Av bet P and 

Q, South S. F. 
Barker George, clerk, dwl 26 O'Farrell 
Barker Grace (widow), dwl 1421 Folsom 
Barker Henry L., brickmaker, dwl 309 Capp 
Barker Henrj' L. , carpenter, dwl 1609 California |m; 

Barker Henj-y N., tnmkmaker Michael Long, dwl W a San ins 

tali; 



ii-: 



Bruno Road nr Lincoln 

Barker Hosea, painter 124 Fourth, dwl 362 Jessie 

Barker Isaac, brickmaker, dwl 309 Capp 

Barker .Jacob, trunkmaker, dwl 1(55 Silver 

BAKKER .I.miES L., wholesale hardware and com- 
mission merchant, 406 and 408 Market, res Oakland 

Barker John, dwl 104 Eddy 

Barker Joshua, bookkeeper Lohman, Cogill & Rountree, 
res Oakland 

Barker Martha H. (widow), dwl S s Post nr Devisadero 



tu 



rRANCIS & VALENTINE, Printers, 517 Clay and 510-516 Commercial St., S 



. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 703, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, EstalDlished 1862. 



arkcr Mary (widow), dwl 3 Boyd 

arker Owen, shoemaker, dwl 172 Minna 

arker R., clerk, dwl (>2!) O'Farrell 

arker Robert, helper Mobbs, Pomeroy & Co., dwl 7 Pratt 

PI 
«rker Samuel, laundrj'man Oakland Laundry, dwl SE 

cor Fifteenth and Mission 
arker Sanih S. Mrs. , nurse San Francisco Ljing-in Hos- 
pital and Koundlini; Asyhnn, 762 Mission 
arker Steplien, contractor, dwl W s Valencia bet Nine- 
teenth and Twentieth 
arkcr Tliomas, laborer Cal. Grain Warehouse, dwl 3 Boyd 
arkcr Timothy L. (Wellman, Peck d: Co.), res Oakland 
B arkhaus Diedcrich (F. W. and D, Barkhaus), dwl 10 
Turk 
arkhaus Frederick W. {F. W. and D. Barkhatu), dwf 

UK14 Sutter 
lARHH.irS F. Vr. A D., books and stationer>-, 535 

Kearny 
arkhaus William, clerk, dwl 10 Turk 
arkhausen Bertha (widow), dwl E s Franklin bet Turk 
and Tyler 
1(6 arkhausen Julius, clerk Bandmann, Nielsen & Co., dwl 
Franklin bet Turk and Tyler 
irkliausen Otto A., bookkeeper Schafer & Co., dwl E s 

Franklin bet Turk and Tyler 
irkhauscn Theodore, dwl E s Vermont nr Sierra 
i?tv irklaiTK William, billiard and bowling saloon, SE cor 
Jackson and Kearny 

ioi irkley , dwl Olympic Lodgrings 

irkley \V. H., bookkeeper Oriental Warehouse, dwl SE 

cor Union and Leavenworth 
irkley. See Barclay 
:* irks Thomas, molder, dwl 23 Silver, rear 

wlage Henrv, cabinetmaker Cal. F^imiture M. Co., dwl 

3 Cushman PI 
irlage Henry Jr., expressman, dwl 8 Cushman PI 
■itP irlarg-e William, jeweler Herman J. Brand, dwl 3 Cush- 
man PI 
;il( irlestra Giovanni, maccaronimaker, dwl 1022 Jlont, rear 
wletti Peter, expressman, cor Washington and Davis, 

dwl 105 Pacific 
irley Harris, plasterer, dwl 5 Harrison Av 
jai irli Alexander, merchant tailor, 609 Clay, dwl 646 MarTcet 
m irlincf H. H., exchange and money -broker, office 500 
jd Montgomerj-, dwl NE cor Mission and Fourth 

irling Nellie (widow), dwl 1142 Folsom 
Iffl irlkha Frank, butcher, dwl W s Railroad Av nr Sixth, 

South S. F. 
;'J irlow Carrie Miss, teacher Washingfton Grammar School, 

dwl 90!) Clay 
tit irlow Charles \R. G. Dun & Co.), res New York 
■li irlow Charles, workman U. S. Mint, dwl 1206 Market 

irlow Charles O., engineer, dwl 20 Stanford 
je irlow Edwin, laborer S. F. Pioneer Woolen Factory, dwl 
n 3 Newell 

irlow Elisha T., agent LefFel & Myers' Turbine Wheels, 
ii! office 306 California, dwi cor Channel and Eleventh 

irlow Herman, carpenter, dwi 10 Margaret PI 
jj irlow John, machinist, dwi 246 Clara 

irlow M., dwi 264 Clementina, rear 
IT irlow Martin, laborer, dwi 713 Front 
(to irlow R., laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s WTiarf 

irlow Sarah (widow), dwi 16 Antonio 
: ]t irlow Thomas, laborer, dwi 321 Eighth 

irlow Warren, teamster, dwi 22 Turk 
. ^ irlow W. W., clerk, dwl 71 Tehama 

irman Isaac, salesman Lithauer & Co., dwl 36 Kearny 

innan Jonas, real estate, dwi 943 Folsom 

irmaii Jonas S., night inspector Custom House, dwl 410 

Ninth 
irman Joseph, milker Nager & Christ, Eighteenth Av 
i-i nr F, South S. F. 

irmore Andrew, caqienter, dwl 513 Howard 

irn Joseph, bootblack, 620 Market 

imaba Barbara, laborer Casassa, Bacigalupi & Corcelia, 

dwi SE cor Hayes and Baker 
iniakoff Frederick, carpenter, dwi 140 Natoma, rear 
.in imard A. C, dwi 781 Folsom 

irnard Alexander B., assistant Barnard's Business Col- 
lege, dwi 617 Eddy 
imard Edward, local policeman, dwi 20 Ellis 
irnard Exiiress (San Rafael), office 333 East, branch 120 
J California 

■ ■• AK\AKD F. «t CO. {Henry Voorman), agents Seat- 
tle Coal and Transportation Co., and dealers coal, 213 
.-^ Jackson 

amard Frank (F. Barnard & Co.), dwl 418 Eddy 
. amard George, waiter stm Ancon, Broadway St. Wharf 



Barnard George B., telegraph operator Barnard's Busi- 
ness College, dwi 617 Eddv 
BAKNAKII IIKXKY A. M., president Barnard's Busi- 
ness College, 120 Sutter and 220 Kearny, dwi 617 Eddy 
BAItN.ilClk I. n., real-estate and general business 

agent, 224 Montgomery, dwl Russ House 
Barnard John, lodgings, SE cor California and Drumm 
Barnard Louis, tailor, dwi 1413 Dupont 
Barnard Mathew L., shoemaker Buckingham & Hecht, 

dwi 528 Stevenson 
Barnard Moses S. , cooper, dwi S s Twenty-fourth bet Ver- 

mf)nt and Kansas 
Barnard Samuel, clerk, dwi 203 Leavenworth 
Barnard Thonnis G., contractor, dwi 32 Rincon PI 
BARNARD'S Bi:8IXI':!!lS C'OLLECiE, Henry Bar- 
nard A. M. president, 120 Sutter 
Bamer William, barkeeper Frederick Lohaus, dwi SW cor 

East and Washington 
Bamert Joseph, merchant (Virginia City), dwl 1403 Oc- 

ta\ia 

Banies , dwi 108 Ellis 

Barnes Benjamin J., springmaker Betts Spring Co., dwl 

812 Dolores 
Barnes E. B. Miss, school teacher, dwl 534 Bush 
Barnes E. D., attoniej' at law, dwi Cosmopolitan Hotel 
Barnes E. T., insurance agent, dwi 907 Bush 
Barnes George, butler, dwi 205 Second 
Barnes George, fireman, dwl S s Folsom nr Main 
Barnes George D. Mrs., furnished rooms, 205 Second 
B.4.R>'ES (iFOROE ED., journalist Morning Call, dw 1 

1206 Market 
Barnes H. A., tinsmith, dwi 14 Turk 
Banies Henrj- L., carpenter S. F. Manuf. Co., dwl 1153 

Howard 
Barnes James, butcher, dwi 125 Second 
Barnes James, horseshoenailmaker, dwi 1226 Green, rear 
Barnes James M., miner, dwi 405 O'Farrell 
Barnes J. D., carpenter, dwi 146 Natoma 
Barnes John, dwi 33 Eddj' 
Barnes Joseph, patternmaker, dwl Fifth bet Howard and 

Mission 
Barnes L. (widow), boarding, 1136 Pacific 
Barnes Nicholas M., horse trainer, dwi Bay District Fair 

Grounds 
Barnes Patrick, carpenter, dwi SE cor O'Farrell and 

Lark in 
Barnes Patrick D., steward Grand Hotel, dwi 319 Tenth 
Barnes Robert, machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 747 

Howard 
Barnes Robert L. C, pressman, dwi 811 Stockton 
Barnes Samuel, clerk, dwi 231 O'Farrell 
Barnes Thomas P., bookkeeper, dwl 319 Tenth 
Barnes W. B. Mrs., dwl 26 O'Fanell 
Barnes W. D. , capitalist, dwi Russ House 
BARNES W. H. L., attorney at law, office 426 Cali- 
fornia, dwi SW cor McAllister and Fillmore 
Barnes William, bookkeeper, dwi 231 Fifteenth 
Banies William, carpenter, dwi N s Ellis nr De\isadero 
Barnes William R., carpenter, dwi E s Treat Av nr 

Twenty-first 
Barnes. See Bams 

Baniet William Y., office 330 Pine room 8, dwi 211 Austin 
Barnett Bartholemew, laborer, dwi E s Illinois nr Shasta 
Barnett Charles H., fireman Horace Da\is & Co. 
Barnett David, harnessraaker Charles H. Mead, dwl E s 

Davis bet AVashington and Clay 
Barnett David, tailor, 525 Sacramento, dwl 235 Kearny 
Barnett Edward, seaman, dwl 110 Berrj' 
Barnett E. T., Tailors' Pro. Union, NW cor Kearny and 

Morton 
Barnett John, machinehand B. & J. S. Doe, dwl 804 Third 
Barnett John Joseph, liquor saloon, 209 Sixth, dwl NW 

cor Sixteenth and Second Av 
Barnett Josejih, crockery and glassware, 39 and 79 Fourth, 

dwi 353 Jessie 
Barnett Joseph P., club rooms, 28 Geary 
Barnett Marks, clerk Benjamin Hirshfeld, dwl Howard 

bet Sixth and Seventh 
Barnett Marx, salesman Solomon B. Oppenheim, dwi 734 

A'allejo 
Barnett Moses S. (S. A. Gyle & Co., Tehama), office 210 

Da^is, dwi 1114 Market 
Barnett Norman G., driver A. F. Green & Co., dwi 318^ 

Fulton, rear 
Barnett Thomas, tanner Funcke & Co., dwl NE cor 

Ninth and Brannan 
Bamev A., peddler, dwi 1004 Market 
Bamev Alfred S., deputv U. S. shipping commissioner, 

office 118 Jackson, dwl 2209 Jackson 



STEELE'S Glycerine Lotion cures Tan, Sunburn, Eruptions, etc. 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Mercl 




Bamev A. W. , conductor Market St. E, R. 

Barney B., clerk, dwl 1220 Market 

Barney Benjamin A., with James M. Barney, dwl 817 

Van Ness Av 
BAK\EY B. ORIFFIX, deputy U. S. shippin;? com- 
missioner, office Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Bock, dwl 

2209 Jackson 
Bamev Edward, dwl 33 Eddy 
Barney H., dwl 16 Turk 
Barney H., dwl 21 Ellis 
BAR.VEY JA^IE!!» >I., commission merchant, office 

304 California, res Yuma, Arizona 
Barney John, musician, dwl 7 Stockton 
Barney John N., carpenter, dwl 1503 Pine 
Barney Lewis N., photographic printer Robert A. Mar- 
den, dwl 1324 Polk 
Barney Morgan L. , lumber dealer, dwl 1324 Polk 
Barney S. E. (widow), furnished rooms, 328 Kearny 
Barney Sophia A., dwl 32 Sixth 

Bamhart Christian, helper Nelson & Doble, dwl 22 Gar- 
den 
Bamhart Daniel (Watsmi & B.), dwl 112 Fourth 
Bamhart George W., salesman Law Department A. L. 

Bancroft & Co., dwl 23 Powell 
Barnhause Theodore, dwl 652 Howard 
Bamhisel Ellen Mrs., lodgings, 147 Third 
Barnhisel E. R. , carrier Alta California 
Bamhisel S. Henry, salesman Toklas, Hahn & Brown, 

dwl 147 Third 
Bamhouse Thomas, machinehand Holland & Ruppel, 

dwl 652 Howard 
Bamot Michael, rag dealer, dwl 248 Clementina 
Bams John, dwl 234 Minna 
Bams N. Mrs., adjuster coiner's department U. S. Mint, 

dwl 510 Ellis 

Bamum , supt White Lead and Color Works 

Barnum E. K., lighthousekeeper South Farallone Islands 
Barnum Henry, editor Pacific Rural Press, dwl 16 Russell 
Barnwell Gilbert T., cashier Cal. Pacific R. R. Co., office 

Broadwa.v St. Wharf, dwl 235 Seventh 
Barnwell Thomas Frederic, housesmith Pioneer Iron 

Works, dwl 235 Seventh 
BaroU N. J., dwl 225 Ellis 
Baron Abraham, tailor, 31 Pacific 
Baron Edouard, clerk John P. Jackson, 330 Pine 
Baron Isadore, capitalist, dwl 1728 Eddy 
Baron John (J. Dupuy d: Co.), dwl 526 Broadway 
Baron Thomas, car conductor, dwl 769 Harrison 
Baron. See Ban-en and Barron 
Baroni Peter, dwl 1318 Dupont 
Baronia Antoni, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery, dwl E s 

Sansom bet Union and Green 
Baronidis George, physician, dwl 518 Green 
Barouquaire August, marbleworker Charles Bianchi, dwl 

1019 Powell 
Barouquaire E. Mrs. , dwl 1019 Powell 
Barouquaire James, tinsmith B. C. Austin, dwl 1019 Pow 
Barr Charles, liquor merchant, dwl 335 Geary 
Barr Daniel, carpenter, dwl 14 Howard Court 
Barr Hannah K. (widow), dwl 318 Oak 
Barr Jacob, butcher Poly, Heilbron & Co., dwl Twelfth Av 

nr N, South S. F. 
Barr J. D. & Co. (D. Samuels), manufacturers umbrellas 

and parasols, 325 Bush 
Barr John, machinist, dwl N s Twentieth nr Valencia 
Barr John, painter, dwl 2013 Folsom 
Barr John, foreman machinist S. F. Gas Light Co. 
Barr John E. {J. D. Barr <fc Co.), dwl 610 Ellis 
Barr J. R., carpenter, dwl 957 Market 
Barr Neil, molder Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 23 Har 
Barr Niel, molder Fulton Foundry, dwlE s Twent3"-third 

bet Harrison and Bryant 
Barr Sarah A. Miss, teacher Girls' High School, dwl 916 

Washington 
Barr William, carpenter, dwl 115 Second 
Barr William H., boatman, cor Davis and VaUejo, dwl 

Bay bet Leavenworth and Hyde 
Barra Ezekiel I., proprietor Barra'sHall and liquor saloon, 

NW cor First and Minna, dwl 4 Minna 
Barra's Hall, NW cor First and Minna 
Barracco Andrew (Barracco & ifit.'isante), dwl 33 Turk 
Barracco Vincent, poultry dealer, 76 Centre Market, dwl 

33 Turk 
Barracco & Mussante (A. Barracco and Charles Mus- 

sante), poultry dealers, 76 Centre Market 
Barrace Charles, laborer, dwl 214 Ritch 
Barragat Jean D. B., shoemaker Boisseau & Son, dwl 33 

Hinckley 
Barran Rudolph, cook Hansa Hotel, dwl 429 Bush 



Barraque John, driver, dwl 634 Pacific 

Barratt , fireman Golden Gate Flouring Mill, dwl 

Minna 
Barratt Hannah (widow), dwl W s Kansas nr Nevada 
Barratt William, molder Oc-cidental Foundry, dwl 316 
Barre August, expressman, dwl 362 Natoma bet Fou 

and Fifth 
Barre Charles, seaman, dwl Johnson PI nr Harrison 
Barre Henry, dwl 520 Broadway 
Barries Adolphe, butcher Barraty & Coutolenc, dwl 

Green 
Barren Augustus, carpenter, dwl 545 Jessie 
Barren Edward, clerk cashier's department Wells, Fa 

& Co., dwl 600 Bush 
Barren Samuel S. , member Califomia Stock and Excha: 

Board, dwl 600 Bush 
Barrellao Camillo, carpenter, dwl 6 Cadell Alley nr Uu 
Barren Joseph, expressman, dwl Sixteenth bet Guerr 

and Dolores 
Barren Julius, butcher, dwl 18 First 
Barren Rudolph, cook, dwl 18 First 
Barren. See Baron and Barron 
Barrere Louis, drayman John C. Morrison Jr., dwl 

Howard 
Barrett Adelaide, actress, Bella Union Theater 
Barrett Alfred, watchmaker and jeweler, 44 Second i 

236 Seventh 
Barrett Alfred J. , plumber John Bohn, dwl 236 Seve 
Barrett Annie Miss, seamstress Levi Strauss & Co., i 

141 Fifth 
Barrett Cornelius, drayman, dwl 104 Polk 
Barrett David C. , bricklayer, dwl 311 Jessie 
Barrett Dennis, miner, dwl 214 First 
Barrett Edmond, laborer, dwl 609 J Minna 
Barrett Edward, baker Patrick Sla\'in, dwl 422 Fremoi 
Barrett Edward, laborer, dwl 24 Clementina 
Barrett Edward, painter Wason & Morris, dwl 614 Ste 
Barrett Edward, waiter American Exchange Hotel 
Barrett Edward J. (Barbier cfc Barrett), dwl NW cor Ji 

and Minna 
BaiTett E. J., expressman, dwl 227 Second 
Barrett Francis A., carpenter E. K. Howes & Co., 

Seventeenth Av nr I, South S. F. 
Barrett George, seaman, dwl 123 Jackson 
Barrett Hannah Mrs. , dressmaker, dwl 19 Langton 
Barrett James, miner, dwl 641 Washington 
Barrett James, painter George Duff, dwl 112 Dora 
Barrett James, seaman, dwl 104 Steuart 
Barrett James A. Mrs. (widow), dwl 515J Stevenson 
Barrett James J. , hostler J. D. Brown, dwl Bay Disti 

Fair Grounds 
BaiTett Jane Mrs. , dwl 1332 Pacific 
Barrett John, blacksmith Larseneur & Sheerin, dwl 

Townsend 
Barrett John, cabinetmaker, dwl Ocean View House, 

Ocean House Road, 6^ miles from City Hall 
Barrett John, carpenter, dwl 1332 Pacific 
Barrett John, carrier Examiner and bookkeeper Jc 

O'Kane, dwl 782 Harrison 
Barrett John, miller Deming, Palmer & Co., dwl 64 Sac 
Ban-ett John S. (Parker & B.), dwl 1218 Clay 
Barrett Mary (widow), Florence Sewing Machine, dwl 

O'Farreil 
Barrett Mary Miss, sewing-maclSne operator Levi Stra' 

&Co., dwl 141 Fifth 
Barrett Mary Mrs., seamstress, dwl 202 Second 
Ban-ett Michael, calker L. S. Allen, dwl 313 Tehama 
Barrett Michael, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wharf 
Barrett Patrick, salesman Kennedy & Durr, dwl 24 CI 
Barrett Patrick, seaman O. & 0. S. S. Gaelic 
Barrett Patrick, watchman Van Nostrand & Co. 
Barrett Patrick N., carrier Evening Bulletin and Exa 

iner, dwl 303 Natoma 
Barrett Paul, dwl 113 Stockton 
Barrett Richard F., framemaker S. Hausmann & Co., d 

427 Stevenson 
Barrett Robert, soapmaker Richard Brown, dwl 122 G 

bert 
Barrett Susan Miss, dressmaker Mrs Annie M. Reen, d 

420 Tehama 
Barrett Timothy, butcher, dwl E s Fifth Av nr K, Soi; 

S. F. 
Barrett William, fireman, dwl 18 Folsom 
BaiTett William, hackman, dwl 303 Tehama 
Barrett William, teamster G. Morrow & Co., dwl 37 C( 
Barrett William G., cashier San Francisco Gas Light Co: 

pany, dwl 1000 Pine 
Ban-ett William H., carpenter, E s Alemany nr Seve 
teenth 



nil 



in 



M 

m 
m 



PEANCIS & VALENTINE. Commercial Printing House, 517 Clay Street, S 



-«i 7AN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



, , IBKKTT tt ^IIKKlVOOn (Robert Sherwood, mc- 
"' eessur), iinporter.s and dealers watches, diamonds, 
jewelry, etc., 517 Mont)foniery 
irretts William, laborer, dwl S 3 Laurel Av bet Van 
P Ness Av and Franklin 

"' irie Charles, drayman Bryden & Hinckley, dwl 362 Na- 
toma 
Tie D. H., haokdriver Lenhart, Brady & Co., dwl 1413 
Polk 
"' rrillac Charles, basketmaker, dwl 3 Moachani PI 

iRKILIS l»IK4iO C'OtNT, Consul Italy, offlco 525 
Front, res Oakland 
' '* Tin),'er Henjamin, fruits, 1211 Powell 

-rinfrer Elizabeth .Mrs., ag-cnt Curtis' Models, 54 Fourth 
'"'' -rinifer Peter H., chemist, dwl 54 Fourth 

Tinj,'ton George F., inspector U. S. Custom House, 
'1 dwl 1713 Clay 

*" Tinifton John, mailing clerk Post-ofBce, dwl 657 
Natoma 

TinL-ton William B., porter Dickson, DeWolf & Co., 
dwl i!27 Green 
. , JTinyton \V. J., third assistant engineer Pacific Mail S. 
™' S. Costa Rica 

Tis Clermont C, broker 302 Montgomery, room 30, 
dwl Russ House 
'"' Tis I.a^■erna, broker 302 Montgomery, room 30, dwl 
J, 91i) Geary 

^m .ro(>iii John, milkman, Presidio Road nr Green 
^'■ii Toilhet Henry (Belloc Frtres), office 524 Montgomery, 
dwl Grand Hotel 

Ton Mrs., furnished rooms, 1009 Powell 
Tt)n A., dwl 636 Commercial 

Ton Cornelius J. (Barron tfr Rea), dwl S15 Market 
.KKO\ EDWARD, capitalist, office 300 Montgomery 
•' room 27, dwl 435 Geary 

, Ton Hugh, laborer new U. S. appraiser's building 
Mei Ton James, captain stra Hope, Washington St. Wharf 
' Ton John, painter, dwl 2 Francisco 
'"' "ron John, carpenter, dwl 12 Downey 
Ton Joseph (ImhoffA; B.), dwl 2200 Mason 
Ton Joseph, capitalist, dwl 606 Stockton 
"p' 'ron Joseph, waiter Worth House, 606 Folsom 

Ton Joseph C, hairdressing saloon, NW cor Powell 
and Greenwich 
1 Ton Michael, carpenter, dwl 2319 Mission 
Ton X. W., driver Portrero and B. V. R. R. 
Ton Philip, laborer James O'Connel, LaRue's Wliarf 
Ton Rachael Miss, dressmaker Jane Schaaf, dwl 31 
" Pacific 

B* Ton Richard, capt stmr Mount Eden, Jackson St. \\'Tiarf 
Ton Terrence, pantryman Lick House 
Ton W. Mrs., furnished rooms, 1009 Powell 
i'l Ton William, barber John Reece, dwl 31 Pacific 

•ron William, groceries and liquors, SW cor Clay and 
kJ Powell 

Ton William R., shipjoiner, dwl 623 East 
Ton & Rea (Cornelhis J. Barron and E. F. Rea), 
r J* house and sign painters, 815 Market 

Tondon Ernest, confectioner, dwl 226 Pacific 
Sat TOW Charles F., engraver William E. Goldsmith 

TOWS Daniel F., housepainter, dwl 129 Second 
i»ii TOW'S Edward, pressman A. L. Bancroft & Co., dwl 

1123 Bush 
!tni TOWS Frank P., manager Victor Sewiug Machine Co., 
1212 Market, res Oakland 
TOWS H. , tailor, dwl 1315 Hyde 
IS TOWS John (Wakefield ifc Co.), dwl 148 Sixth 
I rf TOWS Lotta M, Miss, teacher Greenwich St. Primarj' 
iO School, dwl 1123 Bush 

rrows Robert, clerk Whitney & Co.'s Express, dwl 327J 
Filbert 
Em TOWS Stephen S., contractor, dwl 208 Seventh 
rrows T., dwl 37 Second 

rrows Thomas, general agent Victor Sewing Machine, 
ij 1212 Market res, Oakland 

rrows Thomas, manager Albert Washburn, 751 Market 
;;C rrows William H., attorney at law, office 76 Montgom- 
ery Block, dwl 1531 Tyler 
lU rry Aaron, boxmaker Hobbs, Pomeroy & Co., dwl 14 

Bourbin PI nr Ellis 
im rry Alfred, second officer stm Orizaba, Washington St. 
Wharf 
rry Andrew, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 
rrj- B., laborer A. F. Spear & Co., 218 Drumm 
ft rry Bartholomew, watchman Oakland Ferry, dwl 339 
C«i Clementina 

rry Benjamin, dwl 863J Market 
en rry Bridget, laundress Neustadter Brothers, Gough bet 
Grove and Hayes 



Barry B. V., dwl 157 Seventh 

Barry Catherine (widow), dwl 110 William, rear 

U.iKKY <'HAi:i,K.S K., searcher records, office 619 

Muntgoniery, dwl 2420 Buchanan 
Barry Daniel, clerk S. F. Gas Light Co., King, dwl Elev- 
enth nr N. , South S. F. 
Barry David (David Barry .t Co.), dwl 18 Grand Av 
Barry David, laborer, dwl 18 Washington Av 
Barry David, laborer, dwl 213 Folsom 
BAKRV ItAVID, wholesale and retail wines, liquors 

and cigars, 4(i2 Sixth 
Barry David Jr., butcher, dwl 18 Washington Av 
Barry David & Co. (Joseph Baker), market, 1207 Mission 
Barry Douglass, shijicarpenter, dwl 12 Clementina 
Barry Edward, dwl 73 Tehama 
Barry Edward, carpenter, dwl 214 Broadway 
Barry Edward, laborer Union Iron Works, dwl 23 Crook 
Barry Edward, moulder Union Iron Works, dwl 17 Crook 
Banr Edward, real-estate agent, 415 Montgomery, dwl 

2010 Pacific Av 
Barry Edward, scenic artist Buckley's Varieties, dwl 405 

Kearny 
Barrj' Edward, wheelwTight Progress Carriage Factory, 

25 and 27 Valencia, dwl 24 Ridley 
Barry Edward L., de))uty County Clerk, dwl 318 Pine 
Harry Edwin, laborer Palnier,Knox & Co., dwl 567 Miss 
Barry Elizabeth Miss, milliner Jeanette E. Ware, dwl 528 

Union 
Barry Ellen Mrs., shirt manufacturer, 1306 Polk, dwl 708 

Howard 
Barry Frank, gardener, dwl 541 First 
Barry Frank, milkman Henry S. Hubbard, dwl S 8 Chest- 
nut bet Steiner and Pierce 
Barry George W., expressman, Mr Mission and Spear, 

dwl 12 Sacramento 
Barry H. , dwl 103 Mason 

Barry Henry, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 
Barry James (Hartnett & B.), dwl 406 Broadway 
Barry James, barkeeper William B. Thomas, dwl 55 Pac 
Barry James, driver City R. R. 

