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Full text of "Savannah State College Bulletin--Special Issues"



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K H. GORDON LIBRARY 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
STATE COLLEGE BRANCH 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 31404 | 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/savannahstateco196570sava 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 






MISS SAVANNAH STATE COL- 
LEGE — Verlene Patricia Brown is 
a Senior from Metter, Georgia, ma- 
joring in Social Science. 



HOMECOMING 

1965 



EDITION 



1965 



**T> 



REMEMBER WHEN" 



Youth lives on hope, old age on remembrance. — Unknown 



When other lips and other hearts 
Their tales of love shall tell, 

In language whose excess imparts 
The power they feel so well, 

There may, perhaps, in such a scene 
Some recollection be 

Of days that have as happy been 

And you'll remember me. — Alfred Bunn 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE BULLETIN 

President Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations and Editor-in-Chief Wilton C. Scott 

Issue Editor Carolyn R. Screen 

Feature Editor J. Randolph Fisher 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Volume XIX October, 1965 Number 1 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly in October, December, February, 
March, April, and May by Savannah State College. Second Class mail privileges authorized at 
Savannah, Georgia. 



PRESIDENT'S 
MESSAGE 




Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 



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ALBANY STATE COLLEGE 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



UrUM^n»% 




Albany State College is, indeed, pleased to extend greetings to Savannah State College on the occasion 
of Homecoming; for a very close relationship exists between these two sister institutions. 

Savannah State College has compiled a splendid record of accomplishments regarding significant 
contributions to the educational development of the United States. We congratulate you on this record 
of magnificence and wish for you continued success in all of your endeavors. Certainly, Albany State 
College, as a loyal friend and colleague of many years, is anxious to cooperate with you in all matters 
of importance. 

As for the football games, the good reason that brings us together on this day, we are only desirous 
that the best team emerge victorious. We know that the game and the affairs incident thereto will 
strengthen our bond of mutual admiration and concern. 

You have our very best wishes and highest esteem. 

Most cordially yours, 
THOMAS MILLER JENKINS 




How mvfully sweet are the echoes that start 

When memory plays an old tune on the heart. — Ella Cook 





O. W. O'Neal, Head Footbal 
Coach at Albany State College 



Miss Albany State, 
Gloria Webb 



ALBANY STATE COLLEGE'S "GOLDEN RAMS" 





A place in thy memory, Dearest! 
Is all that I claim: 



To pause and look back when thou hearest 
The sound of my name. — Gerald Griffin 





MISS SENIOR. Minnie Thompson is majoring 
in English, and a native of Ocilla, Georgia. 



MISS JUNIOR. Yvonne Lecounte is majoring 
in English, and a native of Riceboro, Georgia. 




MISS SOPHOMORE. Lula Lecounte is major- 
ing in Home Economics and is a native of 
Riceboro, Georgia. 




MISS FRESHMAN. Helen Peters is majoring 

in Elementary Education, and a native of 

Savannah, Georgia. 




MISS WRIGHT HALL. Elizabeth Simpkin is a 
Sophomore majoring in Social Science. 







MISS SPHINX. Marcia O'Brian is a 

Freshman from Savannah, Georgia, 

majoring in Social Science. 



MISS ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA. Pa- 
tricia Ryan is a Senior majoring in 
Elementary Education. 



MISS LAMPADO. Alyne Eady is a 
Sophomore. 




MISS SIGMA GAMMA RHO. Bettye 

J. Coleman is a Senior majoring in 

Business Education. 




MISS KAPPA. Jacquelyn Ryles is a 
Sophomore majoring in English. 




: 





MISS ZETA PHI BETA. Thomasina 

Jenkins is a Senior majoring in 

Elementary Education. 



MISS NEW GIRLS DORMITORY II. 

Juanita Wright is a Junior major- 
ing in Social Science. 



MISS YMCA. Patricia Gordon is a 

Junior majoring in Elementary 

Education. 






t 




IHSS SAVANNAH STATE COL- 
LEGE. Verlene Patricia Brown is a 
Senior majoring in Sociology. 




MISS BUSINESS. Martha A. Smith 
is a Senior majoring in Accounting. 



CISS TIGER'S ROAR. Lillian Tay- 
is a Sophomore from Glennville, 
Georgia, majoring in Business 
Education. 




MISS TECHNICAL SCIENCES. 

Mary Little is a Freshman from 
Eatonton. Georgia, majoring in 
Industrial Arts. 




MISS DELTA. Lillie Kyles is a 
Senior majoring in English. 




MISS OMEGA. Iris Wright is a 
Senior majoring in Social Science. 




MISS SENIOR. Minnie Merritt is 
majoring in English. 



■4 



\ 







MISS SNEA. Gladys Medlock is a 

Senior majoring in Elementary 

Education. 






ALBERT E. FRAZIER, 

Athletic Director 




OUR COACHING STAFF— Left to right: Richard K. Washington, Defensive Coach; Leo 
Richardson, Head Coach; Frank Simmons, Line Coach; and John Mason, Offensive 

Coach. 



1965 Savannah State College Tigers and Coaching Staff 





VARSITY FOOTBALL ROSTER 1965 



Numbers Name 

Blue White Ends 

83 Headen, James Lee 

85 Mitchell, John 
80 Paul, Allen 

88 Singleton, Harold 

Tackles 
79 Brown, Judson 

75 Handy, Jack 

77 McDowell, Billy F. 

70 Rutland, Charles 

73 Williams, Foney 

Guards 
67 Bell, Robert 

66 Brown, James 
60 Flowers, Melvin 

64 Gold, Barry 

69 Kelly, Steven 
62 Rhodes, Johnny 

Centers 

86 Brown, John 

55 Graham, Horace 

57 Simmons, Willie 

Smith, Charlie 

Halfbacks 
42 Davis, Dennis 

44 Ellis, Frank 

22 Ferguson, Charles 

29 George, William 
46 Piatt, Charlie 
25 Randall, Israel 

20 Witherspoon, Lewis 

Fullbacks 
33 Bell, Frank 

30 Blakely, Joseph 
49 Gaulden, William 
35 Spencer, Robert 

Quarterbacks 
12 Brown, Early 

10 Ford, Vaughn 

14 Fulton, Walter 

17 Oliver, Lawrence 

President Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

Head Coach Leo Richardson 

Statistician Roscoe Edwards 

Manager George Manton 

Assistant Felix Bell 



Age Ht. Wt. School Hometown 

Dillon 
Savannah 
De Funiak 
Savannah 

Savannah 
Savannah 
Anderson 
Winter Garden 
Anniston 

Vidalia 

Savannah 

Savannah 

Mount Pleasant 

Miami 

Savannah 

De Funiak 
Miami 
Frogmore 
Savannah 

Miami 

Savannah 

Newark 

Fernandina 

Goulds 

Pascagola 

Charleston 

Gainesville 
Philadelphia 
Fitzgerald 
Lake City 

Charleston 
Jacksonville 
Jacksonville 
Philadelphia 

Chairman, Athletic Committee Dr. E. J. Dean 

Director of Public Relations Wilton C. Scott 

Athletic Director Albert E. Frazier 

Assistant Coaches John Mason, Frank Simmons, and Richard Washington 

Trainer Robert Matlock 



18 


5'11" 


215 


Gordon 


19 


5'10" 


155 


Johnson 


17 


6'2" 


210 


Tovoli 


20 


6'2" 


165 


Tompkins 


18 


6'3" 


190 


Johnson 


19 


5'11" 


215 


Johnson 


18 


6'0" 


235 


Westside 


19 


6'3" 


235 


Drew 




6'1" 


225 


Cobbs 


21 


5'7" 


170 


Dickerson 


19 


5'9" 


165 


Tompkins 


19 


511" 


185 


Tompkins 


19 


5'1" 


190 


Lans 


19 


6'0" 


190 


Northwestern 


18 


5'11" 


220 


Beach 


19 


5' 11" 


180 


Tovoli 


21 


5'7" 


190 


Mays 


20 


5'9y 2 " 


198 


St. Helena 


18 


6'0" 


180 


Johnson 


18 


5' 10" 


175 


Mays 


21 


5' 10" 


175 


Johnson 


20 


5'10" 


175 


Central 


18 


5'6" 


165 


Peak High 


20 


5'11" 


185 


Mays 


18 


5'10" 


169 


Carver 


18 


5' 11" 


175 


Brown 


19 


5'11W 


185 


Butler 


23 


5' 11" 


190 


Simon Gratz 


19 


5' 11" 


174 


Monitor 


19 


6'0" 


200 


Jones 


18 


6'2" 


179 


C. A. Brown 


18 


5'9" 


170 


Gilbert 


18 


6'4" 


175 


Anderson 


18 


5' 11" 


175 


Simon Gratz 



** *& 



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1 






Halfback Frank Ellis 




Center Horace Graham 




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Quarterback 
Lawrence Oliver 




Halfback Israel Randall 





Fullback Frank Bell 




Guard Robert Bell 



End Harold Singleton 



Guard Johnny Rhodes 



Guard James Brown 



10 




C. G. Wiley was president of SSC. 

The first regular summer school was conducted at SSC. 

Dr. Benjamin F. Hubert was president of SSC. 

The high school and normal departments were discontinued and the 
school became a four-year college, offering the bachelor's degree in agri- 
culture and home economics. 

The College began to offer degree programs with majors in English, 
the natural sciences, social sciences, and business administration. 

The College served as the state land-grant institution for Negroes. 

James A. Colston was president of SSC. 

Dr. W. K. Payne was president of SSC. 

The Regents of the University System of Georgia changed the name of 
the College from Georgia State College to Savannah State College. 





THE FOLLOWING BUILDINGS WERE BUILT: 




Adams Hall 

Willie Powell Laboratory 

Morgan Hall 

Willcox Gymnasium 

Herty Hall 

Camilla Hubert Hall 

The Information Cabin 

The Community House 

Wright Hall 

The Library 

The Technical Science Buildim 



11 



THE BAND 



Your old men shall dream 
dreams, your young men shall 
see visions. — Old Testament 



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The SSC Marching Tigers. 




The Concert Band. 



SSC's Cheerleaders. 




CAMPUS SCENES 




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Girls Dormitory 



12 



As the dew to the blossom, the bi 
As the scent to the rose, are thest 



s to me 



Amelia Welb^ 








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A side view of the recently completed New Classroom Building 




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- 



& 



-a** « T sat 

Annex to Wiley Gym. 




The Technical Sciences Building. 



13 



ACTIVITIES 

Who hath not saved some trifling thing. 

More prized than jewels rare, 
A faded flower, a broken ring, 

A tress of golden hair. — Howarth 




The First Family. 







A group of SSC Tigers view the game. 





Contestants for "Miss Savannah State College," 1965-6( 

Left to right: Verlene Patricia Brown, the winner; Iri 

Wright, Betty Gordon, Lillie Kyles, and Alice Murray. 




A happy group of SSC students after the game betweer 

Savannah State College and Lane College. Savannah 

State College won the game. 



Physical Education students shake hands 
before tennis match. 



14 




ACTIVITIES 

Still o'er those scenes my memory wakes, 
And fondly broods with miser care; 

Time but the impression stronger makes, 

As streams their channels deeper wear. — Burns 



Students relaxing in Student Center. 





SC's Radio Program announcers dic- 
,te and record materials to be pre- 
nted on weekly WSOK radio station, 
'hey are (1-r) Barbara Gray, 
acquelyn Mack, and Marva DeLoach. 



A group of gleeful students enjoy the 
game at Grayson Stadium. 



ALUMNI 



"Miss Technical Sciences," Mary Lit- 
tle, is shown in a class in Engineering 
Drawing. Miss Little is a Freshman 
from Eatonton, Georgia, majoring in 
Industrial Arts. 




3r. Howard Jordan, Jr., receives a check from members of the Medical Auxiliary for student assistance under the National 
>efense Act. Left to right: Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., Mrs. K. W. Moore, Mrs. H. M. Collier, Jr., and Mrs. E. J. Smith. 



15 



ALUMNI 



Long, long be my heart with 
such memories filVd 

Like the vase in which roses 
have once been distilVd, 

You may break, you may 
sliatter the vase if you will, 

But the scent of the roses will 

hang round it still. — Thomas Moore 




Ralph E. Roberson, a chemistry 
teacher at Evans County High School, 
Claxton, Georgia, received a Shell 
Merit Fellowship for advanced train- 
ing at Cornell University this summer. 



MISS 

NATIONAL 

ALUMNI 

Mrs. Leila R. Butler 




MISS NATIONAL ALUMNI AND ATTENDANTS. Left to right: Mr 
Martha Johnson, a teacher at Bartow Elementary School; "Mi; 
National Alumni," Mrs. Leila R. H. Butler, a teacher at Hubert J 
High School; and Mrs. L. Orene Hall, retired. 




Ronald Rivers (center) receives a check from Alumnus 
Robert Young, Principal of Harris Area Trade School 
(right), on behalf of Mu Phi Chapter, Omega Psi Phi 
Fraternity, Inc., to matriculate at Savannah State Col- 
lege, while Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., President of SSC, 

looks on. 




Lee Mark Daniel, an honor 
graduate of SSC, has ac- 
cepted the position of Dean 
of Men at Bethune-Cook- 
man College, D a y t o n a 
Beach, Florida. 




Alfonso Frazier received 

the M.A. degree recently 

from Atlanta University. 



16 




Frank Tharpe, Chairman 

Committee on Homecoming: 

Activities 



COMMITTEE ON 

INTERCOLLEGIATE 

ATHLETICS 



DR. ELMER J. DEAN, Chairman 

MR. C. VERNON CLAY 

MRS. ELLA FISHER 

MR. W. L. JOHNSON, JR. 

MR. JOHN McGLOCKTON 

MR. FRANK ELLIS 

MR. JACK HARDY 



COMMITTEE ON HOMECOMING ACTIVITIES 



MR. FRANK THARPE, Chairman 

MR. EUGENE JACKSON, Vice Chairman 

MRS. GERALDINE ABERNATHY 

MR. FELIX ALEXIS 

MRS. MARTHA AVERY 

MRS. ALBERTHA BOSTON 

MRS. MADELINE DIXON 

MRS. ELLA FISHER 

MR. J. RANDOLPH FISHER 

MR. SAMUEL GILL 

MR. PHILLIP HAMPTON 

MRS. FARNESE LUMPKIN 

MRS. LUETTA MILLEDGE 

MR. PRINCE MITCHELL 

MR. ROBERT MOBLEY 

MR. WILEY PERDUE 

MISS MINNIE THOMPSON 

MRS. CAROLYN R. SCREEN 



MR. W. C. SCOTT 

MISS MARTHA STAFFORD 

DR. WILLIE TUCKER 

DR. JOHN WILSON 

MISS THELMA ALBRITTON 

MISS PATRICIA BROWN 

MR. CHARLES CHAPMAN 

MR. THOMAS CLARK 

MR. CHARLES E. DAY 

MR. WALKER DURHAM 

MR. CHARLES ELMORE 

MISS BETTY GORDON 

MR. BRYAN JACKSON 

MR. THOMAS LAWYER 

MISS ALICE MURRAY 

MR. SYLVESTER SINGLETON 

MISS IRIS WRIGHT 
MISS CAROLYN LOADHOLT 




None other than the person- 
able and dignified Azuloy How- 
ard. She is a graduate of Central 
High School, Waycross, Georgia, 
majoring in Business Adminis- 
tration. Miss Howard is the head 
majorette of the SSC Marching 
Band. 





u 





I 
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VNA SAE 01 




ENERAL INFORMATION ISSUE 



CONTENTS 



An Open Invitation to Prospective Students 

An Introduction to SSC 

Intellectual Center of the Campus . 
Buildings 



The General Curriculum 

Division of Business Administration 

Division of Education 

Division of Humanities 1 

Division of Natural Sciences 1 

Division of Social Sciences 

Division of Technical Sciences ......" 

Division of Home Study 

Activities 2 

Spotlighting Events 2 

General Information . . - 2 




THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE BULLETIN 

President Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations and Publicity Wilton C. Scott 

Editor-in-Chief Charles Smalls '66 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Volume 19 March, 1966 Number 4 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly in October, December, February, 
March, April, and May by Savannah State College. 



AN OPEN INVITATION TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS . . . . 



It is my happy pleasure to extend a cordial invitation to all pros- 
pective college students to enter Savannah State College. 

Here at Savannah State we take special pride in the matchless 
natural beauty of our campus, and in our beautifully designed build- 
ings, because we know that these will lend inspiration to the young 
people who gather here to grasp the opportunity to acquire the basic 
skills, attitudes, habits, appreciations, and understandings requisite for 
the good life. We are proud that our College is modern in all par- 
ticulars, and we are constantly striving to improve and expand our 
offerings and facilities. 

At Savannah State College the general curriculum is concerned 
with the major disciplines that: 

1. Acquaint the students with broad areas of knowledge and 
human experience; 

2. Give them an understanding of themselves, their culture and 
physical environment; 

3. Provide the students with a sound intellectual and moral founda- 
tion upon which character and professional and vocational 
opportunities may rest. 

Students enjoy life here at the College. It is a friendly campus where each individual is respected, and where the 
:mbers of the College family study, work, and play together. 

It is our sincere hope that this booklet will provide you with answers to your questions about the College. As you make 
ur educational plans, we hope that you will seriously consider joining our educational family at Savannah State College. 

Cordially, 




(JqL^A 




Howard Jo/dan, Jr 
Presiden 




First 



SSC and Florida A & M 

Families get together at SSC with 

Kappa Mu Honor Society 



Alpha 




AN INTRODUCTION TO SSC 



Savannah State College, in its long history of 76 years, is located off Taylor Road and Falligant Avenue, in the histor 
city of Savannah, which is the oldest city and chief seaport of the state, as well as the first capital. 

The campus, comprising one hundred and thirty-six acres, presents a setting of matchless natural beauty. 

The College now includes six divisions and 14 departments which give students a wide variety of courses from whic 
to select. The major divisions are Business Administration, Education, Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, an 
Technical Sciences. Through the offerings of these divisions, students may prepare for varied careers in the areas of ar 
modern foreign languages, English and literature, biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics, physical education, hon 
economics, music, history, economics, sociology, political science, engineering technology, and industrial education. 

A dormitory to house 100 women students was opened at the beginning of the Fall Quarter, 1964. This two-stoi 
brick structure was constructed at a cost of approximately $280,000. It includes grooming rooms for beauty culture, a snac 
kitchen, a laundrette, and a combination room for lounging, reception and recreation. Two young ladies are housed in a roon 

A dormitory for 180 women at a cost of approximately $520,000 has been completed and is now in use. 

A two-story air-conditioned classroom building at a cost of approximately $500,000 has been completed and 
now in use. It is located on Taylor Road, south of the Technical Sciences Building across the street from Powell Hall. Th 
new building consists of 15 classrooms, data processing facilities, a language laboratory, a reading clinic, and an administn 
tive area with office space for 33 instructors. 

A $400,000 annex to Wiley Gymnasium has been open since last February. This new physical education facilit 
consists of a swimming pool, classrooms, and additional spectator seating for indoor sports. 

A Music and Fine Arts Building at an approximate cost of $500,000 is under construction. This building will includ 
a Little Theatre for dramatics, and will be ready for occupancy during the Summer Session 1966. 

A four-unit, all weather, lighted tennis court has been erected adjacent to the athletic field, and is now in use. 

Construction of a dormitory to accommodate 180 men is under way. This dormitory is being built at the entrance < 
the campus, on the corner of Falligant Avenue and Taylor Road. It will be a modern three-story facility, and will consist ( 
ninety bedrooms of the studio type. This building will include a lobby, recreational areas, and an apartment for the hous 
director, barber shop, room for TV viewing, and laundromat. This new facility will be completely air-conditioned and cor 
structed at an approximate cost of $600,000. It is estimated that this dormitory will be ready for occupancy in September 196( 

The above listed facilities along with the facilities already available at Savannah State College will provide the studenl 
and faculty with a desirable environment for greater learning activities. 

For the Biennium of 1966-68 Savannah State College has requested from the Board of Regents the following facilities 
A new Dining Hall-Cafeteria; A Natural Science Building; A technical Home Economics Building; A Nursery School fo 
Early Childhood Education and a Student Union Building. 



MELDRIM HALL — Administration Building 



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THE INTELLECTUAL CENTER OF THE CAMPUS 




. H. GORDON LIBRARY — Named in honor of Dr. Asa H. Gordon, who was the first member of the college faculty to 
publish a book. He served the college as Dean of Faculty and Director of Research and Publications. 



The library of the college is one of its most prized possessions. The adequacy of its resources and the nature of its 
rvices to students and faculty largely determine the quality of the academic program. On the Savannah State College campus, 
e library is an indispensable unit which undergirds the instructional program as well as contributes to the recreational 
ading interests. The library is not an adjunct to teaching but the heart of the learning process. 

The library staff and faculty are busy assembling a notable book collection to be used in active support of the academic 
rriculum. Assembling a book collection is not enough! The librarian and his staff actively encourage students to use books 
ith an emphasis on the role that books play in the intellectual life of the academic community. The resources of the library 
elude 51,250 volumes, several thousand pamphlets, 640 periodicals, and 26 newspapers. The London Times, the New York 
mes, the Savannah Morning News, and the Savannah Evening Press, are on microfilm, in addition to book materials in 
icro-print. 

"Let's Listen to a Story," hour under the direction of Mrs. Althea Anderson, Circulation Librarian, is held weekly 

r the children of the community. Dr. Samuel Johnson said, "Those who do not read can have nothing to think and say." 

Great Books Discussion Group, under the sponsorship of the library has been organized to encourage people to read and 
eet together to discuss great books. 

Dr. J. W. Jamerson, local dentist, and E. J. Josey, Librarian, are the codeaders of the group. Exhibitions of paint- 
gs by some of the world's great artists are displayed in the library periodically. A recently inaugurated lecture series has 
uly made the library a market place of ideas. 

All in all, the library of Savannah State College is an essential instrument in the life of the academic community. 



BUILDINGS 







* * -i 4 



W. K. PAYNE HALL — A two-story air-cond 
tioned building comprised of 15 classroom 
data processing facilities, a language labor; 
tory, a reading clinic, and administrative art 
with office space for 33 instructors, was name 
in honor of the late President William 1 
Payne, who served as fifth president of tl 
college from 1950 up until his death in 196 
Dr. Payne also served the college in th 
capacity of Chairman of the Department » 
Education and Dean of Faculty, 



* * * rM M. 




w ■ i ** * a « i | 



Tl ■ ™ 



Willcox - Wiley Health and Physical Education Complex 




HILL HALL 



HUBERT HALL 

Technical Sciences Center 



THE GENERAL CURRICULUM 



The General Education Program proposes to provide opportunities for all students to acquire the basic 
ills, attitudes, habits, appreciations and understandings requisite for the good life. 

It seeks to guarantee to all students competency in communication and thinking. It further proposes to 
ient students toward and to sensitize them to human and universal good and to the worth and dignity of 
ery human being. 

At this college the general curriculum is preoccupied with the major disciplines that: 

1. Acquaint the students with broad areas of knowledge and human experience; 

2. Give them an understanding of themselves, their culture and physical environment; 

3. Provide the students with a sound intellectual and moral foundation upon which character and pro- 
fessional and vocational opportunity may rest. 

The program is concerned generally with freshman and sophomore students. However, some attention is 
voted to students on the junior and senior level of their intellectual maturation. In this respect, general edu- 
tion is an integral phase of the experience of all students who matriculate for a degree at the College. 

The General Education Program is under the general supervision of the General Education Committee 
d the Coordinator of General Education. The Committee consists of students and faculty members. 

THE DIVISIONS 

The formal instructional program of Savannah State College comprises the general curriculum, areas of 
ajor and minor concentration, and terminal curricula. The program is organized within these seven divisions: 

THE DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

THE DIVISION OF EDUCATION 

Department of Elementary Education 

Department of Secondary Education 

Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

THE DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

Department of English 
Department of Fine Arts 
Department of Modern Languages 

THE DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 

Department of Biology 

Department of Chemistry 

Department of Mathematics and Physics 

THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

THE DIVISION OF TECHNICAL SCIENCES 
Department of Home Economics 
Department of Engineering Technology 



DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



A high school student who is preparing for a career in 
business via the college route should direct his efforts toward 
becoming proficient in mathematics and English at the high 
school level. Proficiency in mathematics allows him to make 
quick use of quantitative tools in solving business problems. 
Proficiency in English permits him to communicate his ideas. 
The ability to do both are significant attributes of business 
personnel. 

Though not essential, since the college offers the necessary 
fundamentals, a student may also take such courses as book- 
keeping, shorthand, and other business subjects which are 
offered at his respective high school. Such an approach, at 
least, allows the student to make a tentative judgment as to 
whether or not he is favorably inclined toward specific subject 
areas. It should be pointed out unequivocally, however, that 
business training, on the college level, embraces much more 
than typewriting and shorthand. 

Since more and more high school students are arriving at 
college with typing skills, it is recommended that a course in 
typewriting be taken. Entering students are exempted from 
typewriting courses in which they meet the course standards. 

Whether or not students interested in the secretarial or 
teaching programs should take shorthand in high school, since 
they are required courses in these college curricula, is a 
debatable question. Evidence at our institution suggests that 
the student might well spend the time that he might devote to 
shorthand in high school to additional preparation in 
grammar and composition, if he is not already proficient in 
these areas. 

One of the advantages of majoring in business is that one 
is preparing himself for a wide variety of employment possi- 
bilities. Opportunities exist for self-employment, for em- 
ployment in private industry, and for employment with the 
government — national, state and local. 

Some positions, for which training in business at Savan- 
nah State College is designed to prepare students include: 

Entrepreneurs Secretaries 

Accountants Stenographers 

Bookkeepers Typists 

Salesmen Business Managers 

Economists Teachers of Business 



HAYWARD S. ANDERSON, D.B.A., Chairman 

To realize the aims of a person desiring training in bus 
ness, Savannah State College's Division of Business offe 
courses leading to the degree of bachelor of science and 
terminal, two-year program leading to a certificate of pr 
ficiency. 



A student who pursues a degree in business at this i 
stitution may concentrate his efforts in one of the followii 
areas: (1) General Business Administration, (2) Accour 
ing, (3) Economics, (4) Secretarial Science, and (5) Tl 
Program for Teachers of Business Education. In each 
the above curricula, consideration has been given to tl 
course requirements for graduate study. 

Because of the numerous job opportunities that exi 
currently for accountants and secretaries, students shou 
become familiar with the attributes of successful accountar 
and secretaries as well as the nature of the job opportunity 
that are available. 

A student may find a challenging career in the field 
accounting if he has analytical ability, if he has a facility wi 
figures, and if he derives personal enjoyment while doii 
work which requires the use of these attributes. 

While numerous lists have been compiled which suggf 
attributes of a good secretary, the attributes of loyalty ai 
a mastery of shorthand and typewriting are frequent 
mentioned. While the following list is by no means all i 
elusive, it, nevertheless, gives some further insight in 
desired attributes of a good secretary. A prospective ei 
ployer recently wrote that he had a secretarial vacancy b 
in order to meet the job specifications the secretary had 
have the following: a pleasing personality, facility wi 
English, a mastery of telephone etiquette, courtesy, neatne 
in both appearance and work, and the ability to work wi 
others. Aspiring secretaries can acquire and develop mai 
of these attributes early. 

Because occupations within the field of business a 
numerous and because the specific required attributes with 
each occupation may vary, high school students are e 
couraged, in addition to utilizing their own counselors, 
visit colleges and counsel with professors and counselors f< 
guidance in career selection. 



Business Students Training for Tomorrow's Responsibilities 




DIVISION OF EDUCATION 

CALVIN L. KIAH, Ed.D., Chairman 

The Division of Education at Savannah State College is a member of the Association of Colleges for 
teachers Education. It offers twelve curricula in teacher preparation and a program of basic training for 
sacher-librarians. These programs are approved by the State Department of Education. This means that satis- 
actory completion of any program brings automatic certification in the field of study pursued. 

A person majoring in Education at Savannah State College is the concern of every division and department 
f the College, therefore, the resources and facilities — as well as the interest and efforts of the entire institution, 
re at his disposal. 

Aside from a strong academic classroom program in general, specialized, and professional education, 
he teaching major at Savannah State College has rich, varied, and meaningful laboratory experience which 
•rings one into constant contact with children and youth. 



COLLEGE-WIDE PROVISION FOR TEACHER EDUCATION 




The Division comprises three departments: the De- 
partment of Elementary Education; the Department of 
Health, Physical Education and Recreation; and the 
Department of Secondary Education. The preparation 
of teachers is, however, a college-wide commitment. 
Because every division and department at the College 
is involved in training teachers in some subject matter 
field, this function engages the constant interest and 
efforts, staff resources, and facilities of the entire in- 
stitution. 




Students entering the Division of Education do not only get classroom experiences to enable them to become good 
;eachers but the curriculum also enables them in meeting the responsibility in nursery centers and the community. 
!top) Mrs. Owens challenging students in classroom in order to prepare them to meet the demands and responsibilities 

in society. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 

AND RECREATION 



The essential aim of the Department of Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation is to afford pro- 
fessional training for pre-service and in-service teach- 
ers of health, physical education, and recreation in 
the elementary and secondary schools. A parallel aim 
is advisement. The aim is to provide for all students 
instruction in the basic principles of health and recrea- 
tional activity needed for wholesome living. 

In pursuance of the foregoing aims, this Depart- 
ment provides a four-fold program of instruction. 
For students who plan to become professional workers 
in the field of health, physical education, and recrea- 
tion — either in schools or in other agencies — the de- 
partment offers a sequence of specialized training to 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education, with 
a concentration in health, physical education, and 
recreation. 



In addition, for all students enrolled in teache 
education curricula at Savannah State College, thi 
department provides basic training in supervision o 
one or more phases of a comprehensive healtl 
physical education, and recreation program in th 
schools of Georgia. This phase of the work is pre 
vided either in selected specialized courses or in 
minor sequence. Further, for all students enrolle< 
at the college this department provides instruction i 
the fundamental concepts and activities of healtl 
physical education, and recreation as an essentia 
phase of general education. 

Finally, this department serves the college con 
munity through instruction and leadership in the intra 
mural program. The intramural program is, in effect 
a laboratory in which students enjoy practicing th 
skills learned in general service courses and relis, 
competing with their peers. 




It is not only the policy of the Savannah State College curriculum to train the mind but the college also offers a well- 
rounded program for the training of the body. 



10 



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

FORREST O. WIGGINS, Ph.D., Chairman 



The Division of Humanities, as its name implies, is concerned primarily with transforming the individual 
nto a human and humane person. The technique for realizing this aim is that of serious study of the human 
leritage as it has been recorded in literature, music, art, and philosophy. In this manner the student deepens 
lis appreciation, sharpens his intellect, enhances his critical powers, and incorporates himself in the mainstream 
)f the best that has been thought and felt. 

