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Full text of "San Francisco municipal reports Fiscal Year 1899-00, Ending June 30, 1900"

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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

REFERENCE 
BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

MUNICIPAL REPORTS 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900, ENDING JUNE 30, 1900 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 




SAN FRANCISCO 

THK HINTON PRINTING Co., 516 COMMERCIAL ST. 
1900 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Pages. 

ASSESSOR'S REPORT (Washington Dodge) 374-385 

Introductory Remarks, Aggregate Valuation of Real and Personal Prop- 
erty, Increase in Assessed Valuation Over Preceding Year 374 

Polltax Collections, Fiscal Year 1899-1900 374 

Taxes Collected on Personal Property Unsecured by Real Estate 374 

Office Expenses 375 

Analysis and Comparison of Assessments made for the Three Fiscal 
Years, showing the Increase in Personal Property Assessments for 

the Year 1900-1901 , 374 

Statistics Mechanical and Manufacturing Industries 376-385 

AUDITOR'S REPORT (Asa R. Wells) 227-323 

Demands Audited General Fund, during the six months ending January 

8, 1900 228-282 

" " " " Salaries City and County Officers Gen- 
eral Fund (Statutory) 250-251 

" Advertising Expenses 228 

" Almshouse Expenses 228 

" Assessment Roll 229 

" " " Bosworth Street Tunnel 229 

" " " Burial of Indigent Dead, City Cemetery 

Improvement 229-230 

" County Jails Nos. 2 and 3 230-231 

" County Jail No. 1, Repairs to 230 

" ' Coroner's Expenses 230 

District Attorney's Law Library 231 

Equalization, Clerks Board of 229 

" " " " Examining Insane Persons 232 

" Finance Committee, Expenses of 232 

" Fire Alarm and Police Telegraph Sala- 
ries Extension and Repairs 232-234 

" Fire Department, Apparatus, Hose, 
Houses, Material, Relief Fund, 
Rents, Running Expenses, Salaries 

and Leave of Absence 234-238 

Firemen's Pension and Relief Fund 237 

" " . " " Fish and Game Warden 238 

" Fourth of July Appropriation 238 

" Gas Inspector's Expenses, Grand Jury 

Expenses 238-239 

Hall of Justice, Furnishing of 238 



iv CONTENTS. 

AUDITOR'S REPORT Continued. Pages. 

Demands Audited General Fund, Health Department and Quarantine Ex- 

. penses 239-240 

" " " " Health Expenses for Sanitary Purposes, 

Smallpox Hospital, Jails and Prisons 
City Receiving Hospital Insane 

Ward 241-242 

" " " " Horse-keeping for Prison Van 242 

" Hospital Expenses and Repairs 230, 242-243 

" " Interment of Decedents, ex-Union Sol- 
diers and Sailors 243 

" Joyce Street Steps 244 

" " " " Jury Expenses in Criminal Cases Jury 

and Witness Fes 244 

" " " " Judgments 244 

" Justices Clei-k and Attendant 244 

" " " Law Library Expenses, License Collect- 

or's Blanks, Dog Tags and Basket 

Numbers 244 

Maintenance of Feeble-Minded Children. 244 
" Mayor's Contingent Expenses Type- 
writer, etc 244 

" Military Roll 244 

" Minors Maintenance of at Magdalen 
Asylum, Preston School of Industry, 

and Whittier Reform School 244 

" Money Paid in Error and Refunded 244 

" Municipal Reports, Printing, Binding, 

etc 244 

" " " " Panhandle Commission Expenses 244 

" " " " Plans for School Houses 238 

" Police, Mounted 245 

" " " " Police Station, New 250 

" " " Police Patrol Expenses 245-24C 

Police Department, Salaries and Rents.. 244-245 

Police Telegraph Expenses 24(> 

" " " " Public Buildings, Fuel, Lighting, Furni- 
ture and Repairs 247 

" Prisoners, Subsistence of 247 

Recorder's Newspapers 247 

Registration and Election Expenses 247-249- 

Reporters' Expenses in Criminal Cases 
by Court Orders Boys' and Girls' 

Aid Society 249- 

Sewer Commission's Expenses 251 

Smallpox Hospital Expenses 242 

Special Counsel Expenses Taxes Re- 
funded 252 

Transfers from 1898 to 1899, as per 

Resolution 3381 252 

" Treasurer's Rebate Clerks 252 

Urgent Necessity Expenses 252-256 

" Water for Municipal Purposes 256 

" " " Witness' Expenses in Criminal Cases... 25G- 



CONTENTS. v 

AUDITOR'S REPORT Continued. Pages. 

Demands Audited General Fund, during Fiscal Year 1899-1900, from January 
8th to June 30th, 1900 

Advertising 257 

" Bernal Park 257 

" Bosworth Street Tunnel 267 

Burial of Indigent Dead 251 

County Jails, Maintenance 257 

Court Orders, Miscellaneous 257 

Delinquent Tax List 260 

" Examination of Insane Persons 258 

Fourth of July and Memorial Day 258 

Furnishing Hall of Justice 258 

Grand Jury Expenses 258 

Health Expenses, Jails and Prisons 258 

Horse-keeping, Prison Van 258 

Interment of ex-Union Soldiers and 

Sailors 258 

" Jury Expenses in Criminal Cases 258 

Maintenance Boys' and Girls' Aid So- 
ciety, Feeble - Minded Children, 

Minors at Preston Reform School 258 

Money Paid in Error and Refunded 259 

Municipal Reports 259 

New Police Station 259 

Prisoners' Subsistence 259 

Public Buildings Fuel, Furniture, 

Lighting, Repairs 259 

" Publishing Law and Motion Calendar.. 259 

Sewer Commission Expenses 259 

" Stationery 260 

" Street Lighting 250 

Taxes Refunded 260 

Transcripts on Appeal, Printing 260 

Urgent Necessity 260 

Water for Municipal Purposes 260 

AVitness Expenses 260 

A Imshouse Salaries 257 

Maintenance 257 

" Assessor Salaries 257 

Auditor Salaries 257 

Assessment Roll 257 

T'.oard of Public Works Salaries 257 

" Maintenance, 
Repair Streets 
and Sewers . . . 257 
" Repairs to Bitu- 
men 267 

Sewer Permits.. 267 

Street Sweeping 257 
Street Work, 

1895 267 

City and County Attorney 267 

" " " " Civil Service Department Salaries 257 



vi CONTENTS. 

AUDITOR'S REPORT Continued. Pages. 

Demands Audited General Fund, Coroner Salaries 25t 

Expenses 257 

County Clerk Salaries 257 

" Court Interpreters 257 

Department of Elections Salaries :. 257 

" Maintenance . 257 

" " Department of Electricity Salaries 258 

Maintenance. 258 
" Department of Public Health 

City and County Hospital Salaries . 258 

" Expenses 258 

Health Department Salaries 258 

" Expenses 258 

" District Attorney Salaries 258 

" Fire Department Salaries 258 

Maintenance 258 

" Firemen's Relief and Pension Fund 258 

" " Justices of Peace Salaries 258 

Law Library Salaries 258 

Mayor Salaries 259 

" Contingent Expenses 259 

Police Department Salaries 259 

Police Contingent... 259 

Rents, etc 259 

Patrol Expenses 259 

" Police Judges, etc. Salaries 259 

" Public Pound Salaries 259 

" " " Expenses 259 

Recorder Salaries 259 

" Newspapers 259 

" Sheriff Salaries 259 

Stenographers, Superior Court 259 

" Superior Judges and Secretary Salary.. 260 

" " Supervisors Salaries 26O 

Tax Collector Salaries 260 

' Blanks, etc 260 

Treasurer Salaries 260 

" " " " Rebate Clerks 260 

Summary General Fund :Mo 

Demands Audited Sundry Funds (from July 1, 1899, to January 8, 1900.) 

" " Disinterment Fund Salaries of Inspectors 261 

" " Duplicate Tax Fund 261 

" " Funded Debt, Interest Account and Sinking Funds of 265 

Free Public Library Fund 261-262 

" " Insurance Contribution Fund 261 

" " Overpayment Personal Property Tax Fund 1896, 1899. 

1900 262 

Park Improvement Fund '. 263-264 

Police Contingent Fund 264 

" Police Relief and Pension Fund 264 

" " Pound Fee Fund 264 

Public Building Fund 264 



CONTENTS. vii 

AUDITOR'S REPORT Continued. Pages, 

Demands Audited Special Fee Fund, Stationery, Salaries City and County 
Officers Printing Transcripts on Appeal Print- 
ing 260, 265-267 

" Rebinding Books and Records 267 

Law and Motion Calendar, Published for Superior Court. 267 
Street Light Fund, Lighting Streets, etc., Gas and Elec- 
tricity 264 

Street Department Fund, Repairing County Roads 268 

Street Department Fund, Repaying Accepted Streets, 

Cleaning Streets and Sewers Repairs 267-268 

Street Department Fund, Improvement of Public Grounds, 

and Repairs to Streets Around Public Squares 268 

Street Department Fund, Repairs to Streets in Front of 

City Property .% 268 

Teachers' Institute Fund 265 

Sundry Funds (from January 8, 1900, to June 30, 1900.) 

Duplicate Tax Fund 269 

Library Fund 269 

Park Improvement Fund 269 

Police Relief and Pension Fund 269 

Tearing Up Street Fund 269 

Robinson Bequest Interest Fund 269 

Teachers' Institute Fund 269 

Overpayment Personal Property Taxes 1899 269 

House Moving Fund 269 

Advertising Fund 269 

Coupon Account Park Improvement Bonds 269 

Unapportioned Fee Fund 269 

Public Building Fund 269 

Insurance Contribution Fund 269 

Summary Sundry Funds 269 

School Department Fund .f 270-271 

Recapituation of Demands Audited Classification Demands Audited 272-282 

Demands Audited, Paid, Cancelled, and Outstanding for Year Ending 

July 1, 1899 281-282 

Treasurer's Account with City and County* 285-289 

Disbursements, 1899-1900 290-201 

Cash in Treasury at Credit of Funds and Accounts, June 30, 1900 292-293 

Cash Received for, and Paid to the State, etc 285-290 

Transfer Entries, 1899-1900 294-296 

Treasurer's Account With State, Receipts, Payments and Balance on 

Hand 290-29Q 

Loan Account, 1899-1900 297 

License Exhibit City and County, etc. Amount of Licenses Sold 283-284 

Poll Tax Statement 297 

Tax Collector's Account With City and County and State, 1899-1900 298 

Summary of Taxes Collected and Paid Into the Treasury, 1899-1900 299-300 

Apportionment of Taxes Collected Recapitulation of Collections 301-302 

Bonded Debt and Amount of Sinking Fund, June 30, 1900 306 

Bonds Redeemed During Fiscal Year 1899-1900 308-309 

Bond and Coupon Accounts Number of, Outstanding 308-309 

Recapitulation of Coupon Account 1899-1900, and Amount of Coupons Out- 
standing June 30. 1900 308-308 



viii CONTENTS. 

AUDITOR'S REPORT Continued. Pages. 

Bonds, Special, Outstanding Montgomery Avenue and Dupont Street 

Payable From Taxes on Lands Benefited 307 

Bonds, Special Coupon Account Montgomery Avenue and Dupont Street 

Widening, Recapitulation 312 

Dupont Street Bonds, Montgomery Avenue, Park Improvement and City 
Hall Construction Bonds, Prices Paid for Redemption and Coupons 
Outstanding 310-313 

Assessed Value of Property, Rates of Taxation and Delinquency From 

1861-62 to 1900-1901, Inclusive 303-305 

Estimated Expenditures and Revenue for the Fiscal Year Ending June 

30, 1901 Auditor's and Board of Supervisors' Comparative Estimates.. 314-322 

Tax Levy for the Fiscal Year 1900-1901 323 

BOARD OF EDUCATION, REPORT OF 162-199 

List of^Members, Standing Committees and Members of City Board of 

Examination 162-163 

Explanatory Report First, Educational; Second, Financial 164-170 

Statistical Report 171-199 

Comparative Statement Estimated Population Number of Youth in City 

Under 17 Years of Age, etc 171 

Estimated Value of School Sites, Buildings, Furniture, Libraries and 

Apparatus 171 

Receipts and Expenditures 172-173 

Schedule of Teachers' and Employees' Monthly Salaries, June, 1900 174-176 

Number and Character of Schools, Enrollment and Attendance of Pupils; 

Comparative Classification of Pupils in Different Grades, 1899-1900.... 176-177 

School Attendance Fiscal Year 1899-1900 178 

School Census Report for Fiscal Year Comparative Statement of the 

Number of Children, From the Year 1888 to 1900, Inclusive 178-179 

Comparative Statement of the Number of Children Enrolled and Average 

Daily Attendance From Fiscal Year 1889 180 

Number and Classification of Teachers in Department June, 1900 181 

Number oF and Classification of Teachers by Grades in the Various 

Schools 182-185 

Qualifications of Teachers in Department and Certificates Held, etc. 

Gains and Losses in Teaching Department 186 

Schedule of Salaries Paid Teachers and Employees, etc 187-190 

Recommendations to Board of Education for Granting of Certificates 191 

Credentials Upon Which Certificates Were Granted 192 

Applications for Recommendations for Certificates Rejected 193 

Recommendations for Renewals of Certificates 194 

Receipts From Certificate Fees 194-195 

Recommendations to Board of Education for Recommendation to State 

Board of Education 195 

Applications for Recommendation for State Life Diplomas Rejected 196 

Receipts From Life Diploma Fees, etc 196 

Certificates Held by Teachers in San Francisco School Department 197 

Subjects in Which Special Certificates Are Held 198 

Number of State Educational and Life Diplomas Registered 199 

Permanent Certificates Registered 199 



CONTENTS. ix 

Pages. 

BOARD OF HEALTH, REPORT OF 520-567 

Introductory Remarks by John M. Williamson, M. D., President of the 

Board of Health 520-524 

Remarks by A. P. O'Brien, M. D., Health Officer 525-527 

Report of the Bacteriologist (W. H. Kellogg) 528-543 

Report of Chief Sanitary Inspector (W. S. Chalmers, M. D.) 544-547 

Report of Market Inspectors 548-551 

Report of Chief Plumbing Inspector (John J. Sullivan) 552-553 

Report of City Physician (J. G. Morrissey, M. D.) 554 

Report of Emergency Hospitals (Edwin Bunnell, M. D.) 555-556 

REPORT OF THE CITY AND COUNTY HOSPITAL (G. E. Sussdorff, 

M. D., Superintendent Physician) 557-559 

ALMSHOUSE REPORT (E. A. Reddy, Superintendent) 560-567 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS, REPORT OF 481-519 

Introductory, Names of the Commission, and General Statements 481-483 

Operations During the Year 1899-1900 484 

Bureau of Streets Appropriations for Past Six Years Comparisons of 

Amounts Expended Elsewhere Remarks 484-487 

Bureau of Building Disbursements Appropriation Organization Re- 
marks 487-488 

Bureau of Engineering Receipts Disbursements Organization Remarks. 488-491 
Summary of Work Done by Public and Private Contract During the Fis- 
cal Year 1899-1900 491 

Side Sewer Connections, and Report of Side Sewer Work From January 

8, 1900, to June 30, 1900 492-493 

Repairs to Sewers 483-495 

Lighting Streets 495 

Water for Municipal Purposes 496 

Schedule for Street Sweeping for Year 1899-1900 '. 496 

Appendix "A," Report of City Engineer 497-502 

Appendix "B," Recapitulation of Financial Statement 503-505 

Appendix "C," Report of Bureau of Building 506-507 

Recapitulation of Work Done on Sti'eets 608-512 

REPORT OF LIGHT AND WATER INSPECTOR 513-519 

Introductory Remarks 513 

Amount of Gas Consumed in and Cost of Lighting Public Buildings.. 513 
. Amount of Electricity Consumed in and Cost of Lighting Public 

Buildings 514 

Comparative Cost of Lighting Public Buildings for Several Years.... 515 

Cost of Lighting Public Streets With Gas and Electricity 515 

Table Showing Days and Hours That Street Lights Were Lighted 

and Amount Paid San Francisco Gas and Electric Company for 

Same 51G 

Amount Paid by City and County for Water for Public Buildings, 

Squares and Hydrants, 1899-1900, to Spring Valley Water Works.. 517 

List of Water Meters Tested and Results 518-519 

CHIEF OF POLICE'S REPORT (W. P. Sullivan, Jr.) 97-157 

Introductory Remarks 97 

Statistics Arrests and Classifications, Disposition of Cases, General Re- 
capitulation, etc.. for Fiscal Year 98-107 



x CONTENTS. 

CHIEF OF POLICE'S REPORT Continued. Pages. 

Statistics Fugitives From Justice Arrested in City and County and De- 
livered to the Authorities of Other Counties and States 152 

Statistics Escapes, Prisoners Insane Persons Arrested, Witnesses De- 
tained, etc 116 

Statistics Comparative Number of Arrests and Strength of the Police 

Force for the Thirty Years Ending June 30, 1900 117 

Statistics Number of Witnesses Subpoenaed for the Police and Superior 

Courts Lost Children Restored to Parents During Year 118 

Statistics Value of Property Stolen, Lost and Recovered 119 

Statistics Value of Property Stolen, Lost and Recovered for the Sixteen 

Years Ending June 30, 1900 120 

Statistics Unclaimed Money in Hands of Chief of Police, etc 121-140 

Statistics; Cash Received; From Whom; For Keeping Prisoners in City 

Prison 141-144 

Statistics Cases of Felony Held to Answer in Police Courts, and Trans- 
mitted to Superior Court for Trial Disposition Recapitulation 108-115 

Statistics Fines and Forfeitures in Police Courts From Arrests Made 

by Police, Cash Received 145 

Statistics Police Stations Location, etc 146 

Statistics Summary of Action Taken by the Board of Police Commis- 
sioners in the Supervision of Retail Liquor Dealers' Licenses 147 

Statistics Strength of Police Department Summary of Action Taken by 

the Board of Police Commissioners Against Members 147-149 

Statistics Synopsis of Correspondence and Business Transacted in Office 

of Chief of Police 149 

Statistics Police Patrol Service, and Supplement 150-151 

Statistics Police Contingent Fund Account and Police Relief and Pension 

Fund Account 157 

Statistics Number, Names and Offenses of Fugitives Arrested by the 

Police and Delivered to Authorities of Other Counties and States 152-150 

CITY ATTORNEY'S REPORT (Franklin K. Lane) 8G- 93 

Introductory Remarks as to Litigation During Fiscal Year, etc 86 

City Litigation Wherein Judgments Were Entered in Favor of the City 

and County 86 

City Litigation Wherein Judgments Were Entered Against the City and 

County 86 

City Litigation Number of Cases Pending in the Supreme Court on Ap- 
peal 86 

Opinions Given on Matters Submitted 87- 93 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION, REPORT OF..,.. 54- 78 

Introductory Remarks Appointment, Organization of System, Rules and 

Classification 54-55 

Classification Adopted by Commission, February 5, 1900 56- 58 

Preparation for Examination Board of Examiners Litigation Corre- 
spondence, Clerical Work, etc 56- 63 

Number of Applications Received, and General Remarks 64- 66 

Appendix "A" Report of Civil Service Commissioners 67 

Appendix "B" Civil Service Appointments, Various Departments 68- 77 

Appendix "C" Forms, Publications, Envelopes, Miscellaneous 77- 78 



CONTENTS. 



Pages. 
CORONER'S REPORT (R. Beverly Cole) .......................................... 396-400 

Introductory ........................................................................ 396 

Mortuary Tables Autopsies Made and Inquests Held, etc .................... 396-397 

Mortuary Tables Suicides Nativity, Causes and Occupations .............. 397-398 

Mortuary Tables Causes of Death and Nature of Crime Charged, if Any. 399-400 
Expenses for Year Ending June 30, 1900 ...................................... 400 

COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT ("Win. A. Deane) .................................. 1- 17 

Introductory Ordinary Fees, and Total Receipts .............................. 1 

Deposits in Court in Civil Cases .................................................. 2 

Number of Cases on File in Superior Court, June 30, 1900 ................... 2 

Receipts and Expenditures for Year Ending June 30, 1900 .................. 2- 3 

Civil Actions Commenced in the Superior Court During Fiscal Year, etc.. 3 

Number and Disposition of Actions Appealed From Justices' Courts, etc. 4 
Naturalization of Foreigners, Number of Declarations of Intention Made 

During Fiscal Year Certificates Issued of Naturalization .............. 6- 7 

Medical and Dental Certificates Recorded During Fiscal Year .............. 3 

Marriage Licenses Issued ......................................................... 3 

Number of Articles of Incorporation Certificates of Copartnership Filed.. 4 

Number of Notarial and Auctioneers' Bonds Filed During Fiscal Year ____ 4 

Appeals From the Police Judges' Courts ........................................ 9 

Whittier and Preston Reform Schools Number of Incorrigible Juveniles 

Committed to ................................................................... 9 

Examination of Insane, Number of Persons Sent to Asylum, Nativity, etc. 4- 5 

Probate Proceedings, Superior Court, Department Nos. 9 and 10 .......... 11 

Remittiturs From Supreme Court in Criminal Cases Writs of Habeas 

Corpus Issued ........................ , .......................................... 8 

General Summary of Civil Cases, etc., and Disposition .................... 10 

Criminal Proceedings, Indictments, Informations Filed and Disposition, 

Superior Court, Criminal Departments ..................................... 12- 17 

COUNTY RECORDER'S REPORT (Esmond Godchaux) ........ . ............... 79- 85 

Introductory Remarks ............................................................. 79- 80 

Tabular Statement Showing Monthly Receipts and Deposits ................ 80 

Instruments Recorded or Filed During Fiscal Year .......................... 82- 83 

Tabular Statements of Salaries and Expenses ....... .f ....................... 81 

Recapitulation, Receipts and Expenses Deficit .............................. 81 

Comparative Statement From 1859 to 1900, Inclusive ........................ 84- 85 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS, REPORT OF (Registrar Thos. J. Walsh). 158-161 
Introductory Remarks and Names of Members of the Board of Election 

Commissioners ................................................................. 158 

Financial Statement for Fiscal Year Office and Election Expenses ...... 159-161 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY, REPORT OF (Wm. R. Hewitt) ......... 568-573 

Names of Commissioners ......................................................... 509 

General Remarks, Apparatus on Hand, Work Done and Improvements... 569-570 
Expenditures for Fiscal Year 1899-1900 ........................................ 572-573 

Appropriation and Surplus* Returned to General Fund ...................... 572-573 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S REPORT (L. F. Byington) ......................... 386-396 

Introductory Remarks ............................................................. 386 

Schedule of Disposition of Criminal Cases for the Fiscal Year Offenses 

and Crimes in Alphabetical Order .......................................... 390-396 

General Recapitulation of Disposition of Cases, Petitions for Habeas 

Corpus, Police Court Appeals and Cases Against Incorrigible Minors.. 387-S8& 



xii CONTENTS. 

Pages. 
FIRE PENSION FUND COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 464 

FIRE DEPARTMENT REPORT 401-435 

Report of the Board of Fire Commissioners (Rolla V. Watt, President; 

John H. Grady, J. C. McKinstry, M. H. Hecht) 401-435 

Organization of the Fire Department and Details 401-403 

List of Members Officers of the Board 404 

Officers and Employees Numerical Strength of Uniformed Force and 

Location of Companies, etc 405-430 

Apparatus 431 

Fires Losses, Insurance and Amount Paid 431 

Statement of Number of Feet of Main Pipe Laid in City From July 1, 

1899, to July 1. 1900 432 

Hydrants Re-set, etc 432 

Members Retired on Pension, Deaths of Members on Active, Pension and 

Waiting Lists 432-433 

Appropriations and Expenditures During Fiscal Year 434-43f 

INTERMENT OF DECEASED EX-UNION SOLDIERS (Edward A. Bullis, 

Superintendent) 480 

Interments Made at the Expense of the City and County; Applications 

Received and Action Taken Thereon 480 

JUSTICES' COURT CLERK'S REPORT (E. W. Williams) 436 

Suits Instituted and Fees Received, etc. Receipts and Expenditures.... 436 

LAW LIBRARY ^ 94-96 

Librarian's Report (Jas. H. Deering); Membership; Names of Decedents; 
Additions; Names of Donors of Works; Number of Volumes in Li- 
brary 94 

Number and Classification of Books Received During the Year 94- 85 

Receipts and Expenditures 95- 96 

PARK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT (A. B. Spreckels, President; Jasper 

McDonald, F. W. Zeile, Reuben H. Lloyd, John A. Stanton) 465-472 

Introductory Remarks 465 

General Character and^Progress of Improvements and Construction of 

Grounds 467-472 

SECRETARY'S REPORT (Philip J. Fay, Secretary) 465-472 

Receipts and Disbursements, Construction, Maintenance and Miscel- 
laneous Accounts 465-472 

POLICE RELIEF AND PENSION FUND COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 

(Robert J. Tobin, President) 473-479 

Introductory Names of Members of the Commission 473 

Tabular Statement, Showing Names of Officers Granted Pensions and 

Persons Receiving Allowances, etc 474-479 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT (John A. Drinkhouse) 437-457 

Tabular Statement, Value of Estates, Expenses, Disposition of Cash Re- 
ceived, During the Six Months Ending January 8, 1900 437-457 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT (P. Boland) 437,456-463 

Tabular Statement, Showing Value of Estates, Expenses, Disposition of 

Cash Received During the Six Months Ending June 30, 1900 456-463 



CONTENTS. xiii 

Pages. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY REPORT (John H. Wise, President) 18- 53 

Introductory, Conduct of the Library and Requirements, etc 18- 19 

Board of Trustees, Officers and Employees 20 

REPORT OF SECRETARY (George E. Mullin) 21- 23 

Receipts and Disbursements of Fiscal Year 21 

Record of Delinquents; Fines Imposed and Amount Paid; Volumes 

Lost and Paid For 22 

Statement of Expenses for 6 Branch Libraries 23 

REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN (George T. Clark) 24- 26 

Introductory Remarks Use of the Library The Library Staff Cata- < 

logue Department Branch Libraries, etc 24- 26 

Statistics, Volumes and Pamphlets in Library and Branches, and Dis- 
position, etc 27- 35 

Monthly Statement of Circulation of Books in Library by Classes, etc. 28- 37 
Statistics, Classified Circulation in Main Reading and Reference 

Rooms 28- 31 

Statistics, Circulation of Books in Branch Libraries 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 

and 6 32-35 

Books Ordered Number of Volumes, Character, Cost, etc 38 

Comparative Statement of Books Issued From 1880 to 1900 37 

Correspondence Relative to Building of the Harrison Branch, etc 39- 40 

Books, Pamphlets and Serials Donated Donors' Names 43- 53 

Questions Asked at Examination of Applicants for Position 40- 42 

SCHOOL TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND (R. H. Webster, Secretary).. 200-207 

Receipts and Disbursements 201-202 

Financial Statement Since Passage of Act 203-204 

Names of Annuitants and Contributors 205 

Annuity Fund How Provided and Administered 206-207 

SHERIFF'S REPORT (John Lackmann) 208-226 

Fees Received and Paid Into the Treasury for Fiscal Year Ending June 

30, 1900 208 

Cash Received for Board United States Prisoners 208 

Salaries Office and County Jails, Remarks and Suggestions 209-212 

Number of Officers, Trusties and United States Prisoners in the Three 

Jails for Which an Extra Ration Was Formerly Charged...". 213 

Amounts Collected by Contractors Upon Regular Ration Certificates and 

Corresponding Months Last Year 213 

Amounts of Under and Over Drafts on Supplies Furnished to the County 

Jails for Six Months Ending June 30, 1900 214 

Statistics County Jail for Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1900 Charges 

Against Prisoners Disposition of Prisoners 215-218 

Recapitulation Prisoners on Hand; Committed and Released; Sentences; 
Occupations; Commitments for One or More Terms; Nativity of Pris- 
oners Committed 219-224 

Character, Value and Amount of Work Performed by Prisoners on County 

Roads, Quarries, Farms, Tailor Shops, etc 225-226 

SPECIAL COUNSEL, REPORT OF 

Fisher Ames, Special Counsel for 1873-74 574 

TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT (Joseph H. Scott) 360-373 

Licenses Exempt by Charter 360 

Collections of City and County and State Personal Property Taxes of 

1899 Secured by Real Estate Property Sold to the State, etc 361 



xiv CONTENTS. 

TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT Continued. Pages. 

Real Estate Roll. Tax and Amount Paid Into Treasury on First and 

Second Installments 361-362 

Personal Property Roll, Tax Secured and Unsecured by Real Estate, 

Amount Paid Into Treasury, etc 363 

Percentage Collected on Taxes of 1899 364 

Additional Amount Paid Treasurer Collection of Previous Year's Taxes 

and Percentages, etc 365 

Recapitulation of Collections 365 

Licenses Issued From January 8 to June 30, 1900, and Recapitulation 368-370 

Licenses Issued From July 1, 1899, to January 8, 1900, and Recapitula- 
tion 371-373 

Office Expanses 366-367 

TREASURER'S REPORT (S. H. Brooks) 324-359 

Receipts and Disbursements, on Account of State of California 324 

Receipts and Disbursements, on Account of City and County General 

Fund 325-328 

Special Fee Fund 329 

Unapportioned Fee Fund 329-330 

School Fund and Common School Fund 330-332 

Street Department and Park Improvement Funds 332-334 

Personal Property Tax Fund Overpayments 336 

New City Hall, Library and Street Light Funds 335-337 

Disinterment, Police Contingent, Police Relief and Pension and Pound 

Fee Funds 337-339 

Duplicate Tax and Teachers' Institute Funds 339-341 

Public Building Fund 341 

Advertising Fund 344 

Tearing Up Street Fund 344 

St. Mary's Park Fund 345 

House Moving Fund 345 

Coroner' s Deposits 352 

J. F. Boyd 352 

Board of Public Works 353 

License Collector 353 

Tax Collector 354 

Assessor Personal Property Taxes and Poll Taxes 355 

Redemption of Property Sold to State for Delinquent Taxes 355 

State School Money Unapportioned 365 

Collateral Inheritance Tax 356 

Mission Street Widening 356 

Kentucky Street Grading 356 

Laguna Survey 356 

Tax Collector's Special Account 357 

J. C. Pennie, ex-Public Administrator '. 357 

Assessor Poll Tax Commissions 357 

Bonded Debt Interest and Sinking Funds 340, 342, 346-347 

Police Relief a*id Pension Fund 338 

Account With Assessor for Collections Made of Taxes on Personal Prop- 
erty Unsecured by Real Estate 343, 355 

IfifSurance Contribution Fund 340 

.Robinson Bequest Interest Fund 346 



CONTENTS. xv 

TREASURER'S REPORT Continued. Pages. 

Recapitulation Showing Balances on Hand in the Various Funds on June 

30, 1900 348-349 

Special Deposits of County Clerk 350 

Special Deposits of Police Clerks and Recapitulation 350-353 

Deposits of Public Administrators Disbursements 350 

Special Redemption Fund 351 

Receipts and Disbursements on Account of Absent Heirs 352 

School Teachers' Annuity and Retirement Fund, Receipts and Disburse- 
ments 354 

Recapitulation, Balance in Various Special and Unapportioned Funds 

June 30, 1900 358-359 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORTS. 



Pages. 

Assessor's Report 2- 3 

Auditor's Report 4- 5 

Almshouse Report r 11- 13 

Board of Health Report 6- 7 

Board of Public Works Report 18- 25 

Board of Fire Commissioners Report 57- 59 

City and County Hospital Report 8-10 

Clerk of the Board of Supervisors Report 26- 27 

Chief of Police Report 28 

City Attorney's Report 29 

Civil Service Commission Report 30- 36 

Clerk of the Justices' Court's Report 37- 38 

Coroner's Report 45 

County Clerk's Report 46-48 

County Recorder's Report 49-51 

District Attorney' s Report 52- 53 

Department of Electricity Report 56 

Department of flections Report 54- 55 

Emergency Hospital Report 14- 16 

Park Commissioners' Report 60- 64 

School Department 39- 44 

Twenty-sixth Street Hospital Report 17 

Sheriff's Report 65 

Tax Collector's Report 66-69 

Treasurer' s Report 70 



APPENDIX TO MUNICIPAL REPORTS. 

COMPILED BY JNO. A. RUSSELL. 



Pages. 
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 3- 16 

List of Members, Standing Committees and Officers 3- 4 

Rules of Proceedings 5- 8 

Introduction of Members of Present Board, January 8, 1900 9 

ADDRESS OF HIS HONOR MAYOR JAMES D. PHELAN TO MEM- 
BERS on Their Induction Into Office 9- 16 

Introductory New Charter 9 

Executive and Legislative Departments 9- 10 

City Finances 10- 12 

Park Extension, School Houses, Hospital and Sewers Bond Issues 12- 13 

Water and Light 13 

Assessments 13 

Geary Street Franchise 13 

Street Railroad and Telephone Charges 14 

Departments Reformed 14 

Board of Public Works 14- 15 

Police, Fire and Health Departments 15- 16 

The Parks and Boulevards 16 

City Flag 16 

WATER RATES FOR FISCAL YEAR 1900-1901 17- 66 

Constitutional and Charter Provisions and Statutory Enactments 17- 19 

Statements Required From Persons and Companies Supplying Water 18- 21 

Synopsis of Statements Filed Showing Receipts and Expenditures 20- 21 

Extract From Address of Mayor Jas. D. Phelan Under the Caption of 

Water 21 

Copy of Resolution Adopted Requiring Detailed Statements From the 
Spring Valley Water Works of the Amount of Capital Stock, Fonds, 

Floating Debt and Revenue From All Sources, etc 20 

Statement of Visitacion Water Company, With Recapitulation of Amounts 
Expended for Franchise, Construction, Maintenance and Gross Re- 
ceipts, from 1884 22 

Statement of the Spring Valley Water Works, Showing Revenue and 

Expenditures for the Year 1899 23 

Recapitulation of Annual Statements of the Spring Valley Water Works 

From 1880, Showing Receipts and Expenditures, etc -4 

Statement of the Spring Valley Water Works, in Response to Resolu- 
tion No. 3774 (Fourth Series), Showing in Detail Amount of Capital 
Stock, Bonds Issued, Revenue, Operating and Construction Expenses, 

etc 25- 60 

List of the Properties of the Spring Valley Water Works 37- 61 

Statement of Spring Valley Water Works, Showing Hibernia Bank Loan, 

etc 60 

Report of Committee on Water Rates 61 



xviii CONTENTS. 

WATER RATES Continued. Pages. 

Water Rates (Ordinance No. 29) General and Special 62- 66 

Proceedings of the Board in Investigating as to Water Rates to Be Es- 
tablished 25 

Statement of Spring Valley Water Company, With Estimate of Receipts 

and Expenditures for the Year 1900 25- 36 

Board of Public Works to Examine Complaints, etc 65 

PUBLIC CONTRACTS AWARDED IN BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 67-231 

Introductory Remarks 67 

Supplies City and County Almshouse 67- 81 

Emergency Hospital and Department of Public Health 81- 88 

Twenty-sixth Street Hospital 88 

County Jails 1. 2 and 3, Daily and Monthly Supplies 88-104 

City Prison 105-107 

Police Department 107-111 

City and County Hospital 111-14," 

" Blank Books for the Various Departments, Officers and Offices.. 146-163 

" Stationery for the Various Departments, Officers and Offices 164-194 

" Printed Forms and Blanks for the Various Departments, Officers 

and Offices 194-226 

Miscellaneous Contracts 227-231 

LIGHTING STREETS AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS 232-258 

Introductory Remarks and Resolution No. 6 232-233 

Statements Filed in Compliance With Resolution No. 6 of the Board 

of Supervisors 233-240 

Proceedings of the Board in Investigating and Fixing Rates to Be 

Charged 240-241 

Fixing the Standard Quality of Gas and Price to Be Charged Ordinance 

No. 30 241-242 

Fixing the Maximum Rate and Price to Be Charged for Electric Lights, 

etc. Ordinance No. 49 242-243 

Proposals to Light the Streets and Outlying Districts With Gas, Elec- 
tricity, etc 244-245 

Specifications Gas ! 245-246 

Specifications Electric Lights 246-247 

Specifications Naphtha Incandescent Lamps, General Provisions, etc 247-249 
Proposals for Lighting Public Buildings and Offices, Specifications, etc.. 249-253 
Awarding of Contracts to the Various Companies for Lighting With Gas 

and Electricity Public Buildings, Streets and Outlying Districts 253-258 

HENRI F. WINDEL TRUST 259-262 

History of, Communication From City Attorney 259 

His Honor the Mayor Authorized and Empowered by the Board to Re- 
ceive and Receipt for tfie Sum of $15,504.41 and $715.68, Accrued 

Interest Thereon 259-261 

The Finance Committee of the Board Directed to Deposit the Sum of 
$16,220.09 Equally With the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, San 
Francisco Savings Union, German Savings and Loan Society and the 

Mutual Savings Bank 261 

Proposals to Borrow on Real Estate Security the Sum of $16,000 Pub- 
lished by his Honor the Mayor 261 

Loan Effected to O. D. Baldwin 262 



CONTENTS. xix 

Pages. 

FINANCIAL, EXHIBIT AND REVENUE ORDERS 263-279 

Estimate of Asa R. Wells, Esq., Auditor, of Revenue and Expenditures 

of Fiscal Year 1899-1900 283 

Itemized Statement of Revenue From Other Sources Than Taxation 263-264 

Estimate Referred to Finance Committee Resulting in the Presentation 
to and the Adoption by the Board of an Estimate of the Expendi- 
tures by Resolution No. 498 264-271 

Providing That Certain Appropriations Contained in the Budget for the 
Fiscal Year 1900-1901 Shall Not Be Limited by Monthly Allowances, 
Calling Attention of the Auditor and Treasurer to Same, and Copy 
of Ordinance No. 124 272-27:? 

Second Passage of Ordinance Providing Revenue for Municipal Purposes 

for Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1901, and Copy of Ordinance No. 152.274-275 

Copy of Order No. 216 (Second Series), Providing Revenue for Munici- 
pal Purposes for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1901, and Fixing 
the Levy at $1.127 on Each $100 Valuation of Property 273 

Copy of Ordinance No. 153, Fixing the Levy for State Purposes, as Deter- 
mined by the State Board of Equalization, at 49.8 Cents on Each 
$100 Valuation of Property 275-27G 

Classification of Amounts Raised by Taxation for Specific Purposes and 

Exempted From the One Dollar Limit by Provisions of the Charter 276-277 

Amounts Raised by Taxation for Specific Purposes and Exempted From 

One Dollar Limit by Provisions of the Charter 276-277 

Total Estimated Expenditures 271 

Copy of Resolution Providing for Refunding the Excess of Amounts 
Collected by the Assessor as the Tax on Personal Property for the 
Fiscal Year 1900-1901 278-279 

Assessment of Railways Operated in Part in This City and County 

by the State Board of Equalization 279 

Referring to Ordinances Declaring the Length of the Main Track and As- 
sessed Value of Railways by the State Board of Equalization 279 

FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE CITY AND COUNTY ON OCTOBER 1. 

1900 280-282 

RESULT OF THE BOND ELECTIONS HELD ON DECEMBER 27TH AND 

29TH, 1900 283-284 

COMPLETION OF THE HALL OF JUSTICE AND MORGUE BUILDINGS.. 285-288 

CITY CEMETERIES 289-292 

CITY GOVERNMENT 293-304 

DECISIONS ON PROPOSED BOND ISSUES 305-310 

"THE CARLETON AEROLITE" 311 

VALUATION OF PROPERTY AJSTD RATES OF TAXATION IN THE SEV- 
ERAL COUNTIES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1900-1901 312-315 

ANNUAL REPORTS '. 316 

Charter Provison Requiring the Filing of Reports With the Mayor 316 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 

To the Honorable Jas. D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIR : In accordance with Section 9 of Article XVI of the Charter and in compliance 
with Resolution No. 470 of the Board of Supervisors, of date June 11, 1900, I respectfully 
submit my annual report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, as follows, to wit: 

In presenting this report, it is with pleasure that I respectfully call the attention of your 
Honor and the Honorable Board f Supervisors to the great decrease in the expenditures of 
this office for the fiscal year, which said decrease amounts to the sum of $45,404.30. 

This great paving has been effected by carefully watching the stationery and supplies, and 
ordering only so much thereof as was actually necessary, and also in the amount paid out for 
salaries of deputies and copyists, which account shows that the sum of $76,436.74 was paid out 
as against the sum of $119,541.15 for the preceding fiscal year. 

While the receipts of the office for the last year have not been as great ag the preceding 
year, still this is due to the fact that all insolvency matters in this city and county have been 
transferred to the United States Court under the United States Bankruptcy Act, and also to 
the fact that this office is no longer permitted to collect the amount due for inheritance tax. 

At the present time I have but forty-nine men employed in this office, as against sixty last 
year Still, the work is almost up to date and of a high degree of excellence, which speaks 
much for the competency and efficiency of the clerks, deputies and copyists in my office. 

Although the receipts of the office for the fiscal year just ended amounted to the sum of 
$68,108.75, as against the sum of $74,248.40 for the preceding year, still, as the disbursements 
of the office for this year amounted to the sum of 84,935.79 as against the sum of $130,340.09 
for the preceding year, a net saving has been made to the taxpayers of this city and county of 
$39,264.65 for the year. 

In conclusion I would say that the County Clerk's office should be made self-sustaining:, 
and could be easily made so by a juc'icious revision of the Fee Bill at the next Legislature, and 
to this end I will be only too pleased to devote my best efforts. 

Respectfully, 

WM A. DEANE, 

County Clerk. 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



NUMBER OF CAUSES ON FILE IN THE SUPERIOR 
COURT JUNE 30, 1900. 

General Department 72,898 

Probate Department 23,421 

Adoptions 299 

Certificates of Incorporation 16,643 

Certificates of Copartnership ; 5,311 

Appeals from Justices' Courts (including abstracts) 8,389 

Coroner's Inquests 8,563 

Informations, Indictments and Appeals from the Police Courts 13,457 

Total number of Proceedings on file 148,981 

DEPOSITS IN COURT IN CIVIL ACTIONS. 

Amount on deposit, June 30, 1899 $54,746 41 

Amount deposited during year ending June 30, 1900 24,958 60 

$79,705 01 

Withdrawn by order of Court 14,878 30 

Balance on deposit June 30, 1900 $64,826 71 

RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 

General Department $31,774 15 

Probate Department 10,466 60 

Marriage License Department 7,034 00 

Fines imposed by Superior Court 1,360 00 

Fines imposed by Police Court, Department No. 1 $2,170 00 

Fines imposed by Polict Court, Department No. 2 2,126 00 

Fines imposed by Police Court, Department No. 3 3,089 00 

Fines imposed by Police Court, Department No. 4 .' 4,200 00 

11,585 00 

Law Library Taxes 5,708 00 

Medical and Dental Certificates 181 00 

Total Receipts $68,108 75 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 3 

DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900, 

Stationery and Supplies and Printing from July 1, 1899, to January 8, 

1900 $1,389 75 

Transcripts on Appeal 3,109^30 

Salary of County Clerk 4,000 00 

Salaries of Deputies and Copyists 76,436 74 



Total Disbursements $34 935 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 



1900 January 294 



-July 255 

August 298 

September 304 

October 331 

November 295 May 244 

December 304 June .. 358 



February. 
March.. . . 
April 



Total. 



3,517 



MEDICAL CERTIFICATES. 

Number ofr medical certificates recorded from July 1, 1899, to June 30, 1900 130 



DENTAL CERTIFICATES. 

Number of dental certificates registered from July 1, 1899, to June 30, 1900 , 61 



.CIVIL ACTIONS 

COMMENCED IN THE SUPERIOR COURT DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

JUNE 30, 1900. 

Number of civil suits appealed from Justice Court 267 

Number of civil suits adjudicated 1,357 

Number of civil suits discontinued 399 

Number of civil suits transferred to other Courts 46 

Number of civil suits pending 2,066 

Total number of civil actions commenced . ., 3,868 



4 COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 

ACTIONS 

APPEALED FROM JUSTICES' COURTS DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 
JUNE 30, 1900. 

Number of appeals from Justice Court (including abstracts) ..... ................. 

Number of abstracts from Justice Court ................... ....................... 184 

Number of appeals adjudicated ................................................... 77 

Number of appeals discontinued .................................................. 24 

Number of appeals pending ...................................................... 166 



451 



Total. 



451 



CERTIFICATES OF COPARTNERSHIP. 

Number on file June 30, 1899 5,259 

Number filed during year ending June 30, 1900 52 



Total. 



AUCTIONEERS' BONDS. 
Number filed during year ending June 30, 1900 



NOTARIAL BONDS. 

Number filed during year ending June 30, 1900 



5,311 



20 



ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION. 

Number on file June 30, 1899 

Number filed during year ending June 30, 1900 



Total. 



16,643 



EXAMINATION OF INSANE. 

Total number of examinations of insane during year endin? June 30, .1900 522 

Number committed to the several asylums for the insane 376 

Number discharged after examination. Males, 83; Females, 63 146 



Total. 



V2-2 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 
COMMITTMENTS OF INSANE. 





MALES. 


FEMALES. 


Number committed to Asylum at Agnews 


39 


54 


Number committed to Asylum at Napa 


59 


57 


Number committed to Asylum at Stockton 


27 


24 


Number committed to Asylum at Mendocino 


90 


24 


Number committed to Whitwell's Private Asylum . . 


1 




Number committed to Burke's Private Aiylum. 




1 










216 


160 



NATIONALITIES OF INSANE. 



United States .... 152 

Ireland 60 

England 36 

France 6 

Germany 45 

China 17 

Italy 6 

Sweden 9 

Canada 4 

Austria 5 

Denmark 7 

Switzerland 5 

Portugal 1 

Hawaii 3 

Azores Islands 2 

Russia 4 

Total... 



Hungary i 

Australia 3. 

Mexico 1 

Finland 2 

New Zealand 1 

Chile i 

Norway 4 

Scotland 5 

Waleg 2 

Japan 2 

West Indies 2 

Poland 5 

India i 

Holland 1 

Unknown 5 



376 



NUMBER COMMITTED TO THE CALIFORNIA. HOME FOR THE CARE AND TRAINING 
OF FEEBLE-MINDED CHILDREN, AT ELDRIDGE. 





MALES. 


FEMALES. 


Committed. 


5 


3 


Recommitted 


1 











COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



NATIONALITIES OP NATURALIZATIONS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



couirrRY. 


UMBER 


i 

COUNTRY. 


UMBER. 


Austria 


59 




89 


Australia 


13 


New Foundland 


2 




28 


New Zealand . 


2 




9 


Nova Scotia . . 


12 




43 


New Brunswick 


2 




1 


Portugal . . . 


20 


CoetaRica 


1 


Poland 


7 


China. 


1 


Russia 


48 


Denmark 


73 


Sweden 


152 


Itfypt... 


1 


Scotland 


3S 




134 


Switzerland 


2 




41 


Spain 


5 


France 


44 


Turkey 


i 


8 erman y 


345 


Syria 




Greece 


11 






Holland 


10 


Saxony 




Hawaiian Islands 


1 






Hungary 


7 


Siberia 




Ireland 


221 






Italy 


55 


Wales 




tele of Man 


x 


Crete 






9 






Mexico 


( 











Total 


1,52 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



DECLARATIONS OF INTENTION 

FROM JULY 1, 1899, TO JUNE 30, 1900. 



COUNTRY. 


NUMBER. 


COUNTRY. 


NUMBER 




1 


Mexico 


3 


Australia 


13 




1 


Austria 


37 


New South Wales 


1 


Belgium. . . . 


2 


New Zealand 


10 


anada 


52 


Norway 


58 


Cape Colonj' 


1 


Nova Scotia 


3 


Cape Verde Islands 


1 


Philippine Islands . 


18 - 


Chile . 


1 


Poland 


5 


Denmark.... 


37 


Portugal . 


8 


Eg ypt 


1 




2 


England 


151 


Roumania .... 


2 


Finland 


58 


Russia 


21 


France 


39 


Salvador 


1 


Germany 


166 


Scotland ... 


53 


Greece 


11 




4 


Guam 


1 




no 


Guatemala 


2 


Switzerland 


27 


Hawaiian Islands. 


3 


Syria 


1 


Heligoland 


1 




5 


Holland 


8 


United States of Colombia 


! 




1 


Wales 


4 


India 


1 


West Indies (St. Martin, Isle). . . . 


1 


Ireland 


187 


Western Islands, Azores 


1 


Italv 


53 


West Indies (British) 


2 


Japan 


3 


Tnfjil 


1 183 











COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



REMITTITURS RECEIVED PROM SUPREME COURT 
IN CRIMINAL CASES 

DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1900. 

Number of remittifcurs received 14 

Judgments affirmed 

Judgments reversed and cause remanded 

Judgments reversed and cause remanded for a new trial 1 

Judgments reversed 

Judgments dismissed I 

Judgments affirmed and new trial granted 1 

Totals... 14 14 



WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS ISSUED 

DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 

Old writs carried over in previous reports undisposed 26 26 

Writs pending June 30, 1899 6 

Writs issued during fiscal year 129 

Writs granted 39 

Writs dismissed and petitioner remanded 10> 

Writs dismissed and petitioner discharged 9 

Writs dismissed 42 

Writs denied and petitioner remanded 

Writs pending June 30, 1900 , 25 

Writs withdrawn 1 

Writs denied 3 

Writs off calendar g 

Totals ... .161 161 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



APPEALS FROM POLICE COURTS. 



Appeals pending June 30, 1899 19 

Appeals filed during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900 11 5 

Judgments affirmed 31 

Judgments dismissed 1 

Judgments modified 1 

Judgments affirmed and modified 1 

Judgments dismissed 

Judgments dismissed for want of prosecution 4 

Judgments reversed and cause dismissed 66 

Appeals pending June 30, 1900 

Totals... 134 134- 



INCORRIGIBLE JUVENILES COMMITTED TO WHITTIER AND 
PRESTON STATE SCHOOLS. 

Informations 2 

Petitions 12 

By information defendants convicted of burglary judgment suspended, and ordered 

committed to Preston State School 1 

By information defendants convicted of grand larceny, judgment suspended and 

' ordered committed to Preston School 1 

By petition incorrigible juveniles ordered committed to Preston School of Industry 1 

By petition incorrigible juveniles ordered committed to WTiittier School IO 

By complaint defendant convicted of larceny, ordered sent to the care and custody 

of Boys and Girls' Aid Society 1 

By petitions commitment of incorrigible juvenile, pending 1 

By complaint; to wit, larceny 1 

15 1& 



10 COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



GENERAL, SUMMARY. 

CIVIL DEPARTMENT. 

Number of civil actions commenced during the year .3,868 

Number of appeals from Justice*' Courts 451 

Number of marriage licenses issued 3,517 

Number of medical and dental certificates recorded 181 

Number of Coroner's inquests filed 

Number of auctioneers' bonds filed 6 

Number of notarial bonds filed 26 

Number of articles of incorporation 870 

Number of certificates of copartnership 52 

Number of certificates of naturalization issued 1,528 

Uumber of declarations of intention 1,183 

Number of estates commenced, Probate Department 1,591 

Number of letters issued, Probate Department , 1 ,689 

Number of claims filed, Probate Department 1,968 

Number of examinations of ingane 522 

Number of informations, indictments and appeals from Police Courts filed 115 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



. 11 





^ 


Law Library 


888888888888 


8 

S 




g 


Fees 


* 


s 




I S 




38;232i8 


8 




s o 

O O 

as 


Clerk's Fees 


, S B r 5 . . . 5 - 


o" 

S 




a &< cs 




SSS8wS3^S5SS 


% 


i 


- a; K aj 

ffpii 


No. of Claims al- 
lowed and filed . 




rH 


* 


[ S lg|S 


No. of|Proceedins 
Fees Deferred . . 




8) 





PT 


No. of Proceedings 
Fees Remitted.. 


~ 


S 


Hi 

> 




Guardianship.. .. 


ssssssssssss 




EH 


i 

B 




Special Letters. .. 


c 3S ^ t , 01 cooo S ,joo 


s 


8 


GO 


Administration 
with Will annexed 


10.<NOOOOOOMC00 


s 


8 


E 


Administration . . 


83S33gg:S8>.*.<o 


i 


2 




Testamentary.. .. 


-"-""""""""" 


1 


s 

^ 




Miscellaneous 


! ** r- . i-H rH 


- 


g 


i 


Incompetent 


o^eocooo.so.N^o^^ 


8 


rH 
Q 


fcE 
H 



Insane 


; M . 


a 


fc 
3 


O ^5 

O 


Minors 


"""""^^'^"^ 


8 


0> 





Intestate 


OO^O^rHt-^^*-^^ 


i 


5 


H i 


Testate 


gswSwSweocow^eow 


s 


15 


3D W 










w | 




^SS^aS^SwoMS 


s 


__ 


! 




r-l r-> r- W rH 




j 










| 






: I '. : ' '. ' ' ' ' 




PH 

3 






:::::::::. 




i 






: : : : : : : : : : 




p 






'.'.'. i ' 








E 











^ 










i 


: 






H 




]|1||! ifl, : 





12 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



DISPOSITION OP CRIMINAL CASES FOR 



OFFENSES CHARGED. 



Abduction 

Arson 

Assault by means and force likely to produce great bodily injury. . . 

Adultery 

Assault with a deadly weapon 1 

Assault with intent to commit murder 

Assault with inte^ to commit rape 

Assault with intent to commit robbery 

Attempt to commit burglary 3 

Attempt to extort 

Attempt to commit grand larceny 

Attempt to commit infamous crime against nature 1 

Attempt to commit mayhem 

Attempt to rescue prisoners 

Bigamy 

Burglary 15 

Child stealing 

Conspiracy .' 

Crime against nature 

Destroying telegraph messages 

Embezzlement 2 

Extortion 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



13 



THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



CONVICTED. 


Acquitted 


DISMISSED. 


PENDING. 


1 


As charged 


2 

I 

o 

D 


Of misdemeanor 


No evidence to convict 


Defendants sentenced on 
other charges 


' Defendants dead 


In furtherance of justice. 




D 

cr 

i 


On demurrer 


Defendants discharged 
own recognizance 


Against defend'ts sentenc 
on other charges 


Against defendants insane. . 


Against minors in Industrial 
School 


Ag'nst fugitives from justice 


For trial June 30, 1900 


I 










: B 


: & 






























3 






3 
4 

21 
1 
91 
95 
12 
26 
22 
4 
5 
3 
1 
1 
7 
331 
2 
2 
16 
1 
77 
6 






















1 




1 




1 




1 










4 












4 






.... 


8 
1 


5 




















4 

8 
2 
4 
2 


14 
1C 




4 
6 


3 


1 
1 






i 




11 

8 
4 
3 
5 
1 


2 
5 
3 

3 


1 

4 


3 


14 
9 
1 
1 

1 


14 
14 
1 
4 
2 
1 


21 
24 
1 

9 
2 

1 
1 














4 














i 






2 
















1 






1 
1 










































































1 







































1 


11 


3 
69 


1 
43 
















2 




1 













13 


2 


4 










85 

2 


73 


5 




11 






























9 




2 


1 


1 


1 














4 








1 




6 














1 

5 
2 












2 







1 














18 
4 






21 


12 


16 











































14 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



DISPOSITION OF 



OFFENSES CHARGED. 



Felony under Section 51, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 115, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 222, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 266, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 470, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 475, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 476, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 479, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 564, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 587, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 596, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 22, Purity of Elections Act. 
Felony under Section 2 1 ), Purity of Elections Act. 

Felony under Act of March 23, 1893 

Forgery 

Fraudulently concealing property 

Gaming 

Grand Larceny 

Incest 

Libel 

Manslaughter 

Mayhem 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



13 



CRIMINAL CASES CONTINUED. 



CONVICTED. 


1 


DISMISSED. 


PENDING. 




As charged 


Of lesser offense -felony. . 


Of misdemeanor 


No evidence to convict. . . 


Defendants sentenced c 
other charges 


Defendants dead 


5* 
S 

I 
a 

8 


On habeas corpus 


On demurrer. 


Defendants discharged c 
their own recognizance 


Against defend'ts sentence 
on other chargea 


Against defendants insane. . 


Against minors in industrial 
School 


Ag'nst fugitives from justice 


For trial June 30, 1900 .... 


I 




















3 


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1 
8 




3 

2 
1 
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1 
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2 
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2 

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232 

1 
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7 
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2 














1 


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1 


2 






























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11 

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1 




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36 


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49 
















8 

1 


3 

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1 






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4 

2 








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li 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



DISPOSITION OF 



OFFENSES CHARGED. 



Misdemeanor 

Murder 

Obtaining- money by false pretenses 

Perjury 

Petit larceny, second offense 

Rape 1 

Receiving stolen goods 1 

Robbery 

Seduction under promise of marriage 

Subornation of perjury 



Totals 



2!) 



COUNTY CLERK'S REPORT. 



17 



CRIMINAL CASES CONTINUED. 



COKVICTKD. 


Acquitted 


DISMISSED. 


PENDINO. 





As charged 


S 

1 
o 

! 

i 


<i 


O 




No evidence to convict . . . 


Defendants sentenced c 
other charges 


Defendants dead 


In furtherance of justice. 



a 
sr 
p 

cr 

I 
| 

00 


On demurrer 


Defendants discharged c 
own recognizance 


Against defend'ts sentence 
on other charges 


Against defendants insane 


Against minors in Industri 
School 


<* 

B 

3" 

!*3 

g 

I 

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For trial June 30, 1900 


Sentenced.. 





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7 
15 


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105 


57 


3 


50 


S3 


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10 


3 


240 


203 


25 


3 


182 


163 


284 


1401 



REPORT OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 

To the Honorable Jas. D. Pfielan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: In accordance with the provisions of the Charter of the City and 
County, and on behalf of the Tiustees of the Public Library of San Francisco, I 
submit the following report for the year ending June 30, 1900: 

The reports of the Librarian and Secretary incorporated herewith and made 
a part of this report give all the essential details concerning the administration of 
the Library and a statement of all moneys received and expended, and to them I 
would invite particular attention. The Secretary's statement shows disbursements 
for the year to the amount of $60,369 50. Of this sum, $15,224 28 were expended for 
books and periodicals, and the balance, $45,145 22, for the exposes of maintenance. 
The Librarian's report shows the internal workings of the Library to be in a satis- 
factory condition, and the large increase in circulation reported indicates a gratify- 
ing popularity of the institution with the public at large, and that its benefits 
continue to be more generally appreciated. There are now 30,999 persons registered 
as card-holders and entitled to the privileges of the Library, and during the year 
the recorded use of books amounts to 853,844 volumes. These figures show better 
than anything else can the far-reaching influence of the Library and the extent 
to which the people make use of it. 

The facilities of the Library have been gradually extended until now the system 
includes six branches, in addition to the Main Library. Although the Branch 
Libraries have been placed with due regard to the needs of the various sections 
of the city, there yet remain districts so remote from the existing libraries that 
the residents are practically debarred from availing themselves of their use. From 
some of these districts petitions have been received urging the establishment of 
branches, but, though fully appreciating the justice of the requests and the force 
of the arguments in their favor, yet the slight margin between our income and the 
outlay required by our present equipment has prevented us from undertaking any 
enlargement of the system. The work of the Library has greatly increased of late 
years, the circulation being now more than double what it was five years ago. A 
staff larger than formerly is therefore now required, books must be purchased in 
greater quantities, and a larger allowance must be made for the repair and main- 
tenance of the stock. But by careful and economical management we hav. kept 
the rate *of increase of expenditure very low, when compared with the rate by 
which the volume of circulation has increased. 

The need of a Library building has been urged again and again in these reports, 
and each succeeding year makes the necessity more apparent. Only by utilizing 
corridors for book stacks and encnoaching upon the space set aside for the public 
have we been able to provide shelving for our books. Aside from the exigencies 



OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 10 

of space, the need of an adequate building Is so apparent and Is so thoroughly 
understood by all who have given the matter thought that further argument seema 
useless. The new Charter places the Library upon a satisfactory and permanent 
basis. The tax required to be levied asoures an income sufficient to meat the cur- 
rent expenses. But no provision can be made for permanent improvements from thta 
source. Even though the maximum rate (.$.025 on each $100) were levied, it would 
require years to accumulate funds sufficient to pay for such a building as the city 
of San Francisco should have. It Is evident that if we are to have a Library build- 
ing the means must come from some other source than our annual tax. That the 
peoole would willingly grant the needed aid we have reason to believe from the 
spirit for municipal improvements manifested within the past year. I am pleased 
to be able to state that this matter has been taken actively In hand by a special 
committee of the Library Trustees appointed to take steps toward the procuring of 
a suitable building. 

The Library has been peculiarly fortunate this year in the matter of gifts, the 
most important being that of a lot and building for the Harrison Branch by the 
Hon. James D. Phelan. We trust the example thus set will be followed by others, 
and that ere long all of the branches will be permanently housed In appropriate 
buildings. Tha Library is under obligations also to the Rev. William Ingraham Kip 
for a large collection of books, and to others recorded in the list of donors appended 
to the Librarian'?: renort. 

On behalf of the Trustees of the Library, I desire to express our appreciation of 
the friendly interest you have manifested in the welfare of the institution Intrusted 
to our oare. 

JOHN H. WISE, 
President Board of Trustees. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

JOHN H. WISE (President) 212 San some street. 

'P. N. LILIENTHAL Anglo-Calif ornian Bank. 

A. L. MANN 2222 Clay street. 

EDWARD R. TAYLOR 530 California street. 

JOSEPH O'CONNOR Mission High School. 

GEO. T. SHAW Grand Secretary, Grand Lodge, I. O. O. F., Odd Fellows' Bldg. 

RALPH C. HARRISON Supreme Court Chambers, Parrott Bldg. 

COLTN M. BOYD 411 California street. 

HORACE DAVIS 134 California street. 

JOHN S. HITTELL. ; 1216 Hyde street. 

THOMAS B. BISHOP 532 Market street. 

The Mayor, ex-offlcio. 

GEORGE A. MULLIN, Secretary. MISS M. T. TYLER, Asst. Sec'y. 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN. 

RALPH C. HARRISON Books. 

JOSEPH O'CONNOR Building. 

COLIN M. BOYD Rules. 

EDWARD R. TAYLOR Finance. 

A. L. MANN Branches. 

P. N. LILIENTHAL Municipal Relations. 

GEORGE T. SHAW Printing and Binding. 

THOMAS B. BISHOP .. ...Law. 



Librarian, 
GEORGE T. CLARK. 



Assistant Librarian, 
JOY LICHTENSTEIN. 



OP THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



21 



SECRETARY S REPORT, 



To the Trustees oj the San Francisco Public Library 

GENTLEMEN : Following is a statement showing the Receipts and Expenditures for the 
year ending June 30. 1900 : 



RECEIPTS. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Balance in Treasury June 30 1899 


$11 200 04 




Cash on hand (with Secretary) June 30, 1899 


152 43 




Cash from Treasury for petty expenses 


100 00 




From Taxes ... 


53 608 61 






1 811 35 




Books lost and paid for 


96 85 




Bindings injured and paid for , 


5 40 






22 95 






128 40 




Advertisements in Monthly Bulletin ... . 


81 00 




Old newspapers sold .... 


17 00 




Old carpet sold . . 


12 00 




Donation from J. J. Davis. 


6 66 










DISBURSEMENTS. 

S Uaries 


$32 740 40 


$67,242 69> 


Books 


13 259 49 




Periodicals 


1 964 79 




Printing , 


2 237 84 




Binding 


3 898 48 




Stationery 


110 28 




Electric power for elevator 


580 88 




Telephone 


90 00 




Furniture and repairs 


1 655 52 




Expense Sundry 


831 92 




Fire insurance '. . 


129 65 




Gas for Main Library (3 months) 


300 00 




Gas for branches 


347 65 




Rent of branches 


2 124 00 




Fuel 


98 65 




Balance in Treasury June 30, 1900 


6,713 59 




Cash on hand (with Secretary) June 30 1900 


159 60 














$67,242 69 



22 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



RECORD OF DELINQUENTS. 



FINKS. 

22,317 Fines collected, amounting to , 

643 Fines uncollected, amounting to 

22,960 Total Fines imposed, amounting to 

BOOKS LOST AND BORROWERS BLACKLISTED. 

Main Library, 17 volumes/amounting to 

Branch No. 1, 1 volume, amounting to 

Branch No. 3, 3 volumes, amounting to , 

Branch No. 5, 3 volumes, amounting to 

Total 24 volumes, amounting to 

BOOKS LOST AKD PAID FOR. 

93 volumes, amounting to 



$1,811 35 
332 65 



$20 00 
3 00 
3 75 
5 00 



51,944 00 



$31 75 



$96 85 



OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



23 



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8 
S 


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$2,186 05 


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HUN 
iiliiilli 


_ 





24 REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 

To the Trustees 

I have the honor to submit herewith, in accordance with the rules of your 
Honorable Board, the annual report of the Librarian for the year ending June- 
30, 1900. 

It will be remembered that your Finance dommittee submitted an estimate of 
the 3'ear's exoer-ses, calling for $61,000 as the amount required to meet the Li- 
brary's growing needs. These figures were reduced by the Board of Supervisors to 
$55,000, which amount was set aside as our appropriation for the year. This reduc- 
tion of income, together with the large outlay required for the newly established 
Fillmore Branch, has precluded all expansion of the Library's facilities excepting 
that required to meet the demands made by its natural growth. In fact, only by 
encroaching upon the balance accumulated during the past have we been able to 
maintain our efficiency and at the same time devote a reasonable amount to the 
enhancement of the nermanent value of our collection. The rapid growth of the 
Fillmore Branch, opened May 10, 1899, made large accessions to its shelves im- 
oerative. As shown by the Secretary's report, we have spent on this branch for 
books alone the sum of $1,92^ 92. The maintenance of the remaining branches 
>ias required the usual outlay, while at the Main Library the wear and tear of 
books incident to the largely increased circulation of the last few years has had the 
effect, of materially adding to the number and cost of the necessary replacements. 
For the Main Library this item amounts to $2,551 56, but were the amount even 
larger T should not advise any remittance of the constant care which is exercised 
to keep the books in good condition. The manner in which the book fund has been 
expended is shown by Appendix VII of this report, wherein a statement is made 
of the number of volumes ordered for each of the branch libraries and the various 
departments of the Main Library, together with the approximate cost of same. 
In connection with the accessions for the year, mention should be made of the 
collection of 1,291 volumes, among them some rare and valuable Americana, given 
to the Library by the Rev. William Ingraham Kip, and also of the gift of 61 vol- 
umes by Mr. A. B. Davis. The names of others to whom the Library is indebted 
for gifts of books or pamphlets are appended to this report. 

CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT. 

The catalogue of bocks in the divisions of science and the useful arts, which 
was about ready for the press at the time of my last report, has been printed, and 
the indexer entries for the same books have been carefully revised. A supplement 
to the catalogue of the books in the juvenile department, covering the accessions 
for the four years ending June, 1900, and a new edition of the supplement to the 
fiction catalogue, have also been printed. The remainder of the time of the de- 
partment has been occupied in the completion of the union shelf list of books in 
the branch, libraries and in handling the books currently received, which for the 
year number 15,104. In taking the annual inventory of the branches this summer 
the books were checked directly from the shelf list. In this way clerical errors 
were corrected and all omissions detected. We now have a uniform notation and 
a complete shelf list for all books permanently placed in branch libraries, aggre- 
gating at present 22,276 volumes. 

JUVENILE DEPARTMENT. 

There has been a decline in the use of this department since the opening of the 
Fillmore Branch, the circulation for the year being 64,851 volumes, as against 71,- 
*42 volumes for the year 1898-99. In other respects satisfactory progress may be 
reported. The quality of the books has been improved by not replacing the least 



OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 25 

desirable of those worn out, and the usual care has been exercised in the selection 
of the new ones purchased. The head of the department has mads some very at- 
tractive displays upon the bulletin board for the purpose of calling attention to- 
books on special topics, and I doubt not that beneficial results have been accom- 
plished. 

BINDING. 

By an extension of the existing contract our binding has been done by the same 
house as heretofore and at ths schedule of prices which has been in force 
since 1896. There has been some increase in the quantity of work done, 8,821 vol- 
umes having been bound this year, while last year the number was 8,691. The 
excess is more than accounted for by the additionad work necessitated by the new 
branch library. Notwithstanding- that the Fillmore Branch has been in operation 
for barely fourteen months, after being equipped with a stock of books never before 
used, one-third of the books on the shelves in the beginning have had to be re- 
bound. While the large circulation has placed a great strain on the comparatively 
small number of volumes in the branch, we cannot avoid the conclusion that the- 
chief fault lies in the lack cf durability in the original bindings of so many of the 
new books. The whole number bound for the branch libraries is 3,103. 

CIRCULATION. 

The present number of card-holders is 30,999, an increase during the year of 
4,460. The same cards being usable at either the main or branch libraries, it is- 
not possible to know the exact number of readers at each place. However, those 
issued on applications made at the respective branches may be taken as indicating 
approximately the patronage of each branch. On this basis the card-holders of the 
Mission Branch havs increased from 3,798 to 4,369 in number; at North Beach the 
number has risen from 2,158 to 2,295; at the Harrison Branch from 1,275 to 1,38'5, 
and at the Fillmore Branch from 753 to 2,647. In addition to the cards issued on 
applications from this branch, I estimate that at least 1,000 cards issued at the 
Main Library and used there prior to the opening of the Fillmore Branch, are now 
beint^ used at the latter place, making the number of its card-holders 3,647. Both 
the Potrero and Richmond Branches show a slight decrease in patronage. The 
total k'sue of books for home use from the entire library system amounts to 638, 25O 
volumes, while the recorded use of books in the libraries is 220,594 volumes. Com- 
pared with last year, thet-'e figures indicate an increase in the home circulation of 
93,731 volumes, in the library use of 11,011, and a total increase in use of 104,742 
volumes. The number of technical books used shows a noticeable increase, which 
may be attributed to additional facilities for obtaining them afforded by the new 
printed catalogue of books of this class. Otherwise, there has been no essential 
variation in the character of the books used from that of previous years. Accord- 
ing to the Secretary's report, the sale cf reserve postal cards is nearly fourfold 
greater than for last year, the number sold being 10.272. These have been used 
by readers to secure books for which the demand is so great that copies seldom 
remain on the s^ielf for any length of time. After being self addre&sed by the 
applicants and filled out with titles or numbers of books desired, the cards are 
numbered in order of receipt and filed. When a book thus applied for becomes 
available the card of the first applicant on the li&t is mailed, and the book is held 1 
for not longer than three days. If not called for within that time nctice is sent 
to the applicant next in order. Notwithstanding the proportions to which the sys- 
tem has grown, ita advantages seem to fully justify the extra labor involved. 
While the nominal charge for the cards prevents their indiscriminate use, it is not 
or need not be a bar to any who earnestly desire to obtain particular books. The 
majority of readers are content to wait a brief period for a book, knowin their 
turns will come in regular sequence, but the frequent and fruitless calls, such as 
were unavoidable before the introduction of the reserving system, are necessarily 
annoying and the source of many complaints. Without this system we should be 



26 REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

compelled to orovide more copies of the new books than now suffice to meet the 
requirements. During the year 2,041 books have been issued to teachers for use in 
connection with class work. Most of them were retained for the full period of four 
weeks, and during, that time it may be assumed were in daily use by the various 
pupils. The system of issuing books for school use has been much simplified by 
providing: special cards for teachers, a practice recently authorized by your Honor- 
able Board. There cards enable teachers to draw the requisite number of books 
without making use of their pupils' cards, as under the system previously in vogue. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES. 

On the whole, the work of the branch libraries has made satisfactory progress. 
The new branch on Fillmore street has brought the library many new readers, and 
has rapidly developed a large circulation, amounting for the year to 77,088 vol- 
umes. Situated as it is between the North Beach and 'Richmond Branches, it seems 
to have drawn a few readers from each. At least this seems to be the most plaus- 
ible explanation of the slight decline apparent in their circulation. But most of its 
readers have eitber not beei\ card-holders hitherto or have transferred their cards 
from the Main Library. A continuance of its growth will soon make enlarged 
shelving capacity a necessity. The Mission Branch continues to grow in a most 
satisfactory manner, and the record for the Harrison Branch shows some increase 
both in the number of card- holders and in volumes used. While the North Beach 
Branch has made no advance, its home circulation of 47,617 volumes indicates a 
good state of activity, and is probably as large a business as could be expected in 
that quarter of the city. The proximity of the Fillmore Branch to Richmond and 
the scant population tributary to both the Richmond and Potrero Branches suffi- 
ciently explain the absence of any increase in their respective circulations. In this 
connection I desire to call attention to the relative cost per borrower of the different 
branches. Without including the i>ortions of the salaries of the Librarian, Secre- 
tary and others whose service is chargeable to the entire system and omitting 
the Fillmore Branch because of the unusual expenses incidental to getting it well 
established, the average cost per annum for each borrower in the remaining five 
branches is $1 60. For the Mission Branch the cost is $1 12, for North Beach $1 42, 
for Harriscn $1 64, for Richmond $3 18, and for the Potrero $3 82. We have tried 
to maintain branches of the same order in each district, irrespective of the tribu- 
tary populations. The sparsely settled hills of the Potrero and the populous dis- 
tricts of the Mission have been given branches differing only in degree, not in kind. 
Instead of maintaining permanent collections of books in the smaller branches, 
thus tying up quantities of popular books but little used after the newness has 
worn off, the books could be deposited temporarily and changed from time to time. 
In this and other ways it is possible to materially reduce expenses without impair- 
ing the efficiency of the branches. 

LIBRARY STAFF. 

It is with regret that I record the death in August last of Mrs. Laura E. Mor- 
ton, who, after eleven years of faithful service as librarian of the Mission Branch, 
had recently been assigned to the charge of the FilJmore Branch. The vacancy 
thus created was filled by the appointment of Miss Celia A. Hayward, formerly 
assistant in the -catalogue department. The other changes in the staff are few and 
unimportant. The third examination of applicants for positions under the rules of 
1896 was held November 4th and llth, respectively. Ten candidates passed satis- 
factorily, and their names have been placed on the list of eligibles. The questions 
asked at the examination are embodied in an appendix to this report. In conclu- 
sion, I desire to add a few words in commendation of the members of the staff for 
the faithfu! manner in which they have performed their several duties and for the 
hearty mterest manifested in the welfare of the Library. To them and to the 
members of your Honorable Board, for your courtesy and kindly consideration, my 
thanks are due. Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE T. CLARK, Librarian. 

July 31, 1900 



OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



27 



APPENDIX I. 



STATEMENT OF ACCESSIONS. 

Volumes in Main Library July 1, 1899 100,081 

Added by purchase 7.040 

Added by gift 1,608 

Continuations and pamphlets bound by Library. 729 

Total 9,377 

Less rolumes withdrawn 3,682 

Net increase 5,695 

Volumes in Main Library June 30, 1900 105,776 

Volumes in Branch Libraries July 1, 1899 17,656 

Added 5,727 

Less volumes withdrawn 1,107 

Net increase 4,620 

Volumes in Branch Libraries June 30, 1900 22,276 

Total volumes received, 1899-1900 15,104 

Volumes in Main Library and Branches, June 30, 1900 128,05;* 

USE OF BOOKS. 

Volumes issued at Main Library for home use 348,424 

Volumes issued at Branch Libraries for home use *289,826 

638,250 

Volumes issued at Main Library for library use 150,684 

Volumes issued at Branch Libraries for library use 69,910 

220,594 
Total 858.844 

Borrowers' cards issued 1898-9 15,319 

Borrowers' cards issued 1899-1900 15,744 

Total issue for two years 31,063 

Borrowers' cards canceled (two years) 64 

Cards in force June 30, 1900 30.899 



* Not including volumes sent from Main Library. 



28 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



APPENDIX II 

(MAIN 









189 


9. 






CLASS. 


| 


August 


September . . 


October 


I 

1 


December . . . 


General Works 


180 


246 


424 


321 


342 


301 


Philosophy 


495 


468 


405 


542 


551 


595 


Religion 


513 


491 


593 


500 


564 


519 


Sociology 


884 


1,165 


1,112 


1,232 


1,284 


1,254 


Philology 


337 


428 


451 


429 


398 


366 




914 


912 


1,255 


1,283 


1 306 


1 144 


Useful Arts 


1597 


1 478 


1,549 


1,672 


1 630 


1,793 


Fiiie Arts 


866 


913 


960 


1,070 


979 


930 


Miscellaneous literature 


1,063 


1 200 


1 349 


1443 


1,294 


1 279 


Poetry and drama ... 


636 


797 


891 


946 


973 


855 


Geography and Travel 


1 264 


1 209 


1 164 


1,226 


1,338 


1,340 




1,008 


1 156 


1,113 


1,080 


1,182 


1,034 


History 


1,174 


1 840 


2,273 


2,246 


1,999 


1,605 


Bound magazines 


2,370 


2,216 


2,473 


2,772 


2,840 


3,018- 




769 


790 


721 


782 


848 


892 




5 157 


3 980 


4,312 


4,953 


4 803 


5 079 


English fiction 


17 571 


16 687 


16726 


17 155 


16960 


17 449 


French and German fiction 
School use . . .... 


1,267 


1,263 
179 


1,149 
216 


1,218 

192 


1.094 
123 


1,101 
64 
















Totals 


38065 


37,418 


39 136 


41,062 


40,508 


40.61S 

















OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



29 



CLASSIFIED USE OF BOOKS. 

LIBRARY.) 







19C 


0. 










January .. . . 


February. . . . 


March 


> 





<H 

B 






TOTAL 
VOLUMES. 


PER CENT. 


485 


411 


428 


391 


308 


357 


4,194 


.84 


626 


598 


622 


553 


446 


406 


6,307 


1.26 


597 


572 


664 


594 


563 


480 


6,650 


1.33 


1.730 


1,502 


1,454 


1,356 


1,048 


852 


14,873 


2.98 


491 


432 


440 


375 


318 


425 


4,890 


.98 


1,523 


1.301 


1,520 


1,294 


1,101 


1,106 


14,659 


2.94 


2,338 


2,024 


2,173 


1,875. 


1,750 


2,092 


21,971 


4.40 


1,172 


875 


1,064 


913 


1,141 


962 


11,845 


237 


1.494 


1,485 


1,746 


1,411 


1,408 


1,193 


16,365 


3.28 


1,170 


896 


939 


784 


698 


699 


10,284 


2.06 


1,651 


1,400 


1,838 


1,505 


1,282 


1,200 


16,387 


3.28 


1,340 


1,280 


1,460 


1,146 


1,083 


890 


13,772 


2.76 


2,385 


2,198 


2,472 


2,190 


1,912 


1,383 


23,677 


4.74 


3,403 


3,209 


3,856 


3,125 


2.798 


2,505 


34,585 


6.93 


1,015 


914 


952 


779 


753 


700 


9.915 


1.98 


5,092 


4,606 


5,460 


4,878 


5.138 


5,744 


59,202 


11.88 


19,509 


17,860 


19,718 


17,552 


17.633 


17,994 


212,814 


42.64 


1,291 


1,177 


1,430 


1,212 


1,202 


1,273 


14,677 


2.94 


311 


256 


161 


379 


132 


28 


2,041 


.41 


47,623 


42,996 


48,367 


42,312 


40,714 


40,289 


499,108 


100.00 



30 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



APPENDIX III MAIN 









18$ 


)9. 








IH 
a 
<' 


August 


September 


1 


November 


I 


Books Issued 


28,146 


26 305 


26.911 


28,204 


27,721 


28 320 




9919 


11,113 


1?,225 


12858 


12,787 


12298 


Total 


38,065 


37,418 


39,136 


41,062 


40,508 


40,618 

































30 


3(H 


28 


31 


29 


30 


Average daily delivery 


1,442 


1,349 


1,537 


1,482 


1,527 


1.513 






























Visitors 


3,244 


3922 


4,332 


4,630 


4,651 


4 177 


Periodical Room 


5,138 


4995 


4,668 


5,242 


5,830 


6,241 


Newspaper Department 


12699 


15,876 


18,317 


12,249 


12590 


15,368 






























Cards Issued 
1899-1900 


1,263 


1,344 


1290 


1 279 


1 311 


1,112 


1898-99 


1 094 


1 462 


1 302 


1 372 


1 161 


954 

















OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



31 



LIBRARY STATISTICS. 







19 


00. 








January 


1 


1 


<& 


f 


IH 

d 

3 


TOTAL. 


31,699 


29,291 


32,994 


29,679 


29,456 


29,698 


348,424 


15,924 


13,705 


15,373 


12,633 


11,258 


10,591 


150,684 


47,623 


42,996 


48,367 


42,3-12 


40.714 


40,289 


499,108 



30 
1,731 


27 
1,766 


31 
1.709 


30 
1,597 


30 
1,499 


30 
1,484 


356i 



5,649 


4,826 


5,214 


4,421 


3,766 


3,337 


52,169 


7,292 


6,158 


6,692 


5,569 


5,204 


4.7CO 


67,729 


17,923 


15,435 


16,694 


16,187 


16,619 


16,405 


186,362 



1,626 
1,282 


1,296 
1,162 


1.526 
1,487 


1,274 
1,130 


1,054 
1,564 


1,369 
J.349 


15,744 
15,319 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



APPENDIX IV CIRCULATION 









18 


99. 








(4 

c_ 
<< 


> 

1 


September . 


October.... 


November.. 


December. . 


BRANCH LIBRARY No. 1. 
Home use. Books from Branch 
Home use. Books from Main Library 
Library Use 


7,772 
226 
897 


7,328 
226 
1,097 


7,612 
238 
1,159 


8,724 
275 
1,676 


8,554 
225 
1 740 


8,535 
207 
1 678 
















Total 


8895 


8,651 


9 009 


10 675 


10 519 


10 420 


Daily Average 


332 


302 


319 


381 


394 


382 


BRANCH LIBRARY No. 2. 
Home use, Books from Branch 
Home use, Books from Main Library 
Library Use 


818 
83 
669 


717 
69 
685 


654 
77 
608 


580 
82 
599 


538 
67 

527 


580 
46 
638 


Total 


1 570 


1 471 


1 339 


1 9 61 


1 132 


1 264 


Daily Average 


57 


50 


50 


43 


40 


43 


BRANCH LIBRARY No. 3. 
Home use, Books from Branch 
Home use, Books from Main Library 
Library Use 


3,985 
223 
924 


3,705 
289 
1 076 


3.592 
249 
1 216 


3,819 
283 
1 222 


3.665 
252 
1 215 


3,757 
251 
1 118 
















Total 


5 132 


5 070 


5 057 


5 329 


5 132 


5 126 


Daily Average 


160 


197 


3lT 


151 


166 


191 

















OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



33 



OF BRANCH LIBRARIES. 







190 


0. 








i 


1 


1 


> 
o 
2. 


1 


3 
? 


TOTAL. 


9.514 


8,882 


10.336 


9,708 


9,703 


10,232 


106,905 


290 


266 


287 


222' 


240 


209 


2,911 


2,234 


2,065 


2,109 


1,650 


1,442 


1.427 


19,174 


12,038 


11.213 


12,732 


11,580 


11,390 


11.868 


128.990 


435 


457 


446 


431 


413 


430 




765 


726 


787 


694 


818 


777 


8,454 


60 


59 


87 


54 


39 


47 


770 


753 


717 


627 


655 


786 


823 


8,087 


1,578 


1,502 


1,501 


1,403 


1,643 


1,647 


17,311 


55 


60 


53 


56 


63 


59 


















4,239 


3,710 


4,360 


4.207 


4,35'* 


4,225 


47,617 


300 


302 


314 


267 


287 


214 


3,236 


1,343 


1,206 


1,268 


1,369 


1,285 


1,059 


14,301 


5,882 


5,218 


5.942 


5,843 


5.925 


5.498 


65,154 


214 


171 


206 


22a 


215 


200 





REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



APPENDIX IV 









189 


9. 








<H 

: 


> 


September. 


| 


November.. 


December. . 


BRANCH LIBRARY No. 4. 














Home use, Books from Branch 


1,357 


1,182 


1.128 


1,331 


1,298 


1,161 


Home use, Books from Main Library 


53 


90 


76 


73 


57 


53 


Library Use 


399 


309 


323 


292 


303 


356 
















Total 


1,809 


1.581 


1.527 


1,696 


1,658 


1,570 


Daily Average 


60 


60 


54 


54 


57 


52 


BRANCH LIBRARY No. 5. 
















2,725 


2,450 


2,406 


2,649 


2,765 


2719 


Home use, Books from Main Library 


148 


112 


120 


147 


104 


103 


Library Use 


942 


1 069 


1.116 


1,281 


1,313 


1 604 
















Total 


3815 


3 631 


3 642 


4 077 


4 182 


4 428 


Daily Average 


142 


128 


139 


144 


155 


163 


BRANCH LIBRARY No. 6. 














Home use. Books from Branch 


5,060 


5,111 


5,143 


5,545 


5,318 


6.153 


Home use, Books from Main Library 


135 


207 


252 


318 


311 


260 


Library Use. . 


471 


511 


852 


892 


807 


714 


Total 


5 666 


5 829 


6 247 


6 755 


6 436 


7 127 


Daily Average 


214 


209 


243 


240 


241 


267 

















OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



35 K 



CONTINUED. 







19C 


0. 








1 


| 


cr 


I 


? 


g 

D 


TOTAL. 


1,324 


1,247 


1,457 


1,423 


1,523 


1,498 


15,929 


60 


51 


65 


68 


75 


73 


794 


379 


363 


498 


357 


414 


386 


4379 


1,763 


1.661 


2,020 


1,848 


2,012 


1.957 


21,102 


58 


61 


65 


61 


67 


65 




3,170 


2,947 


3,294 


2,919 


2.8% 


2.963 


33,833 


128 


103 


146 


137 


137 


83 


1,470 


1,552 


1,143 


1,252 


1,207 


1,041 


1,576 


15,6% 


4,850 


4,193 


4,692 


4,263 


4,004 


4,622 


50,399 


175 


171 


165 


159 


145 


168 




6,833 


6,473 


8,015 


7,748 


7,914 


7,775 


77,088 


252 


198 


249 


222 


225 


274 


2,903 


840 


753 


969 


930 


883 


831 


9,453 


7,925 


7,424 


9,233 


8,900 


9,022 


8,880 


89,444 


285 


302 


331 


332 


328 


326 



















REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



APPENDIX V. 

STATISTICS OF BRANCH LIBRARIES, 1899-1900. 





f 


5 


W 


W 

>1 


W 


| 






_^ * 

5' p 


1 5 


W o 


5 & 
S ? 


3 o 


1 ? 


TOTAL. 




I ~ 


3 " 


I " 


.*- 


1 ** 




3, 






128,990 


17.311 


65.154 


21,102 


50,399 


89,444 


372,400 




2,214 


235 


1,028 


317 


642 


1,894 


6,330 




4,370 


567 


2,298 


666 


1,389 


2,647 


11,937 


Volumes in Library July 1. 1899 


6,136 
1,428 


1,577 
269 


3,389 
855 


1,676 
349 


2,756 ! 
425 


2,122 
2,401 


17,656 
5727 




486 


25 


427 


63 


101 


5 


1,107 




942 


244 


428 


286 


324 


2,396 


4,620 


Volumes in Library June 30, 1900. . . 


7,078 


1,821 


3,817 


1,962 


3,080 


4,518 


22,276 



OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



37 



APPENDIX VI. 

BOOKS ISSUED FOR HOME USE, 1880-1900. 





Main Library. .. 


Branch No. 1. . . 


Branch No. 2. . . 


Branch No. 3. . . 


Branch No. 4. . . 


Branch No. 5. . . 


Branch No. 6. . 


f 


1880-1 


137,369 














137,369 


1881 2 


194,112 














194,112 


1882-3 


201,114 














201,114 


1883-4 


183,719 














183,719 


1884 5 


186 268 














186,263 


1885-6 


159 373 














159,373 


1886-7 


151 007 














151,007 


1887-8 


89,313 














89,313 


1888 9 


92 192 


5 359 


4 726 


7 163 








109 440 


1889-90 


121 429 


13,199 


5,890 


9,713 








150,231 


1890 1 


134 622 


17,706 


3,978 


11,517 








167.S28 


1891-2 .... ; 


139,630 


18,592 


5,321 


13,767 








177,310 


1892-3 


147,957 


18,961 


7,225 


18,031 


6,877 






199,051 


1893-4 


140,863 


21,260 


7,038 


18,470 


5,851 






193,482 


1894-5 


189,309 


25,272 


5,586 


18,992 


5,324 






244,483 


1895 6 


203 987 


29 925 


7 145 


17 883 


4 625 






263 565 


1896-7 


249 971 


45,424 


12,990 


31,656 


7 987 


17,916 




365,944 


1897-8 


268 734 


59,615 


13 4 < >6 


35,268 


12 453 


25,515 




415,011 


1898-9 


340,524 


90395 


10 887 


48,037 


16,410 


31,221 


7,045 


544,519 


1899-1900. 


348,424 


106,905 


8,454 


47,617 


15,929 


33,833 


77,088 


638,?50 





















38 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



APPENDIX VII. 

BOOKS ORDERED, JULY 1, 1899, TO JUNE 30, 1900. 



CLASS. 


VOLUMES. 


COST. 


General works, encyclopedias, bound psriodicals, etc 






Philosophy and theology 






Sociology Including education . . 












Fine arts, including architecture and ornanisnt 


91 fi 


m24 


Language anO literature . ... 




846 06 


English fiction 








1,150 






276 






173 












3,314 






1,215 






245 


199 16 




806 


704 82 




309 


253 47 




359 






2,114 






12,419 


$13,265 92 









OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 38 

APPENDIX VIII. 

CORRESPONDENCE RELATIVE TO BUILDING FOB THB HARRISON 
BRANCH LIBRARY. 

Mayor's Office, 

San Francisco, Cal., December 23, 1800. 
JOHN S. HITTELL, ESQ., 

President Board of Public Library Trustees, City- 
Dear Sir: Some time since, your Secretary asked me if I would rent to the city 
a store in the new improvements I am making at South Park, for the purpose of 
housing the Branch Free Library for that section of the city. It occurred to me 
then that the city should own its own Branch Library buildings* and* have them 
attractive in appearance, commodious and well lighted. The people then would 
feel a sense of proprietorship in their own library and its use would be encouraged, 
I have since conferred with your Librarian, who approves of the idea. There- 
fore, I desire to offer the Trustees for the city a lot of land and building for a 
Branch Library to be located in the district bounded by Harrison, Brannan, Third 
and Fourth streets. I will secure a good building lot as soon as I can confer with 
your Board upon the most desirable location, and erect a building, a plan of which 
I have asked the architects Curlett & McCaw to prepare, which they have done for 
your Inspection. 

The only condition I would make would be that the Trustees shall keep as i 
their present purpose the library and reading room open during the day and at 
least until 9:30 In the evening. 

On the approval of the ulan and location, I will forthwith proceed to erect a 
building to be constructed of brick and stone or other durable material. 
Yous respectfully, 

(Signed) JAMES D. PHELAN. 

San Francisco Free Public Library, 

San Francisco, December 23, 1899. 

HON. JAMES D. PHELAN, Mayor of San Francisco- 
Dear Sir: Your generous offer, as proposed, will, I am confident, be gratefully 
accepted by the Trustees of the Public Library to whom I will submit it at their 
next meeting. 

As their representative, and on behalf of the citizens of San Francisco, and for 
myself as cne among them, I tender to you most hearty thanks for your munifi- 
cence. 

Your idea that the Library should own its buildings Is excellent; the place 
which you suggest for one will accommodate many thousands of people, and I hop* 
that your example will be followed by others. Respectfully yours, 

(Signed) JOHN S. HITTELL. 

San Frandaoo, January 3, 1900. 

HON. JAMES D. PHELAN, Mayor of San Francisco- 
Dear Sir: The Trustees of the Public Library, at their meeting last evening; 
unanimously adopted a motion accepting your offer of a lot and building for a 
Branch Library in the neighborhood of South Park and instructing me to expresa 
to you their thanks for the liberal gift. 



40 REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

As a member of our Board, you know that the management of its important 
public trust is without reproach, and that it would be difficult to find a purpose 
in which such an amount as you offer to contribute would do more for the enjoy- 
ment of the people, or would give more enduring satisfaction to the wise philan- 
thropist. Respectfully, 

(Signed) JOHN S. HITTELL, 

President of the Board of Trustees of the Public Library. 

Mayor's Office, 

San Francisco, January 4, 1900. 
MR. JOHN S. HITTELL,, 

President Board of Trustees, Free Public Library- 
Dear Sir: I thank you for your letter of the 3d inst. I will confer with the 
committee, and desire now to withdraw the conditions regarding the hour of clos- 
ing, requesting, however, that the library be kept open in the evening as a read- 
ing room for the working classes in that part of the city. Yours truly, 

(Signed) JAMES D. PHELAN. 



APPENDIX IX. 

QUESTIONS ASKED AT EXAMINATION OF APPLICANTS FOR POSITIONS 
IN LIBRARY SERVICE, HELD NOVEMBER 4 AND 11, 1899. 

LITERATURE (November 4, 1899300 Credits). 

I. Give the names of the authors of the following works: 1. Anatomy of Mel- 
ancholy; 2. Curiosities of Literature; 3. Adventures of Telemachus; 4. Sorrows of 
Werther; 6. Areopagitica; 6. Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts; 7. Sartor 
Resartus; 8. Stones of Venice: 1). Two Years Before the Mast; 10. Bab Ballads; 
11. Paul and Virginia; 12. Ingoldsby Legends; 13. Religio Medici; 14. The De- 
oameron. 

II. Give the names of the authors who wrote under the following pseudonyms, 
wit>^ the title of some work written by each: 1. Owen Meredith; 2. Ik Marvel; 
Z. Barrv Cornwall; 4. Charles Egbert Craddock; 5. Diedrich Knickerbocker; 6. 
Pisistratus Caxton; 7. George Eliot; 8. John Phoenix; 9. Christopher North; 10. 
Currer Bell; 11. Father Prout; 12. Artemus Ward; 13. Mark Twain; 14. Gail Ham- 
ilton. 

III. Give the names of the authors of the following novels: 1. Castle of Otranto; 
2. Lavensrro; 3. Marble Faun; 4. White Lies; 5. Cranford; 6. Vathek; 7. East 
Lynne; 8. Epicurean; 9. John Brent; 10. Frankenstein; 11. Villette; 12. Uncle 
Tom's Cabin; 13. Vivian Grey; 14. Clarissa Harlowe; 15. Eugene Aram. 

IV. Give the names of the authors of the following poems: 1. Vision of Sir 
Launfal: 2. Kubla Khan: 3. One Hess Shay; 4. Burial of Sir John Moore; 6. Bonnie 
Dundee; 6. Allan Percy; 7. Sheridan's Ride; 8. Cotter's Saturday Night; 9. Ivry; 
10. Destruction of Sennacherib; 11. Abou Ben Adhem; 12. Annabel Lee; 13. How 
They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix; 14. Battle Hymn of the Republic; 
15. Casablanca. 

V. Of what eooch or country have the following authors written a history: 
1. Milman; 2. Hildreth; 3. Mommsen; 4. Motley; 5. Lingard; 6. Niebuhr; 7. Gibbon: 



OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 41 

. John Fiske; 9. Harriet Martineau; 10. Justin McCarthy; 11. Francis Parkman; 
12. John Foster Kirk. 

'I. Name the works and authors in which the following characters are found, 
and some trait peculiar to each character: 1. Falstaff; 2. Bob Acres; 3. Mrs. 
Grundy; 4. Captain Oostisran; 5. Ithuriel; 6. Oily Gammon; 7. Pecksniff; 8. Dl 
Vernon; 9. Mrs. Caudle; 10. Scrooge; 11. Sir Artegal; 12. Flora McFlimsey; 13. Dr. 
Primrose; 14. Charles Surface; 15. Squire Western. 

VII. What historical event is referred to in the following- works: 1. Marmion: 
2. Evangeline; 3. Tale of Two Cities; 4. Kenil worth; 5. Barnaby Rudge. 

VIII. 1. In whose reign did Pepys write his Diary? 2. In what form was it 
originally written? 3. What other person has left a diary covering the same period? 
4. Name five writers of French drama. 5. Name t:wo English translations of Dante. 

HISTORY (November 11, 1899150 credits). 

I. Name three voyagers who explored portions of the coast of California prior 
to 1650. 

II. Give a brief account of the discovery of San Francisco bay. 

III. What was the "bear flag" revolt? 

IV. What is the "Consolidation Act"? 

V. What territory has been acquired or annexed by the United States since the 
declaration of war with Spain? 

VI. What were the "Kentucky resolutions"? When were they passed? 

VII. Name the sovereigns or rulers of England in chronological order from 1066 
A. D. to the present. 

,'HI. What is the Domesday book? 

IX. What were the "Wars of the Roses"? In whose reign did they begin? 

X. State briefly the causes of the French revolution. Who was the sovereign 
of France at the time of its outbreak:' 

XI. Give a brief account of the events culminating in the battle of Omdurman. 

XII. What countries constitute the "triple alliance"? For what object was it 
farmed? 

XIII. What was the "Edict of Milan"? By whom was It promulgated? 

XIV. By whom was fousht the battle of Chaeronea? What was the effect 
upon the defeated nation? 

XV. When did they flourish and with the histories of what countries are the 
following- respectively associated: Constantino the Great; Wallenstein; Richelieu; 
Cavour; Junipero Serra. 

GRAMMAR, SPELLING AND COMPOSITION. 



(November 11, 1899 Composition, 100 credits; Grammar, 25 credits; Spelling, 

25 credits.) 

I. Write an essay of not less than three hundred words on one of the following 
topics: (a) Longfellow; (b) War in South Africa; (c) Negro slavery in America. 

GEOGRAPHY (November 11, 1899100 credits). 

I. Mention some of the advantages to commerce that a ship canal across Nicar- 
agua would bring about. 

II. Inscribe Admiral Dewey's course from Manila to New York, naming the 
different bodfies of water through which he sailed. 



42 REPORT OP THE TRUSTEES 

HI. Name two great wheat producing countries. Name two great iron produc- 
ing countries. Name one American industry of which California has a monopoly. 

IV. Locate briefly the most elevated region of each of the Grand Divisions 
and name two large rivers that have their sources in each of these regions. 

V. Locate Liverpool, Conenhagen, Stockholm, Cologne, Lyons, Malaga, Triest, 
Hamburg, Odessa, Oporto. (Just give the country of each.) 

VI. Locate Smyrna, Aden, Teheran, Bangkok, Cavite. 

VII. Locate Alexandria, Magdala, Pretoria, Blosmfontein, Ladysmith. 

VIII. Bogota, Lima, Valparaiso, Buenos Aires and Cayenne. 

IX. What sections of the United States are most noted for the production and 
export of wheat? 

X. Name five States noted for cotton; two for petroleum; three for tobacco; 
three for lumber; two for iron; three for cattle raising; two for manufactures. 

XI. Give the boundaries of the Zones and state distances in degrees from the 
Eauator. How many statute miles in one of these degrees ? 

XII. What causes an eclipse of the sain? Of the moon? 

XIII. What are the causes of the ocean currents? Of tides? Of differences in 
annual average temperature? 

ARITHMETIC (November 11, 189950 credits). 
(All answers must show the entire work.) 

I. (Dictated.) 

II. How many yards of silk can be bought for $100 at $1 62% per yard? 

III. What will it cost to lay linoleum in a library room 27 feet by 60 feet at 
85 cents per square yard? 

IV. The meter is 39.3708 inches In length and the yard 36 inches. If a mer- 
chant import 200 meters of silk at a total cost of $300, what will he gain by selling 
it at $1 50 per yard? 

V. The diameter of a circle is estimated to be 7-22 of its circumference and 
also, more accurately, 113-355 of it. Which of these fractions is the greater? Ex- 
press their difference decimally. 

VI. Two boys become partners in selling newspapers. One invests $2 and the 
other $1 50. When they have made a profit of $5 60, they decide to dissolve part- 
nership and divide the gain in proportion to their investments. How much does 
each get? 

VII. Which Is the better investment, to purchase stock that pays 5 per cent at 
120, or stock at 80 that pays 3 per cent? Give full explanation. 

VIII. The average number of visitors daily in three branch libraries Is 70, M) 
and 90 respectively; if 3,600 books be divided among these branches in proportion 
to these averages, how many will each receive? 

IX. (a) What per cent of 50 Ibs. is 5 Ibs. 4 ozs. ? (b) One-half a stock of goods 
was sold for 2-3 of the value of the whole stock. What was the gain per cent 
thereon? 

X. If one steamer start at noon and sail at the rate of 10% miles an hour and 
another start from the same place at half-past one, and sail in the same direction, 
at the rata of 12 miles per hour; at what rate will the latter overtake the former? 

XI. If I lend $1,000 to A at 8 per cent per annum, simple interest, and $1,000 
to B at 6 per cent per annum, compound interest, payable half-yearly; what amount 
wiill each owe me at the end of two years? 

XII. Work the following in .the shortest way you know: (a) Find interest an 
$743 60 for 8 months at 1 1-4 per cent per month, (b) Find the percentage of gain 
a newsboy makes when he buys papers at the rate of 2 for 5 cents and sells them 
at the rate of 3 for 10 cents, (c) Find the cost of 224 articles at $1 75 each, (d) 
Find tha cost of 8 pairs of gloves at $13 55 per dozen, (e) Find cost of 64 yards of 
cloth at 37% cents per yard. <f) A pound avoirdupois weighs 7,000 grains and a 
pound troy 5,760 grains. What decimal is the latter of the former? 



OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



APPENDIX X. 

GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY, 1899-1900. 



FROM WHOM RKCKIVED. 


1 


!* 
t 


Serials 


Aberdeen (Scotland^ Public Library ... ... 




i 




Adelaide (South Australia) Observatory 


1 






Agruilar Library New York Citv 




i 




Allerton. W. S.. 


1 






American Institute of Homoeopathy 


1 






American National Red Cross Relief Committee 




i 




American Swedenborj? Printing and Pub. Society 


6 






A.mherst College A.mherst Mass 




i 




American Union League Society 


1 










i 




Andover Theological Seniinary 




i 




Arlington Mills 


1 






Armour Institute of Technology Cl'icago 




i 




Balch, E. S :.. 


I 






Balch, T. W 


1 






Baltimore (Md ) City Librai-y 








Baltimore Sun 








Belleville (111.) Public Library 




i 




Bennington Battle Monument 


j 






Bible Normal Collage, Springfield, Mass 




i 




Biddle ^niver^it} fharlott* N C 








Birmingham (Enar ) Free Library 








Blackwell, S. C 


4 






Bollack, Leon, Paris. 




i 




Boston City Council 


1 










^ 


12 











44 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY CONTINUE... 



FROM WHOM RECEIVED. 


f 


Pamphlets 


3 

E 

?> 


* 

Boulware, C. W 


2 










3 




Brewer, Mrs. H. S 


1 






Brinley C A . 


5 










C 




Bronson Library Fund, Waterbury, Conn 




3 




Brookline (Mass ) Public Library 




1 


g 


Brooklyn (N Y ) Pub'ic Library 




; 




T3rown, Enos 




2 




Buffalo (N. Y ) Public Librarv 




3 




Bunker Hill Monument A ssociation 


1 






Burgess Dr O O 




5 






1 






Burr. E. C 




1 map 




California. Bank Commission 3 ^ 


1 






Secretary of State 


5 






State Agricultural Society 


3 






State Library 


2 


3 




State Mining Bureau 




5 




Calilorn'a Academy of Sciences.. . . 




14 




California Dental Association. 




1 








1 




California League of Rspublican Clubs 




1 




Cambridge (Mass.) Public Library 






11 


Carey Dr G "W 




1 




Carnegie Library, Allegheny, Pa 




1 




Carnegie Library Pitlsburg Pa 




2 


10 




2 















OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



45 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY CONTINUED. 



FROM WHOM RBCKIVBD. 


f 


Pamphlets. 


f 


Department of Public Works 


1 






Public Library 




1 




Chicago Board of Trade 


1 






Cincinnati (.O ) Public Library 






Q 


Clark, G. T . . 


1 


2 




Cleveland (O ) Municipal Association 




^ 




Cl^'elaid Public Library 




] 




Cleveland Public Schools 




1 




Cornell Universitv Ithaca N Y 








Colby College "Waterville Me 


1 






Council Bluffs Library 




1 




Craig, A 


1 






Crary, Mrs. B. F 


94 










3 




Dabovich, Rev. Sebastian 


l 






Daly, Miss 


8 






Davis A. B ... 


61 






Davis Horace 


8 


302 




Dayton (O ) Public Library.. 




2 




Detroit (Mich) Public Library . . 




2 




Dohen, Albert 


1 






Drury Wells .... 




10 




Elder & Shepard . 


1 






Emmett Dr T A 


1 






Enoch Pratt Library, Baltimore, Md 




1 


4 


Evanston 1.111 ) Public Library . . 




1 






1 






Field Columbian Museum Chicago, 111 




6 













46 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY-CONTINUED. 



FROM WHOM RECEIVED. 



Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt , 

Fogg Library- 

Forbes Public Library, Northampton, Mass 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia , 

Freadom Pub. Co 

Freud, J. R 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Penn 

Fry t , A. E 

Galesburg (111.) Public Library 

General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, New York 

Grand Rapids Public Schools 

Grosvenor Public Library, Buffalo, N. Y 

Graves, F. B 

Guatemala. Secretary of Public Instruction 

Gunton, S 

Hall, H. O 

Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y 

Hanna, S. J. .' 

Harrison, Ralph C 

Hart, A 

Hartford (Cpnn. > Public Library 

Hartford (Conn.) Theological Seminary 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass 

Harvard University Library, Cambridge, Mass 

Haskell, B. G 

Hertmg, C 

Home of Truth 

Honolulu. Department of Foreign Affairs ... 



. . . ! 10 
2 

v 

.. ;. 10 
i r. 



11..; 

i .... 

i ... 

i ... 
i 

i ... 

10 ... 

4 .. 



12 



OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



47 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY CONTINUED. 



FROM WHOM RECBIVED. 


Vf 

m 


Pamphlets. 


CD 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co 


1 






Illinois. Superintendent of Documents.. 


2 








7 






Iowa Masonic Librarv 




3 




Ipsv/ich Historical Society 


1 






Jan es, L. G 




1 




John Crerar Library Chicapo 




1 




Kip, Rev. "Wm. Ingraham 


1,291 


42 




Lake Miss M 


4 






Lathe, H. W 


1 






Laf ayette College 




1 




Lake Mohonk Arbitration Conference 




1 




Lawrence (Mass.) Public Librarv 




1 


4 


Lemon, D. M 


1 






Library Association of California, 




1 




Lichtenstein, J 


1 


1 




Lombard!, G 




1 




Los Angeles (Calif.) Put lie Library 




I 




Lowell (Mass) Public Library 




1 




Ludlow Gen W H 


1 






McDonald, Arthur 




4 




Maiden (Mass. ) Public Librarv 




5 




Ma ,z, H 


I 






Marwedel Mis E 


















j 






S a cretary of Commonwealth 


2 






Massachusetts Horticultural Society . . . 




4 













48 



REPORT OP THE TRUSTEES 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY-CONTINUED. 



FROM WHOM RECEIVED. 



Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Mechanics' Institute, San Francisco 

Melville, G. W. (Engineer in Chief, U. S. A) 

Melville, Mrs. E 

Mercantile Illus. Co 

Mercantils Library, New York 

Mercantile Library , Philadelphia 

Mercantile Librae, St. Louis 

Merchants' Association, San Francisco 

Millroy, J. J 

Milwaukee (Wis.) Public Library 

School Board 

Minneapolis, City of 

Board of Pa.rk Commissioners 

Public Library 

Morales, D 

Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass 

Mount Vernon Public Library 

Murray, T . H 

Nagao, S 

National Live Stock Association 

Nebraska. Labor Bureau 

New Bedford (Mass.) Public Library 

New Hampshire Historical Society 

New Hampshire Medical Society 

New Haven (Conn.) Public Library 

New Jersey Weathsr Service 

New York City. Department of Education 



17 

2 
2 

1 

7 maps 



OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY CONTINUED. 



FROM WHOM RKCK1VKD. 


f 


Pamphlets. 


f 


New York Circulating Library 




2 




New York Civil Service Reform Association 




1 




New York Farm ers 




2 




New York Public Library 




11 




New York State Library 








Na w Zealand 


o 






Newark CN. J.) Public Library 






7 


Newberry Library, Chicago 




2 




Newton (Mass.) Free Library 




1 












Norris, E. A 




I 




Northwestern University, Evanston, 111 




1 




Ohio State University 




2 




Omaha (Neb.) Public Library 




7 




Orjubin Mrs L .... 








Osgood, F. S . . 


1 






Otis Library, Norwich, Conn 




5 




Owens, M. T 




1 




Paris. Prefet da la Seine 




77 




Parsons. F 


1 






Paterson (N. J.) Free Public Library 




1 




Peabody Institute, Baltimore Md 


1 


2 




Pennsylvania Prison Society 




1 




Pennsylvania State Collet 




I 




Perry, A. T 




1 




Peters, W. H. & J. P 


1 






Phslan, James D 


2 






Philadelphia City Institute 




I 













REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY CONTINUED. 



FROM WHOM RECEIVED. 


| 

o 

?r 


Pamphlets. 


f 










Phi lacielphia Cor^raercial Museum 




1 












Philadelphia Free Library 




1 




Philade'phia Library Co 




2 




Philadelphia Public Ledger 




1 








1 




Pratt Institute Brooklyn N Y 






15 


Princeton University Princeton N J . 


1 










1 










12 











Religious Society of Friends 




2 




Reno Mrs E B 


4 






Heynolds Library, Rochester, N. Y 


1 


2 




Richardson W. A (Estate cf ) ..... . . 


1 






Robinson, Mrs S. . 


1 






Robinson T B 


1 






Rolinson, G. C 


1 






JRonbroke Press 


1 






Boss, D... 


1 






Royal Society of Canada 


1 







Sadler, R. E 









Sahlling Mrs M 








St. George Public Libraries, London, Eng.. 








St. Giles Public Library, London Eng 








St. Ignatius College, San Francisco 




1 




St. Louis (Mo.) Architectural Club 




1 




St. Louis, Merchants of 




1 




fit. Louis Public Library 




2 













OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



51 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY CONTINUED. 



FROM WHOM RECEIVED. 


- 1 


Pamphlets. 


Serials 


St Martin and St Paul Public Library London Eng 








Salem (Mass) Public Llbrarv... 






11 


San Francisco. Board of Health 


1 






Board of Supervj sors 


10 






San Francisco Chamber of Commerce . . . 








San Francisco T'ort Society 








Santa Clara College 








Schmidt A Al 








Schenectady (N. Y.) Public Library 




1 




Scranton (Pa.) Public Library 








Seattle (Wash.) Public library 








Sellers, E. J 


1 






Shaw George T 








Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C 




2 




Society of California Pioneers, San Francisco 








Solberg Thorwalc* 








Somerville (Mass.) Public Library 




1 


10 


Sonoda, S 


1 






Springfield (Mass.) City Library Association 








Stallard, J. H 




5 




Stanford University 








Stevenson, W. M 




3 




Sturtevant, B. F. Q 




1 




Sturtevant & Co 




7 




Sunset Club, Chicago 








Swift, Morrison I 








Tacoma Public Library 








Taunton (Mass.) Public Library 





1 













52 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY CONTINUED. 



FROM WHOM RECEIVED. 



Texas State Historical Association 

Theosophical Pub. Cc 

Towle Manufacturing Co 

Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition 

Trinity College, Hartford, Conn 

Trowbridge, F. B , 

Tufts College, Somerville, Mass 

Tulane University, New Orleans, La 

Ulrich, C 

United States Government, Washington D. C. 

Agricultural Department 

Coast Survey 

Education Bureau 

Geological Survey 

| 

Government Printing Office 

Interior Department 

Labor Department 

Register of Copyrights 

State Department 

Supsrintendent of Documents 

Surgeon General 

Treasury Department 

War Department 

University of California, Berkeley 

University of California, Agricultural Experiment Station. 

University of Chicago 

University of Illinois, Champaign , 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 



455 
1 



13 


1 

3 

7 
247 



251 m'ps 
194 



OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



53 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY CONCLUDED. 



FROM WHOM RECEIVED. 


f 


Pamphlets 


! 


University of the Stat? of New York, Albany 




10 




University of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y 




2 




University of Tennessee, Knoxville 






6 






1 








6 






I 


















2 




Weller Mrs E F ... 








Wells A R . 












3 












"Wilmington (Del) Institute Free Library 




1 






2 










c 




State Superintendent of Schools 




3 




Wisconsin State Historical Society .. .. 




2 




Wood B . 


1 






Wood H 


1 


1 










12 






2 













REPORT 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 



To the Honorable Jas. D. Phelan, Mayor ,' 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 



Dear Sir: In compliance with the provisions of Section 9, Article XVI, of the 
Charter, the Civil Service Commissioners have the honor to submit herewith a full 
report of all the operations of the Civil Service Department of the city government 
for the latter half of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1900. 

APPOINTMENT AND ORGANIZATION. 

By virtue of the authority vested in you by the Charter, and in compliance with 
the provisions of Section 1, Article XIII. thereof, on December 30, 1899, you ap- 
pointed as Civil Service Commissioners: P. H. McCarthy, to serve for one year; 
John E. Quinn, to serve for two years, and J. Richard Freud, to serve for three 
yeara The Commissioners formally organized en January 5, 1900, by the election 
of J. Richard Freud as President. On the same day it was dscided to inaugurate 
the merit system by holding on Monday. January 8, 1900, a competitive examina- 
tion for the position of Chief Examiner and Secretary of the Commission. This 
examination resulted in the selection of Mr. Edward F. Moran. 

INAUGURATION OF THE SYSTEM. 

Temporary offices ware secured in the basement of the City Hall, and appli- 
cation blanks were freely distributed. 

When the Commission opened the doors of its office at noon, January 8, 1900, 
the corridors of the City Hall were crowded with citizens,- many of whom had 
stood In line since dawn, awaiting the opportunity to enroll their names upon the 
laborers' register, or to secure the proper forms on which to make applications for 
examinations. From noon to 5 p. m., 621 laborers were registered, and hundreds 
of applications for examinations were issued. 

In this connection, the Commissioners take pleasure in commending to your 
Honor the public-spirited action of the Directors of the Merchants' Association, 
who, knowing that the Commission was, at that time, without clerical assistance, 
voluntarily gave the services of two of their own clerks, one of whom, a stenog- 



REPORT OP CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 55 

rapher, aided the Commission for three months. The Association also volunteered, 
whenever the Commission would so recommend, to contribute $500 to bring to this 
city from the East an expert on civil service affairs, so that the Commission might 
obtain the benefit of his experience. It was found unnecessary to accept this gen- 
erous offer, but in this instance, as in many others, the Merchants' Association 
displayed an unselfish interest in the city's welfare, and an earnest desire to lend 
its influence for the betterment of municipal conditions. Resolutions expressive of 
the gratitude of the Commissioners to tho Merchants' Association have been adopted 
and spread upon the minutes of the Commission. 

FORMULATING RULES AND CLASSIFICATION. 

Immediately after their organization, the Commissioners began to prepare for 
the important work of classifying (as directed in Section 2, Article XIII, of th 
Charter) all the places of employment In or under the offices and departments of 
the City and County, subject to their jurisdiction. To obtain practical knowledge 
of tha various places of employment, and the duties attaching to each, and also 
for the purpose of advising with the heads of departments, the Commissioner! 
visited every department mentioned in Section 2, Article XIII, of the Charter, and 
thoroughly examined into its system of operation. This required considerable 
time, and resulted, on February 5, 1900, in the adoption of the following classifica- 
tion of seven divisions and sixty-tight classes, as the Classified Civil Service: 



56 



REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



CLASSIFICATION 

FOR THE CLASSIFIED CIVIL SERVICE OF SAN FRANCISCO, ADOPTED BY THE 
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION, FEBRUARY 5, 1900. 



DTVISIOK. 


SERVICE. 


CLASS. 


NATUKE OF SERVICE. 


A 


Clerical 


Class I 


Copyists. 






II 


Stenographers and typewriters. 






III 


Ordinary clerks- 






IV ... 


Book-keepers. 






V 


Experienced clerks. 







VI 
VII 


Register clerks. 
Court-room clerks. 






VIII 


Office deputies. 






IX 


Secretaries. 


B 


Mechanical 


Class I 








II 








Ill 








IV 
V 
VI 


Tinners. 
Plumbers. 
Plasterers 






VII 
VIII 


Painters. 
Masons. 






IX 
X .. 


Machinists, 
Cabinet-makers 






XI 


Carpenters 


c 


Custodian 


Class I 


Janitors. 






II 
Ill 


Elevator-men. 
Messengers. 






IV 
V 
VI 


Hostlers. 
Teamsters. 
Matrons. 






VII 


Store-keepers. 






VIII 


Commissaries . 






IX 


Foremen. 






x 


Inspectors. 






XI 


Superintendent. 



REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



57 



CLASSIFICATION-CONTINUED. 



DIVISION. 


SERVICE. 


CLASS. 


NATURE OF SERVICE. 


D 




Class I 


Rodmen. 






11 








III 
IV 
V 
VI 
VII 
VIII 


Linemen. 
Repairers. 
Draftsmen. 
Architects. 
Surveyors. 






IX 
X 
XI 
XII 


Telegraph operators. 
Steam engineers. 
Electrical engineers. 
Civil engineers 






XIII .... 




B 


Medical 


Class I 


Health officers. 






II .... 


Sanitary inspectors 






III.. . 


Hospital employees. 






IV 

v 


Ambulance attendants. 
Nurses. 






VI 


Pharmacists. 






VII 


Chemists 






VIII 


Bacteriologists. 


F 


Police. 


Class I 


Guards. 






II 


Watchmen. 






Ill 


Van drivers. 






IV 


Jailors. 






v 


Bailiffs. 






VI 




(j 


Fire 


Class I .. 








II 
Ill 

IV 

i 


Hydrantmen. 
Truckmen. 
Tillermen. 



58 



REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



CLASSIFICATION CONTINUED. 



DIVISION. 


SERVICE 


CLASS. 


NATURE OF SERVICE. 


G (Continued) 


Fire 


Class V 


Stokers. 






VI 


Drivers. 






VII 








VIII 


Watchmen. 






IX 


Firemen. 






X 


Pilots. 











The Commissioners also adopted, and issued as Publication No. 1, a "Synopsis 
of the Charter Provisions Governing Appointment, Promotion and Removal In the 
Public Service of the City and County of San Francisco." It was published in an 
eight-page pamphlet, of which 10,000 copies were distributed. Publication No. 2, 
also an eight-page pamphlet, embracing the classification and general rules adopted 
by the Commission, was issued in an edition of 5,000 copies on February 9, 1900. 
This was followed on February 19, 1000, by a like edition of Publication No. 3, 
''General Regulations and Instructions to Applicants for Examinations to the Clas- 
sified Civil Service." Other publications of the Commission are Publication No. 4, 
"Rules for Marking Examination Papers of Copyists," issued March 14, 1900, and 
Publication No. 5, "Rules for Marking Examination Papers of Stenographer-Type- 
writers," Issued March 28, 1900. Copies of all of these publications are herewith 
attached. 



PREPARING FOR EXAMINATIONS. 

In the Intervals between the successive issuance of the first three publications, 
the Commissioners were preparing the many and various forms necessary for the 
proper administration of the office. To gain ideas on this most important subject, 
correspondence was entered into with all the cities of the United States which are 
operated under Civil Service laws, and with the United States Civil Serivca Com- 
mission at Washington, D. C. It was found that all other systems provided to a 
certain extent for the concealing of the identity of the applicant, pending the find- 
Ing on his examination, by marking his papers with a number. Owing, however, 
to the fact that the number thus marked was known to him, it was apparent that 
the possibilities of collusion between applicant and examiner were far greater than 
would be the case if the applicant did not know his number, and the identity of the 
papers was absolutely concealed until the final ratings had been made. The Com- 
missioners therefore applied themselves to the creation of a system whereby the 
identity of an applicant's papers would be absolutely concealed, which resulted in 
the present method of concealing identity, as briefly outlined in Regulation 4, 
Publication No. 3. This method has given great satisfaction, and has won com- 



REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 59 

mendation from all citizens who have inquired into the matter. During the recent 
visit to this city of Chief Examiner A. R. Serven, of the United States Civil 
Service Commission, who is a recognized authority on Civil Service affairs, he 
commended the system adopted by this Commission, and has since written for a 
complete exposition thereof. 

Few of the forms used by other cities were found suitable to our purposes, so 
that it was found necessary to devise nearly all the forms adopted by the Com- 
mission. These forms, eighteen in number, are as follows: 

* Form 1 Application for the position of laborer. 

Form 2 Application for examination to the Classified Civil Service. 

Form 3 Application for examination as policeman. 

Form 4 Request for certification of laborers. 

Form 5 Certification of laborers. 

Form 6 Laborers' notice of employment. 

Form 7 Report of employment of laborers. 

Form 8 Report of discharges of laborers. 

Form 9 Notification of examination. 

Form 10 Notice of eligibility. 

Form 11 Notice of ineligibility. 

Form 12 Request for certification. 

Form 13 Certification. 

Form 14 Notice of certification. 

Form 15 Report of employment. 

Form 16 Applications for promotion. Police Department. 

Form 17 Proof of knowledge of trade. 

Form 18 Prool of knowledge of occupation. 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS. 

Regulation 1, Publication 3, provides that "for each examination in the Classi- 
fied Civil Service, a Board of Examiners, composed of well-known citizens, shall 
be appointed by the Civil Service Commissioners." 

The endeavor to Interest prominent citizens in the work has been very success- 
ful. For the first examination, that of copyists, held March 14, 1900, the Commis- 
sioners were honored by the acceptance of appointments as members of the Board 
of Examiners of Frederick W. Dohrmann, Esq., President of the Merchants' Asso- 
ciation; the Hon. E. B. Pond, former Mayor of San Francisco, and the Hon. 
Charles W. Slack, former Superior Judge. These gentlemen met several times 
with the Commissioners, gave many valuable suggestions, witnessed the sealing 
of the questions, and assisted in the general supervision of the examination. 

At the examination of sewer cleaners, March 30, 1900, the Board of Examiners 
was composed of three practical mechanics Mr. W. F. Grotty, a bricklayer; Mr. 
W. J. McGowan, a plumber, and Mr. O. A. Tveitmoe, a cement-worker. They 
assisted in the examination, and rated the applicants upon the subject of "physical 
ability." 

The Board of Examiners for the examinations of stenographer-typewriters and 
Court stenographers, on April 2, 1900, was composed of the Hon. W. R. Dainger- 
fleld and the Hon Tohn Hunt, Superior Judges, and the Hon. A. C. Freeman, the 
well-known law-writer. The examination of Court stenographers was conducted 
entirely by the Board of Examiners. 

The Hon. J. V. Coffey, Superior Judge; the Hon. L. R. Ellert, former Mayor of 
San Francisco, and Charles Bunschu, Esq., a. Director of the Merchants' Associa- 
tion, acted as the Board of Examiners at the examination of ordinary clerks, June 
1C, 1900. They not only aided the Commissioners by offering timely suggestions 



60 REPORT OP CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 

before the examination, but gave careful supervision to the entire examination that 
was held in the various rooms of the Girls' High School, and subsequently in- 
spected all of the 436 sets of papers submitted. 

ASSISTANT EXAMINERS. 

