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Full text of "Savannah State College Bulletin--Special Issues"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/savannahstateco195471sava 



Greetings from 
the President 



Outstanding 
Events 



Homecoming Edition 

GARDEN OF ROSES 



Miss Savannah State 
and Attendants 



Alabama State Grid 
Stars 

About the 
Campus 



OCTOBER, 1954 



SAWU.'flAH CTATE. COLLEGE U33AR( 

STATE COLLEGE BRANCH 

SAVANNAH, GA, 





These thn 
front of the ne 



sisters, all students at Savannah State College, pose in 
ormitory. They are from left to right: Fay, Blanche, and 
Barbara Flipper, of Savannah. 



OUR COVER 

Miss Savannah State 1954-55 and her Attendants, 
see page 3. 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 

October— 1954 

Vol. 8 No. 

President 

Da. William K. Payne 

Editor-in-Chief 

Wilton C. Scott 

Copy Editor 

Mrs. Gwendolyn L. Bass 

Photographer 

William H. Bowens 

THE SAVANNAH STATE BULLETIN is published i 
October, December, February, March, April and May by 

Savannah State College. Entered as second-class matter, 
December 16, 1947, at the post office at Savannah, Georgia, 
under the Act of August 24, 1912. 

CONTENTS 

Cover Picture of Miss Savannah 

State and Attendants 
Greeting* from Savannah State 

College's President 1 

Greetings from Alabama State 

College's President 2 

Miss Savannah State and 

Attendants 3 

Savannah State College Tigers 

and Coach 4-5 

Alabama State College Hornets 

and Coach 6 

Sports Events at Savannah State 

College 7 

Old and New Buildings at 

Savannah State College . 8-9 

S.S.C. on Parade 

10 Through Back Cover 



New Boys Dormitory 











U ^ o P te °t r ends, *>**^ 5a ,annoV^ gs , <o°*> 






Greetings from the President 



Alabama State College 



Alabama State College appreciates the honor of being 
the guest opponent for the Homecoming game of Savannah 
State College. We also appreciate the several connections 
between these two institutions. Your President is a former staff 
member of Alabama State College. Your First Lady, the wife 
of the President, is both a graduate and former staff member 
of Alabama State College. Our relations are both pleasant 
and cherished. 




We wish for you a most satisfying occasion. May the 
best team win. 



Henry Council Trenholm, 
President 





The Savannah State College student body has chosen Miss Dolores Perry, attractive senior 
from Savannah, to represent them as "Miss Savannah State" for the year 1954-55. Miss Perry, 
a chemistry major, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Perry, 1210 East Gwinnett Street. Her 
attendants will be Miss Elizabeth Jordan, (left) senior from Barnesville, and Miss Frances Baker, 
(right) senior from Darien. Both attendants are elementary education majors. "Miss Savannah 
State" and her attendants will be crowned during the half-time period of the homecoming game be- 
tween the Savannah State Tigers and Alabama State College on November 13. 



Page 3 



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Savannah Slate College linemen as they 

work out for their coming tilts, with Alabama 

State College on November 13 (Ho 

ing) and with Paine College on No 

25 (Thanksgiving Classic). 



Backfield, from left to right, Q. B., LeRoy 

Dupree; L. H. B., Jerry Turner; R. H. B., 

Robert Butler; F. B., Anderson Kelly. 




Head Coach Ross Pearley, as he explains techniques to his 
players. 




SSC "sparkplays," kneeling, left to right: James Ashe, 
center; Ivory Jefferson, guard; James Collier, end; standing, 
left to right, Albert Scrutchins, center; James Willis, guard, 
and William Weatherspoon, left halfback. 





Savannah State College ends as they work out for their coming tilts, with Alabama State College on No- 
vember 13 (Homecoming) and with Paine College on November 25 (Thanksgiving Classic). They are, left to right, 
L. J. McDaniel, Louis Ford, Hurbert Tyler, and Willie James Telfair. 



Savannah State "Fighting Tigers" pose with their coaches, head-coach, Ross Pearley, extreme left, and assistant 
coach, Henry Bowman, extreme right. 







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1954 Alabama State College Football Squad. 



Coach Arthur Simmons, of 
the Alabama State "Hornets". 
Coach Simmons is a graduate 
of Tennessee State University. 




"Miss Alabama State" (center) Celeste Brooks, 
junior, and attendants, Viola Hawze, (left) sopho- 
more, and Mary F. Foy (right) freshman. 



William Stokes, junior, Ala- 
bama State quarterback. 



Page 6 





§.» 




basketball team. National and SEAC Cham. 
1953-54, receive SEAC trophy from President 



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. 







Side View of the New Boys Dormitory 



Annex to Willcox Gymnasium 





Herty Hall 



Buildings 




Adams Hall 



Meldrim Auditorium 




f 



Miss Marie Barnwell, attractive 1954 graduate as she receives the Journal of Business Education Certificate 
Award from President Payne. 

Savannah Stale College Co-eds relax. Left to right: Miss 
Sadie Hall, Sr., Macon, Georgia; Miss Josie Glenn, Freshman, 

Hogansville, Georgia; Miss Mollie Sams, Sr., Savannah; „ .... , . , 

(Second row) Miss Carie Green, Sophomore, Swainsboro, Mrs - Rose Gartrell Vann ' M|SS Savannah State of 

Georgia; and Miss Barbara Ann Matthews, Sr., Jesup, Georgia. 1952 ' relaxes m front of Library. 





Page 11 








HE 




"' Miss Hen 


e College" 




iah T ' 


Slot 


for 1953-54. 







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Southwest Georgia Chapter of SSC Alumni Association. 




Miss Rubye King (center) "Miss General Alumni" and her attendants, Miss Ruth Mullino, left and Mrs. Loretta 

Harris, right. 

If 





Savannah Chapter of SSC Alumni Association. 



Page 13 




Officers of Savannah chapter of SSC Alumni Associat 



"Miss Savannah Slate" 1953, Henrice Thomas, center, and 
attendants left to right, Evelyn James and Beatrice Doe. 



at Homecoming game-1953. Left to right: 
Mrs. Rosa A. Crosse, Attendant; John McGlockton, Presi- 
dent; Mrs. L. Orene Hall, "Miss General Alumni"; President 
W. K. Payne; Henrice Thomas, "Miss Savannah State" 
1953; William Weatherspoon, captain of SSC football 
team; Beatrice Doe, and Evelyn James, attendants to 
"Miss Savannah State". 




1954 Football Squad Roster 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



ALABAMA STATE COLLEGE 




TED WRIGHT, SR., Athletic Director 

No. NAME 

22 Miles Oliver 

47 Willie Reynolds 

24 Robert Butler 

48 Ivory Jefferson 

25 Eugene Hubbard 

49 Harry Roberts 

26 Joe Louis Lott 

50 Hubert Tyler 

30 James Collier 

51 David Richardson 

31 Mat Magwood 

52 William Weatherspuon. Jr 

52 Robert Dulaney 

53 Eugene Miller 

33 E. Z. McDaniels 

54 Cyrus McKiver 

34 Charles Johnson 

54 John Johnson 

35 Anderson Kelly 

55 L. J. McDaniels 
37 Louis Ford 

56 Albert Scrutchin 

39 Price Oliver 

57 Samuel Cooper 

40 Jerry Turner 

58 Willie Telfair 

41 LeRoy DuPree 

59 Joseph Cox 

42 James Willis 

60 George Parker 

43 Daniel Burns 

61 James Johnson 

44 James Ashe 
63 Thomas Smith 

45 Willie Morris 

46 Johnny Dixon 

TIGERS' STAFF 
Ross Pearley, Head Football Coach; Alfred Frazier and 
n, Assistant Coaches; Frank Tharpe, General 
ing Festivities; Elmer Dean, Athletic 
Ellis "Trap" Trappio. Athletic Re- 



POS. 


CITY 


T 


Thunderbolt, Ga 


T 


Savannah, Ga. 


B 


Savannah, Ga. 


G 


Savannah. Ga. 


G 


Woodbine, Ga. 


B 




B 




E 


Ridgeland, S. C. 


E 


Savannah, Ga. 


G 




T 


Savannah, Ga. 


B 


Cario, Ga. 


B 


Atlanta, Ga. 


B 


Savannah, Ga. 


B 


Calhoun, Ga. 


T 


Savannah, Ga. 


B 


Savannah, Ga. 


T 


Vidalia. Ga. 


B 


Jesup, Ga. 


E 


Calhoun, Ga. 


E 


Savannah, Ga. 


G 


Jesup, Ga. 


B 


Marietta, Ga. 


T 


Savannah, Ga. 


B 
E 
B 


Jesup, Ga. 


Savannah, Ga. 


E 


Cairo, Ga. 


G 


Cairo, Ga. 


B 


Ridgeland, S. C. 


B 


Savannah, Ga. 


T 




C 


Columbus, Ga. 


B 


Dublin, Ga. 


C 




B 


Savannah, Ga. 



Chairman of H 
Committee Ch, 
porter. 

School Colors: Bl 



NO 


NAME 


POS. 


HOMETOWN 


10 


Wallace Hall 


G 


Talladega 


11 


Lonnie Scott 


T 


Tallassee 


12 


Edv.-ard Steiner 


T 


Greenville 


13 


Edward Patterson 


G 


Montgomery 


14 


Herbert Ellis 


E 


Daphne 


15 


Hoover White 


B 


Courtland 


16 


Maurice Williams 


G 


Mobile 


17 


Jimmy Green 


B 


Tuscumbia 


18 


Charles Carter 


C 


Town Creek 


19 


Nathaniel Reed 


E 


Camden 


20 


Charles Williams 


E 


Memphis, Tenn 


21 


Otis Leftwich 


B 


East Mulga 


22 


Fred Jackson 


B 


Montgomery 


23 


Andrew Loper 


T 


Mobile 


24 


Clinton Johnson 


C 


Demopolis 


25 


Cornell Torrence 


B 


Auburn 


26 


James Brisker 


B 


Montgomery 


27 


Robert Hogan 


E 


Tuscumbia 


28 


George Ward 


B 


Dothan 


29 


Henry Carnegie 


B 


CollinsviUe 


30 


William McCou 


E 


Memphis, Tenn 


31 


Ulysses Williams 


E 


Gadsden 


32 


Sylvester Moseley 


B 


Inkster, Mich. 


33 


Luther Jordan 


E 


Sebring, Fla. 


34 


Theodore Ward 


G 


Ashford 


35 


Oliver Faulk 


E 


Montgomery 


36 


William Gary 


G 


Gadsden 


37 


Dave Baker 


B 


Port Huron, Micl 


38 


William Stokes 


B 


Birmingham 


39 


Jeppie Carnegie 


B 


CollinsviUe 


40 


Felton Blackburn 


E 


Tuscaloosa 


41 


Frank Brown 


C 


Demopolis 


42 


Alfred Peavy 


E 


Salitpa 


43 


Virgie Hodges 


B 


Atlanta, Ga. 


44 


Reginald Dozier 


T 


Uniontown 


45 


Robert Baxter 


T 


Mobile 


46 


Eugene Hudson 


G 


Montgomery 


47 


Ervin Thompson 


T 


Cleveland, Ohio 


48 


Richard James 


B 


Bessemer 


49 


James Davis 


G 


Gadsden 


50 


Clarence Hightower 


G 


Coffeville 


51 


Joseph Brooks 


E 


Montgomery 


52 


James McKinney 


B 


Tuscaloosa 


54 


Lamar Lee 


B 


Elba 


57 


William Parker 


B 


Montgomery 



HORNET STAFF 
Arthur Simmons (Tenn. State), Coach; C. Earl Anderson 
(Hampton), Assistant; William Lewis (Tuskegee), As- 
sistant; Howard Green, Student Asst. Coach; Walker Alex- 
ander. Student Asst. Coach. 

H. Councill Trenholm, President 
C. Johnson Dunn, Athletic Director 
James M. Reynolds, Director of Athletic Publicity 
School Colors: Old Gold and Black 



and Orange 



i Nickn 



Hornets 



Page 16 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

Savannah State College is an accredited senior college, located in Chatham County, just one mile from 
Savannah, the oldest city in the state. Its campus, surrounded by beautiful moss laden oak trees, is one of 
the most naturally beautiful campuses to be found anywhere. One hundred and thirty-six acres of land with 
more than thirty modern buildings, fully equipped, comprises the campus of "Georgia's largest institution for 
the higher education of Negroes." 

For catalog, information and registration blank — write: 

Registrar, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia 

Students who are graduates of accredited high schools will be admitted without examinations. Students 
who are graduates of non-accredited high schools may qualify for admission to the freshman class through 
examination. All freshmen must file application not later than August 15, 1955. 

Program 

Veterans will get all benefits allotted under the law. Contact the Veteran's Secretary, Savannah State 
College, Savannah, Georgia for details. 
A WIDE VARIETY OF COURSES DESIGNED FOR: 

* Men and women who desire to prepare for teaching positions in elementary schools and secondary 
schools. 

* Normal school graduates and high school graduates who desire to earn a Bachelor's degree in 
Humanities, Social Science, Natural Science, Education, Business Administration, Engineering and 
Technical Sciences, and Vocational Training. 

Eight Divisions 

The Board of Regents has approved the formation of seven Instructional Divisions and the division 
of General Extension at Savannah State College. 

The new divisions will be: HUMANITIES, SOCIAL SCIENCE, NATURAL SCIENCE, EDUCATION, 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, ENGINEERING AND TECHNICAL SCIENCES, and VOCATIONAL 
TRAINING. 

These Instructional Divisions with General Extension, will comprise the Savannah State College Pro- 
gram, totaling eight divisions. 

The departments of Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry will compose the NATURAL SCIENCE 
DIVISION. The EDUCATION DIVISION will be composed of the departments of Elementary and Secondary 
Education The Secondary Education majors will specialize in SOCIAL SCIENCE, General Science, Mathe- 
matics ENGLISH AND LITERATURE, COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS, DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION, INDUS- 
TRIAL EDUCATION, AND GENERAL AND SPECIAL SHOP SUBJECTS. In the DIVISION OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION, the students can specialize in Industrial Management, Office Practice, Accounting, and 
Business and Financial Economics. 

A Bachelor of Science degree in Home Economics is being offered in the following fields, institutional 
management, foods and nutrition, textile and clothing, arts and crafts, and nursery school and family life edu- 
cation. There will also be terminal courses in dressmaking and tailoring, food production and cooking. 



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SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



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December, 1957 



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COSTUMES THROUGH THE AGES 



. 



HOMECOMING EDI' 




The Savannah State College Bulletin 



President Dr. William K. Payne 

Editor-in-Chief Wilton C. Scott 

Issue Editor and Artist Phillip J. Hampton 

Copy Writer Luetta Colvin 

Photographer Robert Modley 

Volume 11 December 1957 Number 3 

The Savannah Slate College Bulletin is published at Savannah, Ga.. 6 times 
yearly in October, December, Februarv, March, April, and May by Savannah 
Slate College. Second Class mail privileges authorized at Savannah, Ga. 



ABOUT THIS ISSUE 



"Costumes Through the Ages" is the Home- 
coming theme for this year. Certainly, a re- 
view of man's eternal fascination with his 
external appearance is both educational and 
revealing — educational in that such a survey 
re-emphasizes the mystic communion between 
people of all climes and of all ages; and re- 
vealing in that such retrospect points up the 
dichotomy that sometimes exists between 
man's extrinsic appearance and his intrinsic 
worth. 

The headdress and standing ruff of the 
Elizabethan costume may be discerned in the 
cover sketch of Dorothy Davis, senior general 
science major, who reigns as Miss Savannah 
State of 1957. 

Background statuary and paintings in some 
of the pictures are through the courtesy of 
the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
Savannah, Georgia. The following persons 
made costumes and props available for some 
of the photographs: Misses Althea V. Morton 
and Althea Williams, Mrs. Louise Owens, 
Robert Holt, Robert Merritt, and Mrs. Rich- 
ardine Mingo, '56, instructor at Springfield 
Terrace School. 




THOMAS Carlyle, clarion-voiced prophet 
of Cheyne Row in Victorian England, 
stressed the vestural quality of life in 
the great metaphysical bouquet that is his 
Sartor Resartus (The Tailor Retailored). 
The symbolical conception of man and na- 
ture was at the core of the transcendental 
philosophy, which reached its peak in Eng- 
land and in America during the nineteenth 

The poetic expression of this clothes- 
philosophy is crystallized in the Earth- 
Spirit's song in Goethe's Faust: 

In Being's Flood's, in Action's Storms, 
I walk and work, above, beneath. 
Work and weave in endless motion! 

Birth and death, 
An infinite Ocean; 
A seizing and giving 
The Fire of Living: 

Tis thus at the roaring Loom of Time 

I Ply, 

And weave for God the garment Thou 
seest Him by. 

The two great garments of God, Man 
and Nature, may be seen at Savannah 
State College, where dedicated faculty and 
students pursue truth that transcends man's 
sense perception but not his knowledge, 
where the genius of man is evidenced in 
the magnificent edifices that rise in the 
midst of natural splendor, where the vital 
union in the universe is made apparent 
when students become aware of the "glory 
that was Greece" through the 
language of sculpture. 



MESSAGE FOR HOMECOMING 13S7 





HOMECOMING celebration at Savannah 
State College is not at all a matter of routine. 
To have visited the College last year for the 
celebration or any other previous year would 
not be sufficient to give one an adequate con- 
cept of Homecoming for this institution. Each 
year finds the College and the celebration 
different and interesting. The rapid growth 
of the College, the changes in the physical 
plant, and the admission of more than two 
hundred fifty freshmen serve as a basis for 
the uniqueness of each year. The College is 
delighted to welcome alumni, former students, 
patrons, and friends to see and enjoy the Col- 
lege as it exists in 1957. 

The active participation of the alumni has 
been one of the areas in which the College 
has made unusual progress. Loyal alumni 
have been liberal in their expressions of con- 
fidence in and loyalty to the institution. 
Through the program of scholarship aid, the 
alumni have made a genuine contribution to 
the College. The entire student body, faculty, 
recipients of the scholarship aid, and the 
Board of Regents have benefited by the in- 
terest and effective participation of the alum- 
ni in the development of a finer and more 
effective educational program here at Savan- 
nah State College. 

The College desires that all who partici- 
pate in Homecoming this year will find the 
occasion one to be cherished. It is hoped that 
the activities including the football game will 
be a credit to the College and to our guests 
of Claflin College. 

W. K. Payne 
President 




iVi AN, according to Carlyle, is the trans- 
cendental unity of apperception. Through 
his perceptive faculties, he can pierce the 
visible cloak of Nature; through his in- 
tuitive powers, he can find the answer to 
the question "Who am I?" in Nature and 
in himself. 

A felicitous blending of the external 
and the intuitive is found in William Ken- 
neth Payne, who has watched the inner 
and outer garments of Savannah State Col- 
lege reveal themselves in a dynamic and 

Like the Renaissance courtier Hamlet, 
Dr. Payne exemplifies the qualities of the 
scholar and the gentleman. The important 
business of making the College a vantage 
ground for learning is foremost with him. 
Always impeccably and tastefully attired, 
he sets a pattern of demeanor that his 
staff and students deem worthy of emu- 

But, unlike the melancholy Danish 
prince, Dr. Payne is a man of conviction 
who must convert this conviction into con- 
duct. He symbolizes the precept that man 
must do the duty that lies nearest him, 
and he has achieved spiritual enfranchise- 
ment because of his acknowledgment that 
the "ideal world" is contained in this 
"so solid-seeming Earth." His life is de- 
voted to translating the real world of Sa- 
vannah State College into ; 
the ideal one of which so 
only. 

And of the one who 
this modern courtier, suffic 
her gentle qualities robe her 
ness and courtesy. 



helpmate to 

it to say that 

gracious- 




PRESIDENTIAL PROFILE 



The glass of fashion and the mould 
of form . . ." 



Ophelia, speaking of Prince Hamlet 




THESE THINGS WE SHALL REMEMBER 



THESE, TOO, SHALL BECOME 
A PART OF THE MEMORY- 
CLOTHES of Alma Mater . . . gossa- 
mer garments that we will wear long 
after we have left her grounds . . . 
dissecting the frog in biology class 
. . . the last-minute pep talk to the 
roaring Tigers to get them on to the 
fight . . . the camaraderie of Tiger 
boosters at the Big Game . . . the 
sweetness of a pretty girl's smile as 
she surveys the gridiron . . . 




*&» 




ONCE again, it is Homecoming, 
and the alumni are gathered to greet 
old friends, make new ones, inspect 
the physical changes, attend the 
football game and renew their 
pledge of allegiance to their Alma 
Mater. There may he those who 
returned for reasons other than 
those mentioned, but whatever the 
reason, welcome home! 

During the past twelve months, 
your National Alumni Association 
has been active in organizing new 
Chapters and encouraging those al- 
ready organized. The most recent 
Chapter to our ranks was organized 
in Washington, D. C. But, even with 
all of this fine work, still too many 
of us are unorganized and not ac- 
tively engaged in alumni affairs. 

To you, already at work for Sa- 
vannah State College through or- 
ganized Chapters, go our thanks 
and congratulations; to the unor- 
ganized, is the challenge to be up 
and doing in your local commun- 
ity. The services of Prince Jackson, 
Jr., our Alumni Secretary, are 
available to you. 

Let us unite ourselves and work 
to build a greater Savannah State 
College through our Alumni Schol- 
arship Fund. All contributions may 
be sent to the Office of the Alumni 
Secretary. 

Respectfully yours, 

Leonard D. Law, President 
General Alumni Association 




MISS SAVANNAH CHAPTER 

Mrs. Otlee Daniel, Mrs. Mary S. Bain and I not 

shown in picture) Mrs. Marie T. LeCount. 

THE 

ALUMNI 

PRESIDENT 

SPEAKS 




(^ 



Ah, this was the Nineties, when men wore waxed moustaches and women worked hard to achieve the 
waist. This was fin de siecle — era of Cezanne and Zola and Sherlock Holmes and the Gibson Girl look 
jrock coats and psyche knots and bric-a-brac and pompadours and patent leather shoes with toothpick toes 
d John Rogers genre groups and Expositions and declamation and brownstone houses and overstuffed fur- 
^Mfure and Victoria and gas burners and Cleveland and leg o' mutton sleeves and Kipling and Whistler and 
thAlasl of the frontiers and the first of the automobile and the railroad and golf and baseball leagues and ani- 
mated picture films and the frenzied search for gold . . . And into this Gilded Age emerged Alma Mater, spin- 
ning her organic filaments that give the lie to Time, touching our day and pointing, antennae-like, to years yet 



MISS SAVANNAH STATE 
1957 

AND ATTENDANTS 



THESE THREE ARRAYED IN GRACE, 
. . . how siveptly fl 
That liquefaction of her clothes— H 



The serenity and grace that illi 
three array them in a fashion that 
These three, selected by their peer 



inate the beauty of these 
fabric can simulate . . . 
n represent them at the 
spirit of Alma Mater 



i nebe mree, seiec 

time of coming Home, symbolize the inner spirit c. .. 

. . . So these three— Dorothy Davis, "Miss Savannah State; 

Shirley Thomas and Rose Marie Manigaull, attendants — e: 

plify the intangible grace that no outer drape can adorn 





HOMECOMING COMMITTEE 1357 



At A MEETING las 
ittee memb 
including those of the 

Sealed, lejl to rig) 
Dorothy Davis. Mrs. B 
ing: Phillip J. Harnptt 

The elf and the fi 



week. Chairman Frank Tharpe discussed the parade route 
. and some members toyed around with coslumi 
tador. the shepherd, and tin- Brandt dame. 
Mrs. Louise Owens, Mr- 

utine Hardviek. Ki.bi-rt Tindal, ami Prince Jackson. Stand- 
Eddie Bivins, Henry Balloon, and Clarence Wright. 

y, 1956 Homecoming motif, are » from lust 

Miss Madeline Harrison. Shirley Thomas, Mrs. Martha 
Ella W. Fisher, Mrs. Dorothy C. Hamilton. Herbert 
ins, Wilton C. Scott. Charles Lee, Carolyn Stafford, Gri 





PROBABLE STA 


Claflin 
Panthers 


El ; 

Eddie Bratton 

m 

Raymond Simpson, Jr. 


James Span 


Luther Brown 




George Sargeant Cornelius 




Sarvis William James 


|w| 

Charlie Chambers 


[I] 

Johnny Alexander 




s 

Frank Davis 


Page P. Saunders, Head Coach 
C. R. Cox, Assistant Coach 
Dr. H. V. Manning, President 


Earnest Fernandex 









STING LINE-UPS 



Savannah State 
Tigers 



Jolly Stephens Willie Batchelor 

© ® © 

Eugene Hurbert Sammy White Nathaniel Davis 

© 

Willie Dukes John Price 

©Dr. Raymond W. Hopson, 
Chairman, Department of 
Physical Education 
Joe Reynolds Theodore A. Wright, 

Director of Athletics 

©Richard K. Washington, 
Head Football Coach 
John Myles, 

Assistant Football Coach 
Albert Fi 

Assistant Football Coach 





Savannah State College Tigers will face Clark 
College Panthers. Saturday, November 16 in At- 
lanta and Claflin College, in SSC's Homecoming 
Classic, Saturday, November 23. 2:00 p.m. Left 
to right— Coach John Myles. Moses Calhoun. James 
Bowens, Nathaniel Davis, Jolly Stephens. Moses 
King, Roy Hayward. Joseph Reynolds, Benjamin 
Somerset, Leroy Brown. .Coach Richard K. Wash- 
ington; (second row) Willie Batchelor, Timothy 
Davis. Hosie Harris. James Whalley. Ted Johnson, 
Fred Walker, Eugene Hubbard, John Sweet, Henry 
Wesley; (third row) Stockton Dupont. Johnny 
Strong. Eddie Bell. Robert Canty. James Hall, 
Willie Dukes, Douglas Battle. Elijah McGraw, John- 
ny Price, Coach Albert Frazier. 



BEAUT? AND GRACE ARE THEIR RAIMENT 




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Sophomore and Attendants | 



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Miss Sigma and Altenda 



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WHAT OTHER PLANETS CIRCLE 
OTHER SUNS? 



-Pope 



What vestment matter, warper of the space-time 
continuum, shall assume in the Age of Space is suhject 
to speculation and research . . . Perchance the radio 
wave will provide inspiration for the attire of the beau 
monde of the 21st century . . . Mayhap the 6eep of the 
satellite signal will become the motif of many a sym- 
phony of the Space era . . . 



P 



<T 



P 



w 




ft 



T> 



But whatever the harbingers 
evoke in our imaginations of 
things dread and wondrous to 
come, we pray, Alma Mater, 
that your dignity and serenity 
clothe us in our hour of naked 
awe and sustain us in our mo- 
ment of faltering . . . And so 
we come again home at the 
time of autumn and russet 
leaves — home to moss-clad 
oaks, home to springy marsh- 
land that has known Cherokee 
footfalls, home to Doric col- 
umns and modern line — con- 
fident that you, Alma Mater, 
will help us remember our 
promises to those yet not — 
certain that you will give us 
courage to lay aside the net of 
metallic fear and let a piece 
of sun into darkness — assured 
that we can reach out and 
touch stars not yet set . . . 




\CH 
F.TH 

YEAE 

__► - v 

,r„ Miid 3d ' '. > ' 
irs.' Katyes W .1 








SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



1963 ALUMNI ISSUE 



Alumnae Honored As 



Mrs. Carolyn K. Dowse 

Mrs. Carolyn K. Dowse, First Grade leacher al Moses 

Jackson Scl I, Mrs. J. II. Hayes. Principal, was named 

"Teacher of (he Year" b; her co-workers for the school year 
1962-63. She is a graduate of Savannah Slate College and 
holds a Masters degree from Columbia University. She is 
an affiliate of the N.E.A.. G.T.E.A., A.T.A., C.C.T.A.. West 
Broad Street V.M.C.A. and Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority. 

Vlrs. Dowse works cooperative]) and untiringly with the 

program of the school. She is S. tar) of the Steering 

Commi Chairman of American Education Week Ac- 
tivities, Chairman of Group III. First Grade City-Wide In- 
service Group to name a few. 

Slu- is a member of St. John's Baptist Church win-re she 
is advisor of the Youth Group. 

She is married to Mr. Isaac N. Dowse, who is also a 
graduate of Savannah Slate College. 

Mrs. Laura Greene Jefferson 

Mrs. Laura Greene Jefferson, a teacher on the faculty 
of Pearl Lee Smith Elementary School, Savannah. Georgia, 
was elected "Teacher of the Year." fol 1963. 

Mis. Jefferson is a native of Macon. Georgia, where she 
attended made school before transferring to Saint Frances 
de Sales Academ) in Rock Castle. Virginia to complete her 
elementar) school work. She is also a graduate of Savannah 
State College. 

Mrs. Jefferson is affiliated with the following civic organ- 
izations: The Savannah Federation of Colored Women's 
Club (president), and the National Federation of Colored 
Women's Clubs. 

She is the wife of William Henry Jefferson, a native Sa- 
vannahian, and the mother of one daughter. 

Mrs. F.tlilh Macon 

Mrs. Edith Macon, named by her co-workers as the 
school's poet, was elected Teacher of the Year for the J. II. C. 
Butler Elementary School for the school year 1962-63. 

She is a product of Chatham Count) Public Schools and 
a graduate of Savanna! Male College. Since graduation, she 
has taken roan) helpful workshops in the areas of Arithmetic, 
Foreign Language. Reading, and Language Aits. 

Her pleasing personalit) and the polished manner in 
which she works with people, have won her special distinction 
in her profession. Ilei performance as a classroom teacher 
has been recognized by administrative personnel and teachers. 

For the school year 1962-63. she assumed the responsi- 
bility of chairman of the school-wide Inservice program. 
To this program she has offered many helpful suggestions. 

Mrs. Macon has played a major role in planning and 
compiling of the recent Social Studies Guides which have 
been approved for use in Chatham County School System. 

She holds professional membership in the Ceorgia Teacher 
Education Association. American Teacher Association, Na- 
tional Education Association, Chatham County Teacher As- 
sociation, and Parent Teacher Association. She is a member 
of Bethel A.M.E. Church. 

She is the devoted wife of Mr. Ralph Macon and the 
mother of three lovely children. Shelia. Ralph. Jr.. and Sherill. 

Mrs. Sadie L. Cartledge serves as principal of the J. 11. C. 
Butler Elementary School. 



''Teacher of the Year" 

Mrs. Kttlye IT . Bolilen 

The principal and faculty of Fell-Jackson Elementary 
School elected Mrs Katye W. Bolden as their teacher of the 
year for 1962-63. lie status in the field of education has 
established her as being highly worth) of this honor. 

Mrs. Bolden is a product of the local public schools and 
Savannah Slate College from which she earned the B.S. 
Degree ill Education. She holds a Master of Arts Degree 
fi "Mi New York University. 

Mrs. Bolden is a second grade leacher. who not onlv 
enjoys her work, but one who counts working with children 
a privilege. She works diligently with all' phases of the 
school's program. She is presentl) serving on the Publicity 

Committee of the scl I. i- the facult) representative on the 

Executive imittee of the C.C.T.A., and has served as a 

membei of the Executive Committee of the P.T.A.: chairman 
of the membership drive; assistant secretary of the P.T.A.; 
membei of the In-Service Committee; Advisor of the Student 
Council and grade group chairman. 

She hold- membership in the following professional and 
civic organizations: Chatham County Teachers Association. 
Georgia Teachers and Educational Association. National 
Education Association. American Teachers Association. 
Future Teachers of America. Classroom Teachers Association. 
the Y.M.C.A.. the L.O.P. Social Club. She is a faithful mem- 
ber of the St. John Baptist Church. 

Mrs. Mildred W. Clover 

Mrs. Mildred \\ .Glover has been chosen by her colleagues 
at Tompkins Junior High School as Teacher of the Yeai for 
(he year 1962-63. 

She is a member of Ihe English Department and works 
diligently with the total school program. She serves as chair- 
man of the In-Service Evaluation Committee. PTA Study 
Committee, Attendance Coordinators, and a member of 
Ihe following committees: Steering Committee. Reading Com- 
mittee, and Social Committee. 

Mrs. Glover, an honor graduate from Beach High School, 
attended Savannah State College from which she graduated 
Cum Laude. She has done advanced work at New York 
I niversit) where she was the recipient of a citation fol speed 
and proficiency in typewriting. 

She hold, membership in the following organizations- 

National Education Association, W, Education \ssoci- 

ation, Georgia lea, I,,-,, ind Education Association, Chatham 
Countv Teachers Association, Parent-Teachei Association. 
arid Delia Sigma Thela Sorority. She is a communicant and 
active with the Connors Temple Baptist Church. 

Mrs. Glover is the wife of Roland Clover. Jr. and mother 
of a son, Kenneth, age 7. 

THE BULLETIN 

Vol. 16 MAY. 1963 No. 6 

Dr. W. K. Payne President 

Wilton C. Scott Director of Public Relations 

and Publication Adviser 

Julia E. Cheely Editor 

Emma Murray Associate Editor 

Robert Mobley .Photography 

The Savannah Stale College Bulletin is published in October, 
December. February. March, April, and May by Savannah Stale 
College. Enteral as second-class matter, December 16, 1947 at the 
I'osl Oliice al Savannah, Georgia under Ihe Act of August 14 1912 




Dr. W. K. Payne, President of Savannah State College, dur- 
ing office hours. 



Entering and Continuing Students to Benefit From SSC Improvements 



The college has embarked upon a program of building 
and campus improvement. Roads around the campus have 

been re-surfaced and a new Km- n. s.'-SOO.OOO dormitory 

foi women students is in the making and should be com- 
pleted during the school year 1963-64. 

The second and third floors of Hill Hall have a new 
look. On the third floor are three music practice rooms, 
music study lounge, four offices, large rooms for music re- 
hearsals and a music-art classroom. There is also an art 
study room, a classroom for ceramics and sculpture, rooms 
for kiln and art supplies in addition to a large room for 
paintings and designs. 

The new women's dormitory at Savannah State College 
will be a two story triple "A" fire-rated one hundred percent 
fireproof building. The exterior walls are to be pressure 



brick, the interior walls to be plastered with vinyl asbestos 
floors in individual rooms, with terrazo ceramic and terra 
cota in hallways, bathrooms, and stairwells. 



The gener 
of a large ail 
feet is 18,474 

The fiist 



iver shape of the building will be that 
vhen at a stand still. The total square 



I will consist of a lobby, lounge and 

,, apartment facilities for dormitory director, 

hair grooming room, laundry mat. one large storage room, 

and twenty-two bedrooms. 



II 



e second floor will consist of a lobby, ha 
storage rooms, and twenty-eight bedroor 



!"■' 



National Alumni Officers 



W. H. McB.ide. '49. President. 284 Plaza. Athens. Georgii 

M.S. Josie B. Sessoms, '36, Vice President, Tattnall Count; 

High and Industrial School, Reidsville, Georgia 

Mrs. Marie B. Martin. '46. Recording Secretary. Willian 
James High School, Statesboro, Georgia 

Mrs. Ester S. Bryant, '59, Corresponding Secretary. 101' 
West 37th Street. Savannah. Georgia 



ice Mitchell. '57. Treas 
vannah, Georgia 

ice Jackson, Jr., '49, I 
Savannah, Georgia 



r, Savannah State College, Sa 
orter, Savannah State College. 



Rev. J. E .Bailey, '17. Chaplain, 6(14 Waters Av 
nah. Georgia 



Former Savannah State College Student Aids in the Establishment 
Of Poliee Department Juvenile Division in Savannah 



William Wallace, a native of 
Savannah, Georgia, Corporal of 
Police with the Savannah Police 
Department, and a former student 
of Savannah Stale College, was 
selected in 1962, from numerous 
applicants to receive a scholarship 
to study at the University of Minne- 
sota. The purpose of the scholar- 
ship was to enable him to study 
juvenile delinquency in order to 
aid in the establishment of a 
Juvenile Division in the Savannah 
Police Department. 

This Division will go into effect 
on May 1. 1963 under the super- 
vision of Police Captain L. E. Ma- 
hony, and will operate in conjunc- 
tion with the Juvenile Court and 
the Welfare Department. 

Mr. Wallace has been employed 
with the Police Department since 
September of 1948. He began as a 
patrolman. In 1957 he was pro- 
moted to the Plain Clothes Division 
where he worked directly under 
the supervision of Sidney B. Barnes, 
Jr.. Chief of Police, participated in 
investigations and solving some of 
Savannah's outstanding crimes and 
worked with the Vice Squad. 

In 1960 he was promoted to the 
Criminal Investigation Division and 
after a one - year probationary 
period, was given the permanent 
rank of Corporal of Police. He is 
a member and Trustee of the First 
African Baptist Church, the South- 
eastern Quarterback Club and the 
Toastmasters International. 

Mr. Wallace is the husband of 
the former Miss Marjorie Frazier, 
who is also a graduate of Savan- 
nah State College and secretary to 
the College Librarian. They are the 
parents of four children; Beverly, 
a junior at Saint Francis De Sales 
High School in Powhatan, Virginia, 
William, Jr., Marcia and Maria. 




The Wa 
, Mrs. Ma 



Benjamin F. Lewis Promoted to Supt. of Parcel Post at Savannah, Ga 




Lette 

Technician, was recently promoted to 
Superintendent of Parcel Post. 

Mr. Lewis comes to this position with 
a well-fortified background, both in 
training and experience. In 1910. while 



a student at S 
took the Civi 
Letter Carrie 
called to Ink. 



he 



h State Colleg' 
ice Examination for 
d in 1941 he was 
first postal position 
and left college with the intention of 
working for one year. But in 1942, he 
was drafted into the armed services and 
served 3'/ 2 years, 2% of which were 
spent in extensive overseas duty, llpon 
leaving the service, he returned to his 
work with the post office. 

In 1947, in spite of his busy work 
schedule. Mr. Lewis was instrumental 
with the assistance of President Payne, 
in getting the first evening classes for 
veterans inaugurated at Savannah State 
College. As a result of pursuing classes 
at night, he completed work for a degree 
in 1952 and has since this time done 
graduate work at New York University. 
During all of this time, Mr. Lewis has 
maintained full employment with the 
Post Office. 

In August 1962 Mr. Lewis was pro- 
moted from Regular Letter Carrier to 
Letter Carrier Technician and served in 
this capacity until 1963 when he was 
promoted to Superintendent of Parcel 
appointment is the first of 
the history of the Savannah 
■. The Parcel Post Unit lo- 
Savannah, 39th and Bull 
the receiving unit for all 
parcel post in Chatham County. Mr. 
Lewis is responsible for the efficient 
and successful operation of this unit. 
He has an interracial working staff and 
directs all of their activities. 

Aside from his work with the Post 
Office, Mr. Lewis is well known among 
alumni of the College and has been 
praised extensively for his oratorical 
ability. Civic wise, Mr. Lewis has been 
several times Commander. American 
Legion Post No. 500; member and 
campaign manager, West Broad Street 
YMCA; Sustaining member, Solicita- 
tion Membership; former member 
Board of Directors, Frank Callen Boy's 
Club; Speakers Bureau, Savannah 
Tuberculosis Association; American 
Red Cross Gallon Club; President for 
two years Falcons Club, Inc.; Alpha Phi 
Alpha Fraternity and member of the 
St. John Baptist Church. 

Mr. Lewis is married to the former 
Nadine Cleveland, a graduate of Savan- 
nah State College, presently employed 
with the Chatham County Board of 
Education. 



Post. This 
its kind ii 
Post Offii 
cated in 
Streets, is 



SSC Alumnus Receives GTEA 
Meritorious Service Plaque 

Ucxander Hurse. a gradui f Savannah Stale College 

and former agent in the Agricultural Extension Department 
of the College, received a plaque from the Georgia Teachers 
and Education \-»m iialion f ..i meritorious services to edu- 
cation and communit) growth and development. 

Mr. Hurse is an alumnus of the College's class of 1934. 
lie received the bachelors degree in Agriculture from Sa- 
vannah State Ithen G gia State), and the masters of 

Science degree in Education from South Carolina Agricul- 
tural and Mechanical College, Orangeburg, South Carolina. 



