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Full text of "San Francisco municipal record"




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SAN FRANCISCO HISTORY ROOM 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 04632 5883 
SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 

3 1223 04632 5891 
Not to be taken jrom the Library 






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San FRkNCisco 




Twenty-Five Centt 



Annual 

Blue 

Book 



SAN 

FRANCISCO'S 

BEAUTIFUL 

CITY 

HALL 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Vol. VI, No. 1 




and 

Official 

Directory 



Photo 

by 

Californians, 
Inc. 



JANUARY 



19 3 2 



w 

d 

C 
E 
Ii 

E 


1^' 


LARRY 
BARRETT 

Makes a 

Special 

Announcement 

to 

CITY 

EMPLOYEES 

RE CO., LTD. 

Street Near Taylor 
PRospect 6804 




Purchasers of 

INDIA TIRES 

ill be entitled to the san 
iscount as that given to tl 
ity Purchasing Ages 
)rop in and examine tl 
idia Tire and inquire - 
to our Budget Pay- 
ment Plan. 

JARRETT Tl 

378 O'FarreU 

Telephone 



// 



Let's Get Associated** 



aOC/4^ 






Fill up at Red, Green and 

Cream Associated Service 

Stations and Garages 



The Best Investment FOR YOU 

AN ANGLO-CALIFORNIA SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

YOU can build financial strength through the complete banking service of the Anglo- 
California banks — nine conveniently located "Savings Headquarters" in San Francisco. 
The officers and employees of the Anglo-California Trust Company cordially invite you 
to open a Savings Account in the Anglo-California main bank or branch bank most con- 
veniently located for you. 

Through our Banking-by-Mail Department we promptly handle the accounts of out-of- 
town depositors. 

For complete information regarding the advantages of an Anglo-California Savings Ac- 
count, write to or call at our nearest bank listed below. 

TOTAL RESOURCES OVER $83,000,000 



'•^•«ij^ 



Member Federal Reserve System 

Anglo-CauforniaTrust Ca 



DEPARIKENTS 

Branch Bantu 

Mission & 16th 

Fillmore & Geary 

Third &. 20th 

101 Market 

NINE COMPLETE BANKS IN SAN FRANCISCO 



OGMMEBCIAL 8AVINBS TRUST BOND SATE DEPOSIT 

Market ^ Jones ^ ^ank 

GeS'stteet & Market &. Sansome Streets 

Twentieth Ave. Montgomery & Sacramento Street* 



Buy from firmj that advertise with as 



^h3S-0. ScuSJ/ 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Vox Health 

ClearUpYour Blood With 
Pure Drinking Water 

Are you listless? Tired mornings? Is strain of work 
sapping your energy? 

Flood your system with National for a month. 
Taste its purity. Then watch your pep curve mount. 
Pure water — free from blood clogging properties — 
gives you new vim, new fire, new life. 

National comes to you in sterilized bottles. It is 
distilled, then ozonated to give it a liveness you like. 
Fifty cents for a 5 gallon bottle. Stand loaned free. 
Call EXbrook 4370 today. 

NATI ON A L 

Pure Drinking Water 

Product of 
National Ice and Cold Storage Company 



of California 



85 Second Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone 
EXbrook 4370 



The 
University of San Francisco 



Extends Its Congratulations to 
Its Alumnus 



ALFRED J. CLEARY 



Chief 
A dministrative Officer 





326 RITCH STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Distributors 

of 

ALHAMBRA SPRING WATER 



Those who drink Alhambra Spring Water 
the year 'round are always sure of pure drink- 
ing water. 

FREE — to every user of this healthful, spar- 
kling spring water, we will give an attractive 
table carafe absolutely FREE! They're just 
the thing to taken on motor trips, vacations, 
hikes, boating, etc. 



Call 

EXbrook 2288 



ROY C. WARD 



GEO. B. DINSMORE 



WILFRED PAGE 



GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1903 

INSURANCE BROKERS AND AVERAGE 
ADJUSTERS 

GENERAL MARINE AGENTS FOR 

PACIFIC COAST 

BRITISH COLUMBIA AND ALASKA 



STANDARD MARINE INS. CO. LTD. 
NATIONAL UNION FIRE INS. CO. 
THE MERCANTILE INS. CO. OF AMERICA 
WORLD MARINE & GENERAL INS. CO. 
GLENS FALLS INSURANCE CO. 



MARINE ' INLAND MARINE ' JEWELRY 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. SEATTLE, WASH. 

308 California Street 211-214 Colman Building 

GARFIELD 3646 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



Office, Mission 444) 



Residence, DEIaware 4979 



R. J. O'CONNELL 

Dealer in 

LIME, CEMENT, PLASTER, ROCK, SAND AND GRAVEL 

Grading and Excavating 

DUMP TRUCKS FOR HIRE y SHOVEL MOVING 

1429-45 Valencia Street San Francisco, Calif. 



c 



c 



AT THE ENTRANCE TO CHINATOWN 




SAN FRANCISCO.CALir. 



] 



rd 



Tel. DOuglas 1182 

JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS 

Iron Founders *" Machinists' Engineers 



Office: 200 Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHN FINN, PresiJent 



ROBERT B. FINN, SecreMry 



JOHN FINN METAL WORKS 

SAN FRANCISCO and SEATTLE 

Babbitt Metah and Solders Type Metals and Zinc Dust 

Galvanizing and Sherdardizing 

372-398 SECOND STREET 

Telephone SUTTER 4188 



F. J. CARROLL, Proprietor 



San Francisco Brass Foundry 

Established 18S0 

Brass, Bronze and Aluminutn Castings f NicrOmetal a Non- 
Tarnishing and Acid-Resisting Metal 

Manufacturers of Superior Bronze Bushings -- Comet Bronze Bushings 



PHONE KEARNY 2623 



48-50 Clementina Street 



San Francisco 



"PUMPING PROBLEMS" 

Solved 

With a Complete Line of 

PUMPS 
Kimball-Krogh Pump Company 



515 Harrison Street 



DAvenport 1113-1114 




LTILITy-EEALTy 



1072-1076 HOWARD STREET 



GEO. OSTERTAG 


CALIFORNIA INN 


RATHSKELLER 


Restaurant and Grill 


BOWLING 


Polk and Turk Streets Phone ORdway 2044 



U. S. Royal Cords - U. S. Solid Tires 

Prest-o-Lite Batteries 

TELEPHONE HEMLOCK 4570-4571 

DECKER & HORSTMANN 

INCORPORATED 

SAN FRANCISCO 
A. HORSTMANN 167 HAYES STREET 



Welders of Automotive Parts :-: Industrial Machinery :-: Boilers & Tallica 
Pipe :-: Contractors* Equipment 

HOLIDAY AND NIGHT SERVICE 



PEERLESS WELDING CO. 

RUDY STRECKER, Proprietor 

WELDING ENGINEERS 

Phones: MArket 0678-0679 < Night Phone: MOntrGU 2277 
155 TENTH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



WATER METERS 



FOR EVERY KIND OF 
SERVICE 



Sizes %" to 36" 



Oscillating Piston ^ Disc * Rotating 

Piston ' Velocity *■ Compound 

Venturi Type 



National Meter Company 



SAN FRANCISCO 
1048 Folsom Street 



LOS ANGELES 
2309-11 East 8th Street 



F. J. HEARTY 8c CO. 

Power Plant Equipment, Steam Heating 
and Ventilating Equipment 

Representing : 

THE EDWARD VALVE 8C MFG. CO. 

THE SUPERHEATER CO. 

QUIMBY PUMP CO., INC. 

MERCON REGULATOR CO. 

THE HERMAN NELSON CORPORATION 

75 Fremont Street Phone GArfield 8045 



Morck Brush 



Manufacturing Co. 

236 8th Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Golden Gate Atlas Material 
Company 

TRANSIT CONCRETE 



CERTIFIED MILL WORK 

National Mill & Lumber 
Company 

GENERAL MILLWORK 

INTERIOR FINISH 

DOORS / SASH < WINDOWS 

CABINET WORK 

230 California Street San Francisco 

Now doing Millwork and Finish on Health Center Building 



Fire . Automobile . Marine . Casualty . Fidelity . Surety 



H 



iREMAN's Fund Grou 



Jireman's \}unci Insurance' Qomnany 

Home '\}ire Sc Marine Insurance Qompanij 

(-^Occiclental Insurance (Bompany 

Jireman's ^und Indemnity (Sompany 

Occidental Indemnity (Bompany 

New York, Chicago SAN FRANCISCO Boston 




Atlanta 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



THIi MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



HANCOCK BROS. 

Expert Ticket Service 

COUPON BOOKS 

STREET CAR TICKETS 

TRANSFERS 

FOOTBALL AND ATHLETIC 

EVENT TICKETS 



25 Jessie Street 



San Francisco 



rV-o.aJ.v'- " i^fiJJii/JUTrrj, '. 



VENDING 

We are manufacturers and distributors for machines 
for over a hundred different uses. Repairs, parts, 
and supplies for all machines kept in stock. 

Advance Automatic Sales Company 

Telephone Fillmore 2466 

1114 Buchanan Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Compliments of 

PHIL C. KATZ 

Public Administrator 



GARFIELD 7020 



920 Phelan Building 



San Francisco, Calif. 



Manufacturers — Renovators 




SAN FRANCISCO 



A. NEBENZAHL, Prop. 

Phone GARFIELD 9679 

Specializing in 

Hats Made to Your Order 

and 

Caps of the Latest Model 
Price ^1.50 and up 






s. 



"Within Your Means" 

WHITE'S FUNERAL SERVICE is compre- 
hensive. Even the slightest duty is performed 
with all the precision characteristic of WHITE'S 
SERVICE. Constant, intelligent supervision of 
every detail not only assures the most satisfac- 
tory service possible, but adds an element of 
sympathy and understanding sometimes lacking 
in ordinary service. 

"While's Prices Are Always Reasonable" 

S. A. WHITE 

Leading Funeral Diretlot 
TRANS-BAY AND PENINSULAR SERVICE WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE 

2200 Sutter Street "^ San Francisco 

TeUplione 



C«l.Ui>li.J 



Success to New Charter Form of Government 

CALIFORNIA 
FLOWER MARKET, Inc. 

Flower Exchange and Wholesale 
Florist 

171 Fifth Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phones: DOUGLAS 4719— SUTTER 8286 



ALLEN'S WHIST CLUB 
GAMES 

Every THURSDAY and SUNDAY EVENING 

at 8:15 

Score Cards 35c 

Every MONDAY and THURSDAY at 2 P. M. 

Score Cards 25c 

1ST, 2ND, AND 3RD PRIZES ' DOOR PRIZES 
Consolation Prizes — Merchandise for 114 or Over 

COTILLION HALL 

159 Church Street 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



PHONE GARFIELD 9697 

WM. H. HAMBLETON 

All that is Good for the Smoker 

HIGH GRADE CANDIES 



30 California Street 



San Francisco 



NOW OPEN 

NEW LOCATION 

RIALTO BILLIARD PARLOR 

H. C. OLSEN, Proprietor 
New and Modern Equipment 



1138'/, Market Street 



San Francisco 



Compliments of 
PETRI CIGAR CO. 



KEARNY 3967 



Special Notice to Municipal Employees 

We solicit your patronage on our Cheerful Credit 
Plan. We dress the entire family from head to foot. 



COLUMBIA OUTFITTING COMPANY 

Mission at Twenty-second 
TELEPHONE MISSION 9142 





Telephone GArfieU 4219 






A. CAVALLI & CO. 






ITALIAN BOOK STORE 






RADIO 




255 Columbus Avenue San Francisco, 


Calif. 



John B. Campodonico, Pres. 



Established 1878 



Success to the New Charter Form of Government 

SCATENAGALLI FRUIT CO. 

GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

100-106 Washington Street 
TELEPHONE DOUGLAS 0150 



PHONE MISSION 8673 

ROYAL TALLOW & SOAP CO., Inc. 

Established 1906 
Manufacturers of 

TALLOW, GREASE & SOAP PRODUCTS 
CRACKLING AND FISH MEAL 

1260 Davidson Avenue San Francisco, Calif. 



EARL E. ROBBINS 

Automotive Repairing 



Phone UNderhill 7746 

SAN FRANCISCO 



55 Oak Street 





MISS G. B. PERRY 






MASSAGE 




Electric 


Cabinet Baths - Mineral Tub Baths - Violet Ray 1 




Will Call at Hotel or Home by Appointment 






Hours 10 to 10 — Open Sundays 






Office No. 4, 889 Geary 






PROSPECT 4009 





GRANT TAILORS 

Limited 

■ Over 25 Years in San Francisco 

EXCLUSIVE TAILORS 

Entire Fourth Floor 

Flannery Building 

702 Market Street San Francisco 

Phone EXbrook 4529 



Compliments 
of 



Buy from firms that advertise v?ith us 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



Neptune Meter Company 

THOMSON METER CORP. 

50 East 42nd Street New York City 



Manufacturers of the 

TRIDENT AND LAMBERT WATER METERS 



Over 5,500,000 



Trident and Lambert Water Meters, 
made and sold the world over, is the 
unparalleled record of growth which we are proud to offer the Water Works field. 



LOS ANGELES 
701 East 3rd Street 



Pacific Coast Branches 

SAN FRANCISCO 
320 Market Street 



PORTLAND 
525 Johnson Street 



Office and Plant: 1999 Third Street, San Francisco Telephones: MArket 2016 / MArket 6909 

MONTAGUE PIPE & STEEL CO. 

San Francisco, California 




NEW TYPE SCREEN INSTALLED AT CRYSTAL SPRINGS RESERVOIR 
Manufacturers of 

Riveted and Welded Steel Pipe, Well Casing, Tanks, Boilers and Stacks 

Montague Hot Water Type Heaters, Montague Siphons 

A GENERAL LINE OF SHEET STEEL AND PLATE WORK 

Buy from firms that advertise with us 




NCISCO 







jj^l^ljg^ll^ 



Vol. V 



JANUARY, 1932 



No. 11 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 

MUNICIPAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1095 Market Street Phone MArket 8438 

Endorsed by Society of California Pioneers 
LOUIS C. LEVY, Editor 



M. B. BOTHW^ELL 
Business Manager 



PHILIP P. LEVY 
Advertising Manager 



PAYNE'S BOLT WORKS 

Telephone DAvenport 3700 
Established 1871 — Incorporated December 17, 1888 

The Only Carriage Bolt Works on the 
Pacific Coast 

Manufacturers of 

Iron and Steel Set Screws, Cap Screws, 
Studs 

And All Kinds of 

BOLTS AND NUTS 



201 Main Street 



San Francisco, Calif. 



DOUGLAS 1120-1121 



LARSEN & LARSEN 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



629 Bryant Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 





CONTRIBUTING 


EDITORS 


Assessor's Office 


Louise M, O'Hara 


Controller's Office 


J. Everett Sharp 


Board of Education. D. P. Hardy and Mrs. Harriet Leaman || 


Board of Health 


Edward M. Coftey 


Board of Public Works 


Sid Hester 


Bureau of Engineering 


L. T. McAfee 


Bureau of Supplies 


Ivy Perkins Cerkel 


City -Attorney's Office 


Edmond P. Bergerot 


Civil Service Commission 


James J. Maher 




Edward M. Coffey 


Coroner's Office 


Jane Walsh 


Count V Clerk 


Howard Gudelj 






Department of Electricity 


Joseph P. Murphy 


District Attorney 


Henry Goldman 


Engineers' Union 


J. L. Slater, Jr. 






Fire Department 


Lieut. Fred Jones 


Justice Courts 


Robert W. Dennis 


Jlayor's Office 


Malcolm Fraser 


Municipal Railway 


Eugene W. Clisbee 


Municipal Carmen's Union 


Clark N. Farlow 


Office Employee's Association 


William T. Bonsor 


Parks and Museums 


W. M. Strother 


Per Diem Men's Association 


F. J. Ferguson 


Playground Commission 


Veda B. Young 


Principals' Association 


Susie A. Ward 


Public Library 


Anne M. Farrell 






Recorder's Office 


Daniel McGloin 


Registrar's Office 


George L. Sharp 


San Francisco Hospital 


Mrs. Mae H. Noonan 


San Francisco Water Department 


N. A. Eckart 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


Mrs. M. Dolan 


Sheriff's Office 


W. J. Martenson 


Superior Courts 


Henry J. McGrath 


Tax Collector's Office 


Homer Warren 


Treasurer's Office 


Duncan Mathewson 





T. E. 

CONNOLLY 

CONTRACTOR 



SHELDON BUILDING 
San Francisco 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



CONTENTS 



1932 Municipal Record Blue Book 



PAGE 

Assessor's Office 18 

Agricultural Commission 21 

Art Commission 36 

Atherton, California 43 

y\ttorney Wolff Appointed 48 

Board of Supervisors 11-14 

Bureau of Supplies 18 

Board of Education 25. 26. 27 

Burlingame, California 43 

Belmont, California 43 

Board of Education Greets New Member 55 

Contributing Editors 7 

Chief Administrative Officer 11 

Civil Service Commission 20 

City Attorney's Office 30 

Controller 1 1 

California Palace of the Legion of Honor 23 

City Engineer Wins Promotion 49 

Coroner Leland's Annual Report 48 

City Hall (photograph) Cover 

County Welfare 36 

Coroner's Office 20 

Civic Center of San Francisco 52, 53 

City Planning Commission 18 

County Clerk 20 

DeYoung Memorial Museum 23 

District Attorney's Office 30 

Daly City, California 44 

Editorials 9 

Elections Department 17 

Employee's Retirement System 18 

Exposition Auditorium 21 

Electricity Department 21 

Fire Department 28 

Finance Director ^7 

Grand Jury ^7 

Hetch Hetchy Project 16 

Hillsborough, California 44 

Index 8 

Juvenile Courts 5^ 

Law Library 36 

Mayor's Office 10 



r.\GE 

Municipal Railway 17 

Mrs. Mary Fitz-Gerald Resigns 55 

Municipal Band 21 

Municipal Court 34, 35, 36 

Municipal Court Index 36 

Menlo Park, California 44 

New Charter Installed by San Francisco 46 

Public Works Department 15 

Public Utilities Commission 16 

Probation Board 18 

Public Pound 18 

Public Health Department 19 

Park Department 22 

Public Administrator 21 

Police Department 29 

Probation Committee 30 

Public Defender's Office 30 

Public Library 36 

Permit Appeals 37 

Pioneers Society of California 38 

Pacific-Portland Cement Company 49 

Police Ball Program 51 

Recorder's Office 14 

Recreation Department 24 

Redwood City, California -H- 

San Francisco Water Department — 16 

Sheriff's Office 20 

Steinhart Aquarium 23 

San Francisco War Memorial. 23 

Superior Court 31. 32, 33 

San Francisco Airport 37 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 38 

San Francisco Junior Chamber of Commerce.... 38 

San Francisco Convention Tourist Bureau 38 

San Francisco Better Business Bureau 38 

San Mateo County Officials 43 

San Carlos, California 44 

San Bruno, California 44 

South San Francisco, California 45 

San Mateo, California 45 

Treasurer's Office 18 

Tax Collector's Office 21 

Water Department Report , 50 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 




Annual Blue Book 

GREATER importance attaches to this year's 
publication of the "Municipal Record's" Blue 
Book and official roster of the City and County of 
San Francisco, because of the many changes in per- 
sonnel due to the installation of the New Charter. 

The public generally, desirous of knowing the occu- 
pant of an office, where located and his telephone num- 
ber, needs only to turn to this volume and lo, he has it. 

Gathering this data and compiling it for ready use 
was a labor of weeks. The presentation of the roster 
was a matter of study. It is, therefore, hoped that it 
will meet with the reader's approval. 

It was impossible to publish the pictures of many. 
This was due to the innate modesty of the office holder, 
who usually replied, "just print the name." 

The Blue Book and Official Roster serves a real 
purpose. It is a book that is kept the year round. It is 
a reference guide, accurate at the moment. Undoubt- 
edly, there will be many corrections in the months to 
come. New appointments, new telephone numbers, and 
other important changes. 

To meet this exigency, it is the purpose of the "Mu- 
nicipal Record" to note these changes in subsequent 
issues of the periodical. 

The "Municipal Record" is a semi-official publication. 
It records the progress of San Francisco. It sets forth 
the improvements contemplated and those completed. 
It makes every effort to present official reports of the 
various departments of the municipal government, in 
an interesting manner, and by the accuracy of these 
reports has won the confidence of the city officials and 
the business men of this city. 

During the ensuing year, this magazine will publish 
articles by the Mayor, the Chief Administrative Officer, 
the Director of Health, the Controller, and other lead- 
ing officials who are laboring to give San Francisco a 
splendid administration under its new Charter. 

Special articles on the progress of the Hetch Hetchy 
project, written by Mr. M. M. O'Shaughnessy ; the sit- 
uation of the San Francisco Water Department, by Mr. 
Nelson Eckart ; the developments of the Police and Fire 
Departments by its able heads. Chiefs Quinn and Bren- 
nan; and the progress being made in education, by Su- 
perintendent of Schools Joseph Marr Gwinn. These and 
corntless other interesting articles will be published, 



each profusely illustrated with the latest photographs 
of the subject under discussion. 

As stated before, the "Municipal Record" has a real 
object — to promote San Francisco, to publish to the 
world its steady progress and achievements. 

We trust the Blue Book and Official Roster of San 
Francisco and San Mateo County will serve a useful 
purpose. We advise that it be filed for reference. 



New Charter Effective 

IN his inaugural address. Mayor Angelo J. Rossi, 
dwelling on the importance of the new charter, said: 

"Only by strictly observing the provisions of the 
new charter in letter and spirit can its possibilities be 
properly tested. This is a responsibility which rests 
en every city official — and I accept my full share of it." 

Pledges made by our Mayor during the recent cam- 
paign were not empty ones. 

He is conscientiously carrjdng out the new charter 
provisions. He proved his sincerity when he appointed 
a special committee to pave the way for a real charter 
set-up. 

Subsequently, his appointments were of the highest 
standard. The men selected by Mayor Rossi are 
pledged to uphold the charter. 

Chief Administrator Cleary recently said : 

"We shall cut the deadwood out of the City Hall. 
The cost of San Francisco's government must be re- 
duced. The old method of paternal politics shall stop 
and the new method of business efficiency shall begin." 

Utterances of that character are an assurance of a 
real administration. 

Mayor Rossi has displayed energy, tact, and firm- 
ness in handling the duties of his important office. He 
is manifesting at this early stage that he will reduce 
the cost of municipal government ; that he will not tol- 
erate useless expenditures, and that the taxpayer is 
assured an economic and efficient handling of his high 
office. 

San Francisco feels proud of the man it elected to 
office. 

It augurs well for the progress and future of the 
"City by the Golden Gate." 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



MAYOR'S OFFICE 



Room 200, City Hall 
Telephone MARKET 0163 

MAYOR 
Honorable Angelo J. Rossi 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
(To be appointed) 

SECRETARY 
Malcolm A. Eraser 

STENOGRAPHERS 

Miss Rose M. Button 

Miss Lotus Coombs 

Harold J. Riordan 

Miss Muriel G. Victor 

MESSENGER 
Earl Gladman 

OFFICERS DETAILED TO 
MAYOR'S OFFICE 

Inspector Thomas D. Daly 

Inspector Peter R. Maloney 

CHAUFFEURS 

Wm. H. McCarthy 

Willard Glaser 




M 
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HONORABLE ANGELO J. ROSSI 
Mayor of San Francisco 



CONDENSED BIOGRAPHY 

NATIJ'E Calif ornian, of Italian parentage, born in Volcano, Amador County, January 22, 1S78. If'as mar- 
ried in 1902. Has one son, two daughters, and fii'e grandchildren. 

Prominent in civic affairs since organization of Dountou'n Association. First entered public life in'1914, when 
Mayor Ralph appointed him to Playground Commission. 

In 1921 was elected a member of Board of Supervisors. Returned to the board in 1929, receiving highest vote 
on ticket. Became chairman of the finance committee. 

January 8, 1931 , was appointed Mayor by Board of Supervisors following election of Mayor Rolph as Gov- 
ernor. At the election held November 3, 1931 , Mayor Rossi was returned to his high office by a plurality of 6,909 
votes. He was inaugurated on January 8, 1932, on which day the new Charter of San Francisco was also installed. 

His appointments to office have won the approval of the entire City and State. His enforcement of the provi- 
sions of the New Charter is evidence of the type of administration he is giving to San Francisco. 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 




ALFRED J, CLEARV 

Chief Administrator, City and County 

of San Francisco 



CHIEF 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

OFFICER 

City Hall 



Alfred J. Cleary 

Chief Administrative Officer 

Ann Mulligan 

Secretary 

Note: Quarters have been assigned in 
rooms formerly occupied by Board of 
Education, second floor, Polk and Mc- 
Allister Street side. In phoning ask for 
Chief Administrator. 



CONTROLLER'S OFFICE 

Room 111, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



CONTROLLER 

Leonard S. Leavy 

COUNTY ACCOUNTANT 

Banning Wentworth 

DEPUTIES 

John J. Boyle, Jr Office Superintendent 

Henry Ingwerson. ...Chief Deputy Auditor 

Horace L. Crocker Redemption Deputy 

John B. Lewis Fee Deputy 

J. Everett Sharp Bail Money Deputy 

Timothy Desmond Ledger Deputy 

George T. Lafrentz Statistician Deputy 

Albert P. Glidden Bond Deputy 

Thelma Benson Stenographer 

H. R. Hurlbut Expert on Minors 

Annie Kelly Tel. Opr., File Clerk 

Frank L. Fenton Attorney 



BOARD OF 
SUPERVISORS 

Meets every Monday at 2 p.m., 

Supervisors' Chambers, Second Floor 
City Hall 

Clerk's Office, Room 235, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



John S. Dunnigan Clerk of the Board 

David A. Berry Chief Asst. Clerk 

For Committee Meeting Rooms Inquire 
at Clerk's Office 

Arthur M. Brown, Jr., 200 Bush Street 

Sam T. Breyer, 1075 California Street 

Victor J. Canepa, 753 Pacific Avenue 

Jesse C. Colman, 211 Montgomery Street 

Andrew J. Gallagher, 606 Grant Building 

Franck R. Havenner, 235 City Hall 

J. Emmett Hayden, 162 Fifteenth Avenue 

James B. McSheehy, 137 CHfford Terrace 

Carl W. Miles, 500 Sansome Street 

Jefferson E. Peyser, Mills Building 

James E. Power, 98 Twelfth Street 

Alfred Roncovieri, 2450 Vallejo Street 

Warren Shannon, 509 Sansome Street 

E. J. Spaulding, 1251 Francisco Street 

William P. Stanton, Claus Spreckels Bldg. 





imv 



LEONARD S. LEAVY 
Controller 



SUPERVISORS' 
COMMITTEES 



SrPERVISOR J. EMMET HAYDEN 
President, Board of Sul>er<visors 



The following committee,s appointed by 
the President of the Board will have 
charge of important civic activities during 
the ensuing year. The first named on 
each committee is its Chairman: 

Civil Service — Havenner, Colman, and 
Roncovieri 

Industrial Development — Gallagher, 
Brown, and Stanton 

Education, Parks, and Recreation — Mc- 
Sheehy, Power, and Stanton 

Finance — Miles, Peyser, and Canepa. 

Fire, Safety, and Police — Stanton, Power, 
and Breyer 

Judiciary — Peyser, Gallagher, and Mc- 
Sheehy 

Music, Art, and Culture — Roncovieri, Col- 
man, and Peyser 

Health — Spaulding, Breyer, and Mc- 
Sheehy 

Public Utilities — Colman, Havenner. and 
Spaulding 

Public Works, Buildings, and Lands — 
Shannon, Brown, and Havenner 

City Planning — Breyer, Canepa. and Miles. 

Streets — Canepa, Gallagher, and Shannon. 

Public Welfare — Power, Mills, and Ron- 
covieri 

Municipal Personnel — Brown, Roncovieri, 
and Spaulding 

Rules — Peyser, Gallagher, Stanton, Mc- 
Sheehy, and Roncovieri 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 




SUPERVISOR JESSE C. COLMAN 
Cliairman, Committee on Public Utilities 



SUPERVISOR SAM T. BREVER 

Cliairman, Committee on City Planning 



SUPERVISOR E. J. SPAULDING 

Chairman, Committee on Health 




SUPERVISOR CARL W. MILES 
Chairman, Committee on Finance 



SUPERVISOR WARREN SHANNON 
Chairman, Public Buildings and Lands 



SUPERVISOR ANDREW J. GALLAGHER 

Chairman, Industrial Development 

Committee 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



13 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 




SUPERVISOR FRANCK R. HAVENNER 
Chairman, Committee on Civil Service 



SUPERVISOR JAMES B. McSHEEHY 

Chairman, Committee on Education, 
Parks and Recreation 



SUPERVISOR VICTOR J. CANEPA 
Chairman, Committee on Streets 




SUPERVISOR V^'ILLIAM P. STANTON 

Chairman, Committee on Fire, 
Safety and Police 



SUPERVISOR JEFFERSON E. PEYSER 
Chairman, Committee on Judiciary 



SUPERVISOR ARTHUR BROWN, JR. 

Chairman, Committee on Municipal 
Personnel 



■4 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 




PERSONNEL 



SrPERVISOR ALFRED RONCOVIERI 

Chairman, Committve on Music, 
All and Culture 




CHIEF CLERK 
John S. Dunnigan 

CHIEF ASSISTANT CLERK 
David A. Barry 

BOND AND ORDINANCE 
Frederick J. Moran 

SENIOR CLERKS 
STENOGRAPHERS 

Kathryn S. Sullivan 
Ralph L. Spoor 

Samuel H. Holden 

Forrest B. Gibbon 

HEAD CLERKS 

Thomas B. McGuinnes 

M. D. Ashe 

FINANCE COMMITTEE CLERK 
Samuel L. Conlon 

GENERAL CLERK 
Mary A. Commerford 

CHAUFFEURS 

William O'Neil 

Joseph Bury 

SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 
Charles T. Kreling 




RECORDER'S OFFICE 

Room 167, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



BENNING WENTWORTH 
County Accountant 



RECORDER 
Edmond Godchaux 

CHIEF CLERK 
Chas. M. Stoltz 

Deputies in Charge of General Work of 
Department 

D. G. Capurro 
I'. L. Clavere 
J. L. Ford 
Will. Glee son 

E. E. Hanifin 

B. F. Hiniiiiell 

C. P. Jones 
R. Kalisky 
J. T. Kane 



C. B. Levy 

L. C. Livingston 

U. J. McGloin 

F. H. Mead 
I. B. Meyers 
E. M. O'Reilly 
J. W. Reinfeld 

G. M. Schiller 
J. F. Whitman 

A. Whiteside 



JAMES E. POWER, Jr. 

Suprr'visor 




EDMOND GODCHAUX 
Recorder 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



15 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



DEPARTMENT OF 
PUBLIC WORKS 

Room 260, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



Wm. H. Worden Director 

Sidney J. Hester Secretary 

Bureau of Engineering 
J. J. Casey City Engineer 

Bureau of Architecture 

C. H. Sawyer City Architect and 

Supt. of Construction 




JOHN J. CASEY 
City Engimer 

Bureau of Building Inspection 

John B. Leonard Superintendent 

Cost Accounting Bureau 

F. W. McKenzie Chief Clerk 

Bureau of Street Repair 

P. W. King Superintendent 

E. E. Shattuck.. First Asst. Superintendent 

Bureau of Pul)lic Buildings 

M. J. Tierney Superintendent 

J. T. Burns Assistant Superintendent 

Bureau of Street Cleaning 
(Excluding Public Utilities) 

George Price Superintendent 

Bureau of Sewer Repairs 
Joseph C. Linehan Superintendent 




J 

WILLIAM H. WORDEX 
Director of Public ll'orks 

UTILITY COMMISSION 

Bureau of Municipal Railways 

Fred Boeken Manager 

E. E. Clisbee Assistant Manager 

Bureau of San Francisco Water 
Department 

N. A. Eckart General Manager 

J. J. Casey City Engineer 

Utilities, Tunnels. Railway and Water 
W. H. Ohmen Assistant Engineer 

Design of Special City Projects. Airiiort, 
Structures. Boulevards, Sewers, etc. 

J. M. Owens ^ Assistant Engineer 

Street Improvement Design 
W. C. Pidge Assistant Engineer 

Street Improvement Investigation and 

Permits 

L. R. Mercado Inspector 




Street Improvement Investigation and 
Permits 

E. E. Jordan Surveyor 

Street Improvements, Assessment, 

Complaints, etc. 

G. F. Stahle Surveyor 

Street Grades 
H. J. Stahle Surveyor 




SIDNEY J. HESTER 

Surveys 

P. J. Ost Electrical Engineer 

Electrical and Street Engineering 

L. W. Stocker Assistant Engineer 

Water Supply Engineering 
L. B. Cheminant Assistant Engineer 




CLYDE E. HEALY 
.Assistant City Enijincer 



CHARLES H. SAWYER 
City Architect 

Reports, Publicity, etc. 

H. W. Kephart Piu-chasing Agent 

Water Supply Purchasing, 
Correspondence, etc. 

J. J. Phillips Right-of-Way Agent 

Lands and Right of Ways 

C. L. Cook Engjineering Chemist 

Chemical and Testing Laboratory 

H. B. Chaffee Photographer 

Photography and Blueprinting 



i6 



THE M LJ NICIPAL RECORD 



January 



PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 



SAN FRANCISCO 
WATER DEPARTMENT 

425 Mason Street 
Telephone PRospect 7000 



PERSONNEL 

N. A. Eckart 
General Manager and Chief Engineer 

J. J. Sharon Auditor 

E. J. White Assistant Auditor 

Willis O'Brien Supervising Acct. 

T. W. Espey Engr. Water Production 




N. A. ECKART 

Gemral Manager, San Francisco IVater 

Department 



I. E. Flaa Hydraulic Engineer 

George W. Pracy. Supt. City Distribution 

G. J. Davis Supt. Peninsula Division 

A. W. Ebright Supt. Alameda Division 

F. W. Roeding Supt. Agric. Division 

V. E. Perry Mgr. Water Sales Division 

W. D. Ryder Sup. Consumers Accounts 

A. W. Till Supervisor Collections 

George E. Fanning Photographer 




HETCH HETCHY 
PROJECT 



LEWIS F. BVINGTON 
Chairman, Public Utilties Commission 



PUBLIC UTILITIES 
COMMISSION 

425 Mason Street 



CONSULTING ENGINEER 
M. M. O'Shaughnessy 

CHIEF ASSISTANT ENGINEER 
L. T. McAFEE 

L. W. Stocker Asst. Eng. in Charge of 

Design 

R. L. Allen Hydraulic Engineer 

P- J- Ost Electrical Engineer 

L. B. Cheminant Office Engineer 



COMMISSIONERS 

LEWIS F. BYINGTON, President 

John H. McCallum 

Edwin M. Eddy 

George L. Filmer 

Daniel C. Murphy 





L. T. McAFEE 
Chief Assistant Engineer Hetch Hetchy 



M. M. O'SHAUGHNESSY 
Consulting Engineer, Hetch Hetchy 

CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERS 

C. R. Rankin 

L. A. McATEE 

M. J. BARTELL 

ASST. ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 
Thorton Easier 

SUPERVISING ACCOUNTANT 

Willis O'Brien 

(Continued on Page 17) 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



17 



DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS 



OFFICE OF REGISTRAR 
OF VOTERS 

Room 155, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



(No More Commissioners under New 
Charter) 

REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 

C. J. COLLINS 

Registrar of Voters Local 170 

Main Office Local 171 

Affidavit Room Local 168 

Naturalization Bureau Local 167 

Basement Local 169 

Warehouse — Eighteenth and Treat 

Avenue Market 1162 

Warehouse — 168 Otis Street 

Underhill 1167 

PERSONNEL 

Cameron H. King, Deputy Registrar 

I. D. Dwyer, Deputy Registrar 
A. G. Knight J. J. Hannon 

E. R. Faucompre Wm. E. Monahan 

Thomas Ashe Charles H. Meese 

George P. Taaffe Joseph L. Dawson 
George L. Sharp Lester Stern 

E.A.Griffith C.J. Breite 

George A. Donohoe 
W. W. Griffin, Custodian of Voting Ma- 
chines 
Emily W. P. Ewald, Stenographer 
A. W. Kelleher, Voting Machine Adjuster 
Wni. G. Duncan, Voting Machine Adjuster 
E. H. Bonnifield, Messenger 
Henry L. Ruppel, Carpenter (Superin- 
tendent Warehouse) 



BRANCH 
REGISTRATION PLACES 

Commencing January 4, 1932 



DOWN TOWN 

The Chronicle Fifth and Mission 

The Chronicle Market-Kearny 

S. F. Examiner Third-Market 

The Emporium... Market between 4th-5th 

Hale Bros., Inc Fifth and Market 

City Paris Dry G. Co...O'Farrell-Stockton 

O'Connor-Moffat & Co 

O'Farrell-Stockton 

Flood Building Market near Powell 

Chamber of Commerce 451 California 

Custom House Washington-Battery 

A Canvas Tent at. .Battery-Bush-Market 

Real Estate Office 4701 Third St. 

The White House Grant-Post-Sutter 

Crystal Palace Market Eighth-Market 

ASSEMBLY DISTRICTS 

Locations 

20th — Colombo Hotel, 615 Broadway, 
near Grant Avenue, 9:30 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

21st — Gilmore Florist, 4585 Mission 
near Excelsior, 9:30 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

22nd— W. L. Johnson Co., 1435 Polk 
near California, 9:30 a. m. to 9 p. ni. 

23rd — Liggett's Drug Store, NW corner 
Mission-22nd, 9:30 a. m. to 9 p. m. 




4 years — Oliver Everett 
1902— Thomas F. Boyle 
1903 — Thomas Maguire 

William Roberts 
1904 — James A. Devoto 

E. C. Leffingwell 
1905 — A. W. Voorsanger 
1906— Thomas V. Cator 

Andrew J. Gallagher 

J. F. Jewell 
1908— C. L. Apperson 

Cameron H. King, Jr. 
1909— George Uhl 

Charles Gildea 
1910— John P. Hare 

N. C. Weinholz 

H. H. Ordway 

Hugh Mclsaacs 
1912— Chas. L. Queen 

William McDevitt 
1913 — John Herman 
1914— Jas.K. Prior, Jr. 

Chas. J. Collins 
1921— J. W.Jackson 
1924 — Dr. John E. Bohm 
1929— J. H. Zemansky 
1930— George R. Reilly 
1931 — Victor A. Sbragia 



CHARLES J. COLLINS 
Registrar of Voters 

24th— West Portal Hardware, 840 Ulloa 
near West Portal, 9:30 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

2Sth — Mooney's Department Store, 1300 
Ninth Avenue, corner Irving, 9:30 a. ni. 
to 9 p. m. 

Karl's Pharmacy, 1698 Haight near 
Clayton, 9:30 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

26th — Star Pharmacy, 492 Castro, cor. 
18th, 9:30 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

27th — Sierra Pharmacy, 2231 Chestnut 
near Scott, 9:30 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

28th— Golden Gate Wall Paper Co., 5411 
Geary, bet. 18th and 19th Aves., 9:30 a. m. 
to 9 p. m. 

REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 

Louis Kaplan 1878-1880 

Joseph L. Tharp 1881-1882 

James A. Johnson 1883-1884 

Patrick F. Walsh 1885-1887 

Benjamin A. Pringle 1888 

Thomas J. L. Smiley 1889-1890 

WiUiam A. Brown 1891-1892 

Alfred J. Evans 1893-1894 

William M. Hinton 1895-1897 

William J. Biggy 1898-1899 

Thomas J. Walsh 1900-1903 

George P. Adams 1904-1907 

Joshua H. Zemansky 1908-1910 

Ed C. Harrington 1910-1911 

Joshua H. Zemansky 1912-1929 

Major Chas. J. Collins.. ..1929 (Incumbent) 

The following constituted the first 
Board of Election Commissioners who 
served under the Charter, adopted in 1900, 
their terms of office being drawn "by lot," 
as follows: 

1 year — A. W. Voorsanger 

2 years — M. Greenblatt 

3 years — S. G. Kellogg 

4 years — Jeremiah Deasy. 



PUBLIC UTILITIES 

(Continued from Page 16) 



MUNICIPAL RAILWAY 

Administration Offices: 2600 Geary Street 
Telephone WEst 0191 



Frederick Boeken Manager 

Eugene W. Clisbee 

Superintendent Transportation 

William H. Scott Senior Accountant 

Thomas B. Johnson Claims Adjuster 




FREDERICK BOEKEN 
Manager, Municipal Railway 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



TREASURER'S OFFICE 

Room 110, City Hall 
Telephone UNdcrhill 8500 



I'l'lipluiiU' local 

Duncan Matheson, Treasurer 380 

Thos. K. McCarthy, Head Clerk 386 

J. J. Cusack. Head Clerk 385 

W. J. Buttgenbach, Senior Acct 382 

Louis Claveloux, Senior Teller 386 

Joseph D. McDevitt, Teller 386 

Laurence F. Cames, Senior Teller 385 
Louis E. Denney, Senior Teller 38/ 

AUerton Hewlett, TeUer 386 

Chas. J. Quinn, Teller 388 

John F. O'Shaughnessy, Senior 

Bookkeeper 382 

William E. Logan, Teller 383 




DUNCAN MATHESON 

Treasurer 

John J. Goodwin, General Clerk 382 

Mary A. Franklin, Chief Assistant 380 

Police Officers, Basement 381 

FORMER CITY TREASURERS 

John E. McDougald 1902-1905 

Chas. E. Eantel 1906-1907 

John E. McDougald .1908-1925 

John H. Thieler Jan., 1926; Aug., 1929 

Duncan Matheson, incumbent, Sept. 4, 1929 



CITY PLANNING 
COMMISSION 

Room 236, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



Meets First and Third Thursday 
W. W. Chapin, President. .544 Market St. 
Mrs. Parker S. Maddux .2868 Vallejo St. 

E. B. DeGolia 114 Sansome Street 

Milton Meyer 485 California Street 

C. Harold Caulfield Mills Building 

R. S. Woodward, Secretary and Planning 
Engineer, Room 236, City Hall 



PROBATION BOARD 

office: 33? Kearny Street 
DOuglas 3923 



CHIEF ADULT PROBATION 

OFFICER 

WM. H. NICHOLL 

Office: m Kearny Street, San Francisco 

Residence: Hotel Colonial, San Francisco 

I'ranklin 44.=;0 

Andrew Y. Wood 

L'are of Recorder, 4fi(l l''oiirlli Street, 

San I'rancisco. Cliairnian 

Augustin C. Keane 

91)1 Hearst Building, San I'rancisco 

Secretary 

Mrs. Selma Anspacher 

795 Sutter Street, San l-"rancisco 

Henry J. Hepner 

\?i2 I'^ddv Street, San Francisco 

Mrs. W. S. Solari 

\M\3 Taylor Street. San Francisco 

Joseph S. Thompson 

3153 Pacific Avenue, San Francisco 

Rev. O. A. Welch, C. S. P. 
'>60 C'alifornia Street. San I'rancisco 



BUREAU OF SUPPLIES 

Room 270, City Hall 

Telephone UNderhill 8500 

Locals 15, 17, 19 

Warehouse, 15th and Harrison Streets 



T. A. Brooks Purchaser of Supplies 

J. H. La Pla.Asst. Purchaser of Supplies 

T. S. Hall Asst. Purchaser of Supplies 

Fred Head Asst. Purchaser of Supplies 

H. W. Kephart Asst. Purchaser of Sup. 

Helen Wright Asst. Purchaser of Sup. 

John F. Finn. Asst. Purchaser of Supplies 

H. J. Flanagan Asst. Purchaser of Sup. 

Ivy P. Cerkel Stenographer 

Katherine McDevitt Stenographer 

John L. Herget Chief Storekeeper 

J. P. Hannan Chief Accountant 

J. J. Gaffney Head Clerk 




ASSESSOR'S OFFICE 

Room 101, City Hall 
Telephone HEmlock 5200 



ASSESSOR 
RusseU L. Wolden 

Harold J. Boyd Executive Deputy 

Herman Zimmerman, Director Supervis- 
ing Appraisers 




RrSSELL L. WOLDEN 
Assessor 



SAN FRANCISCO CITY 

AND COUNTY 
EMPLOYEES' RETIRE- 
MENT SYSTEM 

Room 215, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



RETIREMENT BOARD 

John F. Brady, President; J. Emmett 
Hayden, Arthur S. Holman, William 
H. Scott, DeWitt C. Treat, John J. 
O'Toole, Stephen J. Roche; Ralph R. 
Nelson, Secretary-Actuary. 

Mr. Hayden and Mr. O'Toole are nem- 
bers of the board by virtue of their official 
positions. 



TIIOM.'KS .\. BROOKS 
Purchaser of Supplies 



PUBLIC POUND 

16th and Alabama Streets 
Telephone MArket 4755 



Matthew McCurrie Secretary 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



19 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH 



DEPARTMENT OF 
PUBLIC HEALTH 

1083 Mission Street 
Telephone MArket 1491 




J. C. GEIGER, M. U. 

Direcior of Healili 

Board of Health eliminated by charter, 
January 8, 1932 (new advisory board not 
yet appointed). 

Dr. J. C. Geiger. Director of Public Health 

Dr. Jacques P. Gray Assistant Director 

Edward M. Coffey Chief Clerk 




CITY PHYSICIANS 

Dr. Arthur O'Neill. Dr. T. D.'Arcy 
Quinn, Dr. Joseph F. Poheim, Dr. Fred- 
erick Long, Dr. Fred O. Shumate. 

Charles M. Wollenberg, Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Home. 

Dr. Leon M. Wilbor, Superintendent San 
Francisco Hospital. 

Dairy Food Industrial Divisions 

Thomas P. Lydon Chief Inspector 

Meat and Market Division 

Carl G. Hansen.. ..Chief Market Inspector 

Housing Division 

Homer P. Thyle Chief Inspector 

Plumbing Division 
William D. Hobro Chief Inspectnr 

Bureau of Child Welfare 

I-lleanor Slockton.-Director, Field Nnrsim,' 
Bureau of Medical Inspection of Schools 
Dr. Paul S. Barrett, Director, Child 
Hygiene. 




DR. JACQUES P. GRAY 
Assistant Director of Health 



CHARLES M. WOLLENBERG 
Sul>erintcndent, Latjuna Honda Home 

Bureau of Dental Hygiene 

Robert Grosso, D. D. S Chief Dentist 

Bureau of Tuberculosis 

Dr. W. R. P. Clark Director 

Bureau of Laboratories 

Dr. .\nna D. McRae Director 

Hassler Health Home, Redwood City 

Miss Myra W. Kimball Superintendent 

Emergency Hospital, Personnel in 
Charge 

Dr. Edmund Butler, Chief Surgeon, 

Emergency Service. 
Dr. George K. Rhodes, Assistant Chief 

Surgeon, Emergency Service. 

Emergency Hospital Locations 

Central (including Detention Hospital), 
Civic Center. Telephone Davenport 
2020. 




LEON M. WILBUR 

Superintendent, San Francisco Hospital 

Mission — Potrero Avenue and Twenty- 
second Street, Telephone Mission 0820. 

Harbor — 88 Sacramento Street. Tele- 
phone Kearny 1145. 

Potrero — Twentieth and Third Streets. 
Telephone Mission 5016. 

Park — Stanyan Street, near Waller Street. 
Telephone Lockhaven 3960. 

Ocean Beach — Great Highway and Sloat 
Boulevard. Telephone Montrose 0642. 




EDWARD M. COFFEY 
Chief Clerk 



20 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 




W. J. FITZGERALD 
Sherii 



SHERIFF'S OFFICE 

Room 335, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhUl 8500 



SHERIFF 
William J. (Dick) Fitzgerald 

UNDERSHERIFF and OFFICE SUPT. 
H. F. Bernhard 

PHYSICIAN 
Dr. John Zieg 

CHIEF CIVIL DEPUTY 
Leo Kasten 

ATTORNEY 
Leo A. Cunningham 

CASHIER 
James A. Riordan 

SUPERINTENDENT OF JAILS 
Denis O'Neill 

ASST. SUPERINTENDENT OF 
JAILS 

C. D. Hansen 

CHIEF JAILER 
John Ginty 

MATRON 
Mrs. Gussie Kennedy 

JAILS 

No. 1 — Dunbar and Washington Streets. 
No. 2 — Old San Jose Road (Ingleside). 
No. 3 — Dunbar and Washington Streets. 



COUNTY CLERK'S 
OFFICE 

Room 325, City Hall 

Telephone UNderhill 8500 

Criminal Department in Hall of Justice 



COUNTY CLERK 
H. I. MULCREVY 

Howard Gudelj Secretary 

Robert Munson Chief Deputy 

Edward Hallinan Assistant 

Edward Gilson.Head Clerk Probate Dept. 

W. Castagnetto.-Head Clerk General Dept. 

H. Brunner Head Clerk Civil Dept. 

Grant Munson .Head Clerk License Dept. 

Chas. P. Winter, Head Clerk Appellate 
Court Dept. 

Jas. Farley, Head Clerk Presiding Judge 
Department. 

Alex Goldman. Head Clerk Criminal Dept. 

Wm. O'Brien, Head Clerk Juvenile Court 
Department 

Ray Carroll, Head Clerk Det. Hospital 
Department 



E^ 




^pt^ 


^^^^^^^^Ki ^^'^^'f^^H 


^^^^^^^^^^^HL fi^ ^^^H 






DR. T. B. W. LELAND 
Coroner 



CORONER'S OFFICE 

650 Merchant Street 
Telephone DAvenpoit 0461-0462 



Dr. T. B. W. Leland Coroner 

Jane C. Walsh Chief Deputy 

Dr. A. A. Berger Autopsy-Surgeon 

Dr. A. M. Moody Pathologfist 

Paul C. Greene Assistant Pathologist 

Frank T. Green Toxicologist 

M. J. Brown Deputy 

Thomas F. Gavan Deputy 

Antone Trabucco Deputy 

Frank F. Becker Statistician 

Mary Donohue Female Deputy 

Eva Lankenau Female Deputy 

Lillie Creighton..-. Female Deputy 

C. C. Easley .Court Room Reporter 

Ethel Maxwell. Transcriber 

A. V. Dinsmore Assistant and Driver 

John Angell Assistant and Driver 

Rajmiond Brooks Assistant and Driver 

(Dr. T. B. W. Leland succeeded the late 
Dr. Beverly Cole as Coroner in 1901.) 



CIVIL SERVICE 
COMMISSION 

Room 151-154, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500, Local 160 



HARRY I. MULCREVY 
County Clerk 



COMMISSIONERS 

Dr. Howard M. McKinley, President 

William P. McCabe Harry K. Wolff 

James J. Maher, Secretary and Chief 

Examiner 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



21 



TAX COLLECTOR'S 
OFFICE 

Room 100, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



DEPARTMENT OF 
ELECTRICITY 

Room 205, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATOR 

Room 920, Phelan Building 
Telephone GArfield 7020 



TAX COLLECTOR 
Edward F. Bryant 

M. L. Rapheld Chief Clerk 

J. M. Carroll Cashier 

Kudolph Albora Accountant 

James Briggs License Cashier 

M. J. Lawley License Adjuster 



RALPH W. WILEY 
Chief, Department of Electricity 

City Hall 

Gorden C. Osborne Assistant Chief 

264 Golden Gate Avenue 

Joseph P. Murphy Secretary 

City Hall 
Chester L. Ealliett, Chief Fire Alarm 
Operator 

Turk and Octavia Streets 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR 
PHIL C. KATZ 

J. F. Monahan Deputy 

H. F. Boyen Attorney 

F. J. Pontes Associate Attorney 

A. E. Levinson Associate Attorney 

Fred A. Katz Bookkeeper 




PHILIP C. KATZ 

Public Administrator 



EDWARD F. BRYANT 
Tax Collector 



EXPOSITION 
AUDITORIUM 

Office of 

MANAGING SUPERINTENDENT 

Larkin and Grove Streets 



James L. Foley Superintendent 

Robert P. Drady Asst. Superintendent 

Phillip Heim. Chief Engineer 

Robert Bragg Asst. Engineer 

P. G. Brigaerts Electrician 

Joseph A. Schmidt Foreman Janitor 

Robert Ford Subforeman 

Frank McLaughlin Night Watchman 

Emmett Counihan Night Watchman 

W. A. Oevemdiek Carpenter 

William F. Wagner Painter 



RALPH W. WILEY 
Chief, Department of Electricity 

Samuel C. Curtis Chief Inspector 

City Hall 
Frank Eichkoff, Foreman Instrument 

Makers 

264 Golden Gate Avenue — Dept. of 

Electricity Shops 

Miss Eleanor Walters Stenographer 

City Hall 
Office of Fire Alarm Station, Turk and 

Octavia Streets 

Shops 264 Golden Gate Avenue 

Store Room .....264 Golden Gate Avenue 

Headquarters of Lineman, 264 Golden 

Gate Avenue 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS 
AND MEASURES 

Room 6, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



SEALER 
THOMAS FLAHERTY 



SAN FRANCISCO 
MUNICIPAL BAND 

Room 483, City Hall 



AGRICULTURAL 
COMMISSION 

Agricultural Building 

Embarcadero at Mission Street 

EXbrook 1350 



DIRECTOR 
Philip H. Sapiro 



John B. Steinweden, Agricultural Com- 
missioner 
W. F. Carroll, Deputy Agricultural Com- 
missioner 

Bert Potter Agricultural Inspector 

W. C. Baker Agricultural Inspector 

Gertrude D. Amstein .Stenographer-Clerk 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



PARK DEPARTMENT 




WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY 



PARK DEPARTMENT 

Office: Golden Gate Park, Park Lodge 
Telephone SKyline 1167 



COMMISSIONERS 

Herbert Fleishhacker, President, 1 San- 
some Street 
William F. Humphrey, Standard Oil 

Building 
William Sproule, 1150 Sacramento Street 

M. Earl Cummings 3966 Clay Street 

George Tourny 526 California Street 

John McLaren, Superintendent of Parks 
and Squares, Park Lodge 




B. P. Lamb, Secretary, Park Lodge 

Earl Clements, Assistant Superintendent, 
Park Lodge. 

Thomas A. Munro, Assistant Superin- 
tendent, in charge of Small Parks and 
Squares 

Joseph R. Hickey, Director of Public 
Recreation, Kezar Recreation Center 

SAN FRANCISCO PARKS 

Location Acreage 

Alamo — Hayes and Steiner Sts 12.3 

Alta — Jack.son and Steiner Sts 12.0 

Aquatic — Foot \'an Ness Avenue.. 32.0 
Balboa — Ocean and San Jose Aves. 100.0 
Bay View— Third Street 30.0 




GEORGE TOURNY 



HERBERT FLEISHHACKER 
President, Board of Park Commissioners 

Bernal — Precita Ave. and Folsom 

Street 36.0 

Civic Center — Gough and Larkin 

Streets 6.7 

Columbia — Harrison and Folsom 

Streets 2.5 

Coso — Precita Avenue and Cali- 
fornia Avenue 0.25 

Dolores — Parked Strip 2.75 

Duboce — Duboce and Steiner Sts. 4.4 

Fairmont — Bemis Street 1.3 

Fleishhacker — Foot Highway and 

Sloat Boulevard 60.0 

Franklin — Sixteenth and Bryant 

Streets 4.4 

Garfield — Twenty-fifth and Harri- 
son Streets 2.8 

Golden Gate 1013.0 

Great Highway 140.0 




M. EARL CUMMINGS 

Harding (Golf Course) — Skyline 

Boulevard 200.0 

Holly— Holly Park Avenue 7.5 

Home — Second and Brannan Sts... 0.25 
Huntington — California and Taylor 

Streets l.I 

Jefferson — Eddy and Gough Sts 5.6 

Lafayette — Washington and La- 

guna Streets 9.5 

Larsen — Nineteenth Avenue and 

Ulloa Streets 6.6 

Lincoln (Golf Course) — Thirty- 
fourth Avenue and Clement St. 210.0 

Marina — Marina Boulevard 40.0 

McCoppin — Twenty-second .\ve- 

nue and Taraval Street 7.5 

McKinley — Twentieth and Ver- 
mont Streets 4.4 




WILLIAM SPROULE 



January 

McLaren — Excelsior District 115.0 

Mission — Eighteenth and Dolores 

Streets 14.0 

Motint Davidson -6.0 

Mountain Lake — Thirteenth Ave- 
nue and Lake Street 20.0 

Palace of Fine Arts — Marina 10.0 

Palace of Fine Arts Lagoon — Ma- 
rina 4.6 

Pioneer — Kearny and Greenwich 

Streets 2.0 

Portsmouth — Kearny and W'ash- 

intrton Streets 1.29 

Presidio— Parked Strip 24.0 

St. Mary's — Harrison and Brvant 

Streets 0.8 

Sharp Park— San Mateo County.. 400.0 

South — Second and Bryant Sts 0.7 

Sunset Boulevard (under construc- 
tion) 85.0 

Sunset — Twenty-sixth Avenue and 

Vicente Street 7.5 

Sutro Heights — Great Highway 60.0 

Union Square — Post and Stockton 

Streets 2.6 

Washington — Filbert and Stockton 
Streets 2.2 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 

M. Earl Cummings 3966 Clay Street 

George Tourny 526 California Street 

Mrs. A. B. Spreckels 2 Pine Street 

Walter D. K. Gibson 2 Pine Street 

Paul Shoup 65 Market Street 

O. K. Cushing 

Crocker First National Bank Bldg. 

W. M. Strother Secretary 

De Young Museum, Golden Gate Park 

Lloyd La Page Rollins Director 



23 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 

CALIFORNIA PALACE 

OF THE LEGION 

OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park 
Telephone EVergreen 0858 



Herbert Fleishhacker, President 

1 Sansome Street 

Mayor Angelo J. Rossi 

Ex-ofHcio Member — Mayor's Office, 

City Hall 

William F. Humphrey. Standard Oil Bldg. 

WUliam Sproule. 1150 Sacramento Street 





JOHN McLaren 

Superintindent of Parks and Squares 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

SAN FRANCISCO WAR 

MEMORIAL 

Room 627, Standard Oil Building 
Telephone DOuglas 2726 



JOSEPH R. HICKEY 

Director of Public Recreation, in charge 

of Kezar Stadium 



K. R. Kingsbury, President. .225 Bush St. 

Frank M. Belgrano 376 Pine Street 

R. I. Bentley 101 California Street 

George T. Cameron Crocker Building 

Jesse C. Colman 211 Montgomery St. 

George Hearst Examiner Building 

James I. Herz 327 Bush Street 

Charles Kendrick Russ Building 

General Hunter I. Liggett. 2760 Scott St. 

Richard Montgomery Tobin, Hibemia 
Bank Building 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

George T. Cameron, Jesse C. Colman, 
George Hearst, K. R. Kingsbury, Ex- 
Officio 

BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Frank N. Belgrano, Robert I. Bentley, 

Charles Kendrick, Richard Montgomery 

Tobin, K. R." Kingsbury, Ex-Officio 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 

M. H. DE YOUNG 
MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park 
Telephone BAyview 2067 



George T. Cameron, Honorary President 
Chronicle Building 

Herbert Fleishhacker, President 

1 Sansome Street 

Mayor Angelo J. Rossi 

Ex-officio Member — Mayor's Office, 

City HaU 

William F. Humphrey Standard Oil Bldg. 

William Sproule. .1150 Sacramento Street 

M. Earl Cummings 3966 Clay Street 

George Tourny .526 California Street 

Joseph O. Tobin Hibernia Bank Bldg. 

Nion R. Tucker Ill Sutter Street 

Mrs. Helen Cameron Burlingame 

W. M. Strother Secretary 

Lloyd La Page Rollins Director 

George Barron Assistant Director 




GEORGE T. CAMERON 
Trustee, War Memorial 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY 
OF SCIENCES 

(Steinhart Aquarium) 

Golden Gate Park 

Telephone BAyview 5100 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

William H. Crocker President 

Joseph D. Grant Vice-President 

F. W. Bradley Treasurer 

Susie M. Peers Secretary 

C. E. Grunsky 

N. B. Livermore 

Louis F. Monteagle 

Mrs. Alexander F. Morris 

DIRECTOR 
Dr. Barton Warren Everman 



24 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



RECREATION DEPARTMENT 



RECREATION 
DEPARTMENT 

Room 370, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



COMMISSIONERS 

Mrs. Sigmund Stern President 

1998 Pacific Avenue 

William H. Leahy Vice-President 

2111 Hyde St. 

Miss Alicia Mosgrove 815 Chestnut St. 

George Hearst Hearst Building 

J. C. Berendsen 2509 Broadway 

John McLaren Park Lodge, 

Golden Gate Park 
Joseph Marr Gwinn... Board of Education 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, 

RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

Josephine Dows Randall. ..Superintendent 

Raymond S. Kimbell Asst. Supt. 

Veda B. Young Secretary 

Homer B. Pack Engineer 

George S. Harman Assistant Engineer 

Hester Proctor Supervisor of 

Educational Dramatics 

Marie V. Foster Supervisor of Music 

Gerald Linares Supervisor of Industrial 

Recreation 

Helen Center Supervisor of Swimming 

Norman Center Camp Manager 

Winifred Batkin Secretary to Supt. 

Rene Gibson Bookkeeper 

Doris Brown Assistant Bookkeeper 

John Barry Clerk 

Warwick L. McElvaney Recreation 

Statistician 

Alexia McCarty Director of Recreation 

Information 

PLAYGROUNDS 

Aptos — Aptos and Ocean Avenues. Di- 
rectors: Gertrude McGrane, Walter 
Sparks. 

Argonne — Eighteenth Avenue between 
Geary and Anza Streets. Director: 
Orenia Menzel. 

Bay View — Third and Armstrong Streets. 

Chinese — Sacramento Street, betv^een 
Stockton and Waverly Place. Direc- 
tor.s: Alice Slater, Oliver Chang. 

Douglass — Twenty-sixth and Douglass 
Streets. Directors: Marie McVanner, 
James O'Gara. 

Excelsior — Russia and Madrid Streets. 
Directors: Nellie Shepherd, Julius De- 
Meyer. 

Father Crowley — Seventh and Harrison 
Streets. Directors: Nellie Fitz-Patrick. 
Frederick Levy. 

Folsom — Twenty-first and Folsom Sts. 
Directors: Camilla Lilienthal, Leonard 
Worthington. 

Funston — Chestnut .and Buchanan Sts 
Directors: Helen Loe, Maurice Swee- 
ney. Edwin Moore, Zelda Milani. 

Funston Annex — Chestnut and Fillmore 
Streets. Director: Ralph McIIwaine. 

Glen Park — Chenery and Elk Streets. Di- 
rectors: Mignon Dahl, Ernest Meyer. 

Hamilton — Geary and Scott Streets. Di- 
rectors: Aileen Jones, John Kavanaiigh. 

Helen Wills — Broadway and Larkin Sts. 
Director: Rose McGreevy. 

Jackson — Seventeenth and Carolina Sts. 
Directors: Dorothy Mitchell, Edwin 
Murphy. 

James Rolph, Jr. — Twenty-sixth Street 
and Potrero Avenue. Directors: Imelda 
Cashin, Theodore Hamm. 



Julius Kahn — Presidio Reservation, one 
l)lock l)elovv Jackson, between Spruce 
and Locu.st Streets. Directors: Marie 
Fox, Grayson Price. 

Levi Strauss — Fourteenth and Valencia 
Streets. Director: Alma Peters. 

Margaret S. Hayward— Golden Gate 
.^vcnue and Gough Street. Directors: 
Nancy Bean, Joseph Cunningham. 

Michaelangelo — Greenwich Street, be- 
tween Jones and Leavenworth Streets. 
Directors: Phyllis Fogerty, Gono Mo- 
rena. 




JOSEPHINE DONELLS RANDALL 

Mission — Nineteenth and Angelica Sts. 
Directors: Hulda Popper, Garland 
Hoffman. 

North Beach — Lombard and Mason Sts. 
Directors: Stella Harris, Jack Hursh. 