The Division of Humanities provides opportunities for majoring in English, music, the fine arts, French, 
ind Spanish. The curricula in these areas are designed also to prepare teachers. Thus students who elect to 
each become purveyors of the humanistic tradition. The College provides a means also for meeting the national 
leed for persons trained in foreign languages. As future linguists and/or teachers, students have an unusual 
>pportunity at Savannah State College. A strong faculty in modern language in addition to a recently installed 
aboratory assures the students the means of thoroughly preparing themselves in this area. 




r. Forrest O. Wiggins, Professor and head of the division 
of humanities, lectures to students in one of several 
language courses. 




11 



THE DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

MUSIC 



In the area of music, the Department of Fine Arts at Sa- 
vannah State College offers a major program leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education and two 
minor programs — one for prospective teachers in the second- 
ary schools and a nonteaching program. All of the curricula 
have been approved by the three national accrediting agencies 
— The Music Teachers National Association, the National 
Association of Schools of Music and the Music Educators 
National Conference, as well as by the State Board of 
Certification and the Board of Regents of the University 
System of Georgia. 

Courses include intensive work in theory, history and 
literature, performance, applied music, conducting and music 
education. Although 75 hours are required for state certifica- 
tion, a total of 82 hours constitutes the four-year music re- 
quirement at the College. Previous training of at least two 
years in any applied area is required of all prospective 
majors, but skilled aptitude is recognized and accepted in 
lieu of this requirement if necessary. Most majors must 
pursue four years of training in piano, voice, or another 
instrument as well as the same amount of time in their 
applied major area. In addition to the music courses, all 
candidates for a degree take a large complement of courses 
in general education and the professional sequences. 

The five musical organizations — The Marching Band. The 
Concert Band, The Choral Society, The Women's Glee Club 
and The Men's Glee Club — are each directed by a full-time 
faculty member and provide ample opportunity for students 
inside and outside of the department to receive experiences 
in public performance which range from programs on the 



campus at assemblies, church services, vespers, and special 
programs, to local television appearances, concerts in the 
community, athletic games away from home, and concert tours 
in several states. 

One of the most important operations in this department 
is the awarding each year of a number of scholarships, called 
grants-in-aid, which are given to capable, worthy applicants 
in all organizations upon recommendation of the department. 
Depending upon the aptitude, academic standing, and fi- 
nancial need of the student, these awards are sufficient at 
times to provide tuition for a full year. Grants are made, 
however, only to applicants who file the necessary forms, are 
recommended by the department, and are approved by the 
Committee on Scholarships. Recipients, encouraged to ap- 
ply in the spring, are usually notified during the summer, 
well in advance of the opening of the Fall Quarter. 

As for facilities, the Department at the present time 
occupies the entire third floor of Hill Hall and the Morgan 
Hall Annex, but plans have just been completed for the 
construction of a new Fine Arts Building which will house 
the entire Department. The present facilities provide space 
for classes, organizational rehearsals, practice periods, listen- 
ing room, and offices. Pianos are provided for practice, and 
band instruments are provided, both without charge. Com- 
plete uniforms, robes, stoles, and blazers are also furnished 
to members of the various organizations. 

For any additional information concerning the Depart- 
ment please feel free to address your inquiries to Dr. 
Coleridge A. Braithwaite, Chairman, Department of Fine Arts, 
Savannah State College. 




Dr. Coleridge A. Braithwaite conducting the Savannah State College Choral 
Society. The group, composed of students from every academic discipline, is 
carefully screened and trained in musical technique. 



12 



ART 




SSC student, Lee Fluker, views with appreciation the paintings of fine arts student Paul Johnson. 



The rewards can be great for a person with or 
ithout "artistic talent." To gain these rewards, one 
eeds only the desire to learn and a good place in 
r hich to learn. The Art Department at Savannah 
tate College provides students with an adequate 
nvironment for learning. If one has the desire, then 
e can progress at Savannah State College. 

The Art Department is located in new quarters, 
specially designed and equipped with modern studios 
nd lecture rooms being brought up-to-date, making 
: possible to teach the latest use of books and methods 
i lithography, etching, serigraphy, ceramic, sculpture, 
nd painting. 

Students who have studied art at Savannah State 
lollege have reaped many rewards. Some have won 
arge sums of money in art competition. Some are 
njoying the success of exhibiting their art at qualified 
alleries. One former student is in the Pentagon in 
Washington, D. C, where he is using the knowledge 



of art acquired here. Others have successful careers 
as teachers of art. And, still others have gone on to 
more advanced studies in schools throughout the 
country. 

Art students at Savannah State College occasion- 
ally have opportunities of getting first-hand experi- 
ence, as a number of art jobs of short duration come 
into the Art Department. There are some jobs of a 
more permanent nature waiting to be filled. 

The Art Department is prepared and eager to 
help students in many ways. The rewards can be 
plentiful for those who are seeking; and when they 
acquire a Bachelor of Science Degree in Art Educa- 
tion, they will find that rewards other than salary, 
position, dignity, or fame await them. They may 
learn, ultimately, to enrich their lives with things 
which do not pass so quickly; for, to know and to be 
able to enjoy knowing is indeed a divine reward. 



13 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



The Department of Modern Languages offers in- 
struction in three languages: French, German and 
Spanish. The primary aim of the members of the 
Department is to teach the student to understand, 
speak, read and write these languages so that he may 
communicate with others who speak them. This in- 
struction is carried on in daily recitations in the class- 
room and also in a modern twenty booth laboratory 
where the student can increase his proficiency by 
listening to and repeating exercises of various types 
especially prepared for this purpose. For students 
who wish to develop more than an elementary pro- 



ficiency in French or Spanish, the Department offersj 
courses leading to a minor in either language. It also 
offers courses leading to the degree of Bachelor oi 
Science in Education with a concentration either in 
French or Spanish. 

Outside of the field of education, a person with a 
major in a foreign language can find employment in 
several areas. First, there is the area of organizations 
more or less international in character. Because oi 
the nature of its work, there is almost a constant de- 
mand at the United Nations Headquarters for men 
and women who are proficient in foreign languages. 




The department of Modern Languages does not merely offer instruction but it also attempts to perfect students in the 
understanding, writing and reading of languages in order to communicate with others who speak them. 



14 



DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 

BOOKER T. GRIFFITH, Ph.D., Chairman 



The Division of Natural Sciences is proud of the record that it has made in helping young people find 
lemselves in the scientific and mathematical world during the last quarter of a century. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 




The aims of the Department of Biology are (1) to 
provide for all students that knowledge which is 
essential to an understanding of the biological basis 
of living; (2) to train persons adequately through 
the media of advanced courses for entry into the pro- 
fessional study of dentistry, medicine, and nursing; 
(3) to prepare persons to teach the biological sciences 
in the secondary school or to continue study on the 
graduate level. 

In addition to the required general courses, this 
department offers courses leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science with a major in biology. This 
department offers also a minor. 

The Biology Department is proud of its achieve- 
ments during the last several years. It takes great 
pride in reviewing the records of some of its graduates. 



Jiology students observing professor Joseph Wortham 
dissecting animal. 



15 



THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 



The Department of Chemistry has grown by leaps and 
bounds in the past few years. The teaching staff, teaching 
space and equipment have been increased one hundred per 
cent. 

The Department has been quite successful in obtaining 
funds from Chemical Societies and the National Science 
Foundation to sponsor several significant programs such as 
the In-Service Institute for teachers of Chemistry and General 
Science in secondary education and the Summer Science 
Program for selected high school students. 

Many research projects are carried out by the students 
in cooperation with the department's active research program. 
The Department feels that research projects serve as good 
preparation for more highly developed and specialized re- 
search than the students will encounter in graduate school. 
The research program serves as an outlet of expression of 
the student's scientific interest and capabilities other than in 
the classroom and gives him experience in employing the 
scientific method in problem solving. 

The Department of Chemistry provides basic training for 
higher education — work leading to the Master of Science and 
Ph.D. degree. In addition to this it provides all of the chem- 
istry needed in pre-nursing, pre-dental and pre-medical edu- 
cation. 

The curriculum has been revised so that the student will 
receive a substantial number of courses in mathematics, 
physics, and biology which will aid him in becoming a better 
Chemist. 

The Department believes in creativity, freedom of ex- 
ploration, productivity, hard work, and recreation. 




Students do not only develop good relationship with their 
professors, but they also develop participation-relation- 
ships in research projects with professors. Dr. Charles 
Pratt and students discuss chemistry research findings. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS 




The Mathematics curriculum and courses are being con 
tinually revised to keep in step with the recommendations 
released by the School Mathematics Study Group in 1960 
The textbooks, course outlines, and other materials are con 
tinuously being changed in order to meet today's challenge 
The Physics courses are designed to give emphasis to the 
PSSC recommendations for college Physics. 

The objectives of the department are not only to prepare 
better teachers of Mathematics and Physics, but also to pro- 
vide them with the courses necessary to do further study in 
areas like linear programming and computing, statistical 
research, electronics, guided missiles, engineering, mathe- 
matics for various phases of industry research, actuary 
science and over twenty branches of governmental service. 



The operation of certain instruments is also taught to 

students in chemistry, mathematics and physics classes. 

Dr. Raut instructs student Jannie Singleton. 



16 



DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

ELMER J. DEAN, Ed.D., Chairman 



The Division of Social Sciences offers two major programs for persons interested in the social sciences. 
Curriculum I leads to the B.S. degree in the social sciences with a concentration in history. Curriculum II leads 
o the B.S. degree in the social sciences with a concentration in sociology leading to the professional study of 
iocial work. 

Persons who plan to teach social studies in the secondary school should enroll in the Teach Educational 
5 rogram and pursue the B.S. degree in Education with a concentration in the social sciences. 

Curriculum I is designed for persons interested in careers in: law, government, diplomatic service, general 
•esearch, Young Men's Christian' Association, and Urban League Work. 

Curriculum II is designed for persons interested in careers as social workers, probation officers, voca- 
ional counselors, camp counselors, employment interviewers, juvenile court workers, welfare fund workers, and 
mmigration service workers. 







Dr. Reid instructing students in history class. 



17 



DIVISION OF TECHNICAL SCIENCES 

CLYDE W. HALL, Ed.D., Chairman 



The Division of Technical Sciences seeks to ac- 
complish two major objectives: (1) to provide students 
with sufficient specialized training in engineering 
technology, technical home economics and industrial 
teacher education to meet entry employment require- 
ments in these areas; and (2) to provide students with 
a broad liberal education which includes study in the 
general areas of communications, mathematics, the 
natural sciences, the behavioral and social sciences, 
and the fine arts. 

In order to achieve the above objectives, the Di- 
vision of Technical Sciences is organized into two 
departments which offer curricula leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree. The Department of Engi- 
neering Technology offers programs in building con- 
struction technology, electronics technology, industrial 
arts education, mechanical technology and trade and 
industrial education, and the Department of Home 
Economics affords opportunity for students to major 
in foods and nutrition and institutional management, 
and textiles and clothing. 

Individuals interested in careers in the technical 
sciences should be well grounded in the applied 
sciences. Such high school subjects as physics, algebra, 
plane geometry, trigonometry and industrial shop are 
very desirable for persons planning to pursue engi- 
neering technology curricula, and chemistry and home- 
making are essential for those interested in technical 
home economics. 




Students entering the home economics program get 

actual experiences by working in close relation with 

their instructors. 




Instructor (third from left) and students examine new 
developments in technology at technical science fair. 



18 



DIVISION OF HOME STUDY 

E. K. WILLIAMS, Ed.D., Director 



The Division of Home Study encompasses instructional programs in Business Administration, Economics, 
education, English, Geography, Government, History, Humanities, Mathematics, Psychology, Social Science, 
ind Sociology. These courses are offered for those persons who are interested in furthering their education, 
)ut are unable to do so in residence. 

The Home Study Department is authorized to operate the following programs: 

1. College Correspondence Study 

2. Extension Classes 

There are students enrolled in these courses living in all parts of Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, and 
Uabama; and we have students registered from New York, New Jersey, Washington, D. C. 

The Home Study Department is directed toward two objectives: The first is to provide a service for 
hose persons who cannot undertake residence instruction, and the second is to provide an enriching program 
or those who do not require residence instruction for personal growth and enrichment. 

Extension classes are provided upon sufficient demand. 

For information concerning credit, fees, examinations, textbooks, etc., you may write to: The Division of 
lome Study, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia. 




Students are given adequate time and instructions in preparing for examinations. 



19 



ACTIVITIES 



Savannah State College puts great emphasis upon a rich and varied religious life program. Through its 
religious activities, the College seeks to develop an understanding of and an appreciation for the place of religion 
in everyday living, to deepen spiritual insight, and to make the practice of Christian principle a vital part of 
the life of the well educated citizen. 

Religious life activities are directed by the College Minister. The Sunday School, Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A., 
the Newman Club, and the annual Religious Emphasis Week provide opportunities for religious growth and 
development under the supervision of the Religious Life Committee. 

Savannah State College contributes to the attainment of a well-rounded education by providing many 
opportunities for students to participate in a wide range of organized groups. Programs are planned for the 
social, religious, and cultural advancement of the college community. 

The Savannah State College Student Association, composed of representatives of all classes, works with 
the administration in the government of the College. It works also with the various campus organizations and 
sponsors projects for the general welfare of the student body. 

The Tiger's Roar, official student newspaper, is published every six weeks by students under the super- 
vision of the Public Relations Office. 

The following organizations also provide media for expression of student interest: Art Club, Business 
Club, Camera Club, Collegiate Counselors, Creative Dance Group, Debating Club, Dormitory Councils, Economics 
Club, Newman Club, Savannah State College "Players by the Sea," Social Science Club, Student Loan Associa- 
tion, Tiger's Roar, Trade Association, Usher's Club, Varsity Club, Future Teachers of America (NEA), Home 
Economics Club, Veterans' Club, Y.M.C.A., Y.W.C.A., Women's Council, Boar's Head Club, Canterbury Club, 
and Tiger, student yearbook. 

The following national social fraternities are organized on the campus: Alpha Phi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, 
Phi Beta Sigma, and Kappa Alpha Psi. 

The following national social sororities are organized on the campus: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Sigma Gamma 
Rho, Zeta Phi Beta, and Delta Sigma Theta. 

The national honor societies, Alpha Kappa Mu, Beta Kappa Chi, and Alpha Phi Gamma, have chapters 
on the campus. 

The Department of Health and Physical Education conducts a well-rounded intramural athletic program 
of seasonal activities for men and for women. Utilizing group games and various sports for their full educa- 
tional values, the program features football, basketball, track and field hockey, and badminton. 

A member of the Southern Athletic Conference, Savannah State College maintains competition in all sports 
sponsored by the conference. 

The College also holds membership in two national athletic associations, N.C.A.A. and N.A.I. A. 

To complement formal education on the campus, the college provides many activities for cultural enrich- 
ment. Student assemblies, institutes, motion pictures, lectures, art exhibitions, dramatics, forums, athletic con- 
tests, hobby groups, and tours contribute to the general welfare of the community. 










Georgia's Governor, Carl E. Sanders, ad- 
dressing students and faculty at an all- 
college assembly program for the dedica- 
tion of six buildings on the college 
campus. 



20 



SSC, bound in a tradition of close college-alumni relationship, Dr. Howard 

Jordan, Jr., College President, accepts alumni gift to college from national 

alumni president Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms. 



SPOT LIGHTING EVENTS 




Students participating: in college assembly program with college president and distinguished guests. 





laymond Pace Alexander, Judge of 

"ommon Pleas Court, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 



Pianist Samuel Dilworth-Leslie. 



Dr. George L-P Weaver, Assistant 

Secretary of Labor for International 

Affairs. 





Karl Shapiro, noted Pulitzer Prize Poet. 



Eric Moon, Editor of the LIBRARY JOURNAL, receiv- 
ing the Savannah State College Library Award. 



21 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



How to Get In 

Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and who 
iresent evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, 
ound health, and interest in a specific course of study are 
ligihle for admission to the several departments of the 
'ollege. 

Each candidate for admission is required to make formal 
pplication and thereafter submit such credentials as may 
>e needed to support the application. Admissions correspond- 
nce should be addressed to the Director of Admissions. 
lie application form with instructions may be obtained by 
writing the Director of Admissions. Inquiries should be made 
mmediately. 

Estimated General Expenses 
For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 

^OTE: Fees remitted by mail should be sent by money 
order, cashier's check, or certified check payable to 
SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE. Fees paid in per- 
son will be accepted in cash, money order, cashier's 
check, or certified check. 

Per Quarter Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $ 85.00 $255.00 

health Fee 5.00 15.00 

Student Activity Fee 15.00 45.00 

Student Group Insurance (voluntary) 

Total Charges— Day Student . . *$105.00 *$315.00 

loom, Board and Laundry. . 187.00 561.00 

Total Charges — 

Boarding Students * $292.00 * $876.00 



plies, and tools necessary for satisfactory completion of the 
courses for which they are enrolled. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. 
Students are required to meet financial obligations promptly. 
Persons granted scholarship or work-aid assistance will be 
duly notified in writing, and money accruing from these 
sources will be credited to their accounts. 

Veterans coming to Savannah State College should bring 
with them sufficient funds to pay all fees as indicated on the 
Schedule of Fees. 

Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet college 
expenses through part-time employment, provided they main- 
tain satisfactory scholastic averages. These work opportuni- 
ties include such jobs as clerical and stenographic work, 
library work, waiting tables, washing dishes, pantry and 
kitchen work, skilled and unskilled work in the several trades 
and in maintenance. 

Scholarships 

A limited number of special scholarships are available 
to selected students who meet the required standards of 
scholastic merit, high character, general promise, and superior 
achievement in certain specific areas of the college program. 

The aim of the National Defense Student Loan Program 
is to create at American Colleges and Universities loan funds 
from which needy students may borrow to complete their 
higher education. Students interested in National Defense 
Loan Funds, should write Chairman of Student Personnel 
Service, Savannah State College, Savannah. Georgia. 



The above table includes basic fees only. Other charges 
ire assessed where applicable. Please see "Explanation of 
fees." All matriculation charges, board, room rent, or other 
charges are subject to change at the end of any quarter. 

Normal cost of books and supplies approximates $30.00 
jer quarter. Students are required to secure all books, sup- 



* Freshmen and Entering Students pay an additional $10.00 
General Deposit required of all students upon initial registration in 
any unit of the University System. In keeping with the vote of the 
student body in May, 1962, each student will be assessed a $6.00 
Yearbook Fee due and payable at Fall Quarter Registration or the 
student's initial registration. Please refer to the current college 
catalogue for a complete schedule of fees. 



Director of Admissions, Savannah State College, State College Branch, Savannah, Georgia 

CUT HERE 



ame. 



Ad 



ress_ 



ligh School 



) Business Administration 
) Accounting 
) Elementary Education 
) Health, Physical Education, 
and Recreation 



( ) Secondary Education 

( ) English 

( ) Fine Arts 

( ) Music 

( ) Modern Languages 



would like additional information concerning: 



ac 



_Date_ 
_City_ 



.State_ 



) Natural Sciences 

) Biology 

) Chemistry 

) Mathematics and Physics 

) Social Sciences 



( ) Technical Sciences 

( ) Engineering Technology 

( ) Home Economics 

( ) Medical Technology 



H. GORDON LIBRARY 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
StATE COLLEGE BRANCH 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 314G4 



23 




'Neiv occasions teach new duties, time 
makes ancient good uncouth; 

They must upward still and onward, who 
would keep abreast of truth." 

— J. R. Lowell 



SAVANNAH 

STATE 

COLLEGE 




BULLETIN 




ALUMNI 
ISSUE 



•-'•:■• :■ 




The Savannah State College Bulletin 

Volume XIX May, 1966 Number 6 

President Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations and 

Editor-in-Chief Wilton C. Scott 

Acting Alumni Secretary Prince K. Mitchell 

Issue Editor Carolyn R. Screen 

Photographer Robert Mobley 




Dr. John Foster Potts, President, Voorhees Junior College, 

spoke at the Annual Vespers during the Nineteenth Annual 

Men's Festival. Dr. Potts, left, is shown with Mrs. Howard 

Jordan, Jr., center; and Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., right. 




Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. and Count Basie shake hands fol- 
lowing the appearance of Count Basie and his Orchestra on 
the campus. Mrs. Howard Jordan, Jr. looks on. 



From the Ajlumni 
President' s Desk 

Dear Fellow Alumni: 

As we near the end of another year it is altogethej 
fitting and proper that we pause and review our activitie: 
in order to determine whether we have made progres 
toward our goals as we had hoped or need to speed u 
our actions. How has it been with you? 

( 1 ) Have you sent in your Chapter roster and include 
the address, or your own name and address? 

(2) Have you completed and mailed the questionnaire 
which required so much time and postage to gj 
out to you? 

(3) What about your Chapter meetings and activities 
Your dues? Your scholarship donations? 

(4) Have you given your cooperation for the develoi 
ment of the kind of Chapter and Alumni Associ 
tion you would be proud to claim as yours? 

If you cannot answer yes to the above questions yc 
have allowed things to pile up on you. Please take tin 
to catch up. We need every Alumnus and every Chapte 
To be a "Has Been" is an improper title for any Alumni 
of Savannah State. There is a new Chapter!! It is tl 
Chicago Chapter. Isn't that wonderful? Can't give yc 
details yet, but Congratulations and Best Wishes to thei 
and a great big welcome from us all. 

I regret that all of our Alumni could not attend tl 
dedication of the six new buildings. There were many o 
faces and friends to be seen from far and near. It w, 
thrilling to witness, one seemed to hear a small voice with 
saying "Savannah State College has been remembered 
last," and you wanted to play in the water to be sure \ 
had a real swimming pool. For all of this we should 
very proud and grateful. We should also be more dete 
mined to do our share for this is a great challenge to tl 
Alumni of Savannah State College. Let us not forget o 
responsibility to our Alma Mater at this time when 
strong Alumni group is needed. We have made progres 
but not enough. We have organized in three districts ai 
last year were able to provide enough funds to assist 
matching all funds allotted by the NDEA Scholarship Fun 
and to take advantage of Youth Corps Work Prograi 
However, there is still much assistance needed for t 
Grant-in-Aid Program. With Armstrong State College al 
in Savannah, Savannah State College needs all of o 
support, now more than ever, moral and financial. 

The Classes of 6's will be eligible for reunions th 
June. The Class of 1936 is planning a reunion and wou 
like to hear from all members. Address mail to Mr. Prin 
Mitchell, Alumni Secretary, Savannah State College, Sava 
nah, Georgia. Please write immediately. 

An anonymous donor (not an alumnus) has offered 
give $1,000 or several thousands of dollars toward 
Alumni Guest House which would also house Alumni C 
fices, whenever we decide to take up such a project. Thii 
about it, and talk about it; we will get your reactions lat< 

We were saddened by the recent death of Mr. Jam 
Luten, late Principal of Tompkins High School, Savanna 
The Alumni Association had space on the Funeral Progrs 
which was held Monday, March 28 at Speedwell Method 
Church, Sandfly. 

Miss Lula Smith, our oldest Active Alumna, is ill; se:fl 
her a card — 518 East Henry Street, Savannah, Ga. 

My sincere thanks to each person and Chapter for yol 
cooperation. Come, let us join hands and pull together i 
(Continued on Page 6) 



New Placement Service Available 

To Alumni 



According to N. R. Freeman, Placement Director, Sa- 
tnnah State College, in cooperation with College Placement 
Duncil, Inc., is making a new service available to SSC 
Lumni. The purpose of this new service, known as the 
raduate Resume Accumulation and Distribution (GRAD) 
stem, is to make the qualifications of applicants known 

thousands of prospective employers through the use of 
ectronic data processing. 

An alumnus interested in finding new employment com- 
unicates directly with the Savannah State College Place- 
ent Office. If the Placement Officer feels that the GRAD 
ogram will be of value to the individual in question, the 
ndidate is given an instruction sheet and a four-page 
sume form. The alumnus has the resume completed and 
:atly typed since it will be photo-copied in its original 
rm for distribution and sends it to the College Placement 
auncil, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, with a $10.00 service 
e. At the data center of the Council, each resume for- 
arded by an alumnus is analyzed both in terms of present 
• most recent employment and of previous experience, 
wenty-one key factors are extracted from the information 
id entered into an electronic file. The original resume 

microfilmed to be retrieved almost immediately upon 
ceipt of an employer's request. 

In many respects similar to the electronic systems which 
lable airline ticket offices to determine the availability of 
ight reservations, the GRAD system permits a search to 
: conducted in seconds. In a typical use, an employer 
ay inquire for applicants on the basis of six or eight 
lectors — all in English since the system does not require 
)des. Hardly has his question been completed on the 
letype when the machine reports that 83 alumni whose 
lalifiers are in the system meet his specifications. The 
quiry is restated with more stringent requirements and 
ie number of qualifying applicants now drops to 17. If 
e employer is satisfied, an order is then typed to send 
ssumes on the chosen candidates. 

The use of the GRAD system is not available to just 
lyone. Since its designers were aware that misuse of the 
stem for "looking-around" or job-hopping would detract 
om its value to employers, Placement Directors must 



endorse each resume and attest to the fact that the applicant 
has received a four-year degree or higher. The resume 
remains in the active file for six months. If the alumnus 
has received a job while a resident in the file he may not 
return to the GRAD system for a full year. Those deleted 
from the file at the end of six months are advised as to 
the number of times their resumes were referred. In in- 
stances where alumni have been residents in the electronic 
file for six months and have attracted no offers, it is rec- 
ommended that they communicate with their Placement 
Officer for suggestions as to the shortcomings which may 
be affecting their candidacy. 

Special provisions have been programmed into the 
GRAD system whereby the applicant's current employer is 
blocked electronically from receiving resumes. Employers 
may make their electronic search of selector factors in terms 
of state of residence but not of city. Thus, the geographical 
selector does not reveal the present employer accidentally 
when the applicant is a resident of a "one-industry" town. 
Further confidentiality is provided by maintaining only in 
the College Placement Council data center file the names 
and addresses of alumni applicants and the identity and 
addresses of participating employers. In practice, each 
resume will be studied first to extract the most inclusive job 
descriptor. It will then be further assessed to determine 21 
additional selector elements. Major items among these in- 
clude: state of residence, marital status, major fields studied 
in college and type of degree received, class rank, present 
and required salary, area of job interests, geographic pref- 
erence, language proficiency, and several others of lesser 
importance. Any combination of these may be used by the 
employer in making his search. 

Some of the areas of study being considered are con- 
centrations of employer interest in terms of specific quali- 
fications, supply and demand by various classifications, 
salary trends, etc. Thus, the project not only places oppor- 
tunities of an unparalleled scope before the alumnus but 
promises to make his Placement Office a prime information 
center for real manpower statistics. Perhaps equally impor- 
tant, the college will have available and sensitive to its own 
needs a manpower tool made possible by the latest develop- 
ments in electronic data processing. 




SSC Honor Societies Cited at President's House 



College Gets Grant For 0E0 Project 



The Office of Economic Opportunity 
approved a $144,252 grant to Savannah 
State College for use in Project Upward 
Bound. The purpose of the program is 
to encourage students to continue their 
education on the college level. 

Upward Bound, planned for June 20- 
August 12. will involve 100 boys and 
girls who are residents of Chatham 
County; have completed the tenth and 
eleventh grades; and meet the criteria 
for admission according to the guide- 
lines established by the Office of Eco- 
nomic Opportunity. 

During the period between Septem- 
ber 1 7.^1966, and May 27, 1967 (33 
Saturdays) curricular and co-curricular 
experiences will be provided for the 
100 students. 

Throughout the year students will re- 
ceive intensive instruction in com- 
munication skills ( reading, writing, 
speaking, and listening), mathematics, 
and in Great Issues. During the sum- 
mer session one and a half hours will 
be allotted daily on a five-day weekly 
basis in each section of communication 
skills and mathematics. One hour daily 
will be given to classroom guidance and 
instruction on a three - times - a - week 
basis for "Great Issues" instruction, 
although there will be additional in- 
formal "get-togethers" with students. 
There will be approximately twelve 
students for every teacher in classroom 
activities. Classroom instruction will be 
confined to the morning hours and it 
will be largely initiated out of the ex- 
periences of the students. 

During the afternoons of the sum- 
mer session co-curricular experiences in 
music, art. drama, and dance will be 
provided along with such recreational 
activities as swimming, tennis, volley 
ball, and badminton. These will not be 
recmired, but students will be en- 
couraged to participate in some of the 
activities. Various hobby groups will be 
promoted by the special events director 
with the assistance of tutor-counsellors. 
Principally in the evening hours of the 
summer session, students who desire 
special tutorial assistance will be aided 
by dormitory counsellors. 

Various cultural experiences and field 



trips will be provided for the partici- 
pants throughout the school year. It is 
expected that the students will attend 
various cultural events which are spon- 
sored on the campus. 

Wilbur C. McAfee, Associate Pro- 
fessor of History, Savannah State Col- 
lege, will direct the program. Mr. Mc- 
Afee has been associated with Savannah 
State College for the past three years. 
He has taught for sixteen years on the 
elementary, secondary, and college 
levels. Between 1960 and 1962, he was 
principal of the Horace Mann School in 
Blue Lake, Illinois. Prior to coming to 
Savannah, he served on the faculty of 
Southern University in Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana. Air. AIcAfee obtained the 
B.Ed, degree at Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity and the M.A. degree at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. He has completed 
most of the requirements for the Ph.D. 
degree at the University of Illinois. 

A secretary, clerk-typist, chief coun- 
sellor, two dormitory counsellors, special 
events director, twelve instructors, and 
eleven student assistants will be associ- 
ated with Mr. McAfee. 

Mr. McAfee and his staff will work 
closely with the Economic Opportunity 
Authority for Savannah-Chatham 
County Area, Inc.. and representatives 
of Armstrong State College, the Chatham 
County Board of Education, and the 
Savannah community in carrying out 
the objectives of the proposal. He and 
his staff will be advised by an Academic 
Policy Committee which consists of 
representatives of Armstrong State Col- 
lege, Savannah State College, and the 
Chatham County Board of Education. 
An Academic Policy Committee will 
give overall direction to the Upward 
Bound Program. Members of the 
Academic Policy Committee are Dr. 
Howard Jordan, Jr., President, Savan- 
nah State College, Dr. Henry Ashmore, 
President, Armstrong State College, 
Airs. Ida Mack, Chairman, Chatham 
County PTA Council, Dr. Thord Mar- 
shall, Superintendent, Chatham County 
Board of Education, Sidney Raskin, 
Chairman, Economic Opportunity Au- 
thority, and two additional community 
leaders will be selected. 



Publications Receive Awards 



Five of the College's publications re- 
ceived awards at the 42nd Annual Con- 
vention of the Columbia Scholastic 
Press Association. The convention was 
held at Columbia University in New 
York City. Listed below are the names 
of the publications and their ratings. 
1st Place— TIGER'S ROAR 
1st Place — SSC Bulletins (Homecom- 



ing, Alumni, and Student Information) 
1st Place— ALUMNI NEWSLETTER 

2nd Place — PACEMAKER (pro- 
duced by delegates of the Press Insti- 
tute) 

2nd Place— JOURNALIST (produced 
by participants in the Journalism Work- 
shop) 




President Howard Jordan, Jr. enjoys r< 

marks being made by Florida A & ] 

University official. 