Befo 



Mr 



Hurse served as teacher of V onal Vgricultur 

ville, Georgia; Principal and Agriculture teacher of Wash- 
ington High School. Cairo, Georgia: ami county agent .if 
Ware and Pierce counties, lie also served as Area Supervisor 
of the southern section of Georgia. 4-H Club work. While 
working in this capacity, he was one of the founders of the 
111 Club Ciller in Dublin, Georgia. 

Mr. Hurse came to Savannah Slate College to work as 
supply Stale Agenl in charge of 4-H Club work with boys 
of the stale of Georgia. He later became permanent agent 
in charge. 

From L936-1938 he was president of the Savannah Slate 
College General Alumni Association. He is a member of 
llir Georgia Teachers and Education Association, a deacon 
and Treasurer of Coll,;;,. I'ark Baptist Church, and a member 
of the Prince Hall Eureka Masonic Lodge. 

Mi. Hurse retired from his duties as Agricultural Ex- 
tension Agent ,il the College, June 30. 1962. 




Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hurse r. 


;ad plaque pre 


sented to 


Mr. Hurse for meritorious and faithful 


service to educ 


jtion and 


community growth. 








Wilton C. Scott, Chairman of 
mittee, Georgia Teachers and Edu< 
rector of Public Relations at Savani 
plaque in behalf of Alexander Hu 
presented by Milton White, Chain 
mittee, Georgia Teachers and Educa 



Public Relotio 
n Association 
State College, 
The plaque 
of the Citatic 




Wilton C. Scott, Director, Public Relations, Savannah State 
College and Chairman of the State-wide Public Relations Com- 
mittee of the Georgia Teachers and Education Association, 
presents plaque given by the Association to Alexander Hurse. 




rV. K. Payne, President, Savannah State College 
plaque presented to Alexander Hurse. 



Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms Supervisor 
And Curriculum Director 

Mrs. Josie B. Scssoms, Supervisor and Curriculum Director of 
TaCU.all County is a gradual.- of Savannah Slale College with a B.S. 
degree in Home Economies. She was graduated [roni Savannah SUIe 

in Ju ( 1936. and returned in February of 1937 as a teacher in 

the II ■ Economics Department and as Supervisor of N.Y.A. girls 



Master de; 



Unh 



No 



■mplc 

. National Association ol Supen 

Jeans Association, 
is the foster mother of one niece 
at Tattnall County High School; 
who is in the Railway Mail Ser 
1 Slate College. 



Phi Lambda Sorority, 
cachers Education As- 

- and Consultants and 



Mrs. Eunice S. Andn 



Leroy R- Bolden Is Post 
Manager Housing Development 



111. -. I I Murine, his enrollment at 

J as edilorinchici ol THE GEORGIA 
alien at lhal lime and ol the nil. 






He has I... 



ied lo Ihe former Mis* Kalye Walker, also a 
Slale College and of New York University. 
2 public school system and was elected 1963 
b) the faculty of the new Frances Barlow 
ey are the parents of tluee boys; Leroy, Jr., 



SSC Instructor to Participate 
In Illinois U. Summer Institute 



Iny, head of the De- 



: Ironies let lin..l..gv 
>n from June 17 to 
i.larship by llie Na- 



avannah Stat.' College and is married 
.ii. also a graduate of the College and a leacbci 
Junior High School ol Savannah. They are 
hildren: Charles, Jr., Veronica, and Anthony. ' 
spen.l Ihe summer in Illinois. 



gSi 


Jerry S. Dobrovol 

ig. at the Universil 

Technical Divisi. 


'..".." '"■'"■ 


. Teachers ..I II. 
ml will he in scssi 
was granted a sell 




Two graduates of Savannah State College chat near marble 
bust of Enrico Caruso. Left to right: Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms 
and Augustus Hill. 




Mr. and Mrs. Leroy R. Bolden and sons relaxing at home. 
Pictured (from left to right) are: Victor, Leroy, Jr., Mrs. Katye 
Bolden, Leroy Bolden, Sr„ and Michael Alan. 



A decision on an appeal made to President Payne of 
Savannah State College* Savannah, Georgia, by Messrs. 
Bobby L. Hill and James Brown, Jr., who, for cause on 
April 29, 1963, were expelled from the Savannah State 
College. 



adi' in reply to ;i written appeal .iddressed In me as presidei 
. 8, 1963, requesting reconsideration and relief from the initi 
11 of lilt" I wo slnilenls referred to above. 



2. Following l 
ther considernti! 

3. Afier prayc 
ision in reply l 

a. To provide 



. To advam 
lessrs. Jamc 

he recDinme 

jeelive uppri 



li- r 


iceipl of 
all ill.- 


ilu- 

lails 


and i 


cndulii. 

ib.nnal 


,n availabl 


family 


con, 


nil, 


fill, 

111 


afotemi 


dion 


. ami complel. 
'd appeal : 


considera, 


on, 1 In 


rehy 


pri 


ug 


ipportuni 


y fo 


rehn 

IV and 


ililalioi 
honcsl) 


of Messrs 
of purpos 


Jl is 


Bro> 


»e 


e n 


coopcral 


vc a 


ad lion 


irablc i 


ay of life 


for all 


ouni! 


A 


the 


basic i. 


eals 


that a 


e necessarj to su 


cessful 


indiv 


du 



Brown and Bobby Hill are conditionally permitted to resume attendance ; 
upon their pledge that liny will, as Savannall Slate College Students, bene, 
i due respect fur order, morality, and the rights of others." 'Further, ill, 
"conduct deemed improper or prejudicial lo the College Community." 



1. To Whom It May Concern: 

On April 19, 1963, we sent a release lo the Savannall Morning News in which we slated 

thai President W. K. Payne tlis ed Dr. C. A I hristophe from his position as the head of lire 

Depnrtmcnl of Economies ,,l Savannah Slale College. We also sell! a copy of the communication 



Respectfully submitted. 
Signed: Bobby L. Hill 
Signed: James Brown, Jr. 



2. To Whom It May Concern: 



of all of the sludenls of the College, 



We feel lhal we speak the sr 
urselves, when we say lhal we regret lhal the 

nproper on the pari of some of us. And. we believe that no sludenl desires to do anything 
edit In the College. We therefore hope and lrust that the conduct of al 



/ill now be exemplary for the balance of thi: 

to llie best of their ability; further, we 

Respectfully submitte 
Signed: Bobby L. Hill 
Signed: James Brown, Jr. 

Signed: W. K. Payne, 
May 9, 1963 




Wilton C. Scott, Director, Public Re- 
lations, Savannah State College, present- 
ing a trophy to Mrs. Lillie A. Powell for 
her outstanding services as a secretary 
and for her noteworthy contributions to 
the Southern Regional School Press In- 
stitute over the past four years. The 
presentation was made at a luncheon 
given in her honor following her resigna- 
tion from the College to join her hus- 
band. Sergeant Samuel Powell, in Ger- 



Dr. Clyde Hall Heads Technical Science 
And Engineering Program at SSC 



Savannah State College, rated as an 
excellent technical and engineering 
center, under the dynamic leadership 
and guidance of Dr. W. K. Payne, Presi- 
dent of the College, not only offers de- 
grees in applied arts and sciences, busi- 
ness and teacher education, but it also 
offers a degree in technical science and 
engineering technology. This program 
is designed to prepare men and women 
to serve in the space age. 




Dr. Clyde W. Ha 



Heading this modem program is Dr. 
Clyde W. Hall, Director of the Division 
of Technical Sciences. Dr. Hall is a 
graduate of Savannah State College; 
U. S. Naval Training School. Hampton 
Institute. Hampton, Virginia; Interna 
tional Correspondence School. Scranton, 
Pennsylvania; Iowa State College, Ames. 
Iowa; and Bradley University, Peoria, 

His work experiences prior to his 
present position includes: Supervisor. 
Hannibal Square Playground, Winter 
Park, Florida; teacher at Arkansas A. 
M. & N. College, Pine Bluff. Arkansas; 
Tennessee A. & I. State University. 
Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. Hall was in 
foreign service three years. Dr. Hall is 
a member of the following professional 
organizations: American Industrial Arts 
Association, American Vocational As- 
sociation, American Association of Uni- 
versity Professors, and the American 
Technical Education Association. He 



has written several articles for leading 
publications. 

Savannah State College offers pro- 
grams in the areas of building construc- 
tion technology, electronics technology, 
and mechanical technology. These are 
four-year programs leading to the 
bachelor of science degree in the respec- 
tive areas of specialization. 

The stud) of English, history, govern- 
ment, economics, mathematics through 
integral calculus, physics, and engineer- 
ing drawing js required of all students 
majoring in a branch of engineering 
technology. 

A student majoring in building con- 
struction technology studies such special 
courses as statics, dynamics, surveying, 
strength of materials, specifications, 
estimating, and building design. 

A student majoring in electronics 
technology studies courses dealing with 
topics such as electron tubes, transisters, 
receivers, transmitters, microwaves, elec- 
trical machinery, plus circuits, servo- 
mechanisms, and analogue computers. 

A student majoring in mechanical 
technology studies statics, dynamics, 
fluid mechanics, kinematics, thermi- 
dynamics, internal combustion engines, 
machine design, and electricity. 

Building construction technicians are 
concerned with the erection and design 
of relatively large stationary structures 
and works. Some typical areas of con- 
centration for building construction 
are: structural design, architectural 
drafting, surveying, cost estimating and 
materials testing. 



Electronics technicians are concerned 
with designing, installing, and maintain- 
ing devices involving electron tubes or 
semiconductors. Some typical areas of 
concentration in which electronic tech- 
nicians are interested are: radar, sonar, 
digital computers, analogue computers, 
induction heating and television. 

Mechanical technicians are concerned 
with the design and operation of ma- 
chinery, mechanical devices. and 
processes involving heat. Some typical 
areas of concentration in this program 
are: materials testing, mechanical draft- 
ing, internal combustion engines and 
cyrogenics. 




Tharon Stevens, a graduate of Savan- 
nah State College, was the organist for 
the 45th Annual Meeting of the Georgia 
Teachers and Education Association. Mr. 
Stevens is an instructor at the William 
James High School of Statesboro, 




Daniel Washington, President of the 
Savannah Chapter of the Savannah State 
College Alumni Association, greets mem- 
bers and visitors at the Annual Alumni 
Vespers held at the College. 




Mr. O. H. Brown, Public Relations Di- 
rector, Albany State College of Albany, 
Georgia, delivers annual Men's Festival 
Assembly Address at Savannah State 
College in Savannah, Georgia. 



IMPORTANT MESSAGE 

Dear Savannah State Alumnus: 

This is a message of utmost importance. It is your invitation to 
participate in the 1962-63 Scholarship-Membership Appeal of the 
Savannah State College Alumni Association. This year will be our 
greatest yet, if you want it to be. 

The significance of this years Appeal and the importance of 
your participation are indicated in the following thoughts: 

1. This year must realize at least 1,000 participants and $10,000. 

2. Your gift is an investment in the future of higher education. 
All institutions of higher education must seek new financial 
resources to buttress their work. The best and most stable 
source is through alumni contributions. By your will to give 
financial assistance, we can mold a greater S.S.C. 

3. Your gift helps qualify S.S.C. for Federal Grants. 



Your gift will help 



nber of student scholai 



aid in many other needed institutional en- 



ships and wi 
deavors. 

Your gift is the only ojjicial way to be identified as "an active 
Alumnus. 

An Alumnus will always be identified by the reputation bis 
or her Alma Mater has attained. It behooves us to make sure 
S.S.C. is always the best! 

vhat she has 



We can never really repay our Alma Mater for 
given us but we certainly can try. 



th( 



■d check 



djoi, 



Won't you please take the time now to 
formation form and remit it and the enclo 
postage-paid envelope:" Your check may In- postdated if necessary. 
We are asking that your combined scholarship — membership dues 
be $10 for the entire year. After payment of this amount, you will 
not be called upon again this school year. In addition, you will "re- 
ceive a receipt, and National membership cards, four issues of the 
Alumni Newsletter, privilege to vote and hold office in the local and 
National Associations and other services of the Alumni Office upon 
request. 

This school year promises to be the best yet. May we count on 
you to assist in making it so? 

Very sincerely yours, 

Daniel Washington 

Coordinator 

Robert Young 

Appeal Chairman 

Prince Mitchell 

Act. S.S.C. Alumni Sec. 




SSC Grad Heads 
New Sehool 



Mrs. 


Sadie 


L. 


Carll 


dge 


Principal of a 


staff 


i.f live 
lran-.fi 


red i 




■a.he 


W 


d 700 pupils 


dale. 














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| 


W 


l'"i 


Mil"" ' < ' 


lary. 


ol 111.- 


-jf.-i 


unty. 










] al 


imna of S.S.C 


She 










Atlanta University 




Ncii 1 








Pr 


or to her appoint- 










Co 


nty Board of 


Edu- 










i Je 


nkins and Liberty 












ve member o 


St. 


[oho 






hnrcl 


an 


d founder of 


the 












izalion in Cha 












r ei 


ucational and 














is a member 




Club, 


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,-,-,' 


C.C.T.A., P. a 
Sf.M.C.A., and 


d s". 

Zeta 


Phi Bi 














Mrs. 


Carl 


edj 




the 


wife- of Bl 




Carlle. 


S'\ s 




nd it 




other „f two 




Ernest 


Earl 


nc 


lilan 


nie, 


Jr. 





SSC Alumnus Is 
Athletic Director 



Joll) Stephens, Jr. 



1%0 graduate ol Sa- 
ill. a degree o, Health, 
id It. t. w 



> the former Jaerjuelyn 
f Savannah State College, 
.ill. lb.- Chatham County 



SSC to Hold In-Service Institute in 
Chemistry for Secondary School Teachers 



The Savannah Slate College Chemistry Department announces 


an In-Service Institute in 


Chemistry (or secondary sel 1 teachers of Chemistry and General S 




September 28, l%o t., June 6, 1964 by the National Science Found: 


ion at the College. 


Prospective participants should hold a bachelor's decree, and 1 


e employed as a teacher ol 


Chemistry or General Science (grades 7-12), .unl have taught and/o 


held Ice helot's degrees do 


at least three years, and must ilsu show apparent ability ti> secure 


sufficient benefits from the 


Institute. The following courses will be offered as listed: 




First Quarter 




Chemistry 200— Physical laws of Chemistry (three arte, ho 


ars). This course concerns 


itself with laws that include matter and its structure, mas. energy, ll 


e stales of matter, solutions. 


homogeneous and heterogeneous ei|uilihria, the periodic table, a 


id inorganic nomenclature. 


Laboratory experiments ami problems that illustrate the applieatiot 


of these law- tressed. 


Seoond Quarter 




Chemistry 201— The Fundamentals of ( hemical Reaction (lure 




Irolysis, electrical energy and, chemi. .1 reaction, ... ,,(- and bases ill 


1 A;;','. l ,' l ;"_;:,'," 1 ', , , , i , ."."s. ! ~i.,',', 1 ,',;,. 


Si™ [fffii-ale CTbicTp^areTreSed.' ''""'" '""'"' 


''""''"" ,M " "'~ '""' 


Third Quarter 




Chemistry 202— Selected Topics (three quarter hours). This c 


urse deals with metals and 


metallurgy, nuclear ehemi-tiy, ore.mii chemistry ( nomenclature am 


classification), polymcriza- 


lion, rubber and plastic., carbohydrates, fats ami proteins, colloid 


. Problems and laboratory 


experiments related to the course yvork are emphasized. 




The objectives of the institute shall he: 




1. To offer to science teachers, within a radius of approjtimal 


ly 50-75 miles of Savannah 


Slate College, fundamental courses in Chemistry. 




2. To increase the teacher's capacity to motivate students inn 


science careers. 


3. To create in the high school teacher a greater awareness 


if and appreciation for the 


work of prominent scientists. This will also serve as a 




enthusiasm. 




4. To lielp fill out a void in the teachers' backgrounds, in s 


abject matter, so that they 


may begin an advanced degree program, al some graduate scl 


ool without having so many 


undergraduate prere<|ui-ite. tu lake. 





What Does Savannah State College Mean to Me? 



By JULIA ELAINE CHEELY 

li State Culler, looking forward to 



As a- senior of Savannah State C 
momentarily to take a mental inventory of what Savannah State College real] 

First of all, however, Savannah Slate College i- located on the immedi 
Georgia's oldest, and one of the most interesting cities "I the Southeastern I in 
beautiful eampu- and its ideal location, not too close yel not too far from the ci 
combination of (lie tranquility of country life and the modern convenient e- ol ■ if 
State College and it* surrounding*, therefore, mean an atmosphere conducive t. 

Another factor thai means much to me as a student of Savanna]] Slate, i- tl 
of divisions and departments which make up the College Curricula. This nuinl 
departments, and courses offered make* it easj for one la select a major or 
of study lo hest prepare him for his chosen goal in life, 

After reviewing the rei onU, ;ichie\ einenl-, and present positions of some ( 
State College graduates while compiling this hulletin, I ran say that the worth 
is highly represented by ils products, the Savannah Slate College Alumni. 

What Savannah State College means lo me can very well he summarized 



S.S.C., your name is more lhan just thre 
1 can never forget, the happy days spent; 
In lliis haven so close to the sea. 

Through your halls, have 1 wandered long 
Spring and Fall; 

Crealer knowledge lo find, lo hold and I 
me still closer lo your precious walls. 

I will go on from here lo higher plain*. 
That's what I'm striving for; 
Bui your menior> will always remain 
In my heart like a shining star. 






Guide me on as I _ 
unknown, through long full 
Through smiles and through tears; 
I'll remember the moments spent h 



here lo other land- 




Mobley Presented 
Original Play 

Mr. Leroy Mobley, a graduate of Sa- 
vannah Stale College and English in- 
struclor at the D. F. Douglas High 
School, Montezuma, Georgia, wrote and 
directed a three-act play entitled "Set 
On Edge" at the School. 

Mr. Mobley completed his high school 
studies at Vienna High School, Vienna. 
Georgia before entering Savannah State 
College. After he was graduated from 
Savannah Stale, he worked as an Eng- 
lish instructor at the Vienna High 
Scl I until he was called into military 



Du 



thet 



ny. lie taught 
ge in Puerto 
at the D. r\ 



stay 
English as a foreign Ian 
Rico. This is his first y 
Douglas High School, 

The title for the play was taken from 
one of the Old Testament prophets, 
Ezekiel 18:2 . . . For the fathers have 
eaten sour grapes and the children's 
teeth are "Set On Edge." 

The members of the cast were: Mollie 
Rucker. Ellabelle Salmon. Eula Flowers. 
Henry J. Ladd, Jr., Willi 
Alfred Harwick. Stage 
managers were L. W. 
Walter McCray. 

Mr. Mobley is the husband of Mrs 
Nell C. Mobley, who is a senior a 
Savannah State College majoring it 
Biology. They have one son, Andre, fou 
years old. 



and 
tnd property 
Duncan and 



Directory of Alumni Chapters 

Albany, Georgia Mr. Benjamin Graham '55 Albany State College 

Mr. Willie II. McBride '49 .248 Plaza 

Mr. Arthur Richardson '40 Samuel Archer High 

Miss Ethel Mack . . .1211 Tenth Street 

Mr. Charles L. Bailey '53 7 Long Street 

Mr. Charles DuVaul '26 Spencer High School 

Mr. Timoth) Ryals '54 Oconee High School 

Mr. L. L. Banks '43 . . . 502 North Sixth Street 

Mr. E. T. Whitaker '37 Homerville High and Elementary 

Mr. Arthur Williams '49 Wayne County Training School 

Mr. W. J. Sutton '48 1601 Anthony Road 

Madison, Georgia . Mr. Robert Jackson '55 . Pearl Street High School 

Mcintosh. Georgia Mr. Jesse Stevens . . 1 1 incshaw Elementary School 

Reidsville, Georgia Mrs. Josie Sessoms '36. . .. Reidsville, Georgia 

Sandersville, Georgia Elnus Williams Davisboro Academy 

Savannah, Georgia Mr. James Lulen '38 . . . Sophronia Tompkins High 

Statesboro, Georgia Mrs. Etheleen Talbert '41! 2 Carver Street 

Valdosta, Georgia . Mr. Isaiah Isom '58 Pinevale High School 

Washington. D. C. Mrs. Ora M. Washington 3719 Kansas Avenue. N. W. 

Waynesboro, Georgia Mr. R. E. Blakeney '31 Waynesboro High and Industrial 



Athens, Georgia 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Augusta, Georgia 
Claxton, Georgia 
Columbus. Georgia 

Dublin. Georgia 
Griffin. Georgia 
Homerville, Georgi 
Jesup, Georgia. . . 
Macon. Georgia 



Financing Faculty 
Salaries, a Problem 



Mentic 

the rcgiu 
„( pmfei 



' of educatk 

"The plain fact is that the college teachers 
of the United Stairs, through their inadequate 
salaries, are subsidizing the education of 
students, and in some cases the luxuries of 
their families, by an amount which is more 
than double the grand total of alumni gifts, 
corporate gifts, and endowment income of all 
colleges and universities combined." 






lid the k 
full professors an 
At that time * 
versities paid ihei 



ago the Southeastern 



the i 



■ to both 



avcra';.'. 



lieges and uni- 
$394 less 
full pro- 
ssors checks were more than $1,100 less 
an the national average. 
Today the Southeast still pays the lowest 
laries for both ranks and the gap between 
itional and regional average is even larger. 
Currently Southern instructors earn $619 
ss than their counterparts in other regions 
id full professors earn $1,520 less than their 
unter parts. 

The growing gap doesn't mean that South- 
n salaries stand still. In four years, instruc- 
ts salary levels have increased 19 per cent 
id full professors 26 per cent. The national 
creases were 22 per cent and 27 per cent. 
Because these salaries are still relatively 
w, the region loses its potential teaching 



power II 


i oilier profes 


sions or to other parts 


of the c 






A rec. 


■ill study mac 


le by the Fund for the 


AllVillllT 


nient of Eili 


[cation shows thai fi- 


nancial 


rewards often 


;d to educators by our 


society, 


as compared 


to those for other oc- 




al groups, decreased greatly from 1904 


lu l'l.'.O. 


It is only duri 


ing the last decade that 


1. 




to correct this. 


For i- 

lesson . 
per cent 

road cm 


xample, rail,. 


sad conductors' "real" 
eased 68 per cent dur- 

nivcrsiltes declined two 
: gC professor earns only 

te of the difference in 


occupatu 


mal preparatl 


in required by the two 


vocation. 






Univei 


sities also ha' 


te a hard lime compel- 


ill? Will 


, industry in 


Ihe market place for 


Ph.U.V 


The starling s 


alary for jobs requiring 




in industry i; 


i $8,500 to $10,000. At 




sity, starting 


jobs requiring a Ph.D. 


pay S.i.ul 

private i 
creases 1 


nsthmions mi 


salaries for professors 
in the South are lower 
• institutions, hut the 
ide larger per cent in- 
■s of 1957-58, and 1961- 


62. A n 


otable except 


ion is Duke University 


which pays tile liigln 




solution, 


private or public in the region. 


private i 


nstance, salai 


•ies for professors in 
Texas increased 47 per 


.,■1,1 1» 


ween 1957-58 


and 191.1-62. while the 


public ii 


icrease was 21 per cent. In spite of 



the larf 

age 37,750 at a private institution and S8.630 

at a public institution. 

Salary is important in recruiting and hold- 
ing on lo adequate faculty and slaff for any 
university. The Commission on Goals for 
Higher Education in the Soulh has said: 

"Institutions must attract and develop 
faculties of the highest caliber. To do this, 
faculty salaries in the Southern states must 
be made competiinc with those in the -rest 
of the nation." 




James Carthon (74), and Calvin Rob- 
erts (51) are key men in the Savannah 
State offensive and defensive attack. 
Carthon is a senior and plays guard. He 
is from Thompson, Georgia. Calvin 
Roberts plays at the center position. 
He formerly played at Tompkins High 
in Savannah. Big "Chick" is captain of 
the '62 Tigers squad. 



Robert A. Young, Chairman Big Gift 
Committee of Savannah Chapter 



Mr- Robert A. Young. Principal of Harri- 
Area Trade School, Savannah, Georgia, is a 
graduale of Savannah State College. He i- 
Chairman of the Big Gift Committee of the 
loeal ehapter of the Savannah State College 
for 1963. 



Kennedy C. Childers 



Sup 



Mr. Young received his high school diplorfl 
lid a B.S. Degree from Savannah State Co 
■go (then Georgia State College). He n 



Nets a native of StO 
graduate of Savani 
L-en employed as A 
I Extension Servile 



of Burke Coui 
arrieel to Mrs. 



Montgomery, Georgia and spearheaded the 
campaign for funds. The $20,000 project was 
dedicated in 1949. 

Among his many honors and awards re- 
ceived are the following: The Delaware 
Trophy hy the Savannah State College Alumni 
Association for outstanding services; the State 
Modern Farmers key by the Georgia Associa- 
tion of New Farmers of America; elected to 
Phi Delta Kappa Fraternity, an educational 
organization; elected Vice President of Theta 
Chapter, Phi Delta Kappa Fraternity, Cornell 
University; awarded certificate hy the Chat- 
ham County Board of Education for efficient 
service; elected President of Chatham County 
Principals and Consultants Club; and is listed 
in Who's Who in American Education. 



Augustus Hill State Agent 



Mr. 



n-d and the latin 



of Kmal Housiri 




Eagle 
Payne, Pi 
County Di 



', John Clemmons, Jr., presenting 1 
nt of Savannah State College, for 
of Boy Scouts of America. 



"Guardian Award" to Dr. W. K 
is contributions to the Chathan 



DeLoach Principal of New 
Scott Junior Hi«h School 

Robert Fulton DeLoach, Jr., a native Sa- 
vatinahian and graduate of Savannah Stale 
al of the newly named 
I formerly 




Peace Corps Volunteer Richard M. 
Coger, 22, a Savannah State College 
graduate, works as a teacher in British 



Honduras 


. A native of Pineland, South 


Carolina, 


Coger is one of 5,000 Volun- 


teers wo 


rking overseas. Another 4,000 


Volunteer 


s will enter training during the 


summer r 


nonths for projects in 44 coun- 


tries. Per 


sons interested in these projects 


should v. 


rite the Peace Corps immedi- 



SSC Alumnus Appeared on 
CBS Television Program 

THE DEFENDERS— "The Colossus" with 
Clifford Bryant of Savannah. Georgia and a 
graduale of Savannah State College appeared 
in the role of a Laboratory Assistant, in the 
Laboratory of a Scientist accused of murder- 
ing his wife. E. G. Marshall, Robert Reed, 
Leo Germ and others were shown on Saturday, 
April 13, at 8:30 P.M. on the CBS Television 




larris. Cashier, 
h State College, accept- 
rrom student registran 
a 1956 graduate of the College. 





Jo 


\,a E. I 


:heely, a i 


ten 


ior at Sav 


annah 


State 


Col 


leqe 


ai 


id 


Edita 


r of the 


All 


imni 


Bu 


lleti 


n, poir 


its to the ! 


site 


of the til 


iw dor 


mitory 


for 


WOI 






to be 


erected 


on 


the 




mp, 




ultra-modern 


facilities. 























"Tiger" SSC College Annual Dedicated to 
John B. Clemmons, Dept. Math and Physics 



The Savannah State College "Tiger," 
student annual, was dedieated to John 
B. Clemmons. Associate Professor and 
Head. Department Mathematics and 
Physics. He was presented the yearbook 
today at general assembly by Earnestine 
Adams, - 63. Copy Writer for the annual. 
President William K. Payne received the 
first official copy as the "first citizen" 
of the College community. 

Mr. Clemmons is a native of Rome, 
Ceorgia. He received his B.S. degree 
from Morehouse College and the M.S. 
degree from Atlanta University. He has 
studied toward the Ph.D. in Mathe- 
matics for three years at the University 
of Southern California. This study has 
been under grants by the Ford Fellow- 
ship, Teaching Fellowship and the Na- 
tional Science Fellowship. Mr. Clem- 
mons is affiliated with the following or- 
ganizations: Beta Kappa Chi Honor So- 
ciety, Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society, 
Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, Alpha Phi 
Alpha Fraternity. Shriners, National 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 
Advisory Board of Carver Bank. Board 



of Directors of Golden Rule Insurance 
Company. 

He is a member of St. Phillips Church 
and teacher of Sunday School, Chair- 
man. Savannah State Credit Committee. 
Chairman, Boy Scouts Advancement 
Committee, Director of YMCA Players 
and listed in "Who's Who in Negro 
America." 

Mr. Clemmons is married to the for- 
mer Mozelle Dailey and the father of a 
son. John. Jr.. and a daughter. Sheila. 



Mr. J. C. Reese, Principal, Center High 
School, Waycross, Georgia, speaks to 
Savannah State College student teachers 
during the Spring quarter of 1963. Mr. 
Reese is president of State Teachers Assn. 



Mr. Ezekiel Walker. Special Sales 
Representative. Coca-Cola Bottling Com- 
pany, Savannah. Georgia, is a graduate 
of Savannah State College. 

Mr. Walker is a member of Saint 
Mary's Catholic Church of Savannah 
and the Barron's Social Club. He is 
married to Mrs. Thelma Walker, also a 
graduate of Savannah State College and 
a teacher at Cuyler Junior High School 
in Savannah. They are the parents of 
two sons, Ezekiel, Jr., and Eric. 




Betty Washington is the ne 
addition to the Bethlehem Commi 
Center Staff. Mrs. Washington i 
graduate of Savannah State College 
a degree in Social Science. She is 
Program Coordinator at the Center. 



Hopkins Appointed 
Jury Commissioner 



T. J. Hopki, 
nah Slate Coll 



raduate ..f 



(Geo 



State Col- 
lege), in the class of 1919, has been 
appointed jury commissioner for Chat- 
ham County and the Cit\ of Savannah. 
He is reported to be the first Negro ap- 
pointee in the recent history of Georgia. 




The duties of i 
select jurors for the Chatham County 
courts and to keep a record of jurors. 
Mr. Hopkins plans to make an attempt 
to equalize the number of jurors from 
each race. He is also a graduate of 
Howard University with a Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Electrical Engineer- 
ing. Here in Savannah, he has been an 
Electrical Engineer and Contractor since 
1928 with the exception of three years 
and eight months spent in the Army. 
ii- with the Army Mr. 



kins , 



Offit 



■ for tin 



Vircraft Artillery Group 
guarding Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Com- 
mander of the 1st Battalion 1322 En- 
gineer G. S. Regiment, and Operation 
Officer for the 1312th Engineer G. S. 
Regiment on Luzon in the Philippine 
Islands. He is President of T. J. Hop- 
kins. Inc., Electrical Engineer-Contrac- 
tors, Savannah: Keeper of Finance of 
the Mu Phi Chapter, Omega Psi Phi 
Fraternity; a member of the Hub: 
Chairman of the Building and Property 
Committee of the Board of Managers 
for the West Broad Street YMCA; a 
member of the Executive Committee for 
the Project Sabre; a member of the City 
Advisory Committee on Savannah's 
Community Improvement Program and 
Urban Renewal Program; Vice Presi- 
dent of the Mid-Town Chamber of Com- 
merce and Vice President of Mid-Town 
Toastmaster's Club No. 3131-14. 







Ex-students of Savannah State College have been appointed as firemen for the 
City of Savannah. Savannah is the second city in Georgia to employ Negro firemen. 
Pictured above are: Purdy Bowens, Theodore Rivers, Louis Oliver, Porter Screen, 

Cordell Heath and Wornell Robinson. 




Miss Carolyn Stafford Anderson, a graduate of Savannah State College and an 
Elementary Education major serves as secretary and assistant manager in the Savan- 
nah Relocation Office in the Department of Urban Renewal with Festus Bailey as 
Manager. 



Savannah State College Alumna 
Regional Teacher of the Year 



On 



ind an 



e more, a Savannah State College Alumna has been 
'Teacher of the Year" for Region 11. Mrs. Mazie 
W. Robinson, a Home Economics teacher at Scott Junior 
High School, has received this distinctive honor, and thereby 
symbolizes all teachers in the seventeen counties of Region 11. 
This recent honor conies as a result of Mrs. Robinson's having 
been chosen "Teacher of the Year" by the faculty of Scott 
Junior High School and Chatham County Teachers Asso- 
ciation. 

Mrs. Robinson has rendered many noteworthy services to 
local, state, and national professional organizations. She is 
the chairman of the social committee of Chatham County 
Teachers Association, chairman of the ninth grade Home- 
making Curriculum Planning Committee for the revision of 
the Homemaking curriculum for Chatham County, co-chair- 
man of Walter S. Scott P.T.A. Advisory committee, 
energetic advisor for the N.H.A. She has served o 
statewide committees and presided over the general 
at the last state vocational teachers convention. She was a 
voting delegate at the American Vocational Association con- 
vention which convened in Atlantic City, October 1963. 

She has exhibited genuine interest in the community and 
has displayed untiring efforts in community projects. These 
services include community projects dealing with family prob- 
lems, teaching classes for Red Cross and for the Chatham 
County Health Department, and fund raising drives for youth 
organizations. She is a member of St. Paul C.M.E. Church, 
and makes unique contributions to the church through the 
St. Paul C.M.E. Service Guild. 

Travel and educational tours of many states in our coun- 
try, Cuba, and Mexico serves as a background for adding 
color to the progressive teaching methods used by Mrs. Rob- 
inson. In January 1964, a poll made by an English class at 
Scott Junior High School showed that she received the high- 
est number of votes from students naming her the "Most 
Outstanding Teacher." 

Mrs. Robinson is a product of the local public schools, 
received her B.S. degree in Home Economics from Savannah 
State College and has done advanced study at Tuskegee and 
Stout State College. 

Mrs. Robinson is 
College Alumni, havi 
committees. 



ardent worke 



l the Sav 
ial and h- 



ah Stale 



Editorial 

During the last seventeen years, Savannah State College 
has been guided by four different Presidents. Dr. Benjamin 
F. Hubert left the College in June of 1947, and was succeeded 
by Dr. James A. Colston. Dr. Colston left in August of 1949. 
and was succeeded by Dr. William K. Payne. Dr. P.iyne died 
in July of 1963, and was succeeded by Dr. Howard Jordan. 
Jr. (Actually, we have had five Presidents, because Dean of 
Faculty, Timothy C. Meyers, served as acting President for 
about three months while the Board of Regents was in the 
process of appointing Dr. Jordan.) 

During these seventeen years, the alumni of the college 
have been becoming more active and strengthening our 
alumni organization. Although we are stronger today than 
at any time in our organization's history, we do not have 
nearly ten percent of our alumni actively participating in our 
alumni organization. 

Why do Alumni neglect their Alma Mater? There have 
been many reasons given, and this alumni neglect is suffered 
by ail colleges, from the outstanding Ivy Colleges down to 
the smallest of the extremely poor private colleges. Savannah 
State then, is no exception in this area. 

During the past seven months, we have seen an upward 
trend of alumni participation in our Alma Mater's affairs. 
There seems to be an entirely different kind of attitude 
towards our College, and Alumni are now working harder 
than ever before. The changes in organization to allow 
District units have proved to be a great unifying factor in 
the counties within 100 miles of the College. The actual 
organization of the other districts should really move us 
forward. The creation of the Office of the Executive Vice- 
President has helped the organization tremendously, and is 
being administered by one of our most capable alumni, Ben- 



jamin F. Lewis, "53." The individual Alu 
working harder and the leadership is beco 



Chapte 



vely 



As we enter the "Howard Jordan, Jr." era of our Alma 
Mater- it seems that we are definitely on the march. Dr. 
Jordan is making every effort to push us forward, along with 
his administration. We are sure that the next few years will 
find us, not only strong, but far more generous than at any 
time in our history. We are sure that alumni everywhere 
will join the march, and help us move our Alma Mater 
forward. 

Prince A. Jackson, Jr. 
Alumni Secretary 



^ 



Support Your 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



The Savannah State College Bulletin 

President Dr. Howard W. Jordan, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations and 

Editor-in-Chief Wilton C. Scott 

Alumni Secretary Prince A. Jackson 

Issue Editor Carolyn R. Screen 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Volume XVII May, 1964 Number 6 

The Savannah Stale College Bulletin is published yearly in 
October, December, February, March, April, and May by Savannah 
State College. Second Class mail privileges authorized at Savannah, 
Georgia. 




GREETING 
TO ALUMNI 



/ wish to take this opportunity to sincerely thank the officers and 
members of the Alumni Association along with members of the administra- 
tion, faculty, and student body, for the warm reception and strong support 
which I, as your sixth President, have received in my first year in office at 
Savannah State College. With the enthusiastic spirit which is evident among 
the alumni and the College family, it is certain that Savannah State College 
will move rapidly ahead in taking its rightful place among the leaders in 
the educational world. As we come to the close of our first year in office, 
we pledge to you our every effort towards the development of a program 
of academic and extra-class excellence to ivhich all alumni members and 
friends can look with pride. 

We especially want to thank the alumni for the generous support and 
contributions to our National Defense Education Act Scholarship Fund. 
Through this medium, the College will be able to offer greater assistance 
to young men and women in getting an education, which they may otherwise 
not have been able to afford. 

Elseivhere in this Bulletin, you will note the status of our Building 
Program. I am happy to report that it is moving along according to schedule. 

Mrs. Jordan and Judy join me in ivishing for all alumni, faculty, stu- 
dents, and friends the best of health and happiness during the summer vaca- 
tion. You have, with you always, our prayers and sincere good wishes. 

Howard Jordan, Jr. 
President 



TEACHERS OF THE YEAR 



Mr. John H. Myles 
Sol C. Johnson High School 

Mr. John H. Myles. an excellent 
teacher, a dedicated coach, and out- 
standing personality was selected 
"Teacher of the Year" at Sol C. John- 
son High School. 

Mr. Myles has an exceptional 
academic record, which includes the 
B.S. degree from Savannah State Col- 
lege, a M.S. degree from New York 
University, advanced and special study 
at Florida A. & M. University, and a 
Six-Year Certificate awarded by New 
Y'ork University and the Georgia State 
Department of Education. 

Previous teaching experiences of Mr. 
Myles include positions as teacher and 
head coach at Savannah State College. 
Florida N. 1. & M. College. St. Au- 
gustine, Florida; and Haven Home 
School. Sa 



An ardent church and community 
worker. Mr. Myles is a member of 
Butler Presbyterian Church. His pro- 
fessional affiliations include. C.C.T.A., 
G.T.E.A., A.T.A.. N.E.A. and the Sa- 
vannah Coaches and Officials Associa- 
te Savannah Coaches and Officials 
Association and the Southeastern Quar- 
terback Club, selected Mr. Myles as 
"Coach of the Year." for 1963-64. 



He 



the 



of Mrs. Eliza Myles, 
the husband of Mrs. Dora Sanders 
Myles. and the father of little Cina 
Lorraine Myles. 



Miss Julia A. Lowe 
Florance Street School 

Miss Julia A. Lowe, a fourth grade 
teacher, was selected "Teacher of the 
Year" at Florance Street School. Miss 
Lowe, a native of Savannah, received 
her earliest formal education in the 
public schools of this city. Her high 
school diploma was received from Spell- 
man College in Atlanta. Georgia. She 
was the recipient of the B.S. degree 
from Savannah State College and has 
studied further at Atlanta University. 

The honoree's church membership is 
with the First Congregation Church. 
She is affiliated with local, regional, 
state, and national educational organ- 
izations. 

Her years of teaching have been un- 
paralled in the propagation of wisdom. 
She has given unselfishly of her services, 
and through these services, effectively 



motivated and inspired children to 
plunge full-speed into the learning 
operation. The Florance Street School 
faculty and principal, Mr. Norman B. 
Elmore, consider Miss Lowe's brilliant 
career a compass to guide them in their 
venture in the teaching profession. 



Mrs. Alhertha M. Smith 
Sol C. Johnson High School 

Mrs. Albertha M. Smith is the 
"Teacher of the Year" at Sol. C. John- 
son Elementary School for 1964-65. 