Barry James, foreman Nelson & Doble, dwl 211 Taylor 
Barry James, laborer A. F. Sjjear & Co., 218 Drumm 
Barry James, laborer, dwl E s Second Av nr Sixteenth, 

rear 
Barry James, longshoreman, dwl 158 First 
Barry James, plumber Wade's Opera House 
Barry James, quartennaster Pacific Mail S. S. Granada 
Barry James F., machinehand Holland & Ruppel, dwl 

cor Dolores and Twenty-ninth 
Barrj' James H., compositor Spaulding & Barto, dwl 1018 

Clay 
Barry James J., receiving clerk New City Hall, dwl 11 J 

Fifth 
Barry Jeremiah, salesman David Barry, dwl 462 Sixth 
Barr.v John, baker, dwl 9 St. Mary, rear 
Barry John, bootcrimper Buckingham & Heeht, NW cor 

Gough and Haight 
Barrj' John, brassmolder Greenberg & Co., dwl 3 Fran- 
cisco 
Barry John, bricklayer Henry J. McLeric, dwl 55 Second 
Barry John, bricklayer, dwl 128 Clara 
Barry John, coachman W. F. Babcock, dwl 325 Folsom 
Barrv John, driver N. B. and Mission R: R., dwl 419 Na- 
toma 
Barry John, expressman, NE cor Bush and Kearny, dwl 

NW cor Ellis and Webster 
Barry John, laborer, dwl 18 Freelon, rear Fourth 
Barry John, laborer, dwl 27 Hinckley, rear 
Barry John, laborer, dwl 27 Minna 
Barry John, laborer, dwl 366 Natoma 
Barry John, laborer, dwl Pine bet Pierce and Scott 
Bariy John, laborer Fulton Foundry, dwl 2523 Sac 
Barry John, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wharf 
Barrv John, laborer Quartennaster's Department U. S. A., 

dwl 102 Fourth 
Barry John, miner, dwl 424 Broadway 
Barry John, painter, dwl 361 Clementina 
Barry John, porter Straus, Kohnstamm & Co., dwl 8 

Glover 
Barry John, seaman, dwl 238 Steuart 
Barrj' John, shipcalker, dwl 1137 Folsom 
Barry John, shoemaker, dwl S s Church Lane nr Church 
Barry John H. , delivery clerk Western Union Telegraph 

Co., dwl 211 Taylor 
Barry John T. (Lyons <i- B.), dwl 1526 Gearj- 
Barry Julia (widow) dwl 613 Greenwich 
Barry Mark J., salesman J. J. O'Brien & Co., dwl 200 

Stockton 
Barry Martin, tailor Lancaster & Northon, dwl 2114 Bush 



JAMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists, removed to No. 316 Kearny St. 



FIHE WATCHES and JEWELEY for Sale by D. W. Laird, 513 Montgomer 




Barry Matthew, daily, W 8 San Bruno Road nr Golden 

City House 
Barry Michael, billposter, dwl 39 Everett 
Barry Michael, bootcrimper Buckingham & Hecht, NW 

cor Goutfh and Haight 
Barry Michael, carpenter, dwl 708 Howard 
Barrj' Michael, carpenter, dwl S s Eddy bet Scott and 

Pierce 
Barry Michael, cook, dwl 54 Jessie 

Barry Michael, fruit stand, SW cor Sacramento and San- 
son!, dwl an Clay 
Barry Michael, laborer, dwl 414 Folsom 
Barry Michael, laborer, dwl 444 Union, rear 
Barry Michael, laborer, dwl 511 Mission 
Barry Michael, laborer Union Iron Works, dwl 18 PYeelon 
Barrj' Michael, porter W. &, J. Sloane, dwl 914 Harrison 
Barry Michael, shoemaker, dwl N s Roanoak nr Chenerj- 
Barry Michael, upholsterer William Green, dwl 31 Ellis 
Barry Owen, laborer, dwl SE cor McAllister and Octavia 
Barrj- Patrick, assistant wharfinger Oakland Ferry, dwl 

339 Clementina 
Barry Patrick, boilermaker, dwl 110 William, rear 
Barry Patrick, ex-policeman, dwl SW cor Ash Av and 

Octa\'ia 
Barry Patrick, extraman Engine No. 3 S. F. F. D. 
Barry Patrick, groceries and liquors, NW cor Natoma and 

Marv 
Barry Patrick, hostler Roe Allen, dwl 36 Jessie 
Barry Patrick, laborer, dwl 15S Natoma 
Barry Patrick, laborer, dwl 414 Folsom 
Barrj' Patrick, plumber, dwl 681 Clementina 
Barry Patrick, watchman Michelssen, Brown & Co., dwl 

S s Sixteenth nr Potrero Av 
Barry Patrick O., clerk Charles S. Barry, dwl 22 Glover 
Barry Richard, brass founder, dwl 260 j Clara 
Barrj' Richard, coppersmith John G. lis, dwl 237 Stev 
Barry Richard, currier, dwl 301 Fourth 
Barry Richard, laborer Golden Gate Park 
Barry Richard, sailmaker William C. Wood, dwl 18 Wash- 
ington Av, Bemal Heights 
Barry Robert, dwl 21 Prospect PI 
Barr3' Robert, longshoreman A. F. Spear & Co., dwl SW 

cor Mission and Spear 
Barry Robert, tailor, dwl 9 St. Mary, rear 
Barry Robert F. , ropemaker, dwl S s Sixteenth bet Guer- 
rero and Dolores 
Barry Sarah D. Miss, school teacher, dwl 1018 Clay 
Barry S. J. Mrs., dwl 1018 Clay 

Barry Theodore A. (Barry (t Patten), dwl 709 Gearj' 
Barry Thomas, bootcrimper Buckingham & Hecht, NW 

cor Gough and Haight 
Barry Thomas, laborer, dwl SE cor Pacific and Front 
Barry Thomas, marblepolisher Charles Roche, dwl 735 

Brannan 
Barrj- Tliomas, shoemaker, dwl 2 Eddy PI 
Barry Thomas, steerage steward G. N. & P. S. S. Ancon, 

Broadway St. Wharf 
Barry Thomas J., dwl Morton House 
Barry Thomas T., salesman Lazard Fr^res, dwl 213 Mason 
Bariy William, carjjenter, dwl 133j Dora 
Barry William, clerk Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 88 Ninth 
Barry AVilliam, dairy, E s San Bnmo Road nr Islais Creek 
Barry William, driver Market St. R. R., dwl 1807 Jessie 
Barry William, foreman repair shoj) Omnibus R. R. Co., 

dwl 630 Jessie 
Barry William, hackman, California nr Montgomery, dwl 

474 Tehama 
Barry William, horseshoer Nelson & Doble, dwl 211 Taj-lor 
Barrj' William, laborer WUliam T. Garratt, dwl 513 How 
Barry William, printer C. A. Murdock & Co., dwl 2523 Sac 
Barry William, shipcarpenter Middlemas «& Boole, dwl 21 

Bausch 
Barry William Jr., wheelvmght Ennis & McNeill, dwl 21 

Rausch 
Barrj' William Mrs., furnished rooms, 200 Stockton 
Barry William F., pressman Thomas & Co., dwl 1018 Clay 
Barry William I., clerk Donnelly, Dunne & Co., dwl 200 

Stockton 
Barry William McGill, assistant register clerk Probate 

Court, dwl 200 Stockton 
BAKRY A PATTEX (Theodore A. Barry and Benja- 
min A. Patten), wines and liquors, 413 Montgomery 
Barry. See Barrie 
Barse Ann (widow), dwl 1332 Dupont 
Barser William, laborer, dwl 412 Francisco 
Barsocihini M\\.omo(Lorenzo Marsili d: Co.), dwl 11 Bdwy 
Barsotti Virgil, divl NW cor Mason and Pacific 
Barss James E., hay, grain and feed, 400 Francisco 
Barstow Alfred, attorney at law, office 330 Pine room 50 



'I IliBl 



BARSTOW DATID P., attorney at law, office 32 

Sansom room 17, res Oakland 
Barstow George (Barstow, Stetson tfc Houghton), dwl 92 

Pine 

Barstow John L., capitalist, dwl American Exchange 

BARSTOW, STETSON A IIOIUUTON (Geort 

Barstow, Edward Gray Stetson, atui Roscoe 

Uoiujhtmi), attomejs at law, office'315 California 

Barsuglia Carlo, laborer Francisco Giovannini, dwl SE cc 

Broadwaj' and Keamj- 
Bart Annie (widow), dwl N s Greenwich bet Steiner an 

Fillmore 
Barta Charles, agent, dwl 207 Minna 
Bartch George, farmer, dwl Overland House 
Bartels Albert, cabinetmaker Charles Field & Co., dwl 27 

Perry 
Bartels Conrad, branch bakery, 247 Fourth 
Bartels George, confectioner Charles Lundt, dwl 1 St. Mar 
Bartels Henrj', upholsterer John A. Shaber & Co., dv 

1212 Kearny 
Bartels Joseph, proprietor Columbia Bakery, 30 Sixth 
Bartels Max, teacher music, dwl SW cor Mason and Watt 
Bartels Oscar, mariner, dwl 39 Jackson 
Bartels Otto, expressman, NAV cor Front and Commercii 

dwl Buchanan nr Bush 
Bartels Peter Henrv, liquor and billiard saloon, 1012 Ba 
BARTELS RICHARD, groceries and liquors, SW c( 

Howard and Eleventh 
Barten Felix, seaman, dwl 54 Sacramento 
Barter Augusta B. (widow), hj'dropathic electric phys 

cian, office and dwl 417 O'Farrell 
Barter G. H., warehouseman Whittier, Fuller & Co., dv 

Brannan bet Second and Third 
Barter Charles H., clerk Quartermaster's Department I 

S. A., dwl 2237 Jackson 
Earth Lason L. (Louis Holz iL- Co.), dwl 126 Fifth 
Barth Philip, clerk I. Glazier «& Co., dwl 23 Kearny 
Earthen Antona (widow), dwl N s Cedar Av bet Larki 

and Polk 
Barthman Charles, carpenter, dwl 909 Keamj' 
Barthol Marj', cloakmaker Charles Majer, dwl 40 Teharc 
Eartholme Joseph, cabiuetmaker Kragen & Co., dwl 3J 

Jessie 

B.IRTHOLOJIA JOH\, liquor saloon, 1017 Batterj 
Bartholomew Henry G., expressman, SE cor Front an 

Pine, dwl E s Devisadero bet Claj' and Sacramento 
Bartholow W. E. B., clerk Dunham, Carrigan & Co., dv 

204 Montgomerj' 
Barthrop Edward, dwl 317 Haj'es 
Bartin A., brassfinisher William T. Garratt 
Eartleman Kate Miss, dwl 34 Kearny 
Bartlesen Edward, waiter Freitas & Miller, dwl Bluxoir 

bet Fourth and Fifth 

Bartlett , machinist, dwl 16 Tehama 

Bartlett Alfred, real estate, dwl 2626 Sacramento 
Bartlett Asa W., spring bed manuf. 111 Minna 
Bartlett A. W. M. (widow), furnished rooms, 29 O'Farrel 

and phj'sician, office 13 O'Farrell 
Bartlett Benet, stonecutter, dwl 649 Stevenson, rear 
Bartlett Charles H., paperhanger, dwl 2 Rose Av 
Bartlett Colmnbus (Bartlett <jfc Pratt), dwl 1131 Ellis 
Bartlett Earl, attornej- at law, office 35 Montgomerj' Bloc! 

dwl S s Point Lobos Av nr Sixteenth Av 
Bartlett Elbridge, machinist Cal. Excelsior Co., dwl 20 

Second 
Bartlett Henry, dwl 29 Turk 
Bartlett Henry E., driver Contra Costa Laundry Assi 

dwl 110 Kearnv 
Bartlett J., boxmaker Cal. Cigar Box Co., dwl 234 First 
Bartlett James H., carpenter, dwl Sanchez nr Sixteenth 
Bartlett James V. , stage manager Wade's Opera Hous« 

dwl Palace Hotel 
Bartlett Jared, shipcaqienter, dwl 312 Beale 
Bartlett Job C, drayman David L. Farusworth, dwl 12 

Eddy 
Bartlett John M., clerk 620 Washington, dwl 315 Stock 
Bartlett Joseph, blacksmith, dwl 1453 Minna, rear 
Bartlett Lewis W., dwl 1104 Market 
Bartlett Nathaniel, packer F. D. Conro & Son, dwl 102 

Montgomerj- 
Bartlett Pliny (Hallett, B. .0 Dalton), res Oakland 
Bartlett Robert B. (Garrett it- B.), dwl 36 Moss 
Bartlett Walter, driver Davis Sewing Machine Co., dw 

lis Post 
Bartlett Washington (Bartlett <t Bandoljih), dwl 110 

Market 
Bartlett William, printer, dwl 121 Mason 
BAICTLETT WTLLIA.U t'., editorial rooms Eveninj 

Bulletin, res Oakland 



But 



TEANCIS & VALENTIITE. Commercial Printing House, 517 Clay Street, S. \ 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 




Bartlctt William P., foreman George Thistleton, dwl 13 

O'Farrell 
Bartlctt William S., noteteller National Gold Bank and 

Trust (Jo., res OakUuid 
BAK'I'LKTT «K PIIATT (Corncliux Ilartlett and Le- 

onultic E. Pratt), attorneys at law, ultioe (>:i(i Sac 
BAKTMCTT *i' KA:VU0L1>II Oyuyhinjton liartMt 
and Danu'l L. liandoiph), real-estate and money- 
brokers, oltiee 12 Montgomery 
Bartley Frank, boilenuaker McAfee, Spiers & Co., dwl 

ISf) Dora 
Bartley George, ironmolder, dwl 125 Dora 
Bartley George, laborer Pac. KoUing Mills, dwl W s Lou- 
isiana nr Shasta 
Bartliy Kohcrt, oook, dwl 48 Clenitntina 
Bartling Merriani, shii>t':irpenter dwl 1210 Pacific 
Eartlini,' William (llarthmf .(■ Kivdmll), res Oakland 
B;vrtlin,^' \ Kiniliall {WiUiain Bartlin,/ and Ihniry Kim- 
ball), liuokbiiulers and blank buuk nianufs, MU Clay 
Bartlow \\illiani, bootblack Stable & Bernhard, dwl 021 

Broadway 
Bartoli J. {X. Dartoli cfc Bro.), dwl 320 Broadway 
Rartoli N. & Brother {J. Barloli), cartmcn, 320 Bdwy 
Bartoli N. {N. Bartvli .£• Bni.), dwl 320 Broadway 
Bartmann Charles, dwl <J09 Kearny 
Bartniann Ferdinand, carpenter, dwl 522 Filbert, rear 
Bartniaini John C, teacher music, dwl 72'J Grove 
Barto Harrison (Spaiddimj it B.), dwl E s Reed ur Clay 
Barto Mary (widow), dwl 3 Caroline PI 
Bartiil David, dwl 559 Bryant 
Bartol Lee M., bookkeeper, dwl 559 Bryant 
Bartoldus Andrew, tailor Otto Marks, dwl C16 California 
Bartoli J. (xV. Bartoli cL- Bru.), dwl 320 Broadway 
Bartoli N. (lY. Bartoli it Bro.), dwl 320 Broadway 
Bartoli N & Bro. (J. Bartoli), eartmen, 320 Broadway 

Barton , dwl 8 Clementina 

Barton Benjamin F. (/J. F. Barton tt Co.), res Alameda 
Barton R F. & Co., proprietors Pioneer Salt Mills, 213 

Sacramento 
Barton Charles (Garcin it Son), dwl Eighteenth ur Gu- 
errero 
Barton Charles C, clerk Dunham, Carrigau & Co., dwl 

1325A Minna 
Barton F. , cook, dwl 907 Folsom 
Barton Francis, butcher Smith, Mann & Catlow, dwl cor 

First Av and Kentucky, South S. F. 
Barton George, engineer, dwl 418 Brannan 
Barton Hugh, stonecutter, dwl 553 Mission 
Barton James, boots and shoes, 819 Battery 
Barton James S., engineer, dwl 418 Bramian 
Barton J. H. Mrs., dwl 038 Howard 
BAUTOX JOM\, president Union Pacific Salt Co. and 
Banner Soap Co., office 218 Sacramento, res Alameda 
Barton John, waiter Palace Hotel 

Barton L. M., bookkeeper Baldwin's Hotel, dwl 559 Bry- 
ant 
Barton Mary (widow), dwl 500 Eddy 
Barton Phineas W., clerk Fireman's Fund Insurance Co., 

res Alameda 
Barton I-tichard, watchmaker, dwl 754 Folsom 
BAKTO.X KOBEICT, mining engineer, office Nevada 

Block, 309 Montgomery room 17, dwl 1116 Bush 
Barton Samuel, student, dwl 524 Howard 
Barton S. M., stock and money broker, 238 Montgomery 
Barton Thon\as A., fanner, dwl 421 O'Farrell 
Barton Thomas S., salesman N. B. Edgerly & Co., dwl 

331 Kearny 
Barton Willard T., assistant secretary S. F. Stock and Ex- 
change Board 
Barton William, longshoreman, dwl 2103 Stockton 
Barton William, painter, dwl 1232 Union 
Barton William, sawyer S. F. Manuf. Co., dwl 1420 Pac 
Barton William H., office 331 Montgomery room 27, dwl 

2428 Buchanan 
Bartram Henry, upholsterer, dwl SW cor Mission and 

Eighteenth 
Bartram Johannes, bookkeeper Stange & Hiuk, dwl 18 

Clara 
Bartsch Charles, dwl 435 Broadway 
Bartt George, hostler Peter Finnegan, dwl Larkin bet 

McAllister and Tyler 
Bartz Charles, tailor 502 Stockton 

Bartzotta Peter, baker D. Caraflta & Co., dwl 1309 Dupont 
Baruch David, delivery clerk Ackerman Brothers, dwl 

1224 Bush 
Baruch Frederick, salesman Buyer, Reich & Co., dwl 535i 

O'Farrell 
Baruch Isaac, merchant, dwl 535J O'Farrell 
Baruch Moses, salesman Ackerman Bros., dwl 1224 Bush 



Baruch Paulina, midwife, dwl 252 Minna 

Baruch Simon, salesman Samuel Leszynsky & Bro., dwl 

427 Tyler 
Barut Antonio, waiter Antonio Smith, dwl 1402 Stockton 
Barut Riiymond, butcher, 1402 Stockton 
Baruth Ennis, groceries and liquors, 1901 Post 
Baruth, William, groceries and liquors, NW cor Hyde 

and Sutter 
Barwell Charles, waiter D. Wolf 
Barwes Alexander, barkeeper, dwl 22 Turk 
Barz August (Barz, Suhl it Co.), dwl 120 Davis 
Barz, Suhl & Co. {Aiuj^tst Barz and Christian Suhl), 

wagonmakers and blacksmiths, 114 Drumm 
Basalt Co. (Marin Co., Cal.), Frank L. Palmer, secretary, 

office 302 California room 4 
Basan Antonio, Austrian Benev.lSoc., 71 New Montgomery 
Basch Abraham, Tailors' Protective Union, SW corKear- 

nj and Morton 
Basch Hermann, dwl 429 Turk 
Basch Hyman, tailor, 2 Bryan PI, dwl 359 J Tehama 
Basch Louis, dwl 229 Tyler 
Basch Sanmel (Basch <k Keve), dwl 411 Grove 
Basch & Keve (Samuel Basch and Felix Kove), tailors, 

1202 Market 
Bascoe J., dwl 310 Montgomery Av 
Bascom Dicus N., foreman Wesley Diggens, dwl 2520 

Sutter 
Bascomb Frederick A., machinist Central Pacific B. R. 

shop, dwl NE cor Sixteenth and Howard 
Basendorf Michael, machinist and Pacific U. W. Furni- 
ture M. Co., dwl 128 First 
Basey David, carpenter, dwl 22 Turk 
Basford Howard M., carpenter Henry J. McLerie, dwl 18 

Tavlor 
Basford Jacob K., dwl 2133 Bush 
Basford W. L., apothecary, SE cor Bush and Fillmore 
Bashini E., dwl 1406 Polk 

Basilawski Alphonse, fruits and vegetables, 1427 Dupont 
Basillo Joseph, engineer Black Diamond Coal Co., dwl 

214 Union 
Bask James, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s ^^^larf 
Baskell Frederick, laborer Hathaway's Wharf, dwl 52 First 
Basker villa John S., millhand L. and E. Emanuel, dwl 

591 Si.xth 
Baskerville Sarah J. Mrs., furnished rooms, 591 Sixth 
Baskett Frederick W., miner, dwl 122 Tiu-k 
Basler George A. , painter, dwl 29 Pearl 
Basney William, watchmaker, dwl 721 Bryant 
Bass Charles, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Bass Tliomas J. {T. J. Bassib Co.), dwl S s Fifteenth, bet 

Market and Noe 
BASS T. J. •& €0., paints, oils, varnish, and glass, 26 

Geary 
Bass William, Ship Calkers' Assn, 118 First 
Bassanovich Nicholas Martin, framemounter Snow & 

May, dwl 9 Union PI 
Basse "Thomas, merchant, office 526 California, res Bre- 
men, Germany 
Bassel R., clerk, dwl 10 Hyde 

Bassen J., laborer Hillebrandt & Co., dwl 2019 Folsom 
Bassen Joseph, waiter Antonio Smith, dwl 575 Stevenson 
Bassett A. C, superintendent Southern Pacific R. R., 
office NE cor Fourth and Towisend, Room 45, dwl 
421 Bryant 
BASSET'T V. F. «fe CO., produce commission mer- 
chants, 304 Davis 
Bassett Charles E., master mariner, dwl 13 Clinton 
Bassett Charles F. (C. F. Bassett d; Co.), dwl Ws Mission, 

nr Twelfth 
Bassett Daniel, seaman, dwl 58 Clementina 
Bassett Daniel J., clerk Keyt & Co., dwl 58 Clementina 
Bassett Frank W., dwl 14 Eleventh 
Bassett G. L. Miss, adjuster coiner's department U. S. 