It is the invariable rule in Eastern cities to employ experts at a certain per 
diem to perform the task of marking the examination papers of the applicants. 
As the Commission had no available funds, the public school teachers promptly 
volunteered to assist in marking the examination papers. With their assistance, 
the Commissioners were enabled to properly mark and rate all the papers submitted 
in each examination, with the exception of the one for ordinary clerks. Some idea 
of the magnitude of this work of marking papers may be gained when it is stated 
that, for the copyists' examination alone, it was necessary to carefully examine 
and properly mark 1,840 separate sheets, each of which was then gone over a sec- 
ond time to msxire accuracy in the ratings. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Examinations have been held at the office of the Commission and at the Girls' 
High School, corner of Geary and Scott streets. 

The schedule (Appendix "A") shows the date of each examination held by the 
Commission, the number of applications filed for each examination, the number of 
applicants examined, the number that passed and the number that failed, as well 
as the percentage of ineligibles. 

LITIGATION. 

No sooner had the re&ults of the work of the Commission become evident by the 
certification of eligibles for appointment, than endeavors were made to estop fur- 
ther operations by litigation. Three suits were instituted in the Superior Court, in 
all of which the legal powers of the Commission were tested in some degree. Ths 
first of these suits, that of Farrcll vs. Godcha.ux, filed April 6, 1000, was an action 
by a copyist who had been dismissed by the Recorder, upon the appointment by 
the latter of eligibles certified from the Civil Service lists, to recover from the 
Recorder a small sum for work performed aftor the termination of the temporary 
period for which the plaintiff, with other temporary appointees, had been appointed 
by and with the consent of the Commission. This case was disposed of without 
much difficulty. Next in importance was the case of Cahen vs. Wells, as Auditor, 
also filed April 6, 1900, an action in injunction, in which it was alleged that the pay- 
ment of the salaries of the Commissioners and the Chief Examiner was unnecessary 
and illega^ and in violation of the State Constitution. Upon this complaint, the 
Superior Court enjoined the Auditor from auditing the salaries of the Commission- 
ers and the Chief Examiner. 

The withholding of the salaries, however, did not stop the work of the Com- 
mission. On May 3, 1900, an examination for ordinary clerks was set for May 25, 
1900. Before the latter date, and for the purpose of preventing the examination 
being held, a third action was directed against the Commission. This was the suit 
of Bauer vs. Quinn et a!., all the Commissioners being named as defendants, filed 
May 14, 1900. Upon the complaint in this case, Superior Judge Carroll Cook issued 
an order restraining the Commissioners from proceeding with any further examin- 
ations. This order caused the postponement of the examination for ordinary 
clerks, and effectually stopped any further progress by the Commissioners for the 
time being. 

Through the public-spirited grenerosity of your Honor, Mr. Garret McEnerney 



REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 61 

was engaged as special counsel to assist the Hon. Franklin K. Lane, City Attor- 
neyr and the Hon. G. W. Lane, Assistant City Attorney, In representing the Com- 
mission. The cases of Bauer vs. Quinn and Cahen vs. Wells were heard together 
before Judge Cook on Monday, May 2S, 1900. After very elaborate arguments on 
both sides, the cases were submitted. The Court, without leaving the bench, sus- 
tained the demurrers in both cases, dissolved the restraining order, and denied the 
injunction. The attorney for the plaintiff in both cases has sines given notice of 
appeal to the Supreme Court. 

RESULTS SATISFACTORY. 

That the- practical results of the merit system, as evidenced in the work of the 
applicants appointed from tha eligible li&ts, are eminently satisfactory to heads of 
departments, is shown by the following letters received by the Commissioners from 
the Recorder, the County Clerk, the Registrar and the Board of Public Works, 
which we take pleasure in submitting to your Honor: 



" Recorder's Office, City and County of San Francisco, 

"Hall of Records, San Francisco, July 21, 1900. 

" To the Honorable the Civil Service Commission 

" Gentlemen: With reference to the work in my department during the past 
fiscal year, I have the honor to call to your recollection that on April 3d last I 
accepted twenty-one copyists certified to me by your Honorable Body from the 
eligible list of those who had successfully passed the examination held, the month 
previous. During the three months that remained of the fiscal year the work done 
by the Civil Service copyists was, on the whole, highly satisfactory. * * * 
" I am, gentlemen, your obedient servant, 

" EDMOND GODCHAUX, Recorder. 
"By, Fred S. Myrtle, Chief Deputy." 

"Office of tha County Clerk, 
" City Hall, San Francisco, Cal., July 21, 1900. 

" To the Honorable, the Board of Civil Service Commissioners, City and County 
of San Francisco 

"Gentlemen: As per your request for my approval or disapproval of the 
copyists recently certified to me by your Honorable Board undar the rules of Civil 
Service, I would state: 

" That I find all of said copyists efficient, and thoroughly capable of filling 
the positions allotted them In my office, and that their work is fully satisfactory 
to me. Respectfully, WM. A. DEANE, 

" County Clerk and Ex-Officio Clerk of the Superior Court." 

" Department of Public Works, 
" City Hall, San Francisco, Cal., July 30, 1900. 

" To the Honorable, the Civil Service Commission of the City and County of San 
Francisco 

" Sirs: This Board has obtained through the channels prescribed by the 
Charter, Laborers, Stenographers and Clerks, and daslres to state that the em- 
ployees thus obtained have, in general, proved trustworthy and efficient. 

" Very respectfully, " BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS, 

"By J. Lao Park, Secretary." 



62 REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 

" Office of the Registrar of Voters, 
" City Hall, San Francisco, July 23, 1900. 

*' To the Honorable Board of Civil Service Commissioners 

" Gentlemen: I take pleasure in informing your Honorable Board that the 
Typawriters and Ordinary Clerks that have been certified to by your Commission 
for service in this department are giving entire satisfaction, and I believe that 
the merit system will tend to improve the efficiency of this department. Yours 
respectfully, " BOARD OF ELECTION COMMISSIONERS, 

" Thos. J. Walsh, Registrar." 



We also take pleasure in submitting the following extracts from the report 
of the Committee on Civil Service of the late Grand Jury: 

" San Francisco, Cal., May 31, 1900. 
" To the Honorable, the Grand Jury of the City and County of San Francisco 

" Gsntlemen: Tour committee on Mayor, Civil Service and Board of Super- 
visors, after a most thorough investigation into these different departments, beg 
leave to submit the following report: 

' Several visits were made to the olhce of the Civil Ssrvice Commission, where 
we found everything running very smoothly and conducted in a strictly honest 
and honorable manner, and according to the law laid down by the Charter. 

" The method of examination used by the Board of Civil Service Commis- 
sioners is a very fair and honest system, it being utterly impossible to show par- 
tiality to any one taking these examinations. The examinations have not pro- 
gressed as rapidly as possible from the fact that it is a nawly created office, and 
requires considerable time to adopt rules and regulations in classifying the dif- 
ferent positions of the departments and also in making up examination papers. 
Respectfully submitted, 

[Signed] " E, H. PARRISH, 

" W. F. AMBROSE, 
"A. J. VANDER WHITE." 



CLERICAL, WORK. 

The Commission is assisted in its work by the Chief Examiner, who is also 
the Secretary, one clerk and a stenographer. Besides the minut2-book, the fol- 
lowing books ars kept by the Commission: 

1. LABORERS' BOOK OF REGISTRATION, containing the names and ad- 
dresses of registered laborers, their registration numbers, dates of registration 
and appointment, department assigned to, and all information pertaining to 
laborers. 

2. TEMPORARY APPOINTMENT BOOK, containing a list of all temporary 
(emergency) appointments mode by the heads of departments (not exceeding 
sixty days), and eriving tha surnames, Christian names in full, department, posi- 
tion, date, salary, term and necessity of action. 

3. PROBATIONAL APPOINTMENT BOOK, containing a list of all proba- 
tional appointments, and giving the surname, Christian name in full, rank, de- 
partment, position, date and salary of each probational appointee. 



REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 63 

4. PERMANENT APPOINTMENT BOOK, containing a list of all permanent 
appointments made upon the expiration of the probationary period of six months, 
and giving the surname, Christian name in full, rank, department, position, date 
and salary of each appointee. 

5. BOOK OF SEPARATIONS, containing a list of all transfers, removals, 
resignations and deaths in the classified civil service, and giving the surname, 
Christian name 5n full, date, department, position, salary and remarks in each 
case. 

6. CERTIFICATION BOOK, containing a copy of all certifications made to 
heads <-f departments and a record of the appointments made therefrom; .also, 
giving the dates, salaries, and all special information in reference to the cer- 
tifications and appointments. 

7. GENERAL APPOINTMENT BOOK, containing a list of all appointments 
under the city government, civil service or otherwise, giving date of appointment, 
name, position, office and by whom appointed. 

8. BOOK OF INEI.1GIBL-ES, containing a list of all applicants who have 
failed in examinations, and are barred by the rules from further examinations 
for six months. 

9. BOOK OF ELIGIBLES, showing the eligible list in each class, with rank, 
percentages, date of examination, and date on which the lists expire by limita- 
tion of two years. 

Every applicant for an examination is sent an official notice which is his 
credential, and without which he is not admitted to the examination. These 
notices, the special instructions to applicants, and the examination questions are 
printed by the office force of the Commission. 

Besides being recorded in the certification book, all certifications of eUgibles 
are made in duplicate, the latter being filed with the papers of the applicant ap- 
pointed from the certificate. A satisfactory filing system has been established, 
by which one may ascertain In a moment the complete record of any applicant. 

From January 8, 1900, to June 30, 1900, the applications for examinations to 
the Classified Civil Service filed in this office numbered 3,531. Each of these ap- 
plications bears the signatures of three citizens, who testify to the applicant's 
good moral character, temperate and industrious habits and fitness for the service 
he wishes to entir. It appears, therefore, that including the applicant, four 
citizens are directly interested to a greater or less degree in each application. 
Thus, 14,124 citizens are directly interested in the classified applications on file. 
Adding to this number the 2,600 who have registered as laborers and filed appli- 
cations, we have a grand total of 16,724 citizens who have shown active interest 
in the operation of the merit system during the past six months. 

The number of applications received for each class in the Classified Civil 
Service up to June 30, 1900, is as follows: 



64 



REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



NUMBER OF APPLICATIONS RECEIVED. 



DIVISION A CLERICAL SERVICE 

Class l-Copyists 

II Stenographers, typewriters , 

III Ordinary clerks 

IV Bookkeepers 

V Experienced clerks 

VI Register clerks 

VII Court-room clerks 

VIII Office deputies 

IX Secretaries 

DIVISION B MECHANICAL SERVICE 

Class I Sewer cleaners 

II Brieklayers 

Ill Cement pavers 

IV Tinners 

V Plumbers 

VI Plasterers 

Vll-Painters 

VIII-Masons 

IX Machinists 

X Cabinet-makers 

XI Carpenters 



DIVISION C CUSTODIAN SERVICE 

Class I Janitors 

II Elevator-man 

Ill Messengers 

IV Hostlers 

V Teamsters . . . 



575 



136 
45 
31 
96 



128 

39 

91 

16 

40 

15 

95 

2 

9 

3 

141 



378 
20 

25 




DIVISION C Continued. 

Class VI -Matrons 

VII Storekeepers 

VIII Commissaries 

IX Foreman 

X Inspectors 

XI Superintendents 

DIVISION D ENGINEERING SERVICE- 

Class I Rodmen.. 

II Chainmen. . , 

Ill Linemen 

IV Repairers 

V Draftsman 

VI Architects 

VII Surveyors 

VIII Telegraph inspectors. 
IX Telegraph operators. . 

X Steam engineers 

XI Electrical engineers. . 

XII Civil engineers 

XIII Mechanical engineers 

DIVISION E MEDICAL SERVICE. 

Class I Health Officers 

II Sanitary Inspectors. . 
Ill Hospital employee* . . 

IV Nurses 

V Pharmacists 

VI Chemists 

VII- Bacteriologists 



REPORT OP CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 65 

NUMBER OF APPLICATIONS RECEIVED CONTINUED. 





NUMBER. 




NUMBER. 








50 




45 






II Watchmen 


61 


Total 


3,531 


III Van drivers 
IV- Jailers 


17 
14 


Laborers' applications 


2,603 










V Bailiffs 


29 










Grand total 


6,134 




198 















RULES AND PRECEDENTS. 

Since the issuance of Publications 2 and 3, the Commission has found it neces- 
sary to establish several new rules and precedents, copies of which follow: 

EXAMINATION OF ELJGIBLES. 

Applicants upon an eligible list may take other examinations. Minutes of 
May 9, 1900. 

Applicants appointed from the eligible lists may take an examination for a 
higher class, but they shall not be permitted to hold place upon more than one 
eligible list at the same time. Their refusal to accept appointment from the 
eligible list of the class higher than that in which they are employed shall, of 
itself, forfeit their places upon such eligible list. Minutes of June 11, 1900. 

Applicants upon one eligibls list may take subsequent examinations, and re- 
main on one other eligible list until certified and appointed. Their acceptances 
of appointment shall cancel their places upon all eligible lists. Minutes of July 
16, 1900. 

TEMPORARY APPOINTMENTS. 

The period for temporary appointments in departments under the jurisdiction 
of the Civil Service Commissioners shall not exceed thirty days, and in any and 
all events shall continue only until regular appointments, in accordance with the 
provisions of the Civil Service article of this Charter, can ba made. Minutes of 
April 9, 1900. 

INSUFFICIENT SALARY. 

Whenever an applicant on an eligible list refuses an appointment on the 
ground of the insufficiency of the salary attached to the position, ha shall be 
placed at the foot of the eligible list. Minutes of June 11, 1900. 

IDENTIFICATION MARKS. 

Any competitor who places his name or a distinguishing mark upon the ex- 
amination paper will be excluded from the eligible list. Regulation 5. 

6 / 



66 



REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



The address of the applicant, or any address, written upon the examination 
paper, shall be considered a mark of identification. A fictitious name, signed to 
an examination paper, shall be considered a mark of identification. Reference to 
firms or individuals in examination papers shall be considered marks of identi- 
fication. Minutes of July 5, 1900. 

APPLICANTS TAKEN SICK. 

Applicants who are taken sick during examinations, and who, with the knowl- 
edge and consent of the Commissioners, retire for that reason, may withdraw 
their papers without prejudice, if petition to that effect is made by them bofore 
the publication of the results of the examination. Minutes of July 9, 1900. 

EXPENSE ACCOUNT. 

The expense of the Civil Service Commission for stationery and printing since 
January 8, 1900, has amounted to $1,021 92. Other expenses incidental to ex- 
aminations and the office amounted to $192 15. The total expense for the past six 
months has been as follows: 



SALARIES. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Commissioners 
Chief Examiner 


$1,800 00 
1,200 00 




Clerk . . 


600 00 




Stenographer 


375 00 










Stationery 


$1,021 92 


$3,975 00 


Deduct value of stock on hand (See Appendix C) 


350 00 


671 92 


Miscellaneous 


$192 15 














192 15 


Total. . . 




$4 839 67 









The stationery account includes a typewriter, cost $93; a neostyle machine, 
cost $50; the cost of issuing over 20,000 copies of the Commissioner's publications; 
ths cost of printing many thousands of application blanks and forms of the Con- 
mission; the manufacture of the necessary record books for the office; the printing 
of the examination papers; furnishing ink, pens and blotters for 1,054 examined 
applicants; 5,000 postage stamps; office paper, envelopes and all the many inci- 
dentals necessary for the establishment of a very important branch of the city 
government. 



REPORT OP CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



67 



This review of the work of the Commission for the past six months cannot be 
better concluded than by submitting to your Honor a list of the Civil Service ap- 
pointees, numbering 180, now employed in various departments of the city gov- 
ernment, as shown in Appendix " B." 
Respectfully submitted, 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 
P. H. M' GARTH Y, 
JNO. E. QUINN, 
J. RICHARD FREUD, President. 
E. P. MORAN, Chief Examiner and Secretary. 
San Francisco, CaL, July 23, 1900. 



APPENDIX A REPORT OP CIVIL SERVICE 
COMMISSIONERS. 



EXAMINATION. 


DATE. 


Applicants. . . 


Examined . . . 


a. 


2 

I 


Percentage 
Failed .... 


Appointed .. 


Copyist ... 


March 14, 1900 


575 


460 


181 


279 


60.65 


36 


Sewer cleaner. 


March 30 1900 


128 


115 


94 


21 


18.26 


14 


Stenog-Typo 


April 2 1900 


5 


36 


16 


20 


55.55 


5 


Court Stenographer 


April 2, 1900 


8 


7 


5 


2 


28.67 


4 


Ordinary clerk. 


June 15, 1900 


686 


436 


152 


284 


65.13 


92 



















5 

1,054 

443 

60 

Percentage of failures.. 57.49 

Eligibles employed * 51 

Laborers employed 89 



Examinations held. . . 
Applicants examined. . 

Applicants passed 

Applicants failed. 



68 REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 

APPENDIX B CIVIL SERVICE APPOINTMENTS. 

COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE. 



POSITION. 


NAME. 


SALARY. 


DATE 1900. 


Copyist 


John C Flood 


$100 00 


March 10 


Copyist 




100 00 


Anril *> 


Copyist 


Leo Dfl Cardona 


100 00 


April 5 


Cspyist 




100 00 


April 5 


Copyist 


Edwin K. Zion 


100 00 


April 5 


Copyist... 


* Joseph P. Hayea 


100 00 


April 6 


Copyist 


Carl F. Jacobson . . . 


100 00 


April 5 


Copyist 


* Joseph F O'Beirne 


100 00 


April 5 


Copyist 


Albert Goodman 


100 00 


April 5 


Copyist 


Martin H. Waterman 


100 00 


April 5 


Copyist 


Martin W. Fleming 


100 00 


April 6 


Copvist 


Frank Crowe. 


100 00 




Copyist 


JGuy W. Hassler .... 


100 00 




Copyist 


tC. H. North up .... 


100 00 


June 1 


Copyist 


Isadore Earb 


100 00 


June 1. 


Copvist 


Mary Willis 


100 00 


June 1. 


Copyist 


Edward M. O'Reilly 


100 00 


June 1. 


Copvist 


Philip Ilirleman 


100 00 


June 1 











* Transferred to Recorder's office. t Declined position. 

RECORDER'S OFFICE. 



J Failed to respond. 



POSITION. 


NAME. 


SALARY 
PUR FOLIO. 


DATK 1900. 




Mark Bartlett 


$0 08 


April 3. 


Coovist 


Charles A. Sandegren 


08 


April 4. 


Copyist 


*William J Wilson 


08 


April 4 




tJohn F Williams 


08 


April 4. 











Declined position. 



Transferred to County Clerk. 



REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



APPENDIX B APPOINTMENTS RECORDER'S OFFICE- COKTJMJKD. 



POSITION. 


NAME. 


SALARY 
PER FOLIO. 


DATK 1900. 


Copyist 


*W. H. Smith, Jr 


$0 08 


April 4 


Copyist 


Benjamin P. Wilson 


08 


April 4 


Copyist 


Edward L. O'Connor 


08 


April 4 


Cop\ ist 


Edwin Lewis 


08 


April 4 


Copyist 


Charles Cosgrave 


08 


April 4, 


Copyist 


E J Sullivan 


08 


April 4 


Copyist 


Edwin L. Clapp 


08 


April 5- 


Copyist. 


Otto E. A. Schmidt .... ... 


08 


April 5. 


Copyist 


Reuben Kalisky. . . 


08 


April 6 


Copyist 


Ernest Hewsou. 


08 


April 6 


Copyist 


Robert J Elaine , . 


08 


April 6. 


Copyist 
Copyist 


Louis A. Lacay 
John F Hennessey 


08 
08 


April 6. 
April 5 


Copviat. ... 


Frank H Urmy 


Ob 


April 5. 


Copyist. .... 




08 


April 6, 


Copyist . . 




08 


April 5. 


Copyist 


Edwin T Darbey 


08 


April 5 


Copyist 


Fred J. Fleishman 


08 


April 5 











Transferred to County Clerk. 



t Resigned. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



POSITION. 


NAME. 


SALARY 
PER DAT. 


DATK-190a 


Laborers 
Laborers 


1. P.T.Kelly.. 
2. Philip Murphy 


$2 50 

2 50 


February 1, 
February I. 


Laborers 


3. John Couhlan . . . . 


2 50 


February 1. 


Laborers 


4 Stephen Edmonds 


2 50 


February 1. 











70 



REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



EXHIBIT B APPOINTMENTS TO BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS CONTINUED. 



POSITION. 


NAME. 


SALARY 
PR DAY. 


DATE 1900. 


Laborers . 


6. Patrick J. O'Shea. . 


$2 50 


February 1 




6. Joseph C. Young . . . 


2 50 






7. John C O'Neill 


2 50 




Laborers 


8. James A. Hughes 


2 50 


February 1 


Laborers 


9. Edwin B. Robinson 


2 50 


February \ 




10. Francis Moran 


2 50 


February 1 




11. Charles J. Regan 


2 50 


February 1. 




1?. William . Brodie. 


2 60 


February 1 




13. Ferd N Bruhns 


2 50 






14 Lawrence Kelly 


2 50 






15. John E. Flaherty 


2 50 


February 1. 


Laborers 


16. James F. McCourt 


2 50 


February 1 




17. John W. Ryan . . . 


2 50 


February 7. 




18. Gilbert Whitaker 


2 50 






19 WillittF Brady. 


2 50 




Laborers 


20. Matthew McHugh 


2 50 


February 7. 


Laborers 


21. Patrick Lehaney 


2 50 


February 7. 


Laborers 


22. James M. McCarthy 


2 50 


February 7. 


Laborers 


23. Patrick Murphy. 


2 50 


February 7. 


Laborers 


24 Thomas J O'Connor 


2 50 


February 7 


Laborers 


25. John H. Maguire 


2 50 


February 7. 


Laborers . 


26. Edward D. Whelan 


2 50 


February 7. 


Laborers 




2 50 


February 7. 


Laborers 


28. Thomas J. Lowe 


2 50 


February 7. 


Laborers 


29. Timothy O'Connor ... .... 


2 50 


February 7, 




30. Michael Toland 


2 50 


February 7. 




31. Peter F Grennan. . . . 


2 50 


February 7. 




32 Edward P Waaon 


2 50 


February 7. 




33 Jeremiah Hanley . . 


2 50 


Februar}' 7. 











REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



71 



APPENDIX B- APPOINTMENTS TO BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS-CONTINUED. 



POSITION. 


NAMK. 


SALARY 
PER DAT. 


DATB 1900. 


Laborers 


34. Herman Armer 


$2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
.. 4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
90 00 
60 00 


February 7. 
February 7. 
February 7. 
February 7. 
February 7. 
February 7. 
May 10. 
May 10. 
May 10. 
May 10. 
May 10. 
May 10. 
May 10. 
May 10. 
May 10. 
May 10. . 
May 14. 
May 14. 
May 14. 
May 14. 
May 14. 
May 14. 
May 16. 
May 18. 
June 4. 
July 17. 
July 17. 
May 15. 
June 5. 




35. Matthew Ryan 




36. William Fisher .... 




37. William Bernard 




38 Patrick Murphy 




39 Michael Kavanagh 


Sewer cleaner 


James J. Flaherty 


Sewer cleaner 


Charles Gardella 


*Charles I. Ford 




Timothy Creedon 




*David Sullivan 


Sewer cleaner 


*Michael Quinn 


Thomas E Kenny 




Henry J Daley 




"William J Clare 


Sewer cleaner^ 
Sewer cleaner 


* James Murpky ...... 


Timothy B. Shea 


Sewer cleaner 


John F. McMurray 


Sewer cleaner 


Michael V. Duddy 
Cornelius B Gary 




John W. Madden 




tH J Jackson .. .... 




Lawrence Curtis 


Sewer cleaner 


James Murtha 


Edward M Higgins 




James Hunter 




Henry Cauley 


Stenographer-typewriter 
Stenographer-typewriter 


JWilliam C Keogh . 


tJMiss Maud Powell 





* Discharged. 



t Declined. 



t Per month. 



72 



REPORT OP CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



EXHIBIT B- APPOINTMENTS TO BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS-CONCLUDED. 







SALARY 




POSITION. 


NAME. 




DATE -1900. 






PER MONTH. 




Stenographer-typewriter 


*Miss Clara E. Johnson 


$60 00 


June 9 


Stenographer-typewriter 


Miss Ma E. Sullivan 


60 00 


June 9. 




Miss Alice B Code 


60 00 


July 1 


Clerk-Stenographer 


Alex. D. D'Ancona 


100 00 


July 1. 



* Declined. 



CORONER'S OFFICE. 



POSITION. 


NAME. 


SALARY 
PER MONTH. 


DATE -1900. 


Court Stenographer . . . 


Emil Pohli 


$150 00 


May 15th. 











POLICE COURT. 



POSITION. 


NAME. 


SALARY 
PHR MONTH. 


DATE 1900. 


Court Stenographer . 


Daniel W. Long. 


$200 00 


June 9. 




Frank Vernon 


200 00 


June 9. 




Edward Vernon 


200 00 


June 9. 











REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



73 



ELECTION COMMISSION. 



POSITION. 


KAMI. 


SALARY 

IPBR MOUTH. 


DATE -1900. 


Stenographer-typewriter 


Miss Agnes Kendrick 


$75 00 


June 20. 


Stenographer-typewriter 


Miss Alma A. Kaerth 


75 00 


July 1. 


Ordinary clerk 


T Philip O'Brien 


100 00 


July 9. 


Ordinary clerk 


Frederick Head . 


100 to 


July 9. 

17 


Ordinary clrek 




100 00 


July 9. 




*Patrick H Barrett 


100 00 


Julv9. 




Daniel J McCarthy 


190 00 


July 9. 






100 00 


July 9. 






100 00 


July 9. 






100 00 


July 9. 






100 00 


July 9. 




Ralph W Bliven 


100 00 


July 9. 




Richard J Cline 


100 00 


July 9. 




Charles A Sankey . . . 


100 09 


July 9. 




Humphrey B. Moj'nihan 


100 00 


July 9. 






100 00 


July 9. 






10 00 


July 9. 






100 00 


July 9. 




DEW Williamson 


100 00 


July 9. 






100 00 


July 9. 


Ordinary clerk 




100 00 


July 9. 


Ordinary clerk 




100 00 


July 9. 


Ordinary clerk ...... 




100 00 


July 9. 




tFrank E Madden 


100 00 


July 9. 


Ordinary clerk 




100 00 


July 9. 


Ordinary clerk 


*George W Nickell 


100 00 


July 9. 




William N Swasey 


100 00 


July 9. 




Frederick L. Ruddock 


100 00 


Julv 9. 






100 00 


July 11. 











* Declined. 



f Discharged. 



REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



ELECTION COMMISSION CONTINUED. 



POSITION. 


NAME. 


SALARY 
PER MONTH. 


DATE 1900. 


Ordinary clerk 


Charles B. Higgins. ..... 


$100 00 


July 10 


Ordinary clerk 


Camillo A. Pistolesi 


100 00 


July 10 


Ordinary clerk 


Robert A Miller 


100 00 


July 10 




Oscar L Tuttle 


100 00 


July 10 


Ordinary clerk 


*John A Iloss 


100 00 


July 10 


Ordinary clerk 


*Edwin B Tripp 


100 00 


July 10 


Ordinary clerk 


A. W. Myer 


100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 


James A Douglass . ... 


100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 


Charles H Dodge 


100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 


William G Abtonovich 


100 00 


July 10 


Ordinary clerk 


Frank J Burke 


100 00 


July 10 


Ordinary clerk 


Richard Garvey 


100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 
Ordinary clerk 


Edward B. O'Connor 
George E. Giblin 


100 00 
100 00 


July 10. 
July 10. 






100 00 


July 10 


Or Unary clerk 


James F Pressley 


100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 




100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 


Eugene W Hawley ... . 


100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 




100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 


Isaiah M Silver 


100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary alerk 




100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 




100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 


John D Cuneo 


100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 


Daniel S Curran . ... 


.100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 


William "** Kearns .... 


100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 


Francis E. Kane 


100 00 


July 10. 




Albert E Wheeler 


100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinary clerk 


James T Donahue .... 


100 00 


July 10. 




i William F Brechtel ... 


100 00 


Julv 10. 











Declined. 



t Discharged. 



t Suspended. 



REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



75 



ELECTION COMMISSION CONCLUDED. 



POSITION. 


s 

NAME. 


SALARY 
PBR MONTH. 


DATE 1900. 




Frank Kitz 


100 00 


July 10. 




Edw T Russell 


100 00 


July 10. 




William N Elfendahl 


100 00 


July 10. 




Frederick H. Stable 


100 00 


July 10. 




William G Karpe 


100 00 


July 10. 




John Hannan 


100 00 


July 10. 


Ordinar} 7 clerk . . . 


William F. Harris 


100 00 


July 10 




Allen H Browne. 


100 00 


July 10. 




Clarence K Harman 


100 00 


July 10. 




Allan A Garner 


100 00 


July 10. 




Frank Rittigstein 


100 00 


July 10. 






100 00 


July 11. 






100 00 


July 12. 


y 


Harry E Styles .... .... 


100 00 


July 16. 


Ordinary clerk , 


Edward J. Smith , 
*Joseph Kelly 


100 00 

100 00 


July 16. 
July 16. 


" 


John M Miller 


100 00 


July 14 




Alexander Dijeau 


100 00 


July 16. 


3 


Philip T. O'Brien 


100 00 


July 14. 


7 


Parker W. Jones 


100 00 


July 19. 











Declined. 



AUDITOB'S OFFICE. 



POSITION. 


NAME. 


SALAKY 
PER MONTH. 


DATR 1900 




Josephine H Weed. 


$100 00 


July 17. 




Annie Van Nostrand 


100 00 


JulT 17. 











REPORT OP CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



AUDITOR'S OFFICE COKTINUBD. 



POSITION. 


KAMI. 


SALARY 
PBR MONTH. 


DATB 1000. 


Ordinary clerk 




$100 00 


July 17 


Ordinary clerk 


Elizabeth C Kane 


100 00 


July 17 






100 00 


July 17 




Frank E. Metcalf 


100 00 


Jnly 17 


Ordinary clerk . .... 


Philip Me Aiian v . 


100 00 


July 17 


Ordinary clerk 


Charles H Squires . 


100 00 


July 17 


Ordinary clerk 


William J Riley 


100 00 


July 17 






100 00 


July 17 




Sarah M Kane 


100 00 


July 17 






100 00 


Ju'y 17 




Thomas M Welch 


100 00 


July 17 


Ordinary clerk 


William J S Powers 


100 00 


July 17 


Ordinary clerk 


Henry A Sloss 


100 00 


July 17 




George Miller 


100 00 


July 17 




Edw M Eowland 


100 00 


July 17 




John White 


100 00 


July 17 




Michael Ryan 


100 00 


July 17 




George H Sullivan 


100 00 


July 17 






100 00 


July 17 






100 00 


July 17 




Albert A Peterson . . 


100 00 


July 17 






100 00 


July 17 






100 00 


July 17 




Oscar Waibel 


109 00 


July 17 


Ordin&rv clerk 


Andrew J. Ford. . 


100 00 


July 17. 






100 00 


July 17 






100 00 


July 17. 




James A. Code 


100 00 


July 17. 






100 00 


July 17 * 











REPORT OP CIVfL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



77 



AUDITOR'S OFFICE- CONTINUED. 



POSITION. 


NAMS. 


SALARY 
PBR MONTH. 


DATB-1900. 




Charles H Coffey 


$100 00 


July 17, 




Otto F Tiessuri 


100 00 


July 17. 




Kat 3 Q. McElwee 


100 00 


July 23. 




Alfred L. Morgenstern 


100 00 


July 23. 




Mary A. Connolly 


100 00 


July 23. 




Charles H. Meese 


100 00 


July 23. 




Hugh H. Hay. 


100 00 


July 23. 


Ordinary clerk 


John Shields 


100 00 


July 23. 


Ordinary clerk 


Howard T. Hay 


100 00 


July 23. 



APPENDIX "C" FORMS. 

No. 1. 1,600 Application Blanks (Laborer). 

No. 2. 2,100 Application Blanks (Classified). 

No. 3. 2,200 Application Blanks (Police). 

No. 9. 2,500 Applicants' Credentials. 

No. 10. 2,300 Notices of Eligibility. 

No. 11. 1,700 Notices of Ineligibility. 

No. 12. 800 Request for Certification. 

No. 13. 500 Certifications. 

No. 15. 800 Report of Employment. 

300 Temporary Appointment Blanks. 

900 Laborers' Work Cards. 

600 Examiners' Credentials. 

400 Assistant Examinsrs' Credentials. 



PUBLICATIONS. 



No. 1. 1,700 Pamphlets. 

No. 2. 2,000 Pamphlns. 

No. 3. 1,700 Pamphlets. 

No. 4. 400 Pamphlets. 

No. 5. 100 Pamphlets. 



ENVELOPES. 



Globe 50 Reversible. 

083-0 2,000 White (Printed). 

xx-9 2,000 White (Printed). 
xxx-10 250 White (Plain). 



78 



REPORT OP CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

B. 22. 22 boxes Flat Fasteners. 

Bankers, One-third dozen Sticks Sealing Wax. 

28 One-half dozen Paper Files. 

Shannon, One-half dozsn Cabinet Letter Files. 
Shannon, One dozan Cabinet Binding Cases. 

Four lamps. 

Fifty wire trays. 

One eras radiator and tube. 

Five strong-boxes. 

One official seal. 

One stamp box. 

One numlering machine. 

One challenge eyelet press. 

One stancil. 

Six erlass ink-wells. 

Two boxes rubber type. 

Ona Rem. Sho. Typewriter and table. 

One neostyle printing machine. 

Fifteen large signs for examination hall. 

Ten record books, as set forth in the report. 



RECORDER'S REPORT. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: In accordance with the provisions of Article XVI, Section 9, of the 
Charter of the City and County of San Franclso, I herewith submit to you my 
report of the work of my department during the fiscal year 1899-1900. 

My report is submitted in two sections, the one covering: the period from July 
1, 1899, to January 8, 1900, under the administration of Recorder A. C. Earthier, 
the other embracing the business of the department from January 8 to June 30, 
1900, inclusive, being the first six months of my term of office. 

The rsport upon the first six months of the fiscal year shows receipts $18,422 05, 
against disbursements $24,021 63, giving a net loss of $5,599 58. The report upon 
the second half of the fiscal year shows receipts $19,029, against disbursements 
$15,703 59, thus realizing a profit to the city of $3,325 41. 

Although upon the whole fiscal year 1899-1900 there is a net loss of $2,274 17, it 
will be seen that my administration is in no wise to blame for this. In fact, 
should the business of tha department be conducted in the future as It has been 
for th3 past six months, the department would prove more than self-sustaining. 
Such a condition of affairs has not existed since the fiscal year 1895-96, in which, 
as in all previous years, the fees charged for recording instruments were much 
larger than now, owing to recent amendments in the statutes governing fees. 

Embodied in this report is a recapitulation of the receipts, expenditures and 
business of this department since its inception. 

Following the provisions of the City and County Charter, which went into effect 
January 8, 1900, two important changes have been made in the conduct of my de- 
partment: 

First, the numbering system. All documents presented for record are now 
numbered consecutively, whereas in former years they were put aside In pigeon- 
holes labeled with the initial letters of the names of the grantees. By the new 
method documents are more easily traced, each receipt, which must be given up 
before a document is returned to the owner, bearing a number corresponding with 
that of the document itself. The advantage of such a system to the community 
at large will be apparent. 

The second innovation is that of Civil Service. On the 3d day of April last, 
acting under instructions from your Honor and the Civil Service Commission, I 
discharged one and all the copyists appointed by myself at the outset of my ad- 
ministration and substituted for them a like numtfer of men certified to me by the 
Civil Service Commission from the eligible list of candidates successful at the pre- 
ceding examination. Under the authority vested in me by the Charter, I refused 
to accept any but male copyists. I have only to say that the work of the copyists 
sent me by the Civil Service Commission has been, on the whole, highly satisfac- 
tory. It remains now for time to show whether the Civil Service system as applied 
to a municipal department will in the end prove superior to the former system by 



80 



RECORDER'S REPORT. 



which the head of each department of the city government had the right to select 
his own employees. 

It may not be out of place to here call attention, as has often been done in the 
past, to the wretched condition of the Hall of Records. Nothing has been done in 
the way of repairs since the hall was built, more than a score of years ago. The 
columns are crumbling to pieces; the covers of the books of record, of inestimable 
value to the property owners in this city, are sadly dilapidated. It has been rep- 
resanted that to put the whole in proper condtion would cost a large amount of 
money. In my humble judgment, to delay this very necessary work is an error 
of false economy. Sooner or later, the work of renovation must be undertaken; 
otherwise, the Hall of Records will be a lasting disgrace to the community, and 
this is particularly noticeable at a time when steps are being taken for the im- 
provement of the city in various directions at a contemplated cost beside which 
the expense of refitting this most important department sinks into insignificance. 

In addition, the heating apparatus is worn out and useless. I dread the ap- 
proach of winter, bearing in mind the experience of the winter of 1899-1900, during 
which time I lost two employess of my department, their death having certainly 
been hastened, if not primarily occasioned, by the extreme cold. 

I earnestly trust that the day is not far distant when the Hall of Records shall 
be an objsct of pride to the city, and when the City and County Recorder shall be 
enabled to pursue his duties in the ordinary comfort to which he is by courtesy 
entitled. I have the honor to be, dear sir, your obedient servant, 

EDMOND GODCHAUX, Recorder. 



MONTHLY RECEIPTS PAID INTO THE TREASURY. 




MONTHS. 


RECEIPTS. 


PAID INTO 
TREASURY. 


1899 J ul> 


$2,742 80 


$2,742 80 




2,827 85 


2,827 85 




3,036 95 


3,036 95 


October . 


3,042 25 


3,042 25 




3,167 95 


3,167 95 




2,994 15 


2,994 15 


January (8-30 of a month 1900) 


610 10 


610 10 


1900 January (22-30 of a month 1900) 
February 


2,732 75 
3,134 00 


2,732 75 
3,134 00 


March ' 


3,472 20 


2,472 20 


April ... 


3,333 60 


3,333 60 


Mav 


3,217 80 


3,217 80 




3,138 65 


3,138 65 










837,451 05 


$37,451 05 



RECORDER'S REPORT. 



SI 



MONTHLY STATEMENT OF SALARIES AND EXPENSES AS CHARGED AGAINST THE 
RECORDER'S APPROPRIATION. 



1899 AND 1900. 


Recorder 


Three Deputies. . . 


Mortgage Clerk... 


j 


Folio Clerks 


GO 

I 


1 


July 


$3S3 33 


$550 00 


$100 00 


$75 00 


$2 380 80 




$3 439 13 


August 


333 33 


550 00 


100 00 


75 00 


2,463 48 


$90 00 


3,611 81 


September 


333 33 


550 00 


100 00 


75 00 


2,962 20 




4,020 53 


October 
November 
December 


333 33 
333 33 
333 33 


550 00 
550 00 
550 00 


100 00 

100 00 
100 00 


75 00 
75 00 
75 00 


2,522 40 
2,771 52 
2,671 68 


361 70 
151 25 
248 30 


3,942 43 
3,981 10 
3 978 31 


January 


88 88 


146 66 


?6 66 


20 00 


759 72 


6 40 


1,048 32 


January 
February 
March 


220 00 
300 00 
300 00 


293 32 
400 00 
400 00 


73 28 
96 35 
100 00 




1,244 16 
1,876 32 
2,096 56 




1,820 76 
2,672 67 
2,896 56 


April 


300 00 


400 00 


100 CO 




1,804 24 




2,604 24 


May .... 


300 00 


400 00 


100 00 




2,172 72 




2,972 72 


June . . 


300 00 


400 00 


100 00 




1 926 64 




2 7*6 64 


















Totals 


$3,808 86 


$5,739 98 


81,196 29 


$470 00 


$27,652 44 


$857 65 


$39,725 22 



RECAPITULATION. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Total Expenses for Fiscal Year 1899-1900 


$39,725 22 




Total Receipts for Fiscal Year 1899-1900 


37,461 05 










Peficit .... 




$2 274 17 









RECORDER'S REPORT. 



ANNUAL RECAPITULATION OF INSTRUMENTS FILED, 1899-1900. 









181 


)9. 






1 






19 


DO. 






| 


Q 

*$ 
































% * 




i- 


j>. 




o 


a 






CH 


n- 


t^ 


^ 


t> 


C-t 






INSTRUMENTS. 





| 

1 





CD 


ovem 







1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


c 

3 




1 








1 


r 1 


I 


i* 




*< 


3 












8 










! 


1 


71 








: 




; 




















: 








* 












Acceptances and Abandon- 
ments of Buildings 


35 


30 


24 


59 


49 


42 


248 


43 


29 


C2 


42 


43 


44 




501 


Agreements and Covenants.. 


11 


14 


13 


14 


17 


10 


79 


13 


16 


13 


16 


18 


20 


90 


175 


Assignments of Mortgages . . . 


6 


5 


8 


18 


16 


22 


75 


7 


11 


13 


18 


9 


11 


69 


144 


Attachments, Releases an3 
































Executions 


24 


27 


49 


36 


24 


40 


200 


44 


18 


26 


19 


17 


30 


154 


354 


Ba^: Statements 


1 


























1 


2 


Bills of Sale 


14 


9 


10 


13 


17 


18 


81 


15 


21 


21 


13 


19 


20 


109 


190 






16 


19 


4 


4 


33 


76 


34 




5 


3 


2 


2 


46 


122 


Builders' Contracts and Bonds 


76 


90 


59 


60 


38 


35 


358 


55 


50 


68 


81 


97 


113 


467 


825 


Certificates of Birth, Death, 
































ete 


29 


30 


23 


56 


41 


30 


209 


29 


28 


41 


38 


24 


12 


175 


334 


Certificates of Redemption . . . 


16 


5 


8 


45 


22 


24 


120 


20 


10 


26 


16 


8 


2 


82 


202 


Certificates of Sale, Assign- 




























1 




ments and Redemption .... 


9 


16 


7 


15 


11 


19 


77 


11 


21 


15 


16 


22 


11 


96 


173 


Jkeencfc 


4 


7 


7 


8 


12 





44 


1 


8 


10 


11 


4 


14 


43 


92 


Tteeds 


399 


407 


406 


427 


473 


403 


2,515 


520 


502 


537 


514 


568 


465 


3,103 


5,621 


Deeds of Trust 


38 


37 


59 


44 


54 


52 


284 


48 


56 


76 


74 


67 


59 


380 


661 


Election Expenses, Statement 
































of 










64 


2 


66 
















66 


Homesteads^ Declarations and 
































Abandonments 


19 


21 


18 


17 


15 


16 


106 


18 


23 


16 


23 


21 


18 


119 


225 


Judgments, Abstracts, Tran- 
































scripts, Satisfactions and As- 
































signments 


25 


21 


27 


45 


24 


28 


170 


23 


17 


18 


16 


21 


20 


115 


285 


Lessee, Assignments and Sur- 
readers 


16 


14 


25 


13 


20 


15 


1103 


30 


13 


25 


24 


13 


21 


120 


225 


































Liens and Releases of Liens . . 


36 


57 


91 


95 


S4 


80 


449 


105 


35 


56 


109 


58 


34 


392 


841 


tbP d 


40 


30 


33 


43 


39 


38 


223 


41 


4(5 


36 


30 


40 


58 


251 


474 








1 








1 


1 










1 


2 


3 


Xferriage Certificates 


235 


306 


290 


306 


280 


300 


1,717 


302 


251 


252 


280 


256 


272 


1,613 


3,330 



RECORDER'S RP3PORT. 



83 



RECAPITULATION OF INSTRUMENTS FILED-CONTINUED. 





1899. 


g 


1900. 


g 


O 














1* 


INSTRUMENTS AND DATE. 


c* 


vT 


1 


% 
1 


o 


Novem 


Decem 




_ 


1 

1 


March 


I 


1 








7 








1 




5 


? 




-5 


5 












: i" 


Miscellaneous 


17 n 


^6 


17 


16 


17 


104 


13 


94 


19 


22 


24 


22 


124 


228 


Mortgages of Personal Prop- 
































erty 


97 ifld 


101 


96 


128 


HQ 


645 


1S5 


87 


142 


114 


98 


105 


RSI 


1 326 


Mortgages of Real Property . . 


276 


258 


283 


285 


246 


249 


1,597 


281 


298 


327 


272 


275 


254 


1,707 


3,304 








1 






1 


9 


1 


1 




1 






3 


5 


Power of Attorney.Revocation 
































and Substitutions 


22 


$c 


111 


V> 


IS 


17 


103 


24 


27 


oq 


14 


1? 


23 


149 


252 


Probate Decrees of Distribu- 
































tion etc 


49 


55 


51 


58 


58 


69 


337 


48 


54 


67 


61 


74 


62 


366 


70S 


Reconveyances 


32 


32 


19 


29 


31 


36 


179 


44 


46 


51 


47 


48 


56 


292 


471 


Releases of Personal Property 


































33 


4( 


41 


55 


65 


46 


285 


69 


57 


70 


55 


42 


41 


3J4 


619 


Releases of Real Estate Mort- 


































184 


1ST 


1H7 


17 


iqq 


HiQ 


1 183 


247 


301 


277 


<"M 


9?9 


201 


1 499 


2 682 


Separate Property of Wife 






















1 






] 


1 


Sole Traders 










1 


1 


2 


3 






1 


1 


1 


6 


s 


Tax Certificates 


















5 


I 


1 






g 


9 


Tax Deeds 






112 








112 
















11 


Totals 










2061 






















1743 


1855 


2022 


2087 


1983 


11,751 


2226 


2060 


2286 


2171 


2136 


1992 


12,871 


24.G22 





RECORDER'S REPORT. 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT 

FROM 1859 TO 1900, INCLUSIVE. 



YEAR. 


PAPERS. 


TOTAL 
RECEIPTS. 


TOTAL 
EXPENSES. 


SURPLUS. , DEFICIT. 


1859-60 


5 596 


$18 300 00 


$13 847 00 


$4,453 00 


1860-61 










1861-62 


11 970 


34 605 00 


'6 792 50 


7 902 60 


1862-63 


12 631 


33 633 75 


94 gg4 gg 


8,649 10 


1863 64 


13 391 


34 534 25 


33 358 25 


1,176 00 


1864-35 


13,989 


37,702 00 


29 175 91 


8,52609 


1865-66 
1866-67 
1867-68 


14,114 
14,262 
16 496 


37,348 50 
43,237 25 
51 50 1 50 


28,092 24 
30,427 59 
37 184 14 


9,25626 
12,809 66 
4,317 36 


1868-69 


18 761 


55 549 25 


42 399 52 


13,149 73 i 


1860-70 
1870-71 


14,146 
15 024 


44,890 70 
44 975 50 


36,156 26 
35 873 20 


8,73444 ! 
11 102 30 ' 


187 1-7 9 


12 897 


41 076 75 


35 372 9 9 


5,702 83 


1872-73 


11,207 


34,051 25 


34 494 16 


$442 91 


1873-74 

1874-75. ... 


13,138 
17,486 


32,654 00 
44,407 50 


30,267 64 
38 616 11 


2,38636 
5 791 39 


1875-76 


18,218 


46,626 60 


38 376 23 


6 9 49 37 


1876-77 


21 396 


51 ,386 75 


40 930 41 


10 456 34 


1877-78. 


17,632 


42,835 25 


36 557 80 


6,177 45 < 


1878-79. 


18 871 


38,175 00 


34 893 62 


3,281 38 


1879-80 


17 778 


34,783 75 


33 327 89 


1 455 93 


1880-81 


14 002 


31 420 50 


29 817 40 


1 603 10 


1881-82 ' 


12,835 


31,284 85 


32 093 14 


808 29- 


1882 83 


14 266 


34 237 00 


30 261 34 


3 975 66 


1883-84 


15 340 


38 142 25 


31 894 9 1 


6 248 04 


1884-85 


15,500 


38,702 50 


.; 32,295 00 


6,407 50 


1885-86 

1886-87 


15,092 
17 065 


37,361 00 
43 764 00 


31.1S2 27 
33 754 78 


5,17873 
10 009 22 


1887- 88 


20,005 


53,238 46 


36,144 02 


17,09643 













RECORDER'S REPORT. 



85 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT CONTIKUBD. 



YEAR. 


PAPERS. 


TOTAL 
RECRIPTS. 


TOTAL 
EXPENSES. 


SURPLUS. 


DKFIC1T. 


1888-89 


22,370 


$53,858 56 


$43,476 36 


$10,382 20 




1889 90 


24,907 


64,534 80 


42,497 14 


22,037 66 




1890-91 


76 in 


68 84 53 


45 136 44 


23,148 09 




1891-92 
1892 93 


25,306 
'5 262 


66,520 20 
60 234 00 


38,687 75 
43,190 51 


27,832 45 
17,043 49 





1893 94 


23,102 


55 389 25 


40,490 84 


14,89841 




1894-95 
1895-96 


23,434 
23,637 


58,768 75 
61,947 50 


41,109 80 
42,924 46 


17,658 95 
19,023 04 





1896-97 
1897 98 


22,270 
23,713 


34,559 45 
34,398 85 


41,21792 
42,699 02 




$6,658 47 
8,300 17 


1898 99 


22,272 


31,803 10 


41,679 19 




9,876 09 


1899 1900 


24 622 


37 451 05 


39 725 22 




2,974 17 















REPORT OF CITY ATTORNEY. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 

To the Honorable Jus. D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City mul County of San Franc.isf.o 

Sir: In accordance with resolution No. 470 of the Board of Supervisors, I 
herewith submit a report of the business of this office for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1900. 

The following is a summarization of the report: 

Opinions rendered 151 

Suits begun against the city or its officers 77 

Judgmsnts entered in Superior Court in favor of the City or its officers 21 

Judgments entered in Superior Court against the City or its officers 

(one of which was by consent) 11 

Note Appeal has been taken in seven of these cases. 
Decisions by the Supreme Court 13 

In favor of the City or its officers 9 

Against the City or its officers 4 

Judgment against the City or its officers has been modified by the 

Supreme Court in one case. 
Appeal to the Supreme Court has bsen dismissed by order of the Board 

of Supervisors in one case. 
Judgments by United States Circuit Court against the City or its 

officers 4 

Decision by United States Circuit Court of Appeals in favor of the City 1 

Cases on appeal in Supreme Court 20 

Cases pending in United States Circuit Court 22 

Total number of cases in office 23S> 

Respectfully, 

FRANKLIN K. LANE, City Attorney. 



REPORT OF CITY ATTORNEY. 



OPINIONS RENDERED AND COMMUNICATIONS TO THE BOARD OF 

SUPERVISORS. 

July 1, 1899 Transmitting report for fiscal year 1898-1899. 

July 31, 1899 As to the grade of Sanchez and Twenty-fifth streats. 

August 1, 1899 As to the litigation against A. C. Widber. 

August 12, 1899 As to the disapproval by Board after approval by Mayor 6t 
bond given by People's Mutual Telephone Company. 

August 14, 1899 As to the power of the Board to appoint a Board of Engineers 
under Municipal Improvement Act. 

August 26, 1899 As to the liability of the city for certain premises used by the 
city as a pesthouse and destroyed by fire by order of the Board of Health. 

August 28, 1899 As to the taking possession of Hall of Justice on September 
1st, if not completed by contractors. 

September 18, 1809 In relation to the Windel estate. 

September SO, 1899 Advising that disclaimer be filed in suit brought to quiet 
title to a portion of Western Addition Block No. 42. 

October 2, 1899 As to the advisability of passing an order specifying the 
length of main track and assessing the value of the S. F. and S. M. Railway 
Company in this city and county. 

October 23, 1899 Submitting forms of resolution and ordinances relating tc 
the propossd election for Park and School bonds. 

October 23, 1899 Transmitting draft of resolution transferring certain funds 
to James D. Phelan, Trustee. 

November 2, 1899 Advising that the title to the property bounded by Gough, 
Sacramento, Octavia and Clay streets and the north half of the block bounded by 
Washington, Gough, Clay and Octavia streets is finally in the city. 

November 13, 1899 Advising that a reasonable amount be paid Remain C. de 
Boom for the taking of his property. 

November 14, 1899 Advising that the city join with heirs and legatees in a 
compromise with claimants in the Windel estate. 

November 20, 1899 Transmitting forms for two additional ordinances in the 
matter of the bond elections. 

November 23, 1899 Transmitting three forms of official bonds prescribed by 
the new Charter. 

December 2, 1899 Transmitting two forms of notices of election for Park and 
Sewer and School bonds. 

December 6, 1899 Advising a dismissal of the action of the City and County 
v. Daniel Callaghan. 

December 11, 1S99 As to the right of the city to use money paid for taxes 
under protest. 

December 14, 1899 As to the cancellation of one-half of the assessment of the 
property upon Bluxome street, near Fourth street, lately purchased by the city. 

December 14, 1899 As to the employment of three members of the bar to re- 
vise, reform, amend, codify and annotate the ordinances. 

December 18, 1899 As to the ordinance regulating and imposing a license on 
nickel-in-the-slot machines in connection with telephones. 

December 26, 1899 As to the completion of the Hall of Justice. 

December 26, 1899 As to the demand of the Evening Post Publishing Com- 
pany for publishing ordinances and resolution relating to the bond elections. 

January 5, 1900 Advising that the claim of the Evening Post Publishing Com- 
pany for advertising certain resolutions in relation to the bond elections be re- 
jected. 

January 10, 1900 Referring to communication of August 1, 1899, in re Widber 
estate. 



88 REPORT OF CITY ATTORNEY. 

January 12, 1900 Transmitting copy of letter sent to the Mayor in relation 
to expenses incurred in trial of Rehfeld v. City and County. 

January 22, 1900 As to the method of taking a vote on the final passage or 
adoption of an order or resolution. 

January 22, 1900 As to the legality of the present Board of Supervisors finally 
passing certain orders, resolutions and authorizations which were passed for 
printing by th3 last Board. 

January 22, 1900 Requesting permission to publish summons in the City and 
County v. Albouze. 

January 27, 1900 As to contracts for supplies for the Fire Department. 

January 29, 1900 As to the validity of the contract for public advertising now 
existing between the city and the Evening Post Publishing Company. 

January 29, 1900 As to the payment out of the Treasury of fines collect 5 d 
from persons convicted of cruelty to animals. 

January 29, 1900 As to whether the Charter requii'es the vote on a resolution 
which is not passed to print before final adoption to be taken by ayes and noes. 

January 29, 1900 As to the power of the Supervisors to grant privileges for 
alterations and repairs to buildings, the supervision of which is conferred on the 
Board of Public Works. 

January 29, 1900 As to the validity of all contracts entered into by former 
boards, the time of which has not expired. 

February 5, 1900 As to the preparation of an ordinance respecting nickel-ln- 
the-slot machines. 

February 13, 1900 As to the powers of the Supervisors under the Charter In 

the matter of the expenditures of the Health Department. 

February 14, 1900 As to whether the Supervisors have power to grant psr- 
mission to perform street work by private contract. 

February 17, 1900 As to whether the Supervisors should approve the de- 
mands of the Health Department, the Park Commissioners and the Library 
Trustees. 

February 23, 1900 As to the validity of the proposal notice inviting bids for 
doing public advertising. 

March 1, 1900 As to the acceptance by the city of $7,327.50 from the London 
and San Francisco Bank, conceded by it to be due for taxes. 

March 8, 1900 As to whether the Board after fixing the rate for gas and 
electric lighting should invite proposals for doing the lighting of public streets 
and buildings. 

March 10, 1900 As to which departments are required to present their de- 
mands to the Board for approval before being audited. 

March 12, 1900 Advising that Judge Seawell has decided that the provisions 
Qf the Charter regarding stenographers of the Superior Court are invalid. 

March 14, 1900 As to whether the Board may approve demands for expert 
testimony in an amount greater than for ordinary witness fees. 

March 17, 1900 Advising that in- the opinion of the City Attorney the judg- 
ment of Judge Seawell in the stenographer case would not be disturbed on appeal. 

March 21, 1900 As to the proper proofs necessary to support petitions for in- 
side and outside land grants. 

March 22, 1900 Advising that no demands of interpreters in the Police Courts 
be approved unless they comply with the provisions of the Charter. 

March 23, 1900 Advising that the ordinance requiring the placing of signs on 
street crossings with the names of the streets thereon is invalid. 

March 26, 1900 As to the publication of the ordinances accepting streets. 

March 28, 1900 As to what ordinances must be sent to the Mayor for his ap- 
proval. 

April 2, 1900 Requesting permission to present claim to Congress in the 
matter of the claim of Rehfeld against the City and County. 



REPORT OF CITY ATTORNEY. 89 

April 2, 1900 Advising that necessary expenses are required on the trial of 
City and County v. Albouze. 

April 9, 1900 As to the power to grant permission to remove a boat house 
and locate the same on the beach at the foot of Larkin street. 

April 11, 1900 As to the petition of the Bay and Coast Railroad for permis- 
sion to operate a double track steam railroad along certain streets. 

April 16, 1900 As to certain ordinances regulating the height of fences. 

April 16, 1900 As to the publication of the Delinquent Tax List. 

April 17, 1900 As to the change of grade at the crossing of North Point and 
Webster streets. 

April 19, 1900 As to the validity of Orders Nos. 2177 and 2588. 

April 19, 1900 As to the St. Mary's Park fund. 

April 23, 1900 As to the resolutions purporting to grant permission to main- 
tain obstructions on the streets and sidewalks. 

April 23, 1900 Referring to communication of November 13, 1899, in re claim 
of Romaine C. de Boom. 

April 23, 1900 Advising that $16,229.09 has been distributed out of the Windel 
estate to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors as trustees. 

April 24, 1900 As to whether there is any authority to divert any of the 
funds in the Hall of Justice appropriation in payment of the claims of various 
sub-contractors. 

May 7, 1900 As to the legality of certain bills touching the matter of lotteries. 

May 14, 1900 Advising that it is the duty of the Tax Collector to compile the 
Military Roll. 

May 18, 1900 As to the amendment to sub. 14, Sec. 1, Chap. II., Art. II of the 
Charter, respecting the fixing of rates for water, heat, light, etc. 

May IS, 1900 Advising that this office can give no further information re- 
specting the southerly terminus of Castro street than has already been given by 
the City Engineer. 

May 19, 1900 As to the validity of the ordinance granting a franchise to 
the S. F. and S. J. V. Railway Company to 'construct a railroad along Illinois 
street. 

June 7, 1900 As to whether or not demands exceeding $500 should be passed 
for printing. 

June 9, 1900 As to the resolution concerning the erection, repair and altera- 
tion of public buildings and as to the question of progressive payments on sucn 
contracts. 

June 11, 1900 As to the question of rebating penalties and Interest on de- 
linquent taxes. 

June 11, 1900 Advising that a proposed bill regulating the height of fences is 
valid. 

June 18, 1900 As to the publication in full of specifications for lighting public 
V-uiMings. 

June 18, 1900 As to whether the Southern Pacific Company has an ownership 
in fes in the land situated on Sherman avenue, between Wyoming avenue and 
Old San Bruno Road. 

June 25, 1900 Advising that all requests for an opinion must be In writing 
and the answer in the same form. 

June 27, 1900 Advising against approval of demands of Evening Post Publish- 
ing Company for printing ordinances, etc., from January 8, 1900, and the dat.e 
of the new contract for such printing. 

June 29, 1900 As to whether the Board is obliged to reject the entire bid of 
a bidder where there is an erasure or alteration of one or more items in the bid 
or is allowed to reject the portion erased or altered. 

June 30, 1900 Advising that the Hall of Justice may be accepted without flnt 
adjusting the claims of creditors and contractors. 



90 REPORT OP CITY ATTORNEY. 

TO THE BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

January 13, 1900 As to the taking and giving receipt for moneys in hands of 
M. F. Fragley, former Superintendent of Streets. 

January 13, 1900 As to the tearing up of streets requiring immediate re- 
pair. 

January 19, 1900 As to the insurance of elevators in City Hall. 

January 31, 1900 As to whether laborers must be taken from Civil Service list. 

February 3, 1900 As to the enforcement of the order requiring the Market- 
street Railway Company to move and re-establish curbs and gutters on Bosworth 
street. 

February 19, 1900 Requesting copies of plats and maps to be used in th ca^e 
of Bates v. Benjamin et al. 

February 19, 1900 As to whether it is incumbent on the City Surveyor to make 
private surveys. 

April 3, 1900 As to whether the grade fixed by Order 684 superseded that fixed 
by Order 608. 

April 6, 1900 As to the procedure contemplated by the provisions of the 
Charter in the tearing up of streets, lanes, etc., for the purpose of laying down 
and constructing railroad tracks, laying telephone and telegraph wires, etc. 

April 11, 1900 As to whether the Secretary has power to administer oaths. 

May 5, 1900 As to tha contracts for cleaning and sprinkling streets. 

May 18, 1900 As to whether a contract for lighting public streets can mbrac 
other items, to wit, the furnishing of ornamental poles. 

June 7, 1900 As to the bonds of the members of the Board of Public Works. 

June 18, 1900 As to objections to street work. 

TO THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

September 1, 1899 As to whether teachers can be deprived of their ealaris 
if the schools are closed for three' weeks or a month. 

October 23, 1899 As to the responsibility of erecting fire escapes on the Lin- 
coln School property. 

July 12. 1899 As to whether extra compensation can be allowed Census Mar- 
shal. 

TO THE BOARD OF ELECTION COMMISSIONERS. 

January 17, 1899 As to whether the Election Commissioners can let contracts 
for necessary stationery independent of the Board of Supervisors. 

TO THE JOINT COMMISSION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY. 

February 1, 1900 As to whether a bond is required of the Chief of the De- 
partment of Electricity. 

TO THE BOARD OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 

February 2, 1900 As to whether disabled firemen are to be paid as hereto- 
fore or under the provisions of the Charter. 

February 19, 1900 As to whether bills authorized and contracted for by the 
former Board should be paid by the present Board. 

April 17, 1900 As to whether a horseshoeing contract should be included In a 
contract for supplies. 

May 4, 1900 As to the yearly vacations of firemen. 



REPORT OF CITY ATTORNEY. 91 

TO THE BOARD OP CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONERS. 

March 15, 1900 As to the construction of the words "actually reside" and 
the clause "and must have so resided for one year next preceding their appoint- 
ment." 

TO THE BOARD OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

May 5, 1900 As to whether the Board of Public Works or the Park Commis- 
sioners should provide light and water for all public squares. 

TO THE BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS. 

May 12, 1900 As to the claims for pensions of Hon. Wm. Alvord and Hon. 
R. J. Tobin. 

TO THE BOARD OF POLICE PENSION FUND COMMISSIONERS. 

May 21, 1900 As to the claim of John and Louis C. Schroder and Anne M. 
Casement, children of John Schroder, deceased, for a pension. 

TO THE MAYOR. 

January 8, 1900 Advising that on January 8, 1900, at noon, the Board of 
Health appointed by the Mayor supersedes the one appointed by the Governor. 

January 12, 1900 Advising of the proximity of the trial of Rehfeld v. City 
and County, and requesting $100 to meet expenses for witness and stenographer's 
fees. 

April 23, 1900 Advising that $16,220 09 has been distributed out of the Wlndel 
state to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors as trustees. 

January 12, 1900 As to the "Mission Plaza." 

TO THE ASSESSOR. 

July 12, 1899 As to whether bonds of quasi-public corporations are to br 
treated as solvent credits. 

July 15, 1899 As to the power of the Assessor to seize and sell personal prop- 
erty to satisfy taxes assessed against it. 

July 17, 1899 As to the taxation of vessels registered in foreign ports whose 
owners or managing agents reside in San Francisco, but not plying in whola or 
in part in the waters of this State. 

August 9, 1899 Giving consent to designating by stamp or mark all property 
on the assessment roll for the year 1899 which has been previously sold to the 
State for taxes. 

February 17, 1900 As to the authority of Assessor's clerks to administer oaths. 

March 21, 190O As to the proper construction of Sec. 3648 of the Political Code. 

April 4, 1900 As to ths assessment of the personal property of a United 
States Army or Navy officer in active service stationed in this city. 

April 18, 1900 As to whether an estata having money in bank may deduct 
the amount due State as collateral inheritance tax. 

April 18, 1900 As to whether property of a decedent which was not included 
In a previous year's statement should be penalized as provided in Sees. 3648 and 
3649. 

April 24, 1900 Advising that a savings and loan corporation Is not entitled to 
deduct from its solvent credits the amount of its deposits. 



92 REPORT OF CITY ATTORNEY. 

Juns 30, 1900 As to whether the roadbed and track of the Market-street Rail- 
way Company should be reassessed as real estate. 

TO THE AUDITOR. 

March 15, 1900 Estimate of expenses for fiscal year 1900-1901. 
TO THE TREASURER. 

January 24, 1900 As to the payment of demands of court stenographers. 

January 30, 1900 As to the payment of appraisers' fees out of the collateral 
Inheritance tax. 

February 7, 1900 Advising that the District Attorney is the proper officer to 
sue for the collection of collateral inheritance tax. 

April 5, 1900 Advising- that the litigation concerning Superior Court stenoc- 
raphers is ended and that payment of their claims may be made as heretofore. 

June 12, 1900 As to the transfer of certain moneys to the open account of 1892. 

June 26, 1900 Advising that moneys collected for other years cannot be used 
to liquidate claims arising in 1892-3. 

TO THE TAX COLLECTOR. 

January 30, 1900 As to the collection of license taxes. 

April 30, 1900 As to the tenders of the Columbus Savings and Loan Society 
and the Bank of California. 

May 9, 1900 Advising that the imposition of a license tax of $3,000 per quarter 
on trading stamp clearing houses is invalid. 

June 7, 1900 As to whether taxes tendered in time should be accepted taxes 
on bonds of quasi-public corporations not being included in such tender. 

TO THE COUNTY CLERK. 

March 30, 1900 As to whether returns of sale made by commissionerB mutt b 
recorded. 

TO THE RECORDER. 

January 29, 1900 As to the photographing of deeds. 

February 17, 1900 As to whether fees for recording marriage licenses should 
be paid directly to the Recorder. 

May 29, 1900 As to the approval of demands affected by the case of Farrell 
v. Godchaux. 

TO THE REGISTRAR. 

January 15, 1900 Advising that the names of the candidates for the office of 
Superior Judge should be placed on the ballot headed "General Ticket." 

January 31, 1900 As to the re-districting of the city into precincts. 

April 18, 1900 Advising that the names of the candidates for Justice of the 
Peace should be placed on the general ticket for the coming election. 

TO THE CHIEF ENGINEER FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

January 31. 1900 Advising that Chief Engineer and Assistants take the oath 
of office. 



REPORT OF CITY ATTORNEY. 93 

TO THE CHIEF OF POLICE. 

March 21, 1900 Advising that judgment has been entsred in favor of defendant 
In Barnhart vs. Sullivan, Chief of Police. 

TO THE CITY ENGINEER. 
June 26, 1900 As to the proper form of proposal blank for street work. 

TO THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 
January 18, 1900 As to the holders of life diplomas. 

TO THE SHERIFF-ELECT. 

January 4, 1900 As to the disposition of fees collectad by Sheriff. 
TO THE LICENSE COLLECTOR. 

November 27, 1899 As to what licenses are payable under the New Charter. 

November 27, 1899 As to the collection of licenss tax for the sale of imported 
goods in unbroken packages. 

December .11, 1899 As to the collection of licenses due and which will beome 
flue before January 8, 1900. 

January 2, 1900 As to the liability of the Overland Freight and Transfer Co. 
for payment of licenses on its wagons and trucks, the same being employed under 
a contract for a portion of the time in hauling freight for th3 Federal Government. 

TO THE SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

November 16, 1899 Requesting information as to whether the fences and ob- 
structions on certain portions of Lafayette Square have been removed. 



REPORT OF LAW LIBRARY. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 

To the Honorable Jets. D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIR; Pursuant to Resolution No. 470 of the Honorable the Board of Supervisors, 
the Librarian and Secretary herewith presents the thirtj'-fourth annual report of the affairs of 
the San Francisco Law Library Association. 

The year just closing differs in no material particulars from the average of the past few 
years. 

During the year there were lost from the membership of the library by death: C. R. 
Greathouse and John A. Stanly. 

During tho same period H. W Button, Thomas M. Pennell, J. J. Dunne and James L. 
Hopkins applied for and were granted life memberships. 

There were 17 new subscribers during the year. 

There were added to the library during the year 943 volumes, making the total number of 
books now on the shelves 33,529. 

Of the accessions 78 were presented, 124 were records of the Supreme Court, bound, and 
741 were purchased. 

The donors were: Ralph C. Harrison, William Barber, Moses G. Cobb, Wella Drury, 
C. F. Curry, S. Newburgh, J. A. Russell, the Attorney General of New South Wales, the 
Secretary of State of Nevada and the Secretaries of the Departments at Washington. 

The character of the books added is as follows: 

Text books 115 

Reports 230 

Statutes 120 

Digests and indexes 41 

Periodicals 117 

Records.. 124 

Governmental publications 71 

Selected cases 43 

General miscellany 82 

943 



REPORT OF LAW LIBRARIAN. 



95 



More particularly classified, the accessions were: 

American text books 106 

American State reports 206 

American statutes 101 

American digests and indexes 38 

American legal periodicals 79 

American selected cases 36 

English text books 7 

English reports 13 

English statutes 2 

English legal periodicals 23 

English digests 3 

English selected cases 7 

Canadian text books 2 

Canadian reports 11 

Canadian statutes 7 

Canadian pei iodicals 3 

Australian reports 12 

Australian statutes 2 

Other foreign statutes : 8 

Citations 188 

Encyclopedias legal 11 

Encyclopedias miscellaneous 1 

Miscellaneous periodicals 12 

Statistical works 7 

Dictionaries 2 

Supreme Court records 124 

Trials 1 

Literary works 7 

Governmental publications 71 

Newspapers 10 

Directories 9 

Miscellaneous catalogues and indexes 4 

943 
The expenses for the year were as follows : 

For books *3,109 41 

For binding and repairing 898 63 

For assistants 2,440 00 

For miscellaneous expenses 281 43 

$6,729 47 

The items of expenditure are: 

American text books $466 64 

American reports 600 38 

American statutes 219 66 

American digests 224 05 

American legal periodicals 399 73 



96 REPORT OF LAW LIBRARIAN. 

American selected cases A 130 85 

English and Canadian text books 62 30 

English and Canadian reports 143 41 

English and Canadian statutes 29 55 

English and Canadian periodicals 150 87 

English and Canadian digests 20 90 

English and Canadian selected cases 47 50 

Australian reports 85 60 

Citations 112 10 

Encyclopedias and dictionaries Legal 118 50 

Miscellaneous 16 00 

DirectoriesLegal 1335 

Directories Miscellaneous 10 00 

Periodicals -Miscellaneous 24 25 

Newspapers 71 90 

Trials 3 00 

Literary works 29 00 

Statistical works 19 00 

Miscellaneous catalogues 5 29 

Other foreign statutes : 15 50 

District telegraph and telephone 58 20 

Expressage and cartage 26 68 

Postage 2 60 

Binding and repairing 851 60 

Materials for binder 4703 

Stationery 62 00 

Printing 31 50 

Miscellaneous 39 45 

Governmental publications 35 00 

Salaries 2,44000 

Total $6,729 47 

The income for the year was : 

From life memberships *400 00 

From subscribers, fines, etc 762 20 

From dollar tax ... 5,58500 



Total 86,747 20 

The Library is in urgent need of repairs and lighting. The furniture is very old and very much 
worn, and is very inadequate. The shelving and casing are in bad condition. These matters have 
been laid before the proper municipal board, but as yet no action has been taken. 
Respectfully submitted. 

J. H. DEERING, 

Librarian and Secretary. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 31, 1900. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIR In compliance with Section 9, Article 16 of the Charter, I submit herewith 
the Annual Report of the Police Department for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

Respectfully yours, 

W. P. SULLIVAN, JR ., 

Chief of Police. 



98 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



PH ^ 

HH M 



ii 



ii 



Tot 


ils 


- .^ .,., B ..... g , p . 




' 


June 








I ~ l S 


a : 




N 00 r-t 






May 








00 


CO 1-H i-H 




S S 2 
















2 




CO CO i-l 




April 








March 








i 







(M CO IO 

C! ^ 






February 








^H S 


CO (C 




CO 1C 




January 








a 


" r 




S 8 - 




' 


December 








S : 


t- rl O) 




.-< 








. 








November 








- 


1-1 i-i eq 




S S : 




October 


- - * s 


C5 i-H 


C^ C<1 ^** 






September... 








S : ^ 




rH (M ?O 








C5 




m t-i t- 


(M 


8 S " 






July 








<M t- -c t- 


*. eg S ^ W 






OFFENSE. 










: : -2 : : 

: : .1 : 










>> 


Ml : 




c o 
p, 

^ i 




i jl.i = 




111 


Abduction . . . 


t 




S fr : 

1 Ills 

f i o c 


! 1 

i 8 

U 1 

3 1 


Bath ing undressed in DI 


r 

ordinance, viol 

f ... 


^33333331 


f<= v s 
Ii i 

1 1 1 1 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



99 



Toti 


ils 


cq - l - l 3gS!3cf 05Me ' 5 8 M 888 co 




' 


June 








O tH i-H CS r-l CO r-< C-} CO CO 


May 








;O5 C4 t C4 rH 1-4 CO CM CS 




April 








-H ^ * N tH H - f* fH 




March. 








~ 8 * S ^ j S <" 


February 








C^l 01 -S< -t< W <M M 01 COi-H 


January 








b. C S W 


CO CO 


| 


December 


<M 






g. c, e 


00 <N (N r-l 


November 


1 FH 


CS 


p ri >H O 


rt -* _( 00 "* 


October 


i 


t-i 


<o << j en 


w s M i 


September... 








i-l C<J 00 


en 10 I-H es c-1 


August 


i 






O i-H Cs 


"* ^ 2 *** ' H 


July 








S; N t " 


co : D * 


OFFENSE. 










. : ; : . ; ; & 










j : : ( 

I j I 








I i- M 






: a : : i 


^ c ' ^ 

"I I i 

; i | 1 1 | | | 

-w '33 o o a* *3 
o> a <w *S *s ^, 

"3 S s >> > 1 
8 5 1 i 3 11 

O O S y 3 *- i 

.3 5 3 5 1 o a 


Bill-posting order 

THaRtini?-. rarplpss 


Blasting without permit 
Boulevard order . . . 


Burglary, attempted 
Burglars' tools, having in 
Concealed weapon, pisto 
Concealed weapon, knife 
Oonr.aaled wnanon Rlnno 



100 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



Tot 


ils.. .. 


CM co co cosoojeotocoinofr- co co 

i- 1 ** i 1 CO t i 1 GO CO CO CQ 




1 


June 




1-1 >n fH * \ Cg M C* 


CO -* CO 




May 




-3 " ja-a 


-* * <M 




April 




r-H (M 
**< 


^ 1 S 


(M t- 




March 






CO r-l 


! g ~ a 


n * 




February 






5 ""* 


- 1 s 


CO (M CO 










S : 


O 00 CO 

^ So 


rH CO CO C< 









December 


C 




^ "* 


H s 


t- m (M 




November . . . 




CS 


co m 


-* s r 


O CO <M 




October 






B 


CO <35 t~ 


<M i-H 




September. . . 





m 


: 


O rl 5 


CO 




August 




Tt 


CO d 


CO <MCOr-H(Mr-l r- 




July..,;,, . 






Oi ^rHrHCa^HCO^cOCO lO 






M 

00 




1 





: ^ : : : : : : . 1 






: M. : 3 c 




: ? t : : ^ 


: ? 

1 c i i 

O O S 03 


Dead body, removing with 
mit . . . 


. i i : i : * 

a s ; : ; * > 


a : - : i s ; 1 9 8 u f 8 J 

I 5 1 i f I i J i 1 1 ' S { 

S 1 i ! 1 1 J 1 1 !. ! 1 1 i 

1 5 5 5 g tf | -3 fe -S S 1 

f I i . f i I 1 * 1 1 I* 8 

Ili-'iiiJiilli 1 ! 

PQQ Q: P H 3 H H H H M K 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



101 



! 
Tota 


Is. 


^ -<ti T* I-H ocor-iej>-<eNcoeoooi-i-*co 

O- t>. *** CN *< r 1 F 1 




i 


June 


CM 00 


O 




CO 


(M 
















May 


' H 


o> 


* 




01 oi- 




N 








April 






*" 


Iti 




eo i-H e 


IM 










March 






GO 


in 




* (M 




























February 






IM 


M 




eo <M 


"' 








January 






* 


00 C4 


H 


- i 



















i 


December 


- 




00 
< CO 


<M I-H 




to co N 


<N 


r- 


rH 


November 


m 




D 


CO r-l 


* 







October 




i M 


CO 




! 


^< <M 


] 




CO 


September. . . 




iH > 


> 






















: 










: 










August . . 




= - . 




(M 


I-H tn 


1 




July 




m 


oo 




5 


CO CO 










OFFENSE. 


: 

i 


Extortion, attempted 
Fast driving 
False imprisonment 
False pretenses, obtaining money or 
goods by 
Failure to make legal entry on books 


5 5 

i a- 

s s 










:::::: 




Fire anns, discharging in cit 


i 1 j : 




: M -a : 

* g : 5 

M i * I 

I * 1 1 ! 1 - 

2 o JS > 

3 2 -s Si? 




* 

9 

U) 

i 
3 


J ^r g J 

S "S > -2 > -1 .2 . 
1 8 .2 2 S - 3 : 
ja 5 Ef 2 S 

i i ! I ! i i , 



102 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "A" CONTINUED. 


Tota 


k ls 


g rt <M ,-H g. X 







June 








B j - S 






















m 










May 











| 








, 


April 




. ^ 




S - " 






rH C 




March 




t- CO 




8 j S 






M n n 


February 




" 




& - - 


"^ 




* a . 


January 




rH lH CO t~ r-C in 








lO f-4 


' 


December. . . . 




M - ~ g S! 

1 








" C * 


November . . . 






I s " s 




1-1 


^ 00 




October 




CO 


^H CQ *" 


| 


: S 




September . . . 








g g 




., 




: 








August 

1 


" \ 


" 


m 


: : : c* 








: : 




July 


S3 


o- 




. . 






: : : Jg 




& : : la 




OFFENSE. 






Gambling, lottery aiding and mana 
ing 
Gambling, lottery house keeping . . 
Gambling, lottery house visiting. . . 
Gambling, pool-selling 
Gambling, lottery tickets, in posse 
aion.. . 


Gambling, lottery tickets, selling. . 
Gambling (nickel in slot) 
Gambling, tan game keeping 
Gambling, tan game visiting 
Gambling (Die eow same") 


i 

! 





Gambling (poker) 

Gambling (craps) 
Gambling-house, keeping.. 
Gamhlinfir-hoiiKe. visHiticr 



REPOUT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



Tot 


a l 3 


s a a - * s g - - - 3 S a g - 




i 


June 




m * 


CO CO CM CO i-l 


^ co go 




May 









.- 


'- S S 




: ** : 






: : 




April 




- * i 


i-l CO IM 


CO IM 


2 EH rt S 




March 


* 


M ^ 


oo ;o o 


CO 




S 2 S 




February .... 




g, 


S S5 S 






a * ^ 8 




January 




00 


S3 S S 




~ a s 


S ^ 


i 


December 


c^ 


oq oo co 


8 i 


1-1 




s s 


s 




November . . . 




, a ^ 


t- rt 


" 




in -* 


9 




October 




S ** 


t^ in 


m 




00 


S 




September... 


l-l -l ff. 


CO 






: - 


3! " 




; 






. 






August 


IM IM Ci 


- - a 


1-1 




2 2 M ^ 






July 


CO ^ ^ 






, = - s - 




OFFENSE. 


: : : r * 

i I ! H * f j 

S I f ,1 J 1 1 1 

j jliilii 
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ? 

i. a I. i a d a i 1 


i i I i i 1 


: 3 




1 1 1 S 1 f i 



104 



REPORT OP CHIEF OF POLICE. 



Toti 


ils 


cotieomam.-ieaeoio-ti<Mt~nmi-ie~ 

co ~ <o 55 * 







June 


: N 






i-H -H 34 (M 








May . 


CO 


a 


! 


D 


OO (M i-l CO t- - 


" 




April 






i-H Cs 


e* 


^ * CO <M 








March 


a 




<M 


e* 


,H CO CO ^ 






February 
















January 


* 




r- 





CO 






& * 


* 


: 






1 


December. . . . 


oo 




- 


CO 


CO CO 






8 * 


1-1 


November 







*"* 


CO 


* 






3 ^ 






October 


In 






<M 


f-H 1O 






1? * 






September.. 


S 




1 







b " 






^5 M 


* 




August 


oo 






^ 




CO 






5 S 






July 


m <M 


M t- rH 


1O 






S M ^ 








OFFENSE. 


Laundry ordinance, violating 
Lewd and indecent act, committing. 
License, teleuhone.. . . 


License law, merchandise 
License law.violating Chinat'n guide 
License law, liquor 
License law, no number on wagon . . 
Libel. . . 


License, peddling without 
License, soliciting without. 


Liquor, carrying into City Prison. . . 
Mornhiiie. carrvincr into Oitv Prison 


. 

> : 






Malicious mischief 

Mayhem 
Mayhem, attempt 
Minor, selling liquor to. 



REPORT OF bHIEP OF POLICE. 



105 



Total 






:M 


C-7 


* 


t> 


1O rH fH 
l < 


(M 


8 a ~ 




























June . . 






- 




o 


eo c<) 




*< e<5 




























May 












<M S 




rH 1A O: 








- 










iO CO 




^ : ~ - 




g 


















i 






March 


'~ t 








<M 


in 01 




W CO JH 






February .... 












Tt< rH 




O i-l CO 






January 






l-l 






<tl r- 




~ , g 






December 












^H <M 




rl 






November 












CO CO 




* i-( O 






October 








- 




10 * 


- 


t>. r-t t^ 





























September... 








CC 




< tn 




- ^ 3 






August 












tO M 




*- 2 




























J u ly 


. e* 


Cv 








C CO 


- 


a s 




































6 


6 




i 








| 




c 

^ 

? 


4 

i 

i 
i 

I. 

1 


' 1 

jl 

1 

s 


Minor, jumping on cable car in m 
tion. . 


Minor, jumping on steam car in m 


Minor, failure to provide for 
Murder 
Obscene literature, having in posse 


Obscene pictures, having in posses 


Obstructing officer 
Opium place, keeping 
Opium place, visiting 

Ormiin. na.rrv5nflr inf.r> flit.v Prisnn 


* 


i 

i 



106 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



Tota 


I,1 8 


a ~ * ^ - - -"* "sj| 







June 






i : ' 




F-H F-H <* * 


1-1 15 




. 




May 


e< " 




^ 




. 


rH CO 


: 






April 


<M 




Cs 


F-H 1M 


rH CM t- 


" 




March.. 








I-H <M ' rH in 


'"' ^ 




February. . . 


IT 






^ 


CO F-H 


rH t- 


F-H O 


January 






I ' '""' 




: n 


<M < 


15 


, 


December. . . . 






m . 




<M to 


Oi 


00 


November . . . 


F-H . I-H . . 




i-H 


<M m eo 


9 


October 


I-H * <M 






I-H m 


i 0. 




September . . . 


1 






<M CN 


CO ,-H 


: 


August 






F-^ F-H 




rH F 


n F- 


CO * 


July 


* 








*"" 


co 


F-I m 

rH 






OFFENSE. 


! 

i 


s 

o 




1 


3 




::<<:. 


Pawn-broker, refusing to show b 

tn nffinfir . . 


| 


Pawn-broker, charging illegal iut 
Personating an officer 
Poison, exposing for animals. . . 
Prostitution, paying money fo 
mal for . . 




o> 








: : c 


t 

H 

n i 

M tf 


^ 2 " 
1 | | 

C8 & 

W) . P, ^ 

. I i i 1 
: 1 1 i 1 1 

H n a to a 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



107 



Totals 


3 


oo 

t 


1 


June 


! * 


: : 




W jo 


i 


! 


May 


CO CO 


: ^ M 


cq 


"S 


" 


o 




April 


r-t t~ 


| t> rt O 




-a 




i 




March 


<M b- 


CO CO 


rl b- 




"i 


1-1 


! 




February 


'-*< 


CO 




* 




a s 


i 


! 










January 


10 


.0 rH 




(O 




a 


""* 


1 


s 


December . . . 





. 




CO ^ 


* s - - 


S 


; ; 








November., . . 


C< IO 


r 




";* 


: 1 




S 


October 


^ t, rH r* 








<M CO 





1 








September... 


-'"- 


* 









g 


August 


(H O 


i 






- : 


* 2 




s 

of 










Jnly 


S 


* 






CO 


- s 




CO 


OFFENSE. 


1 




. 









Tutals 




5 






B 




s 


-2 



5 
.2 


: : 




&0 


t 


Trademark, violation of 
Urinating in public places 
Vagrancy 

Wearing unlawful apparel.. . . 
Warrant, maliciously procuriu 


i!l! 

1 s ! 1 1 1 1 

U 1 if 1 f p 
i . !. . 1 1 * 1 1 1 i 
iil i ml : 



108 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



SUPPLEMENT No. 1 

FELONY CASES HELD TO ANSWER IN THE POLICE COURT AND SENT TO 



OFFENSES CHARGED. 



Abduction 3 

Arson 3 1 

Assault by means and force likely to produce great bodily injury 17 

Adultery ' 1 

Assault with a deadly weapon 43 21 

Assault with intent to commit murder 40 

Assault with intenf to commit rape 9 1 

Assault with intent to commit robbery 8 I 9 

Attempt to commit burglary 13 

Attempt to extort 3 

Attempt to commit grand larceny 3 1 

Attempt to commit infamous crime against nature ] 1 

Attempt to commit mayhem 1 

Attempt to rescue prisoners . 1 

Bigamy 1 

Bvrglary 201 

Child stealing 2 

Conspiracy Misdemeanor 2 

Crime against nature 5 

Destroying telegraph message 1 

Embezzlement 58 16 

Extortion 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



109 



TO EXHIBIT "A." 

THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR FINAL TRIAL AND DISPOSITION OF SAME. 



CONVICTED. 


Acquitted 


DISMISSED. 


PENDING. 


1 




o_ 


O 
B" 
I 

1 
e? 
| 


Of misdemeanor 


No evidence to convict 


Defendants sentenced on 
other charges 


Defendants dead 


M 

O 

2* 
3- 

y 

A 
O> 

2. 
*c' 

CD 


On habeas corpus 


On demurrer 


Defendants discharged 
own recognizance 


Against defcnd'ts sentem 
on other charges. . . . 


Against defendants insane. . 


Against minors in Industrial 
School 


> 

OS 

1 
c" 
5. 

ST. 

i 

I 

1 




For trial June 30, 1900 












































3 
1 
8 
1 
14 
9 
1 
1 


1 
1 

8 
5 

1 
1 


$ 
4 
17 
1 
64 
61 
10 
17 
15 
3 
4 
2 
1 
1 
4 
270 
2 
2 
11 
1 
74 
6 






















1 




1 










4 




. 








4 






























2 
5 
3 

1 
3 


1 

5 


.... 


5 
8 
2 
4 
2 


14 
16 





4 
6 


3 


1 
1 




... 


1 




11 
9 
4 
3 
5 
1 

9 


4 








2 






1 










2 








I 






... 


3 






1 
2 


























1 




































1 


















































1 





1 

58 
















9 




1 

86 
2 












13 


2 


4 








.... 


75 


6 




12 


14 


































2 


2 


1 


1 


1 








.... 






4 
1 








1 








4 






1 














6 


18 






21 


*24 
4 














9 







































110 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



SUPPLEMENT No. 1 TO 



OFFENSES CHARGED. 



Felony under Section 51, Penal Code 

felony under Section 115, Penal Code 1 

Felony under Section '^22, Penal Code 1 

Felony under Section 266, Penal Code 1 

Felony under Section 470, Penal Code 1 

Felony unler Section 475, Penal Code 2 

Felony under Section 476, Penal Code 2 7 

Felony under Section 479, Penal Code 1 

Felony under Section 564, Penal Code 1 

Felony under Section 587, Penal Code 1 

Felony under Section 596., Penal Code { 2 

Felony under Section 22, Purity of Elections Act 1 

Felony under Section 2 1 ), Purity of Elections Act 

Felony Compulsory prostitution of women 1 

Forgery 

Fraudulently concealing property 2 

Gaming 

Grand Larceny 134 

Incest... 1 

Libel 7 

Manslaughter 2 4 

Mayhem 12 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



Ill 



EXHIBIT "A" CONTINUED. 



CONVICTED. 


Acquitted 


DISMISSED. 


PENDING. 


1 


As charged 


Of lesser offense -felon: 


2 
I 

i 


No evidence to convict 


Defendants sentenced on 
other charges 


Defendants dead 


In furtherance of justice. . . 



3 

% 

n- 
o 

1 


On demurrer 


Defendants discharged on 
their own recognizance . . 


Against defend'ts sentenced 
on other charges 


> 

S. 
s 
S- 
1 

1 
1 

5 




Against minors in Industrial 
School 


Ag'nst fugitives from justice 


For trialJune 30, 1900 












1 






























3 


3 
] 
1 
3 
1 
2 
9 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
76 
2 
4 
183 
1 
15 
6 
3 


















































1 


















2 






















1 


1 


















































9 




























1 


3 






3 
1 
1 


2 












































































1 






































2 






















1 








































3 
























1 


5 








1 


1 






1 




17 
1 


30 


4 




1 


10 

' 4 
15 

7 
3 
2 


































25 


5 


2 


13 


11 








1 




39 


36 


1 




35 

1 




















( 












3 
1 
1 


3 
1 


1 










1 





























































112 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



SUPPLEMENT No. 2 TO 



OFFENSES CHARGED. 



Misdemeanor 1 4 

Murder 31 22 

Obtaining money or property by false pretenses 33 8 

Perjury 34 3 

Petit larceny, 10 2 

Rape 12 5 

Receiving stolen goods 9 3 

Robbery 37 16 

Seduction under promise of marriage 2 1 

Subornation of perjury 1 

Final Totals... 



1,130 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



113 



EXHIBIT "A" CONCLUDED. 



COKVICTED. 


Acquitted 


DISMISSED. 


PENDING. 


! 


As charged 


2 
1 

(S 

1 

1 
'< 



I 

3 


2 




< 

s 

< 

r 


Defendants sentenced on 
other charges 


Defendants dead 


3 

s" 

I 
I 

O 

"c" 
1 



a 



o 

3 


On demurrer 


Defendants discharged on 
own recognizance 


Against defend'ts sentenced 
on other charges 


> 

5' 

P< 
2, 

CD 

B 

3 

5 

5" 


Against minors in Industrial 
School 


Ag'nst fugitives from justice 


8 

H 

c 

i 

p 


I 
2 

I 


i 














i 




1 










i 

10 
8 
17 


5 
53 
41 
37 
12 
17 
12 
53 
3 
1 

1130 




6 
1 


5 

1 
1 










3 


4 
1 
4 
8 
4 


1 

2 
2 
2 
? 


8 
2 


.... 


10 
23 
11 










i 










2 
4 
1 
3 


























1 
















3 

5 
7 
1 


3 

5 

5 

1 












1 








9 














2 




19 


6 




2 






2 


































































































114 REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



SUPPLEMENT No. 2 TO EXHIBIT "A." 

REPORT OF POLICE COURT APPEALS TO THE SUPERIOR COURT, AND DISPOSITION 
OF SAME FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 

Appeals pending June 30, 1899 16 

Appeals filed during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900 59 

Judgments affirmed 5 

Judgments affirmed and appeals dismissed 7 

Judgments affirmed and modified 1 

Judgments dismissed 1 

Judgments dismissed for want of prosecution 

Judgments reversed and cause dismissed 33 

Bending June 30, 1900 20 



Totals 75 75 



RECAPITULATION 

OF SUPPLEMENTS Nos. 1 AND 2 TO EXHIBIT "A" SUPERIOR COURT CASES. 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants discharged on their own 

recognizance 241 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants sentenced on other 

charges 202 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants insane 25 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendant minors in industrial schools 3 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants fugitives from justice 182 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants for examination 1 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants found guilty but not sen- 
tenced 1 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants convicted and judgment 

suspended 28 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants for trial 163 

Cases received during the year ending June 30, 1900 284 

Writs of habeas corpus pending July 1, 1899 6 

Writs of habeas corpus issued during the year ending June 30, 1900 1?9 

Proceedings against incorrigible minors received during the year ending June 30, 

1900 13 

Appeals from Police Court pending July 1, 1899 19 

Appeals from Police Courts filed during the year ending June 30, 1900 115 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 115 

RECAPITULATION CONCLUDED. 

Conricted as charged 10 

Convicted of lesser offense 57 

Oonvicted of misdemeanor 3 

Acquitted , 50 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments affirmed 31 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments affirmed and dismissed. 1 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments affirmed and modified 1 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments modified 1 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments dismissed 3 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments dismissed for want of prosecution 4 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments reversed and cause dismissed 66 

Appeals from Police Court Pending June 30. 1900 27 

Writs of habeas corpus Granted 39 

Writs of habeas corpus Writs dismissed and petitioners remanded 10 

Writs of habeas corpus Writs dismissed and petitioners discharged 9 

Writs of habeas corpus^Dismissed 42 

Writs of habeas corpus^Denied and prisoners remanded 3 

Writsof habeas corpus Withdrawn 1 

Writs of habeas corpus Denied 3 

Writs of habeas corpus Off calendar 3 

Writs o habeas corpus Pending June 30, 1900 25 

Incorrigibles committed to Whittier State School lO 

Incorrigibles committed to Preston State School 1 

Incorrigibles committed to Boys and Girls' Aid Society 1 

Incorrigibles pending June 30, 1900 : 1 

Dismissed no evidence to convict 32 

Dismissed defendants sentenced on other charges 7 

Dismissed in furtherance of justice 1 

Dismissed on habeas corpus 10 

Dismissed on demurrer 3 

Pending June 30, 19i)0, against defendants discharged on their own recognizance.. . 249 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants sentenced on other charges 202 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants insane , 29 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants imnors in industrial schools 2 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants fugitives from justice 184 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants for examination 1 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants committed to reform schools on other 

charges 3 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants convicted and judgment suspended.... 29 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants for trial 163 

1,412 1,412 



116 REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



SUPPLEMENT No. 3 TO EXHIBIT -'A." 

ESCAPES, PRISONERS EN ROUTE, INSANE PERSONS ARRESTED, WITNESSES 
DETAINED, ETC., DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 

Homeless persons lodged in City Prison ?52 

Indigent persons committed to Alms House 56 

Insane persons arrested 233 

Insane persons en route to asylums 6 

Minors en route to public institutions 308 

Persons arrested on bench warrants from Police Judges and Superior Courts 107 

Persons for medical treatment 1,617 

Persons surrendered by bondsmen 161 

Prisoners detained for French Consul 8 

Prisoners detained for United States Marshal 26 

Prisoners en-route to other cities. 109 

Prisoners en-route to State Prisons 36 

Witnesses detained in custody , 11 

Total number of arrests charged with various offenses, as per Exhibit ' 'A" 26,448 

Total number of arrests and detentions 29,478 

Number of Chinese offenders arrested 2,857 

Number of Japanese offenders arrested 311 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



117 



EXHIBIT "B." 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE NUMBER OF ARRESTS AND STRENGTH OF 
THE POLICE FORCE FOR THE THIRTY YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



YEARS. 


NUMBER 
OF 
POLICE. 


NUMBER 
OF 
ARRESTS. 


YEARS. 


NUMBER 
OF 
POLICE. 


NUMBER 
OF 
ARRESTS. 


1870 71 


104 


12332 


1885-86 


406 


26,587 


1871 72 


104 


11 035 


1886-87 


406 


20,385 


1872 73 


104 


12810 


1887-88 


406 


19466 


1873-74 


121 


13 007 


1888-89 


406 


23 462 


1874 75 


152 


16 820 


1889-90 


406 


23 549 


1875 76 


150 


20 108 


189Q_91 


406 


24 528 


1876-77 


154 


21 789 


1891-92 


456 


28417 


1877 78 


172 


18627 


1892-93 


456 


25,987 


1878-79 


329 


22 120 


1893-94 


456 


25824 


1879 80 


340 


21 063 


1894-95 


482 


25 960 


1880-81 


400 


23 Oil 


1895 96 


557 


30 462 


1881-82 


400 


25 969 


1896 97 


559 


29,168 


1882 83 


400 


24 149 


1897 98 


559 


28013 


1883-84 


400 


25591 


1898 99 


559 


27 769 


1884-85 


400 


24,432 


1899-1900 Jan. 8, 1900 


573) 










June 30 


588| 


26,448 



NOTE. On December 11, 1899, 14 officers were added to the regular force, to succeed 16 patrol 
drivers who were formerly appointed by the Board of Supervisors. 



118 



REPORT OP CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "C." 

NUMBER OF WITNESSES SUBPOENAED BY THE POLICE DEPARTMENT FOR THE 

POLICE COURTS, SUPERIOR COURTS AND GRAND JURY, AND LOST 

CHILDREN RESTORED TO THEIR PARENTS OR GUARDIANS, 

DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



1899-July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1900 January 

Februar} T 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Totals 



WITNESSES 
SUBP(ENAED. 

844 

1,018 

874 

601 

782 

978 

1,016 

1,117 

1,106 

996 

816 

929 

13,470 



LOST CHILDREN 
RESTORED. 

17 
39 
36 
44 
33 
30 
23 
?5 
40 
32 
46 
18 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "D.' 



AMOUNT OF PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND LOST AND AMOUNT RECOVERED 
BY THE POLICE DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



DATB. 


STOLEN AND 
LOST. 


RECOVERED. 


1899 July ... .*. 


$5,784 00 


$2,412 95 




6 316 00 


8 531 75 


September 


5,971 00 


5,024 75 




10,085 00 


2,766 35 




8,117 00 


5,191 90 


December 


12,339 00 


3,993 80 




6,633 00 


4,191 15 




4,290 00 


4 3( 9 73 


"March 


16,700 00 


4 332 67 


April . ... 


4,134 00 


28,961 70 


Mav 


3,667 00 


7,513 30 




3,339 90 


5,008 00 








Totals 


$87,376 00 


$77,238 05 









120 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



SUPPLEMENT TO EXHIBIT ; T>." 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF AMOUNT OF PROPERTY STOLEN AND LOST. AND 

AMOUNT RECOVERED BY THE POLICE FOR THE SIXTEEN 

YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



STOLEN AND LOST. 



RECOVERED. 



1884-85 $141,106 35 

1885-86 83,771 15 

1886-87 95,115 88 

1887-88 123,753 39 

106,103 93 
75,570 10 
1890-91. 

1891-92 90,953 99 

1892-93 97,645 10 

1393-94 119,159 48 

1894-95 98,666 78 

114,405 70 

1896-97 110,44231 

1897-98 96,210 64 

87,995 SO 
1900 87,37500 

Grand Totals... $1,627,14423 



$92,005 50 
43,042 35 

41.319 07 
85,558 15 
58,155 35 
44,420 25 
62,310 10 

52.320 55 
46,443 60 
67,371 63 
59,901 36 
60,934 40 
54,375 24 
61,606 33 
81,239 04 
77,238 05 



J,240 67 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



121 



EXHIBIT "E." 

MONEY AND OTHER PROPERTY TAKEN FROM PERSONS .AT THE TIME OP 
THEIR ARREST AND REMAINING UNCLAIMED IN THE HANDS OF THE 
CHIEF OF POLICE SINCE LAST REPORT, AND DELIVERED TO THE_CITY 
AND COUNTY TREASURER, JUNE 30, 1900, FOR DISPOSAL IN ACCORDANCE 
WITH LAW. 



NO, 


DATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 










1 


1898 Dec. 26.... 


Lun Fong . 


Papers. 


2 


Dec. 26.... 


Len Loo 


Letters. 


3 


Dec. 26.... 


Chew Lung 


Papers. 


4 


1899 Dec. 21. 






5 


Sept. 23 .... 


Ah Sang 


Five dollars and poll-tax receipt. 




Oct. 18.... 


Charlie Lung 




7 


Nov. 29.... 


Ah Sang 


Forty-three copper cents. 


8 


Dec. 5.... 


Toy Ling 


One 85-100 dollars and purse. 


g 


Dec. 17.... 


Ah Woo 


Sixty cents. 


10 


July 16.... 




Thirty cents and purse. 


11 


Nov. 6.... 


Senyan, S. (Jap.) 


One 70-100 dollars. 


12 


Dec, 19.... 


Victor Marcasina (Jap.) 


One 40-100 dollars. 


13 


July 3.... 


Armstrong, Edie 


Two checks, pin, key and collar-button. 


14 


July 24.... 


Anderson, Robert 


One dollar. 


15 


Aug. 9. .. 


Allcott, William 


One 45-100 dollars. 


16 


Oct. I.... 


Archer, Isaac B 


Seventy cents and purse. 


17 


Oct, 4.... 


Argo, James 


Seventy cents and spectacles. 


18 


Oct. 11.... 


Austin, Robert G 


One 45-100 dollars. 


19 


Oct. 29.. 


Anderson, Samuel 


Eighty cents. 


20 


Nov. 4.... 


Allen, G 


Thirty-five cents. 


L 21 


Nov. 16.... 


Armstrong, Robert 


Chain. 


22 


Nov. 24.... 


Allgreen, Andrew 


Purse, lock and key. 


23 


Nov. 2? .... 


Alcarez Joseph . ... 


Fifty-five cents. 


24 


Dec. 9.... 


Angell William 


Sixty cents. 


25 


Der 23.... 




One dollar and foreign coins. 











122 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 


ARTICLE. 


26 


1899 Dec 26 




One 75-100 dollars and match-box 


27 
28 


1889 July 25.... 
1899 July 9 


Brien, Samuel 


One 50-100 dollars. 


29 
30 


Aug. 2.... 
Aug. 14.... 


Borden, E. V 
Bartell, Hans 


One dollar. 
Purse. 


31 


Aug 21 






32 


Sept. 5 




One 55-100 dollars. 


32 
34 


Sept. 18.... 
Sept 20.... 


Brooks, Thomas 
Brady, James 


One 70-100 dollars. 
Seventy-five cents. 


35 


Sept 29 




O. F. nickel watch and gilt vest chain. 


36 


Oct. 1.... 


Brown, W 


Fifty cents. 


37 


Oct. 17.... 


Brown, W. A 


Ninety cents. 


38 


Oct. 18.... 




Letters and papers. 


39 


Oct 31.... 


Burns Walter 


Three pipes. 


40 
41 


Nov. 6.... 
Nov. 8.... 


Bailey, Clara 
Brown, Charles H 


Thirty-five cents. 
Two dollars. 


42 


Nov 9 


Baker A 


One 75-100 dollars. 


43 
44 


Nov. 18.... 
Nov. 25.... 


Blum, L 
Baldwin, H. A 


Twenty-five cents. 
Rin^. 


45 
46 
47 


Nov. 27.... 
Dec. 3.... 
Dec 3 


Burke, Ed 
Brannan, Peter 
Bartlett, George 


Ten cents and badge. 
O. F. nickel watch and chain. 
One 50-100 dollars. 


48 


Dec 6 




Five 10-100 dollars. 


49 


Dec 7 


Brockie, George .... 


H. C. gold watches Nos. 3,477,973 and 48,440 


50 


Dec 10 




and chain. 
One 40-100 dollars. 


51 


Dec 16 


Bartlett, E. H 


One dollar. 


52 


Dec 20 


Brown William 


Two 25-100 dollars. 


53 


Dec 24 




Ten cents. 


54 
55 
56 


Dec. 25.... 
Dec. 29.... 
Dec. 30.... 


Bfeimenter, Charles 
Brody, M 

Buller, John . 


Two dollars, O. F. silver watch No. 6,362,850. 
One dollar. 
Three 50-100 dollars, counterfeit 56-cent piece. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 


57 


1899-Dec. 31.... 


Brooks, Charles 


Chain. 


58 

EQ 


' July 3.... 
Tiilv 4 


Craze, Alfred.. 
Collins Cliarles 


Twenty-five cents. 
Silver O F watch Waltham, Nos: 1 885,408 r 


oy 
60 


uuiy i. . . . 
July 15.... 


Carrington S. W ....... 


93,827. 
Fifteen cents. 


61 
62 


Aug. 8.... 
Aug. 17.... 


Corbett, Thomas 
Collins Frank 


O. F. silver watch Nos. 166,500. 5,181,176. 
Chain and key. 


63 


Aug. 19.... 


Carr, J. J 


Twenty-five cents, 


64 


Aug. 27 


Callahan, Thomas 


Seventy cents. 


65 


Sept. 2.... 


Chambers, Frank 


One 70-100 dollars. 


56 


Sept. 4.... 


Cassidy. Thomas 


One 40-100 dollars. 


67 


Sept. 7.... 


Camp, Edward 


Ten cents. 


68 


Sept. 10.... 


Carey. Hugh 


Chain. 


69 


Sept. 12.... 


Costello, Thomas 


Four 40-100 dollars. 


70 
71 


Sept. 17.... 
Sept. 21 


Colder wood, John 
Coff ey Jack 


Fifteen cents, purse and scissors. 
Two 35-100 dollars. 


72 


Sept. 25 


Connolly Thomas. 


Ninety cents and purse. 


i & 
73 


Sept. 26 


Costello John 


Fifty cents and spectacles. 


74 


Sept. 28.... 


Carmody, William 


One 55-100 dollars. 


75 


Oct. 2.... 


Clark, Cornelius 


Fifty-five cents. 


76 


Oct. 4.... 


Creadon, Dennis 


Nine 5 100 dollars. 


77 
78 


Oct. 5.... 
Oct. 6.... 


Calem, Finn 
Casatana Gussefi. . . . 


Six dollars. 
Sixty cents. 


79 


Oct. 8.... 


Christen&en, K ..... 


Sixty cents. 


80 


Oct. 22 


Corbett Malock 


Fifteen cents. 


81 


Oct. 31 .... 


Cramer P 


Chain and collar-button. 


82 


Nov. 5 


Christol William 


Eighty-five cents. 


83 


Nov. 9.... 


Courtier, L 


Fifty-five cents. 


84 

QK 


Nov. 25.... 
Nov. 26... 


Corbett. Thomas 


One 15-100 dollars. 
Twenty-five 35-100 dollars. 


oo 

86 

07 


Nov. 27... 
Nnv 29 


Carlin, Patrick 
Cliftoo John 


Five cents and purse. 
O. F. silver watch. 


01 


iNOV. *!7. . . 







124 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 


88 


1899 Dec 9 


Clark Jennie. 


Two 35-100 dollars 


89 


Dec 10 


Campbell Annie 




90 
91 
92 


Dec. 16.... 
Dec. 16.... 
Dec 23 


Claybough, Frank 
Christensen, W 

Courey, Thomas 


One 5-100 dollars and chain. 

Norwich gold-filled watch and chain, No. 

847.129. 


93 
94 
95 
96 


Dec. 23.... 
Deo. 24.... 
Dec. 25.... 


Cannon, John 
Christensen, John 
Collins, William 
Clancy Geo. F 


Fifteen cents. 
Eighty cents. 
Seventy-five cents. 


97 




Clinger, August 


One 50-100 dollar? 


98 




D\etz, F 




99 




Demerrea A.. , 


Sixty-five cents 


100 
101 
102 
103 
104 


July 22.... 
Aug. 2.... 
Aug. 6 .... 
Aug. 26.... 
Aug 26 


Donovan, John 
Dillon, Thomas 
Doyle, D. W 
Dougherty, Barney 
Dodge, Edward. 


Thirty-five cents. 
Eight 15-100 dollars. 
Fifteen cents. 
Thirty-five cents. 
One 15-100 dollars. 


105 


Sept. 6 


Dunn C. C 


Seventy-five cents and O. F. Philpot nickel 


106 

107 
108 


Spt. 21.... 
Sept. 26.... 
Sept 30 


Donovan, William 
Davis, John 
Didlake, William 


watch. 
Fifty cents. 

Eighty-five cents. 
Twenty-five cents. 


109 


Oct. 3 


Dewey James .... 


Twenty-five cents. 


110 


Oct 10 . 


Dolan, Edward 


Seventy cents. 


111 
112 
113 
114 


Oct. 11.... 
Oct. 12.... 
Oct. 13.... 
Oct 14 


Donohue, F 
Day, Harry 
Dupey, Samuel 
Daley Charles 


One 25-100 dollars. 
One 30-100 dollars. 
Thirty cents. 
One 50-100 dollars and glasses. 


115 
116 


Oct. 17.... 
Oct 19 


Doe, John 


Twenty-five cents. 
Two 30-100 dollars. 


117 


Oct 31 


Driscoll Dennis . ... 


Eighty-five cents. 


118 


Oct 31 




Twenty-five cents. 











REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



125 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 




PROPERTY. 


119 


1899 Nov . 6 


Debaugl Paul 




120 


Nov. 6.... 


Doyle, D. W 


Fifteen cents. 


121 


Nov 11 


Davis Frank 




122 


Nov 17 




One 95-100 dollars 


123 
124 


Nov. 18.... 
Nov. 25 


Devlan, George 
De Boice Alfred 


Fifteen cents. 
Forty-five cents 


125 


Dec 23 


Doherty Jack 


Twenty-five cunts and purse 


126 


Dec 25 


Dullea Dennis 


Thirty cents. 


127 
128 


Dec. 30 ... 
June 28. .. . 


Derby, Mike 
Eixon, Charles 


Fifty-five cents and purse. 
Ten cents and ring. 


129 


July 2 ... 


Errion, Charles 


O. F. brass watch 


130 
131 
132 


July 17.... 
Aug. 21.... 
Sept 21 


Espinosce, Neston 
Edin, Hans ,.. 


Baggage check and papers. 
One 15-100 dollars. 
Thirty cents. 


133 
134 


Sept. 28.... 
Dec. 2.... 


Evans, H. C 
Errickson, E. W 


Forty cents. 
One 40- 100 dollars. 


133 


July 11.... 


Farrell. Theresa 


Eyeglasses. 


136 


Aug. 12.... 


Fleming, David 


Twenty cents and purse. 


137 


Oct. 11.... 


Fix, Charles 


Letters, books and papers. 


133 


Oct. 14.... 


Ferris, Edward 


Twenty cents. 


139 


Nov. 3.... 


Farrell, Theresa 


Eyeglasses. 


140 


Nov 7 . . 


Fritz John 


One 90-100 dollars and papers. 


141 
142 


Nov. 10.... 
Nov 12 . . 


Finley, John 
Fritz, John 


One 40-100 dollars. 
Two 60-100 dollars. 


143 


Nov. 13.... 


Fraber. P. H 


Fifteen cents. 


144 
145 
146 


Nov. 15.... 
Nov. 25.... 
Nov. 30.... 


Furnell.Fred 
Franklin, Henry 
Fernilius Jack 


Fifty-five cents. 
Fifteen cents. 
Silk muffler. 


147 


Dec. 5.... 


Fitzclarence G 


Seventy-five cents. 


148 


Dec. 6.... 


Fogarty, John 


One 25-100 dollars. 


149 


Dec. 6.... 


Ferguson, Albeit 


Chain and locket. 











126 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 


150 


899 Dec 17 




Fifteen cents. 


151 


Dec 25 


Foster Fred 




152 
153 " 


Dec. 25... 
Dec 27 


Flaherty. Tim 
Fagan, Mary 


Ten cents, purse and glasses. 


154 


July 1 






155 
156 
157 
158 
159 


July 9.... 
Aug. 10.... 
Aug. 20.... 
Aug. 26.... 
Oct 9 


Gaf ney, John 
Gorman, James" 
Gibson, Ernest 
Geary, John 


One 80-100 dollars. 
One 30-100 dollars. 
Keys and chain. 
I Seven dollars. 
One 50-100 dollars. 


160 
161 


Oct. 12.... 
Oct 20 


Green, George G 
Geisser Joseph 


Two 30-100 dollars. 
Nickel watch-case. 


162 
163 


Oct. 28.... 
Nov 28 


Gilmore, C. C 
Gibson George 


One dollar. 


164 


Vnv 29 






165 


Dec 6 


Gilligan, Edward 


buttons. 


166 


Dec 20 


Garrity H 




167 
168 
169 


Dec, 24... 

April 10... 
May 30 


Gleeson, Mary 
Hertel, Gustav 
Hunter William 


One 30-100 dollars. 
Papers and letters. 


170 






Book. 


171 
172 


July 12... 
July 18 


Heggei ty, Edward 


One 30-100 dollars, 
Letter. 


173 


July 25 




One 40-100 dollars 


174 
175 
176 


Aug. 16... 
Aug. 25... 
Aug 25 


Hessinger, Charles 
Hawkins, Jessie 
Hall, G It 


Seventy cents. 
One dollar. 
Cuff-link and lancet. 


'177 
178 
179 


Aug. 26... 
Sept. 2... 
Sept. 21 


Hannah, George L 
Henning, Lulu 
Hansen Fred 


One 60-100 dollars. 
Seventy-five cents. 
One dollar. 


180 


Spt 24 


Harff George C 













REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



127 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 


181 
182 
183 


1899-Sept. 25. . 
Oct. 4.... 
Oct 15 


Hutchings, George 
Harris, Herman W 
Hartter F L 


Seventy-five cents. 
One dollar. 


184 
185 
186 


Oct. 29.... 
Nov. 6.. . 
Nov. 11.... 


Hyrnan, Max 
Hurley, Charles 
Harris, Daniel 


Eighty cents. 
Two 25-100 dollars. 
Forty cents. 


187 


Nov 14 


Herlacher C A .... 




188 


Nov 20 






189 


Nov 29 


Harris Ed 






Nov 30 


Harris Ed 




191 


Dec. 1.... 


Hunt Timothy 




192 


Dec. 14.... 


Habby, Herman 




193 


Dec. 16.... 


Holder, John 


Fifty-five cents and O. F white watch 


194 


Dec 22 






195 


Dec 24 


Hannan William 




196 
197 
198 
199 
200 
201 


Oct. 11.... 
July 30.... 
Sept. 8.... 
Sept. 22.... 
Oct. 20.... 
Oct 21 


Isaacs, Fred 
Johnson, Frank 
Jones, William 
Jansen, Martin 
Johnson, Jack 


Fifty-five cents. 
Scarf pin. 
Eighty-five cents. 
Twenty cents and purse. 
Matchbox and cuff-buttons. 
One dollar, small O F watch wallet and pa 


202 
203 


Oct. 2.... 
Oct. 9 


Johnson, Andrew 


pers. 
One 95-100 dollars. 

One dollar. 


204 
205 


Oct. 9.... 
Oct 24 


Johnson, Frank 


Lock-game check and steamship ticket. 


206 


Oct 28 






207 
208 


Oct. 29.... 
Nor 7 


Jackson, Pauline 


Three 35-100 dollars. 


209 
210 
211 


Nov. 17.... 
Nov. 17.... 
Nov 27 


Jones, Frank 
Jaokson, Thomas 
Jones Charles 


Three 50-100 dollars. 
Glasses. 
Fifteen cents and O. F. nickel watch. 











128 



REPORT F CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


NAME, 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 


212 


899-Dec. 7.... 


Johnson, Henry 


Sixty-five cents. 


213 


Dec. 10.... 


Jampodesto, Mofeto 


One 5-100 dollars. 


214 


Dec. 24.... 


Johnson, Emil 


Fifty cents. 


215 


Dec. 24.... 


Jurey, Con 


Ten cents. 


216 


April 23 


Kappel Mary 




217 


May 2.... 


Kane, Mrs 


Ring. 


218 


July 2.... 


Kempelrner, John 


Ring. 


219 


Aug. 12.... 


Kelly, George 


Forty cents 


220 


Sept. I.... 


Kelly, John 


One 60-100 dollars. 


221 


Sept. 20 


Kane Daniel 


Seventy-five cents. 


222 


Oct. 6.... 


Kane, Edward 


Eighty cents. 


223 


Oct. 7 


Kellet Julia 


Eyeglasses. 


224 


Oct. 19.... 


Kelly, Frank . 


Fifty cents. 


225 


Oct. 27.... 


Kraige, George . , 


Thirty-five cents. 


226 


Nov. 18.... 


Kelly, John .., 


Forty cents and eye tr lcisst?s 


227 


Nv. 22.... 


Klatt, Joseph 


Ring. 


228 


Dec. 6.... 


Kelly, Nellie 


Badge and ring. 


229 


July 23.... 


Lynch, Michael 


Comb and eye-glasses. 


230 


Aug. 6.... 


Laurence, J 


Two 35-100 dollars. 


231 


Sept. 13.... 


Lloyd, J 


Seventy cents. 


232 


Pept. 19 


"Lenon, Jam6S 


H. C. brass watch, No. 82,595. 


233 


Sept. 23.... 


Lindsay, H. M 


Imitation diamond ring. 


234 


Oct. 14.... 


Lane, C 


Purse. 


235 


Oct. 26.... 


Livingston, R. F 


Two dollars, papers and scarf-pin. 


236 


Oct. 31 ... 


Laf&rce John 


T 25 100 d '1 d 


237 


Nov. 3 


Lees P J 


Fort 


238 


Nov. 12 


Lyons, James 


Fift ^vT 


239 


Nov. 15.... 


Lukeson, John D 


Twenty-five cents, purse and keys. 


240 


Nov. 19 


Lyons, Thomas 


, 


241 


Nov. 29... 


LeCount, A 


Baggage c 


242 


Dec. 10... 


Laughlin, Charles 


Forty-five cents and ring. 
Sixty-five cents. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



129 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


KAME. 


: 

PROPERTY. 


243 


1899 Dec. 18 




Three 60-100 dollars 


244 
245 
246 


Dec. 24.... 
June 23 
July 9.... 


Lapsley, George 
Murphy, Catherine 
Magini Mrs. . 


Fifteen cents. 
Thirty cents. 


247 
248 


July 22.... 
July 23.... 


Mackhn, Annie 
Miller Fred 


One dollar. 


249 
250 


July 28.... 
July 29.... 


Merickson, Harmun 
Martin Pearl 


Seal and silver watch 


151 


Aug. 16.... 


Manson, Edward 




252 


Aug. 30.... 


Moutison, Frank 




253 


Sept. 3... 


Martin, John 


O. F. silver watch No. 3,795 and chain. 


254 


Sept. 15 . 


Murray, Charley 


Two 35-100 dollars. 


255 


Oct 1... 


Martin, Lizzie 


Twenty-five cents. 


256 
257 


Oct. 4.... 
Oct 7 


Mason, William 

Moro N 


Forty-five cents. 


258 


Oct. 11.... 


Murphy, Daniel 




259 


Oct. 13.... 


Marnetti, Charles 




260 
261 
262 


Oct. 28.... 
Nov. 4.... 
Nov. 9 


Monohan, Michael 
Moran, John 
Murphy Mike 


Two pair glasses and papers. 
Ten cents. 


263 


Nov. 9.... 


Maine, Jean 


Ten cents and white-metal chain. 


264 


Nov 10 . 


Miller, Henry 


Thirty cents. 


265 


Nov 13 


Morris F 


One 65-100 dollars, hunting-case gilt>atch Nos. 


266 
267 


Dec. 9.... 
Dec 10 


Murray. George 
Magee, Arthur J 


170,919 and 17,090. 
Thirty cents. 

Fifty cents. 


268 
269 
270 


Dec. 12.... 
Dec. 15.... 
Dec. 16.... 


Martini, Rudolph 
Murdock, Walter 
Martin, Mary *. 


Matchbox. 
Glasses. 
One 60-100 dollars, purse, ring and^key. 


271 
272 
273 


Deo. 19.... 
Dec. 20.... 
Dec. 23 . . 


Manasse, Mrs. F. L 
Maher, Mike 
Moore William 


* 
One 15-100 dollars and purse. 

One dollar, 
fifteen cents. 











130 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 


274 


1899 Dec. 30.... 


Mitchell, James 


One 10-100 dollar purse O F. gilt watch No 


275 


July 9.... 


McFihney Edward 


. 6,602,386, chain and charms. 


276 


July 27.... 


McBeth A 


Bank-books S and L Societv 


277 


July 27.... 


McEritt Frank 




278 


Aug. 9.... 


McGrew, Nellie 


Four 75-100 dollars. 


279 


Aug. 11.... 


McArdle, Peter 


One 80-100 dollars. 


280 
281 


Aug. 10.... 
Aug. 14 


McGinness, John 
MCartney Ella. 


One 65-100 dollars. 
Purse 


282 


Aug. 23.... 


McCready, William 


Knife. 


283 


Aug. 29... 


McCleary, Andrew . 


Fifty cents. 


284 
285 


Sept. 28.... 
Sept. 28.... 


McCormick. Nathaniel.. 
Mclntyre, J. C 


Twenty cents and badge. 
Eighty cents. 


286 


Oct. 6.... 


McDermott, Edward 


One dollar and eyeglasses. 


287 
288 


Oct. 8.... 
Oct. 8.... 


McArdel, Michael ,. 
McManus Frank.... 


Sixty-five cents. 
Purse, matchbox and papers. 


289 


Oct. 10.... 


McCormack, Nellie 


Fifty-two cents and purse. 


290 


Oct. 30.... 


McDade, Mary 


Ten cents and purse. 


291 


Nov. 10.... 


McFeeley, John 


O. F. nickel watch. 


292 


Nov. 13.... 


McDevitt, James 


Three dollars. 


293 


Nov. 14.... 


McCousland, James 


One 5-100 dollars. 


294 


Nov. 19.... 


McCreany, Patrick 


Thirty ceuts. 


295 


Nov. 19.... 


McCloud, Dan 


Eighty-five cents and ring. 


296 


Nov. 29.... 


McDonald, Tom 


Fifteen cents and purse. 


297 

298 


Dec. 4.... 
Dec. 9.... 


McSweeney, Mike 
McGrath, Patrick 


Ninety cents. 


299 
300 


Dec. 9.... 
Dec. 16.... 


McDevitt, Andrew 
McArdle, Mary 


One 10-100 dollars. 
Gold ring. 


301 


Dec. 18.... 


McDonald, .lohn 


O. F. nickel watch. 


302 
303 


Dec. 23.... 
Dec. 23.... 


McDonnell, Daniel 
McDade, Edward . 


Fifteen cents. 
One 30-100 dollars. 


304 


Dec. 27.... 


McGonnigan, Henry 


One 80-100 dollars. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



131 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 


305 


1899 Oct 6 


Nacei, Charles 


Thirty cents 


306 


Oct. 12 


Nelson C.W 




307 


Dec. 15.... 


Nichol, James 


Three dollars. 


308 
309 


Dec. 23.... 
Aug. 2. . 


Nolan, Joe 
O'Neil T J 


Thirty cents. 


310 


Aug. 19 


O'Leary Dan 




311 


Oct. 6.... 


O'Brien Timothy 




312 
313 


Oct. 14.... 
Nov. 4.... 


O'Sullivan, Edward 
O'Brien Eugene 


Twenty-five cents. 
O. F. nickel watch. 


314 
315 
316 


Dec. 9.... 
Dec. 12.... 
Dec. 30 


Ogden, Alfred 
O'Brien. Edward 
O'Brien, John 


Fifty cents. 
Fifteen cents and watch chain. 
Ninety-cents and pair sleeve-buttons. 


317 
318 


July 5.... 
July 7 


Perry, Davis 


Ninety cents and H. C. gold watch and chain, 
Nos. 1,152 and 7,267,366, book, purse and 
papers. 


319 


Aug 5 


Pisani Jack 


Nickel watch and glasses. 


320 


Aug 9 




One dollar. 