Because of her educational training 
in the teaching profession, her sincere 
interest in students, academically, 
spiritually, and morally, these and other 
qualities contributed to Mrs. Smith's 
selection. 

A native of Savannah, Georgia, Mrs. 
Smith received her elementary and 
secondary education in the system she 
now serves. A bachelor of science de- 
gree was awarded her in elementary 
education from Savannah State Col- 
lege, and a master of arts degree was 
granted her from New York Univer- 
sity. Further study led her to Atlanta. 
John Carroll, and South Carolina State 
Universities. 

In addition to her classroom duties. 
she serves as advisor to the Safetv 
Patrol, and Junior Jonquill Garden 
Club. She holds membership in the 
N.E.A., A.T.A.. G.T.E.A., C.C.T.A., 
P.T.A. and Classroom Teachers. 



Mrs. Smith is an ardent community 
and church worker and she is a mem- 
ber of Saint Benedict's Catholic Church. 

She is the wife of Maurice Smith 
and the mother of two daughters. 
JoAnn Smith Smith and Minnie Ruth 
Smith Lockhart. 



Mrs. Virginia C. Floyd 
M. G. Haynes School 

Mrs. Virginia C. Floyd, second grade 
teacher, was selected by the faculty of 
M. G. Haynes School as their first 
"Teacher of the Year." Her sincerity, 
dignity, sense of humor, initiative and 
well-rounded personality have estab- 
lished her as being highly worthy of 
this honor. 

Mrs. Floyd is a product of the Sa- 
vannah public schools and Spelhnnn 
College. She received her B.S. degree 
in Elementary Education from Georgia 



State College, now Savannah State 
College, and has done advanced study 
at Atlanta University. 

She holds membership in the follow- 
ing organizations: N.E.A., G.T.E.A., 
A.T.A., C.C.T.A.. Classroom Teachers, 
and P.T.A. She is also affiliated with 
the Order of the Eastern Star, Y.W.C.A., 
Ladies Auxiliary of S.U.N.A.. and lota 
Lambda Sorority. 

She is an ardent member of the First 
Bryan Baptist Church, where she serves 
as chairman of the music department 
and organist of this historical church. 

In addition to her regular classroom 
duties, Mrs. Floyd serves as chairman 
of the school's music department, co- 
chairman of the school council, chair- 
man of the library club, and school rep- 
resentative of the liaison committee. 

She has used her extensive travel ex- 
periences and dedication to education 
for the continuous improvement of boys 
and girls. 



Mrs. Mattie Belle Collins 
Francis S. Barton School 

The principal and faculty of the 
Francis S. Barton School are very happy 
to acknowledge as their "Teacher of 
the Year" for 1963-64, Mrs. Mattie 
Belle Collins. 

Mrs. Collins, a fourth grade teacher, 
is a recipient of the B.S. degree in Ele- 
mentary Education from Savannah 
State College. She further enriched her 
educational background by attending 
summer sessions at Savannah State and 
by participation in several local work- 
shops sponsored by the Board of Edu- 
cation. 

Her professional affiliations include 
memberships in the N.E.A., G.T.E.A., 
A.T.A.. C.C.T.A., Classroom Teacher 
Association, P.T.A., and Savannah 
Chapter of the Savannah State College 
Alumni Association. 

She is a communicant of the Connor's 
Temple Baptist, and serves unselfishly 
in her reli^inu> obligations. For eleven 
years, she has taught in the public 
schools of Chatham County. 

Her pleasant smile, her delightful 
personality and a sincere liking for her 
pupils and associates are certainly at- 
tributes which helped her to attain the 
coveted title of Teacher of the Year. 



Mrs. Mary F. Simmons 
Anderson St. Elementary Sehool 

Mrs. Mary F. Simmons is "Teacher 
of the Year" at Anderson Street Ele- 
mentary School. 

Mrs. Simmons is a native of Way- 
cross, Georgia, a 
graduate of Savan- 
nah State College, 
and at present, is 



He is presently a member of the 
Georgia Interscholastic Association, and 
Co-Chairman of the Region Eight 
Counselor Group. 




of the St. Ja 
A.M.E. Church, a 
volunteer worker at the Frank Callen 
Bovs Club, a member of the West Broad 
Street Y.M.C.A., and a member of the 
Gaynistics Social Club. 

Currently, she is the faculty chairman 
of Anderson Street School, and is group 



of the ! 

the city-i 

member of the Liaison i 

Mrs. Simmons has be 

the board of education 



le teachers fo 
She is also a 
ammittee. 
o employed by 
1951, and 



has served efficiently at Tompkins and 
Spencer Elementary Schools. In 1962, 
she came to Anderson School, with the 
well-earned reputation of being 
standing and talented teacher. 
She is the wife of Walter B. S 
Sr„ and the mother of two sons, 
Jr., and Ronald. 



Mr. Harold B. Fields 

Tattnall County Industrial 

High School 

The principal and faculty of Tattnall 

County Industrial High School in Reids- 

ville. Georgia, has selected Mr. Harold 

B. Fields, Commercial Teacher and 

School Counselor as 

their "Teacher of 

the Year." 

Mr. Fields re- 
ceived the B.S. de- 
gree from Savan- 
nah State College. 

In an effort to 
display his athletic 
ability in high 
school, and college, 
he was an active 
participant in the 
following sports: Football, Basketball, 




Mr. Vernon L. Rhaney 
Alfred E. Beach High School 

Vernon L. Rhaney is a native Savan- 
nahian. His early education was received 
in the local public schools, and More- 
house College. He transferred to Savan- 
nah State College during his sophomore 
year, from which he received the B.A. 
degree. 

Mr. Rhaney taught mathematics and 
science for one year at Appling County 
Training School, Baxley, Georgia. The 
following year he began teaching mathe- 
matics at Tompkins Senior High School. 
In October of 1942. he entered the 
military service. 

Upon returning to civilian life in 
1945, Rhaney resumed his teaching 
duties at Tompkins Senior High School. 
In 1950. he was transferred to the new 
Alfred E. Beach Senior High School. In 
addition to his duties as a teacher of 
mathematics, he is prominently identi- 
fied with the school's guidance services 
program. Since 1950 he has served as 
advisor to the school safety patrol, and 
as a teacher of adult evening classes. 

He earned the M.A. degree from Co- 
lumbia University in 1951, and the Six- 
Year Certificate in Administration and 
Supervision in Secondary Education 
from New York University in 1955. 

In addition to being a member of 
St. Phillips A.M.E. Church, he is 
affiliated with the following: Phi Beta 
Sigma Fraternity; Phi Delta Kappa 
Educational Fraternity ; Chatham 
County Teachers Association, the Geor- 
gia Teachers Educational Association. 
A.T.A.; and the National Education 
Association. 



Marie Gadsden, SS Alu 
Appointment With Peace Corps 

Marie Gadsden, a nationally known 
expert on teaching English as a foreign 
language, has been appointed a Train- 
ing Officer with the Peace Corps, ac- 
cording to an announcement by Peace 
Corps Director Sargent Shriver. 

Born in Douglas, Georgia, and raised 
in Savannah, Mrs. Gadsden is a gradu- 
ate of Georgia State, now Savannah 
State in Savannah. She received her 
M.A. in English from Atlanta Univer- 




Alfred E. Beach High School 
Teacher Receives Fellowship 

Verdelle Lambert, 1962 magna cum 
laude graduate of Savannah State Col- 
lege and presently employed as an Eng- 
lish teacher at Alfred E. Beach High 
School, becomes the first graduate of 
Savannah State College to receive a 
Wall Street Journal Fellowship in 
Journalism. She'll study this summer at 
Syracuse University. 

Miss Lambert was editor of the Sa- 
vannah State College prize winning 
Tiger's Roar during her senior year in 
college. She was recommended by the 
local high school officials and highly 
endorsed by Wilton C. Scott, Director 
of Public Relations at Savannah State 
College and Coordinator of student 
publications under whom she worked 
as a student. Scott was the recipient of 
a Wall Street honor. 1960 Journalism 
Fellowship at Columbia University, 1962 
— .$500 cash Meritorious Service Award 
to Journalism and 1963 — Newspaper 
Crant to study journalism at Northern 
Illinois University. Scott serves as Chief 
Press Officer for State Teacher at Geor- 
gia and director of the Southern 
Regional School Press Institute, 
affiliated with Columbia University 
Scholastic Press Association. 



sity and her Ph.D., in English from the 
University of Wisconsin with a dis- 
sertation on "The Aesthetic of John 
Addington Symonds." 

Mrs. Gadsden has taught at all levels 
from elementary school to college. She 
has served on the faculties of Dillard 
University in New Orleans, Texas 
Southern in Houston and Howard Uni- 
versity in Washington, D. C, where her 
husband, Robert Washington Gadsden, 
Jr., works as an analyst for the Depart- 
ment of Defense. 




Members of the Bulloeh County Chapter. Seated. left to right: Miss Johnnie 

Polk, Rufus R. Butler. Willie Jones, and Mrs. Ethylean Talbert. Standing, left 

to right: Crawford Tolbert, Tharon Stevens, Mrs. Florence Bates, Mrs. Eva 

Moore, John Lawton, and Groover Brown. 




Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Steele, Alumni 
of Savannah State, pose for the cam- 
era immediately after the program 
honoring Mrs, Sadie Steele. 



James Nevels (right) congratulates his brother, Father Harry Nevels, an Episco- 
pal priest of Albany, Georgia. Father Nevels spent his first two years of college 
at Savannah State before beginning his studies for the priesthood. Oree Rawls 
is in the center of the picture. 





John Lawton, Principal of Julia P. 
Bryant Elementary School, Statesboro, 
Georgia, congratulates Willie C. Jones 
on his election to the presidency of 
the Bulloch County Chapter. 



Support Your 

ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 



Walter Leonard, Former Savannah State 
College Editor, Makes National Spotlight 

Wife Works as Regional Secretary for Federal Government 
By Wilton C. Scott 

In speaking of outstanding graduates and former students. Savannah State 
College can point to Walter and Betty Singleton Leonard as ideal examples of what 
a State College education can do. Mr. Leonard is currently, licensed, doing business 
as the Leonard Land Company of Atlanta, Georgia, and is in good standing with 
the Georgia Real Estate Commission. He is a real estate broker. Mrs. Leonard is 
Secretary to the Deputy Regional Administrator for the Housing and Home Finance 
Agency, with headquarters in Atlanta, Ga. 

From 1946-50, Walter Leonard at- 
tended Savannah State College, where 
he participated in numerous school 
activities. He accompanied the Public 
Relations Director on several recruiting 
trips, and served as a member of the 
staff, and later Editor-in-Chief of "The 
Tiger's Roar." His wife, the former 
Betty Singleton, was a student aide for 
four years in the President's Office. 
She finished college, Cum Laude, with 

Atlanta Mayor Salutes Leonard 

In a letter received by the Public 
Relations Office of Savannah State Col- 
lege, from the Honorable Ivan Allen. 
Jr.. Mayor of Atlanta, Georgia, Leonard 
was praised for his service as campaign 

for office. Mr. Allen said, "Walter 



his keen insight and his ability to 
execute an agreed upon plan. 

"I am delighted that you are recog- 
nizing him on this occasion and wish 
to join with his host of friends in com- 
mendation of his many fine endeavors." 



Wnlte 



Makes Front Page of Wall 
Street Journal 



served 
Mayor 



ith 



of , 



particularly pleased with Mr. 
i fine organizational ability. 



Because of his business ability, and 
civic activities, Walter Leonard was 
selected as an outstanding young busi- 
ness executive, and made the front page 
of The Wall Street Journal, Tuesday. 
March 18, 1964. He has only been in 
business fulltime, two years. In 1962, 
he sold $145,000 worth of real estate, 
and S200.000 in 1963. According to all 
indications it is probable that he will 
surpass this mark in 1964. This dis- 
tinguished couple are the proud parents 
of two children, Anthony Carlton, 11 
and Angela Michele, 9. Both attend St. 
Paul of the Cross School. In dis 
how his wife received her Civil Se 




WALTER LEONARD 



appointment, Walte 



Stenographer position. 
Walter's Plea To An 
In 



id, she made 97 
for Secretary- 



Youth 



the question, how he 
would advise the American youth today, 
Mr. Leonard pointed out the famed 
words of Socrates "Know Thyself," 
Walter said that youth should work to- 
ward the discovery of his own ability 
and to develop that ability so that when 
opportunity presents itself, he will 



be 
being a 
pating i 
munity 
sized ov 
being a 



stressed the value 
^sponsible citizen, and partic: 
the political life of the con 
i which he lives. He emphf 
" and over again the value c 
egistered voter who votes. 




Walter Leonard, left of Mayor Allen, listens to one of the 
Mayor's famous fireside chats. On Mayor's right is L. D. 
Milton, President of Citizens Trust Company, a 812,000,000 
bank. To the left of Leonard, Mrs. Geneva Haugabrooks, 
a funeral directress in Atlanta, Georgia. 



Timothy U. Ryals 
Banquet Speaker 

Timothy U. Ryals. "54," Chairman 
of the Business Department of Oconee 
High School, will deliver the Annual 
Alumni Address at the Alumni Banquet. 
May 30, 1964. Mr. Ryals is no stranger 
on the speaker's rostrum. He is one of 
the most widely sought young dynamic 
speakers in the Southeast. 




His duties at Oconee High are only a 
small measure of his great and varied 
talents. He serves as Director of the 
Choral Society of the school. His choral 
group has won wide acclaim through- 
out the State. Century Record Company 
of California has recorded "Songs of 
the Negro," sung by his group. They 
have won first place in the G.I.A. Dis- 
trict IX for the last four years. They 
represented the State of Georgia in the 
Tri-State Music Festival at Winston . 
State College, this spring. They have 
made several television appearances in 
Savannah and have performed for the 
G. T. Si E. A. Annual Meeting in Sa- 
vannah and Atlanta. 

He is now serving as Advisor to the 
Junior Class. He has served as Advisor 
to the Hi-Y. the student newspaper and 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Student 
Activity Fund. He has also served as 
Chairman of the Commencement Com- 
mittee and Chairman of the Steering 
Committee for Evaluation of Oconee 
High School. He has served on the 
Curriculum Committee. 

His outstanding work at Oconee was 
a key consideration in his election to 
the presidency of the Dublin Unit of 



the G. T. & E. A. as well as other im- 
portant posts. Among these are: 
"Teacher of the Year" for the City 
System of Dublin in 1961, a member 
of the Evaluation Committee of Central 
High School in Sylvania, Georgia; and 
President of District IX of the G.I. A., 
an organization consisting of 21 schools. 
This summer, he will serve as a mem- 
ber of the Oconee High Summer School 
Faculty. He is presently Publicity 
Chairman for Oconee High. 

His activities in the Dublin com- 
munity are many. He is Music Director 
for the City-Wide Youth Fellowship of 
Dublin, Musical Director for Zion 
Baptist Sunday School and Baptist 
Training Conventions which consist of 
approximately thirty churches. He has 
served as chairman of the Red Cross 
Fund Drive. He is Organist of the First 
Baptist Church and Secretary of the 
Men's Fellowship Club. 

He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha 
Fraternity. Inc., the Free Accepted 
Masons, and Delta Pi Epsilon the 
Honorary Business Fraternity. 

He has toured Europe extensively, 
having been to London, Paris and other 
cities of France; Rome, Florence, 
Switzerland, Amsterdam, and other 
cities of Holland; West Germany, and 
Austria. While in Austria, he attended 
the Passion Play. 

As an undergraduate at Savannah 
State, he served as President of the 
Student Council. President of the Busi- 
ness Club, member of the Choral 
Society, member of the Collegiate 
Council, Treasurer of Delta Eta Chapter 
of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Inc.. 
Organist for the College Assembly, a 
tutor of Alpha Kappa Mu. pianist of 
the Sunday School, secretary of the 
Y.M.C.A., Vice President of the Junior 
Class, and Drum Major of the March- 
ing Band. In 1954, he was named "Man 
of the Year." 

In addition to his B.S. degree from 
Savannah State, he holds the M.S. de- 
gree in business from New York Uni- 
versity and has worked toward the doc- 
torate degree. Although he has received 
several offers to move up to the college 
level, he has remained in secondary 
work, because he feels that he can make 
his greatest impact there. 

H. H. Dudley, yvell known Dublin 
businessman and Negro leader sums up 
Mr. Ryals' success in this way: "He 
knows how to disseminate his knowledge 
to others." 



Alumnus Receives Grant From 
.National Science Foundation 

James M. English, an instructor at 

A. E. Beach Junior High School, has 

received a grant from the National 

Science Foundation. Under this grant — 

his second— he will 

^0t^ study toward the 

J ^k master's degree at 

fcl?T- Miami University. 

H, A Oxford. Ohio. 

>fcrJK In 1962. English 

^^F*^ /^t lii- first 

KB 



Foundath 
studied < 



sylv 



at Penn- 
State Uni- 



English was born in Savannah, Geor- 
gia, and attended Paulsen Elementary 
School. He graduated from Alfred E. 
Beach High School in 1951. In 1956, 
he received the B.S. degree from Sa- 
vannah State College, with a major in 



athe- 



matics. 

He is married to the former Miss 
Albertha Sheppard of this city, and the 
father of two small daughters, Kimberly 
and Michelle. 



Mrs. Sessonts President-elect of 
National Alumni Association 

Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms is president- 
elect of the National Alumni Associa- 
tion. She was born and received her 
early education in Allendale County, 
South Carolina. 

Mrs. Sessoms received the B.S. de- 
gree from Savannah State College, and 
the M.Ed, degree from Atlanta Univer- 
sity, and has done advance work at 
New York, and Atlanta Universities. 

Some of her work experiences in- 
clude: Teacher of Home Economics at 
Mayo High School. Darlington. S. C, 
and Savannah State College. Principal 
of Junior High School, Thomas County, 
Georgia; Critic Teacher & Workshop 
Consultant, Savannah State College; 
Curriculum Director & Supervisor, 
Tattnall and Evans counties. She is 
presently Curriculum Director & Super- 
visor at Evans County. 

Mrs. Sessoms is affiliated with: Nu 
Chapter, Iota Phi Lambda Sorority; 
Savannah State College Alumni Associa- 
tion, Tattnall County Chapter; National 
Association of Supervisors and Con- 
sultants; Georgia Jeanes Curriculum Di- 
rectors Association ; Association for 
Supervision & Curriculum Development; 
G.T.E.A.; Elite Temple No. 71, 
I.B.P.O.E. of W.— Savannah, Georgia; 
Woman's Auxiliary to South Atlanta 
Medical Society. 



Rapid Progress of Expansion Being 
Made at Savannah State College 



Rapid progress is being made at the 
which will provide additional modern fat 
well-rounded, educational program for all 
the University System has authorized the 
at the College: 

1. A dormitory, presently under con- 
struction, to house 100 women students 
will be ready for occupancy in Septem- 
ber, 1964. This Iwo-story brick build- 
ing will be constructed at a cost of ap- 
proximately S280.000. It will include 
grooming rooms for beauty culture, a 
snack kitchen, a laundrette. and a com- 
bination room for lounging, reception 
and recreation. Two young ladies will 
be housed to a room. 

2. Another dormitory for 180 young 
women at a cost of approximately 
$520,000 will be constructed on Taylor 
Road, south of Powell Hall and west 
of the new dormitory for women now 
being built; it is planned for occupancy 
in September, 1965. 

3. A two-story, air-conditioned class- 
room building at a cost of approxi- 
mately S425.000 is in the final stages 
of planning, and will be built on Taylor 
Road, south of the Technical Science 
Building across the street from Powell 
Hall. This plant will consist of 15 class- 
rooms, data processing facilities, a 
language laboratory, a reading clinic, 
and an administration area with office 
space for 33 instructors. 

4. A four-unit, all weather, lighted 
tennis court is being erected adjacent 
to the athletic field. 

5. A S400.000 annex to Wiley Gym- 
nasium. This new physical education 
facility will consist of a swimming pool, 
classrooms, and additional spectator 
seating for indoor sports. 

The above listed facilities along with 
the facilities already available at Sa- 
vannah State College will provide the 
students and faculty with a desirable 
environment for greater learning activi- 



Savannah State College is dedicated 
to the development of thorough and 
sound programs which will prepare its 
graduates to meet the needs of the 
competitive age in which we live, and 
which we face in the future. 

The College now includes six divisions 
and 14 departments which gives stu- 
dents a wide variety of courses from 
which to select. The major divisions are 
Business Administration, Education. 
Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social 
Sciences, and Technical Sciences. 
Through the offerings of these divisions, 
students may prepare for varied careers 
in the areas of art, modern foreign 
languages, English and literature, 



College in developing a building program 
ilities fin the prose< ution of a sound and 
of our students. The Board of Regents of 

ig additions to the physical plant 



biology, chemistry, mathematics 
physics, physical education, home 
nomics, music, history, 
sociology, poltical science, engineerii 
technology, and industrial education. 
Authorization has been received i 
a Music and Fine Arts Building, at ; 
approximate cost of SI, 130,000, 
new dormitorv for men. whicl 



nd 



d a 



Southern Education 
Foundation Workshop 
June 29 -July 17, 1964 

Fifteen in-service home economists 
have been awarded Southern Education 
Foundation Scholarships to attend a 
workshop in New Foods and New Meth- 
ods of Cookery, June 29 through July 
17. The criteria upon which the par- 
ticipants were selected included related 
science background, interest in promot- 
ing newer vocational careers for prom- 
ising students, and contributions to the 
field of home economics. Workshop ex- 
periences will include lectures, discus- 
sions, laboratory preparation experi- 
ences with new foods, consumer evalua- 
tion techniques and field trips. The type 
of foods to be used in the workshop are 
freeze-dried. dehydrated, frozen, irradi- 
ated, and Froten meats. 

Outstanding Consultants have been 
secured from federal, state, and private 
agencies, to point up the importance of 
new foods in terms of world food sup- 
ply, and consumption. Those persons 
scheduled to participate as consultants, 
leaders, and speakers are: 

Dr. John Powers, Head, Dept. of 
Food Technology, University of Geor- 

^ Dr. Kermit Bird, Agricultural Econo- 
mist, Marketing Economics Division, 
United States Department of Agricul- 
ture. 

Dr. Mary Hill. Nutritionist. Agricul- 
tural Research Service, United States 
Department of Agriculture. 

Miss Lorraine Berger. Home Econo- 
mist, Swift & Company, Chicago, Illi- 

Dr. Carrie Mae Marquess, Florida A. 
& M. University. 

Dr. Charles Pratt, Savannah State 
College. 

Mr. Everett Ellis, Savannah Sugar 
Refinery. 



Special 
Announcement 

SUBJECT: Journalism Grants 
Awarded by Savannah Stale Col- 
lege, Sponsored by the Newspaper 
Fnnil, Inc., which is financed b\ 
Wall Street Journal. 
Below is a list of all of the recipients 
of scholarship grants awarded by Sa- 
vannah State College for the Journalism 
Workshop to be held July 20-31, 1%4. 
Eighteen full scholarships have been 
awarded which include: Matriculation 
fee. health fee. student activity fee, and 
room and board, while seven partial 
scholarships include: matriculation fee. 
health fee. and student activity fee. 

The recipients of the full scholarships 
are: Mrs. Richie T. Adams, Quitman, 
Georgia; Miss Eula Mae Battle, Colum- 
bus, Georgia; Mrs. Lula B. Bass, Co- 
lumbus, Georgia; Mrs. Gwendolyn T. 
Conyers, Bainbridge, Georgia; Mrs. El- 
nora W. Edmondson, Jesup, Georgia; 
Robert James, Jr.. Russellville, Ala- 
bama; Mrs. Mary F. Jenkins, Albany. 
Georgia; Mrs. Flossie Mae Johnson. 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

Mrs. Starr Jordan Kay, Athens, Geor- 
gia; Mrs. Beatrice H. McClammy, 
Greensboro. North Carolina; James J. 
Mitchell. Tallahassee, Florida: Paul 
Burgette Mohr. St. Petersburg, Florida; 
Mrs. Gussie Davidson Moore, Atlanta, 
Georgia; Mrs. Laura B. Odol, Black- 
shear, Georgia: Mrs. Addie C. Sloan. 
Atlanta, Georgia; Mrs. Frances G. Wad- 
dell, Savannah, Georgia; Mrs. Nettie 
Marshall Webb, Atlanta, Georgia; Mrs. 
Evelyn M. Wright, Athens, Georgia. 

The recipients of partial scholarships 
are: Boast Cephas Carswell, Jr., Colum- 
bus, Georgia; Mrs. Katie B. Glenn, 
Dublin, Georgia; Miss Mamie E. 
Greene, Newnan, Georgia; Theodore W. 
Green. Soperton, Georgia; Mrs. Carolyn 
R. Screen, Savannah, Georgia; Mrs. 
Hazel D. Van Buren, Statesboro, Geor- 
gia; Mrs. Margaret P. White, Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

Alternates for full and partial schol- 
arships are: Mrs. Alta E. Vaughn. Knox- 
ville, Tennessee; Mrs. Addie S. More- 
land, Pelham, Georgia; Miss Julia E. 
Cheeley, Crawfordville, Georgia; and 
Mrs. Georgia Y. Gordon, Savannah, 



Alumna Works in Office 
Of Public Relations 

Mrs. Carolyn Robinson Screen is 
Secretary to the Director of Public Re- 
lations at Savannah State College. She 
has served in this capacity for four 
months. 

She received the B.S. degree with a 
major in secretarial science, and minor 
in English from Savannah State College 
in August of 1963. 

Mrs. Screen is married to Porter 
Screen, a Firefighter with the City of 
Savannah, and the mother of four chil- 



Mrs. Robinson Instructor 
In Biology Department 

Mrs. Margaret Chisholm Robinson is 
an instructor of biology at Savannah 
State College. She is a native of Savan- 
nah, and the daughter of Mr. Ralph 
Chisholm, Sr„ of 
this city. 

Mrs. Robinson's 
early education was 
received in the pub- 
lic schools of this 
city. She received 
the B.S. degree, 
Magna Cum Laude, 




State College in 

1952, and the M.S. 

degree in biology 

from the University of Michigan, Ann 

Arbor, Michigan, in 1955. 

In 1961, she was the recipient of a 
National Science Foundath 
Institute Grant to study at Washington 
State University. Pullman, Washington, 
under the auspices of the Botanical So- 
ciety of America. 

Currently, she is the recipient of a 
National Science Foundation Academic 
Year Institute Grant to study toward the 
Ph.D. degree at Washington University, 
St. Louis, Missouri, academic year 
1964-65. 

Her special areas of interest are Plant 
Physiology and Molecular Biology. 

Prior to returning to Savannah State 
College, she taught at Jefferson County 



Training Scho 
State College. 
Mrs. Robii 
Moses Robins 
children; she 



.1 and at Fort Valley 



is the wife of Mr. 
and the mother of two 
presently serving as 
undergraduate advisor of Gamma Upsi- 
lon Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha 
Sorority. 

She is a member of Alpha Nu Chap- 
ter of Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society 
and several Botanical. Biological, and 
Professional Societies. 

10 



Alumna Is Switchboard 
Operator at SSC 

Mrs. Alice B. Williams works as 
switchboard operator at Savannah State 
College. She is a native of Nashville, 
Tennessee. 

Her elementary and high school edu- 



at Ha 



Ho 



Alfred E. Beach 
High Schools, re- 
spectively. In June 
of 1954, she gradu- 
ated as valedictorian 
from Alfred E. 
Beach High School. 
In June of 1958, 
she received the B.S. 
degree from Savan- 
nah State College, 
with a major in English and a minor 



111 



Mrs. Williams has taught in the public 
school systems of Chatham and Green- 
wood Counties. 



Mrs. Milton Secretary 
In Personnel Services 

Mrs. Lois H. Milton has been asso- 
ciated with the college since 1961, and 
is presently employed in the Office of 
Student Personnel Services as Secretary 
of Testing and Guid- 



Mrs. Milton is the 
daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert F. 
Hughes, and re- 
ceived her early 
education in the 
public schools of 
Dublin, Georgia. 
She is a graduate of 
Oconee High 
School. In 1956. 
she entered Savannah State College, ma- 
joring in business education and minor- 
ing in English. Se received the B.S. de- 
gree in 1961. 

She is married to William J. Milton 
of Savannah, and the mother of a small 
daughter. Melissa. 



Miss Dixon Secretary 

In Chemistry Department 

Darnell Myrtice Dixon is presently 
employed as Secretary in the Chemistry 
Department of Savannah State College. 

She is a native of Rhine, Georgia, 
where she attended the public schools. 

Miss Dixon received the bachelor of 
science degree from Savannah State 
College in 1963, with a major in Busi- 
ness Education. She is a member of 
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority. 




Alumnus Heads Division 
Of Business Administration 

Dr. Hayward S. Anderson, a native 
Georgian, and graduate of Savannah 
State College (then Georgia State Col- 
lege), is Chairman 
of the Division of 
Business Adminis- 
tration at Savannah 
State College. 

Before coming to 
Savannah State Col- 
lege, Dr. Anderson 
taught in New York 
City, and at West 
Virginia State Col- 
lege. He has also 
worked in private 
industry, for himself, and for the gov- 
ernment. 

Dr. Anderson received the B.S. degree 
from Savannah State College, with a 
major in Business Administration, and 
a minor in Natural Science. He has 
also received the B.S. degree from 
Northwestern University, with a major 
in Accounting, and a minor in Finance. 
Marketing, and Management. M.B.A. 
degree from New York University, 
major Advertising, and minor Real 
Estate .and Personnel Management 
D.B.A. from Harvard Business School, 
with a major in Business Administra- 
tion. 

During his senior year at Savannah 
State College, he entered the Army, and 
served in several capacities, both as an 
enlisted man and as an officer. He was 
honorably discharged a 1st Lieutenant. 



Alumnus Is Band Director 
At Savannah State College 

Samuel Arthur Gill, a graduate of 
Savannah State College, is presently an 
instructor of music and band director 
at Savannah State College. 

Mr. Gill was born and reared in Sa- 
vannah. Georgia. He 
attended Woodville 
Elementary School. 

Tompkins Elemen- 
tary, and completed 
his high school 
training at Beach- 
Cuyler High School 
of this city. 

After finishing 
high school, he 
traveled over the 
country performing with various jazz 
groups. In 1943, he entered the Armed 
Forces, serving in the capacity of solo 
trumpeter with the 159th U. S. Ground 
Force Band. 




Summer Science Training 
Program Announced 

Dr. Charles Pratt, Head, Department 
of Chemistry, announces the opening 
of the Summer Science Training Pro- 



Thii 



to 



provide opportunities for thirty high 
school students of outstanding ability in 
chemistry to spend eight weeks on the 
campus for advanced study in a college 
environment. 

The students will be able to study 
subject matter in modern chemistry 
which is not generally included in high 
school curricula. The students will fol- 
low a course that will include individual 
projects, and experiments emphasizing 
quantitative measurements. It is antici- 
pated that with the utilization of mod- 
ern instruments the experiments will be 
more intriguing. Standardized tests in 
chemistry, science and mathematics will 
be administered at the beginning and 
at the termination of the program. The 
purpose of the tests will be two-fold: 
( 1 ) to determine in what areas the stu- 
dents are weak, and (2) to measure 
their progress in the course. 



The school day will be from 8:30 
a.m. - 12:00 noon, and from 2:00 p.m. - 
4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 
The morning sessions will be devoted 
to formal lectures, problem sessions, 
film presentations, and lectures by guest 
speakers. The afternoon sessions will 
be devoted to chemistry projects, labora- 
tory and local field trips. The program's 
general objective will be an effort to 
enrich the student's knowledge of chem- 



Tht 



nd 

high school students who hav 
accepted are: Glorious J 
rwood, Route 1, Tayli 



Willie Frank Gerald, 1904-B 
Brown Street, Conway, South Carolina; 
Sherrie Ruth Griffin, 210iy> Ogeechee 
Road, Savannah, Georgia; Wallace Lee 
Hall, Route 2, Box 2, Collins, Georgia; 
Leroy Wright, Jr., 5 Fluke Avenue, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia; Nedra Millicent Hug- 
gins, 1526 Audubon Drive, Savannah, 
Georgia; Stanley John McClinton, 2 
Staley Avenue, Savannah, Georgia ; 
Jenefer Clark. Claxton, Georgia; Judith 
Jordan, Savannah State College, Savan- 
nah, Georgia; David Hicks, Route 3. 
Box E, Vidalia, Georgia; Henry Lee 
Strong, General Delivery, Winterville, 



Georgia; George Frank Wyncott, 1107 
West Main. North Manchester, Indiana; 
Barbara Jean Bryant, 1913 West 59th 
Street, Savannah. Georgia; Ronald May- 
nard Rivers, 502 W. Victory Drive, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia; Martha Lee Bryant, 
3110 Arlington, Bessemer, Alabama; 
John Earl Lang, 308 West 42nd Street, 
Savannah, Georgia; Gerald Boyd Math- 
ews, 1511 Mike, Tallahassee, Florida; 
Sheila Mozelle Clemmons, 2201 West 
Victory Drive, Savannah, Georgia; Bar- 
bara Wynn, 5123 Ranstead Street, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Milenda 
Cooper, Route 2, Box 101, Watkinsville, 
Georgia; Sheila Ann Mobley, 1011 46th 
Street, Savannah, Georgia; Alma Jacqu- 
line Porter, 908 East 37th Street, Savan- 
nah, Georgia; Dennis Orson Brown, 
255A Fox Court, Savannah, Georgia; 

Michael Charles Pratt. 7226 Skid- 
away Road, Savannah, Georgia ; Ora 
Lee Clemmons, P. 0. Box 101, South- 
port, North Carolina; Constance Y. 
Lester, Rte. 1, Box 234, Portal. Geor- 
gia; Helen N. Cromer, P .0. Box 385, 
Whitmire, South Carolina; Jeanette 
Campbell, 509 Shelter Avenue, Jackson- 
ville, Florida; Marva Taylor, 2235 
Brido Road, Jacksonville, Florida. 



New Women's Dormitory 





) 

) 

\ ,' 



(/ -AWil'M \ i 





LLETI 



Savannih State College 





General Information Issue 



CONTENTS 




The Savannah State College Bulletin 

President Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations and Publications Wilton C. Scoll 

Editorial and Publications Assistant Mrs. Carolyn R. Screen 

Photographer Robert Moblcy 

Student Intern O. L, Douglas, Jr. 

Volume 19 March, 1967 Number 4 

The Savannah Slate College Bulletin is published yearly in October, December, 
February, March, April, and May by Savannah State College. 



An Open Invitation To 
Prospective Students . . . 




It is indeed a very great pleasure for me to extend, 
on behalf of the Administration, faculty, and student 
body, a cordial invitation to all prospective college 
students to become familiar with the well rounded edu- 
cational program offered at Savannah State College, and 
to invite each of you to consider seriously selecting 
Savannah State College as your college. 

Since its inception on November 26, 1890, Savannah 
State College has been primarily concerned with develop- 
ing a strong program of education and training for our 
students. We feel that Savannah State College today is a 
challenging place to spend four of the most important 
years of your life. It is challenging because it has an 
excellent faculty, a growing student body, and excellent 
facilities for study, residence, and relaxation. 



part of students designed to give an individual a sense 
of meaning and direction in the democratic way of life. 
Strong efforts are made by the faculty to develop all of 
our students to the maximum in the following areas: 



1. Competence in Co 

2. Vocational Competence, 

3. Critical and Analytical Thinking, 

4. Sound Health, 
-that will help 



ral and Spiritual Val 
prepare for life, anc: 



6. Comprehension of the Cultural Heritage. 

Students enjoy life at the college. It is a friendly 
campus where each and every individual is respected, and 
where members of the college family strive to study, 
work, live, and play together. We hope that you will 
consider joining our educational family. 



It is < 
will provide you 
about the college 



hope that this information bulletin 
h many answers to your questions 



Sincerely, 



^'-i 



Howard Jordan, Jr 
President 



The campus at Savannah State College is one of 
great natural beauty, and each year strong efforts are 
made to improve the natural beauty by adding functional 
facilities. 



Undergirding all of our training programs is our pro- 
gram of general education. This program is intended 
to develop attitudes, competencies, and values on the 



An Introduction to SSC 

Savannah Stale College, founded in 1890, is 
located in the historic eity of Savannah, Georgia, 
which is the oldest and chief seaport of the state 
as well as the first capital. 

A unit of the University System of Georgia, 
Savannah State College is a four-year accredited 
college of arts and sciences, teacher education, 
business administration and technology. 

Savannah State College has one of the most 
beautiful eampuses in the South. The campus 
comprises 136 acres of matchless natural beauty. 
Attractive new buildings are constantly being built. 
Put into use recently was Lockette Hall, an air- 
conditioned dormitory for 180 women students; 
Wiley-Willcox Physical Education Complex, which 
bouses a swimming pool; and W. K. Payne Hall, 
an air-conditioned classroom building. 

Tbe John F. Kennedy Fine Arts Center, con- 
structed at an approximate cost of $500,000, was 
opened (hiring the Winter Quarter. This building 
contains a Little Theatre for dramatics, classrooms, 
and laboratories for music, art, ceramics, and 
sculpture. 

A dormitory for 180 male students has been 
completed and will be opened during the Spring 
Quarter. This dormitory is located at the entrance 
of ibe campus on the corner of Falligant Avenue 
and Taylor Road. Il is a modern three-story 



facility, and contains ninety bedrooms of tbe studio 
type. This building includes a lobby, recreational 
ate is. and an apartment for tlie house director, 
barber shop, room for TV viewing, and laundro- 
mat. This dormitory is completely air-conditioned 
and was constructed at an approximate cost of 
8600,000. 

For the Biennium of 1966-68, Savannah State 
College has requested from the Board of Regents 
the following facilities: A Dining Hall-Cafeteria; 
A Natural Science Building; A Technical Home 
Economics Building; A Nursery School for Early 
Childhood Education, and a Student Union Build- 
ing. 

Tbe College now includes six divisions and 14 
departments which give students a wide variety of 
courses from which to select. Tbe major divisions 
are Business Administration, Education, Humani- 
ties, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, and Tech- 
nical Sciences. Through the offerings of these 
divisions, students may prepare for varied careers 
in the areas of art, modern foreign languages. 
English and literature, biology, chemistry, mathe- 
matics and physics, piiysical education, home 
economics, music, history, economics, sociology, 
political science, engineering technology, and in- 
dustrial education. 

Two-year programs of study are offered in 
Secretarial Science and Dressmaking and Tailor- 
ing. Upon satisfactory completion of the program, 
the student is awarded a certificate of proficiency. 




The Intellectual Center of The Campus 




Asa H. Gordon Library 



The library of the College is one of its most 
prized possessions. The adequacy of its resources 
and the nature of its services to students and 
faculty largely determine the quality of the 
academic program. On the Savannah State Col- 
lege campus, the library is an indispensable unit 
which undergirds the instructional program, as 
well as contributes to the recreational reading 
interests. The library is not an adjunct to teach- 
ing but the heart of the learning process. 

The library staff and faculty arc busy as- 
sembling a notable book collection to be used in 
active support of the academic curriculum. As- 
sembling a book collection is not enough! The 
librarian and his staff actively encourage students 
to use books with an emphasis on the role that 
books play in the intellectual life of the academic 
community. The resources of the library include 
51,250 volumes, several thousand pamphlets, 640 
periodicals, and 26 newspapers. The London 
Times, the New York Times, the Savannah Morn- 



Savannah Evening Prt 
iddilion to book matei 



ing News, and tlu 
on microfilm, in 
micro-print. 

"Let's Listen to a Story," hour under the di- 
rection of Mrs. Althea Anderson, Circulation 
Librarian, is held weekly for the children of the 
community. 

A Great Books Discussion Group, under the 
sponsorship of the library has been organized to 
encourage people to read and meet together to 
discuss great books. 

Exhibitions of paintings by some of the world's 
great artists are displayed in the library periodi- 
cally. 

A recently inaugurated lecture series has truly 
made the library a market place of ideas. 

All in all, the library of Savannah State Col- 
lege is an essential instrument in the life of the 
academic community. 