Ocean View — Plymouth Avenue and 
Lobos Street. Directors: Lydia Pat- 
zelt. James Lang. 

Portola — Hamilton and Sillinian Streets. 
Directors: Anita Nieto, Dorothea For- 
cade, Paul Madsen. 

Presidio Heights — Clay Street, near Wal- 
nut. Director: Claire Evans. 

Richmond — Eighteenth Avenue, between 
Lake and California. Directors: Ger- 
trude Freese, Russell Thomas. 

Rochambeau — Twenty-fourth Avenue, be- 
tween Lake and California Streets. Di- 
rector: Pauline McGuire. 

West Portal— Ulloa and Lenox Way. Di- 
rectors: Jeannette Bravinder, Thomas 
Sullivan. 

RECREATION CENTER 
Hayes Valley — Hayes and Buchanan 
Streets. Directors: Albert Evans. Clif- 
ford Nelson, Gertrude Simonton. 

DRAMATIC STUDIO 
Dramatic and Costume Building — 2435 
Sacramento Street. 

SCHOOLYARD PLAYGROUNDS 

Alvarado — Douglass and Twenty-second 

Streets. Director: Katherine Torpey. 
Andrew Jackson — Hayes, between Cole 

and Clayton Streets. Director: Ralph 

Wertheimer. 
Edison — Dolores and Twenty-second 

Streets. Director: Donald Robesky. 
Fairmount — Chenery and Randall Streets. 

Director: Susie Corpstein. 



Francis Scott Key — Forty-second Avenue 
and Irving Street. Director: Claire 
(Jtten. 

Garfield — Kearny and Filbert Streets. 
Director: Chester Mayer. 

Geary — Cook Street, near Geary. Direc- 
tor: Morton Kenney. 

Guadalupe — Cordova and Prague Streets. 
Director: Louise Collins. 

Irving M. Scott — Twenty-second and 
Tennessee Streets. Director: Bert 
Hirschberg. 

Jefferson — Nineteenth .\venue, between 
Irving and Judah. Director: Martin 
Lehrberger. 

John Muir — Page and Webster Streets. 
Director: Marie Torpey. 

Laguna Honda — Seventh Avenue, be- 
tween Irving and Judah. Director: 
Bernice Doughertj'. 

Lafayette — .\nza Street, between Thirty- 
si.xth and Thirty-seventh Avenues. Di- 
rector: Margaret Harrington. 

Longfellow — Lowell and Morse Streets. 
Director: Julia Nichols. 

McKinley — Fourteenth and Castro Sts. 
Director: Thomas Carroll. 

Raphael Weill — Buchanan and 0"Farrell 
Streets. Director: Dudley Nebeker. 

Winfield Scott — Divisadero, between 
Beach and North Point Streets. Di- 
rector: Allan Sullivan. 

SCHOOL GYMNASIUMS 

Aptos High — Aptos and Ocean Avenues. 
Director: Charles Andrews. 

Balboa High — Onondaga and Cayuga 
.'\ venues. Director: Eugene Hill. 

Everett Jr. High — Church, between 16th 
and 17th Streets. Director: Louis Con- 
Ian. 

Francisco Jr. High — Powell, between 
Chestnut and Francisco Streets. Direc- 
tor; Allan Rhodes. 

Presidio Jr. High — Thirtieth Avenue, be- 
tween Geary and Clement Streets. Di- 
rector: Joshua Faulkner. 

OPEN-AIR SWIMMING POOLS 
Mission Baths — Nineteenth and Angelica 

Streets. 
North Beach Baths — Lombard and Ma- 
son Streets. Directors: Helen Center, 

Alark Graham. 

SPECIAL CLASSES 
San Francisco Hospital — Potrero .A.venue 

and Twenty-second Street. Director: 

Marie McVanner. 
PARENT-TEACHER ASSOCIATION 
Philanthropy Department — Hearst 

School, Fillmore and Hermann Streets. 

Director: Marv .A.llio. 

PLAYGROUND SITES 

(Under development) 

Richmond District — 38th, 39th Avenues, 

Cabrillo and Fulton Streets. 
Potrero Hill — 22nd, 23rd, Arkansas and 

Missouri Streets. Director: Douglas 

Mawhinney. 
Saint Mary's — Crescent Avenue, near Ag- 

non Avenue. 
Visitacion Valley — Delta, Leland, Schwe- 

rin and Visitacion Avenue. 
The Trocadero — Sloat Boulevard, Wa- 

wona, Twenty-first and Twenty-fifth 

Avenues. 

TENNIS COURTS 
Richmond Tennis Courts — Eighteenth 

Avenue, between Lake and California 

Streets 

SUMMER CAMP 
San Francisco Recreation Camp — Mather, 

Tuolumne County, California. 



Tanuary- 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



25 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 



BOARD OF 
E D U C AT I O N 

The Board of Education holds regular 

meetings every Tuesday afternoon at 

4 o'clock. These meetings are open 

to the public. 

Offices: Room 285, City Hall, Second 

Floor East 

Telephone HEmlock 4680 




William F. Benedict 

MEMBERS OF BOARD 

H M. Monroe ^Secretary 

Ira W. Coburn, Pres. Room'28S 

Term expires January 8, 1939 

Mrs. E. J. Mott, Vice-Pres Room 285 

Term expires January 8, 1938 

William F. Benedict Room 285 

Term expires January 8, 1936 

Philip L. Bush Room 285 

Term expires January 8, 1935 

Miss Alice Rose Power Room 285 

Term expires January 8, 1933 





Ira W. Coburn 
President 

Mrs. Mary Prag Room 285 

Term expires January 8, 1937 

SUPERINTENDENT AND 
Deputies 

Joseph Marr Gwinn Supt. of Schools 

A. J. Cloud Chief Deputy Supt. 

In charge of Curriculum and 
Public Relations 

David P. Hardy Deputy Supt. 

In charge of Business AfTairs of 
Board of Education 

John C. McGlade Deputy Supt. 

In charge of High Schools 

Walter C. Nolan Deputy Supt. 

In charge of Junior High School, 
Personnel, Certification, Retirement 

Miss Bertha C. Roberts Deputy Supt. 

In charge of Elementary Schools 




Miss Alice Rose Power 



Philip Lee Bush 

FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS OF 
SAN FRANCISCO SCHOOLS 

Chronology of Superintendents of Schools 

of the City and County of San Francisco 

(Appointed by Board of Education) 

Thomas J. Nevins November 17, 1851 

to December, 1853 

William H. O'Grady 1854 and 1855 

E. A. Theller 1856 

COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT 

(Elected by the People) 
John C. Pelton 1856 



CITY AND COUNTY 
SUPERINTENDENTS 

(Elected by the People) 

John C. Pelton... 1857 

Henry P. Janes 1857-59 

James Denman 1859-60 

George Tait 1861-62-63-64 

John C. Pelton 1865-66-67 

James Denman 1868-69-70 

J. H. Widber 1871-72-73 

James Denman 1874-75 

H. N. Bolander 1876-77 

Azro L. Mann. Dec. 1, 1877 to Jan. 3, 1880 




1883 
1887 
1891 
1895 



Mrs. Ernest J. Mott 



UNDER NEW CONSTITUTION 

(Elected by the People) 

John W. Taylor Jan. 1880 to Jan 

Andrew Moulder Jan. 1883 to Jan. 

Jas. W. Anderson Jan. 1887 to Jan 

John Swett Jan. 1891 to Jan 

Andrew Moulder 

(died) Jan. 1895 to Nov. 1895 

Madison Babcock (appointed by Board 

of Education) Nov. 1895 to Dec. 26, 1896 
Reginald H. Webster 

Dec. 26, 1896 to Jan. 8, 1903 

William H. Langdon 

Jan. 8, 1903 to Jan. 8, 1906 

Alfred Roncovieri 

Jan. 8, 1906 to Jan. 8, 1923 




Mrs. Mary Prag 



26 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



APPOINTED BY BOARD OF 

EDUCATION UNDER 

CHARTER AMENDMENT 

Authorized by Ainciuliiiciit to the 

State Constitution 

Archibald J. Cloud, ActiuR Superintciul- 

ent, January 8. 1923 to June 30, 1923. 
Joseph Marr (Iwinn, Superintendent, ap- 
pointed July 1, 1923, for a term of four 
years, and reappointed for terms of four 
years each on July 1, 1927, and for a 
third term expiring July 1, 1935. 

DIRECTORS AND SUPERVISORS 
OF INSTRUCTION 

Art — Altman. .Aaron, Director. Office. 
Moulder Building, Page and (iough 
Streets. 

Atypical Classes — Lombard, Louis M., Su- 
pervisor. OtTice: Moulder Building, Page 
and tiough .Streets. 

Bureau of Attendance and Guidance — 
Noonan, Enuna L., Supervisor. Office: 
750 Eddy Street. 

Correction of Speech Defects — Cotrel, 
Edna, Teacher-in-Charge. Office: Moul- 
der Building. Page and Gough Streets. 

Department of Service — Gray, Robert F.. 
Director. Office: Moulder Building, Page 
and Gough Streets. 

Home Economics — Bartlett, Ellen M., Su- 
pervisor. Office; Moulder Building, Page 
and Gough Streets. 

Industrial Arts — Carnigilia, Eugene S., 
Director. Office: Moulder Building, 
Page and Gough Streets. 

Kindergarten-Primary — Marian Dunbar, 
Supervisor. Office: Moulder Building. 
Page and Gough Streets. 

Military Science and Tactics — Adams. 
Major John P., U. S. Armv retired. 
Office: Room 457, City Hall. 

Music — Carpenter, Estelle, Supevisor. Of- 
fice: Moulder Building. Page and Gough 
Streets. 

Texts and Libraries: Teachers' Library — 
Mooney, Marv R., Supervisor. Office: 
843 Ellis Street. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF SAN 
FRANCISCO 

High Schools 

Balboa High — Onondaga and Cayuga 
Avenues. Principal, Robert R. Chase. 

Galileo High — \'an Ness Avenue and 
Francisco Street. Principal, Joseph P. 
Nourse. 

Girls' High — Scott Street, east side, be- 
tween O'Farrell and Geary Streets. 
Principal, Charles C. Danforth. 

High School of Commerce — Van Ness 
Avenue and Haves Street. Principal, 
Clyde W. Wliite. 

Lowell High — Block bounded by Hayes, 
Grove and Ashbury Streets and Ma- 
sonic Avenue. Principal, Francis E. 
Crofts. 

Mission High — Eighteenth Street between 
Dolores and Church Streets. Principal, 
\Vm. J. Drew. 

Polytechnic High — Frederick Street, south 
side, between First Avenue and Willard 
Street. Principal, James E. Addicott. 

San Francisco Continuation School — Mis- 
sion and 16th Streets. Principal, Harrv 
G. Hansen. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 

Aptos Junior High — Corner Upland Drive 
and Aptos Avenue. Principal, Charles 
A. Simonds. 

Everett Junior High — Sixteenth a n d 
Church Streets. Principal, John F. 
Brady. 

Daniel Webster Junior High — Missouri 
Street, east side, between Nineteenth 
and Twentieth Streets. Principal. Bur- 
ton A. Burdick. 



Francisco Junior High — East Side Powell 
.Street, between t hestnut and h'rancisco 
Streets. Principal, Thaddeus H. Rhodes. 

Horace Mann Junior High — Valencia and 
Twenty-third Streets. Principal, Dr. Ir- 
vin C. Hatch. 

John Swett Junior High — McAllister St., 
north side, between I'ranklin and Gough 
Streets. Principal, J. Carl Bowman. 

Noe Valley Junior High — Pwenty-fourth 
and Douglas Streets. Principal, Dr. M. 
K. Hlaiichard. 

Presidio Junior High — Location: On 30th 
/Vvenue. between (Jeary and Clement 
Streets. Principal, Carl Anderson. 

Portola Junior Hig'h — Bacon Street, north 
side, between Berlin and Girard Streets. 
Principal. George H. Learned. 

Roosevelt Junior High — Arguello Boule- 
vard, near Geary Street. Principal. 
Ralidi Lcliman, 




Ki.«J^\'?S^'S8SS;:' 



I m 



JOSEPH MARR GVVINN 

Sufit'rintfridrnl of Schools 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

Adams School — 1st to 6th Grade inclu- 
sive. Eddy Street, north side, between 
\'an Ness Avenue and Polk Street. 
Principal, Dorothy Vogelsang. 

Diagnostic Classes — 750 Eddy Street. 
Linder direction of Emma Noonan, Su- 
pervisor, Bureau of Attendance and 
Guidance. 

Alamo School — Kindergartent to 6th 
Grade inclusive. East side Twenty-third 
Avenue, between Clement and Califor- 
nia Streets. Principal, Katherine A. 
AfcGivern. 

Alvarado School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Twenty-second and 
Douglas Streets. Principal, Cicely 
O'Connor. 

Andrew Jackson School — Kindergarten to 
6th Grade inclusive. South side of Grove 
Street, near Clayton Street. Principal, 
Mary C. O'Connell. 

Argonne School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Cabrillo Street and 
17th Avenue. Principal, Mrs. Mabel A. 
Svkes. 



Bay View School — Bay View Street, 
south side, between Pomona and I'lora 
Streets. Principal, Rose C. .Stolz. 

Bernal School — 7th and 8th (Irades. Cort- 
land .\venue, south side, between An- 
dover and Moultrie Streets. Principal— 
Lillie May Kinney. 

Bret Harte School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Third Street and James- 
town .Avenue. Principal, Mary K. Mf)- 
ran. 

Bryant School — Kindergarten to 6th Grade 
inclusive. Bryant Street, east side, be- 
tween Twenty-second and Twenty-third 
Streets. Principal, I'lizabeth I'"., Kelly. 

Buena Vista School — (Health Classes). 
Bryant Street, east side, between Eigh- 
teenth and Nineteenth Streets. Principal. 
.Mary T. Lahey. 

Burnett School — Kindergarten to 5th 
(iradc inclusive. Lane Street and New- 
comb Avenue, southwest corner. Prin- 
cipal, Mollie Smith. 

Cabrillo School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Twenty-fourth Avenue, 
between Balboa and Cabrillo Streets. 
Principal, Anne B. Haigh. 

Children's Hospital Class — California anj 
Maple Streets. Teacher, Mrs. Kather- 
ine Smith. 

Cleveland School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Persia Avenue, east 
side, between Athens and Moscow 
Streets. Principal. Alice Dailey, 

Columbus School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Twelfth Avenue, west 
side, between Kirkham and Lawton 
Streets. Principal, Leota Shuck. 

Commodore Sloat School — Kindergarten 
to 6th Grade inclusive. Ocean Avenue 
and Junipera Serra Boulevard. Prin- 
cipal. Elvina L. Berard. 

Commodore Stockton School — Kindergar- 
ten to 6th Grade inclusive. Washing- 
ton Street between Powell and Stock- 
ton Streets. Principal, Anna T. Crough- 
well. Vice-Principal, Marie G. Klein. 

Detention Home — ISO Otis Street. Prin- 
cipal Hilda May. 

Douglas School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Nineteenth and Col- 
lingwood Streets, southwest corner. 
Principal, Annette Levy. 

Dudley Stone School — kindergarten to 
8th Grade inclusive. Haight Street, 
south side, between Masonic and Cen- 
tral Avenues. Principal, Mary R. 
Carevv. 

Edison School — Kindergarten to 6th Grade 
inclusive. Dolores and Twenty-second 
Street. Principal, Josephine Saunders. 

Edward Robeson Taylor School — Kinder- 
garten to 6th Grade inclusive. Bacon 
and Goettingen Streets. Principal, Etta 
H. Tessmer. 

Emerson School — Kindegarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Pine Street, north side, 
between Divisadero and Scott Streets. 
Principal, Julia C. Coffey. 

Ethan Allan School — Parental. Bryant 
and Seventh Streets. Teacher-in-charge, 
Albert W. Nolan. 

Excelsior School — Kindergarten to 4th 
Grade inclusive. Excelsior Avenue and 
London Street. Principal, Josephine 
Harrigan. 

Fairmont School — Kindegarten to 8th 
Grade inclusive. Chenery Street, east 
side, between Randall and Thirtieth 
Streets. Principal, Kathryn McGough. 

Farragut School — Kindergarten to 8th 
Grade inclusive. HoUoway Avenue, so. 
side, between Capitol and Faxon Ave- 
nues. Principal, Anna Orr. 

Francis Scott Key — Kindergarten to 8th 
Grade inclusive. Forty-second .Avenue, 
west side, between Irving and Judah 
Streets. Principal, Mrs. Mabel David- 
son. 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



27 



Franklin School — Kindergarten to 7th 
Grade inclusive. Eighth Street, east 
side, between Harrison and Bryant 
Streets. Principal, Bessie Carniichael. 

Frank McCoppin School — Kindergarten to 
6th Grade inclusive. Seventh Avenue, 
east side, between Balboa and Cabrillo 
Streets. Principal, Effie Smith. 

Fremont School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. McAllister Street, no. 
side, between Broderick and Baker Sts. 
Principal, Mrs. Edith Cochran. 

Garfield School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Kearny and Filbert 
Streets. Principal, Matilda Levy. 

Geary School — 1st to 6th Grade inclusive. 
On Cook Street, near Geary Street. 
Principal, Kathleen Snain. 

George Peabody School — Kindergarten to 
6th Grade inclusive. Seventh Avenue, 
east side, between California and Cle- 
ment Streets. Principal, Alice G. Brim- 
skill. 

Glen Park School — Kindergarten to 8th 
Grade inclusive. Brompton Avenue and 
Bosworth Street. Principal, Mrs. Laura 
D. Pierson. 

Golden Gate School — Kindergarten to 6tli 
Grade inclusive. Golden Gate Avenue, 
north side, between Scott and Pierce 
Streets. Principal, Josephine Seavey. 

Gough School — Oral Deaf Classes. Wash- 
ington Street, south side, between 
Franklin and Gough Streets. Teacher- 
in-charge, Mrs. Pearl Constantine. 

Grant School — Kindergarten to 8th Grade 
inclusive. Pacific Avenue, north side, 
between Broderick and Baker Streets. 
Principal, Louis Krauss. 

Grattan School — Kindergarten to 8th 
Grade inclusive. Shrader and Grattan 
Streets, southeast corner. Principal, 
Mary Reene. 

Guadalupe School — Kindergarten to 8th 
Grade inclusive. Cordova and Prague 
Streets. Principal, Susie A. Ward. 

Hancock School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Filbert Street, north 
side, between Jones and Taylor Streets. 
Principal, Mrs. Emma Maland. 

Hawthorne School — Kindegarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Shotwell Street, east 
side, between Twenty -second and 
Twenty-third Streets. Principal, Fran- 
ces A. C. Mooney. 

Hillcrest School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Silliman and Cambridge 
Streets. Vice-Principal in charge, Gen- 
evieve McGivney. 

Irving M. Scott — 1st to 6th Grade in- 
clusive. Tennessee Street, west side, 
north of Twenty-second Street. Prin- 
cipal, Ellie McPhee. 

Jean Parker School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Broadway, north side, 
between Powell and Mason Streets. 
Principal, Josephine G. Miller. 

JefTerson School — Kindergarten to 8th 
Grade inclusive. Nineteenth Avenue, east 
side, between Irving and Judah Streets. 
Principal, Mrs. Marjorie Stuart. 

John Muir School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Webster and Page Sts., 
east side of Webster. Principal, Fannie 
M. Franklin. 

Junipero Serra School — Kindergarten to 
6th Grade inclusive. Highland Avenue 
and Holly Park Circle, southwest 
corner. Principal, Pauline Des Roches. 

Kate Kennedy School — Kindergarten to 
6th Grade inclusive. Noe Street, west 
side, between Day and Thirtieth Streets. 
Principal, Sovia Folsom. 

Lafayette School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Anza Street, between 
Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Ave- 
nues. Principal, Elizabeth Hauselt. 



Lagunda Honda School — Kindergarten to 

8th Grade inclusive. Seventh Avenue, 
east side, between Irving and Judah 
Streets. Princijial, Clara White. 

Lawton School — Kindergarten to Sth 
Grade inclusive. On Thirtieth Avenue, 
near Lawton Street. Teacher-in-charge, 
Edna Harrington. 

Le Conte School — Kindergarten to 7th 
Grade inclusive. Harrison Street, be- 
tween Precita Avenue and Army Street. 
Principal, Lucy Cotrel. 

Lincoln School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Harrison Street, north 
side, between Fourth and Fifth Streets. 
Principal, Alice Walsh. 

Longfellow School — Kindergarten to 8th 
Grade inclusive. Lowell and Morse Sts. 
Principal, Alice Chalmers. 

Madison School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Clay Street, south side, 
between Arguello Boulevard and Cherry 
Street. Principal, Dora Plagemann. 

Marshall School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Capp and Fifteenth 
Streets. Principal, Pauline Rvder. 

McKinley School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Principal, Jane Ryan. 




A. J. CLOUD 
Chief Drpuiy Superintendent of Schools 

Monroe School — Sth to 8th Grade in- 
clusive. Excelsior Avenue and Lisljon 
Street. Principal, Annie Hagarty. 

Pacific Heights School — Kindegarten to 
Sth Grade inclusive. Jackson Street, 
north side, between Fillmore and Web- 
ster Streets. Principal, M. Lily Love. 

Parkside School — Kindergarten to Sth 
Grade inclusive. Twenty-fifth Avenue 
and UUoa Street, east side. Principal, 
Gertrude Whiteside. 

Patrick Henry School — Kindergarten to 
6th Grade inclusive.- Vermont Street, 
east side, between Eighteenth and Nine- 
teenth Streets. Principal, Anita J. Bain. 

Paul Revere School — Kindergarten to 6th 
grade inclusive. Folsom and Tompkins 
Avenue. Principal, Mrs. Emma L. 
Dacre. 

Raphael Weill School — Kindergarten to 
6th Grade inclusive. Buchanan and 
O'Farrell Streets. Principal, Bertha J. 
Klaus. 

Redding School — Kindergarten to Sth 
Grade inclusive. Southwest corner Pine 
and Larkin Streets. Principal Susie 
Convery. 

Rincon School — Annex to Lincoln School 
— Stillman Street, north side, between 
Second and Third Streets. 

Sanchez School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Sanchez Street, east 
side, between Sixteenth and Seven- 
teenth Streets. Principal, Margaret L. 
Dunn. 



San Francisco Hospital Class — Twentietli 
Street and Potrero .Vvenue. Senior 
Teacher, Eliza McKinnc. 

San Miguel School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. San Jose Avenue and 
Seneca Street. Principal, Mrs. Alice R. 
Norton. 

Sarah B. Cooper School — Kindergarten 
to 6th Grade inclusive. Lombard and 
Jones Streets. Principal, Lew A. Ball. 

Sheridan School — Kindergarten to 8th 
Grade inclusive. Capitol Avenue, west 
side, between Lobos and Farallone 
Streets. Principal, Catherine F. Rior- 
dan. 

Sherman School — Kindergarten to Sth 
Grade inclusive. LInion Street, south 
side, between Franklin and Gough 
Streets. Principal, Mrs. Agnes R. Tar- 
delli. 

Shriners' Hospital — Nineteenth Avenue 
and Lawton Streets. Senior Teacher, 
Mrs. Susie Connell. 

Spring Valley School — Kindergarten to 
Sth Grade inclusive. Jackson Street, 
south side, between Hyde and Larkin 
Streets. Principal, Naomi Hause. 

Starr King School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Twenty-fifth and Utah 
Streets. Principal, Catherine Hanlon. 

Sunnyside School — Kindergarten to Sth 
Grade inclusive. Hearst Avenue, south 
side, between Foerster and Edna 
Streets. Principal, Alice Corbett. 

Sunshine School — Classes for Crippled 
Children. West side Dolores Street, be- 
tween Seventeenth and Eighteenth 
Streets. Principal, Carrie Daly. 

Sutro School — Kindergarten to 6th Grade 
inclusive. Thirteenth Avenue, east side, 
between California and Clement Streets. 
Principal, Jane Hinds. 

Twin Peaks School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Corbett Avenue, be- 
tween Iron and Copper Avenues. 
Teacher-in-charge, Mrs. Irene Kelly. 

Ungraded School (Washington Building) 
— Washington and Mason Streets. 
Principal, Mary Carniichael. 

-Visitacion Valley School — Kindergarten 
to Sth Grade inclusive. Visitacion Ave- 
nue and Schwerin Street. Principal, 
Mary A. Nolan. 

Washington Irving School — Kindergarten 
to 6th Grade inclusive. Broadway, be- 
tween Montgomery and Sansome Sts. 
Principal, Alice R. Power. 

West Portal School — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. Taraval Street, Clare- 
mont Boulevard and Lenox Way. Prin- 
cipal, Charlotte Estes. 

Winfield Scott — Kindergarten to 6th 
Grade inclusive. On Divisadero Street, 
between Beach and North Point 
Streets. Principal, Mary E. Thomas. 

Yerba Buena School — Kindergarten to 
Sth Grade inclusive. Greenwich Street, 
north side, between Webster and Fill- 
more Streets. Principal, Genevieve 
Carroll. 

EVENING HIGH SCHOOLS 

Evening High School of Commerce — In 

High School of Commerce Building. 
Principal, John A. Lenahan. 

Galileo Evening High School — In Galileo 
High School Building. Principal, Ern- 
est J. Cummings. 

Humboldt Evening High School — In 
Mission High School Building. Princi- 
pal, Edgar S. Anderson. 

Polytechnic Evening High School — In 

Polytechnic High School Building. 
Principal, Clinton L. Markley. 



28 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Room 2, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



Alfred Ehrman, Pres 546 Third Street 

Cesare Restani, Com.. .798 Geneva Avenue 

Thos. R. Creely, Com 3170 Sac. Street 

Frank T. Kennedy Offi. Supt. and Sec. 

CHIEF ENGINEER 

Charles J. Brennan 

ASSISTANT CHIEF ENGINEERS 

Thomas J. Murphy 

Albert J. Sullivan 

Martin J. Kearns 

Dennis J. O'Donnell 

BATTALION CHIEFS 

District No. 1 — Headquarters at Engine 

12, 101 Commercial Street 

Coleman J. Conroy 

Frank A. Carew 

District No. 2 — Headquarters at Engine 

35, 38 Bluxome Street 

John E. Gavin 

George S. Nisson 

District No. 3 — Headquarters at Engine 

14, 1051 McAllister Street 
Thomas J. Keohane 
Thomas E. Kenney 

District No. 4 — Headquarters at Engine 

15, 2150 California Street 

Fred J. Bowlen 

Edward V. Comber 

District No. 5 — Headquarters at Engine 

21, 1152 Oak Street 

Edward J. Skelly 

John J. Kenney 

District No. 6 — Headquarters at Engine 

13, 1458 Valencia Street 

Eugene G. Riordan 

James L. Shanahan 

District No. 7 — Headquarters at Truck 10, 

351 Second Avenue 

Michael J. Flaherty 

Michael Rudonick 

District No. 8 — Headquarters at Engine 

2, 460 Bush Street 

Allen Matlock 

George A. Nolan 

District No. 9 — Headquarters at Engine 

38, San Jose and Ocean Avenues 

Henry G. Cull 

John Mahoney 

District No. 10 — Headquarters at Engine 

16, 909 Tennessee Street 

Alfred J. GalU 

George F. Schaefer 

District No. 11 — Headquarters at Engine 

49, 2155 Eighteenth Avenue 

Edward D. O'Neill 

Timothy O'Connor 

Rudolph Schubert City Hall 

John F. Kearney Drillmaster 

George H. Murray Relief 

George L. Trapp Relief 

BUREAU OF FIRE PREVENTION 

City Hall 

Captain Theodore Trivett in charge 

ASSIGNMENT OFFICE 

1145 Ellis Street 

Capt. Nicholas F. Munson 

Capt. Frederick Jones 



FIKF. MARSHAL, City Hall 

Frank P. Kelly Fire Marshal 

Silvio Favilla Deputy Fire Marshal 

DEPARTMENT PHYSICIAN 

City Hall 

Dr. Edward Lagan 

CORPORATION YARD 
313 Francisco Street 

Samuel Bermingham Superintendent 

Harold Jones General Foreman 

Stephen A. Gill Commissary 

Chris. Gerlach. Foreman, High Pres. Sys. 




CHIEF CHARLES J. BRENNAN 

CAPTAINS OF COMPANIES 

Eng. Co. No. 1 Wm. L. Leichsenring 

451 Pacific St. 

Eng. Co. No. 2 Henry J. Wolf 

460 Bush St. 

Eng. Co. No. 3 Wm. VanDervort 

1067 Post St. 

Eng. Co. No. 4 John O. Larson 

676 Howard St. 

Eng. Co. No. 6 Harry J. Braun 

356 Seventh St. 

Eng. Co. No. 7 Bernard Munter 

3160 16th St. 

Eng, Co. No. 8 Philip A. McCormack 

1648 Pacific St. 

Eng. Co. No. 9 Wm. J. Mathison 

Foot of Harrison St. 

Eng. Co. No. 10 Jos. H. Miller 

3050 17th St. 

Eng. Co. No. 11 James W. Byrne 

1632 Oakdale Ave. 



Eng. Co. No. 12 Erwin G. O'Meara 

101 Commercial St. 

Eng. Co. No. 13 Jos. F. Collins 

1458 Valencia St. 

Eng. Co. No. 14 Wm. J. Kenealey 

1051 McAllister St. 

Eng. Co. No. 15 Wm. J. Nolan 

• 2150 California St. 

Eng. Co. No. 16 John K. Bray 

909 Tennessee St. 

Eng. Co. No. 17 Frank M. Syce 

34 Mint St. 

Eng. Co. No. 18 James Walsh 

Wilde and Girard Sts. 

Eng. Co. No. 19 Albert C. Derhani 

1300 Fourth St. 

Eng. Co. No. 20 Lawrence J. Dwyer 

2117 Filbert St. 

Eng. Co. No. 21 Edward M. O'Donnell 

1152 Oak St. 

Eng. Co. No. 22 George P. Lineham 

1348 Tenth .'\ve. 

Eng. Co. No. 23 Jos. W. Angelovich 

3022 Washington St. 

Eng. Co. No. 24 Eugene D. Valente 

100 Hoflfman Ave. 

Eng. Co. No. 25 Ed. W. Lindeberg 

Third St. and Arthur Ave. 

Eng. Co. No. 26 Michael Lee 

3767 Sacramento St. 

Eng. Co. No. 27 James F. Schou 

52 Waller St. 

Eng. Co. No. 28 Fred W. Ireland 

1812 Stockton St. 

Eng. Co. No. 29 Wm. J. Smith 

Division and 10th Sts. 

Eng. Co. No. 31 Narcisco Perrone 

1088 Green St. 

Eng. Co. No. 32 J. C. Murphy 

Holly Park and Appleton Ave. 

Eng. Co. No. 33 Victor E. Bertucci 

117 Broad St. 

Eng. Co. No. 34 Carl F. Kruger 

1145 Ellis St. 

Eng. Co. No. 35 James V. McKenna 

38 Bluxome St. 

Eng. Co. No. 36 Henry J. Donnedieu 

551 26th Ave. 

Eng. Co. No. 37 John J. Toomey 

25th and Vermont Sts. 

Eng. Co. No. 38 Edw. W. McGrorey 

San Jose and Ocean Aves. 

Eng. Co. No. 39 Jos. A. Fitzpatrick 

1091 Portola Drive 

Eng. Co. No. 40 Charles E. Miller 

1249 Clayton St. 

Eng. Co. No. 41 James A. O'Connell 

1325 Leavenworth St. 

Eng. Co. No. 42 John T. Gaffney 

2426 San Bruno Ave. 

Eng. Co. No. 43 Francis W. Sullivan 

724 Brazil Ave. 

Eng. Co. No. 44 Philip F. Moholy 

3816 22nd St. 

Eng. Co. No. 45 Frank Murphy 

1348 45th Ave. 

Eng. Co. No. 46 Thos. E. Johnstone 

441 Twelfth Ave. 
(Continued on Next Page) 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



29 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice 

Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephone DAvenport 2020 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMIS- 
SIONERS 

Regular Meeting, Monday. 7:30 P. M. 

Hall of Justice 

Theodore J. Roche, President, Mills Tower 

Dr. Thomas E. Shumate.-..86 Post Street 

Frank J. Foran 369 Pine Street 

Charles F. Skelly Secretary 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
William J. Quinn 

Central — Captain Arthur D. Layne, Co. 
A., 635 Washington Street. 

Southern — Captain Thomas Hoertkern, 
Co. B, 360 Fourth Street. 

Harbor — Captain Arthur DeGuire, Co. C, 
Northeast Corner Drumm and Com- 
mercial Streets 

Mission — Captain Frederick Lemon, Co. 
D, 3057 Seventh Street 

Bush Street — Captain WilHam T. Healy, 
Co. E, 1422 Bush Street 

Park — Captain John J. O'Meara, Co. F, 
Golden Gate Park, West end Stanyan, 
opposite Waller Street 

Richmond — Captain Bernard J. McDon- 
ald, Co. G, 451 Sixth Avenue 




WILLIAM J. QUINN 
Chief of Police 



Ingleside — Captain Peter M. McGee, Co. 
H, In Balboa Park, near San Jose and 
Ocean Avenues 

Potrero — Captain Henry J. O'Day, Co. I, 
2300 Third Street 

North End — Captain John J. Casey, No. 
1, Co. J, 247S Greenwich Street. 

Traffic Bureau — Captain Charles Goff, Co. 
K, 635 Washington Street 



Western Addition — Captain Stephen V. 
Brunner, Co. L, 2119 O'Farrell Street 

Bayview — Captain Robert A. Coulter, Co. 
M. 1676 Newcomb Street 

Taraval — Captain Henry J. Lackmann, 
Co. N, 2360 Twenty-fourth Avenue 

Detective Bureau — Captain Charles Dul- 
lea, Cos. D-B, Hall of Justice, Room 105 

Headquarters — Captain Michael Riordan, 
Co. H-Q, Hall of Justice, Room 111 

City Prison — Captain Patrick N. Herlihy, 
Co. C, City Prison, Hall of Justice 

Chief Clerk — Captain Horace McGowan, 
Co. H-Q, Chief's Office, Hall of Justice. 




CAPTAIN CHARLES GOFF 
Traffic Department 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

(Continued from Preceding Page) 

Eng. Co. No. 47 Henry B. Mitchell 

499 41st Ave. 

Eng. Co. No. 48 Henry C. Kolby 

22nd and Wisconsin Sts. 

Eng. Co. No. 49 Frank P. Gibson 

2155 18th Ave. 

Truck Co. No. 1 Jos. B. McKeon 

38 Mint St. 

Truck Co. No. 2 Frank F. Stumpf 

1340 Powell St. 

Truck Co. No. 3 Gustave A. Nelson 

1067 Post St. 

Truck Co. No. 4 James E. Doherty 

1648 Pacific Ave. 

Truck Co. No. 5 Edward E. O'Dowd 

2136 Geary St. 

Truck Co. No. 6 James Fitzpatrick 

349 Herman St. 

Truck Co. No. 7 George W. Lahusen 

3050 17th St. 

Truck Co. No. 8 Thomas E. King 

38 Bluxome St. 



Truck Co. No. 9 Cornelius C. Sullivan 

25th and Vermont Sts. 

Truck Co. No. 10 Jeremiah L. Collins 

351 Second Ave. 

Truck Co. No. 11 Edward J. Sheddy 

315 Duncan St. 

Truck Co. No. 12 Adolph P. Penebsky 

757 Waller St. 

Truck Co. No. 13 George Hartniann 

101 Commercial St. 

Truck Co. No. 14 Charles F. Lennon 

551 26th Ave. 

Truck Co. No. 15 Edward F. Dullea 

1091 Portola Drive 

Chemical Co. No. 1 Hugh J. Carr 

1812 Stockton St. 

Chemical Co. No. 2 John M. Brophy 

2136 Geary St. 

Chemical Co. No. 3.. ..Walter J. McKenna 

460 Bush St. 

Chemical Co. No. 4 John J. Brady 

1051 McAUister St. 

Chemical Co. No. 5 Wm. A. Taylor 

757 Waller St. 



Chemical Co. No. 6 John J. Hartford 

2117 Filbert St. 

Chemical Co. No. 7 Frank Theobald 

317 Duncan St. 

Chemical Co. No. 9 Henry Dieckniann 

349 Herman St. 

Chemical Co. No. 10 M. A. Tehaney 

San Jose and Ocean Aves. 

Chemical Co. No. 11 Ernest L. Osberg 

3050 17th St. 

Chemical Co. No. 13 Willis E. Gallatin 

441 Twelfth Ave. j<i- 

Fire Boat Co. No. 1 Frank L: Smith 

Foot of Harrison St. 

Fire Boat Co. No. 2 John A. Dahlman 

Foot of Bay St. 

Rescue Squad No. 1 Otto H. Lippert 

38 Mint St. 

Pumping Station No. l.Chas. H. Durham 

Chief Engineer 

Second and Townsend Sts. 

Pumping Station No. 2. .John J. O'Connell 

Chief Engineer 

Fort Mason 



30 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



LEGAL DEPARTMENT 



CITY ATTORNEY'S 
OFFICE 

Room 206, City Hall 
Telephone HEmlock 1322 



John J. O'Toole City Attorney 

Dion R. Holm Special Counsel S. F. 

Water Department. 

Walter A. Dold Chief Deputy City Atty. 

Henry Heidelberg Deputy City Atty. 

Leo C. Lennon Deputy City Atty. 

Assistant City Atlorneys 

Robert McMahon 

Sylvain D. Leipsic 

Thomas P. Slevin 

Edmond P. Bergerot 

Former City Attorneys 

Harry T. Creswell, 1893-1898 
Franklin K. Lane, 1899-1902 

Percy V. Long, 1902-1906 

William J. Burke, 1906-1908 

Percy V. Long, 1908-1916 

George Lull, 1916-1926 

John J. O'Toole, January, 1926, to date 




DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S 
OFFICE 

333 Kearny Street 
Telephone DAvcnport 0170 



Matthew Brady District Attorney 

Joseph A. Carry Sr. Atty. Crim. 

I. M. Golden Sr. Atty. Crim. 

Harmon D. Skillin Sr. Atty. Crim. 

Wm. W. Murphy Sr. Atty. Crim. 

Milton L. Choynski Sr. Atty. Civ. 

E. M. Leonard Sr. Atty. Crim. 

August L. Fourtner Sr. Atty. Crim. 

Arthur W. Jones Atty. Crim. 

James P. Wall Atty. Crim. 




JOHN J. O'TOOLE 
City Attorney 



MATTHEW BRADY, District Atlornry 

Peter J. Mullins Sr. Atty. Crim. 

Peter F. Coumeen Atty. Crim. 

John J. McMahon Pr. Atty. Crim. 

John R. Tyrrell Sr. Atty. Crim. 

Terence J. Doyle Crim. Law Clk. 

Arthur A. Ohnimus Crim. Law Clk. 

Henry Goldman Chief Clerk 

Edith Wilson Atty. Crim. 

William P. Golden Pr. Atty. Crim. 

Paul E. Madden ..Crim. Law Clk. 

Martha C. Evans Sr. Crim. Law Clk. 

Morris Silver Crim. Law Clk. 

Walter C. Schiller Crim. Law Clk. 

John J. Ward Crim. Law Clk. 

Geo. Cabaniss, Jr Crim. Law Clk. 

Frances Westdahl Sr. Clk. Typist 

Susan A. Deacon Gen. Clk. Steno. 

Grace Brady Tel. Oper. 

Edward Healy Gen. Clk. 

Leslie C. Gillen .Sr. Atty. Crim. 

Isabel Thompson Crim. Law Clk. 

Joseph Gallagher Crim. Law Clk. 

Helen McAvoy Gen. Clk. Steno. 

EsteUe Wood Gen. Clk. Steno. 

Alec Keenan ...Atty.-Dom. Rel. (part time) 
Madeline Granfield Clk.-Dom. Rel. 



POLICE OFFICERS 

Wm. Zocchi 
John A. Pearsom 
Tel. No., Douglas 2838 
Address, 333 Kearny Street 



PROBATION 
COMMITTEE 

JUVENILE COURT 

150 Otis Street 
TeL UNderhill 8500 



Miss Ruth Turner Fairmont Hotel 

Chairman 

Mrs. Walter Arnstein 2211 Wash. St. 

Rev. John W. Sullivan 3321 16th St. 

Daniel Koshland 98 Battery St. 

Barton Bean 1960 Broadway 

Byron Mobbs Bank of California 



PUBLIC DEFENDER'S 
OFFICE 

333 Kearny Street 
Telephone EXbrook 1535 



PUBLIC DEFENDER 
FRANK J. EGAN 

ASSISTANT PUBLIC DEFENDERS 
Charles R. Boden, John F. Digardi, 
James A. Toner, Gerald J. Kenny 

CLERKS 
Marian Lambert Mae Boyle 




FRANK J. EGAN, Puhlu Defender 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



31 



SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES 




SUPERIOR COURT 

City Hall 



JUDGE I. L. HARRIS 
Presiding Judge 



CIVIL DEPARTMENTS 
Secretary, Jury Commissioner 

Thomas S. Mulvey 480 City Hall 

Telephone: UNderhill 8S52, comicctiiiK 
all clepartnients. 

Dept. 1— Michael J. Roche Room 411 

Dept. 2 — James G. Conlan Room 472 

Dept. 3 — George H. Cabaniss...Room 403 
Dept. 4 — J. J. Van Nostrand. Room 460 

Dept. S — F. A. Griffin Room 402 

Dept. 7 — Edmund P. Mogan ...Room 450 

Dept. 8— T. I. Fitzpatrick Room 479 

Dept. 9— Frank H. Dunn Room 417 

Dept. 10 — Thomas F. Graham. Room 452 

Dept. 13— Daniel C. Deasy Room 435 

Dept. 14 — Walter P. Johnson Room 429 

Dept. 15— E. P. Shortall Room 413 

Dept. 16— C. J. Goodell Room 426 

Department of the Presiding Judge 

I. L. Harris, Judge 404 City Hall 

CRIMINAL DEPARTMENTS 
Hall of Justice, Third Floor 
Telephone UNderhill 8552 

Dept. 6 — Lile T. Jacks. 
Dept. II— Louis H. Ward. 

Criminal Department County Clerk's 
Office, Hall of Justice, DAven'port ()32,S. 




JCDGE MICHAEL J. ROCHE 
Department 1 




JUDGE JAMES G. CONLAN 
Department 2 



JUDGE GEORGE H. CABANISS 
Department 3 



JUDGE JOHN J. VAN NOSTRAND 
Department 4 



32 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES 




JUDGE FRANKLIN A. GRIFFIN 
Department 5 



JUDGE LYLE T. JACKS 
Department 6 



JUDGE EDMUND P. MOGAN 
Department 7 




JUDGE T. I. FITZPATRICK 
Department 8 



JUDGE FRANK H. DUNNE 
Department 9 



^^^^^^Kf _^,J^^^HIJIhH 


H 




^■^a 




Hj 


mtA 


ifl 



JUDGE THOMAS F. GRAHAM 
Department 10 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



33 



SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES 




JUDGE LOUIS H. WARD 
Department 11 



JUDGE DANIEL C. DEASY 
Department 13 



JUDGE WALTER PERRY JOHNSON 
Department 14 




JUVENILE COURT 

150 Otis Street 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



JUDGE E. P. SHORTALL 
Department 15 



JUDGE C. J. GOODELL 
Department 16 



JUDGES 
Frank H. Dunne 
Michael J. Roche 

Judges of Superior Court 

CHIEF PROBATION OFFICER 
R. R. Miller, UNderhill 8500, Local 89 

REFEREE 

Mrs. Mary C. Kohler, UNderhill 8500, 
Local 99 

JUVENILE PROBATION 
COMMITTEE 

Miss Ruth Turner, Chairman, Fairmont 

Hotel 
Mrs. Walter Arnstein, 2221 Washington 

Street. 
Mrs. Eugene M. Prince, 3421 Pacific Ave. 
Mr. Barton T. Bean, 2 Pine St. 
Mr. Daniel E. Koshland, 98 Battery St. 
Mr. Byron G. Mobbs, Bank of California. 

Sixteenth and Julian Streets 
Rt. Rev. Msgr. John W. Sullivan, 3321 

Sixteenth Street 

(Continued on Page 36) , 



34 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



MUNICIPAL COURT JUDGES 





Courtesy the Chronicle 

JUDGE FRANK T. DEASY 
Department 1 



JUDGE FRANK W. DUNN 
Department 2 



JUDGE ALDEN AMES 
Department 3 




JUDGE ALFRED J. FRITZ 
Department -f 



JUDGE THOMAS F. PRENDERGAST 
Department 5 



JUDGE DANIEL S. O'BRIEN 
Department 6 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



35 



MUNICIPAL COURT JUDGES 




JUDGE JOSEPH M. GOLDEN 
Department 7 




Courtesy the Chronicle 

JUDGE LEO A. MURASKY 
Department 8 



JUDGE GEORGE W. SCHONFELD 
Department 9 




JUDGE SYLVAIN J. LAZARUS 
Department 10 



JUDGE THERESA MEIKLE 
Department 11 



t'P-'-mL Ksi 



JUDGE GEORGE J. STEIGER, JR. 
Department 12 



?6 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



JUVENILE COURT 

(ContiniRil from Fane 33) 

PERSONNEL 

Miss Henrietta O'Neill, 150 Otis Street, 
Phone UNderhill 8500; Mr. R. O. Young, 
Miss Felicitas Salazar, Mrs. Helen H. 
Brown, Miss Mary C. Corbett, Mrs. Lina 
R. Grimes, Mrs. Freda Hadley, Mrs. 
Helen L. Hawkins, Miss Blanche Raw- 
don, Miss Inese Dell'Osso, Miss Frances 
Baringer, Miss May I. Collins, Miss Irene 
M. Doyle, Miss Mary T. Green, Mrs. 
Jamie M. Montague, Miss Minnie New- 
field, Mr. Chas. Schermerhorn, Mr. John 
D. Sullivan, Miss Rose P. Boyle, Mrs. 
Elsie L. Slocum, Miss Mary Conlin, Miss 
Mary M. Leete, Mr. Harry Clervi. 



MUNICIPAL COURTS 

Clerk's Office, Third Floor, East Corridor 

City Hall 

Telephone UNderhill 8500 



ART COMMISSION 

City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



John Bakewell, Jr. 

Lewis P. Hobart 

Charles Stafford Duncan 

Edgar Walter 

Albert A. Greenbaum 

Emerson Knight 

Gertrude Atherton 

Ottorino Ronchi 

J. Emmet Hayden 

Mrs. Alfred McLaughlin 



Robert W. Dennis, Clerk 

CIVIL DEPARTMENT, CITY HALL 

Dept. No. 1— Frank T. Deasy Room 388 
Dept. No. 2 — Frank W. Dunn Room 389 

Dept. No. 3 — Alden Ames Room 222 

Dept. No. 4 — Alfred J. Fritz Room 310 

Dept. No. 5— Thomas F. 

Pendergast Room 383 

Dept. No. 6— D. S. O'Brien Room 465 

Dept. No. 7— Joseph M. Golden. Room 481 
Dept No. 8 — Leo A. Murasky....Room 379 

CRIMINAL DEPARTMENT 
HALL OF JUSTICE 

Dept. No. 9 George W. Schonfeld 

Dept. No. 10 Sylvain J. Lazarus 

Dept. No. 11 Theresa Meikle 

Dept. No. 12 George J. Steiger 



LAW LIBRARY 

Room 436, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



LIBRARIAN 
Robert C. Owens 



COUNTY WELFARE 
DEPARTMENT 

Room 462, City Hall 
Telephone UNderhill 8500, Local 403 



Schenk, Eugenie Director 

462 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 405 

Goudey, Irene L Sen. Social Serv. Inv. 

223 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 297 

Bianchi, Lillian C. Social Serv. Inv. 

223 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 297 

Schuster, Constance L Social Serv. Inv. 

223 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 297 

Schwartz, Esther D Social Serv. Inv. 

223 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 297 

Duffy, Margaret C Social Serv. Inv. 

223 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 297 

Clary, Mary K Social Serv. Inv. 

221 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 279 

Peterson, Esther Gen.-Clerk-Stenog. 

221 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 279 

Watkins, Mary E Gen.-Clerk-Stenog. 

221 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 279 

Stall, Edna W Gen.-Clerk-Stenog. 

223 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 297 

Stevens, Blanche Gen.-Clerk-Stenog. 

223 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 297 

McGuire, Margaret Gen.-Clerk-Stenog. 

462 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 405 

Raabe, Evelyn Braille Typist 

462 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 405 



Joesten, Bertha M Senior Clerk 

462 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 404 
Bechtel, Anna V Clerk 

462 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 404 

Flynn, Marie C Clerk-Stenographer 

462 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 404 

Benninger, Rose .-j. Clerk 

462 City Hall. UNderhill 8500, Local 403 

Mann, Helen T. Clerk 

462 City Hall, UNderhill 8500, Local 403 




PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Larkin Street at Civic Center 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



MISS EUGENIE SCHENK 
Din-dor, County ll'elfare Department 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Geo. W. Kelham President 

Albert M. Bender Vice-President 

George A. Mullen Controller and Secy. 

The Mayor Ex-ofhcio 

Eustace Cullinan, Leland W. Cutler, 
Frank P. Deering, R. B. Hale, Eugenie 
Lacoste, Edward F. O'Day, M. C. Sloss, 
W. R. K. Young, Laura McKinstry 

LIBRARIAN 

ROBERT REA 

MAIN LIBRARY, CIVIC CENTER 

Directory 

Information Desk — Second floor. 
Delivery Hall — Second floor. 
Reading Room — Second floor. 
Periodical Reading Room — Third floor. 
Reference Department — Second floor. 
Music Department — Third floor. 
Newspaper Department — First floor. 
Children's Room — First floor. 
Registration Office — Second floor. 

Telephone Service 
Information Desk — 

Week days: UNderhill 8500, Local 56 
Saturday evenings, Sundays, holidays: 
UNderhill 8537. 
Reference Department — 
Week days: UNderhill 8500, Local S3. 
Saturday evenings, Sundays, holidays: 
UNderhill 8536. 
Music Department — 

Week days: UNderhill 8500, Local 49. 
Saturday evenings, Sundays, holidays: 
UNderhill 8S3S. 

Library Hours 

Main Library and Branches 

9 a. ni. to 10 p.m. — Sunday, 1 :30 to 5 p.m. 

Children's Room 

Monday to Friday, 1 to 9 p. m. 

Saturday and school holidays, 

9 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

Sunday, 1:30 to 5 p. m. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES 

Bay View 5025 Third Street 

Telephone ATwater 2411 

Business 1104 Russ Building 

Telephone KEarny 3075 

E.xcelsior, 7 San Juan Ave., near Mission 

Telephone RAndolph 8320 

Glen Park 700 Bosworth Street 

Telephone RAndolph 6912 

Golden Gate Valley, Green St. at Octavia 

Telephone WEst 0236 

Ingleside 387 Ashton Ave., near Ocean 

Telephone RAndolph 2680 

McCreery Sixteenth St., near Market 

Telephone MArket 1314 

Mission Twenty-fourth St. at Bartlett 

Telephone Mission 1517 

Noe Valley Jersej' Street, near Castro 

Telephone Mission 4655 

North Beach.. Powell Street, near Jackson 

Telephone GArfield 3966 

Ocean View 211 Plymouth Avenue 

Park Page Street, near Cole 

Telephone EVergreen 8249 

Portola 2666 San Bruno Avenue 

Telephone DElaware 2081 

Presidio Sacramento Street, near Lvon 

Telephone WEst 6329 

Richmond Ninth Avenue, near Geary 

Telephone EVergreen 2229 

Sunset Eighteenth Avenue at Irving 

Telephone MOntrose 3080 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



37 



GRAND JURY 



PERSONNEL 

Room 460, City Hall 
UNderhill 8552 Night No. 8561 



EXPERT AND ASSISTANT 

William J. Lynch 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Hon. Matthew Brady 

333 Kearny St. DOuglas 2838 

OFFICIAL REPORTER 

Percy W. Girvin 

1932 GRAND JURY 

BIDDELL, GEORGE E. — Photographic Supplies, 
49 Fourth Street, phone DOuglas 2412; Resi- 
dence, 430 Thirty-second Avenue. 

BUNCH, MRS. ROSE.— Widow of Fred G. Resi- 
dence, 1019-A Vallejo Street, phone FRankUn 
3681. 

CURRY, HENRY S.— Tailors' Trimmings, Mgr. 
Anderson & Donnelly, 25 Kearny Street, phone 
DOuglas 4974. Residence, 380 Seventeenth Ave. 

ECKENROTH, FRANK H.— Sales Representa- 
tive, Sussman & Wormser, 155 Berry Street, 
phone EXbrook 2474, Residence, 1408 Hyde St. 

ENOCHS, MRS. EFFIE K.— Widow. Residence, 
1553 California Street, phone GRaystone 3933. 

GERHART, JACKSON R. — Secretary-Treasurer, 
Building Material Drivers' Union No. 216, 200 
Guerrero St., phone MArket 1806. Residence, 
280 Byxbee Street. 

HYNES, MRS. FLORENCE M.— Wife of John 
D., Insurance Broker. Residence, 827 Thirty- 
fifth Ave., Phone BAyview 3384. 

JOHNSON, ANDREW C— Printing, A. C. John- 
son Co., 817 Folsom Street, phone SUtter 8878. 
Residence, 2479 23rd Avenue. 

KALISKY, HARRY.— Retired, Wholesale To- 
bacco Dealer. Residence, 2864 Jackson Street, 
phone Fillmore 2651. 

KEIL, EDWARD A.— CapitaHst, 401 Phelan Bldg., 
phone GArfield 1792. Residence, 2650 Fulton St. 

KLINK, GEORGE T.— Public Accountant, Ly- 
brand, Ross Bros. & Montgomery, 2 Pine Street, 
phone GArfield 2146. Residence, 90 Twenty-fifth 
Avenue. 

LEE, JAMES J. — Investments, 513 Valencia St., 
phone SUtter 3661. Residence, 639 Fourteenth 
Avenue. 

MATRAIA, VINCENT P.— Wholesale Florist, 
195 Fifth Street, phone SUtter 7592. Residence 
320 17th Avenue. 

McHUGH, FRANK J.— Contractor, 3401 Taraval 
Street. Residence, 474 17th Ave., phone EVer- 
green 1545. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
AIRPORT 

Mills Field South San Francisco 

Telephone DAvenport 3824 



SUPERINTENDENT 
Captain Roy N. Francis 




SHEEHY. EUGENE V.— Insurance, 333 Pine St., 
phone GArfield 2626. Residence, 156 Onondaga 
Avenue, phone RAndolph 5772. 

STEPHENS, CHARLES A.— Residence, Elk's 
Club, KEarny 6600. 

SUPPLE DAVID F. — Real Estate and Insurance, 
100 Montgomery Street, phone GArfield 8619. 
Residence, 953 Haight Street. 

URI, SOL. — Wholesale Butcher, Manager, F. Uri 
& Co., 521 Clay Street, phone SUtter 2012. 
Residence, 1849 G'Farrell Street. 

VICTOR. MRS. ETHEL L.— Homemaker, wife 
of Joseph Victor, Salesman for Seller Bros. Resi- 
dence, 363 Tenth Avenue, phone SKyline 4752. 

COMMITTEES 

FRANK H. ECKENROTH, Foreman 

JAMES J. LEE, Secretary 

MEMBERS EX-OFFICIO OF ALL 

COMMITTEES 

MAYOR 
Public Utilities 
JACKSON R. GERHART, Chairman 
ANDREW C. JOHNSON 
EDWARD A. KEIL 
MRS. ETHEL L. VICTOR 
MRS. ROSE BUNCH 
STREETS & PUBLIC WORKS— Public Build- 
ings, Quarters for Jurors. Witnesses, Litigants, 
etc. 

GEORGE E. BIDDELL, Chairman 
HENRY S. CURRY 
MRS. EFFIE K. ENOCHS 
CONTROLLER — Treasurer and Public Admin- 
istrator. 

MRS. ETHEL L. VICTOR. Chairman 
ANDREW C. JOHNSON 

GEORGE T. KLINK 

JACKSON R. GERHART 

EDWARD A. KEIL 

CRIMINAL DEPARTMENTS— Police, Courts, 

Adult Probation. Coroner. 

EDWARD A. KEIL, Chairman 
CHARLES A. STEPHENS 

EUGENE V. SHEEHY 

JACKSON R. GERHART 

VINCENT P. MATRAIA 

CHIEF ADMINISTRATOR — Bureau of Supplies, 

Electricity, Weights and Measures. 

ANDREW C. JOHNSON, Chairman 

HARRY KALISKY 

SOL URI 

MRS. ETHEL L. VICTOR 

GEORGE T. KLINK 

HEALTH — Hospitals. Homes 

MRS. ROSE BUNCH, Chairman 

MRS. EFFIE K. ENOCHS 

HENRY S. CURRY 

FRANK J. McHUGH 

EDWARD A. KEIL 



ELECTIONS, CIVIL SERVICE RETIREMENT 

HENRY S. CURRY, Chairman 

MRS. FLORENCE M. HYNES 

ANDREW C. JOHNSON 

ASSESSOR, TAX COLLECTOR 

MRS. EFFIE K. ENOCHS, Chairman 

FRANK J, McHlTCH 

GEORGE T. KLINK 

COUNTY CLERK, RECORDER, LIBRARIES 
HARRY KALISKY, Chairman 

EUGENE V. SHEEHY 
CHARLES A. STEPHENS 

SHERIFF & BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

EUGENE V. SHEEHY, Chairman 

SOL URI 

DAVID F. SUPPLE 

ENTERTAINMENT— Morals 

MRS. FLORENCE M. HYNES, Chairman 

DAVID F. SUPPLE 

GEORGE E. BIDDELL 

EDWARD A. KEIL 

MRS. EFFIE K. ENOCHS 

SCHOOLS 

DAVID F. SUPPLE, Chairman 

MRS. ROSE BUNCH 

HARRY KALISKY 

VINCENT P. MATRAIA 

JACKSON R. GERHART 

LAW — City Attorney, District Attorney, Public 
Defender, 

FRANK J. McHUGH, Chairman 

SOL URI 

CHARLES A. STEPHENS 

COURTS — Civil Departments 

VINCENT P. MATRAIA, Chairman 

MRS. ETHEL L. VICTOR 

EUGENE V. SHEEHY 

JUVENILES — Playgrounds, Detention Home and 
Court. 

CHARLES A. STEPHENS, Chairman 
GEORGE E. BIDDELL 
MRS. FLORENCE HYNES 
PLANNING COMMISSION- Board Permit Ap- 
peals, Zoning and Annexation. Also Departments 
Not Covered by Committees Listed Above. 
SOL URI, Chairman 
MRS. ETHEL L, VICTOR 
FRANK J. McHUGH 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT— Harbor. Com- 
merce and Commercial Activities, 

GEORGE T. KLINK, Chairman 

VINCENT P. MATRAIA 

DAVID F. SUPPLE 

SOL URI , 

MRS. EFFIE K. ENOCHS 



BOARD OF PERMIT 
APPEALS 

City HaU 
Telephone UNderhill 8500 



Harry W. Glensor, President 
Victor A. Sbragia 

George R. Reilly, Secretary 

51 Nantuckett Street 

Constant J. Auger 
Mrs. Albert W. Stokes 



DIRECTOR OF FINANCE 
AND RECORDS 

Room 232, City Hall 

Telephone UNderhill 8500 
Local 232 



CAPTAIN ROY N. FRANCIS 
Superintendent, Mills Field 



DIRECTOR 
A. E. Curtis 




Mrs. A. W. Stokes, Board of Permit Appeals 



38 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS 



SAN FRANCISCO 

CHAMBER OF 

COMMERCE 

1931-1932 

431 California Street 
Telephone DAvenport 5000 



Leland W. Cutler President 

L. O. Head First Vice-President 

J. W. Mailliard, Jr Second Vice-Pres. 

B. R. Funsten Third Vice-President 

George J. Presley, Executive Vice-Presi- 
dent and General Manager 

Albert E. Schwabacher Treasurer 

M. A. Hogan Secretary 

Cahill, John R., Caliill Bros.. 206 Sansome 

Street. 

Cranston, James A., General Electric Co., 

Russ Building. 233 Montgomery Street. 

Cutler, Leland W., I'idelity & Deposit Co. 

of Maryland, 405 Montgomery Street. 

Fennimore, Arthur R., California Optical 

Co.. 181 Post Street. 
Folger, J. A., Folger Coffee Co., 101 How- 
ard Street. 
Funsten, B. R., Walton N. Moore Dry 
Goods Co., Jilission at P'remont Street. 



Harrelson, Wm. H., Capital Company, 
62.=' .Market Street. 

Head, L. O., Railwav Ex|)rc.ss Agency. 
Inc., Second and Mission Streets. 

Mailliard, J. W., Jr., Mailliard & Schmie- 
den, 20.^ California Street. 

Marks, L. H., Chas. Brown & Sons. 87! 
Market Street. 

Meyer, Frederick H., 525 Market Street. 

Procter, John W., Chamberlain & Proc- 
ter, Mills Building. 

Reid, Robert C, P.alfonr (inthrie &: Co., 
Balfour Building. 

Schwabacher, Albert E., Schwabacher & 
Co., 663 Market Street. 

Somers, Frank A., Somers & Co., 465 
California Street. 

Stewart, Louis C, Sudden it Christenson. 
,^10 .Sansome Street. 

Thompson, Joseph S., Pacific Electric 
MtR. Corp.. 5815 Third Street. 

Threlkeld, J. H., Threlkeld Commissaries, 
213 Market Street. 

Wishon, A. Emory, Pacific Gas & Elec- 
tric Co., 245 Market Street. 

Wobber, Herman, Paramount Publi.x 
Corp., 201 Golden Gate Avenue. 

Wood, Leonard E., California Packing 
Corp., 101 California Street. 

Wright, Colonel Allen G., 1019 Mills Bldg.. 
General Counsel, San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

JUNIOR CHAMBER 

OF COMMERCE 

A Division of the 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

431 California Street DAvenport 3000 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Lloyd Berendsen, A. H. Brawner, Vvhea- 
ton H. Brewer, Robert B. Coons, Edw. 
P. Crossan, Cachot S. Davis, Henry Eick- 
hoff, Jr., Daniel W. Evans, J. A. Folger, 
B. J. Frankenheimer, Chalmers G. Graham, 
D. H. Hughes, Donald L. Kieffer, Robert 
M. Levison, Elliott McAllister, Jr., Emile 
D. Maloney, Herbert H. Mitchell, Gerald 
J. O'Gara, F. Whitney Tenney, C. C. 
Trowbridge, Jr., Sydney G. Walton. 

OFFICERS 

J. A. Folger President 

Daniel W. Evans Executive Vice-Pres. 

Robert B. Coons Vice-Pres. and Treas. 

B. J. Frankenheimer Vice-President 

Frank A. King Secretary Manager 

W. Reimers Asst. Secretary Manager 



SAN FRANCISCO 

CONVENTION AND 

TOURIST BUREAU 

Exposition Auditorium, San Francisco 
Phone MArket 0653 



OFFICERS 

Clarence E. Baen President 

Frank C. Lathrop First Vice-President 

Lyle M. Brown Second Vice-President 

Halsey E. Manwaring Treasurer 

Mary C. Murphy Secretary 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

T. P. Andrews 

Henry Bostwick 

Paul T. Carroll 

George W. Caswell 

Kent W. Clark 

Frederick C. Clift 

Richard W. Costello 

D. G. Davis 

Ernest Drury 

L. R. Everett 

Charles W. Green 

J. Emmett Hayden 

L. W. Huckins 

T. E. Hull 

James A. Johnston 

Albert Kleinhans 

James H. McCabe 

Jefferson E. Peyser 

W. L. Rothschild 



Carsten E. Schmidt 

J. L. Scott 

W. H. Sellander 

George D. Smith 

Arthur W. Towme 

CHICAGO OFFICE 

60 East Jackson Boulevard 
H. H. Campbell, Manager 



THE BETTER BUSINESS 
BUREAU 

of San Francisco, Ltd. 