321 
322 


Aug. 12.... 
Aug 19 


Peters, Joe 


Forty-five cents. 
Forty-five cents. 


323 


Aug. 29.... 


Patton, Fred 


faced silver watch No. 34,945 and chain. 


324 
325 
326 
327 


Sept. 7.... 
Sept. 28.... 
Nov. 9.... 
Nov. 11.... 


Peterson, Martin 
Poole, John 
Piper, R. E 
Phillips, Bert 


Seventy-five cents. 
Fifty cents. 
Six 10-100 dollars. 


328 


Nov 19 






329 
330 
331 


Dec. 24... 
July 7.... 
July 17 .. 


Perry, Frank 
Ryan, Michael 
Richards, John 


Fifty cents. 
Book and contents. 


332 


Aug 27 




Five 70-100 dollars. 


333 


Aug. 29.... 


Root, George 


One dollar. 



132 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT 'E" CONTINUED. 



MO. 


' A""' 


SAME. 


230BKTY. 


334 


1899 -Sept 1 


Ryan E. J 


Two 95-100 dollars. 


335 


Sept. 1 


Roulson A 




336 


Sept 9 


Ruis, Frank 




337 
338 


Sept. 30.... 
Oct. 7 


Riley, James 
F.edington, J oseph 


O. F. nickel watch chain and locket. 


339 
340 


Oct. 8.... 
Oct 14 


Robinson, Robert. ...... 
Rogers William 


One dollar. 


341 

342 
343 


Oct. 20.... 
Oct. 22.... 
Nov 5 


Raymond, Thomas 
Roach, James 


Glass*. 
Fifty-five cents. 
Purse 


344 


Nov 14 


Rekell, Gus 


One 5-100 dollars 


345 
346 


Dec. 8.... 
Dec 9 


Reed, F. W.. 

Redmond George. 


Fifty cents. 


347 
348 
349 


Dec. 17.... 
Dec. 17.... 
Dec 21 


Reeve, William . , 
Rock, John 


O. F. nickel watch, chain and ten cents. 
One 40-100 dollars. 
One 10-100 dollars 


350 
351 


July 10.... 
July 1 


Swanson, Charles 
Sheridan Warren 


Two 45-100 dollars. 
One 90 100 dollars 


352 
353 
354 


July 3.... 
July 4.... 
July 6 


Sullivan, Barney 
Sole.R.M 


Purse and papers. 
Matchbox and glasses. 
One 70-100 dollars. 


355 


July 7 


Stanley R. J . . 


Fifty-five cents and magnifying glasses. 


356 

JE7 


July 8.... 
July 12 


Silva, J. J 


One 25-100 dollars. 
Gold locket 


JEQ 


July 22 


Silva F 


Three 5-100 dollars 


359 


Aug 5 


Shea John 




orn 


Aue 11 


Scott A. B 


Two 5-100 dollars. 


361 


Aug 12 


/ 


Five 80-100 dollars 


362 




Sullivan Mary 




363 


Aug 24 


Savage W. E . ... 


Seventy-five cents. 


364 




Soto, Frank 


Thirty cents andf puree. 











REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



133 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. ' 


365 
366 
367 


899-Sept. 2.... 
Sept. 8.... 
Sept 9 


Schultz, William 
Strasser, Henry 
Smith Harry 


O. F. silver watch and chain. 
Seventy cents. 
One 55-100 dollars 


368 
369 
370 
371 


Sept. 10.... 
Sept. 10.. . 
Sept. 25.... 
Sept 28 ... 


Smith, Harry 
Schmidt, Charles 
Sullivan, Mary 
Smith, Jesse 


Six 10-100 dollars. 
Sixty cents, V.rass O. F. watch and chain. 
Fifty-five cents. 
Twenty-four foreign coins, 


372 
373 
374 


Sept. 29.... 
Oct. 1.... 
Oct. 5.... 


Swansen, Amel 
Sibrian, Joseph 
Shultz, William 


One 65-100 dollars. 
Sixty cents and purse. 
Thirty-five cents and purse- 


375 
376 
377 


Oct. 13.... 
Oct. 15.... 
Oct. 9.... 


Smith. Frank 
Sanke, W.F 
Screen, Charles 


Seventeen 25-100 dollars and glasses. 
Gold badge. 
Seventy cents. 


378 
379 
380 
381 
382 


Oct. 20.... 
Oct. 21.... 
Oct. 24.... 
Oct. 28.... 
Oct 28 


Sullivan, John 
Sweeney, Raymond 
Stevens, James 
Schultz, Charles A 


Two 60-100 dollars. 
Seventy-five cents. 
Twenty-five cents. 
One 30-100 dollars.! 


383 


Oct 29 


Silva, Laurance 




384 




Sheehy Michael 


Ten cents and purse. 


385 


"Wnv fi 




One 15-100 dollars. 


386 
387 


Nov. 9.... 
Nov 11 


Simpson, Samuel 
Schwab B 


Ninety cents and purse. 
Ring. 


388 


Nov 15 


Slade Robert 


Two 55-100 dollars. 


389 
390 
391 


Nov. 16.... 
Nov. 17... 
Nov 21 


Severance, J. G 
Smith, William 
Scott Frank 


Three dollars. 
Twenty-five cents. 


392 


Nov 23 






393 
394 


Nov. 25... 
Nov 25 


Sanderson, Fred 
Smith S. H. 


Sixteen 40-100 dollars. 


395 


Nov 25 


Shaw F E 


Fifty cents. 











134 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 




899- Nov 26 


Spitts, G. F 






Dec 2 








Dec 3 




Chain 


399 


Dec. 5 ... 
Dec 6 


Spitz, John T 


Fifteen cents. 




Dec 7 




One 5-100 dollars 


402 


Dec. 25.... 
Dec 27 


Sudeman, Fred 
Slater, C H 


Twenty-one 55-100 dollars. 




July 25 




Thirty cents. 


405 


July 31 


Thompson, Mary ........ 


One 60-100 dollars. 


406 


Aug 3 


Tutore, O 


Eight 1W 00 dollars. 


407 
408 


Aug. 14 .. 
Aug. 20 


Tierney, John 
Terry, James 


Six 20-100 dollars. 
Twenty-five cents and card case. 


409 
410 
411 
412 


Sept. 3.... 
Sept. 8.... 
Sept. 13.... 
Sept. 13.... 
Sept 15 


Townsend, John 
Thompson, Daniel 
Thompson, Daniel 
Tulley, James 


Discharge papers. 
Bank-book on G. S. and L. S., No. 90,651, 
Eighty-five cents. 
Watch fob. 


414 
415 
416 


Oct 16... 
Oct. 21... 
Oct 22 


Tryon, Thomas 
Thompson, S. F 
Tarchie, Coratto 


One 50-100 dollars. 
Twenty-five cents and one foreign coin. 
Breast-pin, ticket and shipping receipt. 


417 


Oct 23 




Forty cents. 


418 


Nov 7 


Tobin Michael 


Sixty -five cents. 


419 


"Vov 24 




Five 50-100 dollars. 


420 


Dec 10 




Sixty-five cents. 


421 
422 


Dec. 18... 
Aug 20 


Turban, Benjamin 
'/ally Matilda. 


Brass H. C. Hartford watch, No. 675,890, 
Glass and scarf-pin. 


423 


Nov 20 


Velis Angel 


Forty-five cents. 


424 
425 


Dec. 4... 
Feb 24 


Vincent, Walter 
William Joseph 


Fifty-five cents. 


426 


July 8... 


Wanderer, Frank 


O. F. nickel watch. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



135 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 


427 


1899 July 30 


White John 


Fifty cents and key 


428 


Aug 27 


Welch Patrick 


Ninety cents and purse. 


429 
430 
431 

432 


Aug. 5.... 
Sept. 3.... 
Sept. 3.... 

Sept 7 


Wilson, EWse 
Welch, Mike 
Wildy, Charles 
Wilson George 


Six 75-100 dollars. 
One dollar. 
Three 10-100 dollars. 


433 


Sept. 13 


Williams, Thomas 


One 50-100 dollars 


434 
435 
436 
437 


Sept. 14.... 
Sept. 18.... 
Sept. 20.... 
Nov 1 


White, Etta 
Whalen, Joseph 
Watson, Alfred 
Wilson Frank 


Two rings. 
Two dollars and breast-pin. 
Fifty-five cents. 
One 45-100 dollars 


438 


Nov 4 




Sixty-five cents 


439 


Nov 4 






440 


Nov. 9 


Washer Joseph 


Fifty cents. 


441 


Nov 21 


Wilson George W 


Sixty cents and purse. 


442 


Nov. 22 


Willbie Bell 


Thirty cents. 


443 


Nov. 25 .. 


Wilson Sarah 


Fifteen cents. 


444 


Nov. 26 . 


Williams John 


Twenty-five cents. 


445 


Nov. 29 


Weldon James 


Two 50-100 dollars. 


446 


Nov. 30 ... 


Williams Tom 


Twenty cents. 


447 


Dec. 2 


Walsh, John 


Thirty cents. 


448 


Dec 2.... 


Walters May 


Seventy-five cents. 


449 


Dec 31 


Walton George 


One dollar. 


130 


Oct 11 




Fifty-five cents. 


t51 


"Yov 20 




Fifteen cents and two pair glasses. 


452 
453 
454 


Nov. 23.... 
Dec. 7.... 
1895 Nov 10 


Young, G. W 
Young, Herbert 
Fin Fook 


Nickel watch and chain. 
Sixty-five cents and memorandum book. 
Ten cents (evidence selling opium). 


455 


1896 June 13 


Ah Wing 


Fifteen cents (evidence ( selling opium). 


456 


June 29 


En Wee 


Fifteen cents (evidence selling opium). 


457 


July 14 


Gum Toon 


Ten cents (evidence, selling opium). 











136 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 


458 
459 
460 
461 
462 
463 
464 
465 
466 
467 
468 
469 
470 
471 
472 
473 
474 
475 
476 

477 
478 
479 
480 
481 
482 
483 
484 
485 
486 
487 


1896-Dec. 19.... 
1897 Dec. 3.... 
1899 Apr. 18.... 


Ah Que 


Eighty cents (.evidence, selling opium). 
Five cents (evidence, selling opium). 
Fifteen dollars (evidence, tan game). 
Delivered per receipt, July 12, 1900. 
Ten cents (evidence, lottery game). 
Twenty cents (evidence, lottery game). 
Ten cents (evidence, lottery game) . 
Ten cents (evidence, lottery game). 
One 50-100 dollars (evidence, lottery game). 
Fifteen cents (evidence, lottery game). 
Ten cents (evidence, lottery game). 
Twenty five cents (evidence, lottery game). 
Fifty cents (evidence, lottery game). 
Brass chain (evidence). 
Three bracelets (evidence). 
Two bills of sale (evidence). 
Papers (evidence). 
Thirty- five cents (evidence). 
H. C. gold watch, Springfield make, No. 92,703 


Ah Wong 


Ah Sam and 4 others 


July 11.... 
Aug. 31 
Aug. 31 
Sept. 1 .... 
Sept. 24 .... 
Oct. 6.... 
Oct. 10.... 
Oct. 15.... 
Dec. 23.... 
1893 Oct. 8.... 
1894 July 2.... 
1895 July 9.... 
Sept. 17.... 
1896 May 29.... 
July 17.... 

NOT. 6.... 
1897- April 22.... 
July 30.... 
1898 Feb. 23.... 
May 15.... 
June 10.... 
June 3 
July 7.... 
Oct. 24.... 
Dec. 14.... 
1899- Jan. 9.... 


John Griffin 


Wong How 


Ah Yee .... 


Ah Fook 


Ah Tang and others 


Mann You 


Ah Yut 


Ah Hin 


George Hansen 


Frank Smith 


Badaman , S 


Gallagher, George H 
Herman, Harry 


Grady Frank 


Gray, Frank 


(evidence), 
Check for $2.35 and letters (evidence). 
Pair cuffs (evidence). 
Check on First N. Bank, No. 33.545 (evidence). 

Two rings and stud set with white stone (evi- 
dence). 
O. F. silver watch No. 3,153,218 and chain (eyi- 
dence). 
One pair ladies' kid gloves (evidence). 

Letter cards and receipt (evidence). 

One check for $75.00 and check for $25.00 (evi- 
dence. 
Shirt-stud setting, no stone (evidence). 

Purse, $5.00, telegram and letters (evidence). 
Three papers (evidence). 


Anderson, W. C 
McCord Guy .... 


Ruttlidge, John 


Blom, Fred, alias Vendal 
Blome, Henry 
Reno, R. R 
Murphy William 


Road F H 


Scott Charles . . . 





REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



137 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


PATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 


488 
489 
490 
491 


1899- Jan. 19.... 
Mar. 1.7.... 
May 14.... 
May 29 


Garcia, Salvador 
Kennedy, Paul 
Meyer, Fred 
Whiteker , Berlen 


Watch movement (evidence). 
Powder box (evidence). 
Silver vest-chain (evidence). 
Three 50-100 dollars (evidence) 


492 
493 


July 1.... 
July 8.... 


Flynn.T 
Martin, John 


Ninety cents and scarf-pin (evidence). 
Glass cutter (evidence). 


494 
495 
496 
497 


July 11.... 
Aug. 7.... 
Aug. 9.... 
Aug 23 


Watts, William 
Foran, Joseph 
Mills, Kay 
Belmont, J. C 


Bill of sale for horse and cart (evidence). 
Letters and cards (evidence). 
Thirty-five cents (evidence). 
Check (evidence). 


498 
499 
500 


Nov. 8.... 
Aug. 5.... 
Aug 17 


Lavin, J* 

Hennessey, A. J 
Campbell, C. E 


Papers (evidence) 
Check (evidence). 
Forged order (evidence). 


501 


1898 Feb 4 


Fritz Burman 


Pencil note (evidence) 


502 


Mar 16 


George Molivers 




503 
504 
505 


Mar. 26.... 
Apr. 19.... 
Sept 23.... 


George Hayford 
L. Laid 
A. C. Wilder 


Checks (evidence). 
Check and papers (evidence). 


506 

507 


Sept. 24.... 
Oct 10 


Robert Kirkman 


Letters and papers (evidence). 


508 
509 
510 


Dec. 7.... 
Dec. 12.... 
] 899 Jan 7 


L. F. Breen ... 
L. F. Breen 
Joseph Hall , .. 


Check (evidence). 
Check (evidence). 
Three contracts and pawn-ticket (evidence). 


511 
K 12 


Jan. 9.... 
Jan 23 ... 


Charles Proppe 
Charles Morton 


Eight checks, nickel in slot (evidence). 
Papers (evidence). 


513 
514 


Jan. 31... 
Feb, 13... 
Feb 26 


Ernest Hayman 
D. Vonder Mehder 


Papers (evidence). 
Two checks, nickel in slot (evidence). 


516 


M 10 ... 


Hugh Trainer 


Check, niokel in slot (evidence). 


517 


25 .. 


Joseph Horn 


Two checks, nickel in slot (evidence). 


218 


Apr. 29^.... 


Charles Laurance 


Four checks, nickel in slot (evidence). 



Alias Davis, alias Land. 



138 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME. 


PROPERTY. 


519 


1899 June 21.... 


Joseph Brown 


Tickets and papers (evidence). 


520 


June 26 


James Hilliker 




521 


June 27 . . 


J. Edmonds 




522 


June 20 






523 
524 


Mar. 29.... 
July 30.... 


Henry Muller 
Santo Bolisha 


Two checks, nickel in slot (ovidence). 
Twenty cents nickel in slot (evidence). 


525 
526 


July 30.... 
Aug. 12.... 


Tomaso Tudicha 
Jennie Howard 


Fifeeen cents, nickel in slot (evidence). 
Two money orders Nos. 128 and 1,792 (evidence) 


'527 


Sept. 11.... 


A. Bergstrom 


Ninety cents, nickel in slot (evidence). 


528 


Sept. 11.... 


Peter Dorcy 


Fifty cents, nickel in slot (evidence). 


529 


Sept. 11.... 


The Grotto Saloon 


Eighty-five cents, nickel in slot (evidence). 


530 


Sept. 11.... 


Oberou Saloon 


One 20-100 dollars, nickel in slot (evidence). 


531 
532 
533 


Sept. 11.... 
Sept. 11.... 
Sept. 11 


Coronado Saloon 
Gobey's Saloon 
Reception Saloon . 


Thirty cents, nickel in slot (evidence). 
Twelve 40-100 dollars, nickel in slot (evidence). 


534 


Sept. 11 


H. Foester 




535 


Sept 11 


Joseph Ethers. 




536 


Oct 18 


John Jackson . . . 




537 


Oct 23 


A. Franck 


Three dollars (evidence). 


538 


N"ov 13 




Fifteen cents and ticket (evidence). 


539 


Nov 15 






540 
541 
542 


Dec. 8.... 
Dec. 22.... 
Dec 23 


George Williams 
Georg'e Merchant 
F. Camp 


Box of face powder (evidence). 
[Metal badge (evidence). 




Dec 31 






EJ4 


1891 May 1 




H C gold watch No 1 274 443 gilt vest chain 


KAK 


1895 April 1 . 




and H. C. gilt watch Nos. 1,484 and 8,670. 
four gilt vest chains, one black hair chain 
and lot of miscellaneous jewelry left in the 
Property Clerk's office for identification. 

Pawn ticket taken from 10^ Stockton street by 








Captain Lees and Detective Harper for 
identification. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



139 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


XAME. 


PROPERTY. 


546 
547 


189fr-Oct. 26.... 
1898 Feb 23 




Plush watch case and gilt chain bracelet, and 
one white-stone finger ring, for identifica- 
tion, 


elg 


1899 Jan 6 




the office of the Chief of Police for identifi- 
tiou. 


549 


j an . 7 




street by Detectives Harper and Sullivan for 
identification. 


550 


Feb 9 




two razors, two memorandum books and 
pair of spectacles, taken from Lou Yeone 
Sung, a Chinese thief, by Detectives E. L. 
Gibson and E. J. Wren for identification. 


551 
552 

CO 


Feb. 14.... 
May 29.... 





pearls taken from No. 33 Taylor street by 
Officers P. Sullivan and O. C. Phillips for 
identification. 

One electric belt recovered from No. 916 How- 
ard street by Officers Ryan and O'Day for 
identification. 

Purse left by Sergeant Colby for identification. 
Lady's gilt chain bracelet taken from No. 103 




Ort ^1 




Grant avenue by Detectives Gibson and 
Wren for identification. 


555 
556 


Oct. 30.... 

Dec. 20.... 
Dec 25 





and turned into California Street Station 
for identification. 

H. C. gilt Fearless case No. 697,754, movement 
No. 56,379 and small gilt chain left in Palace 
Beer Hall aud recovered by Officer Sullivan 
for identification. 

Two bank-books left by Sergeant Colby for 
identification. 

One marked J dollar, date 1872, taken from 




July 28 




No. 728 Sutter street by Detectives E. Wren 
and J. Dinan, for identification. 








streets by J. Aubry, and turned over to Offi- 
cer P. Sullivan. 



140 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "E" CONTINUED. 



NO. 


DATE. 


NAME 


PROPERTY. 


559 


1899 July 4 




O F. nickel watch found by S. McDonald, of 


560 


July 22.... 




No. 9 Glen Park, and turned over to Officer 
Dassman. 


561 
562 


July 23.... 
Sept. 11 




teenth street and turned over to Detective 
Bainbridge. 

H. C. silver Waltham watch-case No. 3,422,850, 
movement No. 33,078, silver chain and key, 
found on the ocean beach and turned over 
to Golden Gate Park Police Station. 


563 
564 


Oct. 14. .. 
Oct 14 




Kearny street line, arid turned over to Offi- 
cer F. E. O'Brien. 

Gold badge found outside of the baseball 
grounds corner Sixteenth and Folsom streets 
by Archie Cameron, and turned over to Offi- 
cer T. Oalnan. 


665 


Dec 21 




Purse containing seven cents found on grounds 
at foot-ball game, Sixteenth and Folsom, 
and turned into Mission District Police 
Station. 








and Columbia Banking Co.'s receipt No. 
No. 58,834, found on McAllister street by 
Officer J. J. O'Meara, 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



141 



EXHIBIT "P." 

AMOUNT OF MONEY RECEIVED FROM SHERIFFS OF OTHER COUNTIES, MASTERS 
OF VESSELS, UNITED STATES MARSHAL AND OTHERS, FOR DETENTION AND 
KEEPING OF PRISONERS IN THE CITY PRISON, DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 
ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



DATE. 


NAME, 


WHERE FROM. 


AMOUNT. 


1899 June 29 ... . 




San Luis Obispo Co 


$2 00 


July 5 


Cpt. Dugan Det. Morrissey 




1 00 


July 8 


Constable H. M Bernstein 




1 00 


July 12 


U. S. Marshal John H. Shine 




61 20 


July 18 


Constable J. W. Dumas 


Fresno Co 


1 00 


July 20 


Constable F McMahon 




1 00 


July 20 ... . 


Constable Buleston 


Fresno Co 


1 00 


Aug 5 


Dep. Sheriff C. H Wiley 


Merced Co 


3 00 


Aug 8 


Dep. Sheriff R. M. Blair 


Amador Co 


1 00 


Aug. 12 


Marshal J. D. Morgan 


Fresno Co 


3 00 


Aug. 14 
Aug 17 


Sheriff J. M. Mansfield 
Capt. Fr. ship Touraine 


San Mateo Co 


1 00 
27 00 




Chief of Police M Rawle 


Santa Cruz Co 


1 00 


Aug. 7 


Sheriff Blackington 


New Mexico 


9 00 


Sept 6 


Under Sheriff James A Daly 


Napa Co 


2 00 


Sept. 9 


Sheriff F Knablock 


Nevada Co 


6 00 


Sept 10 . . 


Sheriff Nat Stewart 




1 00 


Sept. 11 


Dep. Sheriff J. J. Hunter 


Sacramento Co 


1 CO 




Capt. J Harris 


lone School Amador Co.. 


9 00 


Op.,4. 00 


Sheriff R A. Prouty 


Mariposa Co 


1 CO 


Sept. 26 


Sheriff M. R. Keefe 


Monterey Co 


1 00 


Sept 26 


Capt Fr. sh Gen'l DeCharette 




6 00 


Sept 28 


Constable J. W Kelly 


Kern Co 


4 00 


Sept 30 


Constable Black . . ... 


Yolo Co 


2 00 


Sept 30 


Constable G. T. Davis 


Stanislaus Co 


1 00 




U. S. Marshal John H. Shine 




11 60 


Oct 1 


Sheriff H L Borgwardt 


Kern Co 


300 


Oct 9 




Contra Costa Co 


2 00 











142 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "F" CONTINUED. 



DATE. 


NAME. 


WHERE FROM. 


AMOUNT. 


1899 Oct 11 


Sheriff W. V. Buckner 


Kings Co 


1 00 


Oct 16 






1 00 


Oct 19 


Dep. Sheriff J E Donohue 




1 00 


Q c t 21 


Agent C. W. McDeid 


State of Nevada 


6 00 


Oct 21 


Sheriff Griswold 


State of New York 


1 00 


Oct 26 


Sheriff Wilson 


Butte Co 


1 00 


Oct 28 


Sheriff F. P. Grace 


Sonoma Co 


1 00 


If ov 12 


Sheriff T. F Bergin 


Trinity Co 


1 00 


Uov 15 


Sheriff Langford 


Santa Clara Co 


3 00 


U ov 17 


Constable B F Grauss 


Napa Co 


2 00 


U ov 20 


Constable F W Dooley 


Mendocino Co 


1 00 


jq- ov 30 


Sheriff E. Harris 


Los Angeles Co 


1 00 


Dec i 


Sheriff M. R. Keefe 


Monterey Co 


1 00 


Dec 7 


Under Sheriff A J Snodgrass 


Ventura Co . 


2 00 


Dec 13 




Kern Co . . 


2 00 


Dec 19 


Sheriff C. H. Behrens 


Shasta Co 


1 00 


Dec 22 


Officer H H Budd ;... 


lone School, Amador Co 


] 00 


Dec 27 


Constable J D Martin 


Santa Clara'Co. 


1 00 


Dec 30 


Constable G. E Mitchell 


Santa Clara Co. 


1 00 


1900 Jan. 5 


Supt. D. S. Hir&berg 


lone School, Amador Co 


3 00 


Jan 9 


Sheriff Nat. Stewart 


Santa Barbara Co 


1 00 


Jan. 12 
Jan. 14 


Agent Thomas A. McQuade. . . 
Captain . . 


State of Pennsylvania 
French bark Normandie .... 


18 00 
4 00 


Jan. 18 


Sheriff Langford 


Santa Clara Co 


2 00 


Jan. 18 . .. 


Officer Frank McMahon 


Sau Mateo Co 


1 00 


j an . 20 


U. S. Marshal John H. Shine. 


San Francisco 


80 


Jan 21 


Sheriff Langford 


Santa Clara Co 


2 00 


Jan. 23 


Und. Sheriff T. L. Robinson . . 


Solano Co 


1 00 


Jan 25 


Sheriff E. C. Irvine ... 


San Luis Obispo Co 


1 00 


Jan. 30 


Officer R. C. Hunt 


State of Washington 


1 00 


Feb 1 


Sheriff H. L Borgwardt 


Kern Co. 


8 00 











REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



143 



EXHIBIT "F" CONTINUED. 



DATE. 


NAME. 


WHERE PROM. 


AMOUNT. 


1900 -Feb 3 








Feb. 6 




Fr bk Marechal de Touraine 




Feb. 9 


Dep. Sheriff G. M. White 


Kern Co. . . 


1 nn 


Feb. 9 


Dep. Sheriff J. J. Winters.... 


Sacramento Co 


1 On 


Feb 12 


Captain 


Fr. bk. Canrobert 


fi no 


Feb 15 




Fr bk Marie 




Feb. 16 


Sheriff R. A. Prouty 






Feb. 19 


Marshal J. D. Morgan 


Fresno Co. 


1 00 


Feb 20 


Captain 


Fr bk Marie 




Feb. 23 


Constable W F. Cook 






Feb. 24 


Dep. Sheriff A. M. Ayers 


Kings Co 


2 00 


Mar. 2 


Sheriff C. H. Smith 




* w 


Mar. 3 


Sheriff H L. Borgwardt 


Kern Co 


Inn 


Mar. 6 


Sheriff M. R. Keef 






Mar 10 


Constable W. E. Wagner 


San Mateo Co 


A nn 


Mar 19 


Sheriff R. J. Langford 


Santa Clara Co 


i nn 


Mar. 20 


Constable E E. Hill 


Placer Co 


2 nn 


Mar. 22 


U. S Marshal H. Z Osborne.. 




1 00 


Mar. 23 


Sheriff H. L. Borgwardt 




i no 


Mar. 23 


Sheriff H. M Bernstein, 


Kings Co 


l 00 


Mar. 30 


Constable W J Ramage. 




1 00 


Apr. 4 
Apr, 6 
Apr. 10 
Apr. 11 


Marshals. H. Chiles 
Detective Frank McBride 
Sheriff B. K. Thorn 
Marshal Ora C. Kelsea . . . 


Jackscn Co., Mo 
Montgomery Co., Ohio 
Calaveras Co 
Kansas City Mo 


10 00 
5 OJ 
1 00 
5 00 


Apr. 24 


U S Marshal John H Shine 




5 60 


May 4 


Sheriff Veale 


Contra Costa Co 


1 00 


May 7 


Sheriff C. H. Behrens 


Shasta Co 


1 00 


May 8 


Dep. Sheriff C. F. Schwilk. . . . 


Sacramento Co 


1 00 


May 9 


Chief W. Desmond 


St Louis, Mo 


15 00 


May 23 


Dep. Sheriff Golden 


Sacramento, Cal 


1 00 











144 



REPORT OP CHIEF OP POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "F" CONCLUDED. 



DATE. 


SAME. 


WHERE FROM. 


r AMOUNT. 


1900 May 30 


Sheriff G. H. Crawford 


Del Norte Co. 


81 00 


June 6 
June 13 


Dep. Constable J. J. Crum. . . . 
Dep. Sheriff T. K. Vernon. . 


Shasta Co 
San Bernardino Co. 


1 00 
1 00 


June 14 .... 


Sheriff R. B. Purvis 


Stanislaus Co . . . 


1 00 


June 15 


Sheriff C. H. Behrens 


Shasta Co . 


1 00 


June 18 


Dep. Sheriff H. F. Butts 


San Mateo Co 


400 



Total amount of money received for prisoners en route to State Prison and elsewhere during 
the fiscal year euding on the 30th day of June, 1900 Si>40 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



145 



EXHIBIT "G." 

TOTAL AMOUNT IN CASH PAID INTO CITY TREASURY FOR FINES AND FORFEIT- 
URES IN THE POLICE COURTS, FOR ARRESTS MADE BY THE POLICE DEPART- 
MENT DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



DATE. 


DEPT. No. 1. 


DEPT. No. 2. 


DEPT. No. 3. 


DEPT. No. 4. 


1899 July 


$600 00 


$871 00 




$540 00 




482 00 


395 00 


$653 50 


510 00 


September 


1,180 00 


483 00 


705 00 


105 00 


October 


505 00 


565 00 


432 50 


365 00 


November 


385 00 


275 00 


480 00 


415 00 


December 


437 50 


665 00 


487 50 


210 00 


1900 January 


545 00 


290 00 


175 00 


385 00 


February 


410 00 


360 00 


862 50 


985 00 


March 


280 00 


329 00 


978 50 


1,405 00 


April 


483 00 


395 00 


365 00 


660 00 


May 


360 00 


22 00 


490 56 


680 00 




130 00 


720 00 


217 50 


85 00 












Totals 


$5 797 50 


5 370 00 


$5,847 50 


$6 345 00 













Grand total 

Adjourned for vacation. 

10 



.$23,360 00 



146 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "H." 

POLICE STATIONS AND THEIR LOCATIONS. 



NAME OF STATION. 



Central Station* 

Sub-Central Station 

Southern Stationf 

California Street Station* 

North End Station 

O'Farrell Street Station 

Potrero Station 

South San Francisco Station 

Mission District Station J , 

Ocean View Station 

Harbor Station 

Harbor Police Ship Boarding Station 

Golden Gate iWk Station. .. 



City Hall, corner Larkin and McAllister streets 

Will be retained at City Hall. 

City Hall, corner Larkin and McAllister streets. 

536 California street. 

1712 Washington street. 

2117 O'Farrell street. 

609 Twentieth street. 

Southeast corner Railroad and 14th avenues. 

3215 Seventeenth street. 

Plymouth street, bet. Sagamore and Ottawa. 

32 Sacramento street. 

Foot of Powell street Wharf. 

506 Stanyan street. 



*Will be transferred to the Hall of Justice about October 1, 1900. 

fBill now pending in the Board of Supervisors to appropriate 25,000 to build station at Fourth 
and Clara streets. 

JWill be transferred tu new station tofbe erected on Seventeenth and Channel streets. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. U7 



EXHIBIT "I." 

SUMMARY. OF ACTION TAKEN BY THE BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS IN 
THE SUPERVISION OF RETAIL LIQUOR DEALERS' LICENSES FOR THE FISCAL 
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 

Total number of license paying places July 1, 1900 3 ( 007 

Total number of applications received. 7,525 

Total number reported on and granted 7,008 

Applications refused 273 

Applications withdrawn 195 

Total number applications pending . 49 



7,525 

fc 

Total number of saloons closed after action by the Board 42 

Total number of arrests made for violations of liquor license law 37 

Total number of arrests for peddling without a license 10 

Number of cases disposed of in Police Courts 42 

Number of cases pending 5 



Fines and forfeitures in Police Courts $ 185 09 

Amounts licenses caused to be paid through prosecution in the Police Courts 161 00 



Total amount paid as above $446 00 



Total nu&ber of licensed places on July 1 3,173 



EXHIBIT "J." 

STRENGTH OF POLICE DEPARTMENT AND SUMMARY OF ACTION TAKEN BY THE 
BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS IN THE TRIAL OF COMPLAINTS AGAINST 
MEMBERS THEREOF DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1100. 

BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS PROM JUNE 30, 1899, TO JANUARY 8, 1COO. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN President. 

WILLIAM ALVORD Commissic net. 

MOSES A. GUNST Commissioner, 

I. W. LEES Chief of Police and Commissioner. 

I. W. Lees, Chief of Police, was retired January 2. 1900, and Robert J. Tobin, President of the 
Board, was appointed Acting Chief of Police. Captain George W. Wittman was detailed by Acting 
Chief of Police Tobin to attend to the duties of the office of Chief of Police during his absence. 



148 REPORT OP CHIEF OP POLICE. 



The Charter going into effect January 8, 1900, the following Board of Police Commissioners 
was appointed: George A. Newball, William Thomas, W. F. McNutt and W. J. Biggy. 

W. J. Biggy was appointed Acting Chief of Police, and served from January 8 to February 13, 
1900. On February 13, 1900, Commissioner Thomas resigned and W. J. Biggy was removed by the 
Mayor, and vacancies of Commissioners were filled by appointment of D. I. Mahoney and William 
T. Wallace. William P. Sullivan, Jr., was appointed Chief of Police February 13, 1900. H. (). Beatty 
was appointed Secretary of the Board January 8th, and was succeeded by B. L. Cadwalader, 
February 13, 1900, H. O. Beatty having resigned. 



NUMERICAL STKENGTH OF POLICE FORCE JANUARY 8, 1900. 

Chief of Police 1 

Clerk to Chief of Police 1 

Property Clerk 1 

Captains of Police 6 

lieutenants of Police 5 

Detective Police Officers 15 

Sergeants of Police 43 

Corporals of Police 12 

Patrolmen 489 

Maximum strength 573 

On January 8th sixteen officers who were under the control of the Park Commissioners were 
added to the regular force. On April 16th, B. F. Bohen, :.Captain of Detectives, was retired, and 
the Civil Service Commissioners decided the Department was entitled to only five Captains, includ- 
ing Captain of Detectives, or one Captain for each 100 officers. 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS, JUNE 30, 1900. 

GEORGE A. NEWHALL President 

Vf. F. McNUTT, M.D Commissioner 

D. I. MAHONEY Commissioner 

W. T. WALLACE Commissioner 

APPOINTMENTS BY THE BOARD. 

Secretary Board of Police Commissioners 

Poiice Surgeon. 

Police Photographer 

Matrons City Prison 

NUMBRICAL STRENGTH OF POLICE FORCE JUNE 30, 1900. 

Chief of Police 1 

Captain of Detectives l 

Captains of Police 4 

Clerk Chief of Police l 

Property Clerk. 1 

Detective Sergeants ^ 

ILfeutenants of Police 5 

Sergeants of Police 43 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 149 

Corporals of Police. . . - 12 

Patrolmen, foot 486. 

Patrolmen, mounted 17" 

Patrolmen, bicycle 2 



Total.., 



REMOVALS DURING YEAR. 

Resigned 8 

Dismissed 3 

Died ^ 4 

Retired ... .39 



54 



Appointments made to force during the year 6T 

Thirteen vacancies existing June 30th, to be filled by Civil Service examinations. 

Number of complaints filed 60 

Number of complaints sustained 29 

Number of complaints dismissed 31 

Number of witnesses subprenaed and examined 442 

Aggregate amount of penalties imposed , $1,125 00 



EXHIBIT "K. 



SYNOPSIS OF CORRESPONDENCE AND BUSINESS TRANSACTED IN OFFICE OP 
CHIEF OF POLICE DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 

Letters received and acted on 1,968 

Letters sent out 2,236 

Telegrams received and acted on 304 

Telegrams sent out 360 

Total 4,868 



150 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



EXHIBIT "L." 


SUMMARY OF POLICE PATROL WAGON SERVICE DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 


Persons taken home 


- - j a ft ; 


o 


ing prisoners on March 1, 1900. 


Fires attended .... 


CO C4 to t-< 


55 




Prisoners taken from Cen- 
tral Police Prison and 
delivered to the Sheriff 
at the County Jail 


8 g : S " : " g 


1 


Prisoners taken to Cen- 
i tral City Prison from 
various sub-stations 


1 1 s s * i ; 


in 


Insane persons cared tor. 


SSSS'^jiJ^SocSS 

* 


a 


Sick and injured taken -^o^,^^,^, 
to the Receiving Hospi- !-58 t ~ c ' 3e ' 3 o 00 S 
tal and otherwise cared i 
for ! 


S 






Sick and injured taken to 
City and County and 
Other Hospitals 


s - r - s - i 


3 




False calls from Police 
Patrol boxes 


i '?Dcoe<ic>t>-tDc^ * 


1 


Number of miles run Sisfjclsssiiils 


1 


Prisoners brought to Cen- iSSooSSools 
tral and Sub-Stations.. ! <^~ >' " 


~ 

05 


Whole number of runs. . . 


il^I^iBis 

cf in rt in of r-T 


1 


* City Prison van was discontinued for the use of transferr 


STATIONS. 


::::::::: 


1 


: : : : : : : : 


: : : : : : : 




: . 


| j | | 1 
! ^ 1 1 n i 

8ilf2|J8l 

S ;g 02 js 9 3 & 5t a 

1 i 3 i i i 1 1 1 
i 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 J 

SSxcSSSx? 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 151 

SUPPLEMENT No. 1 To EXHIBIT "L." 

PAWNBROKERS. 

Total number of applications filed during the six months ending June 30, 1900 63 

Total granted 63 

Withdrawn (Mrs. Gusta Conn) 1 

Closed (M. Finger) 1 

Total number in business June 30, 1900 61 

SUPPLEMENT No. 2 TO EXHIBIT "L." 

INTELLIGENCE. 

Total number of applications filed during the six months ending June 30, 1900 31 

Total granted 31 

Withdrawn (Quan Yuck & Co.) 1 

Closed (P- Kurate, M. Deguchi and Sam Kee) 3 

Total number in business June 30, 1900 27 

SUPPLEMENT No. 3 TO EXHIBIT "L." 

SECOND-HAND DEALERS. 

Total numb ar of applications fiied during the six months ending June 30. 1900 139 

Refused and on reconsideration granted (H. Rabbi) , 1 

Number of places in business June 30, 1900 139 

SUPPLEMENT No. 4 TO EXHIBIT "L." 

PEDDLERS. 

Total numbar of applications filed during the six months ending June 30, 1900 1,196 

Total number granted 1.149 

Total number refused 47 

SUPPLEMENT No. 5 TO EXHIBIT. "L." 

AUCTIONEERS. 

Total number of applications filed during the six months ending June 30, 1900 44 

Total granted 43 

Refused 1 

Withdrawn and closed <5 

Total number in business Jun 30, 1900 37 

SUPPLEMENT No. 6 TO EXHIBIT "L." 

JUNK DEALERS. 

Total number of applications filed during the six months ending June 30, 1900 24 

Total number granted 22 

Refused and on rehearing granted 2 

Total places in business June 30, 1900 24 



152 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



P g 

53 



ss 

03 A 

\ I 
^ S 

^ S 
O M 



BELIVERKD TO 
AUTHORITIES OF 


ii * 

Mil 


.. Alameda Co. 
.. Santa Clara Co. 
Contra Costa Co. 




1 

i 


. . Merced Co. 
. . San Mateo Co. 


.. Santa Clara Co. 
. . Nevada. 
.. Nevada. 
.. lone Sc'l, Amador. 


)FFICEK. 


! i h 

S ' i * 

E i a 


i 1 
5 1 

i S 




d 

1 


.2 -2 
o o 

S & | 




1 i ^ s 


: <! 






^ ^ b 


ARRESTIN 


tit! 

a s ja a 1 

1 1 I I 1 s 

p o h g 3 c 

H, (SJ H H ^ f 


. A. Anthony 
. R. Graham and J. 
T. T, RVATI 


j 

c 


. Thomas Furlong. 
. Ryah, Morrow an 


H.M.Murray.... 
. J. F. O'Shea and . 
. J. F. O'Shea and 
. T. L. Ryan and E 




1 i : i 


: 




I : 
f; 




O 


g : : : 










OFFENSE CHARGE 


. Felony embezzlement 
. Obtaining money by false p 

. Malicious mischief. ... 
. Petit larceny 


. Violating Ordinance 1,619. 
. Defrauding an innkeeper. . 

Kiirtrlarv 


n 
i 


. Obtaining money by false 


. Defrauding an innkeeper.. 
Grand larceny 
. Gi and larceny 
. Fugitive 


. 


: : : . : 








i : : i 


> 
O 


N ! 1 1 


4 

2 s 






D ^ rj 


m 

& 
o 


M 


M i ? 1 

S * 1 1 \\ 

= & i " 
a | | s $ 1 


Henry Hufschm 
G W. Perrin... 
.Tnafinh C TW.an 


! 

c 

i k., 
K 


J. A. Lambert. . 
William Mitchel 


F. S. Camp 
Robert McKenz 
Arnold Maher.. 
William Alexan 




MM; 






j : 


: : 


3 


M eo <~> o oe j 

8 P SS 3 H ! 


i s si ? 


i > 

4 


1 1 1 


i-I OJ O> t^ 

f^ *J * 
f f f 




i 











REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



153 



DELIVERED TO 
ACTHORIT11 


Kern Co. 


YoloCo. 


Stanislaus Co. 


Fresno Co. 


Santa Cruz Co. 


Santa Cruz Co. 


Preston Ref'm Sch'l. 


Contra Costa Co. 


ISanta Clara Co. 


Santa Cruz Co. 


Solano Co. 


Sail Mateo Co. 


New York. 


Alameda Co. 


Alameda Co. 


Napa Co. 


Santa Clara Co. 


Santa Clara Co. 


B 

g 

B 







r 




a 

s 
te 

> 








and Wren 












= 

a 


\ 




1 


m 


All RESTING 


. E. L. Gibson and E. 


. aibaon, Wren and I 


ce 
O 


. J. E. Edwards and ^ 


. John Galloway 


. C.Crockett 


. E.M. Bankofsky.... 


. Reynolds and Dinan 


. Wren and Gibson . . . 


. J. J. McShane 


M* 

d 


B 

rj 

-3 
*- 


. Captain J. Seymour 


S 

i 
1 

l-j 

H 


. Arnop Bainbridge.. 


. P.Sullivan 


. James Aitken and G 


. James Aitken and G 
























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2 


















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H 


i 








j 








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1 














ae 

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to commit 


embezzlem 


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arceny 


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a 


to murder 


embezzlem 


JB 

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off horse w 


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arceny 








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| 

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55 


William Russell 


William Berger 


Patrick O'Connor ... 


Laura, alias Trixy Lt 


George Ralych 


B 


Arthur Otta 


t-t 

O 

1 


Wong Henng 


j 


H. O, Barnett 


William White 


Marjorie Vinton.... 


Ah Sing 


L.L. Starr, al.White. 


James Barnhart 


AhShue 


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: 




: 
































H 


1899-Sept. 27. 


Sept. 29. 





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i 


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ro 


i 


i 


S 

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154 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



g 1 
a s 

K 


S 

c3 


ara Co. 


6 



t 


S 

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S 








S 


n 
1 


ara Co. 


Ref'm Sch'l. 


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a 


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, 


S 2 


Santa Cl 


Santa Cl 


Santa Cl 


Santa Cl 





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Preston 


Alameda 


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ymour... 




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James Aitkei 


James Aitkei 


James Aitkei 


S 
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A. Anthony t 


A. Anthony 


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A. Anthony i 


Sergeant Col 


| 

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Captain J. Se 


F. Reardon.. 


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Murder 


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Murder 


Felony embezz! 


Felony embezzl 


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Murder 


j 


Assault to kill.. 


<o 

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Grand larceny . 




Obtaining good 


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Grand larceny.. 


Grand larceny.. 


Grand larceny.. 


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Minnie Carter 


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John Fitzgera 


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Joe Shung, ali 


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Steve Potter.. 


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Frank Marsha 


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1-5 


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3 




3 


3 


3 


3 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



155 



DELIVERED TO 
AUTIIORITIKS OF 


.... Kern Co. 


Kern Co. 


.... Humboldt Co. 


l 


. . . . San Mateo Co. 


r.. Whittier Ref'm Sch'l 


. . . . 8an Mateo Co. 


Kern Co. 


Washington. 


.... Contra Costa Co. 
Alameda Co. 


.... Santa Clara Co. 
Stockton. 


6 
1 


. . . . Kansas City, Mo. 


. . . . Kansaa City, Mo. 


. . . . Santa Clara Co. 


. . San Mateo Co. 


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M 

O 



o 
H 

1 

M 


T. L. RyanandE. O'Day .. 


ft 

b 

~ 

s 

1 

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P. M.Erown 


1 

5 

I 


H. C.Reynolds 


W. F. McDonough, J. B. O' 


N. Reardon and J. A. Belye 


a 

2 

m 


F. L. Rjan and E. O'Day.. 


Reynolds, McMahon and Ja 
A. Anthony 


L. F.Deely 
C. Crockett and F. Dillen.. 


J. F. DiuanandE. J. Wren 


H. Reynolds and G. McMah 


J. F. Dinan and E. J. Wren 


I 


M 

JS 

5 

W 


E. OFFENSE CHAR(!KE 


Grand larceny 


fl 

1 



o 

a 




I 


Manslaughter 


Fugitive 




Grand larceny 




Deserter 


Felony 


Felony embezzlement 


Neil.. Murder 


j 
1 


Grand larceny 


Disturbing the peace 


NAME OF FUGITIV 


Clarence Gannon 


j 

o 


Edward Rolland. alias 


Ed. J. Gaylor, alias Sey 


Charles Porter 


J 

S 


Julius Tobin 


Antonio Bullna 


John Collins, alias Har 


Edward Fox 
Mabel Stein 


^ 5 

2 

M * 

1 1 


Walter R. Groft 


James Redmond, al. O 


Alon zo Fisher 


Mow Kern 


Albert Davis 
































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156 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



DELIVERED TO 
AUTHORITIES OF 


Alameda Co. 


o 

1 


1 

I 

s 


Alameda Co. 


o 
O 


6 

1 

s 


Los Angeles Co. 


Sacramento. 


Redwood City. 


Redwood City. 































3 


! 








o; 






ARRESTING OFFICER. 


2 

"5 

02 

1 

1 
fi 

d 


Capt. J. Seymour and R, Whittal 


K 

1 
IX 

I 


C. Callahan 


A. Anthony and J. E. McGovern 


A. Anthony and J. E. McGovern. 


i 

w 

1 

B 

O 

a 

1 

i 


C 

I 

1 
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s 

? 

o 


F. Dillon and George McMahon . 


F. Dillon and George McMahon . 


















































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OFFENS 


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1 


Grand larceny.. 


Burglary 


Defaulter 


I 




Felony ernbezzk 


Petit larceny... 


Petit larceny... 






i 


: 


1 










; 


: 






! 














. 








; 


















NAME OF FUUIT 


n 

B 

S 

H 


1 
8 




Elmer L. Sheets 


Charles Lawler 


May Brown 


Lesa Jacobs 


! 


William H. Talbot.. 


George O'Connor. ... 


1 












































: 


s 

a 


55 

a 

i 


g' 


1 


i 


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d 

1 


June 19... 


i 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 157 



EXHIBIT "N." 

POLICE CONTINGENT FUND ACCOUNT. 

Amount of allowance for year ending June 30, 1900 $6,000 00 

Amount expended for Police Department incidental expenses, as per receipted 

vouchers 5.434 15 

Balance $565 85 

The above credit balance of $565.85 in the City and County Treasury, remaining untxpended, 
has reverted to the General Fund. 



EXHIBIT "O." 

Wm. P. Sullivan, Jr., Esq., Chief of Police S 

DEAR SIH : The following is a statement of the amounts received and paid into the City and 
County Treasury to be placed to the credit of the Police Relief and Pension Fund account, as per 
receipts on file; for officers detailed at places of amusement, etc., as per $12, Chapter 10, New 
Charter, from January 8 to June 30, 1900, as follows : 

January $75 00 

February 212 50 

March 420 00 

April 167 50 

May 60 00 

June 97 50 

Apportionments tendered by the Honorable the Board of Police Commissioners 

from rewards for official services, 12th and 21st April, 1900 17 00 



Total $1,049 50 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN T. GREEN, 

Sergeant of Police. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 
To the Honorable Jas. D. fftelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: In accordance with Article XVI, Section 9, of the Charter of this 
municipality, and in compliance with Resolution No. 470 of the Board of Super- 
visors, adopted June 11, 1900, the Board of Election Commissioners have the honor 
to submit a report of the operations of this department for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1900. We believe that a comparison of the methods of registration and 
voting, and cost of conducting elections in San Francisco, will compare favorably 
with the leading cities of the United States. The present Registration Act was 
passed originally in 1878, and has been amended in many particulars, but we are 
of the opinion that the amendment of March 4, 1899 (Smith Act), which provides 
for using the original affidavit, instead of a printed register, as before, for use in 
the polling-places, is a step in the right direction and worthy of commendation. 

And in the matter of giving ample time to voters to register, the above-men- 
tioned law has made it more convenient for the citizen, as registration is continuous 
from January 1st of each year up to a date within forty days of any municipal or 
general election. 

After efficiency, we believe that economy should be the prime consideration in 
public affairs, and San Francisco has reason to be gratified at the showing which 
she makes from the reading of the following comparative table of the cost of elec- 
tions in the principal cities of the United States: 

San Francisco, in 1899, had four elections, as follows: Primary, August 8th; 
municipal, November 7th; bond elections, December 27th and 29th. Total cost, 
$140,014 81, making a net cost of 50 cents per registered voter. 

BOARD OF ELECTION COMMISSIONERS. 

JEREMIAH DEASY, President Term, 4 years 

OLIVER EVERETT Term, 4 years 

SHELDON KELLOGG Term, 3 years 

M. GREENBLATT Term, 2 years 

A. W, VOORSANGER Term, 1 year 

THOS. J. WALSH, Secretary and Registrar Term, 4 years 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOS. J. WALSH, Registrar of Voters, 
Secretary of the Board of Election Commissioners. 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS. 



159 



NUMBKR 
OF ELECTIONS. 



TOTAL PER 
REGISTERED VOTER. 



Boston 

Brooklyn 

New York.... 

St. Louis 

Philadelphia. . 



2 21 

1 00 

1 50 

64 

49 



REGISTRATION AND ELECTION EXPENSES. 



Advertising 

Architect's Services , 

Assistant Cleiks 

Attorney' s Ff es 

Ballot Paper 

Building, Furnishing and Repairing Booths , 

Candles and Candlesticks 

Carriage and Horse Hii e 

Brooms, Brushes, etc 

Electrical Material 

Erecting Booths , 

Expressaga 

Fuel 

Furniture 

Gas Fixtures 

Groceries, etc 

Incidentals 

Incinerating 



$2,526 70 

62 SO 

54,392 70 

9,000 00 

874 15 

7,547 78 

13 75 

407 50 

54 90 

51 80 

1,600 CO 

715 00 

70 75 

7 50 

61 71 

45 75 

38 80 

27 00 



160 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS. 

REGISTRATION AND ELECTION EXPENSES CONTINUED. 



Janitor Messenger 63 75 

Lamps and Repairs 17 SO 

Lumber 174 55 

Meals . . . : 62 50 

Messenger Service 14 35 

New Storehouse 1,440 00 

Officers of Election j 30,62000 

Postage Stamps 1,560 00 

Posting Proclamation 95 00 

Printing and Stationery 4,561 25 

Printing Ballots 710 00 

Printing- List of Voters 1,79920. 

Rent of Typewriter | 53 21 

Rents ; 4,624 39 

Rubber Goods 8 25 

Rubber Sto.mps 305 75 

Salary Typewriter 30 25 

. Storing Booths 194 50 

Surveying 309 00 

Towel Service .' 3 00 

Telephone Service 161 yj 

Transcribing '. 9 00 

Sand 215 00 

Typewriting Material 17 43 

Watchman 91 00 

Reg. Cl*rk? 1,15667 

Registrar of Voters ; 2,180 00 

I 

Total $127,87604 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS. 



161 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

FROM JANUARY 8, 1900, TO AND INCLUDING JUNE 80. 1900. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Salary of Commissioners 


$2,388 75 




Salary of Registrar . ... . 


1,146 66 








$3,535 41 


Salaries of assistant clerks 


$6 125 6 9 




Advertising 


117 I 9 




Printing , 


1 002 40 




Stationery 


471 60 




Warehouse and booths 


860 62 








8,603 36 






812,138 77 



Total expenses July, 1899, to January 8, 1900 

Total expenses January 8, 1900, to June 30, 1900. 



.$137,876 04 
. 12,138 77 



Grand total. 
11 



$140,014 81 






REPORT 



BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco - 

DEAR SIR: I hereby submit the annual report of the Board of Education for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1900. The report includes a brief summary of the work accomplished 
since January 8, 1900, and also the Annual Statistical Report of the Superintendent. 

Most respectfully, 

CECIL W. MARK, 
President Board of Education. 



BOAED OF EDUCATION. 



MEMBERS. 


OFFICES. 


OFFICE HOURS. 



C. W. MARK, PRESIDENT 
MARY W. KINCAID 
JOHN B. CASSERLY 
JAMES DENMAN 



City Hall, second floor. 



Daily 8:30 A. M. to 5 P. M. 

RECEPTION HOURS: 
f Mondays, 3:30 to 4:30 P. M. 

\ Thursdays, 3:30 to 4:30 P. M. 
I 
^Saturdays, 10 A. M. to 12 M. 



REPORT OP BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



163 



CITY BOAED OF EXAMINATION. 

SUPERINTENDENT R. H. WEBSTER. 

DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENTS W. B. HOWARD, L. A. JORDAN. 
W. D. KINGSBURY, SECRETARY. 

OFFICERS. 



C. W. Mark 

R. H. Webster 

W. B. Howard... 

L. A. Jordan 

W. D Kingsbury 

John H. Hansen 

Charles A. Berliner 

Raleigh P. Hooe 

W. D. Kingsbury 

Miss M. F. Cusick 

Miss Tessie S. O'Connor 

John O'Brien 

H. Armer 

P. M. Wellin 

W. Commary 

Charles McAuliffe 

P. L. Weaver . . . 



President. 

Superintendent. 

Deputy Superintendent. 

Deputy Superintendent. 

Deputy Superintendent. 

Secretary. 

Assistant Secretary. 

Assistant Secretary. 

Secretary Board Examiners. 

Stenographer. 

Stenographer. 

Messenger Superintendent. 

Messenger Board of Education. 

Inspector Buildings. 

Assistant Inspector Buildings. 

Storekeeper. 

Assistant Storekeeper. 



164 REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

The Board of Education In making its annual report desires to present it in 
two divisions. 

First The educational side of the School Department. 

Second The financial or business side of school administration. 

The Board realizes the great difficulty of presenting in a proper manner the 
educational side of its administration, for results of this kind are not easily seen 
but must take time to show the ultimate effect of changes made. Educational 
reform in all large cities has come slowly, for the changing of school policy and 
the improvements made are not, at all times, understood by large bodies of citi-< 
zens; but judging from the results shown in other large cities of our Union, we 
are confident that every change made by us will greatly benefit and improve our 
city school system. 

It may be wall to take up some of the most important changes which have 
been introduced, not simply in way of defense, but in order to present cogent 
reasons for the action of the Board of Education. The Charter provides for cen- 
tralization of authority, and, in keeping with this wise provision, the Board has 
placed more power in the hands of the principals, making them responsible for 
their entire school. This, we find, has worked well, as divided responsibility will 
soon ruin any thoroughly organized department. The principal of the school is 
considered by the Board of Education the head and moving spirit of the teachers 
and children under his care, and for this reason power and authority are givsn 
to him in controlling his entire school. 

The Charter also provides for increased supervision in the schools. The lack 
of supervision in the past has been one of the greatest defects in the school sys- 
tem. With a paid Board of Education and with a Superintendent and his depu- 
ties, a careful system for visiting schools has been inaugurated, acquainting the 
officials of the Department with every detail of work and familiarizing them with 
the needs of the various schools. All large cities during the past few years have 
greatly improved their methods of supervision, thereby unifying, connecting and 
correlating all of the good forces for the benefit of their school systems, and also 
correcting many abuses which are bound to creep in where a large department is 
not properly supervised. 

The Board has abolished special privileges, for the reason that the department 
should be considered a unit. What is of real worth for one school should also be 
of value to another. This has led in the introduction of special lines of instruc- 
tion, to make them uniform in all schools, thereby giving aqual rights and privi- 
leges to all. 

One of the most important questions which the Board has considered is a plan 
for the proper election of teachers to the Department. Owing to the abolition 
of schools and the consolidation of classes, it will be some time before the Board 
will find it necessary to elect teachers to the Primary and Grammar Schools. 
However, it is a point of vital moment to the educational interests of the School 
Department, and for this reason the Board has been considering the various 
methods and plans used in other cities of our country. In past years teachers 
have been appointed for political and personal reasons, and, occasionally, purely 
on merit. The Board intends to formulate a plan and adopt it which will settle, 
once and for all, the method of electing teachers, when needed, into the Depart- 
ment. The Charter provides for Civil Service, but this plan cannot apply to the 
School Department, as teachers are properly certificated and have already passed 
one test in either graduating from the University, the Normal School, or having 
secured their certificate upon examination. For this reason, the strict letter of 
the Civil Service Rules cannot apply, and the Board will adopt a modification of 
these rules, thereby placing the election and appointment of teachers in the De- 
partment on merit and successful experience. Teachers, enjoying as they do life 
tenure of position and being paid good salaries, should not be appointed to the 
Department unless they possess the highest qualifications. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 165 

The best plan to adopt for the promotion of pupils from grade to grade is a 
question of vital importance, and has been carefully considered by the Board. As 
far us known, the best educational thought in our country is practically opposed 
to written examination as a sole test for promotion, but believes that the proper 
time for such tests should be during the school year. The question of promotion 
of pupils from grade to grade should, in a properly supervised department, be 
left entirely with the principal and class teacher. However, opinion on this ques- 
tion is somewhat divided, and the Board has adopted a conciliatory measure, 
thereby excusing: certain pupils who are honorary and recommended from ex- 
aminations and examining others, allowing the year's standing to count for one- 
lialf and the examination of the Board to count for the other half, thereby ad- 
justing the matter fairly for all. 

A serious defect and one which the Board hopes to remedy is the unyielding 
graded system of our city schools. This defect has been brought to the attention 
cf many persons deeply interested in education, and many cities have been try- 
ing different plans. Almost all have adopted a six months' scheme of promotion, 
thereby relk-ving somewhat the evils arising from a strictly graded school. It is 
impossible to find fifty children or a less number in a class all of equal ability, 
and for this reason greater latitude and flexibility should be permitted, and 
bright pupils should be advanced, rather than held back waiting for the entire 
class to finish the year's work. The best solution of this defect is in the creation 
of an ungraded class in large schools. This class is not particularly for the dull 
child or the abnormal pupil, but also for the exceedingly bright child, for the 
puril who, for some reason or other, is behind in his work and can by a little 
special help become proficient. For instance, a boy may be weak in grammar 
and a girl may be deficient in arithmetic, but under skillful teaching might be 
abie to pass to the next grade and thereby save a year. This ungraded class has 
been successfully tried in many places, and the Board hopes to give a trial in 
some of the large schools. 

The most important work that the Board has accomplished is the adoption of 
a new Course of Study for four years. After most careful consideration, it was 
finally agreed to change the present nine years' Course of Study of the Primary 
and Grammar Schools to an eight years' course, thus following the plan adopted 
ty nearly all of the large cities of our Union. 

Dr. Frederic Burk, President of the San Francisco State Normal School, 
writes thus of the Course of Study: "The new Course of Study stands 
for the best and highest educational thought of our country. It is both con- 
servative and progressive, both directive and suggestive, both simple and plain- 
spoken, and yet leaves plenty of material for imagination. The method of its 
construction was fortuitously wise, for many opinions were gathered from teachers 
and principals of the Department, and many conferences were held before finally 
adopting it. The new Course of Study is pedagogically sound, and it is uni- 
versally admitted, while educators may object to minor details, that under the 
system of its administration it will work out for the best interests of the School 
Department, and on the whole there is not much question that it is the most 
practical embodiment of the admitted truths of modern pedagody which has baen 
put into practical operation. There is throughout it a nice balance between con- 
servatism and suggestive progressiveness, which gives to it a stability which for 
practical operation it must have, and yet an elasticity which progressive pedagogy 
needs. Another important point is that of the supply of direct, plain-spoken 
pedagogy of each topic, giving clear yet full explanation for the educational pur- 
pose of each direction. The fact is clear to those familiar with the special exi- 
gencies of San Francisco, the Course has been wisely framed, and while holding 
to that which is safe and practical, nevertheless, it lifts aloft the flaming candle 
to light the way towards broader development when conditions are more ideal. 
Certain it is, on the whole, that the San Francisco school system, by its new 
Course of Study, has taken in spirit a stride fifty years in advance of any city 
of equal or greater size in the United States, and there are no binding chains in 



166 REPORT OF BOARD OP EDUCATION. 

this Course to prevent the flesh from following the spirit's lead as rapidly as the 
practical difficulties of its physical inertia are overcome." 

The Course of Study also contains some features to which the Board of Educa- 
tion desires to call especial attention, not in defense of its action, but more par- 
ticularly to express its reasons and the purposes for the special lines of instruction 
introduced. 

Manual training: has been adopted as a proper and necessary feature of the 
curriculum, in recognition of the close correlation existing between motor activity 
and intellectual life. It is a method of education, based on the fundamental 
nature of the child, to gain ideas that form the basis of thought through the ex- 
ercise of his senses and other physical organs in conjunction with intellectual 
operations, and to express these ideas in terms which are appreciable to th^ 
senses. It is a mode of self-activity growing out of that eternal alliance between 
hand and brain which has led Colonel Parker to make the statement that "Manual 
Training has done more for the human race than the exercise of any, if not all 
of the other modes of expression. It is absolutely indispensable to normal physical 
development; it has had a mighty influence upon brain-building." 

The modified Swedish Sloyd system seems closer to the ideal in this respect 
than any other form of manual training yet proposed for the Grammar Grades. 
The Swedish system, as found in the best American schools, will form the founda- 
tion of the work for this Department. In detail and application it will be adapted 
to local conditions. 

The equipment provided at this time is for the accommodation of the Seventh 
and Eighth Grades throughout the city, the work to be carried on by special teach- 
ers in schools centrally located. The laboratories are well fitted out with the best 
modern devices. The work is to be conducted as a regular subject of study, an 
integral part of the system of education. For professional and economic reasons, 
it is to be conducted by special teachers in especially equipped school rooms. 

The following figures show the extent of the introduction of manual training: 

Number of centers or laboratories 7 

Total approximate cost of equipment $6, 000 

Number of special teachers (all highly qualified to per- 
form the work) 6 

Number of schools sending boys 7 

Number of boys taking Manual Training (about) 2,000 

The grades provided for are the Seventh and Eighth, all of which are taking 
the work, and it has been received enthusiastically. 

The Course of Study suggested in Sewing has been prepared, not that a few 
may learn to make elaborate garments, but that all of the girls may be taught 
to do plain sewing neatly and well. We believe that careful training in the use of 
the needle should form part of the education of every girl. Sewing has been made 
a part of the regular work of every girl, beginning with the Fourth Grade, and no 
special teachers are employed. 

That a broad development and application of home economics is in the direct 
line of progress no one will doubt, and this being so it is with much satisfaction 
that we have established a Domestic Science (or Cookery) Department in our public 
schools. The equipment for the work (without any undue expense) is of the most 
comprehensive and up-to-date character, comparing most favorably with the 
cookery centers of New York, Boston, Chicago and other Eastern cities. One of 
our Board has visited similar schools in various European countries, notably Eng- 
land, France, Switzerland and Sweden, and nowhere have been found more com- 
pletely fitted up school kitchens, yet without needless apparatus, such as is re- 
quired in every household of average means. 

"The Course of Cookery," as we term it, not only embraces a knowledge of 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 167 

aimple cookery In all Its branches, but, In connection with that, treats of personal 
hygiene, feeding of infants, care of the sick, planning and serving of meals, how to 
buy foods, also the care of them, and the nutritive value and digestibility of staple 
articles of diet. By correlating with these topics the teachers aim to bring the 
pupils' knowledge of natural science to bear upon the problems of home life. 

The pupils are taught how to keep their utensils clean, and everything about 
their work is dona with exactitude and system. Already, after four weeks' In- 
struction, they are showing a great aptitude for it, and are eager and industrious 
pupils. 

The idea aimed at in this course of domestic science is not that the girls shall 
become skilled cooks, but that they shall become impressed with the fact that 
skilled manual labor is dignified, and that the happiness of home life depends In 
a large measure upon the knowledge of domestic topics, and upon a practical abil- 
ity to meet the difficulties of house-keeping. 

In conclusion, while the pupils are taught cookery in an "all-around" manner, 
economy is taught as thoroughly. Nothing either of food or fuel that Is not util- 
ized; and we are sure when it Is known how little has been expanded at the end 
of the year this fact of economy will be endorsed by all. 

Dr. G. Stanley Hall writes: "The curriculum of the cooking school would be 
of the highest educational value even if the food had to be thrown away, because 
It invoh es skimming the cream of so many sciences. The cooking school, even 
more than the anti-temperance crusade, is the best of all forces against intem- 
perance." 

The following figures show the extent of the introduction of Domestic Science: 

Number of centers or laboratories 7 

Total cost of equipment $2,220 

Number of special teachers (especially qualified to per- 
form the work) 5 

Number of schools sending Eighth Grade girls 30 

Number of girls taking cooking 1,200 

The Course of Study also includes a four years' High School course, a course 
for Night Schools, courses in Drawing, Music and other special lines, in all making 
the most complete and helpful Course of Study the city has ever had. 

Physical culture taught by special teachers was temporarily suspended by the 
Board of Education, pending reorganization of this most important branch of In- 
struction. For several years past three special teachers have been employed to 
visit the schools and instruct the children in this work. It was found upon inves- 
tigation that the visits to the various schools did not occur oftener than once In 
every six weeks to three months. This the Board felt was not teaching or bene- 
fiting the children very much, arid it was decided that the principal and class 
teachers could just as well have systematic gymnastic exercises and could just 
as effectually teach Calisthenics as special teachers. For this reason, the Board 
decided to dismiss the persons engaged in the teaching of Physical Culture, and 
at an early date to reorganize and perfect this system. The Board believes that 
the Physical Culture director should teach more than a few gymnastic exercises; 
he should understand fully the physical nature of the child; he should be able to 
improve the nervous condition of many of the children of our schools, and, above 
all, to lead the teacher to realize the importance and the benefit of Physical 
Culture, not only for the benefit of the child, but for herself. The Board sincerely 
expects to place Physical Culture in the Department on a firm basis, thus meeting 
the necessity of perfecting this most important branch of instruction. 

The Board 1 of Education has assisted and co-operated with the San Francisco 
State Normal School in establishing a Model Training School for the preparation 
of attending teachers, and also where the teachers of the School Department can 



168 REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

go and receive new inspiration in the proper methods of instruction. This Model 
School will be of great benefit, not only to the Department, but also to the educa- 
tional interests of the State, and it is hoped that all will co-operate and assist in 
thoroughly establishing the State Normal School of San Francisco on a true and 
firm basis. 

A question of vital importance to our School System is that of classification. 
This has been very carefully considered by the Board, and after examining the 
reports and looking into the conditions of the various schools, we have practically 
adopted the reports of principals, with few exceptions. The School Department 
need feel no uneasiness, for the Board has classified in the best interests of all 
concerned, and in no case has any violence been done to the best educational inter- 
ests of our city. The classes are not overcrowded, and the average daily attend- 
ance in the majority of schools will not exceed forty-five. However, in a few in- 
stances, some of the schools have a larger number in average daily attendance. 
The Board in classifying has observed two cardinal principles: 

First To classify for the best interests of the child, and not violate any under- 
lying principle of educational thought. 

Second To classify in the interest of economy, not allowing unnecessary teach- 
ers to remain in classes where they are not absolutely necessary. 

Not many teachers have lost their positions by the recent consolidation of 
classes, for, owing to vacancies, the Board has succeeded in reassigning a majority 
of those who have lost their positions. However, there are some teachers who, by 
the abolition of certain schools, are temporarily placed on the substitute list. 
Thirty-two in all have been temporarily relieved from duty, and of this number 
twenty have been reassigned to classes, thereby not losing one day's employment. 
The Department is now thoroughly established on a good educational and financial 
basis, and it is hoped that no violent changes will be made, and that the remainder 
of the year will be spent in earnest work. 

Owing to the changes in the centers of population and to the fact that certain 
portions of the city which were at one time resident sections have now become 
manufacturing centers, thereby decreasing to a large degree the attendance of some 
schools, the Board decided to abolish these schools. This economical measure did 
not in any way interfere with the educational interests of those sections of the 
city, while it secured better classification. 

The Longfellow Primary School, on Silver street, near Second, was abolished 
for the reason that in the neighboring schools there were many vacant rooms, and 
also many classes not fully attended, and for the further reason that the Rincon 
Grammar and the Longfellow Primary Schools occupied the same lot, and the 
attendance of said schools did not justify the maintenance of both. For similar 
reasons, the Stanford School, located on Eighth street, near Bryant, was abolished 
and pupils sent to adjacent school on the same lot. 

The Le Conte Primary School, located on Powell street, near Jackson, was 
abolished for the reason that the pupils could be distributed in surrounding 
schools, and for the further reason that the Board desired to assist the State 
Normal School of San Francisco to organize a Model School. This has been done, 
and many of our public school children enjoy the privileges and training of this 
well-conducted Model School. 

The Cliff School, with an average daily attendance of 13, and costing the city 
about $1,800 per year, was abolished. The children were sent without any great 
inconvenience to neighboring schools. 

The attendance of the Spring Valley Evening School was not large enough 
to justify its continuance. Its pupils attending were sent to the Washington Even- 
ing School, and by this change no one was deprived of evening school advantages, 
while the city was saved the expense of maintaining an additional school. Owing 
to the complete reorganization of the Polytechnic High School and the removal of 
its Commercial Department to the Lincoln Grammar School, it was found neces- 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 169 

sary to abolish the Business Evening School, as the latter occupied the rooms of the 
Polytechnic High School. No one was deprived of attending the Evening Commer- 
cial School, but, on the contrary, the school is now batter equipped, and has as 
large an attendance as it had in its old quarters. 

For years past there has not been a close distinction made between the gram- 
mar and the primary schools. Wherever practicable, the Board has sent all the 
grammar grade pupils above the fifth grade to the grammar schools. This classi- 
fication was made for two reasons. The first, grammar schools afford better 
educational advantages to the grammar pupils owing to equipment, etc. Second, 
it was more economical to have the grammar pupils attend the grammar schools, 
owing to the fact that in many primary schools the grammar classes were small 
and could just as well be absorbed in neighboring grammar schools. 

For past years Boards of Education have neglected the supplying of indigent 
books and also the purchase of books for supplementary use. This matter was 
made a Question of serious consideration by the Board, and we were enabled by 
saving in other departments to purchase out of the revenue of this fiscal year 
$2,000.00 worth of indigent books and $2,000.00 worth of supplementary books. It 
is hoped that during the coming year more money will be expended for this most 
worthy purpose. 

In order that a small number of books can reach a large number of children, 
the Board intends to establish districting centers in various parts of the city. 
The Principals of the schools selected as centers will be responsible for the 
proper distribution and care of the books, and each Principal will be responsible 
for the further care of the supplementary books used in his school. This plan 
of establishing, as it were, school libraries in various parts of the city, will effect 
a great saving and at the same time with a comparatively small amount of money 
reach thousands of school children. 

THE FINANCIAL SIDE OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. 

The following financial and statistical report will show the great improvement 
in the manner of conducting the business affairs of the School Department. 

In accordance with the spirit of the Charter, we have endeavored to decrease 
the current expenses in order that more money could be applied to permanent im- 
provements and our school buildings placed in a sanitary condition. For years 
past almost all of the School Fund has gone for the payment of salaries, leaving 
comparatively littla for permanent improvements. For this reason many of our 
school buildings are unfit for occupancy, and owing to the neglect of keeping 
them in repair they have greatly depreciated in value. Some of the buildings 
have been almost ruined owing to the failure on the part of school authorities to 
paint and otherwise repair them. 

The Board of Education has begun to repair the roofs of all the school build- 
ings, and, as funds permit, to paint and make such general improvements as are 
needed. Much care has been exercised in the proper manner of conducting the 
repair department. Business methods have been introduced, and men are now 
required to do a full day's work and not allowed as heretofore to idle away their 
time. The repair of school buildings has always been a source of great waste, 
and owing to improper methods used has been unsatisfactorily done. Our Board 
has allowed Principals a small sum of money each month to do minor repairs. 
This works well and has been a saving of many thousands of dollars a year to our 
Department. A system of bookkeeping has been introduced by which separate 
accounts are kept with each school. This enables the Board to find out accu- 
rately what amounts are spent monthly and to distribute the money more equally 
among the various schools. 

An improved system of furnishing supplies to the Department has also been 



170 REPORT OF BOARD OP EDUCATION. 

inaugurated, which saves to the Department considerable each month. While 
we have been exceedingly liberal in furnishing supplies, at the same time, owing 
to the strict business methods pursued, no money has been wasted. It is hoped, 
in the near future, that the Supply Department will be removed to the City Hall, 
thereby placing it directly under the supervision of the Board of Education. 

In the appointment of new janitors to fill vacancies the Board has selected, 
as far as possible, men who have some mechanical skill. This will make con- 
siderable saving, as the janitors will be required to do the minor repairs on the 
school buildings. Great improvement has been made in the janitorial service 
since we have placed it directly under the charge of the Principal, making him 
(Principal) directly responsible for the appearance of the school building. 

In the interest of economy, and, at the same time not interfering with the 
best educational interest of the Department, the Board abolished the following 
schools, thereby saving many thousands of dollars a year to the Department: 



1. Cliff Primary School. 

2. Spring Valley Evening School 

3. Business Evening School. 



4. Longfellow Primary School. 

5. Stanford Primary School. 

6. Le Conte Primary School. 



In addition to the current expenses we have been able to make extensive per- 
manent improvements on the following school buildings, to-wit: 

1. Cleveland. 9. Garfield. 

2. Denman. 10. Girls' High. 



3. Fairmount. 

4. Lafayette. 

5. Lincoln. 

6. Polytechnic High. 

7. Richmond. 

8. Franklin. 



11. Grant. 

12. Laguna Honda. 

13. Henry Durant. 

14. Starr King. 

15. Webster (now part of Lincoln 

16. West End. 



Other repairs were made on the following schools, to-wit: 



1. Bernal. 

2. Douglass. 

3. Everett. 

4. Irving. 



5. James Lick. 

6. Stanford. 

7. Horace Mann. 

8. Humboldt. 



Extra expense of administration imposed by new Charter, 

payable out of School Fund $10,056 37 

Payment of water bills, heretofore paid out of General 

Fund .. 6,240 00 



$16,296 37 

Introduction of special lines of work and other extra expenses incurred: 

Introduction of Manual Training (approximately) $6,000 00 

Introduction of Cooking 2,220 00 

Placing new shades in all school buildings 2,683 76 

Improvements on Lafayetts School, destroyed by fire 2,50000 

Purchase of Indigent and Supplementary Books 4,000 00 



Total additional expense $33,700 13 

While the Board of Education has paid all its current expenses, also the ad- 
ditional expense incurred by the Charter for administration, still it has been en- 
abled by prudent management to introduce special lines of work much needed in 
the Department, thus tardily following the example of many large cities of the 
United States. 

The balance to the credit of the School Fund, June 30th, 1900, $12,643 62. 



REPORT OF BOARD OP EDUCATION. 



171 



STATISTICAL REPORT. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 



FISCAL YEAR TERMINATING JCXE SOTH, 


1899. 


1900. 


Population of the city 1898, estimated. 


340 000 


344 000 


Number of youth in the city under 17 years of aare 

Number of youth in the city between 5 and 17 years of age 
who are entitled by law to draw public money. 


98,363 
75 292 


102,022 

78 554 








Assessment roll of the taxable property of the city 
Receipts of the School Department 


8405,111,615 00 
1,298,213 45 


$410,155,304 00 
1,801,513 18 


City school tax on each hundred dollars. 


12 13 cts 


10.87 cts. 








Estimated value of school sites 


$3 293 200 00 


$3 293 200 00 


Estimated value of school buildings 


1 700 000 00 


1 700 000 00 




350 000 00 


350 000 00 


Estimated value of school libraries 


12,000 00 


12,000 00 


Estimated value of school apparatus 


60 000 00 


60 000 00- 










$5 514 200 00 


$5 514,200 00" 









172 



REPORT OP BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



STATEMENT 

OF THE SCHOOL FUND FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30 1900. 
RECEIPTS. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 




$700,237 95 




(Belonging to the school year 1899-1900. ) 
Amount received from State apportionment* 


66,987 53 




(Belonging to the sehcol year 1898-1S99.) 


461,708 87 




(Belonging to the school year 1899-1900.) 


4,603 81 




(Belonging to the school year 1898-1899.) 
Amount received for rents of school property 


56,485 10 




Amount received from the sale of old material 


70 00 




Total receipts 




81,290,092 2f 









* Received on account of collateral inheritance tax. 

EXPENDITURES, 



Administration 

(a) Superintendent and Deputies since January 7, 1900 

(b) School Directors since January 7, 1900 



(c) Office salaries 

Secretary (since January 7, 1900), Assistant Sec- 
retaries, Stenographers and Messengers. 

(d) Shop employes 

Storekeeper, Inspector of Buildings, teamsters. 
scavengers, etc. 

Teachers' salaries 



Sixty-nine per cent of November, 1898. 

Janitors' salaries 

Sixty-nine per cent of November, 1898. 



$3,124 73 

5,766 64 

11,315 55 

6,973 95 

975,316 55 

64,604 20 

56,269 70 

3,463 42 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



173 



EXPENDITURES- CONTINUED. 



FOR WHAT. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Advertising 


$55 00 






2 000 00 




Cen sus . . 


4,956 00 




Fuel . ... 


4,693 94 




Furniture 


19,801 13 






5,094 91 




Le c 'al expenses . . ... 


265 00 




Lights ... 


8,979 36 




Mission High School (final payment) 


3,096 25 






317 18 




Printing 


2,930 47 




Rents . . 


8,860 20 




Sixty-nine per cent of November 1898 


597 25 




Repairs 


47,250 13 






5,306 30 




Supplies (including $2,067 for <{ indigent" books) 


26,508 25 




Telegraph service and telephone. ... .... 


6,390 |6 








<aj 074 ana 97 









RESUME. 

Receipts 81,290,092 26 

Expenditures 1,274,696 37 



Balance 

Total amount derived from collateral inheritance tax and delin- 
quent taxes (1898-1899) ag per foregoing statement $71,591 34 

Paid to teachers, janitors and rents, November, 1898 68,664 87 



Surplus . 



$15,398 89 



2,926 47 
$12,469 42 



174 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



NUMBER OF TEACHERS RECEIVING VARIOUS SALARIES, JUNE 1900. 



9 evening substitutes (receiving $2.50 per evening when teaching) S 

91 teachers in Evening Schools 50 00 

25 primary teachers, with two years' experience 55 00 

5 grammar teachers, with two years' experience 56 00 

20 primary teachers, with three years' experience 57 50 

12 grammar teachers, with three years' experience 59 00 

30 primary teachers, with four years' experience, and teachers in evening 

High School classes 60 00 

8 grammar teachers, with four years' experience 62 00 

12 primary teachers, with five years' experience 62 50 

123 grammar teachers, with five years' experience and primary teachers with 

six years' experience and cooking teachers 65 00 

6 primary teachers, with seven years' experience 67 50 

46 grammar teacher?, with six years' experience, and the maximum salary 

paid to teachers with primary certificates 68 00 

11 primary teachers, with eight years' experience 70 00 

3 grammar teachers, with seven years' experience 71 00 

1 1 primary teachers-, with nine years' experience 73 00 

14 grammar teachers, with eight years' experience 74 00 

6 special teachers, and teachers in the Commercial Department of the 

Polytechnic High School 75 00 

124 maximum salary paid to primary teachers with ten years or more ex- 
perience 76 00 

14 grammar teachers, with nine years' experience 77 00 

155 maximum salary paid to grammar teachers, with ten years' experience or 

more, teaching the fifth, sixth and seventh grades 79 00 

8 teachers in Polytechnic High School 80 00 

6 primary teachers at their maximum salaries, with 5.00 additional for 

teaching French or German 81 00 

174 maximum salary paid to the eighth and ninth grade grammar teachers and 

to teachers in receiving grades 83 00 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



175 



NUMBER OF TEACHERS RECEIVING VARIOUS SALARIES-CONTINUED. 



2 grammar teachers in the fifth, sixth and seventh trades, at tl.eir maximum 

with $5.00 additional for teaching French or German $84 00 

2 grammar teachers in the eighth and ninth grade?, with ten years' experi 

ence, receiving an additional $5.00 for teaching French or German 88 00 

2 principals of evening and outside schools and teachers in Polytechnic High 90 00 

2 grammar teachers with ten years' experience and $15 00 additional for 

supervising the girls' yard during recess 94 00 

17 teachers, several principals, lecturers in History and High School assistants 

in their .first year, and second vice-principals 100 00 

3 assistants in High Schools, with one year's experience 110 00 

8 principals in ungraded schools 115 00 

4 assistants in High Schools, with two years' experience 120 00 

45 vice- principals, principals of Primary Schools and principal of the Lincoln 

Evening 125 00 

4 assistants in High School, with three years' experience 130 00 

11 principals of Primary Schools 135 00 

28 assistant's in High Schools, at their maximum salary 140 00 

4 principals of Primary Schools 150 00 

1 head of department in High Schools 155 00 

16 principals of Grammar Schools 175 00 

3 vice-principals of High Schools 

5 principals of Grammar Schools with eighteen classes 

4 principals of High Schools , 250 00 

1,015 regular teachers with classes. 

3 teachers of physical culture. 

1 teacher of histor}'. 

4 teachers of sewing. 
9 evening substitutes. 

2 unassigned teachers, day; 

24 unassigned teachers, evening. * 

2 teachers of vocal music. 
1 teacher of drawing. 



1,061 Total number of teachers. 



L76 



REPORT OF BOARD OP EDUCATION. 



NUMBER OF TEACHERS RECEIVING VARIOUS SALARIES CONCLUDED. 





MEN. 


WOMEN. 


Average monthly wages paid to teachers in grammar grades 


86 00 


$84 00 


Average monthly wages paid to teachers in primary grades. . . 




91 00 


Average High Schools .... 


158 00 


141 00 









GENERAL STATISTICS. 





1893. i 


1900. 




1 




Number of High Schools . . 


3 


3 


Xumber of Polytechnic High Schools 


1 


1 




21 


22 




53 


50 




1\ 


10 


urn e g 








90 


86 








Number of brick school buildings owned by the department 
Number of wooden school buildings owned by the departm't 
Number of buildings rented by the department 


7 
06 

20 


7 
65 
22 


Total number of buildings used by the department. 


93 


94 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



177. 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



1899. 



1900. 



Enrollment in the High Schools 2,198 

Enrollment in the Grammar and Primary Schools 40,274 

Enrollment in the Evening Schools 6,258 

Total enrollment 48,870 

Total average belonging 38,191 

Average daily attendance in the High Schools 1,743 

Average daily attendance in the Grammar and Primary 

Schools 31,861 

Average daily attendance in evening schools 3,225 

Total average daily attendance 



1,934 

40,370 

5,754 



48,058 



37,413 
1,429 

31,138 
2,566 



35,004 



12 






REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



SCHOOL CENSUS MARSHAL'S REPORT FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR ENDING 
JUNE 30, 1900. 



Number of white children between 5 and 17 years of age- 
Boys 38,258 

Girls 37,974 

Total 

Number of Negro children between 5 and 17 years oE age 

Boys 141 

Girls 134 

Total 

Hative born Mongolians between 5 and 17 years of age- 
Boys 1,195 

Girls 852 

Total 

Total number of census children between 5 and 17 years of 
age 

Humber of children under 5 years of age- 
White 22,947 

Negro 73 

Mongolian 448 

Total 

Number of children between 5 and 17 years of age who have 
attended public schools at any time during the school year 

Number of children between 5 and 17 years of age who have 
attended private schools, but no public schools at any 
time during the year 

Number of children between 5 and 17 years of age who have 
not attended school at any time during the school year. . . 

Nativity of children 

Native born 100,435 

Foreign born 1,587 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



179 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE NUMBER OF CHILDREN IN THE CITY FROM 
1888 TO* 1900, INCLUSIVE. 

As reported by the Census Marshals. 



UNDER SEVENTEEN YEARS OF AGE. 



May, 1888., 



1891. 
1892., 



1895 . . 

1896 . . 

1897 .. 
1898 . . . 
1899 . . . 
1900 . . , 



81,171 
83,314 
84,531 



87,774 
88,567 



93,558 
94,925 
98,506 



102,022 



180 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE WHOLE NUMBER ENROLLED AND THE 
AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS SINCE 1889. 



Number 
Enrolled. 



Average Daily 
Attendance. 



During the year ending June 30, 1889 

During the year ending June 30, 1890 

During the year ending June 30, 1891 

During the year ending June 30, 1892 

During the year ending June 30, 1893 

During the year ending June 30, 1894 

During the year ending June 30, 1895 

During the year ending June 30, 1896 

During tne year ending June 30, 1897 . 

During the year ending June 30, 1898 

During the year ending June 30, 1899 

Curing the year ending June 30, 1900 



42,626 
42,926 
43,626 
46,172 
45,775 
44,349 
44,822 
45,435 
46,564 
50,101 
48,870 
48,058 



31,609 
31,352 
31 ; 809 
32,434 
32,799 
32,939 
33,020 
33,508 
33,531 
35,116 
36,940 
34,994 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



181 



NUMBER OF TEACHERS IN DEPARTMENT JUNE, 1900. 






Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Number of teachers in High Schools Lowell, Girls' and Mission 


20 
10 


22 
15 


42 
25 


Number of teachers in grammar grades (including Vice-Principals). 
Number of teachers in primary Tades 


12 
2 


284 
477 


296 
47 


Number of teachers in Evenin * Schools 


40 


75 


115 




12 


46 


58 






2 


2 




1 


8 


9 




3 




3 


Number of unassigned teachers (evening) 


3 


21 


24 


Number of teachers History 




1 


1 






4 


4 


Num ber of teachers Vocal Music 




9 


2 


Number of teachers Drawing ... 




1 


1 










Total number of teachers 


103 


958 


1 061 


Whole number of principals (included in total) .... 


26 


60 


86 


Number of principals not required to teach a class (included in total) 
Number of vice-principals (included in total) .... 


21 
12 


48 
24 


69 
36 











182 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



NUMBER OF TEACHERS IN DEPARTMENT BY GRADES-JUNE, 1900. 





9 


a 


M 


^ 


H 


g 


< 




P 


i 





i' 


g 


B 





SCHOOLS. 


o 


iary Grad< 


If 


-Principal 






i 




P* 


I 


5 


m 










P 




c 













16 


3 


1 


9 


20 


2 


18 


Agassiz Primary ... 


2 


14 


1 


1 


17 




17 




2 


2 






4 




4 


Bernal Primary 


3 


8 


1 




12 




12 


Broadway Grammar 


8 


8 


1 


1 


17 




17 


Buena Vista Primary 




6 






6 




g 


Burnett Primary . . . 


5 


9 


1 


1 


15 


2 


13 




1 


4 






5 




5 




9 


9 


1 


9 


19 




19 


Cleveland Primary 


2 


8 


1 




11 




11 


Cooper Primary 




12 


1 




13 




13 


Columbia Grammar , 


8 


11 


1 


1 


20 




20 




14 




1 


2 


15 


1 


14 




9 


7 


1 


1 


17 


1 


16 




2 


8 


1 




11 




1] 






9 


1 




10 




10 


Edison Primary . . 


3 


5 


1 




9 




9 


Emerson Primary 


2 


10 






13 




13 


Everett Grammar 


9 


7 


1 


1 


18 


1 


17 


Fairmount Primary 


5 


9 


1 




15 




15 




10 


2 


1 


2 


13 


1 


12 




2 


8 


1 




11 




11 


Garfield Primary 


2 


11 


1 




14 




14 


Girls' High . . 










16 


4 


12 


Golden Gate Primary 


1 


7 


1 




9 




9 




4 


4 


1 




9 




9 




1 


9 


1 


1 


11 




11 


Hamilton Grammar 


16 




1 


9, 


17 


J 


16 




11 




1 


1 


12 


1 


11 




2 


6 


1 




9 




9 



















REPORT OF BOARD OP EDUCATION. 



NUMBER OF TEACHERS IN DEPARTMENT BY GRADES, JUNE, 1900 -CONTINUED. 



SCHOOLS. 


Grammar Grades 


Primary Grades. 


H Principals withoi 
Classes 


1 Vice-Principals. 


| 


! 


1 






. 


. *. 












1 


g 


1 


1 


10 




10 




10 


10 


1 


? 


21 


i 


20 




2 


11 


1 




14 




14 




20 




1 





21 


3 


18 


Humboldt Primary 


3 


9 


1 




13 




13 






1 






1 


1 




Irving Primary 


1 


7 


1 




9 




9 


Irving Scott Primary 


6 


10 


1 


1 


17 




17 




1 


3 






4 




4 




8 


g 


1 


1 


15 




14 




2 


7 


1 




10 




10 


John Swett Grammar . . 


12 


3 


1 





21 


3 


18 


John W Taylor 




1 






1 




1 


Lafayette Primary 


9 




1 




10 




10 




1 


2 






3 


1 


3 




1 


7 


1 




g 




9 




10 


13 


1 


9 


24 


2 


22 




2 


11 


1 




14 




14 


Lowell High . . 










13 


10 




Madison Primary t . . . 


1 


4 






5 




| 






12 


1 




13 




13 




15 




1 


7 


16 




16 


Mission High . 










13 


6 


7 




2 


5 


1 




g 






Moulder Primary 


3 


10 


1 




14 




14 


Noe Valley Primary 




7 






7 










1 








1 






11 


5 


1 


o 


17 




17 


Park Primary 




2 






2 






Peabody Primary , 


3 


9 


1 




13 




13 



















184 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



NUMBER OF TEACHERS IN DEPARTMENT BY GRADES, JUNE, 1900 CONTINUED. 



SCHOOLS. 


Grammar Grades. 


Primary Grades. . . 


II Principals without 
Classes 


Vice Principals . . . 


1 


P 


Women 












25 


10 


15 


Redding Primary , 


4 


8 


1 




13 




13 


Richmond Primary 


4 


5 


1 




10 




10 




7 


2 


1 




10 




10 




4 


5 






9 








2 


6 


1 




9 








2 


3 






5 








8 


9 


1 


1 


18 


1 


17 






9 






10 




10 




2 


10 


1 




13 




13 




1 


3 






4 




4 




3 


4 






7 




7 




6 


5 


1 


1 


12 


3 


9 


West End 


2 


1 






3 




3 


WTiittier Primary 


2 


17 


1 


1 


20 




20 


Winfield Scott Primary , 


2 


3 






5 




5 


EVENING SCHOOLS. 
Business , 






1 




16 


| 


7 


Franklin 










6 


\ 


3 


Hamilton .... 






1 




14 


3 


11 








1 




15 


3 


12 








1 




20 


11 


9 












1 


1 










1 




27 


8 


19 












2 




2 












2 


1 


1 








1 




12 


1 


n 



















REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



185 



NUMBER OF TEACHERS IN DEPARTMENT BY GRADES, JUNE, 1900 CONCLUDED. 



SCHOOLS. 


Grammar Grades. 


Primary Grades. . . 


Principals withou 
Classes 


Vice-Principals... 


1 


S 


Women 


EVENING SCHOOLS. 






1 




16 


9 


7 


Franklin . 










6 


3 


3 








1 




14 


3 


11 








1 




15 


3 


12 


Humboldt 






1 




20 


11 


9 












1 


1 










1 




27 


8 


19 












2 




2 












2 


1 


1 








1 




12 


1 


11 


Teachers of Physical Culture 










3 


3 




Teachers of History 










1 




1 












4 




4 












2 




2 


Teachers of Evening Substitute List .... 










g 


1 


g 


"Evening Unassigned Teachers 










24 


3 


21 


Teachers of Vocal Music 










2 




2 












1 




1 


Totals 


321 


456 


55 


36 


1 061 


102 


959 



















186 REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Number of teachers who are graduates of the California State Normal Schools 65 

Number of teachers who are graduates of any other State Normal School 20 

Number of teachers who are graduates of San Francisco Normal School 413 

Number of teachers who are graduates of University of California 36 

Number of teachers who hold life diplomas 492 

Number of teachers who hold State Educational Diplomas 33 

Number of teachers who hold High School certificates 87 

Number of teachers who hold county or grammar grade certificates 851 

Number of teachers who hold county or primary grade certificates 43 

Number of teachers who subscribe for some educational journal 1,000 

STATEMENT OF GAINS AND LOSSES IN TEACHING DEPARTMENT. 

Number of teachers in department June 30, 1899 1,074 

Losses 

By resignation 22 

By dismissal 2 

By abolishment of position . 3 

By retirement 6 

By death 3 



1,038 
Gains- 
Teachers elected June 30, 1899, to June 30, 1900 2 



In Department June 30, 1900 1,040 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



187 



SALARY SCHEDULE, 1900-1901. 

EFFECT JULY IST, 1900. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



PER MONTH. 



HIGH SCHOOLS. 

Principals $250 00 

Heads of Departments 155 00 

Assistant Teachers 100 00 

Assistants after 1 year's experience 

Assistants after 2 years' experience 

Assistants after 3 years' experience 130 uO 

Assistants after 4 years' experience 140 00 

Teacher drawing 135 00 

Teachers of French, German and drawing 150 00 

Head teachers of drawing, wood carving and clay modeling in Polytechnic 

High School 135 Ofr 

Assistants in Polytechnic High School 75 00 

Teachers of French, German or Spanish in one High School 100 00 

Teachers of French, German or Spanish in two High Schools 135 00 

Teacher iron-work in the Manual Training Department 110 00 

Teachers of bookkeeping, stenography, typewriting and penmanship 75 00- 

Substitutes per day 6 00- 

In fixing the salary of High School teachers, experience in a regularly or. 
ganized high school in the United States, under a high school certificate 
shall count. 

PRIMARY AND GRAMMAR 'SCHOOLS. 

Principals Primary Schools, 16 or more classes 150 00- 

Principals Primary Schools, 11 to 15 classes 135 00 

Principals Primary Schools, 6 to 10 classes 125 00 

Principals Primary Schools, 3, 4 and 5 classes 115 00 

Principals Primary Schools, 2 classes 105 00 

Principals Primary Schools, 1 class 100 00 

Principals of Grammar Schools having 18 or more classes 20000 



188 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



SCHEDULE OF SALARIES FOR 1900-1901 CONTINUED. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



PBR MONTH. 



Principals of Grammar Schools having less than 18 classes $175 QO 

All Grammar Schools shall be entitled to one Vice-Principal, at a salary of 125 00 

Primary Schools of 16 or more classes shall be entitled to a Vice-Principal at a 

salaryof j 10000 

REGULAR TEACHERS OF GRAMMAR AND PRIMARY GRADE CLASSES. 

Grades will be designated as 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th. 

I 

First year 50 00 

Thereafter a yearly increase of $2 50 per month for 2d, 3d and 4th grades,! 
and $3 00 a month for 1st, 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th, until the following maximum 
of salaries are reached: 

First Grade- 
First year 50 00 

Second year 53 00 

Third year 56 00 

Fourth year 59 00 

Fifth year 62 00 

Sixth year 65 00 

Seventh year i 6S 00 

Eighth year 71 00 

Ninth year 7400 

Tenth year ' 77 00 

Eleventh year 80 00 

Twelfth year 83 00 

Second, Third and Fourth Grades- 
First year 50 CO 

Second year 52 50 

Third year 1 55 00 

Fourth year 57 50 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



189 



SCHEDULE OF SALARIES FOR 1900-1901 CONTINUED. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



PER MONTH. 



Second, Third and Fourth Grades Continued. 

Fifth year 

Sixth year 

Seventh year 

Eighth year 

Ninth year 

Tenth year 

Eleventh year 

Fifth and Sixth Grades 

Seventh and Eighth Grades 



Provided, that the maximum salary paid to the holders of Primary Grade 
certificates shall not exceed 68 00 per month. 

Assistants in Primary and Grammar Schools teaching German and English, 
Drawing and English, French and English, or Music and English, having special 
certificates to teach such special subjects, $5 00 per month, in addition to their 
salaries according to the schedule. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The salaries of Principals of Evening Schools shall be as follows : 



60 00 
62 50 
65 00 
67 50 
70 Oft 
73 00 
76 00 
80 00 
83 00 



Hamilton 


1UU W 










Spring Valley . 


CA f)A 




60 00 




QC Oft 


Irving Scott 


50 00 




50 00 




90 00 


Assistants in Evening Schools 


50 00 


Assistants in High Schools (Evening) 


60 00 


Head Teachers of Mechanical Drawing (Evenincr) . . 


50 00 



190 



REPORT OP BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



SCHEDULE OF SALARIES FOR 1900-1901 -CONCLUDED. 



TO WHOM PAID. 



PER MONTH. 



DEPARTMENT AT LARGE. 

Supervisor of Vocal Music 100 00 

Assistant, Vocal Music 75 00 

Supervisor of Drawing in Grammar Department 125 00 

Supervisor of Drawing in Primary Department 100 00 

Supervisor of Manual Training of Grammar Schools 200 00 

OFFICE AND SHOP EMPLOYEES. 

Assistant Secretaries, each 125 00 

Stenographers Board of Education and Superintendent's Office 75 00 

Messenger Board of Education 5 00 

Messenger Superintendent's office 78 00 

Storekeeper 125 00 

Assistant Storekeeper 75 00 

Teamster, Supply Department 92 50 



FIXES AND DEDUCTIONS 

Fine 50 cents for tardiness in day and evening schools. 

Five dollars fine for failure to acknowledge receipt of circulars or letters 
from office of the Superintendent or of the Board of Education. 

Deduction of one-thirtieth for each day's absence. 

No excuse to be absent from school, -with, pay, shall be granted to any 
principal or teacher of this Department, except under suspension of rules, and 
by special action of the Board of Education ; except for three days, on account 
of the death of a relative within the first degree of consanguinity, or of hus- 
band or wife. 

Fine 85 00 for principals failing to make correct report of absentees on last 
school day of month. 



REPORT OP BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



191 



A. 

RECOMMENDATIONS TO CITY AND COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION FOR THE 
GRANTING OF CERTIFICATES DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 1399-1900. 



GRADE OF CERTIFICATE. 


ON 
EXAMINATIONS. 


ON 
CREDENTIALS. 


TOTAL 
GRANTED 
COLUMN. 


( 


* 


CO 

o 


4k 

1 


I 


E 


5" M 

f* 


2 and 5. 
Female 


3 and 6. 
Total 


High School . . . 


s 




3 
2 
2 

U 

J 

22 


7 
6 


12 

50 


19 
56 


10 
6 


12 
5? 
2 

12 

78 


22 
58 
2 

16 
98 


Grammar Grade .... ... 




2 

2 


'rimary Grade 




Special- 
Bookkeeping 


I 


13 


1 
63 


76 


4 
20 


French, Grammar Grade 




1 


German, High School 




German, Grammar Grade . , 


1 


1 
1 
1 
4 
2 

1 

15 


Greek and Latin, High School 


Latin, High School 


2 


Music 


Stenography and Typewriting 




Wood-carving, Free-hand Drawing, clay Mod 
eling 






7 



192 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



B. 



CREDENTIALS UPON WHICH CERTIFICATES WERE GRANTED, 1899-1900. 



CREDENTIALS. 


HIGH 
SCHOOL. 


GRAMMAR 
GRADE. 


PRIMARY. 


SPECIAL. 


| 


Columns 3, 6, 7 and 10 


i 


2. Female 


w 
1 


*. 

S 
fe 

<D 


P 1 


1 


P 
| 


1 


3 
re* 


M 


00 


co 





H 


1 


Female 


I 






" 














I 




1 




DIPLOMAS FROM 

(A) University of California. . . . 
(B) Leland Stanford Jr. Univ'ty 

Total on diplomas from 
Universities 


6 

1 


10 
2 


16 
3 
















1 


1 


17 
3 


20 
1 

49 

6 
76 










































1 




1 














1 

46 
I 
1 
1 


DIPLOMAS FROM 

(A) San Francisco Normal Sch'l 
(B) California State Normal 








1 


45 
1 
1 
1 


46 
1 
1 
1 
































(c) Illinois State Normal 










(D) Massachusetts State Normal 

Total on Normal Diplo- 
mas. 














































LIFE DIPLOMAS OF , 

(A) Missouri 








1 




1 














1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


(B) Nevada 










2 


2 
1 
1 














(c) Ohio . 








1 














(D) Pennsylvania 








1 
1 
















(E) Washington 


' 








1 














Total on Life Diplomas. . 




















7 


12 


19 


6 


50 


56 














1 


1 














REPORT OP BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



193 



C. 



APPLICATIONS FOR RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CERTIFICATES REJECTED, 1S99-1900. 



GRADE OP CERTIFICATE. 


NUMBER OF 
APPLICATIONS 
ON 
EXAMINATIONS 


ON 
EXAMINATION. 


ORE 

~j 

g 

L 

r 


ON 
)ENTI 

9 

3 

E. 

<B 


ALS. 
CO 


TOTAL 
GRANTED 
COLUMN. | 


1 


2. Female. 


w 


ft 

fe 

E 




5. Female 


o 

| 


h 

* 


5 and 8 
Female . 


6 and 9 
Total . . . 








: 















| 




Hio-h School . . 


3 


1 
4 

8 


4 
4 
8 




1 

2 
6 


1 
2 
6 

>1 

\ 

16 










1 
4 
6 

5 
16 


1 

4 
6 

8 
19 






2 


2 


.... 


Primary Grade 




Special- 
Kindergarten 




1 
3 


^ 
.1 

; 

3 


3 
3 


French (High School) 










1 
2 


German (Grammar Grade) ... 
Latin (High School) 










7 


15 


22 


i 

2 


Mechanical Drawing 


Wood-carving, Free-hand Draw- 
ing and Clay Modeling 










1 
13 




10 


28 


38 


3 



13 



194 REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

D. 

RECOMMEND ATIOXS FOR RENEWAL OF CERTIFICATES, 1899-1900. 



GRADE OF CERTIFICATE. 


MALE. 


FEMALE. 


TOTAL. 


High School 


1 


3 


4 


Grammar Grade 


2 


194 




Primary Grade 


1 


50 


51 


Special- 
French 




6 




German 




2 




Kindergarten '. 




1 




Spanish 




2 


11 












4 


258 


262 



E. 

RECEIPTS FROM CERTIFICATE FEES. 

Received on application for examination for 

High School Certificates $3 00 

Grammar Grade Certificates 8 00 

Primary Grade Certificates 16 00 

Special 44 00 

Received on application for Certificates on Credentials 

High School Certificates $38 00 

Grammar Grade Certificates 102 00 

Primary Grade Certificates 

Special Certificates 2 00 

Received on applications for renewals of 

High School Certificates 8 00 

Grammar Grade Certificates 392 00 

Primary Grade Certificates 100 00 

Special Certificates 22 00 



876 00 



142 00 



522 00 



Total receipts. . 



8740 00 



REPORT OP BOARD OP EDUCATION. 



195 



The foregoing receipts have been duly given to the City and County Treasurer, as follows: 

1899 -July t 

August $33 00 

September 50 00 

October 56 00 

November 

December 48 00 

1900 January 

February 26 00 

March. 94 00 

April 140 00 

May ; 23400 

J une 54 00 

$740 00 



F. 



RECOMMENDATIONS TO CITY AND BOUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION FOR 
RECOMMENDATION TO THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 











Mj 




HIGH 


GRAMMAR 


TOTAL LIFE 










DIPLOMAS, 


E 




SCHOOL. 


GRADE. 


COLUMNS. 


g 


FOR 


f- 


r* 


co 


f" 


P 1 


ps 








I 




<T 


<? 


! 


1 


i 
P 


| 


Eg 


If 


III 


1 

2 






,' 




. 


P 




' *. 





a 










: 




I 










I 








2 




33 


33 




34 


35 




State Life Diplomas (re-issue). 








3 




26 




23 


26 




Total Life Diplomas . . 


I 


i 


2 


3 





59 


4 


57 


61 





State Educational Diplomas 










1 


1 




















196 REPORT OP BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



G. 

APPLICATIONS FOR RECOMMENDATION FOR STATE LIFE DIPLOMAS REJECTED. 
Life Diploma (High School) : 



H. 



Receipts from Life Diploma fees- 
Balance on hand June 1, 1899 84 00 

Received from State Life Diplomas 

High School $4 00 

Grammar Grade , 66 00 

70 00 
Received tor re-issue of Life Diplomas, Grammar Grade 52 00 



Total receipts $126 00 

The same was sent to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Hon. Thomas J. 
Kirk, as follows: 

1899 October 21 $22 00 

Decemberl4 1600 

1900 January[6 32 00 

March 7 4 00 

June 6 32 00 

$106 00 
June 30, balance on hand 20 00 

si 26 00 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



197 





1 


3, 6, 9 and 15. 
Total 


6 1 S 


ia 






h3 g 

I i 


2, 5, 8, and 14. 
17. Female 


So | 


1 




8 


1. 4, 7 and 13. 
16. Male 


i s s 







a 


15. Total 


CO <> O 
r-l rH 


s 




s< . 










a|s 

. ? 


14. Female 


o M * 







j 

< w 
5 


13. Male 


* M H 


s 




a i 


12. Total . . 


13 S 2 







1*5 










t| 


11. Female 


S3 53 S 


9 




S a S 


10 Male 


05 OS 




2 


p 


o 








o 

i 

H 


>* 


9. Total 


w 


S 


5 


< 

a 
S 


8. Female 


o eo 


9 


$ 




CM 


7. Male 


j ; 




c* 




6. Total. 


co i^ oo 

CO JC~ 


S 




0? 










8 


a 


5. Female 


- g S 


i 




o 


4. Male 


CO -H 


S) 






3. Total 


S S S 


So 














S 

5 


2. Female.... 


3 S * 


13 






1 Male 


S 


S 














I 


1 




High Schools 
Grammar and Primary Schools 
Evening Schools 


H 



198 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



J. 



SUBJECTS IN WHICH SPECIAL CERTIFICATES ARE HELD. 





BY TEACHERS IN 


TOTALS. 


HIGH 
SCHOOLS. 


GRAMMAR 
AND PRIMARY 
SCHOOLS. 


ETENING 
SCHOOLS. 


M 
K 

EL 
5T 


2. Female. 


pe 

I 


*. 

g; 

2. 

9 


5. Female. 




I 


; 

F 


8. Female. 


o 
g 


K* 1 

P * 

1 


2, 5 and 8. 
Female 


f| 

'. P 






















Bookkeeping . ... 




6 


6 




1 
2 


1 

2 


8 


3 


11 


8 


10 
2 

1 
3 

8 
8 


18 
2 
3 
3 

3 
6 
11 
11 
1 
1 
2 
5 
2 
3 
1 
1 
3 
15 
4 
4 

96 




Drawing Architectural 










3 




3 


3 

2 


Drawing Free-hand 


9 




2 

3 
1 




1 


1 


Drawing, Free-hand, Wood Carv- 
ing and Clay Modeling 
Drawing, Mechanical 


1 


3 












5 




5 
2 
1 


6 
3 
3 
1 


French .... 


3 
3 
1 


2 
1 


5 
4 
1 




4 
, 6 


4 
6 




2 
] 


German 


Iron-work ... 


History General . 








1 


1 










1 

5 

1 


Latin 


2 




8 










2 

1 
3 


Music 










5 


5 




I 


1 


Penmanship 


1 




1 




Physical Culture 








3 




3 




Physics 


1 




1 






1 




Sewing 








1 


1 










1 

2 
12 

4 
4 

58 


Spanish 




1 
4 
2 


1 
4 
2 
1 




1 
3 


1 

5 

2 
2 

15 


2 
8 
2 
2 

35 


1 
3 

38 


Stenography and Typewriting. 




.... 


3 


3 


Typewriting 




Wood-work. 


1 










Total 


15 


19 


34 


3 


24 


27 


20 





REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



199 



K. 

NUMBER OF STATE EDUCATIONAL AND LIFE DIPLOMAS REGISTERED. 

( According to Section 1,696 of the Political Code.) 





ISSUED 
BEFORK 1880. 


ISSUED 
SINCE 1880. 


Columns 3, 6 and 9. ' 
Total Life Diplomas 


1 Columns 6 and 9. 
| Total Educational Diplomas 


HIGH 
SCHOOL. 


GRAMMAR 
SCHOOL. 


K 

EL 



2. Female]. 


w 
g 


ft 

& 

g. 




5. Female. 


o> 
H 


^j 

! 



8. Female 


P 

J 

















LIFE DIPLOMAS BY 

High School Teachers 


7 
13 
2 

22 


7 
43 
1 

51 


14 
56 

3 

73 


5 
1 

6 


1 
4 

5 


6 

5 

11 


7 
8 

15 


3 

378 
12 

393 


3 

385 
20 

4C8 


23 
446 
23 

492 




Grammar and Primary Grade 
Evenin " School 


Total Life Diplomas 




EDUCATIONAL DIPLOMAS BY 

High School Teachers 










1 


1 










1 
29 
3 

33 














29 
2 

31 


29 
2 

81 















1 
2 


1 
2 





Total Educational Diplomas 

























L. 

PERMANENT CERTIFICATES REGISTERED. 

(A) High School, by female High School teacher 1 

(B) Grammar Grade, by female Grammar School teacher 1 

(c) Grammar Grade, by male Evening School teacher 1 



Total. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

SCHOOL TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND 
COMMISSIONERS. 



OFFICERS. 

MAYOR JAMES D. PHELAN Chairman 

SUPERINTENDENT OF COMMON SCHOOLS R. H. WEBSTER Secretary 

TREASURER S. H. BROOKS..., ...Treasurer 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 

To the Honorable Jos. D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIB: I have the honor to submit the annual report of the Public School Teachers' 
Annuity and Retirement Fund of San Francisco, for the year terminating June 30, 19CO. 
Respectfully submitted, 

R. H. WEBSTER, 
Secretary Public School Teachers' Annuity and Retirement Fund Commissioners. 



SCHOOL TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND. 



201 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



RKCEIPTS. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 






$10 506 50 


Amount received in accordance with Section 8 (a) from teachers 
retired during fiscal year- 
August 23 1899 Mrs B M. Baumgartner 


$30600 




September 2 1899 Mrs E M Poole 


221 05 




September 16 1898 Mrs C M Sissons 


234 75 






294 00 




February 5 1900 Miss C A Templeton 


31062 




March 16 1900 M.iss N S.Baldwin 


30525 




March 17 1900 Miss T. M. Sullivan , 


30525 










Total receipts (to be apportioned 75 per cent to the Annu- 




1,976 92 






$12,483 42 


INTEREST ACCOUNT. 

December 31, 1899 Permanent Fund, German and Security Banks 
July 1, 1900 Permanent Fund, German and Security Banks 


$181 50 
134 53 




December 31 1899 Annuity Fund Hibernia Bank 


$78 13 




July 1 1900 Annuity Fund, Hibernia Bank 


76 35 








154 48 














APPORTIONMENTS. 

To the credit of the Annuity Fuud, 75 per cent of $12,483 42, as 
aforestated 


$9,342 31 


$12,953 93 




154 48 




To the credit of the Permanent Fund, 25 per cent of $12,483 42, 


3 141 11 






316 03 














12,953 93 



202 



SCHOOL TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT CONTINUED. 



ANNUITY FUND. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


1899 July 1 Balance in fund 


$5 946 05 






78 13 




J900 July 1 75 p p r cent of yearly receipts 


9 342 31 




July 1 Interest 


76 35 










Disbursements for year 




815,442 84 
12 229 90 








July 1, 1900 Balance in fund 




3,212 94 









PERMANENT FUND. 



1899 July 1 Amount in fund , 

December 31 Interest 

1900 July 125 per cent of yearly receipts.. , 
July 1 Interest.. 



July 1, 1900 Total in fund. 



$6,010 39 

181 50 

3,141 11 

134 53 



$9,467 53- 



SCHOOL TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND. 



203 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS' 

ANNUITY AND RETIREMENT FUND SINCE THE PASSAGE OP THE 

ORIGINAL ACT, MARCH 26, 1895. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS 

Under original act by deducting 1 per cent from salaries of con- 
tributing teachers and from payments by teachers retired . . . 


$10,961 39 
36,538 78 










Total 




$47,500 17 


DISBURSEMENTS. 
Under original Act 


$4,714 42 




Under amended Act 


30 105 28 










Total 




34.819 70 








Balance ., 




$12 680 47 


Permanent Fund . . 


$9.467 53 




Annuity Fund 


3,212 94 










Total 




12,680 4X 









204 



SCHOOL TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND. 



ANNUITY FUND. 






AMOUN T. 


TOTAL. 


1897 May 5 Balance transferred from fund under original Act 
toAprilSO 


86 246 97 




1900 June 30 Receipts under amended Act 


27 071 25 








$33,318 22 


Disbursements 




30,105 28 








Balance 




$3,212 94 









PERMANENT FUND. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL, 


1899 June 3025 per cent of all receipts under amended Act' 
with interest ... 


$6 010 39 




Receipts for year to July 1, 1900 


3 457 14 










Total July 1 , 1900 




j<9 467 53 









SCHOOL TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND. 



205 



ANNUITANTS. 



NAME. 


ANNUITY 
PER MONTH. 


TOTAL 
PER MONTH. 




$50 00 




Miss L E Ryder. 


50 00 




Mrs H A St John 


45 00 




Mrs. M. H. Currier 


50 00 




Miss Cornelia B. Campbell . 


50 00 




Miss Victorine M Raclet 


45 00 




Mrs. Josephine Gerichten 


45 00 




Miss Elizabeth M Molloy 


50 00 




Miss A M Dore 


50 00 






no oo 




Miss Fannie L. Soule 


50 00 




Miss Flora McDonald Shearer 


36 66 




Miss Kate Kollmeyer.... 


26 66 






25 00 




Mrs. S. N. Joseph 


50 00 




Miss Mary J. Bragg 


50 00 




Mrs. M E. Caldwell 


50 00 




Mrs.E M Poole 


36663 






50 00 




Mrs. E. M. Baumgardner 


50 00 




Mrs. C. M. Sissons 


38663 




Miss C. A. Templeton 


50 00 




Mrs. T. M. Sullivan 


50 CO 




Miss N. S. Baldwin 


50 00 














$1,098 66g 



CONTRIBUTORS. 

Number of teachers contributing $1.00<)er month 

Number of teachers contributing 50 cts. per month 



804 
66 



206 SCHOOL TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND. 



ANNUITY FUND HOW PROVIDED. 

It shall consist of the following, with the income and interest thereof: 

1. Twelve dollars per school year of the salaries paid to all those subject to the 
burdens of this Act, deducted from the warrants for salary and paid by the Treas- 
urer to the Retirement Fund Commissioners; six dollars from evening school teach- 
ers whose salary does not exceed $50 per month. 

2. All moneys received from gifts, bequests and devises, or from other sources. 

3. All money, pay, compensation or salary forfeited, deducted or withheld from 
the warrant or demand for salary of any teacher or teachers for and on account of 
absence from duty from any cause, which the Board of Education may set apart for 
the aforesaid fund; and it is the duty of the Board of Education to appropriate 
monthly one-half of such moneys for such fund. 

TWO PARTS TO THE FUND PERMANENT AND ANNUITY FUND. 

1. A permanent fund consists of (a) 25 per cent of all contributions from those 
affected by this Act; (b) 25 per cent of all gifts, bequests, or devises, unless other- 
wise ordered by the donor or testator; (c) 25 per cent of all moneys deducted from 
the salary of teachers because of absence from duty. [Note. When the permanent 
fund shall amount to $50,000, then all moneys thereafter received shall go into the 
annuity fund, except such gifts, devises or bequests as may be specially directed by 
its donor or testator to be placed in the permanent fund.] 

2. Annuity fund, consisting of (a) the income derived from the permanent fund; 
(b) all other moneys belonging to the annuity and retirement fund not specified to 
be placed in the permanent fund; (c) all money in the fund provided for in the Act 
to which this is amendatory. 

Annuitants shall be paid from the annuity fund only. 

HOW ADMINISTERED. 

The Public School Retirement Fund Commission consists of the Superintendent 
of Schools, County Treasurer and Mayor, who shall meet biennially and report an- 
nually to the Supervisors. The Retirement Committee consists of five teachers, at 
lea*st one being a class teacher from some primary school and one a class teacher 
from some grammar school, one or two being elected annually to serve for three 
years. 

QUALIFICATION FOR RETIREMENT. 

1. Any teacher who shall have served in the public schools in the State for a 
period of thirty years, as a teacher or school officer, and who shall have been sub- 
jected to the burdens imposed by this Act for thirty years, shall be entitled to re- 
tire and to receive fro'm the fund the sum of fifty dollars per month, payable quar- 
+erly. 

2. Any teacher who shall become incapacitated for performing the duties of a 
teacher, and who shall have been a contributor to the annuity fund for at least 
five years, shall be at liberty to retire and to receive an annuity equal to such pro- 
portion of the maximum annuity granted under this Act, as the time that he or she 
has been subjected to the burdens imposed by thie Act bears to the period of thirty 
years. 

Provided, That any annuity shall be suspended if its recipient return to service 
tn the public schools, and any annuity less than two-thirds the maximum annuity 
shall cease If the Committee on Retirement shall, at any time, decide that its re- 



SCHOOL TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND. 207 



cipient has been restored to the capacity of performing the duties of teacher, and 
has beei reimbursed from the annuity fund at least the full amount of his or her 
contribution thereto; 

Provided, further, That such proportionate reduction shall not apply to those 
now employed in the public schools who shall have filed the specified notice within 
ninety days of the passage of the Act, and who shall have paid at the time of their 
retirement an amount equal to what they would have paid into the fund had they 
been contributing thirty years. 

Provided, That if a person cease to teach in any county, or city and county, 
where he or she has been subject to the burdens imposed by this Act, then, after 
such person has taught in the public schools of this State for thirty years, he or 
she shall be entitled to retire and receive an annuity equal to such proportion of the 
maximum annuity granted under this Act as the time that he or she has been sub- 
jected to the burden imposed by this Act bears to the period of thirty years. 

Provided, That if any teacher shall be compelled, by reason of ill-health, to re- 
tire from the profession of teaching after the expiration of five years and before 
the exoiration of thirty years of service in the public schools of this State, such 
retiring teacher, if a contributor to the annuity fund at time of retirement, shall be 
entitled to as many thirtieths of the full annuity as he or she has had years of ser- 
vice, by paying into the annuity fund the contributions to that fund corresponding 
to those years of service rendered at a time when, or in a place where, it was im- 
possible to make such contributions by reason of the non-existence of an annuity 
fund. 

Provided, That the annuity of evening school teachers be based on $25 per 
month. 

Provided, That if at the end of any quarter there shall not be a sufficient 
amount of money in the annuity fund to pay all warrants or demands of annuitants 
in full, then the money in that fund shall be divided pro rata among them, and the 
sum received by such annuitants shall be in full discharge of all claims against 
that fund to date. 



SHERIFF'S REPORT. 



San Francisco, July 16, 1900. 

To the Honorable Jas. D. Phelun, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: In compliance with Section 9, Article XVI, of the Charter, I herewith 
submit my report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, together with statistics 
of the County Jails. 

OFFICE. 

The amount of fees received and paid into the City and County Treasury for 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, as per statement made to the Auditor, is as 
follows: 











1899 July 


$523 14 






August 


642 67 






September. . . . 


724 35 






October 


646 18 






November 


633 82 






December 


583 97 














1900 January 


1 175 02 






February 


1 142 39 






March... 


1 353 60 






April 


1 248 13 






May 


1 244 55 






June 


1,184 93 






















Totals 






$11 102 75 


Received for board of U. S. prisoners and 
paid into Treasury 






7 683 40 










Grand total paid into Treasury ror fiscal 
year 






$18 786 15 











SHERIFF'S REPORT. 209 

SALARIES SHERIFFS OFFICE AND COUNTY JAILS. 





1900-1901. 


1898-1899. 


Office.. .... . ... 


$53,000 00 


$63,800 00 


Jail No. 1 ... .. 


12,600 00 


13.800 00 


Jail No 2 


13.800 00 


16,320 00 


Jail No 3 


5,400 00 


6,300 00 










$84,800 00 


$100.220 00 
84.800 00 






$15,420 00 









JAIL No. 1. 

It has been suggested that this jail be abandoned, and that Jail No. 2 be put 
In such a condition that it would be safe there to keep the inmates of the former, 
but there are a great many objections to that change. In the first place, Jail No. 
2 would need a good deal of overhauling and strengthening entailing an expendi- 
ture of a large amount of money before it would be safe to confine murderers and 
other desperate criminals there. Then the inmates of Jail No. 1 are continually 
brought to the Courts, sometimes as many as thirty in a day, which would be very 
inconvenient, were they to be brought in from Jail No. 2 every morning and taken 
back at night, a distance of six miles each way. Then tha trial of criminals 
sometimes lasts till all hours of the night, and if the van should be driven out to 
Jail No. 2, along the lonely Mission roads after dark, with a load of desperate 
criminals, it would give a rescuing party an excellent chance to overpower the 
driver and deputies, and let the whole load escape. 

The basement of the City Hall might perhaps be converted Into a County Jail 
at less expense, and would be much more convenient, and a great deal safer than 
Jail No. 2, and would be admirably suited for that purpose, if it could be properly 
ventilated and put in a sanitary condition. 

If Jail No. 1 is to be abandoned, the City Hall basement would probably b th 
best solution of the problem. 

It is true that Jail No. 1 is a very old building, and the interior arrangements 
are all out of date, and are constantly needing repairs; but, in spite of all that, it 
is a fairly safe place. We are doing as much work on these repairs as we possibly 
can without putting the city to any expense for it. Practically, the only things 
we require are tools and materials, as we generally have mechanics "in our charge 
who can do the work. Among the work performed in this manner during the last 
six months was the burning off, scraping, plastering and painting dining room, 
kitchen, office, hallways and corridors, cell doors, drug and store room, railings and 
stairways. In the plumbing line, repairs were made in the bath rooms and kitchen, 
on water pipes and on about forty (40) faucets. The floors in cells, corridors and 
yard, and various chairs, desks, tables, etc., were repaired by prisoners who under- 
stood such work. 
14 



210 SHERIFF'S REPORT. 

JAIL No. 2. 

The following report is from Superintendent A. J. Martin, and shows in detail 
what has been accomplished by a judicious management of the means at our dis- 
posal: 

July 1, 1900. 

JOHN LACKMANN, Sheriff, 

City and County of San Francisco- 
Dear Sir: I herewith submit my report for work performed by prisoners in our 
charge, during the last six months of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

You are aware of the fact that we have been allowed barely enough guards to 
fill the posts of duty, being six guards less than former administrations have been 
employing. Therefore, I have been seriously handicapped, and have not been able 
to put in a crop of hay on the farm, or get better results from the other various 
departments, but whatever is set forth in this report is a true and correct account 
of the amount of work performed, and it is not designed to look large on paper 
when in reality there is little to show for it 

When we took charge in January we found all of the automatic locking devices 
out of order, and so rusted that not one of them could be used. You and Mr. 
Mahony, of the Board of Public Works, brought a locksmith out here one day, 
who offered to put the devices in working order for $370. We have performed the 
work with our inmates at a cost of $81.70, thereby saving the city on that one item 
$288. We have done a great deal of repairing on the plumbing of the jail, which 
would have cost the city, if let out by contract, at least $500. The outhouses hav 
been shingled, and other carpenter work has been done, without any expense to 
the city, except the cost of shingles and nails. 