Buildings 



SHOWN ON COVER 

W. K. Payne Hall 

John F. Kennedy Fine Arts Center 

Peacock Hall, New Dormitory for Men 




Wiley-YVillcox Physical Education Comple 




Lockette Hall 



The General Curriculum 



The General Education Program proposes to 
provide opportunities for all students to acquire 
the basic skills, attitudes, habits, appreciations and 
understandings requisite for the good life. 

It seeks to guarantee to all students competency 
in communication and thinking. It further pro- 
poses to orient students toward and to sensitize 
them to human and universal good and to the worth 
and dignity of every human being. 

At this college the general curriculum is pre- 
occupied with the major disciplines that: 

1. Acquaint the students with broad areas of 
knowledge and human experience; 

2. Give them an understanding of themselves, 
their culture and physical environment; 



3. Provide the students with a sound in- 
tellectual and moral foundation upon which 
character and professional and vocational 
opportunity may rest. 

This program is concerned generally with fresh- 
man and sophomore students. However, some at- 
tention is devoted to students on the junior and 
senior level of their intellectual maturation. In 
this respect, general education is an integral phase 
of the experience of all students who matriculate 
for a degree at the College. 

The General Education Program is under the 
general supervision of the General Education Com- 
mittee and the Coordinator of General Education. 
The Committee consists of students and faculty 
members. 



The Divisions 



The formal instructional program of Savan- 
nah State College comprises the general curricu- 
lum, areas of major and minor concentration, and 
terminal curricula. The program is organized 
within these seven divisions: 



The Division of Business Administration 



The Division of Education 

Department of Elementary Education 
Department of Secondary Education 
Department of Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation 



The Division of Humanities 
Department of English 
Department of Fine Arts 
Department of Modern Languages 

The Division of Natural Sciences 
Department of Biology 
Department of Chemistry 
Department of Mathematics and Physics 

The Division of Social Sciences 

The Division of Technical Sciences 
Department of Home Economics 
Department of Engineering Technology 



Division of Business 
Administration 

Hayward S. Anderson, D.B.A., Chairman 

A high school student who is preparing for a 
career in business via the college route should 
direct his efforts toward becoming proficient in 
mathematics and English at the high school level. 
Proficiency in mathematics allows him to make 
quick use of quantitative tools in solving business 
problems. Proficiency in English permits him to 
communicate his ideas. The ability to do both are 
significant attributes of business personnel. 

Though not essential, since the college offers 
the necessary fundamentals, a student may also 
lake such courses as bookkeeping, shorthand, and 
other business subjects which are offered at his 
respective high school. Such an approach, at least, 
allows the student to make a tentative judgment 
as to whether or not he is favorably inclined toward 
specific subject areas. It should be pointed out un- 
equivocally, however, that business training, on 
the college level, embraces much more than type- 
writing and shorthand. 

Since more and more high school students are 
arriving at college with typing skills, it is recom- 
mended that a course in typewriting be taken. 
Entering students are exempted from typewriting 
courses in which they meet the course standards. 

Whether or not students interested in the secre- 
tarial or teaching programs should take shorthand 
in high school, since they are required courses in 
these college curricula, is a debatable question. 
Evidence at our institution suggests that the student 
might well spend the time that be might devote to 
shorthand in high school to additional preparation 
in grammar and composition, if he is not already 
proficient in these areas. 

One of the advantages of majoring in business 
is that one is preparing himself for a wide variety 
of employment possibilities. Opportunities exist 
for self-employment, for employment in private 
industry, and for employment with the government 
— national, state and local. 

Some positions, for which training in business 
at Savannah Stale College is designed to prepare 
students include: 

Entrepreneurs Secretaries 

Accountants Stenographers 

Bookkeepers Typists 

Salesmen Business Managers 

Economists Teachers of Business 

To realize the aims of a person desiring train- 
ing in business, Savannah State College's Division 
of Business offers courses leading to the degree 
of bachelor of science and a terminal, two-year 
program leading to a certificate of proficiency. 

A student who pursues a degree in business at 



this institution may concentrate his efforts in one 
of the following areas: (1) General Business Ad- 
ministration, (2) Accounting, (3) Economics, (4) 
Secretarial Science, and (5) The Program for 
Teachers of Business Education. In each of the 
above curricula, consideration has been given to 
the course requirements for graduate study. 

Because of the numerous job opportunities that 
exist currently for accountants and secretaries, 
students should become familiar with the attributes 
of successful accountants and secretaries as well 
as the nature of the job opportunities that are 
available. 

A student may find a challenging career in the 
field of accounting if he has analytical ability, if 
he has a facility with figures, and if he derives 
personal enjoyment while doing work which re- 
quires the use of these attributes. 

While numerous lists have been compiled 
which suggest attributes of a good secretary, the 
attributes of loyalty and a mastery of shorthand 
and typewriting are frequently mentioned. While 
the following list is by no means all inclusive, it, 
nevertheless, gives some further insight into desired 
attributes of a good secretary. A prospective em- 
ployer recently wrote that he had a secretarial 
vacancy but in order to meet the job specifications 
the secretary had to have the following: a pleasing 
personality, facility with English, a mastery of tele- 
phone etiquette, courtesy, neatness in both appear- 
ance and work, and the ability to work with others. 
Aspiring secretaries can acquire and develop many 
of these attributes early. 

Because occupations within the field of busi- 
ness are numerous and because the specific re- 
quired attributes within each occupation may vary, 
high school students are encouraged, in addition to 
utilizing their own counselors, to visit colleges and 
counsel with professors and counselors for guid- 
ance in career selection. 




Division of Education 

Tiielma Harmond, Ph.D., Chairman 
The Division of Education at Savannah State 
College is a member of the Association of Colleges 
for Teachers Education. It offers twelve curricula 
in teacher preparation and a program of basic 
training for teacher-librarians. These programs 
are approved by the State Department of Educa- 
tion. This means that satisfactory completion of 
any program brings automatic certification in the 
field of study pursued. 



A person majoring it 


i Educath 


ill al Sa 


wmnah 


State College is the conce 


in of eve 


in divisi 


mi and 


department of the College 


. therefor. 


s, the iv 


•on ires 


of the entire institution, i 


tin' intei 
ire al his 


est and 
disposal 


efforts 



Aside fr 



strong academic classroom pro- 
gram in general, specialized, and professional edu- 
cation, the leaching major at Savannah Slate Col- 
lege has rich, varied, and meaningful laboratory 
experience which brings one into constant contact 
with children and youth. 







College-wide Provision For Teacher Education 



The Division comprises three departments: the 
Department of Elementary Education; the Depart- 
ment of Health, Physical Education and Recre- 
ation; and the Department of Secondary Educa- 
tion. The preparation of teachers is, however, a 



college-wide commitment. Because every division 
and department at the College is involved in train- 
ing teachers in some subject matter field, this 
function engages the constant interest and efforts, 
staff resources, and facilities of the entire in- 
stitution. 



Department of Health, 
Physical Education 
and Recreation 

The essential aim of the Department of Health. 
Physical Education and Recreation is to afford 
professional training for pre-service and in-service 
teachers of health, physical education, and recre- 
ation in the elementary and secondary schools. A 
parallel aim is advisement. The aim is to provide 
feu- all students instruction in the basic principles 
of health and recreational activity needed for 
wholesome living. 

In pursuance of the foregoing aims, this De- 
partment provides a four-fold program of instruc- 
tion. For students who plan to become professional 
workers in the field of health, physical education, 
and recreation — either in schools or in other 
agencies — the department offers a sequence of 
specialized training to the degn I Bachelor of 



Science in Education, with a concentration in 
health, physical education, and recreation. 

In addition, for all students enrolled in teacher 
education curricula at Savannah State College, this 
department provides basic training in supervision 
of one or more phases of a comprehensive health, 
physical education, and recreation program in the 
schools of Georgia. This phase of the work is 
provided either in selected specialized courses or 
in a minor sequence. Further, for all students 
enrolled at the college this department provides 
instruction in the fundamental concepts and activi- 
ties of health, physical education, and recreation 
as an essential phase of general education. 

Finally, this department serves the college 
community through instruction and leadership in 
the intramural program. The intramural program 
is, in effect, a laboratory in which students enjoy 
practicing the skills learned in general service 
courses and relish competing with their peers. 




Division of Humanities 

Forrest 0. Wiggins. Ph.D., Chairman 

The Division of Humanities, as its name im- 
plies, is concerned primarily with transforming 
the individual into a human and humane person. 
The technique for realizing this aim is that of 
serious study of the human heritage as it has heen 
recorded in literature, music, art, and philosophy. 
In this manner the student deepens his appreciation, 
sharpens his intellect, enhances his critical powers, 
and incorporates himself in the mainstream of the 
best that has been thought and fell. 



The Division of Humanities provides oppor- 
tunities for majoring in English, music, the fine 
arts, French, and Spanish. The curricula in these 
areas are designed also to prepare teachers. Thus 
students who elect to teach become purveyors of 
the humanistic tradition. The College provides a 
mean- also for meeting the national need for per- 
sons trained in foreign languages. As future 
linguists and/ or teachers, students have an unusual 
opportunity at Savannah State College. A strong 
faculty in modern language in addition to a re- 
cently installed laboratory assures the students 
the means of thoroughly preparing themselves in 
this area. 



Religious Empha 





The Department of Fine Arts 




The Choral Society 

Music 



In the area of music, the Department of Fine Arts 
at Savannah State College offers a major program lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Edu- 
cation and two minor programs — one for prospective 
teachers in the secondary schools and a nonteaching 
program. All of the curricula have been approved by the 
three national accrediting agencies — The Music Teachers 
National Association, the National Association of Schools 
of Music and the Music Educators National Conference, 
as well as by the State Board of Certification and the 
Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. 

Courses include intensive work in theory, history and 
literature, performance, applied music, conducting and 
music education. Although 75 hours are required for 
state certification, a total of 82 hours constitutes the 
four-year music requirement at the College. Previous 
training of at least two years in any applied area is re- 
quired of all prospective majors, but skilled aptitude is 
recognized and accepted in lieu of this requirement if 
Most majors must pursue four years of train- 
piano, voice, or another instrument as well as 
s amount of time in their applied major area. In 
i to the music courses, all candidates for a degree 
take a large complement of courses in general education 
and the professional sequences. 

The five musical organizations — The Marching Band, 
The Concert Band. The Choral Society, The Women's 
Glee Club and the Men's Glee Club— are each directed 
by a full-time faculty member and provide ample oppor- 
tunity for students inside and outside of the department 



jdditi- 



experiences in public performance which rai 
rams on the campus at assemblies, chui 
;spers, and special programs, to local televisi 
?s. concerts in the community, athletic gan 
home, and conceit tours in several states. 



One of the most important operations in this depart- 
ment is the awarding each year of a number of scholar- 
ships, called grants-in-aid, which are given to capable, 
worth) applicants in all organizations upon recommenda- 
tion of the department. Depending upon the aptitude, 
academic standing, and financial need of the student, 
these awards are sufficient at times to provide tuition for 
a full year. Grants are made, however, only to applicants 
who file the necessary forms, are recommended by the 
department, and are approved by the Committee on 
Scholarships. Recipients, encouraged to apply in the 
spring, are usually notified during the summer, well in 
advance of the opening of the Fall Quarter. 

The present facilities provide space for classes, or- 
ganizational rehearsals, practice periods, listening room, 
and offices. Pianos are provided for practice, and band 
instruments are provided, both without charge. Complete 
uniforms, robes, stoles, and blazers are also furnished 
to members of the various organizations. 



For any additional information 
partment please feel free to addre 
Dr. Coleridge A. Braithwaite, Chaii 
Fine Arts, Savannah Stale College. 



the De- 



vour inquiries to 
ii. Department of 



Art 



The rewards can he great for a person with or 
without "artistic talent." To gain these rewards, 
one needs only the desire to learn and a good 
place in which to learn. The Art Department at 
Savannah State College provides students with an 
adequate environment for learning. If one has the 
desire, then he can progress at Savannah State 
College. 

The Ait Department is located in new quarters, 
especially designed and equipped with modern 
studios and lecture rooms being brought up-to-date, 
making it possible to teach the latest use of books 
and methods in lithography etching, serigiaphv. 
ceramic, sculpture, and painting. 

Students who have studied art at Savannah 
State College have reaped many rewards. Some 
have won large sums of money in art competition. 
Some are enjoying the success of exhibiting their 
art at qualified galleries. One former student is 
in the Pentagon in Washington. D. C. where he is 



the knowledge of art acquired here. Others 
successful careers as teachers of art. And, 



others hav 
ichools thi< 



gone on to more advanced studies 
ighout the country. 



Art students at Savannah State College oc- 
casionally have opportunities of getting first-hand 
experience, as a number of art jobs of short dura- 
tion come into the Art Department. There are some 
jobs of a more permanent nature waiting to be 
filled. 

The Art Department is prepared and eager to 
help students in many ways. The rewards can be 
plentiful for those who are seeking; and when they 
acquire a Bachelor of Science Degree in Ait Edu- 
cation, they will find that rewards other than 
salary, position, dignity, or fame await them. They 
may learn, ultimately, to enrich their lives with 
things which do not pass so quickly; for, to know 
and to be able to enjoy knowing is indeed a divine 
reward. 




Modern Languages 



The Department of Modern Languages offers 
instruction in three languages: French. German 
and Spanish. The primary aim of the members 
of the Department is to teach the student to under- 
stand, speak, read and write these languages so 
that he may communicate with others who speak 
them. This instruction is carried on in daily recita- 
tions in the classroom and also in a modern twenty 
booth laboratory where the student can increase 
his proficiency by listening to and repeating 
exercises of various types especially prepared for 
this purpose. For students who wish to develop 
more than an elementary proficiency in French or 



Spanish, the Department offers courses leading to 
a minor in either language. It also offers courses 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Education with a concentration either in French 
or Spanish. 

Outside of the field of education, a person 
with a major in a foreign language can find em- 
ployment in several areas. First, there is the area 
of organizations more or less international in 
character. Because of the nature of its work, there 
is almost a constant demand at the United Nations 
Headquarters for men and women who are pro- 
ficient in foreign languages. 



Receiving; Line for Reception for Senic 




Division of Natural Sciences 

Booker T. Griffith. Ph.D., Chairman 

The Division of Natural Sciences is proud of the record that it has made in helping young people find 
-elves in the scientific and mathematical world during the last quarter of a century. 



Department of Biology 




The aims of the Department of Biology are 
(1) to provide for all students that knowledge 
which is essential to an understanding of the 
biological hasis of living; (2) to train persons 
adequately through the media of advanced courses 
for entry into the professional study of dentistry, 
medicine, and nursing; (3) to prepare persons to 
teach the biological sciences in the secondary 
school or to continue study on the graduate level. 



In addition to the required general courses, 
this department offers courses leading to the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science with a major in biology. 
This department offers also a minor. 

The Biology Department is proud of its achieve- 
ments during the last several years. It takes great 
pride in reviewing the records of some of its 
graduates. 



Department of Chemistry 



The Department of Chemistry has grown by 
leaps and hounds in the past few years. The teach- 
ing staff, teaching space and equipment have been 
increased one hundred per cent. 

The Department has been quite successful in 
obtaining funds from Chemical Societies and the 
National Science Foundation to sponsor several 
significant programs such as the In-Service In- 
stitute for teachers of Chemistry and General 
Science in secondary education and the Summer 
Science Program for selected high school students. 

Many research projects are carried out by the 
students in cooperation with the department's active 
research program. The Department feels that re- 
search projects serve as good preparation for more 
highly developed and specialized research that 
the students will encounter in graduate school. The 
research program serves as an outlet of expression 
of the student's scientific interest and capabilities 
other than in the classroom and gives him experi- 
ence in employing the scientific methods in problem 
solving. 

The Department of Chemistry provides basic 
training for higher education — work leading to 
the Master of Science and Ph.D. degree. In addi- 




tion to this it provides all of the chemistry needed 
in pie-nursing, pre-dental and pre-medical edu- 
cation. 

The curriculum has been revised so that the 
student will receive a substantial number of courses 
ill mathematics, physics, and biology which will 
aid him in becoming a better Chemist. 

The Department believes in creativity, freedom 
of exploration, productivity, hard work, and 
recreation. 



The Department of 
Mathematics and Physics 

The Mathematics curriculum and courses are 
being continually revised to keep in step with the 
recommendations released by the School Mathe- 
matics Study Group in 1960. The textbooks, course 
outlines, and other materials are continuously be- 
ing changed in order to meet today's challenge. 
The Physics courses are designed to give emphasis 
to the PSSC recommendations for college Physics. 

The objectives of the department are not only 
to prepare better teachers of Mathematics and 
Physics, but also to provide them with the courses 
necessary to do further study in areas like linear 
programming and computing, statistical research, 
electronics, guided missiles, engineering, mathe- 
matics for various phases of industry research, 
actuary science and over twenty branches of gov- 
ernmental service. 




Division of Social 
Sciences 

Elmer J. Dean, Ed.D., Chairman 

The Division of Social Sciences offers two 
major programs for persons interested in the social 
sciences. Curriculum I leads to the B.S. degree in 
the social sciences with a concentration in history. 
Curriculum II leads to the B.S. degree in the social 
sciences with a concentration in sociology leading 
to the professional study of social work. 

Persons who plan to teach social studies in 
the secondary school should enroll in the Teach 



Educational Program and pursue the B.S. degree 
in Education with a concentration in the social 
sciences. 

Curriculum I is designed for persons interested 
in careers in: law, government, diplomatic service, 
general research, Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, and Urban League Work. 

Curriculum II is designed for persons inter- 
ested in careers as social workers, probation of- 
ficers, vocational counselors, camp counselors, em- 
ployment interviewers, juvenile court workers, wel- 
fare fund workers, and immigration service 
workers. 




Peace Corps Representatives at SSC 



Division of 
Technical Sciences 

Clyde W. Hall, Ed.D., Chairman 
The Division of Technical Sciences seeks to 
accomplish two major objectives: (1) to provide 
students with sufficient specialized training in 
engineering technology, technical home economics 
and industrial teacher education to meet entry em- 
ployment requirements in these areas; and (2) to 
provide students with a broad liberal education 
which includes study in the general areas of com- 
munications, mathematics, the natural sciences, 
the behavioral and social sciences, and the fine 
arts. 

In order to achieve the above objectives, the 
Division of Technical Sciences is organized into 



two departments which offer curricula leading to 
the Bachelor of Science degree. The Department 
oi Engineering Technology offers programs in 
building construction technology, electronics tech- 
nology, industrial arts education, mechanical tech- 
nology and trade and industrial education, and 
'the Department of Home Economics affords oppor- 
tunity for students to major in foods and nutrition 
and institutional management, and textiles and 
clothing. 

Individuals interested in careers in the tech- 
nical sciences should be well grounded in the ap- 
plied sciences. Such high school subjects as 
physics, algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry 
and industrial shop are very desirable for persons 
planning to pursue engineering technology cur- 
ricula, and chemistry and homemaking are essential 
for tbose interested in technical home economics. 



A Class in Driver Education 




Division of 
Home Study 

E. K. Williams, Ed.D., Director 

The Division of Home Study encompasses in- 
stmctional programs in Business Administration, 
Economics, Education, English, Geography, Gov- 
ernment, History, Humanities, Mathematics, Psy- 
chology, Social Science, and Sociology. These 
courses are offered for those persons who are in- 
terested in furthering their education, but are un- 
able to do so in residence. 

The Home Study Department is authorized 
to operate the following programs: 

1. College Correspondence Study 

2. Extension Classes 



icre arc students enrolled in lliese courses 

in all pan, of Georgia. Florida, South Caro- 

Lind Alabama: and we have students regis. 

tered trom New York, New Jersey. Washington, 



D. C. 



The 1 1<>, 



Dei 



Th, 



I is directed toward 
re, vide a service for 
those persons who cannot undertake residence in- 
struclion, and the second is to provide an enrich- 
ing program for those who do not require residence 
instruction for personal growth and enrichment. 
Extension classes arc provided upon sufficient 
demand. 

For information concerning credit, fees, exami- 
nations, textbooks, etc., you may write to: The 
Division of Home Study, Savannah State College, 
Savannah, Georgia. 




Activities 



Savannah Slate College puts great emphasis upon a rich and varied religious life program. Through 
its religious activities, the College seeks to develop an understanding of and an appreciation for the place of 
religion in everyday living, to deepen spiritual insight, and to make the practice of Christian principle a vital 
part of the life of the well educated citizen. 

Religious life activities are directed hy the College Minister. The Sunday School. Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A.. 
the Newman Club, and the annual Religious Emphasis Week provide opportunities for religious growth and 
development under the supervision of the Religious Life Committee. 

Savannah Stale College contributes to the attainment of a well-rounded education by providing many 
opportunities for students to participate in a wide range of organized groups. Programs are planned for the 
social, religious, and cultural advancement of the college community. 

The Savannah State College Student Association, composed of representatives of all classes, works with 
the administration in the government of the College. It works also with the various campus organizations and 
sponsors projects for the general welfare of the student body. 

The Tiger's Roar, official student newspaper, is published every six weeks by students under the super- 
vision of the Public Relations Office. 

The following organizations also provide media for expression of student interest: Art Club, Business 
Club, Camera Club, Collegiate Counselors, Creative Dance Group, Debating Club, Dormitory Councils, Eco- 
nomics Club, Newman Club, Savannah State College "Players by the Sea," Social Science Club, Student Loan 
Association, Tiger's Roar, Trade Association, Usher's Club, Varsity Club, Future Teachers of America (NEA), 
Home Economics Club, Veterans' Club, Y.M.C.A., Y.W.C.A., Women's Council, Boar's Head Club, Canterbury 
, and Tiger, student yearbook, numerous civic and Civil Rights programs. 

The following national social fraternities are organized on the campus: Alpha Phi Alpha, Omega Psi 
Phi Beta Sigma, and Kappa Alpha Psi. 

The following national social sororities are organized on the campus: Alpha Kappa .Alpha, Sigma Gamma 
Rho, Zeta Phi Beta, and Delta Sigma Theta. 

The national honor societies, Alpha Kappa Mu, Beta Kappa Chi. and Alpha Phi Gamma, have chapters 
on the campus. 

The Department of Health and Physical Education conducts a well-rounded intramural athletic program 
of seasonal activities for men and for women. Utilizing group games and various sports for their full educational 
values, the program features football, basketball, track and field hockey, and badminton. 

A member of the Southern Athletic Conference. Savannah Stale College maintains competition in all 
sports sponsored by tlie conference. 

The College also holds membership in two national athletic associations, N.C.A.A. and N.A.I. A. 

To complement formal education on the campus, the college provides many activities for cultural enrich- 
ment. Student assemblies, institutes, motion pictures, lectures, art exhibitions, dramatics, forums, athletic contests, 
hobby groups, and tours contribute to the general welfare of the community. 



Clul 
Phi, 



The Dramatics Group 



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General Information 

Requirements For Admission 

Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and who present evidence of good moral character, adequate 
ability, sound health, and interest in a specific course of study are eligible for admission to the several departments 
of the College. 

Each candidate for admission is required to make formal application and thereafter submit such credentials 
as may be needed to support the application. Admissions correspondence should be addressed to the Director of 
Admissions. The application form with instructions may be obtained by writing the Director of Admissions. 

Estimated General Expenses 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 

NOTE: Fees remitted by mail should be sent by money order, cashier's check, or certified check payable to SAVANNAH STATE COL- 
LEGE. Fees paid in person will be accepted in cash, money order, cashier's check, or certified check. 

Per Quarter Per Year 

Matriculation Fee 8 85.00 $255.00 

Health Fee 5.00 15.00 

Student Activity Fee 15.00 45.00 

Student Group Insurance (voluntary) 

Total Charges— Day Student "S105.00 *S315J)0 

Room, Board and Laundry . . . ^ 187.00 516.00 

Total Charges—Boarding Students "$292.00 * $876.00 

The above table includes basic fees only. Other charges are assessed where applicable. Please see "Explanation 
of Fees."* All matriculation charges, board, room rent, or other charges are subject to change at the end of any quarter. 

Normal cost of books and supplies approximates S30.00 per quarter. Students are required to secure all 
books, supplies, and tools necessary for satisfactory completion of the courses for which they are enrolled. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. Students are required to meet financial obligations 
promptly. Persons granted scholarships or work-aid assistance will be duly notified in writing, and money accrued 
from these sources will be credited to their accounts. 

Veterans coming to Savannah State College should bring with them sufficient funds to pay all fees as indicated 
on the Schedule of Fees. 

Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet college expenses through part-time employment, provided 
they maintain satisfactory scholastic averages. These work opportunities include such jobs as clerical and stenographic 
work, library work, waiting tables, washing dishes, pantry and kitchen work, skilled and unskilled work in the several 
trades and in maintenance. 

Scholarships 

A limited number of special scholarships are available to selected students who meet the required standards 
of scholastic merit, high character, general promise, and superior achievement in certain specific areas of the college 
program. 

The aim of the National Defense Student Loan Program is to create at American Colleges and Universities 
loan funds from which needy students may borrow to complete their higher education. Students interested in National 
Defense Loan Funds, should write the Dean of Students. Savannah State College. Savannah, Georgia. 

* Freshman and Entering Students pay an additional $10.00 General Deposit required of all students upon initial registration in any 
unit of tbe University System. In keeping with tbe vote of tile student body in May, 1%2, eaeb student will be i 
Fee due and payable at Fall Quarter Registration or the s 
a complete schedule of fees. 



a 




SAVANNAH 

STATE 
COLLEGE 




GENERAL INFORMATION 
ISSUE 



Page 

President's Message - - 3 

Welcome lo Savannah State College .. 4 
Intellectual Center of the Campus . 5 

Organizations ~ - * 

Graduate Program — - 8 

Campus Tour. — ....- - 10 



The Curriculum _ - 

Division of Business Administration .... 
Division of Education .... 



11 



Department of Health, Physical 
Education and Recreation 

Division ol Humanities _ 

Department oi Fine Arts 



Division of Natural Sciences ~ 18 

Division oi Social Sciences 19 

Division of Home Study. 1° 

Division of Technical Sciences - 20 

Activities - - - 20 



13 General Information .. 




THE 
SAVANNAH 

STATE 
COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 

President ... Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations and Alumni Affairs Wilton C. Scott 

Editor Mrs. Carolyn R. Screen 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Volume 20 March, 1969 No. 5 

- The Savannah Mate Collier Bulk-tin is published yearly in October, December, 
February, March, April, and May by Savannah State College. 




Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 



It is indeed a very great pleasure for me to ex- 
tend on behalf of the administration, faculty, and 
student body, greetings to all prospective students 
who are seriously considering Savannah State College 
as your college and to all of our friends everywhere. 
Our college welcomes all of you! 

Since the founding of the college on November 
26, 1890, Savannah State has been primarily con- 
cerned with developing a strong program of educa- 
tion and training for all students. We feel that the 
college, today, is an exciting and challenging place 
to spend four of the most important years of your 
life. It is challenging because it has an excellent 
faculty, a rapidly expanding student body, viable 
programs, and excellent facilities for study, research, 
and relaxation. It is exciting because it is a place 
where minds can meet and exchange ideas, for the 
purpose of solving problems presented by our modern 
society. The college is proud of its reputation for 
excellence which is reflected in the outstanding per- 
formance of its graduates in many varied vocations 
and professions all over the United States of America. 

Savannah State College regards itself as an urban 
college and as such, recognizes that it must meet the 
challenges of the urban crisis in realistic, and even 
self-critical terms. In this connection, we are con- 
stantly striving to develop more understanding of 
the process of urbanization, and we are devising 
more effective programs and approaches to solving 
current urban problems. The college offers courses 
leading to the baccalaureate degree, with a major 



in each of the following areas of concentration: Ac 
counting; Biology; Chemistry; Civil Technology 
Dietetics and Institutional Management; Economics 
Elementary Education; Electronics Technology; Eng 
lish; General Business Administration; Mathematics 
Mechanical Technology; Secondary Education 
Secretarial Science; Social Sciences; Textiles and 
Clothing. 

During the summer of 1968, a Graduate Pro- 
gram leading to the Master's Degree in Elementary 
Education was inaugurated. All of our programs of 
teacher education now enjoy five-year approval by 
the State Department of Education. 

A ten-year Development Plan, which was started 
four years ago, continues to provide better and more 
attractive facilities, well-equipped laboratories and 
classrooms, and modern comfortable dormitories. 

This Information Bulletin which has been de- 
veloped for you will graphically describe the facili- 
ties and programs and will answer many questions 
about the college which you may have. 

Again, it is a pleasure to greet you and we in- 
vite you to visit with us and learn more about our 
college. 




Welcome to 

Savannah State College 



Savannah State College, a unit of the University 
System of Georgia, is a five-year accredited college 
of arts and sciences, teacher education, business ad- 
ministration, and technology. A graduate program in 
elementary education was initiated last summer. 

Founded in 1890, Savannah State College is 
located in the historic city of Savannah, the first 
capital of Georgia, and the second largest city in 
Georgia. 

Savannah State College offers courses leading to 
the master's degree in elementary education, and 
courses leading to the baccalaureate degree with a 
major in each of these areas of concentration: ac- 
counting, biology, chemistry, civil technology, die- 
tetics and institution management, economics, ele- 
mentary education, electronics technology, English, 
general business administration, mathematics, me- 
chanical technology, secondary education, secretarial 
science, social sciences, and textiles and clothing. 

Teacher education programs in the following 
fields have been approved by the Georgia Division 
of Teacher Education and Certification: elementary 
education, secondary education, with a concentration 
in business education; English, French, general 
science, industrial arts education, mathematics, social 
studies, Spanish, trade and industrial education, 
grades 1-12; art education, health and physical edu- 
cation, music education, and teacher-librarian. 

Two-year programs of study are offered in Secre- 
tarial Science, and Dressmaking and Tailoring. Upon 
satisfactory completion of these programs, the student 
is given a certificate of proficiency. 

Savannah State College has one of the most beau- 



tiful campuses in the South. The campus comprises 
136 acres of matchless natural beauty. Attractive 
new buildings are constantly being built. Put into 
use recently was the John F. Kennedy Fine Arts 
Center, A. E. Peacock Hall, and a new athletic 
stadium. 

The John F. Kennedy Fine Arts Center, con- 
structed at an approximate cost of $500,000, contains 
a Little Theatre, offices, classrooms, and laboratories 
for music, art, ceramics, and sculpture. 

A. E. Peacock Hall, a dormitory for 180 male 
students, is a modern three-story building which con- 
tains 90 bedrooms of the studio type; a lobby, 
recreational areas, an apartment for the house direc- 
tor; barber shop, room for TV viewing, and a laundro- 
mat. This dormitory is completely air-conditioned, 
and was constructed at an approximate cost of 
$600,000. 

Presently, a new student center and food service 
building is being constructed. This building will 
feature a dining room equipped to handle 1,200 
students and will house all student activities. A book- 
store, snack bar, lounges, game and meeting rooms, 
and administrative offices will also be included in 
this building. 

Savannah State College has requested from the 
Board of Regents the following facilities: a Natural 
Sciences Building, a Technical Home Economics 
Building, and a Nursery School for early childhood 
education. The science building, and a dormitory 
for 200 students have been approved. 

For further information write: The Registrar, 
Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia 31404. 




Asa H. Gordon Library 



The Intellectual Center of the Campus 



The Library of the College is one of its most 
prized possessions. The adequacy of its resources 
and the nature of its services to students and faculty 
largely determine the quality of the academic pro- 
gram. On the Savannah State College campus, the 
library is an indispensable unit which undergirds 
the instructional program, as well as contributes to 
the recreational reading interests. The library is not 
an adjunct to teaching; but the heart of the learning 
process. 

The library staff and faculty are busy assembling 
a notable book collection to be used in active support 
of the academic curriculum. Assembling a book 
collection is not enough! The librarian and his staff 



actively encourage students to use books with an 
emphasis on the role that books play in the intellectual 
life of the academic community. 

The resources of the library include 73,338 
volumes, several thousand pamphlets, 710 periodi- 
cals, and 57 newspapers. The London Times, the 
New York Times, the Savannah Morning News, and 
the Savannah Evening Press, are on microfilm, in 
addition to book materials in micro-print. 

A recently inaugurated lecture series has truly 
made the library a market place of ideas. 

All in all, the library at Savannah State College 
is an essential instrument in the life of the academic 
community. 



Organizations 






FF1 1 f 1 II I f.l « /ai* /(.& fl tf ffH if 




The Men's Glee Club 








it */* § H # I' & t 1 Si 1 v * # i S 



The Football Team 



iV 



Graduate Program 



The Master of Science degree program is de- 
signed to further the professional growth and com- 
petency of persons choosing a career in public edu- 
cation. Specific objectives are to improve their pro- 
fessional skills and competencies; to expand their 
professional and cultural backgrounds; to further 
their knowledge, appreciation, and understanding of 
their areas of specialization; and to deepen their 
appreciation and performance in scientific investi- 
gation. 

For admission to the graduate program, an ap- 
plicant must comply with the general requirements 
prescribed by the University System. In addition, the 
applicant (1) must have earned a bachelor's degree 
from a regionally accredited college; (2) must hold, 
or become eligible for, a professional certificate in 
the area in which graduate study is contemplated; 
(3) must have earned a minimum score of 450 on 
the National Teacher Common Examinations; (4) 
must have submitted two official transcripts of all 
courses attempted at the undergraduate level as well 
as previous graduate study; and (5) must have re- 
ceived the approval of the Chairman of the Division 
of Education. 

Admission is restricted to include only those stu- 
dents whose academic records indicate that they can 
successfully undertake graduate work. For admission 
as a regular student in full graduate standing, a 
minimum undergraduate average of 2.5 (C+) is 
required. 

Students who apply for admission to a program 
leading to a graduate degree are classified as degree 
students. Students who wish to enroll in a course or 
courses without regard to degree requirements are 
classified as non-degree students. 

The graduate program in education consists of 
sixty quarter hours. These include twenty hours of 
professional education and research, twenty-five 
hours in a specialized field, and fifteen hours of 
electives. The fifteen hours of electives are taken 
either in subject matter courses or professional edu- 
cation, or distributed between these tw : o subject areas, 
subject to the needs and wishes of the student and to 
the approval of the advisor(s). 

The program breakdown is as follows: 
20 hours — Professional Education and 

Research 
25 hours — Specialized Content 



15 hours — Electives (Professional, subject 
matter, or both) 

Twenty hours in professional education and re- 
search is required. These courses briefly described, 
include (1) Advanced Studies in Human Develop- 
ment and Learning or The Nature and Conditions of 
Human Learning; (2) Curriculum Planning; (3) 
Social Foundations of Education; and (4) Educa- 
tional Research or Field Project. 

The twenty-five hours of specialized content are 
designed to assist the teacher toward becoming a 
master teacher through the mastery of meaningful 
sequential concepts and skills related to specific 
fields of knowledge. The Division of Education is 
working with academic Divisions to encourage their 
development of courses that may be selected by ele- 
mentary teachers as areas of concentration. The 
science department has begun developing several 
such courses. According to present and prospective 
staff strength, areas of concentration are planned in 
(1) social sciences; (2) science; (3) reading, speech, 
and linguistics; (4) foreign languages; (5) mathe- 
matics and science; and, (6) art and music. 

The fifteen hours of electives are planned for in- 
creasing the student's overall competency either 
through (1) adding further strength to a developed 
interest area, or (2) developing an additional inter- 
est outlet, or (3) compensating for identified needs. 
Electives may be selected from among professional 
education, subject matter courses, and suggested 
elective areas. 

Upon admission to the graduate program, the stu- 
dent is assigned an advisor who guides the student 
in developing his program. Not later than mid-point 
in his program, or by the time that thirty quarter 
hours have been earned, the student is required to 
file an application for admission to candidacy. 

Approval of that application is a certification 
that the student has made satisfactory progress to 
that point and that he is being granted candidacy 
admission subject to the conditions that follow: 

Certification by his advisors that (a) he has made 
satisfactory progress in all courses pursued; (b) that 
he has received a satisfactory score on the National 
Examinations; and (c) that he has earned an under- 
graduate degree from an approved institution in a 
program which meets the approval of the Division 
of Education of the College. 



Five hundred (500) courses may be taken by 
undergraduates (juniors and seniors) and graduates, 
but 600 courses are open only to graduate students. 
500 Courses 

Education — Directing and Evaluating Student Teaching. 
For providing selected teachers with information, skills, 
and understandings required for effective supervision of 
student teachers. 

Education — Internship for Supervising Teachers. A co- 
operative adventure between a supervising teacher and 
a student teacher — a field course. 

Education — Seminar in Supervision. An opportunity for 
experienced supervising teachers to investigate and to 
design plans for increasing skills of guiding student 
teachers. 

Education — Tests and Measurements. Principles and pro- 
cedures in evaluating pupil growth. 

Education — Methods of Studying Children and Youth. A 
study and application of methods of studying children 
and youth. 

Education — Methods of Teaching Reading. Basic program 
of the elementary school reading program. 

Education — Introduction to Exceptional Children. A study 
of finding, diagnosing, and educating a typical child. 
600 Courses 

Education — Philosophy and History of Education. Modern 
philosophical systems and their impact on educational 
theory and practice. 
*Education — Educational Research. Methodology of edu- 
cational research and its application to instruction and 
guidance. Research project required. 
*Education — Advanced Studies in Human Development and 
Learning. Comprehensive view of human growth, de- 



nphasis upon the recent 
'ces of Guidance, An 




velopment, and learning, with ei 
literature in these fields. 

Education — Principles and Pract. 
introduction to guidance. 
*Education — Social Foundations of Education. The 
tributions of the social sciences focused on the si 
cant issues and problems of education. 

Education — Seminar in Elementary Education. Opportuni 
ties to analyze issues, theories, and practices in ele 
mentary education. 

Education — Neiver Teaching Media. Multi-sensory lea: 
ing and utilization of audio-visual materials and pro> 
grammed learning. 
*Education — Curriculum Planning. Trends, issues, and 
development needed in understanding curriculum de- 
velopment. 

Education — Science for Elementary Teachers. Opportuni- 
ties for acquiring basic knowledge in science appropri- 
ate for the elementary grades. 
*Education — The Nature and Conditions of Human Learn- 
ing. Psychological theory and theories of learning. 

Education — Problems in Reading. Investigation of prob- 
lems met in the teaching of reading. 
*Education — Field Project. A field project in educational 
research (not a thesis, but a written report will be re- 
quired). 



* Twenty hours of professional education and research 
must be chosen from these courses. 
For further information write: 

Director of Graduate Studies 
Savannah State College 
Savannah, Georgia 31404 




i from the Alumni Weekend 



Members of Beta Kappa Chi 



CAMPUS TOUR 




Janie L. Lester Ha 



The Curriculum 



The formal instructional program of Savannah 
State College comprises the general curriculum, areas 
of major and minor concentration, and terminal 
curricula. The program is organized within the fol- 
lowing divisions and departments: 

1. The Division of Business Administration 

2. The Division of Education 

Department of Elementary Education 
Department of Secondary Education 
Department of Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation 



3. The Division of Humanities 
Department of English 
Department of Fine Arts 
Department of Modern Languages 



4. The Division of Natural Sciences 

Department of Biology 
Department of Chemistry 
Department of Mathematics and 
Physics 

5. The Division of Social Sciences 

6. The Division of Technical Sciences 

Department of Engineering Technology 
Department of Home Economics 

7. The Division of Home Study 



The General Curriculum 



The General Education Program proposes to pro- 
vide opportunities for all students to acquire the basic 
skills, attitudes, habits, appreciations and under- 
standings requisite for the good life. 

It seeks to guarantee to all students competency 
in communication and thinking. It further proposes 
to orient students toward and to sensitize them to 
human and universal good and to the worth and 
dignity of every human being. 

At this college the general curriculum is pre- 
occupied with the major disciplines that: 

1. Acquaint the students with broad areas of 
knowledge and human experience; 

2. Give them an understanding of themselves, 
their culture and physical environment; 



3. Provide the students with a sound intellectual 
and moral foundation upon which character 
and professional and vocational opportunity 
may rest. 