Mint, dwl 114 Eleventh 
Bassett Henry C, clerk Figaro, res East Oakland 
Bassett John, stevedore, dwl 3 Thompson Av 
Bassett Joseph, laborer, dwl 509 Washington 
BASSETT JOSEPH, produce commission, 221 and 

223 Clay, res Fruit Vale, Alameda Co. 
Bassett Rachel (widow), dwl 114 Eleventh 
Bassett William, waiter, dwl 1218 Kearny 
Bassey William, cabinetmaker, dwl 721 Bryant 
Bassi Josejih, dwl 620 Post 
Bassini Bernardo, meterman S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 

1327 California 
Bassity James E., plasterer, dwl 113 Jones 
Bast Engelbert, bricklayer, dwl 114 Valparaiso 
Bastheim Joseph {Eimtein Brothers <k Co.), dwl 1509 
Gough 



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JAMES &. STEELE & CO., Apothecaries, No. 316 Kearny Street. 



D. "W. Laird, Manufacturing Jeweler, "Wholesale and Retail, cor. Merchant and Mc 



Bastian Benedict, tailor, dwl 1112 Kearny 

Bastian Jacob (Mcssner <fc Bastian), dwl 402 Pacific 

Baston Abner Freeman, driver Kohler, Chase & Co., dwl 

1026 McAllister 
Baston Jose])h G., clerk Waterhouse & Lester, dwl 1026 

McAllister 
Bastruni Henrj', seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 
Bataille Albert P., waiter M. Deutsch & Co., dwl 421 

Green 
Batchelder Hiram, carrier Alta and Bulletin 
Batchclder John R., carpenter, dwl 1012 Webster 
B,itchelder Levi, clerk Union News Co., dwl 1026 Clay 
Bjitchelder Levi L., stevedore, office Rotunda Merchants' 

E.\;change, dwl 1026 Clay 
Batchekler .J., captain brig Orient, office 44 Market 
Batchelder W. H. Jr., butcher Schmidt & Co., dwl 114 

Austin 
Batchelder William H., housemover David Harris, dwl 

114 Austin 
Batchelder. See Bachelder 
B.4.TCHELOR EDW.4JRD PAYSON (late prosecuting 

attorney and justice of the peace), attorney at law, 

office 7 Montgomery Block, dwl Windsor House 
Batchley Ambrose, mining:, dwl 137 Montgomerj' 
Batcoeski John, baker, dwl 73S Vallejo, rear 
Batdenar Philip, coal and wood, 715 Har, dwl 722 Har 
Bateman Francis, dwl 1124^ Harrison, rear 
BATEMAX ISAAC C, capitalist, office 419 California 

room 7, dwl 555 Harrison 
Bateman James, bootmaker Louis Silberstein, dwl cor 

Broadway and Davis 
Bateman John, carpenter Charles Williams, dwl 21 Stev 
Bateman John C, dwl 1912 Pacific Av 
Bateman LeMott, clerk Bowen Brothers, res Oakland 
Bateman Michael C. Jr., dwl 1912 Pacific Av 
Bateman Michael C. Sr. , real estate, dwl 1912 Pacific Av 
Bateman Miles, carpenter D. A. Macdonald & Co., dwl 277 

Stevenson 
Bateman William, dwl 350 First 
Bateman William, carpenter California Mills 
Bateman William A., dairy produce, 353 Tehama, dwl 906 

Market 
Bates Alfred, carpenter, dwl S s Elm Av bet Tj'ler and 

Turk 
Bates Alfred, teacher University School First Baptist 

Church, N s Eddj' nr Jones, dwl 712 Bush 
Bates Caroline Miss, teacher University School First Bap- 
tist Church, N s Eddy nr Jones, dwl 1404 Van Ness Av 
Bates Cicero M., physician, office 224 Kearny, and pro- 
fessor clinical medicine University of California, dwl 

206 Powell 
BATES COUBTIEX PL.-iTT, medical student State 

University, dwl 2524 Bush 
Bates Daniel S., night inspector Custom House, dwl E s 

Ninth bet Mission and Jessie 
Bates Dewitt, engineer, dwl 6 Rose Av 
Bates Dudley C. (S. B. Boswell <t Co.) dwl 1705 Octavia 
Bates Edward K., bootmaker, dwl 1124 Market 
Bates Ella Mrs., dwl 88 Ninth 
Bates Eugene J., shipping clerk Crane & Brigham, dwl 

764 Harrison 
Bates Felix P. W. , carpenter, dwl SE cor Baker and Cal 
Bates Frank, clerk S. Mosgrove i; Co., dwl 630 Brannan 
Bates Frederick, dwl 120 Park Av 
Bates George, laborer Jacob Christian, 226 First 
Bates George, principal University School First Baptist 

Church, N s Eddy nr Jones, dwl 1404 Van Ness Av 
Bates James, seaman, dwl 54 Sacramento 
Bates John, barkeeper J. P. Tj'son, dwl NW cor Spear 

and Harrison 
Bates John, seaman, dwl N s Townsend nr Third 
Bates John S., gardener, dwl 526 Oak 
BATES JOSEPH €., attorney at law, office 434 Cali- 
fornia, dwl 2520 Clay 
Bates J. W., painter Hopps & Sons 
Bates M., dwl 10 Taylor 

Bates Michael, port«r Murphy, Grant & Co. , dwl 79 Clem 
Bates Morris S. , cashier Williams, Blanchard & Co., dwl 

1110 Leavenworth 
Bates Morris Upham (Bates, Woods & Co.), dwl 1210 

Mason 
Bates Robert, hostler, dwl 6 Card Alley 
Bates Samuel, master mariner, dwl 518 Eddy 
Bates Thomas, laborer Beale St. Wharf, dwl 718 Pacific 
Bates Thomas W., salesman Bax & Co., dwl 652 Howard 
Bates William, contractor, dwl N s M nr San Jos^ Av 
Bates William H., furnished rooms, 211 Stevenson 
Bates, Woods & Co. {Morris Upham Bates and Charles 

Woods), proprietors Commercial News, 411 Clay 



Bateson Marie (widow), dwl 7 Clementina 

Bath , dwl 126 Fifth 

Bath Isidore, dwl 432 Broadway 

Bath Richard W., Coopers' Union, 417 Bush 

Bathel Thomas W., police officer, dwl 13 Fifth Av 

Bathurst Jsellie Miss, tailoress Louis Goldstein, dwl 517 

Bryant 
Batiado G., fisherman, dwl 519 Davis 
Batisbee Frank, wheelwTight McDonald & Cameron 
Batsere Jean, cook Francois Lacoste, dwl 1116 Bryant 
Batt Jacob, peddler, dwl 590 Stevenson 
Battalora P., glazier, dwl 1413 Dupont 
Battams William, salesman Locke & Montage, dwl Occi- 
dental Hotel 
Battams B. J. Mrs., dwl 611 Mason 
Batteau Fla^^a, cook Lick House, dwl 29 Minna 
Battel George, mariner, dwl 243 Fremont 
Battelle N. Y. , clerk, dwl 16 Turk 

Batten George, porter Shattuck & Fletcher, dwl 414 Pa- 
cific 
Batten Sampson {Batten & Mullen), dwl S s California 

bet Baker and Broderick 
Batten & Mullen {Sampson Batten and Michael Mullen), 

stonecutters, W s Geary bet Masonic and Cemetery 

avs 
Battersby Frederick, wheelwright, dwl 410 Beale 
Battersby James, w-atchmaker, 13 Third, dwl 709 Mission 
Battersbv Robert, mining engineer, dwl Overland House 
BATTERV ST. BO>l>ED WAREHOUSE, George 

C. Bode proptr, NW corner Batterj' and Filbert 
Batteux Daniel {Wei.ss <t- B.), dwl 418J^ Sixth 
Batteux Frederick W., artist, dwl 1143 Mission 
Battheimer Charles, stockkeeper Levi Strauss & Co., dwl 

112 Austin 
Battles Sarah (widow), dwl 2 Antonio 
Battifora John, restaurant, 650 Sacramento 
Battin Henn' E., dwl 718 Howard 
BATTLE JOSEPH, merchant tailor, 35 Turk 
Battles Edward, dwl NWcor Third and Berrj' 
Battles John Jr. , lodgings, 3 King nr Third " 
Battles William W., merchant, dwl 1109 Post 
Battu Hvppolite Jr., housepainter, dwl 1112 Hyde 
Battu Zoe Mrs., dwl 1H2 Hyde 
Batturs Edward T., business manager Frank G. Edwards, 

dwl 521 Leavenworth 
Batturs Samuel Archer, upholsterer Frank G. Edwards, 

dwl 521 Leavenworth 
Battye Hans, seaman, dwl 21 Pacific 
Bauch Peter G., custom-house broker, 500 Battery, dwl 

719 Linion 
Bauck Frederick, liquor refiner, dwl Prescott House 
Bauckenburg Henrj', cellarman, dwl 1100 Stockton 
Baud Frank, brass fouudrj-, 522 Fulton 
Baudouin August, patternmaker Bisdon I. and L. Works, 

dwl 636 Pacific 

Bauer , dwl 442 Second 

Bauer A. , engineer, dwl 39 Jackson 

Bauer Abraham {Bauer, Tobriner tfc Co.), res Paris 

Bauer Adolph, fringemaker, dwl 252 Tehama 

Bauer August {Baxter & Schmidt), dwl Lombard bet 

Steiner and Fillmore 
Bauer Charles, laborer Ruhland Bros., N s Central Road 

nr Golden Gate Park 
Bauer Charles, policeman City Hall, dwl 717 Clementina 
Bauer Charles, waiter What Cheer House 
Bauer Charles A., liquor saloon, 1143 Mission 
Bauer Charles F., cabinetmaker, 23 Seventh, dwl 510 

Jessie 
BAUER EMILE, manager San Francisco News Co., 

office 413 Washington, dwl lS38Gear}^ 
Bauer Emile E., liquor dealer, dwl 11 Harrison Av 
Bauer Frank, fisherman, dwl 10 Broadwaj' 
Bauer Frank, teamster F. & J. Stand, dwl 331 Bush 
Bauer Frederick, deckhand stm Coquille, Pacific St. Wharf 
Bauer Frederick, lumbenuan C. A. Hooper & Co. 
Bauer F. T., clerk John A. Bauer, dwl 716 Broadway 
Bauer George, liquor saloon, 19 Dupont 
Bauer Gustave A., machinist, dwl 706 Mission 
Baur Henn,-, upholsterer John C. Bell, dwl 1511 Cal 
Bauer Herman, guilder West Coast Fiimiture Co., dwl cor 

Thirtieth and Castro 
Bauer Jacob, foreman Eclipse Bakerj', dwl 1414 Dupont 
Bauer John, {Chapman cfc B.), dwl 220 Fillmore 
Bauer John, cook R. R. Hotel, dwl 1314 Polk 
Bauer John, cutler Michael Price, dwl NE cor Third and 

Folsom 
Bauer John, laborer, dwl E s Fillmore nr Kate 
Bauer John, laborer George H. Whitney, 114 Steuart 
Bauer John, milkman, dwl A'andewater nr Powell 



PEANCIS & VALENTINE, Printers, 517 Clay and 510-516 Commercial St., S. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO, 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



BAITER JOIIW A., manufactiu-iiig chemist and drug- 

g'lst, 101 Post, dwl 609 Post 
Bauer John A., soapmaker, dwl S s Lombard bet Fill- 
more and Steiner 
Bauer John Jacob, cabinetmaker, dwl 024 Pacific 
Bauer Joseph, dwl ;«» Moss 
Bauer Joseph, cabinetmaker, dwl 7;>."i Brannan 
BAl KK L. A t'O. (F. //o«-/i/((a.v), liquor saloon, 1200 

Market 
Bauer Leojiold, laborer Pacific Stair Factory, dwl Oough 

nr V'allejo 
Bauer Lewis, cutler, 241 King, dwl cor Folsom and Third 
Bauer Louis {L. linxer d- Co.), dwl 1200 Market 
Bauer Moses, dwl 5;i2 Turk 

Bauer Otto, clerk Jliehaeiltschke Bros., dwl 31 John 
Bauer Peter, dwl 1321^ Stockton 

Bauer Samuel, fancydry Koods, 410 Kearny, dwl 532 Turk 
Bauer Simon, barkeeper Felix Block, 520 Kearny 
Bauer, Tobriner & Co. (Abraham Uancr anil Mathew 

ToOriner), imi>orters and wholesale dealers fancy 

goods, laces and embroideries, :<i~ Market 
Bauer William, clerk Joseph Seidl, dwl X',\ Hayes 
Bauer William, confectioner Pellet & Fahrbach, dwl 19 

Lewis 
Bauer William, upholsterer Adam Lenhardt 
Bauer William, usher California Theater 
Bauer & Schmidt (-1 «<;«.■!< Bauer and Peter Schmidt), 

Golden City Soap Factory, SW cor Greenwich and 

Webster 
Bangh Theodore E., dwl 25 South Park 
Buuirard Xapoleon, machinist, 524 Fourth 
Baulisir Nunrod (Michard C. Hanson ct Co.), dwl 1332 

Washington 
Baulme Eugene, tailor, dwl 331 Fourth 

Baum (widow), dressmaker, dwl 5 Essex PI 

BAIN C'lIAKLElS (Charles Edward Heise), custom 

house brokers, 510 Battery 
BAI'.H CHAKIiES, Consul Argentine Republic, office 

510 Battery, dwl 1705 Powell 
Baum David A., clerk Liverpool and London and Globe 

Insurance Co., dwl 600 Bush 
Baum Gustave, furniture, 740 Washington, dwl 715 

Larkin 
Baum H\Tnan, clerk Gustave Baum, dwl 715 Larkin 
BAliM .1. <& to. (Henry J: Morrk Shrier), importers 

and manufacturers clothing, 521 and 523 Market 
Baum Julius (J. Baum d- Co.), dwl 1111 Van Ness Av 
Baum M., laborer Patent Brick Co. 
Baum Philip, dwl 1715 Larkin 
Baum Simon (Siinon Baum d- Co.), dwl 303i Tiu'k 
BAI .11 SIM<»\ A CO., importers and jobbers men's 

furnishing goods, 217 and 219 Pine 
Baum William, dwl 621 California 
Baum William, barkeeper Mrs. C. Mangenberg, NW cor 

Fult«n and Sixth Av 
Bauman Frederick, dwl E s Mont Av bet Pac and Bdwy 
Bauman Charles, chairmaker Hale & Co. , dwl 502 Miss 
Bauman Charles, tailor, dwl 1108 Stockton 
Bauman Henry, teamster, dwl 2 Washington Av 
Bauinan Jacob, dairjiuan Henrj- Schwerin, dwl Visitacion 

Valley nr San Bruno Road 
Bauman .Joseph, workman Michelssen, Brown & Co., dwl 

cor Ninth and Brannan 
Bauman Louis, tailor Henry Planz, dwl 818 Folsom 
Bauinan Pester, milkranch, Webster nr Francisco 
Baun)an Rudolph, reporter, dwl 912 Jackson 
Baumann George, tailor, dwl 1601 Dupont 
Baumann H. H., real estate agent, office 502 Montgomerj', 

dwl 907 Clay 
Baumann John, musician, dwl 707 McAllister 
Baiunann Joseph, barkeeper, dwl 844 Washington 
Baumann Sabattie, Swiss Benev. Soc., 627 Com 
Baumann Sigmund, clerk Levi Strauss & Co., dwl 502 

Bush 
Baumberger Eliza Mrs., teacher piano and languages, 

dwl W s Octavia bet Oak and Hickory Av 
BaumV)erger James, bookkeeper Breeze & Loughran, dwl 

W s Octavia bet Oak and Fell 
Baumberger Solomon, clerk Herman E. Leszjiisky, dwl 

1404 Polk 
Baumeister Bernard, dwl 13 Verona PI 
Baumeister Frederick (Buh d; B.), dwl 411 Bush 
Baumeister George, woodturner, dwl 624 Fourth 
Baimieister Henn,-, hostler S. F. Laundry, dwl NW cor 

Turk and Fillmore 
Baumeister John, dwl 1038 Howard 
Baumeister John A., tailor, 306 Fell 
Baumeister Joseph, sashmaker William B. Bradbury, dwl 

2219 Powell 



Baumgardner E. M. Mrs., vice-principal Denman Gram- 
mar School, dwl 703 Taylor 
Baumgardner S. J., dwl 703 Taylor 
Baumgarten Carl (jW. [Tllinann <fc Co.), res Pesth, Hun- 

fe'ary 
Baumgarten Joseph, cashier M. UUman & Co. , dwl 742 

Washington 
Baumgarten Joseph, shoemaker H. Innschcr, dwl 607 

Union 
Baumgarten Otto, boatman, dwl 40 Jackson 
Baumgartner John J., Swiss Benev. Soc, 627 Com 
Baumgartner Peter, Swiss Benev. Soc, 627 Connnercial 
Baumgartner Robert, clerk Crane & Brigham, res Oak- 
land 
Baumgartner Valentine (Baumgartner <fc Co.), dwl 614 

Natoma 
Baumgartner & Co. (Valentine Batimgartner), manufac- 

terers smoking tobacco, 23 Seventh 
Baumgerslein Otto, seaman, dwl 28 Claj' 
Baumquetz A., laborer, dwl SW cor Miss and Eighteenth 
Baumskey William, boatman, 29 Pacific 
Baumstark Bernhard, carpenter, dwl 429 Pine 
Baun Joseph, driver, dwl SE cor Hartford and Eighteenth 
Baurele Frederick (Baurele <fc Cronk), dwl 702 Filbert 
Baurele & Cronk (F. Baurele and Wm. H. Cronk), cabi- 
netmakers and carpenters, 704 Filbert 
Baurlute Isaac, engineer, dwl 7 Freelon 
BAI'.SM AX WILLIAM, editor Morning Call, office 517 

Clay, dwl 552 Minna 
Bauten Nicholas J. (N. J. Bauten tf^ Co.), dwl 228 Bran 
Bauten N. J. & Co. (William Muehe) groceries and 

liquors, 228 Brannan 
Bautins Burrell, carpenter, dwl 1218 Union 
BAIIX F. A., real estate, office 29 Merchants' Exchange, 

res Oakland 
Bavaria Brewery, Philip Frauenholz & Co. proprietors, 

E s Montgomery Av bet Vallejo and Green 
Bawden William G. (F. W. Crowlice cfc Co.), dwl 1524 

Pacific Av 
BAX E. A CO. (Victor Koppel), manufacturers of 

ground coffee and spices, and tea dealers, 507 Clay 
Bax Edmund (E. Bax d: Co.), res Tubbs' Hotel, Oakland 
Baxter C, dwl 111 Leavenworth 
Baxter Charles, dwl 236 Oak 

Baxter Charies E. A. (Thompson ct B.), dwl 322 Turk 
Baxter Edward H., salesman Crane & Brigham, dwl 1109 

Howard 
Baxter F. C. (Parker <& B.), dwl 102 Mason 
Baxter Francis, artist, dwl 407 Leavenworth 
Baxter Hall W., cashier Crane & Brigham, dwl S s Ellis 

bet Filmore and Steiner 
Baxter James, engineer, dwl 34 Louisa 
Baxter James, miner, dwl 411 Sansom 
Baxter Joseph Parker, local policeman, dwl 1011 Vallejo 
Baxter Louisa L. (widow), dwl 1109 Howard 
Baxter Matthew, tanner Cornelius O'Donnell, dwl 11 

Geneva 
Baxter Michael, laborer, dwl 519 Mission 
Baxter Patrick, laborer Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 17 

Harrison Av 
Baxter William, dwl 1616 Clay 

Baxter William S., clerk Pac. Refinery and Bullion Ex- 
change, res Oakland 
Baxstram Henry, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Mont 
Bay and River Line Schooners, Jerome B. Piper proptr, 

office cor Claj' and East 
Bay Brewery, Weyand & Kasche proptrs, 612-616 Seventh 
Bay City Soda Water Co., F. R. Wilson secretary, 87 and 

89 Stevenson 
BAY DISTRICT FAIRGROUNDS ASSOCIATION, 
grounds Point Lobos Av, C, First, and Sixth avs, 
T. W. Hinchman secretary, office 317 Montgomery 
Bay Salt Co., A. Giorgiani agent, 421 Washington 
BAY Sl'OAR REFINERY, Herman Meese president, 

Peter Meyer secretary, SW cor Battery and Union 
BAY YIEW DISTILLERY^ Andrew A. Louderback 
proptr, cor Nineteenth and H, South S. F., office and 
salesroom 313 and 315 Battery- 
Bay View Nursery, Alfred Brocq proptr, NE cor Twenty- 
first Av and J, South S. F. 
BAY W.4REHOFSE, John Melville proptr, W s San- 
som, bet Lombard and Greenwich 
Bayard Henry, laundrjTnan Victor Quentin, dwl 808 Stock 
Bayard Jos6 O., clerk, dwl 814 Sacramento 
Bayer Jacob, liquor saloon, 16 Ckiy, dwl 27 Clay 
Bayer Joseph C, tinsmith Henry J. McLerie, dwl 811 

Folsom 
B.ayer Julius, beer bottler, 4 Heron 
Bayerle Charles, dwl 933 Kearny 



TAMES Qt. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 
9 



r. "W. Laird, San Prancisoo Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchai f, 



BAY 



122 



BEA 



Baj'Ie John, butcher, 83 and 84 Cal Market, dwl Fifth Av 

bet L and JI, Sonth S. F. 
Bay less Joseph, draftsman Dewey & Co., dwl 8 Geneva 
Bayless Wilhani H., architect, dwl 8 Geneva 
Baylcy C. , driver City H. R. 
KAILEY CHAKLI':S A., Bayley's Sample Rooms, 659 

Clay, dwl 813 Broadway 
Bayley Kdward A., salesman Charles Otto, dwl 1016 Taylor 
Bayley George B., note clerk Nevada Bank of S. F., res 

Oakland 
Bayley Henry, curled hair manufacturer, dwl cor Mari- 
posa and Santa Maria 
Bayley Patrick J., waiter Russ House, dwl E s Pensylva- 

nia Av nr Sierra 
Bayley Thomas, boarding, 73 Oregon 
Bayley Wilbur F., photographer, dwl 824J Pacific 
Bayley William, whitening, 662 Mission, dwl Potrero Av 
Bay lis George, driver Potrero and B. V. R. R., dwl W s 

Kentucky ur Humboldt 
Bayly Charles A., apothecar}', SE cor Howard and Sixth 
Bayly Paiiline Mrs., physician, 163 Tehama 
Bajina Joseph Rev. , professor of mathematics St. Igna- 
tius College, dwl 841 Market 

Bayne, , shipcarpenter L. S. Allen. 16 Drumm 

BajTeuther Amelia (widow), dwl 253 Stevenson 

Bayreuther Clara Miss, dwl 253 Stevenson 

Bayreuther Gustave, tinsmith P. Abrahamson, dwl 253 

Stevenson 
Bays Henry, dwl 745 Market 
Bays John, contractor, dwl 2222 Bush 

Bazaine , laborer Stryker & Kieraan, pier 5 Steuart 

Bazela Frank, gardener, San Bruno Road, Bay View 

Bazelio Christ, cook, John George, dwl 205 Third 

Bazin Ferdinand, physician and surgeon, office and dwl 

1633 Mission 
Bazin Louise Mme., Children's Home, 1633 Mission 
Bazin Victor, tailor, dwl 1633 Mission 
Bazno John, barkeeper, dwl SW cor Vallejo and Mont- 

gomerj' Av 
Bazzini Joseph, shoemaker, dwl 1238 Market 
Bazzini Marco, laborer N. Giamboni &Co., 612 Clay 
Bazzuro Francisco, restam-ant and oyster saloon, 105 Pac 
Beach A. B., teamster, dwl SE cor Bush and Polk 
Beach Andrew, soap and salt dealer, dwl 528 Stevenson 
Beach Baldwin, carpenter, dwl 14 Gilbert 
Beach Carrie A. Mrs., dwl 663 Howard 
Beach, Charles, carpenter, dwl 218 Eighteenth 
BEAt'M t'HILION, books and stationerj', 3 Montgom- 
ery, dwl Grand Hotel 
Beach Carme W., business manager Cal. Chemical Paint 

Co., 117 Pine, dwl 619 Fell 
Beach Eliza (widow), dwl 514 Sutter 
Beach Frank E., salesman Cal. Chemical Paint Co,, dwl 

907 Bush 
Beach George H., salesman Lewis Bros., 213 Battery 
Beach Hannah (widow), dwl 20 Wetmore PI 
Beach Hattie Mrs., artist, dwl 107 Minna 
Beach Henry H., accountant Wellman, Peck & Co., dwl 

228 Turk 
Beach Horace, cashier U. S. Mint, office NW cor Mission 

and Fifth, dwl 534 Bush 
Beach John, barkeeper George Green, dwl 1106 Mason 
BEACH JOfIX v., proprietor Adams House, 537 Sac- 
ramento 
Beach John E., machinist Tait & Hainque, dwl 141 Min 
Beach Joseph G., ceiling decorator, depot 146 Second, dwl 