The interior of the jail has been thoroughly overhauled and renovated; every 
cell and corridor has been whitewashed and painted. The halls, entrance, rooms 
and the interior of the building have been painted throughout. 

The prisoners detained here are not of such a criminal class as one would 
imagine. Those who work generally do as much as any man employed on the 
outside on a salary. Men are often sent here for trivial causes, when at times 
it would be better to give them an opportunity to draw themselves together from 
a spree, and not send them here to associate with petty thieves and the so-called 
"hypos." These "hypos" are a class addicted to the use of opium. They are lost 
to all decency and respect, and should be kept by themselves, as their association 
Is a great temptation for the downfall of others, who many times are induced to 
use the drug. 

The work which is being performed on the County roads is handled differently 
this year from what it has formerly been. Heretofore all rock was hauled by teams 
but, through the kindness and public spirit of Mr. A. B. Spreckels, of the S. F. & 
S. M. R. R., who has placed at our disposal two rock cars, propelled by electricity, 
and also one of their motor men to run them, we are enabled to accomplish more 
work in less time than if we employed fifteen teams. He has also given us the 
right of a convenient quarry, where we are enabled to get the rock, and with the 
use of these cars we can cover many miles of road, which could not be done other- 
wise without an enormous cost. Before tha winter sets in the traveling public will 
have good roads in the outlying districts. As you are aware, we did not get any 
guards to do road work until March 28th, thereby losing three months of the last 
fiscal year. I have obtained figures from civil engineers, and they state that the 
work we are doing on the County roads would cost the city at least $80 per day, 
figuring that it would take fifteen teams at $4 per day, five men in quarry at $2.50 
per day, and five men on the roads at $2.50 per day, all of which is a very low 
estimate, as we do the grading and fixing of culverts also. 



SHERIFF'S REPORT. 211 

The San Jose road, from County line to Glen Park, a distance of six miles, both 
sides of the road included, has been put in good condition. This work could not ba 
done for less than $8,000, which can be vouched for by any competent engineer, 
and the cost to the city will not exceed, including guards, material, etc., $1,000. 
One rock car will haul as much as five teams in one load, and travel at the rate of 
fifteen miles an hour, thereby saving us horse flesh, wagons, harness, repairs, etc., 
and, besides, the work can be done more thoroughly in this manner, the macadam 
being placed on thick and not merely covered over, but to last for a long time. If 
we had to do all this work with teams, the progress would become slower and 
slower the farther we got away from the quarry, but with the electric cars the 
difference in distance is hardly noticeable. 

I will state that, with the additional guards granted us, we can easily put out 
twenty-five men more on other roads, and will, before winter, have finished grading 
and macadamizing all the roads in the outlying districts. For a person who is not 
familiar with the ground it is hard to realize what amount of work is being done 
out here, but the people who live here, and others who use the roads frequently, 
see the change and appreciate it. For the prisoners, I wish to say that they are, 
as a whole, faithful and good workers, some of them working just as hard as if 
they got paid for it, and all of them seem to appreciate the outdoor work. 

The praise of the community is due to Mr. Spreckels for so generously placing 
at our disposal the rock cars, the quarry and one of their regularly employed motor- 
men, all at their own expense. By that act we were enabled to do work In less 
than one month which, if let out by contract, would have cost about $1,000. It is 
\ ery seldom that the feeling of public spirit manifests itself in such an unobtrusive 
manner. 

In confoimit> with the general policy of your office, we have conducted every- 
thing as economically as we could. The saving on the locking devices, carpenter 
work, plumbing and shingling has been mentioned heretofore. The forage for th3 
last six inonlhs has cost us $617.80, as against $1,506.90 for the previous six months, 
a saving of $889.10, or more than one-half. Blacksmithing and horseshoeing 
amounted to $220.55, as against $480.35 for the previous six months, a saving of 
$259 80, also more than one hundred per cent. The repairs on harness cost us $40, 
as against $242.85, a saving of $202.85, or over five hundred per cent. 

JAIL No. 3. 

The following is the report of I. P. Kincaid Superintendent of the Jail. It 
deals witl. the conditions there, and what has been done to improve them. 

San Francisco, July 1, 1900. 
JOHN LACKMANN, Sheriff, 

City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: I herewith submit my report for Jail No. 3 for the six months end- 
ing June 30, 1900. 

I wculd particularly call your attention to the dilapidated condition of th 
building at the time we took possession of the same. 

We found that the building had been allowed to become almost uninhabitable. 
TVe roofs were in such a condition that the rains poured in, causing large portion! 
of the ceilings to fall in the dormitories and many of the rooms. 

The Board of Public Works kindly came to our rescue, and caused temporary 
repairs to be made to portions of the roofs, and also furnished us with materials, 
with which we were enabled to patch portions of the roofs which were covered with 
shingles. This work, and much more in the nature of small repairs, such as mak- 
ing new sinks and drain boards for the kitchens, repairing doors, sashes, windows 
and screens, and many other minor repairs which are necessary in order to keep 
up an institution of this kind and prevent it from falling into ruins, has been 
accomplished through labor performed by prisoners furnished from Jail No. 2, with 



212 SHERIFF'S REPORT. 

comparatively little cost to the city. In the same manner we have been snabled 
to repair the ceilings throughout the building. We are now renovating and paint- 
ing the interior. 

So far we have had to purchase only a small amount of materials at the expenM 
of the city, having been enabled to secure the greater portion of same through pro- 
visions made in furnishing regular rations without extra expense to the city. 

We still have much to do before the building will be restored to a proper sani- 
tary and healthful conditJon. This we expect to be able to do in the same manner 
that the other work has been done. 

In the performance of the duties above mentioned I have been faithfully sec- 
onded by all the employees of this Jail. I have also received much assistance 
through the courtesy of Mr. Martin, Superintendent 'of Jail No. 2, who has fur- 
nished us with prisoners committed to that Jail, who in many cases have worked 
a.3 faithfully as though under pay. 

The most urgent repairs now needed Is the tinning of the roof over the dormi- 
tory and retinning the cornice gutters, also new roof leaders. This will cost less 
than $500, and should be attended to before the rainy season sets in. 

Some of the window sashes will require renewing, all of which I will furnish 
details for whenever required. 

COMMISSARY. 

This department seems to have been carried on In a very peculiar manner, to 
say the least. When I assumed office in January there was not a scrap of paper 
or an entry of any kind found anywhere to show what goods had been received, 
what the jails had been entitled to, how many inmates had been paid for, etc. in 
fact, no record whatever was left to show any of the transaction* of that branch 
of the office. 

I had to inaugurate a system of book-keeping for the Commissary, at consider- 
able tiouble, during the first month, but at the end of that time it was in perfect 
running older, and has worked very satisfactorily ever since. In January I in- 
formed the contractors who furnished supplies to the Jails that I intended to live 
strictly up to the contract, and that I expected them to do the same. When tht 
month was over we made out certificates for the actual number of rations they 
were entitled to charge for, and sent them to the contractors, but found that that 
was not at all satisfactory to them. They claimed that they had always been 
allowed to charge extra rations for officers, trusties and United States prisoners, 
on account of their eating three meals a day, while the ordinary prisoners only ate 
two, and on that account they wanted me to certify to 3,910 rations more for Jan- 
uary than they were entitled to under the contract. I could not see how the con- 
tract could be construed that way, and refused. They then brought the matter up 
before the Police Committee of the Board of Supervisors, and it was finally- sub- 
mitted to you, and my position was sustained, but they showed pretty clearly that 
they had entered into a losing contract if it was to be construed literally, and I was 
requested by all concerned not to draw any more supplies than we absolutely 
needed, which request has been observed. However, the matter was not finally 
settled there. They made numerous showings before the Police Committee that 
their method of being paid for rations had been the custom for years, and that no- 
body had ever construed the contract literally before. So the Supervisors at last 
allowed them $1,500 more for the last six months than they had -received on my 
certificates, and through our economy the under draft that is to say, what we 
saved them in not drawing the full amount of supplies wa were entitled to- 
amounted to $1,962.90, which under the contract could have been deducted from 
their regular bills, so that they were actually paid $3,462.90 more than they were 
entitled to under a strict construction of the contract. Nevertheless, we have still 
effected a large saving by stopping the extra ration business, as the following 
table will show. 



SHERIFF'S REPORT. 



213 



NUMBER OF OFFICERS, TRUSTIES AND UNITED STATES PRISONERS IN THE 
THREE JAILS FOR WHICH AN EXTRA RATION WAS FORMERLY CHARGED. 



1900. 


ygg 

8. 2. ' 

-gS. 

9 f 


Officers and 
trusties, Jail 
No. 1 


Officers and 
trusties, Jail 
No 2 


Officers and 
trusties, Jail 
No. 3 


H 


Contract price. 


AMOUNT. 


January (23 days) 


690 

700 

558 
630 
1,571 
1,572 


842 
476 
961 
930 
620 
600 


2,093 
2,039 
2,624 
2,891 
3,178 
3,160 


2S5 
361 
806 
780 
920 
900 


3,910 
3,579 
4,949 
5,231 
6,289 
6,232 


2034C 
20 %c 
20%c 
20*4c 
2034c 
20*40 


$811 33 
742 64 
1,028 92 
1,035 43 
1,304 97 
1,293 14 




March 


April . . 


May .. 


'June . 




Amount saved by stopping " extra ration " ] 
Less amount allowed contractor by Supervise 

Total amount saved to the City and Coi 


>ayments 
rs 




$6,264 43 
1,500 00 




intv. 


$4,764 43 





AMOUNTS COLLECTED BY CONTRACTORS UPON REGULAR RATION CERTIFICATES 
FURNISHED BY ME, AND THE AMOUNTS COLLECTED FOR THE CORRESPOND- 
ING MONTHS LAST YEAR. 



MONTHS. 


1900. 


1899. 


January .... ... . 


$2,761 63 


$4 110 06 


February 


2,382 09 


4 403 52 


March 


2,508 06 


4,161 19 


April ... 


2,330 85 


3,733 65 


May 


2,464 88 


3,648 33 


June 


2,227 11 


S.327 60 










$14,674 62 


$23,384 38 



214 



SHERIFF'S REPORT. 



AMOUNT OF UNDERDRAFTS AND OVERDRAFTS ON SUPPLIES FURNISHED TO THE 
COUNTY JAILS FOR THE SUBSISTENCE OF PRISONERS FOR THE SIX MONTHS 
ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



MONTHS. 


ITNDERDRAKT. 




February 


$573 95 




March .... 


640 29 




April 


80 29 




May 


472 78 




June 


425 68 










January overdraft 




$2,192 98 
230 08 


Net underdraf t ... 




;1 952 90 









Annexed hereto please find statistics of the County Jails above referred to. 
Very respectfully, 

JOHN LACKMANN, 
Sheriff, City and County of San Francisco. 



SHERIFF'S REPORT. 



215 



1 



CO 



Drunkenness 


- - ' rt -H 'la^fi^taco 


S5 




: : : : 




Disturbing the Peace 


*fl-*OC>O^O5^^C^W 


5 


Discharging: Firearms 




^ 


Cruelty to Sailors 
(U.S.) 


i r r i M M M ! ! 




Cruelty to Children 
and Animals 


COCOMN -.HIM .^HT<r-l 


Ok 


Counterfeiting (U.S.) 


C*rt,_,e>-l -i-lrH ;i-l 





Contempt of Court . . 


: ^ : : - : ^ *^ ^ : ** 


m 


Carrying Concealed 
Weapons 


<N-H^H . CO * 1H l-t 'H 


S 


Burglary, Attempt at 








m-*<nc?)in<O'-int~-<*<e f >n 


8 










' r-l 'i-l 


c* 




: : :::::: 






*^IMt-O'<'C<l'<<j^O-OOt- 
f-H CO t^ O3 f-^ 


g 








Battery 


ooooQOi-ie2t.jH^ft-*- 


R 








Assault on the High 
Seas and Mutiny 


: : : : : : : : : 




(U. S.) 
Assault with Deadly 


^ ^ <e m IH ^< e .'~ lt ~ 


S 








Assault .... 




O5 








Arson 













Absconding Debtor.. 


::::::::: 








s 



S 




c8 ^* 


* * 



2 
3 1 

2 * 

i 


jlJllijIiJJJ 


Number received fo 
fense during fiscal 



216 



SHERIFF'S REPORT. 



Robbery and Aitem p t 


N T* W W CO C3 J3 CO *< 


3 


Receiving Stolen 
Goods 


: :-::::: 


M 


Rape, Attempt and 


f-t CJ r-l 







'. '. 




Rape 


- ~ - : : : 


* 








Prisoners and Insane 




8 








Larceny, Petit Sec- 
ond Offense. . . . 


: : ::<":::::: 


<M 








Larceny, Petit .. 


8SS28S$833 


OO 








Larceny, Grand 


coioto^cocoeiirji-iinio^ 


9 


Goods under False 
Pretenses 




to 


Murder and Man- 
slaughter 


CO O Cq <M S-3 l-l ^J rH 1.-3 r-l l-H 


S 








Murder, Attempt and 
Assault 


C<) rH (M CO CM CO C3 r^ CO <M i-H 


o* 
w 








Misdemeanors other 
than those specific- 
ally mentioned... . 


jn-^oo-^-^t-OicrcotOb--* 


$ 


Mayhem 


: r- : : ~ 


VI 




: : . : 




Malicious Mischief ... 


CO CO ^, c i-< i-H OCO 


?5 


Forgery 


-. ^ : ^ 


t. 




| 




Felony and Perjury 
(U S.) 


- -* rt ~ - : - : 


<N 




: : 






. 




Felony and Perjury. . 


: : : 




Embezzlement 


i-H l-l CO * Tt< fH * C4 ^ 


S 




\ : I 












. .... . 


'o 


* , 




Is 


8 S 




!8 


1 

o 


j 1 s I 1 i ^ J i ^ 

Illlllllllll 


Number received fc 
fense during fisca 



SHERIFF'S REPORT. 



217 



Grand Total 










1 














Number Received 
Each Month for 
Various Offenses. . . 


2 


S3 


5t lOO?^C)OOOi-H 
SSrtSwCMNr-iM 


3 


1 

ti 


Returned from City 
Prison . . . 





c^ 


eo ^ ft > eo ^< -i o w 


eo 


S 














Vagrancy 


- 


3 


^S^fefeS?lS5 


S 


r 


























(State) 






*" 


















Witnesses Detained 






: : : . : f, : 




-i 


(U. S.) 






: : : : : '. 






Vulgar Language 


e* 


d 


cq ft r-i 




00 


Visiting and Keeping 
Lottery Place 


* 


*" 


ft M O if N fl ; ft 


I 


K 


Opium Place 






; : ; : ; ; ; ; 




1-1 


Visiting and Keeping 






: : : ' f, : : 


: 


_ 


Bawdy House 

Violating Timber 
Law(U. S.) 




-' 


- :-:-:-:-:.:--:-: 




" 


Violating Revenue 
Law(U. S.) 








^ 




Violating Restriction 
Act (U. S.) 


c 


te 


SgiSSSS 01 ^*: 


w 


i 


Violating Postal Law 
(US). 






C fl ft i-H W fl 


i 


CO 














Violating Election 
Law , 






: : : : : : 






Threats Against Life. 






: ; - - - i 


i 


w 


Smuggling (U. S.).... 






: <N eo j j f. j 


'** 


t- 


Robbing U 8 Mails 










d 


(U. S.) 






: : : : 






i 
I 






;:*. 




s 
s h 


* 

H 






; ! : : : ; : 




gg 
s5 


* H 
n Z 

a S 






1 

H 

. 


1 f 

: < 

\ 

\ 


lilijiii. 


ii 


Number received 
tense during fisct 



218 



SHERIFF'S REPORT. 



D 

1 

" i 

II 

cfi 3 



^J ^ 

EH S 

p 
O 
O 



Grand Total . 




i 

ft 








Number disposed of each 
month 


OiOOO^*^e^oocot co *o 

SSSS.S2SS255S2 


g 

<N 




,H rn ,H : : : : . 


M 


Police Department 


::::::: 




Died 


* : ** : : : 1 ~ I : "^ 


O 










** : : ^ . ^ ' ^ 


P) 








Sent to Industrial 
Schools 


ri CO .N * ; ^1 | ; 


S 


Transported to State Pr 
son 


NO00(Nt-Ot--lOOt^b- 





Sent to Pest House 


rt : : : ::::::: 




Sent to City Prison to la- 
bor 




9 


Sent to Insane Asylum . . 


I-H v-4 i-H r-( C9 


t- 


Pardoned by Governor 
of the Scate 


Hi i ! i ; ! ; ; 




Delivered to Sheriffs of 
other Counties en route 


rHlO C^CMC^i IrHf-tOCOt 1 


$ 


Acquitted or Charge Dis- 
missed 


Mt-t^.^H^Tt<eooio -CT 


S 


Discharged by Order of 
Court 


CTlO (MC<I<MlOC<l<Mi-l^< 


8 


Discharged on Bail, Ha- 
beas Corpus or Appeal 
Bond 


COC^I^OCOJOCDiaiOCSTHCO 


3 


Discharged on Payment 
of Pine 


t-ieo I-H c *# i-c <# o 





Delivered to U. S. Mar- 
shals for Transfer, Bail 
or Release 


^SSS5!^S??^^SS 


i 


. 


^SSoo^WOT^SoS 


i 


of Term of Sentence . . . 






ft 







2 


. 






; 




! 


:::::: : 




w o 

Q a 




8 


s I 

* 2 

H 

z 
z, 

< 

% 


| '4 j 4 ! * 1 j if 

t ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


Number disposec 
the various ways 



SHERIFF'S REPORT. 219- 



RECAPITULATION. 

Prisoners in County Jails July 1, 1899 (see note) 422 

Prisoners received from July 1, 1899. to June 30, 1903 2,288 



Total 2,710 



Prisoners discharged from July 1, 1899, to Juae 30, 1900, inclusive 2,318 



Prisoners remaining in County Jails June 30, 1900 

Males 273 

Females 51 



Total. 



NOTE. 422, mentioned in th former annual report as the number of prisoners in County Jails 
July 1, 1899, cannot be correct, as the receipts added to that figure and the discharges subtracted 
therefrom should leave us 392, whereas we only have 324, or 68 less than the former report would indi- 
cate. This discrepancy is not in the receipts, discharges or prisoners remaining, as those figures are 
absolutely correct. JOHN LACKMANN. 



EXHIBIT A. 

The 324 prisoners remaining on hand July 1, 1900, are distributed as follows : 

Awaiting trial on the charge of arson 1 

Awaiting trial on the charge of assault with deadly weapon 5 

Awaiting trial on the charge of burglary 6 

Awaiting trial on the charge of embezzlement 5 

Awaiting trial on the charge of felony and perjury 4 

Awaiting trial on the charge of forgery 2 

Awaiting trial on the charge of mayhem 1 

Awaiting trial on the charge of murder, attempt and assault 10 

Awaiting trial on the charge of murder and manslaughter 7 

Awaiting trial on the charge of obtaining money and goods by false pretenses 1 

Awaiting trial on the charge of larceny, grand 10 

Awaiting trial on the charge of rape 2 

Awaiting trial on the charge of rape, attempt and assault 2 

Awaiting trial on the charge of receiving stolen goods 1 

Awaiting trial on the charge of robbery and attempt 5 

United States prisoners awaiting trial 52 

Serving sentence 17 

BRANCH JAIL No. 2. 
Serving sentence 142 



220 SHERIFF'S REPORT. 

BRANCH JAIL No. 3. 

Women serving sentence 48 

Women awaiting trial on charge of grand larceny 1 

Women awaiting trial on charge of murder 2 

Total..., 324 



COUNTY JAIL No. 2 EXHIBIT B. 

NUMBER OF PRISONERS COMMITTED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 
JUNE 30, 1900. 

Number of prisoners on hand June 30. 1899 187 

Committed during the year 1,130 

From City Prison 7 

From County Jail No. 1 7 

Recaptured 2 

Total 1,333 

NUMBER OF PRISONERS RELEASED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 
JUNE 30, 1900. 

Discharged by expiration of sentence 1,157 

Discharged by order of Court 17 

Died 1 

Sent to City Prison 2 

Sent to Insane Asylum 1 

Sent to City and County Hospital 6 

Sent to County Jail No. 1 1 

Escaped 6 

Total number 1,191 

Total number received and on hand 1,333 

Total number discharged 1,191 

Prisoners on hand June 30, 1900 142 



COUNTY JAIL No. 2 EXHIBIT C. 

NUMBER OF PRISONERS LITERATE AND ILLITERATE RECEIVED DURING THE 
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 

Number of prisoners who can read and write 972 

Number of prisoners who can read but cannot write 4 

Number of prisoners who can neither read nor write 154 



1,130 



SHERIFF'S REPORT. 



221 



COUNTY JAIL No. 2 EXHIBIT D. 



SENTENCES OF PRISONERS COMMITTED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

JUNE 30, 1900. 



SENTENCE. 


NUMBER. 


SENTENCE. 


NUMBER. 


S600 or 180 days 


3 


1 year 


8 


290 or 180 days 


2 




1 


190 or 190 days 


1 


1 1 months 


1 


180 or 180 days 


6 


9 months 


1 


150 or 150 days 


1 


8 months 




120 or 120 days 


. 3 


7 months 


3 


100 or 100 days 


13 


6 months 


149 




1 


5 months 


11 


90 or 90 days 


4 


4 months ... . . ... 


22 


60 or 60 days 


8 


3 months .... 


200 


50or 50 days 


9 


90 days 


22 


50 or 25 days 


I 


60 days 


63 


40 or 40 days 


2 


59 days 


j 


30 or 30 days 


29 


40 days 


j 


25 or 25 days 


4 


30 days 


233 


20 or 20 days 


20 


20 days 




20 or 10 days 


3 


15 days 




15 or 15 days 


1 


10 days 




10 or 10 days 


42 






10 or 5 days 


7 


3 days 




5 or 5 days 


10 




j 




1 












1,130 



222 



SHERIFF'S REPORT. 



COUNTY JAIL No. 2 EXHIBIT E. 



OCCUPATIONS OF INMATES COMMITTED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

JUNE 30, 1900. 



OCCUPATIONS. 


NUMBER. 


OCCUPATIONS. 


NUMBER. 




7 


Hotel-keepers 


1 




12 


Hostlers 


15 




18 


Iron-workers 


I 
4 




6 




4 




16 


Journalist 


1 




18 




289 




3 




24 




10 


Locksmith . 


1 




4 


Longshoremen 


10 




3 


Lumbermen 


3 




1 


Machinists 


24 




15 


Merchants 


4 




2 




3 




4 


Metal finishers 


8 




32 


Millers 


2 




4 




26 


Carriagemakers 


jy 


Musicians 






28 


Newsdealers 






1 


Nurse 


j 


n T. 


48 


Painters 




Dishwashers 


6 
j 


Pattern-maker 
Peddlers 


1 


Druggist 


4 


Physicians 


3 










Engineers 


g 


Plumbers 


4 


Farmers 


19 


Porters., 


5 




2 


Printers 


19 




n 


Rag-pickers 


4 




2 


Roofers ! 


6 




4 


Sailmakers 


2 


Harness-makers 









SHERIFF'S REPORT. 



223 



EXHIBIT E, OCCUPATIONS-CONTINUED. 



OCCUPATIONS. 


NUMBER. 


OCCUPATIONS. 


NUMBER. 




33 






Sewing-machine operators 


6 


Upholsterers 


6 


Shoemakers 


20 


Waiters 


48 




4 


Watchmaker 


j 


Stewards 


2 


Watchman . 


1 


Stone -cutters 


9 


Wood finishers 


2 


Tailors 


26 




23 


Teamsters 


63 










Total 


1,130 











COUNTY JAIL No. 2 EXHIBIT F. 

PRISONERS COMMITTED FOR ONE OR MORE TERMS DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 
ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



TIMES COMMITTED. 


NUMBER. 


TIMES COMMITTED. 


NUMBER. 




496 


Fourteenth time committed 


2 




1 


Fifteenth time committed 


2 




223 


Sixteenth time committed 


2 




150 




2 


Fifth time committed 


80 
41 


Twenty-fir time committed 


9 
2 




30 




2 




34 


Thirty-sixth time committed 


1 




]5 




1 




6 


Fifty-first time committed. 


2 


Eleventh time committed 


9 


Seventy-first time committed 


1 




18 


Total 


1,130 











224 SHERIFF'S REPORT. 

COUNTY JAIL No. 2 EXHIBIT G. 

NATIVITIES OP PRISONERS COMMITTED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDINGS 

JUNE 30, 1900. 



NATITIES. 


NUMBER. 


NATIVITIES. 


NUMBER. 


Africa- 


1 




7 




1 




41 


Alaska 


1 




18 




1 


Michigan . 




Austria 


10 


Minnesota 




Australia 


5 


Mississippi. 


3 


California ... 


276 


Missouri 




Canada 


jj 






China 


101 


Nebraska . 




Coloiado . 


9 


Nevada 




Connecticut . . 


5 








4 




g 


District of Columbia 


5 


New Mexico 


I 


England 


47 


New South Wales 


2 


Finland 


1 


New York 


121 


Florida 


2 


Norway. 


9 


France 


12 


Ohio 


27 










Georgia 


1 














Illinois 


20 






Indiana 


4 




2 


Iowa 


15 




j| 










Italy 


12 






Japan. . . . 


3 






Kansas . . . 


1 






Kentucky.. 


10 




o 


Louisiana 


2 


TP** 




Maine 


8 




3 











SHERIFF'S REPORT, 



225 



EXHIBIT G, NATIVITIES-CoNTiNUBi). 



NATIVITIES. 


NUMBER. 


NATIVITIES. 


NUMBER. 


Virginia 


8 


Wisconsin 


5 


Wales 


1 






Washington . . . 


3 




1 130 











COUNTY JAIL No. 2 EXHIBIT H. 



NUMBER OF DAYS' LABOR PERFORMED ON ROADS, QUARRIES AND FARM, TAILOR 
PLUMBING, PAINT, CARPENTER AND BLACKSMITH SHOPS, IN AND ABOUT 
THE HOUSE, GARDEN, STABLES AND JAIL No. 3, FOR THE SIX MONTHS 
ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



MONTHS. 


Blacksmith Shop.. 


Tailor & Shoe Shops 


| 


M 


Laundry 


In and about Build- 
ings, Stables and 
Gardens 


I Carpenter, Paint 
and Plumbing 


1 Farm and Stables.. 


Roads and Quarry. . 


1 




35 
99 
58 
60 
62 
60 


90 

75 
78 
83 
80 
87 


97 
156 
115 
112 

158 
154 


116 
148 
158 
132 
148 
132 


1,160 
1,290 
1,322 
1,358 
1,349 
1,179 


142 
79 
113 
94 
83 
90 


69 
82 
240 
201 
161 
190 


12 

281 
417 

578 


1,709 
1,928 
2,097 
2,321 
2,468 
2,470 




March 


April 


May 


June 


Totals . .... 


374 


493 


792 


834 


7,658 


611 943 


1,288 


12,993 





15 



226 



SH ERIFF'S REPORT. 



COUNTY JAIL No. 2 EXHIBIT I. 

VALUE OF WORK DONE ON ROADS, QUARRIES AND FARM, IN TAILOR, SHOE 
PLUMBING, PAINT. CARPENTER AND BLACKSMITH SHOPS, AND IN AND ABOUT 
THE HOUSE, GARDENS, STABLE AND JAIL No. 3 FOR THE SIX MONTHS ENDING 
JUNE 30, 1900. 





"NUMBER OF 

DAYS' LABOR. 


VALUE 
PER DAY. 


TOTAL VALUE. 




374 


$0 50 


$187 00 


Tailor and shoe shop . 


493 


50 


246 50 


Jail No 3 i 


792 


50 


396 00 




834 


50 


417 00 


In and about buildings and gardens 


7,658 


50 


3 829 00 


Carpenter, paint and plumbing 1 


611 


50 


395 50 


Farm and stables .... 


943 


50 


471 50 


Roads and quarries 


1 9 88 


50 


644 90 


Double teams hauling rock 


215 


4 00 


860 00 


From June 4 to June 30, 1900, there were 201 car-loads 
of rock hauled by electric cars, equal to 251 teams 


251 


4 00 


1,004 00 


Total value of work performed for six months. 






$8,360 50 











AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



SAN FRANCISCO, August 29, 1900. 

To the Honorable Jas. D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIR : I have the honor to submit herewith, in accordance 
with Section 9, Article XVI, of the Charter, and Resolution No. 470 of 
the Board of Supervisors, my annual report consisting of the full 
operations of the Auditor's department for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1900. 

Very respectfully, 

ASA R. WELLS, 
Auditor City and County of San Francisco. 



228 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED 

DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900, ENDING JANUARY 8, 1900. 



PURPOSE. 



ON THE GENERAL FUND. 
ADVERTISING FOR 

Auditor * 104 

1 R4-9 ^^ 

Board of Supervisors 

Panhandle Commissioners 

S24 74 
Public Administrator 

Tax Collector 286 

348 70 
Treasurer 

ALMS HOUSE 

Brass-work and material $41 01 

Blacksmithing 143 90 

Crockery, glassware, etc 50 45 

Disinfectants 19 00 

Drugs, medicines and surgical instruments 499 35 

Dry goods and clothing 1,219 77 

Electrical material 167 63 

Forag* 817 48 

Fuel 3,812 75 

Furniture 356 83 

Grocerieg, provisions, etc 18,616 19 

Hardware 1,272 27 

Harness *nd material 13675 

Horsei 150 00 

Horse ahoeins 153 75 

Carried forward .. $27,457 13 



$3,295 90 



$3,295 90 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $27,457 13 

Ice 86 37 

Incidentals 60 20 

Labor 1,832 50 

Leather and findings 551 77 

Lumber and millwork 558 42 

Paints, oils, etc 62941 

Printing and stationery 148 00 

Rspairs to vehicles 141 00 

Rubber goods 96 90 

Salaries 12,721 54 

Seeds 52 05 

Telephone service 4500 

ASSESSMENT ROLL 

Services in adding, extsnding, experting, redemption of 
property sold to the State, etc., etc., for 1899-1900.. 

BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 

Clerks to 

BOSWORTH STREET TUNNEL... 

BURIAL OF INDIGENT DEAD 

Alms House $116 47 

Head boards 19000 

Carried forward $306 47 



June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



230 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $306 47 

Health Department 1,029 84 

Hospital, City and County 331 02 

Morgue 355 54 

Mt. St. Joseph's Asylum.... 496 53 

CORONER'S EXPENSES 

Chemical analysis $325 00 

Horse keeping 319 50 

Incidentals 374 65 

Rent of premises 390 00 

COUNTY JAIL, NO. 1 
Repairs to 

COUNTY JAIL NO. 2- 

Blaeksmithing $104 70 

Conveying siek horse to hospital 6 00 

Drugs and surgical instruments 8070 

Dry roods 37 60 

Forage 1,467 79 

Hardware 126 24 

Harness and repairs 242 85 

Horseshoeing 197 50 

Ice 54 60 

Let-or 30 00 

Carried forward $2,347 98 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



231 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $2,347 98 

Lumber 50 25 

Paints and oils 114 38 

Plumbing, etc. 

Removing dead animals 500 

Rent of filter 15 00 

Repairs to vehicles 18225 

Salaries 8,513 47 

Telephone service 45 00 

COUNTY JAIL, NO. 3 

Drugs and surgical instruments $37 60 

Forage 6 72 

Hardware 77 10 

Ice 18 20 

Kitchen furniture 82 73 

Maintenance of pupils at Magdalen Asylum 5,427 50 

Plumbing 250 38 

Rent of filter 15 00 

Salaries 2,873 05 

Telephone service 45 00 

Wines and liquors 27 50 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S LAW LIBRARY 
Carried forward .. 



$80,750 29 



11,496 81 



8,860 78 
1,227 IS 

117 00 



$102,460 80 



232 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward 

EXAMINATION OF INSANE 

FINANCE COMMITTEE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
Salaries of experts and expenses 

FIRE ALARM, APPARATUS, MATERIAL. AND RECON- 
STRUCTION- 

Castings $40 14 

Chemicals , 8 12 

Drugs and chemicals 29 42 

Dry goods, etc.., 2 08 

Electrical material 425 43 

Fuel 26 50 

Groceries, etc 9 45 

Hardware 288 65 

Harness and repairs 26 00 

Housekeeping and hire 540 00 

Horseshoeing 62 50 

Lamps and repairs 2 50 

Lumber and millwork 36 80 

Paints, oils and glass 6 55 

Printing and stationery 23 75 

Repairs to vehicles 44 60 

Rubber goods 18 38 

Carried forward $1,589 87 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward . . .' $1,589 87 

Salaries 3,314 15 

Springs 15 00 

"Tiim" furnished 125 00 

Washing 11 50 

Wire and wirework 32 23 

FIRE ALARM AND POLICE TELEGRAPH EX- 
PENSES- 

Bluestone $146 44 

Brass castings 523 59 

Brick, lime and cement 250 

Electrical material 85 02 

Hardware 53 51 

Horsekeeping 164 35 

Horseshoeing 12 50 

Printing and stationery 73 00 

Repairs to vehicles 130 85 

Salaries 3,969 35 

"Time' furnished 2500 

Washing- 4 50 

Wire 20 80 

FIRE ALARM AND POLICE TELEGRAPH, SAL- 
ARIES* 

Superintendent $1,451 60 

Carried forward $1,451 60 



$107,174 11 



5,087 75 



5,221 01 



$117,482 87 



June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



234 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $1,451 60 

Operators 2,721 75 

Repairers 725 75 

FIRE ALARM AND POLICE TELEGRAPH, UNDER- 
GROUND 

FIRE DEPARTMENT, APPARATUS, HOSE AND 
HOUSES 

Architects' services 

Boiler material and labor 78 70 

Brass and copper work and material 7 34 

Castings 327 00 

Chimney work 13 50 

Drugs? and chemicals. 

Electrical material 195 

Erecting engine house, Bluxome street (balance see 

under head Running Expenses) 5,822 80 

Excavating lol for engine house 529 50 

Forage 4,291 02 

2,525 15 

Furniture 57 

Groceries, etc 17 25 

Hardware 1 )131 60 

Hames* and repairs 22326 

Horsekeeping 180 00 

Carried forward $15,795 84 



$117,482 87 



,899 10 



711 16 



$123,093 13 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



235 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $15,795 84 

Horses 75 00 

Horseshoeing 1,960 00 

Hydrants, etc 877 50 

Lamps and repairs 6737 

Lumber and millwork 439 03 

Machinery 507 35 

Paints, oils, etc 460 99 

Plumbing and supplies 1,49040 

Power furnished & 06 

Printing find stationery 38825 

Rents 240 00 

Repairs to vehicles 275 

Rubber goods 148 

Savogran 

Springs 

Telephone service 1,183 75 

Testing electric motors 

FIRE DEPARTMENT MATERIAL AND RUNNING 
EXPENSES 

Brass and copper work $270 72 

Brushes and brooms 1875 

Cement, lime and brick 43 75 

Chimney pipe 62 

Drugs and chemicals 331 " 

Carried forward * 727 46 



$123,093 13 



24,216 86 



$147,309 99 



236 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $727 46 

Employees engine house, Sutro Heights 192 85 

Erecting engine house, Bluxome street 5,693 75 

Flags 57 14 

Forage 8,758 4t 

Fuel 1,338 70 

Fumigating supplies 40 00 

Furniture 18 00 

Groceries 12 75 

Hard-ware 1,258 53 

Horsekeeping 180 00 

Horseshoeing 1,922 50 

Horse 138 40 

Iron 65 00 

Lamps and repairs 1995 

Leather and findings 2834 

Lumber and millwork 718 09 

Machinery 264 50 

Paints, oils and glass 432 05 

Pattern work 86 65 

Power furnished 316 72 

Printing and stationery 10380 

Rents 120 00 

Rubber tires 135 00 

Salaries of employees, Corporation Yard 29,159 20 

Salary of Assistant Clerk 75000 

Carried forward .. $52,537 82 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



237 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



AMOUKT. 



Amount brought forward $52,537 82 

Springs 

Telephone service 1 ' 180 

Testing electric motor 

FIRE DEPARTMENT PENSION FUND.... 
FIRE DEPARTMENT RELIEF FUND 

FIRE DEPARTMENT SALARIES* 

Chief Engineer $1,81452 

Assistant Chief Engineer L 451 60 

District Engineers ^S 54 84 

Superintendent of Engines 1,08871 

Engineer and Machinist i' 016 13 

Clerk of Fire Commissioners 1,088 71 

Clerk of Corporation yard... 

Carpenter 725 80 

Drayman 

Drivers of monitor batteries 1,30646 

Hydrantmen L 306 46 

Messenger and janitor 

Veterinary Burgeon 

Watchman 

Relief engineers 4 ' 064 52 

Carried forward * 21 ' 302 42 



$147,309 99 



53,788 57 



.,691 70 



475 00- 



$208,265 26 



June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



238 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $21,302 42 

Employees of engines 160,971 06 

Employees of hook and ladders 33,446 58 

Employees of chemical engines 19,546 27 

Employees of water tcwer 2,213 72 

Assistant Superintendent of Engines 1,01613 

FISH AND GAME WARDEN 

Salary and expenses 

FOURTH OF JULY APPROPRIATION 

FURNISHING HALL, OF JUSTICE 

FURNISHING PLANS FOR SCHOOL HOUSES 

GRAND JURY EXPENSES 

Expert services $15000 

Horse hire 49 50 

Incidentals 75 00 

Printing and stationery 144 20 

Rent of typewriter 40 00 

Stenographer 559 99 

Telephone 30 00 

Carried forward , 



$208,265 26 



238,496 18 



475 00 



3,000 00 



30,823 84 



2,500 00 



1,048 69 



$484,608 97 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



239 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward , 

GAS INSPECTOR 

Salary and expenses 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT EXPENSES 

Badges $18 00 

Boat hire 800 

Brushes and brooms 70 

Clipping's from papers 

Clothing 33 50 

Compiling statistics 30000 

Cremating oody 3000 

Destroying cattle 31 50 

Drugs and medicines 3,778 35 

Electrical material 6 07 

Electric light 21265 

Expressage : 64 00 

Filing papers, Superior Court 3450 

Flags, etc 

Forage 66 42 

Fuel 358 50 

Fumigating supplies 86 42 

Furniture, carpets, etc 209 72 

Hardware 19 00 

Horseclipping 5 00 

Horsekeeping and hire 733 25 

Horseshoeing 35 00 

Carried forward $6,120 17 



$484,608 97 
940 30 



$485.549 27 



240 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $6,120 17 

Incidentals 65 90 

Instruments and repairs 39 10 

Insurance 30 00 

Lamps and repairs 50 

Launch hire 19 00 

Locksmithing 42 35 

Machinery and repairs 950 

Meals furnished Harbor Hospital 41 -10 

Messenger service 215 

Paints, oils and glass 32 55 

Postage stamps 179 00 

Printing and stationery \ 2,534 50 

Removing rubbish j 20 00 

Rent of Quarantine Office 2 

Repairs to tugboat 76 85 

Repairs to \ehicles 10725 

Reporting vessels 160 00 

Rubber goods 30 

Salaries* 37,888 8 

Samples, etc 

Subscription to papers 

Telephone and telegraph service 753 75 

QO OK 

Towei service 

Transportation 1>028 ^ 

Washing | 124 75 

Carried forward $49,57665 



*June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



241 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



TOTAL. 

r 



Amount brought forward 

Water 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT, JAILS AND PRISONS 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT, RECEIVING HOSPITAL 

Bandages 

Drugs and medicines 

Dry goods and clothing 

Groceries and provisions 

Haraware 

Harness 

Ice 

Locksmithing 

Painting, etc 

Paints and oils 

Plumbing, etc 

Printing and stationery 

Salaries 

Telephone service 

Washing 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT, RECEIVING HOSPITAL, IN- 
SANE WARD 

Dry goods 

Groceries and provisions 

Hardw are 

Carried forward .. 



$49,576 65 
48 00 



?37 50 

426 24 

129 12 

270 00 

6 60 

25 00 

18 70 

1 75 
350 00 

59 25 
263 73 

2 00 
3,890 00 

45 00 
240 00 



$131 25 

548 75 

6 26 



$686 25 



$485,549 27 
49,624 60 

914 94 



5,764 88 



$541,853 75 



16 



242 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Amount brought forward . .. $686 25 


$541 853 75 


Printin " etf 4 00 








Washing 90 00 






2,130 25 


HEALTH DEPARTMENT, SMALLPOX HOSPITAL 
Dry goods $39 50 




Forage 11 00 




Fuel 100 00 




Furniture . 4 50 




Groceries 175 60 




Hardware 103 80 








Plumbing ' 73 15 




Salaried 1,503 90 








Transportation . . 3 00 




"Wines and liquors 12 50 






2,061 95 


HEALTH DEPARTMENT, SMALLPOX HOSPITAL, 1 
SPECIAL 


10,199 78 


HORSEKEEPING PRISON VAN 


300 00 


HOSPITAL EXPENSES, CITY AND COUNTY 
















Carried forward $492 75 









AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



243 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward -. $492 75 

Drugs and surgical instruments 3,989 13 

Dry goods 1,160 57 

Exprsssage 360 00 

Forage 376 03 

Fuel 2,672 76 

Furniture ,~ 559 39 

Groceries and provisions 20,871 26 

Hardware 629 93 

Harness and repairs 1 OO 

Horseshoeing 77 60 

Ice 133 85 

Labor '..... 163 50 

Lamps and repairs 11 70 

Lumber and millwork 15025 

Paints and oils 295 67 

Plumbing, etc 1,212 86 

Printing and stationery 688 70 

Repairs to buildings 2,233 04 

Repairs to vehicles 82 75 

Rubber goods 25 73 

Salari3s* 19,340 50 

Telephone service 105 00 

INTERMENT OF HONORABLY DISCHARGED EX- 
UNION SOLDIERS AND SAILORS 

Carried forward .. 



$556,545 73 



55,645 86 



1,200 00 



$613,391 59 



"June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



244 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward 

JOYCE STREET STEPS 

JUDGMENTS 

JURY EXPENSES IN CRIMINAL CASES 

JUSTICES' CLERKS AND ATTENDANTS 

LAW LIBRARY, SALARIES 

LICENSE COLLECTOR'S BLANKS, TAGS, ETC 

MAINTENANCE OF FEEBLE-MINDED CHILDREN.... 

MAINTENANCE OF MINORS AT PRESTON STATE 

SCHOOL 

MAINTENANCE OF MINORS AT WHITTIER STATE 

SCHOOL 

MAYOR'S CONTINGENT EXPENSES 

MAYOR'S TYPEWRITER 

MILITARY ROLL 

MONEY PAID IN ERROR AND REFUNDED 

MUNICIPAL REPORTS 

PANHANDLE COMMISSIONERS' EXPENSES 

POLICE DEPARTMENT, RENTS AND REPAIRS 

Carried forward 



$613,391 59 
1,505 00 
3,605 62 
979 35 
3,046 68 
1,638 65 

1,406 90 
12,745 00 

1,203 02 

3,566 75 

900 00- 

376 00 

2,300 OO 

1,479 52 

6,000 00 

7,000 00 

4,093 91 

$665,237,99 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



245 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. SALARIES* 

Captains $6,452 76 

Corporals 10,027 92 

Clerk of Chief 1,06727 

Detectives 13,407 00 

Lieutenants 4,972 60 

Property Clerk 1,04266 

Sergeants 38,294 00 

Police Officers 346,15490 

Fines and contributions to Police Relief and Pension 

Fund 8,120 32 

POLICE, MOUNTED 

Forage $8 80 

Hardware 26 73 

Horsekeeping 835 00 

Horses 325 00 

Horseshoeing 277 50 

Salaries 90 00 

POLICE PATROL EXPENSES- 

Drugs and medicines 

Forage 1.331 40 

Groceries 

Harness and repairs 786 00 

Carried forward . $2,260 10 



246 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $2,260 10 

I 

Horseclipping 10 00 

Horsekeeping 4,927 00 

Horses 255 00 

Horseshoeing ) 505 00 

Lamps and repairs 9 35 

Rents 318 00 

Repairs to vehicles 713 30 

Salaries 6,941 00 

Telephone service 81000 

POLICE TELEGRAPH EXPENSES 

Brick, lime and cement $75 25 

Drugs 10 50 

Dry goods 7 05 

Electrical material 310 47 

Fuel 24 25 

Gas fixtures 5 10 

Hardware 14 17 

Horsekeeping 180 00 

Horseshoeing 15 00 

Paints and oils 8 70 

Salaries 1.625 85 

Stationery 15 10 

Washing 3 75 

Carried forward 



$1,095,240 45 



16,748 75 



2,295 19 



$1,114,284 39 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



247 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward 

PRISONERS' SUBSISTENCE 

City Prison 

13,627 52 
Jails 

15,476 81 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, FUEL FOR 

Citv Prison 

$22 50 
Engine room and public offices. 

2,909 95 
Police stcLtioiis 

4 50 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, LIGHTING 

With gas 

$11,036 99 
With electricity 

6,643 72 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, REPAIRS TO 

RECORDER'S NEWSPAPERS 

REGISTRATION AND ELECTION EXPENSES 

Advertising 

' $2,426 70 
Architects' services 

62 50 
Assistant clerks 

54,392 70 
Attorneys' fees 

9,000 00 

Ballot paper 

874 15 

Brooms, brushes, etc. 

54 90 
Building, furnishing and repairing booths. 

7,547 78 
Candles and candlesticks. 

13 75 

Carried forward 

$74,372 48 



$1,114,284 



19,104 33 

2,936 96 

16,680 Tt 

10,071 72 

6 40 



$1,163,084 50 



248 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward f. $74,372 48 

Carriage and horse hire 407 50 

Electrical material * 51 80 

Erecting booths 1,600 00 

Expressage 715 00 

Fuel 70 75 

Furniture 7 50 

Gas fixtures 61 71 

Groceries, etc 45 75 

Incidentals 38 80 

Incinerating ballots 27 00 

Janitor and messenger 63 75 

Lamps and repairs , 1780 

Lumber 174 55 

Meals 62 50 

Messenger service 1435 

New storehouse 1,44000 

Officers of election 30,620 00 

Postage stamps 1,56000 

Posting proclamations 95 00' 

Printing and stationery 4,56125 

Printing ballots 710 00 

Printing list of voters 1,799 20 

Rent of typewriter 53 21 

Rents 4,624 39 

Rubber goods 8 25 

Carried forward $123,202 54 



$1,163,084 50 



$1,163,084 50 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



241 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward ." $123,202 54 

Salary of typewriter 30 25 

Sand 215 00 

Storing booths 194 50 

Surveying 309 00 

Telephone service 161 90 

Towel service 3 00 

Transcribing 900 

Typewriter material 1743 

Watchman 91 00 

Rubber stamps 305 75 

REPORTERS' EXPENSES BY COURT ORDERS 

Police Court, Department 'No. 1 $4,42625 

Police Court, Department No. 2 3,831 35 

Police Court, Department No. 3 3,021 25 

Police Court, Department No. 4 4,25000 

Superior Court, Department No. 3 

Superior Court, Department No. 4 5 00 

Superior Court, Department No. 6 2,375 bO 

Superior Court, Department No. 8 15 00 

Superior Court, Department No. 10 256 25 

Superior Court, Department No. 11 3,756 60 

Superior Court, Department No. 12 2,544 35 

BOYS' AND GIRLS' AID SOCIETY (Non-Sec.) 

Carried forward .. 



$1,163,084 50 



124,539 37 



24,501 55 
2,625 00 



$1,314,750 42 



250 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward 

Salary of 

Assessor* $2,435 58 

Assessor's Deputies* 14,809 94 

Assessor's Extra Deputies* 29,119 06 

Auditor's Deputy and Clerks* 5,396 65 

City and County Attorney* 3,027 80 

City and County Attorney's Assistants* 9,114 99 

Coroner* 2,422 23 

Coronsr's Assistants* 8,138 32 

County Clerk's Deputies* 38,215 38 

County Clerk's Copyists* 14,373 32 

Court Interpreters* 4,541 50 

District Attorney* 3,029 74 

District Attorney's Assistants* 10,123 27 

Engineers, Firemen, Elevator Conductors, etc 6,778 90 

Gardeners 2,725 00 

License Collector's Deputies and Clerks* 20,363 03 

Mayor* 1,816 65 

Mayor's Clerk* 1,816 65 

Police Court Judges* 9,688 92 

Prosecuting Attorneys* 7,264 97 

Prosecuting Attorneys' Clerks* 3,633 31 

Bailiffs* 2,906 60 

Chief of Police* 2,378 10 

Police Commissioners* 3,269 98 

Carried forward $207,38989 



$1,314,750 42 



$1,314,750 42 



*June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



251 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $207,389 89 

Porters and janitors* 10,464 70 

Recorder's Deputies* 4,078 32 

Recorder's Folio Clsrks*. 19,099 92 

Registrar of Voters* 2,18000 

Registration Clerks and messenger* 1,706 67 

Sheriff's counsel* 1,090 00 

Sheriff's Under Sheriff*..." 1,453 30 

Sheriff's Bookkeeper and Deputies* 34,677 63 

Matron of County Jail and Driver of Prison Van 1,017 33 

Superior Judges* 14,000 40 

Superior Judges" Secretary* 1,05000 

Superintendent of Common Schools* 3,141 93 

Superintendent of Common Schools' Deputy* 1,816 66 

Secretary Board of Education* 1,452 33 

Superintendent of Streets, Highways, etc.* 2,422 23 

Superintendent of Streets' etc., Deputies* 17,258 30 

Supervisors* 8,719 80 

Supervisors' Deputy, Clerk, Assistants and Sergeant- 

at-Anns* 7,086 65 

Surveyor* 30 2 67 

Tax Collector's Deputies* 6,176 66 

Tax Collector's Clerks* 22,077 71 

Treasurer's Deputies and Clerks* 6,168 31 

SEWER COMMISSIONERS' EXPENSES 

Carried forward .. 



$1,314,750 42 



374,821 41 
17,362 97 



$1.706,934 80 



June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



252 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward 

SPECIAL, COUNSEL, 

TAXES PAID IN ERROR AND REFUNDED 

TRANSFERS FROM 1898 TO 1899 AS PER RESOLUTION 

No. 3381 

TREASURER'S REBATE CLERKS 

URGENT NECESSITY 

Appraisement of Mission Blocks 

Assistant Clsrk to Supervisors j 

Bond Expert | 4G ^ 

Brooms and Brushes for Coroner 

Care of Public Fountains 2 40 30 

Carfare for Messenger, City and County Attorney 

Carfare for Serg-eant-at-Arms, Board of Supervisors 

Carriage and horse hire, Board of Supsrvisors 

Cleaning Dome 

Cleaning furniture for Supervisors 

Cleaning gutters in basement 

Clipping horses for Sheriff 

Conveying minors to Glen Ellen 

Conveying patients to Agnews | 

Conveying patients to Napa 

Conveying patients to Ukiah j ^ ^ 

J 

j 

Carried forward .. ?1>02 01 



$1,706,934 80 
1,000 00 

627 68 



639 92 



931 42 



$1, 710, 133 82 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



253 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE; 



Amount brought forward .- $1,020 01 $1,710,133 82 

Conveying pupils to Whittier 169 90 

Destroying dogs 2,107 50 

Directory for Law Library 6 00 

Drugs for Police Department 425 

Expenses Head Janitor 126 66 

Expenses suit Truman vs. Stevens 68 95 

Exporting personal property assessments 1,264 50 

Experting rabate books 22500 \ 

Expert testimony 37000 

Expressags for Supervisors 235 

Expressage for Tax Collector 3400 

Extra Janitors 136 00 

Forage for Pesthouse 14 70 

Furniture for Supervisors 442 00 

Hardware for -Sheriff 39 90 

Harness for Coroner 19 00 

Harness for Sheriff 6 00 

Horss clipping for Sheriff 5 00 

Horse hire for Assessor.. 15 QO 

Horse hire for Coroner 29 50 

Horse hire for Gas Inspector 108 00 

Horse hire for License Collector 25066 

Horseshoeing for Coroner 3000 

Horseshoeing for Sheriff 3475 

Ice for Public Offices 356 50 

Carried forward $6,885 13 ! $1,710,133 82" 



254 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 

"I 

Amount brought forward $6,885 13 

Incidentals for City and County Attorney ' 13 40 

Incidentals for Supervisors 1350 

Inspecting Steam Boilers I 105 00 

Interpreting, Coroner 12 50 

Interpreting, Police Courts 547 50 

Interpreting, Superior Courts 45 

Law Books for Auditor 20 50 

Matron for Morgue 136 00 

Mayor's Expert on Supplies 345 85 

Membership fee to League of American Municipalities.. 61 25 

Nurse for smallpox patients 155 00 

Paste for Supervisors , 9 50 

Photographing unknown dead 10000 

Recovering bodies from San Francisco Bay 200 00 

Redemption certificates j 15485 

Removing ashes, etc., from public buildings 1,014 00 

Rent of gas regulators 350 95 

Rent of typewriter 46 00 

Repairs to District Attorney' s typewriter 1 50 

Repairs to Sheriff's van 5335 

Revising Book of Established Grades 900 00 

Salary of Gas Inspector 4000 

Serving subpoenas 118 35 

Stenographing for Supervisors 15490 

Subscription to California Decisions 32000 

Carried forward ' $11,804 03 



$1,710,133 82 



$1,710,133 82 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



255 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward I $11,804 03 

Subscription to Guide, County Clerk 250 

Subscription to papers, Assessor 2050 

Subscription to papers, Supervisors 

Stamps for Assessor 50 00 

Stamps for Auditor 35 00 

Stamps for Coroner 35 00 

Stamps for County Clerk 2200 

Stamps for Justices' Court 22 00 

Stamps for License Collector 77 00 

Stamps for Recordsr 12 50 

Stamps for Sheriff , 53 75 

Stamps for Superior Courts 5025 

Stamps for Supervisors 89 00 

Stamps for Superintendent of Streets | 700 

Stamps for Tax Collsctor 6250 

Stamps for Treasurer 1400 

Telephons serivce for 

Assessor 15 00 

Auditor 10 05 

Board of Supervisors 40 00 

City Hall 1,077 30 

Coroner 45 00 

Corporation Yard, Street Department 4500 

District Attorney 16 00 

Grand Jury 7 50 

Carried forward .. $13,617 88 



$1,710,133 82 



$1,710,133 82 



256 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $13,617 88 

Hall of Justice 4500 

Justices' Court 45 00 

Panhandle Commission 22 50 

Police Department 1,06095 

Public Administrator 30 00 

Secretary Superior Judges 53 50 

Sheriff 4 50 

i 

Treasurer 90 

Tin files for Auditor 4500 

Transcribing for Board of Equalization 383 40 

Transportation for Mayor's expert 25 00 

Transportation of coin for Treasurer 12025 

Treasurer's extra Clerks 3871 

Washing for public offices 18800 

Watchman for Treasurer's offices 4450 

WATER FOR MUNICIPAL, PURPOSES 

Hydrants $86,473 41 

Parks and squares 3,887 96 

Public buildings 

WITNESS EXPENSES IN CRIMINAL CASES 

NEW POLICE STATION... 



$1,710,133 82 



15,725 09 



100,025 00 
$1,547 65 



27,076 00 



$1,854,507 56 



'June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



257 



GENERAL FUND. 

DEMANDS AUDITED DURING FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900, FROM JANUARY STH TO JUNE 30TH. 



PURPOSE. 



TOTAL. 



ADVERTISING $3,076 99 

ALMSHOUSE SALARIES 11,516 51 

Maintenance 30,833 99 

ASSESSOR SALARIES 51,370 69 

AUDITOR SALARIES 6,537 71 

Assessment Roll 3,361 63 

BERNAL PARK 2,558 98 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS SALARIES 88,57005 

Maintenance and Repair Streets and Sewers 20,456 81 

Repairs to Bitumen 10,308 24 

Sewer Permits 1,325 49 

Street Sweeping 83,205 66 

Street Work, 1895 2,48822 

BOSWORTH STREET TUNNEL 7,395 00 

BURIAL OF INDIGENT DEAD 2,912 14 

CITY AND COUNTY ATTORNEY 9,698 87 

CIVIL SERVICE DEPARTMENT SALARIES 3,88229 

CORONER SALARIES 7,644 39 

Expenses 765 59 

COUNTY CLERK-SALARIES 35,97689 

COUNTY JAILS MAINTENANCE 8,59652 

COURT INTERPRETERS 2,86666 

COURT ORDERS MISCELLANEOUS 49205 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS SALARIES 9.922 63 

Maintenance 2,416 74 

Carried forward $408,179 13 



17 



258 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $408,179 13 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY SALARIES 14,966 78 

Maintenance 5,023 49 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

City and County Hospital Salaries 16,005 40 

City and County Hospital Expenses 27,681 41 

Health Department Salaries 42,127 83 

Health Department Expenses 7,667 27 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY SALARIES 17,295 49 

EXAMINATION OF INSANE PERSONS 2,72000 

FIRE DEPARTMENT SALARIES 251,751 95 

Maintenance 36,858 94 

FIREMEN'S RELIEF AND PENSION FUND 7,302 65 

FOURTH OF JULY AND MEMORIAL DAY 499 50 

FURNISHING HALL OF JUSTICE 23,828 44 

GRAND JURY EXPENSES 1,001 40 

HEALTH EXPENSES, JAILS AND PRISONS 120 42 

HORSEKEEPING, PRISON VAN 30000 

INTERMENT OF EX-UNION SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. 1,764 92 

JURY EXPENSES IN CRIMINAL CASES 30200 

JUSTICES OF PEACE SALARIES 9,89000 

I*AW LIBRARY SALARIES 1,601 35 

MAINTENANCE BOYS' AND GIRLS' AID SOCIETY 2,850 00 

Feeble-Minded Children 9,80000 

Minors at Preston Reform School 610 57 

Carried forward .. $890,148 94 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



259 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $890,148 94 

MAYOR SALARIES 4,873 32 

Contingent Expensss 1,800 00 

MONEY PAID IN ERROR AND REFUNDED 1,245 50 

MUNICIPAL, REPORTS 2,39004 

NEW POLICE STATION 12,92400 

POLICE DEPARTMENT SALARIES 361,632 02 

Police Contingent 3,031 80 

Police Department Rents, etc 3,87393 

Police Patrol Expenses 8,222 57 

POLICE JUDGES, ETC., SALARIES 9,906 62 

PRISONERS' SUBSISTENCE 23,011 84 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS FUEL 3,102 00 

Furniture 298 90 

Lighting 17,794 44 

Repairs 4,054 89 

PUBLIC POUND SAL ARIES 450 00 

Expenses 833 15 

PUBLISHING LAW AND MOTION CALENDAR 1,20000 

RECORDER SALARIES 15,703 94 

New&papsrs 13 65 

SEWER COMMISSION EXPENSES 2,63450 

SHERIFF SALARIES 39,355 44 

STENOGRAPHERS, SUPERIOR COURT 5,91285 

STREET LIGHTING 101,435 03 

Carried forward $1,515,849 37 



260 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 
DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $1,515,849 37 

SUPERIOR JUDGES AND SECRETARY SAL ARIES .... 12,89952 

SUPERVISORS SALARIES 19,143 65 

TAX COLLECTOR SALARIES 27,750 63 

Blanks, etc 524 75 

TAXES REFUNDED 212 35 

TRANSCRIPTS ON APPEAL, PRINTING 337 30 

TREASURER SALARIES 6,601 08 

Rebate Clerks .33 33 

URGENT NECESSITY 11,445 30 

WATER FOR MUNICIPAL PURPOSES 132,049 13 

WITNESS' EXPENSES 518 30 

DELINQUENT TAX LIST 3,667 59 

STATIONERY . 17,213 39 



$1,748,245 69 



SUMMARY GENERAL FUND. 



PURPOSE. 



Demands audited from July 1, 1899, to January 8, 1900 
Demands audited from January 8, 1900, to June 30, 



1900 



$1,854,507 56 



1,748,245 69 



Total 



$3,602,753 25- 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



261 



SUNDRY FUNDS. 

FROM JULY 1, 1899, TO JANUARY 8, 1900. 



PURPOSE. 



DISINTERMENT FUND 

Salary of Inspectors 

DUPLICATE TAX FUND 

INSURANCE CONTRIBUTION FUND. 

LIBRARY FUND 

Books $3,281 98 

Binding 1,466 96 

Dating stamps 23 50 

Electric power and supplies 

Fuel 

Gas 146 89 

Hardware 43 25 

Insurance 56 65 

Indices 204 05 

Mantels, etc 28 70 

Newspapers 250 60 

Periodical subscriptions 9 00 

Printing 1,084 96 

Petty miscellansous bills 121 02 

Postage 50 00 

Rent of "Phone" 45 00 

Rent of Branch Libraries '1,062 00 

Ropes 

Carried forward .. $8,25456 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $8,254 56 

Stationery 647 22 

Supplies 195 23 

Towel service 1350 

Traveling expenses 250 00 

Salaries of 

Librarian 1,200 00 

Secretary 900 00 

Assistant Librarian 600 00 

Assistant Secretary 483 35 

Assistants 4,219 90 

Substitutes 380 70 

Cataloguer 493 55 

Assistant Cataloguers 698 75 

Messengers 1,101 30 

Janitors 759 90 

Curator N. P. Department 278 00 

Special Officer 390 00 

Elevator Attendant 32000 

Expressman and Substitute 420 35 

Branch Librarian Assistants 3,931 00 

OVERPAYMENT PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX FUND 

1899-1900 $33,287 46 

1896 52 32 

. Carried forward 



$19,944 59 



25,537 31 



3?. 339 79 



$78,821 68 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



263 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



AMOUNT. 



Amount brought forward 

PARK IMPROVEMENT FUND 

Advertising $15 00 

Brick 14 70 

Cement 319 75 

Clay 684 60 

Coal 2,667 25 

Foraga 2,205 75 

Gas 158 71 

Hardware 1,193 09 

Harness 135 91 

Horses 26000 

Horse medicine 2700 

Insurance 204 00 

Incidental expenses 76174 

Lumber 2,255 29 

Labor 

Loam 9,153 98 

Music 1,044 00 

Merchandise 3,246 12 

Museum expenses 16 50 

Paints and oils 80629 

Rent of bicycles and repairs 3260 

Rent of Typewriter 3 00 

Rolling stock and repairs 68 20 

Carried forward 



78,821 



$78,821 



264 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $93,329 66 

Stationery 112 02 

Seeds and plants , 578 70 

Stone wall 3,36600 

Fires, etc 63 05 

Telephone service 81 65 

Tray 25 00 

SALARIES OF 

Superintendent 2,100 00 

Secretary 750 00 

Policemen 7,165 30 

Engineer 750 00 

Clerk 177 00 

POLICE CONTINGENT FUND 

Photographing prisoners $263 50 

Expenses of Chief of Police 2,148 85 

POLICE RELIEF AND PENSION FUND. 

POUND FEE FUND 

PUBLIC BUILDING FUND 

STREET LIGHT FUND 

Electric Lighting $41,533 14 

Gas Lighting 58,427 00 

Carried forward $99,960 14 



$78,821 



108,508 38 



2,402 35 
18,428 67 

450 00 
13,341 45 



$221,952 53 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $99,960 14 

Pipe and repairs to lamps 

TEACHERS' INSTITUTE FUND 

INTEREST ACCOUNT 

Coupons City Hall Construction Bonds $300 00 

Coupons Park Improvement Bonds, 1874-75 7,35000 

Coupons Dupont Street Widening Bonds 19,985 00 

SINKING FUNDS 

Park Improvement Bonds, 1874-1875 $8,00000 

Dupont Street Widening Bonds 19,000 00 

SPECIAL FEE FUND 

Salary of Auditor $2,42225 

Salary of County Clerk 2,422 23 

Salary of Clerk of Justices' Court 1,453 33 

Salary of Assistant Justices' Court 1,453 34 

Salary of Justices Peace 7,448 32 

Salary of License Collector 

Salary of Supervisors' Clerks 2,180 00 

Salary of Supervisors' Assistant Clerks 1,090 00 

Salary of Sheriff 4,844 41 

Salary of Sheriff's Deputies, etc 4,541 55 

Salary of Tax Collector 2,416 68 

Salary of Treasurer 4 2,422 23 

Can-led forward .. $34,511 05 



$221,952 53 

100,099 94 
100 28 



27,635 00 



27,000 00 



$376,787 75 



266 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $34,511 05 

Salary of Recorder 2,42223 

Salary of Recorder's Additional Deputy 1,090 00 

Salary of Police Court Clerks (4) 5 813 32 

STATIONERY FURNISHED CITY AND COUNTY 
OFFICERS 

Attorney and Counsellor 

Assessor ; 2 > 53 

Auditor 1 ' 311 

Board of Supervisors 

County Clerk and Superior Courts 1>389 75 

Chi3f of Police and Police Department 

Coroner 314 15 

District Attorney 

Justices' Court 523 95 

License Collector 

Police Court No. 1 

Police Court No. 2 

1 ^Q VR 

Police Court No. 3 

Police Court No. 4 

869 25 
Recorder 

Sheriff 6BO 

Superintendent of Streets 

196 20 
Surveyor * ^ 

Tax Collector *' 493 *> 

Amount brought forward 



$376,787 75 



43,836 60 



$420,624 35 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



267 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



AMOUNT. 



TOTAL. 



Amount brought forward $13,009 98 

Treasurer 334 70 

LAW AND MOTION CALENDAR 

PRINTING TRANSCRIPTS ON APPEAL 
BINDING BOOKS 

STREET DEPARTMENT FUND, ACCEPTED STREETS- 

Salary of Assessment Clerk $940 00 

Salary of Clerks 4,709 00 

Salary of Draughtsman 608 00 

Salary of Foremen 4, 199 50 

Salary of Keepers and Assistants, Corporation Yard 1,025 00 

Labor 19,204 24 

Rent of City Hall Corporation Yard 390 00 

Rent of Sixth Street Corporation Yard 300 00 

Surveys 4,940 00 

Repairs to Bitumen (Contract) 10,308 24 

Cleaning and Sweeping Streets 84,700 55 

Repairing streets 7,799 69 

Supervisors' expenses 6,275 67 

Cleaning and repairing sewers 35,351 64 

Basalt blocks 827 80 

Blacksmithing and material 566 70 

Coal 260 13 

Carried forward .. $182,406 16 



$420,624 35 

13,344 68 
1,200 00 

2,772 00 
90 00 



$438,031 03 



268 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $182,406 16 

Cast Iron 93 92 

Gravel 88 33 

Hardware 208 57 

Lumber 1,627 34 

Printing and advertising 98145 

Pipe 415 16 

Rock 322 78 

Salt water 75 00 

Repairs to hose 215 10 

Repairs to tools 25 00 

Repairs to sprinkling cart. - - - 

PUBLIC SQUARE6- 

Horse and buggy hire $120 00 

Labor 11,76653 

Repairs and material 3,020 80 

COUNTY ROADS 

FRONT OF CITY PROPERTY. 



14,907 33 
4,716 22 

3,080 60 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 
SUNDRY FUNDS. 

FROM JANUARY 8, 1900, TO JUNE 30, 1900. 



269 



PURPOSE. 



DUPLICATE TAX FUND $2,16662 

LIBRARY FUND 34,83219 

PARK IMPROVEMENT FUND 113,645 60 

POLICE RELIEF AND PENSION FUND.. 27,981 52 

TEARING UP STREETS FUND 1,29086 

ROBINSON BEQUEST INTEREST FUND ! 2,25500 

TEACHERS' INSTITUTE FUND 659 95 

OVERPAYMENT PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 1899.. 14,070 40 

HOUSE MOVING FUND j 97000 

ADVERTISING FUND 2,02616 

COUPON ACCOUNT PARK IMPROVEMENT BONDS.... 7,32000 

UNAPPORTIONED FEE FUND 2,592 50 

PUBLIC BUILDING FUND 9,720 25 

INSURANCE CONTRIBUTION FUND .. 1,284 02 



$220,815 07 



SUMMARY SUNDRY FUNDS. 



PURPOSE. 



Demands audited from July 1, 1899, to January 8, 1900 
Demands ardited from January 8, 1900, to June 30, 
1900 .. 



Total 



$647,282 79 



220,815 07 



$868,097 86 



270 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT FUND, 1899 1900. 



PURPOSE. 



ENDING JANUARY 8, 1900 

Salary of Teachers $510,398 65 

Salary of Janitors 29,906 40 

Salary of Office 6,921 00 

Salary of Shop 4,076 00 

Advertising- 55 00 

Fuel 1,038 59 

Furniture 11,008 97 

Improvements 317 18 

Incidentals 1,043 92 

Legal expensss 265 00 

Light 4,116 65 

Miscellaneous 1 05 

Mission High School, final payment 3,096 25 

Printing 1,124 80 

Rents 5,103 85 

Repairs 26,565 85 

Stationery 4,217 17 

Supplies 7,476 05 

Telegraph and telephone 318 05 

Water 74 70 

FROM JANUARY 8TH TO JUNE 30TH 

Salary of Teachers $465,216 25 

Salary of Janitors 26,363 30 

Salary of Office 4,394 55 

Carried forward .. $495,974 10 



617,125 13 



$617,125 13 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



271 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



AMOUNT. 



Amount brought forward $495,974 10 

Salary of Superintsndent of Schools and Deputies 3,124 73 

Salary of School Directors 5,76664 

Salary of Shop 2,897 95 

Salary of Census Marshals 4,956 00 

Fuel 3,655 35 

Furniture ' I 8,792 16 

Incidentals 4,046 94 

Light 4,862 71 

Printing 1,805 67 

Rents I 3,756 35 

Repairs 20,684 28 

Stationery 1,089 13 

Supplies I 19,032 20 

Telegraph and telephone 44185 

Water I 6,315 66 

Total 

DEMANDS OF 1898-99 AUDITED IN 1900 FROM FUNDS 
OF THE FISCAL YEAR OF 1898-99 

Teachers (61 per cent) $57,363 99 

Janitors 3,063 98 

Rents 517 21 

Teachers (8 per cent) $7.337 81 

Janitors 399 44 

Rent 67 84 

Total 



$617,125 13 



587,204 72 
$1,204,329 85 



60,940 18 



7,805 09 



$1,273,080 12 



272 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



RECAPITULATION. 

DEMANDS AUDITED DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



PURPOSE. 



FROM 

JULY 1, 1899, TO 
JAN. 8, 1900. 



FROM 

JAN. 8, 1900, TO 
JUNE 30, 1900. 



ADVERTISING $3,295 90 

ADVERTISING FUND 

ALMSHOUSE 

Salaries* 12,721 54 

Maintenance 31,658 75 

ASSESSOR 

Salaries* 46,364 58 

AUDITOR 

Salaries* 5,396 65 

Assessment Roll 12,568 

BERNAL PARK 

BOARD OP EQUALIZATION ' 1,20000 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Salaries* 19,680 53 

Maintenance and Repair Streets and Sewers. 

Repairs to Bitumen 

Sewer Permits 

Street Sweeping 

Street Work, 1895 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

Accepted Streets 186,547 61 

Public Squares 14,907 33 

County Roads 4,716 22 

Front of City Property 3,080 60 

BOSWORTH STREET TUNNEL 14,391 00 

BURIAL OF INDIGENT DEAD 2,519 40 

Carried forward $358,048 71 



$3,076 99 
2,026 16 

11,515 51 
30,833 99 

61,370 69 

6,537 71 
3,361 63 
2,5*8 98 



88,570 05 
20,456 81 
10,308 24 

1,325 49 
83,205 66 

2,488 22 



7,395 00 
2,912 14 



$327,943 27 



*June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



273 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



FROM 

JULY 1, 1899, TO 
JAN. 8, 1900. 



FROM 

JAN. 8, 1900, TO 
JUNK 30, 1900. 



Amount brought forward g ^ 8 

CITY AND COUNTY ATTORNEY 

Salaries * ' ;- 12,142 79 

CIVIL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Salaries 

CORONER 

Salaries* . 10,56055 

Ex P enses 1,409 15 

COUNTY CLERK 

Salaries* 52,588 70 

COUNTY JAILS 

Repairs to 99 4 9 g 

Salaries 11,386 52 

Maintenance 

COURT INTERPRETERS* 4 541 50 

COURT ORDERS, MISCELLANEOUS..., 2 27 12 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS 

Salari 33 

REGISTRAR 

Registration Clerks and Messenger* 

Maintenance 

REGISTRATION AND ELECTION EXPENSES 124,539 37 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

City and County Hospital Salaries* 19,340 50 

City and County Hospital Expenses 36,305 36 

Health Department Salaries* 37,888 68 

Carried forward $684,831 44 



$327,943 27 
9,698 87 
3,882 29 

7,644 39 
765 59 

35,976 89 



8,596 52 



492 05 



9,922 03 



2,416 74 



16,005 40 
27,681 41 
42,127 83 



496,019 93 



''June Salaries of last fiscal j-ear carried over. 
-18 



274 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $684,831 44 

Health Department Expenses 11,73597 

Health Department, Jails and Prisons 914 94 

Receiving Hospital Salaries 3,890 00 

Receiving Hospital Expenses 1,874 89 

Receiving Hospital, Insane Ward, Salaries 1,350 00 

Receiving Hospital, Insane Ward, Expenses 780 25 

Smallpox Hospital Salaries 1,503 90 

Smallpox Hospital Expenses 558 05 

Smallpox Hospital Spacial 10,199 78 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Salaries* 13,153 01 

Law Library 117 00 

DISINTERMENT FUND 1,453 30 

DUPLICATE TAX FUND 80269 

EXAMINATION OF INSANE PERSONS 2,540 00 

FINANCE COMMITTEE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

Salaries and expenses 2,17331 

FIRE ALARM APPARATUS, MATERIAL AND 
CONSTRUCTION 

Salaries 3,314 15 

Maintenance 1,773 60 

FIRE ALARM AND POLICE TELEGRAPH 

Salaries 3,969 35 

Expenses 1,251 66 

Salaries* 4,899 10 

Carried forward .. $735,705 22 



FROM 

JULY 1, 1899, TO 
JAN. 8, 1900. 



FROM 

JAN. 8, 1900, TO 
JUNE 30, 1900. 



June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



275 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



FROM 

JULY 1, 1899, TO 
JAN. 8, 19CO. 



FROM 

JAN. 8, 1900, TO 
JUNE 30, 1900. 



Amount brought forward $735,705 22 

Underground 711 16 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY 

Salaries 

Maintenance 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Apparatus, Hose and Houses " 24,21686 

Material and Running Expenses, Salaries 29,159 20 

Salary Assistant Clerk 75000 

Maintenance 23,879 37 

Salaries* 238,496 18 

Pension Fund 6,691 70 

Relief Fund 475 00 

FIREMEN'S RELIEF AND PENSION FUND. 

FISH AND GAME WARDEN 

Salary and expenses 475 00 

FOURTH OF JULY APPROPRIATION 3, 000 00 

MEMORIAL DAY 

FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 25,537 21 

FURNISHING HALL OF JUSTICE 30,823 84 

FURNISHING PLANS FOR SCHOOLHOUSES 2,50000 

GRAND JURY EXPENSES 1,048 69 

GAS INSPECTOR 

Salary and expenses 940 30 

HORSEKEEPING, PRISON VAN 300 00 

HOUSE MOVING FUND.. 

Carried forward $1,142,09100 



14,966 78 
5,023 49 



251,751 95 



36,858 94 



7,302 66 



499 W 
34,832 19 
23,828 44 

1,001 40 



300 00 
97000 



$903,325 07 



June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



276 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $1,142,091 00 

INSURANCE CONTRIBUTION FUND 17,688 60 

INTERMENT OF EX-UNION SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. 1,200 00 

JOYCE STREET STEPS 1,50500 

JUDGMENTS 3,605 62 

JURY EXPENSES IN CRIMINAL CASES 979 35 

JUSTICES OF PEACE 

Salaries 

Clerks and Attendant 3,04668 

LICENSE COLLECTOR 

Salaries* 20,363 03 

Blanks, tags, etc 1,406 90 

TAX COLLECTOR 

Salaries* 28,254 37 

Blanks, etc 

Delinquent Tax List 

Military Roll 2,300 00 

LAW LIBRARY SALARIES 1,638 65 

Boys' and Girls' Aid Society 2,62500 

Feeble-Minded Children 12,745 00 

Minors at Preston Reform School 1,203 02 

Minors at Whittier 3,566 75 

MAYOR 

Salaries* 3,633 30 

Contingent Expenses 900 00 

Typewriter 376 00 

Carried forward .. $1,249,128 27 



FROM 

JULY 1 , 1899, TO 
JAN. 8, 1900. 



FROM 

JAN. 8, 1900, TO 
JUNE 30, 1900. 



$903,325 07 
1,284 02 
1,764 92 



302 00 



9,890 00 



27,750 63 

524 73 

3,667 59 

1,601 35 

2,850 00 

9,800 00 

610 57 



4,873 32 
1,800 00 



$970,044 22 



June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



277 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



FROM 

JULY 1, 1899, TO 
JAN. 8. 1900. 



FROM 

JAN. 8, 1900, TO 
JUNE 30, 1900. 



Amount brought forward $1,249,128 27 

MONEY PAID IN ERROR AND REFUNDED 1,479 52 

MUNICIPAL, REPORTS 6,00000 

NEW POLICE STATION 27,076 00 

OVERPAYMENT PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 33,339 78 

PANHANDLE COMMISSIONERS' EXPENSES I 7,00000 

PARK IMPROVEMENT FUND 108,50838 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Rants and repairs 4,09391 

Salaries* 428,539 43 

SALARIES CHIEF OF POLICE AND COMMISSIONERS.. 5,648 08 

POLICE, MOUNTED 

Salaries 90 00 

Expenses 1,373 03 

POLICE PATROL 

Salaries 6,941 00 

Expenses 9,807 75 

POLICE CONTINGENT ... 2,40235 

POLICE RELIEF AND PENSION FUND 18,428 67 

POLICE TELEGRAPH 

Salaries 1,625 85 

Expenses 6P9 34 

POLICE JUDGES, ETC. 

Salaries 23,493 80 

PRISONERS' SUBSISTENCE 19,104 33 

Carried forward $1,954,749 49 



$970,044 22 
1,246 50 
2,390 04 
12,924 00 
14,070 40 

113,645 60 

3,873 93 
361,632 02 



8,222 57 

3,031 80 

27,981 62 



9,006 62 
23,011 84 



$1,651,080 06 



June .Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



278 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



FROM 

JULY 1, 1899, TO 
JAN. 8, 1900. 



FROM 

JAN. 8, 1900, TO 
JUNE 30, 1900. 



Amount brought forward $1,954,749 49 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Fuel 2,93695 

Furniture 

Lighting 16,680 71 

Porters and Janitors* 10,454 70 

Repairs 10,071 72 

Engineers, Firemen, Elevator Conductors, etc 6,778 90 

Gardeners 2,725 00 

PUBLIC BUILDING FUND, HALL OF JUSTICE 13,341 45 

PUBLIC POUND 

Salaries 450 00 

Expenses 

PUBLISHING LAW AND MOTION CALENDAR 1,20000 

REBINDING BOOKS 90 00 

RECORDER 

Salaries* 23,178 24 

Newspapers 6 40 

ROBINSON BEQUEST INTEREST FUND. 

SEWER COMMISSION EXPENSES 17,362 97 

SHERIFF 

Salaries* 36,784 96 

Under Sheriff* 1,453 30 

SPECIAL COUNSEL 1,00000 

SPECIAL FEE FUND SALARIES 43,83660 

STENOGRAPHERS SUPERIOR COURT. 

Carried forward .. $2,143,101 39 



$1,551,980 06 



3,102 00 
298 90 



17,794 44 



4,054 



9,720 25 

450 00 

833 15 

1,200 00 



15,703 94 

13 65 

2,255 00 

2,634 50 



39,355 44 



5,912 8fi 



$1,655,309 07 



June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



279 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



FROM 

JULYl, 1899, TO 

JAN. 8, 1900. 



FROM 

JAN. 8, 1900, TO 
JUNE 30, 1900. 



Amount brought forward $2,143,101 39 

STENOGRAPHERS' REPORTERS EXPENSES BY 

COURT ORDERS 24,501 55 

STATIONERY 13,344 68 

STREET LIGHTING 100,099 94 

SUPERIOR JUDGES AND SECRETARY 

Salaries* 15,050 40 

SUPERVISORS 

Salaries* 15,806 45 

SURVEYOR* 302 67 

TAXES PAID IN ERROR AND REFUNDED 627 68 

TEACHERS' INSTITUTE FUND 10028 

TEARING UP STREET FUND 

TRANSFERS FROM 1898 TO 1899, AS PER RESOLU- 
TION NO. 33S1 639 92 

TRANSCRIPTS ON APPEAL PRINTING 2,77200 

TREASURER 

Salaries* 6,168 31 

Rebate Clerks 931 42 

UNAPPORTIONED FEE FUND ;...; 

URGENT NECESSITY 15,725 09 

WATER FOR MUNICIPAL PURPOSES 100,025 00 

WITNESS EXPENSES IN CRIMINAL CASES 1,547 65 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Salaries Superintendent, etc.* 6,410 92 

Salaries of Superintendent, Census Marshals, Teachers, 

Janitors, etc 661,302 05 

Carried forward .. $2,998,457 40 



$1,655,309 07 

17,213 39 
101,435 03 

12,899 52 
19,143 65 

212 35 

659 95 
1,290 86 

337 30 



33 33 

2,592 50 

11,445 30 

132,049 13 

518 30 



512,719 42 



$2,474,460 18 



June Salaries of last fiscal year carried over. 



280 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



DEMANDS AUDITED CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



FROM 

JULY 1, 1899, TO 
JAN. 8, 1900. 



FROM 

JAK. 8, 1900, TO 
JUNE 30, 1900. 



Amount brought forward $2,998,457 40 

Expensss 65,823 08 

Demands Audited in 1900 from Funds of the Fiscal 

Tear 1898-9961 per cent 

Demands Audited in 1900 from Funds of the Fiscal 

Tear 1898-998 per cent 

INTEREST ACCOUNT ON FUNDED DEBT 27,635 00 

SINKING FUNDS 27,00000 

Totals ?3,118,915 48 

Total Amount of Demands Audited During the Fiscal Tear 
1899-1900- 

From July 1, 1899, to January 8, 1900 $3,118,915 48 

From January 8, 1900, to June 30, 1900 2,625,015 75 



?2, 474, 460 18 

74,485 30 

60,945 18 

7,805 09 

7,320 00 



$2,625,015 75 



$5,743,931 23 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



281 



Demands 
Outstanding 
June 30, 1000, 


SB* 8 2 8 S So S 

00 O O O COCO M O 
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June 30, 1899. 


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282 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



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AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



THE COLLECTOR OF LICENSES 

IN ACCOUNT WITH THE AUDITOR FOR LICENSES SOLD DURING THE FISCAL 
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



PURPOSE. 


NUMBER. 


AMOUNT. 


Auctioneers' . . 






Brokers' 


40 c 






OKA 




Bankers' . . . 






Billiards . . 






Bowling alleys 


25 




Coach badges . . 


9 


2 50 




85 


2 500 00 


Coupe badges 


J9 




Cyclery 


CA 




Drivers' cards 


OCA 




Deadly weapon cards 






Dosr ta"a . 








550 




Gratuitous 


400 




Guide badges 


7 


17 50 


Hack badges 


21 


52 50 


Intelligence offices 


275 


2 100 00 


Liverv stable 


25^ 


1 00 00 


Municipal 


7 768 


64 492 00 


Merchandise 






Nickel in slot 


fi flQfl 




Opium 


300 


30 000 00 


Pawnbrokers' .... 


250 


7 750 60 


Peddlers' ta^s 


200 


2 ooo 00 


Retail liquor and grocery 


2,400 


50 400 00 


Retail liquor . . 


10 599 


00 2 579 00 








Carried forward 


45 141 


$512 953 50 









284 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



LICENSES SOLD CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 


NUMBER. 


AMOUNT. 


Brought forward .. 


45,141 


$512,953 50 


Runners' badges 


33 


849 50 


Street solicitors' 


6 


9 00 


Street Department 


6 430 


23 783 25 


Shows 


25 


195 00 


Street railroads 


25 


9,373 15 


Theater 


275 


28,725 00 


Vehicle numbers 


1,858 


1,858 00 


Wagon peddlers 


750 


6,500 00 










54,543 


$578,376 40 



RECAPITULATION. 

LICENSES ISSUED TO LICENSE COLLECTOR AND TAX COLLECTOR DURING 
FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900. 



PURPOSE. 


NUMBER. 


AMOUNT. 


Total number of licenses issued and amounts 


54 543 


578 376 40 


Total number of licenses returned during year 


4,167 


97,173 00 








Total number sold by License and Tax Collector 


50,376 


$481,203 40 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



285 



TREASURER'S RECEIPTS. 

TREASURER IN CASH ACCOUNT WITH THE AUDITOR FOR MONEYS BELONGING TO THE 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO AND STATE OF CALIFORNIA DURING THE FISCAL 
YEAR 1899-1900, ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



PURPOSE. 



GENERAL FUND. 1892 

From Taxes 

GENERAL FUND, 1898 

From Taxes 

GENERAL FUND, 1899-1900 

Taxes $2,698,126 27 

Almshouse, sale of old material, etc 525 90 

Board of Public Works, Sewer Permits 3,39620 

Chief of Police, board of prisoners en route 1,331 20 

Chief of Police, rebate from S. P. R. R 19 50 

City and County Attorney, judgments 296 65 

Coroner's receipts 12183 

Deeds issued by Mayor 354 00 

Fines and forfeitures in Police Courts 22,906 76 

Fines and forfeitures in Superior Courts 1,10200 

Health Office Receipts, Certificates issued 258 00 

Hospital Receipts 40 00 

Licenses, City and County 398,196 50 

Licenses, Municipal 48,215 50 

Rents of City and County Property , 2,894 00 

Sale of Property by Mayor 42785 

Sheriff, for subsistence of United States prisoners 7,684 40 

Carried forward $3,185,89656 



286 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



TREASURER'S RECEIPTS CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward 83,185,896 56 

State of California, 6 per cent, commission State por- 
tion Personal Property Taxes collected by Assessor.. 10,507 39 
State of California, Account of Erroneous Assessments.'. 157 14 

State Lunacy Commission 79 90 

Supervisors, 2 per cent, gross earnings Railroad 

Franchise 15,983 00 

Supervisors, 2 per cent, gross earnings Sanitary Re- 
duction Works 676 80 

Superintendent Fire Alarm and Police Telegraph, 
House Moving Permits 

SPECIAL, FEE FUND 

4 

From Auditor $36 00 

Clerk Board of Supervisors 107 45 

Clerk Justices' Court 10,163 50 

County Clerk 23,236 15 

Licence Collector 17,415 00 

Recorder 18,422 05 

Sheriff 3)8 95 59 

Tax Collector 33 QQ 

UNAPPORTIONED FEE FUND 

From Auditor $66 00 

Board of Public Works 4,818 50 

Clerk Justices' Court 10,173 00 

County Clerk 23,665 95 

Carried forward $38,723 45 



$13,452 



3,213,428 79 



73,308 74 



3,300,189 73 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



287 



TREASURER'S RECEIPTS CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $38,723 45 

Health Department 

Racorder 18,953 75 

Sheriff 7,206 11 

Mayor 222 00 

Police Department 1,032 50 

ADVERTISING FUND 
From Advertising 

DISINTERMENT FUND 
From Removal Permits 

DUPLICATE TAX FUND 

From Duplicates and Overpayments $6,406 29 

13 63 
From Taxes paid in duplicate to Assessor. 

HOUSE MOVING FUND 

From House Moving Permits 

LIBRARY FUND 

From Taxes $53,608 61 

From Fines 2,27444 

OVERPAYMENT PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 
FUND 

PARK FUND 

From Taxes $211,76103 

From Market Street Railroad Company 100 00 

From Pound Fees, etc 

Carried forward 8211,88303 



$3,300,189 73 



6<V,700 81 
1,649 29 

140 OO 

6,419 92 
870 00 

55,883 05 
51,644 83 



83,483,497 63 



288 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



TREASURER S RECEIPTS CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward 8211,883 

From Board of Mounted Police Horses 555 96 

From Donations 300 00 

From Fines 85 00 

From Proceeds Children's Quarters 1,000 00 

From Rent of Boathouse 30000 

From Sale of Old Material, Poultry, etc 263 95 

POLICE RELIEF AND PENSION FUND 

From Contribution of Officers $13 ( 797 00 

Fines of Officers 850 

Fines and Forfeitures in Police Courts 2,029 24 

Sale of Property 782 31 

PUBLIC BUILDING FUND 

From Taxes 

ROBINSON BEQUEST INTEREST FUND 
From interest receivsd on Loans 

SCHOOL FUND OF 1898 

From Taxes* $1,647 79 

From State Apportionment 11,42092 

From State Collateral Inheritance Taxes 66,987 53 

SCHOOL FUND OF 1899 

From Taxes* $453,567 63 

Rent of Lincoln School Lots 48,00000 

Rent of Sundry School Lots 8,485 10 

Sale of Material 7000 

State of California, Apportionment of School Money... 693,068 15 

Carried forward 



18,483,487 63 



214,387 94 



17,368 55 
4 54 

2,255 00 



80,056 24 



1,203,190 88 



$5,00,0760 78 



* See transfer entries for amount transferred from School Fund of 1899 to School Fund of 1S98. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



289 



TREASURER'S RECEIPTS CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



AMOUNT. 



Amount brought forward 

STREET DEPARTMENT FUND 

From Taxes $249,14021 

From Licenses on Vehicles .- 17,376 90 

Two per cent gross earnings of Railroads 13,684 57 

Sale at Carhouse by Supervisors 86 00 

STREET LIGHT FUND 

From Taxes 

TEACHERS' INSTITUTE FUND 

From Faes received 

INSURANCE CONTRIBUTION FUND 

Surplus of Donation for Fourth of July Expenses 

ACCOUNT WITH ASSESSOR- 

From collections of Personal Property Taxes unse- 
cursd by Real Estate, viz: 

Fiscal Year of 1899-1900 $287,926 08 

Fi&cal year of 1900-1901, March and April 156,037 59 

DEPOSITS FOR TEARING UP STREETS 

From Sewer Permits 

INTEREST ACCOUNT PARK IMPROVEMENT BONDS 
1874-5 

From Taxes 

SINKING FUND PARK IMPROVEMENT BONDS,- 
1874-5- 

From Taxes $9,38245 

From Loans returned 22,00000 

Carried forward $31 ,382 45 



$5,000,760 78 



280,256 68 
171.366 80 

740 00 
328 95 



448,963 67 

2,874 27 



$5,915,277 10 



19 



290 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



TREASURER'S RECEIPTS CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL 




831 382 45 


$5 915 277 10 


From Interest received . 


439 70 








31 822 15 


8TATE OF CALIFORNIA 
From Taxes 


$2 236 905 54 




From Collection of Poll Tax 


75 49^ 90 




From City and County for Whittier Reform School 
From City and County for Preston School of Industry.. 
From City and County for Home for Feeble-Minded 
From Collateral Inheritance Taxes 


6,157 15 
1,203 02 
20,902 50 
341 362 04 




T'rom Redemptions 


9 750 26 








2,69^,773 41 












$8,638,872 66 



PAYMENTS BY TREASURER. 



PURPOSE. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 




$956 35 






526,618 22 






1,453 30 




Deposits for Tearing Up Streets Account 


381 47 






2,051 09 












453 1 4g0 43 











AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



291 



PAYMENTS BY TREASURER CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $531,460 43 

General Fund 1892 6,218 42 

General Fund 1899 3,494,92953 

Houss Moving Fund 52000 

Insurance Contribution Fund 18,972 62 

Library Fund 60,78475 

Overpayment Personal Property Taxes Fund 1899 47,357 86 

Overpayment Personal Property Taxes Fund 1896 5232 

Park Fund 234,504 94 

Police Contingent Fund 2,915 00 

Police Relief and Pension Fund 41,48783 

Pound Fes Fund 525 00 

Public Building Fund 26,061 70 

Robinson Bequest Interest Fund 2,25500 

School Fund 1899 1,204,85410 

School Fund 1898 67,861 41 

Special Fee Fund 70,625 09 

Street Department Fund 284,414 88 

Street Light Fund 122,351 57 

Teachers' Institute Fund 599 43 

Interest Account City Hall Construction Bonds 30000 

Interest Account Dupont Street Widening Bonds 19,985 00 

Interest Account Park Improvement Bonds 14,670 00 

Sinking Fund Dupont Street Bonds 

Sinking Fund Park Improvement Bonds 1874-75 

State of California 2,712,874 59 

Unapportioned Fee Fund .. 2,135 75 



8,995,717 22 



292 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



CONDITION OF TREASURY. 



PURPOSE. 



Cash on hand June 30, 1900, at credit of tha following 
funds and accounts: 



Advertising Fund $69294 

Account with Assessor 156,037 59 

Deposits for Tearing Up Streets Account 2,492 80 

Duplicate Tax Fund 10,495 96 

General Fund 1892 1,618 20 

General Fund 1898 3,859 75 

General Fund 1899 231,797 32 

Insurance Contribution Fund 318 95 

Library Fund 13,066 78 

Nineteenth Strest Extension Fund 236 53 

Overpayment Personal Property Taxes Fund 1899 4,286 97 

Park Fund 15,462 88 

Police Relief and Pension Fund 1,513 89 

Potrero Avenue Extension Fund 371 92 

Public Building Fund 87,857 12 

Robinson Bequest Fund 50 00 

School Fund 1899 117,637 74 

School Fund 1898 3,72993 

House Moving Fund 350 00 

Teachers' Institute Fund 97259 

Unapportioned Fee Fund 10,847 53 

Interest Account Pacific Railroad Bonds 3500 

Interest Account School Bonds 1874 30 00 

Interest Account Park Improvement Bonds , 1,856 25 

Carried forward... 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 293 

CONDITION OF THE TREASURY CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $665,618 64 

Interest Account House of Correction Bonds 35 00 

Interest Account Dupont Street Widening Bonds 4 

Sinking Fund Park Improvement Bonds 1874-75^ 167,669 28 

Sinking Fund Dupont Street Widening Bonds 157 03 

State of California 6,62452 

$840,108 85 

Less A. C. Widber's Deficiency Account 16,134 87 

Total 

BALANCE. 

PURPOSE. AMOUNT. 

Cash, otthand July 1, 1899 11,180,818 54 

RecMpts during fiscal year 1899-1900 (including State) 8,638,872 66 

Total 

Payments during fiscal year 1899-1900. 
Balance on hand July 1, 1900 



$823,973 98 



9,819,691 20 
8,995,717 22 
$823,973 98 



LOAN ACCOUNT. 



PURPOSE. 



TOTAU. 



Loans Outstanding June 30, 1900 

Sinking Fund Park Improvement Bonds 1874-75.. 



$40,500 00 



294 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



TRANSFER ENTRIES. 



PURPOSE. 



From General Fund 1899 471,077 26 

To General Fund of 1892 

To General Fund of 1898 

To Police Relief and Pension Fund. 

To Police Contingent Fund 

To Street Department Fund 

To Pound F3e Fund 

To Account with Assessor 

From School Fund 1899 272,256 02 

To Account with Assessor 

To Public Building Fund 

To Sinking Fund Park Improvement Bonds 1874-75., 

To School Fund of 1898 

From Street Light Fund 134,528 33 

To Street Department Fund of 1898. 

To General Fund of 1899 

To General Fund of 1898 

From Street Department Fund of 1899 118,112 08 

To Account with Assessor 

To General Fund of 1899 

To Strset Department Fund of 1898. 
From Park Fund 30,000 00 

To Account with Assessor. 
From Special Fee Fund 40,605 41 

To General Fund of 1898.... 

To General Fund of 1899 

From Unapportioned Fee Fund 53,717 63 

Carried forward ... 53,717 53 



*777 18 

11,433 14 

11,779 00 

2,915 00 

12,029 72 

525 00 

431,618 22 

30,000 00 

500 00 

238,800 00 

2,956 02 

30,000 00 
69,517 84 
35,010 49 

30,000 00 

85,826 33 

2,285 75 

30,000 00 

35,257 61 
5,347 80 



*1, 066,579110 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



295 



TRANSFER ENTRIES CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 



Amount brought forward $53,717 53 

To Police Relief and Pension Fund 

To General Fund of 1899 

From Mission High School Fund 6,074 36 

To School Fund of 1898 

From New City Hall Fund 13385 

To General Fund of 1898 

From Sinking Fund Park Bonds 1874-75 238,800 00 

To School Fund of 1899 

From Public Building Fund BOO 00 

To School Fund of 1899 

From Account with Assessor 526,61822 

To General Fund of 1899 

To School Fund of 1899 

To Park Fund 

To Street Fund of 1899 

To Library Fund 

From Overpayment Personal Property Taxes Fund 1896 2>603 

To General Fund of 1899 , 

From Library Fund 5,00000 

To Assessor's Account , 

From General Fund of 1898 20,447 

To General Fund of 1892 

To General Fund of 1899 

From Street Department Fund of 1898 

To General Fund of 1899 

From Dlsinterment Fund 

Carried forward 



$1,066,579 10 

$935 00 

52,782 53 

0,074 36 
133 85 

238,800 00 

600 00 

431,618 21 

30,000 00 

30,000 00 

30,000 00 

5,00000 

2,551 05 
5,000 00 

0,481 80 
18,966 15 

2,866 46 



81,922,788 52 



296 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 
TRANSFER ENTRIES CONTINUED. 



PURPOSE. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 




$355 33 


1,922,788 52 
855 33 


To General Fund of 1899 






Totals . 


$1,923,143 86 


$1,923,143 85 





TREASURER IN ACCOUNT WITH AUDITOR 

FOR MONEYS BELONGING TO THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900. 



8TATB OF CALIFORNIA. 



Cash on hand 

Taxes received 

Poll Taxes received 

Maintenance of Juveniles at Whittler Reform School 

Maintenance of Juveniles at Preston School of Industry... 
Maintenance of Inmates at Home for Feeble-Minded Chil- 
dren 

Redemption of Property Sold to the State 

Collateral Inheritance Taxes... 



$27,725 70 

2,236,906 54 

75,492 90 

6,157 15 

1,203 02 

20,902 60 

9,750 26 

341,362 04 



Amount paid State Treasurer... 
Treasurer's mileage 



Befinaded under Sec. 3804 (Erroneous collection of Prop- 
erty Tax) 

Transfer of Assessor's Commissions on Personal Property 
unsecured by Real Estate for fiscal year 1899-1900 to 
General Fund . . 



Balance cash on hand June 30, 1900., 



$2,702,142 86 
67 20 



157 14 



10.507 39 



2,719,499 11 



$2,712,874 59 



6,824 52 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



297 



LOAN ACCOUNT FOR FISCAL YEAR 18991900. 

LOANS MADE FROM SINKING FUNDS ON SECURITY OF UNITED STATES, STATE AND 

COUNTY BONDS. 



LOAN'S. 


SINKING FUND, 
PARR IMPROVEMENT 
BONDS. 1874-75. 


TOTAU. 




$54 COO 00 






8 000 00 








62 500 00 




$22 000 00 




Loans unpaid July 1 1900 


40 KOft no 

















STATEMENT OF POLLTAXES 

FOE FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900. 



PURPOSE. 


AVOtTNT. 


TOTAL. 


Sold by Washington Dodge, Assessor 






2,606 Poll Tax Receipts, account of 1899, at $3.00 


$7,818 00 






1,172 70 














6,645 30 


Sold by Washington Dodge, Assessor 






46,936 Poll Tax Receipts, account of 1900, at $2.00 '. 


$93,872 00 




* 15 per cent commission 


14,080 80 










Sold by J. H. Scott, Tax Collector 










420 00 


105 Poll Tax Receipts (delinquent) at $4 00 






Sold by Edward I. Sheehan, Tax Collector 






11 Poll Tax Receipts (delinquent) at $4 00 


44 00 




Less 25 per cent commission 


11 00 








33 00 












$86,889 50 



* These commissions are on special dsposit in Treasury awaiting decision of Court. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



STATEMENT OF TAXES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900; 

TAX COLLECTOR IN ACCOUNT WITH THE AUDITOR. 



DR. 

To City and County Real Estate Roll, taxes of 

Valuation $285,305,370 $4,650,477 53 

To City and County and State Personal Property Roll, 

taxes of 1899. Valuation $119,806,205 1,477,93041 

To penalties collectsd 9,02573 

CR. 

By cash paid City and County Treasurer, taxes and penai- 

ties $5,710,013 80 

By City and County Property exempt from taxation 717 52 

By Property assessed to Regents of the University 8,507 82 

By Property asssssed to Deaf, Dumb and Blind Asylum 260 80 

By Delinquent Taxes, City and County 263,836 67 

By Delinquent Taxes, State 154,097 06 



$6,137,433 67 



$6,137,433 07 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



SUMMARY OF TAXES 



COLLECTED AND PAID INTO THE TREASURY DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900. 



YEAR. 


TAXES. 


PENALTIES. 


TOTAL. 


1899 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 


$5 7CO 988 07 


|9 025 73 


$5 710 013 80- 


1898 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 


2 722 58 


21 79 


2,744 37 


1897 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 


307 60 


66 07 


373 67 


1896 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 


6,118 09 


5 90 


6,123 99- 


1895 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 
Property Taxes 


174 67 


34 17 


208 84 


1894 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 
Property Taxes 


71 S' 7 


13 42 


84 74 


1893 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 
Property Taxes 


27 59 


2 30 


29 89> 


1892 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 
Property Taxes . 


13 85 


84 


14 69- 


1891 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 


2 21 


19 


2 40 


1889 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 
Property Taxes 






2 00 


1887 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 
Property Taxes 






78 


1884 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 
Property Taxes 


30 




30 


1882 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 
Property Taxes 


9 90 


13 


3 


1881 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 
Property Taxes 


65 




65 











300 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



SUMMARY OF TAXES-CONTINUED. 



YEAB. 


TAXES. 


PENALTIES. 


TOTAL. 


1877 Stats, City and County Real Estate and Personal 


63 
10 59 

61 95 
48 65 
6 16 
29 44 
113 25 
6 20 


OS 


66 
10 59 
70 19 
59 88 
6 47 
30 91 
118 92 
6 52 


1875 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 


1873 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 


8 24 
11 23 
31 
1 47 
5 67 
32 


1872 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 
Property Taxes 


1869 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 


1868 State, Ciyt and County Real Estate and Personal 


1867 Stats, City and County Real Estate and Personal 


1866 State, City and County Real Estate and Personal 




$5,710,709 48 


$9,197 81 


16,719,907 29 



City and County's portion of redemptions of property sold to the State, including sale per Sec. 

3,897 $26,952 57 

1899 Railroad Taxes 1,198 92 

1899 Personal Property Taxes collected by Assessor 526,618 22 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



301 



APPORTIONMENT OF TAXES 

COLLECTED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900. 



FUNDS AND ACCOUNTS. 



Duplicate Tax Fund (account duplicate payments to As- 
sessor) $13 63 

General Fund of 1892 577 64 

General Fund of 1898 12,874 56 

General Fund of 1899 2,698,12627 

School Fund of 1898* 1,647 79 

School Fund of 1899 453,567 63 

Street Department Fund 249,14021 

Park Fund 211,761 03 

Library Fund 83,608 61 

Public Building Fund 454 

Street Light Fund 171,36688 

State of California -2,236,90554 

Interest Account, Park Improvement Bonds 14, 986 86 

Overpayment Personal Property Taxes 1899 51,644 83 

Sinking Fund, Park Improvement Bonds 1874-75... 9,382 45 



TOTAL. 



$6,165,608 48 



* See Transfer Entries for amount transferred from School Fund of 1899 to School 
Fund of 1898. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Street Railroad Taxes of 1899 

City and County's portion of redemption of property sold 
to the State, including sale as per Sec. 3897 

Personal Property Taxes 1899, unsecured by Real Estate, 
collected by Assessor 

Taxes collected by Tax Collector during fiscal year 1899- 

1900 , 5,719,907 29 

Less amount collected in June, 1900, and paid to and ap- 
portioned by Treasurer in fiscal year 1900-1901 145,568 52 

Taxes collected in ;June, 1899, by Tax Collector and paid 
to and apportioned by Treasurer in fiscal year 1899- 
1900 i 

Amount of Advertising and Deeds collected by Tax Col- 
lector and apportioned to General Fund 

Amount of Poll Taxes included by Treasurer in his ap- 
portionment of Taxes 



$1,908 92 



26.952 57 



526,618 22 



5,574,338 77 



34,736 84 



1,734 16 



29 00 



5,165,608 48 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



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AUDITOR'S REPORT. 





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AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



BONDS REDEEMED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 

Dupont Street Widening-19 bonds, each $1,000, Nos. 321 to 336, 605, 904, 931 19,000 00 



BONDS OUTSTANDING JUNE 30, 1899, -TO JUNE 3u, 1900. 



TBAR 
OF 
ISSOE. 


ISSUED FOR. 


OUTSTANDING 

JUNE 30, 1899. 


REDEEMED 
YEAR ENDING 
JUNK 30, 1900. 


OUTSTANDING 
JUNE 30, 1900. 


1874 75 




$ Q 50 000 00 




$250 000 00 












1873 


Overdue bonds due 1887-1888 discontinued, 
$2,500. 

SPECIAL BONDS. 

(Payable from taxes on lands benefited.) 
Montgomery Avenue Opening 


1 579 000 00 




$1 579 000 00 


1877 


Dupont Street Widening. 


305 000 00 


$19 000 


286 000 00 
















1,884,000 00 


$19,000 00 


$1,865,000 00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



309 



LIST OF BONDS OUTSTANDING JUNE 30, 1900. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Park Improvement Bonds 1874-751 to 250, 250 bonds, $1,000 
each 


$250,000 00 










Overdue bonds due 1887-1888, discontinued, $2,600.00. 

SPECIAL BONDS PAYABLE FROM TAXES ON LANDS BENEFITED. 

Montgomery Avenue Bonds 18731 to 1,579 -1,579 bonds, 
$1,000 each 


$1,579,000 00 




Dupont Street Opening Bonds 1877 Nos. 136 to 150, 155 to 
176, 189, 190, 207, 209 to 215, 260, 266, 269 to 275, 296 to 
301, 314 to 316, 367 to 372, 398 to 402, 408 to 410, 419 to 
421, 423 to 427, 446, 447, 453 to 466, 477 to 480, 482, 483 
494 to 496. 493, 501, 504, 525,626, 531 to 533, 565, 592, 598, 61 1 
to 613, 623, 625 to 627, 630 to 657, 660 to 703, 708, 709, 717 
732, 733, 734, 791, 793 to 799, 806, 818 to 821, 869, 871, 872, 
875 to 879, 831, 882, 885 to 890, 894, 895, 897, 905, 908, 911 
912, 914, 919, 920, 923, 926, 928, 930, 932, 936 to 949, 956 
958, 960, 931, 983, 964, 965, 967, 969, 970, 972, 974, 979, 983 
984, 985, 988, 991, 998, 999286 bonds, $l,ODO?each 


286,000 00 


I 


Total special bonds payable from taxes on lands benefited 




tl,865 ; 000 00 



COUPON ACCOUNTS FOR FISCAL YEA.R ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



Interest Account Bonds 1858, 1863-64, Pacific Railroad, School of 1874 and House of Correction Bonds- 
Coupons long overdue, now discontinued, amounting to $2,192 50. 



310 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



INTEREST ACCOUNT. 



GRAND TOTAL. 



PARK IMPROVEMENT BOMDS 1872-73 AND 1874-75. 

Coupons due and unpaid June 30, 1899 

Coupons due on bonds of 1874-75, year ending June 30, 1900 
6 per cent on $250,000 00 

Coupons paid fiscal year ending June 30, 1900 

Coupons due and unpaid June 30, 1900 

1872-73 coupon No. 21 of bonds 21, 45, 71, and coupon No. 34 

of bond 1674 coupons, $30 00 each $120 00 

1874-75 coupons No. 52 on bonds 15 to 19, coupons No. 38 to 
52 on bonds 25, 26, 29, 46, coupons No. 41 on bonds 28, 34 
to 42 83 coupons, $30 00 each 2,490 00 

CITY HALL CONSTRUCTION BONDS. 

Coupons due July 1, 190020, $15 00 each $ 300 

Coupons paid fiscal year ending June 30, 1900 



$2,280 00 
15,000 00 



$17,280 00 
14,670 00 



$2,610 00 



$2,610 00 



?,610 00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



311 



COUPONS OF SPECIAL .BONDS. 



MONTGOMERY AVENUE. 

59,412 coupons outstanding June 30, 1899 $30 00 each 

3,158 coupons due, year ending June 30, 1900 $30 00 each. 



62,570 coupons outstanding June 30, 1900 $30 00 each 

6 coupons paid in a previous year and missing $30 00 each , 

62,564 coupons due and unpaid June 30, 1900 $30 00 each 



DUPONT STREET. 

6,130 coupons outstanding June 30, 1899 $35 00 each 

571 coupons paid year ending June 30, 1900 $35 00 each. 



5,559 coupons outstanding June 30, 1900 $35 00 each 

14 coupons paid in a previous year and missing $35 00 each. 



5,545 coupons due and unpaid June 30, 1900 

1 coupon on 151 bonds 151 

2 coupons on 82 bonds 164 

3 coupons on 24 bonds 72 

4 coupons on 16 bonds 64 

5 coupons on 13 bonds 65 

6 coupons on 3 bonds 18 

7 coupons on 1 bond 7 

10 coupons on 2 bonds 20 

13 coupons on 5 bonds 65 

14 coupons on 1 bond 14 

16 coupons on 1 bond 16 

17couponson 5 bonds 86 

18 coupons on 17 bonds 306 

19couponson 5 bonds 95 

20 coupons on 11 bonds 220 



$1,782,360 00 
94,740 00 



$1,877,100 00 
180 00 



$1,876,920 00 



$214,550 00 
19,985 00 



$194,565 00 
490 00 



194,075 00 



$2,070,995 00 



312 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



COUPONS OF SPECIAL BONDS CONTIMJED. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


21 coupons on 3 bonds 63 






22 coupons on 3 bonds . . 66 







23 coupons on 3 bonds 69 

24 coupons on 2 bonds 48 

25 coupons on 2 bonds 50 

26 coupons on 3 bonds 78 

27 coupons on 3 bonds 81 

28 coupons on 9 bonds 252 

29 coupons on 47 bonds 1,363 

30 coupons on 16 bonds 480 

31 coupons on 2 bonds 62 

32 coupons on 4 bonds 128 

33 coupons on 5 bonds 165 

35 coupons on 4 bonds 140 

36 coupons on 32 bonds 1,152 

475 5,559 

5,559 coupons, $35 00 each, outstanding: as per above statement, June 30, 1900 



$194,565 00 



NOTE.- -All coupons settled for on 525 bonds. No coupons unpaid on 475 bonds appears above. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



313 



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314 



ATjuITOR'S REPORT. 



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MATED EXPENDITURE o> 
FIREMEN'S RELIEF AND 


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alof inditrent dead 
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315 



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316 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



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FIREMEN'S RELIEF >i 


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AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



317 



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318 



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MATID EXPENDITURES ON THR 
FIRIMEN'S RELIEF AND PEHSIO 

a.nd mntinn palpmlar 


Librarian and messenger 
ce Judges and stenographers . 
o.<rranhrs Rnnerinr Hoiirt: 


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AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



319 








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320 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 






8 


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SUPERVISORS' ESTIS! 


1 


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AUDITOR'S ESTIMATE. 


$2,997,998 00 


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>N THE GENERAL, POLICE CONTINGENT, POL: 
PENSION, UNAPPORTIONED FEE, SCHOOL, Li 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY. 


FIRE DEPARTMENT. 


CIVIL SERVICE DEPARTMENT. 


DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS. 


DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 


300; State apportionment, $675,000; Colla 


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AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



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AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



323 



TAX LEVY. 





AUDITOR'S. 


SUPERVISORS'. 


Ganeral Police Relief and Pension, Firemen's Relief, 
Unapportioned Fee Fund etc. 


$0.81855 
.11195 
.0145 
.055 




$0.8760 
.1017 
.0153 

.0648 
.0037 

.0029. 

.0212 
.0008 
.0010 
.OC04 

.0303 
.0007 
.0008 
.0004 


School Fund 




Library .... 








Total current 


$1.00 




Park Improvement Fund 


$0.0695 
.0038 
.0025 


Interest Account, Park Improvement Bonds 1874-75. 
Sinking Fund, Park Improvement Bonds 1874-75 

Auditor's total levy 




.0758 




$1.0758 


INTEREST ACCOUNT ON BONDS TO BE LEVIED. 

Park bonds 




Sewer bonds ... . . A , 






School bonds 






Hospital bonds 






SINKING FUNDS FOR BONDS TO BE ISSUED. 

Park bonds 






Sewer bonds 






School bonds 






Hospital bonds 






Supervisors' total levy 






$1.1270 









Auditor's levy based on an assessed valuation of $400, 000,000 00 

Supervisors' levy based on'an assessed valuation of $75,000,000 00 



REPORT OF TREASURER. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 
To the Honorable Jas. D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIR: In compliance with Article XVI, Section 9, of the Charter, I herewith submit my annual 
report as City and County Treasurer. 

Respectfully yours, 

S. H. BROOKS, 

City and County Treasurer. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand July 1, 1899 

From taxes $2,294,15984 

From poll-taxes 18,238 60 

For the maintenance of pupils at the Whittier State School. . . 6,157 15 
For the maintenance of pupils at the Preston School of Indus- 
try 4,20302 

From collateral inheritance tax , 341,362 04 

From redemption of property sold to the State - 9 > 750 2 

For the support of children at the California Home for Feeble- 

minded Children 20,90250 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demands paid $8,54250 

Paid St ite Treasurer, as per settlements with the Controller of 

State"... 2,355,93170 

Transferred to State School money. 348,400 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900 



$27,725 70 



2,691,773 41 



$2,719,499 11 



$2,712,874 59 
6,624 52 



$2,719,499 11 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



325 



GENERAL FUND, 1892-1893, 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 


$577 64 




From transfer from General Fund, 1898-1899 


6,481 80 




From transfer from General Fund, 1899-1900 


777 18 














$7,836 62 


DISBURSEMENTS. 
Demands paid 






Cash on hand June 30, 1900 
















$7,836 62 



GENERAL FUND, 1898-1899. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
From taxes 


$12,874 56 




From transfer from General Fund, 1899-1900 


11,433 14 










DISBURSEMENTS. 
Transferred to General Fund 1892-1893 


$6,481 80 


$24,307 70 


Transferred to General Fund 1899-1900 


13,966 15 


$20,447 95 


Cash on hand June 30 1900 . . .... 




3,859 75 












s'24,307 70 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



GENERAL FUND, 1899-1900. 



RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand July 1, 1899 

From taxes $2,698,126 27 

From City and County licenses 398,196 50 

From municipal dog and duplicate licenses 48,215 50 

From Police Court fines, Department No. 1 5 > 092 50 

From Police Court fines, Department No. 2 5,397 00 

From Police Court fines, Department No. 3 6 - 070 01 

From Police Court fines, Department No. 4 6 > 347 25 

From Board of Health, certified copies of birth and death cer- 
tificates 22050 

From City and County Attorney Judgment for costs in re 

Gfiorge Nicholas vs. City and County of San Francisco 148 50 

From City and County Attorney Judgment in re City and 

County of San Francisco vs. Studebaker Bros 1*8 15 

From Sheriff -Board of United States prisoners 7,684 40 

From Sheriff-Fines 142 00 

From Superintendent of City and County Alms-house Sale 

of hogs, etc 37065 

From Superintendent of City and Connty Alms house Money 

belonging to estates of deceased" inmates 155 25 

From transfer from Street Department Fund 88,192 79 

From transfer from Street Light Fund 102,517 84 

From transfer from Street Light Fund, as authorized by Reso. 

lution of Supervisors No. 3,164 ( Fourth Series) 2,010 49 

From Assessor's account, transfer 431,618 22 

From transfer from Disinterment Fund 355 33 

From transfer from New City Hall Fund 133 85 

From transfer from Special Fee Fund 40,605 41 



249,641 66 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



327 



GENERAL FUND, 1899-1900 CONTINUED. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 




$62 78 53 




From transfer from General Fund 1898-1899. 


13,966 15 






2,894 00 




From Mayor From surplus of Memorial Day Fund 


15 




Frm Mayor Deeds 


354 00 




From Mayor From sale of old horses, Fire and Coroner's 
departments. 


278 10 




From Mayor From sale of old iron, Street Department 
From Superintendent of Fire Alarm and Police Telegraph, 


149 60 

128 00 




From Superior Court fines 


960 00 




From City and County Hospital Sale of swill 


40 00 




From Stntj Lunacy Commission Rebate on examinations 01 
insane 


79 90 




From State of California Taxes refunded .... 


157 14 




From overpayment Personal Property Tax Fund, 1896 


2,551 05 




From overpayment printing monthly report, refunded 


10 00 




From CTefX Board of Supervisors Two per cent of gross re- 
ceipts on franchise of Sanitary Reduction Works. 
From Police Department Board of prisoners en route 


676 80 
1,331 20 




From Police Department Rebate from Southern Pacific Rail- 
road Company .... ... 


19 50 




From Sutter Street Railroad Company Two per cent of gross 


633 45 




From San Francisco and San Mateo Railway Company Two 
per cent of gross receipts 


5 506 21 




From Market Street Railway Compiny Two per cent of gross 
receipts . .... 


9 843 34 




From Board of Public Work? Sewer permits 


3,396 20 











328 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



GENERAL FUND, 1899-1900 CONCLUDED. 



From refund, account error in P. J. Biggy's demand 27 50 

From Coroner's deposits Money found on deceased persons. . 121 83 
From State Controller Refund Assessor's commissions, De- 
cember, 1899 10,507 39 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demands paid..! 3,486,659 63 

Boys and Girls' Aid Society 2 ,225 00 

Transferred to Pound Fee Fund 525 00 

Transferred to Police Relief and Pension Fund 11,779 00 

Transferred to Police Contingent Fund 2 > 915 

Transferred to Street Department Fund, 1898-1899 1] 779 72 

Transferred to Street Department Fund, 1899-1900 250 00 

Transferred to St. Mary's Park Fund 125,000 00 

Transferred to Assessor's account . . 431,618 22 

Transferred to General Fund, 1892-1893 777 18 

Transferred to General Fund, 1898-1899 11 433 14 

Superior Court orders paid 6 . 044 90 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900 '. 



$3,948,162 45 



84,197,804 11 



84,091,006 79 
106,797 32 



1,197,804 11 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



329 



SPECIAL FEE FUND. 





AMOUNT, 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
Cash on hand July 1 1899 




$37,921 76 




$33 00 






17,415 00 




From County Clerk . .... 


23,236 15 






18,422 05 




From Justices' Clerk 


10,163 50 




From Clerk Board of Supervisors " 


107 45 






36 00 




From Sheriff 


3,895 59 














73,308 74 






$111,230 50 


Demands paid .... 


$70,625 09 




Transferred to General Fund, 1899-1900 


40,605 41 








$111,230 50 



UNAPPOKTIONED FEE FUND. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
From Mayor 


1222 00 




From Auditor 


66 00 




From County Clerk 


23,665 95 




From Recorder 


18,953 75 











330 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



UN APPORTIONED FEE FUND CONTINUED. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


From Sheriff , . . . 


$7,206 11 




From Board of Public Works . 


4 818 50 






10,173 00 






563 00 




From Police Department 


1,032 50 










DISBURSEMENTS. 
Demands paid . . 


$2 135 75 




Transferred to General Fund 1899 1900 


5 782 53 




Transferred to Police Relief and Pension Fund 


935 00 








$55 853 28 


Cash on hand June 30, 1900 




10 847 V-5 












$66,700 81 



SCHOOL FUND. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
Cash on hand July 1 1899 




$110,836 06 




$325,117 40 




From rent of school property 


4,910 60 




From State school money . 


378 408 45 




From transfer from Assessor's account 


30,000 00 











TREASURER'S REPORT. 



331 



SCHOOL FUND CONTINUED. 



From transfer from Sinking Fund, Park Improvement Bonds' 

1874-1875 $138,800 00 

From transfer from Public Building Fund 500 00 

From rent Lincoln School lots 28,00000 

From sale of old material 70 00 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demands paid 

Transferred to Assessor's account 30,000 00 

Transferred to Public Building Fund 500 00 

Transferred to Sinking Fund, Park Improvement Bonds, 1874- 

1875 138,800 00 

Transferred to Common School Fund 56,702 89 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900 . . . 



$1,016,642 51 



$1,012,912 58 
3,729 93 



$1,016,642 51 



COMMON SCHOOL FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 

From taxes 

From State school money 

From rent of school property 

From rent of Lincoln School lots. . . 



$130,098 02 

393,068 15 

3,574 50 

20.000 00 



332 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



COMMON SCHOOL FUND CONTINUED. 



TOTAL. 



From Sinking Fund, Park Improvement Bonds of 1374-1875 

Transfer 8100,000 00 

From School Fund Transfer 56,702 89 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demands Paid $485,805 82 

Transferred to Sinking Fund, Park Improvement Bond?, 1874- 

1875 100,000 00 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900 

STREET DEPARTMENT FUND. 

AMOUNT. 

RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand July 1, 1899 

From taxes $249,140 21 

From licenses 17,375 90 

From California Street Cable Railroad Company Two per cent 

of gross receipts of Hyde street branch 3,157 42 

From Market Street Railway Company Two per cent of gross 

earnings 9,715 49 

From transfer from Street Light Fund 30,000 00 



$703,443 56 



8585,805 82 
117,637 74 

$703,443 56 



$50,322 -27 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



333 



STREET DEPARTMENT FUND CONTINUED. 



From transfer from Assessor's account 

From transfer from General Fund, 1899-1900. 

From transfer from General Fund, 1898-1899 

From transfer from Street Department Fund, 1899-1900 . . . 
From E. H. Aigeltinger, Supervisor Sale at car-house, San 

Jose avenue and Guerrero street 

From Sutro Street Railroad Company- Two per cent of gross 

earnings, January 1, 1898, to October 31, 1899 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demands paid 

Transferred to Assessor's account 

Transferred to General Fund, 1899-1900 

Transferred to Street Department Fund, 1898-1899 



$30,000 00 

250 00 

11,779 72 

2,285 75 

55 00 
811 66 



$284,414 83 

30,000 00 

88,192 79 

2,285 75 



$354,671 15 



8404,893 42 



PARK FUND, 



RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand July 1, 1899 

From taxes 

From Police Court fines 

From rent of Children's Playground. 
From rent of boat-house . . . 



$211,761 03 

85 00 

1,000 00 

300 00 



$35,579 88 



334 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



PAEK FUND CONTINUED. 



From transfer from Assessor's account $30,000 00 

From sale of ducks 26 60 

From sale of old horses 22000 

From sale of old iron 5 00 

From Pound fees 104 00 

From sale of old material 12 35 

From Market Street Railway, as per Ordinance No. 1 100 00 

From board of Mounted Police horses 455 

From subscription of Nineteenth Avenue Boulevard Club 

From labor services, Children's Playground 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demands paid $234,504 94 

Transferred to Assessor's account 30,000 00 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900 



244,387 94 
279,967 82 

$264,504 94 
15,462 88 

$279,967 82 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



335 



LIBRARY FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand July 1, 1899 

From taxes $53,608 61 

Fr mfineS $2,26778 

From transfer from Assessor's aceoun t , 

5,000 00 

From donation 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demands paid.... ^^^^ $ CO,784 75 

Transferred to Assessor's account 

5,000 00 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900. 