This program is concerned generally with fresh- 
man and sophomore students. However, some atten- 
tion is devoted to students on the junior and senior 
level of their intellectual maturation. In this respect, 
general education is an integral phase of the experi- 
ence of all students who matriculate for a degree at 
the College. 

The General Education Program is under the 
general supervision of the General Education Com- 
mittee and the Coordinator for General Education. 
The Committee consists of students and faculty mem- 
bers. 



11 



DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



A high school student who is preparing for a career in 
business via the college route should direct his efforts 
toward becoming proficient in mathematics and English at 
the high school level. Proficiency in mathematics allows 
him to make quick use of quantitative tools in solving 
business problems. Proficiency in English permits him to 
communicate his ideas. The ability to do both are significant 
attributes of business personnel. 



Though not essential, since the college offers the neces- 
sary fundamentals, a student may also take such courses 
as bookkeeping, shorthand, and other business subjects 
which are offered at his respective high school. Such an 
approach, at least, allows the student to make a tentative 
judgment as to whether or not he is favorably inclined 
toward specific subject areas. It should be pointed out 
unequivocally, however, that business training, on the 
college level, embraces much more than typewriting and 
shorthand. 



Since more and more high school students 
at college with typing skills, it is recommended that a course 
in typewriting be taken. Entering students are exempted 
from typewriting courses in which they meet the course 
standards. 

Whether or not students interested in the secretarial or 
teaching programs should take shorthand in high school, 
since they are required courses in these college curricula, is 
a debatable question. Evidence at our institution suggests 
that the student might well spend the time that he might 
devote to shorthand in high school to additional preparation 
in grammar and composition, if he is not already proficient 
in these areas. 

One of the advantages of majoring in business is that 
one is preparing himself for a wide variety of employment 
possibilities. Opportunities exist for self-employment, for 
employment in private industry, and for employment with 
the government — national, state and local. 

Some positions, for which training in business at Savan- 
nah State College is designed to prepare students include: 
Entrepreneurs Secretaries 

Accountants Stenographers 

Bookkeepers Typists 

Salesmen Business Managers 

Economists Teachers of Business 



To realize the aims of a person desiring trail 
business, Savannah State College's Division of Bu 
offers cpurses leading to the degree of bachelor of i 
and a terminal, two-year program leading to a certificate 
of proficiency. 



A student who pursues a degree in business at this in- 
stitution may concentrate his efforts in one of the follow- 
ing areas: (1) General Business Administration, (2) Ac- 
counting, (3) Economics, (4) Secretarial Science, and (5) 
The Program for Teachers of Business Education. In each 
of the above curricula, consideration has been given to the 
course requirements for graduate study. 

Because of the numerous job opportunities that exist 
currently for accountants and secretaries, students should 
become familiar with the attributes of successful account- 
ants and secretaries as well as the nature of the job oppor- 
tunities that are available. 



A student may find a challenging career in the field of 
accounting if he has analytical ability, if he has a facility 
with figures, and if he derives personal enjoyment while 
doing work which requires the use of these attributes. 

While numerous lists have been compiled which suggest 
attributes of a good secretary, the attributes of loyalty and 
a mastery of shorthand and typewriting are frequently 
mentioned. While the following list is by no means all 
inclusive, it, nevertheless, gives some further insight into 
desired attributes of a good secretary. A prospective em- 
ployer recently wrote that he had a secretarial vacancy, but 
in order to meet the job specifications, the secretary had 
to have the following: a pleasing personality, facility with 
English, a mastery of telephone etiquette, courtesy, neatness 
in both appearance and work, and the ability to work with 
others. Aspiring secretaries can acquire and develop many 
of these attributes early. 



;upations within the field of business are 
and because the specific required attributes with- 
in each occupation may vary, high school students are 
encouraged, in addition to utilizing their own counselors, to 
visit colleges and counsel with professors and counselors 
for guidance in career selection. 



12 



DIVISION OP EDUCATION 



The Division of Education at Savannah State College 
is a member of the Association of Colleges for Teachers 
Education. It offers twelve curricula in teacher preparation 
and a program of basic training for teacher-librarians. These 
programs are approved by the State Department of Educa- 
tion. This means that satisfactory completion of any pro- 
gram brings automatic certification in the field of study 
pursued. 

A person majoring in Education at Savannah State 



College is the concern of every division and department of 
the College, therefore, the resources and facilities — as well 
as the interest and efforts of the entire institution, are at 
his disposal. 

Aside from a strong academic classroom program in 
general, specialized, and professional education, the teach- 
ing major at Savannah State College has rich, varied, and 
meaningful laboratory experience which brings one into 
constant contact with children and youth. 



COLLEGE-WIDE PROVISION FOR TEACHER EDUCATION 



The Division comprises three departments: the Depart- 
ment of Elementary Education; the Department of Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation; and the Department of 
Secondary Education. The preparation of teachers is, how- 
ever, a college-wide commitment. Because every division 



and department at the College is involved in training 
teachers in some subject matter field, this function engages 
the constant interest and efforts, staff resources, and facili- 
ties of the entire institution. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND RECREATION 



The essential aim of the Department of Health, Phyi 
Education and Recreation is to afford professional training 
for pre-service and in-service teachers of health, phys: 
education, and recreation in the elementary and secondary 
schools. A parallel aim is advisement. The aim is to pro- 
vide for all students instruction in the basic principles ( 
health and recreational activity needed for wholesome livin; 

In pursuance of the foregoing aims, this Departmenl 
provides a four-fold program of instruction. For students 
who plan to become professional workers in the field 
health, physical education, and recreation — either in school: 
or in other agencies — the department offers a sequence 
specialized training to the degree of Bachelor of Science ir 
Education, with a concentration in health, physical educa 
tion, and recreation. 



In addition, for all students enrolled in teacher education 



curricula at Savannah State College, this department pro- 
vides basic training in supervision of one or more phases 
of a comprehensive health, physical education, and recre- 
ation program in the schools of Georgia. This phase of the 
work is provided either in selected specialized courses or 
in a minor sequence. Further, for all students enrolled at 
the college this department provides instruction in the 
fundamental concepts and activities of health, physical edu- 
cation, and recreation as an essential phase of general 
education. 

Finally, this department serves the college community 
through instruction and leadership in the intramural pro- 
gram. The intramural program is, in effect, a laboratory 
in which students enjoy practicing the skills learned in 
general service courses and relish competing with their 
peers. 



13 



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 



The Division of Humanities, as its name implies, is con- 
cerned primarily with transforming the individual into a 
human and humane person. The technique for realizing 
this aim is that of serious study of the human heritage as 
it has been recorded in literature, music, art, and philosophy. 
In this manner the student deepens his appreciation, 
sharpens his intellect, enhances his critical powers, and 
incorporates himself in the mainstream of the best that has 
been thought and felt. 



The Dii 



of Humanities provides opportunities for 



majoring in English, music, the fine arts, French, and 
Spanish. The curricula in these areas are designed also to 
prepare teachers. Thus students who elect to teach become 
purveyors of the humanistic tradition. The College provides 
a means also for meeting the national need for persons 
trained in foreign languages. As future linguists and/or 
teachers, students have an unusual opportunity at Savan- 
nah State College. A strong faculty in modern languages, 
in addition to a recently installed laboratory assures the 
students the means of thoroughly preparing themselves in 
this area. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 



MUSIC 



In the area of music, the Department of Fine Arts at 
Savannah State College offers a major program leading to 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education and 
two minor programs — one for prospective teachers in the 
secondary schools and a nonteaching program. All of the 
curricula have been approved by the three national accredit- 
ing agencies — The Music Teachers National Association, 



the National Association of Schools of Music and the Music 
Educators National Conference, as well as by the State 
Board of Certification and the Board of Regents of the 
University System of Georgia. 

Courses include intensive work in theory, history and 
literature, performance, applied music, conducting and 
music education. Although 75 hours are required for state 




The John F. Kennedy Fine Arts Center 




Alpha Kappa Mu Recepti 



certification, a total of 82 hours constitutes the four-year 
music requirement at the College. Previous training of at 
least two years in any applied area is required of all pros- 
pective majors, but skilled aptitude is recognized and ac- 
cepted in lieu of this requirement if necessary. Most majors 
must pursue four years of training in piano, voice, or 
another instrument, as well as the same amount of time in 
their applied area. In addition to the mu 
candidates for a degree take a large complement of 
in general education and the professional sequences. 

The five musical organizations — The Marching Band, 
The Concert Band, the Choral Society, The Women's Glee 
Club, and The Men's Glee Club — are each directed by a 
full-time faculty member and provide ample opportunity 
for students inside and outside of the department to receive 
experiences in public performance which range from pro- 
grams on the campus at assemblies, church services, vespers, 
and special programs, to local television appearances, con- 
cert in the community, athletic games away from home, and 
concert tours in several states. 

One of the most important operations in this department 
is the awarding each year of a number of scholarships, 



called grants-in-aid, which are given to capable, worthy 
applicants in all organizations upon recommendation of 
the department. Depending upon the aptitude, academic 
standing, and financial need of the student, these awards 
are sufficient at times to provide tuition for a full year. 
Grants are made, however, only to applicants who file the 
ary forms, are recommended by the department, and 
proved by the Committee on Scholarships. Recipients, 
aged to apply in the spring, are usually notified dur- 
ing the summer, well in advance of the opening of the Fall 
Quarter. 

The present facilities provide space for classes, organ- 
izational rehearsals, practice periods, listening room, and 
offices. Pianos are provided for practice, and band instru- 
ments are provided, both without charge. Complete uniforms, 
robes, stoles, and blazers are also furnished to members of 
rganizations. 



For any additional information concerning the Depart- 
ment, please feel free to address your inquiries to Dr. Cole- 
ridge A. Braithwaite, Chairman, Department of Fine Arts, 
Savannah State College. 



ART 



The rewards can be great for a person with or without 
"artistic talent." To gain these rewards, one needs only the 
desire to learn and a good place in which to learn. The 
Art Department at Savannah State College provides students 
with an adequate environment for learning. If one has the 
desire, then he can progress at Savannah State College. 

The Art Department is located in new quarters, especially 
designed and equipped with modern studios and lecture 
rooms making it possible to teach the latest use of books 
and methods in lithography etching, serigraphy, ceramics, 
sculpture, and painting. 

Students who have studied art at Savannah State College 
have reaped many rewards. Some have won large sums of 
money in art competition. Some are enjoying the success 
of exhibiting their art at qualified galleries. One former 
student is in the Pentagon in Washington, D. C, where he 



the knowledge of art acquired here. Others have 
ul careers as teachers of art. And, still others have 
gone on to more advanced studies in schools throughout 
the country. 

Art students at Savannah State College occasionally 
have opportunities to get first-hand experience, as a number 
of art jobs of short duration come into the Art Department. 
There are some jobs of more permanent nature waiting to 
be filled. 

The Art Department is prepared and eager to help 
students in many ways. The rewards can be plentiful for 
those who are seeking; and when they acquire a Bachelor 
of Science Degree in Art Education, will find that rewards 
other than salary, position, dignity, or fame await them. 
They may learn, ultimately to enrich their lives with things 
which do not pass so quickly; for, to know and to be able 
to enjoy knowing is indeed a divine reward. 




MODERN LANGUAGES 



The Department of Modern Languages offers instruction 
in three languages: French, German, and Spanish. The 
primary aim of the members of the Department is to teach 
the student to understand, speak, read and write these 
languages so that he may communicate with others who 
speak them. This instruction is carried on in daily recitations 
in the classroom and also in a modern twenty booth labora- 
tory where the student can increase his proficiency by listen- 
ing to and repeating exercises of various types especially 
prepared for this purpose. For students who wish to develop 
more than an elementary proficiency in French or Spanish, 
the Department offers courses leading to a minor in either 



language. It also offers courses leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Education with a concentration in 
French or Spanish. 

Outside of the field of education, a person with a major 
in foreign language can find employment in several areas. 
First, there is the area of organizations more or less inter- 
national in character. Because of the nature of its work, 
there is almost a constant demand at the United Nations 
Headquarters for men and women who are proficient in 



DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 



vision of Natural Sciences is proud of the record 
made in helping young people find themselves 



in the scientific and 
quarter of a century. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 



The aims of the Department of Biology are: (1) to 
provide for all students that knowledge which is essential 
to an understanding of the biological basis of living; (2) 
to train persons adequately through the media of advanced 
courses for entry into the professional study of dentistry, 
medicine, and nursing; and (3) to prepare persons to teach 
the biological sciences in the secondary school or to con- 
tinue study on the graduate level. 



In addition to the required general courses, the depart- 
ment offers courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science with a major in biology. This department offers 

The Biology Department is proud of its achievements 
during the last several years. It takes great pride in review- 
ing the records of some of its graduates. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 



The Department of Chemistry has grown by leaps and 
bounds in the past few years. The teaching staff, teaching 
space and equipment have been increased one hundred per 
cent. 

The Department has been quite successful in obtaining 
funds from Chemical Societies and the National Science 
Foundation to sponsor several significant programs such as 
the In-Service Institute for Teachers of Chemistry and Gen- 
eral Science in secondary education and the Summer Science 
Program for selected high school students. 

Many research projects are carried out by the students 
in cooperation with the department's active research pro- 
gram. The Department feels that research projects serve 
as good preparation for more highly developed and special- 
ized research that the students will encounter in graduate 



school. The research program serves as an outlet for the 
expression of the student's scientific interest and capabilities 
other than in the classroom and gives him experience in 
employing the scientific methods in problem solving. 

The Department of Chemistry provides basic training 
for higher education — work leading to the Master of Science 
and Ph.D. degree. In addition to this it provides all of the 
chemistry needed in pre-nursing, pre-dental and pre-medical 
education. 

The curriculum has been revised so that the student will 
receive a substantial number of courses in mathematics, 
physics, and biology which will aid him in becoming a 
better Chemist. 

The Department believes in creativity, freedom of ex- 
ploration, productivity, hard work, and recreation. 



18 



THE DEPARTMENT OP MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS 



The Mathematics curriculum and courses are being con- 
tinually revised to keep in step with the recommendations 
released by the School Mathematics Group in 1960. The 
textbooks, course outlines, and other materials are con- 
tinuously being changed in order to meet today's challenge. 
The Physics courses are designed to give emphasis to the 
PSSC recommendations for college Physics. 



The objectives of the department are not only to prepare 
better teachers of Mathematics and Physics, but also to 
provide them with the courses necessary to do further study 
in areas like linear programming and computing, statistical 
research, electronics, guided missiles, engineering, mathe- 
matics for various phases of industry research, actuary 
science and over 20 branches of governmental i 




Sy$? 




DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 



The Division of Social Sciences offers two major pro- 
grams for persons interested in the social sciences. Cur- 
riculum I leads to the B.S. degree in social sciences with a 
concentration in history. Curriculum II leads to the B.S. 
degree in the social sciences with a concentration in 
sociology leading to the professional study of social work. 

Persons who plan to teach social studies in the secondary 
school should enroll in the Teacher Education Program and 
pursue the B.S. degree in Education with a concentration 
in the social sciences. 



Curriculum I is designed for persons interested in careers 
in: law, government, diplomatic service, general research, 
Young Men's Christian Association, and Urban League 
work. 

Curriculum II is designed for persons interested in 
careers as social workers, probation officers, vocational 
counselors, camp counselors, employment interviewers, 
juvenile court workers, welfare fund workers, and im- 
migration service workers. 



The Dh 



sion of Home Study encompasses instructional 
programs in Business Administration, Economics, Educa- 
tion, English, Geography, Government, History, Humanities, 
Mathematics, Psychology, Social Science, and Sociology. 
These courses are offered for those persons who are inter- 
ested in furthering their education, but are unable to do so 
in residence. 

The Home Study Department is authorized to operate 
the following programs: 

1. College Correspondence Study 

2. Extension Classes 



DIVISION OF HOME STUDY 

and students have registered from New York, New Jersey, 



There are students enrolled in these courses living in 
all parts of Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, and Alabama; 



and Washington, D. C. 

The Home Study Department is directed toward two 
objectives. The first is to provide a service for those per- 
sons who cannot undertake residence instruction, and the 
second is to provide an enriching program for those who 
do not require residence instruction for personal growth 
and enrichment. 

Extension classes are provided upon sufficient demand. 



For information concerning credits, fees, examinations, 
textbooks, etc., write: The Division of Home Study, Savan- 
nah State College, Savannah, Georgia. 



DIVISION OF TECHNICAL SCIENCES 



The Division of Technical Sciences seeks to accomplish 
two major objectives: (1) to provide students with sufficient 
specialized training in engineering technology, technical 
home economics and industrial teacher education to meet 
entry employment requirements in these areas; and (2) to 
provide students with a broad liberal education which in- 
cludes study in the general areas of communications, 
mathematics, the natural sciences, the behavioral and social 
sciences, and the fine arts. 

In order to achieve the above objectives, the Division 
of Technical Sciences is organized into two departments 
which offer curricula leading to the Bachelor of Science 
degree. The Department of Engineering Technology offers 
programs in building construction technology, electronics 
technology, industrial arts education, mechanical technology, 
and trade and industrial education. 

The Department of Home Economics affords opportunity 
for students to major in dietetics and institutional manage- 
ment. This four-year program is approved by the American 
Dietetic Association. 

This pre-professional dietetic course which leads to the 



Bachelor of Science degree prepares the student for im- 
mediate internship This internship is a required fifth- 
year of on-the-job training. The twelve-month internship 
may be taken in hospital dietetics, medical dietetics, food 
clinic dietetics, public health and social agencies, college 
institutional food administration, or food business adminis- 
tration. 

The undergraduate curriculum in dietetics contains a 
minor concentration in chemistry. If desired, students may 
be prepared for laboratory careers in scientific food re- 
search, or in new food and recipe development for civilian 



and army 

The Home Economics Department also offers the oppor- 
tunity for students to major in textiles and clothing. 

Individuals interests in careers in the technical sciences 
should be well grounded in the applied sciences. Such high 
school subjects as physics, algebra , plane geometry, 
trigonometry and industrial shop are very desirable for 
persons planning to pursue engineering technology curricula. 
Chemistry and homemaking are essential for those interested 
in technical home i 



ACTIVITIES 



Savannah State College puts great emphasis upon a rich 
and varied religious life program. Through its religious 
activities, the College seeks to develop an understanding of 
and an appreciation for the place of religion in everyday 
living, to deepen spiritual insight, and to make the practice 
of Christian principles a vital part of the life of the well- 
educated citizen. 

Religious life activities are directed by the College 
Minister. The Sunday School, Y.M.C.A., Y.W.C.A., Newman 
Club, and the Annual Religious Emphasis Week, provide 
opportunities for religious growth and development under 
the supervision of the Religious Life Committee. 

Savannah State College contributes to the attainment of 
a well-rounded education by providing many opportunities 
for students to participate in a wide range of organized 
groups. Programs are planned for the social, religious, and 
cultural advancement of the college community. 

The Savannah State College Student Government Associ- 
ation, composed of representatives of all classes, works 
with the administration of the College. It works also with 
the various campus organizations and sponsors projects 
for the general welfare of the student body. 

TheTiger's Roar, official student newspaper, is published 
every six weeks by students under the supervision of the 
Coordinator of Student Publications. 

The following organizations also provide media for ex- 
pression of student interest: Art Club, Business Club. 
Camera Club, Collegiate Counselors, Creative Dance Group, 
Debating Club, Dormitory Councils, Economics Club, New- 



man Club, "Players by the Sea," the dramatics group; 
Social Science Club, Student Loan Association, "Tiger's 
Roar," Trade Association, Ushers Club, Varsity Club, 
Future Teachers of America (NEA), Home Economics Club, 
Veterans Club, Y.M.C.A., Y.W.C.A., Women's Council, 
Boar's Head Club, Canterbury Club, "Tiger," student year- 
book; and numerous civic and Civil Rights programs. 



The following national social sororities ; 
the campus: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Sigma G; 
Phi Beta, and Delta Sigma Theta. 



°Rho, Zeta 



Sign 



ollowing national social fraternities are organized 
;mpus: Alpho Phi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta 
nd Kappa Alpha Psi. 



The Department of Health and Physical Education i 
ducts a well-rounded intramural athletic progran 
activities for men and women. Utilizing group games and 
various sports for their full educational values, the program 
features football, basketball, track, field hockey, and bad- 
minton. 

A member of the Southern Athletic Conference, Savan- 
nah State College maintains competition in all sports spon- 
sored by the conference. The College also holds membership 
in two national athletic associations, N.C.A.A., and N.A.I. A. 

To complement formal education on the campus, the 
college provides many activities for cultural enrichment. 
Student assemblies, institutes, debates, motion pictures, 
lectures, art exhibitions, dramatics, forums, athletic con- 
tests, concerts, hobby groups, and tours, contribute to the 
general welfare of the community. 



20 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and who present evidence of good moral character, adequate 
ability, sound health, and interest in a specific course of study are eligible for admission to the several departments 
of the College. 

Each candidate for admission is required to make formal application and thereafter submit such credentials 
as may be needed to support the application. Admissions correspondence should be addressed to the Director of 
Admissions. The application form with instructions may be obtained by writing the Director of Admissions. 

ESTIMATED GENERAL EXPENSES 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 

NOTE: Fees remitted by mail should be sent by money order, cashier's check, or certified check payable to SAVANNAH STATE COL- 
LEGE. Fees paid in person will be accepted in cash, money order, cashier's check, or certified check. 

Per Quarter Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $105.00 $ 315.00 

Health Fee 7.00 21.00 

Student Activity Fee 15.00 45.00 

Student Group Insurance (voluntary) 

Total Charges— Day Student * 127.00 *$ 375.00 

Room, Board and Laundry 217.00 651.00 

Total Charges— Boarding Student *$344.00 $1,026.00 

Non-Residents of the State of Georgia, Matriculation Fee is $135 per quarter. 

The above table includes basic fees only. Other charges are assessed where applicable. All matriculation 
charges, board, room rent, or other charges are subject to change at the end of any quarter. 

Normal cost of books and supplies approximates $30.00 per quarter. Students are required to secure all book's, 
supplies, and tools necessary for satisfactory completion of the courses for which they are enrolled. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. Students are required to meet financial obligations 
promptly. Persons granted scholarships or work-aid assistance will be duly notified in writing, and money accrued 
from these sources will be credited to their accounts. 



Veterans coming to Savannah State College should bring with them sufficient funds to pay all fees as indicated 
on the Schedule of Fees. 

SELF HELP OPPORTUNITIES 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet college expenses through part-time employment, provided 
they maintain satisfactory scholastic averages. These work opportunities include such jobs as clerical and stenographic 
work, library work, waiting tables, washing dishes, pantry and kitchen work, skilled and unskilled work in trades and 
maintenance. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

A limited number of special scholarships are available to selected students who meet the required standards 
of scholastic merit, high character, general promise, and superior achievement in certain specific areas of the college 
program. 

The aim of the National Defense Student Loan Program is to create at American Colleges and Universities 
loan funds from which needy students may borrow to complete their higher education. Students interested in National 
Defense Loan Funds, should write the Dean of Students, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia 31404. 

"Freshmen and Entering Students pay an additional $10.00 General Deposit required of all students upon initial registration in any 
unit of the University >yslrm. In keeping with the vote of the student body in May, 1%2„ each student will be assessed a $6.00 Yearbook 
Fee due and payable at the Fall Quarter Registration, or the student's initial registration. Please refer to the current college catalogue 
for a complete schedule of fees. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS MAP 




1. Wiley-Willcox P 


E. 


Con 


iplex 


11. 


Payne Hall 


2. Asa H. Gordon 


Lib 


ary 




12. 


Powell Hall 


3. Hill Hall 








13. 


Lockette Hall 


4. Wright Hall 








14. 


Lester Hall 


5. Peacock Hall 








15. 


Hammond Hall 


6. Morgan Hall 








16. 


Harris Infirmary 


7. Adams Hall 








17. 


Camilla Hall 


8. Herty Hall 








IB. 


Meldrim Hall 


9. B. F. Hubert Te 


htl 


cal 




1°. 


President's Residence 


10. J. F. Kennedy F 


ne 


Arts Center 


20 


New Student Center 




ALUMNI ISS 




GEORGIA 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE ALUMNI 
BULLETIN is published during the Spring Quarter by the 
Office of Public Relations and Alumni Affairs. 

Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr President 

Wilton C. Scott Director 

Mrs. Carolyn R. Screen Editor 

Dr. Prince Jackson, Jr. Alumni Secretary 

Robert Mobley Photographer 



CONTENTS 

Why Alumni Should Give 2 

President of Morehouse Speaks 3 

Dr. Hayward S. Anderson Receives Appointment 4 

Savannah State Launches Support Program . 5 

18th Annual Press Conference 6 

National Science Foundation Award 7 

Pictures of Alumni Weekend 8-9 

Mrs. Margaret Rohinson Receives Degree 10 

Revised School Standards Approved 11 

Alumni Century Club Announced 12 

J. B. Clemmons Elected Chairman of Math Group 13 

Attorney Fred S. Clark Heads Support Program- 14 

Ratings of Publications Announced 15 

SSC Ends SEAC Competition 17 

Student Teaching Assignments 18 



ABOUT THE COVER: Dr. Margaret Chisholm Robin- 
son, an alumna of the College, who recently received the 
Ph.D. degree from Washington University. She is an assist- 
ant professor of biology at Savannah State College. 



Why Alumni Should Give 
To Savannah State College 

1. You can provide the opportunity for a better 
life through education for deserving youth: 
scholarships, loans, campus jobs, etc. One 
dollar can bring in nine additional dollars for 
student aid. 

2. Your gift will be proof of a strong loyal, con- 
tributing alumni group. Foundations, busi- 
nesses, organizations, and individuals who are 
interested in giving to Savannah State College 
will be influenced by the extent of alumni 
support. 

3. Your contributions will enable Savannah State 
College to match available federal funds for 
research, for community service, and for train- 
ing the deprived. 

4. Savannah State College continues to be the 
College in the state which educates the largest 
number of Negro youth. Yet, a substantial per- 
cent of Negro high school graduates do not en- 
roll in any college. Your gift will cause the 
open hand of welcome to continue to extend 
from Savannah State College to the high school 
graduate who might not otherwise enter college. 

5. Now is the time to build the foundation for a 
solid alumni annual fund. What you assist in 
starting will become a fund with an impact. 

6. Your gift may influence another alumnus who 
otherwise would not contribute. 

7. When you were a student at Savannah State 
College, you, your parents, and others invested 
in you. That investment is there yet. You have 
received regular dividends. Increase your in- 
vestment. Better educational opportunities for 
others will add to your dividends. 

8. As a person with a college education, you should 
support education. // you dont believe in Sa- 
vannah State College, who will? 

9. Why should you give to Savannah State College? 
BECAUSE YOU CAN AFFORD TO DO IT! 
You probably have never had a higher income 
than you have now. AFFLUENT PEOPLE 
GIVE! ! ! 



President of Morehouse College Speaks at SSC 



Dr. Hugh M. Gloster, president of Morehouse College, 
Atlanta, Georgia, was the annual Honors Convocation speak- 
er at Savannah State College on Friday, January 24, at 10:20 

Dr. Gloster began his higher education at LeMoyne Col- 
lege, where he received a junior college diploma and in 1967 
was elected Alumnus of the Year. Next he attended More- 
house College, where he received the B.A. degree in English, 
and Atlanta University, where he received the M.A. degree 
in the same field. Later, he entered New York University, 
where he received the Ph.D. degree in English. 

The early years of Dr. Gloster's teaching career closely 
followed the path of his higher education. He taught first at 
LeMoyne College and then at Morehouse College. While a 
member of the Morehouse faculty, he offered graduate 
courses at Atlanta University during the regular and sum- 
mer terms. During the summer of 1949, he was Guest 
Professor of American Literature at Washington Square 
College of New York University, and during the summer 
of 1962, he held the same position in the Graduate School 
of Arts and Sciences at that institution. 

During World War II, Dr. Gloster was a professional 
staff member with USO. After a year as a USO Program 
Director at Fort Hauchuca, Arizona, he served two years 
as a USO Associate Regional Executive with headquarters 
in Atlanta. While in this office, he conducted a course in 
USO Policy and Practice at the Atlanta University School 
of Social Work. 

From 1946-67, Dr. Gloster was Professor of English 
and Chairman of the Communications Center at Hampton 
Institute. Under his leadership the Communications Center 
became one of the country's outstanding college language 
departments. From 1952-62, he was also Director of the 
Summer Session at Hampton Institute. In this position, he 
originated Hampton's pioneering pre-college program in 
1952, promoted the redevelopment of the graduate program, 
and established summer institutes for in-service teachers. 
Dr. Gloster was Dean of Faculty at Hampton Institute from 
1963-67. In this capacity, he gave leadership in the up- 
grading of the academic program and in the launching of 
special educational projects supported by foundation and 
government grants. 

Dr. Gloster has written numerous articles dealing with 
life and literature and has given many lectures 
in this field. He is the author of Negro Voices in 
Fiction (Chapel Hill: The University of North 
a Press, 1948), the definitive work in its special 
area, and the co-editor of The Brown Thrust (Memphis: 
Malcolm-Roberts, 1935), an anthology of verse by Negro 
college students, and of My Life — My Country — My World 
(New York: Prentice-Hall, 1952), one of the more success- 
ful freshman English anthologies of the 1950's. 

As a lecturer, Dr. Gloster has appeared in schools and 
colleges throughout the country. In 1952, he made lecture 
tours of colleges and universities in the Far West and New 
England under the auspices of the American Friends Ser- 
vice Committee, and in 1956 and 1959, he made lecture 
tours of colleges in Connecticut. 

From 1953 to 1955, Dr. Gloster was a Fullbright Pro- 
fessor of Hiroshima University in Japan. While in Japan, 
he traveled throughout the four main islands, where he 
gave over a hundred lectures on American life and litera- 



i top: 
Carol 




DR. HUGH M. GLOSTER 

ture. After leaving Japan in 1955, he returned to the 
United States via Hong Kong, Thailand, Burma, India, 
Pakistan, Italy, France and England thereby adding to his 
knowledge of the people of Asia and Europe and completing 
a trip around the world. After his return to the United 
States from the Orient, Dr. Gloster gave many lectures on 
Japan at American colleges and wrote several articles on 
Japan for national publications. Moreover, because of his 
experience in the Far East he was invited to serve in the 
summer of 1955 as a staff member in the Orientation Cen- 
ter for Foreign Graduate Students at the College of William 
and Mary and later in the year in Washington as a member 
of a committee which screened lecturers and post-doctoral 
research scholars applying for Fulbright awards in Asia 
and the Near East during the academic year 1956-57. 

During the summer of 1960, he was Professor of English 
and Director of the Summer Session in the Experimental 
College conducted by Hampton Institute in the Virgin 
Islands. During the academic year 1961-62, he served in 
the State Department's International Educational Exchange 
Program as Visiting Professor of American Literature at 
the University of Warsaw in Poland. As a lecturer in 
Literature, he also participated in the State De- 



1964 and 
pervisor 
allege under the 
Leone. In 1966, 
nd Turkey as a 
i sponsored by 



partment's American Specialists Program in Tanganyika 
during the summer of 1961 and in Poland and Spain during 
the summer of 1963. As Dean of Faculty at Hampton In- 
stitute, he toured folk high schools in Denm 
also visited West Africa in 1964 and 1966 
of the AID program conducted by the cc 
auspices of the State Department in Sierra 
he went to England, France, Germany, 
supervisor of a foreign study progi 
Hampton Institute in those countries. 

Dr. Gloster is founder, former president, and life 
member of the College Language Association, which granted 
him its Distinguished Achievement Award in 1958, and 
also an Advisory Editor of The College Language Associa- 
tion. Journal. From 1948 to 1953, he was a Contributing 
Editor to Phylon, and from 1963 to 1965, he was a member 
of the Executive Committee of the Virginia Humanities 
Conference. In December of 1962, he was one of fifty 
college English department chairmen invited by the U. S. 
Office of Education to the University of Illinois to par- 
ticipate in a national conference on necessary research in 
the teaching of English, and on several occasions he has 
served as a specialist in projects sponsored by the U. S. 
Office of Education. 

He is a member of the Executive Committee on the 
American Association of Higher Education, and of the 
Boards of Directors of the United Negro College Fund, 
the Association of Protestant Colleges and Universities, the 
National Emergency Committee of the National Council on 
Crime and Delinquency, and the Metropolitan Atlanta 
Commission on Crime and Juvenile Delinquency. He is 
also a trustee of the Atlanta University, Morehouse College, 
the United Negro College Fund, and the College Entrance 
Examination Board. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. 

Dr. Gloster is listed in Who's Who in America, Who 
Knows . . . And What, Who's Who In American Education, 
Who's Wlxo in the South and Southwest, and the Directory 
of American Scholars. 




MISS FRANCES SHELLMAN, a former student, is employed 
with the Department of the Army, U. S. Army Strategic Com- 
munications Command-CONUS, HQ Commandant, Washing- 
ton, D. C. She received a Superior Performance Award for 
$150, and was promoted to Property Book Officer for the 
Command. To the left of Miss Shellman is the Commanding 
Officer, Colonel Jack G. Hines. 



Dr. Hay ward S. Anderson 
Receives Appointment 

John P. Latimer, Regional Director of the Small Busi- 
ness Administration, announced recently that Dr. Hayward 
S. Anderson, Professor of Business Administration and 
Chairman of the Division of Business Administration, has 
been selected as a member of the Georgia Advisory Council 
for the Small Business Administration. Appointments to 
the Advisory Council are made in Washington, D. C. by 
SBA, Administrator, Howard J. Samuels. 

Dr. Anderson, a native of Georgia, received the Bachelor 
of Science degree in Business Administration from Savan- 
nah State College; the Bachelor of Science degree with a 
major in Accounting from Northwestern University ; the 
Master of Business Administration with majors in Adver- 
tising and Marketing from New York University; and the 
Doctor of Business Administration from Harvard University 
where he was also a doctorial research fellow. 



nbership in recognition 
i small business. As a 
'ill participate in 
of discussing the 

worked for the 



He was selected for council m( 
of his knowledge of and interest 
member of the Advisory Council, he 
semi-annual meetings held for the purpo; 
needs within the region. 

He has managed his own business 
Federal government, and for private industry. He is a 
veteran and served as a commissioned officer in the Army 
of the United States. Before entering the teaching pro- 
fession, he engaged in public accounting in New York City. 
His previous teaching experiences include teaching assign- 
ments in New York City and at West Virginia State College. 

His membership in professional and learned associations 
include: The American Accounting Association, The Ameri- 
can Marketing Association, and The Georgia Teachers and 
Education Association. He is president of the Savannah 
State College Chapter of the American Association of Uni- 
versity Professors, and is a member of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Georgia State Conference of the American 
Association of University Professors. 

His writings include contributions to The Savannah 
State College Research Bulletin, The Negro Educational 
Review, and Report on tfie National Conference on Small 
Business, a U. S. Department of Commerce publication. 
He has engaged in numerous administrative and curriculum 
analyses. Some subject areas include: "Competition in the 
face of Integration" and "Problems and Opportunities 
Des in the Field of Business." 



Confrontir 

The Advisory Counc: 
to various businesses ; 
SBA programs, as well 
the Regional Director i 
tions. 



1 serves as a channel of information 
nd commercial interest regarding 
as an advisory body which keeps 
nformed of local economic condi- 



Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., announces that Savannah State 
College has received a contribution to its scholarship fund 
of §1,000 from the Savannah Sugar Refining Corporation. 
This contribution will allow the college to receive $9 for 
each. Si contributed from the National Defense Education 
Act of the Federal Government. 



The college has received 100 shares of stock from the 
Donner Packing Company for the purpose of setting up 
the Paul Donner Scholarship Fund, the proceeds from which 
will be used for the Scholarship Program. 



SSC To Launch Its First Annual Community Support Program 



Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., announces that the College 
will launch its First Annual Community Support Program 
on Monday, April 21. The program will end on May 3. 

Through this organized effort of solicitation, the College 
hopes to receive the financial and moral support of the 
entire community. Instead of being asked several times a 
year to donate funds to more than one program at the 
College, the community will be asked for financial support 
once a year during the Community Support Program. 

According to Dr. Jordan, the purpose of this two-week 
campaign is to raise $75,000 for the initiation of two new 
programs, and to supplement existing ones. 

The Student Assistance Program will provide scholar- 
ships, loans, and employment for worthy students who 
could not otherwise obtain the finances they need for a 
college education. This money will be matched by federal 
funds in the ratio of 8:1 or 9:1 depending on the program 
in which it is used. 



Last year, Savannah State College provided 302 students 
with 8141,207 in financial aid, $17,995 of which was con- 
tributed by the College. If the desired amount of money for 
student assistance is received, the College will be able to 
provide assistance to approximately 500 students during 
the next academic year. 

The Faculty Development Program will provide some 
financial assistance to aid more faculty members in acquir- 
ing the doctoral degree. In addition, this program will 
provide the funds for in-service faculty members to attend 
special institutes and certain financial supplements for 
critical area faculty members. 

The Enrichment in Study Skills Program will provide 
"seed money" to study problems encountered in the fresh- 
men program. With these funds, a study will be made of 
existing programs in other institutions and a program will 
be designed for the needs of Savannah State College. 




it — ' W\\ *™. 

Iflral Wm- 



DR. DARIO POLITELLA, President, National Council of 
College Publications Advisers, University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, Mass., receives a Distinguished Service Award from 
Wilton C. Scott during the 18th Annual Southern Regional 
School Press Institute and SUSGA Publications Workshop. 



DR. HOWARD JORDAN, JR., receives the Distinguished 
Leadership Award from Wilton C. Scott, Director of the 
Southern Regional School Press Institute and SUSGA Publica- 
tions Workshop at the Keynote Session. 



Press Conference Is Held 



The 18th Annual Southern Regional School Press In- 
stitute and Southern Universities Student Government 
Association's Publications Workshop was held at Savannah 
State College on February 20-22, The theme was: THE 
ROLE OF THE PRESS IN A RAPIDLY MOVING SO- 
CIETY. Wilton C. Scott, Director of Public Relations and 
Continuing Education, was director of the conference. 

On Thursday, February 20, Carl E. Sanders, former 
Governor of Georgia, was the Keynote Speaker in Meldrim 
Auditorium. On Friday, February 21, Sylvan Meyer, Editor, 
The Daily Times, Gainesville. Georgia, was the speaker for 
the General Session in Wiley Gymnasium. Charles L. Fields, 
Charles L. Fields & Associates (Management Consultants), 
irk, delivered the Annual Luncheon Address, Friday 



Febri 



21 at the Savi 

Consultants and Res 
S. Wright, Staff Repres 
Atlanta. Ga.; Dr. Willi 
Branch, Division of Eq 
partment of Health, Edu 

cation. Washington, D. C. ; Cameron Gregor; 
Personnel Director, Landmark Communication 
folk, Virginia. 

Marion B. Peavey, Director, Information S( 
ford College, Spartanburg, S.C.; W. Euge 



nah Inn & Country Club, 
rce Persons included: Waymond 
itative, The Coca-Cola Company, 
n J. Holloway. Chief, Eastcoast 
I Educational Opportunities, De- 
tion and Welfare, Office of Edu- 
Corporate 



Inc., Nor 



:es, Wof- 

Nichols, 

Chairman, Publications Board, Georgia Institute of Tech- 




nology, Atlanta, Ga.; Mrs. Lillian E. Bell, Chairman, De- 
partment of Journalism, St. Joseph's College, East Chicago, 
Indiana; Dr. John V. Field, Director, Michigan Interscho- 
lastic Press Association. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 
Michigan; Osmond H. Brown, Community Relations 
Specialist, Economic Development Section, Community 
Relations Service, U. S. Department of Justice, Washington, 
D.C. 

Mrs. John V. Field, Publications Advisor, Ann Arbor 
High School, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Edward C. Riley, 
Yearbook Advisor, Richmond Technical-Vocational School, 
Augusta, Georgia; Miss Christine Meyers, Editor, ACTION 
AGE, Detroit, Michigan; Miss Sandra Colvin, Field Secre- 
tary, Student Press Association, Washington, D. C; Miss 
Nellie Lee, Field Secretary, Student Press Association, 
Washington, D. C. ; Otto McClarrin, Director, Community 
Relations, Community Action Programs, Office of Economic 
Opportunity, Washington, D.C. 