Merchants Exchange Building 

Telephone SUtter 2170 
San Francisco, Calif. 



OFFICERS 

Arthur M. Brown, Jr., President 

Geo. A. Van Smith Vice-President 

Walter A. Folger Secretary 

Wm. Cavalier Treasurer 

DIRECTORS 

Kenneth B. Bowerman 

A. M. Brown, Jr. 

Wm. Cavalier 

J. L. Cauthorn 

Fred Dohrmann 

Walter A. Folger 

Lewis E. Haas 

David E. Harris 



Robert P. Holliday 

F. A. Kerman 

Frank F. Kilsby 

Clarence R. Lindner 

Edward Livingston 

L. H. Marks 

M. P. Meyer 

Philip H. Patchin 

R. B. F. Randolph 

Harry Saxe 

Carl J. Simpson 

Donzel Stoney 

Joseph S. Thompson 

George A. Van Smith 

A. Emory Wishon 



PIONEERS SOCIETY OF 
CALIFORNIA 

5 Pioneer Place 
SUtter 8101 



prf;sident 

Charles C. Moore 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Dr. Joseph A. Oliver 

Robert W. Neal 

James K. Moffitt 

Wm. T. Hale 

Dr. G. N. Van Orden 

Charles J. Deering, Treasurer 

H. L. Van Winkle, Secretary 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



39 



Phone MArket 9459 

The Lowrie Paving Co., Inc. 
CONTRACTORS 

Streets, Sidewalks and Basement Floors 
Asphaltum a Specialty 

Office and Yard 
1 540 Sixteenth Street San Francisco 



Automatic Temperature Control 
Manufactured and Installed by 

JOHNSON SERVICE COMPANY 

814 Rialto Building SUtter 2794 



2 oz. Household Size 






"'•'CIOPPACIPIC COAST HOPS 



HOP EXTRACT 

Saves Time, Labor and Waste 

Unequalled for all purposes 
for which Hops are required 



NOT A SUBSTITUTE 



SUPERIOR QUALITY 

MALT SYRUP 

Made from choicest Malted Barley 

and Hop flavored under special 

patented process, insuring full 

flavor. 

E. Clemens Horst Co. 

235 Pine Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

NEW YORK LONDON 

Largest Hop Growers in the World 




Success to the New Charter Form of Government 

Master Lubricants Company, Inc. 

998 Indiana Street, corner Twenty-second 
Telephone VAIcncia 12 70 

We thank you for the business you have given us in the past 
and will appreciate your continued patronage 

PAUL CARSON, San Francisco Manager 
Industrial and Automotive Oils and Greases 



PHILADELPHIA 



LOS ANGELES 



SAN FRANCISCO 




The Original and Pioneer 

Spring Company on 

the West Coast 

Making Good Springs for 
More Than 60 Years 



BETTS SPRING COMPANY 

Incorporated 1868 

888 Folsom Street San Francisco 

PHONE SUTTER 6472 



KODAK HEADQUARTERS 

EVERYTHING 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 



CINE-KODAKS 
BALOPTICANS 



KODASCOPES 
PICTURE FRAMES 



Kodak Finishing and Enlarging 
16inm. Motion Picture Films May Be Rented 

EASTMAN KODAK STORES 



(INCORPORATED) 



216 Post Street 



Phone SUtter 5645 



HIGH-GRADE 
WOODWORKING MACHINERY 

for all purposes 

ALLIS-CHALMERS TRACTORS 

THE EBY MACHINERY CO. 



2334 East 8th Street 
LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



35-41 Main Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



ROBERT W. JAMISON 

Railroad Supplies 

Phone UNderhill 1267 

1222 Mission Street, San Francisco 
California 



Huv from firms that advertise «ith us 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



Telephone DOUGLAS 1373 

ANDERSON & RINGROSE 

Builders 
320 Market Street San Francisco, Calif. 



M. SCANDURRA 
ATwater 0528 



E. ELLISEN 
MOnlrose 9073 



D. CAIMOTTO 

HEmlock 1615 



California Terrazzo Marble Go. 

TERRAZZO— MARBLE— TILE 
CEMENT WORK 

2083 San Bruno Avenue Phone ATwater 0541 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The complete motor truck line of greatest earning 
capacity in money, miles, years. 

WHITE 

FOUR AND SIX-CYLINDER TRUCKS 
AND BUSSES 

THE WHITE COMPANY 

llth and Mission Streets San Francisco, Calif. 



H. A. LUNSMAN 



FRED W. HUMMEL 



SOUTH OF MARKET 
SUPER SERVICE STATION 

Gasoline »■ Oils -t Grease -t Washing 
Polishing / Greasing 

FREE CRANKCASE SERVICE 

Sixth and Folsom Streets San Francisco 

Telephone GArfield 9151 



Phone UNderhill 4628 



Andrews- Willmans Biscuit Co. 

"FROM OVEN TO YOU" 



1026 Mission Street 



San Francisco 



FILLMORE 6658 






ESTABLISHED 1898 


JO 


SEPH 


F. 


HOTTER 


MANUFACTURER 


OF 


WINDOW SHADES 




FIRST CLASS REPAIRING 


1540 Fillmort 


• Street 




San Francisco 



BANCROFT-WHITNEY CO. 

Law Publishers 

Phone MArket 0378 200 McAllister Street 

San Francisco 



BENDER-MOSS COMPANY 

LAW BOOK PUBLISHERS 
CODES— DIGESTS— TEXT BOOKS 



11 City Hall Avenue 



UNderhill 0673 



DR. ROBERT GROSSO 

DENTAL SURGEON 
Chief Dental Surgeon of City and County of San Francisco 

PHONE DOUGLAS 8553 

1432 Stockton Street San Francisco 



TELEPHONE EXBROOK 1802 



H. C. REID 8C COMPANY 

Electrical Contractors 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems 



389 CLEMENTINA ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



UNLIMITED INSURANCE PROTECTION 

A. CROSETTI BRO. 8c CO. 

Building Maintenance 
Window Cleaning and Janitor Service * Janitor Supplies 

574 Eddy Street Phone FRanklin 5621 

SAN FRANCISCO 



MACHINE SHOP 


BRAKE DEPARTMENT 


MOTOR PARTS SALES CO. 




468 Golden Gate Avenue 


4650 Geary 


Street 


ORdway 0461 — Phones — SKyline 9416 




SAN FRANCISCO, 


CALIFORNIA 





Buv from firms that advertise with us 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



41 



QUALITY— First and Always 

QUALITY is paramount. In dairy products — foods that 
play such a big part in achieving well balanced meals 
— only the best is good enough. 

Golden State brand has set the quality standard in dairy 
products in California for more than a quarter century. 
Insistence upon the best of raw products to begin with, 
then attention to every detail in scientific handling and 
testing, is Golden State's stringent rule, which results in 
bringing to your doorstep the finest in dairy products. 

It pays to insist upon Golden State Brand 

Golden State Company, Ltd. 

MILK r CREAM ^ BUTTER < ICE CREAM 

COTTAGE CHEESE < ACIDOPHILUS MILK 

BUTTERMILK 



The Finest Fish Dinner 

IN AMERICA 

That's what you'll say after you have dined in the 

FISHERMEN'S CAVE 

at 123 Powell Street 
In a special setting that reflects a real atmosphere of a 
Fishermen's Cave we will serve you the finest fish dinner 
you ever ate. The surroundings are typical of a "buc- 
caneer's home" with nets, oars, pirates' lamps, waterfalls, etc. 
The menu changes daily, so come tonight. Dine with us 
as you have never dined before. 

BERNSTEIN'S FISH GROTTO 

123 Powell Street 6 Sacramento Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

A FACT! — Fish caught at 5 a. m. served here the same day 



C. TOURNIER 



Phone SUTTER 9436 



E. GUASCH 



PARIS RESTAURANT 

242 O'FARRELL STREET, between Powell and Mason 
SAN FRANCISCO 

FAMILY STYLE DINNERS 

Lunch 40c — 11 to 2 Dinner 50c — 5 lo 8 

Chicken Dinner, Sundays, 75c — 12 to 8 



E. Besozzi - A. Tollini • D. Tollini Open from 7 a.m. 10 9 p.l 

TELEPHONE GARFIELD 9048 

THE FLY TRAP RESTAURANT 

73 SUTTER STREET, cor. Montgomery 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

REGULAR FRENCH DINNER 
Dining Room for Ladies and Families Upstairs 



CALIFORNIA CAFE 

BAKERY, CONFECTIONERY and OYSTER PARLOR 

We make a specially of supplying Parlies and Weddings 
with all kinds of Cakes 

1515 Fillmore Street San Francisco 

Phone WEST 5845 



liiiiio:i»idi:i4ii*i4»] 

n* »INNCI • Mc UHCN ■ 8BEAKFAST 

— IkrM SMF l iailii ■ ■!» « ■ — »S3 Cearr 
Sc. 708 C1i»—I St. mmi BelWrB* Bm^ 
— Ab* lal PiU* Alto ■ Fmoo ■ Stoektaa 
, VaD<4« ■ OaklamJ 



THE CANDY WITH A COLLEGE EDUCATION 



Enjoy Our 
Delightful 

50c LUNCH 
75c DINNER 



Cotnpliments of 

FOSTER LUNCH SYSTEM, Ltd. 

986 Mission Street 



R. PRIGIONI 



A. VIVORIO 



BAY CITY GRILL 

The Landmark of San Francisco 

Oysters, Steaks, Chops, Fish and Poultry 

PRIVATE DINING ROOM FOR LADIES — TRAY SERVICE 

45 Turk Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Telephones — PRospecl 10049 — FRanklin 3431 



LESLIE SALT 



The 

Large 
Package 




Full 

Size 

Two 

Pounds 



PLAIN OR IODIZED 
LESLIE-CALIFORNIA SALT CO. 

155 Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 
LOS ANGELES SEATTLE 



Quality — First and Always 

Quality is paramount. In dairy products — foods 
that play such a big part in achieving well-balanced 
meals — only the best is good enough. 

For more than a quarter of a century Golden State 
Brand has set the quality standard in dairy products 
in California. 

GOLDEN STATE COMPANY, Ltd. 

MILK, BUTTER, ICE CREAM, CREAM, COTTAGE 

CHEESE, CHURNED BUTTERMILK, 

EVAPORATED MILK 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



BUSH ELECTRIC 
CORPORATION 

COMPLETE X-RAY 

AND 

ELECTRO-THERAPEUTIC LINE 

Personal Service Featured 
PHONE SUTTER 6088 

334 Sutter Street San Francisco 



Nitrous Oxide 
Ethylene 
Carbogen 



Oxygen 

Carbon Dioxide 

Anesthetic 

Equipment 



Certified Laboratory Products, Ltd. 

A Pacific Coast institution which has satisfactorily 
served Pacific Coast users for ten years 



1379 Folsom Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone VALENCIA 1131 

MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER CO. 

"Bottled Only at the Springs" 
930 Oakdale Avenue San Francisco 



H. E. Casey Company 



BUILDING MATERIAL 



ROAD BUILDING 



GRADING 



SAND and GRAVEL 



SAN MATEO ' BURLINGAME 



PHONE UNDERHILL 6795 



M. DUCASSE. Proprietor 



West Coast Laundry Machinery Company 

Manufacturers of 

Laundry, Dyers and Qeaners Machinery 

Wood and Monel Melal Washers and Cylinders, Extractors, FlatwoHc 
Ironers, Drying Tumblers, Dryrooms and Curtain Stretchers 

MACHINERY INSTALLED AND REPAIRED 
3238-3248 17lh Street San Francisco. Calif. 



THIS is the entrance to the Alexander Sani- 
tarium, Incorporated, situated in Belmont, 
Californa, half a mile from Belmont Station, on 
Half Moon Bay Boulevard. 

The Sanitarium includes six buildings, all mod- 
ern, steam heated with hot and cold water in each 
room; some rooms have private baths and sun 
porches. 

Features of this Sanitarium: Special attention 
to diets. Hydro-department with trained tech- 
nicians. Electro-department with trained techni- 
cians. Occupational-department with trained in- 
structors and Physio-therapy where indicated. 

The buildings are surrounded by green lawns, 
blooming shrubs and shade trees of live oak, also 
numerous flowers and rose gardens. Inspection 
invited. 

ADDRESS: 

ALEXANDER SANITARIUM, 

Or Phone Belmont 40, or San Carlos 40 




Inc. 



Buy from firms that advertise with lis 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



43 



SAN MATEO CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIALS 



SAN MATEO COUNTY 
OFFICIALS 



SUPERVISORS 

Thomas L. Hickey First Township 

Rosalie M. Brown Second Township 

John W. Poole Third Township 

Manuel Francis, Chairman 

Fourth Township 

Dr. C. V. Thompson Fifth Township 

George H. Buck Superior Judge 

Franklin Swart Superior Judge 

Edmund Scott District Attorney 

Richard D. Bell Assistant 

Patsy J. Abbott Supt. of Schools 

H. E. Jenkins County Treasurer 

Ambrose McSweeney 

County Tax Collector 

Edward M. Stack.. County Auditor 

Daniel P. Flynn County Assessor 

E. B. Hinman County Clerk 

J. S. James County Surveyor 

T. C. Rice County Recorder 

James J. McGrath ..Sheriff 

Joseph Meeks, C. A. Callaghan, Leiand 
Quinlan, Timothy O'Rourke, Belton 
Rhodes, Tom Maloney, Laurence 
Neri, A. Walauck, John T. Simp- 
kin Deputies 

Mrs. Mary Granger Jail Matron 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE 

Ellis C. Johnson First Township 

Daly City 

Edward Farrell First Township 

South San Francisco 

Percy W. Jackson Second Township 

Burlingame 

John J. McGrath Second Township 

San Mateo 

E. I. McAuliffe Third Township 

Redwood City 

M. Bettencourt Fourth Township 

Halfmoon Bay 

A. W. Woodhams. Fifth Township 

Pescadero 

Dr. F. H. Smith Health Officer 

Dr. J. C. McGovern 

Coroner and Public Administrator 

Clara B. Dills County Librarian 

W. C. Belcher Agricultural Commissioner 

J. J. Garland Milk Inspector 

Edward J. Ford 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 





JOHN EDWARD CASEY 
San Mateo 



JAMES J. McGRATH 
S/ieriff, San Mateo County 

Ernest H. Werder Purchasing Agent 

W. C. McLean County Veterinarian 

COUNTY RELIEF HOME AND 
FARM 

James R. Eubanks Superintendent 

Mrs. James R. Eubanks Matron 

COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 

M. C. Wilson Superintendent 

Dr. A. L. Offield County Physician 

PROBATION COMMITTEE 

G. W. Hall, J. C. Williamson, Dr. J. C. 

McGovern, Mrs. C. Michelson, F. A. 

Simmons, Miss M. Haworth, Mrs. M. 

Kincaid. 
F. Robinson Probation Officer 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Pansy J. Abbott, John Gill, George W. 
Hall, Henry C. Hall, Jr., L. D. Hen- 
derson. 

TAX RATES FOR INCORPORATED 
CITIES 

The following are the rates in the in- 
corporated cities as levied by their Board 
of Trustees: 

Athertoii 1.03 

Burlingame 1 59 

Dalv Citv (Old Town) 1.50 

Daly City f.\nne.x) 1.25 

Hillsborough 1.30 

Lawndale None 

Menlo Park SO 

Redwood City (Okl Town) 1.49 

Redwood City (.^iiiie.x) 1.38 



Redwood City (South Annex) 1.135 

San Bruno 2.60 

San Carlos '§5 

San Mateo (Old Town) L44 

San Mateo (New Town) 1.41 

San Mateo (Annex Territory) 1.286 

South San Francisco (Old Town).... 1.64 



ATHERTON 



M. A. Harris Mayor 

J. A. Donohoe Chairman 

E. L. Eyre Councilman 

C. H. Merrill Coimcilman 

Clarence R. Walter Councilman 

Arthur H. Redington Attorney 

Thos. G. Packham Town Clerk 

George A. Kneese Town Engineer 

G. E. Jennings City Judge 

J. E. Farrell Chief of Police 



BELMONT 



C. L. Jordan Mayor 

L. C. Vannier Councilman 

C. J. Messner Councilman 

A. Morrison Coimcilman 

J. P. Halloran Councilman 

J. W. Herringer City Treasurer 

A. Mansfield City Attorney 

S. J. Cook City Judge 

George Kneese City Engineer 

R. G. Kelly City Clerk 

Stephen St. John Health Officer 



BURLINGAME 



C. A. Buck Mayor 

A. F. Hunt Councilman 

R. L. Stone Councilman 

H. E. Jenkins Councilman 

F. Peterson Councilman 

J. R. Murphy City Clerk 

F. A. Bloom Treasurer 

W. A. Rollins Street Superintendent 

John F. Davis City Attorney 




C. A. BUCK 
Mayor, Burtinijame, Calif. 



44 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



SAN MATEO CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIALS 



DALY CITY 



H. H. Smith Mayor 

H. Sundemann Councilman 

A. Bodieu Councilman 

A. J. Dalton Councilman 

Julius Twesten Councilman 

A. L. Stockton Treasurer 

B. C. Ross City Clerk 




A. J. DALTON 
Councilman, Daly City, Calif. 



HILLSBOROUGH 



R. G. Hooker Mayor 

H. W. Poett Councilman 

George Pope Councilman 

Hall C. Ross Councilman 

William Prescott Scott Councilman 

John A. Hoey Clerk 

J. C. Nowell City Manager 

George A. Kneese Engineer and 

Superintendent of Streets 

C. M. Hirschey Marshal and 

Health Officer 




W. A. ROLLINS 

Superintendent of Streets 

Burlingame, Calif. 



MENLO PARK 



W. H. Weeden Mayor 

W. H. Anderson Councilman 

Alfred E. Blake Councilman 

E. J. Crane Councilman 

W. E. Dale Councilman 

F. E. Kurtz City Clerk 

J. William Ryan Treasurer 

G. K. Whitworth City Attorney 

Frank Love Chief of Police 

R. J. Gerlough, M. D Health Officer 

Jean B. Hoss City Judge 



REDWOOD CITY 



D. R. Stafford Mayor 

H. A. Beeger Councilman 

William J. Dusel Councilman 

C. J. Hildebrandt Councilman 

R. B. Hinman Councilman 

Paul A. McCarthy Councilman 

George W. McNulty Councilman 

E. A. Rolison City Manager 




E. A. ROLISON 
City Manager, Redwood City, Calif. 

B. E. Myers City Clerk and Treasurer 

C. Drathman Building Inspector and 

Health Officer 

N. L. Miramontes Collector and 

Assessor 

C. L. Dimmitt... Superintendent of Streets, 
Waterworks, City Engineer 

Albert Mansfield City Attorney 

E. I. McAuliffe Police Judge 

C. L. Collins Chief of Police 

M. E. Ryan Fire Chief 

George Hopkins Supt. of Parks 




LOUIS BELLONI 
Chief of Police, South San Francisco 



SAN BRUNO 



E. J. McGuire Mayor 

William Holliday Councilman 

William Farmer Councilman 

Floyd B. Tower Councilman 

William Maurer Councilman 

Emil A. Bohm City Clerk 

Joseph A. Cunningham Treasurer 

Geo. A. Kneese City Engineer 

R. A. Rapsey City Attorney 



SAN CARLOS 



J. E. Cowgill Mayor 

J. B. Bryan Councilman 

M. R. Hosmer Councilman 

E. H. James Councilman 

E. R. Burton Councilman 

J. S. Edling City Clerk 

B. A. Lindberg Treasurer 

Albert Mansfield City Attorney 

J. V. Clark Tax Collector 

E. J. Wheeler Chief of Police 

Geo. A. Kneese Engineer 




H. H. SMITH 
Mayor, Daly City, Calif. 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



45 



SAN MATEO CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIALS 




HUGH L. MORRIS 
Fire Chief, San Maleo, Calif. 



SAN MATEO 



A. R. Cotton Mayor 

W. H. Taylor Councilman 

C. K. Cheney Councilman 

J. E. Casey Councilman 




M. J. Power Building Inspector 

Dr. W. C. McLean Health Officer 

E. A. Wilson City Attorney 



SOUTH 
SAN FRANCISCO 



EDWARD FARRELL 
Judge, South San Francisco 



Joseph P. Quinlan Mayor 

Victor Boido Councilman 

R. Tibbetts Councilman 

T. J. Brady Councilman jj Minucciani Councilman 

E. P. Wilsey City Manager R. Lloyd Councilman 

E. W. Foster City Clerk J- W. Coleberd City Attorney 



Charles A. Ginnever City Treasurer 

T. F. Burke Chief of Police 

H. F. Morris Fire Chief 

L. F. Kinnell City Judge 



L. Belloni Chief of Police 

Dan McSweeney City Clerk and Assessor 

Geo. A. Kneese Engineer 

Al J. Welte Fire Chief 

Dr. T. C. Doak Health Officer 




FRANK A. BLOOM 

Treasurer, Burlingame. Calif. 



K. C. SUN. Herb SpecMist 
Hours Daily 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Great Nature Herb Co. 

Importers of Selected Herbs 
Consultation Without Obligation 

For Appointment, call WAInut 0969 
1750 Fillmore St. San Francisco, Calif. 




DAN McSWEENEY 

Clerk, .Assessor, Tax Collector 
South San Francisco 



Phones: VAIencia 2041 — UNderhill 7855 

Jansen Soap 8C Chemical Co. 

HANS V. JANSEN 

782 Minnesota Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 




JAMES R. MURPHY 

City Clerk, Assessor 
Burlingamc, Calif. 



A. C. ARMSTRONG 
M. D. 



City Coal Co. 



Buv from firms that advertise with us 



46 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



NEW CHARTER IS INSTALLED BY 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Ideal Form of Government Inaugurated with Pomp and Ceremony 

By LOUIS COOPER LEVY 

Editor, "Municipal Record" 



THIRTY-TWO years ago, the 
first Charter of the City and 
County of San Francisco, which re- 
placed the so-called Consolidation 
Act, was instituted. 

From time to time it was amended, 
but a year ago, in order to keep 
abreast with modern trend and 
thought, citizens of the "City that 
Knows How" elected a board of 
fifteen freeholders, who labored for 
four months and evolved the present 
organic law. 

The new Charter was then sub- 
mitted to the voters of San Fran- 
cisco for approval. Sides were taken 
and a campaign of exceeding in- 
terest followed. Suffice it to say, the 
voters, on August 26, 1930, by a 
margin of 13,638 votes, adopted the 
new Charter. 

Type of Charter 

It is unique in municipal govern- 
ment. Some have declared it to be 
patterned after the so-called "strong- 
mayor" government of Detroit ; and 
others have pictured it as the city 
manager form of government. 

One of the framers of the new 
Charter aptly suggested that it 
should be called "the San Francisco 
Charter." 

Historic Occasion 

The new Charter was installed in 
the presence of a large gathering of 
citizens and officials on Friday, 
January 8. 

It was an historic occasion. The 
ceremonies were conducted in the 
Chambers of the Board of Super- 
visors of the City and County of 
.San Francisco, located in the struc- 
ture that, according to Governor 
James Rolph, Jr., has the highest 
dome in America." 

Governor Is Present 

And Governor Rolph, who had 
labored under the old Charter for 
twenty years as mayor of San Fran- 
cisco, was present to see the new 
law ushered in. 



The occasion was also momentous 
as Mayor Angelo J. Rossi and other 
officials, who had been elected to 
office, were installed. 

In his inaugural message. Mayor 
Rossi promised "fidelity to the new 
system of rule." He said: 

Mayor's Pledge 

"Only by strictly observing the 
provisions of the Charter in letter 
and spirit can its possibilities be 
properly tested. 

"This is a responsibility which 
rests on every city official — and I 
accept my full share of it. 

"When I became mayor last year 
it was by appointment of the Board 
of Supervisors and it is gratifying to 
me to realize that the people them- 
selves have confirmed the judgment 



of my former colleagues on the 
board. 

"I start with responsibilities the 
like of which have not been faced 
since the late Senator James D. 
Phelan had the task of putting the 
charter of 1900 into effect. 

"In this work I ask the whole 
hearted and constructive coopera- 
tion of my fellow-citizens. 

"To the limit of my abilities, I 
shall serve them, and shall expect 
all other municipal servants to do 
the same." 

The new Charter covers 226 sec- 
tions and is contained in a volume 
of 125 pages. It is a formidable 
document, and too long for publica- 
tion in this magazine. The im- 
portant sections are therefore set 
forth in the following summary: 




INAlOrRATION GROUP 

Left to right: Chief A dministralive Officer Alfred J. Cleary, Mayor Angelo ,/. Rossi, 

and Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden, President, Board of Supervisors. 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



47 



Summary of Charter 

Type of Government — Mayor form with 
responsibility concentrated in key men, 
notably Lliief Administrative Officer and 
Controller, appointed by Mayor. The ex- 
ecutive branch takes over many powers 
liitherto held by legislative branch, many 
previously independent departments are 
abolished and their duties placed under 
the Chief Administrative Officer. 

Supervisors — Personnel reduced from 
eighteen to fifteen members today; in 1933 
to be reduced again to eleven members, 
the permanent form. Board loses control 
of public utilities, permit granting, airport, 
auditorium, traffic, publicity and adver- 
tising; its financial powers are largely cur- 
tailed; city budget becomes executive, 
made by Mayor, Chief Administrative Of- 
ficer and Controller, with Board having 
only limited voice. 




ALFRED J. CLEARY 

Chief Administrative Officer 

San Francisco 

Mayor — Appoints Chief Administrative 
Officer, Controller and with them makes 
annual budget; appoints Police, Fire, Pub- 
lic Utilities, Park, Recreation, Civil Ser- 
vice, Library, Art, Library and War 
Memorial Commissions; nominates Board 
of Education, subject to confirmation by 
voters. 

Chief Administrative Officer — Appointed 
by the Mayor; receives $12,000 salary; 
can be removed only by two-thirds vote 
of supervisors or recall election. Controls 
Department of Finance and Records (for- 
merly tax collector, registrar of voters, 
recorder, county clerk, public administra- 
tor). Coroner's Office, Purchasing Depart- 
ment, Real Estate Department, Depart- 
ment of Public Works (formerly Board of 
Public Works, now abolished), Depart- 
ment of Public Health, County Welfare 
Department; heads Street Traffic Ad- 
visory Board. 

Six officers hitherto elective become ap- 
pointive under Chief Administrative Of- 
ficer. He appoints Director of Public 
Works, Director of Public Health and 
the heads of other departments and bu- 
reaus under his jurisdiction. 

Controller — Appointed by the Mayor; 
receives $10,000 salary; removed only by 
two-thirds vote of supervisors or recall. 
He supersedes the present auditor, who 
becomes County Accountant; he exercises 
supreme financial control under a broad 
grant of power. 

Public Utilities — Controlled by commis- 
sion of five, appointed by Mayor. Com- 
mission takes over Municipal Railway, 
Airport, Water Department, including 
Hetch Hetchy; will administer other pub- 
licly owned utilities when acquired. A 
$12,000 a year Manager of Utilities is ap- 
pointed by the commission. Utilities for- 




fected instead of by the supervisors. New 
Board of Permit Appeals created to review 
cases where decision of department is un- 
satisfactory to applicant. 

General Provisions — Tlie only elective 
officers under new charter are: Mayor, 
City Attorney, Assessor, District Attor- 
ney, Public Defender, Sheriff and Treas- 
urer. 

Chief of Police and Chief of Fire De- 
partment hold office "at pleasure" of re- 
spective commissions instead of four-year 
term as in old charter. 

Chief Administrator 

Alfred J. Cleary, chief adminis- 
trator, and Leonard S. Leavy, con- 
troller, the "key men" in the new 
set-up, were sworn in and pledged 
allegiance to the new Charter and 
to Mayor Rossi. 






HON. ANGELO J. ROSSI 
Mayor of San Francisco 

merlv under jurisdiction of Board of 
Public Works. 

Public Works — Administered by Direc- 
tor of Public Works appointed by Chief 
Administrative Officer. Director appoints 
heads of subordinate departments and 
bureaus. All contracts over $1,000 to be 
let by competitive bidding with city re- 
quired to bid against private contractors. 

Budget — Made by Chief Administrative 
Officer and Controller and approved and 
sent to Board of Supervisors by Mayor. 
The board may decrease or reject any 
budget item, but cannot increase any item 
except for capital expenditures and public 
improvements. Charter expressly forbids 
deviation from budget once adopted or 
carrying over deficit from one year to 
another. 

Permits — Issued by the departments af- 




LEONARD LEAVY 
Controller, San Francisco 

J. Emmet Hayden, for twenty-two 
years a member of the Board of 
Supervisors, was elevated to the 
position of president of, the Board, 
relieving the Mayor of the arduous 
duty of presiding over that ani- 
mated body of officials. 




CITY HALL, SAN FRANCISCO 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



ATTORNEY WOLFF APPOINTED 
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONER 



C1\^IC workers, professional 
groups and San Francisco busi- 
ness men exjjressed pleasure with 
the appointment l)y Mayor Angelo 
J. Kossi on January 8 of Attorney- 
Harry K. W'olfF to membership on 
the San Francisco Civil Service 
Commission. 

Mr, Wolff accepted the long term 
appointment on the commission 
which was left open by the resigna- 
tion of Attorney Lewis F. Byington. 
who became a member of the Public 
Utilities Commission. 

The selection of Mr. Wolff as a 
member of Mayor Rossi's official 
family was regarded as a happy one, 
not only on account of Mr. Wolff's 
knowledge of community affairs but 
on account of the need for an attor- 
ney on a commission which has 
jurisdiction over 12,000 employees 
of the San Francisco Municipal 
Government. 

Immediately after his appoint- 
ment, Mr. Wolff participated in the 
organization meeting of the com- 
mission at which Dr. Howard Mc- 
Kinley was elected president for the 
year 1933. 

Dr. McKinley was named as a 
member of the commission in 1931 
following the resignation of Attor- 
ney Hugh McKevitt, who accepted 
an appointment under Governor 
Rolph. 

Labor is represented on the com- 
mission in the person of William P. 
McCabe, whose term expires in 
1935. Attorney Wolff's term expires 
in 1937. 

L'nder the new charter the Civil 
Service Commission assumes juris- 
diction over the employees of the 
Park, Playgrounds and Hetch- 
Hetchy water development. The 
first act of the commission was to 
set in motion the machinery neces- 
sary to give examinations to about 
100 temporary emploi^ees who have 
been working from month to month 
without civil service status. 

Mr. Wolff has practiced law in 
San Francisco for twenty-seven 
years. He was secretary of the 
Presidential Electoral College in 
1928; member of the Republican 




nal activities. He is married and 
has two sons. 

For the past several years he has 
been chairman of Public Schools 
Week. Recently he accepted an ap- 
l)ointment as chairman of the speak- 
ers' committee of the George Wash- 
ington Bicentennial Committee. 



HARRY K. WOLF 

County Central Committee : mem- 
ber of the Republican State Central 
Committee; chairman of the Coun- 
cil of the Republican County Cen- 
tral Committees of Northern Cal- 
ifornia ; past president of the West 
of Fillmore Street Improvement 
Association ; member of South of 
Market Boys ; member of Common- 
wealth Club; ]3ast grand president 
of B'nai B'rith ; grand treasurer of 
District No. 4, B'nai B'rith; trus- 
tee of Temple Sherith Israel ; pres- 
ident of the Hebrew Sheltering Im- 
migrant Aid Society ; past president 
Hebrew Free Loan Society ; Orator, 
of Islam Temple of Shriners; Past 
Master of Pacific Lodge No. 136, 
F. and A. M. ; prominent member of 
San Francisco Bodies, Scottish Rite 
and San Francisco Pyramid of 
Sciots ; vice-president of Masonic 
Club of San Francisco ; past pres- 
ident Masonic Masters and Ward- 
ens Association of San Francisco ; 
Past Chief Ranger. Court Palo Alto, 
Foresters of America ; Past Noble 
Grand of Bay City Lodge of Odd 
Fellows; member of the Executive 
Committee of the Jewish National 
Welfare Fund ; actively connected 
with the Jewish Community Center 
and prominently identified with 
manv other civic, social and frater- 



Coroner Leland Reports Less 
Liquor Deaths 

.Annual reports are always con.-^id- 
ered uninteresting. Not so the one 
issued by the Coroner of San Fran- 
cisco. Coroner Dr. T. B. W. Leland 
has made his report stand out as it 
contains statistics of vital impor- 
tance. 

For instance, he shows that deaths 
due to alcoholism and suicide de- 
creased in 1931. This is in compari- 
son to the previous year. 

As to alcoholic deaths, it must be 
that the concoction of poisonous 
"booze" is decreasing, or that the 
quality is better, because drinking 
under the "noble experiment" cer- 
tainly has not decreased. 

Deaths due to liquor, as listed by 
Coroner Leland, show 19 in 1931 to 
25 in 1930. Deaths due to the ex- 
cessive use of liquor as a contrili- 
uting cause of death totaled 38 in 
1931 as against 52 in 1930. 

The coroner's office during 1931 
investigated 2,129 cases, held 1,672 
inquests, and performed 1.565 au- 
topsies. 

There was a sharp drop in the 
number of fatalities due to motor 
vehicles. In San Francisco, during 
1931, 104 persons were killed, as 
compared with 126 in 1930. In 1927 
the figure reached 158. Twenty-four 
persons injured elsewhere in auto 
accidents died in San Francisco dur- 
ing 1931. 

The number of suicides was the 
lowest in the last five years, with a 
total of 232, of which 192 were men 
and 40 women. The report showed 
11 murders and 13 homicides during 
1931, a slight increase. 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



49 



Tan Cement, a Local Product, Overcomes 

Handicap of 108 Years 

Color Obstacle of Portland Cement Overcome After Long Experiments by Pacific Portland Cement 
Company — Product Meets Standard Specifications of A. S. T. M. Waterproof 

Qualities Revealed in Laboratory Report. 



News of unusual interest to the 
building trade is contained in the 
announcement of a new tan cement 
by the Pacific Portland Cement 
Company. 

The importance of this announce- 
ment is realized when it is consid- 
ered that during its entire 108-year 
history Portland cement has, up to 
this time, resisted all attempts to 
change its basic color from dull 
gray. 

The innovation of tan cement, 
marking as it does the first real im- 
provement in the color of Portland 
cement in over a century, brings ce- 
ment into line with the modern color 
trend and opens up new possibilities 
for its use in present-day architec- 
ture. 

"Tan cement was not discovered 
by accident," said J. A. McCarthy, 
vice-president and general manager 
of the firm. "A number of years 
ago we set out to overcome the color 
obstacle of Portland cement, and the 
new tan cement, which has rewarded 
our efiforts, is the result of long ex- 
periments and persistent effort on 
the part of our entire technical 
staff." 

Under this new process, for which 
patent has been filed, a true Port- 
land cement is now produced for the 
first time in a warm, pleasing color. 
The tan, which is a permanent part 
of the cement, is not only a desirable 
color in itself but lends itself easily 



for producing other colors with min- 
imum amounts of pigment. 

The new product is a true Port- 
land cement guaranteed to pass the 
standard specifications of the Ameri- 
can Society for Testing Materials. 

The demand for a pleasing color 
in cement has existed for years, par- 
ticularly on the Pacific Coast where 
color plays such an important part 
in the landscape and architecture. 
Heretofore, in order to meet the de- 
mand for color, it has been neces- 
sary to import high-priced white ce- 
ments from the East, or else face 
the difficulties of changing the color 
of ordinary gray. 

Because of its moderate cost, the 
new product, which is called "Golden 
Gate Tan Cement," opens the door 
for the first time to the practical use 
of color in mass and monolithic con- 
crete. Its discovery should also 
prove beneficial to the cast stone in- 
dustry in which color plays such an 
important part. 

This new tan cement seems par- 
ticularly well adapted for stucco, not 
only because of its color but also for 
its apparent qualities of plasticity 
and workabilit)'. 

In addition to being produced in 
standard quality, the new tan color 
is available in a plastic waterproof 
cement, a fact which greatly broad- 
ens its field of usefulness. That it 
contains waterproof qualities to an 



unusually high degree is attested to 
by the following report from the 
Hanks Laboratory : 

Laboratory Certificate 
ABBOT A. HANKS. IN'C. 
FIXAL REPORT Dec. 29. 1931 

Lab. No. 96003 
Sample — Tan Plastic Cement 
Reed.— Oct. 26, 1931 

Marked — Sample of Tan Plastic Cement 
received from Redwood Citv by par- 
cel post 10/26/31 your P. O. 40789 
TEST RESULTS 
Permeability Test 
Two discs were made 6 inches in 
diameter and one inch thick using 
Tan Plastic Cement and Standard 
Ottawa Sand in a 1 to 3 mi.\ by 
weight. These discs were cured 
under normal conditions for 28 days, 
then placed under 50-lb. water pres- 
sure in the Permeability machine for 
48 hours. There was no leakage and 
the gain in weight was nil. 

. Respectfully submitted, 
ABBOT A. HANKS, INC. 

The announcement of this revolu- 
tionary improvement in an old sta- 
ple product is particularly welcome 
at this time, when every innovation 
serves as a much needed stimulus 
to the building industry. 

It is particularly noteworthy, as 
pointed out by Robert Henderson, 
president of the company, that tan 
cement should have been developed 
on the Pacific Coast, where color has 
played such an important part in a 
style of architecture which has at- 
tracted wide attention for its beautv. 



New City Engineer Wins Deserved Promotion 



SIGNAL honor was paid John 
J. Casey, Chief Inspector in 
the Department of City Engineering 
of San Francisco, in elevating him 
to the post of City Engineer. 

It was a deserved promotion and 
has been approved by all who have 
a knowledge of his ability and effi- 
ciency. 

To have been appointed to suc- 
ceed M. M. O'Shaughnessy is in it- 
self a great honor. While Mr. 
O'Shaughnessy may have his critics, 
it cannot be gainsaid that he pos- 
sessed great ability. 



Chief Casey is the son of Michael 
Casey, President of the Interna- 
tional Brotherhood of Teamsters 
and himself a worthy scion of a 
worthy son. Mike Casey, as he has 
always been called, was at one time 
President of the Board of Public 
Works, and it must give him lui- 
alloyed pleasure to see his offspring 
elevated to the highest post in the 
Engineering Department of the city. 

Chief Casey is a graduate of the 
University of California in the Col- 
lege of Engineering. He also counts 
the University of San Francisco as 
his alma mater. 



When the World War broke out, 
Mr. Casey enlisted as a private in 
the Infantry, Forty-first Division. 
Before the close of the war he had 
won a commission in the Engineer- 
ing Corps. 

He has been connected with the 
Engineer's office since 1916, with the 
e.xception of the years he devoted 
to making the world safe for de- 
mocracy. 

Mr. Casey is still a young man. 
He has had real experience in his 
profession, and his activity and abil- 
ity will be assets in handling the 
important position of City Engineer. 



50 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



DEPRESSION CAUSES LOSS IN 

WATER SALE 



NELSON A. ECKART, General 
Manager of the San Francisco 
Water Department, in his monthly 
report filed with the Board of Su- 
pervisors, dwells on the decrease in 
sales during- the month of December 
last, and assigns the cause to de- 
pression. 

Following is the report : 

Complying with the provisions of 
Section 5, Ordinance 8691, there is 
transmitted herewith the operating 
statement of the San Francisco 
Water Department for December, 
193L showing a comparison with 
November, 1931, and with a like 
period of last year. 

Water sales revenues within San 
Francisco decreased $46,849 as com- 
pared with November, 1931, and 
those outside of San Francisco de- 
creased $2,629. The decrease in San 
Francisco sales for the six-month 
period ending December 31, 1931, 
as compared with the same period of 
last year amounts to $25,360, while 
for the same period sales outside of 
San Francisco decreased $21,912.67. 
The existing business depression is 
accountable for the decrease in San 
Francisco sales, while the decrease 
in suburban sales is caused princi- 
pally through the development of 
local resources by two of the larger 
water districts in the Peninsular 
District. 

The decrease in rents from land 
and buildings — December over No- 
vember, 1931 — is due principally to 
the accruel in November for five 
months' proportion of taxes billed 
to lessees. The decrease for period 
ending December 31, 1931, over 
same period of last year amounting 
to $11,614, is the result of the 
drought to the extent that the re- 
turns from share crops are $5,981 
below normal ; adjustments in the 
period ending December 31, 1930, 
for rents applying to the prior period 
account for decrease of $2,157 and 
rental received for pasturage of 
sheep in San Mateo County amount- 
ing to $3,476 in December, 1930, 
was not earned this year. 

The increase in Miscellaneous 
Non-operating Revenues, December 
over November, 1931, amounting to 
$225.09, was caused by taking into 
account in December the final re- 
turns (excepting sale of culls) from 
sale of walnut crop. The decrease 




N. A. ECKART 

General Manager, San Francisco If'atcr 
Department 



over same period last year is not 
the final figure. Final returns were 
not accounted until April, 1931, so 
the exact decrease will appear on 
April, 1932, report. 

The decrease in operating expense, 
December, 1931, over November, 
1931, amounts to $7,748. Water pur- 
chased decreased $9,903, which is 
partially oflfset by increase due to 
repairs to transmission mains. The 
increase in operating expenses for 
si.x-month period this year over same 
period of last year amounts to $358,- 
609. Water purchased this year and 
cost of operating Newark-San Lo- 
renzo and Sunset Wells pumps 
amount to $387,500. Flumes and 
maintenance work on Pilarcitos and 
Stone Dam aqueduct and painting 
of bay bridge in same period of last 
year account for a decrease of ap- 
proximately $30,000. 

The decrease in taxes over same 
period of last year, $7,794, is due to 
reduction in tax rates in outside 
counties. 

The charge for Newark-San Lo- 
renzo pipe line, amounting to $24,- 
468. is the principal cause of the in- 
crease over last year in Hetch 
Hetchy aqueduct and other rentals. 
Interest decreased $22,500 on ac- 
count of the retirement of Spring 
Valley bonds in the amount of $1,- 
000.000 as of July 1, 1931. 



The increase in Walnut Orchard 
expense, December over November, 
1931, is caused by taking into ac- 
count in December the culling, sell- 
ing and miscellaneous expenses in- 
curred in connection with disposal of 
crop. The increase over same period 
last year, $1,613, is due to the length 
of time the orchard was taken care 
of. The expense this year covers a 
period of twelve months, while last 
year's expenses date from March 3, 
a period of nine months. 

The decreased earnings and de- 
creased expenses result in a de- 
creased net income for December, 
1931, over November, 1931, and in a 
decreased net income for the same 
period of last year. 

The six months' period ending 
December 31, 1931, shows: 

Total earnings $3,414,471.93 

Expenses 2,428,633.66 

Net income ? 985,838.27 

Appropriations for: 

Additions and 

betterments ..|475,875.00 

Bond redemp- 
tion 500,000.00 975,875.00 

Net additions to 
surplus unap- 
propriated $ 9.963.27 

Total construction expendi- 
tures for the period from 
March 3, 1930, to Decem- 
ber 31, 1931, are $2,111,688.56 

The balance of budget au- 
thorizations, unexpended to 
date is 444,821.44 

Budget authorization for ap- 
propriations to June 30, 
1932 $2,556,510.00 

The number of employees on con- 
struction work on the Upper Ala- 
meda Timnel decreased from 37 on 
November 30, 1931, to 29 on. De- 
cember 31, 1931. Employees on Uni- 
versity Mound pipe line decreased 
from 88 on November 30, 1931, to 
8 on December 31, 1931, and on the 
Crystal Springs Outlet Tunnel from 
59 on November 30, to 44 on Decem- 
ber 31, 1931. 

The number of employees in the 
operating and maintenance work de- 
creased from 520 on November 31 
to 479 on December 31, 1931. 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



51 



Spectacular Features Planned 

for Police Ball 

Civic Auditorium to Be Scene of Magnificent Pageant in Aid of 

Widows and Orphans' Fund 



FOR the past month, members 
of the police department, headed 
by Chief William J. Quinn, have 
been planning for the annual con- 
cert and ball to be given in the Civic 
Auditorium on Saturday evening. 
February 13. 

Mayor Angelo J. Rossi will lead 
the grand march. There will be a 
concert by the San Francisco Police 
Band, drills by the Libyan Guard of 
the Sciots, and a program of enter- 
tainment that is replete with de- 
lightful singing, dancing revues, 
choruses and other features. 

The entertainment will be called 
"Colonial Days" and will be pre- 
sented under the direction of Karl 
Eber and Captain Fred Lemon. 

Arthur E. Garrett, president of 
the Widows and Orphans' Aid As- 
sociation, reports that thousands of 
tickets have been purchased by an 
appreciative citizenry, and this as- 
sures a capacity attendance. 

The committee on entertainment 
and music is as follows : 

Captain Frederick Lemon (cliairnian). 
Company "D"; Lieutenant Michael E. I. 
Mitchell, Headquarters; Lieutenant John 
Alpers, Company "D"; Inspector James 
P. Johnson, Bureau of Inspectors; Ser- 
geant John A. Annear, Company "I"; 
Officer Walter E. Harrington, Company 
"E"; Officer J. Griffith Kennedy, Com- 
pany "J"; Officer John E. Gleeson, Jr., 
Company "L"; Officer Frank A. Nor- 
man, Company "M"; Frederick P. Mur- 
phy. 

CONCERT PROGRAM 

Part I 

7:30 to 7:55 San Francisco Police Band 

7:55to8:0S Drill by Libyan Guard 

L. W. Brillhart, Captain; courtesy S. F. 
Pyramid No. 1, A. E. O. Sciots; Albert 
Springer, Sr., Toparch. 

Part II 

COLONIAL DAYS 

Songs and Dances of Long Ago 

Direction of Karl Eber and 

Capt. Fred Lemon 

"Selection" Orchestra 

Phil Sapiro, Director 

1. "When Honey Sings on Old- 

Time Song" Simondet Singers 



Georges Simondet Doris Turner 
Enrico Martinelli Dorothy Williams 
-Attilio Vannucci Albina Lesslova 
Kenneth Hall Leslie Stafford 

William. Deegen Gertrude Kirske 
Heine Klotz Marjorie Hipsley 

Albert Valette Elizabeth Price 

E. Carrar Clorine Engle 

Emanuel Porcini Marie Vogel 
Frank Figone Lucette Goecke 

Ben Berwick Julia Kling 

Geraldine Kelly 

2. "Minuet" Arr. by Ma.xine Magnus 

Jackie Brunnea, soloist 

3. "M'Appari".... Enrico Martinelli, tenor 

4. "Indian Adagio" The De Cecilitos 

Dorothy Williams, soloist 

5. "Wanting You" Kenneth Hall, 

Marjorie Hipsley. Maxine Magnus, 
dancer. 

6. "American Indian Dance" 

Alma Warfels 

7. "O Mio Fernando" 

Marie Vogel, Contralto 

8. (a) "Sweetest Story Ever Told" 
Doris Turner and Georges Simondet 
(b) "Flower from an Old Bouquet" 

Geraldine Kelly and Clorine Engle 

9. "Virginia Reel" San Francisco 

Neophites; H. Maas, Director; Gar- 
cia Ballet and Magnus Dancers. 



14. "In the Days of Long Ago" 

Willis West 

15. "The Original Neapolitans" 

Emile Valette, Frank Figone, Nick 
Carrar and Emanuel Porcini. 

16. "Blue Danube" 

Simondet Singers and Garcia Ballet. 
Featured dancers: Mary Charlotte, 
Maxine Magnus, Ruth Hummel. 
Garcia Ballet 
Ann Chapman Dorothy Murphy 

.'Vnna Pacher Clara Burton 

Patsy Levy Margaret Shade 

Adrien Spingola Natale VasiliefT 
Eleanor Young Roberta Peery 
Doris Waterman Paula Scott 

17. "Dance Eccentrique" 

Evelyn Cavagnaro 

18. "Drink to Me Only With Thine 
Eyes" 

Simondet Singers, Male Quartet 

19. "Dancing Marvels" 

Kane, Wallace and Grant 

20. (a) "Martha" (Finale) 

Simondet Ensemble 
(b) "Oh, Susanna" 

Nita Navarette and Entire 
Company 
Introduction of speakers 
Grand March — "Star-Spangled Banner" 
Marie Vogel 




Exposition Auditorium illumi 

10. "Kentucky Babe" 

Ladies Double Quartet 
Geraldine Kelly Clorine Engle 
Marie Vogel Doris Turner 

Dorothy Williams Albina Lesslova 
Leslie Stafford Elizabeth Price 

11. "Old-Fashioned Revue" 

Willis West Girls 
Mary Johnson Mary Jane Davis 

Lowell Winton Evelyn Roberts 
Helen Amark Florence Amark 

Jeane Davis Verna Williams 

12. "Carry Me Back to Old Virginny" 

Simondet Singers 

13. "A Few Modern Twists" 

Claire Halloway, Archie and Rollie 



noted for the great Charity Ball 

With twenty-five deaths in tlu- 
organization in the year 1931, 
throwing an exceptionally heavy 
burden of $75,000 upon the treas- 
ury, the arrangement committee, 
headed by Captain John J. Casey 
and Officer Arthur E. Garratt of 
the Widows and Orphans' Aid As- 
sociation of the San Francisco 
Police Department, are working 
overtime to make this year's grand 
ball a record-breaking success. 



■5^ 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



The Civic Center 

of San Francisco; 

A Dream Come True 



By Louis Cooper Levy 

Editor, Municipal Record 




LOUIS COOPER LEW 



Conlinued from December Issue 



Cost of Civic Center 

City Hall ^3,449,262.84 

Civic Auditorium — 2,030,544.69 

State Building 1,000,000.00 

Public Library 1,152,000.00 

Federal Building 3,500,000.00 

Memorial Opera House \ g 000,000.00 
War Ivlemorial 3 

Health Center 1,000,000.00 

Power Building 10,500.00 

Plaza and grounds 10,000.00 

^18,152,307.53 

Based on the cost of land donated 
by the city for the City Hall — ^1,412,- 
263.36, the value of land devoted to 
the Civic Center may be estimated at 
^5,000,000.00. 



THE citizens of San Francisco 
cheerfully voted Bond issue after 
bond issue in order to obtain a Civic 
Center second to none in the world. 
The magnificent structures adorn- 
ing land in the heart of the city are 
another evidence that "San Fran- 
cisco knows how." 



Visitors have marveled at the up- 
building of the city since the dis- 
astrous fire of 1906, but also gaze 
with awe at the "highest dome in 
the United States" and the archi- 
tectural beauty of the many build- 
ings that add charm to the area de- 
voted to civic pride, to culture, and 
to the official life of this great city 
of the West. 

In previous issues of the Munici- 
pal Record the writer has striven to 
outline the inception of the Civic 
Center, also its progress and its his- 
tory. 

Description of the City Hall, the 
State Building, the Civic Audito- 
rium, the Library and Health Build- 
ings have been given. In conclud- 
ing the article, the Health Building, 
an important structure in the group, 
is set forth as follows : 

Health Building 

Ground breaking ceremonies for 
the Civic Center Health Building 
were held on the site at the inter- 
section of Polk and Grove Streets, 
the latter part of September, 1931. 



Mayor Angelo J. Rossi, assisted 
by Dr. William W. Wymore, Presi- 
dent of the Board of Health, and 
the new Health Officer, Dr. J. C. 
Geiger participated. 

The new structure will cost in the 
neighborhood of one million dollars. 
Its construction will give employ- 
ment to hundreds of workers and 
help lessen the unemployment situa- 
tion. 

This handsome building will oc- 
cupy the site now used by the Cen- 
tral Emergency Hospital and Deten- 
tion Home at the intersection of 
Polk and Grove Streets. 

It is directly west of the Exposi- 
tion Auditorium and will add to the 
beauty of the famous Civic Center 
of San Francisco. 

The structure was designed by 
Architect Samuel Heiman. 

Plans for the building have been 
approved and structural work will 
start within the next month. 

A contract for the structural steel 
was awarded to the McClintock- 
Marshall Company' and Herrick 
Company for the sum of $43,000. 




ARCHITECT'S DRAWING OF NEW HEALTH CENTER 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



53 



Bids for the granite and masonry 
on this building have been received. 

It is expected that the new home 
of the Board of Health of San Fran- 
cisco will be ready for occupancy 
by July, 1932. 

All of the city's important health 
work will be concentrated in the 
Health Center Building. 

An Emergency Hospital will be 
located in the building and all the 
activities now located at 1085 Mis- 
sion Street will be transferred to 
that structure. 

The building will be four stories 
in height. The granite facade will 
conform with the other structures 
in the Civic Center and conform to 
the symmetry of the great buildings 
that have already been erected by 
the city and county, the state and 
federal governments. 

Federal Office Building 

Still another magnificent structure 
costing $3,500,000, will be erected in 
the Civic Center by the Federal 
government to house its activities. 

The building will be five stories 
and basement and will cover a site 
bounded by Fulton, Leavenworth, 
McAllister and Hyde Streets. 

The architecture will conform 
with the other buildings in the Civic 
Center. It will be as high as the 
Public Library Building which is 
close by. 

Congress has appropriated $3,500,- 
000 for the erection of the office 
building. 

The building will extend 412 feet 
on the Fulton Street side. There 




Perspective of the neiu Federal Building in San Francisco 



will I)e entrances on Fulton and 
McAllister Streets. 

Work on the structure will begin 
in another month. It will give em- 
ployment to hundreds of artisans. 

When completed the new Federal 
Building will add further beauty and 
fame to the Civic Center of San 
Francisco. 

Arthur Brown Jr. is the architect. 
He is recognized as one of the lead- 
in architects of this country. 

War Memorial Building 

Twin structures — the War Me- 
morial and Opera House — will grace 
the site bounded by Van Ness Ave- 
nue, Grove, Franklin and McAllister 
Street, and be a part of the Civic 
Center of San Francisco. 




Artists' sketch of Fan Kess Avenue facade of 
at Civic Center in honor of m 



one of tivin structures novu under construction 
en and viomen of Pforld IVar. 



These magnificent structures are 
under way. They will face on Van 
Ness Avenue, directly opposite the 
City Hall. 

Patterned in classic architecture 
to harmonize with the other units 
of the Civic Center group, the me- 
morial buildings will be of granite 
and granitex terra cotta over frame- 
works of steel and reinforced con- 
crete. 

They will be duplicates in size and 
exterior design. 

Each will be four stories high, will 
have a 231-foot pillared facade on 
Van Ness Avenue and will extend 
back 282 feet to Franklin Street. 

The project will cost approxi- 
mately $6,000,000, of which $4,000,- 
000 was raised by a bond issue and 
the rest by public subscription. It 
is providing employment for 600 
men of the building trades and for 
hundreds in the local plants supply- 
ing the materials. 

As an indication of what the job 
means to local industry, the build- 
ings will require 7500 tons of struc- 
tural steel and more than 30,000 
cubic yards of concrete. 

The War Memorial Building will 
be the headquarters of thirty or 
forty patriotic organizations, includ- 
ing the American Legion, Veterans 
of Foreign Wars, Spanish Veterans, 
D. A. R., and Gold Star Mothers. 

Its monumental features will be 
a memorial hall and war trophy 
room. Much of the main floor will 
be given over to an auditorium, 
which will boast the novelty of an 
adjustable floor that can be tilted to 
allow a clear view of the stage from 
any point or leveled for dances and 
receptions. 

(Continued in February Issue) 



54 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



HOOD 8C STRONG 

Certified Public Accounlanti 

425 Standard Oil Building 

and 

Van Nuys Building 

LOS ANGELES 



Robinson, Nowell 8C Co. 

Certified Public Accountants 

GARFIELD aiI9 

Crocker Bldg. San Franciico 



F. W. Lafrentz & Company 
Bullock, Kellogg & Mitchell 

Certified Public Accountants 

RUSS BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HENRY H. MEYERS 

GEORGE R. KLINKHARDT 
MILDRED S. MEYERS 

Associate Architects 
1201 Kohl Bldg. San Francisco 



Geo. A. Applegarth 
ARCHITECTS 

703 MARKET STREET 



J. R. MILLER 

AND 

T. L. PFLUEGER 

ARCHITECTS 
580 MARKET STREET 



Professional 
Directory 



Builder of Schools for 30 Years 

HENRY C. SMITH 

Architect 

Telephone GARFIELD 4187 

Humboldt Bank Building 

785 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



O'BRIEN BROS. 

W. D. PEUGH, A.I.A. 
W. J. O'BRIEN 

ARCHITECT 
ENGINEER 



Frederick H. Meyer 
ARCHITECT 

525 Market Street 



W. ADRIAN 

Consulting Engineer 
417 Market Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Telephones 

San Francisco: DOuglas 7841 

Oakland: HUmboldt 5382 



Office of 

H. A. MINTON 

Architect 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CHARLES J. SIMON 
M.D. 

632-637 Butler Building 

135 Stockton Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Office: EXbrook 2680 Rei.: SUtlet S700 

Emergency: MAtket 2100 



DAVENPORT 1176 

Crim, Resing & M'Guinness 
ARCHITECTS 

ROOM 202 
488 Pine Street 



Edward A. E antes 

ARCHITECT 



HYMAN & APPLETON 

ARCHITECTS 

SAMUEL LIGHTNBR HYMAN 
A. APPLETON 



68 Post Street 



San Francisco 



Charlea F. Maalen, A. I. A. 
Lexer W. Hurd, A. I. A. 



Masten and Hurd 

ARCHITECTS 

T. F. CHACE, ContuUing Englruer 

233 Post Street DOuglas 6257 



John Bakewell, Jr. 



Ernest E. Weihe 



Bakewell & Weihe 

ARCHITECTS 

251 Kearny Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



DODGE A. RIEDY 

ARCHITECT 
PACIFIC BUILDING 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



January 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



55 



Board of Education Greets New Member 
and Takes Leave of Aged Educator 



APPOINTMENT of Philip Lee 
. Bush as a member of the Board 
of Education to succeed Alfred I. 
Esberg, resigned, the resignation of 
Senator Daniel C. Murphy from the 
board to accept appointment as a 
member of the Public Utilities Com- 
mission and the resignation of Mrs. 
Mary Fitz-Gerald on February 1 as 
a deputy superintendent of schools 
after forty-four years of service 
were the outstanding developments 
in the Board of Education during 
January. 

The board expressed confidence 
in the presidency of Commissioner 
Ira W. Coburn by unanimously re- 
electing him to the presidency for 
the calendar year 1932. a position 
which Mr. Coburn has held for two 




PHILIP LEE BUSH 

years. At the same meeting Mrs. 
Mary Prag was elected vice-pres- 
ident of the board, succeeding Mrs. 
Maude I. Mott, who remains as a 
member of the board. 

The appointment of Mr. Bush, 
who occupies the executive chair of 
chief engineer for the California 
Packing Corporation, represents 
continuity in the character of service 
rendered by the retiring member, 
Mr. Esberg, in that the interests of 
both gentlemen have been in the 
world of finance and commerce. 



Commissioner Bush was formally 
seated as a member of the Board of 
Education on January 6, having 
been escorted to the meeting by 
Malcolm A. Eraser, private secre- 
tary to Mayor Rossi. 

In welcoming Commissioner 
Bush, Ira W. Coburn, president of 
the board, took occasion to pay trib- 
ute to the services rendered by Mr. 
Esberg since he first assumed his 
place as a member of the board in 
1921. 

President Coburn recalled the de- 
tailed attention which Mr. Esberg 
had given to the building program 
in its most formative stages. 

In consenting to serve as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Education, 
Commissioner Bush returns as a 
commissioner in a school system in 
which he was once a student. He 
was l5orn in San Francisco, June 29, 
1875, attended the Lincoln Primary 
School, the Lincoln Grammar 
School, and the Boys' High School, 
He was graduated from the LTniver- 
sity of California in 1896, obtaining 
his degree from the college of civil 
engineering. In later years his en- 
gineering accomplishments were 
recognized by membership in the 
American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers. 

In 1911, Mr. Bush was united in 
marriage with Lucile T. Shear of 
Penns3'lvania. At present their son, 
Philip David Bush, is a student at 
Galileo High School and their 
daughter, Claire Elizabeth, attends 
the University of California. 

Although appointment to the 
Board of Education represents Mr. 
Bush's first entry into the official 
life of San Francisco, he has been 
identified with community activities 
for many years. He has served as 
president of the Argonaut Club, 
treasurer of the Beresford Country 
Club, captain of the Coast Artillery 
of the National Guard of California, 
and lieutenant-colonel on the staff 
of former Governor Budd. 

At present Mr. Bush is a director 
of the Mt. Zion Hospital, a director 
of Temple Emanu-El, and a mem- 
ber of the provisional committee of 
the Jewish Community Center. 



XVJL resigned from her position as 
Deputy Superintendent of the San 
Francisco Public Schools on Febru- 
ary 1, after having served for more 
than forty-four years as a member 
of the staff. 




MRS. MARY FITZ-GERALD 

Mrs. Fitz-Gerald's resignation was 
tendered to Superintendent of 
Schools Joseph Marr Gwinn on the 
day following her return to duty 
after she had recovered from the 
effects of an operation for appendi- 
citis. She has contemplated retire- 
ment for several weeks in order that 
she might devote time to other ac- 
tivities. 

The resignation of Mrs. Fitz- 
Gerald marks the passing from the 
schools of San Francisco of an edu- 
cator who has been styled as one of 
the most brilliant women identified 
with the public life of California for 
the past twenty-five years. 

As an organizer of note, as a 
writer whose works have com- 
manded the attention of the lay and 
educational world as well, and as a 
speaker, Mrs. Fitz-Gerald has 
carved for herself a niche in the life 
of San Francisco which all observ- 
ers agree is one that cannot be easily 
filled. 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



January 



Nineteen New Classic Alleys on Ground Floor 
for Ladies and Gentlemen 

THE GOLDEN GATE 

RECREATION BOWLING 

ACADEMY 

DE LUXE 

HARRY G. ALTEN. Manager 
Telephone PRospect 0306 

115 Jones Street 
San Francisco, California 



BARRETO BROS. 



Phone FRinklin 9} 19 



GENUINE MEXICAN 
RESTAURANT 

Legilima Cocina Mexicana 
SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO PARTIES 

67 Turk Street San Francisco 

Adrian Ramazzotti 
PLUMBING - HEATING 

1473 Vallejo Street 

ORDWAY 1261 
Phone DOUGLAS 3505 

Wildberg Bros, Smelting & 
Refining Co. 

Smelters, Refiners and Manufacturers 

GOLD, SILVER and PLATINUM 

Bankers Investment Building 

742 Market Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone MARKET 7565 

Merchants Special Delivery 
Merchants Parcel Delivery 

F. ADDLESTONE 

330 Larkin Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

PACIFIC AUXILIARY 
FIRE ALARM CO. 

412 Claus Spreckels Building 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Alarms are directly and instantly trans- 
mitted to the City Fire Department 

Empire Planing Mill 

H. W. GAETJEN, President and Manager 

General Mill Work 

Phones KEARNY 0770-0771 

740-750 Bryant Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Success to the New Charter Form of 
Government 

Indemnity Insurance Co. of 
North America 

R. W. FORSYTH, Manager 
206 Sansome Street SUtter 49 J 1 



New Process Laundry Co. 

Make Your Washday the 
New Process Way 



385 Eighth St. Phone MArket 0951 

PHONE DOUGLAS 1844 

CAESAR PEZZOLO 

ACCORDION STUDIO 

253 Columbus Avenue, between Pacific 
and Broadway 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

C. E. Mailhebuau. Prop. Auguste Olivie, Afgr. 
Telephone SUTTER 9503 

Camilles Rotisserie 
AND Restaurant 

FORMERLY: 

Franks, 419 Pine Street; Lamolle House. San 

Jose; Old Poodle Dog, Eddy Street; Bergez- 

Frank's Old Poodle Dog 

441 Pine Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



McDonald's 
bookshop 

Books of All Kinds Bought 

and Sold 

Lowest Possible Prices on New and 

Second Hand Books 

65 Sixth Street Phone DOuglas 8197 



Puccinelli Bail Bond Co. 

Agents for 

The Greater City Surety 8C 

Indemnity Corp. 