TOTAL. 



817,968 48 



$60,883 05 



$78,851 53 



$65,784 75 
13,066 78 

$78,851 53 



336 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



STREET LIGHT FUND. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
Cash on hand July 1, 1 899 
















171,366 89 


DISBURSEMENTS. 
Demands paid 


*12 9 351 57 


256,879 90 


Transferred to Street Department Fund 1898-1899 


30 000 00 ' 






104 528 33 














6256,879 90 



OVERPAYMENT PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 










51 644 83 


From o e p y 






DISBURSEMENTS. 




$54,248 20 




$47,410 18 




Transferred to General Fund . 


2,551 05 








$49 961 23 


















854,248 20 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



337 



DISINTERMENT FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand July 1, 1899 

From permits issued 

DISBURSEMENTS. 
Demands paid 

NEW CITY HA.LL FUND. 

AMOUNT. 

RECEIPTS. 
Cash on hand July 1, 1899 

DISBURSEMENTS. 
Transferred to General Fund . . . 



$1,688 63 
140 00 



$1,808 63 
$1,808 63 



$13385 



133 85 



22- 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



POLICE CONTINGENT FUND. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
From transfer from General Fund . 




$2 91 00 


DISBURSEMENTS. 
Demands paid 




2,915 00 









POLICE BELIEF AND PENSION FUND. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
Cash on hand July 1 1899 




$12,919 17 


From contributions of officers. . . . 


$13,690 00 




From fines of officers 


850 CO 




From Police Court fines 


2,029 24 




From transfer from General Fund . 


11,779 00 




From transfer from Unapportioned Fee Fund 


935 00 




From unclaimed property recovered by Police 


782 31 




From reward for official services. 


17 00 








30,082 55 








DISBURSEMENTS. 




$43,001 72 


Demands paid 




$41 487 83 


Cash on hand June 30, 1900 




1 513 89 












$43,001 72 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



33f 



POUND FEE FUND. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
From t r ansfer from General Fund 




$525 08 


. DISBURSEMENTS. 
Demand8 paid 




1 

525 00 









DUPLICATE TAX FUND. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
Cash on hand July 1 1899 


" 


$6,127 13 


From taxes paid in duplicate 
From overpayments made to Assessor 


$6,406 29 
13 63 








6,419 W 








DISBURSEMENTS 




$12,P47 05 


Demands paid 




$2 051 09 


Cash on hand June 30, 1900 




10 495 96 












$12,547 05 



340 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 
INSURANCE CONTRIBUTION FUND. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
Cash on hand July 1, 1S99 




818,962 62 


From Board of Fire Commissioners Return of surplus of 
$1 500 00 drawn for July 3d and 4th 




3->8 9~> 








. 




$19^291 57 


DISBURSEMENTS. 
Demands paid 




$18 972 62 


Cash on hand June 30, 1900 




318 95 












819,291 57 



SINKING FU^D PARK IMPROVEMENT BO^DS, 1874-1875. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
Cash on hand July 1, 1899 




3143 847 13 


From taxes 


$9 382 4"> 




Fror.i interest. 


439 70 




from loans returned 


22 000 00 




From transfer from School Fund 


133 800 00 














170,622 15 


DISBURSEMENTS. 
Transf err M! to School Furid 


8138,800 00 


$314,469 28 


Loans on collaterals . 


8 000 00 


$146 800 00 


Cash on hand June 30, 1900 




167 669 28 












$314,469 28 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 
PUBLIC BUILDING FUND. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
Cash on hand July 1 1899 




$113,914 28 




$4 54 




From transfer from School Fund 


500 00 


604 4 












$114,418 82 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


$26,061 70 






500 00 








$26,561 70 


Cash on hand June 30 1900 




87,857 12 












$114,418 82 



TEACHERS' INSTITUTE FUND. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 




$832 02 




$192 00 




From fees certificates issued 


548 00 








740 00 












$1,572 02 






$599 43 












972 59 












$1,672 08 



842 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



COUPONS OF PARK IMPROVEMENT BONDS. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 




$1,539 39 






14,986 86 












$16,526 25 






$14,670 00 






1,856 25 












$16,526 25 



COUPONS CITY HALL CONSTRUCTION BONDS. 





JAMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 
Cksh on hand July 1 1899 




$300 00 


DISBURSEMENTS.- 
Demands paid 




300 00 









TREASURER'S REPORT. 



343 



ASSESSOR'S ACCOUNT. 



Cash on hand July 1, 1899 

From taxes $443,963 67 

From transfer from General Fund 431,618 22 

From transfer from School Fund 30,000 00 

From transfer from Street Department Fund 30,000 00 

From transfer from Park Fund 30,000 00 

From transfer from Library Fund 5,000 00 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Transferred to General Fund $431,618 22 

Transferred to School Fund 30,000 00 

Transferred to Street Department Fund 30,000 00 

Transferred to Park Fund 30,000 00 

Transferred to Library Fund 5,000 00 

Apportioned to sundry funds 526,618 22 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900. 



AMOUNT. 



970,581 89 



$1,209,274 03 



1,053,236 44 
156,037 59 



$1,209,274 03 



344 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



ADVERTISING FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 



From advertising fees 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demands paid 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900 

TEARING-UP-STREETS FUND. 

'AMOUNT. 

RECEIPTS. 
From sewer permits , 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demands paid 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900 



$1,649 29 



$956 35 



$1,649 29 



$2,874 27 

9381 47 
2,492 80 

$2,874 27 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



345 



ST. MARY'S PARK FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 
From transfer from General Fund 

DISBURSEMENTS. 
Cash on hand June 30, 1900 , 

HOUSE-MOVING FUND. 

AMOUNT. 

RE( EIPTS. 
From moving permits 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demanda paid 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900 



$125,000 CO 



125,000 00 



$*70 00 



$520 00 
350 00 



$870 00 



346 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



ROBINSON BEQUEST INTEREST FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 



From interest. . 

DISBURSEMENTS. 
Demands paid 

COUPONS OF DUPONT STREET BONDS 

AMOUNT 

RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand July 1, 1899 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Demands paid 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900 



$2,255 00 



2,255 00 



$19,985 00 
4 38 



$19,989 38 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



347 



SINKING FUND, DUPONT STREET BONDS 



RECEIPTS. 
Cash on hand July 1, 1899 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Bonds redeemed 

Cash oa hand June 30, 1900 

LOAN ACCOUNT. 

AMOUNT. 

RECEIPTS. 

Loans outstanding July 1, 1899, as per report. 
Loans made 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Loans returned 

Loans outstanding June 30, 1900 



$19.157 03 



$19,000 00 
157 03 



$19,157 08 



$54,500 00 
8,000 00 



$62,500 00 

$22 r OOO 00 
40,500 00 



$62,500 00 



348 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



RECAPITULATION 

OF THE BALANCE ON HAND IN THE VARIOUS FUNDS OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF 
SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 30, 1900. 



General Fund 1892-93 $1,618 20 

General Fund 1898-99 3,859 75 

General Fund 1899-1900 106,797 32 

School Fund 3,72993 

Common School Fund 117,637 74 

Unapportioned Fee Fund 10,847 53 

Park Fund 15,462 88 

Library Fund 13,066 78 

Police Relief and Pension Fund 1,513 89 

Insurance Contribution Fund 318 95 

Public Building Fund 87,857 12 

Duplicate Tax Fund 10,495 96 

Teachers' Institute Fund 972 59 

Overpayment Personal Property Tax Fund 4,286 97 

Nineteenth Street Extension Fund 236 53 

Potrero Avenue Extension Fund 371 92 

Pacific Railroad Interest Tax Account 35 00 

Coupons School Fund 1874 30 00 

Coupons House of Correction Bonds 35 00 

Coupons of Dupont Street Bonds 4 38 

Coupons of Park Improvement Bonds 1,856 25 

Sinking Fund Park Improvement Bods 1874-75 167,669 28 

Sinking Fund Dupont Street Bonds 157 3 

Robinson Bequest Fund 50 00 

State of California 6(62 4 52 

Assessor 156,03759 

Advertising Fund 692 94 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



349 



RECAPITULATION CONTINUED. 



FUNDS. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 




$350 00 




Tearin^-up-streets Fund 


2,492 80 




ary's Park Fund 


125,000 00 








$840,108 85 


Balance cash on hand June 30 1900 


$823 973 98 






16 134 87 














840,108 85 



350 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



SPECIAL AND UNAPPOKTIONED FUNDS. 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR. 



Balance cash on hand July 1, ]899. 

Receipts during the year 

Orders paid during the year 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900 



$23,084 C6 
19,755 82 



$42,839 88 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



$17,3J2 30 
25,527 58 



$42,839 88 



COUNTY CLERK, SPECIAL ACCOUNT. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Balance cash oh hand July 1 1899 . 


$25,703 95 






45,345 75 




Paid b v order of Court 




$37 582 20 


Cash on hand June 30 1900 




33 467 50 










$71,049 70 


$71,049 70 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



351 



SPECIAL REDEMPTION TAXES. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Balance cash on hand July 1, 1899 


$1 263 99 




Receipts during the year 


558 63 




Paid to purchasers during the year 




$687 3 9 


Cash on hand June 30 1900 




1 135 30 










$1,822 62 


$1,822 62 



POLICE COURT BAIL MONEY. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Balance cash on hand July 1 1899 


$5 665 00 




Deposits made by Police Court Clerks 
Orders of Police Judges paid 


240,155 05 


$237 596 05 


Cash on hand June 30, 1900 




8 225 00 










$245,820 05 


$245,820 05 


RECAPITULATION OF BAIL MONEYS ON HAND. 
June 30, 1900, to the credit of 
Police Court, Department No. 1 


$4,495 00 




Police Court, Department No. 2. . . . 


1,165 00 




Police Court, Department No. 3 


975 00 




Police Court, Department No. 4 . 


1,590 00 














$8,225 00 



352 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



ABSENT HEIRS AND ESTATES OF MINORS AND INCOMPETENTS. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



Balance cash on hand July 1, 1899 1,901 92 

Receipts during- the year 1,387 17 

Orders paid during the year $857 78 

Cash on hand June 30, 1900 2,431 31 

$3,289 09 33,289 09 

CORONER'S DEPOSITS. 

RBCETITS. DISBURSEMENTS. 

Cash on hand July 1, 1899 : $66 91 

Money found on deceased persons 40 

Transferred to General Fund $67 31 

$67 31 67 31 

J. F. BOYD. 

- - - . 

RECEIPTS. DISBURSEMENTS. 

Cash on faftftft J uly 1, 1899 *8 10 

Cashpaidhim $810 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



353 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



From building permits, etc 84,68718 

Demands paid $4,687 38 

POLICE COURT FINES. 

RECEIPTS. DISBURSEMENTS. 

From fine? $12,287 00 

Transferred to General Fund $12,28700 

LICENSE COLLECTOR. 

RECEIPTS. DISBURSEMENTS. 

Licenses collected $105,657 00 

Transferred to General Fund 1105,657 00 



23 



354 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



SCHOOL TEACHERS' ANNUITY AND RETIREMENT FUND. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Balance cash on hand July 1 1899 


$14 087 06 






10,466 50 






1 9S9 92 






3 70 




From interest on depr sits in savings banks . 


376 88 








11,080 05 


Cash on hand June 30 1900 




1?,844 01 










$26,924 06 


826,924 06 


The balance as noted above is made up as follows : 
Deposits with German Savings and Loan Society 
Deposited with Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 


5,111 39 
4,886 92 






",630 14 




Coin in City and County Treasury 


3,215 56 





15,844 01 



TAX COLLECTOR. 






RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Cash on hand June 30 1900 


145 336 46 











TREASURER'S REPORT. 



355 



ASSESSOR, PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Cash on hand June 30 1900 


397 233 87 








' 



ASSESSOR, POLL-TAXES. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Cath on hand June 30, 1900 


$22 536 90 











REDEMPTION OF PROPERTY SOLD TO STATE FOR DELINQUENT 

TAXES. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Cash 


on hand June 30, 1900 


$6,706 98 




(Money received since settlement with State in May.) 



STATE SCHOOL MONEY UNAPPORTIONED. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Cash on hand June 30, 1900 


$118 400 39 











356 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



COLLATERAL INHERITANCE TAX, 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Cash on hand June 30, 1900 


$5,878 12 




(Money received since settlement with State in May.) 







MISSION STREET WIDENING. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Cash on hand June 30, 1900 


$18 39 











KENTUCKY STREET GRADING. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Cash on hand June 30, 1900 


$110 04 











LAGUNA SURVEY. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Cash on hand June 30, 1900 


$115 23 











TREASURER'S REPORT. 



857 



TAX j COLLECTOR, SPECIAL ACCOUNT. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Cash on hand June 30, 1900 


$11 85 











J. C. PENNIE, EX-PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 




$4 75 











ASSESSOR, POLL-TAX COMMISSIONS. 





RECEIPTS. 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


Cash on hand June SO, 190D 


$14,080 80 











358 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



RECAPITULATION. 

OF BALANCE ON HAND IN VARIOUS SPECIAL AND UNAPPORTIONED FUNDS, 

JUNE 30, 1900. 



County Clerk $33,467 50 

Tax Collector 145,?36 46 

Collateral inheritance tax 5,878 12 

Redemption of property sold to State 6,706 98 

Police Court bail money ; 8 225 

School Teachers' Annuity and Relief Fund 3,215 56 

Balance cash on hand $15,844 01 

In German Savings and Loan Society $5,111 39 

In Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 4,886 92 

In Security Savings Bank 2,630 14 

In City and County Treasury 3,215 56 

$15,844 01 

Special redemption taxes 1,135 30 

Absent heirs and estates of minors and incompetents 2,431 31 

J. C. Pennie, ex-Public Administrator 4 75 

Laguna Survey 115 23 

Mission Street Widening 18 39 

Kentucky Street Grading 110 04 

Tax Collector, special account 11 85 

Public Administrator 25,527 58 

Assessor, poll-laxes 22,536 90 

Assessor, poll-taxes account commissions 14,080 80 

Assessor, personal property taxes 397,233 87 

State school money 118,400 39 



$784,436 03 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



359 



GRAND TOTAL. 



- 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 




$784 436 03 






840 108 85 








SI 6' ? 4 544 88 









Respectfully submitted, 



S. H. BROOKS, 
City an 1 County Treasurer. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 



To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 



DEAR SIR : In accordance with law and in compliance with Resolution No. 470 of the 
Board of Supervisors, I beg leave to herewith respectfully submit my report of the operations 
of the Tax office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

Your attention is drawn to the apparent large delinquency on the Personal Property Roll, 
but in my opinion the real delinquency is less than for many years past. By referring to 
report, you will find but $4,191.36 on the first installment, $7,116.57 on the second installment, 
$513.30 from the personal property secured, making a total of $11,821 .73. This amount being 
the actual sales to the State for the year 1899. 

The amount of $386,078.99 of taxes on bonds and unsecured personal property, declared 
illegal by the Supreme Court, swells the total to the large amount contained in my report. In 
reference to the License office, now a department of this office, permit me to call your attention 
to the following facts : First, that Section 15 of Chapter II of the Charter has by its operation 
taken in the neighborhood of $104,517.00 from the revenue of the city; therefore my total 
returns are less than the amount collected by my predecessor, but by reference to the slip 
hereto attached you will note that I have exceeded the amount heretofore collected for licenses 
by the sum of $28,905.65. 

In conclusion permit me to sa,y that these results were obtained by a force greatly reduced 
numerically but of exceptional ability, thereby causing a saving to the city in salaries alone of 
the sum of $20,546.86 for a period of six months during my term of office. 

JOSEPH H. SCOTT, 

Tax Collector. 
LICENSES EXEMPTED BY CHARTER. 

Merchandise licenses 894,597 00 for fiscal year 1893 

Opium licenses 5,650 00 for fiscal year 1898 

Fireworks licenses 1,270 00 for fiscal year 1838 

Merchandise brokers', etc., about 3,000 00 for fiscal year 1 1898 



$104,517 00 

Total amount of licenses for 1893 504,556 25 

Less exempted licenses 104,517 00 



$400,039 25 



Total amount of licenses for 1899 $481,203 40 

Leas one-half exempted license for first six months 52,258 50 



$428,944 90 
400,039 25 



Amount in excess of year 1898 28,905 65 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



361 



CITY AND COUNTY AND STATE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES. 

FIRST INSTALLMENT. - 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


GRAND TOTAL. 








$2 325, ?38 77 


Taxes collected and paid to the Treasurer 




$2,310,451 91 




Property sold to the State for taxes of 189Q 


$4,191 86 






Property sold to the State for taxes of previous years 


4,863 47 






Property assessed to the Regents of the University of Cali- 


4,253 91 






Property withdrawn from sale under Section 3,806, Political 
Code 


409 83 








464 55 






Property of the City and County of San Francisco 
Property assessed to the Directors of the Deaf, Dumb anc 


322 90 
130 10 






Property in process of collection 


99 9? 






Partial payments amount still due. . 


50 02 


14,786 86 
















82,325,238 77 


2,325,238 77 



362 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



CITY AND COUNTY AND STATE REAL ESTATE TAXES. 

SECOND INSTALLMENT. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


GRAND TOTAL. 


Amount charged 






$9 325 238 76 


Taxes collected and paid to Treasurer 




2,367,197 32 




Property sold to the State for taxes of 1899 


7,116 57 






Property sold to State for taxes of previous years 


5,063 44 






Property assessed to the Rearents of the University of Cali- 
fornia 


4,253 91 






Property withdrawn from sale under Section No. 3,806, Politi- 
cal Code 


409 82 






Property enjoined from sale, order of Superior Court 
Property of the City and County of San Francisco 


464 55 
394 62 






Property assessed to the Directors of the Deaf, Dumb and 
Blind Asylum 


130 40 






Property in process of collection 


155 10 






Partial payments amount still due 


53 03 


18,041 44 
















$2,325,238 76 


2,325,238 76 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



CITY AND COUNTY AND STATE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES. 

SECURED AND UNSECURED. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


GRAND TOTAL. 








$1,477,930 41 


Taxes collected and paid to the Treasurer 




$1,083,338 84 




Property sold to the State for taxes of 1899 


$513 30 






Property sold to the State for taxes of previous years 
Property enjoined from sale, order of Superior Court 


1S4 13 

6,500 47 
265 33 






Property in process of collection 


44 42 






Property withdrawn from sale under Section No. 3,8()6, Politi- 
cal Code 


1 005 55 






Partial payments (tax on bonds declared illegal by Supreme 
Court) 


235 573 19 






Delinquent unsecured personal prop3rty taxes 


1 ^0 fiO*) 18 


394,591 57 
















81,477,930 41 


1,477,930 41 



364 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



PENALTIES. 

PERCENTAGES COLLECTED ON TAXES, FISCAL YEAR 



To amount charged on Personal Property Taxes, secured and un- 
securedPenalties 

To amount charged on Real Estate Taxes, first installment Penalties 

To amount charged oil Real Estate Taxes, second installment Pen- 
alties 

To amount collected in excess of amount charged 

By expenses collected and paid to Treasurer $9,025 77 

Ry 20 per cent on $394,591.57, delinquent on Personal Property Taxes 

(page No. 1) 78,918 31 

By 20 per cent on $14,786.86, delinquent on Real Estate Taxes, first 

instaliment (page No. 1) 2,957 37 

Ry 5 per cent on $18,041.44, delinquent on Real Estate Taxes, second 

installment (page No. 1) 90207 

By 20 per cent on $98,317.06, not collected on taxes from various banks 
in accordance with resolution of Board of Supervisors, said pen- 
alty having been previously charged 19,663 42 

By 5 per cent on $2,613.56, not collected on taxes from various banks 

(same conditions as above) 130 68 

By 15 per cent on $798.17, not collected on taxes from various banks 

(same conditions as above).... 119 70 



$100,316 25 
9,085 21 



2,277 49 
38 37 



$111 717 32 



$111,717 32 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



365 



ADDITIONAL AMOUNT PAID TREASURER. 





AMOUNT. 


AMOUNT. 






$17 662 51 


For taxes of previous years. . . . 


89,722 31 




For penalties on taxes of previous years. 


171 18 




For advertising taxes previous years 


402 56 




For advertising taxes of year ] 899 


1,113 50 




For deeds ... 


42 00 






453 00 




For duplicate and overpayment taxes 


5,757 % 












$17,662 51 


17,662 51 



RECAPITULATION. 



1 


AMOUNT. 


AMOUNT. 






$5,727,676 35 


From City, County and State Real Estate taxes 


$4,617,649 23 




From Personal Property Taxes, secured and unsecured 


1 083 338 84 






9 025 77 






9 893 49 






1 558 06 






453 00 






5,757 96 














5.727,676 35 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



OFFICE EXPENSES 

OF TAX AND LICENSE COLLECTORS, FROM JULY 1, 1899, TO JANUARY 8, 19CO. 



TAX COLLECTOK'S OFFICE. 

Salary of Tax Collector. Deputies and Clerks , 

Stationery $1 ,461 40 

Advertising 

Military Roll (paid to E. I. Sheehan) 2.300 00 

Cartage on coin 34 00 

Postage stamps, etc., etc 62 50 

Total expenses of Tax Collector's office 

LICENSE DEPARTMENT. 

Salary of License Collector, Deputies and Clerks $20,279 68 

Postage 77 00 

Horse hire 250 66 

Stationery 150 25 

Total expenses, Tax and License Collector, first half of the 
fiscal year 



27,817 81 



4,143 90 



$31,961 71 



20,757 59 



$52,719 30 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



367 



OFFICE EXPENSES 

OF TAX COLLECTOR UNDER NEW CHARTER, FROM JANUARY 8, 1900, TO JULY 1, 1900. 



Salary of Tax Collector. Deputies and Clerks $27,750 63 

Publishing Delinquent Tax List, 1899 3,667 59 

Stationery 

Advertising 

Cartage on coin 

Postage and stamps 

* Unable to secure desired information at present. 

RECAPITULATION. 

AMOUNT. 

Total expenses of Tax aid License Colleetors, first six months $52,719 30 

Total expenses of Tax Collector, last six months 31 ,418 22 



831.418 22 



$84,137 52 



368 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



LICENSES ISSUED 

BY JOSEPH H. SCOTT, TAX COLLECTOR, FROM JANUARY 8 TO JUNE 30, 1900. 



NUMBER 
ISSUED. 


CHARACTER OF LICENSES. 


TERM 
OF LICENSE. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL 
GENERAL FUND. 


22 


Merchandise license. 


'Quarterly.. 


$58 00 




53 


Bankers' license. . . 


Quarterly. . 


7,203 00 




132 


Brokers' license 


Quarterly. . 


992 00 




11 


Billiards license 


Quarterly. . 


226 00 




69 


Auctioneers' license 


Quarterly. . 


474 00 




120 


Livery stable license 


Quarterly. . 


480 00 




1 


Bowling allev licease 


Quarterly. 


6 00 




122 


Pawnbroker license.... 


Quarterly. 


3,782 00 




42 
52 
6 104 


Theater and show licenses 
Intelligence office licenbes 
Retail liquor licenses . . 


Yearly .... 
Quarterly. . 
Quarterly. . 


3,018 00 
832 00 
128,184 00 




3 49J 


Municipal license . . 


Quarterly 


26,164 60 




362 


Produce peddlers' license 
Basket peddlers' license 


Quarterly. . 


2,620 00 
1,948 00 






C3 r clery license 




32 00 




278 


Dog tags, licenses 


Yearly 


556 00 




227 


Dog tags (duplicate), license 


Yearly 


113 50 




^j 


Runners' badges, license 


Yearly 


16 50 




o qq-i 


Slot tags, license 




6,691 00 




4 


Fireworks license . 


Yearly 


40 00 




1 






2 50 




1 

2 

CO 


Street-work solicitors' badge, license . . . 
Opium dealers' license 
Deadly weapon license 


Quarterly. . 
Quarterly. . 
Yearly 


1 .50 
100 00 

204 00 






Gratuitous license 




' 




000 


Vehicle license. 


Yearly 


6,494 75 




1 100 


Vehicle numbers, license 




1,100 00 















REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



369 



LICENSES ISSUED BY TAX COLLECTOR-CONTINUED. 



NUMBER 
ISSUED. 


CHARACTER OF LICENSES. 


TERM 
OF LICENSE. 


AMOUHT. 


TOTAL 
GENERAL FUND. 


144 


Drivers' cards, license 




$144 00 




10 


Hack badges, license 




25 00 





46 
12 


Scavenger wagon, license 
Street railway license . 


Yearly 
Quarterly 


84 00 
4,123 75 














17,333 








$195,716 00 



370 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



CR. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


By amount paid City and County Treasury, as follows : 


$22,280 00 




February 


37,379 25 




March . . 


30,399 25 




April 


44,694 00 




May 


31,235 75 




June . . 


29,727 75 














sin.T.Tifi oo 



RECAPITULATION. 



Collected by Fred W. Lees, License Collector 

Collected hy Joseph H. Scott, Tax Collector 

Total collections from licenses, fiscal year 1899 



$285,487 40 
195,716 00 



481,203 40 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



371 



CITY AND COUNTY LICENSES ISSUED FROM JULY 1, 1899, T) JANUARY 8, 1900, 12 M. O'CLOCK. 



NUMBER 
ISSUED. 


CHARACTER OF LICENSES 


TERM 
OF LICENSE. 


GENERAL 
FUND. 


TOTAL AMOUNT. 


10,014 


Merchandise license 


Quarterly. . 


$41,211 00 




88 


Bankers' license 


Quarterly, . 


11,900 00 




145 


Brokers' license 


Quarterly. . 


955 00 




28 


Billiard license 


Quarterly. . 


530 00 




68 


Auctioneers' license 


Quarterly. . 


430 00 




131 


Livery stable license . . 


Quarterly. . 


393 00 




2 


Bowling alley license 


Quarterly. . 


10 00 




130 


Pawnbrokers' license 


Quarterly. . 


3,900 00 




89 


Theater and show license 


Yearly 


5,100 00 




45 


Intelligence office license 


Quarterly. . 


675 00 




4,433 


Retail liquor license 


Quarterly. . 


88,660 00 




2,242 


Grocery and liquor license. .. 


Quarterly. . 


44,840 00 














17,4J5 








198,604 00 




One dollar received on each of the above, 






17,415 00 


863 


Exemption Merchandise License 








183 


Exempt Lodging-house and Restaurant 
licenses 














MUNICIAAL 
. LICENSES. 




3 887 


Municipal license .... 


Quarterly. . 


$27,451 00 




318 


Produce peddlers' license 


Quarterly. . 


3,180 00 




257 


Basket peddlers' license 


Quarterly. . 


2,570 00 




3,132 


Dog tags, license 


Yearly 


6,264 00 




313 


Dog tags, duplicate, license . . 


Yearly 



156 50 




11 


Cyclery license. 


Quarterly. . 


44 00 




16 


Runners' badges license 




24 00 




5 


Fireworks, license 


Yearly 


50 00 




3,127 


Slot tags, license 


Quarterly. . 


9,048 00 















372 



REPORT OP TAX COLLECTOR. 



CITY AND COUNTY LICENSES ISSUED FROM JULY 1, 1899, TO JANUARY 8, 1900 CONTINUED. 



NUMBER 
ISSUED. 


CHABACTKR OF LICENSES. 


TERM 
OF LICENSE. 


MUNICIPAL 
LICENSES. 


TOTAL. 


2 


Guide badges license 


Yearly 


85 00 




48 




Quarterly. . 


3,300 00 




317 




































STREET 




' 






DEPARTMENT. 






Vehicle license 


Yearly 


$10,326 50 








Yearly 


744 00 




-I 00 




Yearly 


183 00 










62 50 




152 


Scavenger wagon license 


Yearly 


368 00 




17 


Street Railway license 


Quarterly. . 


5,691 50 


17,375 90 












4 5 223 








$285,487 49 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



373 



RECAPITULATION. 



NUMBER 
ISSUED. 



17,415 

11,433 

4,223 

863 

183 



34,117 



City and County Licenses, General Fund , 

City and County Licenses, Special Fee Fund 

Municipal Licenses, General Fund 

Street Department Licenses 

Exempt Merchandise Licenses 

Exempt Lodging-house and Restaurant Licenses. 

CR. 
By amount paid City and County Treasurer 



$198,604 00 
17,415 00 
52,092 50 
17,375 90 



$285,487 40 
285,487 40 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Payments to Treasurer as follows : 
1899 July 


$61,658 65 




August 


36,678 25 




September. .... 


40,599 00 




October 


55,392 00 




November . . . 


35,167 75 




December . 


36,689 50 




January 8, 1900 


19,302 25 

















ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIR: In compliance with Article XVI, Section 9, of the Charter, I herewith submit 
my annual report as City and County Assessor. 

On July 2d 1 delivered to Jno. A. Russell, Esq., Clerk of the Board, the assessment rolls, 
as required by law. The rolls show the assessment to be as follows (after corrections and 
changes made by the Board of Equalization). 

That you may better understand the work done in this office, I submit tables for three 
years, covering two years of my administration, 1899 and 1900, and one of my predecessor's, 
1898. As will be seen, the large increase in the assessment roll has been mainly on personal 
property. The apparent falling off of the roll in 1900 is due to a decision of the Supreme 
Court in April, 1900, declaring bonds of California corporations non-taxable. This decision 
struck off $19,000,000 of assessable property from the roll of 1899, which was nearly replaced 
by personal property added in 1900, that heretofore had escaped taxation. Notwithstanding 
the work incident to the increased assessment roll, the expenses of the office in 1900 was 
reduced about $25,000. 



ASSESSMENTS. 





1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


Land ... 


$189,559,834 00 


$189,215,050 00 


$190,380,155 00 


Improvements . 


93,529,150 00 


96,090,320 00 


98 054 000 00 


Personal Property 


68,695,110 00 


119,806,245 00 


113,990 747 00 










Total of roll . - 


$351 784,094 00 


$405 111,615 00 


$402 424 902 00 











COLLECTION OF TAXES. 





1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


On unsecured personal property 
On poll-taxes . . . 


$433,036 09 
73,604 00 


$526,608 18 
92 217 00 


$556,403 67 
96,263 00 










Total cash collection 


$506,604 09 


$618,825 18 


$852,666 67 











ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 



37* 



EXPENSES. 





1898. 


1899. 


1900. 




$4 000 00 


$4 000 00 


$4 000 00 


Salaries of deputies, regular 
Salaries of deputies, extra 


24,300 00 
72,910 00 


24,294 96 
79,394 86 


32,550 00 
47,999 92 


Rolls, stationery, block book?, etc 
Horse and buggy hire. 


2,543 63 
56750 


4,671 83 
44100 


1,800 00 
30000 




31 00 


30 50 








829 


829 










Total 


$104,35" 13 


8112,841 44 


$86,658 21 











Respectfully youra, 



WASHINGTON DODGE, 
Assessor of the City and County of San Francisco 



376 ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 



ASSESSOR'S STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE MECHANICAL 
AND MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 

OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

JUNE 30. 1900. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENT MANUFACTORIES-?." 
Men employed ........................ 150 | Value of manufactures ................ $300,000 

AIR COMPRESSOR MANUFACTORIES-5. 
Men employed ........................ 80 I Value of manufactures ............... $300,000 

ARTIFICIAL STONE MANUFACTORIES 33. 
Men employed ........................ 300 | Value of manufactures ................ $450,000 

ARCHITECTURAL IRON MANUFACTORIES-?. 
Men employed ........... ............ 70 | Value of manufactures ................ $175,000 

AXLE GREASE MANUFACTORIES 4. 
Menemployed ........................ 30 | Value of manufactures ............... $60,000 

BAG MANUFACTORIES (Jute and Hemp) 5. 

Men and boys employed .............. 100 j Value of manufactures ............... $650,000 

Girls employed .............. , ......... 40 I 



BAG MANUFACTORIES (Paper) 2. 

40 
Girls employed ........................ 20 



Men and boys employed .............. 40 I Value of manufactures ................ $60,000 

I 



BARREL MANUFAOTORIES-23. 
Men and boys employed ............... 320 | Value of manufactures .............. $600, 000 

BARBED WIRE AND WIRE NAIL MANUFACTORIKS-2. 
Men and boys employed ............... 75 | Value of manufactures ............... $150,000 

BEDDING AND UPHOLSTERING FACTORIES 16. 
Menemployed .................. . ..... 200 | Value of manufactures ................ $400,000 

BED SPRING MANUFACTORIES 2. 
Menemployed ..................... 27 I Value of manufactures ................ $80,000 



ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 377 

BELLOWS MANUFACTORIES-2. 
Men employed 10 | Value of manufactures. $20,000 

BELTING MANUFACTORIES-9. 
Men and boys employed 45 | Value of manufactures $160,000 

BILLIARD TABLE MANUFACTORIES 4. 

Men and boys employed 30 | Value of manufactures $60,000 

BOAT BUILDERS-12. 
Men employed 100 | Value of manufactures $100,000 

BOOK BINDERIES-34. 

Men, women, boys employed 800 I Value of manufactures 12,000,00 

BRASS FOUNDRIES 10. 
Men and boys employed 400 | Value of manufactures $850,000 

BOX MANUFACTORIES (Cigar) 5. 

Men, boys and girl (white) employed. 60 j Value of manufactures $60,000 

Chinese employed 80 I Value of manufactures $25,000 

BOX MANUFACTORIES (Paper) 10. 
Men, boys and girla employed 220 I Value of manufactures $190, 000 

BOX MANUFACTORIES (Wooden) 7. 
Men and boys employed 400 I Value of manufactures $600,000 

BREWERIES-35. 



Men employed 1,000 



Beer manufactured, barrels 600,000 



Hops consumed yearly, pounds 650,000 Aggregate value of product $3,500,000 

P.arley consumed yearly, tons 30,000 



BROOM MANUFACTORIES- 8. 

Men and boys employed 100 1 Value of manufactures $175,000 

Chinese employed .... 55 I 

BRUSH MANUFACTORIES-7. 
Men and boys employed 50 | Value of manufactures $100,000 



378 ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 

X 

CANDLE MANUFACTORIES-5. 

Men, boys and girls employed 60 | Value of manufactures $75,000 

CARRIAGE AND WAGON MANUFACTORIES 40. 

Men and boys employed 350 | Value of manufactures $350,000 

COFFEE, SPICE AND CHOCOLATE MANUFACTORIES-27. 
Men, boys and girls employed 250 | Value of manufactures $2,000,000 

CONFECTIONERY MANUFACTORIES- 20. 

Men, boys and girls employed 400 | Value of manufactures $700,000 

CIDER MANUFACTORIES-5. 
Men employed 23 I Value of manufactures $15,000 

CIGAR MANUFACTORIES-315. 

Men, women and boys (white) em- i Cigars manufactured 54,810,20 

ployed 359 Cigarettes manufactured 7.410, 5CO 

Chineie employed 600 ' Value of manufactures $1,750,000 

CRACKER MANUFACTORIES-3. 

Men, boys and girls employed 300 | Value of manufactures $1.5:10,000 

CAR MANUFACTORIES-4. 

Men emyloyed 80 | Value of manufactures 8150,000 

I 

CHEMICAL WORKS-6. 

Men employed 100 i Value of manufactures 1,500,000 

Chin CM employed 40 ! 

CLOTHING MANUFACTORIES-30. 

Men, women and boys employed (white) 800 i Chinese employed 250 

I Value of manufactures $1,500,000 

COPPERSMITHS 12. 

Men and boys employed 50 | Value of manufactures $100,COO 

CORDAGE AND ROPE FACTORIES 2. 
Men, boys and giris employed 250 | Value of manufactures $700,000 



ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 



379 



CLOAK MANUFACTORIES-3Q. 
Women employed . 700 I Value of manufactures $500,000 

COFFIN MANUFACTORIES-3. 

Men and boys employed 50 I Value of manufacturer $150,000 

CUTLERY MANUFACTORIES 4. 

Men employed 40 I Value of manufactures $35,600 

DRY DOCKS tFLOATING)-2. 

Men employed 60 I Capacity of docks 1st. 4,500 tons 

2d, 2,000 tons 6,500 

DRY DOCKS (STONE)-l. 

Length of excavation in rock, feet . .*. . 490 . Capacity of drawing, feet 22 

Width of top, feet 120 Capacity of pumps for cleaning per 

Capacity of length 425 hour, cubic feet 326,316 

Total cost of work $675,000 

ELECTRIC-MACHINE WORKS-4. 
Men employed 300 | Value of manuactures $400,000 

ELECTRIC-LIGHTING COMPANIES-6. 

Men and boys employed...- 1,000 i Horse-power of motors 15,000 

Number of incandescent lights 120,000 Coal used, tons 75,000 

Number of arc lights 5,000 I Value of manufactures $3,000,000 



Men employed. 



ELECTRIC SUPPLY MANUFACTORIES 17. 

160 | Value of manufactures $310,000 



Men and boys employed. 



ELEVATOR MANUFACTORIES- 3. 

80 | Value of manufactures $150,000- 



FERTILIZER MANUFACTORIES -8. 

Men and boys employed...., 100 I Value of manufactures $330,000 



Men and boys employed 
Chinese employed 



FIRE-WORKS MANUFACTORIES-1. 



10 



Value of manufactories 



40.000 



FLOUR, FEED AND MEAL MILLS -11. 
Men and boys employed 300 I Value of manufactures $2,5CO,000 



380 ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 

FOUNDRIES AND MACHINE WORKS-45. 
Men and boys employed. .'. . 4/000 i Value of manufactures 86,000,000 

FRINGE MANUFACTORIES-*. 
Men and women employed 125 ) Value of manufactures $14,000 

FRUIT CANNING AND PRESERVING FACTORIES-9. 



Men, women and boys employed 2,050 

Chinese employed 200 



Value of fruits, vegetables and meats $3,000,000 



FUR MANUFACTORIES-6. 
Men and women and employed MO I Value of manufactures $310,000 

GAS WORKS-3. 



Menemployed 1,000 | Value of manufactures 3,000,000 

GAS-ENGINE WORKS-5. 
Menemployed 50 I Value of manufactures 150.000 

GLASS WORKS 15. 

Men and boys employed 175 , | Value of manufactures $1,300,000 

GLASS STAINING, CUTTING AND BENDING WORKS-5. 
Men and boys employed 50 | Value of product $200,000 

GLOVE MANUFACTORIES-19. 

Men, boys and women employed 450 | Value of manufactures 8500,000 

GLUE MANUiTACTORIES-2. 

Men and boys employed 25 I Value of manufactures.- , $75,000 

GLYCERINE MANUFACTORIES 2. 
Menemployed 10 | Value of product $25,000 

HARNESS MANUFACTORIES-32. 

Men and boys employed 250 I Value of manufactures $500,000 

HAT AND CAP MANUFACTORIES-8. 
Men and women employed .-. 160 | Value of manufactures 410,000 



ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 381 

ICE MANUFACTORIES 4. 
Men employed 100 I Value of product $200,000 

INK AND MUCILAGE MANUFACTORIES-l. 
Men employed 14 | Value of product $40,000 

IRON-FENCE MAMUFACTORIES-4. 

Men and boys tmployed 22 | Value of manufactures $40,000 

JAPANNING AND GALVANIZING FACTORIES 3. 

Men and boys employed 40 | Valua of manufactures $110,000 

JEWELRY AND SILVERWARE MA.NUFACTORIES-29. 
Men employed 152 | Value of manufactures 



LAUNDRIES (WHITE, 131; CHINESE, 170)-290. 
Men, women and boys empl'y'd (white) 1,500 I Chinese employed 950 

LAST MANUFACTORIES 3. 
Men employed 14 | Value of manufactures $15,000 

LEAD PIPE AND SHOT FACTORY-1. 
Men employed 60 I Value of manufactures $500,000 

LINSEED-OIL WORKS -1. 

Men employed 60 | Value of product. $170.000 

MACARONI AND VERMICELLI FACTORIES-12. 
Men and boys employed 150 | Value of manufactures $130.000 

MALT HOUSES-5. 

Men employed , 70 | Value of manufactures $512,000 

MARBLE WORKS-20. 
Men and boys employed 100 | Value of product $200,000 

MATCH FACTORIES-4. 

Men and boys employed 60 j Value of manufactures $50,000 

Chinese employed 20 I 



382 ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 

MILLINERY MANUFACTORIES - 100. 
Women employed 600 I Value of product $800,COO 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT MANUFACTORIES 14. 

Men and boys employed 50 I Value of manufactures $100,000 

NEATSFOOT OIL MANUFACTORIES 1. 
Men employed 5 | Value of manufactures $5, 000 

OAKUM MANUFACTORIES-1. 
Men employed 20 | Value of manufactures $20,000 

PAINT MANUFACTORIES-?. 
Men and boys employed 65 | Value of product 575,000 

PICTURE FRAME MANUFACTORIES-9. 
Men and boys employed 220 I Value of product . 200,000 

PUMP AND PUMPING MACHINERY MANUFACTORIES-11. 

Menemployed : 60 | Value of product $310,000 

PROVISION PACKING HOUSES-5. 

Menemployed 600 | Value of pro'luct $2,500,000 

RUBBER MANUFACTORIES-3. 

Menemployed 100 | Value of manufactures $300.000 

RUBBER STAMP MANUFACTORIES 12. 

Men and boys employed 60 | Value of product $50,000 

SAFE AND VAULT WORKS-?. 
Menemployed i'O | Value of manufactures $100,000 

SAW AND PLANING MILLS- 14. 
Men and boys employed 503 | Value of product $600,000 

SHIRT MANUFACTORIES-38. 

Men, women and boys employed 700 | Value of manufactures $1,230,000 

Chinese employed 1,000 I 

SAW MANUFACTORIES-9. 
Men employed 40 | Value of manufactures $125,000 



ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 383 

SASH, DOOR AND BLIND FACTORIES 10. 
Men and boys employed 203 | Value of manufactures 8300,000 

SHIP YARDS-6. 
Men employed 400 | Value of product $2,500,000 

SALT WORKS 4. 
Men and boys employed. 50 I Value of product 3100,000 

SHOE FACTORIES -10. 

Men and boys employed 4CO I Value of manufactures $1,500,000 

Chinese employed.' 100 I 

Girls employed 150 | 

SOAP FACTORIES 14. 

Men employed ... 100 I Value of manufactures $450,000 

Soap made annually, pounds 9,000,000 I 

SODA WATER WORKS -11. 
Men employed 70 | Value of manufactures $150,000 

SOLDER AND BABBITT WORKS- -3. 
Men employed 35 I Value of manufactures $30,000 

SHOW-CASE FACTORIES 4. 
Men employed 15 | Value of product $20,000 

SUGAR REFINERIES-1. 



Men and boys employed 63') 

Sugar (raw) used, pounds 368,379,880 

Sugar (white) made, pounds 338,434,435 



Sugar (yellow) made, pounds 12,886,050 

Syrup made, gallons 621,740 

Value of manufactures $14,211,516 



SYRUP AND CORDIAL FACTORIES-4. 

Men employed 25 I Value of manufactures $25,000 

TANNERIES, HIDES-20. 
Men employed 200 | Value of manufactures $1,200,000 

TANNERIES OF SHEEP SKINS-3. 

Men employed 90 | Value of product $150,000 



384 ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 

TINWARE AND TIN-CAN FACTORIES-8. 
Men and boys employed 600 | Value of manufactures 1,500,000 

TRUNK MANUFACTORIES-20. 
Men and boys employed 60 | Value of product $125,000 

TYPE FOUNDRIES-4. 

Men employed 110 | Value of manufactures $70,000 

TANK MANUFACTORIES-23. 
Men employed 25 | Value of product S50.COO 

VARNISH MANUFACTORIES-5. 
Men employed 16 I Value of manufactures $60,000 

VENEERING MANUFACTORIES 1. 
Men employed 30 I Value of product .$50,000 

VINEGAR AND PICKLE FACTORIES-10. 

Men and boys employed 100 ' Value of manufactures $150,000 

WHITE-LEAD MANUFACTORIES-3. 

Men employed 60 | Value of manufactures $275,000 

WIND-MILL MANUFACTORIES-5. 
Men employed 40 | Value of manufactures 50,000 

WIRE AND WIRE-ROPE MANUFACTORIES-2. 
Men employed 200 | Value of manufactures $1,000,080 

WILLOW AND WOODEN-WARE MANUFACTORIES-3. 

Men employed 40 I Value of manufactures 80,000 

WOOLEN MILLS-1. 

Men, women and boys employed 125 I Value of product 350,000 

Chinese employed 2C I 



ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 385 

WHIP MANUFACTORIES-2. 
Men, women and boys employed 9 | Value of manufactures $14,000 

WOOD-TURNING AND CARVING MANUFACTORIES-9. 
Men and women employed 120 I Value of product f 100,000 

WATER-WHEEL MANUFACTORIES-2. 

Men employed 60 | Value of manufactures $275,000 

WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERWEAR MANUFACTORIES-16. 

Women employed 150 I Value of product $200,000 

Chinese employed 500 | 

WOOL SCOURING AND GRADING HOUSES-9. 



Men and women employed 300 

Wool produced, pounds 36,500,000 

25 



Wool scoured, pounds 125,000,000 

Value of product $2.000,000 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S REPORT. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 30, 1900. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

SIR: In pursuance with Section 9 of Article XVI of the Charter of the City and 
County of San Francisco, I have the honor to herewith submit the report of the District 
Attorney's office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, only a portion of which time includes 
my incumbency of the office. 

The report shows in detail that during the said fiscal year there have been received 284 
felony cases, and that there were 163 cases pending for trial June 30, 1899. There have been 
165 convictions and 50 acquittals. 

There have been 129 writs of habeas corpus issued during the year, and 6 were pending 
June 30, 1899. Of these, 6 were denied, 39 granted, 61 dismissed, 3 off calendar, 1 withdrawn 
and 25 were pending June 30, 1900. 

There were received during the fiscal year 115 appealed cases from the Police Court, and 
19 were pending June 30, 1899. Of these 33 were affirmed, 66 reversed, 7 dismissed, 1 modified 
and 27 are pending. 

The District Attorney's report necessarily contains a great deal of what may be considered 
dead matter, as, of the cases reported pending, a great number have been carried along for 
years where defendants have been sentenced on other charges, are fugitives from justice, 
insane, etc. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LEWIS F. BYINGTON, 

District Attorney. 



REPORT OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 387 



WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS. 

Old writs carried over in previous reports, undisposed of but now dead 26 

Other writs pending June 30, 1899 6 

Writs issued during thj year ending June 39, 1900 129 

Writs granted 39 

Writs dismissed and petitioners remanded 10 

Writs dismissed and petitioners discharged 9 

Writs dismissed 42 

Writs denied and petitioners remanded 3 

Writs withdrawn 1 

Writs denied 3 

Writs off calendar 3 

Writs pending June 30, 1900 25 

Old writs carried over in previous reports, undisposed of but now dead 26 

161 161 

CRIMES AGAINST INCORRIGIBLE MINORS OTHER THAN ON FELONY 
INFORMATIONS. 

Complaints filed during the year ending June 30, 1900 13 

Committed to Whittier State School 10 

Committed to Preston State School 1 

Committed to Boys and Girls' Aid Society 1 

Petitions for commitnr ent to Whittier State School denied 

Pending June 30, 1900 1 

13 13 
APPEALS FROM POLICE COURT. 

Appeals pending June 30, 1899 19 

Appeals filed during the year ending June 30, 1900 115 

Judgments affirmed 31 

Judgments affirmed and dismissed 1 

Judgments affirmed and modified 1 

Judgments modified. . . 1 

Judgments dismissed 3 

Judgments dismissed for want of prosecution 4 

Judgments dismissed on account of death of appallant 

Judgments reversed and cause dismissed 66 

Judgments reversed and new trial ordered 

Pending June 30, 1900 27 

134 134 



REPORT OP DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 
GENERAL RECAPITULATION. 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants discharged on their own 

recognizance 241 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants sentenced on other 

charges 202 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants insane 25 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendant minors in industrial schools 3 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants fugitives from justice 182 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants for examination 1 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants found guilty but not sen- 
tenced 1 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants convicted and judgment 

suspended 28 

Cases reported pending July 1, 1899, against defendants for trial 163 

Cases received during the year ending June 30, 19*. 284 

Writs of habeas corpus pending July 1, 1899 6 

Writs of habeas corpus issued during the year ending June 30. 1900 129 

Proceedings against incorrigible minors received during the year ending June 30, 

1900 13 

Appeals from Police Court pending July 1, 1899 19 

Appeals from Police Courts filed during the year ending June 30, 1900 115 

Convicted as charged 105 

Convicted of Jesser offense 57 

Convicted of misdemeanor 3 

Acquitted 50 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments affirmed . . 31 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments affirmed and dismissed 1 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments affirmed and modified 1 

Appeals from Police Court - Judgments modified 1 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments dismissed 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments dismissed for want of prosecution 4 

Appeals from Police Court Judgments reversed and cause dismissed 66 

Appeals from Police Court-Pending June 30. 19DO 27 

Writs of habeas corpus Granted 39 

Writs of habeas corpus Writs dismissed and petitioners remanded 10 

Writs of habeas corpus Writs dismissed and petitioners discharged 

Writs of habeas corpus-Dismissed 42 

Writs of habeas corpus Denied and prisoners remanded 

Writs of habeas corpus Withdrawn 

Writs of habeas corpus Denied 

Writs of habeas corpus Off calendar 

Writs of habeas corpus Pending June 30, 1900 

Incorrigibles committed to Whittier State School 10 

Incorrigibles committed to Preston State School 1 



REPORT OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 389 
RECAPITULATION CONCLUDED. 

Incorrigibles committed to Boys and Girls' Aid Society 1 

Incorrigibles pending June 30, 1900 1 

Dismissed no evidence to convict 32 

Dismissed defendants sentenced on other charges , 7 

Dismissed in furtherance of justice 1 

Dismissed on habeas corpus 10 

Dismissed on demurrer 3 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants discharged on their own recognizance. . . 249 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants sentenced on other charges 202 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants insane 29 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants minors in industrial schools 2 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants fugitives from justice 184 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants for examination 1 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants committed to reform schools on other 

charges 3 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants convicted and judgment suspended. ... 29 

Pending June 30, 1900, against defendants for trial 163 

1,412 1,41 



390 



REPORT OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 



DISPOSITION OF CRIMINAL CASES FOR THE 



OFFENSES CHARGED. 



Abduction 

Arson 

Assault by means and force likely to produce great bodily injury. . . 

Adultery 

Assault with a deadly weapon 1 

Assault with intent to commit murder 

Assault with intenf to commit rape 

Assault with intent to commit robbery 

Attempt to commit burglary 3 

Attempt to extort 

Attempt to commit grand larceny 

Attempt to commit infamous crime against nature 1 

Attempt to commit mayhem 

Attempt to rescue prisoners 

Bigamy 

Birrglary 15 

Child stealing , 

Conspiracy Misdemeanor 

Crime against nature 

Destroying telegraph message 

Embezzlement 

Extortion . . , 



REPORT OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 



391 



FISCAL YEAK ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



CONVICTED. 


Acquitted 


DISMISSED. 


PENDING. 




As charged 


2 

1 
1 

v; 


Of misdemeanor 


No evidence to convict. . . . 


Defendants sentenced c 
other charges 


Defendants dead 


In furtherance of justice. 




D 

ET 


On demurrer 


Defendants discharged c 
own recognizance 


Against defend'ts sentence 
on other charges 


Against defendants insane 


Against minors in Industri 
School 


Ag'nst fugitives from justice 


For trial June 30, 1900 















3 


fr 


































3 

1 
8 
1 
14 
9 
1 
1 


1 
1 

8 
5 

1 


3 
4 
17 
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64 
64 
10 
17 
15 
3 
4 
2 
1 
1 
4 
270 
2 
2 
11 
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74 
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4 












4 
































4 
8 
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4 
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14 
16 





4 
6 


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11 
9 
4 
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2 
5 
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1 
















































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43 
















9 




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13 


2 


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86 

9 


75 


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14 












































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18 






21 


24 
4 

















































392 



REPORT OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 



DISPOSITION OF 



OFFENSES CHARGED. 



Felony under Section 51, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 115, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 5;22, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 266, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 470, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 475, Penal Code 

Felon y under Section 476, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 479, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 564, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 587, Penal Code 

Felony under Section 596, Penal Code ! 

Felony under Section 22, Purity of Elections Act 

Felony under Section 2 1 ), Purity of Elections Act 

Felony under Act of March 23, 1893 

Forgery 

Fraudulently concealing property 

Gaming 

Grand Larceny 9 

Incest 

Libel 

Manslaughter 4 

Mayhem 



REPORT OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 



CRIMINAL CASES CONTINUED. 



CONVICTED. 


Acquitted 


DISMISSED. 


PENDING. 




As charged 


Of lesser offense felony 


Of misdemeanor 


No evidence to convict 


Defendants sentenced on 
other charges 


Defendants dead 


Tn furtherance of justice. . . 


On habeas corpus 


On demurrer 


Defendants discharged on 
their own recognizance . . 


Against defend'ts sentenced 
on other charges 


Against defendants insane. . 


Against minors in Industrial 
School 


I 
8 


For trial June 30 ; 1900 
































3 


S 

1 
3 
1 
2 
9> 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

a 

i 

76 
2 

4 

isa 

i 

6 

a 


1 
















































1 


















2 






















l 
































1 






















* 


2 




























1 


3 






3 
1 
1 


2 














































































1 




































2 
























1 






































3 
























1 








5 











1 


1 


... 




i 




17 
1 


30 


4 




1 


10 

4 

15 

7 
3 
2 






























16 


5 


2 


13 


11 












39 


36 


1 




35 

1 




















I 












3 

1 
1 


3 
1 


1 










1 

























































394 



REPORT OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 



DISPOSITION OF 





5 




C 




o 


o 2 


o 

B 






n 5 

"1 


i 
i 

Bk 




a 

* 


3 


P 

= 




1 


Cg 




OFFENSES CHARGED. 




* ? 


I 




: 





5 




: 


5 


3^ 






? 


1 






: o 

r 


| 










Murder . . 
















Perjury . . .. 








Petit larceny second offense 








Rape 






1 










Robbery .... 








Seduction under promise of marriage 








Subornation of perjur}" 
















Final Totals . 


i 


3 


29 











REPORT OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 



395 






CRIMINAL CASES CONCLUDED. 



CONVICTED. 


Acquitted 


DISMISSED. 


PENDING. 


1* 


As charged 


Of lesser offense felony. . . 


Of misdemeanor 


No evidence to convict 


Defendants sentenced on 
other charges 


Defendants dead 


In furtherance of justice. . . 


O 

3 

i 




a 

I 


Defendants discharged on 
own recognizance 


Against defend'ts sentenced 
on other charges 


Against defendants insane . . 


Against minors in Industrial 
School 


Ag'nst fugitives from justice 


For trial June 30, 1900 


1 
2 
1 


1 
7 














i 




1 










1 
10 

8 
17 


5 
53 
41 
37 
12 
17 
12 
53 
8 
1 




6 
1 


5 
1 
1 












1 
4 
8 
4 


1 
2 
2 
2 


8 


.... 


10 
23 
11 










i 


3 












2 




2 
3 
1 
3 




















9 




1 














3 
5 

7 
1 


3 

4 
5 

1 












1 












2 






6 




2 






2 








































105 






I 5 




7 






10 












184 


57 


9 


32 




1 


3 


249 


202 


29 


' 


163 


1130 






CORONER'S REPORT. 



SAN FRANCISCO, June 30, 1900. 

To the Honorable Jas. D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIR : Pursuant to the provisions of Section 9, Article XVI, of the Charter of the 
City and County of San Francisco, I herewith submit to you my report of the operations of the 
Coroner's office during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

In this connection I desire to express my appreciation of the action of the Honorable Board of 
Supervisors, providing a matron for this office, as being in furtherance of public decency and 
morals. 

Yours, respectfully, 

R. BEVERLY COLE, 

Coroner. 



TABLE No. 1. 

NUMBER OF CASES REPORTED, INQUESTS HELD AND AUTOPSIES MADE. 



MONTHS. 


DEATHS. 


INQUESTS. 


AUTOPSIES. 


1899 July 


74 


62 


55 


August 
September 
October 


87 
75 
76 
76 


44 
33 

32 
25 


63 
55 
56 
5=> 




98 


40 


57 




79 


36 


64 




85 


33 


78 


March . 


79 


39 


75 




78 


37 


76 


May.. 


72 


33 


59 


June . 


69 


35 


64 












948 


419 


754 



CORONER'S REPORT. 



397 



TABLE No. 2. 

SUICIDES. 



SUICIDES. 


NUMBER. 


TOTAL. 


Color- 
Black 


1 




White 


162 




Yellow . 


8 










Sex- 
Female . . 


32 


171 


Ma'e 


139 










Condition 


2 




Married 


81 






55 




Unknown 


22 




Widow 


1 




Widower , , . . . .... 


10 








171 


Religion 
Christian ... 


130 




Infidel . 


20 




Jewish ... 


7 






8 




Unknown 


6 














171 



NATIVITY. 



Austria 


1 






1 


Norway. 


China 


7 


Peru . . . 










9 


Russia 


Finland 


1 


Scotland 






Sweden 




29 


Switzerland 


Ireland 




United States . . . 


Italy 


4 


Unknown 


Japan 






Total 







3 
2 
2 
1 
3 
1 
S 
3 
65 
20 

171 



398 



CORONER'S REPORT. 



TABLE No. 2 CONTINUED. 
CAUSES. 





.. . 4 




4 




] 


Sickne-s 


26 




1 




7 


Grief 


1 


Unrequited love 


1 




10 






Total... 






.. 171 



OCCUPATIONS OF SUICIDES. 



OCCUPATION. 


NUMBER. 


OCCUPATION. 


NUMBER. 


Actor 


1 


Journalist . 


1 


Agent 


4 


Laborer 




Baker. 


3 




3 


Barber 


1 


Letter carrier 




Barkeeper 




Merchant 




Blacksmith. . . .... 




Messenger . . 






1 


Milkman 






2 


Millman 






4 


Miner ... . .... 






1 




9 


Butcher. . , 


2 


Operator ... . 




Butler. .. .. 


1 


Painter 


2 


Brewer ... 


1 


Peddler 


1 


Capitalist. 


6 


Plasterer 


1 




1 


Porter.. 


2 


Cabinet-maker 


1 


j Photographer 


1 


Clerk. . ... 


8 


1 Printer 


2 


Coal dealer 


1 


j Hockman 


1 


Compositor 


1 


Sack dealer 


1 


Conductor 


1 


Salesman 


2 


Cook 


3 


Saloon keeper 


1 




1 


Sawdust dealer 


1 




3 




3 




2 




1 


Druggist. 


1 




3 




1 


Soldier 


2 




1 


Stableman 


1 




1 


Student 


1 


Engineer 


1 
1 


Sugar refiner 
Tailor 


1 
2 




1 


Teamster 


1 


Fitter 


1 


Telegraph operator 


2 




1 


Unknown . 


10 




1 


Upholsterer 


1 




21 


Waiter 


1 




1 


Watchmaker 


1 




2 










Total 


1T1 



CORONER'S REPORT. 



399 



TABLE No. 3. 

MORTUARY TABLE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



CAUSE OF DEATH. 

* 


1 Justifiable 
HomirM . 


Murder.... 


Accident. . . 


Suicides 


Natural..." 


Unknown.. 


| 






7 










^ 


Abortion (self-induced) 






(i 






9 


s 


Asphvxia (""as) .... 






> 


24 






50 


Asphyxia (submersion) 






17 


14 




11 


4 9 








4 


1 






5 






1 


8 








9 


Concussion of brain 






11 








11 


Fracture of humerus 






2 








2 


Fracture of ribs 






4 


] 






5 


Fracture of skull . .'. 






56 


<> 


.... 


a 


60 


Fracture of spine 






4 








4 




2 


23 


3 


41 






an 


Hanging.. 








20 






20 






1 


23 










Knife wounds 


1 


5 


1 


g 






19 


Natural causes 










48fi 




486 


Premature birth 












10 


19 


Shook (violence) . . 




j 


24 


1 






26 


Unknown 












10 


10 


Poisons- 
Alcohol 






1 








1 


Alcohol (wood) 






1 








1 


Arsenic 






1 


1 






2 


Carbolic acid 
















Chloroform 






1 










Cyanide of potassium 








s 






g 


Laudanum 








1 






1 


Lysol 








3 






3 


Morphine 






3 


10 

























400 



CORONER'S REPORT. 



TABLE No. 3 CONCLUDED. 



CAUSE OF DEATH. 


Justifiabl 
Homicide 


1 Murder.. 


Accident 


1 Suicides. 


Natural . 


Unknown 


I 


* 
















(Poisons 
















Muriatic acid 








1 






1 


Opium 






2 


3 






5 


Phosphorus 






1 










Rough on rats ' 








1 






1 


Strj'chnine. 














5 




3 


38 


904 


179, 


486 


45 


948 



















The following expenses were incurred in the prosecution of duties of the office: 

Recovering 42 bodies from bay $420 00 

Interpreter's Fees, first six months 12 50 



Boat hire 10 00 

Chemical analysis, first six months 100 00 

Expert on fire-arms 10 00 



Total *. $55250 



REPORT 



BOARD OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



HEADQUARTERS FIRE DEPARTMENT, ) 

OFFICE BOARD OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS V 

CITY HALL. ) 

San Francisco, July 1, 1900. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: In compliar.cs with Section 9 of Article XVI of the Charter of the 
city and county of San Francisco, the Board of Fire Commissioners herewith 
present* and submit their report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The Fire Department, as now constituted, consists of a Board of Commis- 
sioners of four members, a Secretary, a Chief Engineer, one First Assistant 
Chief Engineer, one Second Assistant Chief Engineer, seven Battalion Chiefs, 
thirty-six Engine Companies, eight Hook-and-Ladder Companies, seven Chemical 
Companies, one Water Tower Company, two Monitor Battery Companies, two Re- 
lief Engine Companies, and employees of the Office, Corporation Yard and De- 
partment Stables, numbering all told 470 men, of whom 432 are uniformed. 

Prior to February 1, 1900, the Department consisted of a fores of 572 mem- 
bers, 356 of whom were "call members." On that date the Department was re- 
organized according to the provisions of the Charter. Such members of the De- 
partment as could not be utilized at the time of reorganization were placed on 
the "Temporarily Discharged" or "Waiting List." From this list all vacancies 
in the Department have been and will be filled until the list is exhausted. 

26 



402 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



DETAILS OF ORGANIZATION. 

(Salaries fixed by Charter.) 
OFFICE. 



NO. 


POSITION. 


SALARY 
PER ANNUM. 


4 


Commissioners, each . 


81,200 00 


1 




2,400 00 


1 


UNIFORMED FORCE, 
Chief Engineer 


4,000 00 


1 


First Assistant Chief Engineer 


3, COO 00 


1 


Second Assistant Chief Engineer 


2,400 00 


7 


Battalion Chiefs, each 


2,100 00 


35 


Captains of Engine Companies "each . . 


1.440 CO 


35 


Lieutenapts of Engine Companies each 


1,200 00 


S6 


Engineers of Engine Companies, each 


1,350 00 


36 


Drivers of Fn"ine Companies each 


960 00 


36 


Stokers of Engine Companies each 


963 00 


131 


Hosemen of Engine Companies each .. 


960 00 


- 


Captains of Hook and Ladder Companies each 


1,440 0# 


g 


Lieutenants of Hook and Ladder Companies each 


1,200 00 


8 


Drivers of Hook and Ladder Companies each 


960 00 


g 




960 00 


53 


Truckmen of Hook and Ladder Companies each . . . .. 


960 00 


7 


Captains of Chemical Engine Companies each 


1,440 00 


7 


Lieutenants of Chemical Engine Companies each . . . 


1,200 00 


7 


Drivers . . 


960 00 


7 


Hosemen of Chemical Engine Companies each 


960 00 


1 


Captain Water Tower Company. ... 


1,440 00 


1 


Driver Water Tower Company 


960 00 


1 


Hoseman Water Tower Company 


960 00 


2 


Drivers Monitor Battery Companies, each 


960 00 


2 




1,440 00 









REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



403 



DETAILS OF ORGANIZATION -CONTINUED. 



NO. 


POSITION. 


SALARY 
PER ANNUM. 


2 


Lieutenants Relief Engine Companies each 


$1,200 00 


2 


Hosemen Relief Engine Companies each 


960 00 


1 


CORPORATION YARD EMPLOYEES. 

Superintendent of Engines 


1,800 00 


1 


Clerk and Commissary 


1,500 00 


3 


Ilvdrantmen, each 


1,080 00 


2 


Draymen, each 


900 00 


2 


Watchmen, each. 


900 00 


1 


DEPARTMENT STABLES, 
superintendent of Horses 


1 200 00 


6 


Hostlers each 


720 00 









Under the provisions of the Charter Drivers, Stokers, Tillermen, Hosemen and 
Truckmen receive $960 per annum for th3 first year's service, $1,080 for the 
second year and $1,200 for the third year and thereafter. 



404 REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



MEMBERS AND EMPLOYEES 



BOARD OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 

ROLLA V. WATT, President Term expires January 8, 1904 

JOHN H. GRADY , Term expires January 8, 1903 

J. C. McKINSTRY Term expires January 8, 1902 

M. H. HECHT Term expires January 8, 1901 

J. W. MCCARTHY Secretary of Board. 



OFFICERS. 

D. T. SULLIVAN Chief Engineer. 

JOHN DOUGHKRTY First Assistant Chief Engineer. 

P. H. SIIAUGIISKSSY Second Assistant Chief Engineer 

M. J. DOLAN Battalion Chief. 

JOHN WILLS Battalion Chief. 

WILLIAM WATERS Battalion Chief. 

E. F. McKiTTRiCK Battalion Chief. 

T. M. FBRNANDKZ Battalion Chief. 

J. J. CONLON Battalion Chief. 

JOHN MCCLUSKEY.. . Battalion Chief. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 

COMPANIES. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 
Location No. 419 Pacittc street. 



405 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 


J J Callen 




E Gillig 


Engineer 








Stoker 


Joseph H O'Brien 








Thomas Coleman 


Hoseman. . ... . 


David M Caselli 


Huseman 


Charles Tyson 


Hoseman 


August Banker. 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 2. 
Location No. 410 Bush street. 



RANK. 


NAMKS. 


Captain 


Michael Boden. 


Lieutenant . 


Charles F. Ward. 




Charles Murray. 


Driver .... ... 


John Johnson. 


Stoker ... . . . 


Charles Schemel. 




Matthew McLaughlin. 




Frank Dougherty. 




G. W. Dinan. 




E. L. Raffestin. 




James Walsh. 







406 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 3. 
Location No. 1317 California street. 



RAXK. 


NAMK8. 


Captain 
Lieutenant . . 


Thomas Magner. 
Walter Cline 


Engineer 


T. J. Canovan. 


Driver 


Joseph Stevens 


Stoker . . ... 


William Byrnes 


Hoseman 
Hosenaan 


Benjamin Currier. 
S S Powell 


Hoseman ... 


Myrtle Yehl 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 4. 
Location No. 144 Second street. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 
Engineer . . 

Driver 

Stoker 

Hoseman . 
Hoseman.. . 
Hoseman.. . 
Hoseman... 
Hoseman. . 



John Wilson. 
N. N. Matheson. 
Michael O'Connell. 
Maurice Hallinan. 
Edward Lennon. 
James Minigan. 
Charles Dakin. 
Bernard Donnelly. 
Edward Downes. 
F. H. Kenny. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



407 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 5. 
Location No. 1219 Stockton street. 



NAMES. 



Captain 


J. J. Mahoney. 




David Harrison 


Engineer .... . . 


Thomas Coogan. 


Driver 


Robert Malburg. 


Stoker 


D F Buckley. 


Hoseman .... 


Paul DeMartini. 




A Isaacs 


Hoseman 


George Van Poon. 


Hoseman.. 


Robert McShane. 


Hoseman ;. 


David Levy. 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 6. 
Location No. 311 Sixth street. 



Captain 


John Conroy. 




Julius DeMeyer. 


Engineer. . 


P. H. Brandon. 




Joseph McDonald. 


Stoker 


Charles Neil. 


Hoseman , 


John Titus. 




Edward Daunet. 


Hoseman . . 


Patrick Sullivan. 




Thomas Parker. 




Joseph Bailey. 







408 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 7. 
Location No. 3160 Sixteenth street. 



RANK. 




NAMES. 


Captain 


Arthur Welch 


Lieutenant 


Samuel E Kennard 


Engineer 


M. J Rodriguez 


Driver 




Stoker 


John Allen 


Hoseman 


Charles Malloy 


Hoseman 


J M Rojas 


Hoseman 


William Smith 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 8. 
Location No. 1648 Pacific avenue. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 




Stephen Russell 


Lieutenant . . .... 


W W Willis 


Engineer 


Edward Culli"-an 






Stoker . ... . . 


Charles Gallatin 


Hoseman 


Mathew Brown 


Hoseman. 


Stephen Balk 


Hoseman. . . . . 


Daniel Coughlin. 







REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



409 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 9. 
Location No. 320 Main street. 



II 

RANK. 


NAMES. 




Charles Cullen 


Lieutenant 


J. B. Cane. ' 


Engineer 


C. J Strouse. 


Driver 


Louis Walters. 


Stoker . . ... 


J. A. O'Brien. 


Hoseman 
Hoseman 


W. D. Conroy. 
E. J. Sheddy. 


Hoseman . . . . .... 


Charles Leter. 


Hoseman 


James Bridge wood. 


Hoseman 


Charles Claveau. 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 10. 
Location No. 516 Bryant street. 



K \N'K. 


NAMES. 




Gejrge Bailev 




William Gill.' 


Engineer.. 


Thomas McElroy. 


Driver 


James Cronin. 


Stoker 


Dennis Quinlan. 




John Lavaroni 


Hoseman , 


C. E. Durning. 


Hoseman . 


John Leckie. 




W F. Gallatin 




George H. Thomas. 







410 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 11. 
Location No. 1632 Fifteenth avenue South. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

Engineer 

Driver 

Stoker 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 

Hoseman.. 



Charles Smith. 
Joseph Hoare. 
C. H. Ferguson. 
James Hagan. 
Christopher Windrow. 
C. F. McTiernan. 
Peter Brady. 
Frank Josephs. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 12. 
Location No. 101 Commercial street 



Captain'. 

Lieutenant 

Engineer 

Driver 

Stoker 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 



Jeremiah Sullivan. 
Emile Gouvi. 
Andrew Reid. 
William Hensley. 
Frank Becker. 
Thomas Lyons. 
George Spellman. 
Julius Phillips. 
John McCarthy. 
Henry Behrmann. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



411 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 13. 
Location No. 1458 Valencia street. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain . .. 


Daniel Newell 


Lieutenant 




Engineer . . 


John F McQuade 


Driver 




Stoker 


Thomas Barry 


Hoseman 


Walter Nichols 


Hoseman . ... 




Hoseman 


John F O'Donnell, 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 14. 
Location No. 1007 McAllister street. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 
Engineer . . 

Driver 

Stoker 

Hoseman . . 
Hoseman . . 
Hoseman. . 



William Kenealey. 
John Bowlan. 
L. H. Barricks. . 
Daniel Lyons. 
Herbert Sorenson. 
Hugh Powers. 
Leo Castillo. 
E. A. Richardson. 



412 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 15. 
Location No. 2114 California street. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 


Fred Whitaker ' 


Lieutenant ... 


George Brown. 


Engineer 




Driver . 


Frank Lerman. 


Stoker.. .. 


Timothy O'Brien. 


Hoseman 
Hoseman . 


James Boopman. 
E. J. Moran 


Hoseman . . . ^ 


T. R. Walsh. 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 16. 
Location No. 1009 Tennessee street. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

Engineer 

Driver 

Stoker 

Hoseman 

Ho&eman 

Hoseman 



C. J. Hogan. 
Martin Duddy. 
Samuel Rainey. 
M. E. Gray. 
B. F. Jones. 
William Moore. 
Philip Moholy. 
Michael Cusack. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



413: 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 17. 
Location No. 34 Mint avenue. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 




Lieutenant 


William Nicholson 




William H Kerrigan 


Driver ... .... 


Claude Brownell 


Stoker 


Frank MoCluskey. 




J C. Crowley 


floseman 
Hoseman 


Philip Denehy. 
Joseph Hay den. 


Hoseman .... 


William Sawyer 


Hoseman . . 


William O'Farrell. 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 18. 
Location No. 317 Duncan street. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 


Willinm Holmes 


Lieutenant . ... 


Dariiel Murphy. 






Driver 


John Scannell 


Stoker 
Hoseman . ... 


Charles MacDonald. 
J P Reimers 


Hoseman . . .... 


Thomas P. Jones. 


Ho;- eman 


Thomas Connors. 







414 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 19. 
Location No. 1749 Market street. 



Captain-.. . 
Lieutenant 
Engineer . . 

Driver 

Stoker 

Hoseman.. . 
Hoseman.. . 
Hoseman.. . 
Hoseman.. . 



H. F. Horn. 

John Matheson. 
S. P. Oppenheim. 
John Little. 
O.arles Bryan. 
G. Kelleher. 
Henry Soeckman. 
William Muenter. 
W. A. Frodsham. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 20. 
Location No. 2117 Filbert street. 



Captain Henry Schmidt. 

Lieutenant , J. J. Kelly. 

Engineer Frank Crockett. 

Driver ! Maurice Barrett. 

Stoker James Tyrrell. 

Hoseman John Gavin. 

Hoseman i William Matheson. 

Hoseman Patrick Canty. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



415 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 21. 
Location No. 1152 Oak street. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

Engineer 

Driver 

Stoker 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 



John Fay. 
James Feeney. 
Henry Smith. 
Joseph Cully. 
H. H. Smith. 
Charles Cochran. 
Daniel Cooney. 
Joseph Rodgers. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 22. 
Location No. 1819 Post street. 



RANK. 


NAME9. 


Captain 


John R Mitchell 


Lieutenant 


Thomas Collins. 


Engineer 


K. S Hall. 


Driver . . . 


M. J. O'Connor. 


Stoker 
Hoseman. . ... 


J. J. Mitchell. 
William Wunderligh 


Hoseman 
Hoseman 


Edward McDermott. 
James Fitzgerald 







416 



REPORT OP FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 23. 
Location No. 3022 Washington street. 



Captain i James Layden. 

Lieutenant i Patrick Parry. 

Engineer i Charles Hewit, 

Driver J. J. McCarthy. 

Stoker W. J. Shields. 

Hoseman George McDonald. 

Hoseman George Lawson. 



Hoseman 



William F. Curran. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 24. 
Location No. 449 Douglass street. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 
Engineer . . . 

Driver 

Stoker 

Hoseman. . . 
Hoseman... 
Hoaernan. . . 



Edward Skelly. 
Eugene McCormick. 
B. J. McShane. 
William O'Connor. 
M. J. O'Connell. 
Edward Toland. 
F. J. Pope. 
William Mtillaney. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



417 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 25. 
Location No. 2547 Folsom street. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 




Lieutenant 




Engineer 




Driver 


Malachi Norton 


Stoker 




Hoseman 


Henry Morrison 


Hoseman. 


William Swanton 


Hoseman 


P. F. Dinran. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 26. 
Location No. 327 Second avenue. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 
Engineer . . 

Driver 

Stoker 

Hoseman. . . 
Hoseman.. . 
Hoseman.. . 



James H. Dever. 
Michael Drury. 
Patrick Hughes. 
Walter Lintott. 
Henry Welch. 
M. Dougherty. 
J. B. Owans. 
Louis Andrews. 



27 



418 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 27. 

Location No. 621 Hermann street. 



Captain 

Lieutenant . 
Engineer . . . 

Driver 

Stoker 

Hoseman.. . . 
Hoseman . . . 
Hoseman.... 
Hoseman. . . . 



R. H. Sawyer. 
Larry O'Neil. 
E. P. Brennan. 



J. J. Nagle. 
George F. Banner. 
Edward Church. 
William Seiwert. 
Edward O'Donnell. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 28. 
Location No. 301 Francisco street. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

Engineer 

Driver 

Stoker 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 



John Maxwell. 
William Everson. 
Joseph Pendergast. 
J. F. Sweeney. 
John Arata. 
Charles Stieglitz. 
James Grace. 
Gecrge Clancy. 
M. Ryan. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



419 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 29, 

Location No. 1305 Bryant street. 



BANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain ... 


William Byrne 


Lieutenant 


T. J. Bean. 


Engineer .... .... 




Driver 


Thomas Hart 


Stoker 


Patrick O'Connell 


Hoseman.. 


T J Murphy 






Hoseman. ... 




Hoseman 


James Flood. 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 30. 
Location No. 1737 Waller street. 



Captain 

Lieutenant . . 

Engineer 

Driver 

Stoker 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 



D. R. Sewell. 
W. A. Cook. 
Milton Morgan. 
John Brophy. 
William Harvey. 
Edward Kelleher. 
John Enright. 
C. G. Harkins. 



420 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 31. 
Location No. 1214 Pacific street. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 




Thomas Canty 




James Walsh 




W. T. Welch. 




JohnCahill. 


Stoker . 


John Fitzsimmons. 




J. F. Shaughuessv. 




J. H. Ho< r an 


Hoseman . . . 


M. J. O'Brien. 




Jamc-s Mathews. 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 32. 
Location Holly Park and West Avenue, 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 


Eugene O'Connor 




George Styles 


Engineer 


W. S. Casebolt. 




John Blythe. 


Stoker . .... 


William Murphy. 


Hoseman 


L. A. Smith. 


Hoseman . 


John Thompson. 


Hoseman 


James Bohan. 







REPORT OP FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



421 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 33. 
Location No. 117 Broad street, Ocean View. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 


R. T. Brown 


Lieutenant 




Engineer 


William Heaney 


Driver 


Jerry McNamara. 


Stoker 


Peter Buike 


Hoseman 


J J. Casaerly. 


Hoseman 


Thomas Johnson. 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 34. 
Location No. 1119 Ellis street. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 


Henry Mitchell. 


Lieutenant. ' 




Engineer .... 


Louis Kiehl 


Driver 




Stoker... . . . 


James Bucklej r . 




Henry Newman. 


Hoseman . .... 


Anthony Phelan. 


Hoseman 


"William Hanton. 







422 



REPORT OP FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 35. 
Location No. 38 Bluxome street. 



Captain 

Lieutenan t . 

Engineer 

Driver . 

Stoker 

Hoseman.. . . 

Hoseman 

Hoseman. . . 
Hoseman. . . . 
Hoseman 



William Danahy. 
Patrick Heniker. 
Fred Orr. 
William Tobin. 
James McGibben. 
James H. Handler, 
William Gernandt. 
W. F. Miskel. 
M. Burns. 
D. McAuliffe. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 36. 
Location Sutro Heights. 



Engineer.. 

Driver 

Stoker . . 



Joseph Matthews. 
James Stroud. 
W. P. Conlon. 



TRUCK COMPANY No. 1. 
Location No. 22 O'Farrell street. 



Captain . . . 
Lieutenant 
Tillerman. 

Driver 

Truckman . 
Truckman . 
Truckman.. 
Truckman.. 
Truckman.. 
Truckman.. 
Truckman.. 
Truckman.. 



Eugene Crowe. 
R. H. Woods. 
George Carew. 
C. Conn ell. 
Hugh Quinn. 
Daniel Donovan. 
Timothy Flynn. 
W. F. Tracey. 
John J. Quinn. 
Thomas Gallagher. 
Henry Donnadeau. 
Julius Gimmel. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



423 



TRUCK COMPANY No. 2. 
Location No. 627 Broadway street. 



Captain i John Dryer. 

Lieutenant John Leahy. 

Driver A. J. Mogan. 

Tillerman j Alfred Florence. 

Truckman Frank Cuminings. 

Truckman i Rinaldo Cuneo. 

Trnckman J Frank Kruse. 

Truckman .! John Crosby. 

Truckman H. T. Hefifernan. 

Truckman James Corwell. 

Truckman ! j Harry Wilson. 

Truckman i Joseph Wolf. 



TRUCK COMPANY No. 3. 

Location No. 1749 Market street. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 


William Schultz. 


Lieutenant . 


Edward Kehoe. 




Michael Hannan. 


Tillerman 


Joseph Burnett. 


Truckman. . . 


Ernest Cameron. 




M. Fitzhenry. 


Truckman. 


William Hopkins. 


Truckman 


Archie Jensen. 


Truckman . 


Thomas McGlynn. 




C. W. Heggum. 







424 



REPORT OP FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



TRUCK COMPANY No. 4. 
Location No. 1648 Pacific avenue. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 


T B Kentzell 


Lieutenant , 




Driver 


William Shackleton 


Tillerman 




Truckman 


Patrick Hogan 


Truckman 




Truckman 




Truckman 








Truckman 


W H Kelljj. 







TRUCK COMPANY No. 5. 
Location No. 1819 Post street. 



Captain . . . 
Lieutenant 

Driver 

Tillerman. . . 
Truckman . 
Truckman.. 
Truckman . 
Truckman.. 
Truckman.. 
Truckman.. 



Matthew Farley. 
Charles Mulloy. 
William Serens. 
William Otto. 
T. J. Harrington. 
Henry McMahon. 
J. H. O'Brien. 
T. Timmons. 
E. F. Murray. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



425 



TRUCK COMPANY No. 6. 
Location No. 1152 Oak street. 



Captain 

Lieutenant . 

Driver 

Tillerman . . 
Truckman . . 
Truckman . . 
Truckman . . 
Truckman . . 
Truckman . . 



W. E. Kelly. 
Joseph Capelli. 
J. P. Hayden. 
R. Oppenheim. 
H. H. Casey, 
(^ustave Hain. 
Fred Grote. 
Georere M. Boyson. 
James Franks. 



TRUCK COMPANY No. 7. 
Location No. 3050 Seventeenth street. 





William Carew. 




William Bannon. 




Charles Thoney. 




John Pvne. 


Truckman 


Henry Sullivan. 




W. J. O'Connor. 




Frank Johnson. 




J. J O'Connor. 




Michael Wright. 


Truckman 


Frederick Woods. 







426 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



TRUCK COMPANY No. 8. 
Location No. 38 Bluxome street. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 


Frenk Nichols 






Driver 


Joseph R.van. 


Truckman .... 




Truckman 
Truckman 


Henry Mulligan. 


Truckman . .... ... 


Peter Gallagher 






Truckman . 




Truckman.. 


Fred Ellensberger. 


Truckman 


Michael Flannigan. 







CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 
Location No. 144 Second street. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 


Michael O'Brien. 




Fred Sayers. 


Driver .... 


Richard Allen. 


Hoseman 


John Fitzpatrick. 







CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 2. 
Location No. 1348 Tenth Avenue. 



Captain . . . 
Lieutenant 

Driver 

Hoseman... 



John Kenney. 
William Crawhall. 
Eugene Crummey, 
Martiu Spellman. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



427 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 3. 
Location No. 112 Jackson street. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 






Dieutenant 


Thomas Kelly. 


Driver .... 


M. J. Higgins. 




J F AI each am 







CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 4. 
Location No. 415 McAllister street. 



Captain . . . 
Lieutenant. 

Driver 

Hoseman . . 



James Britt 
Alfred Davis. 
Thomas McGovern. 
Edward King. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 5. 
Location No. 627 Broadway. 



Captain 


W F. Gallatin. 


Lieutenant 


J. F. Riley. 


Driver 


William Newman. 


Hoseman . 


Frank Casassa 







428 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 6. 
Location No. 311 Sixth street. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Captain 








Driver 


J S Brant 


Hoseinan 


William Hart 







CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 7. 
Location No. 3050 Seventeenth street. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

Driver 

Hoseman . . 



George 
John Devine. 
Howard Holmes. 
A. C. Goddard. 



WATER TOWER COMPANY No. 1. 

Location No. 108 New Montgomery street. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 
Driver... 



Peter Wralty. 
J. W. Belden. 
E. J. Shaughneasy. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS 



429 



MONITOR BATTERY No. 1. 
Location No. 516 Bryant street. 



Driver. .. N. Barbetta. 



MONITOR BATTERY No. 2. 
Location No. 22 O'Farrell street. 



RANK. 


NAMES. 


Driver ... . . 


Joseph Wales. 







RELIEF ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 
Headquarters Corporation Yard No. 2. 



RANK. 


KAMES. 


Captara 


Henr}- Gorter. 


Lieutenant 


D. R. Conniff. 


Hoseman 


Thomas Muldowney. 







430 



REPORT OP FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



RELIEF ENGINE COMPANY No. 2. 
Headquarters Engine House No. 3. 



Captain 

Lieutenant . 
Hoseman 



I. Gurmendez. 
J ohn Doyle. 
Alexander George. 



* Relief engine companies and employees of the Corporation Yard are required to report 
at third-alarm fires. 



CORPORATION "SARD EMPLOYEES. 



John W. Reilly . 

P. H. Fleming 

Henry Rice 

Philip Brady 

John T Crummey . . 

Joseph Sawyer 

John S. Farley 

John Riley . . 

John Sheehan 



Acting Superintendent of Engines. 

Acting Clerk and Commissary. 

Hydrantman. 

Hydrantman. 

Hydrantman. 

Watchman. 

Watchman. 

Drayman. 

Drayman. 



DEPARTMENT STABLE EMPLOYEES. 



P. O'Connell 

John O'Brien 

John Murphy 

Philip Meehan 

Patrick McKenna . 

Frank Brown 

F. J. Helm? 

William F. Egan . . . 



Acting Superintendent of Horses. 

Hostler. 

Hostler. 

Hostler. 

Hostler 

Hostler. 

Hostler. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



431 



APPARATUS. 

The following is a list of the apparatus in use in the Department, all of which 
is in good condition: 53 steam fire engines, 53 hose wagons, 1 combination hose 
and chemical wagon, 9 chemical engines, 11 hook and ladder trucks, 4 monitor 
batteries, 2 water towers, 24 officers' buggies (including relief buggies), 6 hydrant- 
men's carts, 2 breaking carts, 10 delivery wagons, 2 supply wagons, 1 crane neck 
truck, 1 horse ambulance, 2 hose carriages, 1 hose cart, 50 Babcock hand chemical 
extinguishers, 69,300 feet of cotton hose. 



FIRES. 

During the year the Department responded to 863 alarms, 493 of which were 
from street and automatic boxes, 472 were first alarms, 16 second alarms and 5 
third alarms. There were 370 silent alarms received verbally or by telephone. 



LOSSES BY FIRE, INSURANCE, AND AMOUNT PAID. 



MONTH. 


LOSSES. 


INSURANCE. 


INSURANCE 
PAID. 


1899. 
July 


$26 061 45 






August 


64 708 69 






September 


8 043 48 






October 


78 821 61 


oqc 412 fi7 




November. 








December 


^7 518 66 


375 925 00 


15,840 32 


1900. 
January 








February 






15,684 03 


March 






8,488 45 


April 






75,679 13 


May 






11,050 75 


June 




166,310 00 


30.292 89 






492,973 00 


44,017 57 


Total 


$486 694 20 


$3 376 863 49 


^jai ASS) c-i 











432 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



STATEMENT OF NUMBER OF FEET OF MAIN PIPE LAID IN CITY FROM JULY 1, 
1899, TO JULY 1, 1900. 



SUE OF MAINS. 


NUMBER OP 
FEET. 


TAKEN OUT. 


ABANDONED. 










4-inch .. .. 


4,050 




1,100 


6-inch 


3,225 


1,300 




8-inch 


17,350 


400 




10-inch , 








12-inch 


1,450 






16-inch 


7,100 






20-inch 








22-inch 








24-inch 


2,300 














Total feet 


35,475 


1 760 


1 100 











Hydrants set during year 10 

Hydrants taken out during year 59 

Hydrants re-set 32 

Total number of hydrants in use July 1, 1900 3,677 



MEMBERS RETIRED ON PENSION. 

During the year five members were retired under the provisions of the Fire- 
men's Pension Fund Act of 1889, viz: 

Edward O'Sullivan, Hoseman of Engine Company 11, retired September 14, 
1899. 

William H. Ayras, Department Carpenter, retired November 9, 1899. 

J. J. Murphy, Engineer Engine Company 26, retired November 9, 1899. 

Felix Desmond, Hoseman Engine Company 5, retired November 16, 1899. 

John Devlin,* Hoseman Engine Company 20, retired Dscember 7, 1899. 

DEATHS. 

During the year the following deaths occurred among the members of the De- 
partment: 

ON ACTIVE LIST. 



John McGlynn, Hoseman Engine Company 27, died Septsmber 24, 1899, of 
pneumonia. 



REPORT OP FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 433 

George P. Sheritt, Hoseman Engine Company 32, died November 29, 1899, of 
typhoid pneumonia. 

Eugene Sheridan, Driver Truck Company 7, died December 7, 1899, of con- 
sumption. 

Thomas Pendergrast, Hoseman Engine Company 25, died January 11, 1900, of 
consumption. 

John J. McCarthy, Hoseman Engine Company 19, died March 12, 1900, of heart 
disease. 

Henry O'Neill, Truckman Truck Company 4, died March 15, 1900, of injuries 
received while working at a fire. 

John E. Sweenej', Hoseman of Engine Company 29, died June 20, 1900, of in- 
juries and burns received while rescuing a man from a burning building. Mr, 
Sweeney's act was one of great heroism. The man he saved lived while poor 
Sweeney died. A generous and grateful public has made ample provisions for the 
family of deceased and has paid its tribute of praise for his heroic deed. 

ON PENSION LIST. 

John Devlin, died January 24, 1900, of pneumonia. 
William H. Ayers, died May 24, of heart disease. 

ON WAITING LIST. 

Jamas O'Connor, died May 18, 1900, of consumption. 
William H. Thomas, died June 29, 1900, of aneurism. 

28 



134 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEAR 

1899-1900. 



Appropriation by the Board of Supervisors $573.400 CO 

Contributed by insurance companies, through A. J. Clunie, State Insur- 
ance Commissioner 17,791 57 



EXPENDITURES. 



$591,191 57 





FIRST SEVEN 
MONTHS. 


LAST FIVE 
MONTHS. 




$9530 00 






16,'J44 61 


$9 910 49 




1,023 45 


413 80 




15 250 24 


11 105 43 


y ue l 


4,656 55 


4,048 30 




615 15 


61 95 




8,721 31 


2,485 56 


Hose 


2 970 00 






800 00 




Horseshoeing... . .... 


4,515 00 


3 049 00 




*17 725 92 




Houw repairs to 


7,113 42 


3,608 77 


Harness and repairs 


1,680 CO 


1,7(7 20 


Hydrants 


877 50 


90 00 


Machinery . 


317 30 




Pensions 


8 137 06 


5812 18 


Rent . .... 


840 00 


600 00 


Salaries 


242 297 97 


208 893 25 


Salaries substitutes for injured men 




963 78 




fiSI fifl 






2 758 20 




Sundries 


33 41 


523 65 








Totals 


$347 488 59 


8256 326 73 









* For completion of Bluxome street house. No new houses other than this were built during 
the year. 



REPORT OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 435 



Total expenditures for year $603,815 32 

Total appropriation for year 591,191 57 



Total amount overdrawn $12,623 75 

Less fines deducted from salaries and credited to Pension Fund 236 64 

Total deficit $12,387 11 

The expenditure have been divided into two sections, before and after February 1st, the date 
when the re-organizaeion was effected. 



The Department is in excellent condition. The downtown companies have the 
full quota of men, but in the outlying districts engine and truck companies are 
two men short, mad2 necessary by the limited appropriation. 

Three new engine houses are needed, but the appropriation to the Board of 
Public Works will apparently make it impossible for us to secure them during the 
ensuing year. 

Perhaps the most needed addition to our fire defenses is a firstclass fire boat 
for the protection of our immensely valuable water-front property. 

We recommend that ampls provisions for the engine houses referred to and 
the fire boat be made in the next tax levy. 

Very respectfully submitted, 

BOARD OP FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 

JOHN W. MCCARTHY. Secratary. 



REPORT 



CLERK OF THE JUSTICES' COURT. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1901. 
To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIR : Pursuant to Article XVI, Section 9, of the Charter of the City and County of 
San Francisco, I herewith submit the following, showing the business transacted, including 
the receipts and expenditures of the Justices' Court during the fiscal year ending June 30 r 
1900: 

Number of civil suits filed during the year. ... 6,514 

Number of suits filed on behalf of City and County for taxes 14,000 



Total number of suits filed -20,514 

RECEIPTS. 
Total amount of fees collected and paid into Treasury $20,336 50 

EXPENDITURES. 

Salary of Presiding Justice (first half of fiscal year) $1,350 00 

Salary of Presiding Justice (second half of fiscal year) 1,350 00 

Salary of 4 Associate Justices (first half of fiscal year) 4,800 00 

Salary of 4 Associate Justices (second half of fiscal year) 4,800 00 

Salary of Chief Clerk (first half of fiscal year) 1,200 00 

Salary of Chief Clerk (second half of fiscal year) 1,200 00 

Salary of Deputy Clerks (first half of fiscal year) 3,600 00 

Salary of Deputy Clerks (second half of fiscal year) 3,000 00 

Total disbursements for year $21,300 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. W. WILLIAMS, 

Clerk. 



REPORTS 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

/ 

DEAR SIR : I respectfully make the following return of all estates of decedents which have com* 
into my hands for the six months ending January 8, 1900. 

JOHN A. DRINKHOUSE, 

Public Administrator. 



To the Honorable James I). Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIR : I hereby make my return of all estates of decedents which have conic into my hands 
for the six months ending June 30, 1900. 

Respectfully submitted, 

P. BOLAND, 
Public Administrator. 



438 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OP DECEDENTS 



Date of Issuance of Let- 
ters of Administration 


NAMES OF DBCBDBNTS. 


Approximate Value of 
Estate as far as can 
e ascertained 


I Money which has come 
into the hands of the 
Administrator 

1 


1899 July 5 


Frank Steinman 






July 10 


William Reese 


$69 35 


$69 35 


July 10 


Edmund Carmody . 


335 80 


335 80 


July 10 


Henry P. Stulz (special). 


34 00 


24 00 


July 17 


William Murphy 






July 18 


James Tierney 


2,591 76 


2,591 76 


July 20 


J. E. McGugin (special). . 


423 00 


423 00 


July 24 


A. C. A. Boyson ... 


3,110 90 


610 90 


July 25 


J. B-. Moore . 


2 310 92 


2 310 92 


July 26 


Margaret Casserly 


20 474 06 


20 474 Oft 


July 28 


John Enright (special) . . 


9 9 00 


29 00 


Julv 31 


Elizabeth Thomsen. 


2,612 50 


112 50 


July 31 


William J. Morgan . . 


2,032 15 


2,032 15 


Aug. 1 


John Wallace 






Aug. 7 


Gottlieb Suter 


1,564 28 


1,504 28 


Aug. 7 


Thomas Lyons 


1,737 12 


287 12 


Aug. 14 


Catharina Emilia Silva 


349 20 


349 20 


Aug. 15 


Moritz Schieffer (special) 


7,090 00 


480 00 


Aug 16 


Henry T. Gibson 


1 804 50 


1 804 50 


Aug 17 


Bridget Carroll 


5 453 05 


4 953 05 


Aug 22 


Frederick D. Einfeldt. 


20 115 40 


20 115 40 


Aug 22 


C. E. Allen 


2 264 05 


2,264 05 


Aug 31 


Mfchael J. Dona van (special). . 






Sept 1 


George Frank Lemon 






Sept. 5 


Alexis C. Montaudin 


157 60 


157 60 











PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



439 



ADMINISTERED CONTINUED. 



Funeral Expenses, Ex- 
penses of Last Illnfs?, 
Debts and Family Al- 
lowances Paid by Ad- 
ministrator 


Fees and Expenses Paid 
by Administrator 


Money on Deposit with 
Union Trust Company 
to Credit of Estates of 
Decedents 


Property Exclusive of 
Money in Hands of 
Administrator 


Distributed to Heirs.... 


1 

g 

1 

f 




$1 00 










$49 35 


7 50 








$12 50 




35 05 








300 75 




6 00 




$10 00 




18 00 




1 00 










325 50 


14 50 


$2,253 86 








242 75 


58 00 






$122 25 




229 00 


182 79 




2,500 00 




199 11 




214 55 


2,049 45 






46 92 


352 00 


1,646 00 


2,120 03 




16,399 98 






1 00 








28 00 


20 00 


117 91 




2 500 00 






782 25 


365 20 


886 70 










1 00 












38 75 


1,564 28 








161 45 


36 01 


38 55 


1,500 00 






77 25 


13 75 


222 75 






35 45 




210 00 






6 880 00 




25 00 


94 00 


1,669 30 






16 20 




21 05 
20 00 


4,879 00 
20 000 00 


500 00 





53 00 
OS 40 


371 00 


39 00 


1,966 55 










1 00 












1 00 












20 00 








137 60 















440 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OF DECEDENTS 



S 



NAMES OF DECEDENTS. 



- 

*- 



ff 



ETC 

| 




: is. 




J Sept. 7.:.... 


Sebastiana O' de Sanchez 


ft->50 00 


$220 00 


Sept. 11 


Edward P Cressev 


228 45 


228 45 


Sept. 11 




20 00 


?0 00 


Sept. 19 




543 70 


543 70 


Sept. 20 








Sept. 22 
Sept. 26 


.Francis Groizard 


465 50 


415 50 


Sept. 26 


Ellen E Chase. 






Sept. 27 


Elisabetha Kuffner 


23 199 24 


23 199 9 4 


Sept. 28 . 




1 251 80 


1 251 80 


Oct. 2 
Oct. 2 


Harriet Stewart 
Moritz Daeweritz 


200 00 
14 337 49 


1,809 25 


Oct. 5 
Oct 9 


William Johansman. 


1,164 23 
1,800 00 


1,164 23 

557 00 


Oct. 16 
Oct. 17 . 


George Graham 
Denis Connor 


319 38 

2,997 36 


319 38 
2,997 36 






4 572 40 


572 40 


Oct. 24 

Opt 94 


Mary Haverty (alias) 
Ursule Athenais VilfrOy Vanhove 


3,461 89 
15 896 00 


3,461 89 
896 00 


Oct. 24 
Oct 31 


Hinrich von Bremen (special). 
Jacob Schueder 


57 80 
14 056 35 


57 80 
14 056 35 


Oct 31 


William Lock . . 


3 137 40 


2 137 40 


Nov 3 


John Welsh 


754 12 


754 12 


Nov 3 


Margaret O'Rorke. 






Nov 3 


Ann Kelly 















PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



441 



ADMINISTERED CONTINUED. 



Funeral Expenses, Ex- 
pt-nees of last illness. 
Debts and Family Al- 
lowances Paid by Ad- 
ministrator 


Fees and Expenses Paid 
by Administrator 


Money on Deposit with 
Union Trust Company 
to Credit of Estates of 
Decedente 


Property Exclusive of 
Money in Hands of 
Administrator 


Distributed to Heirs 


Cash on hand (in bank).. 




$18 00 




$30 00 




$202 00 


$91 00 


13 00 








124 45 


18 50 


1 50 










148 25 


43 50 


$68 25 






83 70 




1 00 












7 50 




50 00 




408 00 
















161 00 


2 789 4 






249 00 


89 50 


47 25 

7 00 


1,000 00 


200 00 




115 05 




161 00 






$14 176 49 




10 00 


39 82 


611 90 






501 51 




92 82 
13 00 


450 00 


1,243 00 





14 18 
306 38 


20 00 


15 50 


2,800 00 






161 86 


298 36 


43 72 




4,000 00 




230 32 


279 00 


14 00 


3,121 00 






47 89 




575 09 




15,000 CO 




320 91 


56 80 


1 00 












20 00 


14,000 00 






36 35 


100 00 
250 00 


13 50 
13 50 


1,969 40 
450 00 


1,000 00 




54 50 
40 62 




5 00 












I 00 
















i 







442 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OF DECEDENTS 



Date of Issuance of Let- 
ters of Administration 


NAMES OF DECEDENTS. 


Approximate Value of 
estate, as far as can 
be ascertained 


Money which has come 
into the hands of the 
Administrator 


1899 Nov 6 


Julia Galli^an (special) 



81,809 70 


$1,809 70 


Nov 6 


Hattie A Trundle 






Nov 14 


John Cook (alias) 


528 80 


328 80 


Nov 14 


William Rollins 


1,000 00 


37 50 


Nov. 20 
Nov 20 


Edgar W. Perry 
William H Barley (special) 


1,065 10 


1,065 10 


Nov. 21 




111 85 


111 85 




Frank K Warr 


377 63 


377 63 


Nov 23 


A A Gilmour .... 


256 50 


6 50 


Nov 28 


William Brooks 






Nov 29 


James White 


519 15 


519 15 


Dec 4 


Thomas Hogan . ... 








William Ryan 


5 200 80 


5 200 80 


Dec 6 


Johannes Liebe 






Dec 18 


Winifred Fennell (special) . .. 


8,000 00 




Dec 19 


Matthew Beecher 


511 47 


511 47 


Dec 20 




450 00 




Dec 21 








T)PP 91 


Eugene O'Reilly . .... 








Nellie Powers .... 






Dec 21 


William Bishop 






Dec 21 


Marv Bryson 






Dec 21 


Jerry Callaghan .... 






Dec 21 


William Clarkson 






Dec 21 

















PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



44S 



ADMINISTERED CONTINUED. 



Funeral Expenses, Ex- 
penses of last Illness, 
Debts and Family Al- 
lowances Paid by Ad 
iiiinistrator 


Fees and Expenses paid 
by Administrator 


Money on Deposit with 
Union Trust Company 
to Credit of Estates of 
Decedents 


Property Exclusive of 
Money in Hands of Ad- 
ministrator 


Distributed to Heirs.... 


Cash on hand (in bank).. 




$109 50 






$1,700 20 






1 50 












5 05 




$200 00 




$323 75 




1 50 




962 50 




36 00 


80 65 


9 00 


$801 35 






174 10 




1 00 










9 5 80 


1 00 








85 50 




1 50 








376 13 





2 50 




' 250 OOJ. 





4 00 




9 00 


500 00 






10 15 




1 00 












23 60 


5 000 00 






177 20 




1 00 
















4,000 00 








2 25 








509 22 




1 00 






4 500 00 






1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 CO 























444 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OP DECEDENTS 



r 

Date of Issuance of Let- 
ters of Administration 


NAMES OF DECEDENTS. 


Approximate Value of 
estate, as far as can 
be ascertained 


Money which has come 
into the hands of the 
Administrator 


Dec. 21 


Nellie Close 






Dec. 21 .. 


Michael Connolly 






Dec. 21 


Maria Dalj 






Dec. 21 








Dec. 21 


Patrick Donelan 






Dec. 21 .. 








Dec. 21 








*Dec. 21 








Dec. 21.. .. 


James Holden 






Dec. 21 


James Holahan 






Dec. 21 


Jane Kerr 






Dec 21 








Dec. 21 


Edward Lynch 






Dec. 21 
Dec. 21 
Dec 21 


P J. McDonald 
Colin McPhail 







Dec 21 


Henry W Miller 






Dec 21 


Peter Nelson 






Dec 21 


Joseph O'Neill . . . 






Dec 21 


Mary O'Neill 






Dec. 21 
Dec 21 


Elizabeth O'Reilly 
William Williams 







Dec 21 


Edward Tracy 






Dec 91 








Dec. 21 


Patrick Sullivan 








PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



445 



ADMINISTERED CONTINUED. 



Funeral Expenses, Ex- 
penses of Last Illness, 
Debts and Family Al- 
lowances Paid by Ad- 
ministrator 


Fees and Expenses Paid 
by Administrator 


Money on Deposit with 
Union Trust Company 
to Credit of Estates of 
Decedents 


Property Exclusive of 
Money in Hands of 
Administrator 


Distributed to Heirs.... 


Cash on band (in bank). 




$1 00 




j 








1 00 












1 00 




































1 00 
























1 00 













1 00 












1 00 




, 

1 








1 00 












1 Ofl 




| 








1 f>0 












1 no 
























1 00 














^ 










1 00 













1 00 












1 00 




I 






i 


1 00 




, 








1 00 





1 








1 00 












1 00 












1 00 




| 












I 







446 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OF DECEDENTS 



Date of Issuance of Let- 
ters of Administration. 


NAMES or DECEDENTS. 


Approximate Value iof 
Estates as far as ascer- 
tained 


Money which has come 
into the hands of the 
Administrator 


1899 Dec 21 . .. 


Antonio P. Scares 






Dec. 21 


Pedro Antonio Silva 






Dec. 21 


Ellen Robinson 






Dec 21 


OttoRichter 






Dec 21 


Peter Raff erty 






Dec 22 


William Potter 






Dec. 22 








Dec. 22 








Dec. 22 


John Coleman 






Dec. 22 


Margaret Lewis 






Dec 2' 


Patrick Lynch 






Dec 22 


William MacLeod 






Dec 22 


John Murray 






Dec 22 


Ann O'Neill 






Dec. 22 


Mary Jane Pierce 






Dec. 22 


Rose Stewart 






Dec 22 


Timothy Sullivan 






Dec 22 


Mary Taffe 







Dec 22 


L. I. Backstrom 






Dec 22 


Catherine Turley 






Dec 2 .... 


Ellen Tracy 






Dec 22 


Jane Trimble , . 








John Claffey 






Dec. 22 


Charles Detruit 






Dec. 22 


MaryDillon 















PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



447 



ADMINISTERED COXTI N r i: i >. 



Funeral Expenses, Ex- 
penses of Last Illness, 
Debts and Family Al- 
lowances Paid by Ad- 
ministrator 


Fees and Expenses Paid 
by Administrator * 


Moneys on Deposit with 
Union Trust Company 
to Credit of Estates of 
Decedents 


Property, Exclusive of 
Money, in Hands of 
Administrator 


Distributed to Heirs .... 


Cash on hand (in bank) 




$1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 


( 










1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 
L 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












I 00 













1 
1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 























448 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OP DECEDENTS 



Date of Issuance of Let- 
ters of Administration 


> 

|l | 

85 3 

NAMES or DECEDENTS. 

\i ; 

* 

98, 


I 
Money which has oonie 

into the hands of the 
Administrator 


1899-Dec. 22 


Peter Donlan 




Dec. 22 


Agnes C. Ely . 




Dec 22 


Clotilde Agnes Jette ' 




Dec. 22 


James W. Foster j 




Dec 22 






Dec. 22 






Dec. 22 






Dec. 22 


James Hellisy 




Dec. 22 


Anne Henry 




Dec. .22 


John A. 11} land 




Dec. 22 


Garrett Maloney . ... 




Dec. 22 


Thomas Norton 




Dec. 22 
Dec. 22 


Denis O'Brien 
Maria O'Connor 





Dec. 22 


Wi> Ham Taylor 




Dec. 22 


C. Sheehan j 




Dec 22 


Michael Reynolds 




Dec. 22 


James Graham 




Dec. 22 


Annie Davis 




bee. 22 


William Duffy 




Dec. 22 
Dec. 22.. 


David B. Gifford 
William Hughes.. 





Dec. 22 
Dec. 22 


Giuliano Alliata 5,500 00 
Stephen G. Williams 45000 





Dec. 22 


Caroline A. Barnard . . . 











PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



449 



ADMINISTERED CONTINUED. 



Funeral Expenses, Ex- 
penses of Last Illness, 
Debts and Family Al- 
lowances Paid by Ad- 
ministrator 


Fees and Expenses Paid 
by Administrator 


Moneys on Deposit with 
Union Trust Company 
to Credit of Estates of 
Decedents 


Property Exclusive of 
Money in Hands of 
Administrator 


Distributed to Heirs.... 


Cash on Hand (in Bank). 




$1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 




450 00 








1 00 























29 



450 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OP DECEDENTS 



NAMES or DECEDENTS. 





78, 



Ill 



III 

S&E 





A 



1899-Dec. 22., 

Dec. 22., 

Dec. 22., 

Dec. 22. 

Dec. 22. 

Dec. 22. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Des. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dee. 26. 

Dec. 26. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 



Rose E. O'Connor 

John Williams 

Robert Macintosh' 

Carolina Carlson 

Fannie M. Watson 

James Duncan 

Ellen Flannery 

Gabriel Badimont 

Alphonse Dehail 

Frank Mueller 

Jean Baptisie Bertheau 

Jean Maeder 

Denis L. Foley 

Thomas Anderson 

Mathilde Barfeld 

H. Waldraff 

Francois Hanouin 

R. J. Fillmer 

Mary Eudey 

Giovanni Daneri 

Fritz Baillod 

F. W. Schroeder 

William B. Noble 

Jennie Cardenos 

Wilhelm Walter... 



$538 76 



C06 65 



$606 65 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



451 



ADMINISTERED CONTINUED. 



Funeral Expenses, Ex- 
penses of Last Illness, 
Debts and Family Al- 
lowances Paid by Ad- 
ministrator 


Fees and Expenses Paid 
by Administrator 


Moneys on Deposit with 
Union Trust Company 
to Credit of Estates of 
Decedents 


Property, Exclusive of 
Money, in Hands of 
Administrator 


Distributed to Heir*.... 


Casb on hand (in Bank). 




$1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












t 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 








$606 65 




1 00 












1 00 























452 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OP DECEDENTS 



NAMES OF DECEDENTS. 



.11 

5 



78, 



1899 Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 

Dec. 29. 



Edmond Dalton 

G. D. Augspurg 

William Dand 

David Laraond 

Thomas Brian 

Job aim Bang 

Patrick Hession 

Henry Mellor 

Henry Steffen 

Mary Cunningham , 

J. 11. Puckering 

J aiues Berryman Rob rts 

Albert Lawrentz 

Ella Manchen 

E. S. Lowrej 

Samuel Norris 

Mary M Keyes 

Milton Barrett 

David C. Marshall 

Thomas McKinnon 

Johann Zundorf 

Samuel F. Jackson 

Sarah Cohen 

John Sheehan 

Abraham Anderson. . . 



$8,000 00 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



453 



ADMINISTERED CONTINUED. 



Jfl 
SotTgS 

iilil 
fl!** 

ss,w 
5 & tl 

6|S1 

glgl 

"<^p- 

>%$ 


Fees and Expenses Paid 
by Administrator 


Moneys on Deposit with 
Union Trust Company 
to Credit of Estate of 
Decedents 


Property, Exclusive of 
Money, in Hands of 
Administrator 


Distributed to Heirs.... 


I 




$1 00 












1 00 




$8 000 00 








] 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 








. 




1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 OD 












i 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 CO 












1 00 























454 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OF DECEDENTS 



Date of Issuance of Let- 
ters of Administration 


NAMES OF DECEDENTS. 


Approximate Value of 
estate, as far as can 
be ascertained 


Money which has come 
into the hands of the 
Administrator 


1899 Dec 29 


S. W. Moore 






Dec; 29 


Charles Habersang 






Dec 29 


William Morgan 






Dec. 29 


John Blackburn 






Dec. 29 








Dec 29 


P A Brown 






Dec. 29 


J. B. Gramm 






Dec. 29 ...... 


Johann Hulss 


$331 40 


$331 40 


1900 JB 3 


Maria Clapper 






Jan S 








Jan 4 


Ella McGinness 






Jan 4 


Valeria R Chapman 


6 000 00 




Jan 4 


Lovantia E. Whittier 






Jan 4 


William Emniett 


392 60 




Jan 4 


Cecilia C. Bensley 






Jan. 4 


Julien Beranger 






Jan 4 


Clotilda H Wright 






Jan 4 


Michael Castle 


125 00 




Jan 5 


Archibald J. McDonald 


76 00 


76 00 


Jan 5 


Ivan Deniszewicz .... 


3 275 04 


83 40 


Jan 5 .... 


Charles Nash 








Jose Carrascoza. 


300 00 




Jan 8 


Florentine Sanrey 


524 95 




Jan 8 








Jan 8 


Charles Brandenburg 


555 00 













PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



455 



ADMINISTERED CONTINUED. 



Funer.il Expenses, Ex- 
penses of Last Illness, 
Debts and Family Al- 
lowances Paid by Ad- 
ministrator 


Fees and Expenses Paid 
by Administrator 


Moneys on Deposit with 
Union Trust Company 
to Credit of Estates of 
Decedents 


Property, Exclusive of 
Money, in Hands of 
Administrator 


9 


Cash on hand (in bank) . 




$1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












* 1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 55 








$329 85 








































8 80 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












2 50 












1 00 








75 00 




7 50 




$55 00 




75 90 




1 00 












1 00 




220 11 








1 00 












1 00 












2 50 




100 00 



















456 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OF DECEDENTS 



Date of Issuance of Let 
ters of Administration. 


NAMES OF DECEDENTS. 


Approximate Value of 
estate as far as ascer- 
tained 


Money which has come 
iuto the hands of the 
Administrator 


1900 -Jan. 8 


Marcella Caleb 






Jan. 8 


Mary Moore 






Jan. 8 


George A Raabe (special) 






Jan. 15.... 




* 




Jan. 17 


Norman S Clark (special) 






Jan. 17 


R C Jennings. 






Jan 17 


Charles Nelson 






Jan 17 


Henry Stewart 






Jan 17 


Samuel M. Briggs 






Jan 17 


John T. Lyons 






Jan 17 


Michael Roach (alias) 


















$224,900 64 


$127,150 45 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



457 



ADMINISTERED CONTINUED. 



Funeral Expenses, Ex- 
penses of last Illness, 
Debts and Family Al- 
lowances Paid by Ad- 


Fees and Expenses paid 
by Adrni nistrator 


Moneys on Deposit with 
Union Trust Company 
to Credit of Estates of 
Decedents 


Property Exclusive of 
Money in Hands of Ad- 
ministrator 


Distributed to Heirs.... 


Cash on hand (in bank). . 




$1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 












1 00 






















$4,103 41 


$4,912 22 


$86,581 40 


$57,859*00 


$39,278 92 


$7,007 98 



458 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OP DECEDENTS 



Date of Issuance of Let- 
ters of Administration 


NAMES OF DECEDENTS. 


Approximate Value of 
estate as far as can 
be ascertained , 


Money which has come 
into the hands of the 

Administrator 

i 


1900-Jan. 24 


William Taylor 


$714 00 




Jan. 25 


William Taylor 






Jan. 26 


Thomas Egan 


244 20 


$194 20 


Jan. 30 


George P. Wallace 






Jan. 30 




200 00 




Feb. 5 




4,415 00 


215 00 


Feb. 7 


John Rubel. 


236 30 


236 30 


Feb. 7 


George Fortman 


326 59 


310 59 


Feb. 7 


Dudley iJurley. . 


73 95 


68 70 


Feb. 8 


Hung Lung (special) 






Feb. 19 


Fustus Bepler (alias) 






Feb. 26 


Leopold Ries 


133 65 


3 05 


Feb 28 


Richard Slevin . . .... 


723 55 


723 55 


Mar 1 


Annie F Lennon 






Mar. 2 
Mar. 5 
Mar. 5 


Anna Herzo (special) * 
Richard Welsh 
Kate Curtin ... 


60,000 00 
1,924 10 
145 87 


22 00 
1,921 55 
145 87 


Mar 6 


Minerva Washer 


7 500 00 




Mar. 8 


Christina Schuldt (alias) 


161 19 


153 74 


Mar 15 


Julia Winchester . 


281 75 


276 00 


Mar 16 


John C White (special) 


7 379 95 


4 379 95 


Mar 19 


Jacob Kiehl (special) 


30 072 10 


27 072 10 


Mar. 22 
Mar 22 


George W. Stone 
KateT Stack .'... 


127 05 
345 76 


123 30 
339 76 


Mar 23 




157 40 


155 65 


Mar 27 




582 48 


81 13 











Property turned over to succeeding executor. 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



459 



ADMINISTERED CONTINUED. 



^!f 


4 


? f 


Ill 


i 


| 










3" 


o 


S-g * 8 


&g, 


*p- B o 


S'vS^" 


B 


p 


|*|2, 


|K 


ToSM 


IV W 


& 


1 


S?fl 


I'l 


: M|| 


l?l 


w 


g 


*IP 


fl 


: l|| 


ill 


a 
i 


I 


Srlf 


: ^ 


1 aS? 


: 2,2, 


: 


"^ 





$1 00 












1 00 










$100 00 


30 43 


$60 00 


$50 00 




$3 77 




] oo 












1 50 




200 00 








27 86 


190 00 


4 200 00 








19 08 


190 00 






27 22 


75 00 


51 80 


185 00 


16 00 








19 19 


50 00 


5 25 








7 50 


i 










6 00 












2 00 




130 60 




1 05 


160 00 


54 00 


345 00 






164 65 




1 00 












22 00 










165 00 


28 75 


1,585 00 


2 55 




142 80 


75 00 


14 00 


25 00 






31 87 




7 50 










82 50 


21 75 


17 50 


7 45 




31 99 


159 00 


44 25 


26 00 


5 75 




46 75 




1 00 


4,000 00 


3,000 00 




378 95 


600 00 


1 75 


250 00 


S 000 CO 




26 320 35 


75 00 


29 00 




5 75 




19 30 


21*) 65 


53 50 


34 35 


6 00 




36 26 


79 00 


8 00 




1 75 




68 65 


30 00 


18 81 




501 35 




32 32 










1. ... 





460 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OF DECEDENTS 



Date of Issuance of Let- 
ters of Administration 


NAMES or DECEDENTS. 


Approximate Value of 
estate, as far as can 
be ascertained 


Money which has come 
into the hands of the 
Administrator 


1900 Mar. 27 


Albert H Jansen 


$59 85 


$59 85 


Mar. 27 
Mar. 28 


Amelia Steiger (special)* 
Joseph Roux 


704 10 
462 77 


704 10 

431 77 


Mar. 28 


Caroline C. Sankey 


1,393 00 


1,375 00 


Mar 29 








Mar. 29 




2 79 


1 79 


Mar. 30 


Charles Sondstroni (alias) 


2,290 85 


2,290 85 


Mar 30 




300 000 00 




Apr 2 


Fred K, Wood 


1 219 90 


1,199 40 


Apr 3 


Michael M Kielly 


32 00 




Apr 5 


J VV Winter (special)* 


50 00 




Apr. 7 




600 00 




Apr. 10 


Patrick Hutchinson 


73 67 


48 67 


Apr. 11 


Frank L Perkins 


849 35 


849 35 


Apr 11 




3 050 00 


15 


Apr. 12 
Apr. 13 


John Thelin 
George F. Hartwell . . 


2,696 29 
1,307 19 


1,751 00 
606 39 


Apr. 17 


Virginio A. Machado 


901 50 


901 50 


Apr 18 


Emma Tyson 






Apr 18 


Charles F. Stanle} 7 


100 00 


65 62 


Apr 19 


James McKenzie (alias) . 


503 10 


403 10 


Apr 19 




253 33 


248 73 


Apr 24 


Denis McCarthy 


4 298 98 


2 298 98 


Apr. 24 


Louis Parent 


4 204 99 




M-v 3 








May 7 


Kathe Mueller (alias) 


1 227 30 


707 80 











* Property turned over to succeeding executor. 

t Property turned over to succeeding administrator. 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



461 



ADMINISTERED CONTINUED. 



Funeral Expenses, Ex- 
penses of Last Illness, 
Debts and Family Al- 
lowances Paid by Ad- 
ministrator 


Fees and Expenses Paid 
by Administrator 


Moneys on Deposit with 
Union Trust Company 
to Credit of Estates of 
Decedents 


Property Exclusive of 
Money in Hands of 
Administrator 


5* 

1 
g 

f 


g 

5' 

| 


$25 00 


$7 50 








1 27 35 


150 00 


1 75 










169 00 
182 00 


63 60 
149 00 


$141 00 
768 00 


$31 00 
18 00 




78 27 
276 00 




6 00 












1 00 




1 00 




79 




163 75 


1,840 85 






286 25 




3 25 










218 00 


79 75 


825 90 


20 50 




75 75 




1 00 












1 25 












1 75 












8 75 




25 00 








62 00 


700 00 






87 35 




6 86 




3,049 85 






286 50 


48 45 


925 50 


945 29 




490 55 


186 00 


37 50 
67 75 


114 00 

700 00 


800 80 




168 89 
143 76 




1 00 












7 50 




34 38 




58 12 




13 00 


250 00 


100 00 




140 10 


74 50 


15 50 


75 50 


4 60 




83 23 




30 75 


1 750 00 


2 000 00 




SIR 23 




7 50 












1 00 










129 50 


117 65 


220 50 


519 50 




240 15 















462 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



ESTATES OF DECEDENTS 



Date of Issuance of Let- 
ters of Administration 


NAMES OF DKCEDENTS. 


Approximate Value of 
estate, as far as ascer- 
tained 


1 

Money which has come 

into the hands of the 


1900 May 8 


Charles Letterman (alias) 


$882 10 


$880 60 


May 14 .... 


Theodore Fox (alias) 


51 10 


21 10 


May 14 


Louisa O'Neill 


7 954 SO 


949 75 


May 14 


Jennie Lewis 


5 287 53 


287 53 


Mav 14 


Frank Field 


207 15 


205 40 


May 16 


Mary Keefe (special) 


5,199 03 




May 16 


Hattie S Van Schaick 


3,000 00 




May 21 


Catherine Hal'et (alias) 


5,223 70 


220 85 


May 24 .... 


Robert R Searle (special) * 


47,500 00 


5,466 75 


June 4 .. 


Max Metzl (alias) 
Minnie E Edwards 


5,805 80 
4,218 24 


5.107 80 


June 8 




11,322 28 




June 8 




807 20 


807 20 


June 13 


Charles Burkhardt 


200 00 


200 00 


June 18 




936 29 




June 18 




3,725 64 


3,175 64 


June 19 


Dominick Harrison 


5,196 28 




June 25 


Andreas Andersen (special) 


285 00 
3,025 00 


282 50 


June 25 


Richard Widen 


874 20 


74 20 




Louis Albert 


6,662 00 
















$560,389 19 


$67,945 81 



Property turned over to succeeding executor. 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT. 



463 



ADMINISTERED CONTINUED. 



Funeral Expenses, Ex- 
penses of Last Illness, 
Debts and Family Al- 
lowances Paid by Ad- 
ministrator 


Fees and Expenses Paid 
by Administrator 


Moneys on Deposit with 
Union Trust Company 
to Credit of Estates of 
Decedents 


Property Exclusive of 
Money in Hands of 
Administrator 


Distributed to Heirs.... 


Caah on band (in bank). 




$127 00 


$475 00 


$1 50 




$278 60 




? 25 




30 00 




18 85 


$273 00 
161 50 


167 00 
41 25 


60 25 


7,005 05 




449 50 
84 78 


90 00 


2 25 




1 75 




113 15 




17 25 




5 199 03 








1 00 


...V 


S 000 00 






100 00 


51 75 




5 002 85 




69 10 




464 60 










334 50 


304 25 
1 00 


3,515 50 


698 00 




953 55 




13 00 




11,322 28 






204 50 


1 00 


195 50 






406 20 




1 25 








198 76 




1 00 




936 29 






300 00 


4 00 


2 000 00 


550 00 




871 64 




7 25 












6 00 













1 00 




2 50 




281 50 




1 00 




25 00 








1 00 





800 00 




73 20 




1 00 




5,760 00 


















$4,590 15 


$,2,575 47 


$21,515 35 


$59,004 62 





$33,&19 35 



REPORT 



BOARD OF FIRE PENSION FUND 
COMMISSIONERS. 



San Francisco, August 1st, 1900. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco- 
Dear Sir: The Board of Fire Pension Fund Commissioners authorized by 
Chapter 6 of the Charter respectfully reports: 

That the Board of Fire Commissioners duly organized themselves into a Board 
of Fire Pension Fund Commissioners and elected as Secretary S. W. Nicoll for 
the six months ending June 30, 1900. 