Marion Jackson, Sports Editor, Atlanta Daily World, 
Atlanta. Georgia; Lester Johnson. Yearbook Advisor, A. E. 
Beach Sr. High School, Savannah, Ga.; Miss Evelyn S. 
Freeman, Vice President and Consultant, Charles L. Fields 
Recruiting Management Consultants, Inc., New York; Dr. 
H. I. Fontellio-Nanton; Director of In-Depth Study, Voor- 
hees College, Denmark, S. C. ; Lawrence W. Bryant, Sales 
Representative, American Yearbook Company, Hannibal, 
Missouri; Louis J. Corsetti, Communications and Training 
Specialist, Nuclear Materials & Equipment Corporation, 
Apollo, Pennsylvania; Dr. B. Kendall Crane, Director, 
WDUQ, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pa.; and Harvey 
Brinson, Media Specialist, Media Section, Community Re- 
lations Services, U. S. Department of Justice, Washington, 
D.C. 

Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., President, Savannah State 
College, served as Honorary Chairman of the press con- 
ference. 

Serving as Honorary Vice-Chairmen were: The Honor- 
able J. C. Lewis, Mayor of Savannah, Georgia; The 
Honorable J. A. Brown, Former Mayor of Savannah Beach; 
The Honorable B. B. Heery, Judge, Superior Court, Eastern 
Judicial Circuit of Georgia; The Honorable Robert F. 
Lovett, Chairman, Chatham County Commissioners; Tom 
Coffey, Managing Editor, Savannah Morning News; Dr. 
Henry M. Collier, Representative, National YMCA; Wallace 
Davis, Managing Editor, Savannah Evening Press. 



FORMER GOVERNOR CARL E. SANDERS del 
Keynote Address during the 18th Annual Southern 
School Press Institute and SUSGA Publications Workshop 



Regional 



Also, W. J. VanLandingham, Assistant Vice President, 
The Citizens and Southern National Bank; J. D. Holt, 
Executive Director, Georgia Ports Authority; Dr. J. R. 
Jenkins, Executive Secretary, Young Men's Christian 
Association; Sidney A. Jones, Director, Sidney A. Jones 
Funeral Home; Dr. Calvin L. Kiah, Dean of Faculty, 
Savannah State College; J. D. McLamb, President, First 
Federal Savings & Loan Association; Charles H. Morris, 
Publisher, Savannah Morning News— Evening Press; 
George Patterson, President, Liberty National Bank & Trust 
Company; Dr. E. K. Williams, Coordinator, General Edu- 
cation, Savannah State College; Douglas Weathers, News 
Director, WTOC Radio & TV; and Larry Sims, President, 
Savannah State College Student Government Association. 



National Science Foundation Awards Grant to SSC 



Savannah State College was awarded a grant of 338,910 
by the National Science Foundation for support of a "1969 
Summer Institute in Chemistry for Secondary School 
Teachers." This grant is under the direction of Dr. Willie 
G. Tucker, Department of Chemistry, and will terminate on 
September 30, 1969. 

The National Science Foundation was established in 
1950 as an agency of the Federal Government by an act of 
the Congress. Annual appropriations made by Congress 
enable the Foundation to carry out its responsibilities to 
strengthen research and education in science and mathe- 
matics. This project is one of more than 1,000 institutes 
and research participation projects supported annually by 
the Foundation for the purpose of improving the subject- 
matter competence of teachers of science and mathematics 
at all academic levels. 

The objectives of the institute are: to offer teachers with 
a very weak background in chemistry an opportunity to 
increase their knowledge of the subject matter; to help fill 
out a void in the teachers' background in subject matter 
so that they may be motivated enough to eventually begin 
an advanced degree program in chemistry rather than or in 
addition to graduate study in the traditional education 
courses; to increase the teacher's capacity to motivate 
students into science careers; and to create in the teacher 
a greater awareness of an appreciation for the work of 
prominent scientists. This will also serve as a means of 
stimulation and enthusiasm. 

Each participant will be selected on the basis of ability 
to show a particular need for the courses offered in order 
to fill a deficient background, and thus improve his quality 
of teaching. The deadline for making application is Feb- 
ruary 15. 

A participant must be presently teaching chemistry or 
general science at the time of application. Most consideration 
will be given to those applicants who have never participated 
in a National Science Foundation sponsored Summer Insti- 
tute. 

Dr. Willie G. Tucker, Professor of Chemistry, will direct 
the institute. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from 
Tuskegee Institute in 1956 and 1958, respectively. His 
research for the master's degree was concerned with a study 
of exchange reactions in the preparation of flourothiethers. 
Dr. Tucker received his Ph.D. from the University of 
Oklahoma in July 1962. His research was concerned with 
the preparation of 2-chloropyridine. Dr. Tucker served 
four years as a Teaching and Research Assistant in the 
Department of Chemistry at the University of Oklahoma. 
He earned a certificate for completing the Radiological 
Monitoring Instructors Course offered by the University of 
Georgia Extension Division. He was main lecturer for an 
In-Service Institute for High School Teachers of Science 
1963-64, and for the NSF Summer Institute for High School 
Students, summer 1964. He is a member of the Society of 
Sigma \i. the American Chemical Society, and the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, and is listed in 
American Men of Science. 

Dr. Charles Pratt, Professor of Chemistry and Head of 
the Department, will serve as an instructor for the institute. 
He received his B.S. from Langston University in 1951, 
and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of 
Oklahoma in 1958 and 1962, respectively. During the 
summer of 1965, Dr. Pratt was employed by the Savannah 



River Plant of Atomic Energy Commission as a Research 
Chemist. His teaching experience numbers five years in 
high school in science and mathematics, plus four years 
of college teaching. He attended a NSF Institute for High 
School Teachers at the University of Oklahoma in 1957, and 
served as Associate Director for an Institute for High 
Ability School Students at Prairie View A. & M. College 
in 1961. He also has publications in Science Education, 
Pharmaceuticals (Local Anethetics) and Flavonoid Com- 
pounds. 

J. B. Clemmons, Associate Professor of Mathematics and 
Chairman of the Department of Mathematics and Physics, 
will also serve as an instructor for the institute. He received 
his B.S. degree from Morehouse College; and his M.S. 
degree from Atlanta University. He studied three years at 
the University of Southern California. Mr. Clemmons has 
completed residence work for the Ph.D. degree in mathe- 
matics and his current research interests are concerned with 
the Theory of Probabilities. From 1941 through 1945, he 
served as high school principal, and joined the staff at 
Savannah State College in 1947. He has studied under the 
following fellowships: (1) Ford Foundation Faculty Fellow- 
ship 1952-53; (2) National Science Faculty Fellowship 1957- 
58; (3) University of Southern California Teaching Fellow- 
ship 1954-55. Mr. Clemmons taught regular mathematics 
courses at the University of Southern California as a Teach- 
ing Assistant, 1953-54. He served as official mathematics 
tutor for the University of Southern California's football 
team. He is a member of the State Advisory Committee on 
Mathematics and Evaluating Committee for Colleges in the 
State of Georgia. 



Savannah State College has received a grant totaling 
$2,000 to support a two week Journalism Workshop for 
high school teachers of journalism. This grant was approved 
by the Newspaper Fund of the Wall Street Journal. The 
workshop will be held at the college from July 21 to 
August 1. 

The purposes of the workshop are to create opportunities 
for professional and evaluative guidance; to aid the partici- 
pant in acquiring college training which will be of help in 
improving scholastic newspapers and curriculum offerings; 
to aid the participant in developing an increased awareness 
of and respect for the social aspects and dynamic influences 
of journalism in a democratic society; to create opportuni- 
ties for the participant to acquire practical experience in 
school newspaper and yearbook production; and to increase 
the major forms of scholastic news writing. 

Further the program promises to increase the partici- 
pant's knowledge of the principles basic to high school 
journalism; to develop an understanding of management 
and labor and its relationship to the economy; to develop 
the social skills basic to getting along with others; to develop 
an appreciation for the printed word and its influence on 
the reader; and to enhance the communicative skills. 

Any high school, vocational or junior college teacher in 
the South, whose duties include being an advisor to a 
scholastic newspaper, yearbook, or whose teaching program 
includes a course in journalism, is eligible for the workshop. 

The applicant's previous training and experience in 
scholastic journalism will not affect eligibility. The work- 
shop is designed to help teachers with scholastic publica- 
tions assignments acquire journalistic training and ex- 
perience. 

Each participant will receive five college credit hours for 
participating in the workshop. 




SCENES 

FROM 

THE 

ALUMNI 

WEEKEND 



Mrs. Robinson Receives Ph.D. Degree 

Mrs. Margaret Chisholm Robinson, Assistant Professor 
of Biology, received the Ph.D. degree from Washington 
University last month. 

A native of Savannah, Georgia, she received the B.S. 
degree from Savannah State College, and the M.S. degree 
from the University of Michigan. In addition, she attended 
a NSF Institute of College Teachers of Botany at Washing- 
ton University. 

Dr. Robinson's leaching experiences include: a teacher 
of biology at Jefferson County Training School, Louisville, 
Georgia from 1952-54; an instructor of biology at Fort 
Valley State College from 1955-58; and she began teaching 
at Savannah Stale College in 1958. 

She graduated magna cum laude from Savannah State 
College; is a charter member of Mu Chapter, Alpha Kappa 
Mu Honor Society; and a member of Sigma Mu Honor 
Society. 

In a recent interview with Dr. Robinson, it was learned 
that she has performed over 150 experiments within the 
past year in the area of botanical science. Some of the 
species and the microscope used were donated to Savannah 
State College by Washington University. 

When Savannah State College gave Dr. Robinson a 
year's leave to improve her knowledge of botany, it got 
more than it bargained for. Her academic work at Wash- 
ington University brought her 
$4,500 in scientific equipment 
in which she is held. 

The equipment includes a centrifuge, a spectrophoto- 
meter, microscopes, chromatographer apparatus, ultraviolet 
lamp, pH meter and time clock with switch. 

Dr. Robinson feels that, "Now we are going to be in the 
position to give students a well-rounded background and 
some knowledge of plant life as well as of animal life." 
She composes the entire botany department at Savannah 
State College, but states that, "I'm looking forward to 
attracting more faculty now that we have this new equip- 
ment. 1 know that one of the things I would ask if I were 
invited to join a college faculty is, "Could I do research?" 
Now we can say "yes" because we will have the facilities 
for it. 



mlfall of gifts valued at 
well as the high esteem 



Home Economics Career Day Is Held 

The Annual Home Economics Career Day was held 
on Friday. March 7 at the college. According to Mrs. Evanel 
R. Terrell, head of the Home Economics Department, the 
department utilized the services of state and local home 
economists to develop the spread and utilization of pro- 
fessional services in this era of critical living. 

The Keynote Speaker was Mrs. Jean Brackett, Chief, 
Branch of Standard Budgets, U.S. Department of Labor. 
The general national theme of Consumer Education, "Ex- 
tending the Focus of Home Economics in the Community" 
was highlighted in this address. 

Mrs. Brackett received the A.B. degree from Williams 
College, Chambersburgh. Pa.; and has done graduate studies 
in philosophy, economics and statistics at Vasser, the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Catholic University; and the U.S.D.A. 
Graduate School in Washington. D. C. 

Her experience has been with the U. S. Department of 
Labor in the areas of manpower problems, employment 
statistics, and prices and living conditions. Her publications 
have appeared in the Monthly Labor Review and in the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletins. 



A panel of Consultants guided an Emphasis Clinic on 
"Promoting Consumer Responsibility in Our Communities." 
These Consultants were: Miss Amanda Cummings, State 
Department of Education, Atlanta, Ga.; Miss Anne Postell, 
Extension Home Economists, Limited Resource Families, 
College of Agriculture, the University of Georgia; Mrs. 
Sarah Burns, Health, Home Aides Specialist, Savannah 
Area Vocational Technical School; Mrs. Jane Stinson. 
Caseworker, Greenbrier Childrens Center, Savannah; Mrs. 
Emmie Murray, Supervisor, Home Economics Education, 
Savannah and Chatham County; and Mrs. Virginia Hallis, 
Nutritionist. Dairy Council of Savannah. 



Willie E. Vasser, Jr. '67, graduated from the United 
States Army Engineer Officer Candidate School at Fort 
Belvoir, Virginia, and has been commissioned a Second 
Lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He is stationed at 
Fort Benning, Georgia. 

The challenging 23-week course was designed to provide 
the U. S. Army tvith qualified engineer platoon leaders. 
The curriculum included training in mechanical and tech- 
nical equipment, topography, and military science and 
engineering. Emphasis was given to developing leadership 
capabilities and increasing physical proficiency. 




Funeral services for Mrs. Varnetta 
Kebey Frazier, dietitian at the college 
for 40 years, were held in Meldrim 
Auditorium on Saturday, January 25 
at 2 p.m. Rev. Wilie Gwyn, Pastor of 
College Park Baptist Church, officiat- 
ed. 



Mri 



Fra 



is the daughter 
d Baglee Kelsey 
She graduated 
later taught at 



of the late Ja 
of Millen, G> 
Institute Colle£ 
Frazier-Nunn Industrial School, Ai 

She came to Georgia State College (now Savannah State) 
as dietitian and then worked as dormitory director for a 
few years. She was reappointed as head dietitian, and served 
in this capacity until December 15, 1968. 




A Scene from the Alumni Weekend. 



State Board Approves Revised School Standards 



The State Board of Education at its February meeting 
approved the withholding of funds from any school unit 
failing to fully satisfy certain criteria in the revised School 
Standards, and approved the construction of a two billion 
dollar vocational facility in Lowndes County. 

The revised school Standards will be divided into three 
sections. Section I is to contain all criteria based on require- 
ments of law, Section II, all criteria based on firm Board 
policy and Section III, all other criteria contained in the 
Standards as approved by the State Board. The Board 
approved the withholding of funds from school units failing 
to fully satisfy the criteria in Sections I and II until 
necessary corrections are made. 

The Board also made industrial arts a required part of 
the secondary school curriculum and placed it in Section III 
in the revised Standards. 

The authority for withholding state funds comes to the 
State Board under a Section of the Minimum Foundation 
Program of Education Act. This section states in part: 
"In the event a local unit of administration shall fail to 
comply with any provision of this Act or other school laws, 
or any provision of rules, regulations, policies, standards or 
requirements established by the State Board, or the terms 
of any contract with the State Board, the State Board may, 
in its discretion, withhold from such local unit all or any 



part of the State-contributed minimum foundation program 
funds allotted to such local unit under provisions of this 
Act until such time as full compliance is made by the local 

The two billion dollar vocational facility in Lowndes 
County will be sponsored by the Economic Development 
Administration, the Coastal Plains Regional Development 
Commission and the Lowndes County Board of Education. 
It will be used to provide an educational program for the 
economically deprived in a six county area — Lowndes, 
Berrien, Cook, Brooks, Lanier and Echols. 

According to George Mulling, State Director of Voca- 
tional Education, the new program will be designed specifi- 
cally to prepare unemployed, unemployable youth and adults 
and drop-outs for entry level jobs. 

This facility will also be used to serve out-of-school 
youth and adults for preparation for higher level job skills. 

In their meeting the State Board also passed a resolu- 
tion to the Georgia congressional delegation on Discrepancy 
between Congressional authorizations for Vocational Edu- 
cation for fiscal year 1970 and the Federal Budget Appro- 
priations for Vocational Education for fiscal year 1970. 
They pointed out that the proposed Federal Budget appro- 
priates less money for Vocational Education than was 
authorized by Congress for fiscal year 1970. 





DANIEL WASHINGTON, President of the SSC National 
Alumni Association, addresses the Alumni during the Alumni 
Weekend Activities at the Manger Hotel. 



DR. PRINCE A. JACKSON, JR., 
dresses the Alumni during the Alumi 
the Manger Hotel. 



Alumni Secretary, ad- 
i Weekend Activities at 



Free Job Placement Service Proves 
Beneficial to Employers and Students 

Six thousand leaders of business and industry are being 
invited to participate in 1969 TECHDAYS, Georgia's state- 
wide program for vocational-technical students, advises 
Jack P. Nix, State Superintendent of Schools. Because of 
its previous success, this year there will be two TECHDAYS 
projects at Georgia's area vocational-technical schools: one 
beginning April 16 and a second starting July 23. 

TECHDAYS is a project to bring together area voca- 
tional-technical students with potential employers. Before 
development of TECHDAYS, Georgia industry often had 
the problem of surplus job openings for which students 
had been trained, but many graduates were unaware of 
these available positions. TECHDAYS allows management 
to interview potential employees in the setting in which they 
are trained. 

TECHDAYS has doubled in effectiveness during the two 
years the project has been held, according to George W. 
Mulling. Director, Vocational Education Division. In 1967 
362 companies participated in the venture, compared to 643 
businesses during 1968. In 1967 954 jobs were offered; 
in 1968 1.978 openings were made available to the students. 
Last year the Georgia Chamber of Commerce lent its 
support to TECHDAYS with a statewide letter to employers 
and local co-operation with individual schools. This year it 
is lending the same kind of support. 

Students who were placed by this Department of Edu- 
cation service have praised past TECHDAYS for the 
following reasons: there was a wide variety of companies 
represented; students could talk to management about 
available jobs and their benefits; the potential employer 
could discover the type of instruction that was being offered 
and under what conditions; il was possible to experience 
a job interview in familiar classroom surroundings; and 
concern was displayed by management towards the indi- 
vidual student as an employee. 

One employer advised Director Mulling that he has 
retained five of the six TECHDAYS students he recruited 
a year ago, and that he felt the students proved to be well 
qualified when they finished the area school. 

Skills taught in area schools include a multitude of 
crafts from aviation mechanics and electronic technology 
to cosmetology and medical laboratory research. 

Georgia's area vocational-technical schools usually are 
designated by the name of the community in which they are 
established. The schools are located in Albany. Athens, 
Atlanta, Augusta. Columbus, Coosa Valley. DeKalb, Griffin- 
Spalding, Lanier, North Georgia (Clarkesville) , Macon 
Marietta-Cobb, Moultrie, Pickens County, Savannah, South 
Georgia (Americus), Swainsboro, Thomas, Troup County, 
Upson County, Valdosta, Walker County and Waycross- 
Ware. 



Presently, the construction oj a new student center and 
jood service building is underway at the college. 

The building will feature a dining room equipped to 
handle 1,200 students and will house all student activities. 

A bookstore, snack bar, lounges, game and meeting 
rooms and administrative offices will be included in the 
student center. 



ATinouncing The National 
Alumni Century Club 

The doors of opportunity are opening and many gradu- 
ates of Savannah State College are entering. 

You are invited to help in opening these doors even 
more, by becoming a charter member of the Savannah State 
'College National Alumni Century Club. Your support will 
enable many worthy students to receive the education they 
deserve and the College to establish and maintain the margin 
of excellence necessary for recognition as a strong educa- 
tional institution. 

The purpose of the Century Club is to aid the College 
in establishing a broad base for annual gifts from alumni, 
parents and friends of the College. 

The funds will be used for scholarship purposes to open 
the door of opportunity for deserving students, to aid the 
college in meeting the many incidental expenses that are 
necessary for academic excellence, and to strengthen the 
development of a strong athletic program. 

The standards of membership are simple: belief in the 
aims and aspirations of Savannah State College, and a 
gift of $100 or more as an indication of your interest in, 
and support of Savannah State College and the significant 
part it plays in the development of responsible educated 
citizens. 

As a member of the Century Club, you will receive a 
certificate suitable for framing, your picture will be placed 
in a designated section of the administration building, and 
you will be honored at the banquet during the Homecoming 
Weekend at the Manger Hotel in the fall. Most importantly, 
you will share the personal rewards of knowing that you 
have helped deserving students and Savannah State College 
grow and develop. 

Contributions may be made in either of the following 

1. Cash donations (check or money order 1. 

2. Pledges (sign the self-addressed pledge envelope which 
will be sent to you at a later date, indicate the date 
that the contribution will be made and return it to 
the College). 

Interested persons may also join the President's Club 
for a contribution of §500 or more. For additional informa- 
tion contact: 

Robert L. Bess 

Development Officer 

Savannah State College 

Savannah, Georgia 31404 




Airman Alexander Brown '68, 
has completed basic training at Lack- 
land AFB, Texas. He has been as- 
signed to Lowry AFB, Colorado for 
training in the supply field. 

Airman Brown is a graduate of 
Todd-Grant High School in Darien, 
Georgia. 



Airman John D. Marshall Jr. has 
completed basic training at Lack- 
land AFB, Texas. He has been as- 
signed to Chanute AFB, Illinois for 
training in weather services. 

Airman Marshall, a 1964 grad- 
uate of Alfred E. Beach High School, 
received his B.S. degree from Savan- 
nah State College. 




J. B. Clemmons Elected Chairman of Mathematics Group 



On March 7, the Academic Committee of the University 
System Advisory Committee unanimously elected John B. 
Clemmons to serve as chairman and direct the affairs of 
that committee for the insuing two years. 

Clemmons has represented Savannah State College on 
this committee, which is made up of members from each 
of the twenty-six units of the University System. He is 
head of the Mathematics Department at Savannah State 
College. 

The purpose of this Academic Committee is to make 
recommendations to the Advisory Council for consideration. 
A second important function of the committee is to discuss 
problems in mathematics which include course 



content of common course and their prerequisites. Evalua- 
tion of textbooks, transfer credits, and other materials make 
up a large part of the committee's responsibility. 

A new function has been assigned this committee and 
that is the one of trying to provide for a smooth transfer 
from a junior college to a senior college of the system, 
where mathematics is concerned. 

When approached about the new position, Clemmons 
said it is a great responsibility to follow men like Dr. Ball, 
Head of the Department of Mathematics, University of 
Georgia; Dr. Drucker, Head, Department of Mathematics, 
Georgia Technology; Dr. Tiller, Georgia State College 
of Atlanta; Dr. Woll of West Georgia and other such men 
that have given strong leadership to this committee. 



Hypertension 



Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is the commonest 
of the diseases affecting the heart and blood vessels. Sta- 
tistics from the most recent national health survey indicate 
that hypertension afflicts at least 17 million American 
adults and perhaps as many as 22 million. 

Hypertension accelerates the development of the artery- 
clogging deposits of atherosclerosis. It substantially increases 
the risk of heart attacks and strokes. 

Almost all cases of hypertension, whether mild or very 
severe, can be controlled by any of a variety of effective 
drugs or combination of drugs for reducing elevated blood 
pressure. 

The death rate from hypertension has decreased by 
nearly 50'/< during the past decade. 

Currently the National Heart Institute of the National 
Institutes of Health is supporting more than 200 research 
projects totalling more than S7 million dealing directly or 
indirectly with improving methods of prevention, diagnosis 
and treatment of hypertension. 

These and other facts about hypertension are contained 
in a publication recently issued by the National Heart 
Institute. Entitled "Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)", 
NIH Publication No. 1714, this booklet describes how 
blood pressure is measured ; how it is controlled ; what 
hypertension is; the causes and diagnosis of hypertension; 
the drug treatment of hypertension and the effects of this 
treatment; and what research is being done to find the cure 
for hypertension. This 48-page, fully-illustrated publication 
also contains a glossary of terms. 

Copies of "Hypertension {High Blood Pressure)" (NIH 
Publication No. 1714) may be obtained, free of charge, by 
writing to the Heart Information Center, National Heart 
Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20014. Quantity copies my 
be purchased at 50c each from the Superintendent of Doc- 
uments, Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 
20402. 



Airman Rickey R. Cooper, son of Mr. and Mrs. Johnnie 
J. Cooper of 1704 Mitchell St., Savannah, Ga., graduated 
from a U.S. Air Force technical school at Sheppard AFB, 

The airman, who was trained as a medical services 
specialist, will remain at Sheppard for further training. 

He is a graduate of A.E. Beach Senior High School 
and received, his B.S. degree in biology in 1968 from 
Savannah State College. 

His wife, Jessie, is the daughter of Mrs. Doris Roberts 
of Victory Drive, Savannah. 



Six predominantly Negro private colleges have formed a 
consortium, the Triangle Association of Colleges of South 
Carolina and Georgia. Members are Allen University and 
Benedict College, Columbia; Clajlin College, Orangeburg; 
Morris College, Sumter; and Paine College, Augusta, Ga. 

Under way or pending are cooperative programs in 
library development, collection of National Defense student 
loan repayments, and training sessions for administrators. 
Proposed are a "master teacher" program to keep faculty 
members abreast of new methods and materials; publication 
of a research journal; a cooperative computer system; and 
a study to investigate the problems involved in recruiting 
more white students. 




MISS ELOISE ALSTON, ' 
the alumni during the Al 
Manger Hotel. 



National Alumni," addresses 
Weekend Activities at the 



More Colleges Sign For '69 Series 

Collegiate Broadcasting officials say more than half of 
the 50 Negro colleges and universities it is seeking to par- 
ticipate in the '69 "Campus Spotlight" series have already 
agreed to join. 

CBG is working toward the 50 college goal in order to 
qualify for a matching grant. The funds will be used to 
improve the quality of the radio productions. 

The participating institutions for the '69 "Campus 
Spotlight" series are: 

Clark College, Lane College, Oakwood Coll-ge, Knox- 
ville College. Morehouse College. Spelman College. Gammon 
Theological Seminary, Morris Brown College, Savannah 
State College, Bennett College. Langston University, Morris 
College, Bishop College. Virginia Seminary and College, 
Xavier University. Talladega College. Morristown College, 
Texas College, Tougaloo College. Fayetteville State College, 
Texas Southern University, Florida Memorial College, 
Florida A&M University and Jarvis Christian College. 

CBG's "Campus Spotlight" series is produced to better 
acquaint high school students with the offerings and re- 
quirements of the various institutions. The '69 series will 
begin broadcasting the week-end of January 4th in 25 major 
markets. 




DuVaul and Ho 



Charles W. DuVaul, distinguished 
principal of Spencer High School 
in Columbus, Georgia for many 
years, and a civic leader in the state 
of Georgia, retired recently. 

One of Savannah State's most 
outstanding graduates, he was one 
of the most widely known Negro 
educators in Georgia. 

He has received numerous cita- 
tions from many organizations and 
institutions including the Fort Valley 
State College which honored Mr. 
er T. Edwards, Sr., recently for their 
ice to the education of Negro children in 



Since his retirement, Mr. DuVaul ha 
Columbus. 



ntinued to live 



Rehabilitation Center at Warm Springs is 
utheastern facility of its type to be accredited 
Accreditation of Rehabilitation 
ack P. Nix, State Superintendent 



ational, independent authority 
requirements in the training of 



The Ge 
the first si 
by the Co 
Facilities, according t 
of Schools. 

The Commission 
that has established st 
handicapped persons. 

The accrediting agency bases its evaluation on a facility's 
purposes, services, personnel, records and reports, fiscal 
management, physical facilities and community relations. 

John S. Prickett, Jr.. Assistant Superintendent for Re- 
habilitation Services in the education department said, "We 
are extremely proud of the Warm Springs facility under 
the direction of Robert M. Long and the high standards 
it maintains." 

The Center is operated by the Office of Rehabilitation 
Services, Georgia Department of Education. 



Clark To Lead Support Program 

Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., President, Savannah State 
College, announces that Attorney Fred S. Clark, Assistant 
City Attorney for Savannah, has agreed to serve as the 
General Chairman of the College's First Annual Com- 
munity Support Program. The campaign will officially 
begin on Monday, April 21 and end on May 3. 

Attorney Clark, son of Attorney and Mrs. H. Sol Clark, 
is a graduate of Benedictine Military School, Cornell Uni- 
versity, and the University of Georgia's School of Law. 

He was the recipient of the Jaycees Outstanding Young 
Man of Savannah Award for 1968, and was one of the 
five recipients of the Outstanding Young Men of Georgia 
Awards for the same year. 

Attorney Clark, a partner in the Brannen, Clark, and 
Hester law firm, is former Assistant United States Attorney 
for the Southern District of Georgia, and president of the 
Legal Aid Society of Savannah. While a student at the 
University of Georgia Law School, he founded the Athens 
Legal Aid Society. 

His legal publications include: Public vs. Private De- 
fender, Defense of Indigents in Ga., and an Annual Survey 
of Georgia Law on Agency. 

According to Dr. Jordan, the purpose of the campaign 
is to raise funds for the initiation of new programs, and to 
supplement existing ones. These programs are: Student 
Assistance, Faculty Development, and Enrichment in Study 
Skills. The tentative goal of the campaign is $75,000. 




SHERMAN ROBERSON, an alumnus of the college, was 
the speaker for Assembly Program sponsored by the College 
Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of 
Colored People recently. He is shown here with Miss Estelle 
Freeman, President of the chapter. 



Ratings of Publications Announced 



Tuskegee Insti- 
The Crusader, William 
; and Excellent, Les Me- 

;, S. C. 

First 



Wilton C. Scott, Director of the Southern Regional 
School Press Institute and Southern Universities Student 
Government Association's Workshop, announces the ratings 
of the publications that were judged during the press con- 
ference, February 20-22, at Savannah State College. Serving 
as judges of the publication were the staffs of the Savannah 
Morning News and Savannah Evening Press. 

COLLEGE YEARBOOK DIVISION: First Place, The 
Bulldog, South Carolina State College, Orangeburg, S. C; 
First Place, The Pine Cone, Valdosta State College, Valdosta, 
Ga.; Second Place, B-Cean, Bethune-Cookman College, Day- 
tona Beach, Fla.; Superior, Tl 
tute, Tuskegee, Ala.; Excellent, 
Carey College, Hattiesburg, Miss. 
moirs, Claflin College, Orangebur 

JUNIOR COLLEGE YEARBOOK DIVISION: 
Place, Columns, Anderson College, Anderson, S. C. 

HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOK DIVISION: First Place, 
Spencerian, Spencer High School, Columbus, Ga. ; Second 
Place, The Bulldog, A. E. Beach High School, Savannah, 
Ga. ; Very Good, Fairmontonian, Fairmont High School, 
Griffin, Ga.; Very Good, Atom Smasher, Sol C. Johnson 
High School, Savannah, Ga.; Very Good, Hamiltonian, 
Hamilton High School, Scottdale, Ga. 

Also, Good, The Hornet, Lee Street High School. Black- 
shear, Ga.; Good, The Wildcat, L. J. Price High School, 
Atlanta, Ga.; Good, The Tiger, Floyd T. Corry High School, 
Greensboro, Ga.; Good, Hi-Lite, Turner High School, At- 
lanta, Ga. ; and Good, The Hurricane, Bryson High School, 
Fountain Inn, S. C. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOK DIVISION: 
First Place, Treasure Chest, W. C. Pryor Jr. High School, 
Ft. Walton Beach, Fla. 

COLLEGE NEWSPAPER DIVISION: First Place, The 
Cobbler, William Carey College, Hattiesburg, Miss.; Second 
Place, The Eastern Progress, Eastern Ky. University, Rich- 
mond, Ky.; Superior, The Pine Needle, Pembroke State 
College, Pembroke, N.C.; Very Good, The Stormy Petrel, 
Oglethorpe College, Atlanta, Ga. ; Very Good, The Campus 
Canopy, Valdosta State College, Valdosta, Ga.; Very Good, 
Tlie Volette, University of Tennessee, Martin, Tenn.; Very 
Good, The Campus Digest, Tuskegee Institute, Tuskegee, 
Alabama. 

Also, Very Good, The Bue 'N Print, Baptist College of 
Charleston, Charleston, S. C. ; Good, The Southerner, Bir- 
mingham Southern College, Birmingham, Ala.; and Good, 
The Campus Carrier, Berry College, Mount Berry, Ga. 

JUNIOR COLLEGE NEWSPAPER DIVISION: First 
Place, Alpha '69, Florida Junior College, Jacksonville, 
Fla.; Second Place, The Yodler, Anderson College, Ander- 
son, S. C; and Very Good, Timber Chatter, Lake City 
Junior College, Lake City, Fla. 

HIGH SCHOOL NEWSPAPER DIVISION: First Place, 
Green Light, Turner High School, Atlanta, Ga. ; Second 
Place, The Laney Highlights, Lucy C. Laney High School, 
Augusta, Ga.; Excellent, The Price Wildcat, Price High 
School, Atlanta, Ga. ; Excellent, Blue Star, Avondale High 
School, Avondale Estates, Ga.; Very Good, Tiger's Voice, 
Liberty County High School, Mcintosh, Ga.; Very Good, 
The Beach Beacon, Beach High School, Savannah, Ga. 



Also, Very Good, OCCS Newsette, Oglethorpe County 
Consolidated School, Lexington, Ga.; Very Good, The 
Big G, R. W. Groves High School, Garden City, Ga.; Very 
Good, The Golden Key, St. Pius X High School, Savannah, 
Ga.; Very Good, The Echo, Tompkins High School, Sa- 
vannah, Ga. ; Very Good, The Spencer, Spencer High 
School, Columbus, Ga.; Very Good, The Hurricane Times, 
Bryson High School, Fountain Inn, S. C. 

Also, Very Good, The Sound, Dennis High School, 
Bishopville, S. C; Very Good, The Corry High Clarion, 
F. T. Corry High School, Greensboro, Ga.; Very Good, 
The Hornet, Lee Street High School, Blackshear, Ga.; Good, 
Tlie Johnson Explorer, Sol C. Johnson High School, Savan- 
nah, Ga. ; Good, The Fairmont Bear-Lite, Fairmont High 
School, Griffin, Ga.; and Good, The Rams Review, Scho- 
field High School, Aiken, S. C. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL NEWSPAPER DIVISION: 
First Place, The Capitol Echo, Capitol Avenue School, 
Atlanta, Ga. 

MISCELLANEOUS PUBLICATIONS DIVISION: Su- 
perior, The Archon, Emory University, Atlanta, Ga.; Ex- 
cellent, Anderson College Magazine, Anderson College, 
Anderson, S. C; Very Good, F.I.C., Florida Junior College, 
Jacksonville, Fla.; Good, VSC Alumni Newsletter, Valdosta 
State College, Valdosta, Ga.; Good, The Experience, Florida 
Junior College, Jacksonville, Fla.; and Good, Ivy Leaves, 
Anderson College, Anderson, S. C. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL NEWSPAPER DIVISION: 
First Place, The Pirate's Log, W. C. Pryor Junior High 
School, Ft. Walton Beach, Fla. 




SYLVAN MEYER, Editor, THE DAILY TIMES, Gainesville, 
Ga., was the speaker for the General Assembly during the 
18th Annual Southern Regional School Press Institute and 
SUSGA Publications Workshop. 



Technology Is The Key 

Technology is the key to achieving relevancy in the 
schools. This is the point of view in the current issue of 
Theory Into Practice on "Technology." 

Guest Editor Wayne K. Howell, vice president of the 
Fund for Media Research, stresses that technology in 
itself will not solve education's problems if everything else 
remains static. "Newer technologies cannot be effective 
additives to an old system; they must be tested in totally 
new educational designs," he said. 

In the issue the writers and editors explore the problems 
brought on when innovations such as the new technologies 
are haphazardly applied in an "add-on fashion to the old 
pedagogy of a rigid establishment." 
al goal for the issue 
>ns of both educators 
e of the newer device 

"This attempt 
such de. 



was to examine the 

nd businessmen con- 

i, tools, and systems 

s abandoned," Howell 

obscured on all levels 



The origin 
rational decisi 
cerning the ui 
of instruction 
said, "because 
by fragmentation, intuit: 
general frustration." 

The contributors all agree that application of technology 
may mean a direct trade off for many present ways. 

The authors and the titles of their articles include: Jack 
Frankel, "Change in the Developing World"; Ted Johnson 
and Hector Otero, "The School and Technology"; Betty 
Jean Radvak, "The Teacher and Technology"; Stephen D. 
Berry and Charles 0. Miller, "Where Do We Co From 
Here?"; Robert Heinich, "Mediated Instructi 
live to Classroom Instruction"; and Way: 
"Technology and the Human Need." 

Copies of this issue on "Technology" can be obtained 
for SI. 50 each from College of Education Publications, 
1945 N. High Street, Columbus, Ohio 43210. 



: judgment, empire-building, and 



Alterna- 
Howell, 



Dr. Pratt Selected to Serve on Task Force 

Dr. Charles Pratt, Head of the Chemistry Department, 
was selected to serve on several task force committees of 
the American Chemical Society which held its national meet- 
ing in San Francisco, recently. 

Dr. Pratt will serve on the Education in Writing Re- 
search Proposals and Grants Committee which will consider 
ways to assist small colleges, particularly Negro colleges, 
in writing proposals for research and teaching grants. He 
will also be concerned with the Education of High School 





pkv J» 







Guidance Counselors Committee. This task force will con 
sider a program to describe to guidance counselors, par- 
ticularly in disadvantaged areas, the career opportunities 
in science. It will also make plans for a program geared 
to involve perhaps as many as 500 underprivileged students. 
Dr. Pratt received his B.S. degree from Langston Uni- 
versity, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University 
of Oklahoma. His teaching experience numbers five years 
in high school mathematics and science; plus four years 
of college teaching. He attended a NSF Institute for High 
School Teachers at the University of Oklahoma in 1957, 
and served as Associate Professor for an Institute for High 
Ability Students at Prairie View A & M College in 1961. 
He also has publications in Science Education, Pharma- 
ceuticals (Local Anethetics) and Flavanoid Compounds. 



James E. Bess, an alumnus of the College, is presently 
employed at the Boeing Atlantic Test Center, Cape Cana- 
veral, Florida, as a price estimator. He is responsible for 
preparing estimates in the areas of Engineering, Manufac- 
turing, Material, Technology Proposals, and for the appli- 
cation of appropriate Rates and Factors. 

Additionally, Mr. Bess makes detailed breakdowns, de- 
termines manufacturing processes to estimates, and 
calculates material, labor tests, and costs to develop selling 
price for spares, production design changes, and modifi- 
cation of parts and assemblies. He also contacts change 
board representatives and project engineers to verify or 
supplement design change or modification information as 
necessary to develop estimates; revises and maintains price 
information in documents for departmental records; pre- 
pares cost summaries, price breakdowns and justifications 
as required. 

On January 13 of this year, he received a Zero Defects 
Award for his outstanding error-free preparation of pricing 
estimates in Cost Accounting; and was selected "Employee 
of the Month" for December 1968. In November of 1967, 
he received a Certificate of Award from the Boeing Atlantic 
Test Center in recognition of his personal contribution to 
the team efforts which culminated in the highly successful 
flight of the first AS-501 Apollo-Saturn Vehicle on No- 
vember 9, 1967. 



Former Governor Carl E. Sanders receives a Distinguished 
Service Award from Wilton C. Scott, Director, 18th Annual 
Southern Regional School Press Institute and SUSGA Publica- 
tions Workshop. 




A Scene from the Alumni Weekend. 



Tournament Win Puts Crown on Long Season 



Savannah State College, playing in its last season of 
SEAC competition, and perhaps one of the most frustrating, 
made it a happy ending by winning the tournament in 

The Tigers started off the long season by winning two 
straight games. Dissension then hit the club and a number 
of key players quit. The Tigers then fell into a losing 
streak of eight straight games even with Michael Jordon 
averaging in double figures, and so was Walter Fulton, who 
graduated in December. Fulton averaged in his last 10 
games 15.3 rebounds and 15.2 points. 

January 10th was the beginning of a new era for the 
Tigers, for on this date, 6' 7" center Vincent White return- 
ed. Although White made 21 and 22 points respectively 
against Paine and Fort Valley, the Tigers lost. After the 
players got adjusted to each other, the Tigers were winners 
from then on. With White in the lineup, senior guard Carl 
Crump's point production greatly improved and so did the 
teams' fast breaks. 

Crump, in the remaining games, did not make less than 
16 points in one game and against Voorhees, Benedict and 
Florida Memorial he made 40, 43 and 43 respectively in 
Tiger wins. 

The Tigers not only had big gunners in White and 
Crump, but also in easy-going 6' 7" forward Michael Jordon. 
Jordon's points were made so effortlessly and this is why 
he wasn't publicized much. The big guy, known as the 
'California Flash', ended the season with 99 points in the 



SEAC tournament to finish with a 23.9 clip. He led the 
team in total rebounds and was second in average with 16 
per contest. 