107 Minna 
Beach Thonaas P., secretary Coos Bay (Oregon) Coal Co., 

office 424 Montgomery 
Beach Tyler, president Cal. Chemical Paint Co., and 
president Pac. Proprietary Medicine Co., office 410 
Fourth, res San Jose 
Beach & Paxton Gold and Silver Mining Co. (Storey Co. 
Ncv.), Michael Landers secretary, office 309 Mont- 
g'omery room 2 
BEAI>LE I>OXAI/D, shipping and commission mer- 
chant and agent stm Mary Taylor for Point Arenas, 
office 40 California, dwl NW cor Fulton and Laguna 
Beadon John, seaman, dwl 39 Jackson 
Beagle Francis N., carpenter, 1225 Filbert 
Beahee Joseph H., patternmaker, dwl 246 Beale, rear 
Beakley Absalom, cane-chair repairer, 3i Mills PI 
Beakley John S., homeopathic phj'sician, office and dwl 

532 Geary 
Beakley Sarah Mrs., dwl 532 Geary 
Beal, B. F. , tinsmith Locke & Montague, dwl 704 How 
Beal Daniel, driver City R. R., dwl 251 Fifteenth 
Beal Martin, jeweler Weyl Bros., res Oakland 
Beal Robert, machinist, dwl 950 Mission 



Beal Samuel, manufacturer mattresses, 575 Mission, dwl 

2526 Clav 
Beal W. A., dwl 411 Sansom 
Beal William, liquor saloon, 601 Kearny 
Beal William, miner, dwl 6 Perry 
Beale Charles, carpenter, dwl 9 Taylor 
Beale John (William Beale X- Sonx), dwl 948 Mission 
Beale John J., machinist Washington & Wagner, dwl 950 

Mission 
Beale Richard (William Beale d- Sons), dwl 948 Mission 
BEALE ST. MILL, Holland & Ruppel proprietors, 

NW cor Beale and Mission, office 304 Mission 
Beale St. Warehouse, John McHugh superintendent, cor 

Beale and Brj'ant 
Beale St. Wharf, foot Beale 
Beale Thomas, laborer, dwl 509 Washington 
Beale William (William Beale & Sows), dwl 948 Mission 
Beale William & Sons (Richard and John), marble works, 

950 Mission 
Beales John T., stockbroker, 426 Mont, dwl 1523 Polk 
Beall Samuel W., observer signal service U. S. A., office 

and dwl 42 Merchants' Exchange 
Beals Charles, agent, dwl 421 O'Farrell 
Beals Caroline R. Mrs., assistant Girls' High School, dwl 

1204 Leavenworth 
Beals Charles Ward, pressman, dwl 2101 California 
Beals Edward C, clerk Lachman & Stemfels, dwl 2101 

California 
BEALS 'H. CHAXIVLVG, editor Commercial Herald 

and Market Review, office 409 Washington, dwl 2101 

California 
Beals J., driver City R. R. 
Beals J., physician, dwl 40J- Geary 
Beals John P., music engraver and printer Matthias 

Gray; 513 Market, res Alameda 
Beam George W., sailmaker Harding & Brown, dwl 1207 

Union 
Beam Joel M., cook Richard Toomey, dwl?ll Pacific 
BEAM PETER CJ., general agent Michigan Central R, 

R. Office, 140 Montgomery, dwl Lick House 
Beam William, cook Richard Toomey, dwl 311 Pacific 
Beaman Orlando, hatter Henry White, dwl 6 Centre PI 
Beaman S., clerk, dwl 620 O'Farrell 
Beaman. See Beeman 
Beamish Abraham, laborer, dwl 714 Grove 
Beamish John, dwl 23 Rmcon PI 
Beamish John, bootmaker George Burkhardt, dwl 714 

Grove 
BEAMISH PEKCT, importer and manufacturer cloth- 
ing, shirts, and fm-nishing goods, 691 and 693 Market, 

dwl 2130 Howard 
Beamish William, clerk, 533 Commercial 
Beamish. See Beamis 

Bean Adolphus, seamen stmr Ancon, Broadway St. Wharf 
Bean Alfonso, helper Betts Spring Co., dwl 533 Com 
Bean Benjamin, blacksmith, dwl 215 Ninth 
Bean Charles T., calker Middlemas & Boole, dwl 1207 

Union 
Bean D. F., porter James M. Curtis 

Bean Edwin F., salesman J. H. Deering, dwl 865 Mission 
Bean F., dwl NE cor Berry and Madden 
Bean George W., sailmaker Thomas Reynolds, dwl 1207 

Union 
Bean James, machinist, dwl N s Twenty-fifth, nr Castro 
Bean James, shipwright Middlemas & Boole, Pier 19 Steu 
Bean John D., cook Dennis Mataranger, dwl 636 Com 
Bean Joseph H., carpenter California Mills 
Bean Levy, bootmaker, 602 Fourth 
Bean Moses T., master mariner, dwl 1207 Union 
Bean Redmond, stevedore, SE cor Mission and Steuart, 

dwl 112 Tehama 
Bean Sylvanus, plumber C. H. Stoombs & Co., dwl 1207 

Union 
Bean Wesley P., upholsterer William J. Heney & Co., 

dwl 913 Jackson 
Bean William, drayman Glynn & Bridgman, dwl 35 Park 

Av 
Bean William, laborer, dwl 33 Clementina, rear 
Bean William, salesman Kennedy & Durr, dwl 643 Stev 
Beane William, painter, dwl 141 Second 
Beanston George, secretarj' Board of Education, dwl 13 8a! 

Verba Buena ' 

Beanston Peter, can-iage blacksmith, dwl E s Webster bet 

Ellis and O'Farrell 
Bear Edwin, machinist Union Iron Works 
Bear Francisco, dwl 309 Bay 
Bear Solomon, moueybroker, 140 Montgomery, dwl 418 

Sutter 
Beard George, calker, dwl 54 First 



BEAMISH'S-Nucleus Bldg, Third & Market, Shirts Si Men's Furnishing &ood 



Beiu 



Beavi 



^P. VAIT SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 7U, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Beard George, longshoreman, dwl N s Greenwich bet 

MoiitjT'inierj' and Sansom 
Beard Horace H., clerk Max Richter, dwl 331 Sixth 
Beard Joseph K., dwl "04 Howard 
Bcardslee Cyru.s, carpenter, dwl 430 Union 
Beardslcy C. Mrs., dwl los Ellis 
Beardsley George F., gasfitter W. R. Allen, dwl NE cor 

lirannan and Geneva 
Beardsley James Jr., foreni«n Pacific Commercial Co., 

dwl N'E cor Franklin and Fulton 
Beardsley John H., accountant, otfioe 5 Court Block 636 

Clay, dwl 910 Taylor 
Beardsley Paul F., stockbroker, 306 Montgomery, dwl 534 

Bush 
Beardsley Sophia (widow), furnished rooms, 631 Geary 
Bearsing James, mariner, dwl North German Hotel 
Beurwald Jacob, printer Edward Bosqui & Co., dwl 719 

Tehama 
Beasley Edward C, teacher Han'ard School, Tehama nr 

Second, dwl 423 Harrison 
Beasley Isaac, engineer, dwl 424 Broadway 
Beasley Philip, salesman Anthony J. Griffith, dwl 828 Cal 
Beasley Samuel, seaman, dwl 32 Steuart 
'"t Beasley William, gardener, dwl S s Francisco bet Jones 
and Taylor 

Beason Frederick, drayman, dwl 907 Larkin 
Beasy Ann (widow), dwl 1553 Kearny 
Ecu til George, waiter, dwl 421 Green 
■i Beaton Alexander, cook Farley & Lamb, 202 First 
-il Beaton Angus, shipcarpenter Boole & Webster, dwl 26 
Webster 
Beaton John J., shipcarpenter Middlemas & Boole, dwl 26 
Silver 
Ji Beaton \eil, carpenter John Fumess, dwl 26 Silver 

Beaton Norman, piper, dwl 5 Morton 
-'I Beaton Peter, shipcarpenter Middlemas & Boole, dwl 26 
Silver 
Beattie Da^id, tailor Austin Fitzgerald, dwl 219 Slinna 
2. [Jeatty C, driver City R. R. 
Beatty Henrj', waiter Lick House 

Beatty James, clerk Miu-phy, Grant & Co. , dwl 31 Eleventh 

'■ Beatty James, teamster, dwl Tenth Av m- M, South S. F. 

Beatty John, cabinetmaker S. F. Maufacturing Co., dwl 

81 Eleventh 
Beatty John, conductor N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 8 
Folsom Av 
11 Beatty John, gardener Industrial School 

Beatty Lee, carpenter, dwl 527 Sacramento 
> Beatty Patrick, mattressmaker, 320 Dupont, dwl 531 
■A OFaiTcll 

Jeatty Rebecca, laundress Grand Hotel 
Beatty Samuel, liquor saloon, 1006 Kearny 
Beatty Samuel, shoemaker Einstein Bros. & Co., dwl 343 
:iil Jessie 

Beatty Samuel G., dwl 309 Jones 

Beatty William, watchman International Hotel, 824Kear 
'.:Ti Jeatty William, carriage proprietor, NW cor Bush and 
Kearny, dwl 413 Bush 
Jeaucliamp Frederick, salesman Solomon Bine, dwl 1116 
ai Jackson 

3eauchamp G. W., salesman S. Wolfif & Co., dwl 109 Leav 
;;'); ieuuchamp Julia A. (widow), dwl 2430 Sac nr Fillmore 

Beaudry Alexander, barkeeper, dwl 1142i Market 
.■II Jeauharnais S. A. Mrs., embroiderer, dwl 1206 Stockton 
■a Jeauman Louis W., manufacturers' agent, iJffice 27Beale, 
dwl 816 Powell 
Jeauregard N., rolltumer Pacific Rolling Mills 
Jeauregard William, boilermaker Pacific Rolling Mills 
Beaux is John, baker, dwl 1513 Dupont 
.1, leaver George L., student at law Jarboe & Harrison, dwl 

1300 Taylor 
■Jl Jeaver George W., capitalist, oflBce 414 California, dwl 

NE cor Washington and Taylor 
1., Jeaver Harrj', laborer, dwl 9 Ritch, rear 
leaver Mining Co. (Elko Co., Nev.), Watson G. Hughes 
[ i scretarj-, office 309 California room 6 
leaver Morris, clerk, dwl 912 Howard 
leaver Nathan, clerk, dwl 912 Howard 
leaver Samuel E., currency teller Bank of California, 
dwl 426 Kearny 
li Jeaverly John A., salesman Terwilliger & Fink, dwl 729 
Folsom 
- (I leban Rocco, restaurant, SE cor Dupont and Broadway, 
dwl 1313 Kearny 
tec Bartholomew, dwl 1407 Stockton 
Jecartd Philoxime, manufacturer cigars, 9 Polk Lane 
.;: iech August, blacksmith, dwl 83 Ste\enson 

iecher Henry J., cook Russ House, dwl 622 Ash Av 
Jecherer Agnes, music teacher, dwl 311 L^nion 



Becherer Charles F., map mounter, 622 Clay 

Bechler Joseph H., miller Deming, Palmer & Co., dwl 

3-2'J Eddy 
Becht George J., salesman Newman & Bennett, dwl NE 

cor Fifth and Folsom 
Bechtaw William, dwl S37 Folsom 
Bechtel Max, bookkeeper Chicago Brewery, dwl 219 

Geary 
Bechtenger Joseph, physician, oculist and aurist, office 

704 Sacramento, dwl 1012 California 
Becir Lucas, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Montgomery 
Beck Adolphus G., accountant and teacher bookkeeping, 

432 Montgomerj- 
Beck Alexander, mining stocks, dwl 66 Jessie 
Beck Andrew P., porter James N. McCune, dwl 8 St. 

Charles 
Beck Anthony H., musician Maguire's Opera House, dwl 

S09 Union 
Beck August, dwl 608 Greenwich 
Beck August, gun and locksmith, dwl 510 Broadway 
Beck August, maltster F. Fortmann & Co., dwl 267 

Tehama 
Beck Charles, butcher, 549 Hayes 
Beck Charles, laborer F. Korbel & Bros., dwl SW cor 

Twenty-third and Alabama 
Beck Charles, laborer S. F. Pioneer Woolen Factorj', dwl 

SW cor Francisco and Larkin 
Beck David L., merchandise broker, 405 Front, dwl 18 

Stanly PI 
Beck Eugene B. (Jones <fc Co.), dwl 34 Rincon PI 
Beck Frank, upholsterer Schlueter & Volberg, dwl 115 

Seventh 
Beck G., engraver, dwl 10 Taylor 
Beck G. G. , clerk, dwl 34 Eddy 
Beck George, machinist Union Iron Works 
Beck H., cutler, dwl 717 O'Farrell, rear 
Beck H., musician, dwl 809 Union 
Beck Hannah, (widow), dwl 533 Mission 
Beck Hans (Hanson d- B.), dwl 122 Stevenson 
Beck Hans S., whitening and plastering, 403 Sutter, dwl 

1127 Harrison 
Beck Henry, boots and shoes, 1128 Market, dwl 518 Jessie 
Beck Henrj', tanner, dwl Twenty-eighth Av nr San 

Bruno Road, South S. F. 
Beck Henry, tanner Samuel Bloom, dwl cor Alabama and 

Twenty-third 
Beck Jacob, bricklayer, dwl E s Church nr Seventeenth 
Beck John, driver Philadelphia Brewerj% dwl 232 Second 
Beck John, grainer and painter, dwl N s Pine bet Kearny 

and Dupont 
Beck John, horseshoer Thomas Mclnamy, dwl cor Mis- 
sion and Nineteenth 
Beck John, horsetrainer, 210 Mason 
Beck John, machinist West Coast Furniture Co., dwl 607 

Stockton 
Beck John, shoecutter Adolph N. Uhl, dwl 636 Mission 
Beck John G., laborer, dwl E s Devisadero bet California 

and Pine 
Beck John P., brassfinisher, dwl 22 Stockton PI 
Beck Kate (widow), nurse, dwl 134 Folsom 
Beck Ludwick, drajTuan, dwl 422 Post, rear 
Beck Ludwig, survejor Svea F^e Insurance Co., 213 San- 
som, res Alameda 
Beck Mary (widow), dwl 804 Pacific 
Beck Michael, laborer, dwl 509 Washington 
Beck Nathaniel A., currier, E s Folsom lU' Eighteenth 
Beck Nelson, machinist Risdon I. and L. Works 
Beck Nicholas, local policeman, dwl 156 Steuart 
Beck R., with Good & Tschurr, dwl 12'J O'Farrell 
Beck Robert, upholsterer William J. Heney ^ Co., dwl 

814 Montgomery 
Beck Samuel, clerk Straus & Levy, dwl 303J Turk 
Beck Samuel, trunkmaker D. S. Martin & Co., dwl Fol- 
som nr Eighteenth 
Beck S. B., seaman stm Humboldt, Jackson St. AVharf 
Beck W., plumber, dwl 13 Eddy 
Beck Walter A., clerk J. M. Shay & Co., dwl 619 Sac 
Beck Walter F., clerk Cutting Packing Co., dwl 18 Stanly 

PI 
Beck William J., tinsmith, dwl 134 Folsom, rear 
Beckedorff George H. C, teamster Evu-eka Salt Works, 

dwl 33 Russ 
Beckenbough Sarah (widow), dwl 214i Sixth. 
BECKEU B. AUOLPII, dwl 808 California 
Becker Bros. (Diedrich and Charles U.), groceries and 

liquors, SE cor Sutter and Leavenworth and SE cor 

Larkin aud Turk 
Becker Caspar, carriagetrimmer Daniel S. Shute, dwl 703 

Buchanan 



JAMES G. STEELE & CO. dispense Prescriptions from Pure Medicines. 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merclia ?>^ 



Becker Charles, cabinetmaker with Johu B. Luchsinger 

& Son, dwl 79 Fourth 
Becker Charles, machine operator Buckingham & Hecht, 

NW cor Gough anil Haight 
Becker Charles, waiter, dwl 75 Fourth, rear 
Becker Charles H. {Becker Bros.), dwl SE cor Turk and 

Larkin 
Becker Christian, cabinetmaker Herman Granz, dwl 10 

Charles PI 
Becker Diedrich {Becker Bros.), dwl NW cor Califoniia 

and Leavenworth 
Becker Elizabeth (widow), dwl 606 Third 
Becker Frank, clerk, dwl 111(3 Pacific 
Becker Frederick L., shooting gallerj', 903 Kearny, dwl 

826 Kearny 
Becker Frederick W., cigars and tobacco, 705 Davis 
Becker George {Mantz li- Co.), dwl 13 Jansen 
Becker George J., cook, dwl 13 Harlan PI 
Becker George J. , restaurant and liquor saloon, SW cor 

Fourth and Berry 
Becker Gustave J., porter Louis Taussig & Co., dwl 

Hampshire bet Twenty-second and Twenty-third 
Becker Gustavus, waiter K. R. Swain & Co., 213 Sutter 
Becker Heinz, wine and beer saloon, 113 Fifth 
Becker Henrj' {Becker d- Jaeoby), dwl 915 Howard 
Becker John, clerk Kahrs & Becker, dwl SE cor Taylor 

and Sutter 
Becker John, commission agent, dwl 417 Brannan 
Becker John H. {Kahrs <t Becker), dwl SE cor Taylor 

and Sutter 
Becker Joseph, crockery and glassware, 227 Dupont 
Becker Jost, local policeman, dwl Hinckley PI 
Becker J. W. {Becker d- FUcher), dwl 313 Gearj', rear 
Becker Louis, baker William Hesler, dwl 1031 Dupont 
Becker Louis, bookkeeper, dwl 124^^ Welsh 
Becker Lucas, barkeeper George J. Becker, SW cor 

Fourth and Berrv 
Becker M. Rudolph E., dwl 808 California 
BJX'KEK MAKTIN H., groceries and liquors, 41 

Fourth 
Becker Michael, bakery, 409 Union 
Becker JJ^icholas, porter Rothschild & Ehrenpfort, dwl NE 

cor Gough and O'FaiTell 
Becker Otto, cabinetmaker Werman Granz, dwl 24 Garden 
BECKEK OTTO F., proprietor Prescott House, SW 

cor Montgomer3' Av and Kearny 
Becker Peter {Eisert & Becker), dwl 216 Stevenson 
Becker Peter, cabinetmaker, dwl 227 Post 
Becker Samuel {Becker A- Bralich), dwl 919 Clay 
Becker T. W., printer, dwl 313 Geary, rear 
Becker William, bakeiy, NE cor Clay and Mason 
Becker AVilliam, groceries and liquors, NAV cor Spear and 

Mission 
Becker William, willowworker, dwl 77 Fourth 
Becker & Bralich {Samuel Becker and Frederick Bra- 
lich), coffee and chop house, 624 Kearny 
Becker k Fischer (</. W. Becker and George Fischer), 

beer saloon, 1134 Market 
Becker & Jaeoby {H. Becker and J. Jaeoby), dry goods, 

302 Third 
Beckerstaf James, waiter Occidental Hotel, dwl 164 Clem- 
entina, rear 
BeckeS Matilda Mrs., cook, dwl 22 Dupont 
Becket Solomon, cook Pacific Mail S. S. Montana, dwl 22 

Dupont 
Beckett Francis A., signpainter, 8 Washingfton 
Beckett George, dwl 310 Montgomery Av 
Beckett H., machinist Risdon I. and L. Works, dwl 415 

Fifth 
Beckett James, blacksmith Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl N s 

Sierra nr Louisiana 
Beckett Samuel A., assistant superintendent Union Iron 

Works, res Oakland 
Beckett William, foreman Bay View Distillery, dwl cor 

Nineteenth Av and H, South S. F. 
Beckhusen Henry, clerk Christian Meierdierks, dwl cor 

Post and Powell 
Beckingham Henn', seaman brig Sea Waif, Howard St. 

Wharf 
Beckler J. Conrad {Beckler if- Daiss), dwl 252J Tehama 
Beckler & Daiss {J. C. Beckler & E. Daiss), liquor saloon, 

NW cor Kearny and Bush 
Beckmann Bros. {John N. and Peter W.), groceries and 

liquors, NE cor Mission and Fourteenth 
Beckmann Charles, clerk E. V. Hathaway, dwl 235 Ritch 
Beckmann Claus {Walters & Co.), dwl 210 Austin 
Beckmann Daniel, dwl 261 Stevenson 
Beckmann Frederick {Beckmann <k Co.), dwl 420 Grove 
Beckmann Frederick, market S s McAllister nr Franklin 



Beckmann Henry, laborer Pacific Distillery and Refining 

Co., dwl NE cor Fillmore and Lombard 
Beckmann Jacob, carpenter, dwl 18 First 
Beckmann John, groceries and Uquors, NE cor Geary and 

William, dwl 714 Geary 
Beckmann John, seaman, dwl 47 Sacramento 
Beckmann John N. {BecknKinn Bros.), dwl NE cor Mis- 
sion and Fourteenth 
Beckmann Peter W. {Beckman Bros.), dwl 1334 Minna 
Beckmann Vincent, dwl 313 O'Farrell 
Beckmann Wilhelm {Beckmann ifc Otten), dwl SE cor 

Vallejo and Dupont 
Beckmann William, laborer Washington Brewery, dwl 

NW cor Lombard and Tajior 
Beckmann & Co.{Frederick Beckmann), cabinetmakers, 

SE cor Van Ness Av and Grove 
Beckmann & Otten {Wilhelm Beckmann and Peter Ot- 
ten), groceries and liquors, SE cor Vallejo and Dup 
Beckwith Elliott, boatbuilder George A. Oilman, dwl 

Commercial bet Montgomery and Sansom 
Beckwith Frederick A., shoemaker Buckingham & Hecht, 

dwl 105 Hayes 
Beckwith George L., metalroofer, dwl 105 Hayes 
Beckwith Ida J. Miss, dressmaker, dwl 105 Hayes 
Beckwith James R., driver Wells, Fargo & Co., dwl 706 

Bush 
Beckwith John AV. , policeman City Hall, dwl 565 Tehama 

bet Fifth and Sixth 
Beckwith Seth L., boatbviilder, dwl 105 Hayes 
Beckwith William, carpenter, dwl SE cor Nevada and 

Kansas 
Becraft Almerin T., blacksmith, dwl 102 Dora 
Becraft Henrj' L., machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 7 

Rausch 
Becsev Joseph A., interpreter French and Spanish, Police 

Court, dwl 1414 Powell 
Bedell William, machinist Hope Iron Works, dwl E e 

Mission Av, bet Seventeenth and Eighteenth 
Bedell William E., helper William F. Palmer, dwl 730 

Fourth 
Bedford William H., dwl 635 California 
Bedley John Meller, dwl 736 Pacific 
Bee, Camille T., tailor, 1028 Dupont 
Bee Emile, tailor, 726 Washington 
Bee Frank M., dwl 612 Jones 
Bee Joseph, policeman City Hall, dwl 921 Powell 
Bee Timothy, patternmaker Pacific Iron Works, dwl 806 

First 
Bee Theodore C, assayer Selby Smelting and Lead Co., 

dwl 1028 Dupont 
Beebe Charles H., carpenter L. S. Allen, dwl 1519 Pine 
Beebe Charles W., clerk Robert J. Trumbull, res Oakland 
Beebe Joseph J., compositor S. F. Chronicle, dwl 55 Sec 
Beebe Luke, laborer, dwl 509 Washington 
Beebe William F., foreman Cutting Packing Co., dwl 988 

Howard 
Beebee Georgiana (widow), dwl NE corner Broadway and 

Webster 
Beebee W. S., dentist, office and dwl 616 Sacramento 
Beecher Charles, helper John Weichhart, dwl 308 O'Farrell 
Beecher Gulliver A., lastmaker Leveque & Potter, dwl 

844 Mission 
Beecher Henry, cook Buss House 
Beeching Robert, general agent California Prison Coin< 

mission, office 302 Montgomery, dwl 1016 Taylor 
Beechinor Norman, laborer Pacific Commercial Co., dwl 

328 Geary 
Beecroft John T., lumber surveyor, dwl SE cor Nevada 

and Utah 
Beegan John, laborer, dwl 26 Bluxome 
Beegan John, salesman Fratinger & Noll, dwl 10 Mont 
Beehe Joseph H., patternmaker McCormick, Lewis &COt, 

dwl 246 Beale 
Beek Bernard, sawyer, dwl Sacramento Hotel 
Beekman Charles W., seaman, dwl 125 Sacramento 
Beekman Helen C, lodgings, 125 Sacramento 
Beeler Jacob, teamster, dwl S s Greenwich, bet Scott 

and Pierce 
Beeler John, mining stocks, dwl 325J Bush 
Beeman Edward, waiter AVilliam Spreen, cor First Ay 

and Kentucky, South S. F. 
Beeman William, engineer, dwl 730 Kearny I 

Beer Bernard, porter S. Levy & Co., dwl 316 Da\i8 
Beerman Henry, cooper Pacific Distilling and Refining 