No business was transacted except to audit the demands of the pensioners 
upon the Firemen's Relief Fund, in accordance with the Charter. 

During that period no new claimants were added to the list of pensioners. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BOARD OF FIRE PENSION FUND COMMISSIONERS. 
S. W. NICOLL, Secretary. 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 



To the. Honorattle James D. Phetan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 



DEAR S a : Pursuant to Section 9, Article XVI, of the Charter of the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, the Park Commissioners herewith present their report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

PHILIP J. FAY, 

Secretary. 



RECEIPTS. 



By balance brought forward 

From taxes 

From rent of children's quarters 

From rent of boat-house 

From Police Court fines 

From sale of horses 

From sale of ducks 

From sale of old iron, etc 

From Pound fees 

From subscription received, Nineteenth avenue boulevard. 

From boarding and keeping Polic* horses 

From Polo Club for labor on field. . . 



$2,754 95 

216.896 62 

1,000 00 

30000 



1735 

4 00 

300 00 

555 96 

18 00 



$222.178 48 



466 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



To construction account 

To maintenance account 

To salaries Superintendent, Secretary and clerks 

To office expanse Telephone, stationery, postage, printing, coal, 
electric lights and general expenses 

Yearly Report- 
Lithographing; $82500 

Printing 294 85 

Squares and Parks - 

Construction 3,462 30 

Maintenance 9,64566 

Balance on hand... 



$77,800 90 

122,469 61 

6,897 21 

754 45 



1,119 85 



13,107 96 
28 50 



$222,178 48 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



467 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


STRUCTURES. 

Iron on bear cage ... 


$32 00 




Building shed and walk Seventeenth avenue station. 


426 77 






3,709 00 




Hardware used on structures 


13 63 




Paints used on structures 


15 60 




Rustic bridge at Lakelet 


437 75 




Building fence, south side . . 


481 45 




Building hay shed for buffaloes .. .... 


49 67 




Concrete steps at new music stand 


2,155 40 




Constructing tunnel at new music stand 


1.869 63 




WATER WORKS. 

Extension of water-pipe Labor and material 


$3,876 39 


$9,190 90 


Deepening reservoir , 


5^115 50 




Labor, lumber, hardware, etc., sundries, belting, wire-cloth, paints, 
valves, grading, etc 


254 60 




DRAINAGE. 

Labor, material, pit>e, etc 


$762 50 


9,246 49 


NURSERY. 

Grading, etc 


$780 50 


762 50 


Seeds and plants 


91 88 




Constructing propagating house, frames, paints, "etc 


3753 




ROADS AND WALKS. 

Constructing drive around lake 


$1 844 90 


1,248 91 


Constructing bridle-path 


923 00 




Constructing walk and drive at new lake 


1,210 70 




Constructing walk at First avenue 


45 50 




Widening drive on the great highway ". 


5,637 50 




Now in course of construction- 
Opening drive from Nineteenth avenue to south drive 


198 30 




Walk from Ninth avenue to music stand . 


157 35 




Sundries fowder, fuse and hardware 


200 87 








10,218 12 



468 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT-CONTINUED. 



GROUNDS. 

To labor, material, etc., of grading, forming, dressing, trimming am 1 
fertilizing grounds and purchasing of loam and manure and trees. 

Improving grounds 

Loam and manure 

Supplies -Hard ware, implements, etc 

Trees, seed, etc 

Grading for new music stand 

Improving grounds around chain of lakes 

Improving grounds in deer park Labor and material 

Improving grounds at Broom poinfe 

Improving grounds at beach 

PLANTATIONS, FORESTS AND RECLAMATIONS. 

Planting trees Loam, etc., for reclaiming the sand drifts- 
Labor in hauling loam and manure 

Loam purchased 

Trees and seed "... 

Moving Araucaria Imbricata 

Flower calendar, trees, labor, etc 

CONSERVATORY. 

To purchasing new plant?, etc 

STOCK AND IMPLEMENTS. 

To horizontal engine, 10x12, 

Plows, harrows and implements 

One white deer and two common 

MUSEUM. 
To new show-cases, alterations, etc 



$5,826 65 

10,547 56 

122 53 

3.138 78 

150 75 

1,129 75 

1,934 50 

340 00 

237 00 



$16,644 65 

6,236 69 

78 00 

311 60 

1.181 44 



$152 55 



$225 00 
63 02 
45 60 



$134 70 



$23.427 52- 



24,452 38 



15255 



33362 



13470 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



469 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT-CONCLUDED. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


SMALL WORKS. 

To construction of lakelets Labor, material, clay, cement 


$7,751 10 
355 75 


$7,751 10 


Columbia Square Trees, plants. 


155 25 




City Hall Square Trees plants .. 


214 78 




Hamilton Square Trees, plants 


2 00 




South Park Square Trees and plants . ... 


800 




Portsmouth Square Trees plants .. 


30 88 




Union Square Trees f plants, regrading, loam nick 


4,040 21 




Alta Plaza Trees, plants 


168 75 




J eff arson Square Trees, plants 


41250 




Lafayette Sqnare Trees plants. ... .... 


800 92 

















MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


STRUCTURES. 

To labor, lumber, paints, oils, hardware, etc., used in the general 
maintenance of buildings. 


$5 421 05 




Material. . . .... 


2,459 55 














$7.880 60 



470 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT-CONTINUED, 



WATER WORKS. 

To labor in repairing water-pipe, enginaer, caal, labor and material. 

Labor 

Coal 

Oil and material 

DRAINAGE. 

To labor and material for maintenance of sewers 

ROADS AND WALKS. 

To labor and material, repairing, cleaning, dressing, sprinkling roads 

and walks 

Powder, fuse, hardware, clay, etc 

GROUNDS. 

To maintenance of lawns and grounds generally- 
Labor and material 

Supplies Hose, seed, hardware, poison, loam, manure, etc 

FOREST, PLANTATIONS AND RECLAMATION. 

Labor 

Hardware 

STOCK AND IMPLEMENTS. 

Labor on stock 

Repairing implements 

Purchasing horses 

Feed for birds and animals 

Medicine 

Insurance on stock 



3,855 30 
3,557 17 
1,810 64 



$380 14 



$10,229 44 
588 41 



$45,168 14 
881 48 



$3,474 85 
41 62 



$3,652 35 

1,927 62 

825 00 

1,011 23 

54 00 

134 00 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



471 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT-CONCLUDED. 



CONSERVATORY. 

To current cost of the Conservatory, including labor, fuel and ma- 
terial, etc 

Labor 

Coal 

Material, plant, bulbs, etc 

MUSEUM. 

Labor , 

Coal 

Gas 

General expense, supplies, etc 

ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Lights , 

Supplies Carbon, globes, etc 

POLICING. 

Labor 

Keeping of horses.. ,, 

Rent of bicycles 

Gas and telephone, etc , , 

Harness 

MUSIC. 
To weekly concerts 

SUNDRIES. 

To general current expense- 
Freight and expressage on plants 

Electric lights in lodge , 

Petty general expense 

W ire-cloth, aviary 



$4,473 45 
857 50 



$5,914 85 

520 47 

16850 

1,042 99 



$1,830 65 
92 51 



$7,772 89 

1,200 00 

151 00 

82 54 

95 75 



$1,957 50 



$147 17 
102 75 
123 16 

137 00 



$5.537 82 



7,646 81 



1,923 16 



9,302.09 



1.957 50 



51008 



472 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



APPORTIONED ACCOUNTS. 



STABLE. 

Labor 

Hay, grain, feed, etc 

Supplies, drugs, brushes, hardware, etc 

Veterinary services 

NURSERY. 

Labor 

Seeds, lumber and material 

SQUARES AND PARKS. 

To labor, material and implements- 
Alamo Square 

Alta Plaza 

Columbia Square 

City Hall Square 

Garfield Square 

Hamilton Square 

Jefferson 

Lafayette 

South Park 

Portsmouth Square 

Washington 

Union Square 

School groundi , 

General expense . . 



80 
4,859 17 
322 27 
263 00 



$6,686 60 
441 33 



$1,302 94 
1,047 88 
725 26 
933 82 
481 37 
740 45 
1,444 61 
779 12 
31275 
37335 
345 58 
865 48 
154 00 
139 05 



$8,441 24 



7,127 93 



9,645 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS 



POLICE RELIEF AND PENSION FUND 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 

To the Honorable Jus. D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIR : The following Board of Police Pension Fund Commissioners was in office 
at the beginning of the fiscal year July 1, 1899, continuing in office up to January 8 1900, and 
noting under authority of an Act to create a Police Relief, Health and Life Insurance and 
Pension Fund m the several counties, cities and counties, cities and towns of the State of 
California, approved March 4, 18S9, as amended by Acts approved March 31, 1891, and March 
2, 1897 : 

ROBERT J. TOBIN President 

WILLIAM ALVORD Commissioner 

MOSES A. GUNST , Commissioner 

ISAIAH W. LEF.S *Chief of Police and ex-offlcio Commissioner 

C. P. WRIG HT tSesretary 



* Up to his retirement from active duty, January 2, 1900. 
t Up to his retirement from active duty, January 8, 1900. 



The Board of Police Relief and Pension Fund Commissioners assuming office January 
8, 1900, by virtue of the provisions of the Charter of the City and County of San Francisco, 
approved by the Legislature of the State, January 26, 1899, and acting under authority of 
Chapter X of Article VIII of said Charter. 

GEORGE A. NEWHALL President 

W. F. McNuTT Commissioner 

WILLIAM THOMAS 'Commissioner 

W. J. BIGGY fCommissioner 

WILLIAM T. WALLACE JOommissioner 

DAVID I. MA HON EY {Commissioner 

K. F. CONWAY {Secretary 



* Resigned February 1, 1900, 
t Removed February 13, 1900. 
t Seated February 13, 1900. 
Appointed February 28. 1900. 



474 REPORT OP PENSION FUND COMMISSIONERS. 



The following police officers of the City and Count}' of San Francisco were retired from 
active duty and pensioned by the Board of Police Pension Fund Commissioners holding 
office up to January 8, 1900, under the provisions of an Act to create a Police Relief, Health 
and Life Insurance and Pension Fund in the several counties, cities and towns of the Stutf . 
of California, approved March 4, 1889, as amended by Acts approved March 31, 1891, and 
March 2, 1897, viz. : 



NAME. 


Section under which 
retired 


PENSION 
PER 
MONTH. 

j 


RANK. 


DATE WHEN 
RETIRBD. 


I. W Lee? 


3 


165 66^ 


Chief of Police 


Jan, 2, 1900 


Cassius P. Wright 


4 and 5 
4 and 5 


74 00 
74 00 


Clerk to Chief of Police. 


Jan. 6, 1900 
Dec 31 1899 


William Price 


4 and 5 


61 50 




July 12 18S9 




3 


61 50 




Nov. 2, 1899 




3 


61 50 | 


Sergeant 


Dec. 7, 1899 




4 ancl 5 


61 50 1 


Sergeant 


Dec. 31, 1899 




4 and 5 


61 50 


Sergeant 


Dec. 31, 1899 


Thomas W. Bethel 


4 and 5 

4 and 5 


61 50 
61 50 


Sergeant 


Dec. 31, 1899 
Jan. 5 1900 


Dennis Courneen 
Matthew Wilson 


3 
3 


50 CO 
50 00 


Patrolman 


Aug. 2, 1899 
Oct. 2, 1899 


Charles H Hall. 


4 and 5 


50 00 




Oct. 5, 1899 




4 and 5 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Oct. 5, 1899 


Patrick E Fleming 


4 and 5 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Oct. 5, 1899 


Daniel C. Libby 


3 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Oct. 5, 1899 




3 


50 00 




Nov. 2, 1899 


Patrick Menihan 


4 and 5 


50 CO 




Dec. 6, 1899 


\rnos M Williams 


4 and r > 


50 00 




Dec 6, 1899 


Thomas J. Duggan 


3 
4 and 5 


50 00 
50 00 


Patrolman 
Patrolman 


Dec 6, 1899 
: Dec. 31, 1899 




4 and 5 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Dec. 31, 1899 


Levi M Benjamin 


4 and 5 


50 00 


Patrolman 


; Dec. 31, 1899 






50 00 




Dec. 31, 1899 


Thomas Byrne 


4 and 5 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Dec. 31. 1899 


Maurice Behan.... 


4 and 5 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Dec. 31, 1899 


Thomas H. Dillon 


3 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Dec. 31, 1899 




3 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Dec. 31, 1899 




4 and 5 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Jan. 5, 1900 


Thomas C. Tryon 


4 and 5 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Jan. 6, 1900 













Died March 25, 1900. 



REPORT OF PENSION FUND COMMISSIONERS. 475- 



The following police officers of the City and County of San Francisco were.retired from 
active duty and pensioned by the Board of Police Relief and Pension Fund Commissioners, 
who assumed office on January 8, 1900, under the authority of Chapter X of Article VIII of 
the Charter : 



NAMK.| 


Section of Chapter 
X, Article VIII. 
of the Charter, un- 
der which retired. 


PENSION. 


RANK. 


DATE WHEN" 
RETIRED. 




3 


$50 00 




Apr 16 1900 


Daniel McNeill 


3 


50 00 




Apr. 16 1900 




3 


75 00 


Detective Sergeant . 


Apr 16 1900- 


Daniel Coleinan 


1 and 2 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Apr. 16 1900 


John W Shields 


1 and 2 


61 50 


Sergeant 


Apr. 16, 1900 


Mier Lindheimer 


1 and 2 


61 50 


Sergeant 


Apr. 16, 1900 


Benjamin F. Bohen 


1 and 2 


124 00 


Captain of Detectives.. . 


Apr. 16, 1900 























DECEASED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



NAME. 


PENSION. 


RANK. 


DIED. 




$50 00 




Sept 15 1899 


Michael Fit/gerald 


50 00 




Nov 2 1899 


Joseph F Murphy 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Mar 25 1900 











RESTORED TO ACTIVE SERVIOE DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



NAME. 


PENSION. 


RANK. 


RESTORED 
TO ACTIVE 
SERVICE. 


Cassius P. Wright 


$61 50 


Sergeant 


June 26 1900 


Edgar R. Harper 


61 50 


Sergeant 


June 26 1900 




61 50 




June 26 1900 


William Price. ... 


61 50 


Sergeant 


June 26 190C 











476 REPORT OF PENSION FUND COMMISSIONERS. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Number of retired officers drawing pensions on Ju'y 1, 1899 49 

Other persons drawing pensions on July 1, 1899 2 



Total drawing pensions on July 2, 1899 



Number of officers retired during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900 .................. 37 

Other persons granted pensions during fiscal year ending June 30, 19GO ................ 

Total pensioned during fiscal year ending June 30, 1900 .......................... 

Deceased during fiscal year ending June 30, 1900 ....................................... 3 

Restored to active duty during fiscal year ending June 30. 1900 ......................... 4 

Total removed from pension roll during fiscal year, ending June 30, 1900 ........... 7 

Total drawing pensions on July 2, 1900 ........................................... 



30 



LIST OF PENSIONED AND RETIRED OFFICERS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900. 



NAME. 


PEXSIOX 
PBR MONTH. 


RANK. 


DATE WHBN 
RETIRED. 




*165 66i 


Chief of Police 


Apr. 7,1897 




165 66^ 


Chief of Police 


Jan. 2, 1900 




124 00 


Captain of Detectives 


Apr. 16. 1900 


Will : am Y Douglas 


74 00 




July 31, 1895 




74 CO 


Captain. 


July 31, 1895 


Cassius P Wright 


74 00 


Chief Clerk 


Jan. 6, 1900 




74 00 


Property Clerk .... 


Dec. 31,1899 


George W Bennett 


69 00 


Lieutenant 


Apr. 4, 1898 


Delia Burke 


46 00 


Widow of Lieutenant Burke 




Raymond Silvey 


74 00 
61 50 


Detective Sergeant 


Apr, 16, 1900 
Jan 5 1900 




61 50 




Apr 13 1900 


William Price 


61 50 


Sergeant 


July 12, 1899 


Thomas W Bethel 


61 50 




Dec 31 1899 




61 50 




Dec 31, 1899 











Restored to active service June 26, 1900. 



REPORT OF PENSION FUND COMMISSIONERS. 477 



LIST OF PENSIONED AND RETIRED OFFICERS-CONTINUED. 



NAME. 


PENSION 
PER MONTH. 


BANK. 


DATE WHEN 
1 
RETIRED. 




.$61 50 


Sergeant^ . 






61 50 


Sergeant 




John W Shields 


61 50 


Sergeant 






61 50 


Sergeant 




William D. Hensley 


61 50 


Sergeant 


Apr 8 1890 


Abraham Sharp 


61 50 


Sergeant 


Aug 31, 1893 


William P. Coles 


61 50 


Sergeant . 


Apr. 23 1894 


George W. Harmau 


61 50 


Sergeant. 


Jan. 31 1895 


Abraham J. Houghtaling. . . . 


61 50 


Sergeant 


Jan. 3, 1898 


Edward Cohrn 


61 50 


Sergeant. . . 


July 31 1895 


Cornelius Martin 


61 50 


Sergeant. 


Jan 3, 1898 


John Avan 


61 50 


Sergeant 


Nov. 2, 18i8 


Michael Fitzgerald* 


61 50 


Sergeant 


Jan. 3, 1898 


John D. Dolan 


57 50 


Corporal 


Sept. 1, 1899 


John Heaney 


57 50 


Corporal 


Apr. 3, 1899 


Jacob Lerman 


57 50 


Corporal 


Dec. 31, 1895 


Frederick Smith t 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Jan. 1, 1899 


Henry Gardinier , 


50 00 




Sept 30 1899 


John Beatty 


50 00 




Sept 30 1899 


Patrick McDonough 


5000 


Patrolman 


Sept 30 1899 


James H. Cochran 


50 00 


Patrolman 




William Tyner 


50 00 




Sept 30 1899 


William Birch 


50 00 


Patrolman. 




William P. Morehouse 


50 00 


Patrolman. . .. . . . 


Jan 1 1 899 


Charles O'Malley 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Jan 20 18&9 


William Gaynor 


50 00 






John Birmingnam 


50 00 






Dennis Courneeu 


50 00 






Matthew Wilson 


50 00 




Oct 2 1899 


Daniel C. Libby 


50 00 






Patrick E. Fleming 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Oct 5 1899 











* Died November 2, 1899. 
t Died September 15, 1899. 



473 REPORT OF PENSION FUND COMMISSIONERS. 



LIST OF PENSIONED AND RETIRED OFFICERS-CONTINUED. 



NAME. 


PBNSIOX 
rER|MOXTH. 


RANK. 


DATE WHEN 
RETIRBD. 


Dennis Hayden 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Oct 5 1899 


Charles H Hall 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Oct 5 1899 




50 00 


Patrolman 


Nov 2 1&99 




50 00 


Patrolman. 


Dec. 6 1899 




50 00 


Patrolman 


Dec 6 189 


Patrick Menihan 


50 00 


Patrolman . . 


Dec. 6, 1899 




5'J 00 


Patrolman 


Dec. 31, 1899 




50 00 


Patrolman. 


Dec. 31 1899 




50 00 


Patrolman. 


Dec. 31, 1899 




50 00 


Patrolman, 


Dec. 3', 1899 




50 00 


Patrolman 


Dec. 31, 1899 




50 00 


Patrolman 


Dec 31, 1899 




53 00 


Patrolman. 


Dec. 31, 1899 




50 00 


Patrolman 


Dec. 31.1899 




50 00 


Patrolman 


Jan. 5 1900 




50 00 


Patrolman. . . 


Jan 6 1900 




50 00 


Patrolman. 


Apr. 16 19'0 


Dani 1 McNeill 


50 00 


Patrolman. . 


Apr 16 1900 




50 00 


Patrolman 


\j> r ]6 1900 




50 00 


Patrolman 


Jan. 4 1897 




50 00 




July 1, 1897 


Michael Murphy 


50 00 




Jan 3 1898 




50 00 




Sept 3D 1889 




50 00 ' 




Apr 3 1890 




50 00 


Patrolman 


Apr. 13 1890 




50 00 


Patrolman. 


Apr. 6 1891 


Francis C McMahon 


50 00 


Patrolman 


July 6, 1893 




50 00 




Feb 26 1894 




50 00 




Sept 1, 1894 




50 00 




Sept. 30 1894 


Joseph H. Brigaerts 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Feb. 18. 185 











REPORT OF PENSION FUND COMMISSIONERS. 479 



LIST OF PENSIONED AND RETIRED OFFICERS-CONCLUDED. 



NAME. 


PENSION 
PER MONTH. 


RANK. 


DATE WHEN 

RETIRED. 




$50 00 


Patrolman 


July 31 1895 


James L. Gallagher 


50 00 


Patrolman 


July 31, 1895 


Alexander B. Asher 


50 00 


Patrolman, .... 


July 31. 1895 


Michael Lof tus 


50 00 




Jan. 3, 1898 


George A. Anderson 


50 00 




Jan. 3, 1898 


Thomas McNulty 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Jan. 3 1898 


Charles C Wells 


50 00 




Apr 4 1898 


William Little 


50 00 


Patrolman 


Apr 30 1898 




50 00 




July 5 1898 


Amelia Michaels 


33 33 


Widow of Michael Michaels 






50 00 




Dec. 31, 1899 











* Died March 25, 1900. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 

By amount paid in pensions during fiscal year 1899-1900 $45,760 19 

By amounts paid for other purposes 

C. P. Wright, Secretary $300 00 

K. F. Conway, Secretary 260 00 

Dr. G. M. Terrill (examining applicants for pensions) 70 00 

Dr. T. L. Mahoney (examining applicants for pensions) 70 00 

650 00 

By total amount paid from Pension Fund $46,410 19 

BOARD OF POLICE RELIEF AND PENSION FUND COMMISSIONERS. 
K. F. CONWAY, Secretary. 



REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF INTERMENT OF 
DECEASED EX-UNION SOLDIERS. 



SHOWING THE NUMBER OF APPLICATIONS, REJECTIONS AND INTERMENTS 
OF EX UNION SOLDIERS, SAILORS AND MARINES OF THE WAR OF THE 
REBELLION AND VETERANS OF THE MEXICAN WAR DURING THE FISCAL 
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



SAX FRAXCISCO, July 1, 1900. 
To thf. Honorable James D. P'nelan, Ma^or 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR Sis : I have the honor to report to you the following, in carrj-ing out the provi- 
sions of the Act of the Legislature of this State, entitled, "An Act to provide for the burial 
of ex-Union soldiers and sailors who may hereafter die without leaving sufficient means to 
defray funeral expenses." (Approved Mareh 15, 1889.) 

The following is a record of applications, rejections and burials for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1900, viz.: 

Total number of applications for interment 70 

Applications for interment allowed 49 

Applications for interment rejected 21 

70 
The cases rejected were for the following causes : 

Left sufficient means to defray funeral expenses 7 

Died outside City and County of San Francisco 3 

Insufficient military or naval record 11 

21 

Regarding receipts and expenditures ; Section 5 of the Act of March 15, 1889, reads;: 
"That the person appointed as provided in Section 1 of this Act shall not receive any com- 
pensation for any duties he may perform in compliance with this Act;" consequently there 
are no expenditures for salaries, stationery, etc., to record in this report, outside the 
$2,450.00 drawn from the City and County Treasury on approved demands, and paid to the 
undertakers of this city for the burial of the forty-nine deceased ex-Union Veterans of the 
War of the Rebellion and Veterans of the Mexican War. 

Very respectfully. 

EDWARD A. BULLIS, 

Superintendent of Interment. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



SAN FRANCISCO, August 1, 1900. 

Tu the Honorable Jamet D. Phelan, Mayvr 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

SIR : The Bovd of Public Works herewith transmits its report for the fiscal year 
1899-1900. 

Respectfully, 

G. H. MENDELL, 
A. B. MAGUIRE, 
MARSDEN HANSON, 
Commissioners of the Department of 

Public Works. 
J. LBO PARK, Secretary. 



By Article VI of the Charter of San Francisco, there was created a Department 
of Public Works, under the direction and control of three Commissioners. In 
compliance with this Article, Hon. James D. Phelan, Mayor of San Francisco, 
designated the following Commissioners of this Department: 

Col. George H. Mendell, for a term of three years and Presidant of the 
Board; Jeremiah Mahony, Esq., for a term of two years; Marsden Manson, C. E., 
for a term of one year. 

Mr. Mahony held the appointment until February, when his resignation was 
accepted by the Mayor. His successor, A. B. Maguire, was appointed June 27th. 

The new Charter went into effect at noon, the 8th day of January. 1900. At 
one (1) o'clock on that day, the above-named Commissioners met in the office of 
the City and County Surveyor In the City Hall, presentsd their credentials, and 
th Board of Public Works was declared organized by the President. 

It than elected Mr. J. Leo Park, Secretary, and Mr. C. E. Grunsky, City 
Engineer. Mr. A. J. Donovan, Principal Deputy in the former Street Depart- 
ment, was continued in charge of that office and directed to report the number 
of employees necessary to discharge the duties of that branch of the City Govern- 
ment. 

The records of the City and County Surveyor's Office were taken charge of 
and placed in the hands of the City Engineer. 

In order to fully dischargs the' duties of the Department, meetings were held 
31 



482 REPORT OF THE BOARD 

daily until the 3d of February; tri-weekly until March 20th; bi-weekly until May 
25th, and weekly thereafter, with such special meetings as were found necessary 
or expedient. 

The duties of the Board prescribed in the Charter include everything that ap- 
pertains to constructing, repairing, cleaning and lighting public streets of the city; 
all public engineering work and construction of every kind; all repairs, super- 
vision and lighting of public buildings or other structures; supervision of all 
private constructions; of all constructions or repairs under the streets; of con- 
duits of every kind laid of corporations or private parties holding franchises; of 
the surveys of lots and streets; opening new streets and fixing grades; of the 
janitorial service of the City Hall and all other public buildings and such other 
incidental matters that may be assigned to it or authorized under Ordinance of 
the Supervisors. 

These duties of the Board of Public Works are performed under Ordinance of 
the Board of Supervisors, as adopted from time to time. The Board's powers are 
purely administrative. 

It was not possible, mainly by want of funds appropriated, for the Board to 
assume at once all the duties assigned to it by the Charter. For this reason, the 
Board of Fire Wardens continued during the fiscal year to inspect private build- 
ings and to perform certain other work as had been its custom. 

The offices of the Department have been and are now scattered in widely 
separated parts of the City Hall, awaiting the transfer of the Police Courts and 
the Police Department to the Hall of Justice, when it shall have been com- 
pleted. This unfortunate condition has, in a considerable degree, embarrassed 
the operation of this Department. 

One of the first duties falling to the Commission was the fixing of fees for 
street work performed by the City Engineer and his assistants. These fees were 
recommended to the Board of Supervisors and all fees connected therewith are 
paid into the City Treasury. The amounts of the fees are set forth in the re- 
port of the City Engineer. Upon inquiry, the Board found quite a number of 
Deputies in the former Street Department who had no specific duties assigned 
them. These were at once notified that their services would be no longer required. 
Complete inventories of tools and materials in the possession of the former 
Superintendent of Streets were received from that official, verified and signed. 
Also inventories of tools, machinery and supplies in the repair department of 
the Fire Commissioners and in the repair department of the schools. 

There was in the possession of the Superintendent of Streets $4,307.18, being 
moneys deposited in his hands for special permits and privileges, as provided for 
by law, and to be returned to the depositors upon compliance therewith. The 
City and County Attorney advised the Board of Public Works that it should re- 
ceive said deposits and account therefor. The above-named amount was there- 
fore accepted and receipt therefor given, and this fund was deposited with the 
City Treasurer. Later, this official, finding that the Charter does not designate 
a fund into which said deposits could be credited, declined to remain custodian 
cf the same. The funds were, therefore, transferred to the Bank of Wells, Fargo 
& Co., and arrangements made to draw upon the same by checks in avor of par- 
ties to whom portions of such funds became due. 

In order to systematize the duties of the Department of Public Works, it was 
determined that it should be divided into the following bureaus: 

First Bureau of Engineering. 

Second Bureau of Streets. 

Third Bureau of Building. 

Fourth Bureau of Light and Water Service. 

These are to be subdivided whenever more desirable administration can be 
thereby attainsd. 



OF PUBLIC WORKS 483 

The first-named Bureau is under charge of the City Engineer elected by the 
Board, Mr. C. E. Grunsky. In addition to the engin3ering, surveying, construc- 
tion of public works, except buildings, this Bureau has charge of the surveys 
and Investigations assigned to the Board by the Charter, under the head of Public 
Utilities, which comprise water works, works for power and light, for acquiring 
street railroads, etc. 

The other Bureaus are, or will be, under the direction of Chiefs or Superin- 
tendents, who. under the direction of the Board, are to direct the operations of 
thair respective Bureaus. 

The Board at once assumed the charge of the City Hall, and of the jankorial 
service and repairs of all public buildings not in course of construction, and of 
the duties assigned by the Charter or by the Ordinance of the Supervisors appsr- 
taining to streets. 

The pavements of this city have generally been laid without intelligent, and 
in many cases under fraudulent, supervision. The specifications of the contracts, 
if the work had been carefully and honestly supervised, would have produced 
much better results, but concrete, hardly worthy of the name, is to-day the 
foundation of many of the bituminized streets. Miles of block stone pavements 
exist, but little better than the almost discarded cobblestones. 

Progress has been made in reforming the long-existing system, but complete 
reform requires new men, capable and attentive; better materials and better 
methods; and time is required for the creation and establishment of these favor- 
able conditions. 

Specifications have been prepared which ought to, and doubtless will, result 
in bettor pavements, bituminous rock, asphalt and basalt. 

The prices paid for materials by this Board are lower than those before in 
practice. A system of responsibility now exists which Insures faithfulness in 
caring for public property, which was apparently absent in the past. 

One of the serious difficulties confronting the Board of Public Works was the 
maintenance of a bridge across Channel street at its Intersection with Fourth 
street. This bridge was built some six years ago, upon badly designed plans and 
of rather defective workmanship. The structure has been repeatedly strained 
by collision of vessels passing through the draw, and by the settlement of an un- 
supported fill on the south end. It will be desirable to replace this bridge in the 
near future by one of more modern type and better designed to meet the require- 
ments of the locality, maintenance and operation of the present structure being 
a very serious tax upon the city. 

In the discharge of its duties up to July 1st, 1900, the Board held sixty-seven 
(67) meetings. Petitions, protests, requests and complaints numbering two hun- 
dred and eighty-six (286) have been presented or referred to it concerning streets, 
sewers, buildings and encroachments, etc. Upon a majority of these reports have 
been made by individual Commissioners or by one of the employees of the various 
Bureaus. 

In addition to this one hundred and twenty-two (122) special reports and com- 
munications have bsen considered. 

The Board of Supervisors has referred twenty-six (26) resolutions and a larg 
number of the above-named petitions, besides miscellaneous and unclassified sub- 
jects. 

In carrying out this work it has bsen necessary to prepare one hundred and 
seventy two (172) resolutions. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 



OPERATIONS DURING THE YEAR 1900-1901. 

The allotment of money for the support of the Department of Public Works, 
during the present fiscal year, is $637,194.00, distributed bewteen the different 
Bureaus as follows: 



1. Bureau of Streets 

2. Bureau of Engineering 

3. Bureau of Building 

4. Bureau of Light and Water. . . , 
i. Commissioners' office . . . 



AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


$436,434 00 




87,930 00 




91,100 00 




2,350 00 




19,380 00 









BUREAU OF STREETS. 

Deducting from the total the items for street sweeping and sprinkling, the 
rsmainder represents the money available for administration, repairs of streets 
and sawers, roads and bridges and new construction: 



Total allotment 

Amount allotted for sweeping and sprinkling 

Sum available for all street purposes, other than sweep- 
ing and sprinkling 



$436,434 00 
205,400 00 



$231,034 00 



OF PUBLIC WORKS. 485 

The appropriations are here given for the past six (6) years, including the 
present year: 

1895-96 $359,000 00 

1896-97 357.500 00 

1897-98 392,500 00 

1S98-99 350, 500 00 

1899-1900 239,982 00 

1900-01 231,034 00 

As a comparison of amounts expanded elsewhere, the following table of ex- 
penditures may be interesting: 

In Boston, during 1 the year 1898, the expenditure in paving, street 

watering and cleaning, and in general street improvements was... $2, 174, 612 49 
And for sewers 1,135,32779 



Total $3,309,940 28 

The allowance for the present year is the lowest in the record. It is little 
more than sufficient to maintain the streets and sewers in their present condition, 
but it is hoped that a sufficient surplus may result to pay for a few new blocks 
of pavement, absolutely necessary for accommodation of commerce. The most 
pressing of these demands appear to be the commercial traffic streets south of 
Market street, connecting with the railroads and ships. 

It is not hoped to put Spear street in condition to meet demands throughout 
its length during the present year, but if the unserviceable portion between Har- 
rison and Bryant streets, authorization to build which was asked of the Super- 
visors in June, can be restored, this, with a new block on Main street, between 
Mission and Howard streets, will very much better present conditions and serve 
to tide over the year. 

It is also hoped to replace cobbles with basalt blocks on Fourth street, and 
cover several blocks north of Market street with bituminous pavement. 

There is considerable settlement below authorized grades in Market street, 
from First street to the Ferry, and in the streets which adjoin Market street on 
both sides, north and south. 

The restoration of these street levels and repaving of the blocks are properly 
all parts of a single, problem, which, when begun, should be continuously prose- 
cuted to completion. This work is obviously beyond the year's possibilities. In- 
deed, under pressing requirements in other directions, no particular consideration 
has been given to the matter, which is here mentioned in order to call attention 
to a. necessity not far distant in the future, and which, when met, will go far 
to give to merchandise transportation the best practicable street facilities. 

It would be easy to cite other instances of pressing requirements in the re- 
placement of cobbles, where grades permit, and the repair or replacement of 
rough and noisy pavements. 

Indeed, the demands are so great in every quarter as to make it plain that a 
period of years will be required to satisfy them. 

Nor is it alone on street surfaces that attention is requited. The absence or 
inefficiency of sewers, while less observable to the eye, calls for correction in 
many directions. Our main reliance in this direction is upon the prospective 
Issue of bonds, for in the present year we can hardly hope to more than keep 
sewers in reoair. 

The preparation of specifications for pavements has been, and is, an important 
work of the Bureau of Engineering, which looks to a betterment of existing 



486 REPORT OF THE BOARD 

methods and to introduction of other constructions not now authorized by 
Ordinances of the Board of Supervisors. These specifications are to include the 
following methods, namely: Basalt blocks, laid upon foundations of graded sand 
and gravel and upon concrete; bituminous rock and asphaltum upon concrete and 
upon the old surfaces of blocks and cobbles, and wood blocks upon concrete. 

Whenever a suitable brick appears in the market, its use for pavements will 
be considered. 

It may be stated, as a general proposition, that throughout the business area 
of the city the pavements require reconstruction. The grades are generally light, 
and for the most part permit the adoption of any road surface suitable for the 
current traffic. 

For traffic of heaviest load, basalt upon concrete will be required, and in 
other cases of lighter loads, bituminized surfaces upon concrete, or upon a founda- 
tion of the old street covering, namely, blocks or cobbles. 

The cobblestones will disappear or remain only upon steep slopes, imprac- 
ticable with other covering. 

The areas to be rebuilt lie about equal on each side of Market street, and in- 
clude portions of all the distinctively named portions of the city, including dis- 
tricts known as North Beach, the Mission, the Western Addition, North of 
Market, East and West of Kearny and South of Market. 

The Merchants' Association, as a result of much study of street paving re- 
quirements, proposes a definite schedule of reconstruction, which in four years 
can be made to cover these various districts with new pavements, adapted te 
different needs, at a yearly expense of one hundred and twenty-five thousand dol- 
lars ($125,000.00) or a total of five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000.00). This 
amount is certainly a minimum appropriation, if we consider the area to be 
covered, the necessity to be served, and the restoration of grades in the lower 
Market street vicinity already referred to. 

If bonds were issued, it might be advisable to reduce the period of reconstruc- 
tion to two years, and make the expenditure five hundred thousand dollars 
($500,000.00) per year. In the absence of this resource, a yearly appropriation of 
one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars ($125,000.00) is recommended. 

Disposing of street sweepings and sewer detritus during the present year is 
a new matter of increased expenditure not provided for by appropriation. This 
refuse is. and has been, for the most part deposited on dumps, the capacity of 
which Is now well nigh exhausted. A certain portion of the street sweepings 
most accessible to the Park is now, under the existing contract, delivered to the 
Park. The Park Commissioners have, under the contract, a right to all the 
sweepings, upon the condition that they pay for increased cost to contractor of 
haulage, a privilege which has not been accepted. 

This refuse has value as manure, and the Park needs it all. Therefore, the 
public interest requires that it be deposited in the Park. The most practicable 
method of disposal of the major part is by carriage on the street railway system 
to H street, which borders the Park along its length. 

The Merchants' Association studied the question, and several months since 
submitted a project to the Supervisors, which this Department approves. It con- 
sists of a receiving strtion upon a city lot, situated at Eleventh and Bryant 
streets, within easy connection with the street railway system. The refuse will 
be deposited in bunkers, to be built by the city, from which it may be removed 
by cars and tracks to be provided by the Market-street Railway Company. The 
price asked by the railway company for transportation is thirty (30) cents per 
cubic yard, not exceeding 1800 Ibs. in weight. The company declines to reduce 
the rate, but it seems plain that the rate should be fixed either upon weight or 
upon cubical contents, but not upon both. 



OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



487 



If the Bureau of Streets were sufficiently provided with funds, it could make 
no objection to paying for transportation, but in its restricted condition it has been 
hoped that the Park Commissioners, who can make good use of this manure. 
might sea a way to pay all or a part of the cost of transportation. It has been 
found impossible to make such an arrangement. As the Park Fund is outside 
the dollar limitation in taxation, it is possible, perhaps, for the Supervisors to 
arrange that the transportation may be effected without charge upon the street 
funds. 

The quantity to be transported is about 3,000 cubic yards per month. 

The estimate for the station is $5,660.00. 

BUREAU OF BUILDING. 

The Bureau of Building fulfills the duties concerning buildings and structures 
imposed by the Charter upon the Department of Public Works. These duties con- 
sist in the maintenance, repair and construction of all city public buildings, the 
supervision of all private building, and th3 preparation of plans and estimates for 
all buildings as may be" required by the Supervisors and heads of departments. 
The buildings belonging to the city are the City Hall, the Hall of Justice, the 
Hospitals, Jails and the buildings of the Fire and Police Departments. 

The money appropriated for repairs and maintenance of the school houses, not 
having been allotted by the Supervisors to the Board of Public Works, it is as- 
sumed for the present, with the assent of the Board of Education, that this De- 
partment has no duty in connection with, or control over, said buildings. 

The appropriation for the current year in support of this Bureau is $91,100.00. 

This amount is distributed as follows, namely: 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Repairs to buildings of Fire, Police and Health Departments, 
to iails and City Hall 


$25,250 00 




Employees City Hall, Hall of Justice and scavengering 

New elevator, City Hall, and supplies and power for City Hall 
and Hall of Justice 


39,?50 00 
15,500 00 




The Bureau now consists of an Architect, Superintendent of 
Building, three Inspectors and a Clerk, a minimum organ- 
ization which costs more than the allotment for its sup- 
port namely. 


9,000 00 






2,000 00 




For the nurses' quarters at the City and County Hospital, and 
we have a total of 










$91,100 00 



The allowance for repairs, namely, $25,250.00, is very much below that mads 
in previous years, expenditure upon buildings of the Fire Department alone having 
been about $25,000.00. 



488 REPORT OP THE BOARD 

The duties of this Bureau were formerly distributed among special commissions 
or in the respective departments of the city government, who selected architects 
to make plans, specifications and estimates for construction or repair, or other- 
wise arranged, at their own discretion, while the supervision of private building 
construction and enforcement of Ordinances of Supervisors relating thereto, came 
within the prescribed duties of the Fire Wardens. 

These duties are now performed by the Bureau of Building. 

Owing to absence of any provision for its support, it could not be organized 
until the beginning of the year, and for a similar reason it is yet but imperfectly 
organized in a provisional manner. 

This is a new expense. The Fire Wardens who exercised ihis supervision 
before the Charter drew compensation from the Fire Department, so that the cost 
of the service was not apparent. 

The probable staff at present necessary for inspection and maintenance con- 
sists of an Architect, a Superintendent, at least four (4) Inspectors and a Clerk. 
Whenever plans and specifications for new buildings are called for, provision for 
an increase of staff will be necessary. 

For the present Mr. William Mooser Jr. holds a provisional appointment as 
Architect, calling for a fraction of his time. 

The people have a great interest in this Bureau, which may not be altogether 
appreciated. Life and property are largely concerned in faithful building. In 
old communities this Bureau is regarded as second in importance only to the 
Street Department. Many conflagrations are traceable to dereliction in construc- 
tion. The temptation of the builder to neglect is great. The saving of money 
may be considerable. The safeguard is a faithful Bureau with competent In- 
spectors. 

This Bureau ought to be self-supporting, and this result is expected if an 
amended ordinance, to be recommended, shall be passed by the Supervisors. 
Under the existing ordinance, the income will probably almost cover the present 
cost of the staff, and amount to about nine thousand dollars ($9,000.00) per year. 

This money, although ordered by ordinance to be credited to the funds of this 
Board, can not, it is understood, be made available for the support of the Bureau; 
nevertheless, the Treasury is practically recouped for the expenditure upon the 
Bureau. 

HOUSING OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

The quarters occupied by the Board and its Bureaux, since January 8th, are 
cramped in space and scattered in locations remote from each other, situated 
upon all the floors of the City Hall, to the great embarrassment of public service. 
The situation even prevents efficient organization. This condition is to be 
remedied upon removal of various offices to the Hall of Justice. 

Owing to circumstances herein mentioned, the Board is disappointed in not 
being able to promise during the present year, in full degree, the improvements 
which it had hoped to introduce, but it trusts that reforms and betterment 
already made in prices of materials bought, and in efficiency of personal services, 
resulting in considerable economies and improved methods, are already recog- 
nizable. 

BUREAU OF ENGINEERING. 

A most important duty and responsibility falling to the Board of Public 
Works is the maintenance of the existing sewer system and the adjustment of all 
repairs, alterations and additions to the main lines of drainage designed in 1899 
and adopted by the Board of Supervisors in that year. 



OP PUBLIC WORKS. 



489 



This duty is performed through the Bureau of Engineering under the City 
Engineer. 

It is possible that during the fiscal year 1900-01 the construction of the main 
drainage system of sewers may be commenced, but whatever may be the outcome 
of the legal decision as to the validity of the bond issue for this purpose, the main 
linos of drainage laid down must in general be followed, for they conform to the 
topography of the peninsula. Special effort is therefore made in each instance to 
fit and adjust all work to these lines of main drainage, and where new work or 
repair work is done along one of these lines the same is as far as possible made 
to conform to the dimensions, alignments and grades laid down in the above- 
mentioned drainage system. 

The Bureau of Engineering did not assume all these duties during the yqar. 
It performed the work of streets and lot surveys formerly done by the City and 
County Surveyor under a system of fees accruing to that official, and also surveys 
for which the city paid this officer at rates fixed by the Board of Supervisors, 
amounting generally to many thousand dollars per year. 

Under the Charter the City Engineer is compensated solely by his fixed pay 
and the fees for his services are paid into the City Treasury. He also performs 
duties assigned to him by the Supervisors or by the Board of Public Works with- 
out extra compansation. 



The outlay of this Bureau from Januarj- 8th was. 
The income from fees was . . . 



The net cost to the city was 

The cost to the city for this service from July 1, 
January 8, 1900, was 



), to 



$9,326 32 
4,818 50 



$4,507 S2 
5,475 00 



Under the old system the cost of work for which fees were not collected at 
rates usually paid to the City and County Surveyor are thus seen to have been 
more than the net cost, $4,507.82, so that this Bureau may be said to have saved 
money for the city. Besides, the services performed by the Bureau of Engineer- 
ins: are much more extensive than the work formerly done by the City and 
County Surveyor, all of the constructive engineering work having been trans- 
ferred to this Bureau. 

There had been designed and partly constructed during the past administra- 
tion a concrete bridge at the intersection of the San Jose Railway and Bosworth 
street The purpose of this structure is to connect the streets adjacent to Glenn 
Park with the Mission Road and to pass the traffic beneath the tracks of the 
railroad. The position of this structure was unfortunate, the foundation being 
mostly in the fill made during the construction of the railway. It was thought 
at the time of the adoption of the plans for this structure that this fill had set- 
tled to a permanent position. This was not found to be the case when the lines 
of foundation were excavated, and in the summer and autumn of 1899 instructions 
were given to the City and County Surveyor's Office to widen the foundations and 



490 REPORT OF THE BOARD 

to introduce joint planes in the structure so as to permit settlement to take 
place without serious injury. Complaints had bean made previous to the organ- 
ization of the Board of Public Works as to the character of the work and doubt 
expressed as to the integrity of the structure. Members of this Board and the 
City Engineer devoted much time and careful consideration to this structure. It 
was finally completed at a cost of $27,286. Although slight and irregular set- 
tlements may be expected from time to time, no serious damage may be antici- 
pated. 

These settlements are due to the irregular foundation and the unfortunate 
necessity of locating the structure through the large fill crossing the north arm 
of Islais Creek. 

Details regarding the operations of the Bureau of Engineering are given in the 
Report of the City Engineer, which forms Appendix A of this report. 

THE BUREAU OF STREETS. 

The Board found in the Street Department a number of employees receiving 
high compensations and doing little or no service. The lists were very much re- 
duced and the service has since been greatly improved by replacement of as- 
sistants by others more competent and industrious, and by considerable change in 
the working force. 

The improvements in tone of the service as well as in the amount of work 
done per man is noticeable. But the correction of long-standing evils cannot be 
accomplished without systematic and sustained effort extending over considerable 
time. 

This Bureau is charged with the maintenance and repair of streets and sewers. 
Although the previous winter rain had been comparatively light, very extensive 
breaks had occurred in several of the important sewers of the city, notably in 
Brannan street and in Sacramento street. The county roads leading southward 
into San Mateo County were almost impassable by reason of discharge into the 
road of drainage water carrying large quantities of sand and waste, which had 
been deposited upon the roadway. The repairs of the breaks seriously taxed the 
funds 'remaining to the credit of this work, and the Board was forced, in the 
case of repairs of county roads, to draw upon street funds. 

The Street Department, previously to January 8th, 1900, had charge of: 

1. The construction of sewers. 

2. The laying of all pavements and sidewalks by public and private contra'cts. 

3. The maintenance, repair of sewers and pavements. 

4. Street sprinkling and cleaning. 

5. The inspection of all sub-surface conduits and connections therewith. 

6. The care and maintenance of public squares and street fountains. 

Under the better subdivision of this work, provided in the Charter, the Bureau 
of Streets has been restricted to: 

1. The maintenance and repair of pavements. 

2. The repair and cleaning of sewers and making connections therewith. 

3. Supervising the cleaning and sprinkling of streets. 

4. The inspection of connections made with conduits laid in the streets. 

The construction of sewers and the grading and paving of new streets has 
been transferred to the Bureau of Engineering, and the care of public squares to 
the Park Commission. 

The cost of the work performed at the expense of the city, including the 



OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



491 



superintendence of the same and of that done by persons and corporations during 
the fiscal year 1899-1900 has been $398,862.72.* This left a surplus in the funds 
availabla for this work of $21,654.17. This surplus could have been advantageously 
spent upon streets and sewers, but deficiencies in other departments of the city 
government made it necessary for the Board of Public Works, at the suggsstion 
of the Honorable Mayor and Board of Supervisors, to restrict the operations of 
the Bureau of Streets to the maximum extent, so as to covar these deficiencies. 

* Sse Appendix "B." 

The following: is a summary of the work done during the year, for which the 
owners of adjacent property have paid: 

SUMMARY 



OF WORK DONE BY PUBLIC AND PRIVATE CONTRACT DURING THE 
FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900. 



NATURE OF WORK. 


LENGTH. 


EXTKXT. 


COST. 


Grading 
Macadamizing 
Brick sewers 


4,086. 75 lineal ft.. 
13,915.5 linpalft.. 
910 lineal ft.. 
9,551.4 lineal ft.. 


79,907 cub. yds. 
371,8785-12 sq. feet 


$17,142 07 
28,967 05 
4,441 30 
14 271 5O 


Sidewalks - 
Macadamized 
Plank 


10,742 lineal ft.. 
6 699 5 lineal ft 


146,558 square feet.. 


4,603 39 
9 780 19* 


Bituminous rock or concrete. 
Granite curbs 


953 lineal ft.. 
18,877 lineal ft.. 


13,541 square feet.. 


1,323 08 
15 81 22 




13935 15m al ft 






Cobble paving 


608 75 lineal ft.. 


21,899 square feet.. 


3 689 82 


Basalt.. . .*. 


1 899 3 lineal ft 






Bituminous rock 


13 779 7 lineal ft 






Cesspools 
Manholes 


43 
80 


> (estimated) 


6,000 00 
















$206,334 22: 



Details of this work are found in Appendix "B." 



492 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 



SIDE SEWER CONNECTIONS. 

It is a matter of experience that faulty construction and connections of side 
sewers with main sewers result in breaches to both, which in repair entail an 
expense of many thousand dollars per year. The custom has always prevailed 
of having this work done by contract, and this system under careless supervision 
not only led to frequent and unnecessary breaches of the main sewers, but to in- 
equalities and settlement in pavements. The new Charter requires that this 
work shall be done directly by the Bureau of Streets at the cost of the owner. 
This system was put in operation, and since January 8th 225 sewer connections 
have been made at an average cost of $14.20. The system results in better 
sewers and better pavements, and when the old connections shall have been re- 
newed the full advantage gained will become evident from reduced cost of repairs. 

While the cost of side sewer connections is borne by the owners and the city 
is fully recouped for its outlay, it is not so with the Bureau of Streets, because 
while the Bureau expends its funds in doing the work the return money goes to 
the City Treasury and to the General Fund and not to the money allotment of 
the Bureau. The Bureau's loss of funds to June 30th was $3,195.34. 

REPORT OF SIDE SEWER WORK 

FORM JANUARY 8, 1900, TO JUNE 30, 1900. 



Deposited in Treasury 

Demands on Treasurer 

Cost of work 

Laborers 

Pavers 

Inspection charges 

Material and cribbing 

Bitumen patches 



195 50 
128 19 
341 47 
622 46 



$6,270 46 



$3,075 12 



6,270 46 



At the beginning of the fiscal year there were accepted streets as follows: 

Basalt Block Pavements 90 miles 

Bituminous Rock 75 miles 

Cobble Stone . 20 miles 



Total . . 185 m iles 



OF PUBLIC WORKS. 493 

During the fiscal year 1899-1900 there were added: 

Basalt Block Pavement 0.88 miles 

Bituminous Rock Pavement 5.82 miles 

Cobble Stone Pavement 0.21 miles 



Total 6.91 miles 

Bringing the mileage of accepted streets up to 191.91 miles. 



Prior to July 1st, 1899, the following mileage of sewers was in existence: 

Brick 110.80 miles 

Ironstone pipe 171.02 miles 

Cement pipe 18.88 miles 

Wooden Sewers 4.60 miles 



Total ...305.30 miles 



During the year there were added: 

Brick Sewers 0.17 miles 

Ironestone pipe 1.89 miles 



Total 2.06 miles 

Bringing the mileage of sewers up to 307.36. 

REPAIRS TO SEWERS. 

The Board has repaired 328 breaks in the S3wers. The universal result of ex- 
aminations at these breaks is that defective workmanship and materials have 
characterized nearly all of the sewer construction, the breaks having invariably 
been due to one or the other or both of thess causes. The most expensive break 
was on r.riiiman street, between First and Second streets. This sewer was de- 
signed and constructed as a main drainage sewer in 1881. It has a cross section 
of 50 square feet. The break was due to poor materials and workmanship, and 
cost $1,650.00 to repair. Examinations of adjacent portions show several other 
points where similar breaks have been repaired. The irregular alignment and 
grade o; this sewer were reported on by the Sewer Commission in 1893-4. Exten- 
sive portions of this sewer will have to be rebuilt before it can serve the pu.-- 
T-OP! for -which it was designed. These repairs and rebuilding will cost nearlv 
na much as the original construction, and afford a costly lesson as to the ne^d r>f 
competent and hcnest supervision of public work. 

Another condition v as revealed by stoppage of flow on Clay straet, west of 
Spruce street. 

Here a 14-inch ironstone pipe sewer was uncovered for half a block. It was 
fc urn 1 to have bean laid in 1895, upon such Irregular line and grade and of such 
defective workmanship that it was not possible for water to flow through it. 
Whenever rock a little harder than usual was encountered in excavating the 
trench the- workmen cut around or ovsr it, with no regard whatever to placing 
the sewer on line and grade; deviations of two or three feet were found in grade, 
which resulted in depressions in the pipe, causing it to fill up entirely. It was 
necessary to cut through the asphalt and concrete paving, excavate the trencn t'j 
true *rade and rebuild the sewer at a cost of $243.65 within six years after its 
construction and acceptance. 



494 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 



On Sacramento street, between Webster and Buchanan streets, a break made 
Itself manifest by upheaving and rupturing the concrete and bituminous pave- 
ment near Webster street, water from the sewer having escaped and accumulated 
uiider the foundation of the pavement with sufficient pressure to upheave the 
same. 

Upon uncovering the sewer it was found to be one of the "cement pipes" 
which had disintegrated, and had been crushed to such an extent that it became 
necessary to uncover, take up and rebuild almost the entire block before a sound 
piece of sewer could be found to which to attach permanent repair work. This 
reconstruction cost $384.75. 

On Sixth street the sewer is so built that it does not drain, but permits sewage, 
sand, etc., to accumulate to such an extent as to back up sewage into connecting 
side sewers. It is not possible from the records to determine how many times 
the cost of constructing and reconstructing this sewer has been spent in "flush- 
ing" and "cleaning" it in past years. Within the last twelve months the ex- 
penditures have been about one-half the cost of reconstructing it, namely, 
$6,767.96. 

These ara but types of very many cases which show that it will be many 
years before the evils of incivism and fraud will be eradicated, and they afford 
abundant reasons why the universal demand for permanent improvements cannot 
be fully met, for a large portion of the available funds will have to be spent in 
Tenewiiifc, work, which, for want of intelligent design and honest supervision, 
must be rebuilt within a few years after its acceptance. 

The cost of these repairs between January 8th and June 30th, 1900, has been 
$34,012.42. The number of breaks repaired was 328 and the average cost per break 
was $42.72, distributed as given in the following table. 

It will be observed that the breaks average more than one per mile of existing 
sewers. 

LIST OF SEWER BREAKS AND REPAIRS FROM JANUARY, 1900, TO JULY, 1900. 



MOXTE. 


NUMBER OF 
BREAKS. 


COST OF 
MATERIAL. 


COST OF 
LABOR. 


January . . 


56 


$201 81 


81,950 00 




62 


274 18 


2,051 20 


March 


57 


474 39 


3,928 53 




61 


473 34 


1,575 30 


Mav 


41 


271 82 


1 0."9 47 




51 


253 80 


1,355 23 










Total 


328 


81,949 34 


811,919 73 


Miscellaneous Sidewalks, etc 




18 60 


124 75 


Total 


328 


1,967 94 


812,044 








14,012 42 











Average cost per break. 



.$42.72 



OP PUBLIC WORKS. 495 

EPEAR STREET. 

The impassable condition of the city's portion of Spear street, between Har- 
lison and Brannan streets, was brought to the early attention of the Board. 
Plans and specifications were prepared for rebuilding this street, and the work 
vas about to be let to contract, but the restricted state of finances made it ad- 
visable to dafer doing this work until more ample funds were available. Ths 
street surface being of wood and resting on piles, and being highly dangerous, 
uus l.arricaded to prevent traffic thereon, and left until the beginning of the new 
fiscal year. 

Pending discussions of the Board of Supervisors regarding the mods and char- 
acter of the work, the contract for rebuilding it has not yet been entered into. 

LIGHTING STREETS. 

The streets were lighted during the fiscal year 1899-1900 under a contract with 
the San Francisco Gas and Electric Company. 

The prices for this service were as follows: 

For each open flat gas burner (about 17 c. p.), 10 cents per night. 
For each electric light (nominally 2,000 c. p.), 42 cents per night. 
The total cost of the service for the year was $201,393.14. 

The number of lights at the close of the year was as follows: 

Street lamps, open flat burners 4,520 

Discontinued, being within the range of electric lights 378 

Number of lights at beginning of fiscal year 4,898 

Electric lights (nominally 2,000 c. p.) 786 

During the months of March, April, May and June all lights were extinguished 
at midnight, except nine (9) electric lights kept burning in "Chinatown." 

Gas was supplied from two stations, one in the northerly end of the city at 
the foot of Laguna street, manufacturing producer gas; the other at the Potrero, 
manufacturing coal gas, both supplies being turned into connecting maine. The 
average illuminating power, as determined weekly by the Inspector of Gas and 
Water, was 18 candle power, and in no case less than 17 c. p. 

It is purposed during the coming fiscal year to change all open gas burners into 
Welsbach burners of higher efficiency and no greater cost, and to extend the 
electric lighting as much as the means will permit. A map has been prepared 
showing the location of all lights, thus giving a definite presentation of many 
problems which would otherwise be troublesome and some'times costly to solve. 



49(5 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 

WATER FOR MUNICIPAL PURPOSES. 



The expenditures for water for municipal purposes during the fiscal year 1899- 
1900 were $231,621.02, which capitalized at 3V 2 per cent, is $6,617,886.00. This ex- 
penditure was made as follows: 



For public buildings 

Fer public parks 

For fire hydrants, Spring Valley Water Works 

For fire hydrants, Visitacion Valley Water Works 



Total as above. 



$17,840 54 

3,898 38 

209,582 10 

300 00 



$231,62102 



Thirty-two meters were tested by request of consumers during the \eur. 



SCHEDULE FOR STREET SWEEPING FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900. 



MONTH OF 


SQUARK YARDS. 


COST. 


1899 July 


27,519,389 


"-'14,807' 68 


August . . . . . . ' . . 


30,597,183 " 


16, 5^0 55 


September 


27,168,968 


14 868 56 


October 


26,060,783 
24 934,753 


14,360 76 
13 377 13 


December 1 to December 25 


19,522,881 


10,765 87 


December 21, J899, to January 7, 1900 . 
1900 January 9 to January 31 
February 


7,764,907 
24,291,136 
24,586,918 


4,642 89 
13,070 06 
13,351 79 


March . ... 


24,582,297 


13,325 24 


April . . . 


24,191,702 


12,557 64 


Mav 


27,123,099 


13,820 42 


June 


23,041,223 


12,437 62 



311,985.210 



>at57,906 21 



OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



497 



APPENDIX "A." 

REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



To the Honorable the Board of Public Works 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 



GBNTLKMEN : During the first six months of the fiscal year this office was conducted as a 
fee office; hence no statement is made of receipts and expense 2 . Nor can an exact statement 
be made of the force employed. 

The receipts < f the office from January 8, 1900, to June 30, 1900, for services rendered on 
contract work and the surveying of lots for private individuals have been as follows : 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 




$2,496 00 




For surveys of lots 


2,322 50 




Total 




$4,818 50 


The total expense of office for six months ending June 30 
1900, was 




$9,326 32 


Of which there was expended for salaries 


$9 115 19 




For transportation and incidental expenses 
For office supplies 


140 20 
70 93 








9,326 32 








Total 






The expenses for salaries may be subdivided as follows : 
Expended fiT field work in connection with lot surveys 
Expended for field work in connection with srrveys for con- 
tract work on street 


$1,623 05 
1 0*58 7O 




Expended for field work in connection with matters referred 
to the Department by the Board of Public Works 


759 72 




Expended for services in office given wholly to matters referred 
by the Board of Public Works 


1 013 50 











REPORT OF THE BOARD 






AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Expended for services in office on miscellaneous matters, ex 


o 271 33* 


' 


Salary of City Engineer 


2,388 89 










Total. 




$9,115 19 


Paid for surveys of city work during first half of fiscal year. . . 




5,225 00 



* This item includes all office work in connection with the surveys of lots, surveys for 
street work, the supervision of construction of all characters on public streets, and the 
general office work and management of the work in field and office. A considerable amount 
included in this item is chargeable to work on matters referred by Board of Public Works. 
These matters are attended to in such a manner that their several costs cannot well be segre- 
gated. 



The following persons have been connected with the department during the year : 
PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT. 



NAM 8. 


RANK. 


DURATION OF SERVICE. 


C. E. Grunsky 
C. S. Tilton 
E J Morser 


City Engineer 
City and County Surveyor. . 
Chief Assistant Engineer. . . 


January 8, 1900, to June 30, 1900 
June 30, 1899, to January 8, 190O 


A. D. Sanborn 
J H Smith 


Assistant Engineer 
Assistant Engineer 




C H Holcomb 


Assistant Engineer 




H. D. Gates 
F. H. Reed 


Assistant Engineer 
Assistant Engineer 
Draughtsman 


About 6 months. 
About 4 months. 


p -yf Bradv 


Field Assistant 






Helper 


About 8 months. 









OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT CONTINUED. 



499 



NAMES. 


RANK. 


DURATION OF SBRVICR. 


Daniel Green 


Helper 




W. W. Mathewsori 


Helper 




Andrew Olsen 


Helper 




Bliss Rickey 






William Finriepr.in 


Helper 




James Garbarino 
V. Beck 


Helper 
Help r 


About 2 months. 









The following persons have served as inspectors on construction on public 
work during the latter one-half of the fiscal year. The faes for their services are 
advanced by the contractor, the amount being afterwards entered as an item of 
expense and charged in th2 asssssment to the property-owners for whom the work 
is done. They are not constantly employed and are paid only for the time which 
they actually serve. 



J. T. Bonifield, 
W. R. Boone, 
John Blake. 
R. B. Chesssman, 
J. D. Cavanaugh, 
Thomas Christal, 
N. P. Duffy, 



W. P. Lambert, 
Hamilton Morton. 
Alexander McLaughlin, 
Lawrence McMahon, 
Ellis Powell, 
C. D. Rhodes. 



Following Is a brief summary of the work done: 

From July 1st, 1899, to January 8th, 1900 

Number of surveys of lots 228 

Number of certificates issued for street work 117 

Number of matters referred to the office by the Supervisors and 
reported upon 28 

From January 8th, 1900, to June 30th, 1900 

Number of surveys of lots 154 

Number of certificates issued for streat work 77 

Total number of surveys made of all characters 368 

Number of matters referred to the office by the Board of Public 

Works 226 

Number of referrsd matters reported on 202 

Number of jobs of street work in progress or completed 70 

Number of certificates issued assigning work to Inspectors 92 



Plans and specifications have been prepared for tha following work: 



500 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 







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OF PUBLIC WORKS. 601 

For repair of bituminous rock pavement. 

For trenching and back-filling to apply to work done by Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. 

For repaving with bituminous rock, side sewer, trenches. 

Plans and specifications for the construction of a culvert and grading Nine- 
teenth avenue at Trocadero Gulch, also for the construction of a culvert at Ken- 
tucky and Twenty-sixth streets, are being prepared. 

An assessment map has been prepared of the district to be assessed for the 
construction of a sewer on Bryant street, between the center line of Twenty-sixth 
and Army streets, and a map of the district to be assessed for the construction 
of sewers in Andover avenue, between Ellert street and Crescent avenue, and in 
Crescent avenue, between Andover and Nevada avenues, has been partially pre- 
pared. 

The concrete arch bridge under the railroad embankment on Berkshire street, 
which was in process of construction as planned and contracted for by the former 
administration, has been completed at the total cost of $27,286.00. 

A full discussion of the problems presenting themselves in connection with 
street and sewer work will be deferred until the organization of this office has 
been perfected. Means for accomplishing this have not heretofore been available. 

Scant provision had been made by the last administration for tha maintenance 
of this office, and its work has therefore been carried forward under adverse cir- 
cumstances. 

All street work and nearly all sewer work done in this city in the past has 
been done without engineering supervision. The City and County Surveyor waa 
called on for line and grade, but could exercise no control over the contractor. 
General direction of work, inspection of materials and supervision were in charge 
of a Superintendent of Streets. 

This work, under the new order of things, falls to the Bureau of Engineering, 
where it belongs, and it will in the future receive proper attention, both in the 
matter of planning and projecting new work as well as in the matter of super- 
vising its construction. 

Control of work has in the past been so lax, owing to the above indicated 
division of responsibility, that unfortunately much inferior street and sewer work 
has been accepted by the city, and it is now forced to meet the increased cost of 
maintenance and repair. Then, too, appropriations for maintenance and repair 
have been small, so that the general condition of the business streets has gone 
from bad to worse, many of the old pavements showing such neglect as to render 
streets almost impassable. There are still miles of cobble pavement in use in 
localities where a first-class pavement is urgently needed. Liberal provision 
should be made at the earliest possible date for a reconstruction of pavements 
where commercial interests would be best served, and in districts where there has 
been considerable settling, notably on both sides of Market street east Of Bush 
street. The needs of other departments of the city ara so great that only a 
moderate allowance has been made for much-needed work of this class to be done 
during the current fiscal year. 

For an exhibit of the work done on streets and sewers, not including repairs, 
reference is made to the compilation made by ths Bureau of Streets. 

It appears from this exhibit that during the year the cost of street and sewer 
work has been as follows: 



502 



REPORT OP THE BOARD 



WORK PERFORMED. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Street and sidewalk work of all classes 
Sewer construction (not including the estimated cost, 86,000, 
of manholes and catch-basins) , 


$181,621 42 
24 712 80 










Total 










$206,334 22 



Much sidewalk work has been done in the city by property-owners of which no 
record has reached the Street Department, and such work has not, therefore, been 
included in the above figures. 

The aggregate amount of work done during the year has been very small. 
This falling off of street work is notably trua for the last six months, and is 
chiefly attributable to the fact that operations are being conducted under a new 
organic law. 

New main sewers are projected and their construction is dependent upon tha 
validity of a bond issue which is still in question. Meanwhile all new sewer work 
is being done in such a way as to fit existing as well as proposed improved con- 
ditions of sewage disposal, and where this cannot be done new sewers are recom- 
mended only when ui'gently needed. 

The Board of Public Works and the City Engineer are charged with the in- 
vestigation of public utilities, with a view to determining the cost of their con- 
struction and acquisition by the city. As no funds could bfe placed at the dis- 
posal of the Board for this purpose prior to July 1st, 1900, the work thus far done 
has been mainly of a preparatory character. 

Of the work urgently needed to be done by the city none is probably of greater 
Importance than tha systematization of the sewerage and drainage works to fit 
existing and projected sewers into the lines of main drainage and sewerage dis- 
posal, as proposed and adopted during the last year. 

This work, as well as the work of extending straet line surveys, setting monu- 
ments and establishing grades for streets in the outlying rapidly growing districts 
of the city (also urgently needed) is of a character not productive of revenue. All 
work of this class will ba pushed forward as fast as the available funds will 
permit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. E. GRUNSKY, 

City Engineer. 



OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



503 



APPENDIX B, PART 1. 

RECAPITULATION OF FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 

SHOWING APPROPRIATION AND EXPANSES OF THE OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT 
OF STREETS FROM JULY 1, 1899, TO JANUARY 8, 1900, AND FOR THE BUREAU 
OF STREETS, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, FROM JANUARY 8, 1900, TO 
JUNE 30, 1900. 



FOR THE MONTH OF- 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 




$410 500 00 






3 184 13 




Amount from protested taxes 


6,632 76 














$420,316 89 


1899 July .... 


$30,560 91 




August 


38,544 43 




September .... ... 


33,866 29 




October 


36,755 98 






36 217 25 




December 


35 512 07 


$211,455 93 




33,959 86 




February 


28,965 07 




March . . 


33,749 84 




April ..... . 


29 394 51 




May 


31 893 04 






79 243 47 


187 205 79 




21 654 17 


21 654 17 










$420,316 89 


$420,316 89 



504 



REPORT OP THE BOARD 



REPORT OF SPECIAL DEPOSIT FUND 

FROM JANUARY 8, 1900, TO JUNE 30, 1900. 



Balance from last administration $4,307 18 

Receipts from building permits issued 7,0'5 00 

Receipts from kettle permits issued 110 00 

Receipts from house-moving permits issued 800 00 

Receipts from contractor money received 228 30 

112,500 48 

Money returned to depositors 7,376 78 

Balance on hand June 30, 1900 

Balance on hand from side-sewer permits . . |20 00 

Balance on hand from building permits 4,760 00 

Balance on hand from kettle permits. 180 00 

Balance on hand from Ackerson's administration 80 00 

Balance on hand from Ambrose's administration 60 00 

Balance on hand from Ashworth's administration 20 00 

Balance on hand from contractor money 3 70 



$5,123 70 



5,128 



OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



505 





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Wages of gardeners and 
bridgemen appointed by 
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audited by Street Depart- 
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. 


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Superintendent o' Streets' 
office and field assistants, 
commissioners, assistants 
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506 REPORT OF THE BOARD 



APPENDIX "C." 

REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF BUILDING. 
To the Honorable the Commissioners of Public Works 

Gentlemen: I beg leave to make the following report on the operations of the 
Bureau of Building for the first six months under the new Charter. 

Owing to a lack of funds to carry us through the fiscal year ending June 30th, 
1900, this Bureau was unable to take charge of the Fire Department engine 
houses or of the school houses. The repairs and maintenance of those buildings 
were carried on by the Fire Department and School Department. 

On taking possession of the City Hall we found it In a most dilapidated con- 
dition and so filthy as to be almost beyond description. The corridors were cov- 
ered with the dirt of ages; every closet In the building where dirt, ashes and rub- 
bish could be stored was filled to overflowing; the rotunda and vestibule were 
coated with the original dirt, lime and mortar made In construction; the sub- 
basement was so filthy as to endanger the health of any person who was? com- 
pelled to pass through it; several parts of it, which were below level, were filled 
with stagnant water; the leader pipes running to the sewer were broken in many 
places, and many of the sewer pipes opened directly into the sub-basement; the 
water closets and toilet rooms throughout the building were so unsanitary that 
the occupants of the building who had any regard for their health would not use 
them; the roof and dome were covered with dirt, rubbish and old lumber of every 
description, the roof itself leaked badly in every part, the windows were broken 
in many places, and all of them were so covered with dirt that many of the oc- 
cupants thought it was done on purpose to exclude the sunlight; the window- 
cords wers broken, and very few of the windows could be raised or lowered to 
ventilate the rooms or for the purpose of cleaning the glass; the carpenter work 
in all parts of the building was hacked and broken and perishing for the want 
of varnish and paint; the plumbing work was badly out of repair and in a very 
unsanitary condition; the plastering in all of the corridors and in many of the 
rooms looked very much as if some person or persons had deliberately tried to re- 
move it from the walls with a hatchet. 

We have remedied all these matters as far as it was possible to do so in the 
time and with the limited amount of money available for such purposes. All of 
the mechanics employed in the building, the head janitor, the assistant head 
janitor and all the janitors, in fact, every one connected with the building, have 
earnestly co-ooerated to better the conditions as far as was possible for them to 
do, and I believe that the improved appearance and sanitary condition of the 
building in all respects show how faithfully they have performed their duties and 
justify ma in highly commending their services. 

Enclosed I hand you my report of expenses for the six months ending June 
30th, 1900. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN BARNETT, 
Superintendent of Public Buildings. 



OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



5U7 



EXPENSES 

BUREAU OF BUILDING FROM JANUARY 8, TO JUNE 30, 1900. 



FOR WHAT EXPENDED. 



Wages 

Wood 

Coal 

Supplies for public buildings 

Material for repairs to public buildings.. 



$11,870 60 

260 25 

2,613 70 

1,436 24 

1,649 08 



$17,999 87 



508 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 







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OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



509 






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REPORT OP THE BOARD 





MANHOLES AND 


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REPOKT OF THE BOARD 





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OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



513 



REPORT OF LIGHT AND WATER 
INSPECTOR. 



SAN FRAJSCISCO, July 1, 1900, 



To the Honorable the Board of Public Works < 

Of the Oily and County of San Francisco 



GKNTLEMEN . I herewith respectfully submit my report of the working of the Department 
of Bureau of Light and Water for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 

The gas used by the City and County of San Francisco for lighting public buildings was 
furnished by the San Francisco Gas and Electric Company and Pacific Gas Improvement Com- 
pany at the rate of $1 35 per M cubic feet. The electric current used to light public buildings 
was furnished by the San Francisco Gas and Electric Company at rates] ranging from 5 cents 
net to 15 cents (less 15 per cent) per kilo watt. 

The street lights, both gas and electric, were furnished by the San Francisco Gas and 
Electric Company. 

AMOUNT OF GAS CONSUMED IN, AND COST OF LIGHTING PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



MONTH. 


CUBIC FEET. 


AMOUSf. 


1899 July 


1 654 400 


9 939 44 


August . . 


1,475 400 


1 991 79 


September 


1 319 700 


1 781 60 


October 


1 441,800 


1 946 43 


November 


1,724,900 


2,328 61 


December 


1,670,000 


2,254 51 


1900 January 


1,846,000 


2,492-11 


February 


1,558,300 


2,103 71 


March 


1,401,100 


1,891 48 


April 


1,161,200 


1,567 63 


May 


1,022,900 


1,380 93 




912,200 


1,231 47 










17,187,900 


23,203 71 



33 



514 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 



AMOUNT OF ELECTRICITY CONSUMED IN, AND COST OF LIGHTING PUBLIC 

BUILDINGS. 



MONTH. 


WATT HOURS. 


COST. 


1899 July 


9,594,000 


$1,009 04 


August 


10,564,000 


1,092 08 


September 
October 


9,895,000 
13,055,000 


1,030 37 
1,312 57 




17,943,000 


1,191 86 


December . . 


16,768,000 


1,103 77 


.1900 January 


18,097,000 


1,178 68 


February .... 


15,047,000 


1,011 33 


March 


12,691,000 


899 45 


April 


11,377,000 


808 26 


May 


10,024,000 


726 46 


June 


10,545,000 


756 14 










155,600,000 


$12,120 01 



Gas consumed 17,187,900 M feet $23,203 71 

Electricity consumed 155,600,000 watts 12,120 01 



Total 

Less- 
Amount paid by Public Library $300 00 

Amount paid by ^Sheriff 833 12 



Appropriation 
Surplus 



$35,323 72 



1,133 12 

$34,190 60 
35,000 00 

$809 40 



OP PUBLIC WORKS. 



515 



COMPARATIVE COST OF LIGHTING PUBLIC BUILDINGS FOR SEVERAL YEARS. 



YKAR. 


GAS CONSUMED. 


COST. 


1896-1897 


17,689,300 cubic feet. 


$44,949 33 


1897-1898 


17,654,000 cubic feet. 


43,126 18 


1898-1899 . 


20,126,700 cubic feet. 


41,961 23 


1899-1900- 


17 187,900 cubic feet. 


35,323 72 









The consumption of gas has been materially reduced during the past year by the installa- 
tion of Welsbach burners. I estimate that the investment by the city of about $300 in 
Welsbach burners has resulted in a saving of about $2,000 in the last six months. 



LIGHTING PUBLIC STREETS. 



Number gas lamps June 30, 1900 

At lOc. per night per lamp. 



Number of gas lamps June 30, 18')9 

Discontinued on account too near electric lights, etc 378 



4,520 



Number cf arc lights. . . . 



At 42*^0. per night per lamp. 



786 



516 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 



TABLE SHOWING DAYS AND HOURS THAT STREET LIGHTS WERE LIGHTED, AND- 
AMOUNT PAID SAN FRANCISCO GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY FOR SAME. 



MOIfTH. 


DAYS 
LIGHTED. 


HOCRS 
LIGHTED. 


AMOCN 
GAS. 


r PAID. 

ELECTRICITY. 


1809 July 


28 


223 9 


$13 692 90 


*9 364 88 




25 


222 1 


12 295 90 


8 704 43 


September . . 


20 


199.3 


9,655 30 


6 719 25 


October 
November . . , 


25 
25 


282.4 
309.5 


11,566 30 
11,286 60 


8,374 20 
8,370 38 


December 


25 


322.5 


11,288 10 


8,374 20 


1900 January . 


25 


327.6 


11,291 90 


8,374 20 


February 


24 


268.9 


10,840 80 


8,032 50 


March* 


26 


148.4 


$91,847 80 


166,314 04 
91,847 80 
lf>, 809 29 


April* . 


25 


130.9 




10,807 37 


May* 


26 


124.3 




10,809 29 


June* 


25 


111.5 




10,807 35 












Total . . . 


299 


2,671.3 




$201,395 14 



* Last four months lights were extinguished at midnight at $10,750 per month, plus cost 
of 9 lights in Chinatown burning all night. 

I have tested the illuminating power of the gas furnished the city and county at least 
once a week, and in no case has it been less than 17 candle-power. The average has been, 
about 13.3 candle-power. 



OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



517 



AMOUNT PAID BY CITY AND COUNTY FOU WATER FOR PUBLIC BUILDINGS, 

SQUARES AND HYDRANTS, 1899-1900, TO SPRING VALLEY 

WATER WORKS. 



MONTH. 


PUBLIC 
BUILDINGS. 


PARKS. 


HYPRANTS. 


TOTAL. 


1899 -July 


$2 104 79 


$858 74 


$18 605 00 


$21 568 53 


August 


1,783 32 


743 20 


15,904 95 


18,431 47 


September 
October 


1,948' 64 
1 926 70 


814 2i 

805 60 


17,428 20 
17 244 25 


20,191 08 
19,976 55 


November 
December . . 


1,925 10 
2 049 49 


676 60 


17,37470 
17,575 00 


19,976 40 
19,624 49 


1900 January 


2 048 64 




17 575 00 


19,623 64 




800 81 




17 575 00 


18,375 81 


March 


799 61 




17 575 00 


lb 374 61 


April 


791 77 




17 575 00 


18 366 77 


May 


825 86 




17,575 00 


18,400 86 


June 


835 81 




17,575 00 


18,410 81 


Totals . 


$17,840 54 


$3 893 38 


$209 582 10 


$231,321 02 













Paid Visitacion Water Company, 5 hydrants at $60 per year $300 00 



518 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 



WATER METERS TESTED. 



DATE. 


LOCATION. 


RATE. 


1899 July 13,. 
July 18 
August 7 


616 Dupont street 
109 Mission street 
Eighth and Bryant streets. 


12 per cent. slow. 
12 per cent slow. 
Correct 


Sept. 27 


2303 Howard street 


4 per cent slow 


Sept. 29 


537 Sacramento street 


8 per cent slow 


Oct. 10 


3508 Sixteenth street 


Correct. 


Oct. 17 


1206 Market street 




Oct. 25 


614 Sutter street 




Oct. 25 


737 Sutter street 


6 per cent slow 


Nov. 8 


419 Ellis street 


Correct 


Nov. 10 


144 Gearv street 


2 per cent slow 


Nov. 15 


127 Ellis street 


Correct. 


Nov. 16 


919 Market street 


12$ per cent. slow. 


Nov. 24 


206 Davis street 


10 per cent. slow.. 


1900-Jan. 12 


14 Third street. 


4 per cent. fast. 


Jan 13 


408 Ellis street 


Correct 


Jan 13 
Jan. 29 
Feb 17 


Valencia street car house 
852 Mission street 
530 Third street . 


1 per cent slow. 
20 per cent. slow. 


Feb 17 


526 Third street 




Feb. 20 


410 Polk street 


5 per cent slow 


Feb. 28 


101 Powell street 


Correct 


March 13 


118 Sixth street 




March 13 


628 Sutter street . .... 




March 18 


126 Fifth street .... 




March 19 


816 Sutter street 




April 6 


48 Seventh street 




April 20 


112 Fulton street . 




April 20 


101 Geary street 











OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



519- 



WATER METERS TESTED CONTINUED. 



DATK. 


LOCATION. 


RATE 


1900 -May 8 


331 Ellis street 


4 per cent slow 


May 9 '... 


Mason and Ellis streets 


2 per cent slow. 


June 10 


575 Mission street 


Correct. 









Respectfully, 



0. M. TUPPER. 

Light and Water Inspector. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



San Francisco, June 30th, 1900. 

To the Honorable James D Phelan, Mayor 

Of the, City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: I transmit you herewith the Annual Report of the Department of 
Public Health for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1900. This report comprises full 
data from the various institutions under control of the Board of Health, to wit: 
The Health Office, the City and County Hospital, the City and County Alms House, 
the Emergency Hospitals and Hospital for the Detention of Insane, the Twenty- 
sixth Street Hospital and Smallpox Hospital. 

The reports from these different divisions of this department contain very 
accurate and detailed statistical tables, which have been prepared with great care. 

Accompanying the report for the fiscal year just closed is the Annual Report for 
the preceding fiscal year, which had been left in an incompleted condition by the 
last administration in the Health Office. This latter report has received the same 
attention with regard to correctness of detail as that referred to above. 

It is a matter of regret that the Board of Health on assuming office in January 
last found the department badly crippled, owing to the Insufficient appropriation 
granted its predecessors who, during their brief term of office, had conducted affairs 
In the Health Office, the Bureau of Food Inspection, the laboratories and other 
branches with a full complement of employees. The large sums expended for 
salaries and other expenses had almost entirely consumed, within the first half of 
the fiscal year, the full amount set apart for the year. 

The amount granted to the Board of Health which retired from office January 
8th, 1900, was $46,960.00 for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1900. The records 
chow that this sum was overdrawn to the extent of $1,257.98 at the expiration of 
the first six months. The fund of the department being bankrupt, the Board of 
Supervisors was requested by the present Board of Health to appropriate sufficient 
money for the conduct of the Health Office and Emergency Hospitals during the re- 
mainder of the year. On March 12th, 1900, the Board of Supervisors relieved the 
stringency to the amount of $24,000 00, which was the limitation of the sum that in 
their opinion would suffice for the necessities of this department for the period 
cpecified. 

As a result of this small appropriation the Board of Health found it necessary 
to Inaugurate radical methods of economy. The Health Officer, the Secretary, the 
major portion of the clerical force, the Sanitary, Plumbing and Food Corps, the 
Chemist and Bacteriologist were all stricken from the salary roll, thus reducing the 
amount of expenditure for the services of employees to the minimum figures of 
|802 50 in March and $1,675 00 in April. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 521 

The officers and employees who were deprived of their salaries immediately 
volunteered their services gratuitously, and during their period of suspension per- 
formed their duties with assiduity and painstaking fidelity, thus enabling the de- 
partment to continue in certain lines of work which otherwise would have been 
abandoned. This action on the part of the attaches permitted the department to 
effect such a saving that by degrees those who had been removed were restored to 
the payroll. 

The administration of the present Board of Health has been marked by the 
occurrence of certain incidents which have, unfortunately, brought upon the mem- 
bers an excessive amount of virulent press criticism. The members of the Board, 
in strict pursuance of the duty devolving upon them as conservators of the sanitary 
Interests of the City, have been subjected to violent opposition. This opposition 
may be traced to an early animosity manifested by the press to the entire City 
Government under present auspices. The continual attacks directed against the 
Board in the editorial and news columns of some of the papers of this City have 
been successful in molding the opinion of a large percentage of the public into 
one of pronounced and aggressive enmity toward the Board as a body, and toward 
its members as individiials.. 

The main factors in producing this intensity of feeling was the discovery on 
March 6th of the present year of a case of bubonic plague in the Chinese quarter. 
With the co-operation of the Police Department, a cordon was placed around the 
Infected district and a quarantine declared until a rapid Inspection could be made 
for the purpose of ascertaining if other cases of the same disease were in existence. 
This action called forth a storm of protestation on the part of sundry newspapers, 
which declared that the entire proceeding was a political one, having for Its ob- 
jects the creation of positions for administration favorites and the systematic loot- 
ing of the City Treasury. Five days later the quarantine was lifted, as Inspection 
failed to discover any living cases of disease which would warrant the continuance 
of the embargo. 

Three more bodies of Chinese dying of the same disease were found on the fol- 
lowing dates: March 15th, 17th and 18th. On April 24th another case was found. 
In the month of May two cases were found, on the llth. On the 13th a case died 
at the Pacific Hospital, northeast corner of Stockton and Chestnut streets, presum- 
ably of typhoid fever. Autopsy revealed the evidences of plague, and enquiry 
showed that the patient had resided at 730 1 /& Commercial street, in the Chinese 
quarter. Two more cases were discovered in the same month, on the 14th and 
29th, respectively. 

In June two cases were foundone on the 2d; the other on the 9th both Chinese 
residents of the Chinese quarter. 

All the cases above enumerated were verified by animal inoculation, the experi- 
ments and investigations being conducted by the Bacteriologist of this department, 
by the Federal Quarantine Officer and by the Bacteriologist of the State Board of 
Health. The findings in every case were also examined and endorsed by several 
members of the Board of Health of Honolulu and by members of the faculties of 
Cooper Medical College and the Medical Department of the University of California, 
as well as by several other independent observers. 

When the quarantine was lifted early In March, the Board of Health found 
Itself seriously embarrassed in its intention to inspect and disinfect the Chinese 
quarter. An appeal was made to the Mayor and the gravity of the situation was 
explained. On March 20th a conference was held with the Finance Committee of 
the Board of Supervisors, consisting of Messrs. Jennings, Tobin and Hotaling. 
There were also present at this meeting the Mayor, the Chairman of the Committee 
on Hospitals and Health, the Auditor and several members of the Board of Health. 
After hearing the statement of the facts, the Finance Committee, with the ap- 
proval of the Auditor, instructed the Board of Health to the effect that $7,500 would 
be allowed for the inspection and cleansing of Chinatown. 



522 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

On March 22d a large force of men, twenty-five being physicians, was placed at 
work in the Chinese quarter, under the direction of the Chief Sanitary Inspector. 
This inspection continued till April 7th. During this period every habitation and 
place of business in Chinatown was inspected. The sewers were flushed daily and 
drenched with disinfecting solutions. The thoroughfares were cleared of accumu- 
lated garbage and tons of chloride of lime deposited in streets, yards and un- 
sanitary places. All occupants of residences in the district were compelled to 
place their premises in cleanly condition, with the result that at the close of the 
inspection the sanitation was vastly improved. 

The occurrence of several cases of plague in the early part of May caused the 
Board of Health to determine upon more stringent precautions than those hereto- 
fore employed. In accordance with a resolution adopted May llth, employees of 
this department, acting with the assistance and advice of the Board of Public 
Works, commenced a systematic destruction of rats in the infected district and a 
considerable area thereto adjacent. Large quantities of poisoned fish were placed 
as bait in the sewers, which were screened as a preliminary measure. This re- 
sulted in the killing of a great number of the rodents, which are recognized as 
being active agents in the dissemination of the plague. 

A recommendation had been made by the Marine Hospital Service that 
inoculation with the Haffkine Prophylactic should be proffered to all Asiatics 
and others who might possibly be exposed to contagion. As a preliminary 
to the inauguration of this step, a conference was held at the headquarters of the 
Chinese Six Companies, there being present many prominent Chinese merchants, 
the Consul-General, Ho Yow, Mr. J. E. Bennett, representing Chinese interests, 
several members of the Merchants' Association, Dr. J. M. Gassaway of the U. S. 
Marine Hospital Service, the members of the Board of Health and the Health 
Officer. Mr. Bennett opened the discussion by stating to the Chinese that plague 
existed in the City, and that all cases so far found had been among Chinese. He 
explained the intentions of the Board of Health, and further quoted a dispatch from 
the Chinese Minister at "Washington asking the people of his race in San Francisco 
to aid the Health authorities in preventing the spread of the disease. Short ad- 
dresses were delivered by Dr. Gassaway, Mr. E. B. Pond, the Health officials and 
others. At the conclustion of the conference the Chinese present promised their 
hearty support and asked that inoculation be commenced without delay. 

On the following day, May 21st, a corps of sanitary inspectors and other medical 
men, accompanied by assistants, went into the Chinese quarters and offered volun- 
tary inoculation to all who cared to accept. Strong resistance was offered and, 
with very few exceptions, the Chinese refused to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunity offered. The reason of this revulsion of feeling was the circulation of in- 
flammatory bulletins, printed in the Chinese language and setting forth statements 
that the Board of Health had conspired with the Chinese Consul-General to bring 
about the annihilation of all Mongolians in the City by the hypodermic injection of 
deadly poison. This slander was implicitly believed by the ignorant classes, who 
attacked our inspectors, mobbed the Consulate and forced the closing of all stores 
situated in the district. Realizing that it would be useless to attempt to carry out 
the proposed inoculation against superstition and mob violence, the effort to im- 
munize the Chinese against plague was abandoned. 

At this time however, Dr. Kinyoun, Federal Quarantine Officer, acting under 
the advice of the Surgeon-General of the Marine Hospital Service, notified trans- 
portation companies to refuse to sell tickets to Asiatics intending to leave San 
Francisco unless said Asiatics presented certificates of inoculation. This order was 
promptly obeyed, and officers of the Marine Hospital Service and of this depart- 
ment were stationed at various points of exit from the City, for the purpose of 
inoculating Chinese and Japanese who desired to submit to the prescribed condi- 
tions. So intense was the opposition to this measure that those Chinese who did 
pnbmit were in danger of forfeiting their lives through the violence offered them by 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 523 

their countrymen. The Japanese, as a rule, exhibited intelligence, and except 
through a formal protest by their Consul, displayed no antagonism to the order. 

In the meantime the right of the Board of Health and the Marine Hospital 
Service to enforce compulsory inoculation was carried into the United States Circuit 
Court. A restraining order was issued until a decision could be rendered. On 
May 28th Judge W. W. Morrow decided that the actions of the Federal officers and 
the Board of Health were illegal and showed discrimination against Chinese and 
Japanese. The Court also held that the Board of Health, not being vested with 
legislative functions, had not the power to declare a quarantine. The defendants 
in the case at issue bowed to the decision of the Court and inoculation was no 
longer enforced. 

On May 28th the State Board of Health held a meeting at the Grand Hotel in 
this City. The question of the presence of plague was thoroughly discussed, and at 
the close of the session the Board officially determined to demand a quarantine of 
the Chinese quarter by the Board of Health of this City. Communication to this 
effect was immediately transmitted to the Health Office, and on the evening of the 
same day the Board of Health convened. A large number of representative busi- 
ness men were present and were emphatic in their endorsement of the request of 
the State Board. 

On the following day the Board of Supervisors held a special meeing to consider 
the request of the Board of Health for authorization to establish a quarantine. 
Prompt action was taken, and a resolution passed empowering this Board to proceed 
at once in the placing of a cordon about the infected district. At 3 P. M. of the 
same day the quarantine went into effect. 

The United States Circuit Court became again the scene of a contest as to the 
right of the Board of Health to maintain this quarantine. On June 15th a decision 
was rendered denying the right of the Board to quarantine a district. Upon receipt 
of this information the cordon was at once removed. 

While this quarantine was in effect valuable assistance was afforded the Health 
Department by the formation of the Citizens' Relief Committee, which was organ- 
ized at the rooms of the Board of Trade June 1st. At this meeting nearly $30,000 
were subscribed, to be expended under the direction of proper committees, for such 
measures as the U. S. Marine Hospital Service and the Board of Health might see 
fit to employ for the safeguarding of the community. A garbage crematory was 
erected on the edge of the quarantined area, and refuse accumulating within the 
lines were promptly destroyed. Steam sterilizers, loaned by the Marine Hospital 
Service, were placed in Portsmouth Square and the clothing of employees of the 
department on duty in the district thoroughly disinfected. Large quantities of 
sulphur were burnt and the sewers filled with the vapor, while other disinfectants 
were freely used throughout the district. 

Throughout this entire period of quarantine much resistance was offered on the 
part of the Chinese, and the work of the representatives of the Health Department 
badly hampered. Such of the Chinese as showed a willingness to facilitate inspec- 
tion were terrorized by their countrymen, and the assistance of the police was 
frequently required to quell disturbances. This belligerent attitude assumed by the 
residents of the quarantined district was fostered and encouraged by the advice of 
attorneys and the malicious reports of certain of the local press. 

Upon the removal of the quarantine the Citizens' Relief Committee notified 
the Board of Health that it would not be responsible for any further expense. 
This was modified to the extent of providing for the continuance of the garbage 
crematory until all garbage accumulated had been consumed, but within a few 
days the furnace was wrecked by some miscreant or miscreants whose Identity 
has never been established. This latter act of vandalism amply illustrates the 
difficulty with which this Board has had to contend in every move it has under- 
taken to improve the sanitation of the City. So far has this spirit of antagonism 
permeated the community that it has even extended into official circles. On June 
19th the Hon. W. N. McCarthy, a member of the Board of Supervisors, intro- 



524 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

duced into that body a resolution setting forth a statement that the Board of 
Health was composed of men who were not competent to recognize bubonic plague; 
that the statements made by the Board of Health urging a quarantine of the 
Chinese quarter were malicious and false; that the Board of Health had no longer 
support and confidence of the Board of Supervisors, and by reason of the foregoing 
the Mayor was earnestly requested to declare vacant the offices of its members. 

During the months of May and June, the Hon. Henry T. Gage, Governor of 
the State of California, was reported in the daily press as conducting an investiga- 
tion to ascertain the truth or untruth of the statements made by this Board as 
to the existence of plague in San Francisco. This investigation was carried on 
in an ex-parte manner, and no information was sought or procured from the 
records of the Health Department of this city. On June 13th the Governor issued 
a letter addressed to the Honorable Secretary of State of the United States, 
wherein he officially denied that plague at that time existed or had ever existed 
within the borders of our State. This opinion was concurred in by certain prom- 
inent physicians, who .had not derived their information from the records of the 
Health Office, and by certain well-known bankers and merchants who evidently 
accepted the findings of the Governor without giving due consideration to the 
actual facts. 

The effect of the Governor's message upon the community was the production 
of a feeling of false security which was not justified by the true conditions. The 
attacks against the Board of Health were redoubled and every obstruction possible 
placed in the way to prevent the performance of its duty. Realizing the utter im- 
possibility of being truthfully represented to the public through the columns of 
any San Francisco daily papers, the Examiner and Report excepted, the members 
of this Board did not attempt to reply to the scurrility and mendacity which con- 
stituted the bulk of the information concerning the Health Department doled out 
with unfailing regularity by the daily and weekly journals published in this City. 
Under all the adverse circumstances above set forth, the efforts of the Board and 
its officers have not been relaxed, and so far as possible the work has been carried 
on with the single intention of protecting the health of the municipality. It is 
the belief of the members that time will produce the vindication which is due, 
and which has already been privately conceded by many who have not the courage 
of their convictions to express their opinions publicly. 

Further comment on the subject of bubonic plague is at present writing un- 
necessary, but it will not be amiss to state that the investigations by this depart- 
ment have not been conducted solely by its own representatives. The findings 
which have caused so much bitter criticism and false accusation have been ex- 
amined and participated in by others absolutely removed from any suspicion of 
interest in either side of the controversy. Among them can be mentioned Drs. 
Raymond, Cooper, Day and Hoffman of Honolulu, all of whom were familiar with 
the disease in question from having observed it during its recent activity in their 
own community, and all of whom concurred in the reports presented by the Bac- 
teriologist of this department relative to the cases investigated in San Francisco. 

In conclusion, I will simply draw attention to the fact that the institutions 
are not being neglected by reason of the urgent matters which have recently con- 
cerned the Board. Reference to the reports presented by the officers in charge 
will show the character of work which is being accomplished. A word must be 
said regarding the deplorable condition of the Twenty-sixth Street Hospital and 
the necessity for improvement therein. This hospital and the Smallpox Hospital 
should be demolished and new structures erected where those persons who are so 
unfortunate as to need their shelter may be housed and cared for in a manner 
consistent with common humanity. Your assistance in bringing about this much- 
needed reform is earnestly requested. Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN M. WILLIAMSON, M. D., 

President Board of Health. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 525 



REPORT OF HEALTH OFFICER. 



San Francisco, June 30, 1901. 

To the Honorable the Board of Health, 

City and County of San Francisco 

Gentlemen: In making my report for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1900, I 
feel that, in order to properly place the work and improvements made in the De- 
partment of Public Health for the City and County of San Francisco, it is absolutely 
necessary for me to give you a slight resume of all the happenings in the Depart- 
ment from the year 1895. At that time the Health Department was in a deplorable 
condition, owing to the fact that the City had outgrown in a vast degree the appro- 
priation set aside for sanitary work the sum total being $26,000, allowed by the 
Board of Supervisors, and this sum computed on conditions as they existed twenty- 
five or more years ago. Seeing the necessity for more money for the maintenance 
of a proper sanitary department, the Board appealed, and successfully, to the Board 
of Supervisors for an increase in appropriation, and were generously assisted by the 
different commercial associations, the Chamber of Commerce, Regent Reinstein of 
the University of California, and others, the result being that the sum of $65,000 
was appropriated. With this sum of money at their disposal, it was thought ad- 
visable to create other departments for the greater efficiency of the service, to wit: 
a Public Vaccinator, Milk Inspector, Veterinary Surgeon, and Bacteriologist. An 
Ordinance regulating the quality of milk supplied to the City was submitted to the 
Board of Supervisors and officially adopted by that body. Milk and dairy inspection 
were at once inaugurated, and the effect was a marked improvement in both dairy 
and herds. The reduction of infant mortality the following year was almost fifty 
per cent. 

The corps of Health Inspectors was increased by two, in order to better Inspect 
the houses of the City. 

An Inspector of Bakeries was appointed, the good judgment of which was 
demonstrated in the correction of the filthy methods and surroundings in the bake 
shops. 

Two Bath and Laundry Inspectors were appointed and every laundry in the City 
inspected and thoroughly renovated, and in every instance the Department insisted 
that cement floors be laid in the washrooms, and, in addition, an Ordinance was 
adopted which prohibited the employees of Chinese laundries from spraying the 
clothes by means of water emitted from the mouth. 

Owing to the extreme conditions in Chinatown and in the Latin quarter, two 
additional Plumbing Inspectors were appointed, and their work, now a record in 
this Department, shows the wisdom of this policy. 

With the increased appropriation, two Laboratories one for the examination of 
food stuffs and the other for bacteriological research were established. A Chemist 
and assistant were placed in charge of the Chemical Department, in which they 
have since been kept busy analyzing food samples, water supplies of the City, and 
illuminating gas. 

The Bacteriological Department has afforded the physicians throughout the 
City the services of the Bacteriologist for the verification of diagnosis of diphtheria, 
and sterilized swabs are constantly being prepared for the culture of the Klebs- 
Loeffler bacilli. The same facility is extended for typhoid fever and other re- 



526 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

searches. Last year the report contained voluminous description of the distribu- 
tion of free anti-toxin to the poor of this City and the regulations governing it. 
The results are proven by a glance at the charts in that report. The vast amount 
of service done in the Food Department are familiar to the public and it has 
learned to appreciate good milk. We also feel that the brands of condensed milk, 
lioneys, jellies, catsups, etc., are to-day, owing to the crusade, superior to the 
article formerly vended. Fines and publicity have in some instances driven the 
dishonest dealers out of trade. 

That the work has been appreciated by the public is evidenced by the fact that 
in the latter part of 1897 the Supervisors generously raised the appropriation to 
$80,000. This shows that the Department undoubtedly had gained the good will and 
approval of both the public and officials of this City. During the next fiscal year 
$85,000 was appropriated and the good work continued. 

The major portion of 1898 found me adsent, having tendered my services as 
surgeon in the U. S. army in the Philippines; but my place was filled, even better 
than I could have filled it, by my friend Dr. John Gallwey, who kindly assumed the 
duties for me during my absence. During this period his responsibility was greatly 
increased by the presence of so many thousands of troops, who necessarily, owing 
to the unhygienic condition of their camps, were a great menace to the health of 
the City. He did his work faithfully and well, as is clearly apparent by a glance at 
the slight increase in the death rate under the circumstances, and in the face of the 
difficulties suddenly thrust on him by the presence of the volunteer camps. 

These camps were proven beyond a doubt, by the sickness among the troops, to 
be a hotbed of disease. That he handled this great problem skillfully is proved, 
as I said before, by the statistics of the Department, and by the manuscript, page 
after page, and of correspondence found by me on my return, which was carried on 
between Army authorities and the Health Officer. After persistent efforts on Dr. 
Gallwey' s part, the former were finally educated to the fact that they must recog- 
nize local law of this Department and establish their camps in conformity with the 
health regulations of this City. Referring to the military camps, we are reminded 
that typhoid fever was one of the prevailing diseases among the troops, and as we 
cannot be too careful in the prevention of the spread of this disease, and while all 
physicians have for years been careful in disinfecting the stools of typhoid patients, 
I recall another source of infection, and probably a greater one, which is generally 
overlooked. I refer to the urine of the sick, which science has proven conclusively 
in the last few years contains typhoid bacilli, and probably not once in ten times is 
it disinfected, so you can readily appreciate how much good a circular to physicians 
calling their attention to this fact would do. 

In February, 1898, the fact that San Francisco had no Pest House of which 
your Board has been preaching and appealing for in the last four years was sud- 
denly thrust upon the public by the presence in your midst of smallpox; and I am 
happy to say that the Hon. Mr. Holland, Supervisor, took the bit in his teeth and, 
with the assistance of His Honor Mayor Phelan, who has always been a friend of 
this Department succeeded in getting a sufficient appropriation for the erecting of 
proper shelter for those afflicted. 

As I was not in office from June, 1899, to January, 1900, 1 am not familiar with 
the work of the Department during this period, except as I have learned it from the 
reports of record in the Department, and the same you will find embodied in this 
year's annual. 

On January 8th, 1900, the present Board of Health assumed duties under the 
new regime that is, the Charter Government of the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. It being a new era, many difficulties opposed the Board in the workings of 
this Department, and it was some time before things were running as smoothly as 
they should. 

The placing of a medical man in charge of the Food Department and the Sani- 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 527 

tary Inspection Department has been conducive of a greater amount of efficiency 
that has ever existed heretofore, and, as well, has the work of the Sanitary In- 
spectors been raised to an extremely high standard by the presence there of a corps 
of professional men. As you are well aware, the late unpleasantness in the Chinese 
district, owing to the presence there of Asiatic plague, has placed additional diffi- 
culties before us. Unscrupulous physicians have succeeded to a very great extent 
in causing the public to disbelieve the honest statements of your Honorable Body 
that a great danger threatened the fair City of San Francisco; but truth is mighty, 
and we have gone along fearlessly performing our duty, irrespective of any criticism 
from press or public, and, I think, have accomplished more in a sanitary direction 
for the betterment of certain districts in this City than has ever heretofore been 
accomplished. 

It is to be hoped that under the new order of things your Honorable Board shall 
have succeeded in formulating rules and regulations for the government of the 
Department of Public Health, and when the same has been passed to Ordinances 
by the Honorable Board of Supervisors the City and County of San Francisco will 
be then in possession of a sanitary code equal to any now extant in either this 
country or Europe. 

It is very greatly to be deplored that owing to the financial stringency resulting 
from the sudden change of the form of government in this City, that our Depart- 
ment was obliged to reduce the expenses of some of the most necessary bureaus, 
chief of which was that of the Chemical Laboratory, wherein it became necessarj 
to deprive Profc-ssor Green of his assistant. This branch of the service has in the 
past performed such specifically splendid work in the long train of Investigations 
embracing milk and food stuffs that it seems a great hardship that the people of 
San Francisco should not, as is the case at the present time, be properly protected 
from the adulteration of food stuffs. I sincerely hope that in the near future this 
necessity will be made so apparent that the Supervisors will recognize it and ap- 
propriate sufficient money for the enlargement of the Chemical Laboratory. 

Many other curtailments have been necessary as well, prominent among which 
is the reduction of the sanitary force and the food inspection force; and I will add, 
that great good might have been accomplished had your Honorable Board money 
sufficient at its disposal for the enlargement of the Plumbing Department, which 
handles, on an average, some sixteen hundred complaints a month. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. P. O'BRIEN, 

Health O'fflcer. 



528 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF THE BACTERIOLOGIST. 



San Francisco, July 1, 1900. 

To the Honorable the Board of Health 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit the following report of work performed 
In the Bacteriological Department for the year ending July 1, 1900: 



TABULATED STATEMENT. 



Examinations for Klebs-Loffler bacillus. 

Klebs-Loffler bacillus present 

Klebs-Loffler bacillus absent 



EXAMINATIONS OF TISSUES. 



386 



130 
256 



SOUKCK. 


Number of Cases or 
Number of Samples. . 


| 

1 


| 




Cattle 


10 


Disease 




1 


Rabbits 


5 


Cysticerci of Tape Worm 


Tuberculosis 
Actmomycosis. . 

Positive 


..8 
..1 


Chinese 


22 


Bubonic Plague 


Positive 


1? 








Negative 


10 


Pork 


2 


Trichina 


Negative .... 




Pork 


1 


Tuberculosia 




1 













BLOOD EXAMINATIONS. 



Examined for leprosy 

Result, positive 

Result, negative 

Examined for typhoid (Widal). 

Result, positive 

Result, negative 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 529 

AUTOPSIES. 

Human 17 

Animal 30 

47 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Sputum f 23 

Tubercle bacillus present 14 

Tubercle bacillus absent 9 



Water, for typhoid bacillus. 
Result, negative 



Milk, for typhoid bacillus 
Result, negative . . . 



Milk, for tubercle bacilli 
Result, negative . 



Criminal cases 

Vaginal discharge 3 

Urethral discharge 1 



Oysters 

No pathogenic bactaria 



Butter 

Tubercle bacilli present 



Urine 2 

Pus 1 

Pathological tissues, miscellaneous 7 

WATER SUPPLY. 

The following report is the result obtained by a bacteriological examination of 
the water supplied by the Spring Valley Water Works to this City and County. 
The examination was made from samples which I obtained personally from all the 
sources of supply in Alameda, San Mateo and San Francisco Counties, and from 
various reservjirs within the City limits. 

The water in Lake San Andreas shows 1,876 colonies per ce. 

Lake Piliarcitos (outlet) shows 1,640 " " 

" " " Lake Pilarcitos (deep) shows 1,380 " " 

Lake Pilarcitos (side flume) shows 1,130 

" Crystal Springs (shallow) shows 1,020 " 

Crystal Springs (deep) shows 900 " 

' Lake Merced (below tunnel) shows 1,040. " 

Lake Merced (deep) shows 280 " 

Niles Sub. Lake (dam) shows 38 " 

Niles Sub. Lake shows 20 " 

Water taken from reservoirs: 

College Hill from Lake San Andreas, shows 200 '' " 

Lake Honda from Lakes Pilarcitos and Merced, shows 220 " 

University Mound from Lake Crystal Springs, shows 140 " 

34 



530 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

With the exception of tha Crystal Springs, the Merced and the Niles water, all 
show a disproportionately large number of colonies on the plate cultures. The 
presence of such a large number of bacteria is undoubtedly due to the decomposi- 
tion of algae and other vegetation commonly found in water. These bacteria thus 
produced are not necessarily .unhealthful. By a SJlective examination of the 
colonies no pathogenic bacteria could be found. This proves that the water is free 
from any poisonous contamination or sewage of any description. In all cases the 
water in the reservoirs contains fewer bacteria after being pumped and piped from 
the lakes. The screening and aerating processes used by the company seems to 
improve the condition of the water. These beneficial effects are proven by the 
following table: 

San Andreas -1,876 colonies before screening 

1.640 " after 

College Hill 800 " before aerating 

290 " after 

University Mound 480 " before screening 

140 " after 

Honda. 600 " before 

230 " after 

Microscopic examination of the water disclosed several forms of small water 
insects which are absolutely harmless, and are generally caught by the screening. 

Some of the work above tabulated, notably the water examination, was done 
by my predecessor in office. 

The work of the Department has been greatly increased by reason of the ap- 
pearance of a disease new to the United States, the Bubonic Plague, and it is 
likely that it will prove a source of trouble to us for many months, if not years, 
to come. 

It will be greatly to the interest of the Department of Health and the City of 
San Francisco if the Bacteriological Laboratory is enabled to progress in the 
acquirement of facilities to a degree commensurate with the growth of the City 
and increasing requirements exacted of the Laboratory by reason of the constantly 
Increasing range of usefulness of laboratory methods to those who have the public 
hygiene in their care. 

One thing which has been very noticeable during the past year is the infre- 
quency with which physicians send in swabs from cases of diphtheria already 
diagnosed, for secondary examination, to determine when it is safe to release the 
patient from quarantine. 

This is an important matter, for It undoubtedly happens that many children 
are allowed to return to school before they are perfectly well, while a bacterio- 
logical examination might reveal the presence of virulent diphtheria bacilli in their 
throats. This persistence of the bacillus in convalescents is probably one reason 
vhy diphtheria is an endemic disease in our large cities. During the coming year 
I recommend the issuance of a circular letter to physicians, calling their attention 
to these facts, encouraging them to take more frequent advantage of their oppor- 
tunities for a leboratory diagnosis, and requesting them to supply this department 
with infornuttion on their diphtheria cases, with especial reference to the use of 
anti-toxin. Blanks for this purpose can be printed and sent out with each swab. 

I would also suggest that the medical inspectors, in the line of their duty, call 
01 the physicians attending each case of diphtheria reported or examined bacterio- 
loglcally, to receive any information they may be willing to impart, in relation 
especially to the use of anti-toxin. Another suggestion would be the establishment 
of stations at several drug stores in different parts of the City where physicians 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 531 

can get the sterilized swabs for throat cases, glass Blips In boxes for collecting 
blood for Wiilal examination, and sputum bottles. 

The inspectors can call at the stations In their respective territories to gather 
up the specimens each day before coming in to report. This will enable the depart- 
ment to keep better informed on contagious diseases In the City, will Increase the 
work of the department, and will bs a great convenience to physicians. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL, DIAGNOSIS OF DIPHTHERIA. 

The m-i'ioc 1 at present in vogue In this laboratory comprises the preparation of 
eterllized swabs, which consist of a small wad of cotton twisted onto the end of a 
wire, tl<e other end of the wire being imbedded In the cotton plug of a six-Inch 
test tube. The whole Is sterilized by dry heat, and is sent out accompanied by a 
blank to be Tiled out by the physician, giving the name, age and address of the 
patient, other persons in the family, duration of the disease, how contracted, and 
location of membrane, if any. These swabs are kept in the Secretary's office, and 
are called for and returned there by the physician. The swabs coming in during 
the day are brought to the laboratory at 5 p. m., where tubes of Loffler's blood 
serum are inoculated with them, and placed in the thermostat at 37 degrees C. 
Little rum ret ing books are kept in the laboratory, with which to number each 
case. Each book consists of 100 leaves, numbered consecutively, each leaf being 
perforated into four parts, each part stamped with a number; the same number 
appears four t'mes on each leaf. A leaf is torn out o* the book, and one of its 
sections placed on the swab tube, one on the slip accompanying it, one on the 
eerum cui'ure, and the next morning the remaining one goes on the slide prepared 
frjm the culture. At nine o'clock the next morning the cultures are removed from 
the thermostat, and cover slip preparations made, stained with Loffler's methylene 
blue solution, and examined. The result is stamped on the slip accompanying the 
swab tube, which is filed. It is also recorded, with the name, etc., in the labor- 
atory reccid, put en a daily report to the main office, and a blank filled out, to be 
mailed immediately to the physician. 

EXAMINATIONS FOR BUBONIC PLAGUE. 

It would seem as though the bacteriological diagnosis of bubonic plague had 
become a regular part of the work of this laboratory, and, as it is a disease with 
vhich we have not hart to reckon, previous to March, 1900, a brief account of ths 
methods we have pursv ed to satisfy ourselves of its identity may not be uninter- 
esting. 

So far, with one or two exceptions, we have been unable to see any of the cases 
before death, only coming- in contact with them by reason of the fact that they 
have all been members of our large Chinese colony, and have died unattended by 
regular physicians. Tht ir great fear of the measures taken by the Board of Health 
to stamp out the disease leads them to conceal cases, and their fear of the disease, 
whoa they recognize it, impels them to neglect the sick. 

In a. few of the e?r lier cases, in which buboes were prominent, we did not per- 
form autopsies, but contented ourselves with a bacteriological examination of the 
contents of the buboes. The reason for avoiding autopsies was that the supersti- 
tious and religious opposition of the Chinese to autopsies was such that we feared 
fie concealment of bodies, if it was insisted upon. Later, however, their wishes 
were disregarded, and all cases autopsied. An account of these cases appears 
later on. 

Smear preparations, stained preferably with one per cent thionin in five per cent 
carbolic acid, are prepared from the heart's blood, pericardial fluid, spleen an>i 
lymph nodes. Agar streaks are also made from these sources, and animals (guinea 
l.Sgs and rats) are inoculated from the spleen and lymph nodes. After having 



532 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

proved absolutely by methods to be detailed later that bubonic plague existed here, 
we have now settled down to the routine diagnosis of plague on the following in- 
formation: 

If the spleen and the enormously enlarged and necrosed lymph glands contain, 
in large numbers, a short, thick, bacillus, with rounded ends, bipolar staining, 
decolorizing by Cram, and the animals inoculated die of a hemorrhagic septicemia, 
mi the same organism is found in myriads in the blood and spleen of the animal, 
then we consider it a case of plague. But, to be absolutely positive of our position 
in the matter, several of these cases have been 'taken, and every recorded bacterio- 
logical experiment ren.ormed with the cultures obtained from it and from the 
animals inoculated from it. Thus it has been found that the organism causing 
the death of these Chinese answers the following description: 

A small, short, thick bacillus, with rounded ends, frequently occurring in 
pairs, and in agar and bouillon cultures in short chains. They are non motile and 
no spore formation was observed. Colonies on agar plates, in seventy-two hours 
at 35 deg. C., were .5 to 1 mm. in diameter, round, semi-translucent, with a 
bluish or opalescent tinge. The surface is rounded, smooth 'and moist looking, and 
the consistency in older cultures tough and stringy. The bacillus was aerobic 
and facultative anaerobic and did not liquefy gelatine. It stains readily with the 
anilin dyes, commonly taking the stain more deeply at the ends, the so-called 
polar staining. This peculiarity was marked with carbo-fuchsin, but thionin 
seemed to give the most satisfactory results. In older cultures there were many 
swollen and rounded forms, which showed the bipolar staining in an exaggerated 
manner, causing them almost to have the appearance of little circles and cres- 
cents. It is decolorized by Gram's method. Bouillon contained flocculent masses, 
was not clouded, and a film formed on the surface and settled downward in a fine 
cloud when the tube was jarred. Bouillon cultures answered to Widal's test with 
Yersin's serum in a most typical and satisfactory manner. Cultures were found 
to be pathogenic to rats, guinea pigs, monkeys and rabbits, but pigeons were im- 
mune. Twenty-four hour cultures on Hankin's 3 per cent, salt agar showed 
abundant involution forms. The postulates of Koch have been complied with to 
the letter. The following is an account of the cases up to the present date: 

CASE NO. 1. 

On March 6th, 1900, the Assistant City Physician reported to me the existence 
ef a dead Chinese, with suspicious appearances, in the basement of the Globe 
Hotel, 1001 Dupont street. Accompanied by him I visited the place and removed 
the lymph nodes from a bubo in the right groin. The following is a history of the 
case: 

Name, Wing Chit King, age 41 years; in Chinatown sixteen years; residence 
1001 Dupont street. He stated to Wing Ging, his brother, that he had been sick 
for six months. On February 7th, 1900, he called at the office of Dr. Chung Bu 
Bing, complaining of headache, tired feeling, pain in head, back and chest, and 
lever; also symptoms of inflammation of the bladder. On February 14th he con- 
sulted Dr. Wong Wo about a lump on the right groin and was lame on that side. 
He was given a plaster to apply to the lump, but no surgery was done. A few 
.lays before his death he was taken with vomiting, profuse diarrhoea and collapse, 
followed by death. 

The glands which were removed showed microscopically the presence of a 
germ resembling that of plague. The organism, as it appeared in the smear from 
the glands and stained with thionin, was very short and thick, with rounded ends. 
It took the stain deeper at the ends than in the middle, and decolorized by 
Gram's method. At this time the laboratory facilities at the City Hall were not 
of a character or kind to keep animals inoculated with material suspected of 
plague, and on consultation with Dr. Kinyoun arrangements were made by which 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 533 

animals could be kept in his laboratory after they were inoculated with suspected 
materials. Accordingly, on the afternoon of March 7th, I visited the quarantine 
station, and there, with the assistance of Dr. Kinyoun and Dr. Agnes Walker, 
Inoculated two guinea pigs, a white rat and a monkey with an emulsion made 
from the glandular tissue. Previous to these inoculations cultures were made on 
agar and blood serum directly from the glands and immediately after their re- 
moval from the cadaver. The guinea pigs and rat died on the fourth day after 
inoculation. The first guinea pig revealed on section an extensive edamatous area 
on the left side, extending from the axilla to the groin. The tissues about tha site 
of inoculation were necrosed and the "inguinal glands enlarged. The peritoneal 
cavity contained a small quantity of bloody serum. The spleen was enormously 
enlarged, dark red, and covered with small yellowish spots. The pericardium con- 
tained considerable straw-colored serum, and the heart's blood was fluid. 

The second guinea pig presented on section a coagulation necrosis of the whole 
left side of the abdominal wall, more intense at the site of inoculation. The 
axillary and inguinal glands were enlarged and reddened. Small hemorrhages 
surrounded the inguinal glands. The spleen was as large as in the first guinea 
pig, but did not show the yellow spots. The lungs were normal, but the pleural 
cavity contained a small quantity of bloody serum. 

The white rat presented evidences of intense infection. At the point of in- 
oculation there was an area of coagulation necrosis surrounded by a considerable 
area of edema. The spleen was four times its normal size, dark and friable. 

The monkey, which died on the seventh day, presented the most beautiful and 
typical lesions of bubonic plague. In addition to the lesions described above, 
there was a well-marked pneumonia and an enormous enlargement of the axillary 
glands on the left side. The mass was as large as a walnut. Cover slip prepara- 
tions made from the heart blood, spleen and lymphatic glands of all of these 
animals, and stained with anilin colors, particularly with thionin, showed the 
presence of an organism in enormous numbers which corresponded morphologically 
and in staining reactions to that of the bacillus of plague. Pure cultures of the 
organism were obtained from all the organs of these animals, as well as from the 
glands removed from the Chinaman. 

CASE NO. 2. 

Chew Gam died fclarch 15th at 723 Sacramento street, aged 22 years. No 
clinical history obtainable. The friends of tha deceased gave conflicting: stories 
as to his illness, some claiming that he had been sick for over two months. 
When the body was seen for the first time the face was enormously swollen and 
edematous. The skin of the whole body was greenish black, and large blebs had 
begun to appear on the dependent portions of the body. The body had the ap- 
pearance of having been dead a week. On section there was found very little en- 
largement of the lymph nodes. The lungs were dark and congested, but showed 
no evidence of pneumonia. The heart was very soff, with thin walls. No valvular 
lesions. There was considerable turbid fluid in the pericardial, pleural and peri- 
toneal cavities. The splsen was enlarged, very dark and friable. The Intestines 
showed evidences of inflammation. Microscopical examination of the blood and 
splften demonstrated putrefactive organisms in large numbers and a few bacilli 
which had the appearance of the bacillus of plague. Attempts mads to Isolate 
this organism from the rest were successful. Cultures so isolated were sent to 
Dr. Kinyoun with the request that ha inoculate an animal from them. I was in- 
formed that the animal died within thirty-six hours of what appeared to be an 
acute toxemia, and on examination very few organisms were found in the tissues 
except at the point of inoculation. These gave a beautiful and typical picture of 
plague. 



' 534 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

CASE NO. 3. 

Ng Ach Ging, age 35 years, died March 17th at 905 Dupont street. No accu- 
rate clinical history obtainable. Man found dead and immediately thereafter 
turned over to the undertakers for burial. At the autopsy, performed forty-eight 
hours after death, the body was found to be fairly well nourished. Considerable 
discoloration of skin. On section the glands were found to be not enlarged. The 
peritoneum contained about three pints of bloody fluid. The intestines were 
reddened; the blood vessels of the mesentery engorged. The spleen was slightly 
enlarged and congested. One of the moSt remarkable features was the complete 
transposition of the viscera. The spleen occupied the right side, the liver the 
left, the caecum being in the left iliac fossa. The lungs were edematous and hypo- 
statically congested. The pericadium contained about two ounces of flocculent 
serum. There was also a considerable quantity of bloody serum in each pleura. 
The heart was flabby, the walls of the ventricles very much thinned. The heart 
cavity contained several clots. Specimens were taken from the spleen and heart's 
blood for microscopical examination. On microscopical examination of specimens 
made of these materials, it showed quite a number of putrefactive organisms pres- 
ent, and in addition thereto was a short, thick bacillus, with rounded ends, which 
had the appearance of the bacillus of bubonic plague. It was readily decolorized 
by Gram's method. Animal inoculations were made from this material, which 
killed a guinea pig wthin thirty hours and a white rat in five days. Drs. Kinyoun 
and Ryfogle were present at the autopsy. 

CASE NO. 4. 

Len Sing Kong, age 47 years, died March 18th at Oneida place. When seen 
forty-eight hours after death the face was swollen and edematous. The skin of 
the whole body and part of the face and neck was a greenish black. Very little 
enlargement of the lymph nodes. The lungs were dark and congested, but there 
was no evidence of pneumonia. The heart was very soft and flabby, the walls of 
the ventricles thin, but no valvular lesions present. There was an inflammation 
of the peritoneum, the cavity of which contained one or two pints of turbid 
bloody fluid. The spleen was enlarged and very dark and soft. Microscopical ex- 
amination of the blood and spleen demonstrated myriads of putrefactive organ- 
isms, and also a short, thick bacillus with rounded ends^ corresponding morpho- 
logically and in staining reactions to the bacillus of plague, and also correspond- 
ing in every respect to the organism found in the previous cases. This organism 
was not isolated in pure culture. 

CASE NO. 5. 

Law An, male, age 38, a resident of California for thirty years, died April 
24th in St. Louis alley, off Jackson street. This man had a large bubo in the left 
femoral region. Incision disclosed considerable bloody fluid and hemorrhages into 
the surrounding tissues. Cover slip preparations showed, among other organisms, 
the bacillus of plague, and two guinea pigs were inoculated, with the result that 
one died in fifty-eight and the other in sixty-one hours. Both these animals 
showed typical lesions of the plague, and the bacillus was found in large num- 
bers in the spleen and heart's blood. 

CASE NO. 6. 

Lim Fa Muey, female, age 16 years, died at 739 Clay street on May llth, 
seventeen days after the fifth case. She had a large bubo on the right sids in the 
femoral region, over which a sticky black plaster had been applied by the Chinese 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 535 

physician. The glands were as large as a walnut, dark, and the interior soft and 
mushy. Smears showed the specific bacillus, and its identity was confirmed by 
inoculation experiments on animals. 

CASE NO. 7. 

Chew Sam died May llth at 717 Jackson street; was a merchant, aged 38 
years, and had been fifteen years in California. I saw this case on the day of 
death with Dr. Wilson, at which time there was nothing visible to account for 
death, and the only suspicious thing about it was the heat of the body, which 
was quite noticeable, although twelve hours had elapsed since death. There was 
some distension of the abdomen with gas. There was a slight enlargement of the 
lymphatic glands in the femoral region, more marked on the left side, and these 
I removed for examination; but their appearance was so innocent that I set them 
aside and did not inoculate with them until forty-eight hours after their removal. 