New York City 

"DOC" PUCCINELLI 
Federal State and Cash Bail Bonds 

800 Kearny Street, corner Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO 

PHONE EXBROOK 4223-4224 

Open All Nighl 



California Corrugated 
Culvert Co. 

armco culverts 

818 Crocker Building 



San Francisco 



Phone 
DOuglas 4457 



E. JACOPETTI AND 
SON 

Bail Bond and Insurance 

615 Washington Street 
PHONE GARFIELD 9908 



NEW FILLMORE 
!^W M SSIQN 



Gas 8C Oil / Free Crank Case Service 
"Where Service Is Paramount'* 

bill NUTTER'S 

Visitacion Valley Service StatioB 
Visitacion and San Bruno Avenue 

REST ROOM 



JULIUS S. GODEAU, INC. 

41 Van Ness Avenue San Francis«o 

Phone MArket 0711 

OAKLAND - STOCKTON 

Complete Mortuary Service at a Coft Within 
Your Means 

Our understanding service tightent 
your burden of grief 



Phone ORdway 2397 

HARRY R. MYGRANT 

GLASS AND GLAZING 

Automobile Glass 

Mirrors, Beveling and Resilvering 

678 Eddy Street San Francisco 



Phone GArfield 6663 
E. G. SOETH J. H. BROWN 

E. G. SOETH & CO. 

BRASS AND BRONZE FOUNDRY 

Exclusive Manufacturers of 

"Soeth's Comet" Brand Double Duty 

Nickel Bronze 

E. G. SOETH ac CO. 

Office and Foundry 
248 Tehama Street San Francisco 



S. F. Window Shade Mfg. Co. 

849 Golden Gate Ave., near Gough 

Telephone WEST 6790 
Established 1906 G. J. Miller. Prop. 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 




WHITNEY BROS. 

Chutes -At -The 
Beach 

San Francisco's Only 
Outdoor Amusement 



OPEN EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR UNTIL 
MIDNIGHT 



Take Can Geary B or Cars No. 5 or No. 7 
Unlimited Parking Space for Automobiles 



Phone WEST 5555 
BUILDER'S EXCHANGE: SUTTER 6700 

Marconi Plastering 
Company 

Cement and Plaster Contractors 

J. p. MARCONI, Manager 

1737 Beach Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Market Phone 
DAVENPORT 7109 



Residence Phone 
RANDOLPH 0860 



L* Lagomarsino &Co* 

Grower and Dealer m 

ALL KINDS OF 
VEGETABLES 



& 



Stalls No. 36-37-38 



COLOMBO MARKET 



Mail Address: 626 Front Street 
SAN FRANaSCO, CALIFORNIA 



UNITED STATES 
RUBBER COMPANY 

300 SECOND STREET 
San Francisco, California 

Rubber Footwear 

Waterproof Clothing 

Mechanical Rubber Goods 



QUALITY RUBBER PRODUCTS 
FOR EVERY USE 



World's Largest Producers of Rubber 



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BANKING 

from your side of the window 



Officers and staff never forget that Bank 
of America has grown from humble be- 
ginnings. 

A sincere desire to serve is the guiding 
motive in daily contacts with all of the 
Bank's customers — ^from the school- 
child, saving his first dollar, to Cali- 
fornia's largest corporations. 



Dank of America 

National Trust & Savings Association 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



Bank of America National Trust & Savings Association . . . a National Bank . . . and 

Bank of America ... a California State Bank ... are identical in ownership and 

management . . 410 offices in 243 California communities. 



NiPS-l 



Thi lAttxt H. Baht Co. tt^tt 9am PijkHato* 



San FRkNCisco 




Twenty-Five Cents 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Vol. VI, No. 3 




JAMES LICK JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Anderson & Ringrose, General Contractors 

MARCH 



CrIM, ReSING & McGuiNNESS, Architects 



19 3 2 




LARRY 
BARRETT 

Makes a 

Special 

Announcement 

to 

CITY 
EMPLOYEES 



Purchasers of 

INDIA TIRES 

will be entitled to the same 
discount as that given to the 
City Purchasing Agent. 
Drop in and examine the 
India Tire and inquire as 
to our Budget Pay- 
ment Plan. 




BARRETT TIRE CO., LTD. 

378 O'Farrell Street Near Taylor 
Telephone PRospect 6804 



TANr€CAN 

spring Racing Season 

Thursday, May 31 to May 14 

Fleetest Thoroughbreds i Greatest Jockeys 

EACH WEEK DAY < RAIN OR SHINE 

ADMISSION $1.00 

Pacific Coast Breeders' 
Association 

SAN BRUNO, CALIFORNIA 



HUMBOLDT EVENING 
HIGH SCHOOL 

EDGAR S. ANDERSON 
Principal 

CITY OFFICIALS 

You are cordially invited to attend the Fifth 
Annual Shakespearean Declamation Contest to 
be held in the Humboldt E'.venin^ Hifih School Audi- 
torium, Fufihteenth Street, between Dolores and 
Church streets, on Friday evenin<r, April 29, com- 
mencing; at 8 o'clock. 

All the San Francisco public da\ and evening senior 
hitili schools are invited to participate in this annual 
event b\- entering contestants. 

In view of the great amount of interest displayed 
in previous contests, and since this year's event will be 
held durinsj Public Schools Week, a crowded audi- 
torium is anticipated. 

Sincerely yours, 

Joseph S. Mancuso, 

Student Manager for Humboldt Evenint/ 

Hio/i Si/ioot's Fifth .Annual S/iakrifiearran 

Declamation Contest. 

(I'liis space by courtesy of the San Francisco 
MuNicip.\i. Record.) 



THE DOGS ARE 
COMING BACK! 

1932 Spring Meeting 

of the 

Bayshore Kennell Club Will 
Open at the Belmont Track 

ON APRIL 20 

WORLD'S FASTEST GREYHOUNDS ARE 

BEING ASSEMBLED FROM ALL PARTS 

OF THE NATION AND ABROAD 

ADDED FEATURES NIGHTLY! NEW THRILLS 

Racing Every Night Except Sunday 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



Official Publication for City and County of San Francisco 
Endorsed by the California Society of Pioneers 



San FRkNcisco 




PUBLISHED MONTHLY AT 

1095 Market Street Phone Market 8438 



M. B. BOTHWELL 
Business Manager 



LOUIS C.LEVY 
Editor 



PHILIP P. LEVY 
Advertising Manager 



Volume VI 



MARCH, 1932 



Number 3 



CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Assessor's Office Louise M. O'Hara 

Controller's Office J. Everett Sharp 

Board of Education. D. P. Hardy and Mrs. Harriet Leaman 

Board of Health Edward M. Coffey 

Board of Public Works Sid Hester 

Bureau of Engineering L. T. McAfee 

Bureau of Supplies Ivy Perkins Cerkel 

City Attorney's Office Edmond P. Bergerot 

Civil Service Commission James J. Maher 

Civil Service Association Edward M. Coffey 

Coroner's Office Jane Walsh 

County Clerk Howard Gudelj 

County Welfare Department Esther D. Schwartz 

Department of Electricity Joseph P. Murphy 

District Attorney Henry Goldman 

Engineers' Union J. L. Slater, Jr. 

Exposition Auditorium James L. Foley 

Fire Department '. Lieut. Fred Jones 

Justice Courts Robert W. Dennis 

Mayor's Office Malcolm Eraser 

Municipal Railway Eugene W. Clisbee 

Municipal Carmen's Union Clark N, Farlow 

Office Employees' Association William T. Bonsor 

Parks and Museums W. M. Strother 

Per Diem Men's Association F. J. Ferguson 

Playground Conimission Veda B. Young 

Principals' Association Susie A. Ward 

Public Library Anne M. Farrell 

Public Administrator Henry Boyen 

Recorder's Office Daniel McGloin 

Registrar's Office George L. Sharp 

San Francisco Hospital Mrs. Mae H. Noonan 

San Francisco Water Department N. A. Eckart 

Sealer of Weights and Measures Mrs. M. Dolan 

Sheriff's Office W. J. Martenson 

Superior Courts Henry J. McGrath 

Tax Collector's Office Homer Warren 

Treasurer's Office Duncan Matheson 



CONTENTS 

Photo of James Lick Jr. High School Cover 

Editorials 3 

Old School Buildings Give Way to New 

Structures ' 5 

School System Organized on Modern Lines 11 

Richard E. Doyle Appointed on Board of Edu- 
cation - 12 

School Building Program Requires a Large Sum.. 13 

Shacks and Insanitary Buildings 15 

5v J. C. Geiger, M. D. 

Hassler Health Farm a Boon to Afflicted 17 

Water Department Rep.orts Decreases 19 

The Civic Center of San Francisco 20 

George W. Pracy to Be Honored 22 

Edward G. Cahill Appointed Manager of the 

Public Utilities Commission 23 

Felton Taylor Named Secretary of Public Util- 
ities Commission 23 

Historic Land Mark Is Preserved 24 

Health Department Appointments 25 

Mayor Rossi Praises Brave Fire Fighters 26 

City Hall Correspondence - 26 

Service to the Blind 27 

Founding of the Symphony Orchestra 28 

Robinson Tractor Company Reorganizes 29 

Knights of Columbus on Annual Pilgrimage 29 

Work Creating Commission Very Active 30 

Mayor Issues Proclamation on Unemployment.... 30 

Some New Books 31 

Utilities Commission Rewards Auditor 32 

E.xterminator Company Has New Manager 32 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



HOOD & STRONG 

Certified Public Accountanti 

425 Standard Oil Building 

•nd 

Van Nuys Building 

LOS ANGELES 



Robinson, Nowell & Co. 

Certified Public Accountants 

GARFIELD 8119 

Crocker Bldg. San Francisco 



F. W. Lafrentz & Company 
Bullock, Kellogg & Mitchell 

Certified Public Accountants 

RUSS BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HENRY H. MEYERS 

GEORGE R. KLINKHARDT 
MILDRED S. MEYERS 

Associate Architects 



1201 Kohl Bldg. 



San Francisco 



Geo. A. Applegarth 
ARCHITECTS 

703 MARKET STREET 



J. R. MILLER 

AND 

T. L. PFLUEGER 

ARCHITECTS 
580 MARKET STREET 



Professional 
Directory 



Builder of Schools for 30 Years 

HENRY C. SMITH 

Architect 

Telephone GARFIELD 4187 

Humboldt Bank Building 

783 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



O'BRIEN BROS. 

W. D. PEUGH, A.I.A. 
W. J. O'BRIEN 

ARCHITECT 
ENGINEER 



Frederick H. Meyer 
ARCHITECT 

525 Market Street 



W. ADRIAN 

Consulting Engineer 
417 Market Street San Francisco, Calif. 

TtUphones 

San Fninciico: DOuglat 7841 

Oakland: HUmboldt )382 



Office of 

H. A. MINTON 

Architect 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CHARLES J. SIMON 
M.D. 

632-637 Butler Building 

135 Stockton Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Office: EXbrook 2680 Rej.: SUner S700 

Emergency: MArket 2100 



GARFIELD 1878 

Crim, Resing 8C M'Guinness 
ARCHITECTS 

ROOM 202 
488 Pine Street 



Edward A. E antes 

ARCHITECT 



HYMAN & APPLETON 

ARCHITECTS 

SAMUEL LIGHTNBR HYMAN 
A. APPLETON 



68 Post Street 



San Francisco 



Charlei F. Maaten, A. I. A. 
Leaier W. Hurd, A. I. A. 



Masten and Hurd 

ARCHITECTS 

T. F. CHACB, Contuliint Englittr 

233 Post Street DOuglas 6257 



John Bakewell, Jr. 



Ernest E. Weihe 



BakeweU 8C Weihe 

ARCHITECTS 

251 Kearny Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



DODGE A. RIEDY 

ARCHITECT 
PACIFIC BUILDING 



Buy from firms that advertise with ut 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 




The School Situation 

THE Board of Education has acted wisely thus far 
in proceeding with caution before suggesting 
changes which will result in shifting of children to other 
neighborhoods or crowded accommodations in the San 
Francisco public schools. 

Great care must be taken in approaching the subject 
of curtailment of service in the elementary schools. 
After all, the neighborhood school is a unit of the com- 
munity life of San Francisco which the administration 
can ill afford to disturb on the grounds of economy. 

The suggestion has come from some isolated quarters 
that shoe-horn methods be employed to crowd elemen- 
tary school children into large class of forty-five and 
fifty and that basement classrooms may be pressed into 
service in this so-called emergency. 

The City of San Francisco has never been niggardly 
about its public buildings. It has in course of erection 
a new Health Center building, at Polk and Grove 
Streets, a new municipal opera house, a War Memorial, 
and a new addition to the San Francisco Hospital. 

If these public works are permitted to go on, the 
public school building program — which is equally im- 
portant — ^must not be curtailed. 

San Francisco is proud of its school system, also 
proud of the many structures that house the children. 
However, there are many structures that are a menace 
to their precious lives and every effort should be made 
to raze them and erect on their sites buildings that will 
measure up with the magnificent structures that have 
been built in the past five years. 

It is regretted that the bond issue failed of passage 
last year. It is also regretted that a new bond issue is 
not to be submitted to the voters. Wisdom advises that 
this not be undertaken, because of the depression. Let 
us hope that the building program will continue and 
the administration will find some means of financing it. 



The Blue Book 

RECEPTION of the Blue Book by officials and busi- 
■ ness men of this city has been gratif5nng to the 
publishers. 

The Supply was quickly exhausted. The demand for 
the authoritative list of city and county officials was so 
great that an effort was made to have the Board of 
Supervisors authorize the publication of a second edi- 
tion. This suggestion is now being considered by the 
Finance Committee. 



Letters have been received from Mayor Angelo J. 
Rossi, the Better Business Bureau and others express- 
ing approval of the issue. 

The Blue Book is serving a real purpose. Its index 
is comprehensive and each department is recorded. The 
location of the department, its telephone number and 
the list of officials and personnel that comprise its make- 
up, make the Blue Book indispensable. 

The January issue of "The Municipal Record" not 
only contained the roster of the officers and persoimel 
of the various departments of the City and County of 
San Francisco and San Mateo County, but was pro- 
fusely illustrated with the photographs of the officials. 
Judges and heads of departments. 

"The Municipal Record" is proud of its issue and 
takes this opportunity of expressing appreciation to the 
officials who so kindly furnished the accurate informa- 
tion that was used ; also, its thanks to the many business 
men who showed wisdom in using the booklet for the 
purpose of advertising their products and organizations. 

During the present year, "The Municipal Record" 
will continue to publish articles on civic government 
and the progress of San Francisco. 

Its purpose is to extol our city under the New Charter 
and record its splendid progress. 

Symphony Orchestra 

MUSIC is a definite part of business today. It is 
an industry within itself with payrolls that an- 
nually reach a considerable figure. Hundreds of men 
and women in our midst look to music for the liveli- 
hood." 

Mortimer Fleishhacker voiced the foregoing in an 
effort to stimulate the drive for funds undertaken by 
citizens who are striving to save the Symphony Orches- 
tra for this city. 

It is a laudable effort and it is fervently hoped that 
it will succeed. 

Lovers of music, and they are countless in San Fran- 
cisco, have made generous contributions. The fund is 
growing, but more donations are necessary, if the Sym- 
phony Orchestra is to be saved. 

As has been oft stated, every large city has its sym- 
phony orchestra. Each city boasts of a better orchestra, 
and each is well satisfied in its possession. However, 
San Francisco measures up with any in this country. 
Its concerts are superb. The music loving people of our 
city derive great enjo3nnent from attending these con- 
certs. It is a cultural part of our civic life and should 
continue. 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



The Nei^ Woodstock 




// we can prove to you thai the Woodstock will 

(1) Write a neater letter, easier and at less cost 

(2) Increase the efficiency of your operators 3 to 5% 

(3) Give longer service at less maintenance cost, and 

(4) That among big national users the swing is defi- 
nitely toward Woodstock — 

— if we can prove all of these things — then you want to 
know about it, don't you? 

Will you, therefore, write or telephone and tell us when it 
will be convenient for you to have our representative call? 

Woodstock Typewriter Company 

21 SECOND STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 




HE 

HEYWOOD- 
WAKEFIELD 
COMPANY 

take pleasure in announcing 
that they manufactured and 
installed the opera chairs in 
the beautiful auditoriums and 
choral rooms of the James Lick 
Junior High School, the Aptos 
Junior High School and the 
Balboa High School. 



ANDERSON & RINCROSE 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



JAMES LICK JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



320 MARKET STREET 



DOUGLAS 1373 



Painting Contractor 

James Lick Junior High School 
Laguna Honda Home 

H. ANrECX 

22 Lexington Avenue HEmlock 4447 



Athletic and Golf Equipment 

for sale by 

DEALERS EVERYWHERE 



Wilson- Western Sporting Goods Company 
155 Ninth Street San Francisco 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Old School Buildings Give Way 
to New Structures 



SAN FRANCISCO'S junior high 
school building program is now 
two-thirds complete as a result of 
the formal acceptance by the Board 
of Education on February 10 of the 
new James Lick Junior High School 
which represents an investment of 
approximately $750,000 in buildings 
and grounds. Five additional junior 
high schools will complete the pro- 
gram. 

The building was accepted from 
the City Architect, Charles H. Saw- 
yer, by Ira W. Coburn, president of 
the Board of Education, and Com- 
missioner Alice Rose Power. 

The architects were Crim, Resen 
and McGuinness and the general 
contractors, Anderson & Ringrose. 

Miss Power and Mr. Coburn vis- 
ited the school, went through the 
building, and pronounced it ac- 
ceptable. 

Constructed at a cost of $628,000, 
the fireproof, three-story structure 
will permit the abandonment of the 
forty-year-old Noe Valley Junior 
High School at Twenty-fourth and 
Douglas Streets, which has been 
declared unsafe and unsuited for 
modern educational purposes. 

The new school, at Twenty-sixth 
and Noe Streets, occupies almost an 
entire block, and contains forty 
classrooms, an auditorium, gymna- 
sium, cafeteria and shops. It has 
accommodations for 1,200 pupils. 

It is an imposing three-story 
structure of reinforced concrete set 
in a square city block in a long set- 
tled residential district which has 









Charles H. Sa<wyer, City Architect, 
presenting the James Lick Junior High 
School to President Ira IV. Coburn and 
Commissioner Alice Rose Power, rep- 
resenting the Board of Education. 



IRA \V. COBURN 
President, Board of Education 

been in need of modern junior high 
school facilities. The building con- 
tains all fireproof features and is so 
designed that a wing containing six- 
teen classrooms may be constructed 
when such an addition is needed. 

Parents of the Noe Valley and 
Castro district areas realized a 
dream of ten years ago when on 
February 23 the new junior high 
school, pronounced by educators and 
builders as one of the finest build- 
ings of its kind in America, was oc- 
cupied b}' students of the abandoned 
Noe Valley Jimior High School. 

Appreciative of the interest shown 
b}- the parent-teacher organizations 
in the district in the long campaign 
to secure adequate junior high 
school facilities. Dr. M. E. Blanch- 
ard, principal of the new school, in- 
vited Mrs. George Norris and offi- 
cers of the Noe Valley Junior High 
School on a tour of inspection of the 
building on February 12. 

The visiting delegation expressed 
delight and satisfaction with the 
new building, which will care for the 
junior high school needs of the Cas- 
tro Valley district for many years to 
come. 

The modern building stands on 
the site of the old James Lick Ele- 
mentary School, which was razed 
several years ago when it was con- 
demned by fire authorities. The 
yard of the new school was donated 
by the Playground Commission, and 
will be used as a public playground 
after school hours. 



Completion of the James Lick 
structure represents the last com- 
plete building to be finished under 
the junior high school building pro- 
gram and brings the total number 
of jimior buildings up to ten. 

The building program included 
the completion of the Aptos Junior 
High School in the southwestern 
section of the city, the construction 
of a new gymnasium addition and 
the alteration of the Girls' High 
School at Geary and Scott Streets, 
the West Portal Elementary School 
addition, located at Taraval, Clare- 
mont Boulevard and Lenox Way ; 
completion of a second unit of Bal- 
boa High School and athletic field, 
located at Cayuga and Onondaga 
Avenues, and an addition to the 
Francisco Junior High School, Pow- 
ell and Francisco Streets, consisting 
of a separate modern fireproof build- 
ing detached from the main struc- 
ture. 

The Aptos Junior High School 
was completed and ready for occu- 
pancy soon after the close of the 
fiscal year. It was built to accom- 
modate 1100 students and comprises 
forty classrooms with a spacious 




Entrance to the James Lick Junior 
High School 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



Western Asbestos 
Magnesia Co. 

Acoustical and Insulating 
Contractors 

"ACOUSTI-CELOTEX" 

Especially manufactured for Acoustical Treatments, 

including Audition, Quieting and Sound Insulation. 

Used to absorb NOISE in offices, schools, 

hospitals, etc. 

Magnesia and Asbestos Insulating Materials 

21-29 South Park San Francisco 

PHONE GARFIELD 2575 

Western Asbestos Magnesia Company 



66 



ALTCCALL" 

PAGING— FIRE ALARM 

WATCHMAN 

and Sprinkler Supervisory Services 

Are Nationally Known 

AS RELIABLE AND EFFICIENT SYSTEMS 

320 Market Street GArfield 0526 



Champion Electric Lamps 

Are being used in all City Institutions as well as all 
Leading Hospitals 

They are sold by 

Panama Lamp & Com. Company 

815 Howard Street 



PACIFIC MANUFACTURING CO. 

Monadnock Building San Francisco, Calif. 

MILLWORK, CABINET WORK 
INSTALLATIONS 

Established in Bay Counties for over fifty years. Municipal, 
Federal and County jobs. The largest and smallest work 
given careful consideration. 



Phone KEARNY 78J7 

F. KERN & SONS 

Artistic Iron and Bronze Works 

Artistic Forging and Hammering, Iron, Copper, Brass 

and Bronze Grilles, Railings, Stairs, Elevator 

Enclosures, Fire Escapes, Folding Gates, etc. 

517-519 Sixth Street San Francisco 

(Near Bryant) 



Members of Builders' Exchange, 666 Mission Street 
A. FILIPPI, Prop., 36 Wood Street, WEst 4899 

M. H. GNECCO & COMPANY 

CONTRACTORS 
Terrazzo, Mosaic, Tile and Cement Work 

36 Wood Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Telephone WEst 4899 



Phone HEmlock 1062 

HAUSER WINDOW COMPANY 

Reversible Window Hardware for 
All Types of Buildings 



1370 Harrison Street 



San Francisco 



COMMERCIAL LINOLEUM 
& CARPET COMPANY 



Floor Covering Specialists 



Carpets < Linoleums '' Rubber Tile 



357 Tehama Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone DOuglas 3863 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



auditorium and elevator and shops. 
It represents an investment of 
$730,607.64. 

The school is located in one of the 
fastest growing sections of the city 
and has been built on a unit basis 
so that another wing may be added 
without disturbing the architectural 
balance of the structure. 

Another feature of the Aptos plant 
was the installation of a huge me- 
chanically operated door which di- 
vides the boys' and girls' gym- 
nasiums. 

This door may be thrown back to 
make one large room for exhibition 
purposes. 

The Aptos Junior High School 
represents a plan of progressive co- 
operation between two city depart- 
ments in that the San Francisco 
Park and Playground Commission 
built a playground adjoining the 
school which, besides serving its pri- 
mary purpose, may be used as a 
school yard throughout the day. 

Further economy was effected by 
both the Board of Education and the 
Playground Commission in that the 
supervisor of physical education at 
the school also serves as playground 
supervisor. 

The final unit of Balboa High 
School was officially accepted by the 
Board of Educatoin on May 5, 1931. 
President Coburn and Mrs. Ernest 
J. Mott represented the Board at 
the acceptance. They were accom- 
panied by the Superintendent and 
David P. Hardy, deputy superinten- 
dent in charge of buildings. The new 
wing increased the capacity of the 
school about 700 seats, bringing the 
total accommodations up to 2400. 

West Portal 

The West Portal Elementary 
School Addition presented a prob- 
lem for the Board of Education in 




aPi^^ 




Presidio Junior High School 



that the original building was de- 
signed to meet the needs of the fast 
growing West Portal District. After 
the original school was occupied. 



entire block of fine homes were 
erected in the vicinty. 

The Board of Education was in 
agreement with the plea of residents 




The nevi Portola Junior High School 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 





Civic Worli Conipleteii 

LICK SCHOOL, 25th and Noe 

LACUNA HONDA RELIEF HOME 

HEALTH CENTER i CIVIC CENTER 

VAN NESS AVENUE EXTENSION 

MARINA STREETS 

Manufacturers of fully controlled 
and measured products 

The Ready-Mix Plant is simply an enlarged 
testing laboratory producing in correct 
quantity and quality. 

ALL MATERIALS WEIGHED 

AH volumes of concrete measured in special steel 
calibrated hopper before loading truck for job. 

E. H. PETERSON, President 



Pacific Tile 8C Roofing Company 
Tile and Composition Roofs 

666 Edinburgh Street 
Phones: DElaware 6161 — RAndolph 6887 



PALACE HARDWARE CO. 

San Francisco's Leading Hardware Store Supplied 

CORBIN HARDWARE 

for the 

LICK, APTOS AND BALBOA SCHOOLS 

581 Market Street SUtter 6060 



R. RUGGERI 

Western Artificial Stone Works 

Manufacturers of 
Cast Stone, Ornamental Plaster and Travertine 

666 Brannan Street San Francisco 

Near Sixth Street 
Phone DOUGLAS 6295 



Pacific School Supply House 

317 Market Street 
DOUGLAS 6630 



BUILDING SUPPLIES CO. 

Manufacturers and Importers of 

Brushes, Brooms and Feather Dusters 

Hardware, Soaps, Disinfectants, Sponges. Chamois 
Twines, Paper :: Janitorial Supplies a Specialty 

Telephone DAVENPORT 5787 

623 Sacramento Street Between Kearny and Montgomery 



National Theatre Supply Company 

J. C. Riley, Manager 121 Golden Gate Ave. 

Furnished the 

Footlights, Border Lights and Striplights 

to the 

JAS. LICK JR. HIGH SCHOOL 



FLOORS 

ROKADA 

MAGNESITE, INDUSTRIAL and TILE-TEX 

Sanitary -f Resilient -f Enduring 

COMPOSITION SLEEPERS 

PATENTED . . NEVER ROT 

UNderhill 3838 . . Res. Tel. OVerland 6190 

Leroy Olson Company 

170 Hooper Street 



BIRD -ARCHER CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA (Inc.) 

Boiler Cfiemicals 

For the Elimination of Scale, Corrosion or 
Foaming in Steam Boilers 

Based on Analysis of Boiler Feed Water Used 

Forward Samples of Water for Complete Report 

19 Fremont Street SUtter 3158 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



of the district that the West Portal 
Elementarj' School as completed 
should harmonize with the architec- 
tural surroundings of the commu- 
nity. 




MRS. ERNEST J. MOTT 

Accordingly a number of plans 
were submitted by the architects and 
after conference I)etween West Por- 
tal District community leaders and 
the Board, a plan was worked out to 
complete the West Portal unit in a 
manner most acceptable to the citi- 
zens of that district. 

The new liuildings are of the modi- 
fied U type. They will cost approxi- 
mately $175,000 and contain twelve 
classrooms, an auditorium, cafeteria 
and special activities room, alcove 
and coat rooms in each of the class- 
rooms. A feature of the new build- 
ing will be an arrangement for cov- 
ered play space to be utilized in in- 
clement weather. 



When completed the West Portal 
School will accommodate approxi- 
mately 1000 pupils and will repre- 
.'^ent an investment of $329,692. Of 
this amount $78,953.50 is repre- 
sented in the cost of the site and 
$175,738.65 in the present building. 
The new liuilding will cost approxi- 
mately $175,000.'^ 

Girls' High 

Modernization of the Girls' High 
School was eiifected by the addition 
of a wing which included the instal- 




MISS ALICE ROSE POWER 

lation of an auditorium, the addition 
of new class rooms and an office unit 
and the general improvement of the 
main Ijuilding which was erected in 
1912. The cost of this improvement 
is $206,000. 

Commenting on the San Francisco 
schools. Miss Alice Barrows of the 
Office of Education, Department of 
the Interior, said : 



"San Francisco public school 
Iniildings are not only well planned, 
but the)' are beautiful as well. That 
is an innovation which I shall report 
to other cities that I visit. I onlv 




MRS. MARY PRAG 

hope that man}' other cities will fol- 
low your example in bringing color 
into the school buildings. That sort 
of things is just as much an educa- 
tion for children as any feature of 
the school program. I knew the San 
Francisco schools when they were 
held only in old frame buildings. I 
know also how difficult it is to reor- 
ganize a school system and bring it 
up to date in regard to its school 
building program and its educational 
program. The organization of the 
San Francisco schools and the mod- 
ern educational program and the 
housing of these schools into modern 
buildings within the period of twelve 
years is a remarkable achievement." 




luiiinli 




-. w- ;^2Sft— At-; 






T/iv beautiful n^fw Balboa School no-n uciupu-J by lU full quota of pupils 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



California Corrugated 

Culvert Co. 

armco culverts 



818 Crocker Building 
San Francisco 



Phone 
DOuglas 4457 



Phone GArlicId 6663 



E. G. SOETH 



J. H. BROWN 



E. G. SOETH 8C CO. 

BRASS AND BRONZE FOUNDRY 

Exclusive Manujacturers of 

"Soeth's Comet" Brand Double Duty 
Nickel Bronze 

E. G. SOETH & CO. 

Office and Foundry 
248 Tehama Street San Francisco 



Warren Telechron Clocks 

The grcatcti advance ever made in 

ELECTRIC CLOCKS FOR 
SCHOOL USE 

Accuracy i Reliabilily 

F. A. THOMAS CO., INC. 

47 Second Street San Francisco, Calif. 

For futl information, our representative it at 
your service 



Telephone EXbrook 3298 

E. KLOERES & COMPANY 

ORNAMENTAL IRON and BRONZE WORKS 

Wrought Iron Grilles, Sfair Rails, Vestibule Doors, Gates, Etc. 

Forged and Hammered Work - All Kinds of 

Furniture Novelty Work 



477 Clementina Street 



Near Sixth 



San Francisco 



Phone GARFIELD 8321 

« EXO » 

FLOOR WAX 

EXCELSIOR CHEMICAL COMPANY 

426 Bryant Street San Francisco 



Telephone HEmlock 4476 

Pacific Elevator and 
Equipment Company 

C. W. FITZPATRICK 
45 Rausch Street San Francisco 



PRICE BUILDING 
SPECIALTIES CO. 

metal partitions 

AND 

dumb waiters 



683 Howard St. 



SUtter 1939 



James Lick School 
Lubricating System 

Ace Sheet Metal Works 

VENTILATING HEATING 

WALTER M. DERBYSHIRE 

SUtter 6618 

444 Clementina Street San Francisco 



J. H. DEVERT, Inc. 

Painting and Decorating 



912 Harrison Street 



DOuglas 6850 



San Francisco Sawdust 8C Sand Co. 
Dealers in Sawdust and Sand 



1 08 Hooper Street 



HEmlock 6467 



SHEET METAL WORK 
James Lick 

FIRE PROTECTION PRODUCTS 
COMPANY 

J. C. SCHULTHEIS, Manager 

1101 Sixteenth Street San Francisco 

Phone UNDERHILL 2420 



GARFIELD 1181 

ALLEN BREED 

Manager 
The Pacific Redwood Floor Co. 

SHELL BUILDING 
100 Bush Street San Francisco 



Telephone DOUGLAS 3162 
Established 1907 

C. D. KINNEY 

Chinese and Filipino Employment 
Agency 

Chinese and Filipino Help Furnished on 
Short Notice 

65 Brenham Place, cor. Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Odema. 



Most Nourishing 



77/7,5 



Milk C]h(0(S<olat® 

Boldemann's Chocolate Products 
Unequalled in Quality 



Wright Popcorn-Nut Specialty Company 

Wholesale Manufacturers Popcorn 

BRICKS, BALLS AND "KORN KING" PRIZE PACKAGE 

PEANUTS — Fresh Roasted and Raw in the Shell 

POPCORN — T. N. T. South American, White Rice, Spanish 

Giant, Jap Hull-less — Guaranteed to Pop 

115 Davis Street, San Francisco 
DOUGLAS 3937 



Buv from firms that advertise with us 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



II 



SCHOOL SYSTEM ORGANIZED 
ON MODERN LINES 

Director Philip L. Bush Explains the New Reorganization Set-up 



REORGANIZATION of the ad- 
. ministrative set-up in the San 
Francisco Public Schools was ap- 
proved by the Board of Education 
on February 17 as a result of sug- 
gestions from the special committee 
on auditing and accounting, com- 
posed of Commissioner William F. 
Benedict, chairman, Commissioner 
Philip L. Bush and Commissioner 
Ira W. Coburn, president of the 
Board. 

The new plan centralizes respon- 
sibility upon Dr. Joseph Marr 
Gwinn, Superintendent of Schools, 
and makes Archibald J. Cloud, Chief 
Deputy Superintendent, Administra- 
tive Ofificer for the Elementary, Jun- 
ior and Senior High Schools in 
charge of a bureau of education cre- 
ated by the Board resolution. 

The new administrative unit as 
outlined by the Board is as follows : 

1. Secretary of Board 

2. Superintendent of Schools 

(a) Bureau of Personnel 

(b) Bureau of Attendance 

(c) Bureau of Research 

(d) Bureau of Education 

(The following departments to clear to 
the Superintendent through Chief Deputy 
Superintendent:) 




PHILIP LEE BUSH 



(1) Elementary 

(a) Special Schools 

(2) Junior High 

(a) Special Schools 

(3) Senior High 

(a) Special Schools 

(4) Special Courses 

(5) Publications 

(e) Physical Properties Administration 

(1) Maintenance 

(2) Janitorial Upkeep 

(3) Utility Service 

(4) Supplies 



(5) Military Properties 

(6) Shops and Warehouse 

(7) New School Construction 
(f) Office Management 

(Division of Account to have con- 
trol of all records of Board of Edu- 
cation other than Personnel) 

Explaining the new plan before a 
meeting of the Board, Commissioner 
Bush said : 

"In any efficient organization, suc- 
cessful results can follow only where 
there is one executive head, and all 
individuals in the organization must 
be made to so realize. As I visualize 
it, therefore, the entire general oper- 
ative functions of the School Depart- 
ment should clear through the Su- 
perintendent of Schools to the Board 
for confirmation or rejection, where 
so definitely required by law, or for 
advice and guidance in other gen- 
eral situations. 

"The Board does not sit perma- 
nently — only twice a week — and 
hence the entire operative flow the 
more so, should be to one person. 
The Board, however, does require 
certain executive contacts, which in 
no way should interfere with the 
operative conditions of the depart- 
ment. Hence a Secretary to the 




Section of nenu Aptos Junior High School 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



Board, rcportiii}^ directly to thciii, 
with functions as usually set up for 
such a jjosition. 

"I would set uji two major sub- 
division contacts to the Board: (1) 
the Secretary, (2) the Superinten- 
dent of Schools. Under the Su])er- 
intendent of Schools and referring 
to the Committee's report in the 
hands of each meniher, we have: (a) 
Bureau of Personnel — carrying on 
similar to what it has in the past u\) 
to the Board's Personnel Commit- 
tee; (2) Bureau of Attendance — 
similar functions as at present; (c) 
Bureau of Research; (d) Bureau of 
Education, the Chief Deputy being 
h e 1 d \) y the Superintendent of 




WILLIAM F. BENEDICT 



Schools directly responsible for the 
elementary, junior high and senior 
high schools and the sections of the 
special schools coming Under these 
sections ; the special courses and 
publications. 

"From this point on there comes a 
radical departure from past practice : 
(e) Bureau of Physical Properties — 
This covers control of structural and 
equipment maintenance and repairs ; 
janitorial upkeep ; utility service, as 
fuel oil, electricity, etc. ; general sup- 
plies for operating; military prop- 
erty ; shops and warehouses ; new 
school construction. 

"This subdivision (e) is a man- 
size job, a Deputy Superintendent's 
caliber, and certainly if properly op- 
erated, w'ill leave no room for other 
work. 

"By concentrating this branch of 
the department's activities in one 
individual, a material reduction in 
costs from expenditures for similar 
service in previous years should 
result. (f) Ofifice Management — 
This covers a concentration under 
one individual of what can be con- 
sidered all the general office work : 
financial accounts, records of sup- 



plies, o]3erative cost data, personnel 
records, payrolls, etc. It should, if 
correctly handled, reduce office over- 
head costs from many angles. 

"Under (a), (b), (c) and (d) we 
have more or less similar conditions 
as at present, save I feel that these 
can be materially strengthened in 
operative and efifiicient results if 
proper cooperation follows. It may 
be that the Superintendent of 
Schools may wish to rearrange 
those sections reporting direct to 
him or through the Chief Deputy to 
him. 

"Under (e) and (f) there certainly 
should follow by this definite, dis- 
tinct line-up a muchly increased ef- 
ficiency and resulting economies by 
concentrating what might be termed 
in generaly 'upkeep of plants' on the 
one hand and on the other 'office re- 



quirements,' with its possibility of 
taking care of peak loads by switch- 
ing of employees. 

"The above is a general picture of 
the scheme — it is not set up as an 
ultimate, final and inflexible layout. 
Your committee does feel that with 
changed requirements as now exist- 
ing, this suggested procedure will 
result in a material betterment for 
the dejjartment. It is so developed 
as to permit of switching of func- 
tions, as operations in actual ])rac- 
tice develop the necessity, without 
materiall)' altering the basic idea. 
It has been developed with the idea 
that results and not personalities 
must govern the department's func- 
tions and that absolute cooperation 
and support for the general good 
must be rendered by each in- 
dividual." 



NEW SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER 

Richard E. Doyle Is an Authority on Fuel Combustion 

APPOINTMENT of Richard E. 
x\. Doyle as a Commissioner of 
Education to fill the unexpired 
term caused by the resignation of 
Daniel C. Murphy, who recently 
became a member of the newly 
organized Public Utilities Commis- 
sion, was announced bj' His Honor, 
Mayor Angelo J. Rossi. 

Selection of Mr. Doyle as a Com- 
missioner of Education completes 
the organization of the Board of 
seven members and brings to the 
group one who is greatly interested 
in educational problems and has 
devoted much of his time to char- 
itable activities. 

President Coburn announced his 
appointment to the special com- 
mittee on auditing and accounts to 
fill the vacancy created by the res- 
ignation of Commissioner Murphy. 

Commissioner Doyle will serve 
for the balance of the seven-year 
terms of Mr. Murphy which expires on January 8, 1934. 

Mr. Doyle is a member of the firm of Wardell, Doyle and Company, 
investment brokers, with offices in the Russ Building. He is a native of 
San Francisco, a mechanical engineer by profession and specialized in the 
study of fuels and chemistry of combustion. He is regarded as an authority 
in this particular field. Mr. Doyle is a director of the Alice Phelan Cor- 
poration and has for the past eleven years devoted much of his time to the 
management of the varied holdings of this organization. 

During the World War Mr. Doyle served on the War Board, supervising 
the shipping of flotation oil to the copper smelters of Arizona and Texas. 

Mrs. Doyle is the former Gladys Sullivan, a niece of the late Senator 
James D. Phelan. 




RICHARD E. DOYLE 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



13 



School Building Program Requires 

A Large Sum 



APPROXIMATELY $6,100,000 
will be needed to build the new 
schools required in San Francisco, 
according to statements made before 
the Board of Education at a meeting 
held on February 17, when a discus- 
sion was under way as to whether 
the pay-as-you-go plan or the bond 
issue policy should be followed for 
construction during the next five 
years. 

A survey presented by President 
Coburn showed 130 temporary frame 
bungalows in use. No decision was 
reached as to the method of financ- 
ing the new buildinss. 

At the same meeting a new ele- 
mentary school in the outer Sunset 
District was urged by a delegation 
from the Francis S. Key Parent- 
Teacher Association and the Sunset 
Transportation and Development 
Association. 

Members of the group, headed by 
Mrs. George Kennedy, Mrs. Thomas 
R. Best and Mrs. Lucius H. Downer, 
said they had been promised a report 
liy Superintendent J. M. Gwinn 
some time ago. 

The present Francis Scott Key 
School on Forty-third Avenue, be- 
sides being a fire hazard, lacks many 
of the modern educational facilities 
of other San Francisco schools, they 
said. 



Publicist for School 

Department 

All publicity issued by the Board 
of Education is the handiwork of 
George Mullaney. The world does 
not know this, because Mr. Mullanev 




urn 

JOSEPH MARK GWINN 
Superintendent of Schools 

The Board promised to consider 
their problem with the general pro- 
gram. 

Following are the proposed new 



schools for which plans are com- 
plete: 

George Washington High, Thirtieth 
Avenue and Geary Street, $1,200,000. 

Bernal Junior High, Highland Avenue 
and Holly Park Circle, |650,000. 

Matt I. Sullivan Elementary, Arkansas 
Street, between Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Streets, $140,000. 

Longfellow Elementary, Morse and 
Lowell Streets, $125,000. 

Following are other buildings 
planned : 

Abraham Lincoln High, Twenty-third 
Avenue and Riviera Street, $750,000. 

Marina Junior High, Fillmore and 
Chestnut Streets, $650,000. 

Horace Mann Junior High, Twenty- 
second and Valencia Streets, $150,000. 

South Junior High, near present Balboa 
High, $900,000. 

Pacific Heights Junior High, $900,000. 

Hassler School, Florida Street, between 
Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth Streets, 
$150,000. 

Sunshine School, to replace present in- 
adequate Sunshine Building, $120,000. 

Lawton Elementary, Thirtieth Avenue 
and Lawton Street, $150,000. 

Farragut Elementary, Holloway Ave- 
nue between Faxon Avenue and Capitol 
Street, $80,000. 

Guadalupe Elementary, Cordova and 
Prague Streets, $140,000. 

Sites recommended for immediate 
purchase are : 

Merced Tract, elementary and junior 
high. 

Sunset Elementary, in vicinity of Eight- 
eenth Avenue and Pacheco Streets. 

Miraloma Park Elementaryi in vicinity 
of Teresita Boulevard and Arroyo Way. 

Ingleside Terrace Elementary. 



hides his )ight behind the proverbial 
bushel. 

The monthly "Bulletin," published 
by the School Department, is only a 
part of his work. Not only does he 
write many of the articles, but shows 
real skill in editing the magazine. 

Credit should be given Mr. Mul- 



lanej' for keeping the doings of the 
School Department before the pub- 
lic. He has handled the publicity for 
many of the activities of the School 
Board and has won the approval of 
the editors of daily newspapers and 



magazmes using his excellent 



copy. 




Perspective sketch af George lyashington School 



'4 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



Wesiern California 
Products Co. 

Manufacturers of 
TALLOW, GREASE, 

MEAT SCRAPS, 

FISH MEAT MEAL 

FISH OIL 

Factory: 

Davidson Avenue and Lane Street 

Office: Southeast Corner Evans Ave. and Third St. 
Phone MISSION 5600 



RENO 
Evans 8C Plaza 



SANTA ROSA 
9th and Railroad 



EUREKA 
?12 Fourth Street 



A. LEVY & J. ZENTNER CO. 

Distributor§ 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Home Office: San Francisco, California 
Telephone KEARNY 5494 

BRANCHES: Los Angela, 274 Wholesale Terminal; Fresno, San Diego 

and Van Ness; Oakland, S. W. Cor. Franklin and Third St.; Stockton, 

18 East Weber Avenue; Estudillo, Telephone San Leandro 137 



Compliments 




General Potato & Onion Distributors, 


Ltd. 


216 DRUMM STREET 




Phone SUTTER 2845 





ORLANDI 



DEL CARLO 



FREDIANELLI 



TURLOCK POULTRY CO. 

Wholesale and Retail 
LIVE AND DRESSED POULTRY 



1781 San Bruno Avenue 
2500 Bryant Street 



Phone Mission 9247 
Phone Mission 8077 



ESTABLISHED 1860 



CHAS. MENARD 
Manager 



A NATIONAL INSTITUTION 

J Phones: 



PRospect 2861 

LAkeside 2517 

Palo Alio 21178 

San Antelmo 3248 



ROSE EXTERMINATOR CO. 

EXTERMINATORSOF RATS AND INSECTS 



i; 



fRATS 
MICE 
We Contract (roaches 

/ants 

) MOTHS 
(BEDBUGS 
FLEAS 
^TERMITES 



to Rid Your^ 
Premises of 



We Sell 

the 

Finest 



/FLY SPRAY 
FLEA SPRAY 

IMOTH SPRAY 
INSECT SPRAY 



) rat poison 
'insect 

POISON 

^ant poison 



For Expert Advice and Estimates, Call PRospect 2861 
Northern Calif. Headquarters: 470 ELLIS ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



MANGRUM-HOLBROOK CO. 

1235 Mission St. Phone MArket 2400 

Hotel and Restaurant Kitchen Supplies and 
Equipment 



K D, WARD 

PLASTERING 
CONTRACTOR 

BELMONT, SAN MATEO COUNTY 

6th Avenue 
Phone SAN CARLOS— BELMONT 128 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



15 



Shacks and Insanitary Buildings— A Program 
For the Abatement of the Nuisance 



MANY problems enter into a 
case of vacation and demoli- 
tion of buildings and shacks, and 
they certainly have to be handled 
with justice. 

Refugee shacks were legislated 
against by an ordinance No. 6300 
(new series), effective July 31, 1924, 
which reads in part as follows : 

Section 1. It is hereby found and re- 
cited that subsequent to the earthquake 
and fire of April 18, 1906, by reason which 
a large part of the City and County of 
San Francisco was reduced to ruins, many 
wooden and frame buildings were con- 
structed, to meet the emergency then ex- 
isting, in violation of the building laws 
and ordinances of said City and County of 
San Francisco. It is further found and 
recited that said emergency has long since 
ceased to exist and that there is no longer 
any reason for the continued maintenance 
of any of said wooden and frame build- 
ings and that the public safety and wel- 
fare now demand their removal. 

Section 2. All wooden and frame build- 
ings erected subsequent to April 18, 1906, 
within the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco in violation of and contrary to the 
laws and ordinances of said City and 
County of San Francisco are hereby or- 
dered demolished and removed. 

Section 3. It is hereby made the duty 
of the Board of Public Works to enforce 
the provisions of this ordinance and the 
Board of Public Works is hereby directed 
and empowered to serve notice in writing 
upon all owners of buildings affected by 
this ordinance to demolish and remove 
said buildings in accordance with the pro- 
visions hereof. 

Owners Notified 

In short, the Board of Public 
Works shall notify, in person, the 
owner or a responsible person in 
charge of the property, and if the 
owners or parties cannot be served 
notices shall be posted upon the 
buildings complained of. If the 
owner or owners shall fail, for a 
period of ninety days after service 
of notice, to vacate and demolish 
said building, said Board of Public 
Works is hereby authorized and di- 
rected to demolish said building and 
such cost of demolition and removal 
shall be a lien on said property. 

The penalty is $500 or six months 
in jail, or both. 

A great many of these shacks and 
buildings have been vacated and de- 
molished. However, there are some 
remaining, but they are gradually 
becoming extinct. 

Buildings erected to comply with 
the laws prior and subsequent to 



By ].C.Geigek, M. D. 

Director of Public Health. Stni Francisco 




J. C. GEIGER, M. D. 
Director, Public Health 

the fire of 1906 which have become 
old, unsightly, and out of date, have 
been complained about many times. 
However, these buildings cannot be 
legislated against for the simple rea- 
son that our present laws and those 
enacted subsequent to the erection 
of these buildings are not made 
retroactive. 

On page 71 there will be found 
Ordinance No. 501 (new series), ef- 
fective July 13, 1908, which provides 
for declaring insanitary buildings, 
structures, or parts thereof nui- 



sances and providing for the abate- 
ment thereof. 

All buildings, structures, or parts 
thereof which are insanitary are 
hereby declared to be and are nui- 
sances, and the Board of Health is 
hereby authorized and empowered 
to abate the same in the manner pro- 
vided in this ordinance. 

Complaints Investigated 

Complaints are received and after 
due inspection by the chief housing 
inspector, recommendations are 
made to the health officer, who in 
turn makes written complaint to the 
Board of Health of a building, struc- 
ture, or part thereof to be in an in- 
sanitary condition. 

The Board of Health shall, by for- 
mal resolution, order a hearing and 
fix the time and place therefor. 

The Board of Health shall cause 
a copy of the complaint, together 
with a notice of the time and place 
set for the hearing, to be served 
personally upon the owner of said 
building; also shall cause a copy of 
the complaint and notice to be 
posted on the building. The time 
fi.xed for the hearing shall not be 
less than forty-eight hours after the 
serving and posting of said notices. 
All interested parties for and against 
may appear in the case. 

The Board of Health, upon con- 
clusion of said hearing, shall decide 
the facts submitted, whether or not 




SAed used as divelling — abated by demolition 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



said alleged condition cc)nslitntc.> a 
nuisance under the terms of this 
ordinance, and shall embody said 
decision in a formal resolution set- 
ting forth its lindings. 

The Hoard of Health, upon its de- 
termination and finding the building 
to be a nuisance, shall order the \ a- 



aud 14()5-()9 San Bruno Avenue. 
'I'hese buildings were used as tan- 
neries and were fast falling to di- 
lapidation. Tlie Board of Health 
ordered them vacated and con- 
demned, and just prior to the actual 
demoliti<jn a dangerous four-alarm 
lire liroke out in these structures 




Shack occu/iii'J by tivo mm. Ahaled by Jimolition. 



cation of the same for all purposes 
and shall cause a copy to be served 
upon the owner and one to be posted 
on the building. \'acation shall oc- 
cur not less than forty-eight hours 
after said service and posting of 
notices. 

Police Cooperate 

The Chief of Police shall be noti- 
fied and shall enforce the Board of 
Health orders. The owner then has 
forty-eight hours in which time he 
shall signify in writing his inten- 
tions to repair and rebuild, and 
which request the Board of Health 
grants a reasonable time to comply. 

If said orders are not complied 
with within the specified time the 
Board of Health shall, by formal 
resolution, order the abatement of 
said nuisance and the destruction of 
the building. 

There were eighty-two cases 
brought before the Board of Health 
for action within the last fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1931. Of these 
eight3'-two cases four buildings were 
repaired and reconditioned and sev- 
entj'-eight were actually demolished. 

Buildings Vacated 

Many of these buildings were 
not only insanitary old buildings, 
shacks, and barns, but were danger- 
ous to life and property as well. For 
instance, 1-145-55 San Bruno Avenue 



endangering the lives of the firemen 
who had to fight the fire. 

These figures do not include many 
of the buildings and shacks that are 
ordered demolished and abated by 
the Housing Division of the Depart- 
ment of Public Health. 

The Chief Housing Inspector per- 
sonally inspects all buildings that 
are complained of as being insan- 
itary and a nuisance. A complete 



description is taken of the property 
and the surrounding conditions and 
the owner is notified to abate what- 
ever nuisance may exist within 
thirty (30) days or this Department 
will be compelled to recommend the 
case to the Board of Health for con- 
demnation. This action is recom- 
mended to the Health Officer who 
makes his recommendations to the 
Board of Health. In many cases 
these buildings and shacks are de- 
molished and abated on the first 
order. 

Many buildings are now standing 
which should be condemned and de- 
molished. Of these cases some have 
been in estates and have been in 
litigation for years; others are with- 
out complaints and no action has 
been taken. 

For comparison I am submitting 
a set of figures for the last five years 
which show the actual work done 
by the Board of Health in condemn- 
ing buildings : 

1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 

Cases submittecl..l76 136 164 149 139 

Condemned 109 123 120 104 lOS 

Not condemned.. 67 13 44 45 34 
Abated by re- 
pairing 2 6 2 5 4 

Abated by de- 
molition 123 136 161 86 136 

Condemned, but 

not demolished 59 72 55 80 49 



Municipal Railway 

Municipal Railway receipts for 
\\eek ended midnight Saturday, Jan- 
uary 16, were $60,135.39. Daily re- 
ceipts were as follows : Sunday, $5,- 
476.50; Monday, $9,327.20; Tuesdav. 
$9,020.55; Wednesday, $9,980.19; 
Thursday, $8,459.05; Friday, $8.- 
793.80; Saturday, $9,078.10. 




Type of "home" abated by demolition 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



17 



HASSLER HEALTH FARM A BOON 

TO AFFLICTED 

New Buildings Will Add to Number of Tuberculosis Patients Who Require 

Special Care 



No MORE fitting tribute to the 
memory of a tried and true of- 
ficial, was the naming of the San 
Francisco Health Farm near Red- 
wood City in memory of the late Dr. 
William C. Hassler, former Health 
Officer of San Francisco. 

Credit must be given to Dr. Hass- 
ler for discovering the location of 
this ideal retreat for the aflflicted. 
He labored for its success and even 
before his untimel}' demise, saw 
that the experiment was a success. 

The Hassler Health Farm was 
established in Pulgas Canyon, four 
and a half miles from Redwood 
City, in October, 1927. It comprises 
290 acres bathed in sunlight, on 
high ground, in picturesque sur- 
roundings. 

As originally planned, the institu- 
tion could care for forty-four pa- 
tients. Because of the great good 
accomplished on the Farm, the 
Board of Health prevailed upon the 
City and County of San Francisco 
to increase the number of beds. 

Two new buildings were added 
this year. They are nearing com- 
pletion, and but for the stringent 
times, would soon be opened. 

It is hoped to obtain the necessary 
funds to maintain and equip the new 
buildings, so that the number of pa- 



tients may be increased to one 
hundred. This means the care of 
children, in the early stages of tu- 
berculosis. 

All cases sent to the Hassler 
Health Farm are hopeful ones. The 
patients are not chronic, but merely 
touched with the "white plague." 
With sunlight, good food and the 
type of care given at this wonderful 
institution, the afflicted are saved 
and sent back into the world to be- 
come useful members of society. 

During the period between Octo- 
ber 27, 1927, and June 30, 1931, one 
hundred and eighty-three patients 
were cared for. There were twelve 
reentries, so that the number of ad- 
missions totaled 195. 

From the opening of the hospital 
to the end of the fiscal year, June 
30, 1931, 143 patients were dis- 
charged as follows : 

Cured, 5 ; arrested or apparently 
arrested, 45; progressive, 9; im- 
proved. 27 ; left before examination, 
1 : non-tuberculous, 1. 

Dr. Geiger and his associates are 
giving the Hassler Health Farm 
their undivided attention. The 
Health Director is proud of this im- 
portant unit in the splendid group 
of Health Department activities. 



■ 


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MISS MYRA W. KIMBALL 
Hassler Health Farm Superintendent 



Phone ATwater 4562 
After 5 p; m., Mission 1840 

Vassallo & Camilleri 

Wreckers 
Material for Sale 



1225 Sclby Street 



San Francisco 



Vulcan Macaroni Company 

Manufacturers of High Grade 

ALIMENTARY PASTE 



Pacific and Drumm Streets 
SUTTER 5274 



GARFIELD 2682 

WETMORE BROS. 

Commission Merchants 

540 Front Street 



CHARLES FREIS 
MARKET 

Delicatessen, Smoked Meat, Poultry, 

Fresh Fruits, Vegetables, Fresh 

Quality Meats, Fancy 

Groceries 
Phone FILLMORE 9857 

1435 Fillmore Street 

Between Ellis and O'Farrell 



H. B. Parkerson, Sec-Treas.. 1257 Paloma Ave. 
Telephone 3973 

AJAX ROOFING CO. 

BURLINGAME, CALIF. 

ROOFING CONTRACTORS 

Damp Proofing and Repairing 

Estimates furnished 

Work Promptly Attended to and 
Guaranteed 

TELEPHONE 3973 



Telephone GArfield 1370 

Laubscher Bros., Inc. 
DELICATESSEN 

GRANT MARKET 

743 Market St. San Francisco 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



i8 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



Just 

REVENUE from WATER METERS 
... can cut the TAX RATE 




H E R S E Y 
DISC METERS 

decrease deficits 
and increase sur- 
pluses. Write for 
further details 
which explain 
why pro f itable 
water depart- 
ments insist upon 
Hersey accuracy. 



HERSEY 



WATER 




METERS 



HERSEY MANUFACTURING CO. 

Corner E and 2nd Streets South Boston, Mass. 

Pacific Coast Branches: 553 Howard Street, San Francisco, 

Calif.; 450 East Third Street, Los Angeles, Calif.; 

475 Hoyt Street, Portland, Oregon. 



The Chapman 


Valve 


Mfg. 


Co. 


VALVES / SLUICE GATES * 


HYDRANTS 


508 Fourth Street 


San Francisco, Calif. 


SUTTER 1934 







F. J. CARROLL, Proprietor 

San Francisco Brass Foundry 

Established 1880 

Brass, Bronze and Aluminum Castings / NicrOmetal a Non- 
Tarnishing and Acid-Resisting Metal 

Manufacturers of Superior Bronze Bushings — Comet Bronze Bushings 
PHONE KEARNY 2623 

48-50 Clementina Street San Francisco 



"PUMPING PROBLEMS" 

Solved 

With a Complete Line of 

PUMPS 
Kimball-Krogh Pump Company 

515 Harrison Street DAvenport 1113-1114 



JOHN FINN, Preiidtnl 



ROBERT B. FINN, SeertUry 



JOHN FINN METAL WORKS 

SAN FRANCISCO and SEATTLE 

Babbitt Metat$ and Solders Type Metal* and Zinc Dust 

Galvanizing and Shardardiiing 

372-398 SECOND STREET 

Telephone SUTTER 4188 



Tel. DOuglas 1182 

JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS 

lA)n Founders < Machinists' Engineers 



Office: 200 Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Clinton Construction Company 
General Contractors 



923 Folsom Street 



San Francisco 




UTILITy-EEALTy 

%UELLER Ca. 

1072-1076 HOWARD STREET 



Welders of Automotive Part* :-: Induftrial Machinery :•; Boilers 0C Taoks 
Pipe Contractors* Equipment 

HOLIDAY AND NIGHT SERVICE 



PEERLESS WELDING CO. 

RUDY STRECKER, Proprielor 

WELDING ENGINEERS 

Phones: MArket 0678-0679 < Night Phone: MOntrose 2277 
155 TENTH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



19 



WATER DEPARTMENT REPORTS 

DECREASES 

Nelson A. Eckart, General Manager, Informs Supervisors of Losses 



COMPLYING with the provis- 
ions of Section 5, Ordinance 
8691, there is transmitted herewith 
the operating statement of the San 
Francisco Water Department for 
February, 1932, showing a compari- 
son with January, 1932, and with a 
like period of last year. 

Water sales revenues within San 
Francisco decreased $14,537, as com- 
pared with January, 1932, and those 
outside of San Francisco decreased 
$527. The decrease in San Fran- 
cisco sales for the eight-month pe- 
riod ending February 29, 1932, as 
compared with the same period of 
last year, amounts to $34,130, while 
for the same period sales outside of 
San Francisco decreased $24,641. 
The existing business depression is 
accountable for the decrease in San 
Francisco sales, while the decrease 
in suburban sales is caused prin- 
cipally through the development of 
local resources by water districts in 
the Peninsular Division. 

The decrease in rents from land 
and building — February, 1932, over 
January, 1932 — is due principally to 
the collections in January, 1932, of 
rents due in prior months. The de- 
crease for the period ending Febru- 
ary 29, 1932, over the same period 
of last year, amounting to $11,902, 
is the result of the drought to the 
extent that returns from share crops 
are $5,906 below normal ; adjust- 
ments in the period account for de- 
crease of $2,519 and rental received 
for pasturages of sheep in San Ma- 
teo County, amounting to $3,476 in 
December, 1930, was not earned this 
year. 

The decrease in Miscellaneous 
Non-Operating Revenue, $5,059.56, 
over the same period of last year, is 
caused by smaller returns from sale 
of walnuts. This decrease is not the 
final figure. Final returns were not 
accounted until April, 1931. The ex- 
act decrease, excepting sale of culls, 
is $10,479. 

The decrease in Operating Ex- 
penses, February, 1932, over Janu- 
ary, 1932, amounts to $16,718. Pur- 
chase of water from East Bay 
Municipal Utilities District and the 
pumping charges in connection 
therewith were discontinued on 
January 10, which accounts for $11,- 
105.10, the balance of the decrease 




N. A. ECKART 

General Manager, San Francisco Water 

Department 



being the net of miscellaneous in- 
creases and decreases. The increase 
in Operating Expenses for the eight- 
month period this year over the 
same period of last year amounts to 
$366,241. Water purchased this year 
and cost of operating Newark-San 
Lorenzo amounts to $397,580.06. 
Seasonal maintenance work, prin- 
cipally on Pilarcitos and Stone Dam 
Aqueduct and on Bay Bridge, last 
year, account for decrease of ap- 
proximately $33,334. 

The decrease in taxes over same 
period of last year, $10,392, is due 
to reduction in tax rates in outside 
counties. 

The charge for Newark-San Lor- 
enzo pipe line, amounting to $32,306, 
is the principal cause of the increase 
over last year in Hetch Hetchy aque- 
duct and other rentals. Interest de- 
creased $30,000 on account of the 
retirement of Spring Valley bonds 
in the amount of $1,000,000 as of 
July 1, 1931. 

The decreased earnings and de- 
creased expenses result in an in- 
creased net income for February, 
1932, over January, 1932, and in a 
decreased net incorhe for the same 
period of last year. 



The seven-months period ending 
January 31, 1932, shows: 
Total earnings-... $4,449,247.50 

Expenses 3,111,871.26 



Net income — 1,337,376.24 
Appropriations for: 
A d d i tions 
and Better- 
ments $634,500.00 

Bond Re- 
demption .. 666,666.66 1,301,166.66 
Net Additions to Surplus 

Unappropriated 36,209.58 

Total construction expen- 
ditures for the period 
from March 3, 1930, to 

February 29, 1932 2,184,198.65 

The balance of Budget Au- 
thorizations, unexpended 

to date is 372,311.35 

Budget Authorizations for 
appropriations to June 

30, 1932 2,556,510.00 

The number of employees on con- 
struction work was decreased nine- 
teen, as follows : one on the Upper 
Alameda tunnel, five on the Crystal 
Springs outlet tunnel, and the re- 
turn to City pipe line system of thir- 
teen from University Mound pipe 
line. 

The number of employees in the 
operating and maintenance work in- 
creased from 452 on January 31 to 
463 on February 29. 



Water Meter Company 
Moves Offices 

The Hersey Manufacturing 
Company, manufacturers of 
water meters for over fifty 
years, announce that on March 
28, 1932, they moved their 
offices from 690 Market Street 
to their new address at 553 
Howard Street, San Francisco. 
Their telephone remains the 
same, SUtter 0925. 

This announcement comes 
from Allen Jack, district man- 
ager of the company. R. W. 
Keene, with offices at 450 East 
Third Street, Los Angeles, is 
the Pacific Coast manager. 

The Hersey Manufacturing 
Company have been established 
in this territory for a very long 
time and have won many firm 
friends for their products 
among the municipalities of 
the Pacific Coast. 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



The Civic Center 

of San Francisco; 

A Dream Come True 



By Louis Cooper Levy 

Editor, Municipal Record 




LOUIS COOPER LEVY 



IN concluding this series of arti- 
cles on the Civic Center of San 
Francisco, the writer leaves the sub- 
ject with regret. 

Regret that space did not permit 
an even more elaborate description 
of the magnificent buildings that 
grace the Civic Center, and regret 
that his powers of description were 
not great enough to do adequate 
justice to the subject. 

Suffice it to say, that the Civic 
Center is the pride of the citizenship 
of San Francisco. It has won the 
admiration of countless thousands 
of visitors and as it nears comple- 
tion the public will better appreciate 
the wisdom of the men who planned 
it and brought it to perfection. 

Millions were spent in developing 
the Civic Center. It was money 
well expended. Here in an area less 
than a scjuare mile, in the heart of 
the metropolis, are the important 
government buildings. It has proved 
a boon to the taxpayer, who is able 
to transact his business in any or all 
departments of the civic government 
because of their location. 