First Ladies meet at Tallahassee, FloridJ 
Mrs. Howard Jordan, Jr. of SavannJ 
State College, and Mrs. George W. Go 
of Florida A & M University. 




Dr. Edward Brice, Assistant to Assistc 
Secretary of Health, Education and W< 
fare, addresses SSC Press Institute. 



ight Religious Studies 
ellowships For Summer 

The Frank L. Weil Institute for 
udies in Religion and the Humanities 
mounces the availability, again in 
•67, of eight (8) summer fellowships, 
,200 each. The summer fellowships 
e available for post-doctoral faculty 
embers to work on a publishable 
per in the humanities (literature, art, 
story, philosophy, etc.) dealing with 
ligion; the committee will not enter- 
in papers dealing with religion only 
the humanities only. 
The main purpose of the grant is to 
able the recipient ( preferably in the 
wer academic ranks — Instructor and 
ssistant Professor) to forego teaching 
mmer school so as to be able to fur- 
er his research or writing, in con- 
ction with his paper, at a location of 
5 choice. The paper should be an 
tity in itself and not a segment of a 
iok, although it may eventually be 
corporated in a book. 
Application forms may be secured 
jm the Weil Institute. Hebrew Union 
)llege-Jewish Institute of Religion, 
01 Clifton Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 
'220. The last date for submission of 
application is October 1. 1966. 
Awards will be announced in Novem- 
r, 1966. 



ederal Employment 
•pportunities 

The Atlanta U. S. Civil Service 
jgional Office is accepting applications 
r Accountant and Auditor positions 
ying $7,479 a year. 
Applications will be accepted until 
e needs of the service are met. A 
•itten test is not required of applicants 
10 qualify on the basis of education. 
Positions to be filled are located in 
e states of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, 
ississippi, North Carolina, South Caro- 
la, Tennessee and Fort Campbell, 
mtucky. 

Application forms or information as 
where such forms are available can 

obtained from any post office (ex- 
pt the Atlanta, Georgia post office) 

the Atlanta Regional Office, U. S. 
vil Service Commission, Merchandise 
art Building, 240 Peachtree Street, 

W., Atlanta, Georgia 30303. (To 
ply in person, call at the information 
sk, Federal Office Building, 275 
:achtree Street, N. W., Atlanta, Geor- 
1) 

Further information and applications 
ay be obtained from: Examiner-in- 
large, Board of U. S. Civil Service 
caminers, Room 109, Main Post 
fice Building, Savannah, Georgia. 




'^SHM 



Willcox-Wiley Physical Education Complex 




Willcox-Wiley Health and Physical Education Complex, one of the new constructions 

on Savannah State College campus, named in the memory of Professor Cyrus G. 

Wiley, second president of the College. 




The infirmary on campus is now W. A. Harris Infirmary, named in memory of the late 

W. A. Harris, a local physician. 




J. L. Lester Hall is named in memory of Miss Janie L. Lester. She served the College 
for more than 25 years as a teacher and as Dean of Women. 



William Weston To Speak 
At Alumni Banquet 





William N. Weston, a 1956 graduate 
of the College, will be the speaker for 
the Savannah State College National 
Alumni Association's Banquet on May 
28. The banquet will be held on the 
campus. Classes ending in six will hold 
a reunion at this time. 

Mr. Weston is a native of Savannah, 
and was educated in the local public 
school system. He served in the U. S. 
Air Force prior to entering Savannah 
State College. 

After graduation, he was employed 
for a very brief period as a mathematics 
instructor in Liberty County, Georgia. 
Presently, he is employed as a Mathe- 
matician by the U. S. Naval Observa- 
tory, Washington, D. C. 

He was transferred to NASA, God- 
dard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, 
Maryland, as a Mathematician-Pro- 
grammer. He served as a Group Leader 
for .the Spacetask Track Input Analysis 
and Prediction Group. 

Mr. Weston currently holds member- 
ship in Eureka Lodge No. 1, Savan- 
nah (Masonic Order) ; Washington, 
D. C. Chapter, SSC National Alumni 
Association; Alpha Nu Chapter, Alpha 
Kappa My (Savannah State College); 
and AAAS and ACM (professional 
associations) . 

In 1965, he was cited for rendering 
distinguished tutorial service to the 
"Future for Jimmy" program in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

He serves as First General Assistant 
Superintendent of the Sunday School 
of Metropolitan Baptist Church in 
Washington, D. C. He is a former 
member of First Bryant Baptist Church, 
Savannah, Georgia. 

Mr. Weston is pursuing special 



President's Desk 

(Continued from Page 2) 
a greater Savannah State College, and 
a stronger Alumni Association numeri- 
cally, morally, and financially. ASK 
NOT WHAT YOUR COLLEGE CAN 
DO FOR YOU BUT WHAT YOU CAN 
DO FOR YOUR COLLEGE. 

Hope to hear from you soon. Hope 
to see you in June. 
Sincerely, 

Josie B. Sessoms, President 
National Alumni Association 
Savannah State College 




George E. Varnedoe 



Melvin B. Tolson Opens 
National Library Week 



The distinguished American poet, 
Melvin B. Tolson, opened the celebra- 
tion of National Library Week on the 
Savannah State College campus, with a 
lecture in the College Library on Sun- 
day, April 17. 

Born in 1900 in Moberly, Missouri, 
Melvin Beaunorus Tolson was educated 
at Fisk, Lincoln, and Columbia Univer- 
sities. One of his long poems, "Dark 
Symphony," won a national poetry 
competition conducted by the American 
Negro Exposition at Chicago in 1940. 
Four years later his first book, 
RENDEZVOUS WITH AMERICA, was 
published. In 1947 he was named Poet 
Laureate of Liberia by that republic's 
President, William V. S. Tubman, who 
later decorated him with Liberia's 
highest award, the Star of Africa. For 
the Liberian Centennial and Interna- 
tional Exposition in 1947, he was com- 
missioned to write the LIBERETTO 
FOR THE REPUBLIC OF LIBERIA 
(1953) ; a section of this poem was 
published by POETRY (Chicago) in 
1950. POETRY also awarded Mr. Tol- 
son its annual Bess Hokin Prize in 1951 
for his poem "E. & 0. E." and pub- 
lished his poem "The Man From 
Helicarnassus" in its 40th Anniversary 
Issue of October 1952, which contained 
only solicited works. Mr. Tolson's latest 
book, HARLEM GALLERY: BOOK I, 

studies at the University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 



fi 



THE CURATOR (1965) is the 
volume of a longer work, now 
progress, the theme of which is to be tl 
history of the Negro in America. 

In June 1965 Mr. Tolson retired 
Professor of Creative Literature 
Langston University in Langston, Okl 
homa, where he had been a member 
the faculty since 1947. There he not on 
directed the university's Dust Bo 
Theatre for many years but also serv< 
four terms as mayor of the city. F 
the academic year 1965-66 he occupi 
the Avalon Chair of the Humanities 
Tuskegee Institute. Mr. Tolson and 1 
wife have four children. 

When Dr. Tolson was honored on t 
occasion of his retirement as Profess 
of English at Langston University h 
June, Karl Shapiro journeyed to t 
campus to praise Tolson's contributl 
to American letters. Had Robert Frc 
still been alive, he too would have be 
present, for he had expressed a desi 
to honor Dr. Tolson at Langston. All 
Tate, John Ciardi, and Stanley Hym 
are also among Dr. Tolson's admire 

Among his many achievements, M 
vin B. Tolson was given an honora 
doctor of letter degree from Lincc 
University of Pennsylvania. Last f 
he had the distinction of a request 
read selections from his work befc 
an invited audience in the Library 
Congress. 

All Savannah poetry lovers were :| 
vited to hear this distinguished man 
letters. 



George E. Varnedoe, '51, Receives Honor 



George E. Varnedoe, a 1951 graduate 

' the College, is listed in "Who's Who 

the South and Southwest," volume 

ne, 90th edition, 1965-66, page 947. 

Mr. Varnedoe has been a Counselor 
the Wayne County Training School, 
:sup, Georgia, since September 1959, 
id was assigned full-time beginning 
e school year 1965-66. 

He has done post graduate work at 
tlanta University, and is currently 
riting his thesis for a Master's degree 
guidance and counseling. He hopes 
receive the degree in June or August 
: this year. 

Mr. Varnedoe is a member of the 
•llowing organizations: American Per- 
mnel and Guidance Association; 
r ayne County Teachers Associations; 
.E.A.; and Georgia Teachers and 
ducation Association (serves as 
easurer for the region XI guidance 
;partment). He is a Steward in the 
ME Church, and a Mason. Since its 
•rmulation six years ago, he has been 
le advisor for the Explorer Scouts, 
ost 607. 

He is married to the former Miss 
ena Belle Wynn, and the father of 
iur children. They reside in Mcintosh, 
eorgia. 



Nelson R. Freeman Receives 
Summer Intern Fellowship 

Nelson Ft. Freeman, SSC Dean of 
Students and Placement Director, has 
received a Summer Intern Fellowship 
from Chas. Pfizer & Company of New 
York for the period June 13, 1966, to 
August 5, 1966, according to Dr. 
Howard Jordan, Jr., SSC President. 
Freeman will work in the Corporate 
Relations Division where he will have 
a chance to participate actively and ob- 
serve their overall operating procedures. 

The purpose of this program is to 
acquaint the College Placement Officer 
with various Corporate operating pro- 
cedures and to establish a College- 
Industry relationship for job opportuni- 
ties for quality graduates of Savannah 
State College. 

Pfizer & Company is one of the 
largest manufacturers of pharmaceutical 
products in the world. Their work in- 
volves research, manufacture and sale 
of pharmaceuticals, chemicals, minerals, 
pigments and metals, veterinary and 
agricultural formulations, proprietaries, 
toiletries, cosmetics, and fragrances. 
The company was established in 1849 
and employs 28,000 people with plants 
located throughout the United States 
and in about six foreign countries 
The net assets of the company exceed 
340 million dollars and their sales in 
1965 exceeded 500 million dollars. 



Civil Service 

The Board of U. S. Civil Service 
Examiners, U. S. Army Missile Support 
Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, 
has issued an examination announce- 
ment for Pharmacist, GS-7 and GS-9. 

The examination announcement was 
issued on March 17, 1966, and is open 
continuous. This register will be used 
for filling vacancies at the U. S. Army 
Missile Command, U. S. Army Missile 
Support Command, U. S. Army Missile 
Munitions Center and School, Nike-X, 
and the George C. Marshall Space Flight 
Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. 
Similar positions in other Federal 
agencies in the States of Alabama, 
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North 
Carolina, South Carolina, and Ten- 
nessee may also be filled from this 
announcement when no appropriate 
examination for the specific position is 
announced. 

The salary for Pharmacist, GS-7 is 
$6269 a year; GS-9, $7479 a year. 

To qualify for these positions, ap- 
plicants must possess the experience 
requirements as set forth in Announce- 
ment No. AT-35-13(66). 

All qualified applicants will receive 
consideration for employment without 
regard to race, creed, color or national 
origin. 

Application Form 57 will be accepted 
until the needs of the service are met 
and must be sent to the Board of U.S. 
Civil Service Examiners, U. S. Army 
Missile Support Command, Redstone 
Arsenal, Alabama. 




OLLEGE AIDES HONOR GULF - Daniel G. Kean (second 
•om left). Public Relations Representative of the Gulf Oil 
orporation, receives a plaque from Thomas D. Dooley of 
ie National Association of College Deans & Registrars, hon- 
ring Gulf "for its many contributions to the administration of 
higher education." 



Plaque for "Distinguished Service to Education" is pre- 
sented to Charles Pintchman (center), Assistant Director of 
Public Affairs for the Reader's Digest of Pleasantville, N. Y., 
by Wilton C. Scott, Director of Public Relations at Savan- 
nah State College, Savannah, Ga. 



TEACHERS OF THE YEAR 



Mrs. Eldora S. Green 

Mrs. Eldora S. Green has been 
selected by her co-workers as "Teacher 
of the Year" of Moses Jackson School. 
This is the second time Mrs. Green has 
been so selected, having been selected 
by East Broad Street School when she 
taught there, as its Teacher of the Year. 

Anyone knowing Mrs. Green can 
easily see why her co-workers regard 
her so highly. She is a teacher of the 
highest calibre, both professionally and 
academically. When she is at school, 
teaching comes first with her. She is 
truly a dedicated teacher. Her Principal 
often remarks that she places her with 
the top ten of the teaching profession. 

Mrs. Green is the daughter of Mrs. 
Emily Stevens, and the wife of Mr. 
Joseph Green. Principal of Alfred E. 
Beach High School. She has one son, 
Joseph Green, Jr. 

Mrs. Green has prepared herself well 
for her chosen profession. She received 
her early education locally. She earned 
her B.S. degree at St. Augustine's Col- 
lege, Raleigh, N. C. She has attended 
several local workshops and also a work- 
shop conducted by the Association for 
Student Teaching at the University of 
Puerto Rico at San Juan. She has done 
advanced study at Atlanta University, 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

Mrs. Green is a co-operating certified 
supervising teacher with the Teacher 
Education Program at Savannah State 
College. 

Travel has been a great part of Mrs. 
Green's broadening experiences. She has 
visited many parts of the United States, 
Canada, and Mexico. One summer she 
did "island hopping" around the Carib- 
bean. She says it was quite rewarding 
because it gave her a keener insight 
relative to the ways of life in many 
places. The experiences gained from her 
travels have been invaluable to her in 
her classroom situations. 

Educationally and socially Mrs. Green 
has many affiliations. She is a member 
of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, and a 
communicant of St. Matthew's Episcopal 
Church. 

At present, Mrs. Green is very excited 
over her agenda for the coming sum- 
mer. She has just received confirma- 
tion of her reservations for a tour of 
the Orient. Many interesting places will 
be visited by her. She expects to re- 
turn with broadened horizons because 
of her many exciting experiences this 
summer. 



James Sheppard 

The faculty of John W. Hubert 
Junior High and Elementary School 
chose James Sheppard as its "Teacher 
of the Year." For the past four years 
he has served as an instructor of mathe- 
matics at Hubert. He has attended a 
Mathematics Workshop at Savannah 
State College, and is currently enrolled 
in a data processing course at the same 
institution. He presently serves Hubert 
School as a ninth grade co-ordinator, 
co-chairman of the Textbook Commit- 
tee, chairman of the Budget Committee, 
and Parliamentarian of the P.T.A. 

The honoree holds membership in 
the NEA. ATA, GTEA, and Kappa 
Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. He is very 
sports conscious and works with the 
Frank Callen Boys' Club, and the 
Chatham County Little Leaguers. 

Mr. Sheppard is an Army veteran, 
having spent 18 months in Korea. He 
was discharged with the rank of 
sergeant. 

He is married to the former Miss 
Mercida Walls, and is the father of two 
sons, Marion and Timothy. 

Mrs. Magdalene H. Brown 

Mrs. Magdalene H. Brown was chosen 
as "Teacher of the Year" for Pearl Lee 
Smith School, because she has exhibited 
at all times, sincerity, dedication, and 
conscientiousness toward her pupils, 
parents, and co-workers. 

Mrs. Brown received her early educa- 
tion in the Catholic Schools. Later, she 
was the recipient of the Bachelor of 
Science degree in Elementary Educa- 
tion from Georgia State College, and 
the Master of Arts degree from Colum- 
bia University. She has done further 
study at the University of Minnesota 
and Atlanta UJniversity. She is a com- 
municant of St. Benedict's Church. 

She is very versatile in her educa- 
tional training, and is certified in ele- 
mentary education, foreign languages, 
special education, science, dramatics, 
and art. 

Her long experience in the teaching 
field has given her a wealth of knowl- 
edge that has aided the numerous 
pupils that have been under her super- 
vision. 

Mrs. Brown believes in continuous 
growth. She has had vast experiences 
in travel. She has traveled to California, 
New York, Michigan, the northern and 
southern routes going to California, 
Bermuda, Mexico, Texas, Florida, and 
states along the Atlantic Coast. 
(Continued on Page 17) 




Mrs. Eldora S. Greene 




Thelrna W. Harmond, Associate Profess! 

of Education, reviews inspection copy I 

a new book to be used in one of til 

educational courses. 




Phillip J. Hampton, Assistant Professor 
Fine Arts, thinking over painting of oij 
of his students. 




Mrs. Janette B. Hayes 




5eorge Weaver, Assistant Secretary of 

abor for International Affairs, delivering 

peech at NAACP Convocation in Wiley 

Gymnasium. 




v\iss Jeanette Perry, graduate of Savan- 

lah State College, is newly appointed 

Assistant Attorney General for the state 

of New York. 



Alumna Directing First Head Start 
Program In Savannah -Chatham County 



Mrs. Janette B. Hayes, native Savan- 
nahian, Principal of Jackson Elementary 
School, was accorded the privilege last 
year of directing the first Head Start 
Program in Savannah-Chatham County. 
She was appointed to this position by 
the local Board of Education. The 
classes and faculties of the schools in- 
volved were integrated, which was a 
first in public education for this deep 
South city. 

The very excellent job done by Mrs. 
Hayes and her staff with the Head Start 
Program was acknowledged by all con- 
cerned with it. This program was in the 
nature of a pilot program, and laid the 
ground work for other successful pro- 
grams to follow. 

Mrs. Hayes obtained her early edu- 
cation in our local public schools. She 
attended and was graduated from the 
Philadelphia High School for Girls, 
Philadelphia, Pa. She received her 
normal diploma from Savannah State 
College, then Georgia State College, 
later returning there and earning the 
B. S. degree. 

Mrs. Hayes is a life member of the 
National Education Association, and is 
also a member of the National Ele- 
mentary School Principals of the N.E.A. 
Her local and state professional mem- 
berships are also current. 

For the past several years Mrs. 
Hayes has served as a member of the 
Executive Board of Greenbriar Chil- 
dren's Center. She is also a member of 
the Retirement Board of the Board of 
Public Education, and of the League 
of Women Voters. She holds member- 
ship in other civic and social organiza- 
tions. She is a life long communicant 
of St. Matthew's Episcopal Church. 

Mrs. Hayes' career with the Board of 
Education began in 1926 when she was 
employed as a third and fourth grade 
teacher of Springfield Terrace School. 
When Florance Street School was built 
in 1930, she was transferred there where 
she taught fifth, sixth, and seventh 
grades at various times during her 
twenty-five years' stay there. She was 
also selected as Florance Street School's 
first "Teacher of the Year," for 1955-56. 

After serving two years as Principal 
of Harris Street School, Mrs. Hayes was 
appointed Principal of Moses Jackson 
School, in 1958, where she still serves 
in this capacity. 

For several years Mrs. Hayes was in 
charge of the Adult Education Evening 



classes at Florance School, under the 
supervision of Mr. Wilton C. Scott. 

In 1960, Mrs. Hayes was the re- 
cipient of a Teacher's Medal of Honor 
and Certificate from the Freedom 
Foundation at Valley Forge, Pa. 

Mrs. Hayes is the daughter of the 
late Mr. and Mrs. Mack B. Branham, 
and the widow of the late Gus Hayes, 
prominent business man of Savannah 
during his lifetime. She has two sons, 
Leigh Skipper by a former marriage, 
and Augustus Hayes, Jr. She is the 
very proud grandmother of two boys 
and one little girl. 

By Mrs. Mary Mitchell, 
Publicity Chairman, 
Moses Jackson School 




Mrs. Harriet H. Roberts 
Receives Scholarship 

In September, 
1965, Mrs. Harriet 
Harris Roberts was 
the recipient of a 
Child Welfare Edu- 
cational Leave 
Scholarship from 
the Georgia State 
Department 
of Family and Chil- 
dren Services. Mrs. 
Roberts has been employed as a Public 
Welfare Worker for the Chatham 
County Department of Family and 
Children Services for the past four 
years, and was granted leave from this 
agency to accept the scholarship for an 
academic year. Mrs. Roberts is presently 
attending the New York University 
Graduate School of Social Work, New 
York City. In May, 1966, she will 
complete one year of a two-year pro- 
gram leading to the Master of Social 
Work Degree. 

Mrs. Roberts is a June, 1960 gradu- 
ate of Savannah State College. She is 
a member of the following professional 
and social organizations: Student mem- 
ber A.C.S.W. (Academy of Certified 
Social Workers) and Delta Sigma 
Theta Sorority, Inc. She is a communi- 
cant of St. Matthew's Episcopal Church. 
Mrs. Roberts is the wife of Launey F. 
Roberts, Jr., and the mother of a five- 
year-old daughter, Karen. 






SAVANNAH CHAPTER SSC ALUMNI SALUTES MISS LULA SMITH 




By Leanna T. Wilcox and Ruby King 

Flowers are the gift of nature, 
Some are white, some are yellow, 

and some are red; 
We would rather have one while 

we are living, 
Than one hundred when we are 

dead. 

Thus the Savannah Chapter felt such 
high esteem for Miss Smith and the 
wonderful services rendered by her, that 
a gift tree was presented to her at her 
home on April 9, 1966. 

Miss Smith was among the first grad- 
uates of Savannah State College, which 
she cherished dearly. 

Her work with the Alumni has been 
most outstanding. She has at all times 
been an asset to the organization. The 
service that she has rendered in the of- 
fice as treasurer has been unexcelled. 
In 1956, she was the honoree of "This 
Is Your Life" at which time she received 
a plaque and a book entitled "This Is 
Your Life," which contained some of the 
outstanding achievements of her life. 

Her activities extended far beyond the 
confines of her home, for in the schools, 
churches, and civic organizations, Miss 
Smith was found delving into the prob- 
lems of the community. She was always 
trying to bring sunshine into the lives 
of others. As the poet, Sam Walter Foss, 
says: 

"But I turn not away from their 
smiles nor their tears, 

Both parts of an infinite plan; 

Let me live in my house by the 
side of the road, 

And be a friend to man." 

This was Miss Smith's daily motto. 



A life full of service 

Is hers to give 

With Savannah State's Alumni 

As long as she lives. 

This tribute to Miss Smith 
So touching, so kind 
Is given to her 
By our Saviour Divine. 

The Savannah Chapter 
Misses her smile, 

And hopes for her recovery 
In a very short while. 

Miss Smith has been the Savannah 
Chapter's treasurer for many years, but 
due to her illness, she recently relin- 
quished her duties. 

Miss Lula Smith: 
The Chapter needs more women 

like you; 
Women who are tried and true; 
Women who will not shirk, 
Women who will dare and work! 



TELEGRAM 



Public Relations Officer, Wilton C. Scott 
Savannah State College, Savannah, Ga. 

In behalf of the Savannah State Col 
lege National Alumni Association may 
I extend congratulations and sincere ap- 
preciation to the Board of Regents for 
these contemporary achievements you 
have extended to Savannah State. While 
in executive session today may I urge 
you to give further consideration to the 
materialistic needs of the college in or 
der that its status and productivity as 
well as the intrinsic qualifications of its 
students will be commensurate with any 
other four year institution in the Uni 
versity System. 

Benjamin F. Lewis, 
Executive Vice President 
Savannah State College Nationa 
Alumni Association 



9:00 


P.M. 


6:00 


P.M. 


10:20 


A.M 


2:00 


P.M. 


8:00 


P.M. 


7:30 




10:00 


P.M. 


10:00 


A.M 


5:00 


P.M. 


8:00 


P.M. 



Calendar of Commencement EvenU 

1966 

SATURDAY, MAY 21 

•Junior-Senior Prom Greek Hellenic Cente 

SUNDAY, MAY 22 
Senior Vespers Meldrim Auditoriun 

FRIDAY, MAY 27 

- Senior Class Day Exercises Willcox-Wiley Gymnasiun 

SATURDAY, MAY 28 

Faculty-Staff Picnic Hilton Head Islam 

TUESDAY, MAY 31 
Retirement Dinner Adams Hal 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1 

President's Reception for Seniors President's Residenc 

SATURDAY, JUNE 4 

- Senior Brunch Adams Ha] 

National Alumni Meeting Meldrim Auditoriun 

National Alumni Banquet Adams Hal 

Speaker: Mr. William Weston, Class of '56 

Mathematician-Programmer 
Goddard Space Flight Center 
Greenbelt, Maryland 

SUNDAY, JUNE 5 

Commencement Exercises Willcox-Wiley Gymnasiur 

Address: Dr. Charles H. Wesley 

President and Executive Director 

Association for the Study of Negro Life and History 

Washington, D. C. 

President's Reception for Graduates President's Residenc 

Parents, Alumni, Visitors, and Faculty 



3:00 P.M. 



5:00 P.M. 



10 










Mrs. Leila Butler, "Miss National Alumni" for 1965-66, is 

giving directions to her study group at John W. Hubert 

Junior High School. 



anny Washington, Vice President of the Savannah State 
College Alumni Association. 





Louis J. Lefkowitz, Attorney General for the State of New 

York, goes over assignment sheet with newly appointed 

Assistant Attorney General for the State of New York, 

Jeanette Perry, graduate of Savannah State College. 



ames Thomas, President of the local Alumni Chapter, presents plaque 
nd certificate to Mrs. Nancy H. Walker for outstanding contributions 
J the Alumni Association and to the community and college at large. 



11 



Track Team Wins 
In SEAC Meet 

Savannah State College walked away 
with a first place trophy while compet- 
ing with participants from Albany State, 
Edward Waters, Florida N and I, 
Morris, Paine and Claflin Colleges. 

In the one and two mile runs, Savan- 
nah State, led by powerful William 
Alderman took both first places. Alder- 
man ran the mile in 5.38 and the two 
mile in 10:54.2. Lewis of Paine College 
came in second place in both the one 
and two mile runs. 

SSC's sprinter, James Woods, 
captured first place in the 100 and 200 
yard dashes. Woods ran the 100 yard 
dash in 9.5, and the 220 dash in 22.1. 

In the 440 yard dash Jones and 
Ructer, both of Edward Waters Col- 
lege, took the first and second places 
respectively. The time for this event was 
52.5. 

Savannah State's team, unified in 
their effort, also took first place in the 
880 relay, which was run in 1:32.8. 
Second and third place winners were 
Albany and Florida Normal Colleges 
respectively. 

In the field event, Newsom of Edward 
Waters was the first place winner in 
the discus competition, having thrown 
it 132' d 1 /-/'. Torain of SSC came in 
second and William of Paine was third. 

Newsom gave Edward Waters another 
first place in the Shot Put competition 
by throwing the put 41' l 1 /-/'. Carter of 
SSC came in second place. 

In the javelin competition, John 
Brown and Bradford Torain, both of 
SSC, came in first and second respec- 
tively. Brown came in first place with 
a distance of 160' 7M>". 

A record was set in the pole vault 
competition, when Johnson of Edward 
Waters reached a high of 13 feet. 

Miller of Edward Waters captured 
first place in the broad jump competi- 
tion when he jumped 19' 11". Davis, 
another athlete from Edward Waters 
captured first place in high jumping 
with a high of 6' 6". 

In the 220 low hurdle, Jones of Paine 
College captured first by a 27.2. Woods 
of Savannah State and Martin of Albany 
came in second and third respectively. 

In overall competition Savannah won 
first place by 70 points; Edward Waters, 
second place, 64 points; and Paine 
College, third place, 21 points. 

Officials for the annual event included 
Dr. Raymond Hopson, Leo Richardson, 
Richard Washington, John Mason, 
Frank Simmons, Otis Brock and Luther 
Bligen. The officials were assisted by 
student majors of the SSC Department 
of Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation. 




k i 








Lockette Hall, a dormitory for 180 women, is named in memory of Professor John A 
Lockette and his wife, Eleanora Lockette. Professor Lockette served the College a 
Professor of Mathematics, and Dean of Men. Mrs. Lockette served as Director o 

Dormitories for Men and Women. 




* * * - - 4 ..4 

William K. Payne Hall. A classroom building named in the memory of Dr. Willian 
K. Payne, a native of Alabama, who spent more than a quarter of a century on thi 
faculty of Savannah State College. He was head of the Department of Education anc 
Dean of the Faculty from 1940 to 1949, and was President of the College from 194! 
to the time of his death in July, 1963. Under the leadership of Dr. Payne, the institu 
tion was accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 




Benjamin F. Hubert Technical Sciences Center is named in memory of Dr. Benjamin F| 

Hubert, who served the College as third president from 1926 to 1947. During hi: 

tenure, the academic program was reorganized and the institution became a fouri 

year college. 



12 



ALUMNI - ALUMNAE 





r> 




Clifford E. Bryant, 
'53, is employed as 
a Research Assistant 
at the Institute of 
Applied Biology in 
New York City. His 
wife, Laura Tukes 
Bryant, is employed 
as an L.P.N. They 
are members of the 
New York City 
Chapter. Savannah 
State College Na- 
tional Alumni As- 
sociation. 



Mrs. Delores Dor- 
sey Stevens, '57, is 
employed at Youth 
House, Inc., Bronx, 
New York, as Head 
Supervisor. She is a 
member of the New 
York City Chapter, 
Savannah State Col- 
lege National Alum- 
ni Association. 



iik 



Albert B. Bryant, 
'60, is employed as 
a Case Worker with 
the New York City 
Department of Wel- 
fare. He is President 
of the New York 
Chapter of the Sa- 
vannah State Col- 
lege National Alum- 
ni Association. 



Mrs. Marian L. 
W olden Fields is 
employed as a Book- 
keeper with the As- 
sociation for Middle 
Income Housing in 
New York City. She 
is a member of the 
New York Chapter, 
Savannah State Col- 
lege National Alum- 
ni Association. 




Mrs. Gwendolyn 
Dawson Roberts, 
'64, is a teacher at 
Moses Jackson 
School, Savannah, 
Ga. She is the 
mother of three 
children, and mar- 
ried to Sidney Rob- 
erts, employed at 
the Sugar Refinery. 




/ 



Mrs. Rena W. 
Varnedoe, a gradu- 
ate of Liberty 
County Training 
School and Savan- 
nah State College, 
has done advance 
study at Atlanta 
University and 
South Carolina State 
College. 
She is employed by the Liberty 
County Board of Education in Mc- 
intosh. Georgia, as a Guidance Coun- 
selor for Liberty County High School. 
Mrs. Varnedoe is married to George 
E. Varnedoe of Mcintosh, Georgia. 
They are the parents of four children. 
Marjory, Franklin Lamar, Celestine. 
and Arnita Delores, ages fifteen, 
thirteen, nine, and three. 



Clarence Groover, '62, has been 
offered employment as a GS-7 at God- 
dard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, 
Maryland. 

At the College, Mr. Groover majored 
in mathematics and minored in physics. 
He was a member of Newtonian Honor 
Society, and Alpha Kappa Mu Tutorial 
Society. 

He served in the U. S. Army from 
January 16. 1963 to February 3. 1966. 
While in the service, he performed 
electrical and electronic maintenance on 
the Nike Hercules Air Defense Missile 
system, and served as an instructor of 
General Science at the U. S. Arms Force 
Institute in Europe. 