The next day we went to perform an autopsy and found the body in such 
a state of decomposition that we could not have recognized it as the same one 
we saw eighteen hours before had it not been for a secret mark which we use to 
prevent substitution of bodies. The face was puffed up and edematous, abdomen 
almost ready to burst with contained gases. Skin discolored all over. The heart 
was vsry flabby, walls thin and ventricles distended with gas. The lungs were 
normal. Peritoneum slightly inflamed. Some fluid in both pericardial and peri- 
toneal cavities. The spleen was much enlarged, being six inches long, four inches 
wide and two inches thick. Color a dark greenish slate, with reddish patches. 
?mear preparations from the blood and spleen showed many organisms, but noth- 
ing resembling the bacillus of plague. Animals inoculated from the spleen died 
of a toxemia, but no pest organisms could be demonstrated in them. 

The lymphatic glands, which were removed on the llth, the day before au- 
topsy, were slightly enlarged and showed slight hemorrhages into the gland sub- 
stance; but they were firm and otherwise normal. A smear preparation showed a 
few organisms resembling the bacillus of plague, as seen in cultures. A guinea 
pig was inoculated with an emulsion of the glandular substance, and died on the 
.sixth day with the most beautiful and typical lesions of plague. The spleen was 
at least ten times its normal size, covered with yellowish spots which, when ex- 
amined, showed the presence of the plague bacillus in enormous numbers and In 
pure culture. The whole of the abdominal wall was edematous and an extensive 
coagulation necrosis about the site of inoculation. The bacillus was isolated from 
the spleen in pure culture. The appearance of the body and also the cardial 
lesions and general condition of the viscera, were in every way identical with 
cases 2, 3 and 4, already reported, in which difficulty was encountered in isolating 
the organism. It is believed, in view of the facts of this case, that if the glands 
had been taken from cases 2, 3 and 4 as soon after death as in this case, and 
animal inoculations made from them, the same results would have been obtained. 
In this case, bafore the results of animal inoculation were known, the obscurity 
of the lesions seemed to be more in keeping with beri beri than with bubonic 
plague. 

CASE NO. 8. 

Chin Moon, female, aged 16 years, employed as a domestic at 730% Commercial 
street. She was attended by a regular physician, who stated that she first saw 
the girl three days before death, at which time she was suffering from headache, 
high fever, nausea and pain in the iliac region. It was at first thought that the 
case was one of typhoid fever, and she was sent to the Pacific Hospital. On arriv- 
ing at the hospital she was in a moribund condition, dying the following day, 
after an illness of about five days. 



536 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

The body, when I saw it shortly after death, was well nourished and presented 
no evidences of long illness. In the right femoral region was an obscure swelling, 
which on incision proved to be a single (or possibly two) lymph nodes about the 
size of a walnut. The tissues in the region of the glands were very edematous 
and the gland substance was very dark and hemorrhagic. Smears showed the 
bacillus of plague, apparently in pure culture, which was confirmed by animal 
Inoculation. 

CASE NO. 9. 

Herr Woon Jock, age 53, male, laborer, ten years in California, had recently 
arrived from Stockton. He died May 17th at 740 Pacific street. Examination 
showed a bubo on the left side in the femoral region. The skin over the swelling 
was slightly discolored. The gland was dark and mottled on section, contained 
considerable serum, and the glandular tissue was soft and mushy. The smear 
preparation showed great numbers of the bacillus of plague, the identity of which 
was confirmed by animal inoculations. 

CASE NO. 10. 

Dang Hong, aged 40, male, Mongolian, laborer; resident of California for the 
last sixteen years; residence and place of death, 706 Pacific street; died May 29th, 
at about 2:20 A. M. I saw this case with Dr. Wilson on the evening of May 29th 
at Main Fook & Co.'s undertaking shop, 706 Pacific street. There was a large 
fluctuating swelling under the left side of the jaw and a slight enlargement of the 
glands in the femoral region. I cut down on the glands on the left side and 
found them necrosed, and some thick pus present. A smear preparation showed 
the plague bacillus in the glandular tissues from both sources. 

The next morning, May 30th, at 11 A. M., an autopsy was performed, at which 
the following-named gentlemen were present: Drs. Shrady, Cable, Montgomery, 
Kinyoun, Wilson, Morrissey and myself. 

Post-mortem Examination Lungs normal, heart muscle pale and flabby. 
About six ounces of bloody serum in the pericardial sac. Pluraa contained about 
a pint each of the same fluid. Peritoneal cavity contained three or four pints of 
the bloody serum. No lesions of Peyer's patches; congestion of the peritoneal coat 
of the small intestine in spots. Great omentum showed intense congestion. The 
spleen was perceptibly enlarged and its substance a reddish brown color. Mesen- 
teric glands enlarged. Animals were inoculated with the emulsions made from 
the lymphatic glands by Dr. Kinyoun and myself, independently, and all died with 
typical plague infection. 

CASE NO. 11. 

Chen Kuey Kim, aged 49, single, in California twenty-two years; was a cigar- 
maker. Died June 2d, at 10 A. M., at 817% Clay street, between Dupont and Stock- 
ton. An unreliable history of nineteen months' illness with cough was obtained 
from the undertaker and the Six Companies' physician. It was also stated by others 
that he had been sick for only four or five days. 

Post-mortem Examination The body was that of a large, well-built and well- 
nourished man, who would probably weigh 175 pounds. There was an incision 
In the left groin and on the right side of the neck, from which the lymph nodes 
had been removed. The integument was beginning to turn dark all over the body, 
but was more marked on the face and neck. The median incision passed through 
about an inch of fat. The lungs were dark and congested, but otherwise normal. 
Tha pericardium contained about 60 cc. of bloody serum. The heart was a trifle 
flabby, but showed no valvular lesions. Peritoneum dry. Spleen enlarged and 
showing petechial hemorrhages beneath the capsule. A cross section showed numer- 
ous yellow dots all through its substance, which was soft and friable. The 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 537 

mesenteric glands were enlarged and showed evidences of intense inflammation. 
Kidneys normal. By enlarging the incision found in the left groin a lymph node 
about the size of a hazel nut was found, which was necrosed. Microscopical ex- 
amination of this gland and of the heart's blood and spleen showed the presence 
In enormous numbers of the plague bacillus. 

The autopsy on this case was performed by Dr. Donnelly, Assistant Bacteri- 
ologist, and was witnessed by Dr. Wilson, Assistant City Physician, Dr. Hender- 
son, member of the State Board of Health, and myself. Drs. Henderson and 
Wilson accompanied me to the laboratory, where we were joined by Drs. Kinyoun 
and Baum, and where the preliminary examination of the blood, spleen and 
lymphatic glands was made and witnessed by the above-named gentlemen. A 
cover slip preparation of the blood stained with thionin, showed a marked leuco- 
cytosis and the presence of larga numbers of the bacillus pestis, which were short 
rods with rounded ends, bipolar staining and frequently occurring in pairs. The 
Gram method of staining was also tried, and they were found to decolorize per- 
fectly. The spleen and lymphatic glands were simply crowded with large masses 
of the same bacilli, which was enough in itself to establish the diagnosis; but, 
that there might be no question about it, a guinea pig was inoculated with an 
emulsion made from a piece of the spleen, with the result that It promptly died 
on the sixth day with the most typical and -positive appearances of plague. The 
organism was recovered from the organs of the guinea pig in pure culture and 
has been fully identified. Another pig was inoculated with this culture with the 
same result. 

CASE NO. 12. 

Jay Man Tong, male, aged 60, merchant. Died June 9th at 759 Clay street, 
between Kearny and Dupont. 

According to the certificate signed by physicians in the employ of the Chinese, 
he had died of angina pectoris and the duration of the cause was one year. Some 
of his relatives stated that he had complained of pains in the chest for a year 
and some cough, more marked toward the last. 

Autopsy A large, well-developed, rather fat man, about five feet ten Inches 
tall and weight 180 pounds. Pericardium contained two or three ounces of clear 
serum; impaired tricuspid valve. Lungs normal. Intestines very dark, inflamed, 
mottled, distended with gas. Injection of the vessels of the mesocolon. Appendix 
normal. Spleen slightly enlarged. No marked enlargement of lymph nodes. 
Smears from the spleen showad the plague bacillus, but in small numbers. The 
bacillus was obtained in pure culture from the spleen by the Inoculation of ani- 
mals, which died of typical plague infection. 

The question naturally arises, What was the method of Introduction of this 
disease to our shores and when did It occur? That infected ships have arrived 
here from the Orient is known. 

On June 27th, 1899, the Nippon Maru arrived from China, and it was found 
that a suspicious death had occurred aboard and the body was burned at Nagasaki. 
Another case died before arriving at Honolulu, at which place an autopsy was 
performed and Dr. Carmichaal of the United States Marine Hospital Service 
demonstrated the plague bacillus. Five days after leaving Honolulu a woman 
died and was buried at sea. After reaching this port and entering quarantine, 
two Japanese, presumably from fear of being quarantined on board a ship where 
plague had been, jumped overboard and were drowned *in the attempt to swim 
ashore. Another ship, the Gaelic, arrived shortly after with a history of a sus- 
picious death occurring two days after leaving Hong Kong, and the body was 
burned in the crematory at Nagasaki. 

The possibility of articles of merchandise carrying the disease must not be 
forgotten, although this mode of propagation has never been actually proven. 
Instances can be cited, however, in which no other mode seems possible. 



538 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Plague was discovered in Honolulu in December, 1899, and the port was im- 
mediately closed, nothing being allowed to pass out to the neighboring islands. 
A month and a half after this plague appeared in the island of Maui, although 
absolutely no communication had existed between there and Honolulu for ninety 
days. Investigation showed that this outbreak appeared shortly after the Chinese 
New Tear, when a number of Chinese had gathered together and a merchant had 
opened a package of candies and food stuffs which had been In his store for two 
months before the epidemic appeared in Honolulu. Nine cases of plague appeared 
immediately, and the supposition is that the gernis existed in the imported food 
products. 

That the existence of plague in San Francisco is a matter of great seriousness 
and that its extinction is a tremendous undertaking is a statement that admits of 
no doubt, when one considers the nature of the disease, its terrible fatality and 
Its persistence in a locality where it has once gained a foothold. The question 
of how and where the infection exists here during the interval between cases Is 
interesting. It may be that cases which remain undiscovered exist, forming a 
continuous chain, but none of the discovered cases have been traced directly to 
& preceding one, so the continued existence of the virus among the rats and in 
infected merchandise and houses seems most plausible. That the germ is not such 
a delicate one as has been supposed Is shown in the experiments of Rosenau, who 
succeeded in demonstrating that the germs retain their virulence after having 
been dried in albumen-gelatine balls for seventy-five days at 20 to 23 deg. C. 

Eduardo Germano found the bacillus to remain alive in various kinds of earths 
and on linen, wool and silk for sixty days at ordinary temperatures, if not allowed 
to dry. 

That the continued existence of the disease is a more certain danger here than 
in a warmer climate is shown by the German commission who found that the 
bacillus lost its power of infection when dried in eight days in India, but after 
returning to Germany it lived twenty-eight days under the same conditions of 
drying but in the cooler climate. 

An interval of thirty-seven days elapsed between our fourth and fifth cases, 
showing, if no undiscovered cases occurred between, that the transmission here 
has not been by personal contact. A reference to the accompanying map will 
also show how widely scattered were the cases, and attention has frequently been 
called to the lack of connection between the cases. It is true, owing to the nature 
of the people among whom the disease exists, that little dependence can be placed 
on their statements of location of deaths and relation of one case to another. We 
have only their statements that none of the individuals were related or lived in 
the same house. There is no way of connecting one man with another by his 
family name, for they have none. It is also known that they frequently move a 
dying person to some other house to die, or they move the body after death and 
before reporting it. Some of the cases have been found in Chinese undertaking 
shops and we have no way of proving where they came from. To one unac- 
quainted with the Chinese colony in San Francisco, it may not at first be evident 
what their object would be in falsifying about the cases, but, as will be shown 
later, the general conditions and the opposition to the Health Department were 
peculiar. 

Returning again to the question of the origin of the disease in San Francisco: 
May It not have been here much longer than even the date of arrival of the 
Nippon Maru in June, 1^99, and not yet have reached the acme of its development 
or passed the stage of "pestis minor" and acquired that degree of virulence neces- 
sary to its rapid spread? 

Apropos of this suggestion are the circumstances surrounding the appearance 
of a disease here in 1898, the details of which are as follows: I find the following 
in the records of the Health Office: 

Report of Dr. Wm. P. Hereford, City Physician, dated November 22, 1898: 



REPORT OP BOARD OB HEALTH. 539 

"Yesterday afternoon I was notified by telephone by Dr. Minnie Worley, No. 5 
Prospect place, that a number of deaths had occurred at certain places in China- 
town among the Chinese, the cause of which the Chinese as well as herself re- 
garded as something contagious. She stated in an interview with me this morn- 
ing that four Chinese, i. e., a clerk, two cooks and a child, had contracted the 
disease at 1022 Dupont street, and that she had seen one of these cases, Chen 
Chip, who had been taken suddenly ill and had an abnormally high temperature, 
105 deg., and that he -lied November 20th at 840 Washington street. She was 
unable to determine the exact nature of his complaint. Also that at Sam Wung 
Ka's store on Dupont street, between Washington and Jackson, three more men 
had died and one was ill at the present time, and that the store had discontinued 
business on account of the same. She stated that a man was sick in one of the 
houses in St. Louis alley, corner of Jackson, suffering from the same disease. 

"Our first call was at Quong Quck's store, 1022 Dupont street, a wholesale tea 
and general provision store; a small store above and a large cellar below, full of 
tea. Everything was clean and in good sanitary condition; new patent closet, 
etc., and no bad odor anywhere. Here they informed us that they knew Chen 
Chip. He was about 23 years of age and had arrived from China about three 
weeks ago on the Belgic. That he had complained of catching cold and about two 
weeks ago he had chills and fever followed by a little cough, pain in the chest 
and spit a little blood. He did not die there, but some other place about two days 
ago. On calling at 840 Washington street, at the place mentioned by Dr. Worley 
where Chu Chip had died, everybody denied all knowledge of the same. They all 
agreed that nobody had died there recently." 

The rest of the letter relates that the Chinese denied and he was unabla to 
find that any other cases than Chu Chip had been sick at 1022 Dupont street as 
stated by Dr. Worley. 

Here we have an account of a Chinaman recently arrived from China, and It 
would not have been impossible for him to have been suffering from pestis minor 
f.n his arrival, particularly as at that time the Federal quarantine officers did not 
bathe and inspect Chinese as they do now. 

The experience of Dr. Hereford in finding nothing but contradictions to Dr. 
Worley's statements are only our everyday experiences in Chinatown, and it is 
likely that her facilities for obtaining the facts, being a physician attached to one 
of the missions and having the confidence of the Chinese, were much better than 
Dr. Hereford's. 

Dr. V. P. Buckley, now a member of the Board of Health, was called about 
this time to attend a sick Chinaman, whom he had known for years. Dr. Buckley's 
account of the case is as follows: 

On November 22, 1898, I was told to call and treat a sick Chinese at 913 
Dupont street, near Washington street, this city. I found on arriving there that 
the patient was a man whom I had known for years, named Leong Chun Chew, 
aged 46 years, by occupation a teamster or expressman, who had resided in Cali- 
fornia thirty-six years. 

The inmates of the house exhibited signs of the greatest alarm and anxiously 
awaited* my diagnosis of the case, as two Chinese physicians had told them a 
few moments before my arrival that Leong was suffering from bubonic plague. 
On examination I found the pulse 14O, temperature 104 F. and respiration ac- 
celerated to 35 per minute. The skin was dry; tongue very dry and covered with 
a dark brown coating. The day preceding my visit the patient had had several 
very severe attacks of vomiting, and from description of same as given by at- 
tendant I concluded that it was haematemisis. He complained of a painful 
swelling a few inches below Poupart's ligament on the right thigh. I then found 
a circumscribed, slightly elevated and somewhat oedematous swelling about 2% 
Inches in diameter and exquisitely painful when touched. The staggering and ap- 



540 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

paarance suggestive of drunkenness, as described by writers on plague, were 
strongly marked and were observed when the patient arose from his bed and 
went into another one in an apartment at the rear of the house. His bowels were 
constipated. There was a diminution in the quantity of urine passed during that 
and the preceding day. An examination was made of the urine for albumen only, 
but not a trace of it could be detected. Some pulmonary engorgement was pres- 
ent, but no hepatization of the lungs. Purpuric spots were distributed over the 
body and the extremities. The attendant said that the patient had been delirious 
during most of the night before. 

Considering the case one of bubonic plague I so reported to the Acting Health 
Officer, Dr. John Gallwey, and arranged to call with him and see it at 8 o'clock 
the following morning. On our arrival there at that hour we found the house 
deserted by all its inmates except one old Chinaman, who told us that Leong 
Chun had died during the night. On inquiring of the old man he indicated the 
room, where we found the body on the floor, covered with a sheet. After learning 
all the facts in connection with the case, Dr. Gallwey concurred in the diagnosis 
of bubonic plague. Two other inmates of this house died about one week before 
Leong Chun. One was his daughter, 10 years old, and the other a woman about 
K years of age named Sam Goo. Intelligent and reliable witnesses assured me 
that these two females while ill had symptoms precisely similar to those of 
Leong Chun Chew, and that four Chinese physicians who had seen many victims 
of the plague in China, and treated Leong' s daughter and Sam Goo, were positiv* 
that these two had died of the dread disease. 

An autopsy was performed on this case and there was found: 

Brain Intense congestion of the vessels of the pia, also congestion of the 
emaller vessels of the brain substance. 

Lungs Congestion and edema, with post-mortem softening. 

Heart Slightly enlarged, both ventricles flabby and fatty degeneration present. 

Spleen Apparently normal in size, soft and flabby, tears easily. No lesions 
apparent. 

Kidneys Slightly enlarged, soft, congested, show apparent lesion of acute 
diffuse nephritis. 

Slight injection of the vessels of the meso-colon. No enlargement of the 
retro-peritoneal or mesenteric lymph nodes, no enlargement of the cervical, 
axillary or inguinal lymph nodes. 

Post-mortem decomposition well advanced. 

Cause of death Acute diffuse nephritis, complicated by pulmonary congestion 
and edema. 

A subsequent report four days later states that the plague bacillus could not 
be demonstrated. 

To analyze this case we have: 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



541 



FOR PLAGUE. 



AGAINST PLAGUE. 



Short illness. 

Other similar illness in same house. 

Fev?r. 

Delirium. 

Unsteady gait, staggering. 

Painful bubo. 

Purpurie spots. 

Opinions of Chinese who had seen plague, 
before. 

Opinion of attending physicians. 

Autopsy report on brain, lungs, heart, 
spleen, vessels of meso-colon and con- 
gestion of kidneys do not negative 
plague, but to some extent confirm. 



Bacillus not found. 
Apparant lesion of kidneys. 



Again, to examine into the value of the pathological findings we have: 



AGAINST PLAGUE. 



Found acute diffuse nephritis "ap- 
parent." 

No enlargement of lymph nodes. 



Congestion and edema of lungs. 



FOR PLAGUE. 



No albumen in urine. 

Dr. Buckley and Dr. Gallwey found a bubo 
in the left groin. 

No inoculation experiments. 

Body already decomposing, thus rendering 
isolation of the bacillus by culture 
methods difficult if not impossible. 

Congestion and edema of lungs not In- 
compatibls with plague. 



542 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

In explanation of the apparent discrepancies in the clinical and post-mortem 
accounts It may be stated that the congestion and cloudy swelling which may 
exist in the kidneys of a plague septicemia case could readily mislead one who is 
not aware that plague is nearer to him than 5,000 miles. So also with the en- 
largement of the lymph nodes in the femoral region of the thigh. I have seen 
some cases in which the swelling was hardly noticeable to the eye, yet incision 
disclosed a gland as large as a walnut imbedded in the edematous fatty tissue. 
If hurried and unsuspecting a pathologist could readily overlook the enlarged 
glands. 

In giving this case I do not mean to say positively that it was plague, but in 
view of the fact that we have had cases recently that looked as much like it as 
this and were unable to isolate the bacillus and others which did not look as 
much like plague as this and did succeed in demonstrating it bacteriologically. 
It is fair to assume the probability of this case having been one of plague. 

In support of the contention that plague could have existed here in November, 
1898, and to show the danger that may exist from the ambulent pestis minor, I 
will cite instances of its slow development in other cities. Indeed, it would seem 
that this form of beginning was the rule and not the exception with this disease, 
and that it is In the sense of security which is the outcome of familiarity with 
occasional "sporadic" cases that the great danger lies. 

Upon perusing the medical history of the plague in any part of the world one 
is immediately struck by the frequency with which epidemics have been preceded 
by ailments of indefinite nature; cases of fever and glandular swellings, without 
any marked increase in mortality, sometimes extending over periods of one or two 
years or more before plague is recognized. In this respect plague does not differ 
from other contagious diseases, as diphtheria, small pox and typhoid fever, for in 
these three diseases there are often cases of "mild sore throat," "diarrhoea" or 
"chicken pox" preceding epidemics of the severe form. The mild cases are a 
fruitful source of contagion, and in the case of plague the mild cases are even 
more difficult to recognize. 

In Calcutta, at the end of 1896, cases of fever with glandular swellings were 
reported to the municipal authorities, but although the plague bacillus was demon- 
strated in five out of eleven cases brought to the notice of the authorities, the 
existence of plague was denied by a commission appointed to examine the evi- 
dence. It is significant, however, that they ordered the strictest measures of iso- 
lation and disinfection. In 1898 its presence could no longer be denied and 192 
deaths occurred. In 1899, two and one-half years after its first appearance, ths 
severest epidemic of all broke out. 

In Bombay, cases of fever with glandular swellings had been observed many 
months, and, according to some, a year or two before the city was declared in- 
fected on September 23d, 1896. 

In Macau, a Portuguese colony thirty miles from Hong Kong, six cases of 
plague appeared in May, 1894. These were all the cases observed until nine 
months later it reappeared and by May, 1895, the death rate was eighty per day. 

In the city of Oporto, which was declared free of infection on February 9th, 
1900, two cases have just been reported (July, 1900). 

A notable complication of affairs in our plague experience in San Francisco 
has been the bitter opposition of the press, the Chinese and of the merchants (ex- 
cepting an association of the heavier wholesalers), but as this has been a com- 
mon experience in other places it was not so much to be wondered at. 

Another disagreeable thing was the opposition engendered by the ignorance 
and superstition of the Chinese, aided by lawyers who encouraged them to resist 
necessary measures of the Health Department by legal process, to the pecuniary 
advantage of the aforesaid lawyers. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 543 

But, most disgraceful of all, has been the enlistment on the side of opposition 
to the Board of Health of medical men, although, be it said to the honor of the 
profession, that almost without exception they belonged to the faculty, or society, 
of ascertain medical college a prominent member of which was the prime mover in 
the opposition. The bacteriologist of this college, and one other, who was also in 
the employ of the Chinese, were the only bacteriologists in the City who could be 
obtained who would, after an examination, consent to take the position that thess 
were not plague cases. 

It has even been stated by these bacteriologists that the organism which I have 
described, and which they acknowledge was the cause of death of these Chinese, is 
the bacillus of hog or chicken cholera, and they state, among other things, that 
the said chicken cholera bacillus is pathogenic to man and kills rats as readily as 
does plague! By declaring the bacillus of chicken cholera pathogenic to man what 
a vista of epidemic possibilities is opened up for the contemplation of the millions 
of people in the Mississippi valley. 

In conclusion, the determined enforcement of sanitary measures on the part of 
the Board of Health, the thorough cleansing of the quarter, and the careful dis- 
Infaction and quarantining of infected houses, has undoubtedly been of inestimable 
service in checking the development and increase of virulence of the disease, and 
It Is to be hoped that it will continue to be effective. Respectfully submitted, 

W. H. KELLOGG, Bacteriologist. 



544 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF CHIEF SANITARY INSPECTOR. 



San Francisco, July 1, 1900. 

To the Honorable the Board of Health 

Of the City and County of San Francisco- 
Gentlemen: In submitting this annual report for the fiscal year commencing 
July 1, 1899, ending June 30, 1900, I am confronted with difficulties of such a 
character as to impair a full and comprehensive resume of the year's work, apply- 
ing to the intention and work of the Board of Health. 

The intention of the department has been to exert all efforts to improve the 
general sanitary condition of the city, prevent the sale or exposing for sale of 
diseased meat, to guard against unscrupulous dealers adulterating food stuffs, to 
search for and confiscate articles of foo*l in the market that are not standard, all 
of which may be the causa of introducing disease, and affecting the health of 
innocent purchasers and consumers. 

The Board of Health has placed under the Chief Sanitary Inspector the super- 
vision of inspection of the Sanitary, Food, Market, Bath and Laundry, and the 
fumigating Departments. 

Whatever may have been accomplished to comply with the recommendable 
intention of the Board of Health has been greatly embarrassed by a lack of suffi- 
cient assistance from the Board of Supervisors, in whose pow^r was vested the 
legal authority and obligation to give the necessary assistance financially, whereby 
a sufficient number of inspectors could have been employed to carry on a proper 
system of inspection. Instead, we have been crippled by an inefficient number in 
the force. 

At the commencement of the year we had 10 Sanitary Inspectors, 10 Food 
Inspectors, 6 Market Inspectors, 1 Laundry Inspector and 1 Bakery Inspector. 

With this force in operation in these various departments we could by exertion 
partly accomplish what San Francisco would require, but in the months of March 
and April we were forced to reduce the different departments the Sanitary and 
Food Departments to one-half, and combine the Laundry and Bakery. 

Previous to this change, I particularly wish to insert in this report the willing- 
ness of the Inspectors to aid the impoverished condition of the city by their offering 
their services and labor gratuitously for the months of April and May, awaiting 
the help they expected from the Board of Supervisors, which body later showed its 
ingratitude by not recognizing the appeal of the Board of Health to recompense 
the various departments by creating funds to be apportioned by the future con- 
ducting of the departments. 

I will, in order to more clearly explain some of the obstacles we were forced to 
overcome, take each department separately. 

The ten Sanitary Inspectors were detailed to five districts, extending from the 
water front to the San Mateo County line, two in each district, whose duties were 
to examine violations of sanitary regulations complained of and filed in the Health 
Office, search their respective districts for such violations, and cause their abate- 
ment. 

Much good was accomplished, as has been attested by the abatement of 1,669 
nuisances, and referring to other departments, chiefly the Plumbing Department, 



REPORT OP BOARD OF HEALTH. 545 

of 2,248 complaints, all tending to nurse and propagate the germs of contagious 
diseases. One great result, prominently to be mentioned, refers to the scavenger 
industry. Scavengers were in the habit of dumping their collection of filth and 
garbage in vacant lots and on the public streets during the night hours, to avoid 
observation, in all parts of the city, and patrolling the streets, in their business 
of collecting garbage, with unlined, filthy, ill-smelling, leaking wagons. This has 
been checked by the active efforts of the Sanitary Inspectors, who have devoted 
nights after their daily work to watch the evasive scavengers attempting to dump 
their collection of garbage in public places. Their vigilance has caused many 
arrests and a corresponding number of convictions, which has had its good effect 
in forcing all garbage to reach its proper and assigned destination for cremation. 
This work was interrupted in March, April and June. While these Inspectors 
were offering their services gratuitously, on account of lack of funds, they were 
ordered to Chinatown, to meet the disagreeable, and I emphatically add DAN- 
GEROUS, work necessary in that district, the most degraded, filthy, immoral and 
unsanitary location within the boundaries of the United States of America, to 
Which I will hereafter refer. 

It required the entire inspecting force to meet the order for a house-to-house 
inspection, which left the remaining districts unprotected by daily inspection, 
which I deem a necessity. 

In June, 1900, this department was again crippled by a compulsory reduction In 
the number of Inspectors, reducing the number to five, in order to meet the im- 
poverished condition of the treasury, the unreasonable whimperings of a fossilized 
part of the public, the partisan press, and the neglect of the legislative body, the 
Board of Supervisors, to give us their assistance. This reduction is to be operative 
for the ensuing fiscal year, namely, twelve months. 

I will allow the reader who may be a father, a mother, or a public-spirited 
citizen, to conclude if five Sanitary Inspectors make a sufficient sanitary corps to 
daily watch for and correct sanitary violations in a seaport city of an estimated 
population of 450,000. 

The Pood Inspectors, numbering ten, charged with the duties of suppressing 
the sale of adulterated foods and milk, have also been crippled after the discovery 
of bubonic plague in Chinatown. They were detailed to give assistance to the Sani- 
tary Inspectors in their house-to-house inspection, again being compelled to leava 
their respective districts open to violators of pure food ordinances. 

As a compliment to this department, I call attention to the fact that their 
services were offered and furnished gratuitously, on account of lack of funds in 
the city treasury. For this the people of San Francisco owe them a debt of grati- 
tude, and the Board of Supervisors a reprimand for denying them adequate relief 
by officially declining to render them their financial assistance. This interruption 
in their particular line of duty deprived me of their help in examining the milk 
supply given the public of San Francisco, and for this reason milk inspection was 
not attempted during the last six months of the fiscal year, where I had good 
reason to believe much of the milk sold was diluted and deleterious. 

The Market Inspectors, numbering six, havs been districted so as to examine 
all slaughtered meat, and all poultry arriving in the city at the ferries, railroad 
entrances and other inlets; also, the supervision of the slaughtering within the 
city, and an examination of retail market places, as well as the fish markets. 

Again this department offered its services gratuitously to meet that disgraceful 
condition into which the City of San Francisco had allowed itself to lapse a lack 
of funds to remunerate its servants and where could money be better used than 
to protect the people from diseased food being used for daily consumption. 

Attention is particularly called to the number of pounds of condemned beef, to 
which may be added other articles. This is due to condemnation of supplies in 
the United States Departments of Army and Navy. While condemned by the 

35 



546 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

United States authorities, they have been offered at public auction to private pur- 
chasers, ostensibly for fertilizing purposes, but were actually, in many instances, 
purchased for repacking. Many articles, while condemned by the United States 
Board of Survey, were good and marketable, while others, particularly beef and 
pork, were spoiled, and still sold, where they should have been destroyed. I fol- 
lowed the principle in condemnation that articles condemned by the United States 
as unfit for army or navy consumption were unfit for local consumption. 

Many tents, mattresses, blankets, etc., \vere also placed on the market at pub- 
lic auction, having been exposed to contagious disease, without a certificate of 
fumigation. This has caused a great amount of extra work on your Sanitary force, 
but I believe much danger has been averted. 

I wish to attach to this report a few remarks regarding Chinatown, by which 
I may sum up the entire situation in the following words: 

Chinatown to-day is a menace to public health, to public morals, and to public 
decency. 

In this classification, as Chief Sanitary Inspector I might properly confine my- 
self to. the first division, Chinatown as a menace to public health, but the fact 
exists that the violation of public morals indirectly bears an influence on the 
health of an unfortunate class frequenting the district. I openly make this state- 
ment, and I trust the proper authorities will investigate Chinatown morally, and 
such information as I possess will be willingly offered. 

When the attention of your Chief Sanitary Inspector was directed to China- 
town I personally entered the district to determine the necessity of an investiga- 
tion, and, if necessary, the plan of procedure. 

I found Chinatown imperatively in need of immediate relief. It is a district 
populated by aliens, who differ in their customs, habits and ideas of sanitation 
from those approved by modern sanitarians. To advise, entreat, suggest, with 
them was a waste of time. They wanted no advice, would accept no suggestions. 
On the contrary, they repulsed my advances, interpreting my intention as dis- 
honest, and solely for the purpose of extortion. They are a class of people never 
ready to comply with suggestions or requests made in good faith and for their 
welfare, but always waiting until suggestions by necessity are changed to com- 
pulsory edicts. The attention of the Board of Health was directed to this quarter, 
and, almost immediately following such recommendations as I deemed advisable, 
arose the appalling discovery of the fact that Chinatown harbored the germs of 
bubonic plague, and I will at this point offer my conviction, and I believe it well 
founded, had existed and caused deaths eighteen months previous to its detection 
in March, 1900. This caused for closer observation, resulting in discovering an 
area inhabited by approximately 30,000 people, closely confined, existing in open 
defiance of all sanitary requirements and ordinances, through which territory 
public highways permitted Caucasian travel and public traffic constantly carried 
by street cars to all parts of San Francisco. The very few places in this district 
that could possibly be passed on as sanitary were in such immediate proximity 
to unsanitary surroundings that I can without hesitation conscientiously declare 
it my belief that the district known as Chinatown is in an unsanitary condition, 
and I will briefly state the reasons for my declaration: 

First There is a general defective plumbing. 

Second There is a disregard to disposing of garbage, allowing accumulation. 

Third There is a prominently absolute disregard for the cubic-air ordinance. 

Fourth The overflow from the permanently located inhabitants nearly all seek 
underground lodging places, where, in the majority of cases, there is total dark- 
ness, dampness, obnoxious odors, and absolutely no ventilation otherwise than the 
door or entrance. 

Fifth There is always an intention on the part of the Chinese to conceal sick- 
ness and deaths. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 547 

Sixth The disposition of the Chinese to cast aside their unfortunate and indi- 
gent sick, whom, after being pronounced incurable by Chinese physicians, they 
were in the habit of placing in Chinese undertaking establishments, on hard cots, 
within a few feet of an open coffin, conveniently placed there to await the death 
of its prospective occupant 

Seventh A general repugnance to co-operate with the health requirements. 

To correct this, I have previously recommended certain remedies tending to 
abate the existing evils, which hava met with the approval not only of the Health 
authorities, but other departments of the city government, prominently the Board 
of Public Works and the Police Department. Generally speaking, I again recom- 
mend that all streets and alleys within the district be covered with bituminous 
rock where the grade will permit the safe operation of trucks and teams. If this 
could l-e accomplished, it would be an easy matter to use the fire hydrants to wash 
the streets and alleys at any and all times, ordinarily with water, or with dis- 
infectants, if deemed necessary. 

Further, that all underground lodging places be condemned as unsanitary and 
'unfit for human habitation, as they are but receptacles for the accumulation of 
filth and incubators of disease. Many of these places frequented are inhabited by 
Chinese and Japanese, who are servants employed in white families throughout 
the city. Others are small manufacturing places, where clothing, cigars and home 
necessities are prepared for the public market. 

Further, the plumbing of the entire district should be corrected to conform 
with the requirements that are enforced upon the white population of the city. 
Many places have only soil and waste pipes leading to an open sewer, without any 
traps, and in certain alleys the water closets actually protrude on the streets, 
and are blocked by accumulation of human excrements. 

Further, the condemnation of buildings, sheds and partitions as the Board of 
Health may determine unsafe and unsanitary. This last suggestion I believe would 
accomplish more towards a general improvement in sanitation than any other 
action that might be undertaken. 

The reader may pause, and with good reason ask: If such is the case, why 
does not the Board of Health taka action? 

Mr. Reader, my answer is that under the Charter the Board of Health has not 
been delegated the power. The Board of Supervisors is the legislative body of San 
Franclsoo, and without their assistance in passing an ordinance governing these 
abuses and c'elegating power to the executive body, the Board of Health or its rep- 
resentatives canr-ot legally act. Your representatives are anxiously waiting and in 
readiness to be legally garbed, so that the abuses mentioned may be summarily 
corrected. In almost all attempts to improve Chinatown by your representatives 
we meet with potent opposition, a partisan press, a factional public opinion and 
the opposition of Caucasian property owners who derive an enormous revenue from 
tenants who allow sanitary violations to exist, and protect themselves against 
their abatement by resorting to a legal process, the much-abused writ of injunc- 
tion. Respectfull; submitted, 

W. S. CHALMERS, M. D., 

Chief Sanitary Inspector. 



548 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF 



FOR FISCAL YEAR 



SLAUGHTERED. 


TOTALS. 


_, 
c^ 
vT 


> 


September. . . 


October 


Cattle Slaughtered . ... 


101 838 


7 843 


8 294 


8 275 


7 625 


Sheep Slaughtered 


328 223 


23,186 


40 496 


23 000 


23 560 




187,047 


17 840 


1513 


15000 


14 375 


Hogs Slaughtered 


120,005 


9243 


8482 


12 000 


13 165 




41 037 


1 3CO 


1 207 


4 000 


K 














Grand Total 


778 150 


59 412 


59 992 


62 275 


64 088 















CONDEMNATIONS. 

C a ttle 


1424 


8 


61 


40 


3 




115J 


5 


1 


2 


1 


Calres 


199 


13 


4 


30 


9 




486 


4 


10 


87 


3 
















943 


30 


76 


159 


16 














l?j B b. 


110 670 


22000 


200 


13,000 


600 


Poultry (Chickens) 


2506 


227 






150 




2,400 










jj ee f 


46 120 






300 
















Grand Total 


161 696 


22 227 


00 


13 300 


750 















REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



541 



MARKET INSPECTORS. 

ENDING JUNE 30. 1900, 



18 


99 






19C 









November . . . 


December 


5 

| 


February* . . . 


ET 


1 


I 


1 


46 


8,376 


8,431 










45 648 


25,460 


24.396 


24,125 










144 000 


13,590 


15,365 


14,364 










95 000 


12,602 


11,224 


10,989 










42 300 


5,390 


3.761 


3,801 










16 215 


















'64,388 


63,122 


61,710 










343 163 


















5 


3i 


3 










19 


3 


15J 


9 










81 


3 


5 












135 


1 


36 


10 










335 


















12 


58 


22 










570 


















26,400 




1,280 










47 196 


307 


150 


124 










1 54$ 




2,400 




























45 820 


















6,707 


2,550 


1,404 










94 558 



















The figures which a:>p3ar in the June cilunm of this report show the aggregate numbers slaughtered in the fiv 
months from February to June, 1909, no monthly reports of same having been recorded. 

The figures which appear in the June column of this report show the aggregate number condemned in the five 
months from February to Juue, 1900, no monthly reports of same having been recorded. 

The ures which appear in the Juue column of this report show the aggregate number of pounds condemned 
n the five months from February to June, 1900, no monthly reports of same having been recorded. 



550 



REPORT OP BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF MARKET 



CONDEMNATIONS. 


TOTALS. 


| 


> 
a 

d 




September.. 


October 




1,706 


203 






47 


Poultry (Turkeys) 


329 










Poultry (Ducks and Geese) 


38 










Poultry (Rabbits) 


570 








II 


Grand Total 


2,643 


203 








58 














REPORT OF INSPECTIONS. 

Chickens 


657,825 


98,000 


60,000 


70,000 


93,000 


Markets 


8 472 


642 


625 


694 


715 














Grand Total 


666,297 


98,642 


60,625 


70,694 


93 715 















NOTB. In addition to abore a general inspection is made daily of ferries, railroad depots and commission 
houses. 

W. P. CHALMtUiS, M. D.. 

Chief Sanitary Inspector. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



551 



INSPECTORS CONTINUED. 



18 


ft. 






190 


0. 






November.... 


December. . . 


January 


0? 


\ 


J> 


! 


t* 

g 

D 






ICO 












1,306 




242 












87 
















38 
















559 




















392 












1,990 


















92375 


97 000 












147,450 


723 


ti99 












4 374 


















93 098 


97 699 












151,824 




















Tlu figures which appear in the June column of this report show the aggregate number condemned in the sir 
months from January to June, 1900, no monthly reports of same having been recorded. 

Tbe figures which appear in the June column of this report show the total number of inspections for the six 
months from January to June, 1900, no monthly reports having been recorded. 



552 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OP CHIEF PLUMBING INSPECTOR. 



San Francisco, July 1, 1900. 

To Dr. A. P. O'Brien, Health Officer- 
Dear Sir: Herewith please find my biennial report of the work accomplished 

by the Plumbing Department during the two years ending June 30, 1900: 
To summarize, the work performed by this department is as follows: 

Number of plans submitted, 1,099; representing 1,305 houses. 

Number of inspections in construction 2,329 

Number of inspections on completion 1, 340 

Number of inspections on complaints received from Sanitary 

Inspectors 5,517 

Number of abatements made on complaints received from 

Sanitary Inspectors 2, 308 

Number of inspections made on complaints received by Plumb- 
ing Department 745 

Number of abatements made on complaints received by Plumb- 
ing Department 446 

Number of inspections on work granted by permit 1,956 

Number of abatements on work granted by permit 1,221 

Number of inspections made in the Latin and Chinese quarters 167 

Number of abatements made in the Latin and Chinese quarters 108 

Number of feet castiron sewer inspected 100,831 

Number of feet ironstone sewer inspected 79, 359 

Number of inspections made on sewers 2,526 

Number of traps at curb 1,183 

Total number of inspections made 18,663 

And any special details which may be assigned to our department. 

The old work coming to our department from Sanitary Inspectors represents 
all parts of the city. Its attention required a great many visits and consequently 
a great deal of time before the nuisances were abated. 

In the district south of Market street, in that territory lying between First and 
Twelfth streets south to the bay, composed as it is of many small streets thickly 
populated and owned in blocks in most cases by wealthy people, practically no 
attention whatever has been paid to the sanitary construction of dwellings, which 
have consequently been a standing nuisance for years. As complaints are con- 
tinually coming in from this quarter a great deal of our time has been consumed 
in attending to this work. 

In the Chinese quarter the work of this department has been of a very different 
character. The plumbing in many of the Chinatown habitations Is all that is re- 
quired by law, but no attention is paid to the cleanliness of the fixtures or to the 
compartments wherein these fixtures are placed. 

While the plumbing of this district has been materially improved and has 
contributed measurably to a better sanitation, conditions will not be what they 
should be until many other evils receive attention. In my opinion it is imperative 



REPORT OP BOARD OF HEALTH. 553 

that foul basements with decayed wooden floors should be closed or be made 
sanitary. Overhanging, filth-saturated porches should be removed. Unventilated, 
underground sleeping apartments, where laws regulating cubic air and sanitary 
precautions are disobeyed, should be remodeled to conform to the health rules 
adopted by your honorable body. It seems to me imperative that the people of 
this district should be made to conform to the laws obeyed by other classes in the 
city. 

In the Latin quarter of the city conditions similar to those existing south of 
Market street are to be found. If anything, the Latin quarter is from a sanitary 
point of view much worse than the district south of Market street. The buildings 
are extremely old and have hardly an apology for sanitary appliances. The streets 
are poorly sewered, the buildings are inadequately ventilated and the plumbing, 
meager as it is in the district, is of the most primitive character. There is in 
this district the gravest need for sanitary reform. 

From the Mission district many complaints of poor sanitation have been re- 
ceived and have been given attention. The district is far from being in a satis- 
factory sanitary condition. 

The Bernal Heights, Sunset and Richmond districts suffer greatly from a lack 
of sewers, which should be supplied without delay. Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN J. SULLIVAN, 

Chief Plumbing Inspector. 



554 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN 



San Francisco, July 1, 1900. 
To the Honorable the Board of Health 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Gentlemen: I herewith respectfully sumbit for your consideration the report of 
the City Physician for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900: 

This branch of the Health Department has the particular care of the indigent 
sick, the prisoners in the County Jail, the inspection of the dead Chinese, and the 
issuance of death certificates for the burial of the same; also the care of patients 
at the Twenty-sixth Street Hospital. 

Though the calls upon the City Physician from the indigent sick have been 
numerous during the year, I am pleased to say that the City has been free from 
epidemic. 

The Beard has shown its wisdom in the selection of a female physician to look 
after the indigent sick women and children. This was long: needed in this de- 
partment. 

The health of the prisoners in the jails has been as good as could be expected 
with their surroundings. Jail No. 1 is a very old and dilapidated building, and its 
sanitation is not of the best. Jail No. 2 is in a better condition, but Jail No. 3, 
the old Industrial School, should be entirely rebuilt. 

The inspection of the Chinese dead is under the immediate charge of Dr. Frank 
P. Wilson, Assistant City Physician, and will be considered in his report. 

The Pesthouse at the Twenty-sixth Street Hospital is a place totally unfit for 
habitation. In many places the roof is entirely uncovered, and during the rainy 
season the rain pours into the building, rendering it damp and unhealthy. Some 
means should be taken to cover the roof before the next winter sets in. 

I think it would also be advisable for this Honorable Board to endeavor by 
some means to have the lepers at the Twenty-sixth Street Hospital sent to the 
leper colony at the Hawaiian Islands. 

The Smallpox Hospital is well suited for its purpose, and is a well-conducted in- 
stitution. During the year 44 cases were admitted, of which number 7 died, a 
mortality of less than 16 per cent., which I think is an excellent showing. The 
hospital has during the year been under the care of Drs. Tilman and Prior. Dur- 
ing May we were threatened with an epidemic of smallpox, the disease having 
been brought here from Kansas by a womn who secluded herself in a lodging- 
house for three weeks before being discovered. Prompt and vigorous measures 
were used, and the spread of the disease was prevented. 

Previous to my appointment to this office it had been the custom to fill the 
prescriptions given the indigent sick living east of Larkin and Ninth streets at 
the City Receiving Hospitals. This was changed, so that now all prescriptions are 
filled at the City and County Hospital. This works an injustice to the sick, the 
majority of whom come from east of Larkin and Ninth streets, and are both 
physically and financially unable to travel the long distrance to the City and 
County Hospital. Tours, very respectfully, 

J. G. MORRISSEY, M. D., City Physician. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEA 555 



REPORT OF EMERGENCY HOSPITALS. 



San Francisco, July 31, 1900. 

To the Honorable the Board of Health 

of the City and County of San Francisco 

Gentlemen: Herewith permit me to submit a r sport for the fiscal year ending 
June 30th, 1900, for the Emergency Hospitals and the Hospital for the Detention 
of the Insane. 

This report includes a transcript of the records from June 30th, 1899, to Janu- 
ary 8th, 1900, which I found incomplete, and from January 8th, 1900, when I took 
charge, to June 30th, 1900. 

The total number of cases treated at the Central Emergency Hospital during 
this fiscal year was 5,267. At the Harbor Hospital there were treated 3,826, and 
at the Hospital for the Detention of the Insane there were admitted 537 patients. 
At the Park Emergency Hospital during the month of July, 1899 (this Hospital 
was closed July 31st, 1899), there were treated 41 cases. 

On the 8th day of January, 1900, the new Charter went into effect and a new 
Board of Health was appointed, and shortly following, on the 13th day of January, 
I was appointed to take charge of the Emergency Hospitals and the Hospital for 
the Detention of the Insane. Previous to this time the Hospital for the Deten- 
tion of the Insane had been under a separate management, but owing to the pro- 
visions of the Charter it again reverted to the care of the Board of Health. Some 
necessary changes were made in the conduct of this Hospital, notably the care of 
patients. Two stewards and two matrons were appointed, with some knowledge 
in regard to the management of insane people, and under my tuition they were 
further instructed, particularly in the best and most modern methods for con- 
trolling violent patients. Some little difficulty was experienced at first in educat- 
ing these attendants for this peculiar line of work. There seemed to be a gen- 
eral idea that when a patient was violent he should be maltreated, but after per- 
sonal instruction the attendants grasped the idea that brutality in any form was 
entirely unnecessary. The result has been that during the period of my in- 
cumbency no trouble has arisen in that department of any moment, and the 
criticisms heretofore made have been entirely wanting. 

Under the old Consolidation Act the Central Emergency Hospital, or as it 
was then known City Receiving Hospital, had a separate appropriation, but under 
the Chatter all the Emergency Hospitals derive the money for their maintenance 
from the general appropriation of the Health Department. At the time that your 
honorable body took charge of the affairs of the Health Department there were 
outstanding bills against the Harbor Hospital amounting to $1,261.33 unpaid. This 
legacy of debt from the preceding Board of Health, very naturally embarrassed 
the work of this entire branch of your department. Consequent upon this con- 
dition of affairs it was absolutely necessary for me to curtail all expenses, not 
only salaries but maintenance. Six of the surgeons originally appointed as my 
assistants had to be dropped from the payroll. Furniture supplies, beds and 
bedding requisite for the proper care of patients could not be purchased. In short, 
the most rigid economy was Imposed upon me in order to mnka up the deficiency 



556 REPORT OP BOARD OF HEALTH. 

existing in the appropriations which remained to the credit of the Emergency 
Hospitals for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1900. 

For the ensuing fiscal year, although the appropriation granted this depart- 
ment by the Board of Supervisors was very much less than it should be, we are 
finding that it is possible to purchase supplies and maintain the Hospital in a 
very creditable manner, not, however, without the economy which has been ob- 
served for the past seven months. No margin has been allowed for the slightest 
additional expense; bearing in mind at the same time that the Park Emergency 
Hospital is closed. 

The method of obtaining supplies, as provided for under the new Charter, is 
a vast improvement over the old system. It was formerly the practice to make 
all purchases regardless of expense. The system of competitive bidding, as in- 
augurated under the new Charter, enables the City to obtain supplies of every 
description at reasonable rates, a fair estimate of the savings being at least 33 1-3 
P3r cent. A serious item of expense in the Emergency Hospital is the cost of 
bandages. I have materially reduced this by purchasing the cloth and making 
it a part of the duty of the matron to manufacture them. The saving in this in- 
stance amounts to about 50 per cent. 

Former statistics show the necessity for an Emergency Hospital in the great 
pleasure ground of this City. We all know that, particularly during the summer 
months, Golden Gate Park is crowded with men, women and children, and acci- 
dents, sometimes of a very serious character, occur there. At present the only 
way of attending to these cases is by sending an ambulance from the Central 
Hospital. An hour and frequently two hours must elapse before the injured can 
receive treatment. The Park Hospital was closed a year ago for lack of funds, 
and in my opinion should be reopened at once. A presentation of the facts, 
showing the necessity thereof, I am convinced would result in a sufficient sum of 
money being set aside by the Board of Supervisors for that purpose. 
Respectfully yours, 

EDWIN BUNNELL, 
Chief Surgeon, Emergency Hospital. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



557 



REPORT OF THE CITY AND COUNTY 
HOSPITAL. 



San Francisco, July 1, 1900. 
To the Honorable the Board of Health 

of the City and County of San Francisco 

Gentlemen: I have the honor herewith to present for your consideration the 
forty-seventh annual report of the City and County Hospital for the fiscal year 
IS99-1900. 

The following summary has been compiled from the several statements in- 
cluded in this report: 

SUMMARY. 



Patients in Hospital July 1, 1 899 

Examined for admission during fiscal year 

Rejected 

Admitted 

Born (not including 10 stillborn) 

Total to be accounted for 

Patients diseharged- 

Cured 

Improved 

Unimproved 

Own request 

Refused treatment 

Removed by relative or friends 

Insubordination 

Referred to Insanity Commissioners 

Sent to Almahouse 

Sent to Pesthouse 

Arrested 

Ran away 

Died 

Patients remaining June 30, 1900 

Tot 1 1 accounted for. . . 



4,218 
508 



1,313 

962 

149 

332 

13 

166 

23 

13 

101 

1 

197 
629 
331 



3,710 
135 

4,231 



4,231 



558 REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Least number of patients during the year (June 30, 1900) 331 

Greatest number of patients during the year (January 16 and March 1, 1900) 426 

Total number of days' treatment 137,706 

Daily average of patients 377 .36 

Daily average officers and employes 137.52 

Percentage of deaths to number treated 14.87 

Average time under treatment (days) 32.55 

Cost of subsistence per person, per diem 0.193 

Cost of subsistence per patient, per diem .2402 

Total expenses per patient, per diem . 5814 

Total amount expended during the fiscal year $97,977 73 

Amount of appropriation for Hospital purposes 98,500 00 

Balance remaining in Treasury June 30, 1900 522 27 

The past fiscal year has been marked, by many changes in the officials and 
other employees of this Hospital. 

On October 1st, 1899, I felt obliged to resign the office of Superintendent Physi- 
cian, and my successor, Dr. D. A. Hodghead, was installed into the office, which 
he held until January 10th, 1900, when I was again reappointed by your Honor- 
able Body to said position under the Charter. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year various officials were appointed, a majority 
of whom were new to their duties, which made the carrying out of the work of 
the Hospital difficult for some time, and in several instances unsatisfactory. A 
change in the officers and employees occurred again after the Charter went into 
effect, many of them were new to their duties also, but they all have endeavored 
to carry on the work of the Hospital and are daily improving in efficiency. 

The monthly reports rendered for the past year have enumerated events of im- 
mediate importance and minor details, such as the movements of the Hospital 
staff and employees as recorded in the Journal, and which are on file for reference 
in your office. 

The various and elaborate tables of medical and surgical statistics show the 
extent of the work done in these departments. Modern medicine and surgery de- 
mand many new additions in medicines, instruments and surgical supplies. It 
has been a source of regret that this Hospital has not been able to fully furnish 
these necessities, still a steady advance for the better has been made in this 
respect, and an earnest effort will be made in the future to keep abreast with the 
times. This will not be so difficult when the new City and County Hospital is 
completed, but with the present structure it is almost impossible to accomplish 
satisfactory results. 

With regard to the maintenance of the Hospital, I beg to state that although 
the first part of the year was marked by considerable confusion, owing to divided 
authority and changes of administration, the last six months under the Charter 
show a great improvement in accuracy and economy. Whereas, in former years, 
there was a deficiency in the fund annually appropriated for maintenance, I am 
pleased to state that the end of the fiscal year shows a creditable surplus. 

The Hospital buildings need many repairs; their aspect is gloomy and condi- 
tion unsanitary. I would therefore recommend that they be repainted, externally 
and internally. Were it certain that the new Hospital would shortly be completed, 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 559 

I would not make this suggestion. I would, however, respectfully racommend that 
all the wards be thoroughly disinfected. 

The Training School for Nurses still continues to be of much service. The 
number of pupils has somewhat increased over previous years, but there are none 
too many. (See Report of Principal of Training School.) 

The outlook for the future, under the Charter, is cheering. While the details'of 
the work are more exacting than formerly, the new system of contracts for all 
supplies will enable your Superintendent Physician to give a more economical and 
satisfactory administration. Respectfully submitted, 

G. E. SUSSDORFF, M. D., . 
Superintendent Physician. 



ALMSHOUSE REPORT. 



San Francisco, July 2, 1900. 

To the Honorable the Board of Health 

Of the City and County of San Francisco- 
Gentlemen: I respectfully submit to your Honorable Board the following re- 
porl of tha City and County Almshouse for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1900: 

NUMBER OF INMATES ADMITTED. 

Males 525 

Females . . 145 



Total admitted 670 

Remaining in the house July 1st, 1899 960 



Total to be accounted for 1,630 

NUMBER OF INMATES DISCHARGED. 

Number of inmates discharged at own request 325 

Number of inmates discharged at expiration of time 126 

Number of inmates ran away 101 

Number of inmates discharged for cause 29 

Number of inmates died 125 

Remaining in the house July 1st, 1900 924 



Total 1,630 

Daily average number of inmates 947 

The appropriation for the City and County Almshouse for 

the fiscal year 1899-1900 was $90,000.00 

Expenditures during the year 85,967.47 



Balance unexpended $4,032.53 

Amount turned over to the Treasursr from the sale of 

junk, hogs, etc 321.58 

Total balance unexpended $4,354.11 



Which being deducted from $90,000.00 

4,354.11 



Actual total cost to the City for 1899-1900 $85,645.89 



ALMSHOUSE REPORT. 561 

ALMSHOUSE EXPENSES FOR 1899-1900. 

Salaries of officsrs and employees $23,411.06 

Provisions, groceries, fruit, etc 34,446.80 

Dry goods, clothing, etc 4,969.98 

Tobacco 1,204.00 

Medicines, liquors, drugs and alcohol 2,379.76 

Repairs and materials of building , 6,178.56 

Repairs of stoves and ranges 292.92 

Repairs of vehicles and horseshoeing 904.75 

Feed of horsas and cattle 2,066.52 

Tools, implements and harness 304.66 

Crockery and utensils 600.47 

Laundry supplies 67.94 

Furniture, carpets, paints and oils 1,19928 

Printing and stationery 212,11 

Petty expenses 176.62 

Telephone ....: 90.00 

Material and construction of naw buildings 54.12 

Fuel, light and water 7,033.93 

New vehicles 110.00 

Horses 1,250.00 

Cows and hogs 15.00 



Total $85,967.47 

Total cost of food for 1899-1900 $34,446.80 

Daily average number of officers, employees and inmates 981 

Daily cost of food per officer, employee and inmate $0.0961-100 

Total cost of dry goods, clothing, bedding, shoes, etc $4,969.98 

Daily average number of inmates 947 

Daily cost per inmate of above articles $0.0143-100 

According to our books the total amount paid out for 1899- 

1900 was $85,967.47 

Less amount turned into Treasury from sale of junk, etc.... 321.68 

Total cost to city for 1899-1900 $85,645.89 

Daily cost of institution $234.64 

Yearly cost per inmate $90.43 

Daily cost per inmate $0.24 77-100 

Received from sale of junk, bones, rags, etc $63.00 

Hogs 211.08 

Horses 47. 60 

Total turned over to the City and County Treasurer $321.58 

Effects of deceased persons turned over to City and County 

Treasurer $79.46 

36 



562 



ALMSHOUSE REPORT. 



NATIVITY OF INMATES ADMITTED. 



UNITED STATES. 



Alabama 2 

Arkansas 3 

California 10 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 3 

District of Columbia 2 

Indiana 3 

Georgia 2 

Illinois 3 

Kentucky 5 

Louisiana 4 

Maine 9 

Maryland 5 

Vermont 6 

Missouri .. 2 



Massachusetts 14 

Michigan 6 

New Hampshire 4 

Nsw Jersey 2 

Ohio 12 

New York 56 

Pennsylvania 10 

Rhode Island 3 

South Carolina 1 

Tennesses '. 3 

Utah 1 

Virginia 9 

Wisconsin 2 

Total . .. 186 



FOREIGN. 



Austria 3 

Azores 1 

Belgium 3 

Canada 10 

Chile 1 

China 3 

Canary Islands 1 

Denmark 6 

England 38 

Finland 6 

France 17 

Germany 91 

Ireland 238 

Iceland 2 

Italy 7 



Mexico 2 

Nova Scotia r 5 

Norway 7 

Poland 2 

Russia 2 

Scotland 16 

Sweden 12 

Switzerland 5 

West Indies 4 

Western Islands 2 

Total foreign 484 

United States .. ..186 



Total 



.670 



ALMSHOUSE REPORT. 



563 



OCCUPATION OF INMATES ADMITTED. 



Architect 1 

Assayer 1 

Baker 14 

Barber 4 

Barkeeper 2 

Blacksmith 6 

Bookkeeper 4 

Book Agent 2 

Boilermaker 2 

Bricklayer 4 

Brickmaker 1 

Butcher 12 

Cabinetmaker 4 

Carpenter 20 

Canvasser 2 

Carriagemaker 1 

Carriage painter 1 

Carpet sewer 1 

Cement worker 1 

Chairmaker 1 

Clerk 20 

Coachman 6 

Collector 3 

Cook 34 

Cooper 12 

Coppersmith 1 

Dishwasher 6 

Dressmaker 8 

Druggist 1 

Domestic 64 

Dyer 1 

Engineer 7 

Engraver 1 

Farmer 8 

Fireman 4 

Florist 1 

Foreman 1 

Furrier 1 

Gardener 8 

Harnessmaker 1 

Hackdriver 1 

Hostler 5 

Housekeeper 9 

Ironmolder 2 

janitor 1 

Laborer 129 

Laundress 1 

Laundryman 5 

Lecturer 1 

Liveryman 1 

Lodging-house keeper 1 

Machinist ., 6 



Longshoreman 7 

Marble polisher 3 

Mattress-maker 1 

Merchant 3 

Miner 28 

Miller 3 

News agent 2 

Nurse 12 

No occupation 11 

Packer 1 

Painter 12 

Peddler 17 

Plasterer 5 

Plumber 2 

Pianomaker 1 

Porter 1 

Printer 6 

Preacher 1 

Railroadman 7 

Rancher 1 

Reporter 2 

Rigger 4 

Sailor 18 

Sawyer 2 

Seamstress 3 

Sheepherder 1 

Shoemaker 9 

Shirtmaker 1 

Slateroofer 1 

Stableman 5 

Stevedore 1 

Steward... 1 



Stonecutter 2 

Tailor 9 

Tanner 1 

Teacher 6 

Teamster 7 

Telegraph operator 1 

Tinsmith 6 

Traveler 1 

Upholsterer 2 

Varnisher 4 

Waiter 7 

Washer and ironer 3 

Watchman 3 

Watchmaker 1 

Weaver 2 

Wheelwright 1 

Window cleaner 1 

Wire drawer 2 

Total .. ..670 



564 



ALMSHOUSE REPORT. 



AGES OF INMATES ADMITTED. 



From 20 to 30 15 

From 30 to 40 30 

From 40 to 60 48 

From 60 to 60 134 



From 60 to 70 270 

From 70 to 80 150 

From 80 to 90 18 

From 90 to 100... 5 



Total .. 670 



SOCIAL, CONDITION OF INMATES ADMITTED. 



Single 301 Divorced 10 

Married 66 Unknown 1 

Widowed 302 

Total .. 670 



RACE OF INMATES ADMITTED. 



Caucasian. 
African ... 
Mongolian 



661 



Total 670 



BY WHOSE ORDER ADMITTED. 

By his Honor Mayor Phelan 320 

By Suparintendent City and County Hospital 92 

By Dr. J. M. Williamson 3 

By Board of Health 244 

By Superintendent Reddy 11 

Total . 670 



NUMBER OF TIMES ADMITTED AND READMITTED. 



First time . .. 415 

Second time 99 

Third time 48 

Fourth time 38 

Fifth time... . 30 



Sixth time 20 

Seventh time 10 

Eighth time 8 

Twelfth time i 

Fifteenth time 1 



Total 670 



ALMSHOUSE REPORT. 565 



The following is a resume of the work done in the different departmants during 
the year: 

TAILORING DEPARTMENT. 

Men's cassimere coats made 24 

Men's cassimere pants made 23 

Msn's cassimere vests made 23 

Men's blue jean overalls made 328 

Men's blue jean blouses, made 91 

Coats, pants, vests, etc. , altered and repaired 382 



SHOEMAKING DEPARTMENT. 

Men's shoes made (pairs) 204 

Man's slippers made (pairs) 3 

Men' s shoes repaired. 805 

Women's shoes repaired 179 



FEMALE DEPARTMENT. 

Men's overshirts 600 

Men's undershirts 

Men' s shrouds 108 

Men' s aprons 156 

Women's drawers 16 

Women's shirts 11 

Women's dresses 42 

Women's underwaists 74 

Women's nightgowns 80 

Women's dress waists 26 

Women's aprons 192 

Napkins (table) 90 

Tablecloths 16 

Roller towels 100 

Hand towels 37 

Women's chemises 81 

Sheets 245 

Women's shrouds 30 

Bedspreads 186 

Bedticks 59 

Pillowticks 135 

Pillowslips 441 



566 ALMSHOUSB REPORT. 

FARM. 

House lot No. 1, grounds and road 5 acres 

No. 2 building, grounds and road 5 acres 

Hospital lot, grounds and road 4 acres 

No. 4 building, grounds and road . . .2 acres 



UNDER CULTIVATION. 

Potatoes 30 acres 

Hay 7 acres 

Pasturage 8 acres 

Vegetables 17 acres 

Waste lands 2 acres 

Total ...80 acres 



LIVE STOCK. 

Horses 15 

Cows 10 

Calves 5 

Hogs (large) 30 

We have grown all the vegetables consumed by the inmates during the year 
on the grounds, and have every prospect of raising an excellent potato crop from 
the thirty acres planted with the same. 

We still supply water to an adjoining milk ranch, and receive in return one 
can of milk daily, valued at 50 cants. 

I bought six horses at a cost of $1,100 which amount was a portion of the 
surplus money remaining over after the first half of the fiscal year; two of said 
torses have been doing service for the Morgue officials since March last. 

We desire to thank Mrs. Phoebe Hearst for her continued generous annual 
donation to institution. 

Dr. Pischel generously continues his regular visits as oculist to the inmates, 
his services being as heretofore gratuitous. 

Regular visits have been made and many kindnesses tendered the inmates by 
the Rev. D. O. Kelly, the clergy of St. Dominic's and St. James' Parishes, the 
Salvation Army, the Catholic Ladies' Aid Society, the French Ladies' Aid Society 
and the German Ladies' Benevolent Society. 

We desire to return thanks to the many people who have contributed their 
time and talent towards making our monthly entertainments for the amusement 
of the inmates a success. 

The improvements and repairs necessary to the different buildings have not 
been as numerous as could be desired during the past year, sfs I did not deem 
It advisable to expend any portion of the surplus moneys standing to the credit 



ALMSHOUSE REPORT. 56? 

of the institution, except what was absolutely necessary for the maintenance and 
comfort of thi inmates. 

Building No. 1 requires painting and new flooring laid, though we were able 
during the year to newly floor ten rooms and the main hall. We also repaired the 
skylights in main hall and thrse skylights in side hall, also putting new glasses to 
the same. The whole main floor of No. 1 building has also been painted, and the 
wards on the main floor of No. 2 building. 

I put in a copper coffee boiler with a capacity of 100 gallons, threa copper 
covers on stock boilers, and rearranged cooking apparatus and placed a 750-gallon 
compression boiler in the kitchen, also put up a nsw smokestack on laundry 
boiler. We put in twenty stoves in place of grates in sick wards and office of 
building No. 1 and also plastered the same. I bought 75 army iron bedsteads 
to replace the old wooden ones which had become entirely unfit for use. We have 
also made two new tip carts and two new wagon beds. I deem it very advisable 
that a naw steel tank and frame with a capacity of 100,000 gallons be erected In 
place of the present structure, which is in an unsafe condition owing to the tim- 
bers of the tank frame being rotten and tha joists broken. 

Thanking tha Honorable Board of Health and the Honorable Board of Super- 
rlsors for their kind support and co-operation, I respectfully submit this report, 

B. A. REDDY, 

Superintendent, 



REPORT 



DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 

To tht Honorable Jas. D Phelan, Mayor, 

Of the City and County nf San Francisco 

DEAR SIR: We herewith transmit the report of the Department of Electricity for th 
year ending June 30, 1900. 

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS, DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY. 
BY ROLLA V. WATT, PRESIDENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT. 



To tht Honorable Commission, Department of Electricity 



: I have the honor to submit herewith the first annual report of the Depart- 
ment of Electricity, and the thirty-fifth for this service, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1900. 

WM. R. HEWITT, 

Chief, Department Electricity. 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY. 5t 9 

Uoon the ina.ugrurat.lon of the New Charter, January 8, 1900, the Fire Alarm 
and Police Telegraph was superseded by a new department created as the Depart- 
ment of Electricity. 

COMMISSIONERS DEPARTMENT OP ELECTRICITY 

HUN. K. V. WATT (President). 

HON. G. A. NEWHALL. 

HON. J. H. GRADY. 

HON. M. H. HECHT. 

HON. D. I. MAHONEY. 

HON. J. C. McKINSTRY. 

HON. W. F. McNUTT. 

HON. W. T. WALLACE. 

During the past year this department received a total of 864 alarms, of which 
473 were first, 16 second, 5 third and 370 stiil alarms. 

The total number of police calls received, 114,526. 

T^ere are in operation 175 tappers, 128 gongs, 2 automatic whistles, 2 tower 
bells, 551 miles cf wire, 1,2432 poles, 2,372 cells of battery, 303 fire boxes, 200 police 
boxes, 43 engine house equipments and 5 central police stations. 

The system of striking tappers was changed from mechanical to manual, result- 
ing in a great improvement in the regularity of tapper signals. 

Twenty miles of No. 12 H. D. W. P. copper wire were used in reconstruction 
and extensions to twenty- five new fire boxes located as follows: 14, Clay-Drumm; 
117, Post-Taylor: 131, Sacramento- Jones; 133, Bush-Powell; 155, Third-Folsom; 
167, Polk-Union; 233, Folsom-Twenty fifth; 266, Mission-New Montgomery; 272, 
Sanchez-Sixteenth ; 28$, California avenue-Powell avenue; 297, Green-Mason; 317, 
Clay-Buchanan; 318, Jackson-Devi sadero; 343, Fillmore-Fulton; 388, Haight-Baker; 
393, Buena Vista avenue-Central avenue; 397, Oak-Ashbury; 454, Mission-Bosworth; 
<71. Parnassus avenue-Second avenue; 492, Castro-Seventeenth; 493, Uranus- 
Seventeenth; 523, Iowa-Twenty- fifth; 539, Railroad avenue-Eighteenth avenue So.; 
544, Crescent avenue-Andover avenue; 574, San Jose avenue-Ocean avenue. 

Five obsolete fire boxes were replaced by new boxes of our own manufactura. 
Old boxes rebuilt were No. 215 (from 238), No. 14 (from 289), No. 45 (frcm 286), 
No. 52 (from 27;. Boxes moved were No. 45, from Jones and O'Farrell to Jone* 
and Ellis; No. 96, from Ellis and Taylor to Eddy and Taylor; No, 184, from Folsom 
and Rausch to Folsom and Eighth. 

Eighteen fire boxes and twenty-nine police boxes were painted and repaired 
and the locks trapped. Forty-six poles were painted. Tappers were placed in the 
offices of Commissioners Watt and Hecht, and at the Southern Pacific crossing at 
Fourth and Townsend streets. A telephone was placed In the residence of the Chief 
of Police. The whistle at Tenth and Howard streets was moved to the Market 
Street Railway Company's power house at Bryant and Eleventh streets. The silent 
alarm system was placed in the following department houses: Engine Companies 
Nos. 3. 4, 5, fi, 9, 14, 23, 28, 35, and Truck Co. No. 2. Engine Compares Nos. 23 
and 35 were installed with irou-armosd conduit for lighting. In the City Hall 
eighty-eight incandescent lights and 1,043 feet of iron-armored conduiv were in- 
stalled, and the systems generally overhauled and repaired. 

New work was done as follows: 50 new fire boxes, 1,000 fire box keys, 30 strap 
keys,, 12 new sounding boards, 495 flat binding posts, 5 register plate guides for 
office, 81 character whsel blanks, 1 brass running card for office map, 1 multi- 
contact relay for tapper system, 20 8- wire cable plates for office, 355 number 
plates and 4 lamp sockets with base for office map, 1 set harness hangers for No. 
14 Engine, 10 14-post connecting boards, 2 4 -line ground tsst switches for office, 



570 REPORT OF THE 

t 

3 conduit carriers, 120 gravity battery cuppers, 1 sample trolley grounding device, 
1 master tapper key for office, 50 Are box insulators, 20 wing nuts, 70 zinc bind- 
ing posts, 46 character wheels and 41 box number plates. 

539 emergency repair jobs attended to. 

The 50 new fire boxes comuleted consist of: 150 iron shells, painted and 
japanned; 58 movements, finished and lacquered; 58 insulated special contacts; 58 
key boards carrying operating key and ground test switches; 58 automatic cut-outs; 
68 box relays; 58 glass fronts; 58 number plates, and 58 blank character wheels. 

Work done by the Market Street Railway Company was as follows: On Sixth 
street, between Market and Bryant, raised cross arms and run new covered wire. 
On Leavenworth street, between Post and Turk, raised cross arms, put in new 
35-foot poles, and run new covered wire wire; also, on Sansome street, between 
Broadway and Sutter streets. 

Work done by the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company was as follows: 
On Kentucky street and Railroad avenue, between Seventeenth and Twenty-third 
avenues South, put in 25 40-foot poles, raised cross arms and wires. 

The large city map made by this office last year has been equipped with a com- 
plete covermg-in system, having plugs and lamps indicating the location of the fire 
boxes arjd of every company in the Fire Department. 

"When MH alarm is received a small incandescent lamp of one-candle power is 
placed in a socket at the box location, remaining as long as the fire burns. In case 
of an additional alarm from that box, a different-colored lamp is used, red for 
second and blue for third alarms. 

The companies responding are unplugged from their respective stations, and are 
set up in a finished brass running card. 

The object of this is to permit the operators at a glance to note the fires burn- 
Ing <md the companies in service, so that by moving up outlying companies the city 
will be protected as fully as possible under the conditions. 

All company movements, after the first alarm, are timed, so that a complete 
record is made of each company as it moves from house to house and to the flre, 
and from this record a chart is made and submitted to the Chief of the Fire De- 
partment for his inspection. 

Although no appropriation was made for the extension of underground work, 
a dipping plant was erected at the pole yard and twenty thousand feet of lateral 
conduit were cleaned, dipped and stored. 

The following ordinance for the inspection of interior wiring has proved to be of 
great assistance in raising the standard of work. 

During the year 600 inspections have been made and approved, and certificates 
Issued. 

At the request of Mr. John Barnett, Superintendent of Public Buildings, an esti- 
mate of $44,532 was made for a complete steam and electric plant for lighting and 
heating the City Hall. 

A sample panel for lighting was fitted up in the west corridor and proved gener- 
ally satisfactory. 

At the request of Sheriff Lackmann, an estimate of $7,334 was made for a com- 
plete steam pumping and electric lighting plant at Branch Jail No. 2. 

Such a plant appears to be of great necessity, and would soon pay for itself by 
its general utility. 

SAN FRANCISCO ELECTRICAL, ORDINANCE. 

ORDER No. 267 (Second Series) Providing for the placing of electrical wires, 
appliances and construction in buildings in the City and County of San Francisco. 
The People of the City and County of San Francisco do ordain as follows: 
Section 1. All electncal construction, all material and all appliances used In 



DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY. 571 

connection with electrical work, and the operation of all electrical apparatus In 
buildings in the City and County of San Francisco, shall be in conformity with the 
rules and regulations set forth In what is known as the "National Electrical 
Code," being: rules and requirements for the installation of electrical wiring and 
apparatus for electric light, heat and power, as the same are now established, and 
the said rules and regulations, together with any amendments and changes made 
therein from time to time, are hereby adopted and approved. 

Sec. 2. Upon completion of the wiring of any building, it shall be the duty of 
the corporatior, co-partnership or individual doing the same to notify the Superin- 
tendent of Fire Alarm and Police Telegraph, or the Chief of Department of Elec- 
tricity, who shall at once inspect the same, and, if approved by him, shall issua a 
certificate of satisfactory inspection, which shall contain the data of smch inspec- 
tion and an outline of the result of such examination; nor shall current be turned 
on such installation until said certificate be issued; nor shall any change, altera- 
tion or extension be made in the wiring of any building after inspection without 
notifying the said Superintendent or Chief, and securing a permit therefor. 

Sec. 3. Any corporation, co-partnership or individual who shall fail, neglect or 
refuse to comply with the provisions of this Order shall b3 deemed guilty of a mis- 
demeanor, and,, upon conviction thereof, shall be fined not more than one hundred 
dollars or be imprisoned not more than ninety days, or by both such fine and im- 
prisonment* 

Sec. 4. This Ordar shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage. 

Approved, San Francisco, December 29, 1899. 

JAS. D. PHELAN, 
Mayor and ex-Officio President of the Board of Supervisors. 



572 



REPORT OF THE 



EXPENDITURES DEPARTMENT OF 





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MONTH. 











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5 


1899 July 
August. . 


$01 94 


$93 80 
1 50 


$28 87 
2 95 


$4 60 


$34 66 
12 67 


September .. 


35 62 




186 85 


57 49 


2 91 


October 


36 70 


13 93 


43 66 


25 07 


155 84 


November 


200 21 


287 38 


447 02 


23 25 


87 62 


December . ... 


40 34 


150 54 


167 60 




74 17 


1900 January. 


27 76 


51 73 


123 51 




137 97 


February 


33 75 


316 04 


113 55 




239 21 


March 


163 55 


7 90 


75 85 


6 23 


85 67 


April 


292 10 


369 98 


41 92 




26 72 


May 


113 90 


547 50 


81 88 




44 71 


June.. 




286 94 


14 35 


60 


17 48 














Totals 


1,035 87 


$2,127 24 


$1,325 31 


$117 24 


$919 63 















Total appropriations. 
Total expenditures. . . 



$37,540 00 

37,r>29 53 



Surplus 



$10 47 



DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY. 



573 



ELECTRICITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 1899-1900. 



Machinery 


Paints and Oils.. 


Stationery and Pr 




fl 

|s 

p 

1 


Lumber 


Miscellaneous. . . . 


a 
1 

H 

1 
1 


a 
> 


1 


H 






S 

1 


1 

7? 




















I 


















$73 00 


$2 50 




$4 50 


214 45 


$25 00 


$2 132 55 


$2 703 87 




$8 70 




75 25 




3 75 


19500 


25 00 


1 853 65 


2 177 77 












2 50 


204 55 


25 00 


1 757 00 


2 271 92 




2 25 


11 00 




$17 73 


17 25 


23885 


25 00 


2,060 00 


2,647 28 


$4 96 




18 35 
32 10 




6 50 


2 75 
26 50 


29725 
225 70 


25 00 
25 00 


2,280 00 
2 539 00 


3,680 79 
3 280 95 










6 13 


19 00 


18000 


25 00 


2 767 90 


3 3SQ 00 




4 24 


26 25 




74 58 


5 75 


199 55 


25 00 


2 649 08 


3 687 00 




34 90 





50 37 


34 44 


67 75 


23970 


25 00 


2,603 20 


3 89 56 




6 30 
3 30 


12 50 
37 85 




22 72 


17 00 


18400 
182 50 


2f> 00 
25 00 


2,643 00 
2 548 50 


2,641 24 
3 585 14 




44 31 


44 20 




20 88 


6 25 


19300 


25 00 


2,469 00 


3,122 01 


$4 96 


$104 00 


$255 25 


$128 12 


$180 98 


$173 00 


$2.554 55 


$300 00 


$28,303 38 


$37,629 53 



Returne 1 to General Fund- 
Surplus $1047 

Heusemover . . . 108 26 



$118 7i 



REPORT OF SPECIAL COUNSEL. 



SAN FRANCISCO, July 1, 1900. 

To the' Honorable Ja/nes D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIR : I beg leave to report to you from the 30th day of June, 1899, to the 30th day 
of June, 1900, 1 have collected delinquent taxes due this City and County for 1872-73 and 
1873-74, as appears from the exhibits hereto attached, amounting to thirty-two and 21-100 
dollars ($32.21), as follows : 

REAL PROPERTY, 1873-74. 

Principal $2926 

Five per cent penalty 1 45 

Advertising 150 

Total for real property for 1873-74 $32 21 

Less 20 per cent 6 44 

$25 77 

EXHIBIT. 
TAXES FOR FISCAL YEAR 1873-74, COLLECTED FROM JUNE 30, 1899, TO JUNE 30, 1900 



VOL. 


HUB. 


NAME. 


VALUE. 


TAX. 


PENALTY. 


ADVEKTIS'G. 


17 


991 


M. P. Jones .... 


600 00 


$660 


$0 33 


$0 50 


17 


992 


M. P. Jones 


850 00 


9 35 


46 


50 


17 


994 


M. P. Jones .... 


1,210 00 


1331 


66 


50 








J2.660 00 


$29 26 


$1 45 


$1 50 



That after deducting from said total amount "0 per cent I have paid over to Joseph H. 
Scott, Tax Collector of this City and County, 80 per cent thereof, to wit : twenty-five and 
-77-100 dollars ($25.77) and taken his receipt therefor. 

That these were all the moneys collected by me during the period named, and that all 
moneys that have ever been collected by me, prior to the date hereof, after deducting com- 
.missions, have been paid to the Tax Collector in said City and County of San Francisco. 

FISHER AMES, 
Special Counsel for 1872-73 and 1873-74. 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORTS 



TO 



JANUARY 1, 1901 



FIRST CALENDAR YEAR UNDER THE CHARTER 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT, SHOWING THE SAME WORK 
UNDER THE CONSOLIDATION ACT 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF ASSESSOR, 



San Francisco, December 24, 1900. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan,' Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: Herewith find report of expsnses of my office from January 1 to 
December 31, 1900; also, comparative tabla of expenses in previous years and 
amounts of assessment rolls. Respsctfully yours, 

WASHINGTON DODGE, Assessor. 



ASSESSMENT ROLL. 



ASSESSED VALUES. 


IN 1898. 


IN 1900. 


Lands 


$189 448 545 


$190 457 425 


Improvements 


93,321 185 


98 073 220 


Personal property 


69 577 337 


121 624 659 








Total 


$352 347 067 


$410 155 304 








Increase of assessment 1900 over 1898 


$57,808,237 












$433 096 78 


$556 403 67 









SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF ASSESSOR. 

SUMMARY OF INCREASE ON PERSONAL, PROPERTY. 





ASSESSMENTS. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 






$400,000 








1,018 234 




., 


private bankers 


630,896 




( 




6,381,423 




., 


wholesale merchants 


11,372,082 




., 


quasi-public corporations 


28,408,107 




,. 




11,836,578 












Total 






$56,047,320 


Increase on 






1,008,880 








4,752,035 










Total 






$60 808 235 


Less: 

Reductions 


Dn old improvements and outside districts . 




3,000,0(0 


Net i 

















EXPENSE FOR CLERK HIRE IN ASSESSOR'S OFFICE. 



YEAR. 


ASSESSOR. 


ROLL. 


EXPENSE. 


RATIO 
OF EXPENSE TO 

ASSESSMENT. 


1900 
1898 


Dodge 
Siebe . . . 


$410,155,304 
352,344 061 


$7U0 00 
104 352 13 


.000173% 
0002% 


1897 


Siebe 


347.954 920 


103,193 35 


000296 


1883 


Holtz. . 


221 225 245 


106 660 09 


000482 


1882 


Badlam 


202 162 007 


133 514 67 


000660 


1881 


Badlam 


222 433 400 


222 628 65 


001000 


1880 


Badlam . 


239 423 662 


146 087 45 


000680 













Prior to 1896 th3 Tax Collector collected taxes on unsecured personal property. 
Since then that work has been added to the Assessor's duties, thereby increasing 
office expenses. 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



REPORT OF AUDITOR. 



San Francisco, January 8, 1901. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: In response to your request of the 10th ult.. for a brief statement of 
the .calendar year's work of my department, and tha cost of its maintenance, to- 
gether with data for comparing same with cost under the Consolidation Act, I beg 
to submit the following statistical table, and offer the following suggestions in 
reference thereto. Under the Charter the routine work of the department has been 
materially increased, necessitating a clerical force of six to discharge the same, 
while previously four clerks were sufficient. For ths payment of the salaries of 
four of these six clerks, amounting to $4,800 per annum, I have drawn upon tha 
appropriation allowed by tha Assessment Roll, thereby not only effecting a corre- 
sponding saving in that item, but also materially reducing the expenses of the 
Assessment Roll as compared with previous years. Prior to the year 1899 the 
Auditor's attorney fees, which averaged about $1,800 per annum, were paid out of 
the appropriation for special counsel, as provided for in the Consolidation Act, and 
the same is not Included in the statement covering those years. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ASA R. WELLS, Auditor. 



STATISTICAL TABLE. 



YEAR. 


ADMINISTRATION. 


SALARY 
OF AUDITOR. 


SALARY 
OF CITY HALL 
COMMISSIONER. 


SALARIES OF 
DEPUTIES AND 
CLERKS. 


TOTAL. 


1894 


William Broderick.. 


$4,000 00 


$1,2CO 00 


8,475 00 


$13,675 CO 


1895.-.. 


William Broderick.. 


4,000 CO 


1,200 00 


10,045 70 


15,245 70 


1896 


William Broderick.. 


4, COO 03 


1,200 00 


9,867 49 


15.C67 49 


1897 


William Broderick.. 


4,000 00 


1.2CO 00 


9,695 (.1 


14,895 01 


1898 
1899 


William Broderick.. 
AsaR. Wells 


4,0:0 co 

4,000 00 


1,200 00 


9.6CO 00 
*9 6 00 


11,800 03 
13 600 00 


1900 


Asa R Wells 


4 000 00 




*9 624 34 


13 624 34 















* The sum of 
Counsel." 



CO per annum is included, as provided for by the Charter, "Auditor's 



OP AUDITOR. 



^ASSESSMENT ROLL. 



YEAR. 


INCUMBENT. 


TOTAL. 


1894 


William Broderick .. 


$18,009 00 


1895 


William Broderick 


12 972 21 


18% 


William Broderick 


15,G*09 36 


1897 




11 369 19 


1898 


William Broderick 


13 716 10 


1899. 


AsaR. Wells 


13,599 43 


1900 


Asa R Wells 


13,171 79 









SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



San Francisco, December 31, 1900. 

Tu the Honorable Jfis. D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 
j t 

Dear Sir: Herewith find financial statement for the fiscal ysars 186S-99. 1899- 
1000, January to July (inclusive), 1900, and July to December (inclusive). 1900, 
this latter showing expenditures sines the conduct of the Health Office under the 
New Charter. Yours truly, 

J. A. BROWN, Secretary. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT, HEALTH OFFICE. 



EXPENSES. 


JULY, 1898, 

TO' 

JUNE, 1899. 


1899-1900, 


JULY TO 
DBC'M'BKR. 

1900. 


JULY, 1899, 

TO 

JAN., 1900. 


JANUARY 

TO 

JULY, 19CO. 


Stationery 


$404 89 
407 65 
3,550 00 
606 70 
610 00 
862 00 
1,183 50 
922 17 
69 59 
208 81 
588 50 
3,328 10 
19082 


$1,276 35 
520 95 
1,833 90 
636 95 
255 00 
761 10 
435 84 
100 15 
102 59 
259 68 
76 90 
977 00 
287 45 


$286 16 
17265 
42U 05 
314 56 
20000 
20800 
^ 247 03 
13577 
231 30 
937 24 
60 50 
671 50 
38 67 


+ 
t 
$844 50 
t 
90 00 
247 50 
419 27 
82 00 
75 97 
204 95 

10 20 


Printing 


Transportation 




Postage , 


Vaccine 




Chemist 


Bacteriologist 


Fumigation 


Anti-toxin 


Statistician 


Food department 




$12,932 73 


$7,523 86 


$3,935 43 


SI, 974 39 



* Not furnishing anti-toxin nor printing monthly bulletin. 
t Furnished by Board of Supervisors. 



OP BOAHD OF HEALTH. 



RECAPITULATION. 







1899- 


1900. 




EXPENSES. 


TO 

JUNE, 1899 


JULY, 1899, 

TO 

JAN., 1900. 


JANUARY 

TO 
JWLY, 1900. 


DKC'MBER, 
1900. 


Salaries 


$61,868 38 










12,932 73 


















Salaries 


$74,801 11 


$29 610 21 






Expenses. 




7 523 86 
















Salaries 




$37,134 07 


$18,806 85 










3,93543 














Expenses 






f $22,742 28 


$1 974 39 


Salaries 








26,886 63 




















928,861 02 



^SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



CITY AND COUNrY HOSPITAL. 



STATEMENT OP EXPENSES. 

Appropriation 1897-1898 ,...$91,390 43 



MONTHS. 


Subsistence 


Miscellaneous... 


Dispensary 


os 


Salaries 


g 



1897 July. 


$2,845 26 
2,628 91 
2,619 77 
2,658 10 
2,239 33 
2,701 68 
2,593 58 
2,469 99 
2.925 87 
2.846 67 
2,683 89 
2,732 02 


$1,110 69 
1,080 27 
1,324 69 
1,086 46 
87759 
1,166 01 
1,156 83 
1,487 67 
1,383 36 
2.065 43 
1,154 84 
2,093 60 


$848 76 
855 21 
1,031 96 
74352 
70020 
61364 
70581 
940 28 
1,046 73 
899 93 
882 43 
286 10 
$9,554 57 


$56 01 
66 36 
101 23 
66 71 
59 90 
54 60 
63 59 
8997 
56 47 
60 91 
65 34 
8251 


$2,662 50 
2,768 50 
2,679 90 
2,862 30 
2,786 50 
2,750 00 
2,738 55 
2,754 50 
2,786 10 
2,753 45 
2,771 70 
2,769 25 


$7,523 22 
7.399 25 
7.757 55 
7,417 09 
6,663 52 
7,285 93 
7,258 36 
7,742 41 
8,198 53 
8,626 39 
7,558 20 
7,963 48 


August 


September 
October 


December 
1898 January. 




March . 


April 


May 


June 
Total 


$31,945 07 


$15.987 44 


$823 60 


$33,083 25 


$91,393 93 





OP BOARD OF HEALTH. i> 

STATEMENT OF EXPENSES-CONTINUED. 
Appropriation 1893-1899 ...$98,37035 



MONTHS. 


tp 
I 

a 


Miscellaneous. . . 


Dispensary 


Stable 


Salaries 


1 


1898- July . .. 


$3,060 78 
3,295 85 
3,156 89 
3,296 55 
3,396 55 
3,339 86 
3,054 74 
3,129 46 
3,538 73 
3,198 73 
3,008 79 
2.931 57 
338,40850 


$1.367 13 
1.042 02 
1.000 23 
1,261 32 
1,142 32 
2,189 62 
1,070 09 
1,512 80 
1,186 35 
923 03 
881 66 
73707 
$14313 64 


$936 30 
72982 
470 96 
766 32 
844 20 
98622 
731 82 
1,105 64 
1,178 60 
1.126 89 
539 04 
541 50 
$9,957 31 


$6897 
56 80 
98 31 
9531 
2543 
11532 
88 88 
10989 
100 94 
5909 
52 16 
41 02 


$2,824 35 
2,991 45 
2,877 20 
2,982 35 
2,980 50 
2,930 50 
2,8% 45 
2,879 80 
2.854 70 
2,874 70 
2,889 55 
2,914 20 


$8,257 53 
8,015 94 
7,603 62 
8,401 85 
8,38900 
9,561 52 
7,841 98 
8,737 59 
8,859 32 
8,182 44 
7,371 20 
7,165 SS 


August 


September 
October 




December 


1899 January. . . .... 


February,, 


March 


April 


May 




Total . . 


$912 15 


$34,795 75 


$98,387 35 





Appropriation 1899-1900 $98,500 00 



MONTHS. 


Subsistence 


Miscellaneous. 


Dispensary 


00 

5T 


Salaries 


1 


1899 July. 


$3,318 34 
3,430 26 
3,495 10 
2,546 58 
2,665 41 
2.910 49 
2,921 68 
2,714 21 
3,012 05 
2,372 37 
2,426 14 
2,493 45 
$34,306 08 


$1,538 65 
1,409 50 
3,900 47 
972 13 
1,919 07 
2,079 43 
1.786 83 
1.150 32 
1.249 63 
1,286 32 
942 86 
615 19 


$1.577 11 
982 32 
1,109 50 
642 98 
43800 
813 65 
660 59 
70578 
661 77 
702 38 
771 51 
393 87 
$9,459 46 


$125 15 
65 54 
8484 
45 86 
10808 
57 49 
105 36 
26 24 
40 46 
61 62 
329 53 
32 1& 
$1,082 33 


$2,910 70 
2.950 56 
2,927 00 
2,911 90 
2,910 50 
2,949 75 
2.745 60 
2.889 95 
2,904 05 
2,454 00 
2.829 10 
2,866 35 


$9.499 95 
8.838 18 
11,516 91 
7.119 45 
8,041 (6 
8,810 81 
8.220 C6 
7,486 50 
7,867 96 
6.876 69 
7,299 14 
6,401 02 


August ... 


September 






1900 January 


February 


March, 


April . 


May 




Total 


$18,850 40 


$34,279 46 $97,977 75 





10 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES-CONCLUDED. 
Appropriation 1900-1901 .......................... 



.$87,600 90 



MONTHS. 


Subsistence 


[ 


Dispensary 


cc 

T 


Salaries 


I ' 


1900 July 


$2,254 07 
2,309 55 
2,357 64 
2,549 27 
2,876 81 
2,633 63 


874 35 
682 07 
911 03 
1,082 87 
1,142 26 
1,301 77 


$739 70 
848 69 
642 89 
804 74 
75234 
87fi 95 


$5725 
62 50 
47 45 
94 00 
174 10 
38 94 


$2,874 25 
2,936 20 
3,029 05 
2,901 30 
2,941 05 
2,930 15 


$6,799 62 
6,839 01 
6,988 06 
7,432 18 
7,886 59 
7.181 44 
843.726 90 




September 


October 


November. . . . 


December 


Total .. . 


314.98] 00 


So. 994 35 


$4.665 31 


S474 24 $17.612 00 



OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



11 



ALMSHOUSE EEPOET. 



Ban Francisco, December 14, 1900. 

To the Hon. John M. Williamson, 

President of the Board of Health 

Dear Sir: Herewith I beg to submit a report of the expenditures of the City 
*nd County Almshouse for the fiscal years 1898-99, 1899-1900, as follows: 

From July. 1898, to June, 1899 $94,606 19 

From July, 1899, to June, 1900 85,96747 

The expenditures for the first five months of the fiscal year 1900-1901 are shown 
by the Itemized statements herewith enclosed. Respectfully submitted, 

E. A. REDDY, Superintendent. 



EXPENDITURES FOR JULY, 1900. 



EXPENSES. 



Beef, mutton, poultry and fish 

Groceries, flour, etc 

Dry goods, clothing, etc 

Tobacco 

Medicines and drugs 

Liquors 

Repairs of vehicles 

Feed of horses and cattle 

Horse shoeing 

Fuel and lights 

Tools and implements 

Laundry supplies 

Petty expenses 

Tslephone service 

Salaries of officers and employees. 

Milk 

Disinfection 

Total . 



$1,055 72 

1,280 94 

123 01 

141 15 

96 41 
125 26 
136 95 
266 07 

12 50 
685 46 

44 49 

62 94 

6 00 

7 50 
2,005 00 

310 00 
6 50 



$6,253 40 



12 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



EXPENDITURE FOR AUGUST, 1900. 



EXPENSES. 



Beef, mutton, poultry and fish 

Groceries, flour, etc 

Dry goods, clothing, etc 

Tobacco 

Medicines and drugs 

Liquors 

Feed of horses and cattle 

Horseshoeing 

Fusl and lights 

Tools and implements 

Crockery and utensils 

Laundry supplies 

Telephone service 

Salaries of officers and employees. 

Milk 

Disinfection . 



Total 



$882 57 

1,222 66 

355 24 

55 90 

85 42 

123 25 

204 69 

67 35 

1,010 70 

65 00 

21 50 j 

28 67 

7 50 

2,005 00 

310 00 

6 50 



$6.481 68 



EXPENDITURES FOR SEPTEMBER, 1900. 



EXPENSES. 



Beef, mutton, poultry and fish 

Groceries, flour, etc 

Dry goods, clothing, etc 

Tobacco 

Medicines and drugs 

Liquors 

Repairs of vehicles 

Feed of horses and cattle 

Fuel and lights 

Tools and implements 

Crockery and utensils 

Laundry suppliss 

Telephone service 

Salaries of officers and employees. 

Milk 

Disinfection ., 



Total . 



$1,007 33 

817 75 

181 25 

55 90 

148 75 

117 74 

475 00 

96 68 

786 30 

4 50 

79 32 

50 

7 50 

2,005 00 

300 00 

6 50 



$6,090 02 



OF BOARD OP HEALTH. 13 

EXPENDITURES FOR OCTOBER, 1900. 





EXPENSES. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 




$1,000 09 






1,253 87 






423 35 






139 75 




Medicines and drugs 


40 39 






116 48 






51 15 




Feed of horsss and cattle 


218 68 






52 50 






D42 86 






89 30 






8 00 






72 74 




Petty expnses . . .. ....... 


47 25 






2 005 00 




Milk 


310 00 




Disinfection 


6 50 










Total . 




16.387 , 



EXPENDITURES FOR NOVEMBER, 1900. 



EXPENSES. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 




$1 182 72 




Groceries flour, etc 


1,631 97 






149 35 




Tobacco .. 


111 80 




Medicines and drugs 


77 14 






70 11 






13 00 




Repairs of vehicles 


5 00 




Feed of horses and cattl a 


311 30 




Horseshoeing 


38 75 




Fuel and lights 


532 95 






96 40 






26 22 






70 80 




Salaries of officers and employees...... 


2,005 00 




Milk 


304 80 




Disinfection 


6 50 











Total 




$6 533 81 









14 



SUPPLEMENTAL. REPORT 



EMERGENCY HOSPITALS. 



San Francisco, January 1st, 1901. 



To Son. John M. Williamson, 

President of the Board of Health 

Dear Sir: In compliance with your order, I have the honor to hand you here- 
with comparative financial statement of the expenses of the Emergency Hospitals, 
Including Insane Department, for the fiscal years 1898-99, 1899-1900, and to De- 
cember 31st, 1900. Respectfully, 

EDWIN BUNNELL, Chief Surgeon. 



STATEMENT OF EXPENSES RECEIVING HOSPITALS, FISCAL, YEAR 

1898-99. 



EXPENSES. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Central Receiving Hospital, Harbor Receiving Hos- 
pital, Park Receiving Hospital 


$23,319 82 




Insane Ward 


4 563 31 




Paid from Health Department Appropriation, account 
Park Hospital 


753 40 




Paid from Health Department Appropriation, account 
Harbor Hospital 


2 057 15 




Paid from Police Patrol Fund, maintenance of horses 
for ambulance 


1 500 00 




Paid from Polic Patrol Fund, account ambulance 
drivers' salaries 


2 ICO 00 




Salary Police Surgeon, paid from Health Department 
Appropriation 


1 20O 00 










Total 













OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



15 



STATEMENT OF EXPENSES RECEIVING HOSPITALS, FISCAL, YEAR 
1899-1900 (a) June 30th, 1899. to January 8th, 1900. 



EXPENSES. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Receiving Hospital expense, as per Auditor's Report. 
Insane Ward expanse, as per Auditor's Report 


$5,764 89 
2 130 25 




Salary, Police Surgeon, paid from Health Department 
Appropriation 


626 64 




Salaries, Harbor Hospital, paid from Health Depart- 
ment Appropriation 


4 324 00 




Salaries, Park Hospital, paid from Health Depart- 


1 640 00 




Paid from Health Department Appropriation, ac- 


194 51 




Paid from Health Department Appropriation, ac- 
count expanse Harbor Hospital 


4 233 73 




Salaries, Ambulance Drivers, paid from Police Patrol 
Fund 


1 128 00 




Maintenance, ^ Ambulanca horses, paid from Police 
Patrol Fund 


700 00 










Total 










$20,742 02 



EMERGENCY HOSPITALS (b) January 8th, 1900, to June 30th. 1900. 



EXPENSES. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Paid from Health Department Appropriation, account 
Emergency Hospitals and Insane Ward 


$1,935 88 




Paid account salaries 


10 367 48 










Total . ... 




$12 303 36 









16 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



STATEMENT OF EXPENSES RECEIVING HOSPITALS, FISCAL YEAR 
1900-1901 June 30th, 1900, to December 31st, 1900. 



KXPENSEB. 



Total expense Emergency Hospitals and Insana De- 
partment 

Total salaries 

Total 

Note Total expense Receiving Hospitals for six 
months Immediately preceding the 8th day of 
January, 1900, the data when the New Charter 
went into effect 

Total expense of Receiving Hospitals for first six 
months under New Charter... 



$3,600 00 
12,000 00 



$20,742 02 



12,306 36 



$15,600 00 



Prior to the 8th day of January, 1900, no account was kept of the expenditures 
of thsse hospitals by the hospital authorities; consequently there. was no means 
of ascertaining from day to day or month to month whether appropriations had 
beeti exceeded or otherwise. 



OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



17 



TWENTY-SIXTH STEEET HOSPITAL. 





DISBURSEMENTS. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Salaries 


1898-1899. 


$2 880 00 








1 450 05 














1899-1900. 


$3 322 50 




Expenses July 1, 189 


9, to January 1 1901 


558 05 






1900, to July 1 1900 






Salaries July 1, 1900, 


1900-1901. 
to January 1, 1901 


$1,830 00 




Exp -rises- July 1, 190 


0, to January 1, 1901 


1 561 15 










3,390 15 











SMALL-POX HOSPITAL. 





DISBURSEMENTS. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Salaries . 


1899-1900. 


$3320 00 




Expenses (from C 
Salaries July 1 


'ity and County Hospital). 
1900 to January 1, 1901 


2 677 50 




Expenses July 1 


1900, to January 9, 1901 


380 51 


















IS3.058 01 



2+ 



18 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



REPORT OF BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT 

SHOWING EXPENSES OF STREET DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR 1899, AND BUREAU OF 
STREETS, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS, FOR THE YEAR 1900. 



1899. 



Cleaning and sweeping streets $173,14253 

Repairs to bituminous streets 20,61648 

Cleaning and repairing sewers 78,918 28 

Repairing accepted streets, basalt and cobbles 69,49819 

Repairs to county roads 10,003 24 

Maintenance of bridges '..... 6,854 90 

Corporation Yard expenses 7,909 15 

Work done in front of city property 5,468 87 

Contracts, sewer construction and repaying accepted streets : 70,504 41 

Office and field assistants 28,500 00 

Engineering and surveys 11,886 00 

$483,302 05 

Salary Superintendent of Streets 4^00 00 

$487,302 05 

1900. 

Cleaning and sweeping streets $172,552 53 

Repairs to bituminous streets 15,209 02 

Cleaning and repairing sewers 55,247 95 

Repairing accepted streets, basalt and cobbles 50,652 66 

Repairs to county roads 7,270 87 

Maintenance of bridges 6^58 72 

Corporation Yard expenses 5^57 30 

Work done in front of city property 3,601 87 

Contracts, sewer construction and repaying accepted streets 3164 95 

Office and field assistants 23,600 00 



$343,216 33 



OF BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



19 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT CONTINUED. 



1900. 



Salary of Commissioners, Secretary, Employees General Office, Superintendent of 
Building, Gas Inspector and expenses Bureau of Engineering, "Paid out of 
Street Department Fund," first six (6) months 1900, January 1st to June 
30th, inclusive. (These departments, under the Consolidation Act, were sep- 
arate and distinct and had funds apportioned them individually for main- 
tenance.) Under the Charter the same are controlled exclusively by the Board 
of Public Works 



117,474 05 
1360,690 33 



*DETAILS OF ABOVE CONTRACTS. 



WORK PERFORMED. 



AMOUNT, 



Macadamizing Twelfth avenue, between Clement and California streets $120 00 

Macadamizing Ninth avenue, Point Lobes avenue and Clement street 60 00 

Sidewalk on Henry street, between Sanchez and Noe 100 00 

Grading, macadamizing and setting curbs, crossing of "C" street and Seventh 

avenue 190 00 

Repairs to cement sidewalks 153 25 

Grading Sixth avenue and K street South 975 QQ 

Bituminous rock pavement and gutterways on Merchant street, between Kearny 

and Montgomery j 9 ^2 00 

Bitumen pavement on Washington street, between Kearny and Montgomery 1,291 74 

Bitumen pavement on Kearny street, from north line of Clay to north line of 

Washington 1 199 00 

Constructing granite curbs and paving with bitumen Waller street, between Oc- 

tavia and Laguna, and crossing ,*n - 



20 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT CONTINUED. 



WOKK PERFORMED. 



Paving with bitumen- 
Crossing of Pacific avenue and Broderick streets $58 SO 

Crossing of Clay and Laurel streets ' 59 70 

Crossing of Clay and Lyon streets 6G 81 

185 31 

Constructing sewers and grading 

Sewer crossing of Eighth avenue and K street 

Reconstruction of cesspools, corner of Church and Reservoir streets 

Ironstone pipe sewer, Twelfth avenue, from California to Lake streets 499 00 

Extra sewer pipe for same 18 00 

Macadamizing crossing Clement street and Twenty-second avenue 15 43 

Constructing sewer in crossing of Eighteenth and Howard streets 100 00 

Cobble pavement, Filbert street, between Kearny and Dupont 499 50 

(trading, macadamizing, etc., Andover avenue, between Courtland and Ellert 377 o9 

Sewer, San Bruno, between Sixteenth and Seventeenth 89 00 

Sewer, Mission and Spear streets 90 00 

Cement sidewalks 

Eighth and Market streets >, 

Post and Larkin streets ' igo 00 

Sutter and Larkin streets j 

Constructing Brannan-street sewer 11,399 00 

Creosoting piles and timbers for extension of Brannan-street sewer 3,383 00 

Payments on contract to construct culvert, Mission and Canal streets 6 S90 00 

Paving with bitumen, Market street, from Sixth to Van Ness avenue 31000 00 

Brannan-street sewer, extra work on construction ' 174 80 

Cement sidewalks- 
Sacramento street, between Kearny and Montgomery Q - o- 

6<Ji &t 

929 Clay street 30 88 



OF BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT CONTINUED. 



WORK PERFORMED. 



Cement Sidewalks (Continued) 

Eddy street, between Polk and Van Ness avenue 

Macadamizing roadway of Ninth street, from Bryant to tracks of S. P. R. R. Co.. 

Basalt block pavement on Bush street, between Kearny and Grant avenue 

Creosoting timber, extra work on piles for wharf 

Sewer and manholes, Waller street, between Octavia and Laguna 



$28 00 

335 00 

1,283 15 

985 60 

32 56 



$70,504 41 



CONTRACTS PAID, AS NOTED ABOVE. 



Sidewalk approach to Zoe place $8000 

Constructing sewer from junction Charles and Arlington streets to Ran- 
dall street and San Jose avenue 1,31600 

Constructing 18-inch sewer, north wing of crossing of Rhode Island and 

Alameda streets 4760 

Constructing manhole, Baker and Vallejo streets 4000 

Contract, Sixth street, between Folsom and Harrison, repaying basalt 

blocks, including Inspectors' fees 1,681 46 

$3,164 95 
Contracts entered into, to be paid when work is completed, to and Including 

December 31, 1900: 

Mission street and Naglee avenue, storm water inlets, etc $1,149 60 

Main street, Mission to Howard, repaying 7,311 68 

Fourth street, Howard to Harrison, repaying 6,828 20 

Spear-street wharf, repaving 6,16100 

Trocadero Gulch 10,000 00 

$31,450 28 



22 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT CONCLUDED. 

RECAPITULATION. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



Total expenditure, 1899 (Superintendent of Streets) 

Total expenditure, 1900 (Bureau of Streets D. P. W.). 



Balance in favor Board of Public Works 

Less contracts above referred to, as entered into. 

Net balance .. 



?4S7,302 05 
360,690 38 

$ 126, 611 67 
31,450 28 

95,161 39 



OF BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



23 



LIGHT AND WATEK INSPECTOR 



REPORT OF LIGHT AND WATER INSPECTOR FOR THE SIX MONTHS 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1900. 

Cost of lighting public buildings for last two (2) years 





19( 


X). 


18S 


)9. 


MONTHS. 




AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


January 


$3,670 79 




94,382 59 






3,115 04 




3,473 92 




March 


2,790 93 




3,779 82 




April 


2,375 89 




3,380 91 




May 


2,107 39 




2,994 23 




June 


1 987 61 




2 891 36 














July 


$1 95 60 


$16,047 65 


$3 24 9 48 


$20,902 83 




2 193 96 




AQO Q7 




September 


2 350 43 








October 


2 fiOfi J1 








November 


2 848 52 




3 520 47 




Decemoer 


3 249 30 




3 367 28 














t 




15,264 72 




19,285 07 






$31,312 37 




$40,187 90 



24 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



Cost of lighting public streets for the last two (2) years 



MONTHS. 


1900. 


1899. 


AMOUNT. TOTAL. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


January 
February 
March 


$19,666 10 
18,873 30 
10,809 29 
10,807 37 
10,809 29 
10,807 38 


$81,772 73 
$108,304 65 


$23,253 47 
20,758 98 
23,120 77 
22,247 33 
23,069 4& 
22,244 13 


8134,694 1& 
$119,622 44 


April 


May 
June ... 


July 


$18,378 93 
17,984 98 
18,137 00 
18,224 47 
17,389 23 
18,190 04 


$23,057 78 
20,930 33 
16,374 55 
19,940 50 
19,656 98 
19,662 30 


August 


September 
October 


November 


December 








$190,077 38 


$254,317 60 



Expenses last six months Bureau of Light and Water 



DISBURSEMENTS. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Salary of Inspector 


$9i'0 00 




Four (4) months' hire horse and buggy 


100 00 






343 13 




Total 










$1,343 13 



OF BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 25 

It will be seen by the foregoing figures that the public buildings were lighted 
this year for $8,875 53 less than the year previous. Of this amount $2,500 was 
saved by reduction in rates by the Board of Supervisors, and about $6,375 was 
saved by the strictest kind of economy and by the use of Welsbach lights $343 13 
being expended for Welsbach lights and mantles and $100 for horse hire, or a 
total expenditure of $443 13, resulting in above saving being 14 39-100 times the 
amount of the investment or 1439 per cent. 

In the matter of lighting streets there was a saving of $64,240 22. This is not 
a fair comparison, for the reason that in the months of March, April, May and 
June of this year the street lamps were lighted only to midnight, owing to short- 
age of funds, at a reduction of $43,000, which should be deducted from the 
$64,240 22, leaving a balance of $21,240 22, being the amount that would have been 
saved had the City been lighted full time. Of this saving of $21,240 22 the reduc- 
tion in rates by the Board of Supervisors and competition in electric lighting 
saved $8,934, and the Board of Public Works, by discontinuing unnecessary lights 
and by shutting off the electric lights on moonlight nights, not provided for in the 
contract, saved the balance $12,306 22. 

Not only has the City been lighted for $21,240 22 less than the year previous, 
but, by the persistent efforts of the Board of Public Works, Welsbach lights to 
the number of 4,551, giving a candle-power of 273,060, have been substituted for 
the same number of gas lamps with flat-flame burners, giving candle-power of 
77,367. Thus we have increased the amount of light on the streets 195,693 candle- 
power, or 352 per cent., and decreased the cost of the same about 9 per cent. 

Under the present system of lighting we have gas lamps equal to 273,060 can- 
dles, and electric light equal to 392,500 candles, or a total of 665,560 candles about 
one and one-half (1%) candles to each inhabitant. 

O. M. TUPPER, Light and Water Inspector. 



26 SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 

REPORT OF CLERK OF BOARD 
OF SUPERVISORS. 



San Francisco, December 31, 1900. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: In accordance with your communication dated December 10, 1900, 
calling- for a brief statement of the year's work of the office of the Board of 
Supervisors and the cost of its maintenance, making at the same time comparison 
with the work and cost of the department under the Consolidation Act, the fol- 
lowing is respectfully submitted: 

Under the Charter all the preliminary work for the improvement of streets, 
alleys, lanes, etc., has been transferred from this office to the Board of Public 
"Works, the Board of Supervisors simply ordering the work on the recommenda- 
tion of the Board of Public Works and granting extensions of time for its per- 
formance. 

The Charter requires that the Board of Supervisors shall annually determine 
what goods, merchandise, stores, supplies, drugs, subsistence and other necessary 
articles will be needed by the City and County for the ensuing fiscal year, and 
provides that unless the provisions of the Charter as to competitive bidding is 
strictly followsd, no contract shall be made for any article. 

In accordance therewith, proposals were invited to furnish supplies for the 
City and County Hospital, Almshouse, Emergency Hospitals and Subsistence of 
Prisoners. The prices bid for each article were carefully considered by the respec- 
tive committees of the Board to which the proposals were referred, and the award 
for each separata article was made to the lowest responsible bidder. It is esti- 
mated that a reduction of over 20 per cent has been effected in the prices bid this 
year. 

The Charter also provides that the Clerk of the Supervisors shall annually, 
under the direction of the Supervisors, advertise for proposals for supplying the 
various departments, officers and offices of the City and County with all stationery 
And supplies in the nature of stationery, assessment books, minute books, blank 
books and the printing of blanks. In accordance therewith schedules were com- 
piled for stationery, books and printed blanks, and contracts were awarded to the 
lowest bidder for each article. In accordance with the provisions of the Charter, 
rooms were fitted up for the Stationery Department and an assistant clerk ap- 
pointed to take charge thereof at a salary of $125 per month. 

In the year 1899, the amount paid for stationery, books and printed blanks was 
over $39,000, and under the Charter and the appropriation made in the budget for 
the fiscal year 1900-1901, it is limited to $24,000, making an estimated saving of 
about $15,000. 

The salaries of the Supervisors for 1899 amounted to 

Twelve Supervisors at $100 per month $14,400 

For 1900 

Eighteen Supervisors at $100 per month $21,600 



OF BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 

SALARIES EMPLOYEES BOARD OF SUPERVISORS, 1899. 



27 



IHSBI'RKI'.MKXTS. 



Supervisors' Clerk and Deputy Clerk $5,40000 

Seven Assistant Clerks at $1,800 12,600 00 

Supervisors' Sergeant at Arms 1,20000 

Clerks Board of Equalization 1,200 00 

Finance Committee's expenses, expart 2,10000 

Finance Committee's Bond Clerk 2,10000 

Finance Committee's expanses 10000 

Expert, Street Committee 1,80000 

Expert, Street Committee, buggy hire $30 per month 360 00 
Expert to Committee on Psrsonal Property Assess- 
ment 1,500 00 

Expert employed to Revise Street Grades, Public 

Property, etc 1,660 00 

Total for salaries, 1899 ! $30.01000 

SALARIES, 1900. 

1 Supervisors' Clerk $3,GOO 00 

Seven Assistant Clerks 11,700 00 

One Assistant Clerk, Stationery Department, six I 

months, $125 per month 75000 

Sergeant at Arms 1,20000 

Clerks Board of Equalization 56000 I 

Expert Finance Committee 2,100 

$19,910 00 

Saving for 1900 $10,10000 



The Municipal Reports for the year 1898-1899 cost ths sum of $8,967 04, and 
as the appropriation for the Reports for 1899-1900 in the budget for this year is 
$5,000, which amount cannot be exceeded, a saving of $3,967 04 is effected. 

There is a large saving in the management of the Public Pound as regu- 
lated by the provisions of Ordinance No. 115, which was passed by the Board of 
Supervisors In order that the Public Pound should be managed to conform to the 
provisions of the Charter of the City and County of San Francisco. Very respect- 
fully, 

JNO. A. RUSSELL, Clerk. 



28 SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 

REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 



San Francisco, January 14, 1901. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelaii, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Sir: In accordance with your request of December 10th, 1900, I herewith sub- 
mit a comparative statement of the cost of maintaining the Police Department 
for the years 1899 and 1900. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



1895*. 



lyoo. 



Salaries 8710,61389 I $749,34220 

Printing and stationery 2,78071 87764 

Rents of stations 6,579 00 6.529 00 

City Prison, subsistence 8.95216 5,81638 

Contingent expenses ! 4,141 10 6,033 64 

Telephones I 2,333 55 1.818 05 

Fuel j 508 30 89 50 



Running expenses, repairs, etc 2,366 69 872 60 

Rental of patrol boxes 1.620 00 1,215 00 

Forage 3,41429 2,39373. 

I 

Patrol wagons and repairs 1,167 80 1,640 50 

Keeping and care of horses .. I 10,76153 9,34330 

Stablerent (Mission) 576 00 576 00 

Horse-shoeing.. 1,8'27 50 1,455 75 

Harness and repairing 1,35815 18285 

Horses purchased for the Department 1,100 CO 

Sundry expenses Oils, lamps, etc 469 82 65 10 

j 

Total $760,57049 $788,25124 



Note The bills for printing and stationery are now sent to Mr. Finn. Sta- 
tionery Clerk, which accounts to some extent for the decrease. The salaries are 
increased on account of the fact that fourteen patrol drivers and sixteen Park 
officers have bsen added to the regular force. The bills for fuel are now sent to 
the Board of Public Works, and horses purchased for the department have bsen 
paid for out of the Contingent Fund. A portion of the telephone bills are now 
paid out of the Contingent Fund, and the balance of the bills are sent to the 
Board of Supervisors direct. Respectfully submitted, 

W. P. SULLIVAN JR., Chief of Police. 



OF CITY ATTORNEY. 29 



REPORT OF CITY ATTORNEY. 



San Francisco, December 31, 1000. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of Sun Francisco- 
Sir: The force of this office and the salary list thsreof is the same under the 
New Charter as it was under the Consolidation Act. The volume of business has, 
however, greatly increased, owing, in part at least, to the fact that the Nsw 
Charter has extended the number of departments to which the City Attorney is 
the legal adviser. 

During the past twelve months I have written 186 opinions, which is an in- 
crease of about 400 per cent, over the average for previous years. Many new 
questions have arisen calling for adjudication by th3 Courts, and there are now 
pending in the various Courts 286 cases to which the City and County is a party 
plaintiff or defendant. Respectfully, 

FRANKLIN K. LANE, 

City Attorney. 



30 SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 

MUNICIPAL CIVIL SERVICE OF 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



San Francisco, January 21, 1901. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan,'' Mayor 

Of the City and County of Kan Francisco 

Dear Sir: Pursuant to your request of the 10th ult., we ( submit the following 
brief statement of the past year's work of this department and the cost of it* 
maintenance: 

APPLICATIONS RECEIVED. 

During the past year 4,550 applications for examinations for positions in the 
Classified Civil Service have been filed in this office, and 2,636 laborers have been 
enrolled. Each of the applicants for classified positions is required to present, as 
part of his application, the indorsements of three reputable citizens, who sep- 
arately certify that the applicant is of good moral character, temperate and in- 
dustrious habits, and, in all respects, is fit for the service he wishes to enter. 
Laborers are enrolled upon application and without examination. They are cer- 
tified in the order of their enrollment. 

Mechanics and other applicants for positions requiring special skill in the use 
of tools and materials are required to file, in addition to their indorsed applica- 
tions, a "Proof of Knowledge of Trade." This document, which is an official 
form of the Commission, must be signed by three responsible citizens who have 
employed the applicant, and who certify that he is, to their personal knowledge, 
a competent journeyman in his trade. The requirement of such evidence of an 
applicant's practical and satisfactory experience as a mechanic has greatly aided 
the Commission in securing competent men for the public service. 

EXAMINATIONS AND APPOINTMENTS. 

During the year the Commission examined 2,173 applicants for various posi- 
tions in the Classified Civil Service. Forty-two separate examinations were held 
for various clerical and mechanical positions and for policemen. Of the 1,031 
applicants who passed the examinations, and thereby secured places on the 
eligible lists, 213 have been appointed to various positions in the departments of 
the City and County Government. In addition, 350 temporary appointments of 
ordinary clerks have been made in the offices of the Auditor, Election Commis- 
sion and Tax Collector. The appointees to permanent places are distributed as 
follows: 

Auditor, 8; Coroner, 1; County Clerk, 16; Election Commission, 13; Fire Com- 
mission, 1; Fire Pension Fund Commission, 1; Board of Health, 24; Police Com- 
mission, 29; Police Pension Fund Commission, 1; Police Courts, 3; Board of 
Public Works, 76; Recorder, 21; Sheriff, 3; Tax Collector, 20. 

Under the rules of the Commission, original appointments are made on pro- 
bation, the probationary period being six months. During that period the ap- 
pointing officer or department may, by and with the consent of the Commis- 
sioners, discharge an appointee, upon assigning in writing his reasons therefor to 



OP CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 31 

the Commission. If he is not discharged within the probationary period, his ap- 
pointment becomes permanent. By the operation of this latter rule, the thirty- 
sevsn copyists in the offices of the County Clerk and the Recorder, the stenog- 
raphers of the Police Courts, and some of the mechanics of the Board of Public 
Works are now permanent appointees. 

Appendix "A," attached to this report, shows the date and class of each ex- 
amination held 1 , the number of applicants and the number that failed, passed 
and were appointed. 

DISCHARGES. 

Nine laborers, six sewsr-cleaners, one paver and one ordinary clerk have been 
discharged; four laborers and one copyist have resigned from the lists, and two 
copyists have declined positions. 

BOARDS OF EXAMINERS. 

The Commission has been fortunate In obtaining the gratuitous assistance of 
many prominsnt citizens, who assisted the Commission at a number of examina- 
tions. 

POLICE EXAMINATIONS. 

The examination of applicants for positions on the Police Force awakened great 
public interest. The physical standard adopted, after consultation with the Po- 
lice Commission, was higher than similar standards in other cities, but results 
have justified this decision. 

During the third week of September 263 applicants were subjected to the 
physical examination. It was held in the rooms of the Olympic Club, by courtesy 
of its directors. Every man was examined thoroughly, and out of 263 applicants 
114 passed the physical test. This examination, like all others held by the Com- 
mission, was public, competitive and free. All these men received the benefit of a 
most thorough physical examination without the slightest expense. In this work 
the Commission was assisted by the following eminent physicians, who, animatsd 
solely by a desire to aid in the establishment of the merit system, gratuitously 
gave many hours of their valuable time to thesa examinations: 



32 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



ADDRESSES. 



Dr. J. E. Artigues 

Dr. C. F. Buckley 

Dr. C. V. Cross 

Dr. T. Byron De Witt 

Dr. Campbell Ford 

Dr. M. W. Frederick 

Dr. Henry Gibbons, Jr 

Dr. George R. Hubbell 

Dr. M. Herzstein 

Dr. E. O. Jellinek 

Dr. E. C. Kelly 771 Sutter street. 

Dr. Alfred Newman 001 Sutter street. 

Dr. F. S. Palmer [ 2614 California street. 

Dr. Kaspar Pischl Crocker Building. 

Dr. G. H. Powers T-33 Sutter street. 

Dr. W. F. Southard 1220 Sutter street. 

Dr. J. W. Shiels I 11'i Stockton street. 

Dr. G. M. Terrill iOo Powell street. 

Dr. W. F, Terry . idio Sutter street. 



G23 Vallejo street. 
813 Vallejo street. 
916 Market street. 
1196 Kentucky street. 
McNutt Hospital. 
131 Post street. 
920 Polk street 
M6 Eddy street. 
801 Sutter street. 
767 Sutter street. 



The applicants who passed the physical test were subjected to a written ex- 
amination, which resulted in the adoption of an eligible list of eighty-three ap- 
plicants. Since the adoption of this eligible list, twenty-eight applicants hav 
been appointed to the Police Force. 

RULES IN FORCE. 

The Commission has adopted rules for carrying out the Civil Service pro- 
visions of the Charter, and for the information and direction of applicants. In 
February last the General Rules and the General Regulations of the Commission 
were published in two pamphlets, copies of which were widely distributed. 

From the experience of the Commission during the past year, it was deemed 
advisable to modify some of these rules, and to add others. The result is the new 
code of rules adopted January 14, 1901. 



OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 33 

PRACTICAL EFFECTS. 

One of the most important rules of the Commission is that providing against 
the possibility of favoritism in marking papers by concealing the identity of the 
competitor while his answer sheets are under examination. Not only has its 
practical oparation been generally approved, but It has gained the commendation 
of acknowledged authorities in civil service matters, such as the Hon. A. Ralph 
Serven, Chief Examiner of the United States Civil Service Commission, and the 
Hon. S. Wm. Briscoe, Inspector of tha State Civil Service Commission of New 
York. 

In a letter to the Commission, under date of November 13, 1900, Mr. Briscoa, 
writing of the means of concealing identification, as providad in Rule 18, says: 

"I consider the identification sheet used by you most valuable, as it virtually 
destroys all means of identification until the proper time for the name of ths 
candidate to be known has been reached, and I shall endeavor to have the same 
system introduced, not only in the State service, but in the several municipalities 
of the State." 

CREDIT FOR EXPERIENCE. 

This subject presents ons of the most difficult problems before the Commis- 
sion. The knowledge that every other Civil Service Commission, whather State 
or Federal, has had difficulty with the same proposition, is not without its con- 
solation. If, as urged by some, recognition were accorded those in offlca by giv- 
ing them a certain percentage because they are, or have been, in offlca, the prob- 
lem would be much easier of solution. The Commissioners, howevar, must enforce 
the law as they find it in the Charter, and neither the letter nor the spirit of 
Article XIII of that instrument providas or contemplates that any of the appli- 
cants in our Civil Service examinations shall be given a handicap to the dis- 
advantage of others. 

PARTICIPATION IN POLITICS. 

The Commissioners are of the opinion that the participation of Civil Service 
appointees in partisan politics is contrary to the spirit of the Charter, and sub- 
versive of the best interests of Civil Service. The opinion has been embodied In 
Rule 16 for the guidance of Civil Servica appointees. 