Co., SW cor Chestnut and Pierce 
BEEKS BAKKETT, dentist, office 230 Kearny, re« 

Oakland ] 

Beers Hiram W. , rector Trinity Church, dwl 607 Sutter I 
Beersley Parker, farmer, dwl 22 Turk | 



Ms] 



Behrs 



BEAMISH'S— Shirt manufacturer, Nucleus Building, corner Third and Marl^ IE! 



ii ?. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



11 Becslcv Charles A., clerk, dwl 452 Bartlett 
I^■l s,m Charlotte Miss, dwl 1221 Pacific 

-III Froilerick P., drayman, 409 Knmt, dwl 907 Larkin 
Mill Isaac, porter Jonas Schoenfcld, dwl 10 White 
Ij^^/. Frederick, bootmaker, 315 Bush, dwl 130 Park Av 
Bcsr.il Anifcl, laborer, dwl 1318 Dupont 
4- Be^r Jacob, (gardener Francisco Garcia, S s Fifteenth 

bet Noe and Ciistro 
i Be^Mrd Herman, cignrmaker, dwl 721 Pacific 

Bcijerola Louis, pressman Thomas & Co., dwl 419^ 
Dt Stockton 

Bepgs , Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl N s Michigan nr 

:ii Sierra 

Beg-srs James, engineer S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl S47 How 
^, Beings John, dwl 366 Natoma 

Beg^jrs Samuel, third assistant engineer Pacific Mail S. S. 
*. Colima 

1 Be;,'!^ Thomas Mrs. (widow), groceries, 122 William 
.»i Bej,'irs William, varmsher S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 122 

William 
at, Be.Lrin Joseph, butcher, dwl Constitution Hotel 
Be;,''c.\- John, driver Michael Begley, W s Sherman nr 

Seventeenth 
Beg'ley John, quarrjTnan, dwl 316 Beale, rear 
:« Begley John Jr., plumber and gasfitter, dwl 316 Beale, 

rear 
in Begley Michael (Begley <t- Wegi>eman), dwl Ws Sherman, 
l)et Seventeenth and Eighteenth 
Begley Peter, laborer, dwl 268 Brannan 
■ji Begley & Wesseman (Michael Bajleu and Barnard W. 
Wesseman), groceries and liquors, 31 Sixth 
Beguelin Henry, machinist Joshua Hendy, dwl 6 Russell 
ii; Begiihl Ailolph F., proptr Recreation Grounds, dwl SE cor 

Folsom and Twenty -fifth 
d Behan Charles T., bookkeejier J. W. Tucker & Co., dwl 

219 Mason 
r( Behan James, painter Poland & Hathaway, dwl N s 

Twenty-third bet Alabama and Columbia 
■jj Behan John, butcher, dwl E s Dolores nr Sixteenth 
Behan Maurice, liverj- stable, 726 Union 
Behan Patrick, driver N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 831 

Folsom 
Behan Thomas, laborer John Reyn olds, dwl San Bruno 

nr Twenty-seventh 
Behe M., kitchenhand Palace Hotel 
Behen Emma, weaver Mission Woolen Mills 
Ii Behlow Chartes J. (H. Liehes dt Co.), dwl 40 Twelfth 

Behl.>\v Emil, furrier H. Liebes & Co., dwl 40 Twelfth 
i ,1 Behlow William, foreman Charles M. Plum & Co., dwl 416 
O'Farrell 
Behn Charles, printer, dwl 326 Fifth 
3 Behn Walter, salesman Tillmann & Bendel, dwl 632 Bdwy 
,.. Behncke Albert, seaman, dwl 409 Pacific 

Behnemann Albert (Hollweqs Ji Co.), dwl NW cor Seven- 
^ teenth and Church 

Behnemann Henrv (Behnemann & Co.), dwl SW cor 
-I Tavlor and O'Farrell 
BEHNE.n.iX.X & CO. (fl. Behnemann and M. Joost), 
groceries and liquors, SW cor Taylor and O'Farrell 
-J Jehnke Frederick, tanner Funcke & Co., dwl 6 Downey 
j, iehnke John, cabinetmaker, dwl 332 Sixth 
iehnke John, farmer, dwl 609 Jackson 
iehnken John, porter Pacific Distilling and Refining Co., 
3 dwl 501 Broadway 

3ehr Alice Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 861 Folsom 
, Behr Hans C, draughtsman Union Iron Works, dwl NW 

cor Fifth and Bryant 
j 3ehr Herman, physician, office and dwl 656 Bryant 
3ehr Otto, porter Henry Brickwedel & Co., dwl W s Cook 
nr Point Lobos Av 
. 3ehr Michael, dwl 279 Jessie 
f. iehr William, barkeeper, dwl 908i Larkin 

Jehre Frederick, foreman E. Guittard & Co., dwl 414 

Larkin 
Behre Robert L., clerk Doyle, Barber & Scripture, dwl 
SE cor Larkin & Turk 

fehre William, blacksmith, dwl E s Illinois nr Twentieth 
ehrend Frederick, porter Leon Peiper, dwl 819 Kearny 
3ehrend Louis, cook German Hospitol, dwl 14 Oak Grove 
, , Av 

Behrendt H. & Co. (Jacob Levy and Michael Long), man- 
ufacturers trunks, valises, etc., factorj- Crook bet 
Townisend and Brannan, salesrooms 513 Market 
., Behrendt Herman (H. Behrendt d- Co.), dwl 805 Ellis 

Behrens Adrian G., clerk Treadwell A: Co., dwl 232 Oak 
, Behrens August, pantr.\-man S. F. Verein, 219 Sutter 

Behrens Charles, clerk Mohmiann ,K Co., dwl 501 Bdwy 
. , Behrens Christopher, butcher, d%vl 1517 Dupont 
' Behrens Dericke, (Feldmann it Co.), dwl 213 Dupont 



Behrens Dora Mrs., midwife, dwl 1517 Dujiont 
Belirens F. C, expressman, 411 Pacific, dwl 15 Wash 
Behrens Frederick, groceries and liquors, NWcor Folsom 

and Twenty-fourth 
Behrens George H. , clerk Crane & Brigham, res Oakland 
Behrens Ileiwy, dwl 9 Washington 
Behrens Henrv, captain schr Columbus, Clay St. Wliarf 
BEIIKE.VS IIE.N'KY V. F., physician and surgeon, 

office and dwl 11 Third 
Behrens James, importer wines and commission mer- 
chant, 504 Battery, res Saucelito 
Behrens James G., draftsman Herman Luedecke, res 

Saucelito 
Behrens Johannes, farmer, dwl 39 Jackson 
Behrens John, bootmaker Frederick Beez, dwl 317 Bush 
Behrens John F. , groceries and liquors, NE cor Potrero 

Av and Twenty-fourth 
Behrens Joseph, laborer Lyon Brewery, dwl 420 Chestnut 
Behrens Nicholas, clerk with Frederick Mej'er, dwl NE 

cor Sixth and Stevenson 
Behrens Richard, dwl 1326 Kearny 
Behrens Richard, laborer Hillebrandt & Co., dwl 2019 

Folsom 
Behringer Henry, telegraph instrument maker Electrical 

Con. and M. Co., dwl 9 Harian PI 
Behrle Alois, plasterer, dwl 5 Harrison Av 
Behrle Antone, carpenter, dwl 8 Heron 
Behmiann Charles, clerk John & Peter Medau, dwl 207 

Montgomerj" Av 
Behrmann Charles, waiter Herman Striiving, dwl 1313 

Stockton 
Behrmaun Frank E. , collector German General Benev. 

Soc. , dwl 262 Minna 
Behrmann Frederick, bakery, 1218 Powell 
Behrmann Henry, cabinetmaker, Pac. U. W. Furniture 

Manuf. Co., dwl 324 Seventh 
Behrmann Joachim H., cabinetmaker Pac. U. W. Fur- 

ture Manuf. Co., dwl 324i Seventh 
Behrmann Maria Mrs. , midwife, 324i Seventh 
Beicke Louis, blacksmith, 304 Market, dwl cor Folsom 

and Twenty-second 
Beier William, "blacksmith, 908i Larkin 
Beighle George W., salesman 'Schlueter & Volberg, dwl 

lOlS Hyde 
Bellies John (Lacua ct Beilles), dwl 713 Broadway 
Beine John, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinerj-, dwl SW cor 

Brannan and Eighth 
Beintry Charles, steward Nucleus House 
Beirne Bartholomew, groceries and liquors, 41 Jessie 
Beime Michael, stairbuilder Henry McMahon, dwl cor 

Sixteenth and Second Av 
Beirne Patrick, groceries and liquors, 123 Shipley 
Beirnert David, shoemaker (308), 2206 Sixteenth 
Beisel Jacob (Jacob Beisel <fc Co.), dwl SE ar Mississippi 

and Mariposa 
Beisel Jacob i: Co. (H. X. Cook), proptrs Potrero Tannery, 

cor Mississippi and Santa Clara 
JBeith John, groceries and liquors, 247 Clara 
Bekeart Charles A., blacksmith Paul Friedhofer, dwl 

346 Third 
Bekeart Frank C, tinsmith, dwl 346 Third 
Bekeart Julius F., hardware, 346 Third 
Belancourt Frank, pantrvman Pacific Mail S. S. Granada 
Belando Pietro, wood and coal, 1210 Powell, dwl 1208 Pow 
Belarde Robert, boatman, dwl 1113 Kearny, rear 
Belasco Abraham, dwl 174 Clara 

Belasco Israel, trunkmaker Michael Long, dwl 174 Clara 
Belau Michael, tailor, dwl 1318 Kearny 
Belau Otto, clerk Greenbaum & Co., dwl 1317 Kearny 
Belcher Frederick P. , drayman, office SW cor Market and 

Fremont, res Oakland 
Belcher Philip, chicken ranch, dwl W s Michigan nr 

Shasta 
Belcher Reiuhold, carriagesmith J. J. Lachapelle, dwl 

Folsom bet Fourth and Fifth 
Belcher Robert H., draj-man Frank P. Belcher, dwl 1015 

L'nion 
BELCHER SILVER MIXIXK CO. (Gold Hill, Nev.), 

John Crockett secretarv, office 419 California 
Belcour Jules, chancellor of Consulat-General de France, 

office 704 Washington, res San Mateo 
Belden Block, SW cor Montgomerj- and Btish 
Belden Charles A., exchange clerk Merchants' Exchange 

Bank, dwl Palace Hotel 
Belden Charles C, painter, dwl 536 Mission 
Belden Edward J., boxmaker Geo. W. Swan & Co., dwl 

510 Howard 
Belden Edwin S., official reporter Fourth District Court, 
office 637 Kearny, res Oakland 



:EELE'S Squirrel Poison is sold by all Druggists, Grocers, and General Dealers. 



D. "W. Laird, San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchan 



BEL 



126 



BEL 



EeUien George F., bookkeeper Cal. Chemical Paint Co., 

chvl Palace Hotel 
Belden Henr}% metal roofer William Cronin, dwl 1023 

Market 
Belden Henry K. (Belden <t- Stone), dwl 1227 Pine 
Belden Joseph W., bookkeeper, dwl 1020 Geary 
Beklen Josiah, capitalist, office 200 Sansom, res San Jos6 
BeUlen M. S. (widow), dwl 510 Mason 
Belden & Stone (Hennj E. Belden and Frank F. Stone), 

insurance agents, office 313 California 
Belding Oren, mill superintendent, dwl 608 Hayes 
Belduke Joseph, wagonmaker 110 Oregon, dwl 860 Miss 
Belelley Henry, hostler Van Nostrand & Co 
Belender Charles, varnisher and polisher John Easton, 

dwl SW cor Oak and Buchanan 
Beley Henrj', manufacturer curled hair. Mission bet Mar- 
iposa and Santa Clara 
BELCill'M, Emil Grisar consul, office NW cor TowTisend 

and Fifth 
Belhje Albert, cooper, dwl 39 Jackson 
Belhomme F., tinsmith, 1602 Stockton 
Belinge F. A. A., physician, office and dwl 938 Mission 
Eelitzer J., clerk Edward Cohn & Co., dwl 225 Mont 
Belken Theodore, mariner, dwl 28 Clay 
Belknap David P. (Winaiu d- B.), attorney at law, office 

604 Merchant, dwl 108* Powell 
Belknap Edwin S., student Alison Van Denburgh, dwl 

1081^ Powell 
Belknap James, lumberman C. A. Hooper & Co., dwl 137 

Townsend 
Bell A. Miss, dressmaker, dwl SE cor Ellis and Taylor 
Bell Alfred J., engineer, dwl 146 Fifth 
Bell Alice Mrs., milliner Mrs. G. W. Cowles, dwl 30 Welch 
Bell Amory F. (Bell A Began), dwl 2609 Sacramento 
BELL ALEXAXWER D., office Consolidated Tobacco 

Co., 207 Front 
Bell Antoine, dairyman Isaac Stone, dwl W s San Bruno 

Road nr Cortland Av 
BELL, BYRXE A fO. (P. W. Byrne and W. L. 

Cou-an), law and collection office, 606 Montgomer}- 
Bell Charles, fireman Engine No. 5 S. F. F. D. 
Bell Charles, laborer Pacific Rolling Mills 
Bell Charles D., hostler, dwl Bay District Fair Grounds 
Bell Charles H., porter First National Gold Bank, dwl 5 

Ewer PI 
Bell Charles T., agent Journal of Commerce, 414 Clay 
Bell Conrad, dwl 7 Card Alley 

Bell Daniel P., clerk Tobin, Davisson & Co., dwl 513 Hayes 
Bell David B., fish, 34 Grand Central Market, dwl 502 Stev 
Bell Edward J., carijcnter, dwl 1225 JIarket 
Bell Ellen (widow), nurse, dwl 1011 Pacific 
Bell F. , driver City R. R. 
Bell Fidelia Mrs., boarding, 681 Mission 
Bell Frank, tinner, dwl 704 Howard 
Bell Frederick C, clerk, dwl 21 Turk 
Bell F. Vinton, clerk W. H. L. Barnes, dwl 308 Leaven- 
worth 
Bell George H. (Bell <t Co.), dwl 639 Kearny 
Bell George R., scenic artist Bella Union Theater, dwl 33 

Pleasant 
Bell George W., porter Mark L. McDonald, dwl 1011 Pac 
Bell Henrj', dwl Central Pacific Hotel 
Bell Henry, conductor Central R. R., dwl 1211 Fillmore 
Bell Henry, gardener, dwl 66 Brady, bet Mission and 

Market 
Bell Henry, laborer new U. S. Appraiser's Building, dwl 

524 Turk, rear 
Bell Henry, miner, dwl 21 Turk 
Bell Henry, molder Pacific Rolling Mills, dwl SE cor 

Sierra and Michigan 
Bell Henr}-, plumber and gasfitter, dwl 546 Seventh 
Bell Henrj', waiter, dwl 12 Miller PI 
Bell H. H. Mrs., dressmaker, dwl 906 Market 
Bell James, gents' furnishing goods, 338 Fourth 
Bell James, laborer C. A. Hooper & Co. 
Bell James H., bellman Palace Hotel 
Bell John, laborer, 163 Tehama 
Bell John, capitalist, office 715 Market, dwl Occidental 

Hotel 
Bell John, carpenter, dwl 17 Clara 
Bell John, carpenter, dwl 530 Pacific 
Bell John, plumber, dwl 13 Leroy PI 
Bell John C, carjiets, upholsten-, and fumitiu-e ware- 
rooms, 524 Market, and 21 Sutter, dwl 502 Greenwich 
Bell John C. Jr., clerk Charles Gay, dwl 502 Geary 
Bell John D., conductor N. B. & Mission R. R., dwl 302 

Fourth 
Bell John P., attorney at law, office 215 Sansom room 6, 
dwl 2213 Steiner 



Bell John W., clerk forwarding department Wells, Fargo 
& Co., dwl 508 Third 

Bell Joseph, clerk, dwl 335 Turk 

Bell Joseph, engineer Hammam Turkish Baths, dwl 915 
Powell 

Bell Joseph, seaman, dwl 418 Drumm 

Bell Lizzie Miss, bakerj-, 420 Fourth 

Bell Lucy, furnished rooms, 240 Sixth 

Bell Maggie (widow), lodgings, 137 Natoma 

Bell Margaret (widow), dwl lOJ Rausch 

Bell Mathew, boxmaker Cook Brothers, dwl 16 Garden 

Bell Miah, calker, dwl Greenwich bet Van Ness Av and 
Polk 

Bell Otto, tinroofer H. G. Fiske, dwl 506 Howard 

Bell Peter, janitor Dashaway Hall, dwl 139 Post 

Bell Peter, tinsmith, dwl 513 Hayes 

BeU Peter B. , painter Andrew Frei, dwl cor Fourth and 
Townisend 

BELL PHILIP A., editor and proprietor Elevator, of- 
fice and dwl 616 Battery 

Bell Robert, mattressmaker, 1045^^ Howard 

Bell Robert, U. S. District officer Custom House, dwl 1246 
Howard 

Bell Robert W., folder Occidental Laundry, SE cor Fil- 
bert and Octavia 

Bell Samuel L., carjjenter M. Fulda & Sons, dwl 17 Clara 

Bell Sophia J., dressmaker Abbie C. Weeks, dwl 732 How 

BELL THOMAS, commission merchant, office 305 San- 
som, dwi 1107 Bush 

Bell Thomas, hostler Samuel Bryant, dwl Bay District 
Fair Grounds 

Bell Thomas, laborer A. M. Simpson & Brother, Beale St. 
Wharf 

Bell Thomas, lumber stevedore, dwl SJ Gilbert, rear 

Bell Thomas, porter M. Heller & Bros., dwl 27 Rausch 

Bell Thomas H., captain, dwl 607 Powell 

Bell William, clerk Cal. Pacific R. R., NE cor Fourth and 
Townsend, dwl 127 Perry 

Bell William, compositor Morning Call, dwl 22 Prospect 

Bell William, handcartman, dwl 305 Davis 

Bell William, laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s 'Wharf 

Bell William, shipcarpenter, dwl Greenwich bet Van Ness 

Av and Polk 
Bell William, shipwright, dwl SE cor Minnesota and Butte 
Bell William, waiter S. S. Montana, Folsom St.WTiarf 
Bell William, watchman Pac. Rolling Mills, dwl W s 

Jlichigan nr Shasta 
Bell William H., insurance agent, dwl 514 Valencia 
Bell William H., stationerj', blank books, etc., 4 SLxth, 

dwl 519 Stevenson 
Bell William G., machinist WiUiam T. Garratt, dwl 19 

Clementina 
Bell William J., machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 16 

Sherman 
Bell W. T., conductor Central R. R., dwl 1211 Fillmore 
BELL & CO. (George H. Bell), booksellers, stationers 

and periodical agents, 639 Keamj' [ 

Bell & B-egSLU (Amory F. Bell and John R. Regan), axLC-\ 

tion furniture and commission, 3 Powell 
Bella Trinity Miss, dressmaker, dwl 636 Jessie 
Bella Union Quicksilver Co. (Napa Co., Cal.), Abraham 

Halsey secretary, office 200 Sansom 
BELLA IXIOX THEATER, Samuel Tetlow manager, 

803 and 805 Keaniy 
Belleau Ann S. (widow), dwl 4 Wetmore PI 
Bellemere Adolph, wholesale and retail wines and liquors, 

7 Stockton 
Bellemere Anna B. (widow), dwi 1163 Mission 
BELLEMERE ALGISTIS (Frontier, B. & Co.), dwl 

208 Sutter 
Bellemere Romain B., jeweler Frontier, Bellemere & Co., 

dwl 1023 Sutter, rear 
Bellcr Henry, miner, dwi 614 Kearny 
Bellennann Emil, bookkeeper Merchants' Exchange Bank, 

res Oakland 
Bellet August, cook San Francisco Verein, 219 Sutter 
Bellevue Joseph, carpenter, dwl 066 Miima 
Bellevne Mining Co. (Placer Co., Cal.), D. F. Verdenal 

secretarj', office 409 California 
Eellew James H., upholsterer Goodwin &Co.,dwi 31 Ohio 
Bellew John, dwl 14 Ohio 
Bellew Thomas, porter J. W. Davidson & Co., dwl 113 

Olive Av 
Bellgard L. Mrs., dwi 421 Fourth 
Belli Antonio, vegetables, Colombo Market 
Belli Giovanni, vegetables, Colombo Market 
Bellingall Peter W., Custom House broker, 508 Batteiy, 

res Oakland 



BEAMISH'S—Nucleus Building, corner of Third and Market streets. 



an P. VAN SCHAACK «S: CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



BELLI\f;iIAM »AY COAL <'0., P. B. Coniwall 

jtresiileiit, ottice K s Spear bet Fdlsotn ami Ilarrisun 
Belliiif^haiu Harry, shoemaker, dwl Uss Broadwaj' 
Bellincliaiu .lolin, shoemaker, dwl 11,\8 Broadway 
Bellinijhani Robert, shoemaker, dwl 11S8 Broadway 
Bellini Antonio, umbrellamaker ThuGiius T. Yea^'er, dwl 

NW cor Dupont and Post 
Bellislc Francis N., master carbuilder Southern Pacific R. 
R., dwl W s Bryant bet Twenty-fourth and Twenty- 
fifth 
Bellisle .Moses, carbuilder Southern Pacific R. R., dwl Ws 

Bryant bet Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth 
Belliveau Joseph, carpenter, dwl 397 Kiifhth 
Bellizia Uominick, musician, dwl 210 Mont;^oniery Av 
Bellman Vincent, laborer, dwl E s Tennessee nr Nevada 
Bellmer tYederick, driver Mausshardt &, Uoelscher, dwl 

431 Seventh 
Bellmer John H. C, restaurant, 26 First 
Itellnow Louis, asphallum worker, dwl 23 Stevenson 
Bcllo Vincent, fruit dealer, dwl 20S Octavia 
BELLOC FKKKKS {Irene BMoc, Henry Barroilhet 
and lli/piilite Dellnc), bankers and a^'ents General 
Transatlantic Co. (Paris, 7S Hue de Courcelles), office 
f>24 Monttronierv 
Belloc Hypolite (liMoc Fr^res), dwl 325 O'Farrell 
Belloc Irene {BMoc Fr&res), res Paris 
Belloc William, with Mortimer W. Belfehaw, dwl 1C26 Jack 
Bellocq Alfred, butcher RajTuond Barut, dwl 1402 Stock 
Bellon Emile, cook, dwl 19 Lewis PI 
Bellows Aaron, machinist, dwl 420 EUia 
Bellows E. St. John, bookkeeper U. S. assistant treas- 
urer's office, dwl Windsor House 
Bellows Joseph, painter, dwl 1024 Stockton 
Bellows Peter, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Bcllstedt John, assistant en«:ineer Cal. Sutfar Refinery, 

dwl S 8 Tenth Av nr Railroad, South S. F. 
Bellue Pierre, laundryman, dwl 1031 Dupont 
Belmer Margaret Miss, dwl NE cor Powell and Ellis 
Belmont Co. (Chinese), manufacturers cigars, 310 Dupont 
Belmont Mining Co. (Nj'e Co., Nev.), Frank Swift secre- 
tary, office 419 Montgomery 
Belmore Katie Miss, actress Maguire's New Theater 
Below John, dwl 3 Ridley 
Belshaw Mortimer W., miner, office 109 Montgomery, dwl 

1626 Jackson 
Belstein Richard, clerk, dwl 106 Bernard 
Belt Alfred M. , clerk Charles Clayton & Co. , dwl 1008 Bush 
Belt T. W., bookkeeper BrooklJ^l Hotel 
Belting Henry, carpenter, dwl 22 Turk 
Belting Henry, clerk, dwl 23 Powell 
Belton Frederick, seaman, dwl 106 Jackson 
Belton Phillip, weigher Custom House, dwl W s Alabama 

bet Twenty-second and Twenty-third 
Belton Philip M., clerk, dwl 40S Shipley 
Belton William {Sartoriris <i- B.), dwl 9 O'Farrell 
Beltram Joseph, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New Mont 
Beltrani Mascias E., barber, dwl 12 Margaret PI 
Belucca Joseph, milker Nager & Christ, Eighteenth Av nr 