List of Buildings 

In the Civic Center may be found 
the following structures : 

City Hall. 

Civic Auditorium. 

Public Library. 

State Building. 

Federal Building. 

War Memorial. 

Grand Opera House. 

Health Center. 

Power Building. 

The City Hall houses the depart- 
ments of the City and County of San 
Francisco, the Superior Courts, and 
various legal departments. 

The Civic Auditorium, the gift of 
the Directors of the Panama Pacific 
International Exposition, covers a 
square block. It can accommodate 
ten thousand people in its immense 



auditorium and has two minor halls 
that are very useful. The description 
of this remarkable building appeared 
in a previous issue. 

The Public Library is an out- 
standing structure. It is an archi- 
tectural gem and within its walls 
is gathered a remarkable collection 
of books, paintings, and manu- 
scripts. The collection is priceless. 

State Building 

In the State Building, erected by 
the State of California, are impor- 
tant offices of the Governor and de- 
partments doing business with the 
cities of San Francisco and those 
adjacent to it. 

The Federal Building will soon be 
in course of construction. 

Wrecking of the buildings on the 
site of San Francisco's new $3,500,- 
000 Federal Building is now in prog- 



ress in the block bounded by Fulton, 
Hyde, McAllister, and Leavenworth 
Streets. 

Contractors for the city have torn 
down the two-story frame building 
at 21-23-25 City Hall Avenue, a part 
of the James Irvine property ac- 
C|uired to complete the Federal 
Building site. 

A part of the $330,000 Irvine land 
will be used in opening Leaven- 
worth Street and squaring Fulton 
Street through to Market Street. 
The rest will form part of the build- 
ing site, which will entirely elimi- 
nate City Hall Avenue. 

Plans have been comjjleted and 
within another year will see a hand- 
some addition to the Civic Center. 
It will house important departments 
of the Federal Government and add 
to the value of the Civic Center. 




An artist's sketch of the Memorial Opera House 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



The War Memorial and Memorial 
Opera House are two magnificent 
structures facing on Van Ness Ave- 
nue and opposite the City Hall. 
These buildings are nearing com- 
pletion. 

The Health Center is under way. 
There is some delay in completing 
the structure by reason of necessary 
appropriations. However, Mayor 
Rossi and his aids are evolving plans 
for the continuation of this impor- 
tant branch of the city government. 

Washington Shaft 

It is now planned to erect a per- 
manent monument to George Wash- 
ington in the Civic Center. It will 
be in the form of a shaft. Subscrip- 
tions are being received by Lewis 
F. Byington and Postmaster Harry 
L. Todd. The movement is sup- 
ported by more than 1,000 San 
Francisco organizations. 

It is estimated that the cost of the 
buildings and lands of San Fran- 
cisco's famous Civic Center is nearly 
$20,000,000. 

Continuing the description of the 
remaining buildings in the Civic 
Center : 

War Memorial Building 

Twin structures — the War Me- 
morial and Opera House— will grace 
the site bounded by Van Ness Ave- 
nue, Grove, Franklin and McAllister 
Street, and be a part of the Civic 
Center of San Francisco. 

These magnificent structures are 
under way. They will face on Van 
Ness Avenue, directly opposite the 
City Hall. 

Patterned in classic architecture 
to harmonize with the other units 
of the Civic Center group, the me- 




Artists' sketcli of Van Ness Avenue facade of 
at Civic Center in honor of m 

morial buildings will be of granite 
and granitex terra cotta over frame- 
works of steel and reinforced con- 
crete. 

They will be duplicates in size and 
exterior design. 

Each will be four stories high, will 
have a 231-foot pillared facade on 
Van Ness Avenue and will extend 
back 282 feet to Franklin Street. 

The project will cost approxi- 
mately $6,000,000, of which $4,000,- 
000 was raised by a bond issue and 
the rest by public subscription. It 
is providing employment for 600 
men of the building trades and for 



Civic Center 
let 




Progresses 
or Rossi 



JN HIS INAUGURAL ADDRESS, delivered on the occasion of the induction 
of the neiv Charter and himself into office, Mayor Angela J . Rossi dwelt on the 
progress being made in the Civic Center, and particularly, his success in clearing 
away all obstacles to the construction of the Federal Building. He said: 

"The Federal Building in the Civic Center, a proposed $5,000,000 structure, was 
likewise at a standstill ivhen I assumed the office of mayor in January, 1931, on 
account of existing controversies ii'ith property owners. 

"After considerable negotiations all of the obstacles have finally been removed, 
a deed to the property has been given to the federal government and construction 
work on this new unit in our Civic Center will be started immediately. 

"It should gratify our citizens to observe the present construction activities in 
the Civic Center. 

"On the ivest, the $5,000,000 H'ar Memorial and Opera House; on the south, 
the $1 ,000,000 Health Center Building are furnishing employment to hundreds of 
our local mechanics and laborers. 

"Long before these are completed, work on the federal building will be well 
under way." 



one of twin structures now under construction 
en and luomen of World H'ar 

hundreds in the local plants supply- 
ing the materials. 

As an indication of what the job 
means to local industry, the build- 
ings will require 7500 tons of struc- 
tural steel and more than 30,000 
cubic yards of concrete. 

The War Memorial Building will 
be the headquarters of thirty or 
forty patriotic organizations, includ- 
ing the American Legion, Veterans 
of Foreign Wars, Spanish Veterans, 
D. A. R., and Gold Star Mothers. 

Its monumental features will be 
a memorial hall and war trophy 
room. Much of the main floor will 
be given over to ar» auditorium, 
which will boast the novelty of an 
adjustable floor that can be tilted to 
allow a clear view of the stage from 
any point or leveled for dances and 
receptions. 

Grand Opera House 

A much needed and desired addi- 
tion to the Civic Center will be the 
grand opera house, which will face 
on Van Ness Avenue. It will be a 
structure of simple grandeur, with 
well-nigh perfect facilities for the 
presentation and enjoyment of opera, 
symphony and even motion pictures. 

Its monumental features will be a 
spacious vestibule and promenade, 
finished in artificial limestone and 
dignified by high columns. 

Its auditorium will be an artistic 
combination of beauty, comfort and 
the luxuries and conveniences that 
go with such places. The main floor, 
two galleries and a tier of twenty- 
five boxes will seat 3250. Light tones 
will feature the color scheme, and 
the principal decorative effects will 
be worked out in painted plaster. 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



The stage will be one of the larg- 
est in the world, with an extreme 
width of 133 feet and an extreme 
depth of 90 feet. The i)roscenium 
opening will be 52 feet wide and 
50 feet high. 

The Opera House will be remark- 
able for its mechanical equipment, 
practically all of which will be oper- 
ated electrically. It will be possible, 
for example, to raise or lower the 
stage at will, either as a whole or 
in sections, to give the efTect of hills 
or valleys. Floors will be movable, 
so that new settings can be prepared 
while the stage is in use. Throwing 
of two switches will slide an old 
setting into the wings and bring 
another up from the basement. 

The orchestra pit will have reg- 
ular accommodations for eighty-five 
musicians, but the touch of a but- 
ton will bring thirty-five additional 
chairs into place and increase the 
capacity to 120. 

There will be equipment, too, to 
raise or lower the entire pit. 

Illumination will be outstanding. 
even for an opera house. Briefly, the 
installation will take care of all con- 
ceivable effects on the stage and 
then harmonize the auditorium 
lights with them, to fit the mood of 
any occasion. 

Additional features will include an 
electric ventilating system, a pro- 
jection room for four motion pic- 
ture machines. 300 radio ears for 
deaf patrons, electric equipment in 
the stage work shops, electrically 
operated stage curtains, and an elec- 
tric carriage-call system that will 
flash automobile numbers to five 
points in the Franklin Street park- 
ing area. 



Civic Center Power Plant 

For the purpose of steam heat- 
ing the City Hall and other public 
buildings within the Civic Center, 
a substantial building has been 
erected at the northeast corner of 
Larkin and McAllister Streets and 
equipped for the generation of 
steam for heating purposes. 

The cost of construction was $10,- 
800. The installation of boilers cost 
$11,950. 

-Approximately 2400 feet of pipe 
has been laid through the Civic 
Center for transmitting steam heat. 
This will be increased as the new 
buildings are put in active service. 

Civic Center Plaza 

The Civic Center Plaza, bounded 
by Polk, McAllister, Larkin and 



Cirove Streets, has been set aside 
and dedicated for purposes and has 
been transferred and assigned to the 
control and supervision of the Park 
Commission. 

The area of the Plaza, including 
sidewalks, is 5.36 acres. Excluding 
sidewalks, 4.44 acres. 

In course of time, other buildings 
will be added to the Civic Center. 
It is even hoped that a structure to 
house the entire legal machinery of 
the city and county will be erected 
in the empty space opposite the 
new Federal Building. 

This would mean all the courts 
now in the City Hall, which is some- 
what crowded, the Law Library, 
Criminal Courts and probably a 
prison at the top of the building. 

This idea will undoubtedly re- 
ceive serious consideration. 




Perspectwe of the neiv Federal Building in San Francisco 



Will Be Next President, Water Works 

Association 



GEORGE W. PRACY. Superin- 
tendent of City Distribution of 
the San Francisco Water Depart- 
ment, has a signal honor in store. 
When the American Water Works 
Association holds its convention in 
Memphis, Tennessee, in May of this 
year, he will be chosen president of 
that important body. 

Mr. Pracy will be the first repre- 
sentative of the waterworks utili- 
ties of the West to be elected presi- 
dent. He has been a member of the 
local section since 1920, has been its 
secretary, and a member of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee. 




GEORGE W. PRACY 



He is a member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. He has 
been a member of the Spring Valley 
Water Company and the San Fran- 
cisco Water Department since 1909. 
He is a native of this city and is a 
graduate of Polytechnic and Cogs- 
well schools. He subsequently en- 
tered the University of California, 
graduating from there in 1908. 

Mr. Pracy has rendered a great 
service in handling the city distribu- 
tion of the San Francisco Water 
Department. His selection as head 
of the national organization is grati- 
fying to his many friends and ad- 
mirers in the profession. 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



23 



MANAGER OF PUBLIC UTILITIES 



EDWARD G. CAHILL, promi- 
nent San Francisco engineer 
and contractor, has been appointed 
Manager of Public Utilities. His 
selection was made by the Public 
Utilities Commission at a recent 
meeting. 

Felton Taylor was also named 
Secretary and John J. Sharon, Audi- 
tor of the San Francisco Water De- 
partment, was appointed Assistant 
Secretary. He will combine both 
positions. 

Mr. Cahill is a member of the firm 
of Cahill Bros. Among the build- 
ings erected 'by the firm were the 
William Taylor Hotel and the Hunt- 
ington Apartments. 

Although appointed to ofiice by 
Mayor Rossi on January 8, Commis- 
sioners Lewis F. Byington, John H. 
McCallum, Edwin M. Eddy, George 
L. Filmer and Daniel C. Murphy, the 



y^^^ii^^ 



& 



EDWARD G. CAHILL 
Manager, Public Utilities Commission 

Board delayed making appointments 
until it had canvassed the field. 

Mr. Cahill has won considerable 
fame as an engineer and is recog- 
nized as being highly capable for the 
position. 




FAMOUS FOOTBALL PLAYER NAMED 
UTILITIES SECRETARY 



FELTON TAYLOR, one of the 
best known residents of this 
city, has been appointed secretary 
of the Public Utilities Commission. 
He has alrealy taken up the impor- 
tant work of his office, which will 
be located in the City Hall. 

Mr. Taylor was horn in this city, 
educated at Brewer's Military Acad- 
emy, the Boys' High School, Heald's 
Business College, and also studied 
at the Hasting's College of Law. 

For many years he was in charge 
of the warehouse and lumber de- 
partments of the Southern Pacific 
Milling Company at San Miguel. 

He has spent most of his active 
life in San Francisco, is married and 
has three children. 

As president and manager of the 
Monterey Lime Works, he built that 
important plant and operated it. 

A year before the great fire in 
1906, he built a large apartment 
house, and shortly after its destruc- 
tion proceeded to rebuild it because 
of his faith in his native city. 

Because of his interest in public 
affairs, and particularly in the up- 
building of his city, Mr. Taylor was 
elected state president of the Apart- 
ment House Association of Califor- 
nia, and for the past seventeen years 
has been, almost continuously, chair- 



FELTON TAYLOR 

man of the Board of Directors of 
the San Francisco Local Apartment 
Association. 

In passing, it might be timely to 
announce that Felton Taylor in his 
younger days was a really great 
football player. He had Walter 
Camp's stamp of approval. Mr. 
Taylor was a member of the famous 
Reliance and Olympic Club teams 
that beat the Universities of Cali- 
fornia and Stanford, the Carlisle In- 
dians, the University of Chicago, 
and the famous Butte team. 

Mr. Taylor is the son of James 
M. Taylor, prominent attorney of 
San Francisco and pioneer, who was 
associated with John B. Felton, 
leader of the bar of California. 



Recreation Commission 

Defining an entirely new departure 
in activity, the San Francisco Play- 
ground Commission is bringing to 
conclusion plans for extending all 
of the city's recreation facilities to 
adult groups. This new undertaking 
is made possible largely through an 
arrangement with the Board of Ed- 
ucation whereby the latter has made 
available a number of high school 
gymnasia. 

According to members of the 
Playground Commission, this new 
work especially will fill a long-felt 
want in the field of industrial sports. 
This field of sports in recent years, 
through its rapid growth, has 
needed the facilities and the organi- 
zation that the Playground Commis- 
sion can offer, in being a cleaving 
house for the various teams and 
organizations. 

The Playground Commission's 
new Department of Industrial Rec- 
reation has started out with a pro- 
gram for a city-wide basket ball 
tournament. Tentative plans call for 
a league divided into 145 pounds 
"A" and "B" divisions and unlim- 
ited "A" and "B" divisions. A nom- 
inal entrance fee, sufficient only to 
defray the expenses for referees, 
awards, and other incidentals, will 
be charged. It is expected that the 
league will ultimately include thirty 
or forty such teams. 

According to Gerald J. Linares, 
supervisor of industrial recreation, 
he has already submitted the plan 
of the department to R. S. Turner, 
of the Industrial Association ; M. L. 
Brown, of the Retailers' Associa- 
tion ; to William Cook, of the Stock 
and Bond House Association, and to 
Sandy Turner, of the Bankers' 
League. All have expressed the 
deepest interest in the plan, Linares 
states, and have expressed the belief 
that it will do much to facilitate and 
develop industrial sports. 

"With the existing facilities of 
the Playground Commission and 
now with the added cooperation of 
the School Board and the Park 
Commission, we believe that we are 
opening the way to a new era of 
development in industrial recrea- 
tion," said Mr. Linares. "In many 
other cities comparable with San 
Francisco industrial sports have 
long been sponsored and supervised 
by the municipal bodies similar to 
the Playground Commission. Our 
only desire is to serve, to reduce to 
a minimum cost these sports, and to 
encourage healthful recreation." 



24 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



HISTORIC LANDMARK 
IS PRESERVED 

Old Trocadero Rancho to Be a Memorial Recreation Park 



AN historic old landmark is to be 
^ preserved in San Francisco 
through the generosity of Mrs. Sig- 
nuind Stern, president of the Rec- 
reation Commission, who has 
presented to the city a large portion 
of the famous old Trocadero Rancho 
at Nineteenth Avenue and Sloat 
Houlevard. 

The gift comprises three city 
l)locks and was presented to the city 
by the donor as a memorial to her 
late husband, Sigmund Stern, for 
many years a prominent civic leader 
of San Francisco. The work of de- 
veloping the area as a recreation 
center is already under way. 

Bernard I. Maybeck. one of the 
nation's foremost architects, whose 
Fine Arts Palace at the Panama 
Pacific International Exposition was 
acclaimed as one of the most beau- 
tiful dream structures ever erected, 
is consulting architect for the proj- 
ect. The work is being executed, 
however, by Gardner A. Dailey. 

The three blocks comprising the 
gift are situated in a wooded dell 
that forms a natural bowl, said to 
be ideally suited for open air con- 
certs, pageants, and other forms of 
recreation. The fact that the tract is 
walled in on two sides by high 
slopes, which in turn are heavily 
wooded by groves of fifty-year-old 
eucah-ptus, gives the bowl a shel- 
tered protection which makes it the 
warmest outdoor area in San Fran- 
cisco. Those who have studied its 
climatic advantages declare that it 
is fully ten degrees warmer than the 
rest of San Francisco. 

The Sigmund Stern gift comprises 
the entire dell. At the present it has 
an approach from Nineteenth Ave- 
nue just north of Sloat Boulevard. 
The plans call for a similar approach, 
however, from Wawona. Automo- 
biles will be prohibited, the park 
being reserved for pedestrians only. 

The dell will be a unique addition 
to San Francisco's recreational at- 
tractions. Those most familiar with 
its possibilities declare that, in its 
wa)', it may become as widely known 
as the Hollywood Bowl, where each 
year renowned conductors appear in 



what are advertised as "concerts 
under the stars." 

The property forms an integral 
part in San Francisco's colorful past. 
It was purchased from George M. 
Greene, octogenarian, who was born 
on the ])roperty and still lives there 
in the famous old house, said to be 
(jne of the first built in San Fran- 
cisco. 

This house, which for a number 
of years was operated as the Troca- 
dero Inn, is still standing and with 
reconditioning will be available as a 
clubhouse. 

The first of the Greenes came 
across the plains from Maine in 1847 
to take up a homestead in San Fran- 
cisco. Several brothers followed 
and between them took up home- 
steads on all the available land from 
the ocean to a point beyond the 
present Trocadero Rancho. 

In the early seventies the Troca- 
dero Rancho became the scene of 
many exciting events that have all 
the glamour of the old West. Own- 



ers of the adjoining Ranchcj Laguna 
de la Merced had the northern 
boundary of their grant moved far- 
ther north to include the Trocadero. 
A long litigation followed and in 
the meantime ejection proceedings 
were brought against the Greenes, 
who then had the status of "squat- 
ters.'' 

"Red shirts'' with guns and re- 
volvers, hired at $10 a day, harassed 
and threatened the settlers. At one 
time Mother Greene, with her boy. 
the present Charles Greene, stood 
off a United States marshal and 
twenty-two deputies with a pot of 
boiling water and a rifle, notwith- 
standing the fact that the minions 
of the law came armed to the teeth. 

Drawing a bead on the marshal, 
Mrs. Greene said : 

"One move on the part of your 
men and I'll shoot." 

There was a conference between 
the marshal and his deputies, and 
then they announced they would 
withdraw, declaring that they had 
not come to fight a lone woman. 




"Trocadero," to be converted into a playground as a memorial to the late Sigmund Stern. 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



25 



Following this, the Greenes built 
a fort on that part of their property 
commanding a full view of the sur- 
rounding country. A young Cana- 
dian plainsman who had fought with 
Custer was recruited as an aide. The 
father, two sons, the Canadian and 
a couple of dogs, and Mother Greene 
constituted the defending forces. 
However, they stood off all assaults 
until the legal battle was finalh' won 
by a special act of Congress in 1887. 

For many years the Trocadero 
was a famous outing place for early 
San Franciscans. Its cuisine was 
known afar, as well as its trout fish- 
ing and its open air dancing and 
music. Among the celebrities fre- 
quenting the place were Broderick 
and Terry, who were later to fight 
their fatal duel on the shores of 
near-by Lake Merced. 

Gradually through the years, with 
the increasing burden of taxation 
and assessments following the de- 
velopment of Golden Gate Park, the 
twin Peaks tunnel, and other proj- 
ects, the family either lost or was 
forced to dispose of portions of their 
original vast holdings. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 
APPOINTMENTS 

UNDER the new set-up of the new Charter, Dr. J. C. Geiger, 
Director of Public Health of the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, has the following member? as an advisory Board of Health : 

Dr. William Wymore, Dr. James W. Ward, Dr. Howard Adler, 
Dr. Frank H. McKevitt, Lawrence Arnstein, Frank J. Klimm and 
Thomas J. Lenehan. 

The foregoing were named by Chief Administrative Ofificer 
Alfred J. Cleary. 

The old Board of Health was composed of Dr. Wymore, Dr. 
Ward, Lawrence Arnstein, Frank S. Klimm, Arthur H. Barendt, 
.Arthur M. Sharp and Dr. Alex S. Keenan. 

The appointment of Charles M. Wollenberg, Director of the 
Laguna Honda Home, as "Business Director" of the Department 
of Health, is a happy selection. Dr. Geiger in his capacity as 
Director of Health made the appointment. 

Mr. Wollenberg has proved his worth as Director of the Laguna 
Honda Home and also as chairman of the Committee on Unemploy- 
ment Relief. He will not only be a great help to Dr. Geiger in 
handling the many institutions under his care, but will save the 
city thousands of dollars by correlating purchasing, and in advising 
the handling of the various branches of the Health Department. 

Mr. Wollenberg will not relinquish his handling of the Laguna 
Home, but will handle his new task in conjunction with his present 
manifold duties. 



l|ag^B f ark Slaunirg 

Washing for Hotels, Restaurants and 
Barber Shops Our Specialty 

Phone RANDOLPH 1394 

915 Cayuga Avenue 
Near Ocean Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



R. H. TRAVERS, President H. T. HENNIG, Secretary 

Physicians and Hospital Supplies 
Company 

Wholesale and Retail 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS and HOSPITAL 
EQUIPMENT 

429 Sutter Street San Francisco 

Phitne SUtter 8596 



CLARENCE T. BRAUN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

CURLED HAIR 

Manufacturers of 
Curled Hair for Mattresses and Upholstering 



1207 Thomas Avenue 



San Francisco, Calif. 




Buy from firms that advertise «ith us 



26 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



MAYOR ROSSI PRAISES BRAVE 

FIRE FIGHTERS 



"San Francisco has also reason to he proud 
of its •wi-H-disciplined and hiijlily efficient Fire 
Department. 

"Under t/ie able direction of the Hoard of 
Fire Commissioners and the supervision of 
Chief Charles J. lirennan, the executive head 
of the Department, the efficient, courageous, 
vjell-trained body of men <u:ho form the rank 
and file of San Francisco's firc-fii/htinc/ force 
have won national recoi/nition." — Extract 
from Mayor Rossi's inautjural address. 

CHIEF ENGINEER Charles J. 
Brennan, head of the San 
Francisco Fire Department, justly 
deserves the high praise accorded 
him by the Chief Executive of this 
city. 

In his modest wa}- he acknowl- 
edges the compliment, but feels that 
it belongs to his men. He glories in 
their achievements and takes pride 
in the belief that his department 
measures up with the best in this 
country. 

Chief Brennan has had wide fire 
experience. He entered the depart- 
ment on October 1, 1902, as a sub- 
stitute. He had just returned from 
foreign service in the Spanish- 
American War, where he had won 
an enviable record as a soldier. He 
had the distinction of 'being selected 
aide to the first military governor 
of the island of Negros, in the Phil- 
ippines. 




CHIEF CHARLES J. BRENNAN 

Executive Head, San Francisco Fire 

Department 

Having served a year as substi- 
tute in his beloved Fire Department, 



Chief Brennan on April 1, 190.3, was 
appointed a regular member of the 
city's fire-fighting forces. In the 
interim he had successfully passed 
the civil service examination, the 
first held under the old charter. 

The embers of the 1906 disaster 
had hardly cooled when, on Sep- 
tember 21, 1906, he was promoted to 
a lieutenancy. This promotion was a 
deserved one. He had passed up 
through the ranks of hoseman, 
truckman, driver, tillerman, engi- 
neer, and operator. 

It is this remarkable experience 
that has made him the ideal head of 
the department. 

His splendid record continued. He 
became a captain on September 22, 
1913, a battalion chief on October 
10, 1917, and attained the position 
of assistant chief engineer on No- 
vember 1, 1926. 

On two occasions he acted as 
chief engineer of the department, 
and as a crowning honor he was 
appointed chief engineer on Novem- 
ber 8, 1929. 

Sincerity of purpose, consistency 
of achievement, and absolute loy- 
alty are attributes which character- 
ize Chief Charles J. Brennan to 
everyone who knows him. 



CITY HALL 
CORRESPOIVDEXCE 

By DARWIN P. ANDERSON 



Editor's Note: The author of this column 
has earned a ncws-iuriting reputation locally 
by luriting for the Budde district papers and 
school papers. He is the former editor of the 
school paper at the Galileo Evening High 
School, and has been the youngest city em- 
ployee for the past three years.) 

O. K. Fellow Employees : 

A book might well be written on 
the present charter installation 
chaos entitled "Charter House 
Knights" . . . San Francisco will be 
a better city for the new charter . . . 
thanks to the Bureau of Governmen- 
tal Research and city officials . . . the 
city beside the Gate might well be 
proud of its employes as they more 
than did their bit for the unemployed 
recentlv . . . 



The roar of construction on the 
new Van Ness Avenue edifices has 
caused more than one to wear ear 
plugs . . . which ruined more than 
one phone conversation . . . but the 
completion of these new buildings 
will more than reward all who suffer 
. . . and here is a sad line . . . M. S. 
Blanchard, for years one of the most 
popular and beloved of City Hall 
employees, has been transferred to 
Eleventh and Bryant . . . we shall 
miss you, M.S. B. ... and Joe Man- 
cuso, man about the Hall, is plan- 
ning to toss his felt into the Super- 
visorial ring at the next election . . . 
Major Collins, genial registrar of 
votahs, has a keen sense of humor 
. . . and is a great, though modest, 
chess player . . . Charles Martin, 
Superintendent of Payrolls, is I^oth- 
ered 2,000 times daily by incjuiries 
in regard to payrolls . . . Henry Ing- 
wersen in the Auditor's office is well 
known as a local swimming meet 
promoter. . . . Dr. J. M. Gwinn, 



schools head, recently returned from 
a convention in Washington, D C. 
. . . and David P. Hardy of that of- 
fice is past president of the Public 
School Business Officials' Associa- 
tion of the State of California . . . and 
is a great pistol shot. . . . Clotilde 
Podesta is the best dressed woman 
in the City Hall . . . Malcolm Eraser 
of the Mayor's staflf the best dressed 
man .. . Henrietta Conrich is now in 
the Registrar's office signing 'em up 
. . . Harold Lillard, City Hall's offi- 
cial postman, is liked by the entire 
beat. . . . Jackson Carle of the second 
floor press gang, poisons guys who 
don't put the "e" on the end of his 
name. . . . and it. seems there was a 
fellow from Los Angeles up here and 
he had been bragging about some of 
the wonders of the souseland when 
he piped the City Hall and asked 
what it was. "Damfino," answered 
a Sand Franciscan, " 'twasn't there 
yesterday." ... so that's 30, all. 
I thank vou. 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



27 



SERVICE TO THE BLIND 



To FIND yourself bereft of your 
vision is not only a personal 
tragedy but also economic disaster 
to the person who has to earn his 
own living. Through its Needy 
Blind Aid, the County Welfare De- 
partment helps to relieve immediate 
economic distress of the individual; 
carries him through the long and 
difficult adjustment process, and 
plans for his ultimate rehabilitation 
and independence. Today the de- 
partment is assisting 182 blind per- 
sons and is expending $5,717.50 a 
month for that purpose. 

The adjustment period at the on- 
set of blindness is not an easy one; 
it entails a complete reorientation to 
the physical world, finding one's 
way about by touch and ear instead 
of by sight ; it requires the substitu- 
tion of fingers for eyes in reading, 
and use of rehabilitation techniques 
in learning new ways of making 
one's living. The fortitude, courage 
and cheerfulness of many of the 
blind in remaking their life along 
these new ways is an unceasing 
source of wonderment and inspira- 
tion to those who work with them. 

Readjustments 

In this period of readjustments 
the County Welfare Department 
plays an important role. Aside from 
the financial assistance which it 
renders, equally important is its 
work in planning for the rehabilita- 
tion of the blind individual by con- 
tacting the various training agen- 
cies. The department believes that 
the Needy Blind Law is aimed to 
help the blind help themselves and 
is not designed as a substitute for 
effort. It maintains that the blind 
are employable and their produc- 
tivity of value to society ; that to 
merely subsidize the blind through 
the aid and to make no parallel 
effort to utilize their working ability 
is to deprive them of one of the 
fundamental human rights, the right 
to function as useful, creative, con- 
tributing members of the commu- 
nity. 

The great therapeutic value of 
work has been strikingly demon- 
strated by many of the blind whom 
the department has contacted. The 
mechanic who was stricken blind in 
his prime felt that life was over for 
him when he first came to the of- 
fice. Discarded by industry, he felt 
a burden to himself and to the com- 
munity, useless for the rest of his 
life. 



By Esther D. Schwartz 

Occupational Vocations 

The department immediately 
asked Miss Kate Foley, home 
teacher of the adult blind for the 
state library, to interest him in read- 
ing the raised type. But Miss Foley 
teaches the blind more than reading. 

Herself blind, her long years of 
usefulness and her dynamic person- 
ality serve as an inspiration to the 
blind and help bridge the first diffi- 
cult step in their adjustment. 

As a next step the department 
asked Miss Bernice McCrary, field 
worker for the State Industrial 
Home for the Adult Blind, to visit 
him for possible training in some 
handicraft. To pass the heavy hours 
away he learned to make rugs. He 
became interested and utilized his 
mechanical ability in making ingen- 
ious labor-saving devices for his 
work. What was started as a pastime 
in the dark hours of early discour- 



agement has now become an ab- 
sorbing life work. 

He takes a craftsman's delight in 
his rugs and, although his sales are 
still few, he hopes to eventually be- 
come independent. These stories of 
achievement could be indefinitely 
multiplied. 

There is the man who is begin- 
ning life anew by learning to string 
tennis rackets ; the young man who 
received training as a masseur 
through the Bureau of Rehabilita- 
tion of the State Board of Education 
and is on the road to self-support ; 
the man who learned to make bas- 
kets to keep from losing his mind 
and has thus found a new vocation. 

The blind have demonstrated their 
desire and ability to take training 
and to do useful work, but the com- 
munity has not yet been educated 
to absorb their productivity in its 
offices and workshops. 




Miss Kate Foley leaching a blind dependent of tlie County Welfare Department 



28 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



FOUNDING OF THE SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden Earns the Title, "Father of 

Municipal Music" 



By Alfred Metzger 



WHEN the Panama-Pacific Ex- 
position Company presented 
the City of San Francisco with the 
million dollar Exposition Audito- 
rium, there was also presented an 
opportunity to assemble a multitude 
of ten thousand people. 

While in the beginning little 
thought was given to housing in 
this edifice events of a musical na- 
ture, principally because its acous- 
tic qualities had not been satisfac- 
torily established until later. Super- 
visor J. Emmet Hayden already saw 
future possibilities in interesting 
the city government in giving the 
people the best of music at prices 
within everybody's reach. 

This idea became crystallized 
when through the courtesy of the 
Exposition directors the official or- 
ganist, Edwin H. Lemare, was ap- 
pointed municipal organist after his 
engagement at Festival Hall on the 
Exposition grounds had terminated. 

Founding of Symphony 

After a few preliminary attempts 
to give popular concerts with de- 
cisive success — • Herman Perlet, 
Giulio Minetti and Frederic Schiller 
leading an orchestra at various times 
— Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden 
founded the Municipal Symphony 
Concerts on November 8, 1922. 




SUPERVISOR J. EMMET HAYDEN 
President, Board of Supervisors 

The first soloist was Louis Per- 
singer, violinist, at that time concert 
master of the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra. This first concert 



was followed by another on Decem- 
I)er 9, 1922, with Mme. Johanna Gad- 
ski as soloist. On this occasion the 
Auditorium was packed with an 
audience of 10,000. The remaining 
three concerts of this first season 
took place on January 4, 1923, Feb- 
ruary 1, and March 7 with Arthur 
Middleton, Benno Moiseiwitsch and 
Efrem Zimbalist as soloists, respec- 
tively. 

From that year until now the 
Municipal Symphony Concerts have 
been enjoying the utmost popularity. 
Nearly fifty of the world's greatest 
artists have been heard by about half 
a million people, many of whom had , 
never had an opportunity to hear a 
symphony orchestra of nearly ninety 
musicians together with world re- 
nowned soloists. 

Annual Festivals 

The fact that so many people be- 
came for the first time acquainted 
with the higher form of music 
naturally added to the regular con- 
cert-going public, thus increasing 
the number of concert goers and 
opera lovers. 

The Municipal Symphony Con- 
certs proved such a success that, 
soon after their inauguration, the 
City of San Francisco, at Supervisor 
Hayden's suggestion, cooperated 
with the Musical Association of San 




An interior vievs of the Exposition A uditorium 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



29 



Francisco in starting annual Music 
Festivals, under the direction of 
Alfred Hertz. 

It became necessary to employ a 
chorus of several hundred mixed 
voices and, in order to have such an 
organization always ready when 
needed, Supervisor Hayden, who 
was at that time chairman of the 
Auditorium Committee of the Board 
of Supervisors, engaged, at the sug- 
gestion of Alfred Hertz, Dr. Hans 
Leschke, who during the last few 
years has done such excellent work 
in training the men and women 
comprising the chorus. 

Municipal Chorus 

The Municipal Chorus, like the 
Municipal Symphony Concerts, has 
become a feature of San Francisco's 
musical life, and only last summer 
it created a sensation at the closing 
concert of the Hollywood Bowl 
summer concerts. Press and public 
spoke in the most enthusiastic 
terms of its performance of the 
Ninth Symphony by Beethoven, 



conducted by Alfred Hertz and with 
the cooperation of the Hollywood 
Bowl Orchestra, which includes the 
entire personnel of the Philhar- 
monic Orchestra of Los Angeles. 

Annual performances of The 
Messiah have been among the big- 
gest attended events of the Munici- 
pal Chorus and the value of this 
organization may be ajipreciated 
when it is known that a number of 
members of the chorus participated 
in the splendid performance of Die 
Meistersinger given last fall by the 
San Francisco Opera Association in 
the presence of a sold-out house. 
Beethoven's Ninth Symphony was 
presented several times Ijy this or- 
ganization with gratifying success. 

Missa Solemnis 

Early this 3'ear the Municipal 
Chorus and the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra, under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Hans Leschke, presented 
Beethoven's famous Missa Solemnis 
(Solemn Mass), for the first time in 



this city, before a packed audi- 
torium and with splendid artistic 
results. 

The City of San Francisco, thanks 
to Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden's 
fine cooperation as chairman of the 
auditorium committee and also as 
chairman of the finance committee 
of the Board of Supervisors, also 
became interested in the Summer 
Symphony Concerts. These concerts 
brought to San Francisco from all 
parts of the world the foremost 
symphony conductors during the 
last six years. During that time 
nearly 400,000 people heard these 
concerts at moderate prices of ad- 
mission. 

To enumerate all the musical ad- 
vantages derived by the people of 
San Francisco through the city's 
interest in music would require far 
more space than is at the writer's 
disposal at this time. Suffice it to 
say that this municipality heads all 
other American cities in its encour- 
agement of high class musical en- 
tertainment for its people. 



Robinson Tractor Company 
Reorganizes 

The formation of the Robinson 
Tractor Company, composed of 
Thomas E. and Olive L. Robinson, 
is an interesting announcement. The 
company has established headquar- 
ters at 1705 East 12th Street, Oak- 
land, and also an office at 1175 How- 
ard Street, San Francisco. 




THOMAS E. ROBINSON 

The Robinsons have been in the 
Caterpillar field for the past four 
years. They had the agency in Ala- 
meda, Contra Costa, and Solano 
counties, and a part of Sacramento 
County. They also had charge of 
the sale of Caterpillars in southern 



Oregon, northern and eastern Cal- 
ifornia and Nevada. 

The rearrangement gives the 
Robinson Tractor Company the ter- 
ritory of San Francisco, San Mateo, 
Alameda and Contra Costa counties. 

The Robinsons are well known in 
the Caterpillar field of activities. 
They have been developing the sale 
of dirt-removal equipment for the 
past six years, and have accom- 
plished great results. 

Knights of Columbus on Annual 
Pilgrimage 



Bearing the official endorsement 
of His Excellency, Most Rev. Arch- 
bishop Edward J. Hanna, D. D., and 
carrying credentials from Governor 
James Rolph, Jr. , of California, 
Mayor Angelo J. Rossi of San Fran- 
cisco, and other Pacific Coast digni- 
taries, the pilgrimage of members 
and friends of California Council 
No. 880, Knights of Columbus, to 
the 1932 International Eucharistic 
Congress, in Dublin, Ireland, this 
summer, is slated to be one of the 
largest parties visiting Europe this 
year. 

The delegation is scheduled to 
leave San Francisco at 6 p. m., Sat- 
urday, June 4, in a special de luxe 
Pullman train, traveling via the Pa- 
cific Northwest, through the state of 



Oregon and Washington, and thence 
eastward to Chicago, Niagara Falls 
and New York. Sailing at midnight, 
June 10, on the specially chartered 
new Holland-American liner "Veen- 
dam," the pilgrims will proceed from 
Cobh, Ireland, to Dublin, where the 
party will occupy first-class accom- 
modations in leading downtown 
hotels during the Eucharistic Con- 
gress, June 22 to 27. 



M. CURODA 



D. BATHEN 



PLANTERS CAFE 

"A Good Place to Eat" 

860 Kearny Street 
Telephone GArfield 9695 



Phones: EXbrook 6223-6224-6225 

Elite Produce Company 

Geo. Alberigi, President 

Wholesale Fruit and Produce 

Receivers f Distributors / Jobbers 

316-318 Drurnm St. San Francisco 



22. 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



Work Creating Commission 
Very Active 



Headquarters for San I'rancisco's 
newly formed Work-Creating Com- 
mission were opened in the Chancery 
Building, 564 Market Street. 

At the same time Bert W. Levit, 
general chairman, issued an appeal 
to the public to assist in providing 
as many extra jobs as possible for 
bona fide residents of San Francisco 
this winter. 

Last year many hundreds of extra 
jobs were provided to heads of fam- 
ilies through the repair and im- 
provement of homes and business 
structures. This year the need for 
such jobs is even greater, according 
to Levit, and an immediate response 
to the appeal is essential. 

If you have a job around your 
home that will provide a few hours' 
or a few days' employment, call 
Commission headquarters, Garfield 
5636. You will be provided with 
help from a carefully investigated 
and qualified group of men or 
women. 

If you know of any contemplated 
building or major improvement 
work, also call Commission head- 
quarters, Garfield 5636. Every ef- 
fort will be made to see that such 
work is done immediately, in order 
to provide additional employment 
this winter. 

"Through the San Francisco 
Work-Creating Commission, civic, 
veteran, and business leaders are be- 
ing mobilized in a program to create 
employment through the repair and 
improvement of residential, indus- 
trial, and commercial properties," 
Mr. Levit said. 

"Employers also are being re- 
quested to spread work to as many 
as possible through staggered em- 
ployment and shorter hours, if nec- 
essary to avoid lay-ofifs." 



Phone ORdway 2397 

HARRY R. MYGRANT 

GLASS AND GLAZING 

Automobile Glass 

Mirrors, Beveling and Resilvering 

678 Eddy Street San Francisco 



Telephone MARKET 2772 

Union Machine Co. 

ENGINEERS and 
MACHINISTS 

934-944 Brannan Street 

Bet. Eighth and Ninth Sts. San Francisco, Cal. 



Mayor^s Proclamation 

RECOGNIZING the need of organized effort upon the part of all 
■ good citizens of San Francisco to alleviate unemployment in our city, 
I have accepted the position of honorary chairman of the San Francisco 
Work Creating Commission, the purpose of which shall be to encourage the 
doing of all possible work that will tend to increase the volume of employ- 
ment in San Francisco for bona fide resident working men and women. 

"This Commission is sponsored by the American Legion, Building 
Trades Council, City and County Federation of Women's Clubs, Industrial 
Association of San Francisco, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, San 
Francisco Junior Chamber of Commerce, San Francisco Labor Council, 
Second District California Congress of Parents and Teachers, the various 
religious denominations of San Francisco, and other organizations interested 
in civic welfare. 

"The present economic emergency can be materially relieved if each of 
us will take an inventory of his personal situation and initiate all possible 
improvements and odd job work. There is much work that can be done 
economically at the present time, and many deserving residents are greatly 
in need of employment. 

"Many San Francisco business firms and corporations have staggered 
employment and shortened hours of labor instead of laying off employees. 
Widespread adopting of this program is essential in these trying times. 

"As Mayor of San Francisco, I call upon all citizens to cooperate to the 
fullest in this community effort." 

ANGELO J. ROSSI 



Wl FILLHORE 

,NEW M SSIQN 



JULIUS S. GODEAU, INC. 

41 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 

Phone MArket 0711 

OAKLAND . STOCKTON 

Complete Mortuary Service at a Coat Within 
Your Means , 

Our understanding service lightens 
your burden of grief 



Gas 8C Oil f Free Crank Case Service 
"Where Service Is Paramount" 

BILL NUTTER'S 

Visitacion Valley Service Sution 
Visitacion and San Bruno Avenue 

REST ROOM 



GEORGE MORLEY, Proprietor 


The 


Red Bird Restaurant 


Good 


Eats / 


Service -t Courtesy 




1584 


JACKSON 



120 Golden Gate Ave. FRanklin 1221 



FILM ROW CLUB 

Exclusively for Men Connected with 
Motion Picture and Theatrical Trades 

Admittance by Membership Card Only 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 1400 

HANNI & GIRERD 

Authorized BUICK Service 

Official Service Station for 
MARVEL CARBURETORS - EXIDE 
BATTERIES - DUCO 
REFINISHING 

1765 California Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



March 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



31 




IF you like a chatty book — and 
who does not — by all means read 
Seymour Hicks' "Between Our- 
selves." He seems to have known 
everyone of any importance from 
the time he went to the London 
theaters in 1887 as a call boy down 
to the present day. Now a noted 
theatrical magnate, Hicks was the 
intimate friend of the late Daniel 
Frohman and his associate in many 
of the older man's ventures in play 
producing. 

Hicks' pen pictures of Oscar 
Wilde and his unfortunate trial, of 
the childlike vanity of the poet 
Tennyson, and of the immortal tra- 
gedian, Henry Irving, are alive with 
humor and pathos. As having the 
questionable honor of being the only 
person to have kicked the jovial 
King Edward, Hicks admits that it 
was a purely accidental happening, 
and covered him very properly with 
confusion, until the genial monarch 
smiled and said, "It's all right." 
With no claim to great writing, this 
volume holds interest and is exceed- 
ingly entertaining. 

Books and Writers 

Another book by an Englishman, 
Eric Gillett, called tersely "Books 
and Writers," proves to be a series 
of essays on a variety of subjects. 
Originally most of the articles ap- 
peared in a Malayan newspaper, but 
not unless one glanced at the place 
of publication, "Singapore, Straits 
Settlements," would one be aware 
that the writer was not continuously 
participating in the bustle and strife 
of town life in London. 

One essay is of particular inter- 
est. It is called "For the Young," 
and is a friendly defense of the read- 
ing of the do-and-dare type of fic- 
tion by the growing boy (or girl). 
It was of especial interest to me, for 
well can I remember a ragged copy 
of the questionable adventures of 
Nick Carter and his friend (or en- 
emy, I've forgotten which) King 



Some New Books 

By Anne M. Farrell 

Fiction Department, Public Library 



Brady, which was the delight of my 
childhood. For years I have dis- 
creetly covered this blot on my lit- 
erary scutscheon, but now, backed 
by the defense of the eminent Eric 
Gillett, I am moved to confess my 
early folly. 

Shooting to Kill 

Gillett in the course of his dis- 
course quotes from one of his own 
favorites, a volume called, I think, 
"Doom Canyon." One's hair fairly 
bristles with the savage deeds of the 
dastardly villain, Lobo Smith, who 
kills his victims with one shot, add- 
ing two or three others for good 
measure. And there is the ever- 
present Lucy, a gal who says, "Give 
me a gun — one of those rifles. I can 
shoot — and hit." And the author 
continues : "And the heavy Colts 
vomited red flame . . . now and 
then thudding home." But in the 
crisis, "home" comes a bullet to 
nestle 'neath Lucy's golden hair, but 
our heroine, though indulging in the 
regulation histrionics, is but slightly 
harmed, and a sentimental fade-out 
is provided, with Lucy in the arms 
of the hero. Strong (above all 
names !). 

There are several other essays in 
the book, all short, and not one of 
them dull. "The Bad Old Days" is 
particularly good, also a somewhat 
serious attempt, "The Art of Ap- 
preciation." 

M. G. Eberhart has a new detec- 
tive story off the press — "From this 
Dark Stairway." In the melee of 
mystery tales, one by Eberhart al- 
ways stands out as distinctly differ- 
ent, and may be ever recommended 
as absorbing entertainment. Again, 
Sarah Keate is the motivating unit, 
through whose eyes we see the 
story unfold. Unconcernedly she 
rides in a darkened hospital eleva- 
tor, only to scream with terror as 
she turns on the switch and finds 
the body of Dr. Harrington in a pool 
of blood. All kinds of complica- 



tions arise, in which a Chinese snuff 
bottle, a lost formula, and two or 
three assorted romances figure 
prominently. 

The action takes place entirely in 
the Melody Memorial Hospital, with 
eerie shapes ranging the corridors 
and phantom shadows disappearing 
into the linen closets, but only when 
that debonair unraveler of crime. 
Lance O'Leary, arrives, is the mur- 
der solved and the culprit captured. 
Sarah Keate is a delightful char- 
acter, taking her place in fiction 
alongside of Dorothy Sayer's cele- 
brated Lord Peter Whimsey, who is 
also in his way a bit of a detective. 

Another, and quite different mys- 
tery store is the new Anthony Ab- 
bott problem, "About the Murder of 
the Night Club Lady." Again 
Thatcher Colt, Commissioner of Po- 
lice in New York City, is on the 
job, as Lola Carewe, woman of 
mystery and of money, is killed. She 
has been warned that she will die 
before three o'clock early in the 
morning of the first day of the new 
year. With Colt and the District 
Attorney guarding her, she goes into 
a room for a moment to get her 
cigarette case, a cry rings out, and 
the two men enter the boudoir to 
find Lola lying dead as the tiny 
clock in the living room peals dis- 
tinctly three times. Strange insects, 
a notorious blackmail scheme, a half- 
crazed doctor and various suspicious 
figures of the night life combine to 
make a topnotch mystery story. 

A Merry Mad Adventure 

Those who enjoyed "The Haunted 
Bookshop" and "Parnassus on 
Wheels," will be slightly discon- 
certed by Christopher Morley's lat- 
est contribution to literature, "Swiss 
Family Manhattan." One wonders, 
sometimes, if Morley is primarily a 
humorist, a stylist, a novelist — or 
what! And this merry mad adven- 
ture of a little Swiss clerk, attached 
to a Bureau of the League of Na- 



E 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



March 



tioiis, does iidlliiiij; to decide the 
point. l'"or wliile there is a distinct 
plot, and nuidi writing of a very 
humorous nature, there are also 
some very beautiful ])assages, some 
of the finest, in fact, that Morley 
has ever written. 

The little clerk takes his family 
on a voyage of discovery in a dir- 
igible, which is wrecked on top of 
the great Empire State P)uilding in 
New York City. From then on. the 
book is a riotously fantastic tale of 
this new discovery of America liy 
the delightful Swiss, his boys, and 
his beloved Gretchen. It will no 
doul)t be (juite popular, for Morley 
has a loyal following. 

An American Saga 

Evelyn Scott, the author of "The 
Wave," offers a new two-volumed 
novel, "A Calendar of Sin." It is a 
saga of an American family, reall}- 
their love life, through five genera- 
tions. The book is saved from mor- 
bidness by the very clever manner 
in which the author adroitly paints 
in as a background the changes in 
the country and the times. 

The story begins in 1867 with an 
emotional crisis in the life of Cad- 
wallader Sydney, a New Englander, 
who had moved with his wife to In- 
diana. Sydney finds that Memory 
Burgess, a school teacher, has be- 
come very precious to him. and after 
a passionate interlude, he elopes 
with her to Dakota. From then on 
we are given a vivid picture of the 
South as it goes through the recon- 
struction period, and the followers 
of the lost cause attempt unsuccess- 
fully to retain the gentilit}' of more 
fruitful years. 

The great era of railroad l:iuilding 
comes, and with it the necessity of 
readjustment. The book concludes, 
in 1914, a photographic record of a 
phase of American life, of which the 
author says, "The life of a country 
has a continuity as unbroken as the 
life of a man Ijetween his birth and 
death." 

Several splendid translations have 
been published recently. One, 
"Bondy, Jr.," by Baron Ludwig Har- 
vany, is of definite merit. It is the 
history of a Jewish family in Hun- 
gary. In 1790, Simon Bondy, a ped- 
dler, migrated from Moravia to 
Hungary, and married. Thus began 
the Bondy family, which, as the 
years went on, increased its wealth 
as well as its members. The story 
deals chiefly with Sigi, the strange 
son of the clever Hermann, who has 
added huge monies to the already 
great fortune of the Bondys. 



Utilities Commission Rewards 
Auditor 



Exterminator Company Has 
New Manager 




JOHN L. SHARON 
Auditor and Assistant Secretary 

The appointment of John L. Sharon 
as Assistant Secretary and Auditor 
of the Public Utilities Commssion, 
is a deserved reward for a capable 
official. For many years Mr. Sharon 
has been auditor of the San Fran- 
cisco Water Department. He is ex- 
ceedingly familiar with the set-up 
of the municipal water service and 
other utilities. 



Social Workers to Meet at 
Riverside 



Reflecting existing welfare prob- 
lems, the California Conference of 
Social Work has chosen as the 
theme for its twenty-fourth annual 
meeting "Social Values in an Eco- 
nomic Crisis.'" The meeting will be 
held at Riverside, May 1 to 5. 

Speakers of national prominence 
in social welfare work will appear 
on the program, which promises to 
prove a laboratory of research effort. 
In addition to the eight sections of 
the conference, covering the entire 
range of social service activities, 
delegates to the meeting will have 
the added advantage of some two 
score kindred group meetings at- 
tracted to Riverside by the confer- 
ence of this state body. 



Charles Menard, the new manager 
fur the Northern California branch 
of the Rose Rat Exterminator Co'm- 
pany, has been a resident of Cali- 
fornia and San Francisco for the 
])ast sixteen years. His birthplace 
is Cincinnati, the ])oint of origin 
of the Rose Exterminator Com- 
pany. He is a veteran of the World 
War, having fought with the 347th 
Machine Gun Battalion of the re- 
nowned 91st Division. 

Mr. Menard, in taking over the 
management of the R. R. E. Com- 
pany, does so with a background of 
experience that will prove of value 
to the customers of this Company 
with its nation-wide organization, 
the reason being that he is a nephew 
of its founder and has had contact 
with the extermination of vermin 
practically all his life. 

Since the latter part of January 
the R. R. E. Company, in addition 
to its specializing in contract w'ork. 
is putting on the market a line of 
the highest quality Fly, Moth and 
other liquid sprays and insect pow- 
ders which will be sold direct to the 
consumer. 



Students to Compete in 
Shakespearean Contest 



Arrangements for the Fifth Annual 
Shakespearan Declamation Contest 
to be held in the auditorium of the 
Humboldt Evening High School on 
Friday evening, April 29, are prac- 
tically completed. 

A special meeting of representa- 
tives of all the high schools of San 
Francisco will be held at the Hum- 
boldt Evening High School on 
Tuesday evening, April 5, to discuss 
plans for the contest. 

Judges Cabaniss and Harris of the 
Superior Court will be judges of the 
contest. A third judge is to be se- 
lected. 

Marion S. Blanchard, honorary 
chairman of the organization spon- 
soring the annual competitors, is a 
great believer in these contests, as 
they have led to a love of the Bard's 
plays and have also developed the 
histrionic ability of high school 
students. 



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to 

CITY 

EMPLOYEES 



Purchasers of 

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will be entitled to the same 
discount as that given to the 
City Purchasing Agent. 
Drop in and examine the 
India Tire and inquire as 
to our Budget Pay- 
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YOUDALL 
CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY 

MATSON BUILDING 

DAvenport 0664 
SAN FRANCISCO 



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Publication for City and County of San Francisco 
Endorsed by the California Society of Pioneers 



Sat^ FRmNcisco 




PUBLISHED MONTHLY AT 

109S Market Street Phone Market 8438 



M. B. BOTHWELL 

Business Manager 



LOUIS C. LEVY 
Editor 



PHILIP P. LEVY 
Advertising Manager 



Volume VI 



APRIL, 1932 



Number 4 



CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Assessor's Office Louise M. O'Hara 

Controller's Office J. Everett Sharp 

Board of Education .D. P. Hardy and Mrs. Harriet Leaman 

Department of Health Edward M. Coffey 

Department of Public Works Sid Hester 

Bureau of Engineering Wm. C. Pidge 

City Attorney's Office Edmond P. Bergerot 

Civil Service Commission James J. Maher 

Civil Service Association Edward M. Coffey 

Coroner's Office Jane Walsh 

County Clerk Howard Gudelj 

County Welfare Department Esther D. Schwartz 

Department of Electricity Joseph P. Murphy 

District Attorney Henry Goldman 

Engineers' Union J. L, Slater. Jr. 

Exposition Auditorium James L. Foley 

Fire Department Lieut. Fred Jones 

Justice Courts Robert W. Dennis 

Mayor's Office Malcolm Fraser 

Municipal Railway Eugene W. Clisbee 

Municipal Carmen's Union Clark N. Farlow 

Office Employees' Association William T. Bonsor 

Parks and Museums W, M. Strother 

Per Diem Men's Association F. J. Ferguson 

Recreation Department Veda B. Young 

Principals' Association Susie A. Ward 

Public Library Anne M. Farrell 

Public Administrator Henry Boyen 

Recorder's Office Daniel McGloin 

Registrar's Office George L. Sharp 

San Francisco Hospital Mrs. Mae H. Noonan 

San Francisco Water Department N. A. Eckart 

Sealer of Weights and Measures Mrs. M. Dolan 

Sheriff's Office W. J. Martenson 

Superior Courts Henry J. McGrath 

Tax Collector's Office Homer Warren 

Treasurer's Office Duncan Matheson 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Pictorial Review of Hetch Hetchy Cover 

Editorial 3 

San Francisco Must Complete Hetch Hetchy....' 5 

Hetch Hetchy Water Project 7 

By M. M. O'Shiiughnessy. 
Utilities' Manager Issues Statement on Hetch 

Hetchy Bond Issue 13 

Mayor's Phone Operator Handles Many Mes- 
sages 13 

Completion of Hetch Hetchy Vital to San Fran- 
cisco Water Department 17 

By Nelson A. Eckart. 
San Francisco Will Play Prominent Part in 

Livermore Rodeo 19 

Water Bond Issue Vital for Welfare of San 

Francisco 21 

By Leivis F. Byington. 
The Upper Alameda Creek Diversion Works.. 23 
By N. A. Eckart. 

"San Francisco — Her Story" 25 

Public Schools Week : 26 

Some New Books 27 

By Anne M. Farrell. 

Washington Bicentennial Parade and Grand 

Ball 28 

Noteworthy Aid to Home Sanitation 31 

Water Department Report 32 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



HOOD & STRONG 

Certified Public Accountants 

425 Standard Oil Building 

and 

Van Nuys Building 

LOS ANGELES 



Robinson, Nowell 8L Co. 

Certified Public Accountants 

GARFIBLD 8119 

Crocker BIdg. San Franciico 



F. W. Lafrentz 8C Company 
Bullock, Kellogg 8C Mitchell 

Certified Public Accountants 

RUSS BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HENRY H. MEYERS 

GEORGE R. KLINKHARDT 
MILDRED S. MEYERS 

Associate Architects 
1201 Kohl Bldg. San Francisco 



Geo. A. Applegarth 
ARCHITECTS 

703 MARKET STREET 



J. R. MILLER 

AND 

T. L. PFLUEGER 

ARCHITECTS 
580 MARKET STREET 



Professional 
Directory 



Builder of Schools for 30 Years 

HENRY C. SMITH 

A rchitect 

Telephone GARFIBLD 4187 

Humboldt Bank Building 

785 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



O'BRIEN BROS. 

W. D. PEUGH, A.I.A. 
W. J. O'BRIEN 

ARCHITECT 
ENGINEER 



Frederick H. Meyer 
ARCHITECT 

525 Market Street 



W. ADRIAN 

Consulting Engineer 
417 Market Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Telephimea 

San Francisco: DOuglas 7841 

Oakland: HUmboldt 5382 



Office of 

H. A. MINTON 

Architect 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CHARLES J. SIMON 
M.D. 

632-637 Butler Building 

135 Stockton Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Office: EXbrook 2680 Rea.: SUner S700 

Emergency: MArket 2100 



GARFIELD 1878 

Crim, Resing 8C M'Guinness 
ARCHITECTS 

ROOM 202 
488 Pine Street 



Edward A. E antes 

ARCHITECT 



HYMAN 8C APPLETON 

ARCHITECTS 

SAMUEL LIGHTNBR HYMAN 
A. APPLETON 



68 Post Street 



San Francijco 



Charlea F. Masten, A. I. A. 
Lester W. Hurd, A. I. A. 



Masten and Hurd 

ARCHITECTS 

T. F. CHACB, Conntlling £n(meer 

233 Post Street DOuglas 6257 



John Bakewell, Jr. 



Emctt E. Weihe 



Bakewell 8C Weihe 

ARCHITECTS 

251 Kearny Street 
SAN FRANOSCO 



DODGE A. RIEDY 

ARCHITECT 
PACIFIC BUILDING 



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April THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 3 

Vote Yes on Hetch Hetchy Bonds 

WE urge you to vote "Yes" on the Hetch Hetchy Bonds. On May 3 the citizens of San Fran- 
cisco will have the opportunity of sanctioning the completion of the great Hetch Hetchy water 
project. That they will not fail to record their votes for this remarkable engineering feat, is a foregone 
conclusion. 

It means so much to our metropolis; it means more for the future growth of this section of Cali- 
fornia; it means so much for future generations. 

For the past five years the MUNICIPAL RECORD has devoted its pages to a description of this tre- 
mendous public utility. 

It has recorded its progress with pride, and will continue to do so because it has the utmost con- 
fidence in M. M. O'Shaughnessy, the eminent engineer who has been at the head of this project almost 
from its inception. 

There may have been criticisms leveled at the men who had this task in hand, but there is no gain- 
saying it, they have accomplished wonders. 

Mayor Rossi has appointed a Citizens' Committee to sponsor this election. Those selected are 
bending every effort to bring about the authorization of the Hetch Hetchy bonds. 

It is onlv the short-sighted who would fail to approve the bond issue. 

Hetch Hetchy finances are in a healthy condition. Out of the $77,000,000 bonds heretofore sold, 
more than $13,000,000 have been redeemed, largely from the earnings of Moccasin Power House, 
which have been $15,000,000 to date. 

San Francisco is paying less in taxes for water purposes than the east bay cities. 

The Hetch Hetchy system will soon be bringing to San Francisco the pure waters of the Sierra 
Nevada, caught in the Hetch Hetchy and Lake Eleanor reservoirs, from the melting snows and gla- 
ciers of the rugged mountains of the Yosemite National Park. 

Vote "Yes" for Hetch Hetchy bonds. 

It means continued employment to thousands of men; it means no interruption in the carrying out 
of this enormous project. 

The additional funds required are necessary to replace moneys that were diverted from the acque- 
duct funds to build emergency pipe lines. 

To satisfy unanticipated demands for extra safety precautions in driving tunnels. 

To satisfy the demands of the United States Government as to building roads and trails in Yo- 
semite National Park in accordance with the Raker Act which gave the City certain rights in the 
Park. 

Therefore, we appeal to the voters of San Francisco to go to the polls on May 3 and record their 
votes in favor of this much needed bond issue. 
Vote "Yes" for the Hetch Hetchy Bonds. 



SAN FRANCISCO'S LOSS 

THE San Francisco Municipal Record joins with our Mayor and other civic leaders in deplor- 
ing the loss of one of our most valuable citizens. 

Best known for his work as president of San Francisco's World Fair, the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition of 1915, Charles C. Moore has been identified for many years with all construc- 
tive activities of his city. 

Known for his self-sacrificing willingness to aid in the promotion of San Francisco's greatness 
he accepted the task of campaigning for the Hetch Hetchy bond issue. Although he was almost dying 
he agreed to act as chairman of the Mayor's Citizens' Committee. 

His death while still in harness for his beloved city came as a great shock to all of his friends and 
his passing, in the words of Mayor Rossi, "leaves a gaping hole in the ranks of those who love San 
Francisco, and a place that will never be filled." 

It behooves all good San Franciscans to remember that this great fellow citizen devoted the last 
active hours of his life to their common benefit and to see that this sacrifice was not wasted. The Hetch 
Hetchy bond issue must be voted upon favorably. 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



FOR THK SANITARY 
DISPOSAL OF REFUSE 

HEALTHGARD 



HEALTHGARD does away forever with 
the old-fashioned garbage can. Sinks flush 
with the ground. Entirely out of sight, except 
the cover. A pressure of the foot opens. 
Closes automatically. To empty, just lift out 
the removable container. 

Long hfe, made of concrete, aluminum and 
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groove stops ants. Sanitary bottom drain. 
Very simple to install. Low cost. Information 
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MAKERS OF LIGHT AND GREY IRON 
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POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



GOVERNOR ROLPH 

asks you to 

VOTE **YES" 

on Proposition #1 — Oil Control Act 

ELECTION, MAY 3rd 

Nearly 600 independent oil producers, all oil experts, State and Federal government 
authorities, all say the 

Sharkey Oil Control Act Will NOT 
Increase gasoline prices — -create a monopoly — or injure the smiall independent. 

The Sharkey Oil Control Act Will Positively PREVENT 
Monopoly < Higher Prices ^ Bankruptcy < Unemployment 

It gives the small independent oil producers EQUAL RIGHTS with the big companies . . . 
It protects his investment ... It will POSITIVELY stabilize labor — industry — and speed 
the return of PROSPERITY. 

Vote ''YES" on Proposition #1 — Election, May 3rd 

CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS ASSOCIATION 

Representing 90% of the State's Resources 



April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



San Francisco Must Complete 
Hetch Hetchy 



CITIZENS of San Francisco are 
confronted with an unusual situ- 
ation. This is a situation where it 
is necessary to spend money in order 
to save money. To complete the 
great Hetch Hetchy water supply 
project there is required a sum of 
$6,500,000. This money must be pro- 
vided by a bond issue. In accord- 
ance with the charter this bond is- 
sue to complete Hetch Hetchy will 
be submitted to the voters on the 
ballot at the primary election on 
Tiiesdav, Mav 3. 




SIPERVISOR JESSE C. COLMAN 
Chairman, Public L'tilities Committee 

Here is the reason why you should 
vote for this bond issue in order to 
save money. The Coast Range Tun- 
nels which pierce the hills between 
Livermore and the bay are not com- 
plete. There is a five-mile gap yet to 
be finished. If you do not vote "yes" 
on this bond issue and it fails to 
carry it will cost $3,000 a day. or 
over $1,000,000 a year to maintain 
these tunnels in their unfinished 
condition. 

It is, therefore, a matter of com- 
mon sense economy to vote "yes" 
and finish the job. 

These tunnels are driven through 
earth and rock and in order to carrv 




the tremendous volume of water 
that will flow down from the Hetch 
Hetchy reservoir the tunnels have 
to be heavily lined with cement. 
Without such lining there is always 
danger of ca\e-ins. 




main. The Hetch Hetchy system is 
96 per cent complete. Out of a total 
of 135 miles of tunnels and pipelines 
130 miles are all ready to carry 
water. As soon as the remaining 
five miles are completed sparkling 
water from the snowclad peaks of 
the Sierra will be at your faucets. 
To complete this five-mile gap and 
bring mountain water into your 
homes there is required the compar- 
atively insignificant sum of $6,500.- 
000. Compared to our total invest- 
ment of $120,000,000 for a nerpetual 

(Continued on Page 32) 



SCPERVISOR FRANCK R. HAVENNER 

Member Public L'tilities Committee, and 

Chairman, Citizens' Committee, Hetch 

Hetchy Campaign. 