Savannah State also had great games from Johnny 
Abrahms, Jimmie Rutley, Ezra Gatewood, and Gerald 
Hendricks. Rutley, Hendricks and particularly Gatewood, 
were responsible for the Tigers winning the tournament. 
Gatewood averaged 11.1 points in the tournament games, 
while Rutley was directing the Tiger offense. 

Coach Richardson's team in winning the tournament, 
also dominated the awards that were presented. White, 
Crump and Jordon were named to the first string all-tourna- 
ment team; White and Crump were named to the all-con- 
ference first teams, with Jordon being named to the second 
team, and White was named the tournament's Most Valu- 
able Player. Although White made only 55 points as com- 
pared to Crump's and Jordon's 99 and 97, he averaged 22 
rebounds in those three games and raised havoc on defense. 
Coach Richardson was named Coach of the Year. 

The shoot-em-up Tigers averaged 106.6 points per 
game in the tournament and grabbed rebounds at an average 
of 65 per contest. 

The tournament win was of course the best way for 
Savannah State to end its long career in SEAC. The team 
will next season compete in the tough SIAC, against such 
teams as Tuskegee, South Carolina State, FAMU, and of 
course, Fort Valley. The opposition is great, but Coach 
Richardson and the returning and new players look forward 
to next season with much optimism. 



Support Your Alumni Program 



All of our alumni have every right to be proud of 
Savannah State College and the progress that is being made. 
This year the enrollment exceeded 2000 students for the 
first time in the history of the college. As the student 
population increases, your Alma Mater is also growing and 
improving in many other ways. Within the last three years 
eight new buildings have been dedicated. The beginning 
of the past football season witnessed the dedication of the 
new Football Stadium. A new student center-food service 
building is presently under construction and three other 
buildings are scheduled to be started prior to the end of this 
academic year. 

In addition, the college was recently accepted into the 
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and conse- 
quently will be expected to compete with stronger athletic 
opponents. In order for our Alma Mater to compete with 
such powerful opponents as Alabama State, Alabama A. & 
M., Florida A. & M., South Carolina State, Tuskegee Insti- 
tute and others in this conference, additional revenue must 
be obtained to build strong competitive teams. The college 
cannot provide these additional funds — the Alumni Associa- 
tion must accept this responsibility. 

In April of this academic year Savannah State College 
will launch its first annual Community Support Program. 
An organized campaign will be conducted to secure sub- 
stantial financial support from the total community. The 
funds secured from this campaign will be used to initiate 
certain badly needed new programs and to strengthen the 
total development of the College. 

As the chairman of the Alumni Campaign Committee, 
I urge your support of the alumni efforts in this very worth- 



while project. Alumni support will determine to a large 
degree the kind of support that we may expect and receive 
from others. I am personally making a substantial contri- 
bution and encourage those of you who can to do so also. 
Those who contribute $100 or more will become members 
of the Savannah State College National Alumni Century 
Club and will be honored at the Homecoming Banquet 
during the Alumni Homecoming Weekend at the Manger 
Hotel in the Fall. In addition, their pictures will appear in 
an assigned section on the wall in the Administration 
Building. 

Sincerely yours, 

Henry M. Collier, Jr., Chairman 
Alumni Campaign Committee 
Community Support Program '68-69. 



Duke University, with the aid of an $85,000 grant, has 
begun a scholarship program to bring underprivileged 
students into its law school. The grant will provide three- 
year, full-tuition scholarships for five students in each fresh- 
man class during the next three years. Funds are being 
sought to cover living expenses and other fees. 

Eventually, Duke hopes to expand the program so that 
at least 10 percent of each law class will be composed of 
underprivileged students, primarily Negroes. Grants will 
be made on a half-loan, half-scholarship basis, with one- 
third of the loan forgiven for each year the graduate prac- 
tices law in the South. The Duke law school opened its doors 
to Negroes in 1961, but has had only four Negro graduates. 



Student Teaching Assignments 



Mrs. Dorothy C. Hamilton. Director of Student Teach- 
ing, announces the student teaching assignments for the 
Spring Quarter. 

Richard Arnohl High School, F. Hemans Oliver, Princi- 
pal: Jimmy Owens, Industrial Arts Education, Willie 
Michael, supervising teacher. 

Beach High School, Joseph M. Greene, Principal: Ola 
Jane Brown, Business Education, Mrs. Ruth Lowman, super- 
vising teacher; James Mitchell, Mathematics. Mrs. Virginia 
S. Wynn, supervising teacher; and Annie Juanita Russell, 
Business Education, Mrs. Frances Waddell, supervising 
teacher. 

Beach Junior High School, Robert F. DeLoach, Princi- 
pal: Marcia Hawkins, English. Mrs. Mildred Young, super- 
vising teacher. 

Cuyler Junior High School, Malcolm G. Thomas, Princi- 
pal: Deborah Bolton, Health and Physical Education, Mrs. 
Rita Williams, supervising teacher; Raymond Buxton, 
Health and Physical Education. Thurman Thomas, super- 
vising teacher; and Peggy Jackson, Art Education, Mrs. 
Kathleen Johnson, supervising teacher. 

Groves High School, J. Rife English, Principal: Scealy 
Brown, Mathematics, Mrs. Margaret Polite, supervising 
teacher; John Foston, Mathematics, Terry Pye, supervising 
teacher; Frances Huggins, Business Education, Mrs. Mary 
Elizabeth Nettles, supervising teacher; Jerry Mims, Business 
Education, Mrs. Bobbie K. Williams, supervising teacher; 
Shirley O'Neal, Business Education. Miss Carol Kitchens, 
supervising teacher; and Harry Rayford, Industrial Arts 
Education, Edward Shroeder, supervising teacher. 

Hubert Junior High and Elementary School, Henderson 
E. Formey, Principal: Fleming Golden. Mathematics, Harry 
L. Powell, supervising teacher; and Freda Malone, Grade 6, 
Mrs. Albert Thweatt. supervising teacher. 

Jenkins High School, James A. Reynolds, Principal: 
Carolyn Bruce, Mathematics. James Sheppard. supervising 
teacher; Hendricks. Health and Physical Education. James 
L. Spear, supervising teacher; and James Taylor, Social 
Studies, James Dekle, supervising teacher. 

Johnson High and Elementary School, James L. Bon- 
nette. Principal: Mary Alexander, Social Studies, Mrs. 
Mamie Hart, supervising teacher; Christine Brown, Grade 
4, Mrs. Eldora Marks, supervising teacher; Earl Brown, 
Health and Physical Education. Benjamin Sommerset, super- 
vising teacher; Sadie Collins, Grade 2, Mrs. Ruth Dobson, 
supervising teacher; Judson Brown, Health and Physical 
Education, John Miles, supervising teacher; Hattie Knight, 
General Science, Clevon Johnson, supervising teacher; 
Carolyn McCray, Grade 3, Mrs. Sadie Steele, supervising 
teacher; and Miriam Thomas, Health and Physical Educa- 
tion, Mrs. Doris Wood, supervising teacher. 

Mercer Junior High School, Adam R. Andrews, Princi- 
pal: Patricia Jamerson, Health and Physical Education, 
Mrs. Jean Skuse, supervising teacher. 

Savannah High School, Delmas H. Knight, Principal: 
Marion Foston, Mathematics, Mrs. Cleo Howard, super- 
vising teacher; Ina Rozier, English, Mrs. Dorothy U. Adams, 
supervising teacher; and Hosea Singleton, Industrial Arts 
Education, F. Rufus Futch, supervising teacher. 

Scott Junior High School, George Fritts, Principal: 
Mary Little, Industrial Arts Education, Ernest Brown, super- 
vising teacher. 



Tompkins High School, Roger B. Jones. Principal: 
Archie Lawton, Industrial Arts Education, Joseph Bur- 
roughs, supervising teacher; Charles Lawson, Art Educa- 
tion, Miss Alethia Burgess, supervising teacher; and Johnny 
Mathis, Health and Physical Education, Joseph Turner, 
supervising teacher. 

Emanuel County Elementary and High School, Swains- 
boro, Georgia, D. D. Boston, Principal: Annie Frances 
Jordan. Mathematics, Dessie Davis, supervising teacher; 
and Gwendolyn Rivers, Business Education, Mrs. E. D. 
Thomas, supervising teacher. 

Liberty County High School, E. B. Cooper, Principal: 
Evelyn Douglas, Business Education, Miss Lillie Gilliard, 
supervising teacher; and Yvonne Jackson, Mathematics, 
James Hall, supervising teacher. 

Northside High and Elementary School, Jesup. Georgia, 
Frank Robinson, Principal: Arlinda Jacobs, Grade 3, Mrs. 
Alethia Turner, supervising teacher; Thespain Patterson, 
Grade 2, Mrs. Lou Ella Williams, supervising teacher; and 
Priscilla Williams, Business Education, Miss Elnora Edmon- 
son, supervising teacher. 

Anderson Street Elementary School, Mrs. Carolyn 
Dowse, Principal: Novela Pinkney, Grade 5, Mrs. Rosemary 
Banks, supervising teacher. 

DeRenne Elementary School, Mrs. Mary B. Council, 
Principal: Dorothy Phillips, Grade 4, Mrs. Laura Webb, 
supervising teacher. 

Henry Street Elementary School, Mrs. Alma Wade, 
Principal: Bettye Grant, Grade 6, Mrs. Lelia Jones, super- 
vising teacher. 

Haven Elementary School, Mrs. Priscilla Thomas, Princi- 
pal: Jean Ester Bell, Grade 6, Mrs. Ola B. Dingle, super- 
vising teacher. 

Haynes Elementary School, William B. Lain, Principal: 
Maude Boddie, Grade 6, Mrs. Erma Williams, supervising 
teacher; and Anna Belle Cobb, Grade 4, Mrs. Pauline 
Hagins, supervising teacher. 

Moses Jackson Elementary School, Mrs. Janette B. 
Hayes, Principal: Barbara Ellison, Grade 5, Mrs. Eldora 
Greene, supervising teacher; and Rosa Lynard, Grade 5, 
Mrs. Lois Dotson, supervising teacher. 

Pulaski Elementary School, Mrs. Frankie Winn, Princi- 
pal: Elliot Sams, Grade 4, Mrs. Eleanor Williams, super- 
vising teacher. 

Pearl Lee Smith Elementary School, Mrs. Countess Y. 
Cox, Principal: Dwalyne Thomas, Grade 3, Mrs. Earnestine 
Harris, supervising teacher; and Freddie Wilson, Health 
and Physical Education, Benjamin Polite, supervising 
teacher. 

Spencer Elementary School, Mrs. Ayler Lovett, Princi- 
pal: Joan Wright, Grade 3, Miss Pearl Singleton, super- 
vising teacher. 

Tompkins Elementary School, Arthur Roberts, Princi- 
pal: Earnestine Fleming, Grade 6, Mrs. Hattie Artis, super- 
vising teacher. 

White Bluff Elementary School, Mrs. Cecile R. Register, 
Principal: Freddie Bacon, Grade 1, Mrs. Louise Milton, 
supervising teacher. 

Windsor Forest Elementary School, Mrs. Doris Thomas, 
Principal: Gladys Harris, Grade 6, Mrs. Lelia Braithwaite, 
supervising teacher. 



Mentally Retarded Can Be Workers 



Georgia is proving that mentally retarded workers can 
become productive and valued employees when they are 
properly matched to their jobs. 

During the four-and-a-half fiscal years that the Federal 
Placement Program has been operated to help the mentally 
retarded, 222 placements have been made in 14 federal 
agencies in Georgia, according to John S. Prickett, Jr., 
assistant superintendent for rehabilitation services, Georgia 
Department of Education. Prickett's office administers the 
U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare funds 
for the mentally retarded workers project. 

This project was initiated in 1963 by President John F. 
Kennedy to provide job opportunities in government 
agencies for the mentally retarded. The program has 
demonstrated to non-government employers that retarded 
individuals can hold responsible positions in business and 
industry. 



A recent HEW survey reports that many of the place- 
ments have earned promotions to more difficult assign- 
ments after training. The survey rated Georgia eighth in 
the nation in terms of total number of placements in federal 
agencies. Among the jobs performed successfully were 
those of typist, messenger, laboratory technician, clerk and 
laundry worker. 

Prickett said that rehabilitation counselors in the pro- 
gram give clients a variety of services in preparation for 
job placement; they also counsel clients after they are em- 
ployed. Aid is given in such areas as housing, transporta- 
tion, medical and financial assistance and training in proper 
work habits and personal grooming. 

Interested federal agencies may contact coordinators in 
each of the eight vocational rehabilitation districts in 
Georgia. 



"The Negro in the 20th Century" is the title of a course 
being offered this spring for the first time at the University 
of Alabama. A continuation of an existing course "The 18th 
and 19th Century Negro," the new course deals with the 
relationship of the Negro to the industrial-urban environ- 
ment of the U. S. A visiting professor from Stillman College 
is teaching the course, which has about 100 students enrolled. 



Charles F. Kettering II, founder and president of CFK 
Ltd., Denver, Colorado, a philanthropic corporation en- 
gaged in educational development, was elevated to chairman 
of the board at a February 25 meeting of the organiza- 
tion's board of directors. Dr. Edward Brainard, who has 
served as executive vice president since the corporation was 
founded, was named president. 

CFK Ltd. was organized in 1967 with primary focus on 
the improvement of the learning environment at the ele- 
mentary and secondary school level. The corporation's cur- 



rent work in the area of human relations in the school has 
received extensive publicity nationally and internationally. 

With CFK Ltd.'s assistance, six school districts around 
the country are preparing detailed plans by which improved 
means of emphasizing effective human relations as a basic 
goal of these schools can be demonstrated. Seven educa- 
tional consultants produced model plans for the project. 

Another unique program is the development of an in- 
service approach to individualized continuing education for 
secondary school principals and their immediate supervisors. 
This project has been undertaken by eight school districts. 
It is aimed at the administrator's educational leadership 
rather than his managerial functions. 

Working out of Denver, CFK Ltd. differs significantly 
from other funding organizations in that it assumes the 
initiative and develops its programs by working directly 
with able educators in selected school districts throughout 
the United States. 




A Scene from the Annual Honors Day Convocatic 



THE BULLETIN 



V5W, It IO 



HOMECOMING EDITION 



-1970 




IHSli 



Savannah, Georgia 31404 




THE MYSTERY OF BLACK 




The Savannah State College Homecoming Bulletin 1970 



President Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations & Continuing Education Wilton C. Scott 

Editor Juanita Jackson 

Student Assistants Curthbert Burton, Larry Rudd, Arnold Gaston 

Alumni Secretary Robert Bess 

Photographer Robert Mobley 



Volume XXIII 



November, 1970 



The Savannah Stale College Bulletin is published yearly in Ocl 
and May by Savannah Slate College. 



, December, February, March, April 



(Cover designed by Lucille Stiles) 




THE PRESIDENT'S 
MESSAGE 



Dr. HOWARD JORDAN, JR., PRESIDENT 



The choice of a theme for this year's homecoming, "The Mystery of Black," seems significant 
in these times when black people are striving mightily to help our nation renew itself. We as a 
college community must stand before our countrymen and before the world as a bold and vivid 
contradiction to the belief that black people -and the institutions which serve them are inherently, 
intrinsically and generically inferior. We at this college without apology for our origin, without 
shame for our character and without equivocation about our purpose, shall try to help our nation 
take an honorable change of direction. Ours is no easy assignment but it must be done. 

In addition to the relevant choice of a theme, the homecoming celebration at Savannah State 
College is not all a matter of routine. Each year finds the college and the celebration different 
and interesting. The rapid growth of the college, the changes in the physical plant, and the admis- 
sion of more than six hundred freshmen serves as a basis for the uniqueness of this year. The 
college is delighted to welcome alumni, former students, and friends to see and enjoy the college as 
it exists in 1970. 

It is my sincere hope that all who participate in homecoming this year will find the occasion 
one to be cherished. We are especially happy to host our good friends from our sister institution at 
Fort Valley State College. We extend a warm welcome to all of them. 

Mrs. Jordan and I hope to have the opportunity of greeting each of you personally after the 




Howard Jfc/dan Jr. 
President 



PROFILE: SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 




Savannah Slate College, a unit of the University System of Ge- 
teacher education, business administration and technology, and w< 



credited college of arts 



founded 



UNO. 



n institution which provided four years of 
al arts. After placement of the entire system 
with major? in English, the natural sciences, 
3 then changed to Savannah State College 



Initially, it was named Georgia State Industrial College for Colored Youth, 
high school training, a normal division training in agriculture and the mechani 
under the Board of Regents in 1931, the college began to offer degree program? 
social sciences, and business administration. The name Georgia State College wj 
by the Board of the University System in 1950. 

Being a state institution, Savannah State is charged with the responsibility of providing education an 
youth of the State of Georgia, in particular, and the nation, in general. However, apart from this legis 
that justifies its existence as a state institution. Savannah State College, like all institutions of higher 1 
that it must assume a wider responsibility to its enrollees and the community at large. 



responsibility 
rig, recognizes 



Savannah State College offers courses leading to the master's d 
the baccalaureate degree with a major in each of the following areas 
technology, criminal justice, dietetics and institutional management. 
English, general business administration, mathematics, mechanical technology 
nd textiles and clothing. 

one of th< 



elementarv education, and courses leading to 
entration: accounting, biology, chemistry, civil 
s. elementary education, electronics technology, 
darv education, secretai 



ial 



Savannah State College 
unparalleled natural beauty. 



most beautiful campuses in the South. The campus encompasses 136 acres of 
Attractive new buildings are constantly being built. Put into use recently was the Martin Luther 
king-Vainetta Frazier Complex, which serves as the student center and food service building. This building features a dining 
room equipped to handle 1,200 students and facilities to house all student activities. A bookstore, snack bar, lounges, game 
and meeting rooms, and administrative offices are also included in this building. 



Other new attractive buildings include the John F. Kennedy Fine Arts Center, 
700.000 and contains a Little Theatre, offices, classrooms, and laboratories for mus 



cted at an approximate 
ceramics, and sculpture. 



ost of 



Presently under construction a 
and a warehouse and shop building 
cost of $925,000. The $1.1 million 
tories for bio-chemistry, chromatog 
The warehouse and shop will house 



re eleven faculty homes, a dormitory for 200 female students, a natural science building 
The new dorm is being built by the Walter Strong Company of Savannah at an estimated 
science building will include a low-radiation nuclear laboratory, an additional 10 labora- 
-aphy, instrument and dark room, and other special laboratories for chemistry and physics, 
space for buildings and grounds and general campus upkeep. 



Savannah State College has requested from the Board of Regents the following facilities: a technical home 
building, a business administration building, and a nursery school for early childhood education. 

As a state institution, and at a time when the cry for equal opportunity is rapidly being met by the call of the techno- 
logical and business world for better trained manpower, Savannah State College recognizes that it must accept the responsibility 
of adequately preparing its graduates for these limes. 




DUANE ADAMS 



"MISS SAVANNAH STATE 
COLLEGE 1970-1971" 



for 1970-71 Duane is a member of the Pyramid Club of Delta 
Sigma Theta Sorority Inc., YWCA, Phi Beta Lambda and the 
Executive Branch of the Student Government Association 




BLACK IS 



# *+ ^ 




"Miss Senior" 
Rosalyn Frazier 
Atlanta, Georgia 



/ 




;•• 



"Miss Junior" 

Gilda Dawson 

Savannah, Georgia 



CLASS QUEENS 




W0* 



•'Miss Sophomore' 
Olive Keaton 
Tampa, Florida 




^ 



m.4 




c 



"Miss Freshman" 

Gail Merritt 
Savannah, Georgia 



BEAUTIFUL 




«di 



"Miss Freshman Attendant," Denise Sharpe, 
s a native of Summerville, Georgia, and is 
najoring in Sociology. 



Attendants to "Miss SSC" 





"Miss Junior Attendant," Eloise Cooper, is i 
Business Education major from Tampa, Florida 




"Miss Omega" BH 
Joyce Stiles 





- — ^-' v ' :: ^' 




S^w/ ( i 




*4» 



CAMPUS QUEENS 








vs»%. 




* 




W 4 






"Miss Physical 

Education" 
Shirley Keaton 




sk 





«iJ ^ 





WffiL; 



i ; vj^.:./ 





i ■ 





Bryant, Theodore 

Butler, Nathaniel . 
...Daise, Rodney 



CLASS WT. POS. 






Soph. 



. Frazior. Charlie 

. Garrett, Leonard 

Gleaton, Daniel 

Going, Marvin 

Gray, Lawlon 

Green, Larry .„ 

. Gregory, Waller _ 

Hall, Larry 

. Hamilton, Frank _ 

Harper, Frankie 

Horns, Joseph 

Hester, Neal . _. 

Jones, Dennis 






. Soph. 






Norlhside 



Tompkins 
Tompkins 
Price 

Bunch 



Westside 

Savannah 
_B1. Ely™ 
-Tattnall _ 

....Raines 

^Tompkins 
...Johnson . 
..Wilson 
-Lincoln _ 



HOMETOWN No. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 35 
St. Augustine 
Orangeburg, S. C. 
Conway, 

Jesnp, Ga. 

..... Ocala, Fla. 

Savannah, Ga. 

- Savannah, Ga. 

Vidalia, ( 

Savannah, Ga. 
Atlanta 
.*...... Hastings, Fla. 

. .... Waveriy, ( 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

. . . Savannah, Ga. 

Stockbridge, Ga. 



Dilloi 



S. C. 



_ Savannah, Ga. 

'ompano Beach, Fla. 

...._ Glennvill, 

...... Anderson, S. C. 

... Jacksonville, Fla. 

Savannah, Ga. 

Savannah, Ga. 

Tifton, Ga. 



...Mitchell, Wallei 
..Mofiett, Carlton 
-Newberry, Rosby 

Nunally, Maurice 

Parker, Max 
...Peoples, Talkoy . 
..Pierce, Bobby 

..Pollard, Marshal 

Poythress< E. C. 
...Pugh, James 

Reynolds, Willie 






Soph. 



POS. SCHOOL 



HB . . Natl Gov. 



Columbus, ( 
Pakis 

Savunnuh, t 



. Clerm 



Fla. 



204 G 


Tompk.n, 


Savannah 


20o . E . 


. Johnson 


. Savannah 


5! E 


Burgess Lin 


.... __ Millen 


S3 DB 


. Beach 


Savannah 


80. ._E . 


. Valdosla .. . 


Valdosla 








90 LB 


_ Jackson _ 


Jacksonville, 


205 .G . 


— Parker 


. Savannah 


210 G 


...Trimly __ 


Decalur 


95 . C 


...Carver 


... Columbus 


250 .....C . 


Douglas . 


,_ Atlanta 


240 . LB 


_Lucyl«na 


Augusta 


18 LB 


._ Groves 


" Savant,ah 


68.-DB 


. Richard Arn 


. Savannah 


99 DB 


.Johnson ..... 


_ Savannah 


52 .C - 


__Tompkii. s - 


Savannah 


06 ...LB 


Johnson 


_ Savannah 


84 LB 


_Johnson .... 


_.. Savannah 


05 QB 


.. Whittemore 


. Conway, 


85 _.E . 


. .Murphy .... 


Atlanta, 


70 .QB 


— Beach 


__ Savannah, 


6£ HB 


. Ware Co. 


. Waycross, 








87 HB 


.-Johnson 


. Savannah, 



-"£.-* '■WyV-*-' 







. ~i .*^ 



u 



i . 'B H 




^sijsi 




;' . ■■ - 





■ 



1895, is a 4-year, co- 
unit of the University 
ted in the city of Fort 
ly accessible via routes 
.1 miles off of Interstate 75. 
ghout her years, the college 
;ss and growth. President 
administrator of the college, en- 
"» of institutional programs to in- 
■taff and college facilities, 
llment, approximately 2.37(1, 
stitution cla 



000 alumni. 

positions 

ide holding profes- 



The collegers present ei 
steadily on the increase. The 
a large percentage of whor 
within the state. Others are 
sional jobs that run the gamut 

Offering the B.S. and B. \. degrees on the undergraduate level, 

the college has expanded lis programs offering degrees in over 

35 major areas. In 1957. the institution began offering the 

degree in Guidance and Counseling. Several 

elude cooperative programs with business and 

Master, to mention a few, and our excellent 

Placement Center help to aid enrichment and enhances the future 

outlook of our student body. 

The college operates on a quarter system hosting three sessions 
during the regular school year and hosts 
and four weeks respectively. 



"Miss Fort Valley State College": Miss Brenda 
O'Neal, senior Social Science major, is a native 
of Barnesville, Georgia. 




Leon J. Lomax, Head Football Coach 




Alfonzo Varner, Chief Assistant, Head Line Coach 







1970 WILDCATS FOOTBALL ROSTER 



CLASS HEIGHT 



WEIGHT OFF. 







85 . Green, Arlhur 
87 White, Albert 
80 . Greene. Jesse 
24 Lane, Moso 


Freshman 6- 
Sophomore 5- 
freshman e 


27 . Hagan. E.rley Freshman l 

Bl Lowe, Ronnie Senior 6 
88 . Woodard, Edward Freshman 62 


33 Harvey, Oscar 

75 . Williams. Weldon 


Sophomore 5- 


76. . Halm. Arlhur . . Sophomore l\ 


71 Clerkley, Johnny 

74 . Dollison, Bobby 

72 Baldwin Sidney 
70 Flowers, James 
78 . Beadels. Charles 
52 Williams, Kennolh 

60 Armsler, Earl 


Freshman . 65 

Sophomore . 6( 

. . Sophomore . 62 

Sophomore . 5 1 

Junici 5 6 


69 . Simon, Kenneth 
68 Oglelree. Bradley 
84 Butler, Jerome 


Senior . 5-e 


02 fchtsoT' Hirati V"" 5 '' 


S7 Tucker, Colbert freshman 5 9 




51 Hollis, Arthur 




55 Molls, Ronnie 

54 ... . Freeman. Jackie 

63 Whittlesey, Jerry 

15 . Edmond Koberl 

13 Hamilton, David 

42 . Redding, Lovolt 
21 Dawsey, Kelly 


Freshman 6 1 

Freshman 5-1 

Froshman_ 6-0 


44 Brown,' Robert ^i. .'";!.? \ " 


45 Bnrnetl Alvesler 
41 . Hamm, Terry 
3! Lawrence. James 
26 . Simmons. Charles 


Senior 62 

_ Senior . . 6-7 


43 Moss, Eugene 

25 Love, Anthony 


.- — Freshman . .5-1 



90 - 11 : 


CB 
CB 


Glynn Academy 
. Douglass 


. . Perry, 

Brunswick, 


84 SE 

92 Jl. 


. - CB 


. Tattnall Counly 


Perry, 
Reidsville, 


12 Fl 


— l~ 


East Depot 


LaGrange, 




21 T 


E 


Pearl Stephens 


Warnor Hob.ns, 

Washington, 

largo, 


54 T 




Largo High 


34 T 


E 


A. S Clark 


Cordole, 


20 T 




Us^Depot 




14 . T 








33 . T 


T 


A. S Clark 


Cordole, 


35 G 


LB 


Mays 


Thomasv.lle. 
Miami, 




L 'f 


^fcer" 


Thomasviile, 


8 G 


LB 


Mays 


M.am,, 


5 G 


_ T 


Carver 


. . Atlanta, 
Douglass, 



McDoi 



CB Perry High 



WE SRLUTC ML ALVMNI 



National President Extends 
Greetings 




ALUMNI HOMECOMING WEEKEND 

November 6-8. 1970 



Friday 
Nov. 6 
7:00 p.i 

10:00 p.i 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE NATIONAL ALUMNI MEETING — A. V. Center of the A. H. Gordon 

Library. 
OPENING OF SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION HOSPITALITY 

SUITE TO ALUMNI AND FRIENDS — Downtowner Motor Inn, 201 W. Oglethorpe Ave., Room 225. 

HOMECOMING PARADE — Downtown Savannah 

HOMECOMING GAME — SSC Tigers vs. Fort Valley State College Wildcats. "Miss SSC" and "Miss SSC 
National Alumni" and their attendants will be presented during half-time. 

CLASS REUNIONS FOR THE "O's" — Downtowner, Room 225. 
7:00 p.m. SSC NATIONAL ALUMNI HOMECOMING BANQUET — Downtowner Motor Inn. Certificates will be 
presented to alumni members of the Century Club and recognition will be given to Outstanding Alumni 
members. 



Saturday 
Nov. 7 
10:00 a.n 

1:30 p.n 
6:00 p.i 



8-30 p.m. SSC NATIONAL ALUMNI HOMECOMING DANCE— Downtown, 
fully equipped Hornet, Color TV, and Transistor Radio will b 

Sunday 
Nov. 8 
10:00 a.m. BREAKFAST — SSC National Officers and Chapter Offi 

18 



Adult beverages will be served free. 1970 
awarded at 10:30 p.m. during the dance. 



Downtowner Motor In 



"MISS NATIONAL ALUMNI" 





"Miss Savannah State College National Alumni," Miss 
Allette Wiggins, 1966 graduate, native of Savannah, pres- 
ently teacher in the Chicago Public School System and 
working on her M.A. degree in Library Science at Chicago 
State Teacher College. 



Left to right: Mrs. Marian McKay Houston, 
attendant to "Miss National Alumni," and 
Mrs. Susie K. James, attendant to "Miss Na- 
tional Alumni." All three young ladies are 
natives of Savannah and presently teachers 
in Chicago Public School System 





Left to right: Mrs. Susie K. James, attendant, Mrs. Marian McKay Houston, attendant, Mrs. Clarence Las- 
seter. President of Chicago Chapter, and Miss Allette Wiggins, "Miss National Alumni." 



Alumni - Savannah Chapter 




Dr. Prince Jackson, Jr. presents plaque to Mr. E. 
Edward Greene who was featured in "This Is Your Life" 
by Savannah Chapter. Sharing the honor is Mrs. E. 
Edward Greene. 





Miss Matella Maree 

President 
Savannah Chapter 



Mrs. Ruby L. King 

Secretary 
Savannah Chapter 




Mr. Robert A. Young 

Principal, Harris Area 

Trade School 



Mrs. Edith L. James 
Director of Community 

Services and Senior 

Counselor, Educational 

Talent Search, "Project 

Seek" 



Mrs. Rosemary Banks 
Chatham County Teacher 
Selected as "Outstanding; 

Woman of the Year" 



Mr. Wade Simmions 
Supervisor and Principal 
Harris Reading Center 





Mr. John McGlockton, president of the Sa- 
vannah State College Athletic Association, urges 
all interested persons to give their support to the 
athletic association, which has been instrumental 
in securing lights for Tiger Stadium as well as 
other facilities for the athletic program. 



■i 










Left to right: B. B. White, Secretary, and Mrs Doris Pochi 
Porter Games, President, Albany Chapter. Standing? Willie LRus 
Treasure? Pre5,dent ' }oh " n * "»'»» ™* Commode™ Conyers, 



Mrs. Albany Alumni Chapter 
Mrs. Doris Pocha Porter Gaines "I960" 





Miss Savannah Chapter" is shown here with 
attendants. Left to right: Mrs. Edna Jackson, So- 
cial Worker, EOA; Miss Juanita Jackson, Adminis- 
trative Intern, SSC, "Miss Savannah Chapter": and 
Miss Leola Lawrence, Director, Hodge Memorial Day 
Care Center. ' 




y^J, fill 



Y 




G 







\ 1 


u ! 


■ f» *^ 1 


' F 


N 


i » ■*? fim 


T 


G 


-"■^ife 


k E 


"MISS SSC 1971" 


*&' r 


D 


Miss Sharon Lewis 

Senior 

Elementary Education Major 


and 





BLACK 



PRICE 

50c 

SAVANNAH 
STATE 
COLLEGE 

T 
H 

E 

B 
U 

L 

L 

E 

T 

I 

N 

HOMECOMING 
EDITION 

1971 

SAVANNAH, 

GEORGIA 

31404 



Young, Gifted, Black 



I am BLACK and I have 
seen BLACK hands Raised 
in fists of revolt, side by 
side with the white fists of 
white workers. 




And some day — and it is 
only this which sustains me 
- — -Some day there shall be 
millions and millions of 
them, On some red day in 
a burst of fists on a new 
horizon! 



ADDO-OSAFO, ACCRA, GHANA 



1VANNAH STATE COLLEGE HOMECOMING BULLETIN 1971 

President Dr prince A. Jackson, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations Wilton C. Scott 

Edltor Miss Juanita Jackson 

Student Assistants John Davis, Curt Burton 

Alumni Secretary Elmer Thomas 

Development Officer Robert Bess 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Volume XXm November, 1971 Number 1 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly In October, December, February, 
March, April, and May by Savannah State College. 





Dr. Prince A. Jackson, Jr. 



YOUNG, GIFTED, AND BLACK, sets the tone for the Homecoming celebration. 
Today's young person has many advantages — in that, with the turn of events, the aware- 
ness of a proud, Black heritage, the young, gifted, and Black student is being afforded 
opportunities that were 'unheard of in the past. 

As in previous years, the Savannah State College family is proud to welcome 
alumni, and friends of the College, to the campus to share with us in this new "aware- 
ness." It is our hope that while you are here, you will accept our invitation to tour the 
campus and get a first-hand look at our new facilities which indicate the progress we 
have made toward promoting academic excellence in the "young, gifted, and Black" 
student. The entire College family has benefitted from the interest shown, and the ef- 
fective participation of the alumni in the development of a finer and more effective 
educational program here at Savannah State College. 

We sincerely hope that all who participate in Homecoming this year will find the 
occasion one to be cherished, and that the activities, including the football game, will be 
a credit to the College and to our guests from our sister institution, Albany State Col- 
RIGHT ON! 



Sincerely, 



\J/U^—e<: yj x-^^slo-*^- 



Prince Jackson, Jr. 
President 




NEW SCIENCE BUILDING 



Savannah Stale Coll 
teacher education, k 



nit of the University Systr 
nistralun and tt'rlinol"g\ 



Initially, it was named Georgia State Industrial College fo 
high school training, a normal division training in agriculture 
under the Board of Regents in 1931, the college began to offe 
social sciences, and business administration. The name Geoig 
by the Board of the University System in 1950. 



Georgia, is a five year accredited college of arts and sciences, 
was founded in 1890. 

Colored Youth, an institution which provided four years of 
ind the mechanical arts. After placement of the entire system 

degree programs with major in English, the natural sciences, 
l State College was then changed to Savannah State College 



Being 



state institution. Savannah State is charged with the responsibility of providing education and trainin" for 



the youth of the State of Georgia 
sibility that justifies its existence 
recognizes that it must assume a i 



Savannah State College offers courses leading to the m; 
le baccalaureate degree with a major in each of the folio 
nil technology, criminal justice, dietetics and institutional 
ology, English, general business administration, mathem 
ience, social sciences, and textiles and clothing. 



particular, and the nation, in general. However, apart from this legislated respon- 
i state institution, Savannah State College, like all institutions of higher learning, 
r responsibility to its enrollees and the community at large. 

iter's degree in elementary education, and courses leading to 
zing areas of concentration: accounting, biology, chemistry, 
lanagement, economics, elementary education, electronics tech- 
nics, mechanical technology, secondary education, secretarial 



Savannah State College has one of the most beautiful campuses in the South. The campus encompasses 136 acres of 
unparalleled natural beauty. Attractive new buildings are constantly being built. Put into use recently was the Martin Luther 
King-Varnetta Frazier Complex, which serves as the student center and food service building. This building features a dining 
room equipped to handle 1,200 students and facilities to house all student activities. A bookstore, snack bar, lounges, »ame 
and meeting rooms, and administrative offices are also included in this building. 

Other new attractive buildings include the John F. Kennedy Fine Arts Center, constructed at an approximate cost of 
S700,000 and contains a Little Theatre, offices, classrooms, and laboratories for music, art, ceramics, and sculpture. New 
buildings opened this fall include eleven faculty homes, a dormitory for 200 female students, a natural science building 
and a warehouse and shop building. The dorm was built by the Walter Strong Company of Savannah at a cost of $925,- 
000. The $1.1 million science building includes a low-radiation nuclear laboratory, an additional 10 laboratories for bio- 
chemistry, chromatography, instrument and dark room, and other special laboratories for chemistry and physics. The ware- 
house and shop houses space for buildings and grounds and general campus upkeep. 

Savannah State College has requested from the Board of Regents the following facilities: a technical home economics 
building, a business administration building, and a nursery school for early childhood education. 

As a state institution, and at a time when the cry for equal opportunity is rapidly being met by the call of the tech- 
nological and business world lor better trained manpower, Savannah State College recognizes that it must accept the re- 
sponsibility of adequately preparing its graduates for these times. 




MISS SAVANNAH 

STATE COLLEGE 

1971-72 





MISS SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 1971-72 



Miss Lewis holds membership in the following 
organizations: Student Government Association, 
SNEA and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. 



MISS 



ssc 



"Miss Junior Attendant" 

Joyce Gease 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Attractive, Personality Plus 

Social Science Major 





"Miss Senior Attendant" 

Connie Jackson 

Savannah, Georgia 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 

Fashionable, Becoming, Outgoing 



'"..-* •-■ 




Carol Ann Allen 
Savannah, Georgia 



Melineze Logan 
Savannah, Georgia 



"MISS 
JUNIOR" 



"MISS 
SENIOR" 




U 
E 
E 

N 



Llllie Kirkland 
Savannah, Georgi; 



Ann O'Neal 
Savannah, Georgia 



Savannah State College "Tigers" 
















TIGER P0WE1 



FOOTBALL 

Savannah State College 

vs. 

Albany State College 

Saturday 
November 13, 1971 

1:30 P.M. 
TIGER STADIUM 



1971 Tiger Football Roster 



Name 

Alston, Andre 
Baker, Bernard 
Bailey, James 
Bee. Anthony 
Bennett, Lorenzo 
Bryan, Alvoy 
Carr, Larry 
Carthon, Mitchell 
Dessasure, Theodore 
Duncan, Nathan 
Dupree, James 
Edwards, Marvin 
Ellis, Chester 
Farley, Charles 
Fleming, Benjamin 
Frazier, Charlie 
Gaither, Robert 
Garrett, Leonard 
Gibbs. Joseph 
Gilbert, Joseph 
Gleaton, Daniel 
Gregory, Walter 
Grovenor, Arthur 
Hall. Larry 
Harper, Frankie 
Harris, Joseph 
Harris, William 
Hawkins, Walter 
Hester, Neal 
Johnson, Eddie 
Jones, Collins 
Jones, Dennis 
Jones, Randolph 
Kemp, Everett 
Khan, Amin 
Kendrick, Horace 
Lawrence, Calvin 
Laurice, Herbert 
Lester, Alvin 
Lowe, Julian 
Moffett, Carlton 
Morgan, Cornelius 
Newbuerry, Rosby 
Nunnally, Maurice 
Owens, Montgomery 
Parker, Max 
People, Talkov 
Pollard. Marshall 
Poythress, Elijah 
Pugh, James 
Reynolds, Willie 
Rogers, Herman 
Rouse, Williams 
Sears, Leon 
Scott, Fletcher 
Singleton, Julius 
Spear, George 
Tucks, Lewey 
Wardlaw. Dennis 
Wood, Roderick 
Woods, James 



Head Coach 

Mr. John H. Myles 

Assistants 

Mr. John Mason 

Mr. Frank Ellis 

Mr. Willie Pippins 

Sports Information Director 

Mr. Wilton C. Scott 

Student Sports Director 

Curtbert Burton 

Statistician 
Augustus Howard 



wt. 


Pos. 


School 


Hometown 


215 


DE 


Raines 


Jacksonville. Fla. 


240 


OT 


Raines 


Jacksonville. Fla. 


175 


DB 


Carver 


Atlanta, Ga. 


244 


OT 


Tompkins 


Savannah, Ga. 


187 


SE 


Northside 


Jesup, Ga, 


156 


DHB 


Johnson 


Savannah, Ga. 


213 


TE 


Wilkinson 


Orangeburg, S. C 


180 


TE 


Robert Lee 


Thomaston, Ga. 