LEGAL ACTIONS. 

Since April 6th last, when the first Civil Service suit, Farrell vs. Godchaux, 
was filed, the Commissioners have been called on to defend the merit system 
against five separate attacks made in the courts. 

Early in Octo"ber a restraining order was issued by the Suparlor Court, pro- 
hibiting the holding of any examinations for the so-called County offices. Subse- 
quently the Superior Court issued an injunction prohibiting the Commission from 
holding any examinations for positions in the offices of tha Assessor, County 
Clerk, Coroner, Recorder, Sheriff and Clerk of the Justices' Court, and from doing 
anything pointing toward the introduction of Civil Service into these depart- 
ments. This case is now on appaal before the Supreme Court. 

Another Civil Service case now pending in the Superior Court is that of Seyden 
vs. J. H. Scott, as Tax Collector, and the Civil Service Commissioners. This la 
an endeavor to prevant the appointment of candidates from the eligible list of 
the Commission as Deputy Tax Collectors. It is the most recent attack upon the 
merit sjwtem, the restraining order having been issued on January 5, 1901. 

3f 



34 SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 

Much of the tima of the Commission has been given to meeting these attacks. 
The work has been repeatedly interrupted; it has been necessary to abandon 
plans and schedules, and it has been impossible to carry the work along as rapidly 
as had bsen contemplated. 

COST OF MAINTENANCE. 

During the past year the expenses of the Civil Service Commission havo 
amounted to $10,181 28, as follows: 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



SALARIES. 

Commissioners 

Chief Examiner 

Clerk 

Stenographer 

Two additional clerks at $100 each for on 3 month 
(Resolution 880 Board Supervisors) 

STATIONERY AND PRINTING. 

Stationery and printing, including typewriters, desk, 

two steel filing cabinets and postage stamps 

Advertising examinations 

Office furnishings 

Incidentals 

Total . ....... 



00 


2,400 00 

1,200 00 | 
782 50 

200 00 



413 56 
144 50 



$8,182 50 



1,405 04 



593 74 



$10,181 28 



In concluding this report the Civil Service Commissioners desire to again 
testify to the generous and constant support given them by your Honor during 
the year. Respectfully submitted, 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONERS. 

p. H. MCCARTHY, 

JOHN E. QUINN, 
J. RICHARD FREUD, President. 
E. F. MORAN, Chief Examiner and Secretary. 



OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 



35 



APPENDIX "A." 

SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS HELD. 



EXAMINATIONS. 


1 


f 


f 


A umber . 
amined 


f 


2 

1 


5 






; 


j 


r 


: 




f* 


Copyist 


1900. 
March 14 


A 


I 


460 


181 


279 


37 


Sewer Cleaner ... ... 


March 30 


B 


I 




94 


21 


16 




April 2 


A. 


II. 


7 




7 


4 


Stenographer and Typewriter 


April 2 


A 


II 




16 




4 


Ordinary Clerks 






III 


436 


152 


284 


350 


Brick-Layers 




B 


II 


24 


11 


13 


g 


Pavers 


August 10 


B 


III 


37 


37 


o 


14 


Rammers' 


August 10 


B 


III 




35 


4 


15 




August 14 


B 


V 


17 


6 


6 






August 17 


B 


VII 










Machinists 


August 21 


B 


IX 


14 


11 


3 


o 


Hod-Carriers 


August 24 


B 


IX 


10 


10 


o 


g 




A ugust 29 


B. 


XI 


63 


44 


19 


g 


Book-Keepers Board of Public Work" 


September 7 


A. 


IV 


37 


22 


15 


2 


Book-Keepers, Sheriff's Office 


September 7 


A 


IV 




6 


15 


3 




Sept. 17 to 27 


F 


VI 


763 


114 


149 






October 3 


F 


VI 


113 


83 


30 


j-28 


Experienced Clerks Board of Health 


September 15 


A 


v 


22 


14 


g 




Experienced Clerks, Tax Office 


September 26 


A 


v 


129 


84 


45 


20 


Experienced Clerks, Board of PuWic Works 
Experienced Clerk Auditor's Office 


October 12 
October 23 


A 
A 


v. 

y 


22 
13 


17 

10 


5 
3 


7 
g 


Deputy (Auditor) 


October 26 


A 


VIII 


5 


3 


2 


2 


Deputy Justices' Clerk . . 


November 9 


A 


VIII 


10 








Secretary Board of Health 




A 


IX 


3 


3 


o 


| 


Secretary Fire Commission 


November 14 


A 


IX 


3 


3 


o 


1 


Secretary Police Commission 


November 14 


A 


IX 




1 


1 


1 






A 


IX 


i 




Q 




Secretary Police Pension Fund .... 




A 


IX 


1 


1 


o 


1 






E 


II 




g 


5 




Sanitary Inspectors 


November 19 


F, 


II 


TO 


g 


2 


5 




November 21 


E. 


II 


21 


11 


10 


g 



















Declared off. 
fUnder injunction. 



36 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 
APPENDIX "A" CONTINUED. 





g 


C 


g 


fe 





| 


> 




i 


1: 


P 


~ 


i 




cro 


EXAMIK.ATIONS. 




o 




3 a 


p* 




* D 










Si 






U 






i 




i ^ 






TO 




1900. 
















November 23 


K 


II. 


14 


g 


5 


5 




November 27 


D 




4 


4 





4 




November 27 


D 


III. 


19 


7 


12 


7 




November 27 


D 


IV. 


13 


fi 


7 


5 




November 30 


D 


IX. 




7 


? 


8 




December 4 


A 


VIII. 


38 




13 






December 7 


A 


VIII. 


W 


IS 




11 






r 


X. 


48 










December 11 


f! 


X. 




,, 


1 


1 




December 11 


O 


X. 


14 










December 28 




VII. 


49 


33 


IB 










1 











^Injunction. 



OF CLERK OF JUSTICES' COURT. 



37 



REPORT OF THE CLERK OP THE 
JUSTICES' COURT. 



San Francisco. December 31, 1900. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the~_City and County of San Francisco 

Replying to your communication of tha 10th inst. I have the honor to submit 
the following, showing the business transacted, including the receipts and ex- 
penditures, of the Justices' Clerk's Office during the year ending Decsmber 31st, 
1900, also a comparison of the same with the previous year of 1899: 

RECEIPTS. 



MONTHS. 


1899. 


1900. 




$1,814 50 


$1 822 25 




1 706 75 


1 619 75 


March 


1,960 25 


1 934 25 


Aoril 


1,824 00 


1 690 75 


May 


1,801 25 


1,701 50 




1,940 50 


1 691 25 


J U ly . . 


1 fi82 ?> 


1 "i31 BO 




1 768 50 


1 863 00 




1 673 75 


1 738 75 


October . .. 


1 638 75 


1 806 50 




1 612 00 


1 690 00 




1 500 50 


1 691 50 








Total . 


$20,923 50 


$20,781 00 









33 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



EXPENDITURES. 



EXPENDITURES. 


1899. 


1900. 




$2 400 00 


2.400 00 


Salaries of deputies 


7,200 00 


6,000 00 




810 00 










Total salaries 


10,410 00 


$8 400 00 




1,298 20 


586 00 










$11 708 20 


$8 986 00 









RECAPITULATION. 



Net saying in salaries during year 1900 over 1839 $2,010 00 

Net saving i:i stationery, etc., during year 1900 over 1899 711 64 



Net saving in expenditures during year 1900 over 1899. 



2.722 64 



Number of suits filed in year 1900 . 
Numbr of suits filed in year 1899 . 



6,610 
6,447 



Increase in number of suits over 1899. 



163 



It will be seen from the above that the business of the office during the past 
year was equal to that of 1899, the receipts, however, being a little less, occa- 
sioned by the decision of the Supreme Court rendered about a year ago in the 
case of Kosmlnsky vs. Williams, reducing the fees for services in certain cases, 
thereby decreasing the revenue about 20 per cent. The saving in salaries was 
not made by any reduction in the individual pay of the clerks, but by reducing 
the number of employees to conform to the provisions of the Charter. The saving 
shown above In printing and stationery must necessarily be attributed to the 
Charter, for in the year 1900 we consumed about the same quantity, but the 
prices paid for the same were materially reduced. In conclusion, I would say that 
the clerical force of the office is amply sufficient for the proper conducting of the 
business. Respectfully submitted, 

E. W. WILLIAMS, Clerk. 



OF SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



San Francisco, December 26th, 1900. 



To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francteco 

Dear Sir: In compliance with your request of December 15th, 1900, I submit 
the financial statement of the School Department, showing the Improvement 
under the operation of the Charter. For this purpose this report Includes the 
expenditures for ths fiscal years ending June 30th, 1897, 1898, 1899 and 1900. In 
order to make a comparison of the first year under the Charter with that of pre- 
vious years, I have also prepared statistics showing the expenditures for th 
calendar years of 1897, 1898, 1899 and 1900. Both of these statements show & 
decided Improvement in favor of the Charter. The latter Is more conclusive than 
the former, for the present Board has had control of the school funds for this 
calendar year with the exception of eight days from January 1st to January 8th, 
1900. 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT SHOWING THE EXPENDITURES FOR THE 
FISCAL, YEARS ENDING JUNE 30TH. 



1897 (including $65,860 25 for Mission High School) 

1S98 (including $81,135 04 for Mission High School) 

1891 (including $38,150 00 for Mission High School) 

1900... 



$1,223,188 71 
1,340,679 44 
1,393,728 00 

*1, 206,690 43 



*Not including $68,664 87 paid to teachers, janitors and rents for November, 
1898, derived from ths collateral inheritance tax and delinquent taxes, 1898-1889. 



The amount of $1,206,690 43 shows expenditures for the fiscal year ending 
June 30th, 1900. For six months of this fiscal ysar the school fund was under 
control of the present (Charter) Board of Education. 

I desire to call especial attention to the expenditures made necessary by the 
Charter for administration; also additional expenses made necessary in order to 
place our department on the same plane, educationally, with other large cities of 
our country and to make permanent Improvements on many of our school build- 
ings. 



40 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



EXPENSES. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


Extra expense of administration under Charter for 






Payment of water bills heretofore paid out of Gen- 


6,240 00 










Total 




$ 16 9 96 37 









INTRODUCTION OF SPECIAL LINES OF WORK AND OTHER EXTRA 
EXPENSES INCURRED. 



AMOUNT. 



Introduction of manual training (approximately) 


$6,000 00 
2,220 00 


Placing now shades in all school buildings 


2.683 76 


Improvements on Lafayette School, destroyed by fire.. 
Purchase of indigent and supplmentary bootas 


2,500 00 
4,000 00 






Total additional expense 


$33 700 13 







While the additional expense of $33,700 13 was incurred, we ware still able to 
have a balance at the end of the fiscal year June 30th, 1900, of $12,530 43. For 
June, 1899, there were unpaid merchant and labor claims amounting to $6,474 32. 
While the present Board of Education was not legally bound to authorize the 
payment of these claims, it gave its consent for the Auditor to do so. There still 
remains to the credit of the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1900 (approximately), 
f8,066 11. 



OF SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



The following statement will show more definitely the Improved financial ad- 
ministration of the School Department under the Charter: 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT SHOWING EXPENDITURES FOR THE MAIN- 
TENANCE OF THE DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEARS OF 



YEARS. 


AMOUNT; 


1897 . 


$1,207,750 40 


1898 


1 292 287 81 


* 

1899 


1 200 939 14 


1900 


*1 181 698 % 







A few bills contracted for December, 1900, amounting to (approximately) 
$300, will be presentsd for payment in January, 1901. 



The difference in total expenditures for the above calendar years in favor of 
1900 (Charter) is as follows: 



YEARS. 


AMOUNT. 


1897 . 


$26051 44 


1898 


110 588 85 


1899 


19 240 18 







While the present Board has expended for the calendar year ending December 
81st, 1900, 11,181,698 96, it is well to call especial attention to additional expenses 
which former Boards were not required to meet. This shows a still greater saving 
to the department in maintenance over that of the calendar years above men- 
tion*d. 



42 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



EXPENSES FOR ADMINISTRATION NOT HERETOFORE PAID OUT OF 

SCHOOL FUND. 



Directors | $11,766 64 

Superintendent, heretofore paid out of General Fund. 3,924 71 

Deputies 4,500 00 

Secretary, heretofore paid out of General Fund 1,765 00 

Total t 

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. 

Water bills, heretofore paid out of General Fund.... 

Manual training and cooking teachers 

Raise of salary for Fifth, Sixth and Seventh Grade 
teachers 

Manual training equipment 

Cooking equipment 

Shades in all schools , 

Repairing Lafayette School, destroyed by fira , 

Transfer to Annuity Fund 

Tinting, painting, remodeling, furnishing and wiring 
offices for Board, Superintendent and Deputy 
Superintendents 

Total . 



$21,956 85 

13,064 61 
5,217 95 

5,000 00 
6,000 00 
2,220 00 
2,683 76 
2,500 00 



2,688 65 



S62.220 32 



This was mad2 necessary by the appointment of four Directors who are re- 
quired to devoted their entire time to their official duties, and additional number 
of deputies. 

While during the past calendar year ' we have expsnded $1,181,698 96, this 
am junt includes $62,220 32 which former Boards, especially our immediate pre- 
deoessors, were not called upon to pay. Taking this amount from the annual ex- 
penditure (for 1900) of $1,181,698 96, there remains $1,119,478 64, a sum with 
which we would have been enabled to conduct the department, including the same 
items of expense as former Boards had to meet. 



OF SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 45 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT SHOWING EXPENDITURES OF THE PRES- 
ENT (CALENDAR) YEAR, WITH PRACTICALLY THE SAME OBLIGA- 
TIONS AS FORMER BOARDS WERE REQUIRED TO MEET. 



1900.. 



$1,207,750 40 
1,292,287 81 
1,200.939 14 
1,119,478 64 



The difference in total expenditures for the above calendar years in favor of 
1900 (Charter) is as follows: 



YEARS. 


AMOUNT. 


1897 


$88 271 86 


1898 


172 809 17 


1899 


81 46G 50 







One item will suffice to show wherein the currant expenses have been greatly 
reduced by the present Board of Education. I have taken the teachers' salaries for 
one month, as this is the largest item of expense. However, the same favorable 
comparison could be made in all lines of expenditures. 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT SHOWING THE EXPENDITURES 
TEACHERS' SALARIES FOR THE MONTH OF DECEMBER. 



FOR 



1930.. 



$82,199 65 
89,340 00 
82,084 40 

77.456 70 



*Not including $981 55 for special teachers of cooking and manual training. 



44 SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 

The difference in the monthly expenditures for teachers' salaries for Dscember 
of 1S07, 1898, 1899, in favor of 1900 (Charter) is as follows: 



1897 i $4,742 95 

1898 11,883 30 

1899.... 4,62770 



I affirm, without fear of contradiction, that with one-half the expenditure 
we havs done as much general repairing and improving as former Boards have 
done. On sixteen school buildings extensive repairs have been made in the nature 
of painting, remodeling, plumbing, etc., while on twelvs buildings repairs not so 
extensive have been made. 

The Supervisors apportioned for this fiscal year ending June 30th, 1901, 
$1,160,000, as against $1,200,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1900. The 
former amount is practically $80,000 less than our predecessors had available 
for the maintenance of the schools. The explanation of this is that, in addition 
to having an apportionment of $40,000 less than last year, $25,000 is now required 
for administration which former Boards were not required to pay; also $15,000 
water bill heretofore paid out of the General Fund. The first six months of the 
present fiscal year we have spsnt $575,022 29; allowed by Supervisors for first six 
months, $580,000; balance to the credit of the School Fund for six months, $4,977 67. 

The most healthy sign of the excellent credit of the present administration is 
found in the perfect willingness of all reputable merchants to supply the de- 
partment with goods. 

On last June, when the yearly contracts were awarded, many of the leading 
firms of our city were in competition. This also shows the renewed confidence 
in the administration of the financial affairs of ths San Francisco School De- 
partment. Respectfully submitted, 

CECIL, W. MARK, 
President Board of Education. 



OF CORONER, 

REPORT OF CORONER. 



45 



San Francisco, January 3, 1901. 
To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County oj San Francisco 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENSES OF THE CORONER'S OFFICE 
DURING THE YEARS 1899 AND 1900. 



EXPENSES. 



Salaries 

Stabling and care of horses 

Shoeing 

Rent 

Lamp, autopsy room 

Recovery of bodies 

Photographing of bodies 

Chemical analyses 

Interpreter 

Extra horse-hire 

Miscellaneous expenses. 

Incidental expenses 



$17,740 00 



78000 

12 00 

520 00 

100 00 

300 00 

25 00 

9 50 

145 85 



$21,192 15 



1900. 



$16,360 00 
600 00 
63 00 



12 00 
440 00 
100 00 



114 00 
63 00 

520 09 

$19,152 09 



Note The increase in the item of "extra horse hire" was caused by reason of 
th3 following state of affairs: At the beginning of the present administration of 
the Coroner's office, the horses belonging to the Morgue, and which had been in 
constant use for ten years, were found to be entirely ussless for the service for 
which they were intended. They were sold by the City in March of last year, 
since which time this department has had no horses, but has been doing its work 
with horses borrowed from the Department of Health. The larger part of said 
item was incurred between the first of the year 1900 and the time whan the old 
Morgue horses were sold, which necessitated the hiring of extra horsas while still 
paying for the stabling of the old ones. 

The increase in the item of "rent" was occasioned by tha fact that the pres- 
ent Coroner found, upon taking office, that the quarters provided by the City for 
the transaction of the business of his department were absolutely inadequate for 
the needs of the same, and two extra rooms used as inquest and jury room 
respectively have besn rented since that time at a cost of $10 per month. Respect- 
fully submitted, 

R. BEVERLY COLE, Coroner. 



46 SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



REPORT OF COUNTY CLERK 



San Francisco, January 2, 1901. 

To the, Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Frar.cisco 

Dear Sir: In compliance with your letter of December 10th, 1900, I have the 
honor to report as follows: 

For ths purpose 'of presenting a proper statement of the first year's work of 
the County Clerk's Office and the cost of its maintenance under the New Charter, 
it has been necessary for me to go back into several of the past administrations 
of this office so that a proper comparison might be made as to the working and 
cost of this department under the Consolidation Act and under the New Charter, 
and I therefore call your attention to the schedule here attached, marked Exhibit 
"A" and made a part hereof. 

As you will notice I have not included the year 1899 in said schedule, for the 
reason that in the latter part of said year the force in my office was but thirty- 
four, with a pay-roll of $5,300 per month, and as this reduction of the working 
force was caused by a decision of th3 Supreme Court, I omit the whole year, as 
the pay-roll was less than that allowed by the Charter. 

During the year 1900, the first under our New Charter, with a force of forty- 
nine men, and with a monthly pay-roll of $5,950, I have handled a far greater 
amount of business than was ever before had in the County Clerk's Office during 
any one year. The books show that 7,220 civil, criminal and probate matters and 
cases were filed in this office from January 8th, 1900, to and including December 
31st, 1900. This does not include the work of the four Police Courts, which was 
attached to this office by the New Charter, and the Auditor's books show that 
from all Sources I turned into the Treasury during the said year the sum of 
188,313 60. 

While the general fees of the County Clerk's Offi.ce have not been as great as 
in some of the former years, this is due to the fact that all insolvency proceedings 
have been transferred to the United States Court under the United States bank- 
ruptcy law, and also to the fact that the collection of the Collateral Inheritance 
Tax has been taken away from this office and given to the Treasurer's Office, 
and of course this has made considerable of a difference in the revenue. 

In conclusion, I would state that my office under the New Charter, 1900, as 
compared with the office in the year 1894 (Consolidation Act) shows a saving of 
$1,616 35 per month; compared with 1895 (Consolidation Act) shows a saving of 
$3,574 84 per month; 1896 (Consolidation Act), $4,719 95 per month; 1897 (Con- 
solidation Act), $4,708 75 per month; 1898 (Consolidation Act), $4,241 30 per 
month. Respectfully submitted, 

WM. A. DEANE, 
County Clerk and ex-Offlcio Clerk of the Superior Court. 



OF COUNTY CLERK. 



47 



EXHIBIT "A. 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES AND PAY-ROLL 


8 

NAME OF COUNTY CLERK. 


Average number 
of employees.... 


Average monthly 
pay-roll 


1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1900 


Haley 


52 

72 
82 
79 
75 
49 


$7,566 35 
9,524 84 
10,669 95 
10.658 75 
10,191 30 
5,950 00 


Curry 


Curry 




Uurry 


Deaiie (January 8th) . . 








GENERAL FEES RECEIVED. 



? 


NAME OF COUNTY CLERK. 


AMOUNT. 


1894 


Haley 


881,374 75 


1895 




*86,684 25 


1896 




*82,713 53 


1897 




77,205 86 


1898 




65.741 60 


1899 




f74,248 40 


1900 




88.313 60 









* Insolvency included. 

t No insolvency; no inheritance tax. 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



NUMBER 



COMPARATIVE. 

OF CIVIL, CRIMINAL, AND PROBATE CASES FILED 
JANUARY S, 1900, TO DECEMBER 31, 1900. 



FROM 



lfJ-4 . 
1895 
1896 



1900 (Janawr 8th). 



6.434 
6,517 
5,744 
6,236 
5,948 
7,820 



OF RECORDER. 



49 



REPORT OF RECORDER, 



SAN FRAXCISCO. February 14, 1901. 
To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

DEAR SIR : In obedience to your expressed desire, I herewith submit to you a statement 
of the work of the Recorder's office during the calendar year 1900, together with a table 
showing the work for the year 1899, so that a comparison may be had of the systems before 
and after the adoption of the Charter: 

RECEIPTS. 



January $2,419 70 

February 2,674 15 

March 3,127 55 

April 3.029 15 

May 2.96370 

June 3.09285 

July 2,74280 

August 2,827 85 

September 3,036 95 

October 3.04225 

Noyeruber 3.167 95 

2.994 15 

Totala $35,119 05 



1900. 



$3,34285 
3.134 (0 
3.472 20 
3,33360 
3.217 80 
3.13865 
2.90470 
3,061 35 
2.529 45 
3.276 45 
3.199 60 
3.188 10 



50 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



EXPENSES. 



MONTH. 


RECORDER 


THREE 
DEPUTIES. 


MORTGAGE 
CLERK. 


PORTER. 


FOLIO 
CLERKS 


TOTALS. 


1899. 


$333 33 


$550 00 


$1CO 00 


f 75 00 


$2,071 56 


$3 129 89 


February 


333 33 


550 00 


ICO 00 


75 00 


2,380 68 


3,439 01 


March 


333 33 


550 00 


100 00 


75 tO 


2,762 64 


3,820 97 


April 


333 33 


550 CO 


100 00 


75 00 


2,547 24 


3,605 57 


May 


333 33 


550 00 


100 00 


75 00 


2,567 64 


3,625 97 


June 


333 37 


550 CO 


100 00 


75 00 


2,568 12 


3,626 49 


July 


333 33 


550 00 


100 00 


75 00 


2,380 80 


3,439 13 


August 


333 33 


550 00 


100 00 


75 00 


2,463 48 


3,521 81 


September 
October 


33333 
333 33 


550 00 
550 00 


100 00 
100 00 


75 00 
75 00 


2,962 20 
2,522 40 


4,020 53 
3 580 73 




333 33 


550 00 


100 00 


75 00 


2,771 52 


3,829 85 




333 33 


550 00 


100 00 


75 00 


2,671 68 


3,720 01 
















Total .... 


$4000 00 


$6,600 CO 


$1,200 00 


$900 00 


$30,669 96 


$43,369 96 
















1900. 


$308 88 


$439 98 


$100 00 


$20 00 


$2.022 58 


$2,891 14 




300 00 


400 00 


96 95 




1 872 67 


2 669 62 


March 


300 00 


400 00 


100 CO 




2,096 56 


2 896 5& 


April 


300 00 


400 00 


100 CO 




1 969 52 


2 769 52 


May 


300 00 


400 00 


100 00 




2 007 44 


2 804 44 




300 00 


400 00 


100 00 




1,926 64 


2,726 64 


July 


300 00 


400 00 


100 00 


75 00 


1,929 84 


2,804 84 




300 00 


4CO 00 


100 DO 


75 00 


1,974 40 


2,849 40 




300 00 


400 00 


100 00 


75 00 


1,855 04 


2,730 04 


October .... 


300 00 


400 00 


100 00 


75 00 


1,938 80 


2,813 80 




SCO 00 


400 00 


100 00 


75 00 


1,848 00 


2723 00 


December 


300 00 


400 10 


100 00 


75 00 


1,819 76 


2,694 76 


Total 


$3.608 88 


$4,839 98 


$1,196 95 


$470 00 


$23,260 95 


$33,373 76 

















OF RECORDER. 
RECAPITULATION. 



51 



Total Expense Year 1899 143,369 96 

Total Receipts Year 1899.... 35,11905 



Deficit. 



Total Receipts Year 1900 $37,798 75 

Total Eipense Year 1900 33,373 76 



.$8,250 91 



Total Surplus , $4,424 91 

1899, Deficit $8,250 91 

1900, Surplus 4,424 99 

Total Gain for 1900 12,675 90 



PAPERS RECEIVED. 



MONTH. 


1899. 


1900. 


January 


1 757 


2226 


February 


1 810 


2060 


March 


2,182 


2,286 


April 


2,054 


2,171 


May 


1 997 


2136 


June 


2,060 


1,992 


July 


1 743 


1,890 


August 


1 855 


2,254 


September 


2,022 


1,631 


October 


2,087 


2,086 




2 061 


2,060 


December 


1,983 


2,125 








Total . 


23 611 


24 917 









Rf spectfully submitted, 



EDMOND GODCHAUX, 

Recorder. 



52 SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 

REPORT OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY, 



San Francisco, February 16, 1901. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

In accordance with your request I herewith submit a report of the workings 
of the District Attorney's Office during the year A. D. 1900, the first year under 
the Municipal Charter, and as compared with previous years. 

Prior to the adoption of the Charter the duties of this office were mainly con- 
fined to the prosecution of criminal cases in the Superior Court, and the office 
force consisted of the District Attorney, three assistants and four clerks. The 
prosecutions in the Police Courts were confided to four Prosecuting Attorneys, 
appointed by the Board of Supervisors. Complaints and warrants were drawn by. 
four Assistant Prosecuting Attorneys, also appointed by the Board of Supervisors. 

At the present time all prosecutions, both in the Superior and Police Courts, 
together with the drawing of complaints and warrants are confined to the District 
Attorney's Office, and there is further imposed upon it the additional duty of 
receiving cash bail and approving all bail bonds and appeal bonds taken in the 
Police Court. 

This change has resulted not alone in a more efficient administration of jus- 
tice, but in a marked financial saving to the City and a correction of several 
abuses which had grown up in our municipal government. 

The total yearly cost to the City under the Consolidation 
Act of conducting the offices of District Attorney, 
Prosecuting and Assistant Prosecuting Attorneys, in- 
cluding statutory and extra clerks was $41,000 00 

Total cost under the Charter... .. 36,200 00 



A yearly saving to the City of $4,80000 

(There is a further saving of $2,100 per year formerly paid an expert whose 
duty it was to examine bonds.) 

And it is to be remembered that the District Attorney's Office now not only 
performs all the duties which, under the Consolidation Act, were performed by 
departments costing the City $6,900 per annum more, but in addition thereto re- 
ceives cash bail and approves all bail bonds taken in the Police Court and renders 
other services not formerly imposed upon it. 

The records of this department, running back for many years, will show that 
crime in this city is less prevalent than ever before, while the percentage of con- 
viction of parties held to answer before the Superior Court, charged with the com- 
mission of felonies, is much greater and the administration of justice speedier 
than at any other time. 



OF DISTRICT ATTORNEY. 53 

Number of Informations filed during year 1900 was 243. 

Percentage of convictions of cases tried 88 

Number of informations filed during year 1895 was 573. 

Percentage of convictions of cases tried 73 

Number of informations filed during year 1890 was 502. 

Percentage of convictions of cases tried 75 

Number of informations filed during year 1886 was 492. 

Percentage of convictions of cases tried 76 

Number of informations filed during year 1880 was 477. 

Percentage of convictions of cases tried 74 

WARRANT AND BOND DEPARTMENT. 

This department is a creature of the Charter, nothing similar to it existing at 
the time of the Consolidation Act, and the duties of said department are carried 
out by a Warrant and Bond Clerk and three assistants. Under the old system 
the same number of employees were retained simply to draw complaints in the 
Police Court. Under the Charter the matter of taking bail and the drawing of 
complaints are both accomplished by the same corps of officers and the office i& 
kept open for the transaction of business every day and night throughout the year, 
as required by law. 

During the year 1900 the sum of $232,765 in cash ball has been received and 
accounted for to the Treasurer and the Auditor. 

In addition to this 665 bail bonds, aggregating $320,220, have been received 
and examined by the Warrant and Bond Clerk. 

In no Instance has any bail bond been declared forfeited which has not been 
collected. 

This department was established to correct abuses long existing and to eradi- 
cate the taking of "straw bonds." How successful It has been in this particular 
may be judged from the fact that no such thing as an uncollectable, or straw, 
bond has been heard of during the last year. Another practice, namely the re- 
lease of criminals upon their so-called O. R.'s, or, in effect, without bail, has been 
entirely checked. The guilty are thus prevented from escaping and the law i 
no longer brought into contempt. Respectfully, 

LEWIS F. BYINGTON, District Attorney. 



54 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS. 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT 

OP EXPENDITURES OF ELECTION DEPARTMENT FOR TEN YEARS. 



ELECTION. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


July 1, 1890, to June 30, 1891, office expenses 


$6 787 ]7 




Expense General Election, November 4, 1890 


128,286 00 




Total 




3135 073 17 


July 1, 1892, to June 30 1893 office expenses 






Expense General Election, November 8, 1892 


$7,287 83 






292,700 35 




Total 




299,988 18 


July 1 1894 to June 30 1895 office expenses 






Expense General Election November 6 1894 


$6,600 00 










Total 




204 666 23 


July 1, 1896 to June 30th 1897 office expenses . 






Expense General Election, November 3 1896 












. Tot^l 




202,156 78 


July 1 1898 to June 30 1899 office expenses .... 






Expense General Election, Novembsr 8 1898 






Preparation Proposed Primary 












Total v 










164,413 91 



OF DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS. 



55 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT CONTINUED. 



ELECTION. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


July 1 1899 to Jun 3 30 1900 office expenses 






Primary Municipal Bond Elections 


















Total 




S139.9S4 81 


July 1, 1900, to January 1, 1901, salaries Commission 


$3,699 00 




Expenses General Registration and General Election 
held November 6, 1900 


85,762 53 










Estimated expenses six months ending June 30, 1901. 


$89,462 53 
15,000 00 




( 







For the first time in the history of the Election Department since its control 
was changed from the County Clerk to that of a Board of Commissioners in 1878, 
the expenditures have bean kept within the appropriation, and instead of the 
usual deficit will show a surplus in spite of the fact that the appropriation was 
the smallest in many years. In order to make a fair comparison of the expenses 
of ths department with the previous years, the election of 1896 presents as near 
as possible similar conditions to that of 1900, inasmuch as on both occasions 
Presidential elections were held, and the registration was nearer in volume to 
that of 1900, being 72,992 in 1896 and 73,628 in 1900. One item of expense which 
did not aris2 in the latter year was that of the municipal election which was held 
in conjunction with the general, making an increase of $15,000, which will not 
occur again, as the Charter separates the different elections. On the other hand, 
under the present regime the Election Commission receives, a salary which 
amounts in all to $5,000 per year, and an additional expense is created by the fact 
that the Smith Registration Act passed by the last Legislature provides for con- 
tinuous registration, instead of confining it to a fixed period of eighty-five days as 
before, and necessitates more clerical assistance. 

Nevertheless the showing is quite gratifying, and more than justifies the ex- 
psctations of those who favored the adoption of the Charter. Respectfully sub- 
mitted, 

BOARD OF ELECTION COMMISSIONERS. 

THOS. J. WALSH, Registrar and Secretary. 



53 SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY. 



San Francisco, January 11, 1901. 

To the Honorable Jas. D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the, City and County of San Francisc<> 

Dear Sir: It is difficult to render any report which will be of value to you 
regarding the Department of Electricity. The appropriation for the department 
for the fiscal year 1899-1900 was $37,540; for the current fiscal year 1900-1901, 
$50,000. During the year 1900 the department handled 1,058 fire alarms, an increase 
of 229 over the previous year, and 117,329 police calls, an increase of 4,235 over 
the previous year. We have manufactured and finished fifty new fire boxes and 
twelve complete modern engine-house electrical equipments. Under the Charter 
this department is charged with the additional duty of inspecting all electrical 
wiring of buildings, and during the past year made 2,567 inspections and issued 
2,033 certificates. Doubtless these careful inspections will result in a much 
higher standard of electrical work and a consequent decrease in fire hazard. Our 
city ordinances require thoroughly modern installation of electric wiring. 

The Department of Electricity since July 1st has saved from its appropria- 
tion $4,763, with which amount we are now able to begin placing fire alarm and 
police telegraph wires underground in District No. 1. Had our appropriation 
been sufficient this work would have been completed ere this. It will be the aim 
of the Department of Electricity to remove all overhead wires from the down- 
town districts as rapidly as funds at our disposal will permit. Respectfully sub- 
mitted, 

ROLLA V. WATT, President Joint Board. 



OF BOARD OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 



57 



REPORT OF BOARD OF FIRE 
COMMISSIONERS. 



San Francisco, January 0. 1901. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San J>'rancisco 

Dear Sir: On behalf of the Board of Fire Commissioners I have the honor 
to submit the following brief report of tb.3 business of the Fire Department for 
the year 1900, and for ready comparison have included the figures of the three 
previous years: 



TOTAL EXPKNDITURES. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


Running expanses 
Building and repairs. . . . 
Pensions . 


$185,806 10 
65,689 71 
10 996 95 


$173,494 52 
34,000 64 
12 305 00 


$182,526 38 
63,604 32 
13-430 95 


$103,491 07 
*7,823 12 
11 172 55 


Salaries 


391 98'' 55 


394 198 00 


393 078 35 


514 026 63 


Leave of absence 


7,836 75 


10 136 75 


684 10 














Total 


066-i 312 06 


$624 134 1 


$653 224 10 


$636 6^8 37 













Board of Public Works after July 1, 1900. 

The reduction in "Running Expenses" Is marked, notwithstanding the fact 
that the prices of hay, oats, coal, wood and horses, constituting in the aggregate 
a very large percentage of our total expenses, were considerably higher than in 
1899. The large incrsase in salaries is accounted for by the fact that the depart- 
ment became "fully paid" on February 1, 1900. We now have 462 rsgular men 
giving their entire time to the department and having no other occupation. Their 
alaries are fixed by the Chartar and are considerably in advance of the average 
paid in previous years. In 1899 there were 175 fully paid men and 297 extramen. 
The extramen were engaged in other occupations in all parts of the city, but were 
required to respond to all alarms. Being widely scattered, dangerous delays In 
arriving at fires can be easily understood. Extramsn were paid $35 a month; such 
of them as are now permanently employed receive $80 a month. Prior to February 
1, 1900, each engine company responded to alarms with three fully paid men, 
viz., driver, engineer and stoker, the latter driving the hose wagon; each truck 
company responded with two men, viz., driver and tillerman. With this force 
hose could not be pulled up to the second floor of a building nor ladders raised 
until the extramen arrived. With our "fully paid" department from seven men in 
the "outside" districts to ten in the "downtown" districts with each engine com- 
pany, and from nine to twelve men with each truck company, ride upon the appa- 
ratus in response to every alarm; thus full companies arrive at the scene of the fire 



58 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



with the utmost promptness ready for any emergency which may arise. This 
may account for the fact that although there were 229 more alarms in 1900 than 
In 1899 and 19 sscond alarms, indicating a large number of important fires, there 
were but three third alarms, and no fourth, fifth or sixth alarms during the en- 
tire year. 

FIRE ALARMS. 



YBAR. 


NUMBER. 


1897 


846 


1898 


933 


1899 . 


829 


1900 


1 068 







PROPERTY LOSS 



YEARS 


AMOUNT. 


Average property loss for nine years prior to 1900 
Property loss, 1900 


$1,023,769 00 
511,931 48 



In addition to the greatly reduced property loss above referred to, our citizens 
are receiving, on account of our fully paid and efficient Fire Department, con- 
cessions in insurance rates aggregating several hundred thousand dollars per 
annum. 

Ws have saved from our appropriation for the current fiscal year (July 1 to 
December 31, 190O) over $16,000, a sum sufficient to pay for two new steam fire- 
engines, two new hook-and-ladder trucks and twenty Pompier ladders for life- 
saving purposes, all now under contract for early delivery. All of the apparatus 
of the department is in excellent condition. 

SAN FRANCISCO'S NECESSITY FOR SUPERIOR PROTECTION. 

San Francisco differs from most of the great cities of the United States In 
two important particulars, viz., its preponderating frame construction and its 
isolation. No other large city in this country has so large a number relatively of 
frame buildings, and no other city of similar size is located so that it cannot get 
abundant help in case of emergency, such as a great conflagration, from its 
neighbors. To illustrate: 



OF BOARD OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 59 

BRICK AND FRAME BUILDINGS IN VARIOUS CITIES. 



CITIES. 


BRICK 
BUILDINGS. 


FRAMI 
BUILDINGS. 


San Francisco 


3 881 


50,494 


Boston 


25 2^0 


55 739** 


St Louia 


s j 493 


18 498 


Philadelphia 


26 245* 


13 885 


Chicago 


69 849 


51 808*'* 









Philadelphia is noted for its thousands of small brick dwelling houses. 

'Includes extensive suburban districts. 

Includes suburban districts now a part of "Greater Chicago." 



APPARATUS IN ADJACENT TOWNS. 

When Boston burned in 1872 there were fifty steam fire-engines with their 
crews called in from adjacent towns and cities within a radius of fifty miles. At 
the present time there are 161 steam fire-engines in commission in sixty-six 
towns and cities within a radius of fifty miles of the city of Boston. 

Outside of San Francisco there are in the State of California fifty steam fire- 
engines, only fourteen of which are located within three hours by rail of San 
Francisco. It is apparent, therefore, that the combined departments of the Stats 
of California coming to our rescue as quickly as possible would be a poor substi- 
tute for any impairment in our own department. 

One other point may be mentioned; the topography of San Franc' ;co makes it 
exceeding important that fire companies be numerous and well distributed, for it 
is impossible to move the apparatus over our high hills. Referring tt the cities 
above mentioned, all are located on practically level ground, so that the apparatus 
can be moved from one section of the city to another readily and at great speed. 
This is impossible in San Francisco. 

In conclusion, I desire to speak in the highest terms of the personnel of our 
department and in praise of its marked efficiency. We believe the adoption of ths 
Charter, which removed the department from politics and placed it upon a firm, 
self-respecting and fully paid basis, will prove of great permanent advantage to 
the City of San Francisco. Respectfully submitted, 

ROLLA V. WATT. 
President Board Fire Commissioners. 



60 - SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



San Francisco, December 31, 1900. 

To tht Honorable Jus D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: In compliance with your request we herewith submit a complete 
statement and comparison showing expenditures of maintenance and construction 
of parks and squares for the year ending December 31, 1900. 

The work of the year commenced with the widening and improving of the 
drive along the Great Highway, from a width of 10 feet to 80 feet, for a distance 
of one-half mile, or the entire width of the Park. This improvement gives this 
fine drive a straight line of about three miles along the sea beach. Its cost was 
about $4,900. 

The construction of the Chain of Lakes begun last year was continued during 
the present year. It was necessary to move 25,000 cubic yards of material in 
grading to the water line. One engine and ten dump cars were used in the re- 
moval of the sand. The rough grading is about completed and the slopes are 
now being fertilized with loam, manure, etc., preparatory to being planted with 
suitable ornamental trees, shrubs, plants and grasses. The area of this lake sur- 
face is about ten acres, and varies in width from 30 to 200 feet, the length being 
about 2.000 feet. The lakes are laid out in the natural style, with a few small 
islands dotting their surface. The water line varies in character and outline, pro- 
ducing landscape effects entirely different from any to be found elsewhere in the 
Park, and -en joyed by hundreds of visitors. This locality, which at present Is a 
chain of beautiful lakes, fringed with the trees and shrubs that delight in such 
moist, shady and sheltered places, was originally a barren sand waste. This im- 
provement cost $26,000. 

The removal of the Park Band from the old music grounds to the Spreckels 
Pavilion necessitated the improvement and reconstruction of the grounds inter- 
vening, and before the work of improvement could be started it was necessary to 
move the elk and other animals to different quarters. On looking over the Park 
the best site appeared to be the rolling section of ground situated immediately 
west of Nineteenth avenue and lying between the Middle and South Drives. This 
section contains about twenty-five acres and is admirably adapted for the pur- 
pose, being thickly wooded, thereby giving the necessary shelter, while the 
undulating character of the ground is well suited for their exercise. The paddock 
has been enclosed by a wire fence eight feet in height and a mile in length. 

A large amount of loam, manure and other fertilizers have been hauled to the 
Park during the year, from ten to forty teams having been engaged in this work. 
This material has been used principally in fertilizing the starving trees west of 
Strawberry Hill. This we consider is in the line of true economy and should be 
continued until the entire area of the Park has been covered to a good depth. 
The cost of this work will be understood when I state that it takes 1,600 cubic 
yards to cover one acre to a depth of twelve inches, and that each cubic yard de- 
livered costs 80 cents. 

Considerable tree planting has been done during the year, mostly of the finer 
foliage and flowering kinds, such as rhododendrum, flowering almonds, flowering 
plums, flowering cherries, etc., the intention being to have a display of color 
effects in trees and shrubs for each of the calendar months. 



OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 61 

Much attention has been given to the thinning of the forest trees during the 
past year, cutting out those that were crowding or injuring each other by being: 
In too close proximity; the best specimens in all cases being retained as per- 
manent trees. The thinnings were cut into lengths and used as fuel at the pump- 
Ing station, thereby saving the expense of coal. 

About one and a half miles of new footpaths have been constructed during th 
year, mostly in the vicinity of the Chain of Lakes and about the Spreckels Music 
Stand. In making the walk leading from Ninth avenue to the Music Court we 
found it necessary, in order to reach the auditorium without the danger of col- 
liding with vehicles or bicycles, to construct a tunnel or subway for the use of 
pedestrians. This was done by building a tunnel under the carriage way and 
bicycle roads; this tunnel is 22 feet wide, 150 long, and is much used by those 
visiting the grounds. 

A new entrance to the Park was made opposite Nineteenth avenue, with 
branch roadways leading east and west. The grounds have been nicely laid out 
and planted with appropriate shrubbery and the borders with flowering plants, 
giving a good finish to the work there. 

The Park has been materially benefited in the past year by the magnificent 
gift of Mr. Glaus Spreckels. The new Music Stand is conceded to be the 
finest pavilion for that purpose of any park in the world, the musicians being 
enthusiastic in their praises of the perfect acoustic properties of the new build- 
ing. On account of the increasing number of visitors to the Park, and also be- 
cause of the much larger area of improved ground being opened, it was deemed 
necessary to procure a large number of additional park settees. After advertising 
the number required and the class of bench wanted, a contract was entered into 
with Baker & Hamilton, who were the lowest bidders, to build and deliver 3,000, 
all of which have been placed in the vicinity of Concert Valley. Additional 
benches have been secured and placed in Union Square and also in Buena Vista 
Park. 

Quite a number of accessions have been added to the Museum collection dur- 
ing the past year, the principal ones being two rare meteorites, a blanket made 
from down of rare birds, several Chinese objects of ethnographic value, a large 
Alaskan Indian totem pole, collections of weapons and mementoes of the war in 
the Philippines and two large bronze cannon trophies of the Cuban war. 

During the year over 8,000 feet of water pipe has been laid, varying in 
diameter from 8 inches to 1% inch, mostly in the westerly end of Golden Gate 
Park. 

On January 6th the grounds of the public squares, twenty in number, and 
comprising in all 180 acres improved or unimproved, were placed under the juris- 
diction of this department. After a tour of inspection around the different 
squares they were found to be in a very poor and neglected condition; the trees 
looked starved, the grass patchy and rough, and nearly all of them covered with 
a coat of rough stable manure which had killed the finer grasses almost entirely. 

After looking carefully into the condition of each of the squares, orders were 
issued first, for a general cleaning up of all litter and other objectionable ma- 
terial; next for the cutting out of all dead and dying trees and shrubs, and then 
the appointment of experienced gardeners as foremen for each of the principal 
squares, the selection being from men who understood the work and took pride 
and interest in keeping the grounds under their charge in good order and condition. 

As it was found impossible to reconstruct all of the squares in one year, it 
was determined to take up the improvements of the different squares ons at a 
time and give them a thorough overhauling, the first one selected for the work 
being Union Square on account of its central location. Plans of many different 
styles were submitted, the one selected being the one now carried out and finished. 
Work on the plan was commenced in the month of March by plowing the mac- 



62 SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 

adam walks, carting off the rock and replacing it with loam and manure, laying 
out and constructing new walks, planting trees and shrubs and sowing new 
lawns, putting the whole in first-class condition. 

The next square selected for Improvement was Alamo Square. This was im- 
proved by planting about 1,500 trees and shrubs and by sowing to grass about 
three acres, thereby giving it a much more finished appearance. 

After completing the work on Alamo Square, the improvement of Ports- 
mouth Square was begun and treated in a similar manner, it receiving a thorough 
overhauling by trenching up the ground, plowing the walks parallel to the street 
sidewalks, planting groups of smooth-leaved ornamental shrubs, besides regravel- 
ing all of the walks. 

The next square to be improved is Alta Plaza. This one will be treated in an 
entirely different manner, the plan adopted for the improvement being (on ac- 
count of the steep character of the ground facing Clay street) the terrace style, 
with steps leading to each terrace and a straight walk on top with formal shaped 
trees bordering the walks. Notwithstanding the fact that the expense for labor 
in maintaining the force of men at present employed in the square is less than 
half of the former expense, the grounds are noticeably improved and kept in 
much better condition. The grounds surrounding the different schools being also 
placed under this department, our attention has likewise been given to them. The 
only one we have changed or improved is the Denman School grounds. These 
have been improved by planting palms in front of the building, hauling and 
placing loam over the surface and sowing the ground to grass. 

Whereas formerly there were four men employed in taking care of the school 
grounds throughout the city, we now have one man, who, with the occasional 
help of the men employed in adjacent squares, manages to keep them in satis- 
factory condition. 

In September of this year the grounds surrounding the City and County Hos- 
pital was placed under the Park's jurisdiction; also necessitating the employ- 
ment of additional men, which, together with the squares and school grounds, 
causes a heavy drain on the Park Fund which heretofore was barely adequate in 
maintaining, improving and beautifying Golden Gate Park. 

Yours truly, 

A. B. SPRECKELS, 
President Board of Park Commissioners. 



OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



63 



DISBCR8KMENTS. 



Office expenses and salaries 

Construction of structures 

Construction of water works 

Construction of drainage 

Construction of roads and walks 

Construction of grounds 

Construction of forests, plantations and reclamations 

Construction of stock and implements 

Construction of nursery 

Construction of museum 

Construction of small works 

Maintenance of structures 

Maintenance of water works 

Maintenance of drains 

Maintenance of roads and walks 

Maintenance of grounds 

Maintenance of forests, plantations ar.d reclamations 

Maintenance of conservatory 

Maintenance of stock and implements 

Maintenance of police 

Maintenance of nursery 

Maintenance of stables 

Maintenance of museum 

Sundries 

Electric light 

Labor in maintenance of parks and squares, averaging per month . 



YBAR ENDING 

Due. 31, 1900. 



?9,200 

17.7CO 

2,400 

1,300 

7,000 

19,000 

19,500 

700 

900 

100 

9,000 

8,000 

10,000 

250 

10,500 

42,000 

4,300 

4,400 

7,700 

550 

7,500 

9,000 

7,200 

2,250 

1,750 

1,600 



YEAR ENDING 

JUNE 30, 



$6,600 
7,433 

10,520 
563 

18,098 

16,392 

35,210 
1,797 
1,053 
2,589 

13,456 
8,779 

10,055 
403 

12,196 

58,721 

508 

6,444 

6,732 

14,857 
6,548 

10,290 
8,758 
2,107 
1,912 
3,500 



64 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



YEAR ENDING 
DKC. 31,1900. 



YEAR ENDING 

JUNK 30, 

1899. 



COB! of water used in Golden Gate Park, 320 acres under irrigation, 
averages per month 

Cost of water used in the parks and square?, 47 acres under irriga- 
tion, is per month 

School grounds, one man per month 

School grounds, four men per month 



$850 



SCO 
62 



OF SHERIFF. 



REPORTAGE SHERIFF. 



San Francisco, January 1, 1901. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of an Francisco 

Dear Sir: In accordance with your request I herewith submit to you a state- 
ment of the expenditures of the Sheriff's Department for the year 1900, and the 
average annual expenditures of the same for the preceding six years. 

In explaining the large saving effected I wish to state that the saving in the 
Salary Roll is directly due to the Charter, and that we are well able to handle 
the work of the office under the new conditions with the force as at present con- 
stituted. 

The saving in the cost of maintenance and stationery is partly due to the 
Charter and partly to management. Under the Charter the money seems to go 
further and work is done better, and by proper management we have stopped 
wasteful extravagance of material and supplies. 

But the saving: effected in the cost of subsistence of prisoners should not be 
credited to the Charter, as the conditions that prevailed in the Commissary De- 
partment under the Consolidation Act could prevail equally as well now. In 
order to pull that department out of the groove in which it had run for years, 
it was necessary to instill business methods into It, and to constantly keep watch- 
ing every detail of its operation. I was thereby enabled to stop the practice of 
contractors charging "extra rations" for guards, trusties and United States 
prisoners, which was entirely uncalled for and illegal. That and other radical 
changes kave enabled me, without stinting anybody, to reduce the expenditures 
of that department last year by 15,901 20. 

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL,. 


Average annual salary roll from 1893 to 1899 


$100,440 15 




Salary roll for 1900 


84,425 00 








916,015 15 


Average annual cost of prisoners' subsistence from 
1893 to 1899 


$46 305 95 




Cost of prisoners' subsistence for 1900 


30,404 75 










Average annual cost of maintenance of jails from 
1893 to 1899 


$10,147 56 




Cost of maintenance of jails for 1900 


7,405 89 


2,741 66 


Average annual cost of stationery from 1893 to 1S99.. 
Cost of stationery for 1900 . 


$1,450 00 
1,258 14 








191 86 


Saving effected in 1900 over the expenditures 






of the previous six years 










$34,849 86 



Respectfully submitted. 

JOHN LACKMANN, Sheriff. 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



San Francisco, December 27, 1900. 

To the Honorable James D. Phelan, Mayor 

Of the Qity and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: Replying to your request of the 10th inst., I beg leave to submit the 
following report of the transactions of this office for the current year ending De- 
cember 31, 1900. I also beg to remind you that the Charter has merged the office 
of License Collector with that of the Tax Collector, thereby causing the expense 
column to appear a little larger some months than formerly, although the year's 
expense column is less in the aggregate; the receipts are in excess of former 
years, notwithstanding the license on merchants, etc., has been abolished. Very 
respectfully, 

JOSEPH H. SCOTT, Tax Collector. 



COLLECTION AND EXPENSE OF COLLECTION. 



TA.X DEPARTMENT. 



f 


if 

o | 


fc 





> 
B*B 

it- 


it 

II 


|l 

's, 




ii 




: o 

: o_ 


: O 
: * 


If 


1893-4 


$342,644,179 00 


1.60 6-10 


6,653,353 28 


381.916 28 


$61,406 74 


1894-5 


325,108,898 CO 


1.49 3-10 


5.091,942 70 


63,681 37 


62,212 60 


1895-6 


327,805,147 00 


2.25 


6,944,897 30 


69,855 15 


62.068 43 


1896-7 


422.069.716 00 


1 39 82-100 


5,352,036 74 


203.213 85 


58,604 81 


1897-8 


347,954,920 00 


1.69 54-100 


5.482,558 67 


32,840 68 


60,158 98 


1898-9 


352,344,061 00 


1.806 


5,862,893 77 


81,101 53 


65.234 54 


1899-00 
1900-1 


405.111,615 00 
410 155 304 00 


1.63 
1.625 


5.727,676 35 


427,419 87 


29,844 77* 


Calendar 
Year 1900 






6,099,458 76 



















'Six months preceding January 8, 1900. 



OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



67 



LICENSE DEPARTMENT. 



YEAR. 


i! 

it 


r! 

Is. 

1? 


1893 l 


$538 249 90 


$33,033 14 


1894 5 


519,678 75 


32,936 91 


1S95-6 . 


529,669 60 


38,055 17 


18967 .. 


529,291 15 


38,167 97 


1897-8 


535,087 75 


39,024 63 


1898 9 


504 55fi 25 


41 475 27 


1899 00 


481 202 90 


22 156 69* 


Calendar Year 1900 


441,352 00 











Six months preceding January 8, 1900. 



68 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 



RECAPITULATION. 



1893-4. 



Tax 

License. 



86,653,353 28 SCI. 406 74 

538,249 90 33,933 14 



Combined 



1894-95. 



Tax 

License. 



$7,191,603 18 



85,091,942 70 
519,678 75 



Combined 5,611.621 45 

1895-96. 
Tax 

License... 



$6,944,897 30 



529,669 60 



Combined. 



7,474,566 90 



1896-97. 



Tax 5,352.036 74 

529,291 15 



License. 



Combined. 



85,881,327 89 



1897-98. 
Tax... 85,482,558 67 



S94.439 88 



362,212 66 
32,936 91 

95,149 57 



$62,068 43 
38,055 17 



8100,123 60 



S58.604 81 
38.167 97 



96,772 78 



License. 



Combined. 



Tax 

License. 



535,087 75 



$6,017,646 42 



360.158 98 
39,024 63 



$99,183 61 



-55,862,893 77 
504.556 25 



Combined 6,367.450 <# 



$65,234 54 
41.475 27 



$106,709 81 



OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



69 



CALENDAR YEAR 1900. 



. 


Collections 


Expense 




$6 099,458 76 






441 352 00 




Combined 


$6 540 810 76 


<*66 873 38 









Attention is respectfully invited to the cost of running the License and Tax 
Office for the six months preceding January 8, 1900, amounting to in the aggregate 
in the sum of $52,001 46, and the cost of my administration for twelve months, 
amounting to $66,873 38. 



70 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF TREASURER. 



REPORT OF TREASURER. 



San Francisco, January 6, 1901. 

To the Honorable James 1). Phelan, Mayor 

Of the City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Sir: In conformity with request in your favor of December 10. 1900, I 
have the honor to submit the enclosed report of the various expenses of my office 
for the year 1900, together with a statement of the average for the calendar years 
1897-98-99 for like items of expense under the Consolidation Act, for comparison. 
Trusting that this statement will give you the desired information, I remain, your* 
very truly, S. H. BROOKS, Treasurer. 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF AVERAGE EXPENSES OF YEARS 1897, 1898, 1899 
AND THE EXPENSES OF 1900. 



TEARS. 


2 


Stationery and 
book account. . 


Advertising, etc.. 


Rubber stamps . . 


Average expenses for years 1897, 1898, 
1399 


$14 960 33 


$873 94 


$973 25 


$23 77 


Fxpenses for ver 1900 


14 073 75 


438 70 


120 00 


14 00 












Saving for year 1900 


$886 58 


$435 24 


853 25 


$9 77 













Total saving for year 1900 $2,184 84 



MR. A B. MAGUIRE, 




Mr. A. B. Maguire, who was elected a member of the Board of Supervisors at 
the election held on November 7, 1899, took his seat with the members of the 
Board on their induction in office and became a very active member, taking great 
interest in the affairs of the municipality. 

On June 29, 1900, Mr. Maguire tendered his resignation for the purpose of 
accepting a Commissionership on the Board of Public Works, to which he was ap- 
pointed by his Honor Mayor James D. Phelan, to fill the vacancy caused by the 
resignation of Mr. Jeremiah Mahony, who was appointed and took office on Janu- 
ary 8, 1900, but owing to his private business could not devote the time he deemed 
should be given to such an important office. 




MUNICIPAL FLAG. 

The suggestion that San Francirco have a municipal flag was first made by 
Mayor Phelan in his message to the Supervisors on January 8, 1900. He said: 

"I recommend to the Board, finally, to adopt a flag for the City of San Fran- 
cisco. Other cities have their ensigns. Upon ours should be enscribed the senti- 
ment now upon our City's seal, 'Oro en paz, fierro en guerra' 'Gold in Peace, Iron 
in War.' It is singularly appropriatej by reason of the fact that California is the 
Golden State, and San Francisco has become tha point of debarkation for our 
troops, whose heroic work in the Pacific has been the principal event of these clos- 
ing years, and because our own California boys, mustered in in San Francisco, 
wsre the first to the front. Gold is emblematic of the abundance of nature and 
iron c-f the fortitude and courage of man; but, when the war ceases, let us hope 
that productive industries, of which iron is also emblematic, may permit us to read 
the inscription, GOLD AND IRON IN PEACE." 

The Mayor appointed Commissioner of Public Works Gc-o. H. Mendell, Park Com- 
missioner John A. Stanton, Supervisors Hotaling and Duboce and Douglas Tilden a 
Committee to invite designs for the flag, offering at the same time a prize of $50 to 
the successful competitor. In response to the Committee's invitation, over one 
hundred designs were submitted, and on April 14, 1900, the Committee decided to 
recommend to the Supervisors for approval and adoption the design of John M. 
Gamble. This design, which is given above, was subsequently approved by the 
Board, and is now the city's flag. 

The Phoenix, the crest of the city, taken from its seal, is used to symbolize the 
mur iclpality. It is shown arising from the ashes of the old Consolidation Act 
to renewed power under the New Charter, and may be taken as an emblem of the 
era of prosperity in store for the city under improved conditions. This was the 
designer's idea. 

Two colors, black and gold, are used in the design. The former is supposed to 
be typical of iron, the latter of gold. The use of these colors harmonizes with th* 
motto, "Gold in Peace, Iron in War," which is tha inscription beneath the design. 



OBITUARY RESOLUTIONS. 



Coroner and ex-Supervisor Dr. Richard Beverly Cole Died Janu- 
ary 15th, 1901. 

Supervisor John E. A. Helms Died June 26th, 1900. 
Supervisor Colonel Victor D. Duboce Died August 15th, 1900. 



DR. RICHARD BEVERLY COLE. 



At the meeting of the Board of Supervisors held on January 21st, 1901, Super- 
Tisor Joseph S. Tobin presented the following resolutions of respect to the memory 
of Dr. Richard Beverly Cole, which was on his motion unanimously adopted, 
to-wit: 



RESOLUTION NO. 1206. 

Whereas, This Board has learned with deep regret and sorrow of the sudden 
death of Dr. Richard Beverly Cole, a former member of the Board of Supervisors 
and of the local and State Boards of Health; a prominent member of the medical 
fraternity of this City and County, and our late Coroner, whose many noble deeds 
and kindly actions are closely interwoven with the history of the municipality. 
The earnest efforts which he made, while Chairman of the Committee on Hospital 
of the Board of Supervisors, during the smallpox epidemic in 1868, to prevent the 
spreading of that dread disease, having neglected his private practice to attend 
and minister to those afflicted, was an instance of his noble and self-sacrificing 
character. The deceased was also a member of the Committee on Outside Lands 
of the Board of Supervisors during the years 1867-1868, performing such judicious 
and meritorious services in the matter of the settlement of land titles that he 
earned the gratitude of the community; therefore, 

Resolved, That by the death of Dr. Richard Beverly Cole this City has sus- 
tained a great and grievous loss, and this Board of Supervisors hereby expresses 
its heartfelt sympathy and condolence to his wife and other members of his family 
in their bereavement. 

Further Resolved, That this resolution be entered in the Journal as a tribute 
to the memory of Dr. Richard Beverly Cole and as a record of the services per- 
formed by one whose heart and soul were with his fellow-citizens for the welfare 
of the community. 

JNO. A. RUSSELL, Clerk. 




DR. RICHARD BEVERLY COLE. 



JOHN E. A. HELMS. 



At a special meeting of the Board of Supervisors held on July 26th, 1900, 
Supervisor Reed announced the death of Supervisor John E. A. Helms, and in 
feeling terms spoke of the sudden death of Supervisor Helms, while returning 
from a trip to Lake Tahoe with the other members of the Board, made for the 
purpose of investigation of a water supply for San Francisco from Lake Tahoe, 
and he thereupon presented the following Resolution, which was adopted 
unanimously, viz: 

RESOLUTION NO. 694. 

Whereas, It has pleased Almighty God to remove by death from the scene of 
his kindly ministrations our honored and respected friend and fellow-member, 
John E. A. Helms, who had endeared himself to the citizens of San Francisco by 
his conscientiousness and his uprightness as a public official and by his earnest 
efforts to advance the welfare of our community, and who likewise had endeared 
himself to his associates on this Board by his manly bearing and his noble quali- 
ties; therefore, be it 

Resolved, By the Board of Supervisors in special session convened, That in the 
death of their baloved associate, John E. A. Helms, the City of San Francisco 
has sustained the loss of a faithful, competent and trustworthy public servant, 
whose labors and actions were ever directed toward that course which was just 
and right. 

Resolved, That this Board and each individual member thereof does hereby 
extend to his wife the utmost sympathy and condolence in this her great bereave- 
ment. 

Resolved, That this Board attend the funeral in a body, and that these Reso- 
lutions be entered in the Journal and an engrossed copy thereof be transmitted 
to his bereaved wife. 

JNO. A. RUSSELL, Clerk. 




JOHN E. A. HELMS. 



COLONEL VICTOR D. DUBOCE. 



At a special meeting of the Board held on August 15th, 1900, pursuant to the 
call of his Honor, Acting Mayor Tobin, for the purpose of taking appropriate ac- 
tion in regard to the death of Colonel Victor D. Duboce, a member of the Board 
of Supervisors, Supervisor Sanderson in feeling terms addressed the Board, re- 
ferring to the high character, fervent loyalty, amiable disposition and faithfulness 
of the deceased. He then read and presented the following Resolution of respect 
to the memory of Colonel Victor D. Duboce: 



RESOLUTION NO. 750. 

Whereas, Our late friend and associate, Colonel Victor D. Duboce, has been 
summoned from the activities of life and the field of civic and patriotic duty, the 
immediate result of his loyalty and service to his flag and to his country; be it 

Resolved, That by the death of Colonel Duboce this Board has been deprived 
of an intelligent and public-spirited member, one who had at heart the welfare 
of his country, his State and the City of San Francisco. 

Resolved, That in the opinion of this Board the example of our late esteemed 
fellow-member, in responding in common with his fellows of the First California 
Volunteers to the Nation's call for defenders in the late war with Spain, at great 
personal sacrifice, demands our highest respect and admiration. We can have no 
fear of the safey and perpetuity of our institutions when California and its sister 
States breed men of such heroic mold. 

Resolved, That we extend to the widow of our late member our respectful 
sympathy and that these Resolutions be entered upon the Journal and a copy of 
the same sent to Mrs. Duboce. 

JNO. A. RUSSELL,, Clerk. 




COLONEL VICTOR D. DUBOCE. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
1900-1901J 



Mayor and Ex-Officio Prssident HON, JAMES D. PHELAN. 



MEMBERS. 

JAMES P. BOOTH Press Club, 128 Ellis street 

CHARLES BOXTON 231 Post street 

HENRY U. BRANDENSTEIN 530 California street 

*SAMUEL BRAUNHART 762A Harrison street 

A. COMTE, JR 534% California street 

JOHN CONNOR 246% Oak street 

PETER J. CURTIS 117 Front street 

A. A. D'ANCONA 1022 Sutter street 

L. J. DWYER 40 Nsw Montgomery street 

M. J. FONTANA., 825 Francisco street 

RICHARD M. HOTALING 429 Jackson street 

THOS. JENNINGS 213 Front street 

WILLIAM N. MCCARTHY Parrott Building 

CHARLES WESLEY REED Rooms 20-21, Mills Building, 7th Floor 

GEORGE R. SANDERSON 238 Montgomery street 

fHENRY J. STAFFORD 97-98 Flood Building 

JOSEPH S. TOBIN Hibernia Bank Building 

JHORACE WILSON... 421 California street 



'Appointed June 27, 1900, vice A. B. Maguire, resigned. 
tAppointed November 1, 1900, vice John E. A. Helms, deceased. 
^Appointed November 1, 1900, vice Victor D. Duboce, deceased. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

(As reconstructed October 22, 1900.) 

Judiciary BRANDENSTEIN, COMTE, TOBIN 

Financs JENNINGS, HOTALING, TOBIN 

Streets, Sewers and Parks CURTIS, CONNOR, DWYER 

Wharves and Water Front WILSON, FONTANA, MCCARTHY 

Public Buildings BRAUNHART, SANDERSON, BOOTH 

Water Rates CONNOR, COMTE, JENNINGS 

Police TOBIN, STAFFORD, REED 

Fire DWYER, CURTIS, WILSON 

License and Orders COMTE, McCARTHY, BOOTH 

Hospital and Health D' ANCONA, BRAUNHART, BOXTON 

Printing and Salaries BOOTH, JENNINGS, CONNOR 

Artificial Lights HOTALING, MCCARTHY, DWYER 

Outside Lands STAFFORD, BOXTON, SANDERSON 

Equalization of Assessments McCARTHY, REED, CURTIS 

Civil Service SANDERSON, BRANDENSTEIN, FONTANA 

Charities and Correction FONTANA, WILSON, STAFFORD 

Education BOXTON, BRANDENSTEIN, D' ANCONA 

Public Utilities 

..REED, HOTALING, McCARTHY, CONNOR, COMTE, JENNINGS, DWYER 
Charter Amendments BRANDENSTEIN, TOBIN, McCARTHY 

OFFICERS. 

JNO. A. RUSSELL Clerk 

JOHN H. RYAN, 
P. H. McKENNA, 
JOHN E. BEHAN, 



...Assistant Clerks 



T. B. McGINNIS, 
JOHN S. BANNERMAN, 
JAMES E. DONAHUE, 
JOHN A. LENAHAN, 

R. W. ANDERSON Ssrgeant-at-Arms 

CYRIL WILLIAMS . Expert Finance Committee 



RULES OF PROCEEDINGS. 



1. In the absence of the President, the Clerk, on the appearance of ten mem- 
bers, shall call the Board to order, when a President pro tern, shall be appointed 
by the Board for that meeting, or until the appearance of the President. 

2. Whenever it shall be moved and carried that the Board go into Committee 
of the Whole, the President shall leave the chair and the members shall appoint 
a chairman of the Committee of the Whole, who shall report the proceedings of 
said Committee. 

3. The rules of the Board shall be observed in the Committee of the Whole, 
except the rules regulating a call for ayes and nays and limiting the time of 
speaking. 

4. A motion, in Committee of the Whole, to rise and report the question, 
shall be decided without debate. 

5. The Clerk shall have clips, upon which shall be kept all Bills, Ordinances, 
Resolutions and Reports to be acted upon by the Board, except those not reported 
upon by a Committee. 

6. A Resolution or a Bill shall not be submitted to the Board for action until 
it shall have been referred to and acted upon by a Committee of the Board. 

7. The Standing Committees of the Board, each of which shall consist of 
three members, except the Committee on Public Utilities, which shall consist of 
seven members, shall be as follows: 

Judiciary; Finance; Streets, Sewers and Parks; Wharves and Water Front; 
Public Buildings; Water Rates; Police; Fire; License and Orders; Hospital and 
Health; Printing and Salaries; Artificial Lights; Outside Lands; Equalization of 
Assessments; Civil Service; Charities and Correction; Education; Public Utilities; 
Charter Amendments. 

Said Committees shall consider and report upon such subjects as may be re- 
ferred to them by the Chair or the Board. 

8. The Order of Business, which shall not be departed from, except by the 
consent of ten members, shall be as follows: 

1st. Calling the Roll. 

2d. Reading the Journal. 

3d. Roll Call for Petitions from Members. 

4th. Presentation of Petitions filed with the Board. 

5th. Communications and Reports from City and County Officers. 

6th. Reports of Committees, except Finance Committee. 

7th. Presentation of Proposals. 

8th. Unfinished Business. 

9th. Presentation of Bills and Accounts. 
10th. Report of Finance Committee. 

llth. Bills, Ordinances, Motions or Resolutions (New Business). 
12th. Roll Call for introduction of Resolutions, Bills and Ordinances not 
considered or reported on by a Committee. 



6 RULES OF PROCEEDINGS. 

9. No person other than a member or an ex-Mayor shall be allowed to ad- 
dress the Board on any matter that may be before it, without the consent of a 
majority of the members present, nor to speak to or in any way interfere with a 
member while in his seat or on the floor of the Chamber. 

10. If any question under debate contains several points, any member may 
have the points segregated and acted upon separately. 

11. When any question has been put and decided, any member who voted with 
the prevailing side, may move its reconsideration, but no motion for the recon- 
sideration of any question shall be made after the Bill, Ordinance or Resolution 
voted on shall have gone out of the possession of the Board. A question shall be 
reconsidered only at the meeting at which the vote thereon was taken, or at the 
next succeeding meeting; provided, notice of intention to reconsider shall have 
been given at the meeting at which said vote was taken; provided, further, that 
when a Bill is put upon its final passage and fails to pass, a motion to recon- 
sider shall be voted on only at the meeting next occurring after the expiration of 
twenty-four hours after the adjournment of the meeting at which said question 
was voted on. Only such questions are subject to reconsideration which result 
in the defeat or passage of a Bill, Ordinance or Resolution or Amendment thereto, 
and no such question shall be reconsidered more than once; provided, however, that 
any member who voted with the prevailing side may upon notice of intention to 
reconsider given by any other member voting with that side move the recon- 
sideration of the question. 

12. A motion to refer or lay on the table until decided shall preclude all 
amendments to the main question. A motion to lay on the table or to postpone 
indefinitely shall require a majority vote of all the members of the Board. 

13. It shall be the duty of the Clerk to issue such certificates as may be 
required by Ordinances or Resolutions, and transmit copies of said Ordinances or 
Resolutions to the various departments affected thereby. 

14. All accounts and bills presented shall be referred to the appropriate Com- 
mittee and acted upon by said Committee and the Finance Committee before ac- 
tion is taken by the Board. 

15. The President shall preserve order and decorum, and shall decide ques- 
tions of order, subject to an appeal to the Board. 

16. A member, before speaking, shall rise from his seat and address the 
President. No motion shall be in order if made while the mover is seated or out 
of his place. 

17. When several members rise at the same time, the President shall desig- 
nate the member entitled to the floor. 

18. No member shall speak to the same question oftener than once until all 
'other members desiring to speak shall have spoken, nor oftener than, twice with- 
out the consent of the Board, nor for more than five minutes without the per- 
mission of the President; provided, however, the author of the Bill, Motion, 
Ordinance or Resolution shall have the right to close the debate thereon. 

19. A motion shall not be put or debated until seconded. When seconded it 
shall be stated by the Chairman before debate and shall be reduced to writing 
upon the request of the President or any member. 

20. After a motion has been stated by the President, it shall be deemed to 
be in the possession of the Board, but it may be withdrawn by the mover thereof, 
with the assent of the second, before it is acted upon. 



RULES OF PROCEEDINGS. 7 

21. Upon a call of the Board the names of the members shall be called over 
by the Clerk and the absentees noted. Those for whom no excuses or insufficient 
excuses are made may, by order of those present, be sent for and be brought to 
the chambers of the Board by the Sergeant-at-Arms, or by special messengers ap- 
pointed for the purpose. Proceedings under the call may be dispensed with by 
the vote of a majority of the members present. 

22. When a question is under debate, no motion shall be entertained except: 

1st. To adjourn. 

2d. Call of the Board. 

3d. To lay on the table. 

4th. The previous question. 

5th. To postpone to 'a day certain. 

6th. To commit or amend. 

7th. To postpone indefinitely. 

which several motions shall have precedence in the order in which they are 
arranged. 

23. A motion to adjourn shall be decided without debate. 

24. The previous question until decided, shall preclude all amendments to and 
debate on the main question, and be put in this form: "Shall the main question 
be now put?" It shall be carried by a majority vote of all the members. 

25. Every member present when a question is put shall vote for or against it, 
unless the Board shall excuse him from voting, or unless he is interested in the 
question. But no member shall be permitted to vote upon a division unless present 
when his name is called in the regular order. 

26. A member called to order for unparliamentary conduct or language shall 
immediately take his seat, and the Board, if appealed to, shall decide on the case, 
but without debate. If there be no appeal, the decision of the Chair shall be 
final. The question upon such appeal shall be: "Shall the decision of the Chair 
stand as the decision of the Board?" 

27. After the Board has acted the names of those who voted for and those who 
voted against the question shall be entered upon the Journal, not only in cases 
required by law, but when any member may require it; and on all Bills, Ordi- 
nances and Resolutions on final passage the ayes and nays shall be called by tha 
Clerk and recorded. 

28. All appointments of officers and employees shall be made by a majority of 
all the members of the Board. 

29. No member shall leave the Board during its session without permission 
from the President. 

30. All Committees shall be appointed by the Board, unless otherwise ordered 
by the Board. Committees shall report on any subject referred to them by the 
Board a statement of facts and also their recommendation thereon, in writing; 
and no report shall be received unless it be signed by a majority of the Com- 
mittee. Whenever a Committee recommends that a contract be awarded to any 
one other than the lowest bidder thereon, said Committee shall state specifically 
in its report its reasons for such recommendation. Unless otherwise ordered a 
Committee shall report upon all subjects referred to it within thirty days there- 
after. 

31. Every remonstrance or other written application, intended to be presented 
to the Board, must be delivered to the Clerk, not later than 12 o'clock noon, on 
the day on which the Supervisors convene; only the endorsements of such re- 



S RULES OF PROCEEDINGS. 

monstranca of application shall be read by the Clerk; provided, however, that 
upon the request of the President or of any member, its contents shall be read in 
full. 

32. Upon adjournment the members of the Board shall not leave their places 
until tha President leaves the chair. 

33. Ten members shall constitute a quorum to transact business, and no Bill, 
Ordinance, Resolution or amendment thereto shall pass without the concurrence 
of at least that number of membsrs; but a smaller number may adjourn from day 
to day. 

34. Except when otherwise provided by these Rules, the Charter or Law, a 
majority vote of the members present shall be necessary for the adoption of any 
motion. 

35. On any questions of points of order not embraced in these Rules, the 
Board shall be governed by the Rules contain2d in Gushing' s Manual. 

36. It shall require a two-thirds vote of all the members of the Board to 
amend, suspend or repeal any of these Rules. 

37. In calling the roll th2 Clerk shall call only the surnames of the members, 
prefixing the word Supervisors to the surname of the Supervisor first called. 

38. No smoking shall be permitted in the chambers of the Supervisors during 
the sessions of the Board. 

[The forsgoing Rules were approved and adopted October 22, 1900. Resolu- 
tion No. 975.] 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 



On January 8th, 1900, the gentlemen who were elected to the office of Super- 
visor at the election held on November 7th, 1899, were introduced by the retiring 
members, presented their credentials and took their seats; thereupon the Board 
was called to order, and his Honor Mayor James D. Phelan, who was re-elected, 
presented and read his Third Inaugural Message, a copy of which is as follows: 

THIRD INAUGURAL, MESSAGE. 

GENTLEMEN OF THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: 

The inauguration of the new government under the Charter is the most note- 
worthy event in the history of San Francisco. The work before us is fraught 
with so much importance for our city's permanent welfare that you must realize 
not only the responsibilities which rest upon you, but also the signal honor you 
enjoy by your participation in shaping the destinies of San Francisco, at a 
critical period, when new duties and powers are to be defined, precedents estab- 
lished and great public improvements inaugurated. In fine, the old order of things 
is to be superseded by a progressive policy which will result in the creation of a 
new San Francisco. 

We have, at last, Home Rule. The Constitutional Amendments recently in- 
terpreted by the Supreme Court deprive the Governor and the Legislature of the 
right to interfere in our City affairs. We have no County Officers now, as once 
we had under the ruling of the Supreme Court in the case of Kahn vs. Sutro 
we have only City officers. In some respects, the City is the agent of the State, 
and we will serve the State, but through officers of our own choosing, whose 
tenure and whose compensation shall be fixed by us. San Francisco has been 
emancipated by the New Charter, and we have now all the responsibilities of free 
men, and our success or failure will depend upon our own efforts. 

THE EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

The Board of Supervisors has become purely a legislative body. The Mayor 
has become the Executive and Administrator and is responsible for the execution 
of the laws and for the wise and economical expenditure of public money through 
various boards and commissions. The Commissioners are responsible to him, and 
he is responsible to the people. Therefore, there should be loyal co-operation 
between the two branches of the government and between the Commissioners and 
the Mayor. The Commissioners have to express in their public actions the policy 
for which the Mayor stands, as enunciated particularly in the platform of the 
party on which he was elected. With this complete understanding, the Commis- 
sioners should be allowed a wide discretion in putting policies into force and 
effect, and the Mayor should not interfere unless there be an abandonment 
on the part of the Commissioners of such policy, or if they suffer flagrant 
abuses to creep into the administration. The Mayor comes from the people and 



10 BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 

must speak for them, and his office will be judged not alone by the personnel of 
his appointees, but by the results of their work. Next to the fixing of responsi- 
bility and the establishment of Home Rule, the Civil Service provisions of the 
new organic law make the most radical departure from the old and condemned 
methods, and these provisions should be strictly enforced. 

THE LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

The most important functions of the Board of Supervisors will be the fixing 
of the tax rate and the apportionment of funds, which, when once apportioned, 
are inviolable; the enactment of orders imposing licenses for police and revenue 
purposes, the equalization of assessments, the fixing of rates for water and arti- 
ficial light, and the granting of franchises and privileges. 

In the appropriation of money, you are closely associated with every depart- 
ment of the government. In the great department of public works, your co- 
operation is particularly required, because, under the Charter (sec. 9, ch. 1, art. 
VI), the Board of Public Works shall have charge, superintendence and control 
of all public streets, sewers and public buildings, and the construction, repair 
and cleaning thereof, under "such Ordinances as may from time to time be 
adopted by the Board of Supervisors." 

I have, therefore, by your authority, named Committees which will correspond 
with every department of the government, and it is expected of the Committees, 
that they make a special study of the several departments, because, under the 
Charter, the appropriations once segregated, cannot be changed, nor can more 
than a one-twelfth part of the appropriation in any one month during the fiscal 
year, with a few necessary exceptions, be used by any department. 

CITY FINANCES. 

The pledge in the Democratic platform, on which the Mayor and a majority 
of the members of the Board were elected, limits you to the raising of a tax not 
exceeding one dollar on the one hundred dollars, based upon the present valua- 
tion of property assessed, and exclusive of the amounts necessary for the In- 
terest and Sinking Fund and maintenance of Parks and Squares. This is the 
Charter limit, also, with the exception that the pledge refers to the present roll 
instead of the assessment roll which may be submitted for the next fiscal year 
by the Assessor, which possibly will be as great in amount, although the validity 
of about $20,000,000 of personal property assessment is being disputed in the 
courts. The present assessment roll is $405,000,000. I would call your attention 
to a slight disconnection between the duties of the Board and the duties of the 
Assessor, which can be easily remedied by co-operation. The Assessor is re- 
quired to turn over his assessment roll to the Supervisors on the first Monday in 
July, and the Supervisors are required by the Charter to make the tax levy not 
later than the last Monday in June. The Supervisors must, however (sees. 3 and 
4, ch. 1, art. Ill), meet annually between the first Monday in May and the first 
Monday in June, for the purpose of preparing a budget, and transmit the same to 
the Mayor for his approval not later than the first Monday in June. Within ten 
days thereafter he must act, and consideration of his veto of the said budget, or 
any part thereof, if there be such veto, shall be finally considered by the Board 
by the last Monday of June. On the last Monday of June, the tax levy must be 
made for City purposes. Therefore, when the Board acts upon the tax levy 
finally, it will, first, have no official knowledge of the amount of assessment roll, 
and, secondly, it will not have met as a Board of Equalization, because, under 
the general law, the sessions of the Board of Equalization cannot be held earlier 
than the first Monday in July. I therefore recommend the Assessor to unoffi- 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 11 

cially inform the Board of the approximate total of the assessment roll as early 
as possible. Sitting as a Board of Equalization in July, the Supervisors may 
equalize the roll as presented by the Assessor, if they find it desirable, by deduct- 
ing from one assessment and adding to another; but if they increase the 
total roll, as they have the power to do, they simply increase the unapportioned 
revenues of the City, which will go into the surplus fund and which will possibly 
be only available at the end of the fiscal year. 

The Charter makers were forced into this position in their worthy desire to 
have the tax rate fixed before the beginning of the fiscal year, and in order, also, 
to permit its submission to the Mayor. 

There is one elemental thing in city finances which must be respected and that 
is, no department shall exceed its appropriation. The Superior Court has ruled 
that the Board of Health may appoint subordinates, deemed necessary by Its 
members, irrespective of the appropriation, and that they shall be paid out of 
the general fund. This is illogical and vicious, because otherwise the legislative 
body, which is "the power of the purse," would be ignored, and the treasury 
could possibly be depleted by one department, leading to financial chaos. 

The Board of Public Works, as well as the Board of Health, under the 
Charter, has the same right, granted in almost the identical language of the 
superseded statute, to employ as many persons as it may deem necessary, and 
fix their compensation, but that must certainly mean within the appropriation 
-allowed the department, and I would like to so construe it. 

The Election Commission is independent, however, of this restriction, because 
the Supreme Court has properly held that not even the legislative power of the 
city has the right to interfere with the holding of elections, on which the gov- 
ernment rests, which they might do by making an insufficient appropriation, and 
thus perpetuate incumbents indefinitely. 

I trust all public officers will co-operate cheerfully in conducting their depart- 
ments economically and within the amount allotted them by the Board of Super- 
visors. 

Outside of the tax rate the revenue of the City and County consists principally 
of license receipts. The Charter exempts from license tax every business con- 
ducted at a fixed place, except such as require permits from the Board of Police 
Commissioners. The exempted licenses aggregated $94,000 for the fiscal year end- 
ing June 30, 1899. This is a loss in the City's revenues which should be made 
up by the Board of Supervisors after a study of local conditions, by a revision of 
the license orders now in force. 

The financial condition of the city is satisfactory in this, that the net bonded 
indebtedness amounts to only $54,000, and that the value of the property actually 
ownsd by the City is $27,600,000. The rate of taxation for the last fiscal year for 
ity and County purposes was $1.029; for State purposes, .601 total $1.63, which 
was levied on an assessment of $375,000,000 (the pledge). This produced revenue 
by direct taxation for City purposes alone, $3,858,750. The amount of money 
derived from other sources than taxation, including license tax for local purposes, 
amounted to $1,438,578 total, $5,297,328. More taxes were, however, paid because 
the roll exceeded $375,000,000, as we have seen. We raised for State purposes, 
$2,253,750. The duty of the Supervisors will be, therefore, to provide a progres- 
sive, yet economical government, on a maximum expenditure as follows: Tax of 
$1 on $405,000,000, $4,050,000; revenue from other sources, $1,345,000; tax for parks 
and squares (maximum, seven cents), $283,500; interest and sinking funds, $25,000 
total, $5,703,500. This is the maximum revenue possible within the pledge, and 
Is, perhaps, more than sufficient. It yields $400,000 more than the revenue raised 
last year, and makes the rate $1.09, as against $1.029. 

It tvill be seen that there is a margin here for meeting increased interest and 
sinking fund accounts, made necessary, perhaps, by the new bonds. In the mean- 



12 BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 

time, the revenue can be used for the improvement of accepted streets, as Bush 
street, and other necessary purposes. It will devolve upon the Board to provide 
for the issuance of the bonds for Park Extension, the construction of new school- 
houses and the repair of old, the erection of a City and County Hospital, and the 
beginning of a new sewer system. 

PARK EXTENSION AND BOND ISSUE. 

In my message last January, I recommended the connection of the Park with 
the Presidio, and the extension of the so-called Park Panhandle to the junction 
of Van Ness avenue and Market street, and I desire to thank the outgoing Board 
of Supervisors for their friendly co-operation, and, indeed, for their uniform 
courtesy throughout the year. The bonds have now been voted for this purpose, 
and for the acquisition of two blocks in the Mission for a public square, the au- 
thorized amount for all park purposes being $4,550,000. These bonds are issued 
under the Park Improvement Act, and, as required by law, will run for twenty 
years, are payable in lawful money, and bear 3^ per cent interest One-twentieth 
of the amount necessary for the redemption of the bonds shall be raised every 
year, and will go into a sinking fund, and the Board must invite bids for the re- 
demption of the bonds, in no event paying therefor more than par. If, after 
proper advertisement, bonds are not offered for redemption, interest shall cease 
upon the highest numbered bonds to the extent of the amount on hand available 
for their purchase. The City and County Attorney has been authorized to begin 
condemnation proceedings, but desires complete abstracts for each piece of prop- 
erty before beginning any action. It will be the duty of the Board to provide 
such abstracts, either by collecting them from the property owners and running 
them down, or by contract. This work should be done immediately, in order that 
these lands may be acquired and improved for park purposes if possible within 
tha present calendar year. The two Mission blocks have been offered to the City 
for $300,000, and it will be the duty of the Board to either negotiate for their 
purchase or order condemnation proceedings, as no action has been taken with 
respect to this particular property. 

SCHOOLHOUSES, HOSPITAL AND SEWERS: BOND ISSUE. 

The bonds authorized for schools, $1,400,000, hospital, $475,000, and sewers, 
$4,600,000, are to be issued by authority of the General Municipal Improvement 
Act. They are forty-year bonds payable in gold coin, bear interest at the rate 
of 3 per cent, and are known as serials, that is to say, one-fortieth of the entire 
amount is raised every year for redemption, and in selling the bonds they are 
so numbered that one-fortieth is payable in one year, one-fortieth in two years, 
one-fortieth in three years, and so on. The bonds of later maturity will naturally 
sell for a higher premium. Ih the present condition of the money market, how- 
ever, it is not reasonable to expect a large premium, but it is important that 
the Constitutional Amendment submitted by the last Legislature to be voted upon 
next November should prevail, exempting all State, county and municipal bonds 
of California from taxation. Without interfering with the progress of these 
public undertakings, it may be possible to defer the actual issue of the bonds 
until after the November election, in which event they will, in all likelihood, be 
exempt from taxation, and hence our own people can afford to buy and hold 
them. If they are not exempted from taxation, they will certainly be sold and 
held outside of the State of California. In case the Amendment does not prevail, 
the Board should propose an amendment to the Charter exempting all municipal 
bonds of San Francisco from local taxation. The Charter now exempts bonds 
issued for the purpose of acquiring public utilities under that instrument. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 13 

It will be the duty of the Board of Public Works to construct buildings and 
sewers, and the duty of the Park Commissioners to lay out, improve and maintain 
the lands acquired for Park purposes. 

WATER AND LIGHT. 

It is the duty of the Supervisors in the month of February to fix water rates, 
and also the rate for gas and electric lighting to be paid by not only private 
consumers, but by the city for the illumination of streets and public buildings. 
The decisions of the Courts in recent years have established the doctrine: That 
the companies are entitled to a "fair return upon the reasonable value of their 
property at the time it is being used for the public." They should, therefore, 
receive a fair rate of interest, their operating expenses and their taxes. It is in- 
cumbent upon the Board to institute, however, a searching investigation to ascer- 
tain the "reasonable value" of the properties of the companies in use at the 
present time, and to determine whether their operating expanses are extravagant. 
The Charter confers upon the Finance Committee extraordinary powers as an 
inquisitorial body. 

The pledge given by this Board to the people is to allow the Water Company 
five per cent on its real value, and, in the matter of the price of gas, a rate 
not exceeding fl.35 per thousand cubic feet. During the year, the principle of 
fixing the gas rate by the Board of Supervisors has been for the first time estab- 
lished in this city, when a reduction was made from $1.75 to $1.50 per thousand, 
for private consumption, and from $1.50 to $1.35 for public lighting. Competi- 
tive electric companies regulate, in most districts, the price of electricity. 

When in February you fix a maximum rate for gas and electricity, as there 
is more than one company ready to supply the several districts, I suggest that 
you take up the matter at once of the erection of ornamental and other poles, 
to be owned by the municipality. By this means, freer competition, and better 
terms can be secured, because it is unreasonable to expect the company to erect 
poles when the contract is for but one year. Bids should be invited by district. 

The office of gas inspector should be provided for by the Board of Public 
Works. Under a recent ordinance the citizens can have their meters tested by 
the payment of a small fee of $1, to be refunded in case the meter complained of 
is running more than 5 per cent fast. A diligent gas inspector can save the 
city many times his salary in the regulation of public lights in buildings and 
streets. 

ASSESSMENTS. 

In the month of July the Supervisors sit as a Board of Equalization, when 
they can raise or lower the assessment roll or any item thereof. The administra- 
tion of Dr. Washington Dodge of the Assessor's Office has been such that com- 
pels only words of commendation, and hence your duties in this respect will be 
light. However, there should be a full knowledge of the facts and perfect co- 
operation between this important public officer and the members of the Board. 

GEARY STREET FRANCHISE. 

Your term of office will expire January 6, 1902, and I regret that the Geary 
Street, Park and Ocean franchise does not expire until November 6, 1903, and, 
as no action can be taken on franchises under the Charter until within one year 
of their expiration, this Board unfortunately cannot dispose of that valuable 
property, which should belong to the city and be operated as a model railroad 
in the public interest. However, I desire by this reference to remind the public 
of their powers and duties in the premises. 



14 BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 

STREET RAILROAD AND TELEPHONE CHARGES. 

A movement for the reduction of fares has been agitated, and the only ap- 
parent obstacle in the way is the objections of some of the poorer railroads, 
namely, the Union Street, and the San Francisco and San Mateo; but I recom- 
mend to this Board a careful consideration of the subject. Other cities have low 
fares for workingmen and school children during certain hours of the day, and in 
building up a city it is more important to have low rates granted by railway 
companies or fixed by the Board of Supervisors than to impose upon them high 
licenses and franchise taxation. But if for any reason low fares cannot be se- 
cured, the public revenues can be increased by the application of that excellent 
rule adopted by the Assessor and approved by the Supreme Court in the case of 
San Jose Gas Company versus January. For, if the profits of the companies are 
great, and yield a higher rate of interest upon their actual investment than is 
reasonable, the stock and bonds of the company will sell for a higher price in 
the market, and the market price of the stock and bonds is the basis upon which 
the Assessor makes his valuation of the franchise. 

The same reasons apply to the telephone service, which should contribute 
more in license taxation to the city and concede to the people lower rates. There 
seems to be no authority under the Charter to fix telephone rates, and therefore 
it is the duty of the Board to see that the companies pay taxes in proportion to 
the value of their property. The whole spirit of our taxation policy is not to 
oppress industry, but to distribute the burdens of government equally. It is no- 
torious that the large corporations in the past have evaded their just contribution 
to the municipal revenues. 

DEPARTMENTS REFORMED. 

The change in the government is in the nature of a revolution. The admin- 
istration is charged with the duty by the people of driving out old abuses and 
establishing the government upon a business basis. 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

The Board of Public Works has disposed of and absorbed the Street and 
Engineers' Departments. It is required by the Charter to appoint an efficient 
engineer with the great purpose in view of providing, first, a water supply for 
San Francisco; secondly, a public lighting plant; and, afterward, other public 
utilities. Within one year from this day, "the Supervisors must procure through 
the City Engineer, plans and estimates of the actual cost of the original con- 
struction and completion by ttfe City and County of water works, gas works, 
electric light works, steam, water or electric power works, telephone lines, street 
railroads and such other utilities as the Supervisors or the people by petition to 
the Board may designate." 

The Supervisors must also procure and place on file plans and estimates of the 
cost of obtaining from all the several available sources a sufficient and permanent 
supply of water, as preliminary to incurring municipal indebtedness for its ac- 
quisition. After such plans and estimates are procured, the Supervisors, at as 
early a date as they deem best for the interests of the City, shall enter into 
negotiations for the permanent acquisition of such utilities as they may regard 
most important to be first acquired, and to submit the same to the people at a 
special election; but, before providing for original construction or condemnation 
of public utilities, the Supervisors must consider offers for the sale of existing 
utilities, in order that the electors shall have the benefit of acquiring the same, 
if they so prefer, as an alternative proposition. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 3& 

The Board of Public Works, having jurisdiction over boulevards, should lay 
out one along the City front and the Bay shore to the Cliff House, and estimate 
the cost of a better bridge across Channel street, connecting the Potrero, a section 
of the City which deserves special consideration, on account of its productive 
activities, with the City proper. Perhaps, ultimately, a tunnel under Channel 
street, as under the Chicago River, will facilitate traffic. 

When our harbor shall have been recovered from the State, the Board of 
Public Works will have the construction of docks and wharves; and the bay shore 
to the county line should be regarded hereafter from the- point of view of the 
extension of our harbor facilities, and the Federal Government should be inter- 
ested to make a breakwater at North Beach, whither the seawall will be ulti- 
mately extended. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

The Police Department will be reorganized and will be more accountable to 
the people than in the past. One of the reasons which gavs rise to the Charter 
movement was, as is well known, the perpetual tenure of office enjoyed by the 
Police Commissioners, and the appointing power possessed by the Governor. 

Chinatown, where irregular tribunals, highbinders' societies, prostitution and 
gambling, in violation of law, can only exist with the connivance of the police, 
has been a field of corruption, demoralizing to the department. It exercises as 
malign an influence over the police as did the quasi-public corporations over the 
Supervisors in the past; but, as the City found men to withstand the blandish- 
ments of the corporations, so must we find men who will meet these conditions. 

Public gambling is a great evil, leading to poverty, disgrace, defalcation and 
death, which the records of this department abundantly prove, and its practice 
should be discountenanced and suppressed. 

The police should detect crime and punish offenders for their salaries, and 
not for special rewards. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The Fire Department has reached a high degree of efficiency under Chief 
Sullivan, but it should not be suffered for one moment to become a political ma- 
chine in the interests of any faction, organization or party. When the men 
know that they will be protected so long as they perform their work, for which 
they are employed and paid by the City, they will be better pleased. No longer 
will it be necessary for them to take orders from anybody except in the line of 
their duty. Section 32 of article XVI of the new Charter requires the Board of 
Police and Fire Commissioners to remove any officer or employee who shall par- 
ticipate in partisan strife, or pay any assessment for political purposes; and 
these Boards expose themselves to removal if they refuse to enforce this section. 

The object of the Charter is to remove these two important departments of 
the city government from active participation in political movements, on account 
of the great danger of their being controlled in special interests. The men are 
left free to vote as they please,' and, in the spirit of the Charter, the taint of 
corrupt political bossism must be eliminated from the administration of the 
affairs of the Police and Fire Departments of San Francisco. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

The Board of Health under the new law consists of five members, the Presi- 
dent of the Board of Public Works and the Chief of Police, so there will be full 
co-operation between the three departments in the enforcement of sanitary laws 
and the creation of healthful conditions. 



16 BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 

The Board of Supervisors should purchase a site for a Pest House in the ex- 
treme southeasterly boundary of the county, and, at as early a date as possible, 
locate, on lands now owned by the City, the new City Hospital. 

THE PARK AND BOULEVARDS. 

A new interest has been awakened in the Park pleasure grounds, as a result 
of the recent election. The Park should receive generous support from the 
Supervisors. Lombard street, Bay street, Van Ness avenue, Buchanan, south 
from Oak street, Dolores street and Baker street to Buena Vista Park should be 
lined with trees as the beginning of a boulevard system. The trees should be 
furnished and planted by the Park Commission and they should be maintained 
by the Board of Public Works, as no dependence can be had upon private initia- 
tive; but the increased value of the property along the line of these improve- 
ments should b3 made to repay the City for this outlay, and the attention of the 
Assessor should be directed to this fact. 

The Lodge in the Golden Gate Park, which has cost about $70,000, should be 
thrown open to the public and maintained, perhaps in part, as a branch free 
library, to meet the needs of that growing section of the city. The Superin- 
tendent should be provided with a modest house, located in a less conspicuous 
place. 

The Park Commission and the Board of Public Works should co-operate to 
remove disfiguring signs on streets, hilltops and hillsides, and the United States 
Government should be requested, through proper channels, to open a driveway 
around that beautiful promontory, Fort Mason, the termination of Van Ness 
avenue, so that that attractive spot will be brought into our Park and boulevard 
system. 

Many reforms and improvements will suggest themselves to you from time 
to time, as you grow familiar with your duties; and I trust that at the expira- 
tion of our term of office all that we have planned for the new San Francisco 
shall have been accomplished. 

A CITY FLAG. 

I recommend to the Board, finally, to adopt a flag for the City of San Fran- 
cisco. Other cities have their ensigns. Upon ours should be inscribed the senti- 
ment now upon our City's seal Oro en paz fierro en guerra "Gold in Peace, 
Iron in War." It is singularly appropriate by reason of the fact that California 
is the Golden State and San Francisco has become the point of debarkation for 
our troops, whose heroic work in the Pacific has been the principal event of 
these closing years, and because our own California boys, mustered in in San 
Francisco, were the first to tha front. Gold is emblematic of the abundance of 
nature and iron of the fortitude and courage of man; but, when the war ceases, 
let us hope that productive industries, of which iron is also emblematic, may 
permit us to read the inscription, GOLD AND IRON IN PEACE. 

JAMES D. PHELAN, Mayor. 



WATER RATES. 



The Board of Supervisors, pursuant to the requirements of the Constitution of the State 
and of Article II, Chapter II, Section 1, of the Charter, and after having obtained state- 
ments from persons or corporations engaged in the business of supplying water during 
the year 1899, showing their receipts and expenditures, and after consideration and investi- 
gation fixed the rates to be collected for furnishing water during the year commencing July 
1, 1900, and ending June 30, 1901.J 

The following article of the Constitution of the State, adopted in 1879, and which went 
into effect on January 1, 1880, made it the duty of the Board of Supervisors, in the month of 
February of each year, to fix the rates of compensation to be collected by any person, com- 
pany or corporation engaged in the business of supplying water for the use of the city and 
county or its inhabitants: 

AKTICLE XIV. 

WATER AND WATER EIGHTS. 

SECTION 1. The use of all water now appropriated, or that may hereafter be appropri-. 
ated, for sale, rental or distribution, is hereby declared to be a public use and subject to the 
regulation and control of the State, in the manner to be prescribed by law; provided, that 
the rates or compensation to be collected by any person, company or corporation in this 
State for the use of water supplied to any city and county, or city or town, or the inhabitants 
thereof, shall be fixed annually by the Board of Supervisors, or city and county, or City or 
Town Council, or other governing body of such city and county, or city or town, by ordi- 
nance or otherwise, in the manner that other ordinances or legislative acts or resolutions 
are passed by such body, and shall continue in force for one year and no longer. Such ordi- 
nances or resolutions shall be passed in the month of February of each year, and take effect 
on the first day of July thereafter. Any board or body failing to pass the necessary ordi- 
nances or resolutions fixing water rates, where necessary, within such time, shall be subject 
to peremptory process to compel action at the suit of any party interested, and shall be 
liable to such further processes and penalties as the Legislature may prescribe. Any per- 
son, company or corporation collecting water rates in any city and county, or city or town 
in this State, otherwise than as so established, shall forfeit the franchises and waterworks of 
such person, company or corporation to the city and county, or city or town where the 
same are collected, for the public use. 

SEC. 2. The right to collect rates or compensation for the use of water supplied to any 
county, city and county or town, or the inhabitants thereof, is a franchise, and cannot be 
exercised except by authority of and in the manner prescribed by law. 

The following section of Article XI of the Constitution, as amended in 1885, also granted 
the right to persons and corporations to use the public streets for supplying water or illum- 
inating light to the inhabitants, on condition that the Legislature shall have the right to 
regulate the charges: 

ARTICLE XI. 

RIGHT OF WATER AND GAS COMPANIES TO USE PUBLIC STREETS. 

SECTION 19. In any city where there are no public works owned and controlled by the 
municipality, for supplying the same with water or artificial light, any individual, or any 
company duly incorporated for such purpose under and by authority of the laws of this 

2* 



18 WATER RATES. 

State, shall, under the direction of the Superintendent of Streets, or other officer in control 
thereof, and under such general regulations as the municipality may prescribe for damages 
and indemnity for damages, have the privilege of using the public streets and thoroughfares 
thereof, and of laying down pipes and conduits therein, and connections therewith, so far as 
may be necessary for introducing into and supplying such city and its inhabitants either 
with gas light or other illuminating light, or with fresh water for domestic and all other 
purposes, upon the condition that the municipal government shall have the right to regu- 
late the charges thereof. 

The Legislature of the State, at the session of 1881, passed the following Act, providing 
for carrying out the objects of Article XIV of the Constitution, by imposing upon the Board 
of Supervisors the duty of requiring all persons or corporations engaged in supplying water 
to file statements in the month of January of each year, showing the names, residence and 
the amount paid by each rate-payer during the year, the revenue derived from all sources 
and an itemized statement of expenditures made for supplying water during the same time: 

AN ACT TO ENABLE THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS, TOWN COUNCIL, BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 
OB OTHER LEGISLATIVE BODY OF ANY CITY AND COUNTY, CITY OR TOWN, TO OBTAIN DATA 
AND INFORMATION FROM ANY CORPORATION, COMPANY OR PERSON SUPPLYING WATER 
TO SUCH CITY AND COUNTY, CITY OR TOWN. REQUIRING SUCH BOARD, TOWN COUNCIL 
OR OTHER LEGISLATIVE BODY TO PERFORM THE DUTIES PRESCRIBED BY SECTION 1 OF 

ARTICLE XIV OF THE CONSTITUTION, AND PRESCRIBING PENALTIES FOR THE NON- 
PERFORMANCE OF SUCH DUTIES. 

Approved March 7, 1881. 

The People of the State of California, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact, as 
follows : 

[Municipal Corporations to Fix Water Bates.] 

SECTION 1. The Board of Supervisors, Town Council, Board of Aldermen or other legis- 
lative body of any city and county, city or town, are hereby authorized and empowered 
and it is made their official duty, to annually fix the rates that shall be charged and collected 
by any person, company, association or corporation for water furnished to any such city 
and county, or city or town, or the inhabitants thereof. Such rates shall be fixed at a regu- 
lar or special session of such Board or other legislative body, held during the month of 
February of each year, and shall take effect on the first day of July thereafter, and shall 
continue in full force and effect for the term of one year, and no longer. 

[Annual Statements to be Made by Water Companies, etc.] 

SEC. 2. The Board of Supervisors, Town Council, Board of Aldermen or other legisla- 
tive body of any city and county, city or town, are hereby authorized, and it is hereby made 
their duty, at least thirty days prior to the fifteenth day of January of each year, to require 
by ordinance or otherwise any corporation, company or person supplying water to such 
city and county, city or town, or to the inhabitants thereof, to furnish to such Board or 
other governing body, in the month of January in each year, a detailed statement, verified 
by the oath of the President and Secretary of such corporation or company, or of such per- 
son, as the case may be, showing the name of each water-rate payer, his or her place of 
residence, and the amount paid for water by each of such water-rate payers, during the 
year preceding the date of each statement, and also showing all revenues derived from all 
sources, and an itemized statement of expenditures made for supplying water during said 
time. 

[Additional Statements to be Made by Water Companies, etc.] 

SEC. 3. Accompanying the first statement made as prescribed in Section 2 of this Act, 
every such corporation, company or person, shall furnish a detailed statement, verified in 
like manner as the statement mentioned in Section 2& hereof, showing the amount of 
money actually expended annually since commencing business in the purchase, construc- 
tion and maintenance, respectively, of the property necessary to the carrying on of its 
business, and also the gross cash receipts annually, for the same period, from all sources. 



WATER RATES. t 19 

[Refusal by Water Companies to Make Statement a Misdemeanor.]; 

SEC. 4. Every corporation, company or person who shall refuse; or neglect to furnish 
the statements mentioned in sections two and three of this Act, or either of them, or who 
shall furnish any false statements in relation thereto, within thirty days after having been 
required or requested to furnish the same, as prescribed in sections one, two and three of 
this Act, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor. 

[Copies of Statements to be Made and Filed with County Recorder.] 

SEC. 5. Upon receiving the statements provided for in sections two and three of this 
Act, the Board of Supervisors, Town Council, Board of Aldermen, or other legislative body, 
shall cause a copy thereof to be made and filed in the office of the County Recorder'of such 
city and county, or of the county wherein such city or town is situated. 

[Water Rates to be Equal and Uniform Proviso.] 

SEC. 6. Rates for the furnishing of water shall be equal and uniform. There shall be 
no discriminations made between persons, or between persons and corporations, or as to the 
use of water for private and domestic, and public or municipal purposes; provided, that 
nothing herein shall be so construed as to allow any person, company, association or 
corporation to charge any person, corporation or association anything for water furnished 
them when, by any present law, such water is free. 

[Excess in Charging Rates Forfeits Franchise, etc.] 

SEC. 7. Any person, company, association or corporation, charging or attempting to 
c ollect, from the persons, corporations or municipalities' using water, any sum in excess of 
the rate fixed as hereinbefore designated, shall, upon the complaint of the said Board of 
Supervisors, Town Council, Board of Aldermen, or other legislative body thereof, or of any 
water-rate payer, and upon conviction, before any court of competent jurisdiction, shall 
forfeit the franchises and water works of such person, company, association or corporation, 
to the city and county, city or town, wherein the said water is furnished and used. 

[Penalty to Supervisors for Neglecting to Enforce Provisions of Act.J 

SEC, 8. Any Board of Supervisors or other legislative body of any city and county, city 
or town, which shall fail or refuse to perform any of the duties "prescribed by this Act, at 
the time and in the manner hereinbefore specified, shall be deemed guilty of malfeasance 
in office; and upon conviction thereof, at the suit of any interested party, in any court of 
competent jurisdiction, shall be removed from office. 

[Act in Effect.] 
SEC. 9.KThis Act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage. 

The following article of the Charter of the City and County of San Francisco, approved 
January 26, 1899, and which went into effect on January 8, 1900, empowered the Board of 
Supervisors to fix and determine by ordinance the rates or compensation to be collected 
by any person, company or corporation for the use of water, heat, light or power, and to 
prescribe the quality of the service : 

ARTICLE II. 
CHAPTER II. 

POWERS OF THK SDPERVISOR8. 

SECTION 1 Sub. 14. To fix and determine by ordinance in the month of. February of 
each year, to take effect on the first day of July thereafter, the rates of compensation to be 
collected by any person, company or corporation in the City and \ County, for the use of 
water, heat, light or power, supplied to the City and County or to the inhabitants thertof, 
and to prescribe the quality of the service. 



-20 WATER RATES. 

On December 11. 1899, the Board adopted a resolution calling for water statements to be 
filed, a copy of which resolution is as follows, to wit : 

RESOLUTION No. 3,774 (FOURTH SERIES). 5 

[Providing for Statements being Filed by Companies, Corporations or Persons Engaged in 
the Business of Supplying Pure, Fresh Water for Use of the Inhabitants of This City 
and County.] 

Kesolved, That the Spring Valley Water Works, a corporation, and every other cor- 
poration, company or porson, if any there be, supplying water to the City and County of 
San Francisco, or to the inhabitants thereof, be and hereby are required to furnish to the 
Board of Supervisors of the said city and county, in the month of January, in the year of 
our Lord one thousand nine hundred, a detailed statement, verified by the oath of 
the President and Secretary of such corporation or company, or of such person, as 
the case maybe, showing the name of each water-rate payer, his or her place of resi- 
dence, and the amount paid for water by each of such water-rate payers during the year 
preceding the date of such statement, and also showing all revenue derived by such 
corporation, company or person from all sources; and an itemized statement of expenditures 
made for supplying water during said time; and that such statement be accompanied by a 
further and detailed statement, verified by the President and Secretary of such corporation 
or company, or of such person, as the case may be, showing the amount of money actually 
expended annually since commencing business, in the purchase, construction and mainten- 
ance, respectively, of the property necessary to the carrying on of the business of such 
corporation, company or person, and also the gross cash receipts annually for the same 
period from all sources, ia accordance with the provisions of an Act of the Legislature, 
approved March 7, 1881 (Statutes 1881, page 54). 

Resolved, That the attention of every corporation, company or person engaged in 
supplying water is hereby called to the provisions of Section 4 of the Act of the Legislature, 
heretofore referred to, as the same will be strictly enforced, to wit: Section 4. Every cor- 
poration, company or person, who shall refuse or neglect to furnish the statements 
mentioned in Sections 2 and 3 of this Act, or either of them, or who shall furnish any false 
statement in relation thereto, within thirty days after having been required or requested to 
furnish the same, as prescribed in Sections 1, 2 and 3 of this Act, shall be deemed guilty of a 
misdemeanor. 

Resolved, That the Clerk of this Board is hereby directed to forthwith serve a certified 
copy of this resolution upon the President and Secretary, respectively, of the said corpora- 
tion, the Spring Valley Water Works, and every other corporation or company, and upon 
every person so supplying water to the City and County of San Francisco, or to the inhabi- 
tants thereof. 

In Board of Supervisors, San Francisco, December 11, 1899. 

Adopted by the following vote: 

Ayes Supervisors Aigeltinger, Attridge, Black, Byington, Collins, Deasy, Heyer, Hol- 
land, Kalben, Lackmann, Perrault, Phelps. 

JNO. A. RUSSELL, Clerk. 

On December 13, 1899, certified copies of the foregoing Resolution, with blank 
form of statements requiied under the Statute, were served upon the following 
persons and corporations, to wit: Th3 Spring Valley Water Works, the Visitacion 
Water Company and John Center, parties engaged in supplying water. 

The following are extracts from statements filed in response to such notice: 

JOHN CENTER (artesian well, Folsom street, near Sixteenth street) Receipts 
from water rates, $60; expenditures, $141.26. 

VISITACION WATER COMPANY (artesian, Bay View, South San Francisco) 
Receipts from water rates, $9,909.65; receipts from other sources, $179.95; total 
receipts for the year 1899, $10,089.60. Expenditures (cost of coal, labor and main- 
tenance), $9,666.84. Gross amount expended for purchase, maintenance from the 
year 1883, $262,466.45. 



WATER RATES. 21 

SPRING VALLEY WATER WORKS Receipts from water rates, $1,853.998.64; 
receipts from other sources, $49,413.21; total receipts for the year 1899, $1,903,- 
411.85. Expenditures Operating expenses, $444,864.59; for taxes, $196,011.36; inter- 
est, $579,481.81; dividends, $716,800.00; total expenditures for the year, $1,937,157.67; 
amount paid on account of new construction and permanent improvements, $708,- 
430.44. 

On January 8, 1900, on the organization of the Board of Supervisors the mem- 
bers of which were elected at the General Election held on November 7, 1899, His 
Honor Mayor Phelan, in his address, stated under the caption of "Water and 
Light": 

"It is the duty of the Supervisors, in the month of February, to fix water 
rates, and also the rate for gas and electric lignting, to be paid by not only private 
consumers, but by the City for the illumination of streets and public buildings. 
The decisions of the Courts in recant years have established the doctrine: That 
the companies are 'entitled to a 'fair return upon the reasonable value of their 
property at the time it is being used for the public.' They should, therefore, 
receive a fair rate of interest, their operating expenses and their taxes. It is 
incumbent upon the Board to institute, however, a searching investigation to ascer- 
tain the 'reasonable value' of the properties of the companies in use at the present 
time, and to determine whether their operating expenses are extravagant. The 
Charter confers upon the Finance Committee extraordinary powers as an inquisi- 
torial body. 

"The pledge given by this Board to the people is to allow the Water Company 
five per cent on its real value, and, In the matter of the price of gas, a rate not 
exceeding $1.35 per thousand cubic feet. During the year, the principle of fixing 
the gas rate by the Board of Supervisors has been for the first time established in 
this city, when a reduction was made from $1.75 to $1.50 per thousand, for private 
consumption, and from $1.50 to $1.35 for public lighting. Competitive electric 
companies regulate, in most districts, the price of electricity. 

"When in February you fix a maximum rate for gas and electricity, as there 
is more than one company ready to supply the several districts, I suggest that you 
take up the matter at once of the erection of ornamental and other poles, to be 
owned by the municipality. By this means, freer competition, and better terms 
can be secured, because it is unreasonable to expect the company to erect poles 
when the contract is for but one year. Bids should be invited by district. 

"The office of Gas Inspector should be provided for by the Board of Public 
Works. Under a recent Ordinance the citizens can have their meters tested by tha 
payment of a small fee of $1, to be refunded in case the meter complained of is 
running more than 5 per cent fast. A diligent Gas Inspector can save the city 
many times his salary in the regulation of public lights in buildings and streets." 



22 



WATER RATES. 



STATEMENT OF THE VISITACION WATER COMPANY. 

(Filed January 30, 1900.) 



INCOME AND EXPBNDITURES. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


INCOME. 

For water supplied to 547 consumers, as per lists attached 


$9,909 65 




Connections .... 


40 25 




Sundries 


137 70 










Total income for year 1899 




$10,089 60 


EXPENDITURES. 

For coal and cartage . . . 


3 269 44 




For labor 


3 063 50 






3,333 90 










Total expenditures for the year 1899 




f ;9 666 84 









RECAPITULATION. 



For Prior Years, 
.and until December 31, 1899. 


Gross Amount 
Expended for Purchase, 
Construction and Maintenance 
of Works. 


Gross Cash Receipts. 


1884 


$73 693 95 


$73 728 90 


1885 


36 290 36 


37,561 73 


1886 


13,063 83 


11,757 51 


1887 


12 183 35 


12 183 35 


1888 


14 917 36 


15 260 20 


1889 


10 391 73 


16 731 22 


1893 


11,830 45 


18 049 58 


1891 


12,933 06 


17 824 46 


1892 


13,049 29 


18 141 95 


1893 


8639 59 


16 919 30 


1894 


9,520 08 


16 404 45 


1895 . -. 


9 881 71 


15 645 85 


1896 . .. 


9 255 15 


15 027 10 


1897 


8 271 21 


14 068 95 


1898 


8 878 49 


13 430 77 


1899 


9 666 84 


10 089 60 









WATER RATES. 



23 



STATEMENT 



SHOWING ALL THE REVENUE DERIVED BY THE SPRING VALLEY WATER 

WORKS FROM: ALL SOURCES FOR THE YEAR PRECEDING JANUARY i, 

1900, AND AN ITEMIZED STATEMENT OF ALL EXPENDITURES MADE 
FOR SUPPLYING WATER DURING SAID TIME. 





A MOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


RECEIPTS. 

From water rente of private consumers . . . 


1,546,939 02 




From water rents of City and County 


240,878 11 




From water rents of shipping 


66,180 85 










From other sources 




$1,853,998 64 
49.413 21 


Total income 


"~ 




DISBURSEMENTS. 7 

For operating expenses 


$444 864 59 


$1,903,411 85 


For taxes 


196 Oil 36 




For interest 


579 481 81 














1,220,357 76 


Dividends paid 




$683.054 09 
716 800 00 












$33 745 91 


Paid on account of new construction and permanent improve- 




$708.430 44 









Ban Francisco, January 30. 1900. 



PELHAM W. AMES. Secretary. 



SPRING VALLEY WATER WORKS, 

BY CHARLES ,WEBB HOWARD, President. 



24 



WATER RATES. 



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WATER RATES. 



25 



The Board of Supervisors held sessions on February 12, 14, 16, 23, 26, 27 and 28, 
1900, and heard the testimony of H. F. A. Schussler, Chief Engineer; Pelham W. 
Ames, Secretary, and Geo. E. Booker, Chief Book-keeper, of the Spring Valley 
Water Works; also, Geo. H. Mendell, President of the Board of Public Works, 
and John Bullock, Christian Froelich and A. W. Von Schmidt, which testimony 
was taken down in shorthand, transcribed and a copy of the same is on file in 
the Office of the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors. 

At the meeting of the Board held on the 12th day of February, the Spring 
Valley Water Works filed a statement showing the gross revenue derived from all 
sources, and an itemized statement of all expenditures made for supplying water 
for the year preceding January 1, 1900, a copy of which statement is as follows: 

SPRING VALLEY WATER WORKS. 



The amount of the authorixed issue of the capital stock is $16,000,000 00 

The amount outstanding is' 14,000,000 00 

The bonds now outstanding are: 

(a) First mortgage $4,975,00000 

(6) Second mortgage 5,000,000 00 

(c) Third mortgage 2,000,00000 

The issue of third mortgage bonds to the amount of 84,000,000 00 was authorized August 4, 
1898, and they have been issued as follows : 





AMOUNT 


TOTAL. 


In September 1898 . ... 


$1,000,000 00 




In November 1898 


100,000 00 




In December 1898 


20,0000 00 




In June 1899 


SCO, 000 00 




In September 1899 


200,000 00 




In November 1899 


200,000 00 














$2,000,000 00 



The floating debt of the corporation in 1899 has been as follows : 

January $281,00000 

February 356,000 00 

March 421 ,000 00 

April 471.000 00 



May. 



4%, 000 00 



June 331,000 00 

July 331 ,000 00 

August 356,000 00 

September 351.000 00 

October 426,000 00 

November 431,000 00 

December 441,000 00 



WATER RATES. 



The revenue for 1899 has been : 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


1. Fixed rates 


987 112 10 




U Meter rates 


557 799 52 




3. From the City and County of San Francisco 


240,878 77 






68,208 25 






31,200 00 






18,213 21 














$1,903,411 85 



The expenditures for 1899, both operating and construction accounts, have been as follows ; 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


1. Interest, dividends, taxes, etc 
Coupons ... . .... 


$557,388 88 




Other interest . 


22,092 93 




Dividends 


716,800 00 




Taxes in San Francisco, San Mateo, Alameda, Santa CJara and 


196,011 36 














$1,492,293 17 


OPERATING EXPENSES FOR 1899... 




... $444.864 59 



Detailed and itemized as follows ; 
Eight pumping plants, viz.: 

Lake Merced, 
Belmont, 

Clarendon Heights, 
Ocean View, 



Pilarcitos, 
Crystal Springs and 
Milbrae Pumps and 
City Engine. 



WATER RATES. 



27 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 






$131,330 99 




31,407 90 






31,133 38 






13,216 19 




4 Ocean View Pump 


983 71 




5 Pilarcitos Pump 


2,230 72 






2,755 79 






27,223 68 






22,379 59 














$131,330 99 



There are five (5) pipe lines, viz.: 

Alameda pipe line, 
Locks creek pipe line, 



ISan Andreas pipe line, 
Crystal Springs pipe line, 
And Pilarcitos pipe line. 





AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 






$28,330 44 




97,416 86 






2,20238 






1,323 78 




4 Pilarcitos pipe line 


5,324 43 






12.062 99 














$28,330 44 



28 



WATER RATES. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOVNT. 



LOBOS CREEK.. 

1 watchman $960 00 

Rent of lots 500 00 

SAN ANDREAS RESERVOIR. 

Labor $8,51000 

Provisions - 679 00 

Screen cloth 

Lumber 47600 

Hardware 38200 

Oils. 1*5 

Freight, repairing, etc. 

PILARCITOS RESERVOIR 

| 

Labor $3,683 00 

Provisions 426 00 

Lumber, etc. 427 00 

Cement 81 00 

Hardware , 79 00 

Freight, oils, paints, etc. 

PORTOLA RESERVOIR 

1 watchman $ 720 00 

CRYSTAL SPRINGS RESERVOIR 

Labor $7,967 00 

Provisions 710 00 

Hardware, etc 1,184 00 

Lumber , 835 00 

Screen cloth 202 00 

Cement 130 00 

Freight, oils, etc. 



$1,460 00 



11,454 47 



5.162 37 



12,249 18 



WATER RATES. 



29 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT Continued. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT. 



CITY RESERVOIRS 

These are : Lake Honda, College Hill, University Mound 
Francisco street, Clay street and Potrero. 

Labor $14.735 00 

Screen cloth 1,792 00 

Lumber 

Castings and hardware 681 00 

Oils, etc 

Insurance 110 00 

Freight, etc. 

CITY STABLE. 

Head hostler, stablemen, etc. Labor 2.506 00 

Feed 2,092 00 

Repairs 179 00 

Supplies 347 00 

Veterinary.. 
Equipment. . 

Insurance 

Freight, shoring, etc. 

SAN MATEO STABLE . 

Iman 300 00 

Feed, hay, harness repairs, etc 

PIPE YARD 

Lab f 3,095 00 

Gas bills 185 00 

Stationery, wood, hardware, etc. 

MAIN REPAIRS 

Labor .. .$13,98100 



$19,678 85 



6,96r 40 



821 75 



3,663 14 



41,843 51 



30 



WATER RATES. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT Continued. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT. 



MAIN REP AIRS- CONTINUED. 

Hardware and castings , $ 1,434 00 

Leads 290 00 

Repair and making service connections 26,760 00 

$42,465 00 

Less labor and material charged out 4,800 00 

METER EXPENSE 

Labor 

Hardware and fittings 845 00 

Lumber 191 

GENERAL EXPENSE. 

Labor 1.080 50 

Railroad tickets 1,691 00 

Donations 783 50 

License 90600 

Meetings 2,550 00 

Stationery 220 00 

Insurance 

Analyses 10500 

Advertising 4,433 00 

Reporting 125 00 

Damages 50 00 

Teams 35 00 

OFFICE EXPENSE. 

Labor 5,152 00 

Printing, stationery, etc 

Postoffice and revenue stamps 372 00 

Rents 

Insurance. 



$22 00 
37,665 00 
22,847 23 



13,713 81 



9,793 41 



WATER RATES. 



31 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT Continued. 



MAINTENANCE ACLOUNT. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


OFFICE EXPENSE-CONTINUED. 


1,633 10 




LEGAL EXPENSE 




$17,8 17 




17,310 00 




Stationery 


214 00 




LAND ACCOUNT 




7,487 00 


Sales etc 


$6 697 00 




Surveys, stationery, etc. 
SALARIES 




40,074 96 


President . 


$10 OCO 00 




Secretary 


4800 00 




Assistant Secretary . 


2 925 00 




Chief Clerk 


6 000 00 






7 050 00 






5 350 00 




Pay clerk 


3,000 00 




Clerk ... 


1 500 00 




BOOKKEEPING DEPARTMENT 








. 




Ledgers, books and stationery, etc. 
ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT 




14,375 05 


Salaries, Chief Engineer and three assistants . . . 


13 600 00 






165 00 




Sundry expenses, photos, prints, etc. 
INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 




9.756 98 




6900 00 




Extra temporary inspectors . 


2 g86 00 




Stationery, etc . 


133 00 











32 



WATER RATES. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT Continued. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT. 


AMOUNT. 


TOTAL. 


COLLECTION ACCOUNT 




824 658 84 


12 or 13 collectors . . 


22,674 00 




Printing and stationery. ... . 


1 150 00 




Fares, etc 


237 00 




TELEPHONE ACCOUNT 




3 305 80 


Rentals, monthly charges, repairs, poles, etc. 
PESCADERO EXPENSE 


$948 60 


948 60 


1 keeper at $79 00, etc. 

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 




$708 430 44 


NEW CONSTRUCTION 








83,797 00 




Pipe. 


59,840 00 




Gates and castings . 


18,212 00 


. 


Lead 


8 665 00 




Meters 


6 723 00 




Hardware 


1,247 00 




Lumber 


696 00 




Rock etc 


688 00 




Cement 


617 00 






550 00 






10 084 00 






8 217 00 






7 641 00 






4 310 00 






935 00 








212 202 00