Mr. Groover has worked toward the 
M.A. degree at the University of South- 
ern California in Aerospace Manage- 
ment. 




President and Mrs. Howard Jordan, Jr. 
entertain Honor Societies. 



Peace Corps Publishes 
Overseas Job Directory 

WASHINGTON— The Peace Corps 
this week published a directory listing 
some 120 training programs it is launch- 
ing this Summer for 47 nations of Asia. 
Africa and Latin America. Directed at 
the Class of '66, the directory is being 
mailed to thousands of college seniors 
and graduate students across the United 
States. 

The directory marks several advances 
in Peace Corps planning. It is the first 
guide of its kind published by the Peace 
Corps and its contents represent the 
largest number of training programs 
and the largest number of overseas job 
openings — over 7.000 — in the organiza- 
tion's five-year history. 

The directory contains descriptions 
of each program scheduled to the June. 
July, August training phase. The pro- 
grams are listed by type and geo- 
graphical region and are indexed by 
appropriate college major. They in- 
clude: 

Latin America — community develop- 
ment, education (teaching at all levels), 
technical and industrial education, rural 
education/community development, edu- 
cational television/television literacy; 
public and municipal administration; 
food/agriculture/4-H, physical educa- 
tion, nursing/social work/pre-school, 
health, cooperatives, electrification, arts 
crafts and secretarial. 

Africa — education, health, agricul- 
ture, land settlement, domestic arts and 
home improvement, community develop- 
ment, highway development, construc- 
tion, fisheries, social welfare and adult 
and vocational education. 

North Africa, Near East and South 
Asia — education, community develop- 
ment, rural literacy, food produc- 
tion/agriculture, health, family plan- 
ning; youth work, public works, archi- 
tecture/city planning, small industry 
development and warehousing. 

Far East — education, educational 
radio and television, physical education 
and health. 

Copies of the directory can be ob- 
tained from campus placement offices 
or by writing the Division of Public 
Information, Peace Corps, Washington, 
D. C. 20525. 



13 



Principal of Tompkins High School Dies 



James E. Luten, Principal of Tomp- 
kins High School expired in Savannah. 
Georgia on Thursday. March 24. 

Mr. Luten. a native of Savannah. 
Georgia, attended Haven Home Meth- 
odist School, and Beach-Cuyler High 
School. He attended Georgia State Col- 
lege High School, and graduated in 
1939 with a B.S. degree in Agriculture. 
In 1953, he received the M.S. degree 
from Tuskegee Institute. He has done 
further study at New York University. 

Mr. Luten was employed hy the 
Chatham County Board of Education 
in September. 1939 as Vocational 
Agriculture Teacher. He served in this 
capacity for 16 years. In 1954, he was 
appointed Principal of Tompkins High 
School. 

In 1956, Mr. Luten was appointed by 
F. C. Underwood to the Executive Com- 
mittee on "bands for better schools." 
In 1960, he became Vice-Director of 
Region XI, Georgia Teachers and Edu- 
cation Association, in 1962 he was ap- 
pointed Director. He was past-president 
of the Savannah State College National 
Alumni Association. He served in this 
capacity for four years. He was a mem- 
ber of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. 
Mr. Luten was a member of Speedwell 
N. E. Church, Sandfly, Georgia. 

Survivors include: Mrs. Edna Kemp 
Luten. wife; Mrs. Annie Mae Luten, 



mother; Mrs. Viola Flynn, Miss Mary 
K. Luten. Mrs. Janie L. Blake, Mrs. 
Ann Richardson, sisters; Jack M. Luten, 
Norman W. Luten. Walter E. Luten. and 
Alexander S. Luten. brothers. 



Leo Richardson Elected 
President of the SEAC 

Leo Richardson, head football and 
basketball coach at the College became 
the first athletic official in the historv 
of the College to be elected President 
of the Southeastern Athletic Conference. 
The meeting was held at Claflin Col- 
lege in Orangeburg, S. C. 

Coach Richardson received the B.S. 
degree from Morris College, and the 
M.A. degree from Tuskegee Institute. 

Another Savannah State College 
athletic official, Richard Washington, 
head track coach, was named Track 
Coach of the Year. 

Members of the Southeastern Athletic 
Conference are: Morris College, Sumter, 
South Carolina; Paine College, Augusta, 
Georgia; Claflin College, Orangeburg, 
South Carolina; Florida Memorial Col- 
lege, St. Augustine, Florida; Albany 
State College, Albany, Georgia; Savan- 
nah State College, Savannah, Georgia; 
and Edward Waters College, Jackson- 
ville, Florida. 



Roberts Publishes Article ii 
'Negro Educational Review 

An article entitled "The Americai 
Educational System and the Negro, : 
written by Launey F. Roberts, Jr., As 
sistant Principal, John W. Huber 
School. Savannah, Georgia, and Assist 
ant Coordinator - Supervisor Chatham 
Savannah Adult Basic Education Pro 
gram was published in the Januar 
edition of "The Negro Educationa 
Review." 

The article, which is a culminatioi 
of intensive research done by th 
author while in graduate school, is j 
critical analysis of tenets of our edu 
cational setup indicating many of th 
inequitable and iniquitous condition 
boys and girls from culturally and in 
tellectually deprived backgrounds hav 
been subjected to through the years 
The article lists recommendations an< 
suggestions for improving and correct 
ing these conditions. 

Mr. Roberts received his Baccalaure 
ate Degree from Savannah State College 
in August. 1959. In October, 1962 h 
received the Master of Arts Degree ii 
Educational Administration from Nev 
York University. During the summe 
of 1963 he did advanced gradual 
study in Educational Administration a 
Atlanta University. Aside from hi 
academic achievements and professiona 
work, Mr. Roberts is affiliated with th 
following social and professional organ 
izations: Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity 
Inc., Midtown Toastmasters Club 
N.E.A., G.T. & E.A., C.C.T.A., A.T.A 
and is a communicant of Sain 
Matthew's Episcopal Church, Savannah 




Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. receives plaque for institution from 
Coca-Cola Bottling Company. 



The Honorable George Weaver was presented a Key to th<| 
City by the Mayor, during his visit to Savannah. 



14 




GRADUATE RETIRES FROM THE ARMY 



Major Charles L. Holliman 
(Right) 



m* - 




)r. Melvin B. Tolson, an eminent Negro 

>oet, addresses poetry lovers during the 

elebration of National Library Week on 

the Savannah State College campus. 




Major Charles L. Holliman has left 
the battlefields and hospitals where he 
distinguished himself so greatly to take 
up a new career — that of a teacher. He 
hopes soon to join his brother, M. C. 
Holliman, a medical technician at Clax- 
ton Memorial Hospital, in Dublin, Ga., 
where he plans to teach in one of the 
local secondary schools. 

The 1949 graduate of Savannah State 
College was awarded the Second Oak 
Leaf Cluster to the Army Commenda- 
tion Medal in a ceremony held in the 
office of Brigadier General Philip W. 
Mallory, the Commander of Walter 
Reed General Hospital. 

The ceremony marked the end of the 
major's twenty year career, first as an 
enlisted man in World War II, and later 
as an officer in the Korean War. 

In this latest award of the Army 
Commendation Medal, the former 
American University student was cited 
for his "exemplary performance of 
duty" as the Administrator of Walter 
Reed's Pathology Service from June 
1962 to March 1966. 

The citation read in part: "Major 
Holliman formulated a new accounting 
system which enabled work units to be 
recorded and compiled in an accurate 
and meaningful tabulation. This en- 
abled the need for laboratory services 



to be more effectively adapted to the 
available space and personnel. This ac- 
counting system also was most useful 
and effective in demonstrating our re- 
quirements as to personnel, space and 
funds. Major Holliman was also very 
successful in insuring that changes 
necessitated by automation would in- 
crease the efficiency and output without 
affecting the morale of the personnel." 
Major Holliman's previous Army 
Commendation Medals cited him for in- 
cidents which occurred at what he would 
consider to be the high points of his 
career. 

His first award cited him for his care 
and treatment of 700 casualties during 
the Korean War. There were no doctors 
available, and Major Holliman, then a 
lieutenant, drew on his experience as 
a combat medic in World War II in 
order to treat them. To do so, he re- 
called he had to perform tasks which 
ordinarily would require a field 
surgeon. Of the 700 casualties, only one 
died. 

His second award covered his service 
as commander of the 563rd Ambulance 
Company in Korea during the period 
1951 to 1952. 

Major Holliman's presence at Gen- 
eral MacArthur's landing on Leyte in 
the Philippines highlighted his career 
as a World War II enlisted man. 



Western Electric Features Alumnus in Ad 



Dr. Cornelius B. Troup, President of Fort 
/alley State College, motivates his audi- 
ence at the Honors Day Convocation held 
at Savannah State College. 



Bobby Burgess, '62, is featured in a 
Western Electric advertisement. The 
upper part of the advertisement con- 
tains a picture of Mr. Burgess at work. 
The copy reads as follows: 

"Know that Bell telephone on your 
table? It's made from copper, iron, zinc, 
gold and a variety of other materials. 
All must meet precise standards of 
quality and purity. 

"Chemist Bobby Burgess at West- 
ern Electric's plant in Indianapolis tests 
the exact composition of such materials 
— before they can be put in your tele- 
phone. 

"With a spectrograph Mr. Burgess 
can detect impurities as small as one 
millionth of an ounce. In fact, he has 
made valuable contributions to Western 



Electric's cost reduction program by 
extending the use of the fast spectro- 
graphs techniques to replace lengthy 
wet chemical tests. 

"Mr. Burgess gained his basic skills 
in chemistry at Savannah State College 
in Georgia. Now he is studying for a 
Master's degree in metallurgical engi- 
neering at Purdue University. 

Western Electric relies on inventive, 
resourceful people like Bobby Burgess 
in the office, the lab and the plant. 
Keeping the cost of your telephone 
service down is as important to Western 
Electric as it is to your Bell telephone 
company. We are the same Bell System 
team. We have been since 1882, work- 
ing together with the same purpose: to 
keep bringing you the world's finest 
telephone service at low cost." 



15 



Assistant Secretary of Labor Weaver 
Spoke At Savannah State College 



On Friday, March 25, at the regular 
all-college assembly, the Savannah State 
College Chapter of NAACP presented 
its annual assembly program. The 
speaker was the Honorable George L. 
P. Weaver. Assistant Secretary of Labor 
for International Affairs. 

Mr. Weaver has had a distinguished 
career. He is the first American to be 
awarded the Malaysian Panglima 
Mangku Megara. The award, presented 
to him in person, September 7, 1963 
by the Malaysian head of state in the 
capital of Kuala Lumpur, honors him 
for his distinguished contribution to 
the development of a democratic labor 
movement in that country. Mr. Weaver 
was also the recipient of the Eleanor 
Roosevelt key. in November 1961, for 
outstanding service to the world com- 
munity. He was awarded an honorary 
Doctorate of Laws by Howard Univer- 
sity, June 1962. 

Formerly Special Assistant to then 
Secretary of Labor Arthur J. Goldberg, 
Mr. Weaver was named to his present 
post by President John F. Kennedy, 
July 21, 1961. 

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on 
May 18, 1912, Weaver received his 
elementary and secondary education in 
Dayton, Ohio. He later attended the 
YMCA school in Chicago ( now Roose- 
velt University ) and Howard University 
Law School. In 1941, Weaver went to 
work with the Congress of Industrial 
Organizations (CIO) as a member of 
the War Relief Committee. In 1942, he 
was named Assistant to the Secretary- 
Treasurer and Director of the Civil 
Rights Committee of the CIO. He served 
in both capacities until 1955 when the 
AFL merged with the CIO, at which 
time he was appointed Executive Secre- 
tary of the AFL-CIO Civil Rights Com- 
mittee. 

In October of 1950, Weaver was 
named Special Assistant to the Chair- 



man of the National Security Resources 
Board. The following year he joined 
the Reconstruction Finance Corpora- 
tion, helping in its reorganization and 
at the same time studying labor prob- 
lems in the Far East and Southeast 
Asia for the International Confedera- 
tion of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU). 

In 1958, Weaver became the Assist- 
ant to the President of the International 
Union of Electrical, Radio and Ma- 
chine Workers (IUE) and directed their 
political education program. His work 
with the CIO and the IUE was inter- 
rupted on several occasions when he 
was put on special assignment by the 
U. S. Government and the ICFTU. 

Weaver also served as the LI. S. 
Government representative on the Gov- 
erning Body of the International Labor 
Organization and Chairman of the U. S. 
Delegation to the ILO Conference at 
Geneva, Switzerland. 

He is a member of the NAACP, 
several clubs and the Omega Psi Phi 
fraternity. 

Mr. Weaver addressed himself to the 
topic, "The Negro in International 
Affairs — Prospect for the Future." 

Officers of the Savannah State Col- 
lege Chapter of the NAACP include: 
Ithamus Studgeon, Engineering Tech- 
nology major, senior, President; James 
Phillip Sapp, III. Social Science major, 
senior. Vice President; Clemontine 
Freeman, Physical Education major, 
senior. Secretary; Skelton Key, Business 
Administration major, sophomore, 
Treasurer; Roy Thomas, Social Science 
major, junior, Chaplain and James 
Dean, Business Administration, sopho- 
more, Parliamentarian. E. J. Josey, 
Librarian and Associate Professor, 
serves as Faculty Advisor. 

The public was invited to hear this 
great American statesman. 




Fine Arts Center — Nearing Completion 



Burke County 
Chapter Reorganized 

The Burke County Chapter of th 
Savannah State College National Alumn 
Association was reorganized Octobe 
28, 1965, in Waynesboro, Georgia 
Plans were made for an effective organ 
ization under the leadership of th 
following officers, who were electei 
after giving all members sufficient tim 
to assess their leadership abilities: G 
Samuel Stone, President; Mrs. Eunic 
Childers, Vice President; Miss Quee; 
Esther Griffin, Secretary; Mrs. Hatti 
Bland, Treasurer; and Tampa Browr 
Reporter. 

The members pledged to donat 
personal money for the scholarshi 
fund. This $50 was presented at th 
homecoming meeting by R. E. Blakeney 
Principal, Blakeney High and Eld 
mentary School. 

Directors for the group have bee; 
elected. These principals of variou 
schools in the county, and persons wit 
influence in the community, will hel 
shape policy and influence members t 
participate fully in the associatior 
They are: Mrs. Susan Berrien. Assist 
ant Principal, Blakeney High School 
Porter Hankerson. Principal. Girarl 
Junior High School; George Williams 
Principal, Midville Junior High School 
Mrs. Ellen Anthony, Teacher, Palme 
Elementary School; Julian Bell, Teach 
er, Cousin Junior High School; an 
Reverend C. I. Benefield, Principa 
Gough Elementary School. 

The membership is presently core 
posed of 47 persons employed as teach 
ers and principals, with the exceptioi 
of G. Samuel Stone, President, who i 
employed as a County Agricultural Es 
tension Agent. 

To enhance the image of Savanna! 
State College in the community, th 
organization presented the Savanna! 
State College Men's Glee Club in con| 
cert on March 28, 1966. This was thl 
major fund raising project for the year! 
From this project, the association wili 
give scholarships to deserving students 
who matriculate at Savannah Statn 
College, and contribute to the scholar 
ship fund. Another project is bein; 
planned. 

The organization feels that the imagU 
of the College could be reflected hi 
cultural programs, consisting of teas] 
lectures, forums, etc., and these ari 
currently being planned. A banquet an<i 
ball in the spring featuring an outstand 
ing speaker or artist will culminate th 
activities for the Chapter. 



16 



Teachers of the Year 

(Continued from Page 8) 

Mrs. Emma D. Lindsey 

The faculty and pupils of M. G. 
aynes Elementary School selected Mrs. 
mma D. Lindsey, an outstanding first 
nd second grade teacher, as their 
readier of the Year" for 1966-67. 

The honor was bestowed upon Mrs. 
indsey because of her elementary and 
igh school training in the local schools 
ad her B.S. degree from Savannah 
tate College. She continued her educa- 
on at Columbia University, where she 
:ceived her M.A. degree. She has at- 
mded workshops in foreign languages, 
:ience, mathematics, and art. She is 
rairman of the Junior Red Cross Club 
E Haynes School, and serves on the 
.T.A. executive committee. 

Mrs. Lindsey is affiliated with many 
rofessional and social organizations, 
he is a communicant of the St. Bene- 
ict Catholic Church, and a teacher in 
le Sunday School. She is a member 
f the Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority. 



Ernest S. Brown 

The faculty of Scott Junior High 
chool chose Ernest S. Brown as its 
Teacher of the Year." 

Mr. Brown is an excellent educator 
ho has the esteem of the student body, 
3 well as the faculty. 

He is a member of several profes- 
onal, social, and civic organizations, 
ome of them are: GTEA, CCTA, NEA, 
'mega Psi Phi Fraternity and Savan- 
ah State College Alumni Association. 

Mr. Brown received his B.S. degree 
"om Savannah State College and a 
taster's degree from Bradley Univer- 
ty in Peoria, Illinois. 

He is an ardent member of St. Paul 
aptist Church, where he serves in many 
apacities. Mr. Brown is the proud 
ither of three children, and is married 
) the former Gloria Spaulding. 

The faculty of Scott graciously en- 
:rtained Mr. Brown with a dinner party 
t the Boar's Head. The principal, 0. L. 
•ouglas, presented a beautiful plaque 
) the honoree. 




The Honorable Carl E. Sanders, Governor of Georgia, delivering the Dedicatory 
Address at a program of dedication for six newly named buildings at Savannah State 
College. The program was held in Wiley Gymnasium on the campus at 2:30 p.m., on 

March 9, 1966. 



I 





The Basketball Team won a first place conference trophy at the Southeastern Athletic 
Conference held recently at Albany State College. Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. poses with 
team members after congratulating Carl Crump, a guard who was cited with recog- 
nition to the second conference team and all-tourney competition; Jerome Johnson, 
forward, co-captain; President Jordan; Charles Day, forward and co-captain; Frank 
Ellis, guard and co-captain, and Coach Leo Richardson, who was named Coach of 
the Year at the All-Conference Tournament. 




Dr. Charles Pratt, Professor of Chemistry and Head, Department of Chemistry, explains 
to students how to use the Gas Chromatograph, a new instrument in the Chemistry 

Department. 



17 



SSC Presents Awards To Two 
Outstanding American Librarians 



The staff of Savannah State College 
Library presented awards to two out- 
standing American librarians during 
National Library Week. 

In a letter to Eric Moon announcing 
the award, E. J. Josey, Librarian of 
Savannah State College indicated that 
"The Savannah State College Library 
Staff feels that your rapid rise in the 
Bowker Company to the Board of Direc- 
tors is a clear indication of the kind 
of leadership that you are giving to one 
of the oldest and greatest publishing 
houses, dedicated to service for the 
library profession. Not only have you 
advanced librarianship through the po- 
sition as Editor of Library Journal, but 
you have signally sensitized the library 
profession to many of its neglected 
obligations, including the democratiza- 
tion of the American Library Associa- 
tion, and pointing up many unexplored 
areas of librarianship that are not prob- 
lems, but golden opportunities." 

Mr. Moon has had an illustrious 
career. He came to Library Journal 
from Newfoundland, where he has been 
director of public library services for 
the Province and secretary-treasurer of 
the Newfoundland Public Libraries 
Board. Mr. Moon went to Canada in 
1958 from England, where he had served 
in five public library systems and was 
prominent among young leaders of the 
profession. He served on a Canadian 
Library Association committee to com- 
pare U. S., Canadian and Common- 
wealth library education and qualifica- 
tions. 

Mr. Moon entered library work in 
1939 in the Southhampton Public 
Libraries, then served in the Royal Air 
Force in Britain, India and Singapore. 
He studied at the Loughborough School 
of Librarianship, and is a specialist in 
historical bibliography. He organized 
the first bookmobile service in the 
Hertfordshire County Library, set up 
a reader's advisory service and a public 
relations program at the Finchley 
Public Libraries, was deputy chief 
librarian at Brentford and Chiswick 
Public Libraries and became head of 
bibliographical services at the Ken- 
sington (London) Public Libraries be- 
fore moving to Newfoundland. 



Mr. Moon has lectured at library 
training institutions in England. He was 
for several years an officer of the As- 
sociation of Assistant Librarians and is 
a past chairman of its Greater London 
Division. He was the first editor of the 
British Library Association's magazine, 
LIAISON, started in 1957, has con- 
tributed frequently to professional pub- 
lications and has written reviews and 
historical pieces for Canadian maga- 
zines and script for the Canadian Broad- 
casting System. He is very active in the 
American Library Association and the 
New York Library Association. He was 
recently elected to the Board of Direc- 
tors of the Bowker Company. 

The second award will go to Dr. 
Virginia Lacy Jones, Dean, School of 
Library Service, Atlanta University, 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

In a letter to Mrs. Jones it was 
pointed out that the staff is presenting 
this award "for your outstanding con- 
tribution to library education and for 
the signal honor and distinction which 
you recently received as being the first 
Negro to become President-Elect of the 
American Association. You have made 
the Atlanta University Library School 
one of the great library schools in the 
country. Savannah State College is 
honored to bestow this award to such a 
distinguished person as yourself." 

Considered to be one of the leading 
library educators in the country, Mrs. 
Jones, who in private life is the wife 
of Dr. E. A. Jones, Professor of French 
at Morehouse College, has had a long 
and distinguished career as a librarian 
and library educator. 

Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Mrs. Jones 
was educated at Hampton Institute, 
University of Illinois and received the 
Ph.D. degree from the University of 
Chicago. She has served as Librarian 
of Louisville Municipal College and 
Hampton Institute. She has served as 
Director of the Department of Library 
Science at Prairie View State College 
and as Catalog Librarian at Atlanta 
University. Since 1945, she has been 
Dean of the School of Library Service 
at Atlanta University. She is very active 
in the American Library Association, 



the NAACP, the Association of Library 
Schools and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. 
Mrs. Jones has contributed articles to 
many professional magazines. Under 
her leadership, the Atlanta University 
School of Library Service received a 
grant of more than $300,000 to improve 
the school. Today, the Atlanta Univer 
sity School of Library Service is con 
sidered one of the leading library 
schools in the country. 

Previous award winners were, ir 
1964. Milton Byam, Deputy Librarian 
Brooklyn Public Library and in 1965 
Miss Ruth Walling, Associate Directoi 
of Libraries, Emory University. 

The awards were presented by Dr 
Howard Jordan, Jr., President of Sa 
vannah State College with Dr. Rober 
D. Reid, the Dean of the college, read 
ing the citation, at the annual Nationa 
Library Week Convocation which was 
held on Friday, April 22. 

In his acceptance speech, Mr. Moor 
stated, "I am not normally very en 
chanted with awards, but around Na 
tional Book Awards time I can ge 
positively cynical and liverish about tht 
whole subject. At such times, it seem 
to me that awards are too often tokei 
appreciation for sheer staying power 
i.e., seniority (in the most liverisl 
moments, I think senility, or for ex 
treme orthodoxy). 

"Somebody once said that a man i:j 
known by the company he keeps." A: 
I look at the names of the other winner: 
of this award — Milt Byam, Ruth Wall 
ing, and my friend Virginia Lacy Jonej 
— I must tell you that I am both de 
lighted with the company and flatterec 
that you should place me in it. 

"Let me add also that I am pleasec 
to be here in your company. You 
librarian is not just a friend but, in nr 
view, one of the most courageous 
librarians in the country. We havi 
fought side by side in the past, and 
will doubtless do so again. Somebody 
most certainly, should give him ai 
award." 

"For mine, thank you very much, 
will try to live up to it." 



13 



TEXT OF REMARKS 



By Governor Carl E. Sanders at the dedication of six 
new buildings at Savannah State College in Wiley Gym- 
nasium on the campus at 2:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 
9, 1966. 



PRESIDENT JORDAN, REVEREND MR. WIL- 
[AMS, MR. SOLMS, CHAIRMAN DUNLAP, CHAN- 
ELLOR SIMPSON. CHAIRMAN LOVETT, MAYOR 
ACLEAN, MAYOR GILREATH, MEMBERS OF THE 
OARD OF REGENTS, DISTINGUISHED GUESTS, 
ND MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY AND STUDENT 
ODY OF SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE: 

This is a banner day for higher education in Savan- 
ih, and it has been my pleasure to share it with you 
;re at Savannah State and over at Armstrong. 

As Governor of Georgia, I have stressed over and 
/er again the importance of education. I have urged 
e people of Georgia to invest in the future of our State 
| making our educational programs adequate. 

It is thus with a deep sense of satisfaction that, as the 

rst Governor of Georgia to visit Savannah State College. 

come to dedicate six beautiful, functional, and im- 

ressive buildings for this outstanding educational in- 

itution. 

To build an exceptional educational program we must 
ove forward on many fronts. We need determined and 
iger students. We need an able and enthusiastic faculty 
id administration. And we need a good physical plant, 
scause you cannot prepare a 20th Century student to 
ve in a 21st Century world in 19th Century buildings. 

The Governor and the Legislature very properly are 
cpected to refrain from day-to-day involvement in 
:ademic affairs. We are, however, frequently asked to 
:t aside state moneys for academic affairs, and this the 
Dvernment of Georgia has done. 

In the four years of my Administration, we will have 
nanced $163-million worth of college construction, 
his is $40-million more than the total of funds spent 
ir college construction during the entire 32 years of 
le University System's previous existence. 

Earlier today I dedicated the new campus of Arm- 
rong College, which was a total investment of $3-and- 
ne-half million, with about $2-and-a-quarter million 
)ming directly from the State. 

And now, it is my privilege to dedicate six buildings 
ere at Savannah State which will represent only part of 
le more than $3,000,000 worth of construction which 
lis Administration is financing at your growing and 
tpanding college. 

In the seventy-four years since it was located at this 
te, Savannah State College has produced many fine 
iucators, and the buildings we name today are dedicated 
l their honor. Today we officially dedicate: 



— A classroom building named for the late Dr. 
William K. Payne whose 25 years of service to Savannah 
State brought many improvements, as well as accredi- 
tation by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 

— Two women's dormitories, housing 280 women 
with one building named for the late Dean of Women, 
Janie L. Lester, and the other in memory of the late 
Professor and Mrs. John A. Lockette, who served, respec- 
tively, as Professor of Mathematics and Director of 
Dormitories. 

The library is named for the late Professor Asa H. 
Gordon, a former Dean of the College and Director of 
Research and Publications. 

The Technical Sciences Building is dedicated in 
memory of the late President Benjamin F. Hubert, who 
was president from 1926 to 1947. 

And finally, we dedicate a new annex, containing a 
swimming pool, to the Willcox-Wiley Gymnasium, which 
already has been formally named. 

I join with you in thanking the members of the 
families of these distinguished faculty members for their 
presence today. 

And I urge every student here, and every faculty 
member, to make the best possible use of these facilities. 
The State can provide the brick and mortar, but it must 
be your efforts and your willingness to learn and teach 
that will make them worthwhile. 

The college student of today, in one sense, has a 
harder task than when I was in school or when your 
faculty members were in school. In another sense it is 
easier because America and our own State of Georgia 
have come to realize that without education our people 
are doomed to poverty and poor health and poor jobs. 
Without the information and the processes of thought 
and accomplishment that quality education can give, our 
people would be barred forever from the bright promise 
of'the future. 

But with education, the doors to the future are opened 
wide, and through them can march a confident and 
united people. 

This march has begun, and with it comes our long- 
sought promise of tomorrow. 

To each of you, I wish good luck and Godspeed. 

Thank you. 



19 






During charm week at Savannah State College, the 
Mantle of Honor for the Junior woman with the 
highest scholastic average is passed to Miss Vivian 
McMillan by Miss Louise Tarber, the last year's recipi- 
ent. Miss Tarber is the highest ranking Senior woman 
at Savannah State College. 



The above Savannah State College beauties were competitors 
for the title of "Miss SSC" for the 1965-66 school term. Left 
to right are Jacquelyn Mack of Savannah, a junior business 
administrative major; Yvonne Le Counte of Midway, a junior 
English major; and Dorothy McPhalter of Sylvania, a junior 
elementary education major. Miss Le Counte was elected by 
SSC's more than 1400 students to wear the crown of "campus 

queen." 



Patricia V. Brown of Metter, Ga., a senior Sociology 
major and Miss Savannah State College, delivers ad- 
dress to students, faculty and visitors at an annual 
Mother's Day Vesper honoring the mothers of SSC 
students during the college's 20th annual Charm 
Week program. "Women on the Move" was the 
theme for the annual Charm Week celebration. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 




..^i^s"' , ?s:rff:? s r?:.!r:; 



.fjf 



MISS SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

Yvonne LeCounte 






HOMECOMING EDITION 

1966 



"IMAGINATION" 



That minister of ministers, 
Imagination, gathers up 
The undiscovered universe 
Like jewels in a jasper cup. 

John Davidson 



Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, 
and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is. 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE BULLETIN 

President Dr. Howard Jordan, J; 

Director of Public Relations and Editor-in-Chief Wilton C. Sco 

Issue Editor Carolyn R. Scree 

Feature Editor J. Randolph Fishe 

Photographer Robert Mobk 

Volume XIX November, 1966 Number 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly in October, December, February, March, April, and May by Savannah State Collej 
Second Class mail privileges authorized at Savannah, Georgia. 




PRESIDENTS 
MESSAGE 




war d 



Jotd 



atl > Jr. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



GREETINGS TO ALUMNI AND FRIENDS ON HOMECOMING, 1966 

As always, I am happy indeed to welcome our Alumni who have come back 
home to share with us this gala 1966 Homecoming Celebration. It is a distinct 
pleasure, too, to welcome all of our friends to the expanding Savannah State College 
campus. Your presence here, today, expresses to us your interest, support, and 
goodwill. Continuation of the kind of enthusiastic support which you have given 
over the years will make it possible for Savannah State College to move further 
ahead towards excellence in the academic world. 

This year, we are happy to report the largest enrollment in the history of 
the college. Our student body now numbers over sixteen hundred students. Higher 
academic standards, long range vision and planning, and striving for excellence in 
all of our activities are our commitments, as we strive to make a bigger and better 
SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE. We invite you to visit with us as often as you find it 
possible. 

We are especially happy to host our good friends from our sister institution 
at Fort Valley State College. I am sure that our athletic competition on the gridiron 
will be an outstanding example of fine sportsmanship. We look forward with enthusi- 
asm to many such meetings in the years ahead. 

Mrs. Jordan and I hope to have the opportunity of greeting each of you 

personally after the game. 

Best wishes and please drive carefully on your way back home . , 

Sincerely ,0 

i "JOw* A _^^w_»- ■-_> 
V — S Howard* Jofd&n, Jr; ■ 
■* President 




PRESIDENTS 
MESSAGE 




nchet 



m } t gin* falleg ^Mt (Ecli^e 



Jforf ^lalkg, (ieorgta 



OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 



STATEMENT FROM THE PRESIDENT 



GREETINGS FROM THE FORT VaLLEY STATE COLLEGE 
It is a pleasure to extend greetings from the F.V.S.C. 
to Savannah State College for this Homecoming game. 
There has always existed a friendly rivalry between 
these sister institutions. Fair play and good sports- 
manship have always characterized athletic contests be- 
tween our two institutions. May the better team win. 