F, South S. F. 
Belue Calixte, clerk Lenormand Bros., dwl SW cor Pine 

and Dupont 
Belue Camille, clerk Lenormand Bros., dwl SW cor Pine 

and Dupont 
Belville Eli, broommaker Gillespie, Zan & Co., dwl 867 

Mission 
Beldweld George, teamster, dwl 719 Tehama 
Eelz John, hairdresser Charles K. Zimnier, dwl 323 Jessie 
Berabower Philip, carpenter, dwl 423 Bush 
Bemis Charles C, U. S. supervising inspector steam ves- 
sels, office 11 U. S. Court Building, dwl 449 Brj'aut 
Bemis F., machinehand Holland & Ruppel, dwl 22 Natoma 
Bemmerer August {Elasser J: B.), dwl 1717 Mason 
Bemns James, magazinekeeper Cal. Powder Works 
Ben Ale.\., seaman S. S. Newbern, Folsom St. Wharf. 
Benabides Alfredo, tinsmith, dwl .528 Green 
Beiiabides Antonio, tobacco, dwl 52S Green 
Benabides Jos6, tinsmith, dwl 528 Green 
BK.V ARI> AUCUST F., liquor saloon, NE cor Fifth 

and Howard 
Benard Victoria (widow), dwl 16 Virginia 
Benbo David, painter, dwl 37 Everett 
Bence John, shoemaker, dwl 111 ParkAv 
BEXC'IILEV LEO.MBAS B. {Li nf or th, Kellogg Ss Co.), 
and manager Pac. Rolling Mill Co., office 3 Front, 
dwl 1019 California 
Bend Charles, sausagemaker Matthatls Schwamm, dwl 5 

Dupont 
Bend Henry, seaman, dwl Minerva House 
Bend Joseph, butcher, dwl 524^ Linden Av 



BE^'DEL B. A CO., propriet<irs Empire Match Fac- 
tory, SE cor Eleventh and Harrison, office 31S Front 

Bendel Bernhard (/?. Bendel tfc Co. and Caiiipc it Co.), 
dwl 142i Fourth 

Bendel Herman (Fellmann <t B.), res Oakland 

Bendols John, seaman, dwl 132 Steuart 

Bender A. S., civil engineer, dwl Bohemian Club 

Bender (Charles, importer and dealer leather and ihoe 
findings, 42 Geary, dwl 40)^ Geary 

Bender Francis, waiter Thomas Holder, dwl 340 Kearny 

Bender Isaac, peddler, dwl 453 Tehama 

Bender Jacob A., bricklaj'cr, dwl 1215 Clay 

Bender Josc])h, baker, dwl 631 Pacific 

Bender Josiah P. , bricklayer, dwl N s Twenty-eighth bet 
Dolores and Guerrero 

Bender Thomas L. {Aitlcen cfr B.), dwl 1215 Clay 

Bender William, waiter Sydney M. Foster, dwl 1204 
Sutter 

Bender William A., clerk William H. Wright, dwl 1215 
Clay 

BenditiJendet, expressman, dwl 1310 Pacific 

Bendit Hcnnan, dwl 747 Market 

Bendit Jlorris, expressman NE cor California and Mont- 
gomery, dwl 608 Ivy Av 

Bendit Samuel, furniture and bedding, 747 Market 

BE\l>'r M'lLLLlM, proprietor Minerva House, 123 
Jackson 

Benecke Henry D., groceries and liquors, 520 Broadway 

Benecke Henry D. {Base cfc B.), dwl 520 Broadway 

Benecke John D. 0. {Benecke J: Mamjels), dwl SW cor 
Clay and Mason 

Benecke & Mangels {John D. 0. Benecke and H. M. C. 
Mamjcls), groceries and liquors, SW cor Clay and 
Mason 

Benedict Charles E., milkdriver, dwl Mission road. Uni- 
versity Mound 

Benedict Charles V., bookkeeper Excelsior Mills, dwl 
2104 Folsom 

Benedict Courtland S. {Benedict <t Smith), dwl cor Fif- 
teenth and Valencia 

Benedict C. \V., physician, office and dwl 221 Mason 

Benedict Edward L. {Weaver, Taylor d: Co.), dwl 306 
Leavenworth 

Benedict F. , vegetable dealer, dwl cor Cal and Webb 

Benedict Frank F., carriagetrimmer Kimball Manuf Co., 
dwl 1617 Sacramento 

Benedict Jacob, refiner Pacific Refinery and Bullion Ex- 
change, dwl N s Beaver, bet Fifteenth and Sixteenth 

Benedict S., dwl 211 Eddy 

Benedict W. , dwl 636 Commercial 

Benedict William C. {Brum cfc B.), dwl 613 Mason 

Benedict & Smith (C. S. Benedict and .lames. R. Smith), 
merchant tailors and gent's furnishing goods, 25 Kear 

Beneken John, porter Pacific Distilling and Refining Co., 
dwl SW cor Broadway and Kearny 

Bener Joseph, laborer, dwl 17 Hubbard 

Benevent Zoe, laundress Leon Ruelle, dwl W s Dolores, 
between Fifteenth and Sixteenth ''Z~'^-^'^. 

Benevides Anton, foreman A. Ramon, 416 Battery 

Benfield C. , seaman, dwl 9 Crook 

Bengtson N., blacksmith, dwl 430 Drumm 

Benham Calhoun, attorney at law, office 1 Montgomery 
Block, dwl 420 First 

Benham Joseph, liquor saloon, 827 Folsom 

Benham William, merchant, dwl Russ House 

Beuhayon Henry, clerk Liebes Brothers & Co., dw'l 212 
Sutter 

Benhayon Jacob, salesman Livingston & Co., dwl 44 
Third 

Benicia Cement Co., office 513 Montgomery 

Bening George F., dwl NE cor Laurel Av and Webster 
Bening Henry, waiter, dwl 26 Minna 

Benjamin Abraham F., dwl 1505 Washington 

lienjamin A. C, storekeeper O. & O. S. S. Belgic 

Benjamin A. E., printer Edward Bosqui & Co., dwl 1505 
Washington 

Benjamin Alfred, upholsterer Frank G. Edwards, dwl 

1505 Washington 
Benjamin Asher L., city agent Wheeler & Wilson sewing 

machine, dwl 1416 Folsom 
Benjamin Charles E., bookkeeper Crane, Hastings & Co., 

dwl 632 Market 
Benjamin Edward, cigar stand, 221 Sacramento, dwl 728 

Bush 
Benjamin Edward, patternmaker Hope Iron Works, dwl 

2625 Mission 
Benjamin Edward C, clerk Crane, Hastings & Co., dwl 

632 Market 
Benjamin Erastus, architect, dwl 2625 Mission 



JAMES G. STEELE ^ CO., manufacturers of Steele's California Perfumes. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Mercian* 




Benjamin Eugene, waiter, dwl 4 St. Marj' 

Benjamin F. Hobart, with Marcus C. Hawley & Co., dwl 

3(>i Perrj- 
Benjamin Frederick A., mining expert, dwl 737 Harrison 
Benjamin Grusvenor B., collector Cal. Transportation Co., 

office Jackson St. Wharf 
Benjamin Henry A. {Ucnry A. Benjamin <t Co.), dwl 

Russ House 
BENJAMI.V HE.XRY A. * CO., Pacific Congress 

Springs Depot, 1(;2 Xew Montgomer}- 
Benjamin Jacob, ex-public administrator, office 430 Cali- 

ifornia, dwl 1505 Washington 
Benjamin Jessie B. Miss, operator Western Union Tel- 
egraph Co., Palace Hotel, dwl 2625 Mission 
Benjamin John, waiter, dwl 4 St. Marj' 
Benjamin Joseph, cigarmaker Jacob M. Cohen, dwl 102 

Sixth 
Benjamin Joseph, tailor, 245 Clementina 
Benjamin J. S. Miss, teacher Valencia St. Grammar 

School 
Benjamin Mill and Mining Co. (Lyon Co., Nev.), S. Leav- 

itt secretarj-, office 33 Nevada Block 
Benjamin Orson C, storekeeper Pacific Mail S. S. Co., 

dwl 32 Jessie nr Seventh 
Benjamin Phillip, telegraph instnmientmaker Electrical 

Construction and Maintenance Co. , dwl 1505 Wash 
Benjamin Thaddeus, dwl 1505 Washington 
Benjamin Victor P., miner, dwl 737 HaiTison 
Benjamin William K., clerk, dwl 32 Jessie bet Seventh 

and Eighth 
Benk Albert, tanner Caspar Baker, dwl W s San Bruno 

Road nr Twenty-sixth 
Benke Frederick, tanner Funcke & Co., dwl White PI 
Benkelmann Adam, liquor saloon, SE cor Railroad Av 

and N, dwl Fifteenth Av bet P and Q, South S. F. 
Benn Frank, fisherman, dwl 6 Merchant 
Benn George, teamster, dwl 121 Bernard 
Benn James, driver Hibernia Brewerj', dwl 735 Clem 
Benn John E., phvsician and surgeon, office 23 Kearny, 

dwl 62S O'Fafrell 
Benn John S., millwright, dwl 25 Crook 
Benn Thomas, dri\er Hibernia Brewen,', dwl 735 Clem 
Benn Wilhelm, seaman, dwl 37 Pacific 
Benndorff Gustav, mattressmaker Henry Frank, dwl 64 

Everett 
Bennel L. George, shipcarpenter, dwl 324 Beale 
Benner Felix, laborer F. Korbel & Bros., dwl 107 Folsom 
Benner Frederick M., depositmelter U. S. Mint, res Oak- 
land 
Benner Henry p., machinist, dwl 328 Broadway 
Benner Maria B. Mrs., fruits and candies, 32S Broadwa}' 
Eennerscheidt Bruno (G iovannini d: B.), dwl 521 Geary 
Benness Thomas, pantryman, Mrs. James M. Donahue, 

Green St. Wharf 
Bennet Charles A. , clerk Henry W. Bennet, dwl 432 Second 
Lennet Henry W., apothecarj-, 21 Third, dwl 1311 Gough 
Bennett A. A., architect, 302 Montgomeiy, room 33 
Bennett A. E., carpenter D. A. Macdonald k Co. 
Bennett Albert, office Crego & Bowley, 9 Merchants' Ex- 
change 
Bennett A. M., sawj'er Charles Field & Co., dwl 62 Na- 

toma 
Bennett Amy Miss, California Theater, dwl Nucleus House 
Bennett Anthonj' J., painter Mills & Evans, dwl 10 An- 
thony 
Bennett A. P., bookkeeiJer, dwl 516 Filbert 
Bennett Bros. (George and John B.}, butter, cheese, and 

eggs, 35 and 30 California Market 
Bennett C, sailmaker, dwl 123 Jackson 
Bennett Charles D. (Xeiiunan lO Bennett), dwl 814 Bush 
Bennett Edwin S., foreman McCord & Malone, dwl 16 

Sutter 
Bennett Frank P., dwl 640 Market 
Bennett Fred M., dwl 632 Mission 
Bennett Frederick, liquor saloon, 230 Brannon 
Bennett Frederick W., mariner Pacific Mail S. S. City of 

San Francisco 
Bennett George, laborer F. D. Conro & Son, dwl 719 Bat 
Bennett George, laborer new U. S. Appraiser's Building 
Bennett George, painter Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl NW cor 

C'.ay and Davis 
Bennett George, salesman Martin, FeusieriS: Steffani (and 

Bennett Brun), dwl F s Fillmore bet Sutter and Post 
Bennett George C, liquor saloon, 511 Fourth, dwl 213 

Perry 
Bennett George M., news agent, dwl 200 Tyler 
Bennett George N., engineer, dwl 1226 Eddy 
Bciniett George W., stockcutter Marks & Feder, dwl C4S 

Mission 



Bennett George W., stockkeeper Levi Strauss & Co., dwl 

128 Turk 
Bennett G. L., usher California Theater 
Bennett Herbert W'., teacher nmsic, dwl 908 Clay 
Bennett J., laborer C. A. Hooper & Co. 
Bennett James, seaman, dwl 34 Pacific 
Bennett James, sheet-ironworker Francis Smith & Co., 

dwl 749 Market 
Bennett John, caqienter, dwl 351 Jessie 
Bennett John, carj^enter, dwl S s Minna bet Third and 

Fourth 
Bennett John, stableman City Garden Livery Stable, dwl 

1505 Folsom « 

Bennett John R. (Bennett Brothers), dwl E s Fillmore 

bet Sutter and Post 
Bennett Joseph, laborer, dwl Fifth Av bet A and B, 

South S. F. 
Bennett Lizzie Mrs. , dressmaker, dwl 862i HariTSon 
Bennett M., carpenter, dwl 1205 Folsom 
Bennett M., painter, 705 Howard 
Bennett Margaret A. (wdow), dwl E s Iowa bet Mariposa 

and Solano 
Bennett Maria L., matron St. Luke's Hospital, Lundy 

Lane, Bernal Heights 
Bennett Martra, peddler, dwl 32 Main 
Bennett Mary (widow), dwl 2322 Folsom bet Nineteenth 

and Twentieth 
Bemiett Mary Mrs., laundry, 557 Brj'ant 
Bennett ilaiy E. Miss, teaclier Valencia Grammar School, 

dwl 2322" Folsom bet Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Bennett Morris, laborer, dwl 1606 Bush 
Bennett Nathaniel (Bennett <i: McClellan), dwl 1218 How- 
ard 
Bemiett Peter, fish dealer, 3 Clay St. Market, dwl 438 

Green 
Bennett Robert, plasterer, dwl 333 Bush 
Bennett Robert, waiter Pacific Mail S. S. Constitution 
Bennett Robert H., commission merchant and produce, 

313 Da\'is, res Oakland 
Bennett Samuel, rfiommission merchant, dwl 2017 Mission 
Bennett Sophia (widow), dwl 515 Stockton 
Bennett S. S. , bookkeeper Grover & Baker Sewing Ma- 
chine Co., dwl 1336 Sacramento 
Bennett Stephen, drajinan, cor Washington and Drumm, 

dwl 509 Washington 
Bennett Thomas, cook Nicholas Buya, dwl 605 Davis 
Bennett Thomas, painter Wilson & Moulton, dwl 303 

Davis 
BEXNETT THOMA.S, physician, office 620 Market, dwl 

716 Pine 
Bennett William, dwl 23 Fell 
Bennett William, bottler Edward C. Slorah, dwl 623 

Tehama bet Fifth and Sixth 
Bennett William, compositor Golden Era, dwl 438 Green 
Bennett William, molder, dwl Colton nr Bradj- 
Bennett William, physician, office and dwl 452 Sixth 
Bennett William, plmnber and gasfitter, 1015 Clay 
Bennett William A., registry clerk Post-office, dwl 606 

Montgomery 
Bennett William H., dwl 555 Br\'ant 
BENXETT M'lLLIAIU H. ill's., teacher music, dwl 

452 Sixth 
Bennett William J., engineer Southern Pac. R. R. 
Bennett William S., brakeman Southern Pac R. R. 
Bennett & McClellan (Nathaniel Bennett and R. Guy 

McClellan), attorneys at law, office 535 Claj' 
Bennighoff George, caiTjenter, dwl 248 Minna 
Benning A., clerk Albert Heyer, dwl SW cor Third and 

Bryant 
Benning William, stovemounter Locke & Montague, dwl 

444i Third 

Benoit , clerk California Hotel 

Benoit Amedee J. , compositor D. M. Bishop & Co. , dwl 

420 Jackson 
Benoit Charles, tailor Ferdinand Gilly, dwl 420 Jackson 
Benrimo Joseph, stockbroker, dwl 615 Kearny 
Benry Henry A., seaman schr Anne, Bulkhead bet Jack- 
son and Pacific 
Bensen E., laborer California Sugar Refinery, dwl SW cor 

Brannan and Eighth 
Bensen Henry, groceries and provisions, NE cor Brj'ant 

and Sixth (and Lilienthal it Co.) 
Bensenhocfer Gottlieb, carjienter, dwl Sacramento Hotel 
Bensick William (J/. Uagrfertii d- Co.), dwl 68 Jessie 
Bensinger Daniel, baker stm Ajax, Oregon S. S. Co. 
BEXSLEY .lOIIX, (Linforth, Kellogg d- Co.), and 

President Pacific Oil and Lead Works, office 3 Front, 

dwl 73S Post 
Benson A. , laborer, dwl 5 Sonora PI 



BEAMISH'S— Shirt manufacturer. Nucleus Building, corner Third and Marke' 



!. P. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 716 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Benson Andrew, longshoreman, dwl N s Filbert bet San- 
sora and Montgoniery 

Benson Annie E. Miss, teacher Kourth St. Primary 
School, dwl 2710 Howard 

Benson Benjamin C, captain stm Kelief, dwl 1330 Bdwy 

Benson B. Frank M., bookkeeper Bowcn Bros., dwl 100 
California 

Benson Charles, dwl 3 Ki7ig 

Bcnsi^m C. D., seaman, dwl iG Sacramento 

Benson Elizabeth J. (widow), dwl 37'2 Clementina 

Benson Franklin R., clerk Odd Fellows' Savings Bank, 
dwl 2710 Howard 

Benson George, baggageman Central Pacific R. R., dwl 
19 Si.\th 

Benson Henry, auctioneer, dwl 6.58 Minna 

Benson Henrj', seaman, dwl 26 Steuart 

Benson Henry C. Rov., editor California Christian Advo- 
cate, ottice .">3(> Stevenson, res Santa Clara 

Benson Henry L., law student George F. Baker, dwl 30 
Silver 

BE\SOX .IAME!i>, secretarj' Odd Fellows' Savings 
Bank, office 32.5 Montgomery, dwl 2710 Ho^vard 

Benson James, teamster, dwl 602 Ellis 

Benson James E. R., pressman D. M. Bishop & Co., dwl 
2710 Howard 

Benson John, real estate, dwl 803 Stockton 

Benson John A., surveyor and civil engineer, office 728 
Montyomery, dwl 108 Mason 

Benson John M., captain stm Alice, office 318 Front 

Benson P., laborer A. M. Simpson & Brother, Beale St. 
Wharf 

Benson Peter, blacksmith Carvill Manufacturing Co. 

Benson Peter, boxmaker Cook Brothers, dwl 39 Freelon 

Benson Richard, master mariner, dwl 1306 Jackson 

Benson Robert, laborer, dwl 21 Freelon 

Benson S. (widow), dwl 411 Powell 

Benson Samuel H., boilermakcr MojTiihan & Aitken, dwl 
SE cor Bryant and Boardman 

Benson Sandford G., foreman Cal. Christian Advocate, 
dwl .30 Silver, rear 

Benson Simon J., master mariner, dwl 325 Union 

Benson Tliomas A. , porter Banner Brothers, dwl 27 Hunt 

Benson William, dwl S w cor Brady and Stevenson 

Benson William, cook, dwl NE cor Turk and Fillmore 

Benson William, printer, dwl 30 Silver, rear 

Benson William, waiter Palace Hotel 

Benson William B. , miner, dwl 314 Bush 

Benson. See Benzon 

Bent C, watchman Mission Woolen Mills 

Bent Edward F., bookkeeper I. Friedlander, dwl 1023 Miss 

Bent James R., bookkeeper Louis A. Zinns, dwl 414 Post 

Bent Jolm T., bookkeeper Mission Rock Dock and Ware- 
house, dwl .515 Folsom 

Bent Peter, seaman, dwl 504 Broadway, rear 

Bent Silas E., wheehvTight Carvill Manufacturing Co. 

Benteen Theodore C, superintendent painters Cal. Chem- 
ical Paint Co., dwl E s Dolores nr Seventeenth 

Bentham Henr}', machinist Union Iron Works, dwl N s 
M nr Guerrero 

Bentlage Charles, porter, dwl 127 Jackson 

Bentle George, laborer William Poehhnan 

Bentley George, bootmaker, dwl 522 Mission 

Bentlev George, special policeman, dwl Potrero 

Bentley H. B., painter, dwl 22 Turk 

Bentley Horace, messenger, dwl 416 Union 

Bentley James, boot and shoemaker, 509 Mission 

Bentley J. E., carpenter, dwl ,519 Pacific 

Bentley Robert, mate schr Maggie Johnson, dwl 144 Steu 

Bentley Thomas, oiler stm Oriflamme, Oregon S. S. Co. 

Bentley W., office 526 Montgomery room 8 

Benton A. W., printer, dwl 1 Central PI 

Benton BjTon W., cabinetmaker Charles Field .S; Co., dwl 
1206 Stockton 

Benton Charles J., collector Swan & Co., dwl E s Howard 
bet Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth 

Benton C. L., bookkeeper, dwl 927i Post 

Benton Edward, dwl 1107 Stockton 

Bentim Helen M. (widow), dwl E s Howard bet Twenty- 
fifth and Twenty-sixth 

Bentsen Edward, laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl 6 Kate 

Benvisa Antoni, dwl 1317 Sansom 

Benusa Peter, laborer, dwl 1317 Sansom 
Benyon Daniel, heater Pacific Rolling Mills 
Benz John C, liquor saloon, 108 Sacramento 
Benzakki F., clerk, dwl 906 Stockton 
Benzatt \\'illiam, dwl 119 William 

Benzing John, carrier Morning Call and Evening Bulle- 
tin, dwl 806 Greenwich 
Benzon A. F., bookkeeper J. Everding & Co., res Oakland 



Beock Henry, machinist, dwl 18 First 

Beoietwigg John O., tailor J. F. Lindow, dwl 912 Pacific 

Bep)iin() Francisco, bootblack, dwl 425 Filbert 

Bejiplcr John, market, 1518 Dnpont 

Bera Antonia (widow), housekeeper, dwl 314 Fifth 

Bera Dionicio, carpenter, dwl 528 Green 

Beralta Lucia, dwl 1113 Kearny, rear 

Beran Adolphe, bootmaker Frank Beran Jr., dwl 1003 Pac 

Beran Frank, bootmaker Frank Beran Jr. , dwl 1003 Pac 

Beran Frank Jr., bootmaker, 1003 Pacific » 

Beran Emanuel, stovemaker, dwl 1008 Powell 

Berard Edward, printer Courrier de San Francisco, dwl 
712 Vallejo 

Berat Baptiste, gardener French Hospital, S s Bryant bet 
Fifth and Sixth 

Beraud Felix, baker, dwl 631 Broadway 

Beraud Porting, butcher Marcelin Bonis, dwl 7 Miller PI 

Beraud Pierre, cook, dwl 7 Miller PI 

Berbcrich August, baker, dwl 27 Lewis PI 

Berdan F. C, adjuster U. S. Mint, dwl 10 O'Farrell 

Berdan William, dwl 605 Pine 

Berdjo John, bootpolisher Ubhaus Bros., dwl 12 Hinckley 

Berensten Emanuel (Andersen it Berensten), dwl W s 
San Jos^ Road, rear Six-mile House 

Beresford John, marketman, Russ House 

Beretta John, machinist Union Iron Works 

Beretta William, collector Italian Benev. Soc, NW cor 
Montgomery and Jackson, res Oakland 

Beretta P", fish dealer, dwl 641 Broadway 

Berg Adolph, inspector Custom House 

Berg Antone T. , clerk G. Ammerup, dwl 25 Folsom Av 

Berg Bertha, saleswoman H. Friedlander & Co,, dwl 27 J 
Harriet 

Berg Carl, physician, office and dwl 618 California 

Berg Charles, "cutler Herman J. Schintz, dwl 541 Hayes 

Berg Charles A., cabinetmaker, dwl W s Mission nr Twen- 
ty-fifth 

Berg Chris, seaman Jerome B. Piper, SW cor Clay and 
East 

Berg Edward, waiter Bocken & Baccala, dwl 719 Clay 

Berg Frederick, market 1005 Folsom, dwl 27i Harriet 

Berg George, dwl 741 JIarket 

Berg Henrj', seaman, dwl 132 Steuart 

Berg H. I., cabinetmaker, dwl 7 Fifth Av 

Berg John, seaman, dwl 26 Sacramento 

Berg John August, clerk Peter A. Swansey, dwl NW cor 
Ritch and Clara 

Berg Julius, bootmaker, dwl 266 Stevenson 

Berg Peter, ironmolder Jackson Iron Foundry, dwl 
1016 Pacific 

Berg Peter, seaman,'dwl 31 Pacific 

Berg Rasmus, laborer, dwl 22 Boardman, rear 

Berg Thomas, seaman, dwl 132 Steuart 

Berg. See Burg 

Berge Errick O., groceries and liquors, 218 Green 

Bergel Frederick, waiter John Bartholoma, dwl 1017 Bat 

Bergen , machinist Lfnion Iron Works 

Bergen John, boilermakcr, dwl 21 Clementina 

Bergen Man,- T. (widow), dwl 1526 Powell 

Bergen T. Adrian, clerk A. Galli & Co., dwl 20 Prospect PI 

Bergeot Alexander, steward Cliff House, Point Lobos Av 

Berger Charles 0. , bookkeeper John B. Camahan, dwl SW 
cor Mason and Bush 

Berger Christian, Tailors' Protective Union, NW cor 
Kearnj' and Morton 

Berger Christian, clerk C. L. Steylaars, dwl NE cor Du- 
pont and Montgomery Av 

Berger Gabriel, surveyor French Savings and Loan Soci- 
ety, dwl 119 Franklin 

Berger Ceorge, clerk Edward Cohn &Co., dwl 808 O'Far- 
rell 

Berger Henry, sailmaker, dwl 28 Clay 

Bereer J. Henry, housepainter, dwl 43 Hayes 

Berger Julius (Edumrd Cohn & Co.), dwl 524 Pine 

Berger Louis, dwl American Exchange 

Berger M. L. Rev., acting pastor Westminster Presbyte- 
rian Church, Fell nr Octavia 