San Francisco's great water sup- 
ply project stands today in a situa- 
tion similar to a man who has just 
completed the l)uliding of an elab- 
orate home and has not yet had the 
water pipes connected to the street 




SUPERVISOR E. JACK SPAILDING 
Member, Public Vlilities Committee 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



K. &E. 
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from 

GAS EXPLOSIONS 

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Interior view of the Hersey Compound Meter. Note the Lever Valve. 
In full open position this valve offers no obstruction to the flow. 



"C VERY compound meter that is even a few per cent off in 
*-^ accuracy is a potential bandit. 

Take the case of a 4-inch compound meter in a Massachusetts 
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cubic feet. It was off 5% in accuracy. This city was robbed 
of nearly a million cubic feet of water ! 

Hersey Compound Meters are the only meters with no loss of 
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April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Hetch Hetchy Water Project 

By M. M. O'Shaughnessy 

Consulting Engineer, Public Utilities Commission, San Francisco 



THIS great system impounds 
water from the melting snows 
and glaciers of the Sierra Nevada in 
two reservoirs, Hetch Hetchy and 
Lake Eleanor. From the reservoirs 
a gravity aqueduct, consisting 
largely' of tunnel, will conduct the 
water to large local reservoirs at and 
near San Francisco. 

Completion of the permanent 
gravity acqueduct will require less 
than two years' time, as about five 
miles of tunnel remain to be exca- 
vated. For temporary use a pipe 
line to carry a portion of the water 
past the tunnel, which is still being 
excavated, is scheduled to be com- 
pleted and ready for operation in 
about three months. 

Coast Range Tunnel 

The tunnel construction is being 
carried on in five remaining rem- 
nants by day labor employees under 
direct charge of the Public Utilities 
Commission, but in accordance with 
the new charter which regulates the 
government of the city, specifica- 




M. M. O'SHAUGHNESSY 

tions have been prepared under 
which the completion of the tunnel 
may be let by contract. The day 
labor organization now doing this 
work is highly experienced and effi- 
cient, as is shown by its previous 
record in driving and lining the 
Foothill tunnel of the Hetch Hetchy 
aqueduct. On this latter work the 
day labor forces three times broke 
the United States monthly records 



for speed in driving tunnel of this 
size and character. For exactly com- 
parable conditions, the cost of driv- 
ing by day labor forces was $35.53 
per foot as against $49.49 by con- 
tractor's forces. In placing concrete 
lining the work of the day labor 
crews was even more satisfactory, 
with a cost per foot of $36.11 as 
compared to the contractor's $47.38 
per foot. 

The tunnel now under construc- 
tion is twenty-eight and one-half 
miles in length. It consists of two 
units, one of which is twenty-five 
miles long, the greatest length ever 
attempted by man, and a shorter 
section three and one-half miles in 
length. The two sections are sep- 
arated by a pipe line which is six- 
tenths miles long. 

To facilitate construction, the 
twenty-five mile tunnel is reached 
by five shafts, two of which are over 
800 feet in depth. Driving has been 
carried on in headings both east and 
west from the bottom level of each 




O'SHAUGHNESSY DAM 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



Phone ISO 



Box 561 



LIVERMORE LUMBER 

CO., Inc. 

Lumber, Mill Work, Lime, Cement 
and General Building Material 

Agents for 
FULLER'S PAINT and PIONEER ROOFING 

North L and Chestnut Sts. 
LIVERMORE, CALIF. 

A. G. ZAHND 



LIVERMORE STEAM 
LAUNDRY 



Second Street 

Between Lizzie and K 



Phone Livermore 237 



LIVERMORE, CALIF. 



ANDERSON MOTORS 

GRAHAM MOTOR CARS 

ROY C. ANDERSON 

Graham Sales and Service 

General Automobile Repairing 



LIVERMORE 



Phone 247 



CALIFORNIA 





TELEPHONE 153 




Independent Lumber 

Retail Dealers in Lumber, Lime, PI 
and Mill Work 


Company 

aster, Cement 


Sole Agents for 
Portland Cement < Golden Gate Ccmen 


t <■ Pabco Shingles 


LIVERMORE 


EARL JOHNSON 

CALIFORNIA 







Licensed Real Estate Broker 




Home Telephone: 217-W Office Telephone: 


142 




M. 


E. CALLAGHAN 




FIRE 


y LIFE 


r ACCIDENT . LIABILITY POLICIES | 






Real Estate and Insurance 






LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 





MalVs Grill 



and 



Coffee Shop 



NEVER CLOSE 



City Employees Welcome 



1141-51 West First Street 
LIVERMORE, CALIF. 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 











m;^- 



0mit 



MOCCASIN POWER PLANT 



shaft and also from the two portals. 
Excavation of the three and one- 
half mile section was completed 
from two portals and the concrete 
lining is now being placed. One of 
the six sections of the twenty-five 
mile tunnel in which excavation has 
been completed is also being lined 
with concrete. In a number of loca- 
tions in the tunnel where the ground 
has been so heavy or swollen that 
successive timbering failed, a gunite 
concrete has been placed, so that at 
present (April 5, 1932) more than 
eleven miles of concrete lining has 
been placed in the twenty-three 
miles of tunnel where excavation 
has been completed. 

About five miles of tunnel remain 
to be excavated and eighteen and 
one-half miles to be lined. It is ex- 
pected that this work will require 
less than two years for completion. 

Work is now in progress on three 
contracts for laying pipe, viz., Red 
Mountain Bar siphon, San Joaquin 



pipe line, and Corral Hollow pipe 
line. 

Red Mountain Bar siphon crosses 
Tuolumne River at the point where 
the river canyon intersects the Foot- 
hill tunnel, which is thus cut into 
two section 10.6 miles and 5.2 miles 
in length. The river canyon at this 
point is flooded to an elevation of 
605 feet during periods of high 
water in Don Pedro reservoir of 
Turlock and Modesto Irrigation 
Districts. It was necessary to com- 
plete the pipe across the river before 
completion of Don Pedro dam in 
1923. 

At that time 770 feet of nine and 
one-half-foot diameter, riveted steel 
pipe was laid and covered with con- 
crete from eighteen inches to two 
feet in thickness. The interior of 
the pipe was lined with cement mor- 
tar one and one-half inches in thick- 
ness. The capacity of the pipe is 
400 million gallons daily. The flow 
of the river was temporarily di- 



verted by construction of a coffer 
dam in successive units, each of 
which covered half the width of the 
stream and the bedrock was exca- 
vated in the dry. 

Under the present contract, the 
two ends of the completed pipe are 
being extended to connect with the 
tunnel portals, a distance of 918 feet 
on the east side of the river and 826 
feet on the west side. On the east or 
upper side is a concrete sand trap. 
On the west side there is an over- 
flow structure. Provision is being 
made for connection for the pen- 
stock of 25,000 horsepower gener- 
ating plant, which it is proposed to 
construct here at a future date. 

The pipe is supported on struc- 
tural steel bents on concrete piers. 
At angle points and at the connec- 
tions with the pipe previously laid, 
the pipe is imbedded in concrete 
anchors. There are six expansion 
joints of the ordinary slip-joint type. 
This pipe line is rapidly approach- 
ing completion, as part of the pro- 
gram to bring in Hetch Hetchy 
water by the emergency pumping 
plan. 

The largest pipe line contract, 
that for constructing forty-seven 
and one-half miles of five-foot pipe 
across the San Joaquin Valley, is 
also nearly complete. The pipe will 
have a capacity of 60 m. g. d. A 
contract was let to Youdall Con- 
struction Company (which is asso- 
ciated with the Western Pipe and 
Steel Company) on May 22, 1931, 
for the estimated sum of $4,156,179, 
a remarkably low price, as it in- 
volves the fabrication and laying of 
about 40,000 tons of steel. All shop 
seams are welded but the circumfer- 
ential field-joints are riveted. This 
pipe is now all laid and backfill will 
be finished at an early date. 

The pipe descends from the outlet 
of the aqueduct tunnel through the 
Sierra Nevada foothills for about 
eight miles in a right of way 200 
feet wide. Here the trench is in 




MOCCASIN REGULATING DAM PROJECT 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 




RhCINAI.I) C). C'l.lFKORI) 

(left) and 

Leonard F. Youdall 

(right) 

•whose matjnificentiuori in 
connection <wil)i the San 
Joaquin I'allcy Pipe Line 
earned Ihem •well deserved 
praise. 




rock. Across the valley, the pipe is 
laid near the southerly edge of an 
110-foot strip which was bought to 
accommodate the city's three pipe 
lines and two double circuit power 
transmission lines on each border. 
One such power line is already in 
service along the northerly edgs of 
the strip. 

Pipe Line Route 

The nature of the soil and of the 
ground water along the pipe line 
route was studied carefully and as a 
result several different methods of 
pipe protection were followed. In 
the rocky trench in the foothills the 
pipe is bedded in fine material and 
similarly backfilled. In addition to 
applying the usual asphaltic coating 
to the steel, the pipe is further pro- 
tected by an exterior cement con- 
crete envelope one-half inch thick. 

This wrapping of the pipe with 
cement mortar was performed by 
Cement Wrapper Pipe Company, at 
a central plant which was located 
first at Bernalis and later at Mo- 
desto. At this plant each pipe sec- 
tion thirty feet long was revolved 
slowly while an ingenious mechan- 
ism placed upon it spirally the one- 
half inch layer of mortar, within 
which was a layer of wire mesh, 
the entire coating being held in 
place by a wrapping of cheese 
cloth. Following this operation the 
coating was sprayed with an as- 
phaltic mixture to facilitate curing. 
After the coating was thorough!}- 
cured the pipes were hauled to the 
trench, laid and tested and the joints 
covered with similar coating. 

Leaving the rocky trench in the 
foothills, the pipe enters dry, sandy 
loam where the pipe covering is 
modified to the ordinary asphaltic 
coating with a wrapping of forty- 
pound asphalted felt, which was ap- 
plied hot and wrapped by machine. 

In slightly corrosive soil with a 
small amount of water, or in soil 
that may develop corrosive proper- 
ties if placed under irrigation, the 



half-inch mortar wrapping is used. 
In swampy areas and in locations 
that may be overflowed if the State 
Water Conservation plan is con- 
summated, the mortar wrapping is 
increased to two inches, applied at 
the central plant in successive coat- 
ings of one inch each. 

Where the pipe is laid at great 
depth, as at Elliott Cut and at San 



Joaquin River, a six-inch -exterior 
envelope of concrete, poured in 
place, is used and the interior of the 
pipe is lined with cement mortar 
one and one-half inch thick. This 
l)i]jc is supported on concrete sad- 
dles on i)ile bents. The work under 
the river crossing has been done by 
Pacific Bridge Company of Port- 
land, Oregon, under sub-contract 
from Youdall Construction Com- 
l)any. 

Corral Hollow Pipe Line 

The third pipe line contract is the 
Corral Hollow Emergency Pipe 
Line, a twenty-four-mile line of 
thirty-six and forty-four inch pipe 
with capacity of forty-five m. g. d., 
in which the water will be pumped 
over a summit at 1540 feet elevation. 
This pipe bypasses the portion of 
the Coast Range Tunnel on which 
work is now in progress. 

Its construction was decided upon 
by the municipal authorities last 




Laying pipe in the San Joaquin Division of Hetch Hetchy 



April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



summer when the city was suffer- 
ing a seriously depleted storage in 
its local reservoirs due to four suc- 
cessive dry winters. In the fall of 
1930 arrangements were made to 
purchase some of the surplus water 
of the East Bay Municipal Utility 
District. A pipe line forty-four and 
thirty-six inches in diameter, twelve 
miles long, and a pumping station of 
capacity of forty m. g. d. were built 
at a cost of over $1,000,000, and the 
city secured from this source as 
much as thirty m. g. d. toward its 
total average consumption of fifty- 
four m. g. d. In the fear that this 
additional suppl}' might be inade- 
quate should the winter of 1931-32 
prove as dry as the four preceding 
ones, it was decided to build what is 
known as the Corral Hollow Emer- 
gency Pipe Line. 

This pipe line is planned to be 
used in conjunction with two com- 
pleted units of the Coast Range 
Tunnel, to deliver water from Hetch 
Hetchy to the local reservoirs of the 
San Francisco Water Department 
system, formerly owned by Spring 
Valley Water Company. 

Water Transmission 

The water transmitted through 
the San Joaquin Pipe Line will 
enter the Coast Range Tunnel at 
Tesla Portal at elevation 399 feet 
to flow four and one-half miles to 
Thomas Shaft. 

An electrically operated pumping 
station in the tunnel will lift the 
water 302 feet vertically through 
thirty-six inch pipe in a shaft 
seven and one-half feet in diameter, 
to a second pumping station at the 
surface. This second pumping sta- 
tion will force the water through six 
and one-half miles of forty-four- 




Dumbarton pipe line crossing San Francisco Bay 



inch pipe to a third pumping station 
against a static head of 200 feet. 
From these last pumps a forty-four- 
inch pipe 0.6 mile long, leads to 
Seco Summit, pierced by a short 
tunnel at elevation 1540 feet. The 
static head is 655 feet from the sum- 
mit the water will flow by gravity 
through seventeen miles of thirty- 
six-inch pipe to Alameda West Por- 
tal of the Coast Range Tunnel, hav- 
ing bypassed the five sections of 
tunnel aggregating five miles in 
length, which are still being driven. 
From Alameda Portal three and 
one-half miles of completed tunnel 
will convey the water to the Baj- 
Crossing Pipe Line which has been 
in service since 1925 delivering 




Hetch Hetchy Hospital 



water into Crystal Springs Reser- 
voir on the San Francisco peninsula. 

Normal Rainfall 

In the winter which has just 
passed the rainfall has been prac- 
tically normal (about twenty inches 
to date). During the early part of 
the winter the rain storms followed 
at close intervals and built up stor- 
age in the local reservoirs to almost 
thirty-one billion gallons, the great- 
est of record. This amount of water, 
together with the yield from under- 
ground sources, assures the city 
of sufficient water for two years, 
without drawing on emergency sup- 
plies. 

The Corral Hollow Pipe Line is 
being constructed by Youdall Con- 
struction Company under contract 
awarded November 6, 1931, in the 
estimated amount of $951,050.90. 
The pipe is fabricated and laid by 
Western Pipe and Steel Company. 
Every reasonable economy has been 
adopted in construction as the pipe 
will go out of service upon comple- 
tion of the tunnel. All seams are 
welded. A three-inch bell is pro- 
vided for welding, but only one inch 
of this used so as to facilitate sal- 
vaging the pipe at some future date. 
Construction is proceeding rapidly 
and should be completed early this 
summer. It is possible that the 
pumping equipment may be stored, 
to be installed should necessity arise. 

Present State of Finances 

The Hetch Hetchy work has been 
financed by four bond issues aggre- 
gating $79,600,000. Two of these 
issues, amounting to $45,600,000, 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



were autliDiized jirior to tin- re- 
clesigniiifj of the system by John K. 
Frecniaii in 1912 and before the 
Hetch Hetchy (irant iiad been made 
by Congress. 

The system planned up to that 
time included miles of open, unlined 
canal along the deen canyon of the 
Tuolumne River and provided for 
pumping sixty m. g. d. over the 
Coast Range Mountains. 

The Freeman Plan scrapped these 
methods and jsrovides for a gravity 
delivery, using sixty-six miles of 
tunnel, as well as the development 
of the maximum amount of hydro- 
electric energy by successive drops 
in the course of the water from the 
high mountains to the lower levels. 
This plan calls for ultimate deliverv 
of 400 ni. g. d. and 250,000 horse- 
power of hydro-electric energy. 
Necessarily, the Freeman Plan is 
more expensive than the earlier 
plans. 

Bond Issue of 1928 

In 1928 a bond issue of $24,000,000 
was authorized to complete the 
w^ork. At the present time the con- 
struction is seriously hampered by 
lack of cash. Last summer the 
writer, in his then capacitj' of City 
Engineer, recommended to the 
Board of Supervisors that thev sell 
the $12,000,000 of bonds then re- 
maining on hand, to provide funds 
to continue the work until this sum- 
mer. The Supervisors authorized 
the sale of $8,000,000 bonds which 
brought a substantial premium, but 
in November, 1931, when they so- 
licited bids for part of the remain- 
ing $4,000,000, no bids were re- 




L. T McAFEE 
Chii'j Assistant Emjinrer 

ceived, as the value was less than 
par and the City Charter prohibits 
the sale of bonds at less than par. 

The employees on the project then 
stepped into the breach and formed 
what is known as the "Hetch 
Hetchy Bond Purchase Syndicate," 
consisting of every man on the job, 
from the highest to the lowest. 
Each man contributes to the Syndi- 
cate 10 per cent of his monthly pa\'. 
Bonds are purchased from the City 
Treasurer at par and then sold to 
the highest bidder. The Syndicate 
pays the difference between par and 
the market value. Wherever pos- 
sible, contractors and material men 



take bonds in jiayment. Thus the 
work continues and some 1500 men 
are kept in em])loyment. 

Diversion of Funds 

l-'unds totaling $2,500,000 orig- 
inally authorized for tunnel con- 
struction have been diverted to 
emergency pipe line installation. 
About $1,000,000 additional cost was 
introduced by the insistence of 
-State and Federal Inspectors for 
extra safety methods and equip- 
ment in tunnel construction. The 
demands of the United States De- 
partment of the Interior for con- 
struction of roads and trails within 
Yosemite National Park require an 
additional $1,500,000. The deter- 
mination to use construction funds 
to pay for power for construction 
purposes, generated at the city"s 
Moccasin Power House adds $700,- 
000 more, so it is now necessary to 
ask the voters to authorize an addi- 
tional bond issue of $6,500,000 to 
complete the tunnel work. This 
proposition goes on the ballot the 
presidential primary election on 
May 3. 

The tunnel work must be com- 
pleted some time. It is estimated 
that if the work were temporarily 
discontinued, it would cost approxi- 
mately $1,000,000 annually to main- 
tain the tunnels until work could be 
resumed. In the meantime, use of 
the Corral Hollow Pipe Line would 
cost about $400,000, annually for 
delivery of the forty-five m. g. d. 
There is no alternative except to 
complete the tunnels. 




Photo by Chaffee 
The life stream of San Francisco as it courses througli the Early Intake Spilluay. .4 bond issue to hrint/ it to the people 

<u;ill be voted upon May 3rd. 



April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



13 



Utilities Manager Issues Statement 
on Hetch Hetchy Bond Issues 



Mr. Franck R. Havenner, 
Chairman of the Citizens Committee, 
Hetch Hetchy Bond Campaign, 
608 Crocker Building, 
San Francisco, California. 

Dear Sir : 

I strongly urge the people of San 
Francisco to approve the $6,500,000 
Hetch Hetchy bond issue on May 3. 
I believe that this issue will provide 
sufficient money to completely finsh 
the Hetch Hetchy Water Project. 

In order to determine whether 
I can conscientiously make that 
statement, I have had two estimates 
prepared independently by two sets 
of engineers, covering the cost of 
completion of the Hetch Hetchy 
system. 

One estimate has been made by 
the engineers under Mr. O'Shaugh- 
nessy, rechecking their previous 
statements of cost. They have made 
new measurements covering the 
work necessary to be done. Their 
estimates, taking into consideration 
the work that has been completed in 
the last few months, rechecks their 
original costs and shows that the 
funds asked for will be ample to 
complete the work. 

The other estimate of cost was 
made by Mr. Randall Ellis, engineer 
for the Board of Supervisors, and 
his estimate made independently, 
shows the same results. 

The bonds must be voted because, 
from a business standpoint, it is the 
cheapest thing to do. Bond interest 
on the $6,500,000 issue would be ap- 
proximately $325,000 per year. If 
the bonds do pass, interest until the 
construction is finished will be paid 
from the principal sum of $6,500,000, 
thus entailing no added hardship on 
the taxpayer in the present difficult 
economic situation. If the bonds do 
not pass, the work must be shut 
down and the tunnels maintained 
until such time as money shall be 
made available for the completion of 
the work. The maintenance work 
consists of pumping out the tunnels, 
retimbering and mucking out caved 
ground. This work will cost approxi- 
mately $1,100,000 per year. This 
money can only be raised by an in- 
crease in the tax rate, and the 
amount to be so paid will be more 




contracts and the completion of the 
work. 

The Public Utilities Commission 
has unequivocally assured me of its 
support in this plan for the comple- 
tion of the San Francisco municipal 
water system. 

Yours very truly, 
E. G. CAHILL, 

Manager, Public Utilities Com- 
mission. 



EDWARD G. CAHILL 
Manager, Public VtUitics Commission 

than triple the amount to be paid as 
interest on the bonds. 

As a mining engineer of consider- 
able experience, I know that even 
with the huge maintenance costs 
mentioned, if these unconcreted tun- 
nels are left open for any consider- 
able length of time, parts of them 
will cave in. Every cubic yard of 
rock that caves in must be moved 
out of the tunnels, and when the 
time comes to concrete the tunnels 
the void made by the cave-in will 
have to be filled by concrete. There- 
fore, it will never be as cheap in the 
future to complete these tunnels as 
it is at this minute. The extra cost 
required if the work is not done now 
depends on the length of time that 
elapses between the shut-down and 
the resumption of the work, and 
there is every probability that if as 
long a time as six months were to 
elapse a considerably larger bond 
issue than $6,500,000 would be nec- 
essary to complete the job. 

If the funds for the completion of 
the Hetch Hetchy work are made 
available by the vote of the people 
on May 3, the procedure which I 
will observe in connection with the 
completion of the Hetch Hetchy 
project will be strictly in accordance 
with the provisions of the new 
charter. 

Bids from private contractors will 
be called for in connection with all 
work on that project, without excep- 
tion. Contracts will be let to the 
lowest responsible bidders, who will 
be compelled to furnish bonds for 
the faithful performance of their 



Mayor's Phone OperatcM* 

Handles Many 

Messages 



Miss Dorothy Healey, secretarial 
telephone operator in the Mayor's 
office, is, of course, a valuable mem- 
ber of the group that aids the Chief 
Executive in carrying out the duties 
of his office. 




DOROTHY HEALEY 

Miss Healy recently attained a 
permanent place in the office, due to- 
iler ability and experience. Her suc- 
cess has pleased her numerous 
friends in and out of the city gov- 
ernment. 

Mayor Rossi and Chief Adminis- 
trator Cleary congratulated her, and 
other officials who know her skill in 
this difficult field added their best 
wishes. 

Miss Healy is a native of this city, 
and a daughter of a pioneer. She 
has held the position of operator for 
the past eight years, first under 
Governor Rolph and now under 
Mayor Rossi. 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



BEST WISHES 
to 

OFFICIALS 

and 



Hetch'Hetchy Workers 



DELBERT HANSEN 



HAULING 



and 



GENERAL TRUCKING 



LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 




H. H. Aqueduct, Tesla Portal and Camp 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



15 



J. H. CREIGHTON 



Using New 



FEDERAL 

MOTOR TRUCKS 




Hauling and Trucking 

LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 








ito /JO 



■ TW¥A^£Li TO rtV/.flC£7r AQueouc T 

■ fifpe z-*vfs TO cor*fig£7x /tQu£Cx/<:r 



/'90 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



i6 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



General Metals Corporation 

FOUNDRY DIVISION 

STEEL CASTINGS {Electric Furnace Process) 

Hest Steel Plant - - Oakland, Calif. 

IRON CASTINGS (Cupola Process) 

Best Iron Plant Oakland, Calif. 

JEWELL STEEL CASTINGS (Malleable Process) 

Pacific Malleable Plant Oakland, Calif. 

MALLEABLE CASTINGS 

Pacific Malleable Plant Oakland. Calif. 

Western Malleable Plant - - - - Los Angeles, Calif. 

FORGE DIVISION 

DROP FORCINGS 

Western Drop Forge Plant - - - Los Angeles, Calif. 

PRESS FORCINGS 

Western Press Forge Plant - - - Los Angeles, Calif. 

MACHINE DIVISION 

TRUCK WHEELS (Spoke-Type) 

California Wheel Plant ----- Oakland, Calif. 

CC and DC RIMS (Attached clamp) 

California Wheel Plant Oakland, Calif. 

General Metals Corporation 

483 California Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone EXbrook 5568 



Page 


Steel & Wire Company 




Chain Link Fences 




Distributor 




Michel & Pfeffer Iron Works 




SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



F. J. CARROLL, Proprietor 

San Francisco Brass Foundry 

Eilablished 1880 

Brass, Bronze and Aluminum Castings / NicrOmetal a Non- 
Tarnishing and Acid-Resisting Metal 

Manufacturers of Superior Bronze Bushings - Comet Bronze Bushings 
PHONE KEARNY 2623 

48-50 Clementina Street San Francisco 



"PUMPING PROBLEMS" 
Solved 

With a Complete Line of 

PUMPS 
Kimball-Krogh Pump Company 

515 Harrison Street DAvenport 1113-1114 



JOHN FINN, PrtiiJtnl 



ROBERT B. FINN, StcrtUry 



JOHN FINN METAL WORKS 

SAN FRANCISCO and SEATTLE 

Babbitt Metati and Solders • Type Metals and Zinc Dust 
Catvaniting «nd Sherdsrdizing 

372-398 SECOND STREET 

Telephone SUTTER 4188 



Tel. DOuglas 1182 

JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS 

Iron Founders < Machinists' Engineers 



Office: 200 Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Clinton Construction Company 
General Contractors 



923 Folsom Street 



San Francisco 




LTILIXy-BEALTy 

%UELLER Ca. 

1072-1076 HOWARD STREET 



Welders of Automotive Parts :-: InduitrUl Machinery ;•: Boiler* ft Tatilu 
Pipe Contractors* Equipment 

HOLIDAY AND NIGHT SERVICE 



PEERLESS WELDING CO. 

RUDY STRECKER, Proprielor 

WELDING ENGINEERS 

Phones: MArket 0678-0679 r Night Phone: MOntroM 2277 
155 TENTH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



17 



Completion of Hetch Hetchy Vital to 
San Francisco Water Department 

By N. A. EcKART 

General Manager and Chief Engineer, San Francisco Water Department 



UNDER the provisions of the 
new charter, the Hetch Hetchy 
project is set up as a utiHty separate 
and apart from the San Francisco 
Water Department until its comple- 
tion, at which time it will merge 
with the Water Department. 

In view of this fact, the San Fran- 
cisco Water Department is vitally 
interested in the success of the bond 
election to be held on May 3 to pro- 
vide for the completion of the Hetch 
Hetchy project. With Hetch Hetchy 
completed, pure mountain water 
will flow directly by gravity into our 
Crystal Springs reservoir, from 
which it will flow into San Fran- 
cisco, eliminating the costly pump- 
ing which otherwise would be 
required. 

These tunnels must be completed. 
Failure to vote the bonds at this 
election means that the proposition 
for bonds must be submitted again 
and again if necessary until funds 
are provided to complete this work. 
Failure to carry the bonds at this 
election means that an expense of 
$3,000 a day must be incurred for 
each day that elapses until the nec- 
essary bond issue is carried. This 
expense of $3,000 a day will result 
from the necessity of maintaining 




crews at the shafts and in all of the 
unlined portion of the tunnels al- 
ready driven, to keep the tunnels 
free of water and to constantly re- 
new the timbers necessary to hold 
the excavation open. The cost of any 
such work is chargeable as a part of 
the cost of the project and must be 
borne either by taxes or reflected in 
water rates. 



The completion of the Hetch 
Hetchy tunnel will eliminate forever 
the specter of a shortage in our 
water supply, with which we have 
been confronted so often in the past. 

With Hetch Hetchy water avail- 
al)le in the Peninsula and in San 
I'Vancisco in abundant supply, we 
will be in a position to invite new 
industries, new consumers, and pro- 
vide a market for a greater con- 
sumption of water. It is primarily 
through such increased consumption 
of water and greater volume of sales 
that we may look for a reduction in 
our water rates. 

Construction costs will probably 
never be lower than they are toda}'. 
. Work done during this period of 
low prices insures the greatest re- 
turn in the future for the money 
expended. Those who saw the de- 
pleted condition of our reservoirs 
in Alameda County and on the Pen- 
insula last fall can appreciate how 
close we were to an absolute water 
famine. With the Hetch Hetchy 
completed this condition will never 
confront us again. Vote "Yes" on 
the Hetch Hetchy bonds May 3, 
1932. 




The first built of Spring Val- 
ley's three major distributing 
reservoirs in San Francisco is 
Laguna Honda, at Seventh 
Avenue opposite Ortega Street. 
Make sure that this and other 
city reservoirs will always be 
full of clear mountain water 
by voting "Yes" on the Hetch 
Hetchy Bonds. 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



U. S. Royal Cordi - U. S. Solid Tirci 

Prcit-o-Lite Batteriei 

TELEPHONE HEMLOCK 4370-4371 

DECKER & HORSTMANN 

INCORPORATED 

SAN FRANCISCO 
A. HORSTMANN 167 HAYES STREET 



Manufacturers — Renovators 




SAN FRANCISCO 



A. NEBENZAHL, Prop. 

Phont GARFIELD 9679 

Specialising in 

Hats Made to Your Order 

«nd 

Caps of the Latest Model 

Price ^1.50 and up 



L. [). liEIMAN 



Candies and Novelties 



MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 



SALOMON 

AND 

HERMAN 











Best Wishes from 

W, HASLAM 

HAUTJNG AND GENERAL 
TRUCKING 

OAKDALE, CALIFORNIA 











Buy from firms that advertise with us 



April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



19 



San Francisco Will Play Prominent Part 
in Famous Livermore Rodeo 



NINETY minutes from the heart 
of metropolitan San Francisco, 
the old West lives in all its glory 
at Livermore, where the great Liver- 
more Rodeo will be presented May 
14 and 15. Here the cowboy reigns 
supreme from his throne in the sad- 
dle on the back of a plunging bronc 
while the thrilling sports of pioneer 
days are portrayed in true western 
fashion. 

San Francicso, leading metropolis 
of the West of today, plays a promi- 
nent part in the pageant of the old 
West. Mayor Angelo J. Rossi will 
lead the pioneer parade of old stage 
coaches and prairie schooners which 



will open the show Saturday morn- 
ing and will be guest of honor at 
the performance that afernoon. Gov- 
ernor James Rolph, Jr., will make 
his annual visit to the big show 
Sunday when he will present tro- 
phies and prizes to the winners of 
twenty spectacular cowboy events 
and extend congratulations of the 
state of California to John Schneider, 
Livermore boy who is cowboy cham- 
pion of the world. 

Hugh S. Walker, San Francisco 
hide merchant and owner of a cattle 
ranch near Livermore, is one of the 
active promoters of the Rodeo. He 
is arena director, in charge of the 




MAYOR ANGELO J. ROSSI 

San Francisco's Mayor will lead the Pioneer Parade at Livermore. This happy photograph 
was taken luhen he acted as Grand Marshal of La Fiesta de Las Rosas in San Jose last year. 



bronc riding, Brahma steer riding 
and roping contests. Dr. T. E. Shu- 
mate, San Francisco police commis- 
sioner, is also a director of the show 
and more than a dozen prominent 
San Franciscans are listed as hon- 
orary directors. 

A special invitation has been ex- 
tended to the children of San Fran- 
cisco to attend the big show May 
14. As guests of Johnny Schneider, 
all children of grammar school age 
who are accompanied by their par- 
ents will be admitted free of charge. 

Buggies and surries that drove 
smartly through Golden Gate Park 
forty years ago will be exhibited in 
the pioneer parade which will open 
the show Saturday morning. They 
were formerly owned by the late 
Chris Buckley, political leader of 
San Francisco, who had stored them 
at Ravenswood, his beautiful ranch 
in the Livermore valley. Presented 
to the Rodeo Association three 
months ago, they will be appearing 
in the parade for the first time this 
year. 

Four miles of pioneer vehicls. in- 
cluding the greatest collection of 
old stage coaches in e.xistence, doz- 
ens of prairie schooners and many 
other relics of the past will be in 
line for the parade. 

Twenty spectacular events are on 
the program for the Rodeo, which 
will present the greatest riders in 
the nation in competition with the 
wildest horses that have ever ap- 
peared at a cowboy show. Steamboat, 
huge outlaw, who has never been rid- 
den, will test the mettle of such fa- 
mous cowboys as Johnny Schneider, 
Earl Thode, Pete Knight, Perry 
Ivory, Clay Carr, Smokey Snyder 
and a hundred others. Brahma 
steers, savage cattle with long 
gnarled horns and huge humped 
shoulders will be be used in the 
steer riding contest with Sunny Jim, 
unridden bull, leading the herd. All 
the other events for which the Liv- 
ermore Rodeo is famous, including 
bulldogging, steer roping, trick and 
fancy riding and roping, and the 
thrilling -pony express and relay 
races are on the program. 

Livermore, last remaining strong- 
hold of the old West in the Bay 
district, is a delightful ninety-minute 
ride over paved highways from San 
Francisco. Motorists may drive over 
the bay bridge or use the ferry to 
(Continued on Page 21) 



20 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Apr 



WATER 

All Are Good 
Some Are Better 
One Is Best — 




The EMPIRE 

Oscillating Piston Meter 



TO SAY that anything is the 
"best" is a pretty broad state- 
ment, but there seems to be good 
reason for speaking that way about 
the EMPIRE meter, because it has 
been on the market for nearly forty- 
six years, and no other meter has ever 
surpassed it in sustained accuracy; 
and no other meter can show such 
records of long service, often with 
no repairs at all, and in all cases 
with unequaled economy of main- 
tenance. 

If accuracy, lasting qualities, and 
low upkeep can make a meter the 
"best," we have used the right word 
to describe the EMPIRE. 



NATIONAL METER COMPANY 

299 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

1048 Folsom St., San Francisco 5401 Woodlawn Ave., Seattle 

2309-11 East Eighth St., Los Angeles 



L. P. Degen Belting Company 

Manufacturers 

Belting ^ Leather Packings 

Gates Vulco Rope V -Drives 
260 Mission Street EXbrook 3820 



James A. Nelson, Inc. 

Heating and Ventilating 
Contractors 



1375 Howard Street, cor. Tenth Street 



Automobile 
Reconstruction 



Phone 
GRaystone 0226 



GOLDEN GATE RADIATOR, 
BODY & FENDER WORKS 

RADIATORS CLEANED 

Circulation Guaranteed 

Re-cored and Re-built — Complete Duco Refinishing 



440 Golden Gate Avenue 

RAY F. COSTA 



San Francisco 



CEMENT GUN 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA 
E. F. HALLORAN, Manager 

We Do High Class Cement Gun 
Work and Supply Necessary 
Expert Engineering Supervision 

85 SECOND STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone SUTTER 8306 

Wholesale Department: Phone VAlencia 4208 



WAYLAND COMPANY, Ltd. 

ENGINEERS and CONTRACTORS 

JOHNS-MANVILLE 

ACOUSTICAL AND SOUND ABSORBING 
MATERIALS < CORRUGATED AND FLAT 
ASBESTOS WOOD / ASBESTOS WALL 
TILE f PACKING 8C POWER PRODUCTS 



563 Second Street 

Telephone GArfield 7440 



San Francisco 



"A Dependable Source of Supply" 

TAYLER & SPOTSWOOD CO. 

Inc. 

MILD STEEL BARS, SHAPES, SHEETS 

COLD ROLLED STEEL 

"EMPIRE" HEAT TREATED BOLTS and NUTS 

"BRIAR HILL" SMITHING COAL 

"RACO" WELDING ROD 

HEAVY HARDWARE 



MINNESOTA dC 19TH STREETS 

San Francisco California 

Phone Mission 7800 



Enterprise Electric Works 

THE MOTOR HOUSE 



Wlf! RENT, REPAIR, SELL and EXCHANGE MOTORS 

*^ RENT HOISTS, SAW TABLES and COMPRESSORS 

INDUSTRIAL WIRING 



1164 Mission Street 



HEmlock 2701 



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April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Water Bond Issue Vital for Welfare 

of San Francisco 



By Lewis F. Byington 

President, Public Utilities Commission 



IT is difficult to believe that an}' 
good citizen can give a moment's 
thought to the welfare of San Fran- 
cisco and then, on May 3, next, vote 
against the proposition authorizing 
the sale of $6,500,000 bonds to pro- 
vide necessary funds to aid in the 
completion of the Hetch Hetchy 
water system. The result of the de- 
feat of the measure providing for 
the bonds would be to directly in- 
crease the burden of the taxpayers 
and work an injury to all our people, 
for it would be absolutely necessary 
to provide money to keep up the 
tunnels and entire system, at an es- 
timated cost of $3,000 per day, or 
practically one million dollars a 
year, which amount it would be nec- 
essary to collect through taxes 
levied on the people, and it would 
also delay bringing the water and 
thus deprive San Francisco of the 
revenue which would come to it 
from the sale thereof. It would also 
result in throwing between 1,200 
and 1,400 men out of employment 
and disorganize the entire depart- 
mental force, and be a paralyzing 
blow to San Francisco. 

Dams in the High Sierra to im- 
pound over sixty billion gallons of 
the purest mountain water have al- 
ready been built at Lake Eleanor 
and Hetch Hetchy. Tunnels have 
been constructed and pipe lines laid 
which will bring the waters almost 
to our homes and industries. Of 
sixty-four miles of tunnels included 
in the system, all have been driven 
through our mountains with the ex- 
ception of approximately five miles. 
To refuse to provide funds now 
would be as unwarranted as to lay 
the foundations, build the ap- 
proaches, and carry on the construc- 
tion of a splendid steel bridge across 
the bay to the Alameda shore, and 
then refuse to provide further funds 
when but one short span remained 
to be laid before traffic could cross. 
Failure to vote the bonds to com- 
plete this project to give San Fran- 
cisco a greatly needed supply of 
water would be to discredit us 
throughout the nation, and it would 
be said that we were unable to ac- 
complish what all other great cities 
had accomplished. 




Los Angeles, last fall, voted a 
bond issue of 220 million dollars for 
an additional supply of water from 
the Colorado River, and, I am ad- 
vised, that this involves a further 
yearly pumping expense of six mil- 
lions. Compare this with some 75 
millions we have spent and the six 
and one-half millions now asked; 
and our system, when completed, 
will have no pumping expense, as 
the water will flow from the High 
Sierra to the city reservoir by the 
force of gravity. 

It is true that approximately $79,- 
000,000 has been voted for the Hetch 
Hetchy system, but of this nearly 
$5,000,000' has been diverted to 
emergency measures in bringing 
water from other sources owing to 
continued dry years, in building 
roads and trails ordered by the gov- 
ernment under the terms of grants, 
and providing safeguards in driving 
tunnels. These emergencies have 
now been provided for and with the 
completion of the tunnels and pipe 
lines to bring Hetch Hetchy water 
here, all danger of a future scarcity 
of water will have passed. The 
Spring Valley reservoirs, now our 
source of supply, at the end of win- 
ter hold some thirty billion gallons 
of water ; Lake Eleanor and the 
Hetch Hetchy dams, now almost 
ready to be tapped, hold seventy- 
five billion gallons. The money sup- 
plied and the work completed, San 
Francisco will be blessed with the 
finest municipal water system on the 
continent, supplying to our people 
the purest and most healthful water. 



Progressive San Francisco cannot 
afford to defeat this call for the au- 
thorization of a sale of $6,5000,000 
of bonds to bring needed water to 
the consumers, both domestic and 
industrial. 

The Public Utilities Commission, 
upon the passage of the bond meas- 
ure, will at once invite contractors, 
under the terms of the new charter, 
to bid on all work necessary to be 
done in carrying on the project, and 
feel assured that this will result in 
a saving of money and in measura- 
bly speeding up the work. All the 
registered voters should become in- 
terested in the completion of the 
Hetch Hetchy water system and, by 
voting on May 3, assure the passing 
of the bond authorization with a ma- 
jority far in excess of the required 
two-thirds. 

A city can have no greater asset 
than abundant and pure water; all 
great cities are continually looking 
for available sources from which to 
supply this necessity. We have built 
our impounding dams, dug over 
sixty miles of tunnels through the 
mountains, laid our pipe lines across 
the valleys, and brought this greatly 
needed utility almost to our doors. 
Every consideration of sound busi- 
ness judgment demands that we 
complete the work now. 



SAN FRANCISCO PLAYS PART 
IN LIVERMORE RODEO 



(Continued from Page 19) 

reach highways through either Dub- 
lin Canyon or Niles Canyon, both 
beautiful journeys. 

Adoption of the May date for the 
Rodeo, which formerly was held 
July 4, brings the big show in the 
spring when the Livermore valley 
is carpeted wth green grass and 
golden poppies, before the heat of 
the summer. It also comes at a 
time when all of the top-notch cow- 
boys are in California, before they 
separate to compete at Calgary, 
Cheyenne and other big shows 
throughout the Middle West. 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



SIMMONS 

Scdi iMattresscs Springs 



•uitT roa aiAXf 



Beauty-Rest 
Mattresses 




Ace Box 
Spring 



Specialists in Sleeping Equipment 

for 

HOMES f HOTELS r APARTMENTS 

HOSPITALS / CONSTRUCTION CAMPS 

Your furniture dealer will gladly help you make a 

selection of Simmons Equipment 

The Simmons Company 

San Francisco Factory: 295 BAY STREET 



PAYNE'S BOLT WORKS 

Telephone DAvenport 3700 
Established 1871 — Incorporated December 17, 1888 

The Only Carriage Bolt Works on the 
Pacific Coast 

Manufacturers of 

Iron and Steel Set Screws, 
Cap Screws, Studs 

And all kinds of 

BOLTS AND NUTS 



201 Main Street 



San Francisco, Calif. 



MAKE YOUR ROADS DUSTLESS 

with 

Solvay Calcium Chloride 
GEO. HERMANN COMPANY 

300 Front Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Neptune Meter Company 

THOMSON METER CORP. 

50 East 42nd Street New York City 



Manufacturers of the 

TRIDENT AND LAMBERT WATER METERS 



Over 6,000,000 



Trident and Lambert Water Meters, 
made and sold the world over, is the 
unparalleled record of growth which we are proud to offer the Water Works field. 



LOS ANGELES 
701 East Third Street 



Pacific Coast Branches 

SAN FRANCISCO 
320 Market Street 



PORTLAND 
525 Johnson Street 



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April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



23 



The Upper Alameda Creek Diversion Works 
of the San Francisco Water Department 

By N. A. EcKART 

General Manager and Chief Engineer, San Francisco Water Department 



THE Upper Alameda Creek Di- 
version Works which was com- 
pleted in December, last, for the 
San Francisco Water Department, 
was part of a program originally 
laid down by the Spring Valley 
Water Company in the development 
of the water resources on the east 
side of San Francisco Bay in Ala- 
meda and Santa Clara Counties. The 
project, in brief, consists of a rein- 
forced concrete diversion dam con- 
structed across Upper Alameda 
Creek together wth screen racks and 
control gates connecting with a tun- 
nel 9,700 feet in length leading into 
Calaveras reservoir. The purpose 
of the project was to make possible 
the storage in the Calaveras reser- 
voir of the run-off during the per- 
iods of heavy stream flow from 
about thirty square miles of water- 
shed of Upper Alameda Creek lying 
above the diversion dam, thus con- 
serving the flood flows which other- 
wise would flow down the stream 
and be wasted into the bay and add- 
ing thereby approximately twelve 



million gallons daily to the normal 
capacity of the Water Department's 
system. 

It is estimated that the timely 
completion of this project made pos- 
sible the storage in the Calaveras 
reservoir of riearly six billion gallons 
of water during the past rainy sea- 
son which otherwise would have 
been wasted. 

Plans and specifications for the di- 
version dam were prepared by the 
engineering office of the Water De- 
partment early in 1931, which were 
approved by the State Engineering 
Department. Bids were invited and 
a contract entered into immediately 
after July, when funds were made 
available under the current budget. 
Actual work was commenced about 
August 1 by the contractors, Bar- 
rett & Hilp, and completed Decem- 
ber 18, 1931, in ample time to divert 
the first flood flow of Upper Ala- 
meda Creek through the tunnel on 
December 26, 1931. 

The driving of the tunnel, which 
was started by the Spring Valley 




FIELD FORCE DURING CONSTRUCTION 

Left to right — George Gama, draftsman, S. F. If. D.; E. M. Goldstine, accountant, 
Barrett & Hilp; J. T. Hester, junior hydraulic engineer, S. F. tV. D.; J. M. Smithiuick, 
instrument man, S. F. tV. D.; O. F. Atkinson, superintendent, Barrett & Hilp; E. Levy, 
carpenter foreman, Barrett & Hilp; C. Gilfeather, timekeeper, Barrett & Hilp; C. E. 
Lauenstein, resident engineer, S. F. fV. D. 



Water Company on a day-labor 
basis, was carried on and completed 
by the San Francisco Water Depart- 
ment on the same plan. At the time 
of acquiring the properties on March 
3, 1930, 4,400 feet of this tunnel had 
been driven and lined by the Spring 
Valley Water Company, working 
from the West Portal ; the remain- 
ing 5,300 feet were being finished 
by the city, driving from both ends. 
The diversion dam is located on 
Upper Alameda Creek, approxi- 
mately a mile above the point where 
this creek joins with Calaveras 
Creek and about ten miles southeast 
of Sunol, Alameda County. Almost 
immediately after the City took over 
the Spring Valley properties prelim- 
inary steps were taken toward open- 
ing a camp in the vicinity of the 
damsite which was used by the City 
forces in driving the tunnel from 
this easterly portal and later in con- 
nection with the construction of the 
dam. It was also necessary to con- 
struct an extension of the 11,000- 
volt transmission line over the hill 
from the west portal to furnish 
power for the tunnel driving opera- 
tions and for the dam construction. 
Other preliminary work consisted in 
the building of a necessary road to 
provide access for delivery of mate- 
rial to the site of the work. Test pits 
were made to determine the charac- 
ter of material at each of several 
possible damsites before locating 
the dam in its present position. In- 
formation gained from these test 
pits also was an important factor in 
determining the type of dam to be 
constructed. 

The diversion dam is what is 
known as a reinforced concrete 
"slab and buttress" type structure. 
The crest of the spillway is at an 
elevation of thirty feet above the 
stream bed, the dam is approxi- 
mately 130 feet in length, the spill- 
way section being 90 feet long. The 
spillway has a capacity of 7,500 
cubic feet per second with a depth 
of 7y2 feet over the crest, although 
the dam is designed to pass 15 feet 
over the crest without overtopping^ 



2J_ 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



the ahutmeiUs. 'I'lu' dam is liollow 
with an ins]>ccti()n fi;allery leadiiiK 
throujjh it, giving access to the gate 
control system at the tiimiel portal. 



An extensive system of screen 
racks serves to ])revent trees, l^nish, 
and other debris from entering the 
tumul, wliile a sand trap with scour- 




ing gates permits the sluicing out of 
sand and gravel which in periods of 
Hood may be deposited behind the 
dam. 0])portunity was had follow- 
ing some of the heavy flood flows 
to determine the efificacy of the sand 
tra]) and gates, with very satisfac- 
tory results. 

The tunnel is concrete lined 
throughout and is of a horseshoe 
section 5>^ feet in width and 63^ 
feet in height. It has a slope of one 
foot in a hundred. This compara- 
tively steep fall gives the tunnel a 
carrying capacity of more than 600 
cubic feet per second, equal to 400 
million gallons daily. 

The nature of the material through 
which the tunnel was driven was 
not homogeneous, about one-fourth 
of its length being in hard blue 
sandstone, whereas the remaining 
distance was largely a decomposed 
shale, or "gouge," as the miners 
called it. Driving the tunnel through 
this "gouge" presented much diffi- 
culty largely due to the fact that it 
was what was generally referred to 
as "swelling ground," which has the 
effect of moving in after the tunnel 
is excavated, tending to close the 
opening. This resulted in great 
weight being placed upon the tim- 
bers used to hold the ground before 
the lining is placed. In many places 
the timbering had to be replaced 
two or three times before the tun- 
nel could be lined. The difficulty of 
driving was added to by the pres- 
ence of an explosive gas which is 
found in most of the Coast Range 
formations. The presence of this gas 
necessitated the enforcement of 
most rigid regulations, including the 
installation of approved type of 
safety locomotives and other appa- 
ratus designed to prevent the igni- 
tion of such explosive gases. This 
materially slowed down and added 
to the cost of the work. 

The cost of the entire project was 
a little over a million dollars, which 
expenditure has been more than 
justified in this first year of opera- 
tion. 



Top: yieiv iiuring construction^ looking doivn stream, shoeing screen racks at left 
and up stream face of the dam to the right. Photo taken October 30, 1931. Center: 
yieiv of completed dam, looking up stream, •with three feet of tuater over the spillnvay. 
Loiver- Vieiu of ivest portal of diversion tunnel discharging at the rate of four 
hundred million gallons daily into Calaveras reservoir. 



California Corrugated 
Culvert Co. 

ARMCO CULVERTS 



818 Crocker Building 
San Francisco 



Phone 
DOuglas 4457 



April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



25 



SAN 
FRANCISCO 

Her Story 



THE most outstanding publica- 
tion issued from the City Hall 
in many years is "San Francisco — 
Her Story," a 208-page book in color 
written by a committee of elemen- 
tary school teachers for use in the 
fourth grades and illustrated by stu- 
dents of the Galileo High School, 
under the direction of Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Baldwin. The book was origi- 
nally authorized by members of the 
Board of Education as a textbook to 
fill a demand made by educators for 
more than twenty-five years for a 
history of the city that would be 
understood by children. Although 
intended only for school use, the 
book was claimed by the entire com- 
munity, and hundreds of requests 
asking that the book be placed on 
sale have been received. . 

The illustrations in the book were 
featured in a full-page rotogravure 
display made by the San Francisco 
Chronicle on Sunday, April 24, and 
an extensive window display of orig- 
inal drawings has been made by the 
Emporium. Copies of the book were 
also on display at all downtown 
book stores. 

"San Francisco — Her Story" was 
written by a committee of five ele- 
mentary school teachers, Mrs. Edith 
Cochran, principal of the Fremont 
Elementary School, chairman ; as- 
sisted by Zoa Meyer, John Muir 
Elementary ; Annette Schraft, Sher- 
man Elementary ; Marguerite Lentz, 
Fremont, and Cecilia Papini, Gua- 
dalupe Elementary School. 

The book is dedicated by the au- 
thors to Miss Bertha E. Roberts, 
deputy superintendent, and to A. J. 
Cloud, chief deputy superintendent, 
in appreciation of the original sug- 
gestion that such a work be written 
and for the cooperation given to the 
committee in the preparation of 
manuscripts. 




More than 200 illustrations in 
color, glorifj'ing historic spots in the 
city, were made for the book by art 
students at Galileo High School, 
working under the direction of Mrs. 
Elizabeth Baldwin. The art phase of 
the book rejM-esents more than two 
years of research and is the first 
known instance on record wherein 
students in the secondary schools 
have illustrated a printed book for 
use by children in the lower grades. 
The illustrations show a boy and a 
girl viewing the city in all its inter- 
esting and historic aspects. 

The book is divided into fifteen 
chapters and contains fifty full-page 
illustrations in color and 125 small 
illustrations depicting historic fea- 
tures which blend into the text at 
the bottom or side of almost every 
page. 

Formal presentation of the book 



to members of the Board of Educa- 
tion took place on Wednesday, April 
27, at the Raphael Weill Elementary 
School, when students of the school 
presented a pageant based upon the 
illustrations in the book. 

The following reference is quoted 
from the foreword : 

"This little book tells the story of 
San F"rancisco, the city by the 
Golden Gate. The story begins more 
than 150 years ago. Indians lived 
here and enjoyed the mild climate. 
They fished and hunted around the 
shores of San Francisco Bay. 

"The story ends with San Fran- 
cisco today — San Francisco tomor- 
row. All things have changed. Fine 
homes and schools have been built 
where once there were only dunes 
and rugged hills. This is a great city, 
a beautiful city, a city loved around 

(Continued on Page 31) 



26 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS WEEK 



D 



ICniCATION of two junior 
liijj;ii schools, nine large public 
meetings, and a series of radio ad- 
dresses featured the thirteenth an- 
nual observance of Public Schools 
Week in San Francisco, under the 
direction of A. J. Cloud, chief dep- 
uty superintendent of schools. 

Harry K. Wolff, member of the 
Civil Service Commission and one of 
the leaders in the Public Schools 
Week campaign down through the 
years, was the principal speaker at 
the dedication of the Aptos Junior 
High School at Upland Drive and 
Aptos Avenue, on Sunday afternoon, 
April 24. Mr. Wolff delivered an in- 
spiring message of characteristic 
brevity and force calling upon the 
parents and well-wishers of the pub- 
lic schools to protect these institu- 
tions against any unnecessary en- 
croachments which would affect the 
normal development of children. 

Commissioner E. J. Mott of the 
Board of Education, who has just 
returned from an extended tour of 
China and the Far East, presided in 
gracious fashion as chairman of the 
day. 

The Aptos Junior High School 
was built to accommodate 1,100 stu- 
dents, and represents an investment 
of $730,607.64. It is already over- 
crowded but has been built on the 
unit scale so that another wing may 
be added as the growth of the stu- 
dent population maj- require, with- 
out disturbing' the Ijalance of the 







f 


m 




5 


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9 


1 


1 




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1 


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1 


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2 


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Fi^^ 


1 




^^r 




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III^H 




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HARRY K. WOLF 



Entrance to James Lick Junior Higli School 

Structure. One of the features of 
the interior arrangement is a large 
mechanically operated door which 
divides the boys' and girls' gymna- 
sium and which may be thrown back 
to make a single large room for 
auditorium or exhibition purposes. 
At this school an illustration is 
given of progressive cooperation be- 
tween two city departments, in that 
San Francisco Recreation Commis- 
sion has laid out a playground ad- 
joining the school. Besides serving 
its primary purpose, this playground 
is placed under control of the Board 



of Education for use as a school 
yard throughout the day. Recipro- 
cally, the gymnaisum and shower 
and locker rooms have been so de- 
signed that they may be cut off 
from the remainder of the building. 
I'hey are operated for the benefit of 
the community at night, and on 
school holidays by the Recreation 
Commission. Under these plans fur- 
ther economy was effected by both 
the Board of Education and the Rec- 
reation Commission through organ- 
izing the supervision in such a way 
that the teacher of physical educa- 
tion at the school also serves as 
playground director. 

Dr. Joseph Marr Gwinn, superin- 
tendent of schools, was the principal 
speaker at the dedication of the new 
James Lick Junion High School, 
held on Sunday, May 1. The school 
is located at Twenty-fifth and Noe 
Streets. Dr. Gwinn pointed out that 
"the virtue of prosperity is temper- 
ance, the virtue of adversity is forti- 
tude. We have but recently passed 
through a great period of prosperity 
but we did not exercise its virtue 
of temperance ; on the contrary, this 
period of prosperity was character- 
ized by lack of self-control leading 
(Continued on Page 29) 




!«-.„M«»i»^iNS?S^'S!SSR«'^'''0. 1-J 



JOSEPH MARR GWINN 
Superintendent of Schools 



April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



27 




Some New Books 

By Anne M. Farrell 

Fiction Department, Public Library 



^CTING on the theory that the 
human machine is quite as 
anxious in this day of efficiency to 
raise itself to the highest possible 
state of perfection as it is to have 
a perfected motor car or a radio free 
of static, the publishers have issued 
all sorts of books and treatises on 
personality, personalysis and char- 
acterology. 

One of the most entertaining is 
Ethel Cotton's. "Keeping Mentally 
Alive." Tips on what to talk about, 
how to swing the conversation 
around from trite comments on the 
weather, how to be interesting with- 
out the effort being too evident are 
a few of the subjects listed. Miss 
Cotton has for several years con- 
ducted classes in poise and expres- 
sion, and many of her problems and 
conclusions are to be found in her 
book. 

Another volume, "Personality and 
Personalysis," by J. J. Theobald, 
has an intriguing series of charts 
which one makes out (telling the 
truth about one's self) and a friend 
must make out a dunlicate. It is 
appalling to find that though we 
have flattered ourselves into believ- 
ing that we were possessed of a 
supply of courage and high ideals, 
our friend's estimate of our charac- 
ter is that we are weak and "just 
an old meanie." A great game (if 
we have a sense of humor, and cling 
fast to it while we are being per- 
sonalyzed). 

A perfectly grand book of rem- 
iniscences is Ford Maddox Ford's 
"Return to Yesterday." It was 
Ford, you remember, who collab- 
orated with Joseph Conrad in "Ro- 
mance" and "The Inheritors," and 
who did so much of the necessary 
technical correcting when the great 
stylist was ill. The book is a ver- 
itable literary saga in which we find 
little stories of Arnold Bennett. 
Henry James, Lord Northcliflfe, and 
a host of others. It is to the author's 
credit that we are quite as interested 
with his accounts of odd village folk 



and stray acquaintances as we are 
with the names of those we recog- 
nize. One of the most enjoyable 
features of the book, and there are 
many, is the tvpography and form 
of the volume. After reading thick 
tomes composed of many hundreds 
of pages, with print that was evi- 
dently supposed to be scanned under 
a magnifying elass or the other ex- 
treme of enormous type fit for a 
child of six, we are indebted to 
Horace Liveright, the publisher for 
a book that is pleasant physically 
as well as aesthetically. 

Something new in travel guides. 
"New York Is Everybody's Town," 
by Helen Josephy and Mary Mar- 
garet McBride, is a priceless volume 
if you expect to go to the "big city" 
this spring. And, if you do not, it is 
quite as exciting. Chapters with 
such titles as "Orchids and Prize 
Fights" telling about the opera, 
sports and happenings ; "He-man 
Food," taking us on a personally 
conducted tour of the restaurants 
where Robert Benchle}', Konrad 
Bercovici and O. O. Mclntyre dine, 
and pointing out the table where 
Rex Beach met his wife ; "Bargains 
and Basements" where one may pick 
up anything, as witness. "There is 
a story that a man who wanted an 
elephant telephoned to Wana- 
maker's and was told 'Certainly, we 
can get you an elephant, but it may 
take a week. Was it urgent?'" The 
authors sponsored two other travel 
guides, one of London, and one of 
Paris, but the current volume is by 
far the most interesting. 

If you are a Philip Gibbs devotee 
(and after "The Middle of the 
Road," of several years back, who 
is not) — you will want to read "The 
Golden Years." The story in the 
present day, begins, "It seems in- 
credible that I should know a lady 
who once danced with the Emperor 
Napoleon — the third, of course — and 
had her hand kissed by old "Dizzy" 
with his oiled ringlets, and her 
cheek, smooth and rose-flushed in 



those days, touched by a young man 
who was hanged publicly outside 
Newgate Prison." 

The old lady is eighty-one, but 
through the author's artistic in- 
genuity we are back again in the 
days when she is a tiny girl, the 
dainty Lady Isobel Ingleby, daugh- 
ter of the powerful and stern Lord 
Alderton. She grows up and "comes 
out" in the regal era of Victoria, and 
meets Harry Verney, whose mother 
played the provinces and was not 
too particular. The love of Isobel 
and Harry is a strange emotion, 
that weathers the difficulty of their 
trysts, when to be meeting a lover 
anywhere but in one's mother's 
drawing room, properly chaperoned, 
was a mark of lost caste. 

But Isobel, stout hearted in her 
love, dares everything, defies her 
father, turns from her mother's ad- 
monitions, but is conquered when 
the Queen, the august Victoria, 
commands that she wed Arthur 
Mannington, a charming yoimg man 
who has loved her from childhood. 
Her final meeting with Harry is pa- 
thetic, two lovers from different 
worlds parting broken-hearted in 
the weird atmosphere of Madame 
Tussand's wax works, the only place 
they can find to be undisturbed. 
Caught in the web of conversation 
and formality of the 1890's there is 
no way out. Though, as the author 
points out, had Harry said, "Come 
away, Isobel. Come home to my 
little house in Royal Avenue," she 
would have followed him to share 
his poverty, but Harry, with greater 
foresight, knew it would in all prob- 
ability have failed. Instead, Isobel 
marries Arthur, and Harry marries 
a girl who visits his sister occa- 
sionally. The author relieves us of 
a sense of sadness and futility by 
giving, on the last two pages, a brief 
resume of the years intervening, and 
we are back again in the present 
day, and the characters are old, and 
the vital drama of the young Lady 
Isobel and the lad Harry seems very 
far awav. 



28 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



Washington Bi-Centennial Pa- 
rade and Grand Ball Saturday, 
April 30 

A tw(i-iiiile-li)njJf parade ii]) Mar- 
ket Street and a fJi'ala iiiaiif^ural hall 
in the Civic Auditorium Saturda) 
night, Ajiril 30, will be the spectacu- 
lar part of San Francisco's celebra- 
tion of the two hundredth anniver- 
sary of the birth of Georg-e Wash- 
ington, Supervisor Carl W. Miles, 
general chairman of the bicentennial 
commission, announced. 

The ball, to commemorate the one 
hundred and forty-third anniversary 
of the inaut;uration of Washington 
as first President of the United 
States, will be one of the leading 
social events of the year in this city. 
More than 3,000 couples, including 



ihis city's society leaders and the 
army and navy sets, will attend. 
Members of all of San Francisco's 
veteran and military organizations, 
in addition to representatives of 
nearly all of the foreign legations, 
will also be i)resent. 

Su])ervist)r E. Jack Spaulding, 
general ch.'urnian of the ball, de- 
clared the main floor of the audito- 
rium will be used for the main af- 
fair. All people present will be at- 
tired either in colonial costumes or 
in formal evening dress. Both Lar- 
kin and Polk halls of the auditorium 
will be thrown open for public danc- 
ing, and the public will be admitted 
to the balcony. 

The parade. Dr. A. C. Carlton, 
grand marshal, announced, will be 
the leading one of its kind in the 
city this year. A full regiment of 



sailors from the I'nited States battle 
fleet, which will be in port at the 
time, a full regiment of soldiers from 
the Thirtieth United States Infan- 
try and the Sixth Coast Artillery, 
and a battalion of marines will com- 
[jose the bulk of the line of march- 
ers. (Jther units of the parade will 
include the National Guard, all vet- 
eran organizations, fraternal and 
civic units with their auxiliaries, 
high school R. O. T. C. cadets, and 
several hundred school children in 
colonial costume. The parade will 
start at 11 a. m. 

The ceremonies on April 30 will 
be part of the nation-wide series of 
celebrations in honor of the bicen- 
tennial anniversary of George Wash- 
ington. The celebration, which 
started February 22. will last until 
Thanksgiving Da>-. 



The Great 

LIVERMORE 
RODEO 




Ninety minutes frotn 
San Francisco 

Saturday and Sunday 

May 14, 15 

TWENTY THRILLING 
COWBOY CONTESTS 

Honoring Johnny Schneider 
World's Champion Cowboy 

SATURDAY 

Mayor Rossi's Day 
Pioneer Parade 
Children's Parade 
All Night Revel 

SUNDAY 

Governor Roiph's Day 
Grand Finals 



CHILDREN FREE SATURDAY IF ACCOMPANIED BY 
ADULT 











L 


AT THE ENTRANCE TO CHINATOWN 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAUF. 


J 












GAFFNEY & LUCE 

WHOLESALE MEATS 
Specializing in City Contracts 

1676 MARKET STREET MARKET 0437 





Phone WEst 9768 








JACK'S 






Sandwiches 


f Steamed Clams i 


Clam 


Broth 


1347 Steiner Street San Francisco, Calif. 




Corner Geary 







"Success to the Bonds" 

RICH PIE SHOP 

"Exceptionally Good" 

HEMLOCK 1818 

1086 Folsom Street San Francisco 



April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



29 



THE SHARKEY OIL CONTROL ACT 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS WEEK 



IN a direct appeal to the voters of 
the state, Governor James Rolph, 
Jr., in a radio address April 19 urged 
the ratification of the Sharkey Oil 
Control Act at the election on 
May 3. 

Governor Rolph stressed the im- 
portance of the measure for the 
good of the entire state. Joining 
with him in the presentation of facts 
regarding the oil industrv were Gov- 
ernor WilHam H. ("Alfalfa Bill") 
Murray of Oklahoma and Governor 
Ross S. Sterling of Te.xas. In both 
of these states measures similar to 
the Oil Control Act proposed for 
California have been in successful 
operation for some time. 