Cordially yours, 

W. W. E. Blanc he t 
Acting President 



SA V ANN AH 

STATE 

-60tbE&E-\ 

IN 

CAPSULE 




Savannah State College, founded in 1890, is located in the historic city of 
Savannah, Georgia, which is the oldest and chief seaport of the state as well as 
the first capital. 

A unit of the University System of Georgia, Savannah State College is a four- 
year accredited college of arts and sciences, teacher education, business administra- 
tion and technology. 

Savannah State College has one of the most beautiful campuses in the South. 
The campus comprises 136 acres of matchless natural beauty. Attractive new build- 
ings are constantly being built. Put into use last year was Lockette Hall, an air- 
conditioned dormitory for 180 women students; Wiley-Willcox Physical Education 
Complex, which houses a swimming pool; and W. K. Payne Hall, an air-conditioned 
classroom building. 



The John F. Kennedy Fine Arts Center will be put into use during the Winter Quarter of this school term. 

Another dormitory for 180 male students is in the final stages of construction. 

For the Biennium of 1966-68 Savannah State College has requested from The Board of Regents the follow- 
ing facilities: A Dining Hall-Cafeteria; A Natural Science Building; A Technical Home Economics Building; 
A Nursery School for Early Childhood Education, and a Student Union Building. 

Savannah State College offers courses leading to the baccalaureate degree with a major in each of the 
following fields: Accounting, Biology, Chemistry, Building Construction Technology, Economics, Elementary 
Education, Electronics Technology, English, Foods Nutrition and Institution Management, General Business 
Administration, Mathematics, Mechanical Technology, Secondary Education, Secretarial Science, Social Sciences, 
and Textiles and Clothing. 

Teacher education programs in the following fields at Savannah State College have, been approved by* the 
Georgia Division of Teacher Education and Certification: elementary education; secondary education, with a 
concentration in business education, English, French, general science, industrial arts education, mathematics, 
social studies, Spanish, trade and industrial education, grades 1-12, art education, health and physical educa- 
tion, music education, and teacher-librarian. 

Two-year programs of study are offered in Secretarial Science and Dressmaking and Tailoring. Upon 
satisfactory completion of the program, the student is awarded a certificate of proficiency. 




"MISS FORT VALLEY STATE COLLEGE" 

Cue me an ounce of civet, good apothecary, to sweeten my imagination. 

— Shakespeare 



..,^j*r.;,,- **»•<»** 




MISS FORT VALLEY STAxfi COLLEGE. Miss Margaret Lee, a senior majoring in Elementary Education, 
from Conyers, Ga. She is a member of Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. 



"MISS SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
AND COURT' 

But thou, lliol didst appear so fair 
To fond Imagination, 
Dost rival in the light of day 
Her delieate creation. 

— Wordswortli 




-«.* 



fe*^i|p^ 




SENIOR ATTENDANT 

TO MISS SSC 

Alma Sheppard 






' a * * £ 
Kill, * 

* t * « * t v 
**»««*♦• 

f t« *t»?,»< 
I » * •* I j 

i • * » • * »v 



mmmmmmtmxk 



JUNIOR ATTENDANT 

TO MISS SSC 

Blendina Huckaby 



MISS SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
Yvonne LeCounte 




SOPHOMORE ATTENDANT 

TO MISS SSC 

Barbara Walker 



FRESHMAN ATTENDANT 

TO MISS SSC 

Jacquline Wyatt 



CAMPUS QUEENS 



The idea of her life shall sweetly creep 

Into his study of imagination, 

and every lovely organ of her life 

Shall come apparell d in more precious habit 

More moving-delicate and full of life 

Into the eye and prospect of his soul. 

— Shakespeare 




-^XW/i/i'^ 




MISS SENIOR 

Marva Benton 



MISS JUNIOR 

Lillie Nolley 




MISS SOPHOMORE 
Ruth Cummings 



CAMPUS QUEENS 




The lovely and talented Miss Jacquelyn E. Mack 

reigns as "Miss Alpha Kappa Alpha," 1966-67. 

Miss Mack is a senior Business Education major 

hailing from the city by the sea. 



The man wlio cannot wonder is but a pair of 
spectacles behind which there is no eye. 

— Thomas Carlyle 




MISS CAMILLA HUBERT HALL 



MISS SNEA 
Amy Lou Clark 



CAMPUS QUEENS 



Imagination 
is the eye of the soul. 
— Joubert 



r* ■ m. 




MISS ALPHI PHI ALPHA 

Marcia O'Brien 





MISS LOCKETTE HALL 

Auzora Thomas 




MISS OMEGA PSI PHI 

Arlinda Jacobs 



- 


>v 


k? 




MISS SPHINX 

Helen Peters 


t 




L«p# ^^ 


1 




' 3 




MISS LAMPODAS 

Evelyn Wilkerson 



CAMPUS QUEENS 




11 



1966 Fort Valley State College's "Wildcats' 




VARSITY FOOTBALL ROSTER 1966 



No. Name Position Class Wt. Ht. Home 

15 Hill, Vince Quarterback 1 150 5'9" Atlanta 

12 Tallon, David Quarterback 2 180 6'0" Douglas 

14 Brown, Dean Halfback 4 178 5'11" McDonough 

13 Williams, Johnny Quarterback 1 150 5'9" Ft. Valley 

16 - Corney, Ernest Quarterback 2 160 5'9" Columbus 

17 Carey, Moses Quarterback 4 160 5'10" Atlanta 

20 Wiggins, Arthur Halfback 1 175 5'11" Pontiac, Mich. 

22 Vickers, Jimmy Halfback. ..... 2 180 6'0" Douglas 

23 Best, Joe Halfback 3 160 5'9" Swainsboro 

25 Williams, James Halfback 1 175 5' 11" Columbus 

30 Wilds, Wilbert Halfback 3 180 6'1" Ft. Valley 

35 Johnson, Obie Halfback 4 175 6'0" Jackson 

40 Crawford, Larry Fullback 1 200 6'0" Marietta 

41 Price, Fred Fullback 2 190 6'0" Atlanta 

43 Shorter, James Fullback 1 188 6'1" Pontiac, Mich. 

48 Goff, George Fullback 3 190 6'0" Valdosta 

49 Roberts, Jimmy Fullback 1 190 6'0" Claxton 

51 Brown, Fred Center 1 188 6'0" Ft. Valley 

52 Brown, James Center 3 220 _ 6'2" Ft. Valley 

53 Moore, Charlie Center 4 200 6'0" Swainsboro 

54 Williams, Harold Center 1 180 6'3" Bainbridge 

60 .Pope, Calvin Guard 1 190 6'0" Columbus 



No. Name Position Class Wi. Ht. Home 

61 Clark, Jesse - Guard 2 215 5' 11" Columbus 

62 Jackson, Jacob Guard 4 220 6'1" Augusta 

63 Haynes, Randolph Guard 3 180 6'0" Griffin 

64 Wright, Phillip .-. Guard 1 180 6'1" Griffin 

65 Abrams, Eugene Guard 4 198 6'0" Milledgeville 

68 Anderson, Alfonsa Guard 4 210 6'2" LaGrange 

69 Ross, Sanford Guard 4 215 6'1" Ft. Valley 

71 Gate, Willie Tackle 1 210 6'2" LaGrange 

72 McCall, Hyrom Tackle 2 230 6' 1 ' ' Augusta 

74 Green, Willie Tackle 4 230 6'2" Columbus 

77 Young, Ben Tackle 1 240 5' 11" Brunswick 

78 Johnson, Melvin Tackle 3 210 6'4" Crawfordvill 

79 Street, Willie Tackle 2 215 6'2" Columbus 

80 Bryout, Willie End 2 185 5' 1 1" Bajnbridge 

81 Lewis, Arthur End 4 180 5' 10" ...Ft. Valley 

82 Cash, Calvin End 3 180 6'0" Brunswick 

83 While, Fred End 2 180 6'3" Atlanta 

84 Wright, Larry End 3 220 6'6" Griffin 

86 Randolph, Royal End 4 180 6'3" Brunswick 

87 Williams, Lewis End 3 170 6'0" Thomasville 

88 Morris, James End 1 175 6'3" Columbus 

89 White, Edward _ End 2 170 6'0" Thomaston 




FORT VALLEY STATES COACHING STAFF. Left to 
right: Alfonso Varner, Chief Assistant; Chester A. Robin- 
son, Backfield Coach and Chief Scout; Leon J. Lomax, 
Head Coach; James E. Hawkins, Line Coach; and Robert 
Blount, End Coach. 



12 



1966 Savannah State College Tigers and Coaching Staff 







■*W? -»-•;* , '*& » *% • «8S» »■ 



F.4KSITY FOOTBALL ROSTER 1966 




L Name Age Ht. Wt. Position Class School Hometown 

12 Abrams, Johnny 18 6'3" 178 QB Freshman Palmetto Marion 

70 Adams, Reginald 20 6'2" 232 T Sophomore Jones High Alando 

71 Armstead, Willie 20 6'0" 190 LB Freshman Trinity Atlanta 

46 Bell, Felix 21 5'9" 181 QB Freshman Tivoli High DeFuniak 

30 Bell, Frank 19 6'0" 190 FB Sophomore Butler High Gainesville 

60 Berry, Isaiah 19 6'0" 257 G Sophomore Booker High Sarasota 

29 Betts, Henry S 19 5'10" 170 LB Freshman Carver High Pascagoula 

85 Brown, Earl 19 6'0" 163 E Sophomore C. A. Brown Charleston 

55 Brown, James 19 5'9" 168 LB Sophomore Central High Palatka 

67 Brown, Judson 20 6'3" 214 T Sophomore Johnson High Savannah 

62 Carter, Bobby 21 5'9" 215 G Sophomore Johnson High Savannah 

75 Carter, Nathaniel 18 6'1" 254 T Freshman Center High Waycross 

42 Davis, Dennis 19 5'11" 185 Safety Junior Mays High Miami 

22 Ferguson, Charles 20 5'IOV-." 172 HB Sophomore Central Newark 

64 Flowers, Melvin 20 5'9" 198 G Sophomore Tompkins High Savannah 

14 Ford, Vaughn 19 5'11" 172 HB Junior Gilbert High Jacksonville 

27 Foxworth, Leroy 18 5'8" 162 HB Freshman Johnakin High Marion 

83 Evans, James 19 5'11" 185 E Freshman Carver High Pascagoula 

44 Gaulden, William 20 5'8" 184 FB Junior Monitor High Fitzgerald 

50 Graham, Horace 21 5'7" 205 C Senior Mays High Miami 

79 Handy, Jack 20 6'0" 216 T Sophomore Johnson High Savannah 

57 Harris, John 19 5'IOM;" 185 C Freshman Johnson High Savannah 

80 Keels, James H 19 5'11" 182 E Freshman Nashville High Nashville 

69 Kelly, Steven 20 6'1" 165 G Junior Northwestern Miami 

81 Leggett, Terry J 18 6'2" 195 E Freshman Johnson High Savannah 

35 London, Willie L 17 5'7" 182 FB Freshman Burney-Harris Athens 

73 McDowell, Billy 19 6'3" 275 T Sophomore Westside High Anderson 

10 Oliver, Lawrence 19 5'11" 168 QB Sophomore Simon Gratz Philadelphia 

89 Roberson, David 17 6'1" 188 E Sophomore Tompkins High Savannah 

86 Rutland, Charles 20 6'3" 234 T Sophomore Charles Drew Winter Garden 

88 Singleton, Harold 21 5'9" 192 HB Senior Tompkins High Savannah 

66 Stinson, Edward 19 5'10" 192 G Freshman Mays High Miami 

17 Tabor, Madison 19 5'10" 175 HB Sophomore Hunt High Ft. Valley 

20 Witherspoon, Lewis 19 6'0" 185 HB Junior C. A. Brown Charleston 

25 Westmore, Carlos 20 6'0" 182 HB Junior Tivoli High DeFuniak 

49 Woods, James 20 6'0" 180 HB Junior Johnson High Savannah 

Dr. E. J. Dean, Chairman, Athletic Committee; Wilton C. Scott, Director, Public Relations; Albert E. Frazier, Athletic 

director; Leo Richardson, Head Coach; John Mason, R. K. Washington, Assistant Coaches; Stanley Rivers, Statistician; 

Charles Elmore, Sports Information Interne; Jimmy Westley, Manager; Gaithan Calloway, Trainer. 




*•*-»,. 



Albert E. Frazier 
Athletic Director 















A group of SSC Tigers. Left to right: Bobby Carter, Melvin Flowers, Edward Stinson, Isaiah Berry, 

Steven Kelly and Judson Brown. 




/ 




t^fe* 



■ ir 




Leo Richardson 
Head Coach 



John Mason 
Assistant Coach 



R. K. Washington 
Assistant Coach 



14 



THE BAND 



Imagination is not the talent of some men but is the health of every man. 

— Emerson 




The Concert Bant 



.-. ■ ■■ ■ . 

jj- .: 

t 




The SSC Marching Band at Clark College in 
Atlanta 



- r f- /c: # -J? ripj 



*^ % 



<i 



'*"( 



The Cheerleaders 



The Men's Glee Clul 




CAMPUS SCENES 



We sin against our dearest, not because we do not love but because 
we do not imagine. 

— Ian Mac Lai en 




MEET OUR FIRST FAMILY. Left to right: Mrs. Howard Jor- 
dan, Jr., Judith Louise Jordan, and Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 




Benjamin F. Hubert Technical Services Center 



Lester Hall (A Dormitory For Women) 



16 



In mid-way flight imagination tires; 

Yet soon re-prunes her wings to soar aneiv. 

— Young 



CAMPUS SCENES 




W. K. Payne Hall (A Classroom Building] 




Lockette Hall (A Dormitory For Women) 




Wiley-Willcox Physical Education Complex 










Asa H. Gordon Library 



17 




ACTIVITIES 



Imagination frames events unknown. 

In wild fantastic sliapes of hideous ruin, 

And what it fears creates. 

— Hannah Moore 



Recently appointed Dean of Fac- 
ulty, Dr. Calvin L. Kiah. 




Dr. Clyde Hall, Professor and Head of the Technical 
Sciences Department; and James Cobham, use equip- 
ment in drafting class. 







A PLEASANT THREESOME. Left to righi| 

Wilbur Campbell, Juanita Wright, and Aij 

chie Lawton. 




KAPPA ALPHA PSI FRATERNITY PRESENTS MEDALLION OF OFFICE. Shown above are W. V. Winters 
(right) and W. L. Johnson, Jr. (left), admiring the 24 carat gold "Medallion of Office" presented to Dr. 
Howard Jordan, Jr., President of Savannah State College, by the Savannah Alumni Chapter of Kappa 
Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. The Medallion is the official symbol of the office of the President and is worn 

during academic convocations. 



18 



ACTIVITIES 





MISS SSC AND COURT. Left to right: Freshman Attendant, Jacqu- 

line VVyatt; Sophomore Attendant, Barbara Walker; Yvonne Le- 

Counte, Miss SSC; Junior Attendant, Blendina Huckaby; and Senior 

Attendant, Alma Sheppard. 



nagine meeting these lovely young ladies on our 
impus. Left to right: Barbara Baker, Veronica 
Merritt, and Joann S. Richardson. 





etting to ring the Victory Bell for Homecoming is 
arietta Cave, a transfer student from Alabama State 
Jllege, and graduate of Central High School, Syl- 
vania, Georgia. 



Receiving line at Reception for Freshmen. Left to right: 

Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., Mrs. Calvin L. Kiah, Mrs. Wesley 

L. Johnson, Wesley L. Johnson, Mrs. Howard Jordan, Jr., 

and Dr. Calvin L. Kiah. 



ACTIVITIES 




The human race is governed by its imagination. 
— Napoleon Bonaparte 



Miss SSC received a bouquet at Clark College on 
behalf of the Atlanta Chapter of the Savannah 
State College National Alumni Association. Left to 
right: Thomas Locke, President, Atlanta Chapter; 
Miss SSC, Yvonne LeCounte; Al Farmer, Chairman, 
Atlanta Chapter Scholarship Fund; and Jacqueline 
Wyatt, freshman attendant to Miss SSC. 





""•"•v. 



Iff. 



Phil West, an electronics major, tests equipment in elec- 
tronics class. 



11 "«t**^. .-.Nsr^Hm 
Henry Bacon conducts a chemistry experiment. 




Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., awards Willie D. Batchelor of Adel, 
Georgia a certificate for successfully completing the 1966 
summer Driver Education Workshop at Savannah State 

College. 




The game 



between Clark College and Savannah Sta 
College. 



20 



IMAGINE 



Getting the Master's degree at Savannah State College. 
Getting the Doctorate degree at Savannah State College. 
An R.O.T.C. at Savannah State College. 
Four and Five-Story buildings on the campus. 
A student lounge in each building. 
A snack bar in each building. 
A faculty lounge in each building. 
Students commuting from class to class on bicycles. 
Students, faculty and staff members working together as one big 
happy family. 



ALU MM 

Imagination is more important than knowledge. 

— Albert Einstein 





Mrs. Josie Sessons, President, Savannah State College Na- 
tional Alumni Association, presents the Savannah State 
College National Alumni Association's "Distinguished 
Service Award" to Dr. Joseph H. Griffin. 



MISS NATIONAL ALUMNI. Miss Al- 
menia S. Stevenson, a native of Florence, 
S. C, received the B.S. degree from Sa- 
vannah State College in 1958. Presently, 
she is treasurer of the D. C. Chapter, and 
a teacher in the D. C. public schools, 
Armstrong Adult Education Center. 




Miss Savannah Chapter, Savannah State College National 
Association, and Attendants. Left to right: Mrs. Nancy 
Walker, Mrs. Florine B. Moreland, "Miss Savannah Chap- 
ter," and Mrs. Orene Hall. 



91 



VI 





MISS NATIONAL ALUMNI AND ATTEND- 
ANTS. Left to right: Mrs. Lula Dixon An- 
drews, Miss Almenia S. Stevenson, "Miss 
National Alumni," and Mrs. Carolyn West 
Hayes. 



William O. Weston, Speaker for Alumni Day. Mr. Weston is a merr 
ber of the Washington, D. C, Chapter of the Savannah State Colleg 
National Alumni Association. 




Attendant to "Miss National Alumni." 
Mrs. Carolyn West Hayes, a native of 
Savannah, Georgia, graduated from 
Savannah State College in 1961. She 
has done advanced studies at Howard 
University, and is a teacher in the 
Manpower Development Training Pro- 
gram, Armstrong Adult Education 
Center. 



Attendant to "Miss National Alumni." 
Mrs. Lula Dixon Andrews, a native of 
Sparta, Georgia, is employed with the 
War Production Board and Depart- 
ment of Defense as assistant super- 
visor of the Training Output Section. 




n 




President of D. C. Chapter. James O. 
Thomas, a native of Eulonia, Georgia, re- 
ceived the B.S. degree in chemistry from 
Savannah State College. He has done ad- 
vanced studies at George Washington Uni- 
versity, and is employed as a Senior Patent 
Examiner, U. S. Patent Office, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



D. C. Chapter Chairman of Public Rela- 
tions. Ellis M. Trappio, a native of Colum- 
bia, S. C, is employed as Housing Manager, 
National Capitol Housing Authority, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



22 



ATHLETIC COMMITTEE 




Dr. E. Dean, Chairman 
Mr. C. Vernon Clay 
Mrs. Ella Fisher 
Mr. W. L. Johnson, Jr. 
Mr. L. D. Law 
Mr. J. McGlockton 
Harold Singleton 
Louis Witherspoon 



Frank Tharpe, Chairman 

Committee on Homecoming: 

Activities 



COMMITTEE ON HOMECOMING ACTIVITIES 



Mr. Frank Tharpe, Chairman 

Mr. Eugene Jackson, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Geraldine Abernathy 

Mr. Felix Alexis 

Mrs. Martha Avery 

Miss Albertha Boston 

Mr. L. Brown 

Mrs. Madeline Dixon 

Mrs. Ella Fisher 

Mr. J. Randolph Fisher 

Mr. Samuel Gill 

Mr. Phillip Hampton 

Mrs. Farnese Lumpkin 

Mrs. Lnetta Milledge 

Mr. Prince Mitchell 

Mr. Robert Mobley 

Dr. Prince Jackson 

Mr. W. C. Scott 

Miss Martha Stafford 

Dr. W. G. Tucker 

Dr. John L. Wilson 



Antionette Battiste 
Barbara Bryant 
Dennis Davis 
Johnny Davis 
Tommy Glass 
Richardean Golden 
Alma Hooks 
Quinton Jefferson 
Beatrice Johnson 
Gertrude Lewis 
Mary V. Little 
Ruth Magwood 
Jeanette Moore 
Jimmie L. Owens 
DeWitt Porter 
Harry Rayford 
Allen Roberson 
Theodore Richardson 
Roy Thomas 
Lawrence E. Weaver 
Arthur Williams 





FRESHMAN ATTENDANT 

TO MISS SSC 

Jacquline Wyatt 



SOPHOMORE ATTENDANT 

TO MISS SSC 
Barbara Walker 





JUNIOR ATTENDANT 

TO MISS SSC 
Blendina Huckaby 



SENIOR ATTENDANT 

TO MISS SSC 

Alma Sheppard 



THE BULLETIN- homecoming edition -1968 



MISS SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

Linda Williams is a senior from Bain- 
bridge, Georgia, majoring in 
mathematics. 




SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 




// thou beest he — but o, how falVnl how changed 
From him who, in the happy realms of light, 
Clothed with transcedent brightness, didst outshine 
Myraids, though bright. If he, whom mutual league, 
United thoughts and counsels, equal hope, 
And hazard in the glorious enterprise 
Joined with me once, now misery hath joined 
In equal win, . . . 

Milton, Paradise Lost 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE BULLETIN 

President Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

Director of Public Relations & Continuing Education Wilton C. Scott 

Editorial Assistant :Mrs. Carolyn R. Screen 

Feature Editor J. Randolph Fisher 

Student Assistants Augustus Howard and Bobby Adams 

Alumni Secretary Dr. Prince Jackson, Jr. 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Development Officer Robert Bess 



Volume XXI 



November, 1968 



Number 1 



The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly in October, December, February, 
March, April, and May by Savannah State College. Second Class mail privileges authorized at 
Savannah, Georgia. 



PRESIDENTS MESSAGE 



OFFICE OF 
THE PRESIDENT 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

state college branch 
Savannah. Georgia 31404 

November 9, 1968 




GREETINGS ALUMNI: 



I am happy to extend greetings and a warm welcome to all of our 
alumni and friends as you come to Homecoming of 1968. I especially 
want to express my sincere and grateful appreciation for the excellent 
manner in which you have supported the program of the College during 
the past year. 

During the past year, I have had the opportunity to meet and talk 
with alumni in many parts of our State and of the country. It is a source 
of genuine pride, stimulation, and inspiration to witness the interest, 
enthusiasm, and support that Savannah State College men and women 
have for their Alma Mater. 

This year, with the creation of our Development Office, and with 
an alumnus, Mr. Robert L. Bess, as Development Officer, we will make 
a greater effort to contact larger numbers of our alumni. We urge you 
to support the new Development Officer in his new activities. 

We are happy to welcome you to our new Stadium, and it is our 
sincere hope that you will come back often to the new home of the TIGERS. 

It is always a pleasure to have Fort Valley State College students, 
faculty, and staff on our campus. We extend a warm welcome to all of 
them. 

We hope that this alumni Homecoming weekend will be an enjoyable 
one for all of you--renewing old acquaintances and meeting new friends. 
When this weekend is over, we hope that you will be happy that you came, 
Please plan to visit with us often. 

Have a safe trip home, and remember that you carry with you our best 
wishes and prayers. 



Sincerely, 




Presided 




owardYJJordan , ]i 



PRESIDENTS 
MESSAGE 




Dr. W. W. E. Blanchet, President 
Fort Valley State College 



FORT VALLEY STATE COLLEGE 
FORT VALLEY, GEORGIA 



The Fort Valley State College extends greet- 
ings to Savannah State College and is pleased 
to share in your Homecoming Day Festivities. 
The warm spirit of friendship which exists be- 
tween our institutions, both on and off the field 
of athletic competition, is a source of gratifica- 
tion. We trust that this fine relationship will 
continue to grow through the years. May the 
better team win. 

W. W. E. Blanchet 



MISS SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

AND COURT 




Left to right: Valerie Ash, sophomore attendant; Mary Eady, junior attendant; Linda Williams, 
Miss SSC; Gilda Dawson, freshman attendant; and Jacqueline Dorsey, senior attendant. 




The Isles of Greece, the Isles of Greece! 
Where burning Sapplo loved and sung, 
Where grew the arts of war and peace, 
Where Delos rose and Phoebus sprung! 
Eternal summer gilds them yet 
But all, except their sun, is set. 

Byron, Isles of Greece 



MISS FORT VALLEY STATE COLLEGE 








Lee Ann Mitchell is a senior majoring in elementary education from 

Smithville, Georgia. 



But now at last the sacred influence 

of light appears, and from the walls of Heaven 

Shoots far into the bosom of dim night 

A glimmering dawn. 

Milton, Paradise Lost 



CLASS QUEENS 




MISS SENIOR. Betty Grant, from 
Fitzgerald, Georgia, is majoring in ele- 
mentary education. 




MISS SOPHOMORE. Linda Morgan, 

majoring in sociology, is from Boston, 

Massachusetts. 



The tale of their own deeds will ivitness to their doon, 
Whilst thou, to all men justified, canst say 
That of thy loneliness thou mad'st a boon. 

Dante — Paradise 




MISS JUNIOR. Carolyn Lucas is a na- 
tive of Valdosta, Georgia. 





MISS FRESHMAN. Sandra LaVerne 

Jones is from Augusta, Georgia. She 

is an English major. 



CAMPUS QUEENS 



MISS ALPHA PHI ALPHA. Vire 
giner Bryant is a junior major- 
ing in elementary education 
from Atlanta, Georgia. 



MISS KAPPA ALPHA PSI. Duane 

Adams is a sophomore from Ma 

con, Georgia. 






MISS LAMPODA. Peggy Billips 
is a junior majoring in elemen- 
tary education from Swainsboro, 
Georgia. 



MISS SCROLLER. Bernice Stro- 
bridge is a freshman majoring in 
business education from Swains- 



boro, Georgia. 

MISS SPHINX. Cheryl Russell is 

a freshman from Savannah, 

Georgia. 








MISS OMEGA PSI PHI. Barbara 
Mobley is a senior majoring in 






MISS PHI BETA SIGMA. Emma 

Graham is a junior majoring in 

biology from Jacksonville, 

Georgia. 





MISS ZETA PHI BETA. Theresa 
Law is a senior majoring in Eng- 
lish from Augusta, Georgia. 






MISS ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA. 

Susie Kornegay is a senior ma- 
joring in social science from 
Hazlehurst, Georgia. 




MISS ALPHA PHI OMEGA. Mari- 
lyn Bennett is a senior majoring 
in sociology. 





MISS DELTA SIGMA THETA. 
Bettye A. Battiste is a senior ma- 
joring in biology from Savan- 
nah, Georgia. 



MISS IVY. Desmona Williams is 
a sophomore majoring in ele- 
mentary education from St. Pe- 
tersburg, Florida. 






MISS LESTER HALL. Devarn 

Murray is a sophomore majoring 

in business education from Ft. 

Lauderdale, Florida. 



MISS LOCKETTE HALL. Lu- 

freda Williams is a junior from 

Beaufort, South Carolina. 



MISS TORCH. Gwendolyn Ben- 
ton is a sophomore majoring in 
dietetics and institutional man- 
agement from Covington, 
Georgia. 



CAMPUS QUEENS 



MISS CAMILLA HUBERT HALL 

Shirley Williams is a freshman 
from Beaufort, South Carolina. 



MISS PEACOCK HALL. Ann 

Hayes is a junior majoring in 

elementary education from 

Thomasville, Georgia. 






MISS WRIGHT HALL. Shirley 

Bundage is a freshman majoring 

in elementary education from 

Sparta, Georgia. 





MISS BIOLOGY. Judy Wright is 

a senior from Savannah, 

Georgia. 



MISS BUSINESS. Louise Mabry 

is a junior majoring in business 

education from Alma, Georgia. 



MISS HOME ECONOMICS. De- 
lores Murray is a sophomore 
from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. 



MISS SOCIAL SCIENCES. Au- 
drey Harper is a senior from 
Hartwell, Georgia majoring in 
sociology. 






MISS YMCA. Rubye Jackson is 
a sophomore majoring in busi- 
ness administration from Adel, 
Georgia. 




MISS SAVANNAH STATE COL- 
LEGE. Linda Williams is a senior 
from Bainbridge, Georgia major- 
ing in mathematics. 



SENIOR ATTENDANT TO MISS 

SSC. Jacqueline Dorsey, major- 
ing in sociology, is from Rome, 
Georgia. 




JUNIOR ATTENDANT TO MISS 

SSC. Mary Eady, majoring in 

textiles and clothing, is from 

Savannah, Georgia. 



. 



SOPHOMORE ATTENDANT TO 

MISS SSC. Valerie Ash, major- 
ing in elementary education, is 
from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



ISS PLAYERS BY THE SEA. 

Patricia Jamerson is a senior 
majoring in English from Sa- 
vannah, Georgia. 



MISS TIGER. Fannie White is a 

senior majoring in biology from 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 







MISS NAACP. Shelia Gordy is 
a junior majoring in elemen- 
tary education from Sanders- 
ville, Georgia. 



BLACK AWARENESS COOR- 
DINATING COMMITTEE 
QUEENS. Left to right: Mero- 
lyn Stewart, junior; Michelle 
Lyons, sophomore; Rosalyn 
Allen, Jewel Wise, sophomore; 
and Jackie Robinson, 
sophomore. 


















7^s§ 










i^;'* »r wfff m tfWtt M ft ., 

^ it, U 'l.,- LI M .MU*'il-;»-*' 



i .k - 

f 






*, j^?.<a«yjj % , 



J-UL^ 




Blue White 


27 


27 


48 


42 


41 


41 


45 


45 


40 


44 


77 


77 


72 


71 


76 


7b 


78 


78 


79 


75 


74 


74 


75 


70 


73 


73 




71 


65 


65 


69 


69 


64 


64 


60 


60 


66 


66 


62 


62 


67 


67 




68 


53 


53 


51 


51 



e Fort Valley State 

Name Position Hi. Wt. Class Hometown 

Thomas, Alphonsa ...TB 5' 8" 172 2 McDonough 

Redding, Frank FB 6' 1" 198 2 Forsyth 

Price, Fred - FB 6' 0" 180 4 Atlanta 

McCloud, Donald FB 6' 0" 203 1 Metter 

Mitchell, Gordon FB 5' 10" 191 1 Newnan 

Young, Benjamin T 6' 0" 257 3 Brunswick 

Street, Willie T 5' 11" 238 4 Columbus 

Humphrey, Arthur T 6' 4" 258 1 Macon 

Ford, Eugene T 6' 1" 239 1 Cordele 

McCall, Hyrom T 6' l'A" 264 4 Augusta 

Kilgore, Robert T 6' 3" 255 1 Monroe 

Kilgore, Gus T 6' 2V2" 214 1 Lithonia 

Brown, Reginald T-G 6' 0" 191 1 Wash., D. C. 