288 


DE 


Ridgeland 


Ridgeland, S. C. 


190 


RD 


Savannah 


Savannah, Ga. 


243 


DT 


Lyons 


Vidalia. Ga. 


220 


C 


Tompkins 


Savannah, Ga. 


180 


QB 


Tompkins 


Savannah, Ga. 


232 


OT 


Effingham 


Guyton, Ga. 


268 


DT 


L. J. Price 


Atlanta, Ga. 


170 


Flanker 


Ralph Bunch 


Waverly. Ga. 


200 


OG 


Jenkins 


Savannah, Ga. 


207 


DT 


Raines 


Jacksonville, Fla. 


215 


DE 


Johnson 


Savannah, Ga. 


170 


DB 


Savannah High 


Savannah, Ga. 


205 


C 


Westside High 


McDonough, Ga. 


187 


QB 


Tatnall High 


Glennville. Ga. 


175 


DB 


Risley 


Brunswick, Ga. 


180 


HB 


Cresent 


Anderson, S. C. 


195 


DB 


Tompkins 


Savannah, Ga. 


245 


OT 


Johnson 


Savannah, Ga. 


187 


DB 


Johnson 


Savannah, Ga. 


190 


QB 


Jones 


Oilando, Fla. 


221 


TE 


Wilson 


Tifton, Ga. 


256 


DT 


E. O. Douglas 


Sebring. Fla. 


198 


LB 


Carver 


Columbus, Ga. 


230 


RB 


Lincoln High 


Clermont, Fla. 


232 


LB 


Clermont High 


Clermont, Fla. 


180 


LB 


Sol Johnson 


Savannah, Ga. 


180 


K 


Gov't High 


Pakistan 


165 


P 


Rochelle High 


Lakeland, Fla. 


215 


RG 


Tompkins 


Savannah, Ga. 


160 


DHB 


Robert Smalls 


Beaufort, S. C. 


220 


OT 


Vienna 


Pinehurst, Ga. 


190 


DB 


Westbury High 


Westbury, N. Y. 


176 


DHB 


A. E. Beach 


Savannah, Ga. 


176 


DHB 


Tompkins 


Savannah, Ga. 


191 


SE 


Valdosta 


Valdosta. Ga. 


171 


SE 


Harper 


Atlanta, Ga. 


215 


FB 


Johnakin 


Marion, S. C. 


192 


LB 


Jackson 


Jacksonville, Fla 


203 


OE 


Parker 


Birmingham, Ala 


205 


OG 


Carver 


Columbus, Ga. 


264 


C 


Douglas 


Atlanta, Ga. 


251 


MLB 


Lucy Laney 


Augusta, Ga. 


203 


DE 


Groves 


Savannah, Ga. 


184 


LB 


Jenkins 


Savannah, Ga. 


215 


C 


Tompkins 


Savannah, Ga. 


208 


LB 


Johnson 


Savannah, Ga. 


176 


DB 


Richard Arnold 


Savannah, Ga. 


265 


DT 


Beaufort High 


Beaufort, S. C. 


191 


TE 


Murphy High 


Atlanta, Ga. 


180 


QB 


A. E. Beach 


Savannah, Ga. 


245 


T 


H. V. Jenkins 


Savannah, Ga. 


180 


Flanker 


Harper High 


Atlanta, Ga. 


180 


Flanker 


Sol Johnson 


Savannah, Ga. 


Athletic Director 






Mr. Albert E. 


Frazier 










Student Sports Editor 






Mitchell Inman III 




Student 


Sports Reporter & 


Photographer 






Arnold Gadson 






Student Photographer 






Charles Jenkins 






Photographer 








Mr. Robert Mobley 






Affiliations 








SIAC, NAIA, NCAA 






1970 Record 






Head Coach, John Myles 





Coaching Staff, Ellis, Pippen, Myles, Mason 



*n^**r e t? 1 



um 



#11 f 





Albany State 
College President 



ALBANY STATE COLLEGE 



To: Students, Faculty, Staff and Alumni 

It is with great pleasure that I take this opportunity to send a message to our sister 
college, Savannah State, in commemoration of its Annual Homecoming Event. To the 
alumni who are returning to the institution to renew friendships and to enkindle new 
friendships, please be reminded of the very important task which lies ahead of you 
with respect to Savannah State as an institution within the University System of Georgia. 
Through the years your institution has contributed greatly to the education of young men 
and women of this state, a tradition which you should be very proud of. 

From the faculty, students, staff and alumni of Albany State College we extend to 
you best wishes and well wishes for your most cherished event — the Homecoming Festivi- 
ties. I trust that as our teams meet on the gridiron that each will conduct itself in a 
gentlemanlike fashion with the hope that when the final whistle is blown such will in- 
dicate that two institutions will have been well represented win, lose, or draw. 

Again, our best wishes to all of you at Savannah State College. 



Sincerely your 



*? 



Charles L. Hayes 



History of Albany State College 



Albany State College, founded in 1903, marks its G8th year as the 1971-72 academic year com- 
mences. The institution is a tax-supported liberal arts college, established and maintained by the state 
to serve the people of Georgia, and particularly the youth of Southwest Georgia. 

The school traces its evolution to the establishment of the Albany Biblical and Manual Training 
Institute. Dr. Joseph Winthrop Holley, the Lincoln University (Pa.) educator, came to Albany seek- 
ing aid and encouragement in the establishment of a school that would afford better advantages for 
Negro youth. With the financial help of the Hazard family of Peace Dale, Rhode Island and several 
of the leading white citizens of Albany, the Winnsboro, South Carolina native established the school 
that is now Albany State College. These persons, particularly the Hazard family, responded liberally 
to the needs of the school and, for many years, actively supported its growth. 

In 1917, the state of Georgia through an act of the Georgia Assembly, assumed responsibility 
for the operation of the school and its name was changed to the Georgia Normal and Agriculture Col- 
lege. The institution offered work on the junior college level in teacher education, agriculture and 
home economics. 

President Holley retired and became President-Emeritus in 1943, forty years after the school's 
founding, being succeeded by Aaron Brown as president. 

In the first year of Brown's administration the name of the school was changed to Albany 
State College and was upgraded to a four-year status, becoming a degree-granting institution in the 
fields of elementary education and ho 



In 1953, President Brown resigned to accept a position with the Phelps-Stokes Foundation and 
was succeeded by William H. Dennis, Jr., who had been closely associated with him as director of 
student teaching. Dennis succumbed in 1965 after eleven years at the helm and was succeeded by Dr. 
Thomas Miller Jenkins, a former dean of the Florida A. & M. University Law School. Jenkins resigned 
in 1969 to accept a post at Georgia State University, and was succeeded by Dr. Charles L. Hayes as 
the college's fifth president. 

The institution has grown steadily and has a projected enrollment of 2,175 students with more 
than 500 courses and about 95 faculty members. This growth is further reflected in a steady building 
program that included such recent construction as a student health center; faculty housing; the 
Dennis Student Union, Gibson Hall, the new women's residence hall, an addition to the Science 
Hall; and campus landscaping in several areas of the campus. 

In his short span as head of the institution, Dr. Hayes is responsible for what may be the largest 
project ever undertaken at the institution. Already constructed is a §90,000 project completing a 
badly needed perimeter road around the campus and parking spaces. A face lifting job has been 
done on the front of the campus featuring widened walkways, lights and shrubbery. One of two new 
dormitory complexes has been opened for occupancy while the other is still under construction. Also 
currently under construction on the front campus is a mall. 

The campus ground, which spans a little more than 100 acres, is located immediately to the 
east of the downtown area of the city of Albany. 

Albany State College reflects the community and the area in blending new and old, tradition and 
progress, while serving at the educational and cultural center of Southwest Georgia. 








Defensive Linemen 

Left to right — Charlie Flowers, Walter Johnson, Larry Brooks, 

Iriad Pittman, and Jerome McConnell. 



Woodard, Jacksonville, Florida. 



< 9 A 


Alban) 


r State 


College "Rams" 


LI 




5 «t 


62 








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S5i?te 


>z 


t^' 


XM6£45. 


WXp 


Sft^&W 




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s- 






bKl 




Tf » 


rfcj 


£»«v& 




3 


p4j 


@m 


s&^isf 




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*«*3* 


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2Enp 


T^.^S^J 


^w -T^" ' ""-"!1 . 


^. r " 






ASC FOOTBALL 


ROSTER 






No 


Name 


Pos. 




Age 


Ht. 


Wt. Year 


Hometown 




67 


Alexander, Regino 


OG 




21 


60" 


230 4 


Sanford, Fla. 




55 


Bowden, Ronald 


C 




19 


S'll" 


186 2 


Atlanta, Ga. 




62 


Brooks, Larry 


DG 




19 


6'0" 


260 2 


Albany. Ga. 




10 


Burke, Kenneth 


QB 




20 


6'2%" 


203 4 


Moultrie, Ga. 




83 


Cameron, Art 


TE 




21 


6'4" 


230 3 


LaGrange, Ga. 




54 


Cameron, Oliver 


G 




21 


&9W" 


145 3 


LaGrange, Ga. 




44 


Coleman, Willie 


HB 




19 


6'1" 


217 1 


Chicago, III. 






Davis, Lucious 


DS 




20 


5'10" 


155 4 


Tampa, Fla. 




85 


Flowers, Charles 


DT 




21 


6'3" 


249 3 


Vienna, Ga. 




76 


Forbes, Reginald 


DT 




21 


6'2" 


235 4 


Eustis, Fla. 




15 


Frazier. Thomas 


K 




20 


6'0" 


155 2 


Madison, Fla. 




70 


Gaines, Dennis 


DT 




18 


6'4" 


260 1 


Quitman, Ga. 




50 


Gibson, Willie 


MLB 




17 


5'10" 


235 1 


Albany, Ga. 




51 


Grissom, Eddie 


LB 




18 


6'0" 


170 2 


Warrenton, Ga. 




75 


Hatcher. Robert 


DT 




21 


6'3" 


265 3 


Winter Haven, Ga. 




21 


Hicks, Hugh 


DCB 




21 


S'll" 


165 4 


Eustis, Fla. 




19 


Hopkins, Adam 


QB 




18 


6'0" 


210 1 


Thomasville. Ga. 




81 


Howard, Roy 


WE 




19 


6'2" 


188 2 


Alcora, Tenn. 




35 


Jackson, Cornelius 


HB 




18 


5'lOVi" 


175 1 


Macon, Ga. 




22 


Jackson, Myron 


S-P 




18 


6'2" 


185 1 


Albany, Ga. 




42 


Jefferson, Roderick 


FLK 




17 


6'0" 


180 1 


Quitman, Ga. 




31 


Johnson, Rudolph 


FB 




20 


S'll" 


200 4 


Columbus, Ga. 




78 


Johnson, Walter 


DT 




21 


6'3" 


270 4 


Augusta, Ga. 




40 


Johnson, Wayne 


CB 




21 


6'0" 


193 3 


Monticello, Fla. 






Jordan, Johnny 


TE 




18 


6'1" 


200 1 


Sandersville, Ga. 




82 


Kennedy. Russ 


SE-K 




20 


6T r 


172 2 


Ann Arbor, Mich. 




32 


Lester, John 


PB 




19 


6'2" 


200 1 


Blakely, Ga. 




30 


Little, Harold 


ES 




17 


6'5" 


188 1 


Linden, Ala. 




53 


McCall. Hebert 


LB 




20 


6'1" 


215 3 


Thomasville, Ga. 




86 


McConnell, Jerome 


DE 




19 


6'4" 


241 2 


Atlanta, Ga. 




24 


McGhee, Donald 


HB 




18 


5'9>/ 2 " 


173 1 


Fort Valley, Ga. 




33 


McKinney, Marion 


FB 




18 


6'0" 


190 1 


Albany, Ga. 




80 


McNeal, Thedore 


P 




19 


6'3" 


204 1 


Augusta, Ga. 






Magwood, Booker 


SE 




19 


6'1" 


170 1 


Miami, Fla. 




18 


Marlin, Larry 


DB 




19 


6'0" 


170 2 


Albany, Ga. 




26 


Nelson, Ronnie 


FB 




20 


6'0" 


185 1 


Albany, Ga. 




11 


Nixon, Ronald 


QB 




17 


6'0" 


170 1 


Macon, Ga. 




87 


Peabody, Jackie 


TE 




22 


6'1" 


198 3 


Phoenix City, Ala. 




12 


Petty, Eugene 


QB 




21 


6'1" 


170 4 


Americus, Ga. 




74 


Pittman, Iriad 


DT 




23 


6'4" 


275 3 


Campbellton, Fla. 




25 


Price, Jerome 


F-RB 




19 


5'2%" 


154 2 


Macon, Ga. 




68 


Reese, Willie 


LB 




18 


5'9" 


190 1 


Sparta, Ga. 




63 


Robinson, Hosea 


DT 




19 


8'3%" 


235 2 


Manchester, Ga. 




60 


Ross, Fred 


MLB 




19 


511" 


205 2 


Thomasville, Ga. 




77 


Russ, Robert 


OT 




21 


6'2" 


265 4 


Defuniak Springs. Fla. 




43 


Sampson, Matthew 


DB 




18 


6'0" 


170 2 


Jacksonville, Fla. 




13 


Sellers, Jimmy 


DS 




22 


S'll" 


160 4 


Atlanta, Ga. 




64 


Seabrooks, Johnny 


LB 




19 


6'0" 


190 3 


Monticello, Fla. 




23 


Sherman, Lester 


HB 




19 


5'io" 


178 1 


Albany, Ga. 






Siplin, Michael 


DHB 




18 


5'8" 


150 1 


Jacksonville, Fla. 




28 


Taylor, Angelo 


CB 




18 


6'0" 


185 1 


Macon, Ga. 




73 


Taylor, Bruce 


LOG 




19 


6'2" 


260 3 


Moultrie, Ga. 






Terry, Clarence 


TE 




19 


6'5" 


190 1 


Fort Pierce, Fla. 






Turner, Oscar 


QB 




18 


6'1" 


180 1 


Jacksonville, Fla. 




66 


Wells, Gregory 


OT 




17 


6'4" 


215 1 


Mcintosh, Ala. 




61 


West, Michael 


G 




18 


5'10" 


213 2 


Albany, Ga. 




56 


Willis. Edward 


DB 




20 


6'1" 


170 1 


Albany, Ga. 




34 


Wilson, Eddie 


FB 




21 


6'1" 


185 3 


Jacksonville, Fla. 




72 


Woodard, David 


OT 




21 


6'2" 


250 4 


Jacksonville, Fla. 






Vera Green 

"Miss Home Economics" 

Savannah, Georgia 



Johnetta Bradley 
"Miss Lester Hall" 
Pelham, Georgia 




ft 



Dora Burke 

"Miss Alpha Phi Omeg; 

Stillmore, Georgia 




Georgetta Dempsey 

"Miss Sphinx" 
Savannah, Georgia 






ill 



V 



Clydenedia Williams 

"Miss Crescent" 
Kingsland, Georgia 




Lynn Bradley 

"Miss Zeta Phi Beta" 

Savannah, Georgia 



Carolyn Patterson 

"Miss Gamma Sigma Sigma" 

Savannah, Georgia 



|ff""1' M *«JBi 'w"»"ii— i 




Anthomeze Bentley 

"Miss Marching Tiger" 

Covington, Georgia 



Margie Smith 

"Miss SNEA" 

Statesboro, Georgia 



GREETINGS 




ALUMNI 







itmi><H^ 




MISS NATIONAL ALUMNI 




Mrs. Sara Reynolds Ellison, Class of 1959, has 
been selected as Miss Savannah State College Na- 
tional Alumni from the Washington, D. C. Chap- 
ter. Mrs. Ellison is currently teaching Business 
at McKinley High School where she also serves 
as Chairman of the Business Education Depart- 
ment. Mrs. Ellison is married to Leroy M. Ellison, 
Jr., and th"y are the parents of two children. 




Pictured above are several of the Phone-A-Pledge participants who 
helped to make the project a success. Left to right, Daniel Washing- 
ton, President of National Alumni Association; Robert Bess, Develop- 
ment Officer; John P. Rousakis, Mayor of Savannah; Dr. Prince A. 
Jackson, Jr., President of SSC; Willie Chambers, City AJderman; and 
Henton Thomas, Chairman of the Phone-A-Pledge Drive. The Phone- 
A-Pledge drive netted in access of $15,000.00. 



Alumni Homecoming Weekend 1971 





"MISS FOOTBALL" 

Rose Copeland 

Senior 

New York, New York 




Come in 
and meet the 
Savannah State 
College Family 

4 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 31404 

"The College By The Sea" 



This BULLETIN is presented in order to give an 
overview of the Savannah State College Family - its 
faculty, student body, facilities, academic program 
and its activities. COME IN AND SEE WHAT WE 
ARE ALL ABOUT! ! ! 



MAY, 1971 



GENERAL INFORMATION BULLETIN 

Savannah State College 

Savannah, Georgia 



. . . in perspective 

This BULLETIN is presented in order to give an overview of 
Savannah State College • - its facilities, its academic program and 
its activities. If it has not already been planned, very soon it will be 
necessary for students and parents to decide where the student 
will continue his education. 

The importance of this' decision cannot be over emphasized. 
Why not supplement the information contained in this BULLETIN 
by visiting the campus and by talking with present and former 
students of SSC? 



Table of Contents 



From The 
SSC Belie 



Roof- 



Cu 



ulurr 



General Informatu 



of Business 4 

of Education 5 

of Humanities 6.7 

of Social Science 8 

of Technical Science 9 

of Natural Science 10-11 

Athletics ^2 

Graduate Program ^3 

Campus Life 14 

Family Tree 15 



Inside Back Co 



General Information Staff 

President Prince A. lackson, |r 

Dir. ol Public Relations Wilton C Scott 

Editor Miss juanita lackson 

Alumni Secretary Robert Bess 

Photographer Robert Mobley 



The Savannah Stale College Bulletin is published yearly in October 
December, (4 March 



OUR PRESIDENT 



Leader of definite action . 

understanding deeds 

respeci and sincerity 

loyal school spirit 

nor - The Held nl the family 






liive advice 
The Hp,k( <il the Family 



Dr Prince A lackson. 



GREETINGS TO ALL PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS: 

On behalf of the entire Savannah State College family may I extend 
greetings to all of you who are prospective members of the college family. 

We consider ourselves a family because we are all working toward a 
common goal and that is to achieve academic excellence. 

We are a family of diverse backgrounds, and approximately 2,700 in num- 
ber. 

Here at SSC we take special pride in the matchless natural beauty of our 
campus, and in our beautifully designed modern buildings, because we 
know that these will lend inspiration to those who have gathered here lo 
grasp the opportunity lo acquire the basic skills, attitudes, habits, ap- 
preciations, and understandings requisite for the good life. 

We feel that SSC today is a challenging place to spend four of the most 
important years of your life. It is challenging because it has an excellent 
faculty, a growing student body, and excellent facilities for study, residence 
and relaxation. 

Students enjoy life at our college. It is a friendly campus where each in- 
dividual is respected and where members of the college family strive to 
work, live and play together. 

WE INVITE YOU TO IOIN THE SSC FAMILY AND SPEND FOUR OF THE 
MOST PROFITABLE YEARS OF YOUR LIFE. 



Prince A. lackson, |r. 
President 




FROM THESE ROOTS 



From a meager beginning in 1890 of a faculty of 4, an 
enrollment of 8, and one building, Savannah State College 
has grown to a 5-year unit of the University System o 
Georgia with 97 full-time faculty members, 22 part-time 
faculty members, approximately 2500 undergraduate 
students, 98 graduate students and a physical plant con- 
sisting of 31 buildings. 

Savannah State College today, is a five-year accredited 
college of arts and sciences, teacher education, business ad- 
ministration, and technology. A graduate program in 
elementary education was initiated during the summer o 
1968. 

The College is located in the historic city of Savannah, the 
first capital of Georgia, and the second largest city in 
Georgia. 

Savannah State College offers courses leading to the 
master's degree in elementary education, and courses 
leading to the baccalaureate degree with a major in each of 
these areas of concentration: accounting, biology, chemistry, 
civil technology, dietetics and institutional management' 
economics, elementary education, electronics technology! 
English, general business administration, mathematics' 
mechanical technology, secondary education, secretarial 
science, social sciences, textiles and clothing, and criminal 
justice. 

Teacher education programs in the following fields have 
been approved by the Georgia Division of Teacher 
Education and Certification: elementary education secon- 
dary education, with a concentration in business education 
English, French, general science, industrial arts education' 
mathematics, social studies, Spanish, trade and industrial 
education, grades 1-12; art education, health and physical 
education, music education and teacher-librarian 





. (hat each sludent should be trealed as an individual, recognizing 
lhat the educational development of individuals varies widely. This 
means that each student should be guided, encouraged, and educated 
individually At SSC the only limitations which exist for students are 
those which are imposed by his own ability. 

lhat each student should be instilled with a never-satisfied sense of 
curiosity which will lead him down established paths of knowledge 
and into the avenues of the unknown and unexplored. 

..thai the liberally educated person must be able to communicate his 



wledge tc 
writing. 



thoughts and ideas, both verbally and 



that intellectual snobbery has no place in 

educated man realizes that the more he learm 
learned. 



ur society. The liberally 
the more Ihere is to be 



that a student's mind is sharpened and seasoned through com- 
petition, stimulated by contact with scholars, and challenged by 
association with other academically-oriented young people. 



DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



A high school sludent who is preparing for a career in business via 
the i ollege roule should direct his efforts toward becoming proficient 
in mathematics and English at the high school level. Proficiency in 
mathematics allows him to make quick use of quantitalive tools in 
solving business problems Proficiency in English permits him to com- 
municate his ideas The ability to do both are significant attributes of 
business personnel 

Though not essential, since the college offers the necessary fun- 
damentals, a sludent may also take such courses as bookkeeping, 
shorthand, and other business sub|ecls which are offered at his respec- 
tive high school. Such an approach, at least, allows the student to make 
a tentative judgemenl as to whether or not he is favorably inclined 
toward specific subiecl areas. It should be pointed out unequivocally, 
however, that business training, on the college level, embraces much 
more than typewriting and shorthand. 



Some positions, lor which training 
College is designed to prepare sluden 



bus 



Enlrepreneurs 


Bookkeepe 


Business Managers 


Teachers o 


\. i ountants 


Salesmen 



at Savannah Stale 



Economists 
Secretaries 
Slenographe 



Typists 



To realize Ihe aims of a person desiring framing in business. Savannah 
Slate College's Division ol Business oilers courses leading to the degree 
of bachelor of science and a terminal two-year program leading to a 
certificate of proficiency. 

A sludent who pursues a degree in business at this institution may 
concentrate his efforts in one of ihe following areas: (I) General 
Business Administration, (2) Accounting, (J) Economics, (4) Sec- 
retarial Science, and (5) the Program for Teachers of Business Educa- 
tion In each ol the above curricula, consideration has been given to 
the course requirements for graduate sludy 




DIVISION OF EDUCATION 



i i ?! 



I ■ f;; aii 



i i 




The Division of Education al Savannah Stale College is a member of the 
Association of Colleges for Teachers Education. It offers twelve curricula in teacher 
preparation and a program of basic training for teacher-librarians. These programs 
are approved by the Slate Department of Education. This means satisfactory com- 
pletion of any program brings automatic certification in the field of study pursued. 

A person majoring in Education al Savannah Stale College is the concern of every 
division and department of the College; therefore, the resources and facilities--as 
well as the interest and efforts of the entire institution, are al his disposal 

Aside from a strong academic classroom program in general, specialized, and 
progressional education, the teaching major at Savannah State College has rich, 
varied, and meaningful laboratory experience which brings one into constant con- 
tact with children and youth 



COLLEGE-WIDE PROVISION FOR TEACHER EDUCATION 

The Division comprises three departments: the Department of Elementary 
Education; the Department of Heallh, Physical Education and Recreation; and Ihe 
Department of Secondary Education. The preparation of teachers is, however, a 
college-wide commitment. Because every division and department at the College is 
involved in training teachers in some subject matter field, this function engages the 
constant interest and efforts, staff resources, and facilities of Ihe entire institution 









DIVISION 



Savannah State belii 
person 



literati 



, drama, 



s that each stude 
i to enjoy hims 
and art. 



it should be encouraged to j 



« 



nd to exp 



elf through 



The Division of Humamtie 
transforming Ihe individual j 
for realizing this aim is that 
been recorded in literature, 
studenl deepens his appreci 
powers, and incorporates hii 
thought and felt. 



as its name implies, is concerned primarily with 
o a human and humane person The technique 
serious study of the human heritage as it has 
iusic, art, and philosophy. In this manner the 
on, sharpens his intellect, enhances his critical 
elf in the mainstream of the best lhat has been 



The dii 



I Hun 



Tiaioring in English, 
who elect to teach become 



provides opportunil 
music, the fine arts, French, and Spanish. The c 
designed also to prepare teachers. Thus studenl 
purveyors of the humanistic tradition The Coll 
meeting the national need for persons trained i 
linguists and/or teachers, students have an unu 

Slate College. A strong faculty in modern languages, in addition to a recently 
installed laboratory assures the students the means of thoroughly preparing 
themselves in this area. 



foreign languages. As futur. 
lal opportunity at Sav 



ART 



Students who ha 
ewards. Some hav 
njoying the 



s studied art at Savannah Stale College have reaped man 
won large sums of money in art competition. Some ar 

; of exhibiting their art at qualified galleries. One formf 
student is in Ihe Pentagon in Washington, D C, where he is using th 
knowledge of art acquired here. Others have successful careers as teachers < 
art. And, still others have gone on to more advanced studies in schoo 
throughout the country. 



The Art Department is prepared and eager to help students in many ways 
he rewards can be plentiful for those who are seeking; and when they 
cquire a Bachelor of Science Degree in Art Education, will find that rewards 
ther than salary, position, dignify, or fame await them. They may learn, 
Itimately to enrich their lives with things which do not pass so quickly, for, to 
now and to be able to en|oy knowing is indeed a divine reward. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



The Department of Modern Languages offers instruction in three languages: 
French, German, and Spanish. The primary aim of the members of the Depart- 
ment is lo leach Ihe student to understand, speak, read and write these 
languages so that he may communicate with others who speak them. This 



UMANITIES 



instruction is carried on in daily recitations in the classroom and also in a 
modern twenty booth laboratory where the student can increase his 
proticiency by listening to and repeating exercises of various types especially 
prepared tor this purpose- For students who wish to develop more than an 
elementary proficiency in French or Spanish, the Department offers courses 
leading to a minor in either language. I! also offers courses leading lo Ihe 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Education with a concentration in French or 
Spanish. 

Outside of the field of education, a person with a major in foreign language 
can find employment in several areas. First, there is the area of organizations 
more or less internalional in character. Because of the nature of its work, (here 
is almost a constant demand at the United Nations Headquarters for men and 
women who are proficient in foreign languages. 




In the area of music, the Department of Fine Arts at Savannah Stale College 
offers a major program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music 
Education and two minor programs-one for prospective teachers in the 
secondary schools and a nonteaching program. All of the curricula have been 
approved by the three national accrediling agencies-The Music Teachers 
National Association, the National Association of Schools of Music and the 
Music Educators National Conference, as well as by the State Board ot Cer- 
tification and the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. 

One of the most important operations in this department is the awarding 
each year of a number of scholarships, called grants-in-aid, which are given to 
capable, worthy applicants in all organizations upon recommendation of the 
department Depending upon the aptitude, academic standing and financial 
need recommendation of the student, these awards are sufficient at times to 
provide tuition for a full year. Grants are made, however, only to applicants 
who file the necessary forms, are recommended by the department, and are 
approved by the Committee on Scholarships. Recipients, encouraged to apply 
in the spring, are usually notified during the summer, well in advance of the 
opening of the Fall Quarter. 

The present facilities provide space for classes, organizational rehearsals, 
practice periods, listening room, and offices Pianos are provided for practice, 
and band instruments are provided, both without charge Complete uniforms, 
robes, stoles, and blazers are also furnished lo members of Ihe various 



For any additional information concerning the Department, please feel free 
to address your inquiries to Dr Coleridge A. Braithwaite, Chairman, Depart- 
ment of Fine Arts, Savannah State College. 




M\U[)\\ 




DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 



The Division of Social Sciences offers Iwo major programs for per- 
sons interested in the social sciences. Curriculum I leads to the B.S 
degree in social sciences with a concentration in history. Curriculum II 
leads to Ihe B.S. degree in the social sciences with a concentration in 
sociology leading to the professional study of social work. 

Persons who plan to teach social studies in the secondary school 
should enroll in the Teacher Education Program and pursue the B.S. 
degree in Education with a concentration in the social sciences. 

Curriculum I is designed for persons interested in careers in: law, 
government, diplomatic service, general research, Young Men's 
Christian Association, and Urban League work. 

Curriculum II is designed for persons interested in careers as social 
workers, probation officers, vocational counselors, camp counselors, 
employment interviewers, juvenile court workers, welfare fund 
workers, and immigration service workers. 




DIVISION OF TECHNICAL SCIENCES 



The Division ot Technical Sciences seeks to accomplish two ma|or 
objectives: (1) to provide students with suificient specialized training 
in engineering technology, technical home economics and industrial 
teacher education to meet entry employment requirements in these 
areas; and (2) to provide students with a broad liberal education which 
includes study in the general areas of communications, mathematics, 
the natural sciences, the behavioral and social sciences and the fine 
arts. 

In order to achieve the above objectives, the Division of Technical 
Science is organized into two departments which otter curricula 
leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. The Department of En- 
gineering Technology offers programs in building construction technol- 
ogy, electronics technology, industrial arts education, mechanical 
technology, and trade industrial education. 

The Department of Home Economics affords opportunity for 
students to major in dietetics and institutional management. This four- 
year program is approved by the American Dietetic Association 

This pre-professional dietetic course which leads to the Bachelor of 
Science degree prepares the students for immediate internship. The in- 
ternship is a required fifth-year of on-the-job training. The twelve- 
month internship may be taken in hospital dietetics, medical dietetics, 
food clinic dietetics, public health and social agencies, college in- 
stitutional food administration. 




—— W 



DIVISION OF 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 



The aims ot the Department of Biology are: (I) to provide for all 
students that knowledge which is essential to an understanding of the 
cal basis of living; (2) to train persons adequately through the 
media of advanced courses for entry into the professional study of den- 
tistry, medicine, and nursing; and (3) to prepare persons to teach the 
biological sciences in the secondary school or to continue study on the 
graduate level. 

The Biology Department is proud of its achievements during the last 
several years. It takes great pride in reviewing the records of some of its 




JATURAL SCIENCES 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS 



The Mathematics curriculum and courses are being continually 
revised to keep in step with the recommendations released by the 
School Mathematics Croup in 1960. 

The objectives of the department are not only to prepare better 
teachers of Mathematics and Physics, but also to provide them with the 
courses necessary to do further study in areas like linear programming 
and computing, statistical research, electronics, guided missiles, 
engineering, mathematics for various phases of industry research, ac- 
tuary science and over 20 branches of governmental services. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 



The Department of Chemistry has grown by leaps and bounds in the 
past few years. The teaching staff, teaching space and equipment have 
been increased one hundred per cent. 

The Department has been quite successful in obtaining funds from 
Chemical Societies and the National Science Foundation to sponsor 
several significant programs such as the In-Service for Teachers of 
Chemistry and General Science in secondary education and the Sum- 
mer Science Program for selected high school students. 

The Department of Chemistry provides basic training for higher 
education-work leading to the Master of Science and Ph.D. degree. In 
addition to this it provides all the chemistry needed in pre-nursing, pre- 
dental and pre-medical education 

The curriculum has been revised so that the student will receive a 
substantial number of courses in mathematics, physics, and biology 
which will aid him in becoming a better Chemist. 




ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Savannah Stale has a well-rounded athletic program, both inter- 
collegiate and intramural. I he athletic activities .ire carefully integrated 
into the overall edut at ion program I here is inten ollegiate ( om pet it ion 
m football, track, swimming and grill 

rhe college lias an excellent alhlelic plant — Wilpy-Willcox Physi 
Education Complex, athletic Held, tennis courts, and I iger stadium. 

The Department ot Health and Physical Education conducts a well- 
rounded inlramural program of seasonal activities for men and women 
in Wiley-Willcox Complex Utilizing group games and various sports for 
their lull educational and health values, the program features football, 
basketball, track, lennrs, boxing, golf, baseball, Softball, volleyball, field 
hockey, swimming and badminton 

In intercollegiate alhlelics, Savannah Stale College is a member of the 
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, and maintains com- 
petition in all sports sponsored by the conference. The College also 
holds membership in Iwo national athletic associations, NCAA and 
NAIA 






GRADUATE PROGRAM 



The Master of Science degree program is designed to further the professional 
growth and competency of persons choosing a career in public education. 
Specific skills and competencies; to expand their professional and cultural 
backgrounds; to further their knowledge, appreciation, and to deepen their 
appreciation and performance in scientific investigation. 

For admission to the graduate program an applicant must comply with the 
general requirements prescribed by the University System. In addition, the ap- 
plicant (1) must have earned a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited 
college; (2) must hold or become eligible for, a professional certificate in the 
area in which graduate study is contemplated; (3) must have earned a 
minimum score of 450 on the National Teachers Common Examinations; (4) 
must have submitted two official transcripts of all courses attempted at the un- 
dergraduate level as well as previous graduate study; and (5) must have 
received the approval of the Chairman of the Division of Education. 

The graduate program in education consists of sixty quarter hours. These in- 
clude twenty hours of professional education and research, twenty-five hours 
in a specialized field, and fifteen hours of electives. The fifteen hours of elec- 
tives are taken either in subject matter courses or professional education, or 
distributed between these two subject areas, subject to the needs and wishes 



of the student and to the approval of the advisor(s) 
The program breakdown is as follows 

20 hours-Professional Education and Research 

25 hours-Specialized Content 

15 hours-Electives (Professional, subject matter, or both) 

Upon admission to the graduate program, Ihe student is assigned an advisor 
who guides Ihe student in developing his program. Not later than mid-point in 
his program, or by Ihe lime that thirty quarter hours have been earned, the 
student is required to tile an application for admission to candidacy. 

Approval of that application is a certification that the student has made 
satisfactory progress to lhal poinl and thai he is being granted candidacy ad- 
mission subjecl to the conditions lhal follow: 

Certification by his advisors lhal (a) he had made satisfactoty progress in all 
courses pursued; (b) lhal he has received a satisfactory score on Ihe National 
Examinations; and (c) thai he has earned an undergraduate degree from an ap- 
proved institution in a program which meets the approval of the Division of 
Education of Ihe College. 



M 




Living quarters al Savannah State College are 
the ideal place lor study, rest and meeting with 
friends Student dormitories are well-kept, clean, 
.mil modern On campus socials, cultural 
.mil intramural sports all enhance the at 
mospher a i heerful i ampus life, 

On campus dormitories include Cj 
Hubert, Lester, Locketle and a new five- 




CAMPUS 
LIFE 







iwunc -«ll ■-■,,- K , t ,, ,■ t y lvuku juuvu h STAni'iM add inrvvi /• ;,;;:. 

.. v .- ,. , ;- -t' 1 wjM t aooo darcher, , 

•A 32QQQ -■'•'' ■ 



fiQ°°0XAMPHIl 

-v, J2000 
BUSINESS 50000 



THE FAMILY TREE 



If you are considering applying lor admission to Savannah State 
College you might have some questions about the people who will be 
sharing undergraduate life with you. 

Savannah State College is an academic meeting ground for hundreds 
of persons of all ages: typical Americans predominantly Black - the 
teenager just out of high school; the professor jusl out of grad school, 
the commuter who might be working his way through college; the 
educator who has devoted years of his life to educating others; the 
housewife who has decided to further her education; the military 
veteran who realizes how much a college education means - the un- 
der-achiever who has decided to take advantage of SSC's resources in 
helping him to belter himself: all pursuing the common goal: 
EDUCATION. 

Savannah State College has highly qualified administrative officers 
and staff personnel; a faculty composed of 97 full-time educators and a 
student body consisting ol approximately 2,500 undergraduates and 98 
graduate students. 




THE CURRICULUM 



3. The 



The formal instructional program of Savannah State College com- 
prises the general curriculum, areas of major and minor concentration, 
and terminal curricula. The program is organized within the following 
divisions and departments: 

1. The Division of Business Administration 

2. The Division of Education 

Department of Elementary Education 

Department of Secondary Education 

Departmenl of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

Division of Humanities 

Department of English 

Department of Fine Arts 

Department of Modern Languages 

4. The Division of Natural Sciences 

Departmenl of Biology 

Department of Chemistry 

Department of Mathematics and Physics 

5. The Division of Social Sciences 

6. The Division of Technical Sciences 

Department of Engineering Technology 
Department of Home Economics 

7. The Division of Home Sludy 



THE GENERAL CURRICULUM 



The General Education Program proposes to provide opportunities 
for all students to acquire the basic skills, attitudes, habits, ap- 
preciations and understandings requisite for the good life. 

It seeks to guarantee to all students competency in communication 
and thinking It further proposes to orient students toward and to sen- 
sitize them to human and universal good and to the worth and dignity 
of every human being. 

Al this college the general curriculum is preoccupied with the major 
disciplines that 



1. Acquaint the student 
human experience, 



'ilh broad areas of knowledge and 



2. Give them an understanding of themselves, their culture and 
physical environment; 

3. Provide the students with a sound intellectual and moral foun- 
dation upon which character and professional and vocational 
opportunity may rest. 



This program is concerned generally with freshman and sophomore 
students. However, some attention is devoted to students on the junior 
and senior level of their intellectual maturation. In this respect, general 
education is an integral phase of the experience of all students who 
matriculate for a degree at the College. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION SCHOLARSHIP 

Each candidate for admission is required lo make formal application A limited number of special scholarships are available to selected 

and thereafter submit such credentials as may be needed to support students who meet the required standards of scholastic merit, high 

the application. Admissions correspondence should be addressed to character, general promise, and superior achievement in certain 

the Director of Admissions. The application form with instructions may specific areas of the college program, 

be obtained by writing the Director of Admissions The aim of the National Defense Student Loan Program is to create at 

A student applying for admission is required to pay a non-refundable American Colleges and Universities loan funds from which needy 

application fee of $10.00. This fee will not be accredited toward other students may borrow to complete their higher education. Students in- 

expenses. The fee should accompany the application. terested in National Defense Loan Funds should write the Dean of 

Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and who present Students, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia 31404. 
evidence of good character, sound health, and an interest in a specific 
course of study are eligible for admission. 

ESTIMATED GENERAL EXPENSES 

SELF HELP OPPORTUNITIES 

for One Academic Year ol Three Quarters 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet college expenses , 

through part-time employment, provided they maintain satisfactory Note Fees remitted by mail should be sent by money order, cashier s 

scholastic averages. These work opportunities include such ,obs as check, or certified check payable to SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE. Fees 

clerical and stenographic work, and skilled work in trades and main- paid in person will be accepted in cash, money order, cashier s check, 

tenance or certified check. 

Per Quarter Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $105.00 $315.00 

Health Fee 10.00 30.00 

Student Activity Fee 1500 45.00 

(voluntary) 

Total Charges-Day Students "0.00 390.00 

Room, Board and Laundry 291.00 873.00 

Total Charges-Boarding Student 421.00 1263.00 

Non-Residents of the State of Ga. Matriculation Fee 
is $135.00 per quarter. 



The above table includes basic fees only. Other charges are assessed 
where applicable. All matriculation charges, board, room rent, or other 
charges are subject to change at the end of any quarter. 

Normal cost of books and supplies approximates $30.00 per quarter. 
Students are required to secure all books, supplies, and tools necessary 
for satisfactory completion of the courses for which they are enrolled. 



All fees are due and payable at the lime of registration Students are 
required to meet financial obligations promptly. Persons granted 
scholarships or work-aid assistance will be duly notified in writing, and 
money accrued from these sources will be credited to their accounts. 

Veterans coming to Savannah Slate College should bring with them 
sufficient funds to pav all fees as indicated on the Schedule of Fees. 



^y