Berger Otto, bookkeeper, dwl 333 O'Farrell 
Bergerot John, French Academy, 613^ Stockton 
Bergerot John A., marketgardener, dwl N s Sixteenth nr 
Rhode Island 

Berges C. , expressman, SW cor Dupont and Post 
Berges P. B. & Co. (A. Drayeurand C. Cazeaux), proptrs 
Miners' Restaurant, 529 and 531 Com and 769 Market 
Berges Peter Bernard (P. B. Berges & Co.), dwl 411 Post 
Bergevin Nelson L. , salesman John Renz, dwl 235 Steven- 
son bet Third and Fourth 
Bergevin Peter, laborer, dwl N s Santa Rosa Av bet Ferrie 
and Collins 






ilJ JAMES &. STEELE & CO., Chemists and Apothecaries, 316 Kearny Street. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 513 Montgomery cor. Merclian' 



Bercrez Jean, waiter FYederick Pourcho, d\*i 621 Union 
Beru^ez Louis, clerk, dwl 021 Union 
BerirfclJ Robert, cariienter, dwl 135 Dora, rear 
ltKIt(;€lKE\ AI'til'ST, money and exchange broker, 

and consul Sweden and Norway, office 406 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 1111 Stockton 
Berg^Ten Hermian, dwl 1111 Stockton 
Berdi Erasmus, laborer West Coast Fvimiture Co. 
Bert'hauser Fred, dwl 600 Taylor 
Bers,'-h;i)^er .Tijlm, capitalist, dwl 600 Taylor 
Bcrijhoier Conrad, butcher, dwl 512 Folsom 
Beryholte William, tailor, 10 Mason 
Bergimer Philip, carpenter, dwl 406 Broadway 
Berlin Amelia Miss, seamstress Elizabeth Crockett, dwl 

NE cor Leavenworth and Clay 
Bergin Martin, surperintendent Market St. R. R., dwl S 

s Seventeenth nr Mission 
Bergin Michael, attorney at law, office 79 Mont Block 
Bergin Peter, dwl 624 Fourth 
Bergin Thoniiis I. (McAllisters d: B.), attorney at law, 

office Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery room 38 
Bergin Williara B., foreman Standard Soap C'o.'s Works, 

dwl E s Mission Creek bet Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
Bergiven P., laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wharf 
Berglein Henry, paper- boxmaker Wempe Bros., dwl 419 

Oak 
Bergluud A. , Tailors' Protective Union, NW cor Kearny 

and Morton 
Berglund Hans, shipcarpenter Oregon S. S. Co., dwl 38 

PeiTy 
Berglund Nicholas, shoemaker Nolan Bros., dwl 232 

O'Farrell 
Bergmann Abraham, confectioner, dwl 102 Bernard 
Bergmann Gustaf, lumbemian, dwl 132 Steuart 
Bergmann Henry, shoemaker Herman Thumler, dwl 25 

Morton 
Bergmann .Jacob {Frankenthal & Co.), dwl 1603 Gough 
Bergmann Samuel, butcher Wilson, Merry & Co., dw^l 331 

Kearnv 
BEKGXER JOnN A., painter, 219 Mission, dwl 232 

Fremont 
Bergold Charles V., boarding and liquor saloon, 726 Bran 
Bergshicker William, brewer, dwl 317 Francisco 
BEK<;!!>0\ OLE, carpenter and builder, dwl 312 Fulton 
Bergstein Lewis Mrs. (widow), dwl 1326 Polk 
Bergstein Samuel, waiter H. Bemhamer, dwl 25S Stev 
Bergstrom John, organbuilder, NE cor Mission and 

Twenty-fourth, dwl Lundy Lane bet California and 

Prospect Av, Bemal Heights 
Bergue Joseph, boarding, 736 Pacific 
Berguido Louis, pantrjman stm Humboldt, Jackson St. 

^Miarf 
Berguois A., dwl Overland House 
Bering John P. , manager Eckfeldt & Co., and secretary 

Pac. Wire and Wire Rope Manuf., Co., dwl 417 

Francisco 
Berjer Charles O., bookkeeper John R. Camahan, 537 

Market 
Berk Maurice G. , cigar dealer, dwl 7 Mason 
Berke Adolph, silversmith Schulz &, Fischer, dwl 243^ 

Stevenson 
Berkeley Ferry, Front St.Wliarf m- Green 
Berkeley Ferry and Railroad Co., William Stuart secre- 
tary', office 113 Liedesdorff 
Berkeley Land and Town Improvement Assn, S. A. Pen- 
well secretary, office 717 Montgomery' 
Berkeley Real Estate and Water Works Co., William 

Stuart seoretarj', office 113 Liedesdorff 
Berkeley Villa Assn, William Stuart secretary, office 113 

Liedesdorff 
Berkemann Mrs., chambermaid Hotel Rhein, 909 

Kearny 
Berkhout Jacob, longshoreman, dwl N s Green bet Mont- 

gomerj' and Sansom 
Berkley Joseph M. , laborer, dwl 638 Post, rear 
Berkley Michael, porter, dwl S s Geary bet Scott and 

Devisadero 
Berkovich Peter, Austrian Benev. Soc, 71 New M&nt 
Berkowitz Meyer, merchant, dwl 556 Minna 
Berkowitz Rebecca Mrs., cloaks, materials, etc., 1008 

Stockton, dwl 556 Minna 
Berleman Henrj', engineer tugboat Rescue, Broadway St. 

Wharf 
Berlenz F., laborer Saulmann & Lauenstein 
Berli Solomon, Swiss Benev. Soc, 627 Commercial 
Berlin E. L., architectural draftsman, office and dwl 8 

Montgomery Av 
Berlin F. A., attorney at law, office 515 California, dwl 8 

Miintgomerj' Av 



Berlin Henry, traveling agent, dwl 309^ Elm Av 

Berlin William, longshoreman, dwl N s Lily Av bet Gough 

and Franklin 
Berliner A. (Haskell & B.\ dwl 353 Third 
Berliner Herman A. (Diamant, Berliner Jc Co.), dwl 326 

Minna 
Berliner S. B. Mrs., fancy goods, 946 Howard 
Berling Cliarles, farmer, dwl 619 Pacific 
Berling John, engineer Pioneer Iron Works, dwl 16 

William 
Bermann Otto, salesman Mrs. Ann Simon, dwl 8 Park Av 
Bermel John G., agent human hair goods, 50 Second 
i3ermingham Edward, compositor Examiner, dwl 736 

Market 
Bermingham Edmund R., deputy county recorder, dwl 

245 Tehama 
Bermingham Edward, plumber, dwl W'inchestcr Hotel 
Benningham John, agent Colorado Steam Navigation 

Co., office 10 Market, dwl Russ House 
Bermingham Henrietta Miss, dressmaker, dwl 520 Bdwy 
Bermingham Margaret (widow), dwl 123 Clinton 
Bermingham Margaret (widow), dwl N s Ash Av bet 

Larkin and Polk 
Bei-mingham. See Birmingham 
Bermudas Jessie (widow), dwl 14 Pollard PI 
Bermuitger George, cabinetmaker Weir & Greenwood, 

dwl 531 Fourth 
Bemal Geronima (widow), dwl SE cor Seventeenth and 

Church 
Bemal William, expressman, dwl 212 Clara 
Bernard Albert O. , dwi SE cor Union and Jonea 
Bernard Annie Miss, shoefitter, dwl 614J Natoma 
Bernard B., salesman John C. Bell, dwl 2613 Mission 
Bernard Bassini, employee S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl 1327 

California, rear 
Bernard B. F., clerk A. B. Elfelt & Co., dwl 15 Monroe 
Bernard Charles, baker John Bordenadi, dwl 614 Bdwy 
BEKXAKD C'HAKLES, coffee and spice mills, 707 

Sansom, dwl 312 Oak 
Bernard Charles, cook, dwl SW cor Montgomery Av and 

Vallejo 
Bernard Charles A., house and sign painter, 629 Mer- 
chant, dwl 1611 Clay 
Bernard Edward, butcher Galinger & Maj'er, dwi 5 

Meacham PI 
Bernard Francis, carpenter and builder, office 516 Kearny, 

dwi 1515 Hyde 
Bernard H., painter, dwl 633 California 
Bernard Hannah Miss, dwl 614i Natoma 
Bernard Harris, hairdressing "saloon, 653 Sacramento, 

dwi 537 Stevenson 
Bernard Isaac, varieties, 2214 Sixteenth 
Bernard J., waiter, dwl SW cor Dupont and Broadway 
Bernard Jane (widow), dwl 57 St. Charles PI 
Bemard J. F., clerk A. B. Elfeldt & Co., dwi 323 Sutter 
Bernard Johanna (widow), dwl 614i Natoma 
Beniard John, stevedore, dwi junction Cal and Market 
Bemard John L., carpenter California Cigar Box Co., 

dwl 614t Natoma 
Bemard Julius, furniture, 1120 Stockton 
Bernard LawTcnce, expressman, dwi 108 Lily Av 
Bemard Mary (widow), dwl 262 Tehama 
Bernard Michael D., porter Main & Winchester, dwl 

1304J Montgomerj' 
Bernard Miles, foreman J. A. Folger & Co., dwl S s EUen 

bet Seventh and Eighth 
Bemard Minnie Miss, shoefitter, dwi 614^^ Natoma 
Bemard Renton F., captain First U. S. Cavalry, dwi Pre- 
sidio Barracks 
Bemard Robert, laborer A. M. Simpson & Brother, Beale 

St. Wharf 
Bemard Ulric, baker William J. Davis, dwl 23J Second 
Bemard Walter, agent, dwl 10 O'Farrell 
Bernardi Louis, cook John Vitach, 111 Second 
Bemarski Alexander, dwl 62 South Park 
Bemert Frederick, dwl 430 Broadway 
Bemert John, messenger Quartermaster's Dept. U. S. A., 

dwi Twenty-ninth Av nr San Bruno Road, South S. F. 
Bemhamer Harrj', restaurant 21 Sutter, dwl 258 Stev 
Bernhard Bemhard (Stahle tt Benihard), dwl 215 Pros- 
pect PI 
Bemhard George Jr., barkeeper, dwi 22 Stockton PI 
Bemhard Jacob, carpenter Gilbert & Moore, dwl 3 Fol- 
som Av 
Bemhard Jane Mrs., second-hand clothing, 781 Folsom 
Bernhard Peter D., hairdresser Bentencourt & Martin, 

dwl 215 Prospect PI 
Bemhard Tlieresa (widow), dwl 900 McAllister 
Bernhard Triest, dwl 1715 Powell 



BEAMISH'S—Nucleus Building, corner of Third and Market s-treets. 



p. VAN SCHAACK & CO., 705, 708, 710, 712, 7U, and 716 Kearny, Established 1852. 



Bernhardt Charles, clerk Continental Hotel 

Bcmheini Eddy, confectioner Rothschild & Ehrenpfort, 
dwl (il7 Jones 

Bernieri John, clerk Brizzolara & Roccalajjleata, dwl 24 
Wetniore PI 

Bernis Bnilditijj;, 024 and 626 California 

Beniiu.s Frederick, special policeman, dwl SVV cor Beale 
and Bryant 

Bcnistein , clerk, dwl 427 Bush 

Bernstein Ahrahani, fruits and vegetables, 528 Third 

Bernsteiu Al)raham, oystennan George Bernstein, dwl 
253 Minna 

Bernstein David, tailor, 779 Folsom 

Bernstein Elias, furniture, 313 and 315 Third, dwl 544 
Bryant 

Bernstein Georg«, OTOterman, 50 and 51 California Mar- 
ket, dwl 253 Minna 

Bernstein H., carpenter F. Korbel & Bros. 

Bernstein Henry, commission merchant, dwl 915 Howard 

Bernstein Hcnrj-, gents' furnishing goods, 422 Third 

Bemst€in J. C, dwl 70C Harrison 

Bernstein Joseph, clothing and gents' furnishing goods, 
824 Market, dwl 115 O'Farrell 

Bernstein Louis, clerk Jacob A. Alexander, dwl 525 Te- 
hama 

Bernstein Louis, clerk Joseph Bernstein, dwl 115 O'Farrell 

Bernstein Max {3fax Bernstein .(■ Co.). dwl 41S Sutter 

Bernstein Max & Co. (David Eiitner), manufacturers dec- 
orative wood carpet, 46 Gearj' 

Bernstein Morris, seaman, dwl 804 Third 

Bernstein Morris C, furniture and bedding, 517 Califor- 
nia,' dwl 1180 Broadway 

Bernstein Philip, vamisher Frei & Co., dwl 522 Third 

Bernstein Solomon, fancy goods, 38 Fourth, dwl 405 Post 

Bernstein Solomon, junkdealer, 711 Brannan 

Bernstein William, clerk Ordenstein & Co., dwl 1603 
Gough 

Bemt Christian, laborer, dwl 1507 Franklin 

Bemzott Jlichael, packer S. F. Packing and Provision Co. 

Bero Juhn, carjjenter California Mills 

Berolzheim Jonas, bookkeeper Porter, Oppenheimer & 
Slessinger, dwl 922 Geary 

Beronio Antonio, laborer, dwl Roma Hotel 

Beronio Gitano, proprietor Roma Hotel, 215 Broadway 

Berrecci Peter, Lumbermen's Pro. Union 

Berri Giacomo, milkman M. Fochetti, dwl Francisco bet 
Steiner and Pierce 

Berri Valentine, laborer Ruhland Bros., XW cor Fell and 
Stanyan 

Ben-iball John, carpenter, dwl 32 Rausch 

Berrigan John, laborer, dwl NW cor Sixteenth and Guer- 
rero 

Berrman Louis, laborer H. F. AVilliams, dwl Long Bridge 

Berroa Espiridion, barber, 1423 Dupont 

Berron Cornelius, bartender, dwl 654 Howard 

Berry A., dwl 111 Leavenworth 

Berrj- Albert, dwl 1709 Polk 

Berrj- Andrew B., carpenter, 418 Hayes 

Bern.- Augustus, bookkeeper McPhefson & Peterson, dwl 
Pacific Exchange 

Berry Charles C, carpenter, dwl 720 Stockton 

BerrV Charles M., clerk Fulton 6. Berrj', dwl Commercial 
Hotel 

Berry Edwin W., foreman Chase & Boruck, dwl 1319 
Montgomery 

Beny Enoch, machinehand Holland & Ruppel, dwl 11 
Verona PI 

BERKV Fl'LTOX C, stockbroker, office 418 Mont- 
gomery, dwl 2212 Howard 

Berry Geor^'c, jiainter, dwl 537 Third 

Bern' George, sheepraiser, dwl lOS Ellis 

Berrv George W., truckman, SE cor Spear and Mission, 
dwl 10 Eleventh 

Berrv G. G., first officer Pacific Mail S. S. City of Tokio 

Berry Gideon M., bookkeeper Sherifli's Office, dwl 930 
Market 

Berry H., waiter stm Oriflamme Oregon S. S. Co., Folsom 
St. ^\'harf 

Berry Henry, master mariner, dwl 512 Folsom 

Berry James, dwl 106 Post 

Beny James (Berry <t Gillman), dwl SE cor Bush and 
Montgomery 

Berrj- James, brassfinisher George H. Tay & Co., dwl 22 
Frederick 

Berry James, machinist Union Iron Works 

Berry James, seaman, dwl 29 Frederick, rear 

Beny J. B. Mrs., furnished rooms, 109 Montgomery 

Berry J. JL, carpenter schr Bonanza, dwl 314 Jessie 

Berry John (Grmiold it B.), dwl 23 Welsh 



Berry John, carpenter, dwl 31 Lafayette 

Berry John, laborer, dwl 225 Perry 

Berry John J., clerk general freight office Central Pacific 

II. R., dwl SW cor Market and Guerrero 
Berry Julia Mrs., dwl 745 Market 
Berry JL A. Miss, dressmaker, dwl 1017 Howard 
Berrj- Marj- C. Jlrs., dwl 1153 Mission 
Berrv Jlaiiuel J., conductor N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 

340J Fifth 
Berry Patrick, hostler, dwl 104 Jessie 
Berry Peter, bellman Palace Hotel, dwl 8 Dupont 
Berry Richard, assistant engineer S. S. Montana, dwl 543 

Howard 
Berrv Street House, Edward Stoetzer proptr. Berry nr 

third 
Berrj- Street Wharf, S s Beny bet Third and Fourth 
Berrv T., laborer A. F. Spear & Co., 218 Dmmm 
Berry T., laborer Pacific Mail S. S. Co.'s Wiarf 
Berry Thomas, carpenter California Mills, dwl 1723 Jessie 
Bern- Thomas, driver Market St. R. R. 
Berry Thomas H., operator Atlantic and Pacific Tele- 
graph Co., dwl E s Capp bet Twenty-fifth and Twen- 

tj--sixth 
Berry William D., printer Chase & Boruck 
Berry William F. , deliverj- clerk Atlantic and Pacific Tel- 
egraph Co., dwl 371 Minna 
Berry William L., printer Chase & Boruck, res Oakland 
Berrv W. 0. M. (Treadwe.il <t Co.), res Oakland 
BERKV A CAPP (Charles S. Ca;^p), real-estate agents 

and housebrokers, 41S Jlontgomery 
Berry & Gillman (Janus Berry and James Gillman), 

hackstable, 195 Stevenson 
Berrj-man C, dwl S03J Market 
Bern-man Frederick M., clerk Berrj-man & Doyle, dwl 

i620 Powell 
Berr^-man Henry B. (Berryman <C- Doyle), dwl 611 Polk 
Bern-man J. T. , butcher SUll 47 Grand Central Market, 

dw-1 8 Tjler 
Berrj-man & Dojle (Henry B. Berryman), coal and pig- 
iron, and agents Wellington Colliery Nanaimo, B. C, 

office Bulkhead bet Pacific and Jackson St.\\'harves 
Berson A. (A. Berson <i: Son), dwl 429 Sutter 
Berson A. & Son (Gitstave Berson), carpets and oilcloths, 

710-714 Washington 
Berson Genevieve, laundn% 429 Sutter 
Berson Gustave (A. Bermn & Son), dwl 429 Sutter 
Bert Alexander, carpenter Charles E. Boman, dwl 741 

Market 
Bert Bernard (Henry Schroder d: Co.), res Europe 
Bert Charles, hackman. Plaza, dwl 1C17 Mason 
Bert Edward G., dwl W s Treat Av nr Twenty-second 
Bert Edward G. Jr. , ticket clerk AVade's Opera House, 

dwl W s Trust Av nr Twenty-second 
BERT FREDERICK >V., lessee and manager Wade's 

Opera House, N s Mission bet Thii-d and Fourth, dwl 

Palace Hotel 
Bert. See Burt 
Berta Arminio, waiter John Jury & Brothers, dwl 524 

Merchant 
Berta Attilio (Berta, Jury Ji- Pedrazzi), dwl 624 Merch 
Berta Dominico, waiter John Jury & Brothers, dwl 524 

Merchant 
Berta Enniuio, waiter John Jury & Brothers, dwl 524 

Merchant 
Berta, Jury & Pedrazzi (Attilio Berta, Henry Berta, and 

Louis Pedrazzi), California Restaurant, 319 Pine 
Bertaloni Pierre, plasterer, dwl 518 Vallejo 
Bertaud Hvpolite, cook, dwl 1119 Montgomery 
Bertelsen Adolph, cook Lorentz Foard, dwl W s Webster 

bet Eddy and Ellis 
Bert«lsen Otto, draj-nian, dw-1 E s Buchanan bet Post and 

Gearj- 
Eertelsen Christian, stevedore, dwl 642 Second 
Berth Charles, shoemaker, 5 Quincv PI 
Bertheau C, with Heurj- Balzer & Co., dwl 1013 Powell 
Berthelot Charles L., conductor Central R. R., dwl 5 

Martin's Block 
Berthet Jidius, jeweler Levison Bros., dwl 1013 Powell 
Berthier Albert C, clerk, dwl 417 Kearny 
Berthola Peter, laborer, dwl 531 Green, rear 
Berthold Adam, driver, dwl 634 Br<iadway 
Berthold Jacob, butcher, dwl N s First Av nr Kentucky, 

South S. F. 
Berthold Louis, butcher, dwl 815 Battery 
Berthold Rafael, laborer Torrens & Enricht, 1520 Clay 
Berti Joseph, with Good & Tschurr, dwl G27 Broadway 
Bertie A., vegetable dealer, dwl 11 Union PI 
Bertm Alexander, dveing and scouring, 137 Third, 334 

Bush, 1030 Market and 521 Filbert, dwl 1205 Stock 



STEELE'S Glycerine Lotion cures Tan, Sunburn, Eruptions, etc. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchan i?. 



Bertin E. J., dwl 29 Turk 

Bertin Leon C, packer J. A. Folger & Co., dwl 9 Polk 

Lane 
Bertin Paul, jeweler Wenzel, Rothschild & Hadenfeldt, 

dwl 929 Powell 
Bertin Pierre, furnished rooms, 1131 Dupont 
Bertini Ulderico {Bertini & Co.), dwl S s Broadway bet 

Dupont and Stockton 
Bertini & Co. (Ulderico Bertini, Angela, Petri, and 

Pictrn Pfdrotta), bakery, 1031 Keaniy 
Bertody Adolph, carpenter, dwl 1008J Market 
Bertody Charles, physician, office and dwl 1005 Stockton 
Bertolacci Sebastiano, agent Sebastopol charcoal, dwl 518 

Vallejo 
Bertolo Enrico, laborer California Italian Paste Co. 
Bertolo Gerolimo, tinsmith, dwl 518 Vallejo 
Bertiiluoci Gniseppe, liquor saloon, 307 Broadway 
BEKTO.X FKA.\<'IS, manager Swiss American Bank, 

and consul for Portugal and Switzerland, office 527 

Clay, dwl 11 South Park 
Bertoni Charles, waiter Leon Dingeon & Co., dwl 428 Bush 
Bertram F. , seaman, dwl 123 Jackson 
Bertram George W. , chairmaker, dwl 108 Virginia 
Bertram H. J., machinist Union Iron Works, dwl 437 Pine 
Bertram .Jacob, brewer Philadelphia Brewery, dwl 232 Sec 
BERTR.IM THOMAS, stoves and tinware, 982 and 984 

Fots'im, dwl 31J Folsom 
Bertrand Alfred, cook California Hotel 
Bertrand Andrew, furrier, dwl 501 Kearny 
Bertrand Bajitiste, cook, dwl 636 Pacific 
Bertrand Constantine, mariner, dwl 56 First 
Bertrand Dennis, oysterman, Lick House 
Bertrand Frank J., proptr All Nations Hotel, 432 Bdwy 
Bertrand .Jacques, cook Frank J. Bertrand, dwl 432 Bdwy 
Bertrand Jean De B., cook Poodle Dog Restaurant, 445 

Bush 
Bertrand John, laborer, dwl 1122 Dupont 
Bertrand Joseph, waiter American Exchange 
Bertrand Norris, oysterman R. R. Swain & Co., dwl 213 

Sutter 
Bertrandras A. Mrs. , dwl 409i Fourth 
Bertsch Gottlieb, maltster Chicago Brewery, dwl 1428 Pine 
Bertschi Albert, porter Yates & Co., dwl NW cor Dupont 

and Sacramento 
Bertucci Gaitland, vegetable dealer, dwl Green bet Kearny 

and Dupont 
Bertucci Louis, barkeeper, dwl 420 Jackson 
Bertz Jacob {Diez, Bertz & Co.), dwl 2215 Fillmore 
Berunner Andrew, butcher, dwl cor First Av and Ken- 
tucky, South S. F. 
Berwick David, plumber McNally & Hawkins 
Berwick Thomas, sailmaker William C. Wood, dwl 1127 

Clay 
Berwin Moritz (P. Berivin & Brother), res New York 
Benvin P. & Brother {Moritz Berwin), importers and job- 
bers hats and caps, 106 Batten' 
Berivin Pincus {P. Berwin tt Brother), dwl 1320 Tyler 
Besancon Eugene, shoemaker Boisseau & Son, dwl 324 

Dupont 
Besley Henry J., barkeeper J. B. Fitch, dwl 314 Ivy Av 
Bescheinen Henrj', watchmaker Frontier, Bellemere & 