Williams, Weldon T 6' 0" 190 1 Warner Rob. 

Walker, Lawrence G 6' 0" 192 2 Columbus 

Simon, Kenneth G 5' 8" 158 3 Thomasville 

Bulter, Jerome G 6' 0" 194 2 Miami, Fla. 

Armster, Earl G 5' 8" 186 1 Thomasville 

Dollison, Bobby G 6' 1" 210 2 Cordele 

Ellison, Gerald _.. G 6' 1" 183 3 Fort Valley 

Harris, Henry G 5' 10" 217 2 McDonough 

Jackson, Leroy G 5' 11" 185 2 Pont., Mich. 

Ford, Ray .„.. C 5' 11" 174 1 Thomasville 

Hollis, Arthur C 5' 11" 212 2 Quilman 



College WILDCATS 

Number 

Blue White Name Position Ht. Wt. Class Hometown 

59 55 Beadels, Charles C 6' 3" 228 1 Newnan 

54 54 Williams, Harold C 6' 3" 170 3 Bainbridge 

88 84 George, Willie TE 6' 5" 206 2 McDonough 

86 86 Reed, Arthur TE 6' 3" 191 1 LaGrange 

87 87 Hamm, Terry TE-TB 6' 0" 191 2 Elberton 

83 83 Hulin, Arthur TE 6' 0" 209 1 Washington 

22 22 Vickers, Jimmie SE 6' 0" 179 3 Douglas 

25 24 Williams, J. B SE 5' 9" 155 3 Fort Valley 

89 89 White, Edward SE 5' IOV2" 178 4 Thomaslon 

23 23 Gray, Robert SE 6' W 171 1 LaGrange 

80 80 Willis, Tommy Flkr. 6' 3" 182 2 Griffin 

81 81 Lowe, Ronnie Flkr. 6' IV2" 192 2 Griffin 

49 31 Sims, Leonard Flkr. 6' 2" 193 1 Jesup 

85 85 Bryant, Willie Flkr. 5' 11" 185 4 Bainbridge 

12 12 Talton, David .. QB 5' 11" 181 4 Douglas 

15 15 Edmonds, Robert QB 5' 10" 163 2 McDonough 

18 14 Hill, Vince QB 5' 10" 148 3 Atlanta 

19 13 Evans, Louis QB 5' 9V2" 152 1 Hinesville 

20 20 King, Cedric QB 6' 2" 176 1 Toledo, Ohio 

16 11 Coney, Ernest TB 5' 7" 164 4 Columbus 

21 21 Dawsey, Kelly TB 5' 8" 176 1 Perry 

26 32 Little, Havies TB 5' 8" 177 1 Fort Valley 

28 33 Hill, Richard TB 5' 7" 174 1 Newnan 




THE FORT VALLEY STATE COLLEGE COACHING STAFF. Front 

row: Student Coach, Buddy Hooper; Head Coach, Leon J. Lomax; 

and Assistant Coach, Alfonzo Varner. Back row: Backfield Coach 

A. C. Robinson; and Assistant Line Coach, William Ross. 



12 



T— 



~-" 







~s 









7«iu»-^! 




#^4 -'i : 



-w~— 




1 










The Savannah State 


Colle 


g e 


TIGERS 




Numbers 














D 


L 


Ends 


Classification 


Age 


Height 


Weight School 


Hometown 


85 


85 


Brown, Earl 


Senior 


21 


5' 11" 


170 


C. A. Brown 


Charleston 


86 


86 


Chestnut, Jessie 


Freshman 


18 


6' 2" 


180 


Loris 


Loris 


88 


88 


Hill, Charlie 


Freshman 


18 


6' 0" 


175 


Gibbs 


St. Petersburg 


82 


81 


Leggett, Terry 


Junior 


20 


6' 2" 


200 


Johnson 


Savannah 




89 


Tarver, Roman 


Senior 


21 


6' 2" 


190 


Landrum 


Millen 


83 


83 


Wayman, Albert 
Tackles 


Freshman 


18 


6' 3" 


200 


Butler 


Gainesville 




62 


Bellamy, Richard 


Freshman 


18 


6' 2" 


200 


Whirmore 


Conway 


75 


75 


Brown, Judson 


Senior 


21 


6' 3" 


235 


Johnson 


Savannah 


87 


80 


Denegal, Jimmy 


Junior 


21 


6' 1" 


240 


Norlhside 


Jesup 


79 


79 


Dupree, James 


Freshman 


18 


6' 3" 


220 


Lyons 


Lyons 


72 


72 


Kelly, Jackie 


Freshman 


19 


6' 3" 


230 


Carver 


Pascagoula 


70 


70 


Harris, Joseph 


Freshman 


20 


6' 2>/ 2 " 


235 


Johnson 


Savannah 


71 


73 


McDowell, Billy 
Guards 


Senior 


21 


6' 0" 


240 


Westside 


Anderson 


63 


60 


Berry, Isiah 


Senior 


21 


6' 0" 


260 


Booker 


Sarasota 


64 


64 


Flowers, Melvin 


Senior 


21 


5' 10" 


210 


Tompkins 


Savannah 


68 


61 


Garrett, Leonard 


Freshman 


18 


6' 0" 


190 


Raines 


Jacksonville 




67 


Green, Kenneth 


Freshman 


22 


5' 11" 


210 


Wallace 


Charleston 




15 


Mydell, Roger 


Freshman 


18 


5' 0" 


180 


Central 


Springfield 




55 


Parker, Max 


Freshman 


18 


6' 0" 


185 


Jackson 


Jacksonville 


66 


66 


Stinson, Edward 


Junior 


20 


5' 9" 


190 


Mays 


Goulds 


69 


69 


Wright, Donald 
Centers 


Sophomore 


20 


5' 11" 


190 


Carver 


Pascagoula 


50 


50 


Armstead, Willie 


Junior 


21 


6' 0" 


200 


Trinity 


Atlanta 


74 


53 


Alston, Andre 


Freshman 


18 


6' 1" 


190 


Raines 


Jacksonville 


53 


57 


Belts, Henry 
Fullbacks 


Senior 


21 


5' 11" 


180 


Carver 


Pascagoula 


32 


30 


Bell, Frank 


Junior 


22 


6' 0" 


208 


Butler 


Gainesville 


83 


83 


Jones, Dennis 


Freshman 


18 


6' 2" 


215 


Lincoln 


Clairmont 


35 


35 


Stephens, Felix 
Halfbacks 


Freshman 


18 


6' 0" 


195 


Central 


Springfield 


44 


18 


Smalls, James 


Sophomore 


19 


5' 11" 


176 


Voorhees 


Denmark 


44 


49 


Bell, Felix 


Senior 


23 


5* 10" 


200 


Tivoli 


DeFuniak 


23 


22 


Harris, William 


Freshman 


21 


6' 1" 


190 


Johnson 


Savannah 


27 


16 


Jones, Steve 


Sophomore 


19 


5' 10" 


168 


Summerville 


Cartersville 


40 


42 


Kendricks, Horace 


Freshman 


20 


5' 10" 


179 


Rochelle 


Lakeland 




37 


McCormick, Leroy 


Freshman 


18 


5' 8" 


160 


Ballard-Hudson 


Macon 


46 


20 


Peoples, Washington 


Freshman 


18 


5' 10" 


170 


Tompkins 


Savannah 






Pratt, Michael 


Junior 


20 


5' 10" 


170 


St. Pius 


Savannah 


24 


25 


Randall, Israel 


Senior 


20 


5' 8" 


177 


Carver 


Pascagoula 






Washington, Harry 


Freshman 


20 


5' 8" 


170 


Rochelle 


Lakeland 




27 


Walker, Arthur 


Freshman 


20 


5' 9" 


178 


Rochelle 


Lakeland 


43 


17 


Oliver, Lawrence 


Senior 


21 


5' 10" 


178 


Simon Gratz 


Philadelphia 


84 


19 


Smith, Charlie 
Quarterbacks 


Sophomore 


20 


5' 11" 


180 


Sol Johnson 


Savannah 


29 


29 


Abrams, Johnny 


Junior 


20 


6' 3" 


186 


Johnakin 


Marion 


13 


12 


Bell, Henry 


Sophomore 


19 


5' 10" 


160 


Tivoli 


DeFuniak 


14 


14 


Mosley, Freddie 


Sophomore 


22 


6' 2" 


170 


Rochelle 


Lakeland 



13 



FOOTBALL 




Savannah State College 

vs. 

Fort Valley State College 

of 

Fort Valley, Georgia 

Saturday, November 9, 1968 

2 P. M. . . . SSC Stadium 



Albert E. Frazier 
Athletic Director 



SSC 




Felix Bell 

Halfback — Quarterback 

Captain 



Henry Betts 

Linebacker 

Captain 




Willie Armstead 
Center 



14 





THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE COACH- 
ING STAFF. Left to right: John Mason, 
Leo Richardson, Head Coach; and Richard 
Washington. 




Earl Brown 
Offensive End 




■E& 3&Si 



Joe Harris 
Offensive Tackle 



Judson Brown 
Defensive Tackle 




Ok 



7*. 



^ 





•> 'A 



Jimmy Denegal 
End 




& 




, '. * 



Bill Harris 
Defensive Halfback 




• : . 



■ 





Melvin Flowers 
Guard 



- 



15 



FOOTBALL 





SSC: AN ISLAND OF PARADISE 




Savannah State College, a unit of the University System of Georgia, is a four-year accredited college of arts and sciences, 
teacher education, business administration, and technology. A graduate program in elementary education was started during 
the summer quarter, 1968. 

Founded in 1890, Savannah State College is located in the historic city of Savannah, the first capital of Georgia, and 
the second largest city of Georgia. 

Savannah State College offers courses leading to the master's degree in elementary education and courses leading to the 
baccalaureate degree with a major in each of these areas of concentration: accounting, biology, chemistry, civil technology, 
dietetics and institution management, economics, elementary education, electronics technology, English, general business ad- 
ministration, mathematics, mechanical technology, secondary education, secretarial science, social sciences, and textiles and 
clothing. 

A mind is not to be changed by place or time; 
The mind is its own place, and in itself 
Can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven. 

Milton, Paradise Lost 



17 



Teacher education programs in the following fields have been approved by the Georgia Division of Teacher Education 
and Certification: elementary education, secondary education, with a concentration in business education; English, French, 
general science, industrial arts education, mathematics, social studies, Spanish, trade and industrial education, grades 1-12; 
art education, health and physical education, music education, and teacher-librarian. 

Two-year programs of study are offered in Secretarial Science, and Dressmaking and Tailoring. Upon satisfactory com- 
pletion of these programs the student is given a certificate of proficiency. 

Savannah State College has one of the most beautiful campuses in the South. The campus comprises 136 acres of match- 
less natural beauty. Attractive new buildings are constantly being built. Put into use recently were the John F. Kennedy Fine 
Arts Center and A. E. Peacock Hall. 

The John F. Kennedy Fine Arts Center, constructed at an approximate cost of $500,000, contains a Little Theatre, offices, 
classrooms, and laboratories for music, art, ceramics, and sculpture. 

Peacock Hall, a dormitory for 180 male students, is a modern three-story building which contains 90 bedrooms of 
the studio type; a lobby, recreational areas, an apartment for the house director; barber shop, room for TV viewing, and a 
laundromat. This dormitory is completely air-conditioned, and was constructed at an approximate cost of $600,000. 

A new stadium was put into use at the beginning of the 1968 football season. 

For the Biennium of 1966-68, Savannah State College requested from the Board of Regents the following facilities: a 
Dining Hall-Cafeteria, a Natural Sciences Building, a Technical Home Economics Building, a Nursery School for early child- 
hood education; and a Student Union Building. The dining hall, student union, science building, and dormitory for 200 
students have been approved at a total cost of 2.7 million dollars. 

For further information write: Director of Admissions, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia 31404. 




THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE GOLF TEAM. Left to 

right: Dr. Herman Sartor, Coach; Jacob Brown, Herman 

Pinkney, Morris Brown, and Jimmy Westley, Captain. 



Fill high the bowl with Samian wine! 
On Suli's rock, and Paget' s shore, 
Exists the remnant of line 
Such as the Doric mothers bore; 
And there perhaps some seed is sown, 
Heracleidcen blood might own. 

Byron, Isles of Greece 



18 




THE MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



ORGANIZATIONS 




P I win i Mi* I pi r I 5ft i 

1 x ' " • « if A i 1 



1 jp 






It 



iA , .^- 









THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE MARCHING BAND 



4bL 




Ik * 



i ti 






" ,' . JP f*«JiJ MBS i. • ^ibu V *f i* Jr J fc* 



N, . 



VTa \H--\ 



rHE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE CHEERLEADERS. Left The Majorettes and a member of the SSC Band doing 



o right: Brenda Sutton, Patricia Jamerson, Co-Captain; 

/ireginer Bryant, Captain; Gloria Ferrell, LaVern Yar- 

bray, and Juanita Favors. 



their own thing. 




Sharon Lewis is a Juanita Russell is a Jo Ann Thomas is a Roslyn Finch is a Valerie Driscol is a 
freshman from At- senior from Coving- freshman from freshman from At- freshman from At- 
lanta, Georgia. ton, Georgia. Americus, Georgia. lanta, Georgia. lanta, Georgia. 



19 



CAMPUS SCENES 







It's spring at Savannah State College. 

I' V; 




THE BENJAMIN F. HUBERT TECHNICAL 
SCIENCES CENTER 




LOCKETTE HALL, a dormitory for women. 



■ '■"•'■■•:.".■■: i" v .. ' :.------ ;'iX:^'k*' * 



* Cs * i 



* a 




W. K. PAYNE HALL, a classroom building. 



' : . . ■ 

: .- : x •",■ '■■ ■.;£:■; ■:■?■■ -: ™ : - - \ : : T. - '■■, ' s:r ■ ■■■■ ■■ ;:■, ■ : ; ; . 

■■ ,"■:; 

f . ' '.- . " ■ 

: ^ ';■ .■=■ ■>.■,,■■:.;: .■•:;;■.-. ■".■■■= 





ASA H. GORDON LIBRARY 




J. L. LESTER HALL, a dormitory for women. 




WILEY-WILLCOX PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
COMPLEX 



The swimming pool located in Wiley-Willcox 
Physical Education Complex. 



ACTIVITIES 






GEORGIA PEACH. Christine 
Dobson is a junior majoring in 
usiness from Columbus, Georgia. 



Can you imagine snow on the campus? 

Well, this February there was, and here 

is the evidence. 



%$*# 



Larry Sims, President, Savannah State 

College Student Government Association, 

addresses the student body. 








» 












Several members of the June 1968 graduating class gather 
around their gift to the college, a new scoreboard. 



A large crowd watches a game in the new Savannah State 
College Stadium. 




CONTESTANTS FOR MISS SSC FOR MISS SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE A scene from the All-College Cook-Out. 
967-68. Left to right: Susie Kornegay, FOR 1966-67 AND ATTENDANTS. Left 
inda Williams, Miss SSC, Jacquelyn to right: Freshman Attendant, Jacque- 
tyles; Barbara Walker, and Shirley line Wyatt; Sophomore Attendant, Bar- 
McDuffy. bara Walker; Miss SSC, Yvonne Le- 

Counte; Junior Attendant, Blendina 

Huckaby; and Senior Attendant, Alma 

Sheppard. 




\CADEMIC PROCESSION FOR AUGUST COMMENCE- 
VIENT. Vernon Clay, marshal; Dr. Vivian W. Henderson, 
president, Clark College, Atlanta, Georgia; Dr. Howard 
Tordan, Jr., president, Savannah State College; Dr. E. K. 
Williams, director, Summer School; Dr. Calvin L. Kiah, 
lean of faculty; and other members of the faculty and 
graduating class. 



PLATFORM GUESTS AT THE JUNE COMMENCEMENT 
EXERCISES. Left to right: Rev. Samuel Williams, College 
Minister and Dean of Men; Father Harry Nevels, Rector, 
St. Matthew's Episcopal Church; Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms, 
President, Savannah State College National Alumni Asso- 
ciation; Dr. Raymond S. Scruggs, Personnel Director — 
Urban Affairs, Personnel Relations Department, American 
Telephone & Telegraph Company, New York; Dr. Howard 
Jordan, Jr., President, Savannah State College; Dr. Calvin 
L. Kiah, Dean of Faculty; and Wiley A. Perdue, Registrar. 



21 



ALUMNI 




Hi 




i 



^ 




MISS NATIONAL ALUMNI AND ATTENDANTS. Left to right: Mrs. 

Zelma Gordon, a native of Florence, South Carolina; Miss National 

Alumni, Mrs. Eloise E. Alston, a native of Crawfordville, Georgia; and 

Mrs. Velma Zeigler, a native of Savannah, Georgia. 



Daniel Washington, the newly elected 
President of the Savannah State Col- 
lege National Alumni Association, ad- 
dresses the alumni. 





R. Wilbur Campbell was recently 
appointed Financial Aid Officer 
at the college. He received the 
B.S. degree from Savannah State 
College, and was formerly em- 
ployed by the Chatham-Savan- 
nah Board of Education as a 
teacher. 



Benjamin F. Lewis, Executive 
Vice-President of the Savannah 
State College National Alumni 
Association, presents a plaque to 
Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms, former 
President of the SSC National 
Alumni Association. 




Robert Bess was recently ap- 
pointed Development Officer at 
the college. He received the B.S. 
degree from Savannah State 
College, and M.A. degree from 
Indiana University. Mr. Bess 
was formerly employed by the 
Chatham - Savannah Board of 
Education as a Vocational School 
Counselor. 



DEDICATION. Last year the Philadelphia Chapter 
of the Savannah State College National Alumni As- 
sociation chartered a bus to Savannah in order to 
attend all of the Homecoming activities. 



Of man's first disobedience, and the fruit 
01 that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste 
Brought death into the ivorld, and all our woe, 
With loss of Eden, tell one greater man 
Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, 
Sing, heavenly muse, . . . 

Milton, Paradise Lost 



90. 



Miss Savannah Chapter Alumni 



■ 



, .. 






MISS SAVANNAH CHAPTER ALUMNI AND ATTENDANTS. Left to right: Mrs. Daisy B. 

Alston, attendant to "Miss Savannah Chapter" and a teacher at Haven Elementary School; Miss 

Ruby King, "Miss Savannah Chapter" and teacher at Bartow Elementary School; and Mrs. Elsie 

A. Brewton, attendant to "Miss Savannah Chapter," a teacher at Effingham County School. 



MISS SAVANNAH ALUMNI. Miss Ruby Lee King, a 1939 graduate of Savannah 
State College, possesses characteristics of a master teacher. She received her 
M.Ed, degree from Atlanta University in 1951, and a Professional Diploma from 
Teachers' College, Columbia University in 1961. Miss King is known for her 
outstanding contributions in school, civic and community activities. She served 
as secretary for ten years of the Savannah State College Alumni Association. 
She is a member of Greenbriar Children's Center, Inc., Y.W.C.A., Y.M.C.A., 
local, state and national professional organizations. Besides being a member 
of Asbury Methodist Church, Miss King is Church School teacher, choir mem- 
ber and member of the Commission on Finance. At present Miss King holds 
offices of Chaplain of Paulsen P.T.A., and Basileus of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority. 



%f« 



yy t 



K 



WiX 






MISS NATIONAL ALUMNI AND ATTEND- 
ANTS. Left to right: Mrs. Edith James, 
"Miss National Alumni," Mrs. Martha John- 
son; and Mrs. Priscilla Thomas. 



23 



Miss National Alumni, Washington, D. C. 




Miss Chicago Chapter Alumni 




CHICAGO CHAPTER MISS ALUMNI AND ATTENDANT. From left to right: Miss Allette Wiggins, Class of 1966. Hails 
from Savannah, Ga. Employed by Chicago Board of Education. Mercedes Kelsey, Class of 1955, was crowned Miss Chicago 
Vlumni of SSC. Presently employed by Chicago Board of Education. President Clarence L. Lasseter, Class of 1948, chats 
ivith Queen and Attendant before making final plans for trip to Homecoming Festivities. Presently employed by Benson- 

Rixon Company as Assistant Manager. 



25 



MAJORETTES 



feS 




!& 




fro** 1 
3 o *nn **£&, Geo Ig .a. 




•r / 



V 




: _ ;..-. ' 






^1 «"* 




■'■■ : - ■',-■' 



Sh 



aro " Lewis, a f reshm 

««4 oSSS? trom At - 



*■?<: 



.,■;• .. " :' 'il 

" Russell, a senior, from Cov- 
juamta R^^n, Georgia. 



ATHLETIC COMMITEE 




COMMITTEE ON HOMECOMING ACTIVITIES 



Eugene Jackson, Chairman 


Tom Bolden 


Frank Tharpe, Vice Chairman 


Vireginer Bryant 


Mrs. Geraldine Abernathy 


Christine Brown 


F. J. Alexis 


Dennis Brown 


Mrs. Martha Avery 


Calvin Butts 


Miss Albertha Boston 


Hezekiah Campbell 


Leroy Brown 


Donald Cook 


Mrs. Madeline Dixon 


Beverly Cornish 


Mrs. Ella Fisher 


Daisy Douglas 


Samuel Gill 


Roosevelt Eady 


Phillip Hampton 


John Garvin 


Dr. Prince Jackson 


Augustus Howard 


Mrs. Farnese Lumpkin 


Melvin Lawrence 


Prince Mitchell 


Warren Mitchell 


Robert Mobley 


Henry Owens 


Mrs. Margaret Robinson 


David Sims 


Wilton C. Scott 


Miriam Thomas 


Miss Martha Stafford 


Reginald Wade 


Dr. Willie Tucker 


J. Randolph Fisher 


Calvin Atkinson 


Barbara Walker 


James Bedner 


Jimmie Westley 


Timothy Bing 


Priscilla Williams 





SENIOR ATTENDANT TO MISS SSC 

Jacqueline Dorsey 



JUNIOR ATTENDANT TO MISS SSC 
Mary Eady 





SOPHOMORE ATTENDANT TO MISS SSC 

Valerie Ash 



FRESHMAN ATTENDANT TO MISS SSC 
Guilda Dawson 






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Table of Contents 

Page 

Alumni Secretary Writes 2 

Press Conference Is Held 3 

Dean's List 4 

Savannah State Shorts 5-10 

Alumni - Alumnae 11-14 

Graduate Program 15-17 

Commencement Calendar 18 

Bill Russell Speaks 18 

SSC Hosts Reading Conference 19 



Alumni Secretary Writes . . . 

The following is a copy of a speech delivered 
by Robert Bess, Alumni Secretary, to the North 
Jersey Chapter of the Savannah State College 
National Alumni Association, during their installa- 
tion ceremonies on Sunday, April 12, 1970 in 
Newark, Neiv Jersey. 
As we pause here today to pay tribute to your inaugura- 
tion as a new chapter of the Savannah State College Na- 
tional Alumni Association, I feel compelled to begin by 
stating that the state of the College, at present, is excellent. 
I say this in this way because as you can imagine in this 
day of open rebellion, student unrest and revolt, the demands 
and pressures placed on an institution of higher learning 
both internally and externally are almost insurmountable. 
From mixed faculties representing old and new points of 
view in regards to the whole matter of educational objectives, 
purposes and organizational structure, to a very aggressive 
new student who is no longer willing to accept a back seat 
in regards to relevance of subject matter — from an active 
and productive alumni association whose views in regards 
to student activities and regulations might differ radically 
from the views of the students involved, to a contributing 
community who constantly raises the question of the econ- 
nomic feasibility of two state supported four-year insti- 
tutions operating in the same community. 

I'm happy to report that both because of, and in spite 
of the pressures from all sources Savannah State, your Alma 
Mater, is still a thriving, growing productive institution of 
higher learning, presently making greater strides than at 
any past period in its 80 year history. We presently boast 
a student population of approximately 2,500, a faculty of 
115, with 30% holding the doctorate degree and an active 
contributing alumni Association. We have had a sixty-nine 
percent increase in student enrollment over the last five 
years, approximately 14% per year and projections indicate 
that this trend will continue. We are presently in the 5th 
year of a 10 year building program with 8 new buildings 
having been added to our campus within the last 6 years, 
with five more either presently under construction or sched- 
uled to be started within the next two to four months. In 
addition, there are others scheduled to be placed on campus 
within the next five years. During the late winter quarter, 
we witnessed the completion of sidewalks, a sewerage and 
drainage system, and an over hauled heating system. We 
are presently involved in the first organized beautification 
program on campus that will cause shrubbery to be placed 
on campus according to a landscape design. 

In spite of our growth, in spite of our progress, in spite 
of our optimism this afternoon, or maybe even because of 
these, the needs of the institution are greater today than 
ever before. Yes, the demands for services, the demands 
for the best by way of total student preparation force us into 
continued efforts to provide quality educational programs 
and services for the youth we serve. As you might well 
expect we need additional funds. While we are a state 



"assisted" institution, public funds are never sufficient to 
provide a truly great institution; they provide the basis 
but funds for the creation and maintenance of the margin 
of excellence must come from the private sector. We need 
funds for student assistance — to help capable, deserving 
students, who cannot afford the price of an education, 
defray the cost of their training. Last year through the 
N.D.E.A. Scholarship Matching program, Savannah State 
College provided $141,207 in financial aid to 392 students, 
$17,995 of which had to be provided by the college. While 
this might appear to be a large number receiving such aid, 
it is safe to add that less than 50% of the students needing 
and qualifying for assistance were able to receive it. Funds 
are needed for our Athletic program to assist in providing 
a strong team capable of competing with the very powerful 
opponents in the new conference, the SI AC; the state 
does not provide funds for athletics. Funds are needed for 
faculty development, for research, for a better equipped 
band and for general unrestricted operating expenses. 

In addition to the need for funds, the college needs well 
qualified, capable students. We need to attract and recruit 
a greater percentage of students graduating from high 
school in the upper quartile. This kind of student can do 
much to enhance the image of the institution. We need 
Friends — individuals from all walks of life who are willing 
to support the institution in all respects and most especially 
to sing the praises of the college — to talk positively about 
the college and the things we do. And most importantly, 
we need you and other alumni like you. 

Now that you understand to a degree the state of the 
college and now that you have a slight idea as to our needs, 
I feel the urge to take one additional minute to challenge 
you to the realization of the responsibilities that you under- 
take as a new chapter. But first let me congratulate you 
and thank you for becoming an organized group of con- 
scientious supporters. I'm encouraged today by many of 
the things that I see happening in the Alumni Association — 
the dawn of a new spirit — the awakening of a new conscious. 
In February we installed a new chapter and were very im- 
pressed with their progress. Two nights later I met with 
a new group in Detroit who wanted to know just what do 
we have to do in order to become an organized affiliate. 
They held their organizational meeting two weeks later 
and I expect to present their charter in the very near future. 
Last week I met with a new group in Miami, they held their 
organizational meeting on Friday night, and here today 
we're with you. 

It is then in this spirit of optimism that I charge you 
as a new chapter with the responsibility of working co- 
operatively together in the true spirit of Savannah State 
College, remembering and maintaining at all times the lofty 
ideals of your Alma Mater — I charge you with the respon- 
sibility of putting aside individual wishes when they do not 
coincide with those of the majority, I charge you with 
the responsibility of maintaining an abiding faith in and 
love for Savannah State College and the National Associa- 
tion, and finally I charge you with the responsibility of 
selection and recruitment of the worthy sons and daughters 
of North Jersey and for supporting your Alma Mater and 
National Association both morally and financially. 

Throughout this discourse, I have continuously alluded 
to my habitual stance of optimism and positive movement, 
may I conclude on the same note. Without doubt this 
philosophy has been influenced by the thinking of Oliver 
Wendell Holmes who is given credit for the following state- 
ment: "I find the great thing in this world is not so much 
where we stand, as in what direction we are moving." For 
Savannah State College and the alumni association there 
must be only one direction— Forward ! 



NATIONAL PRESS INSTITUTE HELD AT SSC 




The 19th Annual Savannah State College National School 
Press Institute and College Communications Workshop was 
held at the DeSoto Hilton Hotel on February 19-21, 1970. 
"THE SCHOOL PRESS: A LOOK AT THE 70V' was the 
theme. Wilton C. Scott, Director of Public Relations and 
Continuing Education, Savannah State College, directed the 
three-day meeting. The Press Institute was open to all pub- 
lication advisers and publication staff members. Delegates 
representing 46 colleges and high schools from a cross- 
section of the United States attended. The National Press 
Institute is affiliated with the Columbia Scholastic Press 
Association and numerous national school-press agencies. 

The Keynote Address was delivered by Donald M. Wen- 
dell, Special Assistant Secretary for Administration, Depart- 
ment of Health, Education and Welfare, Washington, D. C, 
on Thursday, February 19th at 9:00 a.m. at the DeSoto 
Hilton. 

Dr. E. Frank Ellis, Director of Public Health and Wel- 
fare, Cleveland, Ohio, delivered the public address at the 
assembly on Friday, February 20th at 10:20 a.m. at Savan- 
nah State College in the Wiley-Willcox Gymnasium. The 
Awards Luncheon speaker was the Most Rev. Gerard L. 
Frey, Bishop of the Savannah Diocese. The Luncheon was 
held at 1:00 p.m. on Friday, February 20th, in the Grand 
Ballroom of the DeSoto Hilton. 



WORLD FAMOUS HONOREES 

The honorees featured at the Awards Luncheon included: 
The Honorable Carl Stokes, Mayor of Cleveland, who re- 
ceived an award for Outstanding Service in Political Affairs; 
The Honorable Michael Collins, Assistant Secretary of State 
for Public Affairs (Astronaut), for Outstanding Service in 
Public Affairs; The Honorable James Farmer, Assistant 
Secretary for Administration, HEW, for Outstanding Service 
in Human Rights; and Robert Joiner was presented the 
Student Journalist Award. 



Outstanding 



RENOWNED CONSULTANTS 

Consultants and Resource Persons for the Press Institute 
were: Madeline R. Gill, Yearbook Coordinator, Howard 
University; John V. Fields, Professor of Journalism, Uni- 
versity of Michigan; Elizabeth Deal, Supervisor of English, 
Chatham County; W. Eugene Nichols, Associate Professor 
of Journalism, Georgia State University; Louis Corsetti, 
Head of the Journalism Department, West Liberty State 
College; Marion Jackson, Sports Editor, Atlanta Daily 
World; Alan Bussel, Director of Public Information and 
Publications, Clark College; Doris C. Vaughn, Director of 
Publications, Southern University; Archie Whitfield, City 
Manager, Savannah Morning News; Thomas Coffey, Assist- 
ant to the City Manager, City of Savannah; Lawrence 
Bryant, Sales Representative, American Yearbook Com- 
pany; Mrs. John V. Fields, University of Michigan; Otto 
McClarrin, Director of Public Relations, Howard University; 
Lester Johnson, Instructor, Savannah State College; and 
many others. 