Governors Murray and Sterling 
stated flatly that the oil control 
measures of their states had resulted 
in protecting the interests of the in- 
dependent producers, had stabilized 
conditions in the industry, and had 
prevented increases in the price .of 
gasoline. 

"This act," said Governor Rolph, 
"protects the interests of all; puts 
industry upon a conservative basis ; 
keeps labor employed, keeps the 
wells pumping, and restores pros- 
perity to California's greatest indus- 
try. The Sharkey Act plays no fa- 
vorites. It provides for the handling 
of the industry by the industry it- 
self, under the supervision of the 
state. 

"I am firmly of the belief that the 
Sharkey Act is one of the ablest acts 
of legislation to benefit everj'one 
whose interests are identified with 
the oil business ; producer, labor, 
consumer, and the stockholder who 
has made investments in the indus- 
try. Conditions in the industry can 
hardly be worse. Why not accept 
this opportunity to improve them?" 



nlW FILLHORi 
NEW M SSIQN 



Gas 8C Oil / Free Crank Case Service 
"When Serrice 1$ Psrmmouni" 

BILL NUTTER'S 

VUiucioB V«Uty Swric* Sttd— 
ViaiucioB and San Bruno AvaniM 

REST ROOM 



Striking at the extentions of the 
minority opposing the Sharkey Act, 
Governor Rolph said : 

"There is nothing, in my opinion, 
in the argument that has been ad- 
vanced of a monopoly and high- 
priced gasoline, because oil control 
will be administered by a commis- 
sion elected by all the producers, 
with one vote each, regardless of the 
size of their holdings. The man with 
ten acres will have the same number 
of votes as the man or corporation 
with thousands of acres. 

"Anything is better than the de- 
moralized condition of the oil indus- 
try today. Let us give the act a 
chance. A\'e can never expect to see 
things better, wages improve, labor 
employed, if we do not vote 'Yes.' 

"I am deeply concerned about 
800,000 or more of our fellow Cali- 
fornians who are dependent in one 
way or another upon the oil indus- 
try of this state for their living and 
for the happiness of their families. 
I desire to see them working, and I 
think the oil control act will aid in 
putting and keeping them at work, 
and that it will spread the beneficial 
results which it will bring to the oil 
industr)- throughout all industries, 
with more work, more money in cir- 
culation, more buying, and better 
times for all. 

"We have no coal to feed the fur- 
naces of our present and future in- 
dustry, but we have fuel oil, and I 
desire to protect that oil against 
waste. I respectfully suggest that 
j'ou go to the polls on Tuesday, May 
3, and vote "Yes' on Proposition No. 
1, known as the Oil Control Act, and 
you will feel better for putting your 
mind in the frame of 'Yes.' " 



JULIUS S. GODEAU, INC. 

41 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 

Phone MArket 0711 

OAKLAND - STOCKTON 

Complete Mortuary Service at a Coat Within 
Your Means 

Our understanding service tightens 
your burden of grief 



Cleanliness 



Quality 



Service 



STAR DAIRY LUNCH 

Catering to City Officials and 

Employees at the Hall of 

Justice 

710 Kearny Street 
SUTTER 3797 



(Continued from Page 26) 

to excesses of all kinds due to over- 
confidence. 

"Now that we are in adversity, 
shall we likewise fail to exercise its 
virtue of fortitude and again fall 
into equal excesses growing out of 
fear? There are man}' signs that 
we are going to behave as foolishly 
in adversity as we did during pros- 
perity. 

"It is time we got hold of our- 
selves and exercise all those virtues 
which education should have given 
us. Let us use our education, for it 
is education that must sustain us 
and lead us out of the slough of 
despondency. 

"Again I cite you to one of the 
old masters, for it was Aristotle that 
said that education is an ornament 
in prosperity and a refuge in adver- 
sity. We should flee to that refuge 
now and confidently rely upon edu- 
cation. 




A. J. CLOUD 
Chief Deputy Superintendent of Schools 

"Education has taught us that the 
human race has climbed out of sav- 
agery to higher and higher levels of 
civilization — not in a straight line, 
but in an ever-ascending course with 
its minor peaks and depressions, but 
it moves on and upward. 

"This is no time to lose faith in 
education and permit ourselves to 
join with those who would deny the 
children and youth of the country 
their full opportunity." 



5 MILES TO GO 
Finish the Job 

Vote "YES" 

Hetch Hetchy Bonds 



Buy from firms that advertise vfith us 



12. 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



April 



BRET HARTE 



MARK TWAIN 



SONORA 

HEART OF THE MOTHER LODE 

AtSonora At Columbia 

Mother Lode Rodeo Bret Harte Pageant 



MAY 7th and 8th 



MAY 29th AND 30th 



kJO YOU KNOW that all material and supplies used in the build- 
ing of the O'Shaughnessy Dam were carried over the line of the 

SIERRA RAILWAY CO, 

Offices: Jamestown, California 



PACIFIC 
GROCERY CO. 

Groceries, Meat, Fruit 
Vegetables 



TERMS 30 DAYS 



Phone 5 



Groveland, Calif. 



TELEPHONE 73 

THE MUNDORF 
MERCANTILE COMPANY 

F. C. HOLMAN, Proprietor 

General Merchandise 

GROCERIES / HARDWARE < PAINTS 
AND OILS 

Mining Supplies -t Agricultural Implements 
Stoves / Crockery / Granite Ware 

SONORA, CALIFORNIA 



HALES and SYMONS, Inc. 



Lumber and Building Materials 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



April 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



31 



A Noteworthy Aid to Home Sanitation 



SAN FRANCISCO— HER STORY 



SANITATION is a requisite in 
maintaining a "Better Home," 
comments George Forni, manager of 
the Forni Manufacturing Company, 
manufacturers of "Healthgard" un- 
derground waste receptacles. He 
says : "To reach and maintain the 
American standard of "Better 
Home" owners, many sanitary de- 
vices have been perfected and 
adopted. Important among these is 
the sanitary waste receptacle we 
are featuring. These 'Healthgard' 
receptacles are foolproof against 
insects or roaming animals, and 
makes it possible to have a rear 
yard that is attractive in every re- 
spect. It sinks flush with the ground 
and is entirely out of sight with the 
e.xception of the cast aluminum 
cover. 

"This new product is rapidly re- 
placing unsightly garbage recep- 
tacles and it represents an important 
advance in saniatry methods. It 
makes possible the transformation 
of the average back yard into a place 
of beauty. The "Healthgard," with 
its receptacle sunk flush with the 
ground, is an important feature to 
be considered in modern homes. 

"This is the age of modern home 
improvements, both indoors and 
out. The new product is proof 
against insects and other intruders. 



.\ sanitary drain in the bottom of 
the receptacle permits of frequent 
washing with hose. Since it is sunk 
flush with the ground, the product is 
out of sight, wherever located. It 
has been designed to afford easy in- 
stallation, and is meeting with the 
approval of architects, builders and 
home owners. 

"The device consists of an outer 
shell of concrete, which holds a 
large, heavy, corrugated and galvan- 
ized iron container. The top is op- 
erated by a foot lever, giving maxi- 
mum convenience and accessibility. 
Ants and other insects are prevented 
from entering by an oil groove at 
the top which they refuse to cross, 
and which effectually seals the can 
from their inroads. The installation 
is simple. A hole slightly larger 
than the concrete shell being all that 
is necessary in the way of labor. 
The shell is then slipped into the 
hole, and a little of the dirt thrown 
back around it. The factory makes 
the installation if desired. A sani- 
tar}' bottom drain facilitates hosing 
with water, if it ever is deemed nec- 
essary to do so. We maintain a 
demonstration truck, which will call 
if desired, or information may be 
obtained at the factory 1379 Sixty- 
second Street, Oakland." 




Shotting operation of the "Healthgard," a receptacle for <u;aste, manufactured by 
the Forni Company of Oakland. 



Phone GArfield 6663 
E. G. SOETH J. H. BROWN 

E. G. SOETH & CO. 

BRASS AND BRONZE FOUNDRY 

Exclusive Manufacturers of 

"Soeth's Comet" Brand Double Duty 

Nickel Bronze 

E. G. SOETH 8C CO. 

Office and Foundry 
248 Tehama Street San Francisco 



Phone ORdway 2397 

HARRY R. MYGRANT 

GLASS AND GLAZING 

Automobile Glass 

Mirrors, Beveling and Resilvering 

678 Eddy Street San Francisco 



(Continued from Page 25) 

the world. Its history is an inter- 
esting one. As you read you will 
become acquainted with the people 
who lived here a long time ago. You 
will meet and admire many brave 
explorers who lived here a long time 
ago. You will read many exciting 
events. You will meet many loyal 
citizens whom you will wish to re- 
member." 

Chapter three described "The 
Coming of the White Man"' as fol- 
lows : 

"'The men who discovered San 
Francisco Bay did not come by sea 
but by land. These explorers were 
searching for another bay and found 
our fine port by chance. 

"Don Caspar de Portola. a Span- 
iard, with his soldiers, marched 
from San Diego up the coast of 
California. He was seeking Monte- 
rey Bay, where Father Serra hoped 
to build a mission. The soldiers be- 
came sick and hungry as they did 
not have enough food. They passed 
the bay for which they were look- 
ing. As many of the soldiers could 
go no further, they camped at a site 
now known as Montara. 

"A few of the soldiers under Ser- 
geant Ortega continued north, 
thinking they might not have 
reached Monterey Bay. On Novem- 
ber 1, 1769, Ortega and his soldiers 
saw the Golden Gate. After walking 
a short distance they gazed upon our 
wonderful bay — the harb6r that had 
waited many long years for white 
men to find. 

"Ortega, finding that he could not 
cross the Golden Gate, returned to 
the Montara camp and told what he 
had seen. Portola, disappointed in 
not finding i\Ionterey Bay. returned 
to San Diego. 

"Several years passed before the 
white man returned. In 1775 the 
San Carlos, with Juan de Ayala as 
captain, sailed through the Golden 
Gate. Captain Ayala was the first 
white man to bring a ship into the 
bay. With the members of his crew 
he explored the entire harbor. 

"The next year Juan Bautista 
Anza arrived here from Monterey. 
He and his party surveyed all the 
land around the bay. These also 
chose sites for a mission and a pre- 
sidio. A place inside the entrance 
to the bay was selected for the pre- 
sidio, a fort for the protection of the 
bay and the settlement. On Sep- 
tember 17, 1776, the presidio was 
started." 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Apri l 



WATER DEPARTMENT REPORT 

Issued by Nelson A. Eckart 

General Manager and Chief Engineer, San Francisco IFater Department 



COMPLYING with the provi- 
sions of Section 5, Ordinance 
8691, there is transmitted herewith 
the operating statement of the San 
Francisco Water Department for 
March, 1932, showing a comparison 
with February, 1932, and with a like 
period of last year. 

Water sales revenues within San 
Francisco increased $1,271, as com- 
pared with February, 1932, and 
those outside of San Francisco in- 
creased $1,735. The decrease in San 
Francisco sales for the nine-month 
period ending March 31, 1932, as 
compared with the same period of 
last year amounts to $18,335, while 
for the same period sales outside of 
San Francisco decreased $25,230. 
The existing business depression is 
accountable for the decrease in San 
Francisco sales, while the decrease 
in suburban sales is caused princi- 
pally through the development of 
local resources bj- water districts in 
the Peninsular Division. 

The decrease in rents from land 
and buildings, March, 1932, over 
February, 1932, $258, is due princi- 
pally to the nonpayment by tenants 
of amounts due. The decrease for 
the period ending March 31, 1932, 
over the same period of last year, 
amounting to $12,205, is the result 
of the drought to the extent that re- 
turns from share crops are $5,524 
below normal ; adjustments in the 
period account for decrease of 
$3,205, and rental received for pas- 
turage of sheep in San Matecj 
County, amounting to $3,476 in De- 
cember, 1930, was not earned this 
year. 

The decrease in miscellaneous 
nonoperating revenue, $10,169, over 
the same period of last year is 
caused by the smaller returns from 
sale of walnuts. 

The increase in operating expense, 
I\Iarch, 1932, over Feliruary, 1932, 
amounts to $3,001. This amount is 
the net of miscellaneous increases 
and decreases and is accounted for 
by increase due to seasonal mainte- 
nance and expenses, $2,000, and by 
the inclusion in March of the Water 
Department's prorata of Public Util- 
ities Commission expenses, $1,000. 
The increase in operating expenses 
for the nine-month period this year 
over the same period of last year 
amounts to $339,328. Water pur- 
chased this year and cost of operat- 
ing Newark-San Lorenzo pumps 




XI l.MiX A. El'RART 

amount to $344,591 in excess of last 
year. The balance is the net of mis- 
cellaneous increases and decreases. 

The decrease in taxes over the 
same period of last year, $11,691, is 
due to reduction in tax rates in out- 
side counties. 

The charge for Newark-San Lo- 
renzo pipe line, amounting to $36,- 
225, against $4,000 last year, is the 
principal cause of the increase over 
last year in Hetch Hetchy aqueduct 
and other rentals. Interest decreased 
$33,750, on account of the retirement 
of Spring Valley bonds in the 
amount of $1,000,000, as of Julv 1, 
1931. 

The increased earnings and in- 
creased expenses result in an in- 
creased net income for March, 1932, 
over February, 1932, and in a de- 
creased net income for the same pe- 
riod of last year. 

The nine-month period ending 
March 31, 1932, shows: 

Total earnings $4,962,958.62 

Expense 3,448,441.76 

Net income $1,514,516.86 

Appropriations for : 
Additions and better- 
ments $713,812.50 

Bond redemption 750,000.00 1.463,812.50 



Net additions to stirplus 

unappropriated $ 50,704.36 

Total construction expend- 
itures for the period from 
March 3, 1930. to March 
31, 1932 $2,212,668.02 

The balance of budget au- 
thorization, unexpended 
to date is 343.841.98 

Budget authorisations for 
api)ropriations to June 
30, 1932 $2,556,510.00 

The number of employees on con- 
struction work was decreased 23, as 
follows: 7 on the Upper Alameda 
tunnel, 16 on the Crystal Springs 
outlet tunnel. 

The number of employees in the 
operating and maintenance work in- 
creased from 463 on Februarv 29, 
1932, to 466 on March 31, 1932.'This 
increase of three is caused by the 
temporary employment of two meter 
readers in the Water Sales Division 
and by transfer of one laborer from 
Upper Alameda tunnel to Alameda 
Division. 



SAN FRANCISCO MUST COM- 
PLETE HETCH HETCHY 



(Continued from Page 5) 

water supplv unequalled in the 
world, $6,500,000 is a trifle. A vote 
"yes" on this final Hetch Hetchy 
bond issue means that you will have 
this matchless water in the very 
near future. 

A vote "no" means that you are 
willing to throw away over $1,000,- 
000 a year to maintain the tunnels 
until the bond issue does carry. 

Do not be confused by the fact 
that the election on Tuesday, May 
3, is also the presidential primarj'. 
Many people mistakenly believe that 
if they do not declare their party 
affiliations when registering they 
cannot vote at the presidential prim- 
ary. It is true that if you did not 
declare your party affiliations when 
registering you cannot vote for any 
group of delegates on the ballot. 
But you can vote on the Hetch 
Hetchy bond issue. Whether you 
registered Republican. Democrat, or 
an)' other party or whether you de- 
clined to state your party, remem- 
ber that you are entitled to vote 
on this bond issue. You will find it 
at the top of the voting machines. 
Look for it as soon as you enter the 
booth and by all means vote "yes" 
for the completion of Hetch Hetchy. 



ROSENTHAUS 

Sales Stores 

JOSEPH ROSENTHAL, President 

2415 Mission Street 

Phone KEarny 7213 San Francisco, Calif. 




MAJESTIC 

Ban Francisco's Most Restricted Ball Room 

Especially Featuring Old Fashioned DancM 

Sociability Our Watchword 

Phil Sapiro's Orchestra 

CORNER GEARY AND FILLMORE STS. 

Ott« Knock, ngt. — Phone WA Inut 0537 



SUNSET 
PRODUCE CO. 

FRUITS and PRODUCE 
Wholesale Dealers and Shippers 

CAR LOTS A SPECIALTY 



All Codes — Cable Addresses: 

"PRODUCE" San Francisco . . "SUNCO" San Francisco 

"JEWETT" San Francisco 



PHONE SUTTER 3027 

447-487 Front Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Market Phone 
DAVENPORT 7109 



Residence Phone 
RANDOLPH 0860 



LXagomarsino &lCo* 

Grower and Dealer in 

ALL KINDS OF 
VEGETABLES 



&' 



Stalls No. 36-37-38 



COLOMBO MARKET 



Mail Address: 626 Front Street 
SAN FRANOSCO, CALIFORNIA 



^ 



^KRVIC^ 



"Within Your Means" 

WHITE'S FUNERAL SERVICE is compre- 
hensive. Even the slightest duty is performed 
with all the precision characteristic of WHITE'S 
SERVICE. Constant, intelligent supervision of 
every detail not only assures the most satisfac- 
tory service possible, but adds an element of 
sympathy and understanding sometimes lacking 
in ordinary service. 

"While's Prices Are Always Reasonable" 

S. A. WHITE 

Leading Funeral Director 
TRANS-BAY AND PENINSULAR SERVICE WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE 

2200 Sutter Street H San Francisco 

TcI«plion» 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



SAN MATEO - HAYWARD 
BAY BRIDGE 

I HE San Mateo-Hayward Bay Bridge, 
■'- connecting the New Bayshore Boule- 
vard with the State Highway thru Dublin 
Canyon, offers the motorist a fast, easy 
route between San Francisco and Interior 
California. 

Write for folders showing routes afid 
interesting motor trips via the bridge. 



S. F. Bay Toll-Bridge Company 

SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



JKraStil® Higlh Flr(e(il 

FaienKS® Til® 

In plain colors and designs, used in Park-Presidio 
and Roosevelt Junior High Schools. For walls and 
floors and exteriors and interiors. 

Made by an exclusive monolithic method that fuses 
the body and enamel of the tile, Kraftile is proof 
against cracking, crazing, wear, fading, tempera- 
ture changes and acid. 



IKEAFTIILE COMPANY 

Main Office and Plant 

NILES, CALIFORNIA 

San Francisco Office and Display Room 

55 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET 



for CITIES with a FIJTIJRE 

"Caterpillar" Tractors serve 
well the City with a future — the 
City that constantly extends its 
streets, builds new airports, new 
parks and municipal golf courses. 
They speed up new work, to the 
eternal gratitude of taxpayers 
and voters. Bought first for one 
major task, they prove wide use- 
fulness at a score of odd chores. 
Traction and power, of course; 
but, above all else, "Caterpillars" 
bring long life and versatility. 

ROBIXSOX TRACTOR COMPANY 




CATERPILLAR 

RSe. U.S. PAT. OFF. 

TRACK-TYPE TRACTORS < COMBINES 



ROAD MACHINERY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

1175 Howard Street 



OAKLAND 

1705-09 East 12th Street 



Thi Iames H. Barrt Co 



San PRANCitco 



San FRkNcisco 





LARRY 
BARRETT 

Makes a 

Special 

Announcement 

to 

CITY 
EMPLOYEES 



Purchaiers of 

INDIA TIRES 

will be entitled to the same 
discount as that given to the 
City Purchasing Agent. 
Drop in and examine the 
India Tire and inquire as 
to our Budget Pay- 
ment Plan. 




BARRETT TIRE CO., LTD. 

378 O'Farrell Street Near Taylor 
Telephone PRospect 6804 



World Famous Tiger Brand 

TUBE REPAIR KITS, CEMENT, 

TIRE PATCHES, HOSE, FLAPS, 

FAN BELTS, ETC. 

Our new low prices especially for 
municipalities 

FREIGHT CHARGES ALLOWED 
Goods Guaranteed First Quality 

Write for price list, charts, samples, and catalog 



DAVID NICHOLS CO. 

KINGSTON, GEORGIA 



"Your signature 
is all that is 
n e c e s s a ry." 



A Friendly 
Personal 
Finance Service 

is offered 

PUBLIC EDUCATORS 

when MONEY is quickly needed for 

VACATION 

OR OTHER PURPOSES 

Loans up to $300 

can be completed through our Prompt and 
Dignified Service 

To make your vacation a success is one 
of the many functions of our profession 



Personal Finance Co., Ltd. 

610 Bank of America Bldg., 625 Market Street 

PHONE GARFIELD 3228 
Tune in on KFRC every Wednesday 9:30 p. m. 



You Have Tried the Rest 

— Now Try the Best' 



FISK ,,^«„ TIRES 



Now you can buy the new 

Fisk De Luxe Double Duty 

Tire at the standard 

6-ply price. 



Radios < Electrical Appliances / Auto Supplies 
Exide Batteries / Golf Equipment 

PACIFIC TIRES SALES CO. 

LIMITED 
982-984 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 

"CITY WIDE TIRE SERVICE" 

Telephones: 

FRanklin 7557 FRanklin 7558 FRanklin 7559 FRanklin 7560 

"WHAT WE ADVERTISE WE DO" 




Buy from firmi that advertise with us 



Publication for City and County of San Francisco 
Endorsed by the California Society of Pioneers 



San FRkNCisco 




PUBLISHED MONTHLY AT 

1095 Market Street Phone Market 8438 



M. B. BOTHWELL 
Business Manager 



PHILIP P. LEVY 
Advertising Manager 



50c per copy; $5.00 per year 



JULY, 1932 



Vol. VI, No. 5 



CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Assessor's Office Louise M. O'Hara 

Controller's Office J. Everett Sharp 

Board of Bducation..D. P. Hardy and Mrs. Harriet Leaman 

Department of Health Edward M. Coffey 

Department of Public Works Sid Hester 

Bureau of Engineering Wm. C. Pidge 

City Attorney's Office Edmond P. Bergerot 

Civil Service Commission James J. Maher 

Civil Service Association Edward M. Coffey 

Coroner's Office Jane Walsh 

County Clerk Howard Gudelj 

County Welfare Department Esther D. Schwartz 

Department of Electricity Joseph P. Murphy 

District Attorney Henry Goldman 

Engineers' Union J. L. Slater. Jr. 

Exposition Auditorium James L. Foley 

Fire Department Lieut. Fred Jones 

Justice Courts Robert W. Dennis 

Mayor's Office Malcolm Fraser 

Municipal Railway Eugene W. Clisbee 

Municipal Carmen's Union Clark N. Farlow 

Office Employees' Association William T. Bonsor 

Parks and Museums W. M. Strother 

Per Diem Men's Association F. J. Ferguson 

Recreation Department Veda B. Young 

Principals' Association Susie A. Ward 

Public Library Anne M. Farrell 

Public Administrator. Henry Boyen 

Recorder's Office Daniel McGloin 

Registrar's Office George D. Sharp 

San Francisco Hospital Mrs. Mae H. Noonan 

San Francisco Water Department N. A. Eckart 

Sealer of Weights and Measures Mrs. M. Dolan 

Sheriff's Office W. J. Martenson 

Superior Courts Henry J. McGrath 

Tax Collector's Office Homer Warren 

Treasurer's Office Duncan Matheson 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 



Vacation Days Cover 

Editorial -- 3 

Babies Are Safe in San Francisco 5 

By J. C. Geiger, M. D. 

Effect of the Depression on the Street Railways 1 1 
By Fred Boeken 

Dedication of Sigmund Stern Recreation Grove 13 
By Alicia Mos grove 

A Record to Be Proud of 14 

Vacation Season Prevails at San Francisco's 

Mountain Camp 15 

By Veda B. Young 

Water Department Report 16 

Making Good a Promise 16 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



July 



HOOD & STRONG 

Certified Public Accountants 

425 Standard Oil Building 

and 

Van Nuys Building 

LOS ANGELES 



Robinson, Nowell & Co. 

Certified Public Accountants 

GARFIBLD 8119 

Crocker Bldg. San Franciico 



F. W. Lafrentz & Company 
Bullock, Kellogg & Mitchell 

Certified Public Accountants 

RUSS BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HENRY H. MEYERS 

GEORGE R. KLINKHARDT 
MILDRED S. MEYERS 

Associate Architects 
1201 Kohl Bldg. San Francisco 



Geo. A. Applegarth 
ARCHITECTS 

703 MARKET STREET 



J. R. MILLER 

AND 

T. L. PFLUEGER 

ARCHITECTS 
580 MARKET STREET 



Professiona 
Directory 



Builder of Schools for 30 Years 

HENRY C. SMITH 

A rchitect 

Telephone GARFIELD 4187 

Humboldt Bank Building 

785 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



O'BRIEN BROS. 

W. D. PEUGH, A.I.A. 
W. J. O'BRIEN 

ARCHITECT 
ENGINEER 



Frederick H. Meyer 
ARCHITECT 

525 Market Street 



W. ADRIAN 

Consulting Engineer 
417 Market Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Telephones 

San Francisco: DOuglas 7841 

Oakland: HUmboldt 5382 



Office of 


H. A. MINTON 


Architect 


SAN FRANCISCO 



CHARLES J. SIMON 
M.D. 

632-637 Butler Building 

135 Stockton Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Office: EXbrook 2680 Res.: SUlter 5700 

Emergency: MArket 2100 



GARFIELD 1878 

Crim, Resing QC M'Guinness 
ARCHITECTS 

ROOM 202 
488 Pine Street 



Edward A. Eames 

ARCHITECT 



HYMAN & APPLETON 

ARCHITECTS 

SAMUEL LIGHTNBR HYMAN 
A. APPLETON 



68 Post Street 



San Francisco 



Charles F, Masten, A. I, A. 
Lester W. Hurd, A. I. A. 



Masten and Hurd 

ARCHITECTS 

T. F. CHACEi Consulting Engineer 

233 Post Street DOuglas 6257 



John Bakewell, Jr. 



Ernest E. Weihe 



Bakewell 8C Weihe 

ARCHITECTS 

251 Kearny Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



DODGE A. RIEDY 

ARCHITECT 
PACIFIC BUILDING 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



July 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 




1776-1932 

INDEPENDENCE DAY, dedicated to the ideals and 
teachings of the Father of Our Country, was the oc- 
casion of a patriotic and colorful celebration, on the 156th 
Anniversary of the Birth of Our Nation. 

Differing vastly from that of a decade ago, with the 
parade up Market Street to the City Hall through the 
flag bedecked streets, the rh3rthm of marching foot- 
steps to the accompaniment of martial music, the deafen- 
ing bang bang of firecrackers, now but a memory of by 
gone days, San Franciscans enjoyed, in its fullest meas- 
ure, a safer and saner Fourth. 

While the highways and b3rways drew many out of 
the city, ample entertairmient was furnished the stay-at- 
homes. 

A military review at the Presidio attracted thousands 
in the morning, the parks and beaches were crowded, 
and later the Marina and Pacific Heights were jammed 
with still more thousands to enjoy the magnificent dis- 
play of fireworks. 

To climax a great and glorious holiday, the literary 
exercises sponsored by a Citizens Committee headed by 
Supervisor E. Jack Spaulding, taxed the capacity of the 
Civic Auditorium. Patriotic exercises, singing, a pageant 
portraying Washington's farewell to his mother con- 
stituted in part the program, concluding with a grand 
ball. The music was provided by the Municipal Band 
under the capable direction of Phil Sapiro. 

U. S. Senator Samuel Shortridge, who was to have 
been the orator of the day, being detained by his duties 
in Washington, Supervisor Spaulding delivered a mas- 
terful address, declaring, "We, in America, are confronted 
by the stupendous task of keeping the world in balance. 
With thrones toppling and wars threatening, we stand forth 
as one nation in strength and dignity." 

May this thought indeed be our Independence Day les- 
son and inspiration. 

Welcome, Shriners! 

CALIFORNIA, here we come" will shortly be the 
theme song of numerous caravans which have 
crossed the burning sands, and San Francisco welcomes 
these travelers with the traditional hospitality of the 
Golden State. 

Shrinedom, we greet you; our city by the Golden 
Gate is yours. 

Not only for your honored presence in our midst, 
your laughter, your ga3^ty, your gorgeous parades and 



glittering pageants, but for that inspiring responsibility 
you have assumed and are so successfully consummat- 
ing, the restoration to a vigorous and healthful youth 
of those unfortunate occupants of your children's hos- 
pitals. 

Again, Nobles, welcome. 



w: 



For Humanity's Sake 

'ITH the unemployment situation growing more 
serious, San Francisco is to be congratulated 
that the caring of the jobless is directed so ably and 
efficiently by Charles M. Wollenberg. 

A graduate of the University of California, Mr. Woll- 
enberg during the catastrophe of 1906 was in charge of 
the refugee camp at Ingleside. The skill and ability dis- 
played in that trying position resulted in his appoint- 
ment to the superintendency of the Laguna Honda 
Relief Home. 

With over twenty-five years' successful administra- 
tion of that institution, Mayor Angelo J. Rossi ap- 
pointed Mr. Wollenberg to the chairmanship of the 
committee of thirty mayors and council to care for the 
unemplo3mient situation in California. 

Mr. Wollenberg is giving unstintedly and ungrudg- 
ingly of his time and efforts to relieve an acute and 
appalling situation, and is rendering splendid service to 
the City and County of San Francisco. 



Your City Employee 

HAS he or she nieasured up to your standard? In 
these trying days of depression and hardship en- 
vious glances are thrownti on those who still retain their 
jobs. But does the unfortunate one give his more for- 
tunate brother fair consideration? 

City employees, to the number of nearly 14,000, in 
the large majority, have given years of faithful service, 
are protected by their civil service rights, are courteous 
and considerate, expert through long experience in the 
particular work in which they are engaged, and give 
liberally and uncomplainingly to the unemployment 
funds and various charities. 

Again, in the boom days of 1914 and on, Mr. Average 
Citizen drew on the average a larger pay check than 
your city employee ; a fact, however unpleasant to recall 
under existing conditions, which should, in all fairness 
and justice, be remembered. 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



July 



FIFTY YEARS OF GAS RANGE LEADERSHIP 



RO 




VENTILATED OVEN 

assures best baking results under 
MOST HYGIENIC CONDITIONS 



^ 

ll(i^^*^ 




1 j 


' 


' 





OVER ONE MILLION SATISFIED USERS 

Geo. D. Roper Corporation 

C. B. Babcock Company 

Managers, Pacific Coast Branch 
135 Bluxome Street San Francisco 




WESTCOAST 

GUARANTEED 

Plumbing Fixtures 

meet the requhretnents of 

STATE, COUNTY 

and 

CITY 
Health Authorities 

A 100% California Product 



WESTCOAST 

Sanitary Manufacturers 

Showroom: 1267 MISSION STREET 



Nitrous Oxide 
Ethylene 
Carbogen 




Equipment 



Certified Laboratory Products, Ltd. 

A Pacific Coast institution which has satisfactorily 

served Pacific Coast users for over 

ten years, 

1379 Folsom Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 




681 SUTTER STREET 



Wear the R. N. Cap 

and 
protect the profession. 

Registered Nurses only may 
purchase these caps on presen- 
tation of certificate. 

Patent Pending No. 598491 
Sold exclusively 

by the 

Nurses' Specialty Shop 

PROSPECT 7539 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



July 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Babies Are Safe in San Francisco 

By J. C. GEIGER, M. D. 

Director of Public Health, City and County of San Francisco 




J. C. GEIGER, M. D. 

A COMPARISON of the 1931 
death rates of infants, in the 
larger cities of the United States, 
brings out the unmistakable fact 
that San Francisco has by far the 
lowest infant death rate of any city 
with a population of one-half mil- 
lion or over. 

Many factors contribute to the 
health and safety of our babies in 
San Francisco. 

Situated most advantageously as 
far as its geographical location is 
concerned, the city by the Golden 
Gate may boast of a healthful cli- 
mate second to none. Warmed by 
the California sunshine and cooled 
by ocean breezes there are no ex- 
tremes of temperature at any sea- 
son of the year. Even the seasonal 
variation is slight and the absence 
of the rigors of a frigid winter or a 
torrid summer mean all-year round 
in the out of doors to all children. 

Babies must have food and the 
principal food of babies is milk. 
A proper milk supply is an absolute 
essential if children are to be reared 
safely and San Francisco may in- 
deed be proud of the quality of her 
milk supply and the safeguards 
which surround its production and 
distribution. 

Frequent examinations of the 
herds supplying milk to San Fran- 
cisco are made to detect the pres- 
ence of disease. Frequent inspec- 



tions are made of the stables and 
utensils to insure clean surround- 
ings at the source of the supply. 
Each and every dairy ranch must 
have its own refrigeration plant for 
the rapid cooling of the milk imme- 
diately after milking. Then there is 
a rapid journey by motor truck with 
the pre-cooled milk to the pasteuri- 
zation plant in the city. In these 
plants the pasteurization process is 
checked daily. Clean plants and 
healthy workers are assured by reg- 
ular inspection and physical exam- 
ination. 

Besides safe food babies must 
have safe living quarters. The in- 
spections of the Housing Division 
prevents overcrowding of sleeping 
rooms and the housing of children 
in dressing closets. It provides for 
light and ventilation for all sleep- 
ing rooms and the complete sani- 
tation of the interior and exterior 
of all dwellings. Old, unsafe or in- 
sanitary shacks and buildings are 
condemned and demolished. These 
measures are instrumental in pro- 
moting health and preventing the 
spread tuberculosis and other com- 
municable diseases. 

A direct educational health pro- 
gram is carried on in the Child Hy- 
giene Bureau througTi the health 
centers and field nurses. The De- 
partment of Public Health conducts 
nine infant welfare centers with a 
total of eighteen sessions per week. 
These centers are operated not as 
clinics, but as educational and ad- 
visory conferences to which moth- 
ers may bring infants and young 
children for the purpose of prevent- 
ing defects and for instruction in 
the principles of infant hygiene. 

No defects are corrected in these 
centers but mothers are instructed 
to consult their own physicians 
when medical treatment is indicated. 
The need of the child is outlined 
and the mother is left to do her 
own choosing as to how this need 
should be met. 

Although the conferences are for 
well babies only, mothers coming to 
the center to watch the weight of 
the baby become educated in the 
knowledge that medical attention is 
essential. Physical defects often un- 
known to the parents are pointed 



out and the correction of such de- 
fects is carried out by the family 
physician or specialist. 

Child Welfare Centers are free to 
all classes of people to use for ad- 
vice. The work is educational in 
character and emphasis is placed on 
health promotion of the whole child, 
physical, mental and social. Vacci- 
nation against smallpox and im- 
munization against diphtheria are 
stressed and the services offered to 
those who desire it. 

The public health nurse is active 
in the direct teaching of prenatal 
and infant hygiene in the home, in 
emphasizing the necessity of med- 
ical supervision for the baby not 
only when he is sick but when he 
is well. 

There is direct supervision and 
licensing of infants' boarding homes 
and children's institutions. 

(Continued on Page 7) 




IFeit/hing in for life's battle at San Francisco 
Baby Clinic 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



July 



Draperies 




Bedding 







Compliments 




M. 


R. 


Fleischman, Inc., 

Manttfaclurert Since 1897 

SAN FRANCISCO 


Ltd. 



PARK SANITARIUM 

Corner Masonic Avenue and Page Street, San Francisco 

For the care and treatment of Nervous and Mental 
Diseases, Selected Alcohol and Drug Addiction Cases. 
Open to any physician eligible to the American 
Medical Association. Patients referred by physicians 
remain under their care if desired. Laboratory 
facilities. 



MRS. C. D. McGETTIGAN 

Owner 



Cars Nos. 6, 7 and 17 



Telephone MArket 0331 



American Janitor Supply Company 


o 
p 


1781 Mission Street 


p 

R 


E 
N 


WHOLESALE and RETAIL 


O 
M 


T 


Full Line of Equipment 


P 
T 


I 
L 


MOPS, BROOMS AND BRUSHES 


D 


L 


Made to order. Floor Oil and Sweeping 


E 
L 




Compound. Auto Wash Rack Supplies. 


I 




SpecializinR in Stain Removing from 


V 


P. 


Woodwork. All Goods Delivered 


R 


M. 


Promptly. 
Wholesale and Retail 

Telephone HEMLOCK 0612 


Y 



WEINSTEIN COMPANY 

MAIN STORE: 1041 MARKET STREET 

A Great Department Store 

Selling Nationally Known Goods for Less 

Branch Drug and Cigar Stores at 

80 Turk Street r 172 Ellis Street / 615 Market Street 

119 Post Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SCHWARTZ 8C COMPANY 


PRINTING 


TYPOGRAPHY 


583 Market Street GArfield 3641 



CALIFORNIA PERFORATING SCREEN 
COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

PERFORATED METALS 

Telephone KEarny 1889 
416-450 Harrison Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Grinnell 8C Company 

Paper, Stationery and School Supplies 



511 Howard Street 



sutler 7894 



SAN FRANCISCO 



24 Hour Service Turkish Baths 


Attendants Both Sexes 


THE BATHATORIUM 


"Something Different" 


673-675 Geary Street, cor. Leavenworth 


L. BARR, Manager SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



STAR 
OLIVE OIL 

Most Healthful and Digestible of 
All Salad and Cooking Oils 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



July 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



BABIES SAFE IN SAN FRAN- 
CISCO 



(Continued from Page 5) 
A continuous check is kept on 
birth registration and a home visit 
is made on all mothers and infants 
attended by midwives. 

For families in need of the ser- 
vices of social and health organiza- 
tions the Department of Health is 
often instrumental in bringing the 
agency and the family into contact 
with each other. 

Child health is, directly or indi- 
rectly, an integral part of each ac- 
tivity of the Health Department. 
Measures which safeguard the fam- 
ily, safeguard the infant and vice 
versa, and any agency or individual, 
official or not, who contributes to 
the welfare or health of a single 
individual helps to protect the en- 
tire population and maintain the 
fine record for infant health for 
which our city is noted. 

Total City Budget (1932- 

1933) 164,000,000,00 

Total City Government cost, 

per capita 98.31 

Total Department Budget... 2,825,000.00 

Cost per capita 4.35 

Budget for Public Health 

Activities 600,948.00 

Cost per capita .93 

Of $4.04 tax rate, $0.16 goes to the De- 
partment of Public Health — and $0.04 
goes for public health activities. 

Of every $1.00 paid into City Treasury 
$0.04* goes for Department of Public 
Health and $0.01* goes for public health 
activities. 

*Approximation. 



As Health Department Activities Should 
Be Divided 

Communicable Disease Control 360 

Child Hygiene 210 

Sanitation ". 160 

Food and Milk 30 

Care of sick poor 50 

Laboratory SO 

Health Education 80 

Vital Statistics 60 

1,000 



Syrups 



Cordials 



Chas. Segalas 8C Co. 

Since 1862 

Manufacturers of 

Beverages y Hillside Brands 

Saa Carlos Tonic and Seasoning Wines 

461 Bryant Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Telephone KEarny 7188 



Phone MArket 6876 



H. WENIGER 

Manufacturer of 

Surgical Instruments and Orthopedic Appliances 

Surgical and Dental Instrument Repairing 

Grinding, Tempering and Re-Plating 



143 Valencia Street 



San Francisco, Calif. 




Jl'atching the health of future San Franeisco citizens 



COMPARATIVE BUDGET ALLOWANCES 

Budget Allowance Cost 

1931-1932 Per Capita 

Police Department $3,5 18,532 §5.32 

Fire Department 3,344,971 5.07 

Health Department 2,825,690 4.35 

(a) San Francisco Hospital 1,112,840 1.71 

(b) Laguna Honda Home 486,672 0.75 

(c) Relief 350,000 0.54 

(d) Emergency Hospital Service 201,855 0.31 

(e) Hassler Health Home 73,375 0.11 

(f) Public Health Activities , 600,948 .93 



Portion 
Per Dollar 
Revenues 

$0,055 
0.052 
0.044 
0.017 
0.008 
0.005 
0.003 
0.001 
0.009 



ALLOCATION OF FUNDS AND RELATIVE COST PER CAPITA OF 
DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES 



Administration , 

Communicable Diseases 

Epidemiology (Including Rat Extermination) 26,340 

Venereal Disease Control (Including Dr. Burlin- 

game $1,800) 6,600 

Tuberculosis Control (Including tuberculosis nursing) 24,360 

City Physicians 

Mental Hygiene 

Laboratories (Not includifig Medical Milk Inspector).... 

Child Hygiene (Incld. Out-Patient Obstetrics Service) 

Food, Meat, Milk (Including Medical Milk Inspector).. 

Sanitary Engineering 

Nursing (Including Tuberculosis, duplicate of tuber- 
culosis control) 

Non-Personal 

Deduct Tuberculosis Nursing 

Appropriation 600,948 

Dr. Burlingame (Isolation Hospital) 1,800 

$602,748 
(Continued on Page 9) 







Cost Per 


AppropriatioD 




Capita 


$ 53,000 




0.082 


57,300 


0.040 

0.010 
0.038 


0.088 


10,800 




0.016 


18,000 




0.028 


23,220 




0,036 


62,960 




0.097 


96,348 




0.148 


61,080 




0.094 


162,360 




0.251 


75,500 




0.116 


620,568 


0.956 


17,820 




0.027 


$602,748 


0.929 






0.924 



0.927 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Election 
Tuesday, August 30 




Number 3 
on the Ballot 



Retain 



JUDGE I. L. HARRIS 

Incumbent 

PRESIDING JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT 



One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Half Yearly Report 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 



SAVINGS 



COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY lOTH, 1868 



One of the Oldest Banks in California, the Assets of which have 
never been increased by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Assets— JUNE 30th, 1932 

United States Liberty and Treasury Bonds, State, Municipal and Other Bonds 

and Securities (total value $65,931,292.00), standing on books at _.. $62,640,540.16 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by first mortgages 72,824,280.46 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and Other Securities 1,383,523:04 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and branch offices (value over $2,125,000.00) 

standing on books at _ „ _ 1.00 

Other Real Estate (value over $460,000.00), standing on books at.._ _ 1.00 

Pension Fund (value over $780,000.00), standing on books at _ 1.00 

Cash on hand and in Banks and checks on Federal Reserve and other Bank s 16,929,551.85 

Total $153,777,898.51 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors _ $147,577,898.51 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds. 5,200,000.00 



Total.. 



.$153,777,898.51 



GEO. TOURNY, President 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 30th day of June, 1932. 

(SEAL) O. A. EGGERS, Notary Public. 

The following additional statement may be of interest to the Depositors of the Bank: 
The Earnings of the Bank for the entire Fiscal Year ending June 30th, 1932 were as follows: 

Income $7,452,861.44 

Expenses and Taxes . 875,666.62 



Net Profits- 



_$6,577,194.82 



The above does not include Interest due on Loans but not yet collected. 

Dividends on Deposits as declared quarterly by the Board of Directors, are Com- 
puted Monthly and Compounded Quarterly, and may be withdrawn quarterly. 

Deposits made on or before July 11th, 1932, will earn interest from July 1st, 1932. 



Jul^ 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



J"ly 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 







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t— 


* 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



July 



AMERICAN CABLE COMPANY, INC. 

Tru-Lay Brand Preformed Wire Rope 
Tru-Loc Brand Processed Fittings 



Hazard Wire Rope Company 

Hazard Wire Rope i Lay Set Preformed Wire Rope 
Highway Guard Rail Cable 

Associate Companies of the American Chain Co., Inc. 



NEW YORK PITTSBURGH ST. LOUIS 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CHICAGO 



Incandescent Supply Company 

LIGHTING FIXTURES / FLOOR LAMPS 
FIREPLACE FURNITURE 

726-730 Mission Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Telephone SUTTER 4600 



F. J. CARROLL, Proprietor 

San Francisco Brass Foundry 

Established 1880 

Brass, Bronze and Aluminum Castings / NicrOmetal a Non- 
Tarnishing and Acid-Resisting Metal 

Manufacturers of Superior Bronze Bushings ~ Comet Bronze Bushings 
PHONE KEARNY 2623 

48-50 Clementina Street San Francisco 



Telephone DElaware 7873 

A. B. GERDING 

General Contractor 

1580 ALEMANY BOULEVARD 



A NATION-WIDE INSTITUTION 
Head Office: SAN FRANCISCO 

NATIONAL DOLLAR STORES 



SAN BERNARDINO 

BAKERSFIELD 

SACRAMENTO 

LONG BEACH 

SAN DIEGO 

BERKELEY 

PASADENA 



. . . Stores in , . . 
VALLEJO 
OAKLAND 
SAN JOSE 
MONTEREY 
SANTA ROSA 
STOCKTON 
MODESTO 



FRESNO 

OGDEN 

SEATTLE 

TACOMA 

PORTLAND 

SALT LAKE CITY 

KANSAS CITY 



Three Stores in SAN FRANCISCO 



THE DRYRITE COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA, INC. 

SUPERIOR LINEN TOWEL SERVICE 
MINIMUM COST 



Phone MArket 0060 



3840 Eighteenth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HANCOCK BROS 

Expert Ticket Service 

COUPON BOOKS 

STREET CAR TICKETS 

TRANSFERS 

FOOTBALL AND ATHLETIC 

EVENT TICKETS 



25 Jessie Street 



San Francisco 



JOHN FINN, President 



ROBERT B. FINN, Secretary 



JOHN FINN METAL WORKS 

SAN FRANCISCO and SEATTLE 

Babbitt Metals and Solders • Type Metals and Zine Dust 
Calvaniting and Sherdardiiing 

372-398 SECOND STREET 

Telephone SUTTER 4188 



EDWIN A. NEWTON 

Newton Fireworks Display Co., Ltd. 



249 Front Street 



Phone DOuglas 7049 



DAN ROOT 

Cigars, Cigarettes, Tobaccos, Candies, Magazines 

SODA FOUNTAIN 

Northwest Corner 18th and Mission Streets 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



I 



July 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Effect of the Depression 

Street Railways 



on 



th 



CONTRARY to the belief of a 
great number of citizens, street 
railways are seriously affected by 
the financial depression ; perhaps 
not as much as those business en- 
terprises which depend largely for 
an output of their product on the 
continuation of the development of 
our resources, both public and pri- 
vate. 

The slackening up along those 
lines was immediately felt by the 
transportation agencies, street rail- 
ways being no exception. 

While the percentage of decrease 
in the volume of business done by 
street railways may not be as large 
as in other forms of transportation, 
it must be remembered that the loss 
is practically a net loss, as they are 
engaged only in furnishing trans- 
portation. As a rule, the percentage 
of loss in gross receipts of other 
transportation enterprises has been 
much larger than that sustained by 
street railways, but it does not 
necessarily follow that this is a fair 
comparison, as the former are en- 
gaged in other activities aside from 
merely carrying a person from one 
place to another, and the percent- 
age of gross decrease in business 
does not represent a true picture of 
net loss sustained. 

In comparing the fluctuation of 
business as represented by street 
railways with other business enter- 
prises which are engaged in selling 
some form of merchandise for profit, 
it should be borne in mind that 
while those concerns might show 
a much greater decrease in gross 
they might even show a net gain in 
their business due to a possible sav- 
ing made through economies that 
are more easily effected than is pos- 
sible in the operation of a street 
railway, among which might be 
mentioned the following: 

Reduction in cost of merchandise 
purchased. 

Reduction in inventories. 

Rent, services, etc. 

Street railways buy very little 
merchandise. Generally, they own 



By FRED BOEKEN 

Manager, Municipal Railway 




FRED BOEKEN 
Manager, Municipal Railivay 

their own property, and to a certain 
degree, are limited in the matter of 
service reduction, and aside from 
wage reductions their field of pos- 
sible economies is rather limited, and 
as stated before, their source of rev- 
enue is limited. 

Even were it possible to adjust 
wages and reduce service at will, 
such a policy would work a hard- 
ship on any community due to the 
large number of employees engaged 
in this enterprise, and would tend 
to discourage street car riding. 

The years 1930, 1931, 1932, in so 
far as street railways are concerned, 
have been most discouraging. Re- 
ceipts are continually declining, 
necessary maintenance is deferred, 
equipment cannot be purchased, and 
properties are deteriorating for lack 
of funds ; service is being reduced in 
an effort to offset somewhat the 
losses, and in the last year there has 
been a considerable reduction in 
wages in a number of cities. 

The collapse in the stock market 
in October, 1929, was felt shortly 



after by the street railways, more 
immediately by the companies in the 
eastern cities having large factories, 
and a little later by the cities of the 
western states. 

Speaking of San Francisco, where 
it is perhaps easier to make an 
analysis than elsewhere, due to there 
having been no change in the rate 
of fare, we find the following condi- 
tion : 

Up to the early part of 1930, we 
enjoyed an almost unbroken record 
of increased revenue each year. Be- 
ginning with the month of May, 
1930, every month has shown a de- 
crease in receipts up to the present 
time in comparison with the same 
month of the previous year, and we 
find during the month of May, 1932, 
a 17 per cent decrease from May, 
1929, a three-year period. 

This decrease applies nearly alike 
to all the street railways in San 
Francisco, with the Municipal Rail- 
way faring somewhat better than 
the private companies. 

A 17 per cent decrease amounts 
to a combined loss in receipts of all 
the street railways in this city of 
over $2,306,000 from the receipts of 
1929. This sum would go a long 
way in meeting the necessary obli- 
gations and the upkeep of the prop- 
erties to a proper standard of effi- 
ciency. 

Various economies hav? been re- 
sorted to by the Municipal Railway 
to offset as much as possible the 
loss in revenue. Power meters were 
installed on all cars a year ago. The 
skip-stop method of operation has 
been in effect on portions of the sys- 
tem for several months. A gradual 
reduction in car hours of service has 
been made in the past two years. 
The car hours for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1932, will be ap- 
proximately 63,850 less than for the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1930, with 
a saving of about $2.75 per car hour, 
or $175,587.50 annually. With the 
inauguration of the new charter on 

(Continued on Page 14) 



12 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



July 




LTILIXy-CEALTy 



1072-1076 HOWARD STREET 



Welders of Automotive Pen* :•; Induitrial Machinery :-: Boiler* 8C Tatikg 
Pipe :•: Contractors* Equipment 

HOLIDAY AND NIGHT SERVICE 



PEERLESS WELDING CO. 

RUDY STRECKER, Proprietor 

WELDING ENGINEERS 

Phones: MArket 0678-0679 / Night Phone: MOntrose 2277 
155 TENTH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Office Phones: SUTTER 8983-8984 

DANNENBAUM PAINT 
COMPANY 

Good Paint Makers 

S. R. DANNENBAUM, President 

245-247 Vallejo Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



For Tools 

HARDWARE AND ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 
ED. JONES HARDWARE 8C TOOL CO. 

1261 Market Street 



^^STOP THIEF 



95 




Interior viiw ef tht Hcrsey Compound Miter. Note the Lever Valve. 
In fall open position this valve offers no obstruction to the flow. 



EVERY compound meter that is even a few per cent off in 
accuracy is a potential bandit. 

Take the case of a 4-inch compound meter in a Massachusetts 
city. This meter when removed had registered 19,000,000 
cubic feet. It was off 5% in accuracy. This city was robbed 
of nearly a million cubic feet of water ! 

Hersey Compound Meters are the only meters with no loss of 
accuracy at the "cross over" point or throughout the entire 
range of flow. They are the only meters with the patented 
"Counterbalanced Lever Valve" that assures full head of 
water. The all-bronze single-piece case eliminates the factor 
of corrosion and cuts maintenance expense. 

Let us show you how a Hersey Compound Meter will save 
enough to pay for itself. Write the nearest Branch Office. 



HERSEY 

WATER r?l7l METERS 



HERSEY MANUFACTURING CO. 

Corner E and 2nd Streets South Boston, Mass. 

Pacific Coast Branches: 553 Howard Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

450 East Third Street .... Los Angeles, Calif. 

475 Hoyt Street, Portland, Ore. 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



July 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



13 



Dedication of Sigmund Stern 
Recreation Grove 



THE Sigmund Stern Recreation 
Grove was dedicated for the use 
of the people of San Francisco on 
June 4 with a program which in- 
cluded selections by the Junior Civic 
Symphony of the Recreation De- 
partment, choral music, toy sym- 
phony numbers and dancing. 

Jesse Colman was chairman of 
the day, Mayor Rossi spoke in ap- 
preciation of this gift. James Mc- 
Sheehy, chairman of the Parks and 
Playgrounds Committee of the 
Board of Supervisors, and Edward 
Rainey, State Superintendent of 
Banks, also spoke. 

A large group of people attended 
and were greatly impressed v^dth the 



beauty of the setting with the tall 
eucalyptus trees and the green car- 
pet of grass. 

The first symphony concert was 
given on June 19, and was directed 
by Gaetano Merola, director of the 
San Francisco Opera Company. The 
orchestra was composed of sixty- 
members of the San Francisco Sym- 
phony, and Jascha Veissi was the 
soloist. 

Bernard Maybeck designed a mu- 
sic pavilion for the orchestra. The 
program was especially suited for 
the Grove and included : 

1. Prelude to "Die Meistersinger von 
Nurnberg" (Wagner). 



2. Violin Concerto Andante, 2nd Move- 
ment (Saint Saens). 

3. "L'Arlesienne Suite" No. 2 (Bizet). 

4. "Steppes of Middle Asia" (Boro- 
dine). 

5. Two Hungarian Dances. Nos. 5 and 
6 (Brahms). 

6. Blue Danube Waltz (Johannes 
Strauss). 

Many of San Francisco's music 
lovers enjoyed the concert and spoke 
enthusiastically of the acoustics and 
the possibilities for the future. This 
concert marks San Francisco's en- 
trance into the ranks of America's 
outstanding open-air facilities for 
music and drama. 

ALICIA MOSGROVE, 
Member, Recreation Commission. 




Children of Father Crowley Playground who danced Jarabe Tapatio at Dedication Program of Sigmund Stern Recreation Grove 



JULIUS S. GODEAU, INC. 

41 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 

Phone MArket 0711 

OAKLAND - STOCKTON 



Complete Mortuary Service at a Cote Within 
Your Means 

Out underttanding terrice lighten* 
your burden of grief 



nLW FILLMORE 

m M SSIQN 



Gas SC Oil f Free Crank Case Service 
"Where Serrice 1$ Paramount** 

BILL NUTTER'S 

Visiucion Valley Svrvica Station 
Visiucion and San Bruno Avenue 

REST ROOM 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



14 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



July 



STREET RAILWAY 
DEPRESSION 



(Continued from Page 11) 
lamiary 8, 1932, a yearly saving of 
"some $45,000 was made possible by 
the elimination of onerous working 
conditions. The saving in power due 
to meter installation and the skij)- 
stop operation will probably exceed 
$40,000 per year. These various 
economies will mean a total annual 
saving to the Municipal Railway of 
more than $260,000. 

Street railways in general have 
resorted to numerous economies 
and, as stated previously, herein, 
have in a number of cities, made 
substantial reductions in payrolls, 
Init are unable to come anywhere 
near offsetting the loss in revenue. 
If there is any satisfaction in 
knowing we are more fortunate than 
most eastern cities, we might com- 
pare our situation with Detroit, 
which has a municipally owned and 
operated street railway and bus sys- 
tem and possibly has suffered more 
from the business depression of the 
past two years than any other city 
in the country, the receipts drop- 
ping from $25,125,914 for the year 
ended April 30, 1930, to $15,988,588 
for the year ended April 30, 1932, 
a decrease of $9,137,326 or 36 per 
cent. Operating expenses were re- 
duced $6,568,638, or 32 per cent, 
leaving some $2,568,638 of a drop 
in revenue which was not offset by 
any reduction in expenses. 

Numerous other eastern cities are 
far worse off than the Pacific Coast 
cities, some of them running al- 
most as bad as Detroit. 

The Municipal Railway of San 
Francisco has always enjoyed one 
of the best safety records in the 
country. Accidents decreased 18 
per cent for the past year as com- 
pared with the year ended Decem- 
ber 31. 1929, and in the past nine 
years there has not been a fatal ac- 
cident to a passenger on our cars 
or Isuses. 

The property has always been 
kept up to a high standard of effi- 
ciency, and is in turn in a position 
to benefit immediately by any up- 
ward turn of the tide to which we 
all look forward in the near future. 
In his recent report Chief Engi- 
neer A. G. Mott of the State Rail- 
road Commission stated that the 
major portion of the service was 
found to be remarkably well related 
to the demand and that the conduct 
of the platform men of the Mu- 
nicipal Railway, both as to their 
courtesy to t he public and their 
ability to operate the equipment, 
was on a par with the personnel of 
the best systems in California. 




MRS. MARY PRAG 

A Record to Be Proud of 



On July 7, 1852, amid the sand 
dunes, with their tents and shacks, 
a steamer docked at Montgomery 
and Washington Streets and a mere 
child of seven disembarked with her 
parents. 

That same child today is one of 
our foremost and beloved citizens, 
Mrs. Mary Prag, honored and es- 
teemed for her devotion to the de- 
velopment and uplift of our youth. 

Learning her three R's in a 
wooden shack, in the days of min- 
ers, traders, and vigilantes, Mrs. 
Prag for several years was an edu- 
cator, later principal of the Girls 
High School, and since 1921 a mem- 
ber of the Board of Education ; has 
watched the growth and expansion 
of San Francisco's public schools 
with the knowledge and satisfaction 
that our magnificent school build- 
ings and educational program are 
second to none and have attracted 
wide attention. 

Our city is deeply appreciative of 
Mrs. Prag's unceasing efforts, and 
hopes to enjoy her counsel and 
judgment in the years to come. 

JUDGE SHURTLEFF ELECTED 

PRESIDENT OF STATE 

PIONEERS 



At its annual meeting, held July 
7, Judge Charles A. Shurtleff was 
elected president of the Society of 
California Pioneers. Admitted to the 
practice of law in 1882, Judge Shurt- 
leff has been president of the Bar 
Association of San Francisco, the 
California State Bar Association, 
and of the Legal Aid Society. 
Other officers elected were : 
Vice-presidents, Dr. Joseph A. 
Oliver, James K. Moffitt, Robert W. 
Neal, William L. Valentine, and 
"William T. Hale; treasurer, Charles 
J. Deering: marshal, J. H. P. Gedge : 
directors, John J. Lerman, Charles 
S. Gushing, Anson S. Blake, David 
Leith McKay, Oliver P. Stiger, 
James Irvine, F. de P. Teller, James 
G. Swinnerton, and I. M. Peckham. 



Phone DOUGLAS J505 

Wildberg Bros. Smelting 8C 
Refining Company 

Smellers, Refiners and Manufacturers 

GOLD, SILVER and PLATINUM 

Bankers Investment Building 

742 Market Street San Francisco, Calif. 



SEEDS - BULBS - PLANTS 

Our Nursery Is located at 23rd Ave. and Quln- 

tara Street, Sunset District, this city, where 

we have a fine assortment of ornamental 

shrubs, perennials, etc. 

Open Dally from 7 A. M. to S P. M. 

Except Sundays 

VISITORS WELCOME - ASK FOR OUR 

FREE CATAIXMillES 

HALLAWELL SEED COMPANY 

store: 268 Market St. San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone SUtter H981 

Nursery Phone: MOntrose 7043 



Phone MArkec 2209 and 2210 

FELDMAN & EILER 

Manufacturers of 

Automotive Radiators 

Cartridge Radiator Cores 

GENUINE FEDDERS RADIATORS 

Staggard Fin Radiators, "Eskimo" Radiator Cores 

140 Tenth Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Telephone ORdway 7926 San Francisco, Calif. 

ORIEL GLASS WORKS 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Bent Glass Our Specialty 
Etching . . Chipping . . Sand-Blasting 

2845 Gough Street Near Greenwich Street 



Phone GArfield 6663 
E. G. SOETH J. H. BROWN 

E. G. SOETH & CO. 

BRASS AND BRONZE FOUNDRY 

Exclusive Manufacturers of 

"Soeth's Comet" Brand Double Duty 

Nickel Bronze 

E. G. SOETH & CO. 

Office and Foundry 
248 Tehama Street San Francisco 



Phone ORdway 2397 

HARRY R. MYGRANT 

GLASS AND GLAZING 

Automobile Glass 

Mirrors, Beveling and Rcsilvering 

678 Eddy Street San Francisco 



California Corrugated 

Culvert Co. 

armco culverts 

818 Crocker Building Phone 

San Francisco DOuglas 4457 






July 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



15 



Vacation Season Prevails at Camp Mather 



By VEDA B. YOUNG 



THE 1932 vacation season was 
recently opened at the San Fran- 
cisco Municipal Camp, located on 
the Tuolumne River Gorge at 
IMather, California. This camp which 
has been operated since the sum- 
mer of 1924, is situated among cool 
evergreen forests and rolling moun- 
tain meadows at an altitude of 4,500 
feet. Last season was very success- 
ful, and this season looks very prom- 
ising. 

The trip to camp, covering 175 
miles, can be easily made in eight 
hours. The road from San Fran- 
cisco is via Hayward, Trac)', Man- 
teca, Oakdale, to Yosemite Junction 
over a paved highway. From 
Oakdale the Big Oak Flat road 
which is in good condition is taken 
to Mather via Groveland and Carl 
Inn. 

Each year the San Francisco Rec- 
reation Department spends consid- 
erable time and money in improv- 
ing this mountain playground. This 
year a more extensive development 
was made than for several previous 
seasons. The work included besides 
general alterations and repairs, the 
erection of several new Ijuildings, 
laundry facilities for guest use, an 
increased water program, new 
equipment for the comfort of pa- 
trons on the grounds and around 
the camp fire, the building of a new 
house and platform at the lake for 
the swimmers and spectators. 

In these trying financial times 
beset with mental strain, it behooved 
any one able to get away to take 
advantage of the very inexpensive 
vacation afforded at the San Fran- 
cisco Mountain Camp. 

Reservations 

It is advisable to make reserva- 
tions at the Recreation Department 




Sz^-imminff in Ihc High Surra 



office in Room 370, City Hall, anv 
day except Saturday, between 8:30 
a. m. and 5 p. m., or on Saturday 
until 12 o'clock, to be assured of 
accommodations. 

Personnel 

A first-class personnel is em- 
ployed at Mather to help everyone 
enjoy his or her stay to the utmost. 
An experienced camp hostess plans 
many delightful programs includ- 
ing daily camp fire entertainment 
for the enjoyment of the guests. 
Sample Menu 

Culinary experts prepare delect- 
able foods which are served in un- 
stinted portions, cafeteria style, in 
the lodge dining room. Modern re- 
frigeration and kitchen equipment 
facilitate the preparation of foods 
and insure the freshness of meats 
and vegetables. 

Breakfast : Fruit, cereal, bacon or 
ham and eggs, hot cakes, toast or 
rolls. 

Luncheon and dinner : Soup, salad, 
meats or fish, fresh vegetables and 
desserts. 

Beverages : Coffee, tea, chocolate, 
postum, iced tea. lemonade and milk. 




0# for a canter at Camp Mather 



Splendid Accommodations 

The accommodations consist of 
rustic cabins which are modestly 
furnished and sheltered by giant 
pines. The cabins assure comfort 
and privacy. Each cabin is equipped 
with ample wardrobe facilities, steel 
spring cots, pillows and mattresses ; 
guests supply their own blankets 
and bed linens. 

The Lodge which has an open 
fireplace provides a large assembly 
room for social activities and music. 
There is also a library. 

There are strictly modern sani- 
tary appointments at camp afford- 
ing showers and tub baths with an 
abundance of hot water at all hours. 

A camp store is maintained where 
films, postal cards, stationery, fish- 
ing rods and equipment, candies and 
beverages and tobaccos are procur- 
able. 

Recreation 

Opportunity is afforded to take 
pack train trips into the mountains. 
Horseback riding is available by the 
hour or day at moderate rates. Fish- 
ing in the nearby streams and lakes 
is thoroughly enjoyed. Innumer- 
able sports and games are provided 
without charge. 

Swimming is a major attraction. 