Co. , dwl 832 Broadway 
Beschim Charles, dwl SW cor Dupont and Broadway 
Beschormann Adolph, upholsterer Schlueter & Volberg, 

dwl 328 Mason 
Beschormann August, clerk Koch cfc Rogers, dwl 328 Mason 
Beschormann Charles F., mail clerk Calif ornia Demokrat, 

dwl 312 Post 
Beschormann Otto, upholsterer, dwl 328 Mason 
Besecke William {Waqener A B.), dwl 1906 Larkin 
Besino Frank, porter stm Ajax, Folsom St. Wharf 
Besse Joseph O., salesman Kaindler & Co., dwl 1416 Polk 
Besse Samuel H., dwl NW cor Post and Devisadero 
Bessleman Henry, clerk Neubert & Turk 
Bessemer Henry L., chemist and perfumer, 12 Mary 
Bessing Frank, locksmith John G. lis, dwl 1520 Dupont 
Bessing Joseph, clerk, dwl 643 Commercial 
Bessety James E., plasterer, dwl 113 Jones 
Besson Auguste, cook, dwl 526 Vallejo 
Besson Caniille (widow), dwl 17 Union PI 
Bessor Joseph, hackraan, plaza, dwl N s Pacific nr Sansom 
Best A. D., barkeeper, dwl 28 Turk 
BEST A»il» BELCHER MI.\1X« CO., (Storey Co., 

Nev.), William Willis secretary, office 309 Mont- 
gomery, room 29 
Best Charles, maltster Lux & Scherr,dwl 433 Shipley,rear 
Best David, steward, dwl 722 Front 
Best John, cabinetmaker, 314 Pine, dwl 1717 (1817) Leav 
Best John R., carpenter, dwl cor Louisiana and Sierra 



Best John T., clerk Robert S. Williamson, dwl 319 Fre- 
mont 

Best Joseph, clerk, dwl 20 Ellis 

Best G., clerk, dwl SW cor Turk and Hyde 

Best William, stairbuilder, dwl (1817) 1717 Leavenworth 

Bester John H., liquor saloon, 913 Kearny, dwl 631 Val- 
lejo 

Besthorn George (Mahlstedt <t- JS.), dwl 422 Leavenworth 

Besthorn Hermann, shoemaker Adolph Utschig, dwl 7 
Everett 

Beston Herman, oysterman John Elich Jr., dwl cor Mis- 
sion and New Montgomery 

Bestor Henry T., architect, 652 Market, dwl 1921 Sutter 

Betancue Joseph P., operator Hector W. Vaughan, res 
Oakland 

Betaux Eugene L., porter Prosper May, dwl 706 Pine 

Betche Charles, ironworker, dwl 5 Maiden Lane nr Val- 
lejo 

Betebeman Robert V. , carpenter, dwl 613 Mission 

Beteloti Pietro, laborer Bay Sugar Refinery, dwl W s 
Batterj' bet Vallejo and Green 

Betger Charles, jeweler Levison Bros., dwl 736 Gearj' 

Betger Edward, boots and shoes, 545 Merchant, dwl 736 
Green 

Beth A. H., waiter M. Deutsch & Co., dwl 421 Green 

Bethel George, waiter S. S. Los Angeles, Bdwy St. Wharf 

Bethel Thomas W., dwl 13 Fifth Av nr Harrison 

Betkowski John, baker Gustavus Melsing, dwl NE cor 
Vallejo and Powell 

Betkowski Peter, expressman, NW cor Bush and Mont- 
gomery, dwl 23 Silver 

Beurham John, dwl 80S Mission 

Betson Lewis, dwl 29 Minna 

Bettelheim A. S., rabbi Mason St. SjTiagogue, dwl 1311 
Larkin 

Bettencourt Caesar A. (Bettencourt tSs Martin), dwl 36 
Merchant 

Bettencourt & Martin (Ccemr A. Bettencourt and Man- 
uel Martin), hairdressers, 20 Clay 

Bettis O. J., blacksmith, 1434 Jackson, dwl 1808 Larkin 

Bottles Henrj', laborer, dwl 217 Perry 

Bettman Gustave, bookkeeper, dwl 508 Eddy 

Bettman Moses, soap manufacturer, office 311 Commer- 
cial, dwl 508 Eddy 

Bettner Henry, baker John Sohmer, dwl 1139 Folsom 

Bettridge J. A., compositor Alta California, dwl 824 
Kearny 

Bettridge William, bricklayer, dwl 423 Bush 

Betts James M., surveyor, office and dwl 420 Cal room 12 

Betts John M., physician, office 209 Kearny, dwl 24 
O'Farrell 

Betts Peter M., vice-president Betts Spring Co., office 218 
Fremont, res Oakland 

BETTS SPRIXii CO., William M. Betts president, 
Peter M. Betts vice-president, Edwin Fretwell secre- 
tary, office 218 and 220 Fremont 

Betts William, springfitter Betts Spring Co., dwl 5 Free- 
Ion 

Betts William M., president Betts Spring Co., office 218 
Fremont, res Oakland 

Bettsery John, cook, dwl 1116 Bryant 

Betz Joseph, foreman Lange, Meyer & Co., dwl 2216 
Mason 

Betzch Charles, locksmith John G. lis, dwl Maiden Lane 
nr Vallejo 

Betzel Charles W., physician, office and dwl 233 Sixth 

Betzel Isidor L., bookkeeper Held Bros. & Co., dwl 537 
O'Farrell 

Betzel Louis, manufacturer boy's clothing, 109 Sansom, 
dwl 537 O'Farrell 

Betzel M. L., reporter, dwl 725 California 

Betzel Otto, hairdresser, dwl 51 Clara 

Betzheld Charles, dwl 502 Mission 

Betzler Philip, laborer, dwl 722 Harrison 

Betzold Jacob, foreman Poly, Heilbron & Co.. dwl N s 
First Av nr Kentucky, South S. F. 

Betzold Mathias, driver Conrad Thaler, dwl 418 O'Farrell 

Beuchel Ernest, jeweler, dwl 727 Broadway, rear 

Beuchel John, tailor, dwl 727 Broadway, rear 

Beucler George F. , watchspringmaker, dwl 38 First 

Beutler Emily (widow), dwl 114 Ridley 

Beucler (widow), dwl 14 Eighth 

Beucler Julius J. , laundrjmian Lick House 

Beumer Frederick, cutter Levinsky Bros., dwl cor Folsom 
and Fourth 

Beutler Frank B. , shademaker George W. Clark, dwl 216 
Stockton 

Beutock H., laborer Cal. Sugar Refinery, dwl SW cor 
Brannan and Eighth 



BEAMISH'S— Importer Pnrnishing Goods, Nucleus Bldg, cor. Third and Market. 



p. VAN SCHAACK ^ CO., 706, 708, 710, 712, 714, and 715 Kearny, Established 1862. 



Bevan Charles W., plasterer, dwl 933} Folsom 
Bevan Edward, mariner, dwl lOG Stcuart 
Bevan J. A., purser 0. & O. S. S. liolj,'ic 
Bevan James, waiter California Restaurant, dwl 8 Ber- 
nard 
Bevan John, coalpasser Oregon S. S. Co.'s Montana, Fol- 
som St. Whar/ 
Bevan Owen, teamster, dwl cor Trccita Av and Precita 

PI, Uernal Hei^'hts 
Be\ifn Wasliington, trunkmakcr, dwl 805 Mission 
Bevan. See Beevan 

Itevans Isaac L., compositor, dwl 1111 Mason 
Bevaiis. See Bevins 

Bevell Mar{,'aret (widow), housekeeper, dwl 29 Park Av 
Bever Josei)h, miner, dwl 303 O'Farrell 
Beveridge A. E., dwl Terminal Hotel, 000 Fourth 
Beveridge Horatio, clerk Falkner, Bell & Co., dwl 1620 

Washington 
Reverlcigh & Co. ^Chinese), manufs cigars, 409 Com 
Beverly Kutli .\I. (widow), ladies' nui-se, dwl 338 Fremont 
Beverly William, waiter Kuss Himse 
licverson (.'arslcii, groceries and liquors, 570 Mission 
Beversen Henry, clerk Carsten Beversen, dwl 17 Anthony 
Bevcrsen Martin, clerk Blohm& Gerken, dwl NEcor Mis- 
sion and Beale 
Bevins Isaac, laborer, dwl E s WTiite nr Vallejo 
Bevins John, baker stm John L. Ste])hens, dwl 1313} Sac 
Bevins William M., printer, dwl SW cor Tyler and Web- 
ster 
Bevins. See Bevans 

Bewley Clifton, salesman Gedge & Thayer, dwl 628 Sutter 
Bewley William J., bookkeeper, dwl 210 Minna 
Beve Adele Miss, photograph retoucher Bradley & Ru- 

" lofson, dwl 34 Eddy 
Bevea James L.(Iiwtte cfc B.), dwl 305 Keaniy 
Beyer Adolph (F. Fortmann d: Co.), dwl 2212 Sixteenth 
Beyer Emma Miss, embroiderer, dwl 625 Vallejo 
Beyer George {Beyer <t' Saiiter), dwl SW cor Geary and 

Williams 
Beyer Otto (Schneller ct Beyer), dwl 8 William 
Beyer Louis, hairdresser, dwl 625 Vallejo 
Bever Louis Jr., bookkeeper, dwl 025 Vallejo 
Beyer Robert W. (Beyer it- Butler), dwl 1028 McAllister 
Beyer William, barkeeper Louis Eppinger 
Beyer & Butler (R. W. Beyer and \V. Butler), draymen, 

office 221 California 
Beyer & Sauter (Geonje Beyer and William Sauter), 

liquor saloon NW cor Vanderwater and Powell 
Bcyerle John E., coppersmith John G. lis, dwl SW cor 

Kearny and Broadway 
Beyersdorf Edward, barkeeper, dwl 915 Stockton 
Beyersdorf Louis {Safferhill ifc B.), dwl 206 Van Ness Av 
Bejnion Da\id, rougher Pac. Rolling Mills, dwl W s Michi- 
gan nr Shasta 
Bezeno Milo, drayman, dwl 739 Vallejo 
Bezzini Daniel, cook N. Giamboni & Co. 
Bezzini Jules, waiter N. Giamboni & Co. 
Biaggoni Juan, vegetable dealer, dwl 516 Sansom 
Biagi Ltomenico (Biatji it yardini), dwl 118 Post 
BI.4(iI A NAUDI.M (Doinenicu Biagi and Antonio 
Xardini), produce commission, 525 Sansom and 616 
Front 
Eiancalana Leonardo (Marsele <t' Co.), dwl 320 Broadway 
Bianchi Angelo, tailor, dwl S s Cadell Alley nr Union 
Bianchi B. Jr., Swiss Benev. Soc., 027 Commercial 
Bianchi Charles, marbleworks, 829 Market, dwl Mission 

nr Twenty-sixth 
Bianchi Eugenio, teacher vocal music and operatic artist, 

office and dwl 426 Kearny 
Bianchi G. B., carpenter John Drouilhat, dwl 425 Bd'vvy 
Bianchi G. B. , steward N. Giamboni & Co. 
Bianchi Guiseppe, maccaronimaker, 421 Battery, dwl SE 

cor Sansom and Pacific 
Bianchi Pietro, carpenter Giacomo Brignardello, dwl 9 

Union PI 
Bibb Daniel H., salesman Treadwell & Co., dwl 961 Har 
Bibber Jacob, miner, dwl 619 Pacific 
Bibbins George, mining superintendent, dwl 315 Jessie 
Bibbins, Tilton & Co. (Tracy L. Bibbim and Stephen S. 

Tilton), land agents, office 402 Kearny 
Bibbins Tracy L. (Bibbins, Tilton it Co.), dwl 1507 Leav 
Bibeau Isaac, blacksmith, E s Mission bet Twenty-eighth 

and Twenty-ninth 
Biber G. Jlrs., dressmaker, dwl 1011} Stockton 
Bibilich Joseph (Bibilich it Cammarota), dwl 10 Clara 
Bibilieh & Cammarota (Joseph Bibilich and Mitchell 

Cammarota), restaurant, 212 Brannan 
Bibo Sarah, clerk Schoenholz Bros, k Co., dwl 463 Minna 
Biehard Charles N., clerk Nicholas Bichard, dwl 365 First 



KICIIAKH IVI(:ilOLA8, coalyard, 16 and 18 Howard, 

dwl 305 First 
Bickel Margaret (widow), dwl 20 Haight 
BiekcrstafI James, waiter Occidental Hotel 
Bickle Fanny E., Mrs., dwl 10 Prospect PI 
Bickle Stella Miss, teacher music, dwl 10 Prospect PI 
Bicknell J. N., gilder, dwl 000 Stockton 
Bidau J. Begue, lodgings, 924 Dupont 
Biddick Ann (widow), dwl 5:i8 Natoma 
Biddick James, carpenter, dwl 538 Natoma 
Biddle Frank, Tailors' Protective Union, SW cor Kearny 

and ilorton 
Biddle Martin, shipsmith Hendrj- & Co., dwl Columbia 

House 
Biddlecomb L. T., farmer, dwl 22 Turk 
Biddolph James, fireman Golden State Iron Works, dwl 

(>!;) Mission 
Bididcb Henry, Swiss Benev. Soc, 627 Commercial 
Bidlack J. B. W., physician, office and dwl 002 Third 
Bidlenian Enoch, bookkeeper E. Martin & Co., res 

Oakland 
Bidlenian William A., clerk E. Martin & Co., dwl W s 

Ninth bet Folsom and Howard 
Bidley John, liquor saloon, dwl 408 Broadway 
Bidwell Henry C, mining, office 312 Montgomery, res 

Oakland 
Bidwell John E., salesman Emanuel Mansbach, dwl 429 

Geary 
Bieber Nathan, bookkeeper C. Klopstock & Co., dwl 912 

Howard 

Biebergell , dwl 417 Filbert 

Biebesel Fritz, carpenter, dwl 624 Pacific 

Biedenbach August, beer saloon, NE cor Mission and 

Third, dwl 140 Silver 
Biederman Erolinda (widow), dwl 3 Torrens Court 
Biedennan Frederick, butcher S. Newinan & Co., dwl 14 

Natoma 
Biederman Louis, cook, dwl 360 Clementina 
Biedinger Charles, dwl 130 T\irk 
Biehl Herman, seaman, dwl 127 Jackson 
Biehl John A., porter Charles Fox, dwl 1122 Sacramento 
Bielawski Casimir, draltsman U. S. Surveyor-General's 

Office, dwl 1615 Clay 
Blelenberg Peter, groceries and liquors, 21 Minna 
Bielenberg Peter, mariner, dwl 024 Pacific 
Bieler Adolph, tailor, dwl 6 l|>uincy 
Bielski Max, dwl NE cor Pine and Powell 
Bien Joseph, locksmith, 311 Battery, dwl 305 Tyler 
Bien Morris J., student, dwl 305 Tyler 
Bienenfeld Elias, fancy goods, 1229 Stockton 
Bierbrauer Carl, tinsmith Sol. Wangenheim & Co., dwl 

123 Sacramento 
Bierbrauer John, cabinetmaker, dwl 1133 Harrison 
Bierce Ambrose G., assay dept U. S. Mint, dwl 755 Har 
Bierce Albert S. , sweep cellar melter and refiner's depart- 
ment U. S. Mint, res Oakland 
Biergo Joseph (Adar it Biertjo), dwl 736 Pacific 
Bierhoff Samuel (Schoenholz Bros. & Co.), dwl 110 Sixth 
Bierig Charles (L. A M. Kahn <t Co.), res New York 
Bierler Adolph, Tailors' Protective Union, SW cor Keaniy 

and Morton y 

Bierman August, baker, dwl 339 Jessie /t. C '. - ' ' 
Biers Charles H., cabinetmaker, N s JteiUHid' \M, Fourth 

and Fifth, dwl 14 Gilbert 
Bierschwale Charles, cabinetmaker, 731 Mission 
Biersterfeld Oscar, ironer Occidental Laundry, SE cor 

Filbert and Octavia 
Biesta Frederico, clerk Italian Consul, dwl 331 Mont 
Blester William, laborer August C. Pape, dwl 1817} Pow 
Biffendorfer George, bookkeeper, dwl 010 California 
Big Bar Mill and Mining Co. (Amador Co., Cal.), John 

M. Buffington secretary, office 309 California 
Bigage L., machinist, dwl 439 Minna 
Bigarel F., dentist, dwl 037 Washington 
Bigelow C. P., bricklayer, dwl 423 Bush 
Biaelow Daniel, boilerniaker F. I. Curry, dwl 154 Dora 
Bigelow Francis H., printer, dwl 315 Kitch 
Bigelow George H. , insurance agent, dwl SW cor Howard 

and Twenty-first 
Bigelow H. B. (Holcomb Bros.), res New Haven, Conn. 
Bigelow Henrs', dwl 13 Powell 
BIOKLOW 'UEXKY H., general manager Home 

Mutual Insurance Co., office 400 California, dwl SW 

cor Howard and Twenty-first 
Bigelow Jonathan E., insurance agent, dwl 350 First 
Bigelow John F., with Cross &Co., dwl 619 Pine 
Bigelow Lewis, driver City R. R., dwl 103 Fifteenth 
Bigelow S. C, real-estate," office 200 Sansom, dwl Grand 

Hotel 



JAMES G. STEELE & CO., Chemists, removed to No. 316 Kearny St. 



D. "W. Laird, San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 




Bijfelow Susan H. Mrs., dwl 416 Bryant 

Biys^er Alexander, cabinetmaker William J. Heney & 

Co., dwl 227 Post 
Bigger Alexander, steward Pacific Mail S. S. Constitu- 
tion, dwl SW cor Nineteenth and Stevenson 
Bigger William H., draj-man Hayden & Lincoln, dwl 326 

Tehama, rear 
Biggers Jennie P. Mrs. , adjuster coiner's department U. 

S. Mint, dwl Windsor House 
Biggins Frederick, dwl 624 Ellis 
Biggins Patrick, plasterer, dwl 632 Brannan 
Biggins Patrick, teamster S. F. Gas Light Co., dwl N s 

Sierra, nr Georgia 
Biggins William, plasterer, dwl 6 Bridge 
Biggio A., vegetable dealer, dwl IS Ohio 
Biggorino Joseph, driver Bavaria Brewery, dwl S s 

Green bet Dupcjnt and Kearu}' 
Biggs Abel R. (A . li. Bijgs d- Co.), res Oakland 
Biggs A. R. & Co. (Arthur McCuviiskey), wines and 

liquors, 305 California 
Biggs Harry C, salesman S. McHenry & Co., dwl 2114 

Steiner 
Biggs Henrj"-, laborer Pacific Rolling Mills 
Biggs Jesse, carpenter S. S. Culverwell, 24 California 
Biggs John E., proptr Flume House, E 3 San Bruno 

road nr Twenty-sixth 
Biggs R. E. , merchant, dwl Russ House 
Bigg}- John, expressman, junction Market and Stockton 
Bigg^' John, helper Weed & Kingwell, dwl 523 Howard 
Biggy Terence, hostler N. B. and Mission R. R., dwl 523 

Howard 
Bigg}- William, apprentice Weed & Kingwell, dwl 523 

Howard 
BIOLEY BROTHERS (Daniel and George), groceries 

and provisions, NE cor Clay and Davis 
Bigley Daniel (Bigley Brothers), dwl 203 Eleventh 
Biglej' George (Bigley Brothers), dwl 1011 Washington 
Bigley John, dwl 707 Larkin 

Bigley John, gasfltter P. R. O'Brien, dwl 316 Beale 
Bigley John, laborer California Grain Warehouse, cor 

Beale and Brannan 
BIGLEY THOM.VS, shipwright, calker, and sparmaker, 

13 and 15 Spear, dwl S32 Mission 
Bignami Frank, carver S. F. Manufacturing Co., NW cor 

Main and Howard 
Bi.gn6 Vincent (Dol cfc B.), dwl 619 Union 
Bignotti Giacomo, proprietor Garden Stables, S s Clark 

bet Daris and Front, dwl 9 Lafayette PI 
Bignolli John, laborer with Casassa, Bacigalupi & Cor- 

celia, dwl SE cor Hayes and Baker 
Bigwood George, seaman Pacific Mail S. S. City of San 

Francisco 
Bigwood Job (Xewsham <fc B.), dwl W s Columbia bet 

Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth 
Bihler Jacob, teamster Pacific Distilling and Refining Co., 

SW cor Chestnut and Pierce 
Bihler William (Charles F. Wagner & Co.), res Lake\ille 
Bilay Antone, clerk S. Lachman & Co., dwl W s Mission 

bet Twelfth and Thirteenth 
Bilby G. L., carpenter, dwl 907 Folsora 
Bile W., messman S. S. Oritianmie, Fulsom St.WTiarf 
iiiley John, dressmaker C. Myers, dwl 1226 Bush 
Bilfinger Gustave, carrier Guide, dwl 1334 Dupont 
Bilfinger Marie (widow), dressmaker, 1332 Dupont 
Bilicke Gustave, capitalist, dwl 824 Geary 
Bill Conrad (Bill li- Schniirmund), dwl 427 Union 
Bill Conrad, upholsterer Henry Luchsinger & Co., dwl 7 

Card Alley 
Bill George, butcher Louis Zeh, dwl 1413 Kearny 
Bill Jacob, butcher, dwl 512 Linden Av 
Bill Katv, Miss, bakery, 213 Fourth 
Bill Philip, laborer, dwl 213 Fourth 
Bill Philip, real estate, dwl 29 Ritch 
BILL »V SCH.niRMlXO (Conrad Bill and Conrad 

Schminnund), chojihuuse, 39 Market 
Billanej' John, fireman, dwl 42 Clara 
Billaney R., oiler Pacific Mail S. S. Colima 
Billet Frank, laundryman, dwl 279 Minna 
Billett Maria (widow), dwl 111 Ridley 
Billinghurst Ray, salesman Thos. Kelly, dwl SE cor 

Leavenworth and Geary 
Billings A. D. , actor Maguire's New Theater 
Billings David R., groceries and liquors, 1311 Stockton, dwl 

522 Filbert 
Billings Edward P., porter Bank of San Francisco, dwl 

436 California 
Billings Ellen Mrs., funiished rooms, 13* Geary 
Billings George E., salesman A. Roman & Co., dwl 809 

Hyde 



Billings James, laborer, dwl 509 Washington 

Billings J. N., dwl Grand Hotel 

Billings Joseph, deckhand stm Marj' Taj'lor, dwl 531 East 

Billings Kate (widow), dwl 52S Natoma 

Bills. F. J., telegraph operator Central Pacific R. R., NE 

cor Fourth and Townsend, dwl 241 Ninth 
Bilse A., bookkeeper Arthur E. Magill, dwl 537 Turk 
Bilstein Richard, butcher S. F. Packing and Pro\ision Co. 
Bilty T. G. & Co. (William A. Jones), stockbrokers, 236 

Montgomery room 6 
Bilty Theodore G. (T. G. Bilty X- Co.), dwl 1420 Powell 
Biltz F. R., tuner Shennan & Hyde, res Oakland 
Bimat Felicine, laundress De Haes & Clement, dwl 633 

Third 
Binder Charles, clerk, dwl 34 Ellis 
Binder Charles A., barkeeper, dwl 814 Montgomery 
Binder Frederick, brewer, dwl 342 Union 
Binder George J., bookkeeper Ballard & Hall, dwl 1424 

Gear}' 
Binder l" Frank, paymaster's clerk U. S. Navy, dwl 1424 

Gear}' 
Bine Leon, salesman Solomon Bine, dwl 605 Taylor 
Bine Solomon, fancy goods, 133 Kearny, dwl 614 Sutter 
Bineaud Leon, hairdresser and wigmaker, 818 Stockton 
Binet Frank, laborer Lafayette Restaurant, dwl 711 Com 
Binet Joseph L., housecarpenter, dwl E s Laguna bet 

Lily Av and Oak 
Bingenheimer Christopher, cooper, 110 Davis, dwl 5 Clem 
Bingham Alexander, wireworker Cal. Wire Works, dwl 

435 Pine 
Bingham Dora Mrs., dwl 139 Fourth 
Bingham Henr}' (Menzies d- B.), dwl 1808 Dupont 
Bingham M. A. (widow), dwl 710 Taylor 
Bingle William, carpenter, dwl 108 Eighth 
Biui Guiseppe, laborer Cal. Italian Paste Co., dwl Gari- 
baldi House 
Binn George, driver James Dunn 
Binney Henry, clerk, dwl 100 Jackson 
Binnings John, clerk Henry Brommer & Co., dwl SE cor 

Hayes and Franklin 
Binny Stewart B., dwl 702 Sutter 

Binswanger Louis, gents' furnishing goods, 513 Kearny 
Biojini Fernando, express, dwl E s San Jose Road nr St. 

Maiy's College 
Birhe Henry C, clerk Charles Smith, dwl SE cor Railroad 

and Sixth 
Birce Frank A., clerk, dwl 1238 Howard 
Birch, Argall <& Co. (Win. H. Birch and John Argall), 

proprietors California Machine W'orks, 119 Beale 
Birch Patrick, stevedore, dwl 114 Townsend 
Birch Samuel, gardener, dwl E s Castro bet Seventeenth 

and Eighteenth 
Birch Thomas J., bookkeeper Examinei, dwl 729 Cal 
Birch William, carpenter Holland & Ruppell, dwl 949 Fol 
Birch William A., bookkeeper H. H. Noble & Co., dwl 913 

Sacramento 
Birch Willi