EDITORS-IN-RESIDENCE 

The Institute was favored with the presence of four 
outstanding editors who served as Wall Street Journal 
Editors-in-Residence. They were: Sylvan Meyers, Editor, 
Miami News; James P. Brown, Editor, Saginaw News; 
Patrick Kelly, Editor, Winston-Salem Journal; and Ralph 
Langer, Editor, Dayton Journal Herald. 



HONORARY CHAIRMEN 

Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., President of Savannah State 
College served as the Honorary Chairman. The Honorary 
Vice-Chairmen included: J. C. Lewis, Jr., Mayor of Savan- 
nah ; Jack P. Nix, State Superintendent, State Department 
of Education; State Representatives, Joseph Battle, Morriss 
W. Elliss, Arthur Funk, Alan S. Gaynor, Bobby L. Hill, and 
George N. Whaley; County Commissioners, Robert F. Lovett, 
T. E. Clifton, Edward S. DuFour, John P. Rousakis, and 
L. Scott Stell, Jr. 

Chief Advisor to the Pacemaker, a newspaper published 
by the participants of the Press Institute, was Robert Joiner, 
a graduate journalism student at the University of Michigan 
and a former Ail-American Editor at Savannah State Col- 
lege. Joiner was the only student editor to win Ail-American 
honors from the Educational Press Association, U.S.A. 

Newspapers and yearbooks were judged by the staffs 
of the Savannah Morning News and Savannah Evening 
Press. Awards were given for the most outstanding publica- 
tions in the junior and senior college divisions, junior and 
senior high schools, and elementary schools. 



SSC'S DEANS LIST FOR WINTER QUARTER 




Dr. Calvin Kiah, Dean of Faculty at Savannah State 
College, announced that 115 students made the Dean's List 
during the winter quarter. Each person has attained an 
average of 3.50 or higher on a full program. They are: 
David L. Akins, Bainbridge, Ga.; Daisy Alexander, Elberton, 
Ga.; Johnnie M. Allen, Helena, Ga.; Cynthia Anderson, 
Savannah, Ga.; Bennie Arkwright, Savannah, Ga.; Peggy 
D. Atcherson, LaGrange, Ga. ; Caesar A. Austin, Attapulgus, 
Ga. ; Paul Bailey, Jesup, Ga.; Jerome Baker, Savannah, Ga.; 
Willie Benyard, Savannah, Ga.; Tom Bolden, Lyons, Ga. ; 
Wilmotine Brisbane, Savannah, Ga. ; Jacqueline Brock, 
Montezuma, Ga.; Janie Brown, Savannah, Ga. ; Maxine A. 
Brown, Savannah, Ga. ; Sharaveen Brown, Miami, Fla. ; 
Doris Bryant, Macon, Ga.; Calvin L. Butts, Sparta, Ga. ; 
Bobby S. Carlyle, Millen, Ga.; Gloria Carroll, Harlen, Ga. ; 
Marietta Carter, Lownors County; Ronald Clark, Newark, 
N. J.; Lamar Clarke, Chicago, 111.; Shirley Crawford, Sa- 
vannah, Ga.; and Carolyn David, Savannah, Ga. 

Also Roseman L. Deas, Georgetown, S. C; Harold Ector, 
Griffin, Ga. ; Tommy Elder, Covington, Ga.; Barry Ellis, 
Broxton, Ga. ; Elizabeth Fields, Savannah, Ga. ; Freddie 
L. Florence, Brunswick, Ga.; Eloise C. Formey, Appling 
County; James Fowler, Jr., Warrenton, Ga.; Joyce Gease. 
Atlanta, Ga.; Nathaniel Golden, Perkins, Ga.; Michael N 
Greene, Savannah, Ga.; Juanita Harris, Washington, D. C 
Thomas Harris, Sandersville, Ga. ; Ann Hayes, Thomasville 
Ga.; Aurico Hill, Macon, Ga. ; Claudia Howell, Savannah 
Ga.; Udella Huckaby, Moultrie, Ga. ; Patricia Hunter, Sa 
vannah, Ga.; Dazola Jackson, Savannah, Ga.; Gloria E 
Johnson, Savannah, Ga.; Charles C. Jones, Riceboro, Ga 
Debra Jones, Lithonia, Ga.; Dorothy Jones, Savannah, Ga 
James S. Jones, Savannah, Ga. ; Mary A. Jones, Statesboro 
Ga. ; Oliver Jones, Statesboro, Ga. ; Samuel Jones, Savan 
nah, Ga. ; Lillie Mae Key, Cedartown, Ga. ; Karen L. Lashley 



Cheraw, S. C; Andrew Lewis, Harlem, Ga.; Charles E. 
Ling, Savannah, Ga.; Brenda Logan, Savannah, Ga.; Percy 
A. Mack, Savannah, Ga.; Clarence Martin, Baxley, Ga.; 
Shirley Mathis, Atlanta, Ga.; Josephine Maxwell, Savan- 
nah, Ga.; Elijah McDuffie, Savannah, Ga. ; and James P. 
McLendon, Washington, Ga. 

Also Sandra Meachum, Savannah, Ga. ; Ronald Mikel, 
Hagan, Ga.; Wiletha E. Mills, Savannah, Ga. ; Shirley A. 
Mims, Savannah, Ga. ; Singh Mohinder, Savannah, Ga. ; 
Johnny Morant, Georgetown, S. C. ; Linda Morgan, Boston, 
Mass.; Carolyn D. Mosley, Swainsboro, Ga.; Solomon 
Myers, Edward E. Oglesby, Tallahassee, Fla.; Beverly B. 
Outler, Savannah, Ga. ; Ivy D. Page, Jerelene Parrish, 
White Oak, Ga.; Robert Patillo, LaGrange, Ga.; Joyce 
Perry, Augusta, Ga.; Michelle J. Perry, Atlanta, Ga.; Beverly 
Pickett, Alma, Ga.; Joseph Pickett, Jr., Alma, Ga.; David 
Plair, Jr., Millen, Ga. ; Margaret Powell, Savannah, Ga.; 
Michael Pratt, Savannah, Ga.; James Price, Girard, Ga. ; 
Celestine Pringle, Georgetown, S. C; Carletha Quarterman, 
Savannah, Ga. ; Mary Reddick, Riviera Beach, Fla.; David 
Roberson, Savannah, Ga.; and Gloria Roberts, Riceboro, 
Ga. 

Also Willie Roberts, Terrence Romanski, Gary, Ind.; 
Jacqueline Ross, Tifton, Ga.; Geraldine Russell, Gray, Ga.; 
Lena Scream, Dublin, Ga. ; Brenda G. Shoultz, Savannah, 
Ga. ; Joan Simmons, Savannah, Ga.; Andrea Smith, Savan- 
nah, Ga. ; Stanley C. Smith, Savannah, Ga. ; Edward Stinson, 
Naranja, Fla.; Emily Tait, Savannah, Ga. ; Doris E. Walker, 
Savannah, Ga. ; Freddie M. Walker, Savannah, Ga.; Sophia 
D. Waye, Kingsland, Ga.; Geneva White, Patricia White, 
Savannah, Ga.; Annie Williams, Lexington, Ga. ; Charles U. 
Williams, Savannah, Ga.; Jacqueline Wyatt, Atlanta, Ga.; 
Shirley Young, St. Petersburg, Fla.; and Betty Zeigler, 
Savannah, Ga. 



4 



SAVANNAH STATE SHORTS 



NEW COURSES ADDED TO 
CURRICULUM 

The following new courses have been added to the cur- 
riculum: 

Education: Seminar in the Teaching of Foreign Lan- 
guages — Discussion of various methods of teaching foreign 
languages with special emphasis on the audiolingual method, 
discussions, etc. 

English: Journalism — To create opportunities for pro- 
fessional evaluation and guidance; to aid the participant in 
acquiring and improving scholastic newspaper and curricu- 
lum offerings, to develop an appreciation for the printed 
word and its influence on the reader. It will be offered 
during the Fall quarter for five credit hours. 

English: Journalism 431 — Practice in writing for news- 
papers, radio, TV, business publications, and other media. 
Five class hours a week during the winter quarter, the course 
will be offered, for five quarter hours. 

English: Journalism 432 — Writing and merchandising 
of the non-fiction feature for Sunday magazine supplements, 
newspapers, and magazines. The course will be offered for 
five hours a week during the Spring quarter for five hours 
credit. 

Sociology 460, Sociological Perspectives on Black Cul- 
ture; Sociology 462, The Black Man in the Third World; 
Biology 414, Radiation Biology is under consideration by 
the Department of Biology. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 
REACTIVATED 

The Savannah State College Athletic Association, inac- 
tive since its founding in 1964, was reactivated during a 
recent meeting of the Board of Directors. According to Mr. 
John McGlockton, President, the Association was reactivated 
to assist the athletic program at Savannah State College to 
become competitive in the new SIAC Conference. 

The Athletic Association was granted a Charter in Janu- 
ary 1964. One of the major purposes of the association as 
stated in the Charter is "to provide facilities of every kind 
for the conduct of athletic activities, games, exhibitions and 
contests by and for the benefit of Savannah State College." 

At the initial meeting the group decided that member- 
ship dues would be set at $50 for all members. All Alumni 
Century members would automatically be considered mem- 
bers of the Athletic Association because of their contribu- 
tion to the Century Club ($100 or more) . Mr. McGlockton 
stated that membership in the Association is open to any 
of the general public who are interested in promoting the 
athletic program at Savannah State College. 

According to Mr. McGlockton, goals of the Association 
are: securing one hundred new members, lights for the foot- 
ball stadium, completing the east side of the stadium, and 
providing at least $5,000 in funds for athletic scholarships 
for the 1970-71 school year. 

Persons interested in additional information should con- 
tact Mr. John McGlockton, President (234-6807) ; Dr. 
Prince Jackson, Secretary (354-5717, Ext. 332), or Mr. 
Robert Bess, Development Officer (354-7865) . 



The Graduate Program at 
Savannah State College 

I feel that the graduate program at Savannah State Col- 
lege is doing an excellent job in preparing master teachers 
for the jobs we are now engaged in. We are living in a 
changing society, and this program is an incentive in helping 
us to cope with these changes. 

I have been benefited by this new program at Savannah 
State and if there are any inconsistencies, I am sure they 
will vanish as the program grows. I am hoping that this 
will eventually become a graduate school in all areas. 

— Edith S. Brown 





S. S. C. Alumni in D. C. 




The Eastern Region of the Savannah State Col- 
lege National Alumni Association held its annual 
meeting, Saturday, December 18, at Marlboro Plaza 
in Washington, D. C. The D. C. Chapter was host 
to the delegates and officials of the College. 

In attendance were: Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., 
President of Savannah State College, who delivered 
the principal address; Dr. Prince Jackson, Jr., Chair- 
man, Division of Natural Sciences and Alumni Secre- 
tary; Robert L. Bess, Development Officer; Daniel 
Washington, National Alumni President; Miss Met- 
tella Maree, President of Savannah Chapter; Mrs. 



Rozlyn Blakeney, of Philadelphia Chapter; Mr. and 
Mrs. Raymond Knight, and Mrs. Margaret Grant, of 
New Jersey. 

James 0. Thomas, Vice-President of the Eastern 
Region, presided. He indicated the need for unified 
effort to update the calibre of athletics at Savannah 
State College. Those in attendance were welcomed 
by Dr. Julius Gooden, President of D. C. Chapter. 
Among the alumni members and guests were Alfonso 
McLean, Michael Angelo Graham, Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard Lee, Ellis M. Trappio, Cleveland Brown, 
Julius Smith, Mrs. Velma Zeigler, Mrs. Ora Washing- 
ton, Miss Frances Shellman and Milton Brown. 



Physical Changes at SSC 



Savannah State College is at present undergoing a few 
physical changes: foremost of these is the construction of 
a dorm for 200 female students, eleven faculty homes, and 
a proposed natural science building. 

The new dorm is being constructed adjacent to Lester, 
Camilla Hubert and Lockett Halls. The dorm is being built 
by the Walter Strong Company of Savannah. It will be 
five stories high, and costs $925,000. 

The $1.1 million science building, which will include a 
low-radiation nuclear laboratory, will be located in the 
vicinity of the Kennedy Fine Arts Building and the stadium 
on the north side of the present campus access road, and 
will be constructed by the Reeves E. Worrell Company of 
Savannah. The two-story structure will be of yellow brick 
exterior similar in style to the Kennedy Fine Arts Building. 

The low-radiation laboratory will be on the second and 
will have a special safety wall and an enclosed section to 
be used as a Geiger scale counting room. An additional 10 
laboratories on that floor will include bio-chemistry, chro- 
matography, instrument and dark room, and other special 
laboratories for chemistry and physics. Only one lecture 
room is to be placed on the second floor. 



The first floor will house the biology department with 
seven larger laboratories, a small laboratory for distilling, 
sterilization and incubation, an electron microscopy labora- 
tory, a laboratory with constant temperature, live animal 
range and a special men's room adjacent to it, six instruc- 
tors' offices with private laboratories adjoining. 

A colorful decorative tile frontispiece will be placed over 
the doorway on the north, or access road side. The south 
side of the building also will have frontal appearance be- 
cause in plans for future campus development a proposed 
campus perimeter roadway will skirt the site on the south. 
A mall is proposed with additional buildings to be con- 
structed in llie area where the present access road is located. 

In addition to these buildings, a warehouse maintenance 
building, and eleven faculty homes will be constructed east 
of the football field. The College is now in the initial stages 
of planning for a new library. 

All of these improvements and accomplishments are in- 
deed a tribute to the president of our fine institution, Dr. 
Howard Jordan, Jr. 





Henry Collier, Chairman of the SSC Scholarship Drive 

presents Distinguished Service Plaque to Mrs. Madeline 

Hannah during Alumni Weekend Festivities. 




Dr. and Mrs. Howard Jordan, Jr. pose for photographer 
during Senior Reception in Peacock Hall lobby. 




SSC Initiates Degree In 
Criminal Justice 

Savannah State College has been approved to offer a 
program in Criminal Justice. This is one of the few 4-year 
programs in the country and it leads to the Bachelor's 
Degree upon completion. It is open to all persons who are 
engaged in a field of activity related to law enforcement 
on either a full or part-time basis. 

To encourage prospective enrollees to enter the program, 
a limited number of loans and grants are available. Inter- 
ested persons should contact R. Wilbur Campbell, Director 
of Admissions and Financial Aids Officer, Savannah State 
College. 



Alumni Enjoy Gala Weekend 

Approximately two thousand alumni joined students, 
parents and friends of Savannah State College during the 
Alumni Homecoming weekend on October 25, 1969. Many 
alumni and friends lived at the Manger Hotel in downtown 
Savannah during their stay here for the weekend activities. 
Those participating began the weekend with the Annual 
National Alumni meeting held in the A.V. Center of Gordon 
Library on Friday night. The meeting was followed by 
alumni and friends returning to the Manger Hotel for hos- 
pitality sponsored by the National Association. Saturday 
began with Savannah State College's parade at eleven 
o'clock a.m., followed by the game between the SSC Tigers 
and the Clark College Panthers (the Tigers won by a score 
of 32-16) . At six p.m. the banquet began with several 
awards being given for sustained service to the Association 
during the sixties and the awarding of certificates to the 
Century Club members. The banquet was followed by the 
annual dance during which several people won prizes; the 
first prize, a 1970 Rambler-Hornet, was won by Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Hall, Savannah; second prize, a portable color TV, 
won by Robert Mullen of Chicago, 111.; and third prize, a 
transistor radio, won by Asay A. Eaddy, also of Chicago. 

The homecoming weekend this year proved to be a suc- 
cess in every way. Mr. James Thomas, '56, of Washington, 
D. C, seemed to have expressed the sentiments of all alumni 
when he said, "this was without doubt the best homecoming 
I have witnessed since I left Savannah State." 



SSC students board the train to begin journey to Africa 
as a part of the African Seminar program at the college. 



Exchange Courses Taught 

Dr. Calvin L. Kiah and Dr. Dean Propst, the Deans of 
Faculty at Savannah State College and Armstrong State Col- 
lege, announced that the two respective Callaway professors 
will conduct the initial courses between Savannah State 
College and Armstrong State College. 

The Callaway professors are Dr. Joseph Killorin, Pro- 
fessor of Literature and Philosophy at Armstrong State 
College, and Dr. James Kelsaw, Professor of Sociology at 
Savannah State College. The courses to be exchanged are: 
Natural Right: History of an Idea — Plato to Martin Luther 
King, to be conducted by Dr. Killorin at Savannah State 
College, and Perspectives on Black Experience in the United 
States, which will be offered at Armstrong State College and 
taught by Dr. Kelsaw. 



Dr. Densler Named Alumnus 
of Month 

Dr. James F. Densler, '54, an Atlanta practicing 
physician, has been designated "Alumnus of the Month" 
for January by the Atlanta Chapter of the Savannah State 
College Alumni Association. Dr. Densler, a native of Sa- 
vannah, Georgia has many significant achievements to his 
credit; a few of them are listed: received the Bachelor of 
Science Degree from Savannah State College in 1954, re- 
ceived the M.D. with the top rank in the class of 1961 at 
Meharry Medical College in 1954, internship and residency 
in General Surgery was completed at the USPHS Hospital, 
Staten Island, New York. Diplomat, American Academy of 
Pediatrics, received an "Outstanding Soldier" Award in 1956 
at Tripler Army Hospital in Honolulu. He is a member of 
a number of professional organizations, and a member of 
the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity. Dr. Densler's wife, Mabel 
Wesley Densler, received the R.N. and M.S. degrees from 
Meharry Medical College and Boston University respectively. 
They are the parents of two active children, James, Jr., and 
Duane. 

Dr. Densler holds appointments at the following Atlanta 
hospitals: Hughes Spalding Pavillion, Georgia Baptist, St. 
Joseph's, Mclendon's, and Holy Family. 

The Atlanta SSC Alumni are pleased to designate Dr. 
Densler as an outstanding physician who is making a 
significant contribution to the progress of the Gate City of 
the South. 



SSC Mourns the Loss of 
Dr. Griffith 

Dr. Booker T. Griffith, chairman of the Division of 
Natural Science and head of the biology department at 
SSC for the last twenty-five years, died on Sunday evening, 
February 15. Dr. Griffith was a native of Prentiss, Missis- 
sippi. He received the Bachelor of Science, Master of 
Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees from the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburg. 

Dr. Griffith has served as Divisional and Departmental 
chairman at New Orleans University, Clark College and Fort 
Valley State College before coming to SSC. After twenty- 
five years of service and dedication to Savannah State Col- 
lege, he retired with the honor of Professor Emeritus of 
Biology, July 1st, 1969. He was the first professor in the 
history of the college to receive this distinction. 

He is survived by two sons, Booker T. Griffith, Jr., 
Edgar Henry Griffith, and one brother, Theodore R. Griffith 
of Tyler, Texas. 

Funeral services were held on Wednesday, February 18th 
at the Butler Presbyterian Church. 





V 





Students enjoy a game of ping pong in the new 
Student Union Building 





Dr. James Eaton and Mrs. Virginia Whitehead, student 

in Graduate Program, discuss Mrs. Whitehead's 

application for candidacy. 




Scene from the lobby of Peacock Hall, a new 
men's dormitory. 



Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., receives Kappa Delta Pi charter 
from one of the fraternity's executive officers. 



Attention Kappas! ! ! 

Dr. Prince Jackson, National Secretary 
Savannah State College Alumni Association 
Savannah State College 
Savannah, Georgia 

Dear Dr. Jackson: 

I have been in contact with Joseph Bristow, San Bernardino, 
California, and J. Franklin Wells, Miami, and we would like to con- 
tact all the Charter members of Gamma Chi Chapter of Kappa Alpha 
Psi Fraternity. This Chapter was set up in 1950 and it is our think- 
ing that it would be appropriate to get together for a twenty year 
reunion. 

I have written Julius Williams, Polemarch of the Savannah 
Chapter, but fust in case he may not react immediately, I am asking 
for whatever help you may be able to offer. 

I am listing the names of the members other than those listed 
above: Randolph Dennis, Billie A. Johnson, Henry Lockhart, Russell 
R. Mole, William P. McLemore, Oliver Murray, Leon Schmidt, Wal- 
ter Strickland, Solomon Bynes, Emerson Walker. 

I believe this is the complete roster; however, there may be 
others. If possible, one of the undergraduate members of the Chapter 
there may examine the Charter for additional names. 

We are aware of the limited time to get things arranged, but 
we trust that we can reach as many as possible. Probably we could 
arrange the date during the week of Commencement Activities. 

I trust that they have not been as negligent as I have about the 
Alumni Association and have remained active. There are some twenty 
alumni living here in this area. Each time we mention the Associa- 
tion they are all interested but when you call a meeting no one will 
show up, nor ivill they respond to notices or communication. 

Looking forward to hearing from you, I remain 

Respectjully yours, 



Outstanding Teacher 




Frances McBride 

Mrs. Frances Eberhardt McBride, daughter of the late Mr. and 
Mrs. Lucius B. Eberhardt, Sr., is a native of Athens, Georgia. She is 
one of seven children, all of whom are graduates of the Athens High 
and Industrial School, recently renamed Burney Harris High School. 
Her parents are cited as having exerted the greatest influence on 
her life. 

She attended Savannah State College, graduating with a B.S. in 
Home Economics. She received the M.A. Degree from Atlanta Uni- 
versity. She has done further graduate work at Atlanta University 
and the University of Georgia. 

Mrs. McBride is very active in the civic-social-religious and edu- 
cational life of Athens, where she now lives. In 1958 she was named 
"System Teacher of the Year." 

She is a member of the Local, Region, State and National 
GTEA, NEA, PTA; a member of the American Association of Uni- 
versity Women, Ebenezer Baptist Church, Bon Bon Club, American 



Civil Liberties Union, Girl Scouts of America, Young Women's 
Christian Association, Light of the World Church Club, Silhouette 
Club of Athens Alumni Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity. 

She has served in the following positions of leadership: 

Vice-President of Clarke County Unit of GTEA, President of 
Region Four ACT, Vice-President Elect of State Association of ACT, 
Vice-President of Clarke Junior High PTA (2 years), Chairman of 
Social Science Committee at Alps Road School, Chairman of Awards 
Committee for Social Science Fair, participant on Professional Day 
Programs, served local organization in following positions: Secretary 
4 years. Chairman of Program Committee 2 years, member of Legis- 
lative Committee, member of Social Committee, worked on local 
Salary Committee 1968-1969, served on local Merger Committee 
1968-1969, and a member of the National ACT Advisory Council. 

Places of responsibility (excluding professional educational or- 
ganizations) in organizations of which the teacher is a member are 
as follows: Sunday School Teacher, Ebenezer Baptist Church; Direc- 
tor of Junior Ushers, Ebenezer Baptist Church; President of Silhou- 
ette Club of Athens Alumni Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity; 
Girl Scout Leader; Chairman of Hospitality Committee, American 
Association of University Women; Chairman, Hospitality Committee, 
Ebenezer Baptist Church. 




Participants in the Teacher Education Workshop listen 

to one of the various lecturers during the 

one-day meeting. 




Members of the Savannah State College Art Club work 

on their prize winning entry into the Savannah Arts 

Festival "Paint A Car Contest." Members of the club 

took first prize honors over Armstrong State College. 




Dr. Coleridge Braithwaite plays the new organ, which is 
a recent addition to the Department's musical equipment. 



10 



ALUMNI - ALUMNAE 




Alphonso McLean Selected Among D. C. 
Black Men of the Year 

Washington, D. C. — Alphonso S. McLean, a 1961 gradu- 
ate of Savannah State College, was honored as one of 
"Washington's Great Black Men," at an awards presentation 
sponsored by the Sophisticated Socialites Club recently. 

McLean is President of the A. E. McLean Company, Inc., 
Washington's first Black Business Furniture, Interior Design 
and Office Supply firm. The certificate of award presented 
cited Mr. McLean, "In recognition of sincere service and 
dedication to the community action efforts of the Washing- 
ton Metropolitan area for 1970." 

Other outstanding honorees included: The Honorable 
Mayor of Washington, Walter E. Washington; U. S. Con- 
gressman from Detroit, John B. Coyers, Jr.; D. C. Council- 
men, Joseph P. Yeldell, Sterling Tucker and Stanley Ander- 
son; Dr. Paul Cooke, President of D. C. Teacher's College; 
Reverend David Eaton and Walter E. Fauntroy; Actor Jaye 
Williams of the Great White Hope Production; Housing 
Developer, Reverend Channing Phillips. 

McLean is a native of Savannah, Georgia and was a 
Business Administration major at Savannah State. His 
firm has projected one million dollars in sales for 1970. 
McLean has done additional graduate study at the American 
University in Washington. 



Isaiah Mclver Initiated Into International 
Fraternity 

Isaiah Mclver, an instructor in 
the History Department at Kankakee 
Community College, and a doctoral 
candidate at Loyola University, will 
be initiated a charter member of Phi 
Delta Kappa Fraternity at Loyola Uni- 
versity, Chicago, Saturday evening, 
April 18, at a formal dinner at the 
university. 

Phi Delta Kappa is an interna- 
tional professional fraternity for men 
in education. Membership is com- 
| posed of recognized leaders in the pro- 
Si fession and students whose leadership 
9 potential has been identified in the 
classroom, in educational research, or 
in educational administration. Mem- 
bers must have earned the baccalau- 
reate degree and have attained a 
scholarship level acceptable for admission for candidacy for a gradu- 
ate degree in the Chapter University. The organization's purposes 
are to promote quality education, develop and maintain the demo- 
cratic way of life, and implement a high quality of educational 
leadership through research, teaching, and other professional services 
concerned with, and directed toward the improvement of education. 
Mclver taught in the Massachusetts public school system and 
served as an assistant professor of social sciences at Savannah State 
College before assuming the deputy directorship of the Kankakeeland 
Community Action Program in 1966. In 1969-70 he was listed in 
Personalities in the West and Mid-West, was one of 10 recipients in 
1970 of the Kankakee VFW Post 2857 Community Service Awards, 
and was invited by the Graduate School of Education at Loyola 
University to design, develop, and teach the first graduate course in 
the History and Theory of Afro-American Education to be introduced 
at a major American university in recent years. 

Mclver was recommended for charter membership by Dr. G. L. 
Gutek, Chairman of the Department of History and Philosophy of 
Education and by Dr. J. M. Wozniak, Dean of Loyola's Graduate 
School of Education. 




11 



Board of Regents Appoint 
Clifford E. Hardwick, III 




s i 

Hardwick poses with wife. 

The Board of Regents of the University System of Geor- 
gia, appointed Clifford E. Hardwick, III, as an Assistant 
Professor at the University of Georgia, effective April 15, 
1970. Hardwick serves as the Director of the Inner City 
Education Center which is cooperatively sponsored by Sa- 
vannah State College, Georgia Southern College, Armstrong 
State College, and the University of Georgia. This program 
is located in the Model Cities Neighborhood, and has offices 
at 1314 Drayton Street, Savannah, Georgia. 

The purpose of the Inner City Education Center, as 
stated by Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., President of Savannah 
State College, who is serving as chairman of the executive 
board for the Center, is two fold : ( 1 ) To establish a pilot 
project whereby educational projects can be designed and 
offered to the people in the Model Cities area; (2) To serve 
as a seed-bed for educational research, which can provide 
clues for certain basic questions about deprived adults in 
an urban setting. 

The program objectives are as follows: (1) To establish 
an organizational structure which will link relevant human 
and material resources to the educational needs of people in 
the program area; (2 I To determine the problems and needs 
of people in the program area, establish priorities, and 
select the most appropriate courses of action; (3) To formu- 
late educational programs and services that will meet the 
problems and needs identified; and (4) To seek active in- 
volvement of the institutions of higher education and 
relevant agencies in the formulation, implementations and 
evaluation of educational programs. 

The other members of the committee include: Dr. Henry 
Ashmore, President of Armstrong State College; Dr. J. W. 
Fanning, Vice President of the University of Georgia, and 
Dr. John E. Eidson, President of Georgia Southern. 

The University System, and the cooperative colleges, 
are delighted to have the services of an able educator such 
as Mr. Hardwick, to serve as the Director of this project. 
Mr. Hardwick received his early education in the public 
schools of Savannah, Georgia, the B.'S. Degree from Savan- 
nah State College, and the M.S. Degree from the University 
of Pittsburgh. He has had additional graduate study at 
Howard University, North Carolina College, Atlanta Uni- 
versity, and the University of Georgia. In 1969, Mr. Hard- 
wick attended a six-week course at the Mott Leadership 



Institute in Flint, Michigan, under a Mott Foundation 
Scholarship for Community School Directors. With the 
Savannah-Chatham County Board of Public Education, Mr. 
Hardwick has served as Chairman of the Biology Depart- 
ment of Alfred E. Beach High School, Supervisor of Sec- 
ondary Education, and is presently serving as Director of 
Community Education. He is President of the Chatham 
County Teachers Association, and holds membership in 
numerous professional organizations on local, State, and 
National levels. Mr. Hardwick is listed in Who's Who in 
American Education, Outstanding Personalities of the South, 
Community Leaders of America, and Creative and Successful 
Personalities of the World. Mr. Hardwick is married to the 
former Beautine Williams, and is the father of two sons. 

Operation of the Inner City Education Center is ex- 
pected to begin immediately. 



James Presents Paper 




Christopher James 

Christopher James, son of Mrs. Lizzie James of Wood- 
bine, Ga., and a protein chemist at the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture's Northern Regional Research Laboratory, 
Peoria, 111., presented a paper before the national meeting 
of the American Association of Cereal Chemists in Chicago, 
111. Mr. James, who appeared on the program Thursday 
morning, May 1, described the research work that he and his 
associates had done in studying some of the chemical 
changes that occur in proteins during the processing of 
corn to manufacture starch. To loosen this starch from the 
protein, the corn kernel is soaked in a sulfur dioxide solution. 
Mr. James determined the nature of the chemical changes 
that occur in the protein that cause it to be dissolved by 
the sulfur dioxide. He found that sulfur dioxide attacks the 
protein called glutelin. 

This work is of special interest since in a new type of 
corn-high-lysine corn-glutelin is present in larger amounts 
than in ordinary corn. The new corn that is high in lysine — 
an essential amino acid — is an important development be- 
cause it contains more nutritious protein. This research on 
the chemical evaluation of cereal grains is part of the pro- 
gram being conducted at the Northern Laboratory to in- 
crease the use of corn. 

Mr. James is a graduate of Ralph Johnson Bunche High 
School in Woodbine. He received his B.S. degree in chem- 
istry from Savannah State College, Savannah, Ga., in 1964. 
After two years of service in the U. S. Army, he joined the 
staff of the Northern Laboratory in 1966. 