Special tours are arranged by bus 
to points of interest at nominal 
rates. Among the points of interest 
in the vicinity are : Muir Gorge, 
5000 feet deep, Laurel, Vernon. Ben- 
son and Rodger Lakes, Iving at alti- 
tudes of between 6,000'and 10,000 
feet. Tuolumne Meadows, Lake Te- 
naya and Mono Lake, via the Tioga 
Pass and Levining Grade, all are 
but a day's trip by motor, and the 
Yosemite Valley is thirty miles from 
Camp. 



i6 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



J"Iy 



Making Good a Promise 



Judge I. L. Harris has made fjood 
the promise f^iven the first of the 
year, when he became presiding 
judge of the Superior Court, to clear 
the court calendars within six 
months. 

The judge of the court had issued 
an announcement today that for the 
first time in history of the court 
business is virtually balanced. 

During the last six months there 
have been several trials of extraor- 
dinary length, chief of which is the 
$1,800,000 suit of I, E. W. Pioda vs. 
Golden State Milk Products Co. 
This case has been on trial before a 
jury in Superior Judge Walter 
Perry Johnson's court since March 
14. 



"Judge Harris' achievement is re- 
marka])Ie in view of the fact that 
since he became presiding judge not 
one judge from another county has 
been called in to help get rid of the 
congestion of business," Thomas S. 
Mulvey, secretary of the Superior 
Court, pointed out. 

"In former years several outside 
judges have been called in, and 
sometimes were on the job here for 
months at a time." 

The tabulation of cases disposed 
of by Judge Harris from the begin- 
ning of the year to June 30 is as 
follows : 

Total jury cases disposed of 435 

Total nonjury cases disposed of 501 
Uncontested cases disposed of. .1704 
Dismissals of actions 424 

Grand total 3064 



WATER DEPARTMENT REPORT 

By NELSON A. ECKART 

Water sales revenues within San Francisco decreased $598.76, as com- 
pared with April, 1932, and those outside of San Francisco increased 
$4,686. The decrease in San Francisco sales for the eleven-month period 
ending May 31, 1932, as compared with same period of last year amounts 
to $44,148, while for the same period sales outside of San Francisco de- 
creased $34,883. 

The increased earnings and decreased expenses result in an increased net 
income for May, 1932, over April, 1932, and in a decreased net income for 
the same period of last year. 

The eleven-month period ending May 31, 1932, shows: 

Total earnings $6,073,743.69 

Expenses 4,127,895.68 

Net income 11,945,848.01 

Appropriations for: 

Additions and Betterments $874,025.90 

Bond Redemption 916,666.66 1,790,692.56 

Net additions to surplus unappropriated $ 155,155.45 

Total construction expenditures for the period from March 3, 1930, 

to May 31, 1932 2,254,061.04 

The balance of Budget Authorizations unexpended to date is 304,037.36 

Budget Authorizations for appropriations to June 30, 1932 $2,558,098.40 



Telephone KEarny 5820 



GUERRINI COMPANY 

PASQUALE PETROMILLI. Proprietor 

Awarded Gold Medall: Genoa Expoiition 1914; 
P. P. I. E., S. F. 191S; San Diego Expo. 1916. 

The Leading and Largest Accordion 
Factory in the United States 

Patented: May 1904. July 1911. December 1913, 
February 17, 1914 



277-279 Columbu* Ave. 



San Francisco 



The Brand in Demand 
REGISTERED 

WHITE DUCK CLOTHING 
MFG. COMPANY 

Coats, Vests, Pants, Gowns, Caps, Aprons, 
Towels, Napkins 

45 Ecker Street GArfield 1341 

SAN FRANCISCO 



P. Monteclaro 



I. Mon 



Pacific Pool Room 
and Restaurant 

"The Place Where Friends Meet" 

849 Kearny Street Near Jackson 

SAN FRANCISCO 



T. GALLAGHER 

NEW FOURTH STREET 
BILLIARD PARLOR 

Cigars, Cigarettes, Candy, Magazines 
90 Fourth Street San Francisco 



STAR POOL ROOM 

Cigars and Candy 

T. FILIPINO SOCIETY 
623 Pacific Street 



Day Phone 
GARFIELD 0513 



Night Phone 
FRANKLIN 8823 



AL. MANN 

CASH BAIL < SURETY BONDS 

853 Kearny Street 
Near Jackson Street San Francisco 



SUtter 0306 

L. & M. Alexander & Co. 

Dealers in Latest Model 

TYPEWRITERS 

All Makes Sold, Rented and Repaired 
Inspection, Service and Supplies 

742 Market Street San Francisco, Calif. 

We sell Portable Typewriters 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



THE MANDARIN THEATRE 

REGULAR CHINESE DRAMA 

Entire Troupe Direct from China 

Program Changes Daily 



ADMISSION 50c to ^1.75 
1021 Grant Avenue San Francisco 



ALBERT P. JACOBS 

PresidenI 

JACOBS, MALCOLM 8c BURTT 

Wholesale Fruit and Produce 

Corner Drumm and Washington Streets 
Telephone SUtter 6810 San Francisco 



U. S. Royal Cords - U. S. Solid Tiret 

Prest-o-Lite Batterie* 

TELEPHONE HEMLOCK 4J70-4J71 

DECKER & HORSTMANN 

INCORPORATED 

SAN FRANCISCO 
A. HORSTMANN 167 HAYES STREET 



Manufacturers — Renovators 




6I-4IH ST. 
SAM FRANCISCO 

A. NEBENZAHL, Prop. 

Phone GARFIELD 9679 

Specializing in 

Hats Made to Your Order 

and 

Caps of the Latest Model 

Price ^1.50 and up 



Market Phone 
DAVENPORT 7109 



Residence Phone 
RANDOLPH 0860 



L^ Lagomar sino &lCo* 

Grower and Dealer in 

ALL KINDS OF 
VEGETABLES 



^ 



Stalls No. 36-37-38 



COLOMBO MARKET 



Mail Address: 626 Front Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



^^EKV^ICB;: 



"Within Your Means" 

WHITE'S FUNERAL SERVICE is compre- 
hensive. Even the slightest duty is performed 
with all the precision characteristic of WHITE'S 
SERVICE. Constant, intelligent supervision of 
every detail not only assures the most satisfac- 
tory service possible, but adds an element of 
sympathy and understanding sometimes lacking 
in ordinary service. 

"White's Prices Are Always Reasonable" 

S. A. WHITE 

Leading Funeral Diretlot 

TOANS-BAY AND PENINSULAR SERVICE WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE 

2200 Sutcer Street "S San Francisco 



West- 
770 



l 







Buy from firms that advertise with us 



The Charm of the Orient 

in 

The City That Knows How 



VISIT THE 



Japanese 
Tea Garden 



GOLDEN GATE PARK 



SECURITY LITHOGRAPH 
COMPANY 

Bank and Commercial Stationers 

Lithographers / Printers 

Book Binders 

32 Clay Street Phone EXbrook 0250 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: WEST 1303— FILLMORE 9954 

WM. C. UHTE 

MOTOR BODY 

BUILDING ^ REPAIRING 



1J75 Eddy Street 



San Francisco, Calif. 




3616 Geary St. at 20th Ave. San Francisco 

TELEPHONE EVERGREEN 8343 



BROWN & WILLIAMSON 



383 Brannan Street 



DOUGLAS 3282 



FOREIGN 
SECURITIES CO. 



ERNST J. KRAUSE 

Manager 



315 Montgomery Street 

GARFIELD 6739 



Ths )amu H. Baut Co. ,<tta>, San Fiamoio 



San FRkNcisco 





Courteiy of Daily P.icihc Build.r 



MAGNIFICENT MAIN LOBBY, OPERA HOUSE 



Photo by Piggott 



NOVEMBER 



19 3 2 




Sierra Equipment Corporation 

Sales Agents 

for 

Lali^e Mannfaeturing Company 

Aiiierican Automatic Electric Co. 



AND 



Other Manufacturers of 



SIGNALLING EQUIPMENT 

San Francisco / Seattle ^ Los Angeles 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



Publication for City and County of San Francisco 
Endorsed by the California Society of Pioneers 




San Fni^kNCisco 

Nl 





;ai!SmjMSSI£S 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY AT 

1095 Market Street Phone Market 8438 



50c per copy ; $5.00 per year 



NOVEMBER, 1932 



Vol. VI, No. 6 



CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Assessor's Office Louise M. O'Hara 

Controller's Office J. Everett Sharp 

Board o£ Education..D. P. Hardy and Mrs. Harriet Leaman 

Department of Health Edward M. Coffey 

Department of Public Works Sid Hester 

Bureau of Engineering Wm. C. Pidge 

City Attorney's Office Edmond P. Bergerot 

Civil Service Commission James J. Maher 

Civil Service Association Edward M. Coffey 

Caroner's Office Jane Walsh 

County Clerk Howard Gudelj 

County Welfare Department Esther D. Schwartz 

Department of Electricity Joseph P. Murphy 

District Attorney Henry Goldman 

Engineers' Union J. L. Slater, Jr. 

Exposition Auditorium James L. Foley 

Fire Department Lieut. Fred Jones 

Justice Courts Robert W. Dennis 

Mayor's Office Malcolm Fraser 

Municipal Railway Eugene W. Clisbee 

Municipal Carmen's Union Clark N. Farlow 

Office Employees' Association William T. Bonsor 

Parks and Museums W. M. Strother 

Per Diem Men's Association F. J. Ferguson 

Recreation Department Veda B. Young 

Principals' Association Susie A. Ward 

Public Library Anne M. Farrell 

Public Administrator Henry Boyen 

Recorder's Office Daniel McGloin 

Registrar's Office George L. Sharp 

San Francisco Hospital Mrs. Mae H. Noonan 

San Francisco Water Department N. A. Eckart 

Sealer of Weights and Measures Mrs. M. Dolan 

Sheriff's Office W. J. Martenson 

Superior Courts Henry J. McGrath 

Tax Collector's Office Homer Warren 

Treasurer's Office Duncan Matheson 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Lobby, Opera House Cover 

Federation of Municipal Employees Formed.-. 3-5 

San Francisco's War Memorial 7 

School Activities - 9 

Water Department Report 1 1 

D. A. V. By George Bottoms 1 1 

Community Chest Appeal 12 

San Francisco. By Mary A. O'Hare 13 

Municipal Popular Concerts 13 

Harbor Day Celebration 14 

San Joaquin Valley Pipe Line 14 

Electric Auto Call S\stem for Opera House 15 

Traffic Control at War Memorial 16 

By Captain Charles Goff 

David Scannell Club 16 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



November 



BRILLIANTSHINE 


USED BY 


The San Francisco Fire Department 



THE S. S. WHITE 

DENTAL MFG. 

COMPANY 

450 Sutter Street 

San Francisco 

Phone SUTTER 1300 



TRADE IS BUILT ON QUALITY 

Frank's Fine Sausage and Luncheon Meats 

are 

"For Those Who Want the Best" 

FRANK FOOD COMPANY 

974 Howard Street San Francisco 

Phone EXBROOK 3958 



m 



Phones: GARFIELD 2281-2282 

THEISEN 8C CARRIE 

SHAMROCK BRAND 
CORNED AND SMOKED MEATS 

285 SIXTH STREET 



PLYMOUTH CAFETERIA 

509 MARKET STREET 
FRESH VEGETABLES in Season 

Try Our Owri Baked 
HOT BREAD - PIES - CAKES - PUDDINGS 



THE LOWRIE 
PAVING CO., Inc. 

CONTRACTOR 

Streets, Sidewalks and Basement Floors 
Asphaltum a Specialty 

Phone MARKET 9459 

Office and Yard 
1540 SIXTEENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 





PHONE GARFIELD 8321 






«EXO» 






FLOOR WA X 




EXCELSIOR CHEMICAL COMPANY 


426 Bryant 


Street 


San Francisco 



James Rolph III Edward C. Landis Raymond L. Ellis 

Have your broker insure through us 

ROLPH, LANDIS 8C ELLIS 



INSURANCE GENERAL AGENTS 



FIRE - CASUALTY - AUTOMOBILE 
SURETY BONDS 



MARINE 



345 Sansome Street 1428 Franklin Street 323 W. Sixth Street 

GArfield 4860 GLencourt 2978 MUlual 9186 

SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND LOS ANGELES 

REPRESENTING OLD ESTABLISHED COMPANIES 



Sunday Dinner, 30c, from 12 to 8:30 

PARIS RESTAURANT 

242 O'Farrell Street, bet. Powell and Mason 

Phone sutler 9436 San Francisco 

Full Course Lunch from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., 30c 

7 Course Dinner from 4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 

with 

HALF OF SPRING CHICKEN, LAMB CHOPS OR 

TENDERLOIN STEAK, 50c 



Buv from firms that advertise with us 



November 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Newly Formed Federation of Municipal 

Employees Achieves Notable 

Success in First Test 




MANUEL J. JACOBS 
President 

N outstanding accomplishment of 
this year which will lead to an 
improvement of public service and to 
greater unity of city employees has 
been the successful organization of 
the San Francisco Federation of Mu- 
nicipal Employees. 

Already the new Federation has met 
its first test — that of working out a 
solution to the wage cut problem which 
would be satisfactory to taxpayers and 
city employees alike. 

That this work was successful is 
shown by the hearty endorsements of 
San Francisco's newspapers and civic 
organizations. Commenting upon the 
solution, as proposed by the Federa- 
tion, the San Francisco Call-Bulletin 
said in its leading editorial September 
29: 

A Satisfactory Ending to the Mu- 
nicipal Salary Cut Squabble 

"The great majority of San Fran- 
ciscans, this newspaper believes, will 
accept the settlement of the municipal 
salary reduction problem as just and 
pleasing. 

"There will be no salary reduction 



amendment on the ballot at the No- 
vember election, because of the with- 
drawal of thousands of signatures from 
the Uhl amendment petitions. There 
may be a special election at some time 
in the future, but even that now is 
doubtful. 

"The city employees were well with- 
in their rights in opposing those 
amendments. They have never shirked 
their share in aiding unemployment re- 
lief. For many months they have given 
two days' pay a month to that cause 
and they have now pledged themselves 
to continue their contributions as long 
as the supervisors and the mayor con- 
sider them necessary, either for that 
relief work or for tax reduction. 

"The move to reduce their salaries 
did not force this action from the city's 
workers. They were functioning in 




FRANK C. MILLER 
Vice-President 

this generous fashion long before the 
attack on their incomes was made. Now 
let them have a little peace for a while." 
Through the Federation the em- 
ployees have agreed to continue their 
voluntary salary contributions, amount- 
ing to |1, 500,000 yearly, up to June 
30, 1934, and thereafter if determined 
necessary by a vote of two-thirds of 
the Board of Supervisors with the ap- 
proval of the mayor. The money will 
either continue to go to unemployment 
relief, or into the general fund for tax 
reduction purposes. 



This agreement was unanimously ac- 
cepted by the Board of Supervisors, 
and as a result of this action and the 
withdrawal of thousands of names 
from petitions, no charter amendments 
were placed on the ballot. Thus the 
employees are helping the city meet its 
financial problems and at the same time 
protecting their wage standards and 
pension rights as guaranteed under the 
new charter. 

In recognition of their vision and 
leadership in undertaking the difficult 
task of welding a strong, permanent 
organization to represent all of the 
13,500 city employees, the delegates of 
the Federation unanimously elected the 
following officers to serve this year : 

Manuel J. Jacobs, President. 

Frank C. Miller, Vice-President. 

Joseph A. Lee, Recording Secretary. 

Warren J. Telfer, Financial Secre- 
tary. 

William T. O'Connor, Sergeant-at- 
Arms. 

Anthony Knight, Victor Doyle and 
James F. Coughlan, members of the 
Board of Trustees. 

Manuel J. Jacobs, President, is now 
a member of the faculty, of Polytech- 
nic High School. He is a graduate 
civil engineer, studied in the Univer- 
sities of Illinois. Chicago, Cincinnati 
and California and has engaged in pri- 
vate and public construction and engi- 
neering activities. Mr. Jacobs was head 
(Continued on Page 5) 




JOSEPH A. LEE 
Recording Secretary 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



No 



Specify 

DICKEY 



CLAY 
PRODUCTS 



Since 1856 



Tubbs Cordage Company 



200 Bush Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Manufacturer of ROPE and TWINE 



V. THEODOS 


W. DAVIS J. FRANKLIN 




PIONEER 


BRASS, 


BRONZE AND ALUMINUM 




FOUNDRY 


159 Fourteenth Street Phone UNderhill 7942 



SAN FRANCISCO and LOS ANGELES 

Incandescent Supply Company 

Lighting Fixtures y Floor Lamps 
Fireplace Furniture 

Household Electric Appliances < Vacuum Cleaners 
Washing Machines r Electric Refrigerators 



726-730 Mission Street 



Phone SUtter 4600 



Phone UNderhill 4628 

ANDREWS-WILMANS BISCUIT CO. 

"From Oven to You" 

CRACKERS AND BISCUITS 
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



1026 Mission Street 



San Francisco 



Regent Duck Coat and Linen Company 

and 

Coast Coat and Apron Supply Company 

1246-48 FOLSOM STREET 
Manufacturers and Suppliers 

DOCTORS' GOWNS NURSES' UNIFORMS 

WAITERS' COATS WAITRESS' UNIFORMS 

COOKS' COATS COOKS' CAPS and APRONS 

ALL KINDS OF TABLE LINENS 

For Real Service Telephone 
MARKET 1386 



Minneapolis-Honeywell 
Regulator Co. 

specializing in Controls for All Types of 

BUILDINGS 

Schools — Residences — Offices 

EXbrook 1770 557 Market Street SUtter 5328 
SAN FRANCISCO 



LEVI STRAUSS & CO. 

98 Battery Street 
"SINCE 1853" 



H. MOFFAT CO. 

Wholesale Butchers 

Raisers of and Dealers in 

LIVESTOCK 

Plant and Offices 

THIRD STREET and ARTHUR AVENUE 

Telephone ATwater 0700 San Francisco 



BERTRAND SEED COMPANY 

High Grade Lawn and Golf Course 
Grass Seeds 

600-602 Front Street Tel. EXbrook 3724 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Factories: Sonoma and Half Moon Bay, Calif. 
MISSION BELL ICE CREAM - VALLEY OF THE MOON BUTTER 

Sonoma Mission Creamery, Ltd. 

MANUFACTURERS OF CHEESE 

ALSO IMPORTERS 
G. lACONO Phone GARFIELD 2058 

Main Office: 1435 Stockton Street San FranciscOj Calif. 



Buv from firms that advertise with us 



November 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Federation of City Employees Formed 



(Continued from Page 3) 




WILLIAM J. TELFER 

Financial Secretary 

of the Department of Mathematics in 
the Berkeley schools, director of edu- 
cation at Folsom prison, director of 
education for the Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation during the war, and the 
founder and principal of the Irving M. 
Scott Part-Time High School. 

Frank C. Miller, Vice-President, is 
with the Department of Health, and 
Joseph A. Lee, Recording Secretary, 
is with the Police Department. Mr. 
Lee has been secretary and an active 
worker in many employee organiza- 
tions. 

Warren J. Telfer, Financial Secre- 
tary, is a member of the Polytechnic 
High School faculty and William T. 
O'Connor, Sergeant-at-Arms, is a Su- 
perior Court Bailifif. Anthony Knight, 
member of the Board of Trustees, is 
with the City Registrar's office, Victor 
Doyle is with the Department of 
Works, and James Coughlan is in the 
City Engineer's office. 

The object of the Federation is best 
expressed in the preamble of its con- 
stitution and by-laws : 

"The employees of the City and 
County of San Francisco believe in 




ANTHONY KNIGHT 
Trustee 

democracy and the due performance of 
all civic duties as public servants ; thev 
believe that the city employees should 
be one of the most highly productive 
of working bodies; and that the best 
interests of the community demand an 
intimate contact and an effective co- 
operation between all city employees to 
safeguard their rights and also the 
rights of the citizens of San Francisco. 
There have appeared in the daily press 
many misstatements and unjust criti- 
cisms regard the service of city em- 
ployees without any attempt to refute 
them. It behooves us, therefore, to 
unite all city employees in an associa- 
tion, non-political and non-partisan in 
character, in which all departments of 
the employees may be represented, 
enabling us to refute and answer any 
unjust charges or criticisms that may 
be brought against us, and, for that 
purpose, the city employees of San 
Francisco do organize this Federa- 
tion to be known as : 

The San Francisco Federation of 
Municipal Employees." 

Membership is by organization only. 
Organizations and departments are rep- 




VICTOR I. DOYLE 

Trustee 

resented by delegates on a basis of one 
delegate for each one hundred members 
or less of municipal employees, and 
one delegate for each additional one 
hundred, or major fraction thereof ; 
not to exceed ten delegates from any 
one department, so as to assure a demo- 
cratic form of representation, allow- 
ing no one group to control. 

The purpose of this Federation is 
to assist in maintaining the highest 
standard of public service ; to create a 
friendly relation between the citizens 
and its public servants ; to assure united 
action in all matters afifecting the wel- 
fare of the municipal employees and 
the community; to unite all city em- 
ployees for the purpose of maintain- 
ing, protecting, and advancing their in- 
terests. The Federation does not in- 
tend to usurp any functions of af- 
filiated organizations, its function be- 
ing to deal with matters of mutual 
concern only. This Federation does not 
permit individual affiliation. Individuals 
must join one of the existing organiza- 
tions or departments to which they are 
eligible and thus become members of 
the Federation. 







WALK 

RUN 

SKATE 



-A-THON 

DERBY 



GOLDEN GATE ARENA 
Jones and Eddy Streets 

VERNON BALFOUR, Director 
PRospect 0316 



GEORGE HEEG A. HOLZAPFEL 




LIBERTY 




Bakery and Coffee Shop 


142 


SIXTH STREET UNDERHILL 5331 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



N. 



ovember 



LRSTER, HRRRIGK 
AND HERRIGK 

Certified 
Public Accountants 

403 Merchants Exchange 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



HOOD 8C STRONG 

Certified Public Accountants 

425 Standard Oil Building 

aad 

Van Nuys Building 

LOS ANGELES 



Robinson, Nowell 8C Co. 

Certified Public Accountants 

GARFIELD 8119 

Crocker Bldg. San Francisco 



F. W. Lafrentz 8C Company 
Bullock, Kellogg 8C Mitchell 

Certified Public Accountants 

RUSS BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Geo. A. Applegarth 
ARCHITECTS 

703 MARKET STREET 



J. R. MILLER 

AND 

T. L. PFLUEGER 

ARCHITECTS 
580 MARKET STREET 



Professional 
Directory 



Builder of Schools for 30 Years 

HENRY C. SMITH 

A rchitect 

Telephone GARFIELD 4187 

Humboldt Bank Building 

785 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



O'BRIEN BROS. 

W. D. PEUGH, A.I.A. 
W. J. O'BRIEN 

ARCHITECT 
ENGINEER 



Frederick H. Meyer 
ARCHITECT 

525 Market Street 



W. ADRIAN 

Consulting Engineer 
417 Market Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Telephones 

San Francisco: DOuglas 7841 

Oakland: HUmboIdt S3 82 



JOHN FINN, President 
ROBERT B. FINN, Secretary 

John Finn Metal Works 

San Francisco and Seattle 



Babbitt Metals and Solders 

Type Metals and Zinc Dust 

Galranizing and Sherdardiiing 



372-398 SECOND STREET 
Telephone SUtter 4188 



GARFIELD 1878 

Crim, Resing & M'Guinness 
ARCHITECTS 

ROOM 202 
488 Pine Street 



Edward A. E antes 

ARCHITECT 



HYMAN & APPLETON 

ARCHITECTS 

SAMUEL LIGHTNER HYMAN 
A. APPLETON 



68 Post Street 



San Francisco 



Charles F. Masten, A. I. A. 
Lealer W. Hurd, A. I. A. 

Masten and Hurd 

ARCHITECTS 

T. F. CHACB, Consulting Engineer 

233 Post Street DOuglas 6257 



FLOORS 

ROKADA 

Magnesite .... jor General Use 
Industrial .... for Heavy Duty 
Asphalt Tile in Attractive Designs 

Sanitary, Resilient, Enduring 

Uni-Bond Composition Sleepers 
Never Rot — Patented 

UNDERHILL 3838 
Res. Tel. OVerland 6190 

LeRoy Olson Company 

170 Hooper Street 



Buy from firms that advertise vfith us 



November 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



San Francisco*s War Memorial 



ADMISSION DAY, so dear to 
, the heart of every Native Son 
and Daug-hter, carried a greater sig- 
nificance than the usual parade and 
celebration — the dedication of a fit- 
ting monument to those honored 
dead, who gave their lives in the 
Great ^^'ar, the San Francisco Wa.T 
Memorial. 

This War Memorial, composed of 
twin structures, the Veteran's Build- 
ing and the Opera House, separated 
by a Memorial Court, stands on the 
west side of Van Ness Avenue, op- 
posite the west facade of the City 
Hall, forming a magnificent addi- 
tion to the Civic Center. These 
buildings have cost approximately 



The Veteran's Building 

This building will be the head- 
quarters of the American Legion, 
and other patriotic organizations, in- 
cluding the Veterans of Foreign 
Wars, Spanish Veterans, D. A. R. 
and Gold Star Mothers. 

The entrance doors open into the 
main vestibule, and thence to the 
Trophy Gallery which will hold the 
exhibition of war trophies, the Sou- 
venir Gallery, serving as a museum 
of war medals, etc., being located at 
the south end. From the Trophy 
Gallery, entrance is gained through 
the arcade to the foyer of the Audi- 
torium. From the foyer, stairs lead 
to the basement, rest, telephone and 



dows opening upon a loggia across 
the front of the building, also six 
meeting rooms are located on this 
floor. The third floor also contains 
ten meeting rooms. The fourth floor 
is devoted entirely to thirteen gal- 
leries and a Statuary Court, all for 
exhibition purposes. There, also, are 
a library, offices and rest rooms. The 
galleries were designed with a view 
to occupancy by the San Francisco 
Art Association. 

The Opera House 

Among the foremost buildings 
of its kind in the world, San Fran- 
cisco will inaugurate a brilliant sea- 
son of grand opera in this magnifi- 




Couriexy of Daily Pacific Builder 



VETERANS' BUILDING — SAN FRANCISCO WAR MEMQRIAL 



$6,125,000, in addition to part of the 
site contributed by the City. Public 
subscriptions provided over $2,000,- 
000, a City bond issue $4,000,000, 
with $125,0OO received as premium 
on the bonds. 

The construction of the project 
has been directed by a Board of 
Trustees, authorized by the City 
Charter, composed of a group of 
men prominent in the advancement 
and growth of San Francisco, headed 
by Mr. Kenneth R. Kingsbury, who 
has served as President since the 
Board's formation. 

Work on the structure was begun 
January 2, 1931, the cornerstones of 
both buildings being laid on Armis- 
tice Day of the same year. 



check rooms, while other stairs lead 
to the balcony level. 

The Auditorium has a seating ca- 
pacity of 710 on the main floor and 
396 in the balcony. A unique fea- 
ture of the main floor is its auto- 
matic control, so that it may slope 
when used for a stage performance, 
or made level with the stage floor 
for dancing or other purposes. A 
motion picture projection room is 
also provided. The arched panels of 
the Auditorium will contain eight 
colorful Brangwyn murals which at- 
tracted great attention at the Pan- 
ama-Pacific Exposition of 1915. 

The second floor corridors lead to 
club rooms for both men and wo- 
men, a library and lounge with win- 



cent temple of music, the first mu- 
nicipally owned opera house in the 
United States. Although a structure 
of simple grandeur, its monumental 
features will be a spacious vestibule 
and promenade with broad main 
stairs of marble rising to the upper 
levels. 

The Auditorium treatment is di- 
rect and dignified but featured by 
beauty, comfort and luxury. The 
main floor, dress circle, balcony and 
mezzanine boxes have a seating ca- 
pacity of 3,285, much less than the 
Chicago, New York or European 
opera houses. The main lighting 
fi.xture, 27 feet in diameter, will pro- 
duce the effects of a huge illumi- 
(Continued on Page 13) 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



No 



TheTurner Company 

Wholesale 

Plumbing, Heating, Engineering Supplies 
Pipe, Valves and Fittings 

Distributors 
for 

Westgoast Sanitary Mfrs, 

A 100% CALIFORNIA PRODUCT 
329 Tehama Street EXbrook 2970 



B. F. SHEARER COMPANY 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Stage Equipment 
Auditorium Draperies 



243 Golden Gate Avenue 



UNDERHILL 1816 



Duplicating Supply Company 

Distributors 

NIAGARA DUPLICATORS, STENCILS 
INKS AND SUPPLIES 



Telephone DOuglas 6630 



317 Market Street 



Painters and Decorators 

EKLUND CO. 

3506 Sixteenth Street 
HEMLOCK 2282 




••»»■ 



^1 



LARRY 
BARRETT 

Makes a 

Special 

Announcement 

to 

CITY 

EMPLOYEES 



k. 



Purchasers of 

INDIA TIRES 

will be entitled to the same 
discount as that given to the 
City Purchasing Agent. 
Drop in and exatnine the 
India Tire and inquire as 
to our Budget Pay- 
ment Plan. 




BARRETT TIRE CO., LTD. 

378 O'Farrell Street Near Taylor 
Telephone PRospect 6804 



I^ELIAELE 

I^AINTINC C€. 

R. POSTLER, Proprietor 
Painting Contractor in All Branches 



3247 Nineteenth Street, cor. Shotwell 
Phone MISSION 4348 



l|ay^0 Park SlaunJiirg 

Washing for Hotels, Restaurants and 
Barber Shops Our Specialty 



Phone RANDOLPH 1394 
915 CAYUGA AVENUE 

Near Ocean Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Buv from firms that advertise with 



November 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



School Activities 



THE educational set-up of the San 
Francisco Public Schools was 
given new honor during the past month 
when the records revealed that ninety- 
five out of every one hundred children 
in the elementary grades won promo- 
tion at the opening of the fall term, a 
record which compares favorably with 
elementary schools throughout the 
country. 

Nationwide recognition of the cre- 
ative ability and talent of students in 
San Francisco Public High Schools 
was contained in an announcement 
made by the National Education Asso- 
ciation in Washington recently, award- 
ing two of five national prizes to stu- 
dents of art classes in San Francisco 
High Schools. The winners were 
Charles Shaw of the Balboa High 
School and Rieno Niemela of Mission 
High School. 

Every high school in the United 
States was invited to participate in this 
annual competition. Aaron Altmann, 
director of art, submitted thirty-two of 
the best cartoons drawn by students in 
the seven San Francisco Public High 
Schools. 

Thirty-seven awards were won by 
the San Francisco Continuation School 
at the California State Fair which 
closed recently. The awards included : 

1. The Silver Cup trophy for best 
continuation school display. 



2. The second place Sweepstakes 
award, a $15,000 prize. 

3. The second place award for best 
exhibit of printing. This award was 
won in general competition with all 
high schools of the state. 

First prize blue ribbon awards were 
won for the following : Budget of Busi- 
ness Correspondence, Budget of Busi- 
ness Transactions, Budget of Type- 
writing, Linoleum Block Print, and 
Mechanical Drawing Plate and Trac- 
ing. 

Second prize red ribbon awards were 
won for : Budget of Typewriting, Dry 
Tile Ornamental Plaque, Remodeled 
Garment, Printing Project, and Place- 
ment Records. 

The Recognition of Merit Award 
was won for exhibits in Business Prac- 
tice Transactions, Budget of Business 
Forms, Budget of Typewriting, Dec- 
orative Wood Block, Decorative Wood 
Block and Print, Art Color Gypsy 
Dress, Show Card Poster Lettering 
Project, Linoleum Block Print, Draw- 
ing for Wood Block, Drawing, Child's 
Coat and Hat, Tailored Suit and Hat, 
Remodeled Hat and wardrobe for four- 
year-old child. Dresser Set, San Fran- 
cisco Continuation Literary Magazine, 
Loud Speaker, Drawing Project, Busi- 
ness Arithmetic Project, Occupa- 
tional Study "Teaching," Occupa- 



tional Study "Nursing," and Fancy 
Bag made of Dish Cloth. 

An official delegation of educators 
from Jugoslavia arrived here last 
Wednesday to investigate progressive 
methods in use in American public 
schools with a view to introducing any 
desirable innovations in their own 
country. 

The delegation headed by Professor 
V. Mesner, chief of Section for Sports 
in the Ministry for Physical Education 
in Jugoslavia, was received by Dr. Jo- 
seph Marr Gwinn, Superintendent of 
Schools, at the offices of the Board of 
Education. Professor Mesner told of 
the interest of the ministry of educa- 
tion of Jugoslavia in the school organ- 
ization and classroom procedures in the 
United States. Other members of the 
delegation were M. M. Naumovic, San 
Francisco Consul for Jugoslavia, and 
Peter B. Knego, president of the Jugo- 
slav Sokol of San Francisco. 

"The fine work that is being done 
in the San Francisco Public Schools 
has created for the city an educational 
reputation which has reached my coun- 
trymen," said Professor Mesner. 
"Therefore we decided to come to your 
city and obtain a first-hand account of 
these progressive methods." 

The delegation visited the Everett 
Junior High School and the Mission 
(Continued on Page 12) 



San Francisco Schools Win Two Out of Five National Poster Awards 





WHY PUT IT IN THE ICE BOX? 



Drawn by Charles Shaw, Balbofl High School, San Francisco. Calif. 



Drawn by Rieno Niemela, Mission Hifih School, San Francisco, Calif. 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



November 



Years of Specialized Experience Stand Behind 

ALGOR 

A Complete Service which 

MAKES, KEEPS BOILERS CLEAN 

R. S. ELLIOT, Pacific Coast Representative 

FEEDWATERS, INC. 

519 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone SUTTER 3487 




UTILIXy-BEALTy 



1072-1076 HOWARD STREET 



LEAD 

BUNKER HILL BRAND 
LEAD PRODUCTS 

99.99% PURE 

Sheet Lead < Lead Pipe y Lead Wool 
Pig Lead ^ Lead Fittings *" Calking Lead 

Lead Burning Contractors 

Bunker Hill Smelter 
Northwest Lead Co. 

Manufacturers 

F. A. HAMMERSMITH, District Sales Manager 
Crocker Building San Francisco 

LOS ANGELES OAKLAND SACRAMENTO 

SPOKANE SEATTLE SAN DIEGO 

SALT LAKE CITY 



^^STOP THIEF 



99 




Interior view of the Hersey Compound tAeter. Note the Lever Valve. 
In full open position this valve offers no obstruction to the flow. 



EVERY compound meter that is even a few per cent off in 
accuracy is a potential bandit. 

Take the case of a 4-inch compound meter in a Massachusetts 
city. This meter when removed had registered 19,000,000 
cubic feet. It was off 5% in accuracy. This city was robbed 
of nearly a million cubic feet of water ! 

Hersey Compound Meters are the only meters with no loss of 
accuracy at the "cross over" point or throughout the entire 
range of flow. They are the only meters with the patented 
"Counterbalanced Lever Valve" that assures full head of 
water. The all-bronze single-piece case eliminates the factor 
of corrosion and cuts maintenance expense. 

Let us show you how a Hersey Compound Meter will save 
enough to pay for itself. Write the nearest Branch Office. 



HERSEY 

WATER C?vl METERS 



HERSEY MANUFACTURING CO. 

Corner E and 2nd Streets South Boston, Mass. 

Pacific Coast Branches: 553 Howard Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

450 East Third Street .... Los Angeles, Calif. 

475 Hoyt Street, Portland, Ore. 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



November 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Increase in Water Sales Shown by Report of General Manager 

Nelson A. Eckart 

Complying with the provisions of this year was $695,784, as against 

Section 5, Ordinance 8691, there is $573,110 for the same period of last 

transmitted herewith the operating year, an increase of $122,674. Gross 

statement of the San Francisco income from all sources for the three 

Water Department for September, months' period was $59,297 less than 

1932, showing a comparison with last year and this, with three 

August, 1932, and with a like period months' proportion of obligations 

of last year. added to the Water Department. 

The net income for September, under the 1932-33 budget require- 
1932, was $255,790, which is an in- ments (rental of Bay Crossing Pipe 
crease of $36,762, as compared with Line, $150,000 per year) amounting 
the month of August. This net in- to $37,500, accounts for total de- 
crease is caused by the increase in creases of $96,797. This is oflfset by 
amount received for sale of water in elimination of water purchases, 
San Francisco, $41,108, and decrease which last year amounted to $147,- 
in suburban sales of $3,375, or an 041, a decrease in pumping expenses 
increase in water sales of $37,733. of $46,204, other operating expenses, 
This increase is reduced by the de- $8391; bond interest, $11,250; ac- 
crease in revenues from "Rent from count of retirement of $1,000,000 
Land and Buildings," $1604; "Inter- bonds, and taxes, $3855, account of 
est on Fund Balances," $334, and reduction of tax rates in outside 
"Miscellaneous Non-Operating Rev- counties, other expense accounts, 
enue," $39, a total decrease of $1977. $2730; a total reduction of expendi- 
This decrease is partially offset by tures as compared with last year of 
reduction in operating expenses $219,471, resulting in an increase in 
of $1007, making a net increase of set income of $122,674. 
$36,762. The month of September, 1932, 

The net income for three months shows : 

Total earnings I 604.294.89 

Expenses 348.504.44 

Net Income $ 255,790.45 

Appropriations for: 

Additions and Betterments 139,166.00 

Bond Redemption 83,333.34 122,499.34 

Balance for Surplus ? 133,291.11 

Appropriated to General Fund, 1/12 of $715,000. 

(1932-33 Budget Estimate) 59,583.34 

Net Additions to Surplus Unappropriated I 73,707.77 

Total construction expenditures for the period from March 3, 1930, to 

September 30, 1932 $2,373,264.92 

The balance of Budget Authorizations unexpended to date is 550,008.48 

Budget authorizations for appropriations to June 30, 1933 ?2,923,273.40 

The number of employees on Construction Roll remained the same on September 
30, 1932, as on August 31, 1932. The number of employees on Operating and Main- 
tenance Work decreased from 475 on August 31 to 467 on September 30, 1932. This 
net decrease of 8 is the result of the following: 
Decreases: 

1 Temporary Meter Reader, water sales; laid off. 

1 General Clerk, part time, water sales; laid off. 

1 Temporary Oiler, City Distribution Division; laid off. 

1 Temporary Fireman, City Distribution Division; laid off. 

1 Laborer, City Distribution Division; resigned. 

1 Pipe-Caulker, City Distribution Division; leave of absence. 

4 Temporary Laborers, Peninsula Division; laid off. 

10 
Increases: 

1 Janitress, Peninsular Division; temporary. 

1 Night Watchman, Peninsular Division; permanent. 

2 
8 Net Decrease. 



D. A. V. 



Telephone EXbrook 0981 



Factory: Bay view 



Dan P. Maher Paint Company 

DEPENDABLE PAINT 
MANUFACTURERS 

Specializing in 

Industrial, Marine and Technical Paints 
and Varnishes 



Office: 



55 New Montgomery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 6663 
E. G. SOETH J. H. BROWN 

E. G. SOETH & CO. 

BRASS AND BRONZE FOUNDRY 

Exclusive Manufacturers of 

"Soeth's Comet" Brand Double Duty 

Nickel Bronze 

E. G. SOETH 8C CO. 

Office and Foundry 
248 Tehama Street San Francisco 



By GEORGE BOTTOMS 

GOVERNOR ROLPH'S office 
in the Capitol Building at Sac- 
ramento. A heated discussion over 
the granting of a boxing permit to 
the San Francisco Chapter of the 
Disabled American Veterans of the 
World War. Thos. M. Foley, promi- 
nent local attorney, member of the 
D. A. V.'s and the leader in their 
fight for the right to put boxing on 
a higher plane, speaks. 

"It's a question of the survival of 
the fittest." At the mention of the 
age-old code Commissioner Leslie T. 
Kelley was all attention. During his 
service as chaplain during the war 
he had heard that expression many 




THOMAS M. FOLEY 

times. He should have known that 
these veterans would always remem- 
ber that. Hadn't they outlasted the 
opposition? 

When Foley had finished there 
was a silence. Kelley kept turning 
that phrase over in his mind, and 
then suddenly he made a decision. 
He indicated that at the next meet- 
ing of the California Boxing Com- 
mission, May 10, 1932, he would 
favor the veterans' application, 
thereby giving them the necessary 
majority. The two-year fight had 
been won. 

And they have survived. Once 
again they have outlasted the oppo- 
sition until today they are the big- 
gest revenue-producing organization 
of their kind. While all other fight 
clubs are finding it difficult to break 
even the D. A. V.'s are operating on 
a paying basis. While others have 
been against a broadcast of their 
program the veterans have favored 
it. It's Ernie Smith, the hey-hey 
boy, who brings all the thrills of the 
ringside to those disabled veterans 



(Continued on Page 15) 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



Nov 



School Activities 



(Continued from Page 9) 

High School and had the advantage of 
being escorted through the buildings 
and of having the education work ex- 
plained in detail by Principals John F. 
Brady and William J. Drew. 

His Honor, Mayor Angelo J. Rossi, 
has nominated Attorney C. Harold 
Caulfield, a member of the City Plan- 
ning Commission, in succession to Miss 
Alice Rose Power, as a member of the 
Board of Education. Attorney Caul- 
field was a member of the Board of 
Freeholders which drew the new city 
charter. Miss Power has been a mem- 
ber of the Board of Education since 
1919. Her present term of seven years 
expires January 8, 1933. 

Major Adams has been relieved by 
Capt. Walter M. Mann, former regi- 
mental adjutant of the Thirtieth In- 
fantry. 

The order affecting Major Adams. 
made as an economy measure by the 
Federal government, moves from the 
San Francisco Public Schools one who 
has reflected the uniform courtesy of 
the army into the rank and file of the 
R. O. T. C. units in San Francisco 
since he was assigned to the professor- 
ship in December, 1921. 

The Commissioners of Education, 
the Superintendent and the several 
principals of the San Francisco Public 
High Schools received word of the re- 
tirement of Major Adams with expres- 
sions of regret and appreciation for the 
valuable service he has rendered. 

Five hundred pupils from fifteen 
senior and junior high schools and ele- 
mentary schools visited the waterfront 
to learn first-hand the lesson of Harbor 
Day, the celebration which called the 
attention of San Franciscans to the 
importance of their harbor. 

The children were escorted by Junior 
Chamber of Commerce members 
aboard three ocean liners and shown 
how modern steamship travelers are 
housed, fed and entertained while at 
sea and how California products are 
carried to every corner of the globe 
from the Port of San Francisco. 

"World League of International 
Education Associations" is the title of 
an article just published by Japanese 
Abroad, a monthly magazine printed 
in Tokyo. The article, written by Mrs. 
Alice Wilson of Girls' High School, 
San Francisco, founder of the organi- 
zation, tells of its aims and purposes 
which has units in high schools through- 
out the world. The concluding para- 
graph follows : 

"And step by step we are building 
up an organization of young people 
who may some day be instrumental in 
bringing about a better understanding 
among people of the next generation." 



Community Chest Appeal 

Tlie goal of the Community Chest 
cam])aign, from November 14 
through December 2, has been set at 
$2,500,000, according to W. P. 
Fuller, Jr., chairman of the execu- 
tive committee of the Chest. 

Last year, with the same goal, the 
camjKiign was oversubscribed with a 
total quota of $2,635,000. 

Warning San Francisco of the 
danger threatening the social and 
economic structure of the cit}- of 
the 100 budget participating agencies 
of the Chest are not maintained at 
this critical time, Ray W. Smith, 
executive secretary of the Chest, 
said yesterday : 

"The Chest supports welfare work 
of vital importance to every man, 
woman and child in our city. The 
bond issue will feed our unemployed. 

The Chest is dedicated to the task 
of caring for neglected babies and 
homeless children, of guiding young 
people confused in this period of 
doubt and disaster, of providing 
medical and hospital care for our 
indigent sick and aged, of saving 
from utter despair the destitute fam- 
ilies and men and women at the end 
of their resources. 

"It will be a hard fight this year, 
but we dare not stop short of our 
goal of protecting the homes of San 
Francisco from squalor, disease and 
crime. 

"Recognizing the difficulties the 
Chest faces this year, we have 
strengthened our team organization 
in every division. The army of 6000 
volunteer workers is ready for the 
hardest battle in the social history 
of San Francisco." 



Made Before Your Eyes Fresh Daily 

TAYLOR'S 
ALL-PORK SAUSAGE 

Wholesale and Retail 
Front Window - Crystal Palace Market 

1175 MARKET STREET 



Telephones DOuglas 0528-0529-0530 

Kindel & Graham 

(THE HOUSE OF NOVELTIES) 

Importers, Distributors and 

Manufacturers 

NOTIONS, TOYS, NOVELTIES 
& PREMIUM SUPPLIES 

782-784 Mission Street 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Quality and Cteantincn Is Our Motto 

Evergood Pork and 
Delicatessen Store 

RAUSCHER ft SONS 
Manufactureri o/ 

High Grade Sausage and Delicacies 
Phone ATwater 1323 2449 Mission Street 



California Fire Extinguisher 
Company 

FIRE DEPARTMENT AND 
FOREST FIRE EQUIPMENT 

67-71 Main Street 

Phone SUTTER 0618 



Modern Methods 



Prompt Service 



PERFECTION 

CURTAIN CLEANERS 

Curtain Specialists 
LARGEST MODERN PLANT 

3121 Seventeenth Street 
Phone HEmlock 7474-7475 



P. Laborde 



Phone PRospect 0430 



L. RUFFIEUX 

FRENCH CONFECTIONERY 

Dining Room Service - Delivery Service 
Take Home Service 

LAYER CAKES - COFFEE CAKE 

PASTRY - PETITS FOURS 

Jones and O'Farrell San Francisco 



OSTROW'S 

PURE FOOD 

DELICATESSEN SPECIALTIES 

CRYSTAL PALACE MARKET 

Market Street at 8th San Francisco 

Telephone MARKET 6899 



STIEFVATER'S 

FLOUR AND 
BAKERS' SUPPLIES 

750 Battery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Buy from firms that advertise with us 



November 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



13 




MUNICIPAL POPULAR 
CONCERTS 



CoUTttsy S. F. Operj Associatio 



Gabriel Moulin, Photographer 



OPERA HOUSE 



San Francisco War Memorial 



(Continued from Page 7) 

nated star, the color of which may 
be changed to suit the stage light- 
ing. 

The orchestra pit accommodates 
over 100 musicians, and may be 
raised or lowered as desired. In the 
basement at the. front of the build- 
ing is a promenade, from which open 
rest and phone rooms, a hospital 
room and a large buffet. A com- 
pletely equipped projection room 
with all facilities for spot and flood 
lighting of the stage is located at 
the rear of the dress circle. 

Administration offices of the opera, 
the symphony and board room of 
the War Memorial Trustees, will be 
found on the fourth floor. 

The stage, one of the largest in 
the world, is 83 feet deep, 131 feet 
wide and 140 feet from stage level 
to roof. Its equipment, practically 
all electrically operated, is of the 
finest that could be obtained. A 
switchboard 30 feet long controls 
the entire lighting of the Auditorium. 

Arthur Brown, Jr., was the archi- 
tect for the War Memorial group, 
with G. Albert Landsburg, collabor- 
ating architect, for the Opera House. 

The hopes and dreams of a ma- 
jestic temple of music have been 
realized, and the War Memorial 
group stands as an expression of the 
faith and courage of a community 
achieving: its ideals. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Oh, City of St. Francis, hold your 

Golden Gate ajar 
When the moon, a silver crescent, is 

the cradle of a star. 
For the heart of me seeks entrance, 

as it has so many times — ■ 
Ah, the ear of me is lonely for Old 

St. Mary's chimes ! 

For the hustling at the Ferry and 
the clanging and the roar — 

For the Adventure that awaits me 
on Market Street once more- — 

For people of many nations finding 
kindly atmosphere. 

Making you a wondrous city — glam- 
orous — without a peer! 

For your Bay alive with white caps, 
dotted with many sails — 

Harboring world port ships, veterans 
of many gales — 

Oh, the mind of me has held you 
as a canvas background could 

Hold the lights, the trees, the shad- 
ows, that are St. Francis \\'ood ! 

So, I find myself returning in my 

musings constantly — 
San Francisco, you are holding the 

very heart of me ! 
Though the Wanderlust may take 

me many, many miles afar — ■ 
I look forward to returning through 

the Gate to where you are ! 

MARY A. O'HARE. 



The Municipal Popular Symphony 
Concerts which were started on 
November 8, 1922, will enter their 
tenth consecutive successful season 
on Tuesday evening, November 15. 
Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden, who 
is responsible for the city's interest 
in musical endeavors, has the satis- 
faction to know that his confidence 
in the people's love for music has 
been justified. Approximately 50,000 
people have attended these events 
annually during the last nine years. 

The tenth season will begin with 
Issay Dobrowen wielding the baton 
over the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra of eighty-five musicians. 
The soloist will be Alice Gentle, an 
operatic and concert soprano of 
national fame. 

The instrumental part of the pro- 
grom will consist of: Overture, 
"Benvenuto Cellini" (Berlioz), Sym- 
phony in B minor, "Unfinished" 
(Schubert), Symphony No. 5, 
"From the New World" (Dvorak). 
The selections to be interpreted by 
Alice Gentle will be "Pace, Pace mio 
Dio" from "La Forza del Destino" 
(Verdi), "Traum durch die Dam- 
merung" (Richard Strauss) and 
"Caecelia" (Richard Strauss). 

While the lowest priced seats for 
these concerts have been sold out, 
the scale of prices is so moderate 
that the highest priced seats for 
these Municipal Popular Symphony 
Concerts cost no more than the low- 
est priced seats at many of the other 
musical events. Up to now only 
season tickets were sold. Beginning 
with Monday, November 7, single 
admission tickets will be for sale at 
the box office at Sherman, Clay & 
Company. 



Fred Solan's Grill 

19 Maiden Lane GArfield 9600 

Opp. Old Chronicle Bldg., off Kearny St. 

24 Private Dining Rooms 



Gallo Pastry Company 

1510 STOCKTON ST. 

Phone KEamy 2908 

135 GRANT AVE. 

Phone EXbrook 5714 



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THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



November 



Harbor Day Celebration 



SAN I'RANCTSCO'S colorful mari- 
time celebration, Harbor Day, 
held on Wednesday, Sejjtcmber 28, 
was the greatest ever staged. 

A si)ectacular street parade, par- 
ticipated in by the entire steamship 
community, civic organizations, the 
Army, Navy and Marine Corps, 
drew much favorable comment; 
while the marine parade on the bay, 
races between yachts, motor boats 
and rowboats, with the crowning 
event, the Olympic Cup race between 
cutters of the United States battle 
fleet, attracted thousands of spec- 
tators. 

The history of Harbor Day goes 
back to pioneer days, when the ar- 
rival of ships was signalled to the 
little settlement on the beach along 
Montgomery Street by flag or lan- 
tern from the crest of Telegraph 
Hill. 

During the P. P. I. Exposition in 
1915, the first formal Harbor Day 
was staged under the auspices of the 
Board of State Harbor Commission- 
ers, and was revived by the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce in 1929. 

Harbor Day has awakened and 
stimulated among San Franciscans 
the importance, needs and traditions 
of their wonderful harbor upon 
which the business life of the com- 
munity revolves. 

To Walter L. Dawes, general 
chairman and his various commit- 
tees must be given unstinted praise 
for their eflforts in making the 1932 
Harbor Day Celebration one that 
will long be remembered by San 
Francisco's citizenry. 



San Joaquin Valley Pipe Line 
Completed 

Hetch Hetchy water was brought 
a step closer to San Francisco res- 
ervoirs today when construction of 
the 47^-inilc San Joaquin pipe line 
was completed by Youdall Construc- 
tion Company. 

This pipe is capable of carrving 
60,000,000 gallons of water daily' and 
cost approximately $4,500,000 for 
fabrication and laying. It extends 
from Oakdale Portal, the western 
terminal of the Hetch Hetchy-Sierra 
tunnels to Tesla Portal, the eastern 
end of the Coast Range tunnels, 
which are still under construction. 

The new pipe line was filled with 
Hetch Hetchy water for the first 
time Tuesday and successfully with- 
stood tests and has been accepted by 
the city from the contractors. It was 
announced that the new line will be 
kept filled with water until it is 
actually placed in use, in order to 
keep depreciation at a minimum. 

With completion of this line, 
water from Hetch Hetchy reservoir 
was brought a total of 97yi miles 
toward San Francisco from Hetch 
Hetchy reservoir. The boring of ap- 
proximately 3J4 miles more of tun- 
nel through the Coast Range and 
concrete lining of approximately 
fifteen miles will complete the entire 
170-mile aqueduct. 



The staff of the Municipal Record 

extend their deepest sympathy to 

Supervisor James B. McSheehy 

in his recent bereavement. 



TH I'^ San I-Vancisco Federation 
of Munici])al ICmployces, repre- 
sented 13,500 city employees, an- 
nounced opposition to Constitutional 
Amendment No. 9, which would 
change the system of taxation for 
the support of the public schools 
from taxes on real property to taxes 
on income and on sales of commodi- 
ties. 

The Federation this week passed 
the following resolution, according 
to an announcement by Manuel Ja- 
cobs, president. 

"Whereas, Constitutional Amend- 
ment No. 9, to be voted on at the 
general election in November, 
changes the system of taxation for 
the support of public schools from 
taxes on real property to taxes on 
income and on sales of commodities, 
and 

Whereas, the national government 
has entered the field of taxation on 
incomes and should be allowed that 
privilege exclusively, and 

Whereas, the sales tax as a rule 
places the burden on those who are 
least able to bear the same, and 

W^hereas, incomes from these 
sources, especially in time of finan- 
cial distress are hazardous and un- 
certain, and 

Whereas, the change would greatly 
reduce the city retirement salaries of 
all public school teachers in San 
Francisco, and 

Whereas, this is a very inoppor- 
tune time to make radical changes 
in the financial structure of our 
school system, therefore, be it 

Resolved, that the San Francisco 
Federation of Municipal Employees 
go on record as being opposed to 
said Amendment No. 9. 



Waltham Grinding Wheels 



Standard Twist Drills 



SCHEID HEAVY HARDWARE 
& STEEL CO. 

Blacksmith r Body Builders f Machine Shop 
Garage Supplies 

1075 FOLSOM STREET 
PHONE HEMLOCK 3969 



Automobile 
Reconstruction 



Phone 
GRaystone 0226 



GOLDEN GATE RADIATOR, 
BODY & FENDER WORKS 

RADIATORS CLEANED 

Circulation Guaranteed 

Re-cored and Re-built — Complete Duco Refinishing 

440 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

RAY F. COSTA 



GAFFNEY & LUCE 

WHOLESALE MEATS 

Specializing in City Contracts 

1676 MARKET STREET MARKET 0437 



COMPLIMENTS 



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November 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



15 



ELECTRIC AUTO-CALL 

SYSTEM FOR OPERA 

HOUSE 



AMONG the many conveniences 
L. of the Opera House, one is 
particularly unique, the auto calling 
system. Designed by Robert L. 
St. John, electrical engineer, work- 
ing in conjunction with the Lake 
Manufacturing Company and the 
Sierra Equipment Corporation, the 
Lake Automobile Calling System 
will eliminate the usual confusion 
and congestion so familiar, yet an- 
noying, to theatergoers and traffic 
officers alike, and aid in the rapid 
dispatch at the conclusion of the 
performance of patrons with chauf- 
feur-driven cars. On arriving at the 
Opera, the patron is given a dupli- 
cate numbered card, retaining for 
himself one portion, handing the 
other to the chauffeur who drives 
to a reserved parking space, near 
strategically placed illuminated an- 
nunciators. When desirous of leav- 
ing, the patron informs the oper- 
ator of the control panel, situated 
in the Memorial Court promenade, 
who dials his card number which is 
instantly flashed on the annunci- 
ator, and the chauffeur so notified. 
The three annunciators each show 



three numbers, thus insuring a 
maximum of departures with a mini- 
mum of congestion. 

Attention is called to the Strow- 
ger Automatic P-A-X dial telephone 
system operating 100 phones in- 
stalled in offices, mechanical and 
other departments of the two build- 
ings constituting the War Me- 
morial, also the S. H. Couch Com- 
pany intercommunicating system 
for the stage, projection room, 
prompter's booth, etc. The usual 
"curtain" on the doors of the per- 
formers has become a memory, the 
Lake Company's annunciators in- 
forming the players the stage is 
ready. 

The foregoing equipment is the 
result of intensive study and experi- 
mentation by Messrs. Allen Lake, 
president, and William Brainard, 
of the Lake Company, who appre- 
ciate the hearty cooperation of 
Mr. Frank I. Du Frane, local mana- 
ger of the Sierra Equipment Cor- 
poration, and the painstaking in- 
stallation by the Alta Electric and 
Mechanical Company. 

Thanks are also extended to that 
popular and courteous traffic of- 
ficer, George F. Laine, for his 
demonstration of the working of 
the auto call system. 



New Health Building Dedication 
Set for December 15 




Another addition to San Fran- 
cisco's Civic Center, the new Health 
Building, will be formally dedicated 
on or about December 15. Situated 
directly west of the Exposition 
Auditorium, at the intersection of 
Oak and Grove Streets, this new 
structure will house all the activities 
of the Health Department now situ- 
ated at 1085 Mission Street. The 
Central Emergency Hospital is also 
located in the new building. 



D. A. V. 



TRAFFIC OFFICER GEORGE LAINE OPERATING CONTROL PANEL 
(Installed by Sierra Equipment Corporation and Lake Manufacturing Company) 



(Continued from Page 11) 

unable to attend besides the fans who 
for some reason or another cannot 
come. Those veterans from Liver- 
more and other homes that can be 
there are seated in a special section 
where they may enjoy the fights. 

For two years the D. A. V. had to 
fight before they could even start 
on the upward climb to the peak of 
fisticanna success. Their first appli- 
cation made in the summer of 1930 
was denied, the excuse being made 
that there were already too many 
fight clubs in the East Bay area. 
Then followed the conference with 
the governor, and finally the grant- 
ing of the permit in May, 1932. 

The appointment of Frank Schuler 
as promoter as soon ,as their permit 
was granted was met with the ap- 
proval of all sports followers, as he 
has been one of the leading figures 
in the fight game for a great many 
years. His first match, the Young 
Corbett-Verle Whitehead fight, was 
the first held in the Civic Audi- 
torium for over fifteen years and 
drew 8000 fans while still thousands 
listened in on the radio. Since then 
Schuler has given local fight follow- 
ers the best entertainment possible 
week in and week out, his latest suc- 
cess being the John Henry Lewis 
fights with Braddock, Lenhart and 
Scozza. 

But the fighter behind the fights 
has been Tom Foley. The San Fran- 
cisco attorney pushed the permit 
through after that long two-year 
battle in which he was very active. 
It was his reference to the survival 
of the fittest that gave San Francisco 
high-class exhibitions in its Civic 
Auditorium and meant increased 
revenue to the city. The veterans 
won a real fight. 



i6 



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD 



November 



Traffic Control at the War 
Memorial Opera House 



By CAPTAIN CHARLES GOFF 

TH !•: opeiiiiifT of the Tenth An- 
nual Season by the San Fran- 
cisco Opera Association in the new 
War Memorial Opera House held 
on October 15, 1932, is now "his- 
tory." 

The enthusiasm with which this 
event was looked forward to and 
displayed in gala form on this mem- 
orable occasion by all those in- 
terested, in one way or another, can 
better be imagined than described. 
In this connection the Police De- 
partment played an important role 
in handling that significant part — in 
which everybody is interested — 
known as TRAFFIC. 

The opera house fronting on three 
streets, Grove Street, Van Ness 
Avenue and Fulton Street — with all 
the necessary driveways, rams, mar- 
quis, canopies, illuminations and all 
other conceivable features for the 
acceleration of smooth and orderly 
movement of vehicular, as well as 
pedestrian traffic, bear testimony to 
the wisdom and vision with which 
all this was planned. 

The building, having three en- 
trances and exits, in itself sug- 
gested the segregation of traffic in 
three distinct groups. On the Ful- 
ton Street side, where a "court" has 
been established, around which a 
driveway of sufficient width for two 
lines of vehicles to proceed on this 
horseshoe track in the same direc- 
tion at the same time ; entering from 
Franklin Street and returning again 
into FrankHn Street — no opening 
for vehicles having been made from 
this driveway into Van Ness Ave- 
nue — all chauffeur-driven cars came 
in with their passengers and de- 
parted with instructions to return 
in about one hour and parking space 
would be provided for them on 
Franklin Street, south of Fulton 
Street, and as far south as neces- 
sary, as well as Fulton Street, west 
of Franklin Street and on Ramp 
No. 1. 

Ramp No. 1 is that area lying di- 
rectly back of the Opera House from 
Fulton Street to Grove Street, par- 
allel with and east of Franklin 
Street, and of about the same width 
as Franklin Street. 

Three large and distinct annunci- 
ators have been established ; one 
at Fulton and Franklin Streets, one 
at Grove and Franklin Streets, one 
on east side of Franklin Street, be- 
tween Grove and Hayes, facing 
south, on which can be shown three 




Officer George Laine 'viewing the annunci- 
ators at the War Memorial Opera House 

distinct sets of numerals at one 
time, calling three different cars at 
one time. This calling of cars is 
controlled from a dial-switchboard 
in the Opera House directly inside 
the Fulton Street entrance. 

At the arrival of the party at the 
opera, the patron is given one-half 
of a ticket bearing a number and 
the chauffeur is given the other half 
having a corresponding number, and 
at the close of the opera, the pa- 
tron comes up to this switchboard 
and presents his ticket and has his 
number "called" and the chauffeur, 
seeing his number displayed on the 
annunciator, immediately proceeds 
to get in line and call for his peo- 
ple. This was a new innovation in 
traffic regulation in San Francisco, 
but the interest and enthusiasm 
with which it was received by the 
citizenry of this community be- 
speaks well for its assured success in 
the future. 

The taxicab industry, in its en- 
deavor to render a maximum of 
perfect service to its patrons, was 
not overlooked in the arrangement. 
Grove Street from Van Ness Ave- 
nue to Franklin Street, was desig- 
nated for them. Surplus of reserve 
supply of cabs were parked on 
Grove Street, east of Van Ness Ave- 
nue, and at the "break" of the opera 

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these cabs were called across Van 
Ness Avenue; the traffic at this in- 
tersection, as well as all other inter- 
sections in the vicinity, being cov- 
ered by i)olice officers detailed for 
traffic duty. 

The Van Ness Avenue entrance 
was left for "Public for Hire" lim- 
ousines and private "owner-driven" 
cars, making the third group, above 
referred to. 

Considering the compliments that 
were paid by those who attended the 
opera and spoke from experience, 
there is no question but that the 
efforts put forth will meet with that 
success that it so richly deserves. 



DAVID SCANNELL CLUB 



Promising another substantial 
saving to taxpayers, members of 
the San Francisco Fire Department 
today announced that they are plan- 
ning to voluntarily submit to the 
voters a charter amendment allow- 
ing them to contribute to their 
pension fund. 

Under the new charter, firemen 
were exempt from paying toward 
the maintenance of the Employees' 
Retirement system. Details of the 
contribution have not been com- 
pleted, according to Captain F. W. 
Ireland, president of the David Scan- 
nell Club, but the amount will mean 
a considerable saving in taxes. 

This action follows the recent 
agreement of all city employees to 
contribute $1,500,000 annually for 
unemployment relief and tax reduc- 
tion. The proposed payment by the 
firemen to their pension fund will 
be in addition to their present sal- 
ary contributions (ranging from Sj^ 
to 12 per cent of their pay each 
month) to the relief fund. 



L* P* Heiman 



CANDIES 

and 

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MANUFACTURERS' 
AGENT 



LIVERMORE STEAM 
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Second Street 
Between Lizzie and K 



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Phone Livermore 237 



LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 


HEMLOCK 4570 - 4571 


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1 "NEVER 


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Market Phone 
DAVENPORT 7109 



Residence Phone 
RANDOLPH 0860 



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COLOMBO MARKET 



Mail Address: 626 Front Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



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Fall Meeting 

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FIRST RAGE 2 P. M. 

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SAN BRUNO, CALIFORNIA 



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The above represents part of six carloads Steel Bag Hoppers for one of 
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