12 






BLACK DEAN PLOWS TOUGH ROW 




Assistant Dean Leonard 

Reprint, Harvard Law Record 
By Oliver Henry 

From ploughman on a tenant farm to Assistant Dean of 
Harvard Law School — a long road — but one travelled by 
Walter Leonard. 

Born during the depression in Alma, Bacon County, 
Georgia, Dean Leonard was fatherless by the time he was 
two years old, a fact which might account for him quitting 
high school in his sophomore year to join the Coast Guard. 
And while in the Guard, Leonard spent nearly four years 
as a messmate on a cutter patroling the North Atlantic. 

After leaving the Coast Guard, Leonard enrolled in 
Savannah State College where he became involved in the 
kind of activities and committments to which good students 
and campus leaders fall heir: president of the college chapter 
of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored 
People, student reporter for the local newspaper, and a 
fraternity. But Savannah proved perhaps a little too small 
for the young man from Bacon County, so he left. 

Dean Leonard completed his undergraduate education 
at Morehouse College and continued his studies at Atlanta 
University. While in Atlanta, he was involved in the life 
of that southern metropolitan city. In the premier city of 
Henry Gray's "New South," Leonard established the Leonard 
Land Company, a real estate venture which handled $200,000 
in business during its first full year of operation. This 
prowess in business earned for him a feature length article 
in the Wall Street Journal, the first Negro so noted by that 
"establishment" organ. 

In 1965 Dean Leonard relinquished his Atlanta life and 
moved to Washington, D. C, where he entered Howard 
University Law School, commencing a new phase in a life 
which had begun on a Georgia tenant farm. 

While a student at Howard, Leonard made The Howard 
Law Journal, was the first National Chairman of the Student 
Forum on International Order and World Peace, and served 
as a research assistant to then dean Clarence Clyde Ferguson, 
who, according to Leonard, "represents a sort of hero of 
mine." And upon his graduation in 1968, this relationship 
resulted in the dean offering to him the position of Assistant 
Dean of the Law School, a new post. 

Leonard did make a contribution at Howard, for while 
assistant dean, he established an annual alumni giving pro- 
gram. Another project initiated at Howard was an alumni 
publication, The Howard Lawyer. Until the establishment 



of this sheet, "the school only had the Howard Law Journal 
and the student newspaper, The Barrister. The Lawyer aided 
us in the development program and gave the alumni some 
means of communication to and about the school." 

Work with development and alumni affairs were not 
the only areas of concern to Leonard while at Howard. "I 
attempted to involve myself in student affairs. It all goes 
back to how I see a university: it is a community made up 
of two kinds of people — senior scholars and junior scholars. 
The senior scholars are the faculty members because of age 
and experience while because of their searching and in- 
quisitive minds the students represent the junior scholars. 
In this community each group in search of knowledge must 
work with the other because both have something to offer." 

When Howard Law School was racked by a student 
strike, this view of the university fortified Leonard. "I didn't 
find that I was not with it because I had opened a dialogue 
with the students. They had been made to feel that they were 
important, had something to contribute. I felt as though I 
had been successful in this," he said. 

With all of this success, one wonders why he chose to 
leave the mecca of the Negro legal profession for the pre- 
dominantly white climes of Cambridge? For while at 
Howard, not only was he a ranking administrator, but he 
taught classes in Land Finance, Mortgages, and Real Estate. 
Seemingly, Leonard combined administration with teaching, 
a sometimes unusual ability. Only when confronted with 
this question does the short, cautious man in the conserva- 
tive gray Herringbone appear hesitant. 

So, the man who has travelled a long road resolved a 
dilemma that increasingly confronts talented Negroes: 
whether to remain within institutions in the larger society, 
perhaps, as important in the long run. 

Being the first Negro anything involves a certain amount 
of ambiguity, but Leonard is quite comfortable in being 
first. Before coming to the Law School, he was the first 
Negro appointed to the summer session faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia Law School. And he is one of a very few 
Negroes involved in the mutual fund industry serving as a 
director of Investment Opportunities Fund, Inc., a no-load 
fund with a 50 million dollar capital authorization. 

With this background, Dean Leonard feels that he can 
be of service to "the present number of black students at 
Harvard and to the increasing numbers certain to come." 
He feels strongly that he "can share with students an ex- 
perience and observation in the business world and relate 
that to their legal education." Leonard makes it quite clear 
that he "won't be a spokesman for black students because 
his responsibilities at the Law School — as director of the 
first year financial aid program and assistant director of 
admissions with responsibility for all recruiting, not just 
blacks, involve all students." 

Still he has some concern for Law School Negro students. 
"I am very impressed with the students here, especially the 
black students. These students have a right to demand 
someone on the administrative staff with whom they can 
relate on the basis of life style, color and, hopefully, com- 
mitment." 

In some respects, the Law School's new dean is the 
stereotype of the successful man on the move, one who just 
keeps "trying to do an effective job on the goals" he sets 
for himself. But, in any case, Dean Leonard exemplifies a 
variation on that theme, for being a Negro, the trek from 
Bacon County to Chestnut Hill was somewhat more difficult, 
a bit more arduous than, perhaps, it had to be. But to all 
students, Dean Leonard says, "I'm here." 



13 




Lassiter Manages Clothing Store 

Clarence Lassiter, a 1948 graduate of Savannah State 
College is presently manager of the Erie Clothing Company, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Lassiter received the B.S. degree in Agriculture Edu- 
cation. He has done further study at Chicago State Teachers 
College. 

Lassiter has held positions as county agricultural agent, 
Walton County, Monroe, Georgia; salesman, Afro American 
Life Insurance Company, Atlanta, Georgia; salesman, Fuller 
Products Company, Chicago; salesman, Erie Clothing Com- 
pany, Chicago; Assistant Manager, Benson Rixon Com- 
pany, Chicago. 

Presently, Lassiter's staff includes two cashiers, four full 
time salesmen, one window display man, tailor, four part- 
time salesmen and stockboys. 

Lassiter was chosen as one of Chicago's ten Best Dressed 
Men in 1960 by one of the top social clubs in the city. He 
was also selected as one of the fifty most eligible bachelors 
by Ebony Magazine June 1969. 

Civically, Lassiter is affiliated with the Auburn Park 
Businessmen's Association; Chicago Chapter, Savannah 
State College Alumni Association; Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce, and the NAACP. 



Serving Our Country . . . 

U. S. Air Force Technical Sergeant Leon W. Schmidt, 
Sr., son of Mrs. Annie Bowman of 933 W. 38th Street, Sa- 
vannah, Ga., has arrived for duty at McClellan AFB, Cali- 
fornia. 

Sergeant Schmidt is a radio maintenance technician with 
a unit of the Aerospace Defense Command which protects 
the U. S. against hostile aircraft and missiles. The sergeant, 
who previously served at Hamilton AFB, California, is a 
1946 graduate of Beach High School. He attended Tuskegee 
Institute and received his B.S. degree in 1950 from Savannah 
State College. 



Airman First Class John F. Harris, Jr., son of Mr. and 
Mrs. John F. Harris, Sr., of 13305 White Bluff Road, Sa- 
vannah, Ga., is a member of a unit that has earned the 
U. S. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award. 

The 437th Military Airlift Wing at Charleston Air Force 
Base, S. C, was cited for meritorious service from July 
1968 to July 1969 for its support of military operations. 
This marks the fourth time in five years the wing has been 
honored as an outstanding unit. 

Sergeant Airman Harris, a suppdy specialist in the 437th, 
will wear the distinctive service ribbon to mark his affiliation 
with the unit. 

The organization is part of the Military Airlift Com- 
mand which provides global airlift for United States mili- 
tary forces. 

The sergeant airman, a 1964 graduate of Sol C. Johnson 
High School, received his B.S. degree in mathematics in 
1968 from Savannah State College. 



Alfred L. Mullice, son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel P. 
Mullice, Sr., Route 1, Richmond Hill, Georgia, was recently 
promoted to Army sergeant while serving with the United 
States Army Material Command near Zweibrucken, Germany. 

Assigned with the command, he entered the Army in 
February 1968 and completed basic training at Ft. Benning, 
Georgia. He was last stationed at Ft. Lee, Virginia. 

The 24-year-old soldier is a 1967 graduate of Savannah 
State College where he received a B.S. degree. He is also 
a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. 



Leila Butler to Attend Institute 




Leila Butler 



Mrs. Leila Butler, former Miss 
Savannah State College National 
Alumni and local teacher was ap- 
pointed by Dr. W. L. Williams, 
Director of Math Institute at Uni- 
versity of South Carolina as a Re- 
search Assistant for the summer. 
The Research program is designed 
to investigate relationships between 
a teacher's effectiveness and his 
knowledge of mathematics. 



Mrs. Butler will be doing the Research work at the Uni- 



versity of South Carolina. 



14 



Graduate Program of SSC 




Growth of the Graduate Studies Program 

The purpose of the Graduate Studies program is to 
offer advanced preparation to those teachers who serve in 
elementary schools. 

In June, 1968, fifty persons were admitted in the 
initial group of graduate aspirants. Much was done by the 
committee in charge of admissions to see that the students 
selected were able to do graduate work. 

The fifty students selected were composed of seven men 
and 43 women. 

All of the courses were new. However, the students 
were very energetic in carrying out assignments. From the 
start of the program, it could be seen that these were in- 
dividuals quite capable of doing graduate work. 

From time to time, during the first quarter, the students 
were given the opportunity to evaluate both the courses and 
teachers. Many helpful suggestions were received. 

At the end of the first quarter, there were many sur- 
vivors. Thus, the program was well on its way. 

During the fall quarter of 1968, 13 additional students 
were admitted. These students were seven women and six 
men. It can be readily seen that the percentage of men had 
increased tremendously. 

During this quarter three courses were offered. These 
courses seemed quite enough for the number of students 
enrolled. 

The winter admissions for the year 1968-69 were fewer 
than for any other quarter. Three were men while nine 
were women. 

For this quarter two courses were offered. One was held 
on Saturdays and the other during the evenings. 

Admissions to begin study during the spring quarter 
reached a total of 17. This was an increase over both the 
fall and winter quarters. As usual, there were more women 
than men. There were 14 women and three men. 

During this quarter, three courses were offered. One was 
scheduled on Saturdays and the other two were scheduled 
during the evenings. 



After just one year, the program had grown from 50 
to 92 persons. It is interesting to note that the students who 
entered during the first year completed their undergraduate 
work at 21 different colleges and universities. However, the 
majority of these students were graduates of Savannah State 
College. 

The number of persons enrolled in the program indicated 
two things. First, there was a need for such a program. 
Second, enough interest was shown for the continuation of 
such a program. 

The program continued to mushroom during the summer 
quarter. A total of 81 new students were admitted. This 
brought the total number of students admitted since June, 
1968 to 173. 

The persons admitted during the summer of 1969 repre- 
sented 17 different schools. Savannah State College was 
included in this number. 

The three quarters of the school year 1969-70 showed a 
gradual increase in the number of students admitted to the 
program. 

It is interesting to note here, that "during the winter 
quarter of the 1968-69 school year, two graduate courses 
were offered. Just one year later, the winter quarter of 
1969-70, five graduate courses were offered. One class had 
an enrollment of over forty persons. The other classes had 
an average of 18 persons. 

During the spring of 1970, the program had grown well 
over 200 persons. The interesting point is persons are 
constantly applying to the program. 

From the program's beginning two years ago, it has 
operated on a part-time basis. Because initially the program 
was set up to serve in-service people, evening classes were 
scheduled during the fall, winter, and spring quarters. A 
regular program was followed only during the summer 
quarters. 

After two years, the program can be acclaimed a great 
success. 

Dynamic leadership has been provided by the Director 
of the program, Dr. James A. Eaton, as well as the Chair- 
man of the Division of Education, Dr. Thelma M. Harmond. 



15 



FIRST PERSONS ADMITTED TO CANDIDACY FOR M.S. DEGREE 



In July, 1969, Dr. James A. Eaton, Director of Graduate Studies, announced that seven persons had been admitted as 
candidates for the M.S. degree. 

They were: Carolyn Anderson, Gloria S. Brown, Otis Cooper, Jr., Lillie Ellis, Musetta Martin, Velma Simmons, and 
Dorothy Vaughn. 

Each candidate was officially welcomed into the program by the Chairman of the Division of Education, Dr. Thelma 
M. Harmond. 

The following persons have finished requirements for the Master of Science Degree in elementary education, and will 
receive degrees on June 7, during the commencement exercises. 





Carolyn S. Anderson 



Gloria Spaulding Brown 







Lillie K. Ellis 



Mrs. Adlene W. Kennedy 



Velma G. Simmons 



Mrs. Dorothy B. Vaughn 



Carolyn S. Anderson, a native of Savannah, Georgia, received her 
high school diploma from Alfred E. Beach High School and bachelor 
of science degree from Savannah State College. 

Her experience includes teaching positions at Brize-Norton, Eng- 
land, Bentwaters, England, and Fort Walton Beach, Florida. She is 
presently teaching first grade at White Bluff Elementary School in 
Savannah. 

She is a member of St. Paul's Baptist Church, Alpha Kappa Mu 
Honor Society, Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society and Alpha Kappa 
Alpha Sorority. 

She is married to Walter Anderson, Jr., and they have two 
children, Alana and Davie. 

Gloria Spaulding Brown is a native of Savannah, Georgia. She 
is the daughter of the late Mr. Lee Spaulding and Mrs. Sarah 
Spaulding. 

Mrs. Brown received the Bachelor of Science Degree from Savan- 
nah State College, Savannah, Georgia. She was among the first 
students at Savannah State College to be listed in Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities. She graduated Magna Cum 
Laude, ranking second among the students graduating. 

Mrs. Brown has worked in the field of education for ten years. 
Six years, she served as a primary teacher in Chatham County. For 
the past four years, she has served as a school librarian. She was 
the first full time librarian of Bartow Elementary School. She now 
serves as librarian of Port Wentworth Elementary School, where she 
was the first full time librarian. 

Mrs. Brown is a member of several professional organizations. 

She is also a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Alpha 
Kappa Mu Honorary Society and a charter member of the newly 
organized Kappa Delta Pi Educational Honor Society. 

She is a communicant of the Second Baptist Church. 

She is the mother of four adorable children: Ernest Leigh, nine 
years old; Sarolyn Deidre, eight years old; Reginald Vernon, five 
years old; and Yolanda Pearlette, three years old. 

Gloria S. Brown is president of the first graduate class at 
Savannah State College. 

Lillie K. Ellis was born in Savannah, Georgia. She is the 
daughter of Mrs. Jessie Kyles and the late Frank Kyles, Sr. 

She is a 1966 graduate of Savannah State College, where she 
majored in English education. 

Lillie is married to Frank Ellis, Jr. 

She attends Mt. Tabor Baptist Church, and is an assistant to 
the chairman of the Sunday School Program Committee. She is 
treasurer of the Theta Mu Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi National 
Honor Society; vice-president of Eta Alpha Mu Graduate Chapter 
of Alpha Kappa Mu National Honor Society; recording secretary of 
the graduate class at Savannah State College; and a member of 
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. 

Mrs. Adlene W. Kennedy received her B.S. degree in elementary 
education from Savannah State College in 1965. 

Prior to her attendance at Savannah State College, she attended 
the New York Institute of Dietectics from 1956-1958. 

Mrs. Kennedy has served as a dietitian for the Jewish Chronic 
Disease Hospital Agency in Brooklyn, New York; and for the Man- 
hattan General Hospital in New York City. 



She holds membership in the following organizations: The 
National Education Association, the Georgia Teachers and Education 
Association, the Chatham County Teachers Association, and the 
Classroom Teachers Association. 

Mrs. Kennedy is presently teaching at Florance Street School 
in Savannah. 

Mrs. Velma G. Simmons is a product of the local public schools. 
She is a graduate of Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia. At 
Spelman she chose English as her major field and music as her 
minor field of concentration. 

As the recipient of a grant-in-aid from the Georgia State Depart- 
ment of Education, she studied on the graduate level at Tuskegee 
Institute in the summer of 1963. In addition, she has enriched her 
career as an educator through periodic study at Savannah State 
College. 

Mrs. Simmons has twenty years of teaching experience. This 
experience includes teaching English and music at Risley High 
School in Brunswick, Georgia; serving as an itinerant music teacher 
for kindergarten pupils; tutoring pupils in grades 5 and 6; and 
teaching grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 in the Savannah-Chatham County 
Public School System. Currently, she serves as a teacher at Florance 
Street School. 

In the year 1961, she was selected by her co-workers and the 
members of the PTA as "Quality Teacher of the Year." This unique 
honor was sponsored by the Board of Public Education and the 
Chamber of Commerce. In the year 1968, she was chosen "Teacher 
of the Year" by her co-workers. 

Her other activities include all of the professional associations, 
such as CCTA, GTEA, NEA, and the Department of Classroom 
Teachers. Mrs. Simmons is a communicant of the St. John Baptist 
Church. She is also a member of the Savannah State College Chapter 
of the Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society and a member of the Les 
Soeurs Secretes, a quality club for women. 

Mrs. Simmons is the daughter of Mrs. Maggie M. Graham and 
the late Mr. John B. Graham. She is the mother of one daughter, 
Velma Evelyn. 

Mrs. Dorothy B. Vaughn was born in Springfield, Georgia. She 
is the daughter of Mrs. Jessie Burnett and the late Mr. Warren 
Burnett. 

She is married to Mr. Robert Vaughn. They are the parents of 
one son. 

Mrs. Vaughn's elementary and high school training were done 
at the local public schools. 

She received her Bachelor of Science Degree from Savannah 
State College in 1958. 

She is a member of a number of organizations. These include 
Chatham County Teachers Association, Georgia Teachers and Edu- 
cation Association, National Education Association, Delta Sigma 
Theta Sorority, a charter member of Kappa Delta Pi Educational 
Honor Society and the Les Jeune Dames Social and Civic Club. 

Mrs. Vaughn is a communicant of the True Love Baptist Church. 

Presently, she is employed as a first grade teacher at the 
Florance Street School. 



16 



OTHER STUDENTS ADMITTED TO CANDIDACY 




:. a 



DR. JAMES EATON 

Program Director 

Otis Cooper, Jr. was born in Sylvania, Georgia. He was 
reared between Sylvania and Savannah. He finished high 
school at the age of 16 and entered Georgia State College. 
He also matriculated one year at Morehouse College. 

He has served in the armed forces. He spent three years 
overseas: 12 months as a clerk and two years as a supply 
officer. 

He graduated from Savannah State College in 1951 with 
a Bachelor of Science degree in Social Science. 

He has taught in the field of Social Science in Bryan 
County since 1958. 

Musetta B. Martin was born in Beaufort, South Carolina. 
She is the daughter of the late Daniel Webster and Gertrude 
Lawrence Bee, and the eldest of seven children. 

Her elementary and high school education was com- 
pleted at Robert Smalls High School, Beaufort, South Caro- 
lina. 

In 1965 she completed her undergraduate work at Sa- 
vannah State College. 

She is presently employed as principal of the Matthew 
E. West Elementary School, Hardeeville, South Carolina. 

After reading the news concerning the graduate program, 
I was thrilled, just to think, here was my alma mater 
initiating a graduate program, a tremendous need in this 
area. To me it was a dream come true. 

Constance H. Nash is a native of Savannah, Georgia. 
Received her early education in the public schools of Sa- 
vannah, and graduated from Alfred E. Beach High School. 
She received the B.S. Degree from Savannah State College, 
graduating Cum Laude with a major in Elementary Edu- 
cation in June 1967. 

She was among the first students to enter the graduate 
program at Savannah State in the summer of 1968, and is 
presently working toward the M.S. Degree in Elementary 
Education, completing requirements in August of 1970. 

Presently she is a third grade teacher at Anderson 
Elementary School and is married. 

Virginia Baker Whitehead was born in Kingsland, 
Camden County, Georgia. She is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Baker, Sr. 

She received her early education in the public schools 
of Camden County. 



Virginia is a 1968 graduate of Savannah State College 
where she majored in elementary education. 

Virginia is married to the Rev. W. W. Whitehead, and 
is the mother of one daughter, Jannah Juliett. Virginia is 
a member of the Conndis Temple Baptist Church. 

She is presently employed as a first grade teacher at the 
Charles Ellis Elementary School, Savannah, Georgia. 

Mary Catharine Brown was born in Harlan County, Ky. 
Graduated from George Peabody College, Nashville, Tenn. 
Married to a Civil Engineer. Mother of two sons. Librarian 
at Wilder Junior High School. Member of Isle of Hope 
Baptist Church. 

I feel that the graduate program has been initiated with 
careful consideration of present needs and future expan- 
sion. I have been pleased with both the faculty and student 
body. 

Martha Bishop Collidge was born in Dooly County, 
Georgia. Attended the University of Georgia. Graduated 
Cum Laude from Armstrong State College. Married to an 
attorney. Mother of three children. Presently employed as 
the assistant librarian at Sol C. Johnson School. Member 
of St. Paul Lutheran Church. 

I have been well pleased with the graduate program. 
The faculty and student body have shown such enthusiasm 
that I'm sure the future success of the program is assured. 

Edith S. Brown was born in Blackville, South Carolina 
May 21, 1934. She attended the public schools in Jasper 
County, South Carolina, and in 1961 received a B.S. degree 
from Savannah State College in Elementary Education. 
Presently she is employed by the Jasper County Board of 
Education as a teacher in mathematics and science at M. E. 
West Elementary School, Hardeeville, South Carolina. 

She is a member of Fishers Chapel United Methodist 
Church, St. Catherine Chapter No. 46 O.E.S., The National 
Funeral Directors and Morticians Association, South Caro- 
lina Education Association, National Education Association, 
and the Jasper County Teachers Association. 

She is married to Isaiah Brown, and they have two 
adorable children, Valeria and Isaiah, Jr. 

Mary Evans Roberts, a product of the public schools of 
Savannah and a graduate of Savannah State College. 

Presently employed by Savannah Public School System. 
Teaches English and serves as Chairman of the English 
Department at Sol C. Johnson. 

Married to Enoch Roberts and is the mother of one son, 
Phineas Lenardo. 

Affiliated with NEA, GTEA, CCTA professional organ- 
izations. Social affiliations include Jack and Jill of America, 
Inc., and Leisurettes Club. 

Honored as Teacher of the Year at Sol C. Johnson in 
1965. 

I feel that the Graduate School at Savannah State is an 
asset to the community and the state. The program has 
enhanced the growth of education for all persons who have 
become a part of it. The courses offered in the Graduate 
Studies Program have furthered the professional growth 
and competency of persons choosing a career in public 
education. 

It is my sincere wish that the program continues to 
expand the professional and cultural background of its 
students. 



17 



SSC Announces Commencement Calendar 

Dr. Calvin L. Kiah, Dean of Faculty at Savannah State 
College, has released the following calendar of events for 
June graduates: 

On May 24, Senior Vespers will be held at 5:00 p.m. 
in Meldrim Auditorium. The President's Reception for 
Seniors will be held in the lobby of Peacock Hall at 7:30- 
10:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 27. 

Seniors will be honored during the Annual Senior Class 
Day Exercises which will be held in Willcox-Wiley Gym- 
nasium on Thursday, May 28 at 10:20 a.m. 

On May 28, seniors will leave for Miami Beach, Florida 
on their annual three-day trip. 

Commencement exercises will begin at 3:00 p.m. on 
Sunday, June 7 in Willcox-Wiley Gymnasium, at which time 
Dr. Samuel Proctor, Director of the Black Studies Program 
at Rutgers University, will deliver the commencement ad- 
dress. 

Following the commencement exercises the President's 
Reception for graduates, parents, alumni, faculty and visi- 
tors will begin at 5:30 p.m. in the Martin Luther King- 
Varnetta Frazier Complex. 



Bill Russell Wows SSC Audience 



Dr. Jordan Receives Award 

The 1970 Liberty Bell Award was presented jointly to 
the Presidents of Savannah State College and Armstrong 
State College at the Law Day Ceremonies in Johnson Square 
on May 1. 

The award was made by the Savannah Bar Association 
to honor those members of the non-legal community who 
contribute to the community's understanding of the work- 
ings of the law. 

In this citation to our distinguished president, Dr. Jor- 
dan, the Savannah Bar Association commended his guidance 
and direction to follow that course of redress provided by 
the laws of this land. 

It further cited Dr. Jordan's administration for the 
proper relationship between the individual rights of those 
whom he represents and the rights of the people at large. 

Following the Law Day theme, "Law — Bridge to Jus- 
tice," the citation said that the law is the bridge leading 
to the promised land we all seek: Liberty, Freedom, Justice 
For All. 

The citation to the President of Armstrong State College, 
Dr. Henry Ashmore, is identical. 





Russell Beseiged by Admirers. 



Bill Russell 

In a very informal and relaxed manner, Bill Russell, 
ex-player coach of the Boston Celtics, wowed a Savannah 
State College audience of over 4,000 by his address during 
the First Annual Co-Ed Festival observance. 

There wasn't an inattentive ear as Russell expounded 
on several major political, social and economic problems, 
which Americans, "the now generation," face today. 

In the vernacular of the "now generation" Russell stated 
that he was "embarking on a journey to find out about the 
hip generation. In other words, I'm in search of America." 
Russell stated that he believed that this generation was 
turned in on people and not things. "If you're not part of 
the solution, then you're a part of the problem." 

Russell touched on the ever-growing narcotics problem, 
when he said that "I do not advocate smoking weeds or 
grass." However, he felt that not enough was being done 
to adequately alleviate the problem. He felt that the same 
way he came into Savannah on Thursday evening, without 
ever having been in the city before, and could have been 
turned on by some pusher, so could the police find and 
ascertain the same information. 

Russell stated that "I have tried marijuana before, and 
I got high, and although I'm not saying whether this grass 
is good or bad, but the same person who sells you marijuana 
would sell heroin to an eight-year-old kid, because that per- 
son has no concern for people." 

In a very amusing manner Russell attacked the Viet Nam 
war as being "alright except that it was immoral, illegal, 
unfounded and underclassed." 

Russell's amusing formula for ending the draft was to 
set up three qualifications, which were that the draftee must 
be 40 years of age or older, make a salary of 15,000 dollars 
or more a year, and be elected to or holding political office, 
the latter of which were to be classified as lA Top Priority. 
Russell stated that "the best way to fight communism was 
not by war but by practicing the Constitution." 

His views on the desegregation of schools was that "The 
nation does not do what it can, but what it wants to do. 
It took us only 9 years to put two men on the moon, but 
15 years filled with Supreme Court decisions and we can't 
get a child across town to attend a desegregated school." 

Russell gave his reason for leaving the profession of 
basketball as "The game was beginning to become one 
played for mercenary reasons and not professional." He 
stated that when asked if he was a basketball player, his 
answer was "No, I'm a man that plays basketball." 



18 




SSC Hosts EPDA Conference 

Mrs. Abbie Jordan, Instructor of Reading at Savannah 
State and Director of the EPDA Institute in Reading in 
Savannah, announces that on Wednesday, February 11, Sa- 
vannah State was host for a conference called by the United 
States Office of Education. 

Invited to attend were Directors of Educational Person- 
nel Development Act Institutes in five states; the Directors 
from the University of Georgia, South Carolina, Nebraska, 
Florida and Tennessee; State Coordinator of Title I; and 
Area School and Title I Officials. Also attending were Dr. 
Bruce Gaardner, Chief, Division of Basic Studies, and six 
other representatives from the Office of Education. 

The purpose of the conference was to get the Directors 
of federally funded projects to unite their resources in order 
to become stronger as a whole. 

After summarizing the efforts of the conference, Dr. 
Gaardner said that of the meetings his office has held 
recently this one was the most "singularly fruitful." 

Mrs. Jordan served as chairman of the conference. 



Fifty-two Alumni Join Century Club 

The Savannah State College National Alumni Associa- 
tion initiated its first Annual Century Club during a fund 
raising campaign that began during the Spring of 1969, 
and fifty-two members responded to the appeal. The pur- 
pose of the campaign as stated in the brochure was "to aid 
the college in establishing a broad base for annual gifts 
from alumni, parents and friends of the college." The funds 
will be used for scholarship purposes to open the door of 
opportunity for deserving students; to aid the college in 
meeting the many incidental expenses that are necessary for 
academic excellence and to strengthen the development of 
a strong athletic program. 

Under the leadership of Dr. Henry M. Collier, Jr., 
Alumni Campaign Chairman, the following members con- 
tributed $100 or more and received Century Club certifi- 
cates at the National Alumni banquet during the homecom- 
ing weekend on October 25, 1969. 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bess, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bynes, 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Wilbur Campbell, Dr. and Mrs. Henry M. 
Collier, Jr., Mrs. Nancy Collier, Mr. and Mrs. Robert De- 
Loach, Mrs. Carolyn Dowse, Mr. Isaac Dowse, Mr. and Mrs. 
Norman Elmore, Sr., Mr. and Mrs. James Fisher, Mr. and 
Mrs. Eugene H. Gadsen, Dr. and Mrs. Clyde Hall, Mrs. 
Madeline V. Hannar, Mrs. William Harris, Dr. Thelma 
Harmond, Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Hobbs, Dr. and Mrs. 
Howard Jordan, Dr. and Mrs. Prince Jackson, Jr., Mr. and 
Mrs. William C. Jackson, Mrs. Dorothy Jamerson, Dr. and 
Mrs. Calvin L. Kiah, Miss Ruby King, Mr. Leonard D. 
Law, Sr., Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Lewis, Mr. William Lud- 
den, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Manning, Mr. and Mrs. T. Mc- 
Bride, Dr. and Mrs. S. M. McDew, Mr. and Mrs. Willie 
McBride, Mr. Alphonso McLean, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Raleigh 
Macon, Mr. and Mrs. Enoch Mathis, Miss Mattella Maree, 
Dr. and Mrs. Carlton H. Morse, Dr. and Mrs. Kamalakar 
Raut, Mr. C. W. Reed, Jr., Mr. Arthur Roberts, Mr. and 
Mrs. Moses Robinson, Dr. and Mrs. Herman W. Sartor, Mr. 
and Mrs. Wilton C. Scott, Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms, Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter B. Simmons, Sr., Mr. and Mrs. James 0. 
Thomas, Mr. Daniel Washington, Mrs. Nancy Walker, Mr. 
William Weston, Dr. and Mrs. J. W. Wilson. 



Chicago Alumni Meet 

Robert Bess, Development Officer and Alumni Secre- 
tary at SSC was guest recently at a social meeting of the 
Chicago Chapter of the SSC National Alumni Association. 
The meeting was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George 
James on February 25. Mr. Bess showed slides of the 
changes taking place at the college, to the amazement of 
most of the alumni present, things had really changed. 

Members present were: Alette Wiggins, Paul Long, 
Dennis Williams, Alfred Garner, Rose Barker, Arthur and 
Mary Terry, George and Susie James, Fred and Myrtice 
Quillin, and Clarence Lasseter, responsible for arranging 
the meeting. 



19 



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K H. GORDON LIBRARY 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEaE 
STATE COLLEGE BRANCH 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 31404